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THE 



TIMES 


No 62,516 


WEDNESDAY JULY 23 1986 


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•Mrs Thatcher, before she had her 
. regular audience with the Qneen last 
right, left open the possibility of 

personal talks with President Botha 
• President Reagan said Mrs Thatcher 
was right to denounce sanctions 


• The anti-apartheid United Demo- 
cratic Front said it would not meet Sir 
Geoffrey Howe in South Africa 

• Annette Cowley, the swimmer, failed 
in a High Court appeal to be reinstated 
for the Commonwealth Games 

By Philip Webster, Chief Political Correspondent 

■! '-TbePrimc Minister, refus- to raise Mrs Thatcher’s rela- by the Government to the 

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-mg all attempts to draw her 
into comment about her rela- 
tions With the Queen, opened 
up the possibility yesterday of 

- personal talks with President 
Botha about the South Africa 

-crisis. - 

During a tense question- 
time session -in the Commons, 
just over three hours before 

- her regular audience with the 
Queen at Buckingham Palace, 
Mrs Maiggret Thatcher slone- 

! walled as several MPs ques- 
tioned her on the reported rift 
.-with the Queen. 

• ;But she told a Conservative 
MP. : who had asked her to 
leave open the option of talks 
with Mr Botha either inside or 
outside South Africa in the 
coming weeks, that she did not 

- exclude that possibility. . ' 

She also disclosed that the 
Foreign Secretary, Sir Geof- 
frey Howe, may make more 
than the scheduled two trips to 
Pretoria as part of his Europe- 
an Community peace mission. 

. -Whitehall sources empha- 
sized later that, although no 
personal talks were planned 
between Mrs Thatcher and Mr 
Botha,- they could not be ruled 
, ouL ITtey Were not encourag- 

- ing the idea that Mrs Thatcher 
would go to Pretoria 

The Prime Minister was 
. jeered by Labour MPs and 
cheered by Tories when. in her 
. custqmary answer setting out 

- her engagements for the day, 

she said that she hoped to 
have an audience of the 
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• There was no 
winner in The Times 
Portfolio Gold . 
competition yesterday 
so today’s prize is 
doubled to £8,000. 

• Portfolio list, page . 
25; how to play, 
information service, 
page 20. 


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Faster trains 
for 1990s 

Faster trains between main 
towns and dries are being 
planned for the 1 990s, Sir Bob 
‘ Reid.- chairman of British 
Rail, disclosed as he reported 
a £1.2 million profit for last 
year Page 2 

Envoys’ safety 

-The Government was accused 
. of neglecting the safety of 
^ British' diplomats and their 
. families serving abroad, by an 
1 all-party Foreign Affairs 
. • Committee Page 3 

Tokyo shuffle 

Mr Yasuhiro Nakasone, the 
Japanese ■ leader, easilv re- 
tained his post as Pnme 
■ Minister and formed a new 
Cabinet Page 13 

Smoke hoods 

The Civil Aviation Authority 
is considering the use of 
Smoke hoods for passengers 
-on -British airlines, after an 
acrident . at Manchester air^ 
port last year Pag® 5 

Visit denied 

The. Wife of the British-born 
journalist held in Peking was 
denidi permission to visit him 
as hopes of an early release 
. faded after six days Page 13 

Willey is back 

Peter Willey, the Leicester- 
shire all-rounder, has been 
recalled to the England side in 
place of the injured John 
Emburey for the first Test 
match against New Zealand at 
Lord's tomorrow Page 40 


Heme News 2-S 
O’seas 7A13.14 
Appts 22 
Arts 19 

Birthsjteatlis. 
m a r ri ages 18 
Business* 21-25 
Cmrt 18 
Croswjrfs 8J0 
Oiarv -16 

Lawkepert U 


him and others the Prime 
Minister proffered the stan- 
dard reply that she intended to 
follow precedent and not an- 
swer questions directly or 
indirectly about the Monarch. 

As usual there was no 
official word last night about 
what was said between Mrs 
Thatcher and the Queen at 
their meeting, although minis- 
ters were speculating that both 

Cowley hearing 2 

Zimbabwe pullout 7 
Drugs ban 40 

would have been voicing re- 
gret about the published alle- 
gations of a rift between them. 

Other senior ministers ad- 
mitted yesterday that the con- 
troversy was damaging the 
Government. 

Highly placed government 
sources said that if someone at 
Buckingham Palace had said 
the words reported in The 
Sunday Times they would not 
have been said with the au- 
thority of the Queen. If the 
Queen's political views were 
to be made known it would be 
damaging above all to the 
monarchy, it was said. 

In the Commons, Mis 
Thatcher called on the coun- 
tries boycotting the Common- 
wealth Games to reconsider 
their derision. . 

But she refused to give Mr 
Neil Kinnock the assurance he 
demanded after last Friday’s 
meeringuf thelhboghie states 
ih' Harare, of a commitment 


imposition of sanctions. 

When Mrs Thatcher told 
him he was making an absurd 
demand Mr Kinnock accused 
her or "spoiling the games, 
rupturing the Commonwealth 
and sabotaging the mission of 
the Foreign Secretary”. 

Meanwhile, The Sunday 
Times yesterday threatened 
further disclosures to support 
the authenticity of its report 
last Sunday. A denial of the 
repon was issued on Saturday 
night by the Queen's press 
secretary. Mr Michael Shea. 

Yesterday, Mr Andrew 
Neil, editor of The Sunday 
Times, said: “I want to leave 
nobody in any doubt that our 
report was published only 
after the most exhaustive 
checking with our sources at 
the highest level inside Buck- 
ingham Palace”. 

He said the accusation that 
the report was “entirely with- 
out foundation” was one that 
responsible officials in the 
Palace knew to be untrue. 

He added: “If they do not 
withdraw h The Sunday 
Times will feel it necessary to 
protect its reputation by mak- 
ing further disclosures about 
the background to our report 
to substantiate its auth- 
ors lilive nature”. 

Mr Neil added that that 
would take the form of a 
breakdown of how the paper's 
journalists received briefings 
by their sources. The paper, he 
added, had no intention of 
naming the “mole” because it 
8lways refused to disclose its 
sources. 



.. ■„ 

W ‘fiA -vo- x "v 

Eve-of-the-wedding wave from Miss Fergnson, watched by a Clarence House footman. 




Leaders 

17 

Letters 

17 

Obituary 

17 

Parliament 

4 

Pn»erty 

Sale Romo 

« 

Science 


Sport' 36-40 1 

Theaires.rtc 

39 

TV & Radio 

39 

Weather . 

20 


*.***** 


Last-minute blow 
to Howe mission 

From Michael Hornsby, Johannesburg 
Sir Geoffrey Howe's mis- discriminatory legislation;, 
si on to South Africa was dealt Sir Geoffrey will meet Presi- 

a further blow yesterday when 
the United Democratic Front, 
the most important of the 
radical anti-apartheid organi- 
zations still operating legaUy, 
announced that none of its 
representatives would meet 
the Foreign Secretary. 

In a memorandum deliv- 
ered to the embassies of 
Britain and other EEC coun- 
tries, the UDF accused Euro- 
pean governments of having 
“chosen to placate the nation- 
alist Government” at a time 
“when the black majority and 
white democrats are under die 
severest attack ever launched 
by this fascist regime in the 
history of our country”. 

Calling for immediate puni- 
tive action against Pretoria, it 
said it would not meet Sir 
Geoffrey “or any other emis- 
sary of European govern- 
ments” until the South 
.African Government had: 

• released ail political prison- 
ers and detainees; 

• lifted the ban on the ANC 
and other organizations: 

• disbanded the security 
forces. 

• scrapped all security and 


dent Botha and Mr “Pik” 
Botha, the Foreign Minister 
today. 

The Minister of Law and 
Order. Mr Louis Le Grange, 
yesterday angrily rejected a 
reported claim that be had 
told the Commonwealth Emi- 
nent Persons Group that vio- 
lence in South Africa could be 
controlled if “enough Macks” 
were shot 

Mr Malcolm Fraser, the 
former Australian Prime Min- 
ister. was reported to have 
made the claim m Washing- 
ton. Ff he had been correctly 
reported Mr Fraser had told 
“a blatant lie”, Mr Le Grange 
declared. “No responsible 
government official would 
make a statement like the one 
attributed to me.” 

• LONDON: Sir Geoffrey 
dashed back from Brussels at 
lunchtime yesterday after the 
meeting of EEC foreign minis- 
ters. for briefings on the latest 
developments before leaving 
for Johannesburg (Rodney 
Cowton writes). 

In Brussels he said his 
mission was difficult but not 
without hope. 


Annette 
Cowley’s 
plea fails 

By John Goodbody 

Annette Cowley, the South 
African-born swimmer, yester- 
day lost her case in the High 
Court to be reinstated in the 
English team for the 13th 
Commonwealth Games, which 
begin in Edinburgh tomorrow. 

Sir Nicolas Browne-WQIdn- 
son, the Vice-Chancellor, 
ruled that the deceits of the 
Commonwealth Games Feder- 
ation not to allow Miss Cowley 
to swim was “correct in law". 

He ruled: “It seems she 
rump to this country to take 
part in the swimming events — 
and, if possible, the Common- 
wealth Games — (and) not as 
an inhabitant. She is a visitor 
with a specific purpose, with a 
fixed intention of leaving again 
and no idea when she will 
return”. 

Miss Cowley, aged 19, is 
stndying in the US and only 
arrived in Britain in May. 

The judge said the federa- 
tion had made a “fair 
assessment” of her situation 
when it said she might well 
intend to make England her 
home in the future hot not yet. 

The case hinged on n danse 
in the federation's constitution 
requiring that a competitor 
wishing to represent a country 
other than that of their birth 
most have lived in that country 
for six of the 12 months 
preceding the dosing date for 
entries, most be domiciled 
there, have a permanent home 
there or normally live there. 

Miss Cowley’s action - 
supported by her dob, Wigan 
Wasps — was dismissed and 
she was ordered to pay the 
estimated costs of £10,000. 

More than half the mem- 
bers of the Commonwealth 
Federation have now pulled 
oot of the Games. Mauritius, 
Grenada, Brunei and the Vir- 
gin Islands were the latest 
nations to boycott the event, 
bringing to 30 the number of 
countries staying away. 


Reagan refuses to 
back sanctions 
against Pretoria 

From Christopher Thomas, Washington 
President Reagan adamant- addresses his party congress in 


1y rejected the international 
clamour for punitive sanc- 
tions against South Africa 
yesterday, declaring that Mrs 
Margaret Thatcher was right 
to denounce them as immoral 
and utterly rep.:- *atit 

But he warned that apart- 
heid must be dismantled be- 
cause time was running out for 
the moderates of all races. 

His speech from the East 
Room of the While House 
amounted to a blunt reitera- 
tion of policy and an outright 
■refusal to heed warnings by 
Senate leaders that he feces an 
embarrassing and imminent 
demand from Capitol Hill for 
across-the-board American 
disinvestment unless he 
changed direction. 

In places be defended the 
South African Government, 
saying that it had a right and 
responsibility to maintain or- 
der in the face of terrorists, 
although he attacked its tactics 
and the stale of emergency. 

The thrust of his message 
was that America should not 
forcefully seek to impose its 
will on Pretoria, and that the 
West must maintain contact 
and investment to maintain 
potential leverage for change. 

“We fully support the cur- 
rent efforts of the British 
Government to revive hopes 
for negotiations,” he said. 
Talks between Sir Geoffrey 
Howe, the Foreign Secretary, 
and South African leaders this 
week would be of particular 
significance. 

The speech seems to have 
been designed to buy time to 
see the outcome of Sir 
Geoffrey’s talks and of the 
Commonwealth meeting early 
next month. 

There are high hopes that 
President Botha may indicate 
important changes when be 


the middle of August Senior 
officials indicated that close 
contacts would be maintained 
in the coming critical weeks 
with European allies. 

Significantly. Mr Reagan 
did -tic* cp>e use the term 
“constructive engagement” 
indicating that the expression, 
which seems to have become 
increasingly discredited both 
at home and internationally, 
will now be quietly dropped. 

Senator Richard Lugar, 
chairman of the Senate foreign 
relations committee, urged Mr 
Reagan in an Oval Office 
meeting on Monday night 
never to use the term again. 

Mr Reagan called for the 
released of Mr Nelson Man- 
dela. the jailed leader of the 
outlawed African National 
Congress: the release of all 
political prisoners; a time 
table for elimination of apart- 
heid laws: the unbanning of 
black political movements; 
and the opening of 
negotiations. 

He appealed to Congress 
and Western Europe to resist 
what he called “this emotional 
clamour for punitive 
sanctions”. 

“If Congress imposes sanc- 
tions it would destroy Am- 
erica’s flexibility, discard our 
diplomatic leverage, and 
deepen the crisis. To make a 
difference, Americans must 
remain involved. We must 
stay and work, not cut and 
run.” 

To judge from Mr Reagan's 
remarks and those of senior 
officials afterwards, the thrust 
of immediate Administration 
policy will be to want South 
Africa that its policies are 
creating “self-imposed eco- 
nomic sanctions” because of 
worldwide business decisions 
to disinvest 


Morocco 
talks stay 
secret 

Rabat <AP) - Secret talks 
between King Hassan of Mo- 
rocco and Mr Shimon Peres, 
the Israeli Prime Minister, on 
the Middle East turmoil con- 
tinued yesterday under an 
almost total news blackout in 
Morocco. 

For the second day the 
Moroccan media maintained 
their silence on the unexpect- 
ed visit by Mr Peres, the first 
by an Israeli Prime Minister to 
any Arab country other than 
Egypt. There was an outcry, 
however, from militant Arabs. 

The venue for the talks, the 
King’s secluded summer pal- 
ace at Ifrane. 125 miles east of 
RabaL was ringed by troops 
and police, and access was 
barred to all outsiders. 

Israeli journalists who ar- 
rived with Mr Peres on Mon- 
day were in a luxury hotel 
inside the security nng and 
apparently were not flowed 
to communicate with the out- 
side world. _ . . . 

Bui Moroccan officials lor 
the first time admitted pn- 


Peres ploy. Syrian anger; 
man in the news, page 7 

Leading article, page 17 


Ridley moves to 
cut rate rises 


By Nicholas Wood 
Political Reporter 

Mr Nicholas Ridley. Secre- 
tary of State for the Environ- 
ment. yesterday paved the 
way for low rate rises next 
year, in the run-up to a 
possible general election, by 
boosting the central govern- 
ment grant to local authorities 
bv£l.l billion or 9.3 percent. 

' He also raised the exiling on 
total council spending to £252 
billion, so absorbing into Gov- 
ernment spending targets 
nearly all the current £2 billion 
town hall overspending. 

Other measures announced 
in’ the Commons aimed at 
increasing the “penalties for 
the reckless” were an end to 
■redistribution of grants re- 
couped from high-spending 
councils and the rate-capping 
of 20 authorities - 19 of 
which are Labour run. 

“This will mean that if 
authorities spend in line with, 
the generous provision we 
have made, there should on 
average be no need for rate 
bills to increase at all ” he raid 
to the delight of fellow Tones. 

“Ratepayers will have tite 
certainty that the blame for 
high rate increases lies rainy 
and squarely at the ^ door of 
their local authority.” 



Mr Ridley: Blame for rate 
rises on local authorities. 
Mr Ridley appeared to take 
the wind out of the sails of Dr 
Jack Cunningham, Labour’s 
environment spokesman, who 
concentrated his comments 
on an attack on the 
Government's continuing as- 
sault on local government 
democracy. 

He accused the minister of 
making a cleverly worded, but 
grotesquely misleading state- 
ment. and of “rigging” the 
rate-capping calculations, 
while ignoring the biggest 
over-spending council — the 
City of London. 

Dr Cunningham, who was 
heckled by Tory MPs, said the 
Continued on page 20. col 1 


Gas prices 
may be on 
way down 

By .Edward Townsend 
Industrial Correspondent 

British Gas. due to be sold 
in the world's biggest privati- 
zation project, yesterday an- 
nounced profits of £688 
million and may cut its prices 
early next year. 

The company gained 
270,000 new erstomers, paid 
£525 million in gas levy, £262 
million in tax, and invested 
£57 J . million in capital 
projects- Sales of cookers and 
other appficances rose by 10 
per cent and made a profit of 
£11.9 million, np nearly £10 
million. 

Sir Denis Rooke, the chair- 
man, said the corporation had 
met all targets set Jay the 
Government, if oil prices con- 
tinued to be depressed and the 
poand remained strong, he 
believed the corporation had 
“a sporting chance” of keeping 
gas prices at present levels or 
reducing them. Gas prices last 
rose, by an average of 1.7 per 
cent, in May. 

Turnover rose from £6JM4 
million to £7.687 million, and 
the number of employees fell 
by more than 3300 to 

89,747 ^ 

Details, page 21 


Agents are 
sent back 
to French 

Paris (AP) - The two 
French secret agents jailed for 
their role in the Greenpeace 
ship Rainbow Warrior's sink- 
ing left New Zealand yester- 
day for French Polynesia, the 
Foreign Ministry said. 

Commandant Alain Mar- 
far! and Captain Dominique 
Pricur. who were given 10- 
year sentences, will spend 
three years on a French Pacific 
island. 

The ministry said other 
parts of the French-New Zea- 
land agreement were put into 
effect at a meeting in Pans. 

Legal muddle, page 14 


Pound drops 
to $1.49 

Sterling fell 1.1 cents to 
$1.49 vesterdav and its index 
fell from 73.0 to 72.8. but it 
steadied to DM3.18. The FT 
30-share index lost 1.6 points 
to 1274.7 (David Smith 
writes). 

US second-quarter growth, 
measured by gross national 
product, was an annua! 1.1 per 
cent, down from 3.8 per cent 
in the first quarter. 

Stock market page 23 


Flights 
of fancy 
at the 
Palace 

By Alan HamOton 

Miss Sarah Ferguson plans 
to learn to fly, so that when her 
husband comes home from a 
hard day in the helicopter, she 
knows what he is talking 
about 

Miss Ferguson disclosed 
her ambition in an nn usually 
frank, intimate and frequently 
comical int ervi ew shown on 
BBC 1 and ITV last night on 
the eve of today’s wedding. 

Prince Andrew admitted 
that if bis conversation drifted 
towards flying in the company 
of his family, his younger 
brother Prince Edward did 
“various thing s with knives 
and forks”. 

Sitting in the Prince's quar- 
ters at Buckingham Palace, 
the couple laughed, bounced 
jokes off each other, and 
generally gave the impression 
of enjoying themselves hugely. 

Miss Fergnson, asked by 
Prince Andrew whether he 
should remain In the Navy, 
replied: “Yes 1 do. 1 think you 
do the job very welt And I 
think I can cope very well with 
bring a Navy wife.” To that 
end, she had discovered a good 
fish and chip shop in Portland, 
Dorset where the Prince wfll 
be posted next 

Asked bow they were feeling 
as their wedding approached. 
Miss Fergnson said simply: 
“Great” Prince Andrew con- 
fessed to bring: “Exhausted, 
hot beginning to be on a real 
high.” The bride-to-be stated 
firmly that imlike the Prin- 
cess of Wales, she was word 
perfect on her marriage vows. 

On keeping the word “obey” 
In the marriage vows, the 
Prince said it had been 
Sarah's choice. “In a dilemma 
there will always have to be 
someone who makes die final 
decision. I shall leave that 
decision to my husband.” 

But she added, with a hint of 
steel behind a smile, that she 
was not the sort of person to 
obey meekly, and while die 
Prince would not promise to 
obey, be would certainly prom- 
ise to worship. 

She was, she said, opinion- 
ated and liked to know what 

Continued on page 20, col 8 



INSIDE 


The Times 
guide to the 
wedding of 
the year 



• A modem 
couple: profiles 
of Andrew and 
Sarah 

Page 9 

• All the Queen's 
tide to t 


horses: gui 

ceremonial 

procession 


the 


Page 10 




• The armchair 
guest: following the 
processional route 
on television 

Page 11 

• Inside the 
Abbey: who sits 
where and full 
order of service 

Page 12 

PLUS: The 
Honey Bee and 
the Thistle, a 
celebratory poem by 
Ted Hughes, Poet 
Laureate; Norman 
St John-Stevas on 
Royal liberation; 
Philip Howard on 
Royal Times past 

Page 16 


TOMORROW 


On the day 

The Times’ team 
of writers and 
photographers 
provide the most 
vivid reports of a 
right Royal day 








.. I 

t: 

"'.3 




Faster trains 
planned as 


BR reports 

£1.2m 


A big increase in the speed 
of rail travel between many of 
the main towns and cities is 
planned for the 1990s, fjj* 
chairman of British Rail, Sir 
Bob Reid, disclosed yesterday. 

He was introducing a glow- 
ing report for last year which 
included a £1.2 million profit 
instead of the £420 milium 
loss reported for the previous 
year after the miners' strike. 
The last time British Rail 
made a profit was in 1983 
when it was £7.8 million. 

On speed, he said that top 
speeds on Inter-City trains are 
planned to rise from I25mph 
to 140mph and up to 30 
minutes will be knocked off 
the present fastest times be- 
tween places such as London 
and Edinburgh. That journey 
now takes four and a half 
hours for 400 miles. 

The main beneficiary will 
be the East Coast mam line 
which is being electrified. New 
high-speed electric trains are 
due to enter service in three 
years’time. 

Improvements are also 
planned on the London to 
Manchester, Liverpool and 
Glasgow routes by smoothing 
curves in the track and intro- 
ducing fester trains. Services 
to Wales and the West Coun- 
try and the south and east 
coasts should also benefit. 

Passenger traffic, at 18.800 
million passenger miles, was 
the highest for seven years and 
punctuality and reliability 
were improving. 

“Enormous management 


profit 


im- 


Parents of 
shot boy 
claim for 
distress 


frustrated 
by tunnel 
BiU talks 


effort" was going into 
proved timekeeping. Sir Rob- 
ert said. Cancellations were 
expected to be reduced from 
1.2 per cent of timetabled 
trains last year to a target 1 per 
cent this year. 

About 90 per cent of Lon- 
don commuter trains and 82 
per cent of Inter-City trains 
should reach their destina- 
tions within five minutes of 
the right time this year. 

Other features of the report 
were: 

• Investment A £2,000 mil- 
lion programme now under- 
way is the biggest for 25 yeas 
and is “beginning to breathe 
new and vigorous life into the 
nation's railways". Sir Robert 
said. 

• Taxpayers’ support At 
£919 million was £131 mil- 
lion lower in real terms than 
three years ago. 

• Manpower Down by nearly 
4.500 last year and. after the 
unions* recent rejection of 
industrial action, further re- 
ductions of 5,000 jobs in 
engineering and maintenance 
alone would be carried out in 
the most humane possible 
way. But British Rail would 
still need 7,000 recruits a year. 

• Inter-City and London 
commuter lines: Both report- 
ed improved carryings and 
results, but rail freight lost 
£65 million, partly as a result 
of the miners’ strike and the 
dispute over driver-only 
freight trains, which wasnow 
settled. 


By Craig Seton 
West Midlands Police are 
considering a compensation 
claim for “shock and distress'* 
from the parents of John 
Shorthouse, aged five, who 
was shot dead by a police 


By Sheila Gunn 
Politi 


marksman last August 

line shorthc 


Political Staff 

A confrontation with Chan- 
nel ferry operators is looming 
as the Government attempts 
to push through the Channel 
Tunnel Bill. 


Mrs Jacqueline Shorthouse 
and her husband, John, who is 
prison, have already re- 


in 


ceived £3,500. the maximum 
allowed for the death under 
the Fatal Accidents Act .1976. 

They are now claiminj 
damages for nervous shod 
and distress to themselves and 
their two other sons, under 
common law. 

Mr Trevor Rogers, of the 
West Midlands Police Author- 
ity, confirmed yesterday that a 
solicitor acting for the parents 
had asked the authority to put 
forward a formal offer to settle 
the claim. 

It is understood that the 
authority will seek the advice 
of specialist counsel before it 
decides whether to make an 
offer to the .family. 

Mr Anthony Beaumont- 
Dark, Conservative MP for 
Selly Oak, Birmingham, said 
recently that the parents 
should receive about £10,000. 

John Shorthouse was shot 
dead by Police Constable Bri- 
an Chester during an armed 
police raid on his parent’s 
Birmingham maisonette. 

PC Chester was acquitted of 
manslaughter by a juTy at 
Stafford Crown Court earlier 
this month and has returned 
to duty. 

The dead boy’s father is 
serving a five-year prison term 
for his part in a robbery at a 
Welsh restaurant two days 
before the fatal shooting. 


Top jobs 
hope for 
Catholics 


By Richard Ford 

The number of Roman 
Catholics working in the 
Northern Ireland Civil Service 
has increased by 6 percentage 
points from 1980 to 1985, bat 
Protestants still dominate in 
the most senior posts. 

The Government believes, 
however, that that is a result of 
employment practices of more 
than 20 years ago and that in 

the future there will be a better 

balance between Roman Cath- 
olics and Protestants in the 
higher ranks of the service. 

Figures released in a gov- 
ernment report yesterday 
show the retigioas divide in the 
Civil Service on January L 
last year, at 63.6 per cent 
Protestant and 364 per cent 
Roman Catholic compared, 
with 693 per cent Protestant 
and 30.7 per cent Roman 
Catholic in 1980. 

Protestants form 62 percent 
of the general population in 
the province and Roman Cath- 
olics 38 per cent 

Mr Rhodes Boyson, Minis- 
ter of State at the Northern 
Ireland Office, said that the 
Cnd Service, which employs 
22300 people, “was a quite 
remarkable flagship for the 
province and had made every 

attempt to recruit on merit 

The report shows that in- 
creases in the number of 
Roman Catholics employed in 
the service happened in all 
occupational groups exam- 
ined, but that the highest 
percentage of Roman Catho- 
lics employed were at clerical 
and clerical assistant level and 
the highest percentage level of 
Protestants occurred at the 
level of deputy principal and 
senior principal and above. 


Cowley appealon 
Carnes ban fails 


The South African bora 
swimmer Annette Cowley 
failed yesterday in the High 
Court to overturn the ban on 
her appearing in the England 
team at the Commonwealth 
Games. 

The Vice Chancellor. Sir 
Nicolas Browne-WiUrinson, 
refused to grant the British 
freestyle champion a declara- 
tion that the decision of ihe 
Commonwealth Games Fed- 
eration was “wrong in law”. • 
The judge said far from 
being “manifestly incorrect” 
the decision was “manifestly 
correct”. , , 

Miss Cowley, aged 19, said 
last night “I would have loved 
to have swum for England. In 
the meantime I will continue 
in the hope that one day I will 
be able to swim for my 
country” . . 

Miss Cowley seemed in 
good humour when she faced 
a press conference with En- 
gland team officials after the 
decision. “If I didn’t smile it 
would be tears. This is_ where 
my heart is. This is my 
domicile and this is where I 
am going to come back to”. 

Miss Cowley is studying at 
an university in Texas but 
intends to move to England 
after her studies and complete 
the 12-month residence quali- 
fication required by interna- 
tional rules. , 

Mr David Reeves, Secretary 
of the Amateur Swimming 
Association, said it intended 
to challenge the rules laid 
down by FINA, the 
Intematioanl governing body, 
which had made Miss Cowley 
ineligible. 

The High Court ruling had 
said that the function of the 



In the latest move to stop 
the project becoming bogged 
down in Parliament, the Select 
Committee hearing objections 
yesterday ruled ferry compa- 
nies could not argue against 
the £3 billion rail link. 

Government officials and 
project backers fear the link, 
supported by Mrs Margaret 
Thatcher and the French gov- 
ernment, could flounder if all 
objectors were allowed to put 
their case.lt feces a six-month 
delay because of a miscalcula- 
tion by government advisers 
on the strength of objections. 

Eurotunnel, the English- 
French consortium behind the 
project, said the delay would 
not endanger the tunnel but 
would inevitably increase 
costs and raise doubts about 
its financial backing. 

The Bill could be scrapped 
if it has not gone through all its 
stages before the next election. 

Mr Gerard Ryan, counsel 
for the feny companies, ap- 
pealed for £100 million com- 
pensation for damage ca 
by the link. 

Mr Alex Fletcher, commit- 
tee chairman- and Conserva- 
tive MP for Edinburgh 
Central, said: “We do not wish 
to hear evidence on the viabil- 
ity of the construction, opera- 
tion and maintenance of the 
fixed link.”He said the com- 
mittee was required to listen 
to petitioners concerned that 
their interests should be pro- 
tected or compensated. But it 
was not required to hear 
evidence on the principle of 
the Bill, which has received a 
second reading in the 
Commons. 

A Sealink spokesman said: 
“This gag suggests that the 
Eurotunnel finances do not 
add up, as we have frequently 
suggested, and that the whole 
basis of its financing is very 
suspect” He refused to say 
whether Sealink was consider- 
ing legal action to gain 
compensation. 

He said: “It does seem 
extraordinary that the select 
committee will not examine 
the foil independent economic 
case which compares .the fi- 
nances of the tunnel and the 
femes. This has to be present- 
ed to ensure that the ferries are 
given a fair chance to compete 
■against the tunnel.” 

Mr Jonathan Aitken, Con- 
servative MP for Thanet 
{South and an opponent of the 
tunnel scheme, described the 
ruling as “an outrageous sup- 
pression of free speech". 

Feny companies and other 
objectors barred from the 
hearing wifi have a chance to 
put their case before the 
House of Lords select com- 
mittee later this year. _ 

Sealink estimates it will be 
forced to lay-off 4,000 of its 
4,500 staff, at a cost of 
£30 miHion-£50 million. 


Wap ping dispute 

Union ‘inaction’ on violence 


By Tim Jones 


A High Court judge said 
yesienlay he found it signifi- 
cant that in spite of print 
union condemnations of vio 


being asked to grant injunc- 
tions banning the print unions 
Sogat '82 and the NGA, plus 
named officials, from staging 


UUIUll VUUUVIUUOUXIIW V* - UUIHVU T "Tj-rTI 

lence there was not a “scrap of anything but a peaceful picket 
evidence” of any action being of" six people at the plant 

where The Times. The Sunday 


taken against guilty members. 

Mr Justice Stuart-Smith 
made his remark on the ninth 
day of News International's 
attempt to curb what it says 
are unlawful picketing, 
marches and demonstrations 
outside its new plant at 
Wapping, east London, and 
other premises owned by the 
company or its subsidiaries. 

But Mr Eldred Tabachnik, 
QC. appearing for Mr Michael 
Britton, a Sogat '82 official 
against whom the company is 
seeking an injunction, said it 
was one thing to condemn 
violence and another to iden- 
tify the wrong-doers. 

Mr Brittqn had been de- 
scribed as a chief stewani and 
tha t was not denied nor in dis- 
pute. Mr Tabachnik said his 
client had made it clear be 
deplored such actions as fol- 
lowing people from their place 
of work or taking their 
photographs. 

“He has never seen any 
violent behaviour by an offi- 
cial picket and never encour- 
aged, organized or condoned 
such actions. He would do his 
best to prevent it from 
occurring.” . . 

Mr Justice Stuart-Smith is 


in stating that arrangements 
with TNT, the distribution 
company, were only for dis- 
tributing the group's proposed 
new evening newspaper. 

He said union claims that 
nihmrp The i imes i ne aunuuv the new newspaper had beep 
TmJ^eS^^V^bf part ofasaret plan to transfer 
the World ext published. existing titles to Wa^mg^s 

Earlier, Mr James Goudie, in no way 


QC, for ’the NGA, said Mr 
Bruce Matthews, managing 
director of News Internation- 
al, was “guilty of a falsehood" 


most recent affidavits submit- 
ted by Mr Matthews and by 
Mr diaries Wilson, editor of 
The Times. 


Court action to end 
library ban of papers 

_ • , _ l l_~ .b — V fm ImiII 


Three London boroughs 
which have banned The Times 
and other News International 
titles from their libraries in 
support of 5300 dismissed 
print workers mil have to 
defend then - actions In foe 
High Court 

Mr Justice Macpherson of 
CInny yesterday gave leave to 
Times Newspapers Limited, 
News Group Newspapers and 
News International to seek 
orders ending the bla ckin g of 
their tides after hearing the 
boronghs were embarking on a 
strategy of “masterly delay” . 

Mr Anthony Lester, QC for 
News International, said the 
Boroughs of Ealing, Hammer- 
smith and Fulham, and Cam- 
den had devised their tactics 


after advice from leading 
connseL , . 

Mr Lester alleged the three 
authorities had acted for im- 
proper or political or other 
reasons by “putting their 
weight behind the organiza- 
tions currently engaged in the 
Wapping dispute,”. 

He alleged they were guilty 

of an abase of power under the 

Public Libraries and Muse- 
ums Act, 1964, which imposed 
a duty on every library author- 
ity to provide a comprehensive 
and effective library service. 

The Tima Educational Sup- 
plement and other titles are 
also affected by the ban which 
a dozen other authorities have 
also imposed. 


The "High Court action is 
tied for 


scheduled for October. 


Annette Cowley at the games 
village yesterday, 
tion had acted beyond its 
powers. The court had no 
power or right to intervene 
unless the decision was so 
manifestly absurd that no 
body of reasonable men could 
have reached the decision. 

But he believed the federa- 
tion had made a “fair 
assessment” of the situation, 
namely that while Miss Cow- 
ley intended to make Britain 
her permanent home in the 
future, she had not done so 


Clamp on visitor’s passports 


By Richard Evans 
Political Correspondent 

Mr Douglas Hurd, the 
Home Secretary, last night 
announced a lightening up of 
procedures for obtaining Brit- 
ish Visitor’s Passports, after 
growing abuse by criminals 
and foreigners. 

Applicants have to produce 
only one document from a 
selected list as evidence of 
identity, but the Home Office 
has heard of cases where 


by people giving the wrong 
name. Others are not qualified 
for a passport because they do 
not have British citizenship. 

Mr Hurd said last 
nightTThere have been in- 
stances in which British 
Visitor's Passports have been 
obtained by people not enti- 
tled by identity, or nationality, 
to use them." 

The visitor’s passport, 
which is cheaper that the 
standard passport, lasts for 


In a written Commons an- 
swer, the Home Secretary said 
he had decided to introduce 
changes in the documents 
required from applicants, in 
an attempt to prevent the 
abuse. 

From September, all appli- 
cants wifi have to produce a 
document from each of two 
groups listed by the Home 
Office, except in cases where 
people can provide an ex- 
pired, uncancelled standard 


Man accused 
of riot deaths 
‘a hero at 17’ 



The Government may be 
Brepared to underwrite in- 
creases in teachers' salaries. rn 
exchange for “an umntemmir * 
ed flow of education of the. ,.; 
highest standard * Mr^ 
Kenneth Baker, the Secretary 
of State for Education, hinte^ 

ye ffewas giving his fitS^ 
evidence to the Commons^ 
select committee on education- , 
since replacing Sir Keith,* 

°AtMonday’s meeting, pf the; * 
Burnham management com-* 
mittee, local authomy leaders.;, 
made clear that they were** 
prepared to offer a. pay. and. j 
conditions package “substai^ y 
tially above” the £1-25 bdlion ; 

over four years offered--* 
last autumn. . .'at 

Representatives of the.em- ? 
ployers and the Teaching^ 
unions wifi, meet in Coventry - 
thi s weekend for a two-day., 
negotiating session and Mr. 
Baker . said the Government,^ 

accepted the responsibi lity . o v^ 
funding pari- of -any agre*;^ 
menL ■ 

Nevertheless, it was con- ► 
ceraed about, “the ova^tt.; 
money that is available, whiorS 
has to be balanced against. ^ 
other calls on . the nation’s ^ 
resources”.,. 

Mr Baker would want- to be £ 

satisfied -that a much, more-/, 
rigid codification ofteaeheis’ ,, 
contractual duties and respond - 
sibilities could be agreed be-.* 
fore talking about more- 
money. ' " . 

; The cost of implementing 
the local authorities' jpeace 
ickage could be as high as 
L5. billion.- . - - ; v 

Responding to suggestions 
that some schools were oper- 
ating in a “semi-vacuum 
situation” through the intro- 
duction of . the GCSE exam, 
Mr Baker said he was fully... 
satisfied that eno 


A man accused of the 
manslaughter of two brothers 
in a fire during the Hand- 
sworth riots last September 
I had rescued a girl aged five 
from her burning home when 
he was aged 17, Birmingham 
Crown Court was told yester- 
day. 

Detective Constable Robert 
Bright said. that Mark Barrett, 
now aged 22, a father of three, 
of Wiggin Tower, Newton, 
Birmingham, had admitted 
that he started the fire at the 
Lozells Road sub-post office. 

But be had said that he had 
no .idea that Mr Amarali 
Moledina, aged 44, and his 
brother, Kassamali, aged 38. 
were still inside. 

The brothers died of carbon 
monoxide poisoning and as- 
phyxia, Home office patholo- 
gist Mr Peter Ac land told the 
court. 

Barrett and Samuel Mur- 
rain, aged 18, of Fentham 
Road. Aston. Birmingham, 
deny arson and manslaughter 
charges. 

The trial continues. • 


State may* ; 
back new r 
teacher 



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pr 


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was being made in s__ 

“More preparations have^ 
been done for this exam than* 
for any other in our. history?"^ 
he said. ■ > 

He made particular refer- 
ence tor-one school he visited ^ 
recently which traditionally^ 
started teaching for the aca - 
demic year m July. There,.he’> 
said, instruction for the GC5£ / 
exams in physics had begim 
The„ education departments 
would- soon begin a promo- 
tional campaign directed -at-, 
employers- and trades. unkjH$~ 
to" explain more thoroughly^ 
the j work ing .of. the^ 
examination. • - - , , r w. s ... 

Skeleton find ; 

Workmen building an ex-* 
tension to Ivy House, ait 
Shalboume, Wiltshire,, foe/ 1 
home of Sir Dermot Remt* 
Davis, Chief Justice of GibraF 
tar, yesterday unearthed two* 
skeletons, believed to be from - 
the seventeenth century. ' '*■ * 

Cockle move j’ 

Mr Justice Rose reserved- 
judgement in the High Court 
yesterday as to whether the 
solicitors Herbert Smith &Co 
had been negligent in failing to 
protect the secret . formula 
essential to the bottling of 
cockles by Leslie Parsons,- 
from Burry Port, South Wpjes. , 


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A 24-hour guard is. befog; 
mounted on Holy 'Trinity* 
churchyard, Bordesley, frfrr, 
mingham, to deter grave ro&C 
bers while up 10 3,000 bodi^ 
are exhumed and moved Jbik 
reburial in individual, cofi^ 
i sized casks, making way for * 
road-wideuiug scheme. * 


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BeriuchL missing since taking 
pan in the recent Car’ ’ ^ 
Tran sAtlan tic race, was:'. 
yesterday, capsized and', 
her keel gone, 600 miles . 
Land's End. There was ja’o 1, 
trace of her two-man crew. .' _ 
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Teachers’ plea to keegj 
school sports alive " 





By John Good body. Sports News Correspondent 

Teachers* unions and educa- 
tional bodies straggling to 
arrest the decline , of rugby, 
cricket and football in state 

schools, agreed yesterday to 


ask the Government for a new 
flexible contract to pay staff 
for supervising out-of-school 
activities. 


Lawson, secretary of the coan^ 
tii, said that by restT “ 
team games' to dubs 
would become 
middle-class 




terms a “ramp” of 

children, who may never 
recognized, teachers 


The eight organizations, there should be a new jysra 
which met the Central Council to -identify outstanding) 
of Physical Recreation in Lon-, competitors. 


don, proposed that PE staff 
should work , less during regu- 
lar school hours and be avaB- 
able for extra-curricular 
coaching. 

They also decided that dteh 
area should have a body to 
extend the use of sports cen- 
tres for school-children and 
educational premises for the 
public. 

Although all .speed that 
there should be a strengthen- 
ing of finks with sports dubs 
near schools, Mr- Peter 


The 

seated 

Union 


organizations repre- 
were: the National 

of Teachers, Profes£ 

sfonal Association of Teach* 
ers. National Assocfatian. 
Schoolmasters, and Union-. 
Women Teachers* . Assistant 
Masters’, and Mistresses’ A& 
sedation, the- National -Con* 
federation, ot ParwfTeadjer, 
Associations, the f — * 
Heads Association, 


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it neglecting 
of diplomats 
add families, say MPs 



- j» 


The Government was ac- 
cused yesterday of neglecting 
the safety of diplomats and 
theif families serving abroad. 

The all-party Foreign Af- 
fairs Committee. which made 
the accusa t ion, said that tight 
controls on Foreign Office 
b udgets and frequent attacks 
byHeiforists and other crimi- 
nals- were to blame for the 
increased dangers facing em- 
bassy staff. ' 

Ministers are expected to be 
reasonably sympathetic to the 
committee's request for more 
money to broiect diplomats 
andMheir families and other 
staff. Bui ii is thought likely to 
try "to' find the money by 
reducing overseas. staff or by 
closing a few of the smaller 
missions. 

The committee, chaired by 
Sir Anthony Kershaw, Con- 
servative MP for Stroud, was 
tol<T of '4l attacks on British 
missions, including 25 bomb- 
ings and 4 deaths, since 1976. 

Since that evidence was 
taken there has been the 
rndrder this month of Mr 
Geoffrey Hutchinson, honor- 
ary British consul in Barran- 
quilla^ Colombia. 

. In . unusually strong lan- 
guage -for a select committee, 
the MPs made plain to minis- 
USRs'that more must be done lo 
safeguard diplomats and their 
families. ' 


By Sheila Gann, Political Staff 

“It cannot be right that all 
the funds required should be 
found from within existing 
budgets.'* they said. 

“We regard it as a priority 
that sufficient resources be 
made available without the 
Foreign Office having to cut 
back on its normal activities 
to find the money; and we 
look to the Government to 
take appropriate action.'* 

The committee was told of 
the much stricter security 
imposed on diplomatic posts 
after a review by the Foreign 
Office of the growing terrorist 
threat. That became more 
urgent when fears grew of 
retaliation against Britain af- 
ter the United States raids on 
Libya. 

But the MPs reported: “The 
dangers do not, of course, face 
diplomatic service officers 
alone, but also their families 
and locally engaged staff. 

“In some ways, the families 
are more vulnerable since, 
outside embassy or high com- 
mission areas, they do not 
always get protection. The 
psychological strain on fam- 
ilies can be considerable." 

They praised the Foreign 
Office for paying compensa- 
tion immediately after the 
murder of a diplomat and for 
its decisions on the selection 
of overseas staff and the length 
of tours. 


But they added: “We are, 
nevertheless, concerned that 
these arrangements are not yet 
satisfactory and recommend 
that they be reviewed. 

This year's overseas securi- 
ty budget totals £22.74 mil- 
lion. but the committee was 
dismayed to find that extra 
money to protect diplomats 
and their families had io be 
financed by cuts elsewhere. 

“The committee is of the 
view that the extra expendi- 
ture envisaged on physical 
security is of the highest 
importance, both from the 
point of view of the personal 
needs of diplomatic staff and 
their families and from the 
point of view of enabling the 
Foreign Office to carry on 
doing its job to fun effect'' 

The MPs were also worried 
about the safety of British 
Council staff. It was unaccept- 
able, they said, for the council 
to have to chpose between the 
safety of its; staff and their 
families and maintaining 
services. 

The committee is investi- 
gating the effectiveness of 
overseas aid. In this report it 
called for more money to 
restore aid to the level of the 
1970s. 

Foreign Affairs Com mil ice 
Fourth Report: FCO and ODA 
supply estimates J 986-87 (Sta- 
tionery Office: £9.10). 


Court efficiency 
‘needs computers 9 

- r - By Peter Evans, Home Affairs Correspondent 


■Computers should be used 
. to increase courts’ efficiency, 
1 the -Baf of England and Wales 
says in response to an inquiry 
by the Lord Chancellor into 
personal injuries legislation as 
pan of a wider examination of 
civi] justice. 

“We should look and plan 
yfears ahead," the Bar says. “In 
this field Our present system is 
years behind." The aim of the 
Civil Justice Review is lo 
bring - about reforms that 
would cut delays, cost and 
complexity in civil legislation. 

- Litigants in personal ifijuiy 
cases, the Bar says, should be 
protected against the dilatory 
solicitor by i. system -which 
ensures that account official in 
- ^ihe High Court and thecounfy 
court regularly checks the; 
progress of caseson a oomptA- 
er screen and calls- in the 
solicitors in all cases which 
have fallen behind the pre- 
scribed timetable. - 

‘One contributor to the re- 
sponse of the Common Law 
Bar Association described the 
possible application 'of com- 
puter technology. “Court 
computers should log the date 
of issue of every writ, and of 


service of every pleading, 
notification being given to the 
court by the party serving the 
pleading." 

Failure to comply with a 
required step would lead to a 
computer-generated Notice 
nisi being issued, and at the 
end of the appropriate period 
an action would be struck out 
by the court. 

What form a computerized 
system of case management 
should take must depend on 
ihe outcome of the Civil 
Justice Review, the Bar says. 
“Once the review has decided 
who should be in charge of the 
computer system — judge, 
master, administrator or court 
clerk — and what is required.of 
the xomputer system. ‘’then ft 
can be designed to fit the 
specification." *' 

The Bar has no doubt that, 
in principle, use of computers 
is essential to ensure that 
some of the most serious 
problems associated with liti- 
gation delays and inefficien- 
cies are removed. 

Parties to small, medium 
and large cases should be 
encouraged to consent to the 
arbitration of their disputes. 


Warning on use of 
cling film in ovens 

.-/■ By Richard Evans 

: Cting film, the popular food cizers in all packaging 



wrapping material, is not suit- 
able for use hr cooking, the 
Government warned last 
jtfg&t. 

• Mr Peggy Fenner, Parlia- 
mentary Secretary at the De- 
partment of Agriculture, is 
Urging, manufacturers of the 
ffi* to carry a warning on 
pickets after tests revealed 
that a plasticizer, which is 
used to soften the film, known 
as di-2-etbyhexyiadipate 
(DEHAX can perforate closely 
wrapped food when it is put 
irite an oven. 

■; She also wants manufactur- 
ers of conventional and micro- 
waVe ovens to provide similar 
if^iritings when they sell their 
products. 

'A . department working 
group is investigating plasti- 


materiais. 

In a Commons written reply, 
Mrs Fenner said: “None of the 
levels of DEHA so for fonnd in 
food gives any cause for 
concern on health grounds, but 
the work of the group is 
continuing. There is, there- 
fore, no reason for me to 
restrict the use of the film as a 
food wrapping material. 

“Nevertheless the results, 
so for. do show a markedly 
higher level of migration when 
the film is used in cooking in 
microwave ovens or conven- 
tional evens. 

“I am advised that even this 
does not indicate the existence 
of any hazard to human 
health, but that it does seem to 
be prudent to avoid such usage 
if possible." 


Broadcast 

journalism 

defended 

By Gavin Bell 
Arts Correspondent 

Television and radio sta- 
tions maintain a generally 
high standard of investigative 
journalism, but regrettable 
lapses in research and editing 
occasionally create unfair and 
misleading impressions. 

The Broadcasting Com- 
plaints Commission, express- 
ing that view in its annual 
report published yesterday, 
reaffirmed that such pro- 
grammes performed a valu- 
able public service. 

The commission upheld 13 
complaints of unjust or unfair 
treatment. 10 of them only in 
part, of 20 upon which it had 
adjudicated in the past year. 

High standards of research 
required for programmes that 
touched upon reputations 
were generally attained, the 
commission said, and it was 
sad therefore to record that 
there had been occasions on 
which the quality was disap- 
pointing. That was unfortu- 
nate because it left in- 
vestigative journalism open to 
attack. 

The commission also noted 
with regret “examples of 
editing which, in . their view, 
were an abuse of the 
broadcasters' own guide- 
lines". 

It was especially important 
that persons who were criti- 
cized should have, save in 
exceptional circumstances, 
the opportunity lo reply. 

When there was time to do 
so. broadcasters should also 
inform people in writing of 
allegations that were likely to 
be made against them. 

Complaints upheld in full 
were against Panorama and 
QED programmes on BBC1 
and an Open Space broadcast 
on BBC1 Partial criticism was 
made of programmes on both 
BBC channels, various inde^ 
pendent television stations 
and BBC Radio 4. 

Dame Barbara Shenfield, 
national chairman of the 
Women's Royal Voluntary 
Service, won adjudications 
against a Panorama pro- 
gramme broadcast in Decem- 
ber. 1984. and against Open 
Space for repealing some of 
the offending material. 




Post Office private funding 



v >-•»' ‘ 'P 7 ', 

* i*.sj* - * c " 


sa to 

% ali« 

s^C'*** j#* 

.. 

T ' % 

hs''jV. 


Realizing a retail potential 

By Bill Johnstone, Technology Correspondent 

to allow 




i:3 Vfei 

% ^ 

sd £i ! % - iso I** 


The 21,000 British post 
offices’ comprise the biggest 
high street retailing chain tn 
tfie country and could be the 
one area in the Post Office 
easily able to attract private 
finance. 

The Government has not 
disclosed its . plans for “intro- 
ducing private capital" into 
fife Post Office - announced 
fw6 days ago — but the options 
. often to the Post Office are 
’ greater .than any other nation- 
alized industry: 

Mhsiead of raising private 
fifiafcce to fund the corpora- 
tion-. generally. its four main 
activities — parcels, letters. 
Girobank and counters — 
could be financed separately. 
-In that event the network of 
offices would be the most 
attractive element 
rm Post Office appears to 
A have been • moving towards 
“attracting private capital for 
more than a year. 

''Girobank became a compa- 
ny! -last September and 
counters wHI follow suit this 
sfutumn. 

••‘Parcels and,Ietters will oper- 
ate' as divisions within the 
Pbsi Office corporation. - 
According to Post Office 



management the reorganiza- 
tion was its inspiration and 
nor a government instruction. 

More than 20 million peo- 
ple visit post offices each 
week, making them an ideal 
vehicle for selling any service. 

The Government has al- 
ready indicated its intention 


the corporation to 
offer new services. Partner- 
ships or joint ventures with 
other retailing groups could 
mean a vast range of consum- 
er services. 

About 2.000 of the prime 
crown offices (main post of- 
fices) are to be equipped with 
electronic counter terminals 
in the next five years at a cost 
of more than £60 million. 
Thai network will be backed 
by £200 million worth of 
computers. 

The cost of sending a letter 
in Britain is cheaper than in 
any other European country 
except Spain. Greece and 
Portugal. 

Last year the Post Office 
made £136.8 million profit 
from postal services of which 
£26.4 million came from 
counters. Girobank made a 
further £19.4 million. 

The cost of inland letters In 
the EEC: Britain !7p. due to 
rise to ISp in October. Spain 
8.6p: Greece 1 1.7p: Portugal 
I3p: Denmark I7.5p: The 
Netherlands I8.2p: France 
1 9.7p; Belgium I9.8p; Luxem- 
bourg 2 Up: West Germany 
2I.7p; Eire 23p and Italy 
27. Ip. 



Mr and Mrs Lock on their wedding day (top), her bicycle found chained and locked near 
Broobmans Park railway station (above left), and a map showing the murder scene. 

Rail link in Lock murder 


Detectives investigating the 
murder of Mrs Anne Lock, 
whose body was found beside a 
railway line on Monday, said 
yesterday that they were seek- 
ing a man wanted for two other 
murders and three rapes in the 
London region. 

Det Chief Snpt Vincent 
McFadden, of the Surrey po- 
lice, who is co-ordinating the 
investigation, said that there 
was a “tangible link" in the 
methods used in the murders. 

He said that J00 officers 
were involved in the hunt for 
the killer, who was described 
as being aged in his twenties, 
with a pale complexion, slim to 
medium build and brown, col- 
lar-length hair, and a south- 
east England accent 

“We are dealing with a very 
dangerous killer who obvious- 
ly has no compunctions about 
killing, whatever," Mr Mc- 
Fadden said. 

Mrs Lock's murder was 
linked to the murder and rape 
of Miss Maartje Tamboezer, 


By Nicholas Bees ton 

aged 15. at Guildford, Surrey, 
last April, and Miss Alison 
Day, aged 19, at Hackney 
1V7 ck, east London, whose 
body was found just after 
Christinas. 

In all three cases, the mur- 
derer bound his victims and 
killed them on a footpath near 
a railway station. He was also 
armed with a knife. 

Det Snpt Kenneth Worker, 
of the Metropolitan police, 
will bead the investigation into 
Mrs Lock's murder from inci- 
dent rooms at Hendon, 
Guildford and Romford police 
stations. 

He said that Mrs Lock, of 
Brockmans Park, Hertford- 
shire, was probably abducted 
near Brookmans Park railway 
station and led at knife point 
for a mile down a deserted 
railway line footpath before 
she was kilted. 

The pathologist who con- 
ducted the post-mortem ex- 
amination said that it was still ; 
not clear whether she had been 


sexually assaulted, although 
clues leading to the identity of 
the kilter may emerge from 
articles found at the murder 
site. 

The pathologist said that 
Mrs Lock, aged 29, a London 
Weekend Television produc- 
tion secretary, died of asphyxi- 
ation. Her mouth was still 
gagged when she was found by 
railway workers. 

The police said there were 
indications that her hands had 
been bound. 

Her husband of four weeks, 
Mr Laurence Lock, aged 26, a 
butcher, remained at his home 
yesterday and declined to an- 
swer questions. A friend said 
that be wanted to be left alone. 

Mr McFadden said that the 
police already had strong 
leads to the killer's identity. 
Pathologists had discovered 
after the m order of Miss 
Tamboezer that he had “a 
minority blood group" and 
forensic scientists fold ob- 
tained good fingerprints. 


New links 
found in 
pensioner 
murders 

By Mark Ellis 

Police investigating seven 
murders and one attempted 
killing in which all the victims 
were pensioners attacked in 
their homes during the early 
hours of the morning dis- 
closed more possible links 
between the crimes yesterday. 

Five of the victims, both 
men and women, had been 
sexually assaulted and all. 
except one where the cause of 
death was not yet known, had 
been strangled in their beds, 
said Dei Chief Supt Kenneth 
Thompson, who is co-ordinat- 
ing the murder inquiries. 

A Scotland Yard press con- 
ference was called in the wake 
of speculation that (he mur- 
ders in London over Lhe last 
four months were committed 
by one killer, dubbed the 
“Stock well Strangler", who 
was preying on elderly people, 
mostly in south London. 

Mr Thompson, or Scotland 
Yard's Serious Crime Branch, 
said: “At this stage there is a 
probable link. However, none 
of the investigating officers is 
saying that is definite. There 
arc many factors which have a 
common link with each other 
and many things that don't fit 
in." 

Other similarities, apart 
from the age of the victims 
and the time, cause and places 
of death, are that there were 
no apparent signs of forced 
entry and no obvious signs of 
burglary, although in some 
cases belongings were found to 
be missing from rooms. 

Mr Thompson declined to 
elaborate on the reasons for 
nordefinitefy linking!, except 
that they related to things that 
had taken place within the 
victims’ rooms. 

He said:“lf all the offences 
are by the same person he 
must be caught before he 
strikes again. This man is 
extremely dangerous. We ask 
elderly people to be extra 
vigilant and people living next 
door or close to old people to 
check they are alright and keep 
in touch with them." 

Police have issued a de- 
scription of a man. based on 
accounts from the 73-year-old 
man who survived and 
sightings of a person seen 
acting suspiciously near an old 
people's home where two of 
the victims lived. 

He is described as white, 
aged 28 to 30, five feet eight 
inches tall, with dark short 
hair and a tanned or reddened 
face and wore dark clothing. 


Savage 
career is 
still in 
balance 

By Thomson Prentice 

Science Correspondent 

The future career of Mrs 
Wendy Savage, the consultant 
obstetrician suspended for 15 
months over allegations of 
professional incompetence, is 
likely to be decided tomorrow. 

Tne findings of lhe inquiry 
into the allegations will be 
formally published today, al- 
though the first pan of the 
report was made public two 
weeks ago. with Mrs Savage 
claiming that she had been 
vindicated. 

Her employers, the Tower 
Hamlets Health Authority in 
east London, will meet tomor- 
row to discuss the findings and 
voreon whether she should be 
re-in stated at the London 
Hospital. Mile End. 

However. Mrs Savage's so- 
licitor. Mr Brian Raymond, 
yesterday expressed concern 
about the outcome. “The 
meeting is by no means a 
foregone conclusion. There 
are still pockets of implacable 
resistance to Mrs Savage with- 
in the health authority. 

Mrs Savage, aged 51. an 
obstetrician Tor 20 years, has 
been an outspoken advocate 
of natural childbirth 

She was suspended in April. 
1985. pending an investiga- 
tion of allegations of profes- 
sional incompetence relating 
to the birth of five babies 
under her care in 1983 and 
1984. 

One child was stillborn and 
another died eight days after 
being born. The others are 
healthy. 


Warning over 
straw burning 

Britain's farmers were 
warned yesterday that they 
would be severely penalised if 
they infringed the law on 
straw and stubble burning. 
Launching a new safely cam- 
paign. Lord Belstead, Minister 
of State for Agriculture, said 
that, in spile of the improved 
record in the post two years, 
straw burning had become too 
important an issue to continue 
to be governed by a voluntary 
code. 

Stria by-laws were in force 
in virtually all the main cereal 
growing areas, making it an 
offence to allow fires to cross 
breaks or to allow smoke to 
interrupt road users. The lat- 
ter also applied 1 to domestic 
gardeners. 


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HOME NEWS 


■THE TIMES WEDNESDAY JULY 23 1986 


PARLIAMENT JULY 22 1986 


Thatcher and the Queen 


Howe mission to S Africa might be 


prelude to PM talks with Botha 


APARTHEID 


"‘The Prime Minister does not 
-exclude the possibility of having 
personal talks with President 
..Botha of South Africa, inside or 
outside South Africa, Mrs 
% Thatcher indicated during Ques- 
tion time exchanges in the 
C Commons. She was replying to 
Mr Cyril Townsend 
Bexley heath. C) who asked her 

- to keep that option open in the 
•critical weeks ahead. 

-.Mrs Thatcher explained that 
obviously she would like to 
i consider the results of what Sir 

- Geoffrey Howe, the Foreign 
' Secretary, as President of the 12 
7 EEC member states, was able to 
■ achieve on his visit to South 

Africa, which he was about to 
-■take, before saying anything 
•further. 

She hoped the Alncan Na- 
tional Congress would agree to 
’ meet Sir Geoffrey on his visit to 
. South Africa. If they did not she 
' added, it would cast doubt on 
their attempt to solve the prob- 
lem by peaceful means. 

Replying to questions about 
the position of the Queen, Mrs 
Thatcher made clear she pro- 
.* posed to follow the- wcll-estab- 
- 1 i shed practice of predecessors 
2- and net answer questions direct 

- or indirect about the monarch. 

. The Prime Minister also de- 

- dared that to commit Britain to 
"imposing sanctions against 
South Africa before the 
Commonwealth heads of gov- 
•emment meeting in August was 
absurd. 

” There were loud jeers from 
the Opposition but cheers from 
Conservative backbenchers 
when she stated she hoped to 
have an audience with the 
Queen later in the day. 

Mr Neil Kinnock. Leader of the 
Opposition, demanded that Mrs 
Thatcher should make a 
categorical statement in favour 
of sanctions in order to restore 
participation in the Common- 
wealth Games. He said the 
boycott of the Games was 
entirely Mrs Thatcher’s fault 
and that she was spoiling the 
Games, rupturing the Common- 
wealth and sabotaging the mis- 
sion of Sir Geoffrey Howe, the 
Foreign Secretary, to South 
Africa. 

The issue was first raised by 
Mr David Steel Leader of the 
Liberal Party, who asked: In all 
her considerations with our 
Commonwealth partners of the 


measures which we should be 
taking against the South African 
Govern men l what weight does 
the Prime Minister attach to her 
need to safeguard the position of 
Her Majesty as head or the 
Commonwealth? 

Mrs Thatcher. I propose to 
follow the well-established prao 
- tice of my predecessor and not 
answer questions directly or 
indirectly about the monarch. 
Sir Edward Gardner (Fylde. C): 
Would she not agree that two 
main aims of any policy towards 
South Africa should be to end as 



*$35 






Townsend: Keep open chance 
of talks with Botha 


soon as possible the system of 
apartheid and. secondly, to pro- 
tect the victims of apartheid 
from any unnecessary and 
avoidable suffering and blood- 
shed? 

Both these aims must over- 
rule and override all other 
considerations, including who 
will or will not take part in the 
Commonwealth Games. 

Mrs Thatcher 1 wholly agree 
with him. it is our aim to end 
apartheid as soon as possible — 
(Labour interruptions) — by 
negotiation and by not applying 
punitive sanctions, which would 
hit (hose we most wish to help. 


I agree wholly with him that 
the Games are the Common- 
wealth Games and it would be 
best if those who are thinking of 
boycotting would reconsider 
their decision and come and 
join in the Games. 

Mr Kinnock: Following the 
Harare meeting, is it not dear 
that a categoric statement from 
the Prime Minister committing 
the British Government to the 
imposition of sanctions against 
South Africa would increase the 
probability of restoring 
participation in the Games, 
would improve the prospects of 
the heads of Government meet- 


ing in August reaching produc- 
tive conclusions and at the same 
time strengthen the hand of the 
Foreign Secretary on his visit to 
South Africa? 

Will the’ Prime Minister now 
make such a categoric 
statement? 

Mrs Thatcher No. He is asking 
me to make a categoric state- 
ment before the heads of Gov- 
ernment meeting considering 
the matter. Thai is absurd. 

Mr Kinnock: By foiling to make 
such a categoric statement tor 
which the Commonwealth lead- 
en both black and white have 
repeatedly asked, the Prime 
Minister is spoiling the Games, 
rapturing the Commonwealth 
and sabotaging the mission of 
her Foreign Secretary. 

Does she not realize that the 
Harare statement was an olive 
branch, or is she in such a state 
of paranoia she cannot tell the 
difference between an olive 
branch and a club? 

Mrs Thatcher He is asking us to 
reach a conclusion before the 
meeting which meets to con- 
sider the matter. That is an 
absurd way to go about things. 

The Commonwealth Games 
do not belong to Britain and not 
even to Scotland. They belong 
to the Commonwealth and the 
countries who are withdrawing 
are damaging their own Games 
and our damaging the chances 
of their own athletes. As for as 
the heads of Government con- 
ference is concerned, we shall 
consider before we conclude. 
Mr Kinnock: One thing she does 
say that is true is that the 
Commonwealth Games are not 
directly her business. What is 
her business is the withdrawal 
from the Games because that is 
entirely her fault. When she says 
that a categoric statement in 
favour of sanctions is absurd, 
does she think Rajiv Gandhi is 
absurd? (Some Conservative 
backbenchers*.** Yes!**) 

Mrs Thatcher I am referring to 
the Nassau accord. It said: “The 
heads of Government repre- 
sentatives. after an appropriate 
time will then meet to review 
the situation. If in their opinion 
adequate progress has not been 
made within this period we 
agree to consider the adoption 
of further measures." 

The Leader of the Opposition 
is following his old trick of 
reaching a conclusion before the 
meeting is even held. 

Mr Cyril Townsend 
(Bexlcyheaih. C): In view of the 
crisis in South Africa and 


Britain's difficult position inside 
the Community on this issue, 
will she at least keep open the 
possibility of personal talks with 
State President Botha inside or 
outside South Africa in the 
critical weeks ahead? 

Mrs Thatcher The Foreign 
Secretary goes to South Africa 
today (Tuesday) to have talks 
with the President and a number 
of other people in South Africa. 
There is more than one set of 
talks. He may need to go again 
later. • % > 

I should like to consider the 
results of wtial he is able to 
achieve as president of the 12 
countries of the Community. I 
do not exclude what Mr 
Townsend says. 

Mr James Craigen (Glasgow. 
MaryhilL Labh Does she note 
recent comments about thr rift 
between Number 10 and the 
Palace has arisen from certain 
sections of the Tory establish- 
ment — (Conservative protests) 
— who feel that she has been in 
the job too long as Prime 
Minister and has developed 
monarchical tendencies. 

Mrs Thatcher May I make dear 
once again that 1 propose to 
follow the well-established prac- 
tice of my predecessors and not 
answer questions, direct or in- 
direct. about the monarchy? 

I note that Mr Craigen has no ■ 
complaints about how the Gov- 
ernment is running the affairs of 
the country. 

Mr Joe Ashton (Bassetfaw, 
Lab): Regretting that she cannot 
comment on the relationship 
with the Palace, would she 
comment on her backbenchers 
and the report on the front page 
of The Times yesterday which 
said “Rebel Tories accused of 
Thatcher plot". 

What does she intend to do 
about such treachery? (Laugh- 
ter) Or is i t a plot by the editor of 
the. Tory Times and Rupert 
Murdoch to drive a wedge 
between the Palace and 
Downing Street? Many of us 
hope that she will not be forced 
into resigning her position on 
constitutional grounds because 
we think she is one of the best 
vote winners the Labour Party 
has. 

Mrs Thatcher: I shall continue 
to answer questions, in the hope 
that one day the standard of 
questions from the Opposition 
will improve. (Conservative 
laughter and cheers) 

Miss Betty Boothroyd (West 
Bromwich. West, Lab): In view 
of her evasive answer last week. 


. ■ t .. . t 


- » * 


:%■ ■ • 

'4 ***** 

K 


Ashton: What is she doing 
aboat Tory treachery 


settlement in South Africa are 
for the people of that country — 
all the people — to determine. “ 
That was the unanimous view 
of the entire Commonwealth. 

• Later, an attempt by Mr 
Richard Caborn (Sheffield Cen- 
tral, Lab) to bring in his South 


Africa (Sanctions) Bill to pro- 
vide for the application of the 
Nassau Accord m relation to 
sanctions against South Africa, a 
move was opposed by Mr 
Cranley Onslow (Woking. C), 
failed by 243 votes to 196 - 
majority against, 47. 


Parliament today 

Commons (230): Motion on 
Supplementary Benefit ( Mis- 
cellaneous Amendments) 


Regulations, Social Security 
Bill. Wages Bill, Agriculture Bill 
and Dockyard Services Bill 
Lords amendments. 

Lords (2.30k Financial Services 
Bill, committee, second day. 


More jobs, 
more work, 
since 1983 


would improve the prospects of (Bexlcyheaih. C): In view of the Bromwich. West, Labk In view Lords (2.30k Financial Services 
Lhe heads of Government meet- crisis in South Africa and of her evasive answer last week. Bill, committee, second day. 

Minister’s warning to late bill payers 

^ - Mr R; C hard Qttaway (Netting- small firms may be responsible Mr Henry Bellingham (Norfolk 
SMALL FIRMS Tim North . CkHe said that if for payments Jo large firms. North West, Ck What extra 


EMPLOYMENT - 


More than a million jobs had 
been created in the British 
economy since the Spring of 
1983 and the rate of employ- 


ment had gone up since the first 
quarter of 1983. Mr Kenneth 


quarter 01 tv«J. Mr fsennetii 
Clarke. Paymaster General and 
Minister for Employment, said 

He was replying to Mr John 
Eians (St Helens North, Lab) 
who asked him to confirm that 
despite 16 massagings of the 
figures since the Government 
look office, the underlying level 
of unemployment in the country 
was at the highest point for over 
50 years. 

Earlier Mr Clarke said the 
seasonally adjusted level of 
unemployed claimants in the 
UK this June represented 11.7 
per cent of the working 
population. 

Estimates on a consistent 
basis for June 1983 and June 
1979 were 10.8 and 4.2 
respectively. 


If a pilor scheme to encourage 
voluntary payment by busi- 
nesses of oufstandidg bills does 
not work, legislation may be 
necessary, Mr David Trippier, 
Under Secretary of State for 
Employment, said daring Com- 
mons question rime. 

Asked about the response to a 
guidance booklet on payment of 
bills be said: I have received a 
considerable volume of 
correspondence from pnblic bod- 
ies, large and small and small 
business organizations, welcom- 
ing this initiative. 

Many small businesses -con- 
tinue to emphasize the problems 
that late payment causes them. 


Mr Richard Ottaway (Netting- 
Tiam North, Ck He said that if 
the voluntary code does not work 
be may introduce legislation, 
and some of us say that should 
be sooner rather than later, but 
how docs be int*«a to _ iBOQitQr 
the success of the voluntary 
code? 

Mr Trippier I have ode effective 
way of monitoring the success. 
There are 130 different codes 
printed and now I have just 
recently authorized the reprint- 
ing of this one so the demand is 
considerable. 

We may have to consider 
legislation if the pilot scheme 
does not work. A number of 
small firm organizations have 
indicated to me there are occa- 
sions that small firms do not pay 
the bills of other small firms and 


small firms may be responsible 
for payments to large firms. 

Mr Dennis Skinner (Bolsorer, 
Labk Severi years ago this 
Government was elected on the 
basis of relieving small firms 
from the difficulties that sur- 
rounded them at that time. Now 
the Government is hammering 
small businesss 

Mr Trippier That shows how 
very mudi out of touch be is with 
what is actually going on in the 
small business community. 
There has been a higher in- 
crease of small businesses than 
in recorded history. 

The reason the Government is 
involved in the code of practice 
for late payments is that it 
knows there is a cash problem 
where large firms delay payment 
of bills to smaller ones. 


Mr Henry Bellingham (Norfolk 
North West, Ck What extra 
measures would be pot on some 
of the biggest firms m the land 
that only pay bills twice or three 
times a you-? 

Mr Trippier: I sent the code of 
practice to the 100 largest firms 
in the country, a number of 
whom are' guilty of delaying 
payment of bills. 

There is an opportunity for 
combining the code of practice 
and the Finance Act 1982 
legislation which allows interest 
to be charged as soon as the 
matter has been taken to court. 


NewMP 


Mrs Llin Golding, the new 
Labour MP for Newcastle-un- 
der-Lyme. look her seat in the 
Commons. - 


Theatre artistic directors defended 


THE ARTS 


Prison releases 


An appeal by Mr Gerrard Neale 
(North Cornwall, C) for an 
emergency Commons debate on 
the basis upon which violent 
criminals were released from 
prison on remitted sentences 
and on parole was rejected by 
the Speaker (Mr Bernard 
Weatherill). 

Mr Neale drew attention to a 
case in Bodmin where a violent 
criminal, some four years and. 
two months after he had been' 
convicted, was to return to the 
very locality of his crime and of 
the family affected by iL 


The Minister for the Arts. Mr 
Richard Luce, had full con- 
1 fidence in the boards of the 
National Theatre and the Royal 
Shakespeare Company and in 
their ability to maintain value 
I for money. Lord Belstead. Dep- 
uty Leader of the House, said at 
question time in the House of 
Lords. 


Lord Nugent of Gufldford (Q 
referred to recent press allega- 
tions that the artistic directors of 
the two theatres. Sir Peter Hall 
and Mr Trevor Nunn, had made 
greater profits out of recent 
successes in their respective 
theatres when the successes had 
gone on to Broadway and other 


commercial theatres than the 
two theatres themselves had 
made. 

He said that when such very 
large sums of taxpayers’ money 
— nearly £ 1 3 million — had been 
granted to the two theatres 
something more was needed to 
ensure there was a fair share 
when greater profits were made. 

He added: Will the Govern- 
ment ensure that measures are 
taken to give the Arts Council 
greater control of the manage- 
ment so that the taxpayer, who 
has to finance the losses of these 
two theatres, gets a fair crack of 
the whip when they make these 
successes? 

Lord Belstead: It is within the 
directors* conditions of service 
(hat they should be able to be 
properly rewarded for their 


expertise. This is a question of 
balance between what is due to 
the companies and what is due 
to the directors. 

Sir Kenneth Cork is chairing 
an Arts Council inquiry into the 
funding of the live theatre and 
the Minister for the Arts has 
asked him specifically to look at 
this issue and to produce guide- 
lines for the future. 

Lord Harmar-Nicholis (C): ft is 
wrong that the directors should 
be blackguarded because they 
have produced a success. 

Lord Belstead: The enormous 
popular success of the National 
Theatre and the Royal Shake- 
speare Company are eloquent of 
the ability of the directors as 
well as of the staff and 
performers. 

Lord Misbcon (Lab), who said 


he had been a director of the 
National Theatre for many 
years, added: There is great 
financial control. The nation 
has been privileged to have two 
directors of two great compa- 
nies. Sir Peter Hall and Mr 
Trevor Nunn, as directors of the 
subsidised theatre when the 
commercial world wanted them 
very badly and would have paid 
very much more. 

Lord Belstead repeated that the 
Government had confidence in 
the ability of the boards to 
maintain value for money. 

Lord Birkett llnd) said: The 
suggestion put about recently 
that Sir Peter Hall and Mr 
Trevor Nunn have somehow 
pursued their own distinguished 
careers at the expense of the 
theatres they direct is absurd. 


TOMORROW 
COULD CHANGE 
YOUR LIFE. 


PAGES AND PAGES OF JOBS FOR: 


Financial and Accounting, 

Chief Executives, 

Managing Directors, 

Directors, 

Sales and Marketing Executives, 
Public, Finance and 
Overseas Appointments. 


Immigration figures 


More accepted to 
settle in the UK 


SEE GENERAL APPOINTMENTS 
m UffiiSS^TIMES TOMORROW! 



By Peter Evans, Home 
The number of people ac- 
cepted for settlement in the 
United Kingdom has risen 

r 'n. At 55,400. the total was 
ut 4.400 more than in 1984 
and 1 .900 more than in 1 983. 

But a Home Office report 
said yesterday that the figure 
was well below the 59,000 
accepted in 1981 and the total 
in the previous four years, 
which varied between 69,000 
and 72.000. 

About one-third of the 
grants of settlement were to 
Indian sub-continent citizens, 
and their numbers increased 
by 2.700 ( 1 8 per cent) between 
1984 and 1985. from 14,800 to 
17,500. 

The report giving annual 
immigration statistics, says: 
“This increase was out of line 
with the trend of falling num- 
berssince 1978." 

The number of waves ac- 
cepted increased by 8 per cent 
in 1985. when they accounted 
for 32 per cent of all accep- 
tances. T wenty-one per cent of 
the total grants of settlement 
were to children. 

The number of grants to 
husbands increased by 1.130 
(20 per cent) from 5,550 in 
1984 to 6,680 in 1985. when 
they made up 12 per cent of 


Affairs Correspondent 
the total settlement, lhe num- 
ber of grants of settlement to 
New Commonwealth and Pa- 
kistani husbands rose by 33 
per cent, from 2.360 in 1 984 to 
3. 150 in 1985. 

The number of acceptances 
of Old Commonwealth citi- 
zens. with a grandparent bom 
in the United Kingdom, con- 
tinued to rise, from 5.000 in 
1984 to 5.800 in 1985. 

There was a large increase in 
the number of grants of settle- 
ment to refugees after four 
years. They rose by 156 per 
cent from 450 in 1984 to 
U50 in 1985. Most of ihem 
are Iranians granted asylum 
between 1979 and 1982. 

Action was begun against 
1,100 persons as illegal en- 
trants in 1985, compared with 
960 in 1984 and 830 in 1983. 
The number of persons re- 
moved as illegal entrants rose 
from 550 in 1983 and 630 in 
1984 to 820 in 1985. 

There were also increases in 
the number of acceptances of 
citizens from the Old Com- 
monwealth. by 700 to 8.200, 
and from foreign countries bv 
1. 400 to 20.000. ’ 

Control of Immigration; Statis- 
tics I'nitcd Kingdom 1985 
(Cmnd 9863. Siationery Office: 
£8.15). 


Rates bill hopes 


Minister sees no 
need for rates 


will she take this opportunity to 
clarify her position? Is she m 

favourof early majority rule for 
South Africa or noi?This House 
demands an answer. 

Mre Thatcher I am in favourof 
the process decided and dis- 
cussed, and described in the 
Nassau accord, about apartheid, 
which sent the Eminent Persons 
Group to South Africa, when it 
said: “We agree on the compel- 
ling urgency of dismantling 
apartheid and erecting the struc- 
tures of democracy in South 
Africa. The latter, in particular, 
demands a process of dialogue 
involving the true repre- 
sentatives of the majority black 
population of South Africa." 

We went on: “We believe that 
we must do all we can to assist 
(he process while recognizing ; 
that the forms of political 


bill increases 


RSG SETTLEMENT 


Proposals to pul pressure on 
local authorities which over- 
spend their budgets — and to 
achieve stability in their spend- 
ing and rates demands — were 
announced by Mr Nicholas 
Ridley, Secretary of State for the 
Environment, in a Commons 
statement. 

He said he would: 

' •introduce legislation to end the 
paradox of some erring councils 
getting pan of their withheld 
grant money returned to them 
under the Government's re- 
cycling procedures: 

•publish a report detailing how 
local authorities would be cho- 
sen for ratccapping in the next 
financial year — a formula 
linked to spending patterns 
going back as far as five years; 
•end abuses of borrowing 
schemes that were passed dffas 
though they were expenditure. 
Mr Ridley said the Rate Support 
Gram Settlement ‘for 1 987-88 
should allow either no increases, 
or only very low ones, in rate 
bills, if local authorities 
budgett ed responsibly. • 

Dr John Coanii^aiii, chief 
Opposition spokesman bn the 
environment, condemned the 
statement as cleverly worded 
and presented, but grotesquely 
.misleading. He accused Mr 
Ridley of reducing spending and 
increasing penalties on all local 
authorities. 

Mr Ridley contended that the 
settlement meant that high rate 
bills, or poor standards of 
service, or both, would be 
entirely the fault of the authori- 
ties concerned. 

For local authority current 
expenditure, be was proposing 
provision of £25-2 billion- That 
was a cash increase of £2.9 
billion — or 3% per cent — over 
the sum given in the 1987-88 
Public Expenditure White 
Paper. 

This r epresen ts a reasonable 
assessment of what local 


right statement. (Laughter). 

. He had never heard a poorer 
response to a statement that was 
generally welcomed by MPs, nor 
a more incompetent analysis.' 
Mr John Hetkfle (Mid-Stafford- 
shire. O said that it was no 
coincidence that of the 20 rate- 
capped authorities, 19 were 
Labour controlled and one. 
Tower Hamlets, was liberal 
controlled. 

Industry and commerce in 
other cities would be grateful for 
this protection so that they can 
go about creating jobs arid work. 
Mr Simon Hughes (Southwark 
and Bermondsey. L) welcomed 
the increase of nearly £3 million. 
The view of the local authorities 
was that the increase only took, 
into account inflation over the 
past few years and probably 
would not even compensate for 
increases in wages they would 
have to pay for police, teachers 
and other public officers. 

The capital controls were the 
one thing that local authorities 
most resented. They wanted to 
spend their capital as they chose 
and not have a Secretary ofSlate 
dictate to them that they could 
spend less and less of it every 
year that went by.- 
Mr Ridley said local authorities 
must be responsible for the 
wages they negotiated with their 

employees. 

_ Authorities would get more - 
grant provided 'they did". nor 
forfeit., it by engaging ' in 

overspending. 

Sir Ian Gtknoter (Cheshanf arid 
Amersbarh, C).said much of-the 
trouble this year wasxaused noi 
by the local authority but by the 
Government setting a taper 
point for the reduction of grant 
in totally the wrong place. 

Would he assure them that 
nothing so unjust and ridiculous 
could happen under the state- 
ment just announced?. 

Mr Ridley said mudi of what Sir 
Ian had said had been incor- 
porated into the statement 
Mr Allan Roberts (Bootle, Lab) 
said this was a vicious attack on 
local goverment Mr Ridley 
would daw back and keep most 
of the so-called extra £1 billion. 
Mr Ridley: With so many local 
authorites in the hands of 
Labour or bung it is right that 
the Government should do 
something to protect their un- 
fortunate ratepayers and vic- 
tims. There is no excuse after 
this rate support grant settle- 


authorities win spend (he said) 
given the levd of inflation and 


given the levd of inflation and 
their past pattern of spending. 

But it does not follow that I 
believe local authorities need to 
spend at this level. There is 
widespread scope for carrying 
out sen-ices more efficiently and 
for cutting out extra vagent 
provision. 

For that reason, he was 
reviewing, and would consult 
local authorities about, the ag- 
gregate of Grant Related Expen- 
ditures (GREs). The aim was to 
keep these broadly steady in real 
terms. 

■ He was proposing about 
£12. 85 -billion tn Aggregate Ex- .. 
chequer Gram. (AEGL 

This would- maintain the 
grant percentage at 46.4 per cent 
of relevant expenditure — the 
same as in the current financial- 
year. But it amounted to a cash . 
increase of more than £1 billion. 

If local authorities spend in 
line with the generous provision 
we have made (he said) there 
should on average be no need 
for rates bills to increase at all. ' 

able to plan their budgets and 
rates with much greater 
assurance. 

For councils that the Govern- 
ment would be ra recapping for a 
second consecutive financial 
year, there would be the added 
provision that, even if their 
spending plans were not 1 2Vs per ' 
cent above GRE, they could still 
be limited if they were more 
than 20 per cent up on their 
1982-83 leveis. 

The newcomers to 

ratecapping were: Brent, Brigh- 
ton. Gateshead, Hounslow, 

M iddlesbrough, Newham, 
North Tyneside, Sheffield and 
Tower Hamlets. 

The other incorrigi tries, who 
were being re-elected, were 
Basildon. Camden. Greenwich. 
Hackney, Haringey, Islington. 
Lambeth, Lewisham. New- 
castle. Southwark and 

Thamesdown. 

I 3 m (he said) open to 
representations for redeiermina- 
tion of expenditure levels. 

He would be introducing 
legislation to ensure that such 
expenditure was incurred in the 
proper year— regardless of when 
the authority paid. 

This would apply to alt such 
advance and deferred purchase 
arrangements — and other 
arrangements with similar effect 


ment for any authority raising 
its rates by more, than a small 
amount or zero. If they do, that 
will be the fault of the authority. 
Mr Anthony Beaumont-Dark 
(Birmingham. Selly Oak. C y. 
Cities like Birmingham have 
very special problems. What 
hopes are there for Birmingham 
in this settlement? Will we get 
more money or will we not, or 
are the slums to continue? 
Which is it? 

Mr Ridley: It entirely depends 
on how much money Bir- 
mingham budgets to spend, if it 
budgets to. spend in accordance 
with this year’s spending plus 
3% per cent it will maximize its 
grant take. 


Sick man 
left hours 
in corridor 


Three lose 


Flockton 


A man aged 83 with severe 
head pains was kept waiting in 
a hospital corridor for more 
than four hours before he was 
seen by a doctor, an inquest 
heard yesterday. 

When Mr Wilfred Robin- 
son was eventually examined: 
doctors found a blood dot on 
his brain and in spite of two 
emergency operations he died. 

The inquest at Newcastle 
upon Tyne was told that Mr 
Robinson, of Greenwell Ter-' 
race, Fosteriey. Co Durham, 
had been examined twice by 
staff at Bishop Auckland gen- 
eral hospital after a fall. 

Bui he was sent home oh 
boih occasions when X-rays 
showed no serious injuries, 
Mr Patrick Cuff, the coroner, 
was told. 

A few days later the pains 
became worse and his own 
doctor arranged for him to- be 
admitted to the same hospital. 

He was put in a wheelchair 
and left outside a room from 
145pm until 7pm. when the 
doctor turned up to treat him. 

After tests Mr RobinsoH 
was transferred to Newcastle 
general hospital. One delicate 
operation failed to remove the 
clot and he never recovered 
from a second. 

Mr Cuff adjourned the in- 
quest until September. 


Grey plea 


Three North Humberside 
men. involved in the 1982 
"Flockton Grey” racing scan- 
dal. yesterday lost appeals 
against their fraud, 
convictions. 

The three, including 
Kenneth John Richardson, 
aged 48. a gambler and busi- 
nessman. had criticized the 
handling of the case at York. 
Crown Court by the judge. 
They also called fresh evi- 
dence in the Court of Appeal. 

But the criticisms of Judge 
Bennett were rejected, and the 
Lord Chief Justice. Lord Lane, 
said their new witness was 
simply not credible. 

Richardson, who had been 
fined £20,000 by the judge, 
was yesterday ordered to pay 
the prosecution’s costs of the 
two-day appeal hearing, not to i 
exceed £25,000. 

Richardson, of Jubilee 1 
House, Jubilee Farm, Hutton, 
had also been .given a nine- 
month suspended sentence 
after his conviction on June I, 

.1 984. of conspiring to defraud 
bookmakers and' the betting 
public' 

Colin Scott Mathison, aged- 
48. of Wold View Road North,. 
DriffieltL was fined £3.000,- 
and. Peter Boddy. aged 40. of. 
Hazel Close, Driffield, was 
conditionally discharged fora' 
year • ; • • 


COMMENTARY 


- entered into in England and 
Wales after midnight (Tuesday). 

I am considering exemption 
(he said) so that authorities 
which genuinely need to use me 
device for its proper purpose tor 
an occasional project are not 



Any such exemption would 
take effect , from a date to be 
announced: . 

Dr Cmuringtanft said the Gov- 
ernment wanted to reduce 
grant-related aggregates and in- 
- crease penalties on all local 
authorities by making the slope 
for spending over GRE sleeper 
and more punitive than ever 
before. ' 

The Government was effec- 
tively saying: Here is additional 
money in the settlement. Which 
will be taken away later, almost 
certainly in at least equal 
amount. 

Did not that mean a massive 
windfall for the Treasury — up 
to. and perhaps beyond.. ..£1 
billion —to be used for purposes 
other - than local authority 
spending? 

Any . improvement • in. ef- 
ficiency which local authorities 
might be able to achieve would I 
■ amount to. less than 1 per cent of 1 
total planned expenditure. 1 
Mr Ridley, replied -that, he 
wondered whether Dr Cunning - 1 
ham had been sent a copy, of the 


Thatcher ’no right 
to answer back’ 


An Alliance state, 
in impartiality 


In the long nm they must 
know that parties of the Left 
would probably be even more 
likely to suffer from specula- 
tion that the Sovereign disap- 
proved of them and- their 
policies. 

Labour's leadership may 
well have recognized this. It' 
was notable that Neil Kinnock 
made no attempt yesterday to 
make political capital out of 
the incident . 

The Alliance would, if any- 
thing, have an even stronger 
interest in preserving public 
confidence in the Queen's 
political impartiality. As both 
David Steel and David Owen 
made dear at last year's party 
conferences, ■ their hopes are 

focussed -OH nego tiating w iffi 
one qr_ other of the larger 
parties in a bong parliament. ; 

The prospects for such ne- 
gotiations would be better if 
the Queen were not prepared 
to grant a second dissolution 
automatically to a government 
that was voted, down m the 
Commons,- if it seemed that 
another administration might 
be formed that could comman d 
a majority in the House. - 


Air i 

may 

sino 


The Prime Minister refused 
to be drawn into any comment 

on the rift with the Palace 
-when . she answered questions 
in the House of Commons 
yesterday. She was wise on 
both political and constitution- 
al p-oands. • 

Mis Thatcher personally, 
and the Government collec- 
tively have almost certainly 
been damaged politically by 
the episode. One of its most 
disturbing consequences is the 
probability that some of the 
mud will stick, even though 
there is. no evidence that the 
Queen personally authorized 
any leak of her opinions..* 
Abready, authorization or no 
authorization, one encounters 
a widespread-assumption that 
the report dkl indeed; reflect 
Hit Majesty;* judgement of 
Mrs Thaicber.'IVhen an ex- 
tremely popular queen is be- 
lieved to think poorly- pf .her 
prime minister that is bound, to 
be embarrassing to the prime 
minister. .•• = •' 

All the more so when the 
specific criticisms appear to 
reinforce the doubts that many 
people have about Mrs 
Thatcher. “If she canriOt get 
on with the Queen ", tbeywiB 
tend to say, “then she really 
most be impossible." " . 




pensionei 
loses figfr 
to w ork oi 


This is extremely unfair, on 
Mrs Thatcher. She has now 
.bebn placed m deposition so 
often occupied by tile Palace. 
She has beeuattacked without 
haring the right . to answer 
back. 

. Ifshe was tempted to do so, 
she was sensible not to suc- 
cumb. The more (hal ts made 
of the episode, the more Mrs 
Thatcher is likely to suffer. It 
! was, therefore, shrewd politics . 
not to fan the flames. . 

But there was another more 
im portent reason why the 
Prime .Minster was right to 
behave yesterday with impec- 
cable constitutional propriety. 

. The he&f thaLthe Sovereign 
is above party politics, and 
therefore takes no position m 
puhtic for oi*' against the 
controversial policies of any 
government is essential to the 
role, of constitutional monar- 
chy as it has evolved in this 
country. To undermine that 
belief wonld be to diminish In 
the long ran the value of tiie 
monarchy itself. 

It is tragic for British public 
life that this episode will now 
have placed a question mark in . 
many .people's minds where . 
there ought to be unquestion- 
ing confidence. No matter how 
unfairly, the Queen will; be 
thought to have taken a posi- 
tion on a range of contentious 
policies and to be less than 
enthusiastic about her 
Ministers. 

This is an impression that 
onght to be just as distm&ing 
to the Opposition parties as to 
the Government In the short, 
ran they might hope, to gain 
from Mrs Thatcher's discom- 
fiture. But that wodld be a 
short-sighted attitude. 


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of the royal prerogative would, 
to my mind, be entirely justi- 
fied. That is the. field ut which 
the Queen .would serye. tiie 
national interest by asserting 
her political responsibilities. 
But it could be done without 
too much contention only, if 
there was general con fidence 
in the political impartiality of 
the Palace. 

There is a general interest 
among all parties Ju vreserr- 
mg the traditional beDeC that 
the Crown is above, partisan 
politics. Mrs Thatcher did her 
best to .reassert that tradition 
yesterday. -It- is a: canse that 
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THE TIMES WEDNESDAY JULY 23 1986 


HOME NEWS 


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passengers 
may be made to wear 
Smoke hoods in fires 


on 


By Michael Bafly, Transport Editor 

British air- union may follow next year if flight staff of various British 

the authority decides to go " ' 

ahead. 

If it does so decide all 
airliners registered in Britain 
would be- fitted with smoke 
hoods that would almost cer- 


• s Passengers 

..-‘Ijoes may be required to. wear 

* ; smoke hoods of the gas mask 
;^Wpe- ,n . case of aircraft fire 
-.fromnext year. 

. The Civfl Aviation Author- 

; !«y (CAA), which said yester- .... 

*' ^*8 international tainiy drop down automatical- 

ly anve was needed to ly to the passenger's face as 


saf 


restore public confidence in 

• • air travel, has launched an 
uwuiry- into smoke hoods 

. ‘after last year's accident at 
-Manchester airport where 55 
-"people died in a fire after a 
•. .-British Airtours flight jailed to 
take off. 

Of those, nearly 50 are 
■thought to have been killed by 
■ smoke or fumes rather than 
from flames, and smoke 
hopds have long been advo- 
’■ rated as a means of saving life 
‘-in such circumstances. 

• Other accidents last year — 
; - the worst for air deaths for 20 

• years - included the Air India 
and Japan Airlines 747 disas- 

-ters in which- a total of 849 
people died. 

- Mr Christopher T ugendhat, 

; Authority chairman, introduc- 
ing its annual report, pronv 

- ised yesterday that the smoke 
hoods' study, involving con- 

• ■sultaiion with, among others, 

• airlines and user - bodies, 

- would be carried out with 
great urgency. 

- Results should be available 
in the autumn and implemai- 


oxygen masks do now. The 
two types of mask may be 
combined. 

Sealing off the atmosphere 
except through a filter, the 
simpler hoods would protect 
against fumes for up to five 
minutes in fires on the ground. 
Dearer versions suitable for 
fires in the air would protect 
wearers for about twenty min- 
utes. 

But Mr T ugendhat said that 
hoods had disadvantages. The 
most important guarantee of 
safety in case of fire is to get 
out of the aircraft as quickly as 
possible, he said and hoods 
could cause delay. 

They could mist up through 
condensation, make it more 
difficult to hear cabin staff 
instructions, and — though be 
did not say this — could cause 
suffocation through lack of 
oxygen if not properly de- 
signed 

Several smoke hoods are on 
the market at prices between 
£20 and £100. 

They are fitted to all naval 
vessels and are supplied to 


and other airlines. Mr Tug- 
endhat said that there was a 
big difference between the use 
of hoods by highly trained 
crews and by holidaymakers. 

The only previous move in 
this direction was in the 1 960s 
when the US Federal Aviation 
Administration made a study 
of the hoods, but H decided 
against rite idea. 

On air safety generally, Mr 
Chistopher Tugendhat said: 
“The tragic accidents last year 
in different parts of the world, 
and especially the Manchester 
accident last August, have 
engaged the most serious and 
continuing attention of the 
authority's safety services. 

“The circumstances sur- 
rounding these accidents were 
different in every case, but the 
fact that they took place in 
such a short period of time 
and led to such a large loss of 
life has undoubtedly shaken 
public confidence. 

This year, Mr Tugendhat 
said, had turned out so far to 
have an - excellent safety 
record. But constant vigilance 
was necessaiy and, in addition 
to smoke hoods, the authority 
was acquiring or investigating 
fire resistant seats, cabin walls 
and ceilings, easier access to 
emergency exits, more fire 
extinguishers, and smoke de- 
tectors in lavatories. 


Tourism 
boost for 
Falkland 
Islands 

By Rodney Cowton 
Defence Correspondent 

Up to 200 tourists are 
expected to be flown by the 
Royal Air Force to the Falk- 
land Islands this winter in the 
first big effort to build up 
tourism since the conflict of 
1982. 

The RAF operates the only 
air service into the islands, 
making up to three flights a 
week. Those are primarily 
used for carrying troops and 
supplies to and from the 
garrison, but the Ministry of 
Defence said spare seats could 
be made available to the 
Falkland Islands government 
Mr Stephen Green. British 
representative for Falkland 
Islands Tourism, said that five 
British tour operators and one 
in the United States, were 
offering bookings for 20 par- 
ties between November and 
next March, which is the 
Falklands* summer. 

Most of the parties are being 
limited to eight people, though 
two, which will be accommo- 
dated solely in Port Stanley, 
will have up to 16 members 
each. The cost of the trips, 
including the flight and ac- 
commodation, will be about 
£2,500 a person. 

Most interest was being 
shown in the islands’ wildlife, 
but diving holidays, tours of 
the battlefields, and other 
activities were being catered 
for. Mr Green said. 



Mr .Harold “Dickie” Bird, 
the cricket umpire, displaying 
the insignia of the MBE, with 
which he was invested by the 
Queen at Buckingham Palace 
yesterday. 

Mr Bird, aged 53, a 
Yorkshiremau, regarded by 
many as the world's best 


umpire, told the Queen it was 
the happiest day of his life. 

It was cricket's morning. Mr 
George “Cubby" Allen, aged 
84, a former Englat S captain 
who was capped 25 times and 
has been a powerful figure at 
Lord's for 65 years, 
knighted. 


Tories to penalize 
councils lacking 
civil defence plans 

By Peter Evans, Home Affairs Correspondent 


The Government is to act 
against local authorities which 
do not produce proper civil 
defence plans. Already minis- 
ters are considering withhold- 
ing grants from Avon, Mid 
Glamorgan and South Gla- 
morgan county councils. 


any of the plans received 
from SO other county authori- 
ties are incomplete. With few 
exceptions, there is little or no 
operational detail and in a 
number little more than a 
statement of intent, the Home 
Office said yesterday. 

Mr Giles Shaw, Minister of 
State, said the Government 
proposed to require authori- 
ties to pursue a rolling three- 
year programme, setting six 
monthly targets for the staged 
completion of detailed opera- 
tional civil defence plans in all 
counties within two to three 
years. 

Mr Douglas Hurd, Home 
Secretary, has reserve powers 
to give directions to local 


authorities on the exercise of 
their functions or, ultimately, 
to exercise them himself. 

The sanction so far threat- 
ened is withholding civil de- 
fence grants, which have risen 
from £3.4 million in 1979-80 
to an expected £13.7 million 
in 1986-87. 

Behind the Government's 
action are the results of a 
questionnaire in 1984, which 
disclosed that, although most 
authorities in England and 
Wales had plans against hos- 
tile attack, the majority need- 
ed further work 

Almost all authorities had 
made some provision for 
emergency centres, but just 
over half needed to bring them 
up to the required level. 
Training took place almost 
everywhere, but more was 
needed. One or more volun- 
teer groups existed in about 
two thirds of the authorities 
responding. More needed to 

be established- 


Sleep walker’s death 


Mr Robert Baker, aged 76, a 
retired executive, died when 
he fell from a second floor 
window when sleep walking, 
an inquest in Bristol was told 
yesterday. 

Mr Baker bad a long history 
of sleep walking and was 
found dead at 6.30am, still in 
his pyjamas, by a paper boy 


Dominic Prom, aged 14, 
told the inquest in written 
evidence that when he looked 
up he could see a second floor 
window wide open and that 
the front door to the same flat 
had also been wide open. 

A verdict of accidental 
death was returned. 


S 


Pensioner 
loses fight 
to work on 

A woman who claimed her 
Hampshire employers were 
guilty of sex discrimination 
because they made her retire 
at-tbe age of 60 has lost her 
case. 

Audrey Frew, a lettering 
designer of Chineham, 
Basingstoke, was forced to 
retire last mouth by a private 

■ Basingstoke prints^ firm, so 
she took them to a Southamp- 
ton industrial tribunal, at 
which Miss Helen Marshall, a 
senior dietician, had begun her 
long fight to win the right for 
women in tin public sector In 
work until they are 65. 

. The tribunal had rejected 
the claim of Miss Marshall,: 
aged 62, of Bass&t, South- 
ampton,; thaf the todd health 
authority's decision” that she 
had jo retire at 60 wxs ^sexual 
discrimination. 

She appealed to the Emope- 
• an Court of Justice, which 
decided that under EEC law it 

■ was discrimination, and the 
Government is considering the 
legal implications. ■ • 

But the tribunal has decided 
unanimously that Miss Frew's 

- claim is not wdi founded. 

She told the hearing that 
she knew she could not rely 
directly on Miss Marshall's 

- case, but said it should “have 
regard” in the European court 
ruling. 

She claimed it was unfair 
that she was forced to retire 
because she wanted to carry on 

- working as men did, which 
allowed them to build up their 
'pensions. 

She also argued that she 
had the same bills to pay. 

The company, Thomas de la 
Rue, said she could not refy on 
the ruling because it applied 
' only to member nations acting 
as employers. 


Woollen 
labelling 
‘abused’ 

By Robin Young 

Almost half the textile prod- 
uct samples taken by West 
Yorkshire trading standards 
department over the past two 
years have been deficient of 
their stated wool content by 
more than 10 per cent 

lu an article in The Monthly 
Review, the journal of the 
Institute of Trading Standards 
Administration, Mr Keith 
Hurley, director of the West 
Yorkshire service, says that of j 
452 samples, 208 were found 
to have labels overstating the 
wool content by more than 10 
per cent In two thirds of the 
cases, the doth was found to 
have been - imported from 
Italy. 

Mr Hurley suggests that 
unfair -competition in fextilej 
labelling has contributed to 
the rapid loss* of jobs in 
Britain's textiles and dothing 
industry since 1978. 

• In some cases, he cites 
garments were marked “Pure 
New Wool” and carried the 
Wool mark symbol, yet proved 
to be one fifth polyester. One 
Mouse claiming a 30 per cent 
wool content contained no 
wool at all, and a dress which 
was supposed to be half wool 
had only 4 per cent. 

Mr Hurley says British 
manufacturers insisted on 
malting claims that could not 
be substantiated, though they 
had made no checks, and 
knew that increasing amounts 
of cloth came from Italian 
mills specializing in produdng 
mixed fibre yam from re- 
cycled materials. 

The Department of Trade’s 
draft guidelines to new fibre 
content labelling regulations 
would further encourage wide- 
spread misstatements about 
the wool content of articles 
made with recycled yarn, he 
said. 


‘Hated village squire’ 
complaint rejected 


The Press Council has re- 
jected a complaint about a 
Daily Express report of a 
. village dispute which included 
hostile remarks about the 
squire. 

The report said the village 
of Matfield. Kent, was angry 
at moves by the squire to 
. throw Mr Jack Luery, aged 81, 
ins gardener who was sick, out 
;ofa tied cottage. 

Mrs Mary Jenner. of 
Matfield, was quoted saying 
-Sir William Garthwaite, the 
squire, was hated by virtually 
everyone in Matfield for his 
actions. . 

Mrs Jenner complained to 

the editor about that and other 

quotes, and later to the Press 
Council that the article attrib- 
uted to her comments she did 
not make. 

She had made no personal 
comment about Sir William; 
the ward “hate" was noun her 
vocabulary. 

Mr Stnian Cooper, manag- 
ing editor, said both reporters 
involved insisted their ac- 
counts were true but Mrs 


Jenner maintained that Mr 
Christopher Murphy, a free- 
lance. misquoted hen and Mr 
Robert McGowan, a staff 
reporter, did not speak to her. 

A transcript of Mr 
McGowan’s notes recorded 
that he read to Mrs Jenner 
notes given to him by Mr 
Murphy, and that Mrs Jenner 
said that sounded about right. 

Mrs Jenner told the council 
she did not make the alleged 
remarks to Mr Murphy; he 
asked her various questions 
and she agreed with him. He 
did not write anything down 
in her presence, she said, and 
there had been no follow-up 
call from the newspaper. 

The Press Council conclud- 
ed the complainant had failed 
to satisfy it that she did not 
generally express the senti- 
ments ascribed to her in the 
report. 

The quotation attributed to 
her may well not have been a 
direct statement, but assent to 
comments put to her. The 
Press Council was not satis- 
fied that it was misleading 


King David’s poppies 




A small group of former 
servicemen and women 
placed a wreath of poppies at 
, The Cenotaph in Whitehall, 
London, yesterday to com- 
memorate the fortieth anni- 

• versary of the bombing- of the 
- King David Hotel in Jeru- 

• salem. 

Mr Peter Williams, a war 
1 veteran and spokesman for 
-the group Campaign. Against 
•Terrorism', said the attack on 

• the British headquarters at the 
King David Hotel on July 22. 


J 946, which killed 1 23 people, 
marked the start of interna- 
tional terrorism. 

He said the British Govern- 
ment - had ignored the "terrible 
significance” of the terrorist 
attack during the past 40 
years. • • 

Mr Williams, from Nor- 
wich. said that the Campaign 
Against Terrorism was fomted 
recently as a non-political 
group io campaign against all 
forms of terrorism- 










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IS OUR BUSINESS 




1985/86 was another wonderfuel year for British Gas. Highlights 
included:— 

An increase in current cost operating profit— to 
£688 million 

Record turnover- up £774 million to £7687 million 

Record gas sales— up 957 million million 

therms 

Record number of gas customers - up by 270,000 to 
over 16% million 

£571 million capital investment 

Appliance sales up by 10% 

What does it take to build the biggest fully integrated gas business 
in the western world? 

A business which manages everything from exploration, 
production, distribution, appliance sales and service to a research 
and development programme designed to grow a bigger more 
efficient and more profitable business for the future . 

A business that meets its profit, cash and performance targets . 
Ittakes skilled management-and it takes energy! 

, ' British Gas 

Copiss of tliB British Gas n sport sn.u Accounts are « irn /M/ #o in n/ /cM/rop 

available* price £2.00 from HMS0 book shops . CfVCnuf /w UUn 






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50 years on,we still take 
pride in our appearance. 







People have fond memories of the 
smardy-dressed ‘Nippy 5 of pre-war Britain. 

She and the food she served were a 
huge success. 

During the thirties Lyons Teashops 
and Comer Houses were so popular Lyons 
grew to be Britain’s biggest caterer. 

Today J. Lyons continues to prosper 
serving tea and coffee to the nation. 

We now run a vast range of restaurants. 
As well as catering at leisure, sporting and 
other events throughout the country. 

But times and tastes change. 

Some people now prefer a milkshake 
to the traditional cuppa. 

A fancy cocktail to a pint of Best. 

Enchiladas to egg and chips. 

Or spare-ribs to bangers and mash. 

Which is why, in 1984, we opened 
Calendars, the first cafe 7 bar-restaurant of 
its type in Western Europe. 


Wmt 

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It’s been such a big hit it’s broken all 
turnover and profit targets. 

And how are we celebrating? 

By investing a further £45 million 
building at least 24 new Calendars around 
the country. 

We can afford it Our pre-tax profits 
rose by 23% last year to £269.5 million. 

With our catering experience, if s no 
wonder that we have .1 # 1 I 

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THE TIMES WEDNESDAY JULY 23 1986 


OVERSEAS NEWS 


Israeli premier se eks negotations before Sh amir ta kes over 

Peres tries to 
commit rival 
on peace talks 

From lan Murray, Jerusalem 


Man in the news 


With less than three months 
of his allotted term as Prime 
Minister left to serve. Mr 
Shimon Peres has joined a 
new Middle East peace initia- 
tive, which he cannot hope will 
succeed before he has to band 
over to his arch-rival. Mr 
Yitzhak Shamir, the Likud 
leader.. 

_ Mr Peres, who has always 
said he is prepared to negoti- 
ate Israeli-occupied land for 
peace, has gone to Morocco to 
try to persuade King Hassan 
that meaningful negotiations 
to. solve the Palestinian prob- 
lem must start very quickly or 
risktieing delayed for years. 

. , The new initiative, appar- 
ently taken with American 
advice, has been to by to use 
King Hassan. the Chairman of 
the Arab League, as a broker 
to open 1 direct negotiations 
between Israel. King Husain 
of Jordan and acceptable Pal- 
estinians. The timetable is 
short because the idea of “land 
for. peace” is rejected outright 
by Mr Shamir, who, under the 
terms of the Israeli coalition 
government agreement; takes 
oyer on 'October 1 1. 

. -The Moroccan King is 
known to have been in regular 
contact with senior Israeli 
officials and politicians, in- 
cluding Mr Peres, and he is 
always regarded here as being 
well disposed towards Israel, 
although prevented by Arab 
solidarity from showing any 
public signs of friendship. 

This has meant that even 
the present visit has been kept 
a closely-guarded seem. Yes- 
terday both the Prime Min- 
ister's office and the Foreign 
Ministry here refused to con- 
firm formally that it was 
taking place. “There is no way 
I can confirm this visit at this 
time." a Foreign Ministry 
spokesman said. 

It is understood that Mr 
Peres and the King agreed that 
.no confirmation of the trip 
would be given until then* 
meeting had taken place. The 
feet that it was widely leaked is 
seen as a likely sign that Mr 
Shamir, who as Foreign Min- 
ister was not even involved in 
the planning, wanted the news 
released. 

King Hassan cancelled a 
planned visit to the United 
States in order to see Mr Peres 
and it is likely that he hopes 
any help he gives Israel wfil In 
turn to improve his strained 
relations with Washington. 

- During the visit King 
Hassan is expected to sound 
out Mr Peres on how far the 
Israeli leader is prepared to go 
to achieve peace. This is 


something the King has rec- 
ommended to Arab leaders, to 
whom be suggested some time 
ago inviting a senior Israeli 
politician for talks. 

For Mr Peres a successful 
visit is essential to improve 
his public standing following a 
loss of personal popularity 
after his uncertain handling of 
the “Shin Bet affair", concern- 
ing irregularities in the 
counter-intelligence agency. 

He is known to have be- 
come increasingly frustrated 
with the lack of progress in the 
peace process, which he had 
made one of his priorities on 
coming to office in October, 
1984. 

He is also known to be 
worried that Mr Shamir sees 
little or no need to pursue the 
peace process. He believes 
that only by starting some- 
thing which his successor 
cannot stop can he be sure of 
any negotiations having a 
chance after he hands over 
control of the govemmenL 

It was not clear here yester- 
day whether Mr Peres decided 
to travel to Morocco after 
some kind of exchange with 
King Husain of Jordan. One 
of the Moroccan King's advis- 
ers, Mr Mohammed A wad, 
travelled to Amman on Mon- 
day to see King Husain. 

King Hassan is reported to 
have telephoned Amman at 
the weekend to learn at first 
hand about relations with the 
Palestine liberation Organi- 
zation following the closure of 
Fatah offices in Jordan earlier 
ibis month. 

Jordan radio so far has only 
announced that the visit is 
taking place, with no com- 
ment Mr Peres is due back in 
Israel today, when he is ex- 
pected to brief the Cabinet on 
what has been achieved. He is 
already sure of an angry 
reception from the Right 
Wing, with Mrs Guela Cohen 
of the Tehiya Party already 
accusing him of being ready to 
hand over the West Bank, just 
as the Sinai was handed over 
to Egypt. 

Moderate Palestinians in 
the occuped territories, of the 
kind who could be included in 
a peace negotiation of this 
type, have welcomed the visit- 
Mr Elias Fireij, the mayor of . 
Bethlehem, called it “a coura- 
geous and wise step”. Mr 
Hanna Sihiora, editor of the 
East Jerusalem newspaper A1 
Fajr, said that if the visit failed 
“radicalization will grow and 
we must prepare for conflict 
The chances for peace will 
recede for the next 15 or 20 
years.” 


v >* V/* - • ** 

A'* * * 

mm 




Moderate seeking 
racial harmony 


Fists raised in the Arab world as Mr George Habbash, leader of the Popular Front for the liberation of Palestine, left, de- 
clares that the visit by Mr Shimon Peres of Israel to King Hassan of Morocco, right, could only deepen Arab divisions. 


Rabat (Reuter) — King 
Hassan of Morocco, a leading 
Arab moderate, strongly advo- 
cates harmony between Mus- 
lims and Jews — communities 
that have lived side by side in 
his country for centuries. 

His frequent pleas for reli- 
gious tolerance have spilled 
into the political domain as a 
result of his contacts with 
leaders from Israel, where 
there is a large Jewish commu- 
nity of Moroccan origin. 

In 1984 and again last May. 
his Government gave warm 
official welcomes to large 
Israeli delegations composed 
of Jews who had emigrated 
from Morocco, including sev- 
eral members of the Knesset. 

The King, who in April said 
“there is no shame in discuss- 
ing things with one's enemy”, 
sponsored contacts in Moroc- 
co between Israeli and Egyp- 
tian envoys that led to the 
historic visit of President Sa- 
dat of Egypt to Jerusalem in 
1977. 

That visit brought vehe- 
ment protests from radical 
Arab states such as Syria, 
which recalled its ambassador 
in 1984 and yesterday broke 
off relations in protest at the 
visit to Morocco this week by 
Mr Peres. 

Diplomats and Moroccan 


political commentators say 
the King is taking serious risks 
over the Peres visiL consider- 
ing that he was chairman of 
the last Arab summit in Fez in 
1982 and is now the chairman 
of the Islamic Conference 
Organization — which he 
founded thus establishing 
himself as an Islamic leader. 

The King also contributed 
to the rapprochement between 
President Sadat and Israel that 
led to the Camp David ac- 
cords. but complied with an 
Arab League decision to break 
off relations with Cairo when 
Egypt made peace with Israel 
in 1979. 

In 1982 he he signed -a 
military co-operation accord 
with the US granting it transit 
facilities on Moroccan bases 
in the event of a crisis in the 
Gulf. 

In the stormy world of Arab 
and African politics. King 
Hassan - once dubbed “the. 
great survivor" - has main- 
tained his hold on power 
despite several attempts to 
assassinate or overthrow 
him.These included a miracu- 
lous escape when 1.400 rebel 
troops stormed his seaside 
palace on his 42nd birthday in 
July 1971 and killed nearly 
100 of his guests. 


Syria’s fury with King Hassan fails to arouse Arab world 


From Robert Fisk 
Beirut 

In a savage but lonely 
outburst of anger, Syria yes- 
terday denounced King 
Hassan's “black treason” and 
broke off diplomatic relations 
with Morocco in protest at the 
King's meeting with Mr 
Shimon Peres, the Israeli 
Prime Minister. Bat— save for 
some particularly vindictive 
editorials in leftist newspapers 
In Beirut — the Arab world 
responded mildly to the first 
meeting between an Arab and 
an Israeli leader since Presi- 
dent Sadat's visit to Jerusalem 
in 1977. 

An incrednloas Colonel 
Gadaffi announced in Libya 
that he could “not believe this 
visit has really taken place” 
but contented himself by say- 
ing that if the two men had 
met, then it was “a grave 
violation" of the 1984 Moluc- 
ca n-Libyan treaty which 
might now have to be reconsid- 
ered through a referendum. 
This was scarcely die reaction 
expected of an Arab leader 
who mice regarded himself as 
Nasser's spiritual heir. * 

Indeed, it was * sign of how 
vulnerable the Arabs now fed 
themselves to be — and how 
powerless amid their own dis- 
unity — that an event which 
would once have convulsed 
Arab capitals was greeted with 
little more than vague sm> 


Moscow condemns trip to Rabat 


Moscow — Tass strongly 
tracked yesterday the trip to 
La bat of Mr Shimon Peres, 
aying it was an attempt to 
evive the Camp David peace 
rocess, which had been “res- 
Jutely rejected by the Arabs" 


(Christopher Walker writes). 

The Soviet news agency 
claimed that the United Slates 
supported the Israeli initia- 
tive, and said: “These efforts 
are being made at a time when 
the Israeli aggressors, far from 


displaying preparedness to 
withdraw troops from cap- 
tured Arab lands, are clearly 
leading things to a perpetua- 
tion of the occupation regime 
and annexation of new 
territories.” 


Rocket attack 
on Spanish 
fishing vessel 

Madrid - Rocket grenades 
and automatic weapons were 
fired at a Spanish fishing 
vessel from two Zodiac 
launches off the Western Sa- 
hara, setting the boat on fire 
and killing one of its 20 crew 
members, according to radio 
reports received here yester- 
day (Harry Debelius writes). 

Polisario guerrillas, who 
have been waging a hit-and- 
run war against Morocco in 
the Western Sahara since 
1975. are suspected of carrying 
call the attack on Monday. 

Survivors of the fishing 
■vessel Andes, which was four 
miles off the coast when it 
came under fire, were picked 
up by the Spanish hospital 
ship Esperonza del Mar ana 
another fishing vessel. 

A Soviet ship was also 
reportedly fired on yesterday 
in the same area. 


Harare pulls 
out of two 
more events 

Harare — Zimbabwe is to 
boycott the Commonwealth 
Arts Festival and the World 
Disabled Games in Stoke 
Mandevflle unless the British 
Government promises sanc- 
tions against Sooth Africa. 

A troupe of 17 ostrich- 
pJnmed Ndebele war dancers 
from western Zimbabwe and 
six paraplegic athletes with 
two officials were doe to leave 
for Britain on Monday night. 

But spokesman for the Na- 
tional Arts Foundation and the 
Zimbabwe Association for the 
Disabled thateach had 
been told earlier in the day by 
the Ministry of Youth, Sport 
and Culture that their partici- 
pation was “suspended until 
farther notice.” 

Zimbab we had no entry 
planned for the Edinburgh 
Festival before the boycott 
crisis arose. 


South China 
storm leaves 
1,000 missing 

Hong Kong (Reuter) - 
More than 300 Chinese fishing 
boats and about 1,000 fisher- 
men are missing after a tropi- 
cal storm lashed south China. 

The Guangdong Depart- 
ment of Aquatic Products said 
yesterday from Canton that at 
least a dozen small vessels 
sank in Monday's storm, 
which carried winds gusli og 
up to 60 miles an hour. 

No reports of casualties had 
been received. Many boats 
might have taken shelter near 
offshore islands, but authori- 
ties feared some of the missing 
fishermen had drowned. 

Ta Kung Pao, a pro-Peking 
newspaper in Hong Kong, said 
the storm triggered mudslides 
and flooding in western 
Guangdong. Provincial offi- 
cials had said the Xijiang, a 
main tributary of the ftarl 
river, might burst its banks. 


Eta attack rocks Spain 


Gonzalez defends 


From Richard W/gg 
' Madrid 

dot Felipe Gonzalez, 
ifs Socialist leader, under 
b now because of the 

rist attack on the Defence 

stry here, put before 
ament yesterday his gov- 
ant programme for the 
foar years. 

ie vote, making him prone 
iter for the second time 
ks to his party's ateolnte 
rity, will come after a 
te tomorrow nigh*. 
eanwhOe, for the second 
in three days, the Pans 
irities have handed 1 over 

By a suspected member oi 
Joan Naferrepe, nick- 
id “Jnantxo", Uvingin 
i-west France, and who 
ticked up on Monday 
He was already in 


want, 

hope, 

never 


night to appeal to Spaniards to 

stay calm. 

On Eta, the Basque armed 
separatist organization, be 
saw: “If it is negotiations they 
they can abandon all 
the Government will 

give in to terrorist 

blackmail." 

Seflor Gonzalez defended 
the Spanish security forces' 
anti-terrorist tactics, now un- 
der renewed heavy criticism, 
as “adequate”. But he admit- 
ted the police had foiled to 
break up Eta's “Spain conn 
mando" and the ‘important 
infrastructure it now evidently 
has in Madrid. It was a failure 
shared with the Government, 
he said. 

The only encoi 


attacks on Spanish targets. 

He told viewers that he had 
written immediately to M 
Chirac to thank him. 

Only one of the eight injured 
in die grenade attack was still 
in hospital yesterday. 

The breakup of Sdtor Ma- 
nuel Fraga's opposition coali- 
tion was confirmed yesterday 
when his own party. Popular 
Alliance, indicated it vriD no 
longer observe any electoral 
pacts with its former Christian 
Democrat partners. 

• PARIS: A second presumed , 
member of Eta, Juan Naforr- ! 
ete Arreche, has been “urgent- i 
Iv” expelled from France to ! 
Spain ( Susan MacDonald 
writes). 

His expulsion was carried 
out under the same conditions 
as that of another presumed 

- ft XT 


- - nCWS 

Sedor Gonz&lez could' offer 

"hT to already In ttepromise^^ Vartma] 

;h police custody herein er m tiie day Lopez, last Friday right Both ! 

d yesterday. bow on men are Spanish nationals and 

wrth the country s mood Ministerjfejt fro« Lj» ™ do not hold political refugee ' 
ected by the Drfence FraflcejronW^ status in France, despite hav- 

ay grettfcle attack Sefior south-west corner of its tenv . BTed »n foe Freach Basqne 
h* had already decided too to sm® “ •“**2 ^Ltrv 
^S^WMonday which Eto can prepare its ap- 


prise. The Egyptians even 
went so far as to offer their 
support to the visit. 

Mr Yassir Arafat's Pales- 
tine Liberation Organization 
— which has good reason to 
suspect that the meeting will 
only serve to betray it — 
remained uncharacteristically 
silent. 

Nevertheless, King Hassan 
will have to make personal 
security one of his prime 
concerns. There was a clear 
warning in the prediction of 
the daily al-Hakika that, like 
President Sadat, he would 


ultimately be assassinated. 

In Damascus, Syrian state 
radio quoted a government 
statement which urged all 
Arab leaders to follow Presi- 
dent Assad's example of 
breaking off diplomatic rela- 
tions with Morocco, advice 
which was not followed up by 
Syria's friends elsewhere in 
the Arab world. 

Syrian citizens will hence- 
forth be forbidden to visit 
Morocco and Mr Abdul- 
Waleh ben Massond, the Mo- 
roccan Ambassador to Syria — 
who was summoned to the 


Foreign Ministry m Damascus 
yesterday to be told of Presi- 
dent Assad's displeasure - 
has been given a week to close 
down his embassy and leave 
the coon try with his four 
Moroccan diplomatic col- 
leagues. Mr Ahmed Issa, the 
Syrian Ambassador to Rabat, 
has been ordered to return 
home. 

Most Arab speculation was 
directed yesterday towards 
Amman where King Husain 
spent much of Monday in a 
series of discussions — on the 
phone and by tetter - with 


King Fahd of Saudi Arabia, 
President Assad and Presi- 
dent Mubarak after receiving 
a message from King Hassan. 

Despite assurances from the 
Jordanian Information Minis- 
ter that the King had no 
advance warning of the 
Hassan-Peres meeting - be 
claimed that the messages had 
all concerned a forthcoming 
meeting of non-aligned nations 
— the Palestinians suspect 
that the Jordanian King had a 
hand to setting np the Moroc- 
co visiL 

The scheduled visit of Mr 


George Bush, the American 
Vice-President, to Amman on 
Wednesday of next week has 
only fuelled a growing belief to 
the Arab world that foe Amer- 
icans ami Israelis are engaged 
to joint diplomacy for a new 
Middle East initiative to 
which foe kings of Jordan and 
Morocco will be used to isolate 
thePLO 

PLO officials in Beirut said 
yesterday that PLO offices 
closed down by the Jordanians 
two weeks ago would be moved 
to Baghdad 



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y jq iin 


Sterilization 
mother jailed 


More talks on 
Hong Kong 


Titanic plaque 


Chess winner 


Bus tragedy 


Zutpfaen, Netherlands 
(Reuter) — Two handicapped 
people were killed together 
with a female helper .and die 
female driver of a minibus 
which collided with a train on 
a level crossing near this 
eastern Dutch town yesterday. 


Atom chief 



• 




The Kremlin has named Mr 
Nikolai Lukonin (above) head 
of the newly-created Soviet 
Ministry of Atomic Power 
Engineering. He has for the 
past three years been in charge 
of a giant nuclear plant in 
Lithuania which wifi soon 
have two Chernobyl-type reac- 
tors in operation. 


Harrimanill 


New York (AP) - Mr W 
Averell Harriman, aged 94,. a 
statesman who played a major 


role in forming US foreign 
policy under five presidents 


policy under five presidents 
and worked dosely with Sir 
Winston Churchill during the 
Second World War, is serious- 
ly ill, the New York Daily 
News reported yesterday. 


Dearer bread 


Belgrade (Reuter) - -The 
Yugoslav Government has 'al- 
lowed a 50 per cent rise in the 
price of bread effective imme- 
diately, the official news agen- 
cy Tanjug said. 


Colonel dies 


Manila (Reuter) — Colonel 
Tirso Gador. who played a 
part in the revolt that toppled 
President Ferdinand Marcos, 
was drowned when his para- 
chute was blown into Manila 
Bay after he jumped from an 
Air Force helicopter. 


Cold comfort 


Tehran (Reuter) - Iran has 
sem equipment to provide 40 
tonnes of ice daily for its 
troops sweltering in 122F heat 
on Iraq’s southern Faw penin- 
sula. Tehran Radio reported. 


Americans tight-lipp 


after first 





Russians bn 


From Alan McGregor, Geneva 


Colombo — A British na- 
tional was sentenced to 616 
years’ rigorous imprisonment 
yesterday in the Negombo 
Magistrates' Court in Sn Lan- 
ka tor possessing 41b of hash- 
ish (Vijitha Yapa writes). 

Michael Taylor, aged 39, 
was arrested at the Colombo 
international airport, 
Katunayake, on April 4 when 
he was about to board an 
aircraft for Europe. 

This is the toughest sen- 
tence passed by a Si Lankan 
court on a foreigner for pos- 
sessing drugs. 

Glen Andrew Scott, aged 
22. an Australian, was sen- 
tenced to four years' rigorous 
imprisonment by the 
Negombo magistrate for pos- 
sessing 7oz of heroin. 


Complying with directives 
that the occasion should not 
serve as a “propaganda 
platform", American officials 
Were tight-lipped regarding 
yesterday's inaugural -Ameri- 
can-Soviet meeting on the 
1979 Salt 2 treaty, to which 
President Reagan says the US 
no longer intends to be bound. 


A US communique con- 
fined itself to saying that 
Washington's agreement to* 
convene a special session on 
the issue “stands in contrast to 
the position taken by the 
Soviet Union in 1983 when 
the US asked for a special 
session to discuss compliance 
matters relating to the Salt 2 
Treaty. 


Columbia, South Carolina 
(UPI) — A woman charged 
with murder in the starvation 
death of her three-month-old 
son was. allowed to plead 
guilty to voluntary man- 
slaughter after undergoing 
sterilization in return for the 
reduced charge. 

Debra Williams, aged 26, 
was jailed for the maximum 
30 years for voluntary man- 
slaughter. Her husband, 
James Williams, is awaiting 
trial on the murder charge. 


“The Soviet Union denied 
that request," the communi- 
que added. “However, the US 
has agreed to this session as a 
sign of our desire that the 
Soviet Union join us in estab- 


lishing an interim framework 
of trulv mutual restraint" 4 

Both yesterday morning 
and again in the afternoon, the 
US delegation, led by General 
Richard Ellis, a former diief of 
the country's strategic air. 
command, met the Soviet 
team, headed by General Vla- 
dimir Medvedev, at the US 
diplomatic mission “to clear 
the air" 

The talks; requested by 
Moscow, were held within the 
context of the Standing Con- 
sultative Commission die 
joint US-Soviet body set up in 
1972 to monitor compliance 
with existing arms control 
agreements, and, it was then 
hoped, make suggestions for 
more. ‘ ' ‘ 

A concurrent- development 
in the 40-nation United Na- 
tions disarmament conference 
concerns the proposed global 
network ofseismological mea- 
suring stations to differentiate 
between natural underground 


disturbances and subterra- 
nean nuclear tests. 

