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THE 



TIMES 




No 62,517 


THURSDAY JULY 24 1986 


marriage of pure theatre 


Worldwide audience 
of 500 million 
applauds the finale 


Ponce Andrew and Miss 
Sarah Ferguson were married 
yesterday in an ad of pure 
theatre which included its full 
complement of stunning cos- 
tume. dramatic tension, the 
unraveling of oft-suspected 
plots, a single fluffed line, and 
a finale which gave immense 
satisfaction to a worldwide 
audience of 500 million. 

Three burning questions 
were answered as the play 
unfolded. The principals will 
henceforth be known as the 
Duke and Duchess of York; 
the wedding dress lived up to 
the bride's promise that it 
would be like no other; and 
the honeymoon destination is 
to be the Azores, a modest 
cluster of Atlantic rocks that 
have not tasked in such lame 
since Sir Richard Grenville 
sailed the Revenge to meet the 
Spanish fleet. 

The first of the day's dra- 
matic moments was the an- 
nouncement. 90 minutes 
before the marriage ceremony, 
that the Queen had conferred 
the title traditionally reserved 
for the second son of the 
sovereign, and vacant since 
the death of its last holder. 
King George VL It was no 
great surprise to regular at- 
tendees at the theatre of 
monarchy, who know that it is 
six centuries since a son of the 
sovereign went to the altar 
without a dukedom to share 
with his bride. 

Prince Andrew also now 
enjoys the subsidiary titles of 
Earl of Inverness and Baron 
Killyleagh and his wife may 
regard herself as Duchess, 
Countess or Baroness, de- 
pending on which part of the 
United Kingdom she is in. 

The second. and infinitely 
greater. tfianatii: revelation of 
the play was tire wedding 
dress. Sarah Ferguson 
emerged from Clarence House 
squeezed with her father into 
one side of the Glass Coach, 
while the remainder of the 
carriage overflowed with the 
1 V '- tl of train attached to the 
rear of her bridal gown. 

There were gasps and cheers 
from the m3ny thousands 
lining the route, hut its full 
glory was not revealed until 
later. 

Inside Westminster Abbey, 
the normally sepulchral gloom 
was dispelled by banks of 
television lights, and the sa- 
cranum blazed with candle 
power, colour, and the sheen 
of the Abbey gold plate, the 


By Alan Hamilton 

perfect set for a costume, 
drama. Every ledge and cor- 
nice was dressed overall in 
floral cascades of pink, white 
and cream. 

The supporting players were 
catholic in their choice of 
costume and colour. Mrs Nan- 
cy Reagan took her front row 
seat in peppermint green, Mrs 
Hector Barrantes, mother of 
the bride; sat with the Fergu- 
son family in golden yellow 
marocain silk. 

Mr David Steel sported the 
kilt, while Mr Neil'Kinnock 





iC 






1 

• Reports • and ~ photo- 
graphs 2-5 

• The Times Royal Wed- 
ding Diary ' 20 

• Chart Circular 22 

• Off to the Azores 24 

and Dr David Owen settled 
for lounge suits. 

. There appeared to be a sub- 
plot in progress on who could 
wear the broadest-brimmed 
hat most closely approximat- 
ing to a flying saucer. Mis 
Reagan was restrained in a 
matador style, while the joint 
winners were judged to be 
Princess Michael of Kent and 
Miss Jean Rook of the Daily 
Express . 

The Royal Family, having 
driven in carriage procession 
from Buckingham Palace, 
took their seats. Queen Eliza- 
beth the Queen Mother, who 


Nautical William 



Prince William, dressed in a 
nineteenth century sailor's 
uniform for his role as a page 
boy, almost stole the sh ow — 
men when poking his tongue 
at a bridesmaid, Laura 
Fellow es. In the unnumbered 
Rolls-Royce going to the Ab- 
bey the Ihree-jear-old looked 
ww w i n gh grumpy. In the 
Abbey he bored quickly, and 
started fidgeting with his trou- 
sers, searching for pockets, 
and screwing the dun-strap of 
his sailor hat under his nose. 




• Four readers 
shared the £8,000 prize 
hi The Times 
Portfolio Gold 
competition 
yesterday, double the 
usual amount 
because there was no 
Winner on Tuesday. 

• They were Mrs L. 
Weston, of East 
Preston, West 
Sussex; Mrs T. Beebe, 
ef Temple Combe, 
Somerset; Mr GA.J. 
Comyn,of 

Qkehsmpton, Devon; 
mat Mrs J. Chaplin, of 
Ipswich. 

• There is another 
£4,000 to be won today. 

• Portfolio list, page 
29 ; rules and how to 
play, information 
service, page 24 . 


Leaving the Abbey be had his 
hat pushed to the tack of his 

head at die janotiesr of aisles, 
and when the bridal coach 
swept the newly weds away on 
honeymoon, the Queen bad to 
ntn forward to grab William 

from racing after the coach out 

of the Buckingham Palace 
gates. The Princess of Wales 
carried him part of the way 
back into the palace, but he is 
evidently getting too much of a 
handful even for her, and after 
a few yards she put him down. 


The challenge 

Managements that issue chal- 
lenges motivate their staff and 
get the best results, says 
Martin Vandersteen. a man- 
agement consultant in an 
introduction to today’s seven- 
pace General Appointments 
section Pag** 34-40 

On This Day 

The rationing or bread and 
flour, oi er a year after VE 
Day. was reported by The 
Timcsot July 24, !946Rage2I 

Degree results 

Degrees awarded by the Uni- 
venitv of Edinburgh are path 
hshed today Page 33 


as a previous Duchess of York 
was married here in 1923, 
looked serenely delighted. 

.The Duke of Edinburgh 
leaned tack and took it all m 
his stride, but the Queen 
looked as nervous as a bride; 
fishing in her handbag for her 
spectacles and casting anxious 
gjances down the endless tun- 
nel to the West Door. She 
tapped her foot, weD out of 
time with Handers Water 
Music that announced die 
.arrival of the Archbishop of 
Canterbury and bis regiment 
of clergy. 

Prince Andrew bad been- 
seen on the television screens 
around the Abbey leaving the 
Palace on time and looking 
apprehensive until the roar of 
the crowd restored his piano- 
key grin. But of him at bis 
appointed place before the 
altar there was no sign. 

The bride, having wished to 
exercise - her prerogative of 
being five minutes late but 
ordered to be precisely on 
time at 1128, stepped from 
her coach a minute or so 
behind schedule, and wailed 
on the pavement with her 
father while helpers fussed 
around her dress like tugs 
setting an ocean liner to sea. 

She walked to the Abbey 
door, her train flowing behind 
her, and waited again at the 
start of the river ofbhie carpet; 
still no bridegroom. The organ 
struck up Elgar’s Imperial 
March, and she began bo- 
endless four-minute walk to 
the altar. The congregation 
grew palpably restive in then- 
anxiety. 

And then, at what can only 
be described as the last mo- 
ment the bridegroom and his 
supporter Prince Edward 
emerged from the wings to 
take their places at the foot of 
the altar steps. Prince Andrew 
tried hard not to look down 
the nave; the dress was still an 
unknown quantity to him. But 
he soon weakened to a side- 
long glance, licked his lips, 
chewed his cheek, and broke 
into a grin of amazement and 
satisfaction. 

He was as awestruck as the 
rest of the congregation by the 
dress, and by the bridesmaids 
and pages, led by Prince 
William, whose sailor suits 
and floral hoops were taken 
straight from a Victorian Val- 
entine card- 

Prince Andrew appeared 
upstaged on all sides, both by 
his bride’s outfit and by the 
high-ranking naval finery of 
his fether and his brother 
Prince Charles, whose medals 
and ribbons contrasted sharp- 
ly with his own plain 
lieutenant's uniform. 

The bride arrived at the five 
crucial steps she had to negoti- 
ate. to her kneeling stooL She 
stopped, hitched up her hem, 
and negotiated the steps with 
extreme caution, lest the spell 
be broken by an untimely 
stumble: 

The Prince spoke his vows 
with unfaltering clarity and 
confidence. Miss Ferguson, 
who gave a hostage to fortune 
in a pre-wedding television 
interview by declaring that she 
was word perfect, suffered one 



A windswept and broadly nmning Dake and Duchess of York teatifag Westminster Abbey yesterday (PhotograpkTim Bishop). 

The kiss that sealed a day of public happiness 


By Philip Howard 

The opera ain't over tin the 
fat lady rings. The royal 
wedding isn’t over until the 
newly married royals have 
appeared on die balcony of 
Buckingham Palace and 
kissed each other in an apo- 
theosis of the monarchy as the 
state religion. The crowd 
stages down the MaD in a tidal 
wave, to get as near as possible 
lo the sacred couple, so that 
some of the magic may rob off 
on each of them. 

The Duke and Duchess of 
York kept them waiting fin- 
half an hour beyond the 
appointed time yesterday. 
When at last they appeared. 


they behaved in character. The 
Duchess bounced hum o rou sly 
to control her train; the Duke 
broadly cupped his ear to the 
chanting of; “Give her a kiss, 
then." 

So he gave her a kiss: not a 
moth’s kiss, but a sm a ck i ng 
naval kiss, like a tyre explo- 
sion, or as if he was trying to 
dear the drains. And the royal 
wedding was tra dition a ll y 
over. 

The Victoria Memorial is 
net a tad grandstand for 
watching royal weddings, pre- 
sided over by the matriarch of 
the monarchy in marble 82 ft 
high, and surrounded by em- 
blematic statuary such as 


Charity breast-feeding, and 
the weathered faces of the 
world's photographers. 

Jason Fraser, who works for 
Sipa Press, with an 800 milfi- 
metre Canon and a duster of 
other biggish zoom lenses, did 
not like either of his two rota 
places in the wooden press 
stand, and so had pitched his 
tripod ou the more solid 
granite a week ago. He said: 
“The kiss on the balcony must 
be the picture of the day. 
Please protect the legs of my 
tripod in case somebody jogs 
them.” 

Marlene Eflers, the editor, 
owner, and staff of Royal Book 
News, was wearing a T-shirt 


inscribed “Princess in 
training”. As the bands 
boomed and the Guards 
marched like demented mario- 
nettes, she explained to anoth- 
er American journalist: “This 
is what we would calf the pre- 
game warm-up in the States. 
No, Sarah doesn’t get one of 
those (an escort of Household 
Cavalry). She goes to the 
Abbey a commoner and comes 
back royal. Upwardly mobile, 
huh?” As the landaus rolled 
out, a French photographer 
screamed: “Cast la made. Us 
sont fames, les carrosses.” 

Before the bridegroom's 
great great grandmother drove 
down the Mall to her wedding 


150 years ago, she wrote in her 
diary: “The last time I slept 
alone!!!” I do not suppose that 
she saw quite such cheeky 
ad rice waved at her on plac- 
ards as was on display yester- 
day, much of it deploying 
rhymes with Andy and Fergie. 
But I expect that her crowd 
was as friendly, sentimental, 
and boozy. It listened to the 
wedding service on its 
Crannies, and cheered the 
Duke and Duchess's lines. 

One young woman in the 
crowd, who had ill-ad visedly 
dyed her hair Fereuson red, 
opened a bottle of sparkling 

Continued on page 2, col 6 


Capital reason for a holiday 


By Craig Seton 

Officially, there was. no 
public holiday for the royal 
wedding but, unofficially, tens 
of thousands of Londoners 
decided there should be one 
and stayed away from work to 
watch the big day on televi- 
sion at home. 

Many more travelled to 
work early, tat left their office 
desks and shop counters to 


was word perfect, suffered one 10 

small stumble in the recital of J°« hundtwls of them- 
her husband's names, when sands of people fining the 


rite promised to take as her 
wedded husband Andrew Al- 
bert Christian Christian 
Edward. 

WTien she repeated the 
much-discussed promise to 
obey, she snatched a quick 
sideways . glance ax Prince 

Continued on page 24, col 7 


route of the procession. 

Traffic chaos had been ex- 
pected on the roads of the 
capital but it signally foiled to 
materialize. _ Taxi and bus 
drivers — die most sensitive 
barometers of motoring con- 
ditions in London — were 
confronted with dear and 
frequently deserted roads right 


up to the security zone, which 
had. been dosed for the 
wedding. 

A bemused Automobile As- 
sociation spokesman said: 
“We were very surprised. We 
had expected chaos, but it did 
not happen like that 

“The rush-hour was earlier 
than usual — about 6.30 - 
730am — and it was bad. but 
then much of the traffic 
simply evaporated. 

“We think that London 
commuters either stayed away 
to watch the wedding on 
television or came in very 
early in their cars or on public 
transport.” _ 

British RaJ and London 
Regional Transport reported a 
very early rush to catch pains, 
tares and tubes, almost as 
soon as services started after 
dawn and then, almost as 


quickly, it became "very quiet, 
a bit like a Sunday”, one 
spokesman said. 

Scotland Yard praised Lon- 
don commuters for their good 
sense in leaving their cars at 
borne and travelling by public 
transport and seemed sur- 
prised that the advice of its 
traffic division had been ac- 
cepted so readily by motorists. 

A Yard spokesman said no 
estimates were available for 
the number of people who had 
watched the royal wedding 
procession from the pavement 
but he said; “Traffic is very 
light indeed. People have kept 
their cars out of London as we 
advised them to do.” 


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miltee report on the Westland 

leak affair. 

The report is certain to 
revive memories of the urv- 
happiest period of her two 
governments. 

It comes at a time when 
many Conservative MPs are 
voicing concern about the 
possibility of a rift with the 
Queen over sanctions against 
South Africa, and feats of a 
Commonwealth break-up at 
the summit in just over a 
week. 

The Prime Minister, who 
vesterday entertained 16 Gov- 
ernors-General of the Com- 
monwealth to a royal wedding 
day lunch at Downing Street. 


against Pretoria if the mission 
of Sir Geoffrey Howe, the 
Foreign Secretary, fails. 

The Prime Minister will be 
speaking at the end of a 
parliamentary year which has 
seen a big ’revival in the 
Labour Party and a severe 
drop in the Government's 
popularity at the turn of the 
vear because of the Westland 
and British Ley land episodes. 

The publication of the 
Westland report so close to the 
recess is believed likely by the 
Government's business man- 
agers to minimize the damage 
that it will cause. 

But in the knowledge that 
the report will contain criti- 


cism of Downing Street staff; 
ministers including Mrs 
Thatcher, and the two cabinet 
ministers. .Mr Michael 
Heseltine and Mr Leon 
Brittan. who left office as a 
result of the controversy. La- 
bour MPs will be raising it in 
the Commons today in the 
debate on the motion for the 
summer adjournment 

The ever-pereistent Mr Tam 
Dal yell is to initiate a short 
debate on it tomorrow. 

A senior minister dose to 
Mrs Thatcher said yesterday 
that the Government bad 
given the impression at the 
turn of the year of being 
unable to manage its affairs. 
Since then it has made up 
much of the lost ground. 

Conservative Party strate- 
gists are planning a series of 
regional tours for the Prime 
Minister. 

She is expected to make 
more personal appearances as 
part of a pre-election relaunch 
for the party'. 


f u tu re we’d all like our children to have. 


Johannesburg — Sir Geof- 
frey Howe, the Foreign Secre- 
tary, met President Botha here 
for two hours yesterday at the 
start of the second leg of his 
peace mission for the EEC 
(Michael Hornsby writes). 

Sir Geoffrey described the 
meeting as "candid, courteous 
and substantive” but refused 
to elaborate. 

He said it was dear to all 
outsiders that “after 25 years, 
the wind of change in Africa is 
shaking its southern part to its 
roots”. 

Crucial questions, page 13 

Noye guilty 

Kenneth Noye. cleared last j 
year of murdering a detective, 
was yesterday convicted with 
two others of plotting to 
handle gold stolen in the 
£26 million Brinks-Mat raid j 
in 1983 Page 8 i 


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Cheers, jokes and 
smiles for the 
big family day 


Nobody boycotted 
London's big family event 
yesterday. The crowds who 
thronged the pavements tor 
the royal wedding were scarce- 
ly fewer in number than 
turned out to see the marriage 
of the Prince and Princess of 
‘ Wales five years ago. 

They came from all coun- 
tries of the Commonwealth, 
and there were special cheers 
as cars carrying the Common- 
wealth high commissioners to 
take their places in the Abbey 
rolled by. 

The confrontation between 
police and public, too. was 
friendly in the extreme. Two 
thousand white-gloved police 
officers were detailed to watch 
the pavements, keeping their 
backs at all times to the pomp 
and ceremony of the 
procession. 

They were soon exchanging 
jokes and refreshments with 
those they were watching, and 
so friendly and excited was the 
atmosphere that most felt able 
to sneak at least a glance when 
the carriages went by. By the 
time the coaches returned, the 
police were taking photo- 
graphs for people too far back 
mto the 20-deep lines to have 
good viewpoints of their own. 

Even the weather could not 
dampen the rapturous good 
humour of the occasion. Many 
of the crowd had camped 
overnight along the proces- 
sion route to secure good 
vantage points, and had been 
liberally doused with morning 
showers for their trouble. 


By Robin Young 

Buckingham Palace cheered 
them up by sending out 
servants carrying trays of 
champagne to present to those 
who had been waiting longest 

Union Jack -umbrellas were 
as much in evidence as Union 
Jack hats. Union Jack bal- 
loons, Union Jack T-shirts, 
and occasionally even Union 
Jack paimed faces. One man 
had spray-painted his dog red, 
white and blue. 

Quarter of an hour before 
the royal procession rattled 
out of Buckingham Palace 
gates, grey clouds had rolled in 
from the north-west But the 
sun emerged just in time to 
greet the sparkling carriages 
carrying the Royal Family and 
the bride, and their glittering 
cavalry escorts. 

A huge roar worthy of 
Wembley greeted the 1902 
state landau carrying the new- 
ly created Duke of York and 
his supporter. Prince Edward. 
The Duke looked resplendent 
in his dress uniform, embla- 
zoned with his pilot's wings. 
He wore his South Atlantic 
Campaign medal from the 
Falklands on his breast 

Though at first he seemed a 
little tense and overawed, he 
visibly relaxed as the crowd 
cheered. He started to return 
their frenzied waves and to 
point out to his brother signs 
held aloft in the crowd. “A 
Dandy for Andy”, proclaimed 
one. "Move over Sam Fox" 
suggested another, in refer- 
ence to a well-known public 
figure, “Fergie's coming”. 


So indeed she was, to the 
loudest cheers of all. As she 
waved to the crowd from the 
Glass Coach, women on the 
pavement hugged each other 
with delight to see through the 
bridal veil that she was wear- 
ing her famous titian hair 
down, and topped with 
flowers. 

Beside her rode her father. 
Major Ronald Ferguson, who 
as Commander of the Queen's 
Escort was once reproved by 
the monarch for riding too 
dose: “They've come to see 
me. Ronald, not you.” 

At Westminster Abbey the 
bells began ringing at 10 JO, 
eliciting a medley of songs 
from the crowd, including 
"The Bells are Ringing for Me 
and My Girl”. The groom 
arrived* at 11-17 and strode 
purposefully into the Abbey. 

Ten minutes later an enor- 
mous human fen fere heralded 
the arrival of the bride. As her 
coach appeared, a frenetic 
carpet of wildly agitated red, 
white and blue greeted her. 
Waving uninhibitedly, she 
seemed totally at ease as she 
alighted, and waited patiently 
to be unhobbled as her dress- 
maker, Miss Lindka Cierach, 
and an assistant, laboured to 
get the train out of the coach 
and properly arranged. 

Again the timetable just 
beat the weather, and as she 
moved towards the blue and 
white canopy at the Abbey 
entrance the clouds parted 
enough to give a glimpse of the 
silk wedding dress shining 




The Duke and Duchess of York on the palace balcony yes- 
terday, trying to make out the calls of the crowd. 


resplendency as she went 
inside. 

During the service the 
crowd outside followed it on 
transistor radios. A group of 
SO joined in the popular 
hymns, although Mozart's 
Exuftate Jubilate proved a bit 
beyond them. 

The cheers as the couple 
made their vows were loud 
enough to be heard deep 
inside the Abbey. Felicity 
Lott, one of the sopranos who 
sang Mozart motets while the 
registers were being signed, 
said afterwards that the sound 
of the hurrahs from outside as 
the vows were taken had 
moved her to tears. 

It was 12.29 when the newly 
weds emerged, and the din 
was rapturous. Opposite the 
Abbey a red and yellow ban- 
ner draped across Methodist 
Central Hall carried the same 
message: "Congratulations”. 
The new Duchess of York, the 
flowers in her hair exchanged 
for a royal diamond tiara, 
looked radiant and delighted. 

As the coach pulled away, 
the Duchess ducked and 
weaved her head, opening her 
eyes and mouth wide to signal 
recognition of friends in the 
qowd to whom she waved 



with vigorous abandon. Bowl- 
ing up Whitehall she sudden- 
ly gave a sporting thumbs up 
sign to one particularly rau- 
cous troop of well wishers. 

As the coach turned dose to 
the pavement at the top of 
Whitehall to go sharp right 
under Admiralty Arch, a party 
managed to surprise the cou- 
ple with a generous consign- 
ment of confetti. The Duke 
had to brush himself down, 
while his bride had a good 
laugh. 

Along the Mall both were 
laughing delightedly at the 
banners and eccentric dress of 
enthusiasts lining the route. 
Many of the crowd had been 
practising a newly discovered 
anthem, "The Grand Old 
Duke of York". One group of 
girls waved a placard at the 
smiling bride: "All the nice 
girls marry a sailor”. 

The procession got back to 
the Palace shortly before 
12.45. beating the rain by a 
clear quarter of an hour. An 
army of wellwishers filled The 
Mall in their wake, thronging 
down from Trafalgar Square 
at an orderly place led by three 
files of police to take up 
position around the Victoria 
Memorial, awaiting the balco- 
ny appearance. . 


Feast of 
lobster 
and lamb 

The wedding breakfast first 
course was diced lobster deco- 
rated with prawns, egg and 
tomato. 

The main course was roast 
best end of lamb, garnished 
with tomatoes filled with 
mint-flavoured hollandaise 
sauce, spinach souffle with 
mushrooms, broad beans with 
butter, and new potatoes. 
Asparagus salad was served. 

The dessert of strawberries 
and whipped cream was in the 
form of the Cross of St George 
on a base of strawberry fool. 

Wines were Piesporter 
Goldtropfchen Auslese 1976, 
Chateau Langoa-Banon 1976, 
Bollinger champagne and 
Graham's 1966 port. 

Nannies in 
waiting 

Nine student nannies from 
the Norland Nursery Training 
College in Hungerford, Berk- 
shire, spent the night in sleep- 
ing bags on the pavement m 
Whitehall to catch a glimpse 
of the royal wedding 
procession. 

One of them. Miss Gaire 
HaJL aged 20, of Fulham, 
south-west London, said they 
were hoping the newly weds 
would be starting a family 
soon to coincide with the end 
of their training next year, as 
they all hoped to look after 
royal children. 

Boom time 
for traders 

The wedding was good for 
business. Small shopkeepers 
along Whitehall charged £100 
for standing room at vantage 
points in their premises and 
hundreds of vendors were 
doing brisk trade selling food 
and mementoes. 

A family from Manchester, 
who had brought their hot-dog 
stand to The MalL expected to 
lake more money in the day 
than they would in a week and 
one photographer predicted 
he would take several thou- 
sand pounds during the day. 

Cheap round 

A Toronto radio station got 
live coverage of the wedding 
on the cheap — it telephoned a 
barman in the King's Arms in 
Buckingham Palace Road and 
got him to give two IO-minute 
interviews. 

Poles apart 

Conservative members of 
Hammersmith and Fulham 
council, west London, yester- i 
day ran up the Union Jack at 
the borough's town halls, hav- 
ing hauled down red flags 


The Duke and Duchess kissing in response to the repeated encouragement of the cheering 
crowd outside the gates of the palace. 

Kiss seals ideal of state religion 


Continued from page 1 

white wine with ho* new 
husband as the royal ring went 
on the finger in the Abbey. 

When the processions come 
back ap the MalL you can 
imagine just bow long aid 
unnerving it mast be to stand 
in a thin red line wafting for a 
cavalry charge. Our bedrag- 
gled line of photographers did 
not break, but clicked and 
zoomed and went berserk. 

An Italian paparazzo caused 
havoc among the big lense 

That duly came at 1.50. the 
Duke and Duchess emerging 
first to an ecstatic roar of 
approval. 

The going-away after the 
wedding breakfast was a de- 
lightfully informal affair. 
Members of the Royal House- 
hold, led by Princesses Marga- 
ret and Alexandra, showered 
the couple with confetti in 
their open coach, where they 
had been joined by a 6 ftteddy 
bear. 

The Queen and Princess 
Margaret ran after the coach 
as it entered the forecourt, and 
joined their staff in a rush 


boys. Police drafted in from 
outside and with no knowledge 
of the world's press tried to get 
the photographers to behave 
like human beings. And ha- 
rassed officials from the DoE 
tried to stop the police inter- 
fering with the photographers. 
Then, a flash of freckles, the 
Windsor wave, and we were 
waiting for the climactic kiss. 

American photographers 
who had flights home to catch 
were ticking as fast as their 
cameras. At last the french 

from one side of the yard to 
the other to wave to the 
departing couple as they 
rounded the Victoria 
Memorial. 

The stately vehicle had been 
decked out with some 
supemumary plastic souvenir 
flags, and on the back Prince 
Edward had affixed a satellite 
telecommunication dish with 
the legend. "Phone home”. 
There was also a gas filled 
balloon, and an L-plate. 

The bride had now changed 
her richly embroidered heavy 
satin wedding dress for a 
simple and pretty print frock 


Bride may wait 
for York jewels 


BySuzy 

Jewels in the royal collec- 
tion traditionally due to the 
Duchess of York may not yet 
reach yesterday's bnde since 
convention allows the ladies 
to keep jewels dear to them, 
even after a change of title. 

Queen Mary, who was 
Duchess of York before 
George V's accession in 1910, 
acquired an enormous 
amount of jewellery, not only 
from the inheritance of Queen 
Alexandra and Victoria, but 
also the fruits of the Indian 
Empire 

When Lady Elizabeth 
Bowes Lyon maried her Duke 
of York in 1923, Queen Mary 
gave her new daughter-in-law 
a suite of sapphires and dia- 
monds that may be part of the 
York heritage. She also made 
some generous gifts to Prin- 
I cess Elizabeth on her marriage 
in 1947. but kept most of the 
collection until her death in 
1953. 

Many of these pieces are 
still in the vaults at Garrard, 
the Crown Jewellers, their 
provenance detailed in Queen 
Mary’s writing. 

Clarence House vaults also 
contain a number of jewels, 
and because of the affection in 
which the Queen Mother is 
held by the Royal Family, she 
would not be asked to part 
with any that came into her 
possession as Duchess of York 
more than 60 years ago. Such 

Media army 
brings fame 
to Dummer 

A large white balloon flew 
yesterday over the village of 
Dummer In Hampshire home 
of the Ferguson family. It bore 
the slogan “A Touch of 
Taste”, which might have 
been a reference to the Duke 
of York's choice of bride or 
even to a sweet pink drink 
known as Fergie's Fizz, but it 
turned out to be the name of a 
local restaurant. 

Dummer was not exactly 
bursting at the seams yester- 
day. There were no traffic 
jams, fewer visitors than pre- 
dicted and only a handful of 
policemen. 

About 200 people gathered 
round large television sets in 
the Queen Inn and a marquee 
in the car park to watch the 
wedding. 

Bui there was an abundance 
of camera crews and reporters. 

The locals appeared to ac- 
cept the media invasion. Mr 
Derek Heath, a building work- 
er. said: “Now, when someone 
asks me where I come from 
and 1 say Dummer. I won't 
have to explain where it is.” 


Menkes 

jewels would pass on her death 
to the new Duchess. 

There are at least three 
tiaras from Queen Mary's 
collection in store Mystery 
also surrounds the dramatic 
deep diamond tiara with cabo- 
chon emerald spikes which 
Queen Mary wore at the Delhi 
Durbar of 1911. It was last 
worn by Queen Elizabeth, 
now Queen Mother, during 
the South African tour of 1 947 
but it has never been seen 
again 

Royal wedding photo- 
graphs by Tim Bis bop, 
Ros Drinkwater, Chris 
Harris, Julian Herbert, 
Saresh Karadia, Harry 
Kerr, John Manning, Dod 
Miller, Stuart Nicol, 
Hugh Kentledge, Peter 
Trievnor, John Voos and 
Bill Warhnrst. 

Reports by Nicholas 
Beeston, Mark Dowd, 
Mark Ellis, Angella 
Johnson, Trndi 

McIntosh, John Young. 

The Queen also has person- 
al pieces of her own which she 
no longer wears, including a 
delicate English rose and fo- 
liage design diamond tiara and 
matching necklace given to 
her by the Nizam of Hyder- 
abad on her marriage. 


windows opened in that monu- 
mentally ugly facade, like 
Piranesi on a bad day, and the 
Duke and Duchess and the 
wedding party came out 

The Duke bent down to char 
up a page and helped with bis 
wife's train. And then the kiss, 
to set the seal on an odd but 
endearing British secular tra- 
dition, and make even u wo- 
man tic eyes prickle. And the 
crowd streamed happily away, 
baring been present at another 
royal dance to the music of 
time. 

with puff sleeves adorned with 
iiule blue bou-s. She wore no 
hat. and her hair was blowing 
free in the wind. 

At the Chelsea Hospital the 
Duchess stopped to talk with a 
pensioner who had served 
with her grandfether, before 
joining her husband aboard 
the red Wessex helicopter 
which bore them to Heathrow, 
where they boarded a BAe 1 46 
jet of the Queen’s Right for 
the journey to Portugal. 

Back in London the holiday 
was over, and street cleaners 
went to work cheerily clearing 
up the mess left behind. 


Security 

operation 

success 

Scotland Yard police chiefs 
breathed a sigh of relief last 
night as they scaled down the 
security operation which had 
surrounded the royal wedding. 

They had feced the night- 
marish task of guarding the 
Royal Family, Britain’s politi- 
cal' leaders, and dignitaries 
from around the world. 

Nothing was left to chance. 
Armed members of the Spe- 
cial Air Service Regiment and 
D1 1. Scotland Yard's firearms 
unit, were discreetly placed 
along the royal procession 
route and police sharpshoot- 
ers watched from rooftops. 

Armed officers dressed as 
royal footmen travelled on the 
backs of the royal carriages as 
they made their way past 
cheering crowds to Westmin- 
ster Abbey and 2.000 uni- 
formed policemen and 
policewomen lined the route. 

Bomb squad officers from 
the police and the Army were 
on permanent standby. 

Detectives mingled with the 
huge crowds and a police 
helicopter hovered overhead. 

Streets around Westminster 
Abbey and the procession 
route were closed. 

Rubbish bins, lamp-post 
junction boxes, traffic light 
boxes and drains were meticu- 
lously searched 

In the event. Scotland Yard 
said last night that only 22 
arrests had been made. 


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THE TIMES THURSDAY JULY 24 1986 


Jnst William 


The Queen’s second son waits down the aisle with bis younger 
brother. Prince Edward, who acted as his supporter 


The newly-married Duke and Duchess of York wave happily to the crowd from the 1902 State Landau on 
their way back to Buckingham Palace after the service. 


Lindka Ciersch, who designed the wedding dress, makes a 
final adjustment as the bride prepares to enter the Abbey. 











0 


THE TIMES THURSDAY JULY 24 1986 


Musical ban 


disrupts 
South African 
television 


An estimated 350 million 
people in 39 countries 
watched the live television 
coverage of the royal wedding 
or listened on the radio. 

Bui viewers in South Africa 
were not allowed to hear the 
choir and orchestra in West- 
minster Abbey because of a 
ban by the British Musicians' 
Union. 

Viewers had to watch a sull 
photograph of the scene and 
listen to recorded music. 

The Musicians' Union bars 
"productions — even royal 
weddings — involving its 
members from being shown or 
broadcast in South Africa. 

A similar ban by Equiry, the 
actors' union, also affected 
some commentaries. 

The United States woke at 
4.30 am to blanket coverage 
of the wedding on television 
and radio, with British lumi- 
naries such as Petula Clark. 
Paul McCartney. Roger 
Moore and Jane Seymour 
filling in when the real stars 
were off the screen. 


Audiences were treated to 
commentaries by Lady Anto- 
nia Fraser on CBS and Lord 
Althorp. brother of the Prin- 
cess of Wales, on NBC. .ABC 
was reduced to interviewing 
royal lookalikes. 

Parisians woke up to be 
greeted by headlines announc- 
ing the marriage of in one 
newspaper's words, a “deli- 
ciously British" bride and the 
"enfant terrible" groom. 

lit Luxembourg, hotels laid 
on special satellite links to 
relay television coverage for 
hundreds of guests who 
watched as waiters poured free 
champagne. 

Newspapers in Rome have 
been calling it the wedding of 
the century. 

The carriage procession to 
Westminster Abbey and the 
wedding ceremony were 
broadcast live in West Germa- 
ny. 

One German magazine 
commented in a recent article: 
“The Queen can sleep easy 
again. Her wild Andy has 
married." 


Broadcasting success 
in everyone’s language 


M. Leon Zitrone of the 
French television network 
TF! was visibly impressed. 
Hunched over a monitor 
screen deep in BBC Television 
Centre, he urged the citizens 
of republican France to won- 
der at the exquisite smile of a 
royal English beauty. 

; The distinguished commen- 
- tat or. one of 19 broadcasting 
from BBC studio TC3, said 
later. “The Duchess of York 
looks very much like a girl 1 
' fell in love with when I was 
studying in London half a 
century ago. Just watching her 
makes me feei younger." 

’ In an adjacent booth. Mr 
1 Nakasone. of Japan's ANB 
network, was beaming with 
relief. A communications 
hitch that had prevented him 


from commentating on the 
first 30 minutes of the BBC 
coverage had been overcome. 

In a control room upstairs 
Mr John Leggat. network di- 
rector. was the BBC's 
“goalkeeper" — the man re- 
sponsible for split second 
decisions on pictures just be- 
fore transmission. 

Back in studio TC3 a BBC 
Newsnight crew were filming a 
Spanish TV team commentat- 
ing on a BBC film of the 
wedding. 

As the huge studio gradually 
emptied yesterday, techni- 
cians were already preparing 
for an episode of Last of the 
Summer Wine on Friday. 

"That" observed a BBC 
executive, “is show business." 


of pomp 
beats pop 
approach 

It was the most a romantic 
royal wedding in history for 
television viewers. Millions 
throughout the world were 
able to watch the faces of the 
Duke of York and Miss Sarah 
Ferguson as they made their 
marriage vows- 

The pictures which captured 
the most intimate moments in 
Westminster Abbey were shot 
by a remote control camera, 
nicknamed the Seebert camera 
after the forgotten monarch on 
whose tomb it was mounted. 

Like the camera in the 
Goodyear airship, which pro- 
vided stunning crowd views of 
The MalL the Seebert camera 
was owned by Thames Televi- 
sion who made its pictures 
available to BBC and I TV. 

The two British TV chan- 
nels covered the event in their 
own distinctive styles. ITN, 
Thames TV and TV-am com- 
bined fora down-to-earth, vox- 
pop view of the occasion wh3e 
the BBC focused on pomp and 
ceremony. 

As the Life Guards' com- 
manding officer observed to 
Selina Scott experience is the 
key to success in pageantry 
and the BBCs experience 
made its coverage snperior. 

The occasion was a tonr de 
force by David Dimbleby, who 
relayed sudt a mass of infor- 
mation that be could probably 
compile a royal wedding edi- 
tion of the game Trivial 
Pursuit. 

On ITV. Sir Alastair 
Barnet's mellow tones alter- 
nated with those of Ronald 
Allison 

The BBC added some much 
needed humour live from 
HMS Brazen in Karachi 
whose “doo-wop" band £ang 
wedding congratulations to the 
tune of Ran Around Sue, the 
rock and roll classic: 

In the field of home-spun 
philosophy, the ITV team 
finally triumphed. “Television 
is often accused of presenting 
too much gloom and doom," 
Sir Alastair said. “We plead 
these pictures in extenua- 
tion — they will be remem- 
bered when the others are 
forgotten." 

Celia Brayfield 



The Queen with Major Ronald Ferguson, and Mrs Hector Barrantes with the Duke of Edinburgh, nMkin gjheir™}^oBPcku^|^^^^ 



The Prince and Princess of Wales, and the Queen Mother and Princess Margaret are seen travelling to Westminster Abbey. 




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Ulster Barony to 
go with Dukedom 


Prince Andrew was created 
Duke of York just 90 minutes 
before the wedding ceremony. 
It meant that as soon as Miss 
Sarah Ferguson became his 
wife, she took the title of Her 
Royal Highness the Duchess 
of York. 

Both were said to be delight- 
ed by the honours conferred 
on them by the Queen- 

In addition to his new title. 
His Royal Highness became 
the Earl of Inverness and the 
Baron of Killyleagh. The Eari- 
dom is traditionally linked 
with the Dukedom, but the 
Barony is a new creation. 

Killyleagh is the sailing 
resort in Co Down, Northern 
Ireland, where the Duchess's 
ancestral links were estab- 
lished. The couple visited the 
town on their secret trip to 
Ulster last month. 

The title of Duke of York, 
first granted 60J years ago by 
King Richard IL is traditional- 
ly conferred on the second son 
of the sovereign when he is 
aged in his mid to late 
twenties. 

There was speculation that 
.Andrew would receive the title 
in I9S2 because of his coura- 
geous deeds in the Falklands 
as a helicopter pilot. But it is 


A sleepy town in Northern 
Ireland woke np yesterday to 
find it bad unexpectedly shot 
to fame because of the royal 
wedding. 

Killyleagh In Co Down 
made headlines when Buck- 
ingham Palace annonneed that 
Prince Andrew was to become 
Baron of Killyleagh. 

The royal couple visited the 
town last month to meet 
competitors in the United 
Kingdom Dragon Yacht 
Championships. 

They toured the harbour 
area overlooking Strangford 
Lough and told local people 
they would love to return one 
day. 

“Everyone is very pleased at 
the honour bestowed on them 
today", Mr Fred HamOton, 
chairman of the town commit- 
tee, said. . 

“It has come as a complete 
surprise, but certainly a great 
honour. We were disappointed 
when the royal couple did not 
have time to go on a walkabout 
around the town when they 
were here last month. Now we 
hope we will have a return visit 
very quickly." 

The town w-Ql celebrate 
yesterday's announcement 
during its festival week early 
next month. 

The streets of Killyleagh 
were quiet yesterday as resi- 
dents of the mainly Protestant 
town stayed indoors to watch 
the wedding ceremony. 


understood that the Queen 
insisted he should be treated 
like any other Serviceman. 

Mr Cyril Waiie, Lord May- 
or of York, said the title would 
“bring the North of England 
into the limelight" In the 
House of Commons, York- 
shire MPs tabled a motion 
congratulating the Prince on 
becoming Duke. 

The title carries with it no 
automatic lands or financial 
rewards, unlike the Duchy of 
Cornwall which provides’ the 
Prince of Wales with a sub- 
stantial income. 

In Inverness, Mr Hamish 
Bauchop. the city’s senior 
councillor, said: “The news 
came as quite a surprise. It 
strengthens the royal ties with 
the city, of which the Queen 
Mother is a Freeman." 

Mr Tom King. Secretary of 
Stale for Northern Ireland, 
said he welcomed the an- 
nouncement that Prince An- 
drew has assumed the new 
title of Baron Killyleagh. “I 
know this will give great 
pleasure throughout the prov- 
ince, and is particularly appro- 
priate to mark Miss Sarah 
Ferguson’s family connection 
with the province", he said. 


Mr David Lindsey, the local 
yacht dub secretary who met 
the royal couple during their 
visit, said: “Hopefully the 
announcement will gjfve a big 
boost to the area and to the 
whole of Northern Ireland 
because we certainly need 
good pnbliaty." 

Killyleagh, a popular sailing 
centre, has a town of 3,000 and 
unemployment is running at 
15 per cent Fanning is its 
main industry, but there is a 
linen mill and tannery. 

The biggest tourist attrac- 
tion is Killyleagh Castle where 
Lieutenant-Colonel Denys 
Hamilton lives. The castle, 
built in the twelfth century, 
has been the Hamilton family 
home since 1605. 

Lieutenant-Colonel Hamil- 
ton said: “Killyleagh has never 
been a prosperous town. The 
railway line never came here, 
so developers tended to bypass 
the town. It has always been a 
gentle backwater, bnt perhaps 
all that will change now." 

Forbears of the Duchess of 
York lived ' in 

Killyleagh Dehretts Peerage 
said yesterday: “It is tradition- 
al for a royal duke to take titles 
from all three kingdoms of the 
United Kingdom. The last 
Duke of York was Baron 
Kiliarney, but I believe that as 
KUlarney is in the Republic of 
Ireland it was felt appropriate 
to choose a place in the 
North." 


Instant 
fame for 
chip shop 

It will be jumbo cod and 
chips on the house when the 
Duke and Duchess of York 
make their first visit to The 
Chipper, the Portland fish and 
chip shop mentioned b> Miss 
Sarah Ferguson in her televi- 
sion interview before the 
wedding. 

The Chipper is near HMS 
Osprey, the royal naval air 
station at which Prince An- 
drew did part of his training 
and to which he may return. 

“1 would hate to think that 
the couple have already been 
to my shop and that I didn't 
recognize them”. Mr Brian 
Avis, the shop’s owner, said. 

“There has been a vast 
increase in business from the 
ward room of HMS Osprey 
since Prince Andrew was 
here” he added. 

Mr Avis and his wife. 
Margaret, took over the busi- 
ness almost three years ago 
and they have made it a 
thriving concern patronized 
by local residents, service 
people from the air station 
and the officers and men of 
visiting foreign ships. 

Horse dies 

Bugle Boy. a 25-year-old 
army horse on its last day of 
duty before retiring, collapsed 
at Admiralty Arch on the 
processional route yesterday 
and had to be destroyed 
shortly before the royal wed- 
ding. Its rider. Lieutenant- 
Colonel John Cavering, of the 
Scots Guards, was unhurt. 

Royal dinner 

After an exhausting dav in 
the public eye. the Royal 
Family was expected to reia\ 
Iasi night at an informal and 
private dinner at Claridgcs. in 
central London, as guests of 
Lady Elizabeth Anson, the 
Queen's cousin. 

Blanked out 

Television sets in Beeston. 
Siapleford and Bingham in 
Nottinghamshire went blank 
after lightning struck power 
lines just as the royal couple 
arrived at the altar.’ 

Everage smile 

The bride was so delighted 
to see Dame Edna Everage 
(otherwise known as Barry 
Humphries), on her way to 
Westminster Abbey, that there 
was a special smile for viewers 
of the Channel Nine. Austra- 
lian television station. 

Debut missed 

David Dimbleby's debut as 
a royal commentator on tele- 
vision was missed by his wife 
Jocelyn and their three chil- 
dren because they started a 
three-week holiday in Turkey 
yesterday. It was booked be- 
fore Mr Dimbleby was chosen 
to follow in the footsteps of his 
late father. Richard Dimbleby. 


Killyleagh’s delight 
as it toasts new baron 





' ^ n i ^ 



THE TIMES THURSDAY JULY 24 1986 






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A romantic dress, with a sense 
of history and fun. was Sarah 
Ferguson’s choice for her wed- 
ding day. The royal bride 
brought the past to life with 
her gleaming gown. Pointed 
mediaeval sleeves. Renais- 
sance embroidery oh the bod- 
ice and a rococo tan bow 
above the train were all. his- 
torical echoes. But witty bead- 
ing of Sarah's bee-and-thistle 
coat of arms. Prince Andrew’s 
naval anchors, and hearts for 
young lovers, added a light- 
hearted, modem touch. 

From the back, the dress 
was a triumph. The 17% fool 
train lay like a still lake against 
the royal blue carpet, while the 
Kate Greenaway bridesmaids 
in peach taffeta pinnies 
bowled their flower hoops to 
the sailor suited pages. . The 


ed for dressing, as she prom- 
ised. in her own image. Her 
heart is in the country and 


Shimmering pearls edged 
the scooped neckline, while 
embroidered hearts and gui- 


there was a pastoral feel to her pure lace bows bordered the 
loose cuds, the cascading bou- silJc bobbinet veil. The bead 


quet of blooms and thepeach- 
es-and-cream flowers that 
were hung with artful simplic- 
ity round the Abbey. 

Designer Lindka Cierach 
also, succeeded in making 
bouncy **Feigie" look regal 
and graceful for her wedding 


From the back, the dress dropped waist and py fling the 
was a triumph. The 17% fool fullness of the -thick , 1 shiny 
train lay like a still lake against satin to the back of the dart 
the royal blue carpet while the Television viewers saw 

Kate Greenaway bridesmaids mainly the grand design, of 
in peach taffeta pinnies which the overweening- train 
bowled their flower hoops to ‘ and the cheeky back bow were 
the sailor suited pages. . The . the main features. The detail 
front of the dress was only a* is important because it is the 
curving silhouette scissored "essence of Lindka. Cierach’s 


Shimmering pearls edged This romantic dress has 
the scooped neckline, while more in common with Prin- 
erabroidered hearts and gui- cess Elizabeth's wedding dress 
jjure lace bows bordered the of 1947 than to the then Lady 
silk bobbinet veil. The bead Diana Spencer's puff ball laf- 
design, . which could have feta gown of exactly five years 
looked heavy on a July day, ago. The Princess of Wales 
was foil 1 of movement, as bees chose her dress in fashion’s 
buzzed round the central this- New Romantic phase and it 
tie motif, and the trompe I’oeil was the height of current style, 
embroidered shoulder bows Norman Hartnell’s creation 
dropped into ribbons forming for the finure Queen and 
an "S' for Sarah. The same . Lindka Cierach's for the new 
motif appeared on the sleeves. Duchess of York were both 
The effect was jolly, rather deliberately designed to be 
than grand, and die same was ■ apart from fashion trends, 
true of the anchors, hearts and Sarah Ferguson's fresh flow- 

waves rising in a tide of ers may seem to challenge 
beadwork at the bottom of the stately royal tradition. In fact. 





ms 


design, which could have 
looked heavy on a July day, 
was full 1 of movement, as bees 
buzzed round the central this- 
tle motif, and the trompe I'oeii 
‘■embroidered shoulder bows 
dropped into ribbons forming 
an “S' for Sarah. The same 


day. This was achieved by motif appeared on the sleeves, 
cutting a simple line, fitting .The effect was jolly, rather 
the boned bodice into a than grand, and the same was 


Pf • j 

IW 


true of the anchors, hearts and 


out of ivory satin — until the 
recalcitrant sun lit up the' 
fabric and caught the sparkle 
of -the embroidery on bodice 
and sleeves. 

Changing effects of light and 
shade on the dress echoed the 
dramatic and deliberate trans- 
formation of well-born com- 
moner into a royal duchess. 
Sarah Ferguson went to the 
altar like a country maiden, 
her headiess a floral confec- 
tion of IHy of the valley. lily 
petals, roses and gardenias all 
in dotted cream. She left the 
abbey with heT head held high 
in the leaf scroll and diamond 
collet tiara borrowed — in true 
bridal tradition — from a 
family friend. 

Sarah must be congratulat- 

[ ' SSFI 


style and because it gave a 
depth and richness to the dress 
which will- be appreciated 
when it appears on public 
display. 


long train. Sequins were 
threaded through the veil like 
raindrops and -pearls strewn 
at random across the central 
bod ice contributed to the free- 
dom of the design. 

Even the court slippers, 
which hardly peeped out from 
the scalloped lace underskirt 
had Sarah's favourite theme of 
bees and bows in crystal and 
pearl on cream silk satin. 






V'O' 





when Princess Alexandra of 
Denmark married her Prince 
.of Wales in 1863, her Victori- 
an crinoline was festooned 
with orange blossom, and her 
new tiara nestled among fresh 
flowers. 

Alexandra was forced to 
abandon her first choice, 
which was a confection of 
Brussels lace, because the 
British silk industry objected. 
They must now forgive Sarah 
Ferguson for turning her bow- 
trimmed back on English silk 
in favour ofltalian. 

The- delicious bridesmaids 
confections of peach stub taf- 
feta, trimmed with cotton lace 
woven with thistle bow and 
bee motifs, were British to the 
last stitch and sequin; so were 
the swashbuckling midship- 
man frock coats and breeches 
made for the pages by naval, 
tailors Gieves and Hawkes. 

Suzy Menkes 

Fashion Editor 



The Queen: a delphinium blue 
fiat of stitched crepe, trimmed 
with two organza peonies 


Mrs Barrantes: buttercup 
yellow marocain silk, with 
transparent double brim 





• • 

• • 




it \i.\ / :j..\ 

%J/W 


Princess of Wales: a Victor Edelstein turquoise 
and black polka dot dress of silk satin with 
a black, pleated satin cummerbund 


The Duchess of Kent Mae on cr eam 
embroidered silk faill e hat band , 
decorated at the back with a bow 


Lady Sarah Arms trong-J ones:, 
a caramel straw beater ; 
with a navy bine band 


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Fashionable to the brim, 
these straws in the wind 


Bouquet Lily of 
the Valley, . . 
Ivory 
Gardenia, 
Cream Lily. 
Foliage: 

Myrtle and . 
Veronica 






Spots- and pleats were die 
fashion themes for the 
colourful Abbey guests (Suzy 
Menkes writes). Bright pink 
was the favoured colour but 
the royal family chose blue. 
The rash of spots came out in 
every size and colour and 
always on silk 
The Princess of Wales, who 
has node polka dots . her 
summer trademark was rat- 
characteristically discreet in a 
slim-line turquoise and black 
spot dress by Victor Edebtein. 
. Other gnests struck a bolder 
note: from Pamela 

,StepbeimqD's black and white 
-pillbox perched on a briDo pad 


.svelte, yellow silk, marocain 
coat dress,- by Argentiniao- 
born Roberto Devorik. The 
Queen Mother, in a herba- 
ceous border printed chiffon, 
said it with flowers. Princess 
Anne, elegant in an outfit by 
couturier Gill y Jacques, had 
sQk organza flowers embroi- 
dered ou her long-line jacket. 
The Duchess of Kent, dressed 
by- FwianiwH, had- bine silk 
flowers appBqaed' at the hip- 
line and foe sdme” 1920s 
feeling to her head band. 

The Queen looked' at her 
loveliest in a delphinium blue 
silk crepe by Ian Thomas — a 
tunic dress over a. pleated 


of blonde hair, to Glenys underskirt and dashing organ- 
Kinnock’s purple and pink za peonies under foe brim of 


The bodice: intricately beaded and historically 
inspired— the thistles and bumble bees 
are from the Ferguson coat of arms 


asymmetric stripes and Prin- 
cess Michael's ballooning tu- 
nic of filac patterned silk 
Susan Barrantes, foe bride's 
mother, brought out the South 
American sunshine with her 


her hat. Nancy Reagan also 
picked pleats for her pale 
green silk coat and skirt. 
Princess Margaret's brilliant 
turquoise silk dress and bole- 
ro, by Roger Brines, was 


another pleated outfit. - 

The broad-brimmed hat — 
even for foe Queen — was the 
order of foe wedding day and 
straw the summer favourite. 
Royal milliner Frederick Fox 
scored a hat-trick with a 
jaunty boater in natural straw 
for Lady Sarah Armstrong- 
Jones; a dramatic upswept 
yellow silk and transparent 
brim for Mrs Barrantes and a 
- bandau for foe Duchess of 
Kent 

The big hats were balanced 
by . ‘ wide shoulders, 
emphasising foe fashionable 
silhouette, tapering down like 
an inverted triangle to a slim 
skirt. Most guests picked long 
sleeves or a jacket on a 
blustery day. Among the few 
fashion victims were those 
who really believe that foe 
royal family is our home- 
grown soap opera, and wore 
cocktail ensembles - 


\ 




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Now the Abbey Habit 
earns you even mote. 
8 - 00 % = 8 - 16 % 


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OUR HIGHER INTEREST 
IS NOW EVEN HIGHER 
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ABBEY XVTIOXAL BUILDING SOCtEn'. ABBEY KXSE BAKER STREET. LONDON SV1 6KL 


Illustrations by 
John Babbage 


fhe shoes: satm pump court shoes 
in duchess satm, beaded 
and bugled with bees and ribbons 








PARLIAMENT JULY 23 1986 


Land for building 


Coastal pollution 


Ridley indicates some 
open land building 
cannot be avoided 


ENVIRONMENT 

The high rating policies of 
councils in the north of England 
had driven business south and 
people had had to follow in 
order to get a job. Mr Nicholas 
Ridley, Secretary of Slate for the 
Environment, said during Com- 
mons questions. He told a 
Labour MP he should encourage 
councils in the north to rate 
more lowly. 

Mr Dale Campbell-Savours. 
(Workington. Lab) had said that 
the emphasis of the 
Government's economic and 
industrial policy had been on 
development of the south and 
that was why Jherc was a high 
level of housing demand there. 

A number of Conservative 
MPs expressed concern about 
the pressures building up in the 
south of England to develop on 
greenfield sites. In the ex- 
changes. Mr Timothy Rathbone 
(Lewes. C) asked what was the 
Minister's policy on building on 
greenfield sites or a ribbon 
development from villages and 
towns m southern England. 

Mr Ridley said the policies were 
to encourage the fullest possible 
use of sites in urban areas, to 


protect the green bell and avoid 
ribbon development. 

But (he said) some building 
on open land cannot be avoided 
if the demand for homes and 
commercial and industrial 
premises is to be met. 

Mr Rathbone said structure 
plans drawn up by local councils 
had identified, in his constit- 
uency at least, sufficient land for 
development or houses to the 
turn of the century. 

Would the Secretary of State 
encourage builders to develop 



Ridley: Derelict land 
should be used first 
that land, councils to make that 
land available and would he 
look carefully before giving 
permission for development 
outside those boundaries? 


Mr Rjdky said he was not the 
planning authority in the first 
instance. The district council 
was able to grant planning 
permission and could do so on 
some occasions in open land- 
Mr Anthony Steen (South 
Hams. C) said it was madness to 
build on greenfield sites outside 
towns and villages when there 
were millions of acres of derelict 
land which ought to be devel- 
oped first. 

Mr Ridley agreed that vacant 
derelict land in cities and towns 
should be the first land to be re- 
developed but to develop a hard 
and fast policy on that matter 
would not. he said, be accept- 
able locally and would not be 
right. 

Mr Jerry Wiggin (Weston-su- 
per-Mare. C) contended that the 
Government had a responsibil- 
ity to see that in the south, they 
did not finish up with concrete 
from Kent to Somerset. It was 
important in the national in- 
terest that development should 
be pushed further north. 

Mr Ridley: Yes but I make the 
point that I am not the only 
person who gives planning con- 
sent/ Some 75 per cent of 
consents are given by planning 
authorities. 


Keeping rates down will 
help jobs and industry 


WALES 


Setting an expenditure figure of 
£1.446 million for the Welsh 
rate support grant would ofTcr 
local authorities in the 
Principality a further opportu- 
nity to plan for stable expen- 
diture levels while able to pass 
on benefits in services and low 
rate increases to ratepayers, Mr 
Nicholas Edwards. Secretary of 
State for Wales, said in a 
statement to the Commons. 

The rate support grant settle- 
ment for 1986-87 made pro- 
vision for overall total 
expenditure to increase by 4.9 
per cent, he said, which was 
slightly more than the forecast 
rate of inflation. 

High and unpredictable rate 
rises were bad for business, 
hindered expansion and put 
jobs at risk. He endorsed a plea 
made by the CBI in Wales to 
council leaders asking them to 
recognize the needs of business 
ratepayers. 

The figure of £1.496 million 
was £67.8 million or 4.75 per 
cent more than authorities had 
budgeted to spend this year. 


almost £135 million more than 
the total relevant expenditure at 
the main report stage for 1986- 
87 and £97 million more than 
authorities had budgeted to 
spend in the current year. 

He had decided to retain the 
basic block grant mechanisms 
with no expenditure targets for 
individual councils and also 
that there would be no recycling 
of any underelaim on grant in 
Wales in 1 987-88. That would 
assist forward budgeting. 

Mr Barry Jones. Chief Oppo- 
sition spokesman on Wales, said 
the statement was the 
cosmetician's answer which did 


Local authority capital spending 
would be detailed in the 
autumn. 

Total relevant expenditure for 
rate support grant purposes was 
expected to be £1.732 million. 



Edwards: No recycling of 
any under-claimed grant 

nothing to repair the damage of 
yesteryear. The ministerial vari- 


ation of the status quo was not 
acceptable. 

It had not commanded the 
support of Welsh local authori- 
ties. contained the shabby pro- 
posal to withdraw recycling, had 
defects concerning the assumed 
future inflation rate and con- 
tained glaring omissions on 
funding of the teachers’ and 
firemen’s pay settlements. It was 
a betrayal of Wales. 

Mr Edwards said that far from 
being cosmetic the aggregate 
Exchequer grant for each house- 
hold in Wales would amount to 
£1.200. It would be for local 
authorities to make the decisons 
that would bring relief to rate- 
payers. The settlement meant 
they would start from a strong 
and siable base. 

Sir Raymond Gower (Vale of 
Glamorgan, C) said the 
announcement should enable 
local authorities to avoid the 
excessive increases of the past 
Mr Edwards agreed. The situa- 
tion was improved by the 'feet 
(hat the original, calculations 
had been made when' the infla^ 
tion rate had been higher so that 
worked to the benefit of local 
authorities. 

Mrs Ann Clwyd (Cynon, Valley. 
Lab), said the announcement. 
represented a mere fraction of 
the money taken away from 
Welsh local authorities by the 
Government since 1979. 


f 300m programme to clean beaches 


POLLUTION 


Ir was expected that SOscfaemes 
to clean op holiday beaches 
would be completed throng boot 
the UK in the next fire years. Mr 
William Waldegrave. Minister 
for Environment, told the Com- 
mons when MPs complained 
a boat raw sewage and other 
poll a tion in coastal waters. 

He said these schemes wontd 
cost over £300 million, roughly 
double the spending of the last 
foor years. And be told MPs 
there would be more money 

He assured the House that 
there was no health hazard at all 
on Blackpool beach now. There 
had been a problem at Blackpool 
hot a programme costing over 
£30 million bad been launched 
to put that right. 

Mr Arehy Kirkwood (Roxburgh 
and Berwickshire, Lk who had 
asked about further steps to 
guarantee the safely of bathers 
from coastal pollution, said Mr 
Waldegrave’s announcement 
was helpful. 


There is concern (he said) that 
many of these pleasure resorts, 
which have served us well for 
many years, are being despoiled 
by raw sewage in coastal waters. 

What did the Minister think 
of Greenpeace reports that in- 
dependent analysis showed that 
pollution levels at places like 
Blackpool beach. wh3e meeting 
Department of the Environment 
requirements, were at five times 
the European limits? 

Mr Wa I degrave said the survey 
of all the bathing beaches m the 
country, announced last year, 
would be completed next Spring. 

The preliminary results were 
quite encouraging and showed 
that np to half would probably 
meet the European directive. 

Sir Peter Blaker (Blackpool 
South, C) commented amid Alli- 
ance protests that it would he 
more appropriate for Mr Kirk- 
wood to confine his remarks to 
Berwickshire beaches and not to 
disparage Blackpool beach, the 
finest in the country . 

He congratulated Mr 
Waldegrave on the 
Government’s plans to improve 


the waters at Blackpool but 
wanted details. 

Mr Waldegrave: There is noth- 
ing seriously wrong with Black- 
pool beach' now. There is no 
health hazard at all on char 
beach. 

With the scheme to improve 
Blackpool and other beaches, 
the already fine beaches would 
be yet better, he assured MPs. 
Mr Roland Boyes. an Oppo- 
sition spokesman on the 
environment, accused the Gov- 
ernment of abesing its powers 
under the Water Act so that in 
real terms capital investment 
had declined by 12 per cent since 
1978-79. 

Even worse, in the southern 
water region (be continued) it is 
repotted that there is gross 
pollution m many traditional 
holiday spots and that capital 
investment has declined by 28 
per cent between 1980 and 1985. 

He went on to illustrate his 
complaint by citing the case of a 
Mrs Hargreaves. 

No wonder Mrs Hargreaves 
(he said) found herself swim- 
ming in neat sewage at Seaford. 


It is disgusting, like this 
Government’s policies for the 

water industry. 

Mr Waldegrave: investment ui 
the water industry is at tne 
highest level ever. My figures 
show (hat investment on coastal 
water improvements is about to 
be doubled. . „ 

Mr Da'id Hams <St Ires. CT 
recognized the progress being 
made but asked Mr Waldegrave: 
Do you find it incredible that in 
this day and age raw sewage k 
still discharged into the sea and 
onto beaches, particularly in 
parts of the South West which 
depends on tourism. 

Surely this called for top 
priority in capital spending- 
Mr Waldegrave said it was tor 
this very' reason that consid- 
erable sums were being commit- 
ted. The £300 million 
programme would not be fin- 
ished after five years. Further 
resources would be committed 
after that. .. 

Bv the end of the century (be 
said') it will have removed ''usu- 
ally all the problems which 
remain. 


Too many 
stairs to 
the House 


UNDERGROUND 


ll was a sad paradox that 
Westminster Underground Sta- 
tion. in the capital city and the 
heart of the Commonwealth, 
bad neither lift nor escalator and 
"ageing legislators were left to 
toil up stairs". Lord Broxboume 
(C) pointed out at question time 
in the House of Lords. 

Viscount Davidson, a Govern- 
ment spokesman, replied: It is a 
little like Upstairs. Downstairs. 

Peers were protesting about 
the number of escalators and 
lifts out of order at London 
Underground stations. 

Viscount Davidson promised to 
mention the complaints in dis- 
cussions with the London Re- 
gional Transport Board but said 
that ultimately it was their 
responsibility. There was a mas- 
sive replacement programme 
under way at the moment. 

Lord Grimond (Lk In these days 
of high technology it has taken 
as long to install one lift as it did 
in the days of the horse and cart 
to build the whole Central Line. 
(Laughter) 

Viscount Davidson: It is perhaps 
due io the fact that tbe line was 
built in the days of the horse and 
can. 


Bill meant to 
help disabled 

Mr Roland Boyes (Houghton 
and- • Washington. Lab) was 
given leave in the Commons to 
bring in a Bill to provide for 
effective penalties to be applied 
to registered companies which 
failed to employ a specified 
quota of disabled persons. 

Tbe Bill was read a first time. 


Rifkind imposes 
£125m penalties 


SCOTLAND 


The level of provision of rate 
support grant for local authori- 
ties in Scotland of £3.277 mil- 
lion for 1987-88 recognized the 
efforts made by increasing num- 
bers of authorities to budget at 
or below guideline. Mr Malcolm 
Rifkind, Secretary of State for 
Scotland said- in a Commons 
statemenL 

The figure was 3.75 per cent 
above local authorities adjusted 
budgets for 1986-87 and was a 
reasonable assessment of what 
they were likelv to spend given 
the level of inflation and their 
past pattern of spending. 

Mr Donald Dewar,chief Oppo- 
sition spokesman on Scotland, 
offered what he called a sober 
and classified welcome to tbe 
announcement. Undoubtedly 
the figures were better than last 
year. Entering a fourth year of 
government concentrated tbe 
minds of Ministers on survjvaL 

Mr Rifkind said be proposed to 
set Aggregate Exchequer Grant 
for 1987-88 at £2160 million 
which would, on present es- 
timates. maintain the present 
grant percentage of 56.1 per 
cenL 

The proposals represented a 
fair and realistic settlement for 
next year. He had taken careful 
account of the points made by 
the Convention of Scottish Lo- 
cal Authorities. 

Given this realistic settlement 
(he said), there. is no reason for 
rate increases, next year unless 
local authorities increase their 
spending above inflation or fail 
to bring their spending to guide- 
line in the current year. 

. He had decided to impose 
gram penalties for 1 98647 total- 
ling £J25 million because Scot- 
tish local authorities had 
budgeted to spend 3.9 per cent 


more than the current expen- 
diture guidelines. 

The four authorities which 
were responsible for 90 per cent 
of the overspending wpuld all 
have a penalty which was larger 
than in 1985-86. 

Forty out of the 65 authorities 
had budgeted within the guide- 
lines and would suffer no pen- 
ally at alL He hoped the 25 
remaining authorities respon- 
sible * for . the overspending 
would make every effort - to 
reduce their expenditure at out- 
turn and thus recover the grant 
penalty just announced. 

The advantages of spending 
within guideline (he said) are 
considerable and 1 hope that in 
198647 there will again be 
many authorities modifying 
their spending. 

Mr Dewar said that penalties 
were less steep but he did not 
think there was any cause for 
celebration. The clawback of 
almost £125 million was almost 
exactly the same as in . the 
previous year. Well over a half 
of the population of Scotland 
lived in the authorities that were 
going to be penalised on what 
was an unjust basis. 

To any impartial observer, 
the strategy of the Government 
had been based on hostility to 
local government. No account 
had been taken of the strain on 
basic and essential services. 

Mr Rifkind said this was the 
first time that local authority 
expenditure was in volume 
terms slightlv below what it was 
in 1979. Some two thirds of the 
local authorities were at or 
below guideline. It was right and 
proper that should be reflected 
in the provision. 

Sir Russell Johnston (Inverness. 
Naira and Lochaber. L) said the 
Minister was preventing educa- 
tion authorities improving 
educational provision despite 
falling rolls. 


No room 
at table 
for MPs 


CATERING 


Changes to MPs* dining facil- 
ities at Westminster were noth- 
ing short of a downright scandal. 
Mr Harry Ewing (Falkirk East. 
Lab) complained on a point of 
order in the Commons. 

He was cheered by MPs on 
both sides of the House when he 
protested that facilities that 
should be available to MPs were 
increasingly being encroached 
upon, ft was no» becoming 
almost impossible for MPs to 
obtain tables for meals in any or 
the facilities that ought to be 
available to them. Hardly a day 
of the week passed but an MP 
went down to the terrace hoping 
fora buffet lunch only to find all 
the tables were entirely booked 
bv non-MPs. 

in particular he protested 
about an experiment planned 
for the MPs’ dining room when 
the House returned following 
the ‘summer recess whereby the 
MPs' dining room would be 
used by strangers (non-MPs) at 
lunch lime and the strangers* 
dining room would be used as 
the MPs' dining room. If the 
experiment succeeded it would 
be extended and the MPs' 
dining room would be used by 
strangers for dinner 

The experiment ought not to 
take place until the House had a 
chance to discuss the matter. 
The Speaker, Mr Bernard 
Wea then'll, said it had been the 
unanimous recommendation of 
the Services Committee that 
.this experiment should take 
place between October and 
Christmas. 

After other MPs had also 
complained about the matter, he 
said he would make their feel- 
ings known to the chairman of 
the committee. 


Caning in state schools rejected by one vote 


EDUCATION BILL 

Bv a single vote the House of 
Commons fast night voted for 
abolition of caning, thus 
confirming a similar decision 
taken earlier in the session in the 
House ofLords. An amendment 
to retain corporal punishment 
in schools was rejected by 231 
votes to 230. 

The vote came at the end of a 
four hour debate on amend- 
ments to the Education Bill on 
report stage. Conservative MPs 
had been given a free vote on the 
issue, although Mr Christopher 
Fatten. Minister of State. 
Education and Science, for the 
Government, had said that can- 
ing was a valuable disciplinary 
instrument of which schools 


should not be lightly deprived at 
a time when there was concern 
about disruption. 

Abolition would be regarded 
as a weakening of the position of 
head teachers — the last thing 
they wanted. 

Labour MPs were recom- 
mended to vote for abolition, a 
recommendation backed by a 
three-line whip. 

The cane was a simple aid to 
discipline in the same way as the 
blackboard 3nd its presence in a 
head teacher's study was a 
powerful deterrent as it did not 
have to be used. Mr James 
Pawsey ( Rugby and Kenilworth. 
C) said when he moved an 
amendment to delete from the 
Education Bill a clause inserted 
in the House ofLords providing 
for abolition of caning in 
schools. 


He said that his amendment 
would allow caning to continue. 
School governing bodies would 
decide. The local education 
authority would not be able to 
impose its will on the governing 
bodies by using the articles of 
government. 

He was worried that unelecied 
peers had imposed their will 
upon the BilL by voting to 
abolish caning in schools. Par- 
ents did not want casual, sloppy 
schools. They wanted disci- 
plined schools. What would the 
opponents of caning put in its 
place? More suspensions? More 
expulsions? 

Which (he asked) does the 
greater damage to the pupil 
exclusion from school, or two 
strokes of the cane on the hands? 

If those who wanted to get rid 
of caning thought detention was 


preferable, what would happen 
if a child depended upon the 
school bus as the only means of 
getting home?- 

Mr Giles Radice. chief Oppo- 
sition spokesman on education, 
said that corporal punishment 
was barbaric and inhumane and 
led to abuses. It was degrading 
to the chastiser and the chas- 
tised. There was no hard ev- 
idence for the only respectable 
argument in favour of retaining 
— that without it it would be 
more difficult to maintain order 
in school. 

Mr Graham Bright (Luton 
South. C) said he was opposed 
to corporal punishment in 
schools because it was wrong in 
principle for children to be 
exposed to physical sanctions 
and pain which would bring 


criminal proceedings in the case 
of an adult. 

Mr. Jack Ashley (Stoke-on- 
Trent South. Lab) said the 
hanging and flogging mentality 
had no place in the Commons 
today.* To MPs who were so 
bruiaL so uncivilized, so stupid 
and so old-fashioned as to 
believe that bitting someone 
would solve the problem, he 
would say that it would not 

Mr Stuart Bell (Middles- 
bo rough. Lab) -said that the 
United Kingdom, having signed 
the European treaty, was bound 
to accept the decisions of the 
court. 

Mr David Evetraett (Erith and 
Crayfbrd, O said that like the 
majority of parents in this 
country he supported corporal 
punishment. 


Pay body to review 
peers’ allowances 


HOUSE OF LORDS 

The Top Salaries Review Body 
is to report by January 1987 on 
peers' expenses. Visconnt 
WTutelaw. Leader of the House, 
announced in the House of 
Lords. 

This follows the anomaly 
which arose when the Lords 
accepted without a vote a 
proposal for a 6 per cent 
increase in their secretarial and 
other expenses and MPs then 
carried a motion in the Com- 
mons fora 52.5 percent increase 
in their expenses against the 
advice of the Government. 

Acknowledging that this had 
caused an anomaly. Viscount 


Whitelaw said that the proposal 
that the TSRB should examine 
the matter was the most satisfac- 
tory way to proceed. He told 
peers that the 6 percent increase 
would be paid from August I . 
Lord Cledwyn of Penrhos. Lead- 
er of the Opposition peers, said 
that the Commons decision had 
increased the disparity between 
the two Houses, although he 
accepted that there must be 
some disparity. 

Viscount Whftdaw said that at 
present the subsistence allow- 
ance was up to £47 for night 
allowance and £19 for day 
subsistence. 

He commented: This House 
is facing a much heavier load 
than ever before. 


Kinnock promises to scrap 
legal curbs on union action 

By Philip Webster, Chief Political Correspondent 


The Labour Party yesterday 
unveiled plans for sweeping 
away most trade union legisla- 
tion introduced by the Conser- 
vatives since 1979 and 
proposals for a minimum 
wage. 

But trade union members 
are to retain their rights, 
conferred by the Tory Gov- 
ernment. to a secret ballot on 
strikes and union executive 
elections under the new indus- 
trial policy launched by Mr 
Neil Kinnock. the Labour 
leader, and Mr Norman Wil- 
lis. general secretary' of the 
TUC. 

The right to such ballots will 
be laid down in union 
rulebooks. 

Mr Kinnock. introducing 
Pi’iip/c at Work: Xcw Rights. 
.Veil Rctpvnsihifines. said that 
the rights of individual work- 
ers and trade union members 
were at (he heart of Labour's 
approach. 

Labour's proposals would 


repeal Ihe Employment Acts 
of 1980 and 1982 and the 
Trade Union Act. 1984. It says 
that the right to strike is 'a 
basic civil liberty which brings 
corresponding respon- 
sibilities. 

The redrafted law would 
make it legal for workers to 
organize or strike in defence of 
their interests and give rights 
to picket peacefully without 
threat of civil or criminal 
action. 

The new framework would 
not give employers, customers 
or suppliers any opportunity 
to seek injunctions and dam- 
ages against a union. 

Mr Kinnock, who has had 
to defend the ballot proposals 
against the left which regards 
them as interference in union 
affairs, said that the conse- 
quences of the Conservative 
laws had been “huge cosl 
great injustice and frequent 
conflict". 

“The Thatcher Govern- 


ment has intimidated and 
impoverished on a huge scale. 
It has presented its strategies 
as reform but the purpose and 
product has not been reform. 
For millions it has meant 
regression to pre-Churchillian 
standards of relationship and 
rewards.’’ he said. 

The second statement is- 
sued yesterday. Low Pay: Poli- 
cies and Priorities, sets out a 
framework for the achieve- 
ment of a national minimum 
wage but in line with 
warnings from Shadow Cabi- 
net figures about the need for 
caution over making too 
many expensive commit- 
ments. avoids setting a 
timescale or minimum pay 

Mr Kinnock said that that 
would be the task of a Labour 
government working with the 
trade unions. 

Mr Kinnock said: “We re- 
ject the idea that low pay can 
create jobs or that poverty can 
somehow breed efficiency.” 


‘Victims’ 
told to act 
quickly 

Hundreds of elderly people 
allegedly suffering side effects 
from Opren. the ami-arthritis 
drug, were yesterday warned 
to move quickly by a High 
Court judge if they wished to 
seek damages - 
Mr Justice Hirst said they 
should “as a matter of great 
urgency, get their tackle in 
order" if they wanted to join 
in a multi-million pound 
claim being organized by the 
Opren Action Group on be- 
half of nearly 700 alleged 
victims. 

If they did not issue a writ 
against the defendants, includ- 
ing the American Manufactur- 
ers Eli L illey. its British 
subsidiary Dista Products, the 
Committee on Safety of Medi- 
cines, and the Department of 
Health and Social Security, by 
October 1. more than 300 
potential claimants could be- 
come time barred. 

Opren was withdrawn in 
Britain in August 1982. 


Compensation unlikely oyer nuclear dumps 


No compensation is likely 
to be paid to residents living 
near the four planned nuclear 
waste dumps in Essex. Bed- 
fordshire. Lincolnshire and 
South Humberside. 

A White Paper published 
yesterday . containing the 
Government's reply to the 
environment select committee 
report on radioactive waste, 
accepts many of its recom- 
mendations for stricter con- 
trols and more research into 
safer ways of waste disposal. 


By Sheila Gnim. 

But it is not enthusiastic 
about the all-party com- 
mittce’s call for com pensation 
for those living near dumps. 

The disposal under strict 
conditions win not pose a 
threat to the environ menu the 
W hite Paper states. 

“Nevertheless, if communi- 
ties affected by a radioactive 
waste facility were to receive 
some kind of financial com- 
pensation. it is difficult to 
argue that the same sort of 
benefit should not be available 


Political Staff 
to anyone living near any kind 
of nuclear facility.'* 

If that was done, it could 
spread to calls for compensa- 
tion for those living near large 
chemical works. 

The Nuclear Industry Ra- 
dioactive Waste Executive 
(Nirex) starts lest drilling next 
month at Bradwell. in Ess ex: 
Elstow, Bedfordshire: 
Fulbeck. Lincolnshire: and 
South Kiifinghoime. south 
Humberside. 

Radioactive Waste: The 


Government's response to the 
Environment Committee s Re- 
port (Stationery Office: £3.40). 
• Nuclear waste trains and 
petrol carrying trains should 
not run in the same tunnels ai 
the same time, so far as 
"reasonably practicable”. The 
Department of Transport’s 
Railway Inspectorate makes 
the suggestion in a report on a 
blaze 300ft underground when 
a petrol train crashed in a 
tunnel on the West Yorkshire 
border. 


Cervical 
cancer 
test delay 

By Sheila Gunn 
Political Staff 

ft is deplorable that a 
cervical cancer screening sys- 
tem which has failed to cut the 
death toll has not been im- 
proved, a parliamentary 
watchdog said yesterday. 

The public accounts com- 
mittee, chaired by Mr Robert 
Sheldon, Labour MP for Ash- 
ton-nnder-Lyne, urged health 
officials to make sure that 
computerized arrangements 
for regular smear testing were 
brought in by March 1988. 

During the all-party com- 
mittee study, tbe Department 
of Health and Social Security 
admitted that more than 2,000 
women annually died from the 
cancer, even though more than 
four million tests were carried 
out each year. 

Evidence from other coun- 
tries. such as Canada and 
Finland, where women were 
regularly screened, showed 
rats in the death rates by as 
much as 60 per cent. 

The main reason given for 
the department's failure was 
the difficulty in persuading 
women most at risk — those 
aged more than SO — to come 
forward. Bat it was also re- 
vealed that many health au- 
thorities had poor sy stems for 
recalling women at risk. 

The committee criticized de- 
lays in bringing in regular 
screening of all women in some 
parts of Britain, especially 
since the programme was 
started 20 years ago. 
Committee of PuNic Accounts. 

■f-tih Rcpiirt on Preventive Medi- 
cine (Stationery Office: £5. 1 Ok 


Print unions ‘need 
right to protest’ 


By Tim Jones 


Print workers involved in 
the dispute with News Inter- 
national should be allowed to 
demonstrate and be given the 
freedom to express their feel- 
ings. a High Court judge was 
told yesterday. 

Mr Martin Mann QC, for 
the print union Sogal '82, told 
Mr Justice Stuart-Smith: "We 
say that in the public interest 
those with a grievance should 
be allowed to demonstrate — 
that it should not be bottled 
up. U should be allowed to 
take place under the control 
and supervision of the police.” 

He was speaking on the 
ninth day of News Inter- 
national's attempt to curb 
what it claims are unlawful 
pickets, marches and demon- 
strations outside its new plant 
in Wapping, east London, and 
other premises owned by the 
company or jis subsidiaries. 

Mr Mann said that, with 


few exceptions, marches and 
demonstrations at Wapping 
had been effectively con- 
trolled by the police. To 
involve civil law could lead to 
people being brought unneces- 
sarily before the courts. 

Mr Mann argued that in- 
junctions sought against the 
London Central branch of 
Sogat and Mr Edwin Chard, 
branch general secretary, 
should be dropped. He said 
there was no evidence against 
Mr Chard or against the 
branch that any unlawful acts 
had occurred. 

News International is seek- 
ing injunctions banning Sogat 
and the National Graphical 
Association, plus named offi- 
cials. from maintaining any- 
thing but a peaceful picket of 
six people at the plant where 
The Times, The Sunday 
Times. The Sim and AVirs of 
the World are produced. 

The case continues today. 


COMMENTARY 


Attack by mass picket 

By Craig Seton 


The News International 
plant at Wapping was closed 
to all traffic for two hours 
yesterday during a mass picket 
by' about I J.00 dismissed 
printing workers during which 
a lorry driver was attacked 
and cars were damaged. 

The police advised security 
guards to shut the main gates 
after about 50 demonstrators 
surrounded a lorry delivering 
ncwsprinL smashed its win- 
dows and slashed a tyre and 
the rope securing its cargo. 

Another group of demon- 


strators hurled bricks over the 
perimeter fence and damaged 
six cars parked inside. 

The demonstrators were as- 
sumed to have chosen yester- 
day for their mass protest to 
take advantage of the police 
preoccupation with security 
for the royal wedding, but 
Scotland Yard said: ’’Wc had 
an adequate number of police 
officers ai the scene.” 

By Iasi nighi ihe number of 
demonstrators had shrunk to 
about 500. Several arrests 
were made. 



Ir nil! not be a moment loo 
soon for Margaret Thatcher 
and her colleagues when the 
House of Commons rises for 
the summer recess tomorrow. 
Most governments find July a 
torrid month as tired MPs 
wait impatient!} to rejoin their 
families. This year it has been 
especially difficult for minis- 
ters as they hare been hit by 
one trouble after another. 

The year began in the worst 
possible way with Westland 
and then the British Ley land 
fiasco. The teachers’ dispute 
brought a load «f political 
embarrassment. B> -elections 
have varied from humiliation 
to near humiliation. The ( on- 
sen a tires are running consis- 
tently behind Labour »n the 
opinion polls. Now there is 
South Africa and the 0“ tf en. 
and later today the Defence 
Select Committee will be pour- 
ing vinegar on unhccled 
wounds with its report on 
Westland. 

But the critical question at 
this stage, two-thirds of the 
wav through a parliament, is 
nor whether the Government is 
in trouble hut whether that 
trouble is terminal. 


Mid-term blues or 
final rejection? 


Sometimes a point is missed 
when what are thought to be 
mid-term blues are in fad a 
final rejection. The voters hare* 
simply had enough of a partic- 
ular government and nothing 
short of a political cataclysm 
will persuade them to change 
their minds. That happened 
most memorably with the \\ il- 
son government in 1967-68. 

Has that point now been 
reached for the present Gov- 
ernment? I think there has 
been a lasting change in the 
country's attitude to Mrs 
Thatcher personally. At the 
last general election there «as 
a phenomenon that 1 have 
never known in British politics 
before or since. On the door- 
steps in different parts of the 
country people were spontane- 
ously ‘describing themselves 
not as Conservatives but as 
Thatcherites. 

Labour supporters were not 
calling themselves Fimtitcs. 
Nor in the past did one hear of 
Callaghanites of Heal bites. 
Wilson ites or MacniiUuni.Vv 
it was a popular glorification 
of the individual leader in the 
aftermath of the Falkland 1 * 
war which could not continue 
in more sober times. 


Descent from 
the pinnacle 


But Mrs Thatcher’s descent 
from this pinnacle has been 
precipitous. She now seems to 
grate on the nerves of a large 
section of the electorate, and I 
doubt if she will recover all 
that much of a hold on the 
voters unless there is another 
national crisis. 

But this does not mean 
either that the Conservatives 
will dump her before the 
election or that they, cannot 
win it under her. There is not 
the slightest sign that all the 
criticism has broken her spirit, 
and in any case British elec- 
tions are more than personal 
popularity contests. For all (he 
government’s difficulties, nei- 
ther Labour nor the Alliance 
has really broken through. 
Labour is certainly attracting 
more support than for years, 
and in most fields * Neil 
kinnock seems to have a 
shrewd Idea of the impression 
that the party needs to make 
on the electorate. 

No longer is it inconceivable 
that Labour may have an 
overall majority in the next 
parliament. Vet the Newcas- 
tle-under-Lyme by-election 
must have come as a shock. 
Labour's poor showing there 
can be attributed essentially to 
local and personal factors. But 
these would surely not have 
had the effect that they did if 
the Labour tide was really 
flow ing as strongly as the 
national polls suggest. 

The Alliance has been doing 
well at by-elections and the 
national polls at least offer a 
better spring hoard for tbe 
general election than the Alli- 
ance or the Liberals by them- 
selves have had before. But 
nobody seriously supposes 
that the Alliance could form a 
government by itself, and the 
electorate is not attracted by 
the prospect of a hung parlia- 
ment. 

There is also the uncertainty 
of relations between the Liber- 
als and the Social Democrats. 
How they both handle the 
defence issue, especially at 
their party conferences in the 
autumn, may well be critical 
for their fortunes. 

So it seems to me that 
every thing is still to play for in 
British politics. Ax the general 
election approaches so the 
temptation to predict its out- 
come becomes more pressing. 
But 1 believe that it will be 
determined by events that 
have yet to occur. 




THE TIMES THURSDAY JULY 24 ly8b 



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WHAT’S BEHIND 
THE NEW CITROEN 



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A 


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w 




8 


Mastermind who killed policeman screams at jury as 1 1-week trial ends in uproar 

- - I II ■ III A J • . J 


Noye guilty of 
Brinks-Mat 
bullion plot 


By Michael Horsneli 


Kenneth Noye was yester- 
day convicted of mastermind- 
ing, the disposal of the record 
breaking £26 million Brinks- 
Mat gold bullion robbery. 

After deliberations lasting 
more than 36 hours, the jury 
found him guilty of conspiring 
to handle gold stolen from 
Brinks-Mat’s Heathrow air- 
port security warehouse in 
November 1983. 

Scuffles broke out between 
the police and onlookers in the 
public gallery of Court 1 4 at 
the Central Criminal Court 
after the verdicts, in which 
two other men were convicted 
and four cleared. In the fray a 
son of one of the convicted 
men was arrested and charged 
with contempt of court. 

Sentences will be handed 
out by Judge Richard Lowry 
today after defence mitigation. 

The court was told during 
the 1 1 -week trial that six men 
look pan in the plot to dispose 
of the 6,800 ingots of 999.9 
assay pure gold and to make a 
12 per cent profit on its value 
by charging VAT. 

Noye. a company director 
who made his fortune in 
property deals before taking 
on the disposal of the Brinks- 
Mat loot, melted down the 
gold and sold ' it on the 


legitimate gold market 
through dishonest dealers. 

Convicted with Noye. aged 
38, of Hollywood Cottage. 
West Kingsdown. Kent, were 
Brian Reader, aged 45, of 
Grove Park, south London 
and Garth ChappelL aged 42, 
from Chewton Mendip. Som- 
erset. a director of a bullion 
company. 

Acquitted of the charge 
were Michael Lawson, aged 
37. a company director from 
Hextable. Kent: Thomas Ad- 
ams. aged 25, an asphalier. 
from Islington, north London: 
Matteo Constantino, aged 66, 
a jeweller from Whetstone, 
north London, and Terence 
Patch, aged 41, a contractor, 
from Felton, near Bristol. 

Noye, Reader, Constantjno 
and Chappell were all convict- 
ed on a second charge of 
fraudulently conspiring to 
evade VAT payments. Adams 
and Patch were cleared on the 
VAT charge. 

After the verdicts were an- 
nounced by the foreman of the 
jury, Mrs Brenda Noye and 
Mrs Lynn Reader burst into 
tears and then there was chaos 
in the public gallery, followed 
by the arrest of Paul Reader. 

His father, Brian Reader, 
who served as Noye’s first 



Court actions to 
recover gold and 
seize f 3m assets 


By Michael Horsneli 


The Brinks-Mat warehouse, 
Kenneth Noye, Brian Reader 

lieutenant in the laundering 
operation which followed the 
robbery, shouted at the jury: 
“You have made a terrible 
mistake." 

Kenneth Noye screamed: “I 
hope you all die of cancer." 

Noye stabbed to death un- 
dercover Cli Scotland Yard 
officer Det Con John 
Fordham in the grounds of his 
mansion in 1985 during a 
surveillance operation. He 


above, where the gold robbery took place. Top (from left), 
and Garth Chappell, who conspired to dispose of the bullion. 


was cleared of murder at the 
Central Criminal Court when 
the jury accepted bis plea of 
self defence. 

Yesterday the judge 
thanked the jury for carrying 
its "great burden of decision", 
and released them from fur- 
ther jury service for 20 years. 


In the Brinks-Mat robbery- 
armed raiders overpowered 
guards and forced vault key 
holders to open it by threaten- 
ing to set fire to them. Three 
men have since been convict- 
ed of the robbery but only 
about £1 million of the gold 
has been recovered. 


The jury had been under The trial of two other people 
police guard since the start of for allegedly handling the gold 
the trial on May 6. will follow. 


Legal action has been start- 
ed in the High Court for the 
recovery of the Brinks-Mat 
gold and proceeds from its sale 
and the seizure of the £3 
million assets of Kenneth 
Noye. 

It is being taken in three 
separate civil actions, by HM 
Customs and Excise. Lloyd's 
insurers and the security com- 
pany. against Noye: who was 
convicted yesterday of master- 
minding disposal of the 
bullion. 

Brinks-Mat wants the re- 
turn of its bullion or its value 
at the time or the robbery in 
J9S3. 

An ex parte injunction was 
granted in chambers to 
Brinks-Mat in the High Court 
last Thursday. Those named 
in the writ range from those 
convicted in the criminal pro- 
ceedings to reputable public 
companies who may unwit- 
tingly have handled some of 
the stolen gold. 

Brinks-Mat is seeking a 
declaration that property in 
the hands of 28 of the defen- 
dants is their properly and 
also seeks disclosure of all 
documents in the 30 
defendants’ possession which 
may assist in showing who has 
received die stolen bullion or 
the proceeds of its disposal 

The company is also seek- 



answers 
the call of the businessman 



Making a call on the move, aboard the new Intercity Pullman. 

Each year British companies spend £17 billion on travel, 
subsistence and entertainment. And each yeai; British Rail's 
share of this is increasing as its services become more 7 attractive 
more innovative and more competitive . 

A vital part of British Rail's five-year renewal programme is 
devoted to satisfying the needs of the demanding business trav- 
eller After all, the kind of customer who accounts for nearly 40% 
of Intercity turnover deserves rather special treatment 

Like telephones on the Gatwick Express which keep you 
in touch with your business anywhere in the world Or creating 
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it's easier to park and ride - especially from the new Parkway 
stations near major motorways. r - - 

We've launched the famous Pullman trains and extended 
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times a day. 

On the Eastern side of the country, the Yorkshire Pullman 
and Tees-Tyne Pullman are setting new standards in satisfying 
the growing demands of our business customers, which include 
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.. And now additional air conditioned coaches provide a 
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Londorvas well.' 7 -- 

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discover the Pullman Lounges at Kings Cross, Euston and Leeds. 
And those opening this month at Newcastle, Edinburgh and 
Glasgow* where they will find meeting rooms, telephones, photo- 
copying, free tea or coffee and a licensed bar 

British Rail is also investing £10 million in improving and 
updating hundreds of Intercity coaches Both on the station 
and in the train this is one of British Rail's biggest programmes 
to ensure that business travellers can carry on doing business, 
in comfort, when they travel in style with us.. 

The renewed British Rail really means business. 



ing an injunction to prevent 
the disposal of the bullion. 
Prosecuting counsel told the 
Central Criminal Court dur- 
ing the trial that the gold was 
melted down and recycled on 
the legitimate gold market by 
dishonest dealers. 

But Noye claimed during 
his defence that he was in- 
volved in an international 
gold smuggling operation 
which had nothing to do with 
the Brinks-Mat robbery. _ 

Now Customs and Excise is 
taking action for the recovery 
of up to £1 million in VAT 
which it claims was defraud- 
ed. The undisclosed amount 
represents that which would 
have been chained on the 
amount of gold which Noye 
admitted handling. 

A Customs official said: **A 
writ was issued on July 1 8 and 
served on Kenneth Noye in 
the cells with the consent of 
the court administrator. It 
alleges conspiracy to defraud 
the commissioners of VAT in 
respect of the importation and 
disposal of gold bullion." 

The court was told during 
the trial that Noye had assets 
of more than £3 million _ 

The action by Lloyd's fol- 
lows a record insurance pay 
out of about £26 million with- 
in days of the Brinks-Mat 
robbery. 

Working 
class boy 
who made 
millions 

By Michael Horsneli 
and Stewart Tendler 

Kenneth Noye has told po- 
lice that nndervrorld pressure 
makes it more than his life is 
worth to reveal the where- 
abouts of the half of the gold 
which has not yet been ac- 
counted for. 

After police arrested him for 
the killing of Detective Con- 
stable John Fordham in the 
grounds of his home, the 
former working class boy, who 
trained as a process artist in 
the print trade before striking 
out on his: own with a haulage, 
garage and building business, 
was found to have more than 
£3L2 million in offshore bank 
accounts which now remain 
frozen. 

Noye and his wife Brenda, 
aged 37, who have two sons, 
Kevin, aged 13, and Brett, 
aged 10, grew up in 
Bexleyheath and married in 
their teens. They moved to 
West Kingsdown, Kent in 
1980 and built their 10-bed- 
room mock Tudor Hollywood 
Cottage. 

Noye, obsessed with his own 
safety, surrounded the 20-acre 
site with a security fence, 
installed lighting along his 
100-yard driveway, and pro- 
tected the bouse with closed 
circuit television and electroni- 
cally operated gates. 

Under police questioning he 
had a ready story to account 
for his admitted participation 
in international gold deals, 
which he claimed were nothing 
to do with the Brinks-Mat 
robbery'. 

Noye told the police, who 
found 1 1 gold bars worth about 
£100,000 concealed in a galley 
beside his patio as well as 
evidence that secret compart- 
ments in the swimming pool 
had been used to hide more, 
that he bad smuggled gold 
from Brazil and Kuwait for 
transmission to The 
Netherlands. 

He claimed that be had 
handed it over to 
‘drummers" — slang for or- 
thodox Jews with interests in 
the Hatton Garden jewellery 
industry. 

Noye had, in fact, taken a 
cut from the disposal of the 
stolen Brinks-Mat gold as well 
as charging 15 percent VAT 
for the gold when It was sold 
back to unsuspecting legiti- 
mate bullion dealers at tbe end 
of tbe laundering operation. 

He managed to keep his cool 
after his arrest - offering a 
senior detective a £1 million 
bribe and giving another offi- 
cer a freemason's handshake. 

Scadlynn Ltd, a firm of 
corrupt bullion dealers in Bris- 
tol, played a vital part in 
Sasmsferisig the gold. By the 
time police caught np with 
Noye, Scadlynn had processed 
about £11 million of the 
Brinks-Mat hanl. 

At least half the £26 million 
gold bullion is believed to be 
still bnried somewhere in 
southern England. 

Police have fruitlessly spent 
boors digging up possible sites 
in tbe Home Counties and 
West Country, but have recov- 
ered only £1 million of it. 

They are waiting to inter- 
view at least three other men 
including John Robert Flem- 
ing whose expulsion from 
Spain was ordered earlier this 
month by civil authorities in 
Alicante for possession of a 
false passport. 

Meanwhile. Mr Bob Bish- 
op. the loss adjuster on behalf 
of Lloyd's underwriters who 
met the largest settlement for 
robber)- in the history of 
British insurance, renewed a 
£2 million reward offer yester- 
day for the recovery of the 
gold. 


Man was 
dead in 
flat for 
5 years 

A man’s skeleton was found 
tucked up in bed five years 
after he died alone in his fiat, 
an inquest heard yesterday. 

The remains of Joseph 
Howard Jamilly, who was 
born 60 years ago. were dis- 
covered by police officers in 
his fiat above an Oxfam shop 
in North Cross Road. East 
Dulwich, south-east London. 

In the hall was a pile of mail 
10 inches high dating Irom 
December 1981 and a bag of 
unsigned Christmas cards to 
be sent to friends and 
relatives. 

The skeleton was found by 
Det Sergeant Malcolm Taylor 
when he broke in on an 
unrelated car theft inquiry on 
May 20 this year. 

A pathologist. Dr Louise 
Scheuer. told the Southwark 
inquest that Mr Jamifly may 
have fallen and broken his 
thigh and been unable to call 
for help. She said he could 
have died of cold in the 
unheaicd flat. 

The court was told that the 
winter of 1981 was the coldest 
since 1 940 and night tempera- 
tures often fell well below 

^Nl^Jamilly's brother. Vic- 
tor. a companv director, of 
Hampstead Way. Gowers 
Green, told the court that, 
after losing contact with his 
brother, he and another broth- 
er employed a private detec- 
tive in a vain attempt to find 
him. 

The coroner. Dr Arthur 
Gordon Davies, recorded an 
open verdict. 

More Scottish 
drug offences 

Drug offences increased in 
Scotland last year, but the 
police arc optimistic about 
efforts to combat trafficking, 
according to the Chief Inspec- 
tor of Constabulary for Scot- 
land. Mr Alexander Morrison, 
whose annual report was pub- 
lished yesterday. 

Drug-related offences _ in- 
creased by 15 per cent from 
I9S4 to 1985. increasing from 
4.400 to 5.700. Cannabis and 
amphetamines were the mosL 
commonly available drugs, 
the report’ added. 

Nurse awarded 
£548,946 

A male nurse who was 
paralysed in a road accident 
during a holiday trip to North 
Wales four years ago has been 
awarded damages of £548.946, 
with costs, in Manchester 
High Court 


alaysian-bom Leong Tan. 
aged 29. a psychiatric staff 
nurse, is confined to a wheel- 
chair after a mini-bus being 
driven by a friend hit a wall 
during a visit to Llangollen. 
The award was against the 
driver of the mini-bus. 

‘Canberra 
virus’ death 

Health checks arc being 
made on the fellow holiday- 
makers of a woman aged 69 
who died from the same virus 
as that affecting passengers on 
the liner Canberra. 

Mrs Dorothy Witherford of 
Redditch. Hereford and 
Worcester, collapsed and died 
a fortnight ago after a touring 
holiday in North Wales. An 
inquest has been postponed 
pending the checks. 

Dog licences 
to be scrapped 

Dog licences arc to be 
scrapped. Mr Nicholas Ridley, 
the Secretary of State for the 
Environment, announced 
yesterday. 

Legislation to abolish the 
licence - which has remained 
fixed at 37p for more than a 
century — in England. Wales 
and Scotland will be brought 
in "when a suitable opportuni- 
ty arises". The £5 fee in 
Northern Ireland remains. 

Marilyn bail 

The pop star Marilyn, 
charged in his real name of 
Peter Robinson of Notting 
Hill. London, was remanded 
on unconditional bail until 
August 19 at Marylebone 
Magistrates' Court. London, 
yesterday, accused of possess- 
ing an unspecified amount of 
heroin. 

Tin man goes 

Mr Ken Gilbert, aged 63. 
who played a leading part in 
the fight to keep jobs at the 
Gecvor tin mine. Pendecn, 
Cornwall, has retired as depu- 
ty chairman a month after Mr 
Edward Nassar. the Swiss- 
based businessman, took over 
as chairman. 

Ulster attack 

A young Roman Catholic 
man was recovering in hospi- 
tal yesterday after Loyalists 
attempted to kill him as he 
walked home in the Ligontcl 
area of north Belfast. 
“Loyalists" have killed three 
Roman Catholics in the area 
in the past two weeks. 

Safer Punch 

The hanging scene has been 
dropped from a Punch and 
Judy show at Boscomhe 
beach. Bournemouth, after 
Shelley Buckficld, aged three, 
went home from the seaside 
entertainment and wound a 
dress cord round her neck. 



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Whenever a Japanese fishing boat lands, 
a tuna, it’s almost certainly thanks to British 
technology 

The radar that spotted the blighter in 
the first place will more than likely feature a 
microchip devised over here by Plessey. 

Because even the Japanese 
would admit they’ve yet to beat 
us for a radar image free from 
‘‘Clutter” 


(In plain English, a clearer 
picture.) 

A coals to Newcastle story 
if ever there was one. And there’s plenty 
more where that came from. 

The OK from Akai 

Our chips have found their way into 
everything from Japanese TVs to hairdryers. 

The Nippon Telephone and Telegraph 



company have just given the thumbs up to 
our latest switchboard system. 

Only last week, the mighty Akai placed a 
large order for a development of ours called 
the Data-slicer. 

It makes their video recorders the brain- 
iest on the market 

The little marvel will actu- 
ally listen outforanyprogramme 
running late and re-set its own 
recording time. 

The world s our oyster 
Mind you, it isn’t only the 
Japanese who find themselves on the receiv- 
ing end of our know-how. 

\Wre currently packing off payphones to 
Mexico. A data system to Jamaica. One type 
of radar for the Danish Navy. Another for 
the Sultan of Omaris Air Force. 


Not to mention the thousands of miles of 
fibre optic systems we are supplying to 
countries all over the world. 

A bid for freedom 

Quite simply, Plessey have the techno- 
logy to beat the world’s best at their own 
game. 

Were advanced enough to go on leading 
the way in telecommunications, defence and, 
of course, micro-electronics. 

Indeed, we’ve already set out the strategic 
plans that will enable us to do so. 

Only one thing can stand in our way 

The loss of independence. 

As far as were concerned, only our rivals 
abroad could benefit from that. 

MPLESSEY 

The height of high technology. 








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<-y 




THE TIMES THURSDAY JULY 24 1986 


HOME NEWS 


11 


Fun-loving Britons 
mourn passing 
of a golden age 


The British think of them- 
selves as friendly, polite, hard- 
working, fun-loving folk who 
inhabit a county in irrevers- 
ible decline, according to data 
collected last year by Gallup, 
now published as The Gallup 
Survey of Britain. 

According to the book we 
look back on the 1960s as a 
golden age, and are firmly 
convinced that the country is 
moving away from prosperity, 
despite the' fact that people 
today are much better off in 
real terms than they were 20 
years ago. 

Nearly half the population 
still claim to go around with 
no fear at all that they will be 
the victim of a violent crime, 
yet just over one in three 


By Robin Young 

confessed to feeling unsafe 
walking around alone in then- 
neighbourhood after dark. 
The proportion rose to over 
half in the case of women, and 
to two thirds among elderly 
people. 

Two thirds reckoned vio- 
lent crime was now so ram- 
pant that people would soon' 
take the law into their own 
hands to combat criminal 
violence. 

People were also increasing- 
ly frightened of political ter- 
rorism,' riots and civil 
disturbances, and of catching 
AIDS. - 

As for politeness one in four 
thought British manners were 
generally good but 36 per cent 
thought they could do with 


BRITAIN: THE FUTURE 


Analysis of group Influence and respect 

Greatest Most Least 
influence respect respect 


Group 


Prime Minister 

55 

17 

17 

Trade unions 

50 

5 

29 

Big business (City) 

Cabinet ministers 

47 - 

5 

4 

34 

4 

2 

Economists 

24 

3 

2 

Newspaper proprietors 

19 . 

0 

17 

Royal family 

Civil Service 

18 

18 

18 

2 

2 

1 

PubBc 

17 

12 

1 

Churches 

14 

4 

4 

MP 

13 

4 

6 

House of Lords 

12 

2 

1 


Sunday racing is 
on the cards 

By Peter Evans, Home Affairs Correspondent 


Sunday racing and betting 
proposals are being discussed 
by a Jockey Cub working 
party, according to the Horse 
Race Betting Levy Board. 

Present legislation forbids 
on and off-course betting on a 
Sunday. The only betting al- 
lowed is credit betting. 

The board's policy state- 
ment in its report for the year 
to March 31 says it will 
continue to be involved in 
discussions with all interested 

The Jockey Club has banned 
cellular and cordless tele- 
phones from racecourses in an 
attempt to bait the rapid 
growth in unauthorized on- 
course bookmakmg. 

In addition, the activities of 
tic-tac men will come under 
dose scrutiny, bookmakers* 
pitch rales will be tightened 
and evidence will be gathered 
on offenders. 

Unauthorized bookmakers 
are believed to have seriously 
damaged the offical on-course 
markets, particularly at small- 
er courses. Notices wffl be 
displayed in all betting rings 
warning of immediate 
prosecution. 

Cellular telephones wiff be 
allowed in fhture only in 
exceptional circumstances. 

parties about any measures 
which might benefit the racing 
and bookroaking industries. 

They also include proposals 
to develop a satellite and 
video racing sendee for bet- 
ting offices, through the 
board's subsidiary, RTS 
(Racecourse Technical Ser- 
vices). RTS provides 
photofinish shots, race-timing 
and video patrol teams, and a 
public address and race com- 
mentary service. 

Mr Tristram Ricketts, chief 


executive of the board, said 
tire Racecourse Association 
was negotiating proposals to 
provide a satellite and video 
raring service for betting of- 
fices. and that RTS hoped to 
provide the pictures. 

The board's statement says 
such measures are important 
for the board in view of its 
informal three-year agreement 
on levy rates, as a result of 
which the size of levy yields 
will be wholly dependent on 
the varying levels of betting 
turnover. 

The board accepted a for- 
mal recommendation by the 
Bookmakers’ Committee that 
the levy rates applicable under 
the twenty-fifth levy scheme 
1986/87 should be increased; 
by 4 per ceqi on the under- 
standing that they’ should 
remain unchanged for at least 
a further two years. 

It is estimated that the 
twenty-fifth levy scheme will 
yield £22.9 million, compared 
with a £20.9 million estimated 
yield from the twenty-fourth 
levy scheme, a reduction on 
previous estimates caused in 
part by the freezing weather 
early this year, the report says. 

The board collects money 
from bookmakers and the 
Horserace Totaiisator Board 
and uses it to improve breeds 
of horses, to fund veterinary 
science and horseracing. 

The board has now agreed 
that funds for improving race- 
course facilities should be a 
priority. In anticipation of an 
increase of £1 million to the 
capital fund in 1987/88, bring- 
ing it to £3 million, the board 
has invited all racecourses to 
submit full details of their 
long-term improvement 
plans. 


Corporal punishment 

Teachers pleased 
at ban on caning 


The Commons vote to ban 
ling in state schools in 
iiain. bringing them into 
c with the rest of Europe, 
s welcomed yesterday by 
chers' unions and educa- 
n authorities. 

Even those authorities in- 
ided in the top 10 league 
ile for beatings compiled by 
: Society of Teachers Op- 
sed to physical Punishment 
rOPP) were, in general. 
a$ed that a decision has 
:n made, sweeping aside the 
■vious confused situation 
ere corporal punishment 
s used in some schools and 
wed in others, 
k European Court of Ho- 
rn Rights ruling in 1982 
re parents the right to refuse 
allow their children to be 
icd. but the Government 
I not taken action to cou- 
nt to that decision, 
fhc National Union of 
ichcrs called the one-vote 
ision "a milestone", 
dr David Hare, of the 
tional Association of Head 
ichcrs. said: “We regard the 
e as a victory for common 
se. It is a recognition of the 
t that it would be impossi- 
to run a two-tier system 
►wing parents to opt out ft 
iild have brought corporal 
lishmcni into disrepute 
1 made the position^ of 
ds and staff untenable." 
Schools will have until Sep- 
lbcr 1987 to phase out 
poral punishment. After 
t date teachers who hit 
rils will still not commit a 
nina! offence unless the 
lishmcni is seen as unrea- 


sonable or immoderate, but 
parents will be able to bring 
civil actions for assault. 

Yesterday. Mr Martin 
Rosenbaum, for STOPP, said: 
“We have campaigned for this 
for 16 years. People will look 
back and be amazed that this 
country retained this unneces- 
sary and uncivilised punish- 
ment until so recendy. 

But private schools will now 
be left with the two-tier system. 

Under the Education Act 
teachers at independent 
schools will not be able to cane 
pupils on assisted places. 

But Mr David Woodhead. 
director of the Independent 
Schools Information Service, 
said: “In practice I do not see 
this as a difficulty. The use of 
corporal punishment has been 
falling over the years and my 
impression is that many inde- 
pendent schools have already 
abolished it or keep the cane 
only as a last sanction." 

It is believed that of the 125 
education authorities in Brit- 
ain. only 39 had decided on 
abolition. 

STOPP named Mid Gla- 
morgan as the “beating capital 
of Britain" on the basis of an 
alleged 5,251 beatings handed 
out in some of its 41 second- 
ary schools between 1979 and 
1980. 

Mr Ken Hopkins, director 
of education at Mid Glamor- 
gan. said: “I believe STOPP* s 
figures are incredibly inaccu- 
rate. If corporal punishment 
was going on as often as they 
claim there would have been 
an uproar from parents. As it 
is we welcome the decision." 


some improvement and 39 
per cent thought them pretty 
sloppy. 

the public was evenly di- 
vided on the vexed question of 
who should go through first 
when one person is trying to 
go out of a door at the same 
time that someone else is 
trying to come in. Just over 
one in four said that it should 
be the person going out, an 
almost identical proportion 
said it should be the person 
going in, and 38 per cent with 
that phlegmatism on which 
Britons pnde themselves, said 
it didn't make much differ- 
ence either way. 

More than four fifths of the 
public place the fork to the left 
of the plate when setting the 
table for dinner. Six per cent 
put it on the right, nine per 
cent said they had never 
thought about it, and two per 
cent were undecided. 

The prevailing mood was 
that Britain was in decline, 
and that things would go on 
getting worse. Nearly three 
quarters (72 per cent) thought 
our moral conduct was getting 
worse. Only half the country’s 
parents were satisfied with the 
education their children were 
getting. 

The Gallup Survey of Britain, 
Gordon Heald & Robert J. 
Wybrow, Groom Hehn, £19-95- 
Leading article, page 21 



Mr Nicholas Scott, Under- 
secretary of State for North- 
ern Ireland, boarding an RAF 
aircraft hi Belfast to make his 
1,000th flight across the Irish 
Sea. He celebrated the event 
on Taesday with a bottle of 
champagne. 

Today he readies another 


mflestone in his political ca- 
reer when he becomes the 
longest serving minister in the 
Northern Ireland Office since 
direct rale was imposed on the 
province 14 years ago. Mr 
Scott is serving his third 
secretary of state, Mr Tom 
King, having seen Mr James 


Prior and Mr Douglas Hard 
come and go. 

Sometimes his ministerial 
and parliamentary duties have 
meant that be has flown back 
and forward between London 
and Belfast op to four times a 
week. - . “ - 


Low-tech role 
idea for 
Wendy Savage 


By Thomson Prentice 


Two London Hospital ob- 
stetrics units should be set up 
on separate sites with Mrs 
Wendy Savage responsible for 
a “low-tech" unit at Mile End, 
while consultants wiihjwhom 
she was in conflict could be 
based at the other in White- 
chapel. an inquiry panel sug- 
gested yesterday. 

The panel, which yesterday 
officially cleared Mrs Savage 
of professional incompetence, 
made the suggestion in its 
inquiry report in an attempt to 
resolve what it called “an 
undercurrent of opposition" 
to wards her. 

. Mis Savage- has been sus- 
pended for 15 months from 
her position as consultant 
obstetrician at the hospital 
But yesterday the inquiry 
team saidshe was not at fault 
in the handling of five child- 
birth cases, ana that it would 
not be appropriate for disci- 
plinary action to be taken 
against her. 

However, the panel which 
published the final pan of its 
report yesterday, said that in 
some instances Mrs Savage 
foiled to attain “the highest 
possible standards of care" 
while working at the London 
Hospital 

A special meeting of Mrs 
Savage's employers. Tower 
Hamleis Health Authority, is 
to be held today to discuss re- 
instating her. Mr Francis 
Cumberlege, the authority 


chairman, said yesterday he 
was pleased that the inquiry 
had not found Mrs Savage's 
clinical management to be 
incompetent. 

.. JNe will propose at today’s 
meeting that her suspension 
should be immediately lifted. 

Mrs Savage said yesterday: 
“I am delighted that the panel 
has now vindicated my profes- 
sional competence beyond 
any doubt Naturally I am 
looking forward to being back 
at work again, but re- 
instatement is not a foregone 
conclusion and I fear that 
there are still pockets of 
opposition within the health 
authority despite the panel’s 
verdict" 

The inquiry panel set up 
under Mr Christopher Beau- 
mont a barrister, drew special 
attention yesterday to the 
“poor working relationships 
between Mrs Savage and some 
other obstetric consultants" 
and expressed concern also 
about “poor communication 
between medical staff" at the 
hospital's obstetric units. 

During the public inquiry, 
which look six weeks and 
ended last March, evidence 
emerged of personality clashes 
between Mrs Savage and some 
of her colleagues. 

Mrs Savage, aged 51, an 
obstetrician for 20 years, has 
been a leading advocate of 
natural childbirth . 


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THE TIMES THURSDAY JULY 24 1986 


OVERSEAS NEWS 






* 


m 


p Ikrty?: 


lb‘ ? ,K 


tiowe poses the crucial 
questions for Pretoria 


From Michael Hornsby, Pretoria 


Sir Geoffrey Howe, the chairman of 
Foreign Secretary, began the can Corpc 
second leg of his southern Africa’s bia 
African peare mission on industrial co 
behalf of the EEC here yester- « t-, 
day in an attempt to wring 
concessions from the South ^ 7^ tlie 
African Government and de- 
fuse international pressure for * 
economic sanctions, Kaunaa- tie j 

on Friday 

On . arrival at Johann- country’s Pre 
esbuxg's Jan Smuts airport, Sir Masire, befc 
Geoffrey said his mission South Africa 
reflected ^widespread and The weeken 
profound international con- aside for vis 
cem", of which the focus was and Lesotho. 


chairman of the Anglo Ameri- 
can. Corporation, South 
Africa’s biggest mining and 
industrial concern. 

On Thursday evening Sir 
Geoffrey flies to Lusaka, the 
Zambian capital, where he 
will have, talks with President 
Kaunda. He goes to Botswana 
on Friday to meet that 
country’s President, Dr Quett 
Masire, before returning to 
South Africa later in the day. 
The weekend has been set 
aside for visits to Swaziland 


“apartheid and the need for it 
to give way rapidly, and 
without violence, to a genu- 
inely representative and non- 
racial community*'. 

Although the need for 
change was widely accepted in 
South Africa and had been 
acknowledged by President 
Botha, “the crucial questions 
— the nature of change, its 
scope ' and its time-scale — 
remain unresolved”. Sir Geof- 
frey said, as Mr R.F“Pik" 
Botha, his South African 
counterpart, sat impassively 
at his side. 

“My purpose is to see if a 
framework can be established 
in which peaceful negotiation 
can produce answers accept- 
able to all South Africans,” Sir 
Geoffrey said. Earlier, Mr 
Botha had said that he hoped 
Sir Geoffrey's visit would be 
useful and constructive. 

Sir Geoffrey’s first two ap- 
pointments were with Mr 
Botha and President Botha in 
Pretoria. Today he will meet 
black and while businessmen, 
including Mr Gavin Relly, 

FLO calls 
for summit 
on Hassan 

From Robert Fisk 
Beirut 

The Arab world yesterday 
gave further vent to its sur- 
prised yet largely subdued 
ganger over the summit be- 
tween Mr Shimon Peres, the 
Israeli Prime Minister, and 
King Hassan of Morocco. , 

Even Fatah, the main guer- | 
rilfa wing of Yassir Arafat's 
Palestine Liberation Oigani- 


Sir Geoffrey's itinerary Judging by Pretoria’s 
leaves the inescapable impres- present mood. Sir Geoffrey 
sion that he has found some stands no chance of getting 
difficulty in occupying his any concessions on the EEC's 
time between his two sebed- and the Commonwealth’s 
uled appointments with Presi- minimum demands - the 
dent Botha, . the second of unconditional release of Mr 
which is on July 29. Mandela and other political 

The Foreign Secretary’s Prisoners, and the lifting of the 
main problem has been the ^ >an 00 *be ANC and other 
refusal of any important black outlawed political groups. 

aP"* to® 9“** If Pretoria does give any 
Gaisha Butheiezi, (wad of the ground, it will certainly not be 
conservative Zulu-dominated before a crucial federal con- 
Inkatha movement, to talk to gress of the ruling National 
him. Party in mid-August in Dur- 

British officials insisted yes- ban, and British officials are 
terday that Sir Geoffrey had already talking of "third and 


other member states, but he 
would also like to be able to 
report some interim progress 
to the Commonwealth’s mini , 
summit in London at the 
beginning of August 

If insufficient progress is 
made by the end of Septem- 
ber, the EEC is pledged to 
enter into consultations with 
other industrialized countries 
on further measures against 
South Africa, including a ban 
on new investments and the 
import of coal, iron, steel and 
gold coins. 

Judging by Pretoria’s 
present mood. Sir Geoffrey 
stands no chance of getting 
any concessions on the EEC's 
and the Commonwealth’s 
minimum demands — the 
unconditional release of Mr 
Mandela and other political 
prisoners, and the lifting of the 
ban on the ANC and other 
outlawed political groups. 

If Pretoria does give any 
ground, it will certainly not be 
before a crucial federal con- 
gress of the ruling National 
Party in mid-August in Dur- 











Sir Geoffrey Howe with President Botha, centre, and the South African Foreign Minister, Mr “Pit” Botha, in Pretoria. 

Small ads ‘Realism’ Reaoan isolated hv 


not given up hope of seeing 
Mr Nelson Mandela, the jailed 
African National Congress 
leader, in Pollsmoor prison 
outside Cape Town, even 
though Mr Mandela's wife, 
Mrs Winnie Mandela, said 
last week that her husband 
would not meet him- 

Under the terms of his brief 
from the EEC's Council of 
Ministers, . Sir Geoffrey has 
until the end of September 
before he has to report back to 


fourth legs” to Sir Geoffrey’s 
southern African safari in late 
August and September. 

Meanwhile, Mr “Pik” Bo- 
tha welcomed President Rea* 
gan's Tuesday policy speech 
on South Africa, and in partic- 
ular his “stand that (Pretoria) 
is- under no compulsion to 
negotiate the future of the 
country with any organization 
which proposes a communist 
regime and which uses terror- 
ism to bring this about”. 


bypass of US 

the censor welcomed 


Publicity a key to 
Morocco talks 

From Ian Murray, Jerusalem 


Mr Shimon Peres, the Israe- 
li Prime Minister, agreed to go 
to Morocco to see King 
Hassan only after being given 
an assurance that news of the 
visit would be made- public, 
according to sources here. 
Approval for making the 
trip public .was: given in a 
meeting last week in Morocco 
between the King and Mr 
Nimrod Novik, who is policy 


ration, condemned the meet- I adviser to Mr Peres. 


ing in a restrained manner, 
claiming that it violated Arab 
and Islamic summit resolu- 
tions that had opposed any 
dealings with Israel. 

From its headquarters in 
Tunis, the PLO said that it 
wanted Arab leaders to hold 
an emergency summit to 
“confront” King Hassan. Such 
summits rarely come to pass. 


- By masting on malting the 
trip in the glare of publicity, 
Mr Peres showed that he 
realized the most important 
achievement likely to come 
quickly from the meeting was 
world recognition that a dia- 
logue could be held between 
Israel and an Arab country. 

This was calculated as being 
a diplomatic coup in .its own 


brought the Middle East peace 
process to a standstill 

Mr Abba Eban, chairman of 
the Knesset's influential De- 
fence and Foreign Affairs 
Committee, said yesterday in 
a radio interview that the feet 
Syria had broken off diplo- 
matic relations with Morocco 
because of the meeting proved 
how important it was. 

“This shows and serves as 
an outstanding lesson that 
{ritualism exists in the Arab 
world,” he said.- 

The moral was that Israel 
had toad within the pluralism 
to try "to persuade moderate 
Arab countries, like Jordan, 
Morocco and the Gulf states, 
to recognize Israel as Egypt 
had already done, he said. 

But it appears that Mr Peres 


From Ray Kennedy 
Johannesburg 

South Africa’s biggest-sefl- 
ing daily newspaper, the Jo- 
hannesburg Star, yesterday 
published a column of classi- 
fied advertisements by individ- 
uals airing their views about 
die political situation hi the 
country. 

The advertisements called 
for, among other things, the 
total abolition of apartheid, 
the release of political detain- 
ees, and for leaders of all 
groups to “stop posturing and 
get down to responstbily nego- 
tiating a safe and secure future 
for our country and all its 
peoples'*. 

Mr Rex Gibson, acting edi- 
tor of the Star, told The Times 
it was considered that the 
advertisements were a perfect- 
ly legal expression of opinion 
despite die severe state of 
emergency regulations which 
bar publication of anything 
considered to be in any way 
subversive. 

The Star published 41 of the 
advertisements in its “people's 
initiative column” yesterday. 


Johannesburg — South Af- 
rica’s foremost employers' or- 

S tion, the Federated 
her of Industries, yester- 
day welcomed what it called 
President Reagan’s “note of 
realism”, and particularly his 
call for a timetable for dis- 
mantling apartheid (Ray Ken- 
nedy writes). 

President Botha has refused 
to make such a statement of 
intern. A week ago he said: 
“We ourselves will find solu- 
tions to our problems ... the 
way in which it is done and the 
timespan will be decided by 
ourselves.” 

There was muted approval 
for the speech from Dr 
Andries Treumicht, leader of 
the right-wing Conservative 
Party. 

Both reactions contrasted 
sharply with those of black ac- 
tivist leaders, such as Bishop 
DesmondTutu, who on Tues- 
day night said: “The West can 
go to hell” Yesterday the 
United Democratic Front, the 
largst legal anti-apartheid or- 
ganization, accused Mr Rea- 
gan of buying time for the 
South African Government 


Reagan isolated by 
sanctions speech 

From Christopher Thomas, Washington 


President Reagan's defiant 
rejection of punitive sanctions 
against South Africa has set 
him on a direct course for 
confrontation with bis own 
party in Congress. 

His major policy speech 
from the White House on 
Tuesday has been widely 
viewed as perhaps the greatest 
miscalculation of the mood of 
the country and Congress 
since he came to power. 

Senate leaders are now de- 
termined to pass a sanctions 
BiU which, while .it will have 
scant chance of becoming law. 
will greatly embarrass and 
isolate Mr Reagan. 

There is considerable bewil- 
derment as to why Mr Reagan 
made the speech, since it 
contained nothing new and 
indeed seemed to many to ally 
the US still closer with the 
Pretoria Government. It is 
said that be did so at the 
urging of Mr George Shultz, 
the Secretary of State, who 
believed it would enable him 
to explain the Administ- 
ration's position and thereby 
retain control of policy in the 


coming critical months. 

But that does not seem to 
have been its effect. 

The most significant chal- 
lenge to Mr Reagan came 
yesterday from Senator Rich- 
ard Lugar. chairman of the 
Senate Foreign Relations 
Committee, who announced 
that he would draft sanctions 
legislation banning landing 
rights to South African air- 
ways and closing South 
Africa's consulates. 

Senior officials are putting i 
great store by the outcome of 
this week's visit to South 
Africa by Sir Geoffrey Howe. 
A negative reaction from Pre- ! 
toria will be regarded as a 
serious blow to Mr Reagan's 
attempts to hold off further 
sanctions. 

The White House is greatly 
concerned that the South Afri- 
can issue could present a 
serious challenge to Mr 
Reagan's preeminence in for- 
eign policy. While he has had 
to compromise on issues like 
Nicaragua and arms sales to 
the Arabs, it has generally 
been on his own terms. 


Yugoslav 

floods 

create 

havoc 

Belgrade (AP) — At least 
one person was killed and 
more than 6,000 houses and 
40,000 acres of arable land 
were inundated by the worst 
floods In eastern and central 
Yugoslavia in 10 years, news- 
papers in Belgrade reported 
yesterday. 

Polidko, the daily newspa- 
per, said a girl aged 11 lost her 
life in the floods in Kosovo 
province, and hundreds of 
miles of roads and several 
bridges were damaged or 
swept a«ay by flash floods. 

Rains have been Calling 
incessantly for up to three 
weeks. As the clouds dispersed 
yesterday, farmers began to 
make initial estimates of dam- 
age believed to total several 
million pounds. 

Flood water also crippled in- 
dustrial plants, and in Bosnia 
about 4,000 pheasant chick- 
ens, bred by a hooters’ associ- 
ation near Pdoboj, perished in 
(be floods. 

• Dearer bread: The Yugoslav 
Government has been forced 
to compromise on its anti- 
inflation policies and allow a 
50 per cent increase in bread 
prices, after pressure from the 
baking industry and the 
country’s six republics (Reuter 
reports). 

Mr Branko Mikuiic, the 
Prime Minister, who is trying 
to cut an annual inflation rate 
of almost 100 per cent, has 
said he would punish firms 
deliberately creating short- 
ages to thwart price restraint. 


East and West 
Germany in 
spy exchange 

Bonn (AP) — West German 
officials yesterday exchanged 
a convicted East German spy 
for two accused Western 
agents held in East Germany. 

Herr Friedhelm Ost, the 
Bonn spokesman, said that 
Hansjoeirg Thaieru aged 62. 
one of East Germany’s “trav- 
elling spies”, was traded for a 
West German man and wom- 
an. East Germany's “travel- 
ling spies” are well-educated 
people allowed to travel to 
bring back intelligence. 

Herr Ost would not identify 
the West Germans, and de- 
nied any link of the swap and 
the return to East Germany 
this week of Herbert Meissner, 
an economist suspected of 
being a Communist spy. 


Self-employed? No Pension? 


Happy? 


secret meeting ID years ago usn cupiomauc ues wrm 
sad telephoned Colonel Gad- between the King and Mr Israel . 
affi to tell him of Syria's Yitzhak Rabin, when he was The King is said to have 
decision to break off diplo- Prime Minister. refused to do so because he felt 

malic relations with Morocco, One hoped-for byproduct of this wornd be counter-produc- 
In Jordan, newspapers con- the visit is a speedy end to the p* e and would reduce his 
demned the meeting, but negotiations with Egypt on influence in the Arab work! 
more m sorrow than m anger, resolving the outstanding dis- . Mr Eban did not believe the 

r n r — -i putes visit was as significant as that 

President Mubarak has now made by President Sadat to 
referred to his hopes for Jerusalem in 1 977. 
an early meeting with Mr “With all due respect to 
Peres, who yesterday sent a Morocco, it is not subject to 
particularly warm message of th® same proximity or the 
congratulation to die Egyptian same set of problems which 
President on his country’s characterized the meeting 
national day. with Sadat,” he said. 

Such a meeting would over- “Even so, what ^Hassan is 
come the inertia which has doing is important. 


demned the meeting, but 
more m sorrow than in anger. 
The daily od-Dasrour referred 
to “this new tragedy” while cd- 
roi described the talks as “a 
painful stab in the chest of the 
Arab homeland and people”. 

The Jordanian Government 
has continued to express its 
innocence of the whole affair, 
insisting that it had no ad- 
vance knowledge of the meet- 
ing and doubting its worth. 


influence in the Arab world. 

Mr Eban did not believe the 
visit was as significant as that 
made by President Sadat to 
Jerusalem in 1977. 

“With all due respect to 
Morocco, it is not subject to 



characterized the meeting 
with Sadat,” be said. 

“Even so, what Hassan is 
doing is important.” 


New town to house victims 


Start a Sun Alliance Pension Plan now 
and look forward to a happy retirement 


0 s s 


From Christopher Walker 
Moscow 

The Soviet authorities in the 
Ukraine are now recruiting a 
special force (4* more than 
50,000 construction workers to 
build homes for the evacuees 
from the Chernobyl disaster. 

This tndudes a new town to 
replace the deserted settle- 
ment of Prfpjat, which once 
housed workers from the crip- 
pled nodear plant. 

pravda reported yesterday 
that the new settlement would 
be called Zelony Mys (Green 
Cape) and would replace Pri- 
pyat — whkb is now a ghost 
town fall Of empty high-rise 

buildings - for an indefinite 
period. A total of 10,000 
people win be housed in the 
new settlement about 15 miles 
swath of the phuit. 

The paper said that Cher- 
nobyl workers, now housed on 
the river in a “floating 
settlement” of ships, would 
move to Zelony Mys as soon 
as possible. In addition to a 
further 7,250 houses for evacu- 
ees to be built in the Kiev 

region, 6.000 privately-owned 

houses there are to be refur- 
bished to house the evacuees, 
w ho number almost 100,000. 

The size of the emergency 
force has indicated that costs 
resulting from the disaster are 
alreadv soaring well above the 
initial ~£2 bOliOB reported by 
the official investigation com- 
mittee last weekend. 

Prarda said that the force is 
to "build not only houses, 
community centres, clinics and 
hospitals, but also electric 
transmission and communica- 
tions fines and water pipelines, 
roads and pavements". 

Meanwhile, the weekly 
magazine New Tunes revealed 
that huge new dumps of 


radioactive waste are being 
formed at various unspecified 
places in the Soviet Union to 


special solution and the subse- 
quent burying of the radio- 
active elements purified from 


handle the vast Quantity of the water involved in the 
contaminated material from washing-down of bufldings, 
the dean-up operation in the structures and equipment 
Ukraine. “Finally, the third tech- 

Two leading nuclear sden- nique is the dry treatment,” 
tists, Mr Valery Legasov, first Mr Legasov added. “The snr- 
depnty director of the Korcha- face is sprayed with a special 
tov Institute of Atomic Energy, solution, which polymerizes 
and Professor Yury Sfrinteev, shortly afterwards to become a 
head of one of its laboratories, film whose components bold 
explained that all three de- the contaminated particles, 
contamination techniques be- That done, the film is re- 
ing used involved dumping moved, rotted up and dmnp- 
radfoactire waste, A question ed.” 
from the magazine about the He said that when houses 
possible dangers was firmly were foimd to be heavily 
denied. contaminated the dean-op 

“In the case of beavfly con- squads removed “roofs or even 
lamina ted soil, we simply re- whole sections”, 
move it,” Mr Legasov said. Headed “Chernobyl 80 days 
“The surface layer is shoveled after” the article gave foe 
into containers which are sub- frankest account yet printed in 
seqnentiy driven to special foe Soviet press of the grave 
radioactive waste damps." problems still facing those 

The second so-called “wet attempting to eHntinile the 


technique” Involved bathing consequences of the April 26 
contaminated surfaces with a disaster. 

Terror not to blame 


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rOUC POiS/OM FUND XI (j5 


From Paul Vallely 
New York 

The dramatic decline is the 
number of American package 
tourists to Britain this year 
should not necessarily' be at* 
tributed to fear of internation- 
al terrorism, foe British Minis- 
ter for Aviation, Mr Michael 
Spicer, told a travel industry 
conference in New York yes- 
terday. 

He denied that American 
tourists fell Britain was a dan- 
gerous place' and said in the' 
past five years no major ter- 
rorist incident had taken place 
on a British plane or any flight 
from a British airport 


Mr Rupert Murdoch, pub- 
lisher of Travel Weekly maga- 
zine. which sponsored the 
conference, said two million 
Americans fewer than expect- 
ed had travelled to Europe this 
year. It was “one of the tough- 
est problems the travel indust- 


mot RmtONfUNO trtsi 


STARTING AGE 36 

ftu fcunIffrBBhii 

Fud 

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Uj prorate a w pens*®: £34397 pj. or lump sum of £723)6 
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OVERSEAS NEWS 


THE TIMES THURSDAY JULY 24 1986 


* * ☆ ☆ ☆ 


Journalist expelled by 
China after being 
detained for six days 


After six days in detention 
for alleged intelligence-gather- 
ing in restricted military 
zones, the Peking correspon- 
dent of The New York Tunes, 
Mr John Bums, was yesterday 
expelled from China. . 

Chinese security officials 
took Mr Bums, who has dual 
British-Canadian citizenship, 
from a cell in a Public Security 
Bureau detention centre in 
Peking and drove him to the 
airport, where he was put on a 
jet belonging to China's state 
airline, CAAC, for the sched- 
uled flight to Hong Kong, _ 

Soon after. Chinese security 
officials told the US Embassy 
that their investigation was 
officially concluded. 

