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No 62,519 




<^f> Vi 



Cabinet 

back over 
Westland 



By Philip Webster, Chief Political Correspondent 
,*l!5.S? V T' mmt ****** unfounded, according to min- 
owr tbe Westland affior ty sir Humphrey Atkins, the 


casting doubt on the compe- 
tence of the Commons Select 
Commineeon Defence to crit- 
icize the way Sir Robert Arm- 
strong, the head of the Civil 
Service, and other senior offi- 
cials had' carried out their 
duties. 

In a-short Commons debate 
initiated by Mr Tam Dal yell, 
the Labour MP for Linlith- 
gow, the Government rejected 
the committee's criticisms, in 
its report issued on Thursday, 
of Sir Robert and other staff at 
Downing Street and the De- 
partment of Trade and Indus- 
try involved in the leaking of 
the Solicitor General's letter. 

Mr Richard Luce, the Min- 
ister of State at ►the Privy 
Council Office, spoke of the 
high degree of leadership and 
integrity shown by Sir Robert 
He told MPs that the Prime 
Minister had asked him to ex- 
press her “total confidence" in 
Sir Robert and Mr Bernard 
Ingham, her chief press secre- 
tary, who was also criticized in 
the report. 

Senior Cabinet ministers 
expressed surprise that a com- 
mittee of backbench MPs 
should have “trespassed” on 
how the head of the Home 
Civil Service carried out his 
work. It was said that most of 
the 11 members of the com- 
mittee had little experience of 
government and could have 
very little knowledge of how 
Sir Robert worked. 

Theircrititisms were totally 


chairman, is the only member 
of the committee to have held 
Cabinet rank. Mr John Gil- 
bert, the senior Labour mem- 
ber, was Minister of State for 
Defence and Financial Secre- 
tary to the Treasury in the last 
Labour Government. Two 



Mr Dalyell: onslaught 
on Mrs Thatcher. 

other members are former 
junior ministers. 

In the Commons, Mr Luce 
said MPs should reflect upon 
the growing tendency for offi- 
cials to be summoned before 
committees for their individ- 
ual conduct to be examined. 

His remarks were preceded 
by another blistering personal 
attack on the Prime Minister 
by Mr Daly ell, who said the 
letter written by the Solicitor 
General Sir Patrick Mayhew, 


was always intended to be 
leaked to do down Mr Michael 
Heseitine, the former Secret- 
ary of State for Defence. 

He said that Mrs Thatcher, 
Mr Leon Brittan, the former 
Secretary of State for Trade 
and Industry, and Mr Ingham 
had cooked up the scheme of 
getting one of the law officers 
to send a letter which they in- 
tended to leak. 

The specific charge against 
the Prime Minister was that 
the dirty work, the decision to 
leak, took place before it was 
suggested to the SolidtorGen- 
eral that he should write a 
letter. The affair showed that 
Mrs Thatcher “is unsuitable 
to lead one of the great parties 
of the country?*' 

• A review of the accountabil- 
ity of Civil Servants was urged 
yesterday after the select 
committee's report on the 
Westland helicopter affair. 

The call came from Mr John 
Ward, general secretary of the 
First Division Association, 
which represents top civil 
servants. “At the moment 
they are in an impossible 
position," Mr Ward, who 
described the report as 
“unfair", said. 

“According to the conven- 
tions, Civil Servants are sup- 
posed to do what ministers tell 
them. If Parliament thinks 
that this is the wrong way of 
: it, we need to start 
scratch and discuss who 
is accountable to whom," Mr 
Ward said on BBC Break&si 
Television. 


Monday 


Music in 
the round 



Pavarotti, the 
world’s greatest 
tenor, looks 
forward to filling the 
Wembley arena 



-%4d- 


• There is £12,000 to 
be won today in The 
Times Portfolio Gold 
competition - the 
weekly prize of 
£8,000 phis the daBy 
£4.000. 

• The £4,000 prize 
yesterday was won 
outrightbyMrOJ. 
Strickland, of Epsom, 
Surrey. 

• Portfolio lists, 
pages 16 and 21; rules 
and how to play, 
page 26. 


Two escape In 
balloon crash 

Two men escaped injury 
yesterday when their hot air 
balloon crash-landed into a 
lamppost in Torquay, Devon, 
after grazing a church spire. 

Firemen used a turntable 
ladder to release the pilot, Mr 
Dave Seager-Thomas, and Mr 
Mike Wesicott, aged 19, who 
was stuck half-way up the 
lamppost in the basket. 

The share-out 

Five million customers of tbe 
Trustee Savings Bank wUl be 
eligible for shares in the bank 

when they are issued 
FamSy Money, pages 22 to 24 

Oxford exams 

Oxford Class Lists and degrees 
awarded by Essex Llnwersrty 
are published today 


Report on poverty 
too late for MPs 

By Onr Chief Political Correspondent 


The Government faced a 
new political outcry last night 
over the “underhand” manner 
in which it released figures 
suggesting that more than 
10 million people in Britain 
are now Jiving oh or below the 
poverty tine. 

Mr Frank Field, Labour MP 
for Birkenhead, who has been 
campaigning for 18 months 
for the Government to publish 
its 1983 poverty tables, was 
told in a written reply deliv- 
ered to the Commons after the 
House had risen for the sum- 
mer recess foal foe tobies were 
now in the Commons library. 

The Government had given 
no warning that the figures 
were about to be published 
ami foe figures were deposited 
in the library shortly before it 
closed for the day. 

They showed that in 1979 
there were 5.9 million people 
living on or below foe poverty 
line. In 1981 there were 
7.6 million and in 1983 
8.8 million. Mr Field estimat- 
ed that the present figure was 
around 10.2 million. ' 

He said: "These figures 


should have been released Kastj 
year. The Government did not' 
want them released because 
they show foal poverty is foe 
only boom industry under the 
Conservative Government 

“The way they tried to slip it 
out after MPs had left for their 
constituencies was the most 
blatant and deliberate attempt 
to prevent foe pebtic knowing 
what has happened. I have 
been trying for months to get 
these figures but have been 
constantly fobbed off with 
written replies." 

The poverty line is defined 
for a single person as £29.40 a 
week and for a married couple 
£49.80 a week. 

Mr Archie Kirkwood, Lib- 
era! spokesman on social ser- 
vices, said last night that be 
was not surprised that the 
Conservatives were embar- 
rassed by foe figures. 

He said: “They are a mark 
of condemnation of Mrs Mar- 
garet Thatcher and her poli- 
cies, which have forced 
millions more below foe pov- 
erty line while the rich get 
richer.” 


Bomber secrets lost 


HomeNewt 23 
Overseas v 
Arons I5i» 
Arts 8 

Btrths, geatts. 
Barrages 15 

Brito 13 
Business 17-21 

Chess 

Coart 15 
Crosswords 13^6 


Law! 
Parfiamtat 


0 
26 
4 
15 
15 
15 
27-32 
1205 

TV & Radio 31 
Uahenities 27 
Weather 16 


SdMce 

Services 


****** 


Washington — The Lock- 
heed Corporation has lost 
nearly 1,500 secret documents 
believed to be related to the 
super-secret stealth bomber 
(Christopher Thomas writes). 

Mr Lawrence Kitchen, 
chairman of Lockheed, told a 
congressional hearing into 
how defence contractors han- 
dle secret documents: “Our 
internal laxness is inexcus- 
able. We have not maintained 
proper administrative control 
over classified documents. 

Mr Kitchen said prelimi-*- 


nary indications were that 
classified material bad not 
been compromised. Only one 
document was “top secret" 

A stealth bomba- crashed in 
California two weeks ago. The 
aircraft can apparently dodge 
radar detection. 

• LOS ANGELES: Nineteen 
US defence industry workers 
and one company have been 
charged with involvement in 
kickback and bribery schemes. 
More indictments are expect- 
ed (AP reports). 


TIMES 


SATURDAY JULY 26 1986 



Police claim 
success for 
Brixton raids 


Brace French, the England wicket keeper, being carried semi-conscious from the field 




> ('fr *.}■> K V I*. 

\ ■:!>; ftA 

ri, v’V v. . 

. . and his replacement. Bob 
Taylor, greeting the crowd. 

Behind the 
stumps 
again at 45 

By John Woodcock 
Bob Taylor, the forma- Der- 
byshire mid England wicket 
keeper, found himself playing 
in a Test match again yester- 1 
day. It teppeaed at Lord's 
after Brace French, the chosen 
wicket keeper, had been hit 
while batting. 

Taylor, 45 last week, was 
present as a public relations 
officer for CornhiO, sponsors 
of the Test series against New 
Zealand. He was about to have 
lunch when Mike Gatting, the 
England captain, ran across to 
ask him to get changed and 
keep wicket. Such a substitu- 
tion is thought to be unprece- 
dented in a Test 
Taylor, who played foe last 
of his 57 Tests in 1984, holds 
the record of 1,471 firm-class 
dismissals. In London he jogs 
round Regent's Park, and he 
played yesterday as though it 
were stiU his Kvetihood. 

Though French was wearing 
a helmet when hit by a haU 
from Richard Hadlee, be need- 
ed three stitches in his head 
after tuning away from a 
rising ban. 

*T can't remember anything 
about it, really," he said, 
“although I don't think I ever 
actually lost consdonsaess. 1 
was trying to move ray arms 
and fogs bat they wouldn't 
and I couldn't speak 
either. It was a ward feeling. 

“The Queen (who was mak- 
ing her annual visit to Lord's) 
didn't say anything to me 
about it, Irat Richard Hadlee 
popped his head round the 
door to check I was all right" 
French hopes to play today, 
when he w31 bear comparison 
with Taylor only because he, 
too, is so good at foe job. 

Test details, page 32 


Mob sacks Moroccan Embassy 


From Robert Fisk 
Beirut 

Up to two thousand mem- 
bers of the Hezbollah “Party 
of God” movement in Leba- 
non yesterday sacked foe Mo- 
roccan Embassy in west Beirut 
in the most violent demon- 
stration against the lsraeli- 
Moroccan talks to have taken 
place in foe Arab world. 

Led by Sheikh Ibrahim AJ- 
Axnin, leader of foe Hezbollah 
in foe Lebanese capital, the 
mob smashed windows and 


broke into offices to set fire to 
files. 

Demonstrators — unhin- 
dered by the Lebanese and 
Syrian troops operating foe 
new “security" plan in the city 
— seized hundreds of docu- 
ments in the office of Mr 
Abdul-Karim Bennani, the 
Ambassador, and burnt them 
together with papers from 
other embassy departments. 

Hundreds of Hezbollah 
demonstrators climbed the 
walls of the embassy and set 


fire to portraits of King 
Hassan before hurling furni- 
ture from foe windows. Leba- 
nese police officers outside the 
building stood by im potently, 
claiming — truthfully but typi- 
cally - that they were hope- 
lessly outnumbered and could 
therefore do nothing to pre- 
vent the sacking. Lebanese fire 
authorities managed to enter 
the four-storey building before 
the flames took hold. 

West Bank “offer" page 5 


Howe says peace 
bid should go on 


From Michael Hornsby, Gaborone 

had told him about his meet- 
ing with President Botha last 


Sir Geoffrey Howe, the 
Foreign Secretary, insisted 
yesterday that his EEC peace 
mission in southern Africa 
was still worth pursuing de- 
spite scant evidence of 
progress and Thursday night's 
public verbal drubbing from 
President Kaunda of Zambia. 

But for the first time Sir 
Geoffrey admitted that he 
might have nothing to show 
for bis travels by the time of 
the Commonwealth confer- 
ence in London on August 3-5, 
where Mrs Thatcher will be 
fighting a lone battle to stove 
off further economic sanctions 
against South Africa. 

At a press conference at 
Lusaka airport en route to 
Botswana, Sir Geoffrey called 
on Pretoria to make “a leap of 
imagination and courage” by 
freeing Mr Nelson Mandela, 
the jailed African National 
Congress (ANQ leader, and 
by lifting the ban on the ANC 
and other outlawed black 
political organizations. 

Sir Geoffrey had a for more 
congenial reception in Bo- 
tswana whose president. Dr 
Quett Masire, -though no 
friend of apartheid, is opposed 
to economic sanctions. 

The Foreign Secretary has 
until foe end of September to 
report back to EEC member 
stoles, which are pledged to 
consult other industrialized 
nations on further economic 
measures against South Africa 
if Pretoria has not made any 
moves on Mr Mandela and 
the other issues by then. 

President Kaunda yesterday 
said that nothing Sir Geoffrey 


Wednesday in Pretoria gave 
grounds for optimism that 
progress was possible. 

“I can see no succour, no 
hope at all from what Sir 
Geoffrey told me. By his 
standards, by the standards of 
the Ronald Reagans of this 
world, and the Margaret 
Thatchers of this world, may- 
be he can obtain something; 
but nothing at all to bring 
hope to my troubled mind — 
nothing at alL" he said. 

In line with an agreement to 
keep their exchanges confi- 
dential. Sir Geoffrey himself 
has not disclosed any details 
of his talks with President 
Botha, whom he is to meet 
again next Tuesday. 

The Foreign Secretary said 
he did not see his mission as 
“coming to a conclusion at the 
end of this leg*', implying the 
possibility of further visits to 
South Africa, possibly in 
September. 

He defended ftis phlegmatic 
response to President Kaun- 
da's public harangue on 
Thursday night, maintaining 
that to have “walked out or 
banged the table" would have 
been “absolutely the wrong 
kind of diplomacy. Diploma- 
cy is not a series of walk-outs. 
It is a series of tolk-foroughs." 

He considered that he had 
been “perfectly explicit and 
vigorous” in rejecting Presi- 
dent Kaunda's main accusa- 
tion — that Britain and the US 
were conspiring to preserve 
white rule in South Africa. 

Senate pressure, page 5 


Cruise ship 
hit by new 
outbreak 

By Trodi McIntosh 
The virus that left more 
than 600 passengers ill on five 
cruises of the P & O liner, 
Canberra, is believed to have 
struck again as the ship sails 
towards Cannes, on the 
French Riviera. 

Nine passengers and four of 
the crew were reported yester- 
day to be suffering from a 
gastric complaint, with symp- 
toms similar to the virus, a 
Southampton Port Health Au- 
thority spokesman said. 

But the spokesman said it 
would not be known until the 
weekend whether the latest 
cases were caused by foe virus, 
called Norwalk, which is usu- 
ally. transmitted through wa- 
ter, food or person-to-person 
contact. Last week P & O 
installed an automatic chlori- 
nation system on the liner. 

A port health authority 
scientist is on board but has so 
far found no due to what 
causes the illness. 

The 1,600 passengers on the 
latest 14-day cruise were 
warned before they went that 
there was a risk. Only 20 
cancelled their trip. 

Dr David Harper, of Win- 
ton Applied Occupational Hy- 
giene, said tests on passengers 
affected during previous 
cruises have isolated the virus, 
which is named after an 
American town where it was 
first discovered. 

He believed the virus was 
carried on to the ship in the 
water supply 


Epidemic 
fears over 
meningitis 

By Thomson Prentice 
Science Correspondent 

Government health experts 
are becoming increasingly 
concerned about a national 
epidemic of meningitis for 
which there is no effective 
vaccine. Seventy-two people 
have died of the disease so for 
this year, almost as many as in 
foe whole of 1984. 

The latest victim was a 
Christopher Knight, aged sev- 
en, who died on Wednesday. 
His death was the second tins 
year in Stroud, Gloucester- 
shire, where foe incidence of 
foe infection is 14 times the 
national average. 

Two other boys in Stroud, 
aged four and five, are serious- 
ly ill in hospital with the what 
is believed to be foe same 
virulent strain of meningococ- 
cal meningitis. 

Mr Ray Whitney, Parlia- 
mentary Under-Secretary of 
State for Health, said that it 
will be at least a year before a 
vaccine for the strain. Group 
B. becomes available. 

Long-term effects of foe 
disease may include deafness, 
blindness or brain damage, 
and about one in 10 of these 
who contract it is likely to die. 
It can be treated successfully 
with antibiotics if diagnosed 
quickly. 

Half of the fatalities among 
94 who died last year were 
aged under five, but there has 
been a rise in cases affecting 
those aged between 10 and 20. 


Women take over from bowler-hatted taxman 


By Richard Thomson 
la a perfectly ftmeti on ing 
tax office the average taxpayer 
can expect to be served coorte- 
oasly, considerately and 
promptly by a woman between 
the ages of 21 and 25 who is 
not wearing a pin-striped sist, 
earns between £100 and £1 40 a 
week and assumes one is being 
honest about one's tax affairs. 

The taxpayer is unlikely to 
get the chance to talk to tiis 

Taxwoman twice, however, be- 
cause she win probably have 
resigned in the infervaL 


The revelation that the 
Taxman is actnally a 
Taxwoman is contained m foe 
Inland Revenue's latest annual 
report (the 128th), published 
yesterday. Research shows 
chat 59 per cent of Revenue 
personnel are women, 56 per 
cent are nnder 35 years old and 
most of these are yonnger than 
25. 

The old stereotype may still 
lark on foe upper flows of 
Somerset House, since the 
higher Revenue posts are still 
held by men (a 55 per cent 


majority at bead office). Wom- 
en make ap the majority of the 
younger, clerical grades. The 
Revenue is, however, suffering 
an ever facreasiag number of 
resignations among its senior 
(male) tax inspectors. 

A graph in foe report gloom- 
ily entitled “Resignation Rates 
tor Tax Inspectors", shows a 
red line rising steeply from I 
per cent In 1983 to 5 per cent in 
1986. It costs £40,000 to train 
a firily qualified tax inspector 
and £20,000 for other inspec- 
tors. Inevitably, it is foe tax 


inspectors who are more likely 
to resign. 

One reason cmdd be that 
administrative fanprovemeats 
at the Revenue last year led, by 
October, to the biggest back- 
log of arrears in the 
department's history. The im- 
provements included greater 
computerization and foe re- 
daction In the number of local 
tax offices and collection of- 
fices. But the report promises 
fourth* changes will pave the 
way for greater efficiency in 
tbe furore." Thae-wiU tefl. 


The department's tax take 
was just over £50 bfllion last 
year, collected at an adminis- 
trative cost of IJ&6 per cent of 
total yield, the lowest since 
records began in 1974. Efforts 
to beat the tax evaders of the 
black economy met with in- 
creasing success. 

And, for tbe first time, the 
Revenue has bared its soul by 
publishing the Taxpayers 
Charter, ootiining bow tax- 
payers can expect to be treated 
by their tax office. 


By Craig Se ton 

One of the most meticulous- 
ly planned police anti-drugs 
operations mounted in Britain 
was behind the series of raids 
in Brixton. south-west Lon- 
don. Senior officers believe 
they have smashed a major 
ring dealing increasingly in 
hard drugs. 

“Operation Condor" was 
backed up by a wide-scale 
public relations campaign in 
the sensitive “front line" area 
of Brixton to reassure local 
people and prevent a repeti- 
tion of last September’s vio- 
lence and rioting. 

It was launched on Thurs- 
day afternoon after weeks of 
detailed and secret planning 
and undercover surveillance 
by drug squad officers, who 
had suspected that black drug 
pushers were increasingly 
dealing in hand drugs brought 
in from the new source of 
Nigeria. 

Suspected drug dealers from 
other parts of Britain, includ- 
ing the Handsworth area of 
Birmingham and Bristol, were 
secretly filmed by the under- 
cover officers. 

Sixty-five people were ar- 
rested in foe operation, which 
had been kept secret from all 
but those immediately 
involved. 

ft involved 340 officers 
brought in by a special train 
and in four British Road 
Services lorries. They sealed 
off foe Afro-Garibbean Club 
in Rail ton Road, which detec- 
tives believed had been taken 
over and used as a distribution 
centre by drug dealers. 

One of the police officers 
involved in the raid said: “It 
was a beautiful operation. 

There was no trouble and no 
aggravation. It went like a 
dream." 

Another ],500 police offi- 
cers equipped with riot gear, 
together with more than 20 
armed officers from Scotland 
Yard's DU firearms unit. 


stood by in foe area in case of 
riots. They were not told until 
the last moment that the 
operation was taking place in 
Brixton. 

Police are believed to have 
seized a large quantity of 
drugs, including cocaine and 
heroin and large amounts of 
cannabis, which they believe 
justified the operation. 

They also say they found a 
9mm Browning pistol and 
four rounds of ammunition 
hidden in a drawer at the Afro- 
Can bbean Club, where 30 
people were arrested. Raids 
took place at more than 20 
other locations in the area, 
and machetes and knives are 
said to have been discovered. 

Tbe raids were immediately 
condemned as designed 
provoke by Miss Linda Bellos, 
foe leader of Lambeth council, 
who said that the police had 
launched an unnecessarily 
large operation in order to 
show off and try out their new 
techniques and equipment. 

The meticulous planning of 
foe raids started early in June 
when undercover drug squad 
officers from Brixton started 
detailed surveillance of foe 
Afro-Caribbean Cub, using 
video and long-range cameras 
to identify suspected drugs 
dealers using the centre. 

Only a few senior officers 
were involved in foe filaniung 
of foe raid. British Rail police 
secretly arranged to supply a 
four-carriage commuter train 
for the operation. 

Seventy uniformed police- 
men boarded the train at a 
suburban station south of 
Brixton and other normal 
services were re-arranged to 
enable foe train to arrive at 
precisely 4.30pm on the main 
Clapham to Victoria line, 
which runs along the rear of 
foe dub. 

A wire fence surrounding 
the building had been cut in 

Continued on page 16, col 1 


Luce to take action on 
library ban on Times 

By SheQa Gmm, Political Staff 


Mr Richard Loce, Minister 
for the Arts, announced yes- 
terday that he is taking legal 
action against Ebrary antiuni- 
ties which ban copies of The 
Tunes, The Sunday Times, The 
Sum and News of the World. 

A letter will be seat early 
next week to the 15 local 
authorities, mainly Labour-led 
London councils, suspected of 
imposing a ban in protest at 
the dismissal by News Inter- 
national of 5300 print workers 
last January. It warns them of 
the legal consequences if they 
do not drop the ban and asks 
for council inmates leading np 
to the derision. 

Tbe letters are the first legal 
step In exercising default pow- 
ers under the Public Libraries 
and Museums Act, 1964. If the 


ban is not lifted Mr Lnce is 
likely to order local inquiries 
to find out if the law is being 
broken. He can then make 
orders dedaring the authori- 
ties to default and directing 
them to drop the ban. 

Mr Lace has consistently 
opposed the ban and ordered 
an investigation to find out 
how many libraries are apply- 
ing it Some local authorities 
dispute that they are breaking 
foe law. 

Mr Lace reported chat: 

• 13 authorities imposed foe 
ban; 

• 2 authorities had not yet 
replied; 

• 5 authorities, against which 
there had been complaints, 
had either not had a ban or 
had lifted it. 


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HOME NEWS 


THE TIMES SATURDAY JULY 26 1986 


52 sports grounds must 
meet new safety rules 
to be allowed crowds 


By Philip Webster, Chief Political Correspondent 

Test cricket grounds, the per cent last season, although announced yesterday that the 
irdiff Anns Park rugby sta- attendances dropped by 8 per Government will be sponsor- 


Cardiff Anns Park rugby sta- 
dium and 26 football clubs are 
among 52 more sports 
grounds that must apply from 
next month for local authority 
safety certificates, the Govern- 
ment announced yesterday. 

- Mr Douglas Hurd, Home 
Secretary, was implementing 
the recommendation of the 
Popplewell inquiry into sports 
ground safety that all grounds 
and stadiums with crowd 
capacities of more than 10,000 
should be designated and 
require safety certificates if 
they wish to continue to admit 
spectators. 

The requirement which 
comes into force on August 
23. came on the day that the 
Government confirmed a dra- 
matic reduction in hooligan- 
ism at first and second 
division football grounds last 
season. 

According to figures issued 
in a parliamentary reply, ar- 
rests at first division matches 
fell by 51 per cent and 
ejections from grounds by 33 


cent. 

In the second division there 
was a 41 per cent fen in the 
numbers arrested and 30 per 
cent fewer ejections- There 
was a 12 per cent drop in 
attendances. 

Of the grounds affected by 
the new designation order 
under the Safety of Sports 
Grounds Act, 1975. 26 are 
football 16 rugby union, three 
rugby league and seven 
cricket. 

Mr Richard Faulkner, secre- 
tary of the Football Trust 
which assists clubs on ground 
safety, said last night that 
many of the dubs newly listed 
will reduce their ground ca- 
pacity below 10,000 to escape 
designation. 

“For dubs which normally 
have just a few hundred 
spectators, to spend perhaps 
£200,000 to £300.000 to meet 
designation requirements is a 
waste of money,” he said. 

Meanwhile. Mr Richard 
Tracey, the Minister for Sport. . 


Injunction stays 
on MI5 secrets 


The Guardian and The Ob- 
server newspapers failed in the 
'Court of Appeal yesterday to 
lift injunctions barring them 
from publishing new disclo- 
sures from Mr Peter Wright, 
the former MIS man. 

Sir John Donaldson, Master 
of the Rolls, sitting with Lord 
Justice Must: 11 and Lord Jus- 
tice Nourse, said that freedom 
to publish the information 
from a former security service 
.worker could not possibly be 
justified on the evidence be- 
fore them. 

Sir John added that be 
regarded it “in the highest 
■degree unlikely” that publica- 
tion could be justified on any 
-further evidence which might 
be available at a full trial. 

: But the court varied the 
-injunctions granted to the 
Attorney General earlier this 
-month to allow the newspa- 


pers to publish disclosures in 
Parliament and open court. 


Parliament and open court. 

Mr Wright, who worked for 
MI5 before retiring and mov- 
ing to Australia 10 years ago, 
has written his memoirs. But 
the Government is seeking to 
stop publication in an Austra- 


lian court hearing due to start 
in November. 

The Attorney General 
sought injunctions against the 
newspapers after they pub- 
lished articles containing alle- 
gations said to be in the 
memoirs. 

Sir John, m dismissing the ; 
appeals with costs, said that 
Mr Justice Millett, who grant- 
ed the injunctions when he 
said that Britian’s security 
service must be seen to be , 
“leak proof”, had not erred in i 
principle. “Indeed I have no 
doubt that he was right,” Sir 
John said. 

The newspapers were re- 
fused leave to appeal to the 
House of Lords and must ask 
them direct for leave. 

Outside court. Mr David 
Leigh. The Observer’s chief ; 
reporter, said: “The injunc- 
tion is worthless because ev- 
erything in the articles we 
have already published has 
now been said on the floor of 
the House of Commons. 
There will be further disclo- 
sures at the weekend from 
another member of MI5 and 
that will be within the law.” 


Alliance I Ruling on 


document 

‘bland 9 


NUMrise 
next week 


By George Hill 


-• The joint policy document | 
'released this week by the Alii- , 
ance was attacked by Cabinet 
’ 'Ministers yesterday as “a mas- 
■’terpiece of blandness”, paper- 
ing over its divisions. Mr 
Douglas Hurd, Home Sec- 
retary, and Mr George Youn- 
ger, Secretary of State for 
Defence, emphasized the ; 
document’s reticence on uni- 
lateralism and accused the 
^Alliance of fudging its 
" policies.. 

.7; "The furthest the document 

- will be drawn on defence is to 
refer the reader to the report of 
the joint SDP-Liberal Corn- 

emission — a report which the i 
"leader of the SDP has roundly 
"'’denounced,” Mr Hurd said. 

1 “The new document skates ! 
over the whole question of our 
independent deterrent,” Mr 
Younger said. “The Alliance is 
doing its utmost to jettison 

- . principles in order to travel as 
-.’light as possible.” 

-..Mr Hurd said. “Every cam- 
! .paigning group finds a sympa- 
• ■ thetic reference is this docu- 
. Jment — but with no sign that, 
-’-the Alliance has sought to rank 
its demands against the inter- 
ests of the country. 


The Employment Appeal 
Tribunal yesterday reserved 
judgement on an attempt by 
British Coal to overturn a 
ruling that it acted unlawfully 
by withholding a pay rise from 
NUM members at a Leicester- 
shire colliery. The tribunal, 
presided over by Mr Justice 
Popplewell will give its judge- 
ment next Thursday. 

British Coal formerly the 
National Coal Board, is ap- 
pealing against an industrial 
tribunal ruling in May that it 
broke the Employment Pro- 
tection Act, 1978. by refusing 
NUM miners a £5.50 a week 
pay rise that was already being 
paid to members of the mod- 
erate Union of Democratic 
Mineworkers. 

The tribunal ruled that Brit- 
ish Coal had breached the 
Act's provisions which ban an 
employer from preventing a 
worker belonging to the union 
of his choice. It decided 
British Coal's underlying aim 
was to encourage miners to 
leave the NUM and join the 
UDM. British Coal has argued 
that it would have paid the in- 
crease to all the members at 
the pit, EUistown, near Leices- 
ter, but the UDM refused to 
act on behalf of all miners. 


Leyland job losses will 
be known after holiday 


Workers at Leyland Bus 
Company plants will be given 
; details of redundancy plans 
after an £1 1.7 million manage- 
_ment buy-out when they re- 
turn from holidays next 
month, it was disclosed 
yesterday. 

Redundancies will affect al- 
most all areas of the company, 
Mr George Newbum, manu- 
facturing operations director, 
said. 

It was announced some 
time ago that the Eastern 
Coach Works at Lowestoft 
Suffolk, will close with the loss 


of about 500 jobs at the end of 
the year. 

Mr Newburn said he did not 
want to give details of redun- 
dancy plans. “This is because 
half our workforce is on holi- 
day and the other half is due to 
go on holiday today,” he said. 
“We will wait until all the 
employees are back in August 
to discuss with them exactly 
how the future affects them. 
We have not really discussed 
the proposals with trade 
unions. But they are aware 
there is a desperate need to 
restructure the company if it is 
to survive.” 


Shopping by post? 

Play it safe 


Readers who reply to cash with order advertisements in 
national newspapers or colour soppleinents are safeguarded 
by the National Newspapers Mail Order Protection scheme. 
This covers all categories of goods and savins with the 
exception of: those advertised under c l as s ifi ed headings, 
perishable foodstuffs, horoscopes, tacky charms, gardening 


and medical products. 

The MOPSprotection guarantees that your moon will be 
refunded if a member advertiser stops trading and does not 
deliver your order, or refund your payment. • 
Advertisements covered by the Scheme may include toe 
MOPS symbol or the initial letters MOPS in their layout- 
ForfulldetailssendaS x6 stamped ncNunoNMrcwsmHs 
addressed envetopeto: — r — 

The Notional Newspapers' Mailorder sg iin nr'"- 
Protection Scheme. 

16 Tooks Court, London, EC4A 1LB. ^55 

Play it safe— look for the symbol ■m awwi ronwa 




Government will be sponsor- 
ing a seminar in the autumn 
on sport in schools. 

The grounds of clubs affect- 
ed by the new safety rules are: 
Football Barnet, Nuneaton 
Borough, Bath City, Poole, 
Berwick Rangers, Southall 
Billingham Symbonia, South- 
port. Boston, Sutton, Chelms- 
ford, Telford, Choiiey, Toot- 
ing & Mitcham, Danford, 
Witton Albion, Dulwich 
Hamlet. Worcester City, 
Gateshead, Workington, Ket- 


tering. Wycombe Wanderers. 
Morecambe. Yeovil North- 
wich Victoria, Cwmbran 
Town. 

Rogfey Union: Bristol Leices- 
ter, Camborne, Redruth, Exe- 
ter, Workington, Gloucester, 
Aberavon. Bridgend, Cardiff 
Arms Park. Ebbw Vale, Lla- 
nelli Neath, Newport, Swan- 
sea, Pontypridd. 



Thatcher 


fiir 1 ‘ 
for# 


on parties 9 
security 


7 yes 


By Sheila Gunn 
Political Staff 
The Prime Min&er jresier- . 
day promised help to the main 
political parties with the esca- 
lating costs . of anti-terrorist 
security ' at their ' annual .. 
conferences. , J . 

Sophisticated security mea- 
sures have had to he mounted 
at the conferences since a 
bomb explosion devastated . 
the Grand Hotel Brighton, 
during the 1984 Conservative 
Party conference. ; 

But the scheme announced 
by Mrs Thatcher will gjve no 
help to .the. police authorities 
who bear the major costs. 

The police authority in. 
Lancashire protested,. that . it 
had cost nearly £1 tnilKon’ to.. 
ensure security at last year's 
Conservative Party confer-' 

ence in Blackpool. 

The scheme wifi cover secu-. 
rity costs for foe.Conservative, 
Labour, Liberal Social Demo- 
cratic, Scottish and Welsh 
Nationalists conferences^ 

A political party has to hold 
at least twoseats at Westmin- 
ster, or one seat plus at Jeast . 
150,000 votes, to qualify. The' 
same criteria applies for finan- 
cial assistance to opposition; 
parties. 

Conferences in Northern - 
I relan d will not ..qualify be- 
cause the arrangements for 
security are different. 

Sir fen Fercival Conserva- 
tive MP for Southport and .a 
former solicitor general had 
urged Mrs Thatcher to help 
with the rising costs. * ; ■ 
“In the view of the Govern- • 
ment, the continuation of; 
party conferences is essential 
to the public interest and the ■ 
costs of -these exceptional 
precautions, which win not be 
necessary in every case, 
should not be borne entirely 
by the parties themselves,” 
MrsThatcher sakL 
A Conservative Central Of- 
fice spokesman said that the 
security- costs to the party _ 
amounted to “lens of 
thousands” but would not be 
drawn on the exact total in 
case it aided the terrorists. 




ough, Sheffield Eagles, York. 
Cricket: Old Trafrord, Head- 


Cricket Old Trafford, Head- 
ingley. Lord's, Trent Bridge, 
Scarborough. The Oval, Edg- 
baston. 


A Challenger main battle tank of the 15th/l9th The Klim’s Royal Hussars demonstrate 
dress rehearsal yesterday for tomorrow's Royal Armoured Corps open day at Bi 

Teachers’ pay talks restart 


abilities at the 


By Marie Dowd 


Nine years 
for brutal 
parent 


Two parents who beat, tor- 
tured and deprived their 
daughters “as a way of life” 


were given jail sentences yes- 
terday which were among the 
severest punishments ever im- 
posed in child cruelty cases. I 

Mr Robert Hannan, QC, 
Recorder at the Central Crimi- | 
nal Court, told them: “The 
pair of you had it in for those j 
girls. TTiey were at your mercy, j 
in your charge and had no 
possible redress. You abused 
your role as parents in a way j 
that was sickening” 

The unmarried couple, 
from Croydon, who cannot be 
identified on the orders of the 
judge, were convicted at an 
earlier hearing of causing 
grievous bodily harm to their j 
daughters, aged eight and 10, i 
cruelty and wilful neglect. The 
father, aged 29. was jailed for 
nine years and the mother, 
aged 28, for five yean. 

The judge described the ; 
couple as “callous and brutal” i 
and said the ordeals the little 
girls suffered had left them 
scarred for life. 

He said the children had 
been beaten with belts and 
pieces of wire flex and burnt 
with lighted cigarettes. 


Leaders of the six teaching 
unions and local authority 
employers were locked deep in 
discussion last night at talks in 
Coventry sponsored by the 
conciliation service, Acas. 

Before negotiations got un- 
der way. however, teachers* 
leaders left no doubt about 
what they thought of the 
employers' £2.5 billion pack- 
age agreed on Monday at the 
Burnham management panel 
meeting. 

Mr Fred Smithies, general 
secretary of the National As- 
sociation of Schoolmas- 
ters/Union of Women Teach- 
ers. the second largest union, 
said that the offer could be 
“no more than an opening 
shot”. 

“This is a starting point for 
negotiation,” he said. “It can 
only be seen like that The 
proposals do not come mea- 
surably near to the basis for an 
actual settlement” 

His sentiments were shared 


by Mr Doug McAvoy, deputy 
general secretary of the Na- 


general secretary of the Na- 
tional Union of Teachers, the 
largest union. He said that 
after the long salary campaign 
and 1 5 months of industrial 
action, the pay maximum of 
£14.000 was “totally 
j inadequate” 

A warning against over- 
optimism came from Mr Da- 
; vid Hart general secretary of 
the National Association of 
Head Teachers: “It would be 
wrong for people to go around 
with the idea that everything 
is going to be buttoned up in 


At the centre of the talks is 
the prVoy of pay and condi- 
tions agreed by employers on 
Monday which offers £225 bil- 
lion over five years. The main 
proposals under discussion 
include: 

• An average pay increase of 
6 per cent added to the 5.7 per 
cent deal agreed in May. 

• A sniffed and more fluid 
salary grading structure to 
replace the present four-scale 
system. New teachers would 
start on £7,600 and be placed 
oo an entry grade fin the first 
three years. 

They would then automati- 
caliy pass on to the “main 
professional grade” or MPG 
as it would be called winch 
would consist of a 12-step 
incremental ladder. 

Spread over 10 years, that 
would enable 140,000 scale- 
one teachers to earn a maxi- 
mum of £14,000. more than 
40 per cent above that at 
present 

• An additional responsibility 
allowance for “principal 
teachers.” The term would 
apply to an estimated 15 per 
cent comprised mainly of 
senior teachers and depart- 
ment heads. The allowance 
would be worth up to £1,500 
depending on their 
responsibilities. 


• Provision for local authori- 
ties to make special payments 
for teachers of “merit”, en- 
abling them to speed np 
recruitment of staff for short- 
age subjects such as mathe- 
matics, physics and modern 
languages. Mr XwinnHi Bak- 
er, Secretary of State for 
Education mid Science, is 
known to be well disposed to 
moves to give such teachers 
higher wage differentials. 

■ .The total package is de- 
signed to take in not only pay 
s tr u ct u re but also conditions of 
service and contracts, negoti- 
ating machinery, and teacher 
appraisal. That means agree- 
ment on cover for absent 
colleagues, non-contract time 
and the size of classes will be 
linked to any fu t ure pay 
settlement Union leaders will 
not be able to pick and choose. 

The Acas plenary session 
ends later today. The opening 
overtures are then likely to be 
followed by farther discus- 
sions in September. 

Mr Baker has given few 
dues on how much he is 
prepared to offer to cement a 
deal The figure officially stiD 
on the table is that of his 
predecessor. Sir Keith Joseph: 
£1.25 billion over four years, 
subject to a satisfactory con- 
tract of duties. 


University 

earnings 

doubled 


Universities’ direct earnings 
from industry more than dou- 
bled between 1982 and 2985 
(Marie Dowd writes). 

According to provisional 
figures published yesterday by 
the Committee of Vice-Chan- 
cellors and Principals, indus- 
trial and commercial research 
contracts amounted to 
£47.7 million in 1984-85, 
compared with £23 million 
for 1981-82. 

The figures, which take no 
account of inflation, do not 
indude student sponsorship 
money, nor revenue raised by 
university companies. 

Mr Michael Powefl. a senior 
administrative officer with the 
committee, said that, the de- 
velopment was a sign of the 
times. 


Universities were becoming 
increasingly dependent on 
outride income and were do- 
ing all they could to promote 
foe exploitation of then - inven- 
tions by means of patents and 
licence agreements' with 
companies. 


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Coventry this weekend.” He 
said that the employers must 
come up with another offer. 

Speaking for foe employers, 
Mr John Pearman, who is 
chairman of foe Council of 
Local Education Authorities, 


said that a detailed agreement 


was unlikely at the* two-day 
session. He hoped that suffi- 


session. He hoped that suffi- 
cient consensus- could be- 
reacbed to enable both sides to ' 
present a common front to the 
Government in September. 


Giving the example of Sal- 
ford as a university which had 
made enormous strides to- 
wards L increasing its fundings 
from sources outside the Uni- 
versity Grants. Committee, he 
said it was still -essential that 
the Govemnumr continued to 
provide foe. capital for foe 
more longterm projects. . 


Our reference (July 8) to 
English Debendox “victims” 
being able to sue m the United 
Stares wrongly implied that 
the drug has been found to 
cause birth deformities in the 
United Kingdom, and that the 
recent Supreme Court ded- 
'rion r was that non-resident 
pfeintifishave a right to sue in 
the US. -The Supreme Court 
decision was, in fact, that it is 
for the State Courts to decide 
the letter issue. 


Prisoner 
on paro 


Dispute over drinks 
led to priest’s death 


By Richard Ford 


A woman told an inquest in 
foe Irish Republic yesterday 
how she tried to revive a 
Roman Catholic priest as he 
lay dying on her bedroom 
floor after being hit several 
times by her husband. 

Mrs Teresa Flynn, aged 47, 
told the inquest at Tull am ore, 
Co Offaly, that she had tried to 
lift Father Niall Molloy, a 
family friend for 28 years, 
thinking he had passed out. 
But she then realized there 
was no sign of life. “I tried to 
revive him. I listened for his 
heartbeat and heard nothing. 

Father Molloy. aged 52, 
died last July in foe bedroom 
of Mrs Flynn and her husband 
Richard, aged 48. a business- 
man, at Kilcoursey House, 
Clara. Co Offaly. A dispute 
over late-night drinks in the 
couple's bedroom resulted in 
Mr Flynn knocking his wife 
unconscious and hitting the 
priest several times in foe face. 
Mr Flynn claimed he had been 
attacked by his wife and the 
priest. 

Father Molloy, a curate 
from Castlecoote. Co Ros- 
common. died from swelling 
to the brain. Last month Mr 
Flynn was cleared of man- 
slaughter and assault when foe 
trial judge said there was no 
case to answer. 

Before Mrs Flynn entered 
the witness box yesterday foe 
inquest heard that a parish 
priest went to foe house on the 


night of foe death to adminis- 
ter foe last rites and then told , 
the local police sergeant that it 
was “a terrible scandal in foe 
parish” and asked if it could 
be kept quiet 

Mrs Flynn said that before 
the death she had taken a 
sleeping tablet and gone to 
bed, but woke to find Father 
Molloy sitting at foe end of the 
bed and her husband beside 
her. 

Her husband said that he 
often invited Father Molloy to 
join him and his wife in their 
bedroom to finish their 
drinks. They had all had quite 
a lot to drink and had been 
celebrating the Flynns' 
daughter's wedding when a 
“stupid argument” developed 
among the three of them .over 
who was going to get more 
drink. 

“My wife got out of bed and 
both Father Molloy and her 
charged at me ... I struck 
both of them with my fist I hit 
my wife in the face; she fell 
down. I bit Father Molloy 
two. perhaps three times in the 
face.” 

Detective Inspector Thom- 
as Monaghan said be saw Mr 
Flynn a few hours after foe 
incident and he had said “I am 
the culprit”. He asked whether 
Mr Flynn had found his wife 
in a compromising position 
with the priest and he denied 
it- The inquest jury is to return 
a verdict today. 


Boycott of 
the games 
attacked 


Statistics 
on ethnic 


By John Goodbody 
Sports News Correspondent 


The president of the Inter- 
national Olympic Committee, 
said yesterday that the 31 
| countries who boycotted the 
I Commonwealth Games in Ed- 
' inburgh should be punished. 

Mr Juan Antonio 
Samaranch, a Spaniard, who 
is in Edinburgh, was speaking 
two days before foe Common- 
wealth Games Federation dis- 
cusses what action to take. 

He distinguished between 
games such as the 1980 and 
1984 Olympics, when the 
boycotting countries declined 
to lake part months before the 
event, and the present Com- 
monwealth Games when na- 
tions accepted and then 
changed their minds at the last 
moment under political 
pressure. 

“For me, foe most danger- 
ous situation is when a coun- 
try accepts an invitation to 
compete and at the last mo- 
ment withdraws. In that case 
the country must be- pun- 
ished,” Mr Samaranch said on 
BBC radio. 

He emphasized the impor- 
tance of sport and the attrac- 
tion of important games. “For 
that reason we are manipulat- 
ed by foe politicians. Boycotts 
achieve only one thing: the 
athletes from certain countries 
do not take part.” 

Reports and results, page 30 


origins 

Local education authorities 
are to be asked to collect 
details about foe ethnic ori- 
gins of school pupils (Mark 
Dowd writes). 

In a parliamentary written 
reply yesterday, Mr Kenneth 
Baker, Secretary of State for 
Education, said that he had 
received foe report of a work- 
ing group on foe subject 

“The collection of ethnic 
statistics of school pupils 
woald be of great benefit to 
schools as a basis formatting 
appropriate provision and for 
monitoring -achievement" he 

said. 

“The collection of these 
aggregate statistic will not 
enable any individual to be 
identified.” 


Mr Baker said he could not 
accept the working party's 
recommendation that foe 
Government provide foe nec- 
essary extra funding. This 
would have to come from the 
local education authorities. 


Mr Peter Newsam, chair- 
man of the Commission for 
Racial Equality, said statistics 
had consistently pointed to 
the underperformance of 
black youngsters in Britain’s 
education system, or the 
underperformance of the sys- 
tem in relation to racial 
minorities depending on 
which way one viewed the 
problem. 


Conservatives 
select two 


TV Dracula has his critics 


Mr Timothy Kirkhope, 
aged 41, a solicitor from New- 
castle on Tyne, has been chos- 
en by Conservatives in 
North-East as prospective par- 
liamentary candidate to suc- 
ceed Sir Keith Joseph. 

Mr Keith Mans, a former 
RAF bomber pilot, has been 
selected as prospective Con- 
servative candidate for Wyre, 
Lancashire, which has been 
held by Sir Walter Clegg for 
the past 20 years. 


By Gavin Bell 
Arts Correspondent 


Spire appeal 
at £900,000 


The appeal launched by the 
Prince of Wales to save Salis- 
bury Cathedral's 404ft spire — 
Britain's tallest — has reached 
£900,000 in 15 months. 

Organizers are confident of 
teaching £1 million by Octo- 
ber, when foe appeal will go 
international in an attempt to 
raise another £5.5 million by 
1995. 