After prolonged fence-sit- 
ting the Soviet Union has now 
declared itself willing to par- 
ticipate -in the- international 
effort directed to this concept, 
which is entirely compatible 
with its current endeavour 
-secure a comprehensive bad 
on testing. * ’ V -- z. 

Mr Richard Butler, the Aus- 
tralian delegate, who visitsn . - - 
Moscow last week, js urging, 
the conference: to reach, con- 
sensus on recommendniggOT*;^ 
emments to proceed with the 
required network forthwith.. 

He pointed out that wftff— 
200 national seismic stations 
already in existence, the c ssea^ • - 
tial requirement was to rein- - 
force - the communications ^ 
network for transmission *>f {g 


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London — Four days of 
talks began yesterday to re- 
view progress in implement- 
ing the Anglo-Chinese 
Declaration on the future of 
Hong Kong, which regulates 
the transition of Hoag Kong 
from British to Chinese sover- 
eignty after 1997 (Rodney 
Cowton writes). 

It is the fourth series of 
meetings of the Sino-British 
Joint Liaison Group, which 
rotates its meetings between 
Peking, Hong Kong and 
London. 


Woods Hole. 

Massachussetts (Reuter) — A 
small bronze plaque honour- 
ing the 1.513 people who 
perished when the Titanic 
sank 74 years ago, was placed 
yesterday on the ship's stem: - 



Bienne, Switzerland (AP) — 
Viktor Korchnoi, the. .former 
So^et grandmaster now- play- 
ing for Switzerland, bounced 
back from an -opening loss to 
defeat Swiss teammate Wer- 
ner Hug in the second round 
of the Bienne International 
Chess Tournament 


New York (AP) - The from abroadd# m# arriw, the , : J1M3.3JLI ' ■“;£ 
Russians who worked with doctors-:^ fo^erinei^vo 

American doctors-treating the: . urpoft awl used crowbars ; to , 4 Fipm CpriStoplier Watfcer. - ^ 


f- 


“In tine we got tiie Russians ** t ^ lc . ^ I ^ gst ymp . e , ver .J*~ 
to think like American busi- 


nessmen. We said 'Nothing is 


was a ^battlefield situation", 
in which doctors had to decide 


-CterndbyL: victims.-. lea^rt^•. 0 !P!MrCrat«;«^:tte|>^ipd :: j : t - '■ '■ '• 

something about the American whatthey wanted. .Herr.- .Hans-Dtetricha* 

“Can do" tradition, the US . IX-Gate said he learnt from Genscher, the West German i-r 
physician Dr Robert Gate baring to grapple with the Foreign Minister, wound ^ 
sthL awesome chaltenjge oftreatmg three-day visit to. Moscow -ti 

“In time we got tiie Russians pterday withacall 

to think like American basi- ' l° v,et Union and the Umt^;^ 

nessmen. We said ‘Nothing is 7^.® ’ States t0 ffitenm accorcJs^P 

impossible'," Dr Gale^tid in n^ichtioctorsilia^ to drade on medium-range. and strateh 
an totoriew in Life magazme, glC - missilesiffuU-scaJe agree-:^- 

When the America need- mCT l (,roVed ,n,possi61? ' 

ed an electrical socket changed «ther, ^ there mis little After meetings that includr; " 
to accommodate a centrifuge, hmgn^e problem. ed three hours-of talks with Mr-' ; 

10 Soviet technicians exam- told Mr Mikhail Gorbachov, the Sovietteader, -^ 

ined the outlet for half an hour C^rbacfaqr, the 'Soviet leader, Herr Genscher. said West.Ger- -^ 
then pronounced the task that; the accident and . the many felt that both superpow- .- r 
impossible. : tremendoss. medical response ■ ^ ha d an i nterest in reaching 

“We said ‘Gotta have it it demanded “sbonkl put to 311 interim accord 
That's it.’ And I have to hand rest .any notion that we cohid “A policy of everything- or‘^ 
it to them: they rewired the respond effectively to a nothing would be wrong," Tie.- 
room," Dr Gate said. nuclear accident of a greater said- It would be better to have“ * 


impossible'," Dr Gale said in 

“ inttrvfew m w 


When the Americans used- doctors had worked weU to- 
ed an electrical socket^ged m there was little 


to accommodate a centrifuge, jteiqjni*e'pihbh«, 

10 Soviet technicians exam- fle- had tokfMr Mikhail 


ined the outlet for half an hour (torbachqr, the Soviet leader, 
then pronounced the task that; the ..accident and. the 


impossible. 


room," Dr Gate said. 


When equipment ordered magnitude". . . (a partial soli 

New Jersey racecourse scents trouble 


an interim accord 

“A policy of everything- or ‘?v 
nothing would be wrong," M- 
said. It would be better to have 7 
a partial solution." . - -'i 

- • • ■*' -‘a 




■ -i rxer; 

%"P-wV- 
' • ‘ ! 

i- : 

• i 

f« 

.ir 

■■“•e-irstitet 
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’4-TJriV: 

t rd 


Will 

‘ -S'* ttlte- 

-Of.- 


Horses’ efforts go to waste ^wo vej 


From Paul Vaflely, New York 


The bottom has fallen out of 
the domestic mushroom mar- 
ket and dropped the racetrack 
managers of New Jersey into a 
heap of trouble. 

The problem is one of bow 
to dispose of the daily supplies 
of horse manure produced 
inexorably by the thousands 
of horses permanently stabled 
at the racecourses. 

Until recently the dung was 
a supply of ready cash. They 
sold it to the mushroom 
growers who came willingly 
with lorries to cart the stuff 
away to their farms in the 
limestone caverns of neigh- 
bouring Pennsylvania. Five . 
years ago Meadowiands Race- 
track alone' annually made 
about S250.000 (£167,000) 
from the cash sale. 

But then cheaper mush- 
rooms began to be imported 
from China and Taiwan and . 
local growers began to go 
bankrupt and close thetr 
operations. 

Now the racecourse owners”; 
are having to pay the few 
remaining growers to take the 
manure away. Last year it cost 
Meadowiands $150,000 for 
the trouble. 

Over the next 12 months 
the track’s financial expert 
predicts the cost will double as 
the industry continues to de- 
cline. 

A visit to Meadowiands 
gives some idea of the scale of 
the problem. The stadium 
currently houses 1.700 horses. 


kill weed seeds in whatever 
fodder they- eat, but the less 
ruminant systems ofhorses do 
not To turn horse dung into a 
viable soil conditioner it needs 
to be composted for at least a 
year.' 

. The difficulty is that Mead- 
owiands alone produces five 
lorryloads of manure every 
week. The sSze of the 12 
month compost heap Mead- 
owiands would require does 
not bear thinking about. 

The answer to the problem 
may lie in Saratoga. In recent 
years the Saratoga Raceway in 
New. York State has been 
operating a conversion plant 
Which turns manure 1 into 
fertilizer. 

Now Meadowiands has de- 
cided to spend $20,000 on a 
marketing feasibility, study for 


a similar plant of its own.-; 

“If things cany - on with the* 
mushroom growers as tfaeyffi 
are. pretty soon there woriVS 
even be anyone to.come 
take it away no-nkrtertiarfi* 
much we paid them. Tcfv 
dispose of it all as trash would T 
cost a fortune," sajtf Paul ^ 
Wolcott, a spokesman for the ' 
track. ; 

The Saratoga track,, which r ; 
used to pay 5JOO.OOQ.ia -year . 
for dung disposal now pro- _ 
duces an annual income' of-* 
$300,000 from its “Saratoga. •* 
Organic". Its plant accelerates ', 
the natural process, of decoro*/ 

. position by raising the ambt 
em temperature to 150F aqd:- 
then blowing, oxygen through 
the manure. ' : = 

• “It turns dung to gold," said" . 
Mr Wolcott. - ■ 









CONCISE CROSSWORD NO 1009 

ACROSS 


1 Merry (6) 

4' Rebellious (6) 

.7 Money wine (4) 

8. Multiple (8) 

9 Warship officers . . 

quarters t&) 

P Electric ftsh (3>„ 

16 Wind messure (8^) 

17 Curve (3) 

19 Hold back (8). ' 

24 Mulled wine .(8); ' 
25' Sicilian volcano (4). 
24 Shiny (6) 

27 Frank (6) 


Steaming dung is collected 
daily by stable boys and. 
gathered into piles 10 or 12ft 
high sited judicially along the ■ 
back stretch of the course. 

But though it may be the 
ideal medium for the cultiva- 
tion of mushrooms it is not 
much use for anything else. 
The digestive tracts of cows 


DOWN 

'1 Doorframe vertical 

(4) 

2 Excursion coach (9) 

3 Object (5) 

,4 Houscy.hou5Cy-(5) 

5 Elevator (4) 

6 Divide iniwo(S) 

10 Postpone (5) 

11 Fragrant iris (3) - 




aiHHIB 


PHHBI 


Further Overseas News, pages 13, 14 


s ' \ 13 n7™" <5) “ 

ig~»“ .ssaasg* ■ ^as?su 

" Fn « ra ""m«?> - •* Monarch (3> H DUficull(4) ' 

SOLUTION TO NO 1008 , 

ACROSS: 1 Bedaub 5 Pity RC^dge Tactile li Ntamn»r - « ' 

21 Mundane, 22 • 



atjjg 











■use-*., ">lsrn;^. 

* if? **Av 

*£,*?■ *> 


The marriage of Prince Andrew t o 

today seals the 


on a wing and a smile 


*-:n:sd 


f °nh 


*1(1 ‘ 


ti* 


x s 


*5* 


partnership between two young 
people whose effervescent joy 
has touched millions of hearts 


- r irsrw 
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cop- 


en eath her turn blii 
per mane. Sarah 
son has a pair of bright 
blue-grey eyes which she 
^ employs to great effect. * 
When, in the company of a visitor, 
PrinfCi. • Andrew’s conversation 
charges qfF down the byways of 
naval ■life' and into the dense 
thickets of powered flight, she has- 
a habit of staring directly at the 
third party, slipping behind a 
puckish grin and rolling her hat- 
peg eyeballs to the ceiling like the 
reels of a one-armed bandit. 

- H*f face is open,- lively, know- 
in^T mischievous and always 
painted at the. world around her, 
that .of the Princess of 
Wajts who. on public view during 
her.cngagement, often appeared 
trat&ffxed by the toes of her boots. 

It is a face full of self-assurance, 
confident without being over- 
weening and rarely without a 
laud} luridng between the ears. 
Wqensheand her partner laugh m 
unison-. which they do a lot, the 
r ‘ watdiing world is pear-blinded by 

lite^T pair of Sleinrrayk'concert 
X. gram# with their keyboards open. 

q -' f : Har.former headmistress at the 
exclusive and expensive Hurst 
Lodge girii’ boarding- school at 
Sunni ngdale, Mrs Celia Merrick, 
has recalled: “If there was any fun 
Sarah would be is the midst of it. 
Fnwnbeing'a very small giri she 
If ft i. and Mr Efejj! always had' charm, humour anda 
nciHr ci> opeMjg. : sense offon* She had a very sunny 

dispositioit enormously cheerful, 
i I bubbly and fun-loving. But she 

r£^H CPnAl 1 was not superficial ghf and had a 

i V iljVUvl stubborn streak. Ishould think she 

| will suit the young prince very 

n I AO ATI well: she is a strong .enough 

r 1V w character to keep him in order’’. 

■ Sarah's self-confidence and 

PC openness are. qualities, learned 

kjo&iVo . from an early age and luft&rithout 
a Chris*npher Ww $*■ measure of pain in her four- 
\iiigpk teenfli Year when her mother 

departed for Argentina. Her fam- 
ily background is landed gentry 
*».v. wsa ratfer than aristocracy, with gen- 

- *c.:i3i. eratiqns of distinguished service 

-■i* in the' Cavalry, her greai-great- 

•“ s grandfather died oti active service 
zr.i 1=2 with the Royal Horse Guards in 

- * .v* : - vrzt z^a 1 896. laming the Ashanti on the 

■„ Gold Coast and every generation 

since, down to her father, has held 
a commission in'ihe'Life Guards. 

. b-is a family of old money, but 

~ " r - ■ '“![ not of much. Several generations 
ago the Fergusons were Tandown- 
. : > - • iS r ersi in a mildly grand sort of way, 

■.r <~ r *■-- at Pblebrook Hall in Northaitip- 

■;*. t tonshire. but today the family 

. . - r spread is 8 76 prime arable acres of 

Hampshire. 

. From her earliest years Sarah 

“ ' . *' travelled on her fether's.coat tails 

~ through the upper reaches of 

' V English social life, via his profes- 


sional career of high-flying mili- 
tary ceremonial and his abiding 
passion for polo. It was a training 
that gave her the first-division 
social graces and the self-assur- 
ance to regard her purpose as life, 
liberty and the pursuit of 
happiness. 

She was never an academic but 
few of her background are. She 
managed six O-fevels — in art, 
English language. English litera- 
ture, spoken English, French and 
biology — but her principal school 
achievement apart from mere 
survival against a disintegrating 
family background, now happily 
rebuilt was to be made joint head 
girl with the daughter of the 
television comedian Ted Rogers. 
She dived naked at midnight into 
the swimming pool on her last day . 
at school but then so did everyone 
at Hurst Lodge. 

Her assessment card at the 
South Kensington secretarial 
school she subsequently attended 
was prescient in its judgement 
“Bright, bouncy redhead. A bit 
slapdash, but has initiative and 
personality which she will well use 
to her advantage when she gets 
older, and accepts responsibility 
happily" 


S 


oon after her engagement 
was made public, she took 
a b; l-part in the Queen's 
60th birthday celebra- 
tions, accepting daffodils 
from schoolchildren in the Buck- 
ingham Palace forecourt The ease 
with which die slipped into the 
part was immediately apparent as 
was the unruffled cool with which 
she handled the press gang that 
hounded -her in the days before 
Fleet Street's suspicions were 
confirmed. 

-Prince Andrew, by comparison; 
is something of* an • academic, 
■having- gamed three A-Ievels in 
addition to his six O-levds at 
Gordbiistoun, but there was never 
any possibility that be would go on 
to university like his brothers. 
From the age of 13 Andrew knew 
that he was more of a hairy-chester 
than a swot and he also knew that 
his future lay in flying helicopters. 
The RAF he dismissed as too 
mundane, the Army as too politi- 
cally risky — much of their 
chopper flying is in South Armagh 
— so it had to be the Navy. 

Andrew is nothing if not his 
father’s son; he is even named 
after the Duke of Edinburgh’s 
father. Prince Andrew of Greece. 
He is a world removed from the 
thoughtful and introverted 
Charles and exudes a confidence 
which, until the Falklands war and 
the wise counsel of his mother 
filed down the sharper corners, 
had a tendency to manifest itself 



A shared life: engrossed in the fan and freedom of each other’s company, a pleasure that underlies even the grandest wedding 


as arrogance and the kind of 
behaviour which some can get 
away with as high spirits and for 
which others suffer in the name of 
boorishness. 

• The Falklands campaign was 
the beginning of the malting of 
Andrew and it changed him 
markedly. Shipmates relate that 
on one occasion in those slightly 
unreal days when the task force 
was sailing south. Andrew burst: 
into a crowded cafeteria close to 
the flight deck of HMS Invincible, 
whipped out his service revolver 
and pointed it at the assembled 
and astonished company. By the 
time the trigger had made its 
harmless click the entire company 
had fait the deck. 

Less than a month later he was a 
considerably sobered man. “I was 
airborne when the Atlantic Con- 
veyor was hit. We saw the odd 4.5 
inch shell come pretty dose to u$ 
and I saw Invincible fire her 
missiles. Normally I would say it 
looked very spectacular but from 
where I was it was very frighten- 
ing. I think the moment really 


sticks in my mind. It was horrific 
and terrible and something I will 


never 
most fri 
war". 


It was probably my 
tening moment of the 


Hi 


e later learned an even 
more, chilling feet: 
• three times during the 
heat of battle, the Brit- 
ish radar-guided Sea 
Wolf missile batteries had locked 
on to his helicopter, mistaking it 
for Argentinian -hardware: Who 
could blame him, when the war 
was over, for seeking rest and 
relaxation on a Caribbean isle 
with a woman who had once 
appeared, without her clothes, in a 
distinctly unerotic film? 

Yet for all his derring-do, his 
parade of well-publicized amorous 
adventures, and his obvious en- 
joyment of. the close camaraderie 
of the naval wardroom, there 
appears always to have been a 
streak of isolation, even loneliness 
in him . His only real home has 
been a grand but faintly imperson- 
al suite of rooms in Buckingham 


Palace and his published collec- 
tion of photographs, which be 
describes as .'autobiographical, 
have the feefingebf a man peeping 
through the Palace curtains in 
curiosity and longing at a wider 
world outside. . 

So what .future canbe divined 
for this outwardly fun-loving; pair, 
forever sentenced to a life m the 
public eye? 

The new Princess Andrew will 
begin married life as a service wife 
and will become well-acquainted 
with the inside of married quar- 
ters, as did Princess Anne during 
her first wedded years when 
Captain Phillips was still instruct- 
ing at Sandhurst After the honey- 
moon Prince Andrew goes on a 
training course at Yeovilton, then 
on to an instructor's posting at 
Portland naval helicopter base in 
DorseL 

He signed on for twelve years 
and mil undoubtedly remain in 
the service at least until 199Z 
Beyond that, his career is Jess 
certain; by that time he would be 
in line for quite senior promotion 


and there is a potential source of 
embarrassment in the Queen's son 
competing for high rank with 
other highly-qualified career 
officers. 

Sarah will do her best to 
continue working, at least fSr the 
time being, against the pressures 
on her to give it up. For what else 
is a naval officer's wife to do all 
day if she is not to surrender 
totally to the corrosive effects of 
the service ladies* social round? 

Then a home must be found for 
them. Although there are always 
the quarters at Buckingham Pal- 
ace, it never did any young bride 
much good to start married life 
under the roof of her in-laws. 
Some properties have been looked 
at in the area already popular with 
the family and which local estate 
agents now describe as the “Royal 
South Coiswolds” It will be the 
Queen's wedding present to them. 

They will not be unduly horsey. 
Sarah is competent in the saddle 
but has always pulled up short of 
obsession. Andrew has no. great 


love of the beasts; they used to 
give him dreadful hay fever. 

Their main function in life is to 
be themselves, royals acting out a 
public life which will move to a 
much higher profile when Prince 
Andrew leaves the Navy. Andrew^ ‘ 
at present, has a modest portfolio 
of only 10 patronages, from the 
British Schools Exploring Society 
through the Badminton Associa- 
tion of England and a school for 
problem children in Co. Durham 
to a police convalescent home in 
Harrogate. 

Sarah will so on have her own 
dutch and she -will be a credit to 
“the firm" in the way that she 
conducts her role of a . Royal 
Presence. She is warm, open, 
caring, natural and more or less 
born a commoner, so that her 
audience will readily relate to her. 

G nce upon a time Prince 
Andrew, as a son of the 
monarch, would have 
been despatched as 
Governor-General of 
one of the' larger segments of the 
White Commonwealth. That is no 
longer the case. Australians, for 
example, more or less insist that 
the monarch's representative in 
Canberra is one of them. 

They will be found another role 
on the royal stage; assuming that 
Andrew leaves the Navy at the end 
of his 12-year commission, the 
Queen win be 66 and no doubt 
glad of her family to take from her 
some of the- burden of public 
appearances. They will need to 
earn a living, because not only is a 
£50.000 Civil List allowance mod- 
est to maintain a regal lifestyle, it 
is supposed to be used only for 
offidal business. 

They will have an estate in the 
country and will have to work like 
any other commercial farmer to 
make it pay. Sarah has already the 
look of a woman who could 
mature into a formidable Lady of 
the Shires. They will have chil- 
dren. And Andrew will miss naval 
life, just as his father did when 
official duties forced him to give it 
up. 

• When he starts reminiscing 
about his days on Invincible, his 
wife's eyes will roll up again, the 
puckish grin will return and she 
will probably order hint to gcoff 
and pfey with hisboatsin the bath. 

.Alan Hamilton 



Page 10 
The Procession 
Page 11 
The route 
Page 12 

Marriage Service; 
Inside the abbey 


is; 


waste 


Two very separate lives, glimpsed on the abbey road 


v..;^ » 5 

.. -'-T? *S : . 

_ .. -jug* 

■ ' — £-■ 
* 

• -• ;jr-* 


■ " i r 

■ if 







‘■s'”.'. — : 

The chubbier of the two, that apd now. The Princes Andrew 
and Edward enjoyed a particularly ctose referirashiii wit 
their mother, by then released from the burden of 
father's last illness and the difficult early years of her reign 



The then Mrs Sasan Ferguson with her daughters in the 
Sixties. Not even ia her wudest chOdhood dreams coald the 
sparkling-eyed Sarah, aged nine, left, with her sister Jane, 
have dreamt that one day die would marry a prince . 


precocious 

is demonstrating 
that be never learned die 
meaning of the word “shy 4 * 


A nine-year old country girt 
learning tire skills of the 
saddle, bid pulling op short 
of equestrian obsession 




Flowering Into womanhood, 
a blooming Sarah displays 
an easy poise at her sister s 
wedding ton years ago 


A 13-year-old prince at Bad- 
minton .Horse Trials reflect- 
ing, perhaps, that anim al s 
giro him hay fever • • • 


Life, liberty and the pursuit of happiness. The pose is as floppy as the hatthe face 
opeiucarefree, fresh and young. Sarah Ferguson at tire age of 26 is worldly, self-assnred, 
relaxed and looks as if she knows that something pretty terrific is about to happen to her. 
The face, as always, reflects not only her own warmth but also that of tire sen 


The making of the man: a 
dashing jjrtnce in his heli- 
copter pilot's gear, a 23-year 
old survivor of the Falklands 


IT’S STARTED. 


THE CARPET 


DRIVES OUR 
RIVALS MAD. 

V >u could you little crazy vourself. ) 


30 - 50 * 

off most! 

Nobody would have believed our low prices 
could get any lower. 

Buabis sale is the amazing proof. 

Come and see, to believe. 

We've got the largest variety imaginable: 

HAND-MADE 
PERSIAN &ORIE3STTAL 
ALL SIZES 

MANY SUPERB DESIGNS 
OLD AND NEW 
5 GENERATIONS OF 
EXPERTISE 

No wonderour rivals get maddened. 

And don’t be surprised if you ’re tempted to go 
justa bit mad yourself. 

Open all week! 

Monday- Saturday: 10am -6pm Sunday: 1 lam -6pm 
Creditcardswelcome. 



EstebUsbtd !8& 


47-48 Piccadilly, London Wl, Tel: 131-734 7141 
Our New York Branch: 319th AvenucRTel: (212) 2138400 





THE TIMES WEDNESDAY JULY 23 1986 




Lining up for a 




Britai n’s great State occasions have one thing in common: the 
presence of horses and carriages. Today’s represents both 
grand tradition and modem efficiency, pomp and precision 
rnanif pstfyi in immaculate splendour. Alan Hamilton reports 





1st Division of the Sovereign's Escort 


NCO • Advance Points Mounted Police 

THE QUEEN’S CARRIAGE PROCESSION 


^ i,--* 

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Standard 

Party 


2nd Field State Landau Silver Stick 

Officer Queen Elizabeth The Queen Mother Adjutant 
The Princess Margaret, Countess of Snowdon 
Viscount LinJey 
Lady Sarah Armstrong Jones 


Standard 

Party 


Field Officer 

Pnmnmmffr rg 

Escort 


* Semi-State lawfan 


Outriders 


2nd Division of the Sovereign's Escort 


THE QUEEN 

: of Edit 


The Duke of Edinburgh 


.a v 

l ■ X* 



• • ■ 


Farriers 


4th Division of the Sovereign's Escort 


State landau 
Mistresses of the Robes 
Private Secretory 
Equerry in Waiting 


Stale Landau 
The Princess Anne 


of the Horse 


State Landau 
The Prince of Wales 
The Princess of Wales 


3 rd Division of the Sovereign’s Escort 





<k<k 


2nd Division of the Captain's Escort 


Escort 

Commander 


1902 State Landau 
THE BRIDEGROOM 
The Prince Edward 


Outriders 


NCO 


Advance Points 


1st Division of the Captain's Escort 

BRIDEGROOM'S CARRIAGE PROCESSION 





Bear Polots. •" NCO 


A".ii 







Mounted Police 


4 Troopers of 
The Life Guards 


Escort C ommand er 


The Glass Coach 
THE BRIDE 
Major Ronald Ferguson 


Outriders 


THE BRIDES CARRIAGE PROCESSION 




Mounted Police 


Rear Points NCO - * CpI Mqjor 

and Farrier 


Rise ’n’ shine 
for a day 
in 



• Reveille was early to- 
day at Hyde Park Bar- 
racks. Troopers laid on 
elbow grease, spit and 
polish that would bring a 
sparkle' to the eye of any 
senior NCO. The day of 
the ..horse soldier was 
under way. 


F ive o'clock in the 
morning, and the 
slumbering peace of 
Hyde Park Barracks is 
broken only by the fitful snore 
of a Life Guards trooper, the 
pawing of hoof on concrete 
and the occasional flatulent 
hrmnmmph from the stalls 
where 200- impeccably 
groomed black horses await 
the day with blank patience. 

At 5.30 the fleeting dreams 
of man and beast are shattered 
by a trumpeter of the Blues 
and Royals band piercing the 
capital’s early air. Reveille is. 
half an hour early: there is a 
big job on today. 

Troopers tumble from their 
beds in their well-appointed 
tower-block quarters and 
stumble down to the stables 
for the day’s first' brew-up 


before the chore of mucking 
out. A whisper of soothing 
words in the ears of their 
mounts establishes which 
horses are calm, which excit- 
able. Those not in the right 
frame of mind are led out, clad 
only in blanket and surcingle, 
for half an hour of brisk 
exercise in the riding school: 
nothing like physical exertion 
to calm the nerves. 

By 6.45 the troopers, now 
fully breakfasted, are back in 
the stables to begin the serious 
task of grooming, on which for 
a day like today they will 
spend a good hour and a half. 
No human guest at today's 
wedding will be better turned 
out than the - horses of the 
Household Cavalry. 

There are to be 490 horses 
for today's spectacle, slightly 
fewer than the recent record of 
207 put on parade for the 
Queen Mother's eightieth 
birthday. The Cavalry buy 
them, mainly from Ireland, at 
between three and four years 
of age. and they stay in service 
as long as they are useful. The 
oldest inhabitant of the stables 
at the Cavalry's Hyde Park 
barracks is the venerable 2 5- 



Mugtrgjton by Geoffrey Sims ;■ 



roles: Prince Andrew and Prince Charles en route to the latter's wedding five years ago 


year-old Ringlet, but his trot- 
ting days are more or less over 
ana he will not be called for 
today's parade. 

Horses' names indicate the 
year they completed training 
and joined a troop; this yeart 
graduates all begin with ‘L’ - 
Legend, Lucinda, Leopards- 
town. The minimum height 
requirement for a black horse 
to carry a trooper is 16 hands; 
greys are admitted at 15.2 
hands, but they are restricted 
to the lighter duty of canying 


Multiyorks 
Summer Sale. 


1 T ^£!xVi3 THE SUFFOLK RANGE 

With hsetaade Una and 
ddsb 


jjtSjj 

THE HADLHGH RANGE 
Cnaiaa comfortable 
bridgebctwcaidaastal 

(dv md modem dtasra. o 


tKoprf aL. ' ■ .ML 


o All priced eumpia 

HH|UpMnHPg|2rr in sGfxti 


waGfs. 'm. 


j arc In sekoal'E' Range 

^mcoic. 



•ij A- 

J pmnetre. 


MUCTOonai lstprce Miirm 

MXmONHL 

ooraB 


MHIOaOBI 

LBrras 

SOI MUZ 

At&muL 

Cons 

ARMCHAIR £ 504 . £350 

£115 


aiALL ARMCHAIR 

£ 504 

£350 

£U5 

EX LARGE ARMCHAIR' £ 584 £336 

£125 


LARGE ARMCHAIR 

£541 

£375 

£120 

SMALL SOfA £ 73A £900 

£U0 


VERY LARGE ARMCHW £ 626 

£420 

£140 

MEDIUM SOM ' 'EM' ESB5 

tm 


MEDIUM SOW 

£ 907 

£835 

£220 

LARGE SOFA £939 £850 

£195 


LARGE SOSA 

£1003 

£700 

£240 

ex. large Sofa ukb o» 

£245 


EX LARGE SOFA 

£11S3 

£790 

£270 

FOOTSTOOL- £142 £95 

£45 


FOOTSTOOL 

£ 142 

£ 95 

£45 


THESE ARE JUST TOD QFOURTOADITIONAL RANGES WHICH ARE HANDMADE IN OUR SUFFOLK WORKSHOP OUR OTHER FOUR 
RANGES, ttCOMCTDGE. SOUTHWDU). NflVAMflKETAND BUCKENHAM B£5EN IN YOUR LOCAL MU WYORK SHOWROOM 


99-101 PRINCE0F WALES RD. U LTI YORlf 

NORWICH (06031 625886 I* 1 1 • Haprffrtadetii siiffntti’ 1 


NORWICH (0603) 625886 
MON-SAT 9-5.30 
SUN..V1EW1NG 10-5.00 


THE OLD MILL, MELUS 
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MON-SAT 9-5.00 ■ 
SUN. VIEWING 10-5.00 


ALL SOFAS, SOFA-BEDS AND ARMCHAIRS 
HAVE TOTALLY REMOVABLE CUSHION AND 
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4 CAMDEN ROAD 
LONDON NW1 01-485 2623 
MON-SAT 930-600 
SUN. VIEWING 10-5.00 


NO POLYURETHANE FOAM. 


SOLID BEECHW00D FRAME WITH STEEL CCHL 
SPRINGING. 


1 MIUON RD. CAMBRIDGE 
(0223)313463 
v=,- MON-SAF 930-530 
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CHOICE OF SEAT DEPTHS, BACK HEIGHTS AND 
CUSHION FILLINGS. 


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the musicians on parade duty. 

Grooming is conducted 
with a thoroughness that bor- 
ders on obsession and no part 
of the equine body escapes 
attention. Endless brushing 
brings the coal to a mirror 
sheen that equals the blacking 
on grandmother’s kitchen 
range; powdered chalk on the 
white patches rivals the most 
hyperbolic detergent commer- 
cial. Hooves are pickegl and 
polished, eyes and noses 
wiped with the care of mother 
to child. The night before, tails 
were wrapped in wet ban- 
dages: this morning they are 
taken off so that the bains can 
be pulled to lie neatly between 
the buttocks. 

Troopers have been black- 
ing. whiting and Brasso-mg 
their own kit since the day 
before and buffing up the 
leather harness. The leather is 
first nibbed smooth with the 
edge of the polish tin lid, the 
Cherry Blossom is applied 
with the thumb and the elbow 
grease makes it shine like 
lacquer. 

By 8.15, it's boots and 
saddles. The horses are sad- 
dled while the troopers retire 
to change, helping each other 
into their complex uniforms, 
which include steel cuirasses 
(the Household Cavalry are 
alone in the British Army in 


still wearing armour). It is far 
from unknown fora trooper to 
get part of his kit on the wrong 
way round, and a man poorly 
turned out at inspection may 
well find himself on a charge. 

Nine o'clock, and the long 
process of mounting begins. 
Once up, a trooper stays there, 
and he may be in the saddle 
for more than an hour before 
tfae troop moves out of 
barracks. 


B y this time, Lieuten- 
ant-Colonel Seymour 
Gilbart-Denham, the 
officer commanding 
the Sovereign's escort (a post 
once held by the bride's 
father), or his adjutant. Cap- 
tain Rupert Lendrum, will 
have been on the telephone to 
the London Weather Centre 
and to the Royal Mews at 
Buckingham Palace. The 
threat of serious rain requires 
a decision on wet weather 
order; the Cavalry will be 
given the order u to cloak" and 
the Mews will roll out the 
covered coaches instead of the 
open landaus. 

Then Lieutenant-Colonel 
Gilban-Denham inspects his 
charges accompanied by his 
adjutant and riding master 
while grooms with brushes 
and polish stand by to attend 
to .bis dissatisfactions. When 


his approval has been won, the 
Cavalry moves off through 
city streets, ’now busy with 
workaday traffic, on the 20- 
minute ride to Buckingham 
Palace. 

Meanwhile, across London, 
a group of senior officers 
under the direction of Major- 
General Christopher Airy, 
commanding the Household 
Division and London District, 
have been at woik since early ; 
July in a suite of offices 
directly behind the mounted 
sentries at the Whitehall en- 
trance to Horse Guards. Their 
task has been to ensure clock- 
work precision in the day's 
events, both in the mounted 
procession and in the foot 
soldiers who line the route. 

It is a job they know 
backwards, raving performed 
it, with only minor variations. 


for every State opening of 
ivery State 


Parliament and every 


visit, including that of the 
of W« 


Mall and Whitehall One or 
two have inadvertently disap- 
peared under careless road 
resurfacing, but the easiest to 
spot is the metal stud marked 
'S', two feet out from thelcerb 
. opposite die left-hand sentry 
box at Horse Guards. 

Where one route-lining de- 
.tacbment ends and the next 
-begins depends on how many 
men each regiment can pro- 
vide. Thus, for example, the 
Cheshire Regiment may re- 
ceive the order to commence 
lining 62 paces west of Point S: 

The traditional route has 
two, variations. When the 
Queen opens Parliament, she 
cuts off the Trafalgar Square 
corner and emerges through 
Horse Guards Arch: the Arch 
is the ancient entrance to 
Whitehall Palace, and the 
Sovereign on her way to open 
her Partiament must be seen 
to. be emerging from her 
official residence. State visits 
negotiate Admiralty Arch; so, 
too, wfll Prince Andrew as a 
nod to his own profession. 

Thdre -is a strict lining 
hierarchy. In the Mall nearest 
die Palace it is always the 
Sovereign's own personal 
guard, the Foot Guards. 
Which Guards depends on 
which are available: today it 
will be the Scots and Irish 
Guards, both of which have 
battalions currently stationed 
in the UK. 

Thereafter the route is lined 
by the services in ascending 
order of seniority. From Ad- 
miralty Arch to halfway down 
Whitehall it is the junior 
service, the RAF. Then the 
Army, represented today fey 
the Cheshires, who happen to 
be stationed -atpresent in the 
London area. Finally, dose to 
the Abbey, the senior service, ■ 
the Navy and Royal Marines, 
ending up nearest the Abbey 
door with ratings from the 
ships on which Prince Andrew 
has served. 

There was a full rehearsal 
last Thursday, in the argali 
hours before London was. 
awake, but still nothing is left 
to chance. An hour before the 


procession begins, the marie- J- 
ers for each lining half-compag : 
ay will march to their allot eo7; 
positions, accompanied by^a'4" 
drill warrant-officer with his? 
pace stick. They like, they say,~- 
to get things accurate to within*- : 
the width of a pair of feet - Vi- 
The crowds, who have ’ aV ’ 
propensity To cheer anything V 
that passesreven a Westmfh- V 
ster Council dustcart, as they ;; 
wait for the star turns toll 
appear, wall have a chance to 
give throat to Major-General 
Airy as he rides the route with :! 
two fellow-officers to inspect 
the lining parties shortly be- ;! 
fore the real action begins. 


'3* 

■••• Kr.- 








T hey can cheer him 
again on his return.' 
just before ^aride arid-^ 
groom pass by fin - 
route to the wedding break-!* 
fast And then they’re offcjp^ 
the beat of jangling harness^! 
and of military bands spaced 
along the route. Now it’s all al 
question of getting to the £ 
church on time — exactly on /* 
time: . . I 

Troopers cannot peep at =■ 
their watches under those vast 'C 
white gauntlets, and an up-.* 
wards glance at Big Ben isonly . 1 
a slight help. Foot soldi era will. 
march reliably at U6pacesta l 
the minute, but the walking * 
pace of a horse is n ot quite -so'. = 
precise. Again, it's all a ques^V 
lion of practice and expend 
ence. To slow or speed up fh$-'I 
cavalcade, the officer itt** 
charge of each escort signals:-:!! 
with bis sword. - 
If they get it right, as they? 
almost always do. Queers ' 
bride and groom will eachjje 
delivered in their separate’!- 
processions to the Abbeys 
west door to the minute, 
prescribed in the carefully-laid .! 
plans. If they don't, the crowds^ 
wilT be too enthralled by 
polished rumps of Lucinda,"- 
Leopardstown and the rcst'to^ 
notice, but Lieutenant-CdRp'' 
nel Gilbart-Denham will have ! 
a few choice words to say back 
at barracks. Arid -Ringlet win 
be quite relieved that be 
the day off.’ • 





to ch? 





V.IVM. 








-I 4 


President of West Germany 
three weeks ago. 

Lining the route is an 
equally exact science. Palace 
to Westminster is a well- 
trodden ceremonial path, and 
the Army’s masters of ceremo- 
ny are familiar with every inch 
ofn. 

To help them, metal mark- 
ers. each with its own letter, 
are set in the roadway of the 


THE RETURN PROCESSION 
(shown without escorts) 





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THE BRIDEGROOM 


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State Landao 
The Prince Edward 
The Prince WflUam 
Three Pages/Bridesmaids 


State Landao 
Four Bridesmaids/Pages 
Nanny 


■ Semi-State Landao 
.THE QUEEN 
Major Ronald Ferguson 


SteteLandan 
The 'poke of Edinburgh 
Mrs Hector Barratries 




State Landao 
teen Elizabeth The Queen Mother 
incess Margaret,Countess of Snowdon 
. Viscount Linfcy 
Lady Sarah. Arrastroag-Joues 



State Landao 
The Prince of Wales 
The Princess of Wales 



State Landau 
The Princess Anne - 
Captain Mai* Phillips 
Master of the Horse 




State Landau ' 
Mirowses of foe Robes ! 

Private Secretary 
. Equeny in Waiting ' 




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•'■•■• and where to watch it pass 


Oaraioe House 
agtujr Nash for waifem iv m 
1825, a nd long the home or 
VfctDrta'e sewd son Alfred. 
Dulwof BSnfaurgh. Briefly 
home to the Queen and 
Duke of Edinburgh after 
their marriage in 7947. 
now** home of the Queen 
Motiw. where a piper plays 


St James's Palace 
Stifl the official residence of the 
Court to which foreign 
ambassadors are accntcDted. 
Butt by Henry VIII on die site of e 
toper hospital it contains 


>n me garden at nine every 
morning whUe she is in 
residence. Sarab Ferguson win 
set put for her wedding from 
here, as did the Princess of 
Wales in 1981 "" at * aor 


and staff apartments, as well 
as the beautiful Chapel RoyaL In 
Friary Court the heralds 
procaim a new sovereign 


Maiifcoroogb House 
Built by Wren for the Duka of 
Marlborough using bricks 
brought back as ballast 
afterthe Duke's military 
campaigns in Holland. 

Queen Mary was the last royal 
resident until her death in 
1953. Now used as a 
Commonwealth 
Conference centra 


Admiralty Arch 
Like the Queen Victoria Memorial 
at the other end of the Mali, 
designed by Sir Aston Webb as 
part of the national memorial to 
the Quaen/Empresa. On the north 
side there is a statue of Captain 
Cook, and on the south a 
memorial to the Royal Marines 


Duke of York 
Monument 



Trafalgar Square » 

Laid out at the suggestion of Nash to commemorate 
Nelson’s great naval victory of 1805. The admiral stands in the 
centre atop a 185-foot column, surrounded by four bronze 
■ Cons modelled by Landseer, and bronze reliefs cast from 
captured French cannon. The fountains, by Lutyens, ware 
added in 1948. Famed for its pigeons, political 
demonstrations. New Year’s Eve revets, and giant 
Christmas tree, an annual gift from by Norway 


Horse Gauds 




Butt In 1760 on the old tiltyard 
of Whitehall Palace, now the 
offices of Army London District 
Normally with a ceremonial 
Household Cavalry guard, but 
today supplied by the King's 
Troop, Royal Horse Artillery 


USES The Bride’s Carriage 
*• - - . Procession departs 

from Clarence House 

Lancaster House 
BoSt in 1827 for the Duke of 
>Yorit, and enlarged for the 

Duke of Sutherland, now 

a Government conference 

centra and setting for . ' — ^ 

official receptions, best 

remembered for the s. f 

talks tfrat turned Southern L/ ^ tt 

Rhodesia into Zimbabwe 


-The-Queen's 

Carriage Procession departs 

The Bridegroom's 
Carriage ■ ■ / 

Procession /. 


St James's Park j 

Ninety-three acres of planted / 

lawns and trees surrounding an / 

ornamental lake. Laid out by / 

Henry Villas a deer park between / 

his palaces of St James's and , 

WhrtehaU, and remodelled by / 

Nash in 1B29 for George IV / Old 

Treasury- 

id wi-fd 




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Foreign, fTTT] 
Commonwealth and L -. J 
Home Offices / / 


Treasury 



Banqueting House 
The main survivor of the old 
rpya) palace of Whitehall 
BuDt by Inigo Jones In 
1525 with a magnificent 
ceHIng by Peter Paul Rubens, 
and one of the first 
examples In Britain of the 
rebirth of classical 
architecture, open to visitors 
most days - but not today 


Ministry of Defence 
Britain's war house, 
fronted by statues of 
Sir Walter Raleigh 
and Field Marshal 
Lord Montgomery 


-Cenotaph 





CjUflfc 


Queen Victoria Memorial 
Built in 191 1 to the design 
of Sir Aston Webb as the 
national memorial to 
Britain's longest-reigning 
monarch. The white marble 
statue by Thomas Brock 
Is crowned by a gilded bronze 
figure of Victory, with Courage 
and Constancy at her feet 


a pfe; 



Houses of ParCament 
Riotous Gothic designed by Sir 
Charles Barry, assisted by 
A-W.Pug'm, built 1840-50 and 
recently cleaned. Home to the 
House of Commons and House 
of Lords, k incorporates the 
ancient Westminster Hall built 
by William it in 1097 and one of 
the largest and best timber- 
roofed buildings in Europe 



BUCKINGHAM PALACE 
Built in 17frfortheDukeof 
Buckingham, and bought by George 
ill for lus own use. 'But neither he nor 
Mg successors George IV. who had it 
extensively rebuilt by Nash, agd 
WBHaM IV. ever lived in It ' 

Quean victoria was the first- - 1 
monarch to Inhabit iron her 
accession in 1837. The ugly, 
famfliar frontage Is a 1913. 
addition; behind it is' the much more 
attractive Nash original .. t 


1 1.12am 


tn EEffiH The Bridegroom’s Carriage 
_____ Procession arrives 

The Bride’s Carriage Procession arrives 

Carriage Procession of y * 

the Bnde and Bridegroom departs 

The Queen’s Carriage O 
Proce ssi on departs * 


n BBC/ITV 
jC CAMERA 


CAMERA POSITIONS 


Illustration by John Grimwads 


WESTMINSTER ABBEY . 
Officially the CoBegiate Church of St 
Peter in Westminster. orignatiy built by 
Edward the Confessor and 
consecrated just before Ms death in 
1085. and almost completely rebuilt by 
Henry HI in the 13th Century. Almost 
every English monarch since Wiifiam 
the Conqueror has been crowned here, 
and 16 are buried within its waDs. 
Today it sees its 14th royal wedding; its 
first was Henry I’s marriage to Matilda 
of Scotland ml 100 


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IT- - ' J 


• The battle for television 
audiences reaches a peak' 
today. The BBC has Da- 
vid Dimbleby in the chair 
while. ITV fields the for- 
midable Sir Alastair Bar- 
net and Ronald Allison. 

A constant feature of 
big royal occasions is 
that the BBC pulls in 
more viewers than 
the -opposition. When Prince 
Charles stood in St Paul’s 
Cathedral about to marry 
Lady Diana Spencer five years 
ago. 24.8 million people were 
watching on BBC and 14.4 
million on ITV. 

,Tt Is a disparity not easily 
explained, since on non-royal 
extravaganzas like Budgets 
aod_ General Elections. ITV 
more than holds its own. The 
rough and ready excuse is that 
potential TTV viewers are 
alienated by the thought ot 
commercial breaks even 
though ITV never runs com- 
mercials during royal occa- 
sions and will not be doing so 
today. 

The more valid argument is 
that the BBC has been at it 
longer and has established an 
authority which the- compara- 
tively upstart opposition has 
. found difficult to shake. For 
•many years that authority was 
personified m the amplefigure 
;_oCtiieJate Richard Dimbleby. 

- r^Dbhbieby ill - Coronation 
postponed” went the joke but 
for many millions, a Corona- 
tion or a royal wedding witfi- 
out that huge and reassuring 
presence would have been 
unthinkable. After b» death 
his mantle was assumed by the 
"Scottish actor. Tom Fleming- 
whose bushed, reverential 
tones, perfectly echoed the 
pmitifeby style. 

.--This time, though, there ha* 
been* a minor revolution m 
BBC thinking and out goes 
Fleming. The BBC view-is that 
while the nuptials of a future 
King and Queen needed to be 
treated with' appropriate so- 
tenwity, the wedding of a jony 
Prince, several removes from 


the succession, calls for more 
informal coverage. 

The irony is that in order to 
achieve this, the stiff and 
decorous Fleming has been, 
replaced by another 
Dimbleby. In search of its new 
relaxed style, the Beeb decided 
that its principal royal wed- 
ding commentator this time 
would be a presenter, to be 
seen as well as heard. David 
Dimbleby was fell to be more 
suitable for this role than the 
“off-vision” Fleming. 

For the wedding of Prince 
Charles and Lady Diana. 
Fleming gave bis commentary 
from high up in St Paul’s 
Cathedral Dimbleby will be 
in the thick of things, in a glass 
walled temporary studio at the 
West Door of Westminster 
Abbey. His chair will move on 
rails so that at one moment he 
can talk to camera, at another 
provide the voice-over to 
whatever picture is being se- 
lected from the bank of moni- 
tors in front ofhim^ 

D avid Dimbleby. as 
the son of the great 
Richard, may have 
had a head start to 
his broadcasting career but he 
has been obliged to forge his 
-own style. ' * 

At times he may have lned 
too hard. He was in trouble 
some years back when he 
attempted a less than obsequi- 
ous commentary for the visit 
to Britain of President Rich- 
ard Nixon, and again when he 
tried to press Harold Wilson 
over how much the former 
PM had been, paid for his 
memoirs. But after the requi- 
site wrist-slapping all was 
eventually forgiven and the 
Dimbleby succession is now 
proudly established- It is 
David’s first big royal assign- 
ment . , . . 

ITV, on the other band, is 
fielding the same team as for 
Charles and Diana- The dou- 
ble act of Sir Alastair Burnet 
and Ronald Alteon may nert 
have won the battle of; the 
ratings but it was ^received 
5 yr the critics. Barrie Sates, 
executive producer of the ITV 


wedding coverage, hopes they 
can take at least half the 
audience this time. Michael 
Grade, for the BBC disarm- 
ingly denies that he is out for a 
ratings victory, merely trying 
to give viewers the best possi- 
ble coverage. 

Curiously enough, as the 
BBC moves to the less formal 
David Dimbleby. the ITV duo 
has assumed much of the 
BBCs traditional air of doing 
the right and proper thing by 
the occasion. 

I t was Burnet who con- 
ducted .the exclusive in- 
terview last year with the 
Prince and Princess of 
Wales and he is author of The 
1TN Book qf the Queen Moth- 
er. Allison is even more an 
establishment figure, having 
been BBC court correspon- 
dent and, for five years, press 
secretary to the Queen. 

That gives him an intimate 
acquaintance with the subject 
that no one else commentat- 
ing today will be able to 
match. 

White Dimbleby mixes it 
with the noise and bustle 
outside the Abbey, Burnet and' 
Allison will be a mile-and-a- 
half away. They are spending 
the day in Euslon Road in 
studio five of Thames Televi- 
sion and win deliver their 
commentary from monitors. 
For authentic on-the-spot re- 
porting you have to turn to the 
old-fashioned wireless. 

In fret BBC Radio can 
claim a distinction over the 
telly boys by having a com- 
mentator inside the Abbey. 
This privilege falls to Peter 
Jones,. a man more usually 
found in football stadia but. 
like all the seasoned radio 
voices, able to take almost 
anything in his stride. 

One tradition of royal occa- 
sions that will be maintained 
is that the cameramen inside 
the Abbey wifi wear morning 
dress. Tom Fleming used to 
wear morning dress as well 
even if no one saw him. David 
Dimbleby will wear a grey 
suit. 

Peter Waymark 


• Television and radio is 
providing full live cover- 
age of the wedding 


BBC 1 


6.15am Breakfast Time: 
Introduced by Frank 
Bough and Sally 
i Magnusson. The 
programme indudes 
A wedding Fit lor a 
Prince (6.30), a behind- 
the-scenes look at 
the style of the 
ceremony 

Soon to be Princess 
(7.08), a profile of Sarah 
Ferguson by her 
parents, friends and 
teachers • 

The Abbey Awakes 
(7 JO), last-minute 


The Bachelor Pnnce 
(8.10), profile of Prince 
Andrew by his 
friends and naval 
* colleagues 
Across the Seas 
(8 JO), HMS Brazen 
holds a deck party in 
honour of its temrier 
shipmate: with John 
Mountford 
Summer Deftghted 
(9.05), celebrations in 
Saran Ferguson’s 
Hampshire village home; 
wltii Valerie 
Smgieton and John - 
Stapleton 

Calling the Fatidands 
(9.30), five greetings 
from Prince 
Andrew's admirers 
10.0 Westminster Abbey: 
the .doors open, and 
David Dimbleby 
(below) from a 



Palace described by 
David Dimbleby. 
Dimbleby and Selina 
Scott talk to guests 
about the ceremony and 
Mike Smith joins the 
crowds in the MaU. Ends 
1.30om. 


Departure described by 
Dimbleby. Ends 4.22. 
9J0 ADay to 

Remember recorded 
highlights. Ends 10.30. 


6.15am TV-am Royal 
Wecfcfing Special: 
introduced by Anne 
Diamond and Nick 
Owen. Anne 
Lauchars reports from 
Dummer and studio 

g uests include Alastair 
u met and Ronald 
Allison, the principal ITV 
commentators for 
the da yr Ralph Wykes- 
Sneyd, Prince 
Andrew’s former 
commanding officer 
in the Fatidands; Orusitia 
Beyfus, fashion 
editor of Vogue: Gyles 
Brandreth; and royal 
experts Godfrey Talbot, 
Nigel Dempster and 
Ingrid Seward. 

9J5 The Royal Wedding: 
Martyn Lewis describes 
the scene at 
Buckingham Palace, 
Pamela Armstrong at 
Clarence House and 
Carol Barnes at 
Trafalgar Square. 
Alastair Stewart 
offers a bird’s eye view 
from the Goodyear ' 
airship 1 .000ft above 
London. Alastair 
Burnet (below) and 


, . -..v 


HIGHLIGHTS OF THE DAY 


lOJOam Bridesmaids and pages leave Qarence House for Westminster Abbey 
10.57 The Queen and other members of the RoyaJ Family leave Buckingham Palace 
11 JS Prince Andrew, accompanied by Prince Edward, leaves Buckingham Palace 

11.15 Miss Sarah Ferguson and her father. Major Ronald Ferguson, leave Clarence House 
11.20 Prince Andrew arrives at Westminster Abbey 

11-28 Miss Ferguson arrives at the Abbey 

11 JO Start of the Marriage Service, conducted by the Archbishop of Canterbury 
l2JSpm The Bride and Groom leave the Abbey for Buckingham Palaoe 

1.15 The Bride and Groom appear on the balcony of Buckingham Palace 

4J> The Bride and Groom drive by Buckingham Palace Road. Pimlico Road and Royal Hospital 
Road to the Royal Hospital. Chelsea, before starting their honeymoon 


RADIO 4 



Abbey, John 
Timpson outside 
Buckingham Palace 
and Brian Redhead 
travelling me route 
Ends at 9am. 

10J0 The Royal 

Wedding: John Dunn 
sets the scene and 
the commentators are 
Brian Johnston 
(below) at the Victoria 


temporary studio 
outside the Abbey, 
describes the arrival 
of the 1,800 guests, 
including foreign 
royalty, political figures 
and personalties 

" from show business. 

1045 Carriage 

Procession: Seiina 
Scott at Buckingham 
Palace sees the 
carriages and 
escorts leave for the 
Abbey. Fashion 
expert Sophie Hicks 
looks at the dresses 
of the bride and 
' atten dants. 

11 J0 The Marriag e Service 
and the return 
to Buckingham 



Cream tip No. 47 


yourself for the 
Royal Wedding. 

Creamy Savoury Flaa 

With the wedding of the year nearly 
here, you’ll want to make sure you miss 
none of it 

So here's a simple dish you can 
prepare beforehand to enjoy during the 
celebrations later. 

Line a 20cm (8") flan dish with 225g 
(8oz) of short crust pastry. 

Then fill with your favourite savoury 
filling. 

Beat together 2 eggs with 150ml (ttpt) 
Double Cream, season well and pour over 
the flan for that special touch. . 

Decorate with sliced tomato and 
bake at 200°C (400°F1 mark 6 for 30-35 
minutes. If you’re having a party this 
serves 4 to 6 friends. 

Appetising hot or cold, with salad or 
as part of a buffet It's the perfect way to 
see the happy couple on their way. 

Congratulations all round. 


RQnald Allison 
describe the procession 
to Westminster, the 
wedding service, the 
return of the bride 
and groom to 
Buckingham Palace 
and the appearance of 
the couple on the 
balcony. Ends 1 JOpm. 

4.0pm Honeymoon 

Departure: described by 
Alastair Burnet and 
Ronald Allison. Ends 5. 

645 The Royal Day: 
recorded hfghfights 
• Ends at 7J0. 


Memorial; Vicki 

Gabereau, with Suzy 
Menkes, fashion 
editor of The Times, 
outside Clarence 
House; John Hosken in 
Trafalgar Square; 

Reon Murtha in 
Whitehall; Sue 
McGregor outside the 
Abbey and Peter 
Jones inside. Ends 1pm. 


RADIO 2 __ 


SJOam The Royal 

Wedtfng: John Dunn 
Introduces favourite 
records chosen by 
Prince Andrew and 
Miss Sarah Ferguson. 
From 10.30, Radio 2 
joins with RadiO-4. - 






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THE TIMES WEDNESDAY JULY 23 1986 




Illustration by David Hart 


Prince Michael 
of Kent 



Princess Michael 
of Kent 
Lori 

Frederick Windsor 

Lady 

Gabriefla Windsor 

Princess 
Alexandra 

Hon r 

Angus Ogilvy T 

iFSfs M Duchess of 1 

O&vyr n I Kent 

Marina J_L Earl of 

Ogilvy | | r St Andrews 

L Lady 

Helen Windsor 


Major Ronald Ferguson 
(Father) 

Mrs Hector Banantes 
(Majharj 

Mrs Alex Makim 
(Sister) 

MrAJexMaJSm 
(Brother in Law) 
Lady Ebnhiist 
(Grandmother) 
Mrs Doreen 


Hume ] I Donald ] I John If 

*— * Fnolioh * ■ nihenod "• 


R.RCV VS H * bSMd 

Noel Jones 


Who’s who in 


the abbey 


a Fife stonemason, he was 
an Army padre at the Nor- 
mandy landings, is a former 
vice-chancellor of the Univer- 
sity of Zimbabwe and was 
recently minister of the Scots 
church in Jerusalem. 


• An ecumenical flavour 
for the officiating clergy 
ami a broad international 
touch among the singers 
will be evident as the 
nodding service unfolds in 
the abbey today. 


his former charge as vicar 
of Great St Mary's, the Univer- 
sity church at Cambridge, 
that he missed some of the 
early wedding planning. A 


former head of religious 
1BC 


Dr Robert 
Runcie, Arch- 
bishop of 
Canterbury and 
senior 

clergyman to 
the 27 mil- 
lion Britons 
baptised in the Anglican 
faith. Aged 64. ana a wartime 
tank commander in the 
Scots Guards, Dr Runcie was 
Bishop of St Albans, and a 
part-time pig farmer, before 
"na Dr Donald Cog- 



broadcasting at BSC Radio, 
he will conduct the introduction 
to the marriage service - 
his first part in a rop' — 1 
As the Abbey is a 
Peculiar”, the Dean answers 
not to the Archbishop but 
directly to the Queen. 


Rev Dr Donald I 
Moderator of the Free Church 
Federal Council, adds to 
the ecumenical flavour by 
representing 3 million Meth- 
odists, Baptists and 13 other ■ 
nonconformist groups. 

Aged 56, Dr English is a Meth- 
odist minister, teacher and 
administrator with an office in 
Central Hall directly op- 
posite the Abbey. 


succeeding! 


gan as the next most important 


person in the Church of 
gland after its head, Queen 
Elizabeth 11. This is Dr 
Runde's second royal wed- 
ding; he married the Prince 
and Princess of Wales in St 
Paul's in 1981 and he will 
perform the marriMje of Prince 
Andrew and Miss Fer- 
guson. Regarded as a wet by 
the Prime Minister for his 
conciliatory address at the 
post-Falkland s thanks- 
giving service In 1982. 


Cardinal Basil Hume, Arch- 
bishop of Westminster, repre- 
sents Britain's five million 
Roman Catholics and brings a 
strongly ecumenical flavour 
to the wedding of a son of the 
Protestant sovereign and 
head of the Church of England. 
Aged 63 and the son of a 
distinguished Scots physician. 
Cardinal Hume was Abbot 
of England's leading Cathofic 
boardmg school at 
Ampleforth before being made 


Ven Noel Jones, Chaplain 
of the Fleet and Archdeacon 
for the Royal Navy, is the 
Senior Service's senior chap- 
lain. He wilf deliver the tra- 
ditional prayer of Sir Francis 
Drake at his first rpyal wed- 
ding, where the bridegroom is 
a serving officer with the 
Feet. Aged 53, he served as 
an Anglican vicar in Nigeria 
before becoming a naval chap- 
lain and undergoing Royal 
Marine Commando training. 


Scene from above: how the 
principals line op, top, and 
the lay-out of die abbey 


the country's most senior 
ire cfe 


Catholic clergyman in 1976. He 
will take one of the prayers, 
as he did atthe 1981 royal 
wedding. 


Dr John Habgood, Arch- 
bishop of York and the Church 
of England’s second most 
senior clergyman, is also 
participating in his first 
royal wedding, delivering a 
prayer and the blessing on 
the couple at the end of the 


the registers. She made her 
jutln The 


debutln The Magic Flute at Vi- 
enna in 1967 and was first 
seen in Britain last year. 


FeOcfty Lott 39-year old 
English soprano Known in i 


Rt Rev Michael Mayne, 

Dean of Westminster, the 
Abbey's senior resident 
clergyman and nominal head of 
its administration. Aged 56, 
and so recently arrived from 


Rt Rev Professor Robert 
Craig, Moderator of toe Gen- 
eral Assembly of the 
Church of Scotland, elected in 
May as this year's chairman 
(toe Kirk does not recognise its 
head as dwelling on tins 
earth, and even the Queen is a 
mere member of it) of toe 
900,000-member established 
state church north of toe 
border. Aged 69 and the son of 


service. Aged 59, he was 
promoted from 


Bishop of Dur- 
ham in 1983. His presence 
with Dr Runcie indicates that, 
despite ecumenical 
representation, this is essen- 
tially an Anglican service. 


pro- 
fessional musical circles as 
“FJott", who will sing Mozart’s 
anthem Laudato Dormnum 
during the signing of the reg- 
isters. Regarded as one of 
our premier romantic soprano 
leads, she performed a 
well-received Arabella at 
Glyndeboume last year and 


Arieen Auger, Los Angeles- 
bom soprano, daughter of a 
British mother and a French 
Canadian father, who will sing] 
Mozart's anthem Exuftatq_ 
Jubilate during toe signing of 


recently sang at Covent Gar- 
1 Midsui 


den in A Midsummer 
Night's Dream. After the wed- 
ding she will dash back re- 
turns to Glyndeboume, where 
she is currently appearing 
in Don Giovanni. 



THE NEW £2 COIN 

Available from Post Offices now! 


To celebrate the 1986 Common- ! If you would like one or more 
wealth Gaines in Edinburgh, the | for yourself, or relatives, simply go 


Royal Mint is issuing 
a special commemor- 
ative £2 coin. 

Never before has 
the United Kingdom 
issued a coin to 
honour a sporting 
event It is also the 
first time the UK has 
struck a £2 coin in 
nickel-brass, (the 
same metal used for the £1 coin) and 
like the£l coin it islegal tender. But 
unlike the £1 coin, it is not intended 
for general emulation. It is purely 



along toy our nearest 
Post Office. ‘ 

You can obtain 
the standard coin, at 
face value, for £2. 

There are also 
special collector 
versions available. 
For further 


The edge of the new £2 coin team the inscription 

“XIII COMMONWEALTH GAMES. . 

SCOTLAND 1986," together with the crws-cmvlet details, write direct 
nm'aMtiftkFwIMb*. to ^ Roya l Mint, 

PO Box 500 Cardiff, CF1 1HA. 


a commemorative issue. 




TELEPHONE: (0443) 223880. 


Marriage 


OF 


THE PRINCE ANDREW 


with 

MISS SARAH FERGUSON 
in Westminster Abbey on Wednesday, 23 Judy, 1986 


ORDER OF SERVICE 


MUSIC ON ENTRANCE 


Fanfare 


Imperial March (Organ) 


Edward Elgar 


HYMN 

Praise to toe Lord, the Almighty, the King of creation; 

O ray souL praise him, for he is thy health and salvation: 

ail ye who hear. 

now to his temple draw near. 

joining in glad adoration. 


Praise to the Lord, who o’er all things so wondrously rcignezb, 
shieldeth thee gently from harm, or when fainting sustained 
hast thou not seen 


how thy heart’s wishes have been 
itea it 


granted in what he ozdaineth? 


Praise to the Lord, who doth prosper th^ work and defend thee; 


surely his goodness and mercy shall 
ponder anew 

what the Almighty can do, 
if to the end he befriend thee. 


attend thee: 


Praise to the Lord! O let all that is in me adore him! 

All that hath life and breath, come now with praises before him! 
let toe Amen 

sound from his people again: 
gladly for ay we adore him. 


THE FORM OF 

SOLEMNIZATION OF MATRIMONY 


At the day and lime 
persons to be marri 



CAN shall say. 


I early beloved, we are gathered here in the sight of God and in the 
' face of this congregation, to join together this man and this woman 


ui!» cuuitu, wrnui ouiy mat e cuui auukuw ouv uv«uuu». 

presence, and first miracle that we wrought, in Cana of Galilee, and is 
commended hi Holy Writ to be honoured among aH men; and therefore 
is not by any to be enterpriaed, nor taken in hand, unadvisedly, lightly, 
or wantonly; but reverently, discreetly, sobaly, and in the fear of God, 
duly considering the caoses for which Matrimony was ordained. 


First, It was ordained for the increase of mankind according to the 
will of God, and that children might be brought up in the fear and nur- 
ture of the Lord, and to the praise of his holy name. 


Secondly. It was ordained in order that the natural instincts and affec- 
tions. implanted by God. should be hallowed and directed aright; that 
those who are called of God to this holy estate, should continue therein 
in pureness of living. 


Thirdly, It was ordained for the mutual society, help, and comfort, 
that the one ought to have of the other, both in prosperity and adversity. 


Into which holy estate these two persons present come now to be 
joined. 


Therefore if any man can shew any just cause, why they may not law. 
fully be joined together, let him now speak, or else hereafter for ever 
hold his peace. 


Then. s k 

ARCHB1SHO 


peaking unto the persons that shall be married. THE 
J1SHOP OF CANTERBURY shall say. 


I require and charge you both, as ye will answer at foe dreadful day of 
judgment irbea the secrets of all hearts shall be disclosed, tbar if either 
of you know any impediment, why ye may not be lawfully joined to- 
gether in Matrimony, ye do now confess it For be ye wdl assured, that 
so many as are coupled together otherwise than God's word doth allow 
are not joined together by God; neither is their Matrimony iawftri. 


If no impediment be alleged, then shall the Archbishop say unto the 
Man. 

A ndrew albert Christian edward, wat thou have this 

Woman to tbv wedded wife, to live together after God’s ordinance 
in the holy estate of Matrimony? Wilt thou love her, comfort her, hon- 
our. and keep her, in sickness and in health; and. forsaking ail other, 
keep thee only unto her. so long as ye both shall live? 


The Man shall answer. 


IwOI 


77icti shall the Archbishop say unto the Woman 

S ARAH MARGARET, wilt thou have this Man to thy wedded 
husband, to live together after God’s ordinance in the holy estate of 
Matrimony? Wih thou obey him. and serve him. love, honour, and keep 
him, in sickness and in health; and, forsaking all other, keep thee only 
unto him, so long as ye both shall live? 


The Woman shall answer. 


I will 


Then shall the Archbishop say. 


Who giveth this Woman to be married to this Man? 


Then shall they 1 gi ve their troth to each other in this manner. The 

' ther’s hands, shall cause 
'oman by her right hand. 


Archbishop receiving the Woman at her father’s hands, shall atuse 
the Man with his right hand to take the Wc 


and to say after him asfoftoweth. 

I ANDREW ALBERT CHRISTIAN EDWARD take thee SARAH 
MARGARET to my wedded wife, to have and to hold from this day 
forward, for better for worse, for richer for poorer, in sickness and in 
health, to love and to cherish, till death us do part, according to God’s 
holy ordinance; and thereto I plight thee my troth. 


Then shall they loose their hands : and the Woman, with her right 
hand taking the Man by his right hand, shad likewise say after the 
Archbishop, 


1 SARAH MARGARET take thee ANDREW ALBERT CHRISTIAN 
EDWARD to my wedded husband, to have and ro hold from this day 
.forward for better for worse, for richer for poorer, in sickness and in 
health, to love, cherish, and to obey, till death us do part, according to 
God's holy ordinance: and thereto 1 give thee my troth. 


Then shad they again loose their hands; and the Man shall give unto 
the Woman a ring, laying the same upon the book. And the Arch- 
bishop shall say a prayer for the blessing of the ring. 

I N THY NAME. O LORD, we hallow and dedicate this ring, that by 
thy blessing he who gives it and she who wears it, keeping true feifo 
the one to the other, may abide together in thy peace, continue 
in thy favour. live together in toy love, and may finally dweD iq 
thine eternal kingdom: through Jesus Christ our Lord Amen. 


to 


Then the Archbishop, taking the ring, shall deliver it unto the Man to 
put it upon the fourth finger of the Woman ’s left hand. And the Man, 
holding the ring there, and taught by the Archbishop, shaft say. 

\\7 ith this ring I tbee wed, with my body I thee worship, and with all 

VV my worldly goods I thee endow; In toe name of the Father, and of 

the Son. and of the Holy Ghost. Amen. 


Then the Man leaving the ring upon the Jburth finger of the 
Woman Is left hand, they shaft both kneel down: THE CONGREGA- 
TION SHALL REMAIN STANDING, and the Archbishop shad 
say ; 

Let us pray. 


O 


ETERNAL Cod. Creator and Preserver of all mankind, giver ofall 
spiritual grace, the author of everlasting life: Send toy blessing 
upon these thy servants, this man and this woman, whom we bless in toy 
name: that living faithfully together, they may surely perform and keep 
the vow and covenant betwixt them made, whereof this ring given and 
received is a token and pledge; and may ever remain in perfect love and 
peace together, and live according to toy laws; through Jesus Christ our 
Lord Amen. 


Then shaft the Archbishop Join their right hands together, and say. 
Those whom God hath joined together let no mnn pm asunder. 


Then shaft the Archbishop speak unto the people. 

F orasmuch as Andrew albert Christian edward 

and SARAH MARGARET have consented together fn holy 
wedlock, and have witnessed the same before God and this company, 
and thereto have given and pledged their troth either to oitax, and have 
declared the same by giving and receiving a ring, and by joining of 
hands: I pronounce that they be man and wife together. In toe name of 
the Father, and of toe Son. and of the Holy Ghost. Amen. 


Anil the Archbishop shaft add this Blessing. 

G od the Father. God toe Son, God the Holy Ghost, bless, preserve, 
and keep you: the Lord mercifully with his favour hxric upon you; 
and so fill you with all spiritual benediction and grace, that ye may so 
live together in this life, that in the world to come ye may have life ever- 
lasting. Amen. 





MOTET 


The Lesson, read by HIS ROYAL HIGHNESS THE PRINCE OF' 
WALES Ephesians 3: 14-end (A.V.) 


HYMN 


Tred us. heavenly Father, lead, us 
o’er the world’s tempestuous sea; 
guard us. guide us. keep us. feed us, 
for we have.no help but thee; 
yet possessing every blessing, 
if our God our Father be- 


Saviour, breathe forgiveness o’er us: 

all our weakness thou dost know, 
thou didst tread this earth before us. 

thou didst feel its keenest woe; 
lone and dreary, feint and weary, 
through the desert thou didst go. 


Spirit of our God descending, 

SO our beam with heavenly joy- 
love with every passion blending, 
pleasure that can never cloy: 
thus provided, pardoned, : J " 

nothing can our peace . 


The Prayers, said by THE PRECENTOR and SACRIST 


Let us pray. 


Lord have mercy upon us 
Answer. Christ have mercy upon us. 


Precentor. Lord, have mercy upon us. 

O ur Father, which an in heaven. Hallowed he tliy Name. Thy 
kingdom come. Thy will be done, in earth as itisin heaven. Give us . 
this day our daily bread. And forgive us our trespasses. As we forgive 
them that trespass against us. And lead us not into temptation; But do*, 
liver us from eviL A men. • •“ 


Responses said -f !•'« • , t ; 

Precentor. O Lord, save thy servant and thy handmaid; 
Answer. Who put tbdrtntstm thee. 


Precentor. O Lord, send them hdp from thy holy place 
. Answer’ And evermort-defend them. 


Precentor. Be unto them a tower of strength. 
Answer. From the face of their enemy. - 


• Precentor. O Lord, hear our prayer. 
Answer. And let our cry come unto thee. 


THE PRAYERS 


By THE CARDINAL ARCHBISHOP OF WESTMINSTER 

A hnighty God, giver of life and love; Mess ANDREW and SARAH; 
/V whom thou bast now jefowd in Chmtiaif marriage; Grant them wis- 
dom and dbvotfon in tbeirlife together, -that each may be to the other a 
strength in need, a comfort in sorrow, and a companion in joy. So unite 
their wills in thy wilL and theirspirits in thy-Spmt, that they live and 
now together in love and peace' all the days oFthearlife; through Jests 
Christ onr Lord Amen. J - ... , 

Bv THE MODERATOR OF'THE GENERAL ASSEMBLY OF 
THE CHURCH OF SCOTLAND 


A Imighty God o'ur heavenly Father, who hast given marriage to be a 
source of blessing to mankind.- we thank thee for the joys of family 
life. May we know thy presence and peace in our homes: fill them with 
thy love, and use them for thy glory: through Jesus Christ our LonL 
Amen. 


Bv THE MODERATOR OF THE FREE CHURCH FEDERAL 
COUNCIL 


O Merciful Lord, and heavenly Father, by . whose gracious gift 
mankind is increased: We beseech thee, assist with thy blesahg 
these two persons, that they may both be fruitful in procreation, of dril- 
dren. and also live together so long in godly love and honesty, foarfoey 
may see their children chrislianly and virtuously brought up.- to toy 
praise and honour; through Jesus Christ our Lord. Amen. 


By THE CHAPLAIN OF THE FLEET 


{Prayer afSir Francis Drake) ^ 

O Lord God, when thou givest to thy servants to endeavour any greto 
matter, grant us also to know that it is not the beginning, but the 
continuing of the same until it be thoroughly finished, which yielded! 
toe true glory; through him, who for the finishing of toy work laid down 
his life: our Saviour, Jesus Christ Amen. 


fly.THE ARCHBISHOP OF YORK 


A Imighty God. Father ofall mercies and giver ofall grace, we ask thy 
blessing on the members of the Royal Family as they fulfil their ser- 
vice among us: that both by their word and example our nation and 
commonwealth may be strengthened in love of righteousness and 
freedom, and preserved in unity and peace: through Jesus Christ our 
Lord. Ament , • 


The Blessing of the Couple by THE ARCHBISHOP OF YORK - 

A lmighty God. the Father of our Lord Jesus Christ, Pour, upon you 
the nches of his grace, sanctify and bless you. that ye may pfcaSe. 
him both in body and souk and Irve together in holy, love unto your 
lives' end. Amen. ... 


The Congregation remains kneeling while the Choir sings 


THE ANTHEM 


S et me as a seal upon thine heart. 
As a seal upon thine arm: 

For love is strong as death: 

Many waters cannot quench love. 
Neither can the floods drown it; 

Set me as a seal upon tome heart 
For love is strong as death. 


William Walton 


HYMN 


C ome down. O love divine. 

Seek thou this soul of mine. 

And visit >i with thine own ardour glowing: 
O Comforter, draw near. 

Within my heart appear. 

And kindle it, thy holy flame bestowing. 


ffiu 111 
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William McIGe- 1 


W e wait for toy loving kindness, O God: in toe nndst ofibyTeinpi^ ■ 
O God, according to toy Name. so. « thy praise unto toe woricTs • 
end; thy right hand is full of righteousness. 

Wei^foftoytoving kindness. O God; in the midst of toy Temple 
O Lord, send us now prosperity. Amen. 


- -jr.-l 


O let it freely bum. 

Till earthly passions turn 

To dust and ashes in its heat 'consuming; 

And let toy glorious light 
Shine ever on my sight. 

And dotof^ne round, foe while my path illuming 

Let holy charity. 

Mine outward vesture be. 

And lowliness become mine inner clothing: 

True lowliness of heart 
Which takes the humbler pan. 

And o’er its own shortcomings weeps with loathing. 


And so the yearning strong. 

lh 


With which foe soul will long. 

Shall far outpass the power of human jefljjjg; ' 
For none can guess its grace.- . 

Till he become toe place ■ 

Wherein foe Holy Spirit makes his dwelling. 




THE BLESSING by THE ARCHBisHOP.OF CANTTRBL^V 

°d ti,e Holy Trinity make you strong in faith and love, defend vou 

riZ, nti&tteyw in truth and peace: and foe blesstngof 

God Almiehtv. ihp Rnthpr jhp Rnn anal iUm ITaU* ■ . ■ 


God Almighty, the Father, foe Son and. the Holy Spirit, be among you 
and remain wtfo you always. ■ “ ™ 


THE NATIONAL ANTHEM 


G od save our gracious Queen. 

Long live our noble Queen, 
God save foe Queen: / 

Send her victorious. 

Happy and glorious. 

Long to reign over us ”■ 

God save foe Queen 


S : 

- ■# 


ANTHEMS during die signing of the Registers 
Laudate Dominum 

Exuitaie jubilate _ .. .. 

MVSIC FOR THE FINAL PROCESSION - 
The Triumphal March from Caractacus 
Crown Imperial 


Mozart 

Mozart 


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Rebels hit 
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Nakasone uses election 
triumph to strengthen 
control as party leader 


THE TIMES WEDNESDAY JULY 23 1986 


OVERSEAS NEWS 




control 

From a Correspondent 
Tokyo 

‘ Mr Yasuhiro Nakasone, tiie 
Japanese leader, reaped the 
rewards of election success 
yesterday by easily retaining 
his post as Prime Minister and 
locking into place a new Party 
and Cabinet team which 
should assure him an exten- 
sion of his term. 

Mr Nakasone, who led his 
ruling liberal Democratic 
Party (LDP) to its biggest 
general election victory on 
July- 6. smiled broadly as 
Japan's parliament over- 
whelmingly voted him bade as 
its leaden 

The Prime Minister then 
announced his new Cabinet. 

As expected, Mr Nakasone 
placed one of his most vocal 
economic policy critics, Mr 
Kiichi Miyazawa, aged 66. 
into the key post of Finance 
Minister. 

Mr Miyazawa believes Ja- 
pan should do more to reflate 
its economy to help reduce its 
exports. 

in one move, Mr Nakasone 
thereby removed one of his 
three main LDP rivals for the 
leadership from the immedi- 
ate succession and put Mr 
Miyazawa. into a position 
where be wi{] have to justify 
bis pre-election criticisms of 
the Japanese economy. 

li is also no coincidence that 
with Mr Miyazawa holding 
the purse strings, Mr Nak- 




Cabinet list 

Japan's new Cabinet: Prime 
Minister Yasuhiro Nakasone, 
v ice- Prime Minister Shin Kan- 
emaru, Justice Kaname Endo. 
Foreign Affairs T adasbi Ku- 
ranan. Finance Kiichi Miy- 
Wawa, Education. Masayuki 
Fujio. Health and Welfare Juro 
Saito, Agriculture, Forestry and 
Fisheries Mutsoki Kato. Inter- 
national Trade an ** Industry 
Hajime Tamara. Transport 
Ryutato Hashhnoio, Posts and 
Telecomm unciations Shunjiro 
Karasawa, Labour Ta kush i 
Hirai, Construction Kosei Am- 
ano, Horae Affairs Nobuyuki 
Hanashi. Chief Cabinet Sec- 
retary Masaharu Gotoda. 

Directors General of govern- 
ment agencies: Management 
and Co-ordinatiM Kazuo Ta- 
maki, Defence Yuko Korihara, 
Economic Planning Teisuo Ko- 
ndo. Science and Technology 
Yataro Mitsubayashi, Environ- 
ment Toshiyuld Inamura, Na- 
tional Land Tamisuke Wata- 
nuki. 

asonc may be able to accede to 
overseas pressure to stimulate 
Japan’s domestic growth, 
without being seen himself to 
renege on his own commit- 
ment to do the opposite and 
tackle the nation’s huge debt 
with a tight fiscal policy. 

The surprise post in the new 
Cabinet was Mr Tadashi Kur- 
anari, aged 67, virtually com- 
pletely unknown outside 
Japan, as Foreign Minister 


Mr Kuranari is one of Mr 
Nakasone’s closest aides and 
is expected to help the Prime 
Minister take an even bigger 
role in foreign affairs than he 
has done. 

Mr Nakasone's first-name 
relationship with President 
Reagan has underlined his 
aggressive, personal role in 
foreign policy, which has 
marked him as unique among 
Japanese leaders and has done 
wonders for the Japanese im- 
age abroad. 

If a leader executes foreign 
policy as flamboyantly as Mr 
Nakasone has done, it counts 
in elections, said Mr Michio 
Watanabe, the International 
Trade and Industry Minister, 
last week. 

Such praise did Mr Wat- 
anabe no good in the reshuffle. 
He lost bis post to Mr Hajime 
Tamura. aged 62, who has 
supported Mr Nakasone's bid 
to extend his power. 

Mr Nakasone’s other two 
rivals for the leadership. Mr 
Noboru Takeshita. the former 
Finance Minister, and Mr 
Shintaxo Abe. the fonner For- 
eign* Minister, have already 
resigned from their govern- 
ment posts. 

They have taken the num- 
ber two and three jobs in the 
LDP^ hoping to consolidate 
leadership of their respective 
factions to challenge Mr Nak- 
asone later. 

Easiness News, page 21 




Mr Nakasone bowing as he acknowledges applause in Parliament after being voted back overwhelmingly as its leader. 


Pep talk by Zia fuels 
tensions with India 


Hopes fade for speedy 
release of journalist 

From A Correspondent, Peking 


From Hasan Akhtar, Islamabad 


Peking sees benefit in bankruptcy 


From David Bonavia 


. Bankruptcy is good, accord- 
ing to the latest thinking in 
China. A Peking economic 
journaliias said the collapse of 
industrial enterprises that can- 
not make their operations pay 

Rebels hit 
Kabul in 


enables the state to “reduce its 
operational risks'*. 

The Bankruptcy of an im- 
portant state-owned industrial 
enterprise has recently been 
reported in Peking media. 

Observers here are intrigued 
by the adoption of the idea of 


bankruptcy, specially in view 
of recent pronouncements on 
the desirability of joint- 
stocked companies in the 
mainland’s industry. 

Conservative planners in 
China will be dismayed by the 
trend, which may bring politi- 
cal conflict . 


Hopes for the quick release 
of Mr John Burns, aged 41, a 
correspondent for die New 
York Times* began to fade 
yesterday on the sixth day of 
his detention by Chinese 
authorities. 

Mr Bums, the Peking bu- 
reau chief for the US newspa- 
per, was detained last 
Thursday on accusations of 
“entering an area forbidden to 
foreigners, gathering intelli- 
gence information, and es- 
pionage”. 

The accusations apparently 
stem from his travels through 
restricted areas of Shanxi and 
Shaanxi provinces at the be- 
ginning of the month. 

Under Chinese law he can 
be held for up to 10 days 
without cause. 


His wife. Miss Jane Scott- 
Long, was unexpectedly de- 
nied permission yesterday to 
visit him at the detention 
centre in Peking tomorrow. 

Mr A M Rosenthal, the 
executive editor of the New 
York Times met Mr Li 
Zhaoxing, the deputy director 
of the Foreign Ministry's in- 
formation department, for 35 
minutes yesterday. “1 told him 
that if they had wanted to 
make theh- point that foretell- 
ers should not go into restrict- 
ed areas, they had made it,” he 
said. 

A British diplomat said that 
under the 1984 Sino-British 
consular agreement, British 
officials may not be able to 
visit Mr Burns again for 30 
days. 


A pep talk this week by 
General Zia ul-Haq to Paki- 
stani troops in forward areas 
of the territory disputed with 
India seems to have fuelled 
reports of rising tension be- 
tween India and Pakistan. 
One consequence has been the 
indefinite postponement of 
the visit of Mr Rajiv Gandhi, 
the Indian Prime Minister. 

General Zia, Pakistan’s 
President and Army chief, has 
been louring Pakistan’s north- 
ern areas. On Monday, ac- 
companied by General K M 
Arif. Vice-Chief of Army Staff 
and operational commander 
of the Pakistan Army, he told 
troops in an unidentified for- 
ward area that “God Almighty 
would reward them for the 
sacred job of defence they 


were performing in a sensitive 
region . . 

Pakistan-Indian relations 
have been deteriorating, with 
Pakistan alleging that Indian 
troops occupied strategic posi- 
tions in the Pakistan pan of 
the disputed Jammu and 
Kashmir state in 1984 and 
India claiming that Pakistan 
has supported Sikh 
separatists. 

Border clashes between 
troops are reported to have 
resulted in deaths and injuries 
in recent months. 

Speaking at a public meet- 
ing in Gilgil on Sunday. 
Genera] Zia went beyond the 
previously stated position on 
Kashmir. He said Kashmir 
was an integral part and 
lifeline of Pakistan. 


Mine kills 
28 as talks 
continue in 
Colombo 

From Vijftha Yapa 
Colombo 

A landmine exploded under 
a bus in northern Sri Lanka 
yesterday, killing 28 people. 

Separatist Tamil guerrillas 
are believed responsible for 
the incident in- Kuchikadiya, 
near Vavuniya. Among the 
dead were seven women and 
children. Fourteen seriously 
injured were taken to 
Anurdhapura hospital, 35 
miles away. 

Most of the victims are 
from the majority Sinhala 
community. 

In Colombo, despite the 
continuing violence in the 
north and east in which both 
Sinhala and Tamil civilians 
are dying, , talks continued 
between the moderate Tamil 
United Liberation Front and 
President Jayewardene amid 
optimism that some headway 
* is being made. 

Both sides are keeping silent 
on the nature of the talks but 
on Monday, the Tulf leaders 
met the Finance Minister, Mr 
Ronnie de Mel, ta examine 
details of finances for the 
provincial councils, the pro- 
posed unit of devolution. 

Tulf will meet Mrs Sirima 
Bandaranaike. the' leader of 
the Sri Lanka Freedom Party, 
tomorrow. Her party opposes 
the Government's proposals 
on devolution, and said it 
would boycott the political 
parties’ conference chaired by 
President Jayewardene today 
where the details of devoid - 
lion were being discussed. 

The secretary general of 
Tulf, Mr Appapillai 
Aminhalmgam. said on Mon- 
day that it was tragic that 
whenever the party in power 
tried to solve the ethnic 
problem, the opposition;, 
adopted a chauvanistic line 
and sought to wean the 
Sinhala public away from the 
party in power. 


Trouble brewing Down Under 

Australia turns its 


heavy raid S S THE VOLKSWAGEN LT 31, 

Islamabad (AFP) *» Muslim ... * ^ * * 

Pbels fighting to hold their From Stephen Taylor, Sydney 

BsSaasas „a •jssssui: ansna AMD UHW 1T , C fllRINtl 
Sja-MSKsasaf'-''" nlvU nUVY II JlUniliv 


Islamabad (AFP) •» Muslim 
fobds fighting to hold their 
strongholds in Herat and Kan- 
dahar have moved into Kabul 
with protracted and co- 
ordinated attacks on the Sovi- 
et Embassy and other Soviet 
interests in the capital. West- 
ern diplomats - said- Mierc . 
yesterday. 

i Last week the Mujabedeen 
mounted a two-hour attack on 
the Embassy, a residential 
complex for Soviet diplomats, 
the KGB offices and the 
Russian -cultural centre, the 
diplomats said. 

* They reported a tworhour 
gun battle near a Soviet army 
complex at Dartxi Am an, add- 
ing that Kabul residents heard 
25 .loud explosions in the 
vicinity. 

Small-arms skirmishes were 
also reported near the Foreign 
Ministry and the Prime 

• Minister’s office, they said, 
-without giving details. 

... Contradicting a Soviet 
.-.claim that the resistance in 
Herat, bordering Iran, was 
under control the Western 
diplomats said heavy fighting 
continued in the city, with the 
'old : town mostly razed 
• They said the Mujahedeen 
-still controlled a substantial 
portion of Herat, at the cost of 
destruction, of. much of the 
town. They added that the 
> heavy bombing had left heavy 
: civilian casualties. 


The serious decline of the 
Australian economy has done 
little to disturb the comforting 
belief held by most Austra- 
lians that they live in one of 
. ihc wprld’s wealthiest nations. 

.That is perhaps not^urpris- 
ing when a population of 
around 16 million boasts 
more than 25.000 million- 
aires. and when on a breezy 
day there seems to be as many 
yachts skimming Sydney Har- 
bour as there are city 
residents. 

But there is a relatively new 
side to this glossy coin: Aus- 
tralia may still be among the 
most affluent of nations but its 
proud egalitarianism is fading. 
In the hard times ahead the 
main sufferers are going to be 
the fastest-growing sector of 
the population — the poor. 

Mr Julian Disney, the presi- 
dent of the Australian Council 
of Social Service, which repre- 
sents all welfare agencies, says 
Australia has become a more 
unfair and selfish place; a 
more polarized society where 
“poverty is as bad as that in 
Britain or the United States’*. 

The statistics be quotes are 
eloquent. In the past decade 
per capita gross domestic 
product has risen by more 
than 10 per cent, yet the 
number of people living below 


the poverty line has more than j 
doubled to almost three mil- 
lion, or 17.5 per cent of the 
population. 

; More than 800.000 chil- 
dren, one in five of the 
population under the age of. 
16, live below the povery line 
— a computed income' level 
which; in the case of a family 
of four, is less than Aus $267 
(about £11 5) a week. 

Ten years ago the poor were 
mainly pensioners. Now they 
include the long-term unem- 
ployed and single mothers, 
whose numbers have risen 
sharply since the Family Law 
Act simplified divorce. 

Not all those below the 
poverty line are in such dire 
straits that they are unable to 
feed or cloth themselves, but 
the strain on the community is 
showing. Bodies such as the 
Salvation Army have reported 
an unprecedented demand for 
assistance. In the past year the 
“Salvos” have had to increase 
services of emergency accom- 
modation and food parcels by 
around 18 per cent. 

Welfare organizations are 
watching apprehensively for 
what will emerge from the 
Federal Government’s surgery 
on next month's budget, 
which is expected to hit 
pensions and family allow- 
ances. 


Chickens bring Nicaragua’s 
problems home to roost 


From John Carlin 
Managua 

With Nicaragua facing its 
worst food shortages in seven 
years of Sandinista rale, a 
recent catastrophe which be- 
fell the chicken industry has 
done little for the Gov- 
ernment's waning popularity. 

A full 20 per cent, or 
180,000, of Nicaragua's tot- 
tery r Mekong had to be killed 
earlier this month when they 
began to attack each other, so 


Both explanations — and the 
truth probably lies somewhere 
in the middle — identify key 
deficiencies in an economy 
increasingly under threat from 

the Contra guerrillas, support 
for whom is growing in 
Washington. 

Western diplomats say that 
tod management and a col- 
lapse in export income have 


the problem. According to the 
Economy Ministry six years of 
fighting have led to losses to 
the country of $1 billion (£666 
million) — a huge amount 
given expert income this year 
will not exceed $260 million, a 
sum which covers only one 
third of the economy's foreign 
income needs. 

This added to the fact that 


apse in unw » w « 

encouraged that school of 40 per cent of the country's 
thought subscribed to by the resources - and the best of its 


something to eat. The chicken 
landing ou Nicaraguans 
plates lately has been aston- 
ishingly emaciated and spar- - 
row-uke. 

The problem, the govern- 
ment now admits, was lack or 
protein in the chicken-feed. 
What is less dear is why the 
problem emerged m the mst 
place, especially as chicken 
production had been one of the 
great Sandinista successes, 
with the number in Nicaragua 
having doubled since the over- 
throw of the _ 
^Anastasib Somoza in 1979. 


White House, which believes 
that Nicaragua's three million 


S2SS 

ly emaciated mid spar-' g^SJdS^ 

Ssesjs: d^ggsgg s 

!te Iheebicken-feed. expeneodBgttowwrtmo- 

U wc dear is why the meats since the triumph of the 
m emerged in the first Sandinista revolution, a crisis 
duckM MprofMmlthale** Mpply- 


manpower — are absorbed by 
the war has meant that the 


growth' so cherished in the 
heady days after Somoza's fall 
have had to give way to a 
policy now of sheer sunrraL 
In the lace of a ]4-month- 
old American trade embargo, 
Nicaragua has tod to turn 
increasingly for help to the 
Soviet bloc — the source now of 
84 per cent of international 


President, said last month. 

jrSEZ 


so praouw uuu c™ ~ ■ /• — ~ vr — “;rr 

me food is difficult.” Seffiwr credits and assrstawe. As this 
Seraio Ramirez, the Vice- dependence inevitably grows, 


chicken-feed has to be import- 


given Nicaragua's chronic 
shortage of foreign canency- 
Tbe other, according to a 
report on the official Voice w 
Nicaragua radio station* * 
that the ministry responsible 
failed to realize in tune that it 
-fiad a «st consignment « 
soya-based chicken feed tying 
in a warehouse in the toific 
portof Corinto, 


Soviet Union. 

But Nicaraguans are not 
starving. Nicaragua is a tropi- 
cal, naturally bountiful coun- 
try. As a senior diplomat wryly 
remarked this week, “things 
are not at all bad if you 


the Sandinistas will continue 
— not without reason — to 
blame the war. 

Yet in the capital Managua 
and other cities the war has 
hardly been felt, its being 
confined mainly to the remote 
ruwnnins of the north. 

All the grumbling, discon- 
tented majority of Nicara- 
guans know for sure is that 
they are eating less. If 180,000 
under-nourished chickens 
have suddenly to be killed off 


ZZs*Tto Kxm- or, as tappeorf 
nia in January”. Yet food is 20,000 tomes of meat are 
becoming a°wBtkal proMem. forgotten m a stotMmed 
TbeUS-Bnanced Contra arareboose and left to rot, tee 
war, the Government is always 

quick to say, is at the heart of with the Government. . 


“You have to be strong inside to live alone 
stuck in a wheelchair on the top floor of a 
tower block. At one time I felt like a prisoner 
in my own home: I didn’t get out for weeks 
on end. I got a bit fed up, though I still 
had Chad, my songbird, for company.” 

In Britain, one household in 
seven is inhabited by an old person 
living on their own. One million 
have no regular visitors. Half a million 
have no living relatives. Over a million 
can’t walk without help. 

“ After my husband died I felt I was just 
wasting away from loneliness. I used to just 
sit watching the shadows cross my sitting 
room wall. I knew I should be getting out 
and about more, but how, and where to? 
It's not easy, not with a walking frame.” 

For 20,000 old people every week 
that getting out and about is a Help the 
Aged minibus. 

Sometimes it’s their sole link with 
the community: 

“Honestly, before I drove this run I didn’t 
know what gratitude meant I’ve taken 
people to the shops for the first time in 
3 years. One old man wondered what 
happened to the trams. Often you can see 
their health improve just from contact with 
the other people at the Day Centre, and 
the outside world “ 

TOSS SPACE HAS BEEN GENEROUSLY DONATE) BY VOLKSWAGEN COMMERCIAL VEHICLES 



Help the Aged have helped fund 250 
minibuses for voluntary groups to run. 
We support Day Centres, Day Hospitals, 
provide Emergency Alarm Systems and 
support hundreds of other simple, prac- 
tical projects that combat the frailty, 
isolation and loneliness millions suffer, 
just because they’re old. 

“Old age takes away family, and friends, 
and your mobility, till there you are, just 
with the telly. And not all of us like telly, 
you know, we prefer people”. 

To find out more about our work, 
or to send a donation, please write to 
Help the Aged, 25 th Anniversary Appeal, 
Freepost, 62604, f 

St James’s Walk, 

London ECIB I BP. 

Help the Aged 

THE TIME TO CARE IS NOW 





The Rainbow Warrior affair 

Legal muddle 
fails to delay 
agents transfer 

From Richard Long, Wellington 


Mr Paul Neazor, the New 
Zealand Solicitor-General, 
cleared the way .yesterday for 
the two French agents, jailed 
for their part in the Rainbow 
Warrior sabotage, to be de- 
ported into French custody in 
spite of last-minute legal 
moves by an Auckland lawyer. 

Mr Neazor, who is in Brit- 
ain, signed a stay of proceed- 
ings order to thwart attempts 
by Mr Colin Amery. a lawyer, 
to have the agents held in New 
Zealand to face a private 
prosecution under the Explo- 
sives AcL 

This followed a day of 
drama in the Auckland Dis- 
trict Court in which Mr 
Amery won from a District 
Court judge, Mrs Augusta 
Wallace, a ruling that the two 
agents should be produced in 
court at JO am today. 

Further action against 
Dominique Prieur and Alain 
Mafart would have held up 
their release into French cus- 
tody. as ordered under the 
Rainbow Warrior arbitration 
ruling by Sehor Javier Perez 
de Cuellar, the United Na- 
tions Secretary General 

The agents were to be 
handed over by July 25 in 
exchange for an apology from 
France for the incident, $7 
million (£4.7 million) in com- 
pensation and an end to trade 
sanctions. 

But Mr Jim McLay, the 
Opposition Justice spokes- 
man. and a former attorney 
general. last night criticized 


Mr Geof&ey Palmer, the At- 
torney General for leaving the 
stay of proceedings action to 
the Solidtor-GcneraL 

Mr McLay said this was 
“buck-passing of the worst 
order by Mr Palmer, who 
was also in Britain, and could 
have signed the order just as 
easily as Mr Neazor. 

Mr McLay said the tradi- 
tion in New Z e al an d was for 
the Attorney General to act in 
cases in which he was answer- 
able to Parliament. The Rain- 
bow Warrior case certainly fell 
into that category, be said. 

Mr David Lange, the New 
Zealand Prime Minister, said 
on Monday that the Govern- 
ment and the Attorney Gener- 
al would not act to thwart the 
private prosecution. This was 
a matter for the Solicitor- 
General and the courts to 
decide. 


rfv. 



The Australian guided-missile destroyer 
and its escort entering Singapore bar be 


HMAS 
or yesterday. 


Anchor butter gets EEC blessing 

From Jonathan Brande The arrangement was ag- ances from the Europe 

reed in record time, in suite of Commission that young In 


From Jonathan Brande 
Brussels 
The European Community 
has set new quotas for the 
import of New Zealand butter 
into Britain, in a decision 
which ensures a place for 
Anchor butter on supermarket 
shelves for the next two years. 

The quotas will be 76,000 
tonnes in 1987 and 74,500 
tonnes in 1988, sharply re- 
duced from the 1986 quota of 


The arrangement was ag- 
reed in record time, in spite of 
Irish opposition, because of 
French silence in the negotia- 
tions. In other years France 
has led the attack on New 
Zealand imports but agreed 
not to oppose the deal this 
year, under the settlement of 
the Rainbow Warrior dispute 
between Paris and Wellington. 

Deprived of French back- 
ing, Mr Peter Barry, the Irish 


79,000 tonnes but still roughly . Foreign Minister, dropped his 
a quarter of packet butter sales demand for even larger cuts, 
in Britain. In return he received assur- 


ances from the European 
Commission that young Irish 
farmers would be allowed 
extra production quotas. 

EEC quotas limit fanners' 
milk output throughout Eu- 
rope. But more flexible rules 
for the administration of quo- 
tas would allow the Irish to 
restructure their dairy indus- 
try and give more scope to 
those who want to expand. 

Similar schemes could be 
available in Britain if the 
Government gives the go- 
ahead. 


Students 
cracked 
top French 
computer 

Rom Susan MacDonald 
Paris 

' Three young computer tech- 
nology students have come 
forward and admitted that 
they were the “pirates" who 
ised a scandal by breaking 
to one of France's biggest 
J bestyrotected computer 


The break-in came over the 
Easter weekend at the Code 
Polytechniqoe, where the huge 
Cray-One computer, which 
stores top-secret defence and 
tetatiigkal data, ' is in- 
stalled. 

The three students, who 
refused to give their names or 
where they study, came for- 
ward after having read about 
the rumpus. ' 

In an interview with Le 
Matin, they explained that 
they had meant no harm but 
had broken into some 15 of 
France's largest computer sys- 
tems during the Easter holi- 
days^ in eluding that- at 
Renault, just to see how far 
they could go. 

. Describing how they had 
worked through the night 
when monitoring control 
would be less, they said that 
once they obtained the right 
code “it was magfe” — they 
could do what they wanted. 

Once Ecole Polytechniqoe 
discovered die break-in, of- 
ficials' fears of professional 
espionage led them to dean 
out the whole system, change 
the passwords and cut lines of 
access to the hoot-end com- 
puter, which is where the 
break-in occured. 

. It has been suggested that 
the students should be hired to 
improve the protection of sen- 
sitive computer systems. 


Language 
riot leads 
to curfew 
in Assam 

From Knldip Nayar 
Delhi 

An indefinite curfew has 
been placed on the town of 
Kariraunj in southern Assam, 
India, after six people were 
killed in a language not on 
Monday. , . 

Three of the dead were 
policemen, two lynched by the 
mob and one killed in shoot- 
ing. The Army has been called 
m to oversee the curfew. 

The cause of trouble was a 
government circular making 
.Assamese a compulsory lan- 
guage. Karimgnnj is a Bengali- 
speaking town which has been 
the scene of many protests 
against the imposition of As- 
samese on Bengali-speaking 
population. . 

Nearly 1,000 people, mostly 
students, gathered outside the 
house where Mr Prafulla 
Mahan ta, Assam's Chief Min- 
ister. was staying. 

The demonstrators, carry- 
ing black flags, first shouted 
slogans against Mr Mahan ta 
and later tried to break 
through a security cordon to 
reach the house. 

Police used batons and tear 
g as to disperse the mob but 
when there was no effect they 
opened fire, killing three. The 
demonstrators retaliated by 
seizing two policemen and 
killing them on the spot The 
third policeman was killed 
accidentally in the firing 
According to the femgn a ge 
formula adopted by the Indian 
Government, in consultation 
with the states, every student 
has to read three languages: 
their mother tongue, Hindi 
and English. Lingmsii c minor- 
iries have to read the state 
language as welL 


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behind the scenes. 

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UP TO THE MINUTE IN SERVICE 



Law Report July 23 1 986- -4 

=¥ 


Ciskei can be suetf 



Gar Corporation v Trust Bank 
of Africa Ltd 

Before Sir John Donaldson, 
Masterof the Rolls. Lord Justice 
Nourse and Lord Justice 
Glidewril 

[Judgment given J uly 22} 
Although the’ Government" of 
the Republic of Ciskei was not 
recogn&fid as an independent 
sovereign state by the United 


recognized governments. 

Mr Justice Steyn -haA-cojg 
eluded that the courts should 
not treat the Government of 
Republic of Ciskei m tnej an* 
way as- they had treated UK 
Government of the GDR. , 
' In Carl Zeiss what was certi- 
fied was that the USSR was* 
jure entitled to exercise goven^ 
ing authority in the Eastern 


. lira duuiunij f |V 

Kingdom Government, it was a fom. not that it did so. In Ufc 

“ by the ^ ciskei similarly the* . 

certificate that the C- 


subordinaie body set up . _ 

Republic of South Africa to act ^ DO — - __ 

oh the la tier's behalf, and as Republic of Sooth Africa in fact 
such had locus standi to sue and exercised governing authority.; 


be sued in English couns. 

The Court of AppeaL so heW 
when allowing an "appeal by the 
defendants the- Trust . Bank ■ of 
Africa Ltd. from a deasion of 
Mr Justice Steyn (The Times, 
June 3. 1986). that the Govern- 
ment of the Republic of Ciskei 
had no locus standi to defend or 
counterclaim asd third' party ui 
proceedings brought. ; by _ihe 
plain lifts, the Gur Corporation, 
against the defendants: ■■ 

Mr Peter CressweU. QC. Mr, 
J3ihn Lauierpachu QC and Mr 
John Jarvis tor the defendants; 
Mr Simon Tuckey. QC mid Mr 
Amhony Temple. QC' 07 . 
Ciskei Government: Mr John 
Laws as amicus curiae: Mr 
Antonio Bueno for ibe plain- 
tiffs. 

THE MASTER OF THE 
ROLLS said that the plaintiffs 
had contracted to build a. hos- 
pital and two schools in Ciskei. 
In connection with that contract 
the plain tiffs had asked the 
defendants to issue a guarantee 
in favour of the building owners. 

In due course the building 
owners bad demanded payment 
under the guarantee. The defen- 
dants damned to pay on the 
ground that no demand comply- 
ing with the conditions of the 
guarantee had been made before 

its expiry. In the ensuing litiga- 
tion an three parties had been 
before the court. 

Mr Justice "Steyn bad tried as 
a preliminary point the issue of 
whether the building owner, 
calling itself "^the Government 
of the Republic of CiskcC, had 
any locus standi in the courts of 
•England. He had deckled it had 

none. -. . 

In 198Ifoe South African 
Par liam ent .had .enacted "the 
Status of Ciskei Act 1 981. which 
had purported to declare that 
the territory of Ciskei con-, 
stituted a sovereign and in- : 
dependent state and was no 
longer part . of the Republic of 
South Africa. The Act had also 
purported to empower the leg-/ 
IsJative assembly of Qskef to- 
make laws (including a constitu- 
tion) for Ciskei 

There were no materials on 
the basis of which it might have 
lie Got 


been 

menl 


that the Govero- 


ikei might be viewed 

e entity ' 

government^ which 


era sea govemms 
What was left to be mtetngi 
from the Carl Zeiss certificate 
was expressed m the Ciskfc 
certificate.- that the Unit# 
Kingdom _ Government _ does 
not have a -formal position Jp 
regards ihe.exercise of governing 
authority".. ... 

There was an apparent 
irast between the two 
cates when "it came 
entitlement to: exercise got 
ing! authority. In each case 
certificates were conchisive t 
the GDR or the Ciskei were ’ 
recognized as independent 
ereign States. ' - 
• In the case of the GDR _ 
certificate pain ted expressly 
where superior authority was] 
be found. The question was 
whether foe Ciskei certificates, 
either "alone or with other ev- 
idence. pointed to any superior 
authority of which the coops 
could take cognizance, as 
supplying the requisite am 
ity to enable the Government 
the Republic of Gsfeei-io 
take executive, administrate 
or.legislative acts. J 

In reviewing and eyaluati] 
other evidence the court bad| 
disregard any declarations j 
Acts of the Republic of "Sor 
Africa or of the RqpnUfe 
Ciskei which' conflicted with 
certificates of the United Kii 
dora Government. 

The court had to"disrcgi$id 
section l(l> of the Status ft 
Ciskei Act 198L which declared 
the Republic of Ciskei to bt£a 
sovereign and independent suite 
ceasing to be pan of the n -—-' L 
lie of South Africa and 
1(2) which declared, dm -... 
Republic of South Africa wo^W 
cease to . exercise any authority ■; 
over the territory. It had also^o 
also disregard section" 1(1") offlie 
Republic of Ciskei Constitution 

Act 1981. I ‘ 

. - The court could and had-to 
lake cognizance of the remain- 
der of -those Acts. Thus section 
3(1) of the Status of Ciskei Act 
1981 became a straightforward 
delegation of. legislative power 
which could be revoked m foe 
same - way as it bad boro 
conferred, by legislative Actiof 
the Republic of South Africa? 

. The constitutional historyyof 
the, 'U^ritory of Ciskei was 


d&erou^dtgre 

as.foe same ^ nation of ^ 


government, which existed jm-, 
mediately prior tofoe passiftg-of 
-foe .1 981 AcLfi-vii. i~ ■* '■ 

The jhfere that a party to- 
linganim chose to describe itself 
as “the Government of the 
Republic of. . "did not of itself 
create any problem of locus 
standi. It might be a trade name, 
a firm name, a description of 
what was known in. the travel 
industry as an “affinity group" 
or simply an example of what 
his Lordship ventured to call the 
“Pimlico Syndrome” after the 
classic film Passport to Pimlico. 

It was not such a case, and 
what might otherwise be treated 
as mere pretentiousness could 
not be so lightly dismissed, since 
the Republic of Ciskei was 
undoubtedly recognized by the 
Republic of South Africa. 

In those circumstances steps 
were taken to inform the judge 
or the attitude of the United 
Kingdom Government towards 
foe Republic of Ciskei. 

In Carl Zeiss Stiffhmg 


the Republic of South Africa 
was a recognized sovereign state 
entitled to exercise sovereignty^- 
over Ciskei until the passing oF 
foe Status of Ciskei Act 198 1 If 
section I of that Act was 
disregarded there were no 
materials from which . to infer 
that foe situation had changed 

The legal status of foe Repub- 
lic of Ciskei and itsGovemntent 
was indistinguishable from that 
of the GDR at foe time of foe 
Carl Zeiss case. 

The appeal should be allotted 
and a declaration granted mat 
the Government of foe Republic 
of Ciskei had locus standi -in foe 
UK courts as being a subordi- 
nate body set up by foe Republic 
of South Africa to act on its 
behalf. ? 


LORD JUSTICE NOURSE, 
agreeing, said that the rule that 
foe judiciary and foe executive 
had to speak with one voice; 


J* 


Rayner A Keeler Ltd (No 2) 
(11967] 1 AC 853) foe House of 
Lords held that the English 
courts could take cognizance of 
the legislative authority of foe 
German Democratic Republic 
because, while they could not 
treat it as a sovereign state with 
legislative powers as such, they 
could and should treat it as 
having effective legislative pow- 
ers on foe fooling foal its 
legislative acts were those of a 
subordinate body ret up by fife 
USSR to act on its behalf. 

It was important to bear in 
mind foe change of practice 
whereby foe United Kingdom 


presupposed that the judidary 
could understand what the exec- 
utive had said. Where there was 
a doubt the judiciary "hadn to 
resolve it by looking at : nhe 
question and construing foe 
answer given. .. .. 5 

It was not for the judiciary to 
criticise any obscurity in-fthe 
expressions of the executive,, nor 
to inquire into their origins or 
policy. They had to take them as 
they stood. . ' 

Lord Justice Glideweff agreed 
with both judgments. 

Solicitors: Durrani Pkpse: 
Barlow Lyde & Gilbert: Trea- 
sury Solicitor: Victor Misqcdn 

& Co. T- 


Judge’s irritation 
led to injustice 


Mfllnigton v KSC &Soas 
Lord Justice Watkins, Lord 
Justice Purehas and Sir David 
Cairns 

[Judgment given July 9] 

When a trial judge expressed 
his disapproval of the solicitors' 
incompetence in failing to se- 
cure foe attendance of material 
witnesses at foe trial by. refusing 
to grant an adjournment to 
enable foe witnesses to attend, 
that amounted to an improper 
exercise of his discretion. 

The Court of Appeal so held, 
ordering a "retrial of an action 
heard by Sir Hugh Park at 
Plymouth District Registry on 
January 29, 1986 when hejave 
judgment forfoe plaintiff. Colin 
Michael Millington against foe 
defendants. KSC& Sons. . 

Mr Jeremy Carey for the 
defendants: Mr Christopher 
Goddard for the plaintiffs! 

LORD JUSTICE WATKINS 
said that foe parties were able to 
agree damages before the- trial-’ 
came on ana therefore foe only 
issue forfoe judge was culpabil- 
ity in a collision which took 
place on a dual carriageway at 
Hayle Causeway, in Cornwall 
between a lorry belongmg to foe 
defendants aha a lorry driven by. 
iheplaintiff. • _ • 

-.The appear was as to the 
judge's omission to hear two 
independent witnesses ; who 
were not m attendance. He had 
refused an application to ad- 
journ so that foe witnesses could 
give independent account?. of 
their- recollections. 

Both witnesses' could" have 
helped the Judge m bis consid- 
erations. One in particular, was 
driving behind foe two lorries 
and had .a first-rtHass - view .of 
wfiat led to the colfisioh so fi ' 


he could have been of crucial 
importance on the issuer of 
liability cm- contributory peg- 
iigence. 



waiting 

compensation for over two 
years and now owing loathe 
incompetence of foe defendants’ 
solicitors he was being asked to 
go away again. y " 

It. was apparent from tijose 
observations that the judge; was 
irritated by foe: feilure of. the 
defendants solicitors to., have 
-their tackle in order that day and 
moreover he was quite nghtiy 
making it plain to them that 
they had shown iack of regard 
forfoe court. ■ ".. p 

The jpdEe was more coo- 

cerned untn the solia lots' in- 
competence and the way in 
which they had treated foe Court 
than .he was with, the posible 
dangers of going^n wifooiA the 
, witnesses and therefore fcjjrdW 
-not in the exercise 'of? his 
discretion observe foe cardinal 
principle that the interests' of 
justice were served. ; ' 

LORD JUSTICE PURGHAS 
Mid fot foe Court of Appeal was 
reluctant to interfere with the 
- exercise /. of _the judge’s } dis~ . 
. cretion. ..blit the judge - bad 
concentrated so much oif the 
conduct of the solicitors tint be 
had foiled to put in the bah 
"foe crucial importance of . 

. witnesses on' the central issbe of 
vdiefoer a s ignal to mra left was 
.given.' , . 

The matter had to be renftted 
for retrial with- the - proper 
evidenced ‘ -V ,r ;j - v 

Sir. David Cairns ag ree d ^ 

_ Soliritors: Lawrence G * 
whd Pearce. 'Plymouth. 


; 


!*? 

FI 




h 






iShwliiir"- ■' 




lilllil 

llllfsf 


•' - •••:'•'::•••-•- 
Okizr. 




ORWELL FED? 


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thought about it. Maybe you should. 

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You probably have more influence over your 
employees’ heal* through the food you provide them 
than in any other way. So you should know whether 
their diet is balanced towards fitness and a good work 
performance or ill-health. 

HOW TO FIND OUT 

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.diet for a nominal fee through Heal* First, one of 
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Programmed by a leading nutritionist, the analysis 


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THE TIMES WEDNESDAY JULY 23 1986 




ARE YOUR EMPLOYEES 


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OVERFED 










16 



THE TIMES 
DIARY 


Open door 
for Keyes 

The humiliation ofblack business- 
man Robert ‘Brown, the White 
House's choice for ambassador to 
South Africa, has not dashed 
President Reagan’s hopes of mak- 
ing an anti-apartheid gesture to 
Pretoria. Another black. I under- 
stand. has now emerged as front- 
runner for the post. He is Alan 
Keyes, the highest ranking black in 
the Stale Depanmment and now 
in charge of the Bureau of Inter- 
national Organization Affairs. A 
right-winger. Keyes won his spurs 
as senior assistant to Jeane Kirk- 
patrick when she was US ambas- 
sador to the United Nations. 
Usefully, having jumped the 
hoops of congressional hearings to 
reach his present job. he would not 
have to face further inquisitions. 
Brown withdrew his candidacy on 
Monday amid allegations about 
past union-busting and his busi- 
ness associations with the fugitive 
Nigerian. Umaru Dikko. 

Action stations 

Wifi the Territorial Army be the 
next victim of Labour boroughs* 
displeasure? I pose the question 
since Newham has just joined the 
like-minded authorities of Cam- 
den. Islington. Lambeth and 
Hackney in withdrawing repre- 
sentatives from the Territorial 
Auxiliary and Volunteer Reserve 
Association for Greater London. 
The traditional Function of these 
reps has been to liaise with the 
association over such events as 
Remembrance Day and recruit- 
ment fairs. Bamie Cockcroft the 
association's assistant secretary. 
tells me th3t representatives from • 
other left-wing London councils 
still attend, and that recruitment 
continues unabated in tradition- 
ally strong TA catchment areas 
like Newham, regardless of local 
politics. 

Living in hope 

Another unfortunate, if unwitting, 
marriage between politics and the 
pulpiL In the course of today’s 
service at Westminster Abbey the 
Archbishp of York will beseech 
the Lord that through the word 
and example of the Royal Family, 
“our nation and Commonwealth 
may be strengthened in love of 
righteousness and freedom, and 
preserved in unity ..." 

Full spate 

Thames Water has been flooded 
with complaints over ambigu- 
ously worded water bills. Many 
customers thought that payments 
due on April 1 could be. paid by 
June 30. In feet the June 30 date 
was a deadline not for payment 
but for the authority to initiate 
action against non-payers. As a 
result, thousands of red final 
notice warnings went out. Thames 
assures me the next batch of bills 
will be reworded. 


BARRY FANTONI 



‘And it’s Britain first, second, 
third, fourth and fifth* 


Point made 

The electricity people expect big 
surges in demand today and 
tonight when television viewers 
rush to make the tea or turn on 
lights during breaks in the wed- 
ding coverage. At one point the 
Charies-Diana wedding created a 
1 ,800-megawait strain on the 
power stations. The national con- 
trol room in south London says 
that although today is not a public 
holiday, as it was for the 1981 
event plans have been made to 
cope with a 600-megawatt increase 
in demand. 

Sotto voce 

British architects, get on your 
marks. There is to be a com- 
petition to design a new ambas- 
sadorial residence in Moscow, 
intended to be a showcase for the 
best of British architecture. It will 
replace the present building, with 
a river view of the Kremlin, whjch 
the ambassador has occupied 
since the 1930s. Competitors will 
need to know how to make a 
building bug-proof. >a feature 
notoriously absent from the cur- 
rent embassy complex. “Take my 
word." a Foreign Office spokes- 
man tells me. “it's someihing we’ll 
be paying a lot of attention to”. 

In the balcony 

Office windows and balconies 
overlooking today's royal route 
are at something of a premium, 
and none more so than the six 
balconies of a Denver-based com- 
pany. Scientific Software- 
Intercomp Inc. which overlook 
the entrance to Westminster Ab- 
bev. Bob Parish, the company 
MD. tells me he has been besieged 
by journalists and photographers 
baying for a space, but he has 
sensibly restricted the offer of an 
eagle eye view to The Times , from 
which I shall bring you news anon. 

PHS 


* * ☆ it * * ffl. 


THE TIMES WEDNESDAY JULY 23 1986 



.. , - of changing roles for the _ 

coverage of weddings past — plus a celebration from t he Poet Laureate 

— - " ' ” “ M 


Timely reminder that royal 


Anne: fulfilled 


The royal wedding is in one sense 
a theatrical show, and a very good 
one too. The monarchy, like 
Janus, has two faces; sometimes it 
parades itself as a pageant at 
others it dons an occult face of 
secrecy. Both aspects are essential 
for its survival and influence. 

No doubt the wedding and its 
coverage will cost a considerable 
sum of money, but why not? There 
is something to be said for a 
splendid monarchy and some- 
thing for an austere republic, but 
for a mean monarchy there is 
nothing to be said whatsoever. As 
Bagehot puts ft; “It is better to 
spend a million in dazzling when 
you wish to dazzle, than three 
quarters of a million in trying to 
dazzle and yet not dazzling.” 
Monarchy on the cheap, in Britain 
at any rate, would turn out to be a 
spectacularly false economy. 

Today's wedding has also a 
deeper and symbolic significance. 
We have a family on the throne, 
not a single person. Every citizen 
knows what it is like to have a 
marriage in the family and the 
hopes and ideals which constellate 
around the event. In a very real 
sense then the ceremony in West- 
minster Abbey represents a 


is more than a monarch 


celebration of the nation’s fun- 
damental values. And thanks to 
television it will be an inter- 
national as well as a national 
event. The image of stability and 
continuity which will be beamed 
to the farthest ends of the earth 
will greatly enhance our standing 
in the world, not in a quantifiable 
but in a cultural and moral sense. 

The Queen’s role in the public 
and political life of Britain is dear 
enough: she has defined political 
powers which come into play 
nowadays only in very restricted 
circumstances, such as those cre- 
ated by a hung parliament This is 
supplemented by a wider in- 
fluence. The Queen sees all stale 
papers: the Prime Minister is 
received in audience once a week; 
she has the three rights “to be 
consulted, to encourage and to 
warn.” 

There are two other members of 
the Royal Family — apart from 
the rightly and universally revered 
Queen Mother — who have reas- 
onably clear public positions: the 
Duke of Edinburgh and the Prince 
of Wales. Since Prince Albert’s 
time it has been accepted that the 
prince consort is free to speak 
more frankly and on a wider range 


Norman St John-Stevas 

charts chang in g times 


of subjects than the sovereign 
herself. Prince Philip has fully 
availed himself of this privilege, 
and the losses have been out- 
weighed by the gains. 

The consort's other contribu- 
tion has been to supplement the 
monarchy's stabilizing role by 
meeting the need for change. 
Again there has been a parallel 
between the activities of Prince 
Albert and Prince Philip. Both 


have played a major part in freeing 
the monarchy from outmoded 


jm out 

social customs and connexions, 
which were becoming cumber- 
some and stifling. Ii was at Prince 
Philip’s prompting, for example, 
that the old style socially privi- 
leged Buckingham Palace garden 
parties were done away with and 
replaced by the present mer- 
itocratic gatherings dominated, by 
mayors. 

The Prince of Wales’s task is to 
prepare himself for eventually 
assuming the burden of kingship. 
He has the freedom and opportu- 
nity to supplement a formal 


education by a wide range of 
experience, all of which will be 
helpful in exercising his monar- 
chical duties. Prince Charles has 
extended the range of the Royal 
Family in two very different 
directions — one in the arts world, 
especially in the spheres of music 
and architecture, and the other 
towards concern for social prob- 
lems. supplementing conventional 
charitable activities by coming to 
grips with some of the problems 
and contradictions lying just be- 
neath the surface of contemporary 
British society. 

That leaves the junior members 
of the Royal Family, the younger 
sons and daughter. Princess .Anne. 
Prince Andrew, and Prince Ed- 
ward. What is expected of them 
and what can they achieve? In the 
past they had very little choice: 
they were condemned to many 
princelings or to be immured in 
the armed services. The situation 
different today: within the 


is 


bounds of current social and 
moral conventions they are free to 
do their own thing. 

They owe a greater debt than 
perhaps they realize for this 
liberation to Princess Margaret 
and Lord Snowdon. It was Prin- 


Philip Howard gets out the files to see how we covered previous royal weddings 




Coverage contrasts: bow The Times reported the weddings of the future Edward VII — on an 
Inside page, of course — in 1863 and Princess Anne in 1973. In between, the weddings of the 
future George V (1893), the future George VI (1923) and the present Queen (1947) 


Royal weddings excite newspapers 
to gushers of ink and rainbows of 
colour writing. They can be antici- 
pated. unlike most news; and Fleet 
Street believes the mercenary 
folklore that royal nuptials sell 
papers. Bagehot was blunt enough 
to express this view: “Women — 
one half the human race at least — 
care fifty times more for a 
marriage than a ministry.” 

If you want to categorize like 
Aristotle, you can divide the 
coverage of royal weddings by The 
Times over the past two centuries 
into four stages: the Primitive; the 
High Victorian Exhaustive: the 
Impressionist, with the arrival of 
photographs: and the Post-Im- 
pressionist. to try to compete with 
television. Royal weddings always 
get more space and more display 
than they merit in the long eye of 
history. But we should not under- 
estimate the role they play as 
cheerful signposts to mark the 
passage of time. 

The first big royal wedding for 
The Times was the ill match 
between the Prince of Wales, later 
George IV. and Caroline of Bruns- 
wick. We gave it two pages out of 
our total of four, which was 
handsome considering that the 
proprietor was only recently out of 
jail for libelling the Prince. You 
might just have guessed that not . 
everything had gone as clockwork 
from our account. There was 
mention that the wedding had so 
long been delayed, from a number 
of unforeseen accidents. We re- 
ported that the Prince got up from 
his knees too soon, slopping the 
Archbishop in full flow. 

But this Primitive account in- 
troduced a number of practices 
that were to become conventional: 
interminable tables of orders of 
processions; reporters along the 


From purple prose 
to page one colour 


route; and minute accounts of 
what everybody was wearing, 
down to the last star and furbelow 
of the bridegroom, whom we 
described as looking uncommonly 
well, rather than drunk and look- 
ing like Death, according to a less 
deferential source. 

The Times was never a 
courtieriy paper in the 19lh cen- 
tury. U roused Victoria and Albert 
to fury by regularly attacking the 
marriage settlements for their 
children in its leaders. But it did 
the decent thing in the description 
of their weddings. The full pomp 
of a royal wedding colour piece 
was introduced for Victoria’s own 
wedding, with the first quintuple- 
decker headline in our history: 
admittedly a dullish one: 


be introduced to the family as well 
as the individual, and we promise 
them they will h3ve no reason to 
be ashamed of the acquaintance 
they’ thus make.” 

For the wedding of Victoria’s 
eldest son. we introduced the 
custom of a pious sermon to the 
happy couple: “The fair Princess 
who landed on Saturday morning 
a stranger to the people, their 
habits and modes of thought, is 
now a member of our State, the 
partner for life of the Heir 
Apparent to the Throne, and. if 
the favourable omens under 
which ...” continued on p.94. 


Times in 1914. and photography 
was first deployed for a royalish 
wedding in 1919. for the marriage 
of Patricia of Connaught By 1923. 
for the wedding of the Duke and 
Duchess of York, later George VI 
and Queen Elizabeth (now the 
Queen Mother), royal wedding 
icons were being established: the 
formal team photograph, the wave 
from the coach. 


After the Queen’s wedding came 
television, and the Age of Post- 
Impressionism. .Richard Dim- 
bleby’s commentaries brought in 
relaxed and avuncular description 
rather than foe hieratic prose of 
the previous two centuries, which 
sounded like a cross between 
medieval plainsong and Gibbon 
on an off day. The press had to 
find new ways of describing 
something that everybody in- 
terested had seen several times on 
the box on the previous day. 


Celebration of Her 
Majesty's Marriage 
with His Royal Highness 
Prince Albert 
of Saxe Coburg and 
Gotha 


Three pages out of eight were 
given to description of the cere- 
mony and frequent processions, 
with additional particulars from 
the Court Newsman. Another 
page in small type, with no 
headlines and no leading, ie. at 
least 10.000 words, was devoted to 
Prince Albert’s pedigree: “It is 
right ihai the British public should 


For the Duke of York, later 
George V. we introduced an 
acanthus and vine-leaf pattern 
around the wedding pages, and the 
use of the dramatic present: “On 
the stroke of the appointed hour 
there is a commotion in the 
precincts of the chapel.” More 
influentially, we invented the 
notion of breaking the story up 
into separate chapters: St James's 
StreeL The Ceremony in the 
Chapel Royal, and so on. The 
royalty hacks will be fallowing this 
example today from the village of 
Dummer to the crowds in the 
Mall. 