The British Embassy issued 
a one-sentence statement: 
*'We are glad that the period of 
suspense is over and that Mr 
Bums is no longer in 
detention”. 

Mr Bums, aged 41. the 
newspaper's bureau chief in 
Peking since November 1984. 
was stopped by security offi- 
cers at the airport on Thurs- 
day as he and his family 
prepared to leave fora holiday 
in Hawaii and Vancouver. 

He was held for questioning 
about a motorcycle trip he 
undertook at the beginning of 
the month with Mr Ed 
McNally, a US Justice Depart- 
ment lawyer, and a Chinese 
national, 'through parts of 
Shanxi and Shaanxi provinces 
in central China. 


From Robert Grieves, Peking 

He was never formally 
charged or arrested, but West- 
ern diplomats said that under 
Chinese law he could be held 
for up to 10 days without 
cause. 

In an impromptu press 
conference outside his flat in 
the diplomatic compound af- 
ter his expulsion. Miss Jane 
Scott-Long, his wife, and Mr 
A.M. Rosenthal, the Execu- 
tive Editor of The New York 
Times who had flown to 
Peking on Saturday, said they 
had not been told of his 
expulsion until after the plane 
left. . . . - 

-I’m very pleased John is 
out of China now, and under 
the circumstances I'm sorry 
that we're not going to be able 
to come back here," Miss 
Scott-Long said. "But I'm 
distressed about the allega- 
tions the Slate Security Bu- 
reau has made against him." 

The bureau involves itself 
almost exclusively in intelli- 
gence matters. 

Mr Rosenthal said: "I m 
just terribly sorry that John 
will no longer be here, and at 
the same time I really do feel 
that the Chinese Government 
acted quite quickly to stop the 
situation." 

The newspaper plans to 
send another correspondent to 
Peking as soon as possible. 

Mr Rosenthal read a State 
Security Bureau statement 
which said Mr Bums and Mr 
McNally **deliberaiely violat- 


ed the law governing aliens 
entering into and exiting from 
the People's Republic. 

“They broke into a militari- 
ly restricted zone of our 
country and took numerous 
photos of classified objects.” 
the statement said. "Such 
demeanour obviously consti- 
tutes an act of spying and 
intelligence gathering which 
will not be tolerated by any 
sovereign state and. needless 
to say, is also a regrettable 
incident ... We have made 
the decision to expel Mr 
Bums." 

Both in the statement and in 
conversation with Mr Rosen- 
thal and Miss Scotl-Long, 
Chinese officials emphasized 
they had not wanted to dam- 
age Sino-US relations by ex- 
pelling the journalist. 

Western diplomats inter- 
preted their decision and ex- 
pulsion as a warning to other 
foreign correspondents to 
watch where they travel and 
how they conduct themselves. 

The expulsion of Mr Bums 
is not unprecedented. In 1984 
Tiziano Terzani. the corre- 
spondent for Der Spiegel mag- 
azine, was expelled after a 
brief detention. 

• Teacher told to go: A Euro- 
pean teacher detained for 
alleged membership of the 
Children of God cull, which is 
said to use pornography and 
sex to recruit members, was 
ordered yesterday to leave 
China (AFP reports). 


lUdl V.IIUIO. * ~ 

Burns admits he erred in travel 



Hong Kong - Mr John Boms, the former 
Peking correspondent of The New York Times, 
said on arrival here yesterday (pictured left) 
that he "greatly regretted” having been 
expelled from China because of a recent 
motorevde trip (David Bona via writes). 

He admitted that he had misjudged the 
severity of Chinese travel restrictions after a 
period when they had been liberalized 
considerably. ■ _ . .. 

He and two friends were stopped by police 
after several days on the road in north-west 
China and ordered to return to Peking. 

Mr Burns, who speut seven years in China, 
said he had been trying to retrace the travels of 
Edgar Snow, the American journalist who 
interviewed the late Mao Tse-tungand other 
Communist leaders in north-west China some 
SO years ago. . „ ... 

He refused to discuss details of his 
interrogation, during which he was well 
treated. But he indicated that the afiair had 
been handled by different organs of public 
security and by the Foreign Ministry, which 
did not see eye-to-eye on it. 

The Foreign Ministry, he said, had shown a 
relatively lenient attitude towards his violation. 

The expulsion has laid to rest fears, that it 
might become a major diplomatic incident 
damaging to US and British relations with 
Peking, but it has awakened fears that the 
foreign press corps may be subject to stricter 
controls in the future. 



A grieving Sri Tanltan mother sits beside 
the body of her son killed along with 30 oth- 
ers when Tamil guerrillas bombed a bus 
near the northern town of Vavuniya, 140 
miles north of Colombo. 

Ten more people were injured yesterday 


when the separatist rebels bombed the 
centre of the town just before noon. 



night in Jaffna, their northern stronghold. 


Cabinet forges ahead with 
privatization in France 


The French Government 
forged ahead yesterday with 
its privatization plans, giving 
Cabinet approval to a Bill to 
replace the decree of denation- 
alization rejected last week by 
President Mitterrand. It also 
appointed new heads of 12 of 
the biggest nationalized con- 
cerns to help ease through the 
ambitious privatization pro- 
gramme. 

Under the Bill, which re- 
peats word for word what was 
in the decree, foreign invest- 
ment will be limited in most 
cases to a maximum of 15 per 
cent of the capital holdings, 
and may be barred totally for 
an indefinite period in those 
companies where vital nation- 
al interests are deemed to be at 
stake by means of a govern- 
ment “Golden Share” system. 

The Government will also 
have the power to bar any 
individual private French in- 
vestor from acquiring more 
than 5 per cent of the shares at 
the moment of the sale of the 
company. Ten per cent of the 
shares are to be reserved for 
the company employees. 

A commission of seven 
“wise men" is to be set up to 
provide an independent eval- 


From Diana Geddes, Paris 
uation of each of the 65 banks, 
insurance companies, and in- 
dustrial concerns in the public 
sector which are to be dena- 
tionalized over the next five 
years. Although it will be up to 
the Finance Minister to decide 
what the final sale price 
should be, it will not be 
possible for any company to 
be put on tbe market at below 
that recommended by the 
commission. 

The Go verm men t is expect- 
ed to try to use the guillotine 
procedure to push the Bill 
through without a debate or a 
vote when it is presented to 
Parliament today.. However, 
the Socialist Opposition will 
almost certainly call for a vote 
of censure, which could not be 
debated until Monday at the 
earliest. 

Sucb a censure motion has 
no chance of success, howev- 
er, as the Government has an 
overall majority of four in the 
National Assembly. The new 
law is expected to be passed 
before the end of the present 
extraordinary session of Par- 
liament, which may now have 
to be extended even further 
until almost the end of August 


in order to accommodate the 
unexpected BilL 

president Mitterrand re- 
fused last week to sign the 
government decree on dena- 
tionalization, but is obliged 
under the constitution to sign 
all Bills passed by Parliament. 

The Government has decid- 
ed not to wait for the Bill to 
become law before placing its 
own men in key positions in 
the companies concerned. Of 
the 25 holding companies to 
be denationalized, 12 are to 
get new managing directors in 
place of those appointed un- 
der the Socialists. The fete of 
the managing directors of the 
40 smaller companies is to be 
decided later. 

M Alain Juppe, the govern- 
ment spokesman, said that the 
Government had acted on the 
basis of two criteria in making 
the appointments: the long- 
term interests of the company 
and the aptitude of its manag- 
ing director to oversee its 
privatization. He pointed out 
that the Socialists had re- 
placed all but two of the heads 
of the 24 companies and 
banks they nationalized in 
1982. 


Sudan 
denies 
airport 
capture 

Khartoum (Renter) — Sudan 
\-esterday denied a claim that 
soatluHTi rebel forces had cap- 
tured the airport at the strate- 
gic southern dry of Jute. 

The Sudan Prime Minister, 
Mr Sadcq al-Mahdi, said re- 
ports that Jnba airport had 
fallen to the rebels were un- 
true, the official Sudan news 
acency, Suna, said. 

An official of the Ethiopian- 
backed Sudan People’s Liber- 
ation Army (SPLA). which 
has waged a bush war against 
the Khartoum Government 
since 1983, said the ainmrt 
had fallen to the SPLA after 
heavy fighting. 

Mr al-Mahdi, in addition to 
heading a newly elected coali- 
tion Government, is also De- 
fence Minister. The SPLA 
claim was also denied by the 
Army’s Chief of Staff, General 
Mohammad Tawfiq KhalH. 

Major Deng Alor, an SPLA 
official in the Ethiopian capi- 
taL said: “Juba airport has 
fallen to SPLA forces after a 
heavy battle with government 
troops ... no plane canjand 
there unless we allow it. 

A UN official, who spoke to 
Jute by radio from Kampala, 
said the rebels had bad effec- 
tive control of the airport since 
Thursday after they captured 
Jebel Lada, a hill overlooking 
it from the north. 

Mr Techeste Zergaber, the 
leader of the World Food Pro- 
gramme delegation in Addis 
Ababa, said from Nairobi that 
there was no tactical need for 
an SPLA presence at the 
airport itself because on Tues- 
day the rebels cut off the road 
to Yei, a town south-west of 
tbe city on the Zairean border. 

But a diplomat in Nairobi, 
who asked not to be named, 
said he spoke to Jnba by radio 
on Tuesday, when the town 
was relatively peaceful. He 
said be seriously doubted the 
SPLA claim. 

The closure of tbe airport 
has forced tbe WFP to halt an 
emergency food lift to 50,000 
displaced people who have fled 
to Jnba to escape fighting in 
the countryside. 

Jute had been easily acces- 
sible only by air for some 
months after the SPLA mined 
the main road east to Kenya 
and bandits began attacking 
convoys on the road south to 
Uganda. 

Diplomats in Khartoum say 
the SPLA will have trouble 
dislodging the large Juba gar- 
rison by direct assault But by 
forcing the closure of the 
airport they can deprive the 
garrison of food, ammunition 
and other supplies in the hope 
that they can starve it into 
submission. 


Washington — Five Ameri- 
cans and two Libyans have 
been charged with illegally 
selling parts of two Lockheed 
L-I0&-30 civilian transport 
aircraft and spares worth $50 
million (about 03 million) to 
Libva (Mohsin All writes). 

Mr Stephen Cowen. an 
American lawyer, said yester- 
day that the indictment by 
Federal grand jury in Atlanta 
was the result of a year-long 
US Customs investigation. 


The seven accused had al- 
legedly used the cover that the 
aircraft were to be used for oil 
exploration in Benin in west 
Africa. They were flown from 
Marietta, about 15 miles 
north-west of Atlanta, to New- 
foundland. then to France, to 
Benin and Anally to Libya. 

The Lockheed L- 100-30 
propellor-driven transport 
plane is a civilian version of 
the company's C-130 military 
aircraft. It is built at the 


The 

DUNHILL 
SALE IS 
NOW ON. 


Lockheed-Georgia plant in 
Marietta. 

Mr Cowen made dear that 
Lockheed is not involved in 
any criminal activity. He said: 
"There was insufficient evi- 
dence to charge anyone from 
Lockheed. It is Lockheed's 
position they did not do 
anything wrong." 

The US has repeatedly ac- 
cused Colonel Gadaffi, the 
Libyan leader, of supporting 
international terrorism and 
has banned the export to 
Libra of American products 
and’ other commodities with 
potential military use. 



K»'o COTTON' POLO SHIRTS: £15 REDUCED TO £2), OR 
3 FOR £79 

FURTHER REDUCTIONS 

100% SILK TIES: £35/£29.SO REDUCED TO £12. OR 3 
FOR £29 

JACKETS: £395/£335 REDUCED TO £150 
KNITWEAR: E.G. 100% SILK £250/£23Q REDUCED TO £99 
KNITWEAR: E.G. 100% COTTON £89/£75/£65 REDUCED 
TO £39 OR 3 FOR £99 

100% COTTON BLOUSON :£135 REDUCED TO £49 


\ni pio.mil in i oNP,vs. \i r-i ki sntin. si n\ir.v>. 

ARt M't AM' Al HARROWS. MU R1U(.L!> 
ASDHMVE1 Ml Huis 



From Richard Wigg 
Madrid 
Eta, the Basque armed sepa- 
ratist organization, has warn- 
ed the Government that it will 
increase attacks on French 
targets in reply to the in- 
creased collaboration with 
Madrid in tbe fight against 
terrorism. 

Eta was also a constant 
theme in the Spanish Parlia- 
ment yesterday, when Senor 
Felipe Gonzalez sought en- 
dorsement for a second term 
as Prime Minister. The vote, a 
foregone conclusion because 
of the Socialist majority, was 
due late last nigbL 


Intervening in the debate, 
Senor Gonzalez agreed to a 
proposal from Senor Adolfo 
Suarez, the former Prime 
Minister who now leads the 
Democratic and Social Centre 
Party, for an all-party parlia- 
mentary committee charged 
with working out a global 
strategy for fighting Eta. 

The Civil Guard announced 
last night that it had fore- 
stalled a grenade attack on its 
barracks in Durango in the 
Basque country similar to 
Monday’s on the Defence 
Ministry in Madrid 

Through the Basque news 
media yesterday. Eta said that 


increased pressure, such as the 
swift handing over of two of 
its members living in south- 
west France for interrogation 
by the Spanish police, would 
not deflect it “on the painful 
road” to achieving its political 
objectives. 

Criticism of the new policy 
by France of summary extra- 
dition was also voiced yester- 
day by three Basque political 
parties, including the Basque 
Nationalists who form the 
government in tbe region. 

They all described the poli- 
cy as an “error” and argued 
such methods would not help 


advance the pacification of the 
Basque region. 

During the past fortnight 
the French authorities have 
deported Senor Domingo 
liurbe. whom the Spanish 
police regard as the chief 
personality in Eta’s military 
wing, to Gabon, West Africa, 
and handed over to the Span- 
ish police two militants said to 
be preparing terrorist attacks 

Senor Suarez's proposal 
would include political and 
social measures as well as 
reviewing the degree of effi- 
ciency of the security forces 
fighting Eta and international 
collaboration, he said. 


Family 

damages 
for park 
stabbing 

Santa Ana. California i Reu- 
ter) -The family of a teenager 
fatally stabbed at 
has been awarded 5600.1 HJU 
(£400.000) in damages by a 
jury that found the amuse- 
ment park negligent. 

The family ot Mel ^ortja. 
aged IS. alleged that Dis- 
nevland failed to provide him 
with adequate cmcracnej. 
medical treatment bv refusing 
10 call outside medical help 
after he was stabbed in the 
park's Tomorrow-land section 
in 1981. 

Hacker is 
arrested 

Washington (Reuter) - 
Government investigators ar- 
rested a sophisticated video 
prankster who twice broke 
into paid television broadcasts 
in April and raised concern 
about the security ot U5 
satellites. „ „ . 

John MacDougall of Ocala. 
Florida, has pleaded guilty to 
operating a satellite transmit- 
ter illegally. 

Hero recalled 

Madrid - Spain remem- 
bered Salvador de Madariaga, 
ihc exiled writer and diplomat 
who stood for democracy 
against Franco, on the 100th 
anniversary of his birth. 

Death penalty 

Kuala Lumpur(AFP) — The 
High Court has sentenced 
Swvit Changlek. a Thai na- 
tional. to death for possessing 
20 oz of marijuana. 

Editor cleared 

. Suva (Reuter) - A Fijian 
journalist. Mr Nemani Delai- 
batiki. associate editor of the 
Fiji Sun. was cleared yester- 
Jday of leaking confidential 
| Cabinet papers. 

Satisfied isles 

Wellington (Reuter) - The 
liny South Pacific territory of 
the’ Tokelau Islands has told a 
UN mission that it does not 
want independence from New 
Zealand. 

House vote 

Washington (Reuter) - The 
House of Representatives has 
voted to impeach Judge Harry 
Claiborne, the chief federal 
judge of Nevada, who has 
refused to leave his lifetime 
post although he is in jail for 
income tax evasion. 

Dowry deaths 

Delhi (Reuter) - At least 
1.672 Indian women haw 
been killed in the past >: 
years in disputes over dowries. 
Parliament heard. 


Baby boom 

Cairo (AFP) — Egypt’s pop- 
ulation grew by I million in 
250 days, reaching 50 million 
on July I. according to official 
figures published yesterday. 

New envoy 

Kinshasa (AFP) - Nguza 
Karl-I-Bond, the former 
Zairean Prime Minister sen- 
tenced to death in 1977 for 
treason and then pardoned, 
has been named as his 
country’s ambassador to the 
United States. 


Worker attitudes mar business potential 

Britain comes closer to 
being a good investment 


Britain again has been omit- 
ted from a list of countries In 
which foreign businessmen are 
recommended to invest. But 
the Business Environment 
Risk Information (Beri) group, 
an international business advi- 
sory body, said that it came 
nearer to inclusion in this 
year's list — computed on 1985 
figures — than it had done for 
the past five years. 

“The basic problems are 
still that Britain’s perfor- 
mances in the areas of relative 
productivity and worker atti- 
tude are very poor,” said Miss 
Ann Pickard, the California 
director of research for Beri, 
which has its headquarters in 
Geneva. 

“But there has been a 
distinct improvement over the 
last five years. Britain was this 
year only one percentage point 
away from inclusion." 

Beri compiled its annual 
report from statistics provided 
by the International Labour 
Organization, the Internation- 
al Monetary Fond and the 
United Nations. It listed in- 
dustrial performance in four 
areas. 

Under the heading of “Rela- 


From Paul Vallely, New York 

five Productivity”, it compared 
manufact uring wages to the 
daily output per worker. By 
this standard, Singapore's 
workforce was by far the most 
productive - producing almost 
twice as much as that of the 
US- and West Germany. 
Britain’s rating was very low. 

Under “Worker Attitude”, 
the report computed days lost 
through disputes and absen- 
teeism, giving to Swiss and 
Japanese workers the highest 
rating, followed by Sooth Ko- 
reans and Taiwanese. 
Bri tain 's performance, though 
better than recent years, was 
still considered very poor. 

In the category of “Techni- 
cal Skills”, Britain was rated 
very highly, and it also per- 
formed relatively well under 
“Legal Framework” — which 
covered laws governing hiring 
and firing, restrictions on ex- 
patriate personnel, tbe level of 
“leftist political influence" 
within the unions, levels of 
labour militancy and union 
corruption. Singapore, Taiwan 
and South Korea, where 
unions are weak and heavily 
regulated, were given die top 
ratings. 


The four categories were 
weighted ami countries were 
■ then listed in four groups 
representing grades of invest- 
ment potential. 

Under “Net Low Cost (con- 
sistently productive work- 
force)" were listed: Singapore, 
Taiwan, South Korea, Bel- 
gium, Switzerland, Japan and 
Tbe Netherlands. 

The second most favoured 
group, “Acceptable Net Costs 
(can be motivated and is 
infrequently militant)”, in- 
cluded: Germany, France, 
Denmark, Malaysia, Egypt, 
fonatia, Norway, tbe Philip- 
pines, United States, Sooth 
Africa, Ireland and Sweden. 

Britain and Australia 
topped the third group, “Net 
High Costs (frequently trou- 
blesome and difficult to 
motivate)", which also includ- 
ed: Portugal, Colombia, Mexi- 
co, Argentina-. Pakistan, Thai- 
land, Ivory Coast, Indonesia, 
Venezuela, Kenya, India, Bra- 
zil, Chile. Spain, Israel, Italy, 
Greece, Turkey and Ecuador. 

The bottom rating "Prohibi- 
tively High Net Costs (consis- 
tently troublesome work- 
force)" was reserved for Mor- 
occo. Pern and Nigeria. 


Bonn plagued by political refugees 

_ .... i, AAA . ~ iU. Anri nl 


From Our Correspondent 
Bonn 

West Germany should ex- 
amine a proposal to amend its 
Constitution to cope with a 
flood of Third World refugees. 
Herr Friedrich Zimmermann, 
said yesterday. 


At present West Germany’s 
basic law gives an unrestricted 
right of entry’ to any foreigner 
claiming political asylum. 

A record total of 100.000 
asylum-seekers are expected 
by the end of this year, 
following an influx of more 


than 42.000 to the end of 
June.The refugees are mostly 
Lebanese, Palestinian. Iranian 
and Turkish^ 

Following a Cabinet discus- 
sion on the problem. Herr 
Zimmermann said West Ger- 
many lacked sufficient means 
to handle such numbers. 



Four years old. 
Seriously underweight 
for her age. 
Scavenging for food 
where she can find it. 
And she’s English. 


With a stepfather who refused to ac- 
knowledge her existence and a mother too 
frightened to help her, this child was being 
slowly and deliberately starved. 

She'd reached the point where she was 
feeding herself out of dustbins. 

It didn’t happen in the famine stricken 
third world, it happened in an English town, 
(like the one you live in). 

The NSPCCs first, most urgent concern 
is for the child. 

Above all the child has to be protected. 
But, where appropriate, we can also provide 
help for children and parents. 

£15.48 can protect a child for two weeks. 
And that’s the sum we’re asking for now 

If you can’t afford quite that much, all 
donations are gratefully received. 

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B JU T I SH TELECOM INTE R H AT I OH A L ■ W E'LL P U T YOU OH THE RIGHT LINES. 






j OVERSEAS NEWS THE TIMES TK 

Sikh grievances unresolved on anniversary of peace plan 

Punjab accord makes progress 
but fails to meet deadlines 


From Michael Hamlyn 
Chandigarh 

The first anniversary of the 
signing of the Punjab accord 
today marks the agreement 
itself — which was hailed as 
bringing peace to the troubled 
state and settling the griev- 
ances of its Sikh population 
which was in virtual tatters — 
even though its specific, time- 
bound undertakings have not 
been carried out. The rate of 
terrorist murders continues. 
Hindu families are still leav- 
ing the slate - more than 
1.000 since October Iasi year 
according to official figures — 
and Sikh dissatisfaction ap- 
pears unabated. 

But this assessment which 
is commonly made, leaves 
aside the accord's real 
achievement 

As Mr Suijil Singh Bamala. 
the Punjab Chief Minister. put 
it to me while speaking in a 
quiet ante-room just off his 
grandiose 30fi-tall office in the 
secretariat building shared 
with the neighbouring state of 
Haryana; “It gave a sense of 
peace in Punjab alter a period 
of turmoil". 

It is true, the accord marked 
an end of the worst phase of 
confrontation between the 
Sikh community and the 
authorities. 

Although a number of 


young extremists are carrying 
on the fight, they are now 
being energetically pursued by 
Mr J. F. Ribciro, the state's 
director general of police who 
was appointed from a techni- 
cally more senior Home Min- 
istry post with specific orders 
to root them out. 

According to Mr Ribeiro 
there are only 200 hard-core 
terrorists left and 'They are on 
the run". Police intelligence 
gathering has plainly im- 
proved. as the police chief was 
also able to reel off the names 
of nine of the leaders of gangs 
now operating. 

Among those killed have 
been some particularly vicious 
extremists, including one 
Ranjit Singh Baba who was 
said personally to have killed 
1 00 people and whose day was 
not complete without some 
act of heedless violence. 

But the main achievement 
of the accord is that after 
elections last autumn it 
brought to power a govern- 
ment of the Sikh political 
party, the Akali Dal. and 
handed over to them the 
responsibility to deal with the 
Sikh problem. 

True, that responsibility has 
divided the Akali Dal and 
enabled opportunistic politi- 
cians to make political capital 
from opposing police actions. 
A rival Akali party led by Mr 


Prakash Singh Badal. a former 
Chief Minister, has split from 
the main group in the state 
assembly, using as a pretext 
the police action to clear 
terrorists out of the Golden 
Temple of Amritsar two 
months ago. Only this week 
one of Mr Surjit Singh’s own 
ministers. Mr Major Singh 
Uboke. publicly denounced 
Mr Ribeiro's latest operation 
as “a fraud". 

But Mr Suijit Singh de- 
clared: “I am an optimist", 
adding that some of the 
dissident Akali already want 
to return to his fold. “I had a 
telephone conversation with 

one an hour back You see. 

they want to stay in the 
mainstream. Badal and Tohra 
{another dissident leader) are 
playing into the hands of the 
extremists. They have adopt- 
ed extremist postures which 
are not liked.” 

Mr Suijit Singh can in any 
case count on the continued 
support of the Congress <!)- 
Party of Mr Rajiv Gandhi, the 
Prime Minister. Mr Gandhi is 
unlikely to allow him to fail, 
although his support lends 
credence to those militants 
who call the Chief Minister a 
tool of the Central Govern- 
ment. 

By a very adroit siategic 
political move, however, Mr 
Gandhi seems to have taken 


the pressure ofT one major 
aspect of the accord. By 
removing Mr Bhajan Lai as 
Chief Minister of Haryana 
and replacing him with Mr 
Bansi Lai. he has reduced the 
opposition to the handover of 
Chandigarh — presently the 
joint capital of both slates — to 
Punjab alone. 

Mr Bansi Lai is a former 
Chief Minister of the state 
with a strong track record of 
efficiency and stern ess. He is 
credited with bringing water, 
electricity and roads to the 
Haryana villagers, and is in 
any case a member of the 
dominant Jat caste. 

Mr Bansi Lai put it to the 
Haryana vis i his way : “Do you 
want to have a capital in an 
old city, or do (you) want to 
build a new capital, with 
architecture to rival the finest 
in the world? Do you want a 
building programme that will 
create thousands of jobs? And 
do you want it all free . . . 
provided with land given by 
Punjab, bought by the Central 
Government and funded by 
the central treasury?” 

Put that way even some of 
the Aka! is are beginning to 
have second thoughts about 
their desire to have Chandi- 
garh exclusively to them- 
selves. 



jBPBBngWK' a; 4* —■**-*> ■■ i 

Bolivian “Leopards" police stand guard on a jungle laboratory capable of making 3,0001b of 
cocaine a week. It was raided in a joint operation by police and American assault troops. 


$100m art 
missing 
at Imelda 
auction 

From Keith Dalton 
Manila 

An auction sale next month 
of “Imelda's trines' - hun- 
dreds of antiques, art and 

ornaments which decorated 
the Philippines New >ork 
consulate and town house or 
Mrs Imelda Marcos - could 
return a S235.000 (fIro.UOO) 
profit, officials say. But two 
paintings worth perhaps 
SI 00 m arc missing. 

Brass title plates and wall 
stains indicate that Picasso's 
“Head of a Woman" and ' an 
Gogh's "Peasant Woman 
Winding Bobbins" were sto- 
len during the February revolt 
that toppled the 20->car re- 
gime of Ferdinand Marcos. 

A campaign ofleuers to Mrs 
Marcos, now living in exile in 
Hawaii, is io be launched by 
the five-month-old Aquino 
Government to try to recover 
the paintings, the committee 
of the Presidential Commis- 
sion on Good Government 
(PCGG). said. 

The auction on August Io 
and 17 will be in the six-siorey 
former town house in Man- 
hattan. 

•Kidnap demand: Muslim 
rebels holding hostage a Swiss 
tourist and his Filipino 
girlfriend yesterday demand- 
ed two million pesos (£6.500) 
for their release, military offi- 
cials said. 



Thank and student 


We have a most persuasive argument for 
choosing a Lloyds Bank Student Account. 

We’ll automatically credit £10 to your 
account, for starters. 



And should you find yourself perilously 
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Namely a Higher Education Loan on 
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L ange explains French role 

Agents ‘could have 
been turned back’ 

From Richard Long, Wellington 


The New Zealand Air Force 
aircraft carrying the two 
French agents to Wallis Island 
would have turned back to 
Auckland if France had not 
made its apology and compen- 
sation payment, Mr David 
Lange, the Prime Minister of 
New Zealand, said yesterday. 

He said that while the Orion 
was in the air. Fans tendered 
its formal apology for last 
year's sabotaging of the 
Greenpeace flagship, the 
Rainbow Warrior, and paid $7 
million (about £4.5 million) in 
compensation into an accoaut 
in Washington. 

* While some of the compen- 
sation money would go to- 
wards defraying the costs 
incurred by New Zealand 
government departments in- 
vestigating the affair, he 
hoped that some of it would be 
set aside to fund developments 
in some of the smaller Pacific 
island nations. 

A decision will have to be 
made by his Cabinet, but be 
hoped that trust funds would 
be set np to assist develop- 
ments in the smaller island 
nations, often no more than a 
string of small atolls, which 
survive largely on stamp sales 
and remittances from abroad. 

The two agents. Captain 
Dominique Prienr and Major 
Alain MafarL were jailed for 

K- 5 Soiorrion **' TV — 

Islands i- 


10 years in November when 
they pleaded guilty to man- 
slaughter charges In connec- 
tion with the sabotage of the 
Rainbow Warrior in Auckland 
Harbour last July. 

They were flown on Tuesday 
to the French-held Wallis 
Island and then transported in 
a French military' aircraft to 
the atoll of Hao. north of the 
French nuclear testing site at 
Mururoa. 

Mr Lange said he had 
received confirmation that 
they had arrived at Hao. which 
is to be their home for the next 
three years under the terms of 
the Rainbow Warrior agree- 
ment arbitrated by Seiior 
Javier Perez de Cuellar, the 
Secretary-General of the Unit- 
ed Nations. 

The New Zealand leader 
defended the action of Mr 
Paul Neazor. the Solicitor- 
General, in issuing a stay of 
proceedings order to halt a 
private prosecution which 
threatened to delay the depor- 
tation. He said that Mr 
Neazor acted without political 
interference or consultation. 

“The simple fact is that we 
have always had a law which 
allows the Solicitor-General to 
intervene to ensure that the 
public interest is upheld and 
the judicial process is not 
abused,” he said. 


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3000 miles 


Guru aide 
jailed for 
poison bid 

Portland. Oregon (UP1) — 
Ma Anand Sheeia. a former 
aide to the Indian guru. 
Baghwan Shree Rajneesh. was 
jailed yesterday for 4V; years 
for attempted murder, arson, 
assault, wiretapping and sal- 
monella poisoning. 

Sheeia, aged 36. a native of 
India who once said of Oregon 
that “the whole state is full of 
idiots", had pleaded guilty 
before District .Court Judge 
Edward Levy to three federal 
and four state charges. 

She was given 69 years in 
prison for her illegal actions 
while serving as chief adviser 
and spokeswoman for the 
guru at their commune in 
central Oregon. 

Sheeia was sentenced to 4'A 
years for tampering with con- 
sumer products, involving the 
salmonella poisoning of doz- 
ens of people eating in restau- 
rants in the area, and 4V: years 
for wiretapping. 

She was also fined $400,000 
(about £260.000). ordered to 
pay more than $69,000 in 
restitution for an arson fire 
and ordered to leave the 
United States when released 
from prison. 


Cuba urges 
more work, 
less reward 

Havana (Reuter) - Cuba's 
Communist Party has pub- 
lished a grim assessment of 
the country's economic per- 
formance during the first half 
of 1986. calling on people to 
work harder with less expecta- 
tion of material reward. 

The 146-member Central 
Committee's findings were 
summarized on the front page 
of the party newspaper 
Urannia. 

Echoing recent criticism by 
President Castro, the Central 
Committee spoke of overman- 
ning. bureaucratic attitudes in 
management, shoddy work- 
manship. lack of motivation 
m the work force and “grow- 
ing disruption and inefficien- 
cy in the whole productive 
apparatus of the country.” 

The Government has in the 
last three months launched a 
campaign against speculative 
gains. 

Granina said that the "pro- 
foundly mistaken" belief that 
material incentives alone 
could solve all of Cuba's 
economic problems had led to 
?*' ‘deep neglect of political and 
ideological work*'. 


Sikhs refused bail 


Toronto (Reuter) - An 
Ontario Supreme Court judge 
has denied bail to three Sikhs 
charged with conspiring to 
kidnap relatives of an Indian 
MPand blow up government 
buildings in Delhi. 

Justice Joseph O'Brien re- 
fused to overturn an earlier 
detention order imposed by a 


court judge 


provincial 
Hamilton. 

Mr O'Brien agreed with 
lower court that the accu 
who want India's Pu: 
province to become an ii 
pendent Sikh state, felt bo 
by religious and political 
ties that outweighed the la 
man. 







THF TIMES THURSDAY JULY 24 1986 


NEW TOYOTAS BOUGHT 

BEFORE SEPTEMBER COMAE 


THE OLD PRICE. 


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In short were offering ‘D’ 
registration Toyotas at the ‘C regist- 
ration prices. 1 ; 

Everything else about a 
new Toyota, however, is 
completely up-to-date. 

Take the Corolla. 

Not for nothing- is it the 
most popular range of cars in the 
world. 

The three pictured here have 
an advanced 12 valve, 1.3 litre 
engine, that delivers its power with 
surprising smoothness and gratify- 
ing economy. 

And naturally, they're all 
equipped to a remarkably 
high standard. For 
instance, they sport an 
electronic tune stereo radio/ 
cassette. The GL Executive 
even boasts an electric sunroof 
amongst an array of luxuries. 

The Corollas, of course, come 
with one feature taken for granted 
on all Toyotas. Namely a reputation 
for reliability and longevity, backed 
by a 6 year anti-corrosion perfor 

ation warranty. 

Clearly a visit to a Toyota 

dealer will prove very 
Find him in Yellow 
or phone 0737 68585 and 
ask for Toyota Saleslink 
Speed, however, is of 
the essence. Our prices 

have to go up at the end 

of August 

So you’d better moveThe cars 

undoubtedly will. 

TOYOTA. 


Corolla 3 door GL £5,990. 


Corolla 4 door GL £6,199. 


- Corolla 5'door’GL Executive. £7455. 


l? 2 L/100 KM* < DOOR URBAN - 


i 


THE TIMES THURSDAY JULY 24 1986 


* -tr -te SL 


SPECTRUM 


An airline forever grounded? 


THE TIMESI 


PROFILE 





BRITISH AIRWAYS 


E verybody knows the two 
big stories about British 
Airways. First, it was sup- 
posed to be the Thatcher 
Government's first privati- 
zation project back in 1979, but after 
an incredible series of hitches it 
remains in the public sector. Second, 
it has recovered from a £544 million 
loss in 1982 to a £181 million profit 
in its last full year. 

What is not generally appreciated 
is the astonishing cultural upheaval 
that has accompanied both stories. 
There was a time when BA execu- 
tives would slap you on the back, 
pour you a gin and tonic and give the 
impression that the Boeing you were 
about to board was a Lancaster in all 
but name. Now they have a Director 
of Human Resources. He is Dr Nick 
Georgiades and in his office flying, 
frankly, is beside the point. 

“When I first started working with 
BA the place was littered with 
military names - we had messes, 
ranks like superintendent, execu- 
tives had their 'patches'. It's still 
there to a certain extent but it's dying 
oul The point is that people who 
were 18 when they went into the 
RAF in 1940 are just reaching 
retirement age now." 

In the old days, says Dr 
Georgiades. running an airline 
meant making sure the same number 
of planes came down that went up. 
Now it's all about “emotional 
labour". 

Putting People First is whaL he 
called his programme of courses for 
all BA staff. They were aimed at 
persuading management to treat 
employees and employees to treat 
customers as if they were what 
psychologists would call human 
beings. This is not a matter of 
glittering dentition and a bright 
"Have a nice day": it is an attempt to 
make people relate as they would to 
their own families. In this, says Dr 
Georgiades. BA leads the world. 

The point is that airlines have to 
market something. Nowadays any 
fool can hurl people around the globe 
in aluminium tubes, all much the 
same. Sometimes you can compete 
on price. But the only real "unique 
selling proposition" is the quality of 
the service - all the strange, formal 
manners that have come to be 
associated with flight 
The problem for BA in the late 
1 970s was how to come to terms with 
the new market conditions. The 
airline was the national flag bearer, 
condensed from the pioneering 
clouds of Empire-class flying boats. 
Imperial Airways. Handley Page 
and. latterly. BEA and BOAC. In 
addition it was obliged to be a 
government department ready to 

f irovide information to answer par- 
iamentary questions. 

It was catastrophically over- 
manned. a problem that was to be 
solved by expanding to soak up the 
excess labour, and n was "product- 
led". In other words the flyers and 
operational executives would come 
up with a route package and then 
leave the market men to sell it 
Nevertheless, when the Tories 
came to power, it seemed to present 
a soft target for privatization. There 
were profits, it looked like the least 
logical corporation to retain in the 





aV 










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l pp 











Privatization is the flight plan: can Lord King shake lose the ropes? 


public sector and flying was still 
sufficiently romantic to guarantee 
public excitement But BA was 
lurching towards an extraordinary 
series of mishaps. For a start, 
profitability went badly wrong and 
the figures instantly exposed the folly 
of the attempt to expand. A damning 
and anonymous document ap- 
peared. clearly written authoritative- 
ly from the inside, and claiming 
horrifying incompetence within the 
company. The prospect of a Septem- 
ber 1981 flotation evaporated. 


I n February 1981 Lord King 
became chairman with losses 
mounting, ferocious price 
competition over the Atlantic 
and the complete impossibility 
of a quick flotation. He started on a 
programme of redundancies which 
was to cut the workforce by 21,000 
over the next few years and he 
transformed the team. Out went the 
flyers, in came the managers. Routes 
and aircraft were judged by perfor- 
mance rather than prestige or patrio- 
tism and the strategy became 
market-led. 

After the virtual collapse of the 
whole operation in 1981-2, balance 
sheet and profit and loss account 
improved at a spectacular rate. But 
still all the King's men couldn't 
make privatization happen. After the 
failure of Laker Airways in 1 982. BA 
found itself drawn into a series of 
lawsuits of terrifying complexity, 
carrying the threat of mountainous 
damages from the American courts. 


Then a Civil Aviation Authority 
report suggested stripping the airline 
of some of its routes and selling them 
to British Caledonian in an attempt 
to balance the competitive climate. 

All this lime the Government was 
insisting BA should have a "blue- 
sky" prospectus — a pristine flotation 
document without any awkward 
question marks — before privatiza- 
tion could go ahead. 

King took on the CAA bead on. He 
would not implement their propos- 
als and he would not resign. The 
Government would have to sack 
him. He won. It was a double 
victory, for internally the airline staff 
stopped viewing him as Thatcher's 
hit-man and began to acknowledge 
that he may be a genuine champion 
of their company. Then the lawyers 


unravelled Laker — only one small 
and manageable suit remains — and 
by the beginning of this year 
flotation seemed imminent. 

But then along came Libya and 
Bermuda Two. The latter is the 
agreement which regulates transat- 
lantic traffic Its "capacity annex" 
expired yesterday, renegotiations be- 
gan in February. For BA this was a 
routine piece of airline diplomacy — 
bilateral agreements are constantly 
being negotiated worldwide. But, to 
their dismay, the Government de- 
manded sweeping changes from the 
Americans, who responded with 
threats of limiting imports. Another 
blot on the prospectus. 

Meanwhile the American raid on 
Libya, with its aftermath of reprisal 
fears, had badly dented BA's trading. 
The smooth profits growth from 
1982 was about to be interrupted. 
Rotation, once scheduled for this 
month, was off again. 

The most likely scenario now is 
that Bermuda Two will be settled by 
the autumn and BA will float in . 
. February 1 987 —if it is left any later 
it will become hopelessly entangled 
with the run-up to a General 
Election. If they miss that, top 
management may face their most 


serious crisis of morale yet Many 
came primarily for the move into the 
private sector. If there is a Labour 
Government there may never be a 
flotation. 

In addition, the financial argu- 
ments in favour of privatization 
have become overwhelming. In the 
autumn the airline embarks on a 10- 
year, £5 billion spree. It needs to 
replace its fleet at the rate of £550 
million a year for the next decade, 
and this year it intends ordering 16 
Boeing 747-WOs and 80 engines, the 
biggest British airline order ever. 
Last year the Government allowed 
only £250 million of new borrowing. 


M eanwhile there is the 
ticklish political prob- 
lem of which engines 
to buy. There are 
three contenders: 
Pratt and Whitney and General 
Electric, both American, and Rolls- 
Royce. They will probably buy GE. 
which has RR components thatcould 
be said to amount to 30 per cent of 
the total. 

Now the question is: does the 
Government retain the political will 
to go for the February deadline, or 
would it prefer a risk-free run-up to 
the election? The money raised, in 
either case, will not be the billion or 
more it might have been — lower 
profits and uncertain market condi- 
tions now suggest that £800 million 
is more likely. 

At their headquarters in Speedbird 
House BA executives still breathe 
the kerosene-scented air of 
Heathrow. Many have models of 
aircraft on spindly tripods decorat- 
ing their desks. But King's men are 
not flyers — they are dour, evangelis- 
tic Heads of Public Affairs like 
David Burnside; suave, assured chief 
executives like Colin Marshall; or 
even old hands who have seen the 
light like Jim Harris, Director of 
Marketing. For them flying is just 
another business and any 
schoolboyish excitement from the 
past is just grist to the marketing mill 
— Burnside plans to fly Concorde 
over the Stock Exchange on flotation 
day. A nice touch for the brokers, but 
hardly Handley Page. 


BIOGRAP 


1924: Imperial Airways formed. 

1935: British Airways Ltd first 
registered. 

1939: Two companies merged into 
BOAC. 

1946: British European Airways 
formed. 

1974: BEA and BOAC dissolved to 
make way for new British 
Airways. 

1976: first Concorde service between 
London and Bahrain. 

1979: John Nott, Trade Secretary, 
announces plans to privatize 
BA as soon as possible. 

1980: Privatization postponed over 
worries about performance. 


1981: Lord King takes over and 
launches survival plan. 

1982: Laker Airways collapses and 
anti-trust suit launched.1 983: 
Colin Marshall appointed chief 
executive. Privatization 
■ postponed in wake of Laker 
legal problems. 

1984: CAA report recommends 
forcing the sale of many BA 
routes. Privatization 
postponed again. 

1985: Out of court settlement agreed 
with Laker liquidator. 

1986: July target for sale abandoned 
over Bermuda Two 
renegotiation. 


Bryan Appleyard 


© Tima Newspapers Ltd 1986 


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During the late 1950s about 
1,500 young teenagers were 
killed or badly injured on the 
roads in Britain every year. By - 
1984 the toll had doubled. 
These figures and the masking 
of their relentless rise will be 

raised at a European Road 
Safety Year conference at 
GufldhaU, City of London, 
today by Frank West-Oram, 
vice-chairman of the 
Pedestrians' Association. 

“This killing of duldien is a 
national disaster tat it is 
obscured by tbe decline in road 
casualties as a whole", be 
says. “Among reasons for that 
general decline are stronger 
cars, the wearing of seat belts 
and less walking. Tbe result is 
that people think the roads are 
safer, although for pedestrians 
they are becoming more and 
more dangerous.” 

The Department of Trans- 
port is aware of these facts. 
David Smith, head of road 
safety, said earlier this year 
that the decline in casualties 
among motorists “seems likely 
to leave pedestrians the largest 
single rbad-sser casualty 
gr ou p in the 1990s". 

Peter Bottomley, Minister 
for Roads, has gone further 
than any of bis predecessors in 


Rata per 100,000 




Child pedestria n s 
led and seriously halved 

Aged 10-14 


1958 60 62. .64 68 68 70 72 74 76 78 80 82 84 


teenage casualties has yet 
been taken. 


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advising road safety engineers 
to -switch their attention from 


ENDS SATURDAY 26 TH JULY ♦ 


to -switch their attention from 
vehicles to people. “A third of 
all journeys are made entirely 
on foot. Most other journeys 
involve walking to some de- 
gree. That most make pedes- 
trians the most important 
class of road user. Too often 
planners seem to forget that”, 
he said in ApriL Bat no 
successfol action for reducing 


“Tbe first priority is to do 
something about the speed at 
which drivers travel in towns", 
Mr West-Oram said. "We 
know from the work of Profes- 
sor Ian Howard] at the Uni- 
versity of Nottingham that 
casualties occur in residential 
areas becaose drivers i&iore 
children and not the other way 
round- We need to narrow the 
roads and use sleeping police- 
men to slow down cars", be 
said. 


“The Pedestrians' Associa- 
tion wants to see better polic- 
ing and improved driver 
training as well. In Norway 
yon get a driving licence only 
after passing two tests. Yon 
receive a provisional licence 
after the first but it is made 
permanent only after another 
test, a year later. Something 


Terence Bendixson 


Unbowed by 
revolution 


^ V„ L * 


Nien Cheng spent six years in a prison 
cell, starved and brutalized, because 
she refused to say that she was a spy 


When the Cultural Revolu- 
tion came to the streets of 
Shanghai in the summer of 
1966. Nien Chang knew that 
the Red Guards would come 
for her. She had recently 
retired as adviser to Shell, a 
position she had been asked 
io take after her husband, its 
general manager, had died. 

The Red Guards had set 
about ridding China of the 
“Four Olds" — old culture, 
customs, habits and ways of 


thinking - in devastating 
raids of destruction and loot- 
ing. Nien Cheng took what 
money she had in savings and 
shared it between her three 
servants. Then she sat down 
to wait in a room filled with 
her exceptional collection of 
jade and porcelain. 

On August 30, the Red 
Guards took her house apart; 
they stamped on the porce- 
lain. tore up the carpets and 
burned her books. When, at 
subsequent "struggle 
meetings”, she was called on 
to “confess” that she was a 
spy. she refused. She was 
taken off in a black jeep to the 
No.l Detention House where 
she spent six-and- a-half years 
in solitary confinement. 

She was released from pris- 
on in March, 1973 and finally 
obtained permission to leave 
China in 1980. She now lives 
in a fiat in Washington. 


Nien Cheng is 71. very thin 
and elegant, precise in move- 
ment and speech. Her English 
is almost perfect for she spent 
many of her early years in 


isolation. Her gums bled so 
profusely that she was unable 
to eat: she caught pneumonia, 
developed a gynaecological 
condition that she was told 
was cancer and spent months 
recovering from the sores and 
paralysis caused by 
handcufTs. 

But she did not confess. “It 
was important to me that I 
was a Christian. I found it 
easier to accept death. I think 
I survived because, even 
though I have only one 
kidney. I am very strong. And 
I never wanted for anything 
when I was young. 

“If. on the day they took 
me, they had told me l would 
be there for sivand-a-half 
years, my spirit would have 
broken. But all my life I'xe 
been interested in political 
developments and I was sure 
that Mao was going to die 
before me. 1 knew that when 
he did things would change. I 
am an eternal optimist.” 

When Nien Cheng 
emerged from prison she 
discovered that in Shanghai 
alone some 10.000 people 
had been killed by the Red 
Guards. "I venture to guess, 
perhaps half-a-million mur- 
dered in the whole of China, 
perhaps 100 million 
persecuted." The facts are not 
better known, she says, be- 
cause there is a determination 
within China to look forward 
and not back . 

Like others in her position, 
Nien Cheng had not foreseen 
the possibility of such a 
brutal revolution. “Even 


: 

'I 


Pnter Tnflunor 



Nien Cheng: “Nice people became animals' 


England and America. The 
account of her experiences 
appears today as a book — 
Life and Death in Shanghai 
(Grafton Books. £1195). 


One of the things that 
sustained Nien Cheng in 
prison was knowing that she 
had to survive in order to 
return to her daughter Mei 
Ping, an actress with the 
Shanghai Rim Studio. On the 
day of her release she learnt 
that her daughter was dead. 
She was said to have commit- 
ted suicide but in fact she was 
murdered during interroga- 
tion and attempts to make 
her repudiate her mother. 



“As soon as I heard Mei 
Ping was dead. I thought TU 
leave China and write about 
it'. A friend said 'You can 
make it. You must let others 
know*. 1 still feel that those 
who live in freedom should 
be told what happened during 
the Cultural Revolution. So 
much has been written about 
the holocaust: so little about 
us". 


Nien Cheng’s personal sto- 
ry is one of fortitude. Her 
whole manner suggests not 
toughness but probity, a mor- 
al certainty and determina- 
tion. Being the granddaughter 
of an historian who wrote 
well of some of China's early 
emperors, daughter of a vice- 
minister in a Peking govern- 
ment department and wife of 
a former diplomat, she was 
an obvious target for attack 
and vilification as a 
capitalist 

Her years in prison were 
marked by repeated interro- 
gations, near starvation, in- 
tense cold, brutality and 


Mao couldn't control it when 
it came. There is momentum 
to a violent revolution. 1 
came to a conclusion after my 
experiences: that a human 
being is very complicated, 
with many unpleasant hidden 
things. When the circum- 
stances are right they come 
oul. In the Cultural Revolu- 
tion. there was a state of 
constant hysteria. Nice peo- 
ple became animals". 

Nien Cheng is still critical 
of the Chinese system and 
fears more trouble unless 
some degree of freedom is 
given to the people — “though 
wc are tolerant and can put 
up with a lot”. She adds: *T 
hope my book is construc- 
tive. I do not want people to 
think the Chinese are a brutal 
race. When the moment 
came for me to leave. I found 
it very painful. ” 

Many of the Chinese who 
left to join families already- 
living abroad have since re- 
turned. They found the West 
too lonely. Nien Cheng does 
not intend to go back to 
China- 

She likes her new Washing- 
ton life now that she has 
learnt to drive again and to 
manage her insurance and tax 
and investments. She is also 
studying western literature at 
the Institute for Learning in 
Retirement. 

”! don't feel lonely", she 
says. “I was widowed at 42. 
I'm used to being alone. And 
six-and-a-half years in soli- 
tary confinement is a marvel- 
lous preparation for being 
alone." 




Caroline Moorehead 


(QTimM Newspapers Ltd. 1966 


CONCISE CROSSWORD NO 1010 


ACROSS 


similar should be introduced 
for new drivers in Britain." 

Reducing casualties among 
the 1 0-1 4s presents special 
difficulties. Such children are 
beginning to explore on their 
own and tend to give up the 
“Green Cross Code" ritual. 

They learn to cross tbe 
roads by copying ad alts. In 
time most successfully master 
the dangerous trick of choos- 
ing a gap in tbe traffic, aiming 
for the rear hamper of the car 
ahead of it, and marching into 
tbe road. 

Before the year is over about 
3,000 young boys and girls will 
-fall this test. They wOl be 
killed or hurt. To some extent 
this is not surprising, since 
nowhere are children taught 
that the way most ad nits cross 
the roads is both difficult and 
stupid. 


8 Rubella (6.7) 

9 Pen Up (3) 

10 Close resident (9) 

11 Alpscall(S) 

13 Hint (7) 

16 Stimulus (7) 

19 Likeness (S> 

22 Licdctccior<9) 

24 Hatrtang)c<3) 

25 S Pole pioneer (5.8) 


aaawwBsa awawa 




1 News service f6) 

2 Lured (6) 

3 Heavy glove (8) 

4 Soak in (6) 

5 Foolhardy (4) 

6 Niche (6) 

7 Spirit (6) 

12 Elcc resistance mca- 

16 Bestow (6) 

14 January 6 festival (S) 17 Column (6) 

15 Scold constantly (3) 18 Oih <6) 


20 Nearly (h) 

21 Use up (6) 

23 Theatre gallery Hi 


SOLUTIONS TO NO 1009 

AttW^SgSli-SSS 3 

DOWN: I Jamb 


18 Ruler 20 Event 2| Tonic 22 qSm H ard 


V 









X 



THE TIMES THURSDAY JULY 24 1986 


19 


BOOKS 


Scribe greater 
than his tribe 


* i-fi V 


•tnfcK 




'**•** M 




Pr ** J 


here is a quaint American 
saying that goes something 
like. "It's only the fellow on 
the outside who can tell a 
snail how his shell looks." Shiva 
Naipaul was an expert on the shell 
on that carapace of language and 
custom that obscures our isolated 
and vulnerable selves, and this 
primarily because he was just such 
an outsider. He was bom in 
Trinidad ("of denuded Indian 
ancestry") but travelled to England 
in the mid-Sixtics where, before his 
death last year at the age of forty, he 
had already; made his reputation as 
a major writer. And yet, as be says 
here, he retained an “. . .abiding 
sense of being on the outsideTof 
being a man without a tribe.” 
Within the easy complicities of 
English society, and especially with- 
in the casual bonhomie of the 
metropolitan world in which he 
worked, he was completely accept- 
ed. And yet there was a sense in 
which be always felt himself, to 
stand apart. That is the secret of his 
strength as a writer. 

. This is his last book. It is a 
collection of articles and essays 
hugely inspired by an account of 
Australia that he proposed to write; 
but, if it is incomplete, it is not in 
any sense sketchy or unpolished. 
There is a revealing aside here when 
he mentions the three different sets 
of dictionaries that he had . bought 
for the project — Australian, En- 
glish. and American. Apart from 
anything else, this prolusion is 
testimony to his carefulness as a 
writer; he always found the exact 
word, the word with the appropriate 
resonances and the precise affili- 
ations. because his understanding of 
reality was an exacting one. As a 
result he was a master of language, 
one of the few writers whom n is a 
consistent pleasure to read. 


Peter Ackroyd 
reviews the 
last collection 
of essays by 
an outsider who 
saw on the inside 


AN UNFINISHED 
JOURNEY 
By Shiva Nafpanl 

H Ornish Hamilton, £9.95 


But the precision of his prose 
meant that he was an astute debater 
of other people's rhetoric and cliche; 
the essays in this collection can be 
very sharp - , acute both in perception 
and in judgement His article here 
on “The Illusion of the Third 
World”, for example, ought to be 
studied by anyone whip even pre- 
tends to. have an opinion on such 
matters — be argues that the con- 
cept of the “Third World” was 
created out of a potent combination 
of condescension and inverted rac- 
ism, which dehumanizes those it 
claims io represent 
In another piece, “Flight into 
Blackness”, he criticizes those who 
with some guOt-ridden nostalgje de 
la boue blindly extol the merits of 
aboriginal culture — the aboriginal 
: himselfbeing now part of “the haute 
couture of prevailing intellectual 
fashion.” His dismissal of these 
conventional liberal pieties is al- 
ways refreshing, but it is also just 
His two essays on India are cogent 
examples of political realism, for 
instance, precisely because he 
avoids all the fashionable neolo- 



of the imagination; a piece of 
fiction, say.” Precisely like a piece of 
fiction, in feet, since Shiva Naipaul 
knew that an artist’s vision cannot 
be separated into its component 
parts. His writing encompassed 
both novels and journalism because 
he did not see them as separate 
activities — both were undertaken 
in the same spirit, both of them 
defining a world that only he could 
see. But the other quality that 
animates all of his work is its 
humour if he is acerbic in his 
cultural analyses, his understanding 
ofhuman behaviour is no less acute, 
but it is tempered by sympathy. 


H 


e did not particularly like 
what he saw in Sri Lanka; 
and yet he cannot help 
but be engaged and fasci- 
nated by the reality of that place. He 
had a most infectious laugh, partic- 
ularly when confronted by the 
absurd or the grotesque, and it can 
be heard echoing through these 


gisms and academic dichfcs that 
bedevil the usual descriptions of 
contemporary social or cultural life. 
Shiva Naipaul was one of those rare 
writers who possessed a deep and 
genuine “creative” talent alongside 
an aptitude for intellectual analysis 
and inquiry; 

The last essay in this collection. 
“An Unfinished Journey”, marks 
the beginning of the book on 


Australia that he did not live to- 
finish. Paradoxically he begins, in 
Sri Lanka; but, as always in his 
writing, the specific destination is 
less important than the nature of the 
journey itself He was never quite 
sure of the meaning of his travels 
and “journeys undertaken in this 
spirit — acknowledging, that is. the 
obscority of the impulses that have 
provoked them — resemble a work 


is a larger vision, however, 
which makes bis writing memora- 
ble; and in his account of the 
individuals whom he encounters 
(Shiva NaipauTs journalism is on 
one level a series of conversations) 
he discerns “the pervasive dread 
which, to a greater or lesser extent, 
we all share when faced with the 
prospect of nothingness, of form- 
lessness, of in visibility.” This is the 
condition specifically to be met in 
the detribalized, he said, amongst 
whom he quoted himself So the 
“unfinished journey" was also a 
journey towards himself — “How to 
exist, how to become properly real 
that is the question.” It is this tone 
of self-communing that lends his 
prose its power; just as it is his 
profound detachment as an outsider 
that gives his observations their 
intensity. 

He died so suddenly that it was 
hard to believe he had gone; and it 
was only when I read the last 
sentences of this fine book that his 
absence really struck borne: And yet 
this knowledge came, also, with 
another realization: that, with writ- 
ing like this, he would never wholly 
die. 


Fruitiness and wit from old Cambridge sparks 


Lord Cantcloupe is arranging 
his collusive cuckolding so 
that his wife can produce an 
heir, the first one having 
turned out to be not all there. 
A sinister classics master and 
his pupil, who smiles as 
pitilessly as Apollo, arc run- 
ning a summer reading school 
that is to fnd with dangerous 
rites of passage at a race 
meeting. Meanwhile in a gut- 
ter hear the swamps of the 
Laguna Veneta iheie . is a 
disgusting snipe who may be 
heir to the Canteloupe tides 
and estate. People lave names 
like Ptolemaeos Tunne, and 
talk about cherubic mandibles 
and the wiHowed banks of 
Father Cam. This alchemist's 
mixture of weird nobs, myste- 
rious treasure hunt, taboo 
carnal variations, and ostenta- 
tious cleverness is. of course, 
the third volume of Simon 
Raven's scries of novels with 
the overall title The First-Born 
of Egypt. . 

Ravcnland is a confedera- 
tion of Domford Yates, Ron- 
ald Firbank. and. because 
flying hooves play such a part 
in the denouement of this one, 
Dick Francis. It is Gothic, 
camp, and snobbish. It is not 


for those of a nervous disposi- 
tion, being pretty lubricious in 
places; it also has an elitist 
contempt for the modem 
world, and a wistfulness for 
the supposed vanished values 
of the old world. It is an 
exercise in cerebral superior- 
ity, so mulish on esoteric mat- 
ters ranging from Eton Fives 
to Homeric hexameters. It is 
stylish, and a bit sick; and if 
vou arc at home in Raven's 
rookery, you will enjoy it. 

Freddie Raphaels third col- 
lection of short stories also has 
the fruitiness and wit of that 
golden Cambridge quinquen- 
nium, when something was 
felling like rain off the Fens, 
and it was the typewriter keys 
of the young Gliterati. Like 
Simon Raven, Raphael never 
lets Prudence or Probability 
(boring old fens) get in the 
way ofa good, or even a bad, 
epigram. Like Raven he does a 
display dance with his cultural 
c.v_, including classical refer- 
ences. His fictional world is 
not so fantastic as Raven's, 
but kitchen-sink it ain’t Loca- 
tions range from Highgate to 
Hollywood, and from 
Lea visile Cambridge and hell- 
bole Charterhouse to the lim- 


FICTION 


Philip Howard 

BEFORE THE COCK 
CROW 
By Simon Raven 

Muller, Blond & White. 
£9.95 

THINK OF 
ENGLAND 
By Frederic Raphael 
Cape, £8.95 

THE MADHOUSE 
By Alexander Zinoviev 
Translated by Michael 
Kirkwood 
Gollancz, £12.95 

SWANSONG 

By Richard Francis 

Collins, £10.95 


bo of show-biz rewrite men. 
The characters tend to be 
Jewish Ambitious Writers and 
Intellectuals, or Jawies. There 
is a longer, different and 
moving story about the day 
that Franco was meant to visit 
a small town in Spain. As in 
Raven, there is a tale about the 


bitchiness of modem literary 
reviewing, as a precautionary 
measure. There is usually a 
sting in the tail and stylish 
scales on the body. Those who 
enjoy cleverness will find the 
stories shine brilliantly on the 
surface. The sort of high- 
minded prigs we usually ex- 
pect from Cambridge might 
find them meretricious. 

. The Madhouse is a more 
serious book than the two 
previous ones under review. 
Professor Zinoviev was finally 
expelled from' the . Soviet 
Union in 1978, and Zheltyi 
dom (literally; the yellow 
house, the psychiatric institu- 
tion where dissidents are sent) 
was published in Russian in 
1980. It made 770 pages of 
small type, and more dun 800 
separate texts, or short chap- 
ters each with its own heading. 
The English edition has been 
abridged roughly by half; evi- 
dently with the author com- 
plaining, as writers will when 
the subs get at .them. By 
indirections and patchwork it 
tdls the career and thought 
(downwards) of a young intd- 
tectual known only as JRF (for 
Junior Research Fellow) so 
dim that we do not learn his 


name in the Kaficaesque Mad- 
house of the USSR. Not a lot 
happens. JRF gets turned 
down for the list of approved 
candidates for party member- 
ship. He is sent on a harvest- 
ing trip to the country. The 
texts dart from dramatic dia- 
logue to philosophy, from 
history, with Stalin and the 
rest of the lads making guest 
appearances, to verse that, at 
any rate in translation, is 
doggerel: 

Hip, hip, O comrades mine, 

• . hoorayl 

Now soon will come the 
wished for day. 

The effect is a cross between a 
long scream, a nervous break- 
down, and a Tad lean indict- 
ment of a regime. 

Swansong is a roman not so 
much & ctefasaloquet, about a 
Platinum Lady Prime Minis- 
ter who arranges a tittle war in 
the South Atlantic to get- her 
off the hook. Her husband 
called Derek does, carpentry. 
Other, well-known characters 
appear in cartoon masks. Fun- 
ny in parts; satirical in parts. 
Alasdair Gray did the Sterne 
typography to 
first 


for drunkenness 


Howto 
kiss frogs 


POETRY 


Robert Nye 






Mary Connell is a new name to 
me and Iter little book Help is 
on the Way (The Bodies Head, 
£4.95) comes with a foreword 
by Graham Greene, which 
makes yon think that she most 

be middlebrow, or not really so 
much a poet as an entertainer. 
Surprise, surprise; for Connell 
turns out to be genuinely 
moving, and also memorable 

in that style that owes some- 
thing to Emily Dickinson and 
perhaps even more to Sterie 
Smith; in other words the 
conversational naive that has a 
touch of witty wisdom. 

See especially her “How to 
Write a Novel” (enough to give 
even Anthony Burgess writer's 
block), and the two lines that 
first set Mr Greene to reading 
her , lines dealing on the 
surface, as he says, with the 
legend of the Prince turned 
into a frog, and waiting for the 
kiss to change him back: 

Am 1 kissing wrong frogs? 

Or am I kissing frogs wrong? 


Shaw once wrote to a newspa- 
per, accusing it of misrepre- 
senting his views on 
Shakespeare. They printed it, 
only Shaw had got the wrong 
newspaper. What followed is 
typical of the delight you can 
gel from this book, and also of 
the delight Shaw took in being 
Shaw. 

He wrote a^io, to apolo- 
gize, and then, like a child 
suddenly realizing that here 
was a whole new set of 
playmates, threw in 1800 
words of his views on Shake- 
speare. They printed that too. 
Anyone reading this collection 
of bis letters to the papers will 
be struck by two things. The 
first is that once there was 
enough space in the letters 
columns to allow a man to do 
this sort of thing, though Shaw 
lived long enough to write 
short notes; he always knew 
his market. 

The second is that a profes- 
sional author could find the 
time, but here the editors step 
in. Before submitting his let- 
ters Shaw would expand them 
into articles and send them off 
to foreign news agencies: noth- 
ing was wasted The monster 
he had made of himself was 
always a commercial property. 

It was also a remarkable 
creation. Only rarely do you 
hear the stage machinery 


Letters 
to the 
humbug 

Byron Rogers 


AGITATIONS 

By Bernard Shaw 

Lorrimer Publishing, 
£16.95 


Again, if flogging in the 
Royal Navy prompted such 
virtue as was claimed, why 
should the practice not be 
extended? “The Chinese, m- 
veterately democratic and log- 
ical flog their admirals as well 
as their humbler heroes.” 
There are some lovely mo- 
ments in this book. Humbug 
is everywhere on the run, from 
the humbug surrounding the 
first reactions to the sinking of 
the Titanic (Shaw, protested 
Conan Doyle, did not know 
where to stop), to the humbug 
of Coronations in the 20th 


century. 

And everywhere he is let 
down. Hitler lets him down by 


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Nihilism and “its occasionally 
picturesquely explosive 
murders”. Here poise is every- 
thing and it does irritate. 

But this is rare For most of 
the 75 vears that these letters 
cover no joins show, and you 
lake Shaw at his own estima- 
tion of himself, the perfectly 
rational mind, untethered by 
time or emotion, and at the 
service of humanity. 

He was always trying to 
help- In I8S8 he congratulated 
Jack the Ripper on his contri- 
bution to social reform. Just 
four murders, and the condi- 
tions existing in the East End 
had become a national scan- 
dal. “Indeed, if the habits of 
duchesses only admitted of 
their being decoyed into 
Whitechapel backyards, a sin- 
gle experiment in slaughter- 
house anatomy _ on an 
aristocratic victim might fetch 
in a round half million — . - 


\ 


that other people are as clever 
as I am myself"). The British 
Government, faced by a series 
of Irish bomb outrages, lets 
him down by forbidding the 
importation of dynamite. 
This, he argues, is an offence 
against Free Trade. 

And on it goes, on marriage 
and the atomic bomb (he 
welcomed it, foreseeing a bi- 
zarre form of cheap energy), 
and on capital punishment 
(approved in theory, but not 
in method). There were blind 
spots. The Tsar could do no 
right and Stalin no wrong. 

But Russia apart, you arc is 
the company of a remarkable 
man. not one of whose opin- 
ions you can predict This, 
astonishingly, gives a volume 
of letters a tension, for you 
wait to see which way the man 
will jump; In the end it is 
about athletics. 


Rump rump rump 
from a laconic swinger 


Basie was revered in jazz 
because bis band, like his, 
piano playing, swung more 
than any thing else On the 
horizon; and in both cases it 
was not because he threw 
everything into the music, bnt 
because he left things oul As a 
young man his playing bad 
been flashy and tricksy, in the 
mid-Thirties, when he started 
to become famous, be had 
already pared his style down 
to a kind of shorthand that 
kept the marvellous engine of 
his band ticking over at just 
the right speed. Somewhere in 
this book be refers to the 
Kansas City stomp style 
which he describes as a steady 
rump rump rump rump on the 
floor of the dance hall above — 
never fast, he says, just nice 
and steady. 

Albert Murray has made the 
wise decision to write this 
book in the same style - that 
is, to let Basie's laconic remi- 
niscences flow across the page 
in a warm, conversational 
style. Even when he is te lling 
os nothing, the writing swings 
amiably “1 went and got mar- 
ried right around the same 
time that 1 got my first car. 
Frankly, I'd just as soon skip 
that part of the story.” 

But he has plenty of curios- 
ity about the early days. The 
lak 30 years arc dealt with 
feirly summarily, the touring 
and the feme; what makes the 
best writing and the best 
reading is the atmospheric 
recall of bfc childhood in Red 
Bank. New Jersey (his father 
was a contracting gardener 
who wanted young Basie to 
follow him into the pruning 
and mowing business) and the 
hectic life of a young jazz 
musician in the Twenties and 
Thirties. Racial discrimina- 
tion, social conditions, things 
like that don't interest him 
very much; it's all the odd 
people and places that engage 
his memory. His friend Elmer 
Williams, who never said 
anything much and who, 
when they met again after five 
years, stood beside him star- 


MOes Kington 


GOOD MORNING 
BLUES 

The Autobiography of 
Count Basie 
By Corot Base and 
Albert Murray 

Heinemann, £14.95 


ing across the street trying to 
think of some greeting for naif 
an hour. Drummer Sonny 
Greer, who was more talk- 
ative: “We stood there on the 
sidewalk swapping lies about 
old times and bringing each 
other up to date.” 

He remembers how he in- 
sisted, for the first tour, on 
being paid 40 dollars a week, 
not a cent less. His boss 
looked taken aback bnt finally 
gave in. For. the next tour, the 
boss said that this time there 
was no question of his getting 
40 dollars; it would have to be 
80 dollars, the same as every- 
one else. 

Whether this book would 
appeal to those not m love 
wrih jazz history I am not 
sure. For anyone remotely 
interested, it’s compulsive; 
even though he spills few 
beans and seldom gets excited. 
A rare show of emotion 
comes, oddly, when he talks 
about rail uaveL “I have 
always been crazy about 
trains. I love the way they 
sound, whether they are dose 
up or fer away. I like the way 
the bell claps and also all the 
little ways they do things with 
the whistle. And 1 also like the 
way they feel when you are 
riding them and hearing them 
from the inside-. Lots of 
times, instead of me getting 
into my bed. I used to tit and 
look out of the window most 
of the night as we rambled on 
from one place to another. 
That was music to me." 

He’s right Trains swing, 
net as Basie's music swung. 
This is a good, swinging book, 
for a long train journey, 
ideally. 


Ordinary 

Cabinet 

Puddings 

Woodrow Wyatt 


CABINET 
By Peter Heonessy 

Blackwell. £19.50 . 


It is easier to say what 
Cabinets used to be like than 
what they are today or ought to 
be. That is the difficulty with 
this kind of book, which is 
balanced in its research of the 
past bnt gets wobbly as time 
passes. 

The author quotes the Duke 
of Wellington’s comment after 
his first Cabinet as Prime 
Minister: “An extraordinary 
affair. I gave than their orders 
and they wanted to stay and 
discuss them.” Many Prime 
Ministers mast have echoed 
the Duke's irritation, forced to 
getting their way by subtier 


There is too modi mystique 
about Cabinets. Usually they 
are composed of quite ordinary 
people, and their style changes 
when Prime Ministers change. 
The chairman of all boards or 
companies differ in their meth- 
ods, and in the amount of 
authority they can or want to 
exert A Prime Minister is 
lucky in the untrammelled 
power to sack or appoint 
members of the Cabinet 

Busy Ministers meeting as a 
Cabinet for a few boors a week 
obviously can come to only 
broad conclusions. Much iff 
the work of government is 
dele ga ted to Cabinet commit- 
tees, with the Prime Minister 
choosing the members and the 
chairman of each. Mr 
Heonessy helpfully lists the 
multitude of snch committees, 
about the existence iff which 
Mrs Thatcher has been frank- 
er than previous Prime Minis- 
ters. A glance at the list shows 
how utterly impossible it 
would be for any full Cabinet 
to deal effectively with all the 
subjects concerned; and why a 
Prime Minister who has the 
will can easily achieve domi- 
nance, making the tag primus 
inter para obsolete. 

Mr Heonessy has a fair 
complaint that Cabinets are 
not gifted, because they are 
drawn almost entirely from the 
second-rate material in the 
Commons. Yet if all the 
Cabinet were talented where 
would bet the representation 
for the vast majority who are 
not? A Cabinet rims best with 
four or five outstanding Minis- 
ters, and the others not pre- 
senting to be great men. 

Mr Heonessy is short on 

suggestions for improving our 
unsatisfactory system of Cabi- 
net government which never- 
theless is more satisfactory 
than any other so far devised 
for Britain. He would like 
political ministerial cabinets 
advising Ministers, overriding 
the cavil servants, as they seem 
to have in France. He has not 
noticed the growth in power of 
Junior Ministers, of whom 
there are several for each 
important Department. These 
are ail the political cabinets 
that any Senior Minister 
Should require around him. 

Mr Heonessy also urges an 
inquiry into the Cabinet sys- 
tem. It would be a waste of 
time. No self-respecting Prime 
Minister, now or in the future, 
would take any notice iff it. 


Triumph and toil 
of no mean race 


Scotland, long one of the poor 
countries of Europe, pros- 
pered mightily in the Nine- 
teenth Century, many of its 
people did noL The perspec- 
tives of the social historian 
and the economic historian. 
Professor Smout observes, 
show our century in very 
contrasting lights.- "The age- 
of great industrial triumphs 
was an age of appalling social 
deprivation” He confesses 
himself “astounded by the 
toleration, in a country boast- 
ing of its high moral standards 
and basking in the spiritual 
leadership at a Thomas Chal- 
mers, of unspeakable urban 
squalor... What was the point 
of all those triumphs of the 
great Victorian age of industry 
if so many- people were un- 
speakably oppressed by its 
operation?" 

This is rousing stuff and it is 
the central question of a book 
that is, at the very least, an 
admirable example of how 
academic history may yet be 
written for the genera) reader. 
It is deeply enjoyable, lively as 
Macaulay or Trevelyan, 
packed with interesting detail, 
illuminating anecdote, and 
pithy observation. It is given a 
unity, rare in such books, by 
the persistence of its central 
question, which is perhaps the 
modern equivalent of the one 
that perplexed the Victorians 
themselves, of how to recon- 
cile foe idea of a good and 
loving God with foe existence 
of evil and foe doctrine of 
damnation. 

Certainly the picture he 
paints of urban Scotland is 
wretched. Housing was terri- 
ble; as late as 1917 foe Royal 
Commission revealed that 
there were more than four 
persons per room is 10.9 per 
cent of Glasgow’s houses. The 
towns were insanitary, diet 
deplorable, and wages general- 
ly low, Edward Young, mak- 
ing an investigation for the 
United States Congress, at- 
tributed the great demand for 
Oyde-built ships to their low 
cost; he described Scottish 
industry as unable to compete 
abroad without low wages. 
Infant mortality was high, 
drunkenness frightful, prosti- 
tution rife, illegitimacy com- 
mon. One wonders how 
anyone survived. 

One wonders too if foe 
historian is not overdoing it a 
bit Historians can fell victim 
to their material, and the 
material available to a social 
historian will often encourage 
him to paint a dark picture. 
Police reports, after all, con- 
cern themselves with the crim- 
inal and unruly, and ignore 
the law-abiding. Reformers 
stress abuses. Commissions 
report on what is unsatisfac- 
tory. Poverty attracts more 
attention than prosperity. Yet 
looking at our Nineteenth- 
Century cities, towns, villages. 
and farmsteads, one sees more 
evidence of rising standards 
and an extension of prosperity 
than Smout will allow. 

He doesn’t deny of course 
that foe condition of foe 
working-classes improved, 
that working-hours grew 
shorter, and recreation more 
varied. But he sucks to his 
guns and it is not till one 


Allan Massie 

A CENTURY OF 
THE 

SCOTTISH PEOPLE 
1830-1950 
By T.C. Smoot 

' Collins, £15 

reaches his chapters on educa- 
tion and the radical tradition 
in politics that some sort of 
answer begins to shape itself. 
On education he writes of ‘The 
national delusion" that any 
Scotsman could, through tire 
tradition of national educa- 
tion, raise himself to any 
height he cared for — if he had 
brains and was capable of self, 
sacrifice. But he hardly justi- 
fies the word delusion. On his 
own evidence, though a work- 
ing-class Scot was very unlike- 
ly to achieve a University 
education, he had a better 
chance of doing so than most 
Europeans from a similar 
background; what was deplor- 
able was the poor provision of 
schooling for those who would 
never reach that level. 

Then, as he approaches our 
own lime, he writes of how 
Tom Johnson abandoned the 
Scottish radical and 1LP tradi- 
tion of self-help and self-made 
liberty, in favour of foe mod- 
em Slate’s belief in the rule of 
the expert and the consensus 
of foe well-informed. “The 
fruits of the collectivist State 
are to be seen in the steadily 
improving quality of life for 
the Scottish people between 
the 1940s and 1970s.” 

Such a judgement is turning 
his question on its head, for 
these were years of compara- 
tive economic stagnation. 
May it not therefore be that 
foe individualism of Nine- 
teenth-Century Scotland, 
which bred economic success, 
cannot be divorced from, 
could not perhaps have exist- 
ed without, foe belief that men 
and women make their own 
fete, while foe post-war collec- 
tivist Slate made economic 
success as difficult to achieve 
as absolute social failure? 

This rich book will provoke 
hours of argument It is fine 
history, but Whig history: 
Professor Smout is inclined to 
judge Victorian Scotland by 
the standards of St Andrew’s 
House. He seems oblivious of 
Maitland's warning that histo- 
rians should remember that 
the past was once the future. 
He tends also to see Scotland’s 
problems as unique: was the 
squalor of Glasgow, where foe 
population rose from 275,000 
hi 1841 to 784,000 in 1911, 
really worse than the squalor 
of Chicago? If so, why did 
American urban reformers 
turn to Glasgow as an example 
of how problems should be 
tackled? The Whiggishness 
(and concomitant priggish- 
ness) is a defect Nevertheless 
this book, which sums up a 
great deal of work done on 
Victorian Scotland, noil make 
it difficult for comfortable 
myths of native excellence to 
survive. Perhaps someone will 
respond with a book to disturb 
the Scotland of Si Andrew's 
House and the Labour 
Establishment 


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20 — THE TIMES-THURSPAY JULY 24 1986 - — 

Pomp and poetry, loyal fervour and Fergie-burgers 



Could an imposter have stolen a 
place in Westminster Abbey yes- 
terday? On Saturday evening a 
Sunday newspaper received a 
breathless phone call from Paris. 
Speaking in a “pretty litlie French 
accent", the woman'caller asked if 
the paper would like to buy a 
ticket for the wedding service, 
offers to start above £250. The 
news editor. explaining that his 
reporters already had passes, 
asked how she had obtained hers. 
An invited guest had so id it to her 
for £250. she replied. Clearly angry 
that her offer had been spumed 
the caller - who declined to give 
her name — said there was noth- 
ing for it but to fly ro London 
herself. There, she announced 
confidently, she would sell it on 
the streets for £500 - to an 
American tourist. 

• American listeners to CBS 
Radio's coverage of the wedding 
were yesterday informed: “The 
Archbishop of Canterbury has 
consummated the marriage". 

Big Benz 

From my balcony perch above the 
Abbey forecourt. I noticed that all 
those Commonwealth countries 
who will not be gracing the 
Edinburgh Games had turned out 
for the wedding. Passengers in the 
official cars could easily be identi- 
fied bv the number plates: the 
Zimbabwe car is 1 ZIM; Bot- 
swana's I BOT; Papua-New Gui- 
nea's i PNG — as in persona non 
grata — and so on. I could not but 
notice that British cars have 
declined in popularity among our 
former colonies. Of the Africans, 
only Ghana retains an ancient 
Rolls Royce. Most have adopted 
Africa’s favourite status symbol, 
the gleaming Mercedes. 

Page boys 

The iTN and Sir Alasiair Burnet 
book on the nuptials, due out on 
August 1. is being vaunted as the 
fastest book in the history of 
British publishing. Shotgun wad- 
ding. I call il Their claim is 
extra vaganL however, for a rival 
four-piece team, comprising 
Weidenfeld. Nicolson. TV-am and 
Gordon Honeycombe is scoring 
three days earlier with its Official 


Celebration of the Royal H 'adding. 
“Ours will be £2 cheaper and 
Gordon had exclusive access to 
the Ferguson family photo 
albums", trumpets a spokesman. 
“We’re printing in England, while, 
the ITN one is being done in Italy, 
so I don’t see how they can beat 
us.“ Most of the publication had 
already .been prepared by yes- 
terday and all that had to be added 
were the text and photographs of 
the day’s events. Publishers have 
become far speedier than they 
were five years ago for Charles and 
Diana, which makes me think that 
by the lime Prince Edward takes a 
bride we shall be able to buy the 
book of the show on the day. if not 
before. 

On the Eire 

Even in the Irish Republic they 
watched: but not without protest 
in some quarters. The fiercely 
nationalist Conradh na Gaclige 
criticized Irish television’s de- 
cision to retransmit the BBCs live 
coverage for two-and-a- half hours. 
Conradh's broadcasting spokes- 
man. Maolshealain Ocaollai. told 
me: "At a time when Irish-made 
programmes account for only 
about 30 per cent of RTE output 
we felt it was not its business to 
broadcast a British wedding". 
RTE said its decision had been 
vindicated by the many telepbone 
inquiries it had received. 



‘Royal mng$, flags, leaks to . 
the Sunday Times 


Spreadache 

Yesterday’s wedding menu was 
more successful than some. The 
huge breakfast which celebrated 
Queen Victoria’s marriage to Al- 
bert laid the- young Queen low 
with headache. At the wedding 
breakfast of the future Edward VII 
in 1863 the widowed Queen 
retired to eat alone. It did not spoil 
Edward's appetite: his married life 
ran on 1 2-course dinners but he 
also insisted on cold collations in 
the bedroom at night in case he felt 
hungry. Once, he was seen fighting 
over a dish of mushrooms with his 
rival in gluttony. King Ferdinand, 
of Bulgaria. Unrepentant about 
her diet-free life the new' princess 
may be, but with precedents such 
as this she had better beware. 

In the soup 

Trouble yesterday at. of all places, 
a Park Royal hospital in north- 
west London, where a special 
.Andy and Fetgie lunchtime menu 
for staff (£2.50 a head) replaced 
the routine £1.20 meal. It com- 
prised- “Chicken Feigje-style” 
with white wine saoce: "Invincible 
Vegetarian Quiche" (a hard one to 
sink, presumably); “Honeymoon 
Surprise";- “Confetti Rice"; “B.R.- 
.Andy Sauce", and “Prince An- 
drew’s Apple Pie”. (1 would have 
taken this last to be a reference to 
the bridal bed. bad he not grown 
out of his practical joker phase). 
Oh yes. and for children. Fergie- 
Burgers. It did not go down 
entirely .well, to judge from this 
remark by a member of the 
nursing staff: "It's disgraceful that 


time and money should be spent 
on silly things like this when the 
health authorities are getting rid of 
36 acute-case beds and closing 
down Neasden Hospital. Quite 
disgraceful." 



League table 

Do royal wedding crowds truly 
reflect the mood of the nation? If 
so, I hope the pollsters were 
recording the level of cheering 
accorded to wedding guests as they 
arrived at the Abbey door (I am of 
course excluding the royal party). 
Top of the cheer ratings were 
Scottish comedian Billy Connolly, 
pop singer Elton John, and Nancy 
Reagan. Nancy cheated a little by 
waving expectantly at the crowd, 
but even so the warmth of her 
reception belied the idea that 


Britain is in the grip of ami- 
-American sentiment. Mrs 
Thatcher. I regret to say. was 
roundly booed. 

Rubbernecking 

As all who read the small print at 
the entrance to royal parks will 
know, there is a total prohibition 
on the entry of vehicles carrying 
advertising signs. But what of 
vehicles overflying the parks? I put 
the question to a royal parks 
official yesterday as an airship 
emblazoned with a huge "Good- 
year " sign on each side chugged 
over St James's Park and almost 
over Buckingham Palace itself "I 
don’t see how we could put up a 
barrier against it," he said. "And it 
would be a bit extreme to shoot it 
down. Anyway, we can’t dis- 
appoint the television viewers — 
it’s got a camera crew aboard." 

Adrift 

The smooth efficiency of yes- 
terday's events, reminding us how 
well we do these things, prompts a 
colleague in Portugal to recall how 
badly they can be done elsewhere. 
When the Queen and Prince 
Philip visited Oporto last year, the 
authorities arranged a sail- past 
along the Douro of a flotilla of 
colourful boats, similar to that 
which had enthralled the Pope in 
1984. Flanked by President Eanes 
and scarlet-cloaked English port 
wine merchants, the Queen and 
Duke took their positions in the 
specially built pavilion. After an 
embarrassingly lengthy wait, dur- 
ing which one British rowing eight 


and a lone Portugese naval craft 
were spotted, it became clear that 
the boats were not coming. 
Pressed for an explanation, an 
official shrugged his shoulders. "I 
guess they went fishing." he said. 

Mould shapers 

The royals, after their big day out. 
may take pleasure from learning 
that, in popular opinion, they are 
the most respected group shaping 
the country ’5 future. The Gallup 
Survey of Britain, published todav. 
shows they lead the field with IS 
per cent support, ahead of the 
Prime Minister (17 per cent). 
Cabinet (4 per cent), and news- 
paper proprietors who. I’m sorry 
to say. score nil. 

Barred 

They don't call it the Republic of 
South Yorkshire for nothing. Five 
years ago. on Charles and Di s 
wedding day. a Rotherham pub 
called The Travellers declared 
itself a monarchist-free zone, 
banned customers from referring 
to “the event in London" and put 
on John Wayne videos. By 
3.30 pm every sandwich in the 
house had been eaten and 1,400 
pints of beer knocked back. The 
publican. Keith Nuttall, has since 
moved to the Batemoor Hotel in 
Sheffield, where he gave an 
equally cold shoulder to Andrew 
and Sarah. “I don’t bother the 



‘If only I was working I'd have 
mitcn the day off to celebrate' 


Royal Family and they don't 
bother me." lie told me. Drinkers 
were told that this time the TV 
was staving off completely. And 
the Travellers? Under new 
management, with the bunting up. 

Gavin fun 

After yesterday’s vereical offering 
on this page by Ted Hughes, here 
is a submission by our news muse 
in the pews. Gavin Ewart, the Not 
The Poet Laureate. 

.-1 hard day's morning in the 
Abbe}'.' ' 

Ritneie's purring like a cabby! 
Something attempted, something 
Jane. 

A favoured daughter, favoured 
son. 

Are hitched and spliced — and i Ini 
she say 

That very dangerous word OBt17 
The names came, mart ■ or less, all 
right — 

They learned them (I expect l all 
' night. 

ft's good dial Thatcher didn't 
preach 

Or thrill us with a Caring Spt’cch 
(Enemies Within. il'hat's Right 
and Proper) — 

/ bet they found it hard to stop her! 
Defying Private Eye and Hi.il. 

R uncic did it very well! 

SWl-enders 

Many thanks for your help with 
casting a notional Dynasty-si ) le 
series on the Royals, the inspira- 
tion for which, you may recall, 
came from my meeting with 
Aaron Spelling. Dynasty's Ameri- 
can producer. Your best sugges- 
tions arc as follows: the Queen. 
Vanessa Redgrave: Prince Philip. 
Telly Savalas: Prince Charles. 
Michael York; Princess Diana. 
Liza Minnelli; Princess Margaret. 
Tina Tumor the Dukcol GIouces- 
ter, Burt Lancaster the Duchess of 
Gloucester. Zsa Zsa Gabor. Prince 
Michael of Kent. George Cole; 
Princess Michael, Joan Collins; 
the Queen Mother. Googie Wi- 
thers: and finally, playing Andrew 
and Sarah — Denis Waterman 
and Samantha Fox. But what to 
call this Sloaney Soap (or Sloap)? 
Family. I suppose. PHS 
Cartoons by Barry Fan tom 


,"i 



; . * i- . . 

•*» . 



John Grigg 


After the euphoria, Shaun Johnson finds confusion in the townships 


A yorker for 
sex equality 


‘Prince Andrew is the first member 
of the Royal Family to receive an 
hereditary title since Lord Snow- 
don. who was ennobled in i960 
when he married Princess Mar- 
garet According to precedent. 
Prince Andrew might have ex- 
pected to receive- his title earlier, 
but in recent years there seems to 
have been some hesitancy about 
creating an hereditary royal title, 
and it is rather interesting to 
speculate why. 

The Prince of Wales's title does 
not count for the purposes of this 
argument, because it is not auto- 
matically inherited, even by the 
eldest son of a sovereign. 

In 1960. hereditary peerages 
were being created freely on the 
recommendation of the then 
prime minister, as they bad been 
under his predecessors and were 
still to be under his immediate 
successor. But during the premier- 
ships of Harold Wilson and 
Edward Heath, and during Mrs 
Thatcher's first administration, 
there was an interlude during 
which no hereditary honours were 
conferred. 

After her second election vic- 
tory in 1983. Mrs Thatcher re- 
turned. very cautiously, to the 
principle of hereditary peerages by 
recommending them’ for Mr Wil- 
liam Whiielaw and Mr George 
Thomas (as they then were). But 
in practice these did not involve 
any transmission of lilies, since 
Lord Tonypandy is unmarried 
and Lord Whiielaw has no sons. 
In the absence of a special 
remainder in favour of his cider 
daughter — such as was given, for 
instance, to Lord Mounlbattcn - 
Lord Whitclaw's viscountcy will 
die with him. 

But with the earldom conferred 
in 1 9$4 on Harold Macmillan, the 
principle of hereditary peerages 
has been fully revived. When he 
dies, the earldom of Stockton will 
(it would now appear) pass to his 
grandson Alexander, the bearded 
publisher. Perhaps by coin- 
cidence. the period when heredi- 
tary peerages were not being 
recommended by prime ministers 
saw no bestowal of such honours 
by the Queen upon members of 
her family. 

Now that they have been re- 
established in principle in the 
Prime Minister’s sphere of patron- 
age. the Queen has. perhaps, frit 
no inhibition about making her 
second son hereditary Duke of 
York. This is clearly one matter on 
which the Queen and Mrs 
Thatcher unquestionably do agree. 

If hereditary titles have returned 
for keeps, the implications for sex 
equality will have to be very 
carefully considered. At present, 
the system is grotesquely loaded 
{except in Scotland) in favour of 
male heirs, and it is cxcccdingly 
rarc Tor a woman to be made an 
hereditary peeress. 

By rights, the hereditary Snow- 
don title should have been con: 
ferred on. Princess Margaret rather 
than on her husband, and he 
should have held it as her consort 
rather than vice txrsa (though that 
is noi at present possible, as I will 
show). Moreover, the case for 
making Princess Anne an heredi- 
tary' duchess is even stronger than 
for making Prince Andrew an 
hereditary duke, since she is his 
senior in age and has distinguished 
herself even more in the public 
serv ice. 

And what of the question of 
succession? This is even more 


vexed, but will have to be faced 
sooner or later, if sex equality is to 
be anything more than a phrase 
where hereditary titles 'are con- 
cerned. At present,, the inheritance 
of UK peerages is normally con- 
fined to males. Women are not in 
the running to inherit at all, much 
lesslo take priority over younger 
brothers. Should this gross injus- 
tice be allowed to persist? 

The Queen could strike the first 
blow for sex equality in hereditary 
honours if she were to decree that 
in future the heir to a royal 
dukedom would be the firstborn, 
of whichever sex. Such a decision 
would, I think, be within her 
prerogative, though it would obvi- 
ously be expedient to take it in 
consultation with the government 
of the day - as it would be, even 
more, if she were to propose that 
the same principle should applyio 
the monarchy itself. 

The monarchy can. as we know, 
be inherited by the daughter of a 
sovereign in default of direct male 
heirs, which is analogous to the 
rule in Scottish, though not UK. 
peerages. If the Prince of Wales 
had happened to die without issue. 
Princess Anne would have been 
passed over and Prince Andrew 
would have become heir to. the 
throne. Would this have been self: 
evidently right? 

In view of the manifest success 
of three or four of our female 
sovereigns, including the- present 
one, it cannot plausibly be argued 
that the bias in favour of male 
succession is necessary for the 
public good. 

But sex equality in titles should 
apply both ways. In a few respects 
it now penalizes men, and these 
should be attended to while the 
laigcr injustice to women is being 
corrected. One conspicuous case is 
that of the husband of a female 
sovereign, who does not become 
King Consort, though the wife of a 
male sovereign becomes Queen 
Consort. 

At lower levels this anomaly 
also applies in the discrimination 
against the husbands of peeresses 
in their own right and. for that 
matter, the husbands of women 
who are made dames. If the 
Snowdon peerage had been con- 
ferred, as 1 think it should have 
been, on Princess Margaret, her 
husband would not. as things now 
are. have become Lord Snowdon ; 
he would have remained Mr 
Antony Armstrong-Jones. 

The title dame is the female 
equivalent of sir. Yet while the 
wives of knights assume the title 
lady. -the. husbands of dames do 
not assume the title sir. or any title 
at all. 

Perhaps we should not forget 
baronets, though they have not so i 
far featured in the revival of I 
hereditary honours, no baronetcy 1 
having been conferred since 1964. 

If they were now brought back, as 
hereditary peerages have been, 
there should also be female bar- 
onets (baroncitcs?) whose hus- 
bands would bear . the title sir. 
Special remainders have nor been 
unknown in the case of baronets, 
but they have been very rare. In 
future a baronetcy .should always 
be transmissible to a daughter 
when the only or eldest child. 

Now that she has restored 
hereditary peerages, at any rate for 
ex-prime ministers. Mrs Thatcher 
may well become, say. Countess of 
Grantham in her own right when 
she retires. Surely she would wish 
to share this title with Denis? 



Torment in the townships: a girl carries a friend injured in a protest march — and youths take their revenge 


Those who are against us. 
nr shall reckon with them, 
the day we lake our land back 
Their names are written down. 
When there is a roU call for our- 
. heroes 

I wonder if my name, will be on 
- that roU 

/ wonder what it . will be like . 
when nip sit tilth Tambo 
and tell him about the fall of the 
Boers. 

Song sung at the opening of most 
youth meetings and rallies in tire 
townships. 

Ten years ago. the black youths of 
South Africa catapulted them- 
selves into the forefront of the 
fight against apartheid. Never in 
the history of liberation move- 
ments had youngsters taken the 
lead in this way. The seminal 
action of the children of Soweto, 
1976. was to take to the streets as 
their parents had never done. 

In the. decade since, the role 
played by students and school- 
children as pan of the opposition 
to the South African government 
has grown and matured irrevers- 
ibly. The political initiative 
against the government now rests 
with the militant, impatient 
youth. They determine the pace 
and nature of direct confrontation 
with the slate and serve as the 
motor or resistance activity. 

The importance -of the youth 
organizations and township net: 
works has often been underrated 
outside South Africa. Bui that 
error has not been made by the 
Botha government. Many of the 
moves which it has made during 
the most recent state of emergency 
suggest an all-out effort to break 
the web of organizations. The 
outcome of this battle will have a 
great bearing on the shape and 
form of South Africa over the next 
few years. 

The Soweto revolts were school- 
based affairs, while the principal 
youth organizations that existed of 
the time were student ones. The 
Congress Of South African Stu- 
dents (Cosas). formed in 1979. 
first raised ' the 'idea of broader 
youth organization,- mooting nat- 
ionwide congresses which were to 
draw- iheir members from young 
workers, professionals, un- 
employed youths, women's 
groups, students and school pu- 
pils. The community-based struc- 
ture paralleled thepractice of the 
nascent United Democratic Front. 
By I9S5, these groups were suf- 
ficiently well-entrenched to sur- 


Black youth 
now on 
the defensive 


vive the banning of Cosas, and its 
replacement by local congresses. 

These have spread to embrace 
an extraordinarily wide member- 
ship which includes, in one foim 
or another, black, coloured, In- 
dian and even white youths. Age 
limits are usually stipulated, often 
in the 16-30 range. But it is not 
uncommon to find a congress with 
members as young as 10 eras old 
as 45. Most of the members I 
interviewed said that it was more a 
matter of attitude than of age. 

The level of student and youth 
organization and the degree of 
politicization among young black 
South Africans is far greater now 
than ever before. Today an 
organizational web spans the en- 
tire country. It has developed, 
unevenly, into an intricate mesh 
of strands; some clashing, some 
loose. Two divergent tendencies' 
have emerged. 

The first is represented by the 
hundreds of congresses affiliated 
to the UDF which use the 1955 
Freedom Charter as their point of 
political departure. They describe 
their characteristics as "popular", 
aiming to include as many mem- 
bers as possible as long as they 
subscribe to the basic principles of 
the charter. They regard them- 
selves as “progressive” meaning 
being part of the history of the 
African National Congress. 

According to one of their most 
important leaders. Daniel 
Montsisi. the congresses "drew on 
the experience of groups like the 
ANC Youth League. We regarded 
ourselves as a logical progression 
of that type -of tradition, and the 
UDF was the overall co-ordinat- 
ing organization ” 

Montsisi's own career illustrates 
the change. He was president of 
the Soweto Students Repre- 
sentative Council at the lime of 
the 1976 uprising, and spent four 
years in detention on Robbeo 
Island as a result. He is now UDF 
Transvaal youth officer and an 


executive member of the Soweto 
Youth Congress. 

The ranks of the congresses 
contain political tendencies rang- 
ing from socialist to liberal. The 
very choice of the term “congress" 
is an indication of ideological 
affiliation; harking back to the 
ANC tradition and its alliance to 
the Indian, coloured and white 
congresses in the 1950s. 

The charteri st youth groups are 
the largest and most important 
within the resistance movement 
In many townships they, along 
with civic organizations, provide 
the fulcrums of local power. "For 
the planning and execution of 
campaigns", Montsisi said, “you 
will always find the youth 
organizations doing the practical 
work . . . They are the first to be 
detained, the first to be shot” 

The emphasis on the Freedom 
Charter means that even very 
young children have grasped the 
basic ideals. The charterist use of 
popular symbols — the ANC col- 
ours and the mythology of 
Mandela — has been extraor- 
dinarily effective: 

The second major tendency 
comprises affiliates of the Na- 
tional Forum, a loose coming 
together of black consciousness 
and left-wing groups united by the 
Azanian People’s Manifesto of 
1983. It is a much smaller alliance 
than the UDF and its youth 
groups differ from those of the 
UDF. The Azanian Students 
Movement (AZASM). launched in 
1983 on black consciousness prin- 
ciples. is numerically dominant. It 
excludes whites from membership 
and claims 30.000 adherents. Its 
areas of greatest strength are in the 
western Cape, parts of the eastern 
Cape and the Transvaal. These 
youth groups regard themselves as 
the “pure left" in South Africa and 
reject the Freedom Charter as 
being unsocial ist 

The Youth Brigade of the 
Inkaiha movement headed by 


Chief Gatsha Buthelezi mirrors it: 
parent body: it is a tightly con 
trolled organization whose styli 
bonders on that of a mHitan 
movement Its members weaj 
uniforms and carry identificatiot 
cards. It claims a membership o 
half a million and has un 
questioned authority in th< 
KwaZulu homeland, when 
schools are effectively- admin 
istered by Inkatha. 

The brigade is under Buthelezi': 
direct supervision. It is ve 
hemently anti-socialist ami-boy' 
colt and anti-UDF. The brigade 
president Musa Zondi, told me 
that it upheld the "right oi 
children to go to school, the right 
of teachers to teach, the right le 
protect school property against 
vandalism". It is difficult for othei 
groups to operate in Inkatha- 
controlled areas, but the move- 
ment is geographically restricted, 
with no serious prospect ol 
becoming a national organization. 

During the lengthy and meticu- 
lous build-up to the tenth anniver- 
sary of the June 16 Soweto riots, a 
feeling of confidence developed 
within resistance groups, mosi 
notably the youth movements. 
They were beguming to feel that 
the authorities had lost the ability 
to control protest in the town- 
ships. That feeling has been shown 
to be dangerously wrong. 

Youth organizations are now in 
disarray. Some of their leaders are 
incarcerated, others are under- 
ground, open meetings are impos- 
sible and there is a distinct air of 
aimlessness and despair. I do not 
believe that the slate of emergency 
can destroy the complex, deeply 
entrenched youth network, but its 
growth will be set back. The 
government is well aware that 
schools are the focal points and it 
is taking stringent measures to 
prevent mobilization and expose 
influential leaders. 

The crucial issue is the extent to 
which the existing structures are 
broken down, or take different 
forms. I suspect that the depth of 
youth militancy and politicization 
is such that it is, in the long term, 
irreversible. 

© Times Nampum ism. 

The author spent several months in 
South Africa before the imposition 
of the state of emergency research - 
ing vouth organizations. This 
ai-ticfe is adapted from a paper 
prepared for the David Davies 
Memorial Institute of Inter- 
national Studies. 


moreover . . » 
Miles Kington 


Instant 

nostalgia 

Grand Post-Royal Wedding 
Clearance Sale! 

Moreover State Occasions Ltd. 
purveyor of royal weddings, state 
openings, retreats beaten, etc., 
announces the sale by auction or 
private treaty of the following 
items, most used once if at all: 

• 10.000 metres of red, white and 
blue bunting: enough to start 15 
new second-hand car showrooms. 

• 5.000 flags with celebratory 
motifs and the intertwined initials 
A and S: would suit any go-ahead 
concern sporting these initials, 
such as “Arks and Spencer” 

• Genuine archduchess from 
Austria or perhaps Luxembourg, 
suffering from loss of memory - 
would be ideal as talking point in 
large household, or as member of 
board of directors of influential 
merchant bank. 

• 30.000 linle flags bearing mes- 
sage: “I was Fergie's Flat Mate.” 

• Unidentified parts of West- 
minster Abbey, enough to make 
large rockery-, or small grotto. 

I • 600 Gideon Bibles, inscribed. 

" Please return this Bible to the 
hotel after the service at the 
Abbey, as it is ve/r expensive to 
replace them every time someone 
gets married there”, 

• 5.800 salmon paste sandwiches. 

• 3.400 pieces of cake. 

• 7.600 unidentified objects on 
cocktail sticks. 

• 3.000 mugs showing feces of 
Prince Charles and Princess Di. 
marked "Collector’s items.” 

• 3,000 charts entitled “How 
Sarah Ferguson is related to 
Charlemagne, Genghis Khan and 
Tamerlane the Great.” 

• I large block of stone, with 
jewel-encrusted sword embedded 
in it. and a message reading: 
“Whosoever doth withdraw the 
sword from the stone may rule 
England and do battle with Mrs 
Thatcher over sanctions, and good 
luck to them." 

• 6.000 sketch maps of the abbey, 
showing principal lavatories, re- 
freshment stalls, lost and found 
offices, costume hire shops, maga- 
zine kiosks for wedding service 
reading material, emergency exits, 
branches of Harrods, etc. 

• 100 tickets for wedding service, 
bearing message: "This ticket does 
nor entitle bearer to attend 
reception”. 

• 100 tickets for reception, bear- 
ing message: ‘This ticket does not 
entitle bearer to attend wedding". 

• 100 tickets, bearing the 
message: "This ticket docs not 
entitle bearer to attend wedding or 
reception. However, you may 
come along on the honeymoon, if 
you are very quiet". Chart on 
reverse showing how Fcrgie is 
related to Oliver Cromwell. 

• 100 tickets bearing the 
message:" I am one of Nancy 
Reagan's bodyguards, rf found, 
please return me to the nearest 
American embassy. Thanks a 
million, par. 

• 1 letter from Ted Hughes, 
saying he is still working on that 
poem and still having trouble with 
a rhyme for Fcrgie. 

• Part of an unidentified regi- j 
ment. la|gc enough to invade « 
small African country or keep the 
peace at a Test match. 

• 500 identity tags reading: “Let 
« e i^ugh - only here for 
Poet s Comer!" 

Also many items still left ora 
fr@sn the Frank Bruno Grand Final 
Clearance Sole! Send for list* 



•-s 







THE TIMES THURSDAY JULY 24 1986 


21 



■ i : m 

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I Pennington Street, London El 9XN Telephone: 01-481 4100 


MR STEEL’S SUMMER LESSON 


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Instant 

ostaleia 


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The eadof-term balance sheet 
for the Alliance is weighed 
down by minuses. Its opinion 
poll rating has slipped since 
the beginning of the year. 
Polling performance swung 
awkwardly tirom Fulham to 
RyedaJe. Public esteem for 
both- Mr Steel and Dr Owen 
has lessened, the latter singled 
out {by the pollsters 1 measures) 
for disapproval because of the. 
arguments over defence pol- 
icy. That row itself exposed the 
Alliance as ordinary — as 
fractious as other parties yet, 
eventually, as capable of cob- 
bling a line to cover internal 
dissension. 

The compact has had to 
survive Mr. Steel's candid 
confession of a homicidal 
thoughts about his duumvir, 
and dissi deuce within the 
ranks. The N ewcastle-under- 
Lyrue by-election dem- 
onstrated the strength of 
unilateralism in the Liberal 
Party (though not apparently 
at electoral cost) while the 
Fulham election disclosed, not 
far&e first time, the anarchic 
temperament characteristic of 
local: Liberals Renewed dis- 
sent is possible in the early 
antumir when- the parties 
gather at Harrogate and East- 
DEhsfce, delaying yet further 
the day when the Alliance will 
project itself positively not just 
as .me third runner and lesser 
option, but as a streamlined 
party with a vision of the 
nation and its future. 

The above line of argument 
is often heard among the ranks 
of Conservative and Labour 
activists. The very length of 
the apologia is to some extent 
its own betrayal There are 
plenty of reasons for dismiss- 
ing the third force in British 
politics: Bur to the serious 
observers within the old par- 
ties these is also cause for more 
than niggling doubts as to 


whether dismissal is. the best 
policy. 

Mr Norman Tebbit may talk 
confidently of wasted voles. 
But such an attitude ignores 
the maturation of Alliance 
politics through the war of 
speeches over defences it ig- 
nores. the recent performance 
of Mr Steel as healer of rifts 
and impresario of a lively if 
discordant concert party, it 
ignores the effectiveness with 
which the Liberal Party is now 
operating as a vote-getting 
machine and not only in by- 
elections. 

The claim is made that 21 
million people are affected 
through Alliance power-hold- 
ing and sharing in. local 
authorities. It should be taken 
with a pinch of salt Yet 
behind it is an Alliance pres- 
ence- in a large number of 
communities. Voting for Alii-' 
ance councillors is of course * 
not necessarily transferable 
into Parliamentary success. 

But the signs are that a 
permanent political machine 
is being built outside the old 
conclaves of Liberalism. On a 
number of local authorities, 
the Alliance , now acts as one 
party. Liberal numerical 
superiority. Liberal campaign 
ing experience, the party’s 
vestigial memories of power 
have ah fuelled a process of 
absorption of the Social 
Democrats. 

In a sense it does not matter 
when — whether — there is 
some final act of marriage; for 
it is already being consum- 
mated by joint manifestos and 
the growth of an Alliance 
identity which, however vague 
and amorphous in ideological 
terms, will -inevitably gain 
from common experience of 
power-holding or opposition 
locally. It is noteworthy that 
Mr Steel has in the past few 
weeks permitted himself to 


raise the issue of merger, albeit 
in a gentle and rather dreamy 
way. 

The obstacle is, of course. 
Dr Owen. And it is he, rather 
than Mr Steel, who will surely 
have to spend his summer 
break rather anxiously 
questioning notjust his part in 
the two-man show, but the 
style with which he conducts 
himself. Mr Steel, notably in 
the interview with Brian Wal- 
den, emerged, perhaps for the 
first time, as sufficiently 
hungry for political success to 
subordinate personal pride 
and Liberal shibboleth as the 
occasion demands. Is Dr 
Owen? 

As for the defence row, it 
now seems possible that those 
week&of headlines about splits 
and - disputes were- good for 
both Alliance parties, good for 
both leaders and -perhaps good 
for the nation. Dr Owen has, 
without a doubt, succeeded in 
educating his allies and 
producing from both the Lib- 
erals and Mr Steel some shift 
on the question of Polaris’s 
replacement 

The question for the autumn 
must be: has Dr Owen been 
educated about joint leader- 
ship of the only political 
vehicle he hais got? The public, 
evidently, had doubts about 
thb way he exposed his convic- 
tions. He, too, will have to 
bend and accommodate. The 
two-headed party is a stranger 
in die British political bestiary, 
and the animal appears the 
odder when the heads are 
snapping at each other. It may 
well be incapable of surviving 
beyond an election, a prime 
purpose of which is to produce 
a prime minister. But in the 
run-up to that election, the 
willingness of the electorate to 
look and be amazed should 
not be underestimated. 


RETURN TO GRO WTHMAN SHIP 


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The agreement between the 
International Monetary Fund 
and Mexico will come as 
something of cultural shock to 
anyone who still views the 
IMF as a bi-word for hairshirt 
austerity. The Fund and the 
World Bank are backing a 
growth-oriented ’ adjustment 
programme to such an extent 
that it appears more money 
will be pumped into the Mexi- 
can economy if it does not 
recover fast enough. 

Mexico is umisuaL It was 
held up as a success story of 
the traditionally austere ap- 
proach until felling oil prices 
pushed its debt problems back 
to square one. But the Trea- 
suries of faltering industrial 
countries will not be unhappy 
if the Mexican agreement be- 
comes a precedent. For it 
exemplifies the recognition 
that developing economies too 
will need to expand for the 
world economy to move into a 
new phase of sustained 
growth. 

The American locomotive 
that pulled Europe and the Far 
East out of recession by its 
imports, stalled last year and 
will not restart in that role. The 
Administration, hauling back 
its budget deficit, is keen to 
keep the dollar weak in order 
to sustain domestic growth by 
replacing imports. So the rest 
of the free world will need to 
generate its own economic 
expansion. 

The collapse of oil prices 
was instantly welcomed as the 
spontaneous general mecha- 
nism to achieve this. Shocks, 
however, tend to be defla- 
tionary because those who 
have to retrench do so fester 
than countries given room to 
expand through cost and im- 
port saving. 

The latest American output 


figures show growth at just 1.1 
per cent and the year’s target is 
on its way down from 4 to 3.5 
percent, mainly because of the 
plight ‘ of the domestic oil 
industry. Germany has lost 


yesterday that Japan's in- 
dustry could not cope with the 
rapid 40 per cent appreciation 
of the' yen against the. dollar. 
He is likely to introduce an 
autumn package of ..puhlic. 


expprt cyders from oil-produc- . , yftjrks, and possibly tax cuts, to 
* ' * * * J -boost domestic demand,' but 

probably not enough to 'help 
The rest of the world. ' 

In Europe, Germany will be 
expected to set the ball rolling. 
The Bundesbank does not 
traditionally use interest rates 
as a policy lever and, given its 
enviable long-run success in 
monetary management, is not 
likely to change now. Thus fer, 
efforts to boost the economy, 
primarily , through a pro- 
gramme of lax cuts, have 
proved modest, partly because 
the effects of tax cuts on home 
industry are unpredictable. 
And Chancellor Kohl, mindful 
that Germany and Japan were 
pushed into untimely expan- 
sion shortly before the 1 979 oil 
shock, is likely to prove cau- 
tious. 

The benefits of. lower oil 
prices should stimulate growth 
spontaneously in the autumn 
without old-feshioned govern- 
ment efforts to boost demand. 
The initial evidence, or lack of 
it, will be pored over at the 
IMFs annual meeting in 
September. That may be too 
soon to come to judgement. 
But unless the indicators are 
turning smartly up, Japan and 
Germany will be under strong 
pressure to resuscitate the 
discredited tool of budget defi- 
cits to aid expansion- Such 
expediency, though myopic, 
would at least provide an 
accommodating background 
for Mr Nigel Lawson to cut 
income tax in the next Budget 
regardless of the niceties of 
public finance. 


and began the 
m reverse, Britain has 
suffered from a combination 
of the two. Japan, the leading 
beneficiary of cheaper oil, has 
seen its good fortune exag- 
gerate file rapid rise of the yen 
since test September’s cur- 
rency agreement, and has 
experienced its first quarterly 
fell in output foreteyeii years. 

Eventually, .. cheaper oil 
should bring fester, growth, 
particularly in 1987. But the 
fear, reflected in the summer 
unease in financial markets, is 
that the first malign effects, 
coinciding with a minor cy- 
clical slowdown, could start a 
downward momentum before 
then. 

The natural move to lower 
interest rates has by, now run 
most of its course in many 
countries, though not in Brit- 
ain. Mr Paul Volcker, the 
chairman of the Federal Re- 
serve Board, has not hidden 
his annoyance that Japan and 
Germany, their interest rates 
already low, did not follow his 
last cut in the American 
discount rate. But in his 
regular testimony to Congress 
yesterday, he acknowledged 
that cutting interest rates to 
weaken the dollar could under- 
mine confidence . and hard- 
won stability if pushed too fer. 

The discount rate weapon, 
however, is clearly prodding 
Japan and Germany to expand 
their domestic economies. Mr 
Kiichi Miyazawa. Japan's 
expansion-minded new fi- 
nance minister, complained 


LOW EXPECTATIONS 


•4 



“The English, the English , the 
English arc best// wouldn't 
give twopence for all of the 
rest " runs the refrain of the 
national song invented by Mr 
Donald Swann and the late 
Michael Handers. Making the 
usual amendment of “British” 
for "English” .that seems to be 
the opinion of the British 
people as recorded in The 
Gallup Survey of Britain just 
published. _ 

We are. we told Gallup, 
friendlier, better-humoured, 
and more polite than lesser 
breeds. We work harder than 
the Americans, are more seri- 
ous than the French, have 
more fun than the Irish, are 
more sincere than the Rus- 
sians. and are about as trust- 
worthy as the rest of them put 
together. 

These friendly, good-hu- 
moured, polite. frin-Ioving and 
sincere people are convinced, 
however, that they have fallen 


'V k&t 


on evil days. This conviction is 
sometimes understandable - 
55 per cent take the fatalistic 
view that unemployment is 
something that we just have to 
live with - but sometimes it is 
at odds with the truth as 
revealed by economic statis- 
tics. 

For instance, a gloomy 22 
per cent predicted in August 
last year that it would take 
between 3 and 10 years for 
inflation to fell below 5 per 
cent - and a sturdily pessimis- 
tic 1 1 percent thought it would 
never happen at all Yet the 
rate of inflation is already half 
that figure and it was hovering 
about 5 per cent when the poll 
was taken. 

The pessimism extends fer 
beyond economics. Our man- 
ners. our morals, our world 
influence, our streets are no 
longer whai they were. Is 
Britain moving towards 
prosperity, it asked, or away 


\ 


from it? Sixty-two percent of 
those questioned thought that 
we were moving away from 
prosperity, only 28 per cent the 
reverse. 

There is a disturbing echo of 
genteel folk in reduced circum- 
stances about these attitudes 
which is not altogether jus- 
tified by the recent — and 
modestly creditable - perfor- 
mance of the British economy. 
They are, in feet, a tribute to 
the power of ideas over facts. 

Some comfort can be drawn, 
however, from the fact that the 
question about whether Brit- 
ain was heading towards (or 
away from) prosperity, when 
asked in 1965, produced much 
greater optimism about what 
lay ahead. And what lay ahead, 
of course, was the Great 
Inflation, the two OPEC price 
rises, and the winter of dis- 
content- Friendly, polite and 
good-humoured we may be. 
but medium prophets. 


LETTERS TO THE EDITOR 

The Queen and the constitution Airport threat 


From Mr Philip Allott 
Sir. A constant injustice is done to 
the Queen in popular discussion 
of constitutional questions. The 
Queen's legal status is no more 
shadowy and delicate than that of 
certain other key figures of the 
constitution, most notably the 
.Prime Minister. 

There is no specific legal baas in 
statute or com mon law for the role 
of Prime Minister. At least the 
Queen’s title to the Crown by 
inheritance is confirmed by more 
than one statute. 

When the Prime Minister ad- 
vises the Queen, in the constitu- 
tional sense of that term, the 
former exercises a power no 
different in kind from that which 
the latter exercises in accepting 
that advice. 

The Prime Minister’s status and 
functions are, like the Queen's, an 
obscure amal gam of law and fact 
— bits and pieces of statute law 
and common law, convention in 
the constitutional lawyer’s sense, 
and the residues of history, cus- 
tom, politics, practice, fashion, 
myth and fantasy. 

The Prime Minister may, no 
less than the Queen, exceed her 
legal powers or disappoint the 
non-legal expectations of her role. 

It has been the nature of our 
constitution that it develops .by a 
constant adaptation and 
readaptation of the relationship 
between the different parts of the 
constitution. Edmund Burke com- 
pared it to the reciprocal struggle 
of discordant pans which, in 
nature, draws out the harmony of 
the universe. 

In 1741 Walpole was accused in 
Parliament of a heinous offence 
a gains t our constitution in seeking 
to behave as sole and prime 
minister, unsettling the status of 
both monarch and parliament. 

Whatever the reality behind the 
phantom voice which has pur- 
ported to speak the thoughts of the 


Queen, there is nothing to stop us 
hearing it as a voice of the 
constitution. It may be reminding 
us. as it has done so often down 
the centuries, that our system 
depends on the balancing of power 
and has constantly resisted the 
undue concentration of power. 
Yours truly, 

PHILIP ALLOTT, 

Trinity College, 

Cambridge. 

July 21. 

From Mr Sebastian Payne 
Sir. Ronald Butt in his article of 
July 21 tells us that the Queen has 
an accumulation of wisdom, 
knowledge, and experience- These 
sorts of chums are repeatedly 
made in the Press. In the same 
paragraph Mr Butt writes "no 
prime minister has ever given the 
slightest hint of what has passed in 
such audiences". 

If this is the case, then how are 
we to assess the claims made of the 
Queen's wisdom, knowledge and 
experience. The assertions remain 
unverified platitudes. Further- 
more, is it really the case that 
wisdom is cumulative? 

Yours faithfully, 

SEBASTIAN PAYNE. 

6 Windsor Court, 

Moscow Road, W2. 

July 21. 

From Mr Vernon Bogdanor 
Sir, Some Conservatives seem to 
have forgotten their Disraeli: 4 * The 
principles of the Constitution do 
not contemplate the absence of 
personal influence on the part of 
the Sovereign; and if they did, the 
principles of human nature would 
prevent the fulfilment of such a 
theory”. 

Yours faithfully, 

VERNON BOGDANOR, 
Brasenose College, 

Oxford. 

July 21. 


Funding of Birkbeck 

From Professor T. L. BlundelL 
FRS 

Sir, Sir Peter Swinnerton-Dyer's 
: tetter (July 16) makes it clear that 
the decision of the University 
Grants Committee to cut the 
finances of Birkbeck College was 
not an unfortunate oversight, but 
rather a specific policy decision 
which win have serious con- 
sequences for the future of the 
college. 

My own department provides a 
good example of how Birkbeck 
operates. In 1985 my research 
group was chosen as one of nine 
centres of excellence by the same 
University Grants Committee and 
was given- a special grant of 
£5 45.000. Additionally, we are 
currently funded by many dif- 
ferent industries, charities and 
research councils to the value of 
around £2 million. 

During the daytime we are 
concerned with research into drug 
design, protein engineering and 
many useful but fundamental 
programmes. Nevertheless, I and 
all my colleagues — like our 
predecessors Blackett, Barton, 
Bernal and many others — teach in 
the evenings, mainly to graduates 
from the pharmaceutical and 
chemical industries and from 


hospitals, colleges and other walks 
of life. 

Our objective is to retrain 
graduates in the fast-moving areas 
of science, especially in informa- 
tion technology and biotechnol- 
ogy. Our classes, practical and 
projects require more careful and 
time-consuming preparation than 
those of a daytime-teaching 
university, since everything must 
be carefully scheduled for eve- 
nings, weekends or annual vaca- 
tions. Consequently my colleagues 
and I rarely leave the college 
before 9.30 pm. 

The cost to the taxpayer of our 
degrees is less than that for full- 
lime students; furthermore, our 
. students at the same time contrib- 
ute to the economy and pay taxes. 

In his letter. Sir Peter refers only 
to The level of funding in 1986- 
1987 and to undergraduates. In 
the following years Birkbeck’s 
postgraduate students will be sub- 
jected to a 50 per cent cut in 
support and resources will be 
p r og r essi vely cut to the extent of 
£1.6 million per a nn u m . Our 
teaching and research cannot sur- 
vive with such a savage cut 
Yours nuly, 

TOM BLUNDELL, 

Birkbeck College, 

Maiet Street, WCI. 

July 16. 


S African crisis 

From Dr E. G. Nisbet 
Sir. South Africa seems almost to 
be calling sanctions down upon its 
own head, presumably because 
Pretoria Judges white unity to be 
ssential for survival. It is almost as 
if all Africa is united in the desire 
for sanctions, the aim being to 
destroy apartheid or to preserve it, 
depending on whether the view is 
from north or south of the 
Limpopo. 

A more powerful approach 
would be to take measures which 
would have the effect of dividing, 
not uniting South Africa's ruling 
whites. We should first challenge 
the legitimacy of their institutions. 
South Africa left the Common- 
wealth by a referendum of very 
dubious authority, and the major- 
ity of the population were not 
consulted. We should declare all 
South Africans to be Common- 
wealth citizens. 

We could then use the authority 
of the Commonwealth to set up a 
South African Secretariat — al- 
most a government in exile — able 
to tax and to regulate South 
African trade on entry to Europe 
and North America and able to 
work with the western financial 
community. 

We could also use the UK and 


Canadian missions in Pretoria to 
issue Commonwealth passports 
freely to all South Africans willing 
to sign a simple declaration of 
human rights and then allow free 
travel (and sport) to those pass- 
port-holders, while withdrawing 
recognition from Pretoria's pass- 
ports. 

Broadcasting television and ra- 
dio into South Africa from off- 
shore, the stationing of forces to 
protect Botswana and forcing 
travellers to enter South Africa via 
a specified gateway such as 
Harare, so that they could see an 
effective black State, would also be 
influential measures. 

For us to do nothing is both 
immoral and against our long- 
term economic interest It will also 
destroy the Commonwealth, 
which would make humanity in 
general much the more miserable. 
We should instead choose to act 
intelligently, to protect the 
Commonwealth and yet also to 
show white South Africa that there 
is an alternative acceptable to 
them. 

Yours sincerely. 

E G. NISBET, 

1120 Elliott. 

Saskatoon, 

Saskatchewan. Canada. 

July 16. 


Grassroots, US style 

From Mr Anthony W. Henfrey 
Sir, Ann Sofer's article (June 30) 
on American local government’ 
highlights its obvious advantages 
and strong local accountability. 
However. I wonder if British 
social democratic opinion is really 
prepared to accept some of its 


Spanish Civil War 

From Mr Brian Crozier 
Sir. From the interesting material 
you carried on July IS and 16, it is 
clear that The Times had three 
problems in its coverage of the 
Spanish Civil War. One was 
Geoffrey Dawson, who was afraid 
of offending Hitler. Another was 
Philjby, accredited to the National- 
ist side but working for Moscow. A 
third was George Lowtber Steer.- 
whose superb piece of imaginative 
reporting, which you reproduced, 
was the origin of the apparently 
invincible myth of Guernica. 
Yours very truly. 

BRI AN CROZIER. 

Kulm House. 

Dollis Avenue. 

Finchley. N3. 

July 18. 


inevitable and desirable con- 
sequences. 

Firstly, different local govern- 
ment areas must be allowed to 
choose very different standards of 
service or even not to provide 
certain services at all. I wonder 
what Ms Sofer would say if such 
an elected authority chose to 
introduce education vouchers for 
example? 

Secondly, the system can only 
work if local communities accept 
the full financial consequences of 
their actions. There can be no 
central government rescue for 
local authorities whose electorates 
choose to spend as though there 
were no tomorrow. 

I suspect that the local govern- 
ment system Ms Sofer really wants 
is one that provides more central 
government money but which 
reduces controls over how it is 
spent. That unfortunately, is not 
the American system. 

Sincerely. 

ANTHONY W. HENFREY. 

4900 Republic Bank Center. 
Houston. 

Texas, USA 
July 14. 


to Cambridge 

From Professor Ian Jack and Dr R. 
H. Arnold 

Sir. There is a further serious 
threat to the countryside near 
Cambridge: the plan to build a 
vast engineering workshop 
(euphemistically described as 
a"hangar”) on the edge of Fen 
Dinon. 

At present a commercial airport 
occupies an extensive site mainly 
on the south side of Newmarket 
Road. What is now proposed is 
much larger than the hangar they 
already possess, a new monstros- 
ity SO yards longer than Ely 
Cathedral and as high as its nave. 
It would be used for servicing 
several aircraft at a time, and 
would cause a great deal of noise. 
The aircraft, some of which might 
weigh more than 180 tons, would 
have to be towed across the main 
road, presumably at night, to the 
inconvenience and distress of 
everyone living in the vicinity. 

It seems to us incredible that an 
activity suited to an industrial 
estate should be suggested in a 
residential area which is still part 
of the green belt. Apart from those 
of os who live in the older pan of 
the village, and down to Green 
End (so well known to oarsmen), 
there are more than a thousand 
newcomers in a well— designed 
housing estate within a 100 yards 
or so of the site in question. The 
"hangar” would loom over them 
and shatter the peace of us all. It 
would be the most noticeable 
structure on this side of one of the 
beautiful cities of the world. 

There is an insensitivity about 
the plan which we find astonish- 
ing. It would be an act of 
vandalism. 

Yours etc. 

IAN JACK, 

R. H. ARNOLD, 

High House, High Street, 

Fen Ditto n, Cambridge. 

Macaulay neglect 

From Mr M. Bost ridge 
Sir. 1 must take issue with John 
Grigg's assessment of contem- 
porary Macaulay scholarship (July 
12). There may well have been 
very few new editions of his work 
in the past half century, but to 
state that "very little has been 
written about him” in this period 
is to ignore a number of important 
critical and biographical works. 

Among these the most notable 
is Thomas Pinney’s magisterial 
six-volume edition of Macaulay’s 
letters (the final volume appeared 
in 1981). John Clive's 1973 biog- 
raphy The Shaping of the His- 
torian is a valuable study of 
Macaulay's formative years up to 
1838 when he began writing his 
History . while recent studies by 
John Burrow and Jane Millgate, 
among others, have attempted to 
evaluate Macaulay's place among 
Victorian historians. 

Thai great scholar of the Vic- 
torian stale of mind. Walter 
Houghton, once singled out 
Macaulay’s essay on Francis Ba- 
con as a locus dassicus of Vic- 
torian anti-intellectualism. Surely 
John Grigg does not wish to see 
this characteristic inculcated in 
the minds of today's history A- 
level students? 

Yours faithfully. 

MARK BOSTRIDGE 
7 Richmond Hill, 

Richmond, Surrey. 

Fighting spirit 

From Mr Klaus Neuberg 
Sir, The banning of an egg-and- 
spoon race, an isolated incident 
which you rightly describe as 
“dotty” Heading article; July 18), 
is being used, possibly for political 
motives, to caricature what goes 
on in schools generally. 

Whatever the special problems 
affecting traditional team games 
may be. there is in fact little 
evidence for the Secretary of State 
to bemoan "the sour and pessimis- 
tic dismissal” of the competitive 
element in schools generally. 

Schools are as preocccupied as 
ever with pass-fail testing, 
categorizing and sorting sheep 
from goat. Getting to the top is 
still valued more than making a 
contribution to the life of the 
community, and achievement by 
and large continues to be con- 
ceived in narrow terms; so much 
so that at long last a new 
examination, the GCSE is being 
introduced to widen the scope of 
possible achievement and miti- 
gate the excesses of a system that 
constantly rubs in failure, and 
inadequacy. 

Competition has a part to play 
as one of the means for extending 
achievement, which in turn makes 
for self-respect and respect for 
others. A rat-race makes for 
neither, and making a fetish of 
competition is about as misguided 
and miseducative as can be. 

Yours faithfully. 

KLAUS NEUBERG, 

36 Lake View. 

Edgware, Middlesex. 

Namesmanship 

From Mr Martin L. Perkins 
Sir. Surely the final arbiter in the 
matter of namesmanship should 
be Lumer Farr, Yeovil-trained 
vice-president of International 
Packing Cases. • 

As reported by Stephen Potter, 
in Oneupmanship. he would ad- 
dress co-director Michael Yates as 
Mike; assistant director MY as 
Michael: sectional manager MY as 
Mr Yates: sectional assistant MY 
as Yates: indispensable secretary 
MY as Mr Yates: apprentice MY 
as Michael; and night-watchman 
MY as Mike. 

This is apparently referred to in 
the literature of the subject as 
Fart's. Law of Mean Familiarity. 
Yours faithfully. 

MARTIN L PERKINS. 

5 Tower Road. 

Orpington. Kent. 



JULY 24 1946 

The keadiine contained no fresh 
news — beer had been growing 
weaker since the early days of the 
uwr. The rationing of bread and 

flour, however, over a year after 
VE day created a furore. It urn 
imposed on July 21, with the 
ration for an adult at nine bread 
units a week —four units being 
needed for a large loaf. The reason 
for suck a step was a world 
shortage of wheat and it was not 
until July, 194$, that bread came 
off the ration. All rationing ceased 
on July 4, 1X4, with the freeing of 
the last two commodities — meat 

and bacon. 


MORE BEER 
BU T WEAK ER 

SWEETS UP 2oz.;llb. 
EXTRA SUGAR 


All school milk free 

From Our Food 
Correspondent 

Mr. Stxachey, Minister of Food, 
in reply to a question, stated 
yesterday that extremely few bak- 
ers were being non-cooperative on 
bread rationing. He deplored in- 
stances of bakers declining to 
accept coupons in advance and said 
the scheme was working far more 
smoothly where a high proportion 
of coupons were accepted on 
deposit. 

The chocolate and sweet ration 
will be increased on October 13 by 
2oz. to make it lib. a month, and in 
the ration period beginning on 
September 15 there will be another 
special issue of lib. of sugar a head, 
the fourth t.h« summer. 

From Aiigust 6 — when, inciden- 
tally, schoolchildren will be enjoy- 
ing their aimmw holiday and so 
will not get it — milk will be 
supplied without charge in both 
grant- aided and independent 
schools throughout Britain. Thus 
free milk will be available at every 
kind of school. The quantity is for 
the time being to be a third of a 
pint daily, which for 30 per cent of 
children in Fngfamt and Wales 
who have hw»n having school milk 
and for 14 per cent in Scotland will 
mean a reduction by half. The 
supply outlook for the autumn and 
winter is given by the Minister as 
reason for making the amount 
one-third instead of two-thirds of a 
pint. 

In future during school holidays 
the milk normally supplied for 
children will not go to the distribu- 
tors who supply it but into the pool 
for distribution generally. It was 
stated that difficulties of enforce- 
ment nw yjp ft impossible to award 
rhilii ran home for the Gchool 
holidays a priority on their emer- 
gency ration cards, anahling thi»Tn 
to obtain such items as eggs. 

Beer in August 

More, though weaker, beer will 
be available from August 1. In 
1938-39 production was 25,000.000 
bulk barrels. In the year ended 
September, 1945. it was 32,000,000 

bulk barrels. The recent cut in 
allocations of barley for brewing 
reduced the yearly rate of produc- 
tion to 27,000,000 bulk barrels. 
Now. with an eye to what he 
regards as the most thirsty months 
and to harvesting. Mr. Stxachey 
has asked the brewers to produce 
less of the stronger beers, including 
stout, and more of the weaker 
beers, and by this means produc- 
tion will rise to a rate of 29.000,000 
bulk barrels a year, or 4,000,000 
more than before the war. Gravity 
of beer wiD be reduced by 10 per 
cent but a strength 

below which it should not go has 
been fixe d. 

It was stated that the amount of 
beer going abroad is neg ligible and 
all goes to British troops. Mr. 
Stxachey promised to consider the 
growing tendency of publicans to 
close early or not open at afl. 