It appears that Dracnla 
stalking dark streets in search 
of a bufldiiig society* and 
plastic docks revolving in 
washing machines do not meet 

with universal approval. 

A boy with the superhuman 
power to bend a lamp post and 
a man demolishing his bed 
with a chainsaw are among 
other nniikely characters who 
have alarmed television view- 
ers, according to the Indepen- 
dent Broadcasting Authority. 

All of them feature, along 
with sanitary towels and wood- 
peckers, in a summary of 129 
complaints received by the 
Independent Broadcasting Au- 
thority about advertising on 
independent television and ra- 
dio last month. 

One viewer was concerned 
that an advertisement for wa- 
terproof plasters, showing a 
plastic duck in a washing 
machine, might encourage 
children to put real docks in 
them. The authority believed 


that likelihood was “remote in 
the extreme”. 

Another was convinced that 
Dracota's nocturnal quest for a 
branch of his building society 
would incite perverted men to 
attack women. The IBA fdt 
that too was unlikely. 

The lamppost trick by a boy 
fortified by a soft drink was 
sero by three viewers as an 
incitement to vandalism. The 
authority rated that it was 
patently a comic cartoon, and 
that the feat was “incapable of 
being emulated”. 

Four viewers condemned as 
a dangerous practice the nse of 
a chainsaw to examine the 
interior of a bed, bat the IBA 
aw iittie prospect of ft encour- 
aging other people to do the 
same. 

Others objected to rowdy- 
ism and vandalism in a dder 
commercial in which wood- 
peckers assumed the rote of 
human beings and vice versa. 
“We think it is total panto- 
mime and not intended to be 
taken quite so seriously,” the 
authority said. 


Only one commercial fin- 
butter, was withdrawn by the 
advertiser ate six people 
Complained about children 
mimicking adalt 

coquettishness. 

An objection that “it is -not 
true that The Guardian news- 
paper is editorially neutral” 
was forwarded to the 
newspaper. 

The biggest controversy was 
aroused by a co mme rci a l for 
sanitary towels on Channel 4. 
Viewers did not object to the 
way it was presented, but felt 
the prod net itself was not 
suitable for television 
advertising. 

The IBA said that by yester- 
day a total of about 500 
viewers had compteioed since 
the commercial began being 
screened in March for an 
experimental period of two 
years. 

The test campaign had been 
recommended by the 1TV 
companies and the IBA adver- 
tising advisory committee, and 
was doe to be reviewed ate a 
year. 





Noye to face 
trial after 
porcelain theft 


Kenneth Noye, who was 
sentenced to 14 years' impris- 
onment for mastermin ding 
the disposal of foe £26 million 
Brinks-Mat gold bullion rob- 


bCTy haul is to face another 
trial ax the Central Criminal 


trial ax the Central Criminal 
Court (Michael HorsneU 
writes). 

With his wife Brenda, aged 
36, Noye will stand trial in 
September accused of dishon- 
estly handling £3,000 of Meis- 
sen porcelain figures stolen 
from the Hampshire home of 
- Lord Darnley in August 1981. 

But Mrs Noye, mother of 
two sons aged 13 and. 10, was 
told yesterday that a.charge of 
plotting with her husband to 
handle the Brinks-Mat . gold, 
for which' she was committed 
fast July, is being dropped. 

Mr Michael Coricery, QC 
told the court tiiat the prosecu- 
tion is offering no evidence 
against her. 

Judge Richard Lowry, who 
sentenced Noye on Thursday 
and imposed a £500,000 fine 
for organizing the laundering 
of the stolen gold and operat- 
ing a tax fraufoagreed. 

Noye, aged 38, whose 
£3 million assets have been 
frozen, and his wife were: 
granted l«al aid to fight the 
newtriaL 








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awarded damages 
for hospital blunder 
7 years before birth 


A hospital .blunder over a 
blood transfusion given to her 
mother seven years before her 
birth led to a bram-damaged 
girt aged four being awarded 
£334.769 in the High Court in 
London yesterday. 

Sandra Roberts was bom 
with . .a rare blood disease, 
haemolytic disease of the new- 
born., because West Suffolk 
Hospital at Bury St Edmunds 
tailed to give the necessary 
prefnatal treatment to Mrs 
Julie Roberts, her mother, 
whose. blood was incompati- 
ble with, that of her father. 

The child is deaf, hyperac- 
tive. autistic and is unable to 
walk or control her move- 
ments. The judge, Mr Justice 
Alliott, said that she would 
orie day be able to walk in 
some way and would probably 
attain the intelligence of a 
four-yea r-oWL 

. He said: •‘The .tragedy of 
Sandra's birth stems from a 
transfusion of the wrong blood 
giyen to .Mrs Roberts after a 
road traffic accident seven 
years before Sandra was 
bom.". 


Mrs Roberts, of Mouse 
Lane, Rougham, Bury St Ed- 
munds, was rhesus negative 
and was transfused with rhe- 
sus positive blood. Her blood 
then developed anti-D anti- 
bodies. Mr Frederick Roberts, 
her husband, was rhesus 
negative. 

As a result, there was a 
serious risk that any child 
bom to them would suffer 
from the disease, the judge 
said But it was largely pre- 
ventable. The hospital knew 
of the mother’s condition but 
failed to act 

Mr Douglas Johnson, the 
obstetrician, and East Anglian 
Health Authority admitted 
liability and the judge was 
asked to assess damages. 

The court was told that the 
child was so severely ill when 
she was bora on November 3, 
1981, that she was taken from 
her mother and kept in $pecial 
care. As a result she lost the 
vital first days with her moth- 
er and the bonding between 
them never developed. 

The judge said that Mr and 
Mrs Roberts were unable to 


cope with their daughter, who 
screamed for hours on end 
and after five months she was 
fostered 

The foster parents. Mr Syd- 
ney Woodward aged 55, and 
his wife. Maureen, aged 31. of 
Woodside, Purdis Heath, Ips- 
wich. Suffolk, had done a 
“superb job" and planned to 
adopt the child in September. 

When they began looking 
after her, they had no idea that 
she had a claim for damages 
pending. the judge 
emphasized 

Mrs Roberts wall receive 
£998 from Sandra's award for 
the nursing care she gave her 
during the first five months of 
her life. The award to the child 
also included £12,358 for Mr 
and Mrs Woodward Outside 
the court, Mrs Woodward, 
accompanied by her husband, 
said that looking alter the 
child was “hard work but 
enjoyable". She said: “I love 
her, otherwise 1 wouldn't do it. 
She's a really super kiddy. I 
have no regrets about having 
her." 


Move to curb sale 
of human kidneys 

By Thomson jpreattee^ Science Correspondent 


‘ Transplant surgeons are be- 
ing given stria guidelines on 
the use of kidneys from living 
donors in a move to curb traf- 
fic in the sale of human organs 
for operations. 

• The Government is being 
urged to set up a compulsory 
register of all imports and 
exports of transplantable or- 
gans and tissues into and out 
of Britain; and to keep a re- 
cord of all British transplant 
operations. 

The guidelines have been 
drawn up by the British Trans- 
plantation Society, represent- 
ing the surgeons, because of its 
growing concern about the 
possible exploitation of kid- 
ney*dbnors. 

The society is also calling 
for the register to be set up. 

Most kidney transplants in 
Britain involve the use of org- 
ans from the dead, with the 
consent of relatives. Living 
donors are accepted rarely. 


and in those cases the donor is 
usually a blood-relative of the 
recipient. 

However, surgeons have be- 
come aware of cases in the 
past two years in which kid- 
neys have been taken from 
living donors in Asian coun- 
tries and offered for use in 
Britain. 

The society says in the latest 
British Medical Journal that it 
would be wrong “to exclude 
totally" living unrelated do- 
nors. “But their use will re- 
quire extremely rigorous safe- 
guards to avoid the exploita- 
tion of donors and the 
manipulation of recipients, 
and to afford adequate protec- 
tion for doctors," it says. 

“Safeguards are also re- ‘ 
quired to minimize the chance 
ofa surgeon using a donor org- 
an from a. living non-relative 
when he has been led to be- 
lieve the donor and recipient 
were blood relatives." 


£20 spent 
weekly on 
family car 

The average British family 
spends about £20 a week on 
motoring, more than four 
times as much as on all other 
forms of transport combined 
(Michael Baily writes). 

Spending on cars reached 
£19.65 a week two years ago. 
according to latest figures 
from the British Road Federa- 
tion. and continues to rise. 
Nearly £11 went on petrol, 
maintenance, and insurance, 
and more than £8 on buying 
cars, the federation found. 

By comparison, under £2 a 
week went on air fares, taxis, 
and ferries, just over£l on bus 
fares, and 87p on train feres. 

Transport uses about a fifth 
of the nation's energy, the 
statistics show. 

About 60 per cent of house- 
holds now own one car, and 16 
per cent more than one. 
Official forecasts suggest a rise 
of 18'£ to 45 per cent in car 
traffic by the year 2,000. 



Kasparov (left) and Karpov (above), parrying questions in 
London yesterday (Photographs: Chris Harris). 

First move in war 
of chess giants 


By Tim Jones 


Check on French 
strangling link 


By David Sapsted 


Scotland Yard detectives 
hunting the Stockwell strang- 
ler yesterday asked French 
police for a report on the wave 
of killings in Paris that has 
claimed the lives of 32 ekleriy 
women during the post two 
years. Officers seeking the 
man responsible for strangling 
and often sexually assaulting 
eight London pensioners in 
four months said the request 
for information from France 
was purely routine. 

“We know these killings in 
Paris have been occurring and 
we have asked for a report to 
see whether there are similari- 
ties." a police spokesman said. 

One man, possibly a drug 
addict, is believed responsible 
for about a third of the French 
deaths, all involving women 
aged over 65 living alone. 


Del Supt Bryan Jackson, of 
the Cavendish Road incident 
room, where two of the mur- 
ders are being tnvesugaied, 
said: “Obviously, one of our 
first lines of inquiry must be 
how this man knows where to 
find his pensioner victims." 

He was speaking after an 
inquest on one of the victims. 
Mr William Downs, aged 74, 
had been adjourned yesterday. 
Mr Downs, one of five of the 
old people to have been 
sexually assaulted, died of 
asphyxia due to manual stran- 
gulation. 

Mr Downs was found in his 
flat in Hollis House. Overton 
Road, Stockwell, by his son on 
Monday morning. Extra po- 
lice were again patrolling areas 
of south London where most 
of the attacks had taken place. 


There were so boxing gloves 
in sight bat that could not 
disguise the feet that K was 
war. In high style, Gary 
Kasparov, the world champi- 
on, and Anatoly Karpov, his 
intractable opponent had ar- 
rived to fight again for the 
chess championship of the 
world. 

As they walked ram the 
boardroom of the Park Lane 
Hotel in London, they looked 
more like disco dancers than 
supreme exponents of an art 
which demonstrates the tri- 
umph of the human mind over 
any computer yet devised. 

Kasparov, aged 23, who 
does not dispute his playboy 
image, was trendy as ever in a 
light powder-blue suit. 

In the web of deep psycholo- 
gy that permeates cbess, 
Karpov, aged 35, bad decided 
to go for an early points victory 
paraded in a suit of almost 
ice-cream white, offset by a red 
open-neck shot. 

But it will be the hard grind 
over the 64 squares which will 
determine who will wear the 
crown. Mecca, the bookmak- 
ers, has announced odds of 8- 
13 for a Kasparov victory and 
6-4 for Karpov. 

Both men, in keeping with 
tradition, gave separate press • 
conferences and parried que- 
ries about personal antago- 
nisms. If the questions were 
too positive, they misunder- 
stood and reverted to speaking 


in Russian although their 
command of En glish is good. 

Karpov claims antagonism 
at that level was natural and if 
it ever became personal H was 
“only of a temporary nature 

Kasparov, who wrested the 
crown from Karpov in Novem- 
ber last year, said: “We have 
different attitudes to life. Yon 
can see for yourself that our 
appearance is different." 

That hatred arises from 
their first encounter in Mos- 
cow when, after five months, 
with Kasparov In the lead but 
apparently wilting under the 
physical strain, Mr Fiorenda 
Campdmanes, president of the 
International Chess Federa- 
tion, annulled the match in an 
atmosphere of mistrust. 

When the match restarted 
in September, Kasparov pro- 
duced brilliant chess to win the 
crown of which he considered 
he had been cheated. 

The 24-match series, half of 
which will be played in Lon- 
don before moving to Lenin- 
grad, is a triumph for the 
British Chess Federation and 
for the chief organizer. Mr 
Raymond Keene, chess corre- 
spondent of The Times. 

Mr Keene believes that the 
match will make chess in 
Britain, in televishw terms, as 
popular as snooker. 

Both contestants have 
agreed to donate the record 
£610,000 to the victims of the 
Chernobyl nuclear disaster. 


Prisoner 
on 

killed man 

A judge yesterday called on 
the Home Secretary to investi- 
gate the freeing of a prisoner 
who killed within a week. 

. Judge Hazan. QG said at 
the Central Criminal Court 
that the case of William 
Anderson, aged 26, would 
justifiably cause disquiet He 
bad a string of con victions and 
a personality disorder. But 
after serving half of a five-year 
sentence for stabbing and 
robbing a man, he was given 
weekend parole from Wands- 
worth jail 

He was jailed for life for 
murdering and robbing Mr 
Malik Khattak, aged 39, of 
Hampstead ■ Garden Suburb. 
He was also jailed for nine 
years for attacking and rob- 
bing a tourist 



go to trust 


By Charles . Knevitt 
Archifcecfnre Correspondent 

The Duchy of Cornwall, 
which ouumges brad and prop- 
erty for the Prince of Wales, 
has approved plans to sell 
Newquay House, a block of 76 
flats and maisonettes in Ken- 
ningfoo, sooth London, to a 
housing trust 

The sale would enable a 
tenants' co-operative to take 
over responsibility for its im- 
provement and management 

The recommendation is con- 
tained in a feasibilty study 
commissioned by die dnefay 

last February and produced by 
the community architects. 
Hunt Thompson Associates, 
working with tbe tenants and 
Mr David Conttie, housing de- 
velopment controller of the 
Halifax BuBding Society. 

The report, co-ordinated by 
tbe Royal Institute of British 
Architects, was submitted to 


the dachy council earlier this 
month. 

The Prince of Wales gave 
his approval to the Nan by 
paying an unexpected private 
visit to Newquay House on 
Tuesday afternoon. It was his 
idea last antnum to involve 
tenants in deciding the future 
of the block. 

Mr John Humphreys, 
chairman of the tenants’ pan- 
el said management problems 
began about five years ago, 
especially over new tenancies 
and getting essential repairs 
carried out Rumours that 
dossers whom the Prince had 
visited underneath the arches 
at Charing Cross station were 
to be given tenancies in the 
block proved to be unfounded. 

Tenants began to despair 
about their (mure before Mr 
Ben Derbyshire and Miss 
Caroline Dtwe, the community 
architects, opened an office in 


one of the vacant flats, under- 
took a social survey and con- 
sulted tenants on their 
wishes.Initial suspicion about 
the architects’ ride was soon 
overcome. 

Coach parties of tenants 
visited several other successful 
community architecture pro- 
jects, including Lea View 
House, Hackney, east Lon- 
don, the work of Co-operative 
Development Services in Liv- 
erpool, and the Black Road 
Improvement Schemes in 
Macclesfield. 

Mr Humphreys said: “I 
didn’t know an architect from 
a community architect before 
this, and there is a very signifi- 
cant difference. I'm learning 
all the time." Mr Ron Daw, 
another tenant, said: “We lis- 
tened to (he Prince’s speeches 
about helping people to help 
themselves. Now we know it 
can be done." 


Deal for thoroughbred 
stud ‘never happened’ 


Allan Brown, a bloodstock 
agent, was “ever the optimist" 
when he tried to get back his 
investment in a losing ihor- 
1 oughbred stud called Full of 
Hope. . 

But a High Court judge said 
yesterday that an alleged 
agreement with other share- 
holders to buy out his 14 
shares for £56,000 “never 
happened".- 

Deputy judge Peter 
Crawford, QC, rejected his 
claim for damages against 
John and Ron POpley. of 
Hilltop Stud, Wood HilL 
Meopham, Kent who denied 
that they entered into the 
agreement when Full of Hope 
became a financial liability- 

The judge said he agreed 


with the brothers that Mr 
Brown “found it difficult to 
distinguish between that 
which was and that which 
ought to be. He has deluded 
himself as to what happened". 

He had been told that Mr 
Brown of Collier Street, 
Manden, Kent, had an over- 
draft of more than £56,000 at 
the time of the alleged agree- 
ment in October 1983, and 
wished to sell his shares to 
clear it 

But the judge rejected that 
this had prompted Mr Brown 
to “bend the truth" to suit his 
case. 

He said: "He was ever the 
optimist What he said came 
from the heart and not from 
the head. 


City firm’s move saves 
Everest expedition 


By Ronald Faux 


The City has stepped in to 
save a British expedition 
which aims to climb Everest 
by its most difficult route. A 
cheque for £60,000 has been 
handed by a firm of stockbro- 
kers to the organizers of the 
British attempt on the un- 
climbed north-east ridge. 

Mr Robert Harris and Mr 
Roy Cults, senior partners at 
Sehgmann, Harris and Co, 
said that the financial help was 

S given on behalf of the 
Exchange and the City. 

The firm said yesterday: 
“The City seems to be making 
the headlines at the moment 
and the fashionable view is 


that there is little thought 
beyond making glamorous sal- 
aries. We don't too much care 
for Lhai view. 

The expedition leader. 
Brummie Stokes, a former 
soldier in the Special Air 
Service Regiment founded by 
Colonel Stirling, shouldered 
the expedition's new name. 
The Seligmann Harris British 
Mount Chomolangma North- 
East Ridge '86 Expedition, 
and set off for China yester- 
day, ahead of the 18-strong 
team. 

The expedition has raised 
£315,000 in sponsorship and 
donations. Progress reports 
will appear in The Times. 


New eggs 
‘are bigger 
and better’ 

By John Young 
Agriculture Correspondent 

A new range of poultry 
feeds, which are said to pro- 
duce bigger, stronger and 
healthier eggs, was launched 
yesterday by BOCM Silcock, 
the agricultural feed division 
of Unilever. 

The feeds contain only nat- 
ural ingredients with extra 
vitamins, but have no artifi- 
cial colourings or antibiotics. 

Binds that are fed on them 
produce larger eggs with stron- 
ger shells, better colour and 
texture and improved flavour, 
the company said. 

• The Government an- 
nounced yesterday that Dairy 
Crest Foods, the manufactur- 
ing and marketing branch of 
the Milk Marketing Board, 
was to become a separate, 
legally distinct body with its 
own commercial objectives 
and a majority of independent 
directors. 

But the Ministry of Agricul- 
ture denied a report in the 
magazine. Farming News, that 
Dairy Crest would be floated 
as a public limited company 
within the next two years. 

It also said it was “puzzled" 
by a statement by the Dairy 
Trade Federation, welcoming 
the announcement as “a first 
stage towards total separation 
of Dairy Crest by means of a 
Stock Exchange flotation”. 

It would remain a wholly- 
owned subsidiary of the 
board, the ministry said. 

The federation has long 
resented the dose links be- 
tween the board and Dairy 
Crest, claiming that they dis- 
criminate against the interests 
of its members 


More authors 
benefit from 
; library books 

' More authors received pay- 
ments for library loans of their 
books last year, the annual 
report of the Public Lending 
Right registrar said yesterday 
The number of authors, 
illustrators, translators and 
others benefiting from foe 

scheme rose to 9,6-6 from 
7,622 last year. 

The sum paid our rose from 
£1.6 million to £2.4 million. 
Bui half of those roistered 
under the scheme received 
than £100. and only one in JO 
; received £500 or more. 

For ihe first time payments 
have been extended to wTtiers 
and illustrators of children s 
books of fewer than 32 
and to authors living in West 

Germany. . , 

Report Jp ihe t Minister for lte 
Arts on the P^hc UndtngRtm 
Scheme 1985-86 (HC 523. Sta- 
tionery Office; £1.90). • - • 


Titanic expedition 


Expert not convinced of hull damage 


By Tnufi McIntosh 

The wreck of the Titanic 
conld still be raised, Mr John 
Pierce, a British salvage ex- 
pert. claimed yesterday. 

Dr Robert Balterd, leader of 
tbe American Woods Hole 
Oceanographic expedition 
which completed filming (he 
Titanic on Thursday, had not 
prodneed “condnsive" evi- 
dence that die ship's hnll is 
broken into two sections, he 


Ballard's views that the wreck 
is sot salvageable. Some of tbe 
film conld be misleading and 
does not prove conclusively 
that the hnll is broken into two 
or several sections,” Mr 
Pierce said. 

He said that if the 
expedition's midget submers- 
ible, Alvin, had taken a side 
scan sonar record of the wreck. 
Dr Ballard sbordd release the 
resalts. 


Mr Pierce of Chirk. North 
Wales stfll believes the wrack 
is resting intact 13,000 feet 
below tbe surface of tbe North 
Atlantic, 450 miles south-east 
^Newfoundland. 

He hopes an Angto/French 
expedition can be organized 
next year to salvage tbe ^reck. 

“I am not satisfied with Dr 


“So for, we have only seen 1 
different shots of tbe Htantic, 
but not one cofltiuuons view. A 
lot of questions^ remain 
unanswered," Mr Pierce said. 

Tbe rasing of (he 73-year- 
oM wreck has become a kind of 
Hoi}’ Grail to Mr Pierce, aged 
44, whose inflatable canvas 
bags successfully refloated 
Rainbow Warrior, the 


Greenpeace ship, in Auckland 
harbour last year. 

Mr Pierce believes that a 
similar system on a much 
larger scale conld raise the 
Titanic. 

However, Dr Ballard, leader 
of tbe American-French 
oceanographic survey team 
that discovered (he wrack last 
September, has said that he 
believes any salvage attempt 
would destroy the wreck. 

The Woods Hole Oceano- 
graphic Institution in Massa- 
chusetts said Dr Ballard had 
reported exactly what he had 
observed during the 
expedition. 

“There have been contra li- 
ons pictures of the bowsectioB- 
Wben Dr Ballard returns to 
Massachusetts on Monday, 
we will start examining all the 
photographs, Bnt the view 


here is that the ocean has 
taken its toll oa the wreck." 

Eleven dives were made 
daring the 12-day expedition 
and “more excellent 
photographs" of foe Titan tic 
were taken on the last day of 
filming. 

Bnt Mr Pierce, a Welsh 
aircraft engineer, who recov- 
ered nautical artefacts three 
years ago from the Lusitania, 
which lies 13 miles off foe 
Irish coast in 340 feet of 
water, remains oncourinced. 

He believes that if about 
£7 million was raised, a sal- 
vage operation conld start next 
year. 

He said a submersible de- 
veloped at Ifremer, the French 
govenunent-nm Institute of 
Research and Exploitation of 
the Sea, coaid reach depths of 
more than 20,000 feet- 


Aids risk in swimming 
pools ‘very unlikely’ 


By Thomson Prentice 

Science Correspondent 

Aids (Acquired Immune 
Deficiency Syndrome) could 
be spread in swimming pools 
in exceptional cases, although 
foe risk is “exceedingly 
unlikely", a leading scientist 
has said. 

Swimmers with open cuts 
and abrasions should avoid 
using swimming pools or hy- 
drotherapy pools because it 
was “conceivable" that the 
virus might enter through a 
break in the skin. P-ofessor 
Arie Zuckerman. professor of 
microbiology at the London 
School of Hygiene and Tropi- 
cal Medicine, said. 

Writing in the British Medi- 
cal Journal , Professor 


Zuckerman said research has 
shown that some viruses may 
be spread through water by 
swimmers. 

There was no evidence that 
the Aids virus, HIV, could be 
transmitted in this way. 

Properly maintained and 
supervised swimming pools, 
whirlpools and hydrotherapy 
pools would pose little risk. 

“There is much public anxi- 
ety that the virus causing Aids 
may be spread in swimming 
and hydrotherapy pools," he 
said. 

“There is no evidence, how- 
ever, that it is spread by social 
contact: by sharing of wash- 
ing. eating and drinking uten- 
sils, and other articles 
commonly used; or by sharing 
toilet facilities. 


Police provide driving 
lessons to help jobless 


A chief constable yesterday 
unveiled a plan to cut unem- 
ployment among young peo- 
ple by teaching them to drive. 

Mr Tony Mullett head of 
West Mercia police, also is- 
sued a challenge to potential 
employers. 

Nine long-term unem- 
ployed people aged between 
18 and 24 will start the five- 
week standard police driving 
course at Telford. Shropshire, 
where unemployment among 
men in their age group is 
above 30 per cent. 

If the course proves success- 
ful. it will be extended for a 
year in Telford, then spread 
through the whole of the area 
covered by West Mercia 
police. 

Mr Mullett said that the 
cost of the equivalent number 


of lessons at a driving school 
would be £500. The force will 
also pay for the young people 
to take their driving tests. 

The authority does not ex- 
pect protests from driving 
schools, because those select- 
ed for the course would not be 
able to afford to go to a 
commercial school. 

Mr Mullett said he was 
increasingly concerned at the 
number of young people ar- 
rested for disorderly 
behaviour. 

“One factor that emerges is 
Lhai many of them are unem- 
ployed. It is important that we 
do everything to forge closer 
links 

“I challenge local employers 
to lake advantage of the skills 
acquired by these young 
people." 


Stalker’s 
solicitor 
alleges 
phone tap 

The solicitor representing 
Mr John Stalker, the suspend- 
ed police chief! yesterday 
claimed that his office iele-_ 
phone lines were being 
tapped. The claim was denied- 
by Mr James Anderton, chieF 
constable of Greater Manches^" 
ter and Mr Stalker's superior^- 
Mr Stalker, the deputy chieF 
constable, has been at the* 
centre of a controversy since 
being suspended from his 
investigation into claims that 

the Royal Ulster Constabulary 

had a “shoot-to-kiH" policy 
when dealing with terrorists, i 
Mr Stalker, who was said IQ 
have been critical of the RUG 
in his initial report on thq 
investigation, was suspended 
while allegations involving his 
friendship with Mr Kevin 
Taylor, a Manchester busi- 
nessman. were investigated. 1 

Firemen lose : - 
long hair case; 

Three firemen who claimed 
sexual discrimination after be- 
ing ordered to have haircuts 
have had the cases dismissed 
by an industrial tribunal. Mr 
David Williams. Mr Alan 
Warwick and Mr Ron Bonner 
were furious when the station 
officer at Tottenham gave the 
“short back and sides" order 
in Januaiy. 

The trio told the tribunal 
earlier this month that there 
were two female fire fighters at 
the station — one had short 
hair, and the other had long 
hair in a pony tail style. Mr 
Williams, who has curly and 
bushy hair, said if he had it cut 
he might lose favour with his 
girlfriends. 

Two accused 
over death 

Two men were remanded in 
custody for a week by Wigan 
magistrates yesterday in con- 
nection with the death of a 
missing mother of four whose 
body was found in a shallow 
grave near the M6 m 
Lancashire. 

Mr William Bolton, aged 
41, of Eleanor Street, Wigan, 
Greater Manchester, is ac- 
cused of murdering his es- 
tranged wife. Eileen, aged 34, 
on or about June 6. Mr John 
Roden, aged 40, of Matheson 
Drive, Wigan, is chained with 
assisting in the disposal of the 
body. 

Drugs gang : 
leader jailed 

The ringleader of an inter- 
national drug-smuggling gang 
shouted: “I'll get you." to 
detectives yesterday when he 
was jailed for 10 years by the 
Central Criminal Court. 

Ulisse Marazzi, aged 43, of 
Hawtrey Road. Swiss Cottage, 
who runs an antiques business 
in Camden Passage, Islington, 
north London, was convicted 
of conspiring to supply canna- 
bis. Judge Michael Argyte, 
QC, recommended that 
Marazzi should be deported to 
Italy at the end ofhis sentence. 

£22,852 for 
crash injuries 

Mr Norman Mills, a former 
restaurant manager, was 
awarded £22.852 damages in 
the High Court yesterday for 
road crash injuries which left 
him with double vision and a 
loss of sex drive. 

Mr Mills was awarded b«s 
damages, with costs, against 
Mr Christopher Thomas, the 
rider of a motor cycle which 
was in collision with his car, 

Labour gain 

Labour took a scat from the 
Alliance when it won a by- 
elcction in the Dockyard ward 
of Southwark council. Lon- 
don. on Thursday. Mr Pat Sul- 
livan. an electrician, aged 
60.regained the seat he lost by 
17 votes to foe Alliance in foe 
May council election. 

Chief to retire 

Mr Maurice Buck, aged 57. 
chief constable of Northamp- 
tonshire. is to retire in No- 
vember. Mr Buck played an 
important part in bringing 
computers into British polic- 
ing. and in 1974 Jed the hunt 
for the Birmingham public 
house bombers. 


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OVERSEAS NEWS 


THE TIMES SATURDAY JULY 26 1986 


Massacre of 14 Hindu 


bus passengers in 
Punjab shocks Delhi 


From Michael Hamlyn, Delhi 


Just as the Punjab authori- 
ties were beginning to think 
that they had the Sikh extrem- 
ists on the run, four of them 
committed the most bloody 
massacre to date in the strife- 
lorn state. 

As first light struck the 
flooded paddy fields of the 
rich agricultural district of 
Faridkot yesterday, three men 
armed with Sten 91 ns stopped 
the first bus of the day heading 
from the little town of 
Muktsar to the capital, 
Chandigarh. 

They ordered the women 
and children off the bus, 
segregated the men into Hin- 
dus and Sikhs, and one by one 
shot the Hindus. The attackers 


were joined by a fourth man, 
1 the 


and between them they killed 
1 4 people and gravely wound- 
ed another seven. Then they 
commandeered a tractor and 
careered away on it, abandon- 
ing it dose to Ferozepur 
district and the border with 
Pakistan. 

When news of the incident 
percolated back to Muktsar, 
which is heavily populated, as 
most Punjab towns are, by 
Hindus, a dangerous situation 
arose between the two com- 
munities. A curfew was 


clamped on the town. 

The incident has caused 
widespread shock and con- 
demnation in die state, and in 
Delhi. The stale Cabinet im- 
mediately went into session to 
discuss the fallings, and after- 
ward s the Chief Minister, Mr 
Surjit Singh Barnala, declared 
that they were “an outrage 
against humanity and all civi- 
lized norms 1 '. 

His Government would 
take “drastic measures to 
trade down the culprits of this ’ 
ghastly crime and mete out 
stem punishment to them". 

Mr Julio Ribeiro, the Pun- 
jab police chief, had recently 
praised his own success in 
forcing the extremists on to 
the defensive. He declared 
that a police operation last 
weekend in a low-lying river- 
ine area of the state had 
captured vital hideouts and 
logistical stores, and that the 
gang leaders had been forced 
to flee. 

In a conversation with me 
earlier this week, Mr Surjit 
Singh indicated that in his 
view most of the extremists 
had joined the mainstream of 
political life in the state after 
the Punjab accord was signed 
last year. “Stffl, a large number 


remain who try to create 
trouble," he said. “Many of 
these may come from the 
other side of the border, from 
Pakistan." 

He flew to Muktsar to visit 
the site of the shootings and 
was joined by the state Gover- 
nor, Mr S.S. Ray. The Home 
Minister in Delhi,' Mr Bata 
Singh, also a Sikh, flew to 
Punjab in the wake of the 
qfl a ck - 

An all-party meeting in 
Chandigarh yesterday called 
for a general strike today to 
protest at the fallings. The 
meeting included representa- 
tives of both the Congress (!) 
Party of Mr Rajiv Gandhi, the 
Prime Minister, and of the 
Akali Dal, the Sikh religious 
party. The meeting had the 
support of trade union groups, 
which will ensure the success 
of the strike. 

In May 1 1 people were shot 
dead by Sikh extremists in a 
busy bazaar in Amritsar. 
Yesterday’s attack is reminis- 
cent of the falling of six Hindu 
bus passengers in 1 983. which 
was the immediate stimulus 
for the suspension of demo- 
cratic government in the state 
and the imposition of direct 
rule from Delhi. 


Ambulance 
scandal 
in Rome 


From Peter Nichols 
Rome 


The dangers of faffing QI in 
Rome in high summer bare 
been underlined by the arrests 
of a doctor and fire male Red 
Cross nurses, coupled with 
night visits by Carabinieri 
patrols to check on allegations 
of absenteeism by doom's and 
nurses. 

The six arrests on Wednes- 
day were ordered at the end of 
an inquiry into the Red Cross 
ambulance service opened a 
year ago. Those arrested were 
said to have demanded money 
before they would agree to 
take seriously fll people to 
hospital for emergency tre- 
atment. 

They were also said to have 
accepted about £100 from 
undertakers, whom they tip- 
ped off about impending 
deaths, thereby giving them 
the chance to make offers to 
the bereaved families. 

Another two people said to 
be involved in the first aid 
racket are still being sought 

The daxnpdown arose after 
a woman, seven months 
nant ami suffering from 
ma, died without proper 
medical attention on the way 
to hospital last month. 

This week some 140 Carabi- 
nieri have swooped on three of 
Rome's leading hospitals to 
ite allegations of nn- 
absences by doctors 
and nursing staff. 

The action, ordered by Si- 
gnor Giorgio Santacroce, a 
Rome public prosecutor, is 
part of an inquiry into hospital 
absenteeism which he has 
been conducting for some 
three years. 

The immediate results, he 
says, are not dramatic: a 
maximum of six people can be 
said to have bees absent 
without justification in the 
three hospitals inspected. 

Bat be says there remains 
the problem of a lack of 
personnel during the summer 
months. 

The problem fa exacerbated 
by extra overcrowding in 
Rome's hospitals caused by 
elderly people being sent for 
treatment when then families 
want to go away on holiday. 
The number of patients grows, 
while the chronic problem of 
too few staff with too little 
training is made worse by 
holidays. 


Geneva talks seek 
common ground 


From Alan McGregor, Geneva 
and Soviet ex- Nuclear Explosions Treaty, 
which specifies the same max- 
imum yield. 

- US 


American 
pens, holding markedly differ- 
ent briefs, opened discussions 
in Geneva yesterday on 
nuclear testing, another step 
towards a second summit 
between President 
and Mr Gorbachov. 

The US delegation is head- 
ed by Mr Robert Barter, 
deputy assistant director of 
the Aims Control and Disar- 
mament Agency, and the So- 
viet team by Mr Andranik 
Petrosyan ts, chairman of the 
Atomic Energy Committee. 

The Russians want to talk 
about a treaty banning all 
nuclear tests, particularly as 


they bave been observing a 
self- ir 


imposed moratorium on 
them since August 6 last year. 

The Americans are no less 
eager to concentrate on verify- 
ing observance of the 1974 
Threshold Treaty, which pro- 
hibits underground tests with 
yields exceeding 1 30,000 kilo- 
tons, and the 1976 Peaceful 


The US position remains 
that tests are essential for 
ensuring that the deterrent 
weapon stockpiles remain in 
efficient condition. That 
leaves the question of the 
equivalent Soviet stockpiles 
after the 12 months of the 
moratorium. . 

If there is no prospect of an 
early breakthrough towards a 
comprehensive ban, common 
ground may be found in the 
idea of linking reductions in 
medium-range and interconti- 
nental missiles to reductions 
in numbers, and possibly 
yields, of underground tests. 

• MOSCOW: Moscow's 
chief negotiator at the US- 
Soviet arms control talks in 
Geneva, Mr Viktor Karpov, 
met Chinese officials in Pe- 
king to discuss space weapons 
and other disarmament issues. 
Tass said yesterday. 


Nevada nuclear test 


Washington — The US has 
conducted its eighth under- 
ground nuclear weapons test 
this year, the Energy Depart- 
ment said (Mohsin Aii writes). 

The explosion beneath the 
Nevada desert on Thursday 


was of less power than 20,000 
tons of TNT. 

It was the first test since 
Washington and Moscow an- 
nounced on July 16 that their 
experts would meet in Geneva 
to discuss testing. 





corruption 


charges 


A voter in Bangkok City Hall yesterday surveying photographs of some of the thousands of candidates in the Thai ejections. 


Attack on 
Bayonne 
law court 


From Diana Geddes 
Paris 

A vast police search was 
launched yesterday among 
suspected Basque separatists 
living in the Bayonne area of 
south-west France, after a 
policeman was injured in a 
terrorist attack on the main 
law court in the town. 

Two men, one speaking in 
French and the other in 
Basque, later rang local radio 
stations on both sides of the 
border with Spain, to claim 
responsibility for the attack in 
the name of Iparretarrak. the 
French Basque separatist or- 
ganization. The claims have 
not. yet been authenticated. 

The attack is believed to 
have been carried out in 
protest against the expulsion 
to Spain eaiiier this week of 
two Basque refugees living in 
France. . 

The move marked a signifi- 
cant hardening of the new 
right-wing French 

Government's attitude to- 
wards Spanish Basque mili- 
tants living in exile on French 
soil. Neither man was being 
sought by the police in France 
or Spain. 

The main French judges' 
union, the Syndical de la 
Magistrature, has severely 
condemned what it regards as 
an “extradition in disguise” 
and an abuse of the procedure 
of "emergency expulsion". 

The policeman, who was on 
duty outside the court in 
Bayonne, was injured in the 
arm and eye when terrorists in 
a passing car fired a hail of 
bullets in his direction as he 
went to investigate a violent 
explosion at the back of the 
court just before 5 am yester- 
day. 

Two more bombs which 
bad foiled to explode were 
later found in the court's car 
park and another near a bank. 


Dig uncovers 5,000-year-old state 

New light on China’s past 


From A Correspondent, Peking 

archaeologists “Hongshan" culture of the 
late Neolithic period. 

Chinese archaeologists 


Foreign 
working in China's north-east 
province of Liaoning say they 
have unearthed the remains of 
a Chinese state 1,000 years 
older than China's supposed 
first dynasty, the New China 
News Agency reported yes- 
terday. 

During the past three years 
scientists and other experts 
have excavated six groups of 
stone tombs and a temple to a 
goddess at a remote village in 
die western part of the 
province. 

A large sacrificial altar 31 
miles east of the temple, and 
supposed by Chinese experts 
to belong to the same period, 
was uncovered during a torren- 
tial rain storm in 1979. 

The relics, all of which are 
reckoned to be 5,090 years old, 
are said to belong to tike 


at 

the site said this week that, on 
the basis of these new finds, 
China's first state must bave 
emerged more than 1,000 
years earlier than Xia, hither- 
to supposed to be China's first 
dynasty. Xea flourished be- 
tween the 21 st and 16th 
centuries BC. . 

“Such a big cadre of con- 
struction could hardly, be the, 
centre of merely a local tribe," 
So Bingqi; vice-president of 
tire' Archaeological Society of 
China, Mni. 

“They most be traces of 
social and political activities of 
an early state." Behind tike 
218-yard-wide temple is a 
square larger than a football 
field, under which archaeolo- 
gists guess lies an ancient 


castle. Relics unearthed so far 
include broken st a tue s of na- 
ked females, pieces of jade and 
implements that may have 
been ased in sacrifices. 

Archaeologists are particu- 
larly excited about two small 
female figurines found near 
the temple. These, together 
with an SJHnch-taU head of a 
goddess, painted in colours 
and with eyes of bine jade, may 
indicate that China’s painted 
pottery had developed to 
-high standard in the.NeeBtiiic 


The most attractive piece 
found so for is a vividly carved 


This latest discovery is ex- 
pected to give fiulher impetus 
to China's renewed i nte r est In 
archaeology, which died out 
during tire Cuitmal Revolution 
(1966-1976). 


Argentina showdown 
with striking pilots 


From A Correspondent, Buenos Aires 


Argentina's national airline, 
Aerolineas Aigentinas, has 
decided to recruit new pilots, 
which will infuriate its 361 
striking pilots. 

The dispute between the 
state company and the pilots' 
union, the Argentine Associa- 
tion of Airline Pilots (Apia), 
which started.at the beginning . 
of July "is over and the only 
thing left is to begin restrue - 1 
luring the company with new 
pilots," the airline's president. 
Seflor Horatio Domingorena, 
said last week, only hours 
before the Government re- 
voked Apia's legal status. 

The strike is being widely 
regarded as a test of strength 
for the Government's hopes of 
recasting labour relations and 


tackling inefficiency in public- 
ly-owned companies. 

On the surface, the cause of 
the strike was the pilots* 
unwillingness to accept a rise 
negotiated for all airline work- 
ers on June 19. after a six-day 
strike by afl.six airline unions. 
The pools argue, that then^ 
seniority and responsibilities 
merit spedal trealinent- ’ 

But labour analysts argue 
that what is really at stake is 
. the airline's ability toresist the 
union's pressure and then, 
tafangad vantage of the strike, 
streamline its most expensive 
category of employees. Ac- 
cording to many people inside 
the airline, full service can be 
maintained with only 400 
pilots. 


Three powers 
agree to air 
crisis hotline 


Tokyo — America, Russia 
and Japan have agreed to set 
up a hotline to prevent the. 
kind of misunderstanding 
which claimed 269 lives when 
Soviet jets shot down a South 
Korean jumbo jet in 1983 (A 
Correspondent writes). 

A Japanese Transport Min- 
istry official said the line 
would opea on August 13 to 
allow communication be- 
tween the three sides should 
aircraft inadvertently stray 
into the airspace of the other 
side. 

The South Korean jet was 
shot down after it flew off 
course over sensitive military 
installations on the Soviet 
island of Sakhalin. The inci- 
dent provoked an internation- 
al outcry. 

The line will link the cities 
of Khabarovsk, Tokyo and 
Anchorage. 


Last of ‘family spy ring’ convicted 

From Ivor Davis, Los Angeles 


Jerry Whitworth, the last 
member of what has become 
known In the US as “the John 
Walker fomOy spy ring" faces 
fife in prison after 
convicted in San Francisco 


Whitworth, aged 46, sat 
impassively as a Federal Court 
jury, after deliberating for 10 
days, retnraed guilty verdicts 
on seven espionage coants. 

The accused, who retired- 
from the US Navy in 1983 
after 18 years as a radio 
technician, was convicted of 
selling secrets on satellite 
commonicatioits systems, de- 
coding equipment and code 
keys Between 1974 and 1983 
for a total of 5332,000 
(£225,000). Each of the spy 
convictions carries a life 
sentence. 

Sane of the key testimonies 
against Whitworth came dar- 
ing the three-month trial from 


his old friend, John Walker. 

Walker, the confessed spy- 
master of a ring that included 
his son Michael, aged 25, and 
bi$ brother Arthur, aged 51, 
who are both serving prison 
sentences for espionage, said 
he recruited Whitworth in 
1975, to pass him labelled 
coding secrete and intelligence 

date. 

Intelligence aathorities have 
described the Walker opera- 
tion ns the most dam a gin g spy 
rum since at least the 1950s. 

The bearded, bespectacled 
Whitworth did not take the 
witness stand in his own 
- defence. 

The crux of the case seemed 
to hinge on whether the Navy 
cryptographic secrets were go- 
ing to the Russians or to the 
Israelis, as Whitworth's law- 
yers said their client believed. 

Walker, a key witness for 

the prosecution who is himself 


serving a life sentence, said 
Whitworth provided him with 
a steady stream of secret 
documents from 1975 to 1983, 
when Whitworth left the 
Navy. 

The two men first met at a 
Navy school for radio opera- 
tors in San Diego in 1970. 
Walker said that when he 
retired from the Navy in 1976 
Whitworth became his main 
supplier of secret information. 

The defence did not contest 
that Walker was selling se- 
crets, But his lawyer, James 
Larson, said he was led to 
believe they were going to 
Israel and would never have 
passed secrete if he thought 
they were destined for Russia 
or wonld have hurt the US. 

Walker testified that he 
never told Whitworth he was 
dealing with the Russians, bat 
lied and said the secrets were 
going to Allied natrons or a 



Jerry Whitworth: Sold 
crefo i 


private intefligeDce agency. 

However, the prosecutor, 
Ms Leida Scboggen, contend- 
ed that even without Walker's 
testimony there was a strong 
case that Whitworth knew 
who his customers were. She 
pointed to testimony by a 
series of Navy and intelligence 
officials who said Whitworth 
was drilled repeatedly on the 
need to keep the code from 
fa l l i ng into Soviet hands. 


Australia 
acts on US 
wheat row 


From Stephen Taylor 
Sydney 

The Hawke Government 
yesterday sought to .recruit foe 
support of Canada and Argen- 
tina in a dispute with The 
United Stales over sales 'of 
subsidized wheat , . . 

The ! Australian Govern- 
ment had eariier urged Presi- 
dent. Reagan. to veto Senate 
proposals to qffload surplus' 
wheat cm -Australian maricets 
at an estimated cost to Can- 
berra fof tap to $Ansl billion. 

On Wednesday -night Mr 
Bob Hawke, the Prime Minis- 
ter; telephoned Mr George 


Shultz, the -US Secretary of 
him that if the 


State, to warn 
US extended wheat subsidies 
to the Soviet Union and China 
it would have a devastating 
effect on Australian producers 
and could damage bilateral 
relations. 

Yesterday Mr Hawke asked 
Mr Brian Mufroney and Seftor 
Raul Alfonsm, the Canadian 
and Argentine leaders, to 
make representations to Wa- 
shington. 


Bangkok (Reuter)'- Candi- 
dates in Thailand’s general 
election, have accused oppo- 
nents of bribety, using ghost 
voters" and hiring gunmen to. 
fall rivals in the finaT run-up to 
tomorrow's voting. , 
According to the Bangkok 
Post , ambitious politicians in 
northern ThaOand have paid 

from 150,000 to 200,000 baht 
(£ 3,900 to £5,200) to hire 
kilim to assassinate «! eir 

rivals. ■ ■ • . • 

Police would neither con- 
firm nor deny the rep ort.' ti ro 
latest in a mounting stream 
about violence, but said the 
campaigning was less moody 
thanin the past. 