Photography introduced the age 
of Impressionism in royal wed- 
ding coverage. The first half-tone 
photograph appeared in The 


The colour writers were also 
rediscovering the Old English 
prosodic device of alliteration to 
disguise the paucity of news that 
they’ were describing at vast 
length: “Gleam and gloom were 
chasing each ocher within the 
Abbey.” The advantage of colour 
writing is that you can ignore the 
facts and get on with the purple 
prose. The disadvantage is that ii 
is difficult to sustain waffle for the 
length required by a royal wed- 
ding. Alliteration was to the fore in 
our main headline for the Queen’s 
wedding in 1947. Splendour and 
Simplicity. The inky sermon ex- 
plained. as it had in the case of 
Prince Albert a hundred years 
before, that the bridegroom, al- 
though a foreigner, was all righL’ 
“They know that he has been 
brought up among them in the 
English way. has distinguished 
himself in manly sports, and 
afterwards in the leadership of 
men under the enemy's fire.” 


For Princess Margaret’s wed- 
ding The Times , under a notori- 
ously uncourtieriy editor, did not 
even lead with the story, and put 
the evening departure to the 
Caribbean rather than the cere- 
mony in the Abbey at the top. The 
intro was still breathlessly 
reverential: “They came into the 
body of the church with their 
friends and neighbours, as the 

rubric has it ” By Princess 

Anne’s wedding the Age of Post- 
Impressionism was so established 
that The Times account, the 
splash, could begin: “It was a 
grand morning for a wedding.” It 
could even venture a mild touch 
of irreverence: “The adjective 
radiant trembled on even hard- 
bitten lips.” For the Prince of 
Wales's wedding in 1981, by a 
technical miracle and at great 
expense. The Times gave the 
whole of its from page to a colour 
picture of the bride and groom on 
the steps of St Paul’s. 


The coverage of today's royal 
wedding is based in two centuries 
of history and practice. We shall 
do our best, to surprise and delight 
you. But many of the conventions 
of the inky trade in these matters 
have precedents almost as old as 
the monarchy’s. 


The Honey Bee and the Thistle 


by Ted Hughes. 


A song by the Poet Laureate to 
celebrate the royal wedding: 


of 


Upon this day in West- 
minster 

That brings die Prince his 
Bride 

Out of the sun there 
swoops a song 
That cannot be denied. 


television 


While every 
trembles 

In the organ blare 
And their cardiographs’ 
two butterflies 
Are trying to touch in air. 

While some weep at the 
foamy veil 

That surges her to bliss 
And some drink to the 
princely hand 
That lifts it for the kiss. 


When all the birds 
Roxburghshire 

Danced on the lawns, and 
ail 

The Salmon of the Tweed 
cavorted 

Over The Garden Wall 
Gold as the Honey Bee 

A helicopter snatched you 
up. 

The pilot it was me. 

The props, like a roulette 
wheel. 



ss^i m 

f A'A A A 


Stopped at felicity 
'istle's 


*1 i * ■ 


Soft as (he Thistle's crown 




Before the Country’s dried 
its eyes 

Or bells begin to ring 
Cherub in a shaft of 
fight 

Sweetly starts to sing: 


But now the Abbey 

columns 

Stand like your ancestors. 

And your / do has struck a 
root 

Down through the Abbey 
floors 

Gold as the Honey Bee 


Now like a North pole and 
a South 

You bear the magnet globe 
And axis of our spinning 
land 



Where chaos plays its 
strobe 

Soft as the Thistle’s crown 

But as the day’s 
Commandment 

Which can no longer wait 

Yokes Unicom and Lion 
both 

To haul the coach of state 
Gold as the Honey Bee 

While Royal ghosts in 
silence 

Bend at the register 

And gaze into the letters 

That you have written 
there 

Soft as the Thistle's crown 

Like splitting amp- 
lification 

Of thunder come the 
cheers 

And set my meaning hum- 
ming in 

Your honeymooning ears 
Gold as the Honey Bee 

Dance, dance, as Eve and 
Adam 

Kicked their worries off 


In Paradise, before they 
beard 


God politelycough 
i is tie's 


Soft as the Thistle's crown 

Then dance on. like a 
tuning fork 

That wakes unearthly stars 
In human hearts, and 
makes them throb 
Like noble, old guitars 
Gold as the Honey Bee 

And dance, and dance, like 

Sirius 

Inseparably two 
Who twirls in heaven, to 
show the earth 
What harmony can do 
Soft as the Thistle's crown 

For from this day, which 
gives you each 
To each as man and wife 
That’s the dance* and this 
the song . . 

Of a true and happy life 
Gold, gold as the -Honey 
Bee 

Soft as a Thistle’s crown 

© Ted Hutfm. 1986 







Edward: free to follow a career 


cess Margaret who broke out of 
the royal magic circle by marrying 
a commoner. Lord ' Snowdon 
made his own contribution to 
roval liberation by insisting on 
being free to carry on his own 
profession as a photographer 
which it had been widely expected 
he would have to abandon. This 
was all part of the social revolu- 
tion of the Sixties; the critics of 
that revolution should pause and 
consider what we would have to 
go hack to if it were to be done 
away with as they seem to wish. 

Princess Anne has been strik- 
ingly successful in developing a 
combined private and public life 
stvie of her own. She too married a 
non-royal of her own choice and 
her work for the poor and starving 
children of the world has not only 
bfeen personally fulfilling for her 
but has played a major part in 
arousing the public conscience in 
Britain to our duties towards the 
Third World. It is impossible to 
recognize in the dedicated, in- 
trepid and acclaimed worker for 
good causes the potentially diffi- 
cult. frustrated and unpopular 
princess that at one time she 
threatened to become. 

So if one asks what Prince 


Andrew and his bride will actually 
do. the answer is quite clean 
within reason anything they hke. 

If Prince Andrew wishes to stay in, 
the navy or to leave it and pursue 
some other profession that is a 
matter for him. If his wife. Idee- ... 

many other young wives, wants to *- 

continue at work she is free to do. 


so. 


These basic liberties may strike 
us as obvious enough but they 
have taken centuries to establish. 

Nor is there anything incompat- . 
ible between taking advantage of 
them and .discharging the func- 
tions ofa public life. It is certainly 
to be hoped that they will take this- 
course since the demands on, the . 
Queen are heavy and growing . 

Today there will be celebrations 
and rejoicings throughout the land 
and it would be a curmudgeon 
indeed, who would begrudge the 
young couple their obvious happi- 
ness and fulfilment. And when the 
wedding bells cease to riDg out, the 
good naiured and popular pair will 
enjoy something ..uncommon 
enough in our conformist society ; ’ffz 
but rare indeed among royals: foe 
inestimable privilege to be them- 
selves. 

© times New sp a p e rs , ‘ 1886 . 



moreover . 




Miles Kington 




-V-— 


When they .built Westminster. 
Abbey, they had never considered 
that one day crack police marks- 
men might want to lie on its root ^ 
thought Detective-Sergeant Whit- 
taker, as he lay on the roof of 
Westminster Abbey. Bloody helL I 
mean, if an assassin appeared on a 
nearby roof and he. Detective- 

re ‘ * virt 1 — 


HOMf 


Sergeant Whittaker, picked up one 
of nis five available guns and 


■■‘Hi 


blazed away at him, odds were 
that he, Detective-Sergeant Whit- 
taker, would fell off the roof before 
he had hit him. Bloody hefl. 

1 mean, , if I were a medieval 
architect; he thought, I would 
provide tots of places for crack 
police marksmen. Alright, so they 
only had cross-bows in those days, 
but even sOj you still need a good 
place tcufrre from. Detective- 
Setgeaptlvyhittaker felt a surge of . 
sympathy for the medieval police, f 
even though he recognized deep 
down that there hadn’t been any 
olice in medieval times. Bloody 
lell. No police? 

He was so preoccupied with 
these thoughts that he didn’t see 
the man approach across the roof 
of Westminster Abbey and stand 
over him until it was too late to get 
out one of his five guns. 

“All right,” said the man. “ ’Ave 
you got a ticket to be here, mate?” 

* # * 


■f v 


• • Si 

- *• ■! 


- 


■ 








: “S'r" 




Marvin J. Gordon of Oklahoma 
City had spent $7,890 to be' at 
Westminster Abbey on this day, 
July 23. He had come all the way 
from Oklahoma City to London, 
simply to be a devout but silent 
bystander. It was the only day he 
could gel to London, as the 
divorce law firm for which he 
worked had very strict holiday 
rules. It was actually easier for 
people to get a divorce than get 
lime off from the law firm. 

He was a devotee of Dylan 
Thomas's poetry, and he had 
come ail this way to meditate at 
Poet’s Comer. He was a bit 
puzzled to find that some 3JOOO 
other people seemed to have the 
same idea. 

“All right,” said a man. “ ’Ave 
you got a ticket to be here?” ‘ 

* * * 

Howard Kilner, of 38 The Laurels, 
Fortescue Avenue, Pinner, 
Middlesex, had never been a 
particularly religious man. He had 
talked to God on occasion, -but 
could never remember God talk- 
ing to him. But suddenly, one day, 
he had an urge to go to West- 
minster Abbey and just, well, pray. 

1 ■ mean, sit in an empty pew and 
send out messages. 

■ “All right,” said a man. 14 ’Ave 
you got a ticket to be here, mate?” 

* * * 

It isn't much fun being a ticket 
marshal at a royal wedding. It’s a 
bit like being a traffic warden, 
really. Whether you’re legitimate 
or not everyone resents yon, 
thought Osric Miemeyer, who had 
been cross all his life because of his 
name. 

“All right” he said roughly to a 
group of Icelandic sightseers, 
though he had no idea that they 
were Icelandic — he actually 
thought they were from Leeds or 
somewhere — “ 'ave you. got a 
ticket to be here, mate?” 

* * * 


i ,.L: o*! 


• '• T-'rt: I i* 

to 


1 - I 


ror 


- m 




: fi 

- Mr Pt 
.aw 

. V x 

; "•s '.ctif 

•- ’ -s b* 

V 

I- fu 

, , 






v- u 


/ . 

•* 

- 






The Icelanders fled. They were 
replaced by a rough -lo okin g prup ■ 

m Abbey grey. He looked Gsricup - ■*- 
and down.’ ' 

“All right,” he said. “ ’Ave vou 
got a ticket to be here, mate?"* 

Osnc . hadn’t It was foe one 
thing he hadn’t thought of. 

♦ * * 


v k‘- 


, CSfct 

«* :? v. 


At foe door of foe Abbey, Prince 
Andrew paused on the edge of the 
most wonderful adventure of his 
life. He was about to get married 
to foegiri he wanted to get married 
to. Furthermore, be had managed^ 
to get time .off for his honeymoon, 
and it was very unlikely that be 
would be called bade for helicopter 


Tf* * 

« 

^ ear ^ 


or tm 


duty during his brealt TKerp was 
'thine that 


^ 3 — — 


now. 


X - 

,T- 




nothing that could’ 

He breathed a siL_- 

jfjAli right, 7 said '.a big .voice- 
Aye yougotatickeLmate?* v . - 

•• .. 








THE TIMES WEDNESDAY JULY 23 1986 


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“A princely wedding is a 
brilliant edition of a universal 
Set and . as such rivets 
.mankind-" Bagehot’s insight 
was glimpsed at a time in the 
nineteenth century when, to 
many thoughtful observers, 
the ..monarchy must have 
seemed destined to enter upon 
a; gradual decline in public 
■esteem' and importance. 
Princely weddings, they might 
have reasoned, would con- 
tinued attract more than then- 
usual share of attention for 
some time, but their glitter 
would inevitably fade, their 
brilliance cease to rivet, and 
their significance become en- 
tirely private. 

‘They -would have been in- 
credulous to be told that a 
priheely wedding in the last 
quarter: of the twentieth cen- 
tury would fascinate not only 
the 'populace of London and 
the nation, but also millions of 
people in the rest of the world; 
that many of these remote 
enthusiasts, though living hap- 
pily in republics, would none- 
theless employ the latest 
inventions of science to eaves- 
drop on a medieval display of 
royal pomp; that commercial 
enterprises, loyal to the cold 
rationality of profit, would pay 
the sincere tribute of high 
advertising rates in order to be 
associated with the feudal 
chivalry of the occasion; and 
that utopian radicals, denying 
. the soul, would suddenly find 
it thrilling inconveniently to 
"the jingle of spurs and the flash 
ofsteeL ' . 

- Such a prophecy, seemingly 


A ROYAL DAY 


extravagant and paradoxical, 
is nonetheless confirmed by 
the jostling presence of the 
world's media at today's wed- 
ding of the Queen's second 
son. Prince Andrew, to Miss 
Sarah Ferguson. Some of the 
world's interest rests upon the 
personal qualities of the two 
young people about to many. 
Prince Andrew showed in the 
Falklands conflict that he is a 
young man of bravery and 
dash. Miss Ferguson, thrust 
suddenly into the glare of klieg 
lights and unexpected fame, 
has revealed herself to be a 
level-beaded and attractive 
young woman. A marriage 
between two such plainly like- 
able people would always 
warm the hearts of bystanders. 
But the princely character of 
the occasion is the larger 
explanation of the universal 
interest. 

The character of the 
Monarchy's appeal is, of 
course, under constant subtle 
change. At the time of the 
Queen's accession, fears were 
expressed that the Monarchy 
was remote and confined in 
too narrow a soda] set. The 
Royal Family has since made 
its accommodation with the 
modem world of television 
and intrusiveness. When the 
couple approach the altar to- 
day, they wifi face — uniquely 
among wedding couples - a 
congregation in front of them 
via the cameras. 

That accommodation has 
generally been managed with- 
out loss of the peculiar mixture 


of majesty and restraint which 
has traditionally marked the 
British Monarchy. It has not 
lost its majesty like the cycling 
monarchs of Scandinavia who 
are, in effect, their countries' 
first civil servants. Nor does it 
exhibit a plutocratic enjoy- 
ment of mere wealth — though 
television, in covering events 
like the visit of the Prince and 
Princess of Wales to the 
United States, might some- 
times suggest the opposite. 

Its hallmark in everyday life 
has been elevated normality — 
the Royal Family has been, 
above all. a family — and its 
extravagance has been re- 
served for ceremonial state 
occasions like today's mar- 
riage. These occasions, more- 
over, belong to the nation as 
well as to the young couple, 
and so cement sodal unity 
rather than straining it. 

All weddings, of course, 
blend private emotions with 
public ceremonial. Marriage is 
a sacrament which the bride 
and bridegroom administer to 
each other before God and a 
pledge to help each other face 
the troubles and difficulties 
which disturb every life and 
which may be particularly 
stressful in a royal one. But it is 
also a social occasion on which 
the two central figures an- 
nounce their union to the 
family, their friends, the tax 
collector and the world — and 
receive in return good wishes 
for the future. We gladly wish 
Prince Andrew and his bride 
every happiness. 


HOME THOUGHTS FROM RABAT 


V £«■ 

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t-u; 


. £’ 


Mr Shimon Peres* decision to 
: visit Morocco this week has 
; been "seen as a gambler's last 
r throw. But it is hard to believe 
.v that be boarded his plane 
without a good idea of how the 
•fdice would fall. 
i Like almost everything else 
-* to come out of Jerusalem, this 

• ‘imaginative initiative’* (as 
Whitehall described it) must 

..be 1 viewed against the back- 
7 drop of domestic Israeli poli- 
/ tits- With, three months' to go i; 
. as Prime Minister Mr Peres is 
passing through a turbulent 

• finale 40 what has otherwise 
been a period- of solid 

■^achievment. 

• After two years in power he 
~ has brought down the national 
. inflation rate from more than 
"400 per cent a year to around 
26 per cent at the last count. 

' This has been engineered 
partly by the application of 
: public spending cuts — not 
" usually best calculated to en- 
dear a prime minister to his 
hard-pressed people. But in Mr 
Peres’s case his assault on 

• wasteful state bureaucracy 
-'and, most of all, his 
- determination in withdrawing 
" Israeli troops from Lebanon, 
^rewarded him three months 

ago with the highest opinion 
poll rating of any Israeli prime 
: minister for a decade. 

More recently the Shin Bet 
'Security scandal and the final 
.'showdown between Mr Peres 
and his troublesome justice 
minister, Mr Yitzhak Modai, 
have suggested that his term of 
office is ending with a bang, 
-not a whimper. But the Prime 
; Minister, who is due to hand 
over the reins of government 
'.to his deputy Mr Shamir in 
^October under the terms of 


their uneasy coalition, would 
seem to be intent that he 
should go out on a note of 
promise rather than despair. 

The promise must sound 
rather vague. His host in 
Rabat, King Hassan, is in 
theory a perfect interlocutor. A 
moderate Arab leader with 
pro-Western sympathies, he 
nonetheless is chairman of the 
Arab League. Two years ago, 
moreover, he signed (to 
everyone’s amazement) a ' 
treaty with Colonel Gadaffi. 
Rabat has ethnic links with 
Israel through the large num- 
ber of Jews who live there. Add 
to that the fact that Morocco 
played a part in getting the 
Camp David peac£ process off 
the ground and the relevance 
of King Hassan to the Arab- 
Israeli issue would seem to be 
undisputed. 

Reaction to the Peres mis- 
sion has been fairly predict- 
able, with condemnation from 
radical Arab states like Libya 
and Syria and approval from 
moderate leaders — most nota- 
bly President Mubarak. With 
West Bank opinion neatly 
divided, the only real surprise 
has been the strength of feeling 
in Damascus. For President 
Assad to sever relations with 
Hassan on the basis of a single 
visit, before the results are 
discernible let alone clear, 
would seem indeed to be a 
diplomatic blunder. 

Apart from the depth of this 
Syrian antipathy, Mr Peres 
must have been less than 
surprised by the reaction of 
other countries. American ad- 
vice is said to have been 
sought beforehand and it 
would be astonishing if sound- 
ings had not been made else- 


where. Mr. Peres’ objective 
remains peace negotiations 
with King Husain of Jordan 
and moderate Palestinians, 
leading to a “land for peace** 
agreement in the Middle East 
Is King Hassan the man to get 
this process going? 

The answer to that might 
become clearer after Mr Peres* 
return to Jerusalem today. The 
Israeli Prime Minister sees the 
pursuit of a settlement as the 
lasting task in front of him. 
There can be little chance that 
Mr Shamir and his confed- 
erates from the right-wing 
Likud will open up similar 
initiatives with equal zeal. The 
concept of giving land for 
peace is indeed foreign to 
them. 

For Mr Peres it might be 
enough to get the process 
going. Even that is unlikely to 
happen as a result of this single 
dash to Rabat. But this could 
be the first in a series of 
meetings which would commit 
Israel to the kind of process Mr 
Peres seeks. While Mr Shamir 
might be ill-disposed towards 
it, he would find it politically 
more difficult to extricate the 
coalition government from a 
series of meetings already be- 
gun, than to escape involve- 
ment in the first place. If Mr 
Peres can start the machine, it 
might take some effort to stop 
it. That effort, moreover, 
might have to be made in the 
teeth of American opposition. 

Mr Peres’s flight to Rabat 
may indeed represent a throw 
of the dice by a premier with 
title time left. But if he has 
loaded them correctly he could 
well win a high enough score to 
keep him firmly in business 
until Israel's next elections. 


PRIDE m DEFEAT 




t.-.'- ■ ' 1 


._.. v V 


• ■ o' 


The Government has put in 
six years' hard political labour 
-..in the municipal salt mines. It 

• has tinkered with formulae, set 
targets, cut the grant propor- 

‘ tion. rate-capped, re-cycled, 
dose-ended. Local govem- 
ment finance has consumed 
! umpteen hours of Cabinet and 
ministerial time, alienating 
; backbenchers, creating un- 
necessary tensions between 
central and local levels^ of 
' democratic representation. 
And to what purpose? 

Mr- Ridley, the latest toiler at 
the face, announced it yes- 
terday. Aggregate current 
expenditure by councils in 
England has not shrunk nor 
- ■been reduced. It has grown, 
since 1981. by 38 per cent in 
cash terms, 7 pier cent in real 

• terms. The Government could 

have left in place the system as 
' it was in 1980 and arrived 
today at virtually the same 
point, minus the aggravation 
and the sheer waste of time 

and energy. . , 

Mr Ridley has recognized 

that reality. Indeed a phrase 
. 'current in the ministers 
‘ entourage is “real realism - 
.This involves accepting that 
.councils are now spending well 
in excess of White Pap«:pJans, 
■that there is no way of reduc- 
ing the amount, and adjusting 
the plans accordingly. 
Councils’ current budgeted 


expenditure (9 per cent above 
plan) is being carried forward 
into 1987-S8 in real terms. Mr 
Ridley’s predecessors have all 
forgiven such overspending 
grudgingly and belatedly. Mr 
Ridley has forgiven it in 
advance. Behind his statement 
may be pure politics — clearing 
the decks for spring 1987. But 
the result is a cleaner profile 
for expenditure accounting 
than for several years. 

A price has had to be paid. 
The Contingency Reserve has 
been raided. The 
Government's line yesterday 
was that a large part of the 
Reserve has in previous years 
been earmarked for local 
authority overspending: this 
year such sum is merely being 
transferred to the local author- 
ity allocation. That doctrine 
makes a nonsense of the idea 
of a Contingency Reserve. It 
shows how corrupting the 
Treasury’s battle with local 
authorities has been. 

Between them the Environ- 
ment Department and the 
Treasury have concocted a 
package that ought barring 
accident to free the Govern- 
ment from a 1 987 outcry about 
rates or other distractions on 
the local front But again, the 
cost of political peace is worth 
noting. 

For the past five years the 
Government has cut the 


proportion of local spending 
covered by Exchequer grants. 
The result has been to shift 
some part of the tax burden 
from income to property: rate- 
payers now bear a greater share 
of the cost of local services. 

That process had beneficial 
side effects. It helped in the 
education of consumers about 
the cost of services; it was 
arguably fair for domestic 
property that was increasing in 
value to cany a greater tax 
burden (though the Govern- 
ment has waited too long to 
shield industrial property ). 
Now, suddenly, with no good 
reasons slated, the transfer is 
said to have gone too far, 
become inequitable. 

There are other quirks in the 
package. But the mechanics 
are on this occasion less 
important than the rhetoric. 
This RSG settlement repre- 
sents a great defeat for the 
Government; it is lessened 
only a little by the promises of 
a grand reform of local finance 
still to come. The style of the 
moment is for ministers to 
• praise their spending records 
on social services and educa- 
tional provision. Their new- 
found pride rests to some 
considerable extent on expen- 
diture by councils that has, 
until now, consistently been 
labelled as excessive and un- 
controlled. 


LETTERS TO THE EDITOR 


Second-class citizens at the poly? 


From ihc Recior of the Polytechnic 
of Central London 
Sir. The resolution of Birk beck's 
funding crisis prompis an 
examination of the funding 
comparisons for universities and 
polytechnics published by the 
Department of Education and 
Science. This indicates that in 
1986/87, in order to support an 
evening student at Birk beck Col- 
lege at a basic unit of funding of 

0.7S relative to a full-time student, 
provides £L295 per student per 
annum {plus £984 for research). 

To provide the same type of 
degree course for evening students 
a few hundred yards away in this 
polytechnic, the 0.2 weighting 
provided under the National Ad- 
visory Body gives a basic unit of 
funding of £510 per annum per 
student (with nothing for re- 
search). 

A polytechnic evening under- 
graduate takes up to five years to 
complete an honours degree, as 
against four years at Birkbeck. 
Comparing this five-year norm 
with the four-year norm at Biric- 
beck a “just treatment” would 
resource a polytechnic evening 
sludem at four-fifths of a Birkbeck 
student, which gives a weighting 
of 0.6 of a full-time student. 

In one nation, why should the 
1,000 students studying in the 
evenings for degrees and post- 
graduate qualifications at this 
polytechnic be so inadequately 
funded relative to their near 
neigh hours? Why should these 
students be treated as the second- 


class citizens of higher education? 
Yours sincerely. 

TERENCE BURUN, Rector. 
Polytechnic of Central London. 
309 Regent Street Wl. 

From Or J. V. Pepper 
Sir, The Chairman of the UGC 
(July 16) has now explained the 
UGCs method of resourcing pan- 
time students’ courses. I thought I 
would apply it to my own part- 
time students here. 

They may obtain a degree in 
four years, an honours degree in 
five. So the weighting factors 
would be 0.75 and 0.6 respectively 
for each year’s work, say about 0.7 
overall, as the majority opt for 
non-honours when the course 
divides. 

But, as the Secretary of the 
National Advisory Body told you 
a few weeks ago. I and my 
colleagues will have an aH oca tion 
of only 0.4. or even Q~2 if we are 
foolish enough to offer the course 
on an evenings only basis. On the 
0.4 basis, my students might be 
expected to take 7.5 years {day and 
evening) or 15 years (evenings 
only). Not even the weakest stay 
that long. 

As for buildings, as opposed to 
staff allocations, it's 2/9 for the 
day students, and nothing for the 
evening people. It is true that the 
NAB Secretary also said that we 
could reapportion the money, 
and so we could; but if the UGC 
can get it more right, why 
shouldn't he? 

Yours etc. 

JON V. PEPPER, 

North East London Polytechnic, 
Department of Mathematics, 
Romford Road. El 5. 


Historic buildings 

From Mr Andrew Selkirk 
Sir, The House of Commons 
committee investigating historic 
buildings and ancient monuments 
has been very selective in its 
hearing of evidence. In particular 
it has ignored archaeological soci- 
eties completely. 

Yet the last 10 years have been 
disastrous for archaeological soci- 
eties. Most have declined in 
numbers; their activities, particu- 
larly in excavating, have slumped 
disastrously and, indeed, judging 
by the calendar of excavations, it 
is now very difficult for anyone 
wishing to join a volunteer 
excavation to find one. 

None of this appears co have got 
through to the committee. Al- 
though a number of local societies 
sent in submissions, none has 
been railed upon to give oral 
evidence. Yet we are on the verge 
of a leisure revolution — we hope 
— when the potential contribution 
of volunteer archaeologists is sim- 
ply enormous. 

The current decline must be 
reversed. Is it too late to hope that 
thecoramittee will pay a little 
more attention to the amateurs 
and a little less to the official 
bodies, if it is to make a worth- 
while contribution to preserving 
our past? 

Yours faithfully, 

ANDREW SELKIRK (Ediior. 
Current Archaeology), 

9 Nassington Road, NW3. 


Defence equipment 

From Mr James Cooper 
Sir. Your article today (July 14) by 
Philip Webster indicates that air- 
ships are being considered as an 
alternative to Nimrod This raises 
all sorts of possibilities for criteria 
in the purchase of defence equip- 
ment 

1. Should running costs be the 
determining factor, then piston- 
engined fighters carrying sophis- 
ticated missiles could be 
purchased. On the ground, horses 
could be similarly equipped and 
could then perform in a dual 
ceremonial and fighting role. 

2. Should we purchase equipment 
that does not require the potential- 
enemy to worry about expensive 
slate of the art technology? No 
need for “stealth" aircraft to 
knock out heavily defended elec- 
tronic wanting systems with bal- 
loons. 

The present concept of AWACS 
(Airborne Warning And Control 
Systems) in general allows such a 
high degree of vulnerability that 
perhaps it is logical not to concern 
oneself at all with security. 

Yours sincerely, 

JAMES COOPER, 

146 High Street. 

Watton at Stone, Hertfordshire. 


Human rights lair 

From Mr M. L. S. Passey 
Sir, Dr Jaconelli (feature, July 18) 
claims that a British Government 
might seek to deprive zhe citizen 
in certain situations of the better 
protection afforded by English law 
by invoking the inferior protection 
afforded by the terms of the 
European Convention. 

Such tactics are ruled out by 
Article 60 of the convention, 
which states: 

Nothing in this Convention shat) 
be construed as limiting or derogat- 
ing from any of the human rights 
and fundamental freedoms which 
may be ensured under the laws of 
any High Contracting Parry . . . 

He also argues that British 
judges by background and tem- 
perament are less suited to inter- 
preting Bills of Rights than foreign 
judges. Surely the remedy for this 
inadequacy would be for the Bar 
and Law Society to make the study 
of the European Convention (and 
European Community law) com- 
pulsory elements in the pro- 
fessional training of the lawyers of 
the future. 

Yours faithfully, 

M. L. S. PASSEY. 

The University of Leeds, 

Faculty of Law, 

Leeds, West Yorkshire. 


A separate Bar 

From Mr T. W. B. BrentnaU 
Sir, I think few will disagree with 
the observations of Dr Mann 
(feature, July 1 1 ) on the subject of 
fusion of the legal profession. The 
central issue remains, however, 
the cost to the public; and unless 
this issue is tackled the system will 
change, for worse if not for better. 

Solicitors cannot shirk their 
responsibility: but they at least are 
accountable. Their bills can be 
taxed at the instigation of the 
client and they have.to justify their 
fees. Once a banister’s brief fee is 
agreed, however, that is an end of 
the matter. 

The brief fee is agreed between 
the barrister's clerk and the solic- 
itor and it is said that free market 
principles apply. But nobody who 
has had any direct experience of 
this side of the system could 
realistically say that in fixing the 
fee true market forces do apply. 


In most cases the barrister is not 
briefed until shortly before the 
triaL since the vast majority of 
cases settle and it would be 
squandering the client’s money to 
do otherwise; and at that stage it is 
very difficult, given the volume of 
documentation that often has to 
be mastered and in most cases not 
in the client's interests anyway, for 
there to be a change of horses. 

The Bar will have to take a step 
forward It is no good its members 
continuing artificially to distance 
themselves from the bald mone- 
tary considerations of going to 
law. I should like to see the Bar 
take the initiative on this ques- 
tion; the other many forceful 
arguments that can be made in 
support of the present system 
would then have a much stronger 
ring to them. 

Yours faithfully, 

t: w. b. brentnall, 

S3 Merthyr Terrace, SWI3. 

July 14. 


Invalid permits 

From Mr D. S. Sargent 
Sir. Mr S. Moss's letter (July 18) 
seems to have been written under 
a series of misapprehensions. The 
square badge for display on the 
windscreen is issued to the dis- 
abled person, not to the person 
who looks after him. It carries the 
disabled person's name and an 
expiry date. I see nothing to be 
gained from adding the doctor's 
name. 

Perhaps Mr Moss is confusing 
the circular orange badge for the 
rear window, which has no force at 
all. with the windscreen badge? 
Yours faithfully, 

D. S. SARGENT, 

Dobbs Well, Eastrip Lane, Colerne, 
Chippenham, Wiltshire. 


Connoisseurs 9 choice 

From Mr John Carswell 
Sir. I was glad to see that the 
bidders of today (sale room report, 
July 17) confirmed the judgement 
ofParis by putting Venus first, and 
particularly interested to notice 
that after all these years they 
revealed what Paris himself wisely 
kepi dark, namely second. Juno — 
third. Athene. 

Yours etc, 

JOHN CARSWELL, 

5 Prince Arthur Road, NW3. 


Union elections 

From Lord Rochester 
Sir, Lord Beloff (July 14) rightly 
states that if postal ballots for 
conducting trade union elections 
were now the norm, none of the 
difficulties reported in the recent 
CPSA election would have arisen. 

Even under a system of work- 
place ballots, however, those diffi- 
culties could have been avoided if 
the practice which I advocated on 
behalfof the Liberal/SDP Alliance 
when the Trade Union Act 1984 
was going through the House of 
Lords was now in operation. 

This would have placed on the 
union the onus of satisfying an 
independent person, the certifica- 
tion officer, that a workplace 
ballot was being conducted with 
the requisite secnety, convenience 
of voting and freedom from 
interference or constraint, rather 
than leaving it to aggrieved in- 
dividuals to challenge dubious 
electoral procedures. 

Yours faithfully, 

ROCHESTER, 

House of Lords. 

MPs 9 secretaries 

From Mr C. F. A. T. Holliday 
Sir. . As a public school 
housemaster I spend quite a bit of 
time trying to persuade young 
people to take on, in this ultra- 
materialistic world, the 
responsibilities of service without 
necessarily having material re- 
wards. 

In view of the whacking great 
increase in secretarial expenses 
which I read our members of 
Parliament have voted for them- 
selves, may I ask our leaders, or- 
anyone else, how they propose to 
help those of us who try to put 
service ahead of male rial gain? 
Yours faithfully, ' 

CHARLES HALLIDAY, 

The College. Eastbourne, Sussex. 


The high flyers 

From Mrs Barbara Ashford 
Sir, Your society-page style of 
reporting (Wednesday Page, July 
16) did not do justice to the High 
Flyers 2 Conference. If it had not 
been a women’s conference you 
would have given it far weightier 
treatment - no comments about 
gold cufflinks and Gucci moc- 
casins for men. 

The conference itself dealt with 
matters of national concern: tax- 
ation. employment, stimulus for 
industry — as well as having its 
lighter moments — and this 
needed proper emphasis. 

We already contribute much 
through our jobs or our family life 
or both, and conferences such as 
these play a strategic role in 
encouraging us to take on the 
additional responsibility of active 
involvement in both national and 
local affairs; they are not just 
social occasions. 

Come on., the Thunderer. You 
have a reputation for balanced 
reporting to keep. Don’t let our 
feminine charms lead you to 
forget the more serious aspects of 
such occasions. 

Yours faithfully. 

BARBARA ASHFORD, 

Mayfield House. 

Derby Road. 

Haslemere, Surrey. 

Quick off the mark 

From Mr Donald Bin 
Sir. May I respectfully suggest to 
Mr William Brown of Ceme. 
Abbas (July 17) that he has fitted 
the striker pin above the cyclom- 
eter instead of below. 

This — I think — would explain 
the apparent backward motion. 
Yours faithfully, 

D. BIRT. 

Coppertops. 

Main Road. 

Old Dal by, Leicestershire. 



On-the-spot view 
of sanctions 

From the Reverend C. J. Jewel f 
Sir. The recent General Synod of 
the Church of England has de- 
cided that sanctions are the right 
medicine for South Africa's 
present situation. 

I have been ministering in 
South Africa for twelve years, 
entirely among the “Coloured” 
people — i.e. those of mixed race— 
in the Durban area, so I am not 
speaking from any merely slight 
acquaintance with all the prob- 
lems involved. 

South Africa is going through a 
tough economic recession. There 
are an estimated two million or 
more people unemployed (much 
of which is hidden in the 
“homelands" and is therefore not 
counted in official figures). There 
is little work throughout the 
country in such industries as 
Building and certain types of 
heavy engineering. Aid for the 
unemployed is restricted. 

I cannot see any sense or 
morality in the programmes of 
disinvestment or of sanctions 
which are proposed by people 
usually living between six and ten 
thousand miles away. 

These policies win lead only to 
more misery and poverty for those 
who are already poor. They will 
not have the desired effect of 
bringing peaceful change. I can 
only think that people who ad- 
vocate these ti„ .igs desire to bring 
about, not peaceful change but 
revolution. 

It is not only the brack. Col- 
oured and Indian workers who 
would suffer. Many white people 
are living on slender pensions or 
wages, and professional people 
such as architects, accountants, 
civil engineers and so on, for 
whom there 1 is no state aid. are 
already suffering from unemploy- 
ment and privation. 

Sanctions have never worked in 
any past situation, because the 
imposition is never totaL They 
will not change the Government's 
mind. The economies of the 
surrounding States will be badly 
affected and the whole area of 
southern Africa will need much 
more international aid. 

I want to see apartheid ended as 
much as any one. but by effective 
measures which will preserve and 
not destroy the existing economic 
and industrial structures and as- 
sets, so that the country wifi have 
the means eventually to build a 
new and better South Africa for 
alL Remember you are talking 
about people and not mere sys- 
tems or abstract subjects such as 

black and white ... 

Yours faithfully, 

C.J. JEWELL 
80 Rippon Road. 

Sydenham, 

Durban 4091, 

Republic of South Africa. 

July 14. 


JULY 23 1793 

The struggle between the rival 
factions in France during the 
Revolution, is evident in this 
report of die proceedings id the 
Convention describing the 
circumstances of the assassination 
of Jean Paul Marat (1 743- / 795) 
on July 13. The Mountain was the 
party of the Paris mob. The 
Girondins, of which Gaudet and 
Brissot were members, was the 
party of the provinces. From Caen 
it strove to effect military action 
against its rivaL Charlotte Co relay 
was executed on July 17, 1793. 


ASSASSIN A TION of MARA T. 

ChaboL — “Your Committee had 
for a considerate time been told, 
that a deep plot was to accompany 
the fete of July 14th. — It was 
partly executed yesterday evening; 
and the single point now is the 
effecting of that Counter-Revolu- 
tion in Paris on the same day that 
its inhabitants acquired liberty. In 
order to accomplish this all the 
Deputies of the Mountain were to 
be assassinated; for which purpose, 
the conspirators of Caen kept up a 
criminal correspondence with their 
accomplices, your colleagu e s, who 
still sit in this Assembly. The day 
that Charlotte Corde, the woman 
who struck Marat the mortal blow, 
arrived in Paris, Dupe met received 
a courier extraordinary from Caen. 
Who was that courier? That very 
Corde. Duperret communicated 
the dispatches to FaucheL” 

FaucheL — “You lie!" 

Chabot continued “—A woman 
has been the first instrument of 
their crimes; this woman who has 
plunged a knife into Marat's 
bosom, seems to me to be one of 
those who, during the time of the 
Legislative Assembly, spoke to M- 
Guadet in favour of the conspira- 
tors of Caen. This woman wrote 
thus to Marat last Friday: “Your 
civism must make you desirous to 
discover conspiracies. I have a very 
important one to communicate to 
you, and therefore beg that you will 
bear me at your house." She 
presented herself there yesterday 
morning; but not seeing him, left 
another note conceived in these 
terms; “Have you received my 
letter? If you have received it, I rest 
upon your politeness. It ia enough 
that I am unfortunate to claim your 
attention. 

“You see. Citizens that his 
female conspirator rendered justice 
to the civism of Marat — of Marat, 
who died as he lived, the constant 
friend of the people. Yesterday 
evening she n gajn went to his 
house; and Marat, whose heart has 
ever made so many sacrifices Jo 
humanity, ondered -his doors to be 
opened to her. She spoke a greet 
deal to him about the conspirators 
who . have fled, to . Caen. He. an- 
swered' her, that they would one 
day '.lose, their heads upon the 
scaffold. At these worth she 
plunged this knife Into his bosom, 
(i Cambon shews the instrument). 
Marat had only time to say, / am 
dying. His servant entered the 
zoom, and madea cry; people ran to 
her assistance. This new Tisiphone 
went out with audacity; she was 
stopped. She might have assassi- 
nated herself, but she did not. 
When we told her that she would 
lose her bead upon the scaffold, she 
looked at . us with a smile of 
mockery. She reckons upon the 
success of the traitorous plots of 
Caen, and doubtless hopes to 
escape punishment. 

“But Citizens, these plots will be 
developed; these crimes will be 
punished. The people of Paris are 
rising; they already make their 
enemies tremble [applause]; and I 
dare say, that before the end of this 
week, all the enemies of the 
Constitution will be arrested, and 
that the most guilty will have lost 
their Haada. 

In the pockets of this abomina- 
ble woman were found 150 livres in 
silver and 140 in assignats, a tetter 
addressed to Marat, a passport 
delivered the 8th of April by the 
Municipality of Caen, her baptis- 
mal certificate, a gold watch, etc. 
on her neck, the sheath of the knife 
and a writing in the' form of an 
Address to the French people-." 

Cuthon co mpl ai ne d, that the 
project of ao' many crimes, discov- 
ered the flight of the conspira- 
tors from among the members of 
the Convention, should be yet 
unpunished — He moved. 

First, “That the Revolotionaiy 
Tribunal should hasten the judg- 
ment against the assassin of Ma- 
rat; that it should immediately 
proceed to the trial of Brissot, and 
prosecute as outlaws those depu- 
ties, who, by their flight, had 
deprived themselves of the protec- 
tion of the laws ; 

‘■Secondly, that a Decree of 
Accusation be passed against 
Duperret, previously convicted of 
an accomplice in the above 


Coining a cliche 

From Mr K. SlJ. Berrett 
Sir, Your correspondent Mr Bail- 
lie (July 1 8) has answered his own 
question. From now on we shall be 
able to refer to “the greatest thing 
since the demise of sliced bread”. 
Yours faithfully. 

K. SU. BERRETT, 

9 Reynolds Mews. 

Wilmslow, Cheshire. 

From Miss E. Simpson 

Sir, We say. “the greatest thing 
since the ball point pen". 

Yours faithfully, 

E. SIMPSON. 

107 Boyds Walk, 

Dukinfield. Cheshire. 

From Mr D. Livermore 
Sir, . . . since lined paper? 

Yours faithfully. 

D. LIVERMORE, 

10 Burke Avenue. 

Moseley. Birmingham. 

From Mr Brian Cox 
Sir, . . . : the zip fly? 

Yours faithfully, 

BRIAN COX. 

Si Christopher’s. - ■ • 
Severals Road. 

Bepton Midhurst, W. Sussex. 


I 





18 


TH£ iiMJbS WEDNESDAY JULr lvab 



COURT 

AND 

SOCIAL 


COURT 

CIRCULAR 


BUCKINGHAM PALACE 
July 22; The Queen held^an 


Investiture at Buckingham Pal- 
ace this morning. 

The Queen received the 
Bishop or Saint Edmundsbury 
and Ipswich (the Right Rev- 
erend John Dennis) who was 
introduced to Her Majesty’s 
presence by the Right Hon 
Douglas Hurd. MP (Secretary of 
State for the Home Department) 
and did Homage upon his 
appointment. 

The Secretary of State for the 
Home Department admin- 
istered the Oath. 

The Bishop of Bath and WeUs 
(Clerk of the Closet to The 
Queen) and the Gentlemen of 
the Household in Waiting were 
in attendance. 

The Right Hon Margaret 
Thatcher. MP (Prime Minister 
and First Lord of the Treasury) 
trad an audience with Her 
Majesty this evening. 

The Duke of Edinburgh. Pa- 
tron and Trustee, attended 
Receptions at St James's Palace 
for young people who have 
reached the Gold Standard in 
The Duke of Edinburgh's 
Award. 

The Duke of Edinburgh. Cap- 
tain General, attended a reunion 
luncheon of the Colonels' Com- 
mandant Royal Marines at Ad- 
miralty House, where His Royal 
Highness was received by the 
Representative Colonel Com- 
mandant (Major General John 
Owen. RM). 

Captain Ian Gardiner, RM 
was in attendance. 

The Duke of Edinburgh this 
evening presented the prizes for 
the Tesco Charity Pro-Am Clas- 
sic. heW at the RAC Golf and 
Country Club. Woodcote Park. 
Epsom, in aid of Cancer Relief. 

The Princess Anne, Mrs Mark 
Phillips, this afternoon took the 
Salute at a performance of the 
Royal Tournament at Earls 
Court. 

By command of The Queen, 
the Baroness Hooper (Baroness 
in Waiting) called upon the 
Governor-General of Canada 
and the Hon Maurice Sauve this 
morning at the Inn on the Park 
Hotel and. on behalf of Her 
Majesty, welcomed Their Ex- 
cellencies upon their arrival in 
this country. 

Lady Susan Hussey has suc- 


ceeded Mrs John Dugdale as 
Lady in Waiting to The Queen.. 
CLARENCE HOUSE 
July 22: Queen Elizabeth The 
Queen Mother was presented 
this evening at a Concert given 
bv Mr John Vallier in aid of the 
Marie Curie Memorial Founda- 


tion at the Royal Festival HalL 
Patrick C 


Mrs Patrick Campbell-Pres- 
ton and Sir Martin Gilliat were 
in attendance. 

Mrs Patrick Carapbell-Pres- 
ton has succeeded Lady Angela 
Oswald as Lady-in-waiting to 
Her Majesty. 

KENSINGTON PALACE 
July 22: The Prince of Wales, 
Colond-in-ChieC 2nd King Ed- 
ward VTTs Own Gurkha Rifles, 
this afternoon received Lieuten- 
am-Cotonel Nigel Haynes upon 
relinquishing command of the 
1st Battalion. 

The Prince of Wales. Duke of 
Cornwall, visited Newquay 
House, Newbum Street, 
Kenningion, SE1 1. 

The Princess of Wales. Pa- 
tron. the British . Deaf Associ- 
ation. this evening attended the 
premiere, of the Bolshoi Ballet 
Companv's Ivan the Terrible in 
aid of the Association at the 
Royal Opera House. Covem 
Garden. 

Miss Anne Beckwith-Smith 
was in attendance. 

July 22: The Duke of Glouces- 
ter. President. East Midlands 
Tourist Board, today visited 
Tattershall Castle, the Battle of 
Britain Memorial Flight at RAF 
Conmgsby and Heckington 
MilL Lincolnshire. His Royal 
Highness later opened the Tour- 
ist Information Centre. 
Grantham. Lincolnshire. 

The Duke of Gloucester, who 
travelled in an aircraft of The 
Queen's Right, was attended by 
Li-Col Sir Simon Bland. 
THATCHED HOUSE LODGE 
July 22: Princess Alexandra 
today visited Royal Air Force 
Finningley. South Yorkshire. 

Her Royal Highness travelled 
in an aircraft of The Queen's 
Right. 

Mrs Peter Alia was in 
attendance. 

YORK HOUSE 
ST JAMES'S PALACE 
July 22: The Duke of Kent 
returned to RAF Northolt this 
morning from Berlin. 

The Duke of Kent this eve- 
ning took the Salute at the Royal 
Tournament at Earls Court. 

Captain Michael Campbell- 
La merlon was in attendance. 


Banquet 




the Moderator of the 
Federal Council and M n Engitah. Sir 
Ralph and Lady Porting. Sir Eduard 
and Lady Howard. Sir Murray Fax 
and Mi» Aluon Fax. 


Lord Mayor 

The Lord Mayor and the Lady 

Mayoress gave a state banquet 

at the Mansion House last night r»» j , j 

for the archbishops, bishops and -DlTtlHUiyS tOU«iy 
clergy of the Anglican Commu- 
home and 


nion at home and overseas, 
aldermen. Sheriffs, members of 
the Court of the Common 
Council and Officers of the 
Corporation of London and 
their ladies. The speakers were 
the Lord Mayor, the Archbishop 
of Canterbury and the Arch- 
bishop of York. The other guests 
were: 


Mrs Coral Browne. 73: Sir 
Aiastair Down, 72; Mr David 
Essex. 39; Mr Steve Fenwick, 
35: Mr Michael Foot, MP. 73; 
Mr Graham Gooch, 33; Mrs 
Eispeth Huxley, 79; Mr Danny 
La Rue.- 59; Sir Ivan Magfil, 98; 
Mr Give Rice. 37; Mr Richard 
Rogers, 53; Mr John Stokes, 
MP. 69: Mr Peter Twiss, 65. 




■:.£?& afiLs::. 






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Saleroom 


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*4^, 'A V. 


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Record pig 
painting 
sold for 

£ 15,400 


By Geraldine Norman 
Side Room Correspondent 


1 f 


Detail of the portrait of the prize ho% with Little Haywood in thehackgrogn<L 


Forthcoming 
marriages 

Mr JAC Huggins 
and Miss G-A- MOham 
The engagement is announced 
between Ashley, son of Mr John 
Huggins, of Lindfiefd, Sussex, 
and the Hon Mrs Angus Sin- 
clair. of Embankment Gardens, 
London, SW3, and Genevieve, 
daughter of Mr and Mrs Doug- 
las Milham, of Albury, New 
South Wales. Australia. 

Mr D.A, Beaumont 
and Miss A. Lawrence 
The engagement is announced 
between David, elder son of Mr 
and Mrs PA.L Beaumont, of 
Bolton Percy, York, and Alison, 
younger daughter of Mr L.W. 
Lawrence, of York, and Mrs 
June Lawrence, of Bolton Percy, 
York. 

Mr D. Bleakman 
and Miss V. Savidge 
The engagement is announced 
between David, son of Mr and 


MrCJL Lambert 
and Miss NJ. Richardson 
The engagement is announced.' 
between Charles, son of the late 
Surgeon' Vice-Admiral R_T.W. 
Lambert and Mrs Lois Lambert, 
of Alverstoke, Hampshire, and 
Naomi, daughter of Mr and Mrs 
Kenneth Richardson,- of 
Ashgate. Chesterfield. 

Mr S. Radjen 
ami Miss GL Crum 
The engagement is announced 
between Stephen, eldest son of 
Mrs H. Radjen, of Northamp- 
ton. and Geraldine, eldest 
daughter of Mr and Mrs J.D.B. 
Craen. of Brocken hurst, 
Hampshire. 

Mr CN. Roberts 
and Miss B.M. Cave 
The engagement is announced 
between Christopher, elder son 
of Mr and Mrs L.O. Roberts, of 
Windsor. Berkshire, and Bar- 
bara, daughter of Mr and Mrs 
D.T. Cave of Shoddesden, 
Hampshire. 

Mr C.N. Rose 


The engagement is announced 
between Christopher, eldest son 
of Brigadier and Mrs I.M. Rose, 
of ChiddingfoW, Surrey, and 
Mary Pan eldest daughter of Mr 
and Mrs A.V. Cahill, of Prince- 
ton. New Jersey. United States. 


Mrs R. Bleakman, of Soli hull. 

SS »S?&wSftS£fc r - > - 1 MJ,c * hin 

Mr TA. Cannon 
and Miss L.CritchIey 
The engagement is announced 
between Tony, elder son of Mr 
and Mrs R. Cannon, of 
■ Godaiming, Surrey, and Lynn, 
only daughter of the late Mr and 
Mrs W. Critchley. of Leigh, 

Lancashire. 

Mr JA. Gaggero 
and Mbs MA Isola 
The engagement is announced 
between John, elder son of Mr 
and Mrs John G. Gaggero, of 1 5 
Bayside Road, Gibraltar, and 
Marie Antoine, eldest daughter 
of Mr and Mrs Charles E I so la, 
of Villa Bernadette, Gibraltar. 

Mr M.AJ. Harrison 
and Miss SJ. Hall 
The engagement is announced 
between Mark, younger son of 
Mr and Mrs John Harrison, of 
Leichworth, Hertfordshire, and 
Sarah, elder daughter of Mr and 
Mrs Roger Hall 
Hertfordshire. 


Mr RJ. Taylor 
and Miss MJ. Baker 
The engagement is announced 
between Richard, only son of 
Mr and Mrs DJJ. Taylor, of 
Caine. Wiltshire, and Marian, 
only daughter of the late Mr G. 
Baker and of Mrs J.G. Baker, of 
South sea. Hampshire. 


of Radlett, 


Mr N. Tripolitakis 
and Miss MA Kanakakl 
The engagement is announced 
between Nikos, son of Mr C 
Tripolrtakis and the late Mrs S. 
Tripoiiiaki. of Rethymnon, 
Crete, and Marina Alexandra, 
eldest daughter of Mr EJ. 
Kanakakis, BEM, and Mrs 
Kanakakis, of Watford, 
Hertfordshire. 


Memorial service 

Miss G. Wyndham Goldie 
A memorial service for Miss 
Grace Wyndham Goldie was 
held at All Souls. Langham 
Place, yesterday. The Rev Rich- 
ard Bewes officiated and Mr 
Donald Baverstock read the 
lesson. Mr Leonard Miall read 
from The West Highland Rail- 
way, by John Thomas. Mis 
Catherine Freeman read from 
Liverpool Repertory Theatre 


7P//-34 and Mr Michael Pea- 
cock from Facing the Nation, 
both by Grace Wyndham 
Goldie. Lord Maybew read 
from The Passing of the Second 
Reading of the First Reform Bill. 
by Lord Macaulay, and Mr 
Alasdair Milne. Director Gen- 
eral of the BBC. gave an address. 
The Rev Dr Conn Morris, head 
of Religious Broadcasting. . BBC 
and the Right Rev Agnellus 


Andrew led 


Rev 

prayers. 


Births, Marriages, Deaths and In Mcmoriam 


BIRTHS, MARRIAGES, 
DEATHS ari H UEMORMM 
£4i fin + 15% VAT 

f minimum J lira) 


noiinccmttiis. auttaiika'ed by the 
of the 


me and permanent address 
ider. may be seni ux 


THE TIMES 
TO BOX 484 
Virginia Street 
London El 


or telephoned I by idee bone subs- 
et-' 


cibcm only) lo: 01-411 3824 


Announcement ran be received 
telephone between 4.00am 
3.30pm Monday lo Friday, on Satur- 
day bdween O.UOara and 12 noon. 




day between v.wara and u noon. 
<01441 4804 (Wyl- For pubiicalion the 
following day phone by I Jbpm. 


HWT8C1WH6 HAfiMAOES. WBHWGS 
cic on four! and Social Page K a Eaa 
4- IK VAT. 


Court and Social Page snnouncc- 
mems can iwi be accepted by 
telephone. Enquiries. tor 41-422 ISn 
(after ID.XamX or x nd itx 

1 . Prabraa Straw. Laciaa El. 


Please allow at lust 48 hours before 
pubiicalion. 


I pray. Uwi your In* map 
iH more and more in 
kncrwicoge and in an ludqcmrniL 
PtdiJpfMam i: 9 


BIRTHS 


AKROYD - On 16th July. 19S6. lo 
Nora tne* Stokcsi and James, a 
da ugh I er. Rebecca May EUzabem. 
KARNCTT - On July 18th. to Ceorguia 
and Charles, a daughter. 
BLACKWELL - On 16th July, to 
Penelope <nfe nizwrald-Moore} and 
Charles, a son. Alasdair James 
Bunbury. 

BUCHAN - On July 20th. at Queen 
Chartotle's HospllaJ. to Fiona and 
Edward, a daughter. Annabel. 
COLES - On July 6Eh. lo Anne and 
John, a son. Simon John Grobecker. 
brother to Abigail. Bethany and 
David. 

COUSLEY - On July Bth. to Elizabeth 
(n4e Thompson) and Andrew, a 
daughter. Sarah Louise, a staler for 
Fiona and Alison. 

DAVES - On 19th July, at West 
London Hospital. Hammersmith, to 
Philippa tnie Lynskey^ and RusseU. a 
son. Christopher. 

HORNSBY - On July ism. in Singa- 
pore. to Anita and Nick, a son. 
Frederick Michael, a brother for 
Alexander Patrick. 

KELLY - On July 17th I9B6. at Undo 
wing, sl Mary's, to James and 
. Tessa (nfe Dahl), a son. Luke James 
Roald, a welcome brother for Kale. 
Alexandra. Sophie and Clover. • 
KHJJK - On ah July, at Portland 
Hospital, to Karen and Paid, a 
daughter. Oeorgfana Lucy. 
LOWDELL - On June 24th.' to Sam 
(nee Sandes) and Charles, a son Alex- 
ander Charles, brother for Edward. 
McSAW - On July 20th. 1986. lo 
Marties and Aiastair. a daughter. 
Sophie EUsabeOi- 

MELLOR • On July 2lst- lo Roaxl (wfe 
Nation) and Julian, a son. Frederick 
Anthony Mtonquana. a brother tor 
Daisy. 

FEDEX - On July 19th. 1986 to Anne 
tnee Coxhead) and Michael, a daugh- 
ter. EUen Margaret Joan, a sWer far 
Lucy. 

RAPSON On lOlb July In Oxford, to 
Penelope fnee OUs) and Bernard, a 
son. Augustine William, a brother for 
Josephine 

RKEAD - On July 7 Ul lo Barbara (n6e 
BolUngton) and Mkhael. a son. Peter 
James and a daughter. Deborah 
Jane. A brother and sister for 
Kalherme and Stephen. 

SCHOFIELD - On July 2ISL at St 
Barthofomew's Hospital, to Susan 
and Giles, a son. Charles Jonathan 
Chisholm. 

SKITMORE - On July 19th. at 
Sevenoaks Hospital, to Anne (nee 
Gregory! and Mike, a daughter. 

' Emmr Pamela Douglas, a sister for 
— Oaud: 

STORES? ■ On 2 is! July, at Dulwich 
Hospital. u> Patricia and Dot Id. a 
son. Hugh Alexander. 


MARRIAGES 


PAG&ASAEW on July 19th. 1986 at 
Salisbury Cathedral. Simon Page of 
St. Margaret's. Twickenham, to Hel- 
en Askew ot The Close. Salisbury. 


DEATHS 


ADXMUESHAW - On 22nd July. 1986.' 
Derek Hemingway Addleshaw of 
Bowtfon. Cheshire. Dearly loved 
brother of John. Hilda and the late 
Leslie and a much loved uncle. 
Funeral Service in the Parish 
Church. Bow don on Monday. 28th 
July at 2.45 pm and afterwards 
committal at the Altrincham Crema- 
torium. Flowers from Ihe family 
only please. Enquiries to Messrs. 
John G. Ashton A Co. Id. 061 928 
7816. 

ALDCRSON - cm July 19th. at The SL 
John of Cod Hospital. Scorton. Helen 
Martory In her 92nd year. No (low- 
ers. out donations please lo Oxfam. 

APOLD ■ On 19th July. 1086 at hume. 
John Mackenzie T.3.. much loved 
husband of GUl'an and lather of 
James and Vivienne, fumrai pri- 
vate. Family Oowvr* only tellers 
please. Service ot Tnariugi , uig (o te.- 
announced later. 

ASHEN DEN. Colin Brian AShenden 
passed away very suddenly on Sal- 
urday morning. 19tn July. 1986. 
The love ne v-e «« i»nsun»a!»abfc* 
Dearly beloved hisir^m,. father and 
grar«dia(-iyr. he wut remain in our 
hearts until we m«i ajuin. With all 
our lose. Betty. Mark. David. Caro- 
line. Nell. Diane, baby James. Mum. 
Pod and Tara. Funeral on Friday. 

- 2Stn July at 12.SO pm at SL 
Lawrence's Church. BkS>oroogh. 
Tunbridge Wells. Alt welcome. 
Flowers to wuiowden Cottage. 
Bid borough. Kent. 

BARNES - Peacefully on the 21st July. 
Reverend Arthur Barnes, of the 
vicarage. Winslow, aged 67 yean. 
Funeral. Service at St Laurence 
Church. Winslow, on Thursday. 
24th July at 2.00pm. Garden (lowers 
only but. tf desired, donations to St 
Laurence Church Organ Fund. c/oT 
Capshck. 27 Ofias Lane. Window. 
Buckingham. 

BHEARKDGE ■ On July 21st Monica, 
widow of Godfrey, mother of John. 
Margery and Sylvia. Late of 
Weybrtdge. Funeral Chichester Cre- 

’ matorlum 26 July. 4.30 pm 

BROWN - On 19th July, suddenly at 
home in Kllmeslon. Cam C.K.K 
Brown R.N.. O.B.E.. Freeman of the 
CUy of London. Deeply loved hus- 
band of Anson and beloved rather of 
Fiona and Lorraine. Service of 
Thanksgiving at KUmeston Parish 
Church on Friday. 2Sth July at 3.00 
pm- No Rowers please. 

COKE - On 2lst July, at Warminster 
Hospital. Joan Holland Coke men 
Lortngt. Funeral Service at SaUsbury 
Crematorium. London Road al 9.46 
-am on Thttosday. 24lli July. Please, 
no flowers. Donations. If desired, to 
People's Dispensary for Sick Ani- 
mats. - Bath Road. BrtstaL or 
MacMillan Niros. Dorothy House 
Foundation. 162 BtoontfleW. Bath 

• BA2 2AT. 

CONWAY - On July 20th. peacefully at 
home. ' Professor Cyril Martin 
Conway, beloved husband or 
Caroline and beloved father of 
Alison. Caroline. David. Graham, 
Robert. Edmund and Hugo. Crema- 
tion at Putney Vale Crematorium on 
July 24th at 3.15 pm, Donations to 
Anaesthetic Department 

Westminster Hoad tat tf desired. 

CUSWQRTH - On 1 8th July, al the 

‘ King Edward vn Hospital for Offi- 
cers. Ebsabeih Frances Cusworth. 
widow of George Howard Cusworth. 
of 33 Devonshire Place. London WL. 
The Funeral wiu take place at 
Golden Green Crematorium at 
11.50 am on Friday. 25Ui July. 
Flowers may be sentto W. Garsttn * 
Sons Ltd. 10 CNKern Street Wl. 

DU BOULAY . On 20th July. 1986. 
peacefully In hospital. Mercy Tyrrell 
tree Friend) aged 97. widow of Phil- 
ip Houffcmayne Ou Bnday, mother 
of Robin and George. Funeral al s- 

' Mary's. Rtverhead on Monday. 28th 
July at 1 1.00am. Cremation private. 
Flowers. If desired, to S. Smith. 
Ungfleld RoatL Edenbridge. Kent. 

BUNN on July )8th al Noire Dame 
Convent Plymouth. Stater Agatha 
Dunn late of SL Mary's. Oapham 
and Crawley. Requiem Mato at (he 
Convent 10.00 am Friday 25(h July. 
May she rest In peace. . 


GRAY Peacefully on July 2tsL In 
Chichester. Catherine Margaret aged 
73. widow of Charles GW F.R.C.S.. 
much loved mother of Charles and 
Caroline and grandmother of Juli- 
ette. Anya. Alexander and Lucy. 
Funeral at MKhetoever Parish 
Church on Friday. July 2SUi at 
12.00 noon. Flowers to John Steel & 
Son. Cfwsll House. Winchester. 

GREEN Lt-Col Christopher Donald, 
aged 42. suddenly whilst on duty in 
Germany on 16th July. JL986. Dearly 1 
loved by his aunt and unde. Colonel 
l Dr John P.) and Mrs Tindall, 
coital ns Charles and Ann and his 
many friends In Suffolk. 

HALUDAY - On 2lsl July. 1986. 
peacefully atler a short Alness. Hon- 
or Nesta HaBlday aged 87 years. 
widow of Major win tun John Fred- 
erick Halliday. .Funeral Service al 
Holy Trinity Church. Henley-on- 
Thames al 3.00 pm on Tuesday. 
29th July- followed by interment at 
FairmUe Cemetery. Henley-on- 
Thames. No mourning by request 
Family flowers only. 

HARMS - On 19th July, al Bevendeon 
Hospital. Brighton. Brenda, beloved 
wile of Euan and mother of Anne 
and Zoe. Private cremation. No flow- 
ers please. Donations, if desired, to 
Society for Psychical Research. 1 
Adam A Eve Mews. Kensington. Lon- 
don W8 6UC. 


HUNTER - On July 18th. suddenly and 
peacefully at home. John Leonard 
aged Sl years. Beloved husband of 
Margaret and dearly loved father 
and grand rather. Funeral Service to 
lake place al Slough Crematorium, 
on Friday. July 25th al l.30pm. 
Family flowers only, if desired, do- 
nations to the Thames Valley 
Hospice, maybe sent c,o Dr. D. F. 
Denny. Gateways. Stoke Park. Stoke 
Popes. Bucks. 

KELLEY - On I9lli July. 1986. peace- 
. fully at home. Ronald Henry in hts 
80ih year. Much loved husband of 
. Joan and father of Judith and Paul. 
Funeral Service on Monday. 28th 
July al 2DO pm at Holy Trinity 
Church, western |. Family Dowers 
only please but donations to 
Ranrrrare Church Organ Fund may 
be sent to Sherlock A Sons. Trellis 
House. Dorking. 

LAMOND - On July 20th. at St- 
Thoraas' Hospital. Gillian Mary, be- 
loved wire of Frederic Lamond of 4 
Woodstde. Erskine Hill. NW1 1. 
Mother of Nicholas and Helen, 
daughter of Janet and me late Mr T C 
Ellioil and sister « John and Judith. 
Funeral Service at Tne Church of 
The Holy Cross SarraiL Hens on 
Tuesday. July 29Ut at 12 noon. 

LAME - On July 20th. 1 986. peacefully 
to his sleep alter a fud and acuve 
day. Kenneth Epey aged 60. Btwved 
husband of tne late Jessica, very 
dearly loved by his brouter, four 
daughters, grandchildren, great 
grandchildren and many friends. 
Service at The Par&n Church. 
EwhursL Surrey on Monday. July 
28th at 2.15 pm. followed by crema- 
tion. A Thanksgiving Service In 
MMsomer Norton at the end of Sep- 

. temper. Details to be announced 
tale-. 

LEECH Anastasia, widow of Thomas 
Leech of MU! HIU. on 2 1st July, 1986 
at Ravenscroft Par* Nursing Home. 
Beloved mother, staler, grandmother 
and mend. RIP. Funeral at Sacred 
Heart Church. NW7 at 9.00 am on 
Friday. 25th July. Donations, in lieu 
of flowers, to the Multiple Sclerosis 
Society. Enquiries to H. Phillips, 650 
Watford Way. NW7. tel: 969 4392. 


LE NUUK On July (he 2XsL peacefully 
at LUdebounw Nursing Home. Geof- 
frey. beloved husband of the late 
Norah and loving father of Jennifer 
and John. Uveryman and Freeman 
of too City of London. Cremation Fri- 
day July 25to al i ,00pm. Barham, 
near Canterbury. Family flowers 
only. 

MOSELEY ■ Ort July 1 9lh. suddenly at 
his home. March Hares. Had Lane. 
Mobberiey. Cheshire. Richard An- 
thony John, much loved husband of 
Jackie and adored fallter of David. 
Simon. Mary-Lou. Paul and Ben. Fu- 
neral Sen ice in Sl Wilfrid's Church. 

- Mobbertey on Friday. July 2Sdi at 
2D0 pro. Family flowers only. 

JttYLNE - On July 21 st. al Lckfleid- 
Kathleen D'Esterre aged 100 years. 
Mother of Boris and Jean Howard. 
Funeral at 1.00 pm on Friday. July 
25th at Uekileki Parish Church, fol- 
lowed by private cremation. 1 Passed 
lo Ihe great adventure \ Enquiries lo 
Fuller and Scon. The wakeiyns. 
Uckffcld. TdsOeaSNKMI 


RANSOM - on Sunday. July 20th. sud- 
denly and peacefully to his sleep. 
Charles Ransom. CM.G.. OJELE.. of 
Ladyfleld. Efchtogham. Sussex. Fu- 
neral at Etchingham Church on 
Monday July 28th al 2.50pm. Fam- 
ily flowers only. Donations d wished 
to Save the Children Fund. 

RAPSON on 16th July 1 986 suddenly, 
aged *>5 yean. Harry David Coleman 
Ramon. BSc.. PhJD- A.RJ.C- 
D.I.G.. late of Chelsea College. Uni- 
versity of London. .Much loved 
husband and father, Funeral service 
at All Saints Church. Headley. 
Hampshire, on 26th July at 11JO 
am. Family flowers only. Donations 
If desired to charity- 

RISK - Peacefully at Kensington Nurs- 
ing Home. Glasgow on Sunday. 20th 
July. 1986. Margaret Nelson Robert- 
son aged 92 years. Wife of the late 
Ralph Risk. C.B.E.. M C. and mother 
of Lindsay. Tom. Shirley. Ralph and 
the late John. Funeral at DaMowte 
Crematorium. East Chapel. Broom 
House on Friday. 23(h July at 11-30 
am. Family flowers only please. 

SABATH on July 2lst 1986. Amort, 
peacefully at home. Funeral sendee 
at Golders Green Crematorium on 
Friday July 25th at 10.20 am. 

SHARLAND • On July 2 1 st. at home. 
Philip Sitarland much loved and 
dreadfully missed by his wife Pal 
and children Sarah and Tim. Enqui- 
ries to Hem ley in Par* Road. 
Sushey. lei. 01-950 7253. Family 
flowers only, but If wished donations 
to The British Heart Foundation. 102 
Gloucester Place. London Wl. 

SPARLING - On July 22nd. peacefully 
to Bldeford Hospital, cicely Frances 
to her 86th year, of Uttle Burcombe.- 
Northam. Widow of LI. Col. Sibold 
Snarling. R.A.. V C, Much loved sta- 
ter. aunt arid great aunL Very dearly 
loved by all her large family and hcr 
many friends. Funeral to Sl 
Margaret's Church. Northam on Fri- 
day. July 2Slh at 5 pun. Enquiries to 
TrapneU's Funeral Directors. 
BMefard 72008. 

THOMPSON - On July 21S. 1986. 
peacefully at Townlands Hospital. 
Henley-on-Thames. Dora aged 90. 
mother of Pauline. Funeral Service 
al Reading Crematorium on Thurs- 
day. July 24lh at 2JSO pm. Family 
(lowers only but. if desired, dona- 
tions can be made to Cancer Relief. 
Michael Sobell House. 30 Dorset 
Square. London NW1 6QL. All en- 
quiries to Arthur Butler Lid. Peppard 
Common. Henley-on-Thames *0734 
72223 21. 

VICKERS, on July 20th suddenly at 
ms home at Flndhora. Morayshire. 
Alexander beloved husband of 
Patience. Funeral at Find horn Parish 
Church al 2.00 p.m. on Thursday' 
Juty 24th. 

WOOD - On July 22nd. Janet aged 77. 
aner a long illness bravely endured. 
Betoied and loving wile of Gordon 
ana nvutner grandmatheraunt and 
friend. Requiem Mass at St- Peters- 
to the-Forert. Waitoamstow E17 at 
11.00 am on Friday. July 26th. 
Family flowers omy. Donations to 
Church ot England Children's Soci- 
ety or Cnurcn Times Train a Priest 
Fund. 


MEMORIAL SERVICES 


FLETCHER ■ A Memonal Service wJU 
be held for John Fletcher Ph D- 
F.S.A.. af Alf Samis Church. Sutton 
Courtenay, nr Aunodon. Oxoa on 
Saturday. Septemoer 20th al 
5.00pm. All past colleagues and 
friends win be welcome al Ihe 
church and afterwards at 20 Tunis 
Close. Stolon Courtenay. 

WAKEFIELD R. C ■ Services of 
Thanksgiving for Roger Cuthbert 
(Jumbo) Wakefield will be hew on 
Saturday. 16Ui August at 3.00 pm al 
The Parish Church. Portree and on 
Tuesday. 7th October at 1 1-00 am to 
the Chapel of SL Michael and St. 
George. Si. Paul's CathadraL 


IN MEMOBIAM - WAS 


2*23 SQUADRON RAF REGIMENT 

F. 0 Crowther 

LAC Moore 

LAC Pnlrhard 

LAC Wootton 

23 July 1944 Lympne. 

Remembered 'by ex Cpi Howard. 


FUNERAL 

ARRANGEMENTS 


A Requiem Mass wm be 

hew at 2.00 pm on Friday. 25th July 
al the The Church of the Carmelite 
Fathers. Kensington Church Street 
for Hi lari on Mark Lech mere. 


Marriages 

Mr J. Bncfaan 
and Lad; Evelyn Phipps 


The raarriaj*^ loot place on 


Saturday, July 19,' at St 
Oswald's, Lythe, North York- 
shire. of Mr James Buchan, 
youngest son of ihe Hon Wil- 
liam Buchan, of West End 
House. Horn tern, Oxfordshire, 
and the late Mrs Buchan, and 
Lady Evelyn Phipps, second 
daughter of the Marquess and 
Marchioness of Normanby, of 
Midgrave Castle, Whitby. The 
Bishop of Whitby officiated. 

The bride, who was given in 
marriage by her father, was 
attended by Aniela Komicka, 
Emily Wide, and Chari one 
Ahem. 

Mr DJS. Ryland 
and Miss AJi. Wright 
The marriage look place on July 
18. 7986. at St Mark's Church, 
Regent’s Park, of Mr David 
Stuart Ryland. son of Sir Wil- 
liam and Lady Ryland, of 
Croydon. Surrey, and Miss 
Anne Helen Wright, daughter of 
Mr arid Mrs Kenneth Wright, of 
Benfleei. Essex. - 
Mr P.C. Garretty-Crane 
and Miss KJVL CosgrifT 
The marriage took place on 
Tuesday, July 22. 1986. at St 
Joseph's Catholic Church, 
Southampton, of Mr Peter 
Garretty-Crane and Miss Kath- 
leen CosgrifT. 

Mr J.CG. T rower 
and Miss V -I-H. T angman 
The marriage took place on 
Saturday, July 19, at die Church 
of St Lawrence Jewry-next- 
Guildhall of Mr Jonathan 
Trower. eldest son of Mr and 
Mrs Anthony Trower. and Miss 
Virginia Langman, daughter of 
Mr Roy Langman and Mrs Peter 
Scott Graham. The Rev Ronald 
Stephens officiated, assisted by 
the Rev Basil Watson. 

Tbe bride, who was given in 
marriage by her father, was 
attended by Miss Alexandra 
BelcourL Tessa Baird. Phoebe 
Barran. William Ingram, and 
Jonathan Page. Mr William 
Trower, brother of the bride- 
groom, was best man. 

A reception was held at 
Ironmongers’ nail and the 
honeymoon is being spent in 
India. 


A portrait of the largest PJS 
reputedly ever bred in the 
British Ides secured £15,400 
(estimate £84)00 to £12,000) at 
Sotheby's yesterday. 

The prize hog, a Gloucester 
old- spot, weighing J2cwt, 
661b, was bred by Joseph 
Lawton of Little Haywood in 
Staffordshire; a farmer ap- 
pears holding a scroll in- 
scribed with the hog's vital 
statistics, and the tillage pub 
is shown in the background. 

The painting dates from 
around 1850 and is. naively 
painted, the work of a local 
artist, possibly Thomas 
Peploe Wood of Little 
Haywood. It was. bought by 
the Rutland Gallery of 
London. 

Fat pigs, sheep and Cattle 
were the favourites in 
Sotheby's sale of English na- 
ive and provincial art. A prize 
ram in a landscape by Thomas 
Weaver of Shrewsbury made 
£9,350 (estimate £4,000 to 
£6,000) to Iona Antiques and 
the same dealers spent £8360 
(estimate £3,000 to £5,000) on 
“Job - A Prize Shorthorn Ball 
in a Landscape" by Thomas 
Aider. 

The star of the sale was a 
river landscape inhabited by a 
pair of almost every conceiv- 
able animal and bird and tided 
“Tbe Naming of the 
Anima ls**. It is the work of J. 
Miles of Northleach in 
Gloucestershire and dates 
from about 1830. So successful 
was tbe work that he made a 
number of copies. This one 
sold for £29.700 (estimate 
£14,000 to £18,000) to CsakTs 
Antiques of London. 

Christie's medal sale con- 
tained one invented by Gener- 
al Amin of Uganda in tbe 
1970s and awarded, as far as is 
known, only to himself. He 
called it tbe “Victorious 
Cross" which gave it the well 
known initials VC and ordered 
12 badges to be made by Spink 
and Son In London. 

The example in Christie's 
sale was described as "ex- 
tremely fine, rare" and sold for 
£432 (estimate £300 to £400). 
The auctioneers did not reveal 
where it came from. The medal 
sale totalled £88,138 with 4 
per cent left unsold. 


OBITUARY 

BARON PHILIPPE ; 
de GUNZBOURG 

Maquis contribution to ; 
the D-Day battle 

de delay to transfer their 2nd SS 


Baron Philippe , uc p'^ Di vision (Dos Reich], 


Gunzbourg, whose mettle was jjj^ ugh his fief w Uie Nor. 



vjuiu.uu-.o- througn Ills lie* V 

displayed in his ^andy battlefield. 


the Special Operations 
Executive's French sect* 00 
during the Second World war. 
died on July 10. 

The son of a Russian banker 
and. a French mother, de 


Ordered from ... the. 
neighbourhood ‘ of Toulouse 
on D+l. the Reich division 
was scheduled :to rea« ;j£he 
battle from - whert'its heavy 
tanks of the newest type rai&ht 


■ > 

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(1 


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r> 


Gunzbourg never felt at ea« , , i. ave bad decisive effcet - 

in the cosmopolitan Jewish n+3. • v 

world of his parents; and, as a . - t £ e even i, the drvwabn 

young man, he was a playboy such barassnfcm 

and a rebeL fmm de Gunzbourgfs tectipn,. 

When the French Army ^ al ^, e hands of other SOE- 
demobilized in 1940, he^re- orean j ze d Maquis .further 
jected all thoughts of emigrat- t hai the move 'look- 

ing to safety and chose instead seventeen days - a delay: of 

ificance at a'tftne 


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to buy a farm near Agen in the 
unoccupied zone. As early as 
1941, he made contact with a 
British emisrary of the SOFs 
French section and began 
working for the organization. 

By 1 943, when the Germans 
occupied the whole of France, 
his involvement had grown 
and he sent his wife, Antoi- 
nette. their two children and 
English nanny to the safety of 
Switzerland. 

Under the command of 
George Starr, one of the SOE*s 
most successful agents in 
south-west France, de 
Gunzbourg assumed responsi- 
bility for the. area around 
Sariat. Bergerac and the north- 
ern Loi-ei-Garonne. He 
proved himself an outstanding 
'organizer, welding those 
around him into an effective 
fighting force and frustrating 
German attempts lo destroy 
it. 

His achievements bore fruit 
m June, 1944, at the time of 
the Normandy landings, when 
the Germans needed without 


\ ■ i ■ 

n 




strategic sigrut 

when the Allies were tightim 
fiercely to consolidate and 
extend their beach-head fool- 
hold, and would have regard- 
ed with considerable anxiety 
the addition or another first- 
class, fullyrequipf * 
armoured division to the; 
man defence. . V.;; 

As it was; by theu time The 
Reich division moved infohs 
lagers close to -the battlefield 
on D+J 7. it was with .figging 
qualities and morale natch 
undermined by the anad$'of 
the guerillas. ; 

Many . fell that .;<fe 
Gunzbourg’s MBE (ntiDfaq') 
was scant req%nition o^IiK 
role in these events. _ ’ » . 

After the war. be dev^ed 
much lime and cbnader^hte' 
resources lo ihe. problems of 
those who had been- his crim- 
pan ions-in-anns; and deajite- 
a considerable local standing, 
he never sought pofiticaCof 
fioeL * - .... '.‘v 

His sister. Aline, is.nte^ffed 
to Sir Isaiah Bwiin. . . ' v. ! • 


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MR G. W. QUICK SMITH 




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Party 

“Not Forgotten' 


Service Inncbeon 


Association 
The Queetr was represented by 
Vice-Admiral Sir David •Loram 
at the annual garden party of tbe 
“Not Forgotten” Association 
held in the grounds of Bucking- 
ham Palace yesterday. He re- 
ceived the guests with Admiral 
Sir Desmond and Lady Dreyer, 
Field Marshal Sir Edwin and 
Lady BramaJl . and Air Com- 
mandant Dame Jean Conan 
Doyle. 

The band of the 1st Battalion, 
The- 22nd (Cheshire) Regiment 
played during the afternoon and 
there was a concert arranged by 
Miss Anne Shelton. 

Luncheons 


HM Government 
Mrs Lynda Chalker, MP, .was 
host at a luncheon held yes- 
terday at Admiralty House in 
honour of Mr D.N.E Mutasa, 
Speaker of the House of Assem- 
bly of Zimbabwe. 

Lord Mayor of Westminster 
The Lord Mayor of West- 
minster and Mr Terence 
Mallinscn gave a luncheon yes- 
terday at City Hall in honour of 
the Lord Mayor and Lady 
Mayoress of London. Among 
those present were: 


Royal Marines 
The Duke of .Edinburgh. Cap- 
tain General of the Royal Ma- 
• lines, was present at a luncheon 
of the Colonels Commandant of 
the Royal Marines -held at 
Admiralty House yesterday. 
Major-General J.I.H. Owen, 
Representative Colonel Com- 
mandant, presided. 

Reception 

HM Government 
Mr J. Allan Stewart. Minister 
for Industry and Education at 
the Scottish Office, was host at a 
reception at the Hospitality Inn. 
Glasgow, on the occasion of the 
VIH Common wealth and Inter- 
national Conference on Sport, 
Physical Education. Dance, 
Recreation and Health. 


Dinners 


Lord and Lafiy Elton. Dame Ninette de 
~M. Slr Godfrey and Lady 


valote. CH. 


Taylor. Sir Ian and Lady MacCrcoor. 
Colonel j C_ M Ansel!, Mr and _ Mra 


Duncan Block. Mr and Mrs Jotui Hull. 
Mr and Mrs Anthony Maiunson. Mr 

Sheriff and Mrs Jack Neary. Mr and 

Mrs Alton Sheppard. Mr and Mrs 
Angus swung and Mr and Mrs 
Humphrey Swire. 


Speaker 

The Speaker and Mrs Weatherill 
gave a dinner in Speaker's 
House last night. The guests 
included: 

The Lord Chancellor and Lady 
HaUsham. Ihe Lord President of toe 
Council and viscountess Whlteiaw. 
Mr Michael Fool MP. and Mrs Fool 
M r F J BarrllL Mrs Joan Child. Mr D 
N E Mutasa. Miss Belly Sooth rwa. 
MP. Baroness Hylton-Foster. Mr 
Charles inino. MP. and Mr and Mrs 
wiuiam Beaumont. 

HM Government 
Mr Tim Renton. MP. was host 
at a dinner held last night at 
Lancaster House in honour of 
the Si no-British Joint Liaison 
Group. 


Science report 


US cancer treatment 
developed for women 


By John Newell 


American scientists are devel- 
oping a new way to treat 
cancers that affect only wom- 
en. They plan to nse a chemi- 
cal which is produced 
naturally in tbe cells of male 
embryos and that suppresses 
the development of inappro- 
priate female organs. 

The chemical involved is 
called Mullerian Inhibiting 
Substance, or MIS, What it 
does, when produced naturally 
in male embryos, is to cause 
the tissues that woaW develop 
into female organs in a female 
embryo to shrink and disap- 
pear. 

The new research indicates 
how MIS may also canse 
(amours growing in an adult 
woman's reproductive organs 
to shrink and disappear. 

Until recently, research on 
MIS was very difficult because 
only minute quantities of the 
compound could be obtained 
for research purposes. But now 
a research team from the 
American genetic engineering 
company. Biogen, and the 
Massachusetts General Hos- 
pital hare succeeded in cloning 
MSS. 


They have isolated the gene 
that controls tbe synthesis of 
MIS, and transferred H to 
bacteria whkh then work as 
biochemical factories making 
large quantities of MIS to use 
in laboratory experiments. 

Tests have shown that 
cloned MIS inhibits the 


growth of human tumour cells 
in laboratory culture, especial- 
ly cells grown from cancers of 
tiie female reproductive trace 
cervical, endometrial, ovarian 
and vaginal cancers. 

Biogen and Massachusetts 
General Hospital scientists 
are bnOding up production of 
MIS, and are about to. start 
tests in anhrak. If successful, 
human trials will start in 2989, 

The inhibiting substance 
gets its name because it stops 
the formation of tissues which 
develop from the Mullerian 
duct, a tube which develops 
into female sex organs in a 
female foetus. Another tube, 
the Wolffian dud, develops 
into male organs in a' male 
foetus. 

Male foetuses produce MIS 
naturally and it .affects DO 
tissues in male foetuses except 
those derived from the Mulle- 
rian duct, which would other- 
wise form inappropriate 
female organs. 

The hope is tha t MIS will 
stop cancers on the female 
reproductive system growing 
and perhaps make them 
shrink or even disappearwith- 
ont having any affect on the 
rest of the body, except of 
course on the female organs 
themselves. MIS may stop the 
cells of the female organs 
growing and dividing as well 
as affecting cancers and ways 
will have to be found to restrict 
its affects wholly or partially 
to the cancers. 


Mr George Quick Smith, 
CBE, who died on July 15 at 
the age of 80, was one of the 
most influential figures in 
British road transport for a 
period of 40 years which 
culminated in his term, from 
1968 to 1971, as chief execu- 
tive and then deputy chair- 
man of the National Freight 
Corporation. 

- Among his achievements 
was the role he played in the 
amalgamation of Britain's 
transport associations,, which 
led to the formation;' in 1944, 
of the Road Haulage Associa- 
tion and- the Traders’s Road 
Transport Association (now. 
Freight Transport 


tries, that the limited anfotmt * 
of work available in transport T 
might fall to non-national&- • . 3 

Quick -Smith's solution - ' : : 

trailers and container bodies - 
enabled each country to useits 5 

own tractor units, and there- 5 

fore drivers. This idea found s 

rapid international acceptance ? 

and became tbe basis frm-the * 

enormous growth in - cross- 
border trailer operation. ’ : 

Characteristically, he wgs a 
member of one of-the earlier 
Channel .Tunnel study com- 
mittees in tbe 1960s. 

When, in 1948, the Labour 
Government decided tocreate 
a nationalized road haulage 
business. Quick Smith became 


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ttie . . 

Association). 1 . ;.the first chief executive oCthe 

_ „,Borai op August 23, 1905, new: Road Haulage Executive. . 
Quick', ..Smith lead law at in a very short time, out o#v 
London University and -was. 3,750 haulage businesses he 
admitted - to tbe Bar., by the created an organization with 

40,000 vehicles; 

For tbe next 20 years* -be 
was to be involved with road 
freight organization under. the 
five Transport Acts which 
reflected the see-sawing -phi- 
losophies of successive gov- 
ernments. And when the 
National Freight Corporation 
was formed by Mrs Barbara 
Castle in 1968, be was. the 
natural candidate to belts first 
chief executive. ; . 

George Quick Smith was at 
the heart of policy in triad 
transport for a period of .23 
years of largely public owner- - 
ship; and he wrote a large 
proportion of the high-level 
policy documents which ema- 
nated from the industry. His 


ora 
c£~ •: 
arx-; • 


1 HM.s U i 


r- . 

4 *<’. »ri 


cassrt;-:.- 




nple. He entered 
transport through shipping, 
and between 1935 and 1948 
was secretary of a number of 
transport associations and a 
member of joint negotiating 
bodies connected with road 
transport. 

Notably, be was the British 
employers’ delegate to the 
International Labour Organi- 
zation and be contributed to 
the creation of the Interna- 
tional Road Transport Union. 

In his work for the IRU he 
was instrumental ra overcom- 
ing national objections to 
cross-border lorry movements 
in the period immediately 
after the war. Apart from a 
natural suspicion of foreign 


SC 


i; 


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vehicle movements in a conti- great talent was for reconcfii/jg 
nent which had recently been opposite points of view, with- 
racked by war, these stemmed out permitting emasculating 
from fears, in certain coun- compromise. • 


^ Nicholas 


MR RAYMOND LOEWY 

Mr Paul H. Poliak writes : 

1 was somewhat saddened 


to read' of 'the death of 
Raymond Ltiewy in The 
Times on July 16. However, I 
feel that the record should be 
set right regarding his car 
designs, especially the Avanti. 

Whilst Loewy did indeed 
sign for Studebakers in the 
1930s, the cars for which be is 
best remembered are the su- 
perb range of two-door coupes 
designed and produced in the 
1950s, namely the Champion. 
Starline and Hawk series, 
culminating in the Golden 
Hawk of 1956, which remains 
still a striking looking vehicle. 

The Sludehaker Avanti 
went into production in 1961 
and not in the 1930s or the 
1950s 


vanced thinking incorpopated 
was only appreciated many 
years later, unfortunately too 
late to help Studebaker,-who 
ceased automobile production 
in 1964. 

An interesting footnote, to 
Loewy’s story is the faerthat 
Sru debaker sold the manOfac- 
turing rights to the Avanti, 
complete with all the plant 
and machinery, back in. the 
mid-1960s, and Loewy's de- 
sign still rolls off the produc- 
tion line in the original South 
Bend, Indiana, factory to-this 
very day, albeit in small 
quantities. i 

It was said a few yeai$ ago 
that the Avanti was the best- 
kept secret in the American 
automobile industry. ; - 
Thank you for a tributtrio a 
man who proved that. : tbe 



'■-f 




as was suggested. As „„ 

with all of Loewy's post war Americans could design 
automobile designs, it was tasteful cars, though uri 
the — * - - 

ad- 


many years 
competition. 


ahead of 
and the. 


- ? ^i 


nately die Americans never 
appreciated this until tofrlate. 


MR CYRIL 
LAVENSTEIN 


Mr Cyril Laven stein, Ra, 
best-known for his 
watercolours and pastels of 
Cornish coastal scenes, died 
on June 24 at the age of 94. 

At the age of 1J .he won a 
place at the Birmingham 
School of An, then famous for 
its teaching of the arts and 
crafts. 


MR TED 
ELLIS ■:£ 


After serving as. a driver in 
Salonika during the First 
World War, he was appointed 
second master at Kiddeimm- 
ster School of Art, where he 
remained until his retirement 
in 1954. 

In 1930, he was elected a 
member of the Royal Bir- 
mingham Society of Artists, 
which in 1 93S exhibited hjs 
works,. During the 1930s he 
also exhibited at the Royal 
Academy. 

A serond Birmingham 
brtion in 1984 fed to _ 
television documentary film 
on his life and work. 


Mr Ted Ellis, the Norfolk 
naturalist, author and broad- 
caster , the “ouhj lessen tial . 
duffle coat and gum boots 
scientist” - died yesterday at . 
the age of 77. . .. . . / ^ 

. Bom in Guernsey, I he 
moved . to Norfolk as a child . 
and fell in love with the IJical 
Nora and fauna. : 


His was an expertise which 
came mom a lifetime of otiseF- 
vahon rather than . from 
books, and he carried .out 
much painstaking reoandfr on !. 

fang? and ivy. • . 

He was awarded an hoaor- 


ary DSc by the Uruverefty 
East Anglia in 1970. - 









. Mr Kenned. , . 

“Puty .chairman of tbeSe^x 
ern-Trem Water Au'tfiSfe.- 
exhi 0" June 25;He.was»4. 
Cja *^J.; R °i>e | T 50 n was .a dSsdfiq&iiof ■ 
“■ -imperial Tobacco aridinShag- 
>ng director of John Player & 
Sons beforeTeuringip-j.^. y 







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^SSSlS 8 ** 


THE TIMES WEDNESDAY JULY 23 1986 

THE ARTS 


&r 



Television 

Writer’s 


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; Tmttala fe Samoan for Teller 
' oTTales- It is also the titie of 
;piand 4’s three-part wbop- 
'; ppr .on the last years of Robert 
. Jv'JLouis Stevenson. Losbly ffl- 
'■jt&ed_ - in ‘West Samoa, last 
•i ' 'night's two- ho nr opening had 
^ - the pace of a dinosaur with a 
"■“gammy leg. Occasionally 
;,there was an agonized hop as 
7 >he director Don Sharp (also 
’■ i^sponsibte for A Woman of 
y&UttXance) realized he had to 
v «^th the books. Then 
‘"^Stevenson .would be shown 
;■ *Wth a blank page scribbling 
^ont .the ; words “Dr JekyD". ! 
\ Otherwise 'the result was a 
lumbering plod tbrough this 
7 fine writer's life. • 

7 As performed by John 
'V McEnery it was a life bound in 
Ishuiy jylastfc rather than pol- 
tshed red morocco. Looking 
Bke the young Ken Lmng- 
, sh>ne. bHt with a wider mous- 

- jad»e, McEnery began the 
.film, ns an- unponrished 

. Vdimtken lecher who falls in 
'. -.."fove with a married woman 
' ’• (shade* here of Alan Plater's 
recent dramatization of Law- 
' [race and Frieda). This wom- 
•/- an, played to pop-eyed per- 
' 'lection : by Angela Pnnch 
McGregor, he marries — much 
'3o the chagrin of his bearded 
T’: literary friends who duck that 
^dear Lotus has been destroyed 
, ! te» a writer. He becomes 
^'consumptive, his obsessively 
^ protective wife becomes a crit- 
' ic (**it’s cheap melodrama*', 
she says haughtily of the rest 
' of Dr Jekytt) and they both set 
off forSamoa. 

^This island, as interpreted 
fy the producer Ray Alehin, is’ 
a snbfcropkal Twickenham in- 
Tested with consuls, a. crazy 
" 'vicar, a sweaty estate agent 
and a German who wants his 
'V- navy to “blow up a few 

- •villagers'*. Falling in love with 
v the: view, the Stevensons de- 

cide to settle. At home the 
'•literati. - sink with deeper 
v-groans into their squeaky 
? chairs. 

■•'' There Was* a Crooked 
Man . . i (HTV) investigated 
^ the career of A1 Capone's 
' •hUnchmen, the Welsh gang- 
ster Llewellyn Humphreys — 
“one of tbe most powerful 
•^•'America has ever known" 
a -4Hxoniiim to the pleasanfiy 
*>hyperboUc ; commentary of 
'••Mi Morgan., In a. rare and 

- •riveting interview -. Hmoph- 
. ■' reys's daughter, a fonder «m- 
*- j> .cert pianist, told Morgan how 

T - da ting had beenaJut tridty Tor : . 
-■her and how A1 Capone -and 
his men used to sing her 
> lullabies in Italian. The home 
''-movie she released to Morgan 
j. because of the Welsh conneo- 
" tion showed her lather's fflm- 

■ 'Star looks as, playing Santa 
' Claus, he tucked her into bed. 

- 'There was however something 
"-macabre in the way she ill as- 
pirated her father's obvious 
' charm by saying if yon 
^'dropped a plate of spaghetti in 

his lap he wouldn't annihilate 
•< yon. Mixing stills with modern 
" Chicago, tibe programme trod 
' rather too softly over those he 

■ did annihila te. 

Nicholas 

Shakespeare 


Theatre in New York . . . 

Bring on the 
film stars 


. .Vo 

•< ••* . „v»y 


J am going to put off discuss- an Hispanic dope-dealer; Burt 
ing the New York openings as Young (Sylvester Stallone's 
long as possible. Following the brother-in-law in the “Rocky" 
trend of recent years, numer- films) is his Jewish partner 
ous shows have popped up (or and godfather to ms son 
- plopped down) during the Teddy, played by Ralph 
summer. Two new Broadway Macchio (the title character in 
musicals and Robert Lindsay The Karate Kid). At least three 
in Me and My G/W are due in generations of film-goers are 
August. They may keep three thus appealed to, and they 
theatres lighted but they will have responded hungrily, 
not fill the vacuum left by the The original Off-B roadway 
six plays which closed in a run of eight weeks sold out 
single June weekend, includ- three hours after the box- 
ing Jonathan Miller's staging office opened. Joseph Papp 
of Long Day's Journey into wangled a special concession 
Night and Jessica Tandy and from Actors Equity allowing 
Hume Cronyn m Brian him to offer an additional 140 
Clark's The Petition. seats in a room next to the 

Broadway audiences no theatre for a live, closed- 
longer respond to stage stars, circuit telecast of each perfor- 
and not always to film lumi- mance. Tickets were $7. a 
naries. Jack Lemmon could dollar less than a movie here, 
not keep Long Day's Journey and those sold out. There was 
going, not with mixed reviews a line around the block when 
in an O'Neill tragedy at the Broadway box-office 
Broadway prices, so it comes opened, and a Wall Street 
to London at the end of the lawyer seemed to express the 
month instead. It will be consensus when he said 'Td 



. . . and theatre in London 

A fnlripr nimntp from the grass-roots fascism of 

corner v^umaie his sidekict whose hobby 

Royal Court consists of spraying Sherifa's 

■ washing with National Front 

Karim AJ raw's 12 scenes of dogans. The, contradictions 


V;' 

|. . -.*;** "7.-. < - 





Robert De Niro, playing for a pittance in the bold experiment of Cuba and His Teddy Bear 


interesting to see how Robert 
De Niro fares in a drama 
which is moving from the 


go to see Robert De Niro in 
Swan Lake”. 

AI1 this is good on the 


Public Theater to Broadway premise that you cannot make 
fora 10-week run. While going people into regular theatre- 
prices will otherwise prevail, goers until you get them to go 
second balcony seats will be in the first place. As bait, I 


sold for S10. The producer. 
Joseph Papp, has persuaded 


much prefer movie stars to the 
hi-tech hijinks and spectacles 


the actors to work for $700 a of certain hit musicals, 
week (a pittance compared Now we must get to the 
with what Mr De Niro could productions the movie actors 
demand) and. if this venture will grace or disgrace, and the 
succeeds, he will try others, best to be said is that Cuba 
hoping to pare down all ticket and His Teddy Bear shows 
prices through union nego- that Reinaldo Povod is a 


tiauons. 

The De Niro package, Cuba 
and His Teddy Bear, is a 
marvel of showmanship. 


mildly promising playwright. 
His drama centres upon 
Cuba's relationship with his 
teenage son and the drug 


boasting not one but three culture which he vainly — in 
film actors. De Niro is Cuba, both senses — believes Teddy 


will escape. The most palpable 
sense of that comes, however, 
from two supporting charac- 
ters — a playwright junkie and 
a dealer one would tremble to 
meet at dawn, much less in a 
dark alley. 

Cuba and Teddy have too 
much of too little substance to 
say and do. Though Ralph 
Macchio has presence as Ted- 
dy he “acts" constantly; De 
Niro sustains his role with 
dignity, but 1 for one do not 
feel his lustre on stage as 1 do 
on film. Burt Young keeps it 
simple and wins the acting 
honours in this production. 

The rest of the news is 
worse, apart from the excite- 
ment of Dario Fo and Franca 
Rame bringing their one-per- 
son shows to Manhattan for 
the first time and Spalding 


Gray holding forth in two 
monologues so successfully in 
the small theatre at Lincoln 
Center that his run has been 
extended. A Broadway revival 
of Arsenic and Old lice (46th 
Street Theatre) is so overacted 
by its television luminaries 
that it is painful to watch 
except for Polly Holliday, who 
as die younger of spinster 
sisleTs who murder for charity 
again demonstrates the virtues 
Of simplicity. 

The New York Shakespeare 
Festival's first Central Park 
offering this summer, a 
straightforward Wilford Leach 
version of Twelfth Night, is 
badly spoken in such flat 
voices (except Feste, who 
sounds like an amplified mos- 
quito) that I felt certain it was 
a grammar school production 


until 1 read the programme 
and discovered several actors 
who must be kidding about 
their training, experience and 
awards. 

Of the prestige hit of the 
summer, a performance piece 
called Vienna: Lnsthans (Pub- 
lic Theater) conceived and 
compared by Martha Clarke, 
! have only two things to 
say. For the first time, I 
arrived late because 1 careless- 
ly assumed rather than 
checked the curtain time. That 
confession over. 1 must com- 
ment that the quasi-erotic 
configurations, the snatches of 
speedi and the only vaguely 
Viennese music l encountered 
did not make me regret the 
twenty minutes I missed. 

Holly Hill 



Sid and Nancy, which opens in London this week, may bring the first major film role for 
Chloe Webb (left), but she comes to it well prepared: interview by David Sinclair 

The rock world turns on its dark side 


As the sad story of Boy she is reluctant to speak of her 
George's degeneration contin- own past, it is clear that Miss 


ues to unfold, the release of 
Alex Cox's harrowing film 
about the demise of an earlier 
junkie rock star. Sid Vicious of 
the Sex- Pistols, -and his dis- 
turbed groupie- girlfriend. 
Nancy Spungen. provides a 
timely insight into the. grimy 
underside of the-rock world. 
Sid and Nancy, which opens at 
the Lumi&re on Friday, is a 
stark, unromantic portrayal of 
the true story of two lost souls 
who played a bit part on the 
stage of the punk revolution of 

1977. The musically incompe- 
tent and wilfully violent Vi- 
cious was charged with the 
murder of Spungen in October 

1978, but died of a heroin 
overdose on February 2, 1979, 
before he could be brought to 
trial. 

The part of Nancy is played 
brilliantly by the 27-year-old 
Chloe Webb, a New Jersey- 
born actress who trained at the 
Boston Conservatory of Mu- 
sic and Drama. This is her first 
major film role and, although 


Promenade Concert 


BBCPO/Klee 
Albert Hall/Radio 3 

' -Slowly but steadily the scope 
of Alexander Zeralinsky’s mu- 
? sic has been revealed to Brit- 
ish listeners. Hitherto the 
emphasis has largely been on 
his lurid tragic operas. But 
;*-.;RadSo 3 recently broadcast a 
.; » comic operetta which revealed 


Maeterlinck Songs were origi- 
nally written with piano ac- 
companiment, yet hearing 
them in this later scoring — for 
a sizeable orchestra fastidious- 
ly employed — it is hard to 
imagine Maeterlinck's obses- 
sive. death-wish symbolism 
being cloaked more fittingly. 

The songs move broadly 
from a ballad about three 
sisters, who make a mystical 


that Zemlinsky could have journey seeking an ecstatic 
-been a formidable rival for sort of love-death, to a finale 
Franz Lehar in the waltz in which a woman embraces 
charts had intellectual pride death at dawn like a lover. The 
and a rather complex person- texts in between are hardly 
■ality not steered him on to the less morbid, yet the impact ot 
gloom-and-doom path of the cycle is ; far from deprrcs- 
-Mahler and the others in the ing. Zemhnsky*s orchestral 
progressive circles of tum-of- inspiration is so deft - one 
theceniury. Vienna. thinks especially of the solo 

v 3 cellos in duet, the eene touch- 

es of celesta, the golden bursts 
of autumnal brass sound — 
that the musical mood often 
seems radiant. 


-Here, however, we were in 
the concert hall and exploring 
-the dark comers of the sub- 
conscious. Zeml insky's Six 


Nor are Zemlinsky's melo- 
dies, projected here with ad- 
mirable steadiness, (if some- 
times rather an unyielding 
timbre) by Felicity Palmer, 
un memorable: indeed, the 
winding tune of No 2 has a 
Tchaikovskian elegance. 
There is, though, a certain 
four-squareness — a tendency 
to match poetic metaphor to 
musical "effect" with dogged, 
phrase-by-phrase rigour — 
which prevents his music 
from taking flight, and which , 
will perhaps always condemn 
him to be the also-Tan in a i 
brilliant generation. 

Bernhard Klee obtained 
neat, sensitive accoropani- < 
meins from the BBC Philhar- 
monic here, but conducted 
Mozart's Symphony No 33 
and Brahms’s Symphony No 2 
like a man tiptoeing on 
eggshells. 

Richard Morrison 


Webb has more experience of 
the drug-culture life-style than 
her theatre background, in- 
cluding a spell with the Boston 
Shakespeare Company, might 
suggest. She has known 
friends who died from drug 
abuse, and playing Nancy 
gave her moments of acute 
nervous realization that "it's 
not really that far a road for 
anyone to go down". She is 
full of chaotic New York 
vivacity and, smoking steadi- 
ly, speaks in a speedy, slightly 
stoned drawl. Her language is 
peppered with expression like 
"tripping out" and “doing a 
gig” and for an actress she 
seems extremely “rock and 
roll" herself. 

Yet even just talking about 
her next assignment, in a Peter 
Greenaway film. The Belly oj 
the Architect, where she plays 
a sophisticated wealthy girl 
who goes to a private school 
and lives in Rome, she seems 
to snap into another world, 
involuntarily adopting a clear- 
er. crisper delivery. 

Her mother died when she 
was a child, and she was 
brought up in New York by 
her rather, an architect, who 
died when she was in her 
teens. She lets slip that she was 
expelled from school when she 
was IS. but she is happier 
talking about her roles than 
about herself. Does she prefer 
to be playing a crazed heroin 
addict or a traditional pan 
such as her recent stage role as 
Viola in_ Twelfth Night* “I 


wouldn't like a steady diet of 
either”, she says. “But I do 
want my parts to be intense. I 
go for extremes. I can't stand 
the mushy middle ground.” 

It is hard to imagine a more 
intense part than that of 
Nancy Spungen. There is a 
scene in Sid and Nancy where 
Nancy contemplates her 
bruised and battered* legs. 
“Those bruises were real”, 
says Webb. “I got them doing 
endless retakes of a scene 
where we come piling out of a 
phone-box on to the side- 
walk.” It is not a pretty film, 
and anyone who imagined 
that Sid and Nancy might be a 
glorification of the “live fast, 
die young” ethos would be 
swiftly disabused by the 
scenes of unremitting squalor, 
misery and pointless self- 
violation. But is it not there- 
fore rather a bleak film? “It is 
a job. People who have seen it 
are deprebed at first, but it 
sticks in their minds in a way 
that most films wouldn't." 

The director Alex Cox's 
debut film, the much ac- 
claimed Repo Man. had a 
similarly powerful resonance, 
and was also populated by 
characters reflecting the com- 
plex nature of disaffected 
youth. 

As Webb notes, the oppor- 
tunities for young character 
actors have never been great- 
er. “As the world gets older, 
character parts get a lot youn- 
ger. In the Thirties a 20-year- 
old could really be an ingenue, 
whereas nowadays, most 
women by the lime they are 


20. they've been around the 
block a few times, if not the 
world.” But the effects of such 
an early loss of innocence can 
be saddening, particularly in 
the world, of the groupie,- 
which Webb researched assid- 
uously in her preparation for 
the role of Nancy. “Some of 
them reach the age of 35 and 
they look about 50. They 
become so hard and are 


“real" East End life strike a 
peal of false notes. His charac- 
ters eschew such indigenous 
vocabulary as “poxy" or 
“gutted". They have a weak- 
ness for correct grammar 
(“they were", for instance, 
instead of “they was") and 
the)* have a habit of lapsing 
into quotable quotes. “W hat a 
dark and starless night!“ sighs 
She rife (Janet Steel), a back- 
street Pakistani girl. “What a 
mean, light little island we live 
in!" grouses Marge (Ann 
Mitchell), a back-street pub- 
lican's daughter. 

Apart from this, and ihe feet 
that none of. the company's 
accents was born within the 
sounds of Blow, everyone here 
is as real as the evening is long. 
Sheri fa and Marge are both in 
the family way: the former 
thanks to the latter's father, an 
old pug with excruciating 
ambitions as a stand-up com- 
ic; the latter courtesy of the 
black amazeur boxer who 
works in their back-street pub. 

Shuttling around to little 
dramatic purpose. Marge's 
teenage son (David Fenwick) 
gets involved with stealing 
dogs for illegal fights, but 
manages to distance himself 

Dance 

Carmen 

Coliseum 

Roland Petit created Carmen 
in 1949 to turn Renee 
Jeanmaire into a star, and one 
of the reasons that he succeed- 
ed was the shock-effect of 
raking a good dancer previ- 
ously associated with classical 
or romantic roles and present- 
ing her as a sluttish sex pot 

Alessandra Fern, who dan- 
ced the role for the first lime 
on Monday, has already been 
seen as Manon, as Mary 
Yetsera and as Woyzek's Ma- 
rie. so the element of surprise 
is missing. Still, there was a 
tremendous air of expectation . 
beforehand, and even more 
tremendous applause at the 
end, so she must be said to 
have succeeded She has re- 


which one feels ought to arise 
from this sociologist's pro- 
gramme never gel beyond the 
drawing-board. 

One wonders, -among other 
things, how it has taken two 
directors (Max Siafford-Clark 
and Simon Curtis) to stage 
this exercise in pseudo-natu- 
ralism: perhaps one tackled 
the rowdy bits and the other 
the pauses. Their joint pro- 
duction is certainly at its least 
ineffective when the bitty, 
snatched dialogue is spliced 
into a multi-track collage. But 
the vituperative barneys ap- 
pear to spring up out of 
nothing. 

David Beames's three mi- 
nor roles as a riverside club- 
owner, a bendable local 
copper and a Scottish boxing 
coach provide the most en- 
grossing performances. Ron 
Pember as the aged pug proves 
in his joke-telling that he is not 
Archie Rice and in his perfor- 
mance of “My Old Dutch" 
that he is not Peter Sellers. 
Peter Hartwell's set of railway 
arches gives meaning, for 
once, to die sporadic rumbling 
of the Tube beneath the 
theatre. 

Martin Cropper 



Fern’s provocative Carmen 


faced simpering, pompous 
narcissism exactly right. 

Antoni Clav£*s designs, us- 
ing vivid colours against black 
or beige backgrounds, are as 
brilliantly effective as ever. 


:(• rau m uuicia/ rnris uiuta- 

SSTMTK hisb- She «« entirely 


JhVr^ ih^aim thn,,in B in lhc ,BSl 
STShSm mam mil alS wherc Carm «> 5“™$ tO Seek 
for a girl is to her own death as another form 

the end-purpose is to be m the of 
tail wind of somebody won- ^ 

derful. then I don’t see a lot of London Festival Ballet's 
difference between Nancy production, new to London, is 
Spungen and Nancy Reagan " as wholehearted as you could 
Chloe Webb, who is mar- wish. Don Jose is one of Peter 
ried to a lawyer, holds no Schaufiiss's best roles, tearing 
illusions about wishing to join his heart out for his hopeless 
the glittering world of the big- love. Nicholas Johnson and 
name movie stars. “When you Craig Randolph are wickedly 
become a 'star' you have to funny as the two bandits, and 
protect your image. You can't Lucia Truglia plays their 
look ugly and you can't look mocking, sexually teasing girl 
old and you can’t take risky better than anyone 1 can 
parts. I don't want to be a star, remember. Davide Bombana 
I'd just like to keep acting." gets the toreador's white- 


turned from her year in Amer- ant * ballet remains what it 
ica with her technique sharp- has always been: vulgar, 
ened (very important in the corny, unscrupulous in its 
provocative solos) and her exploitations of Bizet s music, 
personality undimmed a mighty starring vehicle and a 

Twill confess to finding her Sreat.hrt- . 
slightly less than incendiary in ;• : all the more successful 

the early scenes, but perhaps ' ‘ or being ■ programmed be- 
my expectations (remember- ween twp classical works in 
iqg Jeanmaire or Dominique contrasting styles. In both of 
Khaifouni in this roje. and them. Festival Ballet have 
Ferri in' others) were unrea- shown several, fresh casts, 
sonably high. She was entirely Patrick Dupond danced Baya- 
thrilling in the last scene, dire on Monday with im- 
where Carmen seems to seek mense zest and personality, 
her own death as another form his pirouettes are amazing and 
of erotic pleasure. his jumps soar marvellously. 

T . even if his shape in the air is 

London Festival Ballet s sometimes rather eccentric, 
production, new to London, is Vir ^ nie Alberti . and Serge 
as wholehearted as you could Uvoiet a new ^it l0 lh e 
wish. Don Jose is one of Peter company, danced the leads in 
Schauftisss best roles tearing ^ on Saturday with stylish 
his heart out for his hopeless braV ura. Another newcomer, 
love. Nicholas Johnson and pjjblo Savoye, gave a very 
Craig Randolph are wickedly dashing account of the third 
fonny as the two bandits, and movement in Symphony in C, 
Lucia Truglia plays their an d Andria Hall brings a calm, 
mocking, sexually teasing girl dear-dR elegance to the sec- 
better than anyone 1 can 0 nd movement, 
remember. Davide Bombana T i_ ti • 1 

gets the toreador's white- «JOllH rCrCIVfll 


THE TIMES T-SHIRT & SHORTS 


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Petition 

A new play by BRIAN CLARK 




ROSEMARY HARRIS & JOHN MILLS in 

a play celebrating marriage, and a 
triumph ant sur vival against the odds. 
PJbTER HALL directs. 

Lyttelton: Tonight, Tomoz; Fri, Sat at 7.45, 
Then July 28, 29. Opens July 30 at 7.00. 

. Then July 31, Augl,2(m&e),4. 



Tkyfore and more people have 
iVXrealised the importance of 
taking some sort of regular exercise 
whether its jogging, squash, keep-fit 
classes or weight-lifting. These good 
quality, stylish sports garments 
complement each other beautifully 
to provide a smart versatile kit for a 
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B oth the shorts and T-Shirt are 
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Benn will back Being there ... come rain, bail or shine of f^c y 

Kinnock until 


election victory 


By Nicholas Wood, Political Reporter 


The threat of a hanMeft 
challenge to Mr Neil Kin- 
nock's increasingly moderate 
leadership of the Labour Party 
receded last night as Mr Tony 
Benn urged his followers to 
make an election victory their 
top priority. 

But he made dear that be 
was urging a slackening of 
hostilities, not a surrender in 
the party’s internal policy 
wrangles. 

With Mr Kinnock in 
Downing Street, the battle for 
unbridled socialism would be 
renewed afresh, bolstered by 
an influx of new MPs commit- 
ted to sweeping changes. 

Mr Benn, still the standard 
bearer of the far left, outlined 
the new strategy at a meeting 
in Hampstead, north London, 
called to launch Labour Left 
Liaison, an umbrella group 
linking 33 militant MPs with 
various radical groups. 

He said: “Millions of people 
desperately want to see this 
Government defeated and the 
left must see that what we say 
and do helps and does not 
hinder that possibility-. 

“The left should always 
avoid personality politics like 
the plague and have no heroes 
and no scapegoats, and re- 
member that success will only 
come when a strong and 
united movement can be built 
up.” 


Policy goals included over- 
turning legal curbs on trade 
unions, withdrawal from 
Northern Ireland, and an end 
to British membership of 
Nato. 

Mr Benn added: “We 
should not be surprised or 
discouraged by the fact that 
many of the policies necessary 
to achieve all this will not. on 
present indications, feature in 
Labour’s next manifesto— 

“We must campaign public- 
ly for these policies now— We 
must also campaign vigorous- 
ly for them when Labour is 
next in power, recognizing 
that the election of a Labour 
government will both banish 
fear and raise expectations, 
thus releasing energy which 
can be channelled into imple- 
mentation of these policies, 
especially as the crisis we shall 
inherit will demand radical 
solutions that go far beyond 
what is likely to be in our 
manifesto. 

“That is why the election of 
a Labour government is so 
important and must be oar 
first priority." 

Mr Benn’s prescription ap- 
peared to be at odds with that 
advanced by Mr Eric Heflfer, 
member for Liverpool, Wal- 
ton. at the same meeting. He 
castigated party leaders seek- 
ing to win power by stealth 
and fudging issues. . 


Ridley moves to keep 
rate increases down 


Continued from page I 

end of grant recycling meant a 
massive windfall for the Trea- 
sury, which would be lost to 
local government spending. 

Mr Ridley replied that Dr 
Cunningham was wrong on all 
counts, adding that he had 
never heard a more “incompe- 
tent piece of analysis". 

Mr John Heddle, Conserva- 
tive member for Staffordshire 
Mid and chairman of the 
backbench environment com- 
mittee welcomed the settle- 
ment. saying it would comfort 
ratepayers and firms in “cash- 
happy" councils. 

It also drew guarded ap- 


proval from Mr Simon 
Hughes, the liberal local gov- 
ernment spokesman. 

• The 47 rebel Liverpool 
councillors, who were disqual- 
ified from office and ordered 
to pay a' £106,103 surcharge 
for delaying setting a rate last 
year, will have to wait to find 
out if their appeal has been 
successful. 

After a nine-day hearing, 
three Court of Appeal judges, 
led by Lord Justice Lawton, 
said they would take time to 
consider the application to 


overturn a ruling that they 
' ilful 


were guilty of wilfu 
misconduct. 

Parliament, page 4 


Today’s events 


Royal engagements ’ 

The wedding of Prince An- 
drew and Miss' Sarah Tferguson 


at Westminster Abbey. I J.30. 

of Edinburgh, 


The Duke 
President, the Commonwealth 
Games Federation, attends a 


reception. Royal College of Snr- 
Edin burgh. 


geo ns, Nicholson St, 


Exhibitions in progress 

Portrait drawings by Wilhelm 
Hcnsel; McAlpine Gallery, 
Ashmolean Museum. Oxford; 
Tues to Sat 10 to 4, Sun 2 to 4 
(ends Aug 24). 

20th century drawings; Octa- 
gon Gallery, Fitzwilliam Mu- 
seum, Cambridge; Tues to Sat 2 
to 5, Sun 2.15 to 5 (ends 
September 28). 

Work by James McIntosh 
Patrick; Aberdeen Art Gallery 
(ends Aug 1); East German 
Graphics (ends Aug 16); Aber- 


deen Art Gallery. Schoolhifl; 
Mon to Sat 10 to 5; Thurs 10 to 

7. Sun 2 to 3. 

Jill, - Lucy and . Max 
Marschner, Usher Art Gallery, 
Lindum Rd, Lincoln; Mon to 
Sat 10 to 5 JO, Son 2.30 to 5 
(ends Aug 17). 

Recent paintings by Noel 
Monks; City Museum and Art 
Gallery, Derby; Tues to Sat 10 to 
5 (ends Aug 23). 

Music 

Mine head and Exmoor Arts 
Festival: Concert by the Festival 
Orchestra; St George's, Dtmster, 

8 . 

Gower Festival: Harp recital 
by Caryl Thomas; RhossOi 
Church, 8. 

Chester Summer Music Festi- 
val: Recital by the London 
Serpent Trio; Church of St John 
The Baptist, 1. 10; Recital by 
Paul Tortelier (cello) and Maria 
de la Pau (piano); Chester 
Cathedral, 8. 

Llandudno Organ Festival: 


The Times Crossword Puzzle No 17,105 



ACROSS 


1 An Identikit label? (4-4). 

5 Like the number at the 
beginning or end of a race 
(6b 

9 Revolutionary peer’s son on . 
his feet a long time in this 
<8L 

10 Gloomy resort, Lemnos (6). 

12 Predator recognized in Troy 
(5). 

13 Prayer adapted to the ear of 

Ruth (3,6b . 

14 Dog finds soldier on heap of 
stones (5.7). 

18 First trip takes girl mes- 
senger a long time (6.6). 

21 Mature but very hesitant 
breaker of the marriage bed 
(9b 

23 The islanders are naturally 
friendly here (5). 

24 Joined football team (6). 

25 Sir Joseph Porter was office 
boy to one (8). 

26 On late? A new temp is not 
liable (6L 

27 Scorpion-grass — a name to 
remember (8). 


3 Book attendant at start of 
work (5-4). 

4 Group have right to new 
priming process (12). 

6 She is Belgian, according to 
Meredith’s 3 (5b 

7 -Palatial old aeroplane (8). 


8 Join a shy motion picture 


artist on me line (8). 

11 Namby-pamby makes the 
. fairway twice (6-6). 

15 “The — minds of 
innkeepers" (Chesterton) 
(% 

16 Shut up about a Test opener 
being too young (8). 

17 Change duties in part (8). 

19 Dissolve, an international 
bond (6k 

20 They posed for a long lime 
as gods in human form (6b 

22 Prepare for strike (3 2b 


Solution to Puzzle No 17,104 


SOWN 


1 Hunter’s puzzling variation 


of theme i. . 

2 Tempest, for example, 
enveloping N Sea painting 
( 6 ). 





Palace A 


CMrimed frorajwge’J: ' 

was going ob, bnfsbeifidTiqt' 

hare a temper. 

Asked Mir much she was' 
hart by criticism of her figure 
or her clothes, Sarah said: “At 
the beginning I made the 
mistake of taking ft in amL; 
reading it; now I don't Jt 
doesn't bother me injamfe. 

And sis®, J _ 

change at alt I am qmte happy; 

with mywetf." ShescnniedJ^' 

' ■be was.ofiik : 


dfeL • 

In a separate interview -Wat 
the Press Assodation rdeased' 
yesterday she expanded opfoei- 
theme of the womanly foforer; 
“A woman should haveattfck- 
waist, a good fop topVan*: 
enough down the bottom,**)!' 
not too big." 

. On television, she said t&st 
she dressed . L_“xtnly -rfor 

Andrew”, _»ad t he Priace gas . 
cornered into admUtiug- mt^ 
he had raided her, warifauher ' 
and thrown away the-entfitefp- 
did pot like. 







1ST-' ' , 

rf!*' . -’V. 






tons man 

io Comet 


Miss Christine Heron and her mother, Ruth, in The Mall yesterday (Photograph: Dod Miller). Standing room only outside WestminsterAbbey. 

ubiqutsas cameramen. 

Inside the Abbtiy, ladders 


By DavU Sapsted 
They would see more on 
television, of course, bnt being 
there was aD that mattered ior 
the thoasands already lining 
the royal wedding route last 
night. 

Hundreds jostled for the 
prime positions outride West- 
minster Abbey; hardened cam- 
paigners opted for favourite 
spots along The Mall; and 
milling tourists looked on. 


bemused by the daffiness of 
the Brits with their scruffy 
sleeping bags, bulging plastic 
bags and inexhaustible bonho- 
mie in the face of threatening 
rain clouds. 

And then there were the 
Union Jacks. . . the ones on 
the hats, the scarves, the 
doaks and even the cami- 
knickers. 

The police were there, too, 
cajoling the throng outside 


Buckingham Palace and at- 
tempting to prevent visitors 
wrapped up in wedding fever 
from foiling foul of London's 
traffic. 

“Really, we’re just there to 
make sore people eqjoy them- 
selves and to ensure nothing 
goes amiss,” a Scotland Yard 
spokesman said. 

B uildings along the mfie- 
and-a-half route have already 
been checked and today, police 


marksmen will peer down from 
roofs in an attempt to counter 
any terrorist threat. 

Most of the building along 
The Mall and Whitehall are 
government-owned and do not 
provide the police with the 
security headache .that went 
with the long haul to St Paul’s 
on tire Prince of Wales’s 
wedding day five years ago. 

The only folk evident on 
rooftops yesterday were the 


aadriaffoMing rose in mgain- 


The interviewees 
Lawiey and Andrew Gsrdtoer, 
fishing hopelessly for Some 
titbit abort tlrc weddiig d^w^ 

got nowhere. “All I wilLsay ft, 
there wiB never .he t hus# 
match ft,** Miss EergBspn; 
said. “Fating talk^’T fte- 
Prince interjected . l -;- * * : 

They agreed that theyl 
langfced a Jot, and ofim-fo--. 

ifoced each other to sttafoesffo; : 

private, bnt in piftfic had- 
nmnaged to avoid dissotemghC': 
'{jggfes. A shot at 
the film showed them ritti ^ 
on the sea wall at. PartfoK - 
with Andrew playfully smadb-v 
fog her .ion the cheek ; ‘‘^* i 
God, don’t fall off the waHT'ihe; • 
gasped as hfo hride-to-heAfo? ; 
appeared behind him.. 

/. ‘ Asked where they would Bve 
after their maitiage; v : the . 
Prince said it wpnld beBpck- , 
ingham Palace Tor, the < ■& 
meat: “Sarahfo quite 
live with the 








- • •- dz -• <■ 


.-..t : 










i!r- 


: ?■ 

-: : c. : 


v_- :- - 


lyprofosjonamid the towers of They weald, however, be fook- 


Sowers. 

Near hi, the nfovvere 
befog waived in .St James’s 
Park with the RoyaL Parks 
police ’ a dmitting they were 
faming a blind eye to file 
overnight campas.- 

Nobody wanted to spoil the 
party. . •- ’ ' 


y:- 


nog for a house near Portland, , iTl 
although they would- happily . -.yjl S0al?i 
live anywhere in the country . - 

“Anywhere in the country r "“J '...' 
except Gloucestershire. If® ' .... 
Overcrowded.” the Prince rind.' ' fv'__ ‘ 

liberation of the royals and 'r_ . . 

Purple Prose, pageJl£ C. - 
Leading article, page??; *. . . 


'&■ 


:-=lT < 


THE TIMES INFORMATION SERVICE 


.. -... 


Organ recital by Roger Fisher. 
Church of the Holy Trinity, 
Llandudno. 7.45. 

Concert by the Philhannonia 
Orchestra with Dame Gwyneth 
Jones (soprano),' John Wallace 
(mimpet), the Dunvant Male 
Choir and the Cwmbach Male 
Choir, St David’s Halt Cardin 
7.30. 

Organ recital by Richard 
Shepperson; Norwich Cathe- 
dral. 8. 


Organ recital by Philip Saw- 
er; St Andrew and St George, 


yer, 

George St, Edinburgh, I. 

Organ recital by Simon 
Clarkson; St Mary’s Cathedral, 
Palmerston PL Edinburgh. 8. 

Organ recital by Christopher 
Brayne; Canterbury Cathedral. 
8. 

Talk 

Shining Levels: John Wyatt’s 
story of a man who went back to 
nature; Lake District Park Vis- 
itor Centre, Brockhole, Win- 
dermere,. 1.30. 

General 

The Great Weston Air Days; 
sea front, AVestoe-soper-Mare; 
today and tomorrow from 1 1 
am. 

Stewards Chemist's Shop: dis- 
play and reconstruction of 1900 
chemists shop: City Museum 
and Art Gallery. Worcester, 2 to 
5. 


Books — hardback 


The Literary Edttor's selection of in te re s ting books published this 
ArMote’s Poetics, by Stephen HaHiwefiTDuckworth. E?9 JO)' 
CoBns Guide to Cathedrals, Abbeys and Priories in England an 


books published this week: 
£29.50)' V 

England and Wales, 


Mark Pltlp (Duckworth. £28) 

Western Civilization, edited by Michael 


Orient a t i ons. ColJe cted Writings by Pierre Boulez (Faber. £25} 
St Hugh’s, One Hundred Years of Women's Education in Oxford. 