Some bread roundsmen had a 
trying first day. Some employed by 
the South Suburban Cooperative 
Society were busy until nearly 10 
pjn. Roundsmen of the Stamford 
branch of the Peterborough Coop- 
erative Society, after working till 
midnight, declined to make deliv- 
eries yesterday , but after a talk by a 

union officer resumed work in the 
afternoon. Thirty-four roundsmen 


employed by a Camberwell bakery 
firm, many of whom were busy for 
16 hours on Monday, loaded their 
vans yesterday and then said they 
would deliver bread but not collect 
coupons. An official of the Minis- 
try went to Camberwell to investi- 
gate the grievance. 


Rich tapestry 

From Mr David Englehcart 
Sir. On this day I have been 
offered a screwdriver by Barclays 
to apply for a credit card, though I 
have one already: discovered the 
hellish term “vanitory” applied to 
a unit: read an ad for “minimum 
bounce bras”, said to enable 
wearere to breath (sic) easily 
(wasn’t there once a Liberty 
bodice?); and discovered a girls’ 
school which offers “frequent 
individual contact with members 
of staff*. 

Ah well my steed awaits, so 1 
sign myself, as do many of my 
correspondents. 

Yours sinceriey (sic). 

DAVID ENGLEHEART. 

Kinlei Hall, 

Bewdley, 

Worcestershire. 

July 18. 

Setting to rights 

From Mrs Michael Hunt 
Sir. Next time Mr Wreford (July 
1 2) is stranded at the end of dinner 
with only a soup spoon, he should 
say “No thank you” to the 
pudding. 

Yours faithfiilfy. 

C. HURT, 
eastern Hall. 

Ashbourne. Derbyshire. 

July 16. 


inc iiivjLcb ixiUJtoOAX juu'zt iyoo 


u w Sr w tt 



COURT 

AND 

SOCIAL 


Forthcoming marriages 


I Mr HJ. Middleton 
and The Hon Vsdhsb 
C ornwallis 

The engagement is announced 
' between Jeremy Middleton, of 
Barcom Cottage; Rushcuiters 


COURT 

CIRCULAR 


BUCKINGHAM PALACE 
July 23: The Marriage of The 
Prince Andrew with Miss Sarah 
Ferguson was solemnized in 
Westminster Abbey this 
morning. 

The Queen and The Duke of 
Edinburgh, with Queen Eliza- 
beth The Queen Mother and 
other Members of the Royal 
Family, drove to Westminster 
Abbey in a carriage procession 
escorted by a Sovereign's Escort 
of the Household Cavalry, with 
two Standards, under the com- 
mand of Lieutenant-Colonel 
Seymour Gilbart-Denham. The 
Life Guards. 

First Carriage 
(Semi-State Landau) 

THE QUEEN 

THE DUKE OF EDINBURGH 
Second Carriage 
(State Landau) 

QUEEN ELIZABETH THE 
QUEEN MOTHER 
The Princess Margaret, Count- 
ess of Snowdon 
Viscount Linley 
Lady Sarah Arm strong-J ones 
Third Carriage 
(State Landau) 

The Prince of Wales 
The Princess of Wales 
Fomth Carriage 
(State Landau) 

The Princess Anne, Mrs Mark 
Phillips 

Captain Mark Phillips 
The Earl of Westmorland 
(Master of the Horse) 

Fifth Carriage 
(Stale Landau) 

The Duchess of Grafton 
(Mistress of the Robes) 

The Dowager Duchess of 
Aberrant 

(Mistress of the Robes to Queen 
Elizabeth The Queen Mother) 
Right Hon Sir William 
Heseltine 

(Private Secretary . to The 
Queen) 

Lieutenant-Colonel Blair Stew- 
art-Wilson 

(Equerry in Wailing to The 
Queen) 

A Guard of Honour found by 
The Queen's Guard, made up to 
a strength of 100 and provided 
by the 1st Battalion Irish 
Guards, with The Queen's Col- 
our. and accompanied by the 
Band of the Regiment and the 
Pipes and Drums of the Battal- 
ion. under the command of 
Major Christopher Langion. 
was mounted in the Forecourt 
of Buckingham Palace. 

Silver Stick in Wailing (Colo- 
nel James Emson. The Life 
Guards) and the Field Officer in 
Brigade Waiting (Colonel Wil- 
liam Mahon. Irish Guards) were 
present. 

The Queen and The Duke of 
Edinburgh. Queen Elizabeth 
The Queen Moiher and other 
Members of the Royal Family 
were received at the Great West 
Door of the Abbey by the Dean 
and Chapter of Westminster. 

A procession was formed and 
Their Majesties and Their Royal 
Highnesses were conducted to 
their places. 

Princess Alice. Duchess of 
Gloucester. The Duke and 
Duchess of Gloucester, Earl of 
Ulster. Lady Darina Windsor. 


Lady Rose Windsor. The Duke die V 
and Duchess of Kent, Earl of St Gentlei 
Andrews. Lady Helen Windsor, in the 
Prince and Princess Michael of Abbey. 
Kent. Lord Frederick Windsor. The ■ 
Lady Gabriel la Windsor. Prin- the Ye 
cess Alexandra, the Hon Mrs on dul 


the Honourable Corps of 
Gentlemen at Arms was on duty 


Bay, Sydney. New South Wales, 
and Vanessa, vouneer daughter 


and Vanessa, younger daughter ■ 
of Lord and Lady Cornwallis, of 
Ruck Farm. Horsmonden, 


Angus Oglivy and the Hon 
Angus Qglivy, Mr James Oglivy. 
Miss Marina Oglivy. the Hon 
Gerald and Mrs Lascelles, the 
Duke of Fife. Captain Alexander 
Ramsay and the Lady SaJtoun. 
and Colonel Sir Henry and Lady 
May Abel Smith were present in 
the Abbey. 

The Prince Andrew, with the 
Prince Edward, drove to West- 
minster Abbey accompanied by 
a Captain's Escort of the House- 
hold Cavalry, under the com- 
mand of Major Richard 
Sampson. The Life Guards. 

Carriage 

(1902 State Landau) 

THE BRIDEGROOM 
The Prince Edward 
Car 

Wing Commander Adam Wise 


in foe Quire of Westminster 

TTK: Queen's Body Guard of wiU take place in Australia, 
the Yeoman of the Guard was c — • 
on duty in the Nave of ’the _ __ 


Major C.G. Le Bran 
and Miss C J. Kirkland 
The engagement is announced 
between Charles George Le 
Bruit. The Prince of Wales's 
Own Regimenr' of Yorkshire, 
son of Mr and Mrs George Le 
Brun. 'of Podyxnore. Somerset, 
and Caroline Jane, eldest daugh- 
ter of Mr and Mrs David 
Kirkland, of Castle Acre. 
Norfolk- 


Abbey. 

The route of the Procession 
was lined by detachments of the 
Armed Forces. 

The Queen and The Duke of 
Edinburgh gave a Wedding 
Breakfast in honour ofthe Bride 
and Bridegroom. 

The String Orchestra of the 
Irish Guards, under the direc- 
tion of Major M. G. Lane, 
played selections of music .dur- 
ing the Wedding Breakfast 

The Bride and Bridegroom 
subsequently left the Palace in a 
carriage and were escorted to the 
Royal Hospital, Chelsea by a 
Travelling Escort of the House- 
hold Cavalry, under the com- 


Dr S. Ellis 
and Miss L. Brett 
The engagement is announced 
between Simon, son of Mr and 
Mrs CJS. Ellis, of Newcastle- 
under-Lyme. and Lindsey, 
daughter of Mr and Mrs B.W. 
Bren, of London 5E23. 


Mr J.E. Fishwick 
and Miss J. Lwmess 
The engagement is announced 
between James Edward, eldest 
son of Dr and Mrs F. Fishwick. 
of Bedford, and Julia, youngest 


MrJA Noble 
and Miss BJL MacGaw 
The engagement is announced 
between John, youngest son of 
Lieutenant-Colonel and Mrs 
A_T. Noble, of Audbterarder, 
Perthshire, and Belinda, youn- 
ger daughter of Mr and Mrs 
A.W. MacCaw, of Wincanton. 
Somerset. - 


Mr CX-N. Rutter 
and Miss RE, Barber 
The engagement is announced 
between Christopher, elder son 
of Canon and Mis A.EH. 
Rutter, of Trent. Dorset and 

Rachel, daughter of Mr and Mrs 

G.H. Barber, of Bradford Abbas. 
Dorset. 

Mr IVLA. Sullivan 
and Miss J.M . Bolt 
The engagement is announced 
between Mark, elder son of Mr 
and Mrs D. Sullivan, of 
Mowden HilL Northumberland, 
and Jan. second daughter of Mr 
and Mrs!. A. BolLofPOnteland. 
Northumberland. 

Mr RJV.G. Wylde 
and Miss L. Teonison 
The engagement is announced 
between Richard, son of Mr and 
Mis J.A. Wylde. of Wetherdcn, 
Suffolk, and Lesley, daughter of 
Mr and Mrs T. Tennison, of 
Hazfcmerc. Buckinghamshire. , 


OBITUARY 

SIR BRYAN MATTHEWS 

Creative scientist invaluable 
during the war 


Sir Bryan Matthews. CBE. 
FRS, Professor of Physiology 
at Cambridge University from 
1952 to 1973, whose research 


with his own enthusiasm and 
knowledge and which set a 
high standard both in scientif- 
ic method and practical appli- 


was instrumental in making cation to service problems, 
possible high altitude flight. This was done by taking care 


died' on July 22 at the age of that his staff had good con- 
g0 tacts with the operating squad- 

Bryan Harold Cabot Mat- rons so that problems could be 
thews was born on June 14, defined in scientific terms and 
1906. the son of H. E. Mat- subjected to valid laboratory 
thews and younger brother of investigation. 

.« « - f U Tha TWSKlOiWC 


daughter of Mr and Mrs J.A. 
Lunness. of Steeple Morden, 
Cambridgeshire. 


it Lieutenant LM. Shedcy, 


Marriages 


mand of Major Nigel Hadden- 
Paion. The Blues and Royals. 


Pa ion. The Blues and F 
The Duke of Edinbi 


Andrew 


and The 
Edward) 


Prince Tum house in an aircraft of The 
Queen's Flight this evening and 


The Prince Andrew, with The was received by Her Majesty's 


Prince Edward, was received at 
the Great West Door by the 
Dean and Chapier of West- 
minster and, a procession hav- 


Lord- Lieu tenant for the City of 
Edinburgh (Dr John McKay, the 
Righ Hon the Lord Provost). 
The Duke of Edinburgh. 


Mr G.W. Friedman 
and Miss CJ. Spurr 
The engagement is announced 
between Geoige William, youn- 
ger son of Dr and Mrs M.M. 
Friedman, of Harare. Zim- 
babwe. and Caroline Jane, elder 
daughter of Lieutenant-Colonel 
and Mis EC. Spurr, of 
Godalming, Surrey. 


and Miss SJJ. Gallagher 
The engagement is announced 
between Ian. youngest son of Mr 
and Mrs J.D. Sheeley. of 
Warlingham. Surrey, and Sarah, 
daughter of Mr and Mrs P.R. 
Gallagher, of Heronsgale. 
Hertfordshire. 


MrAJX Low 
and Mrs N. Taylor 
The marriage took place on 
Saturday July 19. quietly in 
London, of Mr Alan Logue and 
Mrs Nancy Taylor. 


ing been formed. Their Royal President of the Common- 
Highnesses were conducted to wealth Games Federation, sub- 


their places. 


sequently attended a Reception 


Major Ronald Ferguson and hosted by the Commonwealth 
Miss Sarah Ferguson drove to Games Council for Scotland, at 


Westminster Abbey in the Glass Aw Royal College of Surgeons, 
Coach, with an Escort of The Nicholson Street, Edinburgh. 


Mr SJ-C. Mills 
and Mrs RJ. Harris 
The engagement is announced 
between Sebastian, son of Major 
and Mrs John Mills, of 
Winkfield, Berkshire, and Re- 
becca. daughter of Mr and Mrs 
Thomas Meaney, of Buckhurst 
HilL Essex. 


Mr J.CA- Roper 
and Mrs PL Hart 
The marriage took place on July 
12, in Nantucket. Massachu- 
setts, of Mr John Roper and Mrs 
Mr TJ. Red burn Phoebe Hart, daughter of the 

and Miss S.E. Griffin late R.B. Fester, of London and 

The engagement is announced New York, and of Mrs Jo- 
between Timothy John, only sephrae Foster, 
son of Mr ana Mrs LA. Mr HjL Shaw 
Red bum. of Retgate. Surrey, and Miss WJT. McRae 
and Susan Elizabeth, youngest The marriage took place in 
daughter of Squadron Leader London on Thursday. July 10. 
and Mrs FJ. Griffin, of of Mr KA. Shaw, and Miss 
Wildhern. near Andover. Wilma Joyce McRae, of 40, 
Hampshire. King Henry's Road. 


the zoologist. L. Harrison 
Matthews. At the age of 17, he 
entered a competition to send 
a radio message across the 
Atlantic. Marconi won the 
competition, but the young 
Matthews came a creditable 
third. 

He was educated at Clifton 
College and fGng's College, 
Cambridge, where in 1927 he 
got a First in Pan 11 of the 
Natural Sciences Tripos. 
From 1928 to 1932 he held a 
Beit Memorial Fellowship and 


The physical problems were 
thus considered as specific j 
operating commands, for ex- 
ample, anti-blackout and oxy- 
gen equipment in Fighter 
Command, cold and oxygen 
equipment in Bomber Com- 
mand, and oxygen and de- 
compression sickness in 
Photographic Reconnaissance 
Unit squadrons. 

Later, very practical investi- 
gations were undertaken, 
among them the development 
of waterproof clothing and 


was meanwhile, in 1929, elect- flotation systems for use by 
ed a Fellow of King's. fighter pilots who. on a non- 

return flight, were catapulted 


Matthews started research 
in physiology at a time when 
the electronic amplifier had 
already shown its value jn 
magnifying very small bio- 
electrical events, but before 


from merchant ships on con- 
voy protection duty, frequent-^ 
ly in Arctic waters. This later 
led on to the development of 
immersion suits and ltfe-sav. 


there were the recording in- ing jackets for general service 

stnimenis to take foil ad van- use. 

lage of it. During this time Matthews 


Life Guards, and were received His Royal H 


at the Great West Door by the ceived by the 


ness was re- 
irman of the 


Dean and Chapter. 


Council (Mr Arthur Campbell) 


Miss Sarah Ferguson was 2nd the Honorary Secretary (Mr 
joined at the Abbey by Miss Geoige Hunter). 


Zara Phillips. Miss Alice Fer- Squadron Leader Timothy 


guson, Miss Laura Fell owes and Flnneron and Major Rowan 
Lady Rosanagh Innes-Ker Jackson. RM were in 


(Bridesmaids) and Prince Wil- attendance, 
liam of Wales, Master Seamus The Duke of Edinburgh later 
Makim. Master Andrew Fer- arrived at the Palace of 
guson and Master Peter Phillips Holyroodhouse. 

The Service was performed by The^ Prince of W; 
the Archbishop of Canterbury. J? become patroi 
assisted by the Dean of Society for Asia 
Westminster. educational char 

The Lesson was read by The 1 by S 
Prince of Wales. Younghusband. 

Prayers were said by the Princess Alexani 
Precentor and Sacrisu the Ro- the Freud Mu 
man Catholic Archbishop of Maresfield Gar 


The Prince of Wales has agreed 
to become patron of the Royal 
Society for Asian Affairs, the 
educational charity founded in 
1901 by Sir Francis 
Younghusband. 

Princess Alexandra will open 
the Freud Museum at 20 
Maresfield Gardens, Hamp- 


Wcswiinster. the Moderator of stead, on July 28. 



the General Assembly or the 
Church of Scotland, the Mod- 
erator of the Free Church Fed- 
eral Council the Chaplain ofthe 


The Earl of Stockton, ONi, 
regrets that owing to his illness 
he was unable to attend the 
memorial service which was 


Sussex University promotions: (from left) Dr John Nixon, Dr Brian Roberts, Dr Michael 

Erant and Dr Keith Middlemas. 


He had a remarkable gift for 
designing and making appara- 
tus of all kinds, large and 
small and soon produced a 
"moving iron oscillograph" 
which was a great advance on 
the recording instruments 
then available. With it he 
made the first comprehensive 
study of the messages sent to 
the spinal cord from the 
muscle spindles, the sense 
oigans which record muscular 
tensions and so provide the 
"feed-back” necessary for 
smooth movemenL 

He made many other im- 
provements in electro-ptaysio- 
fogicaf technique and used 
them in investigations on 
brain waves and spinal cord 
potentials. 

In the late 1930s. however, 
Matthews* work took a new 
tum. He had always been 


was also a member of the 
Flying Personnel Research 
Committee and a consultant 
in applied physiology to the 
Air Ministry. His personal 
contributions io the war effort 
had far-reaching effects in 
raising the operational effi- 
ciency of the aircrew, and in 
greatly improving their safety 
and chances of survival. He 
was also consulted by the 
Admiralty on questions con- 
nected with the safety 0.4 
submarine crews. 

After the war. he relumed to 
Cambridge, where he was 
made a reader in 1948. and a 
professor four years later. The 
care of a large and expanding 
department took much of his 
time, but he continued to 
show his remarkable skill. 

At King's, he was a director 
of studies in natural sciences 


Reel and the Archbishop of held on July 1 7 for Lady Diana 
York. Cooper. 

At the conclusion of the - - - — 


University news 


interested in the problems of from 1932 to 1952. carrying 
respiration and neat loss at on the good tradition of 


Service the Registers were n 
signed in the Chapel of St i$2tTC 
Edward the Confessor. 

The Bride and Bridegroom WUI 
were conducted to their Carriage The life 
and. escorted by a Captain's Philip A 
Escort of the Household Cav- by the i 
airy, drove to Buckingham Baron R 
Palace. Wolven 

The Queen and The Duke of Oxford 

Edinburgh, with Queen Eliza- 

beth The Queen Mother, and « _ 

other Members of the Royal JDRTO 


Baron Moore of f^ iMraty * 

Wolvercote appointment of five new 

PhUi’^MSS 1 h °”S cSries Elliott, lecturer at the 

EJfe Imperial College of Science and 

Technology, to a chair of 
mathematics from January 1, 


The life barony conferred on Sir 
Philip Moore has been gazetted 


Wolvercote in the City of 


Family. Major Ronald Ferguson 
and Mrs Hector Barrantes. pro- 
ceeded to Buckingham Palace in 
a carriage procession escorted 

S r a Sovereign's Escort of the 
ousehoM Cavalry, with two 
Standards and a Guidon. 


Baron Bonham- 
Carter 


The life barony conferred on the 
Hon Mark Bonham Carter has 
been gazetted by the name, style 
and title of Baron Bonham-' 
Carter, of Yarnbury in the 


1987. 

Dr Michael Eraut, reader in 
education: Dr . Keith. 

Middlemas, reader in history; 
Dr John Nixon, reader in chem- 
istry: and Dr Brian Roberts, 
reader in Mechanical engineer- 
ing. have all been promoted to 
professorships from. October I. 


of microbiology. Institute for 
Research on Animal Diseases; 
Professor Sir George Porter, 
President of the Royal Society. 
Professor Tan Sri Mohamed 
Rashdan. former Malaysian 
Vice-Chancellor Professor Sir 
Peter Trench. Chairman. Na- 
tional House-Buikling Council 
.MPInh Miss Mary A. Grierson, 
-former official artist. Royal 
Botanic Gardens, Kew. 


T R Hopkins (computing*: Dr B H 
Robinson ictiwnfetryfc Dr P J Robin- 


son i French European sliuttrsE Mr A 
J Shilton I philosophy ). Ms Clare 
L'ngersofl I social administration & 
social work). 


Bath 

Appointments: 

Senior lecturer Dr N M Brooke. BSc. 
PhD. school of mathematics. 
Lecturers: J P Bennett. BA. school of 
mathemauo: Dr M A Oliver. BSc. 
PhD. school of mathematics: and Dr F 
Osman, BSc. PhD. school at engineer- 
ing. 


high altitudes and had been on 
the Bancroft scientific expedi- 
tion to the Andes in 1935. 
After the Munich crisis, this 
interest and his great experi- 
mental skill moved him from 
Cambridge to Famborough, 


Bancroft, which included en- 
couraging undergraduates 
reading for Part 1 of the Tnpos 
to blend biological with physi- 
cal sciences. * 

Matthews was made a CBE 
in 1944 and received his 


where he was put in charge of knighthood in 1 952. He was a 
research into aviation medi- Corresponding Member ofthe 


dne at the RAF laboratories. 
Here, bis task was to build 


Appointments 

Professor Christopher W. 


Newcastle 

Dr Peter Birin has been ap- 
pointed to the chair of occupa- 


up a laboratory to investigate 
problems affecting the safety 
and efficiency of aircrew both 
in flight and after an emergen- 
cy. In 1939, the RAF was 
largely unprepared for sus- 
tained operations at high alti- 
tude, and an urgent need was 
the provision of an efficient 
oxygen system. 

To provide this, experimen- 


Noba-BA..PhD.jmfa »r.f 

September I. 


Her Majesty's Body Guard of County of Wiltshire. 


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Cphmiam & 19 


BIRTHS 


BYFORO On July 23rd 1986 at The 
Roue. Cambridge. To Wendy inte 
aarkci ana David, a son (Harry 
James Cady). 

COOKE - On July 20th. to Eltzabeth 
( nee Sk render) and Richard, a son. 
Frederick John, a brother for 

Edward. 

PEN WG - On July 22. hi Cambridge, to 
Emily i nee Kedant and Thomas, a 
daughter. Elizabeth Laura, 

DODCSOM . On July 22nd. at St 
Thomas' Hospital to Jan inee Hem. 
ingwayt and Paul, a daughter. 
Laura, a stster for Eleanor. 

FISHER ■ On July 22nd to Luctmfa 
■ nee Tanner i and John a daughter. 
Vi ctoria Mary Alice. 

FRASER - On 19th July, ai the West 
London Hospital, to Linda wee Blair} 
and Allan, a daughter. Kirsty Anne. 

JOHNSON ■ on July rath, to Lorraine 
mec Landers) and Henry, a son, 
Andrew Eric, a brother for James. 

MACMILLAH-SCOTT ■ On July 2lsL 
to Meredllh m£e Godsali and Adam, 
a daughter. Isabel Sophie de Lisle. 

MASSEY - On 21st July, at Stamford, 
io Philippa and Graeme, a daughter, 
Rebecca Claire, a sister for RacheL 

MILLER On July 16tti In Tokyo, to 
Alison Man' ince Bnancei and 
Ralph. Ihe gill of a son. Oliver James 
Nicholas. Always remembering 
Caillln. 

POLLEN On 22nd July 1986. to 
Chnsltanne and Richard, a son. Al- 
exander Christian. 

ROSEN - To Jules and Vanessa tnee 
GoodwnghiL a son. James, on Royal 
Wedding Day. 

SHUTTLEWOOO - On July 21sL in SI. 
Albans, to Kale inee MacLeod) and 
Martin, a daughter. Jessica Ruth, a 
stsier lor Thomas and Samuel. 


BANERA Da - On July 20Uu suddenly 
at her home In Calcutta. Beloved 
wife of Sankardas Banerll and much 
loved mother of KalL Bobby. Toby 
and AMca Dam. Mourned by her 
large family and many friends. 

BELGRAVE - On July 19th. suddenly 
at her flat. Emma Caroline 
Prudence, daughter of the tale James 
and Enid Beigrave and sister of 
Sarah, dearly loved by her relatives 
and friends. Funeral Service at Holy 
Trinity Church. Limebury at 2.30pm 
on Wednesday. July 30th. Flowers 
to H. Peasgood & Son. Saffron Wal- 
den (07991 233X4. 

BERNHARD -On July 23rd. peacefully 
at home In Hove. Herbert (BUD 

- Anthony aged 88 years. Funeral wui 
lake place on Monday. July 28U> at 
Downs Crematorium. Bear Road. 
Brighton at 3*30 pm. No flowers or 
donations. 

BURNS - On July 18th. peacefully at 
home after a long illness. Barbara, 
widow of Jacob Michael Burns. Fu- 
neral Service win take ptace at South 
London Crematorium. StreeUam on 
Thursday. July 24ih at 4.00 pm. No 
flowers, please. Donations, if desired, 
io imperial Cancer Research Fund. 
Lincoln's Inn Fields. London WC2- 

BU1YCRWICK Desiree, widow of 
Cyril Bufjmrick. on July ZlsL aged 
93. Funeral Service, after private 
cremation, at SI. Mary's Church. 
Beaconsfleld at 11. Oo am on Satur- 
day. July 26Ui. No flowers by 
request. 

CfMSKE-On July 16th. peacefully in 
hospital. Marian, most dearly loved 
wire of Robert and mother of Peter. 
At her request a private burial has 
taken Place at Holy Trinity Church. 
HurslpierpolnL No letters please. 

DARE - On 21st July 1988. suddenly 


NKSEM. Peter - On 19th July. 1986. 
suddenly al Ids home. Sunnybanks. 
Llanrwst Road. Conway. North 
Wales. So sadly missed by his dear 
friend and companion. Terence John 
Sheerln. Further enquiries to Alt. 
Lambert A Son. FUneial Directora. 
W. 0492 81072. 

O'CONNOR Margaret (Peg) -On July 
22nd. peacefully at home. Wife of 
Ihe late Hugh O'Connor, loved 
mother of Caroline, stepmother of 
Mary and Sue and grandmother of 
Oliver. Romilly and Isabel. 

PENNY. Anne ScotL beloved wife of 
Leonard and mother of Dianne. 
Stephen and Simon, on 21st July at 
Princess Alice Hospice. Esher. 
Funeral at 10-30 am on Tuesday. 
29th July at St. Mary's Church. 
Lower Sunbury-on-Thames. Flowers 
io Lodge Brothers. Funeral Directors. 
4 Clarendon Road. Ashford. Middle- 
sex by 9.15 am. Tuesday, or 
donations to Princess Alice Hospice. 
Esher. 

'PLUMB Charles Joseph OB.E~ of 
Claremont. Woodland Avenue. 
Leighton Buzzard. Beds. Op July 
19th. peacefully. In his 90lh year. 
Loving husband of EMe for 64 years, 
and father of UoneL Martary (Vicky) 
and Pamela. Private funeral, at his 
requesL has taken place. 


Reading 

The university is to confer 
honorary degrees on Ihe 
following: 

Dlitfc Dame P eggy Ashcroft, 
the actress; Professor John Ly- 
ons, Master of Trinity Hall, 
Cambridge. 

DSc Mr A Everard Gunther, 
former senior geologist. Shell 
Petroleum (UK); Professor Har- 
old Hopkins, emeritus professor 
of applied optics at Reading; Dir 
Walter Plowright, former bead 


accounting, Strathclyde Univer- 
sity. has been appointed as 
professor of finance and 
accounting from January 1, 
1987. 

Mr David A. Wilkins, Director 
of Reading University's Centre 
for Applied Language Studies, 


Mr Charies Sutdifle has been 
appointed to the Northern Soci- 
ety chair of accounting and 
finance from October I. 

Dr Trevor Page has been ap- 
pointed to the Cookson Group 


Societe Philomatique de Paris . 
and. in 1961. president of 
Section I of the British Associ- 
ation. He had published in 
1933 Electricity in our Bodies. 

Bryan Matthews concealed 
behind the "imperial" beard 
he grew during the war a 
rubicund and boyish face with 
which went a perennially boy.^g 
ish spirit and a zest for life. 

He bad a great love of the 
country and of the sea. and as 


of engineering m^rinl, 

applied linguistics. Open 


tal work on the physiology of a young man did much camp- 
altitude started on August 29. ing. including an expedition to 


Kent 

The following lecturers have 
been promoted to senior lecture- 
ships from October I; 

Dr J C .Dore urtivdcs): Mr A Gw 
- < accountinsjdiru nisJnuive studies K Dr 


Open 

Mr Michael Birehenaugb, for- 
merly chief inspector of the 
Inner London Education 
Authority, has been appointed 
visiting professor in the School 
of Education. ■ 


Luncheons 


Prime Minister . 

The Prime Minister and Mr 
Denis Thatcher were hosts at a 
luncheon held yesterday at 10 
Downing Street. The guests 
were: 


HM Government 
Mr Tim Eggar, MP, was host at 
a luncheon held yesterday at the 
Savoy Hotel in honour of the 
Deputy Prime Minister of New 
Zealand. 


PRESTON. Raymond Andrew of 
Duddon Lodge, peacefully at 
Tarportey Memorial HospitaL on I 
22nd July 1986. Funeral at St : 
Peler s Church. Duddon al 2.00pm j 
on Friday. 2Sth July- 1 



Reception 

HM Government 
The Secretary of Stale for Wales 
and Mrs Edwards were hosts 
yesterday at a reception held at 
the Welsh Office in London to 
celebrate the marriage "Prince 
Andrew and Miss -Sarah Fer- 
guson. Members ofbotb Houses 
' of Parliament and repre- 
sentatives of London Welsh 
societies, public bodies, in- 
dustry, the arts and the media 
were among the guests. 


Meeting 

Victoria League for Common- 
wealth Friendship 
The annual meeting of the 
Victoria League for Common- 
wealth Friendship was held 
yesterday at the Mansion 
House, by permission of ihe 
Lord Mayor. Lord MacLehose 
of Beoch, chairman of the 
league, presided and SirZetman i 
Cowen, QC also spoke. . 


1939, and soon after, proto- 
type equipment was devel- 
oped, whit* later went into 
production for the RAF and 
the Royal Navy. 

Other major service prob- 
lems investigated were the 
effects of acceleration, night 
vision, decompression sick- 
ness, instrument presentation 
and lighting, and the effects of 
low temperatures. 

To attack these tasks, Mat- 
thews gathered around him- 
self a team which he imbued 


Lapland when to camp there 
was more of an adventure 
than it is now. He was a keen 
skier and in later years his 
great recreation was ocean 
yachting. 

By his marriage, in 1926. to 
Rachel Eckhard he had one 
son. Peter, now also a physiol- 
ogist and a Fellow of the Royal 
Scoiety. and two daughters. 
After the dissolution of this 
marriage he married, in 1 970, 
Audrey, widow of Air Vice- 
Marshal W. K. Stewart. 


MR JAMES GORDON, VC 

Mr James Gordon, VC, who halt, was heavily fortified anc 


Birthdays today 

Sir Bernard de Bunsen. 79; Lord 


Mr James Gordon, VC, who 
died in Perth on July 20 at the 
age of 77, was a private in the 
Australian Military Forces in 
1941 when he won hiy-VC for 


r- ^ 311 heroic single-handed ex- 

JaCques.FOUrpilX, 39; Mr C. E. nlnh-in curruccAillv nnhimn 


Dinner 


and tragically. John Ashton aged 16. 
beloved son of John and 'Betsy and 
brother of Elizabeth. Funeral Service 
at Holy Trinity Chinch. Stoane 
Street on Monday. 28th July at 12 
noon, to be followed by private 
cremation. 

EDWARDS - On July 20th. 1986. 
fey lain* Stewart of Mlrtster-in- 
Thanef. Kent, wife of the late George 
Hugh Edwards and mother of 
Chrlgiabher (deceased). David and 
Elizabeth. Service at Thane) crema- 
torium. Margate, on 26th July al 
10.30am. Enquiries to W.S Cole A 
Son. Monition. Ramsgate. 

GRAHAM. Brigadier W. D. McN 
Graham. O.8.E.. D.S.O. - On July 
20th. m his 82nd year, much loved 
husband of Patricia and father of 
John. MldiaeL Douglas and Anne, ai 
hfe home. Urze de Chelro. 
Monchique. Algarve. PortugaL 

LAWLESS - On July 214L 1986. 
Kathleen. Loyal, kind and true, the 
friend Of many in Marylebone High 
Street. She will be remembered by 
those wtio knew her wim affection. 


ROBERTS - On 16th July. 1986. 
Timothy John Philip- Captain. Royal 
Engineers, aged 26. beloved son of j 
Robert and Patricia and brother of I 
Kale, lost In an avalanche while lead- j 
inq a climbing expedition in the i 
Peruvian Andes. 

SEATON - On 21st July. 1986, at 
home. Jack Seaton, very dear hus- 
band of Iris, father of Shlroa. tMone 
and Francis. Private cremation. Ser- 
vice of Thanksgiving and 'Interment 
al Sl Thomas' Church. Tangley al 
3.00 pm on 29lh July. 

SMrni. Dr F.W. Cordon Smith. MJX. 
MCH.. late of Homestead. Westgate- 
oo Sea. peacefully at Cobh. County 
Cork. Ireland on i7Ui July. 1986. 


Law Society 

Sir Alan Leslie, President of the 
Law Society, was host at a 
dinner held last nigiu at Law 
Society's HalL The guests 
included: 



Jacques Fouroux, 39; Mr G E. 
A Hambra 56; Mr J. W. Hde, 
60; Mr Wilfred Josephs, 59; 
Vice-Admiral Sir David Loram, 
62: Mr Edwin Mirvish, 72; Miss 
Nora Swinburne, 84; Professor 
Frank Ttiistknhwaiie, 71; Mr 
Peier Yates, 57. 


Appointments 


Mr G W. F. Newman, QC and 
Mr J. J. Fonflum to be circuit 
judges on the South Eastern 
GrcuiL 

Mr Jade Wading to be Chair- 
man of the Royal Genera] 
Theatrical Fund Association, in 
succession to the late Mr Clif- 
ford Mollison. 


LOW On 22nd July 1986. Peacefully 
after long illness, borne with courage 
and humour. Charles Stuart, aged to 
years of Sandwich. Kent. Dearly 
loved father of Michael, and brother 
of Patience and Toby. Private 
cremation followed by Service of 
Thanksgiving at The Church Of S( 
Clement. Sandwich. ii.45am Mon- 
day 28tn July. Family flowers only, 
donations If desired to Pilgrims Hos- 
pice. 56 London Road. Canterbury. 
Kent. 


TOFmxi (MURRAY LEACH) - On July 
22nd. Mary Barbara aged 73. at 
Chilian House Nursing Home. Much 
lov ed by children, grandchildren and 
iriends. Funeral al Chilton Parish 
Chureh on Wednesday. July 30Ui at 
2.30 pm. Family flowers only. En- 
quires to FJ. Wilson. Haddenham 
1 08441 291 200. 

WILLIAMS-WOOD - On July 20th. 
peacefully at home after a short 
illness. CyriL steady toted husband 
of Eleanor and loving lather of 
Hermione. Funeral private. 
Donations to imperial Cancer 
Research Fund. 

YOUNG . On 22nd July, aged 90. 
peacefully at home after a long IB- 
ness borne with patience. Eileen 
Young, beloved mother of AUsa and 
Chairman. 


Science report 


Throwing light on plant growth 


ptoit-in successfully capturing 
a machine-gun position under 
a hail of fire. 

James Heather Gordon was 
born on March 7, 1909, at 
Rockingham, Western Austra- 
lia. It was during an attack on 
the night of July 10, 1941, at 
“GreenhilT, just to the north 
of Qjezzine, in Syria, that 
Gordon's company came un- 
der intense machine-gun fire 
and its advance was held up. 

Movement even by single 
individuals, ‘became impossi- 
ble and, in the effort to 
advance, one officer and two 
men were killed, and two men 
were wounded. 

The enemy machine-gun 
position, which had brought 
the two forward platoons to a 


halt, was heavily fortified ana 
completely covered the area 
occupied by the attacking 
forces. Private Gordon, on his 
own initiative, crept forward 
over an area swept by ma- 
chine-gun and grenade fire 
and succeeded in approaching 
dose to the post. He then 
charged it from the front and 
killed the four machine-gun- 
ners with the bayoneL 

The action entirely demor- 
alized the enemy in the sector 
and the company advanced to 
take the position. 

“During ibe remainder of 
the action that night and on 
the following day", reads ibcj 
citation, “Private Gordon, 
who throughout the opera- 
tions showed a high degree of 
courage, fought with equal 
gallantry". 

Gordon was later promoted 
warrant officer class II in the 
31 st Battalion (Q & V) Austra- 
lian Military Forces. 


By Andrew Wiseman 


By miniatnriziiig bulky lab- 
oratory. equipment and adapt- 
ing it to suit conditions, Israeli 
scientists hope to improve 
harvest yields. 


nmm_ photosynthesis: any determine how quickly herbi- 
additienal light would not help tides stop photosynthesis in a 


significantly to produce 
nutrients. 


EDWARDS (nee Slater) - In loving 
memory of Lesley, on this her birth- 
day. and of her Mother. 


MEMORIAL SERVICES 


MARRIAGES 


AJOMALE : RICHARDSON • The mar- 
nage look place on 19Ui July. 1986 
al SI. Mary * church. Iwcme Min- 
««■ at otutoiahaa A Mmole, son of 
Mr and Mrs L- Ptlfold, io Eleanor, 
daughter of Mr and Mm l. 
Richardson. 


GOLDEN 

ANNIVERSARIES 


BATHURST ; STEANE ■ On July 24th, 
1936 at st. Thomas' Church. Regent 
Street. Wl. Peter LancrkM to Joan 
Irene. 


LUKAS on July 19th. Andrew, aged 
14. beloved son of Bngtd inee More 
O Terrain and Rlnus of 107. 
Cranmere Avenue. Interlaken. NJ 
07712. USA. 

MEDLM - On 18th July. 1986 al 
Broormuck Cottage. Ediesborough. 
Beds. Thomas, aged 66 years. Funer- 
al al I lam on Friday. 25Ui July al 
Eaton Bray Parish Church. Flowers 
lo Neville Funeral Service. 311 
Marsh Road. Lragrave. uiton. Beds. 

MORE OTERRALL (see Lukas). 

NEWINO On July 22nd. suddenly 
Stephen, beloved son of Rfrftanl and 
Akiko and brother of Victoria, fu- 
neralserviceai Saini Peters Church. 
Ummfietd. on Monday July 281h. a! 
10.30am Flowers may be sent to 
Ebbuit Funeral Service. UmnsfiekL 
Oxted 3767. 


LACEY - A Service of Thanksgiving 
tor the Hte of William Daniel Lacey. 
C.8.. C.B.E.. former Director Gener- 
al of Design Services. P-S.A.. 
Department of -Environment will be ! 
held al 12 noon on Friday. 1st 
August al- SL Margaret's Church. 
Westminster. 


raSTHUMUS - In memory of Anne 
Posthumus (n^e Tomklnson) who 
died 29 Hi May. 1986. A Memorial , 
Service wm be held- at Woliertey 
Parish Church. Worcestershire on 
Wednesday. 30th July. I9S6 at 
11.00 am. 


IN MEMORIAM - PRIVATE 


LTTFLEWOOD Ray. 23rd July. Al- 
ways remembering, we so need you. 
with Jove. Joan and pie children. 


Plants are not very good at 
photosynthesizing; having 
trapped solar energy, they 
waste some of it by unneces- 
sarily heating their leaves. 

At the Weizmann Institute 
of Science, Professor Shmoel 
Malkin and his coUeagoes 
decided some years ago to ffed 
oat why this happened. They 
designed equipment to 
"listen** to this process or, m 
scientific language, "to apply 
photo^uo&stics (PA) to the 
measurement of 

photosynthesis.'" 

In the laboratory they 
pressed a leaf Into a cell died 
with air (or other gasses), 
connected to a microphone and 
a fibre light guide. Down one 
channel they sent background 
light, saturating the leaf with 
the equivalent of strong sun- 
light. This stinmlated maxi- 


Down the other channel the 
researchers delivered a series 
of tight pulses, about 3S0 
bursts a second. As expected, 
these warmed the leaf inter- 
mittently. The gas expanded, 
generating a tone, which could 
be amplified and measured. 

But when the initial back- 
ground light was turned off, 
these pulses contributed to 
both functions of photosynthe- 
sis, the m a ngfar tnre of useful 
chemicals and ' beating. Bid 
only heating produced sound. 

As its intensity decreased, 
because some of the light was 
used to produce nutrients, the 
scientists were able to deter- 
mine the efficiency of the leafs 
photosynthesis. 

The PA approach has en- 
abled Professor Malkin and 


particular weed, and measure 
any possible adverse effects 
they might have on crops they 
were meant to protect 

Although the PA method- 
ology has been patented, prob- 
lems remain before reportable j 
field version can be developed. | 
Some are engjnooriwg ones, ' 
others linked to the noise and 
vibrations encountered in a 
field bet not in a laboratory, 
dearly, the nkroptene would 
need to distinguish between 
them and signals produced by 
a leaf. 

Professor Malkin Is confi- 
dent they wiu be solved, 
providing agronomists (and 
later fanners) with a simple 
and quick method of checking 
the health of their crops, 
applying remedies and verify- 


LORD BOOTHBY 

Lord Gladwyn writes: 1 referred to this as ! 

Bob Boothby and 1 were interviewed him on the This is ' 


friends and contemporaries at Four Life television pro- ’O*^ 
Eton and at Maedalen and he gramme: and. when he did not 


Eton and at Magdalen and he gramme; and, when he did not 
succeeded me as secretary of dissent, continued, "when you 
the Canning Club. He was my had your foot firmly on thej 


% > 


best man in 1929. 


first rung of ihe ladder which 


Impetuous, outspoken, gen- kd right up to Downing 
erous. warm-hearted, artistic Street, you suddenly had a 


and forgiving, he had alsn , qualm. Supreme power, did 
perhaps, the best instinctive lha .t ntrt mean supreme temp- 
judgment among the politi- ration? So you turned to tne 
cians' of our time. devil, who happened to be 

. On all the major political sitting there, and said. 'Dear 
issues - “appeasement". Eu- devil, please arrange that I 
rope. Suez, monetary policy - shall never be exposed to this 


ins their success. 
Further resear 


Further research, coupled 
with genetic engineering, oould 


his tram to identify plants best also create plants with a much 
|ed tor specific climat ic ami greater photosynthesis effi- 
soii coawfcas. It can also oeucy current varieties. 


he was, as I would think, 
invariably right A first-class 
speaker with a splendid voice 
and a most attractive person- 
ality. there seemed no reason 
why. in the 1920s, he should 
not eventually become prime 
minister. 

There was only one major 
Jailing or. you might say. 
disadvantage. Like another 
figure in pur national life, he 
could resist almost anything, 
“except. of . course, 
temptation". 


particular temptation*. And 
the devil, very obligingly. 


Never mind. In his second 
career, as a television star. 


men in ci ous though it was. te 
probably influenced events M 
much as he would have influ- 
enced them had he been in 
government. 

His friends mourn his de- 
parture. and their sympathies 
go out to his Sardinian wife, 
Wanda, who Joked after him 
so well in his declining years- 





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THE TIMES THURSDAY JULY 24 1986 


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delights 

Once the' Royal confetti had 
been swept into the gutter by 
Diverse Reports on Channel 4, 
the nation's television re- 
sumed programming which 
was... perhaps a little more 
omc^rned than normal with 
the less idyllic aspects of 
Britain in 1986. " 

„ Brick 4s Beautiful (BBC2) 
was a play abcutt economic 
dereliction which was fall of. 
wit, vitality and 'intelligence. 
The. writer, Andy ^Armitage. 
and ■ the director, David 
.Wheatley, constructed their 
drama from interviews with 
young people in Manchester, 
and the piece had the wacky, 
grotesque flavour of urban oral 
tradition. Its context was the 
^oUapse of industrial- society, 
portrayed by shots of Vast 
deniotitnn sites on which Sa- 
tanic mills were reduced to: 
piles ;"of rabble by devouring 
machinery. \r 

- The .figures in thisL land-" 
scape of despair; were good- 

hearted but disenchanted teen- 
agers on Youth' - Training 
Schemes^ From the ashes of 
Victorian prosperity a capital- 
ist phoenix arose, played by 
Christopher. Wild, ■ This . ldd 
swiftly realized Chat he could 
make more money selling old 
bricks .direct: to. tafidera than 
he -could' by stealing them to 
seU to !a~ middle man,. He 
consulted ;a. Pooterish smaU 
business connsellarj who de- 
manded to .know; if he had 
entrepreneurial qualities.' 
“Yon mean, can 7 be a Tight 
bastard? — of course" was the 
cheerful response, ■ and the 
yomg man set about extending 
the trash economy with Instant 
success. Soon he diversified 
into the demolition business 
and was knocking down the 
deserted mill faeflding in which 
his .former ..Maids - were 
squatting- . * 

• The caraeza-woric wasnnso- 
phistkated but imaginative; 
again and again reproductions 
of U5. Lowry's, paintings ap- 
peared, providing a- counter- 
point of Coronatum Street 
romanticism to the reality of 
the declining city. Brick is 
Beautiful had a distinct pro- 
vincial naivety which did not 
detract from its effectiveness 
and which should not bar .-it 
from achieving considerable 
atvtefm. •. ' * : 

Celia Brayfield 


Galleries 

Georg Tappert/ 
Richard Ziegler 
Leinster Fine Art 


Until recently Georg Tappert 
- and Richard Ziegler seemed 
to have dropped from the 
records even in Germany. 
Both members of the.Nov- 
embergruppe. .they did hot 
quite fit in with either out- 
and-out Expressionism or the 
more savagely critical ele- 
ments of the Neue Sachlich- 
keiL With the coming of the 
Nazis Tappert kept his head 
down and concentrated on 
innocuous landscapes, while 
Ziegler exiled himself to En- 
gland and worked extensively 
as an illustrator and journalist 
under the name of Richard 
Ziller until after the war. Both 
paths seemed to leant toxfoscn-. 
riiy if not oblivion. ' 

\ ■ But both artists have recent- 
ly -been" rediscovered, partly 
through the efforts; rpf the 
London-based German, deafer 
Holger Braasch of Leinster 
Fine Art, where there is a very 
striking show of their work 
until August IS. Tappert died 
in 1957, but Ziegleris miracu- 
lously still active at the ripe 
old age of 95. Both of them 
have a very nice line in tile 
joyful .observation of naughty 
ladies showing-.tiwar- knickers 
.(or lack "of them); -both hayea 
wicked sense of .the ridiculous 
and both. are superb' draughts- 
men. as well as highly gifted 
painters. ' 

John Russell 
Taylor 

• John Russell Taylor’s regular 
survey of the an galleries will 
appear on Monday next week 
instead of the usual Tuesday. 




THE ARTS 


Dance: the Bolshoi- Bgllet open in Ixindoh 



Iran the Terrible 
Co vent Garden . 


Almost 30 years after its- 
-triumphant 1 first London. sea-, 
■son and ■ 12 years since ^its- 
previous "visit: the -Bolshoi : 
Ballet is back in force. Qbyi- 
ously- - it “is- much : changed: 
fammar dames in todays cast- 
lists turn out generally. to be 
those of children of The danc- 
ers wc saw before, although. 
Natalya ' Bessmertnova I re- 
mains the head of The troupe^ 
beginning to look something 
of a veteran with so many 
young men around her. . . 

' There are. too, changes of 
style and .repertory; as The 
season goes on we shall be able - 
to asfiessgains and losses more 
' exactly :.The' firsr impresaonv 
created "by" Tuesday : night’s* 
.premiere ts.tjiqr^ ^the ’fevS of 
‘ athleticism ; and.pnCTg^'- ce- 
tfiaihs siipeftjly fnp. especial-:; 
ly among' die men,- but *11131: 
there may be -fewer great 
personalities than before. . 

The choice for life opening 
gala (many of the seats costing 
£200 in aid of the British Deaf 
Association and' the. Royal 
Opera House Trust) was, /van 
the • Terrible, not seta in J 
London - before, ^although it' 
was- mounted at .the Paris 


; Op6ra (with French casts) telly 
a year after its 1975 premiere 
in Moscow. Having left the 
theatre as a storm of applause 
. rang out from an audience led 
■ by me Princess of Wales; I feel 
a little churlish in mentioning, 
that. }t is not actually -a very' 
. good. ballet v ' ,V‘ S. . 

. •. . The -feidts ait principally of 
dramatic construction and of 
choreographyT- tlle virtues- lie 
in the way it is. danced. 'The 
score is by Prokofiev; ib. be 
. ntoreexact, it was puttogeftier^ 
by ML Qiulalo mainly faom* 
Prokofiev’s' music for Eis- 
enstein’s film on the same 
subject, with excerpts : also 
from the- Third- Symphony - 
and Alexander Nevsky £ -some 
paits: more extoisively,. re- 
worked than' others. Tumultu- 
misly played by:the :SadtePs 
.WdJj Royal Ballet Ordiestra, 
conducted by : -Alexander 
Kopylov, it makes a powerful, 
stridknfy theairicalv effect 
--‘Ivan -IV, the fim Russian- 
ruler totake the title Tsar,- had * 
an. eventful -life, but for the 
bailef his story has been 
simplified to the point where 
little - development remains. ; 
Tsar chooses bride (he takes 
the ooe inihe white dress and 
the ^iotlight), conquers some 
Tartar honks, fells. HI but 
recovers, overcomes , a con- 
spiracy, loses --wife to an 


assassination plot, invents the 
political . pob'ce and defeats his 
enemies. 

Such plot as exists is inter- 
rupted by' ' frequent duets 
-fwhJdrten nothing of Ivan but 
: are necessary to build . up, the 
baUerina rale;, and' : even more . 
"often by ihdurridhs-'-of bell-: 
ringers who herald every : 
change of mood. The sight of : 
these .six. fellows twitching 
afecrni at the-end^bf their ropes 
like, demented puppets be- 
, comes . progressweiy ; ■ -more 
comic' as! the evening wears 
on... All the crowd scenes 
repeat a few simple steps over 
and over, - 

.-In his choreographic struc- 
ture, Yuri Grigorovkh closely 
follows the formula that* 
proved so successful in his- 
Spartacus: relying heavily on 
.the. overwhelming cfiect: of 
^great massed entries by. :lhe 
mate dancers, with two' lead-. . 
Lingmeneutti nga tremendous' . 
a swathe through the ensemble ' 
in- solos foil of enormous :. 
jumps. : The- resemblancx to 
Spanacus is made mme obvi- - 
ons by having the viBain, 
'Prince Kurbsky .dressed more 
like a Roman general than a 
Idtb-centmy boyar. Andris 
Liepa, in this role, looks 
glamorous and dances with 
sustained slrength,- but with? ' 
out either the physical or the 


-emotional radiance -of his 
■illustrious father, Maris. 

. Irek Mukhamedov; In the 
title part, is a big man' with a 
brooding presence an d- A - stu- 
pendous capacity for launch- 
ing himself into great whiriing 
. leaps. .Themqstjrapressive is : 
'.when Jfe"-Fevolves iq the air 
witiTbutbody bent back like a 
:bow._ Hc is. an actor of much 
. power, too, -although on_tius 
fevidencermii necessarily oi 

great subtlety:. 

In the love duets, carefully 
assuming' the' sentimental 
poses on: which Grigorovich 
reties •• to express devotion, 
Mukhamedov looks- more- 
conventionaL , Bessmertnova 
plays- his- bride,' Anastasia, 
with an almost sanctimonious . 
sweetness that seems hardly to 
fit with this wify,' unscrupu- 
lous warrior-politidan, , 
Simon Virsaladze’s settings 
chfefiy- comprise three giant 
curved- curtains that ; revolve ' 
.-to ' 'reveal the concave' or 
convex areas; this keeps the 
action moving but at the cost 
of a mainly drab appearance. 
Overhead hang those damned 
bells, and their ropes pro vide a 
thrilling final moment. Ivan 
swinging among them like a 
great malevolent spider. 

John Percival 



Sustained strength and glamour: Andris Liepa' as the villainous Prince Kurbsky 


Jacohowsky and - 
the Colonel 
Olivier . • 

According to Brecht. Franz 
Werfel stole the story of 
Jacobowsky from a poor emi- 
grant and passed it off as his 
own. -No doubt ^this-is an 
envious slander,- typical of 
Honywood’s ' vvartiihe exiles. 

- prompted by Brecht’s. fedure 
to hit the -jackpot -as^Werfel 
and Bebrman had done in this 
once-fernous piece. . 

All the .same, the Broadway 
text (revived at the Olivier as 
“original play by Franz Wer- 
fel: English language play by 
S.N. Behrman”) does come 
over as a story told at second 
hand. In the midst of the 
Occupation .two Pofesmeet in 
a Panshotek sr tavahy'-offiar 
bound-. on a pa tmitic mission 
to England, and a- Jewish 
accountant who has acquired 



.yital government documents; 
When, finally* he V embraces 
Jfacobbwricy as a worthy com- 
rade. his own character van- 
ishes altogether. 

I do not see why the already 
lightweight National Theatre 
repertory should be enfeiged 
with yet another old middle- 
brow comedy; but; given the 
choice, it has been seized for 
what it is worth in Jonathan 
' Lynn’s production. Marvel- 
lously -sustained- sets, by Saul 
Radonsky, featuring a. hotel 
facade with getaway car 
parked outside,- and a country 


house showing every deta i l ofl into large smiles. The largest solar has 


Nigel Hawthorne excelling 
in apoplectic defeat 

It is here, however, that it 
also starts sounding hollow. 


the rustic brickwork, appear in 
stunning succession on the 
Olivier . revolve. Supporting 
parts (excluding the unplay- 
able girlfriend) em e rge in 
bejewded detail: notably Ken 
Stott’s corporal, bolsme as 
they come once he gets into 


particularly if yon relate it to ' civvies^ and Frank Lazarus as 
such past taodds 2 s^pon : Si Jisping Gestapo officer. 
Quixote and the wo military . Nigel Hawthorne, as tbe Colo- . 


prototypes in Arms and the 
Man. Wanting' to tet up a 
contrast between rigid honour 


neL makes- up for romantic 
dash with a crazed patrician 
arrogance, exalting in pas- 
sages of apoplectic defeat and 
holding onr for- the character 
' long after it should, fegrthnate^ 
_ — . * . . y .. . . Jy. have expired., 

despise danger and live lor Geoffrey Hutchings, ahonyr 
romance. So the colonel ig- -mously attired in business suit 
nores his mission and docs a Mil homburg, has an easier 
detour into German, territory task as the all-conquering 
to pick up his beloved after jacobowsky. He succeeds in 
serenading^her by moonlight, springing surprises even 
He may detest Jacobowsky, though you know they are 
but Behrman is careful not -to - coming; but leaves you; long-' 
let a ann-Semitic phrase^ .^g for some grit, or.moment 

psss ms ainra lips. ' of humiin weakness, m the 

Nor, finally, is --there.- ^a-. relentless stream of- benevo- 
and Jacobowsky deliberately -Tjartnershipofopposites along - and-henriernodesty.' 
refuses the rote. He iK he says, the lines- of Sergius and recent German production of 

BUintchti. -It is an all-too 
American story of the conver- 
sion of a snob into a nice guy. 

Every stage of the plot knocks 
some more stuffing out of the 
Colonel: first with the removal 
of his uniform, then with the 
discovery that he has lost his 


a car wju*ch_ he cannot drive,. „ nf< . flexibility, Behn- 
Old date ~ advetsanes; ■ dtey man pushes. the.*-characters 
join forces .to ;- escape ^ : imo fairytale- -stereotypes, 
common, enemy; -and 'em baric Aristocrats are 1 supposed To 
on a series of adventures *n • ~ 

which the lowly Jew — an 
experienced refugee — copes 
triumphantly with every haz- 
ard to the mounting fiuy of his 
aristocratic companion. 

It sounds like yet another 
variation on the classic master 
and servant routine. The colo- 
nel however^ already has -a 
servant -- a docile corporal — 


a "man of resources”, well 
acquainted with the arts of 
survival about which the priv- 
ileged colonel knows nothing. 
It is the feet that he always acts 
with self-respect and ignores 
every lordly snub that gives 
their relationship its vitality. 


Ann Frank had the audience 
helpfully shouting “she's in 
the attic” to the invading 
Gestapo. I had the same 
impulse when Jacobowsky 
took cover in the ladies’ loo. 

Irving Wardle 


BBCPO/KIee 

Albert HaJI/Radio 3 


Promenade Concert 

notably 1 anodyne 


had L a 
flavour. 

-Their second: Prom, howevr 
er, was much more like xt The 
Bruckner had -rough edges, 
most noticeably the untidy ' 
spluttering of wind .entries. 
But the huge paragraphs of 
sound were frequently illumi- 
nated by glorious playing. In 
particular the brass brought a 
massive ruggedness . to the 


To stand reverential and mo- 
tionless through Bruckner’s 
Ninth Symphony is an act of 
sterling physical homage 
which no audience except the 
promenaders would make. It 

surely demands a reciprocal . 

gesture from the performer^; a white” he strings bit 

special commitment ofj Pride : top fonn in the Adagio, attack- 
ed passion to -rewara -fa c -. -ine the tricky opening unison, 
aches -m -a thousand young especial assurance. In. 

feet' ' • • - this mrbuleht' coda to Bmck- 

• One ; would' expect tho'- nef's Iffeand work the orches- 
BBCs orchestras to take a lead' tra played as though inspired, 
in this respect' after aft, the " It is music that revehls the 
Prom's offer them an annual ^conductor Bernhard^ Klee’s 
chance to escape from imper- best qualities! He' pacal the 


sonal studios and excite the 
world's most 'readily enthusi- 
astic audience. Regrettably 
that is not always the case: the 
BBC Philharmonic’s Monday 
night concert for instance; 


outer movements spaciously 
and with more flexibility than 
I had noted from him before, 
but rightly never allowed the 
scherzo to escape from a grim, 
relentless momentum. His 


handling of the long drawn- 
out crescendos, especially ihe 
celebrated .firstrmovement 
ending, was magisterial.: 

Bruckner’s last thoughts 
had been proceeded by Bog’s: 
his Viotin Concerto, with 
Edith Peanemann as soloist It 
was good to hear a work so 
laden with emotive musical 
quotations, tragic real-life as- 
sociation and (so the scholars 
now say) a web of coded 
allusions to girlfriends past 
and present played in such 
tmexaggeraied, ' sweet ■ style. 
Hie second mavement’-s vio- 
lence may have been a little 
suppressed, but this detached 
approach (allied to Klee's 
careful balancing of orchestral 
textures) ' * uncovered 
work’s structure clearly and 
made the Bach chorale entry 
seem more of an inevitable 
conclusion than usuaL 


Richard Morrison 


Apart from -white writers like Cbetze and 
Brink, few African novelists have; be- 
come motes in the public eye. One of the 
most promising candidates is Ben-OkrL a 
Nigerian who packed his bags in 1978, 
came here to study and remained. His 
new collection of stories, written in the 
“vivid desolation” of Hackney bed-sits, 
is pungent with memories of the Biafran 
war, the Lagos ghettoes — where his 
feiher worked as a lawyer — and the 
fantasies of spindly men.at the mercy of 
more brutal people. 

....“GhettOtdwenervare the.^reat fant- 
asists”. Okri says enthusiastically, in the 
incongruous setting of Brown’s HoteL 
Taking tea here, his face mehsconstanily 


Ben Okri’s new collection of 
"short stories. Incidents at the 

- Shrine . , promises to make 

- him one of the tiny group of 

African writers taken 
seriously on an international 
scale: interview by 
Nicholas Shakespeare 

Fantasies 
in 


resulted from the head waiters request 
that he wear a tie. Borrowing one. Okri 
realizes he does not remember how to tie 
it. 

“The ghetto was the place I’ve felt 
most at home because the terms on . 
which everyone lives are so transparent 
There is one code. Survival — but 
survival with honour and style; There 
was an -extraordinary vibrancy there, an 
imaginative life.:When you arethatpooiv— 
all you’ve got left is your belief in the 
imagination.. In the ghetto, if you don’t 
have belief, you’ve got nothing.” 

: ' ..The. civil war that raged in: iNigeria 
between 1967.and;197l, involvinglthe. 
deaths of a million people, also raged 
: within Okri’s own family. He was moved 
to a village where his lessons took place 
with the planes flying over. (It is the 
memory of this which inspired the best 
story in the collection.) “My education 
took place simultaneously with ray 
relations being killed”, he says now. 
“And friends who one day got up in class 
and went out to fight the war” 

Okri’s father wanted him. to be a 
lawyer; a profession which, he argued, 
could jbejwxl in anjtcity in _any period 
whatever the circumstances. .“His re- 
quirements also, fitted writing” Okri 
smiles. He began on the roof of their 
unfinished house, looking down between 
the spiky metal entrails to the whole of 
Lagos. By day be worked as a clerk for 
IC1, rewriting his fictions in a drawer and 
pretending he was penning letters to 
paint-distributors. His stories were pub- 
lished in women’s magazines . and .the 
evening paper. At night, sardined-in the 
bos. going home, be saw the commuters' 
readingfibCTVpormg over his wpnds after 
a 'heavy ' day; surrounded by-, chaos, 
dropping, sweat on to the jiages, but : 
provoked by what they read there into 
frowns and laughter. ' 

■ Unable to find a publisher for. his . 
novel and .thirsting for a university 





degree. Okri engineered his own sacking. 
With the money/ be bought a typewriter/ 
a: camera and a- suitcase into which he 
locked foe .manuscript of Flowers- and 
Shadows .Then, with an idyllic picture of 
the country he had once before visited — 
when his. father was completing his law 


course (and working to support his 
family in a Camberwell launderette) — 
Okri journeyed to England. 

a He hadone address, in New Cross, of a 
distant uncle who had come to study law 
and failed every year for twenty years 
until advised to stop. “When I asked the 
way to New Cross, people walked away. I 
was shocked. I had always thought foe 
English were friendly. When I got to my 
unde’s street, it was as if 1 hadn’t 
travelled. The houses were boarded up. 
There were hundreds of rats. I was given 
a funny room with a broken window 
' through which came foe bright yellow 
light of a street-lamp, h was Nigeria in 
‘ London, ! thought” / ~ ' . . 

1 After studying at Essex, where he was 
-the firsL black student to write -plays, 
Okri returned to London and devoted 
himself to writing and rewriting. Two 
novels resulted and several more stories. 
In March 1984, while sleeping on the 
office floor of a French restaurateur, he 
derided to enter a story for a competi- 
tion. Singled out by Peter Ackroyd in his 
edition of PEN New Fiction, Disparities 
is one of the few stories in the new 
collection to be set in London. 

“A short story is; powerful. Yott can’t 
cheat. Yoii can cheat oh every page of a 
novel and still have a good novel. But in 
a short story foe tightness of form means 

- -a- tightness of writing. One idea. One 
’.cliinax,” Boyishly, be dismisses the 
. suggestion that his owii ideas, and 

climaxes .might be' too dense for some 
readers. “An intense piece of writing 
demands an intense piece of reading. 
You can’t read Joyce's Dubliners casual- 
ly. You’d be bored stiff." 

Arching one of his dark eyebrows, foe 
waiter deposits a pedestal of tea-cakes. 
'"Sweating in foe heat and his own tight 
“Collar, Okri takes one. “The main 

- attraction of -England is that it gives 
distance and perspective. In Nigeria you 

; could write a novel of the street without 
ever going into a room. In London, 
everything happens within rooms. It's 

- cool, quiet, ingrown. But Africa is the 
only place I really want to write about. 
It's a gift to foe writer. It’s the meeting- 
point of so many cultures. Do you know 
there are 350 different languages in 
Nigeria? You can’t wriie about foe place 
with a logical mind. You have to suspend 
judgement and education and see it 
afresh.” He finishes a cucumber sand- 
wich as a silver plate presents itself with 

. the folded bxIL “It's like a ferocious love 
.- completely, claiming your attention." 

- Then, unfastening his collar and' smiling 
broadly, be returns the tie. 

• Incidents at the Shrineby Ben Okri is 
published by Heinemann at £9.95. 


Recital 

Collins/Stott 

Wigmore Hall 


It- is just as weH that the 
clarinettist Michael Collins 
chooses the colleagues .he-, 
does; for his playing alone is 
teaching the stage where it 
deans a critic nght out of 
superlatives. In . his fust two 
the f-Wigmore -Summer -Nights 
there has. as this page has 
shown, been just as much to 
write about foe TakAcs Quar- 
tet: this lime he was joined for 
foe third and last evening by 
Kathryn Sion, whose piano- 


This man has mot 
lost his shirt 



THE GAMBLER 

A Ctttttfy MMteai 

fay Peter Brawls, Bob Goody and Mfll Smith 

jwtict. fnwL xn 

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SALE li ANTIQUES. PAINTINGS AND ORIENTAL RUGS 

AT: HAMPSTEAD AUCTION ROOMS. 28 Rotrtyn ffiH. Hampstead. Wl®. 

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playing provided both equal 
combat and endlessly stimu- 
lating support. 

The programme was a flat- 
tering one. CoHins turned 
away from foe Austro-Ger- 
man classics to foe French fin 
de siecle .and English music 
...which caught its scent Deb- 
ussy’s Premiere Rhaps&die 
1 and' Poulenc's Sonata for clari- 
net and- piano provided foe 
evening’s substance.- While' 
foe first gave both players no 
end of opportunity to listen, 
imagine and then re-create 
new fusions of colour and 
movement the second, with 
its bitter-sweet ebullience, 
honed their wits. Collins’s 
effortless breath-control real- 
ized exactly that langour 
which has a sting in its tail and 
Stott’s fingers compressed and 
concentrated all the clarinet’s 
wry lyricism. 

-The evening’s- endurance 
test for some of us, if obvious- 
ly not . for Collins and Stott 
was Herbert Howells’s ram- 
bling Sonata. The unexpected 
treat was Arthur Benjamin’s 
Le Tombeau de Ravel. A 
brilliantly inventive-and joy- 
ful kaleidoscope, written two 
years before be died, of all the 
composer knew and loved 
best from the dance-halls of 
Paris to' foe heady air of Latin 
America, it searched.outeveryl 
comer of each player’s tech- 
nique and imagination. 

And. as is so often the case, 
it was the evening's minor 
works which really put them 
on their' .. mettle. •. Pi erne’s 
Canzonetia barely.touched the 
ground in foe grace and 
felicity of its phrasing, while 
the -sheer flair of their 
Messager Sob de Concours 
extended its outrageous dc- 
Jjghis far beyond its nature. 

Hilary Finch 


OLD NEW ZEALAND 
AND AUSTRALIAN 
PAINTINGS BUY 

: FRANCES HODGKINS • JOHN WEEKS 
. -JOHN GULLY • J.C. HOYTE 
- AND OTHERS 

PLEASE WRITE WITH PHOTO IF POSSIBLE 

r/o TIMES, Box No. 045 VIRGINU STREET. LONDON El 9DD. 


W, 


B4YE 


Mesmerisi rig. ..Glitter i rig. 
l . ElectniVin^" Observef 


iwtr 


by DONALD FREED 
* STEPHEN JENN - 

HAROLD 

PINTER 

MON-FRI SATS5.0&8.3C 

A- \ 


H Wyndhams Theatre 

BOX OFFiCE 01; 83636^8 ;dc 01^375 6565 





24 


* * ☆ * * 



THE TIMES THURSDAY JULY 24 1986 


And so off to the Azores on honeymoon 


By David Sapsted 

The new Duke and Duchess 
of York. flew oot of Heathrow 
last night Tor their Azores 
honeymoon at the end of a day 
that had brought joy to 
millions. 

After the wedding breakfast 
at Buckingham Palace, the 
couple added a characteristi- 
cally informal note by setting 
off on the first leg of their 
honeymoon with an extra pas* 
’ sengen an outsize teddy bear. 

His unexpected presence in 
the semi-state landau delight- 
ed the huge crowd lining the 
route from Buckingham Pal- 
ace to the. Royal Hospital, 
Chelsea, where the newlyweds 
boarded a helicopter for 
Heathrow. 

The Duke and Dnchess left 
the palace at 4.20pm, an 
ebullient Prince Andrew, 
dressed in a grey lonnge suit, 
standing op in the coach to 
wave to the crowds. 

A bare-headed Duchess, 
dressed in a two-piece green, 
bine and cream floral print 
suit, sat close by, grinning 
braid ly. 

The giant bear, jovially 
attired in pink and Mae rib- 
bons. sat opposite in a coach 
which had obviously received 
the attention of some royal 
pranksters: apart from an L- 
plale. the back also boasted a 
‘phone borne' message and a 
mock-up of a satellite dish. 

A guard of Chelsea pension- 
ers welcomed the couple in Che 
hospital's grounds where, live 
minutes after arriving, they set 
off in a Wessex helicopter for 
the airport. 

Shortly after 5pm the 
Queen's Flight BAe 146 
soared into the air from the 
south side of Heathrow. As the 
aircraft pivoted on the runway, 
two red signs bearing the 
words “just married" came 
into view. Staff from the 
Queen's Flight had attached 
them to the rear airbrakes of 
the jet and had painted a good- 
luck horseshoe and an L-plate 
on the flaps. 

The only minor nrishap-was 
that, during. the two-minrrte 
transfer from the Army heli- 
copter to the aircraft, the new 
bride dropped her handbag. 
Her hnsband stepped in 
smartly to pick it up. 

Then it was off on a three- 
hour flight to the Lajes 
Airbase in the Azores where 
they were to be met by General 
Rocha Vieira, the President of 
the regional assembly. The 
couple are expected to cruise 
around the islands in the 
Royal Yacht Britannia for five 
days. 





• ' - . V: ,;. ".- 

... i,... \-rf' r 

■«" • }■* **■ 






The Duke and Dnchess of York leaving Buckingham .Palace yesterday for thehr honeymoon hi the Azores . (Photograph: Chris Harris) 


THE TIMES INFORMATION SERVICE 


Marriage of 
pure theatre 


Continued from page 1 
Andrew, who rewarded her 
with his ever-read >' grin. 

The ring was slipped on. 
from which point she became 
not only a married woman but 
a Duchess. She in return gave 
back to Andrew his signet 
ring. Three times the cheers of 
the crowd outside, listening to 
the responses on loud speak- 
ers. penetrated the depth of 
the Abbey. Once each time the 
parties said “1 do", and once 
when the Archbishop of Can- 
terbury pronounced them 
man and wife. 

Master Peter Phillips and 
Miss Alice Ferguson sprang to 
their duty, arranging the flow- 
ing train as bride and groom 
negotiated the narrow door in 
the altar screen for the 10- 
minute signing of the marriage 
registers, accompanied by the 
Queen, the Duke of Edin- 
burgh. Prince Edward, the 
Queen Mother. Major Fergu- 
son and Mrs Barratries. The 
hiatus was filled by Miss 
Arlccn Auger and Miss Felici- 
ty Lott singing two Mozart 
anthems. 

And then, backstage left the 
bride reappeared for her tri- 
umphant exit on her 
husband's arm. curtseying 
first to the Queen, not as 
mother-in-law but as Mon- 
arch. The new Duchess looked 
relaxed, self-possessed, and 
exceptionally happy. She 
winked and raised her eye- 
brows to recognized friends in 
The congregation, and both 
took it all easily in their stride 
as the organ played them out 
to Walton's Crown Imperial 


for their carriage ride back to 
the Palace. 

The crowd have come to 
expect a token display of 
public affection, and the thou- 
sands waiting outside the Pal- 
ace chanted S-A-R-A-H, 
restive at the half-hour delay 
in the promised ba Icons ap- 
pearance^, 

But all their wishes were 
fulfilled when, at 10 minutes 
to two. bride and groom led 
the Royal Family on to that 
familiar balcony to hear a 
dillcrenl roar. The Duchess 
pretended not to make out the 
chant of "Give us a kiss", hut 
she knew well enough, and 
obliged. Minutes later they 
returned for an encore*, but 
this time without the kiss. 

By this time the perfor- 
mance was running nearly half 
an hour laic, and the guests at 
the wedding breakfast had to 
make fast work of their diced 
lobster, lamb and strawber- 
ries. London traffic on this 
non-holiday would not wart 
forever, and soon after 4.15 
the couple set off in a shower 
of family confetti for the 
Royal Hospital. Chelsea, in an 
open carnage occupied by a 
giant teddy bear and bearing a 
large “Phone Home" notice 
on its rear. 

A Wessex helicopter of the 
Queen's Flight lifted them 
from the hospital ground to 
the discreet south side of 
Heathrow Airport, from 
where an HS146 of The 
Queen's Flight whisked them 
to Portugal, and then on to ihe 
Azores, where they would at 
Iasi enjoy the company of each T 
other. 


Natural beauty dressed 
in flowers and bows 


With a wedding ring on her 
finger and bows on her sleeves 
the new Duchess of York rode 
off to her honeymoon. Aban- 
doning her hat, and with it 
royal tradition. Sarah dressed 
for a midsummer idyll in a 
lupin blue flower printed suit 
with her favourite bows all 
over (Suzy Menkes writes). 

The sailor collar on the 
peplum jacket was a perky 
tribute to her naval Duke: the 
pleated skirt gracefully long. 
But in this going away outfit, 
by Sue Schneider, wc saw 
some of the defiant anti- 
fashion Fergie spirit! 

Country flowers are not 


high style this summer, but 
they are favourites with the 
Duchess of York, who wore a 
floral patterned dress by the 
same designer for some offi- 
cial engagement photographs. 
The bow on the demere is 
another style Sarah has 
favoured. 

Sarah has said she will not 
accept the straigh [jacket of 
high fashion. The going away 
dress is a departure from ihc 
severe tailoring and serious 
millinery she tried - to much 
criticism — at Ascot. The 
young Duchess, whose great- 
est asset is natural beauty and 
spontaneity, is already kicking 
over ihe fashion traces. 


Today's events 


Royal engagements 

The Queen holds an Investi- 
ture. Buckingham Palace. U; 
and later attends a tea party to 
mark the sesquicen tenary of the 
Royal Medical Benevolent 
Fund. St James's Palace, 4. 

The Duke of Edinburgh, as 
Patron and Trustee, attends a 
reception for young people who 
have reached the Gold Standard 
in The Duke of Edinburgh's 
Award. Palace, of Holyrood- 
house. Edinburgh. 1 1 and 4; he 
also visits the Buchanan Street 
and Port of Leigh Housing 


Associations in Edinburgh, 2.05; 
and later, as President of the 
Commonwealth Games Federa- 
tion. opens the Commonwealth 
Games. Meadowbank, Edin- 
burgh. 6.40. 

Queen Elizabeth the Queen 
Mother attends agarden party 
given by the Nuffield Founda- 
tion. Nuffield Lodge. Regent's 
Park. 330: and later attends a. 
reception given by the Industrial 
Society, Peter Runge House, 3 
Carlton House Terrace, SWI, 
6.45. 

The Prince and Princess of 
Wales visit Sumbuigh Airport. 
Virkie. Shetland, to commemo- 
rate its 50th anniversary. 2; and 


The Times Crossword Puzzle No 17,106 



ACROSS 

1 Caper and show oneself off 
15). 

4 Search behind stall in re- 
sponse to demand (2.7). 

9 E-g. Buckingham Palace 
men in revolution (5.4). 

10 In turn. Mr. Gabriel lost his 
first point (5). 

11 Measure the drink Jack 
knocked back (5). 

12 Veto worth seven (9). 

13 Courteous staff a blessing? 
To some extent (7). 

IS Seeing who starts to c-chant 
(7). 

18 Poet's girl holding hot po- 
tato (71. 

20 One who has a patron 
makes Peter go wild (7). 

21 Depressed chap gives notice 
of leaving (4.5). 

23 Promises to abandon in- 
appropriately humorous as- 
pect O). 

25 A place intended for putting 
colour (5). 

26 Tim and Margie worked to-, 
gether to make an income 
(9). 

27 Disaffected red agents in 
trouble (9). 

28 A singer, of course (5). 

DOWN 

1 Book where crossword used 
to be |9). 

2 Startle in jolly fashion (5). 

3 Prevent from approaching a 
coastal castle? (43.3). 


4 Bush makes trains go slow 
(7). 

5 A centre for restoration play 
once more (7). 

6 Half a duck for a child? (5). 

7 Send for trial over broken 
diet (9). 

8 There are mountains here — 
try somehow to look up (5). 

14 Inflated the punctured tyre 
contributed by you. so to 
spcak49). 

16 Don't give in in televised 
bout (4.5). 

17 Stars with, their own Jake in 
Canada (5.4). 

19 Gcuing entangled on the 
floor! 7 J. 

20 Monument pul up by Miss 
Crawford in depression (7). 

21 Slough — that's employed in 
producing railway truck (5). 

22 Police car with letters for 
father (5). 

24 The Bond series (5). 

Solution to Puzzle. No 17,105 


DiglTi*? 

B B 

BEKE 

ra m 
arrsE 

EO 



Concise Crossword page 18 


open the- hewf Oil Rig Repair 
Quay. Dales Voe. Lerwjck, 3.05; 
later they visit the Town Hall, 
Lerwick. 4; and in the evening 
dine with the chairman and 
trustees of the Port of Lerwick, 
The Shetland Hotel, Lerwick, 
730. 

Princess Anne attends a din- 
ner of the Army Benevolent 
Fund. Royal Artillery Mess, 
SE18.6.40: 

Princess' Alice. Duchess of 
Gloucester, attends lunch inaid 
of the RAF. Benevolent Fund. 
Earl's Court, 12.15; and then 
attends the afternoon perfor- 
mance of the Royal Tour- 
nament. 

Princess Alexandra visits 
HMS Dryad, the School of 
Maritime Operations. South-' 
wick, nr Fa re ham. Hants, 12 

Last chance to see 

Screen prints by lan Hamilton 
Finlay; Jazz by Henri Matisse; 
Aberdeen Art Gallery, School- 
hilL 10 to 8. 

Music 

Concert by the International. 
Philharmonic Albert Hall, Bol- 
ton. 7.30. 

OundJe International Organ 
Weelo-Rerital by-Phyllis Bryn- 
Julson (soprano) and Donald 
Sutherland (organ); Onndle 
School Chapet 7.45. 

Recital by the choir of King's 
School, Rochester; St Mary’s, 
Beverley. 7.30. 

Organ recital by Jane Watts; 
St Mary's. Fishguard. 1 1. 

Concert by the London Phil- 
harmonic Orchestra; St David's 
Hall. Cardiff 730. 

Llandudno Organ Festival: 
Concert by the Clwyd Or- 
chestra; Church of the Holy 
Trinity, Llandudno. 7.45. 

Chester Summer Music Festi- 
val: Organ redial by Thomas 
Trotter. Chester Cathedral. 
MO: Recital by the Define 
String Quartet; Town HalL 
Chester. 8. 

Minehcad and Exmoor Arts 
Festival: Concert by the Festival 
Orchestra; Dulvertoo Middle 
School. 8. 

Cambridge Festival: Rental 
by the Royal Northern College 
of Music Wind Ensemble; St 
Edward's Church. Lift Organ 
rental by Anne Page: Church of 
Our Lady and The English 
Martyrs HilbTld. 1. 10: Concert 
by. St John's College Choir; St 
John's College Chapel. 8: Re- 
cital by the London Serpent 
Trio. Fitzwilliam Museum. 8. . 
Talks, lectures 

Gower Festival: Flowery car- 
pet on the limestone, by Dr 
Mary Giilham: Lfcuunoriais 
Hall. 8. 

How to trace your ancestors, 
by Annesley Malley. The 
Poriandoo Centre. Poitrush. 8. 


Books — paperback 


Anniversaries 


Births: Sim6n Bolivar, liber- 
ator of 'Lathv America. Caracas. 
Venezuela. 1783: Alexandre Du- 
mas. ptre. Villcrs-Conerets. 
1802: Frank Wedekind, play- 
wright. Munich. 1864; Ernst 
Bloch, composer. Geneva. 1880. 

Deaths: John Sell Conran, 
landscape painter. London. 
1842: Martin van Buren. eighth 
President of the USA 1837-41. 
Kindcrhook. New York. 1862. 

The names of the find life 
peers (10 men. four women) 
were announced. 1958. 


The Literary Editor’s selection of interest in g books published this week: 
FICTION 

A Room In Chelsea Sonn, by Michael Nelson (GMP. S3 95) 

Grampian Hodnet, by Barbara Pym (Grafton, £230) 

1 Westev (Black Swan. £3.95) 

(Abacus. £335) 

Lady Addle, by Mary Dunn (Black 

Swan, £230) 

NON-FICTION , 

Str Robert Peel, by Norman Gash (Longman, £12.50) 

The Dangerous Summer, by Ernest Hemingway (Grafton. 

The- Frontier Scouts, by Charles Chevenix Trench (Oxford, £6.! 

The New Mercenaries, by Anthony Mockier (Corgi. £330) 

To Ufin A War ; 1918,- The Year of Victory, by John Iterator (Pspermac. 
£5.95X ' .. . - PH 


The pound 


AustmBaS 
Austria Sch 
Belgium Fr 
CanadaS 
Denmark Kr 
Finland Mkk 
Fran ce Ft 
G ermany Dm 
Greece Dr 
HoogKoogS 


Italy Lira 
Japan Yea - . 

til ilfr erlnnrln CM 

Norway Kr 
Portugal Esc 
Soudi Africa Rd . 
Spain Pte - 
Sweden Kr 
Switzerland Ft 
USAS - 
Yugoslavia Dor 


Bank 

US 

2X30 
6X00 
2.135 
'1244 ' 
7.99 
1069 
X33 
21700 
11.90 
- -1J14 
2270.00 
M5JU 
X725 . 
11-61 
227.68 : 

5.10 

211.00 

1X93 

2.695 

1-555 

64000 


Bank 
Sails 
034 
22.10 
6530 
2JJ35 
"11.79 
7.49 
10.14 
3.15 
203JD0 
. .1140 
-US* 
215000 
. 231-00 
X53S 

run 

21630 

030 

200-00 

1038 

2345 

1.485 

59030 


Rons lor small denomination bank notes 
only as supplied by Barclays Bank PLC. 
Rated Price Index: 3853 

London: The FT Index dosed up 12.1 
at 12868. 


Tower Bridge 


Tower Bridge will be raised- 
today at- (-.40 pm and 2pm. 


Roads 


London and Ow O o ufl i- aajfc A1: Only 
one lane on northbound carriageway N of 
Hornsey Rd A£ Road width reduced in 
both directions on Rochester Way be- 
tween Fateonwood and Ihe Black Prince 
interchange. U2& Contraflow between 
junctions 24- and 25 (Potters Bar and A10 
interchange): also tong term roadworks 
between junctions 18 and 19 (A404 and 
Hunton Bridge in terc han ges); two lanes m 
both ’directions. - 
The MkSandc US: Contraflow between 

junction 4 (A38flromsnrore) and junction 

5 (A38 DrortwichJ. Ml; Motor contraflow N 
andSof junction^) (Lutterworth), delays. 
A3* bants contra* single Rne traffic In me 
Htgft Street. Henfey.m Arden (between 
Bern Ingham and Stratford-on-Avon). 

: wataa nd the West M* One lane only 
on both carnagaweys between jimesons 
44 (MO Swansea East) and 45 (A4067 
Swansea). 

Information supplied by AA 


Parliament today 


Commons (2.30): Consoli- 
dated Fund (Appropriation) 
Bill, all stages. Motion for the 
summer adjournment. 

Lords (3): Social Security Bill. 
Commons amendments. Public 
Order Bill, committee, second 
day. 



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Weather 

A depression will cross N 
Scotland, and an associated 
warm front will cross all 
districts of the British Isles, 
followed by a cold front into N 
and W districts. 

6 am to midnight 


East AngBo. 

at first becoming 
flam thaw 


i spreading from tin W 
dWtwromtraSW light 
lamp 20C (E8F). 


London. SE 
Channel Islands: I 
mostly cloudy, rain : 
in the evomng; wnd' 
or moderate; max ia , . . . 

Central S England, WdlsndK Rather 
ctoudy but dry at first, ran spread*! 
the W: wmd w btftt becoming SW Bght or 
moder a te : max temp 21C 

E, conbtrai N. ME Entomb Dry with 
bngtit or sunny intervals, becoming ctoudy 
wwi rain, moderate at times in afternoon 
and evening; wind W light; max temp 20C 

(6Br|. 

SW, NW England. Wales, Lake district. 
We of Man. SWSMttend: Rain, moderate 
at times, with coestal fog, spreading from 
the W; wind W Bght becoming SW 
m od erate: max tamp 19C(66F). 

Banters, Edtebugh, Dundee. Aber- 
deen, Glasgow, Central Highlands, Mo- 
rey Firth; NE Scotland: Dry but ctoudy at 
firsurain moderate at tames spreading 
from the W law morning: wind SW 
becoming variable fight; max temp 18C 
(64FL 

-Northern Ireland: Rain moderate at 
tiroes. Mowed by braMer, shonmiy 
weather in evening: wind SW moderate or 
fresh, becoming NW moderate: max temp 
19C(66F) ... 

Outlook tar to m or ro w and Saturday: 
-Many cfistricts wfl start ctoudy with 
outbreaks of rain, perhaps heavy m 
ptaces. but bnghter weather with dear or 
sunny eitenw. and a few showers 
already into some NW parts, wfll extend 
SE to aD .districts by late morning 
tomorrow, h wil be mostly dry at first on 
Saturday. 

SEA PASSAGES: S North Sea. Strait of 
Dover: Wind NW backing SW force 4-5. 
Showers at first, rain later. Visibility good 
becoming moderate or poor. Sea slight or 
moderate. Engfish Charnel (EV Wind W 
baching SW force 4. Occasional rain. 

jbecommg moderate with 

Sea sfigm. a Georgo’s 
. Irish Sok Wind SW force 45. 
Occasional rain. VtebHy good becoming 
moderate with tog patches. Sea stated or 
moderate 


Sen (tees: Sun sets: 
5.12 am 9.01 pm 


n Moon sets: Moon rises 
8.46 am 1051 pm 
Last quarter JUy 28 


Lighting-up time 


London 9.31 pm to 444 am 
Bristol 9.41 pm to 4J53 am 
EdMxxgh 1008 pm lo 4.34 am 
Manchester 9.49 pm to <43 wn 
PenuncoB.47 pm to 5.1 1 am 


Yesterday 


Temperatures at mdday yesterday: c, 
ctoud: L tan r. ram: s. sun. 

C F C F 

Mlast c 1457 Guernsey 11559 

r 1060 Inverness c 1355 

c 1355 Jersey 11763 

c 1763 London C1763 

Cardiff 11763 irnchster M355 

Edinburgh c 1254 Newcastle c 1457 

Glasgow c 1559 R’etatsway c 1457 


London 


Yj M terd a y : Tamp: max 6 am lo 6 pro, 1BC 
t64FJ : mm 6 pm to 6 am.ISC (S4F) 
Hum»ty:6pm;49pereent. Rain:24hrto 
6 pm. trace Sure 24.hr to 6 fan, 7^ hra 
Bar. mem sea level. 6 pm. I09as- 
miflfcars. faSng 
1.000 iwH4jan£29.63kT. 


Highest and lowest 


yestmriiiy; Hl^iesf day temp: Sundown. 
20C (68FJ ; lowest day max Cape Wrath. 
12C (54F1 ; Highest ramialL- Notts. St 
Mrs. Boscombe 0.51st: highest 
surwhme. Lerwx*. 12J hr. 


NEWSPAPERS LIMITED. 
r986.PnntPd bv London Povt iPrtut. 

El mi U-d oT l Vlralnld Stnnri. 
Lmdon El 9XN. ThuraCy. July 24. 

e SfJSS5 fl * a “ 


NOON TODAY hnwre to vhown In sSIHmii ROWS Cold Occluded 

ttym k eh mm an mliim nf edgai 



b-Mw sky: bc4lw sky and ctoud: c- 
rloudy; o-overcast: f-log. d^irlzzlc: h- 
tuU: nust mtsl. r-raln: v-snow: Ul- 
limndersionn; iMlnwim 
Arrows show wind direction, wind 
soeed imiitii circled. Temperature 
cenllprade. . 


AM 

HT 

PM 

HT 

4.41 

7.3 

456 

7.C 

3.50 

J 4 

4 39 

4 2 

10.15 

128 

1034 

13C 

1.28 

3-7 

204 

32 

1000 

11.8 

1019 

12.C 

9.11 

52 

9.24 

54 

1.46 

65 

200 

6.E 

8 41 

50 

8.54 

52 

322 

49 

358 

4.3 

2.35 

40 

251 

4 C 

12.50 

5.8 

1.24 

5.3 

fl.59 

7.8 

942 

7.1 ■ 

901 

90 

922 

93 

514 

5.6 

5.54 

55 

1.50 

9.7 

2 19 

9 2 

12.16 

2.4 

12 2 

2E 

058 

4.8 

304 

4.7 

9 1? 

68 

932 

7.1 

803 

6.8 

834 

71 

843 

38 

901 

40 

8.15 

53 

8-29 

55 

10 05 

2.1 

1019 

24 

1 59 

4.6 

2.37 

47 

148 

6.2 

2.24 

62 

102 

4.4 

2.0 2 

45 

920 

91 

940 

94 

630 

5.5 

703 

53 

220 

4.3 

2.40 

4 1 ** 


Portsmouth 
S h ore ha m 
Soaftampton 
Swansea 
Tees 

wnon-omitaa 
Tate measured in metres: 1m>a28tafL 


Around Britain 


Sun Ram 
hrs tfi 

EAST COAST 
Seartaoro 65 .22 
BridSngtoa 4.8 JO 
Cromer 1.5 .15 
Lowestoft 53 .01 
Clacton 5.1 
Margate x .11 
SOUTH COAST 
Fokostone &5 .08 
ttatelnga x .08 
Eastbourne 7.2 
Bodten 60 
WorlMng 8.2 .01 
Lttflehmptn 7.8 - 

BognorR 97 .02 
floriteta 7 2 .19 
Sandawn 83 - 

Shanfcfin 8.9 .02 
Boumomtta 11.7 
Poole 10.7 - 

Swanaga too 
Weymouth 10a 

Exroouiii 83 
Toignmouth 7.0 
Torquay 4.9 

Fatanouft 5.B - 


Max. 

C F 

16 61 showers 
15 59 showers 
15 59 ctoudy 
18 64 showers 

17 63 sunny 

18 64 showera 


Sun Ram 
hrs m 


Max 
C F 


Penz a n c e 36 
Jersey 11 4 
Guernsey 10.4 


19 66 
19 66 
18 64 
18 64 

18 64 

19 66 

19 66 
IB 64 

20 68 

;iss 

19 68 
17 63 
17 63 
17 63 
17 83 


showers 

thunder 

bngfif 

sunny 

showers 

bngtit 

showera 


showers 

showers 

sunny 

sunny 

sunny 

sunny 

bngnt 

sunny 

bright 

bright 


Guernsey 1 
WEST COAST 
Solly Isles 2.8 
Newquay S.I 
Kfracembe 65 
Tenby 6 5 - 

ColwynBay Il.t .01 16 
Wtoraeambe 3 6 2B 15 
Dougtw 6£ .07 15 

ENto^ND AND WALES 
London 7.5 - is 

BtramAimt 70 .15 17 
firteW® 82 J?9 18 
Cwdtff(Ctad) 10 3 . ig 

Apfl^ev 2.1 .04 16 
ffPggw pt 8.0 .03 16 

™o«*“gnpm 5.1 .38 15 
Wro-n-Tyne 62 .06 15 
CuUMie a.4 09 16 
NORTHERN IRELAND 
Beriast 5a JO 16 61 showers 


63 ctoudy 

64 sunny 
64 sunny 

63 ctoudy 
63 Ctoudy 
59 sunny 

63 sunny 
61 sunny 
59 shower 
59 sunny 

64 snewor 

63 showtfri 

64 nail 
66 sunny 
61 Showers 
61 Showars 
59 showors 

59 tnunaur 
59 snowws 
61 thunaor 


Abroad 


Ml no AY: c. ctoud: d. dnzzfe; f. far: fg. fog: r. ran; b. sun; sn. snow. I. thunder 


ssi ; 

Atex’dria I 
Alntera s 
Am*Tdm c 
Athens s 


Bartaads* 
B arceki a 
- Beirut 


Bermuda- f 
B te n iU c 
Bonle'x f 
BouTne 
BruaMto < 
Budapu 9 

Btaw* 

Cairo' s 

Capa Tn c 

CTKanca c 
Chteago* I 
Ch'churcfa s 


C F C F 

iS SI S?*?9«* f 24 75 Majorca 

29 84 Cphugn f 18 64 Malaga 

29 84 Corfu s 31 68 MuBa* 

40104 DuhOn . c 13 55 MtebUie 

17 K Duhmvnk s 26 79 Mexico C* 
33 91 Faro s 23 73 Mtamf 

Florence-- s 29 84 Milan 

£!*•*•*»* r 19 66 Montreal* 

25 77 Funchal f 22 72 Moscow 

f 28 82 Munich 
s 26 79 NeooW 
S 21 70 Naples 
f 31 88 NDaM 

5 25 77 N York' 
i 31 88 Nice 

6 43109 Oslo 
s 18 64 Pans 
f 31 68 Peking 
3 23 73 Perth 
c 22 72 Prague 
G 21 70 Reyfcjrifc 
C S3 73 Rhodes 
r 16 61 mode J 
* 27 81 Riyadh 


28 79 Gferahar 
19 66 Helsinki 
ffl 82 HongK 

22 72 h tBM rc h * 
24 75 Istanbul 

„ Jeddah 
18 64 Uotnirg- 
27 If Karachi 
L Palma 
24 93 Lisbon 
15 59 Locarno 

23 73 L Angela* 

2| 82 Lra^ 
6 43 Medrio* 


C F 

s 33 9t Rome 
s 30 86 Salzburg* 
S 27 81 S Frisco* 
f 16 61 Santiago' 
S Proto* 
f 33 91 Seoul 

> 27 81 Stog’pof 
s 23 73 SCknoim 
1 22 72 Strata -ro 
s 26 82 Sydney 
C 22 72 Tengier 

i 28 82 Tet-avtv 

i 34 93 Tenerife 
f 28 82 Tokyo 

5 25 77 Toronto* 
t 18 64 Tunis 

> 22 73 Valencia 
C 29 84 VsnCvwr* 
c tfi fit Venice 

6 28 82 Vieena 
0 il S2 Warsaw 
5 29 84 Washton' 
C 17 63 WeTnton 
s 44111 Zorich 


* denotes Tuesday 5 figures are latest avaflatee 


C 
a 26 
S 24 
S 21 
5 20 
r 13 
r 24 
s 3? 
C 20 
S 23 
( 23 
f 23 
s 30 
5 25 
9 29 

I 24 
32 
f 311 
C 17 
5 24 
9 29 
i 2b 
s 30 
I 9 
t 25 


F 

79 

75 

70 ' 
68 
55 
75 
90 
68 
73 
73 

8^ 

77 

64 

T 5 

90 

B6 

63 

75 

62 

77 

86 

48 

77 









BUSINESS AND FINANCE 


THE 



TIMES 


25 

SPORT 43 
TELEVISION AND RADIO 47 


THURSDAY JULY 24 1986 


Executive Editor 
Kenneth Fleet 



STOCK MARKET 

•• 

i . .. . 

FT 30 Share 

1286.8 (+12.1) 

FT-SE 100 

1572.3 (+13.1) 

• f 

Bargains 

23021 

f , * 

USM (Datastream) ; 

123.5 (-0.12) 


THE POUND 

1 _ 

1 

i- ■ bi ' 

' x 

• 1 .. 

f 

US Dollar 

1 .4905 (+010005) 

W German mark 

3.1837 (+0.0025) 

Trade-weighted . 

72.9 (+0.1) 

i. ■ * 

Unipart sale 

4.. J 



: The Government is expect- 

r» 

ed to announce today toe sale 

T ■ 

of Rover’s spare parts distri- 


bution business. Unipart, to 
the private sector. 

t 1 

at 

KL 

A group of financial institu- 
tions. led by Diaiteihonse 

Bank, is acquiring a majority 


shareholding of around 70 per 


cent for between £50 million 

v 

and £60 million. There will 

» •• • 

also be an opportunity for 

hit 

management and employees 

K.- 

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Royer car-subsidiary. - 

Sound rise 

Sound Diffusion, the elec- 
tronics engineer, reported full- 
year pretax profits of £5.8 
million (£4.7 million), on 
turnover of £3622 million 
(£30.5 million) for the year to 
December 31 .The company is 
paying a dividend of 0.5p 
: (Q.4 1 pVThe comparative fig- 
ures; for. .1984 have been 
restated in accordance with a 
new accounting stan- 
dard. ' Tempos, page 30 

Equipu down 

Equipu. the photocopier 
and office equipment group, 
made taxable profits of £1.24 
million in the year to April 30 
compared with £1.4 million 
previously. The total dividend 
was raised to 5p from 4.5p. 

Tempos, page 30 


GUSal 


Iv^il 


Great Urirveraaf Stores, the 
mail order, retailing, finance 
and property company, made 
- pretax profits of £290 Bullion 
in the year to March 31, & rise 
of 14.5 per cent on turnover 8 
per cent ahead. The total 
dividend was 21 p against I8p 
last time. 

Tempos, page 30 

Cater vow 

The chairman of Cater Al- 
ien Holdings. Mr James Bar- 
clay. has reaffirmed the 
company's commitment to be 
a market maker in gilts despite 
this week's pullout by Union 
Discount 

US prices up 

US consumer prices rose 0.5 
per cent last month after aCL2 
per cent gain in May, but 
prices in the first six months 
were on average 0.2 per cent 
'lower than in January-June 
1985. . 

TV-am fillip 

Shares in TV-am were a 
success in their Unlisted Secu- 
i ritics Market debut yesterday. 
The shares reached 14Ip, 
having been offered to die 
market at I30p and put a price 
tag of £46 million on the 
breakfast television company. 

Liberty stake 

TransAilantic Insurance 
Holdings^ owned by Liberty. 
Life of South Africa, has 
secured 88.3 per cent of- die 
Continental “ and Industrial 
Trust, including the 25.03 per 
cent it already owned. 







From Bailey Morris, Washington 


The. wotid feces another, 
recession unless the industri- 
alized ' nations honour their 
pledges to' cut their huge trade 
imbalances, Mr Paul Vdcfcer, 
chairman of the US Federal 
Reserve ; Board, said- 


Specifically, Mr Volcker 
said that tire recoyeiy m 
Europe ahtf the expansion in 
Japan may be threatened if 
they do not move to stimulate 
-home-grown" expansions to 
counter the big US slowdown. 

“The strains are- dearty 
showing," Mr Volcker said, in 
a strongly worded monetary 
policy address -to die US 
Congress. ' 

Before his opening state- 
ment, members of the Senate 
banking committee pressed 
Mr Yolcker for information 
on -whether the current expan- 
sion, begun in T 982,' is likely to 
continue or stall into races? 
sion. 

. Mr Volcker replied tfacat 
time was. running short for 
cooperation among the indiis-' 
triafizbd countries in reducing 
the enormous US trade deficit 
and the huge current account 
surpluses enjoyed by Japan 
and West Germany. 

“The hard feet is that 
progress in coordinating ac- 
tion toward the aims of cor- 
recting the enormous 
disequilibrium in the industri- 
alized world has been 
limited,” Mr Volcker said. 

He said that the search for a 
way to achieve sustainable 
growth over the next several 


years was the most pressing 
task facing indusrialized 
nations. 

- Mr Volcker said die United 
States bad been the engine of 
world growth over the past 
several years by consuming a 
record level of imports from 
other nations at the expense of 
its own industrial production 
which, bad not grown appre- 
ciably for more than a year 
and indeed had declined 
somewhat- in 1986. Clearly, 
this 'trend was unsustainable, 
Mr Volcker said. 

The difficulty firing the 
global economy stemmed 
from continuing and growing 
unbalances among the indus- 
trialized nations, be said. 

. Growth -rate, in leading Eu- 
ropean economies and in Ja- 
pan were about three quarters 
per cent less than the reduced 
growth path of the United 
States during 1985 and the 
first quarter of 1986, Mr 
Volcker said. 

He. cited a disturbing con- 
trast. in. the sources of the. 
growth. In the United States, 
the rate of domestic growth, 
while slowing in the third year 
of the expansion, continued to 
average about 3% per cent 
But domestic demand growth 
in Europe and Japan was 
significantly less, about 2£ per 
cent, indicating that where 
their exports dropped of their 
internal economies (fid not 
grow at afl. 

“What is of concern is that 
the domestic markets of our 
major industrial competitors 


have remained so sluggish, 
raising a question as to the 
buoyancy of the markets for 
our exports and of their own 
growth prospects.” 

■ The Federal Reserve chair- 
man said that • the United 
States must begin to reduce its 
$160 billion trade deficit to 
improve the global picture. 
Bui. he added, this would .not 
occur unless there was more 
. growth elsewhere in the world 
to provide markets for US 
export. 

- The Federal Reserve Board, 
for its part, would maintain an 
accommodating monetary 
polity for the rest of this year 
and into next year to avoid the 
possibility of a recession, he 
said. 

The United States would act 
again to lower interest rates, 
through a reduction in the 
discount rate, unilaterally jf* 
necessary,, to provide "addi- 
tional stimulus 

West Germany and Japan 
made dear during the last 
discount rate cut two weeks 
ago that they had- no intention 
of following the US lead, Mr 
Volcker said. 

But this did not signal the 
end of the coordinated ap- 
proach of the industrialized 
nations towards fiscal and 
monetary policies. 

The important tiling was 
that those nations achieved 
more domestic growth, he 
.said. It did not matter hpw 
they achieved it, whether 
through, fiscal or monetary 
policies. 



Pant Vokken progress towards coordinating action has been tunited 


Bond aims 
for HK 
brewery 

* From Stephen Leather 
Hong Kong 

, -JftyfAlaw thft AutStTfc., 
(fen who bought Cafelem ajne 
XXXX lb Britain, is trying to 
take control of San Miguel 
Brewery Limited, the Hong 
Kong subsidiary of San Mi- 
guel Corporation of the 
Philippines. 

As trading in the shares of 
San Miguel Brewery was sus- 
pended at the request of the 
company, executives at Bond 
Corporation Holdings in 
Pertfr confirmed negotiations 
were in progress. 

Mana&ng director Peter 
Beckwith said: “This move is 
a logical progression in one of 
our core busmesei” 

In Hong Kong, "market 
sources saida 24-hour delay in 
a formal announcement of the 
Bond offer had been caused by 
delays in getting the relevant 
authorization from the au- 
thorities in Hong Kong and 
Australia. 

Mr Bond, who is ‘as well 
known for sponsoring the 
winning Australian entry u 
last year's Americas Cup yacht 
race as he is. for his business 
activities, already has more 
than 40 per cent of the 
Australian brewing market, 
through Swan Breweries and 
Castlemaine Toobeys. 

The Australian $1.2 billion 
(£550 million) Castlemaine 
Tooheys takeover in August 
was tire biggest takeover in 
Australian corporate history 
at the time, and it now makes 
Bond Corporation the second 
biggest brewer in thejjountry 
after Carlton mid United. 

- Mr Bond was in Hong Kong 
last -week' reportedlylooking 
for an opportunity to set up a 
brewery in Southern China. _ . 


MARKET SUMMARY 


STOCK MARKETS 


179935 (+4.22) 


New Yoik 
Dow Jones 

SS Dow 17860.07 (+220.75) 

aSt =^ m 

r. AO 1137.7 (+0.r 

Fi 


Commerzbank - 

Brussels: 

General 

PificCAC - — 
Zurich: 

SKA General — 


1786.6 (+24.4) 

~ 638.08 (-195) 
367.1 (+3.4) 


— ~ «V» 
London closing prices ■ Pago 29 


INTEREST RATES 


London: 

Bonk Bass 10% 

S4r»nih-lntort»ank1IM ,, ii* 

3 -month tfgtfe bBs3 n M- n w% 

tjgingra® 

Prime Rates* „ 

Federal Fund* _ __ _ 

sss 

CURRENCIES 


London: 

E. Si. 4905 
£• DM3 .1837 

£: SwMireB 

- fc FFr105770 
E;Yen234.75 
L Index: 725 


New Yorir 
B $1.4910 
S: DM2.1325 
S: index; J13.D 

ECU £0 669562 
soft £0.801520 


MAIN PRICE CHANGES 


RISES: 
Glaxo - 
ICI 


975PC+ 


Royal Ins 


1004p 

852p 


Spafax — 150p 

Vich 


rictoria Cwpats - 

Jaguar 

J Smurflt — 


. 114p 


GUS ‘A* 
Atexon . 
Bat — 


— 21 . 
_1030p( 

— 176p 

— 398p 


!+i3pj 


.1 
m 
ttm 


Union 

Pearl 


wick. 




Stainless Metal 
Guinness — 



FALLS: 

Bt Bloodstock 


228p(- 


Cabie 4 Wireless 
GoriungKerr — 


„ 463p(-Sp) 
645p(-10p) 

310p (-60p) 


GOLD 


Loerion Fixing: 
AMS351.75pm4347.50 
dose S347.50-34R50 (£233.25- 
233.75) 

New York: 

Comax 5347^0-347^0 


NORTH SEA OIL 


Brent (Sept) S9.40 bW (S9.80) 


Aspen to pay £6m 
for Spafax TV 

By Lawrence Lever 

Aspen Communications, — 80 per cent of the company, 
the USM-quoted communica- was placed on the Unlisted 
tioos group, yesterday an- Securities Market at 68p a 
nounSed the £6.08 million share m January last year. It 
purchase of Spafex Television recently reportetfa drop in its 
Holdings, the Wfltshire-based half-year pretax profits from 
video production company. 

The purchase, which has al- 
ready been approved by 57 per 
cent of the Spafex sharehold- 
ers, will make Aspen Britain’s 
leader in corporate video 
productions. . . 

-Aspen is offering 30 of its 
shares for every 63 of Spafex, 
valuing Spafex atTSOpa gainst 
a closing price of I30p " 


£223,000 to £195,000. 

The company specializes in 
producing non-broadcast vid- 
eo programmes for training 
and marketing purposes. It 
boasts a number of blue chip 
clients for its corporate videos 
such as ICI and Hanson Trusu 
It is also involved in in-flight 
on entertainment for airlines. - 

Tuesday^ There is also a cash In contrast. Aspen’s for- 
aUernatiye of about 150p.a tunes appear in the ascendanL 

Share. Aspen, which only came to the 

'■ Spafex's shares closed at USM in April last year, is 
1 50p yesterday, a rise of 1 7p estimating record pretax prof- 
on the day, while Aspen fell 7p its of at least £920,000 for the 
to 338p. first six months of this year. 

Spa fix’s life as a public against £440,000 for the corre- 
company has been short-lived spending period in 1985. 


Berkeley 

calls 

for £30m 

By Cliff Feltham 

Berkeley Technology, which 
prides itsdf on raising devel- 
opment capital ■ for up and 
coming companies, turned its 
fund-raising skills to its own 
advantage yesterday when it 
cameto the City for nearly £30 
million to finance its own 
expansion. . 

The company, supported by 
the financial engineering ex- 
pertise of Kleinwort Benson, 
the merchant bank, has con- 
vinced three of its leading 
institutional shareholders to 
subscribe for new shares at full 
market value: something un- 
heard of in a rights issue. 

The institutions. Ensign 
Trust, Westpac, and RCI 
Holdings, which speak for just 
over 22 per cent of the 
company, have agreed to pay 
200p a share fora total of 63 
million of 15 million new 
shares being issued. 

The balance will be offered 
to re maining shareholders on 
the basis of 3 new shares for 
every 20 hd(t'At 200p “these 
are also the same price as the 
shares in the market, which 
rose 3p on the announcement. 

Mr Nigel Atkinson of 
Kleinwort Benson satdTThis 
is the first time that I am 
aware of where some of the big 
players in a company have 
come in and eliminated the 
discount to get a large Nock of 
shares. These investors obvi- 
ously believe in the strength 
and potential of the company 

Berkeley Technology acts as 
a middle man for its American, 
clients, arranging develop- 
ment capital, and making 
investments in its own right 

It says it needs more cash 
for expansion and it may be 
taking a controlling stake in 
some of the companies in 
which it has invested. 


Societies in 
£9bn merger 

-The Leeds Permanent 
building society announced 
plans yesterday to merge with 
the smaller southern-based 
Town and Country. 

Both boards. of directors 
have agreed in principle to 
recommend the merger 

The merger of the Leeds, 
with its 480 branches, and the 
Town, and Country, with 75 
offices, will create Britain's 
fourth-tergest building society 
with assets of more than 
£9 billion. 

The hew society will still be 
known as the Leeds Perma- 
nent but will add three Town 
and Country directors to its 
board. 


Lever meeting sought 

- : By Our Commercial Property Correspondent 

Berkley House Group, the_ ~po$als which are in Jhe long- 
private residential developer 
which is making a 500p per 
share tender offer for 18.8 per 
cent of Authority Invest- 
ments, the property and bank- 
ing company, is pressing for a 
meeting with Lord Lever, 

Authority's chairman. 

- Berkley wants to discuss 
alternative proposals to the 
agreed £6.6 million offer from 
Mr David Backhouse’s Man- 
agement Group. 

Mr Keith : Meehan, the. 
chairman of Berkley House, 
said: “We want talks to obtain 
specific information about 
Aufodnty Investments before 
forward detailed pro- 


putting' 


term interests of- share-' 
holders.” 

Lord. Lever said last night 
that he would consider what 
response to make after giving 
full consideration to Berkley's 
alternative plans. 

Berkley's lender offer closes 
two days before Authority’s 
extraordinary meeting to vote 
- on ManagementGroup's 143p 
per share offer which Berkley 
says -undervalues* the 
-company. — • — 

By then Berkley 'hopes to 
'have 25 per cent of the voting 
rights'to block ‘the Manage- 
ment Group deaL 


Platinum will shine despite 
metals glooi 


i, says review 

By Richard Lander 


. A generally gloomy review 
of the maior metals markets 
by the' Shearson Lehman 
Brothers commodities trading 
group has-piapointed-platiinmi 
as the only metal with real 
potential for sharp price rises 
in -the near-fo-mediam term. 

The group's mid-year review 
forecasts further depressed 
conditions in the base metal 
markets because of weak de- 
mand from the maim’ industri- 
al economies and cootininag 
.route-overcapacity. * - 
■ In the other precious metals, 
the gold price should maintain 
its slow and steady upward 
trend but sifter* currently at a 
.record low compared to gold, is 
likely suffer from huge OTer- 
suppiy and bolds very little 
attraction as an investment 
medium. 

According to Shearson, 
platinum should continue its 
recent strong performance into 
1987 with industrial d eman d, 
particularly from European 


car makers who use the metal 
in pollution-control devices, 
exceeding supplies for the 
fourth consecutive year. 

In addition, demand from 
investment and speculative 
sources has grown with the 
recent introduction of the 
“Noble** coin and the political 
turmoil in South Africa, which 
is responsible for about three- 
quarters of the world's plati- 
num supply. . . 

The review predicted an 
average platinum price of $475 
(£318) an ounce in the second 
half of this year, rising to $500 
next year, compared with $403 
in the first six months of this 
year. 

The gold price is also ex- 
pected to move slightly higher 
but Hs momentum is expected 
to be slowed by a weak 
investment climate for the 
metaL However Mr David 
Williamson, director of metals 
and mining research at 
Shearson, said investors might 


be more attracted' to grid when 
equity markets appear.to hare 
ended their bril phase. 

The renew predicted gold; 
currently $344 an : ounce, 
worid average $375 in the 
second half of the year and 
$400 in 1987. 

Looking at base metals, 
Shearson said there was little 
hope of a sharp upturn in 
demand for any of the fire 
major metals 

Prices of copper and 
aluminium are expected to 
show little change with de^ 
mand -almost; stagnant 

The renew pointed to a 
slightly brighter outlook for 
prices of lead and zinc over the 
next 18 months as weQ as an 
improvement in the nickel 
market from September be- 
cause of production cuts. 

Mid-year Review of the 
Metal Markets 1986, 
Shearson Lehman Brothers 
Ltd, £50. 


Cuts at Wellcome 
venture with ICI 


By OnrOty Staff 

. ICI and Wellcome, . the Duncan, 
pharmaceutical group, are to 
launch a big cost-cutting exer- 
cise at their jointly owned loss-, 
making animal health 
business. 

About 70 Jobs are to be axed 
at toe Berkhamsted, Hertford- 
shire, base of Coopers Animal 
Health, which was created in 
October 1984 out of toe merg- 
er of the health care divisions 
of both companies. 

Last year toe business made 
a loss of more than £8 million 
on turnover of £180 million 
and this year is likely to finish 
even deeper in the red, particu- 
larly as redundancy costs in- 
volved in toe reorganization 
are expected to be steep. 

Tbe decision to carry out a 
major review of the business — 
as arniQMippd in The Times in 
June — was taken by Dr Bill 


who took over as 
chief executive of Coopers 
Animal Health earlier this 
year. There had been specula- 
tion that ICI might hare 
pulled out of the business 
altogether. 

Coopers has been hit by toe 
continuing depression in world 
agriculture, particularly in im- 
portant cattle producing coun- 
tries such as New Zealand. 

Dr Dnncan said 
yesterday:“We will continue to 
take advantage of our most 
valuable connections with the 
research of Wellcome and ICI. 
We will also extend our links 
with universities, research in- 
stitutes and potential licen- 
sors, thereby maintaining our 
excetlent track record which 
has already brought 19 new 
products and presentations to 
the UK market.” 


Dares buys 50% stake 
in Chelsea Cloisters 

By Judith Huntley, Commercial Property Correspondent 
Dares Estates, the property been valued at £21.5 million 


company, which returned to 
tbe black last year after suffer- 
ing heavy losses on its United 
States property in 1984, is to 
raise its asset base to £1 1 mil- 
lion by buying £9. 1 million of 
London properties, including 
the Greyhound Group's 
50 per cent stake in . Chelsea 
, Cloisters, one of the capital’s 
largest.' residential 
developments.... 

-• Dares is paying Greyhound 
£1.6 million for its interest 
with' the remaining 50 percent 
held by Burgher, a_ private 
investment company in which 
three Dates directors have an 
interest. Chelsea Ooisters has 


and there are borrowings; of 
£16.5 million oustanding 
which remain with the the 
company developing the 
scheme. Dares puis its com- 
pleted value at £40 million, 
less refurbishment costs of 
£10 million. 

Three commercial invest- 
ment properties valued at £7.5 
million are being bought from 
Hampstead Commercial 
. Properties in which the same 
three Dares directors are inter- 
ested. Dares is paying 
£4.5 million cash for the HCP 
purchase. The rest of the total 
consideration will be met 
issuing £4.6 million of shares 


Vickers 
to buy 
tank 
factory 

By Teresa Poole 

The Ministry of Defence 
was completing negotiations 
for the sale of Royal 
Ordnance's Leeds tank factory 
to Vickers last night 

An announcement by Mr 
George Younger, the Defence 
Secretary, is planned for later 
today barring last minute 
hitches. If the sale is agreed, he 
will also confirm that a £100 
million order for Challenger 
main battle tanks has been 
placed with Leeds. 

U is believed that the Gov- 
ernment will seek to sell the 
rest of Royal Ordnance as a 
single entity if tbe Leeds deal 
goes ahead. 

Trafalgar House has already 
expressed interest in the com- 
pany, originally priced at be- 
tween £150 million and £200 
million, but yesterday said it 
was still waiting for financial 
information. 

Last month the l£oD halted 
the public flotation of Royal 
Ordnance at tbe last moment, 
saying that although substan- 
tial progress had been made in 
transforming Royal Ordnance 
into a folly fledged commer- 
cial entity “it has not been 
possible to take this fir 
enough and to have in place 
all the features necessary to 
provide the basis fora success- 
ful flotation this summer.” 

The postponement followed 
protests from Vickers that the 
Challenger order was about to 
be awarded to Royal Ord- 
nance without a public com- 
petitive tender, despite the 
MoD’s procurement policy. 
Without the order the foture 
of the Leeds operation and its 
5,000 employees looked, 
uncertain. 

Vickers, with its modem 
factory on Tyneside, owns the 
only other British manufac- 
turer of main battle tanks. 
Demand is not thought to be 
sufficient to keep both plants 
operating and there have al- 
ways been fears of large-scale 
redundancies following a sale 
of the. Leeds business. A sale to 
Vickers . is . also likely to 
prompt protests that the Gov- 
ernment has created a monop- 
oly tank supplier. 

■ The Leeds operation makes 
profits of more than £7 mil- 
lion and has an asset value of 
£16 million. Royal Ordnance 
also makes the guns, ammuni- 
tion and explosives for the 
tanks — worth around £100 
million a year in total - and 
may lose this work after the 
sale. " 

Royal Ordnance has always 
said that hiving off Leeds did 
not make commercial sense 
and .'attacked the synergy of 
the company. Up until the last 
moment, toe board main- 
tained it was ready for toe 
flotation of the company as a 
whole, which it saw as toe 
prefered method of privatiza- 
tion. 



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—26 BUSINESS AND FINANCE 


THE TIMES THURSDAY JULY 24 1986 


C 


ECONOMIC BRIEFING 


3 


Why high unemployment is 

self-perpetuating 


tUnemploymenL. even after 
five years of economic recov- 
ery. is rising by at least 
: 100,000 a year. The adult 
jobless total, which reached 
3.22 million last month, 
shows no sign of levelling off 
• Even a slight slowdown in 
; growth, such as that expen- 
se need in Britain over ihe past 
1 year, pushes up the rate of 
- increase of unemployment. 
The consequences of a real 
downturn in activity do not 
bear contemplating. 

; But why has unemployment 
; stubbornly kepi on rising 
■ when the average growth rate 
of the economy since the last 
i cyclical trough — reached in 
the second quarter of 1981 — 

' has been a respectable 2.7 per 
cent a a year? 

..One common explanation 
is that while such a growth rate 

* compares well with the long- 
run average for Britain, it has 
not been concentrated in the 
sectors which generate em- 
ployment and. as importantly, 
there has been no catching-up 
in respect of the growth "lost” 

: in 1980 and the first half of 

• 1981. The implication of this 
is that only by a substantial 
growth boost will unemploy- 
ment be reduced. 

The other main view takes 
as its starting point some 
■ equilibrium unemployment 
; rate for the economy, ihe 
natural or non-accelerating 
inflation rate of unemploy- 
ment. The failure of wages to 
adjust to lower inflation is 
! then the main cause of unem- 
ployment and, as long as 
strong growth in wages per- 
sists. unemployment will re- 
main above its natural rate. 

‘ This explanation of why 
unemployment should be 
above its long-run equilibrium 
holds up well as far as it goes. 
The difficulty is that the 


labour market reforms intro- 
duced by the present Govern- 
ment, and the reduction in 
union power that has oc- 
curred, should have acted to 
reduce die natural rate of 
unemployment. 

Thus, either the gap be- 
tween the actual and the 
natural rate has become very 
large indeed, or the natural 
rate itself risen, against wbal 
might be expected. 

Thus, neither the deficiency 
of demand nor the natural rate 
explanations fit the facts of 
unemployment in Britain 
satisfactorily. 

Another approach, which 
fills some of the gaps in the 
other explanations says that 
unemployment is likely to 
stay high because it is already 
high, and because of the 
shocks to the system which 
caused it to increase in the 
first instance. 

This, sometimes known as 
hysteresis, is attracting a lot of 
interest among academic 
economists and was the sub- 
ject of a three-day conference 
at the University of St An- 
drews in Scotland earlier this 
month. 

In developing the concept of 
hysteresis, economists have, 
not for the first time, 'adapted 
a principle from one of the 
natural sciences. The term was 
coined in the early 1880s by 
James Ewing, a physicist and 
engineer, to describe the prop- 
erties of ferric metals. 

Certain characteristics of 
such metals are determined by 
the forces applied to them; 
reversing the forces does not 
return the metals to their 
original state. 

It is easy to see why the 
principle is attractive to econ- 
omists, particularly in the 
context of unemployment 
The simple natural rate view. 



15004 


81 82 83 84 85 88 


for example, implies that all 
other things being equal, it is 
possible to return to the 
original level of unemploy- 
ment as if nothing had 
changed, despite years in 
which unemployment has 
been well above its natural 
rate. 

This is hardly credible, and 
the hysteresis approach tells 
us why. According to Rod 
Cross of St Andrews, who 
organized the conference : 
"Low unemployment rates 
tend to breed low unemploy- 
ment and high unemploy- 
ment rate high 
unemployment” 

The rise in unemployment 
in the eighties has been associ- 
ated with a big increase in the 
proportion out of work for 
very long periods. There are 
around 1.4 million people, 
just under half of the total 
unemployed, who have been 
out of work for more than a 
year. Nearly 600,000 have 
been unemployed for over 
three years, and more than 
200,000 for over five years. 

Thus, the way in which 
unemployment has come to 
be where it is, involving large 
numbers of people out of work 
for very long periods, leads to 
a very different assessment of 
it than if the jobless total 
consisted of people experienc- 


ing unemployment for just a 
few weeks. 

There is also evidence that 
employers are put off taking 
the unemployed on by their 
lack of recent work experi- 
ence. Hu's is the stigma effect 
of long-term unemployment. 

Thus, a vicious circle oper- 
ates in the labour market. The 
recently unemployed are more 
determined to get back into 
work, and their skills and 
experience have not gone 
rusty. The long-term unem- 
ployed find themselves 
pushed to the back of the 
queue, according to a paper 
presented at St Andrews by 
Alan Budd and Peter Smith of 
the London Business School, 
together with Paul Levine of 
the' South Bank Polytechnic. 

Apart from the existence of 
large numbers of long-term 
unemployed, there is another 
explanation of why high un- 
employment has bred high 
unemployment This is that, 
while there has been a reduc- 
tion in union power defined in 
terms of union numbers and 
the legal constraints on 
unions, there has not been a 
reduction in union militancy. 

Thus, if the decline, for 
example, in manufacturing 
employment has been primar- 
ily among non-unionized 
workers; or the imposition by 
employers of harsh redundan- 
cy decisions has increased the 
unions' determination on 
wages, then it could Ire that 
rising unemployment actually 
increases union power, and 
hence the natural rate of 
unemployment 

Assar Lindbeck of the Uni- 
versity of Stockholm and 
Dennis Snower of Birkbeck 
College take this view. They 
argued that union power re- 
stricts an economy’s recovery 


from recession, and hinders 
the recovery of employment. 

"Jo this light.” they con- 
cluded. "the more widespread 
and powerful influence of 
unions in Europe than in tire 
United States may help ex- 
plain why European econo- 
mies have found it more 
difficult to emerge from the 
recession of the early 1980's 
than the American economy 
has.” 

This type of analysis pro- 
duces several conclusions for 
policy. The fnst is that unem- 
ployment, having risen rapid- 
ly in the first half of the 
eighties, is not going to fall 
back as quickly by the end of 
the decade. The sharp rise in 
unemployment has had per- 
manent effects on the labour 
market. 

If unemployment is to be 
reduced then, very clearly, the 
long-term unemployed have 
to be brought back into the 
labour market, through an 
extension of training and oth- 
er government schemes. With- 
out this, there will be an 
unemployment rump until the 
present long-term jobless have 
passed into retirement. And, 
with the biggest proportion of 
the long-term unemployed in 
the 20-24 age group, that will 
take rather a long time. 

Finally, there is a lesson for 
the future in all this. Impor- 
tant though the conquest of 
inflation has been for Britain, 
the policymakers seem to 
have assumed that the associ- 
ated rise in unemployment 
was temporary and would be 
reversed once inflation was 
reduced. The hysteresis ap- 
proach suggests that this is far 
from likely. 

David Smith 

Economics Correspondent 


Sir Geoffrey answers 
Industry Year critics 

Industry Year has always 
been a son target for its critics. 


h 


By its very nature its aims are 
laudable but its results intan- 
gible. Attacking what Industry 
Year's Director, Sir-Ge offiry 
Chandler, sees as the root 
cause of Britain's relative 
industrial decline — our anti- 
industrial culture — is fine in 
principle but considerably 
harder to achieve in practice. 

Id bis half term report. Sir 
Geoffrey unsurprisingly 
judged the year so far to be a 
success. Encouragingly, many 
of the specific targets set at the 
beginning of the year are well 
underway. 

About half the nation's 
7,400 secondary schools are 
now tinted with companies 
compared with 25 per cent a 
year ago; 1,200 work shadow- 
ing programmes for six 
formers have been arranged; 
and more than 3,000 people 
around the country are in- 
volved in a national network 
of groups which are busy 
organising Industry Year 
events. So far a staggering 214 
million booklets and advisory 
pamphlets and publicity mate- 
rials have been issued in 
response to demand. 

It is the countrywide net- 



Sir Geoffrey; on the 
way to hitting targets 

works which should prove to 
be the success of the venture. 
Sir Geoffrey is the first to 
admit that one does not 
change a century of ingrained 
prejudice in 365 days and 
plans are already afoot for 
Industry Year to be extended 
under the working banner of 
“Industry Matters.” 

A nucleus of five staff will 
be kept on at the headquarters, 
with Sir Geoffrey's active 
involvement, but from next 
year its major role will be to 
advise on the most successful 
forms of action. 

The emphasis of Industry 


Year has already shilled from 
groups, such as "trades unions 
and employers’ organisations, 
io their members and ihe aim 
now is io get stronger response 
from the small and medium 
sized companies. It is the 
network of groups committed 
which may actually achieve 
this. 

Within the Department of 
Trade and Industry and the 
Department of Employment 
there is now considerable 
support for the project to 
continue beyond December 
3J and it is likely that some 
department will be willing to 
provide the estimated 
£250,000 needed to keep the 
central office functioning next 
year. 

By avoiding party politics 
Industry Year has won sup- 
port from across the spectrum 
and its aims are safe beyond 
the next election. Sadlv. how- 
ever. the year so far has 
coincided with rising unem- 
ployment and flat manufac- 
turing output Looking further 
ahead. Sir Geoffrey may well 
be creating a generation of 
industry hungry, well-trained 
school "children who will be 
forced to And jobs in an 
expanding services sector. 


COMPANY NEWS 


Standard Chartered has offered an uninterrupted 
service in China ever since we opened our first office 
in 1858. 

So that today, our six offices stand for two 
things. 

A depth of experience in China of the greatest 
value to businesses seeking to seize the burgeoning 
opportunities for trade. 

And a very special approach to the management 
of an international bank. 

In China as in many other major economies, 
Standard Chartered has become an important and 
well-established local bank, in which senior mana- 
gers have developed close relationships with local 
government, financial institutions and businesses. 

And at the same time, part of a fully-integrated 
network of more than 2,000 branches in over 60 
countries, sharing common procedures and infor- 
mation systems. 

It is a delicate balance, but, clearly an achiev- 
able one. 

Contact your nearest branch for more infor- 
mation. 

■you’ll find an ever-open door. 


THE WQ 1 U>. 

Standard ft Chartered 

STANDARD CHARTERED BANK. HEAD OFFICE: 38 BlSHQPSGATt, LONDON EC2N 4DL 


«»*■?„ v- -r\. 


i " ■' ^ . - . *■' '*! 



• MEDMJNSTEfc The com- 
pany plans to raise about 
£550.000 (net) by a rights issue 
of 500.000 ordinary shares at 
120p each on a onc-fbr-fbur 
basis. The directors estimate 
that pretax profits for the year to 
June 30 last will be not less than 
£500,000. The board explains 
that a significant contribution to 
profits in the first half was made 
by the new complex at White 
Gty, specializing in the hire of 
modem furniture and furnish- 
ing and by Gimberts, based in 
Manchester. The net proceeds of 
the issue, which will be used 
initially to reduce bank borrow- 
ings, wiH provide additional 
working capitaL 

• BRITISH BLOODSTOCK 
AGENCY: Year to March 31. 
Total dividend 8.8p (fipk Grass 
revenue £76.94 million (£78.49 
million). Turnover £5.48 mil- 
lion ' (£5.35 million). Pretax 
profit £1.23 mHlion (£1.57 mil- 
lion). Earnings per share (before 
extraordinary item) 20.8p 
(23.9p). The board explains that 
the main factors responsible for 
the lower profits were a fall in 
commission earned on the buy- 
ing and selling of bloodstock, 
increased costs and exchange 
rate movements. 

• PLASMEC: Half-year to 
June 30. Interim dividend 0.7p 
(interim of lp last time, but no 
final). Sales £4. 16 million (£3.51 
million). Pretax profit £140,000 
floss £40,000). Earnings per 
share 3.04p (0.9p loss). 

• VOSPER 

HOVERMARINE: A newly 
incorporated British company, 
trading as Hovennarine Inter- 
national, has recently acquired 
the business of Vosper 
Hovennarine from its joint 
receiver. Hovennarine Inter- 
naiionaJ is owned and financed 
by American businessmen 
experienced in marine engineer- 
ing 

• GOODBODY 
DUDGEON/JAMES CAPEL: 
Agreement in principle has been 
readied whereby James CapeL 
part of the Hong Kong Bank 
Group, will take a 40 per cent 
interest in Goodbody Dudgeon. 
Irish stockbrokers. The remain- 
ing 60 per cent will continue to 
be owned by management Defi- 
nite -agreements are expected to 
be signed in Septemberafier the 

_ ilatory approvals have been 
obtained. The company name 
will be changed to Goodbody 
James Capet and Mr Peter 
Quinnan, chairmen of James 
Capei, and Mr Nicholas Fraser 
wifi be invited to join the boardL 
• NORTH DEVON MEAT: 
By 3pm on July 21, HHIsdown 
had . received acceptances in 
-f-respect of 1, 627,299.. ordinary 
shares (63.5%). The offer has 
been declared unconditional 
with respect to acceptances and 
remains subject to the registra- 
tion of North Devon Meat as a 
limited company and for this 
purpose a special genera] meet- 
ing will be held on July 24. The 
first closing date of the offer is 
3pm on July 25. 

• INDUSTRIAL SCOTLAND 
ENERGY: Texas Gas Explora- 
tion Corporation (UK), a 
subsidiary of CSX Corporation, 
an non need tbe. purchase ' of 
100,000 ordinary shares in 
Industrial Scotland Energy at 
89p per share on July 21. With 
the 931,324 ordinary shares in 
1SE now held by TG and people 
deemed to be acting , in concert 
with TG, it now owns 1,031,324 
TSE 'ordinary shares (4.5 per 
cent). 

1 HENARA: Nigel Newlyn be- 
comes financial director. 


Oil glut likely to 
cut prices further 

By Derek Harris, Industrial Editor 


The possibility of a further 
increase in the oil glut looks 
likely to force down prices 
further ahead of next 
Monday's crucial meeting in 
Geneva of the Organization of 
Petroleum Exporting Coun- 
tries (Opec). which will mate 
yet another attempt to reach 
agreement on production 
quotas. 