They, added, however, that 
they were investigating the 
murder' of a candidate and 
several canvassers during the 
campaign, .'.which has been' 
high 'in personal rivalry and 
low in policy debate. 

One candidate escaped tin-: 
hurt last Saturday when his 
campaign van /was riddled 
with M 1 & automatic rifle fare 
in Lamphun in ' northern 
Thailand. . 

In a bid to check violence, 
police have opened an election 
“peacekeeping centre" in 
Bangkok, and rounded 

5.000 people in a ; 
crackdown on crime.: 

Mom than 120,000- men, 
including bomb disposal ex- 
perts. border units, troops and 
police, will ensure security 
tomorrow, foe police said. 

. According to a number of 
newspapers, banks 'in north- 
east Thailand were short of 
foe 10 and ' 20 baht notes 
campaigner* like to hand out 
to voters. ' ' '. 

In Khon Kaen, in foe north- 
east, a candidate promised 

20.000 baht for information 
leading to foe arrest of his 
rival, who was in hiding from 
an arrest 'warrant dating bade, 
to the 1979 election. 

District registrars charge 
that some parties obtained 
fake identification cards to 
register “ghost voters". 

General Ptem Tinsolan- 
onda, the Prime Minister, is 
tipped to lead a new govern- 
ment after the election, even 
though he is not a candidate* 
The Thai system permits 
non-elected prime ministers 
and General Prem, the 
country's longest serving pre- 
mier, has p 9 wevfol backers 
despite his slipping populari- 
ty, analysts said. 

• The Army, foe main power 
base ma country that has seen 
15 coups or attempted coups 
since 1932,. has signalled its 
support for the 65-year-old 
former general, in a radio 
broadcast’ criticizing his oppo- 
nents. General Prem, who 
retired recently from foe 
Army, also enjoys solid back- 
ing from the influential 
monarchy. 

Only about . half of the 
country's 26 million elegible 
voters are expected to turn 
out, and interest is mainly 
focused on toe showings of . the 
various parties that will form 
the inevitable coalition. 
Sixteen mostly moderate 
parties have lidded 3,811 
Candida tes.The fact that Gen- 
eral Prem is not one of them 
has been one of the main- 
issues in an otherwise dull 
campaign. 


Spanish Civil Guards 
jailed for torture 


From Richard Wigg, Madrid 


Three Spanish Gvfl Guards 
have each been sentenced to 
six months imprisonment in 
Bilbao for torturing a detainee 
while seeking to obtain a 
confession of robbery in No- 
vember 1982 . 

General Jose Saenz de 
Santamaria, bead of foe para- 
military Gvfl Guard, has 
meanwhile been denounced 


Pamplona of colleagues ac- 
cused of similar offences “in 
order to acquire experience". 

The criticism of the general 
came from an underground' 
Gvfl Guard trade union 
which said the order revealed, 
a distrust of the courts. 

The Bilbao court estab- ' 
listed that foe detainee had 
received severe blows on his 


for ordering other members of hands, arms and face during 
the force fating accusations of the 46 hours he was being 
torture to attend a trial in interrogated. 


PARLIAMENT JULY 25 1986 


Westland affair • Wapping dispute 



No 10 accused of conspiracy 


WESTLAND 


Political integrity might be more 
important than political unity, 
Mr Tam DaKefl (Linlithgow, 
Lab) asserted in the Commons 
when be launched an attack on 
the Prime Minister and other 
central figures m the Westland 
controversy. 

He referred to Mrs Thatcher’s 
talk about the virtues of unity to 
the backbench 1922 Committee 
last night and declared: But this 
debate is on the need for the 
virtue of integrity in public life. 

In an adoumment debate 
before the House rose for the 
summer recess. Mr Dalyefl 
claimed that the letter written by 
ihe Solicitor GeneraL Sir Patrick 
Mayhew. which is at the heart of 
[he controversy, was. always 
intended to be leaked to do 
down the infernal nuisance that 
Mr Michael Heseltine. then 
Secretary of State for Defence, 
tad become. 


Leaking it, selectively or in 
full. was . the raison d'etre of the 
letter. The specific chaige 
against the Prime Minister was 
that the dirty work, the derision 
to leak, took place before it was 
suggested to the Solicitor 
General that he should write a 
letter. 

In all innocence Sir Patrick 
Mayhew wrote the letter. The 
only way the Downing Street 


Mr DalyeH accused Mm 
hatcher. Mr Leon Brittan, the 
jrmcr Secretary of State for 
rade and Industry, and Mr 
cmarti Ingham, press secretary 
[No 10 Downing Street 
aiming: These three cooked up 
le scheme of getting one of the 
iw officers to send a letter 
ftieft they intended to leak 
holly of in part 



Ministerial nod or wink or 
instruction. 

The affair, Mr Daiyell said, 
showed that Mrs Thatcher was 
unsuitable to lead one of the 
great parties of the country and 
to be the occupant of No 10 
Downing Street 

If Mrs Thatcher accepted 
ministerial responsibility, her 
office and Mr Ingham, in 
particular, were guilty of 
unacceptable conduct and 
should be disciplined. 

Mr Daljell asked why, after 
foe internal inquiry into the 
leak, were foe police not called 
in as in foe case of Give 
Pouting. 

They were quit* enough (he 
added) to bring in the police 
over Pooling and TisdalL Was 
this to shield someone? 


Defence had dearly said that it 
accepted Mrs Thatcher's 
statement that she had no idea 
of what was taking place on the 
day foe letter was leaked. 

Referring to criticisms about 
civil servants not being allowed 
to give evidence to the select 
committee, Mr Lace said there 
was a tendency more and more 
to summon officials to 
committees. The House would 
need to reflect on.tois important 
issue, particularly the tendency 
to examine the conduct of 
individual officials. 

I hope foe select committees 
(he said) will return to foe 
principles hitherto accepted as a 
basis on which officials give 
evidence to these committees. 


Why could not the report by 
Sir Robert Armstrong. Hea ' 


Lace: House needed tune to 
reflect on the issue 
Gvil Service machine would 
allow a law officer's letter 
anywhere near the press office 
would be because they knew 
they had to act under Prime 


lead of 

the Home Civil Service, be 
made public? No question of 
national security was involved. 
Mr Richard Luce, Minister with 
responsibility for the Gvil 
Service, said Mr Dalyell 
sometimes became so obsessed 
with an issue foal he lost his 
balance and objectivity. One of 
his obsessions was that there 
was a continual conspiracy ui 
government against the nation. 
He lived in a world of illusions 
and this often diminished the 
credibility of his case 
The Select Committee on 


Royal Assent 


The following Acts received 
Royal Assent: Finance: 
Appropriation; Gown Agents 
(Amendment); Gas; Insolvency. 
Company Directors 

(Disqualifications); Legal Aid 
(Scotland Y, Wages; Agricultural; 
Social Security British Council 
and Health Institute 
Superannuation; Dockyards 
Services: Building Societies: 
Ipswich. Port Authority; 
Alcoholics Anonymous 
Dispositions; Boumemouth- 
Swanage Motor Road and 
Ferry: Bromborough Dock. 


Minister 
rejects VAT 
proposal 


BUILDING 


The Government utterly 
rejected as flimsy, ill-conceived 
and narrow based the 
contention by the EEC 
Commission that the UK was 
wrong to zero rale for VAT new 
building and other items. Sir 
George Young. Undersecretary 
of State for Environment, said 
in foe Commons. 

Mr John Heddle (Mid- 
Siaffordshire, Q bad refereed to 
the instigation of proceedings 
against the UK in foe European 
Court of Justice for-foe removal 
of this zero-rating. He said if the 
decision of foe. European Court 
went against the Government, it 
would fundamentally challenge 
the housing policies of foe 
Government over new building, 
particularly foe switch of 
emphasis from foe public to the 
private sector. 

Sir George Young said the 
Government would fight the 
Commission, whose case was 


legally bizarre, all along foe line 
on inis ii 


issue. Harmouzation 
was being pursued for its own 
sake and the imposition of VAT 
on construction and particularly 
new housebuilding would be a 
deterrent to development 


Labour MP demands 


inquiry into police 


WAPPING DISPUTE 


A call for a public inquiry into 
the police handling of what be 
described as a trade union May 
Day parade at, foe borne of 
News International in London, 
was demanded by Mr Ronald. 
Leighton (Newham North-East, 
Lab) in the Commons. 

He made the demand during a 
short adjournment debate when 
he accused the Metropolitan 
Police of brutality against men; 
women and children. 

He also wanted accountability 
of foe Metropolitan Police 
through a democratically 
elected police authority within a 
framework set up - by 
Parliament. 

This was rejected by Mr Giles 
Shaw. Minister of Siaie. Home 
Office. .... 

Mr Leighton said the May Day 
parade on May 3 to brief people 
who had marched from 
Scotland to support foe 5,500 
colleagues robbed of their jobs 
by -Mr Rupert Murdoch, a 
conscienceless industrial 
mugger if ever there was one. 

A squad of riot- police, 
evidently psyched up and 


truncheons, charged on a signal 
and knocked men, women and 
children to the ground 
indiscriminately. Many 
innocent people were seriously 
injured. 


Mr lighten said he had been 
told by an ' official of the 
National Graphical Association 
that a school caretaker, on foe 
morning after the trouble, had 
seen police carefully remove 
rocks and boulders from the 

square where there was a pile of 

contractor's nibble. Dearly this 
was to be used at the police press 
conference later. Also seen was 


foe removal erf" a spear-type 
, The school 


railing at foe school. 

caretaker was prepared to give 
evidence. • 


jumping up and down wjfo wild 
looks on foei 


teir faces and-wavmg 


Mr Shaw said- that for more 
titan 130 years. accountability 
had been put on the Home 
Secretary by Parliament. This 
had -had the support of both 
parties for a tong time. ' 

The accountability offered to 
MPs through the Home 
Secretary and foe Home Office 
was substantial, through 
parliamentary questions, for 
instance. The-. Metropo litan 
force was mien to more direct' 
questioning by MPS titan: any 
other force. 


Offer of talks 
to Mullins 
on bomb case 


BIRMINGHAM 


When foe case. of those in prison 
following the Birmingham 
bomb trial was raised for 'the 
second fun era. 24 hours in the 
Commons', during the 


traditional prweasss. “aH-mghi 
MrDtridMeUor, Under 


sitong, __.mi.WM,, umja 

Secreuuy of State, Home Office, 
said that -if there were points 
which Mr Chris Muffin, author 
of a recent book about the trials 
wished: to put :-hr. writing they 
would beconsktered. 


To suggestions that he shonfcj 
.meet Mr Muffin, who' -wai 
listening- to the debate; Mi 
Mtfarsaid that iriTME 
w»hed to discuss points, a 
discussion .could take place. 
However, flat bulk of too wort 
considering the -case -was 
being done by officials and hie 
suggested that Mr Muffin attain 
meet Mr Caffarey, the. Unte 
Secrettay fo charge of foe 
responsibte division.' An oral 
meetingwitira minister-wa&tidt 
foe best way of carrying forward 
fo05£ difficult mattes. - 

- 77* JJomeSecretwy had to 
consider - whether materia" 
submitted jnstiiieti referrmgth 
case to the Court of i 






THE TIMES SATURDAY JULY 26 1986 


OVERSEAS NEWS 


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Senate pressure forces 
US to study measures 
against Pretoria whites 




In. another twist to its 
beleaguered South Africa poli- 
cy, the Reagan Administra- 
tion is urgently studying a 
senes of “restrictive meas- 
ures” airqed specifically at the 
white minority population. 

The measures clearly feh far 
short of the punitive sanctions 
that are stiff being firmly 
resisted by President Rea^n. 
Bu t, .th ey do go some way 
towards meeting congressio- 
nal .demands tor a more 


From Christopher Thomas, Washington 


assertive stand against Pre- 
toria. 

Even so. the Republican- 
controlled Senate looks cer- 
tain to press ahead with a 
sanctions Bill, in a dear signal 
to the Administration that its 
policy must be toughened and 
clarified. 

Senator Richard Lugar, 
■ chairman of the Senate foreign 
relations committee, .said his 
proposed sanctions Bill would 
seek economic reprisals with- 


Black citizenship 
hopes are dashed 

From Ray Kennedy, Johannesburg 


. Millions of black people 
living -in the independent 
homelands wQl have no chance 
of regain ing, their South Afri- 
can citizenship despite earlier 
government pledges that, this 
was its intention. 

Detuls.of the new Restora- 
tioa of South African Citizen- 
ship Act have been outlined by 
the Department of Home Af- 
fairs fa Pretoria. 

Only people who are citi- 
zens of Ttanskei, Bophuthats- 
wana« Venda and Ciskel bnt 
who work and live permanent- 
ly mth their families in Sofldh 
Africa Will qualify for restored 
Sondi African citizenship. 

rf is estimated that aboid 
five million people residing 
permanendy inthe h omelands 
will have no chance of regain- 
ing their citizenship. 

They will also ha veto obtain 
work permits to work in Sooth 
Africa or face severe penalties 
—der th e Aliens Act. 

Hundreds of thousands of. 
people living in townships on 
the tenders of Bophuthats- 
wana and on the borders of 
Oskei and East London will 
be locked into a permanent 


“quasi-migrancy” status, ac- 
cording to Professor Alf 
Stadler of the University of the 
Whwalersrand. 

• ANC men sentenced: Two 
African National Congress 
(ANC) guerrillas linked to Mr 
Klaas de Jonge, the Dntch 
fugitive who has been in refage 
in The Netherlands Embassy 
in Pretoria for 12 months, 
have been sentenced to 25 
years' imprisonment on terror- 
ism charges. 

The court, at N yt stro om in 
the northern Transvaal, heard 
that Mr de Jonge established 
an arms cache in Mamelodi 
township outride Pretoria for 
the two, Johannes 
aged 27, and Msolisi 
aged 28. » 

• Peaceful day claim: The 
Bureau for Information, sole 
source of official news about 
events involving die state of 
emergency, reported that for 
the 24 boors up to 6 am 
yesterday “on the whole Sooth 
Africa experienced the most 
peaceful day since the state of 
emergency was ammotced.** It 
said no deaths or iqjnrtes were 
reported. 


out requiring withdrawal of all 
American assets from South 
Africa. 

Mr Chester Crocker, the 
Assistant Secretary of State for 
African Affairs, is being sent 
to London next week for top- 
level 'consultations on the 
lands of measures the Admin- 
istration has in mind. 

They include an end to 
landing rights for South Afri- 
can Airways, restrictions on 
issuing visas, and the freezing 
of South Africans* bank ac- 
counts in America. 

Mr Orocker invented the 
term “constructive engage- 
ment”, which from 1981 has 
defined Reagan Administra- 
tion policy towards South 
Africa. The expression has 
now been abandoned. 

A revised policy direction is 
obviously in the making, with 
the final outcome dependent 
on several factors, including 
Sir Geoffrey Howe's mission 
to Southern Africa; the critical 
August 3-5 Commonwealth 
meeting in London; the EEC 
foreign ministers' talks in 
September, and the tone of 
remarks by President Botha at 
his forthcoming party con- 
ference. 

The speed with which the 
Administration is pulling back 
from the the immutable posi- 
tion outlined by President 
Reagan on Tuesday has sur- 
prised many observers. It is 
seen as a tacit admission that 
Mr Reagan's important policy 
speech on Tuesday was a 
disastrous miscalculation of 
the national mood. 

Mr George Shultz, the Sec- 
retary of State, said that some 
sanctions were already in 
place — a reference to limited 
measures imposed reluctantly 
by President Reagan last Sep- 
tember — and that “no doubt 
over time, if things don't 
change, there will be more”. 


Cavaco’s 
land Bill 
defeated 

From Martha de la Cal 
listen 

The Portuguese Parliament 
has voted down the Govem-i 
ment’s proposed revision of 
the agrarian reform law. 

While this was expected/ if 
represents yet another parlia- 
mentary defeat for. Professor 
Aofoal Cavaeo . . Sflyar'the 
Prime Minister, and once 
more raises the possibility that 
his Social Democrat Govern- 
ment might resign. 

The Government proposed 
to dismantle a large pan of the' 
system of land-holding in the 
agrarian reform region of 
Alentejo. which was intro- 
duced in 1977, after most of 
the large estates were occupied 
by form workers and turned 
into - communist-controlled 
co-operatives. 

In Parliament on Thursday 
the Socialists, Communists, 
Democratic Renewal Party, 
Democratic Movement Party 
and the Greens voted against 
the Government. Only the 
right-wing Christian Demo- 
crats gave it their support. 

The leader of the Democrat- 
ic Renewal Party, Senhor 
Herminio Martinho, told Par- 
liament that his party was 
willing to talk to other parties 
to find an alternative to the 
present Government if it re- 
signed. He thought that this 
was preferable to calling 
elections. 

The Social Democrats have 
said they would not take part 
in a coalition government 
without caning elections. Sen- 
hor Cavaeo Silva believes his 
party, which won 29 per cent 
of the vote in October, could 
now get a majority, which is 
very doubtfuL 
The Socialists do not want 
elections before they have 
organized . their party and 
changed their image under 
their new leader, Senhor Vitor 
Constancio, who replaced Dr 
M2rio Soares when he was 
elected President in January. 
They do not want to fonn a 
coalition, but might be willing 
to join one if there was no 
alternative:. 


Islands minister 
rejects charges 


By Rodney Cowton 


Mr Nathaniel Francis, who 
resigned on Thursday as Chief 
Minister of the remote British 
colony of the Turks and 
Caicos Islands, yesterday re- 
jected criticisms that his Gov- 
ernment had indulged in . 
unconstitutional ' behaviour, " 
political discrimination and 
administrati vemalpractices. . 

These charges are levelled at 
Mr Francis and two colleagues 
who resigned with him, Mr 
Robert Hall who had been 
Minister of Health and Educa- 
tion, and Mr Alden Durham, 
Minister of Works, in a report 
prepared by Mr Louis Blom- 
Cboper QG 

There had been fears that 
the constitutional changes 
might provoke civil unrest on 
the islands, which lie 200 
miles east of Cuba, but yester- 
day all was said to be peaceful 

Mr Timothy Eggar, Parlia- 
mentary Under-Secretary at 
the Foreign Office, repeated 
these allegations in the Com- 
mons when be reported the 
Government's decision to re- 
place the executive council in 
the islands with an advisory 
council 

He said; “This is an interim 
measure. We are not suspend- 
ing the .constitution and sub- 
stituting direct administration 
by the Governor. We are not 
taking away the franchise. 

“We will appoint a constitu- 
tional commission to review 
the constitution and make 
recommendations for the fu- 
ture. It will aim to conclude its 
review by the end of the year 
and will be followed by fresh 
elections.” 

Mr E®a r said that Mr 
Blom-Cooper's report had 
found Mr Francis and two of 
his ministerial colleagues “un- 
fit to hold ministerial office” . 

It had also found that the 
leader of the Opposition party 
and a senior Opposition figure 
had been involved in a con- 
spiracy to commit public or- 
der offences in order to 
overthrow Mr Francis’s Gov- 
ernment. 

Mr Blom-Cooper had ob- 
served that “such is the cor- 
rupting effect of patronage 


throughout the system that 
this was the only means of 
protest open to them”. 

The report says “the posi- 
tion of the Government as the 
main employer and dispenser 
of largesse has, against the 
background of the patronage 
system, put great power into 
the bands ' of unscrupulous 
politicians”. 

It says persistent unconsti- 
tutional behaviour, contra- 
ventions of thefreedom of the 
individual from political dis- 
crimination and “intolerable 
(not to say seditious) conduct 
by leading Opposition mem- 
bers of the Legislative Council 
are constant blights upon a 
constitutionally ordered soci- 
ety which is already displaying 
signs of political instability”. 

The report specifically ex- 
cludes from criticism Mr Em- 
manuel Missick, who only 
took office as Minister of 
Commerce and Development 
and Tourism in May. 

Both Mr Francis and Mr 
Hall yesterday criticized Mr 
Blom-Cooper's findings 

Mr Francis denied that 
there had been abuse of the 
petwer of patronage, and said 
Mr Blom-Cooper had been 
wrong to recommend that be, 
Mr Hail and Mr Durham 
should not again hold ministe- 
rial responsibility. - 

He believed that the British 
had wanted to topple his 
Government and had suc- 
ceeded. He thought they had 
wanted to do so because they 
thought there had been a Hnk 
between him and a previous 
Chief Minister and two other 
former ministers - who bad 
been convicted of drug of- 
fences in Tlorida. 

But “there is ho such con- 
nection. I do not handle drugs 
directly or indirectly,” Mr 
Francis said. 

Mr Hall said the British 
action bad been high-handed 
and based on a lack of 
understanding of what the 
people of the islands wanted. 
It was also a cover-up for 
some of the failures of Britain 
in providing employment and 
development in the islands. 



Fires devastate forests on Riviera 


A devastated landscape shows the 
effects of two days of fires on the 
French Riviera, which have de- 
stroyed more than 15,000 acres of 
forest, threatened villages and 
caused thousands to flee from 
homes and camping sites. 

Reinforcements have had to be 
flown in from Paris to help the 
3,000 firemen brought in from 10 
departments in the s urroun ding 
area (Diana Geddes writes). 


Many are exhausted, having al- 
ready had to tackle this summer 
some of the worst fires on record. 
More than 60,000 acres of forest 
have been destroyed in the South 
of France and Corsica so for this 
year. 

Reports that one person had 
died in the fires appear to have 
been unfounded, but several fire- 
men have been injured. 

Earlier in the month four 


firemen were killed when their 
plane crashed while fighting fires 
in the Pyrenees. Their union has 
called a one-day strike next 
Tuesday In protest against the 
state of repair of many of the 
planes, and in support of a claim 
for higher wages. 

M Charles Pasqua, the Min- 
ister of the Interior, admitted on 
Thursday that there were failures 
in the fire-fighting operations 


Problems 
go on hold 
at the UN 

Fkom Zoriana Pysarhvsky 
New York 

Several difficult interna- 
tional problems in which Se- 
nor Javier P6rez de Cuellar, 
the UN Secretary-General, 
has been involved for much of 
his term in office will have to 
be put on hold for some weeks 
while he recovers from heart 
bypass surgery. 

In a four-hour operation on 
Thursday, surgeons per- 
formed a quadruple bypass 
after finding abnormalities in 
what had been described as 
precautionary tests. 

Seftor P6rez de Cuellar, who 
is 66, had complained of 
extreme fatigue when he re- 
turned from a long European 
tour last week. He cancelled 
visits to several African coun- 
tries due to begin this week. 

His mediation efforts have 
focused on the conflicts in 


Press report of West Bank offer 

Peres ‘prepared to 
make concessions’ 



Sefior P6rez de CteUan will 

he stay for another term? 

Cyprus, the Middle East — 
including the Gulf war — and 
Afghanistan. 

In his absence the second- 
ranking secretariat official M 
Jean Ripert of France, and 
“the competent undersecre- 
tary-generar, of whom there 
many, will be running day-to- 
day operations, along with Mr 
Vivendra Dayal of India, the 
Chef de Cabinet. 

His illness has inevitably 
revived speculation on wheth- 
er he would accept a second 
term when his current one 
expires in Decembe r 31. 

Before visiting London in 
April he told British corre- 
spondents that he would like 
to leave at the end of the year. 
But there is little doubt that 
the Western permanent Secu- 
rity Council members — Brit- 
ain, France and the United 
States— and probably also the 
Soviet Union and China, 
would prefer that he stay. 

Africa has never provided a 
Secretary-General and many 
diplomats believe that it 
should have its chance. 

The name most often men- 
tioned is that of General 
Olesegun Obasanjo, the for- 
mer Nigerian leader who is co- 
chairman of the Common- 
wealth Eminent Persons 
Group. 


From Robert Fisk, Beirut 


An intriguing and apparent- 
ly authoritative report in one 
of Beirut's leading daily news- 
papers yesterday suggested 
that Mr Shimon Peres, the 
Israeli Prime Minister, was 
prepared to make concessions 
in his talks with King H assart, 
telling the Moroccan monarch 
that “everything is negotiable 
providing it does not under- 
mine Israel's security”, and 
promising to give “serious 
thought” to aspects of the 
Arab peace plan agreed at Fez 
four years ago. 

The report, by Mr Amin 
Rad wan, the Cairo correspon- 
dent of As Safir, was reported- 
ly obtained from Egyptian 
sources after King Hassan 
gave President Mubarak a 
long telephone briefing on his 
meeting with Mr Peres. 

It says that the Israeli Prime 
Minister was prepared to give 
Palestinians in the West Bank 
and Gaza Strip “autonomy” 
forfive years, followed by “the 
right to self-determination” 
five years later. Pales tini ans 
on the West Bank could then 
choose to live under Israeli 
sovereignty or in a “confed- 
eration” with Jordan. 

The paper quoted Mr Peres 
as saying that “regardless of 
any framework the Palestin- 
ians may eventually opt for, 
they will not be allowed to 
have an army of their own. 
After 1 5 years, they can estab- 
lish some form of diplomatic 
missions abroad and at the 
United Nations.” 

According to As Safir, the 
Israeli Prime Minister refused 
to negotiate with Mr Yassir 
Arafel’s Palestine Liberation 
Organization because they 
were “a group of terrorists”. 

The paper’s correspondent 


’says that King Hassan brought 
the talks to an end after Mr 
Peres refused to discuss the 
evacuation of all Arab territo- 
ries occupied by Israel in the 
1967 war. The latter accords 
with the King's own address 
on Moroccan television on 
Wednesday night. 

But the paper's report also 
says that Mr Peres promised 
the King that he would set up 
an Israeli committee to study 
the occupied territories, con- 
sisting of army officers, for- 
eign ministry civil servants 
and Israeli academics special- 
izing in Arab affairs. 

The committee would de- 
scribe “the strategic signifi- 
cance of each geographic block 
of the occupied lands to 
Israel’s security” and which 
parts might be returned to 
Arab sovereignty. 

Mr Peres, according to As 
Safir, also proposed “demili- 
tarized buffer zones” in the 
occupied territories, which 
could be patrolled by UN 
troops. 

The Fez summit resolutions 
of 1982, representing the most 
recent Arab consensus on a 
Middle East peace, gave im- 
plicit Arab recognition to the 
state of IsraeL 

According to As Safir, Mr 
Peres told the King that to 
return all such land would 
endanger Israel’s “strategic” 
security. 

If the As Safir report is true, 
it means that a good deal more 
ground was covered in the 
talks at the Moroccan town of 
Ifrane than had at first been 
revealed, although the details 
are unlikely to soften the 
attitude of Syria and other 
radical Arab states towards 
the Hassan-Peres initiative. 


Shamir vows to carry 
on talks with Arabs 

From lan Murray, Jerusalem 


Mr Yitzhak Shamir, the 
leader of the Likud faction, 
said yesterday that he means 
to continue the policy of trying 
to bold meetings with Arab 
leaders when he takes over as 
Prime Minister of Israel from 
Mr Shimon Peres in October. 

In a radio interview after an 
hour-long briefing from Mr 
Peres on bis meeting with 
King Hassan,* Mr Shamir said 
there was no possibility of 
direct short-term progress as a 
result of the Morocco talks. 

But he added: “Without 
doubt I shall try to continue 
these contacts, which will 
ultimately bring peace be- 
tween the Arabs and our- 
selves” 


Mr Shamir was not very 
impressed with the achieve- 
ment of the Morocco meeting. 
“Hassan did not say it was a 
failure, and Peres did not 
describe it as an extraordinary 
success,” he said. 

Mr George Bosh, the US 
Vice-President, arrives in Isra- 
el tomorrow at the start of a 
12-day Middle East tour dur- 
ing which he is expected to try 
to exploit the break in the 
Arab front which has ap- 
peared with the Peres visit 

The trip has long been 
planned, probably as part of 
his campaign for Jewish sup- 
port of his candidacy in the 
1988 presidential elections. 


Greeks vie 
for ‘lost 
RAF gold’ 

From Marib Modiano 
Athens 

The British Embassy in 
Athens has asked the Greek 
Ministry of Defence to investi- 
gate reports that rival Greek 
treasure-tenters are after the 
smloeo wreck of a wartime 
Royal Air Force plane off the 
island of Euboea, in an at- 
tempt to retrieve a reported 
cargo of gold coins. 

“If indeed there is such 
gold, we shall certainly date 
it, since it would still be 
British Government prop- 
erty,” an embassy spokesman 
said yesterday. 

The embassy was alerted 
when the Greek Ministry of 
Merchant Marine announced 
this week that it had granted 
ffie research ship Poseidon a 
licence for underwater explo- 
ration in the Gulf of Orem, off 
the north coast of Euboea. 

However, Mr Christos Elef- 
theriou, a machinist aged 53, 
who was bora in Oreoi, asked 
the authorities to withdraw the 
licence mi the ground that he 
had seen the downing of the 
aircraft and already obtained 
permits himself. 

He dates that he saw the 
British plane ditch after a 
dogfight with German aircraft 
in the summer of 1943 and sink 
some 400 yards from the 
fishing boat be was in. “I was 
then aged seven and we were 
felling with dynamite. I know 
exactly where it is,” be said. 

He dates he was negotiat- 
ing the hire of the Poseidon for 
the search when he discovered 
that her owner had applied for 
a licence himself. 

Reports that the aircraft 
was carrying 20 cases of gold 
sovereigns, which could have a 
current value of 140 billion 
drachmas (£700 million), are 
attributed by Mr Eteftherion 
to the unnamed pilot of the 
RAF plane, who apparently 
survived the crash and was 
reported to have goite to Oreoi 
last sunnier with divers in an 
attempt to find the wreck. 

The Ministry of Merchant 
Marine said it had no record of 
a licence for any Briton to 

search for aircraft wreckage in 
that area. British Embassy 
sources in Athens said that if 
the plane did carry any goW 
they doubted w hether it would 
be as much as is reported. 

“If tills was a cargo of gold 
on its way to Middle East 
headquarters, it would not 
have beeen overflying Ger- 
man-occupied Greece, particu- 
larly in broad daylight,” they 
said. 

“Bnt if it was beaded for the 
Greek mountains to make a 
drop of gold coins for the 
partisans, it would not have 
been anywhere near that 
quantity.” 


East Germans’ refugee ploy upsets the West 


-From Frank Johnson 
West Berlin 

‘ West Berliners are becom- 
ing annoyed that, unBte in the 
old days, the world does not 
seem do be taking much inter- 
est in the latest Berlin crisis. 
The crisis has for weeks 

taken tim form of East Germa- 
ny sending over from East 
Berlin thousands of 
“refngees” from the Third 
World: Iranians, Pakistanis, 
Ghanaians, Lebanese, Sn 
Lankans. 

Some-stay in West Berlin. 
Others make their way to 
West Germany. 

After the Second World 
War. West Genmmy - and by 
extension West ■ Berlin — ■ 
adopted an impeccably liberal 
policy on political asylum. 

This was partly because 
Germany was divided and, 

before the Berlin Wall went 
qp, m tttin as of Germans were 


leaving East Germany for 
WestGennany, via Berlin. 

Bnt all that was before mass 
Jet travel ' ^ 

East Germany has realized 
that West Germany’s liberal- 
ism about asylum-seekers of- 
fers a way of making money 
for its unglamorous airline, 
Interflng. . . . 

Interring advertises m Third 
World newspapers, offering a 
way of reaching the West 
without a visa being needed. 

The fore from Ghana, for 
example, is about £300. The 

Ghanaians, orother Third 
World nationals, arrive at 
East Berlin's airport, 
Schonefeld. They receive a 
transit visa allowing them to 
go through East Berfm to the 
Wall There they are told, 
accurately enough, that they 

can cross to the other side and 

mil not be asked for papers 
once there. 

Some walk over at one of the 


pedestrian crossing points. 
Others catch underground or 
surface trains at Friedricb- 
strasse, the last station m the 
eastern ride of the Wall The 
Interflng courier explain that 
they can either stay in West 
Benin, or should make their 
way to the /mam railway 
station and catch a long- 
distance train to Hetmstedt, 
the first West German town 
reached on the main fine 
westward from Berim. 

The courier tells them that 
there is one word which they 
most remember, so as to uto it 
to foe first policeman or 
official who stops them, other 
in West Berlin or on the 
platform at ■ Helm- 
stedfcasyhm. Otherwise there 
is a risk' they might be seat 
back to East Berlin. 

In reality, most of the 
asytan-seekers, with foe pos- 
sible exception of some of foe 
Iranians, are economic, ranter 


than political, refugees. Yet all 
insist that they are fleeing 
persecution. 

The traffic is expected to 
reach 100,000 this year. Un- 
der the asylum laws, the West 
Germans and West Berliners 
must provide accommodation. 
Tents have been put up in 
West Berlin and halls 
reqaistioned by the nremdpal- 
Hy. A huge burden has been 
placed on foe small town of 
Hehnstedr. 

-Here in West Berlin, it is 
broadly agreed tint, while die 
East Germans' main motive is 
their never-ending search for 
hard currency, dime are sever- 
al other advantages from their 
point of view: it places a 
burden on West Germany. As 
West Germans become angry 
and. start to say rede things 
about aft these black and 
brown abusers of the right of 
asyhm, it enables West Ger- 


many to be depicted as 
“racialist”. 

Above all it might force the 
British, American and French 
occupying powers in West 
Berlin to introduce immigra- 
tion checks and restrictions on 
the western side of the Wall 
This would help East 
Germany's long-standing 
daim that the Wall is its 
national border and that East 
Berlin is its capital. For 
complicated legal reasons con- 
nected with foe stiD-misjgBed 

peace treaty ending tbe Second 

World War, foe Western al- 
lies do not want to admit this. 

An American diplomat in 
East Berlin said that, in 
private conversation with him. 
East German officials had 
been openly cynical about the 
use of asylnm-seekm and 
have said such things as: 
“They say they've got a liber- 
al free society over there. Let 
them prove it” 


West shown new MiG 





The Soviet Union's new generation of fighter, the MIG29, 
its debut in the West at a mSkary air show in 
[nopio-Rissala, Finland, earlier this month. 


Progress in Hong Kong talks 


The fourth round of meet- 
ings of the Si no-British joint 
liaison group, overseeing the 
transition of Hong Kong to 
Chinese sovereignty after 
1997, ended in London yester- 
day with both sides agreeing 
that positive results had been 


achieved (Rodney Cowton 
writes). 

Among topics discussed had 
been the Hong Kong shipping 
register, certificates of identity 
and air service agreements. 
The design for a Hong Kong 
identity card had been agreed. 


Martyr of 
Shias alive 
in Libya, 
envoy says 

Beirut l AFP) — Imam 
Moussa Sadr, the Lebanese 
founder of the Shia Muslim 
Amal movement, who van- 
ished on a visit to Libya in -■ 
1978. is alive in a Libyan jail .1. 
according to the Lebanese 
Ambassador to Senegal Mr... 
Ahmad Ibrahim. :rr 

He has told his Govern- 
meet, quoting Senegalese offi- 
cials. that the Imam is in 
Sibha with a Lebanese jour- s . 
nalist, Mr Abbas Badreddine, 
but that Sheikh Mohammah ^ 
Yaacouh. who was also on the ._ 
trip, died in jail 

Imam Moussa went to Lib- W. 
ya at the invitation of Colonel 
Gadaffi. and the affair has 
poisoned Lebanese- Libyan re- 
lations. He is widely regarded -» 
as a Shia martyr, with a _L 
fanatical following. 

Mauritians 
quit Cabinet 

Port Louis (Reuter) — Three , „ 
Mauritian MPs have resigned, -- 
saying that the Prime Minis- .1 
ter. Mr Aneerood Jugnauth, . ", 
had foiled to lead both the 
country and his Militant So- 
ciaiisl Movement party. 

They are the Agriculture , n 
Minister, MrNunkeswarsingb ” 
Deerpalsingh, the Works Min- « 
ister, Mr Rohil Niemo 
Beedassy, and the Minister of 
Local Government, Mr Rash- 
idally Soobadar, all of MSM. ^ 

Chess draw 

Bienne, Switzerland (AP) — 
Werner Hug of Switzerland 
held Tony Miles, the British 
grandmaster, to a draw in an 
adjourned game at the Bienne 
international chess tourna- 
ment John Nunn of Britain 
retained tbe lead, with three, 
points from four rounds. 

Time to rest f 

Tokyo (Reuter) — The Japa- 
nese Cabinet will cancel six 
summer meetings to force civ- 
il servants and ministers to'~ 
rest and to help to tone down 
JapaiTs “workaholic” image. 

Fallen hero I 

GivsJcud, Denmark (Reu-" 
ter) — Frederik, the shy bull . 
elephant which fled and fell 
after persistent sexual harass- 
ment from seven amorous 
she-dephants, has died of a 
heart attack. 

UN expulsion • 

Washington (Reuter) — The - 
US has expelled Mr Alireza"* 
Deyhim. the third-ranking- 
member of Iran's United Na- J * 
tions diplomatic delegation, 
on charges of spying. 

Final flight 

Caracas (UP I) — A man 
carrying both Swiss and Ital- 
ian identity died at Caracas : 
airport after two of 1 8 packets 
of cocaine apparently broke - 
open in his stomach on a flight 
from Rio. .! 

Appeal denied ] 

Zagreb (Reuter) — The Cro-” 
atian Supreme Court rejected ’ 
an appeal by Andrija Artu- 
ko vie, the Yugoslav war crim- ’ 
inaJ aged 86, against the death 
sentence imposed in May. 

Long curfew 

Colombo — The Sri Lanka 
Parliament extended the state ^ 
of emergency for another,? 
month by 124 votes to one._ 
Two parties abstained, and theC 
Communist MP voted, 
againsL 

Hostage freed : 

Zamboanga (AP) — A Fi lipi- : 
no woman kidnapped with a 
Swiss tourist last week by_r 
Muslim separatists in the- 
southern Philippines has been, 
released. 

Swim to jail f 

Tokyo ( Reuter ) - A Korean 1 
wanted for drug smuggling has- 
surrendered to police after 
claiming be swam the freezing* 
32-mile straits from South 
Korea to Japan to escape. 

£lm win lost 

Baltimore (UPI) — A Mary- 
land £1 million lottery fortune 
was lost when the ticket was 
neither received in the mail 
nor handed in. The amount 
will be added to the next draw. 

Nuns set free 

Nairobi (UPI) - Two 
American nuns. Sister Sean 
Underwood, aged 43, a Medi- 
cal Mission of Mercy pilot? 
and Sister Nancy Lyons, aged 
49. who were captured by 
rebels in southern Sudan on 
Monday, have been freed. 

TV team lost 

La Raz (UPI) — A single- 
engine Cessna carrying a US 
TV crew and three photogra- 
phers is missing in the Boliv r 
ian jungle after leaving for a 
cocaine laboratory seized by a 
US-Bolivian drugs force. 

Own goal 

Milan (AP) — The 22 I talian 
footballers who won the 1982 
World Cup in Spain are to face 
chaises of failure to declare 
foreign currency. 

Mixed blessing 

Toulouse (AFP) — A man 
who posed as a Belgian bishop 
and sold blessings at Lourdes 
was jailed for two years fin- 
passing dud cheques. 



THE TIMES SATURDAY JULY 26 1986 


Will 


SPORTS 

DIARY 


Simon Barnes 


Second 

base 


. As the hunt goes on for the new 
; {worn sport, this column can see 
: nothing to stop baseball sweeping 
the country. Channel 4, still 
rejoicing over its success with 
- American football will broadcast 
. seven baseball programmes at 
■ World Series lime in October. The 
; .first will be explanatory, the 
second will consist of highlights of 

• the playoffs, and then come five 
edited games from the World 

. Series itself The structure for the 
expansion of English baseball 

• already exists — Sutton Braves 
play Cobham Yankees tomorrow, 
with the winners the likely South- 
ern League champions. The league 
secretary, Don Ferguson, of 
■Colders Greensox, said; “With 
television interest, the game will 
explode. American football has 
gone in five years from nothing to 
100 teams and £500,000 in 
sponsorship. Baseball can do the 

; same, especially as we are already 
better organized.” 

Meanwhile, publishers are vy- 
: ingto commission baseball books, 
and Sportspages bookshop in Lon- 
don reports brisk sales of ira- 

• ported baseball literature. At the 
'-same time, softball the mild 

version of the game, is already 
taking off. with around 70 teams 
' .in the London area, 40 of which 
are mixed. The game is pleasantly 
unserious; in fact, anyone turning 
up in Hyde Park at two o'clock on 
a Sunday afternoon can usually get 
a game. 


Stoical 


Hampstead Cricket Oub is 
preparing for one of the game's 
more bizarre centenaries on Au- 
gust 4. Its match on that day 
against Stoics commemorates an 
encounter in which the Hamp- 
stead batsman A.E Stoddart — 
later to play 16 times for En- 
- gland - scored 4S5 of his side's 
"total of 813. As for Stoics, they 
•simply did not bat. It was a match 
["which. Hampstead claims, went 
> • some way towards the new rule 
' ' permitting a captain to declare an 
innings closed. 

• Shahrastani has done this col- 
umn favours by winning the Derby 
and the Irish Derby, but I am 
deserting him m die Diamonds — 
the King George VI and Queen 
. Elizabeth Diamond Stakes at 
■ Ascot today. I go for Dancing 
_ .Brave to take his revenge, and 
-recommend Petoski (14-1 as I 
..write) as a good each-way bet 


.Padded out 


Cricket is holding its own on the 
Continent; the Italian national 
team play 1 1 matches in England 
next month. Italian cricket terms 
are most intriguing: bowled trans- 
lates as eliminazione al wicket , 
which is quite neat but lbw is 


■eUminazione per impalto della 
palla con la gamba del baititore 


palla con fa gamba del baititore 
davanti al wicket , which is not 
Mind you it could be worse — 
there could be a German side 
coming over. I have been reading 
-German cricketing terras in a new 
book. The Joy of Words* by Fritz 
SpiegL He explains that lbw is 
tersely expressed in German as 
aus sein, weil des Schlagmannes 
Berne von einem Wurf getroffen 
wurden. As a parting shot the 
; author suggests that silly mid-on is 
best translated dummkopf in mit- 
jelpunkt. That I must say, has a 
certain zing to it 


Glaire shot 


Brighton College Junior School is 
doing its bit to take cricket into the 
21st century. The under-10 side is 
captained by a notable cricketer 
called Claire Connor, the only girl 
to have played cricket in the 
^school's history. She has taken 16 
wickets this season. 


Send for Phil 


Lofted 


Now that his suspension is over, 
; Ian Botham will be spending more 
time on the cricket field than the 
river bank. In the past 18 months, 
! learn, he has hooked* 21 
-salmon — all of which got away. 
However, he believes he has set a 
record in another sphere by gain- 
ing his helicopter pilot's licence 
from scratch in a mere 1 6 days. He 
now plans to fly himself to 
matches. 


BARRY FANTONI 






& ? . f 



Borges’s tomb for Captain Charles Ricketts, neglected in Kensal Green; and a statue of Grief that now adorns a goldfish pond in Norwood 

Geoffrey Munn on Victorian masterpieces that are being left to rot 


Where great art lies 


In 1984 the Manchester Gty 
Museum and Art Gallery paid 
£19,000 for a painted chest of 
drawers by the celebrated architect 
William Binges (1827-1881)- The 
Manchester museum has reason 
to be well pleased with its pur- 
chase. However, only a few miles 
north of Blairman’s — the fur- 
niture showrooms in London 
where the piece was bought — 
another equally important work 
by Burges lies neglected in Kensal 
Green cemetery. 

Designed as a tomb for the sea 
captain Charles Ricketts, who 
served under Nelson, it is a fine 
and concentrated expression of 
Victorian neo-Gothic architec- 
ture. Erosion and subsidence are 
at present serious problems which 
will in time lead to its destruction, 
but more immediately threatening 
is the vandalism rife in all urban 
cemeteries. 

London's cemeteries were built 
to relieve the pressure on the city's 
churchyards caused by the rapid 
population increase in the early 
19th century. Bourgeois Victori- 
ans wanted to rest in an environ- 
ment which reflected their 
temporal wealth, and often the 
craftsmen who worked on their 
monuments had little or no finan- 
cial constraints. Those who built 
and decorated the houses of the 
living were occasionally commis- 
sioned to design the final resting 
place of the dead, and as a result 
we are left with numerous small 
masterpieces of architecture and 
sculpture. 

A clue to understanding how 
permanent the Victorians thought 
their monuments is given by the 
amount of money they spent on 
them. In 1881 the court jeweller 
Robert Phillips left £600 to be 
invested for the maintenance of 
his relatively modest tomb at 
Kensal Green. The merchant 
Alexander Berens, who died in 
1858, paid £1.500 for his extrava- 
gant monument by Edward Barry 
at Norwood. But now, where 
symmetry and order were in- 
tended, decay and ruinare found 
and weeds and briars have retaken 
the land where planned and 
peaceful gardens were meant .to 
endure for ever. 

The gradual return of the 2,604 
acres of London's hundred or so 
cemeteries to the wild has its own 
charm. However, lack of mainte- 
nance is a severe threat to the best 
of the sculptures. At the Brompton 
cemetery the pink Siennese mar- 
ble sarcophagus of the artist Yal 
Prinsep (1838-1904) has suffered 
irreparable damage- The heads of 
some of the medieval-style saints 
which decorate it have fallen and 
gathered in the long grass at its 
feet. At Kensal Green the roots of 
nearby trees threaten the founda- 
tions of the tomb designed by 
Burges. Wind and rain, and 
undoubtedly pollution, have sub- 
tly eroded the previously well- 
defined limestone ornament and 
in a relatively short time nothing 
will save it from collapse. 