Grant (Thames & Hudson, £20) 

s bv Pierre Boulez (Faber. £25) 

edited by 

Antwerp 177&-18R), by Catharina 
Love, A Lite of Mrs Samuel Taylor Coleridge (GoKancz, 


Penny Griffin (Macmillan, £17.50) 
Social" 


Us (Yale. £16.50) 


The Bondage 

£15-95) 

The New Oxford Book of Australian Verse, chosen by Lss A Murray (Ox- 
ford. £15) 

Wsber and the Marxist World, by Johannes Weiss, translated by EBzabeth 
King-Utz and Michael J. King (Routledge & Kegan Paul, £25) PH 


Road closures 


Severe traffic congestion is 
expected in central London 
today on the occasion of the 
wedding of Prince Andrew with 
MissSarah Ferguson at West- 
minster Abbey. A number of 
roads will be closed to traffic 
and additional no parking 


restrictions will apply including 
tf pat ' 


Concise Crossword page 8 


Press cuttings 


Access to over six million 
press cuttings offering contem- 
porary reporting and analysis of 
a broad spectrum of inter- 
national affairs is now available 
at the British Library News- 
paper library.' 

The cuttings, compiled from 
British and overseas news- 
papers. and donated by the 


Royal institute of International 
Lflair 


subject access to 40 years of the 
20th century. The Chatham 
House Press Library Collection 
1939-69 is the largest single 
collection in the gift For further 
details contact The British Li- 
brary Newspaper Library, Co- 
lindale Avenue. London, NW9 
5h£: Tel: 01-200 5515. 


Wedding stamps 


A set of stamps to celebrate 
the wedding of Prince Andrew 
and Miss Sarah Fn^uson are 
now available at all post offices. 

The 1 2p and 17p stamps, 
issued by the Post office, were 
designed by Jeffery Matthews. 
The photograph used on both 
stamp values was chosen by 
Buckingham Place. 


The pound 


Bo* Bank 

testmteS IS 

Austria Sell 2130 22.10 

MtobnFt S3. 15 65.35 

Canada I 2.135 2A3S 

Danmart Kr 12A4 11.79 

RnindHdc 7.99 7.49 

Francs Fr 1089 10.14 

GmsifDn 113 Us 

OreaceOr 21740 20Hn 

HongKoogl 11-S0 11.40 

ksiandPl 1-117 14157 

Italy Lira 227000 2150X0 

JtpaoYert MS. 00 231 M 

H eOw rin daGM 1725 1535 

Moray Kr 11 j61 IIjOI 

Porbi^Esc 227 JO 21&50 

South AftkaBd 5.10 4J30 

Spain Pta 211X0 20100 

Sweden Kr 10J3 1030 

SwttzartandFr 2.70 2^5 

USAS ■ ’ - TJ55 • 1.485 

YugosMaDnr SOM 59100 


Ha*ea tar sntad dsnomHiattofthenk notes 
orty as supplied by todays Bank PLC. 

(M«d Price Mex: 3818 


fondore The FThdeadOSdd down 1.6 at 
1274.7. 


the suspension of forking me- 
ters and residents parking 
places. Motorists are advised to 
travel in by public transport. 

From 130 am to l» pm the tafemkig 
roads w* be dosed to (raffle within an 
area bounded by: Northumberland Ave. 
Cockspir St Pafl MaB. St James's St. 
Picceaiy. Duke of WeBngton Ptaca. 
Groswnor Rd. Lower Grosvenor Piece. 
Bressenden Ptece. Victoria St (w«wt- 
boundV Artaery Row. Greycoat Piece. 
Horsefeny Rd. River Thames between 
Lambeth ana Wes t min ster bridges. Vic- 
toria Embankment 

The Mall, b e tween Queen's Gardens 
and Marlborough Rd. Queen's Gardens 
and Constitution H*. wfl reman dosed 
unci 5 pm. 

Whilst the roads are dosed an inner 
diversionary route wfl opereta around the 
closed areas: 

CLOCKWISE: Lambeth Palace Rd. Lam- 
bed) Bridge. Horsefeny Rd. Greycoat 
place. Aroian' Road. Victoria St Groswr- 
nor Gardens. Grosvenor Place. Hyde Park 
Comer. KccacHy. Pfceadiy Circus. 


(N 


E sides), Northumberland Ave, 

torta Embankment We st minster Bridge, 


York Rd Addnaton St 
ANTtCLOCXWreE: 


Westminster Bridge. 

Victoria Embankment Northumberland 
Ave, Charing Cross. Cockspir a. Pal 
Maa, st James's St Pxxadfly, Duke o t 
WeKngton Place, Grosvenor Place, 
Bressenden Place. Victoria St Vauxhaf 
Bridge Rd. Vauxhad Bridge. Bridgefoot 
Albert Embankment Lambeth Pataca Rd. 

From 220 pm until approximately 4 JO 
pm the tofcwktg roads *HH be closed to all 
traffic: BucUngrum Gate. Buckingham 
Palace Rd, PinSco Rd. Royal Hospital Rd 
a St and Ormonde 
Coaches an route to Victoria 


Anniversaries 


Birth: Corea try Patmore, 
poet, Woodford, Essex, 1821 

Deaths: Domenico Scarlatti. 
Madrid, 1757; Ulysses Grant, 
general, 18th president of the 
USA, 1869-77, Mount Mo- 
Gregor, New York, 1885; Sir 
William Ramsay, chemist, No- 
bel laureate. 1904, High Wyc- 
ombe, Buckinghamshire, 1916; 
James Max ton, politician, 
Laigs, 1946; D W Griffith, film 
director, Hollywood, 1948; Rob- 
ert Flaherty, pioneer of the 
documentary film, Duonerston, 
Vermont, 1951. 

Alexandra Park, London, 
opened. 1863. 


Parliament today 


Weather 


A depression over the 
North Sea will move SE 
into the continent and a 
showery aft-stream will 
cover the British Isles. 


6 am to midnight 


London, SE, central S, central K 
England, MdJands. Channel Is- 
lands: Bright or sunny intervals and 
isolated showers; wind NW -fight. 
oocasknaBy moderate; max temp 
18C (64F). 


East AhgBa, E England: Bright or 
- -ghow- 


sunny intervals and scattered 
ers; wind NW moderate; max temp 



.. . . 


: i 

? f 

v-4 

» 

I 


launch 


* ; j! 

•4 5 








Usting sought ! 




1 


17C (63F). 

-W Eng 


SW England, S Wales: Bright or 
sunny intervals, (sedated showers at 
first more cloudy later wind NW 


or moderate: max temp 18C 


befit l 

(b4F), but cooler on coasts. 


TODAY 
Lamion Bridge 


District, isle of ItanfsIwScDtland: 
Bright or sunny Intevals and Isolated 
showers, becorrang cloudy by eve- 
ning with rain in places; wind NW 
fight or moderate; max temp 17C 
(63F), but cooler on coasts. 

NEEnfftond, Borders, Edinburgh, 
Dundee, Aberdeen, Glasgow. Cen- 
tral Highlands, Moray Firth, NE 
Scotland, Orkney: Bright or siRwiy 
intervals and scattered showers, 
some heavy, becoming more iso- 
lated later wind NW moderate or 
fresh, occasionally strong, decreas- 
ing light or moderate; max temp 16C 


Commons (2.30): Motion on 
Supplementary Benefit (Mis- 
cellaneous Amendments) Regu- 
lations. Social Security . BilL 
Wages Bill, Agriculture Bill, and 
Dockyard Services Bill, Lords 
amendments. 

Lords (2.30): Financial Ser- 
vices Bill, committee, second 
day. 


Tower Bridge 


Tower Bridge will be raised 
today at 2pm and 6.45pm. 


Argyll, NW Scottand, Northern 
Ireland: Bright or surety intervals 
and isolated showers at first, 
becoming cloudy with rain in places; 
wind NW moderate, occasionaBy 
fresh, backing W fight; max temp 
16C (61 F). 

Shetland: Sunny intervals and 
isolated showers; wind NE light or 
moderate, bade NW: max temp 12C 
(54F). 



High Tides ^ . r' 


} ft 

■ ‘ ^ ^ i * 


l^Mue sky. bc-Wup sky and doucb c- . 

r-rog: U-flrtaJK b-~ 


dowly: o-overc s»st r-._. — — „ 

jail: ■_ retw-mtat: r-rain: Mnow: tti 
thunderstorm: p-showero. 

^5L‘ Ur ^ 0on - ’-‘no 
|p««^mph) ctroocL Temperature 


WHon-oo-Hzv 
TMa 


All HT PfSjMT 
354 7.1 4.12 Kfl * 

3-05 A3 3J53. 

9-33 1ZA 9J1.4S2 
12.40 3 J 1.14r.33' 

9.18 11,8 936..-1Z.1 , 

8J26 5 J2 M2' -53 l 

1.00 65 

7-56 5.0 ai2 ‘-&3 

.236 43 3,10 - W- 

1^6 4.0 2J» '>3S_. 
12.04 5A12^7;-M. 

8.19 7S 8JS9. 7* 

aif 9.1 937. fMi 
42& a08 

1-OS 0.6 1^4 -33 
11.19 Z6 

ZJJS 4.7 Z19 *ff>- 
R28 S3 340 T2 1 
7.18 63 739 * 72 - 

8.08 3.7 8J22 4.1. 

737 S3 7j44 -If-, 
9-25 2J 9^3 34- 
1-16 4^ -USt. - AJi 

1-02 62 1.» «2- 
123* AA :t.15-"-45‘ 
&37 92 BJ8. ,«• 

525 S3 6JB ■ R4 * 
1.42 A3 137 M, ‘ 
in nwlres: 1re-32MB»L • ; 


feness role I 

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-ml 


feta trial 


'w. . 


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A i l 


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to 


-t ( «i 

*S ****** 


Around Britain 


Outlook for tomorrow and Friday: 

of rain in W 


Cloud with outbreaks 
drstrids'wai spread to remaining 
areas tomorrow. 


Sunrians: SuiMtx 
5.11 am 903 pm 


(betwe e n Lower Sterne 
Gate]. C 


station w* be perrrtttwllo travel north in 
Buckingham Palace P 


Rd. tram Ebury 
Bnogeta Sarntoy Plara- 
Up until 3-30 pm a pp i unlma triy. rnotor- 
ists w« ba abta to cress ttm dosad roads 
from Lower Grosvenor Place mu 
Bressenden Place. Victoria St into 
Grosvenor Gardens. Ecdeston bridge into 
Ecdaston St Elizatelh St in ambeth 
Bridge. Lower Staone St Wo Cheisae 
Brtdge Rd (both dWOons). 

From 3.30 pm. lor about one hour, the 
ares bounded by the following roads w9 
be dosed to traffic: Stowe Sq, Cflyeden 
Placa Kfcig's Rd. Hobart Place. Lower 
Grosvenor Place. Bressenden Place. 
Victoria St between Brassanden Ptece 
and Vauxhal Bridge Rd. VgpdafiBndBB 


Rd between Victor Sr and Warwick We 


Warwick Way, Suthertand St Lupus S&. 
Grosvenor R(J 


between Lupus St and 

Chelsea Mine Rd. Chetssa Bnbmkment 
between Royal Hospital Rd and Chelsea 
Bridge Rd. /rattle w# not fie permted to 
t ravel south ei ttusven orPtace from Hyde 
Park Comer. 


Roads 


Woka and Weafc M4c Lane doansn 
both (fractions between (unctions tS 
ISwtndon) and 17 (Chw»rtBm). MS: 
Contraflow between junctions 9 (A438 
Tewkesbury) and 10 (MCI 9 Cheltenham). 
JH4: Only one Jane open on born carriage- 
ways between (unctions 44 (A48 Swansea 
East) ana 45 (M0&7 Swansea). 

The North; MSI: kwle tone closura on 
N and southbovw camageways a Wal- 
ton Sunmt (junction M61/M8). A1: Con- 
traflow at BaWersby. near Rjpon, A54s 
Bypass construction at Xelsal HU. 
CnashlrB: care requred. 

Scotland: M74/A74: Two way traffic N 
of Lasmahagow on the northbound 
carriageway. AS1: Single ana traffic near 
Stirling: delays Utcety curing mommg and 
evening peaks. M9: Norttibowid carriage- 
way dosed between unctens 9 and 10 
(Stfrfirg): two way traffic northbound. 

Wom j t kni mpp Be ri by AA . 



-<SM 


How to ptajr - oaajr Pt rt mwt 
On each day your unkiue set of eight 
numbers wiu represent commercial 
and Industrial shares published In The 
Times Portfolio nst which wm appear 
on the Stock Exchange Prices page. 

In the columns provided oext to 
your shares note the price change (+ 
or -L m pence, as oubUSMd in that 
day's Times. 

After Hating the pnee changes of 
your eight shares ror that day. add up 
all dsht share changes io give you, 
your overall local plus or minus (+ or - 


Check your ov erall total against The 
Times Portfolio dividend published on 
me Stock Exchange Prices page. 

H your overall total matches The 
Times Portfolio dividend you have 
won outright or a share of the total 
prize money stated for that day and 
must claim your prize as instructed 
bdow. 


How to pin - Weekly Dtvfefrao 
Mon day -Saturday record y 


. — your daily 

Portfolio total. 

Add these ugelher io determine 
your weekly Portfolio total. 

'our total matches Ute pubttahed 


If your tot 

veekly dividend figure you have won 

juirtgm or a -* * — - 

Hated for uv 


outright or a share of the price money 
slated for Uvai week, and must claim 
your prize as Instructed below. 

How to Clstni 

He r i m it can be aceapud outode ohm 


You must have your card with you 
when you telephone. 


If you are unable la telephone 
someone else can claim on your behalf 


but they must have your card and cau 
• Times Portfolio claims line 


The - 

between the stipulated tunes. 

, No responsibility ran be accented 
for failure w tonlacr me claims omce 
for any reason within the staled 
hours. 


The above instructions are ap- 
plicable to both dally and weekly 


dividend claims. 


n Moon sots: Moon rises: 

7.igam 1027 pm 
Last quartan July 28 


Sun Rain 
hrs In 

EAST-COAST ■ 
Scsrboro 6-6 

BridNngtan 4J9 * 
Crootr - 23 

Lowestoft 3 A 

Ctscton 33 - 


Max 
C F 


Mai nato 
SOUTH C 


I COAST 

Fofcoaton* BA 


21 70 doudy 

21 70 doudy 

20 68 cloudy 

22 72 bright 

21 70 bright 
21 .70 bright 


Stir Rain Max 

hrs In c F‘ 

3.4 -04 18 84 

Tsrtejf 3i) - 18 68 

CotwynBojr 3L9 1 - is 64' 

teoncembs 2^ . 16 81* 

3 3 . - IS Si 


Lighting-up time 


Brighton 


92 

5.6 

iao 


20 68 bright 
bright 


Uttataratn 8.7 
BognorR 105 


London 923 pm to 4.42 am 


Br i st o l 9.42 pm to 452 am 

1057 pm to 452 am 


ErSnburgbK 
Manchsstiar950pmtp4A1 am 
t9.48 pm to 5.10 am 


Yesterday 


Tempemtires at midday yOSttnday. c. 
doud: f. fair r. rain: a. sun. 

CF' . C F 

C 1457 Ouamsoy 8.1661 

11783 fensmsss C1356 

c 1457 J er s e y- . - f19K 

*1783 London c1966 

CattflH S1968 M W ato 'o 1457 

Ectiitourgh e 1558 WswcasBa c 1559 

Glasgow c U57 Rfitidsway -c 1559 


Souths*! 73 

Smdown 8-0 

ShankSn 8.7 

55 
35 

7.4 

W a ywou Th 54 

E a m u ufl i -42 

TWgnmouth ' 7.4 

Torquay 55 

- • 45 

55 54 

, . 15 

Gaeni s ay 23 

WEST COAST 
ScSylsfcs 33 .02 

55 56 


20 68 
20 68 sw»fr 

19 66 'sonny 

20 88 sunny. 
23 73 bright 

21 70 sunny 
21 70 Ooodf . 
21 70 bright 

19 68 cloudy 

20 68 bright 
2» 70 doudy 
20 68 Btmny 


ENGLAND AND WALES 
jaggy, ff - 22 72 
g*"®* 1.3 - IB 68 


Bristol (Ctrl) 65 31 21 TO 
lf(Ctft. 65 53 21 70 



Carcfifff 




f-3 - 18 61. 

13 57 17 63 

| jgsg 2.0 - 18 .64 

NW«-Trng 82 18 6 * 

CwSNe - 3u4 31 15 59 



;t ■ "rwi ea 

S. c.-.. ■ 


- 19 66 


- 21 


- 23 73 


68 sunny: 
70 cloudy 


- 23 73 


sunny 

brigm 


20 68 bright 
''■firtgte 


19 68 


- 20 68 


20 68 


doudy 

Ctoudy 


19 66 
21 


66.siffiiy 
70 bright 


SCOTLAND 

■ frWd w w * 43 J7 tasr 
nmalwkfc- 55 31 16- 61 
$7 35 is 61 

S— ■ .03 35 15-59 

iE** |3 37 14 -57 

!? ?** M-4B 46 81 

SSL, • li " 21 68 

rwaraaan 52 - 18 6a 

gt Nri mw 93- .01 20 68 
- -55 31 IS 84 


dwwsre.- 
UriyWr-: 
shov w w a v 
Showws : 

shdwere -' 
i hoftgre •; 
■foqwwp 


NOfmeWRELAND 
Maaf ./ , 33 JO V 17 


TTira are Monday's figuma 


Floral display 


Abroad 


A floral display in honour of 
the wedding of Prii ' 
with Miss Sarah 


inire Andrew 

Ferguson can 

be seen today ai the Trocadero 
centre in London’s Piccadilly 
Circus. 

The exhibition, a display of 
flower arrangements by pro- 
fessional flonsts from around 


MIDBAY: c. doud; A tXtxaie: frtelrr fjj, ftjg; r, rake 5 . son: tin. snow; t thundw. . 


Ajacdo 

AkmCM 

Ata’drta 

AVm 

Amaron 

Athens . 


C F 


.*■ -W.'fiOBte '-’s 2 


the countr y on the theme of the 
weodi 


royal wedding, has been or- 
ganised jointly by the Royal 
Horticultural Society and. the 
Trocadero.. It is open to the 
public from 10 am to midnight 
today and tomorrow. 


BMadf* 

Bfrcetaa 

Bwut 

as"* 

Bermuda' 
B ia rri tz ■ 
Bonfr’x 
BouTne 
Brussels 


. C F ; ' c F 

» » 79Cotogr» . f..24 75 

siKS*? 8 ". sg'g'ssaa. 

* 36 |7Di* 6« - c-15 'SSSSUg * U § 

* 18 64 Dubrovnfr s 26. 79 MndcoC t 22 
- 29 84 rtro 1 1 ^ ISr 

B28foB«tei. s 28 82 

1 ?S 77 MontmT f 21 70 


- C?F 


- Frankfurt 

S 26 79 Rmcftaf. f 22 72 
Qenava 
c 20 S&Gibrate 
C-24 75 mfri nk i 


S 24r 
S 18-64 
5 18 64 
c 15 39 
f , 2751 
8 32 90; 
f 20 .68 


f 29 8* Hood K 

■ T- 


s P S SET • a g 

1 75-77 g y*?! . S ?5 5 B ■« 81 ■ 



S 23 73 

s 32 90 MMbgl 


c 19 66 Naptos 
84 ttfeM 


OT15«ra PJEW5PAPER& UMTTED. 
[9B6. Pnm#d by London Poet (Pcmt- 
erai Limited or 1 Virginia Street. 
Igndon El 1XN. Wednesday. Jmy 23. 
1986. Revered as a newspaper « 
the Pusi Office. - 


B Aims'. 
Cm -. 
CapaTa 

CTdanca 

Cfaicaoo 1 

OfSm h 


f 28 

s 25. 77 N- York* 

■ s 29 84 Nfce ' 
.S 3&'B7 Oslo' ' ■: 
8 19 68 Paris 
: t 10 &0 Pddng . 


* “ foTtKvn- * 8056:1! 
lU H I**"** * ® 79 ; 
.* - C.22 72. 


-pm-- 


s 25. 77 TouHto* .«*?0 < 

r « W.TteS V- 929 
t'22 72 VteWKte. '-s 29 6^ 
v - - Vaoc'vir* a 20- 58 t 

« g 


c 19 88 Muds' 

e 20-68 Karacm 

- LPahnH « JV 
s- 34-93; Ushon -re 2f'7t T 
rns-uora, . f 25 78' 

\ S ^T-'Ahjjfta' * 2272 _ 

l 3 £ -IS S c 18 64 .an 

C “ •■w^ iin , . 30 ® Rrypdh - * 44111 Zorfdr 
rimotes Mondgya flswesm Meet 


>'■ » 23 73.Vtama . I s^23 73- 
ff.': f 13 » Wbrm ' 

%•- * 28 82 Wastrtour s 3?^ 



M&er ' j 





:X 








☆ & ☆ ☆ it SL 


21 


BUSINESS AND FINANCE 


THE 



TIMES 


WEDNESDAY JULY 23 1986 


Executive Editor 
KeonetlrFfeet 


STOCK MARKET 

FT 30 Share 

1*1274.7 £-1.6} . 

FT-SE100 
t559,2 (-1.0) . 

is ‘ . - 



::(-0.64) 

THE POUND 

US Dollar .. 
1^900(-0.01f0) 

I W German mark 
3V1.812 (-0.0009) 
Trade-weighted 

72.8 (-0J2) ■ 


--- 

itQowbwt 

Hi|| ae,rl[*52 

nnceurte^j Wi, * 

Wrfj!' 

,l b Andrew pUvfciw*^ 

?c ^ on S?Sft 

,od - don’t fall 
a>ptd as his b%5) 
p *f*J befcuS^l 

™ r ,b ™ marrijTi 
Tincc said it uonldTil 
njita Pzktce foi* 
km: "Sarah s^J;- 
!* e H «b Ihe mt^S 
1 R** Roald. honeier.tI 
fJS lor a house Beariw 
•jfbi<L'gh the} ■dbMu 
»**•’ anywhere ifl tbea^ 
“Anv where in fr*, 
\j\p: Gloacestenfetk 
fUTcnmded." the ftij E 
. iheration of the m* 6 
Parple Prostjqs 
Leading arodt,^ 


lin .lJ 

e;» s t5.V?S Worr i* 

4m*o>i =>■ 


Dixons man 
\ to Comet 

-■■■■ Mr Eddie Styrin&,managjne 
:• director of Dixons stores until 
Mi month. -has been appoint- 
" ed managing director of Com- 
pel, 'flic', electrical retailing 
subsidiary of Woolworth 
Holding: : : 

Wooworth said yesterday 

- that it -approached Mr Styring 
after . Dixons Group’s £1.8 
billion- bid. for Woolworth 
tailed- Mr 'Styring. who left 

. Dixons - during the bid. is 

- believed to have had personal- 
ity differences, with Mr Mark 

- Souhami. ihe managing direc- 
tor of overall retail operations 

- including Dixons and Currys. 

MrMichael Hollingbery has 
/ relinquished his post of chair- 
man of Comet, but will re- 
.main -as a : non-executive 
director of Woolworth Hold- 
ups: Mr David Hewitt, until 
now chief executive; will be- 
come chairman of Cornet. Mr 
Jerry Mason wQl retire as 
managing director of Comet 
Radiovision Services. 

AAH soars 

■ AAH Holdings, the phar- 
maceutical supplier and -fuel 
distributor, increased pretax 
profits from £1 1.2 million to 
£1&3 ipilliop.-in the year to 
March 3f as turnover rose bv 
87,5 per cent to £976.9 mil- 
lion. The final dividend of 
4Jl6p* a^insl.4.13p in 1984- 
85s. made a total of7_8p for the 
Tempts, page 22 


''a £48m launch 


:.; v W/¥>. 

*VtT 4/ 


v Acattft- - &’ • Hutcteson*^.«a 
producer of edible , oils, is 
coming to the slock market 
with a £48 million price tag. 
Fifteen per cent of the equiEy 
is being .offered .for sale -at 
I60p a shared ' v 

Tempus, page 22 

Listing sought 

BTR Nylex. the Australian 
company 62.5 per cent owned 
by BTR, is seeking a London 
[isting.-No.new money is being 
raised. Tempos, page 22 


Hich tmb Guinness role 



rr *« mC ''r0 



■- ■: S' 


-Lord Iveagh, president of 
Guinness, has appointed 
Lazard 'Brothers, the mer- 
chant bank, as his personal 
independent adviser iu the 
run-up to next month’s 
shareholders’ vote on the re- 
■ vised board structure. 

Data trial 

‘ Mercury Communications, 
the telecommunications 
group owned by Gable & 
Wireless, is to begin trials in 
the autumn of a business data 
network carried by satellite. 
IBM, the Stock Exchange and 
Electronic Data Systems will 
participate. 

Cranfield post 

Mr Leo Murray, regional 
director of Rothmans Interna- 
tional has been appointed 
director of the Cranfield 
School of Management 




ift 


f i- VZ : ;• ■■ 

- t . ■ ■ : ■ 

K : /• . -c • * •• '• ' 

s .- ’ . - • 

:ar 9* 

, . _ ; r" .1 : 

l * ?: -1 r 

.-if* * ‘.’‘.I-: 

:• ••• : 

li ? 


n 

' r 

£ 


Tenuw 22 

Win Street 22 
CWpnyNeiis 22 
Comirat 23 
Stock Market 23 
FovjgaExdi 23 


Traded Opts 
Mtao MrUs 23 


23 

Mcacy Mrus 23 
Unit Trusts 24 
Coasioditxs 24 
USM Prices 24 
Share Pres 25 


US growth 
weakest 
since 1982 


From Bailey Morris, Washington 


The US economy grew by 
just 1.1 per cent during the 
second quarter, confirming 
reports of a sharp slowdown 
which has led to calls for 
another round of interest rate 
cuts to bolster growth. 

Commerce Department of- 
ficials said yesterday that the 
second quarter figure, which 
compared to revised first 
quarter growth of 3.8 per cent, 
was the lowest since the last 
quarter of 1982 when the 
economy was still in recession. 

Mr Beryl Sprinkel, chair- 
man of the President’s Coun- 
cil of Economic Advisers, said 
the figures reflected **a slug- 
gish performance which 
would be of great concern if it 
were to continue.” 

Mr Malcolm Baldrige, the 
Commerce Secretary, said 
that the slowdown paved the 
way for the Federal Reserve 
Board, which acts as a central 
bank, to authorize another cut 
.iii the discount rate which was 
lowered io 6 per cent only two 
weeks ago. 

On Capitol Hill where the 
slowing economy has loomed 
large as an election year. issue. 
Senate majority leader Mr 
Robert Dole described the 
new data as distressing and 
called for another Vs point to 


full-point cut in the discount 
rate. 

Democratic leaders said the 
data indicated that the four- 
year economic recovery was 
over, to be replaced by a long 
period of stagnation related to 
the huge budget and trade 
deficits. 

The economy was battered 
during the second quarter by a 
continued sharp deterioration 
in the US trade performance. 
Despite the lower dollar, net 
exports fell by S2I billion' 
(£135 billion) after rising by 
S6. 1 billion in the first quarter. 
Lower non-farm stocks, which 
dropped by S25 billion, also- 
retarded second quarter 
growth. 

Officials estimate that the 
trade deficit, which widened 
by more than $1 55 billion last 
year, will set another record 
this year and possibly nexL 
Concern over the manufactur- 
ing sector, which has been in 
virtual recession in some areas 
of the country, has grown in 
recent weeks with the an- 
nouncement ofpoor earnings 
and rising layoffs. 

LTV Corporation, Amer- 
ica’s second largest steel pro- 
ducer, petitioned the courts 
this week for reorganization 


under federal bankruptcy 
laws, citing foreign competi- 
tion and huge liabilities, 
amounting to $4.22 bill ion. 
which it is unable to pay. 

The second quarter slow- 
down. which had been widely 
predicted, has raised fears of 
another recession, particularly 
among private economists. 
They are less optimistic than 
Administration officials who 
predict a rebound in growth 
during the second halt of the 
year as the effects of lower oil 
prices, the lower dollar and 
lower interest rates percolate 
through the economy. 

But the Federal Reserve 
Board, which recently lowered 
its growth projections for this 
year to a range of from 2.5 per 
cent to 3 per cent, discounted 
fears of another recession in 
its semi-annual monetary re- 
port to Congress. 

It indicated that the factors 
are ripe for a pick-up in the 
second half even though the 
timing is difficult to predict 
because of unknown develop- 
ments in the economies of 
other industrialized nations. 

The Federal Reserve indi- 
cated it would continue to 
support the economy with 
sufficient credit to avoid an- 
other recession. 


A surprise BET 
£ 123 m double bid 


By Alison Eadie 

diversified ser- cent, but Mr Wills pointed out 
that the Monopolies Commis- 
had already cleared 


BET. the diversified ser- 
vices conglomerate, surprised 
the stock market yesterday 
with the double announce- 
ment of an agreed £29.9 
million bid for Brengreen, the 
contract cleaning company, 
anefa £933 million contested 
bid for HAT Group, which 
supplies specialist sendees to 
ifaeiDpsiniciion industry.: 

■Mr Nicholas Wills, chief 
executive of BET. said he 
hoped to secure HATs agree- 
ment to the bid. but Mr David 
Telling. HAT chairman, said 
the terms offered woe wholly 
inadequate. * > 

Mr Wills said both compa- 
nies would be excellent strate- 
gic fits and would fill in gaps 
between similar BET busi- 
nesses. He' thought a reference 
to the Monopolies Commis- 
sion could be avoided, as 
neither acquisition would take 
BET above 25 per cent in any 
sector. 

The combination of BET 
and HAT in scaffolding, for 
example, would be 13 per 


sion had already cleared ns 
unsuccessful bid for SGB, 
which would have given it a 
20 per cent market share. 

AU three companies an- 
nounced their results last 
week. Whereas BET showed a 
343 per cent in pre-tax profits 
in 1985/86, HAT showed a 3 
per cent decline in taxable 
profits to £11.1 million and 
Brengreen announced a 33 per 
cent fall in profits to £103 
million. 

The terms of the offers are 
five BET shares for 17 HAT 
shares, valuing HAT at l2H6p 
a share after stripping out 
BET’S I2p final dividend. 
HAT shares closed yesterday 
up 30p at I23p and BET 
closed down 1 5p at 425p. 

BET is offering one share 
for 9 Brengreen shares, valu- 
ing Brengreen at 46p ex divi- 
dend against a closing price of 
44p. The cash alternative for 
Brengreen is 45p a share. 


Mexico and IMF agree 
to debt compromise 

From Our Correspondent, Mexico City 
Mexico has been allowed to sector goods and services. It 
go for moderate growth by the will also sell or liquidate 300 
International Monetary Fund stale-owned companies and 
in an agreement which signi- continue to cut subsidies to 


fies a radical departure from 
the fund's traditional prescrip- 
tion for sick economies. 

The IMF has been trying for 
more than a decade to cure the 
Third World’s balance of pay- 
ments problem with policies 
that invariably led to 
recession. 

But the new agreement, 
signed in Washington, boils 
down to a tradeoff between 
Mexico’s economic needs and 
the IMF's good housekeeping 
ideas. Mexico has agreed to 
keep trimming its budget and 
raising its income by gradually 
boosting the prices of public 


other industries. 

In return, it has gained 
recognition that its depen- 
dence on oil has deepened its 
economic crisis. If puces drop 
below $9 a barrel financial 
support will increase and if 
they rise go above $14 it will 
reduce. 

Senor Gustavo Petricioli, 
the Mexican finance 
minister.immediately went to 
New York to attempt to raise 
another $3.5 billion (£23 
billion) in loans for next year. 
With the IMFs green light 
flashing the banks should lend 
a sympathetic ear. 


Greycoat 
reveals 
bid terms 

By Judith Huntley 
Commercial Property 
Correspondent 

Greycoat Group, the devel- 
oper, has unveiled the terms 
of its hostile £108 million bid 
for Property Holding and 
Investment TrusL 

It is offering PHIT share- 
holders 55 Greycoat shares for. 
100 PHIT shares valuing 
PHIT shares at 135.3p. An 
alternative share and 
loanstock offer is worth 
1 37.8p per PHIT share with a 
cash oner of 137.5p under- 
written by Greycoat at 250p a 
share. 

PHIT. whose shares stood 
at 149p last night, has rejected 
the bid. It is telling its share- 
holders that they will suffer a 
59 per cent drop in income if 
they accept the ordinary share 
offer. 

Pearl Assurance and For- 
eign and Colonial Investment 
Trust with nearly 24 per cent 
of PHIT have also rejected 
Greycoat's offer which has 
been successively scaled 
down.Greycoat says that net 
asset value after a merger 
would increase from 248p to 
26 Ip a share with no dilution. 
PHITs last stated net asset 
value was 1 58p a share. 

Greycoat also argues that 
combined assets of £300 mil- 
lion will allow for a develop- 
ment programme of £500- 
£700 million and the retention 
of a larger share of profits, 
statements which are ques- 
tioned by PHIT. 

• Unigaie group yesterday 
announced an agreed £25.8 
million offer for Oldacre 
Holdings, an animal feeds 
supplier based in Cheltenham. 

It is offering 183p a share in 
cash, a full 78p more than 
Oldacre’s price before 
yesterday's announcement 
with an alternative of three 
shares and 30p for every five 
Oldgate. Unigate shares closed 
unchanged at 283p while 
Oldacre shares soared to 1 80p. 



Sir Denis Rooke: Pressure to continue with rigorous efficiency drive 

British Gas may cut prices 


A new year, post-privatiza- 
tion gas price cut is possible 
after yesterday’s announce- 
ment of a £6873 million 
operating profit by the British 
Gas Corporation. 

Sir Denis Rooke. chairman, 
who will preside over BGCs 
£8 billion stock market flota- 
tion in the late autumn, said 
that with the depressed oil 
price and provided the pound 
remained “fairly strong”, the 
board saw no reason to make 
changes when gas tariffs were 
examined early b 1987. 

“Indeed ft is possible that 
we might be able to reduce 
them,” he said. 

The gas industry 's costs 
rose by £737 million last year, 
of which £546 million was due 
to increases in the cost of gas. 
It paid £520 million to the 
Government's gas levy. A 
proportion of the corporation’s 
gas costs is linked to oil but 
lower oil prices will not be felt 
until later this year. The BGC 
has already lost about 15 per 
cent of its “interruptible” 
customers who can readily 
switch to fbel olL 

A freeze or «nt in gas prices 
will have the biggest impact on 


By Edward Townsend, Industrial Correspondent 

domestic rather than industri- 
al consumers. In real terms, 
domestic gas prices were 30 
per cent lower now than in 
1968. 

Under the regulatory frame- 
work the Government is to 
impose on a private British 
Gas. prices will be allowed to 
rise by 2 per cent below the 
annual inflation rate each 
year. Sir Denis said lbe formu- 
la pnt pressure on the new 
company to continue with the 
rigorous efficiency drive that 
has been in place for some 
years. 

While refusing to be drawn 
on the possible contents of the 
British Gas prospectus, due 
soon. Sir Denis hinted that 
profits this year mould be 
down on the 1985-86 figure, 
which was itself £37 million 
above the previous year's oper- 
ating level It was not the 
board’s job to speculate, he 
said. 

The privatization project 
will give preferential treat- 
ment to British Gas workers, 
pensioners and customers. Sir 
Denis poured some scorn on 
the Labour Party’s social own- 
ership plan under which Brit- 


Record quarter for unit trusts 


By Martin Baker 

The unit trust industry at- 
lracted more money and a 
greater number of investors in 
the second quarter of this year 
than ever before. 

The Unit Trust Association 
(UTA) yesterday announced a 
record £27.6 billion of funds 
under unit trust management 
This is about £1 1 billion more 
than last year. 

Investors placed a net 
£648.9 million in unit trusts 


last month, another industry 
record. 

The popularity of unit trusts 
coincides with strong perfor- 
mances from share markets, 
the entry of new managers, 
principally insurance compa- 
nies. and a minor desertion of 
the building societies by small 
investors. 

The number of funds in- 
creased by almost a quarter to 
908 as insurance companies 
such as Crusader and Sun Life 
of Canada entered the market 


SPORT 36 
TELEVISION AND RADIO 39 


Barclays 

launches 

shares 

scheme 

By Richard Thomson 

Banking Correspondent 

Barclays Bank yesterday an- 
nounced the first scheme by 
one of the big clearing banks 
to offer a special retail share 
dealing service to individuals 
which will also enable people 
to invest in the new govern- 
ment-sponsored Personal Eq- 
uity Plan. 

The scheme is centred on 
Bardayshare. a wholly owned 
subsidiary and a member of 
the Stock Exchange. 

Mr Robin Hoyer Millar, 
general manager in charge of 
Bardayshare. said that the 
bank was emhusiatic about 
wider share ownership and 
wanted to offer a more attrac- 
tive approach to share invest- 
ment for its customers. He 
promised that the new service 
would operate on competitive 
dealing commissions and 
would charge only a small 
annual administration fee. It 
would be cheaper than the 
share service now offered in 
Barclays branches, he added. 

Where possible, deals will 
be channelled through 
Barclays de Zoete Wedd. the 
bank's new securities market 
operation. But Barclays said 
that transactions would be on 
a “best price” basis and other 
brokers would be used when 
appropriate. 

The share dealing service 
will be starling as a pilot 
scheme in three areas next 
summer, but the PEP service 
is planned to be in operation 
from January. 

At present Barclays, like the 
other clearing bantu, offers a 
share dealing service through 
branches, charging the brokers 
commission plus a minimum 
of £5 on each transaction. The 
bank handles around 1.000 
transactions a day through its 
2.000 branches. Mr Hoyer 
Millar said he hoped that by 
the end of 1988 the 
Bardayshare service would be 
looking after around 100,000 
customers.. 

The new service will offer a 
straightforward, share dealing 
fadhty for Bardays Bank cus- 
tomers through the bank’s 
branches where share price 
screens will be available. The 
service will include free stock- 
market advice by phoning the 
Bardayshare centre, and a 
regular newsletter. Branch 
staff will not be authorized to 
give investment advice. 

The Bardayshare PEP 
scheme will be run on a 
discretionary basis, with 
Bardayshare itself making the 
investment decisions for the 
client. Bardayshare will 
charge an annua! management 
fee but no dealing commission 
to PEP customers. It would 
not reveal any fee or commis- 
sion scales at this stage. 


ish Gas would be returned to 
state control in the event of a 
Labour governmeaLWhen any 
government came to power, 
opened the national ledgers 
and saw the reality, be said, it 
had to think about priorities, 
and ’jigging about with our 
organization and who actually 
owns ft” would not be high on 
the list. 

Sir Denis said the BGGs 
results presented a picture of a 
sound and successful business. 
It had sold almost a billion 
more therms of gas than ever 
before, added more than 
250,000 customers, met or was 
on course to meet every gov- 
ernment target and had made 
no tariff increases. 

In the last three years, the 
BGC has achieved a return on 
assets of 4.4 per cent against a 
Government target for the four 
years to 1987 of 4 per cent; net 
trading costs per therm of gas 
sold were reduced by 123 per 
cent against a Government 
target of 12 per cent by 1987; 
and the external financing 
limit for 1985-86, set at a cash 
snrplns of £176 million, was a 
surplus of £190.1 million. 


Individual accounts have 
risen to nearly 3 million, 
according to the UTA chair- 
man. Mr Give Fenn-Smith. 

Building societies suffered 
from lower interest rates over 
the .last three months. 

No UTA figures were avail- 
able on subscriptions since 
this quarter's downturn on 
Wall Street, London and else- 
where, although one major 
unit trust group reports a drop 
in demand of about 30 per 
cent so far this month. 


Plessey in deal 
with Apple 

Plessey, the British electron- 
ics group, has taken up the 
dealership for Apple, the 
American microcomputer 
manufacturer. It also intends 
to purchase a number of 
Apple’s microcomputers for 
its own use. 

In the past year Apple has 
cut its workforce by about 20 
per cent and shut its manufac- 
turing complex in Dallas. 
Texas. But it has maintained 
growth in the home computer 
market and sought growth in 
the business sector. 

Plessey Information Engi- 
neering will manage the deal- 
ership, which should be fully 
operational by the autumn. It 
will concentrate on selling the 
Apple Macintosh to the Brit- 
ish Government, financial in- 
stitutions and corporations. 


MARKET SUMMARY 


STOCK MARKETS 


_ 1794.85 J+15.74) 


New Yoffc 
Ddw Jones 

Nfl&S Dow 17639.32 {+117.10) 

lam: Gan - 282.0 (-4.4) 

Tn . ..■ 1136.8 (+1.4) 


Sydney: A 
Flraitkmrt: 


Commerzbank 1762.4 (-125) 
Brussels: 



General — 

Paris CAC 
Zurich: 


SKA General 


•«wai 


353.7 


n/a 


London' dosibg prices' Page 25 


1NTEHESTRATES 

London: 

Bank Base: 10% 

34nonth Interbank 

3-month efcgible bB5S Z3 M-9‘ , “ % 

buying rate 

Prime Rate 8% ■ 

Federal Funds 6*, 6 % ^ 

! 

CURRENCIES 


London: 

£ $1.4900 
£ DM3.1812 

£ Swfr2£7B2 
£::fiFr1 0.2661 
£rYen233-48- 
£tndex:72£ . 


NewYoifc 
e 81-4855 
S-.OMZ.1480 
$: Index: 11^3; 

• ECUE0-.668241 

• SDR £0.799987 


main PRICE CHANGES 


rises: 

(Cl 


Aden 

Bumdene Inv 

Maher Est 

Tod 

Case Grp 

Logica 

TozerK 

jaguar 7 

Pent! and 

Whitbread 

Dairies & Newman 

FALLS: 

Dwek Group — — 

Equipu 

Conroy — 

Suter — 

Pflkington 


989p(+5p) 
— 92p (+4p) 

83pf+l7p) 




.•(+5P 

_ 79p(+15pj 
, 21 4o |+15pi 
155p (+9pl 
. 506p f+1Gp; 

„ 225p (+7p) 


106pt-l2p 

140pr — 1 

128p 




111 


tame counties 210p|-28p) 

RegaSan 


610p (-25p) 


GOLD 


London Fbdr^: 

AM $3533 
close 5353 
237.50) 

cjSw&Z.5IM53.00 


.50 (£237^0- 


north sea oil 

Brent (Sept) 59.95 bW {$10.45) 


Fighter who landed the top 
Japanese job no one wants 


Tokyo (Reuter) — Mr Kiichi 
Miyazawa, Japan's new fi- 
nance-minister, is no push- 
over. Two years ago. he was 
wounded while fiercely resist- 
ing an attack by a knife- 
wielding assailant at a Tokyo 
hoteL 

Now. at the age of 66. be is 
as combative as ever and 
carries a golf club whenever he ■ 
takes a stroll in the park. 

Analysts said he will have to 
pick his fights more carefully 
if he is going to succeed at the 
top of Japan's most powerful 
ministry. 

For months. Mr Miyazawa 
was a vocal critic of the Prime 
Minister. Mr Yasuhiro Nak- 
asone. resisting until the very 
end his efforts to hold a 
general election on July 6. . 

After Mr Nakasone's vic- 
tory. Mr Miyazawa had little 
choice but to concede defeat, 
dedaring he appreciated Mr 
Nakasone's leadership. 

For his trouble, he has been 
rewarded with the job his 
predecessor. Mr Noboru 



Kiidu 


vocal 


ctu Miyazawa: a vo 
critic of Mr Nakasone 
Takeshita. said no one 
wanted. 

The former foreign min- 
ister's economic strategy dif- 
fers from that of the Prime 
Minister. He wants more gov- 
ernment spending, not less, 
and outright tax cuts. 

Analysis said Mr Nakasone 
may use Mr Miyazawa as a 
foil to cany out the economic 
policy changes he now sees as 


necessary but cannot imple- 
ment without losing face. 

Few doubt Mr Miyazawa 
has the intellectual ability to 
do the job. though some 
question nis consistency. 

A former finance ministry 
official, Mr Miyazawa is well- 
versed in economics and still 
has allies in the bureaucracy. 

Although soon to be named 
leader of the ruling Liberal 
Democratic Party’s Suzuki 
(action, the party's second 
most powerful, he is not 
particularly liked by other 
party members. 

However. Mr Miyazawa, is 
at home with foreigners, espe- 
cially Americans. 

Befitting the economic poli- 
cies he espouses, he has strong 
personal connections with the 
Democratic Party in the Unit- 
ed States. His daughter is 
married to an American 
diplomat. 

He will need all the help be 
can muster in his battfe 
against the spread of protec- 
tionism in the United States. 


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BUSINESS AND FINANCE 



THE TIMES WEDNESDAY JULY 23 1986 


Courtaulds reports better 
results in problem areas 


TEMPUS 


Courtaulds is benefiting 
from lower energy costs. Sir 
Christopher Hogg, chairman, 
told the annual meeting yes- 
terday. Management was also 
achieving better results in 
many areas where perfor- 
mance was disappointing in 
1985-86. 

High street trading had been 
less buoyant than expected 
and business in some signifi- 
cant overseas markets had 
suffered from lower oil prices, 
but the overall effect had been 
one of continued 
improvement 

• MARKING NAMES: Divi- 
dends payable in Canada and 
the US on or after July 9 and up 
to and including July 15 are 
valued at 45.56p per Canadian 
dollar and 63.69 per US dollar. 

• KENYON SECURITIES: 
Final 7p making I0.4p (9.355p) 
for year to Match 3 1 - Turnover 
£6,443.774 (£4,643,880). Pretax 
profit £751,738 (£433,672). Tax 
£303,411 (£190,074). Extraor- 
dinary credit £35,544 (nil). 
Earnings per share 22. 9p 
(I6.2p). The directors consider 
the group is well placed to 
continue its strong growth and 
they maintain their acquisition 
policy. 

• ROHAN GROUP: Rehau 
Plastics has acquired a five-acre 
site on the Langley Business 
Park, in Slough, Berks, from 
Rohan Developments, develop- 
ment subsidiary of the Rohan 
Group, at £550,000 per acre. 

• BURNDENE INVEST- 
MENTS: Complete six-month 
figures are not available due to a 
year-end change from May to 
September 1985- For the 25 
weeks to Match 22, (43 weeks to 
March 31) turnover was 
£8.481.272 (£10.020.038). 
operating profit £987,505 
(£590,741) and net interest 
Charge £151.747 (£240,082). 
Depreciation was £92,400 
(£150.988). pretax profit 
£743.358 (£1 99,67 1). no tax (nil) 


COMPANY NEWS 


and earnings per share 7_25p 
(l.95p). Results of the overseas 
subsidiaries have been 
exdudedThe board expects 
group pretax profits for the 
second half year to Se p tember 
27 to be slightly higher than 
those for the firet half 

• TEMPLE BAR INVEST- 
MENT TRUST: Half-year to 
June 3Cl Interim dividend 2.4p 
(2pk payable on Sept. 30. The 
directors intend to maintain the 
final at a minumum 3.3p. Pretax 
profit £2.6! million (£2.02 mil- 
lion). Earnings per share 3J27d 
(2.37p). 

• BJCC: The company is hold- 
ing talks with Phicom fix- the 
purchase of the British and 
Swedish businesses of Phi corn’s 
Imhof-Bedco electronic enclo- 
sures division. These bu sin esses 
make enclosures for in- 
struments and electronic equip- 
ment, supplying the 
telecommunications and com- 
puter industries. 

• NEIL & SPENCER HOLD- 
INGS: Half-year to May 31. 
Turnover £19.38 million 
(£20.51 million). Pretax loss 
£81.000 (profit £405.000). Loss 
per share 0.7p (d5p earnings). 
The board reports that the lower 
turnover reflects the disposal of 
the last remaining activity not 
connected with the traditional 
business. All activities are now 
concentrated on the main func- 
tion — specialized equipment 
for the textile-care and textile 


dyeing industry. 
• GILBERT 


APPOIN 



RATES 


ABN 

Adam & Company 

BCG 

Citibank Savingst 

Consolidated Otis 

Continental Trust 

Co-operative Bank 

C. Hoars & Co 

Hong Kong & Shanghai. 

LLoyds Bank 

Nat Weslmmster 

Royal Bank of Scotland. 


Citibank NA. 


_iom 
10.00X 

_iom 

_ 10.75% 
.- 10 . 00 % 
._1Q.C0% 
_10.00% 
_?om 
._ 10 . 00 % 
- 10 . 00 % 
- 10 . 00 % 
-. 10 . 00 % 
- 10 . 00 % 
-torn 


Bae Rate. 


Gomme Holdings: Mr Rod- 
ney F Hall and Mr J Richard 
Gawthome have been named 
non-executive directors of 
the company formed for the 
management buyout 

Vinten Group: Mr Christo- 
pher S Gladstone has become 
a non-executive director. 

Clarkson Puckle Interna- 
tional Benefit Consultants: 
Mr David A King has become 
managing director. 

John Crowther Group: Mr 
Stewart Hollander has be- 
come chief executive of the 
clothing division and a mem- 
ber of the board. 

First Security Group: Mr 
Alan Curtis is now a non- 
executive director. 

Ratcliflfc Mr R MrtcheO 
and Mr B C Houlston are to 
join the board. 


McKechnie Brothers Mr 
John Kembery and Mr Stuart 
Moberley have become 
directors. 

G.H. Wood & CO: Mr Eric 
Door bar joins the main board 
and becomes managing direc- 
tor, international division. 

Norman Broadbent Inter- 
national: Sir Ian MacGregor 
has been appointed a non- 
executive director. 

Hillsdown: Mr Steve Or- 
chard becomes sales and mar- 
keting director. 

High Integrity Systems: Sir 
Frank Cooper becomes a non- 
executive chairman. 

Royal Insurance: Sir John 
Nott has been made a deputy 
chairman. 

Simon Engineering: Mr Roy 
Roberts has joined the board 
as deputy chairman. 


• GILBERT HOUSE 
INVESTMENTS: No dividend 
(0.5p) for the year to March 24. 
Turnover £J .21 million (£1.34 
million). Pretax profit £87,648 
(£196,371). Earnings per share 

0.2p (0.6 Ip). 

• CULUNET SOFTWARE: 
The company has bought Esvel 
for $8.4 million (£5.6 million) in 
cash. Esvel is a developer of 
computer software for mini and 
microcomputer systems. 

• MOORGATE MER- 
CANTILE HOLDINGS: Mr 
Julius Silman, the chairman, 
says in his annual statement that 
in the first quarter Mootgate has 
achieved targets well in advance 
of last year's budgets. The 
indications are that this will 
continue and the growth rate 
accelerate. 

• CONSULTANTS (COM- 
PUTER & FINANCIAL): Six 
months to June 30. Interim 0.7p 
(0.2p). Group turnover 
£4,597,596 (£1,357,997). Trad- 
ing pretax profits (due to group 
restructuring in the current pe- 
riod. figures do not offer a 
meaningful comparison). UK 
operations £828,089, CCF 
(Hong Kong and Pacific region) 
debit 54,545. CCF (New York 
and North American region) 
(uds) £88.110. Group pretax 
profit £861.654 (£158^27). Tax 
£394.678 (£113,000). Earnings 
per share 4.69p (0.37p). 

• GORING KERR: Six 
months to March 31. Interim 
3.85p (3.5p), pay Sept 1. Figs in 
£000. Turnover 3.773 (3,793). 


AAH HOLDINGS pic 






Preliminary Results 


m 


Pretax profits and earnings 
per share at record levels. 


FINANCIAL HIGHLIGHTS 

1985/86 

% change 

Turnover 

£976.9m 

+87.5% 

Profit before taxation 

£ 18.28m 

+62.5% 

Earnings perordinary share 

1 7.76p 

+40.9% 

Recommended final 



dividend per share 

4.86p 

+ 17.8% 


* "Outstanding performance from the pharmaceutical 
division." 


* “Further advance in trading profits from fuel distribution." 

* “Expanded base of Group activities creates wider 
opportunities for further growth.” 

* “Seventeenth successive year of increased dividends.” 


Bill Pybus, Chairman 


Trading profit 1 j 019 (1,214). 
Net intere st received 3 (36). 

• WHITBREAD: Mr Timothy 
Colman is retiring as a non- 
executive director owing to oher 
business commitments. 

• REED INTERNATIONAL: 
Mr LA Carpenter, the chairman, 
said the benefits seen in 1985-86 
from cost reductions, as well as 
efforts to improve competitive- 
ness and efficiency, have been 
substantially sustained during 
the first quarter. Despite limited 
volume growth, the advance in 
the first quarter's profits under- 
lines the steps taken to improve 
the quality of its earnings and 
bodes well for ibe first half year. 
He expects theyear as a whole to 
show a good advance on last 
year’s profits. 

• ST ANDREW TRUST: In- 
terim l -25p( Ip) partly to reduce 
disparity. With figures in £000: 
franked investment including 
six months to June 30. 466 
(422). Unfranked investment 
including 441 (386) making 907 
(808). Interest on borrowed 
money 6 (59)l Management i 
expenses 118 (115). Pretax 
profit 783 (634). Tax 258 (214). 
Earnings per share 1.49p 
(I.I9pX Net asset value per 
ordinary share after deducting 
prior chaiges: at par 184.8p 
(135.9p) and at market value 
185.9p (137.0p). Directors fore- 
cast total dividends of not less 
than 3 2p (2.9p). 

• JAYPLAIVT: The offer for 
Lome Exploration has already 
been accepted by the holders of 
more than 50 per cent of the 
capital. The first dosing daze for 
the offer is July 29. 

• REAL “TIME CONTROL: 
Dividend unchanged at 2p for 
the year to March 30. Turnover 
£3.98 minion (£3.73 minion). 
Pretax profit £413,000 
(£312,000). Earnings per share 
3.4p.(3.9p). 

• MORGAN CRUCIBLE: A 
joint venture is planned be- 
tween Copeland and Jenkins 
(part of Morgan's electronics 
division) and Wells Electronics 
of South Bend, Indiana, US. A 
new company will manufacture 
in Europe the Wells' Wdcon 
range of burn-in test sockets for 
the semi-conductor industry 
and other Welcon connector 
products. 

• ROBERTSON RESEARCH: 

The company has expanded its 
natural resources activities by 
the acquisition of 
Hydrotechnica and 

Hydrotechnica (Services) Inter- 
national , which special ire in the 
assessment and management of 
water resources in Britain and 
overseas.. The price was 
£150.000 cash and 227.272 
Robertson shares. 

• DEWHURST: Interim divi- 
dend 4 per cent (3.5 per cent), 
payable Oct- 1. Turnover for the 
26 weeks to March 30, £223 
million (£2.06 million). Pretax 
profit £187.000 (£166,000). 
Earnings per share l.98p 
(l.S9p). The current year is 
unlikely to fully match last 
year's record results, the board 

says. 


AAH’s 

brings 


adopted baby 
a year of joy 


Few acquisitions can have 
come off so well as AAH. 
Holdings* £15 million pur- 
chase of Vestric, the pharma- 
ceutical supplier, from Glaxo 
last year. Although AAH does 
not care to break down 
Vestric’s profit contribution, 
it has obviously fitted in well 
with the group’s established 
pharmaceutical wholesale di- 
vision. 

Vestric has made AAH 
Britain's leading pharmaceu- 
tical wholesaler, and the dis- 
tribution of pills and potions 
is now the company’s largest 
profit-earner by a long chalk. 
Riarmaceuticals accounted 
for 48.5 per cent of trading 


deals where the group is 
looking to increase its share 
of an expanding market 
Analysts are pencilling in 
pretax profits of £22 million 
for 1986-87 which puts the 
shares, 2p lower at 232p 
yesterday , on a prospective 
earnings multiple of 10-5. 
Even after beating the all- 
share index for the past 12 
months, they could have 
further to go. 


BTRNylex 


profits in the year to March 
3! against 34.5 per cent for 
fiid distribution. Overall pre- 
tax income was 62.5 per cent 
higher at £1 8.3 million. 

Apart from the normal 
distribution of drugs, AAH is 
banging away on all other 
fronts to get the most out of 
what is a low-margin busi- 
ness. It has enlisted the 
Walton sextuplets to promote 
the Vantage symbol used by 
2300 chemists and has estab- 
lished a loan guarantee 
scheme to help pharmacists 
to expand. The last year has 
also seen the establishment of 
AAH's own labels for beauty 
products and generic drugs. 

On the fuel distribution 
side, profits were just 4- per 
cent higher at £7.8 million, 
even after the cold spell 
towards the end of the finan- 
cial year. The industry ap- 
pears' to be in an uncertain 


BTR Nylex, the Australian 
plastics company 6225 per 
cent owned by BTR, is seek- 
ing a London listing to attract 
a more international institu- 
tional spread of shareholders. 

The company has grown 
fast through acquisition as 
well as organically and is 
keen to continue growing. It 
is looking for acquisitions in 
the Pacific Basin area, be- 
cause it feds its style is now 
cramped in Australia. 
Around 90 per cent of its 
turnover comes from Austra- 
lia. 

The future appears to be in 
the Far East, with particular 
emphasis on Japan and Tai- 
wan. 

It wants to stay in areas 
related to the markets arid 
technologies with which it is 
already familiar, namely vi- 
nyl products, industrial rub- 
ber, industrial moulding, 
packaging, textiles, engineer- 
msand merchandising. 

The announcement of the 


J ihase with domestic demand 
br solid fuel bit by the 
miners' strike. On the fin 


miners’ strike. On the fuel oil 
side, falling prices have in- 
creased competition and 
forced stock writedowns. 

AAH's other activities pro- 
vide little to exrite. Builders’ 
supplies have suffered with 
the rest of the trade while 
there were small increases in 
the profit contributions from 
road haulage and environ- 
mental services, where AAH 
is finding that the fruits of 
privatized cleansing services 
have to be earned the hard 
way. 

Mr Bill Pybus, the chair- 
man, is looking for takeover 
targets again although he 
•would be hard pushed to find 
another one as good as 
Vestric. Nonetheless. AAH is 
in a strong position to gener- 
ate more internal growth, 
particularly from phannaceu- 


The announcement of the 
listing coincided with publi- 
cation of six -month figures to 
June 30 which showed profit 
before tax of AS24.8 Bullion 
(£10.6 million), a rise of 38. 
per cent on the comparable 
six months. 

Shareholders have seen the 
value of their shares rise from 
around A$3 at the beginning 
of last year to A$6.90yester- 
day. That should offer' en- 
couragement' to British- 
institutions looking at the 

the stock 

market on Monday., 


Acatos & - 
Hutcheson 


Mr Ian Hutcheson, who start- 
ed his Acatos & Hutcheson 
edible oils business 20 years 
ago on a borrowed £21,500, 
intends to make it bid-proof 
when it is floated on the stock 
market. 


He will -have a personal 
stake of 35 per cart in the £48 
million company, and he has 
persuaded a clutch of leading 
institutional shareholders to 
give him first refusal on 
enough of their shares to take 
him over the 50 pefcfan 
mark during the next three 

years- 

The reason, he says, o 
because he is still building up 
tiie company and does not 
want to be distracted fighting 
off takeover bids, ■ Mr 
Hutcheson’s confidence ; jn 
the business seems weB- 

founded. 

Profits have gone up from 
f2 3 million in 1981 to £4 
million last year, on safes of 
£266 million and the direc- 
tors are forecasting profits of 
£6.7 million this year, giving 
it earnings per share of tSp 
and a p/e ratio of 105. ‘ 

Hill Samuel, the merchant 
bank, is offering 4.7 milfron 
shares, 15 per cent of The 
total, at 160p apiece.- Apart 
from two million new shares, 
the balance is coming frbm 
the .institutions who pumped 
money into the business right 
years ago and now betievethe 
time is right to take Their 
profits. . ..." 

Acatos & Hutcheson pro- 
duces and markets^ range of 
branded andown4abd edible 
oils from its own refineries 
and packaging plants. .The 
products include edible oils 
for leading food manufactur- 
ers, flying and bakery fats 
and cooking oils for the 
bakery and catering trades. 

Health fiends wfll find it 
reassuring that the company 
has been steadily scaling 
down the oufout of animal 
fats “ whereas land accounted 
for almost all the turnover in 
the 1960s this has now. fallen 
to around the 12 per emit 
level — and the focus isnow 
more on solid vegetable oils, 
bottled vegetable oils.- and 
polyunsaturated margarines. 

The ^company adnptsflbal 
although the overaflirtaftet 
for oils and flits, including 
butter, is not exjnnding. The 
markets in which it -has 
invested are progressing nice- 
ly 

The issue should enable foe 
company to make acquisi- 
tions, and some early (teals 
seem likely. The strong insti- 
tutional backing for the com- 
pany should see the issue off 
to a good start. 


350 years on 





r at: 

ml 




nMiTti 











l «>ti 

■ r? 




* 1 ^ w ;■» im 

ijtii 






1 i'l'a 




W*iTiiTrc!73 


lONDOttFlfc* 


r- 


To obtain a copy of our preliminary announcement please write to the 
Secretary, AAH Holdings pic, 76 South Park, Lincoln LN5 8ES. 

























THE TIMES WEDNESDAY JULY 23 1986 


BUSINESS AND FINANCE 


—23 


STOCK MARKET REPORT 






Flood of £ 30 m equities washes 
nervous buyers back to safety 


.■tjlS. ji s 

? r "S.ff5 L”* 


By Michael Clarke 


^isha v . ^ 

are fo^L 3 ^ iA 

• — ~ ,0n UlK , ^ 
■ f nsifio 








1n 8 4.7 


Cull 


_ a tv- 

i 




^ ••“sauce is 

ttSSgf 

.^•laiadiSS 


* *- ;s 

Tof.ls. 


"w »0 5^ 


£ ft 


SsajSSS 

£V* S w*® 

*■**!!* toodi* 

^ and fift 
SErC*» * fc* 


a?.d 


, ^-h fie^ 

• —->^-“11 ,u_, . "* <ti 

has -u.: * nai *k mat 
VV ***** sieailvT 
-'• *| hi ouipia 

*■**»» hrt«£ 

»« !asn»^ 


Early attempts ai a rally bv 
-share pnces yesterday were 

* thwarted by the liquidation or 

* ,ja mist bringing around £30 
L mdhon worth of equities onto 

' the markeL 

s s Several large lines of stock 
.came on offer. Phillips & 
i v Drew, the broker, placed a line 
$ .. ,of 800.000 shares in Store- 
boose at around the 305p 
J^level.The price closed Ip 
i . ,0caiCT'ai 31 lp. after 313p. 

* There was also a line of a 
' . million shares in.BBA Croup, 
s'. .‘the fast growing automotive 
Jr.’ products specialist, on offer at 
^-' e 222p. BBA finished un- 
\ '; r changed at 224p. 

■ f.';. . Other lines appear to have 

J - ' • Simon Engineering 
i , been a weak market, fatting 
.almost 50p in recent weeks. 

_ Yesterday, the price firmed 3p 
'to Z36p. Some fond managers 
\ now take the view that the 
;l' 7 $hares on a p/e of 13 and 
j“„ yielding 5 Vi per cent are 
>;'loo)ang . cheap and may be 
f ; . overdue for a rally. Simon 
*7 jconMJjeone to look at once the 
l “ market steadies. 

%■ — ■■ ■ N ■■ 

* “been easily placed. But the 
' ' ^effect on the rest of an already 
I - 'nervous' equity market was to 
* ' - send prices into reverse as the 
S-Tfew cheap buyers who were 
•'-around scuttled back to the 
1 7 “ sidelines.- - 

{**' Asa result, the FT index of 
>'*30 shares soon ran out of 
j -steam: An early lead of 4.2 was 
eroded and the index ended 
l.-the session 1.6 lower at 
{*„ 1*247.7. The broader FT-SE 
iv '100, which was 5.8 up at one 
iv stage, closed "1.0 down at 

L . i339jl 

‘ Once again. 


may enjoy a technical rally 
when trading resumes today. 
This hope was underlined 
the laiesi American GNP 
;ures. which were better than 
expected and may lead to an 
early cut in base rates. Wall 
Street celebrated the good 
news with the Dow Jones 
industrial average opening 15 
points higher in early trade. 

Gilts shrugged off the re- 
newed weakness on the for- 
eign exchange market with 
narrow gains of up to £.'/*. 

But leading shares remained 
dull. Costain, the construction 
group, lost 2p io 534p despite 
confirmation that its recent 
£62.4 million rights issue had 
been taken up by 94 per cent. 
The remaining 820.000 shares 
were placed in the markeL 
The big four clearing banks 
remained a dull market ahead 
of the interim dividend sea- 
son. which stans on Friday 
with Lloyds, down 5p at 399p. 

But Quilter Goodison, the 
broker, is optimistic and be- 
lieves the banks will produce 
satisfactory profits. Its ana- 
lysts. Mr John Ginarlis and 
Mr Roger Ackman. say the 
banks have continued to bene- 
fit from the consumer boom 
with mongage lending, instal- 
ment credit and highly profit- 
able personal loans and credit 


STOCKMARKETS 

(January 1*100) 

SourcKDaia stream 





140 


130 


120 


■110 


card businesses alt buoyant . 

The add: “We expect sector 
strength over the results Ma- 
son. stimulated by some im- 
pressive dividend increases." 

However, interest is expect- 
ed to wane in the autumn 
when investors take a longer- 
term view of the sector. Losses 
of 5p were also noted in 
Barclays Bank on 499p. Mid- 
land Bank on 539p. and 
National Westminster Bank 
on 499p. 

Attempts at a rally by the 
recent debutante Morgan 
Grenfell ended in failure. Af- 
ter opening 4p higher at 44Sp, 
the shares ran into more 
nervous selling with the price 
ending the day Ip lower ai a 
new low of 440p. The shares 


now stand 60p below their 
striking price of 500p. 

Thc rest of the merchant 
banks also showed signs of 
running out of steam after a 
brisk start. Henry Ansbacher 
slipped 2p to 75p, after 79p. 
HUI Samuel 2p to 35 Ip, after 
355p. and Wimrust 1 Op to 
285p. Hambros on 238p, 
Kleiiwort Benson on 71 Op, 
and Mercury International on 
653p. all lost early leads to 
close all-square on the day. 

It was a similar story among 
the insurance composites 
where General Accident 
slipped 3p to & 34 p. after 842p. 
Guardian Royal Exchange 2p 
to 897p. after 904p. Royal 
Insurance 5p to 839p. after 


. ■ "RECENT iSSUES T >: ^ 


turnover was 


- and *jj ; • L.i-jdown to a trickle and. selling 
pv;re solid \*ba ‘ “ * * * pressure was minimal. Job- 
■ J.r-bers reported a few cheap 

buyers around after hours, 
! - raising hopes that the market 


^ -esaabltfl*: 

p.v. un saiaraad aamja 

company^ 

-..-■.•uk the 
i J,r 2-d fan gS 

is skc\|b£- 

in *57j 

«r • :s:ed ere prcgaang 


- r >«_*e shouides^c 
ar.d 

SrC'.-m TrescGjE 
teiiasasaa 
par.> <?■; J-.i seeagst 
:o a hi >Lin 




EQUITIES 

Accord Pub (12Sp) 167 

Alumasc (I50p) 151 

Angiia Secs I115p) 134-2 

Asraey (U (135p) 212+1 

BBB Design (S7p) 70 

Beaverco (I45p) 153 

Bipel 37 1-(2p) 42'j -'j 

Borland (125p) 13S +1 

Bredero (145p) 152 

Chelsea Man (125p) 129 

Coaled Electrodes (84p) 89 

Evans Hallshaw (I20p) 117 

Fletcher Dennys (70p) 74 

Guthrie Corp fl50p) 155 +3 

HUe Ergonom (92p) 90 


Hodgson (B5p) .110 

Hughes Food (20p) 23 

M6 Cash & C (lOOp) 68 

Morgan GranfeD (5O0p) 440 -1 

Shield (72p) 140 -5 

SmaBbone (I65p) 162 -8 

Soundtracks (4Cp) 40 

Stanley Leisure (1i0p) 124 

Task Force f95p) 110 -4 

Templeton (2l5p) 225 

Tenby Inds (11^» 129-2 

Thames TV (190p) 224 

TIP bet & Britten (120p) 124 +1 

Yetverton (38p) ] 4 

Unilock (63p) 68 

Windsmoor (106p) ' 113 


RIGHTS ISSUES 

Abaco Inv N/P 
Antofagasta N/P 
Coiorofi N/P 
De La Rue F/P 
Dataserv N/P 
Er skins Hsa N/P 
Expamet N/P 
Inti Signal F/P 
Leigh Interests N/P 
Top Value N/P 
Wight Collins N/P 

York mount N/P 

(Issue price r brackets). 


23-1 
635 
16-2 
E10 6 !* -'is 
36-4 
11 -1 
9-2 
233 
■« 
2 

128-32 
25 -1 


?rv 

• - .i 


i i'. 


LONDON FINANCIAL FUTURES 


Three Worth Stnflng 

. . Sap 86 

■- Dec 88 — ;_j. 

- . MarB7_ ; 

Jun 87 ; 

Sap 87 

• Dec 87 

Previous 
.■■Three 

■■BSfc 

1 Mar 87 .... 

.-Jun 87 


Open 

90.05 

9032 

9030 

90.20 

Kff 


OSItaeawyBood 

Sep 88 

Dec 82 

Mar 87 


\ . 

% 

t 

V. 

^--•ShMtGar 
Sep 88-..- 
DecSS . 


lintarest 14337 

93.63 

93.64 
93.48 
9326 

99-22 
98-23 
N fT 


Law 

CtOM 

EstVol 

90.05 

90.16 

2444 

9062 

9069 

395 

9029 

9065 

40 

9020 

9021 

2 


90.07 

0 


8067 

0 


90.1 7 
9009 
9036 
9020 


Previous day's total open interest 17468 

93.63 9334 93.59 3283 

93.64 93.55 93-59 1201 

9348 93.40 9344 211 

3326 9322 9321 48 

Previous day's total open Merest 7822 
99-22 96-14 99-26 6709 

99-23 98-06 98-04 16 

0 


Mar 87 


Long G4t 
Sep 86..-. 




Sept 

Dec B6..._ 

Mar 87 

Jun 87 ._ 

FT-SE 100 

Sep 86 

Dec 86 


10044 

118-24 

Kff 

..N/T 

158-60 

16120 


10060 


Previous day's tool open interest 978 
10042 


10050 

10050 

100-50 


194 

0 

0 


Previous day's total open interest 14477 
119-29 118-24 119-28 9257 

11023 0 

11017 0 

11017 0 

Previous day 's total open interest 2479 
159-00 156.50 15825 493 

16120 16120 161.15 2 


TRAD IT10NAL OPTIONS J 


For Settlement 
OCT 28 
Nov 3 
NOV 17 


ory 

Accounts- 




Bret Dealings Last Dealings UMOeelarakni 
July 7 July 18 OCT9 

Jtdy 21 Aug 1 Octffl 

Aug 4 Aug 15 Nov 6 

CaB options were taken 
Freshbake. Rama. Walter 

taSreataT 1 B^'AMtaTong^EwiTp. Argyle Tr«,' FobeL Owners Abroad. Lon.Tst 
Grp. Thurgar B. Spong. Alsbona. Apricot 
Pur London Int Tst 
Put & Gall: Stew Wnght 8rengreen. 


FOREIGN EXCHANGES 


STERLING SPOT AND FORWARD RATES 


Merkel rates 
day's range 
July 22 

N York 14895-14985 
Montreal 2.0553-2.0702 
Afnsdam3.574l4l.59l0 
Brussels 6529-65.75 
C'phgen 11.BB53-11.9386 
Dublin 3.1690-3.1859 
Frankfurtl.0638-1.0724 
Lisbon 21861-221.26 
Madrid 202.99-203.75 
Milan 2 176.45-21 90 JJ8 

Oslo 11.0781-11.1234 
Pans 10.2347-102973 
Sl'kWm 104783-106259 
Tokyo 23125-23348 
Vienna 22292240 
Zurich 26565-26762 


Market rum 

ckwe 

July 22 

1 4895-14906 

20600-2.0629 

36855-36902 

6566-65.75 

1191 57-11.9386 

3.1779-3.1823 

10695-1.0705 

21861-220.15 

203.1020369 

2182.14-218669 

11.0975-11.1124 

102677-102850 

104989-106194 

233.10-233.48 

2227-22.40 

26715-26762 


1 month 

0.47-0 44pftmi 

034-024prem 

1%-r4pmm 

20-14prem 

1%-Kprem 

IVi-l'iorem 

3pram-2dl& 

60-190*s 

40-75<fi& 

1-4dfe 

4-4%dS 

2V2Sprem 

3-4-%prem 

ix-lprem 

10%-9’itprem 

iw-lpram 


3 months 

13D-1.2Spr«m 

O-95-O.BOpram 

4-3Kprwn 

53-44prem 

1%-1Xipren) 

4*-4%prem 

6- 19*5 
195-500*3 
120-190CTS 

7- 1 1(ks 
12'4-12’Mis 
71; -6 ft pram 
1ft- It pram 
at-Spiem 

27*-24tvprem 

3%-3ptwn 


Starling index corepared with 1975 was down at 726 (day's range 726-726). 


OTHER STERLING RATES 


DOLLAR SPOT RATES 


Argentina austral* . 
Austrate doHar .... 

Bataan tfnar 

Brazil cruzado * .... 
Cyprus pound ...... 

Finland mark* 

Greaca drachma.... 
Hong KongdoSar .. 

India rupee 

Iraq dmm 

Kuwait dnarKD .... 

Malaysia dollar 

Mexico peso ... 

New Zealand dollar 
Saut»Arati«nyal .. 
Singapore doear 


.. 16473-1.3497 
.. 2.3445-26487 
. OSOOO-OMtO 
— 20.61-20.74 
.. 0.730041.7400 
. 76000-75400 
,. 203.65-20565 
. 11.697-11.707 
1865-18^75 

!'.'6'4»cw)'4S(o 

. 3.9800-3.9900 

910-960 

. 2.75G9-2.7690 
56725-56125 

32679-32717 


beland 

Smgapore — 

Motaysre 

Austraia 

Canada 


Sweden 


16990-14020 

2.1830-2.1840 

26810-26630 

0.6378-06385 

16810-16815 


- 7.0300-7.0350 


Soutn Africa rand 3.7272-3.7485 

U A E dirham 54565-54985 

•Uoyds Bank 


Norway _... 7 4275-7.4325 

Denmark 76775-7.9B2S 

West Germany 2 1245-2.1255 

Switzerland — 1.7160-1.7170 

Netnerlands 26970-2.4000 

France 6.870066750 

Japan 15565-156.15 

Italy 1460.0-1462.0 

BeJgfun^Canm} - 43.8IM3.85 

Hong Kong 7 8140-7.8145 

Portugal 147.60-148.10 

Spam 13665-13665 

Austria - 15.00-15.0Z 


Rates aupplled by Boreieya Bank HOFEX and ExieL 


t LONDON 'TR ADED OPTIONS' 


Puts 


- m ,Z 


t . iCP 3l Gi' oba " 


y 


w 

Allied Lycra 

300 

28 

2 

40 

20 

50 

33 

J2=L 

1 

10 

6 

20 

8 

23 

Hanson cort 

ISO 

200 

6 

2 

12ft 

6 

17 

9 

14 

33 

17 

33 

18 

33 

Overall volume proved me- 
diocre. Here and there, a 

c 


360 

1 

10 

15 

37 

40 

45 

jaguar 

500 

35 

45 

63 

17 

30 

37 

larger deal was noted bat the 

iJ 1 

BP 

500 

85 

90 

47 

95 

57 

1 

1 

4 

15 

8 

22 

rsoei 

550 

600 

12 

5 

25 

15 

40 

23 

50 

95 

55 

97 

60 

100 

general level of activity contra- 
tied to suffer from the inability 



600 

1 

18 

28 

20 

40 

48 

Thom EMI 

420 

40 

57 

- 

7 

15 

- 


Cons Gold 

1'4271 

420 

460 

500 

B 

2 

1 

42 

25 

10 

52 

37 

20 

3 

37 

75 

25 

50 

8? 

32 

54 

?0 

{*447) 

460 

500 

550 

6 

3 

32 

17 

8 

52 

32 

30 

60 

107 

62 

107 

65 

short-term view. Money, on 
the other band, was cheap and 
plentiful. Local authorities 
were often lenders in size once 
again, but rarely borrowers of 
any consequence. 


Couftautts 

C2771 

260 

260 

300 

330 

18 

2 

ft 

29 

21 

10ft 

5 

42 

29 

20 

12 

1 

5 

25 

55 

6 

13 

30 

57 

12 

20 

32 

59 

T0SOO 

1*353) 

300 

330 

360 

390 

70 

42 

20 

6 

50 

30 

13 

45 

28 

2 

2 

13 

33 

9 

22 

38 

25 

40 

5 'L'i 

■Com Urucn 

0312) 

300 

330 

12 

1ft 

25 

11 

34 

19 

2 

20 

13 

26 

13 

29 

52 


Series 

Aug 

Nov 

Feb 

_Auft_ 

Nov 

Feb 


360 

1 

5 

12 

50 



460 

23 

40 

55 

15 

25 

30 

Baas Rates % 


Cable a Ware 
C658) 

600 

650 

GO 

13 

85 

50 

105 

75 

1 

9 

15 

35 

22 

46 

78 

108 

(•466) 

500 

550 

11 

3 

22 

B 

37 

20 

43 

90 

50 

93 

53 

98 

Clearing Banks 10 

Finance House 10 

. 

700 

750 

1 

1 

&> 

ID 

40 

25 

50 

100 

65 

105 

BATInos 

1*378) 

360 

390 

25 

11 

37 

23 

52 

32 

5 

19 

9 

25 

15 

30 

Discount Market Loans % 

Owrnlgm High: 8ft Low 5 



600 

90 

110 

— 

ft 

4 

— 


420 

2ft 

9 

23 

4S 

47 

52 

Week fixed: 9ft-9ft 


r685) 

650 

40 

70 

— 

1 

15 

— 


460 



— 

85 

87 

— 

Treasury BAs (Discount ft) 

Buying Selbng 


700 

3 

40 

— 

25 




460 

50 

67 

82 

5 

12 

18 


GEC 

ri»>- 

180 

200 

10 

1 

22 

12 

30 

18 

1 

11 

6 

18 

TO 

20 

36 

('4991 

500 

550 

23 

4 

40 

17 

55 

30 

22 

57 

27 

82 

35 

67 

2imtn 9ft 2mnth9ft 

3mn0i 9"i» 3mntti 9»i* 


220 

ft 

b 

10 

31 

36 


180 

11 

21 

26 

6 

11 

16 

Prime Bank Bins (DQcoum %) 


Grand Met 

337 

355 

41 

13 

50 

30 


ft 

i 

6 

12 

_ 

C188) 

200 

220 

4 

1 

10 

5 

14 

8 

20 

39 

22 

39 

28 

42 

1 mntb 9 IJ iM-9ft 2 mnm 

3mntft 9-’ 4 »-9 ,, i.' 6 ninth 9*»-9V4 



382 

420 

1ft 

1 

20 

9 

20 

19 

57 

2B 

60 

63 

Cadbury SCTiwpps 
H62) 

160 

180 

B 

4 

16 

6 

23 

13 

5 

IB 

10 

21 

13 

22 

Trade Bins (Discount ^t) 

1 mnm lO'w 2mntti i0 ,, i* 

■ 

Id 

0991) 

'jOO 

9* 

110 

135 

2 

12 

18 

200 

2 

3 

i 

38 

39 

40 

3 ninth 10" v 6mntti 10'u 


950 

1000 

1050 

40 

4 

? 

/4 

«5 

25 

102 

74 

52 

2 

12 

63 

27 

50 

85 

35 

55 

85 

Imperial Qr 

1-353) 

300 

330 

360 

55 

25 

12 

65 

40 

22 

- 

1 

3 

18 

2 

8 

22 


tntaraank r*>l 

Overrugirt: open 9 close 6 
l week 9ft-9ft 6 moth 10-9 ‘'i* 

^•4 r 

. < 

_ V 

Land Sec 

0325) 

300- 

330 

360 

25 

1 

1 

37 

13 

B 

46 

26 

12 

1 

7 

37 

4 

14 

37 

6 

18 

39 

LadDioke 

(-338) 

300 

330 

360 

44 

20 

5 

49 

28 

11 

GO 

39 

19 

2 

7 

23 

4 

11 

28 

7 

15 

29 

ImnBi TOO 11, ib 9mmh 10-9'*it 

3 ninth KW'i# 12mtti lO-9 Hl i# 

Local Authority Deposits pw 

2 days 9ft 7 days 9ft 

1 mnth 9ft 3rnnth9 l, i# 

6irmh 9 ,s «# 12mtti 9ft 

:■ 

Marks & Span 
H98) 

180 

200 

220 

18 

K 

ft 

28 

15 

6 

34 

20 

11 

ft 

3 

24 

4 

11 

25 

7 

14 

26 

LASMO 

(■100) 

90 

100 

110 

17 

B 

5 

23 

14 

12 

25 

22 

16 

4 

10 

17 

9 

14 

IB 

12 

17 

21 

nk ^ 

She9 Trans 

0790) 

700 

750 

BOO 

92 

42 

2 

105 

85 

35 

120 

88 

58 

1 

2 
17 

6 

14 

38 

14 

25 

45 

p*o 

i*48B) 

460 

5 00 
550 

38 

JO 

3 

52 

28 

ID 

72 

47 

22 

3 

22 

65 

14 

35 

67 

20 

40 

72 

1 mnth lOft-iu 2 mnth iOft-10 

3 mnth lDft-10 6 mnth 10ft -10 


280 

300 

330 

2 

13 

22 

14 

20 

24 


600 



— 

115 

115 

— 

Starting CDs Ph) 

1 ninth 9*'iir9 ,i ii 3 mnth 9»nrS u i» 


0269) 

ft 

K 

6 

3 

11 

5_ 

34 

64 

3b 

64 

38 

65 

Racal 

C172) 

1B0 

200 

9 

2 

17 

a 

24 

13 

13 

30 

15 

30 

17 

32 









Mar 

220 



8 

50 

50 

50 

Doiiar CDs ft) 

1 mnth 650-6.45 3 mnth 6.45-6.40 

6 mnth 6.45-630 12mm 6.45-630 



Seitcs 

Sep 

Dec 

Mar 

Sep 

Dec 

R7Z 

550 

22 

55 

72 

17 

27 

30 


Beecham 

0408) 

360 

390 

58 

70 

48 

78 

55 

3 

10 

b 

17 

10 

22 

(-547) 

600 

650 

700 

3 

30 

14 

27 

18 

105 

155 

to 

107 

157 

63 

107 

157 

* 


?8 

38 

25 

32 

35 




EURO MONEY DEPOSITS % 



460 

7 

15 

25 

57 

62 

63 

Vaal Reefs 

45 

7ft 

9 

11 

1ft 

3M- 

4ft 


Boots 

0252) 

240 

260 

280 

22 

10 

3 

32 

20 

10 

39 

29 

7 

18 

30 

12 

20 

32 

15 

24 

rsi) 

50 

60 

1 

9 

3 

4K 

131% 

15 

8ft 

IB 

Dollar call 7-6 

7 days 6ft-6ft 1 mnth 6ft -6ft 

B1 R 
r29» 

307 

330 

333 

9 

4 

22 

11 

35 

1b 

38 

22 

40 

22 

Lonrtvs 

C243) 

236 

240 

Au g 

ii 

24 

28 

*fSL 

.4 

Nov 

8 

19 

Peutschwisrfc cal 5-4 

7 days 4ft-4ft immh 4ft-4ft 

3 mnth 4ft-4K 6mmh 4ft-4ft 

..4 

Bass 

0760) 

750 

800 

850 

40 

20 

8 

70 

37 

23 

85 

55 

38 

20 

SO 

90 

30 

58 

90 

40 

65 

92 


265 

260 

273 

i 

6 

16K 

35 

Ifi 

36 

33 

7 days 7ft-7ft 1 mnth 7ft-7ft 

3 mnth 7 >i#-7> h 8 mnth 7ft-7ft 

Owisa Franc cati 2-1 

- 

-Blue Cede 

- 600 

27 

47 

6b 

43 

16 

56 

30 

60 

65 


Series 

.fSL 

Nov 

Fob 

*iS_ 

Nov 

Fob 

7 days 2ft-lft ] mnth 4ft-4ft 

-S 

0601) 

■ 700 

5 

12 


103 

103 

_n. 

Tr T1*% 1891 

106 

2*i« 

2% 

— 


1*i# 


Van cal 4ft -3 ft 

7 days 4'4i*4" 1 mnth 4*»i«/' ■ ■* 

3 mnth 4<>i»4"i# 6 mnth 4».*4 ‘ii> 


De Been 

600 

55 

80 

105 

70 

27 

55 

44 

68 

62 

83 

CE1 08) 

110 

*1* 



2ft 

3ft 

4 


roi7) 


17 
10 _ 

37 


90 

105 

- 

Tr 11*% 03/07 
rru7i 

114 

3ft 

’*» 

— 


2 

— 




750 

25 

— 

135 

145 


1 1B 

2 

3K 

3ft 

1ft 

2ft 

3ft 

4J« 

5ft 

GOLD 

■ + ') 

Dixons 

0328) 

300 

330 

360 

-34 

15 

5 

49 

44 

24 

12 

50 

34 

21 

13 

34 

4 

18 

38 

6 

24 

42 


120 

122 

124 

'» 

ft 

2 

1H 

3 

2 ft 

3ft 

5*.# 

7ft 

5ft 

6ft 

8ft 

6ft 

7fc 





July 22 1988. 


Total contract* 20880 


MONEY MARKET 
-AND GOLD - 


725) 


ECGD 


Fixed Rate sterling Export Finance 
Schama IV Average raterenca rate tor 
into rest period June 4. i960 to 
July 1.- 1986 Inclusive: 9.B24 per 
cant 


S54p. and Sun Alliance I Op to 
692p. after 704p. 

Among the insurance bro- 
kers. Stewart Wrightson re- 
gained some of its composure 
after recent fluctuations 
caused by speculation about a 
bid of 700p a 'share from 
Citicorp, the American bank- 
ing and investment group. 
The price jumped 28p to 46 7p 
after hitting a peak of 473p. 

Tod, the USM-quoted off- 
shoot of CH Beazer, has paid 
an initial £1.75 million for 
Straeker Construction, the pri- 
vately-owned- construction 
group. 

Tod. which plans io issue an 
extra 1.4 million shares to 
finance the acquisition, says it 
has enjoyed satisfactory trad- 


• Hoare GovetL the broker, is 
making one of its rare excur- 
sions into the U5M with a 
placing of 2.6 million shares at 
U5p in Atlas Converting, 
which designs and manufac- 
tures slitting and rewinding 
equipment. Valued at £9.29 
million and on a prospective 
p/e of 10.5, the share look 
fairly rated and should attract 
support. 


ing and is looking for pretax 
profits of at least £1.3 million 
for the year to June 30, just 
ended. Analysts believe the 
group is eapable of £2 million 
for the current year, where the 
prospective p/e is around 8. 
The shares advanced 5p to 
!33p. 

Beazer still owns around 70 
percent of the equity, but with 
several other deals in the 
pipeline could see its holding 
reduced to around SO per cent 

BET, the industrial con- 
glomerate. surprised the mar- 
ket by making simultaneous 
bids worth a total of £123 
million for HAT Gronpi, a 
supplier to the building indus- 
try. and Brengreen. the belea- 
guered industrial cleaning 
group. 

BET is offering five of its 
shares for every 17 HAT 
shares. The deal values HAT 
at I2f'/ip a share and 
capitalises the company at 
£93.3 million. It is also offer- 
ing one of its shares for every 
nine Brengreen. There is a 
cash alternative of 4Spa share. 
The terms value Brengreen at 
46p a share, or £29.9 million. 

BET shares fell 1 5p to 425p 
on the news, while HAT 
Group jumped 32p to I25p 
and Brengreen Hftp to 43.5p. 
Brengreen has often been 4 
lipped as a takeover target 

One of the day’s biggest 
rises was Oldacre, the food 
manufacturer, up 75p at 180p 
after an agreed bid of 183p a 
share Unigate. The terns 
value Oldacre at £26 million. 


COMMENT Kenneth Fleet 


Wait and hope for 
the world economy 


The latest output figures from the 
United States do little to shift the 
clouds over the world economy. 

The currency markets marked the 
dollar higher yesterday in apparent 
response to the upward revision of the 
first-quarter GNP figures. The first 
sight of the second quarter, however, 
was at the lower end of forecasts at an 
annual rate of growth of 1.1 per cent. 
The US Treasury is relying on the 
anticipated benefits of lower oil prices 
to show in the rest of the year to bring 
growth up to around 3.5 per cenL 

In that, the US is not alone. Lower 
oil prices have cut growth as much as 
inflation in the United States and 
Britain (by its effect on the oil 
industry); in Germany (through ex- 
port orders); and even in Japan (via 
the exchange rate). Lower energy costs 
should stimulate demand, but the 
longer this takes, the* greater the fears 
that the downward momentum will 
take hold. Noticeably, investment and 
the level of industry’s stocks both 
proved weak in the American second 
quarter. 

If industry has to rely on policy 
measures to keep growth going, each 
economy is on its own. The United 
States, anxious to keep the dollar in 
the sickbay, is looking for its domestic 
industries to replace the imports that 
helped boost the rest of the industrial 
world. Developing countries, with or 
without oil. are nursing weak 
commodity prices and still substantial 
debts. 


Riichi Miyazawa. Japan's new fi- 
nance minister, may be more growth- 
minded but any secondary autumn 
budgets in Tokyo would logically 
concentrate on public works to stimu- 
late big company output. Japan's 
exports may have been trimmed, but 
it is unlikely to become a magnet for 
manufactured imports. 

Both Germany and Britain are 
likely to put income tax cuts top of the 
agenda for fiscal expansion, with 
unpredictable effects for domestic 
industry. 

The drive to lower interest rates 
provides the shared policy goal. Paul 
Volcker, in his regular testimony to 
Congress, is unlikely to hide his 
displeasure at the failure of others to 
follow his lead in cutting the discount 
rate. In Germany and Japan, to be 
fair, there is no incentive left to cut, 
given the trade-off between economic 
stimulation and fears of excessive 
money growth. Nigel Lawson would 
dearly love to follow suit as soon as 
possible, but domestic money and 
earnings figures regularly spoil the 
prospect and the foreign exchange 
markets now have some real fears 
over the British balance of payments 
to back their intermittent distaste for 
sterling. 

Stock markets have sensed the 
summer doldrums, but the likelihood 
still remains that both growth and the 
downtrend in interest rates will find 
more wind come the autumn. 


The time to walk away? 


Is there panic in the hearts of the 
disparate group of players about to 
become market makers in the new 
deregulated gilts market? For months 
observers have suspected it, and their 
fears seemed confirmed yesterday 
when Union Discount announced its 
withdrawal from the list, reducing the 
number of players to 27. 

The original list of 29 approved by 
the Bank of England has already been 
depleted by one: Bank of America 
withdrew earlier this year. But Bank of 
America has serious problems of its 
own and its withdrawal from what is 
expected to be a troublesome and 
unprofitable market was probably a 
sensible way of minimising potential 
headaches. Union's withdrawal is a 
warning to the market that the going 
will be at least as tough as pessimistic 
forecasters have been saying. 

Dealing margins in the short end of 
the gilts market have already fallen 
towards the one basis point level — 
hardly enough to cover dealing over- 
heads. When the new gilts market 
opens. Union believes that margins 
will drop to one basis point or less, 
reducing the dealing turn to little 
more than a figment of the jobber’s 


imagination. Union does not want to 
risk the £15 million it had planned to 
put behind its gilts operation into this 
kind of market, especially when the 
big US houses are patently ready to 
take losses in order to win market 
share. 

Union also argues that with such 
slim margins the real profits, if there 
are any, will come from taking 
positions. But you do not have to be a 
market maker to be a principal, and 
Union has decided that it is happy to 
remain a principal. 

At the same time Aitken Campbell, 
the Glasgow firm in which Union has 
a 50.1 per cent stake, is remaining as 
one of the 27 still on the list Aitken 
operates in thousands rather than 
millions and Union calculates that 
margins will not suffer so severely in 
this area. 

Will there be further withdrawals? 
Cater Allen, another discount house, 
must be seriously considering it. The 
£15 million backing its gilts operation 
is a relatively large chunk of its entire 
capital. Gerrard & National may also 
be mulling the idea over. There is no 
loss of face for the smaller houses to 
puli out before the shooting starts. 


Goodnews 
for Ferguson fens 



1986 

1985 

Increase 


£000 

£000 

% 

Sales 

150,587 

141,498 

6% 

Trading Profit 

9,301 

7,585 

23% 

Profitbefore taxation 

7,510 

6.460 

16% 

Earnings per share 

16.9p 

14.6p 

16% 

Dividend per share 

7.9p 

7.15p 

10% 


The Chairman, Denis Vernon, reports:- 

■ The continued growth in the 3 Ps - 
Printing, Packaging and Plastics, was such 
that final results for the year were a 
record. 

■ We remain committed to the support 
and expansion of our companies which 
have excelled in the quality of their 
products and their services to customers. 


■ To stay among the market leaders we 
have intensified our search for suitable 
acquisitions. 

■ Pre-tax profits for the new trading 
year are already well in excess of those of 
last year. 


For a copy of che Report and Accounts please contact - 
Dept. IT. Feiguson Industrial Holdings PLC 
Appleby Castle. Cumbria CA16 6XH 



Ferguson Industrial Holdings PLC 







BUSINESS AND FINANCE 


THE TIMES WEDNESDAY JULY 23 1986 


* * * * *;SI- 


THE TIMES UNIT TRUST INFORMATION SERVICE 


B-d OHer Qiob tte*J 


Weekly 

M 08V Chfle Ywfo 


Weekly 

80 CM* Oige W« 





S3 


Nil Hob Inc 

PnH ShWM 

Commcdty 

Franc* Goes 
GMT 6 Can 
ini Law* 

Prop Sum 
Uiw Envoy 
World TetJ 
Amor Growth 
•mar income 
Am Smarar COS 

AuR GfOVrth 
Cw» Seqler 
F«EU 
Hong Kona M 
M Grow* 

Jason Pert 
Japan Smeller 
Exempt 

Eww pt Mart* 

BROWN SHPLEV 
9 - 17 . FUrymoue Hd 
out tsar** 
FmanOOL 
Smaflar Co s ACC 
□o *eoma 
H>gh hccme 
tm 

Wan Pornoao me 

Od acc 

North Amwean 

OWN 


1912.4 2052 
182 197 
109.7 II 7.0 
4&6 4&9* 
UJ 15 4* 
170 181 
SB* 74 0 
405 432* 

39.6 flie 
900 SSO 
573 6t 1 
21 B 233* 
59 6 675 
149 155 

47.6 50.7 
3 X 6 759 * 
M4 378 
738 778 
16.9 180 

816 854 


.. 4 7 S 

1009 
-04 2.95 
-01 317 
-01 301 
050 
-04 099 
.. 171 
-03 089 
•0 7 350 
♦03 53« 
•02 038 
41 157 
. 027 
♦05 099 
*0.1 263 
. 146 

♦05 . 


. Hayward* Heat* 

1234 1326 -0 6 7.71 

7» 9 2472 -39 

147 9 1590 -18 0 96 

655 707 -02 577 

74 7 804 -0.4 4.90 

602 6*.7c .. 315 

1005 iO&Oc -01 . 

593 638* 45 131 

849 91.3 *0.1 023 


BUCKHASnll MANAGEMENT 

The Stock Exchange London EC2P 2JT 

01-588 2868 


General bfo >*l 
DO ACCwn (4| 
income Fund (3) 
DO Accren (31 
MO Inc (2} 

DO Accun Of 

Smaiar Me (5i 
Do Acorn IS) 


210.5 221-3* 
3365 35359 
1037 1092 
>82.0 >915 
I2S3 131 1 
1 652 1734 
E1137 1203* 
C12.ll 1282V 


C 8 FUNQ MANAGERS 

12 S Hah HtfOom. -London WC 1 V 6 PY 

01-24? 1148 

CS Japan Fund 84 6 90 0 -44 034 

CANNON FUNS MANAGERS 
01 w *™ w * 7 - NAS 0 NB 

Grow* 2741 291.6* -4.4 254 

Income 318 3 3386* -5 0 4 07 

FvEast 198 7 2113 -11032 

Nor* American l JS.0 1574 43 05S 

GfotMl 47 3 503c 41 150 

EurotMM 493 524 *02 1.00 

Japan 575 6l3 42 050 


WeaFdy 

50 War Cnge yw» 


GUMNESS MAHON UWT TWIST 
HMNAQCBS 

PO Bo* 442 . 32 a U»ry*t-HrL London EC 3 P 
01-633 9333 

Htgn income' 51 6 554 * 44 666 

N «net Trust lfll 5 188.0 4 6 059 

R 4 W«rv 307.1 2204 42 222 

SB Trow 38.4 408 * 0.1 853 

Si Vfleent Me 839 865 -02 548 

St V*om (JS Gdl 792 815 45 073 

Tanfo* 8 * Sm Co 1 1754 185 .M .. S.I 4 
Term* ter USM 362.7 381.7 .. 223 

HAMBROS BASK UWTHWST MAUSERS 
Prertet UT Adnr. 5 . RarMqh FW. Brentwood 
Ehw 

0277 717916 

HpWM S"* Ca t ia .6 1379 * 47 1 88 
HaMOs N Amer 692 726 44 091 

«mro Jap -8 F E 1228 130.6 —09 048 

Hjrobros Scandm 781 8 Jlc 4.6 093 
Hanbros EinDtan 899 B 59 - 1.1 056 

Hanuos Cmaan 475 506 42 158 

Kmfaro* En«tri"C 843 89.7 42 4 76 

Hen-Mot Up Me 596 634 4 3 552 

Hantoos Ras Asia 57,0 605 c 4 1 257 
Kartros ms So 481 Si 2 44 058 


we**r 

ec Ow Chga t«Kj 


weekly 
an Otter Chge VMd 


m om* cnge yi*j 




■ 


, 







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CAPS. (JAMES) MANAGEMENT 

PO Bo» 551 Bm Marks London EC 3 7 JO 

01-671 0011 

CaptaH 354 7 3794 + 0.4 157 

Income 2922 301 9 46 492 

Nor* Amman 287 5 3022 - 4.6 058 

CATER ALLEN 

1 Km VMaffl St EC 4 N 7 AU 
01-623 6314 

G* Trust 1035 1106 +031052 

CENTRAL BOARD OF PMANCE OF 
CHURCH OF ENOLAND 
2 . Fora StrdfiL London EC 2 Y SAQ 
01-588 IBIS 

hr* Fund 41335 .. 430 

Freed*! 1473 e .. 9 J 3 

Depow 1000 990 

CHAFimeS OFT 1 CUL WVCSTMENT FUND 

2 Fere Sosa. London EC 2 Y 5 AO 
01-588 1815 

mcome 38089 • . . 4 83 

Acorn tio .9441 .. .. 

Deposit 1000 .. 955 

CLERICAL MEDICAL MtT TRUST 
MANAGERS 

Narrow pufo. Beaten BS 2 OJH. 

0800 373393 

Amer Grow* • 274 239 42 190 

Gouty HUi Income 419 445 4.1 4.30 

Evrccaan Grow* 295 J 7 J - 0 * 21 X 1 

General Busty 37 6 401 c 42 270 

G* 8 Freed H Gdl 39 5 31 1 c +02 330 

G« 6 Freed Me 74 4 757 * .. 950 

hide* Securities 2 S 2 766 .. 220 

Jap» Owt* 319 339 * *01 050 

county or ttAtucens ltv 

161 . Cheaavde. London EC 2 V GEU 
01-726 1999 


TAROgT TRUST MANAgHB ' .- 

jggHHBo*. Gatthodsa Rtt Aytastvy BucJ* 

AW £1*8 ' • - 7?5 770*. *02 0DJ 
toriSF T65 .176 010 

C&ratty * 870 720 : *01 1.19 
&Sroy 303 325* .4.1 T«4 

12*4 flua -02. 3*3 


4i aoo 

44 1 . 0 S 

45 105 


Extra won* . 
Franed 
GAKoara 
GoUlrctm . 

Da AGBStr • • 
income 

japan 

UW ASWQBDarD 

Do (tamest 
Rut Sham Fa 
UtrCaoiUI 
SpaoM Srt* 
jaeMoaw 

jNpriO Income • 
wcridwmOwmi 
€ a*ty &-&■ 

. Da Acaxti O! 


1157 J2*3 
.SWA ?8£9 
. 104.0 1092 
507 5*2 
. BU 097 . 


49-224 
45 552 
45 IB 
-03 7.0 
059 
... - 038 


795'. f(S* 46 543 
985 1055* -4.9 040 
»? 215 42 354 

907 965- +10 065 
1125 1193 +1211X6 

17.7 19 1* . - - 030 

69.7 74 7 * — 0 * 1 ® 

83.9 . 546c 46 U6 

459 480 4.4 tyo 

. 55-3 » 0 * ... MB 
1385 1488* 42 -fr? 
8tJ.J67... rSJi.m 
1525 163.1 -*fl «6 


-tHOHNTON UNIT HAKAMtt LTD- 






-a-4 1 1 




HILL SAMUS. IWITTRUST MANAGERS 

1 NLA Tower. AddeoontM Road. Croydon 
01-686 43S5 01-628 6011 
Brush Trust UMS 5155 5484 +80 330 

Cap4al Trust UmtS 961 1023c -14 2 74 

D048I Trust Un4S 1813 1929 -20 3 07 

Eirowran That 1212 129 Oe 45 077 

Fat East Trost 1149 i220» +03 i2S 

FhancM That 362.1 38bJ 4.0 257 

G4| Freed rm Inc 290 302c 4.1 955 

00 Grow* 433 *56 41 754 

Hqh YMd Trust 4 934 B75 4 1 527 

reona Trust 80.4 858 .. 453 

Mamaeonai 1173 1345* .. 2.16 

Japan TaNiTst 329 35 l* 41037 
Naual RwMtei 29 j 30£ 4.1 2.73 


Security Trust 
Stoker CPS 
Special Srts 








1721 183.1 
88.4 982 
924 983 


181 FUNS MANAGERS 

32 Queen Annas Gm London swim sab 
01-222 1000 

IBI Bm 6 0 seas 1281 1363 -16 1711 

>e> twe Pka 549 583 -11 990 

IBI Coital Growth 549 585 49 200 

m waw ent Tsl Fnd 653 695 45 3.40 


Energy Trust 
Em income 
Fmanoa 
Gat Strategy 


44.0 488 
1593 169 4 
1648 1753* 
560 577 


Growth Investmer* 368 6 2 S 5 . 7 * 
Income 6 Grow* 3 93 419 
Japanese 6 Pecrtc 171 1 1820 
Ntn Amw Growth 996 1059 
MU Hecoeary 1070 1138 * 
SeoRerCos 210 0 223 3 

Global Me Ts 559 594 * 
Sceool Sna Acc 279 4 2973 


41 381 
-06 546 
-10 191 
41 1.73 
48 274 
41 463 
4.9 066 
46 098 
48 L79 
-16 156 
41 552 
-14 199 


CROWN UWT ntUET SERVICES 
Crown House. Wo*ing GU 71 1 XW 
04862 5033 

rtgn income Trust 2364 2529 -37 517 

Growth Trust 2163 23 Ue - 4.1 311 

American Trust 1249 1336 * 43 875 

CRUSADER UNIT TRUST MANAGERS LTD 
Up da te. Surrey HH 2 BBL 
07372 42424 


♦02 030 
48 030 
42 590 

46 090 
42 230 
42 030 

42 030 

43 080 

47 030 


UK inctm 
UK Grow* Acorn 
Do Ctot 

Eurooaan Growth 
Paohc Grow* 


50 1 534 

524 559 


485 515 42 * *7 

481 512 4.1 243 

481 512 41 243 

SOI 534 1.83 

524 559 +03 .. 


EFM UNIT TRUST MANAGERS 
4 . MeMs Crescent EtSodurgh 
031-226 3492 


American Find . 719 785 
Cacoa! .Find -94 j ioi.Q 

Growth & Me Fund 1293 1383 c 

Htan DM Fund 1073 11*9 

intamaftmal Find >883 2022 * 


713 785 . ..222 

-94 4 1010 49 1.86 

1293 1383 c .. 429 

1073 1149 43 598 

188 3 2022 * 46 1.11 

183 195 .. 051 


Sr* Jap Co S Find 383 409 
Tokyo Find 167 7 179.4c 


Tokyo Find 
(Ex) Amur ( 2 ) 
(E») Japan ( 3 ) 
(Ex) Paodc ( 4 ) 


167 7 179.4c 
1455 1502 
1082 111.7 
379.0 2881 


/Ex) Smaa* Jap M 2195 2765 . . aiO 

Eurotind 2*8 265 * 42 377 

EAGLE STAR UWT TRUST MANAGERS _ 

Be* Road. ChManham. GMueemr GL 63 TLQ 
0242 521311 

UK Balanced Inc 67 1 71 . 5 * . . 245 

Do Aecum 6 K 3 728 * - 4.1 241 

UK Grow* Acorn 81 4 869 . . >91 


Eieooean Accom 
UK G* 6 n Inc 
Do Aecum 


Do Accum 6K3 72 89 4.1241 

UK Grown Acorn Si 4 869 . . 191 

UK W«* Ik Me 645 669 -03 523 

N American Accum 643 886* +09 054 

Far Easton Accum 94A 1007* 48 015 
Eieooean Accum 726 77.4C -07 097 

UK G* * R MC 539 572* +81 831 

Do a com 562 589* . . 807 

EMHJRANCE FUO MANAGEMENT LTD 
Adnwi Centre. Hexagon House. 28 (Western 
Road. Romford RM1 3LB 
0708-66968 

Erxkmnc* 1066 1141 .. 3.14 

EOUTABI9 UMTS ADMUUSTRATIQN 
35. Founahi SL UKMSM 
061-236 56® 

Eonvtt PBfcean 719 785 42 332 


20 . FeiKh u itfi SI. London ECS 
01-823 8000 

Amer Grow* Me 645 68 

Do Accum 65.7 7 C 

Fund Hw T« Ihc 195 20 

Do ACCum 24.7 26 


645 685* 
SS.7 70 0 
195 203 

34.7 26 * 

HOI void Me 1229 1309 

DO AOCUTl 204.7 2180 

m Recovery Me 1012 1079 

Od Accum 1085 1135 

Japan Grow* Me IDi t 1072 

DO Accum 1015 I07.fi 

SnreevCosMc 16*6 17S3 

Do Acas* 2145 2289 

UK Eq Grow* Me 282 295 

DO Accum 483 481 

vKorfowrde Tach Me 39 7 *23 
Do Accun 480 426 


+ 15 126 
*13 .. 
4 > 225 
42 . 

-15 558 
-32 .. 
-15 189 
-15 

-15 0.4? 
- 1.9 

-12 256 
- 1.6 

45 1.00 
48 . 
41 1.18 
41 


. ‘j ei U e. ■' > ■' * ' L 'li ' j * 




L 6 CUMT TRUST MANAGB 4 ENT 
Porcy House. Copmal Ave. EC 2 F) 7 BE 
01-588 2800 

Mcoma Find 454 1 4814 b • 

MM Waon* l Gen 2372 2421 


LEGAL! GENERAL UNIT TRUST 
MANAGERS 

5 . Rnfooh Road. Brentwood Essroi 
0Z77a*§3* 

Eduty DrorfouM* 2649 2829 
Do Accun 4114 442.1 

DO Income 59 7 515 * 

Eiaeuean 66.3 705 c 

Far ILbjwt, 1061 1137 

G* Trust 777 822 

Ml Managed 775 829 * 

Natural Rex 502 517 

N A mncM Tool 765 81 8 * 

UK Speer* Sts 618 ® 3 * 


42 23S 
45 235 
41 5® 
47 1J7 
+10 001 
♦02 7tB 

41 101 

43 1.99 

42 152 

44 136 


LLOYDS BANK UNIT TRUST MANAGBIS 
Regnarea DpL Gomg-By-Sea. Womig. W 
Sussex 


0*44 459144 
nsMncen' * 
Da Aoam 
Energy Md 
Do Accum 
Erte Income 
Do Aeon . 
German G* Me 
Da Accun 
home 
Do Accum 
Mfl Tech 
Do Accum 
Japan Grow* 

Do Acsuo 
N Anar t Gen 
Do Acoxn 
Peake Besn 
Do Aaxxn 


1779 189 6 
3187 3379 

535 S 3 
152.1 1626 
2745 293,6 

59 3 ®4 

593 ®A 
264 1 2832 
5212 5674 
1719 1617 
179 4 IB> 8 

820 875 

821 179 


42 256 
+82 256 
41 692 
_4 1 592 
46 020 
46 020 
- 1.7 450 
-33 450 
.. 048 
41 0*8 
4.1 002 
+81 002 


MSKAND BANK GROUP UMTTRUST 
MANAGERS 

Courrwooa Hse. sever SL Heed. Sheffield SI 3 RD 
0742 769842 

C*p 4 * Income 750 800 * 42 24 

OoAceum 1021 1083 * -03 24 

Common * s Gen 1019 108.7 +o.i 326 

Da Accum 1 * 3.6 153.1 326 

Extra H?i MC 585 624 * - 0.1 772 

Do Accun 683 729 * 4 1 7.72 

GB 6 Fixed MC 54.1 56.4 .. SOT 

DoAccum 883 922 .907 

Han TfoW 1520 1620 44 552 

&0 Accum 2594 2786 47 SH 

mcome 168.0 17 B.IO 43 3.72 

DoAcaro 2714 2915 c- 45 373 

Japan 8 Paofic 24.1 365 +J| 0 « 

DoAccum 2919 3110 • + 2 O'. 0 fl 9 

N Amencen Me 1109 1179 • -41 127 

Do Accun 1324 1412 42 127 

Em G* he 1113 1187 49 119 

Do Accum 1336 1425 44 1 19 


Stewart, nrostr unit trust 


45 . Cherfone So. 1 
031-226 3^1 


Hon «aw 
Do ACCUI 


ROTAL LONDON UNITRUST MANAGERS 
Roy »1 London House. CoOMSSer COI IRA 
(B06 578115 

Amencan Grow* 19.1 9 < 9 * 47 080 

Caps* Accun 1789 1882 * 43 220 
G* Mcome 55.4 584 * +82 893 

IM rncnrne 81.7 879 43 * 79 

rom 6 Grew* - 995 1059 * 46 490 

Japan Onw* . BIX 975 +>3 805 

SokmI US 1105 1179 44. 190 


Da A cam 
Japan 6 PxoAC 

Do Accum 
N Amman Me 
Do Accun 
Em G* he 
Do tm* 
Smaa* Cos Me 
Do Accun 


«AVE*P*WSPBt 

2 a. Westam Rd. riandoid RM 1 3 LB 

- 68 - 73 . Quern -SL Ed xfough EK 2 4 NX 

(tkxxJord) 070696966 Or-tEto) 031-228 7351 


American Fund 
Da Accum 
Da Wxhdra-ii 
AusMmi Fund 
Do Acaxn 
Brash Puna 
. Da Accun 
EuruMen Fuxf 
Do Acaxn - 
Japan Fund 
Do Accun 
Sam PH* ; 


2235 2385 
2514 2679 
157.1 1674 
980 1043 
999 1080 
5959 «H 9 
8019 85 * 0 
2784 2644 
291 JO 3109 
3259 3*85 
3289 3*82 
1684 1784 


.43 234 
44 234 
42 294 
41 127 
49 127 
-r.9 *40 
-25 440 
49 092 
49.092 
+89 821 
+05 821 


Amer foC A Grow* 67.7 729 


1121 1195 * - 1.1 2-13 
119.7 1275 * - 1.1 113 


1030 110 . 1 * 42 0 ® 
1112 1185 * 42 0 ® 
1281 1349 +05 021 


■JURAT JOHNSTONE UKT TRUST 
MANAGEMENT 

183. Hope Street Gfa spow G 2 2 UK 
041 221 3252 


Smaler Cos & Rk 1895 2025 


Do Accun 
HMrfowkM Grow* 
Do Acaxn 
UK Grow* Fund 


2124 227.1 
139.7 2028 
2686 2 ® I 
463 485 


Amancm 
Eirooean 
Smaaer Cos 


1153 1230 +04 3 ® 

226 4 241.6 -39 1.13 

2180 224.1 -l 7 192 


Capmi urea 975 1047* 43 2 1* 

ComwotN? 0 7 46.7 .. 1 J» 

Energy tnds 425 45.4 . <2* 

European Growth 962 1055 -(Ur 055 

Exempt Me Bnd 805 849 42 3.15 

Do MS 1 * 3 ) 57.7 «OB 42 235 

Exjsmtan 367 382 43400 

Financial Sees 974 104.1 41 205 

Grt 4 R Inc " 529 887 +811899 

H^I Retun ureu i 7»7 191 . 1 * 48 490 

Hgh Yield IMt 1532 1745 45 438 

Income UBS 949 1005 42 834 

M a es * ** Tnre 84 A 802 4 1 270 

Iratmatxm* 1143 1215 +06 339 

Japan Growth 915 979 45 .. 


Income IW 
M ve snrew Tru* 


723 41 8® 

1042* 43 2U 

46.7 .. 151 

4S.4 - 434 

1055 40 055 

#49 42 3.15 

SOB 42 235 

382 43400 

1041 41 205 

587 +811089 


5 UK ALLIANCE- *. 

Sui-AKante Hs 8 Wwham. Sussex ‘ 

DS 03 56283 7 

Equty Trust ACC ' 3785 4027 -82 257 

N Am Trust Acc 589 605 43 1.12 

Fw East Trust Acc 81 3 BM 4.4 090 

WorideAM Bond' - 482 829 41 7.13 


TSBUNn-TRUSTtfLTD 

Keens . Houh. Andover. Hants, SP 10 IPG 

0264 567® oaahngr 0264 8343201* 


LONDON* MANCHESTER 
WMaiaoe Park. Exeter EX 5 IDS 
0392 521 ® 

General Tru* 429 450 ..870 

Mcome Tru* 367 393 42 620 

Irtrenatoral Tru« 11.7 372 * . . 870 

Airencro 31.9 342 2-00 

Japan 435 486 c +03 1 00 

Troa of M» 26.1 30.1 41 2*0 


NATIONAL ntOVBENT KVESTMENT 
MANAGERS 

48 GrKWftxt* SI. EC 3 P 3 HH 
01-623 4?00 Ext 2 ® 

NPI UK I 960 2086 

Do Acaxn 3165 3386 

NPI overseas 563.8 5985 

DO Acaxn 8*7 5 731.4 

Far EMI Acc 83 B 882 c 

Anrecen Acc 57 3 6 i . 0 * 

EmoeenAcc 489 521 

WaridwkM Ace 47 8 588 4 


Japan Crow* 915 978 

Japan SmaMr Qos 1294 1383 
Masterfond 2 S 3 382 * 


New Tecnnofogy 
SE As* Grow* 
SctktMS 


Smdkr Co's Me 
Special Stuatons 
UK Eouty 
US Grow* 
Universal Grow* 


888 949 
939 1004 


42 834 
-01 270 
+06 338 
-45 .. 
4* .. 

.. 394 
+83 

+13 390 


1285 137.4* -0.1 293 
1539 1636 -1.1 393 

153.7 1S43 -06 4.05 

743 784 42 1.03 

1®2 1713 49 492 

912 973* -24 293 
1784 1886c -15 274 

714 783 43 196 

8*.1 «J ..139 


American Me 
-Da Accun 
Extra Mama Me 
Do Acaxn 
General (jra Me 
Do Acaxn 
GR* Fixed Me 
Do Acaxn 
Mcome 
Accum 
Pac*e Me 
Do Accun 
Ml Me 
Do Accun 
Selected Oops Me 
Do Acaxn 
kxtixal Res 
Do Accun 


1154 1228 * 43 104 

120.1 1278 * 43 1.04 

115.1 1225 - 1.7 5.15 

134 4 1439 40 5.15 

1526 1624 * 49 290 
2513 » 74 * -49 280 

482 513 * 42 840 

681 879 * 43 8 ® 
2114 2249 * -45 443 
329-6 3587 * 49 4.43 
1583 168 . 1 * + 1.4 028 
1639 1735 * +14 828 
306 6 3213 +12 134 . 

381.1 4055 +13 13 * 

•814 85 * 49 191 

673 71.7 - 1.0 191 

40.1 427 4.1 225 

412 439 4.1 225 







rV* 













UNLISTED SECURITIES 


INVESTMENT TRUSTS 


Hgh Low Company 


<*v Yld 

Pnce Chge penca % HE 


42 

+2 


.. 29 

IS 



.. 88 

18 


. . 0 

.. 23 

213 


29 

19 87.8 

115 

• .. 


6.7 .. 

275 


94 

34 159 

13 * 

-2 

24 

1.7 1&6 

IIW 




141 

• .. 

its 

2.1 135 

2 U 




2 20 




345 


*0 

12 369 

131 

-3 

89 

65 7 .1 

9 S 3 


119 

19 25.4 

38 



.. 89 

705 


ii* 

5.6 69 

93 


80 

85 21.6 

ro 


1 * 

20 169 

1 ® 


71 

36 15.9 



590 

7 * 9.1 


-3 

6.4 

81 69 

X 1 . 

-2 

09 

26 253 



.. 10 4 

14 '. 



.. 250 

40 

-1 


.. 56 

450 

*•10 

6 . 0 - 

13 349 

15 




29 

-1 



42 '. 


18 

42 106 
59161 

115 

-3 

6 40 

215 


5.0 

33 169 

136 

+1 . 



20 


1.1 

S 3 108 

IS 


AO 

48 85 

1 W> 




118 


21 o 

ia i 92 



11.4 


55 


AO 

73 10.0 


-10 

5.0 

13 157 

1(0 


36 

22 238 

305 


VI 6 

39 106 


+ ' 





3.4 

4 4 11 * 

fttJ 


26 

>.« 159 



14 

224 33 

X 


.. e 

. . 4 .7 

IW 

90 

-5 




29 

44 135 

122 


36 

3 D 181 

330 

-TO 

179 

$4 123 

115 

• .. 

at 

27 139 

100 






31 

24 212 

7 

-1 

30 

423 . 

230 

• .. 

52 

23 245 



. « 

.. 19 



IS 




A 3 

22 21.1 

23 '. 




89 


M 

63103 

58 

90 




~3 

31 

3 0273 

35 



. 59 


♦ 5 

1 s 

ID 204 

S3 


/I 

139 356 

m 


57 

2 D 1&3 

m • 


3 / 

35 136 



29 

2 i 179 



74 


60 

-J 

21 

33 159 

i® 

9*2 

76 

72 9.1 

M 

•-I 0 

28 

33159 

71 

00 

as UO 

PS 

j 

ID 

1 1 14 3 

43 



. 259 

173 

*♦5 

1 7 

10 149 

90 


21 

23 73 

73 

♦ z 

14 

ID 109 

197 


A 9 

25 212 

T* 


36 

4 3 10.0 

2 * 


. . e 


144 




4 * 

• +1 

7.0 

66 95 

131 


13 

22 181 

M 

~s 

54 

6.4 6.4 

S 3 


107 

115 63 

205 


70 

34 17 2 

AH 

-io 

50 

>3 289 

21 


03 

1 * 162 

*5 

-2 

25 

SE 139 

140 


31 

22 243 

?4 

a+ 

04 

1 1 179 

7*5 

-10 

86 

35 1 C 6 



| 

MO 



96 

25 175 



46 

37 13.5 

97 

a . 

23 

35 135 

26 

9 


14 

IS 6 40 

140 

-18 

57 

4 B 7.9 

7 A 6 



, , 

7*3 


36 

15 257 



39 

87 20 ft 

20 


T 7 

65 22 




49 172 



39 

43 

1 ® 


256 

59 

48 

90 


43 

19.7 
49 115 


19 ® 

High low 
320 145 
101 65 

655 420 
148 84 

150 98 

47 39 

80 72 
165 40 

17 12 

60 32 

I® 85 

124 H 
128 103 

91 60 

12 * 120 
38 19 

115 90 

in iso 

110 38 

92 58 

49 36 
210 v33 
255 1 ® 

46 28 

*4 383 
390 293 ' 
MS 143 '. 
415 2»5 
205 80 

93 90 

24 9 

116 91 
133 105 
690 412 
1 ® 115 
203 1*5 
183 134 

. 3*0 200 
23 22 

14 8 

I® 115 
2 S 5 (68 
230 165 

31 16 

115 44 

103 88 

353 215 

9 S' 
(41 15 

32 2 S 
1 ® JS 
3*0 233 
190 116 

E 22 
26 2 
148 !« 
118 73 

70 48 

330 253 
90 87 

300 220 
83 55 

113 67 

113 67 

63 37 

125 70 

43 32 

118 1 ®' 

81 BO 

1*0 94 

1 ® 133 

62 21 
®. 
2*5 1 ® 
150 101 
1 ® 55 

08 54 

176 -92 
35 IS 

116 101 
1 ® 93 
363 I® 
220 145 

98 75 
19 9 

75 26 
1 ® 1*0 
380 350 
1 ® 95 
9 4 

IB 71 
95 59 
7 ® 360 
220 1(8 
*7 22 

r® 82 
3 ® 231 
218 134 
1 ® -185 
220 130 

47 14 
1 ® 109 
12 * 82 
158 153 

50 25 

23 . IS 
115 70 
130 1 ® 
367 ?37 
31 13 

5 1 

ZD 14 
95 75 

2 ! <0 
1 ® 91 

ISO 68 
1 ® S 3 
-16 14 


Conpany Price 

French Conn 175 
Fleuioake >00 

FUter Sml* 'A' 655 

OSWXOO 142 

Oee (CecX) 98 

GeefHoten 39 

G£0on Lyons 75 

Gtfoi Mew 1*0 

Gilbert House 12 

Gtatjal Gp *3 

Gcdww Warren 1 10 

GooUread Pun 122 
Gouo | Laurence) 1Z0 
Granvtt Surface 65 
Green (Ernest] 120 
Greeiwacn CaMe 30 

Orosvenrx Sq 98 

Guernsey Adame IW 
HB Elea loo 

Hampden Homacare 75 
Haw* 46 

Harvey 8 Thoma 185 
Havelock Euopa 223 
Heath Caro *3 

Hrewtree *30 

Do A LV 390 

H e n derson Pnrre i** 
MqrvPanr 235 

HMrtanC Part 00 

Wfc Eigonom 90 

Hobson 22-. 

Hodgson ■ - HO 
Hokfim Hydroman 118 . 
Hoknes 6 Marchant«W 
■Hotwse Pio reak m i35 
Home ((robea) 193 
Do A 175 

Howard Group 330 
Hums Food 23 

Humbrao Bee 9 

Hunter Saplw 1*0 

Humhxur Tech 205 


MO Sc« Energy 90 

MfraRad B 

hoeraurope Ter* 220 

Mteheson S'. 

Od 7% 133 

Hrael (Jack U 29’. 

JSO Comp 145 

JS Pathology 3*0 

Jaques Van 173 

Javnunt so 

Jeoserts 8 

JOflnsan t Jorg IX 

Johnstones Pwnts 110 

Juki Runoer 64 

KLP 305 

Kent IJahni 76 

Kenyon Sacs 2® 

Kewrt Systems 76 

Kkxk-Texr* 81 

LPA ind » 

LUOSW GO 

Ud» Thomson 1® 

Leeuro Inv «2 

Lewnur . . 105 

Lodge Care 81 

Lon S OyomWV 123 

LOrtn Elect 190 

L«antw ttet 21 

MS Caen S.Ceny n 

IMT Con* 2*5 

McLauyr*i [ *|Hy ig 

MarenM SB 

J*an* fRonafo) . 158 

Manrexx 16 

UaytiN Oiv ■ 1 ® 

Uayhaws Food* 131 

Meadow Far* 220 

UeOa Tad! 1*0 

Msserwaro 8* 

Memory Comp 1* 

Mqmcom Md «dg» 28 
Mamner-EMSI 1*5 

Murydown Wr» 355 

Metal BuMetr US 

Mettl Goencas r 

M«sec 96 

Mena* ddrj 81 

Utcrokta) 655 

UcrouN 1*5 

Maovdec 36 

Mxfero Marts 178 

M*sunm* Mns 365 

Mias 33 210 

MawartL Brown 18S 

UfS WBrtd 190 

Mnemos U 

MdptoM Gp - 1*8 

Monks X Crane 124 

Monotyea 15* 

Uoriiy (Rft) <6 

Mams (imam 16 

Moss Adiernsxig . 75 

Mwiariw IX 

NMWCmqp 305 

New Q Nat Res 13 

Dowries 1 

Now Encana Props 18 

Do 10*e 185 

texnefo 13 

Ktorank 134 

Mjrpsx? ‘X 

Noncdt H0W6 IM 

N* Sex 8 Gen 2l 


Gross 
dkr IM 

Oi ge pence % PfE 
IS *2 11 4 
+2 2.7 27 18.7 

J. 160 2.4 16 1 

*1 23 20.1 

.. 3.7 18 .. 