It will add to competitive 
pressures, which have driven 
the price of petrol at the 
forecourts down to a national 
average of about £1.61 for a 
gallon of four-star. But dra- 
matic price shifts are not 
expected by the oil companies 
because retail prices are al- 
ready claimed to be about 8p a 
gallon cheaper than is justified 
by the drop in crude oil price 
which anyway because tax- 
ation accounts for 70 per cent 
of the price of a retail gallon 
has a relatively limited 
impact. 

Opec is currently producing 
an estimated 19.5 million 
barrels of oil a day (bpd) 
which is about 2 million above 
market demand. At its meet- 
ing in Yugoslavia last month. 



individual quotas for its 13 
members. 

Crude oil prices have since 
been at some of the lowest 
levels for 13 years, with North 
Sea Brent dropping to near S9 
a barrel, while Dubai crude 
has slipped back to just over 


58 a barrel, cancelling out 
some of the recovery since last 
week's low of $7.40. 

What could add sharply to 
the glut are the apparent 
tactics of Saudi Arabia, the 
world's biggest exporter of oil. 
rt first of all gave a warning 
that it could not be the only 
Opec member to respect its 
quota while some other mem- 
bers flouted theirs. 

There are estimates that 
Saudi production is now run- 
ning not far short of 6 million 
bpd - which is about 1 million 
barrels above June produc- 
tion. Moreover, there are un- 
confirmed reports that the 
Saudis have added to their 
stocks at sea by chartering six 
supertankers . 

This could strengthen the 
Saudi hand at next week's 
Opec meeting because of the 
implicit threat that if produc- 
tion quotas cannot be agreed 
Saudi oil could flood the 
market quickly, force down 
prices and embarrass produc- 
ers in a less strong financial 
position. 

Moves have already been 
made to bring more Opec 
members into line on quotas. 
At the beginning of this week, 
the oil ministers of Saudi 
Arabia and Kuwait, Sheikh 
Ahmed Zaki Yamani and 
Sheikh Ali al-Khalifa al-Sabah 
respectively, went to Abu 
Dhabi to try to persuade the 
United Arab Emirates to soft- 
en their demands on produc- 
tion quotas. 


APPOINTMENTS 


Harvard Securities 
PLC 


Liceucd Heaters 
ta Sammies 


Tv-am 

Bay or Sell Shares 
free of coanmssioii 
To deal ring 

01-928 8691 


BASE 

LENDING 

RATES 


ABN. 


Adam & Company. 
BCCI 


Citibank ... 
CansoGdatsd Cnte. 
Continental Trusts 
Co-operative Bank. 

C. Hoars & Co. 


. 10 . 00 % 
-1000% 
- 10 . 00 % 
-10. 75% 
. 10 . 00 % 
jojxnt 


- 10 . 00 % 
- 1000 % 
- 10 . 00 % 
- 10 . 00 % 

_ 1000 % 

Royal Bank of Scoiland ICL00% 

TSB 10.00% 

Citibank NA_ 1000% 

t Monpge B««e Rue. 


Hong Kong & Shanghai. 

LLoytJs Baric 

Nat Werimmsta 


Incorporated Society of 
British Advertisers; Mr Leslie 
San mens has been appointed 
president, succeeding Mr Don 
McLure, who becomes this 
year's vice-president. 

Casson Beckman: Mr John 
Needleman, Mr Richard Free- 
man and Mr Howard Freed- 
man have become partners. 


Singer & Fricdlander Mr 
Norman C England has been 
named a director. 

Baring Fund Managers; Mr 
D M H Skinner has been 
appointed a director. 

County NatWest Capital 
Markets: Mrs Nisha Alvares 
Meaeses has become a 
director. 


Shandwick 

Shandwick Consultants 
limited 

— Public Affaire Diviaon — 

are pleased to 
announce the opening 
oftheir 

Whitehall office 


Far further info rniarin n ppnfarri 

Keith Lockwood 
Head of Public Affairs 
25 Whitehall 
London SW1A2BS 
01-839 7198 



fiiHb, 


T" 


CJ 


\ 








THE TIMES THURSDAY JULY 24 1 986 


BUSINESS AND FINANCE 


'27 




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Based to 
tdhe opening 

their 

^ 11 office 


jodpsw^ I*. 

ubiicAf:^ | 


SWIA^ 


7« 


STOCK MSRKETREPDRT 


Broker’s optimism on ICI 
results lifts share prices 


By Michael Claris 


• The chemical-sector, re- 
ceived a shot in the. arm 
yesterday, ahead of- the inter- 
im^ figures later today from 

Scrimgeouf Vickers, the 
broker, has' just, published' a 
bullish circular on chemical 
shares and it advises clients to 
remain .overweight in tbesec- 
tor. MrJohaDoree^an analyst 
at Scrimgeohr.points ootihat 
chemical companies are likely 
to . benefit greatly from- the 
drop' in' the cost : of raw 
materials following the fail in 
the. price ' of oil: He said: 
-Chemical companies - will 
benefit directly from The drop 
in costs. 1 * 

• President Enter t a inments , 
.the theme restaurants group, 
is already benefitii^ firnm it* 
US expansion plans. The 
BankAmerica has announced 
it now owns 1.4 nriUton shares 
(7.2 per cent)^pd becomes the 
'.third insdtution'to owD more 
than -5 percent of the equity. 
Others are now expected' to 
' follow. The shares^' which were 
recently promoted from die 
USM, firmed 2p to 113p. 

As a result, chemical shares 
should enjoy a better second 
half, with profits from the 
sector as a whole likely to be 
sharply up. Mr Doree believes 
that today’s second-quarter 
•figures from Id will prb.ve to 
be a watershed for the sector. 
He is looking for pretax profits 
' of £275 raflliori, against £268 
million: for the corresponding 
period last time. That stretch- 
es the total. for the first tix 
months to £535 million com- 
pared wifit £479 million' last 
year. 

Scrimgeour Ts keen to rec- 
ommend ICI, which advanced 


back through the £10 level, 
with an Tip. rise to £10.02, 
along with BOC Group, lp 
dearer at 309p and Allied 
Colloids, 4p higher at 200p. 
Foseco Minsep, 5p up at 238p, 
is also looking cheap following 
weakness over the past couple 
of weeks. 

^The rest of the equity 
market .was looking more 
cheerful as the expected bear 
squeeze' gpt' unifcr way.' After 
houre,- the FT index of- 30 
leading shares wait 12J points 
up at 1, ^6.8, while the FT-SE 
100 rbse by 13.1 to L572J. . 

Newcomer TYnun failed -to 
live pp to early expectations 
after, being 10 times sub- 
scribed. The shares; offered at 
130p on the Unlisted Securi- 
ties Market, opened at I38p. 
Dealers blamed the recent 
nervousness in the market for 
the cautious start to first-time 
trading, but most ftindinanag- 
ers appeared satisfiedwiihihe 
result. The shares later dosed 
at 141.5p — a premium of 
tl;5p.- r ' ; 

""Gilts sported jjaihsoT up“to^ 
£Vi in a thin market 

British Aerospace made a 
brisk' start , with a 7p rise to 
473p, but quickly ran out of 
steam, finishing only 4p 


BRITISH AEROSPACE 
Share iprice 

SaracDafartia ag i' 


u 

[ FTAALL SHARE | 


l— 



JAN * FEB ' MAR"' -APR'.' MAY * JUN - JUL 


dearer at 470p. Some dealers 
claimed the shares were a 
“chart buy. 1 ’ There was pre- 
cious little evidence to support 

this. 

Mr Richard Lake's team of 
chartists at Savory Mffln, the 
broker, said it was to early to 
tell and were still recommend- 
ing clients to avoid the shares 
after their recent dull perfor- 
mance. Jobbers, reported little 
'demand forth em and thought 
there were still “a few more 
sellers about They also point- 
ed out. that if Labour is 
returned to power at the next 
general election, British Aero- 
space is unlikely to escape any 


RECENT ISSUES 


re-natio nalizati on proposals. 
■Brokets like Phillips & 
Drew remain buyers of the 
shares and are looking for 
pretax profits in the current 
year to rise from £151 imUioD 
to £200 million where the 
prospective p/e is 7.5 and the 
-Shares yield 5.7 per cent. - 

The broker is confident that 
■the figure could reach £250 
million -for" 1987. Other bro- 
kers are • worried ■ that the 
recent strike at Warton may 
have hit profits and they are 
adopting a cautious stance. 

Birmid Qoalcast, the 
Poiterton boiler and 
Jawnmower manufacturer, has 


EQUITIES 

-Beavercoll 
BjpeJ37 1 
PoriajKt-fr 
Bradero (1 

Chelsea 

Coated Bectrodes' (84p) 
Evans -Hafchaw (120pf 
Hatcher Dennys 
GT Managemer 
Guthrie Corp {1 
Harrison [(1 SOp) 

HUb Eigonom (92p) 



M8 r Cash F 1?c?S2rt ' 
C5ffip) . . 


GfenfeD 


.Morgan Gian 
Stliwd (72p)* 
Smaltoone-O 
- Soundtracks ( 

'. Stanley. Leisur 
. TV-AM (130p 
. Task. Force 
Templeton 
Tenby tnds'fll 
Thames TV (IE 
-Tlbbflt a Britten *(i20p)-- 
Yelvarton (38p) 

Unlock (63p)_ 
Whidsmoor (106p) 



RIGHTS ISSUES 

Abaco Irjv N/P ’ 

* ' EaN/P 


113 


-N/ 

Do La Hue F/P. 

Dataserv N/P - 

" EnskJne. Use F/P 
ExpametN/P 
IrafacBMl F/P. 

Leigh Interests N/P 

Top Value N/P 
Wight CoMns N/P 
Yononount N/P 

(Issue price In brackets). 


LONDON FINANCIAL FUTURES 


Three Month MKlag 


5.1S 
9037 

aoa+: : 

9023 
' >tr ’ 

-NT 

Previous day's tow opm interest 14478 

Tta»e Month Eurodolmr 

Sep 86 

Dec 86 „ : 

UarKT . 


Dec I 
Msr87. 
Jun87 . 
Sep87 , 
Dee 87 , 


SX54 

93.54 

9339 


to- 

W-i- 


- US Treasury Bond 

fiflpW? ; - 

98-17 

Wur*-* 



98-01 



NT 





st-i - 


Short Gflt 

— - 10849-1 

pr~ 


Dec 97 

NT 

V 


• .My 87 ... — 


*-• 

at> • • 

A '> - 


l.UHHGni . ■ - ■ 

- ■ : T1ftM 


-v,-.r ■ . 



J 


NT 

IP* 

. J 

.liyift? 

__ NT 

AlLmy-.' 


: -FT-SE 108 - 

15865 


. ’ 

- - DecBS 

161 JQ 


NUi . Low- . Clam EttVal 
9048 .... 90.11 -90.13 1594 

«M0 • 9036 90.37 - 2Z7 

30J3B .-.J0J4 .. 9036:. :*». ! 
.9023 '. 9023 ■■ .«X22 17. . . 

V Previous day’s vxalapm Interest 17625 
935* . 3X46 9347 .3144 

9854 9344 9345 1252 

9339 9329 ' 9331 399 

93.15 9338 8339 44 

Previous day's total opsn interest 7682 
97-19 97?1 97-18 6775 


98-01 


97-31 


96-28 




113969*1 


— ft- - 


Previous dey’s total open interest 2464 
159165 15640 1MUB5 '445 

161 JO 161 JO 16170 1 


TRADITIONAL OPTIONS 


First DeeDogs 
Jul2l 
Aug a 

^uol8 - 


LeetPeeteg e 

Aug 1 
Aug 15 
Sept 5 . 


Last DsctamtioQ For 
Oct 23 -- Nov 3 

Nov 6 Nov 17 

Nov 20 - Docl 


Cal wtton were taken totoc 23/7/86 PerkdatoL Westwood Poors 'AYS', Gmet 
Sound Din. Marshall tox, Btacks Latsure. Bntol. JFS. Rama.T.Matshai.-Artlleyard. 
Yorir A EqUtty. Bumdona. Epugy Cap, Abaco, Btue .Arrow, Brengrean. Armowt 

Amairad. PoOy Pec*. Bams. PatranaL R4ay. . . 

PuttCattrPartdale; Stwreton Sacs, Raina. Amstred. Underwood, Brangmen. 


FOREIGN EXCHANGES 


STERUNG SPOT AND FORWARD RATES 


N York 1. 4^50-1 4929 
Montreal 2.0827-20732 - 
Ams <tgm3S705-3£a51 

Brossats SS J8-6536. ■ 
CTptwen 113897-113842 
Dutafi 13627-13753 
FrxnkfwtS. 1665-3.1 961 
Lisbon 21837-220.74 

Madrid 20227-204.17 
Mlart 2174.64-219334 
Oslo 11.0619-11.1450 
Parts 1 02293-103240 
St'khtra 10.4706-105309 
Tokyo 23232-235.16 
Vlereia- 2227-2248 • 
Zurich.2S688-25834 


■' J0N23 
1490014910 

-23B9IF23732 
- 25827-3^26 
65.66-6536 

ii^Smeoa 

I. 0707-1.0717 

21819-3.1863 

21933-22037 

20277-202.55 

217937-210730 

II. 1199-11.1348 

102661-107879 

105090-103309 

234J5-235.13 

22422245 

2568825750 


0.45-O42preoi 

0- SO-OTOpram 
1H-1 Xpram 
19-13 
2%-T 
8 

1^-114prem 
65-1 KkSa 

3S30cfis 

1- 5dis 
SVdXtfs 
2K2prem 
54i»r 
1V%pnsm 
9K-8*prenj 
1X-1pran> 


131-1 TSprarn 
030-0.7 Spram 



Storing index compared wBh 1975 waa up St 723 (dsyt raifta 723-729). 


. . OfflSt STE RLING RATES 
Argentina ausmtP 

AuatiaSadoUar — 

Batalin dinar .... 0560545645 

Brazil cruzado- 20452057 

Prtano vnsnea 
Greece dractam 


DOUAR SPOT RATES 



Hong Kong dollar 
bida rupee 
Ireqtfinar - 
Kuwait cftiar KD 
Malaysia ddsr 

Uwim nmn 

New Zealand doKar _ — _ 2.7K1-2JB73 

Saudi Arabia riyal 5578043180 

SmgapoTBdoder „ 32595276*8 


South Airta rend 
ti-ABdhham — 
rUoydsBenk; . 


3.73S6&7S5T 

,54605-55005 


Hong Kong 

Rjrtigai 
Spain 
Austria . 


. 2.14602.1470 
, 1.7380-1.7370 
2419024200 
6325029300 
, 15735-15210 
14715-14745 
_ 4473-4478 
.73135-75140 
M730-T4210 
13270-13630 
— 1211-1213 


Ram tappied brBMdajrs Bank HOFEX and E»sL 


LONDON TRADED OPTIONS 




Cata 


- 

Pots 



Swiss 


Oct 

Jan 

Jt* 

Oct 

Jan 

AI*d Lyons 

3D0 

27 

40 

50 

1 

6 

B 

C3Z8J 

330 

* 

20 

33 

7 

20 

- 23 

360 

y. 

10 

15 

37 

40 

45 


BP 

500 

85 

90 

97 

i 

.4 

8 

£563)1 

550 

■ 1 

50 

(SO 

1 

14 

20 

600 

1 


■ 30 

-20 

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;45 

Cons Goto 

420 

12 

42 

52 

1 

25 

32 

('433) 

460 

V. 

22 

35 

32 

47 

54 


1 

9 

20 

72 

82 

Ell 


260 

14 

31 

40 

1 

5 

12 

(-277) 

290 

y» 

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28 

7 

T5 

20 



s 

11 

19 

27 

29 

33 


330 


5 

11 

57 

50 

58 



12 

26 

35 

1 

13 

14 

(*313) 

330 

i 

12 

21 

21 

27 

26 

360 

i 

5 

12 

51 

54 

54 

leVTI'"* 

600 

50 

80 

935 

1 

17 

21 

(’645) 


2 

40 

(SO 

10 

38 

50 

700 

Vr 

17 

30 

(SO 

70 

78 


750 

u 

8 

EJ 

110 

115 

mm 

Drawers 

600 

100 

120 

— 

ft 

4 

— 

rw») 

650 

50 

80 

— 

1 

12 

— 

700 

1W 

45 

— 

8 

30 

— 

GEC 

180 

10 

■ T9 

-28 

- 1 

■5 

■ 10 

(188) 

200 

1 

10 

17 

14 

19 

20 

220 

Vr 

6 

9 

34 

36 

38 


327 

51 

60 

_ 

ft 

6 

_ 

1-373) 

355 

23 

38 

— ft 

10 

— 

350 

— 

mmm 

53 

— 


17 


382 

ft 

25 

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11 

20 

— 

rci 

- 900 

107. 


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2 

8 

15 

H004) 

950 

37 

82 

107 

2 

21 

28 

1000 

B 

50 

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2 

44 

hi) 


1050 

2 

28 

53 

507 

5b 

77 

Land Sec 

300 

24 

36 

45 

1 

4 

S 

C325) 

330 


17 

25 

» 

15 

18 

380 

* 

6 

12 

39 

39 

41 


180 

20 

29 

35 

Vt 

4 

7 

1-200) 


ft 

15 

21 

\ 

' 10 

12 

220 

ft 

6 

11 

22 

24 

26 


700 

95 

108 

123 

1- 

6 

14 

cm 


45 

67 

90 

2 

12 

25 

BOO 

1- 

35 

60 

mu 

38 

-45 


260 

280 


m 

31 

21 

15 

11 

24 

il 

2S 

300 

% 

6 

_n 

Si 

36 

38 


wR 

S*P 

Dae 

Mar 

Sap 

Dac 

Mar 


360 

62 

7Z 

SO 

2 

6 

9 

C413) 


38 

50 

6/ 

9 

15 

20 

420 

23 

33 

-40. 

23 


33 


460 

8 

17 

21 

53 

El 

tsu 

Boots 


9S 

35 

42 

6 

9 

13 

f257) 


15 

23 

31 

15 

18 

22 


4 

18 

- 

24 

29 

— 

BTft 

307 

11 

25 

_ 

14 

21 

— 


330 


— 

23 

— 

— 

39 


4 

12 

— 

35 

39 

— 

BBSS 

750 

40 

70 

65 

20 

30 

40 

1*760) 

600 

20 

37 

55 

50 

50 

65 

850 

8 

23 

38 

BO 

90 

92 

BtaaCfedi 

600 

28 

50 

68 

15 

28 

33 

rW3) 

550 

10 

25 

45 

53 

57 

62 


TOO- 

6 

13 

- 

ULLfl 

100 

— 

DeSMts 

600 

55 

80 

105 

E3 

44 

62 

C610) 

650 

20 

53 

A) 

55 

68 

83 


700. 

J? 

37 

— 

90 

EliHl 

— 


750 

10 

26 

— 

135 

145 

— 


300 

36 

48 

56 

3 

9 

12 

(*330) 

330 

1&\ 

28 

SS 

12 

16 

22 


5 

.14 

22 

.32 

36 

40 

GKN 


42 

50 

M 

4 

' 6 


C2S2) 

330 

81. 

3S 

43 

13 

1b 

19 

380 

8 

M 

25 

30 

34 

37 


390 

3 

8 

15 

59 

60 

63 

Giftso - 

900 

120 

150 


20 

30 

_ 

(-973) 

B50 

80 

115 

150 

30 

50 

65 

ItfflO 

» 

95 

115 

55 

85 



1050 

35 

85 

95 

SO 


mm 

Hanson 

135 

41 



1 


_ 

rwi 

150 

X 

— 

m 

1 

mm 

-n- 

160 

17 

25 

30 

a 

S 

8 




Cals 



Put* 



Seriea 

«e»* 

Dac 

Mar 

S«P 

Dee 

Mar 

Hanson coot 

180 

7 

14 

19 

11 

14 

17 

200 

2 

6ft 

10 

30 

• 30 

32 


. 506 
550 


57 

35 

0 

. 15 
40 

23 

46 

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6 

18 

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8 2 

85 

90 

Thom EMI 

- 420 

37 

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(*447) 

: 460 

18 

30 

50 

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37 

42 

500 

5 

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330 

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7 

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390' 

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23 

28 

33 

35 


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Now 

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460 

28 

45 

63 

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23 

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500 

12 

25 

40 

38 

47 

50 

550 

a 

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23 

85- 

87 

90 

BATTnds 

- 360 

"48 

55 

67 

3 

5 

10 

1*396) 

390 

20 

32. 

43 

12 

15 

20 

420 

4 

14 

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2b 

32 

38 


460 

1 

a 

■ — 

83 

6b 

— 


460' 

62: 

77 

90 

4 

92 

13 

(*514) 

500 

30 

45 

62 

« 

25 

27 

550 

a 

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32 

50 

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67 


- 180 

-18 

22 

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5ft 

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15 

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200- 

■ ■' 4 

10 - 

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19 

22 

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- V 

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8 

38 

38 

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Catttxvy SctwppS; 160 

nssi .iso 

13 

S 

27 

9 

-27 
. 15 

3 

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* 

- 17 

11 
‘ 18 


. 200. 

' 2 

5^ 

B 

33 

34 

38 


300 

' 55 

65 


1 

? 

— 

(*353) 

330 

25 

4U 

— 

J3 

U 

— 

360 

12 

22 

— 

18 

22 

— 



46 

-52 

62 

■2 

-4 

7 

1*340) 

330 

21 

29 

4U 

/ 

10 

14 

360 

5 

12 

22 

21 

28 

28 

LASMO 

90 

17 

23 

25 

4 

8 

11 

(101) 


6 

14- 

1J 

9 

14 

IT 

11(F 

5 

12 

18 

16-- 19 

21 

P&O 


Cl 

53 

72 

3 

13 

18 

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Bn 

28 

47 

18 

‘JS 

38 

550 

3 

iff 

22 

63 

6b 

70 



. 1 

4 

— 

113 

113 



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26 

13 

14 

16 

(174) 

200 

2 

0 

13 

mi 

28 

30 

220 

ift 

4 

.9 

EJ 

48 

48 

flTZ 


SS 

-57 

77 

- 15 

-25 

27 

(*557) 

GOO 

r 

33 

44 

52 

55 

60 


3 

IS 

21- 

9/ 

100 

104 


TOO 

2 

10 

18 

147 

150 

164 


45 

50 

m 

a 

12ft 

9 

IS 

3ft 

3ft 

6 

4ft 

7ft 

60 

1 

3ft 

5 

T2 

13ft 

15 


Serin 

*SL 

New 

Mar 

*3L 

Now- 

Mar 


236 

10 

23 

— 

4 

8 

19 

(243) 

240 

■ — 

— 

28 

— 


19 

2S5 

3 

14 


16 

18 





— 

16ft 



33 


273 

1ft 

6 

— 

35 

36 

D 


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Fab 

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New 

Fait 

IriKL-aAi-'-'/M 

106 

2’» 

2S 

— 


1’w 

— i 

TE108) 


V 

IJ-ii. 

114 

1ft 

2‘«s 

2ft 


^16 

"a 

1ft 

a*** 

3 J .i 

_3*_ 

Stt tmzrm 

114 

“is 

5 

— 

7 16 

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— 

rciiBj 

116 

118 

2* 

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3ft 

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4 

1 

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2»-» 

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6m 



% 


2b 

b-'w 

5» 

7 


■ 124 

u 

1 



to 



Johr Aug 

Sept 

Oct 

Jut 

*3. 

sept 

Oct 


FT-SE 

index 







■ra 

wyM 

ri 






KjiB 



B*fl 

WX 







B2B 

i.AJ 

By, 





B LB 


I;1 

I'l 

B 7, 

IlaI 


mm 


B-l 


B-j m 

■ 1 m 

IF- 


1675 1 5 13 . 25 107 HO 112 117 

1700 1 --- 130 --- 

1750 1 - - - 182 - - - 


. My 23 Ills. Total emneai 23387, Celts 13716. Puts 9681 , 


•Undortying security price- 


IV10NEY MARKET 
AND GOLD 


Another quiet session left 
the periods anchored to 10 per 
cent rates across virtually the 
spread of dates from one to 12 
months. Money proved less 
cheap. .Local authorities, often 
heavy tenders of money, sel- 
dom needed recourse to the 
market as borrowers. Eurodol- 
lar deposits showed little 
change. 

Bur Ratal % 

Clearing Banks 10 
Finance Houso 10 

Discount Market Loans % 

Overnight High: 10J4 Low 9 
WeekfeitM-B* 

Treasury BMs (Discount %) 


Zrmtfi 9% 2mntfi 8% 

3mnth S u m 3mnth B*« 

PrfaiMt Bank BSa (Discount 9U 
1 mnJfi 2rnnth 

3irmtfi 9»w-9"«! 6mnth 
IMiUb (ZMscont it} 
ImnttiltFis 2mnmiO°tB 
3 moth 1 Q"m 6 mnth 10*w 

lntata«nk(%) 

Ovsnaghc open 9V dose if 
1 week9 l3 is-9 ,l i« Smnth 10-9 
J mnth 9°m-9% 9 mnth 13-9*, a 
3 mnth 10-9"' » 12mth 102*» M 


2 days 9H 
1 mnth 9% 
EnathSnw 
Local Authority 

1 mnth 1014-10 

3 ninth 10 X -10 

9 mnth 10%-ID 


7 days 
3 mnth 9 ,J is 
12iMh 9% 

PW 

2 mnth 10U-10 
6 mnth 10X-10 

12mth 10-9% 


1 mndTS^a-S^JB 3mn0r9°»2 JT je 
amnthS^frO^ja I2mm3 ,b ia2 l3 ie 

DokarCOsKl 

1 mmh 655-6-60 3 mnth 655-6.60 

6 mnth 655258 12 mdi 6.65230 


EURO MONEY DEPOSITS % 


Dollar 

7 days 6S-6% 

3 moth 6*ir6 7 »6 
DMdsctBaarit . 

7 day* 4H-4% 
3mnth4%-4% 
French Franc 
7 days 4H-4A 
3 mnth 7 s i*-7 i ie 
SMnFreoc 
7 days iovio^ 
3 mnth 4 ,s ie4 , *ia 
Yen 

7 days 5 
3 moth 4 u te4*'is 


cal 
1 mmh 
6mu(h 

CBtt 
1 mnth 
6 mnth 
caB 
1 mnth 
Smnth 
call 
1 mnth 
6 mnth 
cafl 
1 mnth 
Smnth 


7-6 

6%-6% 

5-4 

4%-4fc 

4 ,, i«-4®iq 

7Yrm 

4«-4Vfc 

7K-7K 

2-1 

4«w/«w 

*N“* 

4V-3« 

4“w/"ib 


GOLD 


GoktS3*75ft34aOO 

S35?!»S8 1 M(SoO-234JB) 
iarSljlSl.5S-^7S ) 

-Exdudes VAT 


ECGD 


Fixed Hate Starting Export Finance 
Scheme nr Average reference rate tor 
interest perked June 4. 1986 la 
July 1. 1986 inclusive: 9324 per 


visited several brokers follow- 
ing recent interim figures 
which were above market 
expectation Pretax profits 
for the six months to May .31 
almost doubled from £3.68 
million to £6.14 .million, 
helped by a return to (he black 
at the .foundry division. 

The shares recovered 8p to 
! 39p after recent profit-taking, 
but de Zoete & Bevan, the 
broker, reckons the shares are 
worth nearer 200p. De Zoete 
isconfidenfthat the group can 
achieve pretax profits of £13.5 
million for the year and is 
recommending the shares to 
its clients. It claims there is 
little downside potential in the 
price. 

Preliminary figures from 


Do not give up on Pearson, 
the Financial Times and 
Lazarif banking group, even if 
the price has fallen back since 
touching nearly £6 on takeover 
rumours. That is the advice 
from JKJeinwort Grieveson 
which believes the price is 
unlikely to fall much further 
than the present 513p and the 
strength of- the underlying 
businesses could see buying up 
to 550p. 


- 23'* +'j 
635 
24 +8 
£10**+'ia 

34-2 
‘ 140 
9 

238-1-5 

U 

.2 
165+37 
22 -3 


Dowty, the aerospace and 
mining equipment group, are 
unlikely to prove exciting with 
analysts predicting pretax 
profits of £43 million, com- 
pared with last year's figure of 
£44.2 million. Profits at the 
interim sage were about 10 
per cent lower, with the group 
blaming increased develop- 
ment costs and problems at its 
Dowty Meco subsidiary. The 
shares firmed lp to 206p. 

The Commercial Bank of 
Wales, the subject of an 
agreed takeover bid from the 
Bank of Scotland, held steady 
at 70p. The Bank of Scotland 
has bought an extra 60,000 
shares in the market at 69p a 
share, taking its total holding, 
to 1.77 million shares;- or 7.40 
percent of the issued capital. 

Selective US buying was 
good for a number of leading 
shares. Cadbury Schweppes 
advanced 6p to 168p after 1.8 
million shares changed hands 
overnight on Wall Street. 

There was also support for 
Reuters “B", the international 
news agency and financial 
services group, 3p higher at 
483p, where the Americans 
had picked up 8 1 5,000 shares. 
Others to make the most of 
support. from New York in- 
cluded BATladustries, lOp to 
398p, Glaxn, 20p up at 975p 
and Jaguar • 17p stronger at 
523p. 


COMMENT Kenneth Fleet 


Will Sir Gordon ever 
order the next round? 


The major brewers, whether rightly 
is yet to be seen, seem fairly confident 
they have frightened Sir Gordon 
Borne out of his intention to refer to 
the Monopolies and Mergers 
Commission their practices in supply- 
ing beer. The brewers’ tied estate is 
much too valuable an asset not to be 
defended with every legitimate means 
at their disposal. But if the Director 
General of Fair Trading has been 
shown the tradesman's gate, it should 
be worth someone’s while to unearth 
.the_i^sons why. 

The brewers' own case would not be 
a" sufficient cause. Their central 
argument is entirely emotional; 
namely that the industry has been 
crawled over four times since 1969 
when the MMC last investigated it. 
The Erroll Committee in 1972, the 
Price Commission in 1977 and the 
European Commission in 1983 were 
the others. They have supported that 
tired argument with an aggressive 
threat to ‘Ye-examine" the three-year 
pub refurbishment programme 
should they find themselves referred. 

Yet one wonders why the brewers 
are so anxious about appearing before 
the MMC? They were hardly touched 
by the 1969 findings in that they 
succeeded throughout the 1970s and 
1980s in raising the real price of beer 
by 1 per cent a year. Perhaps their 
anxiety now is explained by the fact 
that the industry is also threatened 
with big shifts in ownership: the 
brewers would be less than human if 
they did not want the Pelion of greater 
competition piled on the Ossa of John 
Elliott. 

If they are referred, the brewers 
would have a near impossible task in 
defending the tie and the monopolis- 
tic power it confers on them to raise 
real prices by more than they could in 
a more competitive environment 
Two favourite arguments in particular 
would not carry much weight Rising 
retail costs, often trotted out as the 
reason for putting up beer prices, are a 
circular argument running costs of 
the tied estates 'represent only 30 per 
cent of total retailing costs, the 
remainder.- being _the_ actual cost of 
goods they selL Falling safes of 
draught beer do point to higher unit 
costs but the brewers cannot have it 
both ways. Lager sales have risen 40 
per cent in the last decade but prices 
have risen on the same scale as for 
draught beer. 

The European Commission inquiry 
did provoke the brewers into loosen- 
ing the tie for wines and spirits and as 
a result brands not owned by the 
major brewers are more readily 
available in tenanted houses than they 
are in managed pubs. Yet it is still the 
case that independent brand leaders — 
Famous Grouse Scotch and Gordon’s 


gin for example — are conspicuous by 
their absence in many managed 
houses. 

There are of course answers, some 
that might receive a sympathetic rj 
hearing, to the accusation that the * 
major brewers throw their monopolist 
tic weight about to the benefit of their?, 
profits and the disadvantage of theirs 
customers and smaller and indepen - 
dent suppliers of drinks outside the - 
charmed circle. But the evidence of . 
high prices and. an almost tottil-i* 
absence of exports alone suggest that" 
the independents should be given . 
more opportunity. Alas political wa-.V 
ters run deep in this essentially > 
conservative industry and perhaps it- 
is true that Sir Gordon's courage has 
failed him. We should know soon. ' 

Standard response 

Standard Chartered Bank is be-, 
lieved to be offering places on the- 
board to the three far eastern investors, 
who ensured the failure of the Lloyds 
Bank bid two weeks ago, following a. 
board meeting on Monday. Their' 
response should help to throw some - 
light on the, so far, shadowy in- 
tentions of these investors. # V 

The interest hinges on a technical- 
ity. If Sir YK. Pao. Tan Sri Khoo Teck. 
Puat and Robert Holmes a Court, the., 
three men who mounted the last 
minute rescue from Lloyds, accept a 
Standard directorship or put one of 
their employees on the board, they- 
will be hindered from buying more 
shares. They could not do so without 
calling a full meeting of shareholders^ 

Acceptance would imply that their 
plans for adding value to Standard's; 
shares — on which they all hold large 
paper losses following the bid's failure 
— are likely to centre on an internal 
reorganization of the banking groups 
If they refuse directorships, their 
position as pure arbitrageurs looking 
for a generous buyer for all or parts of 
the bank is unhampered. 

Certainly, last week’s statement by 
Mr Holmes a Court that he may be in* 
terested in acquiring more Standard 
shares suggests that he prefers the 
latter option. It is still not clear, 
however, to whatextentthe three men 
coincide in their attitudes to Stan- 
dard, so their choices may be 
different. 

In the meantime. Standard an- 
nounced as expected yesterday the 
resignation of Mr Stuart Tarrant, its 
able finance director. The bank denied 
that he had departed because he had 
given support to the Lloyds bid, 
insisting instead that he was simply in 
search of new challenges. It is, 
nevertheless, curious to choose to do 
so at a moment when Standard 
Chartered itself clearly faces demand- 
ing new challenges. 


e It may be over-valued 
stock to you, Hamlyn. 
But it’s a pair of 
trousers to me” 



To our founders, as to ourselves, Audits 
were and are occasions to set aside fellow- 
feelings; to cast a cold eye on a client’s afiairs. 
But it’s amazing what you get out of them. 
A recent audit we did for a 
major chain of menswear retailers 
showed that much stock had been 
over-valued. 

A subsequent chat with the 
Revenue (involving acceptable bases 
for tax) led to our clients saving a 
natty £200,000. 

Our audits can also lead to large corporate 
changes. Asin Birmingham, where an 
engineering client found he could control costs 
better by closing his toolroom and buying 
tooling out. 

Down the road in Wolverhampton, we 
helped a steel stockholder to produce* 
gross profit margins a good deal 
grosser than hitherto. 

And, incidentally, we got him to 
h. / j* ;4*\save £1 ,000 a year by installing a 
ter meter. Thus demonstrating 
once again that at Binder Hamlyn 
we see the wood arc/ the trees. 

So it’s really not at all amazing 
that our cold, clinical audits often 
turn into warm, meaningful 
relationships. 

Does the thought arouse you? Send us 
the coupon now, before you go off the boiL 


To: Tom Burton, Binder Hamlyn, 8 Si Bride Street, 
London,EC4AfflA.Telephone01-3533020.- 
1 fed I should know more about you befo re gening involved. 
Please send me some vital statistics. 


1 

I 


Address 


Postcode 




BmderHamlyn | 




CHARTERED ACCOUNTANTS 


London/ Ayr/Bacup/Batii/Belfeit/Birmingham/Bory St Edmunds/Croydon/DubliTi/Enniskillen/Glasgow/Letds/Manchestcr/Newcastle 
Newm arbei/Nortingham/Rodidale/Sal icoats/SheiBel d/S i ran raer/Te Iford/Wolver Hampton. 

BBS) Internationally Binder Dijker Due & Co. 



















28 


BUSINESS AND FINANCE 



THE TIMES UNIT TRUST INFORMATION SERVICE 


WMMy 

Bd ou# Oige Yield 


«Kr unit trust managers 

SO. Hcteanhural Rd BoumsraOu* BH8 SAL 
03*5 717373 (LMMne) 


©*t S Fond 
nan ta Eaun 

TOO 

American Grow* 

A#an Potto 
Asaen ft finn* 
C*0**i Raw** 
Comm ft Ewgy 
European Capa 


iMHfi 

UK-Grow* « 

Oo Moan 
US anernmg Col 
Ewtas m$e& 

MonenatAcc 


1165 T232# 
9*0 1000# 
190.6 30c 0c 
1*93 1518 
*60 *9* 

tots toss 
ss* ssa 
663 709 
87 6 931 
132.* 1*1 5* 
80.9 861 
881 1023 
137 J i*az 
85 0 588 
1912 2036 
63.7 «&7# 


*08 9.74 
♦Ol *96 
-01 *75 
*13 1*1 
*03 33* 
+0J 197 
153 

-08 1 16 
-07 US 
*05 300 
*06 

-03 176 
*03 1-23 
*03 082 
*03 333 
*0.1 219 


UUDOUMM UWTTOUSIS 
MHO Ounter Crane Swteon SNI 1EL 
0733 610366 ft 0793 28291 

Rrsl Tnd 221 5 2309 

Grower ft Income 1333 1*1 9 

C«Md Trust 2288 2*17 


A ccra Rura 

Aina can Income 
i Income Tit 


Hon * 
EOrty 


3503 3731* 
5388 5736 
325 348c 
3*12 286* 
1370 WM 
1*24 151.7 
29 9 31.1 
610 903* 
11*0 121.* 
1665 179 5a 
SSO 692 
2130 226.8 
23*8 2394 
375 390 
1177 125.4# 
1SSI 1852 

62 1 67.4 

765 815 
1795 191-2# 
855 91.1 
1254 T325# 


Amer Spci Sas 
Sacs Of Am« Tsr 
am Asset Vakie 

£5*1 Growtn 
Snuaec Cos 
2nd Smator CDS 
Recovery Trust 
Met Mm ft Oraay 
Oseos Erawigs 
TecmcXocy Ta 
Mcome Ewmpt _ . 

Erttal Smaller COS 232.1 2*60 
USA - EUCOH Trust 3*00 360 4 
AttaiiTHHcrrsBCURinES 

i3i. Finstxxv pmwmm. Unto ECZA iay 
01-628 9076 01-260 85*011/2/3 
COM3I Growth me 663 ^9 
Do Acara 656 703 

Easto" ft fnfl ’Si 

Da fl“. WtWawJ 1 728 778 
Faunae ft Prop#re 635 682 
Gar ft Fned Income 484 M9e 
Do Accum »| S'* 

Eauity Income 76f 823e 

Oo Aceum 


*05 358 
*06 119 
*08 25 9 
*1 8 126 
*12 300 
*02 *25 
*06 458 
*0* 457 
*02 540 
*05 926 
-07 09* 
*16 002 
*l* 100 
-13 1.42 
-06 092 
*02 125 
*01 250 
2 74 
-02 2.43 
-01 214 
*04 2.42 
*06 110 
*05 096 
*04 (II 
-03 283 
-15 1.1* 


Da Accum 


17*7 192.1 C 
705 835 

2056 2201 
718 76 7# 

Da Accum 73 6 76.7# 

Oo 9". tunas* 667 713# 

Htonaaad Fund 585 62.1 

finwc* income JMJ 

Do tcom 865 1032# 

Gnutor Co’S Acaxn ’358 1*52 
World P am* STUM 35 JO*# 
PryttrWO TV UK 76 0 78.7# 

Pontoto Tsl Japan 'Sit 1 ®?; 
popfcto TR US K}2 71 7# 
Porrtpao TB Eunice 1036 1070# 
PoWtPo Tv HK 310 404# 

-BAflJJECnmKD 
3 OunMas Sl 
031-225 2561 - 
HA Ex 122) 
jaora Be 1*3 
UK Ex (31) 

P*U Pens M 
PM Pens UK 
8G Amene* 

SG Energy _ 

0G Income Grwth 
BG Jn*n 
BO Technology 


*04 061 
*02 081 
-01 220 
♦03 7.71 
*04 7.71 
-02 *50 
-05 450 
-03 712 
-09 7.12 
-01 235 
-01 235 
-C! ZJS 
-Ol .. 

.. 9.74 
-01 17* 
-13 163 
-01 072 
-02 1.63 

ooo 
*05 108 
-Ol 000 
*03 010 


. EH3 6YY 
1228 6066) 
*291 4478# 
4025 4M.3 
2316 2603 
4400 471.6 
1990 2095 
1693 1002c 
13*7 1434 
1928 2003# 
2005 2135 
147.7 1ST 2# 


1 13 
022 
147 


*05 025 
*05 143 
*03 523 
♦09 ODD 

*05 056 

BALTIC TRUST MANAGER S 

25/26 Atamans Street. London WtX 4AD 
01-401 0295 

491 S26 *05 075 

172 184 -02 306 

1124 1203 *137 0.17 

452 485c .. 722 

730 78.1# -04 159 

462 495c *06 4.15 
204 215# .. ion 

341 365 *Q1 205 

385 413 *01 158 


Airenean 

Australian 

Japan ft Genera 


huemafconal TruB 
mcomc GJh Tst 
G*b ft Freed m 
OtO.li Markets 


BARCLAYS UMCOW 

Uncom House. 252. Rtolfero Rd E7 

01-534 5644 


America 
A«n Acaxn 
Do income 
CjMBl 

Eitmgl Trust 
Extra Income 
Fnancto 
500 
General 

G-« I Fixed tnc 
Japan ft Gen me 
Oo ACC 

Growth Accum 
neama Trust 
Leeure Tnsi 

I SfUawra 


Trustee 

Umv Tech Accum 
Do income 

wonmwne Trial . 

B - Tst hw Fimd Acc 3182 3305 
Do me 2062 2130 


84 4 89 7 
1185 1264# 
64.4 897# 
603 726c 
*101 4*47 
75 0 717 
2268 2434 
263 7 2805 
1353 1439 
546 $74 
1651 175 6 
167.0 1776 
1753 1064 
3227 3*32# 
793 843 
1366 1476 
1905 2029 
10*7 1113# 
50.0 SI# 
415 526# 
14*0 1510# 


*11 149 
-19 170 
-1.4 1.70 
*01 303 
*02 *03 
+0.1 532 
+00 317 
.. 310 
+0.0 122 
*02 95*- 
*06 0.15 
*06 0.1S 
*0* 236 
+00 3S 
-Ol 133 
*05 227 
+13 237 
*05 293 
*03 021 
*03 021 
+0.7 106 
+1.1 335 
+07 135 


BARMGRJND MANAGERS 
PO Box 156. Backannam. Kant BR3 4X0 
01-056 9002 
Ausnt# 

Easton 
Ecmty income 
■wap# 

Grown 6 tnc 


Jaoen Swue 
Fra Europe 
Fm Japan - 
FfSt N-Areer 
Fra Smaner Cos 


8A K 1 U N Q TPH MANAG EM E NT 

ID. FencTucti SL London ECS 
01-623 6000 


959 

59.7 

-00 030 
*0 1 030 

55* 

580 

558 

600 

*ai 500 

112.8 

118.7 

-13 090 
+03 230 

619 

661 

102 0 

1099 

*0.7 030 

921 

964 

+10 030 

1008 1070 

.10 000 

87.9 

940 

+0.7 030 

492 

52.6# 

+03 130 

633 

■BO 

-00 270 


Planned Mv 
Eurooean Inc 
Do Accum 


Do Accum 
Gil Y«M Inc 
Oo a cam 
i Tend Me 
i Accum 


"R 

■“fc/ 


1269 13*7 
8*8 889# 
10*5 1094# 
1515 1819# 
207.9 220 7 
113 9 1175 
1826 1503 
85 2 907# 
109 6 180 5 
2*8 J 2615 
250 1 2S3 * 
*93 52.4# 
572 607 
1317 1363 
1482 1556 
79 4 845 
840 1U I 


19* 
-0.1 13* 
.. 13* 
-05 118 

S l 118 
7 937 
+1.1 937 
-02 507 
-05 507 
-05 D8G 
-05 008 
*07 006 
+00 086 
-04 021 
-05 021 
. 15* 
IS* 


Accum 

N Amman Inc 
Do Accum 
PuoAc income 
Do Accum 
So* Cos Inc 
Du Accum 
BRITANNIA IMT TRUST 
74-78 Fmatwy Paeemen t London EC2A UD 
01588 2777 DeMngOI-638 047B/9 
0600010-333 

Grown G41 593 602c 

W Recovery iO*0 111.S 

Smart Cos i *22 151 7 

UK Grown 37 1 396 

Ematnc 5*6 502# 

2".- 259 373# 

Me ft Grown 194 6 2076 


. 0*1 
♦1.1 285 
-09 129 
+01 220 
-Ol 7.70 
*01 780 


weaUy 
Be oner Cnge VWd 


tut HMI Me 
Ftot Snares 


GafelS Gen 
hi Leisure 
Prop Stww 

Urn Energy 
vwjnd Taoi 
AmarGrmrei 
Amer Income 
Am«r SfluAar Co s 
mas Grown 
Euro&rav 
Far feet 

Hong Kong Pit 
md GrO^i 
japan Perl 
Japan &na«er 
Exempt 

Exempt ****** 


1910 2059 
164 116 
1104 >178 
460 480# 
145 156# 
17.1 162 

693 739 
*05 432# 
396 «5C 
910 979 
570 81 3 
222 Z57# 
579 81.8 
14 7 157 
487 510 
238 254# 
356 00 
743 793 

169 I8Q 
81.7 655 

64 7 67 7 


BROWN EMKEV 

9-17. Pwremoxit Rd. Haywards Hat 
04*4 458144 

FMUl 1Z34 1310 

SklWto Coe ACC 2299 2*7.2 

DO MBSM l*7.a 159 1 

Hen Meome 66 0 709 

Income 748 20.4 

MW Portree Me 802 6* Jc 

Do ACC 1005 1080c 

Norm Amenean 590 6*3# 

Orem 852 916 


+07 4.73 

-0110 14 

+08 29* 
*04 216 
+02 290 
*0.1 050 
-01 099 
. . 171 
+03 088 
+10 343 
+02 532 
+04 037 
-07 109 
-02 022 
+12 006 
*02 261 
*02 155 
• 18 

*0.1 309 

*.14 


40 1 096 
+02 570 

♦Ol 4.90 

115 

+05 130 
*03 023 


BUCXMASTER HANACBUSir 

Die Stock Exchange 
01-588 2868 
General Mo t+1 
Do Accum W 
Mamre Fix’d 13) 

Do Accum 19 
Wt me et __ 

Do Accum f2) 

SmVto he (SI 
Do Accum IS) 


London EC2P 2JT 


2105 
3366 
1018 
1783 
1253 
1667 
Ell 37 
£ 12.11 


2212* 300 

3516# ■ 100 

107.1 -2’ 4.62 

1878 -37 4.62 

131 1 137 

1714 1-5 

12-03# 292 

1208# 202 


CS FUND MANAGERS 
125 Mgn Hanom. London 
01-2*2 1 148 

CS Japan Fund 852 


WCIV6PY 
906 *O0 02* 


CANNON RIND MANAGERS 
LOfl'mgc Way- WBmMoy. HAS ONB 

Grown 272 7 290.1# -15 206 

meome 317 5 3370# -00*08 

Far East 1992 2119 *0 6 032 

Norm Amenean ’.503 1599 +2* 057 

CBMMK 474 sue *01 150 

European 49 0 511 -03 1.00 

Japan 573 610 -02 000 

CAPS. (JAMES) ItMUGEMfr - 
PO 8o» SSI Bens Harks London EC3 7 JO 
01-621 0011 

Cara 3513 3770 

Income 203 1 3020 

Nom American 2040 30*0 


-15 193 
+05 401 
007 


CATS) ALLEN 

1 . Kng IWun Sl. EC4N 7AU 
01-S23 6314 
C(>i Trust 


1036 1108 *02 U10O 


CENTRAL BOARD OP FMANCE OP 
CHURCH OF ENGLAND 
S. Fore Sheet London EC2V 5AQ 
01-580 IBIS 

Mr And 41335 

Fixed hit i«70 e 

Depart 1000 


430 

973 

800 


CMARniES OFFICIAL tNVESIMEMT HMD 
2. Fare Seen. London EC2Y 5AQ 
01-608 1015 

Meome 38089 ■ . *83 

Acoxn £100441 

Depose 1000 955 


CLERI CAL M BMCALUWT TRUST 
MANAGERS 

Narro w Run . BnsacJ BS2 GJH 
0800 373383 

Mr# Growth 227 2*2 

Eauty hoome *>.B 44 5 
Eixtxrai Grown 254 27 1 

General Entity 378 4Q3c 

G# ft Fared M GBi 297 313c 

GAABxadMc 2*6 2S0# 

Index SectMisao 252 260 

Japan Growth 325 340# 


*03 190 
. 430 
-02 200 
♦02 270 
+02 320 
+0.1 950 
230 
*07 090 


COUNTY UT MANAGERS LTD 
161. cnaatrode. London EC2V 6SJ 
01-726 19 S 


Enemy Trust 
Extra Meome 


on Snregy 
Gaxvi UMSBnent 
Inara ft Grower 
Japanese ft PaoAc 
Mh Amer Growth 

hfl n ee wy 
Smaler Cos 
Gk»aJ he Tb 
^ noxi Sts Ace 


439 417 
1588 1699c 
165-3 1756# 

560 577 
2890 2666# 

395 420c 
1743 IBS* 
1005 1060 
1073 1141# 
2096 2229 

561 59.6# 
2706 287* 


-Ol 383 
+05 5*4 
400 101 
1.73 
+1.1 173 
+02 461 
+13 00* 
+10 007 
+03 1 28 
-04 157 
+02 561 
+02 1.09 


CROWN <MT TRI/srfEftWCeS 
crown House. Wrtmg GU21 1*W 
0*6625033 

Hen Mcome Tnej 2374 2539 
Grown Trust 2172 2323c 
Amenean Trust 127.1 1350# 

CRUSADER IMT TRUST MANAGERS 
o. stxryy RH2 88L 
42*2* 

*66 510 


Rergree. I 
0737242 


UK .. 

UK Grown Acctxti 46.4 5L5 

Do Del 48 4 510 

European Grown 49 7 520 

Pacta Grown 520 550 


EFM UWT TRUST 
4. MeMMCroscanL 
031-228 3*92 
Amman Fund 
Capa Fund ■ 
Grown ft Inc n#d 
tvy> D« Fund 
MnmjBona Find 
Fine 


+11 SIS 
+10 3.10 
+23 074 


*02 4*7 
+03 2*3 
+03 2A3 
-00 103 
+0.1 .. 


Ernitfi 

710 760 
9<4 1010 
1290 1380c 
1073 1148. 
1090.2020# 
102 IB* 
36.4 *r0 
109.7 1915c 
1455 1502 
1120 11 S 0 : 
2790 2811 
2195 2200 
247 204# 


SrrXIr Jap Gob Fnd 
Tokyo Fond 
TEx) Amer (21 
(Ex) Japan (3) , 
(Ex) Pause (*) 

I Ex) Smart# Jap (*) 
EiHtod 


EAGLE STAR IJMT TRUST 
Bath Road. CtMtonh am . OoutsiM 
<0*2 521371 

UK Balanced he 673 710# 
DO Accum 60* 730# 

UK Grown Accum 61 S 869 
UK Hflh he tnc 535 80.1 
N American Acctxn 642 680# 
Far Eastern Accum «r« 101 8# 
European Aaaxn 715 763c 
UK GW ft H he S30 57.4# 
Do Accum SS0 592# 


+03 221 
.. 10f 

+4L4 1.11 

* 1 “ 

+21 aw 

.. 105 
+19 619 

O AS 
. 0.10 
-0.1 379 


003 710 

*02 245 
+02 241 
+01 191 
-0.7 528 
-01 00* 
♦1.1 015 
-1.1 008 
+02 128 
+03 803 


ENDURANCE RMD MANAGEMENT LTD 

Adntn Cenex. Hexagon Hons*. 28. Wbsmto 

Road, ftondord RM1 3LB 

070B-6CS6B 

Endwance 1069 11*4 *03 111 

scuwAiui M w j ummnu mm 

35. Faumam SL Manchasnr 
061-235 9885 

73 1 778 +13 328 


BTO 


Weekly 
on# Sign 


tWl Meome Trust 75 7 860 *05 508 

0* ft FteM w 52 4 958# *01050 

Tat 01 M» Trusts 802 6*1 -0.4 202 

SpacM Srt Trust 756 805 +0* 237 

Nn Amer This 59 * 632 *05 1.70 

Far Easton Tnto 823 87.6# *05 057 

MGrowm *15 517 *00 109 


EQUITY ft LAN 
a Getrgc Hse 


COrporam St. Gonwey Cvr 


190 
0Z63S5323I 

IK Grrawh Accum 144 B 15*0 *09 356 

Dp Meome 1 »B 1K7 *06 358 

t*K*r Inc ACMen 2*22 2570 +12 48* 

Do Mexxne (95 I 2075 +11 +64 

OBS/FiuxJ Accum 101 0 1013 *04 267 

Do meome 885 910 *0* 287 

Mh Am# Tel Accum 13* 0 1425 *63 030 

Ar Eaa Tst Accum 1503 1598 +1 * 6 S3 

Eun> Ta Mom 1442 1533 -05 124 

General Trust 231 5 2*60 +10 285 

FftCOMrMANAflrMFWT 

1 . larex* Romney HA UMHi EC*R DBA 

01-623 4880 

US am## Go's 732 703 *00 027 

Caoxal Fix’d 10*2 1115 *04 043 

Income F(ta 791 8*7 *03 4 84 

Far Eastern Find 76 8 822 *02 03? 

Overseas HWctm 670 720 *00 380 

Fixed rarest S70 61.6 . . 900 

Natural Res Find 35 1 370 *03 4.70 

Bioceen Imau e 719 763 *0* 333 

FS HWESTlgKT MANAGERS 

190. Wna George SL Oasgo# 02 3tA 

0*1-332 3132 

Balanced Gm he 439 46.7 

Do Actum *4.8 474 

Meome GOt Me <02 428 

Do AcCUTO 422 440 

Sennee Co's Me *7 8 500 

Do Acorn 403 51* 

HOEUIYP H UM A TIONAL 
Rnror wba. Tontmdge. TWO idy 
6732 382222 

Am # can 1066 1076 

Amer EpcMy Moome «-1 3*4e 

Am# Speoal S*s ^3 520 

Fsr East he 318 310 

GR ft Fuad Hit 369 322# 

Growth ft meome 315 1022 

Jwan Specs* Sts *52 41* 

Japan Trap 1310 1*1 1# 

Mwaaafl fnt Tsl 135 1 1*48 

Slak Meome E wa* 802 663 

Prote3S«ra Get 330 »2 

South East Asa TB 28.1 20 9 

SpeoM Srts 1516 >71 7 

m KutMn i H OBgtT) 

So. London EC3A BAN 


100 

500 

100 


+17 060 
*62 459 
+09 159 
-02 303 
*01 098 
-03 404 
-02 .. 
-02 . . 
*0T 001 
-04 4.79 
-02 241 
*61 0*4 
-02 059 


& Crot 
01-838 

Amancan Exempt £3520 3898 
Japan Exemw £409 6 *230 
Am Prepeny tb • - 510781 0 > 
Propeny Yrua £20320 


177 

091 

500 

500 


FRAN LMGTQN UNIT MANAGS4ENT 

1 London VW# Bklgs. London w* London 
E Cat 5NO 


01-630 5181 
Am# 8 Gen Me 
Do A coxa 
Am# Tunamd Me 
Do Acam 
Caoeal Tv Inc 
Do Accum 
Con* ft G* He 
Do Aaaxn 

Extra he Tv Inc 
Oo Accum 
Meome Trust 
Do Accum 
Mt Grow® Fd Me 
Do Accum 
Japan ft Gen Me 
Do Acaxn 
Manny mcama Fd 
Recovery 
Do Acoum 
Eunvoan me 

Do Acaxn 
FRIENDS PROVDENT MANAGERS 
PWhari End. DoMng. S#rey 
0306 885055 

FP Equty DM 1910 20*9 

Do Accum 3210 3413 

FP Fried felt DM 1134 120 G 

Do Acaxn 129.1 1373 

1077 1760 
1712 1830 


2320 2468 
2370 2520 
2070 2202# 
2140 2284# 
20B4 2216 
2568 2666 
872 920# 
1160 1232# 
1500 1680# 
1720 1020# 
117.4 18*0 
1234 1310 
1610 1740 
1616 1334 
880 930 
69 0 940 
019 87.0# 
1340 1426# 
1460 1532# 
566 602 
580 802 


+13 053 
+1.4 653 
*00 1.15 
+1.0 1 IS 
+10 101 
+14 191 
+02 507 
♦62 527 
♦04 409 
+0.4 409 
♦00 407 
.. 407 
+03 .. 
+03 ... 

+ 1.1 ode 1 
+12 008 
+62 407. 
*04 170 
+04 1.70 
*61 089 
+61 609 


+10 288 
+26 206 
+65 59G 
+66 506 

. , +00 126 

Do Acaxn 1732 1830 +19 1.78 

FUNDS M COURT 

Put* Trusree KJngsusy WC2 

Ol-eOS 4300 

Caocsi 351 8 3824 . . 260 

Groa he 1*80 1524# . . 701 

HgnYtod 2100 2212 .. 505 

GT UNIT MANAGERS 

8» Floor. 6 Devonshire So. Lcnfcsi ECZS4 4YJ 
01-283 2575 Deokng 01-820 9*31 


UK Cap Fad Me 
Oo Acaxn 
Income Fix’d 

Pension Brempt 


us ft General 
Tach ft Growpi 
Japan ft Genet# 
Far East ft Gen 
European Fund 
Germany Fund 


8*6 1010 c 

1340 1442 
780 8*4 
1864 1742c 
1639 1752 
-500 620 
63 7 680 
2*4.7 251.8 
107 8 1153 
2285 2*44 
582 *37 


.. 230 
.. 220 
*06 6.10 
+69 190 
*04 000 
■+0J 090 
1.10 
+35 020 
+L0 0*0 
-12 8.40 
-05 1.10 


OARTBtORC FUND MANAGERS 
Z a Miry Axe. London EC3A BSP 
01^3 1212 D eMng 01-523 5780 Dato n g 01-623 

American Trust 894 86.7 +00 000 

Aiansai Trust 171 182 -02 635 

ftttari Tv Accum 54.6 590c +02 227 

DOOM 479 -51.7 c +60 227 

CommooAy Share 566 50 +63 106 

Europe#! Trent 46 1 *93 -66 028 

Extra income Trust *&* *07 +62 339 

Far Eastern Trust 1337 1410 +10 600 

fired Inwest Fund 261 200# -0.19 70 
3# DiM . 280 27.0# - . . • 009 

Oct# Fund ACaxn 167.7 1715 -61 621 

Do DM 1368 -mi -Ol 021 

Gou Share Tnat. .'169 .-11 5 +01 2*0 

Hedged Anwenc 298. 31 7 +64 610- 

H^hHame.TMl 141.8 T5i2c +05 507 
Hong Kong TiUBf 286 204 +64 106 

hem Fund . 7*7 800c . - 30* 

reran Agencies *5.88 4348# -001 T9r 
Japan Trust 1407 TS62P +10 000 

Managed Exempt 2690 2803 *r+10 27T 

O* S Enerojr Trust 300 330 ■ 150 

Spurt Sts Trust S2.B 990 +20 679 

UKSmtrCsRecTv 700.710 +64 144 

GOVETT (JOHN) UWT MANAGEMENT " ' 
WMOiMto Hse. 77. London Wrt. London EC2N 
104 

01-588 5820 

hd Growth 788 040# .. 104 

Amenean Crown 630 683# *62 688 

American Inc 657 71.7 *04 4 93 

European Grow# 201.0 2140 -02 628 

Goto ft KtaareM as 381# *0.1 223 
Jrosn Grow# 1690 i860* *03 . . 

ONE IMT MANAGERS 
Howl Exchange EC3P 30M 
01-688 9903 
GA ft Fixed M 

Grown Eowty 
GuaroM 


Smaner Companies 
Europe#i Dusr 


1209 125.7 
2001 2129 
2B09 2901 
1355 M40 
2305 3*53 
2850 0830# 
2063 221.7 
225.1 2395# 


+01 882 
*00008 
. • 295 
+10 150 
+ 11 013 
..140 
+02 1.70 
-26 1 19 


B4 


weeKy 

Oh# Oiga VMd 


auraas mahon uwrmosr 
meuftgB 

PO Bon 442 32 St Mary-tt-Hd London EC3P 
3AJ 

01423 9333 


regn m 
N Am# 


Dna 

B ro xery 
i» Tni# 

& Vxrocnr me 
a vxicm US Gm 


SIS 553# 
1039 1100 
M62 2194 
39 8 410c 
045 070 
78 4 81.7 


Ten«#8*SmGo* iT&« 1050# 
TemfXe Bar USM 363 7 3917 


-01 657 
•25 087 
-10 232 
+60 BBS 
+47 S.44 
+02 0 73 
314 
273 


HAMBROS BANK IMT TRUST MANA0EII& 
Promt (JT Apron 5 D*| to fl B Ra Brentwood 
Esse x 

0277 217918 

HamPros Sn* Ctfs 1296 >381# +00 188 
Hades N Am# 68 7 731 *05 090 

Hanpro* J40 ft F E T26J 1312 *DB 0*6 

Hanrores Scandwi 798 830c *67 092 

H j mdros Eixopeen 886 9*3 -13 098 

ttoioros Canaaan 474 so* -00 1 S9 

Herons Ggwv Me 842 B&£ -014 77 

i wiio os H#n me 595 633 -01 553 

MMros Res Asm 570 666c 252 

HanrCxros Inrl Sts *83 SI * *00 097 

HENDERSON AOMMSTRAMM 

Prenxar UT Admm olraf on 5. RaylnghJtd. HuPOn 

Brentwood Essex 


0277-017238 


Becevary Trust 
CaDa# Grown - 1 


1317 1409 
1855 1885 
97 1 1033 
519 57 7 
619 880 
1083 1164 
1*26 1533 


Du Aeon 

Kara Assets 

Fmano# Turn 

Income ft Grown Inc 1402 1568 
Do Acaxn 
Hqh 1 name Trust 
Extra ham 
Snuft# Cos Dn 
P*# ft G» 

C4I Trim 

Freed Mere# Trust 
Octal Heatocree 
Oct# Teen 
Gdd 

hsanadco# 

GUO# Resources 
WodC-xte 15) 

Aisaraban 
Eixopeen 
Euro Sma*er CoS 
Japan Trial 


0740 2949 
1750 187 5c 
1610 1725# 

1055 1140c 
473 504# 

4*5 470e 
538 58JM 
705 754 
107 5 1 150# 

373 389 
1587 1888 
64 1 67 9c 
362_7 3818 
55.1 587 
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889 934 
459 7 1 71 7c 
1715 18L* 

709 759 

28 7 286# 

1397 140 6# +20 623 
512 SSS +10 001 


PaaftejSSShMSi 

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North Amonutn 

Amer SmaSer Cos 

A mar P naxieiY Tv 1045 111 8 
HMi Mcoma Exempt 1209 1273# 
SmB# Cos Exempt 1181 1212 
Euro Exempt HI > 1169 
Japan Exempt (5) 1538 1619 

N Are# 869 91 1 

GUO# Tech Ex (51 93* 963 

(5) ’ 1*55 1930 


*62 0*8 
-04 048 
+63 303 
*01 15* 
+0.1 1 5* 
+69 357 
+19 237 
+13 365 
+02 365 
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-0.1 218 
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+18 083 
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+62 215 
-11 118 
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+60 198 
*60 QOI 
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MU. SAMUEL UWT TRUST MANAGERS 
NLA Tow#. Aoascornoe Road. Croydon 
01-686 *355 01-608 8011 
Bntoh Trust urns 519 0 5502 


Capra Trust urns 
□□Bar Trust Una 
Eixoptar Trust 
Far East Trust 
Rnanc# Treat 
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Do Growth 
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+17 308 
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+62 036 
-62 275 
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01-222 1000 

SDBntftCrsoas 1261 1383 .. 170 

LB* he Rus 540 S83 ..990 

IBS Capra Grown 5*9 585 . . 200 

investment TV Fnd 653 695 .. 140 


Joan Tech Tv 


Seaxny Trust 
SmaSer Cos 
Spec# Sttt 


986 1O20C 
1647 1965 
1203 1220# 
1151 1225# 
3620 3850 
29 1 30.3c 
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637 678 
803 855 
1*70 124.7# 
33.1 353# 

T6& 304 
1710 104.1 
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924 880 


20. F#tauroh Sl London EC3 
01-623 8000 


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640 

680# 

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814 

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196 

210 

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280 

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122.6 

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107.7 

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100 7 

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1630 

1735 

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280 

460 

207 

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177 7 wao 

3164 43 03 
489 521 
539. 57 6. - 
1524 1820 
2750 294.1 
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58 9 529 
2634 291 7 

5185 55*5 
1724 1B43 
180 1 1828 
82 7 884 
830 887 
100.7 1090# 
1109 1165# 
1275 1363 
1331 1423 


Seal# Cos ft Rac 1890 2024 
Do Accum 3116 2285 
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Do Acaxn 287 8 2054 

UK tew# Fund *60 495 


Mnveoe Pmh. Exec# E» IDS 
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mcdhoTiuv 369 390 ■ 

Mtoraebr a l Trust 3*9 374# 

fmenean 323 3*8’ 

Japan 44 2 470c 

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403 234 
464 234 

+43 501 
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UNLISTED SECURITIES 


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15 11 ■ 
SO 45 
130 93 
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143 45 

108 30 
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275 183 
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297 26* 
143 13? 
101 106 
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250 185 
355 163 
1B0 132 
620 J4J 

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233 180 
95 61 

71 69 

028 185 

8 ? 68 
123 63 
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45 31 

15 7 

91 38 

460 278 
30 15 

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43 39 

115 88 
018 165 
<40 130 
27 19 

2’0 110 
199 125 
130 75 

350 me 
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163 115 

3*5 230 

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If® 135 
36 6 

42 29 

195 130 
320 90 
69 62 

1*0 86 
3M 2U 
130 6* 

HO 83 
136 129 
18 7 

230 \Z0 
17 B 
115 75 

1S6 152 
23 11 

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91 6* 

95 53 

108 88 
175 HO 
» 30 

11B 74 

60 SO 

343 roe 

108 85 

143 IIS 
415 308 

78 60 

1M 96 
138 75 

103 65 

97 75 

73 43 

178 U6 
1*0 78 

91 71 

216 195 

16 55 

29 20 

144 134 

57 *1 

13? 105 
115 80 

106 70 

228 130 
*80 345 
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52 39 

148 10? 

29 9 

325 2*5 
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3*9 ?44 
148 118 
100 61 
33 26 
15 8 

?(5 140 
245 138 
240 151 
00 56 

42 10 

108 10S 

74 -2 
60 31 

■log 100 
- 60 *6 
M 96 


A ft M GO 
ATA Sehchon 
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Aoeroeen sm Hse 
Acess Saiwie 
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Mesa 

Adam Lbswb 

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Anprmg 

AH* 

Angu Socwtas 
Ana# 

ABpHtrpo 
Apo t HA o w a cre s 
Do (toms 
Aspen Carrera 
Astral 
Astrev 

Assoc Energy 
ASD 

Aummegc 
B8B Dosgn 
BPP 
BTS Gro 

Bernard (WM*m| 

Bomon ft Fortum 
Bensons Crews 
0# L»tey ft Hay 
Bervetoy Exp 
Berdewy Go 
Bp bouws 


00 50 116 
21 40 134 

36 31 165 
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31 

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150 

90 

66 

121 

330 

115 


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BMrtwd Toys 
Borland 
Brownian# 
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Brrt 

Bmanrnj S+C 
Br BModStocH 
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hwonwt 
Brown (Charve) 

Bryant (OweSl 
Brea Resources 
CCA Galenas 
CML Mcrq 
CPS Con# 

CPU Comp 
OVD 

Cain nix van OH 
Camoteoi 
Cannon Sl>eM Me 

Central TV 

Chancery Sees 
Ciwdrooni Europe 100 

Cnorsaa Man 123 

Cnrm Memoos 7 

Cnasiwr w 230 

C*ar 13 

C+caonm 90 

Cum* hobo# is? 

Qooju Gou 23 

CHifi IX Hdna 32 

Coned EKctaxlas 88 

COM! Em#aU 
C oMrg nn Inc 
Comp Fnanoal 
Compsotl 
Conswants 
Cons Tem Mxft 
Coral Mcrowawg 
Cowees 
CPM 

Crmphom 

Cranorews 
Oansawh 
Cmoo Longa 

Crown ma 
Cxuxa 
DBE Teen 
DDT 

DJ Sec Atoms 
Dalton 
Dawes iDYl 

Dean ft Brews 
De ten 1 Andro> 

Drtxre 
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17 

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208 

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111 

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275 


93 

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29 

260 

220 



338 

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588 

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112 

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200 

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213 

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140 

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60 

170 

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118 


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226 

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126 

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160 

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36 

305 


H6 

3. 

77 


3* 

160 

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29 

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22 


110 

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90 

■52 

35 

108 

53 

280 

98 

120 

360 

60 

KM 

80 

71 

88 

43 

173 

90 

75 

197 

75 

24 

144 


131 

Si 

91 

205 

440 


45 


Denmans Elec 
Dewey Warren 
Dutore 
Drue* 

Dunvon 
Fade 

Eahng Etna Dunes i*o 
Ecstmc ?* 

Ed* Fix* 2*5 

Fan Secs 34 

EUnoqr Pope A 37 B 
Electron House 133 
Electron*; Ma p eg 
Enreni ?b 

Enterurnnret (Hod 9 


Eouou 
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FAB GO 
Foeeaecx 

FeroeBiXW 

F.aos tins) 
Fificmx Dennys 
FlrxMcn 
Fiogas 
f«hp (X 
F«ro ft vtoto 


150 

2J5 

241 

58 

26 

125 

74 

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198 

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29 4 4 135 
36 30180 

179 54 129 
3 1 27 119 

3.1 2 4 012 

30 *09 

52 22 245 
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15 1 7 100 

33 22 21 1 


31 20 270 

59 

II 1 0 01.0 
71 114 356 
5 7 00165 

3 7 35 138 

25 0.1 17 8 

74 21 »5 

2 1 3 5 159 

76 7? 9.1 
28 35169 
60 05 140 
1 0 1.1 140 

269 

17 10 MB 

21 23 73 

14 1 9 108 

43 05 21 2 
35 48 180 


09 65 95 

09 20 18.1 
54 64 8 + 

107 118 61 
7.0 14 170 
56 13 294 

0 3 14 160 

25 58 119 
31 20 24 3 

04 I 7 179 
86 35 146 

• 600 

96 35 17 5 

4 6 37 195 
23 26 130 

14 156 40 


36 15 256 
3 9 6 7 208 

17 66 22 

16 J9 172 
55 
256 

109 

43 *81U 


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Conpuiy 
branch Coao 

FrodUrtte 

Fid# Snxtn A 

Ganreco 

Gtarei Lyrets 
Gu» Me# 
GA*1 House 
Global Gp 
Godvwi Warren 
Gooenead rent 
GoiXd ILaurence) 
tenyM Surface 
Green (EmesD 
Greenwtdi CaMe 
Grosven# Sq 


KunXpgn ■ 
WSTB4 


bo 1*4 

102 65 
655 *20 
148 9* 

150 98 

47 38 

80 72 

165 100 

17 12 

80 33 

188 85 

124 88 

128 103 

91 60 

124 110 
^ 19 

IIS 93 
ISO 160 
110 38 

92 Sd 

49 38 

?10 133 
255 196 

48 28 
+40 383' 

390 233 
145 143- 
415 215 
205 60 

S3 90 
24 9 

113 113 
133 105 
BO 412 
158 1t5 
203 145 
183 t34 
340 200 
24 22 

14 8 

166 115 
255 188 
230 165 

31 16 

115 44 

103 68 
353 2T5 

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141 IS 

32 25 

165 85 

340 233 
190 116 
62 22 
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148 105 
118 73 

70 48 

330 253 

90 67 
300 2?0 

83 56 

113 sr 
113 67 

S3 37 
125 70 

43 32 

118 100 

91 80 

140 95 

198 133 

82 21 
90 88 

245 160 
ISO 101 
125 55 

68 64 

176 92 

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135 93 

263 195 
220 MS 
99 75 

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1*8 MO 
390 330 
138 95 
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95 59 Michael (John) 

780 360 - - 

220 118 
47 22 

183 82 
385 231 
218 134 
193 165 
220 130 
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158 I0B 

104 82 

158 I S3 
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115 70 

138 125 
387 037 
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102 

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142 

98 

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75 

140 

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113 

192 

120 

65 

118 

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Gureraey Adanac 160 
HB Beci 95 

Hampden Homacaro 7a 
Harm 47 

Harvey ft Than# 18 S 
HjyMore Eixofa 223 
Heart Care *3 

Heawree 430 

Do A LIT 390 

Henderson Prime 144 

HxyvPram 230 

LHiF’toyj Part 60 
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Hooson 22'. 

Hodgson 113 

Holden Hyreompi 118 
hoMws ft MaretomGCo 
HOMOS Prowcson 135 
Home jllDMrt 193 

Howard Grom' 335 
Hughes Food 2* 

Huxprxd Bee. 9 

1*x+» SaptxT 140 

Ted! 205 
180 

MdScw Brorgv so 
MtraReo 83 

■raerewoM Teen 215 
htovreon S'. 

Od 7*v 135 

Israel (Jack LI 29' 
JSD Core# 145 

JS PMhotogy 340 

Jaouas Wert 173 
Junto* 50 

Jettons 6 

Johns#! ft Joro 12E 
Jo nra wne x (ton 10 s 
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KLP 305 

Kent (John! 75 

Kanvon Sacs 305 
Kewft Systems 76 

Ktoft-Tekna 81 

LPA M S3 

LadO# 60 

Lartaw Thornton 100 
Lean Mv *2 

Lamin' 105 

Looga Care Bf 

Lon & Oydeftde 123 
Loren Elect ISO 

Lysend# Pet 2i 

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MMT Comp 1*5 

MCLaugnan ft H# 123 
Magnate UaMnab 60 
Mammal 66 

Miron |Rnwt 161 
Mawvmt 18 

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Strata 2068 

Swing fob : 96 

Surterdi Bed 31 

Sumenand (ET) S5 

SwmOCH. FV Heap 115 

Synapse Carp 185 

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1 1 

25 114 

4 6 126 

05 74 

02 340 
4 0 313 
09 180 

15 220 
21 160 
7« 65 
72 125 
45 

•so 49 

7 4 103 
23 10 

25 - ao 

31 125 
Z5 13 7 
83122 
65 105 

16 225 
455 

55 19 0 

03 160 
1.7 571 
00 164 
IS SQ5 

4 7 123 


33 16 223 
19 30 29ft 


Meekly 

Oder Cnge Y« 


-m 4 a SEcrames 

Three Quays. Tm 

31-620 4588 
am# ft Gan Me 
Oo Accum 


H8EC3ROQ 


7140 23 Be 
Z*9a 266* 

231 2 2*7 4 

2520 2696 
£5* 630* 
60 6 64?# 
673 720 

734 785 

1402 1533c 
1869 SSO 
3946 420? 
3*61 3*06 

1780 1923 

aoi-o «S’ 

_ - — . _ til 76 12 47 

European ft General *886 1999# 


Do Acorn 
am Smator Cot 
Do Acaxn 
*vw t Gen foe 
Do Acaxn 

Cam ft Gwi Me 
Do Acaxn 
CmsM Grown 
Contra wxi Grown 
Do Inc 

Dwroead FM Me 
Da ' 


Oo Aura 
Ejllri V Wd Me 
Da Acaxn 
F# Easton Me 

FlXM cTwv he 
DO ACC 


2SS3 2380# 
2169 2295 
4665 4946 
1132 T223 
1375 1485 
065 2507 
371 7 39*0 
5985 8340# 
£1269 1046 
615 646 
933 980 
299 320# 
315 3*1# 
3123 33*1# 

8*5 B 9000# 

MB Grown MC 729 3 7701c 
DO Acaxn [it 63 1203 

0» he Me 56 7 G0 1 

Japan 6 Gen he 7895 8 * 1.1 
Do Accum 8*73 9024 

Japan Smaaer Me c 93 4 995 
Martin ft Gen Me 56*0 6965 
Da Acaxn £1451 i486 
Recovery fond Me 3653 3803# 


Do Acaxn 
aa 8 fixed tm 
Do Accum 
Gad Meome 
Oo 


"R 


Oo 

Second Gen Me 
Do Acaxn 
Smertr Cox Me 
Do Acaxn 
Trusree Ftta he 
DoAoaxn 
Cturitxm Me (3) 

De accum 131 
CnankoO tap) 

Do Acaxn (2 j 
P enxrai Exempt ill 4670 4782 
NAACIF 384 


+14 149 
*16 149 
•18 061 
+19 061 
*02 036 
+03 036 
-1 0 13* 
-1112* 
-05 441 
-05 34| 
-03 337 
-TO 25* 
-08 018 
+13 618 
-003 5 IB 
-03 100 
-04 IOC 
-QS 67b 
-10 5 75 
-07 153 
+05 163 
. -04 250 

mo 260 

-17 CIS 
-003 4 16 
*02 9(4 
+Q0 914 
*0 I 422 
•0.1 022 
-II 055 
-20 056 
*47 185 
*017 185 
*0T 019 
*52 022 
•97 022 
-03 004 
-09 4 12 
•003 4.12 
-28 342 


4612 *93 S# -02 0*2 
701 4 7405# -OS 3 73 
£1384 14 67 *001 373 


TIPS 

no 22 1104 
4461 4773 
£1278 1067 
1141 
3565 

385 6 3895 
£1006 1016 


Do Acaxn 


459 5 


-26 287 
-004 287 
*07 430 
+0« 430 
+021058 
-071008 
.. 586 
.. 688 
4«2 

-03 ft 3* 
-00 034 


IBM UNIT TRUST MANAGERS 

11. Omansnrn Sq. London EC2M «VR 

01-62 4273 

Earay Exaavt 396* *160 +10 208 

Da Acaxn 50*1 3265 -21 200 

UK Uadret Fattxes 70S 809 *02 154 

Do Accwn 781 833 *03 194 

Japan Prt onnanc u 1429 162* +10 001 

Do Acaxn 143« 1520 *10 001 

US Special Fasten 679 702 +03 019 

Do Accum 605 709 +03 0 Ps 

Goto ft PreoauetAm 380 413 .. 1 42 

Do Acaxn 302 426 -Ol L42 

US SpecW bE S76 621c *01454 
Do Aceum 61 .I 65.9c . . 454 

Europara fori Inc 766 8X6 -06 108 

Oo Accra! 707 827 +00 1.06 


MLA Graval 
MLA Mtemoao 
MLA GM UM 


MLA UWT TRUST MANAGCMBIT 

99-100 SradMg Rd. Madtane. Kam ME14 1XX 

0622 674751 

323 3*2# *02 219 
51 5 5*5 -07 097 

3* I 2S5C *0210.19 
414 42BC 5 13 

MLA European 27.9 295 *03 064 


-23 282 
-13 7J6 
-1 7 664 
-01 8 S3 
-32 042 
♦12 0 45 
+21 0 13 
-17 170 


■ENCAPUMT TRUST 

Uocom Hve. 252 Ruadard Rd. E7 

01-23* 55*4 

13*2 1427 


Sjjeorgas^wuy. Storenaga Hans 

Growth Unas 722 767 

GM ft Fuad hq 1113 1152 
tegn income Unts 1117 1107 
hyilMMUnl 569 589 

MU Growth Uns 125* 1302 
n Amenean Unas 65* 7J8c 

F« Ejb Units 925 563# 

Cox fund 062 704 


MERCURY FUNOMANAQERS LTD 
30 Kri^Wdran SL EC4R 9*S 


01-3801 
An# Qrowffi 
Do 


Do Acaxn 
Euapsan Grown 
Do Act 
General 
Do 1 

G* ft FMad 
DO. 


Do Accum 


Do Acaxn 
Japan 
Do taoxn 
Recovery 

00 Acaxn 

Exempt Dot 
Exempt Acaxn 


903 tO* -5 
1023 tOBH 
50 6 53 8 
629 562 
1210 1287 
1242 1331 
2381 2502 
387 0 411.7 
88 0 888 
991 1000 
826 67.8 
912 970 
23*9 3490# 
2909 309*# 
1825 194 1 
1867 1906 
’95 7 208.1 
2088 3221 
2194 336 te 
0)66 3470c 


+03 053 
+04 053 
*04 473 
+04 4.73 
-15 126 
-14 12£ 
+04 203 
+06 203 
+07 767 
+07 767 
*02 457 
+02 437 
+16 109 
*24 109 
+16 000 
+16 OOO 
-Ol 2.36 
•01 230 
-105 290 
-1A7 290 


UPLAND BANK GROW WBTTRUST 
MANAOB1S 

Cowtwooa Haa. S*v# SL HM 9MHrtd Si 3RD 
0742 759843 

Caret# hepma 79 ) 901# +0 1247 
Do Acaxn 1023 109.1# +08 247 

ConmoMy A Gen 1D19 10B7 . 026 

DO Acaxn 1437 1532 *01 326 

Extra Hgf! Me 90S 82+# . . 7.7 2 

DoxSrt 683 728# .. 7.72 

GR ft read Me 542 556 -0* 90* 

DO Accum 807 S26 +5* 904 

Tiaid 1532 1634 *0 5 550 

Acaxn 260 2 2775 +09 550 

» 1602 179 «C *03 372 

Do Accra 27*0 29Z2c -06 3P 

Japan ft Pacta .280 5 299.1 *25 009 

TDd Accra) 29*0 3136 *25 009 

N Ammon ta 1114 1188 +09 126 

Go Acaxn 1335-1404 . +12 IS 

Euro G*1 he . 1104 1177 -10 >20 

Do Accra* 1325 1413 -12 120 

9tatoCosta 1IZ3 1197# -03 213 

Do Acorn 1195 1276# +02 013 


■RMfUY JOHNSTONE (087 TRUST 




180 Haps SUBdL Glasgow G2 2UH 
0*1 22i 9252 


European 

Sm e rt r Cos 


H63 10* IC +11007 
233 * 2384 ^1 11* 
2096 2209 -02 102 


NATIONAL PROVtOBiT MVESTMBfT 


40 Gracechnroh 9 l ECraH* 
01-623 4200 Ext 2B0 
NPI UK 196 * 2080 

Dp Acaxn 3173 337.6 

moMta so* em 5 

-Oo ACCOB 5997 7338 . 

Far East acc 9*9 s o*e 

AmencsnAcc 579 616# 

European Acc *66 51.8 

Wonoweto acc *82 SI J 


+04 090 
*0 8 090 
+1.9 070 
+03 030 

+ 12 0 to 

+00 130 
-03 000 
+04 1.40 


Bd OR# Oiga YMd 


HORWOCHUTMARAOBB 

BO Bo< 4 tawer NR1 H9 

n#T* 022200 

GrcuD Trust £11 71 123* +006 079 

W^ua L2*5 1307 *05 1.32 


Oep ptHP MEB TRU ST «*AN 4CTtaNT 

66 Cxrxxxr sees umoen EC*n 6*E 

STsms&ii * w 

htemaeon # GTOw m 1318 i«0# 
Home ft Gvrerai 61 9 863 

wenewroe Rac 6’ 6 875# 

Amatara G#w» 3*1. MS 

JtotfiGfO«9l Bio 53 

Grown M 2 g«# 

UK Grown SI SJ 

Pacta Grown SS »2 

**g* woama M2 ££• 

Practical maama K5 »| 

Dc Acaxn 95 1 lOi 2 

PEARL TRUST 


-1 0 1 47 

+9 1 125 
-02 1.73 
*01 080 
+01 1E7 
-07 015 
0 73 

+0 1 000 
-01 75t 
-01 217 
.. 2 17 


01-4061 
Grown fm mc 
D o Acaxn 
Income F ran 
Hi Etnxiy mc 
Od Acaxn 
Uret Trial Me 

Co < 


Hoeom. WClV 7EB 


888 955 
1334 1419 
1198 1272 
1268 1338 
1258 133 8 
124 9 13)9 
2163 230 I 


*0g 209 
*06 209 
•04 008 
♦03 125 
+03 125 
+09 ZBT 
*0 7 081 


PERPETUAL WOT TRUST 

4ft Karr Sue#. HarXey On Thames 

0481 575S6B 

MUtewd* 261.1 3802 

168 1 201 4 
1407 1532 
70 0 752 
769 826 
744 795 . 
530 580 


Woncwde Roe 
A## Grown 
ho EmeroCos 
Far Eaa Gnvm 
European Gm 


reOUHCUNTT TRUSTS 

222 . 

01-2*7 : 


t*oi mccme 

cc+w ft cm 
Far Eastern 


S£«sH Scs 
TecrmoMgy 
Extra meome 


1115 1196 
60 3 64 9e 
96S 1039 
1730 lass 
1264 1386 
68 1 733a 

1095 1182# 

868 sat# 


*33 0 79 
•03 427 
+•2 1-35 
+05 0 71 
+06 099 
+06 091 
+O0 147 


+0.7 059 
-Ol 438 
-02 591 
+Z5 0*8 
+05 084 
-0 5 1.73 
-02 000 
-03 457 


PRUDENTIAL UWT TRUST MANAGERS 
51-69 Morn Hd. o#d Essex. tGl 2DL 
01-478 3377 


Hctam Conens 
K oo om Nra ta 
Houra ta. 


Hoeom Spec 90s 
H0J0#n UK tewtn 
Hcrsorn GRTtuM 


388 9 4137 
886 941 
5<3 5*5# 
05 6 69 7# 
962 1023# 
959 1020 
75* 802 
601 680# 
79 5 845 
1876 1983 


+06 327 
-09 0 5+ 
.. 065 
*0i 634 
*06 06* 
*07 005 
♦0.7 103 
+03 2.15 
+0 8 222 
+06 049 


OUV.TER MANAGEMENT COMPANY 
31-+S Gresnam SL Umoon EC2V 7LM 
01-600 *177 

Quareani Gan## 43*7 *626 .. 203 

Cjadrzm Meome 2401 2566* .. 522 

Ouadrant M Fd 375 3 395.1 .. 1.13 

CjMraat Recreray 2673 264* .. 2*5 

Nil R0TNSO6LD ASSET MANASBWfT 
St Sxta Lane. London EC+P 40U 
01-280 5*66 

NC Axnenca ta 280 8 296.7# +02 123 

Do Acaxn 305 3 32* 7# +33 1 22 

NC &VTOT Res 1318 1402 -03 2 78 

•tChcome 67 7 932 +0 2 3 79 

NC Joora 1909 2IU0 +10 QOI 

frCSmatoCos 1333 14S I +04 1.89 

NC SmUr Euroo COS 170 0 1 BOB +16 035 

NC Ewmpl GB nJOO 135 0 8 48 

NC Am# hop S1 167 1218 .. .. 

NC Propeny i863 i8&2 


ROMAN UNTT TRUST 

33 Am iMMam SaeeL London EC*R SAG 
oi&BSSia 

American |4| 219 5 2236 .. 196 

Seruntcs (2 7180 7310 248 

HrTl V«M (5) 1700 1756 &*• 

U#yn 13) 3746 3826# +170 106 

Freed Wwes iffii 1705 +06 2*5 

Han IntoSSt 123 0 1240# +101031 

F# East (21 2280 281 6# . 020 


ROYAL UFE AM) MANAOEMBir 
New Hal Place. Liverpool L89 3HS 
051-227 *422 

East? Trust 807 645 *02 257 

UW Trust 720 775c -00 1 31 

Get Tort 266 27 9 +0* 83* 

US Trial 322 3*2 +03 1.48 

Mi T» OB 43 5 +00 051 


-08 150 
-1.2 160 
• 16 *42 
+34 442 
-Ol 097 
•02 097 


20 CWan Sl London EC2 
01-920 0311 

Emxty Dai 1189 1244# 

Do Accum 160 l»0# 

Haa inaxne Trust 903 961# 

Do Accum 1063 113 '• 

US Grown 56 9 606 

Do Acaxn SSO 61 8 


ROTAL LONDON UNIT TRUST MANAGERS 
Rjyai LCrXJOfi Horae. CoktaSMr COI IRA 
0206 576115 

American Growth 89 3 950# *02 000 

Cipxai Acaxn 177 5 1890# *08 219 

GR btrome 555 585# *01 881 

Hah Hart 81 6 963 -01 ABO 

tapme ft Growth 99.7 1081# *02 *29 

Japan Grown 824 983 *08 005 

ScdOalSKs DOB 117.7 +01 130 

SAME ft PROSPER 

28. western Rd Rrentorc ftwi 3L0 
68-73, Queen St EOCOuroh EH2 4NX 
:Romtord) 07D8-6BB66 Or IBM) 031-226 7351 
Are# ta ft Grow* 678 726 +02 6B7 

986 1053# 

436 *66 
*26 466 
979 10*6 
80 7 85 0 
560 61 D 
392 387 
OBJ 1051 
539 56B 
1700 1912# 

1830 17*9 
9*2 100.7 


-<X a moory 

Energy mds 
Enocaxi Growth 
rxeera he Bna 
Op Ir# |* 3) 

cicteronon 

=+ianoxj Sacs 
3Xi ft R ta 
+cn Return Lines 
-ign Yrad lints 


ev asrt ant Trust 


Japan Growtn 
Japan Smartr Cm 


Mew Teettategy 
3E AM Growtn 
SCMMl 


Coa ta 

Soeoai bxuanone 
-M Etxjxy . 

JS Grow # 
.hirers 11 Growth 


8*4 902 
1140 1210 
9X1 895 
1295 1384 
204 303# 
886 9*0 
9*5 1010 
1204 1303# 
1S3.I 1617 
1507 16*3 
740 800 
1605 171 B 
910 973# 
1756 1870c 
710 767 
04.7 906 


+00 2.13 
-01 191 
+01 *23 
-09 055 
*02 S 14 
+03 234 
-05 0 00 
+10 003 
*011087 
*0.1 480 
+04 435 
*02 833 
.. 070 
-03 334- 
+1J .. 
♦0.1 . . 
*01 XB3 
-03 .. 
+08 098 
♦09 081 
+0-1 3-92 
.. 405 
+06 162 
*03 401 
-00 033 
-08 123 
♦04 185 
*00 138 


WMMy 
B id 0*w Oigo Y«d 


3O810DCH UWTT RUST 

aro ronse hq um. Prenmoudi 
J7QS 027733 
A m e nean ta 

Do Accwn 

iratratan Mc 
Do Acaxn 
Eixopera ta 
Do acc#" 

38ft fixed ta 
Da Acaxn 

SH fm ta 

Do Acaxn 


00 Accum 


Dc Acaxn 
jap Sm* Coe *c 

- DO.* 4 Matey 
Acaxn 

Smaner Cos Me 

Do Accum 
Special Sas ta 
Do Accra! 

Tonya FM ta 
Do Acaxn 
US 9m*# Coe AC 
UK Eauey “e 
BoAccun 


1275 1383 +1 7 0 65 

1306 139.5 +1 7 065 

524 563c -1 1 2 18 

563 805C -11 2*8 

1078 11S2 +08 1 10 

1107 1183 *P8 t 10 

9M 9Ut +OJ91B 
*12 87 7c +03 9TB 
26.7 365 -O' 23? 

27 8 29.7 -02 232 

1104 1043# +04 509 
304 6 4113# *09 505 
1104 1100 *05 047 

1534 187 8 *07 0 47 

1498 1800 *08 000 

MPM ft Matey 480 52 1 -01 1BC. 

DoAoaxn 50.5 5a 0 -01 106 

- 129 7 1387 . 1 15 

13Sl3 1456 1 II 

1016 1066 -02 099 

1050 1135 -02 099 

2304 2464 *03 0-2 

3300 3491 *24 #2 

500 998 +02 OH 

996 1064# .. 340 

15*5 1652# 3*0 

7997 8562 . SP 

Pwreons ft Orany 5® 2 60 * +c -036 318 
Satan a 599 6*0# 703 

SCRtITAR ASSET MANAGEMENT 
33-08 GraeactexO! Si London EC3U OAX 
01-623 5776/8711 

UKErextyta |*3 asc . 5 »l 

Do ACC 2* 3 Z68 511 

Eero Tst ta 2* 0 255# * OP 

DO ACC 24 0 25 5# 

GTOIrt Gth ta 280 390 

Do ACC 281 299 

Managed Erempt 1183 1233 

SCOTTISH EOUtTAMJE 

38 Sl Anreew* So. Grenoeign 
031-556 9101 

hfl meome U#i» 1*81 15 ? 5 

Do Accum 2199 2339 

SCOTTISH UFE INVESTMENTS 
19. Sl Anreaws So. Stottojpi 
031 225 2211 

UK Earn 1800 <928 

ir 1*0 7 157 0 

175 0 1873 

European 2179 2331 

SCOTTISH MUTUAL INVESTMENT 
MAMM3ERS 

109. Vine#* SL Glasgow G2 Sto* 

041-2*8 6100 

UK EOW 1639 17*4 

GMAfiVeO 1156 1234 

OK 9«ra Gaft Ea 1«|1»2 
R+noean T78S 190* 

NlSScan 1097 1168 

pao/N 1703 1B1-2 


100 
1 00 
«oo 
400 


333 

333 


*07 18? 
+09 131 
• 16 005 
-2* 062 


•07 256 
+07 810 
212 
+14 i 18 
+13 ISO 
*26 0.43 


SCOTDSNUWTTmJST 

3 Oratae Sa Erertxxgh 
031-228 4372 

Pac*c 641 «!• 

world Growth 360 SL 

N Amenean 33 8 360# 

Mccme Fund 449 481c 

Bxopoan 38$ 411 

N Am# ta 287 206 

UK Growth 309 »i 

Extra ta 3’ 0 338# 


+06 03? 
+46 105 
*03 018 
+02 4 TB 
-05 098 
+02 293 
+01 158 
*01 508 


EM 16 5BU 

031-655 8000 


MX Grow* 
Amenean Mapfe 
Sma* Co s 
Japra Tech ft Gan 


SENTINEL FUNDS MANAGEMENT 
30 Ott Rd. London EC IT 2AY 
01-638 son 

Am# Teen ft Gen 1065 11*0 +03 02* 

£5* 192 0 205* +05 000 

Sec Mcreae Fnd '6fl6 i80*# +0* 4.15 

202 4 2166 +06 1 49 

299 320# *06 016 

71 8 768 *08 03i 

381 41 8 ,157 

1101 1178 +0l OOO 

584 593# *00 50* 
Exempt 5450 504 0# 22S 

UK G#toN 33 0 353 161 

Eixo Grown 301 322 -05 032 

Euro Mccme 386 413 *00 

SIMON 6 COATES 

1. London Wan BUMS. Ltejon EC2M SPT 
01-588 364* Ext 35T 

SoeoN 5a (5) 520 556 . 074 

STANDARD UFE 

3. GanyejL Edmourgh &C 2X0 


031 
Mccme Unto 
Do Acaxn Una 


263 

291 


STEWART. IVORY UVftT TRUST 
MANAGERS 

45 . Oudope Sq. Ererexxipi 
031-226 3271 
Amenean Fund 
Do Acaxn 
Do wraaraart 
Auaaahan Fund 
Dp Acaxn 
Bnnsn Fund 
Do Acaxn 
European Fun) 

Do ACCum 
Frae 


2253 2400 
2530 2695 
1581 1685 
960 1031 
984 10*8 
5953 63*0 
8010 8540 
2738 2918 
2883 307.0 
janra FM 327 3 3*6.5 

DO ACOXB 32B 8 350 2 

Saxes PFP 1684 178* 

SUWAUJANCE 

Sun Aftaiwe Hm. Kotsnam. Sussex 
0*03 56293 

Earay Tnut Acc 3806 40*1 

N Am Tina Acc 570 008 

Far East Trent ACC 824 870 


•01 3 as 
*01 345 


+ 15 233 
• 1 7 233 
+1 1 233 
-12 128 
.12 128 
440 
440 
-2 7 093 
-29 093 
+20 021 
+20 001 


+01 2S7 
+03 HI 
+12 000 
-Ol 693 


TSB UNIT TRUSTS LTD 
nae»s House A n pcvre. 
026* 5B7B9 Oatongs. CQ6* 


„ SP10 IPO 
6343207* 


Amenean ta 
Do Acaxn 
Exxa Meome ta 
Do Acaxn . 
Goto# UM ta 
Do Acaxn 
08 ft F«ad Inc 
Do Acaxn 


Acaxn 
Psohc ta 
Do Acaxn 
(nd ta 
Oo Accum 
O aMc to ) Onres ta 
DO Aceum 
NsnxM Rxa 
Do Acooi 


1182 

•209 

1183 

13*7 

m 

Si 

2121 

3308 

’00-1 

1864 

3102 

383.1 

51.4 

67-3 

*81 

410 


1237# 
1287# 
122 7 
143 3 
1630# 
2683# 
51 4# 
681# 
225 7# 
3520# 
1704# 
176 M 
3300 
4070 
654 
716 
407 

430 


•as 1(0 

+09 1B3 
+02 515 
•03 SIS 
•06 279 
*08 279 
+01 836 
•02 838 
*08 443 
+13 4*3 
+20 026 
+25 029 
+17 103 
+2.1 103 
.. 181 
-0.1 1.81 
.. 205 
. 205 


TARGET TRUST MANA G ERS 
TagNHoraa. Guanouo Rd. Aytesrexy Bucks 

Am# Eacje 
A ustrali an 
Gommoday 

tS? 


731 776* +0 7 003 
1«S 176 OiO 

689 719 -01 109 

300 324# -0 1 1 85 
12*6 1338 *0 1 303 


Wteuy 

Bte dirt u”*' v*'' 


European Sew S« 
Extra moome 
FwianeiN 
GJi Mccme 
Ceia meome 
Cp Acora 
row 
jaera 

UM; ft Emgapura 
Pumc me 
Do N pnre M 
Prat Bure fo 
W cure 
StteX Srt 
TacnreXocy 

WM mcoma 
Utei4*ex Cac«J 
toray E- (3i 
Do accum i31 


958 101 » 
IIS’ i?4J 
1653 

104 5 IC9; 
Sf4 MA 
V ’ 993 
(DO *-*• 
1000 i07 3# 

200 ?! 3 
916 **7 5 
1101 1205 
1?7 l«HN 
701 75 •• 

0*5 K3C 
a5 J a9.« 
55 7 »« 

1393 149 
01 7 8b 7 
IKS »«JI 


-0' 


1 im 


.0 3 2 « 

■Oi Oi* 
•On 1 Z>t 
*u 0 10 
-0.' 307 
• I J 0*4 

.1? I'M 

;?.u 

.0 4 1.18 
.0 * Uh 
*03 0 >0 
.0 4 3 *) 

•**13 

1 - ti 


THORNTON UNIT MANA CtfW LTQ ._^ - 

Ceuftwood "tone Sxv# rt“ "Md Mrtww b* 
074? 797420 

F# Ea* 8Gen »5 56? 

japan ft Dan 9a J J;; 

Mi aim ft Gen 49 J k- ’ 

Pacta Tech M 3 S3 J 

T>ow 5J 5 SB 2 

uSftGen *40 aoft 


C6 DM 
«C.' 06“ 
-0 ■ C J7 
-dC 0 3* 
-CS OSS 

D2 2 14 


auHTTNUtralANA^m 
2 si Uary Are Lora»" EM* 

01 928 3356 

Smanr COS 530 ® :0 


-03 100 


TOUCM WMNANT 
M e» mem mdum 
3AT 

01-2*8 i?50 

Amenean Grow* 
General Grown 
OMC# Tech 
e co m e Growth 
laacme Mentoy 
Japan Growth 
Man Eaui> he 
DO Accum 
Oxen* Grarai 
Smato Coa 
Special GPP5 


TYNDALL MANAOER3 

Rd Bnsrt 


2 PUdtM Dock London EC+U 


427 

459 

•C? 

css 

sea 

54 •• 

•02 

2 *2 

41 5 

444 


Dili 

595 

&)J* 

•a i 

4(R 

487 

52 *• 


694 

491 

5?J 

•tin 

(11? 

737 

763 

-Ol 

?JM 

237 

253 

*01 

:x 

*67 

S’ 1 


tot 

613 

05 3 

-0 1 

233 

710 

>■ 7C 

-01 

191 


AuStafth 
Oo ACC 

Caret* 

Do Accore 

Exempt 

Do Maim 
F# EAMOm 
DO Arturo 
Fm ft Proo 
Op Accum 
G*i Casual 
Do Accum 
Cm Meome 
Do acaxn 
VrOU 


"R 


tnc raw 
Do Aaaxn 
M Eanwijs 


5i3 
515 
XU J 
S*90 
2956 
6723 
1580 
l'OS 
5J9 
0J9 

124 0 
143 7 
1089 
t77l 
540 
118? 
234 7 
7?4 1 

1583 


+4>; 


549 
57 J 
326 2# 
S04f# 

314 PC 
nsie 
1890 
IS? 4 
57 4G 
89 4 c 
1292 
149 A 
102# 
l«4ll# 

57 5 
12»9 
2*99# 

724 l 7*1 1# + 


1686 


flv ten 
0’ 140 
I 3 J3n 
27 336 
OH >71 
1 8 671 
1 3 CB4 
14 CA4 
_ . 3 14 
.0 4 3 19 
*04 6 40 
•05 6*0 
>04 951 
.0 6 9 51 
670 
•01 670 
12 5 in 

-18 i 19 
-04 25b 


IB5XROW0ENTUT MANAGERS 
IWHMM Cast* Sl srewury sP» JS+* 


111 9 M89# >04 

151 3 160 <9# +2 3 
II? 7 119.“# •!? 


0722 
UK Foray 
PBaK Basm 
N Am# 

VANGUARD TRUST 

65 Hotenw Viaduct 
01-236 3053 
Growth ta 
DO Acaxn 
Hen Trad 
Do Accum 
Soecrt S« 

Oo Accum 
Trustee 
Do Accum 
Am# ft Gra 
Do Accum 
Mare# fonlobo 
DO Accum 
Auta Rdh AMS (61 
Do Accra 

for Fare ft Gra ta 

Do ACCum 


EC1A 2CU 


IB6 2 

trail 


2832c 


222 • C 


229.1 

•a? 

*2 B# 


42 1 

134 S 

1 4.15# 


2I&3# 

ws 

637 


637 

rv?so 

61 J4# 


el 59 

1140 

C’e 

1148 

122? 

495 

sr- 1 

*4 5 

527 


-0.1 ?«* 
-cs :■« 

•M 1*1 
•OJ * « 
-C I 254 
-01 .'74 
-01 .1 49 
-0 t 3.4H 

•C 3 1 17 
•0.1 1 *2 
•Ota 2 ?4 
+0 '5 2 5* 
« .H 
13i 
+07 CV 
*02 05* 


WAROLEV UWT TRUST MANAGERS 
Wjrthey Hteoe. 7 D«rvcnytwo aj Urooui' 

01-929 1537 


Amencra Trim 
Far Emu ft Gra 
irai Growdi 
mcoma Tnni 
Japan Grow in 
Small Companies 
Technology 

Auenkj 

UK TiuU 

fix ocean Growth 

Hong Kong 


M3 sa># 

102 6 1 092c 
6“ 7 ?? •• 
83 5 898 
1241 133 5 
ill 5 n»9 
32 9 353 
36 1 »* 
1281 1363 
49 3 52 5# 
220 234 


+pt 
.1 7 
-05 
•AS 
-06 
•0 8 
+04 
•07 


180 
1 Ml 

0 73 
Vt 
020 
: m 
ox 

7 CO 

: -o 
1 20 

1 611 


WAVERLEY ASSET MANAGEMENT 

13 Cnjdcma Sq EdmtexBh 
CJ 1-225 1551 

AusKtoeh Gold 359 <69 -04 0 15 

Pxcta :3? 14 1 -0 7 P 20 

Canerera B4> Gro 57 0 609 -Pt» 

Game Mao Fna ql008 iC50# -da 7-U 

wNnrmoDftLK unit trust managers 

? HOtoy U EC? BBT 
01406 900*6 

Sra DM G# Fund 67 9 886 *0 1 000 

US Govt BOnd fo 4506 509 

WINDSOR TRUST MANAGER* LT w __ 

rtnusor Horae. 81 Ktasway. Lotaon WC20 , 
680 

01-485 B331 

Cone ft Cqray 51ft 55* . 779 

hcrene 526 MJe +«i 

Grow*! 511 544 225 

• Ex dreuand C Cum GAndond. k Cum 
slock spot a Ex stock spW m Cum ju 
(any two or morv of sDOv») ■ Ex zB (any 
two or mom ol scxxre)- Dealing or 


(» 


uabondayo. 1 
Wednesday. 


(ft) Thuraday (5) Friday 


(20) 2501 o» mbmh. (21) 2nd Thursday of 
monDi. (22) 1st and 3rd Wednesday o» 
month. (23) 20tr> of monDi. (24) 3rd 
Tuesday of month. (25) 1st ana 3rd 
Thursday ol month. (26) 4Bi Tuesday ol 
month (27) 1st Wodtitsdayof month |CB| 
Last Thursday Of monm. (2S) 3rd yvonunq 
day of month. (30) 16th d month- (311 1st 
workaig day of month. (32) 200 i of month 
(33) in dey of February. May. August. 
November. (34) Last working day ol 
month. (35) 15th of month. (361 14th ot 
month. (37) 21st ol month. 08) 3rd 
Wednesday of month. (39) 2nd 
Wednesday of month. (40) valued 
monthly. (41) Last Thursday erf Stock 
Exchange account (42) Last day of 
‘ 2nd and 4th Wednesday of 
. . Quartarty. (45) 6th of month 
(46) 


month. (43) 2nd and 4 th Wsdr 
month. (44) Quartarty. (45) 6th i 
(46) 2nd Tuesday ol rn o mh. 


INVESTMENT TRUSTS 


Hgn Low Coererav 


Gross 
Mv 

Pice Chge pence N 


P/E 



109 

+1 

3ib 

20 420 

320 215 

765 

-3 

290. 

30 360 

19* 

156 

127 


4.4 

30 35* 

308 

P'1 

3*2 


B0 

26 530 


FSi 

97 

-i 

00 

00 740 

■ J 

E2J 

116 

• . 

a 

3 4 430 

58 

*5 

3*8 


06 

101 

no 

- SS'r 


30 

40 310 

133 

HO 

39 


00 

10 514 

385 

237 

420* 


21.7 

60270 

233 

188 

91 

• +i 

33 

30 423 

70 

55 

•045 

• .. 

31.40 

30 35 8 

71 

81 

215 

-i 

05 

00 . 

128 

102 

15*- 


120 

70 184 

198 

181 

128 




15S 

138 

330 

-4 

146 

48310 

167 

137 

188 

-1 

10 

1.0 .. 

23* 

215 

598 

+3 

14 

02 . 

mi 

318 

IBS 

•+! 

SS” 

4 0 354 

KJ 

380 

103 


09 800 

6a 

48 

1*0 

-1 

4.7 

24 412 

189 

158 

353 

• 

64 

18 580 

54 

W 

157 

• +1 

55 

30 430 

2*8 

165 

88 


20 

23 533 

339 

779 

1*9 

-3 

20 

13 820 

81 

26 

113 


20 

23 580 

386 

''rl 

300 

+1 

21 

1.1 770 

178 

a 

318 


140 

40 300 

78 

68 


; Artroe 

Gored Onenrei 
G oreti Sc ateQv 
Grorarnar 


LOHDOIf COMMOOITT 
EXCHANGE 

G W Joyneon end Co report 

SUGAR (Fran C. Czanlmw) 
FOB 


75 


80 

116 60 

528 

• . . 

82 

10 862 

iba 


7A 

44 320 

333 


129b 

40 390 

101 

+1 

1.4 

12 

135 


8 

27 521 

660 

-1 

08 .. 

159 


Sl 

30 41 1 

137 


39 

20 590 

151 


23 

22 6*0 

385 


80- 

22 827 

90 


21 

23 600 

91 




1BD 

+1 

20C 

l.i . . 

1*9 


30 

1.7 880 

303 


1700 

50 288 

IW 


34 

2.7 52 2 

109 

ft -3 

50 

48280 

137 

+1 

*00 

29 427 


-*■» 

33 


218 

*1 

51 

2* 614 

3*5 


24 

07 .. 


j+y Low Grareray 


1B0 


rtr Cap 


Greenwn House 
Hmootos 

HeePI ZBB 

715 
267 

__ » 

Ureeeret.Cnreto 93 

Kltxiwort O seas 120 

KttPMTI Srabf 287 
law Dobmixe 231 
Lon Mrochral Sec 58 



panes 

N P/E 

fig* low 

Conwy 


cnge erne* 

•- PE 



199 

•55 

TR Ina ft Got 

187 

-l 

57 

30 404 

64 

36 39.7 

226 

201 

TO Natural Roft 

217 

• . 

111 

54333 

104 

50 282 

101 

89 

TR fttortfi Amoncs 

89 


26 

29 452 

82 


170 

118 

TO Prtta Bara 

167 

*1 

14 

OB 

60 

2S7S9 

196 

140 

TO Property 

179 

• 

57 

3239? 


02 .. 

119 

90'. 

TO Tocli 

10* 

+ i 

26 

25 *91 

24 

30401 

174 

13 9 

TO Trustees 

ISO 


63b 39 374 



189 

135 

Terete B# 

151 

-l 

81b 54 264 



305 

337 


28* 

• -5 

119b 40 340 

90 

30 280 

3TO 

300 

TOrog Svajrw Cap 363 




30 

50 140 

307 

157', 

Tran* Ocaata 

196 


50 

28*96 

11 

10 412 

141 

113 

Tnoune 

128 

• 

40 

31 367 

510 

54 301 

9* 

79 

Tnpleossr tec 

91- 


108 

170 83 

37 

10 730 

365 

717 

US DaOerauro 

263 

-1 

93 

35 537 

7.7n 

50 280 

52 

33 


33 


29b 88 163 

7.10 

44 341 


58 

Wesrood 

56 


30 

38 41 7 

3Jn 

10 .. 

115 

8b 

WBueroonreti Egy 





•000 

20 630 

3i0 

161 

Won 

195 



2*552 

213 

50 290 

359 

38b 

reman 

350 


ISiO 43 36 1 


38 31 
42 37 

*05 338 
171 147 
258 218 


09 

57 3.1 300 
48 78 18.1 
11 OS . 
40 is 880 

0.7 28 251 

770 2.1 880 
40 30 41 A 
1.0 1.4 83.1 

OS 10 " 
17.1 « 39.6 


TRCrt Ol Lrt DM107 



12.1 

40 380 

. S' 

13'- 

♦2 



30' 

■ vr- 

+1 


22 501 

156 

131 

+3 

7.1 

140 

90 



3*7 

187 

-1 

«1 

30*60 

106 

66 

• +3 

89 

20608 

750 

37*i 

+3 

90b 

21 4*4 

94 

77 

-I 

29 

27 580 




350 

83.190 

800 

490 

+2 

121 

34 550 

218 

1U 

+t 

70 

25 527 

440 

330 

♦2 

34 6n 

30 330 

390 

1W1 

♦1 

30b 

*0 290 

382 

364 


20 

25 550 

112 

76 



13 . . 

37 



30 

30 31.0 

!U 

153 

-2 

50b 

50 300 




Grafts 
re* Yin 


FINANCIAL TRUSTS 


47 - 36 
71 31 

49 21 
154 >16 


Areracan Express E*0’. 
*rgyle . 4 

Boustad 31 

Bntetina Arrow 139 

E19 
tIB'. 
141 
122 
212 
101 
750 

66 

Gome ID ft M) i20 

Henoerwn Arena 8*3 
■Cm ,63 

AMI 360 

MftG 240 

Meicanste Hreree 297 

Paatc rnv Ts, tog 

_ l>s Warrants 2* 

S«i»8! New Coixt 1S6 


Deny Me* 
Do A' 
EMctra 
Eng Tr«»l 

Ex CD 

ExpAxapon 

HvrftnQian 
Fro® Go 


14 30 2*6 

+1 838 

60 43 163 

l 700 37 13* 
I TOO 38 109 
I 59 *0 326 

40 33 189 
6 0 £8 117 
33 XI 133 
93 13 3*9 

6* 74 92 

•2 2 5 2 1 336 

l 17 9 21 16 7 

129b 70 75 
229 60 100 
-15 61 25 3? 

199 84 80 

(*2 OS OS 

1+1 100 84 70 


COMMODITIES 


Ag.._ 

1300-31.6, 

Dec 

March 

141.0-420 

__ 152JL5ZB 

S3 

1560-57^ 

^ 1BQ0-6OB 

COCOA 


July 

1401-87 

Sept — 

1462-61 

March 

1492-91 

May 

July 

1511-09 

.. 1526-24 

Sept 

1542-37 

COFFEE 


July 

Sect . 

■ram 

Nov IBIS-15 

Jan . 1955-53 

March 1983-80 

May — 

4S- 


SOYABEAN 




OcF_ 




Fb& 

.... 1290-28i4 

Apr* 

130^295 

June 

— 128.0-27.0 

03? ir — 


GAS OS. 

__ 97.00-35,00 

Sept 

... 3850-9605 

Oct __ 

.. 101.0(M)0.00 

Nov — 

. 10300-03.00 


Dec 


Jan — 
Fab ... 
March 
A (*i- 
vofc— 


1OS0O-O4SO 


107.004)4.00 

108.00- 04.00 

110.00- 06*0 
115.00-07.00 

2277 


LONDON METAL EXCHANGE 
- Unoffi ci al price* 
Official T urn o ver flguma 

Price In E|Mr metric toane 
Sever In pence per trey «wnc# 

RudodWoff SC 0 . 1 M. report 
COPPER GRADE A 


Three Months 

9174-917.5 



STANDARD CATHODES 

Three Months 

8330-8830 



LEAD 

■nsuh 

248.52500 

254.5-2550 

Three Months 



ZINC STANDARD 
Cash _ __ 

Vo) _. 

515JU29.9. 

Tone 

„ Mb 


ZINC HIGH GRADE 

Cash 548.0-649.0 

ITrae Months _. 54S.0-545S 
VOI 2750 

Tone Sbrerliw 

SILVER LARGE 

C») . 335.5-337.0 

Three Months ..... 343^5445 

Vo* Ml 

Tone idte 


S)LV8T SMALL 
Cash. 


335S-337J) 


Three Months — 3435-3445 

V<rf Mi 

Tone Me 

ALUMMUM 

Cash 782.0-7680 

Three Months — 76^0-769.0 

Vpt 3000 

Tone ^ 


WCKEL 

Cash 


26*0-2645 


Three Months 2883-2865 

Vo) .... 430 


Tone . 


Steady 


MEAT AND LIVESTOCK 

coauttsaoN 

Avtoege fenaack prices et 

rapreertitsttve markets on 
23 July 

GBcOBttla.9&25perkglw 

SheeeJ65.73 per kg est d 
) per kg tw 

England and Wsies; 

Cattta nos. upij\, avB- 

masMpt-OAg 
Sheep mi * 14./%. eve. 
— e. 165. B5p(-1 1.07} 
nos. down 33%. ave. 
7SAO(+1AO) 

Soottand; 

C3(0e nos. dDMi as %, ave, 

- ».95.57(+O07) 

Bp nos. im 150%. are. 

' HAS) 

.am 



LONDON MEAT FUTURES 
EXCHANGE 
Pig Contract 
p. par Mo 

Open Ctoae 
Unq. 1015 


Month 

Oct 

Now 

Jan 

Fab 

March 

S£! 

June 


Unq. 109.0 
Unq. 112.5 
Unq. 114.5 
Unq. 102.5 
Unq- 1033 
Unq. 103,0 
Unq. 103-8 
Unq. 1048 
Unq. 104J 
vor-.o 


UMOON MEAT FUTURES 
EXCHANGE 
lire Cattle Contract 


Month 

Aug 

Oct 

Nov 

Jan 

Fab 

March 

« 

Jtraa 


p. per Mo 

Open Oosa 
Unq. 985 
Unq. 

Unq- 


963 

995 


Unq. 100.0 
Unq. SS5 


Unq. 

Unq. 

Unq. 

Unq. 

Unq- 


98.5 

985 

985 

985 

985 

VotO 


LONDON GRAIN FUTURES 
Spar tonne 


Month 

Wheat 

Barley 

0098 

Close 


101.60 

101.60 

Nov 

10405 

10405 

Jan 

107.60 

107.60 

March 

no-20 

10905 

May 

11200 

111.10 

v Wume; 

Wheat ..... 



^ 



236 


LONDON 

POTATO FUTURES 
Eper tonne 


Month 

Nw 

Feb 

Apnl 

May 

Nov 


Open Close 
1285 1190 

142.5 132 9 

218.0 199.0 

227 5 205.0 

SI .8 835 

Vot 2201 


BIFFEX 

OLN.L Freight Futures Ltd 
report S10 per index paint 
freigbt In dex 


Wgh/Lore 

Jut 88 564.0-564.0 

Oct 86 644.0-641 0 

Jan 87 

Apr 87 

Ju! 87 685.0-6655 

Oct 87 

Jen 88 — 

Apr 88 

vot 52 tots 
Open mteresL 2232 


Oosa 
5650 
64*5 
6790 
732.S 
6800 
7700 
795 0 
8500 


TANKER REPORT 

16gh/Low Close 
Ju(86 1010-1010 10105 

Aug 88 1015.0 

Sep 86 — 1012.5 

D«C 86 10125 

Mar 88 10900 

Jun 88 1092.5 

Vot 27 lots 
Open (Merest 46 

Spot market commentary 
TankorMftic 

102350 up 21.00 an 22/7/86 

Dry cargo «dexr 

5665 (town 15 on 22/7/88 








4 






THE mflsS THURSDAY JUtY 24 1986 ’ 


BUSINESS AND FINANCE- - 29-' 



STOCK EXCHANGE PRICES 


Bear squeeze 


ACCOUNT DAYS: Dealings began on July 14. Dealings end tomorrow- §Contango. day Monday: Settlement day August 4. 

§Forward bargains are permitted on two previous business days. 


back or your card. You must always have 
your. pud available- 'when daimiqg. . 


© Tno Nrrrep*pen Liatted 

DAILY DIVIDEND 
£4,000 

Claims required for 
+24 points 

Claimants should ting 0254-53272 



Rubciatd 


Fine An Dev 



rcmcoi-Roadnone 


Smith (WH) *A 


SiviUe Gordon tfl 


Thomson T-Line 


Swre house 


l ESSZSSm i 


E33 1 


Induotats bit 


[jgpj7pT7igJ | 

ES53S3 I 




HAT • ■ 


Rainer? (Jewellers) 


Vkw Products 


Manganese Bronze 


Alpine Drinks 


Stead & Simpson 'A' 





Please beam to take 
ofuyaiMin 


Weekly Dividend 



BRITISH FUNDS 


NANClAL tw^a 


ire ire RomcreMUM) 

3B0 260 Royl Bnk Q( Scot 

«s 

328 

• 42 

7.1 

M2 

S.7 92 

4* 88 


f«V 

~V 

192 

51 1t7 

894 419 Sand Chart. . 

15/ 


GOOti 68 92 

■818 613 Oman - 

693 

+10 

529 

78 899 


H9> 

+v 



320 220 wtatrum . 

285 


33 

27139 


363 248 
840 820 
to a 
M4 K 
525 375 
182 M7 

sen *06 

515 410 
970 640 
804 IBS 
243 1S3 
355 275 
5M 406 
91 69 

179 155 
288 173 
114 77 
2ST 217 
a«a 131 
234 163 
340 S3 
3iB 223 
318 2Z8 
2S1 188 
550 41D 
315 105 


DMMIU A)- 960 

OroenamSwtey IBS 
Orate* Ong . 208 
S uHWl 313 

HUM 0 tfcnMB 5T4 
H#8DM . 75 

mveraorton Dm a 156 
Iran DM- - W3 
ktemon Unman 107 
Mortotf .. 244 

SA tefU l 100 
Soot »ltow 191 
VMOC 378 

ti> n r n 

nTWitei n “» 

DOT 2ffiS 

wMbroaaim 22i 
wamtunpei 8 D 543 
Yaw* 270- 


•43 130 

.... ».T 

• :. ij? • 

48 

• +1D 2O0t>- 

*10 78 

• .. 15.4 

.. MU : 

• .. IBS ; 

78 

42 OS 
■ 48 103 

• .. 230 ■ 

29 i 


. . mo 52.118 

43 MS 48 HO 

• 42 .11.1 4.1 128 

• -. 11.1 48122 

• 108 <8 284 

42 127 28 108. 

' . . HU 38 1&B 


BUILDINGS AND ROADS 



440 
3*0 
108 
133V 
07 
70 
042 
348 236'. 

100 140 
*33 328 

101 71 

tss -tar 

313 195 
290 24« 
70 -60 
204 
82 
121 ' 


114 47 22.4 
15.7 08 148 
01 O.l 108 

ai ao mo 

129 2515.1 
102 38125 
108 21 .. 
.. • .. 49 
108 58203 
44 69 mo 

37.1 *J> 128 

300 58 35 

143 58 254 

44 57138 

57 88 
48 .48154 
.. ... 14 

48 38 !! 
24 24148 
244b 48 38 
08 18124 

S 48 128 
94 134 
28b 19 23.1 
47 48 IBjO 

28. 27 127 
25 37 04 
54 9.0 234 
U 72 14.1 
28 2J0368 
78 21 132 

44 "S3 

24 34 128 

OS 4.1 152 
194 32 154 

7.1 4.1 120 
258e 58 148 
10.0 22 130 
10.0 22 120 
62 48 92 
58 75 04 
102 24148 
74 4.1 2tt0 
11 J .42162 
54 48224 

78b AI 158 
54« 58 .. 
175 4.1 14.1 
02 82198 
14 45 .. 
93 75 108 
228 58 118 
15.7 18172 
98 48148 
74 34 124 
48 48 08 
194 58 02 
ZOO 38148 
IAS 38 108 
128 42108 
9.1 57175 
35 25 198 
60b 92 178 
T34 ES 192 
123 38 141 
75 49 130 
122 29 160 
IS 21 92 
mo 07 3i.i 
134 43 137 
104 ' 37 ISO 
1.4- 2.0 54 
SC 20124 
IS 28240 
0.7 08 127 
20 -18 22.1 
04 27 196 



CHEMICALS. PLASTICS 


40 38’/ 
206 160 
415 Z»1 
2*7 100 
150 106 
Ilf; 70** 

132 102 

ISO 112 
100. 57** 
ISO 82 
309 2*5 
166 135 
160 1T2 
20 15 

163 127 

101 too 

3*5172 

133 111 
299 215 
168 113 
453 330 
101V 72V 
10'* 734 

410 3S3 
lit 102 
226 118 
85 62 

178 129 
330 216 
73 36 
233 ITS 
MO 67 


BTP 

Sapr OMS0 
togon 
Brara Own* 
Br Benzol 
Cnn^lW) 
cww 
Comm Bras 
Do A 

Cory (Horace 
Crons 
Do CM - 

EM 6 EnM 


Hoson DM50 
tap Chan tad 

\%r 


I 225 AUngwonfi 225 -2 IS 

I -no MnHm 130 .. 105 

i 286 Ancugnu 660 .. 275b 

1 110 BacWey Trot, 203 *3 

I IO'i CsMl 09 .. 17.1 

I 194 Ctadow • 2S* 17 

I 10 Ca mmm • 32 

fa 17- Ei«y 6G4n '.00 +*1 1.7 

; 138 JSiy • Stab 130 • .. 65 

1 153 Itatadte 164 *2 08b 

S 62 Wa4 Hoc* Uaob S3 +1 

> « DOft - *»V +*V .. 

I 114 K mulUI 140 


FOODS 



108 02*5 

32 1J 230 
158 58125 

SO 38140 
130 1.6 005 
4* 25 178. 
60 21 175 
40 5-1 95 
94 18225 

7.4 28197 
U 28 110 
40 55 99 
178 34157 

33 1.7 202 
75 78155 
13 08 200 

ao 351*5 

23 40 10.1 
114 40 142 
SO 34140 
68 3713.1 
08 35 142 
174 42 11 2 
75 . 2.1 220 
40 38192 

325 57115 
93 25218 
138 45137 
135b 55 12* 
87 57 19.1 


SweWe SpMtawn SB 
MXnnriotTN ill*. 22! 
Yortxhra ctwn 131 


CINEMAS AND TV 


HOTELS AND CATERERS 


270 178 Mgta TV -A‘ 250 «-3 135 55 13.1 

52 . 27 Ofaw . 40 29 60 65 

2*0.176 HTVfi/V ■' 220 .. 114 52100 

368 293 LINT hugs - 3*0 -4 212 62 138 

-350 186 Set* TV A’ . . 333 .. ISO 45 104 

280 153 TVS N/V -• 2*3 • .. 128 S3 115 

- *6 01 TS* *5 .. 26 58 124 


433 329 Grand Met S3 

2 W 208 Kandy Ck oo ta* 220 
381 §T2 LadUtM 3*0 

5*5 4*7 Lon PadtHota* 522 
100 76V Monet CttWi STj 

IDS 67 tax* Ol W HaM 10 

7Q »u ow n mm rav 

*05 370 Snoy MO tat 'A' 370 

91 56 SUM S* 


+7 135 35 120 

-3 21 18 114 

+2 Itl 47 162 
.. 143 27158 

20 23144 

21 24 155 

-1 23 33152 

SO 14 Wf 
18 20155 
*1 78 62 15.1 


DRAPERY AND STORES 


INDUSTRIALS 

A-D 



S 8 

90 79 
206 13S 
18 7 

650 357 
62 *0 
720 525 
356 236 
174 04 

‘ 53 41 

*00 305 
56* 4a 
268 1*5 
152 116 
395 260 
■ 99 68 
430 216. 
510 3*0 
100 73 
715 610 
22Q 134 
274 IS* 
1$ 39 

179 IDS 
133*J 61 
190 103 
464 310 
178 87 
0* 54 
150 80 
232 172 
5*5 304 
14-.-B30 
11**721 
307 190 
33 25 

43 sa 
162 102 
80 70 
36 a* 
132 110*. 
2SS 135 
630 700 
210 105 
831 »63 

aw 203 
839 >79 
635 530 
*1* 112 
297 109 
353 305 
01 55 

130 100 
103 105 
370 220 

ire ire 

44 31 
370 100 
157 72 
J4IV102 
304 ZU 
72 47 

S 8 

366 205 

a*v m 

42 27 

523 413 
-75 40 

00' 57'. 
190 170 
199 150 
STD 173 
342 235 
178 90 
925 430 


Atom 

Aquaecuwn 

a^' A ' 

Back* Las 
Body Shop 
Bt w ene r 
Broar-M 
Bunon 
Can*** W 

sss®. 

Com VtyflbJ 
ConfbMd Gn0*n 
Court* (f=m> A 1 
DAKS Smpxoa -A' 

DwrtW M~ 

OMn Grp 

HUM 

E*1 4 Gokteteta 
By* (W taM taor u 
Burn Stab* 
Earn 

E xecu te* Ckehae 
Fine Art Dm 
Fort (Mam} 
Form ata 
Freeman* 

sr-r 


HflHne 01 London 
Motet 

House or Lama 

HZ'S? s 

LCP ■ 121 

IMCOQQtr ISO 

LH»rty 710 

Lnrott Knur 200 

Marto i Spencer 200 
Henan pm} 303 

mu inn 2 iS 

Mas Bras 540 

NSS Nwagm 206 
Nero 246 

OwerfQ 3iS 


(Wed (Austro) 

Do A 

S( u Sons 
Samuel (HI 
Do A 
sen 

snmgwrA- 

Stanley (A O} 

sum a Sram 
Saareheun'. . 
SWrragvo 

SHiMCUhes 
SoptrtrjQ SHU 
TenFCoowm 
Toe Proauaa 
Da Top Ores 

WWOpobp ' 
warn wm 
WigtH* 
WbMMttfi 


48 26115 
JLfi 55322 
35 42 127 

35 22309 

38* K5S7* 

07 14 373 

IB.1 25 241 
65 25 tOO 
35 23322 

3.1 75 75 

12.1. 35148 
173 XS MS 
05 4.4 19* 
97 95 75 
65 63 mi 
15 . 15 17J 
*3 15 235 
78 15 165 

3£ 1612.1 
135 2.1 245 
5A 10 175 

61 20 77.1 
28 25 9* 

5.7 30 198 

96 4*108 
11X0 2417.7 
7.TH 4* M.1 
1* 18 <34 
53 38195 

10.7 51 19.1 

65 15 230 

&0 22202 

95 20 707 
ES 28198 
23 85 65 
51 7512* 
128 75118 
55 7.1 17.7 

1.1 17 222 
6* 5518.1 
58 32 S3 

1.1 15848 
07 SI 145 

50 25219 
55 15 H* 
2 S 15575 

62 15 255 

51 25210 

SBn 2*205 
25 4.1185 
18 1* 195 
55 48 20.0 
45b 24 175 
75 25 95 
7.9 35 1S1 
. . -.177 

68 15 642 
88 38 378 
48 45152 

96 38.155 
17n 31 1S7 
35 45138 
SI 59192 
15 35 185 


260 178 AAH 

239 194 ACBnenraeb 

07 » AIM 

671 601 APV 

110 BO Aaranson . 

258 172 Adweet 
3*3 207 WOPAWia 
275 130 ABM M 
*03 170 Apptadora . 
<7 32 Aitasen 

32 23 Anoour 

*40 3S5 ASB6 Lacey 

530 »5 i£% Eng Mb 
S3 37V Aurora 
373 263 Aeon Rotter 
69 *3 Agents Mate 

2*9 138 BBA 
455 3SS SET DM 
65 67 BETEC 

306 277V BOC 
332 237 BTR 
202 140 Btacm 
26V IS BHrnrKH} 

423 280 Bjrfl |M) 

310 216 Baur Panera 

210 128 Banco tad 

17* 112 Bvnara 


40 mi 
95 

-1 05 

.. 198 

.. ao 

.. T15 

45 65 

I .. 12-1 

► 66 
.. OB 
♦1 03 


ELECTRICALS 


398 no AB Beet 360 .. It 4 32268 

101 120 Ata a menc 160 ' 21 15178 

121 3S Amend 110 9 44 do 03445 

99 50 WHCMHH SB OSb 09 44 

96 03 Artan 9* -2 XI 

300 205 Attn Be Comp 270 30 15 96 

S3 *5 Auoo Featay 53 1U 

229 140 Auto 540 193 -6 2.1 1 1 1X2 

370 240 KCC 273 42 157 55 164 

UOSCBSn 63*52*2955 


*3 10 

Ml » 
136 100 
5*2 214 
620 310 

.ga 

5§iS- 

174 147 
256 178 

62 33 

335 167 

!A 

353 250 
22 V 18 V 
123 75 
383 319 
97 62 
46 33\- 
50 3S 

199 110 
21* 139 
130 115 
303 ISO 
143 S7 
323 196 
423 296 
1*5 3* 

3* 15 

49 25 
190 154 
30 19 

73 40 
303 200 
26? 136 

63 59 

M2 M 

58 25' 

so as 

405 253 
120 SO 
38' 25’. 
8 5 

25 2 
93 45 

87* 65 1 
105 SS 

200 196 
6*0 516 
358 2SS 


Beristari £SM9 237 
BMP** 13* 

i 

$ 

S 

axxpmn 240 


SSST* 3?3 

BBI I*t»r me ET7 1 . 