At Norwood cemetery, where 
Burges himself is buried with his 
femily, the same neglect is ev- 
ident The massive and simple 
bevelled stone which overlays the 
grave is carved with a cross in the 


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The Pre-Raphaelite masterpiece by Burne-Jones at Brompton 


medieval taste which must have 
seemed robust enough to endure 
centuries of bad weather. How- 
ever, the inscriptions on the stone 
have suffered badly, its brick 
foundations are rotten and crum- 
bling, and the monument itself is 
almost impossible to find as it is 
completely overgrown with trees 

and brambles. 

The Berens tomb, also at Nor- 
wood, has been described as one of 
the finest High Victorian monu- 
ments in the country; but its roof 
is broken arid a tree grows 
unimpeded from within the struc- 
ture making total collapse im- 
minent The list of gradual detay 
is endless and to a degree unavoid- 
able, but the funerary architecture 
in London's cemeteries is under 
more serious threat that of official t 
and unofficial vandalism. 


At Norwood cemetery, now 


owned by Lambeth council a 
nolicv of demolition euphemis- 


policy of demolition euphemis- 
tically dubbed. “lawn conversion” 
is well under way. According, to 
information supplied last Novem- 
ber the idea is to help grave 
owners and the council “to make 
each cemetery a green and pleas- 
ant garden of rest and remem- 
brance in years to come”. 
However, the more immediate 
intention is to remove all tombs 
dating from before 1876 which are 
not specifically protected and for 
which no special plea has been 
made. Those dating from after 
1 876 are to be partially dismantled 
by the removal of “kerbs and 
landings” and only sound upright 
headstones will escape the bull- 
dozer- thus allowing the council, 
the benefit of economies achieved 


by mechanical mowing and gen- 
eral ease of maintenance. 

Of course, the real reason for 
this policy of demolition is less 
obvious and yet curiously famil- 
iar. It can be found in the 
information supplied by the coun- 
cil in 1984: “All other memorials 
- on graves in which the last burial 
was before 1876 are removed 
completely so the council may re- 
use this burial space.” Similar 
financial constraints have made 
the General Cemetery Company 
. of Kensal Green resort to the sale 
of plots. aloi$ the old driveway 
-and paths which gave access to the 
various parts of these once elegant 
grounds. But until mow they have 
avoided the thinly disguised 
commercially minded philis- 
tinism, of Lambeth council. 

Last December a row broke 
out concerning the use by Wands- 
worth council's contractors work- 
ing in Esher Gardens, Wimbledon 
Park, of broken headstones as 
hard core. . The broken monu- 
ments came from the Sireatham 
Park cemetery owned by the Great 
Southern Group. The loss to our 
heritage when burial grounds are 
destroyed in this way is obvious. 

Perhaps the problem of con- 
ventional vandalism is even more 
acute, as it is utterly indiscrimi- 
nate. A combination of dare- 
devilry and modern day 
necromancy seem to be the mo- 
tive behind the innumerable at- 
tacks on gravestones and 
mausoleums. At Kensal Green the 
somewhat conventional tomb of 
the Duke of Cambridge, grandson 
of King George Hi, has been 
breached and its grisly contents 
can be clearly seen. 


It is nearly too late for Nor- 
wood, where so much has already 
been destroyed. Even recently an 
inspired marble sculpture in the 
form of a personification of grief, 
already robbed of its authorship 
and original position by previous 
demolitions, has been singled out, 


as if simply a poignant garden 
gnome, to form the central motif 


gnome, to form the central motif 
in a series of polythene-lined 
goldfish ponds. However, at 
Kensal Green, Brompton, 
Highgate, and so many others, 
much remains to protect and 
preserve; how bitterly we wiD be 
judged, if we allow the best of this 
architecture and sculpture to be 
lost to future generations. 

<g> Dows Nvmpapars, ISM 


The answer to the current woes of 
England cricket is to appoint Phil 
‘ Edmonds as captain. 1 know this 
' because Edmonds told me so 
himself: Sport books can be feirly 
. dull stuff, as those such as myself 
who review them will hardly 
dispute, but T hope Phil Edmonds: 
A Singular Man , a new biography, 
will be an exception. I wrote it 


Dr Freud’s house of dreams 


Three years and nearly £750,000 
on, the Freud Museum is ready to 
open its doors to an international 
public, in accordance with the 
wishes of Sigmund Freud’s daugh- 
ter Anna, who died in 1980. The 
house at 20 MaresfieJd Gardens, 
Hampstead r- solid and de- 
pendable 1920 neo-Georgian red 
brick, with its blue plaque in 
honour of- the “Founder of 
Psychoanalysis” - is where Freud 
lived and worked during the last 
two years of his life (1938-39) 
having finally been persuaded by 
friends, notably'his eventual biog- 
rapher Ernest Jones, to leave 
Vienna and the ever-increasing 
Nazi threat 


-Joseph Connolly visits a new museum 
devoted to the father of psychoanalysis 


recreated his Viennese' consulting 
room, study and library. Anna 
Freud "kept them perfectly intact 
for 40 years after his death, 
together with personal minutiae 
such as suitcases, spectacles, 
umbrellas, and the coat purchased 
by Freud in Vienna before the 
journey to England. 



powdery aroma of books and the 
perfect stillness are timeless; it is 
difficult to believe that a builder 
has ever set foot through the door. 

The Borough of Camden., as is 
customary, seems to have done its 
best to complicate matters by 
insisting that only a third of the 
building become a museum, and 
the remainder residential Thus, 
the caretaker will live on the 


ground floor and the curator on 
first floor, while the attic flat is to 


‘She’s losing her grip. The time to 
publish it was Wednesday morning.’ 


The move represented no 
particular hardship to Freud for, 
as be bad confided to H.G. Wells, 
it had always been his “wish- 
fantasy” to live in England, and to 
“become an Englishman”. 

He was 82 at the time; and an 
internationally recognized figure. 
His treatment by the Nazis was 
noi therefore, that of an ordinary 
Jewish refugee; they actually as- 
sisted in the shipping of his 
library, furniture, papers and a 
surprisingly large collection of 
antiquities — principally Greek, 
Egyptian and Roman, with a 
smattering of Oriental. 

It is for this reason that the 
opening of the* Freud Museum is 
so fascinating and unique an 
event: the house itelf — commodi- 
ous and imposing though it is — 
just happened to have been locally 
available at the time. It was 
bought' in 1938 in Freud's name 
for £6.500. and would not be 
intrinsically interesting were it not 
for the fact that within its walls he 


So far. so mouth-watering. I 
confess, then, to having been a 
little dismayed during the past 
couple of years as mountain after 
mountain of builder's rubble — 
floors, walls, windows — kept 
appearing at the kerbside. After 
restoration; I wondered, could 
there by anything left of the 
atmosphere of the original? 



first floor, while the attic flat is to 
be let to a suitably (I suspect 
exhaustively) vetted tenant. . 


I am delighted to be -able to 
report that my fears were un- 
founded. The fed is authentic 
both serene and electric. The first 
glimpse of the study grips the 
heart. It is a large room — 40ft by 
20, I should guess — and is lined 
with dark oak fitted bookcases 
bearing Freud's library of 3,000 
volumes, every one carefully re- 
stored by British Libraty experts. 
According to the Canadian curator 
David New la fids, the main prob- 
lem was dehydration, due to 
excessive central heating- The 
leather backs- wens crumbling 
away. Goethe, perched directly 
above the radiator, having been an 
especially affected victim. 


statuary serried about it (there are 
1500 examples in the entire 
collection) and no fewer than 50 
meticulously arranged on the 
surprisingly small Vienna Seces- 
sion desk, set near the centre of the 
room, and opposite the most 
spectacularly romantic and awe- 
inspiring artefact in the house: 
Freud's consultant couch. This is 
hot at all the slippery black leather 
affair beloved of cartoonists, but a 
plump and solidly upholstered 
chaise-tongue, loosely strewn with 
a highly coloured and patterned 
Persian rug. a carpet cushion, and 
an embroidered cloth. 


Although the trustees are mem- 
bers of the Sigmund Freud Ar- 
chives in New York, the 
Maresfield Gardens museum is an 
English charitable trust; there is 
currently a staff* of 18, r mostly 
supplied by the Manpower Ser- 
vices Commission and nearly all 
with appropriate degrees- 

Twenty thousand visitors a year 
are anticipated. 60 per cent from 
America. All involved are ada- 
mant that the souvenirs on sale 
will be of good quality, relevant, 
and restrained: no pop-up instant 
dream analyses, no bumper 
stickers, no T-shirts. 

The official opening of the 
Freud Museum (in the presence of 
HRH Princess Alexandra — by 
invitation only) is on Monday, the 


public being welcome from the 
following dav onwards. Anvone 


following day onwards. Anyone 
who does not feel impelled to go 
along needs his head examined. 


$0 spacious is the room that it is 
hard, to believe that there are more 
than 1 .000 pieces of ancient 


At the head of this is a deep 
velvet tub chair in which Freud 
would siu and listen. The dark and 


Frank Johnson 


is 


•nirpo® 


The sad and negle cted 
Brompton cemetery also suffers 
from vandalism. Mercifully the 
greatest work of art within the 
grounds, and arguably within any 
of the London cemeteries, remains 
relatively unaffected by weather. 
This is the beautiful tomb of the 
industrialist and patron of the arts, 
Frederick Richards Leyland 
(1831-1892). Leyland was a friend 
and patron of Edward Burne- 
Jones and admired his work to the 
extent of commissioning a monu- 
ment which was finally erected in 
1902. It isone of the very finest 
surviving examples of pre-Rapha.- 
elite sculpture. The Leyland tomb 
is not only very beautiful in itself, 
it is beautifully made and this 
seems io have preserved it. 

Some of the finest monuments 
in London's cemeteries, like the 
Phflipson mausoleum al Golders 
Green, designed by Sir Edwin 
Lutyens, are on such a grand scale 
that no radical steps can be taken 
to preserve - them beyond _ the 
attentions of a few diligent 
conservation groups such as the 
Friends of Highgate Cemetery and 
the Church Monument Society. 

The pitiful maintenance af- 
forded by the majority of cemetery 
owners is quite inadequate. But 
this need not be true of possibly 
the two or three most important 
memorials in London's open air. 
The tombs designed by Burges and 
Burne-Jones are relatively small 
and to move them to a safer 
location would be quite feasible^ 

The Brompton cemetery is 
owned by the Department of the 
Environment and to it the Vic- 
toria and Albert Museum is 
ultimately responsible. Logically, 
the museums would seem the 
perfect venue for the tomb de- 
signed by Burne-Jones, at least, as 
private ownership of.the cemetery 
•would be no obstacle to its 
removal once permission- from the 
remaining femily had been given. 
However, the sculpture depart- 
ment at * the museum, despite 
sharing concern for the safety of 
the monuments, was not aide to 
give an answer about whether they 
could be accommodated,- as their 
galleries are already crowded, 
i In the late 20th century death is 
something which society prefers to 
see taking place only on television. 
The influence of this contem- 
porary attitude has meant that 
cemeteries are shunned except by 
those recently bereaved. 


The other day. I was Jetam^ for 
travelling without a valid ticket on 
the Bonn undogound railway. I 
was the victim of a special 
operation, carried out by what the 
local newspaper worryingly 
termed a BidzsqiuuL to round up 
ferc-dodgerc. ‘ . . . 

Watched, from behind their 
newspapers, by other pas- 
sengers — none of whom showed 
any sign of intervening or of 
getting involved in any way-— I 
was removed .from the train by 
several uniformed officials, fed by 
one with an especially important- 
lookmg peaked cap, pa st an armed 
policeman on the platform. 

Iwas taken up a flight of steps to 

an office, in the railway station; 
jxfcgrf by a "ian behind- a desk to 
produce ray papers; questioned 
about my country of origin; 
summarily punished with a fine of 
DM40 (about £12); and asked 
whether I would agree to be 
questioned about my motives tor 
travelling on the underground, 
without a valid ticket, by a 

sociologist. ' . f 

I was shocked. Uniformed of- 
ficials taking travellers off trains; 
other passengers simply doing 
nothing; . men with . important- 
looking peaked caps; watchful 
policemen on railway platforms; 
officials behind desks who ask for 
questions about 


committed the ^raver .offeKe. of 
travelling without a ticket al alL 
For that, the offender presum- 
ably pays the supreme German 
penalty: being interviewed, .not 
just by ^ soctolo^st,_but : by a. 
ptychiatrisu \ ‘ .. 

She seemed disappointed by: - 
this prosaic explanation. 5he„ . 
pointed toa table on theformand 
asked me to tick what J thpngfat 
was the most common of rout 
possible reasons, apart from 
forgetfulness, ; for why*.; people 
travel \ without valid .tickets 
grounds of principle or ufetUoot 
for fun; because ofa lack ofpubhr 

notices explaming foe i*ul?s;«it of 

need or “an unfavourable hvmg 
situation”- (aus ungQnsiigen 
Lebensumstandeh herausjl- 
“None,” I said "Noner xbe 
echoed. “Why?” - 

Because, I suggested, stte'fiad ' 
left <mt the most obviously com-' 
noon reason, which; was greed 
“Greed?” she asked. “Yes.” ! 
elucidated ^Greed, desire, to save 
money, avarice,’ me ann ess.” Bitt r 
noito of them iwas orther form, She 






, .J-TI 


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IWUUUW U>V — X" I 

brow furrowed. pen In corner: of 
mouth, then' . wrote. 11 hi . “greed; 
avarice, meanness” r.:V 

I pre pare d to address hwwrtira 
long sentence about how. tins 
survey for the Bonn Tranport 
Authority had 


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rtmrh 
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The Freud Museum, 20 Maresfield 
Gardens . London NWS 
lOamSpm Mon-Sat: Ipm-Spm 
Sun. £1.50 adult . 75p children, 
OAPs, unemployed 
















THE TIMES SATURDAY JULY 26 1986 


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1 Pennington Street, London El 9XN Telephone; 01-481 4100 


IMPARTIAL AND SENSITIVE 


When tbe enforcement of the 
law becomes entangled with 
racial: concerns, the police are 
expected 10 act in accordance 
with two injunctions which, 
though perfectly compatible in 
strict logic, may sometimes 
point in opposite directions 
an<T which always demand a 
difference of em^iasis. The 
fiisL is that the law must be 
enforced (“there must be no 
no-go areas’'); and the second 
is that the law must enforced 
“sensitively.” 

In some interpretations, of 
course, these injunctions ac- 
tually contradict each other. 
When “community leaders” 
from minority communities 
ask the police to enforce the 
law relating to drug abuse 
sensitively because drug-tak- 
ing is part of a Caribbean 
culture, they are usually asking 
for a discreetly blind eye to 
law-breaking. 

; The criticisms of Thursday’s 
Metropolitan Police -anti-drug 
operation in Brixton — criti- 
cisms from both local commu- 
nity leaders and some visiting 
Euro-MPS — come perilously 
dose tosnch absurdity. What- 
ever the final result of court 
proceedings against the more 
than 50 people charged, it is 
generally - agreed that drug- 
dealing is firmly established in 
the area; This has brought 
other crimes in its train. Local 
residents were understandably 
-anxious and called upon the 
police to take action. A police 
operation of some kind was 
plainly justified. 


It might perhaps be argued 
that the actual raid — which 
involved 340 police officers, 
with 1.500 more in reserve, 
some of them armed — was an 
excessive use of police re- 
sources? But the police had 
good cause to act with suf- 
ficient force to make resistance 
pointless. Policemen had been 
injured before, when attempt- 
ing arrests. And in the event, a 
machete, knives, a handgun 
and ammunition, as well as 
drugs, were seized. 

Ms Linda Bellos, the Labour 
leader of Lambeth council, 
advances the more fanciful 
theory that the police opera- 
tion was “designed to cause a 
riot situation”? But the police 
had warned community lead- 
ers of their intentions and 
printed a letter explaining their 
action to local residents. That 
hardly suggests a provocative 
intent. 

Anyway, whom did the po- 
lice intend to provoke? Not 
those local residents who 
called on them to take action. 
There are only groups of 
people who might under- 
standably take serious offence 
at the police raid — the drug 
dealers themselves, and those 
to whom any police action is 
suspect ‘ because the police 
themselves are suspect. 

There are further refine- 
ments of hypocrisy — on both 
sides of (he argument. Those 
who advocate “sensitivity” in 
drug law enforcement tend to 
deplore the failure of the police 


to act with sufficient vigour 
and impartiality against racial 
harassment. But it must be 
said that those who are most 
keen to enforce the ami-drug 
laws without qualifications 
have not always been loud in 
demanding that the law be 
enforced more vigorously 
against racial attacks. 

On the face of it, the 
argument might be made that 
these crimes, however, vi- 
cious. are ordinary crimes of 
violence to be dealt with by 
regular police methods. But 
this week's report of the Com- 
mons Home Affairs Commit- 
tee establishes dearly that 
where the police have made 
special arrangements to 
counter such racial violence, 
they have had quite dramatic 
success. In Tower Hamlets, for 
instance, such methods as a 
24-hour helpline and the use of 
volunteers from the local 
Bangladeshi community, 
which testify to increased po- 
lice awareness of the problem, 
have pushed up the 
arrest/clear up rate from 8 per 
cent in 1984 to 31 per cent a 
year later. 

The report’s recommenda- 
tions deserve wide drculation 
and quick adoption. The law is 
enforced when it is enforced 
impartially against all crim- 
inals. It is enforced sensitively 
when it is enforced impartially 
on behalf of all law-abiding 
dtizens. And between these 
two injunctions, there is, hap- 
pily, no contradiction. 


CHERNOBYL OBSCURED 


Cist' weekend, the people of 
the Soviet Union were given 
their, first insight into the scale 
of the Chernobyl disaster. A 
tentative and sketchy press 
report on 'the interim findings 
Of the government investiga- 
tion noted the cause of the 
accident (an . . unauthorized 
experiment) and alluded to its 
tonger-term effects, on 
people's health, on agriculture 
and on the Soviet power grid 
This report appeared nearly 
three months after the 
Chernobyl radiation leak was 
detected in Sweden. Through- 
out that time cause and effect* 


that workers at the power 
station took it upon them- 
selves to conduct experiments 
on a nuclear reactor without 
authorization, without super- 
vision, and outside their nor- 
mal working time. 

This stretches credibility, 
both because of the dangers of 
such an enterprise, and be- 
cause of the prevailing attitude 
to work in the Soviet Union. 
Overtime is rarely voluntary 
and taking initiative —of any 
kind — is a high risk propo- 
sition and one the majority of 
Soviet workers avoid, a trait 
which is frequently blamed for • 


had been consistently o jK the country's poor economic. 


scured behind a Soviet epic in 
which firefighters, doctors, sci- 
entists and displaced people 
became heroes. - 

The information gap al- 
lowed speculation, some of it 
irresponsible, to run rife. In 
the West there was talk of 
several thousand dead, of a 
clandestine, military applica- 
tion of the reactor. In the 
Soviet Union people ex- 
changed tales of genetic muta- 
tion and ’ -recommended 
alcohol as an antidote to 
radiation sickness. Unaccus- 
tomed to detailed information, 
they- magnified snippets of feet 
.to the proportions of a natural 
disaster. And, reading between 
the incomplete lines of the 
preliminary investigation, 
they were not fer wrong. 

The findings are disturbing 
both for what they say and for 
what they do not say. What 
they say is that the accident 
occurred as a result of an 
unauthorized experiment on a 
reactor withdrawn for mainte- 
nance. We, and the Soviet 
asked to believe 


performance. 

No, if experiments were 
being conducted and if they 
were not authorized through 
the prescribed channels, the 
likelihood is that they were 
authorized by someone else. 
Whether this was the ministry 
responsible for the power sta- 
tion, at republic or national 
ievel,.a research establishment 
or even; as some suspect, the 
military, the blame for the 
accident does not rest with the 
workers alone; 

Similarly, the decision — 
made public in the interim 
report — to institute criminal 
proceedings against those held 
responsible. An accident of the 
order of Chernobyl is not a 
matter for a criminal prosecu- 
tion alone, or even at alL It 
requires a more fundamental 
analysis of what caused or 
contributed to the action — or 
inaction — of those indicted. 

And here is where the 
preliminary findings (at least 
as fer as they have been 
reported) are most disappoint- 
ing. Responsibility is assigned 


public, are asked to 

REIGNING CATS - AND DOGS 


in the time-honoured Soviet 
manner to personal failings, 
rather than failings of the 
system. Heads have rolled, up 
to and including the head of a 
deputy minister. The Com- 
munist Party has issued its 
reprimands. The whole tragic 
episode has been cited as an 
example of why the Soviet 
leader’s campaign to bring 
discipline and order to the 
Soviet work force is so im- 
portant Chernobyl has been 
harnessed to Mr Gorbachov's 
cause. But the cause remains 
unchanged and unquestioned. 

Nothing in .the Soviet 
government’s preliminary 
findings (as they have been 
reported) touches on either the 
design or the operation of the 
Soviet Union’s nuclear power 
stations There are no gen- 
eralizations, however ten- 
tative, about the siting of 
nuclear power stations, about 
the future of the country’s 
nuclear power programme, 
about the potential risks of 
nuclear power poorly man- 
aged. There is only the cer- 
tainty that proceeds from 
fixing blame on individuals 

The Soviet authorities have 
promised to present their full 
report, running to several hun- 
dred pages at a special meeting 
of the International Atomic 
Energy Agency in a month’s 
time. Whether or not the 
report is made public — and it 
should be made public for the 
benefit of every other country 
which has or plans to build 
nuclear power stations — it 
must ask not only who, but 
also why. And if the Soviet 
authorities lack the courage to 
pose that question, it should be 
done for them. 


i? '>■' 


-r-i* 


“Slowly but inexorably, the 
government has nerved itself 
' t6 '.do away with dog licences 
Qur rulers are wise to have 
considered their position care- 
fully; in this country, dogs stir 
passions unknown elsewhere. 
Hdo, Rex and Pride of Tralee - 
the Third can do nothing 
wrong (in their owners eyes, at 
any rate), and the mere hint of 
a suggestion that they will bear 
watching (whence the licence) 
has always been apt to cloud 
the atmosphere. 

Others take, to put it mildly, 
a contrary view. We have 
heard it said that the license 
fee should be raised to £1,000, 
or £150,000 (a week) for 
anyone who wants to sport a 
Doberman Pinscher, such peo- 
ple jeer at Fido and cross the 
■ road nervously when they see 
-Rex tugging at his lead. 

' We have never wished to 
take, sides. But our proximity 
to the Isle of Dogs has meant 
that it might become matter 
-for embarrassment if we dia 
not declare ourselves some- 
time. : 

On the matter of the licenses 
itself we have nothing to add. 
A different aspect of the matter 

fells to be considered. Has it 

-ever struck you as odd that 

nobody has ever advocated tne. 

licensing of cals* at no njatter 
what rate a year? It cannot be a 
coincidence, surely, nor can 


this 'extraordinary one-sided- 
ness be attributed to a lapse by 
some Under-Secretary in 
1878. What is it about cats that 
has always made them not 
only unlicensable, but' mani- 
festly seen to be unlicensable? 

Well, just look at the crea- 
tures. You can call them 
serene, if you love them, or 
smug, if you don't, but in 
either case you realize that 
such self-sufficiency, such 
blithe contempt for regula- 
tions and good order, such 
sleek certainty of purpose — 
undiscoverable by us though 
that purpose may be — means 
that any attempt to demand to 
see their licences would be 
rejected with a mixture of 
scorn and hilarity not for 
nothing did some wise ob- 
server coin the phrase “enough 
to make a cat laugh”, thus 
indicating that only the very 
finest jest, the cream of jests 
you might say. will suffice to 
make a cat give way publicly to 
mirth. But trying to license 
them would certainly have 
brought cat-laughs galore. 

It has been, of course, unfair 
to dogs. But that is not our 
concern; the universe is unfair, 
and il behoves all sensible folk 
to recognize the feci and stop 
complaining about what they 
c ann ot alter. In Ancient Egypt, 
cats were worshipped, and 
they clearly got a taste for it; to 


this day they go about as 
though they expect hourly 
libations, and most of the time 
they are not .disappointed. 
Perhaps one day there will be 
an Animal Equality Commis- 
sion, before which the dogs 
may plead that they are suffer- 
ing from an inferiority com- 
plex, but that day is not yet. 

The cats (if they will pardon 
the expression), still rule the 
roost, and anyone trying to 
reverse the order of animal 
priorities will be lucky to 
escape with nothing but 
scratches. All through the ages, 
though it must gall the dog- 
lovers to admit it, the special 
status of the cat has been 
recognized. Did not the great 
Beethoven call his Fifth Sym- 
phony O Puss 67? If Tie loved 
them so much that he not only 
kept so many but counted 
them so carefully, the rest of us 
bad better not argue. 

It may be objected that we 
have still not declared our- 
selves on the matter of dog- 
licences. No, but we have 
always faced reality. Liberty or 
licence, that is the question. 
We have, always known 
enough to give the cats, at 
least, their liberty. Whether 
dogs are ready now for equal- 
ity and fraternity, is something 
which only they and Mr. 
Nicholas Ridley, Secretary of 
Stale for the Animal Kingdom, 
can decide. 



LETTERS TO THE EDITOR 


The Palace and Number 10 


From Mr A. L. Le Quesne 
Sir, Il is impossible lo react with 
anything but total dismay to the 
revelations of the supposed breach 
between the Queen and the Prime 
Minister published in yesterday's 
Sunday Times , and to the point to 
which the cult of the "inspired 
leak” has now brought us. There 
appear to be three possible inter- 
pretations of the revelations, all 
deeply discreditable to ail or some 
of those involved and all more or 
less alarming 

Firstly, there is the possibility 
that the story was made up by The 
Sunday Times, or, more likely, 
that tt was based on a gross 
exaggeration or a gross misunder- 
standing of some genuine 
information from the Palace. 

If so. the discredit lies 
overwhelmingly on the shoulders 
of the Editor of The Sunday Times 
and his stafE this seems to me on 
the whole the least alarming of the 
three possibilities, but the depths 
of irresponsibility it would imply 
in the management of a leading 
national newspaper would itself be 
quite sufficiently appalling. 

Secondly, The Sunday Times 
may have reported accurately and 
in good faith information which it 
had received from the Palace and 
originating with one or more of 
the Queen's personal advisers 
acting on their own initiative with 
the aim of influencing public 
policy by doing so. 

I do not think that this possibil- 
ity (on the whole the most likely) 
would acquit The Sunday Times 
of the charge of irresponsibility; 
but this would then become a 
relatively minor issue when set 
beside the implication that some 
of the Queen's closest personal 
advisers are prepared to drag the 
Crown right out into the political 
arena in order to achieve a 
political end, however well-in- 
tentioned that end might be. 

If this is the true explanation, 
one or more resignations from the 
Palace staff would seem to be the 
absolute minimum required to 
restore public confidence. 

Thirdly, it is impossible to 
avoid feeing up lo the possibility 
that the Queen herself may have 
been aware of the leak and 
consented to it, at least tacitly. If 
this is the true explanation, she 
was surely most gravely ill-ad- 
vised 

If the issue was confined to the 
Government's attitude to the 
application of sanctions against 
South Africa, it is perhaps con- 
ceivable that the conflict between 
her roles as Queen of Great Britain 
and head of the Commonwealth 
might leave her with little alter- 
native to such action. 

But the revelations explicitly 
represent the breach between the 
Queen and the Prime Minister as 
being fer wider than this, and as 
being related to a whole range of 
broad domestic issues; and for the 


Queen to tolerate such a leak 
would imply so glaring a breach of 
the tradition of the Crown's 
political neutrality that this 
possibility can surely be ruled out 
However, it should rest heavily on 
.the shoulders of those who played 
any part in its transmission to the 
public that the making of such a 
revelation was bound to make this 
possibility a matter of public 
debate. 

We can only hope, as a mini- 
mum. that the temptation to 
welcome the revelations as a 
handy stick to belabour the Gov- 
ernment with will be strenuously 
resisted by a few minutes' reflec- 
tion on their likely impact on the 
constitutional conventions that 
govern the workings of the mon- 
archy. 

Yours etc. 

A L. Le QUESNE, 

22 St John's HilL 
Shrewsbury, Shropshire. 

July 21.. 

From Mrs Denise Sheldon 
Sir. Your Chief Political 
Correspondent, Philip Webster, 
quotes (July 22) tne MP for 
Birmingham, SeUy Oak. a$ having 
said: "Somebody must go. It is 
absolutely certain that if the 
Queen docs not dismiss one or 
several of her advisers it will be 
dear that the leaks were with her 
blessing”. 

Let us hope Mr Beaumont-Dark 
is mistaken in his assumption, for 
it completely disregards the 
possibility that the source of the 
leak might remain a mystery. In 
which case it would surely be as 
unjust to sack an innocent person 
for the sake of appearances, as it 
would be to deduce that the Queen 
must have assented to the leak if 
she had done nothing of the land. 
Yours feidifolly, 

DENISE SHELDON, 

Wanders. 

55 Dale Avenue, 

Hassocks, West Sussex. 

July 22. 

From Captain John Prescott, RN 
(retd) 

Sir. At both the schools 1 attended 
before the war it was the accepted 
thing that when a misdemeanour 
occurred and the culprits) could 
not be readily identified, he (they) 
invariably stepped forward rather 
than allow odium (and punish- 
ment) to be inflicted generally on 
all his (their) colleagues. 

True, I went to two good schools 
where words like honour and 
integrity really meant something, 
but it would be nice to think, if 
there really was a leak, that similar 
standards still applied to those 
honoured to be called to serve her 
Majesty. 

I am. etc, 

JOHN PRESCOTT, 

Cox Hill, 

Mamhuli, 

Sturminster Newton. Dorset 
July 22. 


Bar pay rise 

From the Chairman of the Bar 
Sir, Frances Gibb has consistently 
covered the issue of criminal legal 
aid fees both sensitively and -with 
concern for the future quality of 
service. But we cannot accept that 
the Coopers & Lybrand report was 
“effectively demolished” by the 
Lord Chancellor's own advisers 
(feature, July 22). . 

The Coopers & Lybrand study 
was carried out over a period of 1 8 
months. The Lord Chancellor's 
Department was consulted 
throughout on the methodology. 
After the court proceedings earlier 
this year, the Lord Chancellor 
belatedly commissioned his own 
study of which the Bar first learnt 
towards the end of our discussions 
with his officials. 

This study, based in part on 
assumptions made by the Lord 
Chancellor's own officials, was 
promptly answered by Coopers & 
Lybrand after consulting an in- 


dependent statistician in a way 
which we consider wholly 
convincing. The Lord Chancellor, 
however, decided to prefer his 
own survey. 

So there remains considerable 
disagreement, and the Coopers 
report has not been invalidated. 
This is why we welcome the 
establishment of a mechanism for 
identifying data from which an 
informed decision can be taken in 
future. 

What is vital is objectivity. It 
cannot be right that the Lord 
Chancellor should simply decide 
to rely on his own report and 
dismiss that of our consultants as 
inaccurate. The new mechanism 
should ensure that we play to 
better rules in future. 

Yours faithfully, 

ROBERT ALEXANDER, 
Chairman, 

The Senate of the Inns of Court 
and the Bar, 

1 1 South Square, 

Gray's Inn, WC1. 


Dukes of York 

From Dr Lionel Kopelowitz 
Sir, You state this morning (July 
24) that the title of Duke o? York 
was first conferred by King Rich- 
ard 11 in 1385. This cannot be 
correct King Edward II reigned 
from 1327 — 1377, and he 
conferred the title of Duke ofYork 
on his fourth son, Edmund. 

Further, you state that the title 
of Duke of York is traditionally 
conferred on the second son of the 
Sovereign. What is the extent of 
the tradition? 

King George V conferred the 
title on his second son. Prince 
Albert The previous Duke of 


York, later King George V, was 
given the title as the second son of 
the then Prince of Wales, who 
became later King Edward VU. 
Queen Victoria did not confer the 
title of Duke ofYork upon any of 
her four sons. 

The previous second sons to 
hold the title were James, Duke of 
York, second son of King Charles 
L later to become King James II,. 
and Frederick Duke of York, 
second son of King George IIL 
Yours sincerely, 

LIONEL KOPELOWITZ, 

41 Montagu Court 
Montagu Avenue. 
Newcastle-upon-Tyne. 

July 24. . 


Unfinished business 

From Lady Plowden 
Sir, Well done, the House of 
Commons, even if only by one 
vote! It is 20 years since we 
recommended that “the infliction 
of physical pain as a method of 
punishment in primary schools 
should be forbidden”. It will now 
be forbidden in all State schools. 

It remains, though, for our next 
recommendation to be accepted, 
that “the Secretary of Stale should 


be given power to deny registra- 
tion to any independent school in 
which the infliction of physical 
pain is a recognised method of 
punishment”. . 

Yours faithfully, 

BRIDGET PLbWDEN, 
(Chairman, Central Advisory 
Council for Education (England) 
1963-I966X 
1 1 Abingdon Gardens, 

Abingdon Villas, W8. 

July 23. 


English church 
heritage at risk 

From the Secretary of the Royal 
Commission on the Historical 
Monuments of England 
Sir. The ChiM Executive of En- 
glish Heritage and your other 
correspondents (July 17) have 
rightly drawn attention to the 
system whereby a listed ecclesias- 
tical building is exempt from most 
of the controls that apply to listed 
secular buildings. 

This exemption is not confined 
solely to Anglican churches for it 
also extends to non-conformist 
places of worship while they 
remain in religious use. Further- 
more the non-conformist 
churches do not have their own 
advisory system comparable to 
the Church of England to monitor 
any alterations to the interiors of 
chapels. 

If a decision is made by a non- 
conformist congregation to apply 
for demolition of a listed chapel, 
listed building consent is required 
However, in such cases local 
authority planning officers may 
not always be able to assess the 
merits of the application, since 
non-conformist places of worship 
are far less appreciated and under- 
stood than Anglican churches. 

The Royal Commission on 
Historical Monuments of England 
has completed a survey of over 
4.000 surviving non-conformist 
buildings dating from before 1800 
and of selected buildings up to 
19L4. It has also drawn up a list of 
those places of worship of the 
Protestant nonconformist or free 
churches in England as being 
especially worthy of preservation. 

But chapels and meeting-houses 
are fast passing into other use or 
being demolished. For instance, 
demolition is currently proposed 
for the former Congregational 
“Square Chapel” at Halifax. Such 
buildings should receive the 
protection that they deserve. 

Yours faithfully, 

TOM HASS ALL Secretary. 

Royal Commission on the His- 
torical Monuments of England, 
.Fortress House, 

23 Savile Row, WJ. 

Sanctions debate 

From the Director of Aims of 
Industry 

Sir. An unpleasant aspect of the 
debate on the South African 
boycott is the curious lack of 
interest in the views of blade 
South Africans. . „ _ 

A recent survey by Professor 
Fatima Meer of the Institute of 
Black Research is Durban casts 
doubt on whether South African 
blacks think that suffering win be 
good for them. Only 26 per cent in 
Professor Meet's survey would 
support divestment if it meant 
that many people lost their jobs. 

So fer as I know, no one has 
asked the estimated nine depen- 
dants of every black wage-earner 
in South Africa what they think. It 
is not hard to guess the answer. 

To quote Chief Buthelezi (who 
enjoys much more black support 
than Bishop Tutu, though less 
from British TV): “They know 
that jobs will give (hem economic 
and political muscle . . . Divest- 
ment will not help the struggle for 
liberation; it will hinder it.” 

Yours faithfully, 

MICHAEL IVENS, Director, 
Aims of Industry, 

40 Doughty Street, WC1. 

Art and advertising 

From Professor N. KurtL FRS 
Sir, Dr Bernard Richards's 
thoughtful and challenging article 
(July 19) will probably result in a 
voluminous correspondence, 
friendly or hostile. May I make a 
neutral comment? 

I often watch television but, 
even without turning off the set or 
closing, my eyes and plugging my 
ears, I somehow do not notice the 
commercials. So, although 1 know 
of Blake and Jerusalem, I have 
only the haziest idea of what 
Fisons do. Now, out of sheer 
curiosity, 1 shall try to see the 
offending Fisons-Hordem piece, 
search for Fisons publicity — and 
congratulate Fisons on a gratis 
half-page advertisement on a 
prime page of The Times. 

Yours faithfully, 

N. KURTL 
University of Oxford, 

Department of Engineering 
Science, 

Parks Road. Oxford. 

In reverse 

From Mr P. J. Freeman 
Sir, The letter from the Director of 
the British Road Federation which 
you published today (July 16) 
probably surprised few of your 
readers (it advocated a more 
energetic road construction pro- 
gramme). Not so the electrifying 
headline you accorded it: “Need to 
back up Channel Tunnel” . 

Sir, at a stroke you have it! We 
drive across on the left, while the 
French can continue to drive over 
on the right — but backwards. 
Yours faithfully. 

P. J. FREEMAN. 

The Gables. 

7 Warden Hill Road. 

Cheltenham. Gloucestershire. 


Teenage gambling 

From the Chairman of the 
National Council on Gambling 
Sir. While it is very important that 
help should be provided for' 
teenage fruit machine gamblers 
and their families (report, July 1 7\ 
prevention is better than cure. 

In general, young people are 
prohibited from taking part in any 
type of gambling in legalised 
fed lilies because their immaturity 
makes them more vulnerable to 
gamble to excess. Consequently, 
jackpot fruit machines have been 
confined - to licensed premises 
under the control of the Gaming 
Board so that children cannot 
have access to them. 

This restriction has not been 


applied to amusement with prizes 
(AWP) fruit machines although, as 
jackpot machines do, they exploit 
the same principles of learning, 
leading to habit-formation. The 
result is an anomalous situation 
whereby children and young peo- 
ple under the age of 18 years are 
permitted to play them in amuse- 
ment arcades as well as cafes, 
snack bars and fish and chip 
shops. 

In surveys done in the second- 
ary schools of one London bor- 
ough 1 found that two-thirds of the 
schools were concerned about 
problems resulting from pupils 
gambling on fruit machines. 

Fruit machines of any sort 
should not be available in places 
with free public access where 


young, immature persons can be 
exploited by this dangerous form 
of hard gaming. Furthermore, 
licensing and regulation of amuse- 
ment arcades will not deal with 
machines in cafes, snack bars and 
fish and chip shops. 

Legislation should be in- 
troduced to restrict all fruit ma- 
chines, including the AWP 
variety, to premises licensed for 
gaining and liquor. In this way 
they would only be available to 
adults. 

Yours faithfully, 

E MORAN, (Chairman, 

The National Council on 
Gambling). 

Chase Farm Hospital, 

Enfield. Middlesex. 


ON THIS DAY 

JULY 28 1877 

A descriptive review of a book by 
E. L. Arnold which relates 
episodes in a round trip from 
Christiania (Oslo) to Bergen 


A SUMMER HOL YD A Y 
IN SCANDINAVIA 

This summer hofyday was spent 
last year by a wise family who knew 
how to enjoy themselves without 
seeking to cram more into a month 
than a month could comfortably 
hold. Measured by distances on the 
map of Norway the space they 
traversed was not great, but mea- 
sured by pleasure it was immense. 
It was quite at the end of July that 
they found themselves at Hull 
ready to embark on the Hero, one 
of the Wilson line of steamers, for 
Christiania; and the 1st of August 
found the four who composed the 
family rolling on the unruly billows 
of the North Sea, and all more or 
less sea-sick . . . 

As jjngtiab tourists their baggage 
had only a nominal examinatio n at 
the Custom-house — a treatment 
very different from that which 
afterwards befell it on the German 
frontier; and, in fact, all the trouble 
which our family had with their 
baggage in Norway arose out of the 
fact that, tike most tourists, they 
had dragged a great deal too much 
of it with them from England. 
They were delightfully ignorant of 
Norwegian travelling, too, ami 
before they reached the country, 
thought that they might ride 
through Norway or walk through 
it; they were only in doubt which 
method of locomotion they should 
adopt — a doubt speedily dissol ved 
by an interview with Mr. Bennett, 
the worthy merchant of Christi- 
ania. who very soon convinced 
them that the only way of travel- 
ling in Norway was to travel as the 
rest of the civilized world does. In 
Norway the civilized world travels 
in carrioles - that well-known two- 
wheeled vehicle which only affords 
room for one person with a postboy 
clinging on to it behind on a ledge, 
which it is a very bad comphment 
to a seat to call by that name . . . 

There is not much to be seen in 
Christiania, so our family very 
wisely put themselves, after a day’s 
rest, into the train and proceeded 
to Eidsvold, 42 English miles from 
the capital on the shore of Lake 
Mjosen where they dined “liberally 
but monotonously, on salmon' 1 ; 
five times running they partook of | 
salmon cutlets, but when their 
sixth dish appeared they fled to the 
balcony outside. Next morning 
they embarked on the Lake in the 
little steamer, and after a delicious 
passage reached Gjovik about half- 
way up the Lake about 4 pun. Here 
our travellers showed great alacrity 
and, like the early bird, were 
rewarded with the worm in the 
shape of the only vehicle, which 
they secured by winking a dagh at 
the post station about a quarter of 
a wiil»» inland. 

When we say that the vehicle in 
question was a “stolkjoerre", in 
English a wretched country cart, 
with one horse, it will be seen that 
even the carriole, the national 
vehicle, sometimes fails the anx- 
ious tourist in Norway. Into this, 
masters of the position, they 
proudly piled their trunks, rifles, 
and railway rugs, and then mount- 
ing their only lady on the top of all, 
they proceeded in triumph on their 
way, the three men walking beside 
the sorry conveyance. So they 
trudged it for eight and a half miks 
to the next post station . . . Next 
morning they made the acquaint- 
ance of the carriole which has a 
light, wooden, spoon-shaped body, 
with an upright splashboard in 
front, a stuffed leather seat very far 
back, and a big apron which tucks 
you in on both sides ... we have 
found carrioling in Norway very 
pleasant when the roads are 
smooth: but roads are like life, not 
always smooth, but often rutty, 
and then let the small of the 
tourist's beck speak for the comfort 
of the conveyance . - - 

. . -Like all tourists of any 

stature, they found the beds of 5ft 8 
inches rather short, and wondered 
at the enormous number of magpie 
— wondering, indeed, rather than 
admiring, for they had brought 
guns and rifles with them, only to 
find as others have found before 
that there is very little game in 
Norway, except a few wary wild 
ducks on the lakes. 

. . . But in spite of all the 
drawbacks, they thoroughly en- 
joyed themselves — During their 
return journey they would have 
suffered much at one or two 
stations but for the provisions they 
had brought with them. Thus at 
Ekre, when they asked for dinner, 
all they could get was a half-melted 
piece of butter and some mouldy 
“fladbrod”, the staple food of the 
peasants, which we may inform our 
readers tastes like very bad dog- 
biscuit, while others have com- 
pared it to the wooden bottom of a 
hat-box with the paper scraped 
off... 


Sale of the century 

From Mrs Denise Williams 
Sir, Mrs Jacinth Whittaker (Jul 
1 9) and 1 move in different circles 
In London to reach the age of 60 o 
65 is a cause for celebration, rathe 
than reticence: could it be that tht 
bad news of advancing years i 
overtaken by the good news oft 
free bus pass? 

Yours faithfully. 

DENISE WILLIAMS, 

44 The Ridgeway. 

Golders Green, NW1I. 

Royal developments 

From Dr John Hi Greensmith 
Sir. I notice that the Duchess c 
York got her wedding snaps bad 
from the chemist the same eve 
ning whereas I have been waitin 
about a week to 10 days for tb 
return of my photographs. 

Ah well perhaps one day m 
prims will come. 

Yours faithfiifly, 

JOHN GREENSMITH. 

42 Prebend Street, 

Bedford. 

July 24. 


8 


THE TIMES SATURDAY JULY 26 1986 


THEARIS 


Television 

A cure for 
insomnia? 

When the mind is free, the 
body is delicate. Today, we 
seem to have freer minds and 
more delicate bodies than ever 
before — so at least would 
argoe the homeopath, George 
Vithoulkas — the subject of 
BBC2's fourth programme on 
The Heating Arts. 

Tamasin Day-Lewis's pro- 
gramme took an important 
subject but treated it with a 
structural looseness that 
might have sent a sensitive 
viewer into a profoundly un- 
troubled sleep. The gentle 
giant of Greek homeopathy 
was shown casting dimpled 
smiles at his patients along 
with questions tike H do you 
fear mice T* or “what about 
thunderstorms 7" These ques- 
tions, he argued, when eventu- 
ally pressed, were designed to 
discover how best he might 
apply his remedy in order to 
achieve “a balance in the 
whole of the individual". Un- 
fortunately. despite his ques- 
tions, we never saw bow he 
came up with an answer to the 
man with back trouble who 
liked nots or the woman who 
could not walk on marble 
floors. 

His caring of these people 
was against a gloomy predic- 
tion that the health of our race 
is degenerating rapidly. Anti- 
biotics, hormones and vaccines 
have destroyed our immune 
systems. Doctors prescribe 
medicines which might reme-. 
dy 30 different illnesses in- 
stead of just the one requiring 
treatment. What exactly 
Vithoulkas’s remedies are re- 
mained opaque, but they seem 
rooted in a tradition, believing 
like must be cored with like, 
which goes back to Hippocra- 
tes. 

In no way must the Greek 
physician be confused with 
hypokrites , meaning stage ac- 
tor (one who pretends to be 
what he is not). Pretence was 
the very octane of The Enemy 
Outside in Granada's medical 
drama The Practice. Affection- 
ately scripted by Lesley Bruce, 
this was another pleasant, 
heart-plucking Investigation 
into how doctors at a Man- 
chester clinic cope with both 
their patients* problems and 
their own. Under some stony 
faces ail sorts of hypocrisies 
were worming away; 

Nicholas 

Shakespeare 


Celebrating a 
giant in stone 


Crartes Avery 


The 600th anniversary 
of Donatello’s birth is 
is being widely marked 
in his native Florence. 
Bruce Boucher reports 

Donatello and his 
Contemporaries 
Forte di Belvedere 

Homage to Donatello 

Museo Nazionale del 
Bargello 

The Old Sacristy 

San Lorenzo 

Italian Drawings from 
the time of Donatello 

Galleria degli Uflfizi 

Few artists have been as widely 
admired in their own lifetimes and 
afterwards as Donatello. Vasari 
judged him one of the three great 
heroes of the second stage of the 
Renaissance and considered Dona- 
tello worth a place among the artists 
of antiquity or beside Michelangelo. 
More than one of Vasari's contem- 
poraries expressed the opinion that a 
work by Donatello was the next best 
thing to classical sculpture. Today, 
his fecundity of imagination and 
variety of expression rank Donatello 
among the foremost artists, compa- 
rable to Michelangelo in Vasari's day 
or Picasso in our own. 