• 2.4 62 118 

. . 40 6.7 13.7 

-10 3.7 2.8 4&S 

0.7 5 8 273 

.. 32 7A1ILS 

-3 3.1 28 157 

-2 *3 34 163 

51 43 87 

• -5 38 46 112 

4G 4.1 12M 

86b 88 78 
35 22 47.1 
07 0 7 339 
-4 21 28 121 

18 39 142 

6.1D 33 23D 
48 22 256 

«+1 1.1 2£ 17 2 

• + I0 -1£3 29 159 

• +10 123 32 153 


10 27 1B3 

60 51 154 

67 10412 

5 0b 28 118 
606 29 1Q.7 
60 IB 20.0 
07 10 155 

04 44 9Q 

36 26 181 
2 1 tO 24.7 
32 1815* 
30 16.7 23 

. . . . 108 


79 36 107 
10 

07 24 229 

3 0 2 1 229 

33 1 0 31 1 
7 9 4.6 150 

04 03 25 0 

. 02 

59 44 MS 
61 54 122 

25 39 10.6 

*7 14 172 

23 30 168 

138 49 17.5 

17 22 112 

14 b 1.7 Ul 

39 O 59 

40 67 74 

54 54 121 

-. 209 

18 3.6114 

29' 38 169 
SO 64 n.i 
36 1.9 157 


66 37X6 
>00 6.1 7.1 
40 57 84 

904 

4.7 30 213 

4 3 41 2l‘ 8 

1.1 08 177 

5* 24 192 
53 38 121 
A 3 A 6 2.1 
232 23 

SO 17.9 19 
36 2$ 1*8 
78 23 164 
61 53 152 

3.5 3 6 14 1 
17 a 1X5 
2 3 0*832 
57 39 110 

19 50 158 

57 32 81.7 
36 09X6 

21 1 0 152 

38 1.9 *03 

7.4 39 10.0 

20 14 274 

39 31 154 

2.1 44 X2 

35 A7 98 
43 M 113 
86 28 168 

2.4 185 34 

/ 87 

0 119 .. 

43 32 174 
17 24 78 

3.4 27 149 

. 42 


" 75 

35 

CHkek 

37 

22 

Opror 

293 

100 

Oador 

35 

83 

(Mnm 

143 

85 

PCT 

2 ® 

1 ® 

Pacer 

79 

SB 

PSOffc 

1 ® 

IX 

Panov 

560 

206 

Rartilk 

52 

10 

Paul 

SI 

X 

Paw 

175 

143 

Penny 

152 

80 

Pew 

148 

63 

Perea 

X 

23 

Perk* 

200 

136 


27 

16 

Pvnog 

34 

X' 

Pwd* 

>16 

24 

Pw P 

73 

31 

Pmea 

96 

® 

Plan 

33 

X 

Plasm 

170 

115 

fka ton 

283 

H 5 

Ww 

245 

IX 

Pdytei 

1 ® 

83 

Power 

1*3 

118 

Promt 

5 ' 

2 

Prow- 

5 

2 

Do 

308 

1 ® 

Ouesb 

43 

18 

Radc 

*6 

33 

Redo 

123 

S5 

Rate 

10 

14 

Rama 

1 « 

68 

06 

*0 

RetiM 
Real ' 

42 

18 

Reran 

190 

70 

HWn 

80 

S 3 

Ro«t 

1 ® 

145 

Ruddr 

IX 

115 

SAC 

IX 

73 

Sense 

*8 
1 M 

19 

Sera* 

1 JU 

1 ® 

Seraj 

178 

138 

Scare* 

112 

73 

Scar* 

l® 

1 » 

Scot 

100 

71 

Secure 

X 

7 

Sdeci 

350 

171 

Sen* 

355 

2 ®' 

Snare 

78 

00 ' 

snafoc 

54 

22' 

Sharal 

220 

1 ® 

Shan* 

1 ® 

110 

Shrek! 

101 

w 

Sign* 

173 

128 

Sre 

220 

IX 

5 focl* 

20 S 

131 

Stowi 

i® 

162 


131 

86 

Snowt 

42 

35 

Said 

102 

113 

Stnn 

31 

12 

SW Pi 

i 0 * 

98 

Space 

1 J 0 

90 

Stoat* 

63 

48 

Spoon 

X 

X 

Soear 

99 

87 

Sera 

71 

» 

Spkrth 

220 

as 

Starts 

70 

32 

Stanek 

96 

71 

Sam 

X 

93 

17 

58 


>25 

110 


230 

175 

Syrocp 

235 

150 

Ti S 

300 

110 

TDS C 

134 

117 

TMD 

114 

1 ® 

Ta* 

IX 

w 

Toy Hi 

148 

103 

Tedi 

3 ® 

194 

Teen 

205 

(35 

Tefoca 

1 ® 

120 

T# 5 a 

1 ® 

70 

Therein 

54 fi 

360 

Therm 

78 

63 

Thorpe 

56 

47 

Tnney 

1*6 

114 

T«iv! 

50 

X 

Towtig 

>« 

>x 

Trade 

470 

270 

Trench 

n 

95 

Tnran 

2 » 

140 

Tyne T 

75 

*3 

Mr) Ce 

5*5 

420 

Utd Fr> 

IX 

» 

UM Pa 

9 * 

85 

U filer 

100 

60 

vmreu 

106 

78 

Wayne 

1 ® 

75 

WnrMe 

•Wa 3 

19 

14 

Wefoac 

95 

69 

Were 

98 

43 

wmg 

1 ® 

150 

woes 

10 

4 

wiaare 

27 

16 

w*e*n 

115 

90 

96 

48 

m 


Hqh Low Company 


<*» Yid 

Ot ga pane* % P/E 


18® 

Mtfi Law Gon*any 


* Yld 

Mce Ch'ge pence % P/E 





a 


FINANCIAL TRUSTS 


47 . 35’. 
71 31 

49 21 
154 116. 
22' 13'. 
28 . I?'. 
156 131 
1*0 90 

a«7 iw 
106 66 
750 375 
94 77 

.133 75 

900 +90 
218 183 
**0 320 
290 IW 
382 26* 
ll? X 
27 16 

206 152 


Arnancsn Strseu ■ 

5®5_ < 

Bpustrad 
Brtarere Arrow 
Ony MM 
_DO 'A 


Goode (D 8 Ml 

Heooerwr Admm 

•Wi 

MAI 

MAO 

Mere * M e House 
paaflpftivTsi 
Do Wa i rants ' 
SwiN* Court 


COMMODITIES 


LONDON COMMOOITY 
EXCHANGE 

G W Joymon and Co import 

SUGAR (Froa C. CzanAow) 
FOB 

131.4-31 £ 

139CK59-2 

Dec TJfi.0-43,0 

March 155.6-553 

159-6-31 .0 

1 S 3 . 4 - 65 .2 



LOMXm MEAT FUTURES 
EXCHANGE 
PtgContract 
p- per Wo 


.. 14 . 

-i • . . ■. 

- ‘- eo 

.*+' ; 709 

• .. 700 

• -1 59 • 

+1 . . . 40 

00 

. . as - . 

+1» ■»", 

+1 8*.. 

• -a 35. 

8.-7 ' 17 Jf. ■ 

129 b 

-S 22-9 . 

• r ; 

. - . 18 J ■ 

• . 04'. 'I 

' -1 - . . 

*-i 10C. I 


LONDON 

POTATO FUTURES 

£ per tonm '■< 





GASOSL • 


*ug 

38 . 50 -S 8.00 

Sept 

IOtSWH .00 

Dct 

1 ffl. 5 MS. 2 S 

NOV 

105 . 50 - 05^5 


reprasmtadve nwrketj on 
July 22 

OB: Catfla. flfiSSp par kg lw 
GB: Shaep 16 T. 64 p par kg ast 
cw(- 8 .B 1 ) 

England «id Wriest 

Cento no6. up 1.4%, am 


-SeefefKfc 

Cams nos, up 3 S am 


TOOJ 100.0 
1003 100 S 


Opsn • doss 
12003 moo 
. 130-00 138-50 
mm 21050 
207.30 22250 - 
7 BJJ 0 8370 
Vob 2059 


: ; • ' BIFF EX," , 

Freight Fwure* Ltd j 

report *10 par Index pa** 

: . ; -frright brto 

Hlgb/Low Close - j 
M86 S64JFS6U 56« ’ 
OK* 641.0-637JJ 641.0 

£»|7 674JF674S 6755 

Apr67 732.0 • • - 

mst essjimdt ; 

0087 ' : .. 780S ' 

*n-« * . 7B5J) 

Apr88 — - v - .. 8500 I 

Vbt:35tota •” 

Open (nterasn'2232 ' 


. TAHKER REPORT -■ 

. Kgh/LtMit.. Ctoss 
J(486« . 880.0-9800 *' 390 J] «£ 
Auam 101 1-1005 1005.0 » 


i£cou«ri 







































THE TIMES WEDNESDAY JULY 23 1986 


BUSINESS AND FINANCE 


25 







ACCOUNT DAYS: Dealings 


Equities fade 1 — “ 

3an on July 14 . Dealings end on Friday . §Comango day next Monday . Settlement day August 4 . 
'Forward bargains are permitted on two previous business davs . 



— — 


© Tow. Nc*spipetv United 

DAILY DIVIDEND 

£ 8,000 

Claims required for 
+16 points 

Claimants should ring 0254-53272 


i>-uf 



IX 

IB? RoeaciMd u> wo 

ia 

380 

14 

2M Hoyt Bm. o ECOI 

5 . Scnrooets 

69< 

616 

fi* Band Chart 

6(3 (Won 

WS Fargo 

683 

71' 

C69 

320 

22Q MWnua 

as 


71 SB 01 
1*3 4 4 95 

IB? 3.1 120 
*2 good e« »3 
■S S3* 7.7 6U 

-ID 7.7 2.7 139 


B gECGBlSESMFlgg s ^^ J _ 

I IE HE 



BREWERIES 


•Md-lyons 125 0 *. 

sw no ■•*; 

Biowibo 58 a-i 

Boodnobm 125 

*»• lUaonawl Sib • . 
Burner <H pi 154 *■ 

tamoa Brew 550 • . 

Ovk iWntnaw] SoS .a 
Sw«*U«l #50 • . 

GwH When IBS +■ 
Greene Kno 20b -4 

Coreness 105 • ♦! 

Harare & Hansons S 14 • . 

MflNaiTO Db 8 75 
■rnwriwi Dee 153 *1 

M" D«l M3 • 

«mw Thompson >07 
WPM -3 

6A Broken** 153 *! 

San A New 191 
vsw 375 

wwraaa - A" 2GA m*l 

Oo B 265 0-8 

WMbreed in» 221 p+3 

woMiaiiuiii A D Ml 
Voting 'A 2 70 -5 


>00 59 lie 
164 44 145 

ii i 49 133 
11.1 43 iu 

106 4 8 264 

13 J 23 192 
10 4 39 192 


ifl EtT^TTTTTf— I'pr.TTff ra.*Ui I 



RaicHfB (Cl 


Suad & Simplon -a' 


Arnold 


Croda 


Ccmrel <£ Sheer I Industrials 4-0 


Hcpawtt Ceramic 



Please be sore to take account 
of any minus signs 


Weekly Dividend 


Please make a noic or your daily totals 
for the weekly dividend of £ 8.000 in 
Sararday's newspaper. 



BRITISH FUNDS 


SH 

)R1 

58' 

94 

rfJT 


im 


100 

«#•- 

97 

92 

101' 

or- 

99 

3T 

101 • 

sv 

97- 

90 

IM 

»7‘. 

99 

92-- 

104 

98- 

10?' 

04- 

9* 

8b'. 

102 

03 

*or 

S3' 

105' 

9b- 

1W 

93' 

»»■ 

94 

96' 

76 . 

86' 

S3 1 

11)/' 

9* 

93 

84' 

108- 

9*'~ 

m 

9? . 

92 

I». 

114- 

103' 

H3' 

100 

m 

Z9- 

100 

W 

t(K> 

asr-- 



sao 379 
m> ibb 
112 75 
19 II' 
<52 64 

738 568 
318 2»3 
943 IB3 

57 37 
' BBS 149 

M2 203 
342 250 

ass 140 
79 62 

190 147 

52 29’ 
365 J62 

50 37 

212 162 
44b 370 

as 46 

62 42 

337 237 
390 255 
253 158 
166 JOB 

53 25 

226 156 
1 GO no 
114 66 

163 55 

358 233 

243 175 
290 95 

323 233 
219 124 
423 270 
433 220 
82 51' 

250 IIS 

58 33 
65 49 

313 241* 
108 Si 
49 18 

580 383 
32 18 

184'- 126 
17’. 13- 
260 150 
190 120 
248 182 
24 -- lb ' 
158 116 
45 22 

234 160 
486 158 
B15 445 
152 74 

54 31*. 

168 96 

216 142 
134 79 

18'- «•- 
253 170 

125 44 

529 374 
260 170 
360 225 
318 206 
273 IBB 
295 155 
190 119 
SOS 320 
£3 725 
(06 54 

IBS 75 
785 230 


Bowmmm 520 

& Telecom 189 

&*wm Bom ten IDi 
Bugm 1AF1 A 13’. 

Cm A Wei TOSS 655 

Camcndga Elec 213 

Cap Go 200 

Creonoe 48 

Oo 7 *. cpt 204 

Comoro 315 

Oar Ewa 333 

OratJWe 222 

One Elea 62 

Duteiem 177 

Demiw A 35 

Owner® 232 

Oauoaig 8 MW 37 

EU*er 172 

Etmroccvrtnnms 361 
Eiearonc Mac* 65 

Electronic ReilB 50 

Em* Uphrtin 299 

Euomemi 290 

f amen Elea 160 

Ferrarii 114 

Po-aifl Teen 42 

GEC 189 

Gi«v«ir 125 

Ft^Hana Elea 96 

•4 Sfl«al A Control 233 
Jon** 5KOUO 240 

Kode 260 

Lee fleMgereuo n 250 

Looca 219 

MK Elea 366 

Uemec 22-0 

Mao BS 56 

Mao Foaa 115 

Monona Eiea no 

Murrey Bra 49 

Neunrert. iLouol 303 

NEi 95’/ 

Oceomca ia 

Ovtom TOouianeres 543 
Precom 29 

PfWa Fn S‘.*u Ci26 

Pn*l» Lanas N/v n3'- 
Prtco 240 

DO 'A Ltd VOWS 
Piewev 216 

Do ADR 25 £21. 

Alan 133 

Quasi Automaton 26 

rtacal Elea 172 _ 

nouflei 479 ' 

Somes IGH) 595 

Swmock 149 

Sound Odfuwon 36 

STC 158 

Siam M 156 

Sgswm Oesqnar* 78 

Taepiiom RanoPs 206 

Teremt*™ 44 

Thom EMI 447 

Thome (FW) 250 

tunsan 300 

UEI 308 

UnnecA 190 


than EMI 447 

Thoipe (FW) 250 

tunsan 300 

U£l 308 

Umwcn i90 

tM Leasing 166 

Inn Somunc iS8 

vg nstmoiams 494 

Vol84 260 

Western Sefecton 79 

VWWwprm Etna 85 

rnmeuie Foreg 260 


1Q0 1 9 175 

107 57113 
43 43 95 
01 072H 

S 6 08 64 
fi 21 179 
106 50 128 


-5 1 1 07 157 

46 1 4 37 8 

• .. 65 29 134 

-1 64 103 205 

r -6 10 QG 

*3 13 4 3 78 

• . 28 08 22a 

-1 21 57 n8 

• 41 24126 

• . 89 23 IBS. 

-6 ID 15B9Q 

• -2 46 92 139 

-2 99B 31 181 

«S 68 2 4 151 

-3 3 1 19 158 

24 21 174 

-2 07 17 171 

-2 61 32 119 

821 68 104 
-1 26 42H0 

• . 17 31 76 

S -3 10 0 4 

■3 121 50 93 

8-5 1710 61 585 

173 72 97 

-20 14# 0 8 237 

B + l 154 42 133 
-5 43 20 170 

-7 Q7 13 88 
-10 

4 0e >00 XI 
0 In 02 

. 193 63 14Q 

7 5 79137 

-2 1 1 6 1 38 

26 05237 

-2 15 5 7 139 

• I STS 46 .. 

-20 U 31131 

75 47 97 
72 33 160 

3.1 23 194 

42 . . 124 

»-4 43 25 161 

7 le 15252 
*7 314 53 134 

-4 17 15 276 

-’r 06 17 70 

*2 . 14 7 

95 41 99 

Q5 05 193 

>2' 100 4 8 164 

-4 25 5.7 25 

■ 25 0 5 6 169 

61 24 124 

l-S 25 0 8 20 7 
-4 79 26212 

85 45 102 

57 34 59 

i-2 51 51 13Q 

-3 3 8 0 7 30? 

. 129 50 97 

43 5.4 IB 5 

22 26130 

93 33 133 


FINANCE AND LAND 


MMMffl 277 .1 

Aefccn Him 138 -1 

Amafagaau &so 

Berkley Teen 200 -1 

Cameo* rig 

Cenoowr 2S* 

Cemreuay 32 

Ecyary A Gen 27'. -2 

Ivory A Sana IX «-3 

M 4 ed » 18 ? 

Na Home Loins 62 
DoP> ESI -3 

Newmarket <45 


-1 19 08 

■ i 100 72 58 
2750 a? 84 


171 09 763 

5.7 2 2 401 

17 82 25 7 
58 49 199 
990 49251 


RmncW Tima appovon Page 24 


313 248 
221 158 
277 2ia 
43' 29 
153 102 
28 17 

104 «,? 

78 18 

XI 262 
28 19 

164 (34 
(77- 130' 
140 K 2 
342 (58 
214 174 
415 315 
55 22 

42 26 

(43 106 
75 60 

628 408 
67 X 
124 94 

69 31 

(29 lOO 

41’ 27 
199 157 
67 51 

131 84 
385 256 
310 360 
118 60 
157 100 
150 111 
11 756 

344 194 
505 376 
182 107 
312 206 
10 6 
93 59' 

232 <34 
162 126 
265 190 
280 230 

41 25 

49 21 

191 141 
190 145 
116 96 

134- H6' 

191- 133 
2?5 175 
523 4)1 
(50 92 

190 61 
221 140 
TOi 96 

98 65 

M2 722 
81 G2 
106 68 
295 148 
120 51 
310 234 
1(5 68 

265 207'. 

191 119 
315 211 
295 260 
123' 96' 
615 473 
2i6 133 

44' 22'. 
330 235 
140 66 

132 67 
29 21 
X 25 

325 198 
IX 106 
298 230 
.215 (23 


CUvten S-jn 
Uun 1 A 1 
Coroien Gp 
Camnned Tech 
Concern 
Com SiMonery 
Coo*, m-nj 

CM. son 

Lnnson |Fj 

COWI 

Crkirmev Pno* 
Con on p* s-M 
Crew McnoMon 
CrTWm House 
Cummins 3 
DSC 
DPCE 
Q * g «» 

Dana 

Danes & Mnf A 
Danes S unenei 
Do»y 

De La Due 
Orta 

Denterej Sionpay] 
Dwsouner 
Dvub Heel 
OWM 
Do mm Pam 

Don. 

Domnon m 

D~r. 

Dyson LIAJ1 
Do A 


Eeswm Pico 265 

Earn 195 

EIS 225 

EtM< 4) 

Eieco (X 

EMctmtuk 1AE1 0 £26 - 

f Aon IB) 96 

Ernnai £24 - 

Engton Cmna day 315 
Ermscn iLMi B £21'- 
Eiskme House 140 

European Femes 140 

Dolr* Prt ;X 

Ernes 718 

Erpamet im 176 

EiW 366 

Focnn 45 

Feed?* Atpic too X 

Fenner UHi (27 

Fm i maria GO 

(•sons 606 

FifrMrton 63 

Fir-teecj C&w 104 

Focei Si 

Fogaiv >05 

Fnfcn. Cr:u0 X 

Fonwr^i A rr.ir.ry (85 
FiemJi |(MmKi 56 

GEI m 104 

CHN 334 

(JP 305 

Ganon Eng HU 

Gesn-mci 130 

Ge-ws IX 

GUie 955 

dyr.wa 308 

Gocng hjfr 370 

Grampun nags iaS 

Grjnau 274 

Gfovema 8 

Hjtn* PlOOSJCn 84' 

He" Eng 194 

FUli |U| 143 

Hjllffn 183 

Hawy 270 

Hjmovifi too X 

llarumna 22 

Hjnbon 169 

Do 8*. Cnv £169 

Do 5 *« Pi 110 

Do >0*- El IB' 

FMgreavps 177 

Hons (Prtt.pl 365 

Hovaer SJ0e*ey 521 

HdwMv HO 

Hay iMormani 160 

HetMonn Cereimc 2G6 

HKSJar 168 

He-* Ml 85 

remote A Jon IT. 1 

HOOrS Bros 69 

Hon Uoyd 95 

hopk arsons 356 

HowiMrt 99 

Assoc 290 

Hunting Group (03 

Kuictisn IMumpoa 250 


100 7 1 94 
• . 15 4 33 711 

-1 Ti 38 145 

-2 56 S> 134 

> . 13 23 145 

1 . 64 3J 14 T 

-2 II 1 2 4 12 4 

21 23 410 

46 44 161 

IZ9 31.1X1 
-» 36 55 IT E 

-I 68 4 3 12 8 

-2 113 5 5 II S 

-18 37b £7 .. 

-i «7e 19 
-5 23 09 371 

179 67 102 

32 53 .. 

ft ia} e« 72 
• I 69 57 96 
I 47 1 46 127 

93 47 97 

-A 114 44 130 

104 <| IDG 

06 34 197 

-3 7 5 35 133 

i . 74 82 IIS 

TI 67117 
1+4 79 6 B 130 

-12 

57 85214 

5 7 78182 


143 54 67 
107 55 128 

96 42 125 

25 57 164 
65D 4.7 130 

43 45234 

IX 56 
16 I 5 l 12 b 
90 04 

06b 04 134 
68 49 103 
7 1 55 

50 23 US 
3 .60 5 5 150 
143 39 166 

07 16 

21 64 85 

71 56 200 

SO 83 174 
7 9 1 3 27 0 

10 16 

56 54 78 

06 12 6i 

61 50 07 

20 56 62 

125 68 138 

41 73 

84 9 1 132 

171 Si 112 
IOO 33 64 
50 4 6 78 

21 15117 

47 36 U8 
157 16 256 

120 39 )54 
150 41 14 2 
5 7 39 14 6 

109 40 124 

05 63 43 

26 3 1 178 

120 62 92 

64 4 5 108 

143 78 163 

24 0 9 29 8 
19 46 95 

5 70 34 >50 
BOO 4 7 
87 74 

0 85 . 

79 4 5 11 7 

132 50 127 

20 7 4 0115 

27 25 88 

5 4 3 4 289 

103 50 172 

6 lb 39 184 

35 46 75 

. B 366 

. . 663 

57 60 134 

107 42 101 

55 56 80 
114 39 90 

86 83 78 


Trannooo 

Tnetu* 

Triple. 

turner 4 Newel 
UKO 

Urvgmua 

Uwwer 

On lev e r |NV| 
VOOr 

Vcfc£TS 

Vsm Products 
Venen 

Volkswagen 

WSl 

wm Poner.cs 
Wagon ma 
HttVr terra GOSS 
Woshom 
Weognood 

War 

Welcome 

Vleumai 

Wniund 

Wests 

Whatman Reeve 
Wnessoc 
WnnecrW 
wanes iJamesi 

Wiiums Hide; 
VWis Go 
VWvsevrr 
wera .uyui 
wood iSwi" 
Woocmjjse A Rn 
Wynwam Eng 

Young |H| 


. 287 

Of 01613 
» . . 39 2 0 153 

-3 ID 7b 53 7 6 
•5 71 30 113 

1.6 15233 

553 33 157 


1ZI 
-4 IS 
SI 

-3 143 


+3 43 

73 
35 

-4 75 

* 120 
96 

-5 >71 

+2 86 
F-S MOD 
38 
140 

-4 36 

-3 28b 

47 


doom k Res 
Goa* pm 
G t Uhm Re, 
•C Gw 
ICC O* 

Vwo 

hCA DnUrno 
LASMO 
Do Lints 
New London 04 
Pwrocon 
Premier 
Rovai Dutch 
Snea 
SWdMna 
SEwflsavgn 
7R Eiwy 
Tncemroi 

Troon Europe 
LFiruma 


237 

37 .1 14 4 4 (2.1 

56 >1 28 50 

*05 P-3 739 s.s 105 

. . I . 

33 -1 

11 -I lj 911 37 

TOO 174 174 14 

I HO -IQ 142 793 .. 
£2 

100 88 88 128 

Al '58 

£52 276 43 . . 

793 .2 50 0 S3 7B 

>77 -4 86 53 25 6 

» ..16 

(2 ... 119 

SO 71 143 22 

M . . it 7 

161 150 93 50 


OVERSEAS TRADERS 


INSURANCE 


Barth*** 51 

Ck*gbi IX 

FMay (Jamasi Bi 

Hamson Cnahckl 355 
meneape 358 

JecM iWm] X' 

Lemmo 7 aj 

Ocean VW500 66 

PBMreort 2oen 2io 

DO A -10 

Poty Pw* 143 

Sana Darby 41 

EMM Bras 565 

Tom» Kemsiey 155 

yueCMD in 


-2 0 7 14 142 

10 0 72 123 

• + i 59 73 . 

+2 78 6 B.l 179 

•3 259 72X4 

-' 16 4 B 125 

‘2 171 7 0 l£0 

• -1 54 92 7 B 

86 41 69 

BE 41 89 

75 52 2.7 

-2 

225 4 1 12 3 
+9 . 558 

too SI 92 


Abbey Lrtr 
AMr 6 Alar 
Am Cut 
Brawn** 
0r48n-BC 
Com Uno" 
Eourty A L4W 
FAi 

Gen Acodeni 
ORE 

tream C E 

Hogg Ftosmson 

Legal 6 Geo 

London A Man 

Lon DM Im 

Marsh A Moan 

Mnfl 

PWS 

P*a*i 

PnxtentisJ 

Refuge 

ftavJi 

beagwek Go 
Stewair v.r son 
Sturge Hugs 
Sun Aaunea 
Sun uie 
Traoe mjemiuty 
was Faber 


95 

in 

890 

.10 88 

-3 4?6 

-1 189 

-5 96 

-15 

314 

-? 41 7 

-2 348 

*3 137 

11 7 
*5 68 

-3 2460 

F . 220 

♦8 11 4 

> 125 


-b 15 7 
*28 15 7 
*5 10 On 

-8 250 

-3 33 9 

-5 46 

*5 125 


PAPER. PRINTING, ADVERT’G 


Investment Trust* appear c 


LEISURE 


Bam twi 1 144 

Eocwy A Ht«MS >58 
Hrern Maker IK 

Cancan 48 

Cnr*sai4 184 

Fast Larturfl XI 

OT« 54 

Herreurgar Bmou 65 
Horcon Travel 115 

im Leoure 137 

j«8anab htugs 41 

Lee m iS3 

AtoOnnsier IX 

PwastFana 318 

Rerfy UsMi4 376 

Riley iMut « 


10D 65 113 

.. 237 
75 48 125 

14 30 123 
ftO 43 119 
93 24 195 
.. ..45.4 

.. 425 

83 58 55 

Tl 56 11.7 
43 10516.0 

75 53 100 
10-7 34 13.1 

161 43155 
.. 243 

8 6 4.1 137 

34 14 14 0 

5.7e S3 125 
61 35 147 



PROPERTY 


CHEMICALS. PLASTICS 


0 * 

I9» 99- 

9 B 9 99 *. 

990 «#'■ 

990 IM'. 
990 BP- 
96790 97- 

990 I0T 1 - 



48 36* 

20) 1W 
415 281 
247 IDO 
IX 106 
111 76’. 

132 102 
160 1 12 

100 57'. 

136 8? 
306 245 
166 IX 
iso H2 
20 rs 

163 127 
■31 100 
245 172 

133 111 
299 215 
168 113 


AKZO N/v Bearer 
MM CtfUMB 
Arnarsnam 
Anchor Chemcal 
BTP 

Bayer DM50 
Blagden 
Brent Cham 
» Boofoi 
Canmng (W| 
CoaMv. 

Coates ftps 
Do a- 

Cay (tomcat 
Croda 
DO OH 

EM A Ererent 
Evooa 

Fosaco-Mntap 

HPUMfUTOS) 
FhcWon . 
Hoechsi DU50 
Bug Cnem Md 
Lagona 
104)11 
Fiysu - 

Roawooh FHdgs 
Ramow 
SWA BPO 
Sutci.Ho SpeakfMn 


E43V 
199 • 

403 M-Z 
237 

142 • .. 

E83*. +': 

1Z4 

745 -3 

75 -1 

113 

330 • 

IM 

1S1 -a 
18 

153 +2 

123 • .. 

20 B 


400 9 2 . 
38 16 205 
100 28 154 

6.1 28 135 

64 45 188 

7D0 84 . 

103 83187 
80 4 1(67 

.. .188 

5.1 4 5 19 0 

107 36 113 

68 40 104 
68 4* 95 
02 55 54 
10O - 68 155 
. .. 12.7 

93 45 14 « 
47 33 1 34 
(29 58 95 
8.4 4.0 125 

214 55 106 

471 43 II j 

11 9 33 145 

54 52 145 

35 1.7 192 

36 48 91 
38 24 183 


Vorurere cnem 


. .. 700 

11.1 50 24 7 

43 34 11.6 


CINEMAS AND TV 


270 >76 Altgta TV A' 
52 27 &wwwi 

240 176 MTV N/V 
368 283 LWT Hugs 
350’ 198 Scot TV A 
280 153 TVS N/V 
46 31 TW 


253 • IM 

48 25 

220 11 « 

350 -3 213 


25 SO 65 

11 4 52 (OO 

-3 215 61 14 D 

. . 150 43 105 


125 53 115 
25 59 124 


DRAPERY AND STORES 


IDO’-OH . 

9.7 

91 



96 

91 


96 +•- 

94 

9i 



KJ9 

91 



97 

95 



104 

Si 



96 

»: 



96 

95 


i29'-6H--- 

108 

95 



10.1 

97 



96 

BE 


56-. 

62 

8< 


90 . 

BS 

95 







95 

95 



8.7 

93 


123 

10.1 

96 



91 

93 



95 

as 



100 

■ 96 



382 

97 



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10 2 

8* 

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91 

9.1 


65'- -*'• 

64 

92 


■36 0* - 

BO 



126 ■* - 

95 


1 

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93 




92 




TO 




93 




92 



27 

S3 


U 


21 

42 

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2 1 


2 


24 




30 

38 



20 

37 



26 

36 

32 


31 


2 


30 

35 

K 


30 



96' • .. 

3.0 


ZS 

9* 

31 


X 



BANKS DISCOUNT HP 


253 .-3 

75 - -1 

197 -1 

£9 

222 s-2 

CB 

340 

414 

502 -a 
41 

503 • .. 

318 • 

55. 

06 -v 

£36 •- 

70 

£87- -I; 

£231 . *(' 
185 •-3 

317 -Z 

84 -1 

236 

Xi -Z 

57’ el 

470 • • 

138 

705 -5 

39* -5 

653 

123 -5 

539 -5. 

215 -3 

502 -2 

niz 

336 . . • 

60 +2 


165 6 7 
200 46 
266 53 

138 27 

28.9 *1 
28 4 7 

IX 53 
206 57 

24 4 9 
80 Ol 
200 82 
65 3 8 

22i 70 

25 38 
103n 44 
185 54 

17.7 38 

SI !4«03 

265b 63 6* 


364 68208 

273 M 
soo 54 as 
158 46 118 
18 20 137 



433 329 Grand Mel 366 -6 135 

286 208 KewWyBrtWre* H3 . Z] 
391 312 Lfld&rofce 339 -1 121 

545 447 Lon Path Hows 5 22 -4 14 3 

100 76'. Mourn CbertoM ■» .• 30 

105 67 Pnnai Of W HaMS 88 ... 2.1 

79 59v Ouaens More 70'.- 23 

405 370 Savoy HOW* ’A 370 -3 50 

■1 SC Slabs _ M -1 lg 

209 145 Trusjnousa Form 151 79 


260 178 AAH 
239 194 AGO 1 
127 95 MU 

671 Ml APV 
110 80 
2SB 172 
3*3 207 
27S IX 
403 170 
47 32 

32 23 
440 355 

91 48 

530 255 
83 37'. 

373 263 
89 43 

209 IX 
*55 383 

85 67 

386 277*. 

332 237 
202 148 
26'. 16 
433 200 
310 210 

210 IX 
174 112 
*95 160 

57 40 

305 180 

33 21 
241 IX 

89 *7 
630 151 
4*3 318 


ELECTRICALS 


399 190 AB Pea MO 

191 120 ABKamone ipo 

(I* X ArtWf d, _ 7 li 

9 9 SO Apnea Computtrs 56 

92 83 Artan ® 

300 J05 At*** Cm ZTO 

58 '46 Aabfl F««y » 

220 140 Au»S«i iS 

3« W BK 

138 6* BSB , . « 


114 32 269 
21 13 170 
DJ M432 
05b 0* 4* 
361 

3.6 13 86 

169 

21 1 . 1-185 

15.7 68 155 
28 32 50 


232 

-3 

10.1 

44 

107 

-4 

66 

46 

ns 


62 

71 

801 

■4 

166 

20 

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60 

60 

22S 


112 

50 

§2 

0*5 

35 

121 

26 

46 

IX 

0 .. 

66 

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42 


05 

14 

25 

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12 

425 

-8 

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60 

48 

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320 

-20 

114 

36 

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1* 

22 

3*6 

-2 

68 

25 

61 


2* 

4B 

224 


29 

13 

423 

-17 

229 

54 

75 


26 

35 

308 

+1 

141 

46 

298 


63 

26 

ISO 

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109 

61 

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365 

-13 

165 

51 

279 

• -3 

107 

39 

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83 

4* 

ISO 

-3 

2* 

16 

2*8 

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51 


35 

7.1 

275 


25.7o 93 

23 

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iflb 63 

158 

-3 

>0.7 

54 

81 


39 

52 

220 

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60 

27 

409 

• .. 

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42 

37 

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237 

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101 


75 

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130 


91 

47 

534 


86 

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993 

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66 

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98 

35 

191 


3* 

161 

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5J> 

42 

131 

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6 ■ 

47 

170 

• ■ 

89 

52 

1*7 


64 

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34 

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14b 34 

360 

• -4 

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06: 

290 


66 

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375 

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171 

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3iO 

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£17’. 




105 




323 


176 

56 ' 

50 


32 

36 

43’. 

*r. 

2.1 

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43 


05 

12; 

163 

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7.1 

44 

202 

-6 

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■ 125 


14 

1 1 1 

270 

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11.1 

41 ' 

112 


43 

30 

310 


100 

32 

354 

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126 

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THE TIMES WEDNESDAY JULY 23 1986 


A SPECIAL REPORT ON 
ITALIAN BANKING 


FOCUS 


Prosperity 


despite 


profligacy 


The inclusion of Bettino Craxi at 
Madame Tussauds was welcomed 
in the Italian press. Here, at last, 
after Sophia Loren, was an Italian 
who. thanks to three years as 
Prime Minister, appeared to have 
made a firm and lasting impres- 
sion abroad. 

. Alas, like the wax in the effigy, 
the impression quickly melted- No 
sooner was the statue ready than 
the Craxi coalition fell. 

The event was a rem inder of the 
feeling of insecurity that, in the 
Italian financial world, too, is 
never far below the surface. 

The Bank of Italy ran into this 
last winter, when all seemed set 
fair for the economy, thanks to 
falls in the price of oil. the value of 
the dollar, inflation and domestic 
interest rates. Bul as the governor. 
Signor Carlo Azeglio Ciampi. told 


the figures so far indicate that the 
target will be exceeded. 

The economy is prospering 
HpsniTe eovernmenl profligacy 


the bank's annual meeting: I “Bust 
iness sentiment changed abruptly 
in the last week of November. A 
foreign exchange crisis broke out. 
which lasted for 30 trading days 
from then until the middle of 
January and proved to be one of 
the most serious of recent years." 

Its cost was SS.3 billion out of 
foreign -exchange reserves, a tem- 


despiie government profligacy 
and the persistence of above- 
average interest rates. The Trea- 
sury expects the increase in gross 
domestic product. 2.3 per cent in 
1 985. to go up to 3.5 per cent this 
year, although other authorities 
are less optimistic. 

Inflation, which came down to 
single figures in 1985 for the first 
time in 13 years, is projected by 
the Treasury to reach five per cent 
this vear and four per cent next. 
The fall in oil prices has brought a 
windfall to the economy, pul at 
15.000 to 20.000 billion lire, that 
will be reflected in the balance of 
payments. 

The financial sector is also on 
the move, but a note of uncertain- 



ty has been injected by the rapid 
spread of financial services, 
known in Italian as parabanking. 

A research study presented to a 
symposium in Venice on para- 
banking organized by Banca 
Nazionale del Lavoro. the 
country's biggest bank, found that 
Italy was late in entering the field, 
but is now making up lost ground 
In factoring, turnover in 1985 was 
greater than in any other Europe- 
an country, including Britain, and 
second only to the US. In leasing, 
Italy was third in Europe in 1984, 
behind Britain and France but 
ahead of West Gennany. 


Risks of too rapid 
technical progress 


porary rise in interest rates, a 
ceiling on bank lending and other 
restrictions. 


The financial district of Milan, still the economic powerhouse of Italy 


The Venice meeting was told that 
the leading leasing houses have 
themselves drawn up a selfc 
regulator code for their sector. 

Traditional banks, which have 
prospered in the successive ages of 


gold money and paper money, are 
raring a challenge in the transition 
to what Signor Guido Carii, a 
former governor of the Bank of 
Italy. ’ describes as “immaterial 
money". 

They find that as deposits from 
the public grow more slowly, they 
are criticized, not only for high 
lending rates, but for failing to 
modernize their mentality. As a 
speaker at Venice said, while 
private firms have invested in 
innovation, banks continue to 
invest in palazzi or property. 

Many bigger banks deny being 
hide-bound, pointing to associa- 
tions and subsidiaries that they 
have formed in parabanking ser- 
vices. Banking efficiency should 
be stimulated by part-privatiza- 
tion moves under way in the large, 
publicly owned sector. Banca 
Nazionale del Lavoro. for exam- 
ple. is to offer 49 per cent of its 
capital on the market to private 
investors. 

However, the authorities are 
disturbed to see indications of 
industrialists and firms buying 


The governor's speech to the 
annual meeting was interspersed 
with references to the risks inher- 
ent in increasing competition 
among banks, in rapid technical 
innovation and — the most imme- 
diate problem of all - in the 
government’s inability to master 
public spending. 

The public sector borrowing re- 
quirement was 16.1 per cent of 
gross domestic product in 1985, 
against a target of 14.4 per cent. 
Though the Treasury aims at a 
ceiling of 100.000 billion lire 


(about £43.8 billion) on the public 
deficit this year - below last year's 


deficit this year — below last year's 
objective of 1 10.000 billion lire - 


The personal savings rate, the 
highest in Europe, has found an 
outlet in mushrooming unit trusts 
and consequent spectacular rises 
on the stock exchange. Opinions 
are heard that more attention is 
likely to be paid in future to 
investment trusts (closed-ended 
funds). Anglo-Saxon-style pension 
funds, and mortgage finance for 
housing. 

Increased competition in the 
insurance market should result 
from government authorization in 
July to Lloyd's of London to 
operate openly. 

Legal structures have not kept 
pace with the financial revolution. 
Bills have yet to be approved by 
parliament on factoring, venture 
capital and merchant banking. 


control over banks. It has been 
policy to try to keep banking and 
industry apart since dose links 
between the two threatened the 
collapse of several leading banks 
in the early 1930s. in the wake of 
the world depression. 

Italian capitalists are on a 


Entrepreneurs with 
holdings abroad 


buying spree as never before. 
Recent examples abroad have 
been Flat's entry (alongside Unit- 
ed Technologies) into Westland, 
takeovers by Signor Carlo de 
Benedetti of the French car- 
components maker Valeo and of 
Triumph-Adler in West Gennany, 
Montedison's purchase of control 
over the Swedish pharmaceuticals 
company Fermenta and the 
moves by Ferruzzi to win control 
ofBerisford. 


Altogether. Italian entrepre- 
neurs are estimated to have con- 
trolling or substantial holdings in 
680 firms abroad, with 232.000 
employees and turnover of 33,000 
billion lire (£14.5 billion). 

It would be incorrect to describe 
the risks facing the banking system 


On the other hand, many new 
financial services are outside the 
net of supervision or regulation, 
including some taking money 
subscribed to the public. Many 
financial organizations are linked 
to leading banks of known reputa- 
tions but others are managed by 
individuals who may be unscru- 
pulous or simply inexperienced. 

There have been cases of prop- 
erty funds collapsing without re- 
imbursement for subscribers. It is 
in the area of unregulated finan- 
cial services that the risk mav lie 


AN ITALIAN BANK IN THE WORLD 


. % 














■ ■ • ■ 


v '-'3 


July 23, 1986 


4** * 
rTclO 




t ^ 




the British 


are persevering 


_ ., -= ' v —* «?x>; 

f- a***? 


from Lloyds, Midland, Standard 


FOREIGN BANKS; 


; t*K. 


A large notice above piastre sheet- 
ing shrouding a five-floor bnlojog 
wider renovation in Milan s Via 
Moscova proclaims this to be the 
new headquarters for the Barclays 

group in Italy. a 
■ This is one way of giving the lie 
to any suggestion that, after a 
shock loss last year of 52 billion 
lire (£22.6 million), the^most 
intimately involved of British 
banks in Italy is considering 
wilting oat Besides having bank- 
ing branches in Milan, Rome and 
Bologna, Barclays has subsidiar- 
ies offering a range of merchant 
banking and financial services 
which, it says, occupy 13 locations 
id Milan alone. 

The intention is to concentrate 
most of these in the new building, 
rented on a long lease. It hopes to 
be back in profit in two years. 


as unprecedented, for well in 
advance of the Sindona and Calvt 
crashes — which would no longer 
be possible under recent legisla- 
tion — there were major banking 
failures in the 1 890s and after the 
Firet'World War. 

The shock waves of the world 
depression led to the Banking Act 
of 1936, still at the basis of the 
system. The central bank has been 
given wide powers of supervision 
and controL These include autho- 
rization for the establishment of 
new banks and for the opening of 
new branches. For new branches 
of existing banks. Signor Ciampi 
promises a policy of increasing 
liberalization. 


John Earle 


Meanwhile, Barclays is .under- 
taking a drastic reorg aniz a ti on, 
dropping smaller clients in favour 
of what it calls “the high end of the 
market", both in individuals and 
companies. It is also cutting staff. 
In May it abruptly announced the 
dismissal of 165, or nearly half 
those working at its Milan bank- 
ing branch, the first mass sacking 
in Italian banking. 

In the face of strong onion 
opposition, however, it withdrew 
the notices and has since bean 
quietly slimming, in agreement 
with the unions, by placing em- 
ployees with other banks and 
offering inducements such as early 
retirement inducements. 

Barclays provides the most 
striking example of the difficulties 
that, to a greater or lesser degree, 
have affected many of the -more 
than 30 foreign banks in Italy. 

Lacking a retail base, most have 
drawn their funds from the inter- 
bank market, and were able to 
enjoy a spread of around four 
points in the 1970s, when all 
banks were subjected to strict 
lending effing * in relation to their 
deposits. But that margin disap- 
peared when the ceiling' was 
abolished and competition hotted 
up. Losses have not been uncom- 
mon in recent years. 

However, many foreign com- 
mercial banks, including the big 
names in London, think that Italy 
is too important a market to be 
'neglected. 

Besides Barclays, manages 


stressed their faith m the fefroej® 
the economy and b * the resultant 
opportunities for theft services. ^ 

Standard Charted ' "tod* 
Opened its Milan branch m 1973, 
reported wtat it. descr ibes .; 
reasonable profits for the first 10 
years, then ran into losses between 
1983 and 1985= It took correctite 
action, dosing a second branebiin 
Fadna and setting up a finance 
subsidiary in Milan concentrattag 
on the domestic capital market 

For the Hongkong Baid u whos e 
.Milan branch, opened in petober 
1982, foreign trade financing is a 
major activity, particularly to Oe 
Far East, but also to the Miarne 
East (the British Bank Of the 
Middle East is a subsidiary) and 
Europe. It sees itself well-placed to 
benefit. from the expansion on the 
horizon in business with China. 

Midland arrived last wi 
Milan branch opened wriy ft 
January, after severed years' of 
hesitation over taking the plunge. 
It stands out in Staving an Italian 
manages', who was formerly Mr the 
foreign side of Banca Commertiftle 
Italians, the second biggest do- 
mestic bank. . 

One of the few to; cater for tj he 
small private account holder . is 
Creditwest, a joint Venture' be- 
tween Creditoltaliano(50.l4:per 
cent) and National Westminster 
(31 per cent), with the rest spread 


■ •••*•'* . . $ 


- C'X’tS 
. ... 








J'** 


Wdl-j>laced for 
the China factor - ; 


. -vr. ; i 


among 5,000 shareholders. In 
1972 Credit® Itaiiano, one of the 
big state-owned banks, bought 
nearly 82 per cent, of a small 
private Milanese bulk and looked 
tor a junior partner. NatWest Says . 
it took this opportunity to . enter 
■Italy, at a time when it was hot so 
easy as now to obtain Bank of Italy 
authorization to set np on. one’s 


5i»: 


• cr’sru 
A I 


own. ■ . 

Creditwest is a normal Italian 
commercial bank, with five 
branches In Milan and one in 
Rome (permission has recently 
been granted by the Bank of Italy 
for- a : second Rome branch). 
NatWest says Creditwest has 
consistently made a profit and has 
been one of its most soccesfhl joint 
ventures anywhere. . 




K 


Reliance 


> - 

k >-c 


■ 'fy 

V. $ 





For us operational and productive size structure, 
Cassa di Risparmi e Depositi di Prato is the leading bank in the 
major textile area of Europe. 

The Cassa’s vital activity and available resources, its 
widespread flexible network of branches, which can be 
considered actual service centres, enable the bank to fully satisfy 
the various requirements of families and industries. 


Sanpaolo Ltd, Nassau; Sanpaolo-Lariano Bank 

is a bank that is constantly developing S.A., Luxembourg. 

to meet the needs of today’s fast-chang- Sanpaolo 

ing business world. has Lgs. 1,400 million of capital ac- 

Sanpaolo . counts together with reserve for possi- 

has more than 353 branches in Italy and ble loan losses and Lgs. 17,644 million 
foreign branches in Amsterdam, Frank- of deposits, mortgage bonds and other 
furt, London, Los Angeles, Munich, bonds. 

New York and Singapore; Represent- Sanpaolo 

tive offices in Brussels, Paris and also means: consultancy, management 
Zurich; its foreign subsidiaries and af- of investment funds, economic analysis 
filiates are: Bankhaus Briill & Kalimus and research activities, data-bank, leas- 
A.G., Vienna; First Los Angeles Bank, ing, factoring, for both domestic and 
Los Angeles; Sanpaolo Bank (Bahamas) international operators. 


lit 


CASSA 
DI RISPARMI 
E DEPOSITI 
DI PRATO 


50M7 PRATO/ ITALY - VIA DEGLI ALBERTI. 2 - TEL. (S74M921 - TELEX 572382 PRATOE 
REPRESENTATIVE OFFICE OF LONDON - ST. HELEN PLACE. 3 - LONDON EC3A 6AU - TEL. 01-6384231 - TELEFAX 01-588 5809 


S&®iOiQB®K 


rsnn.no awaggo 

SANROU) DI TORINO 


betas 

ms. 


CASSA 
DI RISPARMI 
E DEPOSIT! 
M PRATO 


Wherever your business has business 


Official Sponsor 
of the 12 meier Italia for the 
1987 America's Cup Challenge. 




ii 

a 





THE TIMESWEDNESDAY JULY 23 1986 


21 


k but 

sh > 


(( FOCUS D 




ITALIAN BANKING/2 








Slow progress in international monetary coordination worries the central bank as Italian attitudes towards the financial system undergo fundamental change 

( CARLO CIAMPI ) 


s-aSSfe 

■S w Mil*, JJ « Sj 

“S 

' c, V r » taii ttSfc 

Wjod 5»t 

J! ale aecoBB, feu * 

■ - iomt tem?, 1 

- China facto ^ 

tanhaUa, k 
•^s.a Jiinano.onerfi 
!e-owncd banks. 

E*' «nt JrV* 
tank and fey 

wrpimwr.NaiU,J|j . 

opporTouin a J! T 
: a lime when it *35*. 
to obtain Bank life 

tat .v>n ti> up Q|jg 

ir»a>r S a normal hfe 
rcsa 1 bank, with fe 
in Milan and eats 

iptr.";:;>Mr-Q baj rm^ 

Z r> she Baal rffe 
second Race baii 
V Cred'mtai fe 

-t:’v r.:asv a prafcaib 

a- <■>* it* .r.v<: szcssalji 
•> an i where. 

JE 


Jtaly, in the uncharitable phrase of 
‘ a domestic commentator, is more 
. a country of Sindonas and Gal vis 
than of Rothschilds or Warburgs. 
The former two, whose deaths 
. remain mysteries, caused the big- 
-gest banking collapse in the 
.republic’s history. Yet they were 
: “oniy . the two most spectacular 
,!sqapdais in a series involving the 
worlds of finance and politics in 
;the last 20 years- 

Such events add to the burden 
iOf the Bank of Italy in its tasks of 
mainta ining the stability of the 
i&triiency and exercising supervi- 
sion over the banking system. Its 
^governors, furthermore, have had 
u> be. vigilant over the years to 
^preserve, the bank's integrity and 
ward> off. interference from 
ipolitidans. 

; Signor Carlo Azeglio Ciampi 
*lhe p resentgo vem or, was appoint- 
ed at a difficult time, in October 
•1979. Seven months earlier his 
. predecessor. Signor Paolo Baffi, 
.-had been put under judicial 
.investigation and the deputy di- 
Vrector general Signor Mario 
Sarcinelli, had been imprisoned 
for' two weeks. Both were allied 
to have concealed a fraud. 

\ . The charges turned out to be 
trumped- up, inspired, h was 
commonly believed, by certain 
; Christian Democrats, although 
the Christian Democrat treasury 
minister, Signor Filippo Maria 
Pandolfi, came out stoutly in the 
.bank’s defence. But the bank's 
Image and morale were temporar- 
ily impaired. 

Signor ‘dam pi was an in-house 
choice, despite political pressures 
to appoint -a more pliant figure. 
Born .65. years ago at Leghorn in 
Tuscany, he obtained a degree in 
Greek at Pisa university, then, 
after war service as a junior army 
officer, a second degree, this time 
in law. Rather than choose an 
academic career, however, he took 
'in 1946 the entry exam for the 
'Bank ofltaiy. 

V Signor CiampTs career was 
' unremarkable until his appoint- 
ment as head of the research 
. -department in 1970, followed by 
"the posts of semtary general in 

* 1973. deputy director general in 
: 1.976 and director general in 1978. 

• Diplomatically, when asked 
about political pressures. Signor 
Ciampi replied that he had always 
"found general respect from politi- 
cians towardsthe bank, “even if it 
lias not always aroused their 
applause”. 

' fn 'feet, the bank has been 
sniped at in the last year by 
'politicians, this time Socialists. 
The Prime Minister, Signor 
JJettino Craxl criticized the way 
-the lira had been allowed to 




Carlo Ciampi: Appointed Bank of Italy governor at a difficult rime 


struggle 

victory 

The bank's role has been de- 
fined by successive laws since its 
establishment as a joint stock 
company in 1893. In 1926 it 
became the sole issuer of bank 
notes. The Banking Act of 1936, 
still the cornerstone of the banking 
system, transformed it into a 
public body or “institute of public 
law." In 1947 it was given powers 
to supervise and monitor com- 
mercial and other banks. 

Forefen exchange comes under 
the Ufficio liahano Cambi (ViC) 
or Italian Exchange Office, estab- 
lished in 1946 with a monopoly - 
then — over foreign-currency 
transactions. In practice the UlC 
is an arm of the central bank, 
whose governor is its presidenL 

Among important domestic 
events which Signor Ciampi re- 
calls during his term of office was 
the “divorce" in 1981 between 
bank and Treasury over the issue 
of treasury bills. 

Until then the central bank was 
obliged to take up all bills issued to 
finance government spending that 
were left unplaced on the market 
Signor Ciampi arranged with the 
then treasury minister. Signor 
Beniamino Andreaua, for this 
requirement to cease, so that now 


The slow 
towards 


freewheel to a freak 19 per cent 
depreciation against the dollar on 
the “Black Friday" of July 19, 
I98S. on the eve of a planned 
devaluation. 

Both Signor Ciampi and the 
Christian Democrat treasury min- 
ister. Signor Giovanni Goria, 
offered their resignations, only to 
have them rejected. Mud was also 
thrown at the bank's management 
early this year by some Socialist 
trade union leaders, who made 
vague allegations about its having 
“skeletons in the cupboard." This 
has led to a libel action by the 
bank. 

Signor Ciampi emphasizes the 
bank's operational autonomy, free 
from political conditioning. In 
practice, the governor works close- 
ly with the treasury minister of the 
day and with the cabinet’s credit 
committee in deciding monetary 
policy. 

The governor is appointed by 
the bank's supervisory board (on 
which there are no government 
nominees) for a term without 
limit. The government has to give 
its consent, however, because the 
appointment must be confirmed 
by decree of the President of the 
Republic. 


Symbol of the 
Banco d'ltalia. the 
central institution 
with the task of 
maintaining the 
stability of the na- 
tional currency 


the central bank can tailor its 
purchases of treasury bills to its 
objectives for credit expansion. 

Internationally, Italy has gained 
status since the Tokyo summit in 
May decided to involve it and 
Canada in the monetary delibera- 
tions of the Group of Five. Here 
the bank benefits from the experi- 
ence of its number two. Signor 
Lambeno Dini. the director gener- 
al who came from the Interna- 
tional Monetary Fund. 

Both Ciampi and Dini are 
worried by the slow progress in 
translating into practice the objec- 
tives proclaimed by the leading 
powers towards monetary and 
economic co-ordination. 

To those who criticize the 
retention of capital controls. Si- 
gnor Ciampi recalls that the 
European Community has al- 
lowed Italy to maintain them until 
the end of 1 978. In fact, during the 
last two years a 50 per cent 
premium to be deposited in 
buying foreign assets has been cut 
to 25 per cent, while firms obtain 
exemption easily enough for bona 
fide purposes, and unit trusts can 
invest 10 per cent of their assets 
abroad without paying any 
premium. 

Italy's situation is still consid- 
ered fragile, above all because of 
excessive government spending, 
but Signor Ciampi promises con- 
tinuing slow and prudent progress 
towards liberalization. 

Another failure such as that of 
the late Roberto Calvi's Banco 
Ambrosiano should not be possi- 
ble. both because of the tightening 
of international bank collabora- 
tion in the renegotiated Basle 
concordat, and because of recent 
legislation requiring Italian banks 
to consolidate accounts with their 
foreign affiliates. 

However, the position of the 
Vatican Bank under Archbishop 
Paul Mareinkus. involved in the 
Calvi collapse, remains un- 
changed. It is classed as a foreign 
bank, but Signor' Ciampi would 
like to see it apply to open a 
branch on Italian soil for its lira 
business. 

The Bank of Italy has completed 
technical preparations fora new or 
heavy lira, equivalent to 1.000 of 
today. If all goes well, the gover- 
nor will be able to mark victory 
over inflation with its introduc- 
tion next year. 

JE 


f UNIT TRUSTS ) 

Italian mutual funds (unit trusts), 
which have helped feel one of the 
longest ball runs in living memory- 
on Milan's stock exchange, have 
become a catalyst for change in 
Italy's increasingly advanced fi- 
nancial system. 

Though the boom on the stock 
exchange appears to have run its 
course, it is dear that the fends, 
which by the end of Jane com- 
manded 52JJ70 billion lire (about 
£23 billion) of invested assets, are 
here to stay. 

The fends, which first opened 
for business only two ye ars a go, 
owe their extraordinary success to 
a combination of factors, not least 
the fact that profits are exempt 
from any form of capital-gains tax. 

Their launch, after years of 
procrastination by the government 
and initial opposition by the 
powerful banking lobby, was able 
to benefit immediately from the 
release of pent-up demand from a 
thrifty public anxious to find a tax- 
efficient alternative to piling their 
sa rings in bank deposits ami 
treasury bills. 

The creation of the funds also 
coincided with and helped to 
contribute to an 1 8-month boom on 
the Milan stock exchange which 
saw share prices rise dramatically 
before it ran out of steam at the end 
of May. 

Milan's star-performing stock 
exchange, which owed Its success 
at least as much to a sharp 
recovery in company profits as to 
demand from the fends, has been 
the delight of the fend man agers, 
who have been able to secure 
spectacular returns for their 
clients. 

A unit acquired on June 30, 
‘1985 in one of the share fends, 
which invest exclusively in stocks 
and shares, would by the end of 
last month have earned its owner a 
return of just over 60 per cent. A 
uni t invested in the other m ain 
tvpe of trust, known as the 
“balanced fund," holding treasury 
bills as well as shares, would hare 
earned the investor a capital gain 
of 47.6 per cent over the same 
period. 

There is a third type of trust, 
similar to the British gilt funds, 
which invests only in government 
debt Not surprisingly, it has been 
somewhat eclipsed by the other 
two fends. 

However, analysts believe its 
popularity is destined to grow 
when investors start to realize that 
the share and balanced funds will 
be lucky to go on earning the rates 
of return they have achieved over 
the past 18 months. 

Figures released in early July by 
the mutual fends association sug- 
gest that the rate of growth is 



Milan's borsa: Still busy after the recent boom 


Stars of a bullish 
stock exchange 


finally slowing dowmSome observ- 
ers believe this may even be 
salutary'- Giuseppe Santorsola, a 
lecturer at Italy's top business 
school the Luigi Bocconi Univer- 
sity in Milan, said: “It would be 
positively dangerous for the funds 
to go on expanding so rapidly 
because Italy's financial markets 
do not have die capacity to absorb 
all the money." 

As it is, about 60 per cent of the 
funds' assets are invested in 
Italian treasury bills and long- 
term certificates and this propor- 
tion could grow if subscriptions 
continue to flood in from investors. 

Despite a succession of major 
cash calls on shareholders by 
leading Italian companies and a 
series of new listings on the stock 
exchange, supply has not managed 
to keep pace with demand. Some 
feud managers have even called mi 
the Bank of Italy to allow them to 
invest more abroad. Until now the 
mutual funds have been allowed to 
invest up to a maximum of 10 per 
cent of their assets in foreign 
securities. 

However, Lamberto Dini direc- 
tor-general of the Bank of Italy, 
gave a clear signal last month that 


the central hank is in no mind to 
put pnblic subscription of Italy's 
huge government debt at risk by 
allowing unlimited investment 
abroad by the trusts. 

One predictable side-effect of 
the funds' growth has been a sharp 
fall in the growth rate of bank 
deposits. Carlo Ciampi governor 
of the Bank of Italy, said in his 
annual report at the end of May 
that bank deposits bad grown at an 
annualized rate of only 3.9 per cent 
over the first four months of this 
year, compared with 16.7 per cent 
over the same period for 1985. 

Not surprisingly, the banks; 
after initially resisting the intro- 
duction of the funds, have become 
their main promoters and now 
control nearly all the 55 funds oh 
the market 

“The whole concept of banking 
is changing in Italy," Signor 
Santorsola says. “Customers 
spend less time haggling with the 
hank manage r over the interest 
rate offered on their deposit 
account hot want to know more 
abont the other fund -managing 
services he has to offer." 

A special correspondent 




MUU MO 


WE HA/E BEEN 
GRANTNG CREDfT 
TOTHEFUTIM 
FOR FIVE GEN 7 U 




MONTE DEI PASCHI DI SIENA 


1985 ACCOUNTS 

lie. BN 

Variation 
over 1984 

Due to customers 

18,577 

+ 17.44% 

Mortgage bonds and debentures 

2.508 

+ 9.71% 

Net worth and allowances for 
possible credit losses 

2,887 

+ 29.22% 

Total sources of funds 

39,421 

+ 13.58% 

Loans and advances to customers 

11,101 

+ 18.30% 

Security holdings 

10,263 

- 11.63% 

Net income for the year 

179 

+193.01% 




MONTE DEI ttSCHM MgPU 

MPS 

BANK ESTABLISHED W72 


The MPS Banking Group * composed of Monte del Paschi <fl StaoBanca Toscana. Oedto 







f B. Banca Popoiare 

M* /Vm a Imi 


Commotio e Industria 


Established in Milan 1888 


FINANCIAL HIGHLIGHTS 1985 (biilon of tire) 


Balances with bank 

1.226 

+ 7% 

Securities 

757 

— 

Advances to customers 

797 

+ 25% 

Total assets 

3.190 

+ n% 

Customers’ deposits 

1.668 

+ 12% 

Total deposits 

2.471 

+ 9% 

Capital and total reserves 

243 

+ 7% 

Net profit 

19 

+ 15% 


HEAD OfflCE MW*: V» «« 


nuw uwwe wiwno; «■ ww oh - i— . 

Ponton EachangoOtiartnant- TaMshew (03)654982 (tourfbwft-Totw: 




From here we operate 
all over the world 


The Veneto. Friuli Venezia Giulia and 
Trenb'no Alto Adige regions represent 
one of the most economically develo- 
ped areas in all Italy: although ranked 
third overall, they are often leaders 
in the production and trade of ma- 
ny industrial, agricultural and 
hand-crafted products. With 
almost 200 branches, Ban- 
ca Cattotica del Veneto is 
the most important bank 
in this part of Italy with a 
widespread presence that 
extends from the largest city 
centre to the smallest town. 
From here, in order to best serve 
our clients, we have established a 
highly developed international network 
based on two representative offices 
and almost 1000 foreign correspon- 
dents from all over the world 


Banca Cattofica del Veneto 
Via Santa Corona 25 - 36100 Vicenza (Italy) 


Banca Cattolica del Veneto 


ffli ■AMtamnl appan as a aallar of itevtf ooljt 


bvener 


O.S. $300,000,000 

Transferable Credit Facility 


**■*#«* 

Chaw Investment Bank 
First Chicago Limited 
Security Pacific Hoare Govett limited 


tMtUanagtHBf 

Chase Investment Bank First Chicago Limited 
Generate Bank- New York Branch Security Pacific Hoare Govett Limited 
The Taiyo Kobe Bank, Limited The Bank of Yokohama, Ud. 
Compagnle Luxembourg eoise de la Dresdrwr Bank AG 


.Algemene Bank Nederland N.V. 


Banco di Roma 

Ma* toft feme* 


Credit Commercial de France 
Credit .Commercial de France -*•«▼«* bw«* 

Banca Nazlonale delfAgricoitura 

ItawVoriiBnadi 

Banca Nazlonale del Lavoro of Canada 

IBNLOmf) 

Manufacturers Hanover Trust Company 
The Mitsui Trust and Banking Company Limited Pfizer International Bank 


The Fuji Bank, Limited 


Managed Bf 

Banco di Sicilia Cassa di Riepannio delle Provlnde Lombardo 

Nm YorkBoacfa NMlfektaach 


The Chuo Trust and Banking Company, Limited Caisse Nationals de Credit Agricole 
The Dafwa Bank Limited The Hokkaido Takushoku Bank, Limited 

NnlMannak 

Monte del Paschi dl Siena Philadelphia National Limited 


NMVMMncfe 


QHKMSgnfty: 

Binquc Nstlonele de Puts Banca Fopolam dl lllbno 


NnlMI 


Foods PmhMBr 

The Chaw Manhattan Bank NJL ThaHnt National Bank of Chicago 
Ganarale Bank- Haw York Bnnch Socerfty Pacific Natlona) Bank 
The Taiyo Koba Bank, Limited The Bank of Yokohama, Ltd. 

Compagnla Laxombourgsoiw do la Drasdner Bank AG * . CiedR Commercial d# France 


CmdriComnwdal da Franca -NwTrtkMtfe 

AtoeiMM Bank Nedariand N.V. Banca Nazlonale dtf Agrlcomin 

awee—i 

Banco dl Roma Banca Nazlonale dal Lavoro of Canada The Fuji Bank, Limited 
■MfofcaMA iwlodm 

Manufacturers Hanover Trust Company The Mitsui Trust and Banking Company Limited 
Pfizer Intamationil Bank Banco dl Sldlla Cassa dl Fftparmio dsBe Provlnde Lombards 

hiMM 

The Chuo Trust and Banking Company. Limited Cliaae Nationals de Credit Agrlcofe 
The Dahm Bank Limited The Hokkaido Takushoku Bank, Limited Monte del Paachl di Siena 

HmiTM Buck 

Philadelphia National Limited Banque National* da Paris Banca Popoiare dl Milano 

IKvMkr — - 


ABM* 




U$K I9K 


ITALIAN BANKING/3 



Traders in Taranto, southern Italy: Credit cards are seldom used in a conn try that has usually prefered to deal in cash 


RETAIL BANKING ) 


After years of complacency, ltaly^s 
banks are trying to broaden their 
range of retail services. But they are 
finding that one of the biggest 
challenges is to convince a public 
with a strong preference for cash 
transactions that modem banking 
offers practical alternatives. 

Talk of the advent of & “cashless 
society*' rings rather hollow in a 
country wherfe the use of credit cards 
and even cheques' lags far behind 
other .west European countries. Only 
two million credit cards axe in 
circulation in Italy, compared with 
six times that number in France. 

Figures released recently by the 
Italian Banking Association showed 
that 71.7 per cent of tax receipts. 67 J 
per cent of insurance premiums and 
65.7 per cent of rents on property are 
still paid in cash. 

Banks have also found, occasional- 
ly much to their cost that in their 
haste to innovate they have some- 
times introduced products with inad- 
equate preparation and- scant regard 
Tor modem methods of market 
research. The chequered career of 
Italy's ambitious cash -dispenser sys- 
tem. Bancomat, is one such example. 

Launched with much fanfare two 
years ago as the first cash dispenser 
network involving all the major 
banks in a single country. Bancomat 
became a source of derision after a 
gang of ingenious criminals cracked 
the system and made huge illicit 
withdrawals. Italy's press scornfully 
dubbed the service “sbancomat”, 
A-hich . translates loosely as 


Howto win cash 
dealers to 



“bankruptomat” and public confi- 
dence in the dispensers slumped. 

.The thieves, had exposed a fetal 
flaw in Bancomat. The system was 
not “on line**, meaning that with- 
drawals made through cash dispens- 
ers were not electronically debited 
from a customer's account immedi- 
ately but only after a delay of two or 
three days. 

All the thieves had to do was to 
discover the secret code used by 
individual clients to enter the system, 
which they did by placing infra-red 
television cameras in vans parked in 
front of dispensers. Then, by drawing 
on information obtained from print- 
outs discarded by customers after 
they had made withdrawals from 
Bancomat dispensers, they; made 
numerous copies of magnetic cards 
used by clients, which then enabled 
them systematically to ransack the 
system. 

The banks soon realized what was 
going on and suspended use of the 
dispensers at weekends and after 
office hours, when the network was at 
its most vulnerable to theft. This also 
meant Bancomat was unusable at. 
times when customers were most 
likely to need it for cash. 

The banks are now pinning their 
hopes on a revival of the service when 
an “on-line** system, which they hope 
will be burglar-proof is introduced 


thronghoirt Tfie^aSuricry later this 
year. 

Critics of the system say that banks 
have indiscriminately handed out 
Bancomat cards to their customers 
without making a serious effort to 
find out whether they all had any use 
for them. Bank analysts estimate that 
fewer than a quarter of the four 
million dispenser cards in- circulation 
are used with any regularity. 

Meanwhile, a new dimension is 
shortly to be added to the Bancomat 
card when a pilot “point of. sale** 
scheme “goes live** in Milan, Rome 
and several other big Italian cities this 
summer. 

In Milan, the first Italian city to 
launch the experiment. Bancomat 
holders will be able to use the duds to 
make purchases in 70 retail outlets 
scattered throughout tbe dty centre. 

Italy's leading banks have. also 
finally clubbed together to launch a ’ 
new national credit car d; cahed'; 
“Canasi", giving Italians a home- 
grown alternative to American Ex- 
press. Visa and other' foreign credit 
and charge; cards which until "now 
have, had the field almost entirely to 
themselves. 

Cartasi already has a dient base- 
numbering 300,000 users since it was 
formed by merging two other credit 
cards, one of them offered by one of 
Italy's biggest commercial banks. 


Banca Commerriale Italians and the 
other by Credito Itatianb, together 
with, a group of savings banks (cdsse 
di rispdrmio). \: 

All the leading banks have now 
agreed to offer the card- .-to their 
: customers. - . 

: Cartasi. win be a credit card offering 
si milar feci fines, to Visa, although the 
Italian promoters claim that it will 
offer more competitive terms/ '. f 
Howevef, some bankers are scepti- 
cal about whether the card wjfi ever 
really catch, on. ip a coimfry whose 
retail network- is still, dominated .by 
small shopkeepers.with a. preference 
for being paid , in cash. It is not 
uncommon in Jtaly for shopkeepers, 
on production by .* /customer oft a 
cretm eard, to bfier a discount tin 
.condition- that -payment is made in 
cash or fry cheque. - - V 

Italians -lend , to consider credit 
cards more a symbol Of 
creditworthiness and status, than a 
practical tool for malting purchases, 

- Despite difficulties with Bancomat 
and uncertainties over Cartasi, thefp 
have been improvements in some of 
the basic services offered by banks ip 
recent years. Perhaps the most strik- 
ing has been in one of the simplest op- 
erations, that -of- cashing acheqde. 
traditionally one of Italy's more 
nerve-wracking experiences. 

It is now-possible to do this in most 
major banks- in a- single- operation. 


: - : a 




,v- 


- ; ;• V? V -j 
• - - - i v -art 


WtoTsthei 

aTypisfc 


£r. 


This means having to. _queue just 

had to 


once,- whereas formerly one 
band, in the cheque to. a bank clerk 
and then join a second' queue to 
collect die money from a cashier. • 


A special correspondent 


T at-king muscle, but masters of the Ecu 

( EUROMARKETS ) 


rivals by three main factors, 
e first is the fragmented 


Italy has an economy roughly 
the same size as Britain's, is a 
founder member of the Euro- 
pean Community and likes to 
claim that it invented modern 
banking. Certainly, the word 
bank is derived from the 
Italian word for a bench on 
which money lenders sat. and 
the bankers of Lombardy gave 
their name to a well-known 
street in the City of London. 

However, Italian banks 
have made little impact on the 
European scene and their 
activity in the Euromarkets 
bankers* jargon for lending in 
international securities and. 
currencies which have no- 
national home — is smaller 
than their background might 
suggesL 


Allowed to make 
loans anywhere 


Aglanoe at the 1985 league 
tables of managers and book 
runners (those who arrange 
the issue and make a price in 
it) for Eurobonds and syndi- 
cated loans shows that Italian 


banks did not figure at ail 
50 houses i 


in 


among the top 
these markets. 

Only in the technical area of 
lending in European Currency 
Units (Ecus) have Italian 
banks' carved out a niche for 
themselves. There are signs, 
however, that the recent reor- 
ganization of the Itah'anfinan- 
cial ' system, largely at the 
behest of the Bank of Italy, the 
central bank, may be tempting 
Italian banks more into the 
international arena. The his- 
toricaHy determined parochial 
character of Italian banking is 
breaking down. 

It i$ important to distin- 
guish between different kinds 
of international banking. Ital- 
ian banks are heavily engaged 
in. trade- financing both for 
major Italian companies such 
as Olivetti, Fiat and 
Montedison, which are active 
globally, and for the host of 
smaller manufacturers of fash- 
ion or .furniture which are the 
mainstay of employment and 
prosperity in many, parts of 
the country, " 

The Luxembourg subsidiar- 
ies of Italian banks do quite a 
lot of trade financing backed 
by gtrarajitees from the Italian 
export credit agency. 

Where Italian banks are 
very niuch less active is in the 
highly complex but huge 
Euromarkets consisting basi- 
cally of bonds and syndicated 
loans. New Eurobond, issues, 
for example, have been run- 
ning in recent years at an 
annual rate of Si 50 billion 
(£100 billion). Italian banks 
have been constrained from 
moving into the Euromarkets 
with the same force as their 
British. French and German 


The - — . , 

structure of the national finan- 
cial system; By European, 
although not American, stan- 
dards Italy is well provided 
with banks. But until a few 
years ago only 1 5 of them were 
allowed to operate throughout 
the country. Most banks were 
restricted to a particular area, 
where they built up a strong 
local presence. 

So Banca Nazionale de) 
Lavoro, the country's biggest 
commercial bank, was al- 
lowed to make loans anywhere 
in Italy, while Credito! 
Emiliano. a substantia] re-’ 
gional bank, had to obtain] 
permission from the central 
bank to lend outside the- 
northern and central regions. 

% Second, this inhibition not 
only stopped banks from 
growing to the size necessary 
to compete in the heavily 
capitalized Euromarkets. It 
also severely restricted inno- 
vation because it restricted 
competition. Bankers safe in 
their own patch were disin- 
clined to risk operating in a 
fast moving Euromarket dom- 
inated initially by Anglo-Sax- 
ons. A significant portion of 
Italian banking is also owned 
by the state. This sector has 
not been helped by the Italia n 
Treasury, which, in order to 
finance the county's huge 
public sector deficit, issued 


bonds with very favourable 
tax concessions. This drained 
savings and inhibited the 
growth of deposit bases ade- 
quate for international 
competition. 

Third, there were other 
central bank restrictions. The 
most important was exchange 
controls. Evading exchange 
controls is a national hobby in 
Italy, as periodic scandals on 
the Swiss border and the sorry 
episode of the Banco 
Ambrosiano show. For banks, 
however, nothing can cramp 
their international style more 
than tight exchange controls. - 

Ironically, the Euromarket - 
originated essentially as a way. , 
of creating an international 
pool .of Capital outside nation- 
al exchange .controls. The 
cause —and some would argue 
the effect- - of exchange, 
controls was the chronically 
weak lira. Any Italian' bapkl 
moving into the international 
arena raced serious currency 
exposure. 

Many of these controls are 
being lifted. The Italian au- 
thorities have allowed around 
100 banks to operate nation- 
wide, merchant banking, 
which has been the driving 
force behind the Euromarkets, 
is encouraged, and some 40 
foreign Tranks have been al- 
lowed to open branches in 
Italy. Italian bankers admit 
that the influx of foreigners, - 


has greatly stimulated their 
. .own ideas about the business. 

The problem of exchange 
controls is thejeey to. under-, 
standing the attraction to Ital- 
ian banks of the Ecu.. As an 
artificial currency consisting 
of a basket of national curren- 
cies, the Ecu offers the maxi- 
mum- exchaqge rate stability 
against the tempestuous lira. 
It also carries political conno-- 
tations of being good Europe- 
ans, which appeals to the 
Italian authorities. 

However, much of the Ecu 
business done by Italian banks 
is to finance domestic entities. 
’In 1984. for example, the Ecu 
450. million (£670 million) 
“maxiloan” for . Ente 
Nazionale Idrocarburi(ENI). 
the giant Italian energy com- 
pany. included among its lead 


Stimulation from 
foreign influences 


managers the Istituto 
Bancario San Paolo di Torino: 
That loan, which was the 
biggest Ecu loan to date, was 
partly refinanced as a floating 
rate note (a sort of bond, the 
interest rate or -coupon of 
which fluctuates). 

Oae of the leading Italian 
banks in the Euronote busi- 
ness is the Banco di-Roma, 
which is among world's big- 
gest- 100 banks. Along with 


-Banca Commercial Italians 
and: Istituto - Bancario San 
Paolo, di Torino, it is also 
among the top 20 lead manag- 
ers of loans to Italy. The 
obverse, however, is that 17. of 
these top 20 are foreign banks. 

In -many other developed 
countries the lead managers 
would be predominantly do- 
mestic banks — Italian banks 
simply do not have the. finan- 
cial muscle and expertise al- 
ways to compete with major 
American. French, British. 
German and, increasingly, 
Japanese rivals. 

The other side of the coin is 
borrowing. Italian banks are 
well-represented among Ital- 
ian issuers of Eurobonds. J 

Among these tranks over the 
past three years are Banco di 
Napoli. Banco - di Roma, 
Banca Nazionale del Lavoro, 
Banca 'Nazionale 

dell’AgricoItura, Italian Inter-, 
national Bank, Banca 
Commerriale Italiana, Banco 
di Santo Spirito (foe Vatican 
Bank), and Credito ItaJiaho. 
■Several Italian banks have' in 
addition raised. Euroloans. It 
will be some . years before 
Italian banks take their place 
in the Euromarkets, and their 
success will largely depend on 
domestic developments, parr 
ocularly liberalization of. ex- 
change . controls .and other 
banking restriction’s. 






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RECRUIT! 

ADVERT® 

£9,500; 




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VARIED 


Michael Pr^t 


O'# 

& RESFl 

***** 

7. ~ * sewn 


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An Italian bank 
to be found 
the world over 



^ttHANDai 















LA CREME DE LA CREME 



We talk and you listen, no. 
You talk and we listen, yes 





International 

Secretary/R\ 


ne ^ lo 5 .J* 

ft* 

u nj--— •.;- fcSr ^areta. 


\ The General Manager of our 
Export Divisiori, who is respork- 
'^We for the European and North 
American. operations of our 
Company, is looking lor a mature, 
experienced Secretary/fft to work 
at our offices m St Mary Cray; 
Orpington, Kent 

Applicants should be well 
educate d , p r efe r a bly to degree 
st an dard, and be fluent in Italian. 
Spanish anckfar German would be 

an asset The successful candidate 
wiff possess good typmg speeds 

wjth shorthand at 80 wp.m. 
approx. 

■ The position offers an 
opportunity to become invoked 
in die- very interesting work of 


the Division: 

Salary is negotiable and the 
usual hinge benefits apply 

Applications should be in 
writing with full personal and 
career details, together with a 
daytime telephone number, if 
possible, to:- Me D. B. Jordeson, 
Assistant D asopnel Officer; 
Coates Brothers Pic, Cray Avenue, 
SL Maiy Cray Orpington, 
KentBR53PE 


^ Ruent French 
in Public Relations 

Elf UK, the British subsidiary of a major international 
oil company has a vacancy in the External Relations 
department tor a young bi-lingual secretary 

This position would suit a college-leaves preferably 
with WP skills. The Ideal candidate will have an outgoing 
personality and enjoy dealing with people at all levels. 

In return, we offer a competitive salary package which 
indudes 21 days hoTfday a twice-yearty bonus and an 
interest-free season ticket loan. 

Please apply with full current c.u and 
daytime telephone number to: 

Mrs Tessa Store, Elf UK Pic, 

197 Knightsbridge, London SW7 1RZ. 




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cisriing a 
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About £42. 50 


Manpower totes cans to assign its - 
. iomporortos for their skias. personality, 
and lype of work. So we pay 
^ cxxtoiaingiy As o proper eotecuttve 

secretary well ask you to cope with 
assignments that wfll pay you tpwords 
of£40ntoraa weekthonaqijc4med 
• competent audio typist And both get 
. more tor W/P skis. 

0 MANPOWER 

Temporary Staff Specialise 


Butthe oudtoiypW fesffll we* paid 
and canine our free Skill Demtopment 
training to make progress. If you're a 
temporary diet tears how well 

pay you: If not yet. weH help you 
takeoff. 

Taflt to us about pay ... and al 
toe other benefits. 

Can us now. 


Private Secretary 
To £15,000 

A peer - the Chairman of a major 
British pic - needs a private secre- 
tary who will ensure the smooth- 
running of Ns numerous social and 
business engagements. The posi- 
tion demands flexfcttty and an 
aptitude for hard work. You will 
need exceflent secretarial skflte (S/H 
and audio). Preferred age 35/40. 


Senior Receptionist 
c£9,500 

A top City company in EC3 needs 
a senior receptionist to took after : 
a busy reception and switch- 
board, liaise with catering staff for 
client functions etc.. You must 
have several years 1 experience 
gained in the reception of a City- 
company or a top hotel. Preferred 
Age: 25-30. 


*!xma6ncon*MnMnflfty 

Tel: 225 0505 

24 tour orerarhp 


,pfljNCES 


STfiEE**! 


.629 7262 


senior iema 

SECRETARY 
President’s Office 


-6297262 


social correspoffiiat 




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• vra 
: £ 

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;’-:-j3sb 

*1353. 
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' "" Michael 




PA PROPERTY 

c£10,5OO 

TSiis is a key position for apro&esioDal PA to 
join a successful pro p ert y organisation dose 
to Cannon Street, where a full and varied day 
is assured, assisting two charming young part- 
ners. Ideally you are 25+, have accurate ah 
and andio akiHs and would welcome. a. very, 
friendly environment. ■ 

Contact Melanie . 

01^f154r Reckons* 

Prioe -Jami eson 

■— — — amrtmn m— — — — 

RECRUITMENT 

ADVERTISING 

£9,600 

Hie MD of this nug and enncrnfaT anmttanqr 
fWC2) » aedooe ■ Sight band praon* to urist him m 
«dl aren of h» hectic wwUoad. Your bu*y day wfll 
"iacbde Wai«ng with diente end the media, o e ge iriam g 
'tunchee, adminiaterios pmonael nconb as well a 
soperviamc the eeoetarial team. The pontioo offers 
much izrvwvemeot and vancty for a friendly and flexi- 
ble secretary (90/501 who nelly worts to propeas. 
Contact Suzanne Rubens. 

Ol 63l154lRecCoru' 

Price -Jam eson 


OSBORNE RKHARDSON 
MARKETING £10000 

Mematiored Consultancy based In Ham- 
mersmith is offering exciting opportunities 
for capable socrgtafy/a dm feite tra tor s m 
marketing. Handle clients at the sensitive 
negotiation stage and fiafee with afl fevefs 
and nationaHties. 100/60 + wp skSs needed 

VARIED & RESPONSIBLE 

£9500 

Based at the London office of this presti- 
gious company this key position includes 
recruitment admin, for overseas personnel, 
organisation of supplies abroad plus prowd- 
ing backup to senior executives. Age 30+ . 
90/50 skfis needed 

PImm ai DeMw Bartetote. tare FM ind 
Osfeane or Bom R fc f urdsaa 8 an • &30 pa. 



THE ROYAL SOCIETY 

Senior Secretary/Executrve Assistant 


nw a wei tec ht y .BwmaBpon iwWreoHpw — i eng^nownw 
pubfie. to aMkkig an arthuaMB and awli 'ywgflad Sartor Sacra- 
twy/tacutha An s a M to work tor *w Head of ana g| tfw 
TO darting wlft tmmaSonal exdwnges. The Depertmert 
UBte lor artrtrtstacM M Urn KMl ga nrt schma wMrtt 
tads to enable sartor Brttteh odan — ti » stand Inar- 


ta fwtponjMB ter srtrtrtsramg (a) the n«rt (r*nta sctiome wMrti 
(RMdas taids to enable senior Brtttan ocan — a to rttond Inar- 
nshonal mrtwncai. (to a idamt tor anna to orgmssra of 
toMr naM o n rt amfarenoaa to Brttm. (q encFange progrananes with 
Canada. Auaarala. Now Zealand and Japan end (d) a amefl grants 
u id ya twna lor D ia U h adawiaa » vM USA. The post mQ sut an 
nmrtHL MMrttoad and c n a ai s wlow goraos too can weak 
wal under pmaua and can orgartsa tfwlr own noridoad. Pravioua 
axpananca ol word pmrortag and an apdtoda tor flguraa wertd be 
advantages Accurara ahodtan d and typtoo. an eyo tor deal and 
aooaacy- ■ chearfcf i ppu a d i Dim are assa nd a t 
Salary «■ ba on toa aerte ESU* to £9770 par aan pndidng 
London AHowanca) accontng to aga and expartanca. Hours 
SJ0 tm. to sre pat Monday to Friday; 20 worUng days holday 
Bwualy pbs ku Travaf days. 

The Royal Sociaty h cHuatod In an aiagant and comartan part Ol 
London off Loner Regent Street and Et Jama's Park: there h a 
restaurant on mo pramsas. 


AppMcadona In 


ntwwnaj mnfc oa'fc BriaV(Sj> 
wWi Cv should ba sent ux 





SHORTHAND SECRETARY 

cJ8,000 

FOR- WEST LONDON FILM COMPANY 

This prestigious film corapamr «*»“£■ |}J ■“ 
Eampea n&tte Executive. If you have 80 wpm SH/3U 
inmtvoine and would like to gel involved in the co- 
SSUETSr ram rcteax dates, mieraational lauon and 

^CHCraJ sec duties, caifc 

Emma PhBUpS-OB 
01 748 9006. ■ 

Alfred Marts Recruitment Orosidtante, 
f Ring Street, Hammersmith, W6. 



Ik MJL Pwft, Anktart Stctvtory (Ffenacs A bhMUMi 
Tin Rayal SaeWy. 8 C*taa Han Tames, Loads*. SW1Y i 
Mo appiradana tato ba enwirtw ad altw 4 E n g i a i 18U 


Advertising 

£10,500 

This is a young, \1brant agency with an 
exdush-e, higli qualiH' clientele. 
Mavfer-based, tne\' are expanding rapidly 
and now require a bright, outgoing secretary 
to work at director-level A test pace, 
allround involvement in PR and 
promotional events and excellent 
longer-term prospects make this an Ideal 
step for someone with sound secretarial 
experience, good education and good skills. 
Age 23+ . Please telephone 01-493 5T6T7. 

GORDONYATES 

■ i in...... Bec nt nn qi tCc ra u fa pB 


UNIVERSITY OF SURREY 
PERSONNEL ASSISTANT 
Salary up to £8467 per annum 

Do you have fast class secretarial and office sWHs? Do you 
enjoy working n a busy environment aid meeting people? 
Are ytw loolwig for a job wtbcti wai offer interest, respon- 
sibility and scope for working on you- own initiative? 

I am looking for someone, preferably a graduate, to assist 
me with the day to day administration of experimental, 
technical and manual staff recruitment My assistant is 
responsible for placing adverts, arranging interviews and 
maintaining staff records, together with a variety of cor- 
respondence and ad Inc duties relating to the work of a 
very busy personnel office. 

The work involves a great deal of typing and telephone 
work and my Assistant mantams dose Bason with depart- 
ments throughout die University. Wort Processor experi- 
ence is desirable although training can be arranged. Above 
all else, the abiBty to remain cheerful inter pressure is 
absolutely essenttet for survival! 

If you are interested and would Ota. to know more; 
please telephone me. 

John Hmiper; on 
GnBUfonf 571 281 extsaslon 2028. 


PUBLIC RELATIONS 

£ 11,000 

Confident sert-motiwtod person needed to organise She MD, 
6ood owan tead onal aUfe and firtt etus nwrewr required to 

fcuse win top cSents. Excellent opportwty tor Mtt-usored 
person wanting respomUfty * ■ ftomandng but etbnutafing 
envi r onment 

Ptoase ""«»»+ Akon Jones or Rum Owen on KS 4833 

ALFRED HARKS RECRUITIIIENT CONSULTANTS 
«1 PaM Mas 
London SW1 


The iCMA, the prpftarinnnl body apacJafirring in 
na mgMMfi t accountancy, with over 65,000 

Tnwmh^Tw imri wbAnbi liwtrklwkte. eeekw to - 
appoint a aemoraecretaiy to work in the office of 
the p wd i knt, who ia the Inatitute’s pio fea aional 
head wwd frontline «rnl*«ninn. 

The peiaon appointed will be based at the head 
office in central London, and will provide a 
comprehensive secretarial service. First class 
skills end experience at senior level are eaBential, 
as well as a well-organised and flexible attitude, 
and availability to work varying hours, including 
some evenings. Age probably 35+ . 

Salary c. £10,500 pa for basic 32% flexitime 
week. Staff dining room, interest-free season 
ticket loan, life assurance and pension scheme. 
Please apply to the Personnel Officer, The 
lastitnte ef Cost and M a nag e ment A ccni lants. 
63 Partlaad Place, London WIN 4AB. 

(Tefc 01-637 2311) (No agencies) 


SECRETARY 

£8,000 - £8,500 p.a. sua-e. 

A conscientious and reliable person is required 
for our Classical Marketing Manager. The job 
involves a fair amount of typing, regular cir- 
culation of information and dealing with 
telephone enquiries. 

Accuracy, attention to detail a “feel” for for- 
eign languages as well as some interest in 
Classical music are all essential, as well as a 
friendly disposition. This vacancy may suit 
someone aged 28-45. To apply please write 
with full details of background and experience 
to: 

Barbara K. Rotterova 
Senior Personnel Officer 
EMI Records (UK) 

20 Manchester square 
London W1A 1ES 


National Heart and Chest Hospitals 
Bronipton Hospital 
We are looking for a waff qualified 

MEDICAL 

SECRETARY 

(salary starting at not less than £7552 rising to 
a maximum of £8689 plus up to £1040 for 
appropriate proficiency allowances) 
to work for one of our Consultant CartSoto- 
gists and his team. You witi find the work 
varied and worthwhBe in this busy friendly 
hospital in South Kensington specialising m 
chest and heart diseases. Good secretarial 
skills including audio -ana essential. 

Application forms from the Personnel 
Department Brampton Hospital. Fulham 
Road. London SW3 6HP. Tel: 01-352 8121 
Ext 4456 (24 hour answering service). 



ALFRED MARKS 


ANTIQUE DEALERS 

Knightsbridge Antique Dealers re- 
quire an .experienced secretary, 
book-keeper, knowledge of fine 
English furniture , an advantage. 

Apply John Keil: 

01-589 3912 
154 Brompton Road, 
London SW3 1HX. 


We have the 
best clients. 

We need 
the best 
temporaries, 


■ At MacBlam Nash we 
make sure that each assign- 
ment is also a career 
opportunity. After all, we take 
care to provide our clients with 
the best temporaries, so it's 
only right that you, as a 
temporary, should benefit in 
return. 

Our assignments at 
senior level often lead to 
permanent positions and 
naturally we make sure the 
rewards, financial or other- 
wise, are a cut above the rest 

Talk to Kerena Henderson 
today on 01-439 060L 


Temporary 

Secretaries 

Because youVe the best 


22+ 


COUNTDOWN TO BIG BANG 


A unique opportunity exists for a PA to 
become involved in a new development in 
fire Stock Market To take account of the 
major changes which will affect British com- 
panies following Big Bang, a campaign 

will be launched to strengthen links between 


c £10,000 


the Stock Exchange and industry. Reporting 
to the Head of Department you will be 
involved in organising conferences, exhibi- 
tions and producing promotional literature. 
Secretarial skills of 8050 plus 
WP required. "SEW* 


CIS 


x 

>.*!*«* ^ ' 
V . V 


~v..- / iV vj5ju-s»;Jy 


0- M ie ah olds 
in The city 

01- 2567261 

FiN^sse ci 


READING c.£12,000 

The Head of this US consumer products 
compa n y is looking for a PA/Sec to assist their 
young MD. The successful applicant will be 
weh «Jucated, of good appearance and 
ambitious to involve themselves in a 
demanding role. In addition to the normal 
secretarial duties you win be organising ■ 
conferences, top level meetings and 
presentations and liaising internally on afl 
aspects of running a successful and growing 
company. Aged 27-35. Speeds 100/60 + WP. 

ST JAMES’S ■: c.£l 1,500 

This weD established and well-known 
international firm of consultants is looking for a 
wefl educated and wdl presented Secretary to 
join their hard working and happy team. 

Speeds 100/60 + WPand audio. Aged 2340. 


35 Mn Fin m. HI-4937789 



FASHION IN FULHAM 
£8,500 - £10,500 

International famous fashion company currently set- 
ting up their prestigious Design H.CL wish to recruit for 
their buying dapartment- 

PA to COMMERCIAL DIRECTOR 

Organise his busy fife, run the office and supervise 2 
secs. European langs hrtpfuL Rusty shd/audlo. W.P., 
5 yrs sound sec. exp. Age 25-35. 

ADMINISTRATOR 

Opportunity for exp. sec. who enjoys using ma i n f rame 
computer and setting up systems. (80/8$. Age 20’s. 

SECRETARY 

Gen. Sec. support phis supervising a junior. 80/80, 
auefio, WP. plus 2 yrs. sec. exp. Age 20's. 


Benefits Include dress tfiscounL Please calk 

437 6032 

HOBSTONES 


Senior Secretaiy 

To Managing Director 

City Based 

Leslie & Godwin Lid - a leading firm of 
Lloyd’s Insurance Brokers and part of 
one of the largest insurance groups in 
the world require a Senior Secretary to 
their Managing Director/Reinsurance. 
This isa demanding and challenging 
position involving the provision of a 
high level secretarial/administrative 
service at senior management level. 
The successful candidate should be in 
a similar senior position and must be 
able to work under pressure and 
meet deadlines. Excellent secretarial 
skills together with knowledge of word 
processing essential. 

An excellent salary together with fringe 
benefits will be offered. 

Write with full details to: Jackie Baker, 
Personnel Department, 

Leslie & Godwin Limited, 

PO Box 219, 6 Braham Street, 
London El 8ED. 

Lesk&Gochcin Lid ■ 


YOUNG BRIGHT SEC/PA 

£16,000 

Aged 20-30, sophisticated, intelligent, 
well presented Secretary/PA required 
for Young Managing Directory- 
Entrepreneur. Must be prepared to 
work long hours where personality is of 
equal importance to the necessary abil- 
ities. Applicants must live in Central 
London. 

Salary £16,000 neg p^u, company mo- 
tor car and/or clothes allowance for 
suitable applicant 

Please write in strictest confidence 
with age, experience and a recent 
snapshot to BOX F97. 



Public Affairs 

£-10,000 package 

This is an excdlenr. career opening for a 
voting secretary of ai least 2 years' 
eeperience, within the Head Office suite of 
one of the L'K*s most prestigious companies. 
VCoridpg closely with two young managers 
you will handle liaison with press, public 
figures and g* ^eminent contacts and deal at 
die highest levels within the company A 
quick mind, a professional approach "and 
good dolls (90 55) are essential. Age 20+ . 
Please telepltone 01-493 5~K7. 


GORDON-YATES 


SALES SECRETARY 

5 STAR WEST END HOTEL 

£8,500 + benefits 

If you are looking for an opportunity to develop in 
the Sates and Marketing field and would be pre- 
pared to work your way up from the bottom with 
an innovative and professional team, then why 
not take up this tremendous development 
opportunity. 

You should be aged 19-24 with an immaculate 
appearance, outgoing personality and good Sec- 
retarial Skills which include S/H or Audio. 

To apply, please send a detailed c.v. to 
BOXGQ2. TIMES NEWSPAPERS, PO BOX 484, 1 
VIRGINIA .STREET, LQNDON.E1 9XS ... 


TWO PA/AUDIO 
SECRETARIES 

Watts & Partners, Chartered Building Surveyors 
require the assistance of two experienced sec- 
zetariea is their early twenties with a 
background in audio typing and with some 
knowledge of word processing, to assist our small 
team of surveyors in our new office in the heart 
of the West End. 

Competitive salaries are offered, together with 
staff profit share scheme. 35 hour flexible work- 
ing week, optional pension scheme and four 
.weeks annual holiday. 

Please apply in writing with C.V. to: 

Miss Sue Chalmers 
Watts & Partners 

58 Brook Street ' . 

London W1Y 1YB 













*** **»*■* ** *** # »*»* * * *** * * 


THE TIMES WEDNESDAY JULY 231986 


LA CREME DE LA CE 



MEET GEMMA 




# Have yon got speeds of 100/60, good WP akflls and at 
least two years’ Director level experience in London? 

# Maybe you are looking for a permanent job? 

If so, Gemma has a variety of senior level temporary assignments to 
offer you. We also have lots of interesting permanent opportunities to 
explore, and what better way to find a job that is tailor-made for you 
than by trying it out on a temporary basis first? 

All oar skilled temporary secretaries are paid the same excellent hourly 
rates and there is a “no strings attached” holiday bonus for every 750 
hours worked. Ring Gemma T apfin or Julia Stones now on 434 4512. 

Crone Corkill 


RECRUITMENT CONSULTANTS 


OP TO £1IMN>0 

A small team of oorpo- 
me design oonsuhonts. 
with offices in the West 
End, are looking for a 
bt-Jingaal PA/Secretsiy 
to one oT their partners. 
No shorthand needed 
as you will write your 
own correspondence in 
English and German, 
make travel arrange- 
rnems and liaise with 
-diems worldwide. Age 
25+. 

174 Now Bond St Wl 


International 

Secretaries 


International 

-it: w i Secretaries 

rj>,c 



IT yon have — i 
skills as id.as your fan> 
B&atc, the answer u atnKXt 
unlimited. We og re n Uy 
hive vacancies ah over 
London is well « in 
France. tit our super jobs 
st s luge of salaries than 
£9.000 to £12400++. $o 
take your pfcfc from Rich- 
mond. Mayfair. Brentford, 
Gty. Csnroa. Hotborn etc. 
esc. 

PA Wcfve jut jot a job 
ncctfiosAiafe ud Reach 
if ponHc. 

-174 New Bond fltfwv 


International 

Secretaries 



FASHION • ADVERTISING 


A CREATIVE CAREER to £12,000 EXEC PA/ADMIN C£U.500 




This international advertising A well known and expanding 
company need an eneigeihrsenior fashion company seek a top-flight 
PA for one of their main Board PA to their Senior Executive 

directors. A high degree of. responsible forcoiporate 

ini tiative is requireaas you'll relations. Your 60/1 00 skills and 

become involved in top-level excellent administrative ability 

confidential projects in an will be fully utilised in this 

informal creative atmosphere. demanding role to organise 
55/1 10 skills are essential and a charitable events, campaigns and 

sense of humour a must avariety of exciting projects. 

Call Susan Phillips. Joan Barite, Barbara earner, Katrina Verdon-Roe 

VISION APPOINTMENTS 

Easton* Housa, 16-19 EOTfCMtfa Street London WIN 7PA - Telephone: 01-631 4146 


• AN EYE ON Y<» 'K l-VTl'Iti; 


Hr*************************************** 

UK BRANCH OF | 

MAJOR CONTRACTING GROUP * 

SECRETARY/PA i 

required with prior experience working at senior level. * 

Must have experience with W.P. or P.C. Database, Basic knowledge of * 
French is required. $ 

HIGH SALARY COMMENSURATE WITH EXPERIENCE J 

: Send G.V. CGEE ALSTHOM, Granville House, * 

’ 132-135 Sloane Street London, SW1X 9 AX. 5 

• * 

l***t*'* *"*'■* ****** *• *.* * * *•* ****** ** A ********* A 


Elizabeth Hunt) ( Elizabeth Hunt 


MACMILLAN PUBLISHERS LTD 

SECRETARY TO 
GROUP MANAGING 
DIRECTOR 

This is a senior position in a major international 
publishing house. A busy job which requires a high- 
degree of commitment 




Please write with fii U c.v. and ah indication of your 
reasons forapplying to: 

Anne Wakely 
Macmillan Publishers Ltd. 

4 Little Essex Street 
London, WC2R 3LF. 


MACMILLAN 


RECRUITMENT CONSULTANTS 



GET INTO BANKING 

£ 11,000 

tanking efoerlence not essential as secretary to the 
chief executive of this mator City based investment 
bank. Your rote is to provide excellent PA support, 
coordinate meetings and travel schedules and liaise 
cti.his behalf. Excellent benefits include mortgage 
subsidy. 90/55 skills needed. 

NO SHORTHAND 
to £11,000 

Join this famous name City professional company as 
secretary to a divisional managing director. This is a 
very varied position from organising social events to 
setting up meetings in the UK ana overseas. You'll 
have your 'own junior secretary and will enjoy a true 
PA rote. 60 wpm audio abifity is needed and a senior 
level background. 

Etizafoetti Hunk Reauibnent Consultants, 

23GoUege Hfl London EC4 0KM0 3551 J 


GREEN PARK 
£9,500 

A famous name international manufacturing and mar- 
keting company seeks a secretary to the head of 
group pubSc relations. Organise and attend seminars 
and conferences, liaise with the press and media and 
supervise Junior members of staff. Benefits include 5 
weeks hofiday and free lunch. 90/50 skifls and WP 
abifity needed. 

DESIGN FOR LIVING 
to £12,000 

A very successful firm of interior designers seeks a 
personal assistant to a senior executive. You wHl find 
this position is 70% administrative as you handle 
research projects and organise business and social 
events from start to finish. A director level back- 
ground and 60 wpm typing needed. 

^Bnobe^HuntRecnjihnenlGiftsuhof^s. 

L 2^ Bedford Sheet London WC2 GL240 3511 V 


THE CITY UNIVERSITY 
BUSINESS SCHOOL 

Twi prestigious pads ham become available at the Bosi- 
now School which is located at our Barbican premisesr 
Personal Assistant to the Dean of the School: to provide 
executive secretarial support to the Dean and ensure the 
smooth running of the office. Excellent secretarial skills are 
essential as wdl as a flexible, diplomatic approach and the 
ability to deal credibly with personnel at all levels. 

Conferences A Press Officer (Pbr three years in the first 
insurer). This is a new post which would suit an energetic 
setf starts and an important part of the job will be promot- 
ing and OTRaiuEinK the Invitation Lecture activities of the 
School. The ability to type is a necessity as well as a 
knowledge of setting op a computerised data base using 
word processing equipment. 

Both pasts will provide rover for the other during absence. 
Applicants will probably be graduates and will be aged 26+. 

The salaries for both posts are on a scale up to £11,000 
approximately. Benefits will inriude recreational facilities, 
season ticket loan scheme, a generous holiday entitlement. 
For farther information and an application form, please 
write to Us Jane Cameron, Personnel Recruitment 
Assistant, The City University, Northampton Square, 
London, EC IV OHB, or telephone 01-250 1107 (24 hour 
ansaphone service). 

Closing dal* for receipt of a pp lications 6 August 1986. 




CnKDUDE Kino 


★ DIRECTOR’S SECRETARY 

. £11,000 + PERKS ★ 

Ho is responsible kv acquisitions tor this international hotdtng 
company and you w» get tufly involved m all Ws projects. This 
is a new poemon and mere Is a lot ot contact wdh axocutivos 
at director (aval. Benefits include free lunch and sports and 
social dub. 100/60 skins. 

★ MAYFAIR REAL ESTATE 

£ 10,000 ★ 

..An twcufent opportunity for a career secretary to loam how 
nwM-inBon £ property deals are put together. This young 
rector needs someone with a good busmesa train, the de- 
sire to team end the abfflty to work wed under pressure. SMBs 
100/60 + WP. Age 20+. 


pi rav telephone: 01-499 8070 

46 Old Bond Street London W.1. 


P.A. IN THE 
COUNTRY 

This is a marvelous oppor- 
tunity to enjoy top P.AJ- 
secretartal. position in the 
calmness of the counttysde. 
The busy Managing Direc- 
tor of a large company 
based In Reysfon. Hertford- 
shire urgently needs help. 
You w» nave good adminis- 
trative sMs as wefl as 
sh ort han d 90 and .typing 60 
and wfH enjoy the challenge 

of assisting your boss in the . 

day to day running of the 
eom^Age 30+. Salwy 

Tel: 01-499 0092: 
493 5907 

SeniorW 
Secretaries : 


INTERNATIONAL 

LIAISON 

£12,000 

TNs large worktwtde firm 
are looking far a personal 
assistant lor their baton 
partner. He handtes al con- 
tacts between their over- 
seas companies and asso- 
ciates and assists wMh thair 
requbernem In the UK. It is 
just as much your job as he 
travels extensively and 
needs everything to run 
smoothly while he's away. 
Car driver essential. Skib 
90/80 + German helpful. 
Paid overtime + good orp- 
anoational abflty required. 
Age 28-40. 

Tel 01-499 0092 

SeniorW 

Secretaries 


I" w i * , 13 .iL 


STEP AWAY FROM 
SECRETARIAL 
£9,500 

Our Hammersmith baaed clients who are an 
International Computer Company have two 
openings for Word Processing Trainers. No 
experience is n ecessary as a foil and thorough 
training will be given. If you are 25 or over, 
. have good. communicative skills and a knowl- 
edge of typing please forward a detailed 
Curriculum Vitae to 

Seekers Employment Services 

158 Putney High Street 
London SW15 
Or alternatively telephone 

01-789 8292 


EXPERIENCED 

SECRETARY 

Required by Gascoigne- Pees at their busy 
Wimbledon office. - Applicants must be of 
smart appearance, well spoken and enjoy 
working in a busy enthusiastic office envi- 
ronment. Accurate audio/copy typing, a 



pleasant -telephone manner ana good .stan- 
dard of education is required. Age 19-25 
years. Salary aae. Apply for an application 
form ter. 

Nicola Mason on . 

‘ . Weybridge (0932) 57811. • . 


HARD WORKING SECRETARY/PA 
WITH PERSONALITY FOR 
TRAVEL COMPANY 

Would you like to be Involved and help 
organise tours and research them out? If so. 
then Grey Green Tours, N16 may have some- 
thing to offer you. We are looking for an 
enthusiastic and personable Secretary /PA to 
toe MD with foil secretarial skills, good tele- 
phone voice and willing to teem WP. A real 

opportunity, salary c £7,500 pa. 

- For further details and interview 
please telephone 

01-800 8010 


Personal Assistant 
to the Administrative 
Secretary 

Salary up to £11,250 p.a. 

A great deal more than ' traditional’ duties; emphasis 
on this new post is laid upon committee work, people, 
and the acquisition and use of IT SkfaS. Applicants are 
fikety to be intettgent, outward looking ana receptive 
to change; experience in the education work} would 
be helpful. Smafl friendly office in the heart of 
Btoomsbury. 

Further details and appteation form are avaHable from 
Veronica Minards, university of London Computer 
Centre, 20 Guildford Street, London WC1N 1DZ.01- 
405 8400. 



PUBLIC RELATIONS 

£ 12,000 

A successful md fast grewfog PR Consultancy needs an up- 
Omdn^PA^cretaiy ftett good skills inducing W/P) far 

The right percon w& be a superb uganfear. sad nutated. 


i V iii i'li tt ' ' I l ya ■ O ' i 'M4 1 l w j j ti u 




swd on 01-499 


szm m m 


BuA£0M. 


THE HARLEY 
MEDICAL GROUP 

SENIOR RECEPTIONIST 

£8,000+ p& 

A piatmon cosmetic surgical clinic requires an excep- 
tional receptionist The ideal candidate should be well- 
presented, poised and confident as the initial contact 
with tWfrwrt* fa pan»nyvmt in maintaining the Clinic's 
professional standing. She should have a sy mp a theti c 
and reassuring n^nmer as it fa important to allay 
patients’ awyanfr**. If yon possess these qualities please 
calk 

Alison Steenson on 631 5404. 



toe emp loyers asms these 
cofa nm . 


However; if pha these, yoa 
an ipcak French. German 
or matter taapzzge. yoa 
are very special As rum- 
mer fa here; otnr demand 
far temporaries has in- 
creased jo be the «e who 
tamfite Telephone now - 
we'd Eke to hear in about 
yon. 

174 New Bond St Wl 


international 





international 

Secretaries 


PERSONAL 

ASSISTANT 

to General Director (Arts) 

Appficants are Invited for the post of Personal 
Assistant to Nichotes Snowman, the General Drector 
(Arts) at the South Bank Centre. 

The Centre is one of Europe's terB«st arts co mplexe s 
and inc or pora te s the world famous Royal Festival 
HaL 

Appficants should possess, highly devejopsd sec- 
retarial sfcSs incJudtog shorthand and audio together 
with some- admiresTrafivB experience. A working 
knowledge of languages, particularly French, a dear- 
abte, plus an appreciation of tha..arts ganeraSy, 
especafly music. - — • - ■ 

The General Director's office is a busy one and app§- 
’ cants should have the abifity to work under presave 
ki an oroanised manner and to respond to constantly 
changng demands. A flexible approach to working 
hours is essential. 

Salary scale £9,710 - £11,170 tndusive of London 
Wekyiting. starting point according to experience 
and quafi&ations. Benefits include a non-contrfoutory 
pension scheme, subsidised meals end 22 days 



imni, ouuui ■»*«! ’TTr* 

London SE1 8XX by Wednesday 30th July 1986. 


THE PURSUIT OF EXCELLENCE 

£13,000+ 

Would yon enjoy a busy, international environment and 
plenty of excitement in a dynamic young team? If so, this 
leading management consultancy will appreciate your com- 
mitment and enthusiasm. Working mainly for a Senior 
Director you will be producing presentations, reports and 
graphs for clients, organising travel, hotel and theatre book- 
ings and providing general secretarial back-up. Skills of 
100/65/W.P., education to *A' level standard and commercial 
experience necessary. Age 24-30. Smart offices in W.l. 
Please ring 434 4512. 

Crone Corkill 


AnEqaalOpportuiiituaEmplaytr 




, TRAVEL TO EUROPE £14-15,000 

] We are looking for a young dynamic 
I secretary /RA. to join a small, high powered 
I banking team in the City who deal with bus- 
I iness in Europe. You need excellent 
1 secretarial skills and experience, initiative and 


.TH il> r.'i VITweY*'4= T T* 'll iT*T' - 1 


In return you have an opportunity to get in- 
volved. use your organisational skills and 
travel abroad. Speeds 90/60. Age 22-27. | 

PERFECT PJL - W.E. £11,000 f 


. varied business dealings which indtud^prop- 1] 
i erty and F*.R You need the poise end I 
I confidence to handle problems on your own J 
1 and deal with people at all levels as weltje I 
* excellent secretarial skills. Speeds 100/60. . 

| Age early 20’s. 1 

j pteesBcatltBforanhitenriewuntBSJOp ^ J 


There are 3 openings for secretories < in ttiir 
earfy-mid 20’s with « - major City m erofaaut 
bank. You have sound shorthand skills of9tf+, 
aid are happy with -a heavy typmg toad, 4hd 
more than 1 boss. Cheap 

WEST ONE 
You are adaptable, ami have word -pro ce s sing 
arid shorthand skills. As secretuy to the ^pe- 
dal Advisor you wQl cry oy an informal team 
environment • ■ ' ^ j . 

INITIATIVE 

You can use your inidaive as sccrctaryLlo foe 
Senior Manager of an expanding City bank. 
Shorthand and WP skills essential «> r a legal 
background would be useful. Subsidised-mprt- 
gage etc. - -- 

HIGH ENERGY £10-£11,000 
Enjoy the pleasarit. City couhyaril complex 
with: sports finalities ax a secretary with this 
large merchant bank. You need to be mid 20’s 
with^ good shorthand to work wi their Energy or 
Corporate finance department Mortgage sab- 
sidy etc- ;••• .• •; 

tity 3778600 ^^4397001 


TbeSecnetanalCdnstiltonte 


BILINGUAL PA SECRETARY 
(FRENCH) 

c£1 1,000 RICHMOND 

As one of the leading computer leasing companies 
and part of one of the worlds largest banks we are 
seeking a first dass secretary to join our newty 
formed UK operation based in Richmond. As PA to 
the French Managing Director you will have an 
excellent knowledge of French (both written and 
spoken), gpod secretarial skflls including WP, and I 
previous experience at Director leveL ~ 
Please apply in your own handwriting enclosing 
delated C V to: 

Linda Ewlngton 
E.C.S international UK Ltd 
500 Cheshaiti House 
150 Regents Street 
London W1R 5FA 
Tel: 01-439 6288 


EXECUTIVE SECRETARY 
£11,000 + Benefits 

We are looking for a dedicated, professional 
secretary for the new Finance Director and the 
non -executive Chairman of an international 
commo di ty trading company in the City. Deal- 
ing at a top level you will be privy to all 
confidential information, -therefore experience 
at a similar level fa essential. Skills of 100/60. 
initiative and organisational Bair are required 
to carry oot the foil range of PA. ana sec. 
duties. Age 25-40. Please telephone 688 
3G36. 

Crone Corkill 


RECRUITMENT CONSULTANTS 


Fast Motoring 

£10,000 ; 

' ‘ ■ " • . ■' • 7- •’ 

A major UK pic, with an international nanie 
in car component manufecture, seefe a 
high-8>’ing PA/Secretaty to oo-ordlnafothe; 
foies of two divisional MDs. JBodrfflanfare 
adiiev'ers and delegators. You. will thus’ . 
work at senior level," much of the time .or. 
your own initiatiye, handling a rich diveisicy \ 
of social and adrain nespdnsjbiHties. Good 
skills C 90/60) and experience are essenriaL : 
Age 24+ . Please telqshone 01 -493 5787. 


GORDON-YATES ; ; ; 


Admin PA/ Sec ''■-■i 

£ 10,000 plus " Z 

ExceptfonaJ opening for a skilled admto/^sc; : 
with fluent French. The company harwgK 
advertising sales for some of the top tapes fo 
European perkxflcal publiihir^, Appiqx 7096 
admin content fodudes woddpwide Cafapri: 
preparation ofath?rdsing agency preseruarkins 
and account connoffing. You should' “hW 
exoeflent En^ish (mother-tongue level) 0d 
good typing. Age probably 3CH-. PUase 
telephone 01-493 5787. /".TT? 


GORDON -YATES 



UVELY PRESENTABLE SECRETARY 


Required for a property da vatopment company to 
work for s team of 3 surveyors to our prestigious 
Mayfair offices. 

Age 20+ with good auefio (shorthand useM but not 
essential). 2nd jobber would be considered. - 
Salary: up to £8,000 pa. + Staff cfiscounL - 

Please tetephohe:- 

John Finlay on. 01-409. 2322 

Dixons- Commercial Properties Ltd 
(Part of the Dixons. Group pic) 









































TIMES WEDNESDAY JULY 23 1986 




esP 


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i ' - ’ « i*“ 

5 “ 


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All 


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JT\ 11U . 

Ring for news of temporary and permanent jobs from London’s newest recruitment agency. Phone us on Voicebank 01-400 037& WORKING 


MULTTUNGXBI 

oL’ iwTinro JL-< 



CRROUflE KIRQ ^ 

TEMPS! TEMPS! TEMPS! 

EARNING £ 11,000 pa? 

An Mpartrocad iac i«tary toft WP date Mtan the Canafeie Krp anyy 
rw tsn can a^Md a on ta aaast oi ttM above hMc nowig a 
amp of ttsgvnta m tf mas of London. We also hue a area 


OFFICE ADMINISTRATOR 


A vacancy arises for a mature and experienced 
PERSONNEL/ACCOUNTING ADMINISTRATOR for 
our London office. 

The person appointed will be responsible for all 
personnel matters, ensuring essential services am 
provided for Ibis busy office, are] mil have the ability 
to undertake certaai accounting projects (indudina 
petty cash are! cheque payments) and some staff 
supervision. A reafisfc salary is offend and condi- 
tions of employment indude a non-contributory 
pension scheme. 

Applications to: Mrs LM. Ladds, 47 Brunswick Place, 
London Nf 6EB. marked Private & Confidential. 


INTERVIEWER 

c.j£l4,000+ 

We are a privately owned recruitment conso l * 
l?* cy wah in Central Ixxndon. 

Due to. recent promotion and expansion, we ere 
looking for self-motivated people, ide&Dy with 
sales and/or sound cormnerrial experience who 
are looking for rapid management prospects an d 
the opportunity to explore medal areas of Inter* 
est In an already thriving nusinen. 

Call Ctare Cooper NOW on 01-938 3696 


SECRETARY/ 

RECEPTIONIST 

Wkh kudo lypJng/WP for young rapkSy expanding PA and 
Advertising Group loeatad n toe West End. Oca ra nm - 


Advertising Group located in the West End. Circa - 
£M00. Contact 8ua Meier, Mathew Pudney Associates, 8 - 10 
Haflafn SL London WIN 5LF - 

Tat Ot-830 3205 



TbeTTmesi Classified cotamns me read by 
L3xbffioa ofthe most affinentpeopfeiii the 
country.. The fottowfog categories appear 


LU; tl- 1 ■ 1 W - • I 1 »__! i. -e u, - ' ivt 


accompanied by relevant editorial articles. 
Use tte coopon (bdbvr), ood bnd oat how 
easy, tot and economical itK to advertise in 
The Tones Clas s i fie d. 

===== MONDAY— 

Education: University Appcantments, Prep & 
Public School Appointments, Educa t i on al 
Goinses, Scholarships and Fellowships, 
la Ciime de la Crane and other secretarial 
appointments. 

— TUESDAYS— 

Computer Horizons: Computer Appoint- 
ments with editorial. 

Legal Appointments: SoBdtors, Com- 
mercial Lawyers, Legal Officers, Private & 
Public Practise. 

Legal La Creme for top legal secretaries. 
Public Sector Appointments. 

== WEDNESDAY == 

L a Creme de la Creme and other secretarial 
appcdutznehts. 

Property: Residential, Town & Country, 
Overseas, Rentals, with editorial. 

Antiques and CoBectables. 

— THURSDAY ===== 

General Appointments: Management and 
Executive appointments with editorial. 

La Oeme de la Creme and other secretarial 


. FRIDAY ~ 

Motors: A complete car bnyert guide with 

editorial. . M 

Bnriness to Business: Business opportunities, 
franchises etc. with editorial. 

Restaurant Guide. 

SATURDAY 

Owseas and UK Holidays: Milas/ Cottages, 
Hotels, Flights etc. . 


the world famous 

PERSONAL COLUMN, I NCLU DING 
RENTALS, APPEARS EVERY DAY. 


r?" .V 

Mr?..; : ■ " 


1 fiHin foe coapcn and tftadi *:to 

. written niis^ piece ofpapoi allowing 28 lettere 
I Sma«glS^fiA60per ffiie.inc. V AT(min. 3 lines); 

{.BSDH^^P^s&cotanmccirtmKtrc; 


Address. 


THephooe (Daytime) 


barnard marcus 


Due to further expansion of this dynamic 
company, we are looking for bright negotiators 
to join our Residential Sales Offices. 
Outstanding career prospects for the right 
person. Initiative, flexibility and enthusiasm are 
essentiaL Car owner. 

Please contact Constance Vtrnly 
01-4938889 


PERSONAL ASSISTANT 

taplred for Chatan af MmaUanl Canpany 

Ideal position for the right person who writ proba- 
bly in 30'*. good a pp ear a nce and strong sense of 
humour. Top WP skSb essent ia l. Salary £10,000 

Apply with GV.to Susan Maxwell Scott 
C&via House 
65 Oid Church Street 
Chelsea SW3 5BS 


£8,000+ SECRETARIES 

Wa are making a register of secretaries who 
are in the market for jobs paying in excess 
of £8.000. 

If you would lice your details to be avail- 
able to 500 cherts in August please send 
C.V. to: 


TOP FLIGHT SECRETARIES 

Secretary tor Chairman of ‘company near 
Wimbledon Common. £t0£00 

Secretary for M.D. of Centra) Wimbledon in 
Market Research company. £9£00 

Please ring Carol Wisby or Vivette Befie 
on 01-947 0319 or 01-94$ 4424 

or send in your CV to: 

26 The Broadway, 

Wimbledon SW19 
(Emp Agy) 


Ilk 


Sue Wofflngs 
Wardoor Street Agency 
100 WamourStrMt 
London W1 


Or ring Sue on 01-734 8844 
to make a con v enient 
appointment 


n i M ' m 


ASSISTANT 

c£ 12£00 p.a. 

Exceptional opporteni^ for 
a career orientated P A 
within the London offlca 
(WC2) of International Law 
ftm. Total iwohemant in 
demanding. futfiHmg 
environment Excellent 
secretarial and social skiNs 
ptes a good command of 
English and previous legal 
knowledge are of 
tantamount importance. 

Please can. In 
confidence, Vanessa 
Dye 01 242 8844 

ACE FOSTER 
•BEAZLEY . . 

omcoott. 


CLASSICAL 

MUSIC 

AGENCY 

Reauhes 

Secretary/P A with 
good shorthand/ 
typing and 
knowledge/interest 



ADMIN PA 

£10,000 

hM ramu% id cSmto tie 
ladder » maass In Has *61- 
estaBSshed tfeTedi Co. totally, 
ts pa m the nrsaor. cum 
Sacreunai iMOs are mured 
but more mponarsts the ptten- 
tal to develop your mnQtfts at 
i Juoat txKum tael M m 
mss of PR. Salat & Mstmog. 

CITY: ot 481 2345 
WEST END: 01-938 2188 

atbatt 



INSTITUTE OF 
NEUROLOGY 

Personal 

Secretary 

Britaisiastie. ranabte and 
maturaporaon roqukad for 
Harwttig post m Psraortat 
Sacreory to ths Chapman of 
tha Da pan mant ot Cdnicai 
Nauroiogy. Good ssemarlal 
shea ragdrad. mpuiNng 
word processor oxpadanco 
and a knowtadga ot madtoal 
tanntncdogy. Ptaasant ottfca 
In now rasaaich bidding an 
Bloomsbury. Generous hofr 
days, salary on Scalo £7.278 
- 28332. 


Departaiasl ot 

Weal Haurelogy 

Tbs bsttriB a! NatmiqB 
TB8 Kasnii no xp w ii 
Qwee Siuvb. In a do a 
WIN 386. 


htht 

OT? 



^ W .ilgnTirS : 





PERSONNEL 

FRONT LJNER 
c£ 9,000 

Spend yna days n tte mosi 
ftxcutsaB offew In tbe haal of 

Marketing Direcar tfmaiope 

show «ba you are reafy made 
d then toe a yw oppouh 
K jr. » yoa haw parsonakty 


£11M + Benefits 

Use your fluent French and 
enema Sec skills, to pra- 
vrda confatental assistance 
to the Head of this grate- 
sfond frm. Lots of ovwssas 
c&ent Bason and adrnio. 


DffiECTOR- £34109 + 

Prestigious Co. ei Mayfair 


01-935 8474 




si c iu.unai. nunuiTMCMr 
CONSJJLUNI5 


TRILINGUAL PA 
£ 10£00 PA 

It you thrive under 
pressure, ere highly 
motivated and a natu- 
ral self-starter, this 
could give you the 
break you've been 
locking lor. 

Running the office In 
your boss's frequent 
absences abroad wll 
alow you not only a 
great deal of autonomy 
but also the opportu- 
nity to use both your 
French and German 
extensively. 

Excellent- admlnis 
bathe experience end 
confident English 
s hort ha nd era essen- 
tial For further Infor- 
mation please contact 
QRan Efcvood. 


=01-491 1868 



Holiday sia nganem heno u ad. 
For War Wow a — 
arta D Or tebprem 
lone Graham-Wateen, 
Sheffield Bddbig, 
Imperial CoBaga. 
Undon SW7 2AZ. 


81^89 T 5lTTSt 3814. 


BHJNGUAL SEC. 
SPANISH/ENGLISH 
C. £1(M)00 - WC1 

Btergrik, aSeigantaed grs- 
sentable Sac required for 
young fere at Imyere dealing 
exclusively with Anglo/ 
Spanish work. Mist be malty 
te-fttgual Engksfi/CastcSaia 
(not South American Span- 
ish). fast and accurate typat 
(stnrthand not essential) and 
nave at Inst 2 years experi- 
ence of Mridrre at senior 
level, using WP and TLX. 
Bngbt mo de m offices and 
frioily envawvneiL 

Tat 

MFdwel Sari & Associates 

01-242 0848 




PERSONNEL 




PERSONNEL 


■ 1 . 1 ill l i| 


I HUMPHRIES ee 

734 9911 


JW 




m London • tooting tv an a- 
pcdeocad Secretary, preferably 
web Pareontal axpmewe a 
coentnaa the scMdes of a 
very tasy pea onn d depart- 
raam. Be a Sue right hand 
pareoa id Nw Manager and to 
peremnal officer. Dmetoo to 

pb to P utmA serewsng 
md gnam admin doles. Fa a 
very challenging and stretching 
mb. oft 

Haris Therm Oshowrid 
ob 831 8668. 