WH ap 105 

Brenner 321 

Bmwty 90 

sranoraan *6 

Qndptafl Ck> *3 

Saka IBS 

BOormny 202 

Br Bldg 6 Eng App 125 
Br Steam 255 

Br Sf?W 112 

Br«a .310 
tootteMI 3*7 

Bromegegra mat a* 

tear* tofl 30 

Broom Tad 37 

Bro*m 4 Ttam no 

teonn Poftn) 27 

Bnawnj |UM BO 

Butaugn 290 

a wpK 22* 

Pc c a- An oeroon SO 

Candort Eng 96 

Caoaro w S3 

cape me re 

CMS Eng 375 

Cas«gt 110 

Wtrocm 33 

Cental 4 Sheer 5*. 
Caramme* Ha 34 

CH tad .90 

amitan 87 

CtaCMBiHl 100 

DM Cam 290 

Ctanang 000 

Ormtu 270 

one ton *9 

CtottlCtenenl 2*1 


** 11* 38 .. 

-1 1* 28 9S 

9£ 25 12* 
28 48 08 
28 18308 

-8 220 55 128 

20 38 10.1 
+1 14.1 45 117 

45 88 27 21.1 
1109(0 134 
178 

. . ms 5.1 12.1 

•43 107 38 93 

08 4* 14* 
28 18 190 

40 

20 7.1 121 
.. 25.7b 98 0* 

*1 I5b 78 .. 

46 «L7 5-3 as 

08 92 23 

~2 68 20 168 

• 43 17.1 4J17.1 

.. .. I .. .. 

18 48 318 

.'I 75 7 * 0* 

■M 21 48 75 

-2 96 15303 

20 1*44.7 

98 88195 
.. 3* 10390 

50 42 135 
140 6.1 44 138 

» .. 08 52 95 

84 *4 12* 

2* 18 225 

1*0 3* 6* 
» .. 20 06235 

&6 3.1118 
+5 171 45 18* 

*5 10.1 38 164 

43 138* 48198 


-2 178 

38 

42V 21 

.. 06 
*2 7.1 

7* 
1* 

• ■15 11.1 

43 
.. 1U 
-7 

-2 19 

.. 0.7 

22 

■ «2 108 

” ' 48 
-13 11 7 
26 

• 4fi 
25b 

4l 2* 

• -1 29b 

• .. 229 

« .. 48 


• .. 34 

■ . 50 

»4i? 58 

•42 164 

.. 2B> 

42 TM 


1*3 98 
520 300 
216 14! 
2DV 9 
112 71 
57 » 
200 74 

570 356 
BO 32 
111 83V 

425 331 
6i 40 
174 121 
224 156 
2T6VT41V 
40 32 
315 207V 
305 206 
23V 1BV 
90 - 40- 
230 170 
132 S 
io*-6se 
29 171 
260 100 
315 168 
1BV 17V 
371 215 
102V 43 
110 66 
1» 95 
150 29 

97 61 
06 72 


313 2*0 
221 154 
277 21* 
43V 26 V 
IS 102V 
29V 17V 
104 62 

2*» 10V 
301 202 
2&V 10V 
164 134 
177V 130V 
1*0 112 
342 19 
21 * 12 * 
415 315 

56 22 

42 26 

1*3 106 
75 50 

628 408 

67 35 

» 84 
69 31V 
123 100 
41 * 27 V 

199 157 

57 51 

131 04 

385 256 
310 260 

no eo 

157 100 
ISO 111 
11V75SV 
344 194 
505 310 
182 107 
312 206 
ID*. ^ 
83 69V 
232 134 
182 126 
2 ® 100 

200 230 

*1 zy. 
40 21 

191 Ml 
190 145 
119 90 
124M16V 
190 133 
275 175 
623 431 
150 82 

190 01 
221 MO 
2D1 90 

96 65 
142 122 
01 62 
106 08 
2*5 1*8 
TZD 91 
310 234 
US 00 
265 207 v 

191 119 
316 211 


CteyeenSwi 
Cohen <« 

Cetera# Gp 
competed Teen 
Contemn; 

Com Ataowy 
CtW (Wmj 
Codttoo • 
Cowan (F) 
coon 

Courtney ft** 

Gown Oe Groa 
Cwt Kenoudn 
Cramn House 
Cummms 3*i% 
DSC 
PPCE 

Deni . 

Dt4as 6 Met 'A' 

Dbmm 6 N ew ma n 

SW 


00 Denuno Sorapng 


OMde Heel 
Dtatema 


rr 


740 

470 • .. 

194 +7 
9V 

IB ' 

SB •-! 

195 • .. 
460 *2 

70 

10 * 

411 

67 +1 

156 -1 

202 ■ -2 

£141 V .. 

a 

2SS 

273 45 

£19V 
65 -4 

230 •*£ 

(28 *4 

nov • .. 
195 ■ -2 

261 *3 

265 

17 V .. 

215 

90 • .. 

106 

122 •*£ 
100 +2 


700 7.1 84 

154 83?1.1 
7.1 3.7 15.1 


Beorotuir (AQ V 

Ebon ©) 

Bn hwt 

Engksh On CM 
Ertcraon OM) *8' 
Erslune House 
European Femes 
te5VPrl 
Evarad 
Exptmecini 
Exta 
Fafcon 

Feaoex Agne tad 
FwnerUft 
Me keener 


FtatatoCEW 106 

FotW 51 

^S?C«xoN/V '»V 
Fo&arga iHaivey 175 
French Ohoenw) 53 

GE> tat 10* 

am 332 


□tawed 

Goring Kerr 


Groveoet 
H*b* Prncown 


Hekne 270 

tamoeon tad 39V 

H antntx 22 

Hanson 171 

Do ffa. Cm £170 

do sv« pe loon 

DO 10* - £118 

Htagreues 179 

ttante (Pnapt 263 

Henwr siddeisr 523 

U ttar -«a 

Hey (NDnnany iso 

hasMisrth CtatanC 206 
Hestar 163 

Haute 11} 00 

tettmtaS Job 137 

t&m a roe . 2068 

Hotl Uoyd 94 

H u p ta ta uTn 253 

Hotdan 99 

huMtag Asaoe 290 

hflrmnq Group 103 

HuKtso Whampoa 2S4 
M 165 

taobon 229 


12 5.7 .. 
148 68 73 
68 65 98 
<7.1 46 128 

98 48 SS 
11* 4.4 181 
10* 4.1106 
0-6 3*19.7 
78 85 03 
7* 08128 
7,1 87 118 

7.9 65185 

87 65 21* 

67 75198 


143 58 67 
107 55 126 

9.6 42 125 
85 68 193 
08b 48 138 


2B 9V 

90 59 
144 78 

241 73 

281 96 
125 73 

IT* 1SV 
62V 56'- 
209 212 
5*0 293 
130 102 
195 ]20 
20evi34V 
1M 118 
165 128 
236 ISO 
144 89 
1» 181 
375 239 
1S4 09 

231 100 
50V 14V 
110 SS 
116 79 
295 210 
12* 82 
2® 177 
ISO 137 
7*0 335 
160 120 
590 <26 
9* SO 
44 20 

93 43', 
89 64 
178 135 


Tremwod 

Tnekt 

Trdex 

Tirter 0 NMI 

uxO 

ungwo 

3525 (mo 

vtaot 
W dm 

Mctpr PieduetB- 

Wntai- 

Votonagen 

Wade Roeenes 
Wagon tno 
«tetad Qas 
W W H 

WfidgMOd 


UOteacntt 
VMies (Motel] 
Wteems Mdga 
YteaGp 
VKtedl M 
wood {Aibu} 
WondtSW) 

Waxhouso 6 Sta- 

wy«Moi Eng 
Young M 


. . . . 267 

61 61 612 
29 2.1 161 
107b 93 78 
7.1 30 112 
f.6 15 282 

562 38 158 


-1 75 

.. IBS 
*2 08; 
*2 - 25 
+1V .. 

II 4* : 

. . lit - ! 

*6 15 

.. Si : 
*3 M3 i 
.. *1 : 
.. 38 

1? 43 i 

75 i 
alO 35 
79 I 
I .. 125 ! 

96 I 

. . 17.1 i 

*3 08 I 

» .. i5J» : 

.. 86 i 

i*a.l 

*4 39 ■ 

.. 2Bb • 
•2 --*.7. : 


312 200 
58 28 
120 38 
430 271 
7' 4'. 

S* .33 
20 11 
243 85 
300 130 
40 18 

143 95 
3* 23 

S3 1 . *3 
810 6S3 
105 133 
97 18 
23V 12 
153 .43 
290 85 
»6 1S6 


GtaOMNMf 237 

Goal PH 31 

Cl WWton Res S8 

CGK • 405 

CC 04 

taoea 33 

KCA Orteng u 

LASMO . 101 

Do urns 100 

Nn London » 20 

Petrocon • 100 

Praner 27 

Royal Duai £52 . 

Sfio# • 793 

S4katote 172 

S»W 09 i 35 

TR Energy 12 

Tncenrc? 50 

Trtcn Europe 86 

Ltwear 163 


-1 1* 43 117 l 

29 50 . 

> ., 236' 5.9 US V 

:: *3 ax 

*1 174 172 Mi- * 

• M2. 793 ..y\r 

•2 * ■ .a - 

66 SEIZE -r 

. .; IS*-. 

.. 226 43 .. -. 

.. 580 63 70 .- 

88- 8O20fl -i 

1 A . : 

.. .. Il 5 . ; 

.. 7.1 148 2.2- - 

11.7.. -i 

*2 ISO S2 ifc:. 


INSURANCE 


Bnamsc 
Cam Unon 

Etertr 6 Lt 

fSr 

Cm Acddem 
SC 

Hwtai CE 
Hoqg Roman 
Lager 6 Gen 
Lortaon 6 Men 
Lon UH kw 
Uaraft 6 Uctan 


Prademai 

W 

Stegnu* Gp 
Sta-en wr-eon 
Stage wags 
Sun Ateinca 
Sun LA 
Trade tadenaaty 


105 +1 

E24V 

£ 28 v - 

370 -6 

879 *5 

313 *-1 


290 

8*2 *5 

902 *5 

522 +5 

320 

26S +4 

184 4-1 


MS*.. 
100 48 .. 
SU tl .. 
66 £3 28* 
*2.8 48 .. 
169 S« .. 
98 38 .. 


«3V **4 
260 

323 P+5 

E1SV +'■ 

037 *3 

420 

g +13 
+15 

407 

*10 +6 

3 * 

417 +6 


t Trusts awnar on Pnge 28 


68 6i 132 
108 48 108 
65 68 60 
11* 39 90 

M U 74 


126 96V Jtatsne Mate 
615 473 johnwn Ctaanere 
219 133 johmon Meaner 
44V 22V Johnson 6 FB 
330 235 Johnson 
MO 90 Jonas 6 Shpman 
02 67 Joudan (Tiwna*) 
» 21 Katansuo 
30 2S Katal - 
325 108- Kataay tad 
130 IQS Kanmdy Strata 
296 230 IMtaW 
215 123 Ktaait&Se 


18 08*28 
66 32148 

293 58 164 
38 2812* 
.. « .. 160 
10.7 3* 12.1 
SS 43 65 
S3 49 14* 
28 S 10 * 9.4 
1.7 S8 21.0 
11* 38 163 
- 28 b 1.7 21.1 
21.4 v 78 238 
00b 43 133 





13V 4V 
1 0'. 630 
ST: 33 
.09 33 

40 22 

41 22 
190 120 
425 2*0 

160 ao 

21V 9V 
350 232 
-09 . *3 
534 419 
-531 3M 
200 105 

9V 4 V 
•13V. 7V 
TV 2ft 
255 150 
5B4 Z5B 

205 129 
195 B5 
390 220 
4>. 2V 

9 «V 
213 93 

75 19 

ev jv 

10 B 
10V 5V 

478 313 
83 35 . 

37S 170 
,156 91 
_»V 4V 
.350 ITS 
. 91 -47V 
12V 5V 
SV 2 V 

a %, 

410 170 
-157 72 
72 15 
123 60 
20V 1«V 
26 5V 
9 5V 

685 490 

5V 2'. 

1*2 73 

44 25V 

22v 10V 
128 90 

299 205 
25 O’. 

44$ 176 
69 19 

296 225 
791 S11 
7*. IV 
10V S'" 
180 70 
31 MV 
556 288 
138 80 

138 75 
569 300 
59 V 31V 
544 233 
105 52 

90 *5 
17 10V 

645 208 
310 128 
29V 16 
198 114 
265 113 
140 00 
17V 7V 
M 20 
lev iov 
58 as 


Ang Anar Coal 
Ang Am 
Am»ta 
ANT 


Butt* 

CRA 

Can BMd 
Com rating i" 
Oe Beers 
DeafcaM . - • 
Doonriontan 
Dnetoraem 
DUtan 
E Dragee 
EtoxSrad 
BOro 
Bttxra 
E Hand Odd 
E Rend Mop 
« Cone 
FS Dev 

as 1 * 

w** 

GM KMgntrt 


+15 540 
+V 448 
-I 271- 
a .. 142 

» .. .T*2- 

.. 478 

+2 79.0 

+1 260 
♦V 202 
-11 
-2 

-+5 3S0 
+1 160 
+1 48 

., 32-0 

♦V 120 


BOV 2aV Abaca 
04 69 Abed Ian 
90 70 Apta 

183 -i» -Aringten Sec* 


595 440 Bradford 550 

iM 144 Brim 109 

170 130 Bern 1B3 

46 35 CWro (A) SSons 43 

233 210 Cap 6 Coundtl 233 

290 200 Caron Prop zas 

198 170 CahtnMnaai 170 

405 410 CnastariMa *70 

870 790 CALA 055 

91 131 ciaftt NCtoDs 160 

279 IB* Connate - 258 

.zo .14 -Cotnmi Sew- - WV 
MO -90 Camay 6 Nt 120 

ITT .117 Couny 8 186 

K5 175 Cram- 255 

755 *70 Di»|i«n 

20 6>- Dares 

17S M5 Eatons A 


EBMUS6 Agency 
Bgenon TVusi 
Estates Gen 


♦15 

*13 12.0-38 .. 

66 33133 
+1 14.0 143 .. 

+10 260 If* .. 


+V 600 
♦V 870 
.. 468 

-10 .. 

.. 200 
+0 - 640 
5* 

♦V 628 
*2 170 

*2 345 

+* -890 • 

1 V “2 
+3 290 

.. 115 

-a 


MOWS Exp 
Mlwngun 
Mddte VMtS 


MU> Wort 
Oranga Tree 


+2 178 27.4 .. 

-IV 

+2 .. 9 .. .. 

.. 100 20 I! 

♦V 230 7.7 .. 


Rand Mines Ltd 
Rand Utaea Prop 
Randfontam 
Rantaon 
TO 

Ruatan»g 
& Htaane 
SA Lard 
SouttaBBl 
SUtaialn 

SS“ 

Umtt . . 

vui neats 
Wanwspoit 


WtatoaGoOtoy 


Western Utamg 
Warn Rand Cone 
wn«n croak 
Wnkeh 
we wgai 

Zmba Cogpar 

2 inda*n 


... 120 60 40 

♦1 551 136 .. 

+5 

+7 31* 5.7 73 

+■■ 260 43 414 

♦V 125 20.0 .. 

. .. 180.2*0 .. 
+V 110 >3 .. 
♦5 


.. *&J3 T2JS .. 
♦.IV 550 168 .. 
+10 5*0 210 .. 
.. 150 273 .. 

43 66 65 


+10 B70 213 .. 
+3 23.0 150 .. 

+V 171 10* .. 
-4 MU., 
+12 120 92 .. 

-3 a a 

+V 175 210 .. 
+4 1.1 4* .. 

+5 37 MX8 


•181 1*0 Estates Prop- W • 

112 81 Em Of Leads 108 

172 51 J Federated nouteig 156 

70 36 fi»a Oaks - 65 

205 170 Froaaero 205 

192 148 Gr Portland 182 

274 2Q2 Orayeoai 2*6 

16V 11 Hamteod Gp Cl 2V 

400 20* Hamero CinwyteateSiO 
496 *32 V Hananerson 4*0 

*85 *17V DO -A- 425 

2*8 130 Henoror Drooa W 

325 233 Hardangar 303 

310 270 limy 300 

185 155 Jarmyn IBS 

320 273 Lamg Prop 3(0 

75V 54 Land tavesttrs 75V 

3*0- 276 Land Sacoraes 325 

695 358 • L«n 8 EPn Tst . 6B0 

296=147- 00 0^' -239 = 

208 218 Lon 0 Pro* Shop 248 

17S 151 Lon Snap Prop 174 

353 288 Lyreon 3*5 

3S0 275 MEPC -343 

126 » Moneray too 

lie 105 McKay Secs 110 

58 4* MartdWdSI SI 

196 125 Mertvoie Moot 175 

77 60 MartabrouVi 72 

550 173 Matter E» 650 

990 510 MOUtntogn 990 

775 364. Umtataew 720 

108 82 MUCfckta |A3J) ' 104 ‘ 

20 18V Munxteal OflV 

105 73 Ito Swddl 105 

fi. *3 Parwtata . 69 

282 S5 Peachey 278 

230 . 72V Prtest Monans 230 

Z30 176 Prop S (lav 226 

155 107 Prop Hug* MB 

127 108 PropSaeurey 125 

13V 8'- R»CF»h 12 

660 320 Regeten 620 

0*5 313 RooehauOi 600 

297 253 Ruan S Ttmtataw 203 

272 1S3 Samuel 260 

103 78 sea M« 99 

i«3 1*2 Slough Estmaa 174 

445 260 SpaiSwA *2 0 

173 144 Stand Secs 165 

93 68 StocMey SO 

SB 45 Tm Centro 53 

260 138 Tratlort Par* 230 

>48 95 UK Land 130 

900 S25 Utd Real 050 

873 67S Warner 87S 

610 475 Wanted 605 

26 17 V Watt (Jen) 2* 

173 142. Wksr t Ctxmev (88 


0 3b 0.4 . .. 
22 28 19.0 
U 32188. 

84 53 tjjr 
17.1 58 148 
134 £8 108. 
48 2814*: 
31 SjD 192* 

U 37 21.9- 
2.B 03 ...- 
38 51 2*3- 

17.1 36 135 
2370 30 128 • 

90 58 2*2 
68 23 24.4 

.. * ... I. 83 
27 23279 
SB 34 S3* 
88 3*578* 
208 28 139 

43.: 30 322' 
37 S.7-;.. 
26 3223* 
121 6J *58. 
5.1- 53127 
4.7 38 16* 

.. i.. S0 

10.1 42 122 

9* 52 228 

21 13*6-2 


136 12 288' 
50 28 239 
131 50 I1> 

31 37*8* 
39 12*18- 
108 33 153 
1.7 22 422: 
.149 43-21:7: 
•10.7b 18 253 
93 .38 CL 
67 -37 21?' 

7.6 *4 218 
134 lores 
157 4.6218. 

42 42 2Bl): 

31 01 1735 

86 2.1 J7J- 
08 1 3333 

43a as srg 

14.3 1.4 12*. 

7.1 13 no 

7.4 71 130 
173 08 363 

1.7 18 463 

23 33 m3 

111 4* 373) 


312'. >87 
396 SOS 
368 233 
9* 56 
603 ISO 
76 54'. 

12’ 5 


MOTORS AND AIRCRAFT 


38 17 

274 2U 

99 55 
» 49- 
529 373 
141 103 

12s ire 

170 94 

16* 12* 
154 lit 

164 93 
52 29 

138 75 
153 103 
990 703 
53V 32 
SB 1* 
149 03’, 
500 380 
»■- 26V 
133 9* 
41 30 

326 220 
225 163 
IS* 128 
153 71 
118 86 
83 43 
610 3*5 
SCO 354 
1(8 98 
253 170 
99 75 
210 153 
224 183 
248 ISO 
29* 90 

43 12 
221 160 
587 3*9 
195 TI5 
250 « 
535 300 
77 -- 33 
0 5‘- 

95 6* 

165 116 
llfl 91 
236 89 
333 SB 
349 287 
243 200 
195 124 


Si 33 

StoTtasy 23S 

SanOuS » 

State* Corson (j) B1 
Scap* 483 

Scot Gntenhm 128 
Sett Hentsota 170 

Scon 6 Rooartson 156 
Secuncor 13 

Do -A 1 111 

Stony Sore 111 


• .. -7* 

. . 7.1 . 

*2 22 
♦V 18 
... ..1 
+3 11.1 

■+7 228 

*+1 32 

I 78 
.. 58 

a+i 0.4 

.. 78 

-5 48 

*1 72 

48 

+2 258 1 

+2 . 


1-4 38 

-2 38 

+17 123 

... 6.1 

-1 3.0 

+2 15.1 

78 

♦3 13.7 

64 

I 0* 

. . 4.1 


SHIPPING 


Assoc Br Rons Z76 -2 

& CornnorweaUi 266 +1 

Ctaedona 238 • 

Art* (James) 73 

Gtm 520 

Jacobs go 72 

Lite . 5V *V 

Mersey DOCAI 34 

Ocean Transport 219 . fl 

P 4 O DM • *90 

Rtmcmsn (WMer) MO +5 

Tumor* 329 - . . 

Tuntaul Scon- 375 • .. 


- 1* ;283t5 
-108 78 158 

20.0 2*848 
279 12398 

2*3 48 21.6 
0 7 2 9 774 

114 00 OS 


7.1 26 158 

71 27 18.7 

71 30 418 

4.7 84 02 

214 41 87 

5.1 .7.1 too 

as 

;. . .. 38 
93 42 to.) 
228 *.7 140 

7.1 512Z0 


II 


SHOES AND LEATHER 


380 290 FB 325 • .. 93 25 127 

206 152 Oamar Booth IS* . . 143 93 98 

45 32 Hoadtam tons 43 07 1.6 . 

210 168 LatWtert Ho*vm IBS 02 44 99 

82 66 Nmcoid 6 Burton 76 4* S3 238 

1t4 a? Pmard 106 .. 02 58 7,3 

157 118 Snong 6 fisner iso 11* 78 «o 

273 158 Stylo 223 +3 64 28 27.6 


sntoh 124 

Stew 130 

Stab* 950 

Sdrarraw 44 

S«fBh 230 

5b Himoratl ill 

Secrecy *96 

SKF -fl- E34V 

Emms N«hta 125 

Srom vnrorarei 37 

Smote Ind 263 

SflBte MW) 200 

Spraa-torw 176 

Safa PpbeMS 151 

Sag Ftaitesra 109 

Star Comp 80 

Sawney 580 

Stettay *o 

Swing tad 1U 

surairte 2*3 

SOW* 75 

stonon 6 Pe i85 

SuWgtH San ?16 

ar» 229 

Sun Paoic 'A 108'. 
6ycamra 35 

ir- ' m 

TKT 135 

TSL Thermal 110 

Tbcc 515 

Tafeeda Own P7-. 

Tafcw 0 

Tettte 87 

TeaHBJ 5 OS 

Tnro ttta -’0 

Tnomran T-Loe 

Teeamspta) 310 

Trotataar House 2SS 

Trenjcwtnersta 222 

irampon Dev id* 


NEWSPAPERS AND 
PUBLISHERS 


33 28 21 3 
0.4 1.1 250 
68 28208 
96 *5152 

7.6 48 131 

5.7 38 92 
75 7210.7 

. 359 

250 43132 
108 40 14.1 
38 34 274 
17.1 7 0 52 
86 115 74 
.. b .. 58 

129 S0 129 
0 JO 28238 


143 82 121 

188 38 172 

*3° 39 57 
95 13 2*2 

. • 74 

40 4 6 103 
64 4 7 125 
31 28 122 

52b 17 972 
IBM 71 73 
98 43 153 
89 48 158 


Assoc Book 2Z0 

uuc N evap ipor 313 
Btack <AK] 310 

Brntoi 670 

catens flwa} *60 

Do K 310 

EMAP 'A' 20* 

Htynw PUDfesUng 360 
Ham Comets 220 
(MfpendMt . 305 

Ira ThdteOn S3* 
Ntero Wematortel £13 
Ocmpue 310 

PortBeeuth SUM 116 
TiWW H 413 

Uld Htarop bp m 3B5 


Anroor 89 

Aron Energy II 

ABarac Rwcurces 12 

Br Pttndeun 503 

BnMef M 11V 

» Borneo 336 

toao* 140 

Banaii 30 * 

Canes* Caoet a 

Canary 13S 

Charttma* 27 

Enenm 'K 

Gubar Energy 38 


.. ao 

1+3 63 

. . 143 

-5 386 

.. IM 

44 11 1 

+1 5* 

.. 200 . 
+io mo 
120 
.; 140 

140 
+10 98 

e+4 ' 57 

+3 214- 

+5 222 


256 54 119 
188 133 IB 
102 40 12.1 
39 7J) 104 
7.1 U 870 
..-814 
121 115 4.1 



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WALL STREET 


Ju) 

22 


AMR 49% 

ASA 31% 

AlMd&gntf 38%. 
AlfaWStre <8% 
AKJsCWmrs 
Alcoa 
Amaxlnc 
Amnia Hs 
Am Brands 
Am Can 


AmCyrnn'd 
iBPwr 


4 

35V, 

77K 

83% 

80% 

73:v 

ZS 1 -', 


3% 

37% 

23V. 

57% 

6% 

12 


Brden 
Bg Warner 


Am — - 

Am Express 60% 
Am Home 87% 
Am Motors 
AmSlnrt 
Am Taiaph 
Amoco 
Armco Steel 

Asareo 

Ashland Ofl 55% 
At Richfield 43% 
Avon Precis 33 S 
BkrsTst NY 47 
Bankamer 13% 
BkolBston 39% 
Bank of NY 64 
Beth Steel to 
Boa mo 59% 

47% 

36'/. 

Bust Myers 82% 
BP 35% 

Burr ton kid 36% 
Burl'ton Ntn 58% 
Burroughs 64% 
CmpbSSp 62% 
Care Paata 11 
Caterpiler 45% 
Geianase 216% 
Central SW 34 
Champon 23% 
Chase Man 33% 
ChmfflcNY 45% 
Chevron 37 
Chrysler 37% 
Citicorp 55% 
Clark Equip 18% 
Coca Cola 40 % 
Colgate 38% 
CBS 135% 

C'tmba Gas 40 
CmbtnEng 25% 
Comwtth Ed 32% 
Cons Edta 49 
Cn toit Gas 29 % 
Cons Power 12% 
Cntrl Data 22% 
Coming 61 62% 

CPC Inti 67% 
Crane 29% 

Cm 2e£or 37 
Dart & Kraft 60 
Deere 23% 
Delta Air 39 
Detroit Ed 16% 
Digital Eq 84% 
Disney 43% 

. DowChem 55% 
Dresser Ind 15% 
.Duke Power 47% 
DuPont 76% 
'.Eastern Air 9 
■Estm Kodak 55% 
Eaton Corp 64% 
Emerson 0 80 

Exxon Corp 60% 
Fed Opt Sts 81% 


48% 

31% 

38% 

47% 

4% 

35 

11 % 

18% 

91% 

80% 

72% 

28% 

59% 

87% 

3% 

36*1 

23% 

57% 

7 

11 % 

55 

50 

32% 

46% 

13/t 

37% 

62% 

10 '. 

60% 

53 Y: ■ 
48% 

38% 

83% 

35% 

36% 

SB 

65% 

62% 

11 

46 

206% 

33% 

22 % 

39 

45.% 

36% 

37% 

53% 

18% 

40% 

39 

135 

39% 

28 

32'-'. 

48% 

28% 

12% 

22 % 

63% 

66 

28% 

37N 

59% 

23% 

38% 

16% 

83% 

49% 

54% 

15% 

47% 

75% 

9 

54 
64% 
80% 
60% 
80% 


Jti 

22 


Firestone 24% 
Fa Chicago 29% 
FalntBncp 61% 
FstPemC 7% 
Ford 56% 

FTWaehva *i% 
GAFCorp 35 
GTE Corp 54% 
Gen Corp 68% 
Gen Dy’mcs 73 
Gen Electric 74% 
Gen Inst 18% 
Gen Mite 83% 
Gen Motors 74% 
Gn POUtny 22 
Genesco 3% 
Georgia Pac 31 
G*ete 48% 

Gootfefcn 397. 
Goodyear 30% 
Gould Inc 16% 
Grace 50% 
GtAtt&Tec 24 
Grund 33% 
Gruman Cor 26% 
Gull & West 86% 
Hofii HJ. 45% 
Hercules 
Hlett-Ptad 


50 

38% 

65 

22 % 

52% 


ingersoll _ 
Intend Steel 15 
IBM 133% 

INCO . 11% 
totPaper 65 
tot Tel Tel 54 
Irving Bank 56 
Jfmsn&Jtm 69% 
Kaiser Alum 15% 
Kerr McGee 25% 
Kmb'lyGrk 81% 
K Mart S2!i 

62% 
3 

78% 
48% 
24% 


Kroger 
LTV C 


Corp 

Utton 
Lockheed 
Lucky Strs 
Man H*nver 44% 
MamitoCp 2% 
Mapco 47% 
Marine Mid 49 

tot Marietta 43% 
Masco 30% 
McDonalds 68% 
McDonnell 79% 
Mead 47% 

Merck 105% 

MmstaMng 110% 
Mobil Oil 31 

Monsanto 67% 
Morgan J.P. 86% 
Motorola 34% 
NCR Corp 50% 
NLlndstre 15% 
NatCterirs 34 v, 
NatMedEnt 24% 
NatSmcndt 9 
Norfolk Sth 80% 
NWBancrp 38% 
Occidnt Pet 25% 
Ogden 
Ofcn Corp 
Owens-W 
Pac Gas B 
Pan Am 
Penney JC. 75% 
Pennzal 54 

Pepisco __3i% 


38% 

43 

37% 

24% 

5% 


23% 
29% 
61 
7% 
56% 
40% 
32 
55 
67% 
72% 
75% 
18% 
82% 
74% 
22 
3% 
30% 
44K 
38% 
30% 
16% 
50% 
23% 
33% 
26% 
65% 
44 V. 
49 
38% 
63% 
22 % 
51% 
15% 
131% 
11 % 
65% 
53 
55% 
67% 
15% 
25% 
84% 
51% 
59 
2 % 
75% 
48 
26 ’A 
44% 
2 % 
<7% 
50% 
42% 
29% 
70% 
79% 
47% 
101 
109% 
30% 
66 
86 
33% 
50% 
15% 
35 
24% 
6% 
82% 
38% 
25% 
38% 
42% 
36% 
24% 
6 % 
73 
52% 
30% 


Pfizer 

Pimps Doe 

PhApMra 

PteifcsPet 

Polaroid 

PPG tod 

PrctrGmW 

PbSE&G 

Raytheon 
RCA Corp 
RyMdsMei 
Rockwrtlnt 
Royal Dutch 
Safewavs 
Sara Lea 
SFESopae 

SchlOerger 

Soon Paper 

Seagram 

Seats Rbek 

Shef Trana 

Sngw 

Snw*tnBk 

Sony 

Sth Cal Ed 

ioSoS 

Starkog Dm 

Stevens Jr 

Sun Comp 

Teledyne 

Tenneco 

Texaco- 

Texas -E Cor 

Texas tost 

Texas Utils 

Textron 

TravtraCor 

TRW Inc 

UAL toe 

UnteverNV 

UnCartHde 

Un Pac Cor 

Utd Brands 

US Steel 

UtdTachnol 

Unocal 

Jim Walter 

WmarLmbt 

Weds Farm 

W'sQhaeQ 

Weyerti’sar 

Wntopod 

Wootwodh 

Xerox Corp 
Zenith 


CANADIAN PRICES 



AbWbl 
AIcnAhxn 
AtoomaSd 
CSoPactfic 
Cominco 
Con Bathrst 
Hkr/SUCa n 
HdgnB Mw 
tmasco 
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In Pipe 
Mass-Ferg 
RyiTrustCo 


CO . 
ThmsnN’A' 
WlkrHJrarn 
WCT 


22 % 

41 

14% 

15% 

12 % 

24% 

27% 

27% 

35% 

36% 

41% 

°$1% 

79% 

22 % 

30% 

36% 

13% 


22 % 

40 

14% 

15% 

12 % 

24% 

27% 

27% 

35% 

36 

41% 


YK Pad afloat In Hook Kong; nearly £200m spent from his own fortune 


Pao may seek to join board 
of Standard Chartered 


From Stephen Leather, Hong Kong 


% 


% 
78% 
23 
30% 
38% 
13% 


e E> e» «A5w*tM3i5Zm iu lUtomooSET^nraS jrsnMsnu looec yDSBa 

Britain and US near 
to trading abuses deal 

' Washington (Reuter) - The posal that Congress grant the 
United States and Britain are U.S. Commodities Futur es 
near an agreement aimed at Trading Commission (CFTQ 
combating trading abuses in the power to subpoena foreign 
their securities and com mod- citizens in their own countries, 
ities markets, U.S. and British in connection with investiga- 
officials said today. tions of fraud and other 

Under the accord, the two abuses, 
nations would agree to co- REUTER Britain charged in a 
operate when investigations of formal protest to the U.S. 
.possible commodities or secu- State Department^ that the 
rities law violations led across subpoena power, ir granted to 
either border. the agency, would violate 

The first round of talks Britain’s sovereignty, 
began in June in Washington Under British law, the gov- 
and a second is scheduled for emment can withhold bank 
London next month. records and other evidence 

The talks were sparked by from foreign law enforcement 
HBritain’s concern aver a pro- officials. 


Sir YK Pao, the Hong Kong 
shipping tycoon, has returned 
his attention to Hong Kong 
this week following his rescue 
of Standard Chartered from 
the dutches of Lloyds Bank. 

A number of companies 
within his Hong Kong and 
Kowloon Whan group are 
reporting their results this 
week — and Wharfs turn is 
tomorrow. 

Analysts are looking for 
profits of about HKS700 mil- 
lion (£63.6 million) for the 
year to March — a 40 per cent 
increase. 

Switching between Hong 
Kong and London, even at 
shore-notice, is nothing unusu- 
al for Sir -YK Pao, who 
snatched Wharf in as dramatic 
a move as his Standard Char- 
tered intervention. On that 
occasion, he was in London 
when Hong Kong Land 
launched a bid, but flew back 
to the colony, arranged HKS6 
billion in credit lines and 
made a successful higher bid. 

His decision to invest in 
Standard and ultimately 
thwart the £13 billion Lloyds’ 


takeover bid seems to have 
been made at the last minute. 

The bid's deadline was 1 pm 
on Saturday, July 12, but it 
was not until the night of 
Wednesday, July 9, that Sir 
•YK boarded a plane for 
London. On Thursday morn- 
ing. he telephoned his broker. 

They moved into the mar- 
ket immediately and by 
Thursday afternoon had 
bought a 5 per cent stake in 
Standard Chartered, which 
they immediately declared. 

In all be spent almost £200 
million, all of it from his own 
personal fortune. He says 
none of the money was bor- 
rowed from his companies. It 
was cash. 

He said: “I used to be a 
banker and so was my son-in- 
law, Peter Woo, so we know a 
bit about banking and I have 
always wanted to invest in an 
international bank. Standard* 
Chartered is an old and well- 
established bank. The char- 
tered part of it opened in 
China in 1858 and in Hong 
Kong in 1859. It's a good size 


and its assets are solid. It 
suited my tastes." 

Sir YK said be was 
“disappointed" by some of the 
London reaction to his invest- 
ment In Standard Chartered. 

So what of Sir YK's future 
now that he & a major 
shareholder in Standard 
Chartered? 

He is in a strong position to 
askforaseaton the board and 
there is no doubt that the bank 
would welcome his experience 
and contacts. But there is a 
quite definite conflict of inter- 
ests in that Sir YK is a close 
ally and adviser to Hong Kong 
and Shanghai Bank, 
Standard's major rivaL The 
tycoon was a Hong Kong 
Bank director for 13 years ana 
a deputy chairman for three. 

Sir YK is reported to have 
said that because he is merely 
an adviser to the Hong Kong 
Bank there will be no conflict 

He has been in a similar 
position in recent months. He 
became a major shareholder 
in Dragonair Airline at the 
same time as being a director 
of Cathay Pacific. 


f TEMPUS ) 


GUS wins hearts with 
new open manner 


Great Univcral Stores 
pleased the market not only 
because it produced taxable 
profits at the top end of the 
range or expectations at £290 
million, but also because it . 

abandoned some of its a ecus- EfllUDIl 
lomed secrecy and gave a — - 

little more detail about the 
breakdown of those figures. 


front appear imminent, there 
could be more to tell in a rear 


or so. 

The yield is 2. Q per cent. 


More than 80 per cent of 
the group's post-tax profit 
came from mail order (49.2 
per cent) and finance and 
investment (3 1, 4.. per cent). 
The considerable number of 
shops here and overseas, 
which include Burberry, 
Times Ftxmxshing, Lennards, 
Paige and Home Charm, 
contributed only 14.1 per 
cent. 

The breakdown highlights 
the sense of the deals done 
with Harris Queensway, for 
Times and Home Chaim, 
and with Combined English 
Stores for Paige. GUS in both 
cases banded over the man- 
agement of the shops, but 
retained the freeholds and 
leaseholds. 

It therefore retains a very* 
useful property income, but 
allows retailers with more 
acknowledged flair to run the 
businesses. In the Paige deal, 
it will also receive a half share 
of trading profits, which with 
no disrespect to GUS should 
now show strong growth. 

The pretax profits were 
reduced by a £3.1 million 
adverse currency movement 
and property profits were 
marginally lower at £7.39 
million. The first three 
months of this year are 
“ahead” of this time last year, 
but no further detail was 
forthcoming. 

The Gty is expecting prof- 
its around £330 million this 
year which gives a prospec- 
tive p/e ratio of 12 on the A 
shares 30p higher at 1 030p. A 
company with such a sound 
record of dependable finan- 
cial management deserves a 
higher rating. 

Speculation persists about 
the enfranchisement of the 
non-voting A shares and the 
future role of Sir Philip 
Harris, chairman of Harris 
Queensway, should GUS co- 
chairman Sir Isaac Wolfson 
decide to retire soon. Al- 
though no moves on either 


At the half year stage, Equtpu 
said it expected a substantial 
improvement in the outcome 
for the full year. 

City analysis had £ 1 .8 mil- 
lion pencilled in, but were 
presented with a 1 2 per cent 
downturn to£1.24million on 
turnover 53 percent higher at 
£23.6 million. Earnings per 
share fell 29 per cent and were 

followed by an extraordinary' 
deferred tax charge of 
£526.000 fora leasing compa- 
ny which may be sold. 

The problems arose largely 
in the acquisitions. Purdic & 
Kirkpatrick, bought in No- 
vember 1984. has proved 
disappointing, but a reduc- 
tion of overheads and weed- 
ing out of peripheral areas 
such as office furniture and 
stationery - should have done 
the trick. The first two 
months of this year were 
encouraging. 

Computer Supplies, ac- 
quired last November, made 
a small loss instead of the 
expected profit, as directors 
look their eve off* the ball 
when they were busy selling 
their company. BCG. the 
cash registers company, was 
also less profitable than ex- 
pected. 'Finally the ususal 
burst of sales in March, as 
capital allowances were re- 
duced from 50 to 25 per cent, 
did not materialize. 

The problems should be on 
the mend, particularly fol- 
lowing the appointment of a 
new finance director last 
February. The City is again 
looking for £1.8 million this 
year, which with an increased 
tax charge of around 33 per 
cent gives a prospective p/e 
ratio of under 9. 

The shares rose 5p yester- 
day to 150p having fallen 
more than 60p in the last 
week as news of the profits 
fall leaked oul Until concrete 
signs of the improvement can 
be seen, the shares are unlike- 
ly to recover strongly. 


Sound Diffusion 

Sound Diffusion, the some- 
what controversial Sussex- 
based electronic engineering 
company, vesrerdav made 
some very optimistic noises 
about future profiiabiliiy on 
the hack of the overdue full- 
year results for last year. 

The company lovsihc delay 
was caused by the administra- 
tive burden of adapting the 
figures to conform with SS-\P 
21 — the accounting standard 
for leasing’and hire put chase 
contracts. 

This also means that pretax 
profits for 1»>S5 on the basis of 
the new standard are levs than 
the traditionally stated figure 
for I9§4. The company has 
now to spread more of the 
profit from finance leases over 
the life of the lease rather than 
allocating it to the opening 
vear, hence the difference 
between the two years. 

When both years are pre- 
pared on the new basts, pretax 
profits this year show a 23.4 
per cent increase. 

Remedial steps have been 
taken to improve profitabilitv. 
Thc company, which admits 
having been’ “over-tolerant" 
in collecting arrears, has set up 
its own in-house collection 
department. 

Problems affecting small 
lifts, some of which have been 
rented out by the company . 
will be rectified by the end of 
this month. There is still no 
finance director, however. 

The company tays ttiai it is 
hoping to report profits of £ Iff 
million for this year and is 
confident that this figure* will 
be at least doubled over the 
next three years. These "an- 
ticipations *' are* based on “a 
cautious extrapolation of (he 
trading figures for the last six 
months". 

Assuming the company 
maintains its low tax rate of 
around 5 per cent, a profit of 
£10 million puts it on a 
prospective pnee-ejmings ra- 
tio of 5.6. which is hardly 
demanding. 

The company has. however, 
earned some scepticism in the 
past for failing to meet fore- 
casts. so for the time being a 
wait-and-see policy should he 
adopted. 


Generating energy is not simply 
providing kilowatts. It must be provided in 
quantity, safely, efficiently and in an 
agreeable environment. 



Hitachi's wide-ranging technologies in energy (from left to right]: 
nuclear power reactor, generator-motor, laser-test of LPG gas combustion, 
and nuclear fusion plasma testing device. 


The world’s need for energy continues 
to burgeon: and our wish to live in safe, 
peaceful and unsullied surroundings 
remains as strong as ever. Here is how 
we are working towards achieving these 
twin goals. 

Hitachi’s scientists are making 
tremendous progress in nuclear fusion, 
often called ’‘harnessing the power of 
the sun.” Nuclear fusion also has been 
called the ultimate energy source 
because it is generated by a mechanism 
similar to that of the sun. One gram 
of the fuel— hydrogen, deuterium and 
tritium— generates the same energy as 
8 tons Ca tank truck-full] of oil. 

Recently, Hitachi played a major 
role in a landmark feasibility experiment 
conducted by the Japan Atomic Energy 
Research Institute. The experiment 
succeeded in producing the first plasma 
for nuclear fusion— and brings us much 
closer to having this energy source 
‘on line’ early in the next century. 

Since Hitachi’s beginnings three- 
quarters of a century ago, we’ve become 
a premier developer of many energy 
sources. Besides hydroelectric and 
thermal power plants, we’ve been in 
nuclear power more than 30 years. 

We are also working on solar 
energy, coal gasification, and new types 
of batteries and fuel cells. 

We link technology to human needs. 
We believe that Hitachi's advanced 
technologies will lead to systems that 
are highly productive and efficient yet 
eminently safe and comfortable. Our 
goal in energy— and communications, 
transportation and consumer elec- 
tronics as well— is to build products and 
systems that will improve the quality of 
life the world around. 




HITACHI 


















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THE TIMES THURSDAY JULY 24 1986 





What’s this? A summer 
car advertisement with no 
special offers or add-on extras, 
and at a time when all around 
us are loading their ears with 
extra goodies to temptyou? 

Have we lost our reason? 
Or is it simply that our Regata 
range, unadorned with extras, 
still has the edge over its 
rivals? J^,~ a 

Go along 
to your local 
Fiat dealer, cast 

INTERNALLY ADJUSTABLE 
NEARSIDE MIRROR - STANDARD. 

a critical eye over the five 
Regata saloons, and judgafor 
yourself. * 

The mid-range 85 Super, 
for example, comes with a 
smooth-changing 5-speed gear- 
box to make the most of its 16 
litre overhead cam engine. 
Plus tinted windows and, on 
the dashboard, a rev counter, 
econometer and comprehen- 
sive check control panel. 

The driver and passenger 
door mirrors are internally 
adjustable, the front windows 
are electrically operated, and 
there’s central locking. 

You’ll find seat belts front 
and rear, reclining front seats 
with matching cloth head 



restraints, and a stereo radio/ 
cassette -all standard. 

The top-of-the-range 
twin-cam 100 Super offers, 
in addition, power steering 
headlight wash/wipe, an 
asymmetrically split rear seat 
and even a sliding steel 
sunroof. 

Of course, all five models 
offer perform- 
ance in plenty 
-0 to 62 mph 
in 10 seconds 

INTERNALLY ADJUSTABLE 
OFFSIDE MIRROR - STANDARD. 

and a maximum 112 mph’ in 
the 100 Super - together with 
economy that leaves many 
smaller cars trailing. 

All in all, there’s a lot to 
temptyou, and, with prices 
from £5,809 tt to £7,920, n all 
of it affordable. 

And with your Rat dealer 
in a generous mood right now, 
there’s never been a better . 
time to talk to him. 

But even if you decide to 
delay your decision to buy a 
Regata, don’t worry; when you 
do decide, you’ll still find we’re 
offering the same high levels 
of comfort equipment and 
performance. 

Unlike some. 


Regata 



SETTING NEW STANDARDS 


t OFFICIAL DOE FUEL CONSUMPTION FIGURES REGATA 70 COMFORT £]4 MPG r&L- iOOhN AT A CO.‘iS7A.\7 55 i 
39? MPG ?:L. XQKK AT A CONSTANT 75 MPH 301 MPG JiHOQKH URBAN OCLE REGATA DlEScL SUPER 6Z z A’rj 
CONSTANT 5c MPH 362 MPG 7SL 1Q0KM AT A CONSTANT 75 MPH 277 MPG j"L ">V ’_== 

FOR FURTHER INFORMATION PLEASE CC'.TSCT T r 


' V=G 7 x : 03r.M AT A CONST. 1 r-T 75 MPH : ■ : U=G c :1 KOrtS URBAN C'iCLE REGATA So COMFORT AND SUPER: 52 3 MPG -o JL/10DKM. AT A CONSTANT 56 MPH. 

-VirT.' AT* A CONSTANT 56 MPH 6EL "C?KM AT A CONSTANT “5 MPH 398 MPG 7.1L-100KM URBAN (>CLE REGATA 300 SUPER 48 J MPG -'5 8L/100KM) AT A 

■iC'C-S WHERE LEGAL SPEED LIMITS PEP’-'iT "PRICES CORRECT AT TIME OF GOING TO PRESS BUT EXCLUDE DELIVERY AND NUMBER PLATES. 

-.AT :f,fCRMATlON StRV.CE DEPT RSG7&5 PC oG 't : b WINDSOR BERKS SL4 ESP TEL 07 53 856307 





C COMMERCIAL PROPERTY ) 


GRE joins big bang rush 
to build on London Wall 


V - ; 


Guardian Royal Exchange, 
the insurance _ company, is 
going ahead with plans for a 
£75 million office develop- 
ment spanning London Wall 
in the City or London despite 
what it describes as an elev- 
enth hour withdrawal by 
Wimpey Property Holdings,, 
which is allying itself with a 
rival plan put forward by 
Wales City of London 
Properties. 

ORE'S plans involve de- 
molishing part of St Alphage 
House, owned by Wimpey, 
and the total demolition of 
Royex House, a 1960s build- 
ing on which it has a long lease 
fro m Pivot Properties, pan of 
Mr Harry Highams' Oldham 
Estates. 

The new development 
would have 475,000 sq ft of 
space with dealing floor capac- 
ity of 55,000 sq ft. 

The insurance company 
says that Wimpey was in full 
support of its plans until the 
last moment, when it decided 
to opt for an alternative 
development proposed by 
Wates, the only quoted prop- 
erty company with a portfolio 
entirely comprised of City 
offices. 

Mr Michael Davies, the 
chairman of Wimpey Proper- 
ty, says that the company was 
talking with both GRE and 


Wates and that both sides 
were aware of this. Wimpey 
decided not to put its name to 
the planning application sub- 
mitted by GRE as it felt that 
the Wates alternative was a 
more dramatic scheme which 
fitted naturally with its exist- 
. ing building. 

The Wales and Wimpey 
scheme stretches from Wales' 
City Tower in Basinghall 
Street to St Alphage House 
also bridging London Wall 
and joining up at podium 
level, adding another 200,000 
sq A to the existing space. 

Both the existing towers will 
remain in the Wates and 
Wimpey joint venture. The 
bridge itself will become retail 
and restaurant space. Some of 
the shops on the podium are 
now letting for the first time 
since they were built more : 
than 20 years ago. 

Wimpey is also in the 
process of re-designing the 
interna! space in its office 
development for the Little 
Britain site at the end of 
London Wall. 

The scheme has lain fallow 
for some time in spite of the 
fact that Wimpey won a 
protracted planning battle to 
obtain consent for the devel- 
opment and has assembled the 
land for it Work is due to start' 
early next year. 


By Judith Huntley 

And the latest plan from 
GRE is only one of a number 
of big developments mooted 
for the Square Mile where 
developers are vying with each 
other to build laree amounts 
of space in time for financial 
de-regulation. ■ 

MEPC is to redevelop Lee 
House, also on London Wall, 
.in a £65 million, 335,000 sq ft. 
scheme. Mr Stuart Lipton of 
Stanhope Securities, has plans 
for a large development at the' 
Rotunda on the Barbican end 
of London WalL And Property 
Holding and Investment 
Trust hopes to redevelop 
Basinghall House, another 
remnant from the boom days, 
in an attempt to catch die 
current bull market in the 
City. Scottish Amicable, the 
insurance company .has simi- 
lar proposals for Moor House. 

But there are - difficulties 
associated with this process. 
At Basinghall House for exam- 
ple, PH1T would have to buy 
out the tease from Slaughter & 
May, its major tenant This is 
likely to prove an expensive 
business. 

In the case of GRFs Royex 
House, the insurance compa- 
ny says it has come to arrange- 
ments with both the Oldham 
Estates and Coward Chance, 
the tenant, over the lease 
arrangements which wiD come 


play if planning permis- 
is for * 


mto . 

sion is forthcoming from the 
City Corporation. 

The demand for large 
amounts of office space which 
can cope with the technology 
needed by the financial con- 
glomerates has resulted in a 
development boom in the 
Square Mile. ■ 

: Developers see the chance , 
to extract very large develop- 
ment profits by puDing them 
down and starting again. But _ 
there is the 'risk that by the^ 
time they have bought out the 
leases from existing tenants, a 
lengthy mid expensive busi- 
ness, obtained planning per- 
mission and possibly borne 
the cost of building a raft over 
London Wall, that they will 
have missed the big bang boat 
or squeezed development 
profits. - 

Wares takes the view that it 
is essentia] to^ develop build- 
ings which can not only cope ' 
with large dealing floors and 
single tenants, but can also be 
divided horizontally and ver- 
tically. allowing for maximum 
flexibility. 

It is a wise view given that 
big bang could turn out to be a 
damp squib or worse, leaving 
developers with a question 
mark hanging over their City 
office space on the first rent 
reviews. 





Baronpark, the private property company and Royal 
life, the insurance' company, have pre-let their 6,200 
sq ft office scheme. Trinity Court, in Marlow, 
Buckinghamshire at a record rent of more than £13 a 
sq ft Leasing Partners, a firm based in the Thames 
•'Valley, will move to the new space. The letting agents 
were Mann & Co and St Qnintih. The tenant was ad- 
vised by Phillip Andrews. 

Galleria plan unveiled 
for brewery site 


= London & Edinburgh Trust 
has unveiled its plans to 
transform pan of the former 
Courage Brewery she in Read- 
ing,: Berkshire into a £60 
-million shopping galleria. 

The developer is convinced 
that Reading has a high-level 
of unrealized shopping de- 
mand. Its scheme, at Bridge 
Street, would extend back to 
meet the town's prime retail 
pitch. 

LET has consent for offices 
on the site but is now seeking 
permission for the alternative 
retail development which 
would have more than 40 
shop* - 


Construction activity in 
Central London will continue 
at a high level until 1990 
according to E C Harris & 
Partners, the firm of quantity 
surveyors. 

E C Harris questions the 
effect on prices of having to 
build flexible offices which 
can also accommodate dealing 
floors. "Larger, deeper build- 
ings inherently have a more 
economic geometry. This cou- 
pled with modern fast track 
construction techniques and 
an increasing trend to offsite 
p re fabrication should contrib- 
ute to lower development 
costs" the firm says. 


IT'S THE 

WAY OUR 

TEAM IS 

ORGANISED 

WHICH 

HELPS US 

ACHIEVE 

YOUR 

CAPITAL 



GOALS. 





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To offer serrice at the highest level in today's capital markets, 
an investment bank must do more than simply deal in the full 
range of instruments available. 

H must organise itself in a way which allows those instruments: 
to be nsed in combinations which are imaginative and innovat- 
ive on Its clients' befiatL 

County NatWest Capital Markets has been organised to do just 
that 

Our dealing facilities are unusually integrated, operating from 

he NatWest Investment Bank Group 


trading rooms which cover money, currency, bullion, swaps, 
and fixed interest domestic and euro securities. 

These, short Gnes of communicattoa enable us to construct 
transactions made of tifferent elements - and- thus, to 
maximise value added for the borrower ortor the investor. 
Nor is this structure the only area of strength. 

In technical analysis, development is rapid. Advanced com- 
puter modelling systems make for sounder strategies in 
trading, hedging and risk management 


And hi international reach, our resources wffl allow Investors 
in securities such as US treasuries or UK gitts to deal writh 
- County NatWestdeaQng centres in every major time zone. 

Add afl this to the financial strength that comes from the full 
and committed backing of NatWest Investment Bank, and you 
have an operation ready tolake on the world's most substantial 
investment banks. 

And also, may we suggest, the world's most substantial clients. 

County NatWest Capital M arkets 
Nobody's in better shape 


Effra site goes 
to Arabs in 
surprise deal 

Mountleigh * ra,hcr lhan 

of the 7.5 i 


has sold most 
acre Effira site 
fronting the Thames at 
Vauxhall to an Arab consor- 
tium making a £3 million 
profit, just as it was on the 
verge of an £1 1.7 million sale 
io Regalian Properties, the 
residential developer. 

The sale to the Arabs, only 
concluded last weekend . was 
a move which took Mr David 
Goldstone , chairman of 
Regalian Properties by sur- 
prise. "We had agreed terms 
subject to contract. The mat- 
ter was in the hands of the 
solicitors and we were in a 
position to go ahead. But 
unfortunately the vendor ap- 
pears to have decided to deal 
elsewhere,” he commented. 

However Regalian may 
console itsdf elsewhere in 
London. There is an idea, as 
yet only a twinkle in Mr 
Goldstone's eye. for changing 
its consent for 100,000 sq ft of 
offices at Free Trade Wharf in 
Docklands to a residential 
development. 

The wheel has come full 
circle on the Effira site, once to 
be home to the Green Giant 
office development. The Arab 
consortium which now owns 
the site wants to use the 
existing planning permission 
for up to 1 million sq ft of 


offices rather than trying to 
battle with the planners tor a 
residential development. 

Both Samuel Properties, 
which bought the site lor £6 
million last year and 
Mountleigh. which took an 
option on the site from Samu- 
el only days ahead ot‘ i the 
latter's’ merger with Clay form 
Properties, planned residen- 
tial developments there. An 
appeal against refusal of 
Samuel's scheme is due to be 
heard in September. 

But those with long memo- 
ries will recollect that it was 
the Effra site which helped the 
demise of Mr Ronald Lyon's 
Arunbridge company 
Arunbridge planned a £!U0 
million office scheme on the 
site for which it obtained a 
Special Development Order 
from the then Secretary ot 
State for the Environment Mr 
Michael Heseltine. overruling 
normal planning procedures. 
Failure to fund the develop- 
ment was an important factor 
in Arunbridge's collapse. 

The site was sold to Samuel 
Properties bv Julius Baer & 
Co. the tank which held it as 
security against a loan made to 
Arab interests involved in 
Arunbridge. It is now tack in 
Arab hands. 


Dixons snaps up 
West End offices 


Dixons Commercial Prop- 
erties has bought a £15 mil- 
lion portfolio of WestEnd 
properties from Sir Richard 
Sutton's Settled Estates. 

Hie 30 strong portfolio 
includes four office buildings 
in Mayfair and a 40,000 sq 
ft office block let to British 
Telecom in Great Pulteney 
Street. 

Dixons bought the port- 
folio in the foceof strong com- 
petition to obtain a rare 
commodity. West End offices. 
It intends actively manag- 
ing the properties by refur- 
bishment and by long term 
redevelopment. Michael 
Gruber & Co and Grass 
Fine acted for Dixons. 

• Bredero Properties, the 
development company which 
recently came to the mar- 
ket trading at a premium to 
asset value, coald ran into 
delaying tactics over its plan 
to build a £95 million office 
scheme in Hammersmith, 
west London. 

The Labour controlled 
London Borough of Hammer- 
smith and Fulham has not 
only included some of 
Bredero's properties in a 
new conservation area but has 
produced a draft set of 
modifications to the local 
plan, taking an anti-office 
stance to Hammersmith town 
centre, including Bredero's 
island she, for which the de- 


veloper already has plan- 
ning permission for over 
400.000 sq ft of offices. 

The new council has vet 
to adopt these draft modifica- 
tions and any attempt to 
change the existing local plan 
will be time consuming and 
lengthy. 

Meanwhile Bredero » 
carefully considering its next 
course of action with its de- 
velopment partner. London 
Regional Transport, which 
is to receive a new tube and 
bus interchange from the 
office development. 

• Color Properties, the 
private developer proposing to 
build a £500 million retail, 
leisure and entertainments 
complex at Sandwell in the 
West Midlands, says that 
fears over its impact on 
town centre and local shop- 
ping are unfounded. 

The Sandwell Mall is 
modelled on West Edmonton 
Mall in Canada, the 
world's largest shopping and 
leisure development Mr 
Igor Kolodotschko, the chair- 
man of Color Properties, 
said: ** The basis of the 
Sandwell Mall concept is 
that it should be a tourist 
magnet on a scale to rival 
the likes of Disneyland. There 
is no comparison betw een 
this and any other retail de- 
velopment existing or pro- 
posed. In the UK. " 



MAIDENHEAD 

WHITE WALTHAM 

44 ACRES 

FOR SALE 
FREEHOLD 


A UNIQUE INDUSTRIAL DEVELOPMENT 
AND INVESTMENT OPPORTUNITY 

REFERENCE: PFS/NTW 


9 


DEBENHAM 
TEWSON & 
CHINNOCKS 


01-4081161 


CHEMICAL COMPANY 
WANTED 

INDUSTRIAL OR RURAL 

Progressive Australian Company currently 
manufacturing Industrial 8. Sanitation Chemicals, 
stings, paints, adhesives, sealants soil 
conditioners, and livestock feed supplements°/s 

seeking acquisition ot any company Which has either 

P ,oducte or an LtabShS «l£ 
force together with good manufacturing facilities. 

Our client is in a position to offer additional 
technology, additional product lines and extra 

SSSMSKS a company with an experienced 
result oriented management team. 

Initial enquiries to; 

Senior Trade Commission 
Australian High Commission 
Australia House. Strand 
London WC2 B4LA, 

England. 






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THE TIMES THURSDAY JULY 24 1986 


UNIVERSITY NEWS 


33 


Degrees awarded by the University of Edinburgh 


The following degrees are an- 
nounced by the university of 
Edinburgh: 

(D) indicates distinction, •in- 
dicates honours, M indicates 
merit. 

Names in italics, in absentia. 
MA 

Faculty of Arts. 

Arabic 


1 : NJ M Jamil. 

Cta A Cmmhon. 

Cln 2 (m iOi J - Glynn! S E 
MCCOdrft* 

Arabic and Turkish 
Cta 2 (Mr- 0* c A Ctougn. 

Archaeology 

Cl»s fiBj Murray BA. (Oxonr. N A 

CHMZ'COfw I): t C Magturcs M A 
Wyper. 

Ctau 2 CEkhr tOz 8 Ntwman. 

Archaeotoev and Anctent 


Cta 2 (DUf B* F h Stow. 

Celtic and Scottish History 
Ctm hap JMiiUflfc. 

Celtic Studies 

ctan I: M L B Byme. 


O D Kelly: M W O Metcalfe; S V 

pemueouzy. 

Classics 

dan ir m r Poostie- 
Gian 2 (Mr I): M J N CUe. 

English Language and German 

CttU 2 (DM tO* C M Macqueen. 

Btgikii Language and 

Linguistics 

agf&. M igwssa« J A 

(Mr ll): M F Barclay; E J 


HarKM*. 
Ctan l 


EngbshLangnage and 
.Literatee 

~Bn O: W E Balnea: C D 
Brown: A i CAW CJ 



L Johnson: S Kay: SA J Macandrew: 
C M Martin: J D McKay. i_ j 
McKniohl: D J McLean: L D Meanc C 
S Mein**: CFMUbom: J E MUr I J 
Muir head: H V C Murghy: A Patnctc 


aaiasm--- • -- 

Bacon: B ' 

NtcboUs. 

SS?TcH ffi Art 


M AimUaoe: 

C Blael: AC Borrowman: C 


Ctan 2 (Mw D: A R Hunter-, A P 
Rjlrtrio: P J purdom: A M Stannson. 
(Dhrln; L R Cole; C H Culture: 
UTte-HeOcr: N L Hutcheson-. E 


curt 2 
L H Harris- . 
M Robertson. 


French 

t M Taylor. 
I)S M B C , 
Brookes: S A 


Alexander: E 


Class 1: 

E5S2 | 

Cameron nf t'Sieiii f M Jutune: PL 
McCormick: a While: E M WrigtaL 
Class 2 (Div n: M C Andrews: C J 
Bolam: S w Booth: N Brough: P A 

Graham: F A Green: A M Harrison: L 
Hunwr: S M MSUT: C D Palmer: JCG 
Tellwnght: K F Tipple: C M Turner: J 
M Walton: S K White: S C Whlleiaw: 
B E Wills: K i. Wilson. - 
Cbss iATEL Evans: V J Nodes 

French and History of Art 

Class 2 (Mr t>l K J Bungay; P T 

SSm U 2 (Dhr n: J E But: H M 
Edwards t k Stannardr H M woes. 

French and Italian 

§SS f A*M Gruntey; N J 

IIJ: M E uuno. . 

French and Ungaistics 

CUSS 2 (Mr l>* S A Condle- . 

French and Spanish . 

riM. 2 (CNw IR: M F Broods: & E C 
Childs: IT M Jacob: P J C Meigh: J R 
Saver: G Wnghl. . 

French with Business Studies 
Class 2 (iMv l>: K A Duncan: S M 
EniwMtie: D E fcoihngsc J R Lavraon: S 
A Lonsdale: H Scott: S M Stewart: M I 

t&STi" (Dtv IQ: A S GOhen: C N M 
Ho: S E Jarvis: L J Uddie: K E 
Robinson: G Sloddarl: M J Virtue: I 
Williams. . - 

French with Contemporary 
European Institutions- 

French with European History 

Class 2 COW Q« l-A A Campbell:, ff 
Grant. 

French with PhUtfophy 

Clau I (Mv r: S H M MacGregor. ' 

German 

Class is J H Bremn«r. _ . 

Class 2 (Dw n:.R J Coggins: R A 
Doyle: C R Hodgson: S Longman: I W 

CtoS^OMv IR'. S D BeeCTOjt A J 
Grthlng: C E Htfwttl: C E T HtoUts B C 
Pflher: J A Randall: K Wood. 

German aad Politics 

Class 1: M E Hunt. 

German with Business Studies 

§X 2* BrtWK’oobWe: H 

5WKa ?gg SS&SfflBl.l 

German with European History 
Class 2 (DM QiJD P Raynetr P J A 
c£2\ (DW IRS M E Fawcen. 

German with European 
Institutions 

Mans (MtRs AS Jemwm: SLY Ty- 
ler. 

Hispanic Studies 

Ram 2 (Mv Rt A M MGniosh: J R Per- 
kins. 

History 

^ 2 ft <a. W RtW^:S?®fe 

LBritV: J T A Mwuey: N D 
Buchanan: _ C _A Oangij. J B 


Maxwetl' Stewart: J T J 

R Nlrt: HPOrr. WC w Paste S C 
Raien: J M Rogers R B. To bin: J A 
fume: R D Walt: R W Whilecrose: R 




G M Davidson: A E S Ferauwm: 
Fleming: C B Jackson: CL KeUtf b 
MrlcjJfel: C C L Kennedy: MS R 
Lambert: M Lowiner: A_ M mbc- 
donakt. A E m lichen: V A Oceana: A 
jp^m: K K Riodie: K A Scott: P T 
Young. 

History and Sociology 

Rasa 2 (DM R: D P Munro: R B S m a ll . 

History of Ait 

Rass t: M J craske: A M M Rrtd. 
caws 2 (DM O: A G Bauanome: J A 
Fitzpatrick: K N Goodhon: S J 
F E Neallwrcoan R J 

(DM IR: E M Dcnnc: S J A 

Kraver. 

History of Art and Italian 

Class 2 (DM D: K SnoH- 

Italhux 

Class 2 (DM IRi S I Fowler: S J Mmiro: 
L F S Weir. 

Italian and French 

Sam 

Italian with European History 
Oats 2 (Dhr 10: M J Enoel: J m 
MacKenne. 


Latin Studies 

Cnil (Db QiJM Sutherland: A E' 
Van Drunmelen. 

linguistics - 

?w ,1 (Mi R: a r Ciwtwn: J O 
^m^CMi H):H JJ Hunting. 

' Linguistics with Artificial 
Intelligence . 

Ran ? (Wr Lothian. 

Mathematics 

2 (WV Rt T M McWhirter. 

2 (DM R EJ P Fraser. 

Mental Philosophy 

RkSS Is H W Ramsay. 

gSft-2 (DM Rs h h MacDonald: H C 

E * er - 

Phihwopby and Engfish 
Uteratnre 

Mas 2 (PM RiA M Manaenc 8 J N 
SGanun A i L Thomson: H Thomson. 

Politics and Modem History 

Rasa 2 (DM Q= a" W Brtdgesr R J 
-Findlay: .N _ A Fnrsylii: A F 
MCDtarmldi C A Stewart .M J 
Webt?or: A 1 WMte. 

Rasa 2 (Dts lfc D M AUtL. M R 
Bowles: J K Huifton: . R Johnson: A J 
Macday: P Wilson. 

Asgrotat: A C Peetz. 


. . .Mss (DM 1); N A Alcset G W 
Blanshani: A G DPWHB K FerguBon: 
S Graham: A A knur: w □ 
McClelland; KC Nisaet; T t Queen: S 
A a^rteince CMctough): F J Vouch: B 

Second Rasa (DM 23: E M Amtw l si C 
Baird: S Brown; K Oyne: A M 

gSSETT p SSS;:^raS5g?iI 

wong 

■nurd Cbm S J Moocrtcff 
Cewgatv Bemm and Ekw t m o Kt 
Fdst ClaHR TEA Lees: D J Mendetaoo ' 

frss£?<p% n tiftrw 

McKenzie: G J Mum T K Robb - 
S ec e n d Ctm (DM 2): A D Albert' 
Recnu R B Poneous: A H Qym 
Third Rate DAN MacFwiane 
Ceaumur siIhhi and MnaSMMK 

• ' . scMoca ' 

&Hond Rass (DM 1): £ AML J E 
Phillips 

Sasmo Cl*** (DM 2): J M Kennedy 
Comgotar Sri — ob and Mniiiairtn 
Thbd Rub M J Wright 

C si ep diar ffs la nc i and myRcs 
. 8 — a n d Raw (DM 1):AR Darting 


Ctau. 2 (DM U)s M E Uwsn J 
-UvtngBtene. 

Russian and German 

Ota 2 (DM IQl N D Bagshaw. 

Rassian and History of Ait 

Raw 2 (DM Rt R Y Eadle. 

Scottish Historical Stndies 

Ctasa 2 (DM l):SJK Anderson: C M 
smith. 


Cbss 2 (DM R: G A Gormley: CM U 

CBM IR: C L FrteL 

Spank h sml F wwh ; 

Cbss 2 (DM4): K L FToggalhSM Cor- 
doth. 

-Spanish with Business Studies 

Claw 2 (DM Q: A 6 Varney. 

Spanish with European History 

Cbss 2 (DM R: P C PttmJert- 

General MA (HON) 

Ran n C M Band: D Hughec: K H 
Norkeb. 

Class 2CN Addtton: ALBriadenuaM 
Huddart}: J‘ A Edmond: s a M 
Ferguson: P M Fletcher; N M 
Gardner: J E Gordon; J A Guthrie: A 
G HarrKon: J M N JopJlng: B R 
Mackay: C A McCuteheon: J Stott J 
M M Vassle: M E Want TAWatau 
L Webster: D I Wlcfccnc S E 
Williamson. 

Ran t St H £ A*»worth: S J Stevenson. 

Adadnad to bewa u r s . . 

Ran 2r M B Farauhar. 

General MA 

C 6 Almond, wtui Merit: J D Arthur: 
l c BaDey; S Baker, with Merit: F J 
Baity: R f Blincow: K Brotherton: M 
Brown: C A Brunc CJ BucUw; F M 
Campbell: P ouounoun: P B Cooney: 
j H M -Cooper: JD Crabb. with Merit: 
C A Crook: G N J Cummings, wrtth 
Meric F J DaM: P Donaldson, with 
Meric E R_P_Durle: T GJEgiin: A G A 
Esamakr 
Flndlay i_ 

L Forster. 


Ftrst Class: J J Gray 
Second Cbss (DM 1 )ija Wane . 

Environmental chemistry 

One Cbss: 7 A ptor. T Cray: A R 

Mackenzie: 8 W- Rtjyan 

Seoend Cbss (DM. 1): C a MacdonaWb 

G S Stove 

Seottnd Cta (DM RSW Eanxu A 
Hearne 

GoocnpiV - 

Second Cta OMv 1): P D Lewis C J 
M (Clean: C Young 
Second Cbss(DM 2); M P Adam; S D 
Gillies: D Mormon: K A Talbot 
TMrd GbSB S R Miller 

C aele g y 

First Cbss P D Cunningham 

SmMCbss am O: w F AjotaDder 
C R Bales: A A Cabfer: S I Fraswer: H 
M K 

sstt&a&M sss^s 

B T FtockharC H S G Karunaraina: j 
Aleman J M Perrtvat g e Reavior: c 
A SOIars 

TMrd Cbse I G MaeLennan: G W 
Pah» 


First CM 
Rociutfr 


Qus L C Brastih R S Pam D C 


(DM 


5!»OPT’t^^lSS=- , e 

O'Brien: T W Slnciatr 


°Yrz 


l-Cbs* COM 2): M A Bainetc M 
-Brown: G J Cawdhorne: N J Gray: DJ 
Maxwell: K P Rose: T M Sloan: B W 
Whyte 

THM One T R Lister: S J Rae 


FM Rasa: J K McKee 
Second Class (DM 1): J M Bass 
Se c ond Cbss (Dnr 2>s M T Hagan 
ThM Class A D Cownie: M J GrtHlths 


M Rass C Anderson: S P Curie: J E 
Gill: H R Mackie: K C NtsbeC C A 
Simpson: O Stovenson; P J Sweeney 


SMand Class (DW 2): S Cum M C 
Dtck: A D Gooamaiu. A J Hook; l.W 
McKinlay: B D Neteooc j Petrie 
ThM Ctan J E C Chtnniah: G J 
Easton: i/T fmoK M A Mackay: H J 
McKenna: R L Thomson 


Mackenzie: J 


Hysloo: R D G Jack: C Jeffrey: C R 
Jenkins: A U Johnson: I Kelly: J 
Lambie: M J Laurie: S M Lazarus: D 
M Leavy. with Merit: L M Lees: S 
: j C F Mackenzie, with Mem: R 


Luke. 


F Mackenzie, with Merit 1 


McLavIn: E McLMIam G McQnaker: A 
McSeveney: C J Mllchell: j ft Moffett, 
with Merit K MQOC*; M A Morris: KE 
Murdoch : L Nelson: J A NewalL' A J 
Nlchobon: J NICoL L C M Ntcott M J 
Orn N A Penknurst KS Penman: j A 
■ PizzamigMo: H E A Robertson: JID 
Robrirtaon: L C Rulhertord: J N 
Sawyer, with Merit S A Schofield, 
-with Merit: J A Y Scott E J Shuman, 
with Menu R J Stevenson: L J Strath, 
with Meric A Suseoau K Sutherland: 
D E Symons, wilh DWtocnon: D W 
Taylor: G Thaw: SEP Turner. wUh 
Merit G R Walken J G Watson: E M 
Young: G E Young. 

B$c(Hons) ' 

AJtrofHiysu* 

First Rate O ScoiL 
Sacand Rats. DM ti A S Bed: I S 
Bishop: JBScobMe.- D Thylor. 
Seaand Cbss, DM RAJ Fisher: K J 
Ructue. . 

Third Cbss: OWL MbstyivOwen. 

BMolMat tow n - 

B—tariamgy 
Ftrst Cbsst B C Barnett. 

Second Class. DM' is S L Baettmann: G 
j Ponock; A PryderK Stnciain A 
Tayton C Jf Thoiwunr P A WEB. 


wissse-A 


First Cbss: DIB Hunter.' 


I Cbsa, DM tMDN Blackburn: 
n w Blake: <3 M Cannon: C J Church: 
R E CtMiHti walte: T J Qanville: A J 
Gow: P m A tunes: J ODKtm ERT 
Ughity: C J Waugh. 

Second Cbsa. DM 2: SE BeddowK A-M 
Unlr: RAM Lumsden: G G ReM: L L 
Rodger 

B#tmy 

t ai n t Ous <Dtv 1)5 S J ftiefcworOK 

PnilUmore: K Wilkinson: M G Wilson 
Seo— d^Ctass (DM 2): M H Graham: J 


First Qua A M Cartec S A. King 
Secsod Cbss (DM 1): G I R Adam; L 
Campbeil: R FCraae: E AS Laing; N 
A Murray: A M Reynolds 
Second Class (DM 2>s'E M L Kennedy: 
S F Turner . ' . .- 


First Cbss: E J Logan 

Seoend Cbss (DM t): M D Crtaw P L 

Elliot: J Law. S J Middleton: A D 

Walker 

Second Cta (DM 2): ME Quinn: E 
Severe: K J Steele: C Stewart 
TMM Rasa; A H' Homage 
Physios 

First Cbss: C Gray: A P Land: A R 
MacGregor; A P 
Mactnggart: K Weir 
Second Cbss OMv 1): C J Andrews G P 
Times J W P Lowe: F E McNeill: A S 
Mowbray; S Murdoch: B G Murray; S 
Perkins: J R Reid; G S Spell". RG H 
Stewart: D K Todd B J N Wybe 
(DM 2)1 C M Campbell: D M GoddanS: 
J B fitewart: F J Wallace: 5 A Young: 

ThM Rase R Anderson; ■ D W M 
Brown: M K puffin: R G Martin: F M 
McCaUton: A Roberts: Vf E Thompson 

Seobcy 

TiTfoT™ a ^ aMa *‘ 

ThM Cbss: F G Ho/Ua 
BSc 

FasaRy ef Setan— 

T A Aitkeru D M — 

Bngwn: SG Bmwjr- A □ Cameron: 

Dow; l . 

A>SeS*p e S Lraii5oSc , A : A 
Maroregon M A Mallnen; A C Martln: 
S C Masson: J McCabe: CM AteGmny; 
P M Mdntosh: SM MCKiruay: L 
Meld rum: DW Murdoch: F A 
Murphy: D JMurrtn: M A Potter; A C 
RiidTo C RenntaJd DEC Shewan: D 

Cnnr C C Venner: W J West: A T R 
Wilson 

BSc^ Hopsj fai Er^Bsering ■ 

■ First Rase P L Evans: S J HaiHday: R 
E Low: D W Peterson: A J Waters 
Second Rasa (M l)! K J Clark: F K 
Dtckson: N GhoUzadeti: A N Gibson: I 
A N Gray: A J G KeddJe: j M RuneO: 
A Denhofiiu G T Dow. p N fmik W 8 
K Johnston: A J Macaulay: A 
Ma meson: S E Trew: A O WUso n: S J 
Wyan 

San— tf Cbaa (DM 2); A Denholm: G T 
Dow: P N Neffl: WSK Johnston: A J 
Macaulay: A Maihesotc S E Trew; a 
O wibon: S J Wyatt. 

ThM Reis: A Mactaren: S McGhm; M 
G Parker F M Rutherford: J M 
wnitams 

CMS Emmoer lng . 

First Rass: P C Baud: T L Brown 
Second Cbn (DM Us D J CoUIek M P 
Camel: A W C Moon: A O Shaw; 


( 2>! N A Balfour. F M 

le:D WJ Galbraith: S 

C Ho: fl^ Clhu: A P Rudd: D J 
Seaton: A J Todd: P M Wilson 
ThM due CS -tf Fung I M Robertson 


Beaton: JD l 
K M S 


First Rass R McNab. 

Second Cbss (DM Ih M S Murray; A 
M NkcUs: A fSfrilM; 

Second bass (DM 2>s J P. Home r: D J 
Ireland; P D MCLachUm: V A Menztes: 
B J Stevenson: M R J Stewart 


First Rssk v T CunlUFr. C N Parker 


1 Cbsa (OH 11; G J Allan: M J 
Anderson: S M Black: A KB 


_ ... a J Bowes: D 

M Legge: K F Macleod: J Pawvson: M 
i Perar-Robo: 

Wlbon 


M H Smith: M A 


Ftrst Rass: C M Hatgn: C S Laraont 


First Cbss: I B Binnie: A J Cringeam: S 
nilpiak: j C R Bunpaon 
Seeeml Cbss (DM U: P J Buicimr Z F 
Butler A C pent: G H Earle: JR 
Hannah: E Jefferb: C S Kermack: C J 
MaccaUum; A J ktecEionaKU P B 
Maun: K W peter S Ritchie-. 37 Sut/wv 
1 J Slater I S smith: S C Thomas; N G 
Thomson: V CM UikCM Watson: G 
G Walts 

Sawnd Class (DM *)b M LJj M ta 
M-PQioL C G C^m tegTZto i^BgG 

Laurenson:' D JMMk TSjbiffi A 
R F Scon; H J stqghb C MStc A D M 
Thomson: D M Wedgwood: C-Y Wood 
TMrd Cbsa; A J. Horne: R A Lowe: s 
Pritchard: R .( « otw 


Fleming: G 
Owen 

Second Cbsa (DM 2)s R PWMp 


Hair. H T Ebetrical and 


(DM U: J E CDondMK S 
Crockett: A Lebhman: D J wuson 
Second Rass (DM Rt M R W HaOlday: 
1 Murray 

Peyeholagy 

First Cbss: I Davison. 

K S.ur: K M Wynne 

First Rasa: S Donachie: L D Stader 
Second dan (DM 1): C Godden: A C 
finrn; F L HOI: D W Jones ■ J H 


Sacand Cbn (DM 1): I S Cunningham 
B— cod Rau (DM 2): S Gammon 
Mcs hi n inN EngkMorlns 
FMt Cbasc C D Anderson: A D J 
Fraswer: S L McGeoch: a G Pedley: 
M C St addon 

Second Rass (DM 1): A M Easton: A J 

spwKMHRfi 

Truslove: D a Watson 


r . (DM Zp A R A EbereL D 

L Jackson: D L Ooyd: A L 


Tooth 


Fkit Cbss G G McFadyen 

Sacand Cbaa (DM 1): J M Muir; M 

Ramsay 

Second Race (DM Q;PS WOliams 
l A J Catrm Smith 


M C Stone-Wigg: J F Welch 
ThM Pass- C Gnri; W B Howteson 

Fhat Cbaa: N R Edetsturin 
Second Cbaa (DM1): 1 R Bvsvk M R 
Duncan: S Hudson 

BSc in 


J M Brett: E C Omni L T Macdonald 
CMS Engb—CMg 
N J Gehtaru W McCormick 


J R GnfTm K M Moran; M L Seta 


FM Cbn 
Campbell: 


J M Anderson: . J A 

E J M Hamilton: O A 

Humeri A M James: KL Milne C 
Strut hers - B etnp te: R J Sutherland 


S Ntcholis 

BSc (Hobs) ia Agricnhnre 

AfbMii 


G Red: P W Robinson: D G Sinclair 
G A Walker. A J welch: S A While 
UT a n an rt Rasa (DM 2): S M Anthony: S 
ILJ. j Jarvb: S M Jones; GJ 

5we‘C 


l HounseU: 

Kelly. M G LeSHe H a Lewis: .. 
xiu’il'uh; o s Nctic M O Oduiate: . 
FrjfuHL- SJ Ruhtnum: I D G ScotL D S 
Stevenson: L Wallace 
ThM Cbaa: .1 f E Roan; D Taylor . 


i mtv ikLC Anderson: P 
M Anderson: E A Bland: R EJBmds: 
D J Brunlon; C A Cddwdl: M A 
Gardner D S Gregory: S J W Hanjen 
W J M Hamilton; J C Hatfield: ir M 
Johnston: J J Lggan:. KS Monram: A 
D Mourtsey: C MScott R G Strung: G 
T Stnuhers 

I Cbaa (DM Of): R J S Doto: I D 
K Johnston 
Agricultural Sci on — 


cat (DM 1): A GJones: S A K 
Laing: r McMahon: L D Ramsay 


FM Out! S F Dick: 6 C Johnston: C 
S Shearer 


Sacand Cbss (DM 1): S M Cosgrove: K 


Oxford class lists 


Tbe following Class Lists 
have been issued at Oxford 
University: 

Philosophy and Modem 


hurv: DLMMpnfc&L Exeter S: M M 
C Marham. Som. El on: G J Ray. 
LMH. mature student: R w j Taylor. 

Men, cuy oi London 6: DJ Tuck. St 

Anne . Surblioa 


m— « 2 dMtstan BBC Ansdl. Ball. Dr 
Challoner^ HS. UWf Chatfonl: (G) M 
J Banks. New. Kilters, wood S. 


E H fttekertan. Stani 


jura; F M DilUngharo. McrL 
aside: (a D M Freeman. St HI ml 


<F denates (usuncuonln ute colloquial 

use oi French: C denotes dtstincUon in 

inn roiioguiBi use of German* 

•Ran ft M R Ben. Ex. Stanboroiuti S : 
A J Laughiand. BMC, Reading S: (fib 
v Pol it is. - Si . J. 

KalhrdrAbkoJm Aartnrt. Denmark; G 
J Powell. BNC Untfey CS: M E 
Savifl. BNC. Taunton S 
Cbaa 2 Mum HDH Evans. Wadh. 
sktimerv S. Tunbnoge weiH; T R 
Groror. Wadh. Prrvr S. Cambridge; 
N. Grade. LMH. Knttlwerut S: (fi T 
J Hudson. New. Duivvicn C. B c 
Kuril. Jesus. Dtsbofough S. Maiden- 
head- K T Johnston. Si P. Cavendish 
S. (F) L Kennen. Wadh. Bruoti s of- 
PsrtK J N LOwr. a Gath. Elizabeth C. 
Guernsey: P R V Maxwell. SI Calh- 
Winche-der (0) P k Pasternack,, 
som. no school given: F Pine, sr Htw. 
P«er Svmonds . C- .WtnrbeMer: F 
Sommertod. Herd. CoKnesw County 
KS: © f m ThnMwn. St Hugh. 

Rial 2 

Som. BeacbiBlMri 


Jtm Tonyrriall Comp: P S Davies. 
Tnn. Glasgow Academy: E J Death. 
Som. Camden GW* & N A Donald. 

LMH. Merchant Taylor*. Crosby: M R 

Greenland. H*ftf, si Cyres Conw, 
Pmarth: D R HoiroydOoveion. St P. 
Bournemouth S . 

Cbss 3t J S Katraansen. Pemb. no 
school given. 

Modem History and Economics 

Cbsa i: R DR Jones. St J, Appleton 

Hall County H& R D Murray. BNC. 
Urikuav Comp. Kevnanam: A C 
f*e]y BNC. wfiwT S. Wallinwon- 

Cbss 2 dhWM ij T A. EhOtoh. Uoc. 

. BearotBriMd KS: P J Fox. BaiL 
Bio v ham S. BantanVi- D D^Haaie, 
Pemb. Kina Edward* S. -Bauu m E 

Mlirlwii. BNC. Laming: N A Pegrum. 

UK. King Edward V ( s. Southaynp- 
umi: J Plant. JesuL ManchesterGs. M 
p sruter. Prmb. Stand C. fAanetimler 
N T Swales. Magd. xarodean Blxlh 
Form C. Brighton. D Woodhead. St Ed 
a GooK* OB. 


« s jg^ L f M FSsia:-® 

vmede C-_ Madrid: _G M T 


'i fEl R M Freeman. 
Wadh.' "Warwick &CR HarriMm. Or. 
straihallafi SDM Jerry. New. Exeter 
Sixth Form C: S_C. A.Kings»y-Eyans. 
Ch ch 
Weshmi . 

S>«-, ereT *Ball ■ ~pl ean e d WtHlam Hoiw. 
art HS. Stafford. 

Cbsa 2 fdMStaB ft © SJDucker. St 

swiSSs^ cScfl. Imwms. 

pm ft s E Bon on- Jones. KeMe. 
Rugby. 



»m « Luttbbn. 

o(Md HA: W H Neppell. 


Worr wincneater M , S Myers. Si 
Annr. King Alfred S. 

Ancient and Modem History 
Biu i: s D Sinn. Wadh. Ernie 
Decrulv. UnnWv. B Th-utkl Bad. 

SanYdhrtsfcm t: F J Barr. Magd. SI 
Paul's Girts S: P C Bruce. SI HUd. 
MakpfMM Gim HS: JJ H DavKhom 
Wj#. Manchroler C& C C R 
McMahon. LMH. King's S. Canter- 




Modem History and Modem 

lang ua ge* 

tG. I and S denote distinctions In the 
rouoowti use of German. Italian and 
Bnanisn respectively.) 

Dius is P J Epstein. Ball, 
Aafce** 'S. EHtrer: D G 
H Frost. SI J. Nottingham HS: DNL 
i. Eton: ft) J M M Poole. 


SKi'vKS? 


Brtutsgrove HS- 


EDUCATION 


uMHvewiMiBMntuirra 
ioiioufiainBwnaoioii iWBa 
KHtracunumn ,..^ra 

A ■ , nWr * i h i i i | Hl 


MONDAY 
MAKE SURE YOU GET 
YOUR COPY OF 

THEfflB&TIMES 



A Leajh; E H SMIthi V F Sbonlk: A 

Scccmt Cbaa (DM 2)t S H Harpers C Y 
Perkins 

Crop Pro duc e — ic ira cc . 


baa (DM 1>s E G Archer: F E 
McKenzie.- J M Scott: J S White 

BSc in Agriculture 

E R Ferguason; C J Gourtay: 8 1 Irvfng 

BSc in Ecological Science 


Second Cbss (DM 1): T R Anderson: I 
R Stirling 

< Sacgod Cta (DM 2): M C Faulkner 
Foromy 

FjraGtijSt (DM O: A'P Harrison: l G 
Sac ana CUM (Dhr SJ; J N Harrison 


BA ReGgioas Stndies 

A M Or g^K^LjC Heny i^ A ^ K lnneo: 

B Mas (Hons) 

g ee and Cbaa: (Mr t): P T pugoan: R 
A J Forbes: L D Habit: K 8 hsj*. 
DM ft S F Hill: B R KeOock: R M Mar- 
shall: E M McEVoy: A M SutaUffe. 

Paggtss.gS'.PiV^A 

WOliams. 

MA (Hons) 

the Fawny «C Social ScMnccs) 



«EA, M Rerma ek. 

tewnd Cbaa (DM 1}. D M kcJSenLs; 
M J Lloyd! O nnSfimas 

Soabl Podey 

“baa O.i. Anderson. 

Cbsa; (DM 1>;K A Brown: C A 
Cherry: L Macbdyen: w G Peacock: J 
W A Wilson. 

(DM 2J: P J Aitken: L j Panereon. 
Scab) podoy and aoMo b g y 
FMt dutF K Brown. 

StHM can am i); S Harvey. 
(Dhr 7): M GMfney: L M Page: R J 
waiaon. 


WKon 


MCLeSa^ 

fliroXTb tunson: ASK Oen: S (DM Q: E Klrknatrlck: M C Morrtscy. 


Second Cta (DM JJ? C H11L- T J M 
Hod 


. Anas; LED Eunson: AS— 

McGuaker; M M McOoUbn: R J Pai 
I F Rowan: m H m webbtr. 




WVdttb and nrh a r l ci 
Second Cta (DM I): R p Joluston: C 
L F Sett T H Sherrmt: A M Thomson 
Second Cbaa (DM *>: R G Raynor 

BSc hi Ecotapari Sdence 

A D R McFarlane: C A 

Master of Philosophy 

^ B g^D 8 rgS« ! ft M F 
Brackenbury: V J DraitMWd: 5 M 

Faculty^ ot vatarioby MMn 

Master of edocatioa 

MSc 

Faoaa 
H P 

T 

Master of besloess 
administration 
D G Anderson: G A 
AngttK D M Be _ __ 

Broadhuret: T D DeKfcap JRBOam: E 
G Ernest Jones: v T F Greger. S M 
jenlan-Taylor: R R Johortone: T 


Morrow. 

: (DM 1J: R H LMcBryde: 


Hendry: R tf .1 

S RanKuti A (rtf 

W; 


IK H R AOttfrt: A 
6r J M Pome: o R 
Sk&IL-RJ Semple: 


Second Xtocc (DM n: A N Beattie: H K J Emerton: D v Eout iM REverard: 
M Robertson: T R Sale: A J G antth: O P Rule: D E l R Stone:. N A 


..Jt: T R sate A J G sromu 
A M -B Stevenson, 

E ng qga t ip a and Acsoanttac 
fmi CkB A M Munro, 

Sacand Ctuc (DM iK K J A Devine: G 
S J CUmour; G A Mackenzie: N A 

SacaitfStuar (DM 2J: L-E Bruce: S J 
Herron. 

Eta na ib l c a and Ecanoadc 1 Malory 
FM Ctta A J Moulding: 


Bachelor of Commerce with 
honours 

ni ntm, gnuOat 

ciivnfs K Balbnft D R 
Beu: D L Berger; K J Btoorrtirtd: P J 
CrosUtwBlir. DBM Cullen: A L Dlcki 
K J Emerton: D v eouU M R Everard: 
RAC Hughes: A S KcnB 
R B Lyons: H Jl 
D p pule' D E ! 

Strawson: J S SutcMff e: K H waUsc P 
J Waisoa: S I Watson. 

PDJGD Alden: R W Cook: D K 
Graham-. A M McCall: A M McnzlcK 
M D Moore: I M Morrison: J K Reffiy: 
A R L Weir. 


£K at tt***- 


at Veterinary MadMna 


. N A 
R T 


Greger. S M 
ohnstonr 

SitiUtu G urwln: I E Walker. 1 G 
Warner: A R WDson. 

Bachelor of Divinity (Hons) 
(Christian Ethics and Practical 
Theology) 

M Ik A-M Almond: S 

A ^SnS^r 



Bacooa Cbaa: (DM ikJS Qtiqrlxr: 
DBM Cavaye: R J Cowan: G D Frost 
J N Macdonald: I D Methvjm; R C 
MilcheU: D E Rtokman: G W Rowand: 

1 J Harm. 

udl 

Second Cbaa 
(DM 11: A G Row. 

(DM 2): C D Beer: M L Campbell. 


Sacand Clue (DM 2J: A E V Ooofc- 
Rmlaaai i am b i and law 
Second Class: (Dtv 1): H 
(DM 2): J B CartwrighL 


Blade. 

‘ 1)iim Ben: V c 

ton: H C Groom: J 

J Marshall: A J Muckerste 
Iturec T M Willy. 

‘ n F Cook: R P 
_ _ nniina: J E Evans: L J Gibson: P R 
A Green: M E He! by: M J Hendereon; 
N A Human: L J Jackson: M A 
MacNeUll A A . Main: L J MCKie: L E 
McKinney: A McPjjalfc B . A Rea: R 
Scott JJ Sinclair: CTSkenr. O Smith. 


to Honours- 


I Cbsa: (PM RiDATW Berry. 

B Com. 

Bachelor of commerce 



(EMMsmcaf ®rtnJy) J J Page ' 

ESSn&S 

Thoob p) 

Cbaa (DM T)r M A C Low.. 



Stmpaon. 


5S53S 


R M Connolly: L W E Conner: M A 
Cowan: F LDraj; a M Fealherwonc: 

j A Grant; C J Gray: a S Gronoach: E 
Haldane: B S Jameson: D Lamb - 
with 
Lees; 


.Harks; A JR Premier: P F Smith: J 
‘ Inney: M G Wlbon. 



Icoood Cta (DM 1): WH M Cameron 
H M Forties. 

A.G. R'. Citron. 


$sa£?r£i£i 


Find Cbaa J M- HmdcriM: Vm 
M l due. 

(DM 3®: M M Brown, A J 


Ftrst Cbsar G J Phltorick. 

l oco wd Cbsst (DM 1J: w J Meyer BA. 

Bachelor of divinity 

rod 6 Anderson: C Bradshaw; (m) W 
D Brown: On) H A Cauan: A Frator: 
UniRC Grrtg: C M Hunler: td) A. _G_C 
McGregor; UP). 






H M Reid: 


Ktstorv 

ScMBd Cbaa; 

MacdiarmKL 

nSta& D W MtWMr. 

Second Cta: (DM 1): F J Baty; S R 
BaDengec DR. Christie: A W Duncan: 
M cosher: L M L Hepburn: J L 
Honton: R A Lawson: C H W 
Macmillan: E A Madtoe: A F 
McNaugnk U B MilcheU: OF Orr: H 
Rosk A J Russell: F. J Shaw: P 
us H M Turner: L J Wattes D A 

Jk 8 Adams: J E Allan: s' 

tton-Oantlo: A J Lindsay: L E 

MacLeod: R S Talk L H West. 
Psychology bid Unpdsibs 
first M C Saxton. 

Second Cta; CD M t>: C P Smith. 
Psyntialgn wMi Bmknsi Studies 
SeooMiZbSK (DM 1): D C Frauds: K 
A Simpson. 


agaart - with Dlstlnctlcui: id) J 

D M MilHcan - With Distinction: uU K 
D M Uchell ■ with Distinction: raw E 
Molr - with Distinct Km. W D Murray: 
A O Ntcol: T M Qhhuk M H Retd: iV H 
I Silev. J L Rowan:. C J Shaw: D C A 

M 'Stephen: 
west: E V 
Distinction. 


j l Kowan: u j saw: uca 

: Wilkie. S J Wlbon - htm 


MA (Hons 


___ Studies 

O Bat err P C Sunpte. 
p as ta Cbaa: (DM IJ: S Jennings: H C 
Potter. 


Amhropalo o 

SSnS ‘SftW IftJ E Carson: FX 


Slagne; D 

wet 


P Shankland: J W A 
D Smith; I B Walker. 

L Kennedv; A-M Shaw. 


ft S L Borland; 

M S Brown: S M Budunania M^hg-ne 


u: S E Cairns: . 

Cahnes: k / Contemn: T -J Currie; E A 
Ibe M-K.bSoK-R.EIdred: S M 
Fcrmwon: J .-I D Fraser ; A I Cloven H 
*.tf Hossutk J Hunter; K W Jamtewm 
C I B Jones: E A Kirk: .-I Alan rwr D C 
Mart-, / ju Kwptmiw D Alodium K I 
McComhie; M C McDonald: L J 
MeMnim: K A Morphet; L E NeUan: A 
S Net Ison: M S NKOHOn: J K OIMeui: S 
P PunjME W K Robertson; £ J 
Roxburgh: L Simmons: P F Straihearn: 
D L J Thanmson: R N Tyson: A 
ll 'tujnrd: S Wardlaw; a A Wares: A D 
While - wtm Dtsttnctton. 

BEd (Hons) (Edncation and 

S&SgL. (DM QiLA Sutherland. 

BEd 

P J Adams: M C Beaton - with 
Distinction: C T Bray: J A Buchanan: 
M D Burk A W Combe: tf I Dunn: D 
Easton: S A Fealhervlooe: S D Fraser: 
EC Crank. K A Jarvis: J V LaMUaw. j 


W Macdonald: S McIntyre: J Y Mmiv 
A MurttforcU K A Temple - with 
DKUncuon: w D Therbum. 

Bachelor of veterinary medicine 

n? L Barwtse BSc A K 

Beatty - with Distinction: D H Black: H 
J Brockl espy: A Brown: PS Bryan: J 
jewnd: MJ Christian: w j cark: C E 
Clarke: DOS QsJIMk M W Corilon: G 
K Cowan: G D Cruft; R D Evans: J K 
Fisher: F M 5wo: S Hart N J 
Hayward: J W Hughes: M D Kyle: T 
H Ling wood: M Love: C R Lyons: D S 
Mackie: M E Mann: D E Mamievon: R 
I MCArthur. J C S McCance; T R 
Mtuor. T L Norman-. D G Reed: M a 
R oberts: A_Ryder. l Stewart; G H 
Store; K E Taylor: Q D Thom: A J M 
Topp: E N Walker J R Wallace: P J 
Watson. 

BSc (Hons) in veterinary science 

ySioL’^ (DM 1 y. C U Lang. 

BLL 

. j is A P Brown; S A McCombW; P 
McNeil: T J Retd: a G Todd. 

Oau 2 (DM DiSM Aird: F S Alcorn; 
H R Annan: C Armstrong: p a 
A rUiurson: A J Bear hop: K Bowie: 8 
A D Bunw D M Ferguson; F B 

Cordon: R Hay how: K P Hermanns: N 
W Holroyd: J D Hunter: So fnjuts W 
J Jack: R M Jamieson: A A D Keith: G 
F McL Little: A Low den: k a Mackie: 
S A McCkafcev: A J McEwlng: rwh 
M ennte: L Nicholson: M B Poison; A E 
Reid: M Robson: K J ScnoHietd: J M 
Thomson: J D Whlleiaw; E H 
wUlOCkS- 

Cbu 2 (DM I): R P K Cheadle: S W 
col ledge: H J Carmack: F Croabw: D 

S D riik- j a Fergusson; A S Gibb: J 
Good bum A E Gordon; S L Hill: F 
J KUgouR R D Madver: JB Martin: H 
M McCracken; R S McGregor; R B 
Muir: D A Nash: S M Niodrie: p H 
ProudfooL E D Reid: C M Robertson; 
S M while. 

Law and Politics 

Cta 2 (DM DiAS Henderson. 

BLL 

L Atonzu C G Beanie: M L F Brodle: D 
J Crawford: 1 F Davktson: S M 
Davidson: Ej p Dai-le: J E Delaney; K 
M Duncan CDS A W Edwards. MA; N 
D Farauhareon: F S Cailacher; D T 
Gass: M Glen. MA iGlasok C 
Hally button: R D Harrow «r: k j 
H arvte: M L Hiatng; N T Hooke: A J 
tones: G G Irons;- J C Kenneoyr J F 
Kerr M D Ktog; D M Lindsay; A S 
LorUner A G Lyle: A D MacLean: N T 
MacLeod. MA: R D MCCran; A C 
McNaughion: S J Morgan; A E 
Morrison: J A Munro iDr. CAD Pale. 
MA (St Andk F M Roberts iMA Londr. 
S M Sanders: D J Scrtmgeour. MA: L 
Stewart; N Stringer J C Sweeney: M 
W Thomson E M Todd: D M Vause; L 
H L williams: C S Wlbon. MA (St 
And) CD). 

Bachelor of Medicine and Bach- 
elor of Surgery 

J M Allan: F H Anderson; J M 
Anderson: M W J Arm s trong: n A 
BaUey: J R Barrie mOe Walkinsi; J K 
Beattie: K J Blaikle. BSc: A M Blair; F 
M Blythe: T m Bonnes: A Bowman. 
BScIHWl: A Boyce: Q P Bradshaw: N 
T Brewster: C A Brodle: A M 
Campbell; P M Campbell: H A 
Cannon; P J Carder; BSc; G Carter; E 
M Cavanagh; F A Chalmers: I □ S 
ChalmersTS Chaimm BSc: R T A 
chatmers; R_M_ Macdonald _Clapo: A 


K N Lynn: F B MacGregor: R JE 
Mackay: C J R Mackenzie: A H 
Maclean: L M Manson: □ J W 
Marslon; T R Martland; RJ H Mash-; 
H Maxwell. BSc; L McDougall; P K 
McGutre. BSc: A McCallum MclnneK 
c E Mctnnes tnee RonaMMonk R G 
Mr Murray. BSc. J MrTaggart: S M 
Meachim.- J Mew. BSc. K TMilteft K 
A Mune: S R J Moorhead: A G 
Morrison: C H Muir; M J Mukherd. 
BSc E C Murchison: L M Myles. BSC: 
F M M Nairn. BSc: G Nicholson: J E 
Norman: K E Ottie: J M Par he; T R J 
Parke; S L Pearson: A C H PetL BSc: J 
M Penny: D G Pope; S E Pound. BSc: 
E C Praii: C F Ramsay: R Ramsay: J J 
Ranking: G Reah. J A Robinson: E C 
Robson' W E Rocs, BSc: “ “ 

BSc: E P Sanderson: H M . 

S Sarossftian: A J Sou ter. 

H E Starkey. BSc: B J Stereon. M J 
Stewart: G T Stone; C M Sunnera; R 
W Sutherland: J Toihurat! C C V Un: 
A wal-Ven B R Walker. BSc; L C tnee 
SandereonL BA (Cantab); E M wal- . 
lace: w A H Wallace. BSc- c j ward. 
BSc; J Wannw S R Wheatley; D A 
wiuiamson. BSc: I J wmiamson. BSc: 


BSc; AE Rymwv. 
i: H M Shannon, s 
Sou ter. H J Sdcra; 


i 2 (DW Ift 1 E L Craig: P J Si me; 
T S Walsh: A “ 


Ecclesion??? w ' Emohd: R J Feate: a 
F erguson: J^Y Findlay. Kcj 0 


CoodiMd. BSc: M J Come: N J 
Goulden: K M Cram. BSc; C a 
G regson: J E Wood Crew: A F 
Macfariane Crier: C A Hailvasslllou. 
BSc: B W HalUday: A A Harcombe: F 
M Hargreaves: C M B Heard: A C 
Fletcher HosUng: G A Irvine: J R 
Jenklnson. M A Johnston: A J 


.. _.Jng: I 

Lauder; I F Laurenson. BA ■ Can lab j: T 
Lawrence BSC G M Lawson: A M 
Leckle: D M Levy: K H Lew in ska. BSc 
(St And): S R Lindsay. BSc: O R Love: 


S M wiiuamaon: L e Wlbon. BSc. T-Y 
worn; p a woodnouae. BA (Oxon); E 
M Youngson. 

Bachelor of Dental Surgery 

C L AUoohy; F M Bresuti; K A 
Cardwell. A Carmen B Chan: A J R 
CroHiers; O M Dolan: J M Donaldson: 
D S Duncan: J G Duncan: P D Eynon: 
M Foster; D Gauil: J Goodley; B M 
Gordon: A J Greta; R Hanna; A M - 
Harper I S Hay; M D Henderson; M E 
Hotiand: J A Hooks: Y C Jong: J T S 
Leung: F M Uitterodl; K MacDonald; 
D J Mackenley: C P Maenhetson: D P 
Madleir. N J F Marshall: l Martin: J R 
McCoy: A M McCulrheon; N K 
Mcvetgh: J E Memr: A L Morrison: B 
M Morrison: D E Morrison: L H N«r I 
D O'NeUl: K a page: R -anther; C J 
Penman*: C I Retd: A W Robinson; S 
H Rosk A J walker: E-A S Wear. C R 
white: K E Wilson. 

BSc in Sciences 

Bacteriology 

Cta 2 (Dhf D: JD Curran: BSKAbii I 
S Morgan. 

Biochemistry 

Cta 1: R P HafiMTi R L Hayward: R 

dunOv IkRJ Boyd: A E Gold: C 
coidsack: J E Hunter. J a Stewart. 
Class 2 (Dtv IQ: M j Martin 

Pathology 

Cta f: C Doldon.^ 

E wail. 

Pharmacology 

Cbaa 1: D L Connolly: C A Purdle. 
MBChS 

Ctau 2 (Dtv I): J A M Anderson: P M 
Cantley: M PP Piper; MRS Rosa: C E 
Whitworth. 

Physiology 

Cta 2 (Dtv 0: F Z A hr. C J McKenna. 

Psychology 

Ctau 2 (dw l)!MC BereNord-W'eal: A 
J Henderson. 

Chemistry 

Cbaa 2 (Dlv Ik) M D Klndlen. 

Geology 

Cta is L M Hill. 

Mathematics 

Cta 2 (DW IQ: G C Hepburn. 

BSc 

A G Donnelly: J R Mousiey. 

MA 

Facility of Social Sciences 
Economic History 

Cta 2 (DW II): A.J Eisner. 

Bachelor of Commerce 

S A Garvin. 

BSc Social Science 

K A Franks: J K Thompson 


FINANGAL TIMES, 16rti MAY 1986. 


Alumasc launch on SE 
prices it over £ 18 m 


FINANCIAL TIMES. 2nd MAS' 1986. 


BY RICHARD TOMKINS 

, r 1 -* - . . 

’ ; Almitasc. the beer barrd-to-^ 
locks group bought .out hy its" 
management from Ccnsolitiated 
Gold Fields in mSd-1984, comes 
to the Stock market today with' 
an offer for sale of 4fim dares 
at IfiOp a sbare. 

,Its value at the offer price 
will be £18.4m and with. 

Zm ft 


Dalepak coming to market Yalued at £12i 


. 0£ the 45m . shares being 
offered, 2.1m are being sold by 
existing shareholders and 2.4m 
Iqr Bandays Development 
Capital, which funded the buy- 
out. The 980,000 shares being 
issued- by the company will 
about Ftm Jvri" Vtflririh 


* 


t 


ft 


BY HCHARD TOMKINS 

Dalepak Food*. Britain’s bi g- 
gest supplier of frozen grift- 
steaks, is coming to the market 
through an offer for sale.of 4.7m 
shares at 107p a share, giving 
It a value of f 115m. 

GrQIsteaks are made aaX.oi 
meat which has been processed 
by flaking, Mending and form- 
ing to improve Its eating charac- 
teristics. - Dalepak is'. ' brand 
leader in the market "with 


became one of the first com- 
panies in Britain to make what 
has become known as the grill- 
steak. 

Its products are now widely 
advertised on television outside 
London and are sold through 
most big supermarket- and 
freezer centre chain stores. • 

The grfilsteak marke t h as 
grown rapidly in re 
with 


company.' says was due to a 
heavy increase in advertising 
costs. 

Of the shares being sold, 
some 24m are coming from 
existing shareholders and 2.6m 
from the', company, raising 
£2 -2m net to ent short-term 
borrowings and 
d( ' 


flagging so Dalepak has turned 
to one of the <rther biggest 
growth areas— ready meals— to 
sustain the momentum. If the 
volumes come through at a 
level high enough to 
new factory busy 



FINANCIAL TIMES, 21st MAY !0«x 


Flotation values Evans Halshaw at £17i 


BY LUCY KGLLAWAY 

Evans Halshaw, a u tomp tf ve 
distributor, is being floated on 
the stock market with a value 
of £17m eighteen months- after 
the company was bought out 
by its management for f 
Previously a subsii 
LCP. the 


Following the buy-out, the 
directors owned 70 per cent of 
the shares, with the rest owned 
by Barclays Development Capi- 
tal. Barclays will be selling the 
majority of its stake in the 
c£ae frir ol#. while Jfre direc- 


troding. profits were £3flm 
(£2.8 ml on sales, of £152m 
(H40m). Profit before tax was 
almost unchanged at £2 .2m 
because or an extra £lm- in 
interest costs on the borrowings 
I to finance the buy-pyj 
icej 


others in tbe sector. However, 
if >he company looks fairly 
cheap now. it is nothing com- 
pared to the price at which the 
managers bought it less than 

2wa wvn. iiv a 


IN ONE M0NTH,THREE COMPANIES WE FINANCED 
DECIDED TO FIND FRESH BACKERS. 


In one month alone, the three 
companies featured above were 
successful enough to float on the 
Stock Market 

Thanks in no small part, we'd like 
to think, to the backing that Barclays 
Development QpitaJ Limited has 
been able to give them over the last 
few years. 

In two instances we provided 
finance for management buyouts. 
And in the other we helped a 


growing business expand by provid- 
ing them with development capital. 

But our involvement didn’t stop 
there. 

Whenever our clients felt they 
needed it, we were happy to offer 
advice and practical help. 

Not to mention access to ail the 
expertise of the entire Barclays 
Group. 

If you'd be .interested in finding 
out what Barclays Development 


Capital Limited could do for you, 
please don't hesitate to telephone 
Jeremy Seddon on 01-623 2323 for 
a preliminary chat 



BARCLAYS DEVELOPMENT 
CAPITAL LIMITED 

RO. Box IBS, Ebbgare House, 

2 Swan Lane, London ECiR 5 TS. 

9 THE BARCLAYS INVESTMENT BANK GROL’P 









I 


34 


UNIVERSITY NEWS 


THE TIMES THURSDAY JULY 24 1 986 



July 24, 1986 


T he ‘"milkTound** of em- 
ployers seeking graduate 
recruits this year is com- 
ing to an end. At univer- 
sities we have 
interviewed, and been interviewed 
by. about 600 students. This is 
obviously a self-selected group but 
their collective voice has some 
interesting messages. In response 
to some recent advertising, we 
have also looked at several hun- 
dred graduates with two or three 
years* experience and the compar- 
ison show's some disappointed 
expectations. 

One message which has not 
changed over the years is that 
those about to graduate are look- 
ing for challenge and variety and 
the ability to leave their mark on 
the world. This is modified a little 
bv a much greater recognition of 
the need to base a career on good 
training and good basic work 
experience. Perhaps students are a 
little less impatient than they used 
to be. Particularly we find they are 
looking to their employer to make 
a commitment to their develop- 
ment and provide a well integrat- 


ed mix of formal training and 
related work experience. 

We have ourselves for many 
years spent about 10 per cent of 
our turnover in providing training 
to our staff in a well integrated 
package. This year we have found 
much greater interest than previ- 
ously in the way in which we do 
this, and mudt more critical 
questioning. 

• How is the training given? Not 
by academics but by line person- 
nel, partners, managers, and staff, 
giving case studies within a class- 
room simulation of a client 
environment 

• Haw is it integrated with oar 
work experience? By breaking the 
training into short intensive ses- 
sions prior to the work experience. 

• Is it flexible? Can I move 
through the training at my own 
pace? Frequent courses on a wide 
variety of topics mean that train- 
ing progress relates to individual 
development, but within a disci- 
plined framework. 


Today’s managers 


find that setting 


new challenges is 


a discipline that 


gets results, says 


Martin Vandersteen 



from graduates is the increasing 
pressure " that job-hunting is 
putting on their final year. Every 
year the milkround gets earlier 
and earlier and more lime is 
required from students. We are 
finding more and more very able 
students who are using their third 
year to enjoy their university work 
and then starting to look for a job 
in. the following autumn or even 
the next year. 


that they are at the bottom of the 

organization andare being treated 
as such. 


Another major theme emerging 
from the milkround is the growing 


awareness among students of the 
importance of information tech- 
nology to the future of their 
careers. Students tell us that they 
know they have to understand 
information technology if they are 
to rise high in management posi- 
tions. For many industries, the use 
of information technology is now 
a key component of business 
strategy- Students are seeing this 
perhaps more quickly even than 
those involved. 

This applies equally across all 


disciplines, in fact, arts and social 
science students are perhaps more 
aware of the need to gain comput- 
er skills than scientists and engi- 
neers who are exposed to 
computers in their course work. 
They see the need to blend the 
hard technical skills to make 
computers do what is needed with 
the softer people skills which are 
required to help computers and 
people to work in harmony in new 

systems. 

Another message we are getting 


We consider applications at any 
time and have recently introduced 
flexible start dales throughout the 
year in response to this developing 
rhany; we have found a wide 
welcome for this ability to join us 
at any time. 


What do we learn from gradu- 
ates with, two or three years’ work 
experience? We have to be a little 
careful about the sample of those 
who respond to advertisements. 
They are looking for jobs and are 
perhaps less satisfied with their 
experience than their immediate 
colleagues who are not looking 
around.. The general message is 


Perhaps this is realistic, but it 
does not match the expectations o 
students on the milkround or what 
they are told. These people have 
been given variety but perhaps not 
the challenge that they expected. 

Frequently. the jobs they did in 
their vocations at university were 
more challenging than the jobs, 
they have done since leaving 
university. The training has not 
generally been wdlimegrated with 
the work experience arid frequent- 
ly the work experience is more 
that of a spectator than a heavily 
involved participant. 

The overall picture is of young 
people being knocked into a rather 
dull shape, rather than being 
excited to provide leadership ana 
practical enterprise within the 
organization. 


it young and full of enterprise with 
plenty of opportunity for other 
young people to make their mark. 
Because i! covers ‘all industries, it 
cives broad industry experience 
for those prepared to understand 
the business needs of its diems. 


One of the attractions these 

more experienced graduates see in 
the information technology indus- 
try is that its rapid growth has kept 


Appointments Phone: 01-481 4481 


Appointments Phone: 01-481 4481 


Systems Analysts/ 
Programmers and Designers 

Leading City Financial Institution 


c £25,000 package 


Our clients, one of the most prestigious of organisations, 
have offices in key financial centres of the world enabling 
them to be a major player within the global securities 


markets and to offer a comprehensive range of services to 
1 cli 


Items. 


their many international i 


the 



ware 


and software which will ensure their position in the 
coming years. 

They now need to augment the development team 
with a few professional, competent specialists who are 
looking for a high level of involvement, project variety 
and financial rewards. 


Several years’ experience in a DEC environment 
gained in the financial sector is die main requirement 
although closely related experience in another field 
would be considered. The remuneration package 
consists of salary, and bonuses which can be substantial. 


To apply; please write or telephone Brian Burgess 
ting Ren BB 085. . 


quoting 


V |/v| rr i International 

S— iLlUyvl Search and Selection 

Chapman 

mSSmmm I Associates 


160 New BocvdStreet London W1YOHR. 
Telephone: 01 -409 1371 


Sales Director 


Circa £25,000. + Car, 


Age 30-40 


The Company Is the. Brand Leader in Home Computer 
Software, enjoying a high retail profile throughout 
the EEC 


Due to Group restructure and promotion, we wish 
to appoint a Sales Director designate to control and 
enhance our market dominance. 


The successful applicant will be a self-motivating sales 
professional, capable of inspiring and developing our 
existing sales and marketing team. A sales managerial 
background with experience in selling to, and 
negotiating with, major High Street retailers is essential. 


Tofulfil this demanding career opportunity, the - • 
applicant will be domiciled in the Manchester area, 
however relocation would be considered. 


For further details please apply in writing only, 

ention of 1 


enclosing a detailed C.V. f for the attention 
Managing Director. 


the 



Ocean Software Limited, 

6 Central Street, Manchester M2 5NS. 


THE WAY TO PROGRESS . . - 

BUSINESS ANALYSIS 


REGENTS PARK 


TO £16,000 

There are excellent career development opportunities for individuals to 
join a major international professional service organisation. Vacancies 
exist Tor both experienced and junior personnel in our client's Manage- 
ment Services team. 


The successful applicants x*. ill handle a wide variety of projects on an 
individual basis. The assignments will include mini computer based 
s> stems with international communications, the appraisal of work flow 
problems and the automation of complex office procedures. 
Applicants should have a Business Studies or Computer Science degree 
and in the more senior positions should have at least rwo years -practical 
experience. This experience must have been gained within a manage- 
ment verv ices or consultancy env imnrnent. The ability to communicate 
ulTcclivcIv both verbally and in writing at all levels is an important 
attribute Tor these positions. 

The successful candidates can look forward to challenge within an 
organisation that recognises and rewards success. 

The conditions of service arc well above average and include a generous 
holiday allowance, excellent pension scheme and BUPA. 


If you would like further information about the opportunities within this 
professional organisation, please write with full C.V. quoting reference 
S1/2J07.'T to Mxnad Appointments (London) Limited. 30 Fleet 
StrccL London EC4Y I AA. 



JUST GRADUATED? 


LOOKING FOR A FAST TRACK 
CAREER IN THE INTERNATIONAL 
CAPITAL MARKETS? 


Sumitomo Finance International, last growing capital markets 
subsidiary of one of the world's largest banks, has a strictly 
limited number of openings for very high calibre graduates or 
MBAs keen to build a career in either eurobond dealing, sales or 
corporate finance. 


You should only apply for one of these positions if you> 


1. Have at least a H(il) Hons degree from a leading university; 

2. Are aged under 26; 

3. Are prepared to work extremely hard; and 

4. Have a strong, outgoing and convivial personality combined 
with tact ana diplomacy. 


Successful applicants can expect early responsibility, excellent 
on-the-job training and rapid career development combined 
with a competitive salary and benefits package. 


Interested applicants should write, enclosing a comprehensive 
C.V. stating now they meet the above requirements and indicat- 
ing what other career options they are currently pursuing, to:- 


Mrs Fiona Williams 
Personnel Officer 
Sumitomo Finance International 
107 Cheapside 
London EC2V 6HA 


PEABODY TRUST 


DIRECTOR 


This is the top executive appointment in a large 
charitable organisation, widely recognised as one of the 
leading housing associations in London managing some 
12,000 properties. 

A principal role of the Chief Executive is to contribute 
to the formation of policy for the continuing 
development of the organisation; and to provide dynamic 
leadership to a skilled, professional team in adapting and 
extending the charity to meet future needs. 

Attainment at high level in a substantial enterprise 
coupled with a record of creative achievement in top 
management is essential. Previous experience in or near 
housing will be an advantage. 

Terms are for discussion circa £30,000. 

Please send personal details in confidence to Geoffrey 
Elms. Charity Appointments, 3 Spital Yard, Bishopsgate, 
London El 6AQ. 

Chanty 

Appointments 


IT 


INBUCON 


SALES 


South East - CIBCA £15,000 + Car 
Our Client is a company at the leading edge of 
compressor technology, producing a unique Brit- 
ish-designed and built rotary compressor, 
acknowledged as one of the most exciting innova- 
tions in the refrigeration and heat pump industry. 


To spearhead their penetration in the South of 
England, they seek 2 dynamic and high calibre 
Sales Engineers who know the refrigeration and air 
conditioning industry and its customers- 


Candidates must have had field experience, includ- 
ing screw compressors, be technically 
knowledgeable and preferably qualified. It will be of 
real interest to those aged 24-30 who are poised for 
career progress in an environment of rapid growth. 


Please send full career details and indicate, current 
salary to A.GJNL Burden, quoting refer- mWi 
ence 4145. 


INBUCON MANAGEMENT 
CONSULTANTS LIMITED 

Executive S ea rch awl Selection, Knightsbridgs 
House, 197 Knighttbridga. L o n do n 5W7 1RN 



1926’1S86 


BOB appointments 


JOURNALISTS 

Radio Cambridgeshire 
Based) 

&l 


Cambridgeshire has three cities, a dozen matter towns and 

ssssaci 

£9,916— ■£14,024” 

Contract Reporter £8£2S— £10^81 

Because of promotion and expansion we need three 
journalists with energy and flair. A News Producer and 

Contract Reporter (one year contract) in our Cambridge 
newsroom, as well as a News Producer to dig for news m the 

cathedral city of Peterborough. . . 

All three should have a thorough grounding m jouma- 
n oood microphone voices and a determination to get 


these jobs on Cambridge (0223) 315970. 


News Producer (based Cambridge) (Ref.: . 

News Producer (based Peterborough! Ref. 2227/ 
Contract Reporter (based Cambridge) Ref. I 



rto cover the wide 
the Home Counties, 


REPORTER 

Radio Bedfordshire 
Based Luton or Bedford 
£8^28— £10,581* 



Agood microphone voice and driving licence are essential. 

Either newspaper training or completion of a formal 
Radio Journalism course is essential — together with 
relevant experience as a Reporter. 

- Forfurmer details contact MkeGtobons on Luton 
(0582)459111 •■(Rof.2206 ft) 


We are an equal 
opportunities employer 


*Piu3aaowanceof£5G9pa. 

“PlusaBcwancaof £371 pa., ■ ■■_ . .. 

Salaries cunantty under review. . 

Relocation expenses considered for permanent posts. 
Contact us Immediately for appBcationfonn (quote 
a pprop ria te ref. and enclose sab.), BBC Appointments, 
London W1 A 1AA.TeL 01-927 5799. 



Marketing Challenge 


Our client one of Britain's most successful and best regarded 
companies has an exciting opportunity for a young dynamic 
marketing professional. 

The successful candidate wilTtakeup atrue marketing 
challenge, ensuring that the product offering bestfulfills consumer 
needs. They will be^e toJTiakeasubstantiaLcontribution to 
profitable growth, working in an environment in which theyhave 
direct control over product and distribution. 

Applicants should have a minimum of 2-3 years FMCG 
marketing experience, in return, out client offers excellent 
prospects for persona! development in a commercial environment 

Salary aspirations are unlikely to be aprobiem, and the position 
carries an excellent benefits package including a car 



This growth certainly helps us 
keep our people ' challenged and 
stretched- However, it is always 
eaiser to keep someone doing the 
same job - he or she requires less 
supervision and the outcome is 
more reliable, h is a much more 
demanding discipline for manage- 
ment to find new challenges for its 
staff while at the same time 
providing Jiigh-quahty products 
and services. 


We find that this discipline is 
worthwhile in terms of the superb 
results we obtain from highly 
motivated staff who come in every 
morning eager to meet what today 
will bring, even if it is another late 
night to meet a deadline. 


Manin P 'anderstecn is the manage * 
ing partner of Arthur Andersen <£ 
Co. management consultants 


REF: 07/32 


fnteviews are heto direct with prospective employer 




LJ ASSOCIATES 


L J Associates 
Euston House 
81-103 Euston Street 
London NW1 2ET. 
Tel: 01 -388 3111. 


Data Conns Sales 0TE £3SK + car 

Do you have experience of Multfolexors, Pro- 
tocol Converters, PSS or X25’s, then this 
major Data CommumicaSons organisation has 
f career for you soBing their systems 
Into the S.West & s.B'Ham area's. A PC Net- 
work sales type is also needed to sen 
Ethernet Novell or Pronet into the northern 
home counties. 


Big Bang Sales £20K/QTE £55K 

WKhthe coming of de-regulation of the Stock 
Exchange, opportunities sefflng services/ sys- 
tems into the CITY are at thee - highest The 
market leader in brokerage software solutions 
has two sales vacancies plus-a sales trainee 
postion for some one with good 
brokerage/banking software design experi- 
ence & with the right personality. 


Turnkey Sales 0TE E32K + car 

This major dec systems house Is engaged In 

fZSn? plan to m8 * ch ** Sghtysuo- 
cessful sales in 1985/6. London arm unini 

to 39 Jarernow urgently 

^? 3 ? andin 9 distributed 

Sk ’u?S^ npUter SOlU,ions ran 9 0 £ 


Micro Sales DTE £20 - £32K + car 

9 monlhs successful 



Pie Sales Recruitment Specialists 

■WSSBUSS8& 

01-959 IMSS? 


U£ON to ■ 

BRACKNELL to BRENTWOOD fra^whfchto 

birmingham 


WctwIPoeDa, k 
OmsKKxshM 

120 other idles 
A support voemtos 



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GENERAL APPOINTMENTS 



High Technology Manufacturing 



C.I.M 
SPECIALISTS 


£ 16 kto£ 22 k+ 




Systems 


SE England 


Computer Integrated ManufactnringwiD have a unique level of 
comiijercial impact on the electronic products industries of the 



ywwwiiijt 

throughout the group in utflisinj 
technology and to contribute to 
The ideal candidates win be> 

• Aged25-h 


corporate success. 




• Experienced in aspects ofCIM within a i^'otvifomnenL 
The scope of tbenew group wiB be to offer advanced C^linput 
in new and current projects and directly influence the,phumiago 
future equipment needs in each indivkhial operatingcompaoy. - 
You will need to research methods and implementsystems to 
bridge any islands of automation' already present and liaise with 
die senior management team of group companies andbe 


exceptional career structure. 

. For an initial and confidential discussion please call 
W BobArchibold on Newbury (0635) 33445, quoting 
reference number M/38 1/T, orwrite in strict 
confidence to:- . - . 

L ARGHIBOLD RAE CONSU13ANTS LIMITED 


High Technology Recruitment 


CONSULTANTS 

G£7-£10K+ Bonus + Car Newbury 

ARC Recruitment is a successful companywithin the ARC 
Group, dedicated to personnel recruitment within the 
Electromc/High Technology Industries. Recognised as a 
leading Recnntment Group within the UK in both Executive 
Search and Advertising assignments; the future planned 
expansion offers opportunities for a number of 
individuals to train and develop an exdtingcareer within a 
highly successful environmenL . 

The kleal candidates wfllbe?- 

• 24 to 30 years of age. 

• Qualifiedlo Degree level 

• Interested in and aware of the High Technology 
Industry. 

You will alsoneed tQbe^vnmenriallya^reaHd able to 
develop busmesS 'relatioflships at senior management levels. 
After intensive product and industry training your 
responsibilities wffl involve Saies/Marketing of recnntment 
services to a range of clients and the placemans of candidates 
in to a variety of companies throughout the UK. The benefits 
k. include a negotiable starting saterv^bonus scheme and an 
^^excellent future in afast expaodmg group. 

For an initial and confidential discussion please call 


ace C/384/T, or wnte m stnet co; 

ARC Recruitment LttL, 

^ARC House, 11' 13 The Broadway, 
\Naiairy, BeAAirc RG13 IAS. 
^Llefc Newbury (0635) 33445. 


RECRUITMENT 


Financial Controller 

C-£17,000 

My company Is a major machine tool manufacturer 
With co ntinuea success it now has a £30 million turnover. 

Qualified Accountant required either Chartered or 
Certified. Responsible to the Financial Director for: 

* The smooth running of the Accounts Department 

* Timely production of reports and accounts to pre- 
determined timetables. 





ACCOUNTANT 


Dearborn Chemicals Limited, a progressive, 
profitable and expanding Speciality. Chemical - 
.Company and part of WR. Grace & Co., iscurrently 
. seeking to expand its Accounts Department at 
Widnes. . 

The successful applicants (male or female) will 
* join a professional team involved iri.the 
preparation and submission of:- .Monthly 
. accounts, including profit and loss, balance sheets 
and source and application of funds in both*" 
sterling and doHarfermat:— year end schedules in 
compliance with both U.K. and U.S. accounting 
requirements; Various Ad-Hoc financial reports. 

Suitable applicants for these exqting and 
demanding positions will be aged under 45 and - 
b<e qualified or part-qualified ACMA or ACCA and 
have experience of management accounting, 
budgeting and forecasting within a computerised 
environmenL Unqualified but suitably ' 
experienced candidates will also becorisidered. ’ ' 

Attractive salaries, prqfitabtlitybonuses . 
together with other fringe benefits await the right 
candidates. 

. -Please telephone for application forms OLservd. . 
C.V with full career details to: Phil Gibson, 
Company Recruitment Officet 


Grace Service Chemicals Dearborn Chemicals Lid. 
kTlVlLC Widnes, Cheshire WAS 8UD. Telephone: 051 -424 5351 



THE RETAILING REVOLUTION 


RETAIL SUPPLY MANAGEMENT 


- Boots the Chemists -Britain’s most 

popular retailer - is now implementing its 
new retail strategy. This exciting new - 
development involves die creation of ■ 
^_nine autonomous Business Centres -. • 
controlling almost- £2 billion worth of 
. business across a broad range of product 
"categories; from leisure products to 
computers and pharmaceuticals to 
cosmetics.’ ■ 

Hand in hand with this strategy for the 
future, is the introduction of a completely 
new and vital role within the Buying 
Function —Supply Management 

The managers who will fulfil this key 
role will work alongside the buyers on a - 
'daily basis and wiH be responsible for : . 
^optimising stock Hddmg,increasing . 
service levels to : ciistomers i arid liaising 
-with senior management on major stock 
■ and supply issues. 


Appointments will be made at both 
senior and middle management levels. 
Ideally, candidates will have a degree in . 
Business Studies, or another numerate 
discipline, and previous retail or 
distribution experience. A high level of 
commercial awareness and excellent 
communication skills are essential. For 
the more senior appointments, proven 
man management experience is 
desirable. Recently qualified MBA's will 
be considered. 

- Rewards include competitive salaries, 

significant benefits packages and 
excellent career prospects. Vacancies 
exist In both London and Nottingham 
and a generous relocation allowance is 
available' where appropriate. 

- Interested in these new 
appointments? Contact Taylor and 
Partners on the special action line at the 
address below. 