The series of exhibitions with 
which his native Florence is marking 
the 600th anniversary of his birth 
provides a remarkably comprehen- 
sive view of his ’ career . and 
achivements. The celebrations are a 
conjunction of politics and art 
reminiscent of the rapport between 
Donatello and the Medici. But today 
patrons have been replaced by 
sponsors, and the major exhibition, 
Donatello and bis Contemporaries, 
represents a collaboration between 
Florence and its American "twin 
sister”. Detroit. The exhibition runs 
until September 7 in the Forte di 
Belvedere, a Medicean retreat over- 


looking the Pitti Palace and Florente 
itself. There, some hundred objects 
in stone, bronze, clay and wood 
record the achievements of Donatel- 
lo in a way unlikely to be duplicated 
for another century. 

The exhibits are grouped themati- 
cally and chronologically, beginning 
with works by Donatello’s teacher, 
Ghiberti, and ending with sculptors 
who matured after Donatello's death 
in 1 466. The chefs-d oeuvre of Dona- 
tello are found on the ground floor 
and include three statues, among 
them the vigorous John the Baptist 
from Siena Cathedral, whose facet- 
ed, angular surface is like wood 
sculpture translated into bronze, and 
the Mary Magdalen from the cathe- 
dral museum, a harrowing. Giaco- 
metti-like vision of a soul laid bare 
by penance. 

Four crucifixes by Donatello and 
two great rivals are also on display, 
making an unforgettable impression 
through their juxtaposition. One can 
see the early pair carved in competi- 
tion by Brunelleschi and Donatello, 
where the pronounced naturalism 
and ungainly proportions of 
Donatello s figure earned it the 
description "‘peasant-like”. The third 
Christ, by Michelozzo, embodies a 
more restrained version of a 
Donatellesque pattern, while die 
fourth, from the convent of Bosco ai 
Frati, presents us with a later version 
of this theme by Donatello, disturb- 
ing in its combination of high formal 
beauty and intense pathos. 

Beyond these great works, the 
upper floors of the Belvedere are 
given over to smaller sculptures 
which illustrate Donatello's contri- 
bution to narrative, the Virgin and 
Child composition and small 
bronzes. The extraordinary reliquary 
bust of San Rossore. newly cleaned 
and mounted at the proper height, 
evokes that strong sense of a living 
presence and felt emotion common 
to all Donatello's creations. Then, 
too. there are the drawings in stone, 
such as the brilliant Feast of Herod 
from LiUe. in which the rules of 
coherent visual perspective were 
articulated long before Masaccio or 
Alberti. 

Perhaps the most fascinating dis- 
play in the Forte di Belvedere is of 
the Virgin and Child reliefs. It was a 
genre in which Donatello excelled 
and established patterns followed by 
artists down to the 1 9th century. The 
star attraction of this room is a 
modelled terracotta known as the 
Madonna di Pietrapiana, which 
stood in a Florentine street tabema- • 



Grasp of the art: detail from Donatello's 
cie and was found to be an autograph 
Donatello when recently removed 
and examined. A late work, it 
contains marvellous passages of 
modelling and an astonishing assur- 
ance in the angled presentation of the 
Virgin’s chair. 

Other exhibitions in Florence 
highlight various aspects of Donatel- 
lo and bis times. For its Homage to 
Donatello (until July 20) the Bargello 
has reorganized its sala di Donatello, 
containing several of his master- 
pieces from the early Sr George to the 
ambiguous bronze David and the 
Amor-Atys. The chief novelty is the 
newly restored bust of Niccolo da 
Uzzano/ Modelled and painted, the 
terracotta shows the Florentine pa- 
triot cast in the mould of a Roman 
hero, and its vivacity and high 
quality strengthen the traditional 
attribution to Donatello. Also in the 
Bargello is a small but fascinating 
show on Donatello and the 1 9th 
century, which draws attention to 
the forgeries and copies after his 
work, especially by the notorious 
Basdanini. 

The Uffizi has mounted a major 
exhibition of 167 Italian Drawings 
from the time of Donatello (until 
September 7). Few drawings by 
Donatello survive, but his influence 
on artists like Filippo Lippi, Mante- 
gna and Giovanni Bellini was as 


Madonna di via Pietrapiana” 

strong as that exerted on those 
working in stone or bronze. 

The most sensational of the satel- 
lite exhibitions concerns the restora- 
tion of the Old Sacristy in San 
Lorenzo (until September 7). Built 
by Brunelleschi for the Medici in the 
1420s, it was later embellished by 
Donatello and Verrocchio. The exhi- 
bition focuses on Donatello's contri- 
bution to the chapel, notably the 
large stucco roundels with legends of 
St John the Evangelist and two 
stucco reliefs of Medici patron 
saints. Restoration has revealed an 
extraordinary range of techniques 
employed by Donatello on the 
roundels: a background of brick on 
to which nails were hammered, and 
then the stucco, a mixture of lime, 
sand and crushed brick, was mod- 
elled directly over the nails. This 
unusual method shows that Donatel- 
lo studied the remains of Roman 
decoration as well-as recipes handed 
down by Vitruvius. 

Cleaning bas revaled the intensity 
and restricted range of colours 
employed by Donatello, ochre-red, 
blue, while and traces of g reen, while 
the vigour and freedom of modelling 
is breathtaking. These details can be 
seen by visitors to San Lorenzo as a 
temporary scaffolding has been 
erected which will allow them to 
climb to the level of the roundels. 





THE SUNDAY TIMES 




WEDDING SOUVENIR 


jfc *f*. 

' «* r&m? 
• 


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■ Jit. 



I 






.O'- •*•••' . , s. 





ALL THAT’S BEST IN BRITISH JOURNALISM 


Radio 


Machine-gun chat, 

most 



I always sit in speechless 
admiration as the commenta- 
tors on our great public occa- 
sions reel off the facts and 
figures of the scene in front of 
them: little slabs of history, 
intriguing bits of protocol. 
How -do they- know and re- 
member so much? Alas, they 
often don't: it is all part of a 
briefing and sometimes the 
briefing or its reader blows the 
gaffe by getting things wrong. 

Last Wednesday, rehearsing 
the names of famous West- 
minster Abbey organists, Pe- 
ter Jones acquainted his 
listeners with one "Oriand 
Gibbon” of whom the editor 
of Grove would no doubt be 
glad to learn more. Such small 
blemishes apart, however, the 
wedding coverage was as we 
expect: informative, pictorial 
within the limits of the medi- 
um and celebratory without 
excessive hype. 

But what to say of a 
concotion which the Associa- 
tion of Independent Radio 
Contractors has been promot- 
ing to ILR stations up and 
down the country? Made by 
Radio 210 of Reading as a 
special edition of its series. 
Village Life, this was a visit to 
Dummer, homeground of the 
Ferguson family, and it 
purpoted to be a celebration of 
the marriage. Mike Matthews 
presented as if he were at 
Brands Hatch and began: "My 
first visit was to the father of 
the bride. Mqjor Ronald Fer- 
guson. and I asked him to tell 
me about the Guards Polo 
Club.” Just what we were all 
wanting to know. At the end of 
that and each succeeding in- 
terview the victim was urged, 
in the same machine-gun style 
and with the same repetitive 
phrase, to choose a bit of 
music: this not uncommonly 
drowned his or her last words. 

Great traditions were also 
on display three days before 
the wedding in A Gentleman's 
Place (Radio 4. Sunday, re- 
peated Friday, producer. Fran 
Acheson) but here Glyn 
Wqrsnip trod the sacred mar- 
ble of the London dubs. Or 
some of them: three of the 
most select — White's. Buck's. 
Boodle's — had declined or 


loftily ignored an invitation to 
contribute. There was enough 
without them. General Sir 
John Hackett recalled how, as 
a young officer recently elect- 
ed to the Carlton, he was so 
nervous of encountering its 
Tory grandees that it was 
some time before he dared go 
in. 

Dare he did at last, but 
following a visit to his tailor. 
He could not understand the 
apoplectic looks and muttered 
oaths that greeted him until he 
noticed that the tailor had 
inadvertently left one leg of 
his trousers rolled up. 

But the clubs are not quite 
the bastions of eccentric or- 
thodoxy that they were. The 
Guards and Cavalry have not 
only combined but brought in 
a professional manager — and 
ex-RAF type at that — who bas 
rescued their finances and 
made their catering a byword. 
Unfortunately a passing ter- 
rorist sprayed their building 
with machine-gun fire a while 
back and security throughout 
clubland is now a worry, 
although as Mr Worsnip put 
it. the most worrying security 
problem remains bow to keep 
out the women. 

If this programme, with its 
orchestra of well-bred voices 
was utterly absorbing, so was 
the near-solo performance 
that went to make up Mr 
Fletcher, The Poet (Radio 4 
Thursday; producer Pierce 
Plowright). J P Fletcher, a 
Leicestershire builder, won a 
Commonwealth poetry prize 
in 1951 for a poem about the 
mining community into 
which he was bom. A bright, 
studious child, he should have 
gone to grammar school and 
did so for one term until his 
strident mother prevailed: 
“The others went int' pit. 
you're going to the pit". 
Somehow he escaped. He 
read and he read, buying a 
World’s Classic one week, an 
Everyman the next and later 
in quiet moments in the office 
he wrote and he wrote on 
anything that came to hand. 
The talent thus developed 
shone in his speech. 

David Wade 



THE Cao& GAIA CONCERT 


LUCIANO PAVAROTTI 


WITH 

THE ROYAL 

PHILHARMONIC ORCHESTRA 

Arena 

WEDNESDAY 6Ui AUGUST AT 8pm 

Tickets from 03 from Wembley Ansa Btn Office. 
Tet 902 G^. after] to Booking Fee from Kesb 
Prmtte Shops & Craft Card Hate 
741 8989. HMVQ3SSK31 8mp ~ " " 
and usual agents. 


Promenade Concert 

Precision sprung 

BBC Welsh SO/ 


Yansons 

.Albert Hall/Radio 3 

Not having heard the combi- 
nation of Maris Yansons and 


and unqgotisttcally as ifhe had 
been conducting - Bruckner. 
And I would guess from this 
concert. whereBruckner never 
featured, that he would be a 
remarkable Bruckner conduc- 
tor he has that capacity to be 
blindingly obvious-amUt the 


the BBC Welsh Symphony - same, time- .awesomely 
Orchestra before, I was not surprising. ' 
prepared for a concert of such He showed it in the Tcbai- 

utterly musical vim and keen- kovsky, persuading one . that 



of making his orchestra sound 
at the very peak of condition, 
always stretched but never 

frayed, and -they respond to 
him like a spring, quickly and 
with -tensile strength. 

Their precision of dynamic 
nuance, whether m a sudden 
pianissimo for a couple ofbars 
or a crescendo carried across 
different groupings, is one 
testimony to their rapport 
with their chief guest 
conductor. 

Another is their abundance 
of magnificent sounds: the 
dark slabs laid down by 
trombones in the second and 
last movements ofProkofie v’s 
Second Piano Concerto, for 
instance, or the unanimous 
dear freshness of the wood-’ 
wind ensemble, or the free 
confidence of solos, especially 
from the clarinet The opening 
performance ofTchaikovsky’s 
Romeo and Juliet found Mr 
Yansons behaving as seriously 


great 

slow music besides encourag- 

ing hfc pfayeis to an eager 
virtuosity in -the. fester pas- 
sages. Sibelius’s First Sym- 
phony found orchestra ancL 
conductor just as closely at- 
tuned, and just as unembar- 
rassed. The bits of this mosaic 
were illuminated with force 
and yet there was no risk of 
disintegration, partly because 
Mr Yansons showed the com- • 
poser assembling chunks -of. 
Tchaikovsky and Borodin on : 
the blueprint ofa.new musical 
architecture. 

And no one could doubt the ' 
sources when the- second 
movement was so lilting!;/., 
waltz-tike and the third so : 
PoJovtsran. Given a- strong, ' 
deliberate and shiriingiy reso- 
nant. Prokofiev performance 

from John Lill, this, was V 
memorable evening. 

Paal Griffiths 


Theatre ■ 

A rich inheritance 

Observe the Sons 


of Ulster 
Marching 
Towards the 
Somme 
Hampstead 

Casting round for sturdy 
themes on which to hang their 
ideas; . English playwrights 
must often envy their counter- 
parts in Ireland. Religious 
schism, conflicting loyalties.' 
the rival appeals of the world 
and the hearth -history has 
handed them an enviably rich 
compost. 

Nor does the political and 
religious divide raise an insu- 
perable artistic barrier. Frank 
McGuinness, a lecturer at St'. 
Patrick's College, Maynooih. 
has boldly crossed into alien 
territory. First given at the 
Abbey last year, bis play 
presents an outsider's perspec- 
tive of the insular, beleaguered 
mentality of the Five 
Counties' Protestant tradition 
which is well-informed and 
acutely felt.. 

His chosen period is . the 
First World War, his chosen 
protagonists a group of volun- 
teers for the Ulster Division. 
Summoned up like ghosts by 
the modern incarnation of 
their sole survivor, the right 
soldiers are shown in their 
barracks, on leave in Ulster 
and finally on the terrible 
morning of July 1. 1916 as 
they prepare to meet their 
Maker in the first Battle of the 
Somme. 

All are Protestant, most are 
from the country {the two' 
brash Belfast boys jar effec- 
tively) and several are un- 
abashed Carson ites; but one 
Py per, whose story this is — 
stands apart by virtue both of 
class (“We own Armagh" he 
announces loftily of his fam- 
ily) and of temperament. 

Mocking his fellows' ideal- 
ism, he proves himself a 
highly resourceful mtchief- 
maker capable of provoking 
squabbles out of thin air with 
his iconoclastic riddling, and 
succeeds in leading the most 



Joha Bowe: malting a 
point at Hampstead * 

gullible member of the_bar- 
racks squarely up .the garden 
path with a lurid “confession" 
about marrying a three-legged 
Papist whore. 

The satire of bone-headed. 

. Orange bigotry provides.soine ' 
vivid dialogue and John Bowe . 
as Pyper skewers the obvious * 
targets with .relish, but once : 
the characters start developing -■ : 
individual relationships ' 
(“pairing and bonding" in the ' 
author's unfortunate and . 
anachronistic usage), the piece 
begins to tread water and very 
nearly sinks. 

The doubt-hanied former 
clergyman and the sports-mad 
young patriot come to blows 
in ; a church; the baker at- . 
tempts to stiffen the backbone 
of the nerve-strung dupe: the 
Belfast boys lament the feeble 
turn-out for the marching 
season; and Pyper reveals to . 
the blacksmith, who saved his’, 
life in action that his cynicism , 
stems from unhappy loveand' 
failure as a sculptor. ■ • 

Michael Attenborough's 
taut production links these. - 
vignettes together skilfully 
enough, but they hamstring 
the impetus established in the " 
first half: the more the charac- - 
tens explain their identities the - 
less interesting they become, 
and it is only in the .final act, 
with an absurd re-enactment 
of the Battle of the Boyne on - 
piggyback, that the -thing en- 
larges bn its early promise, • • 

Martin Cropper. 


PREVIEWS JULY 31. AUGUST 1& 2 

Opens August 4 th at 7.0 

Monday to Saturdayat 7.30 



Jack Lemmon 

IN. 

Long Days Jottrnw 
Into Night 

by EUGENE O’NEILL 

DIRECTED BY 

JONATHAN MTTI.Tre 


^Theatre Royal Haymarket 

BOX OFFICE ( iCC)01'930 9832 


24hr 1 day (X 


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O': 040 72Q0 







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THE 



TIMES 



•'* 


July 26 -August 1, 1986 


A weekly guide 
to leisure, entertainment 
and the arts 


r-..5.T;p fl 




SATURDAY 

to London’s pawn brokers 


The opening of 
the World Chess 
Championship 
^ jus* ^ i takes place next 

week in Mayfair. 


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William Greaves 
tells how Britain 
captured a share 
of the event 


John Bowe: makinji 
point at Hampuad 

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U nsuspected by ho- 
tel guests and un- 
recognizable from 
their, traditional 
square-jawed and 
Homburg-hatted cartoonists' 
archetype, a steady stream of 
officials from the Soviet Em- 
bassy have spent much of the 
last few weeks flitting between 
the Park Lane Hotel, over- 
looking Green Park in Lon- 
don. and two “safe houses** 
whose top secret locations in 
the capita) are known to only a 
handful of people. 

At- the same time, strange 
things have been going on in 
and :aroiind the hotel's ball- 
room.- Two lavatories, for 
instance, have been built and 
shed carefully so that one 
cannot be seen from the other, 
and for the next five weeks 
both will be under constant 
surveillance. 

In addition, a set of hi-tech, 
dimmable fluorescent lights 
have been installed with the 
specific requirement that they 
be capable of bathing a table 
five metres beneath them with 
anything between 130 and 180 
fool candles of illumination. 

If it all sounds like the 
clinical j preparations for a 
third-degree interrogation of 
the type usually encountered 
in an Eric Ambler novel the 
feces and demeanour of the 
two men for whom it has all 
been designed will do little to 
dispel that illusion. 

Those two men are Gary 
Kasparov and Anatoly Kar- : 
pov, who next Monday, at- 
5pm. precisely. begiir'fln £ ei>- 
cothiter that will • not . only 
place both of them under 
intense- psychological stress, 
but is also unique: For the mst 
time in the. 100 -year history of 
the World Chess Champion- 
ship. two Russians have 
agreed to play each other 
outside the Soviet Union. 

It remains to be seen wheth- 
er the imagination of the 
British public will be captured 
by a match of such cerebral 
intensity that, as often as not, 
five hours will be insufficient 
to finish a single game. What 
is certain, however, is that the 
marathon contest will not be 
allowed to start unnoticed. 

At tomorrow’s £10.000 
opening gala, the entire floor 
of the Park Lane Hotel ball- 



Past masters and 
intriguing moves 


Although it would bare been 
unthinkable a few years ago 
that a world championship 
chess match between two 
Russians wohM be played in 
London, the choice of venue 
for the fust half of the 
centenary match is histori- 
cally appropriate. 

The two men who went to 
New York, St Louis and New 
Orleans to fight out that first 
epic encounter in 1886 were 



room, will be transformed into 
a chess board, from four giant • 
rooks at each comer will flow \ 
Sevroga caviar, "and -all the 1- ■ 
guests— including, .needless to - 
say,’ Tim -Rice and Elaine 
Paigp of the Chess musical 
have been bidden to appear 
dressed entirely in black and 
white. - 

Considering that the out- 
come of the match will not 
even be determined in this 
country — after five weeks of 
battle, the whole circus will 
decamp and hotfoot it to 
Leningrad for the second half 
of the- contest — it might be- 
supposed that such a spectacu- 
lar launching ceremony is in 
danger of reducing everything 
i hat follows to a glorious anti- 
climax. Such thoughts would 
miss the point.' 

What is being celebrated is 
not so much the start of the 
championship, but the fact 


ll'orld championship pioneers: 
Sieimiz (left) and Zukenon 

Wilhelm Stein itz and Johan- 
nes Zukertort. Both were 
Jews. Steinitz, the unofficial 
“champion**, was born in 
Prague and represented Aus- 
tria. while Zukertort de- 
scribed himself variously as 
Prussian and Polish and 
spoke nine languages, in- 
cluding Hebrew. 

Yet, despite tbeir interna- 
tional origins, both lived in 
England, and London was at 
that time the unchallenged 
capital of world chess. 

Steinitz. who won j the 
match and remained world 
champion nndl 1894, was 
noted for the same lack of 
modesty that has distin- 
guished many of his succes- 
sors. his most famous claim 
being that he could give God 
a start of pawn and move, 
and still beat him. 

The first Russian to win 
the title was Alexander 
Alekhine although, by the 
time of his first victory in 
1927, he had exiled himself 
to France and was persona 
non grata in the Soviet 
Union. Alekhine, who lost 
the title in 1935 to the 
Dutchman, Max Enwe, and 
regained it two years later, 
was probably the most 
colourful of chess's 13 world 


champions. .An incorrigible 
drunkard, he achieved the 
remarkable record of being 
married five times - on each 
occasion to a woman older 
than himself. 

Since Alekhine, the world 
championship has been dom- 
inated by the Soviet Union, 
only the brilliant and eccen- 
tric American, Bobby Fi- 
scher, interrupting a 49-year 
clean sweep, during which 
Mikhail Botvinnik became 
the only man in the 
championship's history to 
win and lose his crown three 
times. 

The match in which Fi- 
scher took the title from 
Boris Spassky in 1972 is 
chiefly remembered for the 
remarkable Russian claim, 
after game 16, that 
Spassky's psychological 
well-being was being under- 
mined by “some electronic 
devices and chemical sub- 
stance" installed in the play- 
ing area by the Americans. 

An investigation of the 
stage, air, walls and lights, 
and no fewer than 18 X-ray 
photographs of the chairs. 



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Psychological warfare: 

Fischer (Icti) and Spassky 

revealed nothing more sinis- 
ter than two dead flies — and 
the show went oil 

Even more extraordinary'* 
however, was the “yoghnrt 
incident'' during the Karpov- 
Korchnoi final of 1978. The 
Korchnoi camp suggested 
that Karpov was receiving 
secret signals from his sec- 
onds, contained in the choice 
of the yoghurt flavour sent to 
the table. 

After-a two-day inquiry it 
was agreed that Karpov 
coaid have blueberry yoghurt 
at 7.15pm, but that any other 
flavour needed a written 
request to the arbiters. 


Ilhefinal volume of one of the most remarkable 
biographies of the century 


The Field-Marshal 1944-76 

NIGEL HAMILTON 


i’S 


“Asamemoratothefield marshal...Nigd t^ni^ns 

•toS^neiwbesurpassed-P^^ 

M^iidscope. briBanllv vwweri, and ajpyto read. 

S ™ pe Rdiard Hough, 771 eSundafVmes 



£15.00 

HAMISH HAMILTON 


for ' a semiJtnal play-off 
against the third of the great 
Ks, Viktor Korchnoi, who 
himself had twice lost to the 
title holder. That final elimi- 
nator was to be played in 
■ Pasadena, California. 

K orchnoi, for reasons 
best known to him- 
self, objected to the 
venue and refused 
to appear. Perhaps, 
as a Russian defector, he was 
concerned about security. Per- 
haps it was merely a display of 
petulance. Either way. it was 
the break for which London 
had been waiting. 

Then, as now, Florencio 
Campomanes of the Philipv- 
pines was president of foe 
World Chess Federation. He 
was then, as now, flamboyant 
and imperious. Within his 
rights, but to foe dissatisfac- 
tion of almost everybody, 
including foe two players, he 
declared Korchnoi to be in 
default and awarded foe 
match to Kasparov. 

London had never staged a 
round of foe world champion- 
ship. but Raymond Keene, a 
British grandmaster and a 
Times chess correspondent 
decided to make his move. If 
he could raise £1 20,000, 
would Campomanes give the 
match one more chance and 
would foe players agree to a 
British venue? . . 

Keene approached Dominic 
Lawson, a journalist chess 
enthusiast and son of foe 
Chancellor of foe Exchequer. 
Lawson, showing all foe finan- 
cial flair of his father, persuad- 
ed Acorn, foe computer firm, 
to put up foe money. The 
match was staged at foe Great 
Eastern Hotel. Kasparov won. 
a charismatic new name 
emerged to challenge for 
Karpov's title and, suddenly, 
London had arrived as a chess 

city- r . 

The next year found 
Campomanes in even greater 
trouble. Arrangements for a 
much-publicized match be- 
tween the Soviet Union and 
the Rest of foe World had 
suddenly collapsed. Could 
Britain help out? There was, 
however, one small proviso. 
Twenty of foe most gifted 
chess players alive, together 
with their eccentricities, their 
egos and their entourages, had 
to be housed, sat down and 
ready to start in exactly three 
weeks’ time. 

Again Keene accepted foe 
challenge. A different middle- 
man, an investment consul- 
tant called Rupert Chetwynd, 
stepped into foe breech, and 
Mr Eddie Oliver, at that ume 
financial director of the Lon- 
don Docklands Development 
Corporation, did the rest. 

“As soon as I heard of foe 
project. I had two reasons for 



#7 

Colourful competitors: Alekhine (left), and Euwe 


Capital players: Karpov (left) and Kasparov, pieces in the politics of international chess 

. .. xiaiirMwi twn fmp in Fphruarv. but t 


wanting to pull it off* , Oliver 
recalls. “We were a yqung 
organization and we wanted to 
prove that we weren’t bureau- 
cracy-bound.- 

“We were also promoting 
docklands as a telecommuni- 
cations centre. A great way of 
demonstrating our potential 
was to ask Kasparov to pul on 
a display with half of nis 
opponents in London and foe 
other half in New York. What 
we did was to run foe first- 
ever chess match by satellite. 

It all worked perfectly/’ 

Later that year, in October 
1984. Karpov and Kasparov 
began foeir title match in 
Moscow. Even by world chess 
standards it was to prove an 
interminable affair. Karpov, 
slight, undemonstrative, cor- 
rect. and for nine years the 
king of foe world, blasted into 
his challenger, an outspoken, 
powerfully-built Armenian 
Jew from foe fringe of foe 
Soviet Union, and streaked 
into a 5-0 lead. 

B ut then foe months 
drifted by. Draw fol- 
lowed draw, Karpov 
could not clinch foe 
sixth win he needed, 
and in foe following February, 
just as hotel bills were mount- 
ing towards foe unpayable, 
Kasparov won two games on 

foe trot. . 

Campomanes stepped in 
and called the match off. The 
outcry was instantaneous and 
a powerful chess lobby made 
demands for the Filipino s 
head on a salver. 

At first Karpov acquiesced, 
and then, almost immediately, 
changed his stance to one of 
orotest against foe abandon- 
ment. Kasparov, on the other 
hand lashed out in all direc- 


tions. Karpov, he claimed 
was “just plain scared’, and 
Campon an es “a man with no 
understanding for chess and 
its problems”. 

In September last year, in an 
atmosphere electric with accu- 
sation and counter-accusa- 
tion. foe two men sat down in 
Moscow to scrap it out for a 
second time. So close was foe 
encounter that at foe start of 
foe 24fo and last game, six 
weeks later, a win for either 
player would have given him 
foe title. Kasparov was vic- 
torious and became the new 
world champion. 

Under Worid Chess Federa- 
tion rules, Karpov was enti- 
tled to a revenge match. 
Campomanes announced that 
it had to be played within 
three months. “Nonsense", 
said Kasparov. “Play or be 
stripped of your title”, was the 
Filipino's response. The vol- 
cano was rumbling again. 

Undeterred Campomanes 
invited tenders for foe re- 
match and was not alone in 
expecting extravagant bids 
from cities as diverse as Kuala 
Lumpur. Istanbul. Marseilles 
and Belgrade. In the event, 
there were just two envelopes 
to be opened Leningrad of- 
fered a million Swiss francs 
(£330.000) - and London 1.8 
million (£600.000). 

Then, out of the blue and to 
Campomanes's intense em- 
barrassment. foe two Russians 
agreed to a six-month post- 
ponement. London and Len- 
ingrad were awarded the split 
locations, and that should 
have been an end to foe agony. 
There was. however, to be one 
more twist , J „ 

The British money had been 
pledged by the Greater Lon- 
don Council. That would have 


ISATURDAY 


First impressions: 
Sir John Mills 
on his debut at 
the National 
Theatre - page 14 


Axis Diary 
Bridge 
Omsk 
Cunewts 

OnKStMHlI 

Dance 
Drink 
Eating Out 

Fdnw 

Galleries 


14 Gardening 10 
13 Om and About II 


13 Opera 

14 Pbotoftraphy 

13 Retirw 

[4 Rock & Jazz 
11 Shoppie 
II Time'! Cook 
J4 Tra*d 

14 TV' & Radio 


been fine in February, but by 
julv there would no longer be 
a GLG Would foe sponsor- 
ship still be valid? While foe 
British Chess Federation held 
its breath, foe verdict was 
announced. 

A s foe match was a 
postponement, foe 
cheque would be 
allowed to stand. 
London was to 
have its first world champion- 
ship final after all. And Stew- 
art Reuben, congress director 
of foe British Chess Federa- 
tion. was to have a headache. 

"The first thing io remem- 
ber is Reuben’s rule”, he said 
wiyly. “The fewer people you 
have playing, foe more admin- 
istrators you need. For a 
tournament involving 1.500 
players you need 30 officials: 
for’this one I have 80 on my 
lisL There are three arbiters, 
three members of foe appeal 
committee, people selling tick- 
ets. mementoes and chess sets, 
and others manning micro- 
computers, bookstalls, paint- 
ing exhibition, entrances to 
the hall'...” vI . 

The phone rang: “Now whv 
can't he bring his own. 
There'll be complaints about 
the food, of course, and if you 
overheard the address of the 
house 1 implore you to forget 
it . . 

Whatever the outcome, the 
next five weeks will be a 
personal triumph for foe pa 
tience and diplomacy 1 of Ray- 
mond Keene. “This is just the 
thing British chess needs , ne 
said “We have won the silver 
medal in the Chess Olympics, 
we have 10 grandmasters, and 
1 believe that one of them. 
Nigel Short, will^one day be 
world champion, _ 

The ever controversial 
Florencio Campomanes is the 
model for foe arbiter in Tim 
Rice's musical Chess. Neither 
foe musical nor foe epic match 
in the ballroom of foe Park 
Lane Hotel could wish for 
more appropriate publicity 
from foe other. Suddenly, in 
the heart of London, real life is 
imitating art 

©Times Nwrepspws Ltd. 1808 


Only one 

decaffeinated 


as good as 
Nescafe Gold Blei 


J* 










THE TIMES SATURDAY JULY 26 1986 


ADVERTISEMENT 


ll 



Uncrowned. 

Unhurried. 

Unforgettable. 

This Autumn take a 




peaceful waters of the 
Mediterranean or Aegean, 
and discover the rewards of 
converting mere sightsee- 
ing into an enriching and 
memorable experience. 

During a relaxing and 
convivial two weeks, in 
company with like minded 
people, you can exchange 
todays world for the old, 
exploring lands rich in art 
and architecture, history 
and legend. All with a new- 
found insight For whilst 
cruising in comfort aboard 
the Orpheus, you can share 
the expert knowledge of 


Edited by Shona Crawford Poole 


TRAVEL 


Tilting temples on a moonscape 




j whose lively and informal 
/ talks will give you the badk- 
■ ground to every historic site 
\ visited. Making of each ex- 
£ cursion - indeed the whole 
cruise - a true journey of 
discovery. 

An itinerary of one of 
| our cruises is shown here; 
there are many to choose 
i from, between now and 
I December. Fares from 
around £900 are fully inclu- 
sive, with return flights, 

I most excursions and all 
I gratuities. 

SEPT 3 LONDON- 
f DUBROVNIK. A morning 
: flight from Gatwick and a 
: panoramic drive marks the 
start of our journey through 
the idyllic Aegean. 

I * S ATHENS, the Acropolis 
and other classical sights. 
Laterperhaps on to 
Sounion and the difltop 
temple of Poseidon. 

, 6 DELOS - deserted 
\ island of Apollo, and then 
\ Mykonos. 

\i 7 VOLOS, from where the 
1 Argonauts sailed. Visit 
f picturesque villages, or 
j astonishing Meteora with 
t monasteries perched atop 
t towering rock pillars. 

j 8 MOUNT ATHOS, and a 
; sea view of the monasteries 
in this all-male holy place. 

\ 9 ISTANBUL, to explore 
the ancient treasures of this 
unforgettable city 

10 TROY; city of Priam 
and Hector, Achilles and 
Agamemnon, or Assos and 
then the once mighty 
Pergamum. 

II EPHESUS, a most 
marvellous site, or Priene, 
a fine Hellenistic dty. 

12 RHODES. A walking 
tour of the old walled aty, 
or an optional excursion to 
Lindos. 

13 HERAKLION, and 
Minoan Knossos. 

14 OLYMPIA. A glorious 
site with hs Heroic temples 
and sacred precinct, where 
the Olympic games were 
held for 1000 years. 

16 VENICE. Optional 
excursions, or a stroll 
around “the bride of the 
sea,” one of the world’s 
loveliest dries, before 
flying back to London. 


A sense of adventure 


overtakes 


Tim Bouquet on the 


upward trails 


of Himachal Pradesh 


Y ou know you are getting higher by 
the frequency with which warning 
signs appear on the rock faces at 
hairpin bends. “Speed kills" they 
warn in big stencilled yellow 
letters. “Better late than never". 
“Horn Please!" And a herd of 
sheep and small brown goats 
jangling bells darts over the sheer 
drops. 

Thousands of feet below roads 
that ding somehow to vertiginous 
contours are the lush river valleys 
of Himachal Pradesh. There are 
orchards and terraces and a geome- 
try of yellows, browns and greens. 
Above and beyond, the Himalayas 
wink in snow from behind a 
corrugation of 1 4,000ft hills from 
where the inhabitants of this north- 
west Indian state, sandwiched be- 
tween Kashmir and China, can 
watch the foreigners drive by and 
round and round, bound for the 
greatest tourist attraction on earth. 

For those dissatisfied with 
Kashmir's houseboat ghettos on 
polluted lakes, neighbouring Hi- 
machal is where Himalayan India 
keeps its splendour and beauty 
intact for the more discerning and 
independent visitor. 

Famous for its peaks and its 
apples. Himachal Pradesh is com- 
fortable enough for those not 
wanting to pioneer but who still 
have a sense of adventure. For 
most, the gateway to it is the old 
British summer capital of Simla. 
An English church sits incongru- 
ously on top of the hill on which 
the city is built. A honeycomb of 
houses is stacked up the slopes to 
the flat ridge where the house of 
Cod stands rather sadly, doors 
bolted, windows cracked or bro- 
ken. It is from here one first 
encounters the Himalayas, a hun- 
dred miles or more away. 

Since the British left Simla its 
population has exploded past 
60,000 and given in to the bus. The 
top two tiers of the old capital are 
traffic-less, which means the mass 
of buses, trucks, taxis and cars 
thrashes angrily around the lower 
roads. Policemen blow their whis- 





motoargphs by Onstart 


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Just a graze: a Gaddi shepherd and his flock of sheep and goats at summer camp in Himachal Pradesh ' 




Big day: Gaddfrri shepherd girls ia th«ir finery, dressed for a maniage 


ties continually to keep the traffic 
moving. 

The quaintly-named Mall is 
lined with stalely English houses 
with names plucked straight out of 
Surrey. Traces of empire abound 
but it is the Indian bazaars which 
catch the eye. The sari silks, piles of 
vegetables on large flat baskets. 

Orchards are bordered 
by great craggy hills 

virulent sweets and mounds of 
dyes and spices turn the narrow 
streets into a giant paintbox. 

A more sedate and scenic way of 
reaching Simla, if you have the 
time, is on the old narrow-gauge 
railway which threads its way by 
tunnel, bridge and ratchet from just 
north of Chandigarh. 

From Simla ii‘s another two or 
three hours by road to Mandi, a 
meaningless junction town strad- 
dling the River Beas. and then on 
up the Kulu Valley (you can also 
make for Dalhousie or Dharara- 
sala, home of the Dalai Lama, via 
another road). 

Kulu means “the end of the 
inhabitable world" and this is 


where the adventure really 
begins. So ft orchards broken with 
jacaranda, bougainvillaea and jas- 
mine are bordered by great craggy 
forested hills, or parched escarp- 
ments ripped bare for firewood. 
Himachal houses are made of 
wood surrounded on all sides by 
two-tier verandahs — the upper 
enclosed for winter, the lower open 
to the gentle summers. 

In spite of the breeze the 
temperature climbs. Ice-cream 
men shove drinks on bent sticks 
through vehicle windows. Drapers 




• 'JAMMU AND 4 
• . KASHMIR 'i * 

--v vy. 


\RhMlM Pin 

S Dbamzzub \ i •• ' * . 

'\\ +—Kulu Willey n 

\ himachSl ,s, >L5 

PR.ADeSH_/^ 

PUNJAB 

-Simla I M t 


Chandigarfa 




SO m ite j— J 

/-O j 

^ £ HARYANA^r 


drop off among their bolts. Ani- 
mals driven endlessly God knows 
where are allowed to rest. 

From Kulu to Manali the moun- 
tains become dearer by the mile, 
divested finally of hill cover. The 
river quickens, building for a 
monsoon flood. The guesthouse 
signs start to outnumber the trees. 

Manali is a meeting place. Nepali 
roadworkers and Tibetan refugees 
have signified their permanence by 
building a gompa (temple), where 
Buddha takes up two floors in 
height surrounded by butter lamps 


TRAVEL NOTES 


A number of companies are now 
offering trekking, touring and other 
holidays to Himachal Pradesh. 
Contact Western Himalayan 
Holidays, 66 Hungerford Road, 
London N7 (01-607 4809). 

A standard return fair to New 
Delhi on Air India is £455. Those - 
fixing their own itinerary should 
contact Himachal Pradesh Tourism, 
Chanderfok Building, 36- 
Janpath, New DefhTtlOQI. Further 
information is available from the * 
Government of India Tourist Office, 
7 Cork Street. London W1 (01- 
437 3677). 


and crumpled rupee notes. 

It's 'more round and round to get 
from Manali to the Rhotarig Pass 
by which, at some times of the year, 
it impossible to drive into Ladakh. 
Apple blossom gives way to moon- 
scape debris on the ascent with 
searing snow and liie.odcastbnal 
incongruous and inaccessible 
mountain pasture. This is the land 
of the yak and spring is signalled by 
melting snow, landslides and thou- 
sands of white butterflies.^ j - 

A steady stream of buses and. 
taxis brings; . visitors up; here to 
stand nr the midst of the Himala- 
yas -7 the -massive' drifts, a few 
' persevering trees and brilliant day- 
zEng sunlight. 

But maybe the real jewel in 
Himachal's crown is npt here at all 
but in the tiny mountain village of 

Sirahan is a village of 
shadows and smoke 

Sirahan — due east along the Sutlej 
River which extends up to the 

Tibetan border. 

■ ./ 

Sirahan hugs a green shoulder 
right underneath the mountains. It 
is a village of shadows and 
woodsmoke from tiny rough-slated 
houses where the- animals live 
alongside their minders. 

A pair of temples, wider on top 
than at the base, o rnat ely carved 
like Chinese juaks, sits side by side 
at the head of the village. Onetilts, 
the other dtiesn*L The tenrples are- 
dedicated to BhimakaU. ;'a rather 
bloodthirsty Hindu lady- deity. The 
200 -year-old temple is being al- 
lowed to topple slowly/silver doors 
and all, and the goddess, along with 


her friend fturvati, has moved next 
door into a shrine built in the' early 
. part of this cen tury: ' * 

.- Like the Himachal houses the. 
temple is built' within enclosed 
-verandahs, linked by creaky wbod- 
. en stairs. Temple dnll is to keep the 

■ head covered (with a red topi 

■ sullied- by the rotund -guide)- and ■ 
1 ' leave shnaes backwards,, head 

' slightly . bowed, ' bands together. 
An entry , in the . guesthouse's 

■ visitor's book- shows “that Lady - 
Betjeman (Penelope Chetwode), 

_• who travefled extensively in Hima- 
chaL recommended the purchase 
of some garden furniture so tour- 
ists could take the stunning views 
at their ease. The fhrhiture is still ' 
not there. “Lady- Betjeman's, wishes*, 
are being attended to", the manag-- 
ersnaps. 

Thebig news is the sports ground 
being built above the houses — the 
highest soccer -pitch in the world. 
The highest cricket ground in the 
world ‘is also in Himachal — at 
Chail, just a hill or two away from 
Simla. Chad was bdilFby the focal 
ruler, the Rajah of Patiala, to-rival-' 
Simla. But the grand design felled ■ 
and now the whole place has . an air 
of decay. The bandstand near' the 
cricket ground tilts at a precarious 
angle. The palace itself is now at. 
hotel wher& lhe barman in ihe ; 
Silver Bangle Bax is proud of hislO- ' 

■ brands of whisky. 

: Somehow - it's all rather _sadr 
Efegant dining-rooih furnkure has - 
. to-share- the enormous -space! with ' 
ghastly modern-paintings. Were the- - 
original ; pictures '-smugged out - 
' along with, the family jewels, - 
-leaving nothing behind but' the. ~ 
grand piano, the billiard tables acid ; 
the tarnished silver bangle bar? 


SHOPPING 



IN THE GARDEN 


New life 



Cruise tfarou^i 
the sands of time 

Our Nile Cruises are 
almost as legendary as the 
river itself. Travelling in air- 
conditioned oom fort aboard 
the Nile Star; you can fully 
appreciate the timeless 
beauty of the river along 
your 600-mile journey and 
visit some of the greatest 
monuments in the world. 

As with ail Swan Cruises, 
a guest lecturer - whose 
informal talks give a 
fascinating insight to all you 
will see - accompanies every 
cruise. Nile Cruises run all 
year, except July and August. 


Ask your travel agent, 
or for full information and 
immediate availability on 
Swan Hellenic Orpheus or 
Nile Cruises, please ring us 
on (01) 831 IS 15. or send 
the coupon. 


ftCTOFTHE GROWING WORLD OFMO 
Swan Hellenic Cruises, 

77 New Oxford Street. 
London WClAiPP- 


Please send me details of: 
Swan Hellenic Cruises □ 
Swan Nile Cruises □ 


go-getter 

If you took all the available 
luggage-saving gadgets on 
holiday you would need a 
container truck, preferably 
with its own generator. But 
some are well worth slipping 
in to your bags. 

One was this week deemed 
fit for a prince by its makers. 
Among the presents offered to 
Prince Andrew and Sarah 
Ferguson was a pocket TV 
only 4'£in x 2%in x lin, made 
by Citizen of Japan and 
launched on Royal Wedding 
day. 

Ideal for those who like to 
view on the move, it has a 
square liquid crystal display 
screen which is reflected, 
when the lid is half open, 
through a mirror. It is best 
viewed outside and there is an 
optional back-lit attachment 
for indoor viewing Reception 
is not good enough on all 
channels for concentrated 
bouts of viewing but, for 
keeping up with the latest 
cricket score or for use in taxis 
and restaurants, it is the latest 
in one-upmanship at £99.95. 
For stockists contact selected 
branches of John Lewis. 

Every year someone brings 
out a new travel iron. The 


newest idea is a lightweight 
perforated footplate that fits 
on the blower end of any 
Braun 1200 hairdryer. If you 
can stand the noise, you get 
enough heat for minimum 
holiday pressing — shirts and 
blouses but not suits. Called 
the Braun Solo, it has a plastic 
water spray-bottle and costs 
£ 6 . The Compact 1200 
hairdryer is £8.95: the two 
together £12.85. Available at 
branches of Underwoods. 

If you want DIY room 
service, the Hot Rod boils a 
cup of water in less than two 
minutes in Europe (it takes 
five minuts in America), it 
cuts out thermostatically if the 
water boils dry. Underwoods, 
£7.95. 

Razor sharp is the mind that 
came up with the small square 
of plastic which opens and 
dips together to become the 


• Above: the Braun Solo 
travel iron, which fits on the 

end of a Braun 1200 
hairdryer, £6 from 
Underwoods 

• Left pocket television 
made by Citizen of Japan 
and launched this week, 
4fcjnx2ftinx1in, £99.95 



HIMALAYAN 



Exodus Expeditions 

Tnk to Chomotqn 18 tfcr* 21 Set) 0370. 
Jwo acrors Nona vw ftontw IE cm. 01 
Hw £1230 

Teavte Tow o> SrtnM Photo S*zn 20 
*rp. os on Ei 390 . 

Ootos ol Mu nd non* mm Trots. 
Ateeiuts ft Cafcrf (ours aortmuo a «r 
(water txotivo C*» 

01-178 0151JZ4M 
« with to ow m. tsrfatadmto Mob 
Stout. isMtai sans ou 


SAIL TO THE 



» 


IN MAGNIFICENT STYLE ABOARD THE 
M.S. CONSTELLATION 

And havayourown floating summteoUhe great cufinary arts 
g rands tand aart on the high seas prepared by top chefs (ram 
tarlhe whole ot the exciting (bate. Europe and Australasia. 

This cruise offers total occefence Incredbte entertainment 


iniuuy.exciuSKityand 

Spsctac te . 

Leaving from Venice on 

January 6. the ConstetaMon 

amves at Remantfe on Jaruwy 
30, via Port Said, Suez, the 
Seychelesand Maritas. From 
thenunta Ftouaiy9tf» 
Co ns te teii on wrll taka up position 
right alongside the race course on 
race days, enabflng you to be 

actually pan otthspeatBst 

yachting chaflenge 6n history. 

The stop arrives backm Vance 
On March 6. wa Singapore, 

cotombo, Suez and pen Sad. 

But this cruise has more, very 
much more. Ever varymg 


Muring ballet, chamber music, 
jazz, ft* music and cafcaret 
Fashion shows, discos, danong 
and the latest »ns. Continuously 
c ha nging art exWntons with 
vKflks from imemationa9y famous 
arras. Aswefi as acasno, pod, 
saunas aid aB the usual taaMtes 
you mxtfd expect on a luxury 
Kner. A whoto host of actnrties wfl 
make this crufeeawondertufly 

me moratole exp e ri en ce. 