£ 10,000 


UiW ms wnroa wwi mm* 

gnmwiiMtiem. Vary OOle typng 
- this b an bnponant admin, po- 
stfon nming to* whole office. 
Do a good |ob »J toe fttendal 
rewards cocdd be enarnuus. 
(tag Amanda Fotsteron 

434 0030. 


i 1 

m . , ii ij , , re 


'Mi '. I-. - t-I t 

i 



S 1 

ys 1 

*> • I • I 

Vii I'Tj 


r& 


fkfta 


preshtigious 

PROPERTY 

£ 12,000 

ft* Senior Partner «d ton sw- 
cesduf toyMranaanysaeki 
a prefesstoal PA/Secret*y to 
asst totrerery aspect of to 
day. Enky ex&osnc inwhe- 
ment * dredw level as you 
Dbn lunches aod metengs. 
keeping a day ot sooat an- 
ga gerae nh and bandkng Us 
personal Ufhrs. tea ma n 
speeds 100/80 + W> 

Please telephoue: 
629 8863 

ODGE 


PR MB’S PA 


A chance to gel into PR! Re- 
oreanise this American 
MD'i busy (fiery b a stylish, 
modem office SWL Meet 
and oommimicae wth inier- 


gtamoroos job in a rapidfy 
expanding company. Phone 
SaDy O wyu n an 

434 0039 




£12^08 neg 

Diplomacy and charm are re- 
quired for IMS position of 
total inwofvem oi x- Two dy- 
narrec jet sattitM oortieman 
need ymx atftmi/sacretvtal 
and bookaeping skMs to run 
this Mnms&onal SWl-basad 
bustneea ei toe* r to wnci 
Wonderftd opportuniy for a 
thoroughly comp e te nt self 
starter. 

Caa Mho on 
01-248 8880 


£10,8804-*- 

This company's most succne- 
tu envioyees have aa been 
Capricorns. They are tooUna 
tar a seoataiy with ei c c ato x 
stottoid 0 work in (be Off 
dapartment To loin tob tin 
loving young taam you nut 
have a strong penoialhy and 
b* able to cope wtto pressure. 
Btsudfai offices and axcetoit 
benefits including a iaige 
Christmas bonus. 

CM Desi Utogbam on: 

01439 1719 




£ 101 ) 80 + 

TMi to mrewc. anpaadtaig —- 




Thte we* known presti- 
gious Mayfair based 
company seeks young 
intelligent secretary to 
assist die Sales Director 
and Ns team. Sin per- 
son aged 18-22. keen 
to work In a fun and 
friendly environment. 
Above average short- 
hand/ typing and good 
English necessary. Sal- 
ary up to £7,500. 
Please contact Brian 
MeloronOI 493 5961. 



Legal aucto Sac for 
frimitoytonhmridng Inter- 
national soiettors in WC2. 
Salary up to £9 AN). 

01-831 2741 
(Mo agencies) 


SUPER SECRETARIES 


! ' *711; 


nriveistty af LoaOM) 

EXPERIENCED SECRETARY 

reared to work tar the Pnifesstir jnd Head of toe Academic Depart- 
ment at WofiOM. 

ExcriM ssodwiri tote required lopatber tffih Mifty to work with- 
out supovtsfcm. 

Sstey on state £7.278 - £3332 industo of London Allowance. 33 
how week. 34 toys' leave tnctadbg Pubic and customary days. 
Further mrikatos and MPfcatbn forms anlafato from too School 
tWflce. RFJ1SJA. fiowtand HBI Street. London MM3 2PF (01-784- 
0500 odm. 4282). Please quota reference MQ/S/M. Closing data S 
August 19BEL 



ASSISTANT 

SECRETARY 



aucno nrnm ties ew. t-o 
needed Uat for lei w lw i w pub- 
mttlne protect in w « End- 
Snreds MBTul. Call 

Sue Jay. Office Angrtt Recndt- 
■nenl Consullantt 01 ^ 500844 . 


corr see era for si ww 

work wtm tame He«au Swre 
Group. Seram of humour vital 
Some real nerka. Call Sue Jay. 

Office Ano«» Recruinueni Con- 
sultants 01-430 0844 . 


UUCU W UK T I f n wcejooqty 
Finance Meuse. PregreaOe 
post wttn lots eerta. LVv Soa- 
ton Tltkel loan. CaB June Key. 
Office Anqef* Beanm nent 
CensulanB Ol 829 0 T 77 



AUWO M U» West End wee) 
practice. 2 partners. Charmine 
people and selendM eni trou - 
mem. Bonus. Sobs. rest . PPP. 
Can syivta Lanp. Office Audi 
RKTunmeni cmwinanb ot- 

630 0844 . 


CITY M £9800 Pt u poBocb 
M ner needs smart Sec for went- 
me P.R. nautme. Ptomi share, 
um. red. kn» other extras 
Call Maria Read. Ofllce Angets 
RoTuttinetu Censuicana or- 
430 2831. 


ore piunrwDt sec ctosoo 

CUV Surveyor*. Busy and occas 
glamorous Xerox 646 T W. 
own office. Sums po«. Can 
jannettr Rainer Thomas. Offire 
Araefs Recnatnwil ConstM- 
tana 01-430 2S3I 


YOUNG SCO £T7BOWi. Take 
charge of manager's ofOce Lore 
of enotaetrs around- Vtsltors. 
wai x train Wang 016. Call Syl- 
\ia Lang. Office Angels 
Rrcnillmrnl OpasWUnte Ol- 
630 0844. 



join 2 others 
gynaaology and childrens 
neurology. EB-E9.000 pj. 

Day UMtone: 
01-486 4620 
After 5.30pm: 
01-837 6039 




see to rum io £900 a ww 
find cpninct Team needs brfl- 
liani yourg or ganis e r . Know! 
BM S62C hetpfpl can June 
Kay Office Angels R ecnm meal 
CemvUdbOI4» 0777 


mn UNO PUM. PtaadUly 
offices. Very fenport- MM In 
buernaL dcpL Good LVS Bo- 
nus. Call Sylvia Lang. Office 
Angels RemUnwnl Co ns ul- 
lams 01-630 0844. 


VDU 08 CSSCX Essex new town. 
Insurance Co. Fun travel exp 
paid pms exctil perks. Can Ma- 
rta Read. Office Anpeis 
Rrcruaraem Cansunanis Ol- 
430 2631 


votru. ■ THE 1ST PERSON 

THEY MEET? VN8MP 
Mike will took to you as ReCM- 
MM in Ibis proagwui 
Hvnking agency u^djw 
Covrh Carden. YouTI we ed la 
Be wrWd. arocuUU: 
and capable enough to rope 
with varied Reeepdon dunes ♦ 
acting as Secreury to a Uan» of 
3& 5» rarctmrm. WcH —y M 
to C.7.BOO * beoefBS tor Uir 

nMI petson- ASflMI- 
9 .00-6 JO Mon-FM- awUOl- 

board btd excebeni IvoM 
necessary Can Plppa on Ol 430 
1222. EX1. 2638. mo SMKMI 


A. 1 '* 




m iRH 

l ap* 1 








r-6-r^ " m W 


mm 


Bt 

K ' l . 


•A TO PROS" DM S9O0O. HQ of 
gUnf oorp Hyde Pk. Psrc- very 
varied duties. Sun smart ambt- 
Uous person. Call Svante 
Dunphy. Of ore AnpeN RecruH 
■aeiH Consultants 01-650 0844. 


TRAVEL CSJMO-UnMue oppor- 
tunity to Wo a new dtvtMoa of 
tMs preswaous estabbDmenl as 
■earn secretary to ibelr Tour 
Operations. as weft as 
organising travel mnsnas and 
providing se c r eta r ial su pport, 
there is epporrunfiy for further 
inioino. The aunty Id work on 
your own mUUlho Is ewnttL 
Skills BO 60. Age - 21 ♦ . Please 
telep h one 01-493 6787 Cordou 
Yates Consultancy. 

ILlMilf HUM UMOO + 

benefits. This mafor computer 
company are looking far a 
Irlendtv end org a nised eeore- 
■ary k> asdst their intsmsuonw 
marketing dlrecmr. Your busy 
day wo include keeping tn 
much with clients ana making 
train a r rang em en ts fa all cor- 
ners ol the wortd. StdOs 
too SB. Please telephone Ol 
499 8070. Caroline Kmg Apots. 

SAY rr WITH FLOWERS £8.500 
- leading gardens society w- 
genuv require 

wccpwm i u secret ar y. Varied 
Interesting rate for soneona * 
mealed In norticulture. You 
shouM be well educated, -wed 
pmenird. with some work ex- 
perience. Good lyptoa essential. 
AM 20*. Please lefeptionr Ol- 
493 6787 Gordon Y arts 

ConsulMiicy. 

PUMJ8HM8 MB X92S0 a. early 
rnirw. This imtoig book 
how ts seeking a PA ta an Asa 
mo io ramroia ■ iwKd'and 
im oh tog rate at » savor ln«. 
with ups of author roman and 
ihr on h> me your mutative, 
you win nr boOdtog-ua ntr exp 
suits 80 60 wpm. Synergy, 
toe Teeniumsm ronsuttancy. 
01637 9633 


RL OR NEXOS OP. CZSOpw for 
laroou Toiieqies Company in 
cemral London. Call Suranne 
Dunphv- omce Angrts RcctuU- 
meni ConsuttanK 01-6300844. 








PUBLIC KUTIOW Company 
close lo ToDenham Court Road 
tone need a secretary imM 20 V 
with fast accurate typing to be- 
come part or a dynamic team. 
Varied donas tnrtudtnB 
organisation of press confer- 
ences. lunches and general 
admin. £8300 pb- For buer- 
view contact Tina Croker 9BO 
6733. Cenacoro SUff Agency. 


TRAVEL ADNHNUntATOK Ex- 
clusive SW1 hoixtay Co 
reoulres a cheerful individual 
|«-Z3 mui owns mum <46 
worn) |p train Into 
Uckeung reservation. Good 

prewtdautm o leN p i na w man- 
ner essential. Please romacT 
unda Mcieed as soon as ootu- 
tsr tor men dnatts. 01-439 
3064 FaUhfotd Persumel 


miCMCOin W1 hairs vacan- 
cy for a bright bubbly iccreiary 
Io work tar a young Mam. Lots 
of opportunity lo tee your tnt- 
uauie. shorthand b not 
necessarv but good typing ts es- 
s*nH»l. CoOege leaver or 2nd 
lobber. L.7AOO. Please can An- 
drea an 01-629 7838 Barnett 
Media. 


are AUDIO £8000 West End 
Surveyor. LVs. Friendly, social 
crowd. Call June Kay Office 
Angela R oc mi troeni Consul- 
tants 01629 0777 


JHR SEC/PA £7300 for City Tax 
Mngr. Get totally involved here. 
Young busy dept, can Mana 
Read. Office Angela Recruit 
meal OorauHanQ 01-430 2531 


nRMMRS 1866. £6000 

to £9 500. We are nmanlly re- 
cruiting for four vacancies 
within the wortd of property, 
design and banking for prtstt- 
9Kxb rotnantues based in 
Sioane Souaro. South Kenstng- 
loa. Hera lavon and MaylMr. 
Ideally we are tooWno for out- 
going indMduau with smart 
appearance and excel lent tele- 
phone manner. Please contact 
Linda Mctrod on 01-439 3054 
FaMMobj Personnel 


PA/KC. TO Dheesor. Chairman. 
Age 26 - 45. fillJXJO*- P4. 
Prpsilgioua position tor weD- 
guouned sec. with s n. typing. . 
ICO SO w.pjn. Musi be weO- 
groomed and spoken and have 
at least 5 years* exp id director 
level. Large Property Banking 
Co with otoces worldwide. 
Telephone Mm. C. Maucisherg 
far 4P0f. 528 5799. Ktogstot 
Pern Com. 


NON-SECRETARIAL | PART TIME VACANCIES 


CHESTERTON'S 


NEGOTIATOR 

Our continued (powth and 
expansion has readied in a 
vacancy tor a negotiator In 
our Residential Letting 
Department 

W» require an energetic and 
enttusbstic person to join 
our team. 

Experience prefeired but not 
esssntaL A driving Hearns is 
a must 

Please apply now with full 
tv. to: 


'iisu . 


AREA DfflECTQR- 
LETTW6S 

48 CMPM*M Brest 









tDMNOSTSATOR lo Cl 1.000. 
Develop your admin skins ovu-r 
a broad frooi within ms Co. 
where you win hate mis ee va- 




NRMMKMIIPCN0O.M; 

s M tor MO of Rita, leading 
interior design company In bwj- 
tng aniioues and In dead™?**™? 
rnawr protects. Skills 90 » 

wpm. Synergy, iherecroltmenl 

consultancy- 01687 9S33 




PA TO SNR mm Frenetic CA 
office EC4. lou *.h but 
varied routine. LV&. call Man* 
Read. Ofllce Angels Reovul- 
tnent CunsuUwds 01-430 2S31 


VDU £4900 HOtbum SUB 18 - 
20yr «M Great perks. Call 
Mana Read. Office Angels Re. 
mnimenl ConsuttanB ox -430 
2331 . 




SECRET ARKS lor ArcMUCK * 
Designers. Psnaanenl A leinpo- 
r ary positions. AMSA Specialist 
Rec. Cons. 01 73a 0632 

FRENCH BUngual PA. W1CR. 
P.R. Director. Od cemoiumra. 
non * °r 9 W*s*ng*“Jto. 
C9.000 + car. QiU Natalia TED 
A9V 01-736 98S7 
MARKET RESEARCH CO. Audio 

See Tram on w AYbuno 
inety. social Co. B9£Op*.CM 
Kaialla TED Agy 01-736 98S7 
GERMAN /ENGLISH senior PA 
EntfisiiSH. £12- 000 - Language 
sun Agy 465 8922. 



|££ 33 -£ 25 j 

;■ virgin ’! t 8 


ATTRACTIVE Lady with Porsche 
wants prestige dMvtngjoh. Mrs 
J. Hands Bookbam BMlf be- 
fore u jm. 


PREP & PUBUC 


GCE retakes - 
Which College? 


Consult ts about *0' 
and 'A' lewd retakes and 
get expert advice on 
tutorial colleges. 

Our counselling is free 
and objective. Our offices 
are just six minutes by 
Underground from 
Marble Arch. ‘ 



Cm FRIDAY wttb Uay hand- 
writing A good Mephone 
manner nsund by mu 
friendly Co mar Victoria Sin to 
lake telephone orders A wru* 
up books. TVpUig an advantage. 
Good career proeperts for red- 
able accurate, numeraie young 
person. Ring 01-821 B48S. 






| 1 . L 4 i ‘S O » > i < iAi 








(fliTTW I 


SRCRCTARY IOO 80 wNh 
OUiefti 2010 exp. urgently re- 
ouired rot lung term anterunm 
in wey End. ExctUng work In 
P SL ExcrOcnt rate. Plow lri«- 

- phone Brenda Stewart eo Oi- 
499 8070 Caroline King Apdts. 


LATE VACANCIES AVAILABLE 

"Ctaistef wd Castle", Aureal 1-6; August 28-31. "Borotov- 
esque Ait and ArcMacture^TSeptombBr 18-21. ‘YwmCew 
weekend", September 26-28. 

Exptoffitons to mec&vri sites in an tore of autstamftn 
nBbirel beauty. Accomodtoton In totr uU h te Queen Anne 
farm Douse. 

SAE. or phone Christie Amo 
Medievfl Study Centre- 
Tan House 

Newtand ague. GLIB BNP ‘ 

Tel: 0594 32222 


































































THF. TTMRS WEDNESDAY JULY 23 I9S6 





PROPERTY BUYERS’ GUIDE 
LONDON PROPERTIES 



lynden Gate Is a new. period devetopraent 
on Putney Heath. SW1 5. 

The houses which have 2 or 3 bedrooms 
and 3 ewepttaral reception rooms are offered 
for sale at around S2SOOOO freehold whkh 
Includes double garages. 


AbDOdure Is available front: 

The Linden Gate Sales Office. Portsmouth Hd, 
Putiey Heath. LondonSWlSTetOl -799-5018. 

The Suwtause b open Thursday to 
Monday from 10am to 4pm. 


LYNDEN GATE 

The Rqyco Corporation. Rc^Housa Liston Rd, Martaw. Bucks. SL7 1 BJCTefc (06284)6922. 


Near City & River 
5 minutes walk from Tower Hill Station 
or St Katherines Dock 


LEYBOURNE HOUSE - 58 new flats ft studio flats for occupation early 1987. First 
phase sold. Second phase available £75.900 - 180.000 

Healed indoor swimming pool. sauna, solarium, porterage, 2 lifts, superb finishes to 
flats ft common areas. Early reservation will secure purchase at fixed price. 

Sole Agent Stephen Morgan 
TeJ 01-403 6200 




^.XWESOPBUtiKKBSaa^^ 

' aaosrscnswT^jnskAREft -■ - . # 


Retaining origmal features 
indudingexquisitemaride 
fireplaces, and four with 
private terraces/paQ05,al] are 
finished rathe highest 
standards with fitted carpets, 
spacious reception rooms, 
designer khebensand 
bathrooms, and access to 
beautiful private gardens. 


2 Exceptional 
Maisonettes 
£395,000-£420,000 
land 2 Bedroom 
Apartments 
£195,000-£225,000 
StudioPiedaTerre 
£89,500 




44-KOHHranfmn Road Lndoa SOT 152 Wtara Rote bndooSlTOTO 
W-5WM9l*m-5«W41 01-3738425 

Hi3e ftopaty Derdapmas 



Dumta q Hoorn andun tuto (Wtmxan. 4/5 Bads. 2 

^ss^-cSasss^h 

gate. 2 ms. 2 Raceetin Rooms. Ktefcan. IMBy 
Bdbb. Jnge. 51 year laaw. 

Lanin Clna, SI1 £425,080 


Modensad and interior deripnnt Usw House. 
«rajfato- 


Suto. 2 turftsr 
Cloakroom. Pa- 


jltajm. 

HagL n«i|inuMi 

HE, tMMUUU 

to. 65 vor tan. 

Balfraria, SMI S295JO0 

Ntmty rehrtisftad Rat 2 Bods, 2 Baths. Dafcfe 
Votare Racepto Roooi, Bad K&tm 38 yew 


£280 

Conveyancing by City Solicitors 


For buying or selling your home in the usual 
way, we charge £280 (+ V.A.T. and disburse- 
ments) for prices up to £60,000. Please 
telephone us for a quotation on figures higher 
than that We can also help you find a 
mortgage. 


BARRETTS 

49 QUEEN VICTORIA ST 
LONDON EC4 


TELEPHONE: 01-248 0551 


f ^Gascoigne-Pees 

I ^ - r — ° 


'■uunutM 

Spoon Mo bm ml 
Ml Bx9l End Gk 


flmtoa 


Ha.OUlRMO.KiLUaiy.2 

- a ft F/H. EIGUn 


nSm and quM grand floor state ta fcmoc P/S bfadt CfcM Son 

sTmTsum iff* ts* no ul Com ch a tux-ftne. ta v**. 
man. sole wots. 


Oanka nkabaked penod coB don Hawk ad Hydi Pait Ha. 2 
FtatTW. n. 3 MS 2 Bte. am. Tarn, to CH foaUL 

anna 


Ban own tut 4 KW. Porte. 81 j 

UMR (WANE S I MI T , SV1 

Sum iftuMatf 2nd Boor u m pn« tarifeg. Dbm 

. rat ftttp. Had Kt Wb Bad. Ban GnCiiSBiaai £ti 

\JG8tTS. 


54/56 LOWER SLOANE ST- LONDON SW1W8BT 
SALES fll-730 8762 TELEX BBAGP93S944 
RENTALS 01-7308682 24HR ANSAPHONE 


NORTH GATE NW8 

Magnificent unmodem teed 4th floor flat with 9 rooms 
facing Regents Park. £600,000. 142 year lease, 

Apply to: 

Lordsgate Properties, 

The Estate Office 
01-586 4363 


Nr aeniwkji 
Park, anrac. 2 dM bed. P/b IM. 
larcw ml ouniiiy m. arts. GCH- 
£62.300 01-808 7241 eves.- 


DISCOVER OUR NEW DOCKLANDS 
Enormous riverside houses 
doser to CITY than the Isle of Dogs. 

OVERLOOKING OPEN COUNTKY5IDE. 

as far as the eye can see. 



• Balconied Irving room • 35ft studio room 
onto garden • 3 or 4 bedrooms • 2 bathrooms 

• 20ft Idtchenfcliner fully applkmced 
• Cos central heating 

• Private parking • 95% mortgages 5.T.S. 

PRICES £108,995-£n 9,995 

Srib stonfl o f ifiiaaiirti far qufefc exchanges 

WflURMINT QUAY, CRAVEN WALK, 


VIEW SAT-SUN 

2pn-frn I OFF OAFTON COMMON, E5 


Brochureline ALAN SELBY & PARTNERS 

01 -986 9431 until 8pm. 



WESTMINSTER 


An outstanding penthouse 
of about 5000 sq, /if. 


Dining Hall, magnificent drawing 
room, spacious roof garden, 

3 bedrooms, dressing room, 

3 bathrooms. 


Substantial offers invited for the 
long leasehold 

Adjoining studio flat available in 
addition. 


Bernard Thorpe 


19-24 Saint George Street, 
Hanover Square, London W1R OPT 
Telephone 01-499 0353 


WHY NOT RE-MORTGAGE 
YOUR PROPERTY 


And get the benefit of your equity 

Installing Central Heating 
Refurbishment of your propert y 
Extension of your property 
School fees 
Buying a Car 
Going on holiday etc. 

(No fees payable) 
HERSCH INTERNATIONAL 
(FINANCIAL SERVICES) LTD. 


One of Enropes leading Mortgage Brokers. 
* idon wlX 5AE 


Tel: 01-629 


eley Mr 
5051/2 


TELEX 28374. 


VERY LAST 
CHANCE 


To buy a 2,000 sg ft flat in 
West 100 


Butters' Wharf 
yards from Tower Bridge. 
This is reputedly the finest 
Warehouse conversion or 
the riverside, but prices 
are still less than £200 
per sq ft for the last 2 
units. Unbelievable views 
of River and Bridge from 
large balconies of 
superbly finished 2 
bedroom flats at £369.00 
and 3/4 bedroom shell 
flat at £335,000 -allow 
£45,000 to finish. 


Sale A j 

Stepbee Morgaa 
TeL- 01-493 6200 


Sr 


|£ Keith Gardale Groves 


% 


CLOSE TO HYDE PARK C715#W 

A oagafctM M tm Mbi NUjratend •«■«»»■». tate M 
im. jtahr. nofi^cR* kadim/Sua im. mofctW dnuagmS mm. 
van Bed, ififiAm Mdv. 2 taOt toads wan. ttan gda. cqtt, 


HtayWr OMoK 01 829 fi804 


CHELSE A CLOttTBtS SW3. 


C1K000 

kill «add 


ini8ni«anwiwi>iBitu8imi 

obIb a ranm pefrUm v mem Mjng kmdnm Itaw. h* MM U. 

dorimxHL taMBM. «. eti A o». In 12S yen 

OlfiCK 01 581 0166 


OUEENSGATE SW7 _ £210000 

aaw« bm ttinA ki ta period kan moAmsid M Mi 
Rwv. rin no. fbrii M 08 . Wm no. U. Bb d Kta 


Knigbtsfaridg* Offic* 01 581 0155 


KnigtaMirMgB Ones 01 581 0155 
1CITY EC* _ £235400 


% 


Uajblr 43 Nartb AadkySoect, London W 1 Y 2 AQ. 

251 Bre rnton R ond. Loaka SW3 SEP 


0 


NORTH OF THE 
THAMES 


VERY SPACIOUS 
FAMILY HOUSE 
wii 


4 storey md tea period hsa on 
qutt street, putty raodsmsad. 
Waal 2 ints, 6 beds. 1 study. 2 
twttls, s hows’, Urge kitchen. 4 
WC. 2 recept. ong. taaons, tas 
BS&bHshed rear gdn. wtb 
tawn/pabo, smal (rent gdn- Gd 
deearatiw outer ttraughouL 
SCH. OH SI ping. 


Tel: 81-229 1811 


BELGRAVIA 

t'ljCM PmwsaV: rfTVrind Mb* 


rRHIW 
talc («dm. 


■jiM off Eaton Sovm 
Maimo* Scan TrepkaJ Pn- 


Tuufl) ir fa riiMitii MuNc Doorv 
S«\Th 


kiidwa. 3 hAk. 24 ft Rc- 

cepnan. 2 ' ■ Bubs. 54 tor bau 
Q25JIO. \Ttw Mta?. 


Tek 01-730 5061 

«r 8663 503791 (24 bs) 


BEMCBJEY COURT 
. GLENTWOHTH ST HW1 
Luxuriously rcnmuted show 
not in rmtw «o». Futn- 
lousty hmBMd. 4 bedroom. 
2 bathrooms, shower room. 
«ursi cloak room. nojiltkoTl 
triple reception, fully mud 
LUrnen. UR. poncr. VMM se- 
curity. roof uarcten. Lore 
Lease. C33S.OOO. 

PALACE PROPERTIES 
01-486 8S26 


liie 2 bed 2nd nr fUL nuns 

.Rom tube. OCR ni Ml 4 cote. 

sontrap roof terrace, shared 

F MU. GSCLOOa 623 9647. 


CHISWICK 


modern j bedroom home 
PU-S 

(VMIMI'NU O ARDEN 
„ ftlvm VTESS 
EXfELLENT (ONDTTION 
VI4IHBU IMMEDIATELY 

FOR SALE BY TENDER 
31st JULY. 
Details phone 
01-409 2377 (T) 


QUEEHS6ATE, SW7 


Meartte Park. 2nd floor 
(Bt). 4 Beds. Long lease. 


Sole Agents: 

BraeaptM Estates 


01-5893033 


SELECTION OF 
EXCELLENT 
STUDIOS IN W2. 
From £ 47 , 000 . 
ORB1TON 
ESTATES 
01 402 3188. 


SWISS COTTAOC - Stunning, 
brrenr. purpose-built. 2 
beoroomed. lop door flat. Now 
Iv decorated. Lonv lease 


C9I.OOO Tel : Oi- 


! 4622 


HW3- ATTRACTIVE m ais onette 
with paced garden In excflistv* 

KKUIon. 3 rooms, kUchen din. 

Uto room, laundry room, 
ha Ui room, lease SO years. 
C 63.000 Aflen Omne Ana 
dales.' 01*261 


OVERSEAS PROPERTY 


prf2LSS 




to have been there for decades 


Waterside living: Spoeny’s complete town tmilt in traditional style 

It’s Venice, made in France 


•.;v: 


In 1966 the French architect and town 
planner Francois Spocrry began creating 
his idea of a Provencal Venice on a large 
trad of swampland on the Bay at St 
Tropez. Today Port Grimaud is an 
established attractive town of 2,000 
homes built along intricate networks of 
linked canals interspersed with focal 
points including two large market 
squares and small “quarters” of bistros, 
bars and boutiques. 

Virtually all the houses have been built 
in traditional maison de pecheur style — 
tall, narrow and fronting the water and 
each with its own mooring, essential in a 
town at present boasting 75 acres of 
water but no roads except those giving 
access. There is, however, an efficient 
public transport system of water buses 


By Diana Wildman 


40 houses to be built 
on a created island 9 


and plenty of mooring availability in the 
main squares, both of which make 
holiday living easier. 

Until the past year or so, the maison de 
pecheur ; with two, three or four bed- 
rooms, was the only type of property for 
sale, but now some small apartment 
blocks known as Les Grimaldines have 
been completed near the perimeter of the 
town. Homes in the second phase. 40 or 
so small studios and one-bedroom flats 
overlooking the water, are now for sale at 
prices ranging from £30,000 to £47,500. 

Francois Spoerry has now completed 
the designs for 40 houses to be built on a 
newly created “island”. Work is sched- 
uled to begin in September and the first 
phase of 17 houses is due for completion 
next June. 

Montpelier Inlemationars local repre- 
sentative Nicholas Beuttler has found a 
demand, mainly from existing owners, 
for larger houses with garden, swimming 


pool and garage, and to cater for this, five 

large four-bedroom homes have been 
included in the first phase. Two have 
sold off-plan and the rest are priced at 
around £350,000. The other eight, which 
are still for sale, are the standard maison 
de pecheur in the two-bedroom and 
three-bedroom form at prices from 
£127,000 and £150,000 respectively. 

All the maisons de pecheur ran built in 
traditional style, using old Provencal 
roof tiles, and are basically the same 
overall design inside. 

Not everyone wants the constant 
activity associated with a boat-owning 
community or even to be on the 
coastline. Within about half a mile of the 
St Tropez beaches there are rolling 
wooded hills with small villages seem- 
ingly dotted about at random. 

Eight miles from Port Grimaud, amid 
the steep slopes of cork trees, a mile 
above the village of Croix Valmer, 
Montpelier International is building 22 
two-bedroom detached and semi-de- 
tached houses at Super Valmer. The first 
phase of 1 1 villas will be completed by 
January and three are stiH available at 
prices ranging from £88,000 to £93,000. 

The show house should be open by 
September and the second phase, of 
which seven are still for sale priced from 
£93,000 to £98,000, is scheduled for 
occupation next summer. The origmal 
Super Valmer schema situated above 
this development consists of 18 villas, 
which are now all built and sold, and 
there is a large communal pool for all 
owners. 

Details: Montpelier Internationa]' pic, 
17 Montpelier Street. London SW7 1HG 
(01-589 3400). 

Eight miles south of Cannes, on a 


sloping ate above Tl^ale-sm-mef, 
Chestertons Overseas, together: whites 
South of France associate agents; John 
Taylor SA. is marketing what must-be 
some of the most keenly priced holiday 
homes along the Cote cT Azure. .Buiifc 
of the development, known: as: Les 
Residences Panorazner.: wilt, .start this 
summer. . C • - • 

The nine-acre site ; nestles around, a, 
vast turri-of-the. century house. . which is 
being restored by the Fanoramer deyd- 
opers 'for' the mayor of Theoult The 
plans are fora first phase of 61 sxnall.de-. 
tached one-, two- and t)n«e4)!edrbom 
villas .and a' second : phase of 38 
apartments. A. swimming pod and two 
tennis courts will be built alongsidc the 
first phase. . .1- 



<0-5 


Countrycottapewith 
, terracotta tiling 


The villas have been designed in 
classic Provencal country-cottage; style 
with a strong-emphasis on .the tenaepna 
tiling Rooft are angled low over the 
windows, many of which have been 
. designed, with, wroughi-iron grilles. • - •* ' 
Forty villas are already sold and prices 
are from £38.000 for one bedrooqj, 
£63,000 for two bedrooms and £85,000 
for three bedrooms. Fluctuations in price 
are according to size and position. .*■ 
There are plans for a full on-site 
managementand rental service as well as 
a leaseback scheme. The developers ate 
offering a guaranteed rental return over 
three years of 6 per cent net with the. 
owners having use of the home for spe 
weeks every year — three in high season 
and three in low seasoiu 


'J.- -.;i ■" . 

• • - 


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in. - 

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fa -v9.4AMi 

eWPWNi 

Zz* r>£ 



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ilse 7ft wide houw 


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1 :r. i "rtesow 
- : . .-c • - « : 


Details: Chestertons Overseas, ! 16 
Kensington High Street, London W8 
TRW (01-937 7244). 


rsy.z v 


ORCHARD MEAD 


FINCHLEY ROAD, opp West Heath Rd 
HAMPSTEAD 


LUXURIOUS 2 & 5 BED, 
2 RATH FLATS 

from £107,000 


Balconies • Central heating 
Sports/Leisure centre 


Sauna • Whirlpool spa 


Gymnasium • Lifts 
Private Parking • Porter 


SITE SALES OFFICE 
01-4581996 

SHOW FLATS OPEN DAILY 
12 -6pm 


REGAUAN 


REDUCED FOR QUICK SALE 


MghUKMfli Mas SW7. A irtqu# low butt dWu fronts Period 
VI tupstb S facing gardsn & wal planned fimdy anam. 3 bad & 
i. 2/3 fatter bedrooms. 4th taBi. 3 maps + Nam* s s&ngroom. 
acnen. doataoom. Lane 50 yn. E495.000 Jnrt sole agenis 

di iWbisffm a 

lBl3uplflSM fwuiroH) 


01-681 8022 


01-351 2383 


SLOANE STREET 


4 Bed 1st floor flat 
Long lease. Quick Sale. 

£215,080 
Sole Agents: 

BMICPnW ESTATES 
81-589 3833 


ST JOHNS WOOD 

In daUgntfii ai de sc. Eacbu- 
Ina tan moranlQa Utah mod 
S rwty to mo« ma. 4/5 twis. 
2 teths (1 an suite) cUa mm. 
State/ ted 5, fln im. ««. 


dtarii. UUy nit 8tr ten. Pteue 
nkng. Ran md. E43U00. 


Sole 


724 4439. 


nom w umr park, ibw e a- 
wardlan I W T a ced. B tWOs. 5 
luiin It M suite). 2 no. HKh- 
cn. utility. 800 pardon. 
wmnarn*rtlo«By modernised to 
■nain ordinal features ■ 6 fite- 
Nmh motuc floors etc. Nw 
ouauiv cmrti and Moitr 
ru ruins inroughout. 10 mins 
wm End. pood acccs » coy. 
Cl 35.000 F. TU 01-960 0841 


HWL ST tlfOHTMa ROABl 

Camden. £ 220 . 000 . Vldorim 
mthI det her %enh BO" south fae- 
ng win. 6 due oeds « main 
bedim with shower en suite}. 
Rerep. lux an dmer. uiotty rm. 
MUl Gas CH. snnw targe 
self remained l bed basement 
fUL Urgent sale. 01 387 8083 
iw enda A EAey. Ol 499 0396 
oxi 40 lotflco Days) in. 


PETH M TO te RO NS. Extraordi- 
naiy arrJnteci design mats, 
brtghi 4 wadaus. full of origi- 
nal and new features. 3 «l 
beds, tee lounge, superb study. 
1 ' - bam. hand rrafled kit diner 
opening onto gem gdn. Immacu- 
late throughout All mod roes* 
extras. Seeing n DeHrving. 
Cl 40.000 984 2966 afl 6 p ro. 


PALACE COURT W2L Choice tad 

3 appes. all superbly mod * 

refurb.eieg m-nod use. Each of 

2 beds. 2 baths, rtc- lux kit 

Base 1st -Mti floors Gas CM Lift 

New IHynkr a 05.000 la 

060000 Ring today loam - 

1pm MATHESON9 on 349 
2882 thereafter 402 2*41. 


REGENTS PARK 

3 Storey Im bwse 

Beautifully maintained in- 
terior designed house in 
quiet close with in pre- 
cinct of Regents Park, 
West End & Marylebone. 
Large reception room with 
balcony & adjacent pantry 
kitchen, study, dining 
roan, & superbly fitted 
kitchen and utility area. 

3 bedrooms, 2 bath- 
rooms, 1 en suite, master 
bedroom having walk in 
wardrobe, fitted wardrobe 
in both other bedrooms, 
downstairs cloakroom 
with large wardrobe room. 
Double glazed throughout 
Gas central heating, large 
integral garage (will take 
Roils), additional parking 
tee. Includes top quality 
ed caqjets & curtains 
and certain fitted furniture 
included in price low 
ground rent and 
maintainancs. 


Leaslwld 
1,000 ono. 
01-486 9100 


HimLBKBMM MW Charming 3 
bedroom. 2 bathroom house, 
[tea mi fully dmraiM drawing 

room, kitchen breakfast room 
wHh frmch windows lo pretty 
oaittfti. Dry cellar. Loft cam er- 
sten pant Mr C 162,000. Tfl 01 
736 613*- eses and weekend. 
Ol 248 9046- office Itrs, 


mmeu cate SW7. mibi be 
sold, superb g I flat in luxury 

period devHopmenl. 2 bed uih 

suites, high crumgM drawing 
rm. dining rm. fit ML porterage. 
997 yn Cl >50. OCX) 

HA8RODS ESTATE OFFICES. 
01-589 1490. 


DUKES MU, WC3 A charming 
I Bod flat on the 3rd floor of a 

■null P 8 block. Many ong fea- 

tures. 100 yr be. C73.930. 
Bany Bet em Good- 636 2736. 



- ir 




Where in Battersea can you find the 
best value flats for sale with private 
sports club, luxury fitted kitchens, 

• carpets, private parkings video entry? 



REGAUAN 


WHERE ELSE BUT 
Phase 2 NOW OPEN 

1 Bed from £57,500 

2 Bed from £70,950 
• Sales Office open weekends 12-6| 

Weekdays 12-7p.m. Tel: 01 -223 

. FALCON HOAD, BATTERSEA SW11. Next to Ctapham JncL St 



OULU COUKT 
j»rrai qdh *w*z 

j.- t -■ 

Jr*un-a.- — r,- 
X 1 * *r -• . 

■*-- ■■■ - 
W. . -m i*. ■ -j. 
d*. Jn =• it -T- 

- jmm n ‘mmt 


'S346106WP 




MORTGAGE & 
FINANCIAL ADVICE 





- MORTGAGES • 10096 advanced up to 
£120,000 • JVixmain income plus • ixsecondary 
Income > 3i x Joint Incomes taken • non status 

• REMORTGAGES Forany reason, eg: 

• Home improvements* Business Reasons 

• Educational Expenses* large Leisure Purchase, 
(boat, caravan. etcJ • Second House, (UJt or 
overseas • Matrtmonal settlement 

• Consolidate Existing Borrowings 

• COMMERCIAL MORTGAGES 

• Shops, Factories. Etc 

• PROPERTY DEVELOPMENT 
AND BUSINESS FINANCE 




GiovatLane. 

London 

ecs 


Robson 


Limited 

01-623 3495 


BHQ8E THAMESIDE 

Mb& studa & hons in eouiste 
setuig in ObmcIi W4. Stuto/ 
racm of ZT *nb Inge nonb 
2 teds, u. badi/K. Se- 
lwIcngpabogdnKDBeol 


mertank odn. SmaS but very 
sjwaaLEI&OOO 


rwd.ottw5D- 

vREd. Vov Mon. Sots agems 

Siatoa Andrews 848 9E1L 


lcsmsia guobb 

sn 

(Me of dw bast fliB In Wbmwgnr e 

rm nabbla. pan a ftw moiMirts wtoH 

hum me Homes of Pmamom < 

toms. 3 b Me Mfrms. elegH 

dole rac dnng nn. now My nt bL 

M«i rm. Fmshea to tbe Mwst ne- 

danL Ql LNtamed (tenets. Etesai 1 
M 4 many otter fojtUBS. 

Room Hotane to ananm an 
WM W I to new 

01-221 2221 (I) 


--- — QuM location. 
2 BM Carden Ral near lube. Ex- 
rrtlcni kUchnL Many 
cupboards. GasCH 6 Fitted car- 
pets throughout Lease I2S 
»«brs- £ 68.000 for mmMlate 
sale. Alton & Moms 361 5122. 


NWS. TRULY ORIGMAL tianten 
llaL S DMk ter reerp, wgrWng 
(Irrpuwp. CHs.CH. DbtooUzino. 

walled garden wim appte tore. 3 
Mins luhr Excel tern condUMn 
ihroughoui COBJOa 01 *85 
4564 Ihl 01 734 0981 iOl 


W* HAMMERSMITH. FLal 
fronted rod ot terrace house In 

auiet.nil de sac etone us Rner. 

Very Hghl gadetled racepuoa. 
Mlchen dining room. 3 bed- 

rooms. bathroom, shower rm. 
garden. 0137^00. Tri 01 748 

4590 or 01 221 8724 


DANIEL SMITH 


Md-wno .loon hteMg™ 


itorabiwL On 4 ito. OmnOr I 


2 aw 


bfei. F /H tlfiOOOO. 

KU OF BOGS. E U 
Tao 1 Bod IWs Cbneftr bang M 


Realy te acodsboa tate* IS 

Loral 999 jto. E78UOOO 

01-930 6641 


MUSWEUL MLL 

E d wat Sto i house double fronted 

set m quiet lawd tree hned ad de 

sac dose id ztl imentas. 8/7 

beds, 3 roes. Hdun/Saer. 2 

bafts, dortraom, 2 WC, Ml ms 

C/H. cvpOX for 3 cars. SOUTH 
FACING OBden 180TT X 40ft 


TB4 01-883 9284 
AFTERNOON/EVEMNG3 


ftAVSWATtft W2, Spacious, ele- 
gant sltidlo In gdn oq. Caltorted 
sJecfdnq area, vru idL bath, use 
of gdiB. Lae 92 yn. £89^00. 
ono. View today. Tef 01221 
6175 IHI 629 7444 e« 313 lOV 


FULHAM MLACC HO AO p B 

Lux Shtmus Fiat. Lrg Recept. 
3 bed*. CCH. Oak FF MtCh (aU 
anounm me). Fully Tiled 
Bath wc. Many extras £79.600 
92 yr tow. TeirOl 381 8138 


WHCTSTOW N2S 4 bed Mod Dec 

Hse. 2 bath rms. l en suite. Lux 

fitted kU. Dole tecep. Study. 

Ground flr cloak rm. Sunny 

Odn. Own Oge. Mow sonant af- 

ter fM. Cteoe shop*. Stn. Bum 
Etc- C162S00. Exceptional VM- 

ue. must be wen ret: Ot 446 

5388 Hm. 01 361 0983 off. 


THE ANCHOR BREWKOUSE 


/ !TW8 \ 

asrarssT 

265000 1 

I 


SK\D THAMES SE1 


ADJOINING TOWER BRIDGE 

London's most magnificent riverside development : 

WALK TO THE CITY 



Studio's from £ 87,500 

1 and 2 bed flats witb stunning views final £160,086' 
123 year leases for sale 

a 


Final release 
VIEW TODAY 12-4 





Keith Cardale Groves j 

629 6604 


Carieton Smith & Go. 

[ffi 488 9017 


AVBWE CLOSE, IW8 

Superb lux rafljrt) grd flr.ffi 

with virtual private odn. Obto 

Rocap Room. 8 Sods. 2 BatttaJ 

(1 arvsuttsi. sep WC. now 
mod fitted kit. Immediate 


ocojpaHon. 998 jMse. 


Price £275^00 

fflpete. curteka & Kttchen 

Aments ate. 

Tot Owner 722 tolO ftq 
or 829 8102 (O). ft). 


aDBCESra TERRACE 

^*os2 ■ W room fta. Urge 

SMMUB 

rawn. root ganlan, monte mm 
80 year lease. 


81-225 5128 Mrtr 

war 


IIANVSl LAU a bed. p B let n 
fUL Oiled ksUben. bSh^! 
25 1 - l*£oe lounge, ndrance 
yr. lease. ncoMHoi 
amenHies. nr heath, C72B00. 
Tct Ol 267 91M «*«»■ 


lacMUmv m, -dim iar in 
IMUoAtW^MS?, mtst S 
dlo In Victorian, (ofty fitted 
large kumt-n. mower .room. 


ItoW Ca y prt| An d t Uflltai 

E4«x». 


«t«EU. fi CT. WC3 

P? .» 8 : m, agjsoo. ;«M 
Estows. 01-639 1442. - 

W3L Law 3 bed -ftaL U -1 
cizaooa lpj. sue 

938 2222. 

«ST jwm PK HO . unit 
Lnmod hsr rorconrercton^FH, 
Cl 90.000. 01 244 8189^ 


mortgages 

iodk to aio^oo 

r.^UKT- 

tonortm to ESOlUda 
Non Status to £150000 

REE CONVEYANCING 

HraOY 
: H1 t431 803S 


WtMm st, Wt 

Uge unmodemised 
flat in superb' man ; 
btock. 3beds, 2W 
bsths. Triple aspect 
recap. 49 yrstae. 

£139,950 

WMdita 014H tm. 


Conwrvsttorv aiwn. 3 bed*.~2 

. twth^-Hto kHinge. .Batoony wftt 

totet r bvtewsof Enping Foresr&. 

London, dose Ctmrp um . 
C79.960. 01-504 0551 - 


WapoteParv. attractive 
t bed fl at m prestigious new or- . 
veMPtnnu.- entrance ghoew. ear , 
^ SO.-, “ft**?™ 0L-84O B361 

01-2624080 ext 2690 IOJ ' 


P“Jto rn M wnn vnrsm r, 1 

bJd atd floor Itet ofr drat 
Hrtdna. CH. Fined kUchen. 

• “Mb att Mk. itogjQOg 

Di-sis laai'-.vJ v. • 
rwjteM uouwArswc. tv- 
flgtmy ratutevu rates. m«a 
flJVLgpreeen. date bnfcra. tat 
. j g- rm ch. uch74- .f8i.96a 
Sturgto A Soo OL -736 2 ZZ 3 . 


.j c -Z" 

1 >>>, 

. j s : ". ^ ' 

• •; TaJtiw 1 Vr- . 

I \ 







































PROPERTY BUYERS’ GUIDE 


OJUNTRY PROPERTIES 


Lane Fox & Partners 

with Rylands 



ke * f Qr 


decades 


ance 

Si§ 

Kai 

“- 1,1 ^onga^J 

^^ottageivi^ 
ra cotta tiling 

■ni‘ : ^Wi 

_ -rt“« lou 

c: .‘^nich ha\-e w 'Jj 
1 grabs. 

! “ ' ~ 2C ' sc, ‘i2iidpQ 

' - one badSfe 

*raf?;jaid®j 
vvnv F. -ct^auansinpc 
• *- -'.d poauaa 

P~“i ’Of 2 fiiij (g^ 

O-C 'i"ui SSnSKiCBrit 


ir.’Ti* i *2? uei'jJopgj* 
'"‘^i Team o? 
'' ■ r.*: M-». rjiwiij 
•: •;-*■ ' hossfej 
***' - 

••-•<: :r:cr.i Ovssa'i 
F.i" >:r:-tL Lczcos li 


find the 
private 
kitchens, 
ivideoenttf 


_ Paul Gefl yvho in the past 

has restored this house and 
;ras Deauuft^y proportfoned rooms. Mount 

■ Stonehas tour reception rooms, three 
bedrooms and two self-contained guest 
^surtre, write there js a separate ^ 

f awn's studio and outbuildings. The 
yhousfrand gardens are on a raised 
...rock plateau overlooking Plymouth 
-.» Sound, with the fine gardens of more 
i.^iarrai; acre protected by high rocks and 
. ./boundary walls. 

Stratton and Hdborow of Plymouth is 
Asking around £300,000. F 

" ■ Pickwick Cottage in College Road, 
Dulwich, south London, to which In 
Pickwick Papers Dickens retired Mr 

- Pickwick, is for sale through Harvey and 
Wheeler at around £800,000. it was 
originally two cottages bid was 

Converted to one house in the mkl- 
19th century in classic, low-built 
Regency style, it stands in three- 
quarters of an acre and has four or five 

bedrooms, a drawing room, a dining 
.-room and study and a studio outbuikSiig. 

Bakery fiats 

■ A mile closer to the centre of 
London, conversion work has begun on : 
The Old Bakery at Peckham. It was 

: built in 1 896 as a tea warehouse when 
Peckham village expanded with the 
' coming of the railway. The building, 
'behind a courtyard tnrough wrought- 
iron gates, is being restored by 
Bakehouse Ud (01-703 6104) and wfll 

- be converted into three flats, one on each 
, .flootvThe original design is being 

: Observed and toe woodwork replaced, 
and toe flats wiH be completed to 
-'‘shell" finish, each costing £69,950. 
Suggested layouts for the flats have 
been prepared and can be carried out by 
the site builders at an agreed price 
unless the purchasers prefer to complete 
toe flats themselves. 

7 B The development of six flats on 
the River Thames in Pimlico, mentioned 
in this column on July 9, is next door 
to the Elephant on the River dub and 
restaurant, not on the site of it, as 

- Stated. The proprietors empha^ze that 
the chib and restaurant am still in 
-bust ness. 

The 7ft wide house 

'■ Acottage that is only 7ft wide is for 
sale at£42,S0a The cottage, atthe end of 
^ a terrace in Chorleywood, is thought 
by the agents Raft & Mead to be me 
-smallest house in Hertfordshire. It has 
a ground-floor reception room, which 
• narrows into a Jdtchen — which 
'narrows to a point The first floor has a 
bedroom and a bathroom, which also 
narrows to a point Nicholas Davies, of 
toe agents, reports "enormous 
Interest". 


Grcyiirfars,- designed by Charles Voysey and bn3t In 1896, is regarded as one of 
his best bonses and stands proudly on the Hog's Back, near Guildford, Surrey, 
with magnificent views to the south. Voysey, described by Sir Nikolaus Pevsner 
as haring 'hunch greater artistic integrity than Lutyens", included many of the 
decorative features which became ms trade marks, including a heart-shaped 
letterbox and door hinges to the studded oak front door. The noose, rough-ren- 
dered with stone mullioned windows, 1ms four main reception rooms, eight bed- 
rooms, five bathrooms, a separate staff flat and three cottages. The terraced and 
woodland gardens and paddocks cover 48 acres, including a squash court, a ten- 
nis court and a swimm ing pooL -Knight Frank & Rutley is asking £1 million 

Rogers on the riverside 


SWG 

Meal ft* the entfuaasM Handy- 
men. Spasms second now 
purpose bun flat nrtn tub 

centra/ /wrong Turn owttfBS 

smm M tne River -nomas or bum 
stmon. Innofa nns if yea ura at 
E35.000 LmmmM 
SW19 

Souerp Vernon ftnwy resi- 
dence. ImiToadME oeeer. ? 
enormous bedroom* spacious 
cel Ur. 130 Mint) beano garden. 
BeaunWy ranotnuo iHtn con- 
vanem Motion. Corawaseurs 
oiease take need 

£237.000 freehold 
8 W 6 

Pmamai unumnad umnm the 
lour aed i oomod omoeny 1 Lo- 
cated dose to Huwan CM 
3 sapzrzu raeopoon rooms. 5 

r un bedrooms. paoosv- 
Eanyuttaww essential. 
£200,000 Freehold. 

01-736 9191 
OPEN 7 DAYS A WEEK 



Richard Rogers is one of our best known 
architects. He designed the Pompidou 
Centre in Paris, thereby becoming better 
known outside this country than in, a 
fate befalling many British innovators. 
More recently, among other buildings in 
this country, he designed the Lloyd's 
building in the City of London, with its 
innards on its outside and its blue cranes 
on the top. ■ 

Now this controversial man has 
turned to residential property, and his 
first scheme is in west London, at 
Thames Reach off Fulham Palace Road, 
close to Hammersmith. It is, not 
surprisingly, a prestigious she, originally 
owned by him, occupying an outstanding 
position on the river with uninterrupted 
views both to the south and west and 
over the playing fields of Barnes. Rogers 
sold the one-acre site, next to his own 
offices, about 18 months ago to 
Croudace Construction, the contracting 
company and a development division of 
the Croudace Group, which conceived 
the development and commissioned the 
Richard Rogers Partnership to act as 
architects. 

Darrell Bean, of Croudace, said: "We 
bought the, river but Richard Rogers 


opened our eyes to its possibilites." The 
result will be 23 apartments due for 
completion from January. Their recep- 
tion rooms, looking directly on to the 
Thames, will all have about 28 feet of full 
double glazing. 

The scheme is made up of three blocks 
which together have seven two-bedroom 
and 13 three-bedroom apartments and 
five penthouses. AH the three-bedroom 
apartments have master bedrooms on 
the side facing the river, while the 
penthouses are on two floors and have 
double-height reception rooms and some 
of the largest terraces to be found 
anywhere in London — according to the 
agents. 

Several of the apartments have roof 
gardens, the blocks are enclosed in 
private gardens, and the development is 
likely to be one of the more spectacular 
pieces of riverside architecture. Some of 
the apartments have not surprisingly 
been sold or reserved, and prices range 
from £165.000 for a ground-floor two- 
bedroom apartment to £323,000 for a 
three-bedroom penthouse. 

Christopher Warman 

Property Correspondent 



How an artist sees it: Rogers* scheme for apartments on the Thames 





I HO**t s 



TMtKWHOjSjj 


tower bridge 

D THE CITY 


umx VENICE W2 Ifl nr u 

iNrw ramnMnl. 1 bed. 
taunt* dtntr. fll Kit. Uathrm. 
balcony. Ira mar coral. Quick 
sal? £73.960. Ol 734 1679. 


CONNAUGHT IT W 5 beds 

unmodenthed flat. lat floor. 
prmlMgr buJMtng. a* yew* 
MM?. £149.000. OL 344 8189 


MAPPING. South Quay. 4 bed 
will del rise In new Brwtoy 
dnrMmRiL £112.000. Tel: 
Ol 265 0653 net Wdta. 


WCt KMM OHMS 3 unusual 1 
bed flats. C Phone. tnd. On 
CH. 126 yr be. 47.500 Fran* 
Harris A Co 387 0077 


BAMHCAN TO Selection Of 1- 2 
A. 3 bed flats In this modem Ctty 
drcetapmeal. 120 yr Is? from I 
£85.000. Frank Harrs & Co I FULHAM SHrtnon 
387 0077 I flan Stadias undn 


IILHAM SHrtnon I Bed 
flats Stadias under £50.000 
Abbotsbury Estates 381 6677 




01-370 6793 


MMOOHMMHAMBDttS.UgM 
Hudous garden level manstau 
flat. Lge swim room. 2 dW 
bed*. notenUai 2 bam*. Long 
iiw. of whs. Oden In ep- 
ees* of £1300300 Tel: Ot 60S 
8474. 



“ ouuucra 

CIAIM A COKFWT 

Secluded. irique cottage /flat 
attached to service block in 
SW7. 2 receptions. Z bed- 
rooms. 1 bathroom. 1 shower, 
modem Idtchen, smafl garden, 
garage. 50 yre. 

E2S9JI00 

Tel: 01-584 1067 or 
01 589 3379 (evenings) 


c si! Ini' 


6 th Hoot (H 0.4 DetJfooni ML 
2 tags communicating recap- 
Axi moms. 4 bedroom. 2 
Mtbmoms. large Utthen. «n- 
paccaMe decor, cofinnuiai 
gdsn and p*Ung. 146 yew 

msw 

01-803 7799 after 4 pm. 


Etigml macmjs 3/4 bed. 2 
b*.K. 2/3 tecaphgns. ongnd 
tarty Vktwm Mum bautmf 
dKontBd.panmfkwnng.Uy 
feed Untn/traktat room. 


tcngn/lmkfast room 
ononnous winy foaMema. ID 
antes ink from the Lyete. 

was use 
NO AGBfTS 
H- 37 » 3«2 



CHEYNE WALK. 
CHELSEA SW3 

Prestige p/b 2 bed 
flat 24 hr porterage, 
security, gge. 88 yr 
Ise. £187,500. 



VIEW BY 
APPOINTMENT 
11AM- 3PM 
at 

71, FTTZJOHNS 
AVENUE, NW3. 

An eeagumal devdopment of » 
elegant ras «d»h UR in a dtebne- 
tiw Detached resdence X the 
summt ot ttus ranovned tree- 
kned postal withn 2 mtoutes 
Mdk lo Hampstead VdJage. 
Choice of 1. £ or 3 Bedrooms 
ncTOdng in autsaskng Pent- 
house wth Lagt Hoof Tefrace. 2 
wan TEiran ptus 2 with Bedroaai 

S . Merlar desgmd 10 the 
speafleauans to mdude 
totchen. hDuy fietfr- 
roans Gas OH. VMeo E 9. 
Impressive common haihays. fit- 
ted lobes and camels etc. 125 
yew Uses. GNUSS (subjerttn 
evadabdity). 


Fran Ciejm la E 2 S 0 J 0 B. 
5 N 0 AfiMb SeUHtaU 
Hewtud CessePs 
( 49 ns apee May pem-Tpn) 

01-435 4404. 



NKUHU m. Off Walton 
SimH, Superb 1 2 bed flat, 
newly returbtshM. CH. retro, 
filled k lichen, luxury balli. Por- 
ter. Cl 15000 83 yr Ise. 

RfdcMTes: Ol 361 7633. 


conmaroH Mananeac 

unmoor ntsed. Spacious 3 bed. 
Retro. K'kctwn h Balli. see wc. 
000 sa ft roof terrace gch 
C age oon. use. r hold 
£ 188.000 ono. 01 602 8866 


W14, eery epanous a bedim ron 
irtNwn. Htah CNHnps. 
Communal Carden. Low 
ouwoino*. 94 yrs. Good coral i- 
IKHi C97JWO TelrtJl 603 4870 


«va • m won a* kcm. »m a 

Mm flat on tree-lined Eli with 
tgewnnv termre. Kcm to loiL 
F H C129X1QO. 373 9362 tHl 
638 6291 lOI 


CHGLSCA Luxiirioiniy renovated 
2 bedeoem 2 bathroom* Hi 
floor awrony fiM CMr Staane So. 
C235O0O TetXH-730 1632 


CHELSCA SMflO Oil Kings Road- 
Attract 7 bed 2 nd nr m. km 
retool. 1 fu 1 .baU 1 . 9 c ti.97yr 
bP. £ 88 . 000 . 01-731 6496 


HAMPSTEAD St 
HIGRGATE 


oahdcm stttiin hwu 

Char ml no 4 6 bed ree in elow. 
[w U1 BkM rm.-. dWe retro- 
FH £269^00. 50» IW «T) 



Hi a mow owi man ewe is cameon. an 
amcM Vcwun faniy tase aHfenep bv- 
<eg mm. Lae KK/Dnet. * takas. 2 
Baums. Pnsy Gm On SUM PMoog 
SI93.KH) Fneudd 



NORRIS 

PROPERTIES 

01 737 4242 
PITNEY SWiS 
BeautrfuBy modernised 3 
bedrooin/3 racepdon 

room house ei quet cut de 
sac wnti many additional 
features £120.000 

freehold. 


AN ELEGANT FAMILY HSE 
A dUMing cmy vuran nu 
bona d WWW tee SWO ISO w 

ok ametne ne taed mat mHv 
me draroon Dev aea Theomimy 
benebls mm i very sedoded odn 
+ oil st Dkrg 4 a stidM Mbn 
•aKno osancc of tee Oval t 
iwoafkitt sin 4 beems. due 
leceo. dnng m bt umnn no 
wc. BO Mr Eany ueMia rtcam 
iWMW Tl7S DDK 5. m 7559600 
WnbMrtti 567 0600 




Victorian rastdencB, pnvatft 
road. 17 mins Veioda. origi- 
nal toah889- G beds. 3 reeps. 
conservatory, old pmo 
kitchen, laundry. C/H. Sun- 
nier house, garage, 
outbuidings. new roof. 160 ft 
secbjded rear garden. 

CITSjOOQ 

Tef 01-778 7389 


BATTERSEA 

Victorian 4th flr mansion 
flat with vines over park. 
Lge reoep, 4 beds, bath, 
lge kit/b'fst nn. gas ch. 
Clrig features. £129.000 
he’hlA View today 622 
1746 or Taylor Dixon 
Porter 891 1282. 


WEST HAMPSTEAD: SpacWuL 
1*1 i low. 1 bed flat m well 
maintained nqnlm btach. U*e 
el Barden. Very rk»e an 
anunenilvn. CCH. C61.00O.Nd 
aqenK. T« 01 328-7179 
CMtOCH SUBURB NW11 Char- 
acier cott elyle house a beds. 2 
rerep*. 19? i rraralin. qdn. 
Ml bkfcl tm E205XX30. 
Tel:209 1244 rri 
MAMHTCAD. Imniae 6 bedjS 
rn-ep. 2 bain home £380.000. 
Seeker* Ot 794 0600. 


SOUTH OF THE 
THAMES 


BATTERSEA. Artift* freehold ter 
need railway coliae?- 
inunanoare coixtfitan. Untaue 
deikahiul character. 2 Mm* 
Caapham Junction Station. 
Close Id Wandsworth Cot mion. 
Open plan Weep. I I Wne kJkh- 
m wiih hull l In Met onen. 
lerrarotta Uled floor. 2 
beds sludlo Sunny mature 
root pan GCH. £79.960. Ring 
Mon onward*. 01 228 6145 


SHEEN FAMLMMEi Fully 
medemued Edwardtan menu, in 

■mmarulMr corah Uon 4 beds. 2 

rerun*- balhroom downslair* 
rtoakroom 17 IE fitted kitch- 
en breakfast room., and 60 h 
west lannp garden. Gas r h. 
All raroe« tne FreehoUE 
£167.600. Tet : 01 8764SSS 


DULWICH borders, upper Nor- 
wood SE19. lge Victorian Iced 
me. 3 firs + eetf -contained baae- 
mrm flat. Ideal conterstan or 
(amuy residence. Mamie nre- 
platev son gun. No yellow 
lines parking metres C 9 ZOOO. 
Ol 701 4956 0836216090. 


LAME MAISONETTE for sale. 4 
beoraamv 2 batnrooms. 
taunoe. dining room and Mich 
en Ideal as London donuctle or 
a* Mtrsimrni. SElS. 6 mile* 
from City and dotUanila. 
£65.000 leasehold. Tet 
Ol 659 4489 are phone. 


WEST PUTNEY DeUghUul dMe 
Ironted del house tn consersa- 
uon area. 6 irp beds. 3 recep. lge 
Ml brh. utility rm. 3 bath*, cel- 
lar CCH. Small odn. Garage 
ana elf street parkin g. r H. 
C296JMO. Tel-Ol 788 4079 


BLACKMEATH Spacious 1st now 
rial 3 Dbie Bed*. Lounge Din- 
er. rill KM Blast- Bath. Sen 
WC Led. Ga* CM Caraw 
Gdn C7T.ooo. Ten 01 iiB 
. 7(36 ittrti. . 


CLAPHAM JUNCTION.- AH «CH- 
uotial well moeenthed flat 
consoling al 2 Bedrooms, fitted 
K B. ga* C.H.. cot* with a stun- 
ning garden. C76JS00. Td: Ol. 

* 228 9607 view today. 


RING 

NOW 

for the best selection 
of flats & houses in 
Clapham & Battersea. 
01-228 0023. 


CLAPHAM PARK. Charming 2 
bedroom 19lh Century farm 
rouage Open fireplacr. pretty 
walled garden, full gas rh Fully 
dec Further desctamneiU possi- 
bility.- £78.000 671 3666. 


PtfTMEY-2 bed purpose buUt flat 
In Puutey Hearn Lane, good 
rondlaan. modem block. 1 
sil din roam. I I kitchen, bain- 
room A garage. £69.000 ono 
lor quirk Mk. Tet 789 3849 


CLAPHAM SOOTH. Supero 2 bed 
1st now (Ul Mins walk 

Common . Tube Recently 

modernised, CH. £62.000 ono 
016766361 tie 937 0444 Day 


EUEBAHT 2 bed gnd ftr (la! In 
Victorian l»r. Large *11. dining, 
ul. bath, garden Quief St. ctose 
lube SW9 Now only £69.500 
Morgan Ctme oi 761 0900. 


STREATHAM RRJL Los ely soar 
2 bed flat. Flench dr* lo 7SCt 
garden. CH. Good dec order. 
Ou lei re* Rd Close amenities 
JCSOlOOO. T I* 01-67 1 0750 


UNIQUE period mats with an uiv 
equalled slew over VauxhaD 
Pfc. Fully mod. all ong feats 
walk to Westminster £69.300 
Morgan Guie; Ol 761 0900. 


STOCKWELL. Charming 2 bed 
1*1 fir cons Hal Fined kilrhen. 
& balli. GCH. F h Close lube* 
C49.96a 274 6394 aher 7pm. 


5W1 1. Sunny Igr man. 17-sil rm. 
new nil din. 2 dMe beds, drew 
rm. tulh. sep we. GCH. 94 yr 
he. C674500i Ol 602 0014 


UNDER 470.000. H 5 yr* ago 
you had Started an CUale A gen 
r» selling tusl One Beds h 
studios, by now you'd lui e cor- 
nered Ihr market and would be 
knocking Uie competiuon fw 
six. we did. and we are. Stem 
SlUtftos. Oi 244 7301 
CLAPHAM 6W4 Stunning Vtr 
lor Ian lam hse. 2 min* from 
Common, superb decor & fit 
men IS. 4 owe Bedim*. 2 
batbrms. Ml bklsl rm. 2 receps. 
gdn £128.000 FH E. Hugh 
Henry 6 CO 01-720 1208 
CLAPHAM OLD TOWN SuMtan- 
Oaf un-mod 12 ma. 5 Jwlhrms. 
P eriod Hse ui somhl alter taca- 
itan. Beautiful ong (ealure*. tgr 
gdn*. £265X00 FH. E Hugh 
Henry 6 Co 01-720 1208 
CLAPHAM OLD TOWN, spacious 
and Light flat. 3 mins from 
common lube. 2 b d. taunoe 
<1SM4). kit a. Gas c h. 
. b alarm, carpets £69500. Tel. 
01-720-1650 

SEMIDETACHED mld-Mctartan 
3 bedr. cottage cl. Banersea 
Bridge. South lac. garden, ete. 
gam d. rereolion and lg* 
k dining £140.000 T Hoskins 
730 9937 fSund. 94ff 23071 
WANDSWORTH TOWN. Spacious 
3 bed modernised bouse, close 
to station. 2 T recent km. 20' 
Mlrhen diner plus uiuily area 
30' garden -laces West 
Cl 03.000 TH 870 7785 
WANDSWORTH COMMON 

SW12. 3 storey « bed i iclonan 
lerrare house CMne S B. a nd 
lube £116.000 673 1578 W 
408 1670. 

LA VENDER WLL Lge Period one 
bedr flat 6 South far palm on 
raised ground n. T Hosklm 
730 9937 

PUTNEY. Two bedroom .Hat in 
modern Mock. Large lounge. 
CCH. 6 mm* from lube 
£69.950 Tet OI 871 0631 
BATTERSEA. 3 Bed gdn Mat 96 
I ir ise £79000. Shan E nter - 
prise* 203 5S57.W 203 6087 


RICHMOND & 

KINGSTON 


SOB YARDS Twickenham side of 
Rirnmond Bridge taoUng 

anou taicly park past Marble 
H«r Hse <17301 (awards 
Thame*. 4 6 Bed Edwardian 
family House. Mature W.gdn. 
■used iwrrourf fw 3 cars Et< 
rrtirni netgfltmirhood. primary 
6 secondary schts. Waterloo 23 
min*. M26 16mm*. £179.950 
F H Agrni. Redmans. Ol B91 

2^144 


GLOUCESTERSHIRE . 472 ACRES 

Cheltenham 6 mites, Cirencester 9 miles 
ATTRACTIVE RESIDENTIAL AND SPORTING 
FARM 

In glorious CotswokJ Country 
FINE LISTED HOUSE 

2 Reception Rooms, 6 Bedrooms, 2 Bath- 
rooms. Bam 


GLOUCESTERSHIRE - COTSWOLDS 

Cirencester 8 rides, Cheltenham 10 mites 

ATTRACTIVE MAINLY GEORGIAN FORMER 
VICARAGE 

3 Reception Rooms, Playroom, 6 Bedrooms, 3 
Bathrooms, 4 Attic Bedrooms. 

Ofl fired central heating 
Garden. 3 Paddocks. 

About 5 Acres 

Cirencester Office: 0285 3101 


HAMPSNUtE-NR HARTLEY WITNEY 

Basingstoke 10 miles, Reading 12 mites, M3 4 
mites, London 38 mites 
A SUPERB GEORGIAN VILLAGE HOUSE 
Situated on the edge of a village adjoining 
farmland 

4 Reception Rooms, 6/7 Bedrooms. 3 
Bathrooms. 

Delightful Coach House. Mature Garden. Hard 
Tennis Court 
ABOUT 1 ACRE 

London Office: 01-489 4785 


Northampton 7 miles 
A CHARMING COUNTRY HOUSE 
Close to village, in an outstanding situation 


PERIOD FARMHOUSE 

Modem and Traditional FarmbuMdings 

82 Acres Woodtands. Excellent Shoot 

ABOUT 237 ACRES ARABLE, ISO ACRES 

PASTURE 

FOR SALE PRIVATELY AS A WHOLE OR IN 3 
LOTS 

Cirencester Office: 0285 3101 



3 Recep 
Room, 2 


lion Rooms, S Bedrooms, Dressing 
! Bathrooms 


Detached COTTAGE. Stabling. Mature Gar- 
den. Hard Tennis Court 2 Paddocks. 

About 6 Vi Acres 

Joint Agents: Bertram & Co: 0604 32642 and 
- Lane Fox & Partners with Rylands. 

Janbury Officer 0295 710592 


Cirencester 12 miles, Swindon 13 miles, M4 16 
miles 

A VERY CHARMING LISTED COTSWOLD 
FARMHOUSE 

4 Reception Rooms, 6 Bedrooms, 3 
Bathrooms. 

Gas central heating. 

Superb Bam. Tennis Court Attractive Garden. 

Paddock. COTTAGE 

About 4 Acres - - 

Cirencester Offices 0285 3101 


WILTSHIRE - BEAUFORT HUNT 

Bath 9 mites, M4 3 mites, Chippenham mam 
fine station 9 miles 

LISTED FORMER RECTORY OVERLOOKING 
ITS OWN BEAUTIFUL RIVER VALLEY 

2 Reception Rooms, 6/7 Bedrooms. 4 Bath- 
rooms, FLAT. 

Bam with planning permission, Stabling. Ga- 
raging. Cottage. Fishing Rights. Paddocks. 
About 8 Acres. Further land available. 

Cirencester Office: 0285 3101 


M4 Motorway 9 miles. London 50 mites 
Didcot Station 6 miles 

A CHARMING WELL MODERNISED PERIOD 
HOUSE 

Dating from around 1750, to peaceful unspoilt 
village 

3 Reception Rooms. 7 Bedrooms. 2 
Bathrooms. 

Delightful formal and informal, partly walled 

Gardens 

About 2 Acres 

Joint Agents: BuckneH & Ballard, WaOtogford 
36651 and Lane Fox & Partners with Rylands. 

Banbury Office: 0295 710T 


#$$*35 





SeO*5i 






1 4'h 'YMita » . »• 

.i-.-'rW. r .y. . .. -V I 


m 3 ; 


Wimpey Homes are coming to Wheatley 

It’s easy to get from the pretty village of Wheatley to Oxford and the M40. 
Wll soon be opening an exclusive development of 4 and 5 bedroom 
detached houses, some of which wilHse of traditional stone construction. 

So for the pick of the plots call Linda Pitts on Wheatley (08677) 4039 
or visit our Sales Office on Saturday 26th July. 

WHEATLEY 

Church Dene, London Road. 

Britain’s No.1 




Modem Town house ba ch in g *■ 


reatywUo a private Manna and 
nwr Thames. Omn/noonigs. use 
of private swnuiMig am and 
sms court Luxury 3/4 bed- 
rooms. 3 receptions. 2 
bathrooms (1 en suite) 
{ZT&flfiB F re eh o ld . 

01-221 1560 
OFFICE HOURS ID 


HAMPTON, town hse Small, ex 
riu&Jir rirt-Ue-rar. ideal wkIimi 
clow W met . well -maintained. 
3 d bed*, lge Inge diner, hare, 
kit. gw- small attractive Mn. 
GCH £117.600. Substantial Ire- 
durtion fw uamcdiaie sale. Tel: 
Home 01 941 1606. Office 

(SUHUi Ol 460 2331 


KEWOAHDCNS - 9 mins stattati 
and Garden*. 9 bedroomed. 
modern, puroosr buUL ground 
now flat i law e™«H9 
room, kilehen & bathroom CH 
Ofi wen narking Communal 
qarorn 990 »etr leas* 
£70.000 Tet : 940 3894 


DULWICH 


DULWICH BORDERS. 1930's 
semi with panoramic view*, go 
order 9 recep* m kU. 3 beds, 
bath, sep WC. ooe. secluded 
gdn. GCH. nan able glazed, a,- 
pets A rurums £89^00 
freehold. Tet Ol 670 51 la 


WIMBLEDON 


BATHGATE ROAD Large and 
lovely 30JJ built house. 6 beds. 
3 recep*. garden (amity room, 
kitchen breakfast roonL 2 bath- 
room* double glazing. Terrace, 
weu Hocked oar den. oarage .Of- 
fer* ov er caaa.ooo THOl 947 
4960 or 01 879 3005. 



PICKWICK COTTAGE 
COLLEGE ROAD 

A m*| hcanc teuton ln_i twi 
Bass locooc. tm Iwasa m DtW« 
a ofcti Panes noog r stmug 
■nmanal Mr Putwsck- T he PWPO ty 
i ptnno w nt positw ui 
CoBegt Hota. mh one al U* 
Bl#g IweMS B tj*.**®- ,2 
proonds ot ma me 3/4 m.™ 
b£e iw tart p*«i 
ceoton founts itc most 
gmss at M tronr M m. ™ 
pmxny oab « on 
ol me oasw. nm tuBL ft qwor 
stylo. F11U emour brorturo mon 

^M^roalMBBMW 
Sofa Aoeett 
Hmjniwte 

01-737 EZ 11 
OpM 7 ttys a MCk 


PROPERTY’ TO LET 


KENSINGTON - Immaculate, 
lolly modernised- lully Jut- 
nishrd- 3 bedroonwd 2 

namroomed Mint IW rang 
term teniai Suttabie tw 

company dlptamal let. 6 mUM 
uolk trom Otauc ester Road im- 
drraround uauon £600 mr 
week neg TH : 01 373 1376 


FULHAM. House with 5 beds. 2 
bath*, garden, avail from now. 
Mm 1 jear £460 pw. Masau 
villas Ol 948 9191. 

ASKLEMH ESTATES sprrtalKr 
ip renting A toning In the West 
End & Central London, from 
simple sIikuos lo UnurtoiB 
apanmrittv Coniari 409 0394 


BERKSHIRE 


BASTBURY, near Lambeurn M* 
■j i4i a nuto*. mammg penoa 
farmhouse with gardens and 
grounds- 12 loose boxes In 
yard. Berks bam. 3 rec. 4 beds, 
bain. rh. dbl garage, about i- 
arre. U 70.000 regwn. 
Drewrons Country House De- 
partment. Newtnify >06361 
38395. 


COMPTOM. a classic Georgian 
village house M4 U13I 6. Gor- 
ing 4. ■ Paddington 46 mlnutcsi 
pan formerly vitUW PO. Ideal 
rWurb 3 ree. 5 beds, ba Ul. out 
buudinm. groorato. lge ptai 
available Offers ClOOOOa 
DrewealU Country House De- 
partment Newbury (0638i 
38393. 


RIVERSIDE 

WRAYSBURY 

An trxnsng 1830's 5 

B a doi u ned deact»d rwrads 
resdenca wtedi 6 £®us®d pjst 
Umnsroam from Ruviyncao 
War ft benaftts trom a wry Ido# 
landscaped pH. 45' raw Iront- 
age. 3 reception rooms, omroto 
saffiBB. sauo/pooL Urge Saury 


Often li tass xA OB8JIM 8 
CONTACT SOLE ASBfTS 
BAOGBB ESTATE MOTS 
E 6 HAH 0 VS 4 35336 
7 days ■ rank 


M2S 4 m(«s. In tavety 087 
an rnrdens with rural views. 
Fme i large 3 bedmomed de- 
tached Buigt<tM. 3 reaps, 
double gangs. GCH Plus targe 
seif contained annex. Often 
over £175. DOO. 


SOUTH BUCKS. 55 mis London 
IM401. Martavu 8. High Wyc- 
ombe 6 My me I8U1 Oenlury 
Grade II LkM l arm house won 
period barn 2 ‘: acre* 1*1 gar- 
den. i'i naddwki. 3 recep. 
study, ktortien b'laslrm. uimiy. 
6 beds (4 dbfei. 2 baths. Barn: 
ramprKtng S4fl ga w it i rm. Ha- 
hie. tag more & dMe garage. 
Surrounded by arable farmland 
and wonderful riding. 
£370X300. Tel. 0494 881451 


DEVON & CORNWALL 




WENPOMDt i Aylesbury 4>* 
milesi- An anracthe 
mod rm Used period cottage tn 
the heart or nmsenaitan am 
oi Hits pretiv village iMaryto- 
bone 60 mins). 2 good slagd 
tree ps. modem kitchen. 2 
Bedrm*. Modem Balhrm. 
£62.500. CH TH: Brown A 

Merry. OB96 624444. 

N. BUCKS utllaoe tacaihsnt send- 
<1M 1 8C cottage: 4 bed. »scJl 
recently restored. Mtin'i acre. 
£69.960.00. TH: 02686 431. 


*T MAWCS, Yachting paradue, 
walerlroM re*. £188.750 Aak 
for propwiy list H Tkldy. st 
Mawes. Garawaa. 270212. 


C OBti BB Ul 8B 






























































THE TIMES WEDNESDAY JULY 23 1986 


PROPERTY BUYERS’ 


STRUTT &.<!■. 
PARKER"!!' 


U HtlL STOfET BERtiELE Y SQUARE 
LONDON W1X SOt 


01-629 7282 


PERTHSHIRE 

Kfflin 6 Mites Edinburoh 90 Mwa 

PertWw* 6*** *Wi Stack Face Steap Hodt, 

Hsbtag on 7 Wes a* Btaer Loctay. 

Farmhouse. 8 Cottages. 2 Man Sheep Fanks. 

120 Acres In-Bye Ground. 200 Acres Enclosed HBl Parks. 

180 Acres Woodland. 17100 Acres Hill. 

Afforestation Potential. 

8 Sheep Hirsute. 4.100 Ewes and 100 Cows. 

Red Deer Stalking: 86 Stags 10 Year Average 
Trout Fishing and Waked Up Grouse Shooting, 
ta an about &DQB Acres 
joint Agents Savifls 

46 Charlotte Street. Edinburgh. Tet 031-226-6961 
Strutt & Parte 

Edinburgh Office: 26 Walker Street 
Tel: 031-226-2500 


HTTdiiireiu‘ ilu 


Saxmundham 3w miles. Wodbrodge IB males, 
ipswcti 25 miles 

A dnmnag 1GU> Centtsy bouse in deBgMfid 


3 reception rooms. 5 bedrooms. 3 bathrooms, 
staff bungalow, fain buildings . paddocks 

About 6H acres 
Region £201000 

19 acres o> adjoining pastureland available m 
addition 

Ipswich Office. 11 Museum Street Teh (0473) 
214841 (Rel.5DG8580) 



WEST SUSSEX 

Horsham 4H mrtes 
Crawfey 11 miles 

AttneSve coaotry boose on edge ol wfiage 
at^Ahang wooded bnnfand 

4 reception rooms, 6 bedrooms. 2 attic rooms. 
2 bathrooms 
Heated swimming pool 
Gardens, paddock and wood tend. 

About 6 acres 
Region £275,000 

Joint Agents: Cubit & West Horsham 
Tel: (0403) 69268 

Strutt & Parker. London Office Tel: 01-629 
7282 

(Red 1AG 5117) 


SUFFOLK 

Ipswich 5 miles (Liverpool Street 60 minutes) 
Bury St Edmunds 20 miles 
A CteSngutt hed fated manor, bo ose. 6 racad fe 
bantu ol landscaped gardees nd grounds 
Reception Halt 3 reception rooms. 6 bedrooms, 
3 bathrooms. 

Oil central heating 

Garaging and domestic outbid frigs 

Well kept, partly waUed gardens and grounds 

including part of a former moat 

About 2JB acres 

Ipswich Office: 11 Museum Street Tel: (0473) 
214641 

London Office: Tel 01-629 7828(ReL5BB85S3) 



SUFFOLK 

Ipswich 7 mites 

An imposing Grade It fisted tanner manor 
boose dating iron 16 th century 

m need of restoration aid relurtMshnwnr 
Hafl. 2 reception rooms. 3 bedrooms, 2 
bathrooms 

Hat (easily incorporated into main house) 
Hall. 2 reception rooms, 4 bedrooms, bathroom 
Fme coach house, garage, workshop 
Dekghtful ground including small wood 
About It* BOOS 
Region £1454180 

Ipswich Office: 11 Museum Street 

Tel: (0473) 214841 (ReL5BG8569) 


BERKSHIRE/WILTSHIRE 

Kennel Valley 

A most attractive and wefl modernised Grade 
R listed Georgian farmhouse to a goM rural 


3 Reception rooms, conservatory. 3 bedrooms, 
2 bathrooms (one en-suite) large boarded attic 
(bedroom) 

Garden, 

Tennis court outbuildings 
Stables and paddock 
Abpi*t ZV* acres 

Newbury Office: 55 Northbrook Street Tel: 
(0635) 34763 

London Office Tat 01-629 7282 ( Ref. 1EE9006) 


A FULL FACILITY RESIDENTIAL 
COMPLEX ON THE SOUTH COAST 


ROTTINGDEAN 

PLACE 

Rottingdean-Sussex 



The Sussex downs provide a 


picturesque backdrop for a new concept 
in exclusive luxury Hvlnp. RotUngdran 
Place caters for all >our lifestyle needs 
ulUiin extensile prtiale grounds. 

These sparfously laldout and 
lavishly finished houses, apartment 
and penthouses, relain iheir original 
character and atmosphere w hilst 
offering the finest of modem facilities 
and amenlites. From a lentils court and 
swimming pool to acres of country 
gardens, we have anllcipaled your every 
leisure need. Designed and refurbished 
for elegant living, each home's interior 
Is handcrafted. Incorporating luxurious 
fully Rued kitchens and bathrooms. 
Naturally, essentials arruell taken care 

dUStavd Pwain 


of with ample underground garaging 
and a professional grounds staff. Mhdc 
ail. your security and peace of mind are 

B reserved by the video entry system. 

mmer. for a change of pace. London 
is easih accessible In road or rail and. 
the Gonunent lust a Tew hours away. 

tt RnUIngdean Place, you will 
discover Die perfect . secure 
environment for an elegant and relaxed 
lifestyle. 

For a folly illusi rated hrochunr. 
rontacl the joint Sole Agents or call the 
Sales Office, on (02731 3390*5. 

(24 hours). 

Show units and Site Sales nfllcr 
open 7 days a week Mam — 1.30pm. or 
by appointment. 


CHESTEOTONS 


UB.O.HCVW 1KB 

(•HSuMnBN’.rW __ 

w imi uunurroH ira. imn 


*1 Csnmu 9 « arm union W2 W 
TBWXM Ol -KVSMOriw SHED 


DEVON ft CORNWALL 


EAST DEVON 

Character house in 1.8 acres 
idea Hie secluded woodland, 
only '* mile from Uptyme 
Village. 2 miles from coastal 
iown of Lyme Regis. Archi- 
leci designed Slone 
farmhouse style accom of 
3.000 sq ft. Iveath of fea- 
tures beams exposed brick, 
hardwood doors windows 
molded achiuives ski rung. 
Double glazed toughed glass, 
cavity wail insula non. Ch. 
18 x 15 kitchen, flag floor. 


maghog units, d/washer, 
uufity room, larder, wt lge 


integral dbl gge. service pm. 
remote control maghog 
door, huge living dining area 
massive exposed brick/ in- 
glenook f place, games 

snooker room, entrance haiL 
elm s/case, study, master 
bedrm built in robes en suite 
baihrm. french windows io 
balcony. 4 further beds &. Ige 
bath with sep entrance hall 
+ lge cellar area. Wifiton 
carpets throughout. 
OH'.VERS 001 NG ABROAD 
£I85jBOO For wrick sale 
Tel: 0297 45122 


OUTSKIRTS OF TORBAY. Uw 

DH BUMWtlOW STYll KbOSNCl 
5lji«s<ig in J oars O' bwl IW1 -"dew 
PjCoocV u-ww CL we TVTV1 q* 

IVn ti **« IS u»ew»s » 

Mrrnd BuntM* Rmy-nr* hjflfitiB 
win tto 5 < Fill DN» qarj^e 
IklW mrlrir? «|B*- Uof* Ben 
wtul-.m* SM« ert A uwp* tw 
hfi) m auu it i owmui wjo 
■ j>oero ,i*wv m cn»tq tow (Wei 
■ri.iinr in ine -nyon o< SUsOOC 
f Mw 


BOYCE ALLEN, 


ML Corset. 
Am. Oem 


[P623W1M 


CORNWALL 
CAMEL ESTUARY 

Svotm modrimtil 4 bedim 3 

luftirin fictions Urmnsr Dmq 


cu*irg rm Mud* ufim, 
U suing cm 4 Beamii 1 batons 
r jw*> PjMonjl wr tjtorg Sw 
Mr ta wnrtf'JW HRmolM 
yipra bust w GoflMK wir 
ooisi ta ute into f 150000 W 
bJQ 54WW" & Hofeeroo Omt-t 
nun Si Aon* id Comm* 07» 

65611 


SOUTH DEVON 



CORNWALL 

3 rules soulti m Two Aft Fai Estuvy 
ArcWea Des^isd DeBefted Res 
dence n 'i toe o> Grants, ftuft 
1928 Cmpnsmg ol lonje. Dmng 
Room 3 Bedrooms. Bamroum. 2 Seo- 


am WC s. Kitchen . uwj Dome 
Geoge rah Wort Shoo. Sesame 
Amne. a present 5UM (mmy tU) 
£127.500 Freehold 

Tel Tram 862061 
Eve i Weekends 
tar mitten delate. 


DUNW1CH 


Close Bird Reserve. 3/4 Bed 
modern deuchcd bungalow is 
st^erb grounds. 

Offers in region of £130/100 
Freehold. 


Tel: Heritage Estates 
0728 830322 
or after hours 
072886 3993 


ALDEBUBGH 


Spacious 4 Bed ground 
floor apartment enjoying 
superb sen views. 


£87.000 Leasehold 


Heritage Estates 
0728 830322 
or after boors 
0728 853993 


Isle ol Wight 


Yarmouth 9 miles. Newport 6 miles. 

. Highly Productive and Versatile Arable Farms. 


Modem Architect Designed Farmbom. Bungalow. Extensive Modem Btriktinge- Fertile 

Greensand Sofl. Irrigation Licence) for 45 MiTIkin G&Oons 

Basic Potato Quota for 88 Acres 


< 742 Acres 

For Sale as a Whole a in 2 Lots 
Mayfair Office Teh 01-499 4155 
and Arandel Office Tel: (0903) 882213 


East Worldham, Hampshire 

Alton Station 2 miles. London 50 miles. 


An attractive ‘Listed* Farmhouse requiring some renovation. Becsp tio w HaR. 2 Reception 
Study. Kitchen. Utility Room, 4 Bedrooms and 1 Bathroom- (Ml Fired CH. Double Garage. Garden- 2 
Paddock*, [a si about 4 Acres. Fre eh old. Far Sak by Private Treaty. 

Mayfair Office Teh 01-499 4155 


Churchill, Oxfordshire 

Kingbam 116 miles (B.R. Paddington lhr 15 mha) Burford 7 miles. Oxford 18 mites. 

A charming Country property, bebeved to ba aariy Victorian, in a superb situation with view* of roOtag 
countryaids and set m about 3 Acres of Garden arid Grounds with a mmtuificwA Lakeana a smaO 
Wood. Reception Halt. 2 Reception Rooms, large Kitchan/Breaklast Room. Utility Room- Cloakroom. 3 
double Bedroom s , enstate Bathmm/Dressing Room. Bathroom 3- Oil Fired CH. Loggia. Garage. 
FreehaM. For Sak by Private Treaty. 

Oxford Office Tel. (0865) 246611 


West Hendred, Oxfordshire 

Didcot 5K m3es (B-R. Paddington 30 minutes) M4 10 mites. Oxford & M40 12 notes. 


A Dehghtftd Bam Converskw ta a moat attractive garden courtyard retting with 2 further Barra, (one 
with kitchen and bathroom facilities), troth ta vary good order and used as artist's stadia and gallery. 
Potential for a wide variety of tries, suitable tar borne based buttress, subject to coosanta. Reception 
HalL Sitting Room, Kitchen, 4 Bedrooms, 2 Bathrooms. Granary with services connected. Further 
outbuiMngs. About (L4 of an Acre. Freehold. Often Mud hr the regfan of HSM8®. 


Joint Agents. Clnttons, Oxford Office (0865) 246611 
and Dreweatts, Wantage Teh (02357) 4642 


NORFOLK 

(Swaffham 9 miles) 

A fine Agricultural and 
Sporting Estate 

1212 ACRES (430 Ha) 

mixed woods, farmhouse, six cottages 
and farm buildings 
Milk quota 647,000 litres 
First dass^ph^sant^^, fishing in 

For sale as a whole wifit vacant possession 

(subject to cottage occupancies) 

32 3 acres CommoaLand grazing rights 

Sole Agents 


Bernard Thorpe 


fLmr, 


im 


.4 bedrwmhornesfrom€1pZ,0(X^. 


SRuatsdacgacentfotfwri^qwnt^^ • 

Downs, Sf^yning Isa niist picturesquesmaD mtftettmm of 
unspoDtdtana 

TWSBTtpressbedevdopm^atcnaixDBS^V^ 
IhungakwancT 18 houses.each wKhan rntfividu^tieSigwl 

exta1cr.gasi^ntraIhrating.anen-sritEShowWroom. 


^ephone: 01-644 4321 orcon^tetemjpoafadrta^ 


• iriO J>I I r*f*f c 


19-24 Saint George Street 
Hanover Square 
London WIR OPT 


London WIR OPT 
Tel: 01-499 6353 


y>r* »**♦*****•*»*■»*'***»******' A A A A A 

| RESIDENTIAL | 
i RETIREMENT SCHEME i 

: RETIRE TO THE SOUTH COAST * 




Are you now on a low bad income, aged 70 years or 
over, with capital tied up kt your home? You can now 
release It under our Home Reversion Scheme. 



release It under our Home Reversion Scheme. 

By saffing your properly and buying one of our luxury 
self-contained fiats you can have the security jof owning 
your home as wee as having cash in tfw bank,' which 
will improve your standard criming whist retaining your 
fndepwidance. 

We currently have available: . 

WORTHING, SUSSEX - One bedroom luxury flats (n a 
Quiet residential area, dose to sea and shops. From: 
£19,525. 


K King &Chasemore 




SOUTH SOMERSET 

Residential Farm 33 Acres 

A (teSgMM’y sttuaud is akta i M F totting «tth snows rat^oAipstf 4 tod- 
room tomnou&s. excsflcni ouawAtogs. Jtmna pennsBoa tor tom 
arownm and aum 33 am productM nstin ton. fSosc Dorset bonttsr 
and km aimiMs. For aaln by auction onto** pml uu sly soH 

Enquiries: YeovN (0935) 76348 


CKOCKENHOJk. KENT 

£252.000 Esc Edwardian 
name 1910. Half acre HalL 
call star. 2 rpc. library, study. 6 
tredsn with Mum ana motmi 
muiri. Uiu rm. b fast rm tux 
Mi wtih Ago. shower rm. 
baihrm. Dry ctflrr CTCH. Dry 
rvu«r To mins min lo London. 
M25 M20 nr. Dbtv access 
arise Superb oar dm. Tet 
(05221 63530 or 60121. 


rages, m excewnt town centra potobon. From: E2b,S7B. 
WMTON, BOURNEMOUTH - New purpOSfrtuBt one 
and two bedroomed flats wtth garages, situated in cor- 
nw position of a delightful residential area, dose to ati 
amenities. From: 672.750- 


Afl finished to a very hfoh standard, being superbly 
appointed and havtag fifiy fitted carpets and being 
heated throughout, plus newly fitted kitchen and bath- 
room units. 

Write or phone for further information and detafi& of our 
latest developments, we me spedafists in re ti rement 
homes, and our friendly staff will ba pleased to discuss 
alt aspects of the Scheme to the strictest.confldence. 

HALEY PARTNERS, Wghflekf House, 27 South Street, 


appointed and 


TUN WELLS OoM.lcWy mural 
Me. 3 mbs walk SR flood os 
rnimi Beam 3 bed. 23 n retro. 
1*1 fir flat, listed ooroun hw 
Dt>(p Gee. own from Gdn. 91 
yrs. £66.990. tort new carpets 
& curtaur*. Tri OB92 24362. 


Tarring, Wortbtog, Sussex, BN14 7LQ- 
TWepfrone: (0903) 204106. 


i*********** *r* * ****** ****** 



Hampton & Sons □ 


NEW NEWBURY, BERKSHIRE 

Newbury S miles. M4 (Jnncmm IS) 2ft miles 


A pretty Georgian tout toompa ratio g an a n mxc mop, an 
lkrrdgrof«e«fe 2 hgBJet Eatu ucciafl. drawing room-rimmy 
room, siding room, dookroom. kiKbca. oeflar. 4 prindpsl bed- 
roonu. 2 bathrooms. Atfionring annese cottage with doakroom. 
drawag room, dining room, kitchen. 2 bedrooms and bath- 
room (easily incorp o rated into the mam accommodation). 
Daachcd coach bouse and stable block with ganging for 2 care. 
Delightful garden and grounds of in all about 7ft acres. 


Far Sak by Auction on Tknrsdtay Aogest 28tb 1986 
(antess pnrrieesly sold). 


6 Arlington Street London SWlAlRB 


01-49382221 


ADJACENT GUSTARD COMMON. 


Near Wheathampstond 

Sww«y srtmtEd 2 year BdEew^wiayte house In piwato road S««i about h 
acre of dtogtnby nntira garden. Mew bedroom wth dnswig room and 
tetmtom. 2nd bedroom rah m suto ballnam. 2 totter bereaoms and M 
bzth mam. 3 npeps. Wctien. bretotosi room. utMy mom am Ootble gauge. 
Offers in ragien of E2NL0O0. 

Apety Sole Agontx Planwel Properties 
33 H*gti Street, Wheattumpstaad. 

Tab Wntoathmnpsteatf 3596 / 2269. 

(Answer phone out of office houts). 



TEDDIMeroN LOCK MMdlnni. 
unlour Mann of VWortaaa with 
Modern ton close to Royal Parto 
and Thames, a dbi bedrooms ' 
plus suite at 2 rooms: 2 oath- 
rooms. 2 receptions. HUM 
kitchen, uuuty. dhigge.gas CH. 
courtyard & lOOfi garden For 
Sale tor AueOoo. 2nd Septem- 
ber 1986 Guide Price 
£225.000 Freehold. Barton & 
Wyatt 01-977 3374. 


£71,500. MINSTER, SHEPPEY^: 

Prestigious detached spadoos home approachnj by : ctr- 
cubr drive set ra H acre mature garden. Gas CH:T)ouble 
bedroo m with en suite shower. 3 further doubk Tied- 
rooms. 2 ulQity rooms. Podibie selfcontaind mn. 2 


rooms. 2 utility rooms. Posable self con tamed m 
car garage. ' 

MANN&CO: - 



Pnifi fnWHt 4 


f St John Naughan/ / -n 


BRIGHTON SEAFRONT 


Fine early Georgian grade II fisted house, one of the 
- taw in single privtee ownership on Kemp Town 


SUFFOXK BARNS 



Comated to hmraa haras Mb exposed beams aid period batons. 
Fun central betting, double garage, landscaped patens, ftrty fBtod htetwi, 
hfltoy tBdiroom. m vfltages dose a Bay a Edmnds. Mewn a teL Can- 
bndge will venr easy access to Mil aid London. 

Prices Emm £54.950. 

AO anoutries to: 

. JANUARY ESTATE AGENTS 

4 Whitrag 5L Bny St Edmonds. SrfToft 
Tel: (0284) 67117 


TERENCE RATTIGAN in the sixties. Five 
rooms, 2 bgthnxKDs. 2 nagnificezit reception .rootne 
.with the finest quality fittiqgb- Study* a/c 2 bedroom, 
l aum dceepera* fldiL Large high -vaulted cdttr mates 
ideal games room. Most be viewed. Freehold si 
£225400 for quick rale. ' 


; .Tel (0273) 723656 ; y 


HAMPSHIRE - SELBORNE 
ALTON 4 MHaES 


VkatSteadnd 

Om stone butt retudance. 


17lh emtorton. SpB C ttCUttr 
views. Rural setting. Ch. 
Lge. Din Rm, Study. Kd. UtS- 


Lge. Dtn Rm, Study. Kd. UtS- 
Hy. 3 dble Beds. Baih. 
Snower Rra. Cottage gdn. 
Goa Handy toby. Nans. 
ShBffMd. O/A 

£115,000 

Teb Ambergate 2875 (T) 


SOUTH COTSWOLDS 
HARESF1ELO 


A magnificent 17lh Century Cotswotd stone bam beoutBUly con- 
verted and restored peacafuSy sAiited to the mounds of a fine 


restored peacefuly sduated to the grounds of a fins 

country house with fabulous accommodation oft- Reception rial, 
drawing room, dining room, firing room, fitted k i tc hen, 4 bed- 
rooms. z bathrooms (one en state), good sized gardens, parking. 


room (one en suite), good sized gardens, parking. 

LEAR ft LEAR STONEHOUSE 
(045382) 2555/5755 


18th Ccm Coll Modernis'd. C H 
Nr Cl os. Trwks. cnrll. MS 5/d 
brdv S rrr ttvji gdn. rurel Ulr 
£bSOOO 104621 730794 Ei« 



K. CORNWALU PWlurcwjw 
clur4rirr 4 brd. 2 haUi lormer 
MUi home in Iranouil rural «1 
ling clme lo Rork l acrv 
nwlurr g ardrrw with vream 
(.168 000 PWIID Mutton 
MridCMrogn 0208 81569S 


NR SANOHMCHAM ftJfk megnin 
ceni 4 B roonlry tee. m slafl. 
di« imhrpd qnn barn, sutun. 
apv 2 ‘ ■ acr CMthr Rising 339 
BLAHCNEY. New Lux colleen. 
fjtM news. From £39X00 
TnnMn 0263 713143. 


EXTENSIVE 1ETH Cml Ihalrlwd 
ilurvin roll M Dmon VII- 
LKK- Master Wd wild m sullr. 
unwrr. 3<ufllHV DnH. battwrm., 
5 rirpv kil unm> '« arrr edm, 
LS9.960. TH 1036361 278. 



EAST ANCLIA 


SOUTH DEVON 

T»gi Estuary with sw»ang 
tMm Lutuiy read fnee. S ens 
run! Siimumhngs. finpwisna, 

eximsn* acarnmodahofl 

including indoor baled S«n- 
mng Pool £250000 Ref RJP 

WAYGOnS 

5 Fleet Street Torquay 

(0803) 2123531. 


North Norfolk, 

Hob 4 miles. 
DrtgMtui paw of semi- 
dstashsd buck and Art 
cottages. 2 Bedrooms. 

2 Recaptions. Kitchen, eta. 


Offers m the reaen of 
£30400 earn. 


SMITH-WOOUEY. 

Teh Norwich 612626. 


THE BOAT 
HAVEN 


It L-Wtpiri i*j unde Xi imuk bv ro» 
v ’* bj Cvmrw Cn Cere On uw 
yas ir m> nut Oma wr CkrmWv UK 
Utn" wnu ra J it» To inn*n i« 
■n Mroou ft* j .- 4* m rartue aria 
jflCftnj. 0n«4 tr mr ii«o" ni £59550 
a<e "iitfl! toiftr JpMfdi « £51750 
toim;p« iSv»Wi«i Canpwa 
tut: M 2 yearns ra tree mamg * 
rt ■cuimi 

TetSaeti and Ca.- 286 8181. 


(2 mas 

Lovely del penod I5tti cm Use 
ol Georgian appearance sm in 1 
aae Had. 3 tecs, lge tat uWrty 
«c. S bedrms. Z batftmis. dble 


gge etc. MetnAwsfy restored Dy 
dissent owner, exc cond. 


dissent owner, exc cond. 
£175.000 ref 10085. H. J. Tim* 
& Son (0787) 72833. 


SMENF1ELD Exrlwitr modern 
noinr Million MnuKI diM as 
mnn Llirrpool Slrrel 3 reap- 
lions. 4 bromonw (inr Cranny 
iulft-v Ura kiuhm. I baUi 
room 3 thoweri. Full C n 
Small "urden Doiitok- earaqr 
caao.ooo Tel: Bfpnl wood 

•02771 212623 


17TH CENTURY 
FARMHOUSE 

Wrttstoe Dnraei twCers In elevated 
povnen veto gtanous rvaJ wws. 
wigs® of Medwwr wflaeft 3 toe 
roceos. 5 beta. 2 bate Stow ma- 
ims mgfcnoote Bams *■ o to 
buAleigs lor P0S5 converam. Sal n 
18 acres, ml pond. 500 yds (mX 
sbeam SnensBR gOmnswawtao 
E275.000 _ 

Evenings 0747 870373 


HOnwiNTS. Lovely Grade 2 
I wed Hone Mn Victorian 
houw in NonhampKmshlrp nl 
tor. WMBirobwmiqti suuon 4 
miles 1 50 mini SI Panrravi. Qu- 
el torauon. 3 beds, onqmal 
VlrlorWii fHniro. rrtepUon. 
dllUnq room. £69.000. i0933) 
6761 52. 


iltete' l" 1 ^ 


n Cobnrott wtoge.5 ins waft Irom 
Cu^itov S«m. ran emnss rad 


tak orenng fregueni lewce Wft 70 
rrws Paddmuxi Ideal ta raeand 


NORTH EAST 


nw» Patftwown Meal to raeand 
rttroiJ Dus I recap room to 
C,h Ongml loons ref stow too 
Ken. targe brootace and exposed 
bum 
CB855Q 

Tefcff1-351-*358 


WORCS, ft SHROP 


CHARMWC SUBSTANTIAL. Ed 

wardian town house. Ctate 
Tceride Airport. Coast. Moor*. 
2 Receps. 3 Bens. BaUirni. h'll 
CATdem. £ 20 . 000 . 086 32343 


raw* wro * » top W *1 brae 

w(h Mi ran lo Sbror Haagra 
3 Pedrooms. 2 tHthrooms. drawing 
room dm mg room, kecten. uetay 
wn. chukroom. moc bedroom, box 
room, mows entrance toil, garage 
emote and communaJ gardens, et all 
atiou: 10 acres, ottos m reran ol 
£105000 

WELLER EGGAR 

(0730) 68111 


. JAMES HARRIS & SON 


NORTH HASH'S HIRE- 
CAN DOVER VALLEY 

W 5 Ums tamgsnto - 
6 Wfe i»renes» • W IHk 
wtnene nMniooW houw m 
»«e m «bgt aie«ni raajc pond 
Iraq in api nu npnwnwn cl an eoun 
ran i h«hiub nans * Bcdraomx 
DraleGnqe Prod Outta**«& UTOr 
C«doi MOOT 04 ACHES. 


iraf Safe Jraee Itoni I Sml 
>ra Ctonim Jnra Swat 
ttrown Hampun T*t W nw 
tod 4 Pttar. 41 Hiram SWM. 
SaMuv WdsMe Td OW a/41 


ESSEX Comen alien iiikiqe 
Grjdr II Dmon award Timber 
Brwk Cdtlaqe 2-3 beds, nr 
tdilinq slalKin. offrr* oner 
twlOOO 0621 772638 eies 
ESSEX Mwed Period DH 4 bed. 
3 rrr. CH i DM O. sm Gdn. 
o hlds 1 hr Ui St E99JXX) 
Trl 03716 25344. 


POOLE. DORSET. Detached mod 
mi houw 4 double beds. 3 en 
Mjrtr bathrooms, lounpc. sun 
Iouih}p. dinino room, lully fined 
modern Mlrhen. 2 uulnr 
roonn. l study, l snooker 
qamn room CMrlknt garden. 
Cl 75 0CX3 Musi be slewed io 
appreciate Tel: 0202 760230 
SuTKtoi. or 0461 22136 any 
other lime >TI 


PEACE a 




Harelort /Gloucester Borders, 
clou Forest of Dean. 5 mdes 
Ro»on-Wye & M5O/A40. Ap- 
pealing. deturesoue Georgian 
sione character House Orawng 
Rm. Dmmg Rm. Kddien raft 
Age Study. Gd floor Bedroom 
SutB. 5 Beds m a. 2 Baths. OH 
C.H Garages Beautiful level Gar- 
den ft 10.000 COLES. KNAPP S 
KENNEDY. Tudor House. Hoss- 
on-Wye. 0389-63553- 



recepwi A bednns. 3 taBmns + 
service flax. TUI eti Gym & sama S 
swuimng pool es is acres ran 
range Ol our bttngs & pp to 8 ptes 
Otters e> regron ol £175.000. full 
padndara irom Stpoke. Hdl & Co 23 


King SL Heretord. Tel Hereford 

1043ZI 267511 ref P9I 


NORTH WTST 


SOUTH axon. Didcot V IMfta. 
Oxford 13 miles. Motor pari or 
Tudor Jacobean house. 3 rec. 
G beds. oanaemO- oulbulldtnvi. 
pool and gardens. Guide 
xj 45.000. Oreweans wantage 
1 02367 1 4643. 


BATH 


Victorian Rasrdanoa. Many 
fine original features: Su- 


perb cfecorattve order. 5 
Double- Bedrooms, Dtnlng 
Half. SpectacuUr Gallery. 
Landing. Consarvatory, 
Basement accommodation 
(erihersetf contained or suit- 
abie for professional 
personage). 1 rrwte City Cen- 
tra. % acre garden. Easy 
access M4. Offers to the re- 


gion of £206,000. 
Tel: John Ro 


John Robinson 


An rraptioml small deralopexnrm <rf7 homes, cooreaested ftwn 
ban l?uMin«p. in * peacc&i «lc6 -of -vffi*ge crating. 3 and 4 
badrootm. . 


From £87.500 to £l0&;000 - - 

Joint Agents: Messenger May Baverstpd, 
Alton (0480) 80868 
Weller Eggar, Alton (0480) 86201. 




RIVERFRONT HOUSE - SANDWICH 
in lidriraratoL ora n cbmMfrata OPff crarra . ingwexato dficita 

rwao. hnuiT kildrai. * bnh, hnhnn Ahmatm rocra. 
nudy/mSay ' num. rlralmum. bathmAu takbnin iwcrkrohliw rfraw. Cor 


Kent CT13 9DX. (03MI 61440S 


NORWICH 


Rare* of bxfividns] pentiwuse flats. Adjpcent. to river. Centred 
around spectacular hndreaperf glared atrium. Superb view* of 
irittoric dry centre. Some with gafleried landtag ani spiral gtair- 
caoe & enrage. All tatty fitted lo the highest standards. £49.506 to 
£8LOOO, 125 year tease. 


Phone 0603 630280 or 
0206 47936 for colour, brochure. 


OSSALDESTOH HALL. Nr Pres- 
ion. Grade II laud period 
rountrv house o\ rrlooUnp Rl\- 
rr Tibbie, e. 11 acres Inc 
woodland 4 rec lully fined 
kitchen. 5 beds. I baths Former 
banqueting hall, ouibtdngs. ten- 
nis court. C.H. Elizabeth Hall 
Counlrj Houses Bureau. 
CJilheroe: i0200l 41 179. 

MIWAL hr L'pool or ChwVer 
■b nr ftianctmier nr ptrtur- 
esque sllge. gcOf course, sailing 
club, beaches, charming del 
hse 4 ran. 6 bed*, s c Hal 
O.C H. uw gg*. Tennis crl 1 
acre FH £146X00 Tef 061 
US 04.78 8122 

ULSWATER. THWEL. Ideal noli 
d»- home Mod 3 bed deL 
recrnJilied wr. lux baih. oar 
den. mim. low oui goings 
£66.000 Tel l 0768(657 12 
1 20 23rq July* 23rd on 
'0671 >2863 

TWO BEDROOMCO FLAT 7U1 

IKw o' rrtooklnn Lord 64r*cl 
and ra 'lew Balcony, porters 
A IttlS £28X00 o.n.o. Tel. 

104841 512741 day Lime 

NOttTHUMBRIA. Trad det 3 lied 
cottage by stream. CH. garge. 
o buildings, lge gdn £40.000 
ono ObV76 477. 


SCOTLAND 


PLAGE. Cieganl serMced 
drawingroom Hal in presugtom 
West End 2 public. 2 double, 
bedrooms. Fitted kitchen, bath- 
room and shower room. 
Crnirai healing. Shared garden. 
Filled carpels and designer cur 
idins Immediate entry FftM 
Price £62.500. Viewing tele 
Phone 031 226 6237. 


miimBalh Brtttol. Spacious de- 
lathed house overlooking 
slllage green. Entrance hau. 4 
reception rooms, kitchen -with 
gas Rayburn, utility, cloaks, 
consenawry. 4 beds, dressing 
rm. nursery, nattiroom. shower 
roam, furl gas CH. double ga- 
rage. greenhouse, secluded ft 
acre garden. £89X00. 0761 
232796. 


BATH: Superb rial in Georgian 
haute. Cuy entire. 2 beds. 3 
recnx*. who- Parking 
£38.500. Tef: 10228166836 
r24hr*> 


ISLE OF SKYE Large 3 4 bed 
rerun aied cron house In Ham- 
tel of Torrln Beaulilul 'lews of 
Cullin' close lo Ihe sea. Garage. 
Rayburn cooker 6 part c h & 
dblv gracing Ideal for holidays 
or retircmmi £42.000. Dr 
Thompson 04712 246 


EXCEPTIONAL Country Cottage, 
immaculate Lovely position. 
Gomenleni MS Mi, Bristol 14 
miles London 2 hours £93800 
Tel .10272 1 876117 


OX8MOTT. Ughl spacious S bed 
hse. south news across Mole 
valley from, on rooms Built 
1 939 Io high spec for present . 
owners, ft acre Cdn in Drt\ es- 
tate. 4 creep rtns. Portland 
sione feature fireplace. HI ted 
kll. efficient GCH throughauL 
unhjne lux hathrm with 
Jacuzzi, sen shower rm. hard- 
wood window frames, bulll In 
wardrobes all bedims, amide 
Ml space, lge gge with ample 
Parking in garralgr drive way. 
£225.000. 037 284. 2963. 

■URAL T BROOK. Midway 
Codalfnlng Haslemere. 180 
nuns Waterloo!. Elegant spa- 
cious portion Via country Me. 
Superb drawing rm. toe 
dining UL 3 beds, baihrm. 2 
elks, utility, ouittse. Wen pro 
*en ted. Many fme features. Oak 
Ors. ’■ acre oettghUut wen 
slocked gdn. Gge JUl&OOO 
ono Wonuley >0428791 2567 



OXFORDSHIRE 


EAST OF ENGLAND 


NEAR MSS. Norfoll. Dei wr 
mod ? bed bunoalovt . Ggc Mag 
nitweni garden U9.9SO Tel 
0°B 381 562 


NORWICH S MLB NTH: 3 bedrm 
collage 2 in inn. paniry. kneh 
rn. Whrm p 1 CH Secluded W 

acre grin + stream tSCl.OOO 

Write aarkr. 8- Highland 
Drnr. Berflro. NR3* 7AP 


UNCOLN5MRC ■ DeUghtlul old 
renorv m 3 acres maiurr 
grounds, ■daff.'ranl bungalow, 
swimming pool, paiillionf 
uarnes room wermnoo. office*. . 
'tables. garage*. peaceful 
umpoill area. 2ft hrs London 
uniaMr mam’ uses, inr busi- 
ness Cl 66.000 Trl. 07903229 


■StAHRSOME PARK. Praolr At 
Irarli'r modem romersion. 
srawnr. ground ftogr. 2 bed 
fiat Kit diner. Lounge, baih 
room GCH. Sunny prnaie 
garden. Garage Oow to sea 
and shops C 43.500 Tel .0432 
269219 or 0202 763343 


NR LTME RECa charming hill 
lop bungalow + mobi! horn- so 
to » "re. S beds. 2 reeps. huge 
sun lounge oierlooking m A 
NaftTruM Land. Close A56 
F H £68.000 10297) 89538 


GLOUCESTERSHKE 


SOUTH DEVON. Nr Stake Babrtel 

Imugimrlrirtv cwrierted torn 
wilh annul 15 acres of Wood 
Uinl Pi oreiulls totaled by Ihe 
Run Dari 3 4 rrceplions. 3 
iiedrms 2 hjlhrms. £155.000. 
Moirlund Large i062nr 33928 



COTS WOLD 1 ml Broadway, a 
ted det* bed sione Inr. rirca 
ITOO Esrell. village Ideation 
StiBerOff decorJled En »wte 
'hower GCH Ggr. eirtra pklng- 
Aur«f-lt\e gdn spacious famitt 
resHh-nre ideal small goed hse 
Oilers £ 86.000 0386 8S3097 


MtO DEVON Lmuue del roumrv 
rhairi house 7 hnh. 2 lib. 3 
liaih. 2 rreep ronserv oMrv. I 
•kip vriuded i alley pom lion 
£80.000 TI-L0769 80529 


ESSEX ' SUFFOLK DDfL N 

Manning! rre 55 mins 14' to 
f nil'- restored CeonjMn Hse 
lue coach hse studio complex. A 
lied. 3 nr. t baUi. 2 shwf tl er 
suite* kil b'isi rm. uUllij-. cel 
Ui fir Gas ch All mains 
UI5.000 0200 392220 


OAKLE GREEN. LPteodon Near 
MB A MSO a t>ed h*n»sr in need 

01 repair Large garage, approx 

2 arms ac land Wonderful 
Cpuiii reside Tel MinsieruKinn 
10452751 216 


BLACKMORE VALE- DMaChed 
Tl Him Crnl Farmhouse with 
belt -Contained Cottage in 
peaceful I own iuin 
ballsburv 5 her bourne. Close 
bmps. Schools. Buses and su 
lion 1 walertoo 2 hours' Sldhe 
nuill Tiled roof Tastefully re- 
stored to a high standard 5 
Beds 2 Baths, a Rerep. 2 Kits 
Double Garage Malum Gar- 
dm Gas cml hig U26 000 
Possession. CHAPMAN. 

MOORE & MLGFORD. AgrrUs 
tot West Cotmlry Property Tel. 
07476 2244 

DORSET BLACKMORE VALE 

ThMrhed period collage 2 re 
replied* 4 bedrooms, rh. I wo 
thirds at on acre £1 15.000 feta* 
02580 o38- 



OXFORD 
City Centre 

FOLLY BROKE COURT. 
Luxay paretnuse fiaL 2 
badroom's. gas C/H. hft. of 
trarca phone, underaroundcar 
writ Vim's of GuMdvcft 
m trie Thames (east and 
msT) Fufiy furnished to a Ingh 
standart. AvMaWa Saptanber 
1st. 

OFFBffi CIRCA £1«WHL 
REPLY TO BOX C19. 


SUTHERLAND, DURNESS house 
renm died fa fugn sfandarU 
Fully furnished easily main 
rained Superb views £25.000 
Contact Messrs MacNeill A 
CriKhtey OtouS 225 OOO or 084 
756 235 

CEHTURY Old Lodge |3 Apt I In 
green bell rural setting with 
stream, garden, and woodland: 
Ift acres. Near Glasgow T<Se 
Phone Cumbernauld 31027. 
CAlmELTOWN Mull Kuilyrp. 
SPanuus private 4 bedroom 

bungatou, overlooking Loch 
ca 7.000 Tel. 0586 53941 



SOMERSET & AVON 


OXFORD tffley Village “2 mites 
04' Centre". Handsome de 
lor hen penod house ui exrettervi 
order throuohout. 2 Rees. 
Studs . Kitchen. 9 Bedrooms. 4 
BainroMiH i2 en suilei. CH. Ca 
raging for 4 S can Studio. 
Swiftwnntg pool Tennis Court. 
Superb high walled & timbered 
garden Of 1.30 acres. Offers are 
invited in esfcea of £60.000 for 
Ihe I3 1 : year lease Rent 
C4 OOOp a. Brechon 4 Brrrt, on 
108651 244735. 





Taunton 22 nates. YkjvH 7 
mites, ft Gaorgisa rifiagi 
(nuts* wtth ■ Mil cottrgB. 
Ewflltent family accomm- 
otJatwn. 4 recejKion rooms, G 
bedrooms, 3 bathrooms. 


swimming pool Mm ta ffit 

Rtflfaia of n7D.0M 
ftppiy: 38 lla n d h ri, Yrerefi. 
BA20 lUATri (0335) 74886. 


WALTON ON THAMES Burwood 
park. Detached cottage, located 
in a secluded estate in ft acre 
with mature gardens. 4. beds. 2 
bathroom (1 enstote). -very 
large lux uiv Idlrhwi. 4 targe re- 
reotton roams aU In nerttent 
decorative order. 8 mm* irprn 
BR i25 mtns to London) 
Freehold Available 
I mmrdiairly .Offers £265.000 
03727 44684 lO) 0952 240795 


MMLT9N-0N-THAME5C Town 
house In soartous. communal 
grounds. Patio garden ^xmloira 
purpose but It mosaic, taetszi. 3 
dble eedrooms. bathroom, 
cloakroom, fully miod ku lap. 
ntwnces toCL tounse diner, 
vponous hdjuuo c h. integral 
oarage 28 ratro Water loo 

£84.950 Ttt 10932) 226386 


SEAFRONT 

Immaculate 9th floor bal- 
cony Mat. 1 bod room. 


toungo. dining room, 
kitchan ft bathroom. 


HOVE; (t HOUR LONDON ) 
ELEGANT .SUNNY. REGENCY . 
BALCONY FLAT. 1ST FLOOr! 
Furnished by Ha (rods. Onto- 
•He oca and lawnv, 5 
trarownS-Dravno, . Dining 
room, fitted Id (then, both 
room and dhower room. Gas 
c h Very quirt. Parking 
swee.. Lift and car«ak«r, 
OuteohiB*- El 687 I per 

anmmi. OLOM we. CON. 
TDn '- 1 Imnwdlate 

occupation. I0273J 779660 


Arcnuect . de- 
3 M detached 
sfluared In avilel lane 
wtui tfeiighUui south ■ fating 

v tews io Funrtteld Creek- Su- 

2™**9r<D , v 9 order with lutty 
fftoDm ttodern kitchen. Dou- 
ble glared. FuH ch - nfmhte 
jraage. ample roqnTrofi 
boat raravan >-i of acre aac- 
Trt HartSfl 
ttUyurneV or 
072961 evenings ft weekends 






BUSHEV HEATH Spacious 3-brd 
deiaritett nous*-, rmr 'lev*. 10 
mins drive tune. Huge using 
nil. mature landscaped gdn. Lge 
■.lichen breakfast ro>. Ga& CH. 

2 garages ample parking. 

Cl 70.000 ono. Ol 9S0 1566. 


attractive mod del hotne over- 
looking fields. Good M40 act. 
EM nail, rikmv. Inge, dining rm. 
mod kit Master bed >MbL 3 lur- 
tmr beds. 2nd baih. gge. CH. 
vrtuded gdro £116 500 Tel- 
GMdy ft Giddy <0491 r 34788 
OXFORDSHIRE V1LLAGC. Eartv 
19th wnfury IradllMnal stone 
bull! ntlogr. exposed beamv. 


otxni log fire. Often around 
C70.000 Td Q8676 78665. 


m TAUNTON Spactotft 5 bedrm 
Or aiaM Bungalow. Lounge, 
d r. kit, vludy. baihrm. sep wc. 
shower rm. dor garage Garden 
C76500 Tel: 04«06 4230. 
Swarm 7 mis J 2 i m 3 untoue 

'■era Acre gdn. 4 be*. 3 rereo 

? baih. Qutet not tsoUted. Of 
fers El 55400- Tl 095484 2116 
SOMERSET 3 bed bung- ■ Mobile 
Homei Small park 5 Taunton, 
all sen ires, connected site war. 
den C28 .000 000.10823' S6120. 
STQNEBUI1.T ypac hse Of guU ft 
chat viu centre 6M 5 of Bate. 
Cl 50000. Tei: *02212212694. 


DIMSFOLD ICodabnlng 7 mites. 
Walertoo an ndnsi. 4 
ordroomed Black A whhe owl. 
«d cottage, plus 2 bed detached 
Lodge. ’1 acre garden am farm- 
land- CH- etc. ' ■ ; Around 
£285.000. Messenger • May 
Baverstoctr-TN: 04868 7222. 


ESHER charming VKIorhi cot 
lage. Ctose shops. 2 beds. Inge, 
diner, kitchen, cellar study, 
weft filled bath, slactng ft ne~ 
chided gdn C85.00O. Eaher 
68135. from Mon. 


ASHDOWN KMCET. EiKhanttng 
9*7106 cottage in Uny hamlet of 
Btrch Grove. Restored with 
tarams «t lngtenook.,4 Beds. 
Bath, D recs Pine km. flrwst 
Rm. Cl kb. Coe. WfaRp, DHtOtU- 
lul Gdns. Sutettanuat Often; 
I nvuro . Taylor ft ■ Tester 
<08926163131. 

HOrtBHAjH Substantia} Edwanti- 
an semi -com id Ids cftaisrcni 
JJjjL W- Rra. hft anr. 0 H>. we. 

klf. uttty rm. eoi wc. bUv. we. 
jj* t-re rec Qdn. F H.Sutl 
miestment. -granny* or easy re- 

ron'vrslon. Nr aft ft M23. 
£98.000. Te« G4W 6480U 
KHTHOUSCyCHKHCSTEK spU 
tejefta Georgian calm try hse lr> 
lap acres t2 acres of odnt. 3 

rera «i ire l >***2 tranf 




mmm- 




1 

fejij 



Si 


•tl • ns 


9 Dll 





















































































MDOUC MfSOOraRDu 0 KID 
briaBm. wan. awnning w 
AMtln cattoo. 2 imn 9 
mb. imr kH.-nnfjai im, iik 
belli rm.O»r, OB CH. Carden 
bane* onto Ri\er Avon: Mtuag 

rights vnm cottage. c 72.600. 
<079775 ) 487. 

•WHOM- supm Tudor rnl- 
Mk» wlih cottage at hM«k<l 
Interest. 2 rrc. 4 2 bath. 

<tbl oarage, ornate wiim gar- 

wn ■ acre. J3 45.000 region 
DR-wrum rarranl and 
wtqhunan iOTOM 55301 


YORKSHIRE 


NORTH YORKSHIRE 

Spate Pub Brendsfay. You w 
nates. Thnk 15 nates tUma M 
nates A taam a i i u datacned sum 
M ttemlwaft 3 taat/ooa rooms 
4 Mtes 2 te moo uB . 2 use 
rooms Candutly and tboagWuSy 
rstwMtel raaMtess of eoa To- 
»ttw v4ft a detached cotage. 
useful and umuct range of 
bmitaltags tajM garden and 2 
g» paddocks Smart a a pfl- 
van Bosmon vma ntuniftcMt 
owns at wb> daeaton 724 ms 
n an. Farpartotes coma Wert 
Cundrt rOK3 5581) 


PROPERTY TO LET 
COUNTRY 


BUY A HOLIDAY HOME OF YOUR OWH 
HI A 5 STAR HOTEL Hi SUNNY SPAIN 
OUT OF PETTY CASH 

You can taw ■ stucto ipvtniHix of your own In a tabuloua 5 Stir HaW 
far on* waste aech and awry yiar far Ha for a total paymsnt of £100 
chpoilt and £1 par day for S yaara. Two «wrts would ba £2 par day and m 
on. 

Tta famlahadL fltr oondltfonad apartmanta In tta 5 Star 8anta Clara Hotal 
contain twin tads. private trtopfxxw, fully squlppod fdtetanatta, 
bathroom and balcony owrioofclng ttw ml 

Santa Clam Is ona of tta worM'a graat hotois, wttore everything la tbit 
aw# from U» oommtostonalra on tta door, to 24 bourn asrvkc* and 
••curtly. Largo private gardena. awfrnming pool, ahopa, h afr draa ae r a . 
baautlnil (oungaa, restaurant, bar*, ate. Hare you can Hw Hka a 
mHHonali* 

You can buy now on tMa aaay paymant plan something that could be 
worth five or tan thmsaa much In tan or twenty years’ time — (What was 
your own houao worth 20 yaara ago?) to. from a private or company point 
el vlaw your own "Caatta « Spain" could bo ona of tta bail Inmabnants 
you would haw aver mada. 

^Mffawtafag«Mi|083MSS13q DOfflC HOUSCLTO, WESTFIELD 




'tfm M 




FARMS £ 
SMALLHOLDINGS 


BRECON MAT MARK. Tout TOO 
awes. 2*v hr* London Mod 
18594 bed hse. Sutadm. Mars 
*9*tn*in avail. Oifer* oirr 
LI 00.000 0039 730828/399. 


LAND FOR SALE 


MCVAdsav c o mmit AiA- bum- 
ing plot win planning 
permission for bungalow. 46H 
X 10011 4pprox. Oder* over 
£14X00 Tri.O&VJ 230908 nr 


A Guide to 
Home Buying 
ontbe 

Costa del Sol 

Ask lor your free copy 
and brochure now. 
Heknwood Overseas 
Properties Lid 
01-2723317/8188 

[24 floors) 


Property 


■IMAGINE 
your perfect garden 

in the sun Enjoy a tranquil 

garden setting, minutes from MarbeUa und 
Puerto Barm. ADD Wimpey quality 
and reliability —marble floors, fitted 
kitchen, 27ft lounge —and you 'ce the best 
ualue in Rfarbella Take your place m the 
sun on MarbeBa's Golden MUe from . . . 