Taylor & Partners 

GREENCQAT HOUSE ■ FRANCIS STREET - LONDON SW1P 1DH 
TELEPHONE 01-630 1758 - TELEX 27706 ■ FAX 01-821 5385 


ONLY THE BEST 
NEED APPLY 

We are expanding our successful sales department due to 
the continued growth of our publications. 

Therefore there are opportunities for sales people who 
possess the qualities and character to compliment our 
existing team. The required qualifications are a good level 
of education, enthusiasm; dedication, and a good appear- 
ance. A knowledge of typing .would be desirable. 4 

There" Will be ample scope to capitalise on new business' 
opportunities and full training will be given to equip you 
to meet the challenge and demands of this role. The right 
applicants will be ideally aged under 35 and will reside in 
London or within easy travelling distance. 

Your ability to respond to the competitive nature of 
advertising in order to develop new business for Times 
Newspapers will earn you the -reward of an excellent 
starting salary plus bonus scheme and generous holiday 
entitlement 

Please telephone: - ~ ■ ’ • ' - v 

June Wyse .01-833 7430 : 

Steven Oxley 01-837 1234, extension 7706 . . . 






THE SUNDAY TIMES 


P.O. BOX 7, 

200 GRAYS INN ROAD, 
LONDON. WC1X 8EZ 




YOUNG GRADUATES 


Now that the cap fits, 


Yo«\e raadeij^y^V^gotyDur degree- You know you're 
good You kriowthat now the mostirnponara career 

derision S finding The righrcofn|xffiy«^tlTirryht' 

commitment -to you and your future. 

Here our rar ra itmera 

graduates b unquestioned. AsEurope'sieading IT company 
we'reln a position to offer trie sort of career scape id young 
people that many of our competitors could only dream of. 

Currently our Group Information Services unit is looking for 
a number of recent graduates tojoin the End User 
Computing team. Here, after an initial induction period, - 
you'll be at the centre of analysing business needs. . 

originating sofotwns and de%^opingsysffifnstfi3twflf beat 

thefonrfrontbfaxnpijting.^^ - . 


I L" I ll * i 7 t-T ill* ^1*1 if f iVi 1 ! HdGilll ilirlj ILnr/J 


good degree tnCem^puterSdenre, Business Studiesor 
anotherreiated subject, location wlH be other London: . 
Readmg"orBr«*ndJv^highly'cornpetftivestartfi^sa^ 
packages ranging (rornc. £8.400 to c£IQD0O. - - 

YbuVe got to find out more. Fbwrard full pereonal and 
career detafom Amanda Lucy-. Graduate 
RecnAment Executive, ICL, Bridge Home, 
Putney Bridge, Fulhaih, London. SW6 31X. 
Alternatively call her today for an application form on 
01-788 7272. 

KXIs an equal opportunities employer. ' 


We should be talking to each other. 


A MEMBER OF THE STC PLC GROUP 


PERSONNEL 

MANAGER 


Shipping 


Up to .£ 20,000 +Car 


WinmwenP Selection Division 


"The challenge of change in a rapidly evolving industry 
demands a thoroughly professional response from the 
individual to be appointed to take charge of shore 
personnel in this long-established major UK shipping 
company. 

The successful candidate will have a record of success 
in a multi-site business* and bring experience of a full 
range of personnel and administration functions. 

Though based in London, the job holder will spend time 
serving up to a dozen locations across the country. - 

Please write enclosing full career details to Tony Milter 
at 105 Fenchurch Street London EC3M 5HH, quoting - 
ref R208. I 

Miller, Brand^Company 

Limited J 

PROFESSONAL PERSONNB. CONSULTANTS RHP 


Innovative, well organised 

NATIONAL FIELD SALES 
MANAGER 

c £16,000 pa + car . ' Midlands based 

Identification of new markets has meant that C3ne of ourMid land dierTts has restructured the 
whole of their Sales and SalesTraining opefatioa^ .•••.•• •' : * ■ ' ■ - 

This has given rise to a new appointment. That of NationalField Sales Manager, with great 
emphasis being placed on the ability to train, motivate and re-direct the existing sales force 
in line with the company's new approach. 

The job will be challenging. It will involve controlling 8 reps nationally, selling to both public 
and private sector clients. . 

Aged 25 - 40, you're probably a Regional Sales Manager at the moment - perhaps within 
tire grocery, non-foods or pharmaceutical industries. 

You'll bean energetic, self motivated Manager with-lots of new ideas: someone capable of 
planning the actions of the sales force, encouraging them to achieve and monrtoring.their 
success. Above all, you must have a first class record in sales arid sales training. 

Male and female candidates who feel their background and experience matches up to 
this demanding new role should send a full cv.' to SIP Partnership, 17 Oldfield Park,. 
•’Bath,Avoa 

SIP PARTNERSHIP 



“f 


rlf 

, CTE C-S ; . c ', 

r* 1 * 11 - ’■ ^ ,, "■ 

* to »’* t: -■ 


m 

m *u czc 








GENERAL MANAGEMENT - PUBS 

Can you recognise a potential success story- and make it happen? 
c. £17,000 potential + executive car. 

Some people might call It the Midas touch - the ability to create the “a ter" in a 
“before and after* story. If this is beginning to mean something to you, you should contact 
our clients about the unusual role of managing approximately 175 pubs in the Wales and 
West area. 

Aged 28-40. you will be responsible for managing and controlling a team of three 
Area Managers, reporting directly to the Innkeeper Director. 

It is an extremely successful operating company within a major international and 
UK leisure group and they mean to go places - they would like you to join them. 

They want intelligent achievers who recognise that the future is far moreimporfanf 
than the past and they have few preconceptions about qualifications and experience - 
you will, howavenneed to demonstrate a sound track record in your chosen career to 
date. 

They are offering a very attractive package, considerable accountability, influence 
and excellent career development potential; 

Please write with fun CV to: Mike Bawden, AJD Recruitment (quoting R«f 360), 
Bourton Grange, Bourton, Swindon, Wiltshire SN6 8HZ. Tel: (0793) 783444 Ext 21. 

AJD Recruitment 

• ADVERTTSING.SEARCH.SELECTION 
AdWisionof Akrander James trOaxtor Limited 


THIS YEAR YOU 
ARE GOING 
TO START UP 
YOUR OWN 
BUSINESS... 


Because this is a business that revolves 
around you and your talents- not yOur age, sex. 
social standing or job experience UrequinB your 
common sense, your charm and sU your naked 
ambition. The business It called YOU and die 
business you are in is cafled direct selling, 

MOVE INSTANTLYTOTHE NEXT AO ifyou 
djBikyoa can gtf anywhere in tits life without 
needing to pdlyoursdf effectively. 

Still with us?Good,then you recognise 
that given the right training, good prod ueband- 
serviees, supported by a professional corporate 
framework, yon could be considerably richer by 
this time next year purely on your own ability. 

There’s no other job where t h e talent— 
earnings equation works aut solely m your favour 
There's no other way (barring a legacy or pools 
Mp.) of ever breaking treeirotn tlie predictiirility 

of your present bfe style But could you cope? 


AND IT 
ISN'T GOING 
TO COST YOU 
APENNY. 

and no catch. 


Could you ridea bike or alii the first time? 

Of course you need training. ThaFs why 

ourdients have aD spent years perfecting their 
seJesbaairngocwisesitsa valtiabkjUKtMfiich . 
'wdTensureyou afetmeand it’s a sound investment 
-- for the com panics who make up somiof the top' 1 
■ - names. in Britain. They form a boom sector to.flie 
economy and have b«n identified as lhcmi»tiikeiy 
sources of entrepreneurial talent ths country has. 

I Essentially our clients are an elite dub of 
high per fo rming individuals operating under a 
c or p or ate umbrella. ■ ... 

They had the courage to say “No' to a 
regular but mediocre salary. It's arundicabon pf 
their self confidence that they wot prepared to 


THERE'S NO 
STOCK TO 
BUYANDNO 
PREMISES 
TO FIND... 


mvest ir therrttelvo' for high returns rather than 
settle for a life lenience as a hired hand. 

That sdf confidence is there in most of ru. 
waiting to be developed hared up and given free 
«bl Wait no longer Call us today or tomorrow 
between'^ am. and 9 pm. fust ask the operator for 
Treefianeihto{dnA9Sociates,iteadirtgorcQmplete 
the coupon and we will send you an inJcmnation 
pack-by return. No BtampneoesaryL Justaddress - 
it: Anthony Ma^on.ft Associates tid. Freepost., ; 

Redding RC 11 BR-Wcvvon’i waste any time . . 

. bewwe,-asfioni today your trmemearis money. • 




AjVJTHONY MOXQN & ASSOdATES LIMITED 

a CASTLE STREET. K£AOtniaBBlKSMK£RCl7SB(W?«Sa2ra " 


HomeTeleplioneP 
Current Area of W 


















1xi£ jljJvIcS YHtJRi>i>Ai j ULr a4 i>oo 


GENERAL APPOINTMENTS 



ICKON 
^DOLPHIN 



LTD 


Recruitment Advertising 
Executive Search 
Management Selection 
International Recruitment 


178-202 Great Portland Street. 
London WIN 5TB.TeI:01-631 4411. 
8 Mathew Street Liverpool L2 6RE. 
Tel: 051-236 1724. 


O&M 

Analyst 


The Management of Change 
in a truly Dynamic Company 


As the UK coraurnerbraradi of one of the 
worirfslaigest hanks* Qfiaank Sayings has 
achieved success through innovation in 
" the value of Investment in 

y. in progressive banking 
1 doable management in 
maintaining our lead. 

Organisation and methods is considered 
cenxraJtothedevdopmentofsucce^&i 
efficient services, in out ever widening range of 
financial products offered to the public. 

A vacancy has now arisen in our O&M 
team for an ambitious, experienced analyst 
WHh at least three years' experience within the 
wfflbeabjetoap^^your 

IBM ft'sto a range of activities including 
organisatkmrewtew5.m eth t>d s tudy pregeds. 


clerical work measurement exercises and 


cuu un i f ic ation skills. 

TTus challenging op, 

considerable career prospects f er _ 

individual, offers attractive remuneratkjri 
including a full range ofbanking benefits. These 
comprise subsidised mortgage, preferential 
loans and non-contributory pension scheme 

Please write with lull details of 1 your career to 
date to Chris Downs. Citibank Savtngs, 

St. Martins House: Hammersmith Grove. 
London W60NY 

Citibank Savings O 


Production 

Planner 


Maidstone, Kent 


KmberiY-CIarfc is an international leader in the 
manufacture and marketing of disposable 

products such as Kleenex* radal tissues, 
Smp^dtY* feminine hygiene products and 
Kmniwipes* wipers. We nave an excellent 
record ofbusiness growth which we aim to 
maintai n . 

Ybur role in helping to maintain this gowth 
will be to create snort and medium term plans 
forarange of our products that will mini mi se 
the total costs of production, distributian and 
stockholding whilst ensuringour customers' 
needs are met totally This will require you to 
liaise and negotiate with marketing, production 
and distribution dep a rtments at our various 
sites in this country and in Europe. 

To take up the challenge of this demanding, 
high profile role you wffl need a background ot 
4/5 years in a FMCG environment and 
exposure to the latest farming techniques 
would be advantageous Complete confidence 


in your inter-personal abilities is essential. A 


and tnitiativ*; persuasiveness, drive and the 
determination to grow with the Company wfQ 


s r em u neration package offered, which 
indudes relocation expenses where 
a p p ro p ri at e, wifi be particularly attractive to self 
motivated, positive people who are able to 
contribute to the success ofthe Company. 

Interested? Please write for an application 
form or send your CV to: Bob Keywood, 

Senior Ftasormel Officer 
Kfanbetty-Claik Limited. Larkfiekl, 

Maidstone. Kent ME20 7PS. 

Tel Maidstone (0622) 77700. 

@ K imberly-Clark 

’Regotnrd frolrmerki qftheKimbtriy-Oart. Corporate* 




Creative new role in data commimications 

circa £17500 

Our client is the newly formed data communications division of a prestige British 



personnel professional to play a key role in the achievement of these pi 

You will be fully responsible for providing a comprehensive personnel function 
to the division which will involve developing and implementing many new 
practices. You should be able to focus on, and solve, priority issues and be able to 
communicate actions on a divisional and corporate basis. Key areas will include: 
manpower planning; salary planning; recruitment; management development 
programmes; monitoring personnel administration. 

Essentially, you will enjoy managing a varied role which demands a high level of 
autonomy and personal involvement You should also enjoy the challenge of 
tackling often complex personnel issues and presenting your own view 
forcefully within a young and dynamic management team. 

You should be able to demonstrate a broad track record in personnel, not 
necessarily at management level. Experience of working within high growth 
organisations (ideally within high tech/com muni cations) and with divisional 
operations would be advantageous. The role offers significant opportunities for 
personal career growth on an international scale, within a challenging and 
stimulating environment 

For further information please telephone Paul Child on (0784) 34322, or write to 
him at Kramer Westfield International, 5 The Avenue, Egham, Surrey TW20 9AB. 
Recruitment Consultants to the Communications Industries 



INTERNATIONAL. 


Assistant Secretary 

c£l7,000 


0 


Head Office. 

As one of two Assistants, the successful applicant 
will support, advise and make recommendations 
to the Secretary on legal, structural and 
contractual matters relating to ITV and TT .R 
programme companies ana the general f uncti on 
of the IBA within the relevant Acts. He or she will 
also be involved in minuting, and drafting and 
writing papers. 

Candidates of graduate level should hold 
corporate membership of the Institute of 
Chartered Secretaries and Administrators or 
similar body. They should have had 10 years post- 
qualification experience, including 3-5 years in a 
Company Secretary's or Administration office of a 
large organization or public body in a senior 
administration role. 


TT - . INDEPENDENT 
SKA BROADCASTING 
AUTHORITY 

* An Equal Opportunities Employer * 

For an application form and further details of the 
post, please write to or telephone the 
Personnel Officer. IBA, 70 Brompton Road, • 
London SW3 1EY. 

Closing date for return of applications: 

7th August. 1986. 


COMPLEAT RECRUITMENT 


If you are one of those rare individuals who can 
combine a genuine knowledge of mainframe 
systems with proven commercial awareness, 
you maybe our new 

Product Marketing 
Manager 

Software Development Systems 

c£20K negotiable plus big company package 
indcar 

Our diem, one of the giants of the DP Industry is supplying a unique 
systems package to leading British companies and central government 
departments enabling them to enhance the productivity of their 
software development for any computer from analysis through to 
implementation. 

Following internal promotion we seek to recruit a product marketeer 
who is genuinely au fait with big system development either through a 
consultancy or software background. The new Manager will ensure our 
client's continued success in this field through liaison with international 
source suppliers, devising and carrying through marketing plans while 
working closely with a highly successful sales force. 

Location: East of London. 

Please write or telephone John Medlock of Hobbs Wedlock. Imperial 
House 21/25 North Street. Bromley BR1 ISD. 01-460 5575 or 
telephone weekends (2-8pm) or evenings on 0689 21658. 

II T-T OBBS M EDLOCK 


Redbridge 

Entrepreneurial 

Flair 

(c. £22,000 p.a.) 

That's the best description of the Nal asset n 
the candidate we're seeking - and we'll give 
him or her Chief Officer status too. Why? 

We want Redbridge wdl and truly on the map. 
We want to encourage: 

• the good management and development 
of our reviving prime shopping centre - 
Ilford. 

• similar efforts far our other shopping and 
oammeraai areas; 

• industrialists and commercial concerns 
expanding in or relocating to our 
Borough. 

Wave no set idea of the successful candidates 
background - it could be property one of the 
technical professions or marketing. What we 
do know is that he must have a proven record 
in leading o muhi-disdplinary team. 

But whoever joins us must have drive, iruHotive 
and the wiH and ability to produce results. 
(nddentoK^ the fob title is 

Borough Commercial 
Liaison Officer. 

More details from Walter P aters o n, Director of 
Land Management, RO. Box bta2,lbwn Haiti 
128/142 High Rood, Ilford, Essex IG1 1DD or 
phone him on 01-478 3020 ext. 376, for an 
in formal chat. 

Ibis past wHI gnr* tfj* rtgfa parson toed saSstodSoo. 

LONDON BOROUGH OF REDBRIDGE 


GRADUATES 

RELOCATION 

TRAINEES 

International Service Company based in 
central London seeks ambitious self 
motivated individuals with management 
potential. Specific qualifications are not 
essential but this post is likely to appeal 
to graduates of commercially biased 
disciplines or those with experience in 
residential property. Please accompany 
your CV with a letter specifying why your 
qualifications or experience might be of 
interest to us at 

Merrill Lynch Relocation 
Management International Ltd, 
136 New Bond Street, 
London Wl 

Attention Debra Jardine 
Telephone 01-629 8222 


FINANCIAL MANAGEMENT 
A GROWTH AREA OF THE MOMENT 
AND OF THE FUTURE - DON'T MISS OUT! 

FPS (Management) Ltd is a leading firm of financial ^visore Md of 

expansiraml986 is looking for outstanding individuals to complement its London eased team 

° The ^{Individuals (aged 23+ and based in London) will be energetic and intelligent, highly 
motivated, hardworking and able to absorb new ideas quickly. 

R^^tiln^p^^bfik excess of £20,000, and lead to management within the first 

ye ^is is a superb opportunity to develop your own business and career path in a growing 
company and in an exciting industry. 

For further details phone the Regional Manager on 01-240 9Ujo 



Company 

Secretary' 

Director 

A.C.I.S. or Solicitor 

Dorset 

to £20,000 + car 


production faculties. 

The business is cwrently undergoing 

lundamental change and our cSent is weflpto^ritot^ceftffl 

advantage of the many opportunities this Is creating. 

The opening of new branches is high 

• and 

vlZrbriefwffl also include the 

responsibStiss and you wil be actively involved in developing 
more efficient systems. And as a member of me smafl sentor 
j-. <- — ~+< — {q contribute 


to the group s I--— — « — »- 

Applicants must be.quaRfied, either AC.l.S. or peihaps a soticSor, 
Yfrth derronstrabte skitts In property negotiation and office 
management 

An attractive remuneration package induSng relocation 
assistance is offered and there are excellen t prospects tor 
someone with drive, initiative and ambition, 
flteasa send concise detafls, induing current safer/ and 
daytime telephone number, quoting reference M2044, tows 
GMand, Executive Selection Division. 

Grant Thornton 

Management Consultants 
Fairfax House, Fulwood Place, London WC1 V 6DW. 




Just because you are out of a job 
doesn’t mean there isn't 
a job out there for you! 


Mary people assume that it is 
impossfoie to find The rightjob for ma- 
te so natural to mafcran a blinkered 
view ofyour own potential that US' ' 
hartfly surprising if you fail to achieve 
your tree potential 

Chuad Lander can change aH that 
Ws are a group of specialist career 
consultants whose sole function is 
to glide executives and professional 
people to achieve their personal and 
friancial ambitions - 

We guarantee that we wHI commit 
our time and effort until you are 
satisfied that your career objectives 
have been realised. . . 

Then you can realy celebrate! 


For thirty years we have been 
strivingfbrtfiebest. 

Now its your turn! 

Telephone us to arrange a 
confidential personal assessment 
without obligation, or write to: 

The Administrator, Ref C/7/1 . 

35/37 Ftarcy St. London W1P 5AF 
enclosing a brief career summary 


LONDON 01-580 6771 
BIRMINGHAM 021-643 8102 
BRISTOL 0272 22367 
MANCHESTER 061-228 0089 
NOTTINGHAM 0948 37931 
GLASGOW 041-332 3502 
BELFAST 0232 622824. 



Si CHUSID LANDER 


BARCLAYS GROUP STAFF UNION 

Appflcatioos are nrritMl for die new past of General 
Secretary 's Asrisrimt- 

Thc appointee will join an cmhusnmic, bard-working 
team operating under constant high pre ssu re and will be 
directly responsible to the General Secretary. 

You will be responsibly involved in financial monitoring 
and control functions as well as condncting studies into a 
wide variety of BGSU activities. 

Although based at Haywards Heath,' there will be a need 
to work in other areas on occasion and this may entail 
some committee work. You must have the maturity and 
confidence to communkaie successfully with BGSU staff 
and members, other Barclays staff, representatives of tbe 
Bank and other organisations at all levels, bat h is not 
envisaged that the appointee will have negotiating 
responsibilities in the industrial rotations field. 

The ideal candidate win be fluniliar with computer-based 
systems and will have proven managerial skills besides 
good potential for further advancement. Knowledge of 
clerical work- measurement and administrative systems 
win be an advantage as will formal management training 
or qualifications. 

BGSU has a membership of about 46,000 in the Barclays 
Group and is an independent division of the Charing 
Bank Union which has a current total membership 
acceding 100X00. 

Residence in or dose to Haywards Heath, West Sussex 
win be required. 

A starting salary of not less than £1 1.000 jxa is offered 
but could be considerably higher lor the right person. 
There is a non-con mbmruy pension scheme and 
assistance with relocation expenses will be offered if 
appropriate. 

Applications in writiag. marked ‘Srrktfy CoafideatioF 
gtrhrg fall career det m h, should be seat ta> The General 
Secretary, Barclays Grotty Staff Uakra, OarkoB Haase, 
Ootboll Head, Haywards Heath, West finer RHI6 3DG, 
to arrive not later than Friday 1st August 1986. 


AREA SALES 
EXECUTIVE 

London Sooth, Kent, Surrey, 
Sussex 

An outstanding opportunity has arisen for an experienced 
salesperson to sell corrugated and specialised pacfcagjrg 
to industrial outlets. 

We an looking for a professional aged 25*35 with a 
proven track record to join our successful manufacturing 
operation. 

In return fora high level of motivation and commitment 
we are able to offer excellent benefits, including an anno- 
live salary commensurate with experience, company car, 
commisswo and bonus schemes, pins benefits. 

Apply . in writing quoting Ref TT24/07 la 

Geoff Carter 

Turner Packaging limited 
Unit 14B, Homdo Industrial Park 
Station Road, West Horndon 
Brentwood, Essex CM13 3HW 


TURNER NIC KA0HQOfD 



Royal Botanic 
Gardens 

SECRETARY 

£ 18,785 - £ 25,065 

The Rujnl Botanic Gardens at Kew have an international 
reputation for botanical research and house a vast collection of 
plants. They are open to the puhlic and are used both as an 
educational and leisure amenity. 

As Secretary co the Board of Trustees, you will head die 
Administration Division, taking responsibility for the financial 
control of the Gardens and contributing to the success of 
present and planned commercial activities. You will control oil 
administratrix: matters relating to personnel management, 
maintenance work arid computer facilities for Kew and the 
satellite gardens at Wakehurst Place. Sussex. 

You must be of high inteilecnal and practical calibre, with 
considerable adm i n i s trative, financial or managerial experience 
gained in a senior role. An interest in botanical research and 
conservation would be an advantage. 

For further details and an application form (to be returned 
by 1? August 1986.1 write to Civil Service Commission, Aiencon 
Lmk. Basingstoke, Hants RG21 IJB. or telephone Basingstoke 
( 0 -t 6 ) 468551 (answering sen-ice operates outside office 
hours). Please quote re£ G/6943. 

An equal opportunity employer 


SISSONS 


Sales Representatives 

We are progressive private compary man- 
ufacturing slamless steal products for the 
BuldHig, Catering, Hospital and Leisure 
industries. 


*A' level at equivalent, who ha 
thflf previous selling experience t 
jwwnal communication skills, disi 

and self motivation to succeed in a ! 


ex- W® a fast class remunei 
w® need addHtaal sales pacha 0 e marf e up of task: salary 
far tbe toflwiag areas: car, atongwithnon 

l AVON/SOUTH WEST ™“ By ^ scfte 

ICmEJHBm/BBKS 

^■■.yj e j. oohin 0 f w persons aged be- Sissons Limited, Cahrer wTcadvar ' 
tween 23-35 yrare with an education to field S30 1XA. ** V8r ’ ' 

making the most of stainless stei 






^ infUtonh' 

1 • 1 ■ / ■ 


Bm<rn* *, t ;. „ 

"■ r ft* 

m path .. , lr 





•fldtoi a.«. 

4 df no*: .»■>.• 

lliifato* " 


£*•**-*:? - 
rtywnu-v... 


r «*i*vw,^ 

•rflBJlVt*.'!,-- 

Nimii rsrtT- 1. •• 

•My to ux 

rpWlMp&nro ■ 

OH Nto OPcr 

QMfocratmn 

p W Wp O Ctt «.V 

MMbvvj 

MM3044 fr ,V 



of a job* 



ID LANDER 


Manic 

tns 

JRY 


5.065 


m h-i! - . 

rflW* "■ 

l An n** 


tetorir- ! 
g fc- i5w ■•>• 

wr» ^ -* • 

HMl V 

•K* J w K ' - -' 
f rr^T-Q’ ■ 
fw«. .*: *' '* 

Jfc-W! 

»V* - ■■ 

Kki^'-«" * 


<■»§*■* *'* 



THE TIMES THURSDAY JULY 24 1986 


j/ 


GENERAL APPOINTMENTS 







Harnessing the 
Nation's Potential — 
Putting Britain in Front 

National Council tor 
Vocational Qualifications 

Chief Executive 

£32,350— £35,350 p.a; 

As a result of its acceptance of the 
recommendations of the Review of Vocational , 
Qualifications, the Government is estabfahfrigariew 
national body — The National Council for Vocational 
Qualifications— to implement a system of 
qualifications better suited to meet tire demands of a 
modem trading nation, ensuring a better qualified, 
fuBy competent workforce. • 

Based in London, you will be accountable to the 
National Council for the development of a 
comprehensible, relevant, and accessible system of 
vocational qualifications throughout England, Wales 
and Northern Ireland. You wBI be responsible for 
about 00 staff, many at senior professional levels. 

- - You will be expected to ensure Ae development - 
and effective implementation of the pobdes of the 
Council, to assume full financial control of the — 

-CoupdPs-oper a ti o ns,- a nd to establish effective 

relationships with educational, professional and 

industry bodies. 

A proven record of achievement in a senior 
managerial capacity, a good understanding of 
education ana training systems, and the 
' communicatiDn skills to negotiate effectively at the 
highest levels in industrial, educational and 
government circles will be essential. 

Above all, you wfil need the vision, commitment 
and expertise to help realise the nationally 
important objectives of this new CoundL 

A starting salary m toe range of £32350 — 

£35350 is offered and terms ami conditions of 
appointments are analogous to those in toe Gvfl 
Service. *_’••• 

Please contzrct fames Lowe, at PER’s Leicester 
Office (0533)551418 for further information. 
Relevant details including full cV. should be sent to 
him atPER, Northampton House, 177 Charles Street, 
Leicester LEI 1LA by 14th August 


Manmment Selection Division 


One ofLondon’s most 
successful estate agencies is 
goong through a period of 
rapid expansion. We require 
-mdividuids-efhigh-calibre — • 

. who h a ve had considerable 
success in their careers, but 
who fed the need to change 
direction. 

Our ideal applicants will be 
30-plus, and will match the 
following profiler 

■ You could be a buyer in a 
leading Loudon store; 

Or havetf successfij ^jager in an employment agency;' 
or perhaps in seating presrig? rar* or fin a n c i al services. _ 

You mjghrhave spent many yeazS selling antique furniture, rare 
books {ranting*. . "p : - • 

■ Or yon might already be working in property or related fields. 

■ You have a sound education (not necessarily a PhD from Oxford), 
with pexhaps-a business studies background. 

■ Yon are accustomed to de a lin g with all kinds of people, with 
empathy, enjoyment and firmness. 

■ You expect an income in the order of £25,000 to £30,000 p.a., plus 
a company car, and anticipate rapid progression from there. 

■You will want to be totally involved, absolutely dedicated and 
sm^e-minded in pursuing a career. 

.* If you considertoatyou have whatit takes, and wish to know more, 
my name is Finn Sutaria. You can -cdT meat my private o ffic e on 
.01-221 8939, or send your CV with covering letter to me at VI 

89 Notring Hill Gate, London Wll 3JZ. . zIM. 


Company Secretary's Office 

Dynamic Role in 
Corporate Administration 

London/Essex borders c. £20,000 + car 

This is a senior management position in the Company 
Secretary's Office of a major public company in the 
international market for high-tech products. 

Candidates, male or female, will have the professional 
experience and intellectual prowess to take responsibility 
for. a variety of aspects of corporate administration - 
working in close liaison with top management and outside 
agencies to ensure that company law is adhered to, and. 
that good working practices are established, communicated 
and implemented. Specific elements of this brief will 
include: monitoring changes in company law; directing 
systems and procedures for the correct presentation of 
statutory and other information; administration of 5AYE 
share option scheme; maintaining the share-interests register. 
The work and the business environment are ideally suited 
to an ambitious Chartered Secretary, or a law graduate with 
appropriate experience, seeking scope and recognition for 
initiative and talent, tt is unlikely that you will be under 30 
years of age. 

Confidential Reply Service: Please write with full CV 
-quoting ref. 2048/AM on your envelope, listing separately 
any company to whom you do not wish your details to be 
sent. CYs will be forwarded directly to our client who will 
conduct the interviews. Charles Barker Recruitment 
Limited, 30 Famngdon Street London EC4A 4EA 

CHARLES BARKER 

ADVERTISING - SELECTION • SEARCH 



SALES CAREER 

£1,000 PM RETAINER (iiic. bar allowance) 
PLUS COMMISSION - Genuine £20-35,000 PA Package 

An international Promotions Company has 3 VACANCIES THROUGH- 
OUT its LONDON ft HOME COUNTIES* SALES TEAMS for intelligent 
wefl groomed and articulate SALES MEN t WOMEN. No direct 
experience Is required and thorough training Is provided. 

This is a permanent prestige psotkxi with significant financial re- 
wards. Media back up ana continuous promotional activity ensures 
strong interest at ail levels of management and guaranteed repeat 
business. 

The opportunity to transfer to an overseas branch In USA, Canada, 
New Zealand or Australia is available after an 8 month qufifiying 
period. The opportunity is unique, the rewards ample ana the corxfi- 
ttons excedent 

TELEPHONE 940 8171 (10 lines) 

EASYFIND PROMOTIONS LTD. 

RECRUITMENT OFFICE 
37KEWRQAD. RICHMOND, SURREY - r - 


mond, Croydon, Bromley, Ratting, 


HumanResources 

Consultants 


y 


London based 
upto£30K+car 




Price Waterhouse is an international business advisory and management 
consultancy organisation with a reputation for excelience.The Human 
Resources division has developed significantly over the past tow years, and 
wenow intend to expand our well established team to meet market demands 
into the late 1980s/eariy 3990s. 

We seek highly motivated selfstarters aged 2540 with an appropriate 
degree and/or professional qualification. Candidates from an industrial, 
commercial or consultancy environment will have already built up a reputation 
tor high quality work in at least oneof the following areas: 

• employee communications •compensation and benefits 

•organisation restructuring •management assessment 

•Job evaluation •employee relations and law 

•management development •organisational development 

•computerised personnel inform a tion systems 

To be an effective consultant you require self confidence, and excellent 
communication skills, together with the ability to inspire confidence both in 
clients and in colleagues alike. 

We offer excellent opportunities tor career and personal development 
as well as a negotiable salary, BURA and pension. A company car is provided 
to those appointed at Senior Consultant level. 

Write, in confidence, with toll personal and career details (quoting 
reference MCS/8068) to Peter Humphrey, Price Waterhouse, Management 
Consultants, No 1. London Bridge, London SE1 SQL 


Price Witerhouse 



SALES EXECUTIVE 

c. £20,000 + Bonus + Travel 

Our client, a major U.S. F inan cial Publication, needs a 
competent, professional person to take over and expand an 
established client base. Covering mainly Switzerland, Spain 
and the U.K. you will be selling advertising space to presti- 
gious, high profile financial institutions as well as new, 
exciting consumer accounts. You need a degree, fluent 
French and preferably experience within the financial sector. 
Based in central London. Training will be given in New 
York. Age 26-32. Please write to Crone CoririD, Victory 
Honse, 99 Regent St London WJL or telephone 434 4512. 

Crone Corkill 

RECRUITMENT CONSULTANTS 


ARE YOU EAGER FOR SUCCESS? 

ARE YOU AVAILABLE NOW? 

As a result of our continued growth ws require several MANAGEMENT 
CONSULTANTS to maintain ourdevetopment_ 

Coukfyou be one of them? " 

You rrn&t be highly motivated with an appetHefbratotevanttnt Your 

successful track recojti will showthat you are thoroughly experienced in 

the business to business area and capable of problem sohring for small 
and medium sized companies, be they financial, commercial or 

manufacturing. 

You wfll receive comprehensive training and the back-up necessary. A 
first-rate remuneration package commensurate with effort isoffered. 

If this is your sort of challenge and you are freeforan IMMEDIATE 

START to join our ewjanding team, please send complete career details 
to Mark Quinery, Rer T1 500, Independent Consulting and Management 
Company Ltd.,UnivBrsal House, 5658 Clarence Street, Kingston-tgxxv 
Tbames, Surrey KTVINP. . 


AMBITION 

THERE'S ROOM FOR YOURS AS ONE 
OF OUR TEMPS C0NTR0LLB1S 

Them is plenty of room for the right people to grow at 
Kmgsway. On the one hand you wiH be lo oking after an 
efts team of temporaries. On tee other tan meeting 
charts, spending time getting to understand titter busi- 
ness and establishing a professional relationship with 
them. 

Naturally, the promotion prospects are ocwitenL Within 
two years you could become a Branch Office Manger. You 
won Inacessanty need to have. recruitment experience 
although this will be an advantage. You will however have 
sucessfui contntercial background preferably gained ind 
sales environment and. tore a proven ability to d® with 
people. 

You w® redeye an outstanrfitg salary Mdage, comta** 
with a position at this level Then it is up to you. 

Please send a fuff CV to 
Paul. Jacobs at 
Temporary Staff Consultants, 

Duke "Srret House, 415417 Oxford Street, 
London W1. 

or call us on 629 9863. 


t * « 

inn** * * r " 1 : 

r4i ■] [ 

** ***■»«** * 


KINGSWAY 


nwHonwr 

GOMUUMIS 





EDITOR 

Opportunity for young graduate to gain valu- 
able experience with an educational trust 
which gives free advice on the choice of 
independent schools. You will have fuH 
responsibility for an annual reference book. 
We seek someone with self-reliance, good 
communication skills, literacy and attention 
to detail. 

Send CV with names of three referees to: 

The Truman & Knightley Educational Trust 
(ref LH) 76-78 Notting Hill Gate, 

London W11 3U. 


Britain's. Largest 


SALES EXECUTIVE 



Marketing 

Manager- 


RANK XEROX 


There can be do doubt about the strength of the Rank 




c£ 22,000 

A commitment to 
advanced technology 
and market leadership 


problems of companies both large and smaiL we now oner a 
wider rangp of office automation products and systems than 
any otter angle manufacturer and we ate expenenring an 
nnpresavegrowihmourshare of the overall market 
throughout Europe. 

Representmganimportaiit feature of our development 
strat^weiecernlyiiaroduced anew range of facsmnle 
products, indudm£ the 295 - a higb-speedaiehal desk- top 
transceiver, the^ 495-1 - a highly sophisticated machine that 
can be linked to a micro or LAN to provide an automatic 24~ 
hour electronic post room, and the7010- a portable, digital 

transceiver lhai was launched mMay.to wide-spread 
acdaiin.Now»wiih ambitious frians for the furtner _ 
penetration of this highly competitive market, we wish to 
appoint » Marlcwing Managpr .tnjnm nur already reaahfishrri 
team. 

You wQl be responsble for mainiainiDg regular {raison 

with oor European enjeramq; companies, for the formulation 

nffrn<iness p lans ana the corn pita firm of agpvrtyanahraes and 
fnrthff man^pmful nfnewjntTd nrtbinnchec Pmhablyin 
your early 30s, you wifi airrendy be working hr ^ -orwiD 
recently have been hwhedm-thefecsimile industry and 
win, ideally, baveanunderaanding of thejmeniational 
market and the various tedmica] and regulatory issues. 
Experienced meither prodnta or sales management, yxi will 

be able to demonstrate the ability to prepareand deliver 
presentations to senior management as well as to our dealers 
and key customers- Significant travel throughout Europe is 
an important dement of the job role. 

In return, we can offer a salary of e£ 22,000, a choice of 
quality company car, a wide rangeof first class benefits and 
excellent prospects for career progression. Currently based 
in London, our International HQ^ will be moving later this 

K to exceptionally well-equipped offices in 

ow ana we vdl, of course, be wiffing to provide 
relocation assistance where appropriate. 

Please send a fuD CV to Christine Hand, Senior 
Personnel Officer. Rank Xerox LnL, 338 Euston Road, 
London NW13BH. 


Are you earning £20,000— £100,000 P-a. 
and seeking a new job? 

Con naughts discreet and successful Execu- 
tive Marketing Projpamme provides profes- 
sional excellence In helping you to identify 
those unadvertised vacancies. 

Contact us for a free and confidential 
meeting to a s se s s if we can help you. if you 
are currently abroad ask for our Executive 
Expat Service. 

Telephone: 01-7343879 (24 hours) 


Connaught 


32 Savile Row London, W1 
■The Executive Job Search ProfessfonateMl 


£12300 + per mm /tec. c anml sri w ) wflb 
c omp any csr in mil beosfitB 


A hey and expanding privaMy owned 
require an adddonaJ sales person to Join a 
and enthusiastic team. . 

The successful appfleant aboiM have toioiitedM at the 
Sght aide buiMare m er c hant s trades, mdufing 
sanfiarywere and plumbing. Existing co n tracts within 
Sirrey. Sussex. Kent. Ha mps h ire ana London would be 
an advantage. 

Reporting dreedy to the Commerc i al Director, this 
appdrmed re pre se nts en axcapfrona) cypcr?ungy for 
applicants wtth am b i tion, who wish to Ym a company 

which wi ghw the support to develop their career into 
sales menegemenL ... 

EnthusmSe Field Sales Personnel should write, 
in corSdenca tor 

Mr. ILL AsAews 

Harris sad C Bmpa i y fftefoate) LbL, 

15-21, West Street, Rebate, Surrey, RH2 MW. 


Civil Defence College 

Group Director 


This residential College, set in pleasant rural 
surroundings In Easingwold, Vbrk, provides 
seminars, studies and courses at senior level on 
all aspects of civg defence. It caters for personnel 
of local government, the armed forces, police, 
Industry and voluntary organisations. 

\bu win organise and supervise tutorial staff; 
initiate and prepare instructional programmes; 
supervise support services and banting aids; 
and monitor toe effectiveness of training. The 
work also includes chairing discussion groups, 
lecturing and contributing to toe development of 
College policy 

Vbu must have relevant civil defence experi- 
ence at an appropriate level in either central or 


focal government or in an organisation involved 
in plan rung tor major emergencies. Experience 
in an appropriate appointment in education or 
trakting is also essential 

Salary £H315-£18u495 according to quali- 
fications and experience. 

for further details and an application form 
(to be returned by 2 September 1986) 
write to CivU Service Commission, Alencon Link, 
Basingstoke, Hants RG21 1JB, or telephone 
Basingstoke (0256) 468551 (answering 
service operates outside office hours). 

Please quote ref: G/G954. 


Hie CM) Service is an equal opportunity employer 


- » \ 



to 1 

tft • 

Mubr^- ‘ 

* ,a .. 

S1 



FINANCE/MARKETING 

MANAGEMENT 

OvontraKMd HO. of ax p sndlng schttKhnl duMmg com- 
ptny rtquM Aararett assMart wtth ntmUa mind. Gonerei 
busnm Mi aM flair necessary Mutfng some aceounOng 
and me rt Wn g Miow how. Post would sub graduate or naar- 
at ni w M e M ere teaman dtayttiewWi a to 3 yeare experience. 
CorapetM salary arat aovaneemam prosp earn (or me right 
candstete. Location Wattorvon-Thamw. 

W»wimCV.toitefttoianixm.cnei*nAms«»EKt.urti7. 
TW finber Cantre,.lyon Road. Heraham. Sumy KHZ 3PU, 


GRADUATES 

Martowa Sacha, a sufasktey of Navi Baltic pic are frter- 
matfariaa in the Wd of Unit Trusts, Rwisions. 
Investments (Onshore and Onshore), and insurance. 

As part ot our expansion and Wring plan lor 1986/87 we 
raqure m teWgant. ambitious people (23-35) to Join our 
successful team of sales proiesdxWs. 

We writ provide you wish 
tt Fufl technical training and support 
■k a chance to build a sound progressive career bi one 
of the most rapkfly growing industries in The ux. 
■Ar early managsmeot opportoMtes, Ospencflng on spHty 
k good base income package and commiaslon 
structure 

If woo have the drive and d eterm i na tion to succeed 
tel ep h o n e OT-ZS2 2420 {TT24/7} 


M 


Marlowe Sachs 

28 Greville Street London KIN 8SU 

Jeff 01-242 2420 


TRUST SERVICES - Isle of Man 

Oor diem, lie AssUtem Vtct-Prerakat for Europe cf a nsajw imer- 
rmtooti Trod Caiipsoy, is seeking a scoior czecudtc d mrage the 
Oanpcy^ opertfutt is the hk of Mat 

The ideal candidate viH pasr rsg 

— i broiedge of all aapoRtc and p cn gul mat 

idttcd 

— yml acccunoog, ■ rf i n i i i lai ati ve and M iptreBu y dSb 

— ftp yMifp m rfe iirifip nrw ham* »nrf wiaiimin n -kiianAipc 
vkh local gmemacm ofikaals 

CcropennnoD is the farm of a gcnoas rainy + benefits + reloca- 
BOQ opemei ate offnd 

Emptbia and reamer way be dittoed «■ confidence ta 
James B. ftni'ih 

DOUGLAS S. CARRICK ASSOCIATES LTD. 
914 » 120 Adelaide Sam, 

West Toronto, Ontario, Canada M5H 1T1 
(tcL no. 416 - 862-1550) 


FINANCIAL FREEDOM 

ONLY ANSWER THIS AD IF YOU 
ARE SERIOUSLY INTERESTED 
IN MAKING MONEY 

You can work from home and earn a good 
Jiving. 

Earn up to £2,000 per month part time, £4,000 
per month fed time. 

Cali 01-723 4963 Steve 

Full training given 

Agents required in all parte of the country 


QUANTITY SURVEYOR 

Requeed by fast expanding company based in tee South-East in 
tee interior finishes industry. 

Experience in parbBonmg, suspended ceilings and rased access 
flooring. Knowledge of c on t rac t law a necessity. 

Salary area £15300 plus usual benefits. 

APPLY IN WRITING TO: 

INTERLOCK INTERIOR DEVELOPMENTS LIMITED 
(atertock Bashes* Centre, Kataht Road, 
Stood, feat HEZ2AT 

Telephone: Medway (0634) 724711 


BEAUTIFUL 

FURNITURE 

seeks warm and friendly sales person. 

The London Sofa-Bed Centre 

631 1424 or 580 3823. 
Ref:WSA 


EXPERIENCED 
NEGOTIATOR/ 
ESTATE AGENTS 

Busy Holland Pari office requires willing, hard work- 
ing negotiator. Aged 25-35. Experience essentisL 
Salary neg + commission, bonus and car allowance. 

- ' Imck&Co 








THE TIMES THURSDAY JULY 24 1 986 


GENERAL APPOINTMENTS 

STOCKBROKERS -INSURANCE BROKERS -TAX EXPERTS 

BUILD YOUR FUTURE WITH 
FREDERICKS PLACE GROUP 

A major expansion p rogr am me in Fredericks Place Group has 
created exciting opportunities for talented and ambitious financial services 
specialists. 

FPG is a new financial services group, ■which combines Fredericks 
Place Group PLC, Spencer Thornton & Co., andTfae Country Gentlemen. s 
Association PLC. 

FPG offers a wide range of advisory services to over 50,000 indk 
viduals and small companies. Vk have a network of 12 offices throughout 
England and Scotland. 

Now we want to expand aggressively throughout the market and 

require staff at all levels and locations. 

We’re also looking for men and women with the desire to establish. 

new branches, specialising in one or more of the above services, in new 
locations. 

Build on your experience in: 

Stockbroking - Private client account executives, directors* assistants, 

institutional salesmen, analysts and dealers. 

Insurance broking -Life, pensions and unit trust advisers, general broking. 

Taxation -Personal taxation, CTT, accounts preparation. 

Marketing -In all of the above areas. 

Write in complete confidence to: 

Stuart Goldsmith, ChiefExecutive, 

Fredericks Place Group, 

1 Fredericks Place, Old Jewry, 

London EC2R 8HR. 

Manchester ‘London • Letchworth -Horsham ■ Crawley 'Abingdon* Sudbury 
Cullompton ■ Alresford ■ Edinburgh • Dalkeith ■ Dundee 


Business Development 
-Computer Technology 

Wfe are tootepg for a computer systems specialist 
with marketing flair or a joumafet/consultarrt who 
knows the computer scene and warts to develop 
his/her career into something more chaitengng. 

The tab role is to identify and develop business 


The lob role is to identify and develop business 
conferences which examine key issues. Continuous 
contact with senior industry executives ts essential; 
the successful candidate, therefore, will be a 
confident and competent communicator. Age 
range 25 - 35. 

The. attractive remuneration package indudes a 
profit share ami company car- Please write with 
your CV, photo and salary history to: 

Rosemary Whitest Personnel Director, 

Online International Limited, 

Rrmer Green House, Ash HiH Drive, Pinner, 
Middlesex HA52AE 

Online is the world’s leading organiser of 
conferences and exhibitions concerned with the 
business applications of higjh technology. 


SALES MANAGER 
TABLE GLASSWARE 

Sales experience. Must have at least ten 
years marketing experience of selling 
glassware to wholesale and retail trade. 
Should be conversant with the planning and 
handling of large inventory. Excellent 
renumeration with fringe benefits. Please 
apply in writing with CV: 

Saher Corporation Ltd., 
255/9 Commercial Road, 
London El 2BT 


FINANCE DIRECTOR 
(DESIGNATE) 

An international Business Group with a diversity of 
interests and with an aggressive expansion programme 
seeks a Financial Director who can combine entrepre- 
neurial flair with the conventional disciplines. This is an 
invitation to join a small executive team wtiich makes aH 
the decisions. Considerable travel Is involved. This 
position wHl orWy suit seasoned achievers who are con- 
fident in their own abifity to get results. Those results 
will stage a unique opportunity In terms of both rewards 
and satisfaction. 

For further details write with all relevant particulars to 

BOX C82. 


I 

•I 


FfPIG 


UNDERWRITING 

ASSISTANT 

Required for Box at Lloyd's. Age 18 -24. No 
experience necessary. Please apply in own 
handwriting with CV. to.— 

PJL Maguire, Room 351, Lloyd's, 
London, EC3M 7HL 


CAREEROPPORTUNITY 

IN MANAGEMENT CONSULTING 

(United Kingdom) 

Large prestigious Consulting Firm with worldwide operations is in need of a person for the position of 







The company is the leader in its field with an exceptional reputation. Clients include a high percentage of the best 

known international companies. 

This should be a tremendous opportunity for an experienced salesman starting in a management 

development programme. 

After preliminary training; assignments will be in Sales and Client Handling; contacting and negotiating with Chief 

Executive Officers of major companies. 

The applicant should be approximately 40 years of age with a good educational background. Business experience 
should show a record of advancement to Top Management Position and a proven abifity to produce results. 
Ambition, hard work, dedication and integrity are essential to success. We are performance minded. 

Past experience in consulting is not necessary, but talent for dealing and negotiating with top management level is 
a requisite. Position involves travel. This outscandingsituacion pays substantially with generous future pay increases 

and advancement based on performance 

There are no limits to the potential of this challenging position. 

If interested please write; expressing your views of your personal qualifications and enclose a 
curriculum vitae with past salary history, photograph, telephone number and salary 

requirements. 

Please write to Universal Communication, chauss4e de La Hulpe 1 22, 1 050 Brussels 
(Belgium), under reference 306, who will forward applications to their client. 


ASSISTANT 


£10,000 - £11,000 

A wan-known P.R. company 
requires a bright profes- 
sional graduate to assist 
two dromo n who are in- 
vohod in establish* ig new 
business in the find of 
&ALC.O. You wH be re- 
apan ri bte for waarchlng 
new accounts and cowering 
al aspects ot P.R. (or thee 
efiants. The auocessfii can- 
dfean must have a mature 
and oonBdant attitude, be 
wifing to offer their own 
ideas and su gg estio n s and 
ham soma Pit experi- 
ence. Skils typing SO. Age 
23-27. 

01-489 0092 

SeniorW 

Secretaries 


AN INTERESTING NEW 
IN QUALITY 

The Building and Construction Department c i BSL C e rti fi c a tion and 
Aseesamenl Somce develops and adnwusttua independent BS 5250 based 
quatay assurance for all sectors erf building and construction industry 
mdnding product manufacturers. 

This want is mtetestmg, varied and riowumHmg , requiring motivation, 
initiative and an aridity to commumcaie. 

Trie increasing d em and for these cervices has created new vacancies. 
Senior Certification Officer - Building Contracting CFerIT/49) 
Certification Officer — Building Engineering Services 

(F5tUtf21) 

Certification Officer or Assistant — Plumbing Sanitazr Products 

Certification Officer (PoU7/48) 

Assistant Certification Officer or - Water Suppte processing end 
Technical Assistant distribution {Bat 11/45) 

Applicants should possess a technical degree or «ir pnmit « mamh a mM p of 
tetovant professional body together wah practical esparieace in thear field. 
A base knowledge of toe principles and applic ation s of quality assurance 
and BS 5750 Quality Systems would be an advantage. 

The positions am pensionable with five weeks holiday and ere based at 
oar Mihon Keynes Offices at Linford Wood. 

Application tans end job descriptions an 
available from: 

Personnel Department (Quoting rat please) 
British Standards Institution 

Mayianda Avenue Kernel Hmonstead 

Ham HP2 4SQ. Telephone (0442) 311L 



GUIDANCE FOR 
ALL AGES! 

£ 1* rs Srtocictwe«.ftMtaeB 
15 Job (mama cures 

IS W,tj 

35 Si|is ZitfC«M Radua&K, ' 
Bum — nnwtiG w j— M far j 

afliQn FtoabmdMni 


• • • CAREER ANALYSTS I 
tototo WGtmwPlKaWI 1 

• • • 

GRADUATE JOB OPPOtm.NI 
Til *- I HD I P WITH TYPING. 
OB** f.WBT 





A vacancy has arisen 
In a leading West End 
Brokerage. The suc- 
cessful applicant will 
be 23+ and of smart 
appearance. Please 
call Chris Unwin on 
01-409 1215 


CVS flulfwi.iii.illi wnllril 

Ctir*r*' ut >l\|p \na -WiiW 
Trt PM4 on Off** lSt>7 


(manor Designer requires 
Draughtsman to produce 
excellent interior flesipi 
sketches. S per drawing 
tteg. 

Please can 
01 602 4942. 


BECOME A rurr TUBE Emu* 
twin' Btnv sv* I fvuaif t*im 
wfl .1 f,HK nicr (\puMr 
mU*v» iimumujI under 4-5 lo 
IH-IP utn tlfli' jikI 

hniKnltpm C335CDJ dim 

umm rommrwm Ol o^3r> 


ACTUARIAL RESULTS! 

This last month brought your academic results. Now 
is the opporturety to examine yow future career. 
ABP specialises in recruitment tor the Ute Assur- 
ance and Pensions industry. We can not only advise 
and guide you as to your future but are currently 
handling recruitment assignments that may well in- 
terest you. 

Contact us by phoning or writing to 
KDary Welch 
ABP 

The Old Dutch House 
134 High Street 
Dorking Surrey 
RH4 1BG 

Tefc 0306 76439 


ARE YOU 



CV* PLUS hfliaVIEW HELP 

and mu warm m!\Kv WHW 
BrniMmsW <044271 72 209 


imwwu 


ACCOM! AIT 

Croydon EISJHfeCar 

Wb* knewn sarvtca cc_ oTTars 

a new position to a 
commercially mnded salt 
stamr. Reporting to the 
DhmUotwI Omar 
responsltiatiu ndude 
developing pricing otretaqlea. 
dMsnnal maingwtum 
reporting md finance! 
accounting. CtireXtotos age 

25-36. not neewsarty 

quaflftei tfnuki possess 
excsUontoonmincahon 
sue and several ware 
experience. Ref. MF. 

Robert Half Personnel 
Roman House, 
Wood Street 
Loodoa EC2Y 5BA 
01-638-5191 


RESBKHT PA And wrorr 

W<"k» trtHWH PA with 
nruanHing ability <>uii art' grad 
or vnniA Tjumq A cddimmi 

MUtlimil man orf M 

wnual Own iuiir ra liiyf 
rouuin mw snr run O. to 
BOX GOB .... 


GRADUATE 

ADMINISTRATOR 

£10250 

A major international 
service organisation based 
in Central Loodoa re- 
auires a bright alert gra- 
duate with formal work 
experience who is capable 
of undertaking logsrical 
pi aiming in a Eel moving 
people orientated eqvt- 
ronmenu This position 
wiU appeal to those who 
are analytical thinkers, 
are good communicators 
and who like people and 
pressure. Age 23-30 
yean. Excellent benefits 
and working conditions. 

01-437 1014 

MacBlain. 


& Associates 
Recruitment Consultants 
130 Regent Shed, London W1 




Central Lm*m c£1B,008 

H you taw t xe /tert odnm- 
trame and aecnnato nets (audio 
di snortnanai inis ogamng 
presents a great opportunity to 
use your MUOw and aMftMto 
tin U 

a suecesatm Mamaaomi mo 
tne seaicn eomoany. we am 
notueg to a PA to wonc wWi Vie 
ne u e at nemoer ol our Partnw 
Greuo We need someone w*i 
tne cww a anea ana eonnuniea- 
&on am to wort cortortattf at 


scope to n5wTvaioao<e ctxi- 
»W press* *» CV to.- 

n> CaW—i PartHTS 




An exciting 
career is open to 
individuals (22+) 
who are single 
minded and 
intvestsd bi their 
own future. This 
is an opportunity 
to earn over 
£20,000 p.a. and 
eam shares in a 
nationwide 
group. 

Please cafl 
MrPickersglQ 
01-439 8431 


in : <• 1 


C. London cXIA^OD 
Rapkfly ex pandtog P JL firm 
sneks a WgWy reticulata 
and commenaa fl y aware 
supervisor to run a 
department of 5. 
B espgnsMaie s Include 
monthly accounts and 
maintaining the 
computerised system. 
Excellent prospects tar a 

young part-quaHfiad 
accountant wife craven 
managerial akfite. Rat: FD. 

Robert HaH Personnel 
Roman House, 
Wood Street 
Londoo EC2Y 5BA 
01-638-5191 




C£1 5^)00 

If you ere ambitious and have 
senior management potential. 
VM may be able to offer you a 
unique opportunity. Wbh a 
young team, we have been 
nghty successful In spedafat 
recrunmem. Attar qpenmg a 
second office A e WT End, wa 
w« be dnwstfying Mo other 
secure. «, estate agency, 



A PEW VACANCES tab! tor UU 
v<-™a «iuaeim to nHn wuh 
hop haoesUnqMpnrmi im Sw 

tomtor lor J-a wiwb Apply in 
wrung to. EL wicwnam a sum 
Lid CBHMunw Fun. 
Ooudhunt. Kent TNI7 ILP 


FINANCIAL AND 
ACCOUNTANCY 


AtoLfTY - NW tuffs rrwaidM? 
cm id your duns wiw a icnre 
loti mw Gall Ol 831 2402 Ac 
r oun lanes Cnihans iAdvi 


SALES OPPORTUNITIES 
LONDON, NORTHAMPTON N.ENGLAND, 
ABERDEEN, GLASGOW 

services throughout the counfry-Qur various locations 

Krt’SKtoM- — rate, wWeh « highly 

competitive. 

Techiwret ipy rrmrikiatos with a knowledge of eiectrical 

—are- ■* 

m. w« to a««d. 

bteirt Sales Personnei axceltoit communkation skifis and 

product Working as part of a young and 1 
inchida handling existing accounts, 
andSBneralbf promoting n«wr business. 
Due to intemal promotions, we also require: 

aid responsible post, caHng far accuracy and dedication. 

MANAGEMENT TRAMEEtiLondon , , . , . ILIJLJ 1JL „ 

We are seekinq a graduate to commence wvotfc fci sties and from there move on 
^SSS&SSZm receiving tiding aspect of 
Mttnugh a marktiSg or busine^ent^d^ree^ Jl'SStetiS 
asinwid flaxibifity are mof* fmportafrt m order to maxmiiM the bonoftts of 

career opportunity. 

We offer attractive salaries combined with an exsatert 

If you feel you matt* our rcKiuirerntori^JbBiBpVxjfiol^mMiAhrtmwiOl^TS^^ 

fvran applGBiJon farm or write, enctosing 

and FtexSas Limited, R&D House, Ftirway Drive, QreanfOKl. Mddlesex, l/BS 
8PW. 


| Tfie fastest growing name m cables \ 


PERSONNEL OmMTIMTV An 
Meal dunn tor a vouno oradu- 
Ur to tram In recrullmml 
pc ran net. Sometypmo is eseen- 
nal for Ltos inKT«iin« anU 
nspomiMeMb based in our Vic 
tona head office reporting 
directly to our Mananmn Direc- 
tor E&SOO-CA.OOO. TNtotwn* 
01-898 0972 


inrnuior. nwnnKnl. wlili 
admin aMUUep required. Full- 
iimc TeUtowne 283 8100. 


AUDIO VISUAL FHm and Cm 
auve Recnidmetii Consultants 
in WM End need another per 
son will) Tertiniral Knowledoe 
in AV. video or Film aiM an 

a&uily in cornmumeate. Phone 
Fiona or Jane 01-439 0809 


WINTER SEASON In Uie Alps. 
Small compaiu- seeks a cham 
person and ski leader for com 
■in winter season. Apply C 
Sunnard. Oasts Hotel. Marine 
Parade. CIreal Yarmouth 


accu wmr GUARD for private 
no use in London Suitable tor 
former member of the PoUCe or 
Armed Force*. Apply in unung 
alien! ion S M T . Brerner A 
Co . 78 Brook Street. WI 


QUALIFIED PHARMACIST tliua 

ded awuani pnarmam 
reaulnd far AuHraua country 
border I own Award rale wages 
(round la SA 23K1 with bpiruxy 
rary acrornmodauon arrangM 
Apphraium forward to PO 
BOX IDS Barium. 2739 
Auslraha 


BANKING & ACCOUNTANCY 

Gilt-Edged 
Portfolio Manager 

Kleinwort Benson Investment Management is 
seeking to appoint an additional fund manager 
to its expanding multi-currency fixed interest 
team. The successful applicant is likely to be a 
graduate, aged 23-30, and will be expected to 
manage gilt-edged and other sterling- 
denominated portfolios within an international 
framework. 

An important part of his or her responsibilities 
will be contributing towards the strategy 
followed for all fixed income portfolios. The 
ability to communicate both orally and in 
writing, and a minimum of two years’ experience 
of the gilt-edged market, are necessary for this 
post Experience of other fixed income markets, 
while advantageous, is not essential. 

We offer an attractive salary and benefit package 
together with excellent career prospects. 

Please write enclosing c.v. to:- 
Gareth Hughes, Assistant Manager - Personnel, 
Kleinwort Benson Limited, 20 Fenchurch Street 
London EC3P 3DB. 


Kkanwoit Benson Investment Management 


MANAGEMENT 

ACCOUNTANTS 

BUDGET 

ANALYSTS 

COST 

CONTROLLERS 

For the best in temporary 
assignments, call 

accountemps 

01-638 8171 

A di»;$:cn 5 ! Rcburt Hall Psrcu.me; 


AHMTAKT 
COMP ANT 
SECRETARY 

Durian ctxnpmy seeks Asris- 
toitl to Company Secretary. 
Relevant admin and account 
background 10 supervise 
Kcoums stair A deputise for 
Company Secretary. 

£12JX» nig 
ADLAN D PLUS 
31. Percy Sired. 
London W|_ 

01 636 2116 


FINANCIAL 

ACCOUNTANTS 

BUDGET 

ANALYSTS 

LEDGER 

CONTROLLERS 

For the best in temporary' 
assignments, call 

accounlenips 

01-638 8171 

A iivu::r Cl Rcbtn H;jlt Fcrwnnj; 


SALES A MARKETING 


AT A CAREER 
CROSSROADS? 

Hill Samuel Investment 
ServteLM reanre Executivs 
aged 30 - 50, with a 
ba ckgrou nd in Industry, 
tonniurca or tfie Prcfesaona, 
m be trained to offer a wide 
range of financial sendees to 
businessmen, professional 
ritermedones fi individuals. 
Send CV to 

StSL 

1 Haddn SL UretawranM 
m ring 01-434 4583. 


SALES CtMMDMATOR C8J500 
* S Mfkj' Itolicuu An own 
ton! WOrtmvtj lor a bnren. 
■irtiriiiain and ouwmq panon 
lo mu a muttk-n^uoiuU to CUy 
b«4a Pri^ktos WcpoTROfr m* 
“In cfHjrditvuor o «wnii»i 

of education 
iPrrt -A mu) Ao^fliouid be 
■rroutlO ZS This pcmiioo offer*. 
9" noni wnw good pnMoecre 
Can Maream on asi 73 qa 
Kinouana Pm C«» 


COMMERCIALLY 
MINDED ACCOUNTANTS 

required ^ 

INTERNATIONAL MUSIC COMPANY 
with H.Q. in Mayfair is looking for two young 
newly qualified accountants who would like a 
short spell trouble-shooting with' our central 
OPERATIONAL AUDIT team, before mov- 
ing into a line accounting post. 

We operate throughout Europe, the Amer- 
icas. Far East and Australasia in the fields of 
recorded music, music video and publishing. 
What we are offering is a superb opportunity 
for you to gain exposure to an exciting part erf 
the entertainment industry, with travel initially 
to some of the European countries involved, 
and later further afield. 

Operational Audit's work plan is estab- 
lished by project requests either from the 
international Board of Management, or from 
one of the national Boards. Working at this 
level obviously good interpersonal and com- 
muntcaiion skills are essential. A knowledge of 
European languages ts very useful. 

For the successful candidates there win be 
a highly competitive salary with benefits, and 
where appropriate relocation a«ictn w y 

Why not send personal and career details 
to Joy Hamlyn, Personnel Officer, Pol yG nun 
Inurnational, 45 Berkeley Square, London 
w i x 5DB, and persuade us you are the person 
for the job. - 

polyGram 


ACCOUNTS 

AND 

OFFICE MANAGER 

<£13,000 

We require the services of a thoroughly 
competent accounts and office manager to 
personally handle computerised accounts, to 
delegate and motivate staff and to act as a 
financia| I controller for an energetic, 
well-established company, where hard work 
and happiness go together. 

. Rease apply, enclosing CV 
m the strictest confidence to; 

Mr G.K WQcox 
G.K.W Business Machines Ltd 
424 Upper Richmond Road 
East Sheen, SW14. 










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JTUfcrfiip^ 


ji x h*i£a> x nuAOjJn x J U jj'i' 2 *t i 706 


m*.. ■ 

tta n 

**•* •■* '<*■ ; , 


BANKING & ACCOUNTANCY 


Life 

British National 


FUND 

MANAGER 


Senior Accountants 

North London c.£ 18,000 + benefits 



Citicorp’s wliolly owned life aranrance subsidiary 
ireare proud of onrmnstfai p feiwfee an atm ait MCpid in nni ftiinlf^ • 
products. 


* i*» 

1TW .fa 




* la* ti.u 

Wfc**i »*. 



A major retail gronp with a turnover in excess of £380m, is a result, two oppomrn 

rapidly expanding its activities. The company’s success and for recently qualified a 

profitability is sens continue through organic growth and, as 

Financial Accountant 

Principally, you will be responsible for the preparation and deadlines, a small tean 

production of statutory accounts and of financial reports for to manage and motivai 

presentation to the Board and Departmental Heads. Other duties addition, experience 0 ! 
will include the necessary year-end procedures, variance analysis, modelling would be uf 

the development of accounting procedures and the extension of the mainframe and microc 
current computerised systems. To assist you in meeting tight Ref: SSA8/0602/T. 


a result, two opportunities have arisen in the Finan ce Department 
for recently qualified accountants. 


ponsible for the preparation and deadlines, a small team trill report to you and, therefore, the ability 

ots and of financial reports for to manage and motivate this young department is essential. In 

Departmental Heads. Other duties addition, experience of computerised systems and financial 

•-end procedures, variance analysis, modelling would be useful, as extensive use is made of both 

l procedures and the extension of the mainframe and microcomputers. 

To assist you in meeting tight Ref: SSA8/0602/T. 

Senior Administrative Accountant 

This position requires a highly-motivated character with maintained and the group complies with legal requirements, you 

initiative, who can work with minimum' supervision. Your will maintain records of borrowing levels, be responsible for 

responsibilities will include handling the tax affairs and company updating cash-flow forecasts and monitoring inter-company 

secretarial pattern, as well as monitoring the daily cash balances, . . borrowings and dividends. An interesting and challenging role 
which will involve constant liaison with the group’s external for which a good technical background and the requisite tax 

advisors. In addition to ensuring that the statutory books are knowledge is required Ref: SSA8/06tt3/T. 


Both these positions offer invaluable experience and 
excellent career development opportunities to bright, 
energetic and ambitious individuals as part of a small, 
but dynamic team committed to the success of the 
company. Candidates should be recently qualified ACA7 


tenence ana aluvauwa 

to bright, V H prepared tom 

of a small, W fc Toapplx 

iofthe ■ current salt 

alifiedACA/ JBL. reference 

BA Personnel Services 


ACCA/ACMAs, aged mid~20s to early 30s, who are 
prepared to make a positive contribution to the group, 
lb apply, please write in confidence, indicating 
current salary and quoting the appropriate 
reference to Fiona McMillan. 


■ Rxenamn Search • Selection - Psychometrics - Remuneratum 6* Pers onne l Consultancy 


• ' Hyde Park House, 60a Knightsbrldge, London SWIX 7LE. 
Tel: 01-235 6060 Telex: 27874 




Jfteni M. 


awmc\ 


s will K 


hrr n-v 

WWrdv i!\ 


Ik I 


The market for Financial Information Services is possibly the most rewarding environment in which you could choose to 
develop your Sales or Marketing career. 

As a Division of The Stock Exchange we are, as you would expect at the centre of its dramatic growth and development 
Utilising the latest Computing and Communications technology, we now offer an array of market leading products and 
services to Financial Communities throughout the UK and overseas. 

We have created SEAQ, wNch forms the basis (rf the new computerised Stock Market 
” ' " ~We have established TOPIC - our orvline/reakime database of Securities and related information - as an essential 
decision making tool with already over 5000 aibscribers worldwide. ■ 

'*• • *; : We have now introduced CRS-LYNX and TOPtCUNE which 

nuuiiHiniiiniiiHiuiiiHiiiuiimmniimiJininiimiiminiiniiiiminiiminiiiiiiiuiiHiinnmfmifuiminiifmiiiiHiinHTiimiinuiHii acc f ss 5 inf ^ m ? i ° ri 1 i n conputer-readabie fom\ and 

• - • ORBTT - an elegant networked solution to the manipulation and 

fiTIfilM CVCTCU O distribution of data from efiverse sources. 

U j II BW ■% 1 I - Whether you already operate within this field or are seeking to 

■ ■ wr ■ w • W ■ W ■ ■■■■■ w prepress from a more traditional area of the Computer Industry, we 

ArATAn can offer you an exciting yet secure and professional future. 


PRODUCT MANAGER 


Your role will be to ensure that we maintain and develop our 
position as a leading supplier of computer-readable data and related 
systems solutions. 

With a background in the Rnancial or Computing Services 
Industries you will be experienced in the identification, building and 
launch of new products. 

You must be a creative, strategic thlnkerwho can generate 
enthusiasm and participation in development projects. 


INFORMATION SYSTEMS 
— FINANCE SECTOR — 


NHMIimHIlinHIRM 









MAJOR ACCOUNT SALES 


- Reflecting the scale of our market opportunities we are 
significantly expanding our sales organisation. 





Account Managers 
(London) - 

Sales Consultants 
(London/Brrm'ngfianO 


Sales Managers 
(London) 


Overseas Sales 
Development 
(London based) 


developing business within existing - 
users of strategic importance. 

identifying new business opportunities 
wiftin both our traditional and emerging 
markets. 

growing and manage a team of 
Account Management and Sales 
professionals. 

pursuhg business opportunities outside • 
the UK. Fluency in French, German, 
Spanish or Japanese is essential. - - 


Your background should include experience and achievement within 
/iirn DMA TtdKl Cf oi///“CC ^ Compute Communications or Financial Information Services 
in/rUr\rlMl lUIr JCnlr/LLJ Industries in a Sales, Sales Management or, possibly, Support role. 


PRODUCT MARKETING MANAGER 


Leading a team of Marketing Professionals, you will be 
responsible for a broad range of activities. They will include product 
launches, sales support, documentation and pricing in relation to the 
ever expanding portfolio of financial information carried by the 
TOPIC service. 

You should have extensive product or brand management 
experience, preferably within the Financial Services Industry. 

. . These appointments are outstanding opportunities to become 
part of the UK’s most successful industry. We offer a professional 
working environment ample scope for career development and 
exceBent remuneration packages. 

They will indude comprehensive benefits and, where applicable, 
commission guarantees. 

For further details please contact our Recruitment Consultants in 
the first instance All applications treated in the strictest confidence 

. Paul Chambers on 01 387 4549 
' weekdays before 7.00 pm or 
01 987 6487 evenings/weekends 

Alternatively, send a brief CV as soon as possible to: Green 

Greenfield Human Resources 

40 Triton Square fgj, 

London NW1 3HG 


Manageoc 


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CHIEF ACCOUNTANT 
£15,000 

Our Client, the major National Txacfir^Oi^nisafioQafaBurapean 
Country wishes to reauit^Quef Accountant - 
, The London Office handles allrelated trade andbarter activities 
which include the export and import of prime raw materials, plastics, 

» ^petroleum products, crude oil, dant and equipment 

m 1985 the tumoverwas in excess of$200 million. 

. This is anewporition and the person appoirxtedwiU report to the 
Fmanrial Contnwer^io is based in London and willbe responsible for 
maintaining the statutory Sterling books and reoords, the prqxuatkm 


will occupy the Chief Accountant full time and it is likely that there will 
be ample opportunities far travel in^ Western Europe to assist with the 
accounting requirements efthe Organisation m a number of Countries. 

The succesful applicant is likely to be arabitious^ with strong 
commercial acumen and good incerpasonal skills. A knowlec^eof 
either German, Italian, French, Spanish or Serbo-Croat will be an 
advantage as would apro&saonal qualification such as FCA, CAor 
ACGAiAgeisrelativdyunimporta^ ■ • 

■vApi^icaiitsshoulda ppfy initially i n writ ing^ with CVs to. . - 
Guy N: Fishei; FCA, SIlLPLEY BLACmJRN, 14-16 Regent Street, 
v London SW1Y4PS. 

j Shipley Blackburn 

l J J A Chartered Accountants 


INTERNATIONAL PLANNED 
PARENTHOOD FEDERATION 

Management 

Auditor 

Salary £14,963 per annum 


planning 

countries 


*pp6catoM are hvfced for a post ol Management Auditor reporting to Head. Evaluation 
and Managamm AtKft. The successful appttcvrt wBl be recoined to view flffictonGY and 
economy Rill* use of M resources: review management procedures and structures; 
ewmfcis: flhancU transactions accounts and repons, to insure compliance with 
WB*twadona] pofcfcs and {Sans. 

onrtHid of the time w« b* spent fraveSng overseas. 

^gP* canta stiorid held a wooflnieadmof asa ig nal quaacailo nreiatBd to ihe abore duties 
a" *« yeore- audit or compendia experience ^preteaUy to Indud i soma 
■wnerfanoe. Adwmoad computar skMs required. Fluency m Bitten and one 
or two at thelSowing Inguagac Ranch. Spanish. - Ante is essandfi. 

Salary £14^63 per annum together with benefits tacJutfng pension hind and mecficaJ 
i cover. ... ... 

eend c.v. to U s ed . 


k 






Finance and 

Administration Manager 


-■ An enterprising concern 
engaged in the commercial services 
industry seeks to appoint a Finance 
and Administration Manager: - ' 
Basedontiieoutskirtsof 
London, the person appointed 
will report to the General Manager 
and be responsible for aJI the 
accounting and administrative 
functions, including accounts, tax, 
treasury, budgeting, etc. * 


c£18,000 

South East London 


• Operatfogirrto Europe, thiswkte 
role requires candidates to have 
at teastSyears’ management 
experience in a “hands on" 
accounting rote, in a computerised 
environment • - 

Ideally the position willsurta 
“mid thirties" qualified accountant 
who enjoys working in a service 
industry Knowledge of a European 
language would be a distinct asset 


The salary is negotiable around 
the Indicator shown. 

- Candidates should apply in 
confidence, enclosingfiill 6/ and 
quoting reference MCS/3QQ1 to : 
TraceyPhiilips • 

Executive Selection Division 
Price Waterhouse 
Management Consultants 
No 1 London Bridge 
London SE19QL 


YOUNG ACCOUNTANTS 
CENTRAL LONDON 

Assistant Financial Accountant cf 12,000 

A leading international advertising agency, undergoing 
expansion both organically and via acquisitions, seeks 
a career minded part-qualified to assist the financial 
Accountant. Good opportunity to develop financial 
accounting skills and liaise with senior management, 
both in the UK and overseas. Ref DM 2314 

Management Accountant c£l0,000 

An international construction organisation seeks a 
young pan-qualified to assist in management account- 
ing. with some involvement in financial accounting. 
Generous study assistance and highly visible career 
prospects should provide a sound basis for your furore. 
Ref DM 2289 . ' 

Far farther njormatioa please cokucc 

Diane Mmnmery, 
Consultant, Management Personnel, 
2 Swallow Place, London W1R 7AA 
Telephone 01 408 1694 


Bnwe Waterhouse public appointments 



Personal Financial 


Plannin 


( BA- to Partnerl 

New Post From £17,000 pa 

Wb are a 700-strong firm with 90+ tax staff. Tax seniors 
are responsible for both corporate and personal tax cases, - 
including both compliance and planning. 

The partner responsible for the specialist personal 
financial planning section new needs a Wto assist with new 
client casework and the expansion and development of 
consultancy services. 

- The WwiD be expected to make regular use of other 
in-house specialist units to provide co-ordinated advice on 
rax efficient investments, insurance and pension planning, 
international tax. BES, Woodlands etc. 

The position is open to qualified accountants with a 
minimum of two years’ relevant specialist tax experience, or to 
unqualified consultants with a minimum of five years' 
personal financial planning experience. 

Candidates should write. giving details of qualifications 
and relevant experience, to Barry Stillennan, Personal 
Financial Planning Partner at 8 Baker Street, London 
W1M IDA. Telephone: 01-486 5888. 



Stoy Hayward 

Amex&erol Hor watn & Horwath international 


Credit Control 
Manager 

EXCELLENT SALARY + CAR 

Greenham Trading Limited ere a rapidly expand- 
ing National Wholesale Group who now require a 
Credit Control Manager to work at their newly 
developed offices in Isteworth. 

The successful candidate will be totally responsi- 
ble for managing the Credit Control Department, 
wU report directly to the Financial Controller and 
wo also be requierd to visit dents and the 
company's brandies around the country. 

The computerised sales ledger consists of ap- 
proximately 10,000 accounts which are bu3t up 
from multiple trading locations throughout the UK. 
Applicants must have considerable experience of 
crecfit control, county court collection procedures 
and legation through solicitors and wfli be re- 
quired to supervise a department of 2550 people, 
for this reason, those applying should be at least 
30. with previous managerial expe ri ence. 

We offer an excellent salary commensurate with 
age and experience, ‘a company car as wall as 
generous benefits of employment^ with tee interna- 
tional Taylor Woodrow Group. Applications to be 
sent ter. 

Mr P. Grinltam, Greenham TrarSng Lid, 

671 London Road, Isteworth, Middlesex TW7 
4EX. Teb 01 560 1244 


0 


MolfrcioliW-5.;.-ou5n c‘ 


WIRRAL 

'AN EQUAL OPPORTUNITY EMPLOYER 




2 SOLICITORS 
£11280 - £12885 

(a) Planning & Highways. 

An excellent opportunity to gain or broaden 
experience in the areas of planning and high- 
way law within a combined legal and committee 
team with particular emphasis on enforcement 
matters and plannhg enquiries, together. with 
advisory and court work generated by client 
departments. 

(b) Policy Group 

To assist the Principal Solicitor In contractual 
and personnel matters. Will be required to deal 
with cfisclpilnary appeals and some industrial 
tribunal work, and most aspects of foe legal 
work emanating from foe Council's licensing 
functions, inducing appeals to foe Magistrates 
Court 

Local government experience in each of.tha. 
relevant fields would be an advantage, as there 
wB be a requirement to attend and advise Com- 
mittees. However, applications will be 
welcomed from newly admitted SoRdtors or 
Solicitors in private practice with experience in 
property and contentious matters- 

For informal discussion contact Nick McGinn 
ext 240 for post (a) and Peter Crossley ext 258 
tor post (b). 

Application forms and further particulars from 
the Borough SoOcftor and Secretary, Town • 
HaU, Brighton Street Wallasey, Wkral L44 
BED, (051-838 7070 ext 207) returnable by 8 
August 






























40 


THE TIMES THURSDAY JULY 24 1986 


(( HORIZONS^ 


Guide to career 
development 


First class job in the Third World 


Third world countries with acute eco- 
nomic transport and medical problems 
require expertise to be spread among the 
local people, not dished out with well 
imentioned zeal Health care workers, 
nutritionists, horticulturalists, hydrolo- 
gists, engineers and economists are in 
demand but to carve a career overseas 
demands dedicated planning, tong term 
contracts are usually in administrative 
positions, earned through practical 
experience 

In Gambia, Robin Pouiton, develop- 
ment specialist and director of Action 
Aid, is based in down-town, run-down 
offices in Banjul, working with a couple 
of fellow cx-pats. They are deliberately 
outnumbered by Gambians. 

A few minutes drive away, while 
tourists lie in the sun on hotel beaches, 
he is concerned with energy-sapping 
poverty up-country where Action Aid is 
assisting 8 1 schools, with the cash from 
10,000 UK sponsors. The money pro- 
vides training courses for local teachers, 
school gardening projects to t e ac h the 
basics of food production, tree nurseries, 
village marketing schemes and wells 
(being dug ever deeper as drought 
encroaches). 

Lack of electricity, minimal telephone 
network, petrol shortages, and govern- 
ment corruption hamper progress in 
Robin's aims to: “enable communities to 
be productive, to face up to 

Teamwork and example 
is the best way forward 

desertification and to give their children 
education." The way towards self- 
sufficiency for Gambians is through 
gaining abilities, not through endless 
cash donations. 

Robin Poulion believes that in this 
small country (Britain's first and last 
colony) with a population of 700.000 
agencies are too numerous. They come 
from Germany. Sweden, Islamic coun- 
tries. UK. Canada and the US (including 
his wife Michelle who works with Save 
the Children US). To coordinate their 
activities he has helped to found 
TANGO (The Association of Non 
Governmental Agencies). 

.Among the longest established agen- 
cies is the Methodist Mission. In 
addition to running a school in Banjul, 
the Mission employs Sue and Bob Mann, 
a couple who have devised their own 
dual careers in African countries. They 
are about to return home for a breathing 
space after a decade in the Gambia. Sue, 
a nurse, runs a clinic in the bush village 
of Marakissa. where, for example, a 
mother is taught how to revive her 
dehydrated baby whom she had carried 
for miles. 

While health today is Sue's preoccupar 
tion. Bob is pessimistic about the future: 
“What has happened in Ethiopia is going 
to happen in Gambia." says the agricul- 
ture officer. He has propagated a nursery 
of drought resistant fruit trees which are 
then distributed as seedlings to villages, 
with full instructions on planting and 
protection. His assistant is a graduate 


. Long-term contracts 
overseas are usually 
administrative and 
gained by practical 
experience. Ann Hills 
looks at the considerable 
challenge of this work. 

.sent through Voluntary Service Over- 
seas, with a knowledge of forestry (VSO 
usually demand two year commitments). 
His deputies are Gambians, trained to 
lake over. 

Both the Manns and Paul ions contrib- 
ute through teamwork and setting exam- 
ples within stricily structured 
programmes linked to government in- 
vestment in health, education and 
agriculture. To cope they have become 
resilient, not sacrificial, gaining job 
satisfaction and living reasonably com- 
fortably (with time off on the beach with 
families and friends). Staying fit and able 
to work constructively in an. often 
uncomfortable climate is vitaL 
Most specialists like Judith Appleton, 
arrive on shorter contracts, for a year or 
two, to tackle a particular emergency or 
project, though they may return as 
consultants in years to come. She is a 
nutritionist who became caught up in 
emergency feeding programmes in Ethi- 
opia, and is now in search of a new job, 
probably with another agency, since 
Save the Children hasn’t a suitable 
opening in view; 

“The problem is Fm ambitious. I want 
to be in nutrition in development, 
involved with food production as well as 
consumption." Judith, just 40. with an 
MBE for her work in Ethiopia (regarded 
as praise for die whole team), a BA in De- 
velopment Studies (University of East 
Anglia) and MSc in Human Nutrition 
(London School of Hygiene and Tropical 
Medicine) set out to equip herself for a 
Third World career. The first step, 
during marriage to a Norwegian, was 
working with the Vietnamese Liberation 
From in Oslo, which inspired her to 
become a volunteer English teacher in 
Vietnam, soon after the war ended. 

“Working there, I became interested in 
food and agriculture, but for a career, 1 
had to get qualifications." From Hanoi, 
she applied to the University of East 
Anglia, and was accepted, but because 
Judith was born in Canada, she had to 
pay some study fees herself By 1982, 
with degrees (in addition to a quartet of 
languages), she was qualified and jobless. 

“Agencies were looking for cheap 
research assistants and some didn’t even 
take health insurance seriously." A 
representative of Save the Children met 
her at the London School of Hygiene and 
Tropical Medicine (where die worked on 
data processing and word processing to 
fill in a few weeks). Next stop: Wollo 
Province, North Ethiopia with a one year 


-contract, a £5,000 salary, plus living 
costs. 

The date was March, 1983 - the 
drought began to bite. “I was apprehen- 
sive. I had not thought of myself as a 
disaster person.” She helped to standard- 
ize methods of measuring the scale of 
calamity, weighing young children, in- 
structing African fieldworfcers, working 
with a logistics officer. In the midst o? 
honor, compounded by civil war, “you 
have to eat, sleep and keep dean." 

Her training, though, had not been to 
become “part of a great feeding 
machine" so, in 1985, her next posting 
(after a month’s paid visit to Guatemala 
to learn Spanish) was Honduras, work- 
ing with villagers, developing a healthier 
eating programme through maximising 
available food. 

What next? The advantage of being 
with an NGO is that “these smaller 
agencies can respond quickly," but in 
career terms the United Nations, with an 
assortment of administrative posts," 
tends to pay more. NGOs, keeping costs 
to a minimum, avoid bureaucracy and 
employ recruits as necessary. “I'll inev- 
itably work one year. at, a tune as a 
member of field staff, but maybe get a 
desk job when I'm older.” 

At Save the Children I also met 
Richard Spearman, assistant field direc- 
tor, organizing health care in camps for 
refugees from Afghanistan in Pakistan. 


Specialists tend to work 
on shorter term contracts 

He had just flown home escorting 
colleague Jill Scoones, who had been 
wounded three days earlier by a gunman 
at the Pearl Continental Hotel in 
Peshawar an unlikely hazard of the job. 
The isolated, incident hasn't changed 
their plans to return to duties in 
Pakistan. 

Return visits to London headquarters 
gives time to catch up and share accounts 
with administrative staff Darrell Jack- 
son. deputy director overseas, is respqn- 
sible for evaluating projects, including 
work with Afghans. He explains: “We 
have about 200 employees abroad, on a 
mix of short and longer term employ- 
ment Field directors run projects costing 
from £80,000 to £1 million plus, or in the 
case of West Sudan, £ 15-million this 
year. That huge programme has 30 ex- 
pat staff and nearly 600 nationals." He 
himself earns £15,000 a year, is likely to 
visit 20 countries during 1 986 and “can't 
imagine a better job." 

His advice is, if possible to take a 
relevant degree in economics, social 
anthropology, or geography. Follow that 
with a post-graduate qualification in 
nutrition or rural development, water 
engineering, development planning and 
get experience overseas. That is the 
Catch 22: even volunteers won't be 
welcomed without specialist knowledge. 

MThe Directory of Work and Study in 
Developing Countries by David Leppard, 
published by Vacation Work, 9 Park End 
Street, Oxford, £6.95, is a comprehensive 
guide to Third World careers. 


I .A CRftME PE LA CREME 


£t3,0M«J5,000++ 

PERSONNEL 

RECRUITING 

Use your considerable 
recruiting experience, 
positive personality and 
drive to gain you job 
satisfaction, and finan- 
cial rewards. Due to 
expansion, a consultant 
is needed in the West 
End for each of our spe- 
cialist divisions 
Secretaries Plus and 
WonlPlus. Salary pack- 
age £ i 3,000-i 1 5,000++ 

Cafl Lyn Cedi on 
439 7001 

Qtv 3778600 [ 

Wat&d 439 7001 J |, [ 


Secretaries Phis 


ura sanas b*t 

- ST. GEBBCFS HOSPITAL, 
LOBOV, SV17 MT 

Secretary to 

Clinical Oncology Slit 
Salary nootiabte 
Hairs : I 6 jur. 

An crating poa has astn tor 
an BDs«nd mate) secre- 

a wtfi good auto and typng 
l Tlus is a rapBJly towop- 
uig bnovatne uw rtttwi a 
protons Union reacting 
Hosasal. tha work Is vaned, nib 
envi raiment e treaty (wan 
seme patient conact) and busy. 

Tde 01-410 0057 to 
farther details 

AN EQUAL OPPORRMTY 
EMPLOYER 


■DRAKE 

PERSONNEL 

RBflCXTE TO MONACO 
SAUWT COMMENSURATE 


Has ja» nfeti atias you te- 
nd *w NgMy saccteM 
d jamtic Presort ol Ms Mt>* 

msocoJ RkMOw* Company. 

You nil be based n tin bean* 

Id Dr&KQtty of Monaco where 

you un yaw ncatem tawafc 

dUs and MM at as Ws 

around tamtlVti ail need 

to Im a tagii anew late. tie 

M nwtaaMard uttfcacsh 

ratted to yaar goal, an d tta 

prapea of trnalan tha amtil 
and tiamg prat d W anccess- 

td amam uD on appata to yon. 

and you Me otahnt short- 

bad and wng. then 
CaS Santa Brastmly no 
91 734 OIL 



LONDON PROPERTY 




Wlnkworth^. 

MORTGAGES X 


TERMS NOW AVAILABLE 

* 3% tfams Ircoim or 2% times 
joint Income 

* 100% mortengM avnUnblo 

* No nvidMcn of Inco m e inquired 
for loam up to £250,000 for 
qualifying Applicants 

* MIRAS facility available over 
£30,000 

Ring 01-235 0691 
For fall Information 
Open until 8pm today 




Winkworth 
Financial Services 

25a Motcomb Street 
London SW1 


/ 


NORTH OF THE 
THAMES 


ama cottaoc suhimim 
wnm wnw twill 2 
WiinMinl loo I Iren ikii 
It Luna Vuv 

1*1 noo Trl PI V? 


BUCKS 


SH.VERST0NE 

VILLAGE 

r ru* from Furt; Otrtrt Wmnaiti 
JUJKfl aanra 
Tjuffl home EM by mjse* 
t'U.'ew w wn ram* acasTmodJ- 
trar an jrra <if redodw gotten 4 
CiSiSie Bee'. 3 Pirns 

!«ur ywa pprn iirpMcr sow oik 
■J»’i me gjitrv uud, fltfmg loom, 
pjnm room uWI». dram oauga. 
twMiQ far 6 u>5 M'BonKraiw 
Crtp Rw mu Mi. iimr 
ute 45 rnmufes tusion 
5357,500 

FOR PRIVATE SA1£ 

TEL 03Z7 857588 


N. BUCKS niluqr lornionl Mim 
tlrl ua 1 ion, nr 4 hrd im j |». 

iittiii nttornl wmi', acre 
Ce3’»VJl K> Trl tvseft -J.M 


HERTFORDSHIRE 


BUSHEV HEATH Snanou, from 
art*rnrd how. linr mo io 
mim drnr luhr Hiw tiling 
inn. malum laiKiw aped <ain Lgf 

Mkhni iwMhioti mi cnpi 
r oiijoh amnio haihi 
C l 75 000 one Ol <»SO IM 


PROPERTY WANTED 


: Berth ivanlM (nr w 
will IPOII inUuml bariK 
(•ri'ijhiv hrt.rm IVMlnvj 

•IM Dot kun4« Cong or slmrt 
trim Trl 01 228 0705 


FRANCE 


SOUTH or FRANCE. 7 6 mint 
from Plan Or La Tour siltour 
Hiunrau ik Cot to Lin is mm 
uln Horn Bearn By car \m 
inmrrti omprm surrtHindm 
h, mi»t jiHv hilh dmibl, ant- 

iwwi hiror kMinqr rimitMj room 

«nn mr.-Hinni' in tlrrp h-o. 
luiiv i-iuimm Litmrn. . Bain- 
rnran and leu In Pnialr ulm 
edivilul on rompiry mm pool 
and Irlum (ourle £48.000 
Phone 'CC27i 751414 


GENERAL 


ANDORRA. Hov dirrrl Irom 
nniidrr ,imh from uoooo 
roll nuiugrnwnl A InlUl wr 
e irr CiVl Andorran Prop, Lid. 
5 RMf London 

t*H 4NI* Tot Ol ill MH] 


SPAIN 


HHZA - CALA LLONOA. 9 Bed. 2 
Oak on v dupm. wj \K-*rv on 
rHaMntird *-Hl run nrertoo 
rm-nl. 9 pod,. ' ■ rniK* Beach, 
ideal lamilv holidava £2t.OOO 
lor guK-k sale Trt Ol SB! 1544 
L\l 9c*} >dai t or 01361 3409 


PUBLIC NOTICES 


TOWN AND COt NTTJV 
PLANNING ACT 197! 
NfWIrr under Scrnon 96 «3> 

• Primmed ile\Wopm«U 41 
Rn\rw How iMarrmanBurv 
Sgnare SI Alphage Hour iWnl 
wimi Fore Street, and im t. 3 
and a Si AkpNage High Watk. 
Lonifon LC9 

NOTICE i, hereby gtten that 
applH-aimn n being made to Ihe 
CorpcHalionot London nv Guard- 
lan Rmal EvrhaiiBe Assurance 
Mr lor Manning prrmlwan hi re- 
ipm or demalillon d existing 
MlH-e rrlad building and weclion 
of new. uuMinm Wi IHJH res* 
denlial office and letsurr use and 
car narking 

A ngi Of me noMkulion and of 
me Mans arid other documents 
suhmilled with II mas- be inspecl 

« 4 TP Bennett Partnership. 

iW High MoUxan. London 
well TDL at all rnMniUr 
hours within 20 davs a' (tie dale 
or puhllralKin M Uln Nobrr 
Ans verson who wishes lo 
make renrvsenlatKms to the 
ales, e mentioned Corporation 
about Ihe appIKalaon should 
make mem in wnlmqov that dale 

lo the Corporation al GuUdluU. 

London CCTP 2EJ 
S KB led. Ticwer Still & Keeling 
On behalf of Guardian Roval Ex- 
change Assurance Mr 
29nd July 1986 


TOWN AND COLNTHY 
PLANNING ACT I9TI 
Nolice under seel Io n 97 

Proposed desefoomrnt 31 
Rases House AMermanlMiTV 
Sotiare Si Alphage House ihni 
tainqi Fore Nlreel. and not. L. 2 
and 3 si AUdutir High Walk. 
London CCS 

NOT KT n Hereby gt\m Uial 
jpptH JiKHi is bemv made lo Ihe 
Corpm alian ol London By Guard- 
un Renal Cxrhaitqr Assurance 
pic lev Manning perm i ssion in re- 
sped ol demolition of existing 
nlliee retail nuilding and crerfion 
o< new tiuMina for retail resl- 
denlial oKire and Insure use Add 
rar packing 

Any owner of Ihe land i namely 
a nvetMider or a person entitled 
in au unrspired term of al least 
se*«n sears under * lease) w|» 
h ishes io make nvn-ustUlloits lo 
me anme mentionea Corporation 
about Ihe appHranan should 

make them In t*nhng within 90 
days Ol Ihe dale M tttr publlcalion 
td mis Noure in me Cohomim 
at Guimmii. London nsp zej. 

Signed- Troswer SfiU A Keeling 
On behalf of Guardian Royal Ex- 
change Assurance pic 
22nd July I486 


BRACE otherwise WHITE. GER- 
ALD ALBERT BRACE otherwise 
GERALD ALBERT WHITE lale of 
TJB S Hi of Read. Brent. London 
NW IQ. was lound null thrrr on 
9lh Juls I48S lEslale about 
C IT. 6001 

The lainer of rtie abose-named M 
miuesled Id apMV to Ihe Trea- 
sun Solicitor iB \ k Ouern 
Anne's Chambers. 38 Broadway. 
Loudon SB :H 9JS. tadmg wlurh 
■hr Timin' Subelfor nuy ble 
steps lo AdtiunBier me estate. 


LEGAL NOTICES 


IN THE HIGH COURT OF JUS- 
TICE No. OQMbS Of I486 
CHANCERY CHNTStON 
MR JLSTXX HOFFMANN 
Fol 271 B 63 

Monday 3Qt h day of June 19BS 
IN THE MATTER OF ASHLEY 
INDUSTRIAL TRUST pic and IN 
THE MATTER OF THE COMPA 
NIES ACT I486 
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN 
that the Order of the High Court 
of Justice i Chancery Dtvtwon 
dated 30th June 1986 confirming 
ihe reduction of the capon of me 
abase, named Company (nan 
E t .750.000 dr\ ided into 
6.024.000 Ordinary Shares of 
Mo earn and 9.880.000 -A' Ordi- 
nary Shares of Sp each to 
£706,200 divided into 6.004.000 
Ordinary Shares and 9.880.000 
'A' Ordinary Shares aU of 5p 
each and Ihe Minute approved by 
me Court showing with respect to 
■he capital of Uie Company as al 
iered me several particulars 
required by me above-mentioned 
Acl were registered by the Hints. 
liar of Companies an Bth July 
I486 

DATED this 16th <UV of July 
1986 

Alexander Tat ham 4 Co or 30 51 
Ann Street. Mancnester M2 SOB 
SolKilors for use above-named 
Company 


THE LEPTON THEATRE COM 
PANV LIMITED 
•IN UOL’IDATIONI 
Notice is iwrefiv given that the 
rrediton or the above-named 
Connunv. wsuch h be mg voiun 
lailtv wound un. are reguued. on 
or NSace Ihe 31 si day Of Auauvl 
19b lo send in Ihetr <uU Chris 
lian and surnames. Uieir 
addresses and descsiplions. full 
particulars of ihetr drtm 
rlattm and Ihe names and ad 
drr-nrs ot I heir Sonniers ill anvL 
lo l be underagneu Anltions Ray 
mood Houqhlon « Touctir Ross 
& Co 33- 34 Chancery Lane Lon 
dan WC24 ICW Ihe LMNKUlor of 
Ihe -und company, and. n so re 
a mred by notice in writing from 
Ihe said Uouidalor are personal 
h or bv Ihetr Soiiniors. to come 
ut and prove their dents or claims 
al surh lime and more as shall be 
specified in such notice, or in de- 
(JUil thereof Ihry win 

rsriuded irons the benefit of any 
distribution made before such 
dents are proved 
DATED Uin l?lh day of July 
I486 

A R HOUGHTON 
ta u mdtor 


RE. COMMERCIAL DECORAT- 
ING SERVICES LTD and The 
Companies Acs 1985 
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN 
pursuant lo Sort (on 588 of Ihe 
Companies Acs I486 mat a steel 
urn of the Creditors of uw above 
named Company wUI be held at 
The Barbican Crty HoieL Central 
Street. London CCl on Wednes- 
day Ihe SOth day of July. I486 al 
IO o'clock in Uk- lor moon, for Ihe 
purposes menltoned m SeetKHB 

589 and WJ ol Ihe said Art 
Dated infs 16UI day Of July 1986 
R L Burt 
Director 


NATHAN GAMES LIMITED 
NOTICE ts HEREBY Gl\ EN pur. 
xuani to Section 568 of the 
Companies Act. 1983. that _ 
MEETING of Ihe rrcdilon of Ihe 
above named Company win be 
held al Uie offices of LEONARD 
CLRTTS A CO., uluatrd at 30 
E.4VTHOLRNE TERRACE i2ND 
FLOOR i LONDON WS 6LF on 
Monday Ihe 28Ui day of Jidy 
I9B6 al 12 00 o-riock nuddav. 
lor Ihe purposes branded for m 
Seri ions 589 and 990 
UMs-d uie t4th day ol July i486 
B A COX- Dttrctor 


re export ontEcnoN Lrsfrr 
ED 8V ORDER OF THE HIGH 
COL RT DATED THE 19th Dr. 
cetnber i486. 

NTWLLE ECKLEY FC4 OF 

352 BRIGHTON ROAD. SOL.TH 
CHOI DON has hern appointed 
LigunUfor ot the movnioiim 
C ompany vtilhovu a Comimnec of 
unorrlion 

DATED IBrh July 1986. 


COURSES 


INTERNATIONAL private non 
fradllianM Lnfvrrucy offers 
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A truB mole ts in nR k sought 
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led City practi ce . Enjoy a 

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Hoggett Bowers 

Executive Search and Selection Consultants 

BtXMnCfUM. CAJOifT. CUSGOW. UTOK LQWOH. HUKHOmt. VTWCSJTLE SHE7H£LDo«l USVTaOE 


Chairman’s 

PA/Secretary 


[©socnisDa] 


Expanding Home Fashion FLC 
Central Manchester a £12,000, Benefits 

Diluting the highest profile PLC in Manchester, the 
Chairman, aged 37, has talran the Company from £6m 
turnover in 19P8 to £60m last year with axdicipated sales of 
over £10 Om in the next financial year. A sales level of 
£25 Om is planned for the Colaroii Home Fashion Group 
within 2/3 years — the Chairman needs an exceptional 
person for support. A graduate aged 25-35. you will have 
excellent secretarial skills and be used to operating at 
Director level in a particularly active, preferably international, 
environment. 

Considerable satisfaction will be gaiw«sH from achievement 
in this important position. The highest presentation and 
personality strengths will.be wall-utilised. 

D. A. Tbala Ref: 3O06Q/T. Male or famula can di dates 
should telephone in confidence for a Personal History 
form. 063-832 3500, Hoggett Bowers pic. St. John’s Court, 

78 Gertside Street. MANCHESTER, M3 3EL. 


ARE YOU INTERESTED IN 
SPORT AND FASHION? 

If so International Management Group 
The Mark McCormack Organisation 
Has the following vacancies 
French/German Typist 

For Msrehaadns Dhr. - dealing with rarioo* sporting roota. Lota of language am te nt sod 
would writ fizst jobber. 

Secretary for Licensing/Fashion Executive 

- Lots of dint csou& 

AB applktina should pome w good wqguriri ahilh and Idephom manner, togetto with riato 
u mi under p re a me . 

Pfemr call or Bead CV to SaOy taag. I atemmOnaa] Managbrnegf Groan, 
14-15 nidNAgf Street. London W1H STL 01-486 7171. 


ANTIQUE DEALERS 

Knightsbridge Antique Dealers re- 
quire an experienced secretary, 
book-keeper, knowledge of fine 
English furniture an advantage. 

Apply John Keil: 

01-589 3912 
154 Brompton Road, 
London SW3 1HX. 


WTER1ATI0XAL 
BEMVENJITfOII CLWC 


requti** 

ttontttto work in Ae Hartgy , 
Street area. We are looking 
tar b dynamic imtivkiuai cfr- 
peble at organising and 
naming a practice. Previous i 
medical experience not 1 
essential. However, wa do I 
require sonetiody who is | 
Iriemtiy and outgotag as waB 

as being efftaenL 
Salary negotiabie. . 

Teh 01-636 6196 


INT. NEWSPAPER 

Intelligent and numerate self-starter required 
as PA io circulation Manager. Good clerical 
skills essential, WP and Languages desired. 
Good prospects for right candidate. Please calk 

01-940 6660 


BARNES 

Small property 

group requires 
experienced mature 
shorthand secretary 
to run office. Salary 
according to 
experience. 

TeL* 01-741 0557 


RARE OPPORTUNITY 

BI- LINGUAL 
SECRETARY TO 
MANAGING 
DIRECTOR 

S.W. London/Surrey 
j'rve Figure Nego ti a b le Sfilsry 


ine Managing ltochr- « v» ~ . n .y- 

ing teandB of high vrfmne cttwsnv dutoiles aeoio 
a secretary of a w*y p«i towkwM»l caEbre. 

French » a pra-requrite for aB appheaflts. 

can expect an aUx a cliv e salar y apd « «- 
frflm,f. worki ng coorlitinn* in an office location m 
the S.W. Landon/Srewy area. 

Applications are aongfat from indnridaala 
demonstrate a talk record m a Bemor 

secretarial tide. 

Interested? Then please toward ywr 
application, fa ctatin g a fiill oimcnhnB 

Illingworth 4 AaeociBlee, MaMgreaertCcwdtan^ 

2 CWh Street, Bnmham, Buc ta. SL1 

Bu mtore (08288) 64031 epoting reference LY/EflW 



c-^llotgycvrtb Ajsocuiles 

*« — ' O iMwsencoeuTaffi 



JUST IHE TICKET 

AT £10,500 

Wembley-based MDotsufr- 
sidaries of quoted compmy 
needs a setf-modviBd ex- 
perienced perso n lo lunDe 
aB secret ari al (90/50) and 
PA duties rrtdxfing aB travel 
arrangements, personal 
business and abffiy to hold 
the fort in Ml's absence. 
Located opposite Wembley 
Stadium with 2) days holi- 
day. LVs and other benefits. 

01-589 4422 

SeniorW 

Secretaries 


PERSaRBL/ABHUI 
£11,000 SW3 

This very successful com- 
pany requires a highly 
motivated senior PA to jan 

their team ol professional 

data service consultants. 

Good sfwrthand/typmg cou- 

pled with a flair lor 
orga nisa ti o n are necessary. 
Being a good judge of char- 
acter. you wtB supervise and 
rremtain a happy, efficiert 
office. Yore cheemd depo- 
sition and conscientious 
efforts will not go un-no- 
ticed wffli excefcnt benefits 
offered. 27-33 

01-689 4422 

Senior? 

Secretaries 


PERSONNEL SECRETARY 

(21 - 30 ) 

HELP! Fast accurate shorthand Secre- 
tary (100/50) needed who loves being a 
secretary. Lots of shorthand/typing, 
telephone and people contact. Previous 
personnel experience not necessary but 
you must be flexible, able to work under 
pressure end on your own initiative. 
Excellent salary and perks. 

INTERESTED? 

Please phone: Jane Percfval on 
01-408 1161 ext 2190 


r— is? 



••a 


Tasteful Temping 

No hassles. No let-downs. Just plain, ample, 
high grade temping. 

A tasteful package of top jobs, elite rates and 

thoroughly professional service. 

If you have sound skills and experience, you 
should be talking to The ^fork Shop 1 . 
Telephone Sue Cooke on 01-409 1232. 

Rcc n4 t m g m Co nrailmnm 



TEMPS 

THE BEST YOU CAN GET! 

Prostate £12400 pa wWi prompt payment 
and persona aanrtcs. 

bnuMuJafn and constant neputraments tor 
cheerful, outgoing lamps wtttr: 

T«/Hecp exp - Wang wp vntft good SH or awflo - 
Adter screantyper exp rtth auto - Excetiant 
S&wpmlSH (lOOwpm slrttej. 

Hag JuSo Ho re m ut or Jmmy Lme 
For oa r 



TU12 HANOVER STREET. LONDON W1R9HF 


SULTANATE 
OF OMAN 

SUPERB OPPORTUNITY 8UUHIATE ESSENTIAL 

Senior Secretary /Petsonal Assistant. 28+ . repaired 
for prastigioas and interesting; pew. Good secretarial 
Bldlis will be rewarded with tax-free salary, 

car, housing allowance, bosom travel and many 
other benefi ts. C.V. pha photograph p to; 

Jean Kerr, 26 Thames House, 

South Bank Business Centre. 

140 Battersea Park Road, 

London SWU 4NB. 


J 


RECRUITMENT 

CONSULTANCY 

Urgently needed 3 very competent WP Operators: 

L West End TV Cmw, super sec skills. 

2. City Accountants, mast be good at f^re mrt. 

3. Gly Accountants, iritii a^cnifeg ability. 

We will retrain you free. Contact Kata or Jeon! 

01-446 5080 


barnard marcus 


Due 10 further expansion of this dynamic 
company, we are looking for bright negotiators 
to join our Residential Sales Offices. 
Outstanding career prospects for the right 
person. Initiauve. flexibility and enthusiasm are 
essential. Car owner. 

Please contact Constance Viruly 
01 - 493 sm 


COMMITTEE SECRETARY/ 
PERSONAL ASSISTANT 

OPT 0*9,900 

An experienced secretary able to produce 
dear, accurate and informative minutes and to 
provide an efficient secretarial service is 
needed io work for the Design Council s 
Deputy Director and its Head of Industrial 
Design. 

Applicants should be well educated with the 
ability to exercise initiative, io work 
accurately underpressure and to communicate 
with a wide range of people in Government, 
industry and the design profession. A high 
standard of literacy and good secretarial skills 
(including shorthand) are essential. 

The starring salary will be up to £9^ 300 pa, on 
a scale rising to £10,800 pa. There are 24VS 
days’ holiday, flextime and a non-contributory 
pension scheme. Other benefits include a 
season ticket loan scheme, subsidised 
sandwich bar and discount in the Design 
Centre Shop. 

For further details and an application foim 
please contact: 

Ms Gillian Webb 
Personnel Officer 
The Design Council 
28Haymaxket 
London SW1Y 4SU 
Telephone 01-839 8000 ext 30 

An equal oppo rtunities 
employer 


THE 



COUNCIL 


MR’ REEDS A PA 
KWeifTSBRIDGE 
£9,500 

Tibs fast-expanding devel- 
opment company needs a 
super Audio/Shofthand PA 
to work for the Director hi 
beautiful otlices. Tact, 
diplomacy and good 
organisational stills are es- 
sential. If you are a 
perfectionist witfi a worii- 
hard. ptay-hani altitude fins 
«riH be your niche wiring 
alongside highly motivated 
open-fiwdeo pfepie. Excel- 
lent benefits wi# reward the 
successful applicant 22 +. 
01-589 4422 

SeniorW 
[SecreiariesJ 


SOMMER 

TEMPORARIES 

VE MEED YOU 

We donl offer boUday pay 
with strings attached tut we 
do offer the following: 

* Top rates to match your 
skats 

■ Regular aswg insn ls 

* Professional advice and 
support 

Come and meet our young 
energetic team who wdl ca- 
ter to your needs with a 
variety of bootings. 

01-589 4422 

Senior!® 

Secretaries, 



Poise & Style 

£ 10,000 J 

This Is a top-level job for a poised, professional RA. 
Assisting the Senior Rutner of one of London's leading 
estate agencies you will play a high calibre role, handling 
meeting s; lunches; board minutes etc. He is utterly 
ehaimifift and will involve you fully in his PR/socia! 
entertaining Approx 50% Mb*™ content Stills 100 60 
(or good audio typing) and previous aenior-levd 
experience requested. Age 24+. Please cafl 01-409 1232. 


TIRED OF A DULL, BORING 

SECRETARIAL JOB? 

Secretary/PA needed for Directors of 
medium-sized company (North London) 
involved in BMW sales, restaurants, and 
property. Bright, efficient person able to 
cope \fcnth all the traumas of business life. 
25-35 years. 

Full or part-time considered. 

Telephone: 340 0929- 


WEST END OIL TRADING COMPANY 

SECRET ARY/ ASSISTANT 

Required for branch office of major Gorman 
group. Essential requirements: good secretarial 
skills; telex experience; numeracy sufficient for 
basic bookeeping; confident telephone manner. 
Previous experience in oil related business and 
working knowledge of German would be useful. 

Salary c £9,000 
Telephone 01-629 7331 
(No agencies) 


EXPERIENCED PA/SECS 

Required for partners of large 
practice of leisure architects 
based in Covent Garden. Chal- 
lenging and demanding position. 
Excellent salary. 

01-585 0391 
No Agencies 


CITY WINE MERCHANTS 

OM estab lish ed Wine Merchants require wdl spoken 
and wdl presented Tdephonist/R«septiomst mini- 
mum 2 yean experience with Herald system. Fust 
class remuneration for right applicant. 

C.V. to Mrs. M. Newby 
Corney & Barrow Ltd 12 Helmet Row 
London EC1V 3QJ 


PUBLISHING - FULHAM 
Receptionist/ Copy Typist 

depending on experience. 

Please contact Anne Brennan on 

01-736 6524 


CHELSEA 

BASED PROPERTY CO 



pairo^ bnorujand and good typmg'efed 
ary^fLSOO^ ^ ,nrtiat to essential. : 

Tel: 01-584 4229 




















SF 5 ®® 


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Btsifc* 


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SS2: 

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* A Hill. i'HK!V 

£TARIAI JOB: 

f*k nrr-?-v 

»MU - 

n*r» r • •*« ' •• ■ 

i il«r ■ ; ■ • 

V • • 

kOM: 341) <w:<- 


Mtorr * 

^OIM? O! *- 

No pgi'^d 


fNCED PARCS' 

J tO* !r * 

I ddp»^ !: * ! 
ftCat'lf? 1 ”*- 

1*585 03? i 

lO Ae<?rcr£^_> 


r K r ■ ■ 

Wr* *-<* 

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lriE fi Jvi£S i ii Ui&SDA x JULY 24 Ivoo - 


LA CRfiME DE LA CK&ME 


PERSONAL 


OVERSEAS TRAVEL 


Fashion 


£10,500 


Working in Uk office of this energetic Chairman 
means involvement in many aspects of his varied 
business and personal interests. As second secretary 
you wiirbe preparing policy documents, liaising with 
merchandising and- financial departments, handling 
property matters and dealing with charitable institu- 
tions. This is a demanding position -requiring a highly 
capable senior level person who can work as part of a 
team and enjoys being at the cen tre of activity. 

Age 25-35 Skills: 100/60 


Spam* ad Frank n fee 
bib laagugu wtt imiWna 
EauHi dndfcnt/tffBg + 
W. im h i <m*f 
jmte wtriMQ for Atworian 
CMwna&ri traders in the Kyr 
f f tm a d aga « 25 J 5 mi 
ftw l» fl aw scope far id- 

wnwant Aa attnedn 
padoga of faiogt (ante it 


Age 25-35 Skills: 100/60 

College Leaver £7,500 

Small international company in SWl has an opening 
for s well presented, young secretary to join their 
friendly team working for two executives. You will 
have the opportunity to consolidate your secretarial 
Stulls and learn word-processrag and telex. ■ 

Skills: 90/50 

:RECRlllTMENT.ffl CK iS 

8-C O M PAN Y-TOL - 31 1220 


SECRETARY FDR CITY BANK 

Free BSPA Free flavel 

Merit bones 5% mortgage 

2 general Secs 100/60. Must have 
good education to A level and be 
extremely presentable. Lots of admin 
content. Salary up to £10.000. ' 

Age 22-30. 

LEGAL SECRETARY - 

Legal Sec for partner in large firm of 
City Solicitors, very Interesting but de- 
manding position for dedicated and 
committed shorthand Sec. 100/60. 
Salary £10,500 + o/t (OTE £17,000). 

Phone Liz, Pat or Freda at 
Manley Sommers 
01-403 7588 


flraw pbera nr writi tK 
30/31 Revt Lana 


EC4 


I HHP HEAD-HUNT! 

"£12*00 - £14,000. 

Wort for a man *tw wMasfc 
your opinion, n tig on -yunr 
judgment and enewraga 
you Id get involved in as 

iraMofintanaiiomlmcu- 
tiw sneh. Arrange lop level 
fftsmas and enjoy «cep- 
riant team atmosphere. 
Good typ + sh. Please^ 
01-408 0424 




IS NIGHTSBRIDC C 
A SECRETARIES C 



Great opening for a young Sec/PA, Ideally with -a 
background in property admin dr related field (eg 
architects’ office). This lively go-getting restaurants 
group uigendy meed your skills and experience to 
co-ordinate their property projects division. You wiH 
deal with new acquisitions, management and related 
property matters — and look after enquiries etc In 
executive^ absence. Accurate skills (80/55). Age '22+. 
Please tel 01-409 1232 - 

' Recruitment CfnUuUautB 


Public Relations 

-£9,000 

Small, very successful, rapidly expanding PH 
agency seek PA to Rutnen This is a demanding, 
fast-moving and utterly absorbing role — where 
your organising skills, professional approach and 
sheer appetite for work will be utilised to the fall. 
The position affords scope for development, and is 
thus an ideal step" to longer-term career , growth. 
Accurate~skiUs (75/60) ami PR or media liaison 
experiorce requested. Gall 01-409 1232. 

Bfpnri t i n mi Consul Eanio 


HOUNSLOW £10,000 

Dynamic North American MarkoUng Director of Otis Intcr- 
nahonaJ Manufacturing Company needs a Surnlative 
Shorthand and Audo Secretary (90/00) wWt -potes, 
personalty and Mttotto. Free parking. Start Now. 

Pleatt cafl 408-1631 


AD- classified advertisements 
cam be acce p ted by telephone 
(except Announcements}. The 
dcedbnei*i.00p<n 2 days prior 
to publication (ie 5.00pm Mon- 
day for Wednesday). Should 
you with to tend an advertise: 
mcnl in writing please indode 
your daytime phone number. 
CUSTOMSI SERVICES 0E- 
-PARTMEHT. If yotrltavriny 
queries or pRfolans telaUng to 
your ad wusemem ooee H baa 
appeared, please contact our 
Customer Services D e p artm e n t 
by telephone oo B1-4B1 *100. 


ANNOUNCEMENTS 


LACOCK AMSV, wilts. Baroque 

muHc- Litniw wttvna, 1 JAit 

aH. aw 7 00 pm Easy 
■arrrsn-M* TO. OZ* 973 227 or 
01957 00»a. ' * . 


UK NATIONAL- ASCOCtASIOM 

(or UmOtrwtlBaaiM and euwc 
Chan|m lu, r started a proten 
to ascertain wnjs aon means to 
memo tlHvquaiiis- ol jhwuuk 
ite.protkM for our iitnoma 
propte-ln Bib - country.- we 
would appreewtr any com- 
mrnto or MHs (rent artUmal 
Him wearers amt other wml- 
cd panics. Reply w NALO. PO 
Bm 20. Hounslow TW5 OLL 


BIRTHDAYS 



WNUTUII to tri- to wmP Non. 
sense. Be an - apprentice 
champion, an apprmuro -mil- 
MnaiiYT NOW write for the 
book to' QufdP you' to A MAC. 3 
Barttetn: Sauare. WIX.SHO or . 

. Irate your number with Ol 404 
OOll r34 hnl 

ntKMKSinr. unp or Marnane. 
All A9M. areas. Oatebne. Dew 
1016123 Atunpdon Hoad Inn., 
don W8. Tel: 01-938 1011. 

IBHCANAMMy. London^ riub for 
professional unaitairhed people 
2343. Over 200 etenls month- 
ly. 24 . hr into tap e. 997 7994. 

SELECT EMENDS Exclusive in- 
troductions lor the unattached. 
68 Maddox Stmt. London Wl. 
Telephone 493-9937. 

CAUBHE CVS Ltd profentoral 
cumcuJum tuae documents. 
Details: 01-631 3388. 

capital CV« prepare nignouatt- 
IV rurrtruhmi Ulan. 01-607 
7905. - - . . 


A SECRETARY 

A Mcretaty fat required hi the Techoka] DeparinaoL 
Tbisdcuartaseiit is concerned with ibeadmbuNzatioo of the 
PrtductimWpr ta htp8«ndtli» Stage DtpttWMa ia raping 
bon stage ladunona to Mund and Hghtliig. 

Vie Job iwqhta m penoa wKb food aetzctariil ikBinad the 
ibilify to muk under pressure u this opentitHtal dapartreant. 


Natloual Theatre. 


> ¥ I * * 


BBLL1BR AND FOREIGN ^ 
EXCHANGE COMPANY 

Requires mature, secretary. wHh minimum 2 
years experience. Typing and shorthand essen- 
tia! and must be well spoken. Salary.. <£8,000 
neg. Apply In own handwriting to: 

Mromaizan Co (UK) Ltd 
Westmorland House 
: 127/131 Regent Street 
London W1R 7HA 

| SHOWROOM * 

* ASSISTANT $ 

* DC/IIIIDCn t 




fitf 






MANAGEMENT CONSULTANCY 
WEST END 

Excellent secretarial (WP/SH/Typ) and adminls&ative 
skills required for mtertniiig and demanding PA posi- 
tion for MD of smalt and expanding firm. Flexibility, 
sense of humour and experience in running a small 
office indispensable. Age range 25 to 35. 

Salary jCIO/XXR. 

: Hease telephone: 01-387 9226 


r 


LUordPlus-i- 


TheWPConsaltants 


PA CAREER 


C £8-10,000 +. 

Business woman seoks 
oomnotant ratable, hard 
wanting, wall prasenlod 
PA/ all roundar for sales 
consultancy with showroom 
near Victoria Sm. .Pleasant 
.outgoing personality & 
confident telephone manner 
mo re' e s»a ri Ba l-~Btan- typing 
and Sa 

Ring 01-821 8485 


SECRETARY/PA TO CHIEF EXECUTIVE - 
. c. £9,000 

T in H m o ra l Od iymn 's teDcafton upcbsodk Dm Interests of <000 mft 
processors md BsMXNBl. 

TIN Otiri EwctPwt nqoies an ettarieacid and affiaaot Saeniay/PA to work 
n Dhtcss u n po hn B Regent's tat.' 

fast amnte typng and sbortteal slaBs aerotwrefl as well oc ga nfeaaorel 
airiH». The canraN staid be site » conmuncu etteanwy a al isms oy 
Munore nd m petsoL 
Ask lor duds and an areiedan fame 

Hr. A NL BM 
Nataasf Pahyiw's An a tilt la a 
19 ConmH Tmce 
Laarioa NW1 4QP 
Tst 01-B35 4SG2 



£11X11 


W 


For. busy Putney Estate 
Agara. Marastiig and varied 
duties. Excellent working 
conrt t tam. Prefe rred aga 20 
- 25. Salary negotiable. 

Plow contact 
dames iTArey 
01-785 2122 


PARTNER’S SECRETARY 

Presti^ous firm of Chartered Surveyors require 
Secretary with good shorthand and audio skills. to. 
work in their busy Mayfair office. Salary offered 
c. £9,000. 

_ _ For further details please contact 
Brigid Keenan on Friday 

01-629 6604 


US VHM MATTERS E S GUdeon 
LS Ibwwr'lT ButStnw* SL 
' London Wl- 01 486 081 3. 


WANTED 


WANTED - LARGE TAIUCS. tea 
of iIum. lamb mirror*, book- 
rtse*. m-xks & burrwu*X>l-68B 
0148 228 2716 day mphL 


FOR SALE 


- The British Antique Dealers' Assodatfon 

IN-HOUSE PR 

required for the BADA. Position wiU probably will 
suit someone aged 24-30 with previous PR experi- 
ence. Salary negotiable. Please telephone Anne on: 

01 589 4128 

for farther details. 


art) n h iti a i » 


P M N MUTE. Wmm maibie la- 
Mr 8 ft putt 10 maictiino cnatrs 
& Mdrboard ore as new. SuU- 
abW duunq rm or ronwrvaiory. 
Pnv-Mataia. Bamm £2.0O0or 
any reasonable offer. 23S 7966 ' 


MHGHTS OF KTTUara. bn- 

mroiatr Or In cry on numerous . 
pu-rr* of 17th .6 lSUi Cmlury 
rrotaca furniture. Including 
Urais by . Anhw arttt. 
TUchmamh 6 Goodwin and 
wm. Tillman, nmimm. Nr. 
Hmlryon TTiam«. ■ iOl4l) 

64H is: Boumrmouih 1 02021 
293680: Topmam. Qnw 
•0392871 7443: BarMHcy. OMs 
■0463) 810952 

SFLSNDBMttd maimoany. hand 
bull duunq taow. L nusrd. Sud 
Huacial home or drawl Hoard 
room. Eximds lo nrarty 12*. 
rk no to 8". Can seal 16 Tradl- 
- tienal Rrvwqr rrorouaruan 
rutiribs. Miid bran. Arreut 
Cl. 600. Numbrr of matrtunq 
Pnnrr Of Warn rtuurs. hand 
rart.nl and poltsrtrd. Alt un- 
,u*M. £125 earn. Trl . 01 203 
6007 .... 

FINEST duality -wool carnets. At 
iradr pnm and onflrr. also 
availablr tOOS extra Larqr 
--room- sue -remnants imM’-htf- 
normal pnm Chanceiy Carpets 
01 406 0463. 

TIE TUNES 1798-1986. Other 
lines axaiL-Hami bmind neady. 
for pmmtauan im 
“S undays". £12 60 Remember 

When. 01-668-6323- 

TICKETS FON ANY EVENT, Cats. 
StarUqhi Exn. Chew. Let Mis. 
All theatre and sports. 

Tel: 821-6616 828-0496. _ 

AX* Visa Dram. 

■MM WAV DUE T Givaeonieonr 
an enguial Tiroes Newspaper 
dated the very -day they were 
bom. nxfio.. Oeq^iios, 

OLD YORK flMRONCL cob- 
ble setts etc. lyaoonwWr 
dobvertes. Tel: <03801 860039 
iWiiim. 


RESISTA 

CARPETS 

SALE NOW ON 

Yfaol nta B«iMra from £355 per 
SO yri + VKT. On wool Heavy 
Domestic VWton£l3J5prtsq yd 
+ VAT. Cortoptoa Mes £8/5 
per sg yd + VA T 8 many omer 
gnst imoctna. 

255 Nn Hags Road 
Parian Grew. SW5 

Tet 01-731 25U 

Fre* estimates - Expat Mag. 



KING'S COLLEGE (KQC) - University of London 

SECRETARIAL ASSISTANT 

Facfllty Of Laws 

A SECRETARIAL ASSJSTMT is required to undertake 
a variety of duties. Applicants should have good short- 
land and typing skats, initiative and a helpful aid 
pleasant attitude. The ability to use a word processor 
an advantage. 

Four weeks annual leave plus extra days at Christinas 
and Easter. Salary within the scafo £6370 - £7465 per 
annum inclusive. 

Please apply to the Assistant Personnel Officer; IQng's 
College London (KQC), Norfolk Buikling, Strand, 
London WC2 2LS. 


PUBLIC RELATIONS 
£7,500 

Secretary required for Fleet Street PR Company. 
Good, accurate typing and spelling essential; 
hard work but fan. Telephone Rachel Sendee on 

01-353 9253 


EXCITING VARIETY! 
PA/SECRETARY 

Our dynamic Director offers, a challenging opportunity 
to a young. (18-21 years), smart weff spoken person 
who enjoys variety and working on their own initiative. 

If you have fast accurate typing, shorthand, drive a car 
ana are mterested in PR and Personnel, this could be 
the job for you.' .. ... 

Telephone Fiona Toone on 

01-828 0972. 


PHOTO ONAPIIIC Agency Pro- 
duction -Company. West End. 
Capable. basM receptionist 
typist. Phone Jane 01-439 1821 




UNIVERSITY nutiDIT WWM 
by property company in SWl 
for roumir acrounts wort. lor 
approx « wds.' Must be nu- 
merate ■ a knowledge . ol 
rewnputees mi advanuoe. Ring 
Margaret Harwood. Ol 223 
7878 


■COW NOWl Temp In Advents 
ln» PR. Conference ogankunp. 
Arrnjiem. wmes ft Stums ana 
PubUshing. Too rales at Coven! 
Carden Bureau. HO Fleet SL. 
EC4. 353 7696. . . 


MOKATE TO LONDON. Join the 
Lvxha to Loudon for hiHfM- 
inb and rtulknotag opminpv 
Wr wui gladly help im advae 
on trtnnorary arrammodanon. 
Cwlegr iravre mpunn ur- 
grnili ipflurrm lor career mbs 
wiin lop nnunnw Ptease 
bhone oi 683 1034 Meredith 
RecniHRieM 


MTENVIEWER. SECRET ANY 

r Cl 0000 BrigM. yoong. eti- 
thinuMN person with good 
.. ynrrrliUMd barkground Immwll. 

jWj rrewred for R«aU 
■ecnaimpDi consul lancy local 
ed hi wert Did. MM of tho 
»oik involves riireii and apnll- 
<anl roman The wiceesiful 
randKfjte wilt also prmMr a 
Mmoartlng tmeWRl role 16 
two Consul lanh. Tetephone 01 
430 3389 


TO ilO.OOO; Too pnwftjs- Cam 
pam. Wt PA Audio Sec. 24+ 
Goad sLHh for partner. Gauntry 
Dnx Most luiemtHtg p*«Uon 
for ronfMem anobranl. uwd to 
rlirru rontart and ntgniy ronfi- 
drtHiai work. Phone_ Miner 
McNnh Her Com 437-8476 or 
734 3768. 133 Oxford Sheet. 



NON-SECRETARIAL 



svm.ing y.«h an «sre«eni 
“■"Wfcrjwu wtu be mvotved 
in Ms of admin, ntunnnt 
™4»ef cmertainmenl: 

arfonuMauan lor clients wr to 
4*Wi0n to a full range of PA 
duftj* ™« German and 
voonn wrraanol espenenre 
wniial. Acrurair typing 
itdHimi Age 33-» phw IN 
01 409 1232 The Work Shoo 
COLL CO E LEAVER CLMO-ev 
teuiional npentwi hx ah 
out b0*i*9 and fiythuunw- col 
leor leaver, within tnn superb 
Wt athertninp and puMnmuo 
oioup Voting, dynamic and 
VH* Inendly einwompetil 

Grro* nthww ana tanef} of 
weak rontrni You win need 
bbod eth* alien <nao o-lnMi 
and acruraie short nand/D W ng 
Mrinn tet tM-409 -UU The 
WotL Shop 


see /pa to raAWAcm. j» jsoo 

* bonus Prestnpous City bated 
company has a vacancy for a 
brtom- com idem person wun 
good seemanaf barKgrouna 
iShorthand 80. typing 60S with 
WP ewwnre. This postlion 
would mvoue unending semi- 
nars. arr a ngi n g MvfL 

irtepnone lukM and general 
veer etar kal duties Age 24*. 
Margaret 405 6040 Kingtland 
Pers COOS. 


EXECUTIVE ADMIN SEC /PA 

Fleet Street. Young bnoht PA ■ 
Ser 10 the Administrative 
OVertor DKelteni owwnuniu- 
to orrome unolved ut Ncwana- 
pm 41 E-vmittve level. 
Shorthand 80*. Sajars: ». 
ciaooo WP useful. Call Roy 
Siorkion 01 -734 8466 or CV lo 
StocMon AstbC Pee Cmis. 29 
CUMhow Street Wl 


SCCHETAItV /ASSISTANT lo D*- 

ref iocs mtuirrd. Age ever 2>- 
Small rmulv fwm In Baker 
Street area. Lve of rar. pa 
S erirtartat and general 4UKe 
duuev 8 day week KMS Lp lo 
CaOOO arronung lo.nrevious 
evperterxv Call 01-78* 149* 
for emmediaie interview 


OFF SLOANE STREET. Cneerful 
and mielUgrnl prnonal nw 
larv rroinrro for senior partnn- 
ot rktdDhsnrd firm of estate 
agenlik Own gf nre and pieasabi 
MWTOumUngs. saun- according 
Uy evpenenre -Tel e pho n e 01 
838 7097 


AequHBd for toog-tetra com: 
trad overseas, VIP 
operation. 

Write with 'Mi detals phis 
[dwto. to: 

Jet Personnel Ltd 
6 Hanover SL, 
London W1R OLE 


ADMW AC CEPT KN01. T with 
petse and natural lum. for 
Managemeni CanmlumH in me 
Wen End. Look after their de- 
lightful reception. book 
conirrenre roams and operate 
simple" switchboard - would 
Irani Afternoons 3pm-8pm. 
■ Age range 26-36 years. 
CC9.000 Please phone Ol 583 
1034 Mn-wdiOi Sroff 
RemiHmnu 

UHUNY ASSISTANT CT.000 
Young arts graduate to brio fn 
library of property rompany. 
would suit ainet aradmur per 
• son who is tuum- to get gewer a i 
library ro we an 1 with a pfe 
fnuoMi rompany. Lmuied 
tvpinq an anon. Please phoae 
Ol 583 0053 MrredAh broil 
ftecniiUtK-m 


PART TIME VACANCIES 


QVWB lo work 3 days a uur h 
as Prevonat Awoax with ora 
rrM of lire dour* m small Bvrts 

offire \ KlMta area stortmg Sep- 
tember are boy rg* - - 



BATTERSEA. Lgr Obi rm In new- 
■ ly moo iw vvim neaner. Close 
CUMuni Sh lune. £96 pw.inct 
exrepi pnone Tel Vigors Ol 
23o 1522 ex 128 idayl 01 228 
1501 taller 6 L 6 nmi. 


CHELSEA 5WS. Prof T. 26+ NS. 
To snare Hal wun entrance 
pnone in- purww-omii mock. 
All son ires including CM. CHW 
• anerporter Own room £46.00 
pw rarl Totr.Ol 362 B376 


BATTERSEA /CLAPHARL Pro 

levuenaf. person co snare ter 
- fUL Own room and tnlhraom 
won-unokyr. CoO per week. Tel 
ties 01-228 7013. 