For those with only runted tone 
avaSabta. there are flyrsail 
combnatoensoi s hor ter duration 
to/ from various ports, 

A remarkable voyage -and tha 
finals of ths AMERICAS CUP! 


• Woo (worth's razor, packed 
(above) and assembled (right) 

neatest travel razor imagin- 
able. The size of a pack of 
book matches and weighing 
almost nothing it comes 
equipped with a Wilkinson 
Sword twin blade: 99p for a 
pack of five at iaiger 
Woolworths. 

Avalanche shovels and 


Continental 
Motoring ! 


- 1 C-h I [4^ 


Choree etf over 150 holds wuhin 
easy driving distance of Calais and 
Boulogne. 

Wltta j33ur octets, jmtl beglren a 
tree rape cassette or information pack 
far the area. 

Prices, from around £51 p.p^ 
Include hold acrct no wdauoo and 
breaklasLand return hovercraft cpms- 
tnfi with car from Dover [assuoung 4 
adults in party!. 

Rw a brochure see your oavd 
agentorphooeiOl 1554 706 L 



aluminium sand ladders are 
among bits of equipment for 
the more adventurous on offer 
in the new Saferiquip cata- 
logue, £1 from 13a Waterioo 
Park. Upper Brook Street, 
Stockport (061 429 8700). 


Beryl Downing 



old church 

St Mary-at-Lambeth has been 
transformed. Ten years ago it 
was derelict, the ancient 
church deconsecrated and due 
for demolition, its churchyard 
an overgrown, tip. The family 
tomb of the Tradescants, 17th- 
century gardeners and one of 
the most important-influences 
on English gardening, was 
barely discsnible behind 
heaped rubbish. 

But now the churchyard 
memorials preside over a 
mature flourishing garden 
filled with the plants of the 
Tradescants and their time 
and the church itself has 
become the first Museum of 
Garden History. It. was the 
indefatigable efforts of Rose- 
mary and John Nicolson. and 
the Tradescant Trust which; ' 
they founded, which put St 
Mary's back on the map and 
created this remarkable 
churchyard-garden. Until the 
end of July a Kew-spon sored 
exhibition. “Huguenots and 
Horticulture'', is also on view. 

The centrepiece of the 
churchyard is an elaborate 
knot garden, planted with a 
variety of curious plants asso- 
ciated with the Tradescants. 

In the outer compartments are 
buck’s-hom plantain and 
Bat's double red dianihus,and 
the extraordinary Plymouth 
strawberry which sprouts 
leaves on its fruits. 

The wide borders hold an 
abundance of historic flowers 
and shrubs and several well- 
grown trees including robinia, 
now thought to be a Trades- 
cant introduction. The blue 
spider-wort, another plant 





Tradescantia: bhie spider-wort; family tomb and knot garden 


which the Tradescants popu- 
larized in England,’ is perma- 
nently associated with .them 
by its scientific name Trades- 
cantia virginiana. Also called ' 
trinity plant because- of its 
unusual three-petal led 
blooms* this hardy species will ’ 
continue flowering brightly 
through into - September. - It 
likes welT-draihecr but moist 
conditions and: will thrive , in _ 
sun or semi-shade. * . 

Some of the plants are on 
sale and the museum shop- 
also offers an interesting select 
tion of cards and prints in- 
cluding early plant portraits 
from “Tradwcant’s Orchard’", 
a series of rich water colours 
now in the Bodleian Library. : 
The Museum of Garden ... . 
History (St Mary-at-Lambeth), 
Lambeth Palace Road, 

London SE1 (01-261 1891). 
.OpenMon^nMarn-3pm; 

Sun 10.30am-5pm. Entrance 
free. 


Francesca Greenoak 


WEEKEND TIPS 


• Walt until peas are in flower 
' and then water regularly. : 

• Take out tips of gooseberry 
- shoots to rednee risk of Ameri- 
can gooseberry mildew. 

• Take semi-ripe cuttings of 
passion flower. 

• Spraying runner beans all: 
over, as tobR as watering ' die 
rodis, helps setting. . . 

• Trim jayender with shears 

• If yoer garden is looking not 
: so much, luxnriant . as over-. 

grown, snipping and catting 
' back berean<L tbere rsmmqira 
all the difference. 

• It is'btiter. to gire.fiberal 
. weekly waterings, turning the 

hose on the roots, than a few 
strips every day,.. . 


What a difference 
a pond makes! 



Constellatioii Cruise 

TO THE AMERICAS CUP 

For full details and abrochure contact Kavourtdes (UK.) Lid.. 
50 PaH Mall, London SW1 . Tel: 01-930 7619 (Office hours) 




Short Breaks 


Special offers ttc 
Paris 

Amsterdam 
Hie Hague 
Brussels 
Geneva 

Lausanne 

Fnm £75.00 with flints 
byBCALfrom Garwick 
and two nights hotel 
accommodation. 

TxmeOffLtd 
Chesser Close 
London SW1X7BQ. 
01-2358070. 



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That’s two weeks on exotic WaikSti Beach, Honolulu, no 
less, for £599, inclusive of return flight, hotel plusastopover 
on America’s West Coast. 

Ask your Travel Agent. Or ring us on (0293) 776979: 

m CONTINENTAL AIRLINES TOURS 



Your health 
and well-being 
in good hands, 

Indoor and outdoor thermal swimming pools. ? '! 

Our thermal springs have ihm htghfsf minwmf content ^ 

af any in Swil:»rlonc. 


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THE ONLY GARDEN TRACTOR 
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1 



^__^^^LEICE5TER 
' Charnwood 

■^P^ So many country 
■r walks are, almost by 
^ definition, lens than easily 
accessible unless yon are In 
Che locality. On the other 
hand, who wants to walk next 
to a motorway? Charnwood 
Forest is bisected by the Ml, 
hnt.yon would hardly know it. 
Little hills and. dales provide 
Interesting walking, with 
something near being revealed 
at the end of every neM. 

When yon rise to the top of 
Deacon HID (only 248m) the 
picture changes to a much 
broader canvas. Loughbor- 
ough lies below, while the 
smnd^. brushstrokes across 
the lazy Trait betray the 
existence of Nottingham. The 
topograph points out much 
more, iadudfrig Lincoln 45 
.miles away. No sign of the 
motorway, which runs in a 
catlin g, bat junctions 22 and 
23 are mere miaates away. 

From the car park to the 
sooth of Beacon HU! climb to 
take in the view, at its best 
early in the day. Return 
through the outcropping rocks 
to the car part, and then strike 
off south-west to Ulrerscroft 



Lodge. The gaunt, imposing 
priory remains are off to the 
left. 

The radio masts are oar 
next target At Copt Oak, the 
smeU of chips betrays the pah 
kitchen pa the left: we tarn 
right, right and second right 
onto the B591. Half a mOe 
down the read, go left by 
Careens Rough and Charley 
Chapel to the Kippln Walk, an 
arame of trees leading hack 
onto Beacon Hill for another 
look round. This time, look 
sooth-west and trace the route 
just undertaken. The map to 
nse is OS sheet 129 (Notting- 
ham & LongJUraroagh). 

Iain Liddell 


THE TIMES SATURDAY JULY 26 1986 





OUT AND ABOUT 


Step ashore for treasure in miniature 


For many years Brownsea 
Island, in Poole Harbour, was 
a mysterious and forbidden 
place. Now its ruined villages, 
lost gardens and natural won- 
ders are open to anyone 
willing to take a 20-minute 
boat trip. 

h is owned by the National 
T rust, is l 'h m vies long by half- 
a-mile wide — a country in 
miniature with beathland. 
meadow, forest, marshland 
and two tiny lakes. 

Packed into those few acres 
are red squirrels, Sika deer, 
numerous peacocks and rab- 
bits galore. Both land and sea 
birds abound and the island 
contains one of Britain’s larg- 
est heronries. 

The boat trip from Poole 
costs £2 return for adults, 
£1.25 for children and sets you 
down amid battlements and 
turrets with Brownsea Castle 
to the left and the National 
Trust Information Centre 
ahead. There is a landing fee 
of 80p for adults, 40p for 
children. 

You can pick up a nature 
trail leaflet and dedicated 
nature lovers can join a daily 
guided tour of the reserve run 
by the Dorset Naturalists' 



• 'i&3 



Back to nature: Brownsea Island, jnst a boat trip away 


Trust. This lakes you into a 
part of the island closed to the 
general public and allows 
viewing from two bird hides 
(shelduck. teal and cormorant 
abound). The walk also takes 
you through the ruins of a 
pleasure garden created in the 
early 19th century. 

The National Trust publish- 
es a short history of the island 
starting with 1 1 ih-century her- 
mits and a visit from King 
Canute. It passed through the 


hands of various owners who 
indulged in necromancy, cut 
their throats or went bankrupt 
before it reached the golden 
age when it was bought by the 
van Raalte family at the 
beginning of the century. 

Under their ownership the 
castle and the island became 
the setting for some of Edwar- 
dian society's most glittering 
social occasions. Ana it was 
during this period that Major- 
General Robert Baden -Powell 


organized the first Scout camp 
on the island, in 1907. 

But in 1927 the island was 
bought by Mrs Mary Bonham 
Christie and the party was 
definitely over. She forbade all 
visitors and lived the life of a 
recluse determined "to give 
the island back to nature". 

When Mrs Christie died in 
(961 her grandson gave the 
island to the Treasury to pay 
estate duty and they gave it to 
the National Trust. 

A short walk from the quay 
is the church which was built 
in 1853 and is full of fine 
carved figures and lamps, 
screens and panelling brought 
from all over the world. 

Outside the energetic can 
explore the remains of the 
daffodil fields or search for the 
last traces of the village built 
for pottery workers in an ill- 
fated attempt to bring indus- 
try to the island. 

Jacqueline Mair 

Brownsea Island, Poole 
Harbour, Dorset (0202 
707744). 

The Dorset Naturalists' 

Trust tour starts at 2.45pm 
every day and costs 70p. 
Brownsea Castle Is not open 
to the public. 


OUTINGS 


CHILDREN'S BOOKS: 

Annual exhibition showing the 
National Book League's 
selection of the best of the 
year's children’s books - 
fiction and non-fiction. 

National Book League, 

Book House, 45 East HiR. 
London SW18 (01 -870 
9055). Today-Aug 2. Mon-Sat, 
I0am-6pm. Free. 

PUB GAMES AND REAL 
ALE: Annual event for real ale 
enthusiasts — 27 different 
varieties on sale — and those 
who enjoy silly games like 
dwile flonking, passing the 
splod, amber tossing and 
bat and trap. 

The Royal Oak, Chichester 
Road, Midhurst. West Sussex, 
(0730 814611). Today. 
11am-3.30pm; 6-1 1.30pm. 
Free. 

SIEGFRIED SASSOON 
CENTENARY: This afternoon, 
flower show, hot-air balloon 
rides, shire horses, craft stalls, 
vintage engines and 
machinery roi lowed by a 
dance. Tomorrow, more of 
the same minus the balloon 
rides and plus 

commemorative church service 
at Matfekl, vintage car 
competition and cricket match. 
Sassoon's house is open in 
the afternoon, with open-bus 
shuttle from Branch ley. 
Memorial Halt and Cricket 


Ground, Brenchley, Kent 

Today, from 2pm. 

Tomorrow, service at 1 1 .1 5am, 
events from 2 pm. 

WAR GAMES: Men-at-arms 
war game show at the fortress 
which dates back to 
Napoleonic times. Also rate- 
playing and fantasy games. 
Redoubt Fortress Museum, 
Eastbourne, East Sussex 
(0323 21333). Today, 
tomorrow, 11am-6pm. Adult 
70p, child 35p. 

BATTLE OF RADCOT 
BRIDGE: Re-enactment of the 
1645 battle performed bv 
members of the Sealed Knot, 
plus brass band, morris 
men, tug-of-war, parachute 
drsplay.heHcapter rides. 
Racfcot, Fartngdon, 
Oxfordshire. Further 
information: Alan Powell 
(0993 76451). Today, 
tomorrow, noon-6pm. Adult 
£2, child £1. 

COMMONWEALTH ARTS 
FESTIVAL: Extensive 
programme of musical, 
theatrical and fringe events; 
also talks, exhibitions, 
dance and other activities. 

City of Edinburgh, Princes 
Street Gardens, Assembly 
Rooms, Art Centre and 
other vBnues. Today — Aug 2. 
For further information 
telephone 031 -225 2424, ext 
6632. 

Jody Froshaug 


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Keep barbecues simple — but don’t be scared to use some imagination., says Shona Crawford Poole 

Fresh fish for the fresh air 


Diana LaatftMttar 


-:>• an-j kMtpifc j, 



' -s rsCCltfl?' 

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- -ur.2«rW>»? 

V '. -’jj- "with 

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iLi** 
' "* . ihiti ^ F* 


Simplicity, it seems to me, is 
the whole point of barbecue 
cooking. Which is not the 
same as saying that that 
anything more inventive than 
a charred sausage is inappro- 
. priate. What I do not see the 
•point of is using a charcoal 
grill, to cook fou packets of 
things. 

There are exceptions, of 
course. The camper in- search 
of breakfast can be forgiven 
for employing the barbecue as 
the only means available of 
satisfying a whim fin- poached 
eggs. On holiday there is time 
for such absurdities. But die 
idea of using great ingenuity 
and immaculate organization 
to construct a four-course 
meal m the garden seems 
contrary to the spirit of al 
fresco cooking. 

4 Fish is the simpie& erf all 
rfoods to barbecue and one of 
the most successful Oily fish 
- large and small — are 
especially succesful because 
they are self-basting and less 
likely to dry. Rows of tiny 
silver anchovies marshalled 
for cooking have great appeal 

Fresh sardines, once a nov- 
elty, are now widely available 
and excellent candidates for 
barbecuing Fancy grilling 
racks, square or circular, with 
sardine-shaped baskets to 
hold the fish are fun. They are 
also another gadget to dean 
and store. Instead, try thread- 
ing the sardines bead to tail on 
two . skewers hekf about 7cms 
(2ins) apart. 

L Gutting and cleaning sar- 
dines is optional Some cooks 
do, others don't bother. Salt 
them generously before grill- 
ing quickly ana serve them 
with lemon wedges to squeeze 
over the fish. 

Barbecuing is the best possi- 
ble treatment for very fresh 
mackereL Clean them, make 
severe) slashes down each 
side, cutting the flesh about 
half way down to the bone so 
that ft will cook as evenly as 
possible. Heat the grilling rack 
well and, just before cooking 
the fish; brush it with oil to 
discourage it from sticking. 

Tjmiqg will depend on the 



heat of the embers and the size 
of the fish, which should be 
cooked quickly on a steady 
high heat It is cooked when it 
flakes easily from the bone. 
Test with a pointed knife 
inserted into the thickest part 
of the fish. 

Sea bass flamed with fennel 

Servos six 

1 sea bass, 1.5kg (3tb) or more 

Olive oil to baste 

Salt ' 

Bunch of dried fennel twigs 

4 tablespoons pastis or 
Armagnac to flame 

1 lemon 

Cooking a big fish whole is a 
special pleasure of barbecuing 
Sea bass flamed with fennel 
twigs is a classic dish. Sea 
trout or small salmon can be 
barbecued and it is one of the 
better treatments for large 
formed trout. The same meth- 


od applies to all but the herbs 
can be varied. Primings from a 
bay tree are one possibility. 

The fish should be scaled 
and cleaned. It will look 
particularly handsome if, in- 
stead of slitting the belly and 
gutting it in the usual way, it is 
cleaned through the gills in- 
stead. The gill themselves and 
viscera can be pulled out 
through the gill flaps. 

Rinse the cleaned fish and 
use a sharp knife to make 
diagonal slashes along both 
sides. Cut about half way to 
the bone to allow the flesh to 
cook evenly. Brush the fish 
with olive oil and sprinkle it 
with salt 

Set the fish on an oiled grill 
(a special fish-grilling basket 
reduces the risk of breaking 
the fish) and cook it for about 
20 minutes, turning and bast- 
ing it frequently with oiL It is 
cooked when the flesh at the 


thickest part is opaque and 
. flakes easily from the bone. 

While the fish is grilling 
arrange a bed of fennel twigs 
in a large proof dish. Transfer 
the cooked fish to the dish. 
Sprinkle the pastis or the 
Armagnac over the fish and 
set light to the spirit If the 
twigs are laid loosely to allow a 

C draught, they, too, will 
. adding flavour . 

Serve with lemon wedges 
and a rice pillau flavoured 
with saffron. Skewers thread- 
ed with parboiled new pota- 
toes and fresh bay leaves and 
finished on the barbecue with 
a basting of oil or butter are 
another choice. 

Freshness apart the essen- 
tial quality of fish for making 
kebabs or brochettes is that it 
should have firm flesh 
that does not easily disinte- 
grate. Monkfish is ideal as arc 
scallops, and large uncooked 
prawns in their shells. The oil- 


based equivalent of snail but- 
ter makes a marinade that will 
be hard to better. 

Monkfish kebabs 

Serves four 

600 g(1 X lb) monkfish fillet 

2 doves garlic 

1 teaspoon salt 

1 tablespoon lemon juice 

4 tablespoons olive oil 

4 tablespoons finely chopped 
parsley 

Cut the monkfish into large 
cubes. Crush the garlic and 
mix it with the salt, lemon 
juice, oil and all but one 
tablespoon of the parsley. Stir 
in - the cubed fish and leave it 
to marinate for about 10 
minutes before draining the 
cubes and threading them on 
to flat-bladed skewers. Grill 
them over charcoal basting 
once or twice during cooking. 
Sprinkle with the remaining 
parsley before serving. 


EATING OUT 

Things ain’t what they used to be 




In his restless search for cheaper meals, 
Jonathan Meades revisits old haunts 







Of course there is such a 
thing as a free lunch. The trick 
is simply not to acknowledge 
that for every quid there must 
be a-quo, to rail to submit to 
the bnbery implicit in the very 
special bottle, to ignore the 
flattery of the expenses-fiteDea 
srooothspieler whom Topy 
Rivers, in a recent Toiler 
article, characterized as the 
“company wife". 

We’re. talking here about the 
grown-up world. Before we 
reach this world - in which 
who actually pays is a matter 
of form rather than relative 
wealth — we trudge through a 
world where a free meal is 
what we get from parents 
friends’ parents and 
that we habitually seek is the 
cheap meaL 

The -topography of the 
world is no doubt determined 
by generation. For my tot — * 
was at Rada at the fog end of 
the Sixties - it meant an 
endless .trek between 
Schmidt’s in Charlotte Street 
and Jimmy’s at the southern 
end of 'Fifth Street, between 
lie Budapest is Greek Street 


i 

mm 


and Daquise in South Ken- 
sington. 

At Schmidt’s in 1969 one 
could eat a massive meal of 
g oulash, fresh noodles and 
strudel with a bottle of White 
Shield for 5s 6<L That great 
Teutonic canteen, the surli- 
ness of whose waiters has 
trespassed into the collective 
conscious, closed in 1974. 

Had it hung on for just three 
or four more years it would 
have found itself at the van of 
modishness: it was, after all 
the archetype of the soi disant 
“brasserie”, the unwitting pre- 
cursor of Langau’s, where the increase which matches'll 
waiters, despite their boss s a house in, say, Kilbum. 
example, have still to learn the But by comparison with 

meaning of real abuse. most of Soho it is good value: 


grilled pork and spicy sausage. 
The decor is all-purpose Mag- 
yar - lots of forest green and 
stencilling and folkwoven 
nothingness. Wallet damage, 
realistically, £33 for two. 

I never stopped going to 
Daquise. You can loiter here 
all day with a coffee. The only 
“improvement” in all these 
years has been the installation 
of a flashier Gaggia machine. 
It is still run by autochthonous 
Polish Emigres; it is still full of 
those of their compatriots who 
didn't move to Ealing in the 
1940s. 

It makes no attempt to keep 
up with indices of the “cost of 
living”. The cheap set lunch is 
£3, the expensive one £3.50. 
There isa lovely cokl magenta 
-soup called chlodnik corn- 
increase which matches that of posed of cream, beetroot, 


The Budapest, which was a dishes such as prnsed boar’s 
couple of shillings more ex- head (Formula One brawn), 
pensive, commensurate with chicken with nee and paprika, 
Ss portions, closed even earfi- preposterously sweet pan- 
er It re-opened a year ago as cakes, are just die thing if you 
the OM Budapest. At least, a haven't eaten for a couple of 
olace of that name opened on days. , 

ate. What cost nine bob 1 7 The single best dish is one of 
years ago — a force-course cabbage stuffed with intensely 
lunch wth beer - now costs savoury minced mb. ganged 
ill near enough: a 24-fold up with sweet pickled cabbage. 


a house in, say, Kilbum. pickled cucumber and ham 
But by comparison with stock. There are pierozki. 
most ofSoho it is good value: literally “little pies”, 
dishes such as pressed boar’s thatsomerimes resemble foe 
head (Formula One brawnX world’s best ravioli. Last week 
chicken with rice and paprika, they were made with crisp 
preposterously sweet pan- pastry. The herring with potar 
i-afruc , are just the thing if you toes, onions and sour cream is 
haven’t eaten for a douple of sumptuous. Russian zro=y is a 


gem, and I pray that it will 
never change. Ordering from 
the carte — there4§no men u at 
night — and drinking Tatra 
beer, two of us spent £16.50. 
Service tends to be better 
nalured in the panelled base- 
ment than on the ground floor 

The service at Jimmy's is 
conducted by Cypriot oldsters 
who look like extras from foe 
garage scene in a film noir— T- 
shirts tucked into pleated 
trousers and plenty of stubble. 

The place mirrors them 
uncannily — plastic wood 
walls, a ceiling of magnificent- 
ly pocked decrepitude, yards 
of ad hoc wiring, ancient strip 
lights, wobbly fans. The entire 
basement is stained with nico- 
tine. The atmosphere of old 
Soho is plastered on impasto. 
The grub is in the Isthmian 
league of kebab cookery and is 
only to be broached by foe 
genuinely needy: £14 for two. 

Old Budapest 6 Greek 
Street London Wl (437 2006). 
Open Mon-Sat noon-3pm 
and&*11pm. 

Daquise, 20 Thurloe 
Street London SW7 (589 6117). 
Open daily lOam-i i .30pm. 


sort of meat loaf with mush- open daily lOam-i 1.30pm. 
single best dish is one of rooms and a heavy-duty gravy jimmy-*, 23 Frith Street 
k shiffed with intensely poured over iL The cakes (off- London Wl (437 9521). Open 
v minced oiz. eaneed sales also) are first rate. ’ Mon-Sat noon-3pm and 

ifwmoickleJcabbS. The piece is altogether, a 5-SO-llpm. 


Tim Waters, wine buyer for 
Oddbins, clearly has a prob- 
lem: “We know we are spkial- 
ists, the place to go for port, 
Armagnac, malt whisky and 
champagne. Yet we also sell 
an awful lot of Muscadet and 
Cotes du Rhone. We aren't the 
comer off-licence, but in im- 
age terms we are stuck be- 
tween supermarket high- 
volume, single-bottle buyers 
and consumers who buy in 
large volume, but in cases.” 

Oddbins' s original and in- 
dependent stance has attract- 
ed loyal and like-minded 
customers over the years. 
Their first branch, at which 
they billed themselves as 
“wine merchants 

extraordinaire”, opened in 
1963, and soon their rustic, 
no-frills shops, complete with 
fairground graphics, single- 
sheet wine list, wooden bins, 
cases and baskets of bottles 
piled high, became a popular 
High Street site. 

Their knowledgeable staff 
was another extra, again much 
appreciated by customers who 
were fed up. with the mostly 
churlish and ill-informed ser- 
vice they received at their 
local off-licence. 

But the UK wine scene 
changed dramatically in the 
late 1970s and early '80s with 
the advent of supermarket 
wine sales, and foe almost 
amateurish Oddbins approach 
began to look somewhat out- 
dated. It was inevitable that 
the company should be snaf- 
fled up by a more powerful 
concern. In May 1984, 
Seagram's, the giant American 
wine and spirits conglomerate, 
did just that 

Although still perhaps in a 
state of flux, the company's 67 
branches appear, so for, to 
have changed little under 
Seagram's wing, apart from 
upping their Seagram-owned 
brands, such as Mumro cham- 
pagne and Sandeman sherry 
and port, from some IS to 30 
lines. Or as Tim Waters puts 
it “Being part of Seagram’s 
has not at any time, in my 
opinion, compromised our 
principles”. 

Sadly, Oddbins by Post, 
their useful mail order service, 
has disappeared under 
Seagram’s auspices, and an- 
other temporary (lei us hope) 
change m foe company’s mo- 
dus operand i has been foe 
abandonment of foeir bi-an- 
nual list, which gave an in- 
valuable run-down on foeir 
wide range of wines and 
prices. 


Q Cooking 
Utensils © Tableware 
Write or call for our new 
1986 Catalogue. 48 pages 
(many in colour). Price £2.50. 

68/72 Maryfebone Lane, 
London W1M 5FFTe1. 01-935 0689. 

139/141 Fulham Road, 
London SW3 6SD. Tel. 01-581 8065. 





DRINK 


Dilemma 
of the 
no frills 
approach 


Efk; Beaumont 



On foe plus side, purchasing 
power has been much in- 
creased recently. Tim Waters 
now buys not just for Oddbins 
branches, but also for foe 
Gough (137-odd) and Agnews 
(70) chainsihat together make 
up Seagram RelaiL 
The great strengths in the 
Oddbins wine list have come 
in the past from countries 
such as Spain and Portugal 
But recently both foe Italian 
and Californian sections have 
expanded considerably. The 
Italian one, in particular, is 
now a real lour deforce ; with 
64 wines to choose from, and 
anyone buying 12 bortles of 


Italian wine before August 24 
will be given a free copy of 
Nick Belfrage's Italian wine 
book. Life Beyond 
Lamhrusco. 

My choice among their 
Italian whiles, is Masi’s *85 
Soave Classico (£2.79), whose 
positive, leafy-lemony smell 
and taste is very different from 
the usual dull dreary Soaves. 
Considerably more expensive, 
but worth iL is Masi's *85 Cot 
Baraca Soave Classico at 
£4.56. Do splash out on this 
wine, for its eleganu flowery- 
green flavour is a revelation. 

Of foe Italian reds, foe '83 
Monte Gnutella ValpoLicella 
Classico from Santa Sofia 
makes a seductive, flowery 
mouthful and is good value at 
£3.99. But this wine is again 
eclipsed by Masi’s soft, vel- 
vety, damson-like *83 Serego 
Alighieri Valpolicella 
Classico, priced at £4.69. - 

Of their two dozen or so 
Californian wines, a firm 
favourite is Monticello’s 
Chardonnay, whose '84 vin- 
tage with its rich, pineapptey 
style is, fora first-class Califor- 
nia wine, an excellent buy at. 
£7.69. ... 

With the strawberry season 
in foil swing inexpensive 
sweet wines to accompany 
these and other summer fruits 
are always much in demand. 
Oddbins have unearthed a 
ridiculously cheap Bulgarian 
Mehana sweet white whose 
unusual clean, spicy-grapey 
taste is practically given away 
at just £1.69 a bottle. 

Jane MacQuitty 


Rioja from 

CVNE 


“Deep garnet colour” 

“Fall, balanced wine, 
tinged wxdb oak” 

" E lega nt , witfa long 

finish...” 


"Unmistakably 

CUNE" 


From GUNE, a range of 
very fine wines including 
foe incomparable Imperial 
Reservas and Gran 
Reservas. 



*^d R2S&' ! 

V 

„ ... . 


• t, 




poiSP 

smaATtvE bs visfc -'im yke 


A 

DELICIOUS 

WHITE 

BURGUNDY 

In The Times on Monday 
Just &45.90 per case 











THE TIMES SATURDAY JULY 26 1986 


5fi£ barbican hall 


tu!vtGtwk*o.id*cvKit'- ■** woxoMics 


..hi / oat -:c ;■*- 


M|g Barbican Centre. Silk St. EC2Y 60S 


Open qBtfcir-»ih *»«**«« end teaduime name GofireSwABiifte. Bore ondBwndaCJt 
lore you os e«w Pn/£ariSun ewnmgs. Enjoy fainognifnnl wews of Big Ben ml (Moment from one nverode 


01-638 8891 /62S 9795 

Telephone Bookings I0am-8pm 7 days a week 



ROYAL FESTIVAL H ALL 





TCHAIKOVSKY fTtHIHU - UWJon . . . _ 

CiAbHHi 6wwt Riser Gouttmg iconfll M teui l m Bfens lira) 
TeMtooky Mattti Save Casnae Mm Am CWW MO 1 . 
Svie. Tm Nidcraeter Oienwe 1812 

(4 C5 £6 E7 £SS0 ffllaO £1050 Siyrnoorl Qdbeav Ud 


QUEEN ELIZABETH HALL 



, , P> jonn Time*. M Ban* as Janice* 

London Sieorwe PM Cmutty crro Kona U 4 M itfnt CRMbUim 
wMiCampeniciHiJonnCeMMMiP^oi AFjoy rate 

lot utfioarfl c>ana hi vcun JTO pte«a. OiKenno 
CWC 350 C 5 M C 750 TneSoum Bar* Board 


Lamm 5 eihmwaa.Miil 0 ml iconp. Oand Rnnaniaiieoar) DaM 

Ooaat •an^vn ^MrOumtOnl 'I’JbiaigoeSBi/mrl 
£ 450 i(U* 0 lrarl Cfi*i t 6.£3 Cl? The Sautn Ban* Board 


ROYAL FESTIVAL HALL 


RAYMOND GUBBAY praam SUNDAY 3 AUGUST at 7J0 pa 

WfCHAIKOVSY 


P March Steve: Capriccio baficn; 

Piano Concerto Nal? The Nwcreetox Soto 

Overture 1812 

with cannon and mortar effects 

LONDON CONCERT ORCHESTRA 
Cooduew FRASER GOULDING MALCOLM BINNS pan 
BAND OF THE COLDSTREAM GUARDS 

£4, £5. Du JJ. £8 JO. £9 JO, £10.50 HaB 01-928 3191 CC. 01-928 8800 


RA YMOND GUBBAY (rkob SUNDAY 17 AUGUST at 7J0. pen. 


MOSCOW VIRTUOSI 

VLADIMIR SPIVAKOV director/violin 

Mozart tSINEKIiilNE 

jEjSm NACHTMUSIK 

fll\W9 Bach VIOLIN CONCERTO IN 

\A>sV A MINOR, BWV 1041 

Vivaldi THE FOUR SEASONS 

£4. £5, £6, £7. £BJ0. £9.50, £10 50 Hall 0I-92J 3191 CC 01-928 8800 


VICTOR HOCHHAUSER promt! at etc ROYAL FESTIVAL HALL 

SUNDAY 10th AUGUST at 7.30 


POPULAR CLASSICS 


NEW SYMPHONY ORCHESTRA 
Introduced & conducted by: ANTONY HOPKINS 
Soloist: ANDREW HAIGH 

CHABRIEK -Eapa h a 

DUK AS ■ — The S orcerer* * Apprentice t 

GERSHWIN — ■!.«-— Ay ia Bloc « 

TCHAIKOVSKY Snn Like Setae 

ELGAR .„ — Pomp A Circunisnacc March No. 1 

RAVEL. Bolero, 

£3.50 £4 50 £5.50 £T £8 50 £9.50 £10 50 fno Kill 428 1(4(1928 8800 



RAYMOND GUBBAY presents 
gt the BARBICAN 
TOMORROW at 730 pjn. 

OPERA GALA NIGHT 
THOMAS ALLEN baritone 

§ *n Y AL PHILHARMONIC ORCHESTRA 
NICHOLAS CLEOBliRToo^oafir 
LONDON CHORALSOOEn 
FANFARE TRUMPETERS FROMt 
XHE SAND OF THE WELSH GUARDS 
See B/ri*30 pmd for fnD dcrai 


MONDAY NEXT 28 JULY at 7-45 pjn. 

BARRY DOUGLAS 
ROYAL PHILHARMONIC 
■te. ORCHESTRA 


ENRIQUE BATE Coad actor 

ALL SEATS SOLD 


TUESDAY NEXT 29 JULY at 7.45 pjn- 

MOZART 

l/AfeENGUSH CHAMBER ORCHESTRA 
k\lf GoodeetDr PHILIP LEDGER 
4^/ VOVKA ASHKENAZY piano 

See Bataan panel for fuB de»2s. 


WEDNESDAY NEXT 30 JULY at 7.45 p-m. 

STUART BURROWS SINGS 

Sum Borrow: wnh special gnesa 


Ann Mackay and Mark Borrows 
9, M FlCLHARMONIA ORCHESTRA 


ran BABMflSTA ORCHESTRA 

r BARRY WORDSWORTH 

IN A CONCERT OF 
POPULAR FAVOURITES 
See Bataan panel far faB deads 


THURSDAY NEXT 31 JULY at 7-45 pjeo. . 

POPULAR CLASSICS 

Tchaikovsky Romeo and Juliet Ov^ 
Bizet Carmen Snhr, Gershwin Rhapsody 
in Blue, Liszt Hungarian Rhapsody, 
9>fl| 1 CMMt TT Rnges from die South. 


t j. Strauss H Roses Bom the South, 

Pipr Pomp and Cucumstance Match 
Bmr No-4, Borodin Polovtsan Dances from 
Prince Igor. 

LONDON CONCERT ORCHESTRA 
Caatonr PHASER GOUUHSG MALCOLM BINNS piano 
£K£h £7, £B50.£m£tOSD 


Tooigfal 26 My 7.45pm BARBICAN HAL 

i LONDON SYMPHONY 


‘Die Mdstosmger’ Overture 
CeSo Concerto 
Symphony No 5 


W1I11AM BOUGHTON conductor 
ALEXANDER MICHEJEWcdo 


VICTOR HOCHHAUSER 
in assoc, with the So uth Bank Board 
presents at the ROYAL FESTIVAL HALL 


THE INCOMPARABLE 


CHINESE ACROBATS 

Direct from China in a dazzling 
display of acrobatic feats 
ONE WEEK ONLY 


TONIGHT 7*39 BBC SYMPHONY ORCHESTRA 

RONALD TOLLMAN Jen DEBUSSY 

PHYLLIS BRYN-JULSON Four Ordasred Pieces Op. 12 BARTOK 
SARAH WALKER The Nighting dc (sung in Rusotn] 

ELIZABETH LAURENCE STRAVINSKY 

IAN CALEY. JOHN BROCHELER, JULES BASTIN, - 
RICHARD VAN ALLAN. BBC SINGERS 
Please nose ctacar of co n d urg y and prognmiae 
£IL£5Jn. £4. £2.e0 

P>c Prom talk by John Drmnmnnd 4.15 


0050. £8-50. £750. £6, SAJ0. ELS0 
Box Office Td- H)-8 everyday inc. Sun 01-638 8891/628 8795 


Thursday 7 Aagnst at 7.45poi BARBICAN HALL 

SHAKESPEARE AND MUSIC 

with 

CHRISTOPHER PLUMMER 
SIR NEVILLE MARRINER 
OV. ‘A MIDSUMMER NIGHTS DREAM’. Mendelssohn 

•HENRY V .... .Walton 

ROMEO & JULIET ..Prokofiev 


ISO 


MONDAY 28 JULY 7J0 BBC WELSH SYMPHONY ORCHESTRA 
LOUIS FREMAUX Symphony No. 4 Talan - MENDELSSOHN 
ALUK HODD1SOTT* Sun, die pea hmaamr of 

PETER SCHIDLOF the unwene* ALUN HO PD1N OTT 

£8. £5SU. £4. £260 Kaold a Inly BERLIOZ 

Pre-Prom talk by Alan Hoddmatt 6J5pa 


MON AUG 25 TO SUN 31 E«gs. 7.30. Mats Sai.StmiOO- 
£3. 50. £600. £7 50. £9.00, £1 1 .50 from HaU 938 3I9U928 8800 


GLYNDEBOURNE 


TOURING OPERA. 

Verdi 


SIMON 

BOCCANEGRA 


new production daed from 1986 Gtyndeboutne Feswal 


Mozart 

DON GIOVANNI 

-one of ihe finest open pmdndioas of ihe pnt decade' DTU 


Britten 

ALBERT HERRING 


"anoperabccasiedy of the rates qnfity" TLS 


6-18 October 

GLYNDEBOURNE, Sussex Season 

21-25 October 

OXFORD. Apollo Theatre 

Bex Office OxtonllOM 5)244544 BoakingMfeoptn 

28 OcftAer-1 November 

PLYMOUTH, Theatre Royal 

BoxOffiocPtymoDdi (0752)669595 Booking opaa II 

4-8 November 

NORWICH, Theatre Royal 

Bex Office Norwich (0603) 628205 BaeUagmurertm 

11-15 No vember 

MANCHESTER. Palace Theatre 

Bo» Office Manchester (061) 236 9922 flwffiimupw 


RTTOto M iIra dnn e p fc ge aaiewneiequirodeadmndgeio 
PUBUOTY DCPAJUMENT, GLYNDEBOURNE TOURING OPERA, 
GLYNDEBOURNE. LEWES, EAST SUSSEX BN8 5UU 


tumtt i C^telwLCH436 

3870 CC 379 6B6 6 CC 379 
6*33 Oroup Sate* 836 3962. 

TOM HULCE 


THE NORMAL HEART 

by umr ttmii 


OPERA & BALLET 


i — , 


COUSKUM S 836 3161 


OC 340 6260 
-ncketnu&i«r 379 6433 

LONDON FESTIVAL 
BALLET 

Last 2 eerte Today 5-30 A 
7.30: 6» M te/C»iiPlw 





"The grttuspc a ji a rTproenonx the eruur drama of Shak afj eo j c l 
Henry V spoken by Christopher Plummer andaccompanied by 
comas fiom Waltons memorable film score, specially arranged 
by Sir Neville Marriner 

LONDON SYMPHONY ORCHESTRA 

£10-50. £8-50, £7-50. £6, £4-50. £3.50 
Bax Office Tei 10-8 every day me San 0 1 -638 R89 1 / 628 8795 



WEDNESDAY 2D AUGUST at 7-45 pun. 

SUMMER LOVE CLASSICS 


Sommer is the Giy concerts by the 

ACADEMY OF 
STMARHN- 
IN-THE-FIELDS 

Snday 3 Ab^dA TJOpm 

HADYN-THE CREATION 

sung in German 

SIR NEVILLE MARRINER conductor 

MARGARET MARSHALL soprano 
ANTHONY ROLFE JOHNSON tenor 
STAFFORD DEAN bass ACADEMY CHORUS 
Seat Prices £11, £9.50, £8^0, £7, £6, £5 


TdaSumkn .SLEEPING BEAUTY WAL7Z 

CABMEN SUITE 

RMfanmnbmr RHAPSODY ON A THEME OF 

lIVll - PAGANINI 

| k tB7 Grieg PEER GYNT SUITE Na I 

|k\W/ L Strmasa H BLUE DANUBE WALTZ 

R««I BOLERO 

LONDON CONCERT ORCHESTRA 
Caodmv CHRISTOPHER ADEY ANTHONY GOLDSTONE pm 


£5. £fc £7. £BJ0. £95(L £ia50 
Bax Offi* Vl-628 8795 C.C 01-6» 889! 




24 hoar credit aid xrria 
01-2(07200 No booking &e 


JOIN OUR FREE MAILING LIST. Vote nj Rtynsood Gubbxy Ltd- 
Frccpon 20, Laadon W1E 4YZ ino samp required) rr phone 01-Xl 4206 


Tuesday 5 Aagast 7.45pm 

VIVALM- THE FOUR SEASONS 

Coocoti Gross in B flat, Op4 No 1; A mmor t Op 3 
No 8; B minor. Op 3 No 10 
IONA BROWN director/vkjGn 
ADRIAN LEVINE 

JONATHAN REES, BRIONY SHAW violins 
Seat Prices £9, £8, £7, £6, £5 



NEW SYMPHONY ORCHESTRA 
Conductor DAVID COLEMAN 


ra a:« ■ in: | 


£6.00, £7.00, £8.50, £930, £10.50 fiom HiQ 628 8795/638 8891 


Wednesday 6 August 7-45pm 

RAVEL MaMereTOye 

SAINT-SA£NS cdlo Concerto No 1 in A minor 

FAURt — — Ei&gte 

BIZET Symphony in C 

SIR SEVILLE MARRINER conductor 

LYNN HARRELL ceDo 

Seat Prices £930. £8-50, £730. £6, £5 


VICTOR HOCHHAUSER 
hi kwoc. with ttee BARBICAN mitimEpreoegno 

PACO PENA’S 
FLAMENCO DANCE COMPANY 
Direct from Spain in a spectacular 

SPANISH FIESTA 

An electrifying p er f orm ance of Flamenco 
Guitar Playing, Singing and Dancing 
ONE WEEK ONLY TDE AUG QTO SUN ADG n 



Lili 




18-23 August 1986 

7.30pm, matinee 2.00pm 

THE GOLDEN AGE4 


A spectacular and exciting ballet mtkeca^ma 
style qf the Bolshoi, set in the-roaring 192$- 
ExJ&arathtgj soaringdaTiartgperforrpe&i 
Shostakovich’s brillumt score. > 






\x/Ai BMa BBESS 

nTlil i 'HMUM 


BO°.h 

x r O vV ' 





12-16 August 1986 

7.30 pm, matrnee 2.00 pm 

RAYMONDA 


TK* gEttermg classical fairytale baHctnich': 
fn a gnifirre nt mnsic is set in a mcdievul castle; 


'A tporklmg spectacle, Yuri Grigorookh Kas 
brOHandy preseroedthe beauty of \ _ 
this classical ballet.* 


DIVERTISSEMENT 
Programmes I and 2 ; 


including Les Sylphides, excerpts from /■ 
Cc^pelia, The Nutcracker, Swan Lake, ^ 
La Bayadere, Talisman, Spring Waters, ■?' 
The Golden Age, Le Coisaire, La FSe ^ 
xnal Gardee, Sleeping Beauty and - 1 4 : 

Spartacus (Art JI). . ‘ 


Details -from 
the box office 
tel 061-2369922 





Friday 8 Aagmt 745fxn 

MICHALA PETRI — Recorder 


E*g*. 7.45.Sua w 7.30. Mote Sxt A’Sccon 3. 

£6.00, £7.00, £8.50, £9.50. £1030 Sen EUl 628 8795/638 8891 


VICTOR HOCHHAUSER i 


i sf (kc BARJBICAN 


HANDEL Cooaeito Grbed in A m 

PKCOUS CofJtmjoo No 6 

VIVALDI Reroute Concetto hi C 

TELEMANN _.3aiteinFforReconlerBDdStrinai 

TCHAIKOVSKY Serenade for Strings in C 

KENNETH SCLUTO director 


SUNDAY 24 tb AUGUST at 7.30 

TCHAIKOVSKY 


MUTINY! 


Seal Prices £9. £8. £7, £6. £5 


THIRD HILARIOUS YEAR 


Sunday 10 Augnst 7.30pm 

VTVALDi Gloria 

BEETHOVEN Symphony No 9 ‘Choral’ 

SIR NEVILLE MARRINER conductor 
ARLEEN AUGER soprano ALFRBDA HODGSON mezzo 
KEITH LEWIS tenor JOHN TOMLINSON bass 
ACADEMY CHORUS 
Seat Prices £1 1. £9.50, £830, £7. £6, £5 
BARBICAN HALL 01-638 8891/628 879S 


Sake firm *Sw«a Late* ♦Na tci tkir Saite* Plane Coactrte No 1 

OVERTURE 1812 WITH CANNON AND 
MORTAR EFFECTS 
LONDON PHILHARMONIC ORCHESTRA . 
Conductor: GRAHAM NASH Soloist: ALLAN SCHILLER 
£6.00, £7.00, £8.50, £9.50, U0.50 Ban HaU 6288795M38 8891 


PHW ARD Box Office 
TM WSi Ft*w can 24- Hr 7 Daya 
« Booking 836 3464 Ora SMB 
930 6123 

Moofiai a. mu Thufs te Sat 3JIO 


pmB 


with ill, London PMHunnoMC 
Orrhmln until ISu AuaM. 



SALAD BATS. Cues 7-46 MU I JS«niW (Air Cmd) 8 ee 836 
Ttiur A Su 2-30. I 2238 KP 741 9999 Grp Sates 930 

I 6t23 Men (o Frl 8 Sal 8JSO Thurs 
A SU 3 .00 

JANE ROGER 

UPOTAiRE REES tm 

DOUBLE DOUBLE 

“It Brings back your fahn in 
modem tneatrr_n could becomt 
a cun- BBC 


NORMAN MEADMORE Ltd presents at (he BARBICAN 

jteBk Evening 7.45pm. Sat Matinee 3.00pm. 


HMS PINAFORE 


by W. S. Gilbert and Aitbur SuUvmi 

Wednesday 27-Satnrday 30 Ai^ust 




ROYAL OKRA HOUU Covrol 
Carden. WC2. OI-2dO- 
1066/1911 66 amMii anate 

ai.au from lOam on the day. 
THE BOLSHOI BALLET 
Today 2 00 & 7.30. Mon 7.30 
lean Hit Tn-rttUr. Tmr. Frl 7. SO 
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Thv CMden Aee. 







by the LONDON SAVOYARDS 
cdebratingJOHN REED’S 35th YEAR IN PROFESSIONAL 
GILBE RT AND SULLIVAN 
JOHN REED as Sir Joseph Porter KCB 

la Caddy. Kate Hobos. Justin Lavender. Thomas Lvrior, 
CC nd udfa Rflinhridgc. Kata Mrfamw. Mkhari Wateham. 
Jeremy Edwanfc. loadqn S a w a y a w fa Ohom. 