1 Bed, 1 Bath from 

2 Bed, 2 Bath from £50.000* 


BlIH 

^"inning 

nger court 



*1 


••• v._Vi;:?££ 

- - 1- «aae 

I>OMO$ Ltd 

• l ‘ : *- 


A project of 

, . Owenro* Corporation 

, SONESTA 
m BEACH VILLAGE 

• PUERTO DELADUQUESA- COSTA DEL SOL 

‘ Bead* front PmHb ^■ronaoi 4 mm taMM adiioan ao rte 
mama and new Rabat Tran joocs IS bole pdf amne 

Prices front £21 JMM 

Oniv 25 miiHiOLk 6c*n Gfcnkar 
• Telephone: 05 m - 3M2} or 33522 daring office harm 
■1*0 Sandaya and E*mrop o — 8 pm. or wnae to 

CAMPBELL GILL MARKETING LTD 

Salon Home, 17- 19 Sawn Pbee.Sc. Hdkr. Jersey, Choroid Island*. 
-- - ihw riir r<r .» ’ 


r-- 



X SEAFRONT 

T-t-v •rjKLVM.nteu 

C i a-s.rij;. rtsjroiK 
-AN •: -jt.js Ft^W- 

_ r«t; rwcirran 

. ft. i ,- : xse 
C-T-- i l;-. • a J:#d cOi sh 
■ v .«r •. Frwr-'jiS 
- r : nie. ' . 

273? 72S555 


IE - SELB0R.M 
N 4 MILES | 


grr BaYCSflu. 

:. .iiJO' 36201. 1 


u/l/ztffyO?' 

*' . „ 

as * • • 

‘ ri f 

- ‘ „ ». 
.... . I ? 


y§\. FLORIDA 

hut Eagle Creek 

, feOlF & COUNTRY CLUB GUF OF MEXICO. USA 
luxury estate homes, villas & garden apartments from 5150.000 - 
S250.000. Superb eframpiartsiup golt course, tennis & recraebonai 
comphtx. ... 

■ Golf VDtas Ltd, 

Chestnut House. 178-182 High St North. 
Dunstable. Bedfordshire. -T9tli>S82) 660681 


COSTA DC LA CALMA. »H«n 
2 « 3 bnB. S bom. vojc 
C 43XOO A £55.000 CD 
WARDS 1NT TrC- Ot 938 
. 2222 ....... 

»«tXA AT MCA LUSA- Tjjvrty 
. kuw uroiDKl fhsot (ormsbed 
■. JM.goll pool Mr Cl 9.500 Tri 
Ravner. 107241 871992 
VILLA * Po« -fumr-lornhlicd. 
ivMulirully vUtwiru Cab 
Iooihm n*r» to&OOO. 

. TM 10703) 406127 474714 


AMAMftXA GOLF A COUKTKY 
CUia S Tmonir. aponmnib 
A vilUb Irani C1S.930 lO min* 
Horn mr atroort. exrrlicni tool 
men. h*. bom imniktewiv 
. rWhmi 2 got! rourw* and much 
morr Trl hrM or 021 *43 
7023 or Ol 938 261* 


CHATEAU-APARTMENT in 
CIMtocu south of Irawr near 
hdotdoMUpr Thjrr ona two 
balhv large uJon kUrnm intng. 
room 13 acres omaie land. 
Gb&OOO Rrsly to BOX F92 
FRANCE- SOUTHERN RCStON. 
Large range o 1 proper) rm . 
denUaK^qit CMPmerrSII.- Fiw 
brorhurv WinroTl Duval Infer- 
- nauouat-TM; 102031 73339. 


CORFU Restored farm house vc« 
‘ bi 1 acre ol oinr trees with so 
perb views 2 dblr beds. 2 
shown*. fHied kitrnen. large 
lounge 10m in* ora C 6S. 3 0 O 
ouo Trl Ol 722 1263 


LAND SSjOUO - SliOOO 
1 .71)0 so m - i2U(J H) m 
BOUSES fffiiOO ■ SIOSjQOti 
Cooridrr this offer today 
- Call (dr mon- info. 

Ot-938 2756. 

Stole of Florida certified. 


T1MESHARE OVERSEAS 


IEW ORLEANS. Luxury .inn in 
Chateau Onearw in heart « 
Ft enrn Ouarter. 2 dole bedims, 
grwn. vwirnmlnp pool Last 
wee*. Sept. rreehoW L7-500 or 
will rent. 1072883) 2422 


OVERSEAS PROPERTY 
TO LET 


EXCHAROE torpe not ts bedim. 2 ■ 
bslhri min Pam iNr OWK I7i 
rte OuDe and M Ungual srhboli 
Hr I he roiMi -in-SIh London. I 
. year, (com 3ep.80._4n0 0V57 . 


CASAS YOW HOME M THE SUN 

NEW PROPERTIES <N SPAIN - COSTA DEL SOL 
MARBEUA - PUERTO BANUS - ESTEPONA 

Apartmems/Vinas/Town Houses available 
[ccn v D a from Cl 9.000 up to £150.000 (Freehold) 
cbrAlxAFree-impeciion fkghis.ro purchasers. Mortgage facib- 



CYPRUS 





DipfarnioKcrntefanfriaganda 

SBebtopudiaeidUiia 

mMbbcnIik sipoNoto 

oftssondttaii ( 01*5 bine 

HrtnsOTotifeicioaecsDl 

tonpctaUgondo 

PtaacorfacfiiMiddds: 

EucpeimAstodofarfa 

Coopn*fi m 

snAchMdeUA A 

lOWMnaefei 

Bdgun JKKEi 


■ nos available. Buyers* legal and fmanolai rights hily 
— - - - . proieciod. 

Please contact: . Cases Espafta Ltd , Unociln House. 

184-186 Queens Road, Buckhunt ita. 

I T Essex JG9 5BD- Tel: JD1) 504 0444 


OVERSEAS PROPERTY FOR SALE 

AlfivBVK - Vil)as in t ouniry semnfis frm£.i6.D00 

1. \IN/.aROTK - fin Iced rental apis fmiDSXOO 

TKNtRIH! - Community of villas St apis fimOlDOO 

181/A - Superb villas frm£b4.000 

Keuoiag Atlantic 
17 Hannover Street Loadoa WI 
01 499 8313/409 0571 ( 24 bis) 

A member of (he l 


■ tcyne. 6 mm wait* irom tea 
Tel 01-507 88*8. 


FRANCE 



nnned nouveJor -ole. in village 
ol 6anU Flora on mountain*. 
Pbnoiamie views, has lo parr 
after is omnoiiv veers. 
£20.000 srerUfio. No Ollrrs. 
Tel: 107371 832875 
ITALY - MOUSE, near Abrtazo 
Small twnlinq tod be on wooded 

mountain*: dr Slrep> *■ 

£32.000. Detail* on renueji. 
Trl. 107*8) *3338 


RENTALS 



BUYERS’ BIBLE 


ERTY m SPAIN" 
Beaches Lid 
The Costa Raua Exp 
34 Hadey Mews, Hi 
Han. West Midlands 
9LQ _ 

0562 885181 
PeneaBod ExhBiMu 
Hagiey HaB. 


COSTA DEL SOL 

Properties from C8D00 up- 
wards. The widest range on 
the coast Ucwjsed agents. 
Members of ABOPA. 
ASSOCI ATED SP ANISH 
PROPERTIES 
(TWS) 

206 Upper Richmsod HO, 
Loodcu) SW15 6TD 
Tot 01-7 SB 21 SO 


CLOSE PALACE many flats lo lei 
liomtludio CllOpw lo 5 bed. 2 
bam flat C27S pw Co Ln. 
DounlMK 83* 8000 


FULHAM superti soartous 5 bed 
house wiin roof tenare A ndn. 
K kil. new drror C293 pw 
Finch * 73* 6603 IT l 


KA M I * S TE A D In the heart of I he 
v illage Imrrur mo*r spar 2 heo 
flat £230 pw Nathan Wilson a 
C o 794 not. 


LOMO /SHORT LET proper I lev WIMBLEDON lullv (urn J 4 Ded 
Irom £100 C3.00CT>w Personal hnuse. nasCH. garden. Co Em 
Service 01 438 3o«0 or 083* imsvv M* From COOO prm 
642824 anyiune iTl TH 0274 308291 


MONDAY - FRIDAY Kampviead 
rwtulilul modern pmlhouve 2 
beds. >oulh IrfTdCe close tubes 
£130 pw Inrl 01 58* 9261 


..*>d 




- • >■; 


BIKTOMMnA.tfi ATIJKW1OTN4- 
’.fr Uonai Rarfc. 1 hour Br«4 4« 

- Qutmper 23 mins 

■ i. Main buUdlng w«l preserved^ 
- .. convened barn *• 

- “ water, rtecirirlly- 

bread oven, uoui stream- Jw^c- 

jveflhlg In .lO acnS 400.00011- 

Rtng Ol 727 197*. 

south or rnAttca, 2.6 
. from -pun deLa Tour vni»a«. 
Hameau de Oorioton J IS mjn- 

- ulea 'Irom beotfvoy Js»rV«Y 
.’ modem pmoertv 

by vineyard*, wfth aoiWW 0f« 
-r room -large tounoe/dnung room 

■ wilh mrtTanme to P*«. 

. ..-fully roufpood Michetw »"■ 

room and MM. 

. alUMHd OP tirrmxrx 'gtogg 

and Minis courp- f 4 *- 900 

' Phone: 102271 751 «4A - 

SURAI4AR. Hf ConnavJBivAPtfUl 

viHa. HabUat idrnwwd- sw*- 

- Nr private Dtwct i * w ith W 
MfKnd vierf aeTOw u» baV - 
■ : piuTs&n -mtaw »«• 

•r - (used only l mo nUD 

-i=. 

■ 780304 fWeriutaW* 

.z*f 7788*7 tn eiX» A «•*! 



SiOOO. Rite evening. Mald- 


KNICHTS8RIDCC. Lux Hat 2 
bed. I balh. living dining- sit. 
new-iv turn. Ideal Co W. 
C3B0pw 01229 4*84 

CHELSEA. SW10 Spacious, qui- 
rt. sunny dewoner* 4 Bed hse 
Super dec order. JuR back on 
marvel. Due Co tenant* change 
of plane. 2 flee, r Baibscn- suite. 

1 Bathroom I6H13* * lacu/O 
Kit aO mach. Garage. Terrace. 
Alarm Soil Embassy. Reduced 
from £400pw lo CTaopw tor 
quirt. 1 year trt Gavin Cow 
per Estate* Ol 361 6732. 

CARLTON MU. NM. Spacious, 
tunny, garden matsonelle. 3 
min* Armncan School. Part or 
lutty furnished. 7. beautiful 
loom* i3 4 bedroom*). 2 balh- 
rooms, modem kllthen. litlluy 
room, all mod eon* £445 o.w 
mri daily cleaning. Long let. no 
aornele*. Tel 01 324 1347. 
ESSEX - CRESSIHC Wlinam 4 
mile* (Liverpool Street 44 min 
uie*i l» M lurmvned 
Cxcpix tonally One period how 
5 bedrooms. 3 reception room* 
modem Mlchen. Gan central 
healuK). Double glazing Beaub 
ful gardens aoouI 1 acre. 
SAVtLLS (02461 26951/. 
HENSMOTOH 1WS. Amazing 
designer'* flat Stunningly deco 
rated and exduisiiety turahhea 

2 double bedrooms 'both e» 
suite bauiroom*i plus a runner 
Viewer room, omm room, 
study, women wuh aL a Poll 
anre*. Asaiuoto Now. Co lei 
£275 pw 244 7353. 

qUEEHSOATE SW7 Brand new 
convernon lane rj^rt'lrtn. 
iwo double bedrooms, two baUt- 
roonw. umurnbhed rarepl for 
■ carpet* and curtains Company 
embassy let only. £320 p.w 
Inrtudmq c.h. and c.h.w. Trt; 
Mr James; 01-588 1049 idayi 
AMEMCAR EX£C»mVX5 S«rt. 
lux flats houses: £200 Cl OOP 
pw usual lees rca. Pnmips 
Kay 8 Lewi*. South of ine RwL. 

‘ Chehea office. 01-352 81 1 1 or 
North ol me Pane , fleg m* « 
Park Office. 01-586 9882. 
EARDLEY CMS. SWS OMgnifl- 
rnd inienor de* to l»e d M U 
if*ojt< bjraUan. OWc oww o\rr- 
looking gdn. larnerpccp). dining 
m luflv (Hied -K A B. PaUQ 
MUSI be wen lo be b^'cvcd. 
CISC pw 244 7363 lT» 
BSMOPS PARK. HW- imm ar 
newly dec hse with arrr&lo 
shops A lube 3 bearms. db^ 
rim mt. kil dining mv. 
baihrm. odns CiBO pw Sum- 
van Thomas 731 1333. 
f HP*r* SWIO Sparfoin 2nd 

ftoorfSl in 

im*l 2 NUn ii *• w 2 rocem. 
rT^JrtS^baKony. Bfl- Ga* 
CH. all morns £275 P« Long 
LH. 01-370 6781ITI 

CORNWALL GARDENS Charm 
toTi Bed apl U1 quiet am*. 

Good Balh Antique fum. 
mnomv. Denham li Rcm.es 
938 3622 , , 

lUOaHTSBRlDOC Maurtf. fur, 
njxbed man. 3 beds- 2 baths. 2 
”■ rereo. toe kil tocoWd v. close lo 
uarradv HWUy letominmdeiL 

A Boy ton 487 4401 
.KERSmOTON £146 pw, C3XH 
1 mi mocious wefl furnished 2 
• • bed ^SSSToai. 01603 94*6 


SI JOHNS WOOD Luxurious 2 
double bedroom fiat, fully filled 
kil and bath. CH. uarden. £275 
per week. Tel Ol 681 4189 


REGENTS PARK. Marfborouqh 
House 1 bed. self font, lux rial 
lullv- furtihhrd. C h. enhance 
phone, porter. £120 pw unci. 
Trt 638 6000 ekt 8828 idayi. 
-435 29*9 -evesk 
RENT YOUR FURNITURE with 
out rapful outlay Tor 

immediate service «u ailrariive 
Wires. ring Mr MKhael 
Kmburv John lilrand Con 
irarH Ltd. Tel Ol 486 861S 
ALBERT SMDGE. Ouirt 2 bed. 
fully equipped flat on Ballersea 
Park GCH. Easy pUi«- Go.lel 
End Aug. £146 pw Pan*. 
474712M days. (Ian Frosil. 

AN AOMMARLE Hampsirad 
Abode. 5partous Luxury 3 Bed 
room Flat with every comfort. 
Large Brcepuon. Separaie Din- 
er Cl 80 weekly 286 8040 
RAKER STREETr Superb 3 vr old 
I urn hse. 4 bed*. 2 baths. <1 
ensuHei. mge. diner, kil b kfsi. 
opr palto 9dIL GCH. £400 pw. 
Trt: Ol 847 264! . 221 8376 
BATTERSEA. Beautiful IUI over- 
Woking Park Newry dec g, 
rrfurb. 2 dole bed*. 1 sole bed. 
toe rerep. ige luted kfl. bath rm. 
sep WC C330pw Ol 2236606 
BLACKHCATH IB monthtold 
Mews house. WeU-fumhhed. 2 
beds, lux kitchen, bath 4 show 
er. Cdm. Gge. £140 pw. Trt: 01 
318 9666 or 0227 70241 
CHELSEA. Luxury matsonetie. 2 
bed*. 2 baths. 1 reception, fcitch 
en aU machine*, root garden. 
C H 3 mlnme* Stoane bouare. 

. £328 pw Tel: 788 2324 (Tl 
CHELSEA SWX Stoane Avenue 
smart wimor dcsteieO MucUo 
in service block, lifts. 24 hr 
porterage MUv 1 mth tot. £160 
pw met Ol 384 7396 
OKLSEA Stylish mod 2 Bed llal. 
Pretty Recep. Open plan kit 
Good - balh Mr roof Terr. 
CJ«5nw Benham A Reeves 
938 3322. 

HOLLAND PARK Prrtly apt In 
Eaves ol P er i od hse. Lge Recep. 
Kil Balh * 2 OH Beds. Trad 
fun* Ci95pw. Benham A 
Reeves 938 3322. 
KERSMOTON SW3. Fully fum 
s c superior studio A 1 due bed 
oats with inge. kit am. bain. 
Comm gbits Oo let £115 pw 
Ol 720 3212 Warmark. 

KINGS ROAD MaNonrtte 2 
Brdrms. 2 Batbrmt A Roof Ter 
* rare to be leL IN new tsi 
serve £300 per mofilh Co lrt 
nol required. Tel: 01-731 3191. 
KNWWTS MU DCE DeUqhKui 
immac. town hse. (idly (um. 2 
rerpts. lux kR. 2 dbie A 1 single 
bed*. ? baths, sep elks, sunny 
roof l err C 67S pw. 684 3130. 
LANCASTER GATE COMPtMic 
l Bed iial in good block. Rerep 
Kil A Balh Trad furn a fresh 
decor. CiSOpw. Benham 3 
Reeves 938 3622. 

WATERLOO Spacious 2 Bed nai 
in mod P-B Heck. Lge Recep. 
Balh A Kil Near Transport & 
Theatres. £225pw. Bennara A 
Reeves 938 3622- 
AMEMCAM GARK urgently rq 
wuru luxury flab and Musts 
From £200 - £1.000 pw. Ring 
Burgms Eitato Agenb 381 6136 
MOLD AT APARTMENTS Irom 1 
week lo 3 Months from £300 lo 
£3.-000 pw. 01-937 9681. 
KCMUMCTOH WS Lux 1SI 11 111. 1 
mile bed. toe rrc > brand new 
W iuS pw toe- 01 938 23S5. 



■ Hampton & Sons 


RENTALS 


1 


mm 


r.KOkCK KMCIIi \hr \ Htm:- \iicnl 


FURNISHED RENTALS 


PALACE C08BT, LOlffiOII, WZ 

Outstanding privata apartments dose to 
Kensington Gardens wim axceterrt per- 
sonal services, this fa a spa oo us 
Edwardian mansion Mock with a warm 
atmosphere and the luxury of modem 
facilities inckxfrng maid service, laundry 
service, catering, secretarial services, 
eic.. and 24-hour porterage. 

The flats are interior designed to excep- 
tional standards and accommodation 
Indudes:- 

3 or 4 double bedrooms 
. 3 bathrooms 

2 'urge reception rooms 
Urge and fUly fitted kitchen 

Rom 2800 p.w. 


HANS PUCE, LONDON, SW1 

Only ona rrunuta from Harrods these 
large, wel-proportionad flats overtone 
the gardens. Accommodation includes: 
2/3 bedrooms, drawing room, 2 large re- 
ception rooms. 2/3 bathrooms, fuly 
fitted kitchen, resident porter and use of 
communal gardens. 

f = ro*n 2700 p.w. 

CADOGAN SQUARE 

An exceptionally spaoous and fight 
penthouse flat overtooking the square, 
comprising: 3 double bedrooms, 2 bat£ 
rooms, 2 shower rooms, large double 
reception room with good-sized balcony, 
dining hen. frtfy fitted kitchen, and use of 
communal garden. 



M AN A ( . K M K N T K \ P K RT I S K 


Pemberton & Clark 


A SELECTION FROM OUR REGISTER 




6 Arlington Street, London SWlA lRB 


01-4938222 



Horner HW 


UMITED 


INCORPORATING 



RENTALS 


For rentals in Sussex. Surrey Berkshire and S. W London. 
Homer Hill Ltd. incorporating Mays Rentals offer the widest 
range of quality houses and flats. 

Telephone: 037284 3811. Telex: 89551 12. 



HOWARD MINTER 


mmm 


5 Bedrooms, 3 Bathrooms, Shower rooms, 2 Large 
Reception rooms with balconies. Large fuly 
equipped kitchen; new carpets and curtains. Resi- 
dent Porter, C.H. Lift, ate. 

TO RENT FURNISHED OR UNFURNISHED. 


-3 CADQGAM PLACE LONDON S V-f 1 01 235 2332 





-FSTATE AGENTS'. 


LETTINGS NEGOTIATOR WANTED 

R«srtar*w kmng* nagooaax rsqurea lor otr Putney Ofbeq. we art ntat>- 
tobed marvel iMdws m rarang propmy Proumul London wontng to 
a»pan4 our akaaoy ubmnMI pixinbo aM ora tookxiQ tor ■ moHUM 

pwson to pm aw dfnenc n Irandy ma 

Prospects uPuunarrmafvctoiii i and uq—KlumB a ro m r a ak i maftr y 
• coaKMn and ear idoranea. 




01 738 3903 


01-736 5503 



BRUCE 


CHESTERTONS 

R FSIDENT1A L — ^ 


to. -PH ! H-HD 


LOWNDES SQUARE, SWl 

Stunning fiat with large Recaption Room. 2 Bedrooms. 2 
Bathrooms. Fitted Kitchen & Patio. ETOOpw. 

PARK WALK, SWIO 

Vary large famay house. Staff basement Ful sized b«- 
ferd room. Large Garden. 6 Bedrooms. 4 Bathrooms, 
Kitchen. Dining Rm.’ Dbie Reception Room. Vary wed 
furnished. £ 2 , 000 pw 

VICTORIA SQUARE 

Period house avaiiabto unfurnished consisting of 4/5 
Beds, 3 Bathrooms, 2/3 Reception Rooms, CTOOpw. 


ST. JAMES HOOSE. :3 r.e«S't;GrCM SG:jARH. 
LOMCOrJ '.VS 01 '■07 4.347-937' vjge« I' 


LONDON W11/W2 

Are you looking for a 
good quality 2 bods flat? 
We currenil) have an ex- 
cellent selection from 
£140 to 050. Give us a 
ring. 

Netting Hill Office 
01-221 3500 


DOCKLANDS E14 

Brand new 2 bedroom 
collage with garden and 
garage. Good quality fur- 
nishings. £120 per week. 
6 months plus. 

Docklands Office: 
01-538 4921 



HOUSES AND FLATS THROUGH 
OUT THE DOCKLANDS AREA 

RESIDENTIAL LETTING DEPARTMENT 
TEL 01-48S 4852 


OUOOWeSTDNE ST. 8W6 CADOGAN LANE SWl 
Pretty hoine wnn garden. 3 Unfum house with garden and 
beat. 2 oaths. 2 recaps, garage. 4 beds. 2 recaps. 2 
Mteeak room. £370p*. baths, doaks. kitchen. ESOOpw. 

CADOGAN PLACE SWl CADOGAN STREET SW3 

CentraFy located flat. 2 beds. Attractive house own garden. 2 
bath, recep, lot keys in beds. bath, doefca. recaps. 
Cadogan Mace. E2S0p*. study, ktt, garden. £300pw. 

ORR-EWING ASSOCIATES 
01-581 8025 


sr. stems tcC sms. no* ok- 

onM HOUSE wtfi Land scared 
Garden 4 Beds ? Rtcnamu 2 Bad. 
Lag* Kndxe wtth al madsnes. Tim 
P srVmq Ccrveneni WcfinraslB/ 


CdV £220 pm 
SHORT LET SMS. Gfflkn te rod) 
Bedsmng rm. Large Mtton/ brok- 
lon «m «ndi an machnes. Sumy . 
BaOvDOrt (be of Gaidnv AwuWila 
August/ Septaiter 180 pm 

MARVEEN 

01 937 


COLBtBUE COUKT SUB Otort de- 
g my nkam/Kd tut on 3rd In 
(wertookmo Bardens. 3 Beds II ea 
sung) SeoaraM Snoirer rm 2 Receo- 
Uns Xechen/Biasi rot math all 
machMs. lice ol Square Gardens 
Porte LA AvabUeNo* (400 pa 
RSKUFFE MEWS SW10 Me» <nU- 
not desjpied Mews House jbedrms 
il enuKei 2nd Biihrm Dbb nop. 
(idy fneo UdKfi iMh all ntactees. 
Garage. Company Let t3S0pv> 
SMITH 
9801 


□ Sturgis 


am am sth, s.wjl 

hnnoc 3rd ft ftui n wB run btodc. 
m beat ot CtMsea. i bed. recap, 
tum wtb Cher. Atad U. fafL unto. 
Esc Marty. T.VTwtao. Long Co 
In E2D0 pfc 

HBUJUB PABX AVE, W.11. 
BngM A spaoou* ia Ik IUL Deco- 
rated n bnely oalf cottars. 1 bed. 
neap. bath, filly efusotd m. bal- 
enty. Long Co ta. £250 pw. 
BnUW SDNS, S.W.7. Gd 2nd 
Ur te. M newly hrn fi dec. 2 tads, 
neap, htth Mth shwr. FuUy 
equoped bL Long Co let £275 pw. 
N A BO H HT TEBH, S.W.1B. 
£xc la ft Oat mUi Ige wr. 2 dbie 
bedmis. recap, oab. mod tt. long 
Co kL E32S P.W. 

JlBy Aadonaa or Jaffa WgtfB 
>1-244 7441 


MASKELLS 

~ ESTaTE'aGENTS 

' EATON PLACE, SWl 

Supsfb. Bngto Iwr pud D W wbli 
■poaoua roeepkon. Ortng im. moo 
ul 2 dWa bednai weh enauie 
bodvm, ctaotoin. lovefy pafloi AMO 
now. long CO let CSfX) pw. 

REDESOALE ST, SW3 
Newly dec ia A 2nd b mett. 2 
beds. Mkng mv mod U A tail 
Ante August, tong co W C32S pw. 

107 WALTON STREET. 

LONDON SW3 2HP 
THJS’HONE; 01-581 2216 


KNKHTSMfDflE. Luvtirv rrx-w* 
rwirw 2 dfrtr- bna* Lono short 
k-t* IrofH C59S pw 584 7350. 


WANTED Suomor proprtlm tor 
kwiO snort Co lrt* Ol 45H 3*80 
or C«o 5u?«24 anvllmc ■! i 


AVAILABLE NOW Luxurv flals 4 
nobM-<. Christa. KoHitiisbridm* 
Brtqrmia- - £200 LT.QOOpw. 

Trt. Burq.-** 581 51 J6 
BATTERSEA. I bod 114! m imrrur 
- rotid CIm 1 main line dn. £95 
pw Trt PfPPU 788 7884 

WOrrrnfc. 

BLACKHCATH SE3. Ourmuiq 
fum fi brtl MSP. 3 rrcr-ps. 2 
bdihx lux kil. rti. figp gdn 
C22S pw T.P M 446 2025 
CLAPHAM COMMON: spill Irvrt 
M lid to. Clove lube Own phone, 
ruihroom Sail couple: CSS per 
week Trt.Ol 720-7144 
DULWICH BORDERS S bra art 
me. 2 Orths, mod kil. 13 mirw - 

ClLv 12 monlfts lrt from 1st 
Aug. £750 pent 01-693 3221 
EALING Lux apl 5 bed*. 2 ree*. 2 
Orths, kil diner. 3 ml ns lube. 
Lt .200 prm rial* A hse* avail 
irom LI 20 pw. 992 9966 iTl. 
HOLLAND PK. Nice * parlous sc. 
ttrt OOI bed. Mg lounge, 
kn din New rq- Comm gdns. 
Co Lrt £195 pw 741-9577 
BUMGTON sell ronlaliwd i 
arromadJiion 1 vrar Cl so pw , 
2 prol genilemm References 
plrave Ring 01 369 5733. 
KEMSIMGTOH SW5 BngM. 
cto-erful llal Poier Jones lur 
rusnixl 2 bedrooms, treat, a A 
0. £126 pw CM 581 4103 
MAVTAJR, HYDE PARK. The 
most luxurious tong short let 
apt*, lwk 1 st 1 8 beds Best 
pores. W.T. P 01 933 9612. 
MAYFAIR Hlgn quality furnished 
dal on 2nd floor. 3 rm*. K A B. 
Co lei only lor 12 mih* or tong- 
er. C280 pw. 01-499 9681 
REGENTS PARK - Luxury rood 
fum studio overlooking park. K 
A B Cl 33 pw Trt-01 4S7 7619 
937 9681 The number to remem- 
ber when seeking ix-J rental 
proorrua In central and Draw 
London area* £150/ £2 OOOpw 
VISITING LONDON /PARIS Allen 
Bales & Co havr a large srtec- 
IKH1 of dais avail lor E?OOpw+ 
tor 1 wk+. Tel. 01 499 1666 
ACADEMICS VBIWK. Flats nr 
Vniveruty A Brtl Museum. Trt 
Helen Walson h Co 380 6276. 
CENTRAL A DINER LONDON. 
Very good nats A houses. Lono 
or short lets. 937 4999 ITL 
CHELSEA Ltohl lux balcony Hal 
Dbie bed. re rep. mis. Porter*. 
£196 pw. Long lrt 622-6*126. 
LITTLE VEWCe WZ. Luxury 2 
bedroom turn dal. toted kil. rti. 
£2 60 pw. T P M 446 2025. 
LOOKING tor I he bcM flai. du 
pie*. house In London? 
ClOO ICOOpw. cal) 689 6481. 
SW3 Tastefully decorated 2 bed 
m. Fll KM. All app £2?6pw 
Andre Lauauvte 491 78C2 
SWS. i bed (um ftai. l rrcco. kil. 

wash morn, rti £116 pw. 
T P.M. 440 2025. 

two, 4 bed lav turn hse. 2 
recep*. Ch. Gdn. £220 pw. 
T P.M. 446 2023. 

SWS lux 1 b*d oanened' apart- 
ment. baiconv. 11 M> pw 
Finch'* 73* 6506 m 
W14 KuSlk: CH 9dn flaL dngle 
bedsM, a b. 6 12 mm. lo ium 
guesl. £225 PM. 603 6091 
WZ Spacious 2 Bed flai m ear Bik 
opp par*. Ac c. HAB. S^SDpw, 
Allen Bates A Co. 499 16*5. 
WZ. 2 bad lux furn flai wnn sun 
lerr. Cb. Close lo 4lL amenities. 
£180 pw- T.P M- 44* 2023. 


BELGRAVIA SWl 

Selection of luxury flats available. 
Fully fitted and furnished . 

Lifts, video entryphone and GARAGES. 
1 BEDROOM FLAT - £200 pw. 

2 BEDROOM FLATS - £400 - £0OO p% 

Co lets only 

preferably long term lets 
Contact: Sarah 235 8836/90&7 
D. HOLDINGS 


Quraishi 
-Constantine 


For the best 
rental selection of 

QUALITY 
FLATS & HOUSES 

in prime London areas 
ZJO Boris Coart And SWS. 


KATHINI GRAHAM 

For the best selection of furnished properties in Central 
London. 

18 Montpelier Mews 
Knightsbridge 
LONDON SW7 
01-584 3285 



PALACE GATE W8 

? Mtnnq 3rd floor irturmshad 
Haft NMty deemed ft car 
Drtnl Some bads have 
•anSrttoes&e sholhs or shower 
rms. Bolh op arts have newly fit- 
ted Us taag all eiaancal 
appteiees Wrfl locate) nr to 
Kntfrtsbndgei Hyde Pari, early 


ties axnpnse ■ ha#, reetpt mi. 
M 2/3 tads. bam. sap ctoakrm. 
£300 ft £*00 pw neg nd of c/b. 
chw ft potter age 





barnand 

marcus 

E3 


01 -24-4 7353 j 


PALACE 

PROPERTIES 

w« naw a supab settenon of 
pereonaBy nspeoed lumoned and 
unfunoshed properties m many fine 
Readeiutel dsinrts. rerang frwn 
•150 pw to £2.000 pw. 
SNORT/LONG LETS 
MANY HOLIDAY FLATS 
AVAILABLE 
Tel: 01-486 8526 





Keith 

Cardale 

Groves 



VALUE! VALUE! knightsbrtttgeA 
Miningaon. SuwiB 12-3 4 
Bed Mivfd ftoft ui pmuptoufi 
pwlrrtd buliaing avail lor hob- 
oar or tooo tn Prtee Irom 
L750pw . Ayirstoro A Co 727 
6663. 


FULHAM 2 irons from lube Com 
plrtrtv lumKhM 2 OouMp 
BW o nwnl ll*i lounge, fully 
filtrd klfrhen and tv Ih room, en- 
nv cTOone. pnv*(r entrancr 
£140 pro- week Co tol only. Trt 
Prior 0 -Regan 01 381 4815. 


BARBICAM duplex roastonrdr. I 
bod. (ultv (urnKhcd Co tol 
Cl 80 pw Parking available 
Trt 01 689 4533 exl 279 


SERVICED APARTMENTS. 

CHELSEA. Well girt rcslau 
ranis. Idle nighi shopping 
ruriushedsiuoioand 1 bed (lata 
iron) £1*0 pw. Mm I monlh. 
Lrtllna Orfko. Nrtl Cwynn 
Howe. Sloan o Av . Londrai 
SW3. Ol 384 8317: leiex 
916358 NGHIDN. 


MAYFAIR, WI 

Srtednn of tey tumtied bnun- 
oib. Aims, ’stuard m ooet 
■cadenMl tocadon pot dll Gnw» 
nvSq These apanmorts are set 
n a needy ndvbohed block. 
Vproachad through hrodsomi: 
maugN von gates and a mart** I 
coutyanf Eat* apt My equate 
id a lunay slanted ana would b 
<w Im Knot executive seefang 
Mayte based acomnwiami. 
took F175-I35ftro 


^01-629 6604^1 

E Pfaza Estates 


HOLLAND PARK RD,'Wf1 
Lwrty modem nerty dec townhouse 
wta Kty ya w ac co mmed — a 
Sfi beta. 2/3 ioccpl 2 bans. W. 
Gardea 2 Roof Terraces. Garage, 
long M £S60 pw udwnand £650 pw 
ton) 

WOODSFORD SO. W1« 
Excellent large modem unfimlsiw) 
hnuse m wrt known deaetoproenL 
id tB Im cMdron. 5 Be*. 2 Bate 
Playroom. DNe Recn. tt. Pabo, Ga- 
rage. Long La QSOD pw (iwg). 

724 3100 


; -01-72^3100 : -01-5317646 • 


SUPERIOR FLATS 8 HOUSES 
avail. & read. For diplomat*, 
mrcmuvrs. Long A short let* In 
afl areas Unfriend ft Co. 48. 
Atoemarte Sl Wl 01-4996334. 


HOLLAND PARK. Wll Newly 
iohv max* in well maintained 
portod property Exiremely spa- 
rlous.Rerrp Rm. Large Masirr 
Bedrro. 2 Single Brdrro Filled 
Kil. BaUirm Lge private roof 
lerrtvr. Co Let Avail now. 
CUSpw AROUND TOWN 229 
996* 


Nr Hyde Bl Comptaety redec 
S retob Ca CHW. t dW bad 
(en suae dressing room). 1 
angle Oats, ige iecu#on m 
dining rm. taatbrm with 
shawr. itaa modem Mteftan. 
ireezer. w / machine, 
d; washer, wssffi ifisposal unt 
eoioufTV.emraiieeimone.se- 
cumy locks, sweet maiyaid 

garwn. 

ONLY £2N Pffl WS( 
FOR QUICK LET. 

Tet 01-979 2*11 


INTERNATIONAL EXECUTIVES 

Urgently require flat* A house* • 
In central London front £150 to 
£2.000 pw. Please call Sally 
Owen or Lorane Cuiebdl on 
01-957 9084. 


KENSINGTON. WS New rial wilti 
2 Bed*. Rerep. KAB. Ltd Par- 
ler CH C230PW Larger fU* 
wilh 2. 3 Bed*. Spactois Rerep. 
Kr.2S. E325PW Barth A C* 
734 7452 _ 


DOCKLANDS SCI ■ Luxury Slu 
dto in li-u-d nultolng £150ow 
£1 • Beautifully rumnhed 2 Bed 
flat, view* ol Tower Bndge 
ClfOpw £14 • Brand new l 
Bed IUL balcony over Dock* 
CllSpw. Car Irion Smith A Co 
488 9017. 


WOBURN. On (Handing large lux 
ury 4 bedroom home lo lei 
umumimrd suiaKH in own 
ground* dove to Wo*unt Park 
and J12 ol Mi. CDramunlra- 
lion* lo London excrilenL 
Daytime: Ol 589 4804. W, e + 
eves: 062SB 3086 


DOCKLANDS. UMEH0U5E Tru- 
ly biunning Rivrr View* irom 
jin enormous wtiarehoute flaL 
2 Due Bed* with en-wtle Bates. 
Recep. Dining, Study. Balco- 
nies. £500pw. CartetOD Smith 
- ft Co 488 9017 . 


Shor! lets in central areas 
so avj i £100 i"1 GGOev/ 
: C *-62S.£2a1 • 


S IMS CITY. Cxrepiional lux 
flai. 2 dbie bedim*. 25' Inge 
Filled Mi all martt*. O'tobkmg 
uuM Green Co lrt pref. £160 
pw Trt Mr Pollard 657 3388 


LARGE LUXURY furnished flai. 
Wl 5 mill) walk US emh**)' 
Available immedialrty 3 Bed*. 
2 R Props. Kitchen & 2 Balhs 
GasCH All appliance*. LOf>9 let 
p*ef CiSOpw Tel. Crl -629 
0102 iTl. 


NR WMDSOR In drtignllui 
Domnr village. 16ih Crttturv 
(arm home full ol characlrr 4 
bedroom*, curtain* and camel*, 
new luxury kilrtien. sun room, 
pauo and garden £tJ150pc.m 
Telephone Palmer 06286 4*38. 


OULHRCH. Bmmtottr rumiOvd 
Cdw’ardlan House - 6 beds. 3 
recep*. garage, large garden 
Avail August. £3U) pw 733 
4318 key hold 


KEHMMCTOM. Bright newly dec 
4 equipped maw In quirt 51. Nr 
lube. 1 dbi 2 *gl beds N S CO 
lrt prel. £165 P w Trt Ol *73 
3321 / Ol 735 1084 


— —e ARCH Fully furnished 
mew* collage. oiwi tocalmn. 2 
dole bn*. I recep. kil diner, 
bathroom and 2 w e"s £360 per 
wref. Trt Ol 286 8250. 


BLUE VUAB. Mew ly dec A 
furn mod town hse 3 bj*. V 
rec. 2 balh*. gdn ?9e £37* P»'- 
Hainan witson A Co 79* i 161 


GML5EA FLAT- to rent lor 

appro* 4 weeks from 111 Alto- 

Sul, angle 

mi ind, 01 M 2 4343 * os 


INE LET FLATS AMD MOUSE*. 

Con, art Richard or Mirk- Davis 
WOO*’ ft Co 402 7381 
WtMFOLE *T. Wt. 3 beds. 1 
bain, diowemn. new kltchm. 1 
recent. £330 pw 01 501 1163 


TO PLACE YOUR 
PROPERTY 
ADVERTISEMENT 
IN 

THE TIMES 

TRADE ADVERTISERS 

TEL: 01-481 1986 

ADVERTISING FAX NO. 
01-481 9313 

TELEX 925088 
PRIVATE ADVERTISERS 

TEL: 01-481 4000 

USE YOUR 

ACCESS OR BARCLAY 
CARD 









































































SPORT 


36 

THE TIMES WEDNESDAY JULY 23 1986 ■ ... 


O' 

171 

pen 

iVl 

[Al 

r Tt 

Al 

’ 1 

n 

[A4T 

M 

rc 


ANTIQUES & 


I GOLF 


All classified advert semen is 
ran be acecpicd by teleph on e 
{cucpt AilMiiixatKfnst 77 k 
deadline a 5.00pm 2 days pnor 
lo publScaiion lie 5.00pm Mon- 
day for Wednesday). Should 
you wish io send an advertise- 
ment in writing plea* include 
your daytime phone number. 
CUSTOMER SSIVICES DE- 
PARTMENT. If you have any 
queries or problems rcSaimg to 
yow advertisement once it has 
appeared, phase con tad our 
Customer Services Department 
by telephone on 01-4*1 4100. 


announcements 


LACOCR ABOCV, wns* Baroque 
mow Lftwup vdimj I • 3 Au- 
OUST 0.30 7 00 nm Easy 
jrrnUl Trt. 024 073 207 or 
Ol 937 0084 


EXPANDING PUBLISHERS 

would Likr To Hear From au 
itKwi li you lure wnll+n a 
Hook mat dr*+n « publication 

Wnln IO- Dppi TM11 12 THE 
BOOK GUILD LTD. 25 High 
sirwi. Lewn. Suwex bnt 2LI 
ELDERLY LONE SKIER of mod 
i-,l ability wrto acquaintance of 
oovrs ior punning fulun* trim. 
DIPfnd Houv Taunton TA3 
7NR TrK'Phone S444C 
AFRICAN BOY. 17. win May In 
Mmllv a- paying gum CVwv. 
2 nii ruo V Han- 8*000 Pol- 
iter*. Franco. 


ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS 


OAYNOR Wpll 

(fun J> lev. h>n 


done and 


SERVICES 


P. Loin or Marriage 
All wv arr» Daldlrw. Oral 
■OI*i 23 Abtnpdon Road. Lon- 
don %V8 Tel. Ol «38 ion. 
BREAKAWAY. London's dub lor 
professional unaitalrhed people 
23-43 oirr 200 ments monin 
It- 24 hr In/C UPC. 797 7994. 
MARRIAQE A ADVICE Bureau 
kaihannr Allen ifx foreign Of 
Iitei prnorul UiUjmmnr.7 
brdley PI. Wl. Ol 499 2656 
HEM FISHER INTRODUCTIONS 
Send SAL N Beauchamp PI. 
6V.1 01 267 6066 Eun area. 
□1 504 4142. High sucres* rale. 
Men 4045 In demand 
CALIBRE CVS Ud proTnaonal 
rurrtrulum vitae documents. 
Detail* 01-631 3388 
CAPITAL CVm prepare high quail- 
IV curriculum tiun 01607 
7905 



WANTED 


ARTIST URGENTLY requires 
large workshop In any corvfl- 
bon wnhin 1 nr w London lo 
rent purchase 01 385 0536 
WANTED - LARCE TABLES, sen. 
of cham. large mirrors, book- 
rases, desks 8 buresnn Ol -586 
0)48 228 2716 day night 


Spink 

Qtiu EWor MmHnlc 


Buy K War Medals 

todudlng Orders 1 Decorations 
Spin) Ir Son Limited 
5-7 King 5am. SLjamn's. 
London SW1Y6QS 
w Tel:OI-9W78Mt2< houni^ 


ALL JEWELLERY 
WANTED 


. Top cash- 

HOUSEQF 
WILLIAMS . 

43 Lambs Conduit Sl 
London WCI 
TBL4058538 


FOR SALE 


FINEST duality wool carnets At 
irade prices and under, aho 
available lOO's extra Large 
room wr remnants under half 
normal price. Chancery Carpels 
01 406 0463 

SHERATON STYLE Dining Ta- 
mes. chain, sideboards and 
desks Catalogues from William 
Tillman. Crouch Lane. Borough 
Green. None 0732 883278 
THE TUNES 1795-1M*. Other 
lilies avail. Hand Pound ready 
for presentation also 

-Sundays". £1 2.50 Remember 
When. Ot 688 6323 
TICKETS FOR ANY EVENT. Cats, 
Starlight Exp. Chen. Les MIS 
All fheaire and soorls. 

Tel. 8216616 828-0496. 

A. Ex Visa » Diners. 
SCATFlMDERS Any even! inc Les 
Mb. Coven l Gdn. Stanighi Em 
Clyndrboume 01-828 1678. 
Major credit cards. 

CATS. CHESS. Les Mis. AU Ihe 
aue and sport. Tef 631 3719. 
637 1715. All major credit 
nOOSES/ FREEZERS. Cookers, 
etc Can you buy cheaper? B A 
S Ud. 01 229 1967 8468. 

4 GLYMEBOURFE tickets lor 
sale Augai 2nd. Tel: Ol 684 
0659 

VKTOMAM Fireplace beauttfUUv 
detailed while marble, very ele- 
gant £726. Tel: 0! 501 5541. 


RESISTA 

CARPETS 

SALE NOW ON 


Wool mta Berbers from EJ35 per 
sq yd + VAT. 80% wool Heavy 
Domeste Writon E13-S5 per » yd 
+ VAT. Coriawtafl ties £8.75 par 
sq « + VAT& many other greal 
reducDoos 

182 Uppre (Sctanad Mad 
London SW14 

Teh 01-876 2089 

Fan esflmatos-E*pert Ota#. 


ANNOUNCEMENTS 


AU-PAm IN 
AMERICA 

ai Ian a legal 4u-Rnr 
w op aiim i u ui ihc USA! 

If wo arc 

* Agrd IMS 

■ Have cvpcrieacc ia look in g after 
CfllldfCB 

We offtn 

* Fire return Oglu io New York 

* S Ay a n o m iion on arrival 

* F a d a n gr aimer ran 

* SlOO per meek pacha money 

* Mcdni i muiMK and ouier 
benefit* 

iMcrvicm ore now bent Md far 
dcpnt tw BS beer dm pmcr. 


Apply far dettils and a pp h e -ati o n 
farm u __ 
D«tTT 18 

Amrrlcan fafUMc far 



MARKSON'S PIANO 

SALE IS NOT ON' . 
With price* cheaper than nth 
m vale pnm-wlM needs a 
bow? lOO's of upright* ft 
Grands lor sale hire vrtlh op- 
tion no purchase pun (rum 
tltom 

markson pianos 

Albany street. NWi 
Ol 9 35 8632 
. Artillery puce. IB 
01-8S4 4517 


IMMACULATE condition, ugm 
mnltaqaity regency dtniirj 
room suite 6 chairs and 2 
carver* SKfaboart and server. 
7 it tn al table £2000. Tet 01 
580 5343 


UUJQUE VASE - w me form of 
luo doves in original presenu 
lion box Brand new. £200 DO 
Tel : 01 568 5700 


BRIGHTS OF NCTTLEBCD. Chip 
pendalp and Sheraton during 
room I um it ure aulhenUrally re- 
produced by our own 
cranemen. Any period style 
purr made lo cimihown soeci- 
fir auons Netuebed. Nr Henley- 
on Thames <0491i 6411 15: 

Boumrsnoulh 1 02021 293580. 
Tnpvham. Devon 10392871 
74A5 Berkeley. Glo* iCUBSi 
810952 

SFLCNIHD solid mahogany, hand 
bum dining table Unused Sun 
mUtmi home or etrgani board 
room Extends lo nmrlv 12*. 
r loses lo 8‘. Can seat 16 Tradl 
imnal Regency reproduction 
Fillings, solid brass. Accept 
Li 600 Number ot matching 
Prince of Wales chairs. Hand 
caned and polished. All un- 
used E126 each Tel : Ol 203 
6027 


MUSICAL 

INSTRUMENTS 


BLACK STEMWAY Uptight 
No79622 Beautiful instrument 
Cl 6SO Telephone 01-946 
0467 


BE CHS TON. «n Grand Piano 
Rosewood NO 42406. £3.000 
emo 061 928 7619 


STEMWAV upright very large pi 
ano. anion refelled. Mack tase 
£1.350. Tel 01-291 5139 eves 


aOS CHPOB FER LONDON PIANO 
CENTRE Seasonal slock clear- 
ance. continental uprights ft 
Grands High quaittv. afford- 
able prices. 38. Wjgrnor* SL 
Wl Tel Ol 486 3111. or Ol 
935 7378 

THE PIANO WORKSHOP SALE. 

Genuine reductions on over 
100 new ft restored Instru- 
ments. Lnrfvailed affer sales 
service Free catalogue. JOa 
Hmngate RUl NW6 01 267 
7671 Free catalogue. 

SftmWAY Grand O. Turn of me 
century BeauIrftiUy restored. 
Rovew ood.Tel.iOS27M26B6 


SHORT LETS 


SOUTH LONDON To lei for Au- 
gusl. all i active family house. 
\ i clarion terrace with pretty 
landscaped len-aced garden . 
bbo and good f acuities lor ran 
dmv. 5 beds (1 playroom). 2 
turns Close lo porky and only 7 
mins by BH In Victoria £500 
pw inr of mils and cleaning. Tel 
Ol 274 6157 


WSHGATE Comfortable 2 double 
bed family flat Reception room 
overkmhme Urge garden, w til 
equipped kit. 40 COnvenlenm. 
Pleasant neig h bourhood nr 
lube August. £200.00 per 
week. Tel Ol 348 6475. 


HOLIDAY FLATS ft houses avail 
able C20O-E5J00OPW. Personal 
Service 01 -458 3660 or 0836- 
692824 anytime m. 


ST JOHN’S WOOD ■ Holiday let. 
My detighfui 2 bedrtnd garden 
flat can be yours for £280 pw 
Tef Ol 722 7578 or 686 3992 


E. FINCHLEY 15 nuns from 
City w.e. 1 bedroom s c luxu- 
ry flats Sleep 2,4. kitchen, 
bathroom, lounge, colour TV. 


central heabng. letebhone. from 
pw ■ £750 pm. Phone Ol- 


£200 _ 

BB3O042. 9.00-6.30. 
EDINBURGH Furnished property, 
aiiaiabie for shon term lets. 
Games. Festival and thereafter. 
Contact Green Hawes 
■0311 226 4543" “ - * 

CENTRAL MODERN S C -flat 
Sleeps 2 3. Spacious and wen 
.equipped Cge. Close Tube. 
CI7500PW, Tef; 01-6339165. 
EATON PLACE SUM Excel leruy 
fumnhed newly Renovated flaL 
Spartous retro. . bedim etc. 
£246 pw TH: Ol 352 8896 tOk 
FULHAM. Spacious 1 dbl bed noL 
Recpi idled m ft bam Nrshopt 
ft transport Avail now 3 mil*. 
£110 pw Tel 01-743 7815 
SWI basement flat wllh gdn To 
Lei- whole of July. Aug. Sept.2 
bedrms All mod cons. £260 pw 
Incl TeftJl 638 4453 
HWHGATE VILLAGE NS. Luxury 
house, with garden. £50 per 
dal-. Ring Ol 340 7408. 
LUXURY SERVICES FLATS, 
central London from £326 pw. 
Ring To wn Hse Apts 37 3 3433 
■ MMS WESTMINSTER, sunny 
quirt pb flaL 2 beds, newly dec- 
orated. C62S pern. 7 35 2194. 
SERVICED APARTMENTS bi 
kenungton. Col TV 24hr swbd. 
ux GolUngham Apis 373 6306. 
ST IAMES SWI. Luxury 2 Bed 
fully (urn serviced apt nr park. 
01-373 6306 IT) 


FLATSHARE 


LITTLE VEVBCC. Beautifully dec- 
orated w«u equipped, spacunn 
flat Suit 2 sharing or couple 
Access pensile garden Good 
transport, i mar Marble Arch. 
£160 pw. 01472 4291 (day*. 
Ol 289 1678 levee 
SWLB Prof M F. O R m knefy 
hse ♦ gdn AU mod cons + CH. 
Nr lube. £200 pem cxc. 871 
2165 >x203) or 542 5696 <evei 
WANTED SW LONDON/ KINGS- 
TON Hopefully nr Rher. Room 
ft Parking for middle aged busi- 
ness man. 3 Night* per week 
MU week* rale. 0763 864709 
CMS WICK prof ref male read w 
share charming gdn rial near 
river, own room. £210 pem 
Tel 01 996 4267 
FLATMATES Selective Sharing. 
Well estab Introductory sen ice 
Ptee let for appb 01-589 6491. 
313 Bromptwi Road. SW3 
HERN E HKJL prof M F 25+ to 
share friendly house + 2 others. 
O R £130 pem exd. Tel T43 
991 1 'day). 274 7037 l eves i. 
KENSINGTON SW5 Nr Tube. Al 
IK flat. O Room. Fitted 
cupboard? £46 ow exd. Refs. 
DefKHU. 01 352 7410 
MAIDA VALE, prof M F. share 
flat. N & O R. aU mod con*.. 
£42 pw exc. Tel 01-960 7668 
alter 6 p.m. 

Fmam SWI Attractive 2 bed 
flat wllh roof gdn All laclUte* 
£180 PW. Tel Mr Taylor 831 
9222 <OI 834 8909 iHI 
RICHMOND, garden flaL M F. 
n S. share wllh one other. 
O R. nr lime £IBQ pern eseef + 
did Tel 01-948 2276 
SWI. UqhL and grandeur A 
really magnificent ftatshare. 
Cl 12 per week. Inclusive. 01- 
589 0910. 

8 ALHA M prof F. N. S- own room 
in l ua mixed hse Nr lube £150 
pem Tel 673 2650 an 4 pm. 
GLAPKAM Lot rm. lux 4 bed Me 
+ gdn nr lube £53 pw exd. 
Ansaphane 584 1718 
FOREST MU- F Mr lux flat. Lge 

0 R W marh CH Nr BR. £40 
pw. Ol 291 6883. 579 6292. 

HAMPSTEAD F. Sh. Lge rm 
mixed flai £130 pem. Tel: 01- 
267 8830 i after &omi 
HAMPSTEAD LUX (Um flaL 2 1 
receps. I 2 bed*, ail mod cons. 
C1S8 PW. Co let Ol 794 4200 
MOKATE WOODS. Prof M F. 
N S share lge lux rut. O. R. 
£60 PW loci 01-444 7724 
MOKATE prof peel grad, n s. 
28+ . rieganl o r. w Tube. 
£190 pern. exc. Ol 883 6110. 
KENSINGTON Prof M F lo share 
lux f f flat. O r. Lin. Interior 
des. css pw. J73 3Sas eves 
KfOGHTSERDKE FLU. Room 
£29 pw snare with Male of 23 

years. TH: 01-584 B83S 
Min sf. for comfortable house, 
wllh gran- o r. £160 prtu cxc. 

01 809 4833 aner 6 p.m. 

NWS prof Female o r refs ft dec 

req. £36 pw rvr. Tel: Day 01- 
499 8666 ext 230 
PARSONS GREEN. 2F w share 
room. Ch. wash marh. Nr tube. 
£33 pw each. 736 4932 eves. 


TO ADVERTISE 
IN THE 
RESTAURANT 
GUIDE 

NEXT FRIDAY. 
25TH JULY 
Please telephone 

01481-1920 


before 
Wednesday 5pm. 



GREAT OFPORTUinhr For room 
■n luv mats with qdn nr river 
C50 pw i IK I •age-2* 4 L Day-01 
437 7822. Eve* 350 1617. 


CLAPHAM COMMON /Batlerwa. 
riurr house, own room, prof 
only. C4 q pw Tel 01 £28 6031 


CLAPHAM -Own DM room. Cor 
den CiBOprm exc or shared 
Cl SOpcra cj exr. 673 6333 eve 


PUTMEY. Prof F 25+- Mor Fri 
share. Lux flat. £4£pw Inc. Tel 
725 1111 day. 789 4399 eves. 

PUTNEY M F. N -S. 22-30. 0 R 
in rial. Near lube ft b.r. £36.00 
pw eel. Tel ■ OL 874 6532 level 

SW1L. 3rd prof person for o rtn 
nice house £40 pw rxcl. TCi. 
01-223 0336. 

SW12 Prof M N S. O-R in mod 
house. CH. garden. ClftOpcnt 
me bill* Ol 475 3301. 

SWL7 prof M F. N S- 
ftiisrw bedsn ch. £30 pw 
excl Trt. 01 767 8994. 

Wl. lady 30 plus- pw room, lux- 
ury flat, circa £80pw. Phone: 
01 499 2671 . 

W2 Proff M F io ware gdn maw 
O R. Nr lube EZeOpcm inc 
TH: Ol 727 4087 eves 

WJL Fun prof F M share with 1 
other, n-v dote o t. gdn. £45 
pw ewcl Tel OL 95$ 5109 eves 


OVERSEAS TRAVEL 


SWITZERLAND 
FROM ONLY 
£99 RETURN 

Save with Swissair's 

Super Apex. 

London toZurich or 
Geneva daily on con- 
venient afternoon 
flights. And daily 
flights to Basle 
(except Sundays). 
Book and pay 14days 
before departure. 

Stay in Switzerland 
at least until the 
Sunday after arrival. 
Bookings and full 
conditions from 
travel agents or 


01-4379573 


IT S ALL AT 
TRA1LFINDERS 


More low-cost flights 
via more routes 
to more destinations 
than any other agency 
PLUS 

• PGst, expert, high-tech 
service - Free worldwide 
hotel S car hire pass 
u (R> to 60% discounts 
Open 9-6 Hon-Set 
On-the-Spot 

Immunisation, Insurance, 
Foreign Exchange, 
Map ft Book Shop 


font 

43-48 Earis Caut Road 
London Wm6EJ 
Loo+Haui 01-603 ISIS 

Eutom/USA 01-937 5400 
1st/Busin«a a 01-838 3444 
'SmommUIcmmIIImM 


★ALL FUGHTS BONDED^ 

★★save rs n rs** 

★★TOUWST CLASS ★★ 

★★CUS CLASS* ★ 

★★1ST CtASS«« 
★★AROUND THE** 

★ ★WORLD FARES** 


9-svwtY * +urumjRK* 
A-JtBTH . ..BRSWM * 

*■ HOBART # -* DOfUUK * 

* JOBUBG + * S AfflCA * 

* «KXUl»ffl * *W£LLHCTON * 

* FLU « *FT MtMSBY * 

+ BANGKOK 6 * TTWI11 * 

* SNGAPORE * * ' IUWU1 ■* 
6 DUBAI * + BAHRAIN * 

» wo East * * wwofli * 

* LUSAKA * # HARARE * 

* TORONTO <r * VANCOUVER * 

* L AHOLES * * _ MAM * 

* CARBBEAN * +S FRAMCtSCO * 

** SOUTH AJIffBCA *■* 

* USA 6 USA * USA 6 USA 6 

SUNWOBLD TRAVEL 

(lijtf'd 1969) 

5<» South Sl Epson . Sunrv 
1037J71 :75M/55S30!O7l09/ 
2531 S/24832/26097 


. TRAVmfRS SEATS •- 
LAST MINUTE BARGAINS 


From 

£79 


01-7340584 

01-7346135 

Visa/Acceu. 
Sub A/1 ax. 
ATOt 2032. 



BARGAIN FUGHTS 

Sydney £385 E899 


Auckland 
Jo' 1 


£415 £745 

£306 £499 

£229 £375 

Tef Aw £119 £224 

New York £169 £320 

Los Angeles £216 £399 

TOP DECK 
FLIGHT CENTRE 
01-370 6237 


EBSCOUVTED FAKES 


snob return 
Jo'lwg/Har £300 


. .. . £«90 

Nambi £375 sasa 

Can £150 E230 

S DS K40 £360 

/Bail £350 £350 

Bangka* £220 £350 

Doufta £420 

Atra Astaa Irani Ltd 


TEUB 
Law & Group 
AUEXVISA 


78 


GOLA AIR TRAVEL 


LflVf C8ST AU nuva 

ATHENS. MALAGA, CORFU 
AUCAHTE. Cunt FARO 
{WOOES 
MOL 2173 
Other deshr m kxis 
SKIATHOS. BARCELONA 
IBIZA, CANARIES 
BOOK NOW 
Tat 01-631 3802 


UP UP & AWAY 

Nairobi. Jo'Bmg. Cairo. Dubai. 
1st3nbuL Singapore. K.L DdhL 
Bangkok. Hoag Kong. Sydney. 
Europe. & The Americas. 

F lamin go Travel, 

76 Staftcsbery Avene 
Laodoe WlV 7DC- 
01-439 0102 
Open Saturday 10JHM&M 


MW LDH FAKES WOflUHHDE 

AIM fth £400 Dubai £370 

Freetown EWO htntui EiBO 

Lagos £330 MdV> £440 

Imvomi £400 Knctn £275 

torn* £280 W.'Sn «« 

Baugh* £360 KtmH £350 

Booi W 045 NVVk 075 

Cam £230 Stmt' _ OTp 

Cfflombo S415 Syd/Md £W 

Damascus £270 Tokyo £570 


acniMO nuva ltd 

2 OSMAN STREET. LONDON Wf 
7*91439 

AHUM 



LOWEST BIHES 

£85 N YORK C27S 
ESP LAfSF £395 
£320 Maim £320 
£325 Sfngasce E49 
£460 8a>W* E33S 
E205 Xamanou C«40 
U» w ., £3» Rangoon £350 

Hong Kong £510 Catena £«5 
Ptoaa Hfl 
SUN ft SJUO) 

21 Suflm SL Im 4* Wl 
lt-439 3m«7IH7 
MAJOfl CfCAfiDS ACCEPTED 


PW, 

Frankfurt 

UgW 

Haw 

JODueg 

MiBom 


AUGUST AVAIL. TrtTWr- HOI 
Turkov Hpntid a wrek rrtaxJng 
at our private bearh mi +1 ih+n 
a ui+V mwmfl oti our yaou 
lor £460 inr rn. H B. free 
IV iBOTB lwk ft other CMAbt- 
luuom pm aim fils only f r 
C99 Ol 536 1006. 


CQSTCUTTTRS ON flWilB.nob 
io Cufoge. IS Aft most aesfdvf- 
Hon* DHHomal TreveL 01 730 
2201. 4BTA IATA ATOL. 


OKECCE, TUmCY, CANAIWS 

Lad nunulp noldayi 109251 
77l26oi34hrvl. Tineuay Hod 
da**. ABTA ATOL 1107. 


CHEAP FUGHTS Europe WorW- 
I+Tde Gill Edge Travel: ABTA 
01-859 5055 Ring Angle 


CHEAPEST FUGHTS W/WBC - 

Benz Trav el. Tel Ol 58S 6414 


CHEAP FUGHTS Worldwide. 
Ha vnu rivet 01-930 1566 


DISCOUNT FANES Worldwide 
Ol -454 0754 Jumitr Travel. 


DBCOUNTKD A GHOUP FARES. 

U TC. Open Sol 0765867036. 


LOW COST FANES w U S A. Mo- 
lar Travel Ol 485 9257 IATA. 


MALAGA. CAHAIOES. 01-441 
till. Travel wise. AMa AM. 


SPAM. Portugal. Cheapest fares. 
Biggie*. Ol 758 8191. ATOL. 


SWITZERLAND Scheduled flights 
Ol 724 2588 ABTA ATOL 


.Y£Z4S.aiuic wen appoint- 
ed ELI HOTEL in secluded Bay 
of Sanl'Alevsio. only- 7 miles 
from rhe Megan! iniemauonai 
resort of TAORMINA. Price 
tnct 7 nighu half-board in twin 
room, ref urn daytime Galwlcfc 
Ms every Tuesday Pool ft pri- 
vate beach, transfers ft airport 
lax No hidden extras Sicn.. 
IAN SL'N LTD Ol 222 7452 
ABTA. ATOL 1907 
TUNISIA. Our own wl ol Port El 
Kantooui Pe eping 2 iu a ft wuh 
H row fit* b now ai-oilaMe 2 
wks relaxing In Its* sun from 
£508pp inc Pamela WHdMood 
Lid 0249 817023 or 01 658 
6722 ABTA ATOL 1276 
AIRFARE SPECIALISTS Sydney 
o w £395 rtn £696 Auckland 

0 w £420 nn £786 JoHurg 
a w £506 rtn £499 Lo* Ange- 
tesa w £21 6 rui £405. London 
n lohl Centre 01-570 6552. 

ABt TICKETS SPECIALISTS 
New York £269. LA £529. To- 
ronto £269. JDare £496. 
Nairobi 6375 Sydney £689. 
Auckland £749 Dartalr 150 
Jermyn Street 01 839 7144 
MOROCCAN HOTELS and holi- 
day service* through Moroccan 
bound travel the Moroccan Spe- 
cialist* Govl licenced and Abu 
bon ded. Tet 01 754 6507. 
TIjc27376. 

ONE CALL for some of the belt 
deal* in flights, apartments, ho- 
tel* and cor hire Tel London Ol 
636 5000. Manchester 061 852 
2000. Air Travel Advuonr 
Bureau 

LATIN AMERICA. Low con 
fl Kriils eg RH> £485. Lima 
£496 rtn Also Small Group 
Holiday .tourneys.' rg Peru 
from £550' JLA 01 747 5108 
LOW FARES WORLDWIDE • 
USA. S America. Mid and Far 
East. S Africa. Tray* ate. 48 
Margaret Street. Wl, ol 680 
2928 i visa Accepted) 

M/YORK Miami LA. Cheapest 
fares on major U-5. scheduled 
carrier*. Also transoUanttc 
chart er* ft night* lo Canada. Ol 
584 7371 ABTA 
LOW COST FUGHTS. Most Euro- 
pean dnOtnauon*. Vafexonda- 
Ot 4 03 426 2 0063 ABTA 
61004 ATOL I960 
MACK GREEK- ISLANDS al 
ttuflir price*. Flight* ft 
holiday* Freedom HoUdoyv 

01 740:4686. ATOL 452. — ’ - 


MIAMI. JAMAICA. H.YORK, 

Worldwide cheapest fares. 
Richmond Travel. 1 Duke 61 
Richmond ABTA Ol -940 4075. 
TUNISIA Perfect beaches lor 
your summer holiday. Colt for 
our brochure now. Tunisian 
Travel Bureau. 01-373 4411. 


AUCAHTE. Faro. Malaga efc. 
Dima Ad Travel ATOL 1783. 
Ol 581 4641. Horsham 68541 
AUSSIE. N£. South Africa. 
L S.A. Kong Kong. Best Fare*: 
01-493 7776 ABTA. 


IH S COUmS lst/Eronomy Urk- 
els Try us last FUCKT- 
BOOKERS Ol 587 9u». 
EUROPE 'WORLD WIDE lowest 
fares on charter scheduled ms. 
651 0167 Agl A lot 1893 


SPAM 

Flights F-iklor 01-471 IXM7 
ATOL 1640 Acres* visa. 
SYD/MEL £618 Perth £545 All 
major carrier* lo A US N2. 01- 
684 7371 ABTA 


TURKEY FLIGHTS /HOLIDAYS. 

For col brochure call SieepwesL 
Ol 629 2879. AIM 1898 
SOUTH AFRICA Jo-burg Prom 
£466. 01-584 7371 A OTA. 


CRUISE & SAIL ABROAD 


CRUISE Turkey 12 berth crewed 
motor yachl 2 wks Ir £*25 Pf> 
me fir*. Whole boat available 
31 her week* from £1000. Free 
w sports, h b Ol 526 1006. 
AIM 2091. 


GENERAL 


TAKE TUNE OFF lo Parts. Am- 
sterdam. Brussels. Bruges- 
Geneva. Berne. Lausanne. The 
Hague. DubHn. Rouen. Bou- 
logne ft Dieppe. Time Off 2a. 
Chester Close. London- SWiX 
7BQ Ol 236 8070. 


SELF-CATERING 


SUPERIOR 

VILLAS 


Hfe can afoays supply a frs class 
vdU. nvn a Ota test monte. Wi 
havB probably the finest selection 
n tha M wl ri tmmcan . on Conu. 
CmJft Paw*. Aten*. Italy - on 
the beach or wm pool. All have 
maid, some a cook. Pnees? From 

tha vt ey wp enshe to the surpns- 
mgly modwaL 
Brocfus: __ 

cv Tfuva m 
43 Cadana Stmet 
Undos SW3 2PH 
•1-581 8851 / 01-584 003 
| MB Oljtt - M fo 
It ftW t service) 

UTA AWL 


LATE VELA HOLIDAYS m Al- 
garve. Marbefla ft South of 
France. An villas have own 
pool*. Palmer A Parker 01-493 
5725 


SELF-CATERING 

BALEARICS 


MENORCA villa*, some with 
w*. apartment*. Uvernaa. all 
date* avail. July specials. hWh 
veason from £125 Celtic Hob- 
day* 01 309 7070 ft 0622 
677071 or 0622 677076 (24 
hrsi AIM 1772. 


SELF-CATERING 

FRANCE 


1st - 15th 
AND 
16tfa-3Ist 
AUGUST. SEPT 

Mid Weg roast Royan dsm. 
- In lunoos villas, strep a ■ 1(1 
penple. 

THE FRENCH 
SELECTION 

0273 552454 


HtCC. Lowest fares fr £99. 
aggie*. 755 8193. AM 1895 


BRITTANY AN D PO BQOOME- 

House* and aparnnom*. Auqm 
avail from Cl7fi jt.wf 0225 
357477 or 0223 33S761. 


SELF-CATERING 

GREECE 


CORFU Sunday 27 July + every 
Sun in Aug. Beautiful villa*, 
fully equipped w the boachJ-X 
□aivnck. Open sat- »n wortd 
Hobday* 01-734 2962 


ISLANDS IN THE SUN 
JULY/AUfi/SBPT 

FLY DIRECT FROM GATWCK to 

CORFU. CEPHAS, WA. 

zwcywthos. am t swims. 
Bealdul vdbs & apts close to 
gfg^heaeftet FflEE wndswftjo 

Sumer. Late Stoatos 

25/7. Ceohatarea S/7. 

HORSHAM 
0403 59788 
IU0S ISLAND HOLIDAYS 

ABTA *TO 4TUL W5Z 


ISLANDS IN THE SUN 

JULY/ AUGUST/ SEPTEMBIX 

.. .FLY OffSCT to CORFU. 

CEPHALQMA, ZAKYNTHOS. 

CRETE & SWATHOS. BaUdU 
vOas ft ante 


FREE wndsurting in Crete. 

HORSHAM 
0403 59788 
UiOS ISLAND 
HOUDAYS 
UTA JUTD ATOL 1452 


The mosf beautiful place 
you-tfe never heard of... 


L..LEFCAS 


, osmsA 

|mm or retag w oa raxw 
I&tek Ur. dOTOBd bam*. 
1 -nnam.igUMn. BBq* & bcpBr 
’area w tafac. coots* or taiBo. 


I SWadton hse Bark Pt Samer Hem I 

ba 


GREECE, unspoilt islands, chew 
flights. vuia rentals etc. Zeus Hot 
Klays. 0 1-454 1647. Atoi /Ub. 
RHODES Lux apart hots from 
£189pt>- 26. 50/7. 6/8. 

Strama. 0706 862814. 


SELF-CATERING ITALY 


VRLAB WITH A MAGIC TOUCH. 
A villa, a pool and a beuHtful 
view What more could you 
want? Choose from Tus cany . 
Santtnla or RaveUo - the Meti- 
er parts of Italy where the mam 
market operators don't go Or 
combine a vlua hotkiay wuh a 
stay in Venice. Florenc e or 
Rome. Free brochure Irani 
Mogx OT nobr. Dept T. 47 Shep- 
herds Bush Green. W 12 8PG 
Tel: Ol 749 7449 (24 hn 
service) 


SELF-CATERING 

PORTUGAL 


ALGARVE exquisite private, 
staffed house wllh paaL met Ln 
trooKol garden, and unvote ac- 
cess 10 beach. Two miles east of 
Ajoufeua ovau. 9 Aug. A 
connoisseur's bouse and be- 

cause of its high quality interior 
no CMM under 9. £ 2.000 p.w. 

sleep B. .Two other super houses 

ovatL from 23* 8. Book for Au- 

tumn in ihe Algarve now. 
Phone today. The Algarve Al- 

ternative. 73 Sl James'* SneL 
London SWI. 01-491 0802 
ALGARVE. MogesUc. sufled 
mansion cm millionaire's Mil 
near AMwftera. s teeps 10 . 
£2.200 pw. Pool. Available 
28th August for 2 week* Book 
for the Algarve Autumn now 
With Uie Algarve Alternative. 
73. st James'* Stmt London 
Swl. TH 01 491 0802 
ALGARVE, Lux villa. Carvoetro. 
Sips 6. pvte poH. Aug. 3rd. 
Twits with fit* ir M -C. other 
date* avail. £599pp. Resort vil- 
las. 061 833 9094 ABTA. 
ALGARVE. Lux villas wuh pools 
ft apt*. Avail Jul Ocl. 01 409 
2838. vuiaWortd. 

ALGARVE, villas with ooofs. The 
Villa Agency. Ol 824 8474. 


SELFCATERING SPAIN 


MARRCiLA. Lux villas with 
pool*. Avail July to OO. Ol 409 
2838. vuiaworld. 


SELFCATERING 

TURKEY 


TURKEY- inclusive holidays 
available, direct flights. 29 July. 
8. 12 Aug from £269. Turkish 
DeHghi Hobdays. 01 891 

6069f24hr*l. ATOL 2047. 


SPECIAL INTEREST 


STUDENT COUR SE S M ITALY 

4 Weeks Rome Venire Florence. 
TH Art History Abroad Ol 244- 
8164. 


WINTER SPORTS 


SW BUU90N LINES 

SS/87HtOCH(RESNaWOU11 
47 Resorts in A BfcBrtMd 
Astra. France ft ttfr 
The Oqgest Choice On Stisl 
Ex SavK*. Luton. Manchsster, 
GtasgM ft EdmOtritfi 

91785 2280 

NtoKk Dap- 0422 7H21 
UTA 10723 ATO. 1232 


SKI WEST Manner brochure oat 
now packed with all the top re 
sort*. Sunday nights meat the 
irafflcn, and amaangty tow 
Prices storting al £69 Ring (Oil 
7»5 9999 for your copy. 

ABT A 69256 ATOL 1585. 


DORSET. HANTSh & 
L0.W. 


5 bed furnished farm 
cottage on edge lovely Rhodo- 
dendron Mile. Ideal families, 
gdn wm, Shetland Pony red- 
denrt Puddlefown. £100 pw. 
Avail HI 20UI Sept. 03003 306. 


Lux Cliff top 

flaL stunning Mifewt. 5 beds. 

Inge- k ft b. gdn. avail 
July/ Aug. £32S pw. TH:(020GQ 
769133 


LONDON 


DRISCOLL HOUSE HOTEL. 200 

stmrie rooms. £65 pw PB. 172 

New h'ent Rtf. London. SEX 

4VT. 01 703 4176 


DOMESTIC & CATERING 
SITUATIONS 


ASSIST ART to Manager Super 
new Wine Bar In prestigious Art 
Gallery suti young enthusias- 
tic. responsible person. 9.00 - 
5 00. Five days 01-377 6182 . 
Message* 01602 3612. 

QIMUnEBL emerfe/ired Nanny 
Sfi 55 yp* for a yr old child In 
Jordan working atonwk Bril- 


hn Nannies. Phone 09904 

5885. 

OVERSEAS AU MR AGENCY 

87 Regent Street .Land on Wl. 
Tef 459 6534 .UK Overseas. 
Aho m help*, derro temp perm 


PORSCHE 


92S S 1N4 Auto B Reg Metallic 


Bronre wllh Brown kather in- 
1 in flen. Full *lr 


lenor. 24 OOOl 
pack. Sunroof. Fmiy Serviced 
FSH. Intense rand. £26X100 
Tel: 1021) 386 3588 day 


811. Carrera Spwti Coupe- 1984 
>AI 29.000 mile*. One owner. 
Full Service History Price: 
£21250. Tel Day. 0282 
866794 EM- 0535 35097. 


MERCEDES 


2S0 T5. Auto White May 82. 
ol .OOO miles S Roof plus outer 
extra*, fsh. immaculate condi 
lion £6.995. Tel: 0608 50308 


TM NEW MERCEDES HOTLINE 

All ModeK AvalUMc Now Call 
0856-225256. 


LOANS A INVESTMENT 


INVESTORS REQMRED for sal- 
vage operation rn Gartobean 
Minimum bivestmen* £8.000. 
Parkgaie inveMments Umtted. 
po Box to. Tower Street Cen- 
tre. Ramsey. &le of Mao. Tef- 
(06241 815571. 


COLLECTABLES 


BENTLEY &C9 

now nrg ciiU y require to pnndiase 

DIAMONDS AKDMAMOfffiJFWOiFXY 


iimnwH afai mwk ftff i jn - T TaTnatintin mafia. 

65 New Bond Street, W.i. Telephone 01-629 0651 


AMERICAN BUYERS SEEK 


toon***. EPtads. hnots. Jite. Pw*r. Ctnefcs. tantngs. 

Ohs. OU Ml Toyi and Toddy 8sn etc. 1940s antes, 
PMtey ft octer. staafL RjBSmort QpSl Swnten. CusMM 
jarttey. Lacg. Utnw. a Maom: dons. Od incscal bong ft ta t nrtu nb vc 
ftownWft MhuRh ttom tawmilBe cart by retm W Awrimy oof odor 
aiMbs im by pen. 

On wm! m tad in yog tr cad Berecaxywttnn oMoaons (ta> Man - SK 
300 530 am 

GBfflW AHaWE OULBVEtl. 11T 

Wl 7UL Tet BVS28 
(Ateo to Hew YortJ 


Rare Items from 

Private Collection 

Louts PfoBtp period French 
hed m KiqpmtxxJ fry 
Zwriner exqoisae cond iti on. 
Large. £35.000 Ono. 

Ccorge I period Wabtn Bu- 
reau booicase. Immaculate 
£285)00 Ono. 

Fine qualify pair Ea#eh 
Commodes. Sheraton period 
£35.000 ono. 

Large heavily carved J7iia 
Ceniuty Minor. Grindley 
Gibbons Style. £30000 ono. 

(0582) Luton. 28783. 
(Day) 

0582 Luton. 581281. 
(eves) 


Donald Newby presents 
The 20th Annual 

SNAPE 

ANTIQUES FAIR 

The MdUmp Coocm Hatt. 
Snape. Suffolk 


Jrfy 23ril-26di 1986. 
OpesdxRy 11-fttSfU It-S). 


For Details; 

AagGan Arts & Antiques 

Tel 09867 2368 . 

Lkvsaed Bar ft Restonartts. 


JEWELLERY TO SELL? 

ar 


l eseuated temdy jewelers 
hi urchase second hand 
fUrtMtrt and amour canape 
dnete a add a n> <ored an) 
Bifoestiuy roUeHioa 
Write or cafl to eoafidase Uc- 
MMOUH-HaNSTON UD, 
43 BHlagtaa Arcade. 

Unmet Wl. 

TeL 01-433 8337 


DRESDEN PORCELAIN Oaaeti. 
18 in* tong. 3 ngurme*. Gilded. 
exguMtefy decorated Recall 
■ value about £2.500 For quick 
sale £950.00. Trt Esher 65261 . 


NAZI SCHOOL ATLAS - Ham- 
burg 1941. Exceftenl condi Uon. 
Viewed London by appo 
menL Reply lo BOX F89 . 


KIOSKS FDR 
SALE. K6 modified from £350 
and K6 unmodified from £SSO. 
Trt. Ol 760 0776 ft 760 0688. 
LARGE BAROQUE STYUE 3 
piece suite £500 ONO. TM 
054882 537. 

L0HGCA5E CLOCK. 30 hour. 
Painted face. Oak- Attractive. 
£850 Trt 0664 S20S2 


LEIGH A8CTKM B0OMS 

Sft-W PAU KALL IB8JHW- 
SEA, ESSEX 559 Itt 
TlSSww 070M7851 
fty Drier (H Tto Estcatan ft 
Others (actadtq fta Exocataa 

Sola Of ftathpnc Clocks ft 

— - . 

it Ilf Mil 

SALE BY AUCTION 


TUESDAY 29tJi JULY AT 
10.30 AJL 

whchwai mcWe a large 
coDectofl ot Antique dock. 
Watches. Manne Chronometere. 
Sastai Ckx*. earty Hediiaf 
docks, Grandlaffier docks, a 


coUedwn of Horokwy 

iRnBc. 


Anmjue Fundm 

VIEW SATURDAY & 
NHHUAY PBfflB TO SALE 

10aLm.to4pJL 
£1 


THE ANTIQUE 


47 NEWNHAM ROAD 

CAMBRIDGE TEL: UM* 
WE BUT AJffl SELL MTHWEMI PW 
1930*8 FDIOtnOTE ETC. EOWLETE 
MDSES CUMSD 
OT» WOKSAT UMM-USm 


CALL M W KEH Y OU ARE 

IN CAMBRIDGE 


NEWSPAPERS 
II 690’ 5-1 890'S) 

• Original * 

' Baautitufly Preserved * 
FROM E15JD0 EACH. 

0492 - 31303 

E JONES 

43 DUNOONALD ROAD 
COLWYN BAY 
CLWYD LL29 7RE 


REGENT AUCTION 
GALLERIES 

Dorking 


Antique & modem. Ateo 
Special Sale includes about 
30.000 boote. Weriaasriar 
SUi AagnsL Viewing 2/4 - 


Enquiries D3D8 884451 


CASH REOtsrtRS Brass nahonal 
dMxnaf of private rotteeboe. 
each register with sUmnenl 
date & restored to perfect work- 
ing order. From £500 each A 
appreciating. 021 622 5642 


ROLEX. CARnEXJEWELXJERV. 
an agues, watches etc. Top 
price* paid for quality Uem. Ot 
626 6083. 


CONTRACTS 
& TENDERS 


TENDERS are Invited Immediate- 
ly lo furnish 24 RestdenOal Flats 
In sureatham including floor 
covering*- curtuitvantf t urnuore. 
Appbcauotis may be obtatnM 
from Fir*i Secretary ip&Mi. High 
Commissi on of India. AidwyctL 
London WC28 WA. I0IAS6 
84841 during working hour*. 


PUBLIC NOTICES 


ALEXANDER. CYRIL ALEXAN- 
DER late of 12 Newtaery way. 
Chaivey. Slough. Berkshire dted 
al Slough on 20ih July 1985 (Es- 
tate about £ 12800 ) 


□ODD. GABRIEL WILLIAM 
DODD Otherwise WILLIAM GA- 
BRIEL DODD tale of West View. 
High Street Brtttngham. 
Hexham. Northumberland died 
General HogvUbl Hex ham on 
24th July 1985 (Estate about 
£20200) 


PUBLIC NOTICES 


HVBE RT. WILLIAM JOHN 
FRENCH HUBERT late of 49 
Castirton Avenue. BarnehureL 
Kent died at Dortford. Kent on 
21*1 December 1984 (Estate 
about £6.000) 


MOYE. LILIAN CLARISSA 
MOVE- SPINSTER late of Renuy 
Lodge HormioI. Newport PagnelL 
BucMnghamdilre died lucre on 
22 ml November 198S (Estate 
about £5.600) 


ROW. RICHARD ROWE Me of 

113 Partulare Road. Plumstead. 

London SE18 dted at Greenwich. 

London SE18 on 17Th March 

1986 i Estate about £24.000) 


SMITH lormerty HAWTHORNE. 
CLA0VS SMITH formerly 
GLADYS HAWTHORNE. SPIN- 

STER late of 66d wen n»g«on 
Road. Bournemouth died mere on 

or about 2lst May 1985 (Estate 

about £ 10 . 000 ) 


WOOD. ELIZABETH HILDA 
WOOD. SPINSTER Ute of IO 

Pembroke House. York Street. 

Stockport. Cheshtre died at Stock- 

port on 14th December 1965 

(Estate about £11.200) 


The ton of ihe above-named art 

requested 10 apply lo Ihe Trea- 

sury Solicitor (B.V.L Queen 
Anne** Chambara. 28 Broadway. 

London SW 1H 9JS. falling which 

the Treasury Solicitor may take 

stem lo administer Ihe estate. 


PASTORAL MEASURE 1983 
The Church Con um sMoner* have- 
pr roared Man pastoral schemes. 
orovhMng tor dKtnoom o f re- , 
dumtoncy UiT dip ect of the cliurch 
of Sl Helen, curobei worth OJn- 
cotn dtoceser. and in respect of Ihe 
ctrn r cn of st Jolut the Baptist. 
Bdper. and - Bs appropriation to 
use as a meeting place and heri- 
tage centre (Derby dlocesee and 
draft redundancy schemes pro- 
viding tor the transfer of the 
redundanr church or North 
Cocfcecingun St Mary to the Re- 
dundant Churches fund ftn- case 
and maintenance (Lincoln dio- 
cese): and provKUne for the 
vesting of the redundant church 
of North Audley Street. St Mark 
in the London Diocesan Fund for 
care and matiumance iLomhai 
diocese). Conte* of Ihe draft 
schemes may be obtained from 
Hie Church commissioners. 1 
Mitnmnk- London swip 3JZ to 
whom any rep resentatlon* should 
be serii wUMn 28 days or the pub- 
Hendon of ties notice 


LEGAL NOTICES 


IN THE HIGH COURT OF JUS- 
TICE CHANCERY DfVKKON 
BI RMING HAM DISTRICT REO- 
BTTRY NO. 30077 of 1986 
IN THE M ATTER OF OP TOjON 

LIMITED and IN THE MATTER 

OF THE COMPANIES ACT 1988 

NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN 

that Uie onter of the Hlefa Qourl of 

Justice (Chancery Dtetam) dated 

14th June 1986 confirming Uw 

reduction of the capital of the 

above-named Co mpan y from 
£6.398 XXX) to £3*247.000 and 
uie cancellation of its share pro- 
■Sin account of £548.996 and 
the Minute approved by the Ooort 
snowing wta, respect to the capi- 

ta of rhe Company as altered me 
several particular* required by 

the above-mentioned Act were 

registered by the Registrar Of 

Companies on 2<Uh June 1986. 

Dated thl* 17th day of July 1986. - 

Plnsew ft Co. (Rof-CIRL Post ft 

Man House- 26 Cotmore Circus. 

Bit mb nil iam B* 6BH. 


IN TH E MAT TER OF WESTMIN- 

STER PRO HEHTV GROUP 
LIMITED 

BY ORDER of the WGH COURT 

OF JUSTICE dated ihe loth day 

al April L986 Mr CHRISTOPHER 

MORRIS of 33-34 CHANCERY 

LANE. LONDON WQ2A 1EW has 

Been appointed LtouUaier of the 

above-named Company with a 

Committee of Inspection 
Dated DUS I ath day of July 1986 


SPECIAL 

ANNOUNCEMENT 



for the placement 
ot ad\erlisitu> 


Youcannowpbonemyouradvertiseznentto 
us any Saturday rooming, horn 9 JOim. to LOOp m 

This is a unique new service for aQda^ed 
advertisers mTlK Times aifo Sunday Times— and it 
costs no extra. 


book your achertisemenrphaie 01-^14000. 


THE SUNDAY TIMES 

THE^mTIMES 

MAKE- THEM- WORK- FOR- YOU 




strong case for 
the 



By Pad Martin 

Gary Player, the three-times 
Open Championship winner, is 
hatching a scheme. He has 

seniors event. With the h yper- 
bole that is second nature, 
Player asserted that such an 
event would attract as big .a 
nflen as was at Turnberry 
itself. . 

Player is mw taunebed on a 

career on the senior dreait in the 

United States, where he has won 
four of the 12 events since be 
turned 50 late tost .yew Hetaj* 
made more money (8241,000) 
Hron ew he raked to on the 
ordinary tour over a ssraSafr 
period.. 

The man in Hack gets irate at 
the saggestkm that the seniors 

tour bTSTsCTKma. “Have ^ 

ever seen ns in action?^ b* 
glowers. **1 want to win there 
every bit as mack as at this 
Open.” 

The R & A have confirmed 
that they will be tfisenssing, the 
mopos il at their next comnutte*- 
meeting in October. Bat they do 
not appear to share Player's 
enthusiasm. **11 wouldn't have 
the tradition or appeal that the 
Open possesses,” Michael 
BooaBack, the secretary, said. 
**We may well decide it is better 
to put oor energies into junior, 
rather than senior, coif.” He 
thought It distinctly fikety that 
the McCormack Group, the 
main proponents, would stage it, 
even without R & A back i n g . 

Player has played the Open 
for 32 consecutive years, which 
he thinks is an all-time record. 
He aims to play another 10 so 
rtrav he wfll have taken part in 
over one-third of all the Opens 
ever held. He ‘Mreams” that he 
wfll set yet another record - by 
w inning a British Open In four 
separate decades. . 

“My appetite is not for off 
what it was iu 1955,” he 
maintained. Though h^asting he 
would take on any man of 30ln 0 
physical fitness contest, he ad- 




8 --,>**« '■ 


f - 

P '. ^ H 




Pfoyen appetite retard 

nrits to increasingly dim eye- 
sight, and slightly more tattered 
nerves. - 7 " 

. Player was at -odds wiffj to 
fellow profess i o n al s thfc y^r„ 

“TremendoDS cry-babies^ thel ot 
of them,'" **ns how he rooaded 
on the Timiberry_ course's -eth- 
ics. He saM: *Tliis » how s 
championship eovse shoold*he 
-set ap. It's a test of patience, 
courage and. ability. r, He w 
thoroughly sick of the -“stereo 
golf conrees**. with wide^foir- 
ways, large greens and fight 
rough. “This was tjie dfomt 
paper set by the R ft A -cand 
yon. can't choose the qaestfoos 
on it," he added. ^ . 

He leaver no stone tanaraed 
in maintaining pohHdty, per- 
haps sensing that the Hnirilg h t 
is fading. After repeatin g aa 
entire interview with the BBC 
last Sunday hecanse the studio 
had foiled to record ft tfae first 
time. Flayer spotted a South 
African jooTBaiist slipping 
- away: “Hey, come back,”J?byer 
yelled. u Xoo haven't asked jpe 
any questions yef* - ■ 

Still the persistent . gjbtK- 
trefter, bft has nipped homeler 
five Says, . returning at : the 
weekeml -for a pro-celebrity 
event Ad ardent Sooth African 
patriot, be is grateful that goll 
has been spared the anti-apart- 
heid proton that afflict the 
Commonwealth Games. - . A 


. 1 ?* 


t - . 


— •-.•.-5- 


ter. 




r-r. 


v: • 

.v: 


*.-L- : VS 
- • - * 




: H 

■■ :tf 


i 

,^‘fT 


r ^.. - 
if'’- 


■jM 


A ft«7 

-•* e* 
- « 




ix* 
,.-d tv 


Cook ivith lovely touch 




:-.i. " 


By Mitchell Platts 


;i.>. 

* >:V 


James Cook, the British boys’ 
champion. Twill attempt Kt com- 
plete a memorable junior career 
by winning the Chrris .Tn^by 
which starts al Moor Park. 
Ricksmansworth, today. 

Cook, aged 17, was given 
special di^iensation to wave 
school three years ago — he is 
taught ai home by Ms mother, 
who is a schoolmistress — . so 
that be could, concentrate on 
gol£ 

He emphasized his growing 
maturity by .beating Wayne 


McEvoy, twice ibe Amateur 
champion, with his p r ogress. 
“He now combines a prodigious 
long game with a lovely touch 
on and . around the greens,” 
McEvoy said. 

Cook, who finished thir^ in 


i\s 






‘1 

I 


the Tilman Trop^ earlier this 


Henry, the England boys' cap- 
tain for 


1986. Sand 4 in the final 
at Barnton last year. 

Cbok, who is from Leaming- 
ton -and County, ha$~ impressed 
Lntr- fcss *r ~player than Peter 


yrar behind Peter Baker, twice a 
winner of the Cams Trophy Jhat 
not eligible this year, will rave 
Henry, of Porters Park, one of 
faismain rivals. 

Hie Cams Trophy, which is 
iyed over 72 holes on the 
igh Course, has provided a 
launching pad for several 
-outstanding golfers, including 
■Sandy Lyre, who won in I97fo£- 
Ken Brown (1974) and Peter 
iFowBsenti(l964).-=-- — ... 


a 

Higl 


- 5 "X * 

! 

; - / ?*. ■ 4 

• - * tef . ^ 

- -iNf.-*.": 

- 

. it 




SPEEDWAY 


Americans 
hit by 


mjuries 

By Keith Macklin 


While the Danes were mop- 
ping np as usual at the inter- 
continental final at Bradford, 
one or two dramas were befog 
played backstage. That perky 
JekyU and Hyde character, 
Kelly Moran, of the United 
States, turned op with his arm in 
a . sling and tried to be cheerful 
about the fact that he has lost 
the use of much of the arm after 
tire heavily publicized fall and 
severed artery fa a bedroom in 
Poland. 

Moran, whose brother Shawn 
is also having iqsry problems, 
ruefully a d mitt ed that it conld be 
the best part of the year before 
he would be able to use (he arm 
sufficiently to control ft bike 
again. He certainly wQl not be 
riding again this season and his 
absence wiH.weaken farther die 
United States team for the 
forthcoming international series 
against England- • • 

Despite his problems, Kelly 
Moran is still very mach part rtf 
the speedway scene. Sadly, the 
tempestuous and ill-starred 
Kenny Carter is gone but not 
forgotten by Ins vast anuy-oC 
fans and . a hard-working ami 
dedicated committee were on 
duty at Bradford raisfag support 
for the Kenny and Pamela 
Carter Memorial Fond. 

They have a fund-raising 
dinner in HaKfay on August 7 
and on Sunday, Erik Guaderseu 


nay- 

and Hans Nielsen proved that 


there were generous impulses 
nrtfafossness and fero- 


bebind 

dons smgle-niindedness of the 
world's top two riders. 
Guudersen and Nielsen »nmirfl 
over tire racing jackets they bad 
used in the meeting In be 
auctio ne d to hdp swell tire 
Carter fond. 

In the Grand Stand, acting as 
saaunarizer for a radio station, 
sat Ivan Manger, die New 
Zealander who dominated the 
sport in the late lfoiOs and '70s 
just as Gttndersen threatens to 
do in the *808. 

Sr'S knowledge came 
fa several predictions. 
He srid that six points out of 15 
could mean qualification, and 
tie Englishman, Marvyn Cox, 


Inst made it m a ride-off with 
Jan Andersson. Mwqger ■!*«* 
said that Chris Morton, another 
Engfeh rider, who nude a 
dreadful start, would come ha ck 
late in the meeting to qualify, 
and tire determined Morton rode 
a gritty last race to win and so 
through. 

Cox ami Morton will be Joined 
by Neil Erittsand Ketvfa Tafam 
at Katowice, Evitts putting up 
tire expected strong performance 
On his own track to win three of 
his five races. . With four 
Englishmen going to -the final 
this year, three more than fot : 
year when Tatum was England's 
duly Qu a lifier , the home scene 
hm -had a very necessary, ff 
short-lived, boost - 


t*. : 


SHOOTING 


SANOCA 


Gilson in 
a class 
of his own 


q 1 - 

i!i s s .n?£.:w MO 


rorrespoodeot 
Sain Gilson, a casbier -far 
Lloyds Bank al Gatwick Air- 
port, was on ihe receiving end in 
the money stakes at Bisley, 


- -?~l' r: • '2 r *hw» 

- *■”'= ?,Kv- • ••- : : 

“ * r-qa 

= ,L1A .. jjZ 

K «r-t i % : -j-av. .to, 
3<iC=i! . 


s 1 — . 


•-? i* 


9 


__ r T Sandown 

winning the Corporation of tire - . 3^ Vfg 

City of London Challenge ? V vt 

and £120. Gilson, who fives at • " • . .. tv*, 

J .L.. 4 . 4* r • f 'nil 






Crawley and shoots for Sussex, 

England and Great Britain, does 
hot get to Bisley very often 
because of the unsocial hours of 
his job, but when he doe&'be' 
makes his presence felt ' 

Last month he won the Sussex 
championship in only bis sec- 
ond competition' of the season 
and yesterday became, the first 
of the 1,200 target rifle compet- 
itors to wiiT' outright, riith no 
extra-tie shots and no tiebreak- 

ers. He was the only one to .put 
- every one ofhis 10 shots on o the 

bull's-eye at 1,000 yards. ■ 

The long-range shoot, which 
kept many scores low, brought a 
major change , in the leader 1 
board for the Grand Aggregate — 
the overall championship' — 
which continues until tomor- 
row. Andrew Tucker, a. gun- 
smith from Cobhaxn, Surrey, 
who is presidehl of Twick- 
enham Rifle Club, moved 

from fifth place to take the K , 

with only -seven points dropped 

out of a possible .350 in the jp^i 

seven major events completed. 

Tucker, who has shot-. in ^ 



: ‘■'■a iftr J 1 




-ware 




-.t-,; - : ■'* 11 

T Wi'i 


.. 

'£i*i 


practically every country where 
uie 7.62mm rifle is used 


used.-Won 


the Queen's Prize in 1979. and 
has . also held the British small- 


bore championship. So for.howr 
ever, the Bisley Gfautl 
Aggregate has eluded him.“- 
He will need to keep tin top 
w stay ahead because^with 
aU the highest possible scores of 
the last three days. Tucker is- 
only two points ahead of 1 the 
high-powered quartet .qf.Grat 
barn -Berman, one of Ausrai ia’s - 
most experienced shots. . Dick 
Roslingythe 1 972 Queen’s Rria 
wmner, Jim Scohie, froroScot^ 
-fond; ■ and Roger Mundy, a 
form er Civil Service Champion. 
■SgAJ* Cotpowfann oh 
Si fjjWSLM ! 


i 

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-MM 



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*AKXM 1 


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: 39 tM wflti 


<5 Harrison 

ghfaw a a 

T uckor rrw ac*aanhiBTrt. 294 ^ Na« Zaatoxl 

WKSS& 8 -- 

.. 1. J’-H Canfafoad ' 

and J R -Kton {Hdrtt 

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as e f. 8 » 


THE TIMES WEDNESDAY JULY 23 1986 


SPORT 


— 37- 


RACING:THREE POSSIBLE PACEMAKERS INCLUDED AMONG NINE DECLARATIONS FOR ASCOT SHOWDOWN 




_ A 





f/V. 


sixth victory 
in a row 



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By Mandarfat (Michael PhStfps) 

^‘4oyfhi Dancer, now trained a bad race but now that his 

weight includes a penalty for 
winning at Brighton he should 
find the concession of 29lb to 
The Mechanic too much over 
a distance that may well be a 
furlong too short for him these 
daw. 

Copper Red and Lodanaga, 
third and fifth in die Windsor 
Castle Stakes at Royal Ascot,' 
can take the EBF Supersloane 
Maiden Stakes and the Cham- 
pagne Hen riot Royal Wedding 
Stakes, respectively. 

While Same Ha Sam and 
Prosilient will both relish the 
distance of the latter race I still 
feel that they may lack the 
necessary zip to beat 
Lucia naga whose courage was 
a feature at Windsor where he 
held Ajanac at toy 
At Yarmouth Sieve 
Cauthen can do his prospects 
of retainingibe jockeys* cham- 
pionship some good by land- 
ing a double on Queen Midas 
(2.1 S) and Eastern House 
(3.45). Both are trained for 
their owner-breeder, Louis 
Freedman, by Henry Cecil ‘ 
Geoige Robinson, our New- 
market Correspondent, speaks 
particularly well of Queen 
Midas, who is my selection to 
win the EBF Cotman Maiden 
Fillies Stakes on her debut 
Cecil and Cauthen won the 
same race 12 months ago with 
Lucayan Princess, who had 
been well galloped before- 


^-■yWJHe i Brooks at 
obourn, instead of Paul 
ile, Tvfll * be attempting 10 
repeat his victory of two 
seasons/ago- in the Harpers 
: and . Queen Handicap over a 
mile at. Sandown Park this 
evening. He wflf be ridden 
again, as he was then, by 
-Richard Quinn who knows 
4fim best 

... But even after that encour- 
png nm at Brighton earlier 
us month, when he was 
; ; caugbL:m the last stride by 
j&alaestra, I still find it tmpos- 
j, siWe to envisage him beating 
■ Aventino, who is my entirely 
. justifiable if somewhat uoorig- 
: mal nap. ■ ■ 

r v One of the most improved 
Jxorses in. training, Aventino 
. ; fias now won five races in 
iflSuccession. 

A , r,' While- two of those results 
were achieved over today's 
•bourse and distance Aventino 
- '.has not been more impressive 
.'than he was last time out at 
. .Newmarket where he beat the 
^useful : Pinstripe by four 
-lengths. Since then Pinstripe 
has paid his - conqueror a 
.'■tribute by winning at Yar- 
:-ihouth only a matter of days 
* 'before running Then Again so 
close at Newmarket last 
.'^Saturday. 

Come On The Blues, who 


;has a Whitsun Cup win over 
today’s course and distance, in __ 

. ■ the teg,- could finish only fifth hand, and I am Ted to believe 
‘when be took on Joyful Dane- that Queen Midas, who is one 
•fer on this occasion two years 0 f the first crop of 


ago. More recently he acted as 
JBold Arrangement’s pacemak- 
'4 efr iisihaEctipse States here. 
Btit like the others, be looks 
to have an impossible task this 
.evening against Aventino, 
"whose trainer, John Sutcliffe, 
- . has a Jess discernible chance 
.. but a chance, nevertheless, of 
.also winning the Silks of St 
James' Handicap with Hie 
■Mechanic. - - 

# 1 j * 

* . After winning at Beverley 
-midway through June The 
“ Mechanic has been placed at 
’ - Kempton and Doncaster. On 

the latter, course he was up 
, against that much improved 
, sprinter Felipe Toro who then 
won his next two races, at 
■ ,. Beverley. and York. 

* Old Ferryman seldom rims 


crop of that 
beautifully bred stallion Glint 
of Gold, is expected to follow 
in her footsteps even though 
she lacks the racecourse expe- 
rience of So Stylish mid 
Lisianthus. 

Stable companion Eastern 
House is not a world beater, 
but she should only have to 
nm as well as she did at 
Epsom behind Dusty Dollar 
to w in the Applegate Fillies 
Handicap. Afterwards, Dusty 
Dollar was runner-up to none 
other than the Irish 1,000 
Guineas winner Sonic Lady in 
the Child Stakes 

Alec Stewart's decision to 
bypass Eastern House and run 
Nordics in the Royal Wedding 
States instead looks like being 
justified. 


Starkey 

allays 

fitness 

fears 

By Michael Seely 

Greville Starkey will be on 
board Dancing Brave when 
the Derby runner-up and 
Shahrasiani line up for iheir 
needle re-maich in the King 
George VI and Queen Eliza- 
beth Diamond Stakes at Ascot 
on Saturday. 

The jockey hurt his back at 
exercise last Thursday and 
aggravated the injury when 
successful on Codices at 
Kempton the same afternoon. 
Since then he has been making 
daily journeys to Cambridge 
for treatment. “Grevilfe’s 
much better," said bis wife 
Chris, “he was out at New- 
market this morning. He's 
riding work at PuJ boro ugh on 
Thursday and resumes at 
Sandown on Kaladiola and 
Ostensible that afternoon." 

The Guy Harwood camp 
wifi be relieved to have fit 
again the man. who rode such 
an inspired finish on Kalaglow 
to give the stable victory in 
Britain's most important ail- 
aged race, in 1982. 

Willie Carson is also confi- 
dent of being back in the 
saddle as the dynamic Scot 
and Fetoski attempt to gi ve a 
repeat performance of their 
victory last year. 

The royal jockey injured a 
small muscle on the right- 
hand side of his spine in a fell 
at Newbury last Friday and 
like Starkey aggravated the 
damage when riding in Osiend 
on Sunday. 

*‘I rode out at West Ilsley 
this morning,” he said yester- 
day, ‘i was alright, but didn't 
enjoy it much. It's only a little 
thing, but it's very painful. I'll 
either start again at Sandown 
on Thursday or Ascot on 
Friday. I’m having daily treat- 
ment from Val Ridgeway at 
Tbatcham." 

All the principal contenders 
were yesterday reported to be 
in fine shape. “Dancing Brave 
did his last bit of serious work 
this morning.” said Geoff 
Lawson, Harwood's brother in 
law and assistant trainer, “if 
anything he's in better form 
than at any time previously 
this season. I'm looking for- 
ward to the race tremendous- 
ly, and whatever happens it's 
going to be a lot of fun.” 

Harwood is returning from 
the Keeneland Sales this eve- 
ning, but Michael Stoute, the 
trainer of Sbahrastani and 


: S-' • •• •: 

t. \f ' •<.- i- >;■ * * • •* 

i ' i. •“ rLy jI - 1 a’ 

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mmm 



BLOODSTOCK SALES 

Arab influence still 
powerful during 
opening exchanges 

From David Hedges, Lexington, Kentucky 


Dihistan, the Hardwicke Stakes winner, is likely to hare a crucial pa cem a k i ng role for his 
stable companions, Sbahrastani and Shardari, at Ascot on Saturday 


Shardari, was expected to 
have arrived by Concorde at 
Heathrow last night in order 
to put the finishing touches to 
the Aga Khan's redoubtable 
pair's preparation this morn- 
ing. “Both horses are very 
well," said the trainer's wife, 
Pat. yesterday. 

When the trainers showed 
their hands at yesterday's 
four-day stage of acceptors the 
nine declared included ail 
those expected and three pos- 
sible pacemakers in Dihistan, 
Boldden and Vouchsafe. 

Stoute has not yet con- 
firmed that he is employing 
Dihistan in this jianicular 
role, but it is impossible not to 
think that the Hardwicke 
Stakes winner will be in the 
field on Saturday to set as 
strong a gallop as possible in 
order to exploit Shahrastani's 
proven stamina and to try and 
blunt Dancing Brave’s re- 
doubtable burst of finishing 
speed. 

Dick Hero, the man who 
used two pacemakers when 
Bustino was so narrowly de- 
feated by Grundy in that epic 
battle in 1975. has not yet 
formulated his final plans. 
Confirming that Petoski was 
in peak form, he said 
yesterday “I haven't yet decid- 
ed whether to run Vouchsafe 
and Bofdden or just one of 
them. There are several fac- 


tors to be taken into 
consideration.” 

The best odds available 
with William Hills and 
Ladbrokes yesterday were as 
follows: 5-4 Shahrasiani and 
Dancing Brave, 1 3-2 Shardari, 
14-1 Petoski and 25-1 
Triptych. 

I have no intention of 
opposing Shahrasiani after his 
impressive Irish Derby vic- 
tory, but there is no doubt that 
the 1 4- 1 on offer against 
Petoski appears to represent 
sound each-way value. 

Before his departure for 
Kentucky Stoute was adamant 
that he did not want the 
ground to be loo firm for 
Shahrastani. Yesterday Nich- 
olas Beaumont, the clerk of 
the course, allayed the 
trainer's fears on this score. 
"Having had no appreciable 
rain for several weeks, we had 
half an inch last night. If we 
had been racing today, the 
going would have been 
perfect 

“I've been watering the 
course for the past fortnight” 
he went on, “and this rain will 
have settled the whole thing 
down. Showers are forecast for 
the next few days and if this is 
correct we won't be watering 
again- I’ve never tried to 
change the going to suit one 
particular horse and I don't 
intend to start now." 


In view of the tremendous 
interest aroused by the pro- 
spective meeting between the 
two superstars Captain Beau- 
mont is expecting a larger 
crowd than the 30,000 that 
usually attend Diamond Day. 

“I’m intending to treat it as 
though it was a day at the royal 
meeting,” he continued, 
"we're going to have more 
people on the turnstiles, more 
racecard sellers and we’re 
going to open more bars than 
usual, and I implore everyone 
not to turn up at ten to two, 
that's why the approaches 
tend to become jammed on 
this particular afternoon. At 
Royal Ascot racegoers stagger 
their arrivals as a lot of people 
arrive early for lunch and 
picnics.” 

.And so the excitement 
mounts as what promises to 
be the highlight of the Flat 
racing season approaches. 

• Ray Cochrane, the New- 
market based jockey, was in top 
form yesterday at Folkestone 
where he rode a 305-1 treble. 
This now takes Cochrane's 
number of winners for the 
season to 42. His winning rides 
were on College Wizard. Last 
Recovery and Pip 

• Julian James, the head master 
of St Aubyn's Preparatory 
School in Brighton, had bis fust 
winner at Folkestone yesterday 
when Sir Arnold won tbe Jones 
Lang Wooton Stakes . 


Keene land's two-day selected 
yearling sales opened on Mon- 
day against the background of 
26 per cent of the horses 
catalogued at the Fasig-Tipton 
sales last week being led out 
unsold and rumours that the 
Arab influence on the market 
would be much less this year. 

In the event, tbe first day's 
sellin g at Keeneland. white 

Iasi y ear^saw 
Arab interests purchase at least 
32 yearlings worth $24,030,000. 

These were the identifiable 
purchases as appearing on tbe 
sales return sheets, but there 
may have been otter yearlings 
bought through agencies. 

The first day produced a 
turnover of $55,494,000 for 129 
lots, with an average of 
$430,186, to be compared with 
last year's total of $59,040,000 
for 130 lots and an average of 
$454,153. 

There was no headline horse 
breaking through the $10m 
barrier as last year, tel prices 
were solid through tbe middle 
market. 

Highest price was the $3.6m 
paid by Darky Stud Manage- 
ment, which operates Sheikh 
Mohammed's Dalbaxn Hall 
stud, near Newmarket, for a colt 
from Windfields Farm by 
Northern Dancer out of South 
Ocean. This yearling is a full 
brother to the champion Ca- 
nadian filly North ernetie and to 
the champion English and Irish 
two-year-old Storm Bird. 

BBA (Ireland) paid $3^m for 


a colt by Northern Dancer's son 
Nijinsky out of Kush With 
Pride on. behalf of Robert 
Songster and partners. Blush 
With Pride, who is by Blushing 
Groom, is from die same female 
line as El Gran Senor, who won 
. tbe 2.000 Guineas for Sangster 
and was narrowly beaten by 
Secrete in the Derby and won 
the Irish Sweeps Derby. 

Sheikh al-Maktoum's Gains- 
borough Stud Management 
bought for $2m a colt by 
Blushing Groom out of Glori- 
ous Song, a mare by Halo who 
won 17 of her 34 races and who 
was champion mare in both 
Canada and the United States. 

A third aJ-Maktoum brother. 
Sheikh Hamdan, who has stud 
forms in both Kentucky and 
near Thetford in Norfolk, 
named Shadwell, was also 
among the upper bracket of 
buyers. He paid $ 1 .4m for a colt 
by Nureyev out of Heavenly 
Power, whose second dam pro- 
duced the successful racehorse 
and sire Majestic Light. ~ 

For SI J>m Gainsborough 
Stud Management bought a coll 
by Alleged out of the Lyphard 
mare CTiain Bracelet. This is 
Chain Bracelet's second foal and 
her first, named Division, is a 
winner in Ireland this year. 

English Woodstock agent 
George Blackwell, who is now 
associated with Khaled Abdulla, 
wen: to Sl.ISm for a colt by Mr 
Prospector out of DurtaL by 
Lyphard, who was the cham- 
pion two-year-old filly in En- 
gland in 1976. 


Optimistic report from 
Levy Board chairman 


Sir Ian Trethowan, chairman 
of the Levy Board, is pleased 
with tbe current financial state 
of racing. 

Commenting on tbe Levy 
Board's annual report for the 
year to March 31, Sir Ian said: 
“Tbe industry generally seems 
to be more buoyant than in 
recent years and the impact of 
television in betting offices, 
complimented by oar policy of 
making significantly more 
money available to help race- 
courses improve their facilities 
and thus attendances, makes ns 
cautiously optimistic about the 
future.” 

The chairman said that tbe 
onset of satellite racing had 
brought optimism for tbe future 
and in the year ahead the board 
looks forward to more talks on 
alt-weather tracks, Sunday rac- 
ing, combatting illegal betting 
and reducing betting doty. 

Tbe Board's total income for 
1985-86 was £2L8m and its: 


expenditure £20.4m. 

Tbe Tote, which contributed 
£680,000 to the Levy Board 
during the year, has announced 
pre-tax profits of £3^000. 
This is £29,000 less than last 
year and the loss of 12 9 days 
racing, dne to tbe harsh winter, 
was blamed. 

German target 

I Want To Be and St Hflarkm 
are British-trained probables for 
the Grosser Preis von Berlin at 
Dnsseldorf on Sunday and 
Theatrical is a likely rnmter 
from Ireland. The one they all 
have to beat is Heinz Jentzsch's 
Grand Prix de Saint-Cloud win- 
ner Acatenango. On Saturday, 
Tarib runs in the Ostennann- 
Polud at Gelsenkirchen. 

Samarld, the surprise winner 
of the McGrath Stakes on Irish 
Derby day is a possible Michael 
Stoute starter in the Prix Daph- 
nis at Ewy orrSaturday. 


SHOOTIM 

Gilson if 
a class 
of his oiii 

3) Oi: Shorn 

C '/rresp"^ 

’’ -■ * 

• ' : 

..-j-ir-4? v 

. - _r;' 

- : 


SANDOWN PARK 


Goingifirm - 

Draw: high nun&era best 

6.25 EBF SUPERSLOANE MAIDEN STAKES (2-Y-O: £1,718: 5Q 
(Brunners) 

3 323 COPPER BH)pMmaanOPMndn 9-0 T<Wnn3 


IJwkvwr from Captain’s BkW (7- 
ac(7-7)3xi3roto 


4 

5 
8 

9 

10 
11 
12 
13 


0 PESMNWBC (B}{Atea*MtortBHgM«9-0. 
^■gMRmmf (J Noonan) R Hannan 9-0 -^h 


0423 LAST DANCE 


00 non* BROKER (H Clew) DLOnM. 
44 OURffleDWEfTMatjAmaftamM 


CRMV{5}7 

WMewncsl 

RCUnufS 


00 VICTORY BALLARD (J O’Connai) R "Hannon W- 
ATTSOPTMG (MrsdCUrbefl} B WfcM 1 

°S2 EmSBE^ t Spa3SMiln^w^11 1t 

1M Last Danes. B-1 Our Fradte. UM Attempting, 

r. 76-1 Victory Baftard 25-1 others. 


L Jones (5) 6 
B Thomson 2 
. J Kennedy 9 
T Warns • 


{B-0)6T, good. Oct 24, 18ran].DAVHX has Uiomi 4108 01 4 outnos 

since (&tS) neck 2nd to Pm*a Pk>p-iO) at Doncaster (», £8413. soft Nov 9. 23 nini 
SANCB IA (7-7) 4L 6th ot 9 Id Possedyno KM) at Newmarket (51, £3876. good to Arm, 

Jtiy 19). FARlfcR JOCK 7th lust time. pr*AousSyj8-7)1liMfeinar from Ca 

9) at Leicester «f. £1803. good to firm. July 14, 15 ranlTHE NECHAMC 
FeBpe Toro (7-7) al Doncaster (51, £2637. Am. Jim 26. 8 ran). 

Selection: LONELY STREET • 

7.55 CHAMPAGNE HENRIOT ROYAL WEDDING STAKES (2-Y-O: 
£4,272: 7f) (10) 

2 40212 LMIRES WARRIOR (L Jamas) R Boss 9-1 Pel Eddery 1 

2201 LUCUNA&A (Ms R Harnbro) PWahryn9-1 Paul Eddery 6 

BISCUIT TRADER (D Hatch) M Haynes 8-11 —2 

DOUBLY GREAT (rFenMoJAt Bfcnshard 3-1 1 W Nowow 7 

00 FOURTH LAD (Mrs L Darlas) R Hannon 8-11 AUcGtoaelQ 

000 MAK1N W5CMEF (D HoMal Blddon Ltd) 0 Laing 8-1 1 _ — SWUBeotft5 

0 PHARAOH BLUE (Mrs C Patarasl C Brian 8-11 

8 PR06HJENT {USAXBri IA Bods) G Hanvood 8-11 

23 SAMTELLA SAM (USA) (R Teano) M Ryen 8-11 

0 STRING SECTM (A Miangcj)G Lama 6-11 PWatomO 


3 

4 

€ 

7 

10 

11 

12 

14 

17 


MRabartB4 

A Clark) 

PRofataeon 9 


.D'- 


Sandown selections 

- . By Mandarin 

6:25 Copper Red. 6.55 AVENTINO (nap). 7.25 The Mechanic. 

- 7^55 1 uri aiiaga. 8.25 Three Times A Lady. 8.55 Tebrtto. 

: • • By Our Newmarket Correspondent 

.-6-55 Northern Chimes. 7.25 DavilL 7.55 Santella Sam. 8J25 French 
’ - Flutter. 

j- Michael Seel ey’s selection: The Mechanic. 

6.55 HARPERS & QUEEN HANDICAP (£3,166: 1m) (5) 

MB'BSgRSSSISijraffitibis^fBg: 

--..a ««W»2 JOYFUL DANCER (C-U) (Vistapton Referer«]_W_Brootor 6-8-fl TOntan 4 

an fUaa ee atfCUTniA IMiP. 


Lad. 16-1 


15-8 Ludanaoa. 2-1 Santefla Sam. 6-1 Laurie's Warrior. B-1 ProsRent il-i Fourth 
Pharoah 


i Btos.20-7 others. 


PORifc LAURIES WARRIOR (8-8) Showed fcnpTPwment whan Wftrd o<4 to Locton (8- 

') at Newmarket (71. £4496. good to firm. July 19). LUCUMAOA (8-11) al out to beat 
(B-1 1 ) hd at Windsor, iMththa&d 71 back (6t. £2855. good to Srm. June 30. 8 ran). 
>0)7H1Sm to Bucha n Na as (BQ) In Sandown maiden from Which the 
have won since (71. £2707, good to Arm. June 25, 17 rant PROSaj^TT 
— — ----- - - — - — (71, 2t 144. epod to fttn. 


2nd. 4th and 


(9-0) never nearer 58*. beaten 8L oahtod Ofhe IM) at Satabw 
June 25. 9 ran). SANTBJJt SAW (»H finished wst when 2X1 
at NBwmerket (71. £4383, flood. JUy 8. 10 ran). 


toGJory I 


(«) 




■ r 



10), winner Since.... 
Newmarket defeat ot . 
-SeJecfiotr AVENTWO 


-seMcooir AVENimu 

735 SILKS OF ST JAMES HANDICAP (£3.210: 5f) (12) 

■ -- . win— .u nr m nftl nhimmnrl fl rhumntl HT- n -T' < 


V 






8 22-0000 Dsorrwyst 
ID 1MM0O MSJL 
11 240203 LOI&' 

T2 


N Outfield) L C0 wb*5-8-« 
J Winter 4^-9. 


r- "14 000210 FARirai jbex P 5 ) (°) t”' 5 H *4»aa4ey) Mrs N M 


_ N Hows 2 
. 1 Johnson 3 

B RouseB 

J Reid 4 

, TWmam*9 
_ N Adams 1 




-—a-IMtoi M 7 

• -IS n-02123 me mechanic ( RMD)Pf L^ . 0 °*yl S 

64 Farmer Jock, 5-2 The Mechanic. 4-1 Ferryman. 8-1 Daw*. 8-1 LonUy Street 

12-1 Stjrtxx t 4- ? of**- 




FORM: FERRYMAN 

firm.- Julv 9. 5 * 





j -1 i)a short hwl at 


CakLct tot r 

8J5 HOORAY HE1«Y CLAIMING STAKES (3-Y-O: £2,914: 1m 6f) (5) 

1 20-0413 PRB4CH AJJTTER (J town) R Sheathar 6-11 — - ---- - — —MW*} 

2 222-313 INMAN ORATOR (USAXBF) (SheUth Mohammed) B Mils 6-11 BThowjoal 

3 002 HELB40EZ (USA) (A Spearman) G Harwood 611 ACfctkS 

6 0 RBOVIND JH ThomsoT) N Vtoort 8-1 1 — S Daeaon 3 

10 000223 THRffi TIMKA LAW (Roldvato L«) PKelewsyM M Edd*y2 

7-4 Three Times A Lady. 2-1 French Butter. 4-1 tntfan Orator. 
M Melendez. 25-1 Rtoewkw. 

'- C3746jJ0°d 
CimH.CTMt. 
to the useM Claw 
m). PT0vtousiy 4L 

Haydock nav*er-o> to hi Oreems 0-11L FRENCH RlfTICR (9-7) Z 1/2L away 3rd 
h eap. £3902, good to thm. JWy 5. 5 ran). 

Relectiort: THREE TMES A LADY 

835 OKAY YAH HANDICAP (3-Y-a £2,323: 1m 3f 100yd) (11) 

5 0M0 DARK ffitfTAQEJJ Guest) C Nelson 9-7.-. JRridll 

6 000-010 TWTTO(C4>)m(LamtfAy|gdW-Goldsni<rtNVigo«9-7 P Cook 5 

7 002210 UP TO UNCLE (Krrrod Ccrpany) R Hannon 9-7 AMcOonoS 

- 8 31-40 NOBLE HLL (W PonsonMD Artwttnot 9-6 WNama4 

9 OMO CAPULET fl Fra) C James 9-3 j».HRe7 

• 14 0-0043 SHKZAO (K AOckda) J Tree 9^) 

16 OOdOO PAUSE FOR APPLAUSE (MBS J Lane) S WOortnan 90 CflMartfC 

17 (HXW PRME NUMBER (FJankVB)PCoie 9-0 TOWnafi 

19 004100 STAR SWNER (B) (USA) (Mra S Khan) G La>Ms 8-10 PWattsel 

' 22 000 BARLEYBREE (W Rogwsl C Bamtaed 8-« .HJtowwIO 

24 0-12000 THE WOOO&i HUT (F8ufl) R Voorspuy 61 S Whitworth 2 

2-1 Shtoad. 7-2 T«Mto, 

FORM: DARK HEfttTAO E (7-13) 9t h ot 19 
£10628. firm, June 19). TB4TTO 7th 

" 'i 

. . r(B-ll)wasoulci«tirg9.StTOAl>_(7-ig i 

before mutwhwi fMM toZaubarr (8-7) at Bath (jm 51 Tg^EgaB. Jl^S 

no better than 9th 



nr.Q^f. wnL NOBLE MLL (64) was 7K back laeL hmitoB ear fiar (8-1 3) beerLa.JtotoOwt< 

(» 3 ) at Chepatow(lm4|.£ilS7.aoftApr10,7ran).PRfe NU MBER ttobatterto 
Crae^JT outZ starts. previoiaiyJS-O) 7X1 5lhto Heavy Brigade (9-0) at Th*n*(1m. Sfifift 

JCERBOY to soft Apr 19, 17 ran). STAR SHBER wed beaten ost 2 starts, first t4Tie out (9-0} 8 

una 14. 12 to m^rtOu t PsrtiafB (9ffl at Newmarket (71. £3tS2, soft Apr 17. 16 ran). 
Sdecdonc STAR SI4HCT 


■ * 

w y*- 
.t ■ 


HAMILTON PARK 


oSlc’rtoSfle to numbers best 

6.45 E B F WALLACE MAIDEN STAKES (2- 

£919l6() & runners) ‘ Rpato01 

g • 0 im CRICKET RonThorapn 9-0 ifimdsfwwW* 

J| 

Evens Stwiyema. 9* Mr OsekeL M wind Ot Pwce. 


.- :> -is 


. . -v 




Hamil ton selections 

By Mandarin 
«45 Shadiyaxna. 7.15 Spittiir Mick. 7.45 Mger 
•March. 8.1 SMy Myra. 8.45 Duelling. 9.15 Fort 
Lino: • 

.By Our Newmarket Correspondent 
6.45 Shadiyaroa. 7. 1 5 Tap The Baton. 9. 15 Reno 
Ralph. . 

By Michael Seeley 

7:1 5. SPITT1N MICK (nap). 7.45. Mister March. 



7.15 LOWTHER NURSERY HANDICAP (2-Y-O: 

.£1437:50(9) 


-5.:^ ■ v - 



G Carter P) 8 
sM, " gMimS 

I RPEao|t2 


7.45 HAMILTON SPHINT HANDICAP (£1,648: 51) 

( 8 ) 

! s aaeaMPSwaajsag j-: 

? SSS 

j Son aa»BBaesi35| 

12 R^^^TOtTBBffimAW Jones 1VM(7eg^ # 

5-2 Loch Form. 9-2 MsurJAa^i. S-l RueUan Winter. 6-1 
Parade GW. 8-1 Carpenter's Boy. Tradesman. 10-1 Wes brae 
Bay. 14-1 Ada's Boy. 

8.15 BONNWGTON SELLING STAKES (£847: 1m 
If) (6) 

2 0400 BUMRJMG BBJ R WOOtfKWSS 4-8-13 A Bond 3 

4 MOO GO SPECTRUM JHaktana 68-11 JOUmiMS 

7 OOM NOlWTOTlETCralgWIl — JQ«* *tt2 

9 MM CUIH»(B)M Jamas 5-66 Sharran Janes 4 

10 -000 MY MYRA PMitcMI 4-6-6— G CantrO) 1 

13 ^ CWWCORN BLIE (B) Ansny Titzgerald 3-8-0. M ny fi 

114 Capricorn Blue. BrjvranoM.6-1 Ctoedo.61 

Go Spectrwn. IM My Myra. 16-1 Norwtsstle. 