BRUCE CROWE NIT Prof F. N & 
sh nice hse. close line + BR. 
gon. w marh. 2 cals I. £38.00 
pw met Orff 01 BOl 446a 


IT’S ALL AT 
TRAILFINOERS 


CRUISE & SAIL ABROAD 


CRUISE Turkey 12 berth rrrwed 
motor yarhl 2 wkt fr £426 on 

mr fits. Whole boat maalsHe 
other weeks from Ciooo. Free 
W sports, h b. Ol 326 ioq& 
Aim 2091. 



The World Federation 
of Association Football 
FIFA 

is mourning the death of 

Sir Stanley Rous C.B.E. 

who died in London on July, 
18 in his 92nd year of age. 

The football community lost a 
faithful Mend and a greats- : 
personality whose life has been 
closely connected with the 
history of modem footbalL 

FEDERATION INTERNATIONALE 
DE FOOTBALL ASSOCIATION 

The President Dr. Joao Haveiange 
The Secretary General: JLSJSIatter 



TON Hopefully nr River, 
ft Parking for nuddle aged bust 
. . bow man. 3 Nlglut per week 
but weeks rate. 0753 804709 
CHBW1CK prof rrl mate rend to 
share charming gdn Oat near 
river, own room.' £210 pon. 
Tel 01-995 4267 ' 

CLAPHAM mil Lee comfort- 
able roam In <nMt CM well 
-egulp-hse. Prtrf-M f. £225 pem 
tart. 01 223-9166 Alter 6pm 
CLAFMAM COMMOat swtl. 
garden Ifai- Prof m/f. n/s. Ige 
o/r C4S p/w eSrt. Tel:01 223 
0402. inner 6-SOPiru 
FLATMATES Selective Sharing 
well non Introduetorv ser* ire. 
Phe US lor raw: Ol 589 5491. 
313 Branipteii Rom. SW 3 
KEWmCTON. Nr lube. Lux ftal 
Lroe gdn. Prol F. N S. Own 
room £60 pw «Ol 351 2383 
MW OOaoo- iHf 373 3729 

SWU. Professional m F. n S. 
Ok in home Nr lube BR. 
Cl SO pern eject TeL 675 6023 
laTlcr 61. . 

■LACKHEATH. Prof prrson M F 
lo Shr Ige hse with 3 gn-H. £150 

prm.rMI. 862 3429-AJMr 7 
CLAFHAM. SOUTH Spacious lux 
flat. Prof Male, os.w tube. 
CldOprm 673 5653 aft 6.00 
CLAFHAM itR'prdf-F. n fc own 
room at lux mixed use Nr lube 
£190 prm Lnrl. 673 2650 off 4 
-CLAFHAM. ~ -Cosy - rm In- lux 
fnendlv Iw. C65 pw tar btiv 
-Tel 01 720 1876 taller 1 pmi. 
FULHAM.. Clrt to sfiafie. superb 
large nai Own rooin. £60pw. 
731 J 944 lafler 6pmv 
FULHAM. F lo ware ig rot. lux 
nai nr Tube £36 pw +'rrt dtp. 
2422649 X226. 3668978 eves 
FULHAM prof m. 96+. n s. for 
mixed nai. o r. 10 num Tube. 
£168 prm 01 731 6986 
8ML 2S+, Lgr o r. gdn vws. w 
marh drier 20 mins Tot Ct Rfl 
£40 pw evrt 883 9003 after 6 
HBHOATE pral 0 oh grad, n s. 
28*. elegant t r. nr Tube. 
£190 prm. cxc. 01 883 61 10. 
KXNSWBTON Prof M Futnare 
Iik f I nu Or. Lin. Interior 
Oes. £65 pw. 373 3249 evM 
N22 Prof r N S to share pieas- 
atii flat O ft- C40p.w wed. Tel 
Ql 881. 8027. eves. 

FUTMCV- M F rra'd to *fir spa- 
nous 5 bed nai □ r £38 pw 
■cvr!.- 789-7362 'After 6> 
SOUTH KEN7 remale share foe 
room to spar lux flat. Ci 20 gm 
PW1 Tel 373 2366 alter 3pm. 
SW11 2nd prof F_23+. n ■ s. o:r. 
t m drtighuul rn tut. Close Ira*- 
n C80 PW inn 223 6071 eve 
SWE. N S. f Id share room m 
mvd fnendlv houvr Cl35 pem 
rxcl Tel 01 381 906 0 e*M 
Wl O R share raanoiK lux nai 
N s Sun prof person. £80 pw 
inr 01-623 7851 X233 day. 
Wl*. BARONS COURT. DMe A 
sNe rm in quiet hxn Kf Tub*. 
£65 £40 pu 01-937 9681 
MMMMFSTEAD. Jubilee Prof 
ml 28* IPsfMire wonneheertu) 
house O/R £48 01-4354141 
Wfc 5 n/s to. share .Mews 
flat From £60 p/w-revdl each. 
Dr-tods TW.Ol^86-ai04»eveel 



ALOARVE. Foe lale summer & 
Autumn avuiablliiy at 
Portugal's exclusive Canoetro 
Oub with luxury villas, apart- 
menis. pools a. maid »m tee call 
Painna H'tidblood LKL. 0249 
817023 or 01 6686722. AST A 
ATOL 1276. 

UCARVE. SenaaUonal staffed 
v die lor 6 on the Prnina Golf 
Course. C2.2O0 pw. Available 
23rd Aug. Pool. Book tor the 

- Akiane Autumn now wild uie 
Algarve Aileroaine. 73. St 
James's Street. Loudon SWl 
Tel Ol 491 080 Q. 

ALGARVE. Lux villa. Carvoelro 
Sins 6. tale Pool Aug. 3rd. 
Twin mw nta ir M C. outer 
dairs avail C39dpp Resort Vil 
las Del 833 9094 ASIA. 

ALGARVE. Lux villas with pools 
a apis Avail Jui Oct Ol 409 
2836. V lJ law orta 


SELF-CATERING SPAIN 


HARBEUA. LUX villas with 
pooh. Avail July m Oct Oi 409 
.2838 \UUW0rtd 


SELF-CATERING 


TURKEY- mrluilve nttaoays 
available, dirert flights. 29 Julj-. 
5. 12 Aug from £269. Turkish 
-LMlBW ..HoJttUvs.. OI .891 
64o9i24nrsl ATOL 2047. 


SPORTS 


SKI BIADON LINES 

K/n BROCHURES NOW OUT! 
"Urnwarti « S**zBtinL 
Austro. Fnace 6 tu ly. 

The Biggest Choice On SSasi 
Ex Gatwdc. Luton. Manchester, 

Sasgdw & EdnUtagb 

01 785 2200 . 

■MdL Dags. D422 78121 
ABTA1S723 ATOL 1232 


SKI NUT tMimper brorhure out 
bo»- parked wun all die rap re- 
sorts. Sunday fhqnn meal me 
IrMlmi. and amazingly low 
nnres starting al £59. RingiOIl 
785 gooo i or your ropy 
ABTA69256 ATOL 1 363 


CORNWALL & DEVON 


POLPmo. Lntoue lurMurude 
ronaoe. avaiiaMe 2om July 
2 nd Auoud FidU furnished. 
£190 p w 0483 23 2230. . 



CORFU Sunday 27 July * every 
Sun in Aug Beautiful vlDaa, 
lulls' equipped nr the beach. Ex 
Catwint. Open Sot. Pap world 
HOUOns 01-734 2062 


WIT CE. Lnapom Miano*. Cheap 

f hgMsv IB* nrntolt He {nalW 

Mass- 01-434 1647 Aire Alla. 


MOCA L.UX apart hob- Iron 
CI89pp. 26. 30 T. 6 8 

mrama. 0706 962814. 


BEAUTIIUL secluded Georgian 
Mansion. Anartmenb 6 col- 
lages in 20 arrrv. Sangv 
bewnev RMmg avail. Autumn 
pamlingriasses. Re«l*uranl and 
bar Nr Cardigan. 023 987 608. 


TO PLACE YOUR 
TRAVEL 

ADVERTISEMENT 
IN THE TIMES 

TRADE 

ADVERTISERS— 
TEL: 01-48J J989 - 

ADVERTISING 
FAX NO. 
01481 93IJ 
TELEX 925088 

PRIVATE 
ADVERTISERS - 
TEL: 01481 4000 

USE YOUR ~ 
ACCESS OR • 
BARCLAY CARD: 



































































































K 


42 


LAW 


RENTALS 



Homer HiU 


UMnED 


INCORPORATING 



RENTALS 


For rentals in Sussex, Surrey, Berkshire and S.W London, 
Homer Hill Ltd. incorporating Mays Rentals offer the widest 
range of quality houses and flats. 

Telephone: 037284 38H. Telex: 89551 12 


fHESTERTONS 

k k s. i n r \ t i \ i. — 


GLOUCESTER STREET 

4 bnriii and spaoou one bedroom ffai with reccpt room. sep 
kitchen, hoihrown. The flu is awutabte far on medio ic 
omipalKHL £150 pw. 

Pimlico Office 01-834 9998 
A 

ii 
in 
m 

VI 
Ci 

H 


ARCHERY CLOSE. LONDON W2 


V Q JcT Si Gcoi^Jl RcUl Wdl fiSra£tfi^£f5<f pw. 

C’ompanv let 

Hyde Park Office: 01-262 5060 




FINCH'S 

Estate & Management Ltd 




FOLIUM ACTSfl 

Lm mo tndraora B8 ■ Uuut * twlraw house. ftree 
Brampton Rah. Djm. suram tnttnam. Mgs gafton. Stmt 
pool, sotmj™. sara. good saw- Lot £400 oh. 

«v £190 p». FULgAM 

BB3U Suort etta Ouw todroom 

Large howy Um boDoom fagua. hose. Hoot Mon and gxtan, 
tact ms. £250 p.w. £295 p *. 

FBUUUI SW 5 

Uw ono bednom M near tidM Limay one tMbuum fpSotod 

n shappng. £120 p.w. apmnmL £180 p.w. 


- 01-736 5505 - 




BELGRAVIA SW1 


Selection of luxury Oats available. 

Fully fitted and furnished 
Lifts, video entryphone and GARAGES. 

1 BEDROOM FLAT - £200 pw. 

2 BEDROOM FLATS - £400 - £600 pw 
Co leta only 

preferably Long term lets 
Contact: Sarah 235 8636/9087 
D. HOLDINGS 


ST JOHNS WOOD 


Furnished s/c Garden Flat 1 living rm, 1 
bedim, kitchen, WC, shwr rm, CH. Phone, 
Constant HW/CH included in rent of £105 pw. 


01-586 2711 (T) 



Co la 1 


2 MM*U. 2 tadl 2 

naa. My ramed uua Long 

1 OW P" 

UK UMBO, OBSI SMI 

Sun 3nL «h HBaonaM. 2 non. 3 

Mds. 2 ban. M» mvM udm. 

efcm. Mens ta ate. Long Co La MOO 

P» 




HOLLAND RD, 
W14 


Spasms 1st flr maison- 
ette recently refurbished 
throughout. 1 dbl, 1 sgl 
bed. large reception, 
fat/b fastrm. modem bath. 
Available now for long Co 
Eels. £300 pw. 


MARSH & PARSONS 
01-937 9622 


FULHAM T min*. Iron, IUt>r Uim 
pieirn lumrtfvd 2 douMe 
bnjinomn] ILU. lounge. IHlY 
HIM kHrhrti and IMtnroom. ra- 
ti, rlvw. pm dir nurinc* 
CIMPTHni Culrlooly TH 
Pettr O Ronn Ol JUI 4MI5. 


KENNfHOTOM. (Inqiil im.hr dec 
& muipprrt man in qum s Nr 
lisde 1 dM 2 vql bmN N S Co 
in ptrl £165 p w Tel Ol *73 
33?l / Ol 735 I OBJ 


in drfcgnlful 
nwnih iiILw. l«h rrriuo’ 
l.innnnuv lull H rtiJTjfWr. 4 
bodroonrv ruiunn and rm* 
nn. lurim lillrhra. win room. 
IMIK> .mil udi Um Cl KSOpc m. 
Irii-ptuiH- Palmrr Ob£tK> 4638 


DULWICH. TWiniliHlY lumnlM 
Lduoiaun fnnrw 5 Inh. 3 

i«rpY oaraor. imr oarttm 
■Ujll AuguM C3UU pw 733 
■> Still hniwld 


eunUM IWL OMTnunq new. 
II nnmnlnl TJuaidi.'in hmw 
in tnHIt InTiMi 1 **ilh 2 bed 
■ ■■inn. If irrnMMiH. 
kill hr n .lininn l.nmi tulh- 
1 1 pom tlrNiOitlul vmlh laina 
■huilrn LlfOpn YlMGmwr 
4wuln "I YC.I oWi 
A ME me MW EXECUTIVES Vrt 
lm lUh hniwY tino ciOOO 

p w I Midi m-» mi Phllm 

*• ji II li'»n suulli H I hr Park 
Chrlw-d oilier Ol SBi2 HI 1 1 or 
Ninlh ol I ho Park H cynl'i 
Pari. nUIrr* r»l Orte HuO 
CANDLEY CHCa. SWS Maqmll 
rrni interim itoqim ikn in 
HhMiliHdlion DtHr nrdrm nirr- 
Ixnbinniplii lame rrrepl. dlnlnq 
im I um HIM h A B. potto 
Mini br own lo hr brlirtrd 
klSO p« 7 M3 iTI 

HVDC PKflH - Mlpo lurnnM 
IldlinrwilUM.r Mark I'urllrnl 
wriniii A Invr i.erkl, clean- 
■ml me I dnle nr-um rrrrp 
haihim A IhHv lilird kitchen a 
LI 70 pw Hrarncv 
Ihdiv Pronrtlo-, Ol »J7 3710 
SOUTH KCNSMCTON - UNFUWN 
lldl UK torprn A i uri jim 
Intrlv %irw nin pmalr <|dr 
Hr," 1 tin In n I ie.ro. kkB. 
i«k PH I vrac ra In CISO 
p»* Rmmn Hoior Proper U r, 
Ol ■»'.? 3710 

HWCHnmDCX. Sporimn I 

IM IM Hum hik mi |UI in por- 
Oeti MiiMir iiiumi room, 
kih hni. ham. 1011111 lull CH. 
Hlrdl lo in Inr wmlr pmon 
LIH3 pw lei (1730111 G3U7 
£90 pw. CHARMM 111 ilrrw lldl 
inNH3 I iNOrhrtfini wiinpdn 
m dime «irw ol London MB 
and Rrrrp I'D lo I vror Co Irt. 
Rnmn Hnrnr Prnmlm Ol- 
M*7 3710 

KECCHTS PARK. MHlMtHiqh 
Ikwiv 1 nro. srtt ram lm lldl 
lull, lurnnhnl C h. nHranrr 

Mhwir POT lei VI.V p» linri 
Tel eJH HMD PM BB2H iddVl 
'IU ,'M)R ini-ii 

VICAIUGC CUES, MIL 

Clumunq - bed (Idl NT Run. 

Mdik T r j n^iuirl GUM nr. 

■ ourlidid Harden, pdf-tuna. 
Idundr, CUR pu mw John 
Hollmaworth 750 WCo 
BAKER STHEETl Suprra JitDM 
lulu hv 4 bnK ’ balhr i| 
i-nsuriri. time inner hll h |>h|. 
nor. lutm Odn CCH UW pw 
Tel fl| HJ7 3eell 221 R27* 
MTTtIHU. DrauUlul dal mrr- 

looking Paili. Newly dec A 
f rturb 2 dUr Dnh. I vgle and. 
bp- mrp. 100110191 bil. tkMh nn. 

srpteC L230PW 01 223 5SOB 
BLACHHCATH IB mwHhOM 
Mi'M house MHI lurnnhrd. 2 
turf, lux kiMltm. both A Vww 
rf.CdiK.OH. CI40PW Tel 01 
31H M*>So or 0227 70341 
HCMSMGTON. SuprrO 2 onf 
ll.il--. nrwl, derordM A fwn lo 
hmf»r*l WjMdra All Hid- 
i hi or* Oav lube Lom Short 
M CI«S prv. 622 2S90 <Tl 
DUNQS HOAD Mdttoncllr 2 
iwnm. 2 Bamniti .% Row Ter- 
irirr m Dr lo. IW ramr W 
w-rn- [500 per raonlh Co M 
nmrnuurrd TH 01731 3I4|.‘ 
KHKHTWMieC Ortnhrful 
imnur . (own Mr. lolly lum. 2 
hums, lux kil 2 dote A I wtfr 
beds. 2 bants, xrp rim. sunny 
tom Hr LJ75 pw 064 3130. 
SW2 ion dhlr rm pm me c h. 2 
mol lm. share nail, kM with I 
id her Owe Dus Tube £30 pw 
ej or CJSdw single Tel 01 o7« 
IMO. otter Son 

AMCIBCAH BANK urgm Uy rc- 
uuirns luxury nais and imam 
lion, 1200 CI.OOOpw Ring 
ItvrD.'MWjlP AgigiKSBI SI 56 
AVAILABLE HOW Luxury run a 
h<nr<”.. Chttwi. SnwDNnrlDC. 

n-nrd\ui C20O- C2.O0OPW 

Tel Burora SHI 3136. 


BERKELEY 

ESTATES 


UNRfflN Lux amen rra. NW6. 2 
Bab. 2 Bauis. Heap. Stady. F/F 
Kd. Catpec & Curtana £300p*. 
HUUOA VALE Prenyl Bad IHn 
conwson. Anri 12 Aug. Long 
lei. E 120 |». 

KEKT TBMACC. NW1 Spans 
bngtd Stwko ltd. asafilly fum. 
£ 250 p*. 


01-935 8959 


JEAN WILLIAMS LTD. 

01 949 2482 


close mam. w* shook 

um on 3 Bbon ne* km hd» 
imp pwii Eb cd Pm gti 

CM8MI rua. DmCHTSaaME. 

SomoKi mend nose. 2 0K5. 2 
Dm 2 >««n Dm no lu 2 
mWi E3/S on 

THUIES aim Samis fie- 

ucfirfl 3 oh rang hue 2 Re 

neqa. dose sa £113 aw 
RKIBUM IBL Nd « I im 
swoons 3 DM HI on 2 Weis. M 
manses. IV VdM £225 a" 


QUEXHSOATC DREWS. KmMlig- 
lon DrIHRiUul mrwx kauir 
willi garage. 3 beds. 2 bain il 
en suite), cloakroom. II ML 
rrceo. £350 pw neg. ftteasr corv 
url Su/drtjH- Conway M 
Saundm of Kenunglan an G 81 
3623. 


WANTED Superior proprrtlrx for 
long >bor,Colrtv01-4BH3680 
«r 0836 502824 anytime IT). 


MARBLE ARCH Fufly lurrmhea 
mrwv condor, quirt lomucn. 2 
■Mr beds. I rrrrp. mi diner, 
bathroom and 2 wr-x £350 per 
wrrfc TH 01 286 8250. 


9 MM3 CITY Exceptional lux 
flat 2 dWe bedrmv 26‘ Inge 
rinro ui ail moctw oTookins 
guiH ftwn Co IH pref £190 
pw Tel Mr Pollard 637 5388 


WOT END. Luxury Hal. 2 reefp. 
a hrdrms Short long From 
£300 pw RRatenOI 491 7546 


CLAPKAM COMMOKi SPUI levH 
-audio Clow rube Own phone, 
bottiroom. Suil ctnottr ras per 

week Trial 720 7144 
CLOU TOWER MODOC- Superb 
ml dm t bed Dial ui pmligp 
block w Irll Washer, rain I 
nun lubr £175 pw. 622 2540 T 
FULHAM. Charming 3 bed 2 Dalh 
Use fully lunuslK-d A 
rgulpprd Co let £250 pw. TH 
JW Lid 01 **49 2482 
HAMPTON. MIDOX. Ctow 
Hra throw. Newly dec 3 bed 
hw owe aspect inge Ggr. 
LIBS pw. JW Lid Ol 946 2082 
ISLINGTON Sett ron lamed 

acromodaUan 1 yrar £1 JO pw. 
2 proi prnttmwn Rrfermcrs 
plejyr Rmq 01 359 5733. 
MARSKAM ST. SWX. Inlenar de- 
signed I bed flat AH marMnrs. 
Oov Victoria 4 Weslnumter. 
£120 pw JW Ud Ol 94S 2483 
FUTMET. Wen fum A spacious 1 
bed flat in mod blocs- Ggr. gas 
rti I if! Long lei CIOO pw. TH 
JW Ltd Ol 649 2482 
REGENTS FARM - Luxury mod 
I urn studio oirrfooking park. K 
4 H £135 pw. TeUOl 437 7519 

9379181 Thr number KJ r raiH M l 

her when seeking DH rrnuu 
prognlks in mum and pnme 
London areas U50/£2.000pw. 
VtSTTMO LODOOM /PAMS AUrn 
Dales A Co ha, r a laroe seier- 
ikk, ol flats a,aU for E200pw«- 
lor I like TH Ol 409 1065 
Wl« BARONS TO4JHT F F 
Charming 2 Ben maisonette 
will, Gdn. £!6Spw Inc <Long 
Ml 675 1896 iTI 
WIMBLEDON VILLAGE 2 lunwsh 
flats. 1 bedroom A 2 bedroom. 
Close lo aU amrrutlrs £490 
peer each TH Ot 94*. 1953. 
DOHCHUHCH RD, WlOSoanous 

I Dwt> Bed ftal Long M. 
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THE TIMES THURSDAY JULY 24 1986 


European Law Report 


Luxembourg 


Legal imm u nity of Euro-MPs 


Wybot r Faure and Others 
Case 149/85 

Before Judge U. Everting, acting 
as President and Judges K_ 
Bah 1 man n, R. Joliet, G. Bosco. 
0. Due, Y. GaJmot and T.F. 
O'Higgins 

Advocate General M. Darmon 
(Opinion given June 3) 
[Judgment given July 10] 

An inierpreiation of 
“sessions” of the European Par- 
liament which included only 
periods when that body was 
actually sitting might jeopardize 
the achievement of the activities 
of the Parliament as a whole: 

On January 27, 1983, the 

director of SA 


managing 


Librarie Plon and Mr Edgar 
on be* 


Faure were summoned, on 
half of Mr Roger Wybot, honor- 
ary director of the Police 
Nalionale and former bead of 
the security service, to appear 
before the Tribunal Correc- 
tional (Criminal Court), Paris, 
as principal and accessory 
respectively, on a charge of 
public defamation of a civil 
servant. 

Counsel for Mr Edgar Faure 
argued that since the latter was a 
Member of the European Par- 
liament he enjoyed, during the 
sessions of the Parliament, the 
immunities provided for in 
article 10 of the Protocol on the 
Privileges and Immunities of 
the European Communities. 

The Tribunal CorrectionneL 


noting that the summons had 
been lodged oa January 27, 1983 • 
and that the European Par- 
liament had been in session 
from March 9. 1982 to March 7, 
1983. although not ‘ actually 
sitting on January 27. 1983. held 
that on the date of the summons 
Mr Faure enjoyed the benefit of 
the immunity conferred by arti- 
cle 10 of the Protocol and 
consequently declared the ac- 
tion of the civil party against 
him inadmissible. 

Mr Wybot, civil party to the’ 
criminal proceedings, appealed 
to the Cour d’Appel, Paris, 
which expressed certain doubts 
relating to the true construction 
of die terra “session" and-' 
therefore referred the matter to 
the Court of Justice of the 
European Communities (br a 
preliminary ruling. 

Article 10 of the Protocol 
provides, inter alia, that: 

"During the sessions of the 
Assembly, its members shall 
enjoy: (a) In the territory of their 
own state, the immunities ac- 
corded to members of their 
Parliament; (b) In the territory 
of any other member state, 
immunity from any measure of 
detention and from legal 
proceedings." 

In its judgment the European 
Court of Justice bekl as follows: 

Article 10 of the Protocol 


reference to national legislation 
for the interpretation of that 
concept would be incompatible 
not only with the text of the 
Protocol, but also wiih the very 
purpose of that provision, which 
sought to provide immunity 
over the same period for all 
Members of the European Par- 
liament. irrespective of 
nationality. 

Anide 27 of the Merger 
Treaty (Treaty of April 8, 1965 
creating a angle Council and a 
single Commission of the Euro- 
pean Communities] provided 
that “the Assembly shall hold an 
annual session. It shall meet, 
without requiring to be con- 
vened, on the second Tuesday in 
March." 

No indication of the duration 
of such a session could be 
inferred, even indirectly, from 
other provirions of the Treaties 
concerning the European 
Parliament 

It followed that the establish- 
ment of the length of sessions 
fell within the power of internal 
organization which, in ac- 
cordance with the judgment of 
the Court of February 10, 1983 
in Case 230/81. Grand Duchy of 
Luxembourg v European Par- 
liament (l 1983] ECR 255) al- 
lowed the European Parliament 


session lasted the entire year 
and that it was not dosed until 
the eve of the opening of a new 


accomplishment of the activ- 
ities of the Parliament as a 
whole- 


session. _ 

The activity of the Pari lament 
was not limited to holding 
sittings which, according to its 
practice, were held on one week 
a month with the exception of 

work carried out in 
plenary sittings required, as in 
any assembly consistingoflarge 


“to adopt appropriate measures 


referred expressly to the concept 


of a session o: 
Parliament. It 


the European 
followed that 


id ensure tne due functioning 
and conduct of its proceedi n gs". 

The established practice of 
the Parliament had been that a 


numbers of members, that 
preparatory meetings took place 
within political groups and par* 
liamentary committees which 
were responsible for drafting 
resolutions for submission to 
the Assembly. 

In order to cany out the task 
conferred upon it bytte Trea- 
ties, the European Parliament 
was endowed with various tem- 
porary or permanent bodies 
which carried out specific tune- 
lions independently of the ple- 
nary sittings. 

It was therefore necessary to 
recognize that the activities oF 
the European Parliament ex- 
tended. in reality, throughout 
the year without interruption, 
apart from August and the 
Christmas and New Year 
period. . . 

An interpretation of the con- 
cept of a “session" which re- 
stricted immunity only to 
periods while the Parliament 
was actually sitting might 


thereby jeopardize 


Pay discrimination justified on objective test 


Rnmoiler ▼ Dato-Drock 
GmbH 

Case 237/85 

Before Judge U. Everting (Presi- 
dent of the Fifth Chamber) and 
Judges R. Joliet, Y. Gal mot, F. 
Schockweiier and J. C. 
Moilinho da Almeida 
Advocate General C. O. Lenz 
(Opinion given May 27, 1986) 
(Judgment given July 1] 

A job classification system 
which was objectively based 
upon the degree of strength 
necessary to cany out the work 


concerned or upon the degree of 
I'hkfi that 


physical hardriiip wl 
work objectively entailed was 
not contrary to the Equal Pay 
Directive. 

The remuneration of workers 


in the German printing industry 
by a framework 


was governed _ 
agreement which provided for 
seven pay categories 
corresponding to the duties 
carried out, and which were 
determined in accordance with 
the degree of knowledge, 
concentration, effort or 
responsibility which those du- 
ties required or of the fatigue 
which they entailed. 

Mrs Rummier. who had been 
assigned to wage group 111, was 
of the opinion that she should 
have been assigned to group IV 
since she carried out work which 
fell within that category, in 
particular, packing parcels - 
weighing more Than 20 kilo- 
grams, which for her was heavy 
physical work. 

She therefore brought 
proceedings against her em- 
ployer before the Arbeitsgerichl 
(Labour Court), Oldenburg, 
which stayed the proceedings 
and referred a number of ques- 
tions to the Court of Justice of 
the European Communities on 
the compatibility of the job 
classification system with Coun- 
cil Directive No 75/1 1 7/EEC on 
the laws of member states 
relating to the principle of equal 
pay for men and women (OJ No 
L45 of February 19, 1975, pi 9). 

In its judgment the European 
Court of Justice held as follows: 

By its first question the 
national court asked, in sub- 


stance, whether a system ofj^ob 


classification was com pa lit 
with the principle of equal pay 
where it was based upon the 
criteria of muscular effort re- 


quired and the fatigue or phys- 
ical hardship which the work 
entailed. 

Article 1(1) of the Directive 
provided, in respect of the same 
work or of work to which equal 
value was attributed, for the 
elimination of all discrimina- 
tion on the ground of sex with 
regard to all aspects of 
remuneration. 

That genera] rule was im- 
plemented by the second para- 
graph of the same article which 
provided that where a job 
classification system was used 
for determining pay. it was to be 
based on the same criteria for 
men and women and drawn up 
so as to exclude any 
discrimination. 

It followed that the principle 
of equal pay required the nature 
of the work to be considered 
objectively. Consequently the 
same work or work to which 
equal value was attributed were 
to be rewarded in the same way, 
whether carried out by a mao or 
by a woman. 

Where a system of job 
classification was used for the 
determination of remuneration 
it was essential, on the one hand, 
that it used criteria which did 
not differ according to whether 
the work was earned out by a 
man or~by a woman and. on the 
other hand, that viewed as a 
whole, h was not organized in 
such a way as to lead in fact to 
sexual discrimination. 

Consequently criteria which 
were appropriate for the tasks to 
be carried out where those tasks 
required physical effort or en- 
tailed physical hardship, ful- 
filled the requirements of article 
1 of the Directive. 

In order to distinguish be- 
tween levels of remuneration it 
was compatible with the prin- 
ciple of non-discrimination to 
use a criterion based upon the 
objectively measurable strength 
required for the accomplish- 
ment of the work or upon the 
degree of physical hardship 
which that work objectively 
entailed. 

By its second and third ques- 
tions the national court asked, 
in the event that the criterion of 
muscular effort or physical 
hardship was compatible with 
the Directive, whether, in 
determining the extent to which 
a given job required effort or 


entailed fatigue or was phys- 
ically hard, the fed of taking 
into consideration the extent to 
which effort, fatigue or physical 
hardship were felt by female 
workers fulfilled the require- 
ments of the Directive. 

The Directive laid down the 
principle that the same work 
was to be paid in the same 
manner. It followed that it was 
the work actually carried out 
which was to be paid in ac- 
cordance with its nature. Any 
criterion which was based on 
values appro p r i ate only for 
workers of one sex contained a 
risk of discrimination likely to 
compromise the principal objec- 
tive of the Directive. 

The failure to take into 
consideration the average 
performances of female work- 
ers. in establishing a progressive 
pay scale based upon the degree 
of muscular effort and fatigue 
involved, might indeed dis- 
advantage female workers who 
would be denied access to jobs 
beyond their physical strength. 

Such a difference in treatment 


might, however, be objectively 
justified by the nature of the 
work where it was necessary to 
ensure appropriate remunera- 
tion for Lhe efforts required for 
carrying out the work, and 
thereby corresponded to a genu- 
ine need of the undertaking (see 
Case 170/84, von Heinz v Bilka 
Kaufhaus ( The Times May 15, 
1986)). 


On those grounds the Euro- 
pean Court (Fifth Chamber) 
ruled: 


1 Council Directive No 
75/117/EEC did not prevent a 
system of job classification from 
using the criterion of muscular 
effort required or muscular fa- 
tigue entailed or that of the 
degree of physical hardship of 
the work to determine the level 
of remuneration if, taking into 
consideration the nature of the 
duties, the work to be carried 
out in fact required a certain 
degree of physical strengh. on 
condition that by taking other 
criteria into consideration, it 
contrived as a whole to exclude 


Objective test for sexing jeans 


HanptzoUanrt Osaabrftck f 
Kleiderwerfce Hela • Lampe 
GmbH & Co KG 

Case 255/85 

Before. Judge T. Koopmans, 
President of the Fourth Cham- 
ber and Judges G N. Kakouris 
and G.'G Rodriguez Iglesias 
Advocate General J. Mischo 
(Opinion given May 29, 1986) 
[Judgment given July 10] 

Jeans with a front fastening 
from left to right were men's and 
boys* outer garments for the 
purposes of the Common Cus- 
toms Tariff (CCT)l 
O n December 23. 1975 the 
respondent had imported from a 
non-member state jeans of tra- 
ditional style which were de- 
clared as jeans for women felling 
within CCT beading 61.02. At 
that time, that category of 
trousers was free of duty in the 
context of a tariff quota. 

On November 22, 1977 the 


appellant demanded payment of 


customs duties of DMlo.lVb on 
the ground that the trousers in 
question were men's trousers 
felling under CCT heading 
61.01 because the front fasten- 


ing was from left to right 

The respondent brought an 
action against that decision 
before the Finanzgerichl (Fi- 
nance Court). Hamburg, claim- 
ing that jeans of^ traditional style 
were also worn by women and 
that it was not therefore possible 
to classify them solely as 
menswear. 

The Finanzgencht annulled 
the disputed decision; however, 
on appeal the Bundesfinanzhof 
(Federal Finance Court) re- 
ferred a question of interpreta- 
tion of the CCT to the Court of 
Justice of the European 
Communities for a preliminary 
ruling. 

In its judgment the European 
Court of Justice held: 

The intended use of goods 
could not be used as an objec- 
tive criterion for their OCT 
classification at the time of 
importation, since it was impos- 
sible. at that time, to determine 
the actual use to which they 
would be put. 

Consequently the actual use 
of goods might not be used in 
order to determine their tariff 
classification. 


A certain and uniform 
application of the CCT would be 
impossible if garments with 
objective characteristics which 
were traditionally those of 
men's garments, were no longer 
considered “recognizable" as 
such on the basis that at a 
certain time, those garments 
were also worn by women. 


Although it was true that, as 
noted by the German court, a 
certain “unisex" fashion had 
developed in the member states 
or the Community, such a 
phenomenon, which was nol 
taken into consideration in 
Chapter 61 of the CCT. could 
not lead to new interpretations 
in tariff matters. 


On those grounds, the Euro- 
pean Court (.Fourth Chamber) 
held: 


On December 23, 1975 the 
Common Customs Tariff was to 
be interpreted to the effect that 
jeans of traditional style, with a 
front fastening from left to right, 
were to be classified as men’s 
and boys’ outer garments under 
heading 61.01. 


Law Report July 24 1986 Queen’s Bench Division 


Immigration rule unjust and to be disregarded 


Regina v Immigration Appeal 
Tribunal, Ex parte Begnm 
(Manshoora) 

Before Mr Justice Simon Brown 
[Judgment given July 10] 

The requirement in the State- 
ment of Changes in Immigra- 
tion Rides (HC 169. para 52) 
that a dependent relative, apply- 
ing for entry clearance to settle 
in the United Kingdom, had to 
establish that he had a standard 
of living substantially below the 
average of his own country was 
partial and unequal in its opera- 
tion as between different classes, 
manifestly unjust and unreason- 
able. The particular require- 
ment was invalid, could easily 
be severed from the remainder 
of the rule and. accordingly, that 
was how the rule was to be 
applied henceforth. 

Mr Justice Simon Brown so 
held in a reserved judgment in 
the Queen's Bench Division 
allowing an application for ju- 
dicial review to quash foe 
decision of an immigration 
appeal tribunal that foe ap- 
plicant had no claim for ad- 
mission to the UK. The case was 
remitted to foe tribunal. 


proi 

provision [for the admission for 
settlement of those who were 
mainly dependent upon rel- 
atives settled in the UK] should. 

not be extended to people 

except where they are living 
alone in the most exceptional 
compassionate circumstances, 
including having a standard of 
living substantially below that 
of their own country . . .". 

Mr A] per Riza for the ap- . 
plicanu Mr Nigel Pleming for 
the tribunal. 


MR JUSTICE SIMON 
BROWN said that foe ap- 
plicant. aged 48, was dependent 
on her brother, a British citizen 
settled m the UK: she was 
single, lived alone, received 
money regularly from her 
brother who also arranged for 
her to receive a regular snare of 
the oops produced on his land 
in Pakistan, and foe had been 
disabled since birth suffering 
from partial paralysis. 

Her relatives who lived close 


by had not assumed responsibil- 
ity for her and were disinclined 
to do so. 

To quality for admission to 
foe UK for settlement as a 
dependent relative oF her 
brother foe applicant bad to 
satisfy the requirements as set 
out in rules 46, 47 and 52. 

The only requirement which 
the tribunal found had not been 
met was that, having taken into 
account the contributions of her 
brother, the applicant’s standard 
of living was not bdOw that of 
her circle in her own country. 

His Lordship said that the 
crucial point was that an ap- 
plicant who bad to be mainly 
dependent on his or her sponsor 
or other relatives abroad was 
singularly unlikely to comply 
with foe requirement that their 
actual standard of living was 
substantially below that of their 
own country. 

Thus the rule was a snare and 
a delusion, a pretence which 
raised expectations without 
there being any real possibility 
of fulfilling them. 

His Lordship said that the 
correct approach to the Im- 
migration Rules had been 
considered in R v Immigration 
Appeal Tribunal. Ex parte 
Shaikh (Munir ‘ 

I 

Immigration 
Ex pane Alexander ([1982] 1 
WLR 1076, 1080). 

The effect of those authorities 
was that the construction of the 
Rules should be approached in 
essentially the same way as the 
construction of legislation save 
only less striedy. the fullest rein 
should be given to the propo- 
sition that the more unreason- 
able foe result of givin| foe 
phrase its natural and ordinary 
meaning, the readier would the 


mands of fairness and 
reasonableness. 

His Lordship concluded that 
the critical consideration was 
the bald point that foe relevant 
words simply would not surren- 
der any meaning save to require 
that the applicant’s actual stan- 
dard of living, however fi- 
nanced, had to be assessed. 

However, foe rule, unlike a 
statutory provision to which 
effect had to be given however 
absurd the result, was amenable 
to the court's power under its 
review jurisdiction to condemn 
il in whole or in part, as invalid 
for unreasonableness; see Kruse 
v Johnson ([1898] 2 QB 91. 99- 
100). 

it should also be recognized 
that where the relevant power 
was given, as in foe present case, 
to a minister responsible to 
Parliament, foe court was even 
less willing to intervene es- 
pecially where foe Rules in 
question were laid before Par- 
liament and subject to a process 


akin to negative resolution. 

Mr Pleming had submitted 


that th e^re quiremem might be 


more readily satisfied if the. 
dependant was living in an 
affluent society rather than, as 
he accepted was infinitely more 
probable, in a Third World 
country. 

But in his Lordship's view 
that made it generally no less 
unjust and if anything more 
partial and unequal in its opera- 
tion as between different classes. 

There was no possible basis in 
sense or justice for a require- 
ment which would automati- 
cally disqualify from admission 
under the rule virtually all those 
from the poorer countries of the 
world irrespective of whatever 
exceptional compassionate 
circumstances might surround 
their cases, and yet allow most 
dependants in the more affluent 
countries :o be considered on 
general compassionate grounds. 

The requirement in paragraph 
52 was invalid and it could 


easily be severed, conveniently 
appearing between commas as 
an independent subordinate 
clause. 

Little, save a great potential 
for injustice, would be lost by its 
excision: the rule would still be 
applied only in favour of depen- 
dants “in foe most exceptional 
compassionate circumstances", 
which was a most stringent test. 

In applying the test, it would 
remain open to the Home Office 
in their assessment of foe level 
of compassionate circumstances 
in any given case to have regard, 
to die dependant’s standard of 
living abroad. 

One could readily see how an 
applicant might fell to satisfy 
even the depleted rule because 
foe standard of living which he 
achieved as a result of financial 
contributions from abroad took 
his case out of the category of 
the most exceptional com- 
passionate circumstances. 

Solicitors: Winstanley-Bur- 
gess; Treasury Solicitor. 


aikh (Munir Ahmed) ([1981] 
WLR 1107, II 141 and R v 
imigration Appeal Tribunal. 


court' be (a|> to find the phrase 


capable of bearing another 
meaning, and (b) to prefer such 


other meaning it contrasted to 

• first 


the meaning first suggested, that 
other meaning was substantially 
further from the literal and 
grammatical sense of the phrase. 

But that was not to say if foe 
words were wholly unambigu- 
ous that they could be given 
some other meaning, even in 
Order to accommodate the de- 


Trinity calls to the Bar 


LINCOLN'S INN 


C Chew; Evelyn MkMOHon: C c Ycoh: 
C S Holmes: R A Underwood: Mrs 
□tzaoeth HubMde Julie Wiiuams S 
Morris, H CTree nq: C Matthews: C M 
Ng: D Dn: C Mamba: Tetk Um: A 
Sarin: Mrs Amanda Town-Ginsbiira: 
D T Eaiougft: R A Snowoen; T C Bate: 
I Ahmad: A Kamarutzanian; M 
Ahmad Alcana: Mu) Lin cimu Wei 
Uan Lott. J H S Rumen: C S H uncial: 
k Lewi: Caihenne Lemon: May leer 
Jalteti: C A Adams: P A Barnes; P V 
Hammerttgy: wim Tin Lee: T C Law: 


v «*e Chan: M 
►.Sf’ri*!? JNMAkr Kaur: Mrs 


SjttWhgaD Kapua-. K r Handley: EB 


VMhyananthan: 6 J Sankan Caroline 


--T hor-Old Helen E Parkinson; 
Josephine j Jones: Maria Sawides: 


Jane Humen M j svoDoda: Bahma 
l- Cnrtstir 


„ _ MIDDLE TEMPLE 

C W Dickson; N H Wray; Kim TtwnSE 
L K C Sf*sAB Chapham: j Smouha: 
W A M Bridgefora: M J Seanden: 
Catron Russeulj C Clarke: Pautme 


LJUan L L lira; Mrs Chttshna A Daniv 
Fenwick; Sarah A Jones: D - 


S C 


CraU; O D Watkins: A j 
Taylor: A J Jackson; I j Bantcu: Grace 
Wong. M T Harmon: P J Bennetts: C 
B Um: K K Low: Yoke K Chong: A D 
Whaley: m Emott: Oiee F Lee: Karen 
M Fonunato: C R Coleman: s L Ng: s 


Angela S SmUh; D p " A 


HSrJSSS&f’A 

BanfUk A C FentandB: K i 


BinuS A V Sabina: M A Jackson: Mrs 
Selene S Fernandez; K S One: Ntrmala 
Oman Aoni j LOh: T Bounce: n a 
T alk Y Lee A&osua a Twum- 
Banma: Nicole K Bur-font: W oan- 
gon-MoiTtx N H Levy; S Mehta: 
Nashrah HaH Ahdifl KamU: Fiona J 
pix-tJyer Fiona c Munra: C G 


SmUh: 

s Lee: i, 

KSflS 1 * a^ens-Hoare: Metea" J 
-feigeiM A Wilson: M D 
Cohartts i Be r Hdte Sarah E Thomas; 
A E Ajtate; p R Coley; Mn Kathleen 
b Buckingham: Moganoaelv! 


INNER TEMPLE 

S.£^! ukw,w i. w H Salomon: R W- 
Humphrcy*: Susan G Lie: W R 
N Magyar: JR a Coleman: J R 
n M Owy: C N Barton; 

gN L Bloom Davis: A J Clarke; R V . 

J l£\y; W DOeaver: R P 
D st owan:_M H Porter: C S Tow J H 
£S 2 £. M C Oaaar J O Houchion: G M 
A ™ w L WcfianMoii; M 
Jutte A MIIK- S T. 
"■fiS N Owo; C V M GoodaH: 
■{W w monL Verity G Jones: P T 
P M M PoUeU: D S 


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It remained possible for the 
Council or the Commission to 
request the Parliament to meet 
in extraordinary session, even if 
the Parliament had already 
closed an annual session. 

Finally, with regard to the 
objection that such extensive 
immunity for Members of the 
European Parliament made it 
impossible to bring legal ■ 
proceedings at national level 
against a Member of the Euro- - 
pean Parliament over a period 
which might be extremely long, 
it was necessary to recall that, as 
in the case of national Par- 
liaments. it was always possible 
for the Parliament io waive the 
immunity ofone of its members 
in accordance with article 10 of. 
the Protocol. 


On those grounds, the Euro- 
pean Council of Justice held: 

Article 10 of the Protocol of 
April 8. 1965 which granted. 
Members of the European Par- 
liament immunity "during the 
sessions of the Assembly”, was 
to be interpreted as' meaning 
that the European Parliament 
was to be considered in session, 
even if it was not actually 
sitting, up to the time of the 
closure of the annual or extraor- 
dinary sessions. 


any disermination based upon 
sex. 

2 It followed from the Directive: 

(a) that the criteria which 
determined the classification in 
different pay groups had lo 
ensure foe same remuneration 
for foe same work actually x 
carried out, whether it was * 
carried out by a male ora female 
worker; 


(b) that foe feet that it was 
based on the average abilities of 
workers of one sex only in order 
to determine to what extent a 
job required physical effort or 
entailed fatigue or physical 
hardship, constituted a form of 
discrimination based on sex 
prohibited by the Directive: 

(c) that fora job classification 
system not to be discriminatory 
when viewed as a whole, it had 
to take into consideration, to the 
extent to which the nature of the 
duties to be carried out in the 
undertaking allowed criteria for 
which workers of each sex were \ 
likely to have particular 
aptitude. 


TaiarrtU: a J STiartan* S P McGrady: 
tool M Sim: CztzBbeUi cr‘“ ~ ' 


UJrko-JmoBc; A R Bower; D ' 
Holland; EitaabeU, E P 


: I McGraiL C J 


Norm: Jang Stansfield: K S Hjrahtm: 

WlCJRHext 


a J Kav-tr n M a Barker i 

D B O LwMwdimg; M M O’Sullivan; 
S N MooKitenw. M Singh. 8 J Khan: 
" iikTKI 


M Hanna: Omna*~j Bandi ’Svvn 
BtiaU*:_A A Maaiab: B_J Patten! 


F'&rnmm^AlirFWeri 


■ J.-.7 ■ nwi—n k [yi reran. 

M „ A Lovea&y: Kerne 
F Hants: J M 


P Maiui:*MlNar k 

T- “uEJmSm: Anna K H 


R M J Held: S K Wan. T Khan: 


Ltow vm Kin zahra P Bn V C l 

F ShlRl: K K 




Niamtt M Bxyan s D sultan: Caroline 


Mjtthrttend: d a Knirran; J E 
Qtorttent; Bfjpice a M McCauley-' 
J E Taylor: A 
MarshaM: KMhannc S Smtav j A 


N P Ramachamlran: P-F 

Pott: Ira Biswas: R P Ranunatnan: N 
Balacftanaran; Stella M CMn Phitt 


Lan: S N Woog: W Lowong: H Chan 


l^lhC«£Y 1 ?*^ V-WBMK A A- 


rjinliL— v: d tSme-.N N Green: R H 
S 1 ™*? JWartyah C As’adr J A 


Sefc Cttwan. SX Ng: P J GoodSody; A 
W O A Martins: S Wu*n: G B 
anghanu 6 k Cttiew: K 6 Chang: 
Christina L SyMs: Mrs AngeU Wong: 
... >. ... -- - - Bocn: 

LJnoa 




wSSTjTO* r *~ t * 3 ™* “ s J 


W M Wan Mamor: A' L 
Attain lan Nor Khaifdah: 


ATS PhanK j a LyonsTh . 

? T Chew: ; 


-- Crout-Smini: Baroara H 
sirachan: Barbara w connouv: J B 
E CCarttvvH i ; RYMan-KJort- 


Lovegrojo: J £ Soles; s ' 


Zucvorcuuaia L Koenan: Mrs joftna 
MtOH 


MMcBMtiPBUwe: Y Y QhIeI, „ 
L Ptnia: ft j B onnan; Cttanthrika 


fori kra on M DW 




Vj vV. 








Court of Appeal 


ixijb AlMcb iti UkdjDAX JULY 24 196b 


Law Report July 24 1986 


Chancery Division 


a--. 

i 

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1 


Police truncheon 
* is adjudged an 
offensive weapon 


Competitor cannot sue games officers 


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tive 


test 


Houghton v Chief Constable 
of Greater Manchester 
Before Lord Justice May and Mr 
Justice Hollings 

[Judgment delivered July ( 6 ] ■ 

Although a police truncheon 
was a weapon which was offen- 
sive^^ the feet that a person 
was wearing one solely as part of 
a police uniform for a- fancy 
dress party amounted to reason- 
able excuse for having it with 
him in a public- place, and 
therefore the wearing of a 
truncheon as pan of such fancy 
dress did not by itself constitute 
carrying an offensive weapon, 
contrary to section 1 ( 1 ) of the 
Prevention of Crime Act 1951 

The Court of Appeal so held, 
allowing in port an appeal by the 
plaintiff, Mr Barry Joseph 
Houghton, from an order of 
Manchester County Court 
(Judge de Cunha) which on June 
13, 1981 had dismissed his 
claim for damages from the 
defendant, the Chief Constable 
of Greater Manchester, for 
unlawful arrest, false imprison- 
ment and malicious prosecu- 
tion. 

Section 1 of the Prevention of 
Crime' Act 1953 provides: **(1) 
Any person who without lawful 
authority or reasonable excuse, 
the proof whereof shall lie on : 
him, has with him in any public 
place any offensive weapon 
shall be guilty of an offence, . . . 

“(3) A constable may arrest 
without warrant any person 
whom he lias reasonable cause 
to believe to be committing an 


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offence under subsection ( 1 ) — 
if the constable is not satisfied as 
to that person's identity or place 
of residence, or has reasonable 
; cause to believe that it is. 
necessary to arrest him in order 
to prevent the. commission by 
' him of any other offence in the 
course of which an offensive 
weapon might be used. 

“(4) . . . ‘offensive weapon’ 
means any article made or 
adapted for use for causing 
injury to the person, or intended 
by the person having it with him 
for such use by him.” 

Mr Anthony Rumbelow for 
the plaintiff; Mr John Bailey for 
the defendant. 

LORD JUSTICE MAY said 
that the plaintiff, who had 
previously been a policeman, 
had gone taa fancy dress party, 
dressed as a .policeman . and 
wearing a truncheon, at a club 
J called the Stuffed Olive. Shortly 
™ after midnight he, with another 
man dressed as an infantryman, 
had left the party and walked 
along the street. 

They had been stopped by 
two policemen who, finding the 
plaintiff in possession of the 
truncheon, bad asked him if he 
was a police .officer. Initially he 
had said that be was, bat when 
asked where he jvas stationed 
said that he had been but was no 
longer. Upon receiving 'that 
answer, the poljce bad arrested. 
j the plaintiff and taken him to 
^ the police station, where he had 
* been locked in a Cell for over two 
and a half hours. . 

The inspector had then de- 
cided to charge him with carry- 
ing an offensive weapon and be 
had been released on bad. Six 
weeks later he had been 
committed for trial; only after 
that had the prosecuting solic- 
itors given serious consideration 
to the charge and decided to 
offer no evidence: 

Five questions arose for 
consideration in this case. 

1 Was a police truncheon 
“made for use for causing injury 
to the person” and therefore 
offensive per se ? His Lordship 
had no doubt that it was. If it 
was to be used at alL it was 
intended to be used by police for 
the purpose of offence, even if 
defensively. It could not be 

dm likened to a sandbag or even a 
razor, since there was no alter- 
native "innocent" use to which 
it could tie put. 

2 Did the plaintiff have any 
reasonable excuse for having the 
truncheon with him ? On the 
evidence it was dear that he had 
it only as a theatrical prop to 


lend verisimilitude to his fancy 
dress. On those fects. the plain- 
tiff did have a reasonable excuse 
for having the truncheon with 
him. 

It should be stressed that it 
would be different in a case 
where there was evidence that 
lire wearer was under the in- 
fluence of alcohol or that he was 
a member of one of two or more 
opposing fections present at the 
time. It should not be treated as 
a licence to carry offensive 
' weapons in urban areas on the 
pretext of wearing fancy dress. 
On the fects, however, the 
plaintiff had bad a reasonable 
excuse, and he had therefore not 
been guiky of any offence under 
section 1(1) of the 1953 Acl 

3 Did the arresting officer 
have power io attest the plaintiff 
? The offence created by section 
1 ( 1 ) .was' not an arrestable 
offence within section 2 ( 1 ) of 
the Criminal Law Act 1967, and 
the arrest was therefore lawful 

only if it was sanctioned by 
section 1(3) of the 1953 Acl 
O n the fects of this case, the 
arrest was not lawful if the 
officer' could not show that he. 
had not been satisfied as to the. 
plaintiffs identity., or place of 
residence. The defendant con- 
tended that the officer had not 
been satisfied as to the plaintiff’s 
identity since he had not been 
sure, in view of his answers, 
whether or not be was a police- 
man. 

His Lordship was satisfied 
that "identity or place of 
residence" in section 1(3) meant 
“name or address". The object 
of the provision was to give a 
power of arrest only where there 
was a risk that if not arrested the 
suspect would hot subsequently 
be locatable; where the officer 
was satisfied as' to name and 
address, any proceedings for an 
offence under section 1 ( 1 ) could 
be dealt with by way of sum- 
mons. ~ 

In this case the officer had 
never asked the plaintiff his 
name and address, and there 
was no suggestion that he would 
have withheld either. There was 
no evidence to justify the 
conclusion that the officer had 
not been . satisfied as to the 
plaintiffs identity, and therefore 
there had been no power of 
arresL 

4 Did the inspector have 
reasoanble and probable cause 
for prosecuting the plaintiff? It 
was clear from Tims v John 
Lewis A Co Ud ([1951] 2 KB 
459. 472) that that was to be 
decided objectively on all the 
evidence before the court 

His Lordship was satisfied 
that a reasonable inspector in 
the relative calm of a police 
station, having consulted the 
Police Officers’ Handbook, 
would have lad no doubt that it 
was neither reasonable nor 
permissible to Charge foe plain- 
tiff under "section 'ITT), ,grreii' 
that the truncheon had been 
worn as part of fancy dress at a 
party the -existence of which 
could have been verified with- 
out difficulty. It was all a storm 
in a teacup, and objectively 
there was no reasonable or 
probable cause for the prosecu- 
tion. 

5 Was the prosecution ma- 
licious ? Malice could not 
always be inferred from the lack 
of. reasonable and. probable 
cause: see Wershof v Commis- 
sioner of Police of the Metropolis 
([1978] 3 All ER 540). There was 
no other evidence in this case 
from which malice could be 
inferred, and in all the circum- 
stances it would not be right in 
this case to infer malice merely 
from the objective lade of 
reasonable and probable cause. 

It followed that the plaintiff 
was entitled to damages for 
unlawful arrest and false 
imprisonment, but not for ma- 
licious prosecution. Damages 
would be assessed at £600. to 
which would be added interest 
from the date of the torts. 

Mr Justice Honings delivered 
a concurring judgment ■ 

‘ Solicitors: Berry & Berry 
Cocker Smith & Co, Bolton; Mr 
P. D. Quick, Manchester. 


Cowley v Heatley and Others 
. Before * Sir Nicolas Browne- 
Wilkinson. Vice-Chancellor 
[Judgment given July 22] 

In their use of the word 
"domicile" in article 34(3) of the 
Commonwealth Games 
Constitution, the Common- 
wealth Games Federation were 
right to give the word its 
ordinary popular meaning and 
not the legal meaning that 
would be given to it under the 
English law of domicile. Even 
bad the legal meaning been 
thought appropriate, the coart 
(fid not consider that the foil 
requirements for malting En- 
gland a domicile of choice had 
been satisfied. 

Further, Sir Nicolas Browne- 
Wilkinson. Vice-Chancellor,- 
hekl in the Chancery Division, 
the court would be unable to 
make a declaration sought that 
the plaintiff was eligible to 
represent England as a compet- 
itor in the Commonwealth 
Games since there was no direct 
contractual relationship be- 
tween her and the federation but 
only between the federation and 
die . Commonwealth Games 
Council for England, who had 
nominated ber.lsven had there 
been such a relationship, the 
court would have felt unable to 
exercise its discretion to make 
such declaration as a dedartion 
afrigbt. 

Mr Edward Nugee, QC and 
Mr N. G. Orr for Miss Annette 
Cowley, the plaintiff; Mr David 
Pannick' for the three defen- 
dants, officers of the federation. 

THE VICE-CHANCELLOR 
said that Miss Cowley, a swim- 
mer, was claiming against those 
representing the Common- 
wealth Games Federation a 
declaration that die was eligible 
for entry as a competitor in the 
swimming events. She was also 
asking that the. federation 
should accept her domicile as a 
domicile of choice in England. 

She was born in 1967 in South 
Africa. Her mother was bom in 
England and her father’s distant 
relatives were also bom in 
Fn ginwt In deciding to make 
her domicile in England, she 
obtained a British passport in 
January 19.85 and came to 
England for the first time in 
May 1986, intending to live here, 
ana stayed with a mend in her 
flaL 

She was nominated to repre- 
sent Trieiand in the Common- 
wealth Games and her selection 
was approved by the Games 
Council for England but, after 
careful consideration, the' 
Games Federation officers de- 
cided that she was not eligible — 
a decision which was upheld on 
appeal last weekend. 

The decision was based on 
their interpretation of article 34 
of the conditions in the constitu- 
tion foF- representing a country 
id the Games. What had to be 
satisfied in article 34(1) was that 


a competitor had to be a 
member of the Commonwealth; 
article 34(2) required that a 
competitor rep rese nting the 
country of his birth should be a 
citizen or subject of that coun- 
try. and article 34(3) was as 
follows: 

"If an eligible . competitor 
wishes to represent a Common- 
wealth country other than that 
of his birth, be must have 
resided therein for a minimum 
period of six months during the 
12 months prior to the dosing 
date of the individual entries for 
tite Commonwealth Games 0007 
cerned — or bis domicile , 
“permanent home", or normal 
place of residence must be in 
that Commonwealth country." 

Miss - Cowley had not been 
resident in this country for six . 
months; she did not have a 
permanent borne as a normal 
place of residence here and 
accordingly, the only way in 
which she could be qualified was 
on the basis of her domicile of 
choice here. 

The officers of the federation 
ruled that she was not so 
domiciled here and the 
Commonwealth Games court of 
appeal upheld that decision and 
held her ineligible. 

The case hinged entirely on. 
the word “domicile". In Englis h ' 
law, the word had a special 
meaning, and for a domicile of 
choice there had 10 be ( 1 ) an 
intention to remain and make a 
permanent home in the country, 
and ( 2 ) residence there. - 

The federation in giving their 
reasons for their decision had 
not given the word “domicile" 
its legal technical meaning; they 
had given it the meaning of an 
ordinary English word as found 
in the dictionary and Miss 
Cowley had submitted that in 
doing so the federation had 
erred in law. 

The federation, however, said 
they were right in giving the 
word “domicile" its ordinary . 
meaning and therefore, if there 
was no domicile qualification, 
she had no right as an individual 
to come to the court for a 
declaration that she was eligible 
to enter for England. . . 

The court would decide on 
that boL first, was “domicile" in 
article 34(3) to have a legal or 
ordinary inte r pr eta t i on? 

For that, it was necessary to 
consider the constitution of the 
federation and the area over 
which it exercised authority. 

It was a body comprising 
members of the Commonwealth 
set up as administrators for the 
purposes of the Commonwealth 
Games. One had to look for the 
meaning of the word in that 
context; “to inquire beyond the 
language and see what the 
circumstances were with ref- 
erence to which the words were 
used, and the object appearing 
from those circumstances which 
the person using them had in 
view": see Prom v Simmonds 


([1971] 1 WLR 1381, 1384). 

It seemed therefore one had to 
look at the document setting out 
the constitution of the 
Commonwealth Games as a 
whole in order to form a view on 
the way those responsible were 
using the word “domicile". 

Looking at the document in 
that way the word “domiefle" in 
article 34(3) would be seen to 
have been interpreted in its 
ordinary meaning and not the 
meaning which would be given 
to it in English law. The word 
was not set out in proper Legal 
terms and there was no clause in 
the document which governed 
its interpretation as used in 
artide 34(3). 

It might also be relevant that 
the constitution covered a large 
number of different nations ut 
the Commonweal ib with mem- 
bers upholding many different 
systems of law. In those circum- 
stances it was the court’s view 
that the articles of the 
constittution could not be gov- 
erned by the law of one 
constitutent member country. 

However, the articles of the 
constitution had to be construed 
and when article 34(3) talked 
about domicile it was dear h 
meant something different from 
a mere place of residence. It was 
said that it had its ordinary 
meaning . of a permanent home 
as a place of residence and it 
seemed the federation were 
entitled to give the word its 
ordinary common or garden 
meaning on the facts before 

them. - 

It was not the function of the 
court to give a decision on fhcis 
but to correct errors of law. In 
the absence of an error of law the 
court had no power to inter- 
vene, unless a decision was so 
manifestly absurd that no 
reasonable body could have so 

Even supposing that the word 
“domicile" was interpreted as 
under English law, meaning the 
country where a person had his 
permanent home, that led one 
rate some difficulty because "of 
the domicile of origin. In law ' 
everyone had to have a domidle 
of origin and could acquire a- 
domicile of choice. That led to 
the question what constituted a 
domicile of choice. 

In the present case. Miss 
Cowley said sbe had abandoned 
her South African domicile of 
origin and had made her domi- 
cile of choice in this country, but 
giving the word its strict legal 
meaning she could not be said to 
have acquired a domicile of 
choice as yet. 

There was then the question 
whether Miss Cowley cdukf dr 
could not bring the present 
proceedings for a declaration 
that she was eligible as a 
competitor in the Games. 

That raised complex issues of 
law; there was here no contrac- 
tual link between Miss Cowley 
and the federation. The federa- 
tion and the national associ- 


ation were in a contractual 
relationship on the terms of the 
constitution but she had no 
contractual righL 

The question was whether in 
those circumstances she had 
some righL some locus standi, as- 
being a person adversely af- 
fected, to bring proceedings for a 
statement on the true construc- 
tion of the rules. 

It seemed it was not necessary 
for the court to decide whether it 
had jurisdiction to deal with 
that question, but even if it had, 
the court would not have ex- 
ercised the jurisdiction so as to 
make a declaration in her 
favour. 

The parties running ' the 
Games were the federation and 
the association; and the national 
committee bad taken every care 
to see that her case was properly 
put before the federation. 

In those circumstances there 
was real doubt whether it was 
appropriate for the court at the 
suit of any such person to make 
a declaration as to rights where 
the individual had no direct 
righL The court would echo the 
sentiments expressed by Sir 
Robert Megarry, Vice-Chan- 
cellor in Mdnnes v Onslow- 
Fane ([1978] I WLR 1520, 
1535) where he said: 

"I think that the courts must 
be slow to allow any impi 
obligation to be fair to be used as 
a means of bringing before the 
court for review honest de- 
cisions of bodies exercising 
jurisdiction over sporting and 
other activities which those 
bodies are far better fitted to 
judge than the courts . . . 

“The concepts of natural jus- 
tice and the duty to be fair must 
not be allowed to discredit 
themselves by making un- 
reasonable •requirements and 
imposing undue burdens 

“Bodies such as the board 
which promote a public interest 
by seeking to maintain high 
standards in a field of activity 
which otherwise might become 
degraded and corrupt ought not 
to be hampered in their work 
without good cause." 

The court would say with 
great respect that that made 
good sense. It was the court’s 
function to control illegality and 
to make sure that a functioning 
body did not act outside its 
terms. But it seemed that no 
good canse would be served by 
attempting to regulate a domes- 
tic body such as the Common- 
wealth Games. 

Sport would be better served 
if there was not running litiga- 
tion at repeated intervals by 
people seeking to. challenge the 
decisions of the regulating bod- 
ies. 

For those reasons the court 
would not have granted the 
declaration sought and the 
application must be dismissed. 

Solicitors: Gregory Rowcliffi 
& Co for Mr J.M.O’Riordan, 
Chorley, Withers 


When employer fails to consult union 


Transport and General 
Workers’ Union v Ledbnry 
Preserves (1928) Ltd 
Before Mr Justice PopplewelL 
Miss J. W. Collerson and Mr R. 
Lewis 

[Judgment given July 22] 

The period under a protective 
award for compensating redun- 
dant employees for their 
employers* failure to consult a 
trade union began with the date 
when the first of the dismissals 
was expected to take effect 
rather than from the actual date 
of the first dismissal 
The decision of the Employ- 
ment Appeal Tribunal m £L 
Green A Son (Castings) Ltd v 
Association of Scientific. Tech- 
nical and Managerial Staffs 
([1984] ICR 352) was to be 
preferred to that of the appeal 
tribunal in GKN Sankey Ltd v 
National Society of Metal 
Mechanics ([ 1 980] ICR 148). 

The Employment Appeal Tri- 
bunal allowed an appeal by the 
Transport and General 
Workers’ Union from a decision 
of a Tewkesbury industrial tri- 
bunal last December that the 
employers, Ledbury Preserves 
(1928) Ud should pay a protec- 
tive award for 30 days for failure 
to comply with tbc require- 
ments of section 99 of the 
Employment Protection Act 
1975. 


Section 99 provides: 

“(I) An employer proposing 
to dismiss as redundant an 
employee - - . shall consult 
repre se ntives of [his] trade 
union about the dismissal . . 

Section 101(1) provided that a 
union could present a complaint 
to an industrial tribunal if 
section 99 had not been com- 
plied with. 

Section 102(4) provided for 
an employer to pay remunera- 
tion for a protected period if 
section 99 was breached. • 

Section 101(5) provides: 

“The protected period under 
an award under subsection (4) 
above, shall be a period begin- 
ning with the date on which .foe 
first of the dismissals to which 
the complaint relates takes ef- 
fect or the date of the award, 
whichever is the earlier . . ." 

Miss Elizabeth Slade for the 
union; Mr Roderick Denyer for 
.the employers. 

MR JUSTICE 

POPPLEWELL said that the 
employers had felled to consult 
the union over proposed redun- 
dancies. 

The industrial tribunal found 
that the proposed termination 
date was December 31. 1983. 
On October 28, 1983 one of the 
employees left. 

The question was whether the 
period described in section 


101(5) began with the date on 
which the first dismissal took 
effect (October 28) or the date 
on which the first dismissal was 
expected to take effect (Decem- 
ber 31). 

If it was the former the 
employees . working up 10 
December 31 would receive no 
benefit from the 30-day award. 

In GKN Sankey Ltd. the 
appeal tribunal said that the 
protective period began with the 
date on which the first dismissal 
took effect. 

In E. Green A Son (Castings) 
Ud it was held that the period 
began from the proposed date of 
the first dismissaL 

The industrial members of 


the appeal tribunal were of the 
view that unless the proposed 
dale was taken h would give rise 
to injustice and anomalies in 
industry. 

Acts "of Parliament should be 
construed so as to give effect to 
good industrial relations rather 
than the contrary. 

The date to be taken under 
section 101(5) was the dale the 
dismissals took effect under the 
proposal and not the actual date 
of the first dismissal. 

The appeal would be allowed 
and leave to appeal granted. 

Solicitors: Paninson & 
Brewer; Brown & Partners, Bris- 
tol • 


£100 statutory award 


Head v Moffett Ltd 

The conventional sum of £20 
previously awarded by indus- 
trial tribunals for loss of statu- 
tory industrial rights when 
compensation for unfair dis- 
missal was assessed should now 
be raised to £100, Sir Ralph 
Kilner-Brown, sitting - in the- 
Employment Appeal Tribunal 
with Miss J. W. Collerson and 
MrG.A. Drain, said on July 17. 

HfS LORDSHIP said that 
loss of statutory rights referred 


to compensation for the qualify- 
ing period to be worked in other 
employment before the statu- 
tory protection against unfair 
dismissal was acquired. 

Because such loss was impos- 
sible to quantify, a conventional' 
sum of £20 was first awarded in 
1972 and bad stayed at that 
figure since, notwithstanding 
the subsequent considerable 
devaluation of the pound. ' 

The sum of£20wasnow quite 
inappropriate and should be 
increased to £ 100 . 


Dismissal compensation award must remain in court 


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Schofield v Church Army 
Before Lord Justice Dillon and 
Lord Justice Croom-Johnson 
[J udgment given July 8 ] 
Compensation of £7,461 
awarded by an industrial tri- 
bal to an employee unfairly 
issed by the Church Army 
and which had been paid into a 
county court should remain ha 
court pending the result of a 
High Court action brought 
against the employee by the 
Church Army in which 1 
alleged that he had stolen £8.5 
between Jane 1981 and April 
1984 while he was in their 
employ. 

The Court of Appeal so held 
allowing an interlocutory appeal 
by the defendants, tire Church 
Army, from an order of Judge 
James in Woolwich County 
Court, who had allowed an 
appeal by tire plaintiff. Mr Leslie 
Schofield, from the deputy reg- 
istrar. and had ordered payment 
out to Mr Schofield of £7,46 1 in 
court with interest. 

The defendants asked for an 
order that the money be re- 
tained in court pending the trial 
of an action ty them against Mr 
Schofield seeking repayment by 
him to them of £8,986. 

Mr David. Melville for the 
Church Army: Mr David 
Fostett for Mr Schofield. 

LORD JUSTICE DILLON 
said that Mr Schofield was for a 
number of years the warden of a 
hostel run by the Church Army 
in Westminster to provide beds 
-. for homeless men. 

“ He was responsible for the 
receipts of the hostel for the 
accommodation provided. The 
receipts took the form of either 
cash or cheques sent by the 
Depanmcm of Health and So- 
cial Security to tire hostel in 
exchange for vouchers issued by 
(he DHSS to the men which they 
handed over to the hostel for . 
their accommodation. 1 . 


It was Mr Schofield’s duty to 
keep records of all cheques and 
• cash received- and to bank the 
cheques and so much of the cash 
as was not required for petty 
cadi purposes in the Church 
Army’s bank account 

-On April 26 and 27, 1984 a 
routine audit conducted by 
Church Army officials showed 
that a number of cheques issued 
to the hostel by the DHSS had 
not been entered in the appro- 
priate receipts journal of the 
hostel, and that some six of 
those unrecorded cheques had 
been paid into the Church 
Army’s bank account, appar- 
ently by Mr Schofield. 

The auditors concluded that 
Mr Schofield bad stolen 
amounts of cash equivalent to 
the amounts of The six un- 
recorded cheques paid in. 

Mr Schofield was asked in a 
five-minute meeting at Church 
Army headquarters about one 
alleged shortfall of £350 and 
although denying .that he had 
stolen the money, as he did not 
give any satisfactory explana- 
tion he was dismissed. 

He applied to an industrial 
tribunal which found that it was 
not reasonable for the Church 
Army to claim that Mr Schofield 
had stolen the money in the light 
of their limited investigation, 
and that the procedure taken in 
dismissing him was unfair in 
that Mr Schofield did not have a 
proper chance to answer the 
allegations against him. 

In the light of those findings 
Mr Schofield was entitled to 
compensation for unfair dis- 
missal. The amount was agreed 
between the panics and on 
February 4, 1985 the tribunal 
made a consent order ordering 
the Church Army xo pay Mr 
Schofield £8,370 compensation. 
That amount fell to be reduced 
by certain recoupment pro- 
visions. 

On April 1. 19S5 Mr Schofield 


wkfa County Court an order that 
the Church Army pay him 
£7.39 1 and costs. Like any other 
county court judgment that 
order was final and conclusive 
between the parties: see section 
70 of the County Courts Act 
I984i 

To enforce that judgment Mr 
Schofield obtained a garnishee 
order from the county court. 
The Church Army’s bank paid 
£7,641 into the county court on 
July I, 1985, under Order 30, 
nile4 of the County Court Rules 
1981. Mr Schofield then applied 
under Order 30. rule 6 for the 
money to be paid out xo himself 

The Church Army opposed 
the application and the deputy 
registrar upheld tire Church 
Army’s opposition but Judge 
James, on an appeal by Mr 
Schofield, set aside the 
registrar’s order and ordered 
that the money in court be paid 
out to Mr Schofield’s solicitors. 

After Mr Schofield's dis- 
missal. the Church Army had 
continued their investigations 
into his accounts and claimed to 
have established by the time of 
the industrial tribunal hearing 
that over £ 8,200 cash received 
by Mr Schofield was un- 
accounted for. 

When the compensation bad 
been agreed, the Church Army 
bad made it plain that they 
proposed to bring High Court 
proceedings against Mr Scho- 
field and did not intend to make 
any payment reflecting the 
tribunal’s award unless and 
until it was found after the High 
Court proceedings that the full 
award or part thereof was still 
owing. 

Accordingly, on February I. 
I9S5 the Church Army issued a 
High Court writ against Mr 
Schofield which was served on 
him on February 21. 

By the statement of claim they 
alleged that Mr Schofield had 


stolen 32 cash sums received by 
him for Church Army use 
amounting to £8,986 and their 
daim was for that amount with 
interest. 

Obviously from the point of 
view of the Church Army if they 
were right in their claim it would 
be galling in the e xtreme and 
would seem unjust that they 
should have to pay Mr Schofield 
£7,641 compensation for unfair 
dismissal before their action 
could come on for trial. 

It remained to consider 
whether Judge James bad been 
right in the way he had dealt 
with the case on the material 
before him. 

On that material his Lordship 
concluded that the High Court 
action, which it was conceded 
was not frivolous or vexatious, 
raised serious issues to be tried 
over 32 allegations of theft. - 

But on that material alone (he 
Church Army had not shown, if 
it was necessary for them to 
show it, that they were bound to 
win or that they would recover 
judgment against Mr Schofield 

In the sum claimed ora substan- 
tial part of in see per Lord 
Justice Kerr in ZUdvA-Zand 
AA-LL ([1982] QB 558.585). 

What then was the scope of 
the court's discretion in order* 
ing. or refusing to order, pay- 
ment out of court under Order 
30. rule 6 . 

The scope of the discretion 
under Order 30, rule 6 of the 
County Court Rules would in 
his Lordship's judgment, be the 
same as the scope of the 
discretion of the High Court 
under Order 47, rule 1(a) of the 
Rules of the Supreme Court to 
slay execution of a judgment by 
writ of ,/ieri facias where “There 
are special circumstances which 
render it inexpedient to enforce 
the judgment”. 

Mr Melville had put the case 
fora stay on the payment out as 
equivalent 10 the position under 


Order 14 where judgment had 
been entered for a plaintiff 
because there was no defence to 
the action, but execution of the 
judgment was stayed pending 
the trial of some cross-claim 
which the defendant had against 
the plaintiff. That was covered 
by Order 14, rule 3(2). 

However, Mr Melville faced 
difficulty in his approach by 
analogy to Order 14 in that in 
Wagner v Laubscher Bros & Co 
([1970] 2 QB 313. 319) Lord 
Justice Sachs said categorically 
that the tests to be applied when 
an application was made for a 
stay of execution on a judgment 
under Order 47, rule 1 were 
quite different from those ap- 
plicable to Order 14 proceed- 
ings see also per Lord Denning, 
Master of the Rods, at p3I7. 

As his Lordship saw it,tbe 
baric reason why the tests to be 
applied under Order 14 were 
different from the tests to be 
applied when a stay of execution 
was sought under Order 47, rule 
1 . was that a judgment under 
Order 14 was a summary judg- 
ment obtained at the very outset 
of proceedings before the defen- 
dant had had any opportunity to 
litigate any cross-claims against 
the plaintiff. 

But if the plaintiffs case went 
to trial and he obtained judg- 
ment, it was not enough for the 
defendant, in order to obtain a 
say of execution, then simply 10 
show that he had an arguable 
cross-claim which he had not 
raised as a counterclaim in the 
plaintiffs action and had not got 
on with litigating meanwhile. 

Therefore where foe judg- 
ment obtained was not under 
Order 14. it was necessary for 
foe defendant, in order to obtain 
a slay, to show special circum- 
stances which rendered it in- 
expedient to enforce the 
judgment or order and not 
simply an arguable cross-claim. 

The mere act that the Church 


claim against 


argual 


Schofield 


which would support a stay 
under Order 14 was not of itself 
enough to warrant a. stay of 
execution of foe judgment 
which Mr Schofield had ob- 
tained in the county court. More 
was required. 

It seemed to his Lordship that 
foe “more required” bad, in the 
present case, to lie in foe 
circumstances why foe claims in 
the High Court action had not 
so far been litigated, rather than 
in considering the strength of 
foe evidence in support of those 
claims beyond the point, already 
reached, at which it had been 
shown that there were serious 
questions to be tried. 

The vital point was that the 
industrial tribunal had nojuris- 
diction to entertain the Church 
Army’s claim, now raised in foe 
Church Army’s action, as a 
counterclaim to Mr Schofield's 
daim for unfair dismissal. The 
tribunal could not have awarded 
the Church Army judgment on 
their claim. 

The proceedings in foe indus- 
trial tribunal were disposed of 
with commendable expedition 
by that tribunal. It had not been 
suggested that foe Church Army 
had been dilatory in prosecuting 
foe High Court action. 

It would be wrong in~his 
Lordship's judgment, that foe 
money in court should be paid 
out before foe High Couh anion 
bad come on for triaL 

He would accordingly allow 
the appeal and discharge foe 
order of Judge James. The 
money in court should remain 
in Woolwich County Court until 
further order and be placed on 
deposit by the coun. 

Lord Justice Croom-Johnson 
delivered a concurring judg- 
ment. _ 

Solicitors: Rubinstein 

Callingham; Miss Penelope 
Grant 


LrtW/arUJU 


■43 


GOLF 


Peace returns as 
Turnberry gets 
back to routine 


By Fail! Martin 

Like long abandoned Roman 
amphitheatres, (Ik grandstands 
stand out gauntly against the 
green undulations and deep bine 
waters of Tnrnbeny. A3sa 
Craig, the black foreboding 
rock, is bathed In a halo of light 
piercing those clouds which 
bedeviled last week’s tour- 
nament. Workers bare been 
taking apart the iron work and 
prizing off the rows of plastic 
seating until jnst . the 
grandstands* skeletons remain. 

Bat those that matter, the 
golfers, are stBl swinging, strid- 
ing and strutting up and down 
the (airways. The famous names 
of last week have, iff coarse, 
departed but a new invasion, 
packaged from America. 
Australia and Japan, hay been 
disgorged from hxxnry coaches. 
They golf for an afternoon then 
dine and sleep at the magnificent 
Turn berry HoteL No fewer than 
30,000 visitors play at 
Tarabercy each year. Demand is 
higher than ever this week. “It's 
a prestige thing to be on the 
coarse straight after the 
championship so they ’can boast 
about it back borne," a 
Turnberry Hotel said. 

The group I met bailed from 
the famous Winged Foot coarse, 
jnst outside New York. They 
told me a story that relfected 
poorly on modern golfers’ 
generosity. A man called Mo 
deans the players dobs when 
the US Open is held at their 
coarse. Almost an the players at 
the 1959 Championship gave 
him a tip. In 1974, only 11 
players remembered and all of 
those had also taken part the 
previous time. In 1984, jnst four 
of the old stalwarts dug into 
their pockets. 



W 


“Some tip you 
some don’t” 


The dabs at Turnberry were 
cleaned last week by the players* 
own caddies. But the locker 
room attendants polished 524 
pairs of golf shoes, the majority 
of them requiring thorough 
attention — because of foe 
inclement weather — from a 
hairdryer. -**Some tip you, some 
don't" was all that could.be 
gleaned from the attendants. 

Turnberry; beyond the 'golfing 
perimeters, had- a dog-eared, 
morning-after look: The heli- 
copter pad, scene of hectic 
activity with arrivals and depar- 
tures every three minntes be- 
tween 9 and 11 each Open 
morning, had returned to its 
rustic solitude. 

The road traffic had also 
subsided. The promising New 
Zealand golfer Greg Tuner 
nearly missed his second round 
tee-off, and instant disqualifica- 
tion, when his car got stock in a 
traffic jam last Friday. He drove 
with foe same single-minded- 
ness as be showed on the course, 
screeching alnpg the Tight- hand 
lane into oncoming traffic with 
his horn blaring and hazard 
lights flashing. He made it, and. 
to boot registered a 71. That 
meant after two rounds he was 
high np the leader board, though 
be fell back with a 77 on the final 
day. 

Still, at 23. with little more 
than a year’s experience in 
tournament golf, be has reason 
to be pleased with his 35th 
place, on 296. He was, after aU, 
level with Tom Watson and 
Gary Player, who had won the 
title eight times between them, 
and ahead of Jack Nickhms. 


>JSC 

Greg Turner: blight future 

Greg had the encouragement, 
and admonishment, of bis 
brother Glenn, 16 years his 
senior. The great New Zealand 
cricketer, formally with 
Worcestershire, is touring with 
the New Zealand squad. Glenn, 
who grew op in poverty, believes 
his brother has had life too easy. 
•although Greg pointed out that 
for a year he delivered bread 
from midnight to dawn before 
going to work as a bank clerk — 
all so he could raise money to go 
to college in the United States. 

Two years abroad saw Greg 
rise to the top rungs in Colle- 
giate golf, whereupon be per- 
formed surprisingly well on the 
Asian «mH Australian circuits, 
winning the competitive Singa- 
pore Open and two others last 
year. He turned to goK, despite 
being his school’s top cricketer 
and hockey player, in an attempt 
to emerge from the shadow of his 
brothers’ fame in these two 
sports (his eldest brother, Brian, 
played hockey for New Zea- 
land). Because of foe age gap, 
Glenn is virtually a father figure 
to Greg, and enjoys nothing 
more than bringing his young 
sibling down a peg or two. 

Fanatic with a 
bird’s-eye view 

Norman Douglas boasts one 
of the worst golf swings of any to 
hare played at Turnberry. He is 
the lighthouse keeper whose 
eyrie, 94ft 3 in high, commands a 
view, through binoculars, of all 
18 boles. He is a golfing fanatic, 
having played without improve- 
ment for 15 years, and Is 
delighted that be resisted an 
offer, from an American 
businessman for a free family 
holiday anywhere in the world 
pins £500 spending money in 
return lor vacating his fiat in the 
lighthouse for die Open week. 
“How could money compensate 
for the privilege Fve had?" he 
asked. “Who else has ever seen 
Norman, Ballesteros and the 
rest tee-off from the ninth hole 
while sitting on their toilet?" 

Within the tented village, now 
being unceremoniously flat- 
tened, had sat a host of charac- 
ters whose stories themselves 
would fill an article. No doubt 
the characters, competitors and 
the crowds will have plenty - to 
tell when the entire show is 
r e asse m bled. at M airfield next 
year. 


m CERTIFIED DIVIDENDS 


I dividends subject to rescruttny. 


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124 HR.SERVICE) 


4 DRAWS £20-15 

12 HOMES £406-05 

(PAID ON 11 HOMES) 

6 AWAYS £4-45 

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Expenses and Commission 
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Above Dividends to Units of lOp. 

Expenses and Commission for Sth July 
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RACING: SANGSTER LINCHPIN TO HARWOOD’S BIG-RACE PLAN FOR REPLACEMENT JOCKEY 


High Conduct 
to complete 
another treble 
for Eddery 

By Mandarin (Michael Phillips) 




Pal Eddery can put himself 
in the right frame of mind for 
the coveted ride on Dancing 
Brave in Saturday's Ascot, 
spectacular by winning anoth- 
er ihree races "at Sandown Park 
this afternoon on Bertguda 
111 5). Andika (145) and 
High Conduct (4.20). 

As Bint Pasha is in the habit 
of getting beaten because of 
her inability to quicken I am 
content to go for Bengucla to 
win the EBF Raynes Park 
Tuo- Year-Old Maiden Fillies' 
Stakes. 

My selection made a pleas- 
ing debut at Newbury five 
weeks ago when she finished a 
close third behind Gentle 
Persuasion and Blue Tango. 
Although the winner of that 
race has not been seen since 
the second has certainly lent 
credence to the form by 
winning at Salisbury before 
she finished third in the 
Cherry Hinton Stakes at New- 
market. 

Rock-solid form for the 
Norman Hill Handicap is 
boasted by Geordies Delight, 
whose principal claim to lame 
w ill probably always be that he 
was Lester Piggoti's first win- 
ner as a trainer. 

But while he is fully exposed 
an individual tike Aniika is 
less so and 1 believe that she 
may well be capable of build- 
ing on that commendable 
performance at Kcmpton 
where she accounted for 
Sarira in some style. 

High Conduct, the third leg 
of the possible Eddery treble, 
has not run this season. But he 
showed sufficient promise in 
his only race last year to 
suggest that the Heathrow 
Malden Stakes should be his 
lor the taking. 

For the M Hears Star Stakes 
the former champion will be 


on Garnet, a fouMengfo win- 
ner at Edinburgh at the end of 
last monrh. But in this in- 
stance i fancy Steve Cauthen’s 
chance more on-Quel Esprit, 
who was runner-up to the 
smart Dominion Royale at 
The Curragh l3Si time. 

The word from Newmarket 
is that Captain's Niece will be 
hard to beat in the Wellington 
Apprentice Handicap follow- 
ing that encouraging win in a 
similar race at Ripen, which 
marked her down as one to 
follow. 

Twelve months ago. Paul 
Cole despatched Maazi and 
Martin Lynch north to 
Caltcrick to win the A One 
Apprentice Stakes. Now the 
some trainer-jockey combina- 
tion looked like hitting the 
bullseye again, this time with 
Fonz. who was a winner on the 
course last season. His form is 
basically the best in the field. 

His stable companion Sum- 
mer Sky, who looked so quick 
in the Spring, is taken to win 
the Stag's Head Stakes with 
Richard Quinn in the saddle 
at Chepstow where Dark 
Promise also looks a good bet 
to-win the Clifton Handicap. 

But my idea of the day's 
best bet is at Hamilton Park's 
evening meeting where 
Bailydnrrow is napped to get 
the better of the course spe- 
cialist Apple Wine in the 
Orbiston Handicap. 

Also a winner over today's 
course and distance during his 
long and honourable career, 
Ballydurrow was beaten only a 
head by Handlebar at Ripon 
last Saturday. That race was 
over only a mile and a quarter 
and Ballydurrow did not qnite 
get there. With another fur- 
long to go this evening he 
should be in his elemenL 



Sad Starkey steps down 
from Dancing Brave 


Quel Esprit, who is a fancied contender for Sandown’s Mflcars Star Stakes 

New industry board recommended 

From oor Irish Racing Correspondent, Dublin 


The Commission of Inquiry 
into die thoroughbred horse 
breeding industry in Ireland, 
appointed in the autumn of 1982 
under the chairmanship of Lord 
Killan in, finally published its 
report here yesterday. 

The ' establishment of • a 
Thoroughbred Industry Board 
to replace the Raring Board Is 
its principal recommendation. 

bat even in this matter it has 
failed to cany the support of all 
the members and one of diem. 
Barton kilcoyne. has published 
his objection arguing that “the 
new Board will be the old Racing 
Board under a new name and the 
financing of racing still its 
principal goal.” 

However, it is Che intention of 
the majority that- the new 
Organization would take over a 
series of subsidiary companies 


including the National Stud, the 
Raring Apprentice Centre for 
Education, the Irish Equine 
Centre and a Racecourse 
Management company. 

They do not how e v er envisage 
any change in the traditional set- 
■p whereby the Turf Club and 
the Irish National Hnat Steeple- 
chase Committee would continue 
responsibility for the rales of 
raring and the licensing of all 
those participating. 

In search of comparative mod- 
els on which to base the new 
supreme authority, members of 
the board travelled all over the 
world and the report contains 
many valuable sets of statistics 
relating to raring and breeding 
in Ireland and other countries. 

As a work of reference for 
future- statitirians it w3l be 
invaluable, but there was a 


feeling in Dublin yesterday that 
the government wonkl be in no 
bury about iatrodudiig the 
legislation needed to change the 
Racing Board. 

Id other matters, though, we 
could see some of their sugges- 
tions pot into action in particular 
that “Racecourse improvements 
should be a higher priority than 
increases In prize money.” 

In the view of die Commission 
we have too many race tracks 
and they note Chat England with 
14 times as many people have 
little more than twice the num- 
ber of racecourses. 

In the long tenn, though, they 
foresee a reduction in the 
amount of money available for 
betting through the introduction 
shortly of a national lottery and 
they pot forward the argument 
that raring should therefore get 
a share of the proceeds. 


In a dramatic late develop- 
ment Greville Starkey said 
yesterday that he will not after 
all be fit to ride Dancing Brave 
in the King George VI and 
Queen Elizabeth Diamond 
Stakes at Ascot on Saturday. 

Pat Eddery has been offered 
the mount on Khaled 
Abdulla’s 2,000 Guineas win- 
ner and Derby ranner-tip and 
will be in the saddle if a 
suitable replacement can be 
found for Vincent O’Brien's 
runners at Phoenix Park the 
same afternoon. 

Al lunchtime on Tuesday 
Starkey telephoned Geoff 
Lawson, Guy Harwood’s as- 
sistant trainer and said that he 
felt he had recovered. Howev- 
er, after going for a ride on his 
childrens’ pony from his bun- 
galow, seven miles outside 
Newmarket, the jockey had 
second thoughts. 

“Greville said he felt very 
stiff and sore mounting and 
dismounting,” said Chris, the 
jockey’s wife, “and after think- 
ing it over he decided it 
wouldn't be fair on anyone if 
he rode Dancing Brave as 
there is so much at stake. So 
he rang Geoff back and the 
stable took it over from there. 
He'll be out for the rest of the 
week and hopes to be fit for 
Goodwood. 

Anyway, everyone would 
have had a field day if he'd 
gone and got pipped,” she 
added wryly, remembering die 
storm of mainly unfair criti- 
cism that had greeted 
Starkey's handling of Dancing 
Brave at Epsom. 

Lawson commented: “Guy 
had been trying to fix tiling 
up in Kentucky, but 1 haven't 
heard anything definite yet 
However Fra pretty confident 
that we’ll get Pat” The great 
jockey and his equally bril- 
liant partner are expected to 
become acquainted for the 
first time on the gallops al 
Pulborough this morning. 

Robert Sangster has already 
agreed in principle to release 
Eddery from his commitment 


By Michael Seely 

for Ballydoyle in Ireland. “He 
is still our retained jockcv.” he 
said at Keeneland. “But Danc- 
ing Brave will be a marvellous 
mount and I don’t want to 
stand in his way if we can gel 
someone of the calibre of Cash 
Asmussen to take his place. 
At present the reigning cham- 
pion French jockey iscomimt- 
ted to riding at E vr y ' or 
Mahmoud Fuslok on 
Saturday. 

It is sad that Starkey has to 
miss the eagerly awaited re- 
match between the season s 
two superstars. Dancing Brave 
and Shahrastani. During the 
past decade the team of 
Starkey. Harwood and 
Lawson has been welded into 
one of the most feared combi- 
nations in the country. And 
the trainer has frequently 
admitted to the extent be has 
relied on the jockey’s judg- 
ment. as well as to his redoubt- 
able skills in the saddle. 

However, this latest ap- 
proach to Eddery and 
Songster's co-operation will 
inevitably add further fuel to 
the speculation that the for- 
mer champion has already 
severed his three-year contract 
with Ballydoyle. which was 
due to expire in 1 988. and that 
he has already agreed to ride 
all the horses owned in this 
country by Mr Abdulla next 
season. 

The Saudi Arabian poten- 
tate has long been an admirer 
of Eddery's talents and it is 
thought that the first approach 
was made after Rainbow 
Quest’s victory in the Prix de 
l'Arc de Triomphe last au- 
tumn. But all the parties 
concerned are still strenuously 
denying that any arrange- 
ments have yet been finalized. 

It is also thought likely that 
Cash Asmussen will not only 
step into Eddery’s shoes at 
Ballydoyle in 1987, but will 
also partner those horses 
owned by Sangster in Britain. 

The probably reason for the 
delay in announcing Eddery's 


change of allegiance may be 
that the Irish camp wish to 
make an simultaneous state- 
ment that they have secured 
the services of the American 
jockey. 

It is high time that a serious 
attempt was made to dispel 
the clouds of doubt that is 
hanging over this affair. 

The fight for Saturday’s rich 
prize promises to be as much a 
battle of tactics as anything 
else as foe connections of 
Shahrastani. Shardari and 
Petoski hatch their plots to 
attempt to blunt Dancing 
Brave* s formidiWc powers of 
acceleration that not only saw 
him finish so strongly in the 


, j • 

t’r * ' l > : 

; 1 , t * 4 s ^ 

• s,* 1 i ** ’ 

i * * \ , •. T' * 

’■ Ui & " " * 


1; ' 

N* 



Pat Eddery waiting for 
Dancing Brave ride 

Derby, but that have also won 
him foe Ed ipse Stakes as well 
as the 2.000 Guineas. 

Yesterday Michael Sloule 
had not yet reached a decision 
about Dihistan's possible par- 
ticipation in the role of pace- 
maker. “I*m going to talk to 
the Aga Khan and will be in a 
position to make an an- 
nouncement tomorrow,” said 
the trainer yesterday. 

Blinkered first time 

CATTEflfCK: 2-30 Giant Redwood. 
HAMILTON: 7.45 Tricky. 8.15 Tum 'Em 
Back Jake. 

CHEPSTOW: 8.30 Sura Landing. 
SANDOWN: 330 Dust Conqueror. 430 
Coihsto. 


1 . i ! * : 1 ! 

' f * • • . : 

i.i; <*t - ' 

* 

.. i ; ;• 

} i 1 * ^ : * 


SANDOWN PARK 


til 


Going: good 

Draw: high numbers best 

2.15 EBF RAYNES PARK MAIDEN FILLIES STAKES (2-Y-O: £3,395: 
71) (9 runners) 
its 


103 

KM 

1C8 

114 

ne 

Jl’ 

121 

122 


3 BENQUELA (USA) |Mis J Chanter) J Tree 8-11 — 
222 BINT PASHA (USAHBF>tFaMSaWar»)P Cole B-11: 
0 ELLIS BEU.(MrsElartMQMBansluii] 8-11. 


... Pat Eddery 4 

T Quinn 2 

W Newness 


KALADKKA (FR) (R Francis) G Harwood 81 1 A Oar*. 9 

IMSK EL KHASHAB iShetti Ahmed Al Maktoum) B HDs 8-11 - B Thereon 7 
400 PERSIAN TAPESTRY fflnWd Manor F»mslJ Francome 8-1 IRCDcteanel 

02 PHJLGWVN (J Jones Morgan) D Laing 8-1 T.*.., „ SKSb»roft3 

0 TUFTY LADY (Mis S Hmde) R Armstrong 8-1 1 — ... ._. P Tuft 8 

ilitWri 8- 1 1 — - . 


WHITE JAZZ (W GwOeyl C Brma*i 8- ll 


SCsatheoS 


7-4 Benquela. 3-1 Bun Pasha. 9-2 Kaladnia. 5-1 Misk B Khashab. 8-1 Ptulgwyn. 
12-1 Persian Tapestry. 16-1 others. 

FORM: BENGUELA (8-5) 2*. I 3rd to Gentle Persuasion (8-6) at Newbury (6f. £7713. 
good. Jine 12. 6 ran) BINT PASHA (8-11) 21,1 2nd to Gotten Brad (8-11) here (71. 
£4162. good to firm. July 4. 10 ran) PMLGWYN (B-11) Vil 2nd u Spotter (6-11) at 
Wolverhampton (71. £1043. good » firm. July 7. B ran). TUFTY LADY (8-1 1) about 81 7lh 
cl 16 io ku-rteo Goes: (8-ni ai Lmghekl (61. £3211. good. June 3). 

SdecMn: BENGUELA — - 


Sandown selections 

By Mandarin 

2.1 5 Bengucla. 2.45 Andika. 3. 1 5 Quel Esprit. 3. 50 Captain's Niece. 
4.20 High Conduct. 4.50 Alsiha. 

By Our Nemarket Correspondent 
2. 1 5 Tufiv Lady . 2.45 Geordies Delight. 3. 1 5 Garnet. 3.50 Captain's 
Ncicc. 4.30 Exclusive North. 4.50 Assaglawi. 

Michael Surly 's selection: 2.45 REALITY (nap). 


3.45 NORMAN HILL HANDICAP (3-Y-O: £3,152: 1m) (5) 

;>11 104143 GEORDIES DELIGHT (USAHD) (Shokh Mohammed) L Pigged 

Cocftrsoc 3 

. n W tt-t REALT7Y (7 NoKjntf-Mjriini R Johnson NougMon S-t SCaomaiS 

70S 001 ANDIKA (Mr>. E Langran)J Tiee 9-4 ..Pat Eddery 4 

LOT 31-30000 SUPER PUNK (J Mjxwuk) M FethorsKHHSodsy 8-l3_. C flutter (5)1 

212 04Q333 LADY LA PAZtG Homage) PCunjeH 7-8... G French 2 

I«1 Geprteo Dokght. 5-2 AndttL 7-2 Reality. 8-1 Lady La Par. 
12-1 Super Punk 

FORM' GEORDtE*S DELIGHT (9-7) M 2nd of3 to Pmstnpe (9-7)at Yarmouth (1m. £2589. 
nood io linn Julv 161. REAUTY [8-11] comfortable 4t Salisbury winner from Marcrodea 
•:<-l t»i7l, £1447. firm. Jirw 27. 18 ran) ANDIKA (8-8l beat Sanaa (8-8) II at Kempton i > I, 
£7176 otvd io Irm. Juno L’S l7ron) SUPER PUNK 7th latest start, first tone out (9-7» 3 
.frri ip Vague Shot (S-l3) at Kempton (7t. £2792. good to firm. May S, 12 rani LADY LA 
PAZ ;R-T) '•! 3rd to Fat Too Busy (7-9) last tune, earter (7-7) ftntohod wed when IM 2nd 
*.c Pinsmp.. (S-lOl here (71. £3522. good to firm. Juno t3. 13 ran). 

SeteCMMK LADY LA PAZ 

3.15 MJLCARS STAR STAKES {2-Y-O: £3,707: 51) {4) 

:-m 11130? DUEL ESPmr (D)(1 Myerai M McCormick 9-» S Cauthen 2 

3» 012 BORN TO RACE (USA) IK FrsCfter) L PiggoO 8-11 R Cochrane 3 

003 RIOT BRIGADE (P NobialC BntUrt 8-tl —4 

’,i: 01 GARNET (D) (A FoustcM R BOM 8-8 . . P« Eddety 1 

4-b Oud Espm. 3-1 Garnet. 9-2 Bom To Race. 8-1 Rio* Brigade. 



F *„lh. i 9-0> ul Newmarkoi 161. £3776. good to firm. July 16. 14 rani. GARNET (8-11) 41 
Ed nbiJiqh Scorn horn Mazurfianova 18-111 — 

Selection; QUEL ESPRIT 


1 1 ) (Sf. £S47!%m, JuneSI). 6 ran) 


3.50 WELLINGTON APPRENTICE HANDICAP (£2,687: 1m 21) (12) 

jpi 


OTOjMO THALESTRIA (FR) (A Rttiaidsl C Austin 4-9-12 Tony MnkSerai ffl) 9 

1300-03 FOR A LARK (B LMvfPn) D Uhaon 4-9-t _ _ LRaroolZ 

00-00 HIGHLAND BALL (E MoUer) G Wrjgn 3-8-12 ,.. . . O SWrerWI 4 

0i CAPTAIN'S M HCE ff t Phacsl W H-Bms 3-8-11 Dde GAno(6) 11 

W3JW' DUOTCONDUEREH (B) (USA) (R Els) Mas B Sanders 5-8-10 .. J Adams 8 

00-4111 HAfU) AS (RON (D| IM Wcfcemi P Haslam 38-10 J Scat* (El 1 

099000 AQABA PHMCE |R POpdr) fl Cunort 6-8-3 M McConoefl (81 7 

00900- KASKEEN (P Watson) Mrs N Smth 4-8-0 -_TjS*erJ 

00100* SUPERFROSHBF) iBar Ecippmenll J For 4-7-13 G Kkx] 6 

cnr.liM nrr'ir nitmiv ana iiiibii u. *- ■# > f m a ... ■* _ 


Jd 
•iCir 
SC* 
snr 

411 
41 J 
4"- 
J'6 
ji? 

j:o ^ 

1 1 E Hard As hon. 7-0 Cjduui's Noko. 6-1 SuperfrosL 8-1 Dick Krwta. 12-1 UrM 
7i n Highland BaU. 14-1 For A Lark. 20-f others. 

fCRM THALESTRIA(8-131 raUed oH behind Mister Wonderful (S-5) ki Group 3 event at 
Nwrojiki'i (7li. CAPTAIN’S NEST (8-4 1 1 : ji Roon Kenner from He Bo Benz(8-7) (1m II 
T *"* w *, J" 5 ?,® 'S 1 " 25- •? fan). HARD M IRON (7-7) won 1 1 Newmarket hem 

T,'P (8-3i ( 1m 21. £4422. good to firm. June 28l SUPEHFROST (9-1 1 never nearer 

2 .i -Jri: ro AnOr (9-Zl at Kempton (tin, CI6SS. firm, jwy jr iq ™l AQABA 
PRINCE iKlwai 7lh DlCX KNIGHT (ailed odlatosi. prdvioi«h)(8-7)hd 2nd of 10 to Mrs 
Chris IW| .11 Beveifev nm *. tlSSUtnn. July 5). MnSmimfoln 

Id o cl a n! SureRra^^ Uef ,lm ‘ C738 ‘ 901x1 “ fimt June 10 - 7 r 3 **)- 


4.20 HEATH ROW MAIDEN STAKES (3-Y-O: £2£Q9: 1m) (5) 
itt 23308 EXCLUSIVE NORTH (USA) (Or C L«) R Armstrong M. SCauthen2 

&P5 4- HIGH COmuCT (USA) iShoMi Mohammed) JwrtOD 94) PatwSvl 

00-0 SILCA CHiAVI |AMnd« Racmg Lid) D BswonhM^.r.... lUUKtaw 5 

00 SPEED STICK i Food frokers Ltd) P Havnes 9-0 ... p yy^tan 4 

0 SUNDAY CHMES (F Sangster) B Hits B-i t B Thomson 3 


si: 


4-6 Hflh Conduct. 7-2 Sunday Ovmes. 6-1 Etchisreo North. 12-1 SJca Chaw. 
!6-i Spoco Suck 

FORM EXCLUSIVE NORTH no show tins ye3r.m 1985 (9*0) 121881 of 9 to BakftaroR (8- 

' * ' “ ■" HK»CONDUCT(9fl13*-,ldtnof18 


Or if Dtrejstnr (Tm Group I. f 43505. 
to kedton t 94)) ^ Folkestone (61. £1 1 
-| 5lh :o Mflracw IB-111 ai Hawtack (71 
Selection: EXCLUSIVE NORTH 


Oct 281 . 

toljm. O ct 1 5) SUNDAY CHMSS (8-1 1) 
£2634. fnm. Jdy 4. 16 ran). 


4^0 FOX WARREN HANDICAP (£3.107: 1m 6f) (5) 

601 1JTO OSTEN9fit£ (USA) |K Abdula) G Han«ao4 3-9-10 Paten*** a 

® OOT300 ASSAGLAWI [R Green Frie P*ntmra| h Thomson Jones 4-9-8 Sbuflms 

W3 0001« AL$«A(CD)iM«Alf^tB^iFBeST8^ BR^I 

6L’9 floor MYTHICAL BOY |Mra C O'Shea) J Fot j 9 

611 104BJ00 COUJSTO (B) (C-D) (Mis S Aldndge) K Brassey 5-8-1 S W^tamrth 3 

»iM5h«aniS B,Ue ‘ *“* A5M9to "' T1-1 Ats,ba - 10 ’ 1 Con ««* 

FOflM:<^TENSlBLE paaMnakmg when 9» of 1 1 10 Shahrastam at The Currach ear 
^? r id Winds Of Uqht (9-5) at Kempron |1m 41. Q394 goodtoftm ' Mav 

5! ASSAGLAWI 61b last tone, earlier (9-8) 31 2nd to Whne Mill (S-I0t! aSmwe soice a 
2?S«r'i m 6, HS? S - 6 f ib..Jtai e28. 1 1 ran) ALSIfiA 

Cp ran, COOBTO 

bl. -.2408. good to soft. Jum »4. 16 ran), hm J a nm (im 

Selection : ASSAGLAWI 


BLOODSTOCK SALES 


Prices reflect changing climate 


From David Hedges, Lexington, Kentucky 


The tuo-day Keeneland sale 
of selected yearlings ended here 
on Tuesday on a downbeaL 
While 17 horses individually 
made more than S i m during the 
tuo days. There were no 
outstanding yearlings such as 
those which made Si 3.1m and 
S7.6tn last year and ibe absence 
of dial chunk of more, than 
5 20 m was reflected in the sales 
figures. 

Total for the sale was 
$104,489,000. which was 24.6% 
down on last year. The average 
price dropped fom $537,384 10 
540S. t60 — a decrease of 
24.03%. .- 

Mr Ted Bassett, president at 
Keeneland. where there is fur- 
ther one-day sale of less select 
yearlings still 10 corae. described 
ihe trend as a sensible levdling 
off He said: “There’s no doubt 
we're going dirough a period of 
adjustment which is a natural 
reaction 10 the past few years. It 
is gratifying that this time there 


was a good, solid middle 
markeL” 

The Irish trainer Vincent 
. O'Brien commented: “A good 
. individual with a good pedigree 
; brought an honest price. T here 
just wasn't a -Si 3m horse in the 
“sale." The al-Maktoum family 
of Dubai again made a huge 
contribution to the market. 
Sheikh Mohammed's Darky 
Stud Management made a fur- 
ther 12 purchases on the second 
day bringing their total to 29 
yearlings for $20,385,000. 

Sheikh Maktoum Al- 
Maktoum's Gainsborough Stud 
Management bought 15 year- 
lings on the two days for 
$lX505,000 while Sheikh 
Hamdan al-Maktoum's Shad- 
well stud, accounted for 13 
yearlings totalling $8,365,000. 
The family's outlay of 
$40,255,000 for 57 yearlings 
represented 38.5% of the two- 
day turnover in money terms- 

BBA (Ireland) Lid. which 


buys largely for Robert Sangster 
and his partners, including Vin- 
cent O'Brien, paid $5,210,000 
for six yearlings. There has been 
considerable speculation that 
the Sangster camp and Sheikh 
Mohammed have gone into 
partnership with many of the 
yearlings that they have been 
buying instead of competing 
against each other, but neither 
side is confirming or denying 
the idea. 

The highest price paid on the 
second day of the select sale was 
$ 1.85m bid by American agent 
James Cannon for a colt by 
Nijinsky out of Christmas Bo- 
nus. a mare by Key to the Mini 
from the same female fine as 
Alydar. 

The top price for a filly on the 
second day was SI. 4m paid by 
Maktoum al-Maktoum for one 
by Nijinsky out of Special, the 
dam of the high-class milerand 
successful sire Nureyev. 


Going: hard, round course; firm, straight 
course 

Draw: lugh numbers best 

6.30 STAG’S HEAD STAKES ^2-Y-O: £1,331: 51) (4 
runners) 

3 1111 LADY PAT (D)M McCormack 9-2 J Leech (7) 4 

* 12 HAMXIB (DXBF) H Thomson Jones 34-.... A Mum* 2 

9 40 UENOIP STAR R Hotter 8-11 IJofimonS 

16 11 SUMMER SKY (C-D) P CCta 8-6. TQosnl 


730 SIR GORDON RICHARDS HANDICAP (3-Y-O: 
£1.255: 2m) (4) 

2 BUS ZAUBAHR (B) (U8AMBF) B Hfc 9-12 — BTboroon 2 

11 4-30 RUN rofl TOM W k G L em 8-3 PWHfronT 

12 0003 BATTLE FLEET M Usher A McOoneA 

13 3000 PRIOKW Nightman 8£ D McKay 3 

8-11 Zautnrr. 5-2 Ron For Your Wife. 7-2 Bettie fleet 20-1 

Pnok. 


&0 T.L CREDA ELECTRIC MAIDEN 
STAKES (3-Y-O: £1 ,575: 1m 2f) (6) 


RLUES 


00 BARSHAM J Doniap 8-11 — 


MM1 Summer Sky. 2-1 Mandub, 4-1 Lady Pat. 10-1 
AtanopSur. 


2 OO BILLS BELLE M Bterehard B-11 

5 0-00 CffitRY GLORY W Whitman 8-11- 
14 20- KEY TO THE KEEP I Batting 8-11 — 

28 REMMSCMG H Candy 8-11 

31 -400 TAS TO! M Feewston-Godtey Ml - 


, TQetan2 
. J Rett 4 


_ D McKay 1 
P Cook 3 

, w W ane* 6 

I H3s 5 


Chepstow selections 

By Mandarin 

6.30 Summer Sky. 7.0 Jabaraba. 7.30 Zaubarr. 8.0 
Barsham. 8.30 Dark Promise. 9.0 Shqjuu. 

By Our Newmarket Correspondent 
6.30 Mandub. 9.0 Shujun. 

Michael Seely's selection: 8.30 Dark Promise. 


15-6 Barsham, 11-4 Key To The Keep. 9-2 Remnecing. 6-1 
Tais Tm. 10-1 Cherry Glory. Bus BeSe. 

830 CUFTON HANDICAP (3-Y-O: £2,934: 6f) (5) 

1 -000 OCEAN TRMpER(B)(D)G Lewis 9-7 PWatdronS 


7.0 T.L CREDA ECONOMY 7~ APPRENTICE 
HANDICAP (£1 .343: 1m 4Q (7) 

10 0040 LONDON CONTACT MPpe 36-7 Dew (5) 7 

11 0004 JABA RABA (US A) LGoggfl 5-96: JTUngffl.T 

12 000- rMEXCEPTtmtAL(USA)R HoAnshead 4-96 

ACufinMfSl2 

13 00-0 HALLOWED JBcsJey 4-9-0 J LRmo<5) 4 

IS 4100 STCNE8B0KERD Haydn Jones 4-B-10 DWBmffl 5 

IT 0032 ANGIES VIDEO R HnUer 4-8-1 AOcfc>S)B 

18 006 JUST CHRISTENED C A Bed 3-7-13 J Carter (5) 3 

2-1 An»es Voeo. 3-t Jabaraba. 9-2 Stonebroker. 7-1 
Lomton Contact, B-1 HaBowed. 10-1 t m Exceptional, 25-1 Just 
Christened. 


2 0132 DARK PROMISE (D) frHobnshead 9-6 S Perks 3 

3 MB MYRA'S SPECIAL raj StAciffe 9-1 M Hits 4 

4 4203 SURE LANOWG(B)C Nelson 8-11 JRbMI 

5 0003 QANCJNG SARAH (C)OH Jones 7-10. D Mkn (7) 2 

%4 Dark Proimse. 5-2 Dancing Sarah. 3-1 Myra's Special, 

11-2 Ocean Trader. 13-2 Sire Lanckng. * 

9.0 SUNSET MAIDEN FILLIES STAKES (3-Y-O: 
£1,602:70(11) 

2 00 CANADIAN OjeSTHCeney 8-11 W Names B 

6 34-4 EASTERN COMMAND (USA) J Dunlop 8-1 1 G BntV 11 

B 000 FIVE OJARTERSLComeB B-11 1Jo«naen7 

12 MO HARMONY tSJOnSR Hannon 8-T1 P Cook 5 

18 0000 LBAKATY M McCOtfl B-1 1 RWeikn] 

19 AKSSBL<J^aLHKodW53 8-fT AOcka(7)3 

20 0-00 MOGOARiUSMPCotoMl TOumn 1 

22 44» GUTFE A GUEST B McMahon 8-1 1 —9 

23 REVAMOBAW R WHkams 8-1 1 N Hona IQ 


^ SHUXW (USA) H Thomson Jones 8-11 A Mtnay fl 

30 0000 TZb-WONGM P%* B-1 1 BTboawmA 


TT-10 Eastern Command. S-l Shu*n. 5-1 Mogoar. 10-1 
Quite A Guest. 16-1 Taj Wong. 20-1 often. 


HAMILTON PARK 


Going: firm 

Draw: mkkflo to high numbers 

6.45 HYNDFORD STAKES (2-Y-O: £1,176: 6f) (2 
runners) 

2 123 DUMJNtUSAXBFjS Norton 9-4 Jlewe2 

8 301 - PINE AWAY (C-U)J W Wsts 9-1 Thmml . 

B-11 Pme Away. 11-10 Dunkn. 


6 0014 M5TER MARCH (BF1 R Hutchinson 

9-7 (Sex) P 

7 3300 GARDA’S GOLD M. 


8 0000 TRICKY (B)P Rohan 9-4 

10 0002 BARGAIN PACK Mia G Remiey 9-0 . 1 
13 0020 RICH BITCH D Chapman 8-3. 


T1-4 Mister March. 3-1 Beechwood 

Terms. 6-1 Bargain Pack, 8-1 Garda's Gold. 10-1 
I Tricky. 


(3)2 
J LoweS 
M Bin* 4 

07 
— T 


. 4-1 Sham 
' Bitch, 12- 


Hamilton selections 

By Mandarin 
q.45 Pine Away. 7,15 Rose Duet. 7.45 Sharp 
Times. 8.15 Turfah. 8.45. BALLYDURROW 

(nap). 9.15 Stone Jug. 

By Our Newmarket Correspondent 

7.45 Beechwood Cottage. S.15 Tum 'Em Back. 

8.45 SaJIoom. 9.15 CenlJe Stream. 

Michgd Seely’s selection: 9.-15 Slone Jug. 


8.15 TRABROUN STAKES (3-Y-O: £1.009: 1m 
40yd) (5) 

1 gt EAGLE DESUNY (USA) I BaMng 9-10 TNeei 

2 -m TURFAH (USA) P Wstwyri 9-10 N Howe 5 


6 (OO- FLYING Z1AD fejflg j^. r ■ A Mad<«y 4 


9 00 TWWEMI 


LBaitay 

94) r Bfoxxnfirid 3 
It 000 FANNY RQBM Denys Smwi 8-11 LCharaoCk2 


8-l36agle Destiny. 3-1 Tixtan, 6-1 TurnEm Back Jade. 12- 


7.15 CLYDE SELLING STAKES (2-Y-O: £763: 5f) 

(10) - 

2 0G32 ROSE EXJET (D)T Barron 8-13 — NConourteaZ 

3 40C4 HOGOZKACKBBUSH(B){gF)CTMMer8-11 ... — 8 

4 00 JUST A EECOY N Braoft B-11 — M IftChettMi (7) 1 

5 0 METRtWAN W Mawe 8-11 NCafideS 

6 004 ON THE MARK |B) J KaMewM 8-11 SWebster9 

8 00 SING FOR THE KING D Oupman 8-1 1_. □Nichols 5 

9 0054 SOUND AS A POUND JBF) M Camacho B-11 . Tints 10 

>1 00 WSS DIAHA H TE (B) EAtston 8-8 A Prccd 3 

1? 0200 MSS 0RUH1IONDJBF) N Tnkier 88. IQm Tidder 4 
1J 0344 PEGGY'S TREASURE M BnCan fr8 MPhghan7 

ft-4 Hugo Z Hacfwnhuah. 7-2 ROM IXiet «-T On 7Tie MarK 
5-1 Sound As A Pound. 6-1 Mss Drummond. 

7.45 LEE HANDICAP (3-Y-O: £1 ,305: 61) (7) f 
2 con innniWRfMijii. 

b 0210 SHARP TMESWMUSSon 9-7 MWigh9B)6 


1 Flying 


845 ORBISTON HANDICAP (£1,857: 1m 3f) (6) 

- 2 04(Q BALLYDURROW (C-D) R Rete 1 9-S-13 D Metals S 

3 0300 SALLOQMJUSA) w (testings- Bass 4-9-8. G DutSeid 3 
S K44 APPLE Wife (CKO) D Cbajmen 944 

S £22 Ga^racAi*mjT5fr44-6— scwMigis 

7 2000 RUSTIC TRACK Dems Smith 644 LOamocftl 

9 2202 EXCAVATOR LADY (H) (C) R KWtakar 

7-7-11 SPGrif0te4 

2-1 BaUydunw. 3-1 Excavator Lady, 4-1 SeBoom. 6-1 
Apple WIib, B-1 Rusbc Track. 12-1 Generation Gap. 

9.15 LAM1NGTON HANDICAP (£1^66: 1m 5f) (7) 

3 0040 SNTLE STREAM J Toler 4-8-7 Thei2 

f 52 CAHW^. ROCKET WJ S W*Wn 3^2 GDeffieMI 
7 -041 STONE JUG Mss S HaO 6-8-11 Men) March 3 

9 0H0 HA-HAM GREYjDiD Chapman 106-10_ DMdwbl 

11 04/2 IffLAM) G0G6EP Rohan 884 I fflonirfrin T 

12 0100 EASY MM (B) RE Peacock 4-8-5^.. J Qumo (5) 4 

13 4032 PERFECT DOUBLE W Pearce 5*4 NCOenrimS 

, ..^^PwtoelDoitote.a- 1 Storm Jug.MCaxauaelHcckaL 6-’ 

lUpftwtt Goose. 8-1 Comm Stream. «w h^wt Gray. 16-1 


CATTERICK BRIDGE 


Going: good to form 
Draw: low numbers best 

2.0 *A* ONE APPRENTICE STAKES (£932: 7f) (10 
runners) 

2 -000 MAJCH DON (DJEWeymes 6-9-7 MTebfauBffl7 

3 0040 MOORES METAL (B) R Hdfcttfteed 64-7 fl Adeem (^5 

4 0020 0 1 OYSTON (C-DXBn J Beny 10-S-7.„ A Wood* (S 8 

6 3400 FOUZ^cj P Cote 1&-11 M Lynch 2 


12 0000 RACSVRM RHAPSODY G M Mooro 8-2. S Wood (7)9 
15-8 Fast And Fnencfly. 11-4 La Cazadora. 9-2 Take The 
Biscuit. B-1 FoKcroft, 8-1 Ribo Melody. 1M Pink Sensation. 
16-1 others. 

3J> TUNSTALL STAKES (2-Y-Ch £1 253: 61) (4) 

1 2013 ALKAOl W O'Gorman 9-7 7 he* 2 

4 410 MtiEAGE BANK fUSAND) P Cole 9-4 J Rett 4 

9 2100 MKSSHEQASJ Berry 9-1 —3 

10 0 BOWERS F0U> Miss S Hal 8-11 KHoOoaonl 


7 0110 WAV 


LY HOOFER (D) Denys Smtti 

3-8-11 A Mbcou(S9 

8 -OOO LADY ABMGER M James 5-8-11 _ WenftCertirS 

9 0000 LOCHOMCA A JarvK 3-8-11 LTodd<3}4 

10 -003 7RYMARDBI(0) Jkisnyfitraerald - 

- 88-11 Ramin (3) 10 

11 004 KARAABAH (USA) H Thomson Jones 

388AHMag(93 

15 2-00 BON ACCUEL H Whiling 3-84 — 1 

9-4 Four, 4-1 Haraabeh. 92 Locrtomca. 64 Bon AccuttL 
8-1 Tty Hanter, 10-1 Moores MetaL 16-1 0 1 Oyston. Heavenly 
Hoofer. 20-1 others. 


8-4 AAtadi. 2-1 MDeage Bank. 5-2 Bowers Fold. 12-1 Miss 
Singes. 

330 WANE GARAGES HANDICAP (£1 ,613:7f} (14) 

1 2022 THE MAZALLR1I Mias LSxldaflfi-S-10 — D Mche0e4 
KG Calvert 4-9-3. 


3 0040 RESTORATION 
4 '0002 MAHA VILLA J 

6 400 CUMBRIAN NUOMH 

7 0032 


44-1....- .f'ffKodtt 

34-11 HBimb 13 


Catterick selections 

By Mandarin 

2.00 Fouz. 2.30 Fast And Friendly. 3.0 AlkadL 
3J0 Qualitairess. 4.0 Schuygufla. 430 Myth. 

By Our Newmarket Correqrondent 

2.0 Haraabah. 2.30 La Cazadora. 3.0 Alkadi. 3.30 
Topeka Express. 4.0 Schuygufla. 4.30 Saffon 


TOPEKA EXPRESS (B) (USA) . - - 

R Arm* onn 3-8-11 RCje«3 

8 0004 ALWAYS NATIVE {USA)(D) D Chf ^®^ spQri6g|> ^ 

9 0000 REMEMBRANCE (D> BE Peacock 94-10.— A Bend 2 

11 0000 POKBIFAYESm (USA) B McMahon 7-84 GDMMd 5 

12 0000 MONSWAHT (B) □ Chapman S-84 A Proud 11 

14 0000 HOPTONS CHANCE SWHes 484 M Fry 9 

15 400 WSS BLAKE M Britton 344 JLcmeS 

17 0020 IE BELLE OFSANTO Denys Smth 37-11 LCtamocfc? 

18 0004 ROSSE7T/D} T Crain 7-7- 10. A Mackey M 

19 4003 raiALITA^SSOJE Stone 4-7-9 N Carlisle 1 

11-4 MaraviOa. 104 Topeka Express, 4-1 The MazaR. 

5-1 Always Nattie. 7-1 Qu a M w e ss . 10-1 La Bale Of Santo. 
12-1 Pokarfayea. 18-1 others. 

4.0 EBF ; LEYBURN MAIDEN STAKES 

(2-Y-O C&G: £1.031: 51) (8) 


BURCWMT R WWHker 94 . 


DMcKoewn? 


230 COLBORN SELLING HANDICAP (3-Y-O: 
£977: 1m 5f 180yd) (10) 

1 3102 FAST AND HUENDLY (O R KoBnshaad 9-7 S Paika 10 

2 400 GIANT REDWOCX) (B) T Fertuxa S-7 — OMcMbl 

3 moo TAKE THE BtSCUfT R Stubbs 96. David WHaais m 4 

4 0004 PWKSStSAnONMsGRe*eiey9SDLaBdbBMrft)7 

5 004 LA CAZADORA R J WiBams 94 ThreeS 

6 0000 FOXCROFT P Hasten 94 TWItonO 

7 400 RIBO IBjOUY J Jefferson 92 M Wood 3 

6 400 STORM LORD C Thornton 8-10 jaaenWeS 

11 040 OBVERBtGN Chamberlain 84 A State (5} 2 


1 

2 4033 HAILEY'S RUN G Pntchanl-Gordon 94 — GOtfflaMI 
4 030 JOE SlIGDEN R Wtiaakar 98 K Bradshaw E 

6 004 PfONCEGATE Mes S Hal 94 K Hodgaen 3 

7 0 R ARAVB IB McMahon 94 Jffl&(5)4 

8 • RPSTBIR Stubbs 94 — AMemrS 

9 342 SCHUVGULLAp^M Janna 04 W Woods) 


12 


0 SOMEIHMGI 


i P Cde 94. 


iSSl 

7-4 Schuygufla. 9-4 Somatfnna Extra, 4-1 Haitoy's Run. 
13-2 Princegan. 10-1 Joe Sugden, 14-t others. 

4.30 GROVE STAKES (£784: 1m 4f 40yd) (2) 

2 2122 SAFFAN (USA)(BR M Proscon 34-11 GDuHMdl 

4 4-21 MYTH R Johnson Houghton 344 RHM>2 

4-7 Myth. 6-4 Saftan. 


Yarmouth results 


Gottgrgoodtol 

2.15 m T. MONTT=ORT(R Cochrane. 7- 

$Q StjSsh (PR’ - - 

has. 9-1) 


ik 2. 


SMsh (P Robinson. 7-1); 3. 

^ (nres. 9-1L ALSO RAN: 4-9 

lav Queen Midas (4ft). 16 A tab. 25 
LightnlngLaw- (5thL Mtes ZoM, 50 
Frrwood(6th). 8 ran. 41 XI. sh hd. 41. 1W. 
W Jarvis at NewnorkeL Tata: £7.80: 
£1-40. £1.70, C1£a DF: £29.70. CSF: 
£50 S3 

„ 2-45 (51 2Sfd\ 1. PETER’S BLUE (M 
Roberts. 44 tsv); Tbe CMppeiftm Aten 
W Cochrane. 94L 3, Greensward Boy CM 
Woods, 15-2). ALSO RAN: 6 Rskrtree 

K8m 6renRl § 

SStoo. Tote] 

£200; £1 JO. £T5a OF; £1.7ft CSF: 
£3 ji . Bought m &600 gns. 

3.15 (1m 21) 1. SIMON'S FANTASY (G 
Baxter 2-1t Z Nordtoa (M Roberts, 
Evwrs tev): 3. Rtara Nephew (R Hito, 12- 
T). ALSO RAN: 11 Tower Fame (4th). 12 
Frame Of Fftwr fSt/ij, 33 DaAas Smith 
(6th). 6 ran. 1L5L1l.hd.2DLR Armatrorm 
at Newmarket. Tote: £270: £*40, £170. 
DF: £1 40. CSF: £4.12. • - 

3.45 (im) 1. EASTERN HOUSE (S 
Cauften . 2f-M lay); 2. ReraScwnd (Gey 
KeBemty. 92J: 3. New C w d ea Le (A 
Mtacav. 1 1-^. ALSO RAN: 94 Queen Ot 
Batte(4tfD.4raank. Ktt. TW.HCeciat 
Newmarket Tote: £2.00. OF: £840. CSF: 
£5.56. 

- 5-W 1 " 89 1- FO XY PRICE (R Guest. 
2-1 fev); 2. Benerare (Gay Kefeway. 4-tt 
3. Tempest Tossed (S Coutheii. 7-2L 
ALSO RAN: 7-2 HWi Bom Bidder ffithU 
H « nW «y OownjiS. 14 Shakeeb isftf- 6 
ran. 11, ia, 5L 51, hd. L Cumarti at 
JttMTWJW^Tote ELSQ; £1 40. £1^0. OF: 
£640, CSF; CI0JH. After a stewards' 
mqury, the pkacaigs stand. 
7 4£™ , .MRMY. 


S30 (im 5C 
RULER (L F 

M^Ser^l 


180yd) 1. NORTHERN 
,10-ifc 2. Cocked Hat 
Ifauh 3. Mrs Chrte 
(M MBer. 5-1). ALSO RAN:.5RamHe(4th), 
.6 Key Royal (5th). 7 HiarMeos (Oh). 25 
Jutntent Lady. 7 ran. Tr^an Wby. II. 1»L 
nk, sh htL XL H Wlitmg al Lou 
Tote: E1S40; £340, £1.10. 

CSF: £2499. 


4j 0 (5ft 1.DANCOK3 BELLE (GDulflett, 
5-1 ): 2. Aid And Abet (W R Swmburn, 4-6 
lav); 3. Afiayel {E GuesL 5-2). ALSO RAN: 
33 Musfe Ought (4th), Royal Special (Sth). 
Sappharino )WjL 6 ran. *L 3L nk. 5i 1 J. T 
Fairtwrst at kUJdtonem. Tote: £8J>0; 
£1.60. £t^L DF: £24a CSF: £8.70. 

4J0 (im 41 40yd) 1, KEEP HOPING <M 
MOIer, 16-lkZ MedteanGM (D McKaoum, 
7-a S. DaAona (M VWg ha ro. 11-1L ALSO 
RAN: 2 bv BnfMr's MU <m), 9-4 G G 
~ 6 ran. 41, 


Maac (SAM, 7 Kero Cool . ^ 

14LVM. sh hd. *Lfl Hufter at 

Tote: El 4,00; B4S0. El 30. OF: £38Sa 
CSF:ffi430. 

Ptacepafc £41.10 

Sandown Park 


Going: firm 

6-25 (Sf) It. 
Evens lav); If, Last 


Rad (T Ourm, 
1FW-" 


25 Dcrame (5tnj. 33 Mtes Matna. DeWi 
Rawnee (4th). 11 ran. NR: Oue BriSart 
M- *ri l. 1W. 2L N CsBaefan at 
T«Ra.70; E130T £BJ0. 
£5130. CSF: £2132. Trioast: 

£84.08, 

Ptaceme £7.15. 

Catterick 

Going: good to 1km 

JgracM AKL SMoreaM. Spring Gaiden 
ff 1 ]- » “PPOf Sm» . v5*n», 50 
Cteasy Scouae, Fir Baby. IS ran. sh hd. 

"k. hd. It Ivory at RsdlML Tote 
S® £1.40 r £130, tela £1.1 a DR 
ma CSF: £1139. Tncsst E7E34. No 
raa. 


CSRCwper Red and Last Dam* £1«, 
Last Dance and Copper Rod £133. . 

6A(1m)1, Joyful OeneerlTOuinn. 11- 
^ 2. Free On iBoenj (8-1): 3, Averatoo (1-3 
rav). 5 nut. II. 41. W Brooks. Tree: £4-20- 
xi 30. d 30. DF: eAZJBL6SF: OT.m* 
.MS i ^0 1. . YTteMeebanlc (C Ruder. 9-2 
tovfcZLnno* street pi-a 3, sa bando 
12 ran. rfL m. J Sdriiffa Tote 
«gfe£13p. £1.70. £9.00. DF: £9.00. 
CSF: £28.16. Trfcast K4O0a 


mum 


Easterby cleared 

The Yorkshire Trainer Peter 
Easlerby was yesterday cleared 
at a Jockey Oub inquiry into the 
running of his horse Lullaby 
Blues at Carlisle in May. 
Easierby’s jockey Mark Birch 
was also exonerated. 

• Cyrano de Bergerac, the Wil- 
lie Hasiing-Bass trained 
sprinter, sustained an injury to a 
knee in the Hackwood Stakes al 
Newbury on Friday, and will be 
rested until next season. 

• Reg HollinsheacLthe trainer, 
was fined £150 for a passport 
irregularity concerning bis horse 
T rojan Way. who was prevented 
from running in the Wanes of 
Catterick Handicap yesterday. 

New grandstand 

The construction of 
Plumpton's new £370.000 
grandstand, due for completion 
by mid-february next year, will 
begin immediately after the 
Sussex course's second meeting 
of the new season on August 25. 

The grandstand, which will 
provide accommodation for 
dub and tattersaiis patrons, is to 
indude increased steppings and 
overhead cover, a new 
members* bar. six private boxes, 
two large private luncheon 
rooms and new facilities for the 
press and the stewards. 


Jkunflton Course specialists 1 


1. Wind Of Peace tN 
4 tau): 2. Shadiwns (11-8): 
! (4-1). 3 ran. m 3 J W 



Going: firm 

945 (8ft 1. 

Gontorton, 5-4 

3. Mr Cricket (, „ ..... ^ „ 

Watte. Tot* £340. DF: £1.10. CSF: £330. 

After a stewards' inquhy ate resitt stood. 