New COBcal QntMstra Jobn BarnxK (conductor) 

Saflr Gfcoi (rirarcographer) Tom Hawkesfdneaor} 

Tfcw Evm £6. £730. £9. £10. £11 . 50. SbL Mai. £4.£5.£63().£}l.£930. 
Bat Office TA ID* ray day im Sure W-63H W>]//>ai879.S 



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Paperbacks 


REVIEW 



testimony 


' matin ^ l : S i^ 

'°U)EN 





indeta i 

easo> - 

A Walk in the Night by Alex La 
Guma (Hainemann, £ 3 . 50 ) 

It is 23 yean since Nelson 
Mandela began his life sen- 
tence on Robben Island. He is 
now 68, but remains the 
national and international fig- 
urehead of an increasingly 
Woody struggle. 

No Easy walk to Freedom 
is a collection of 1 1 articles, 
one conference speech and the 
evidence and addresses from 
three trials. First published in 
1964, with an introduction by 
Oliver Tambo, it was subse- 



• NOV. 

1 °R THE 



Heinemann 
series. 

The contents span the cru- 
cial last 10 years of Mandela’s 
liberty. In 19S3 he wrote. 
There is no easy walk to 
freedom anywhere, and many 
of us have to pass through the 
valley of the shadow of death 
again and again before we 
reach the mountain-tops of 
ogr desires." 

His candour and purpose- 
fulness remind one of Martin 
Lather King Junior, who was 
using similar language in a 
cause which was not entirely 
dissimilar at that time to the 


situation m South Africa. But 
by 1963 King had secured a 
Civil Rights Bin and could 
sense the mountain- top com- 
ing into view. Mandela, on the 
other hand, sentenced during 
the Rivonia trial for conspira- 
cy to overthrow the South 
African Government by revo- 
lution, was on his way to 
prison, where he has lan- 
guished ever since. 

No Easy Walk to Freedom 
is an important book, having 
much in common wiih 
Eduardo Mondlane's My 
Struggle for Mozambique. Bal- 
anced against often depressing 
lists of abuses perpetrated 
against Africans by whites, 
there is always the refining 
optimism of a future; the 
“knowledge" that one day the 
reins of power will be seized 
by the black majority, usher- 
ing in a new age of political 
and moral maturity. Mond- 
lane was assassinated by 
Portugese agents before be was 
able to see Frelimo’s eventual 
victory. Once can only hope 
that Mandela is more 
fortunate. 

These articles provide the 
best introduction to Mandela. 
They are, as the jacket boasts, 
“his own words”, and discov- 
ering the rational and digni- 
fied man behind such 
powerful words is one of the 
pleasures of this book. 

In 1956 Mandela, along 
with 155 others, was tried in 



Cutting edge: Nelson Mandela — powerful candour and purposefulness in the cause 

the South African treason 
trials for drafting and signing 
the Freedom Charter. One of 
his fellow defendants was the 
late writer and journalist Alex 
La Guma. A Walk in the 
Night which first appeared in 
1952. is blurbed 'as “seven 
stories from the streets of 
Cape Town", but in feet it is 

one long novella (the title — 

story) ana half a dozen sketch- circumstances, gains our sym- 
es. while not great writing in paihy because of his 
the class of Gordimer, there is predicament 
more than enough quality here La Guma's book is riddled 
to make one anxious to read with violence, misery, fear 


some of his later work. 
"Michael Adonis, the col- 
oured anti-hero of A Walk in 
the Night kills a white man in 
a rage against “the system". 
Like Richard Wright’s “Bigger 
Thomas" in Native Son, Ado- 
nis is a figure consumed by a 
haired of the white man — 
“the bleddy boer“ -and his 
action, indefensible iu normal 


and squatour. and makes an 
interesting fictional compan- 
ion to Mandela’s more sober 
but equally forceful non- 
fiction. 

Heinemann has have long 
pioneered the publishing of 
African writing, i am pleased 
to see that they have it has 
now begun to reissue some 
books with covers which pos- 
sess some individuality: previ- 
ous jackets have all appeared 
drably uniform in design. 


Ambivalence in a 
world of violence 



[EATRE 

l A NC HESTER! — 


5 Ai 


So Far From God, by 
Patrick Mamham (Penguin, - 
2335) 

When Patrick Marnham set 
out for Nicaragua, Guatemala, 
and El Salvador, be had two 
objectives: to assess for him- 
self the size of the Hispanic- 
Communist threat to North 
America and the “defiance 
offered to the most powerful 
country in the world by these 
tiny countries". In a lighter 


ed long ago in medieval Spain. 
In the Spanish city of Granada 
stands the Church of the Lady 
of the Alhambra, “a Christian 
shrine surrounded by a Moor- 
ish palace, the character of 
neither being compromised". 

In the author’s view, the 
Spaniards who sailed for New 
Spain in the days of Cortes 
and Magellan “took that sinis- 
ter ambivalence with than” 
and imposed it on the indige- 
nous and savage Aztec culture 



Caryl Phillips 

Australia makes it 
short and sharp 


at i yim vuiy luimuiw . **• » — 

- * Vm he was also looking for which they found in the New 

3. matinee 2.0)h tie “stained white suits and World. The three deeply en- 

_ ^ „ . .Wun iIotm miicir’* cn Irmi*. timirhnl rpficnnns have been 

ft’MONDA 


so long 
Central 


r.- sc : + tcctoda 
..■s. . . Yu-. 


RTISSEMEM 
famines 1 sndi 

O'.’r.i.-ta.Sw* 1 * 

t • 5 ?r. ■!***■ 

\_C '[ '■ i'or-ics-fc® 


...... ^nV) 

j6 3S-- 



cheap dance music 
associated with 
America. • . _ 

He speaks Spanish, is Ro- 
man Catholic, and has a 
positive liking for pot-holes in 
the road and the prospect of 
danger - attributes clearly 
necessary for a serious student 
of Central America. 

So Far From God was 
awarded the Thomas Cook 
Travel Book Award last year, 
but this is no ordinary travel 
book. If anything, it acts as a 
strong disincentive to travel- 
ling in this semi-ruined corner 
of the earth. On the other 
hand, if you have a taste for 
; ~tniral slums, locked-up hotels, 
-army road blocks, frequent 
baggag e searches and a seem- 
ingly endless supply of head- 
less corpses in the local 
rubbish dumps and rivers, this 
is the place to go* 

■ Mexico holds few surprises. 

Its 60-y ear-okl government is 

still officially atheist while the 
population has tripled since 
1953. Corruption and the 
pursuit of wealth are rife and 
the country cannot pay its 
debts. 

It soon becomes clear, how- 
ever, that the sources of 
Central America’s instability 
are older and deeper than 
those posed by 20th century 
economics. Those sources ex- 
plain an existing emotional 
ambivalence ■ towards the 
modem world which originat- 


trenched religions have been 
uneasy bed-fellows for 400 
years and form a regional 
triumvirate that the Roman 
Catholic Church, confronted 
everywhere by hostile dicta- 
torships, can no longer hold 
together. 

Travelling down the Isth- 
mus (a geological fault regular- 
ly shaken by earthquakes and 
supposedly dead volcanoes) it 
seems, the author points out, 
as though nature has provided 
the appropriately violent un- 
derworld for the endless mas- 
sacres and Mafia-like power 
struggles taking place on the 
surface. 

The irreconcilable attitudes 
are most clearly expressed by a 
Salvadoran woman, Mrs 


Hernandes. She works for a 
commission on civil rights 
and her job is- to collect 
atrocity figures. When asked 
about the government-spon- 
sored death squads she gives 
the cryptic reply: “Our gov- 
ernment needs the death 
squads. It needs to put fear 
into people ” 

So Far from God is an 
important and disquieting 
book. Full of wryly observed 
incidents, it offers a convinc- 
ing explanation for Central 
America's terrible problems — 
problems that spring from an 
explosive mix of people 
spawned in a lawless tradition. 
It holds an ugly warning that 
lawlessness and bloodshed al- 
lowed to run unchecked are 
probably irreversible. 

Isabel Butterfield 


The Australian Short Store: 

An Anthotogy from the 1890s 
to the 1980s, edited by 
Laurie Heraenham (University 
of Queensland Press, 

£8.95) 

Strong-Man from Piraeus 
and other stories, by George 
Johnston and Charm lan 
Ctitt selected by Garry 
Kinnane (Penguin. £3.95) 

Australia has a rich 
tradition of short 
story writing. This 
has little to do with 
its English heritage 
— the English have 
seldom excelled at 
_ short story wiring 
— and much to do with the 
influence in the early days of 
the Celtic nations, particularly 
the Irish. During the first 100 
years Irish convicts and free 
settlers comprised one in four 
of the population. They were 
poor and illiterate — as were 
most of their fellow immi- 
grants -and this gave rise to a 
society which had little use for 
the written word and much 
use for the ballad, from which 
the short story derives. 

The anthology from the 
University of Queensland 
Press begins in the 1 890s, with 
a deliciously cynical piece 
from Henry Lawson, the fa- 



Fear and lesbian loneliness 

S FICTION 

about it; they are jnstperpetn- icbews is abort to “<*««** 
■llv bemareed hv H. and the woman living alone in 

ally bemused by SL an Elgin Crescent garden flat 

Although some of tip ina- spent i s a )ot of her evening 
dents of then- lives do involve barricading herself from the 
warmth, it fa i always ti»e 1 Tear Notting Hill Rapist. 

a of what is about to be taken The stories are about all 

s away from them which is smts ^ ^men bat they are 

o uppermost m their munis. So M selfeoMdonsIy outsiders, 

b the tene/y old woman waiting They |j ve basements or 

d for a visitor is already worried attics, but never in the more 

it that her gnmd-danghter may confident spaces in between, 

o be offhand; the two women 

a, serving tea in a cafe are Alffl® BfifllCS 

Incidents Involving 

Warmth, by Anna Uvia 
(Onlywomen Press, £235) 

Tbe author of these lesbia 

feminist love stories describe 

herself as a woman “with n 

sign of a pension plan, bealt 

insurance or mortgage", as 
most of her characters also 1 
that description. Yet they i 
not rejoice in that freedou 


ther of the Australian short 
siory, who saw the outback as 
Hell while others persisted in 
seeing it as Heaven; and 
through 2S entries it traces the 
development of the literary 
form to the present day. The 
result is a highly priced but 
highly recommended volume. 

Strong-Man from Piraeus is 
a find. Garry Kinnane is 
writing a biography of George 
Johnston, and came across 
this collection of unpublished 
stories while ferreting among 
his papers. 

Johnston, who died in 1 970, 
was a respected journalist and 
war correspondent who came 
to London in the late 1940s, 
intending to continue his 
newspaper career and write 
novels jointly with his wife 
Charmian Gift. After a few 
years they quit journalism and 
headed for Greece, eventually 
returning to Australia, where 
Johnston published a trilogy - 
My Brother Jack. Clean Straw 
for Nothing, and A Cartload of 
Clay — which earned him a 
lasting reputation. 

They were a talented and 
attractive couple — Kinnane 
claims there was something of 
the Zelda and Scon Fitzgerald 
charisma about them. This 
selection of stories is evoca- 
tive of their life in Greece, 
particularly the last two by 
Johnston. Both are autobio- 
graphical, one a haunting 
story in which he discovers he 
is suffering from tuberculosis, 
the other a . satire on the 
various “intellectual" passers- 
through the island of Hydra 
who managed to waste both 
his time and his money. 

Linda Christmas 


Correction 
We regret the error in last 
Saturday's paper, in which a 
photograph of V.S. Naipaul 
was used instead of Shiva 
Naipaul, author of An Unfin- 
ished Journey, published by 
Hamish Hamilton. 


ON THE AIR 


Tough guy’s tenderness 


FILMS ON TV 


James Cagney was an unusual 
and reluctant star. To genera- 
tions of film-goers he was 
Hollywood's ultimate gang- 
ster-fast talking, amoral and 
brutal. In life he was pleasant, 
polite, relaxed and private. He 
treated filming as “just a job, 
that's all, no stress, no strain", 
all the while yearning to be a 
farmer and breeder, which he 
eventually became. 

He shunned the glamorous 
Hollywood set lived unost- 
entatiously and remained de- 
votedly married to the : same 
woman for more than 60 years 
until his death in March. 

What toughness be exhibit- 
ed was usually reserved in 
fighting his studio. He took on 
Warner Brothers in the courts, 
and won, a victory which 
made the first dent into the all- 
powerful oppression of the 
Hollywood studio system. 

Cagn ey became a screen 
gangster by accident. Original- 
ly a song-and-dance man in 
New York vaudeville shows 
and a minor actor, Cagney was 
spotted by Al Jolson in a 
short-lived Broadway play. 
Jolson bought the film rights 
which he sold to Warners, 
stipulating that Cagney was to 
repeat the role. 

He first played a gangster in 
his fifth film Public Enemy in 
1931. but its success was 
enough to saddle him with a 
role type which was to make 
him one of Hollywood's most 
popular and highest earning 



Musical . „ 

Ruby Keeler (top) and' Joan 
Blondefl in Footiight Parade 

stars of the 1 930s and 1 940s. 

He played the gangster in 
only a minority of his more 
than 60 films, but they have 
unfairly dominated judge- 
ment of his career. He was a 
far more versatile and more 
subtle actor than he is usually 
given credit for. 

Channel 4's excellent 19- 
film season, starting next 
Thursday, demonstrates bis 
wide range. It starts with a 


RECOMMENDED 


High Noon (1952): Gary 
Cooper as lone marshall 
against the baddies in tense 
western classic, enhanced by 
Grace Kelly and a haunting 
theme (BBC2, tonight, 

10.05- 1 1 .35pm). 

The Little Foxes (1941): 
Mesmerizing Oscar-winning 
performance by Bette Davis as 
the evil wife jn Lillian Heilman's 
drama ot a doomed southern 
family (Channel 4, tomorrow, 
10.15pm-12.15am). 

In This Our Life (1942): Bette 
Davis again, this time in fun 
melodramatic flow in rise and 
fall story of a selfish woman. 
Directed by John Huston 
(BBC2, Fri, 11. 50 pm- 1.30am). 

splendid musical, Footiight 
Parade (Channel 4. Thurs, 

5.05- 7pm). The amiable but 
slight plot, with Cagney as a 
Broadway producer, dimaxes 
in a series of sumptuous 
musical numbers, in the last of 
which he demonstrates that 
gangsterism's gain was danc- 
ing's great loss. 

The season also includes 
Yankee Doodle Dandy ; the 
musical which, won him his 
only Oscar, White Heat, his 
most disturbing pan as a 
mother-fixated psychopathic 
killer and One. Two. Three, in 
which he shows wonderful 
comic timing in his last full 
role. 

Marcel Berlins 


The wholesome frontier 


TELEVISION 


The BBC anticipated provid- 
ing an exdnsive daily specta- 
cle of international apoliti cal 
harmony and the pursuit of 
physical excellence from Edin- 
burgh. Instead the Common- 
wealth Games, which dom- 
inates tire BBC's scheduling, 
will resemble an athletics 
meeting conducted under the 
rules of apartheid. 

The next biggest chunk, 
George Washington (BBC2, 
Sun, 9.45-1 1.25pm; Mon and 
Tues, 9-lOpm) is good, un- 
ashamed family program min g. 
Its hero, the architect of 
American independence, is 
handsome, red-blooded and 
seemingly incapable of bad 
thoughts or deeds. Violence fa 
minimal, racism glossed over 
and sex occurs behind dosed 
bedroom doors. 

' Barry Bostick stars as the 
rugged, dean-cot son of the 
frontier who moves easily from 
humble beguurings.to the helm 
of a rich and fertile emerging, 
nation. Jadyn Smith is perfect 
as the prettily-dad object of 


his unrequited love; a shrunk- 
en James Mason cameos as 
the ill-fated General Brad- 
dockand there's a host of 
brightly dressed extras. 

The script, by American 
network standards, is literate 
and intelligent; the settings 
gloriously autumnal and the 
Red Indians more flamboyant- 
ly attired *b»a Mohican punks 
in the Kings Road. 

Tire bewigged, begowned 
. barristers of England and 
Wales come in for skilful 



Barry Bostick: clean-cut hero 


character assassination in 
Scales of Justice (1TV, Mon, 
830-9pmX the first of a lively 
four-part Yorkshire Television 
documentary. 

. Pompons, arrogant, white, 
middle-aged, middle-class 
males with little interest in the 
welfare of their clients or 
justice are the charges levelled 
at this self-regulating elite. 

Child-bearing will cease to 
be a female preserve if re- 
search by Professor John 
Money, of the John Hopkins 
Medical School in Washing- 
ton bears fruit, the jaunty Dr 
Miriam Stoppard discovers in 
Where There's Life (ITV, 
Wed, 7-7 JOpm). 

Seven years ago Margaret 
Shannon gave birth to a 
perfectly normal girl after 
having had a total hysterecto- 
my. The fertilized egg had 
planted itself in the abdomen 
walk a method of child -bear- 
ing that men could, in theory, 
emulate. Dr Stoppard finds 
plenty of men in her studio 
audience willing to undergo 
the ultimate role reversal. 

Bob Williams 


Operatic delights in store 


RADIO 


A rare treat this afternoon for 
all opera lovers — and even for 
those not too sure about 
opera. No one could sit un- 
moved through Puccini’s 
Tosca (Radio 3, 3-5pm) — still 
less in this classic 1 953 record- 
ing, with Maria Callas as 
Tosca and Tito Gobbi as 
Scarpia. These two legendary 
performances are backed by 
the forces of Milan’s Teatro 
alia Scala under Victor de 
Sabaria. Tosca is the first in a 
series of nine starry classic 
opera recordings to be run 
over the coming weeks. 

Radio 4 has a couple of 
interesting plays coming up. 
The Saturday Night Theatre 
production is A Darkening of 
the Moon (7-S JOpm) a wide- 
ranging autobiographical 
piece by James Follett. At the 
age of 14, the author was 
pushed into a gorse bush, his 
eyes were scratched and in- 
fected, and as a result he was 
blind for four years, until a 


successful operation restored 
his sight. 

During his blindness' he not 
only learnt braille — and fell in 
love for the first time - but 
also, became fascinated by 
radio drama. It will be nice to 
hear someone singing the 
praises of radio drama in the 
course of a radio play. 

The other big production on 
Radio 4 is the Monday Play, 
Conflict of Doubts (8. 1 5- 
9.45pm) by David Buck. The 
subject is Adolf Hitler’s obses- 
sive involvement in the 1936 
Berlin Olympic Games and in 
Leni RiesensiahTs filming of 
the event — which was done 
against the wishes of Goeb- 


bels. We can expect a Hitler 
rather different from the rant- 
ing paranoiac of later years. 
He is played by John Castle. 

The Thursday blockbuster 
has Trevor MacDonald (an- 
other rare radio appearance?) 
presenting The People Who 
Came (Radio 4, 7.20-9pm) — 
features, interviews and a 
phone-in, all focusing on the 
Caribbean community in Brit- 
ain. 

A Shropshire Lass (Radio 
4, Tues, 7.20-8pm) is the 
mostly sad life story of Mary 
Webb, the novelist and na- 
ture-mystic. 

Nigel Andrew 











CHESS 

Hunter stalks spider man 


... - With the big match in London 
j - almost upon us. here are two 
extracts from the p ^!. ous 

'*S*^*.' Kasparov-Karpov cfash illiis- 

inning the particular areas of totrpo 

expertise of tr 
protagonists. 

s White: K2rpoy ' 


game, 

tables 


the two 



Black: 

Kasparov. Game 4, Moscow 
1985. 


.’■‘A*'.*# 

wSf 




In the eleventh 
Kasparov turned the 
on his opponent. 

White: Kasparov Black: 
Game II, Moscow 

1985. 

mim* 


Kasparov found this 


Rxd7 24 MS* I0i7 



Now 

coup: 

23 QxdTB 
25 Ba4+ 


Karpov resigned. 

A dramatic finale. After 
25...g6 26 Rxd7 Ba6 27 Bxc6 
Qxc 6 28 Rxf7 is checkmate. 

Dominic Lawson made the 
most penetrating comment to 
me concerning the two 
players' styles: “Karpov 
weaves a fine mesh of moves 
with the relentless care of a 
spider building a web while 
Kasparov hunts the King 
with unrestrained ferocity." 

Raymond Keene 


Competition winners 


. - »f 1 




57 Odj* JtJ* 

■ ■' 59 IW+ m 

• if 59.~Re6 

" •[> > Os 8 *- 

n otM 

yC> 62 W* 


58 RM our* 

60 Qc4 and 




xn 

Od 7 


91 »7 
S3 OeS 


m 




Kasparov resigned 
„ - ^f63-Qd8 64 Qc5+ Re7 

65 Rf4+ Ke8 66 

"i 67 Bg6+ or 63...Re7 64 Qf4+ 

white wins 


B*.”- 


m°65 Qb8+. 
easily in both cases. 



The solution to The Tin»« 
Ahubraic Competition, pub- 
lished on Jqjy 12. 1- Ol*4+ 

Nxr4 2. Ne7 n»at« or 1-Q?j + 
Kh8 2. Qg7 mate. Some fell into 
the trap! bad W* 1. Qg4+ 
Nxg4 2. Nh6+?7 Ttes g Jg 
mate because of move 2— Nxhfc 

The first prize of a season 
ticket to the World Chess 
Championship Iu London pies 
to EJJ. Alms of Grove House, 
Whitley, Warrington. 

The winners of the five one- 
dav tickets to the championship 
are: EJ\ Stent, FJL McGough, 


R. A. Soloman, S. Ednie, 
M-A Nesbit. rickets Tor the 
musical Chess were won by 
J.O. Williams. Copies of 
Betsford Chess Openings ware 
won by R- Prestwicb, 

W. Alkemade, M-P- Gill, 

S. M- Walter. A.G. Roberts, 

A. Girvau. R- Cropper, 
J. Zivkovic, R.W. W bitty, 
A. Aaroio, H, Garfath, 
J.A. Felton, D- Lee, 

M.A. Macdonald Cooper, 
P.C. Griffin, A. Bates, 
G.J. Murfet. S.L. Blrgh, 
&E. Shay, S. Parmenter. 


BRIDGE 


Fright at the end of the tunnel 


Tunnel vision may be a 
neologism, but at least the 
sense is unmistakable. At 
Bridge the term aptly de- 
scribes a declarer who makes 
no effort to unravel the com- 
position of the unseen hands. 

Rubber Bridge. North- 
South game. Dealer North. 

4 011098 
V K 9 2 
v KQ4 
• 73 


• 42 

71043 
f> 7B53 

• J88S 


N 

W E 
S 


• A73 
<7 J7G5 
0 9 8 

• AK92 


• K65 
<7 AOB 

C- AJ 102 

• 010 4 


w- 


N 


NO 

NO 

No 


NO 

14 

3NT 


NO 


1> 

HP 


any thought, declarer played 
the +10. so the defence made 
four dub tricks to go with the 
Ace of Spades. One down. 

“I only had one point, 
partner", said West smugly. 
North was not amused. “I 
suppose if East had actually 
shown you his cards, you 
might have got it right." 

South's error is a common 
one. Without East's bid, tbe 
play of the +10 would be 
correct in deference to the 
odds. 

The second band came 
from the same rubber. . 

North-South game. Dealer 
South. 

4 J 7 
A4 

O K865 

4 A0785 


Opening lead ?3 




4 1084 2 
", J 10 3 2 
v 2 

4 J942 


N 

W E 
S 


4 A96S3 ’ 
/? KS8 
. J 9 7 3 
4 10 


doubtful mom. 

o! rasped 


A 

Red tack 


- by ■ 

Souths 


.. had enough points for Hs 

Strang No Trump but 'tad 

meeounted them. 

Declarer took the lead with 
dummy's S?K and attempted 
to devdop ihe spades. East 
pounced on the +8, and 
switched to a nonchalant +2. 
Without giving the matter 


4 K Q 
7 0765 
C- A Q 104 
4 K 83 


W 


N 


NO 

NO 


3NT 


No 


1NT 

No 


Opening lead 42 
“Surely this must be the 


end of ray torment”. North 
thought as he displayed his 
handsome dummy opposite 
his partner’s strong No 
trump. East took the +A and 
returned the suit. Declarer 
tried the clubs, greeting East s 
failure to follow lo the second 
round with a mournful sigh. 
When East contributed the 
09 on his OA. his face lit up. 

“Lucky I was paying care- 
ful attention", he said as he 
cashed the OQ. When West 
discarded a heart. South s 
bewilderment was ptufbl to 
behold. 

Of course. East's so called 
“obligatory false card of the 
09 was a snare that in a 
different setting might have 
deceived more accomplished 
players than South. But here 
it should have fooled no one. 
because if it were a true card 
it would place East with two 
singletons, distinctly against 
the odds. 

North opened his mouth to 
speak, but sensibly decided 
that a little sustenance from 
the bar would be a more 
agreeable way to reduce the 
pain. 

Jeremy Flint 


t 


CONCISE CROSSWORD NO 1012 

Prizes of the New Collins Thesaurus will be given for the firei two 
correct solutions opened on Thursday. July 31. 1986. cnines 
should be addressed to The Times Concise Crossword Com- 
petition. I Penninglon Street. London. El 9XN. The winners and 
solution will be announced on Saturday, August — l ■ oo. 

ACROSS 
I Hellespont (II) 

9 Flier (7j 

10 Song words (S) 

11 Tool set 13) 

13 Scots girl (4) 

16 Insipid person (4) 

17 Discernment (6) 

18 Sole (4) 

20 Portent (4) 

21 Postpone 1 3.3) 

22 Leak out (4) 

23 Skim (4) 

25 Social insect (3) 

28 Workmen groups (5) 

29 Plug converter (7) 

30 Half boaid (4.7) 


DOWN 

2 Incorrect (5) 

3 Assignation (4) 

4 lnfbrmcr<41 

5 Jaunty rhythm (4) 

6 Tympanic mem- 
brane (7) 

7 Blenheim victor 1 11) 



SOLUTION TO NO 101 1 
ACROSS: 1 Tussle 
ish 10 Honest It Fcm 
neva 17 Stamen 19 Istanbul 
Fag end 25 Enough 26 Din 


5 Actual 8 Pap 9 Gar- 
tm 12 Disraeli 14 Ge- 


22 Tows 
27 Deadly 


24 
28 T- 


DOWN: 2 Usage 3 Soignee 4 Ephedra 5 
Aphis 6 Tonga 7 Absolve 13 Rut 15 En- 
slave 16 Van 17 Salient 18 Antioch 20 
Ahead 21 Biddy 23 Wager 

t/r R. fi. (htkicnuii' Radnor Drive. Chtirchtawn. 
Smilhftni. Mmmidc: and 
Mr\ \t. Beaton. Did Utwfnrd Collage. 
Inncrinrhen. i’evtdesliirc. 


I Dicminiii » » ■ ■ « lJ, 

8 Chinese needle treat- 
tncnt(ll) 

12 Picnic cold con- 
iainer(6) 

14 Chance to speak (3) 

15 Reddish brown (6) 

19 Heraldic diamond 
(7) 

20 Race start (3) 

24 Children's bingo <S) 

25 Italian sparkling _ 
wine town I4j 

26 Domesticated (4) 

27 European perch (4) 

SOLUTIONS TO NO 1 006 (last Saturday's prize concise) 

ACROSS: 1 Aiguitlcttc 9 Nothing 10 Elfin 11 Our 13 Am 16 
Neve 17 Viable 18 Tape 20 Pact 21 Bookie 22 Coop 23Plie 25 
Pea 28 Dolce 29 Nautili 30 Amontillado 

DOWN: 2 Inter 3 Unit 4 Logo 5 Ewer 6 Taffeta 7 Infentidde 8 
Anaesthesia 12 Unlike 14 Eve IS Parole 19 Problem 28 Pep 24 
Laird 25 Peon 26 Ami 27 Hull 


Name — 
Address. 







CONCERTS 

PROM PLAY: Sir John Pritchard 
conducts the BBC Symphony 
Orchestra in Elgar’s Violin 
Concerto, with soloist Ida Haendel, 
andBruckner's Symphony No 4 
for the twelfth Promenade Concert of 
the season. Albert Hall. 

Wednesday 7.30pm 


FILMS 

PAW LORE: Fay Wray screams 
beautifully as the girl in the clutches 
of the world's most famous 
monster as the 1933 horror classic 
King Kong (PG) returns in a new 
print struck from the original 
Btive. Cannon Premiere (01- 
4470). From Friday. 


TIMES CHOICE 


DANCE 

CRIMEAN WAR: Yuri Grigorovich 
is the choreographer of The Golden 
Age, the third production of the 
Bolshoi Ballet's London season. Set 
in the Crimea in the 1920s, it is the 
story of a two men's rivalry for a cafe 
dancer. Royal Opera House (01- 
240 1911). From Wednesday. 


FILMS 


OPENINGS 

COBRA (18): Sylvester 
StaJlone as a Los Angeles cop 
in a violent thriller. 

Warner West End (01-439 
0791), Cannon Haymarket (01- 
839 1527). From Fri. 

DESERT HEARTS (18): A 
discreet, splendidly acted story 
of lesbian friendships. 

Screen on the Hill (01 -435 
3366). Electric Screen (01-229 
3694). Cannon Tottenham 
Court Road (01-636 6148). 
From Fri. 

SELECTED 

SID AND NANCY (18): Alex 
Cox's subdued elegy to punk 
rock. 

Lumiere (01-836 0691), 

Camden Plaza (01 -485 2443), 
Gate Netting Hfll (01-221 02 20). 

HANNAH AND HER SISTERS 
. (15): Woody Allen's assured 
( comedy-drama, chronicling the 
. lives and loves of Hannah, her 
J sisters, and various partners. 
Odeon Leicester Square (01- 
930 6111). 

HALF UFE (PG): Quiet but 
powerful documentary about 
the effects of America's 
nuclear tests on the Marshall 
.Islands during the 1950s. 

I Metro 1 (01-437 0757). 

„ CONCERTS 

' BOUGHTON/LSO: William 
., Boughton conducts the LSO in 
’ Wagner’s Meistersinger 
Overture and Tchaikovsky's 
‘ Symphony No 5 white 
■ Alexander Mfctijew solos in 
Dvorak's Cello Concerto. 
Barbican Centre, Silk Street, 


Concerto No 2. The RPO under 
Enrique Batiz also plays 
Tchaikovsky's Capricdo 
Italian, Grieg's Peer Gynt Suite 
No 1. 

■Barbican Centre. Mon, 7.45pm. 

LISZT PROMS: Two Proms 
to mark the 100th anniversary 
of Liszt's death. Simon 
Preston plays some of his 
organ works, James 
Con Ion conducts the LSO in 
the Two Legends. Danta 
Symphony and Jorge Bolet is 
at the piano for the 
Schubert-Lisz* orchestral 
version of the “Wanderer" 
Fantasy. A feast! 

Royal Albert Hall. Thurs, 

6pm and 8pm. 


OPERA 


London EC2 (01-628 8795, 
credit cards 01-638 8891). 
Today, 7.45pm. 

SUMMER SCOPE STARTS: 
The South Bank's summer 
festival begins with Phyllis 
Bryn-Julson singing melodies 
by Debussy, songs by Ives, 
UedertN Alban Berg. 

Queen Elizabeth Hail, South 
Bank, London SE1 (01-928 
3191 , credit cards 01-928 
8800). 

THE WINNER: Barry Douglas, 
recdnl winner of the 
Tchaikovsky Competition in 
Moscow, solos in 
Rachmaninov’s Piano 


BUXTON FESTIVAL: Alan 
Bates speaks Dryden's words 
in the festival's Arthurian 
highlight, Purcell's King Arthur, 
which plays tonight Wed 
and Fri at 7.45pm. On Thurs, 
also at 7.45pm; Handel's 
Ariodante has its first night 
Opera House, Buxton, 
Derbyshire (0296 71010) 

SOUTH BANK OPERA: A 

new production of Cost fan tutti 
by Opera Factory's 
controversial director David 
Freeman opens the South 
Bank's first opera season in a 
preview performance on Fri 
at 7pm. Paul Daniel conducts 
the London Sinfonietta in a 
performance to be sung in a 
new English translation by 
Anne R idler. Queen Elizabeth 
Hall, South Bank, London 
SE1 (01-9283191) 

. THEATRE 


IN PREVIEW 

LONG DAY'S JOURNEY INTO 
NIGHT: Jack Lemmon makes 
his London stage debut in 
Eugene O’Neill s classic. 
Theatre Royal, Haymarket (01- 
930 9832). Previews from 
Thurs. Opens. Aug 4. 

WONDERFUL TOWN!: 
Maureen Lipman, Ray Lonnen, 
in the Watford Palace 
production of Leonard 
Bernstein's musical. 

Queen's (01-734 
1 1 66/0261 /PI 20). Previews 
today, Mon -Fri, Aug 2, 4-6. 
Opens Aug 7. 


OPENINGS 

THE COCKTAIL PARTY: Alec 
McCowen, Shelia Gish, Simon 
Ward in a new production of 
T.S. Eliot's play, described as 
“a drawing room comedy with 
a serious moral tone”. 
Phoenix (01 -836 2294). 
Previews today (matinee and 
evening). Opens Mon. 

SELECTED 

THE ENTERTAINER: Peter 
Bowles gamely steps into 
Olivier's shoes as the seedy, 
emotionally empty stand-up 
comic Archie Rice. 
Shaftesbury (01-379 5399) 
DYBBUK: An emotionally rich 
and sometimes unnerving 
adaptation of Anski's story of 
demonic possession. With 
Bruce Myers and Josianne 
Stoleru. 

Almeida (01 -359 4404). 

OUT OF TOWN 

GLASGOW: A Wee Touch of 
Class: Rikki Fulton in the 
successful adaptation of 
Moliere's Le Bourgeois 
Gentilhomme by himself and 
Denise Coffey. 

King's (031 229 1201). Opens 
Mon. 

LEICESTER: The Canterbury 
Tates: Adaptation of Chaucer 
by Phil Woods and Michael 
Bogdanov, billed as “a 
boisterous romp." 

Haymarket (0533 539797). 


DANCE 


BOLSHOI BALLET: Further 
performances of Ivan the 
Terrible (today and Mon), 
Raymonds (Tues, Fri). 
Covent Garden (01-240 
1068). 


BOLSHOI BALLET FILMS: 

The Little Humpbacked Horse 
(3pm) and Ivan the Terrible 
(7pm) start a season testing 


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until Aug 14. 

Barbican (01 -628 8795). 

MUNA TSENG: Water 
Trilogy (today, tomorrow). 
Riverside (01-748 3354). 


ROCK AND JAZZ 


ANTTA BAKER: The soul 
crowd's new favourite. 
Tonight and tomorrow, 
Hammersmith Odeon, London 
W6 (01-748 4081). 

LOUNGE LIZARDS: A 
"fake-jazz" band who play 
almost as convincingly as 
they pose. 

Tonight to Wed, ICA. 

London SW1 (01-930 3647). 

ARTURO SANDOVAL: 

Cuban trumpet virtuoso. 

To Aug 9, Ronnie Scott's. 
London W1 (01-439 0747). 

TANIA MARIA: Fiery singer 
from BraziL 

Tomorrow, Shaw Theatre, 
London NW1 (01-388 1394). 

KATE & ANNA 
McGARRIGLE: The folk 
scene's Everty Sisters. 
Wed/Thurs, Mean Fiddler, 
London NW10 (01-961 5490). 
BO DiDDLEY: Grandest old 
man of rhythm and blues. 

Fri, Brixton Academy, 

London SW11 (01-326 1022). 


GALLERIES 


.ONDON FESTIVAL 
BALLET: Two more 
performances today at the 
Coliseum with a programme of 
Paul Taylor’s Aureole, 

Roland Petit’s Carmen and 
Harald Lander's Etudes. 
rhe company transfers Mon to 
Tie Festival Hall where the 
first week's bill is &seHe. 
Coliseum (01 -836 3161): 
Festival Hall (01-9283191). 


OPENINGS 

BRITISH WATERCOLOURS: 
Open exhibition of 
content 
Banksif 

St Blackfrfars, 

(01-9287521). From Fri. 

FRENCH PAINTING: An 
exhibition tracing the 
development of French 
landscape painting in the years 
leading to the first 
Impressionist show. 

National Gallery of Scotland, 
The Mound, Edinburgh EH2 
(031-556 8921). From Fri. 

ARTISTS ABROAD: Paintings, 
drawings and prints. 

The Upstairs Gall 


Sallery, Royal 
adQly, London 
W1 (01-734 7763). From Mon. 

SELECTED 


ARCHAEOLOGY: Major show 
reviewing archaeological 
discoveries made in Britain 
since the war. 

British Museum, Great Russell 
St London WC1 (01-636 1555). 

ACQUISITIONS: Display of 
paintings, drawings, 
photographs and sculptures of 
20th-century personnages. 
National Portrait Gallery. 
London WC2 (01-930 1552). 


PHOTOGRAPHY 


LIFE AND LANDSCAPE: 

Life in rural East Anglia by P.H. 
Emerson, a typical Victorian 
with wide-ranging interests. 
Sainsbury Centre for Visual 
Arts. University of East Anglia, 
Norwich (0603 56561). 


BOOKINGS 


FIRST CHANCE 


SADLERS WELLS BALLET: 
Booking open for season at 
Royal Opera House, 
including London premiers of 
David Bmtioy's The Snow 
Queen. Sept 9-22. 

Person al/phone booking 
from Aug 1. 

Royal Opera House. Covent 
Garden. London WC2 (01 240 
1066/1911). 


LAST CHANCE 


SCULPTURE IN BRITAIN 
BETWEEN THE WARS: 
Includes works by Henry 
Moore, Barbara Hepworth, 
Jacob Epstein. Eric Gill. 
Ends Friday. 

Fine Art Society. 148 New 
Bond Street London W1 
(01-629 5116). 


For ticket availability, 
performance and opening 
times, telephone die 
numbers listed. Films: 
Geoff Bnwm Concerts: 
Max Harrison; Opera: 
Hilary Finch; Theatres 
Tony Patrick and Martin 
Cropper: Dance: John 
Perrival; Rock St Jazz: 

Richard W illiam^ 
Galleries: Sarah Jane 
Checkland: 
Photography. Michael 
Young; Bookings: Anne 
White bouse 


BOOKS 

REDBRICK BLUES: Barbara Pytn 

wrote An Academic Question 
(Macmillan, £9.95) in the earty 
1970s but it was left unpublished at 
her death. Set in a West Country 
university, it portrays a characteristic 
Pym world of self-absorbed - 
academics and elderly eccentrics. 


THEATRE 

GUN LAW: Suzi Quatro plays the 
hillbiHy heroine of Irving Berlin's 
song-nlledmusical Annie Get . 

Your Gun which comes into the West' 
End after a successful launch at 
the Chichester Festival Theatre. - 
Aldwych (01-836 6404). Opens 
Tuesday after previews. 


TELEVISION 

SHOPPING LISZT: Franz Liszt 
died 100 years ago on July 31 . To 
markthe centenary BBC2 is 
putting on a week of programmes 
from today, including two recitals 
by Alfred Brenda I and a live relay 
from Bayreuth of the Faust 
Symphony and Piano. Concerto No 2 


An unromantic 
boon for Mills 


■■ •' •• ' •• -V; yi- - •' ' x'V v 


ARTS DIARY 

Universal 1 



: • . ‘ * r "i' 

■ 


T he word retirement 
sends a bristle along 
the toothbrush of Sir 
John Mills's mous- 
tache. Looking at a pleasure 
boat passing downstream 
from the NationaL he cites the 
case of his chum Bob Hope 
who, when sent by his doctor 
on a cruise, relumed prema- 
turely with the words “Fish 
don't applaud". 

Last weekend, while re- 
hearsing at home with Rose- 
mary Harris for Brian Clark's 
new play The Petition — 
“that's the marvellous tiling 
about a two-hander, it just 
needs the two of you" — 
another “great chum", Rex 
Harrison, came to lunch. Over 
the meaL Sir John's wife, 
Mary, observed they must be 
the two oldest actors in 
captivity. 

At the age of 78. but refusing 
to think himself over 30. Sir 
John has come to the National 
for the first time. “It’s weird 
that here I am at last I've 
done practically everything 
else except circus and opera. 1 
suppose I wasn’t asked before 
because Larry felt I was a film 
.star." 

It makes for His greatest 
regret. If he bad his time again 
he would definitely have re- 
turned to die Old Vic in 1940- 
41 when Tyrone Guthrie had 
planned for him a session 
playing Hamlet. Hotspur and 
Richard III. But the war - “in 
which 1 didn't get a VC but an 
ulcer" — put paid to this. “My 
life might have been totally 
different. I might have be- 
come a major classical actor — 
or a resounding flop." 

Sir John casts his innocent 
blue eyes down the Thames 
and fiddles with a digestive 
biscuit. A self-confessed “car- 
pet-slipper " man he wears 
brown brogues, red socks and 
a red kerchief in his check suit 
pocket. “This is the toughest, 
most difficult part I've ever 
played", he says of his role as 
the General in The Petition .. 
“Something like the village 
idiot in Rjvm's Daughter (for 
which he won an Oscar), I 
didn't find difficult at all. I 
spent two months watching 
films of chaps with -brain . 
damage and the rest was a 
piece of cake." 


Sir John Mills 
makes his debut 
at the National 
exploring the ups 
and downs of a 
complex marriage 

The Petition is also his first 
two-hander. “Rosemary and I 
are on that stage for an hour 
and three-quarters, without a 
second off. It’s an absolute 
marathon, demanding total 
concentration. I’m always dy- 
ing for a butler to come on and 
say ‘Would you like a 
drink? " 

His first night will be as 
queasy as ever, “first nights 
ought to be avoided", he says 
grimly. He has turned down 
two parts before because of 
them. “Cinema reviews of 
work you have done six 
months back don't matter so 
much. On stagey if you have 
been called a bewildered car- 
rot you have to go out the 
following night as a bewil- 
dered carrot. " 

The danger time, however, 
is after about six months. He 
tells of one famous time he 
dried up. “There was this long 
dinner scene in Figure qf Fun. 

I was chatting away and in the 
middle I blew sky high. I 
didn't know if I. was in 
Birmingham or playing Ham- 
let. The cast stopped chewing 
and looked at me. I looked at 
the prompter, but there was.no 
one there. So I went off stage, 
checked the lines and re- 
lumed. Two chums in the 
audience even thought It had 
been deliberate." 

To ward off such bad luck. 
Sir John does not whistle in - 
the dressing room and wears a 
piece of eight around his neck. 
“It’s from a galleon", he. says, 
undoing his shirt -and produc- 
ing the squashed gold circle: ' 
“You*If be frightfully lucky 
now you've touched iL I wear 
it whenever I do a show. Mary 
put it on this chain because I 
was always about to give itlo 
taxi-drivere." 

The Petition is the story of 


two people celebrating a com- 
plex 50-year marriage through 
all its ups and downs and outs. 
Does it resemble Sir John's 
own celebrated marriage 2 
“Not an atom", he says, 
“though we have survived for 
about the same time." - 
He first met Mary in 1 9‘29 at 
the start of his acting career 
(for which he. had forsaken a 
job selling Sanitas toilet pa- 
per). He was touring the Fiar 
East with a company called 
The Quaints and she was the 
red-haired daughter of 
Tiensin’s Commissioner of 
Chinese Maritime Customs. 

The tour also brought Sir 
John another piece of luck. 
Passing the Theatre Royal. 
Singapore, in a rickshaw. Noel 
Coward saw the billboard 
announcing The Quaints in 
Hamlet. What this meant he 
did not know. but he had to 
see. “If I‘ hadn’t met Noel, it 
would have taken me another 
10 years to get to the West 
End. IL was difficult to get 
through those swing doors 
even playing a butler. Nod 
gave me the short-cut." ■ 

I t was the start of their 
lifetime's friendship. 
Through Coward, Mills 
secured an audition with 
Cochran for his 1931 Revue, 
and later, parts written by 
Coward specialty for him: Joe 
. Marryott in Cavalcade and 
Shorty Blake in the film In 
Which We Serve., * 

Curiously, for a man who 
'has made more than 1 00 films 
— “and been up and down the 
ranks like a lee-to-tum" — Sir 
John is often cast in-the public 
eye as stiffishly upper-lipped. . 
“I hate that phrase", he shud- 
ders. It belies -fits versatility. 
Who now remembers how a 
love scene with Sylvia Sims — 
in Ice Cold in Alex — was so. 
hot it was .snipped by the 
censor ? Despite these films. 
“I still, think of myself as a 
theatre-player?. And the the- 
atre. he. believes, raising his 
eyes again to the river, has an 
even bigger grip oik the public 
than before. 

Nicholas Shakespeare 

The Petition opens at the 
L^tatton (OT-928 2033) on 


Well on his way .to raisrag .liis 
personal goal of £2 million, in 
aid of the Mexican. earthquake 
victims; Plarido Domingo has 
taken time off to create anoth- 
er record. Not the plastic kind 
with a hole in the middle, but 
record audiences — in only 
two concents he has sung fo l J 
million people. Domingo en- 
tertained 800,000 Americans 
at the Liberty Concert in New 
York, then flew to Tel Aviv 
where he performed in front of 
ah audience of 500,000 — 
massive by rock concert stan- 
dards. let alone opera. Neither 
event will directly raise monct 
for Domingo's Mexichn ap- 
peal, but with concerts in 10 
cities across the globe already 
under his belt and with several 
more to come - including one 
in London, at Christmas — I 
am told he will easily exceed 
his target. 

Knight errant 

And now for something com- 
pletely indifferent. Terry 
Jones, of Monty Python fame, 
will turn up at the Chaucer 
Festival in Canterbury next 
week pointing out that 
Chaucer's “parfit gentil 
knight*’; was no such this'j. 
“People have the impressmn 
that he was the acme of 
chivalry"^ says Jones, “But if 
you took at the catalogue of 
battles and,5kmnishes£e : was 
involved. in, the cafly inclu- 
sion to draw is that he was a 
mercenary. As such his man- 
ners were likdy lobe indiffer- 
ent and Chaucer’s portrait had 
to be an ironic one." Jones has 
just directed a film of which 
the bard’ would have ap- 
proved; Called Personal 'Ser- 
vices, ilisioosely based on the 
lifeofStreatfaaxn brothel-keep- 
er Cynthia. Payne. 