8.45 COREHOUSE HANDICAP (£1,242: 1m 40yd) 

(5) 

2 00-2 HELLO GYPSY C Tfiklor 68-7 —3 

3 1410 SmiJNG (B) (USA) (C-O) P MteMC 

6 -IM ABJAD (C-O) RWoodwweSM — r . A Bend 2 

7 0400 BOY SANDTOM (& W W BM W- W 

10 -300 SMART MART W M OBnadto 7-(M JLawaT 

n-10 Dueftng. 5-2 HeM Gypsy. 5-1 Abjad. M Boy 

Sandto rd. lD-1 Smart Mart 

9.15 RQSS MAIDEN STAKES (3-Y-O: £906: Im 4f) 


14 mi 

19 2233 RUN TO WON* B Moore 7-7i~-~ 
■ 3-1 Bruoa.J-2 Ti^The BMpn/ 4-1 


Avtes oaH. 8-1 Danarto. 
IM others. 


i(M Rim To Work. 1 





1 2223 BANTS. BUSHY 

4 4*2 FORT UNO ! T 

5 004 RENO RALPH 
7 OOM HELSANCNR 



J Berry 9-0 
M 


OHuffarM-- 
611; 


. JCarrefl{7}4 
IIMMd2 


. G Carter (3)1 
. DMekeown3 


4-5 Fort Lino. 3-1 Bantd Bushy. R«*W 3-r 

Hafaanoa 


Chime Time on 
song for 
the Gimcrack 

Chime Time, who won his 
fourth race from five starts in 
yesterday’s Strathclyde Stakes at 
Ayr. will run next in the 
Gimcrack Stakes at York. 

The colt’s only defeat came in 
the Chesham Stakes at Royal 
Ascot, where he finished secoxid 
to Minstrella. He is trained at 
Mahon by Colin Tinkler. 

Yesterday Tinklers's wife, 
Carol, who was in charge said: 
“My husband is looking after 
ihingsat home because our head 
iad is on holiday. I bought 
Chime Time for 3,400 guineas 
at Newmarket. He is a super 
horse, and nothing worries him. 
He really wants seven furlongs 
now. but has won over six at 
York and the Gimcrack will 
now be his next race." 


Blinkered first time 

SANDOWN: 625 Design Wise. 7.25 The 
M echani c. 8.55 Star Siinar, 

CATTBUCR: 2J0 Storm Herb. 4.0 Music 

YtfSutmt 2.46 Raintrae County. . 
HAMILTON: 7.15 Keen Edge. 9.15 Bento 
Bushy. 

OFFICIAL SCRATCH1NGS: Al Engts 
(dud}: Gay Ghana, Tudors Daughter. 


. Ayr results 

Going: Ann 

230 (5f) 1 . UPSETp McKeown. 7-fl: 2. 
That Certain Snata (M HRs. 611 lev): 3. 
Ltnpac North Moor (J Lowe. 20-1). ALSO 
ranTiO ToatToot (4th). 4 ran. 2L *l. 6L J 
S Wlson to Ayr. Tote: £2 .10. OF: £130. 
CSF: £32$. Imir 0O_82a*c. 


11 Peetvwood Shooter im. IB Mr 
Grvnpy (5th). 5 ran. 1*1 5L i»l. 5«. C 
Tinkler to Mellon. Tola: £1.10: £1-00. 
£S.6a OF: £3.10. CSF: £366. Imki 
1266eec. 

330 (Tm) 1. SIR WILMORE (E Guest 6 
it 2. Emnld Eagle (M Ms, 12-lfc 3, 
Windpipe IN Common, 11-4 fav). ALSO 
RAN: 7-2 Dueling (5th). 5 Ihgh Port(4ttrt. 
11-2 SMtoe (5th). 16 SneOrnan. 7 ran. NR: 
Stdons Daughter. 1 Kl. 21. sh hd. 1%L 6L E 
Weymas at Leybum. Tote: £8.80: £360. 
£600. DFt £8080. CSF: £57.41. Iran 
41.01 see 

4J0 (im 2n 1. CAOEfETTE (N 
Connorton. 12-1 1 2. Mewdte Gate (Gay 
Kafiewmr. 62k 3. Dfar EteNas (M HRs. 14- 
1). ALSO RAN: 100-30 fav Countess 
Cariort (OBi ) 5 Swtft River (4th). 1 1 Colonel 
Hall. 6 Forever Young (5th). 12 BethNL 8 
ran. NR: King Of Gems. Bucks Bolt 2HL 
3L 4L 3L 21. M Camacho at Tadcastar. 
Tola: £18.60: E2.7U. £isa £2 SO. DF: 
£87 JO. CSF: £57.80. Tricast £641.80. 
2imn 07.73sec. Sold Mrs M Stewart 24X30 
fF«s. 

4JO pm 50 1. RUN HIGH (A Clark, 11- 
4); ft Mte Shirtey (J Lowe. 11-8 hwfc 3. 
Denalto (L Chamock. 14-1). ALSO RAN: 


Lakiste (4th), 33 Ntfida. 50 Noel Arm 
jipttapa (5th), Whipcrackaway (6th). Sur 
itTTran. iHk to, 11 3 1 v. OHanmod) 


15-2 Goodtime HaL 12 Mr Moss. 20 
33 Ntttda, 50 Noel Arms, 
“ Sun- 
at 

Pidborough. Tote: £4.10: £2J0, £1.10, 
£530. W: £360. CSF: £6.10- 2min 
51.02S8C. 

iO (71) 1. 8PORTMG SOVEREIGN (W 


Baxteigate. 9 Flying Bkkty (8th). 10 
Batoarmo ffith), CfcudJess Sky. 14 
AJtchandoubleyou. 16 Conwy Crnfoai, 
“ ~ ^ *hal(4th),SkybW .50 
11. nk. XL II. fKL M 


20 Double Chal (4th), 

Feather Girt. 14 ran. II. nk. V 
Jams to New m aricet Tots: CIOJBO, £1.40, 
£220. £2A0. DF: £19.00. CSF: £5ft4S. 
Tricast £27351. Irnln 272Sssa After a 
Stewarts' inoukv. the resist stands. 
Ptac e pot E97PAS to 50p toaka. 

Folkestone 

Going: good to firm 


2.15 (Im 21) 1. LIAM (P Robinson. 5-2 
fav); ft Cool Gales (S Cauthen. 14-1fc 3. 
Admirals AB (W R Swtnbum, 13-2). ALSO 


RANt 11-4 Noble Rise (4th). 9-2 Loreef , 25 
Hot Momma (6th). Sandy BA. 33 Mary 
Suntey (5th). 50 Aah &>y. 66 Cteonair. 
Trojan Splash. Betla Carina. 1 2 ran. a. nk. 
hd. sh hd. 31. M Ryan at Newmaricet Tote: 
£300: £1.10. £420. £1^0. DF: £25J». 
CSF; £31.23. 

2M m 1. sw ARNOLD (U Roberts. 4- 
1); ft Bleak’s Dfiemme (A Bond, 4-8 tav); 
3. Ab m aa uea e i (B Rocaa. 8-1). ALSO 
RAN: 14 Foundry Flyer, 16 Povrted Lady 
Nlh). 20 Career Madness (5th). 33 
Heavenly StroSar, 50 Siitakl Dancer. Vtoe 
(Bth), Condover S»l lOran. 1 3L 5L 
1 Hi. A Stewart at Newmarket. ^ Tote: ESSO: 
£1.10. £130, £1.70. DF: £ft4ft CSR 
£ 8 . 68 . 

3.16 (50 1. -COLLEGE WIZARD 
Cochrane, 4-5 
1): 3. Prineeet 

ALSO RAN: 61 

Comedian (4th). 16 Malada Led. Ram On 
(5th). 20 My Match. 8 ran. 2L nk. S. 1 Y,l. 2L 
M Tompkins to Newmaricet Tote: £1.80; 
El .10. £ft30. £130. DF: £430. CSF: 
£6J4. Winner bought in. 

3X5 (5f) 1. LAST RECOVERY (R 
Cochrane. 4-lk ft 
Whitworth. 100-30): 3, 

14-1L ALSO 


B- 


Wllfiams. 14-1). ALSO RAN: 168 fav 
Green's Gallery (6th). 4 Nation's Song 
(4th). 33 Segovton (5th). Santo Princess. 7 
ran. hd. m i)si. 3L 2HI. M Ryan « 
NewmericaL Tote: £A40 ; £1 Aft E2AD: DF: 
£650. CSF: £1648. 

4.1 5 (2m 100yd) 1 , W (R Cotorana. 36 
1): ft Dtva Encore (S Cauthen. 7-j fav): ft 
ChartfMd |B Crosaiay. 1 1-2). ALSO RAN: 
100-30 Ashcot (4th). 10 Nardssjs. 11 
BkisNng Spy. 12 Forewarn. 20 La 
Serena ta (Si). 33 Hot Bern (5tn). 50 
Janaab. Sea Trouper. 1 1 ran. %l. 2L nlc. 71, 
Hd. S Woodman at Chichester. Tote: 
£29.00: £2.70. £110. E1.9a DF: £26.70. 
CSF: £8321. TrtcaSC £34827- 
*Jspn 1. FRfWJLEJTOum 4-1 tori; 
ft Special Guest (R Cochrane. 7>l k 1 


R Sunburn. U _ 
RAN: 13-2 SOver Form (Bin). 15-2 
Kenooz. ID Manor. 11 Angel Drummer 
Out Of Harmony, 12 ShereeigL 20 


Taylor Of Soheet 

aSqrai 

Kano 
(Bth). 

New' 

MBS. 

ran. i ..... _ ... _ 

WhaKombe. Tote £5.40; £150. £2.00, 
£1.70. DF: £15.10. CSft £31.11. Tncast 
£165.77 
PJsc*p«: £3JM 


YARMOUTH 


Going; firm 

Draw: high mmbefs best 

2.15 E B F COTMAN MAIDEN FILLIES STAKES 
(2-Y-O: £1 267: 7f) (8 runners) 


ATYAB H Thomson Jonas 8-11 .. 
0 FBWO0DRWAirrafrong8-n. 


_ Q Sextan 4 

0333 UGHNM8 LASER (BF) P'ksUswey 

8 - 11 Gay KsDe«re^p)| 


03 USUNTHUSJMmsr8-1l. 

MSS Z0U Jknmy RtzgeraW 8-11- 
0 MOinFOIlTWJarws8-11. 


M Robertas 
R Cochran* 6 
SCsetbenl 


QUEEN UPAS HCeol 8-11 

3 SO STYLISH (BF)GPritchart-Gardon 8-11 PRotatoSMT 
10-11 Queen Midas. 3-1 Ustoithco. 5-1 Alyab. 8-1 So 
Sfyteh. 18-1 Miss Zola. 20-1 Firwood. 25-1 others. 


Yarmouth selections 

By Mandarin 

2.15 Queen Midas. Z45 Peter's Blue. 3.15 
Nordica. 3.45 Eastern House. 4.15 Foxy Prince. 
4.45 Mr Jay-Zee. 

By Our Newmarket Correspondent 

2.15 Queen Midas. 2.45 The Chippenham Man. 

3.15 Nordica. 3.45 Eastern House: 4.15 Foxy 
Prince. 4.45 Chicago Bid. 


.14 4434 SHEWS FANTASY (B^ RW ArinStror^^ g BaatorS 

” 15 0000 TOWER-FAME E'EUki MLIbMnasS 

16 HO RIVHtS NEPHEW (FfflODouieb 3«-- RHHs4 

18 800 FRAME OF POWS1 Jmny FtegeraM 3-7-12 — 1 

20 0000 DALLAS SWTH(B) (USA) UCOupman 

S-7-12JCtotar(7)2 

5-2 Nonfica. 3-1 Simon's Fantasy. 4-1 Rivera Nephew. 
S-l Frame Of Povrer. S-1 Tower Fame. 10-1 Dales Smtth- 

3.45 APPLEGATE RLUES HANDICAP (£2,628: 
Im) (4) 

5 0223 QU EEN O F BATTLE M J Ryan 9-7 It Cochrane 3 

8 2ta EASTERN HOUSE HCed 96 SCautfWi2 

10 1- RARE SOUNO(C)PKNtoway 941- Gay Kdeway (3)1 

17 0022 NEW EVIDENCE E Bdln 8-5 AMacfcsy4 

Evens Eastern House. 11-4 Queen Of Battle. 4-1 Rate 

Sound. 6-1 New Evidence. 

4.15 CROME MAIDEN STAKES (3-Y-O: £1,193: Im 

60 (6) 

2 0 FOXY PRINCE (USAJL CUmanl 90 R Gusto 6 

3 ON HANKLEY DOWN E Beta 3-0 AMsckay 5 


6 -ON SHAKEEB F Duit 9-0- 

7 3004 BENAROSA PI 

8 0 HG H BOR N BtOOER | 
10 -040 TEMPEST TOSSED] 


2.45 DAWSON TURNER SELLING STAKES 
(2-Y-O: £643: 5f 25yd) (6) 

1 00 SISNSWARO BOY K kray 8-11 WWbedsCTS 

2 041 PETERS BUEJrtviwFtageraid 8-11 — MRobwtsS 

3 DON RAWTHEECOUNTY TO P5 Fagsie 8-11 .. A Mackey 1 

6 02 T1« C19PPENHAM IUN (8f)W H Tcxnptam 

8-11 R CochraneS 

7 0000 KAMSTAR D M LesfiB 8-8 Bay Ketatty (3) 4 

10 000 SCABHJNG 8HADYLADY K T hray 86 GBatosr2 

SA Ptoer's Blue, 5-2 The CWppenham Man. 9-2 RaWrae 
6-1 Seaming Shadytedy. 10-1 Greensward, 


3.15 ROYAL WEDDING HANDICAP (E2J81: Im 21) 

(6) 


4 081 NORDICA (C) A C Stewart 3-9-7 . 


M Roberts 5 


S Cmathen 4 

11-8 Foxy Prince, 7-2 BBnerosa. 5-1 Tempest Tossed 
7-1 Hankley Down. 10-1 Shekeeb. 12-1 High Bam Bidder. 

445 VINCENT HANDICAP (£1,749: 7f) (12) 

1 0100 EASY OAYEEkfin 4-9-12 A Hotctrings (7) 1 

2 0021 BLUE BfflLUANT (B) (D) B W Hits 

3-B-* (6ex) NON-RUNNER 11 

3 1302 MR JAY-ZEE (D)(BF) N A Cataghan 

4-9-1 OR Cochrane 7 

5 2001 CMMGOBO(B)(USA)(W)JRWAra^M^^ 5 

8 OLO MISS MAMA J Ffitch-Heyes 59-1 — 3 

8 -ON UMAR SHAMAL-GAL G Pritchant-Gorton 

^8~9R 9 

9 2030 HOPEFUL KATIE {0 DM Leslie 

4^-7 Bay K e lt, w a y (3) 6 
10 0040 D0RAME G T Gains 5-8-3 JSeafiy(7j» 

13 DOOO EUCHARtSfB) A Hide 4-7-11 AMackay 4 

14 0000 DEBACH REVENGE M T Hopkins 4-7-9 RMtne(5)!2 

15 0044 )DEOUGiA(B) A Hide 4-7-7 *1 L ThOBta 10 

16 4031 SWEET ANDY GGGracsy 7-7-7 G Benfwef <7)2 

1 1-4 Mr Jay-Zee. 4-1 Meotogta, 9-2 Ctewo BkL 5-1 Sweet 

Andy. 8-1 Hopeful Kane. Eucharts, Lunar Shama-Oaf. 12-1 
others. 


CATTER1CK BRIDGE 


Going: firm 

Draw: low numbers best 

2.0 LEEDS SELLING HANDICAP (3-Y-O: £1,086: 5f) 
(16 runners) 

_ S Webster 12 

iWSS 

_ MBMOnflS 

EQwtoCTM 


3^0 WANES OF CATTERICK HANDICAP (£1^76: 
Im 5f 180yd) (8) 

3 0041 TROJAN WAY RHoOnshWd 44-10 5Pwto2 

4 0010 WS CHRIS Mtoi*MDn44.l0_ -—-M Mater 8 

- — Calvert 5-9-7 — NRodgera(7)5 

»|7).l 


w -000 KEY BOYALfUSAlfc CaNart 5-9-7 — N ... 
8 OOQO NORTHERN RULER H YArteig 4-0-5 L 

- 4-8-1. 


Wood3 


2 UDOO SELORC&E (SI A Pods 9-7. 

4 0000 PETENCOREJRedfemB^.. 

5 940 JACOtfl JOY K hrory 9-4 

6 2400 PLANTER (BIT Faehteto 9-4 

7 0000 MUSCAL Ad T Cran 9-2 — 


11 roS^HATajAstEUosSHaflfl-M 

eGbc et(3}i 

J Lowe 4 

D Chapman 5-7-13 _ A Proud 7 

2-1 Cocked Hat Supreme, 7-2 Tharaleos.9-2 Mrs Chris. 8- 


14 4003 THAflALEOS (USA) F Watson 6-8-1. — 

15 0000 JUBILANT LADY P-CJ) 


8 3042 PS1CmiOffi)Klvoiy92 AShntos@16 

9 0040 WnOBtQ PATH R wtewhead 9-2 - A WMtatafl (7) 15 

11 0030 THE STRAY BULLETT®)B McMahon 94). Stake 11 

12 008 MPPER SMITH W Bentey 8-13 GtWfitodJ 

13 M0 EASTERN 0ASS(D)E Alston M A Proud 1 3 

14 DOOO VALDARNO D Chaprwi B-B — .... 0 ***?*» * 

16 0000 CLASSY SCOUSED Chapman 8-7 SPGrifMS 


1 Troian Way. 13-2 Rarratte, 10-1 Kay Royal. 33-1 Others. 

4.0 BRADFORD MAIDEN RLUES STAKES (2-Y-O: 
£684: 5f) (6) 


17 080 FUR BABY G Harman 


Jm Eadee (7) 1 


18 0000 SPH94B GARDEN (BfNChamtoertam 8-6 ^ KHedgw iB 2 

19 0000 MURRYL CAWON tos G jteveiey 3-5 , GCrem(7)9 

22 0400 MSSTAUFAN M Brecon 8-3 JUnw7 

7-4 Ftercroto. 3-1 The Stray BuSett 9-2 Wfotfng Path. 8-1 
Plaraar. 10-lMss Taufaa Vtodamo, 20-1 others 


4 AID AND ABET M Stoute 8-11. 
44 ALHAYATR Boss 8-11 


5 OOM DANCSNG BELLE T Failwrat 8-11 - 

5 ”S SgKBSZMSOSi-. 

6 0 SAPPHARMOnStobbeB-11 


.WRMntemB 
E Guest (3)4 
IDnffMdl 


G I 

.G Morgan 2 
,JHMte(95 

..A Mercer 3 

11-8 Aid And Abet 9^ Ateawt S-1 Dancing Belle. B-1 
Royal Specs!. 20-1 Music DelghL Sapphaitno. 


Catterick selections 

By Mandarin 

2.0 Planter. 2.30. Ibnalmaghith 3.0. Noniic 
Pleasure. 3.30 Trojan Way. 4.0 Aid And AbeL 

4.30 G G Magic. 

By Our Newmaricet Correspondent 

2.30 Itmalmaghilh. 4.0 Aid And Abet 4.30 
Britton’s Mill. 


130 WAKEFIELD HANDICAP (3-Y-O: £1,598: Im 
4f 40yd) (6) 

1 4110 MAtNSON OWL (C) R WMakto 9-11 (4ax) 

DMcKBOwn2 

3 982 BRITTON'S MILL (USAXBF) M Prescott 6-13 

G outfield 4 

4 3042 Q G MAGIC D lgytay ^S -lZ J Lowe 3 


5 -000 KEEP HOPMQI 


r8-11. 


■•2SS81 

MWipnS 

7-4 G G Magic. 9-4 Britton's MU. 4-1 Daftora.6-1 Madson 
Qto. 14-1 Keep Cool. 33-1 Keep Hoping. 


6 ION KEEP COOL (FR) R HoBnshead 8-7 

7 -004 DALLONA W Mason 88 


230 HUDDERSFIELD STAKES (2-Y-O: £1,343: 7f) 


( 6 ) 


1 B1T2 wstSLEYDALEWAIBItOR G Moore 9-7 . D CteNy (7) 2 

2 H Th omson M 94— AlAwgrB 


03 CASTLE HEJWTS R Armstrtrg 9-H 


UNDRiCK M H _ 
322 STORM «KJ(8) 


15 0 TOLL BAR MUsSHafi 8-11 


JIMS 

M WOcknonS-ll 

G0to(ieM4 


. K Hodgson 3 


11-10 ibnaknagMh. SS WensleydatoMnrlar. 5-1 Storm 
Hero. 10-1 SW®. iB-i Ton Bar. 20-1 LMrick. 


3j0 DEWSBURY MAIDEN STAKES (£664; Im 4f 
40yd) (6) 

1 000/ BURBRBOE KING STD Ringer 59-7 PFArey 2 

2 (J TRAVEL HOMEfB) M Slerty 6-9-7 S Morris 5 

3 800 BRAIOCN QREY Denys Sm4» 48J — LCtamockB 

6 PALMMiALM M H Easmby 4-9-4 K Hodgson 4 

12 33 NORDIC PLEASURE (USA) B HBs 3-88 — A Huny 1 

13 008 WAVE GOODBYE MissS Hal 344 J Lowe 3 

4-6 Norte Pleasure. 3-1 Wave Goodbye. 6-1 Palmahabn, 

20-1 Travel Home. 33-1 Burtridge Kkig Sl Brandon Grey. 


Today’s course specialists 

SANDOWN 

TRAINERS: G Harwood. 31 wtowafrom 146 rumen. 213%: 
J Tree, 12 from 65. 185%; C Brittain. 27 Iran 174. 155%. 
JOCKEYS: Pat Eddery, 43 winners from 237 rides, 18.1%; 
S Whitworth. 6 from 41. 14-6%. (only two qualfiers) 

CATTERICK 

TRADERS: M Stoute. 10 winners from 32 runners, 31-3%; 
M Prescott. 17 from 6ft 27.4;% B mes. n from 44, 258%. 
JOCKEYS: G DuffieU. 38 wbnats from 221 rides. 17.2%; 
S Perks. IS from 133. Ift0%; E Gueal, 6 from 54, n.1%. 

HAMILTON 

TRAR4ER& M Stoute. 6 winners from 28 nmara, 23.1%: 
M H Eastarby. 8 from 45 17.BV J Watte. 12 from 88. 174%. 
JOCKEYS: K Hodgson. 9 winners from -44 tides. 205%: 
G DutflWd. 46 frcni 255. 18.0%: J Lowe. 41 from 288, 1WL 

YARMOUTH 

TRAWERS: H Cecfl 62 wbneR from 157 runners, 395%; 
A Stewart, 9 from 34. 26.5%: LOrmeni. 34 from 168. 202%. 

. JOCKEYS: S Cguthen. 23 winners from 89 rides. 2S_8%; 
fl Gueto. 12 from 75.'16.0%; T hies. 21 from 189, IITTST 






SPORT 


THE TIMES WEDNESDAY JULY 23 1986 


CRICKET 


Tavare gets cracking to 
provide Kent with 
third championship win 


By John Woodcock, Cricket Correspondent 


Canterbury’. Kent ( 2lpts ) bt 
Lancashire. (5) by eight 
wickets. 

A thoroughly good innings 
by Tavare took Kent to their 
tliird championship victory of 
the season yesterday and their 
first at home. He was 90 not 
out when the match ended in 
the first over after lunch, 
having scored the last 76 of 
them in not much more than 
an hour. 

When Kent won the cham- 
pionship in 1970 they had 
been last at the start of July. If 
their recovery this time is 
unlikely to be quite as spectac- 
ular. yesterday's success will 
have rallied them at a time 
when, with things going 
wrong, the season can start to 
seem very long. 

I have always had a soft spot 
for Kent where traditions, if 
they are good ones, are proper- 
ly preserved. Seen from the 
other side of the St Lawrence 
ground even the new stand 
blends well with the old, and 
of the side that won this match 
only Alderman was not either 
bom or bred in the county. 

.As the game had gone tor 
two days, things could very 
easily have turned against 


Kent yesterday, especially 
when Benson, who had been 
admirably resident on Mon- 
day evening. soon played on. a 
little unluckily- to AllotL But 
Patterson was nothing like the 
bowler be had been the night 
before. He was on his last 
warning, having been pulled 
up twice then by umpire 
Evans for under pitching. Fast 
bowlers are not accustomed to 
a strict interpretation of Law 
42 even in England, let alone 
in the West Indies. 


When Tavare was on 14 he 
survived a sharp chance to 
Watkinson at second slip off 
AllotL That, in the event was 
Lancashire's last chance. Pat- 
terson was spent (he bowled 
only five overs yesterday, in 
two spells) and Tavare began 
suddenly to play his “other 
game” the one be guards so 
jealously. It started when be 
hit Watkinson, bowling off 
breaks for three successive 
fours. In not much more than 
half an hour Tavare went from 
14. which had taken him 95 
minutes, to 51 Taylor made 
him 'a good partner and the 
pitch seemed no longer to hold 
any terrors. No doubt it had 
been a good toss for Kent to 


win, and Lancashire were 
unlucky with the injuries to 
O'Shaughnessy and 
Fairbrother and to Patterson, 
whose heel was said yesterday 
to be sore. 

Had one of the selectors 
been watching Tavare would 
have got a mention at their 
next meeting Having sur- 
vived Patterson's assault and 
battery early in Kent's second 
innings he was rewarded in the 
end with some fairly easy 
pickings against Watkinson 
and the slow left arm of 
Folley. Like Benson, he would 
have got an idea what it must 
have been like to be in West 
Indies last winter when Patter- 
son was not, as now, a lone 
fast bowler but the junior, if 
not the slowest of four. 

LANCASHIRE: First Innings 182 (G R 
DAsy 6 tor 57) 




. - 1 -W' 


• .v ;5 A - 




- 






Second fnrinos 165 (G R ORey 4-53. R M 
EKson 4-36) 

KENT: First foranos 157 (B P Patterson 4- 
43. P J W Alton 4-42) 


. 4nV+- ' • • 

* v 5 'v f 


Second Innings 

M R Benson b ASott 37 

SGHmkseWatWnsonb Patterson — 0 

C J Tavarft not out _ 90 

N R Taylor not out 36 

Extras (no 8 ) - B 

Total (2 wkts) — 171 

FALL OF WICKET: 1-8. 2-48. 

BOWUNG: Patterson 12-1-41-1; Alton 17- 
4-50-1 : Watfunson 6-1-32-0; FoUey 8-3-19- 
0; Abratu ms 5-1-29-0. 

Umpires: C Cook and O G L Evans. 


Foster puts 
Essex on 
title course 


Middlesex kept 
waiting 


TENNIS 


By Marcus Williams 


SOLTHESD: Essex (24pts) beat 
II 'arcestcrshirc (61 by 91 runs. 

Splendid bowling by Neil 
Foster, who achieved career- 
best match figures of 1 1 for 158. 
well supported by the veteran 
John Lever, brought Essex vic- 
tory over Worcestershire yes- 
terday with six overs to spare at 
the end or an absorbing day. 

Worcestershire had required 
250 to win off 63 overs but once 
Foster, exploiting helpful con- 
ditions with a fine display of 
stamina and accuracy, had 
knocked out the heart of the 
innings, only Rhodes, with a 
defiant effort, and Radford 
threatened to prevent Essex 
securing the win that restored 
their championship challenge 
after two successive two-day 
defeats. 

Worcestershire got off to a 
bad stan. D'Oliveira was caught 
at first slip off Lever in the third 
over and Hick, on whom many 
hopes were pinned, had & torrid . 
beginning, hit on, the wrist by 
Lever, doubled up- after a blow 
in the box from Foster and then 
Hashing the next ball through 
Pringle's outstretched hand at 
first slip. 

Hick survived, however, to 
take the score past 50 in 
company with a solid-looking 
Curlis. but aiming to pull a ball 
from Pringle that was well up to 
him. Hick was bowled off his 
body and Curtis followed, leg- 
betbrc on the back foot to 
become Fosters first victim. 
Foster, with up to seven men 
around the bat. drove a hole like 
that in the nearby Southend pier 
through the middle order and 
they slumped to 98 for seven. 
He successfully baited the trap 
for Smith's hook, knocked out 
the off stump of Pawl, who had 
scored a century in the first 
innings, and found the outside 
edges of both Neale and 
Newport. 

Twenty-six overs remained 
but Rhodes and Radford defi- 
antly occupied the next 14 until 
Radford was caught around the 
comer off Lever, while Foster 
took a short rest. Six overs later 
Lever hit Inchmore's off stump 
and two balls later, to a great 
roar from the crowd, he trapped 
Pridgeon leg-before. Rhodes 
was left high and dry on 33. 

At the start of the day Gooch 
goi his side away at a great lick 
as they sought to add to their 
lead of 81. He was in his most 
dominant mood, driving and 
pulling with great power. 

Gooch looked on course for 
his second century of the match 
and it took a fine ball from 
Radford, pitching leg stump and 
hitting middle and off. to re- 
move him. His 79 came ofT 8$ 
balls and contained 14 fours. 
His recent return to form is good 
news for England. 

Essex's quest for quick runs 
and a declaration came unstuck 
as Worcestershire's, seam 
bowlers also enjoyed . the con- 
ditions. Border, hooking, was 
removed by D'Oliveira running 
full lilt to hold a splendid effort 


DERBY: Derbyshire (21 pis) beat 
Middlesex (4) by one wicket. 

Brave hitting by Holding and 
Warner brought Derbyshire a 
thrilling victory yesterday after 
it seemed probable that Middle- 
sex. the county champions, 
w-ould finally achieve their first 
win this season. Derbyshire, set 
to make 289 to win in just under 
five hours, reached their target 
with 6.3 overs to spare. 

Derbyshire still needed 58 
when they lost their eighth 
wicket with 12 overs left. Hold- 
ing and Warner spumed aoy 


question of hanging on for the 

draw and slogged Edmonds and 


draw and slogged Edmonds and 
Daniel for 47 in six overs. 
Holding then played on against 
Daniel. 

Warner, joined by the last 
man. Mortensen, hooked a four 
and a two against Hughes and 
kept the bowling with the help of 
a leg bye. In the next over 
Warner won the game when he 
lofted Daniel back over bis head 
for four. 

It was a remarkable and 
lilting 1 dim ax to a splendidly 
competitive day's cricket, which 
fluctuated between the sides. 
First there was a significant 
contribution with the bat from 
Daniel. He swished and drove 
eight Jours in his 33 after 
Middlesex.' resuming at 271 for 
five. lost three quick wickets. 

Holding, in the first over, bad 
Radley on the back foot leg 
before and Hughes and Cowans 
soon followed. Daniel, though, 
punished Mortensen so severely 
that the Dane was removed 
from the attack. Daniel and 
Edmonds put on 47 for the last 
wicket before Daniel was de- 
ceived by a slower ball from 
Warner. 

Derbyshire had 55 minutes 
batting before lunch and by the 
interval bad lost both opening 
batsmen. Daniel, bowling at a 
torrid pace, had Maher held by 
Radley in the gulley as he dived 
to his left. Barnett edged Hughes 
to second slip as he played 
loosely outside the off stump 
without moving his feet 

Hill and Roberts re-ignited 
Derbyshire's challenge, with a 


By Richard Streeton 

2 jpts) beat careful stand of 78 in 34 overs. 
wicket. Roberts was less pugnacious 
aiding and than usual and Hill outscored 
rbyshirc a him before he tried to cut a ball 
-relay after from Edmonds which went 
at Middle- straight on. At tea Derbyshire 
[tampions, were 1SI for three, 
their first Afterwards Roberts, who at 
yshire. set 22 had survived a chance to 
just under Dowmon off Daniel, was un- 
herr target done by the West Indian's pace 
e. as he tried to turn the fast bowler 

eeded 58 to the leg side. Anderson and 
:rr eighth Milleradded 43 untroubled runs 
left. Hold- before Cowans returned just 
imed any before 5 o'clock and bad Ander- 
m for the son leg before, 
riondsand Morris, who bad not fielded 
iix overs, earlier because of a groin strain, 
on against came in next with a runner. 

Derbyshire needed 79 from the 
r the last last 20 overs but in the second of 
ked a four them Cowans bowled Miller. In 
jghes and the fifth and sixth Marples 
the help of charged Edmonds fatally and 
next over Morris mis-hooked a simple 
e when he catch to long leg and the closing 
3 - his head excitement began. 

. . MOOLESEX Fbst .bmmgs: .142 (R o 
abTe and Butcher 66: 0 HMo nansanS tor 35) 

A J T M9er c^^rb'wS^g -1-1- 29 
keLwhicn w H Stock c Mam* b Mortensen — 100 

the sides. J □ Carr b Mortensen 22 

sienificant R O Butcher c Barnett fi Mortensen .. 58 

h? t frrtii, C T RatSey few b KoJdtng 25 

bat from t p B Dc*m»rj tow Hotong 16 

Hid drove p h Edmonds ms out 23 

33 after SB Hughes c Maher b Mortensen — 0 

at 271 for N G Cowans b HoWng 0 

■ ww Darnel b Warner 33 

vickeiS. -j e Emburey absent hurt 

over, bad Extras (b 2. to 14, w i> 17 

foot leg Total 323 

d Cowans fall of wickets: 1 - 76 . 2 - 121 . 3 - 208 . *- 

1 fhonoh 225. 5-259. 6-272. 7-273. 8-276. 9-323. 


Yorkshire 
go down 
fighting 


By a Correspondent 


against David Lloyd and Ste- 
phen Botfield. But the Essex 
pair hung on tenaciously to save 
the match and change the 
complexion of the tie. - 

Middlesex once again found 
themselves in a marathon en- 
counter. ''this time "against Kent 
for whom Richard Whichello 
was in inspired form throughout 
a day of unpredictable results 
and weal her. However. Richard 
Lewis and his. partner, Simon 
Curtis, finally - outlasted the 
frustrated Kent pair or Martin 
Gun trip and Steven Matthews, 
winning 16-14 in the third set of 
their match to seize the 
initiative. 

The Sussex women, mean- 
while. had the earliest win of the 
day when they took an unbeat- 
able 5- 1 lead after the second 
round of the doubles matches. 


tftWUNG: Hoidcig 26-6-86-4; Mortensen 
28-7-85-4; Warner' 9-3-48-1: Mfer 34-1 1 - 
«M; Roberts 8-2-15-0: Barnett I-0-7-0. 
DERBYSHIRE; first tontogs 177 
Second torwtgs 

B M J Maher c Redtey b darnel 12 

*K J Barnett c Butcher b Hughes — 16 

A Hill b Edmonds 45 

B Roberts tow bOaiMt 55 

I S Anderson tow b Cowans 42 

G Mfler b Cowans 20 

j E Moms c Cowans b Daniel — - 9 

tc Marples st Downton b Edmonds — 6 

M A Hewing b Darnel — - 31 

A E Warner nor art 23 

O H Mortensen not out 0 

Extras (b 1. to 16. w 1 . nb 13) 31 

Total(9wtoal -.290 

FALL OF WICKETS. 1-21. 2-32. 3-110. 4- 
167. 5-210. 6-213. 7-230. 8-231. 9-278 
BOWUNG: Daniel 20 3-4-894: Cowans 
14-2-51-2: Hughes 17-4-42-1; Edmonds 
33-10-91-2. 

Umpires: J Btrfcerrsftaw ant R JiAan. 


BASTAD: Swerfish Open: Rrst round (Swed- 
ish uniass BAiedfc T Hogstadl bt J Cartes 
Baouena (Sp). 3-6. 7-6. 7-5: E Jeton (WQ)bi P 
Hermcscon. 6-3. 60: O K erode (WG) M P 


L unde* an. 6-?. 0-8, 8-3; D ae Miguel tSe) M P 
Morafng (WG). 7-6. 60: S Boner (Cl) W R 
Barman. 61. 1-8. 63; J Antoroo Rodnguez 
iSp) M C Campbe* lUSi 7-6. 64: S Ectoerg « 
C Bergssom. 63. 67. 64. 


Glamorgan fall short 


King’s prove 
to be good 
competitors 

By a Correspondent 


at long leg and though Pringle 
and East flourished briefly be- 


and East flourished briefly be- 
fore lunch, Newport and 
Pridgeon whipped out the last 

five wickets in seven overs 


ESSEX: First Innings 370 lor 5 dec (Q A 
Goocn 151. ,J P Stephenson 85. A R 
Border 58). 

Second Innings 

■ "G Gooch b Radford ^.^—79 

J P Stephenson c ttdc b Pridgeon — 9 

P j Prichard c sub b Newport — 15 

A R Border c D'Ofcveh-a b Inchmora .. 13 

SRHardneHfcfcbRadtord 10 

D R Pringle b Newport IS 

to E East c Smith b Pridgeon — 29 
na Foster c Rhodes b Prtegeon ft 

A WUflayb Newport 0 

J K Lever not out 3 

JH Childs c Childs b Newport 5 

Extras (b 4. to 6.1*3) — _13 

Total 202 

FALL OF WICKETS: 1-76. 2-97. 3-110. 4- 
122. 5-134. 6-175. 7-188. 8-189. 3-193, 10- 
202 

BOWUNG: Radford 17-2-74-2; Pridgeon 
14-1-50-3: Newport 95-1-424; inchmore 
64-17.1. 

WORCESTERSHIRE: First Innings 323 (D 
N PateM28. G A HkA 51: N A Roster 6 tor 
93). 

Second mnfcigs 

T s Curbs tow b Foster 22 

0 B D OWetra c Prmgte b Lever - 4 

G A Hick b Pringle 29 

DM Snath c sub b Poster 16 

*P a Neale c Gooch b Foster 11 

D N Patel b Foster 0 

tS J Rhodes not out — 33 

P J Newport c Gooch b Foster 5 

N V Radtord c Hardfe b Lever 30 

J D inch more b Lever 2 

A P Pndgeon Ibw b Lever 0 

Extras (to 6 ) 6 

Total...... — 158 

FALL of WICKETS: 1-5- 2-53. 3-57. 4-87. 
5-87. 6-92. 7-98. 8-146. 9-158. 10-158. 
BOWUNG: Uver 162554; Foster 24-5- 
6 t& Pringle 14-4-31-1; ChtdS 3-1 -2-0. 
Umpires- J W Holder and H J Rhodes. 


By Peter Marson 
Glamorgan needed to make follow-o 
264 runs to beat Northampton- gone, bu 
shire at St Helens. Swansea. out.Oni 
yesterday, but though Morris his side 
held fast at one end. Maliender. making 
Walker and Harper were too Cook rc 
good for the rest and Glamorgan own at 
fell 68 runs short of their target, amptons 
Glamorgan had been 307 for 1 14 for 
five when Ontong i67L and 
Thomas (9) walked out to take _ "Lr 
guard with another 33 runs 
required to avoid the certainty ‘L way 
of receiving an invitation to ,ve P 0111 

Glams v Northants Leic 

AT SWANSEA 

(*ptsl iftw with Nort ha mpton- Leicester# 

NORTHAMPTONSHIRE: First Innings: 489 LEICESTB 

tor 6 dee (R J 8 aiey 224 n o. R A Harper 

88 . R J Boyd-Moss 68 )- J C Balder; 

Second (nrangs RACobbI 

W Larkins not out 40 P wiHey c 1 

RJ Boyd-Moss cYounisb Hickey 0 *0 1 Gower 

fl J Barley not out - 74 L Pottorc / 

Total (one w« doc) 114 

FALL OF WICKET: 1-0. PAJDeF 

BOWUNG: Thomas 4-24-0: Hickey 61- +P Gid not 

23- 1 : Younts 11-4-43-0: Morns 11-4-444). Extras { 

GLAMORGAN; First torangs Total (7 

H Moms c Weterton b Harper — 90 fall OF w 

DB Pauline c end bCapei 38 £39 

G CHotmesCNGBCookb Harper . 24 

Youras Ahmed c Weterton b M slender 66 Srvjirr-, 

M P Maynard c N 6 B Cook b Harper . 0 

■n C Oritang not out 80 gj* 1 - 3 ® 

JG Thomas cBaftoybMaBender~~. il rfZL—, c 

J F Steete not out 10 

Extras (to 7. w 3, nb 111 ■_& OJFrent 

.Total (6 wkts dec) 340 A M , 

Score at 100 ewers; 227-4. NJLmSSJ 

FAU. OF WICKETS; 1-67.2-119.3-174.4- R] ASkhan 
164. 5-266. 6413. APWettsc 

BOWUNG: Mtfender 29-8437-2: Wafar r m We &3 
19-1-71-0: Capel 24-5-63-1; N G B Cook Extras ( 

24- 9-37-0; Harper 4M6-71-3: WBd 74>- Tataj(3 

^• 0fMC S , hS™ s - wiSS 

ss 

D V Pauline bwb Maflender 0 

GCHdmescNGBCoofcb Maliender 2 Umpires- B 
Yourts Ahmed c N G B Cook b Water 4 «/ 

M P Maynard b Haiper 17 W 

*R c Oraong st Watertcn b Harper .^. 17 
JGThomascNGBCookbHarper ._ Q _ 

jFStwtorwrour 4} ^toucsR? 

tT Davies c Walkerb Harper 8 Essex (4) 

S Bess c BaBey b MaBender 2 Le<cs(l 6 ) 

D Hckay not out — 5 Notts ( 8 ) 

ExbK (b 4 . to 1. nb 7) _J2 Wores^ 

Total (9 wkts) 196 

FALL OF WICKETS: 1-0. 2-7. 3-22. 4-56. surrOTfS) 

5-93. 6-101 . 7-148. 8-173. 9-187. m>«snts ( 

BOWUNG: MaSender 13 - 3 - 304 ; Walker Qerbys (13) 
12-1-52-1: Capel 7-1 -404J: Harper 18-7- Kent (9) 
394: N G B Cook 5-0-30-0. Lares («) 

Umpires: D O Osfear and J H Hampshire. WanwcXs/ 


follow-on. Thomas was soon 
gone, but in an innings of 80 not 
out. Ontong successfully steered 
his side to 340 for five before 
making his declaration. Geoff 
Cook replied with one of his 
own at the point when North- 
amptonshire had got to a total of 
1 14 for one. 


At Grace Road. Leicester, 
Leicestershire and Sussex came 
away with a meagre ration of 
five points from a drawn match. 


Leicester v Sussex 


AT LEICESTER 

Letoesterstvn (Spts) drew w*n Sussex 
(51 

LEICESTERSHIRE: First Innings 162 
Second innings 

J C Baktoretone b Mays 1 »S 

R A Cobb b Reave 15 

P Willey c sub b Lennam 57 

•D I Gower c Gould b Lennam 6 

L Potter CAP wafc b Lennam .. .... 10 

T J Boon not out rg 

P B Cvft c sub b C M Wefe 22 

P A J De Freitas b Lenrtam 17 

fPGd notout 6 

Extras (b S. lb 11 . w 2 . nb 6 ) 24 

Total (7 wkts dec) 301 

FALL OF WICKETS: 1-59. 2-151. 3-159, 4- 
183. 5-239, 6-271. 7-292. 

BOWUNG: Babbngion 9-1-26-0: Reeve 
20-7-40-1; Mays 154-38-1; C M Wefls 30- 
7-81-1: Standing 6-1-15-0: Lanftam 30-7- 

B-4. 

SUSSEX: First Innings 182 (C M Wets 52; 
G J F Ferria 4-54) 

Second Innings 

A M Green b De Frertvs 23 

N JLenhamcCobbb.Wiltoy 35 

R I Aflkhan not out 64 

A P Wells c sub b Clift 14 

C M Wells not out 39 

£xtr»s|bAlbZ» 3 .nb 3 — 11 

Total (3 wkts) ...186 

FALL OF WICKETS: 140. 2*75. 3-12S 
BOWLING: De Freitas 20449 - 1 ; Tennant 
4-1-1 1-0: -ferns 7-2-184): Wiley 24-940- 
IrCUft 194-52-1: Potter 3-0-10-0. . 
Umpires: B LsadbeWr and K E Palmer. 


King's Macclesfield's fiist 
venture into competitive 
schools tennis proved successful 
in the Youll Cup Public Schools 
doubles at Wimbledon 
yesterday. 

The Cheshire school, better 
known for their rugby exploits, 
justified their inclusion when 
i hey reached the last 16 after 
beating Abingdon by straight 
sets in both rubbers. 

The opening match lasted just 
30 minutes, with their first 
string. Martin McCann and 
Richard Harari. both members 
of the local Prestwich club, 
looking solid. 

Their skills will be severely 
tested today in the next round 
against Repion.the holders, who 
dropped only three games in 
four sets against KCS. Repion’s 
No. 1 player. Ulfur 
Gudfonsson. is Icelandic. 

Also through are St George's 
Weybridge. losing finalist three 
times in the last six years, who 
defeated Charterhouse in a 
match highlighted by powerful 
serving from Reinoud van den 
Broe. their 6ft 4 inches 
Dutchman. 

Woodhouse Grove provided 
the day's upsets, triumphing 
over more illustrious oppo- 
nents. Winchester and Oundle. 
Woodhouse's second pair fea- 
tured Mark Ramsbottom. 
whose father John partnered 
Roger Taylor, the former En- 
gland No 1. in Yorkshire* 
county side of the late 1950s. 


RESULTS: FM roinfc MtoOOmuse 
■ Grove bt Winchester 2-1. Oundto bt St 
Edmund's 2-1. Rebate bt Meftwn 2-1. 
Second rowid: Repkxi W KCS 2-0. Kings 
Macclesfield bt Abtoodon 24). Rugby W 


COUNTY TABLE 


Note (8) 
WorcS(S) 


woraslS) 14 

Y0fksl*e(11)14 
HampetWB (2) 13 
Surrey ( 6 ) 14 


Northanta (10) 13 
Derbys(13) 13 


WOMETTS TOUR MATCH: Chetonhan: 
Young England 107 (A Ghosh 6 tor 47k 
Indians 1 08 tor two (G Baneip 68 ). IndiariS 
won by eight wickets. 


Derbys(iZ) 13 
Kem(9) 13 

Lancs (i4> 13 

Wanwcka (75) 15 
Somerset (17J14 
Suss«t|7) 13 
Middlesex (l) 14 
Glam (12) 14 


L 0 Bt Bvri Pt> 

1 7 30 46 186 

4 3 26 41 i83 

2 8 38 40 i« 

2 7 35 42 141 

2 8 35 41 140 

3 7 40 34 138 

3 6 32 40 136 

6 4 28 42 134 

1 9 35 31 114 

2 8 22 42 112 

4 6 21 42 111 

2 8 29 29 106 

3 10 34 39 105 

2 10 37 "30 99 


Macclesfield bt Attrwdon 24). Rugby W 
Shrewsbury 241 SI George's Wwbrtoge 
tn Chanernouse 2-0. Newcastle RGS bt 
Lsncmg 2-0. Nottingham High School bt 
Ftrtsted 2-0. Eton bt Wawi* 24). 
Woodhouse Grave bt Oundto 24). Renste 
bt AUenham 24). Baton M Seafcd 2-0. St 
Paul's bt Cl Won 24). 


Mixed bag 


13- 1 6 6 19 32 67 


7 7 23 41 64 

4 10 27 31 58 


(fS85 posrtons in trxkats) 


■ David Graveney, the 
Gloucestershire captain, will 

have hard currency to take on 
his winter holidays. Yesterday 
he revealed the collection he 
took at Bristol as part of his 
benefit year — five francs, two 
pesetas and. thank goodness. 
£487. 24V: p. plus a packet . of 
cigarettes, brand unnamed. 


ATHLETICS 


Greeks show willingness to 
learn in Games build-up 


By Pat Batcher. Athleucs Correspondent 


Yorkshire continued to prove 
the surprise team in Group 1 of 
the Prudential County Cup at 
Eastbourne yesterday, even 
though they lost to Essex, the 
holders. Having beaten Middle- 
sex on the previous evening, 
they looked capable at one stage 
of adding another notable scalp 
to their collection, particularly 
when Simon lckringfil and Ste- 
phen Heron beat their Essex 
counterparts. Robin Drysdale 
and Paul Reekie, 7-S. 4-6. 6-4 in 
the opening round of matches. 

The mood in the Yorkshire 
camp became positively eu- 
phoric when David Hurst and 
Jeff Newton led by a set and 4-1 


After another successful 
championships in Athens, the 
Greeks can feel fairly confident 
of getting the centenary Olympic 
Games in 1996, that is if there is 
still an Olympic moremenf in 10 
years' time. 

The renewal of chU distur- 
bances in Seoul two days ago 
does not bode well for 1988, 
allied to the distinct possibility 
of more boycotts, especially if 
the Soviet Union has another 
Goodwill Games to look forward 
to in 1 990, when the Ted Tnrner- 
Mikhail Gorbachev creation is 
doe to be held in Seattle. 


On the one hand, the Greeks 
have shown a willingness to 
learn from, organizational mis- 
takes on the first day of big 
events, as wfth the European 
championships in 1982, the 
European indoor championships 
last year, and the world junior 
championships, which finished 
in Athens on Sunday, and ensure 
that they end op' smoothly run. 


extremely good-humoured and 
successful. 

On the other band, (he only 
opposition bids that the Greeks 
are likely to get for the centenary 
or the first Games of the modem 
era in Athens are from countries 
like China, which has been 
earmarked for the year 2000, or 
from any other countries, whom 
the International Olympic 
Committee will advise ro provide 
-gentle" opposition to Athens, 
with a view to getting an 
eventual Games themselves. 

The next stage in the Athe- 
nian build-op to 1996 is an 
international meeting in the new 
Olvmpic stadium on July 29 
next year. The Greeks already 
have an IAAF "appearance 
money" permit, and all the 
winners from the 41 events here 


have been some creative editing 
bv an official who coaid beiwell 


by an official who coaid be-wefi 
employed oh -the Athens version 
of Fleet Street. 

Derrick Florence, the Ameri- 
can 100 metres champion, was 
not short on ambition, saying, 


last week wfil be mrited bade. 'I'd like to eqnal Carl Lewis, bnt 
and the intention is to make it a then, Td rather like to better 


yearly meeting and get it on the 
GrandPrix circuit-. ; 

If the -results- from these first 
world junior championships 


Ovett is back on top 


From Pat Butcher, Paris 


Sieve Oven came through 
what had become a crucial test 
of his ability to contest the 
Commonwealth Games after his 
injury while racing in Nice last 
week when he won the 1.500 
metres here last nighL 

For once the victory came 
second to the importance of 
finishing. But Chert did even 
better by running 3min 
34.52sec. the third fastest in the 
world this year, to Sebastian Coe 
and Mike Hillardt. an Austra- 
lian, whom Oven beat into 
second place last nighL 

Ovett's relief was evident 
after crossing the line. The man 
who for so long rebuffed the 
media looked up to the press- 
box and volunteered: “That felt 
fine. OK." 

It certainly looked fine for a 
man who is due to run a 
championship 5.000 metres in a 
week's time. And the success 
came in the same stadium where 


Oven's long catalogue of prob- 
lems began four years ago. It was 


here in the Jean Bouin Stadium 
in 1982. where Ovett dropped 
out of a race for the first time in 
his life. It was a combination of 
the same heat and humidity 
which affected him so badly at 
the Olympic Games two years 
later, and a bout of food 
poisoning. But it contributed to 
Ovett's lade of top form that 
season and. in honesty, be has 
really been the same since. Now. 
at least, he looks good for next 


him. I hope to set a new- world ; 
record. Jp die Olympics." Cow-, 
versdy the’ athletes frorasocial- 
ist countries, like ' Heike 
Rohrmaa, the East German 
shot-put -winner, did not “want 
to say anything before I speak 
with my coach". 

Aleksei Lukashenko, of the 
Soviet Union, said.- “It was a 
victory of the Soviet youth," 
while Aqt Reiter, another East 
German, said, in a quotation 
reminiscent of the ominous 
scene from Cabaret, “The future 
is mine.** Javier Soto mayor, 
Cuban high-jump winner, 
thought, “This victory perfects 
me as a human being." But 
Werner Reiterer, or Australia, 
put it all back into perspective 
when he won the d&cus silver 
medal. “I only want to drink 
myself to a stupor.” 


week. • . 

Maricica Puica suffered some KIlT*nf' niif 
more ludicrously fast pace-mak- A,Ui vul 
ing in front. Such running Sarah McCann is out of the 


more ludicrously fast pace-mak- 
ing in front. Such running 
ruined her attempt on the mile 
world-record last week in Nice. 
And if was the same last night 
After an opening lap of just over 
60sec. Mrs Puica was left on her 
own and finished in 4min 
20.82sec three seconds outside 
Mary Slaney's record. 


Welsh rowing team for the 
Commonwealth Games be- 
cause of sunburn. Miss 
McCann, of Monmouth, suf- 
fered extreme sunburn to her 
face and one arm when com- 
peting recently in Amsterdam. 


YACHTING 


A British 
lead is ; 





lost near 
the end 


* .-X - 


From a Correspondent 
Palma . 



Forecasts for little wind on 
the second day of the long 
offshore race in the One Ton 
Cup were proved wrong here 
yesterday as The Danish yachi; 

A ride Istan ken. - crossejf the' 

finishing .line of the 272-raile 
course around the CoRunoretes 
Islands and Ibiza jus* 48 hours 
after the Start- . 

Her win was, however, not a 1 
classic, as for the second tune in 
this series the fleet had turned 
itself inside out, tins time 
frustratingly close to the. finish 
line- After sharing the teKt-for 
the majority of the race; Sirius 
IV from Spain and the British 
entry. Panda, owned by Pieter 
Whipp and sailed . by : Colin 
Simonds. .'entered the Bay of 


Right touch! Tavare, relaxed, follows through, with the bat after hitting another boundary (Photograph: Peter Llewellyn) 



largely confirmed national teo- 
deocies is athletics, for example, 
Soviet artiLm* winning the pole 
vault, hammer and triple jaup; 
Africans winning distance 
events: Americans ■ winning 
sprints, etc. then some of the 
quotations from the athletes 
themselves hardly, modified 
international prejudices, 
Although, amid, the hilarity 
provoked on the Press benches 
by some of the “flash 
interviews", that is, the ones 
done hnmediatdy after the com- 
petition, it looked as if there may 


Patttoson. Otftor Brtttoh ptedogK 8 . Nwfia 
Catctwr, J Ovtston; 20. Pand*. P WTripp. 
24. Had*. C Griffith* 29. FU9- Prt. J 
RctatrasTsQ. Summer Wins; RFtocte 


Protests 

decide 

victory 


a S=’=T ■-■-•*** 

*' -7-T - s 


- ' ' 
J;-:. Ay 


By a Correspondent 


After two days of racing, four 
dubs were yesterday evening 
still left in the Viyella Cup 
tournament, organized by- tire 
Royal Yacht Squadron at 
Cowes. They were the Royal 
Ocean Racing Club. The Royal 
Lymington and Royal London 
Yacht Cubs and the Squadron 
itself However, as is not un- 
usual in match race events of 
this type, the outcome of the 


w - :.-:: '> 
■£'‘i - -U' 




•■■V VWLVMI «»■» Wl WIM j, - 

day’s activity on the water hadfr- 
iq be decided in the -protest 


to .bfc decii 
roomy “ 


.The RORC crew bad to face 
vo protests from their defeated 


two protests from their defeated 
Lymington opponents over in- 
cidents in the pre-start manoeu- 
vres and Peter Schofield of the 
Royal London faced a protest by 
the Squadron's '.Peter Nicholson 
over an alleged loul at the final 
leeward mark. - - . 

In the semi -finals of the 
Roche Plate the- unofficial 
runners-up competition —the 
Royal Torbay Yacht Club. beat 
the, Royal Thames, and the 
Royal Southern crew beat the 
crew from the Island Sailing 
Club. Both competitions are due 
to finish today. 


■ "T- 

- . • ... ■‘JTrff 

rr-Vrr. - 




After leading the practice race 
the only non-European compet- 


itor in the Etchdls 22 European 
championship, Ben' Altman,, 


championship, Ben' Altman, 
from Chicago, convincingly 
won the first championship race 
at Troon yesterxiay after leading 
at every mark. The races, run-by 
the Royal. Western Yacht Club, 
are being held in the best stretch 
of championship sailing water 
in Scotland, between Troon and 
Arran, where the fleet of 1 Thave 
so far enjoyed fresh -wind 
conditions. 






**• 


FOR THE RECORD 


IN BRIEF 


BASEBALL 


HAARLEM. Tlw Ncthcrtands: World amateur 
Clwnail owtlwpe : Soutn Korea 14. Italy 8: 
United Sates 4. The Netherlands 3; Dutch 


Amines 5. Japan 3: Puerto Rico 9. Venezuela 
6: Cotomw 6. Bflkpum S. 


CRICKET 


MINOR COUNTIES COMFETmON: Banbury: 
OxtwdsfsrB 1 63 for 4 dec (M D Nurtori B8 no! 
out! and M2 tor 7 dec (Norton 1CM not out). 
Somerset 170 and 197 for 2 (R Barnett 82 not 
out. N Wttams 6?). Somerset won by 6 
meterts. ftoh Wycombe Cornwall 241 tor 7 
dec (P J Steoftons 89. E J VWcock 59; C D 
Boooen* for 71k Buddngnarnsfwe 236 ter 7 
(E E Smm 62. 0 A Tossland 4 ter 471. UncoliE 
L<neatRsnre 186 Kir i dec [G Robi ns on 58) 
and 225 tor 6 dec IT J Hopper 55); 
Salterdshire 178 ter 8 dec (J Wate>nouse 73 
not out. T j Hopper 4 lor 66) and 236 Kx 5 (P A 
Marjnal 81. D A Banta 91 not oul). 
StaHofdsfwa won by 5 wicKels. Oorcbester 
Dorset 203 lor 7 oec IR Mammen 64; D I 
VWM^t lor 78 k Devon 188 ter 7 (N 6 

BAIN DAWES TROPHY: UWfc Glamorgan 252 
ter 6 g Deracit 70. p A Coney 63. 5 F4atnes 
60L Warwtatsrtra 216 lor 7 (R Over 55. D 



Tonks dropped 
from Games 
cycling squad | 


RESULTS: 1 . B Aftman (Ctecago YCb 2. S 
Tender (R Northern YCfc 3 Q Menuel 0 

western YC): 4. TFon (ft Gouradtms. 

J Watson |R Goureck YQ: B. D Lycra |fl 
GourackYC). : ■ 

• Fifty competitors came to the 
start line yesterday for the third 
race of the International 14 


SgUAUSE 


John Tonks has been dropped 
from England's Commonwealth 


PnnceofWaJes Cup Week being 
sailed from the Royal . Norfolk 
and Suffolk Yacht Club at 
Lowestoft. With a -very strong 
northerly going tide against a 
weak opposing breeze the .beats 


^***u"T — - 

. ; v*Vf 


Games cycling squad after fitikl were short, with the offwind legs 


mg to ride in the national 
championships at Birmingham. 
The rider, aged 21. from 


very long. A shift on -the first 
beat left lames Hartley and Ian 
Pilfeti with a comfortable lead at , 


Wolverhampton, ^ expected the firsi 

to do well in the 105-mile road gerald and Adrian Murphy. 

ranp sftpr unnnma an. miA. _ . ' . 


32E 


Percreal SO not our) Glamorgan won by 38 
run?. Hweftefcfc Mricdese* 372 tor 6 (M A 
flcwobariy 63. 6 K Brown 128*; Hampsrwe 
239 for 6 (A N Aymes 96 no) out). MafflBsan 
won try 33 runs. 


CROQUET 


WRUNGHA* nniifiami. Tmm and 


CMnrackB Opm eMnslORSlripE Second 
ro un d . N Spooner bt M KofccaiewskL ±2*. 
*22 (ipK S Mukwr bt W Cotes.+83 ftp). +9: R 


Muffin bt P Swrtey. +26. +28:11 Heap W J 
McOAough. +2. +19: S Lmte bt MAwy. 
+25. -25 lip). 417: N AspraU MBA Keen. 


*26. *26m:D opmstow bt A Hope *15. 
+24. W Prcnard bt P Smtei. + 16<lp). +23(lp)- 


SPEEDWAY 


KNOCKOUT CUA.Hnl need: Reading 53. 
■Kngs Lytm 25. 

WttTlSH LEAGUE CUP: Wolves 39. Coventry 



race after winning an inter- results 
national event over the same Ptettpttf 
Edinburgh course 10 months fogfo 
ago. His place will not be filled. JSnSi 

Cut-price player 

Carlisle United and Port Vale S nit ^. 
football dubs are competing for btmonSn! 
the signature of Scott Macuonai 
McGaryey. the’ transfer-listed cowe& j 
Portsmouth forward. 'i.4»tenan 
McGarvey. signed by Ports- 
mouth from Manchester United gqbli.' 
for £85.000. is on offer at YS?- 

£3o,ooa 


RESULTS: Third race: 1. j 
Ptoottlltfihenor SQ: 2. a fm 


3: 


. J Harttoyandl 
HtzgeraWMxJ A 




424 CHM4PKWSHIPS: LoM 

Stewods). Ovenfl toadar Hedaeboa'9 
MacoonakJ-SnWD). i 


Baron E OB n o tr isc ttUU: 3. KMo. E Mflrvm* ' 

gyfc .i- 

Gaacaj. 1 7.7: 3. w WWaKjouW.- 


Hamson on moye 

Qary Hamson, .the Leeds 
United midfield player who was 1 
released at the end of Iasi I 
season, is set 10 join Bristol City. 




'V,.. 


4:* . r ‘- 


■ ifflUl 


"" yme -ctob. potate a» 




Py y V? jgto & abandoned when Hint 


•..Wtt .... 








sfsaa 


TODAYS FIXTURES 


CRICKET 
Britannic Assurance 
County Championship 

(1 1 .0,11 0 overs rmnimum) 
PORTSMOUTH: Hants v Derbys 
SOUTHPORT: Lancs v N«tS 
LEICESTER: LeiCS v Glamorgan 
THE OVAL: Surrey v Essex 
HOVE; Sussex v Worcestershire 
SCARBOROUGH: Yorkshire v Kent 


SECOND XI CHAMPIONSHIP: Shfeler- 
Oarttystiire * Gtoutasterslwe. Romford: 
Essas .» Notttnshamsfrre. Ca n t e ftury 
Kent v Surrey. Soutti HampatMA MMdto- 
s«x v Warwiekaffira. Ovemtone . Parte.' 
Nortbamptanshre v Lancashire. Yeevfc 
Somerset v Hampsfflra. Wotra ate c 
Worcestarahire v LaOestenhire. 


EWIDB COUNTIES CHAMPfONSMP: 
Ftnchampatead: Berkshire v ComwaB. 

Sfortfcmfc HertfijnWwe v 

WOMEN'S TOUR MATCH: CMMdNnc 
Yowig England v Inifta. 

OTHER SPORT 

CROQUET: BrtOsti Open ctanipionsliips 
(at Hurtmgram); Cheite nftam toumamem. 
GOLF: Bndsn women's Opan criarnpian- 
tfwpgRoyHBrtrtate GC): Cams Trophy 

LAWN TENNIS: Prudential County Cup 


Gatfarad fry page 39 

CINEMAS 


ODCOll HAYMARKZT (930 

ajagi w an g ag) fmtahu 

'Ll Sr» progs Onb > 50 6.00 
8.1D All vws booLuft. oTan - 
\dncr. A««s am vu 

HUSSSU SSSSg '**nnw- 


om»n tteoraraw aqtuutz 


iMO 61111 brio MO 4SS0V/ 

penes Dooa 
?.Op 5 00.8.00. 


WAiMr In Jdvmtf ' . - ~ 


»ass court eftampionstops (men at East- 
foume. CTomar. $ouOis9a,-Hvrs&nton , . 
Malvern. Camwidgo; CteSMek; womoi at 
Eastbourne. Worthing. Cheltenham. 
Bunouth. Pooie. Cambitoga. Feftxstowa). 
YACHTING: Prince at Wotss Cfto'iat 
LcwesMft). 


■ W MXnU uru . 

»w» wrelpo) g l 

RJp Doors opvq Dajiy i an 
J*® *00 &1S, Rcu need prira ■ 
Sludcnr ca^ 

biWere, CB4Q Imidiin. 












THE TIMES WEDNESDAY JULY 23 1986 




39 


Today’s television and radio programmes 


Edited by Peter Dear 
and Peter Davalle 


"S 



hr* \ f c O* 

§§?s|. 

*>-Cr ‘OUw^ 

r::i ‘^rer^if 
• *T7> 5 

•;.'■• vXine. ■ 

* 

*••,- ■T ! , s 1 ,i ®8 

^ e CraS: 



decide 

victory 

B> aCorrespmrfa 

A”..' :•- j 

• -r- -;*s .rS'ercsHft 
• ■•■• ' ::t • i-ib C 

“ •"'•■:• Visual k ; 
*'• a- >_••:*■.: sjuidis, 

: -•»•-• 7r:. «sr lit 
•• Txi-. 

: - -:.t iru Ro;i!ls; 

1 r.d-ju&sr. 

■ ■•■.■ ■ :••• '• '*‘i r a be: 

■•• .. ■> TjI.T !a«ns 

: .- • -•. c-j^ok/s 

■ • •■•-. j-.d ir. lit 33 

‘ - r*SC ;rf* ha:-t 

• •'.■.• "• •■■'..« 


err* V 


"V ^ ■ ‘ = • 




-- i..v- 


BBC 1 


5.45 ceefax. 

6.15 'Rie Royal Wedding. The 
Breakfast Time team set . 
the scene. Coverage 
bwrfns with wratoar-ai 

62j, 6JiS t 7.25, 7.55, &25 

. and 8L57; regional news. 

■' weatner ano travel at 6.57, 

7 21,1 SI and 827; sports 
news from Bob Wilson at 
6-22 and 722. At 6.30. a 

- v. behind the scenes look at 

. die style of the ceremony; 

• 7.0& a profile of Sarah 

• 4 Ferguson; 7.30 a visit to 
' - Westminster Abbey; 8.10 
.Prince Andrew's mends 
remember his bachelor 
*' . - days; 8.30 a deck party on 
HMS Brazen;; 9.05 a visit 
to Dummer. 9JW 
<■ • messages from the 

Falklands. . . 

JOJDO We stminst er Abbey. 

' David Dimbteby describes 
the scene. 

10.45 Guriara Processions. 

. : '• Selina Scott is at 

Buckingham Palace with 
. fashion editor Sophie 
“• -Hicks. 10^0 the 
■"■ bridesmaids and i 
leave; 1QJ55 the I 
and other members of the 
Royal Family; 1 1215 Prince 
Andrew ana Prince 
■* 7: Edward; and at 11.15 from 
Clarence House, the bride 
v< accompanied by her 
•«r father. 

"11.30 The Marriage Service 
■hi conducted by the 

. Archbishop of Canterbury. 

... 12-25 The bride and 
. groom leave the Abbey. 
i 120 They appear on the 
. balcony of Buckingham 
Palace. (Ceefax subtitles 
:> from 10.45} 

120 News After Noon with 
Richard Whitmore and 
;V. Frances Coverdale 
■ • includes news headlines 
' with subtitles 125 
Regional news and 
•• •- weather. 

• 2JD0 Film; Living Free (1972) 

• starring Susan Hampshire 
and Nigel Davenport A 

to Bom Free. Joy 
orge Adamson give 
••• uptodirjobsinorderto 
save Elsa and her three 
; ; . cubs who are on the 

* wanted list after attacking 
’■v • livestock- Directed by Jack 
r< ' Couffer. 

3.30‘The Royal Weddtag: 
Honeymoon Departure, 
introduced by David 
'/ Dimbteby. At 4.00 there 
are highlights of this 
morning's ceremony. 422 

■ .Regional news. 

425 Dastanfly and Muttiey. 
Cartoon, (r) 425 Wacky 

■ Races. Cartoon, (r) 4.45 
So You Want to be Top. (r) 

520 John Craven’s 

•• Newsround 5.10 Hekfi. (r) 
525 The FOntstonea. Cartoon. 

' 620 News with Sue Lawiey and 
?" • Nicholas Wltchell. 
r - ■ Weather. 

625 London Plus. 

•+ 720 Wogen.The 
ni^rtmclui 

■ Mitcnefl and Ernie Wise. 
Ated Jones sings the Poet 
Laureate's poem 
celebrating the Royal 
Wedding, accompanied by 
- the Finley Children's 
Choir.. -. 

... .720 Top of tbe Pops, 

Introduced by Gai^cDavles 
f -„' .- .andPeter-RtwifeiL - J " 

-.s 610* Dallas. The Colombian - 
* ■ jungle is the venuelor this 

' Lweek'sdoseofdirty.- 
dealings, with JR making a 
”■ : secret trip to make sure 

1 his underhand dealings 
; wtti Matt are-kept secret 

'• " -9.00 News with John Humphrys 
and Andrew Harvey. 
Weather. 

• 920 The Royal Wedrfing: A 

Day to Remember. From 
outeide Buckingham 
Palace David Dtmbleby 
and SeHna Scott present 
highlights of the royal 
• procession and the 
marriage service; Glyn 
Worsnip and Paul Burden 
discover the more 
interesting and unusual 
events of the day. 

1020 Film: Meet Me in St Louis 
(1944) starring Judy 
Garland, Margaret 
O'Brien, Mary Astor and 
Leon Ames. A musical 
tracing the life and tunes 
of a middle-class family in 
tum-of-the-centurySt 
Louis. Directed by 
Vincents Minnelli. 

- 1220 Weather, 


\ m + m . 




i.”. 


TV-AM 


6.15 TV-amdRoyal Wedding 
Special, presented by 
Anne IXamond and Nick 
Owen, includes news with 
Gordon Honeycomb® at 
620, 720, 720, 600, 820 
and 920^ Phis, Ronald 
AITrsonand Sir Aiastair 
Burnet recall the wedding 
of the Prince and Princess 
of Wales: Godfrey Tafixrt 
looks back on Ms 40 years 
experience of royal 
events; interviews with the 
Ferguson family; and with 
Prince Andrew s 
com ma ndi n g officer during 
the Falklands campak 
Drusffia Beyfus speculi 
on Miss Ferguson s 
wadding dress; Anne 
Leuchars reports from 
Dummer wedding day 
exercises in Trafalgar 
Square; and in the studio 
Nigel Dempster and the 
other Sarah and Andrew 
who are getting married 
today. 


iTV/LONDON 


925 The Royal Wedding, 
presented by Andrew 
Gardner. Sarah Kennedy, 
Aiastair Burnet and 
Ronald Allison. Martyn 
Lewis sets the scene at 
Buckingham Palace; 
Pamela Armstrong is at 
Clarence House; Carol 
Barnes is in Trafalgar 
Square; and Aiastair 
Stewart surveys the scene 
from 1 ,000 feet up in the 
Goodyear airstup. 1025 
The Queen and other 
members of the Royal 
Family leave Buckingham 
Palace; 1125 Prince 
Andrew accompanied by 
Prince Edward leaves; 
11.15 Sarah Ferguson 
leaves Clarence House 
with her father. 

1120 The Wedding Service, 
performed by the 
Archbishop of Canterbury. 
1225 The bride and 
bridegroom leave 
Westminster Abbey for 
Buckingham Palace 122 
The newly weds appear 
on the balcony of 
Buckingham Palace. 

1.30 News with Leonard Parkin 
2.10 Thames news. 

220 Film: Herbie Rides Again 
(1974) starring Helen 
Hayes, Stefame Powers 
and Keenan Wynn. A Walt 
Disney adventure about an 
old lady who, aided and 
abetted by an old 
Volkswagen, thwarts the 
plans of an evil property 
speculator. Directed by 
Robert Stevenson. 

420 Honeymoon Departme. 
Andrew Gardner. Sarah 
Kennedy, Aiastair Burnet 
and Ronald Allison 
describe the first stage of 
the Prince and his bride's 

honeymoon .(Oracle) 

520 (Swells a Clue Special 
introduced by Michael 
Parkinson. Una Stubbs 
and Lionel Blair are Joined 
, Russell 


a 


Bemie Winters, 
arty. Christopher 


Biggins, Gwen Taylor, Jill 
Gascoine, and Sarah 

. . Greene. 

-520 News with Martyn Lewis 
- 620 Thames news: *• 
620-ptojsroads. - 

$.45 The Royal Day. Sir 
Aiastair Burnet with 
highlights of today's pomp 
and ceremony.*. 

720 Coronation-Street- What is 
•Jadf Duckworth going to 

- T do with his wife's 

Taney man - ? 

820 Film: Rear Window (1954) 
starring James Stewart 
and Grace KeUy. Thriller 
about a wheelchair-bound 
man who becomes 
convinced that a 
neighbour has killed his 
wife. Directed by Alfred 
Hitchcock. 

1020 News at Ten with Aiastair 
Stewart and Pamela 
Armstrong. 

1640 The Return of Shertock 
Holmes: The Second 
Stain. The super sleuth is 
summond by the Prime 
Minister to ask his help in 
locating a tetter stolen 
from the Secretary of 
European Affaire. (Oracle, 

11.40 Crime Inc. Part three of 
the series on the secrets 
of the Mafia families. 
(Oracle) (r) 

1225 Night Thoughts. 



Beautiful, BBC2. 925pm 


• Metaphors queue up to 
scrawl uncomplimentary graffiti 
acrosss the portrait of Mrs 
Thatcher's Britain painted m 
Andy Armitage's surrea l 
comedy BRIOC IS BEAUTIFUL 
(BBC2. 925pm). An old 
building brine on a demolition site 
suddenly glows nke gold 
(message:seoond-hand bricks 
are worth more than new 
ones when you are buUdng a 
neo-Georgian Jerusalem in 
England's green and privileged 
suburban land). An 
apprentice builder on a Youth 
Training Scheme wheels his 
wan across the city rather than 
knock It down (message: not 
everyone subscribes to the 
defeatist policy ol the Consett 
workers who set up a co- 
operative to demolish their 
own steelworks). Taking the 
Tebbit dp. a jobless man gets 


CHOICE 


on ms txka; out his destination s 
only the local refuse dump 
where he is one step ahead of 
the bulldozers in retrieving 
tins of pet food. A woman who 
excoriates TV pictures 
showing Mrs Thatcher in 
economic full night then 
proceeds to feed tinned peaches 
to her dog. The biggest 
metaphor in Brick ts Beautiful is, 
of course, toe exty where it 
was filmed. Armitage's vision of 
Manchester is a highly 
selective one, consisting mainly 
of rubbish tips, demolition 
sites.derelict buildings that are 
sad and crumbling relics from 
the city's great industrial past 
Even toe roads are collapsing 
into the sewers. Plot-wise. 
Armitage's most imaginative 


stroke is to concentrate on the 
city’s jobless youngsters, and 
spedncaUy on five whose are 
touched in different ways by 
the city's harvest of del brides. 
Does toefr future have to be 
as second-hand as these 
symbols of the past ? The 
open-ended nature of Brick is 
SeauftA/f suggests that a 
follow-up is contemplated. I. for 
one. woud welcome it 
• Best of the rest 
Hitchcock's perfectly-fashioned 
thriller Rear Window (ITV. 
8.00pm), Vincent Minnelli's 
charmingly sentimental Meet 
MemStLouis(BBC1.l020pfn) I 
and part one of Inside 
Castro's Cuba (Radio 4. 

8.15pm). a fearless report by 
two Darnels in the lions' den - 
producer Daniel Snowman 
and reporter Bernard Jackson . 

Peter Davalle 


BBC 2 


655 Open University: 
Introduction to 
Psychology. Ends at 720. 

920 Ceefax. 

1630 Play School presented by 
Jane Hardy 

1020 Gharbar. This week's 
edition of the magazine 
programme for Aslan 
women Includes a 
discussion about the 
relationship between 
parents and schools, with 
Surinder Kocharr, Usha 
Sahni, a head teacher and 
Asha Rana. a playgroup 
leader; plus. WPG Neelu 
Bhardwai explaining to 
Parveen Mlrzathe 
reasons for the success of 
Neighbourhood Watch 
schemes. 11.15 Ceefax. 

125 The Physics of Matter. An 
Open University 
production examining how 
sound can be used to 
observe temperature 
changes in the 
stratosphere. 

220 Chock-a-Block. (r) 2.15 
Ceefax. 

525 News summary with 
subtitles. Weather. 

520 Song of Gloucester. A 
musical tour of 
Gloucestershire, 
presented by Johnny 
Coppin, a London 
musician who fell in love 
with toe county. 

620 FKm: Daisy MUer (1974) 
starring CybHI Shepherd 
and Barry Brown. Henry 
James' comic story of an 
American heiress who 
chooses to ignore the 
social conventions of the 
lB80s. Directed by Peter 
Bogdanovich. 

720 Designers. The third 
programme of the series 
examines toe work of the 
London Innovation 
Network. 

8.00 Sweat of the Sun, Tears 
of the Moore Inca Cola, in 
part three of his eight- 
programme series Jack 
Pizzey is in Peru, 
exploring the file of 
today's mca. 

600 M*A*S*H. The 4077th 's 
most entertaining pastime 
is watching the North 
Korean 's worst bomber 
pilot trying, 

unsuccessfully, to hit the 
- unit's ammunition dump, 
frank decides the hilarity 
must stopand that toe 
bomber must be attacked, 
but Hawkeye and Trapper 
hatch a plot to stop Frank 
from carrying out nis 
threat, (r) 

625 Screenplay: Brick is 
Beautiful, by Andy 
Armttage. Christopher 
Wild stars as Steve, a 
young man with a lot of 
ideas but no capital- One 
day he is watching the 
demolition of Victorian 
buildings in Manchester 
when he decides that 
there is money to be made 
in selling old bricks. Not 
content with local trade he 
broadens his horizons but 
discovers that life as an 
entrepreneur is not aU 
beer and skttties. Directed 
by David Wheatley, (see 
Choice) 

1645 Newsmght includes a 
feature on the changing 
image of royalty ana the 
development of royal 
ceremony. 1120 weather 
University: Victoriar 
Moral Painting 1125 
Mechanisms of Pah 
Relief. Ends at 1226 


2.15 Their Lordships' House. 
220 Film: Quiet Wedding' 
(1941) starring Margaret 
Lockwood and Derek Farr. 
Romantic comedy about a 
young couple's hopes of a 
quiet wedding being 
shattered by Trite reference 

from famHy and friends. 
Directed by Anthony 
Asquith. 

4.00 The Cat to the Hat A 
cartoon about the 
adventures of two young 
children and a magical cal 
(r) 

420 Dancin' Days. Julie Is 
involved in an argument 
and lands In jail. 

600 Alice. Vera and Elliot are 
married but toe absent- 
minded clergyman who 
performs the ceremony 
insists on joining them on 
honeymoon. 

520 The Abbott and Costello 
Show* Lou is about to 
propose to a girt he has 
never seen but has 
corresponded with 
through a lonely hearts 
magazine. Bud works out 
a plan to scotch the 
romance, (r) 

600 Family Ties. American 
comedy series. 

620 1986 Tour de France. 
Stage 19, IMars-de-Lars 
to St Etienne, a distance of 
180 kilometres. 

720 Channel Four News with 
Peter Sissons and 
Nicholas Owen includes a 
report from Paris on the 
latest disagreements 
between the socialist 
President Mitterand and 
his right wing government. 
7.50 Comment This week's 


1125 Open 


CHANNEL 4 


600 


S ditical slot is filled by Ann 
Iwyd, Labour MP for 
Cynon Valley. Weather. 
The Bit 


Blood of the British. 

In part six of her series Dr 
Catherine Hills examines 
toe story of the arrival of 
the Anglo-Saxons. 

(Oracle) (r) 

820 Diverse Reports. Jenny Le 
Coat presents a jaundiced 
view of toe media's 
coverage of the events 
leading to today's 
spectacular. 

920 Tusitala. Part two of the 
three-episode drama 
serial about the final years 
in toe fife of Robert Louis 
- Stevenson. This evening 
^ -Stevenson -and his wife 
' find sanctuary on the 
Pacific island of Samoa, 
but life is far from 
peaceful. They become 
mixed up to local politics, 
supporting the Samoans in 
their attempts at self- 
determination, and 
dashing bitterly with the 
colonial administration. 
1655 May the Force Be With 
You. The first of an 
occasional series of three 
programmes to be shown 
during the summer 
examining the 
contemporary state of 
policing in Britain from 
different perspectives. 

This evening's 
programme, presented by 
Paul Boateng. uses 
archive film of public 
incidents of confrontations 
with police over the past 
few years, to argue that 
increasing police power 
could lead to a 
constitutional crisis. 
h2.15 Their Lordships' House. 
Highfights of toe day's 
proceedings in the House 
of Lords. Ends at 1220. 


( Radio 4 ) 


On long wave. VHF variations at 
end. 

525 Shipping. 620 News. 610 
Farming 625 Prayer (s) 

630 Today. Inci 636 726 
820 News. 7.00, 600 
News. 7.45 Thought lor toe 
Day (Archbishop of 

Canter bury). 8-57 Weather; 

Travel 
920 News 

925 Down Your Way. Brian 
Johnston in Westminster 
Abbey talks to some of toe 
people who have been 
preparing for today' s Royal 
Wedding. 

1600 News: From Nosegays to 
Orchid Sprays. Dr Joan 
Morgan, Victorian gardening 
enthusiast, talks about 
the horticultural ''upstairs- 
downstairs " of Royal 
weddings. 

1020 The Royal Wedding. 

John Dunn presents toe 
programme from outside 
BucKingham Palace. 

1647 Queen's procession 
leaves Buckingham 
Palace. 11.05 Prince 
Andrew's procession 
leaves Buckingham Palace. 
11.15 Miss Ferguson's 
Procession leaves Clarence 
House. 11.30 Marrrage 
Service. 12.25pm The bride 
and groom leave 
Westminster Abbey and 
return to Buckingham 
Palace. 

120 The World at One: News 
1.40 The Archers. 125 
Shipping. 

220 News; woman's Hour 
320 News: The Afternoon 
Play. Farewell toe 
Tranquil Mind, by John 
Graham. With Moray 
Watson as the MP (s) 

647 African Encounters. FenS 
Dennis visits Lusaka, the 
Zambian capital. 

420 News 
425 Fie on 4. 

4.45 Scottish Arts week: 
Treasures of Fyvie. 

Joanna Hickson visits Fyvie 
Castle m Aberdeenshire, 
now open to toe public. 

520 PM: News magazine. 

520 Shipping. 525 
Weather 

620 News; Financial Report 
620 Trivia Test Match. Game 
based on the rules of 
cricket 
720 News 
725 The Archers 
720 Face the Facts. Margo 
MacDonald investigates 
. cases of injustice agamst 
Individuals or offences 
against the public interest 
7.45 The Seeds of Criminality. 
Peter Evans examine? • 
recent research which 
suggests some violent 
offenders may have 
sustained bram damage 
early Jn Me (2) 


615 inside Castro’s Cuba. 

(see Choice). 

{too Thirty-Minute Theatre. 

The Cast Two Hours of 
Anthony Anderson, by Brett 
Usher, with Sarah Badel 
as toe widow (rXs) 

920 Coventry Sent to 

Coventry. Colm Semper 
talks to one ot toe city's 
leaders in the field of 
education. David Kershaw. 
g.45 Scottish Arts Week. Colm 
MacDonald reports on 
this year's Commonwealth 
Arts Festival. 

1615 A Book at Bedtime: The 
Third Policeman (8). 

Reader Patrick Magee (r) 
1020 The Worid Tonight 
11.15 The Financial Worid 
Tonight 

1120 Today In Partfaemnt 
12.00 News; Weather. 1223 
Shipping. 

VHF (available in England and 

pm (continued). 1120- 
12.10am Open University: 
1120 17th-century 

land: women. 11.50 What 

i? 


( . Radio 3 ) 

On medium wave. VHF variations at 
Bnd 

655 Weather. 7.00 News 
7.05 Concert Madetoja 
(KuUervo. Op 15). 

Svendsen (Romance in G, 

Op 26: with Hansen, 
violin). Palmgren( Preludes 
from Op 17 and 27: 

Gotooni, piano). Tubfn (Suite 
on Estonian dances: 
Lubotsky, violin). 600 News 
825 ConcertStravinsky (Suite 
No 1). Haydn (Sonata m 
C. H XVI 50: Brendeljiano), 
Butterworth (Banks of 
Green Waiow), Vivaldi 
(Concerto in F, RV 560). 


Stravinsky (Suite No 2). 920 
News 

925 This Week's Composer. 
Debussy. Marche 
eocossaise: Danse sacra* et 
danse profane: 

Biisjiarp). Trois ballades de 
Francois VIHon: Fischer- 
DieskauLLa mar. 

1600 Arcadia: John Stanley's 
dramatic pastoraL Parley 
of Instruments/Baroque 
Orchestra, and soloists 
including sopranos Gillian 
Fisher and Nancy 
Argents 

1025 Mozart and Schubert 
Markham and Broadway, 
pianos. Mozart (C major 
Sonata, K 521: Schubert 
(Fantasia m F minor, D 940) 

11.45 Czech Music: BBC 

Scottish SO. Dvorak 
(Othello overture). Janacek 
(Suite for strings). Pauer 
(Scherzo), Dvorak (Slavonic 
Dances 22.6.7). 120 

125 The Essential Jazz 

Records: Max Harrison s 
selection 

120 Faure piano quartets: 
Capricorn play Nol tnC 
minor and No 2 In G minor 
2.45 Fantasy Pieces: USSR 
State Academy play 
Balakirev's Tamar, and 
NYPO play Dukas's 
L'i 


and their loss of faith in 
public welfare policies. With 
Peter Scott.Comributors 
include Professor Daniel Ben 
and Senator DP 

Moynihan 

1020 Panufmlc Academy of St 
MartitHn-FwWs 
Chamber Ensembte/WiBiam 
Bennett (flute). 

Conductor Panufmk. 
Hommage a Chopm. and 
Arbor Cosntica 

11.00 Manchester Chamber 
Music: Clerkes of 
Oxenford perform Byrd's 
Mass tor 5 voices 
1127 News. 1220 Closedown 
VHF variations: - 
625 Open University. Until 
625am. Open Forum. 
Students' Magazine 


320 Harpsichord rectot 
Robert Wooley. Babefl 

— Handel 


(Suita in B fiat 

420 Choral Evensong: from 
Winchester College 
ChapeL 425 News 

600 Midweek Choice: Auber 
(Crown Diamonds 
overture), tmooen Holst 


(String Quintet 
Telemann (D minor 
Overture), Tchaikovsky 
(Concert Fantasy In G. with 
Katin.piano), Prokofiev 
(Scythian Suite ) 

720 Choral Voices: 

Cambridge University 
Chamber Choir in works by 
Victoria, Carissimi, Bax 
and Jonathan Harvey 


720 Proms 86: Royal 
c/Bri 


righton 

/Collegium 


Philharmonic/t 
Festival Chorus/ 

Musicum of 
London/Be mamln Luxon. 
Conductor Vernon 
Hand ley. Part one. Vaughan 
Williams (Symphony No 
5) 


610 Six Continents: foreign radio 
broadcasts, monitored 
by toe BBC 


630 Proms 86: Walton s 
Belshazzar's Feast. 


615 School for 

Sceptics: Documentary 
about US ! 



Derek Farr and Margaret Lockwood: Qnilet Wedding, C4. 230 


( Radio 2 ) 


On medium wave. See Radio 1 
for VHF variations. 

News on the hour (except 11.00 
am, 1220 noon). 

420 am Cileries Nove (s) 520 
ay Moore (s) 720 Derek Jameson 
(s) On Royal Wedding day.Ken 
Bruce Is at Dummer village and 
Brian Johnston Is outside toe 
gates of Buckingham Palace 920 
The Royal Wedding. John Dunn 
outside Buckingham Palace is) 
1220 David Jacobs ind at 120 
the scene as the Royal couple 
appear on the balcony of 
Buckingham Palace 225 Gloria 
Hunmford (s) 320 David 
Hamilton (s) 525 Graeme Garden 
(s) 7.00 Folk on 2 (5) 820 
Acoustic Roots (s) 600 Listen to 
the Band (s)925 Sports Desk 
1600 Jimmy Jewel Remembers 
1615 Cantabtle 1020 The Band 
Plays On 11.00 Round Midnight 
(stereo from midnight) 1 .00 am 
320-420 A 


Nightride (s) 3.1 
Music (5) 


I A Little Night 


( Radio 1 ) 

On medium wave. VHF 
variations at end 
News on the half-hour from 
620 am until 820 pm then at 1020 
and 1220 midnight 
520 am Adrian John 720 Mike 
Smith's Royal Break last Show 
(from The Mall) 1 600 Andy 
Peebles 1120 Gary Davies and 
Janice Long reporting on the 
Royal Wedding 12.45 Newsbeat 
(lan Parkinson) 1.00 Rada 1 
Royal Roadshow from Blackpool 
220 Steve Wright 520 
Newsbeat (lan Parkinson) 645 
Bruno Brookes 7.30 Jamce 
Long 1020-1220 John Peel (s). 
VHF RADIOS 1 & 2: 4.00 am As 
Radio 2. 1020 As Radio 1 . 1220- 
420 am As Radio 2 


WORLD SERVICE 


S.00 Newsaesk. 6J0 Meridian. 720 
News. 729 Twenty Four Hours. 720 
Rotiroon's Choice. 020 News. 829 
Reflections. 0.15 Classical Record Re- 
view. 820 Bram Ol Britain 1986. 920 
News. 929 Revww of British Press. 61S 
Outlook: Royal Wedding Special including 
Financial News at 0330 and News at 1006 
Marriage Servce from 1100 to 1120. 
1220 Hadto Newsreel. 12.15 Nature 
1225 Farming World. 12.45 

Roundup. 120 News. 129 Twenty 

Four Hours. 120 Rotimson s Cnoce. 220 
and Outlook- 2^5 Report on 

n. 320 Radm Newsreel 3.15 

Ruler's Guide to Repression. 320 Ratio 
Active. 420 News. 429 Commentary. 4.15 
Counterpoint. 645 Sports Roundup. 7.45 
Outlook Royal Weddrtg Special. 820 
News. 829 Twenty Four Hours. 820 
Assignment. 920 News. 921 Compan^oj 


9.15 ABum Time. 925 1 _ 

of Week. 1020 News. 1 0.09 Wortfl Today. 
1025 A Letter From Wales. 1020 Finan- 
cial News. 10.40 Reflections', f a 45 Sports 
.Roundup. 1103 News. 1129 Commen- 
tary. 11.15 Good Books. 1120 Top 
Twwitv. 1220 News. 1229 News About 
BmaoiL 12.15 Radio Newsreel. 1220 
Radio-Active- 1 20 News. 121 Outlook 
Royal wedding SpecoL 220 News. 220 
Review ol Bntfih Press. 2.15 Company of 
Foxes. 220 Assignment. 320 Nevw. *29 
News About Bream. 615 Worid Today. 
4.45 Reflections. 420 Fireman! News. 
520 News. 529 Twenty Four Hotrs. 525 
Worid Today Al times in GMT. 


FREQUENCIES: Radio 1:1053kHz/285m;1 089kHz/275m; Radio 2: 693kHz/433m; 909kHz/330m; Racfio 3: 1215 kHz£ 47 m:VHF- 90 - 
92.5; Radio 4: 200kHz/1500m: VHF-92-95: LBC:1152kHz/261m: VHF 97-3; Capiiah 1548kHz/194m: VHF95.8; BBC Radio London: 
1458kHz/206m: VHF 94.9; Worid Service: MF 648kHz/463m. 


onri WALES 525pm-e20 
PP°.l wales Today. 625-7.00 The 
Royal Welsh 1996. 1620am-l2-25 
News and weather SCOTLAND 625pm- 
720 Reporting Scotland NORTHERN 
IRELAND 525pm-S20 Today's Sport 
620-620 Inside Ulster. 625-7.00 
The Firestones. 1220em-1225 News 
and weather ENGLAND 625p»-720 
Regional news magazines. 

CHANNEL SSSEBS 


620220 Channel Report 1220am 
Closedown. 

MTV WF^T ** London ex- 
ni V WCJ I, CBW . 2.l0pn*-220 


1 0pm- 220 
1640am 


News 620-620 HTV News 
Closedown. 

HTV WALES 

620 Wales at Sou 


REGIONAL TELEVISION VARIATIONS 


b order aasasr 


News 620620 Lookaround 
1640am Closedown. 

TVS As London except 2.10pm- 
JJ^220TV5Newsli»-6i0C< 


to Coast 1840am Company. 
Closedown. 


Coast 


GRANADA 

Granada Reports 620620 Granada 
Reports 1220am Closedown. 

! As London axa . 

1 2.10-220 Lunchtime 828 
Sumnar Edition 8.10620 Whch 
Way Now? 1220am News, Closedown. 


AUftl | A As London except 
HNUL1A 2-10pm-220 AngHa 620- 


B20 About Anglia 1240am The Wed- 
ding Day. Closedown . 

YORKSHIRE 

Calendar News 620020 Calender 

1220en Closedown 

Grampian 

Nwth News 820-620 North TorngW 
12.40am News 12.45 Closedown 

PFNTRAI As London except 
I rwu 2.i0pm-220 central 

News 820 Crossroads 625-625 
Central News 1120 Dlqima Warwick m 
London 1220am Jobfindar 1.40 
Closedown. 


S4C 1-00pm Dancin' Days 1 
Model Marne 220 Rah 

2.15 Interval 320 AWca 420 F 


CyVYTTISH As London ex- 

1 1 1017 cept 1220am Lata 
Cal 12.45 Closedown 

120 
i label am 
l tries 020 FOsn- 

back 420 DumjU in Russia 520 Draw. 

Drawn Y Dwyrain 520 Peis in Pamc- 

uiar 620 Brootuude 620 Tour do Franca 

720 Newyddion Saith 720 Goreuon 

Gwynlryn B25 Roc Roi Te 825 Tocyn 

Tremor 9.10 TusitalB 11.10 Diverse 

Reports 1140 Open the Box 122Sam 

Closedown. 

TSW Londo ° twceot 2.10pm- 
• 220 TSW News 620-620 Today 

South West 12.40am Posuatu 
12.46 Closedown 

TYfJC TBBC As London ex- 

■ TWC EJSSS cept 620-620 

Northern Ufa 12.40am Signs lor the 
Road 1220 Closedown. 


KhJTERJAiNMEl^ 


' CONCERTS 




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- Ladw 5 > n gh«n y Oreh—tr». 

> - William Bouuwow cone. _ 


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Wismoit* BAU. «W6 21*1 

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"lOril 9999 836 7368 3TO 
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ALDWVCM TKEATWl Ol-836 
6404/06^«0rj379 6333 

Open* July 29 al7.Q 

IRVING EceMLBFS 

-ExpiMt* Sucw* Today 

ANNIE GET YOU? GUN 

From W Ctuctwfler FfSPval 
Thearro 
Starring 

9UZ1 QUATKO 

-A Doewiar Ml . conLains more 
famous songs man any 


APOLLO THEATRE 437 *665 

PAUL SCOFIELD 
"MATCHLE^ COMIT Cdn 

HOW AMD ROLLBtt 

in -THE AWiWD^X&TCWED 
BROADWAY SLCCE8S" M OH 
Sunday 

^■ELE CH t S r Sg VlWWg 
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CHURCfRLL Brpmtaw. 460 6677. 

SALAD DAYS. Eves 7.46 Mat 

Thur 6 Sat 220 


COMEDY THEATRE 01-930 
ZB78. CC 741 9999. First Call 

24 nr 7 day CC 340 7300. Orp 

Sales 930 6123 Mon-Frl 6.00 
Sal « OO A 8.46 

THE GAMBLER 

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lornmi Toni. TPtnor 7 30. 
men July 26 6 .26 * Aue 8 to 
14 MEAmuc tiy SP» 
Damns Previews July 3 1 » 

AUO 6 M 7.30 CymMgtM 

7.00 Then AUO 7 THE UEH- 
CAM CLOCK. 


CRITERION Air Oond SSR?!!? 

fj- T7q Mbfi/579 6«33/74i 

•WtiWI FARCE AT ITS MST 

Tiw- ThMjre ol CamedyComow 

HOY RUDD RALPH RATES 

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COTTERU- 


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HITTER 

PETER RLAHE^ 

RUN FOR VOURJWFE 

Wf1U HS v C OO N EY 


DRURY LAKE THEATRE ROYAL 

01-836 BIOS. 01-240 9066 7. 

rirat rail 24.noor 7<iay cy tikes 

2*0 7200 (no tiookuty fee) 


42ND STRST 

A SHOW FOR ALL THE FARBLY 


AWARD 


■Meat frank Mr 1WM 

voMd 

BEST MUSICAL 

STANDARD DRAMA AWARDS 

soled 

mryugCAL 

MUSICAL 
rut 


AWARD 

ip 8.0 Mab Wid 3 

day a( «.OI Sal SO * 830 

Croup Bates 930 6123 

Mi r 


DUKE OF YORKS 836 6122 CC 

636 "9837J741 9999/240 7200. 

Etc* B ThO 3 Sal 6 * 830 

COMEDY OT THE YEAR 


STEPPING OUT 

“TRtLMPH ON TAP - SM 
HH Comedy 6y Richard Harris 
Directed ny Julia McKenzie 
-LAUOH YOURSELF UL1TTD 
■ FE RUC T PEU8Hr O Tel 


FORTUNE I Air Good) 5 cr 836 
2238 KP 741 9999 Grp Sale* 930 
6123 Mon lo Frt 8 Sal 830 Thurs 
A Sal 500 

JANE ROGER 

LAPOTAIRE REESm 

DOUBLE DOUBLE 

-U brings bark your ittHh in 
ii wd e i ii uwatre-41 coaid become 
a mu“ BBC 


CARRICK S 836 4601 CC 379 

6433 A CC 24 hr 7 day 240 

7200 Today Bom only. Tomer 3 

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GLOBE 437 1592. CC 379 6033. 
bko lee IN Call 24 hr 240 7200. 
Grp sates 930 6123. Eies B Mats 
Wed 3 Sal a. 

Andmvnug Webta^Proaents 

JAM FRAMCtS 
RONALD HOLRAYE 


LEN D TE NOR 

-FILLS THE THEATRE WITH 
THE SOLND OF LALGHTER- 
S EXP 

An American Comedy by 
Ken Ludwig 

Directed by Pa\ td Gilmore 
MO MATROX TODAY 23 JULY 
MAT TOaaOBROW 3pm 


GREENWICH THEATRE 01-888 

7755 Ecrttmo* 7 46 Mat Sal 

230 SAMDRA B4CKMSOH, 
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HAMPSTEAD 122 9301. Prc 

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HAYMARKCT THEATRE ROYAL 

Box office and CC Ol 930 9BJ2. 

First Call 24 hr 7 day OC bookings 

01 240 7200. Preview* Juty 31. 

Aug I 6 2 rjOSHia Aug 4 at 

Dfrrrt from Broadway 

JACK LEMMON 

LONG DAY’S JOURNEY 
INTO NIGHT 

By Eugene OTUeUI 
DK tried oy Jonathan Miner 
Cvn only Mon- Sal 730 


HAYMARtUCT THEATRE ROYAL 

Bov office and CC Ol 930 9B32 

Firai Can 24 nr 7 day CC bookings 

Ol 240 7200. 

Cim 7.30 Macs Wed A Sat 2.00 

“VANESSA REDGRAVE 

Times 

“TIMOTHY DALTON 

repeetr 06*. 

ANTONY AND 
CLEOPATRA 

Toni. Totnor Frl ft Sal.lMAl 6 
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THE TAMING OF THE 
SHREW 

Final Pert* Today 2.00. 


HER HAEfm. Haytnarket 

930 4026/6606 2046/2866- 

TKkrimaUer 379 6131 

Firs! Cau CC 240 7200 

THE PHANTOM OF THE 
OPERA 

nrchael’ceaWond 
S aran Stete 

Bngmman Barton 

Midir by ANDREW LLOM3 
W!EB®OS 

Ubretlo by RICHARD 

STILOOC * CHARLES HAJRT 

□Irertrd by HAROLD PRINCE 

Opens 9 Oct 


LONDON PALLADIUM 437 7373. 

ay 1 2066. CC 734 8961. 379 
6333. 74i 9999. Firai Call 24 Hr 

7 Day CC 240 7200. Grp Sales 

930 6123. 

THE HIT MUSICAL 
COMEDY 

GEORGE. HEARN 

i DENIS QL'ILLEY 

LA CAGE AUX FOLLES 

—ASLORtous m aw niu 
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Mojl Fel 730. Mats Wed 2.00 

Sal 2 30 6 6-00 

SUIni concessions avail, at door 
Mon Frt A Sat mats 
ROOK MOW FOR THE 


NO MATINEE TODAY 


LYTTELTON ■**. 928 2262 CC 

iKamnal The* re's prose emum 

slaw I preview's Tont Tomor 

7 46 A July 26 M 29. Opens 

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.1 


I 

VI 

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4tr 


THE TIMES WEDNESDAY JULY 23 1986 


THE 


TIMES 


SPORT 


Europe comes first 


for worried Lyle 


By Mitchell Platts 


Sandy Lyle is contemplating 
missing the United States 
PGA championship at Tole- 
do. Ohio, next month in an 
effort to conserve his energy 
for the European Tour. The 
1985 Open champion, who 
lost his crown to Greg Nor- 
man at Tumberry on Sunday, 
is worried that a one-week trip 
tack to the United States 
could hinder rather than help 
his attempt to regain winning 
form. 

“I've found that I struggle to 
acclimatize quickly and at the 
moment my mind is set on 
missing the US PGA and 
taking a week off." Lyle said. 
“I have a busy schedule ahead 
of me. I’m playing in the 
Scandinavian Open next week 
then I've got a run of tourna- 
ments from the Benson and 
Hedges international starting 
on August 14. 

“I have not been satisfied 
with the way that I have 


played lately and. looking 
back. I did not perform that 
well when I went over for the 
US Open last month." 

John Simpson, who handles 
Lyle's affairs at the Interna- 
tional Management Group, is 
hoping to convince the golfer 
that he should compete in the 
US PGA championship. 
“Sandy calls the shots and it is 
his decision." Simpson said. 
“But I will point out to him 
that as an Open champion, he 
should be playing in all the 
major championships. We 
know that Sandy is capable of 
winning them though I do 
appreciate at the moment that 
his confidence is not as high as 
he would like it to be." 


Even so. he has been disturbed 
by his loss of form, culminat- 
ing with a last round of 74 in 
the Open in which he finished 
joint thirtieth, and he has 
sought advice on his swing 
from his father. Alex, the 
former professional at 
Hawkstone Park in 
Shropshire, 

Lyle is 28th in the Epson 
Order of Merit and with 
official European winnings of 
£23,207. he would appear to 
have little or no diance of 
retaining his position of lead- 
ing money winner as 
Severiano Ballesteros has 
earned £172^02. 


Trust and ihe Golf Founda- 
tion over the next three years 
through the Player of the 
Month awards. 

The champagne that Lyle 
sipped at Sunmngdale might 
not have tasted as sweet as it 
did there 12 months earlier, 
when he was celebrating his 
success at Royal St George's, 
but he seemed to be less 
concerned than most at the 
loss of his title. 


Lyle completed an extended 
run' in the United States 
earlier this year by winning 
the Greater Greensboro Open 
on April 6 and he then played 
well in the US Masters in 
which he finished joint elev- 
enth behind Jack Nicklaus. 


Even so. he emphasized at 
Sunningdale on Monday that 
a change in fortune could be 
just around the comer. He 
compiled a 63 in a special 
event for the PGA European 
Tour Benevolent Trust, 
which, under the sponsorship 
of the Rilz Club, will lead to 
£60.000 being paid to the 


“1 thoroughly enjoyed my 
year as Open champion and 
there will be many more 
opportunities forme to regain 
the title in the future," Lyle 
said. “I was upset with the way 
that 1 played at Tumberry and 
I left the course feeling frus- 
trated. But it cannot be ail bad 
when you are playing for 
something like thirtieth place 
and you still get mad at 
missing a putt. The interest is 
very much there — I simply 
need a change of luck." 

More golf, page 36 


COMMONWEALTH GAMES 


Scotland's boxing 

refused 


request 


Scotland's boxing officials 
responded angrily yesterday to 
a decision by their Common- 
wealth Games Council not to 
increase the size of their squad 
for the Games by two. Al- 
though boxing has been seri- 
ously affected by the Games 
boycott the executive com- 
mittee of the Commonwealth 
Games Council for Scotland 
rejected the request on the 
grounds that they were “not 
prepared to sacrifice quality 
for quantity". 

The decision provoked an 
angry outburst from Frank 
Hendry, the Scottish boxing 
director. “The executive are 
completely out of order in 
refusing our request," he said. 


their authorities while Ireland 
have three standing by and 
England two. 

“Yet here we are, on the 
doorstep of the Common- 
wealth Games, with two Scot- 
tish boxers ready to take part 
but not allowed to compete. 
Lightweight David Robb and 
super heavyweight Colin 
Johnston have both been in 
the training squad and their 
fitness is guaranteed. 


"The boxing entry is 65 per 
i du 


cent down due to the boycott 
and we asked all four home 
countries to consider bringing 
extra competitors. 

"Wales have promised to 
send another seven men if 
they obtain the blessing of 


"We should have been giv- 
en the frill complement of 12 
boxers in the first place in- 
stead of 10. To say I am 
disappointed is to put it 
mildly. It is a disgraceful 
decision taken by people on 
the executive who are interest- 
ed in cycling and rowing.” 

Hendry, who said he had 
taken his request “right to the 
top", said that the senior 
games organizers had been 
sympathetic but that the Scot- 
tish executive had the final say 


Javelin woman banned 


By Ronald Faux 


Diana Royle, the Scottish 
women's javelin record hold- 
er. has been withdrawn from 
the Scottish team in the 
Commonwealth Games after 
failing to obtain the required 
drugs clearance. 

Royle, aged 26. who lives in 
Stretford and ranks in the 
Commonwealth top five, did 
not provide a sample under 
the new scheme of random 
tests introduced this season by 
the British Amateur Athletics 
Board. She was accordingly 
removed from the register of 
athletes. When called before a 
tribunal in Scotland to ex- 
plain. she did not appear and 
was automatically ruled out 

Mrs Hilda Everett, Scottish 


team manager, said yesterday 
that Royle was. no longer 
eligible for competition when 
her name had been removed 
from tlW BAAB doping 
register. 

Miss Royle, injured earlier 
in the season, was not avail- 
able for comment A training 
injury put her out of the games 
in Brisbane four years ago. 

Mike Winch was not select- 
ed by England for the Edin- 
burgh Games because he 
failed to sign tbe register in 
time and another Scottish 
team member, Chris Black, 
also called before a tribunal 
appeared with his solicitor 
and no further action is 
expected. 


Multiple Sclerosis is merciless. 

Ift a disease that can strike anybody, anytime. 

And theiek no cure. . 

Yet. 

Every penny you contribute to the Multiple 
Sclerosis Society' brings the cure that much closer. 

It also brings some comfort to the many 
thousands who suffer the misery of impaired speech, 
loss of eyesight, incontinence and paralysis. 

The much-publicised events of the past twelve 
months have demonstrated just how generous 
people can be when they believe in a cause. 

Our cause is very important 

Please give as much as you can. 

Because the sooner we find the answer the 
sooner we can ensure that the lives of those nearest to 
you are not tom apart 


If charity begins at 
home, imagine yours being 
torn apart. 



ttfc eACkttc a donaikwi 10 The Multiple Sctansii Society rtf , 


NAME. 


ADDRESS. 


I 


i 


MULTIPLE | 
I SCLEROSIS | 

Ws can find the cure only 
jfwe find the funds. j 


YACHTING 


Pajot may 
get new 
backer 


By Barry Ptckthall 


Yves Plot's bankrupt Chal- 
lenge 12 France Syndicate 
co aid rise phoenix-fashion 
from its insolvency problems 
later this week. If the French 
courts rule today as expected 
that the Marseilles group 
should be wound op, the 
French subsidiary of an inter- 
national appliance manufac- 
turer is expected to purchase 
the assets. 

If all goes according to plan. 
Pajot and some of his old crew 
could have their Andriea- 
designed 12 metre, sailing 
next week and appear un- 
daunted by the task ahead of 
developing a complete sail 
wardrobe in the short time that 
remains before the yacht most 
be shipped to Australia for the 
start of the selection trials in 
October. 

• Any misconceptions held by 
the French public that yacht 
racing, and 12 metre sailing in 
particular, is a sedate 
gentleman's sport has been 
dispelled by the serious inju- 
ries to one crewman sailing 
aboard Freedom, the French 
Kiss trial yacht recently. 

The mainsail dew ripped in 
35-knot winds while testing a 
new mast off Sete. Before the 
crew could control the jail it 
tore away from the mast and 
tbe added strain then broke 
the top of the spar. Shortly 
after the forestay broke and 
tbe mast came crashing down, 
crashing the hips, vertebrae 
and legs of Thierry Chappet, 
the syndicate's PT instructor. 
The unfortunate trainer, who 


More yachting 
on page 38 


l To.ThcMBlopbScleroMSodGKFnKpMLjSEAcRwd.LONDONSirfilXZ . 

J. Tckphc'ncOl-^.viw^.CUDBanhNa 5H955S t'd i] 


had not sailed on a yacht 
before joining the group, is 
recovering in hospital. 

• Syd Fischer's late campaign 
to attract support from the 
man in the street for his 
Sydney-based defence syndi- 
cate after failing to attract any 
corporate sponsorship, got off 
to a bad start when unveiling 
the name Steak n'Kidney on 
his Peter Cole-designed 12 
metre at a wacky ceremony in 
the New South Wales capital 
last week. 

Speaking for many voicing 
the astonishment of Sydney's 
conservative set, an as ben- 
faced Gordon Ingate, owner of 
Australia's famous 12 metre 
GreteL, pronounced the choice 
“disgusting**. 

• The British syndicate, who 
continue to give trials to their 
two 12 metres quietly off 
Fremantle, hope to emulate 
the successful New Zealand 
campaign to raise money 
through a supporters dub. Tbe 
Royal Thames Group are to 
hold an open day at their base 
on August 10 and p lan to 
charge £2® a head. When the 
Kiwis did the same two months 
ago, 10,000 itinerant friends 
turned up paying $10 at tbe 
door and another $10 for a 
barbecued beefburger. 

• The latest Kiwi fund-rai s in g 
effort is a $500 per ticket 
dinner to celebrate the launch- 
ing of the syndicate's third 
glass fibre 12 metre this 
weekend which proved a sell- 
out several weeks ago, 

Dennis Conner, who lost tbe 
Cop in 1983, has been attract- 
ed from his secret lair in 
Honolulu as guest of honour 
along with John Bertrand, the 
man who defeated him. Dinner 
guests will have a first chance 
to size op the former champion 
and judge for themselves if he 
is fit enough to ran the 
distance of 57 races against 
the likes of Chris Dickson, 
their young hope. 

• Herb Caen, the San Fran- 
cisco columnist, had the Amer- 
ican syndicates flashing 
denials left and rfeht over his 
story titled “Sniffing More 
than Salt Air" in which he 
described one unnamed US 
group as the “great .white fleet 
where things go better with 
coke". 


CRICKET 


Willey takes 
the place 
of Emburey 


By John Woodcock 
Cricket Correspondent 


Barely three months since 
flying home from Trinidad, 
wondering whether his 
cricketing days were over, 
Peter Willey has been sent for 
to take the place of the injured 
John Emburey in the England 
party for tomorrow’s first Test 
match against New Zealand at 
Lord's, sponsored by Comhill. 

It was while jogging in Port 
of Spain, after the fourth Test 
match against West indies in 
April, that his knee; already 
seamed and scored with 
stitching from previous opera- 
tions. blew up. It looked like 
Ailsa Craig from Tumberry. 
and as rugged As a result he 
missed the first month of this 


season. 

But even at 37 he is still the 
most single-minded of cricket- 
ers (the chances are that he 
would have been jogging on 
his own in Trinidad, unless 
Bruce French was with him) 
and no sooner was he tack in 
the Leicestershire side than he 
started to get runs. 

What he has not been doing 
is bowling, though it is a 
bowler’s place that he now 
lakes. Not that Emburey 
would have been likely to 
bowl a lot anyway. ifGatting's 
first two Tests as captain are a 
fair guide, and Willey’s pres- 
ence. if he plays, will shorten 
the tail, which will be a relief. 


Tavare leads 


Kent charge 


Chris Tavare, the former 
England batsman, steered 
Kent to an eight-wicket win 
over Lancashire at Canterbury 
yesterday in the Britannic 
Assurance county champion- 
ship. Kent, requiring 129 for 
victory with nine second in- 
nings wickets still standing, 
made a bad start when they 
lost Benson for 37. Tavare, 
not noted for his quick scor- 
ing. derided attack was the 
best form of defence and hit 
an unbeaten 90 in 159 min- 
utes. including 14 fours. 

Hugh Morris celebrated his 
appointment as Glamorgan's 
new captain with a score of 88, 
following his 90 the day 
before. Paceman Neil Foster, 
who took six Worcestershire 
wickets in the first innings, 
once more played the destroy- 
er for Essex at Southend. 

Reports, page 38 


Trouble 


brewing 


North Korea have stepped 
up their demand for a share in 
the staging of the 1988 Olym- 
pic Games and warned of 
“very serious consequences" 
if negotiations with South 
Korea, the designated hosts, 
fail. Kim Hyeung Ou, repre- 
senting the North Koreans, 
said in Geneva yesterday that 
his country wanted about 10 
sports, although it was not 
asking for a “clean split" of 
events. 

South Korea have offered 
their Communist neighbours 
two full events - archery and 
table tennis — and part of road 
cycling and foottalL Unim- 
pressed, the North Koreans 
have threatened to lead a 
Communist boycott of the 
Games if their demands are 
not meL So fer, however, they 
have drawn little support for 
that stand. Meanwhile, talks 
between the two sides, spon- 
sored by the International 
Olympic Committee, are 
continuing. 



Back again 


Miliwail have signed David 
Mehmeu their former captain, 
from Gillingham for £20,000 
and David Byrne, a winger, 
for £5,000. 




Navratilova: extending herself and straining every sinew to win a poin t 


Politics takes second place 


to appeal of Navratilova 


From Richard Evans, Prague 


A match of very little conse- 
quence was elevated to a 
different plateau of impor- 
tance by a strange mixture of 
emotional and political signifi- 
cance here yesterday as 
Martina Navratilova celebrat- 
ed her homecoming with a 
victory. 

Eleven years after a podgy 
teenager had ran away to seek 
fame and fortune in America, 
Miss Navratilova emerged to 
cheers and prolonged applause 
on the newly built number one 
court at the Stvanice tennis 
complex, ready and eager to 
show the Czech people just 
what kind of athlete she had 
become. 

In beating Xinyi Li, of 
China, 6-1, 6-0, she did not 
disappoint them. Nor did the 
fact that she was playing in 
this Federation Cup competi- 
tion under the American flag 
seem to affect the great glow of 
warmth and appreciation that 
poured down on her from every 
corner of the little arena. Pride 


and happiness were the over- 
riding emotions of this memo- 
rable afternoon. 


There was humour, too, as 
both the crowd and Martina 
laughed at the umpire when he 
called out;- “Game, Miss 
Navratilova" instead of 
“Game, United States" and 
had to correct himself. 


But perhaps the loveliest 
touch of all was provided by 
the delightful Miss Xinyi, 
who, haring accepted her role 
as outclassed loser with a 
happy smile, demurely asked 
Martina to pose with tar while 
tbe Chinese coach took their 
photograph.' It was an act of 
heartwarming simplicity 
which also revealed a clear 
understanding of just how rare 
a snap it would make for tbe 
family album back home in 
Canton. 


ance. Others leaned over tbe 
concrete balustrades of tbe 
taller stadium and hung from 
the windows of passing teams 
which rolled by with, one 
suspected, deliberate torpitade 
along an elevated track that 
runs parallel to one side inf the 
court. . 

Miss Navratilova did her 
best to treat the crowd to some 
supremely athletic smashed 
and the. occasional lightning 
reflex on tbe half-volley. 


The crowds stood three or 
four deep around the perimeter 
of number one court in antici- 
pation of Martina's appear- 


For much of the past 11 
years the Wimbledon champi- 
on has been classified as a 
non-person by tbe Czechoslo- 
vak media. Bat now the Czech 
people have seen that great big 
happy smile ami all those 
thunderous serves and volleys 
and the whispered legend has 
come alive. Just Tor a brief 
moment or- two, Martina 
Navratilova is back in her 
homeland and politics is fosine 
6-0, 6-0. : 

Results, page 38 


FOOTBALL 


Determined labour to save Wolves 


Wolverhampton Wander- 
ers. fighting to avoid extinc- 
tion for (he second time in five 
years, could be taken over in a 
£3 million move by the town 
counriL The controlling la- 
bour group on the council are 
determined to stop the famous 
Molineux club going to the 
wall. If their takeover plans 
succeed, the local authority 
would end up running the 
club, which will be playing 


fourth division football 
The club have to appear 
before the high court again on 
July 30 to face a winding-up 
order and they could be forced 
to close if no takeover bids 
have been made at that time. 
• A new sponsorship deal 
which- could be worth over 
£300,000 was announced yes- 
terday by Norwich Gty Foot- 
ball Club and Fosters Lager. It 
will start at the beginning of 


the new season on August 23 
with a firm £85,000 one-year, 
deal and a further two-year 
option, at an increased figu 
The total includes a din 
payment to the club and a 
success bonus. 

The deal was' . officially 
signed at Carrow Road yester- 
day by Robert Chase, the dub 
chairman, and David Jacobs, 
the Norwich brewery manag- 
ing director. 


SPORT IN BRIEF 



Waiting game 


Geoff Boycott’s, future as a 
Yorkshire player will not be 
decided until September, 
when the club decide on new 
contracts. Speculation . has 
arisen that the former England 


opener’s playing career could 
after 


be at an end after confirma- 
tion that a broken bone in his 
left wrist will keep him out of 
the game for the next month. 
But Joe Lister, the dub secre- 
tary. said a derision concern- 
ing contracts would be made 
at the end of ihe season' “in the 
normal manner”.- - 


Morris: in control 


Taking charge 


Playing safe 


Hugh Morris was confirmed 
yesieiriay as Glamorgan's cap- 
tain in place of Rodney 
On long, who has resigned. 
The opening batsman, aged 
22, who leads the side for the 
first -time today, against 
Leicestershire, said: “Becom- 
ing a county captain has 
always been my ambition. I 
have enjoyed playing under 
Rodney and am sorry he feels 
unable to continue." 

Oniong, the South African- 
born all-rounder, aged 29. 
took over from Mike Selvey 
two years ago. but admitted; 
“I have not enjoyed captaincy 
as much as I expected?’ 


David Pickering, the Wales 
rugby union captain, has been 
told to wait until September 
before he starts trairringforthe 
new season. Knocked uncon- 
scious during an international 
match against Fiji in May. the 
Llanelli wing forward has been 
advised by a neurologist to 
delay his return to the game. 


On the up 


The Rugby League Alliance, 
the competition for reserve 
teams, will have two divisions 
next season, with three new 
teams -Brantley, Workington 
Town and York - bringing the 
total membership to 27 dubs. 


CYCLING 


Longo’s third 
stage win but; 
Canins in lead 


Villand-de-Lans (AP) — 
Jeannie Longo, of France, won 
the tenth stage of the women's 
Tour de France yesterday, a 
38-mile loop around this Al- 
pine resort, but tbe overall 
leadership was retained - by 
Maria Canins, of Italy. 

It was Longo's thud • stage 
victory in the tour, in which 
Canins has dominated in the 
mountains and Longo in the- 
sprints. 

Longo led the day's .racing 
throughout, controlling''; the 
pace and preventing escapes, 
confident in - her finishing 
-power. But that also helped 
Canins keep-the -yellow jersey. 
The Italian .finished fourth in 
the ; bunch, -only a second 
behind Longo. 

Today’s -stage -is over 39 
miles, fromSerrieresto Saint- 
Etienne. with one m^jordimb 
over the Oeiffiofi pass, -which 
should provide' another op- 
portunity. for Canins • to in- 
crease her lead.. 


FromJolinWncocksou 
Alpe (PHsez 


At a Press conference mite 
Notre Dame des 
pel yesterday Bernard HmaottF- 

refteed to lie down uid admit 
that he has lost the 73rd Tpiar 
de France to his American 
team-mate, Greg LeM ond. . 

“There Is still the time trial 
at St- Etienne on Thursday," 
the Frenchman, aged 31; said. 
“Greg and I hare discnssedjt 
and agreed that we -will not 
race against each other after 
the time trial." This obviously 
indicated that Hinault rhas 
every '.intention^ of attempting 
to overcome his deficit- OF. .2- - - 
minutes 45 seconds before 
then. . ;. 

LeMond, who was 1 sitting 
alongside Hinault, how feel* 
secure in the leader's yetidw 
jersey. “I felt the best ! bate 
ever done was fu the attack 
with Bernard on Monday 
think, the Tour now woiC* - 
LeMond saht 

LeMond is not- a.- hxiy 
leader of what everyone agrees 
has been . one . of toe imost 
spectacular./ and gruellhte 
Touts, for many years* fit 1984; 
in his first appearance in ihe 



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behind Laurent Fignon aod 
Hinault. 

Lastyear, with Hmanttjwii 
team the American 

dabbed second. He had ftp 
good chance of taking the 
yellow jersey during the latter 
stages, but obeyed fbetofn 
of Ms team coach to hold hade. 


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fffrafc i.'JLwigo (Fr), taisfc ; 
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Shnomer {ft},*' at isecT& N 
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This season LeMond has 
raced consistently wed, hft 
has yet to achieve the - big 
victory be seeks. He. 7ns 
earned t handful of. second 
places since . becoming 'tire 
world road.champioa in : 1983, 
a title which he is hoping to 
recapture at Colorado Springs 

In the United States to Sep- 

tember 6. Others have their 
eyes on the same trophy, 
including Hinault, who said 
yesterday. “I may not win the 
Tour de France, but' I wflTte J 
ready to -dullenge for th*_ 1 
world tide. It would be a goefcr 
way of ending my career." '.i 

' The joint victory by the two 
friendly rivals on Monday was 

perhaps more of a h^h point 

in toe race than LeMoad’s 
stage wiu at SHperbagneres ia 
the Pyrenees last week. Roth 
then Worked in perfect harmo- 
ny during their three-hour 
breakaway. ~ 

The American probably had 
the power to leave Hinault on 
the^ -.-'final ascent , to,"*lP* ' 
iTHuez, but he agreed to dhnb 

at the older man's tempo, It 

was a significant .'moment, 
when tbe pair linked. buds 
300 metres from toe- finish, 
and continued side by. sitae, 
sntilingv ap the ^ rise hntil « J 
LeMond generously wajed*^ 
forward his team capfaSi'te ! 
cross the fine first ’ l ’ 

It was Hhmnlt's 26to~stoge 
victory in. his eight :apptor> 
sutces in the Tom- do France, 
which puts him secood.jn /the 

aU-time list behind the great 

Belgian, Eddy Merckx,anoth- 

er five-time Tour winner. 




evt ! 


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3S Monday 


Music in 
:the round 



*??•••: ' njst 


Not a Tour for 
the climbers 



Merckx .followed : toe two 
Alpine stages this week^iad 
toM .ns tint ..he thought 
Hinault could have imp ro ved 
his' chances _'of"w«IaM- : 'tiie 
Tom if he bad ridden differ- 
ently. “Hinault made a. ntis-. 
take by attacking on ", the 
second stage in the Pyrenees*" 
Merckx said. - \r. ; • ' ; 

“I think be underestimated 
his own capabilities. TJ- 
hasn't been a Tom for toe 
climbers like everyone 
thought. That is why mat Gke 
Luis Herrera and Robert 
Millar have failed to stair the 
distance.". 


ar-fiLr 4 '*-® SOW 

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^escape 


Herrera,, the'. - Colsnibiiui 
’rim had' .been tipped rto.^ns* 
contracted a odd which pre- 
vented him from showing/fais - 
best -form in tire .Alps. Her was 
almost last, on the' stege to 
AIpe d’Huez, and lies in 2lst 
position before the remaning 


loon 


5.,?*** i 

hi 


Millar^ who fitredlittte'bet- 
ter <m Monday, is down to 
eighth position oteralfcMwf 
stiU hatoit 1 


a t 

:<s ‘cni 


the Moratnins^ rirto n -~Tn 
tlie spotted red 'toad 
white jerecy which fe awarded 
to the leading climber, MSHar 
will have to score wejjT oo fie 
cumfcs today on the stage to 
Etienne, and on Frfesiy, 
whei seven climbs are inriod- 
ed ou the road to the Puy de 
Dome mountain. 


fc.' 

^^.v. - .T s - 

Hi, 





We stffl don't lcabw what to 
expect Trout Hmauft'. jaid v> 

s between Gr^ and^me - 

after the tinte'teteL^M storf 
te^PfnsifhebeatoX^toBd • 
“•wrfy on- ~ThnMday? : Iff 
thatfrappeus, 
a dunce of hi 
mantowtotoe 



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