, . 7 ^ 5 , ( ^ ) ii s P Wn *** Hodgson, lu- 
ll fe*l: 2. Danadn 114-tt 5, Brutus (ip-TL 
9/ar nti m M H Easterby. Tot* S23ti-, 
|1 30^ £130. £240. OF: £19L60l CSR 

_ 1 ■ jirt ar l larehj p Hutchinson, 

3-1 jt-iar); 2, Wasbrae Bay (10-1k 3. 

giA £13ft £1«L Oft £18,60. CSF: 

, 3-Jshm Ifl L W«U(A Bond.5- 

Ik IQidncom Blue (Ewe fnh 3. 
Notateto (16-1). 6 ran. hd. ivy. r 
0301 £1.9a £1.1 a 
DF: £3.70. CSR £1029. 

Pontefract - Tuesday 

Goto* fimi 


M Rm «M1, NOfflMC Pleasure 
I Homo gthi, IM 


835 (im 4ft 1, . .. 

i. 2-1 2. Dark Stoma 


Eddery. 



£230: e^fosQatLC^- 

£837. 


SANDOWN 

TTW NERS; O.Hawood. 31 urirmsis from 
J Tree. 12 from 85. 
183%: P Cwdd. 5 from 31. 16.1%. 

43 **»ws from 
ftwtm, 7 from 48, 

14.BM. S wtwworth, 8 from 41. 143%. 

CATTERICK 
P ^ Ooto. $ wmners from 13 

W ^Gomian. 1 1 from 26. 
U PrwcotL 1 7 from 62 at 2M%. 

J *2“- 21 ■*»« from 91 
^ 38 from 221 . 

172%. S Berks. 16 from 133. 120%. 

CHEPSTOW 

H Thomson Janes. 15 *fr 
SSS , 2 m 313% P Cato. 10 

*83%; f Bekfing. 6 from 

? S 0 ** ftom rides 

■ HAMILTON 

TRAndS: Miss S HaO. 12 winners from 
S™roar%3i-6%:P Rowan, n tram 48. 
Mfc fe G Rmley, 9 from 42. 21.4%. 

jOQgVS O PuteM. 48 wtenare «»» 
^"dafcia.0%; J Lows. 41 from 288. 
J Bkaadaie. 13 from 105. 12A%- 


m 


In 


i 






SPORT 


THE TIMES THURSDAY JULY 24 1986 


* * * * •* 


-rJ 


3k 

fc* 


, P R S N 

! B fav e , 


CRICKET 


i. 

h.- 

<»• 

V* 


Kent suffer as 
Metcalfe 
puts bowlers to 
the sword 


ByRkhardStreetoa 


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SCARBOROUGH: Yorkshire 
havexored 250 for four wick- 
ets against Kent, 

Ashley -Metcalfe scored an 
exhilarating century yesterday 
as Yorkshire made runs freely 
against a Kent attack, which 
apart from' Underwood, 
looked moderate. Overnight 
rain prevented a start until 
2pm but Yorkshire's enter- 
taining batting quickly com- 
pensated lor the delay. 

Metcalfe, who is 22, has 
been Yorkshire's leading scor- 
er in first-class matches this 
season. His new-found consis- 
tency might be said, perhaps, 
to be overdue; The first disad- 
vantage he bad in life, as any 
fellow sufferer would confirm, 
was to have Decern ber25 fora 
birthday; He saddled his crick- 
et Hfe-wkh another in 1963 by 
making ■ a century on . his 
county debut 

Two uneven seasons fol- 
lowed and Metcalfe was not 
the first player to find it hard 
work to live up to a headline- 
making start.. A spell last 
winter in Australian club 
cricket helped to tighten his 
technique and bis assertive 
stroke play at times this 
summer has been a revelation. 
?- Ait opening batsman by 
‘ preference, Metcalfe usually 
has to bat at no. 3 when 
1 Boycott and Motion are in the 
' side: On this' occasion he 
* revelled from the start in the 
chance to put the new-ball 
1 bowlers to the sword. Aider- 


man early on was hit for three 
fours and Yorkshire sailed 
past 100 after 26 overs as 
Metcalfe drove strongly and 
forced runs on the leg-side. 

All this was achieved after 
Sharp lobbed a lifting ball high 
off the bat to gufly in the first 
oyer ,of the innings. Neil, 
Hartley survived two chances 
as he helped add 124 for the 
second wicket before he edged 
a sharply turning ban from 
Underwood to slip. After 130 
minutes. Yorkshire went into 
tea . 141 for two from 34 overs, 
a marvellous start on a rain- 
soaked 6ekL 

MetcaKe went on to reach 
101 out of 169 in the 45th 
over. He had hit 16 fours and 
passed 1 , 000 . runs for the 
season before he flicked a 
catch to backward square Ie§. 
Love Was caught in the gufley 
but Robinson, making his first 
championship appearance tins 
year, punched the ball away in 
his own aggressive style. He 
had hit 12 lours by the end. 

YOmcSMRE: first Innings 

K Sharp c Benson b (ngtosden — . , 0 

A A Metcalfe c HkiksbEowdrsy — 123 
SN Hartley cTavatob Underwood.. 40 

P E Robinson not out AS 

J D Love c Cowdrey b Steon 9 

PJ Hartley not out — — 0 


Extras (U> 4. nb 8) 


12 


TotM (4 *tts, 70 overs) — . 250 

-fD L Balrstow. P Carried, C Stww. P-W 

Jarvis aat) S J-Dennis tot»t 

FALL OF WICKETS; 1-0.2-124,3-222. 4- 

247. 

Bonus points: YortsWra 2. Kent 1. 

Kent: M R Bensoa S OHinla. C J Tavar*. 
N R Taylor. D G AsiatL -CS Cowdrey. R M 
0kson. -tS A Mnrsh. Dt Underwood. TM 

Alderman. A P fflgdwden. 

Umpires: RPakner am D Oslear. 



Bridesmaids flying high 


llliiUaiil firsts 

•woe ‘ ■' : *~ 

u,.-- .. ‘ 

Cttiri-.-a 


Nottinghamshire’s 
powerful opening 


By Peter Ball 


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SOUTHPORT: Nottingham- 
shire have scored 350 for eight 
“against Lancashire. - 

The former England openers 
Chris Broad and Tim Robinson' 
are doing all they can to 
reawaken the selectors* interest. 
Both are in prolific form at the 
moment and yesterday they ted 
ihe way as Nottinghamshire 
gained a strong position on a 
wicket which promises to be 
interesting. . probably sooner 
rather than later. 

Southport only gets one 
county match, but it is usually 
eventful and always well at- 
tended; Yesterday was no excep- 
tion. neither heavy rtmPttrtftse? 
as Liverpool thf ..corn 
attraction- of an important ' 
vised event preventing & 
and' 1 by tea-time it 
vocal crowd from attending. 

Without Fairbrother, Patter- 
son . and CShaughnessy, all 
injured in the previous match at 
Canterbury, as well as 
SimmoBds. Lancashire had a 
depleted look. After a horren- 
dous start they recovered well 
Murphy. AUott and Folley all 
, prodi\gng steady spells to daw 1 
thefr.sSe bade into the game in 
the. afternoon and evening 
.seafops; 

1 Ti^.mght of the occasional, 
half bouncing and tuming-olf a 
length before lunch suggested 
that it may prove a good toss to 
have won. and by the dose the 
wicket was doing enough to 
confirm that impression. Lan- 
. casbjre may racrei their bowlers' 
early lack of direction, the ball 
.straying down the teg side so 
frequently that . the suspicion 
grew that the stumps were not in 
une. 

Against Broad, that was a fetal 


than his partner. -was'put down 
on two and 25. Murphy, io- his 
first bowl of the season, recov- 
ered admirably from his expen- 
sive start and the. dis- 
appointment of those misses to 
make the breakthrough after a 
flurry of ram bad disrupted 
Broad's concentration. 

With Newell’s arrival the 
momentum inevitably slowed, 
even though Watkinson's line 
understandably suffered from 
the burden of having to change 
his line; However, Murphy kept 
plugging away, and after Folley 
ended .a stand of &7 m 36 overs, 

. Fowler holding a fine runnings 
■ | sp r a w lin g-catch *afcxtfct covets- 
. Lancashire's bowlers, held ‘ at 

least ttpal sway. • 

v - Robinson eventually depar- 
ted. dipping Jfayfinrst to square 
'leg three short of his century 
a stay of 220 mjpnes. and 


as M 


Johnson 


furpby remow 
add Birch with consecutive balls 
Lancashire's recovery 1 was 
reasonably successful 

NOmWOHAMSHlAe First infcgs 
8 C Broad fcwb Murphy — 51 

RT Robinson c Abrahams bHflyhurst 97 

MNowbU c FtxMor b Folley 33 

■CEBFUoobAfce™— 43 

P Johnson b Murphy — ^ 23 


•■SEfc 

; Murphy b 


RMsy 


JOBimhtnvb 

IHBM! 

E E Hwnmings not out . 

K E Coopsr not out — 
Extras(b5.tt>9,b2, wl) , 
Total (SvrWs) — 


. 41 
14 
26 

5 

. . 17 
350 


PMSuchtobat 

FAIL OF WICKETS: 1-82, *169. 3-I8T. 4- 
239, 5-238. &2B3. 7-804. 8-316- 
Bonus poMs; LOTcasW«3. Nottinpwiv 
3tm 4. 

Umpires: j BMcanahaw ml P 8 W«M 


Hants v Derbyshire 

ATPOHTSMOUTH 
HMMMne. rest innings 

C G GrAnidge c AnOarson b Holding 2* 


•4* - • • 


• form at the moment with scores 
? of 122. 47 and 70 in his previous 

VP T«fiy cHJB D Ht*arw.~ 

TCkfcriwoocmatiwBMBer—. 
CLSmftftc Holding hWBrow — 

— 0 

— 33 

— 19 

fc : - 

. i 

first bait from Murphy fora leg- 
side four, and he continued to 
- prosper on an attack directed at 

MCJ Nicholas not Out — 

42 

_ 8 

1 4-*» t 

•i 

u 

Extras (bawl) — 

Tbtal (6 wfcts, 55 ovans) 

4 

166 


• * • • 

1 

■ .• . 


fc-r t 


l »••• 

i. .. 

f A'-’ ■ ‘ 


going the same way as he raced 
to his 50 in an hour. 

To add to Lancashire's prob- 
lems at that stage Robinson, 
who had looked far less secure 

Sussex v Worcs 

ATHOVE 

- WORCESTERSHIRE: First tarings^ 

■ T5 Cum tt* Roux. — 

OBOOSwirac and bfc ROUX 62 

G A HickcPhSfipsonbls Roux 4 


N ,.« «r:.nd^. 


OMSmimo Gould b Mays. — --- 
PA UBS* c Mb (APJ bWWs (CM) . 
. S J Rhodes b Lenham — — ■— 


S R Lsmpttt not ou 
PJN8wipoit15 


bat 

FALL OF WICKETS: 1-12. 2-39. 3^2. 4- 
S4, 5-114, 6-153. 

Bonus poMs: Hampshire 1. DartjysWre2. 
Umprec 0 J Constant and B J Meyer. 

Second XI Championship 

GANTERBtmfe Surrey H 162 Cor five v' 
KenUt ■■ 

VEOWL: HampeWre mi7 (M S Turner 6 
for 22): Somerset 185 for 6. 

HAMPSTEAD: Warwickshire 


I • 

r» p 


.r- 

f" • 


Exftss(D< wt. nb5J JO R Pont 55: 

' . Total (6 wins dec) 280 

FMLWWICKg2:t-B6. 2/10L 3-21 4.4- 

L BOWUNG: le Roux 1IM-48-3: Scott 12-2- 
• 47-0: wens (CM) 234-63-1; Lenhun 
178548-1: Mays 31-8-75-1; 0 mo 1-0-1- 

'.-. a SUSSEX: Rrst wrung* . 

- R l Aflchzn not oat 4 

A U Green 9 

Extras — — - 0 

Ta»nnowW) — ™ 13 

: PWGPitlw.NJ Unham, CMW»fa.AP 

- WMs.«f»JGoumCPPMtown.GS la 
Roox. C S Mays ana A M GScon to bau ■ 

r ‘ Bonus' poifflsrV/orcadanMa 3. Sussax 
2 .•••'-• 

Umpires: MJ Kitchen ndKJ Lyons. 


D64fortwa 


MINOR commas champimw*p: 
Finc faMnps t e wi: ComwaH 143 for 5 v 
Berkshire. 

Indian victory 

Indian won yesterday's Uni- 
vile women's international 
against Young England at 
Cheltenham College by 23 runs 
in a match reduced by rain. 

SCORES: India Iffi lor” six: Young 
England 116 (SPounr 51). 


THE OVAL: Essex have scored 
243 for ■ nine wickets against 
Surrey 

Surrey put Essex in to bat at 
the Oval yesterday, and by the 
time rain ended an interrupted 
day, prolonged by Surrey's dila- 
tory over-rate, they had cap- 
tured all but one of their 
wickets. Border, with a dogged 
52. offered the most prolonged 
individual resistance, which was 
extended by a seventh- wicket 
stand between East and Turner, 
playing his lirsi chmnproashzp 
innings of the season.- 

Both Surrey and Essex were 
weakened by injury, Essex fur- 
ther so by Test calls, and oath 
Pocock again choosing to leave 
himself out of the Surrey team, 
both sides were ted by third- 
choice captains. It therefore 
seemed particularly thoughtful 
of .somebody, that an airship 
should pass oyer' the ground 
early on wishing. “Good Luck', 
presumably.tp Jesty and Hardie. 

. . However,, the presence oh- the 
skyliite -between Keimingion 
and Westminster of another 
airship, a helicopter. Union 
Jacks, and for a white the Royal 
Standard on the Abbey, -soon 
reminded u} that it was in feet 
intended for- another pair of 

Getting off 
to a 

good start 

By Peter Marson 

Sussex had won the toss and 
invited Worcestershire to bat at 
Hove, yesterday. Curtis and 
D'Oliveira got away to a good 
start, and had pm on 96 nxns 
when D'Oliveira then fell caught 
and bowled to Le Roux. 
D'Oliveira had batted well in 
making 62. With another, eight 
runs added, Le Roux dealt 
Worcestershire a considerable 
Mow . by bringing down the 
. formidable Graeme Hick. ‘ 

Between lunch and tea Curtis 
add Smith had moved up half a 
gear at something still below 
three runs an over in taking the 
score along to 231 for three from 
86 overs. Smith having fallen to 
a catch behind off the bowling of 
Mays. Curtis wem on to make 
92 before Le Roux bowled him, 
and Worcestershire to 264 for 
five after 100 overs. 

At Portsmouth, where Derby- 
shire had chosen to field first, 
Hampshire made an uncertain 
start in ' which Terry and 
Greenidge bad gone for 39 runs, 
and by lunch Middleton and 
Chris Smith had been 1 taken, 
too.' as Hampshire came in at 
108 for two -from 41 overs. 
Shortly before tea rain sent the 
players scuttling for the pavil- 
ion. and then Hampshire had 
got to 166 for six. with Nicholas 
42 not out. and Marshall eight. 

Village draw 

The quarter-finals of the 
Norsk Hydro village cricket 
championship will be played on 
Sunday. 

DRAW: Forgo VWey (North YorfcshrteU 
Coition (W6st Yorkshofl: Tott(Chastvs) v 
Chaddesley Cortwtt (Woreastarahire): 
Ynysygsrwn (Glamorgan) v Troon (Cpm- 
wall ). langle ybury (HftillOfSlWB) v 


By Marcus Williams 

players in another fixture op the 
road. 

Jesty's decision to bow] first 
was seemingly influenced by 
tinges of green in the pitch but 
Surrey's early success owed 
nothing to the pilch. Gladwin, 
who is sadly struggling for form 
after promising so much two 
seasons ago, cut a short, wide 
ball from Doughty to give 
Richards his first catch of the 
day. After a brief stoppage for 
bad light - the extra bounce 
generated by Gray's great height 
caused Stephenson to lob a 
gentle catch off the splice to 
gully at 41. 

On a cool breezy day Surrey's 
wicketkeeper and slips wens 
keeping warm between overs 
with a game of "^et me to the 
other end on time", and their 
joint efforts paid dividends for 
the. thud wicket which came in 
remarkable fashion. Prichard, 
after, a stand of 54 in 12 overs 
with'- Bender, edged .Gray, to 
Second slip; Lynch stretched and 
named the ball dowttStewan at 
first fop helped it on further to 
bis left and Richards eventually 
pouched the ball close to the 
ground. Pass the pared has 
nothing on that 

While Needham was sealing 
one ended with a parsimonious 


spell of offspin, Hardie’s run 
out going for an ambitious 
second, brought in Bums, 
Essex's Second XI wicketkeeper 
on his debut as a batsman, and 
he played attractively off the 
front foot 

He saw Border, below his 
best teach his fifty after 140 
minutes, but then Thomas, 
playing for the first time since 
his back injury at the end of 
April accounted for them both 
in the space of three overs. 
Border was caught behind glanc- 
ing, Burns cut uppishly to the 
gully fielder, Garke, 


steady procession 
substitutes. 


of a 
Surrey 


ESSEX: First Innings 
C Gladwin c Richante h Dou^rty 0 

JPSJaptoworcMonkhousebGray 23 

PJ Prictwdc Richards b Gray 34 

A R Border c Richards b Thomas — 52 

*BRHardtenmout 12 

NO Boms c sub b Thomas IB 

S DE East cMonfchouseb Gray 3B 

: Turner c Lynch b Monkhouse —— 32 

I L Pont not out D 

TDTopuybGray — 0 

J K LBVqrnotouf — — a 

Extras Qb 6, w1.nbl2) 19 

Total(9wktSL 92 mars) 243 

FALL OF WICKETS: 1-12. 2-4L 3f5. 4- 
120, 5-143. 6-155, 7-2ia 8-233. 9-234. 
SURREY: N J Felknar, A Needham. A J 
StBwnut, M A Lynch. T E Jesty. 1C J 
Richards. G Monkhouse. DJ Thomas, RJ 
Doughty. KTMedbcott and AH Grgy. 
Bonus points: Surrey 4. Essex 2. 
UrraxresiDGL Evans and NT Flaws. 


A man to put steel into 
voice of the Welsh 


2fy fro Tennant 


LEICESTER Glamorgan have 
scored 48 for two against 
Leicestershire. 

Only 17 overs were possible 
between the squalls at Grace 
Road yesterday. In that time. 
Hugh Morris, Glamorgan's new 
captain, who won the toss, was 
dropped on nought and out for 
eight. Pauline was the other 
batsman dismissed, caught be- 
hind off a glove. The pitch was 
green and batting was not 
pleasant 

It is to be hoped that the cares 
of captaincy and Glamorgan's 
lonely championship position 
will not affect Morris, the 
youngest captain in the country, 
as they have Oniong. To assist 
him. John Steele, who will retire 
from three-day cricket at the 
season's end (but not from the 
one-day game), has been given a 
secretarial rote with responsibil- 
ity for improving the county's 
cricket. 

So Stede and Alan Jones, the 
Second XI coach and captain. 


are to be “the think-tank” of 
Welsh cricket- It would be hard 
to find two more experienced 
players. Steele, who was 40 
yesterday, will have a big say in 
staff appointments. 

One of his first tasks, he said, 
would be to sign an overseas 
player, preferably a quick 
bowler who can baL He is aware 
h iff choice is limited. He is also 
seeking a consistent, seasoned 
county pro — a man, in other 
words, such as himself or 
brother David. 

GLAMORGAN: Rrst Innings 

*H Morris c Butcher b CSft 8 

D B Paulino c G* b Agnew 4 

GC Holmes ran out 25 

Youns Ahmed not out 5 

Extras 0b 1. nb 5) 6 


Total (2 wMa, 173 overs) 48 

FALL OF WICKETS: 1-6.2-41. 
RCOntong, M P Maynard. J G Thomas, 
ft Davies, s J Base. J F Steele and D J 
Hicfcey total 

LSCE8TERSMRE: J C Balderatone, R A 
Cobb. I P Butcher. L Pottw. T J Boon, P D 
Bowter.*PBCJlft PAJDeFrettas,-tPGffl, 
JPAgnew. LB Taylor. 

Umpires: B Laadbeater and K E Palmar. 


Botham’s brief eclipse 


Ian Botham's return to the 
crease yesterday, for his first 
important match in England 
since his two-month suspen- 
sion, was initially over- 
shadowed by the performance of 
Murray Turner, a lit tie-known 
bowler who has made the occa- 
sional appearance for Somerset. 

Botham took the opening 
wicket for Somerset Second XI 
against Hampshire Second XI at 
Yeovil, trapping O’Connor leg- 
before. but Turner claimed six 
wickets before lunch as Hamp- 
shire Second XI collapsed to 1 1 7 

all oul 

At one point. Turner's figures 
were six wickets for five runs off 


30 halls- while Botham could 
only muster one for 28 off nine 
overs. 

Before the match Botham 
said: “The time off has been 
quite pleasant in some ways. My 
aim now is to get back into the 
Somerset first team. 

“1 have got the same enthu- 
siasm. I haven't been moping 
and the break hasn't done me 
any harm.” 

Later in the day. when Somer- 
set Second XI batted. Botham 
made 41 runs in 37 minutes; He 
faced 39 balls and hit nine 
boundaries before being bowled 
by Paul Bakker. Hampshire's 
Dutch fast bowler. 


GOLF 

Craik glad 
sister 
has gentle 
touch 

By Mitchell Platts 

Derek Craik. a Scottish boy 
international, made a fine start 
in the Cams Trophy with 
rounds of 69 and 71 at Moor 
Park. Rickraansworth, yes- 
terday. Craik. aged 16 of 
Frilford Heath, followed his first 
round of 69 on the West Course 
in the morning with an excellent 
71 on the High for a half-way 


A strong wind in the after- 
noon made club selection diffi- 
cult but Craik. following an 
indifferent outward half moved 
through the field with the assis- 
tance of two birdies and an eagle 
in his final seven holes. 

At the 12th (210 yards) he 
struck the five iron to six feet for 
a two and at the long 13th he 
reached the green with a driver 
and a four iron then holed from 

SO feet for his eagle. Craik drove 

into the rough to drop a shot at 

the 14th buihe recovered with a 

birdie at the long 16th where he 
hit the green with a driver and a 
three wood. 

He said: *Tve been putting so 
badly this year that I asked my 
sister, Tracey, who is a Scottish 
under-22 international whether 
I could borrow her putter. She 
allowed me to take it for this 
week and it's worked so well 
that she might have problems 
trying to get it back.” 

James Cook, the British boy’s 
champion, set the pace in the 
morning with a 67 on the West 
Course but he faltered in the 
afternoon by dropping three 
strokes n> the last four boles for 
a 74 on the High Course. 

Cook, of Leamington and 
County, had one birdie and 13 
pars before be missed the green 
at the 15th, where he took three 
to hole, then three putted from 
the back edge of the 17th. He 
dropped another stroke at the 
short 18th where he was 
bunkered. 

Martyn Thompson, of 
Knighton Heath, had successive 
rounds of 71. On the High 
Course he came home in 33 wnh 
the assistance of an eagle three 
at the 16ti> and a birdie at the 
17th. Wayne Henry, the British 
boy's captain, followed a first 
round of 69 on the West Course 


with a 77 on the High where he 
took seven at the 9th after 
needing three strokes to extract 
his ball from the ferns behind 
the green. 

LEADMG SCORES: 140c D Cralc (FriMord 


74. 70. 145: M J Stanford 
70. 14fc M J Joseph 

J 70. 78: w Henry (Porters 

Ic) 89. 77; V C Cox (West Esrad 78. 70. 
147: A Raltt (Richmond) B9. 7& D Hickman 
(Wate ftoovM 78, 71; M J Watson 
(Weymouth) TO. 68. 


SHOOTING 

Youth has 
its day 
at Bisley 

By Our Shooting 
Correspondent 


John Bellringer, aged 29. of 
the Old Epsomian Rifle Club 
and Simon Belither, aged 28 
(Uppingham Veterans) tied at 
Bisley yesterday for the Queen's 
bronze medal for top score in 
the first stage of the Queen's 
Prize competition.Tbey both 
put every shot into the bullseye 
at 300, 500 and 600 yards for 
highest possible score of 105. 
They will reshoot tomorrow. 

But it was not just a young 
men's day. George Arnold, aged 
70. who won the Prize in 1970 
and Charles Trotter, aged 62. 
the Guernsey man who took it 
in 1975. bout qualified for the 
next round with 104. 

Arthur Clarke, aged 64. who is 
the oldest competitor in the 
Commonwealth Games, made 
102. enough to win a place in the 
semi-final but he will have to be 
in Edinburgh, shooting for Scot- 
land, when the 300 survivors of 
the original 1 .200 go to the range 
tomorrow. The same thing hap- 
pened to the England pair, John 
Bloomfield and Nick 
Crawshaw, and one of 
Guernsey's Edinburgh team, 
Rob Courtney. They will all 
have to postpone their Queen's 
Prize hopes until next year 
although their scores were high. 

Mixed weather throughout 
the day brought mixed fortunes 
but scoring generally was up to 
the high standaid of this year's 
meeting although it was possible 
logo forward on all scores of 99 
and above, one point lower than 
last year. There were 90 compet- 
itors on the borderline with 
scores of 98 and only the best of 
those filled the last seven places. 

The lowest score to get in was 
33, 31 and 34, finishing with the 
Iasi shot in the bullseye. 

OTHER RESULTS: 

Range; f. Territorial-. 

Navy 1032: 3. RAF 1 
“ mo* 1. F/Lt D 

<15/15X5: 2. J E M 

14X5:3. R 




TENNIS 


Navratilova finds 
a sweet rhythm 

From Richard Evans, Prague 


Arantxa Sanchez, a little 
Spanish giri. did her best to belie 
her 14 years and prove that 
Martina Navratilova is not 
invincible. The defeat by 6-3, 6- 
0. does not really reflect the 
quality of Miss Sanchez's 
performance when Spain met 
the United States in the second 
round of the NEC Federation 
Cup yesterday. 

She broke the Wimbledon 
champion's service to love early 
in the first set and then, facing 
three match points at 0-5 in the 
second, produced two stunning 
backhand passes off a stroke 
that is hit two-handed and very 
flaL 

Miss Navratilova admitted to 
being impressed and indeed the 
tennis world will soon be 
reverberating with the name of 
Sanchez. Arantxa's brother. 
Emilio, at 21 is already ranked 
21 st in the world, while Javier, 
another brother, is representing 
Spain in the Galea Cup in 
Vichy. 

The United States were, of 
course, much too strong far 
Spain no matter how rosy that 
country's tennis future looked, 
Chris Lloyd beat Marfa Llorca 
6-1. 6-0 and Miss Navratilova 
and Pam Shriver dropped only 
one game in wrapping up the 
irrelevant doubles. 

The singles matches were 
played inside the main stadium, 
an impressive structure with 
7.000 red and yellow seats. The 

Middlesex 
set for 
showdown 

By a Special Correspondent 

Middlesex's hopes of wresting 
the Prudential Comity Cap 
Group 1 title from Essex, the 
holders, were given farther mo- 
mentum between the showers at 
Devonshire Park, Eastbourne, 

yesterday. 

Middlesex, a team of 
contrasting talents, comfortably 
accounted for a game Somerset 
side, and added extra spice to 
today's showdown with Essex, 
with whom they have dominated 
this event for the past decade. 

There had been no such 
optimism earlier la the day when 
Stuart Bale and Chris Brad ram 
were brushed aside 6-3, 6-2 with 
almost indecent haste by An- 
drew Castle and Martin Cor- 
nish. of Somerset, in the opening 
round of matches. 

Slowly, however, the tide 
turned in Middlesex's favour 
and the pairing of Alan Jones, 
Jo Dnrie's -coach, and Pat 
Hnghesntan, were able to make 
the tie safe in the final rubber of 
the second round. 

Essex continued to make 
heavy weather of their defence 
and Berkshire posed them some 
embarrassing questions and also 
bare more than their fair share 
of injury worries. Neil Rayner 
was an early casualty although 
he bravely played on. In the 
women's tournament, Surrey, 
the holders, had an easier titan 
expected win over Devon, none 
of whose team found their best 
form. 


place was packed when Miss 
Navratilova appeared — with 
every entrance or viewing space 
crammed with spectators with- 
out tickets. Any doubts as to 
Czech feelings towards the 
returning heroine were removed 
when Miss Navratilova, having 
double-faulted as she tried to 
come to terms with light balls in 
a swirling wind, was accorded 
the rhythmical clapping of en- 
served tor 


courage mem reserved 
rial favourites. 


spe- 


The whole week, of course, 
has been a special experience — 
a fact of such blinding clarity 
that it was amusing, if not a little 
sad, to hear poor Cyril Suk. the 
Czech federation president, trot 
out the party fine when he was 
asked about Miss Navratilova's 
presence here; “It is normal" he 
said, when it was palpably 
nothing of the son. “It is normal 
that the Czech federation would 
want the best players represent- 
ing their countries." 

Suk. widower of Vera Sukova 
and father of Helena, has. along 
with Jan Kodes. been largely 
responsible for the splendid 
modem sur-roundings in which 
this Federation Cup is being 
played and the general pre- 
eminence of Czech tennis in the 
world game. But comments like 
that only serve to remind one of 
the restrictions under which it 
has all been achieved. 

Results, page 46 

Top seeds 
hand out 
stiff lesson 

By a Correspondent 

The pecking order in schools 
tennis shows little sign of chang- 
ing after the top eight seeds 
reached today's quarter-finals of 
the Youll Cap at Wimbledon. 

AH qualified without needing 
a single decider, but there were 
some anxious moments for 
Newcastle RGS. competing for 
the 31st consecutive year, and St 
George’s Weybridge. in their 
third-round matches with Marl- 
borough and Haileybury. 

Guy Jones and Julian Vacher. 
Marlborough's first pair, man- 
aged to extend Newcastle (Bryan 
Pascoe and Robert Douglas) to a 
first set tie-break, a culmination 
of an hour of frenetic exchanges. 

Nottingham HS, despite the 
absence of Graham Spalding on 
county duty, made light work of 
Eton Spalding's replacement 
Stephen Hopkins impressed. 

Jeffrey Hunter, of St Paul's, 
returns from Germany today 
after playing with the national 
under-] 6 side, hoping his school 
have readied the semi-finals in 
his absence, but Repton, the 
holders, are looking stronger the 
longer the tournament pro- 
gresses and they ended King's 
Macclesfield's challenge for the 
loss of only four games. 

RESULTS: Second round: Biyansttyl M 
King's Canurtxvy 2-0. Thud round: 
Repton bt King's Mocciesfield 2-0; UCS M 
Rugby 2-0: St Georgs's. Waytandge tt 
HaBeytwy 24k Nswcastte bt Marlborough 
2-0; Notangftani bt Eton 2-0; Ragatt w 
Woodhouse Grove 2-0; Bryanston wafle- 
ovflr: St Paul's bt Bolton 2-0. 


SPORT IN BRIEF 


Villa pay the price 


Aston Villa have been or- 
dered to pay Aberdeen £350.000 
for Neil Cooper, the Scotland 
Under-2I international defend- 
er. Villa offered £200,000, Aber- 
deen wanted £500.000. and the 
price was fixed yesterday by a 
Football League tribunal meet- 
ing in Manchester. 

• Trevor Hebbcrd. Oxford 
United's midfield player, ap- 
pears likely to sign a new 
contract with the club and 
yesterday left with Oxford for a 
six-team tournament in Bul- 
garia. He had earlier rejected a 
new contract 

• Preston North End have 
launched a unique clean-up 
campaign in an effort to rid 
themselves of one of the worst 
disciplinary records in the 
League. Under a scheme which 
has the backing of the Football 
Association and the PFA. play- 
ers guilty of dissent will have to 


report in on their days off. 
“They will then have to clean 
the toilets and stands and other 
similar jobs.'' said John 
McGrath, the manager. 

RUGBY UNION: The com- 
pany set up to organize the first 
World Cup, in Australasia next 
summer, has announced two 
senior executive appointments. 
James Campbell, a Wellington- 
based management consultant, 
is the new executive director 
and Wilf Barker the new 
commercial manager. 
Campbell's three co-directors 
are ex-rnternationals John Kcn- 
dall-Carpenier (England). Sir 
Nicholas Shahadie (Australia) 
and Dick Littlejohne 
(Australia). 

TENNIS: Joakim Nysirom, of 
Sweden, the third seed, has been 
knocked out of the Swedish 
Open in the first round by Paolo 
Cane. 


RUGBY UNION 


Irish caught in a scram 

By George Ace 


The news that Sid Millar and 
Mick Doyle will lead Ireland's 
assault on the World Cup in 
Australia and New Zealand next 
year caused many a smile in 
Irish rugby circles. Not that both 
have all the right credentials to 
fulfil their respective roles as 
manager and coach, but that 
their contrasting views as to the 
relative merits or the scrum in 
modern rugby is certain to 
provoke ripples of uneasiness. 

Doyle has been repeatedly 
quoted during his two years as 
Irish coach as saying that the 
scrum is only a means of 
restarting a match- Millar, on 
the other hand, as befits a 
former international and British 


Lions prop forward, has nev 
deviated from his belief that tl 
scrum is the most imports 
single factor in rugby. 

Two opposites, howevj 
sometimes make for the perfe 
blend. Doyle is primarily 
motivator, while Millar's va 
experience gleaned from : 
internationals over three d 
cades for Ireland, nine Britis 
Lions appearances in three ton 
as well as a spell as Irish coac 
and coach and manager to tl 
Lions in 1974 and 1980 respe 
lively to South Africa, wi 
ensure the smooth running t 
the operation, always providin; 
of course, that everyone knew 
who is calling the shots. 


fmirw 

■ a*.'V ,s V. 


YACHTING 


mtar 

■ r ■ 

*■ 

1 

' 1 * 

tt*" . 


Winning guineas on points of law 

By a Special Correspondent 




vr l?: \ 




,* V ■ 


,W 


ti: 


By two consecutive wins in a 
... besi-of-lfmee finals. Nick Ryley 

- and his crew made their club, 
the Royal Lyraington Yacht 

i Cub. the richer by one thousand 

* guineas when they won the 
Viydla Cup yesterday at Cowes 
from the Royal Yacht Squadron 

- crew skippered by Peter 

* Nichotecm. . 

) Iron reafty. Rvfcy reached the 
final without winning a race on 
■; the water. Instead he defeated 
crews from both the Royal 
Southern Yacht Club and the 
Royal Ocean Racing Club on 
, points oflaw in the protest room 
having lost to both at sea. hi the 
final, however, be proved bis 
worth by. simply sailing faster 
There were ' some intense 


luffing matches on the run white 
Ryley three times held off 
Nicholson's challenge; but on 
the second beat superior speed 
and a generous wind shift pul 
Ryley so far ahead that the 
Squadron yacht was never again 
in contention. 


ng s 

Norfolk and Suffolk yacht club 
produced offshore winds of 
between 10 and 30 knots-gmog 
competitors varying conditions 
requiring adaptable rigs and 
good two trapeze technique. 
James Hartley and Ian Tillen 
RESULTS: YiftB* Ou 1. Rwtf wep * SS 8 * 0 VKIOliOU* Showing 
Lyimuton VC: 2, Royal Yacht Squadron; , complete mastery of the con- 
equtJ 4. Royal Oman Ragnc Q uo end ditions and are now virtually 
'rtPtatei. Royal assured of overall victory in lie 
Points Trophy. The following 
order changed regularly but it 
was eventually Will Henderson 
and Bruce Gram who placed 
second. 

RESULTS; Fowih Raee: i, J Hanteyand I 
TUett (ttehaner SO: 2. W Handenoa anfl 
B Grant (FMcaniOe YG): 3. D MadMn and 
1 Csdwallader (RKiSAL 


0/2*1. 
On lot the 


:Z 
.:3- 

CMham (S .Arthak 4. Rad Mart « 
StMd); 5, Jont Venture (R Smoods): B, 
Ayestu IN Wupp). Chnmft alter four 
race* Hedgehog. One ter we Boys. 
CMMen. . 

• The fourth race for the Inter- 
national 14 POW Cup week 


Playing the game in the wonderful world of polo 


Among the SUnsIoixs I have 
about myself ~ and there are 
many — is that had my parents 
only had the courtesy to be 
millionaires. I would now be the 
finest polo player in the history 
of tiie world. What with my 
tasteful ball game and my 
incredible horsemanship Gust 
ask my horse) 1 cannot see what 
would have prevented roe. 

Admittedly, my knowledge of 

the game fe somewhat sketchy — 
about 98 per cent of it comes 
from reading Rudyard Kipling's 
The Maltese Got (which is, of 
course, the finest sports Story 
ever written) at an im- 
pressfooable age. However. I 
have been improving os my 
vajjoe and romantic notion about 
the game by readme The World 
of Polos Post end Proem*, by 
my colleague. J N P Watson. 


" smm 

ft :•&>** 

Simon 

i 

Barnes 

j 


The hook tells yoo all you corid 
wish to know about the game's 
history and its current state. 

Above aR. ft aches with rev- 
erence and tore for the game, 
"'Didn't we meet In Abdul 
Rahman's stable in Bombay four 
seasons ago?* 'Not me.' sakl the 
Maltese Cat politely. ‘I was at 
Malta then, polling a vegetable 
cart, I don't nee, I play the 
game. 

Yes. tiie book contained as 
(abridged tart fllostrated) ver- 
sion of Kipling's great polo yarn. 
as well as many other extended 
quotations from writings about 


the game throughout its history. 
“Man is a Ball tossed Into the 
Field of Existence, driven hither 
and thither by the Chaugan- 
Sttek of Destiny wielded by the 
hand of Providence" - a meta- 
phor of ancient Persia. Or more 
recently: 


For they bear a rode inscription 
saying, “Stranger drop a tear 
For the Caff add Cottar players 
and the Geebung boys lie bene'. 
Add oa misty moonlit evenings, 
while the dingoes howl around. 
You can see their shadows 
flitting down that phantom polo 


Bat pob wives don't care a fat. 
The game is won, they all retire 
For long post-mortems in the 
bar. 

Bat do not pity polo wives 
Because they really tore their 
Uses. 

I cannot resist another quota- 
tion, this time from Australian 
polo: 

By the Old Campmpe River, 
where the breezes shake the grass. 
There's a row of little grave 
stones that the stockmen never 
pass , 


Yoa cam hear the had collision 
as the flying players meet, 

Aad the rattle of themttBets^aad 
the rash of ponies' feet, 

TUI the terrified spectador rides 
like blazes to the pub — 

He's i 

the GeeimngPob 
Indeed, from a prolonged 
examination of the book's many 
historical pictures, it seems 
certain that the reason most 
people play polo fa so that they 
can strut about in the bar all 
sweaty and booted afterwards. 


Strutting about drinking while 
stfU in one's riding boots is, after 
all one of life's richest plea- 
sures. 

“That was glory and honour 
enough for the rest of his days, 
and the Maltese Cat did not 
complain much when his 
vetinary surgeon said that he 
would be no good for polo 
anymore. When Lutyens mar- 
ried, his wife did not allow him 
to play, so his forced to be an 
umpire; and his horse on these 
occasions was a flea-bitten grey 
with a neat polo- toil, lame ati 
round, but desperately quick on 
his feet and. as everybody knew, 
past Pluperfect Prestis si mo 
Player of the Game." 

*The World of Poto: Past and 
Present, by J N P Watson, 
published !?y The Sportsman's 
Press, price £16.95- 




46 SPORT 


• Amateur attitudes 
threaten the future 




By David Miller 



There are two crises, not 
one, in the 13th Common- 
wealth Games, which open 
here in Edinburgh today. The 
more conspicuous is the polit- 
ical boycott Equally danger- 
ous. however, is the 
amateurish organization and 
attitude of the Scotland orga- 
nizing committee, and the 
Commonwealth Games Fed- 
eration itself in a sporting 
world now demanding a pro- 
fessional relationship with 
sponsors, broadcasting and 
with the competitors 
themselves. 

Two new names for 
Games vacancies 

Debbie Gore, of Fleetwood, 
will replace Annette Cowley in 
the 100 metres freestyle, and 
Karen Mellor, of Norwich 
Penguins, fills the vacant 
berth in the 200 metres at the 
Commonwealth Games in Ed- 
inburgh. Both girls were origi- 
nally selected for die two 
events before Cowley was 
successful in her initial appeal 
ever eligibility. 

• Daley Thompson, who de- 
fends the decathlon title, has 
refused to give any interviews 
before the Games. Gordon 
Wright, England's athletics 
team manager, said Thompson 
wanted total rest and quiet. 

Fortunately for the future of 
the Games, the New Zealand 
organizing committee for 
Auckland in 1990 are at this 
moment in a more advanced 
state than the embarrassed 
Scottish hosts, who anxiously 
hope that Edinburgh may yet 
be remembered for its success- 
es rather than its failures. 
With Canada and Wales bid- 
ding for the 1994 Games, 
there is every prospect that 
world-wide historical alle- 
giances with Britain will con- 
tinue to produce a worthwhile 
sporting event beyond the end 
of the century, with or without 
their politically dominated 
black colleagues or the Com- 
monwealth itself 

Malcolm Beattie, the mar- 
keting director for Auckland, 
reveals that they already have 
five exclusive multi-national 
sponsors under contract, and 
expect the rest of their spon- 
sors to have signed by the end 
of the year. “For the Games to 
succeed in the future," Beattie 
says, “the federation must 
appoint a permanent execu- 
tive Games director. The fed- 
eration itself must remain the 
guardian, but we need - a 
movable, professional organi- 
zation, combining all broad- 
casting and sponsorship 
elements, which will repeat 
itself every four years among 
the half-dozen or so countries 


capable of staging a Games. In 
this way they can be operable. 
Otherwise we shall have more 
debacles. You cannot try to re- 
invent the wheel from scratch 
every time." 

The senior Scottish offi- 
cials, Kenneth Borthwick, 
Blair Grossett and George 
Hunter, have procrastinated 
over four years, attempting to 
raise money on a domestic 
rather international front. 
Boycott apart, they have got 
what they deserve; a parochial 
Games. Peter Heady, the 
chairman of the federation 
and himself a Scot failed to 
sense the warning signs and 
should three months ago'have 
been lobbying India and oth- 
ers to ensure a non-political 
attitude similar to Britain's in 
1980 before the break-up of 
the Eminent Persons’ discus- 
sions. Robert Maxwell's blus- 
tering late intervention is of 
little help. 

At this Sunday's general 
assembly. Heady must at- 
tempt as chairman to get the 
Games into a stale of future 
equilibrium, commercial and 
political however impossible 
the latter may seem. The 
Commonwealth Games will 
fold as a major event as much 
through lack of internal lead- 
ership as external political 
interference. The next execu- 
tive meeting is planned for 
Barbados instead of London 
as normal, when wives will be 
taken on a 12-day jaunt in 
which meetings will occupy a 
mere three days. Amateur 
incompetence is rife. 

However, it is too simple to 
write off the Edinburgh 
Games prematurely as a 
disaster, even if that may 
understandably be the emo- 
tional perception of the pub- 
lic When the competitors 
come to the line tomorrow, 
following what may still be a 
proud if devalued opening 
ceremony this evening, it will 
be those who were here who 
will be remembered rather 
than those who stayed away. 

it is the credibility of the 
Commonwealth itself, more 
than its most visible agency, 
the Games, which is in ques- 
tion. As in the last three 
Olympic Games, it is competi- 
tors who are being used by 
politicians in a war without 
bullets which will have no 
effect on the global events they 
seek to influence 

Significantly, of the 43 na- 
tions who were present at the 
house of Sir Sonny Ramphal 
the Commonweal th secrelary 
general in May 1982 to draw 
up the controversial Code of 
Conduct. 35 were represented 
by politicians rather than 
sports officials. 

It is the unfortunate para- 
dox that the allegedly “Fnendr 


. .:-y 





SPAY JULY 24 1986 


gerous message 
le politicians 

j crisis 

SSrlSiS 


V *: 

•ST"** 

Sfcx-.-le* 




r*'w. ;■ 


ifei'-V ! 


athletics - -j 

Triumphant Ovett 
thinks of return 
to blue riband race 

From Pat Botcher, Athletics Correspondent, Paris 

Sieve Oven’s 3min 34.5Qsec, «o bAeMOol 

his fastest time for three year* 
when winning the 1 ,500m at the think way 1 . 

Ban's meeting on Tuesday, has "SSSmmBhnniBdbie con- 

st?sfissrrss 

the Commoawealui Games next D^Kcancdla- 

Owe Ovett had digested the lions elsewhere, and doubtiess 
initial satisfection of completing more joeomfe .a 

SsHrl SSSKsfe 
SSSs Ssaajae. 

ffSOSSfOAS gSQAgsg' 

-1 was really surprised at the nine competitors left m these 

s'S'rarr 

was that be IJ00 runner m BJnbunfc 
would sec how he performed in And Steve Hams hung on to 

SdGames. That b also what Arturo Bamos long enough to 
Steve Oam plans before dead- ensure,, -5! 

mg whether tocontest both 800 27:59.33 for £10000. 
ami 1.500 in the European gives him a quailfiring time _ for 
championships as welL If Ovett the European championship, 
thought that Cram, and Sebas- 
tian Coe were both going to 
double up in 'Stuttgart, that 
might just tempt him to try the 

1.500, hoping to capitalize on 
their potential fatigue, for Ovett 
still looks to have the beating of 
everyone else in Europe over 

1 .500. But, ultimately it would 
be unwise to go against Coe and 
Cram in the sort of form they 
are showing at the moment. 

What is more, Ovett is likely to 
go into the European 5,000 as 
»nm-h of a favourite as be is for 

that distance in Edinburgh. 

And a comment' from Said 
Aoiiita^ after his winning return 
to“ competition in Paris — 3,000 
metres iix 7:42.32 — following 
his ankle gash in Oslo three 
weeks ago might be equally 
indicative of. Ovett’s- state of 
mind regarding the metric mile. 

Aouita said: “As much as I like 
running 5,000 and 10,000 and 
setting world records, or trying 


pF-w ' • *«• : £ jM* 


w:'*. .j- 




*£.y; ‘ * ‘ ‘ ' 

. : . ••• . ■ 
• W: v *■*' .■ ■■ 

! v" * * * "•?* V m f "]*.*■ * *v ■ 

*■:»< • *,».■■■»■» '• 

On the border line: the Welsh pursuit team in dose order as they put in some last-minute 
practice In the Meadowbank Velodrome yesterday (Photograph: lan Stewart) 


ly Games" are the only games 
in the world with a political 
rather than geographical qual- 
ification. 1 doubt if there is an 
athlete who will .compete in 
Edinburgh who is not opposed 
to every aspect of apartheid, 
but politics will be forgotten 
from tomorrow. 

The troth is, however un- 
palatable it may be for the 
emerging third world nations 
of the Commonwealth, that . 
less than 15 per cent of the 
medals mil be affected by 
their withdrawal In the previ- 
ous 12 games, out of some- 
3,650 medals, 2,950 have been 
won by England, Australia, 
Canada, New Zealand, Scot- 
land, Wales and Northern 
Ireland. 

Black Africa wants to call 
the tune, but in sporting terms 
there is no chance of their 


TODAY’S FIXTURES 


doing so as yet It is collabora- 
tion, not confrontation, that 
their sport is needing. Next 
year's African Games at Nai- 
robi, rescheduled Tor the sec- 
ond time, are on the point of 
collapse, economically and 
administratively. All that AT 
rica are achieving with the 
present boycott is minimal 
political effect and maximum 
debilitation of their athletic 
impetus. 

The damage by the boycott 
to the competition is primari- 
ly in boxing, which is irrepara- 
bly reduced by the absence of 
Nigeria, Ghanaand others; to 
some extent- ia wrestling, in 
which India are strong; and in 
certain athletics events. Yet 
swimming, rowing, cycling, 
badminton, shooting and 
bowls medals with be relative- 
ly unaffected, as will be much 


FOR THE RECORD 


of the track and field 
programme 

If only half the Common- 
wealth countries are here, 
there will bemore competitors 
than there were in' Brisbane. 
The village is buzzing even if 
there are empty beds and few 
black feces. There should be 
two marvellous marathon 
races, and a classic duel 
between Cram and Coe in the 
two shorter middle distances. 

There is much to be success- 
fully rescued from these trou- 
bled Games; and they can still 
give us something to remem- 
ber just as Montreal- Moscow 
and Los -Angeles did in spite of 
the politicians. The strength of 
sport is its self- regeneration. 
Remove one champion, 
whether by age, injury or 
boycott and another instantly 
emerges. 


CRICKET 

First Comhffl Test 
LORO’S: England v New Zealand 
Britannic Assurance 
County Championship 
(1 1 .0. 1 10 overs minimum) 
PORTSMOUTH: Hants v Derbys 
SOUT HPORT ) Lancs v Notts 
LEICESTER: Le*cs v Glamorgan 
THE OVAL: Surrey v Essex 
HOVE: Sussex v Worcestershire 
SCARBOROUGH: Yorkshire v Kant 
SECOND XI CNAMPtONSHP: SMptay: 
Dorttysiwa v Gloucestershire. Homtorcfc 
.Essex v Nattnghamstare. Canterbury: 
rert » Surrey South Hampxteed: MxWte- 
se* u Warwick sbre. Overctone Park; 
Nothamptonsiwe v Lsnwrshue. Ytovfc 
Somerset v Hampshire. Wo o e ele r 
Worcestershire v LflKasnntwra 


MINOR COUNTIES CHAMPMNSHIK 
HnchaaKMteed; BericsNra v Conwaa. 
SJough: ajcWngbainshiro v Dorset Ijm- 
wtotK Sutfaik v NorfcA. 

COMMONWEALTH GAMES 
Opening ceremony (at Ednburgh, 


OTHER SPORT 
TENNIS: Prudential County Cup grass 
court champronstxps (manat Easttxxxrvi. 
Cromer. Southsea. Hunstanton. Malvern, 
Cambridge. Ovswich: women at East- 
bowne. Worthing, ChoHonham. Enmouth, 
PoDte. Cambridge. Fefcxstowe). 

ROWING: Doggetts Coetand Bedge. 
YACHTING: Pnnce of Wales Cup, 
LxwestotL 
SHOOTBKS: Osley. 

POUk Cowdray Park CheOenge Cup. 
CROQUETS Brtttsh Open championsM p a 
(at Hurtmgham); CbeRenftam wumameni 





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event And tMsyeac Group 4 has provided total security for the 
Commonwealth Games. Security tor spectators. And security to ensure 
the smooth running ol the Games. 

Other major events we have covered th is year Iridude The Open 

GoU Championships, The National Garden Festival and HaJfaitte' Super 
Prix in Bimungham city centre. 

With years of experience gained from being part of Europe^ largest 
security organisation Group * is wen quebhed to offer as Special Events 
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Kid: 






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+*r4. 


HZ! 







LACROSSE 


Goalkeeper shows how 

: --By Fetor Taflbw 


■Peter CondroD.- of Cheadle 
CHub, made . world champion- 
ship history as the first goal- 
keeper to score a goal in the 
men’s tournament. - 
His feat could not save 
England from a devastating 
defeat as the United. States, the 
holders, won 32-8 in Toronto. 

Condron saved 22 shots at 
goal, but the American pressure 
was - relentless as 'they under- 
lined their attempt , to remain 
world champions. . . .- 


Joe Gold the England coach 
said: “I tried every defence I 
knew but we could not stop 
them." 

The United States will play 
C anada in tomorrow's final ana 
England face Australia in 
today's play-off for third place. 
Canada pounded in seven goals 
in 20 minutes to come from 
behind to beat Australia 17-14. 


RESULfc-WbrU ctamotanaMp: SarnF 
finals: England 8. UD&d States 32 
Canada IT^AKSiaBa 14.. • 


football 

Italians are 
accused 
following 
payments 

title in Spain are being investi- 
gated for allegedly taking home 
"black money" paid them by a 
commercial sponsor. 

Alfonso Marra, the deputy 
stale prosecutor, said yesterday 
that 22 players have been in- 
formed that they are the subject 
of an investigation into the 
allegedly illegal transfer of 
money into Italy. 

Players involved in the in- 
vestigation include the for- 
wards. Paolo Rossi Bruno 
Conti and.Sandro Altobelli. the 
retired goalkeeper, Dino Zoff 
and the defenders and mid- 
fielders. Antonio Cabrini. 
Gaetano Sc ire a. Giuseppe 
Bergomi. Giancario Aniognoni 
and Marco TardellL 

The amount involved, 
equivalent to 400 miHion lire 
(about £185.000), was allegedly 
handed to the players in dollars 
by the French sportswear com- 
pany. Le Coq Sportif. 

Fcdencp Sordillo. president 
of ihe Italian football federation, 
and his board, recently resigned 
following an illegal betting scan- 
dal and fears of a possible 
bankruptcy of some leading 
major dubs. 

Top clubs 
planning 
cup coup 

Leading first division clubs 
are planning to increase their 
influence in the administration 
of (he League Cap, which under 
new sponsorship this season 
becomes the Ltttlewoods Chal- 
lenge Cup. 

Stung by the rejection of their 
j rash restructuring demands for 
the competition, the likes of 
Liverpool Everton Manchester 
United and Tottenham Hotspur 
plan to have the final say at' a 
League extraordinary general 
meeting in London on August 
15. 

In the past all 92 dabs have 
had a vote on League Cup 
matters and towards the end of 
last season the lower division 
dnbs Mocked a move to reduce 
the pool money from 20 per cent 
tn 10 per cent. They also resisted 
a switch in the method of 
sharing out the funds which 
would have meant -more for the 
bigdnhs. 

Now- top duhs plan to posh 
their demands throu gh by 
ftmnging the voting slmrinre. A 
League spokesman said: “The 
management committee want to 
bring the competition into line 
with the League system which 
will mean one and a half votes 
each for foe first division dubs, 
one each Jar the second and a 
total of eight Jar the third and 
foarfo." ' 


(Not inducting currant matches) 


FIRST -CLASS CRICKET AVERAGES -; 

ntches) BOWUNG 


A I Kanteharran 
J JWHItakar : . 
GAWck 
RJ Bailey 
RJ Hadlee 
JD Birch 
G Cook 

CGGreanHge' ' 
W K M Benjamin 
G Boycott 
CEBRice 
■ B.M McMfflan 
JE Morris 
PM Roebuck 
A JLamb 
A R Border 
K M Curran 
J Abrahams 
P WG Parker 
* signifies not out. 


BATTING 

I NO Runs 

12 4 660 

20 6 911 

22 3 1232 

25 6 1223 

13 ' 4 541 

14 5 515 

15- 2 702 


16 - 1 
14 8 


-17 ' 1 
19 3 


8 317 

1 829 

3. 824 

3 870 


3 870 

2 1010 


0 

M 

Runs 

W 

273.4 

78 

590 

42 

381.4 

102 

878 

58 

154.4 

45, 

- 367 

24 

216-2 

54 

559 

34 

363 

83 

1108 

68 

5212 

132 

1293 

77 

245.3 

43 

727 

41 

160.1 

42 

469 

25 

243.1 

72 

635. 

33 

325.4 

107 

763 

39 

319 

94' 

767 

-38 

108 

23 

. 31T 

15 

187.4 

. 42 

‘500 

24 


26 .. 8 
21 5 


3 1006 


FIELDING: Wicketkeepers: R J Parks caught 52, 
stumped 4. total 58; DE East 36, 8, 44; S J Rhodes 34, 
7,41; R C Russell 35, 3, 38; G W Humpage28, 6, 34; P 
R Downton 29, 3. 32; S A Marsh 31 , 0, 5l7FMders: M A 
Lynch 23. K M Curran 20, C E B Rice 18. R A Harper 17, 
<3 C Holmes 15, A R Border 15, K J Barnett 15. 


RJ Hadlee 273.4 

MD Marshall 381.4 

ST Clarke 154.4 

Imran Khan 2152 

TM Alderman 363 

C A Walsh 521.2 

AH Gray 245.3 

KT MecBycott 1BQ.1 

M A Holding 243.1 

JH Childs . : 325.4 

,&R Pringle 319 

- DE Malcolm 108 

TDTopley 187.4 

KE Cooper 251.1 

M Jeaiwaques 96 

J Gamer 341.5 

J E Emburey . 223 A 

N Gifford ' 397 

PW Jarvis 346.4 

J K Lever 418.1 

G S Small 437.3 

NG Cowley 2305 

P A J De Freitas 420 


BEST PERFORMANCES: Fastest hundred: 


56 588 . 28 


96 

' 10 

338. 

;16 

21.12 

341.5 

85 

856 

40 

21.40 

223A 

80 

387 

18 

2120 

397 

126 

901 

42 

21.45 

346.4 

66 

1094 

50 

2128 

418.1 

115 

1172 

53 

22.11 

4372 

99 

1255 

56 

22.41 

2302 

48 

609 

Z7 

2225 

420 

75 

1231 

54 

22.79 

2562 

49 

825 

36 

22-91 


ENTERTAINMENTS 


CoadniKd. bun page 47 


ART GALLERIES 


cinemas 





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■ uwicu uo ^ iuc^ rino mmuufo iui ouiiki wji v uituiiuyaii 14. 

at Taunton on May 8. Best bawling: C A Walsh (9 far “ 

72) for Gloucestershire y Somerset at Bristol on July 

21 . 


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Today’s television and radio programmes and Peter Davalle 


1 V* 3 C H 

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BBC 1 


SUM Ceefax am. News 

headlines, weather/ travel 
and sports bultetins. 

&5Q Breakfast Time wnth frank 
Bough and Debbie 
Greenwood. .Weather at 
- 6i>5 r 7.25*7-55, &25 and 
MR regional news, 
weather and traffic at IL57, 
. . 7.27, 7.57 and 8^7; 
national and international 
. news at 7-00, 7.30,' 8.00; 
8.30 end 9.00; sport at 
7.20 and Butt; and a ■' 
review of the morning 
newspapers at Pius, 
Paul McDowell reports 
from Edinburgh on the 
denuded Commonwealth 
. . . Games build-up; Zoe ' 
Brown files her teenage 
- report; and Richard Smith 
answers viewer^' 'phone* 
In.metfcal problems. 

* O20CeefaX 1040 Ptay School, 
' ■ presented by Jane Hardy 
with guests, Simon Davies 
. and Johnny Ball. 

1040 Cdcket First Test Peter 

- West introduces coverage 
of the opening session of 
the first day's play in the 
game at Lord’s between 
England and New 
Zealand. 

. 1.05 News After Noon wftb 
Moira Stuart, includes 
news headfines with 
subtitles 1.2& Regional- 
news. The weather detaBs 
■'•■come from BiH Giles t.25 
-- Utte-Mseeeandthe i: 
Mfstor Men. tittle Miss - 
Splendid and Mister Jetty. 

MO ^ticket First Test Further 
coverage of the first day’s 

- play-in the match at Lord's 
.between England and New 

Zealand 4.12 Regional 
news. 

4.15 Laurel and Hardy in a 
‘ cartoon. Country Buzz in. 

(r) 4J20 Dastardly and 
* Muttley. Cartoon, {r) 440 
Wacky Racea.fr) 445 
Dungeons and Dragons. 

5*00 John Craven’s * 

Newsround 5-10 Duncan 

Dares.- Peter Duncan, 

* . accompanied by Everest 
.V* mountaineer Doug Scott. 

. . - a ttem p t s to cteob the Old 
Man of Stoer. a 40 metres 
high rock that up to 20 
.years ago. was thought to 
be uncumbable- (r) 

(Ceefax) 

5.35 London Phis. 

6.00 News with Sue Lawley and 
Frances Coverdale. 

- Weather. 

640 XII Commonwealth 
Games. David Coleman 
introduces coverage of the 

- -opening ceremony, in the 
- ---' mesenceoftheDukeof- 

- - Edinburgh. The caremony 

indudes a spectacular 




BGWi.K 


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•*. * hr i -• 


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sn; a 1,000- •. 

strong chofn and a parade 
Of the competing nations* 

-■ Phra.music from the 
Scottish Fiddle Band, led 
by Yehudi Menuhin, and 
regimental bands. 

ICaefax) 

940 News-with John Humphrys 
. . Snd Andrew Harvey. 
Weather. 

- 940 EastEnders. Tony makes 

- a hwrifyfng discovery; Den 
and Angie receive ' - | 

- — my st er i o us infor ma tion j 

about Roty; anffDbbS ISaST 
a heart-to-heart'jwth^ - • - 
Naima, unaware that they 
are not alone in ttw shop. 
(Ceefax).' 

10.00 Rim Dirty Harry (1971) 
starring Clint Eastwood ^ 
and Harry Guardfno. 

Thriller about a tough 
Californian policeman who 
is given the jobs that 
others would not touch 
with a barge-pole. A 
young'psychopath kills a. 
girl and threatens to ItiS -- 
others unless his 
demands are met When . 
the killer is captured and 
then released on a 
technicality. Inspector . 
Harry Callahan takes the 
r law into his own hands. 
Directed by Don SiagaL 
(Ceefax) 

1145 Rhode. American 

domestic comedy series 
starring Valerie Harper in 

- - the title rote, a single girl 

living in New York; Juoa 
•- Kavner as her aster. 

.Brenda; and the defightfuL 

. . - : Nancy Walker as-thar 
scheming mother, Ida. (r) 

-1240 Weather, — - 


TV-AM 


6,15 Good Morning Britain 
- ■ presented by Anne 

Diamond and Nick Owen. 

- News with David Foster^ 
640, 740, 740, 540, 8-30 
and 940;1marcte! report . 
;atB45; sport at6j40 and 
- 7^40; exercises at 645; . 

. cartoon at 7-25; pop mosic 
at 74Rand Barnett's 
postbag at 845* Among - 
J “ 's guests Is royal 

(Jntfc&i 
8.45' Wi 


ITV/LONDON 


&Z5 Thames news headfines 
fotowedby Lost 



i the' 

*'.r elements! 

WeUve Wth. For chll 
‘ " -the sphere,.the cylinder* 

: the cone, and the cube ■ 

10.10 Jayce and the 
Wheeled Warriors. 1040 
Mend WBdSfc. Limestone 
rock landscapes of^ the 

- west coast of Ireland. (0 
1140 Courageous Cat - 
Cartoon. 

1140 About Britain. Waterahip 
Down In October. - 
1240 Tales from Fat Tulip's . - 
Garden. Mice with 
: Measles, (ri 12J0Puddta 
> Lane. (r)1240 The . . 

- -.SuMvane. - 

140 Newt at One-witti Leonard 
Partem 140 Thames news 
140 Riptide. The three- 
man detective agency are 
unwittingly drawn Into ' ~ 
competition with two 
female-private eyes 24S 
Home Cookery Chib. 
Apricot ’n’ Almond Ran. (r) 
240 Something to Treasure. 
■The final visit to Lord . 
Lichfield s estate in 
Shropshtae 340 Take the * 

• .High Road. Drama aerial 
set on a Scottish highland 
- estate. 345 Thames news 
headines 340 Sons end - 
Daughters.- - 
440 Tales from Fat Tufip’s : - 
Garden: A repeat of the . 
programme shown at 
noon* 4.10 The MpondnaJ 
Cartoon series, (r) 440 . r 
NatureTraB. Another 
edition of the wUdBfe 
series 4,45 Under the 
Same Sky. The story of 
Bandukand her brother. 

5.15 Sifter Spoons. American 
domestic comedy series. 
5.45 News with Martyn Lewis 
640 Thames news. .. 

645 Help! VhrTzwlor Gee with 
the first of six . 
programmes tymg4n with 
■ tonight's new serfesr " 
Workout This evening . - - 
Help! Investigates the " 
extent of unemployment in 
London arid ttie south- ; •. 
east and the effects of 
.redundancy. 

645 Crossroads. 

740 EmmerdaleFaim. Matt - 
and DoBy try to paint an 
optimtsbc portrait of their 
future life. 

740 Give Us a Ctae presented 
Michael Parkinson. 

Glair and Una 
Stubbs are joined by *. ; 
RonaldAlIen; Janet 
Brown, Les8e Crowther; - 
SuetkjydrHank-Marvm, - 

’ • 'URTJUtt Rogers, ■; : 

ynn Mtruto^ tw aW Arth ur- - 
agrees to sell a BMW for 
an associate, the police 
raid Arthur’s car-lot and 
take him down to the 
station where he is 
jnterrqgatedbya German 


by Mid 
LmneH 



John McEnery; Angela Punch 
McGregor C49-30i«n J 


•There is a touch of Hamlet 
without toe Prince In The Shape 
of Things to Come, toe final 
fBm in Peter Hennessy's series 
about cabinet government, 

ALL THE PRIME MINISTER’S 
MEN (Channel 4, 8.00pm). 

WhBe the organizational 
philosophy of Mrs Thatcher is 
as afl-pervastve as an old- time 
London pea-souper (thanks 
to Hennessy, however, it is not 
as impenetrable), the lady 
herself is not among the party 
leaders who g« the chance 
to indicate how they might 
3 /ata themselves with the 
system if voted m at the 
next general election. But, In 
the event of Mrs Thatcher 
scoring a hat-trick, she is 
offered as much advice on what 
to do about her team a& what 
not to do. Neil Kinnock thinks 
that a local scout troupe 


CHOICE 


'She 


ought not to be run the \ 
runs a cabinet, wanting to I 
in oh eve 

alleyway, byway and 1 
entrance. Douglas Hurd thinks 
there is room in the cabinet 
system tor some of the grit that 
makes an oyster (he means a 
peart, l thlnkLhe sees scope for a 
little bit of stimulation and 
buccaneering at toe heart of the 
machine. More prosaically. 

Lad Hunt of Tanworth thinks 
that toe time has come, 
perhaps, for a Uttie more 
“evolution". Almost 
everybody has a kind word to 

say about the cabinet ‘Think 
Tank* 1 , created by Edward Heath 
(another of tonight's sflent . 
voic8s)and killed off by Margaret 
Thatcher 


•WORKOUT (ITV, 940pm), ' 
Malcolm Feuerstein's six-part 
dissection of working (and 
non-working) Britain, has got off 
to a busy and human start 
Thera are probably some vital 
statistics in tonight's opening 
film, but I don't remember them. 
And that makes a happy 


and Feue retain has come up 
with soma people who speak 
good quotable lines, like the 
monk who recalls a hard-working 
God setting Man an example 
by creating the world in the very 
first page of His Own book, 
and. at the other end of the scale, 
Arthur Seaton, the factory 
conveyor-belt rebel in Saturday 
Night and Sunday Morning 
with his "Demi let the bastards 
grind you down" philosophy. 

Peter Davalle 


BBC 2 


645 OpenUnftefdbr.lnner.City 

. Story. Ends at 740 

9,00 Ceerex. . . 

4.10 Cricket: First Test Peter 
West introduces coverage 
of the feial session of the 

■ first day's play in the game 

between England and Naw 
Zealand. The 
-' commentators at Lord's 
are Richie Benaud and 
Tony Lewis, wito 
summaries b 
- and Bob WUII 

6.10 Harold Lloyd* In the 1925 
. fittrvTha-Frashman, ha 

pteysastudentwhojiasa 
.. . burritog dastia to be the 
most popular person in the 
college; In Never Weaken, 
.made in 192T, he 
in breathtaking 


640 


tLn 


TWo Rode Together 

tarring Jamas 
and Richard 
.Wldmark. A Western . 

'.. adventure about a Texas 
marshal who is summoned 
by the US Cavalry to 
% .* negotiate with the ■ 

■ ' : Com an cFes toe return of 

. . whitecaptives. ' ~ 

'-Accompanied by-Lt-Gaiy 
the marshal reaches the~ 
T^omanche camp and : - 
--d ftc Dversthat only four Of 
their prisoners are still: 

• • - - • alive. With Shirley Jones 
and Linda Cristal. Directed 
by John Ford. 

640 frees Taduc No Soft 
Option. A foQow-up tq last 
week's p ro gr a m m e about 
the changing face of 
po&ting ft Britain and in 
particular the West 
Midlands force, led bythe 
Chief Constable, Geoffrey 
Dear, who was in favour of 
the new additions to the 
- -police armoury: Reporter 
Gerry Northam asked 
“whether the traditional 
- ■ -face of toe British police 
coukl be toe same again! 
Tonight PsterTaytor '. 
exftoresthis question in a 
studio debate mvolvtiig toe 
police, including Geoffrey 
bear, community workers 
and those who used the 
Talkback line after last 
week's programme. 

940 The Travel Show 


940 Troubles arid Strife- 
Comedy series about a 
trendy young vicar and Ns 
fawning floex of parish 
wives. (Oracle) 

940 Workout Thelirst of a 
new series examining new 
' patterns of work, (see 
Choice) - 

1040 News at Ton with Alastair 
' .B urnet a nd Pamela 
. Armstrong. 

1040 Hotel More intrigue and 
drama set In the swish St 
Gregory Hotel in San 
Francisco. 

1140 Burning the Phoenix. This 
week’s programme about 
the Royal College of Ait 
examines toe rising young 
stars who are stocking 
there. 

1240 Lifestyles of the Rich and 
Famous.. 

1245- (figtitTbouglits- 


940 


T.raports 

from a'mJst-shroudad 
Lucerne; Matthew Collins 
looks torcasuafwork ' * 
between St Tropez and 
- Monte Carlo; and the 
Shaptand. family pave a 
Devon farmhouse holiday, 
exploring the countryside 
in their 1920 Lanchester 
open tourer. 

Moonlighting. The flT- 
matebed couple who - 
comprise the Blue Moon 
Detective Agency are hired 
by the wealthy stepmother 
of a kidnapped cot cert 
pianist to negotiate his : 
release at-the lowest 


CHANNEL 4 


2.15 Their Lordships’ House. A 
repeat of last night's 
programme of highflghts 
of the day's proceedings 
In the House of Lords. 


I Sidney 
James. Comedy about 
three doubtful 
bookmakers who dream- 
up a plot to ease their 
cash- flaw problems 
involving the substitution 
of a horse In a Wg race. 
Directed by Maur 

4,10 Fibn: Lucky Stars* (1 1 


Silent comedy about a 
young Innocent who Is 
duped out of hts savings 
- byaconman who 
persuades him to become 
nis assistant seUng 
bottles of Ns famous but 
useless elixir. Directed by 
Harry Edwards. 

440 Dancin’ Days. Julia, 
languishing In prison, 
refuses to meet any of her 
friends who come to visit 
her. 

540 Rfm: When Comedy Was 
King* (1959) A compilation 
of silent comedy 
sequences from the days 
of Max Sennett in 1 914 to 
the advent of sound. 


1040 


possible ransom. 
Makki 


;ing Waves. Bob - 
Langley. Malcolm McKeag 
and Sue King go to Cowes 
fortoe VryeBa Cup - 
yachting competition and 
that on to Brixham to 
watch the trawlers racing. 

. In addition, Liz Hobbs, toe 
former speed water ski- 
ing world champion, 
demonstrates that she has 
tost none of her nerve ' 
following her accident ' 
10-50 News night 
1140 Weather. 

1145 Open University: Basic ■ 
Education for Adults. Ends 
- at 12.05. 


are Fatty Arbuckle, Gloria 
Swanson. Ben Turpin, 
Charlie Chase, and Charfie 
Chaplin. Produced by 
Robert Younger. 

640 1986 Tour de France. 
Stage 20 -the 60 
kilometres time trial . 
around the town of St 
Etienne in the Massif 
Central. Presented by Nick 
Owen with commentary .by 
-- - Phil Liggett and Paul 
. Sherwen. 

7.00 ChmweTFour news with 
'Peter Sissons and 
- - Nicholas Owen includes a 
' reporton the Defence . . 
Select Committee's - 
investigation into the 
Westiand Affair. 

740 Comment from writer Jad 
Stephen. Weather. 

840 All the Prime Minister's 
Men. This third and final 
programme In toe series 
on government by cabinet 
examines the shape of 
cabinets to come. With - 
• contributions from Netl -. 
^- Kinnock, David Owen. •• 

. . David StoeF, MichaeL . - . 

. Heseitine and Douglas 
Hurd, (see Choice) 

940 Gardener s ’ Calendar . 
Roadshow from Stratford- 
upon-Avon. Royal 
Horticultural experts Ray 
Waite and Reg Perryman 
answer questions on a 
- - varaty of gardening 

' lems. Presented by 
Brookes. (Oracle) 
940 Tusltata. The third and 
final episode of the drama 
serial about the last years 
• in the fife of Robert Louis 
Stevenson. As ctvil war 
rages in Samoa, . 
Stevenson's health is 
cause for concern as is 
the mental state of his 
wife (Oracle) 

1140 Ariottin Conversation 
with Mike Brearley. From 
Ariott's home In Alderney, 
the convers a tion covers a 
wide range of topics from 
D^lan Thomas to cricket 

1240 Their Lordships’ House. 
HighBghts of the day's 
proceedings in the House 
of Lords. Ends et 12^45. . 


( ; Radio 4 > 

On tong wave. VHF variations « end 
545 Shipping. 6.00 News. 6.10 
Farming. 645 Prayerfs) 

640 Today, Tnd 

840,740440. 

News.6.45 Business News. 
7.00. 840 News.745, 

845 SportTAS Thought for 
the Day. 845 Parliament. 

&57 Weather Travel 
9-00 News 

945 Face the Facts. Mango 
MacDonald investigates 
cases of injustice against 

individuals or offences 


940 The Natural Hi 
Programme. Lion* 

Kedeway finds out about our 
Inconsistent attitudes to 
animals. 

1040 News; The Good Book. 

Part three of Brian 
Redhead's series about the 
Basie. 

1040 Morning Story: The New 
Cate, by Dttys Rose. 

Reader Juliet Cadzow 

1045 An Act of Worship (s) 

1140 News; Travel; Inside 
Castro's Cuba. Repot 
by Bernard Jackson. 
Communism with Sugar 
on Top (r) 

1149 Time for Verse. From 
Dublin. Aidan Carl 
Mathews discusses pofitics 
and poetry 

1240 News; You and Yours. 
Consumer advice, with 
John Howard 

1247 Trivia Test Match. Game 
based on the rules of 
cricket with umpire Brian 
Johnston and captains 
Tim Rice and WUhe 
Rushteon (rXs) 1245 
Weather 

140 The World at One: News 
140 The Archers. 145 

atifiSW s Hour. • • 
Includes an interview 
with the EastEnders creator 
JuBa Smith. 

440 News: The Afternoon : .. 
Play. How Genghis Khan 
. became the Pflotof a Hot Air 
Balloon, by Tony Butler. -- 
WitriJohn Rye, Jane 
Wenham.Petar •• 
Woodthorpe and Deborah 
Makepeace (s) 

445 A Good read. Brian Gear 
invites Vivien and 
Michael Noakes to pick 
some paperbacks. 

445 Scottish Arts Week. 


Dorothy Dennett and 
Nigel Tranter talk to Trevor 
Rcwte 1 

540 PM: News magazine. 

. 546 Shipping: £55 
Weathw 640 News: 

Flnancia) report 
840 Brain of Britain 1988. 

. Second round: North 

(r)(s) 

740 News 

7.05 The Archers 
740 Any Answers? John 
Timpson with listeners' 
responses to last week's 
Any Questions? - 
7.40 Inside Out An insight 
Into Sue Crowcruffs and 
Alan Roe’s theory of how to 
ptaygotf. 

8.10 Looking Upwards 

Everyday. A Traveller's 
guide to the Pearly Gates 
and Beyond. 

840 Mr Fletcher, toe Poet 
Leicestershire builder J P 
Fletcher who. in 1951. won a 
Commonwealth Poetry 
Prize for hts poem about 
mining life, looks back. 

940 Does Tie Take Sugar? 

For disabled listeners. 

940 John Ebdon in the BBC 
Sound Archives. 

9*45 Scottish Arts Week. As 
Edinburgh prepares for 
its 40th International Festival 
Neville Garden examines 
its history. 

10.15 A Book at Bedtime: The 
Third Policeman (9J. 

Reader: Patrick Magee (r) 

1040 The World Tonight 

11.15 The Financial World 
Tonight 

1140 Today in Parliament 

12.00 News; Weather. 

1243 Shipping. 

VHF (available in England and 
S Wales only) as above 
except 54£640am Weather. 
Travel. 945-1040 Pirate 
Radio 4. 145-2-OQpm 
Listening Corner 540- 
545 PM (continued). 1140- 
12 . 10 am Open University 
1140- Justice and Power in 
Kira Lear. 1140 Folksong 

. andthe Romantics. 

( Radio 3 ) 

On medium wave. VHF variations 

from 545am to 645. and between 

1045am and 640 
645 Weather. 740 News 

7.05 Concert: Bernstein (On 
the Town dance 
episodes), Bach (Suite, 
Partita In E for 
viofin.transc Rachmaninov: 
Hobson, piano). Bartok 


' (Romanian Folk Dances). 
Vina-Lobos (Viola 
quebrada and other songs; 
Berganza, mezzo). 

Strauss (Don Juan, Op 20). 
. .840 News 

8.05 Bantock (Pierrot of the 
Minute overture), 
Offenbach (Ella a fui. la 
tourtereile: Hendricks, . 
soprano), Sarasate 


CempoH/ibbott). Ravel 
(L'eventail da Jeanne). 

9.00 News 

945 This Week's Composer: 
Debussy. Berceuse 
herolque; Rapsodle (with 
Delangle. alto sax); and 
■ images pour orchestra 
1040 London Forteplano Trio: 
Mozart (Trio m B flat. K 
502), HummeHF major Trio) 
.10.45 Test Match SpedahFirst 
ComhittTesf. England v 
New Zealand. Coverage 
.' continues on medium 
wave until 649. Other Radio 
3 programmes are on ' 
vhf: 

640 Bandstand: Tredegar . . 

. Band.. Wright fTam 
Q'Shanters Ride), Vaughan 
Williams (Variations) ' 

845 Marin Mantis: Fantaisie 

in B minor: Suite No 4; 

Sgjet bvoc 20 couplets. John 

Hsu (viola da gamba), 

Peter Williams (harpsichord) 


740 Proms 86: BBC Welsh 
SO (under Yansans). 

With John UU (piano). Part 
one. Tchaikovsky 
-(Romeo and JukBt fantasy- 
overturaj.Prokofiev, 

- - (Piano Concerto No 2) 


845 Milhaud and Jazz David 
Garth plays the French 
composer 


86: par 
Sibelius's Symphony No 


940 Haydn and Schoenberg; 
Katharina Wolpe (piano). 
Haydn (Sonata in F major, H 
XVI 23. and Sonata in E 
fiat major, H Xvl 49), 
-Schoenberg (Three 
' Pieces, Opll) 

1040 Les malheurs d'Orphee : 
MDhaud's three-act 
i, sung m French, 
g Ensemble (under 
' Latham-Koenlg). and 
soloists including Henry 
Heriord and Rosemary 
Hardy 

1045 Russian Music: WaNfisch 
and Goldstone (cello and 
piano). Borodin (Petite 
Suite), Khachaturian 
(Sonata-Fantasia). Borodin 
(Sonata for cello and 
piano in B minor) 

1147 News. 1240 Closedown. 
VHF variations as follows: 

645 Open University. Until 
645am.Victorian art 
1045 Six Continents: foreign 
radiobroadcasts 
1145 Recorder and piano: 

- John Turner and Peter 
Lawson. Works by Gordon 

1 Crosse. WiBtam AJwyn, 

- Anthony Gilbert, Arnold - 
. Cooke. W|Hiam Alwyn . 

and John Manduell 
11.45 Pied Piper: with David 
Munrow(r) 

1245 Beethoven: BBC SO. 
Leonora No 1 overture: 
Symphony No 7. 1.00 News 
145 Manchester Recital: 

Dennis Simons (violin ). 
Peter Donohoe (piano).. 
Coplan bd (Sonata), 


Shostakovich (Sonata, Op 

134) 

240 La jolie fine de Perth: 

Bizets tour-act opera 
contique. sung in French. 

New Philharmonic 
Orchestra of French Radio, 
and cast including June 
AndBrson, Jose van Dam 
and Alfredo Kraus. Acts 
one and two. Acts three and 
four at 345 

445 Gershwin and Mayeri: 

Susan Tomes plays 

worksinduding Gershwin’s 
Fascinating rhythm, and 
Mayeri s Mangold. 445 
News 

540 Mainly for Pleasure: with 
Brian Kay. 

( Radio 2 ) 

On medium wavs. See Radio 1 
for VHF variations 
News on the hour. Cricket - - 
scoreboard 740oni. 

440am Charies Move (s) 540 
Ray Moore (s) 740 Derek Jameson 
(si 940 Ken Bruce (S) 1140 
Jimmy-Young (s) 145pm David 
Jacobs (s) 2.05 Gloria 
Hunniford (s) 3.30 David Hamilton 
(s) 5.05 John Dunn (s) 7.00 
Country Club (S) 940 Hit it Boys! 

(the roots of American country 
music). 945 Sports Desk 10.00 
Huddwinks starring Roy Hudd 
10.30 Star Sound Cinema (the 
movie world) 1 1.00am Nightrlda 
(s) 340-4.00 A Little Night Music (s) 

( Radio 1 ) 

News on the half-hour from 
640am until 840pm then at 1040 
and 1240 midnight 
' 5.30 Adrian John 7.00 Mike 
Smith's Breakfast Show 940 Andy 
Peebles 1140 Radio 1 
Roadshow from Southport 1240 
Newsbeat (Janet Trewin) 12.45 
Gary Davies 340 Steve Wright 540 
Newsbeat (Janet Trewin) 5.45 
Bruno Brookes 740 Janice Long 

9.00 The Best of Rod (Rod 
Stewart talks to Janice Long) 
1040-12.00 Andy Kershaw (s). 

VHF Radios 1 & 2:- 440am As 
Radio 2. 1040 As Radio 1. 
12.00-440 As Radio 2. 

WORLD SERVICE 

640 Newsdesfc. 6.30 Nature Notebook. 
G*40 Ferrmng Work) 7.00 News. 7.09 
Twenty Four Hours. 7.30 New Waves on 
trie Shortwave 7.45 Company o 1 Foxes. 
BAD News 8.09 Reflections. 9.15 Country 
Style. 840 John Pad 9 00 News. 9.09 
Rdwsw o> Bmisn Press. 9.1S World 
Today. 9.30 Financial News followed by 
Look Anead.. 9.45 Rulers Guide to 
Repression. 10.00 News. 10.01 Ray 
Moore talks to... 11.00 News. 1149 Nows 
About Britan. 11.15 SoortsworkL 1140 
Assignment. 1240 Radio Newsreel. 12.15 
Top Twenty. 12.45 Sports Roundup. 140 
News. 149 Tweotv Four Hours. 140 
Waltz Xing. 1.45 5porisworid. 240 Out- 
look. t. 45 Best of British. 340 Radw 
Newsreel. 3.15 The Pleasure's Yours. 
440 News. 449 Commentary. 4.15 As- 
signment. 5.45 Sports Roundup. 745 
Here's Humph! 540 News. 049 Twenty 
Four Houis. 840 Business Matters. 940 
News. 941 5 ports world. 9.15 A JoUy 
Good snow 1040 News. 10.09 World 
Today. 1045' A Letter From England. 
1040 Finance! News. 1040 Reflections. 
1045 Sports Roundup 11 40 News. 11.09 


About "Bntwn. 12.15 Radio Newsreel. 
12.30 Music Now. 140 News. 141 
Outlook. 140 Wtiltz King. 145 Book 
Cnoce. 150 In me Meantime. 240 News. 
249 Review ot British Press. 2.15 
Sponswortd. 240 Aspects of Liszt 340 
News. 349 News About Bream. 3.15 
World Today. 445 RaDactuns. 450 
Financial News. 540 News. 549 Twenty 
Four Hours. 545 World Today. 

AD times ki GMT. 


FREQUENCIES: 
92£; Radio 4: 
1458kHz/206m: 



BD'fH WALES 545pm-540. 
° nL - 1 Today 1240-124Sara 


oday 1240-1: 

News and weather SCOTLAND 
94Dam-1O40CTVl.NORTHERNfflE' 
LAME 54Spnt^40 Inside Utetar ' > 

1240-1 Z05m News and weather. Bt 
GLAND 545pm fl On Regional news 
;tnagaznes. 

c hannel 

1040 Jack Hofcom 1055 Cartoon 
1140-1140 captain Scarlet I4qpaa 
News 140 Home Cookery 155-140 
Riptide 340440 Country GP 5*15*45 ' 
Connections 640-645 Channel Re- 
port 1 040 Your Music 1140 Burning the 
Ptxwnof1140Th«ts Hollywood 
1240 ureouchettias 140wn Closedown. 

S4£ Starts: 140pm Dancin' Dm " 
SSt ijp Alice 240 Ffakbatam 2.1S 
intiarvri 250 Rfm: Monihara 450 
Cadwgan 545 Swoon y Byd 540 Kids' 
Kale £00 BrooksklB 640 Totrde 
France 740 Ne«wddk>n SaUi 740 
Sarabsig 845 Kywel Morgan B50Y 
Sioefawr 940 H« Street Bluas 10*15 . 
Tisltala 12.15am Closedown. 

borde r 

1045 Fetx the Cat 1045 RreMU XL5 

1140 Once Upon eTime ... Man 1145- 
1140 Cartoon 1.20pm News 140- 
240 The Baron 340 ScrAble 340440 
Young Doctors 5.15445 Weir's Way 
640-846 Lookaroisid 940-940 Simon 8 
Sknon 1030-1140 Mika Hammer 

1240 Closedown. 

HTVWALES ^jyyg, 

Sesame Street 64tom Wales at Sot- : 
1040-1140 TheSweeney. - 


REGIONAL TELEVISION-VARIATIONS. 


wrvvrESTag^g-^ 

Street 1045 Felix the Cat 1040 kSo 
1145-1140 Small Wonder 140pn News 
140-245 Cowtry Practice 5.1^545 
DifTientStrakes 640-645 News 840- 
940 FafconrCrest 1040-1 140 Festi- 
val 1240 Mann's Best Friends 1240 *b 
C iosedown. 

tCENTRAL^SSSSSr. 

950 Robostory 10.15 Moon Jumper 
ILODCafifoniu Highways 1145-1140 
Home Cookery Ck£ 1240pro-1 40 
_ Comacrt40iwws-t40^ab'nie r 8aron 
5.15-545 Give use CJoe 640 Cioas- 
I— rt»drt45-740 News 740-840 Me A My 
, Gin 1045V 12.30am JoMinder 140 
Closedown. 

SCOTTISH 

wood Special 1045 Adventures ot 
Roxy' lOSSGfenrbe 1140-1TJ0 Captain 


nechons 640-645 News and Scotland 
Today 740-740 Take the High Road 
1040 Crime Desk 1045-1140 Shindig 
1245am Lata Can, Closedown. 

ANGUA^ S^_ 

1040 Cartoon 1035 Gtanroe 1140- 
1140 Once Upon a Time. .. Man . 
14DpmKaws 140-240 HOM15.15- ■ 
54SCoonect»ons 640-645 About AngSa 
740-745 Anything Goes 1040 ■ 

Wheels 11.15 Bumng the Phoenix T145 
Tales from thebarksate 12.15am 
-Pioneers ot the Faith. Ctosadown. -- - 


YORKSHIRES'^ 

and the Wheeled Warriors 950 Cal i- 
tomia Highways 10.15 GJenrae 1045 Uni- 
com Talee 1 1 .06-1 140 Fnonds of My 
Friends: 124(kxn-1 40 Catenoar 140 
News 140 Jiati Goes on Holxtay 
240-240 Pariour.Came 5*15-545 Surviv- 
al 64 0 645 Calendar 740 That's My 
' Boy840-840TJ-Hooker-1040-1 140- - 
Hotel 1240 Tate from me Dariokte 
1240am Closedown. - 


GRANADA M London ex- 
unwiwuw cept94fiem Grenada 

Reports 940 Rescue from Gdkgan s 
Island TI40 Granada Reports'll .05 
About Brttem 1140 Connections 
1155-1240 Granada Reports 140pm 
Granada Reports 140-240 Country 
PnetK»3J04M Young Doctor s 5.f5- 
545 Music AHvb 6-00 Granada Re- 
ports 640-645 Thffl Is Your Right 840- 
940 Falcon Crest 1040-1140 M ike 
Hammer 1240 New SquadrenaflBS 
1240am Oosedown. 


ULSTER A5UJOdon * xca P t: 

945am Blockbusters 950 
Sesame Street 1050 Under the 
Mountain 1140-1140 Cartoon 140pm 
Lunchtime 140 Guinness Book ol 
Records 240440 Cartoon 340440 - 
Cantfd Camera 5*15645Gupercar? • 
640Summer Edition &20 Police She .' 

940^ten!^S > 1t^?m^nBin'- 
The Ulster Way 1 1.00-1140 Arcade 
1240 Naws: Closedown. “ ' 


, T\/Q Ab Loaaon except: 948am 
JJL= Sesame Street 1040 Jack HoL 
bom.1055 Cartoon 1140-1140 Cap- - 
tain Scarlet 140 pm News 140 
' Employment Action Une i.35-240 
'Wptxta 5.15-54&Ccmnections 640645 
Coast to Coastl 040 Your Music 
1140 Burning the Phoendr 1140 That's 
Hollywood. 1240 Untouchables 
140am Company. Closedown. 

gyw 

T h i n g 9.30 Onceteion a 
rime ... Man 956 Sesame Street 1050 
Short Story 11.15-1140 World 's Ctal- 
dren 140pm News 1.30-240 Man In a 
Suitcase 5.15-5^5 Connections 
640-645 North Tonight 740-740 That's 
My Boy «40640Faicon Crest 
1040-1140 Cuncy 1240 News* \ 
Closedown.; 

TSW ^ Lond on except 945am 
• ■ Sesame Street 1045 Cabfomia 
Highways 1050 Cjnoon 11.00-11 JO 
Connections 140pm News 140-240 The 
Baron £15-545 Blockbusters 640 
Today South West 645 Falcon Crest 740 
That's My Boy 840-940 Murder. 

She Wrote 1042 Spreinq Imago 1140- 
1140 Sea m Their Btaoa 1240 Sea- 
son of Blues 1240am Postscript 
Closedown. 

TYNE TEES 

940 Sesame Street 1045 Labyrinth 
10*45-1140 Line House on the Frame 
740pm News 145 Lookaround 140- . 
240 The Baron 5:1 S6A5 Parlour Game 
64064S Northern Life 640440 
Murder. She Wrote 1042-1140 Mapp 
and Luca 1240 Sgns lor the Road.' 
-Ctoeedown- — - . 


j nM.fr> '^1 . 


ENTimiAINMEl^ 


CONCERTS 


THUTIO, 

Canton SL wet. S87 9029 OC 
380 1455. 

HARVEY A THE 

29 July - B Aua. Ctre 8 pm. 
Tttit* from ESAO '+ nmu. 


OPERAS BALLET 




i» 


. CQUSnM S 836 5t61 

‘ OC 5*0 K3tS . . 

TkMBnmr 579 e 4 S 3 r 

‘.LONDON FESTIVAL 
BALLET 

Cats S*i. Evm 7 30. Sal Mat 
bso -Twrr mmravewR fc» 
Toroer 6 Sat 


M * 


v n»r» * 


v *■'«" 


atymneuM rmmi o » <n 

wflh Uw London PtmtamtonK 

Orrtmlra until 15th AuduM. 

all wr oaMAHca nu 

OUT PowlWr mum Only. 

BOX OFFICE 0573 83541 1 


ALOOIT Ah- CwteMd. 01-836 
38TB CC 379 656S CC 379 
6433 Croup SUM 836 3962. 

TOM HULCt 
THE NORMAL HEART 

fry uuwrr KRAMEK 
-KAOHWTCCWrr’ Tlnwi. 
“VOTHMC SHOUT OF 

SCmATtONAL" S.EXP 
E»rs B. Mai* Thur ft Sat «-30 

i no o*rf* mm aa * 29 no mat 

Thu 31 Julyi 


ROYAL FESTIVAL HALL 958 

3191 OC 928 6800. 

TMomtaSH- S79 6*33 ’ 

LONDON FESTIVAL 
' BALLET 

58 July • 16 Auqum 
BI..»k J 8 Jul - 2 *09 
teHSMMt*- 9 Aug 
fWFttta 11 - 18 Aug 


1 . r ' 

, .. . i ' 


ROYAL OPtlU House CtAen! 
Cantoti. WCB - 01-540- 
1066 1911. 65 am phi Mb 
a\aU4rem- loam on Uw day. 
THE SOLSMN BALLET 
Tool. Mon 740. Sal 2-00 A 
740 Kaii th» T*rrW. Toreor. 
tup 7.30 Raymonaa. wea 7.30 
Two Golden Ago 



Motors WELLS 578 8916. 

MTUnMTKMUL AUTUMN 

DANCE. SEASON AT 

SADLER'S WELLS: 

CM 01278 0855' for oolow 

htoctwtp 


THEATRES 


APOLLO THEATRE 437 26a3 
434 s»8 rm can 01240 tsoo 
C rew Saw Ol 930 6123 
MW-Fn 0.00 M 4 30 C 6.10 
Thom mala 300 
PAUL SCOFIELD ' 
"MATCHLESS G03SC~ COn 
HOWARD ROLUMS 
“MACNinCEh.T' D Mao 
in ~THC AWARD- FESTOOKEO 
BROADWAY SLCCE6S" M on 
Sunday 

m NOT RAPPAPORT “ 

“WOKDERFLUY 

DEu 

u ELECntWYRM n Today 

“A JOYOUS 8HOLT Ot 
TRIUMPH** DMWl 


AOCLPMB3A761I or 240 7713 

4 a: 741 wee S3* 73 m str 
o433 Crp Mn 930 6123 First 

can 31 hr 7 (Ml’ CC 240 7200 rajjq 

loot IVOW BOriMm TQ FtB 

1MT - - - 

ME .AND MY GIRL . 

THE LAMBETH WALK 

MUSICAL 

FttfUillv 41 7 30 Mata tan) at 5 3C 
A Sac 4 JO a, 6 00 „ . . 

“THE HAPPIEST SHOW 
M T O WN" S [wm 
Tknfen Air C ia ill i ml 


ALDWVCH - THEATRE . 01-836 
O404 C0641-cr 01-379 «233 - - 
Nw P wl airfae 
Op*fs July 39 Jt 7.0 
DCVINO BCRLM’S- 
-Expemr Su c tme " tmv 

ANNIE GET YOUR GUN 

From Uw cwehwtw Festival 

Thaatre 
Slarrlna 
Sim QUATHO 

-A popular nil ..conuuno more 
famous «eim llm any othrr 
mustral of inr wntury" ThnM 
E«o 7.30 Mats w«u A Sat 5-30 
aatu 7 nay rr booking on Firat 
Call 01-240 7200 IM 4 fw) 


APOLLO VICTORIA 88898 8688 

CC 630 6262 TKtwunasKr cc 379 

0433 1st rail cr i«nn 2oo 7500 

lEUg Foci Crp Sam 930 6123 

E\<* 7 46 aiats Tup 3 3a» 8.0 . 

STARLIGHT EXPRESS 

“A MUSICAL THAT SURPASS! 


ANYTHING AROUND M EVERY 
MMENHMr D Exp-* . 

STARLIGHT EXPRESS. 

Must? by 

ANDREW LimD WEBBER - 
Lvnts tn 1 RICHARD 6TILOK 

DiiYrtrrt by TteA-OT. NUNN 

APPLY MIL* TO WM OPF1CE 
FOR RCIWB 

NOW DOOfONG TO MARC* «9f7 


BARStCAN 01 658 6793/630 

8891 CC iMon-Sun lOam-epm) 

ROYAL SHAKESPEARE 

COMPA NY 

DA1WCAN HEATRC Today 

3 OO 4 7.30 TROILIS A CRES- 

SlOA- 25-29 Ju»- THE 
DASTON AFFAIR by Pam 

G«»v SO 31 Julv THE MERRY 

WILES OF WINDSOR 
THE PIT Today 200 A 7.30 
REAL DREAMS «r TNv» 
CilKIUW 


■OOLCVARD WMfecn Ctert WX 

437 2o61 CC 37V 6433 
_ 8 30. Sal matt 540 

INFI DEUTIK 

RUM EXTENDED 


COMEDY THEATRE 01-930 
;sn OC 741 9999. First Can 

20 hr 7 033 CC 2«0 7200 Crp 

bam 930 6123 Men-FTI 8.00 

sat 6 OO 4 »4S 

THE GAMBLER _ 

Oy BRCWtS .-COODY-A SMITH 
A tMNUV mupral wilh 

MEL SMIT H 

BOR OOODV PETER BREW1S 
PHILIP DAVIS PAW. DOWN 
-a nmsrrK nrtuni WttOn 
-AataaCy aa a royal Md 
-D Trtrgraph 
'-Hu*rt> tmM tN*'' r.T 


. . _ Awno 

-Drfinur 3-1 ia\o*KWr- aa 

-A WINNER ALL THE WAV’* 

D Mo* 


iane svaannti&LAnK 

Etei-30. MabThu>.M ? m 


CHURC1BJ. Bramfey 460667T 

SALAD DAVE. Eves 7.46 Mai 
Thur A Sat 2JO. 


UUllMOtt AO- Cond 8930 32IO 

CC 379 6368/379 6433/741 

9999. Crps 836 3962. E\gs 8 OO. 

Thu nwl 230. Sal 630 4i 8.30 


•WHITISH FARCE AT ITS BERT 

□ Man 

Thr Theatrr al OommOl Com pany 

ROT HUDO RALPH BATES 



RUN FOR YOUR WIFE! 

Wrliren and direcietf tiy 
RAY COONEY . - 

“""W MBMTL 


. . . . •** 958 2352 CC 

i National Thaalrv^ small aivO 

mourn' Ton’L Tomor 730. Sal 

230 3 7 50. then Aim 8 » 14 

MEAPTHMC by Sarah Daxurte. 

Pretiews July 31 lo Aug S at 

7 30. Opens JUj 6 M 7 00 


Then Aug 


AMERICAN 


OOS HN MM THEATRE Boa Office 

01 680 8846/01 636 B&38/9 or 

01 660 9562/3 FIRST CALL 

Z4hr 7 D^ CC 638 MIL 

Cro Sales 930 6123.' 

DAVE CUUW'i 

TIME 


-THE SPACE ACC SET B t» 

STN WONDER OF THE WORLD" - 

s.e» 

CLIFF RIOIARD 

_ AS THE ROCN ST Aft* 

THE PORTRAYAL OE -AUASH' 

LAURENCE OLIVIER 

MMi-Fn 7.30 Tbu Mai 2.30 Sai 6 
A 8.30. 

SOSK SEATS STILL AVAILARLE 

NR TODAY'S PCRnHUHAHCC. 

Sputa! miwwIwi it 17 «■ 

TW, mat Hr OAP-a, UMN A 


DONMAft WAREHOUSE Cm Gdn 

240 8230 rt 379 6665 6433 

S R awpaap l a S8 uwnl Dina 

LwteAmN Rtemrihlta 

Fla^n. Dj»*3 R ww In 


SY SIDE SY SONDHEIM. Tix- 

Sai 8. Sal Mat B. In 431. 


DRURY LANE meATK ROYAL 

01-836 8108. 01-340 9066/7. 

Tirsl cU 24-PPW 7-6ar tt okgs 

200 7200 (no Hooking Me) 

Dnta M an itL*a' 

A 

Wter at ah the bw* 
PtaelcM Aware* ter ISM 

\oted 

BEST MUSICAL 

PLATS A PLATERS 
- LONDON THEATRE CRITICS 
AWARD 

Aim BO Matt Wnf SO. 

Mioiaio 

croup Sam 930 6123 

Party Nate AveftaMc 


MIKE OF YORKS 836 31 22 CC 
856 9837/741 9999/840 7200. 
Eves &.Tbu 3 Sal 5 4c 8.30 

COMEDY OF THE YEAR 


- STEPPING OUT 

-TRIUMPH ON TAP" SHI 
HU Corortfy by metiarti Hams 
Directed By Julia MCKratte _ 
•9JUICN YOURSELF SHJ.T** TO 
DM 


FONT1DK (Air Crafi S re 836 

2238 KP 741 9999 Crp Sales 930 

6123 MOP IO Frl 8 SM 830 Tlturs 

A Sal ZJOO 

JANE ROGER 

LAPOTAIRE ~ REES i. 

DOUBLE DOUBLE 

— R tsnnm back your ram* In 
m o d em -maalie^ai could become 
a cun- sac 


O ARMCK S 836 4601 CC 379 

6433 & CC 24 hr 7 day 240 

7200. Today 31 8 Subs'Ev— ' “ 

Wed mol 3 Set S * 8. 

HOSOL 

Iw L k 


CL OSE 437 1392. CC 379 6433. 

Bke fee is can 24 nr 240 7200 

Crp sales 930 6123. Eves 8 Matt 

wed 3 Sat 4. 

Andrew Uoyd Wetoorr Presents 

DCN1E LAWSON 


RONALD HOLOATE 
JOHN RAJtRON 

LENDRffiAJENOR 

-FILLS THE THEATRE WITH 
THE SOUND OF LAUGHTT3T 
S E*P 

An American Comedy ey 
Ken Ludwig 

Dl neae bv owl Cflmure 

MATRKE TODAY 3pm_._ 


6REEMWICM THEATRE 01-658 

T73S. Evenings 7 45 Mat SST 

2 30 SANDRA DKKINSOH, 


Bom Hrnlej, -A c new” 

D Tet^raph. "Vbadi 
Daily Man. 


HATMARXET THEATRE ROYAL 

Boa oh ICC and CC to 930 9832. 
Firs! Call 24 hr 7 day CC Makings 
Ol 240 7200 Previews July 31. 
Aug 1 & 2 7.30. opera Aug 4 ai 
7.00 

Oirea from Broadway 

JACK LEMMON 

LONG DAYS JOURNEY 
INTO NIGHT 

By Eugene O'Neill . . . 

DireetM by Jonatfian MUer 
Eves only Mon-Sal 7.30 


HAYMARKET THEATRE ROYAL 

Bov. of Her and CC O! 930 9832. 

First Call 24 nr 7 pay CC Bookings 
Ol 2*0 7200. - . 

Lvga 7.30 Mats Wed 3 Sal 2-00 

"VANESSA REDGRAVE 


D. Trt 

“TIMOTHY DALTON 


ANTONY AND . 
CLEOPATRA 

Law 3 m hum end Sac 


HAMPSTEAD 722 9301. OPTUS 

Toni 7pm fSuB t,tt 6 Sat 

Mala 4 301. ORSEJTVE THE 
SONS OF ULSTER MARCMNO 
TOWARDS THE SOMME Iff 
Frank 


MR MJUESTYS* HaymarKet 
930 4028/6606 2046/2856 
• ’ TIcketmaKer 379 6131 
FIR Can CC 240 7200 

THE PHANTOM OF THE 
OPERA 

taOtuttOTuwaw 

Sane Steve 

Bright roan Barton 

Music by ANDREW LLOYD 


Ubredo by RICHARD 
STH-GOE * CHARLES HART 

Directed by HAPOLD PRINCE 

Orara 9 Oct. 


LOHDON PALLADIUM 437 7373. 
437 2053. OC 734 8961. 379 
6433. 741 9999. FIR Call 24 Hr 
7 Day CC 240 7200- Crp Sales 
930 6123. . 

THE HIT MUSICAL 
. COMEDY 

GEORGE HEARN 
3 DENIS QULLEV 

U. CAGE A UX FOLLES 

“A ClJORfOea CELEBRATION— 
* ti jll-t mitctt- tle 
EMTEMTAIMMIXT** D Mall 
Men-Frt 7 JO. Matt Wed 2X» 
Sai 2 JO 4 8.00 
Sidnl concessions avail a! door 
Mon-Fn A Sol mats 
ROOK WOW FOR THE 
_ SVDWO OF YOUR UFE 
GOOD SEATS STUX AVAILABLE 
FOR TODAY’S PERF OR MANCE. 


LYRIC THEATRE Shaftesbury 
Ave Wi 01 437 3686 7 01 434 
1350. 01-434 1050. 01-734 

BI66- 7 

' ColM BLAKELY 

-A brilliant A rnnaly : 
ranur perfoematvre" F. Times 



The Nai tonal Theatre's aedalmed 
- jcodu cu oo ol ■ - 
' ALAN AYCKBOURtFS . 

A CHORUS OF 
DKAPPROVAL 

-Heartbrrakbigff funny** Odn 
"Hdanous “ 5 Timm 
**A rare nmlng al 
rtxM exlularauon - Times 
Evas 7.30, Matt Wed and Sat 3.0. 
Croup Sales 01-930 6123. 

Redured price matt Student A 
O AP SUh C-bv 

FIRST CALL 24NR 7 DAT 
CCROOKIMOS ON 01 240 7200 
(MO BOOKMS FEE) 

WINNER OF ALL 
THE BBT COMEDY 
AWARDS FOR 1985 
NOW -BOOKING UNTIL 
- JAN *87 


LYTTELTON -S* 92S 2262 CC 

i National Tnraire's aroKMum 

uauei Previews TonX Tomor 
7.46 A Jvtt-'tar to 29. Opens 

J«dv 30 al 7.00. -Tnen Jub 31 

lo Aug 4 a Aug 12JOJ6 A mat 

Auq 18 IK PErmOH by 
Brian O an~ . 


MERMAID Aircond 236 6568 re 

741 9999 Finl Call CC 240 7200 

<24 Hn 7 Day 1 Mon Fn 8. Sal 6 A 
- 8 30 ■ ■ 

KAntAta 

METAMORPHOSIS 

staged dv 

Sie\ cn BERK OFF 

run Rotn. -nr is A p*3WW* 

MANCE OF EXTRAONDMANT 
VIRTDOSrrr, NO ONE SHOULD 


MISS n- s Tew 

Limited Season 
ptte llu-alre load 6 drink) 


MAYFAIR S CC 629 3036. Mon- 

. Thu 8 Frt/Sal 8.40 A 8.10 

RICHARD TODD re 

■Tbb Beat ThrMtr tee yra-SM 

THE BUSINESS OF 

MURDER 

“An unabashed winner" S Ew 
“Sensational" Times 

6TH THRILLING YEAR 


NATIONAL THEATRE Slh Bank 

NATIONAL THEATRE 

COM PANY 

See SEPARATE ENT RIES undw 
OL IVIER/ LYTTELTON/ 
COTTESLOC Exeeoeni Cheap 
scats nays or oeris all theatres 

from la am. restaurant <928 

20331. CHEAP, EASY CAR PAR, 
- Info 633 0880. AM COND 


NEW LONDON. Drury Lane WCZ 

405 0072 CC 379 6*33 Eves 7.46 
TUe 3 -Sat S CO * 7 4 6. 

THE ANDREW LLOYD WEBBER 
/TJL EUOT MUSICAL 

CATS 

APPLY DAILY TO BOX OFFICE 


Group Bookings 01-406 1667 or 
01-930 6123 Postal bookings 
only now bring accepted for peris 

<i*om Dec 1 to May 30 1987 or by 

telep h one on 01-379 6453 


OUVBR *S* 928 2262 CC (Na- 

bonai Theater's open Maori 

Tom. Tomor t is. sai 2.00 

oow price man 6 7 15. t hen 

Aug 12 to 14 THE 


480 2431 CC 379 6433 

rr Hotline 486 1933 


MUM Today. Fri & Sat 7 as. 
Mats Todav & Sai: 2.30. 


PALACE TWATJtf «37 6834 
CC *57 6327 or 379 6436 
Fsl Can 24 Hr TDav CC 2*0 7200 
- - One Sam 930 6123- 

THE MUSICAL SENSATION 

LES MISERABLE 
“IP YOU CANT GET A 
TICKET- STEAL ONET su 

Lvm 7.30 Matt Thu A Sal 2.30 
Laieramerv nw admoed 
uniu tbr inlrrval 

SEAT THE TOUTS BY EHQtMB- 
MS FOR RETURNS AT THE BOK 


rMW EDWARD So* Other 
734 9951 Ftm Can s* nr 7 a ays 
rr Booking 836 546* Cro Sain 
. ..930 6123 

Mon Bat B. Mat Thin A Sal 3-00 

CHESS 
“A GRAND MASTER OF A 

SHOW" Newsweek 
H-w L.Uu'ag to Mmli 28. 1887 


PICCADILLY THEATRE Air Con- 
dilKuird. 4S7 aS06 Credit Cttrd 
Holllnrs 379 656S. 74 1 9999 CrP 
ttam 636 39&? 930 6423 

2ND SENSATIONAL YEAR 

DAVID FRANK 

ESSEX FINLAY 

MUTINY!-- = 

-SPECTACULAR MUSICAL* * 
Review Magaainr 
Eves. 8 0 Matt wed 3 A Sal 6 


PHOEMX 836 2294 CC 240 

9661 741 9999 Ftrsi mi 24 tub 
7 days 240 7200. GTO Salev 930 
6123. LOW PRICE PREVIEWS 
Ev es 7.30. Sal 4 3 8. 

Op eni 28 July 7pm 

THE COCKTAIL PARTY 

by T& EUOT 


PRINCE OF WALES 01 930 8681 

2 CC Homne 9300844/5/6 Grp 

Sales 930 6123. Keith Prowse 

7419999 379 6433. Firs! Call 24 

hr 7 nay 240 7200. 
*TDZ-TAPPmQ GOOD* D. M* 

“SEVEN BRIDES FOR 

SEVEN BROTHERS" 

THE BLOCK BUSTER MUSICAL 
“I DEFY ANYONE NOT TO 

ENWY rr * r.T mt.. 

—SEVENTH HEAVEN— E Shorter 

Eves 7.30, Mai Thur A Sat 3. 


01-73* 1166/7/ 

0261/0120. 01-439 3849/4031 


sa N ss ! 5ivi 0 ^s 


ROYAL COU RT S CC 730 1746 

Eves BjO. Sal Matt 40. A 
COLDER CLIMATE by Karim 
Alrawi. Dtr. by Simon Curitt A 
Max Sialiord-Ciarti 


SAVOY 01-836 8888 CC 01-379 
6219. 836 0*79 Evenings 7.49 
Matt Wed 3. Sat 5 6 BJO 
5TH YEAR Of 
MICHAEL FRAYN'S 
. AWARD-WINNING FARCE 
CHRISTOPHER OOOWIN 
STEPHANIE _KLG« 

COLE PADDICK 

M ICHAE L COCHRANE 
- COLETTE TIMOTHY 

' GLEESOK CARLTON 

NOISES OFF _ 

Dir by MICHAEL BLAKEMORC 


SHAFTESBURY 379 6399/379 

-6435CC 741 9999 1st cali 2*hr 

240 7200 Gp Sil« 930 6123 

P E TE R BOWLES ia 

THE ENTERTAINER 

B> JOHN OSBORNE 
Syttia Frank 

Syniv Middleman 

ONLY UNTIL JULY 28 TO SEE 
“THIS VISIONARY. RARELY 

PERFORMED PLAT WHERE 

PETER BOWLES DIVES, 

A PERFORMANCE THAT 20 
TEARS FROM NOW PEOPLE 

WILL BE BRAWNS THEY 

SAW- D Mail 

Mon- Fri 7 30 Wed 3 Sar 4 & 8 


ST MARTOTS Ol-W6 1443. Spe- 
rm! CC ho 379 6433 Evgs 8 O 
Tuev 2.45. Sat 60 a nd 8 0. ' 
34Hi yr mt AOATHA CMOTIFl 

THE MOUSETRAP 


STRAND 836 2660 CC 836 
4143/5190 741 9999 FtTVl Call 
2* Hr 7 On- rr 240 7200 Grp 
bale* 930 6122 

CABARET 


ny i ittUrato d . most rhythmic 
Dn»lcat new rmmtas In Ibe Wul 
End" Sid 
Starring 

wayne sleep 

Direrlcd * Choreographea Mr 

QBBan Lynne 

Mon rw T-WMat Wedra-00 ' 
Sal a 30 & 8 16 

BOOK NOW 


STRATFORD-UPON-AVON 
<0789 » 296623 or Tldteonager 

01 379 6433 ROYAL SHAKE- 

SPEARE COMPANY al -fleyal 
Shakrapearn TfrnalrB. Wtetar'a 

Tata Today Sal 1.30. -Drum 

Tbnlghi Sat 7 JO. Rn mae and 

Jultot Tomor 7.30 Swan 
Theatre Mtanw Today Sal 

1.30. Merer Tonight Sat 730. 

Every Man Tomor 7.30. For 

special meal theatre deals and 

hotel slop over ring (0789) 

67262. 


THEATRE OF COMEDY 

COMPANY 

"Thr very best ot Britain's ramie 
laieni** Dally Mall 
See separate enlrtes under: 

CWTOBOH THEATRE/ ■ 


VAUOEVOAE, WC2. Box Office 

and CC CI -B36 9987/5645.' FI fsT 

Call (CC 24 hn 01-240 7200 Bkg 

fee) Eves 7.30. Eves 7 30. Wed 

huts 2 SO. (Ne Mat Today l_ satt 

SO A B 16 

SUSAN. 

HAMPSHIRE 

JOANNA VAN CYSCGMEM 
and MARCIA WARREN 

In 


"FIRST CLASS, BRIGHT. INTEL- 
LIGENT AND THOROUGHLY 
EMJOYABLF*F T.Ovn lOoPerfc 
LAST B WEEKS 


VfCTCRIA PALACE 01-834 1317 

Evn 7 30 Matt Wed & Sal 2.46 

CHARLIE GIRL 

—Eire enrOi. H«rbh» A 
Fabulous Fftrattv" Standard 
PAUL NICHOLAS 

CYP CMAMSSE 

DORA BRYAN 
NICHOLAS PARSONS 
MARK WYNTER 

CHARLIE GIRL 

•*nto Pheonmenathi taewMl 
Famte Show** Tunes 
Attn book on FIRST CALL 24 Hn 

7 pays iBkg Feei 01240 7200 fr 

ALL USUAL AGENTS 


raffic”-- 

FDondcr Director MARTIN STARKS 
IN CANTERBURY 


WESTMMSTER 01-834 028314 
or 834 0048. Fir* call cr24 nr 7 
daw 240 7200 * cr 741 
9999/379 6433. Crp SalK 930 
6123 Even 7 *5. wed Matt 5. Sal 

BA 8.15 . 

MY REX DAWN PORTER 
DERMOT PETER 

WALSH BYRNE 


Murder Mvslrrv 

DEADLY NIGHTCAP 

“The eery feast of T MIm " - 

•HUHHT la the WBS TB lBlER" 


“ MUCH BETTER THAN ACATHA 
CHRISTIE” Wttttt On - 


WHITEHALL SW1 Ol 930 

7766/839:4456 cc Ol 379 
6866/6433. 741 9999? -Grin Ol 

B363962 MtHl-r n 8 00. Wrd Mat 

300 Satt 600 A 6 30 
THEATRE OF COMEDY prevents 

WHEN WE ARE MARRIED 

Bv-JO PrtesUe>- 
Dtierinrffv’ Ronald El-re 
“YOU WHLL HOT FIND A MORE 

PLEASURABLE CVENINC ANY 

WHERE M LONDON - OR THE 

WORLD** S. Exprem 
MAT TODAY AT LOO. 


VOUNO V* STUDIO 928 6363 

Evw-Snm uniir sai Naur 
B »ulttpKwni THR PARQUET 
FLO€» and THE PASSPORT by 



FROM TOURS JULY 24TH TO SUN AUGUST 3 
OPENING DAY COSTUMED CAVALCADE 3PM 
"Canterbury Clerics" in Music for a journey of Pilgrims 7 JO 

MARLOWE THEATRE Tel: 0227 67246 

'- - From Fin July 23 to Sat Aug 2 

cv» 7J0 Sat Mats. 2J0 

“MORE CANTERBURY TALES’* 

Sequel to (he world famous musical 'Canterbury Tales' 
featuring 

“THE ROYAL WEDDING SONG** 

(Now lei therr happiness begin) 
which also receives its first professional public performance 
at this festival in 

•CHEERS FOR CHAUCER’ 
with MIRIAM KARLIN and 
PHILIP GOULD (-Billy* The Juvenile Lead in '42nd Si 1 ) 
on Sunday July 27ib at 7 JO 

Speakers include: 

JOHN WAIN (Author & Oxford Professor of Pocuy. 73-78) 
Sat July 26 

' TERRY JONES (Medievalist & Monty Python star) 

Thurs July 31a 

From Sun July 27 “CHAUCER IN 20TH CART** 
incL DAME ELISABETH HUNK'S ETCHINGS of 
*Thc Canterbury Tales’ . 

MEDIAEVAL FAIR & FLOWER SHOW 
SAT JULY 26th 

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[URSDAY JULY 24 1986 


* * * * * 


THE 


TIMES 


SPORT 



Ingenious Hadlee 



By John Woodcock, Cricket Correspondent 


In West Indies last winter it 
was (he constant presence of 
four fast bowlers that made 
life so difficult for England. 
New Zealand, whom England 
meet in the first Test match at 
Lord's today, sponsored by 
Cornhill. have only one, Rich- 
ard Hadlee, but ii is now he 
who is most likely to do so. He. 
is the key figure in the three- 
match scries. 

To have taken 315 Test 
wickers, only ever with limit- 
ed assistance at the other end, 
is a remarkable achievement. 
In three Test matches against 
Australia last winter he took 
33 of them at 12.15 apiece, 
followed by another 16 in 
three Tests in New Zealand a 
few weeks later. He is 35. but 
as the years have passed the 
more ingenious and versatile 
he has become. He is the 
finest not the fiercest but the 
most accomplished, bowler in 
the world. 

U is a job to be optimistic 
about England's chances. 
Thev won the second of last 
week's one-day internationals, 
but only after being hit for 88 
in their last five overs in the 
field and IIS in their last 
eight an astonishing rate of 
scoring even in one-day crick- 
et 1 read somewhere that 
England bowling “threatened 
to fall apart": in that case 1 
hope not to be there when it 
docs. 

New Zealand have the best 
batsman in the match in 
Martin Crowe, as well as the 
best bowler and at least as 
good a Test record. In West 
Indies, a year before England 
were there, they lost three of 
the Test matches rather than 
all five, as Gower's side did. 
Last winter they beat Australia 


both at home and away. When 
England played New Zealand 
last (in New Zealand in 1984- 
S5) New Zealand won. Five of 
their side today (the two 
Crowes. Coney, Wright and 
Smith) have made a Test 100 
against England: two more 
(Edgar and Hadlee) have done 
so against Australia. 

Because they have several 
all-rounders, including a 
wicketkeeper who can make 
runs. New Zealand will bat a 

Today’s teams 

ENGLAND (from): M W Gaffing 
(Middlesex, captain). G A Gooch 
(Essex). M D Moxon (Yorkshire), C 
W Athey (Gloucestershire). D I 
Gower (Leicestershire), D R Pringle 


batting averages and first in 
the bowling in 1979 was their 
captain, who appeared in 
Wisden as HRH Prince An- 
drew. With 1 1 wickets at 4.54 


injured. Willey, who did. has 
taken three first-class wickets 
this season and Edmonds 14, 

Ontong has taken 25 wickets 
and scored getting on for 500 

So why should England Gflttillg fiDglT 
win? They have lost their last 
three Test matches at Lord's — 
against Australia, India and 
west Indies — and won only 
two of the last eight there. But 
the side they last beat at Lord's 
was New Zealand, who do 
come up against a psychologi- 


xids (M 

(Kent), N V Radford (Worcester- 
shire). N A Foster (Essex). 

NEW ZEALAND (from): J G Wright, 
B A Edgar. K R Rutherford, M D 
Crowe, J V Coney (captain), J J 
Crowe. R J Hadlee, I D Smith. J G 
BracewefC, E J Gray, D A Stirling. W 
Watson. 

lot further down the order 
than England. Had Emburey 
not had to withdraw, to be 
replaced by Willey, England 
would have gone into the 
match with arguably their 
thinnest batting line-up for 
100 years. They still might if 
they leave Willev oul 

I wrote on Monday that 
there must have been a case 
for picking Ontong in the 
original side as a slow bowling 
all-rounder. At 30, he is an 
experienced cricketer who has 
excelled in the hard school of 
South Africa's Currie Cup as 
well as for Glamorgan. Unfor- 
tunately J write too much, so it 
never got in. and nor did 
Ontong when Emburey was 


cal barrier when they play 
England in England. Of their 
31 Test matches in this coun- 
try they have won only one — 
at Headingley on their last 
visit. 

If England do the basic 
things competently, like bowl- 
ing a length and playing 
straight and using their local 
knowledge, they should at 
least be hard to beaL Even 
with the side he has, Gatting 
should know enough about 
Lord's by now to be able to 
make life difficult for New 
Zealand. Hadlee permitting. 

New Zealand have named 
12 players including both 
Watson and Stirling, 
Chai field, who is Hadlee's 
usual partner being injured. 
They have agreed to the 
bowling of 96 overs in an 
uninterrupted day, six more 
than the Indians would have, 
but fewer than the 100. which 
the Test and County Cricket 
Board should make one of the 
conditions of a lour. The 
pitch is not as grassy as the 
New Zealanders had expected, 
and it has had too little sun in 
the last week to give it any real 
pace. 

By way of a topical footnote, 
second in the Gordonstoun 


Mike Gatting bos given his 
England team a dressing-down 
about their "tnrprofessionar 
behaviour before the second 
one-day international against 
New Zealand last week. 

E nglan d's captain is angry 
about reports of some mem- 
bers of die team having a late- 
night drinking session in a 
Cheshire wine fear last Thurs- 
day. He said: “I will be 
speaking to those concerned 
because it was a very s% 
thing to do, bearing in mind 
the dreo instances of before a. 
game. Fines have been talked 
about, bat I'm not sore bow 
mnch fining the boys wonld 
actually help. My feel Lug is 
that they were 
unprofessional.” 

runs apiece and a top score of 
74 he sounds like the all- 
rounder England are looking 
for. It was at Lord's that his 
great grandfather came to 
England's rescue in 1930, 
when Woodful and Fonsford 
had made 162 for Australia's 
first wicket. 

Flay was slopped on the 
second afternoon so that 
George V might meet the 
teams. No sooner had he done 
so that Ponsford was caught 
by Hammond off White for 
SI. The King was known as a 
useful change bowler after 
that. When the Queen comes 
to Lord's tomorrow we must 
hope that her bowlers are not 
in need of such uncovenanted 
mercies. 



Back in business: Ian Botham bowling yesterday for Somerset's Second XI at Yeovil, his 
first match in the county since his suspension from first-team cricket. Report, page 45 


COMMONWEALTH GAMES: HOME COUNTRIES FACE TO FACE WITH THE CONSEQUENCES OF THE BOYCOTT 


England given a 
lot to live up to 


By Richard Eaton 


England's badminton team 
may regard it as only a minor 
surprise that they have been 
seeded, in the draw announced 
yesterday, to win all six gold 
medals in the Commonwealth 
Games. The absence of 
Prakash Padukone, of India, 
tbe former champion and ex- 
pected top seed, as well as 
Misbun Sidek. of Malaysia, 
the all- England finalist, has 
made a complete dean-op of 
titles on the cards. 

Despite the official prognos- 
tications. not everybody will 
take them to do so. A few 
might question how strong a 
men's singles favourite Steve 
Boddeley can be in the face of 
the challenge from Sze Yu, the 
second seed, and Han Jian, 
runner-up to the world cham- 
pion in the world Grand Prix 
finals. 

Baddelcy’s friend, colleague 
and fellow- Londoner, Nick 
Yates, is however the man 
most likely to have tbe first 


real chance of halting an 
opponent who left China and 
then Hong Kong, before going 
to live in Australia. 

No one would quibble with 
Helen Troke, the Enropean 
champion and England's other 
No. I. being favoured to retain 
the women's singles, but the 
men's doubles, in which Andy 
Goode and Nigel Tier have 
been seeded No. 1, is another 
matter. 

Although Goode and Tier 
won the British Airways Mas- 
ters nearly nine mouths ago, 
they had a disappointing 
Thomas Cup In which they 
were beaten by the Welshmen 
Chris Rees and Lyndon Wil- 
liams, who are now seeded 
third. It is the Scots, Billy 
Gill Hand and Dan Travers, the 
former all-England finalists, 
who might count themselves 
most unlucky to be seeded only 
two. The Scots and the Welsh 
are drawn to meet in the semi- 
finals. 


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A member of (he 
National Westminster 


Sly upset 
at Budd 
decision 

Wendy Sly was in tears after 
learning that she will not be 
allowed 10 take Zola Budd’s 
place in the 1.500 metres at 
Edinburgh. The Olympic sil- 
ver-medal winner had wanted 
to replace Budd. who was 
banned last week, but the 
selectors have derided instead 
to bring Gillian Dainty, of 
Birmingham, into the team. 

Sly. the Olympic 3.000m 
runner-up in Los Angeles, 
said: "It is unfair and no one 
has even had the courtesy 10 
let me know. I had been 
counting on doing the 1,500. 
metres. I think 1 could have 

David Miller, page 46 

won iL This decision has 
made me sick and it always 
seems to happen to me. In 
1982 I was kicked out of the 
European championship 
team. It seems ridiculous that 
another girl four seconds slow- 
er is chosen ahead of me.” 

Dainty, a silver-medal win- 
ner in the Commonwealth 
Games 1.500m four years ago 
in Brisbane, was surprised and 
delighted at the decision but 
could not have expected to 
win a place ahead of Sly. 

Frcida Clark, the England 
team manager, said: "We 
made contingency plans at an 
international subcommittee 
meeting on July 5 and chose 
Gillian Dainty. We asked all 
the top athletes what events 
they had opted for and Wendy 
said her preference was the 
3.000 metres." 

Sly's chances of winning a 
gold medal had increased 
following her recent improve- 
mem in form. ’ 


Pearce not 
tempted 

Gary’ Pearce, who has not 
pjayed international Rugby 
Union for almost four years, 
seems certain to reject a move 
to Rugby League. The Llanelli 
fly -half, aged 25, Welsh 
nigby s leading points scorer 
last season, will tour Australia 
and Fiji next -week with his 
dub and hopes to challenge 
Jonathan Davies, of Neath, 
for his international place next 
year. 

Pearce, aged 25. who was 
capped three limes by Wales 
in 1981-82. said: "I have 
turned down two substantial 
offers from Rugby League 
dubs. 1 still feel J have an 

international future.” 

Trevino back 

Lee Trevino, the winner of 
the Benson and Hedges inter- 
nationalgolf championship in. 
1978. returns to Fulford for 
this year's event from August 
14 to 17. The American, aged 
46. will be joined in the 
£180.000 tournament by the 
Australian. Graham Marsh. 
Benson and Hedges champion 
in 1976 and 1930. Sandy Lyle, 
the defending champion, and 
fellow Briton. Nick faldo. also 
are in the line-up. 


Struggling to fix up bouts 


By Srikumar Sen, Boxing Correspondent 


Boxing administrators and 
the event itself are still reeling 
from the body blow of the 
boycott, especially by the Afri- 
can countries. “I have never 
seen anything like it in my 
life** Frank Hendry, tbe direc- 
tor of the Commonwealth 
Games boxing, said yesterday. 
"It is a shambles.” 

The 168 competitors origi- 
nally expected have been re- 
duced to 86 and tbe organizers 
are straggling to find boats for 
all the 11 sessions for which 
tickets hare been sold. Urgent 
appeals have been sent to all 
the conntries still in the 
Games to send any boxers 
denied the trip to Edinburgh 
by their Commonwealth 
Games councils. - - 

So far the Welsh have come 
up with seven, the Cayman 
Islands with two and Western 
Samoa with one; Scotland put 
forward two more boxers and 
Northern Ireland four bat they 
were again rejected by their 
Commonwealth Games coun- 
cils who said they prefer to 
stay with quality rather than 
go for quantity. 

Hendry, who apart from his 


position in the Commonwealth 
Games is also President of the 
Scottish ABA and wears two 
others hats in British and 
international boxing, has ac- 
cepted the offer of Scotland 
and Northern Ireland. He 
intends, with some extra box- 
ers from England to put on a 
three-cornered international to 
bolster the Games programme 
on Sunday which has been 
red need to four contests for the 
day. 

Hendry says: “The public 
will judge if they are good 
enough standard. As far as I 
am concerned the boxers are 
good enongh and the Com- 
monwealth Games Councils of 
Scotland and Northern Ire- 
land, who have no knowledge 
about these matters should not- 
deuy boxers the chance to" 
represent their coon try by 
using the veto.” 

The Irish boxers are fly- 
weight, Tony Williamson, St 
Agnes, Belfast, (he Ulster 
senior finalist, 1986 and an 
Irish international; the light- 
weight, Billy Nicholson, 
Ledley Halt Belfast, the Irish 
junior champion, 1986; the 
heavyweight, Paul Douglas, 


Gold Gloves, Belfast the U1 
ster senior champion from 
1984 to 1986 and undefeated 
since January 1984; the super- 
heavy. Alan Owens, Antrim, 
Ulster, and all Ireland senior 
champion 1986. 

Bob Turner, the Welsh team 
manager, was delighted that 
the seven men who were 
originally pnt forward by the 
Welsh ABA are being allowed 
to compete by the Welsh 
Commonwealth Games coun- 
cil. "They are in top shape 
because they were preparing 
for a multi-national tourna- 
ment in Germany in August. 
They are all Welsh champions 
and most of them were beaten 
by the eventual ABA 
champion. 

- Among, tbe ..Welsh seven is 
Anenrin - Evans, the snper- 
heayyweight, who will swell 
that division from two to three. 
But because of a Common- 
wealth Games rule that says 
fire competitors are necessary 
in a category for four medals to 
be awarded, only the finalists 
will get medals. The late 
Welsh arrival with a bit of hick 
would end up with gold or 
silver. 


Irish but not Scots venture to gain 


Scotland, the host nation, 
have refused to sanction the 
addition of more athletes to 
their own squad, even though 
more than 500 competitors 
have been pulled out of the 
Commonwealth Games which 
open in Edinburgh today. 
"The bottom line is that no 
one wanted to see perfor- 
mances which don't measure 
up to what we would like to 
see from Scottish athletes,” 
Arthur Campbell, their team 
.manager, said yesterday. 


SPORT IN BRIEF- 


The OTganizers or the 
Games had been looking 
mainly to the teams from the 
British Isles to boost numbers, 
Australia having already 
■pointed out the im practicality 
of their calling up competitors 
from the other side of tbe 
world