Peeping her own s , 
roenter brand of loyalty 1 
fo rth co m i ng book. 

Crowned in a Far Country, is 
to be published in October. 
-Bat how to be sore that the 
shops stock It and die 
publishers’ reps like it? 
-Answer invite them all 
roond to Kensington Palace 
ami gjhe-them a. slap-op 

lunch. 

Rudi-mentary 

Rudolf Nimqrev has been 
called many things in his time 
but never kind. At the Paris 
Opera, where he is director, he 
has thumped dance teacher 
Michel Renault and slapped 
dancer Jean-Chrisiophe Part 
and choreographer Roland 



Nmeyev and Seym 
Petit But-according > 
Seymour, in a new ev 
of Nureyev in next 
Harpers & Queen, Ru 
48. has come to other 
more than once. “Ju 
yon think the end ha 
there will be a ca 
Rudolf* .she says dev 

Offbeat 

Visitors to the Ca 
.Festival should hem 


Takac 
playin 
earlier 
one pi 
had it 


big. 

mane 

BMW 

park 

had ! 

poiic 


Of < 


the 
to I 




THE TIMES SATURDAY JULY 26 1986 


15 





0y6 ^S?Q Fta 

-' nya ^C 0 | ita ^ 


\ . . ..r¥| BUCKINGHAM PALACE 

: .'. .-J July- a* ■ Mr W. J. Adams (Her 
-** Many's Ambassador Exi/aor- 
^inare ami Plenipotentiary ax 
;Tbhis) and Mis Adams had the 
-honour of be rag received by The 
■ Queen-' -.■ 

■ Sir .. Antony Adand was re- 
ttetued in audience by liie 
fewen. a nd kissed hands upon 

Jfcp. ' appointment ,as. Her 

rfeAjG&ifiS Ambassador Extraor- 
*■ V |S|At, t . *?®naiy _£Qd_ Plenipotentiary at 

nun . 7* B V«fl .Washington. • . 

Her Majesty invested Sir 
Antony Acland with the Insig- 
nia of a Knight Grand Gross of 
the Most Distinguished Older of 
St Michael and St George. 

The Queen held a Council at 
12.40 pm. 

There were present the Vis- 
count Whitelaw (Lord Presi- 
dent). the Lord Denham 
(Captain of the Gentlemen-ar- 
ArmsX die Baroness Young 
(Minister of Sate, Foreign and 
'.Commonwealth t Office), the 
'■RigJu Hon Norman Fowler, MP 
• ^Secretary of State for Social 
. Services) and the Right Hon Dr 
y 'Kennedy Simmonds (Prime 

I j * > -Minister of St Christopher and 

^ UlVCM ^TheRight Hon Dr Kennedy 
Simmonds. having been pre- 
viously appointed a Privy 
Councillor, was sworn in a 
Member of Her Majesty's Most 
Honourable Privy Council. 

Mr Geoffrey de Deney was in 
- 'attendance as Clerk of the 
■- CounciL 

Lik-r ’ - The Vncounl Whitelaw had 

11 ^oifc * an audience of The Queen 
v. , L , 01 lit fa before the CounciL 
•- aholeiaihj^ 1 Mrs Christopher Ollivant had 
K.,.ra iudienjj, ^ the honour ofbeing received by 
:v ''‘'c?n:em>wk L~ l Queen when her Majesty 

rr.,.': i0n ’ invested her with the Insignia of 



„ as; 

appeal 

cn his to V t. 

4 “fcSIS. P h'.-uFl'* 


COURT 


AND 

SOCIAL 


Finncron and . Major Rowan 
Jackson. RM were in 
attendance. 

The Princess Anne. Mrs Mark 
Phillips this morning reviewed 
the 25th Annual Ceremonial 
Parade at Ryton Police Training 
Centre. Ryton-on-Dunsmore, 
Coventry. 

Her Royal Highness was re- 
ceived by Her Majesty's Lord- 
Lieutenant for Warwickshire 
(Mr Charles Smith-Ryland) and 
the Commandant of the Centre 
(Mr R. Dyde). 

Mrs Richard Carew Pole was 
in attendance. 

'■ By 'command of The Queen, 
the Viscount Long (Lord in 
Waiting) was present at 
Heathrow Airport, London this 
afternoon upon the departure of 
the Governor-General of Can- 
ada and the Hon Maurice Sairvp 
and the Governor-General or 
Australia and Lady Stephen and 
bade farewell to Their Ex- 
cellencies on behalf of Her 
Majesty. 

By command of The Queen, 
the Baroness Hooper (Baroness 
in Waiting) was present at 
Gaiwick Airport. London this 
afternoon upon the departure of 
the Governor-General of 
Tuvalu and bade farewell to His 
Excellency on behalf of Her 
Majesty. 

KENSINGTON PALACE 
July 25: The Prince and Princess 
of Wales continued to visit the 
Shetland Isles this morning. 

His Royal Highness visited 
the Crown Prince Slipway, 
Scalloway and Her Royal High- 
ness visited the Church of 
Scotland Eventide Home. 
Scalloway. 

Afterwards The Prince and 
Princess of Wales visited Aith 
where Her Royal Highness 
named a new RNLI Lifeboat 
“Snolda." 

The Prince and Princess of 


m.'.uOR V(\ n L . UJVQLOJ IK.I WIU1 UIC U1 * a * Bin* » U1IVWW Vi 

:er--. ■•-a Member' of the Royal Vie- Wales later left Scatsta Airport 

V ■ toriah Older. : " 

v V Cobod. The Queen this afternoon 

Uien ftewr- * ‘ * 


attended the Test Match 


in an aircraft of The Queen's 
Flight for London. 

Miss Alexandra Loyd and 
Lieutenant-Colonel Brian 
Anderson were in attendance. 

KENSINGTON PALACE 
July 25: The Princess Margaret. 

Snowdon today 

.... , . , _ . opened the new Extension to the 

: «v->! k, o'-MaJ-O- Lady Susan Hussey. Mr Rob- MP1 National Distribution Cen- 
j but w Hh ranaa T e * lowc * h ^ or Hogh trc at Brackmills Industrial Es- 
: ' :s f =cttk s ibejS *ate. Northampton. 

****£ Km^Sh Her Royal Highness, was. ns 


i djr-»s L., 0,65 „ Her Majesty was received by j u |y25- The Prin 

' : >B1g2r ta - MCC<MrA cSSTVS 

i! »V ft * u .. _ . opened the new E 

J | " ’ , ^ingo s .Mi*. O- Lady Susan Hussey. Mr Rob- MF1 National Dis 


'rctoccme-u 

17 ' 


/ J 17 ^2:C3gr-''teftE^n 
: ■ ttillosj;. * Train thisi 

l la* ujgjL " ' - The Dul 

;; Knight e® 


— -“7-/- „ . — ccived on arrival by Her 

S? -,r8?£ ( and Hugh Umlsay Majesty's Lord Lieutenant for 


Station in the Royal 
this evening for Scotland, 
e Duke of Edinburgh vis- 
ited Caithness, Scotland today. 
His Royal Highness travelled 
'',in an aircraft of The Queen's 
• Flight and was received upon 

„ arrival at Wfcfc Airport by Her 

■adsifetfll'C Majesty's Lord-Lieutenant for 
jflfrrnfito; Caithness (the Viscount 

i- I r V. , , - ’ ^Squadron Leader. Timothy 

S' 1 '--'-k 


no - * for SMHfEi 


Northamptonshire (Mr John 
Lowther). 

The Princess Margaret, 
Countess of Snowdon, who 
travelled in an aircraft of The 
Queen's Flight, was attended by 
Mrs Elizabeth Blair. 




The Queen will open a new 
home for the Qvi) Service 
Benevolent Fund in Dunbar, 
East Lothian, on July 30. 


I •?. 


poifius a . , 

pm Luncheons 

»2s rafh 


Ritchie, presided, assisted by 
the -Wardens, ' Mr F.C. 


»2S r J a c XyAnglo-Aiistriftn Society Minoprio, who also spoke, Mr 

na-.?2^n->-7Lonl Cacoa, President, of the Alarr/ Bunough and Mr T.W. 

Anglo- Au^ian Sodety,, and Sir _TofiekL The Masters of the 


si.-.’aT’- Wilhant Qark. MP, gave * a 
' luncheon at the House of Com- 
mons yesterday in honour of Mr- 
Roberl J. O’Neill, HM Ambas- 
sador designate to Vienna, and* 
Mrs O’NeilL The Austrian 
- Ambassador and Frau Thomas 
were among those present. , 

.r::r,j t.~ jj.'ififlHT* . ■ Distillers' Company 
>.'_r ire. - :: "• The Lord Mayor- accomranied 

- by Mr Alderman , and Sheriff 
v Christopher Collet, was the 
.. guest of honour and speaker at a 
. luncheon given by the Distillers' 
Company at Vimnere' ' Hall 
. y.rra " yesterday. The Master, of the 
^ .. • -.'.-•-jpwii Distillers’ Company, Mr T.N. 


I 


.r.;i j;: 

> :s !vci. si a ate-. 
2nd s^suai. - 
in.wesfiff . 
Jtj-* ii na bl. 

AsstiB’ • 
It t - 


, s t>Js «’•“ ■ 
• 72 rd would S 
'•..j. Ul.VdM-- 

•; ;> aX'W.t 'pS^- 


.Vintners' and Loriners' Compa- 
nies and the Prime Warden of 
the - Basketmakers' Company 
were among others present. 

Reception 

Sternberg Centre for Judaism 
The Apostolic Pro-Nuncio was 
the guest of honour at a recep- 
tion given by the Right Rev 
Lord Coggan, Chairman of the 
Council of Christians and Jews, 
at the Sternberg Centre fori 
Judaism yesterday. Sir Sigmund 
Stem berg received the guests 
and Rabbi Tony Bayfield, direc- 
tor of the centre, also spoke. 


James Tolhurst 


Sin as a personal tragedy 


"An unfinished creature in an unfin- 
ished world" was Bishop F. R- Barry's 
verdict on mankind. But the statement, 
which may intrigue the psychologist, 
hardly satisfies anyone involved with 
the unfinished creature itself, at ground 
level. There is no doubt that all is not 
well but what is the nature of the defect? 

Much of modem theology has been 
arguing over the exact determination of 
Pud’s epistle to the Romans, conclud- 
ing that it is a question of our solidarity 
in sin rather than the ori^n of sin in 
Adam. We live out our lives in this 
sinful environment unless we are gath- 
ered into the grace-environment of 
Jesus Christ. 

But although it goes some way to 
explain the situation it still does not 
answer the stubborn question which 
underlies that state of affairs. Are we 
feted to be sinners, caught up in the 
mystery of iniquity? 

Augustine posed the question to 
himself in the Confessions and said of 
the Manichees that "they preferred 
rather to hold that your substance (ie, 
God’s) suffered evil than that their own 
substance committed it." 

There is more than a hint that an 
unfinished, sinful world may well have 
issued like that from the Creator’s hand, 
in the mind of some theologians who 
would be unwilling to acknowledge 
Manes as their source.... 

Traditionally, the formulae speak of 
"man very far gone from original 
righteousness" (Article IX) and “the 
whole man, body and soul, changed for 
the worse" (Council of Trent). The 
argument has turned not on the origin of 
the sin which "naturally is ingendered 
of the offspring of Adam" but on the 
ensuing corruption incurred. 

It is interesting that the recent 
Dialogue on Mission, which chronicles 
discussion between Evangelical and 


Roman Catholic theologians between 
1977 and 1984. insists that for the 
Evangelicals original sin has distorted 
every pan of human nature, "conse- 
quently the Apostle Paul describes all 
people as 'enslaved', 'blind', 'dead' and 
'under God's wrath*. 

Tram’s decree on Justification "con- 
fesses that all men, having lost inno- 
cence through the sin of Adam 'became 
unclean* and, according to the apostle, 
were 'by nature children of wrath'. So 
completely were they the slaves of sin 
and under the power of the devil and of 
death..." 

Such an apparently pessimistic as- 
sessment goes much funher to explain 
the apparently mindless tragedies that 
in retrospect are so often explained by 
the telling phrase "I don’t know what 
came over me”. At a deeper level, 
severely disturbed criminals wil] admit 
that they are "all bad”. 

Evangelicals would say this affirms 
the total depravity of human nature 
after the Fall whereby man is "inclined 
to evil". But it would seem that if we are 
to accept such a fundamental corrup- 
tion. then it would seem logical to 
demand a melt-down effect to the very 
fabric of the cosmos also. 

The late Francis Shaeffer did, in feci, 
argue that the earth itself was abnormal 
since it had been cursed by God as a re- 
sult of Adam's sin and that it remained 
"subjected to futility, not of its own will 
but by the will of him who subjected it 
in hope" (Genesis in Space and Time. 
1972). 

But this would surely contradict the 
whole concept of sin as being a moral 
defect which cannot transfer to those 
elements of creation which of their 
nature are incapable of moral transgres- 
sion. In fact, the environment would 
appear to have an inherent capacity to 
regenerate after the most serious catas- 


trophe, which has proved very beneti- 

riafto research chemists. 

It would be unscientific to talk of total 
depravity down to the microbiological 
level, are we therefore to abandon the 
concept of an “infection of nature 
(which) does remain”? Surely it should 
be possible to analyse the nature of sin. 
viewed as a psychological 
phenomenon? 

There are essentially only two reac- 
tions possible for matter: it can either 
respond to what is good, or react in 
honor to what it perceives as evil. 

It is this response which characterizes 
our humanity. But instead of talking in 
terms of the weight of corruption, we 
should look at the impact which such 
choice occasions. There is a knock-on 
effect from sin because all matter is 
created good and being forced to choose* 
evil, must bear in its very make-up the 
wound of its choice as surely as we bear 
the physical scars of the damage we do 
to ourselves. 

It is this inherent scarring which must 
surely explain both the capacity for 
good in humanity and also the appar- 
ently irrational quest for self-destruc- 
tion. "the apples felling like great drops 
of dew to bruise themselves". 

We can never bid fereweli to the old 
self or to the conflict which St Paul so 
brilliantly analysed because for him sin 
was not a statistic, or some general 
malaise bin a personal tragedy: “For I 
delight in the law of God, in my inmost 
self, but I see in my members another 
law at war with the law of my mind and 
making me captive to the law of sin 
which dwells in my members. Wretched 
man that 1 am! Who will deliver me 
from this body of death? Thanks be to 
God through Jesus Christ our Lord!" 

The Rev Dr James Tolhurst is Roman 
Catholic Parish Priest of Si Joseph 's. St 
Mary Cray. Kent. 


Birthdays 


TODAY: Sir Peter Carey, 63; 
Mr Vitos Gcrulailis, 32; the 
Right Rev W. P. Gilpin, 84; Mr 
Mick J agger, 43; Miss Barbara 
Jefford. 56; Dr John Kilgour, 62; 
Mr Stanley Kubrick, 58; Sir 
Richard Miller. 82; Mrs Sally 
Oppenheim-Bames, MP, 56; Sir 
Derek Riches. 74; Miss Bernice 
Rubens, 58; Professor Sir John 
Sial ! worthy, 80; Lord 
Tboroey croft. CH, 77; Mr M. H. 
W. Wells, 59. 

TOMORROW: Mr Peter 
Coker, 60; Mr Christopher 
Dean. 28; Sir Ronald Dearing. 
56; Miss Jo Durie, 26; Dame 
Mary Green. 73; Mr Jack Hig- 
gins, 57; Lord Jenkins of 
Putney, 78; Lord Mancrofit, 72; 
Sir James Munn, 66; Sir Denis 
Rlcfcett, 79; Mrs Shirley Wil- 
liams, 56. 


Trinity College 
of Music 

The Board of Trinity College of 
Music, London, annouces the 
following honorary awards: 
FdkiufsMoa flum FTC Lk Derek A»W- 
David Booth. Peter arose. Valerie 
Cardnell , . Reginald Crow*. John 
Dankworth. Eric Fenhy. Duncan 
Fonaes. John Hester and Gay Wis- 
dom. 

Manners then TC Lf. Fam efe. Barker. 
Margaret Bolster. Hertert Cavil. Sid- 
ney Jones- Albert Main. June Valley 
and SUM anas zm mtn i iams . 


Latest wills 

Duke off Manchester, of Ten- 
nessee, United States, and Ke- 
nya, left unsettled . estate in 
England and Wales valued at 
£175,766 net. which, together 
with settled land already valued 
at £1 39,600 net, made a total off 
£315,366. 


Forthcoming marriages 


• IV t eloping fctf ’ J .) 

•p-ifT-vnijr kniod of Ml 
j.'rthr.'rjng boot „ 
- Cr;bsrJ«eft rwff 

... . 

' . n-undloKeasin^. 
?L1WS- 


Births, Marriages, Deaths and In Memoriam 


.- \A’: £t t V-- 

. . r.*'-' *' I ’“ .v. 

a -.. r *'V6 5r 

-" V :; j*?:-- 

' ' . ■ • : 
• -r-xxiai*' 



. BIRTHS, MARRIAGES, 
HEATHS mi ■ HEMORIAM 
f 4 i Em -t- 15% VAT -, 

(minimum 5- lines) • 

Announcements, aniben waned by'ihe 
name and permanent address of the 
sender, may be seal to: 

THE TIMES : 

P0 BOX 484 
Vhsun Street 
Leaden El 

Announcements can be received by 
idqriwnc benwen 9.00am and 
SJOpm Monday lo Fnday, on Satur- 
day between 9.00am and . 12 -taon. 
W 1-411 4M0 Mil- For publication the 
following day phone by 130pm. 

HHtTgCMIK MMBIAGES, .WGDBM6S 

etc on Coon and Social Page n a Raa 
+ 15X HAT. > ' 

Court and Social ftge annou nc e- 
mens ran not . be araepttd by 
Idcptonc. Enquiries toe 9X-VI B*5a 
(after 1030am). dr send l«_ 

1. F — ‘ Lanka H. 

Please, allow at Least 48 hours before 
pubbeanpn. 


HalBM camel out o< my mottert womb 

i&'ZZISLrZZZlS TteSS 

aw * x Min 


BIRTHS 




Hr 

-j* 1 ; vtr 




- . 

:r.c 


iW ■ 

■ jfV' 
1"" . 


-ii.*. . 



ASKEW On July 22nd- to Nadzfcfe 
and RkftanL ai Colchester, a son. Al- 
exander. John AWtS- 
■ASFOKD On 22«t July- to Aflroa 
(nie Ripley) and John: a daoahter. 
Rachel AUce- a sister for Andrew 
BOULTON On July sand, to Chrattr. 
a son. Philip Andrew Edmund, to 
Trtcia and warwiejt. a brother tor 
Alexander 

CSHMB On 23rd July- at home. >» 
WaUraod and BID. a son. Thomas 
Frederik FlaCkL 

GOODDIOUGN - On 24Ui July at May • 
day hospusl Croydon to Rosemary 
& Adrian ' a fine son. Christopher 
John, a boother f or Clalre. , 

COOMtlL On 19th July- 1986. at 
SL MaryX Paddington, to Robert 
and Helen (tee Barrett), a daughter. 
Tbea Laetilla. slater to Hester 
BREN At Aberdeen MaternUy Hos- 
pital on 23rd July- to Lorraine inbe 
wiuoock} and Terry, a daughter. 
Amanda Jane 

IARKEX On 24th July. 1986. at the 
John Radcilffe. to, Cansle inee 
Taylor). and. Jeremy, a son. George 
Richard EfUs. a brother for Sophie 
' and Henry • 

JOYCE On July 22nd. at Edgeware 
General Hospital, to Angela 
• Mills) and David, a aon. Fraser John. 
LU11U On -23nd Juty 1986. ta 
‘ London, to Susan and Adrian- a 
daughter. Jessica Rode 
.UMKAUUMon JidySMth 1 986 ai St 
Thomas’s Hospital to Barbara and 

Robert, a son- Henry wuuaw. 

LONG On July 23rd. at queen 
■ Charlotte's HospUaL .to Sbeua <nee 

Hushed and Cottn, a *»• qarto s 
Henry Gordon, a brother for Emily 
JNLLS - On July 7Uu at Queen Manrs. 
Roehamptw. to Annie and Nom^t- 
another daughter: Natalfo Jt»e. asls* 
tor for Justin. Chfoe and Samuel 


ISORSUS VERDIN On July 14th. to 
Aramlnta and Anthony, a daughter. 

NEAHON • On July 22nd. to Chris and 
Gerry, a son. Richard Edmund 
diaries. 

OAKES On Thursday. 1 7th July, at 
SL Luke's Hospital. Guildford, to 
Sarah into MaxfMd) and John, a 
son. Jeremy David Gilmore, a broth- 
er to Alastair 

PRINGLE - On Joly 23nL at St. Luke's. 
Guildford- to Boh and Barbara, a 
daughter, victoria Emma, a staler for 
Robert. 

RtVALLAND On 17th July, to 
Marilyn and Marc-EdouanL a 
daughter. Monique Louts*, a stator 
for Michael. 

SVEMfAM On July 23rd. lo SteUa 
and DavM. a son. Christopher David, 
a brother for Frances. 

STEEL On July 24th. to Judith (nee 
Douglas) and Richard. Frances 
Elizabeth- a stater for Anna. 

STOTT On July 24th 1986. to 
Caroline (tee Redpath) and Edward, 
a daughter. Clare Louise, a stater for 
Melanie and David. 

WARMER SOOTH - On July 17th. to 
Caroline and Nicholas, a son. Robert 
Witten, a brother lor Christopher 
and Jenny 

WMGW Of Henley-on-Thames, on 
July 17th. to Charles and Sally, a 
son. Huw Edward, brother tor Cues. 
Rebecca and Amy 


DEATHS 


On July Sth. Nigel 
Peter aged 43 of Hertford. Funeral at 
2 J 30 pm on Tuesday. Jidv 29th at All 
Saints Church. Hertford. Enquires 

and flowers to Alfred Scales. Funeral 

Directors. 11 Church Street. Hert- 
ford 52052 

FEWER. Frederick Passed away In 
Johannesburg. South Africa on 24th 
July Sadly mined by his wife Jap. 
children Elaine and Hilton and 
grandchildren 

yn » Murray Victor Burrow. D&O- 
M.C- retired solicitor, aged 99. on 
Friday. 25Ui July In hospital. Late or 
M (Ilham Cottage- Broad well. 

Morton - In- Marsh. Gtos. Uncle of 
Tbnotfty Hill of Broad well. Morton- 
tn-Mareh. and John PMpps. 
Cremation at Oxford at 11.30 on 
Wednesday, soth July 

Christopher Hans Hodges. 
ph.D. On 23rd July. 1966. to 
Addenbroofce’s Hosollal. Cambridge 
after two years illness bravely borne. 
Funeral Service al Cambridge Cre- 
matorium on Tuesday. 29th July al 
1.30 pm. Family Bowers only En- 
quiries to A.F Townsend. Funeral 
Directors Limited. teL Cambridge 
843182. 

AW C tEAW On Jul y 34lh. 1986. 
peacefully at home. Claire, aged 81 
Beloved -widow of Gordon of 
Penirebeylln. Maestrook. Funeral 
Service on Tuesday. July 29th ai 
ZJSO pm at St. John'S- Maestrook. 
Family Bowen. Donations to St. 
John's Church. 

■UUtSLAND On July 24th 1986. 
peacefb/ly al Lymlngion. EUerei 
Frances aged 83. widow of Brigadier 
Kenneth D. Mareland. late Burma 
mne$ and 2nd Brittanian 7th RahHd 
Regiment. Funeral service at 
Bournemouth crematorium on Tues- 
day. July 29th at 2.45 ton- Family 
flowers only Donations, if desired, 
for Cancer Research may be sent c/o 
FWJrtoux * Sons. Funeral Direr 
tors. 33-34 St Thomas SL 

Lymdngton. Hams. 

•USOM John William Woodley. par- 
tered Accountant, husband pfSuran 
and rather or Philadelphia to»d Sa- 
rah. on July 22nd. Funeral private. 
No flowers, but donallens to Cancer 
Research 


MURRAY-BUST - On Jttiy 23rd. very 
suddenly at home. The Old Orchard 
Stofhridge Weston. Dorset. Thoma* 
Moray, aged 84. Most loved husband 
or Mariorie and adored father of AH 
son. No funeral.- at MS wtah Ms body 
being donated to medical research. 

ROBERTS - On July 24lh. Leon of De 
Vere Cantons. Kensington. Beloved 
husband of Romany and father of 
James. Timothy and Lucy. Enquiries 
to JH. Kenyon Ltd. 49 Marloes 
Road- W8. tel. 937 0757 

ROBMSON - On 23rd July 1986. 
Derek Waiter Lcsbe. U Ow (ret'd). 
Royal Artillery, very dear husband 
of Maty and father of David and 
Sarah, suddenly at home. Funeral 
Service al U.OOam on Thursday. 
3lst July al Royal Memorial CM 
Sandhurst. R.M.AJ3. 

SI TOMER - On July 23nf. 1986. sud- 
denly but peacefully. Joy Enid, 
beloved wife of Teddy who she gave 
40 happy years and ranch loved 
mother of Madeleine and Gregory. 
Funeral at Luton Crematorium on 
Monday. 2811) July at lO am. No 
flowers please. Donations. If desired, 
to BUSS. 44/5 Museum Street. 
London WC1 

TtlO M HOk - On July 24lh. 1986. 
Duncan J. T of Hove. Much loved 
husband of Sydney and lather of 
Marie and Kaoy. Requtom Mass at SL 
Saviour's parish Church. Colgate on 
Tuesday. July 29th at 12 noon. 
Flowers lo Freeman Brothers. 
Funeral Directors. Horsham or dona- 
tions. If p re f erred, to Friends of 
Brighton General Hospital. 

VERRAU. - On July 23rd 1986. peace- 
fully at home In Chichester. 
Rosamond Agatha Mary aged 96. 
Daughter of the late Sir Jeoner and 
Lady VerralL Service at St WUrtdh 
Church. Chichester at 11.46 am on 
Wednesday. 30th July prior lo cre- 
mation. Family flowers only 


MEMORIAL SERVICES 


A Service of Thanksgiving 
lor toe life of Rear Admiral A~J. 
■Jodr Miller will take place on Tues- 
day- 9th September al 2X0 pm at SL 
Michael Paternoster RavaL College 
mu. London EC4R 2RL Those wish, 
tog to attend, please ring the Mission 
To Seamen Ol -246 5202 ex 34 or 36 
NZ Lae seared Hal. e/r 3 mtn# 
rmfrat ttae Prof f ptvf Cl 40 
PCM End Ol 723 0362 


IN MEMORIAM - WAR 


Mary Dliabeth. In loving 
memory of a dear wife and mother 
who passed away on 26th July 
1 983. Ffcrevertn our thoughts. John, 
jonothaq and James. 


IN MEMORIAM - PRIVATE 


JCKYU-On July 36. ion Bthu 
mklenc*. Castle Moat House. 

John Jefcyn. je v unrein 
LEMff dir John CBT7 Remembered 
always with affection and gratitude. 
SERTA MARMAII - Remembering Sun- 
day, 27th July. 1941 ‘My wu ana 
worth are cobhrts. brushed aside lit 
the fun flare of BrleC 


FUNERAL 

arrangements 


KEWME STEPHEN The luneral 
which was to have been Imm « 
Monday. 28th July has been tto- 
layed. A further dale will be made in 
due course 


Mr G. BorcheH 
and Miss EX. Dystm 
The engagement is announced 
between Graham, son of Mr and 
Mrs H.W. Burchell. of 
Harpenden, and Edwina. daugh- 
ter of the late Mr and Mrs E.M. 
Dyson. 

Mr RJ. Evelergh 
and Miss L.V. Robson 
The engagement is announced 
between Robert, eldest son of 
Mr and Mrs R.S. Eveteigh. of 
Chelmsford, Essex, and Valerie, 
only daughter of Mr and Mrs M. 
Robson, of Newcastle upon 
Tyne, Northumberland. 

Mr RJVL Fiddian 
and Miss D J. Even 
The engagement is announced 
between Richard, elder son of 
Mr W.E.H. Fiddian, of 
Co lien ham, Cambridgeshire, 
and of Mrs VA Fiddian, of 
Great Finborough. Suffolk, and 
Deborah, only daughter of Mr 
and Mrs CR.W. Ewen, of 
Bacion. Norfolk. 

DrJ.B. Gordon 
and Miss CJL Firth 
The engagement is announced 
between John, son of Mr Harold 
Gordon, of Arvida, Canada, and 
of Mrs Caiherioe Gordon, of 
Montreal, Canada, and Kate, 
eldest daughter of Mr and Mrs 
Denis Firth, of Guilford, 
Connecticut, United States. 

Mr MJ5. Hagg 
and Miss LC Graham 
The engagement is announced 
between Mark, elder son of Mr 
and Mrs J. Hagg, of Fiddleford, 
Dorset, and Iona, daughter of 
Mr J. Graham, of East 
Hanningfield, Essex, and Mrs 
M. Graham, of Cambridge. 

Mr RJE. Humphreys 
and Dr PJ. Roy 
The engagement is announced 
between Raymond, elder son of 
Mrand Mrs ET. Humphreys, of 
Sale, Cheshire, and Philippa, 
younger daughter of Dr and Mrs 
James H.B.Roy, of Mortimer, 
Reading, Berkshire. 

Mr GXS. Jackson 
and Miss K- Gerrard 
The engagement is announced 
between Christopher, only son 
of Brigadier and Mrs D.W. 
Jackson, of Buckland, Oxford- 
shire, and Kate, youngest 
daughter of Dr and Mrs John 
Gerrard. of Far Forest, 
Worcestershire. 


Mr J.G A. Johnson 
and Miss RA- Stead 
The engagement is announced 
between James, elder son of Mr 
and Mrs Rex Johnson.of 
Messingham, Lincoln, and Ra- 
chel, younger daughter of Mr 
and Mrs Gerald Stead, of 
Huddersfield, Yorkshire. 

Mr E.M. Kiely 
and Dr N JVI. Cremer 
The engagement is announced 
between Edward, youngest son 
of Mr and Mrs John Kiely. of 
Ashgrove, Blackrock, Cork, and 
Nicola, elder daughter of Dr and 
Mrs Richard Cremer, of 
Wallington, Surrey. 

The Rev EJ. Lewis 
and Miss R.M. Jones 
The engagement is announced 
between Edward John, only son 
of Mr and Mrs D.O. Lewis, 
Uplands. Swansea, and Ruth 
Mary, elder daughter of the Rev 
Brian and Mrs Jones, 
Llansaralet, Swansea. 

Mr LE. Lindsay 
and Miss B.C-Twigg 
The engagement is announced 
between Iain, son of Mrand Mrs 
Alexander Lindsay, of Radyr, 
South Glamorgan, and Barbara, 
daughter of the late Mr Michael 
Twigg and Mrs Anndont Twigg, 
of Pietermaritzburg. South 
Africa. 

Mr KJL Marlow 
and Miss ILL. Roseveare 
The engagement is announced 
between Kevin, younger son of 
Mr and Mrs F.C Marlow, of 
West Wickham, Kent, and 
Helen, elder daughter of Dr and 
Mrs M.P. Roseveare. of Dul- 
wich. London. 

Mr PjC Tennant 
and Miss M.M. Shively 
The engagement is announced 
between Patrick, younger son of 
Mr and Mrs Anthony Tennant, 
of Longpari5h, Hampshire; and 
Meredith, elder daughter of Mr 
and Mrs Jerry Shively, of Chun, 
Surrey. 

Dr J.F. Wright 
and Dr UP. Ive 

The engagement is announced 
between John, only son of Mr 
and Mrs J.E. Wright, of Herons'- 
Gate, Hertfordshire, and Lucy, 
only daughter of Dr and Mrs 
F-A. Ive. of Nevilles Cross. 
Durham. 


Marriages 

Mr D.N. Diamond 
and Miss S.M. Goldstein 
The marriage look place on 
Saturday, July 19, at the Church 
of the Ho/y Name. Leeds, 
between Mr David Neil Di- 
amond, only son of Mr and Mrs 
Cliff Diamond, of Manchester, 
and Miss Susan Mary 
Goldstein, only daughter of Mr 
and Mrs Erwin Max Goldstein, 
of Leeds. The Rev Antony 
Pearson officiated, assisted by 
Canon T.E. Kennaugh. 

Mr CH. Hansford 
and Mrs GJL Lindsey 
The marriage took place on 
Saturday, July 12, quietly in 
Chichester, between Mr Chris- 
topher Hansford, of Wey bridge, 
Surrey, and Mrs Gillian Lind- 
sey, of Donnington. West 
Sussex. 

Mr M. RhBer 
and Miss C MIDs 
The marriage took place on 
Tuesday, July 22, at the Church 
of the immaculate Conception, 
Farm Street, of Mr Mark Ridler. 
son of Mr H J. Shaw Ridler and 
the late Mrs Iris Ridler, of) 
Saffron Walden, and Miss CathH 
erine Mills, younger daughter of] 
Mr and Mrs John Mills, off 
Cambridge; 

Mr A. Verdin 
and Miss MA Morris 
The marriage took place in 
Oxford on July 1 1, between Mr 
Anthony Venlin and Miss 
Aramima Morris. 

Mr M.D. Williams 
and Miss C. Moss 
The marriage took place on 
Friday, July 25, 1986. in Oxford 
at St Michael at the Nortbgaie, 
between Mr Michael Williams 
and Miss Christine Moss. The 
reception was held at the Bear. 
Hotel, Woodstock. 


Appointments 

Mr Gerwyn Morgan to be 
Secretary of the National Mu- 
seum of Wales, in succession to 
Dr David Dykes, who has been 
appointed the museum's 
director. 

Mr S. W. Wentworth to be 
promoted Under Secretary 
(Meat Group), Ministry of .Agri- 
culture, Fisheries and Food on 
August 4, in succession to Mrs J. 
M. Archer. 

Major-General P. K. Coakley. 
(ate RAMC. to be honorary 
surgeon to the Queen, in succes- 
sion to Major-General W. J. 
Pryn. 


Services tomorrow 


Ninth Sunday 
after Trinity 

CANTERBCRV CATHEDRAL. 8 HC: 

<3.30 M: 11 Sung EutJl. PUIn&onfl 

is^rS^ite 

E. Responses rtncrotoi-Ouaire Peute* 
Doin' 

YORK MINSTER. 8. 8 45 HU. 10.15 
Bung Curti. I sal down under his 
shadow <&airwTwl. prcomdaiy Austin 
Williams. 11.30 M. Collegium Regal* 
iHoweUsu 4 E. Gloucester Service 
iHowelbi. Blessed City iBantowi. Uw 
Chancellor 

ST PAUL'S CATHEDRAL 8.11 HC 
Mass In AngusUta iHaydni. Ave venim 

r Bowens). Hear my words, ye people 
iParryi. the Ri Rev Kennelh 
WooUcranbe. 

SOUTHWARK CATHEDRAL. 9 HC 
11 Euch. Four PartMass (ByrdL O 
sacrum comlvliuri (TailLs). toe Pro 
vosu 3 E. The Short SorvtceiGib- 
.bonsk Laudibus to s a n d i s (Byrd). 

Canon Gerald Parrott- 

WESTMINSTER CATHEDRAL. 7.3. 
9. 12. 5-30. 7 LM. *0.30 SM. 

Sempitcme Deus (Ungk Laudaie 

Domnurr fTallis). O. yeneranda 

Trtouas (Hanoi); 3.30 v. Magnrfical 
octavt lorn iSunanot. Ave varum 

corpus (Josnuini. 

ST GEORGE'S CATHEDRAL- South- 
wark; 8. IO. 12.15. 9 LM. 11 HM. I{l 
Honorem Sanct Joseph! iPeeiers). 
Ave Venim iMozarll. the Very Rev 
James P Pannctl 

»PEL._Si James's Pal- 
_ cn.MHsa 
of Bath 


ALL SOULS. Langnam Place. W|. 
9 SO HR 11 3»r Rev Michael 

Lawson: 6 JO. Mr David Turner 
CHELSEA OLD CHURCH. Old 
Oiurch SrreeL SW3. 8. 12 HCs IO 
Children s Service. 1 1 M. ihe Rev J H 

8HC 1 1 MP and HC. Ihe Rev N W W 
CROSVENOR CHAPEL. SOUIh 
And ley Streek 8.15 HC: 11 Sung 
Euclt. Coronation Maas_ (Mozart). 
Continue de Jean Racine iFaurej. me 
tm A W Mark! 

HOLV Trinity. Brompton Rom 
SW7 8.30 HC 11 M.UwRn JAK 
Milte- 6 JO ES. me Rev Keitb de 

HOLA'TRfNrr^'. Prince Consort 
Road. SW7 8.30. 12-05 HC: LI MP. 
Ihe Rev Martin Israel 
HOLY TRINITY. Stoane Street. SW| 
850. 12 LO HC: 10 30 EudiTcanon 

ST ALBANY, Brooke SI. EC1 9JO 
SM. II HM. Mass in B (Schubert). 

sr tp,ceo<o) ' 

KM? 

g.'Sir.B M^»e w 

ST_BRIDE7S. Fleet Street EC4. 8.30 
C. 11 M and Euch. Responses (Smith). 
Jutjttale (Purcell), (he Rev Charles 
Bewick 6.30 E- 3 settings of CVoria In 
Exrelss (Taverner Mozart and How 

eib> 

ST CUTHBEHT-S. PhD 


5. Philteach Gardens 
.1 Sung Euch. Jnu 
(VtctortaL the Rev 


_ . 10 HC; II 

dulcn memorta ( ... 

John Vin e: 6 E and Benediction. 

ST GEORGE'S. Hanover Square. W| 
8 JO HC. 11 Sung Euch. Short Service 
(Baueni- O^od thai no time (Pear 


U leSmMEucn.Missa 

Brev^iHaydn). the Bishop 

OUEEN ’.f CHAPEL OF THE SAVOY. 
WC2: 11 13 M. Te Deum_(Mac- 
PheiNom. The Lord » King (Boyce), 
the Chaplain. 1PJO HC 
GLARpS CHAPEL. WeUtogtim Bar- 
™ts,swi ii m. me Chaplain. 12 

TOWER OF LONDON. ECS- 9 15 HC. 
II M. Lord, tel me know mine end 

iCn-eriei, ihe QvapMln 

temple CHliRCfLFieet Street EC4. 
8JO KC 11 16 MP. Responses 
m»Jben-S«U>. To Daum L* Mem us 
G'augnan Williams), jumiale Deo 
(Wairora DavtoL the Master, - 

CHAPEL ROYAL. Hampton Cburt 
Palace; 8J0 HC 11 M. Te Deum 
iSurasUKU. JubUaie iWaMord paileai. 
Bishop Mervyn i 
Lorn tnereose our 

ALL HALLOWS BY THE TOWER 11 
Sung Euch. Ds* Kate RKkctU 
ALL SAINTS. Margaret Street. . W| ,3. 
5 15 LM. 11 hRl Misaa .Sanctae 
Marne Magdatonae «Uovd webterL 
until of the wom tEJqarL the Rn C 


.10 30 Suno Euch- Give us Uie 
lailh IE Bullock), ihe Rev 


ST JAS 
HC. 11 


wi ajo 


Btockwpod: 3 30 EL O 
our fatih iLoosemorei. 


Lctomom. 

(BaUom uarauierj. the vicar 


son), toe 

ST JAMES' 

EC4.1030 Sun 
Wings of fault 
John Paul. 

— Ptccadiily. ' 

Euch. 6 EP 

JAMES'S. Sussex Gardens. WM 

HC. 1030 Sung Euch. Mase in G 
l Weber): 6 EL Short Service (Morlny). 

ST lJkT^S. 1 LfiO 

naca lux rTalUsn. tne Rev N Weir 
ST MARGARETS. Wevl minster, 
swi 8 is. 12 IS' HC 11 M and 
Sermo n, the Canon Trevor Beeson 
ST MAH77N-IN-THE-FJQJJEL WC2. 0 
HC. 9 46 Family C. Uie Rev Philip 
Chester - 1 1 30 MP. me Rev Stephen 
Roberts. 2-45 Chinese Service - 0.30 
EP. the vicar 

ST MARY ATOOTS. KettalPfllon. W8 
§.12.60 HOT 50 Suite Eucft. toe Rev 
S H H Acland; li 15 M. ihe Rev S H 
H Acland: 630 E- Stater Gerd 
ST MARVLEBONEL Morvlebonc 
Road. W1 a 11 HC. KrominosmeMe 
iMnarti. I was «*d rParry) ihe Rev 
D Head: 6 30. Ihe Rev-R McLaren 
STMTCHAEL-S. Cornhlll. EC3 11 M. 
Turn tnv lace (Atrwoadt. Responds 
(TomKJrt,). Tc Drum ilreuMi. Ju 
Miate istanfordi. Ms beloved spake 
(HadJesi 12.10 Ha tlte Ret Daud 
Burton Evans _ . .... 

ST FALX'S. Robert Adam RtreN. Wl 
11. Canon Keiin de Berry 630 HC 
Alan Cook 


ST PAULS, wuton Place- SWI 8.9 
HC. li Solemn Euch. Mass of Ihe 
Oulel Hour (Geo roc Otdrovd). 
Exuliaie Deo (Herbert HoweibL Lead 
mo^Lord iS S Wesley), the Rev R □ 

ST PETERT5. Eaton Souare. swi. 
8 15 HC: 10 Family Mass. Ascendens 
Chrtsius (V lttorM). O Praer the Lord 
(Bat lane 11 Sotemn M. the Rev P 
Busan 

ST SIMON 2ELOTES. Milner StreeL 
SW3 - 8 HC li MP. dona Wirt 
(TallM). Jute laic (Stan lord). Snug us. 
O Lord God (Harris!. 6.30 EP. CaM 
thy burden iMendetasohni. Magnlficai 
(Kelly i. Insanae et vanae curae 
(Haydn). Prebendary John Pearce 
ST STEPHEN'S. Gloucester Road. 
SWT 8. 9 LM. II HM. Missa Brevis 
(RoMn Walker)- Ihe Rev Perry Butler: 
6 Solemn E and Benedlcaon. Ihe Rev- 
Graham Morgan 

ST VEDAST roster Lane. U2 11 
Sung Euch. Fiat votunlas rua 
tAndnessenl 

iS&i. 

(Gabrieli t. Ave Maria tPabesirinar. o 
LM and Benediction 

q n S tSo. 

wscot 

SSSS; g^L ’ 5 

THE ASSUMPTION. Warwick Strrei. 
WI 8. IO. 12.4. b LM. 11 SM. MMa 
a 4 iMonleverdi). Retatce in the Lord 
alway iRedfordi. Aonu* Oei tMorlt* 

FARM STRECT. Wl . 7.W. 8 30. IO. 

12 IS. 4 15. 6 15. LM: 1 1 HM. MtaM 
Solemn is iFiikei. iniende tom 
ora hones meac cElgan. Salve Regina 

i raE ia ORATORV. arompirai R"d ; 
SW7 T. 8. 9. IO. 12 30. 4 30. 7 LM. 
11 HM. Mara in ihe Doria n Mod e 
(Howellsv. Surge propera iGuerrwro'. 
3.30 Vespers. Ave verom iJosaran*. 
ST ETHELDRroA-S. IJyPtoje “ 
SM. Iste Confessor and Exsuiafe Deo 

(KJR > La l DV OF VKrroRIES. Keying- 
ion High Street. W8 8. T 
6LVO. LM. II. HM. Mara in A minor 
iCasciollrui. Exaitabo Te Demine 

AMERICAN CHLrpCH W LONDON. 
Wi, II. Ihe Rev Ron F AUtaon 
on - TEMPLE. Hotoorn. EC1 11- 
6.30. the Hft .En cWJWii 

CHELSEA METHODIST CHURCH. 

-- M'sftaad. SW3t 11 6. toe Rev 
wi! 






..it -RCH . Wl 1 1 6-30. ine Rev hen 

RECENT SQL ARE PRESBYTOIAN 
I RC. Tavwoch Place. WC1 II. Iho 
Rrv J W Me Miller 6 30. the Rev 
Timoihy Poh __ , 

ST ANNE AND ST ACND5 iLU- 
Iheranl. Cresham 51 EC2 1 1 HC. 
■ST JOHNS WOOD LRC- NW® 930. 
Ihe Rev John Vine 
WESLEY'S CHAPEL. CdS Road. ECS 
11. ihe Rev Derick Cotlingwood 
WESTMINSTER CENTRAL HALL 
iMNjjodteD. SWI 11, Staler Jacfoe 
put; 6 30. ihe R ev R John Tudor 
WCSTTWINSTEB CHAPEL, Bucking- 
ham Gale SWI II 8.30. the Rev 
John Bush 



OBITUARY 

PROFESSOR FRITZ 
LIPMANN 

Pioneer work in biochemistry 

Professor Fritz Lipmann, 
the .American Nobel Prize- 
winning biochemist, whose 
work provided the basis for 
our understanding of the con- 
version of food into energy, 
died in Poughkeepsie. New 
York, on July 24. He was 87. 

Lipmann shared the 1953 
Nobel Prize for Medicine and 
Physiology with Sir Hans 
Krebs, for his discovery of 
coeozyme A. one of the most 
important substances in the 
body's metabolism. 

The achievement of both 
men, whose researches were 
supplementary to one anoth- 
er. was to demonstrate that 
biochemistry was at last capa- 
ble of analyzing aspects of the 
intermediary metabolism 
which were at that lime poorly 
understood. 

Fritz Albfcrt Lipmann was 
born on June 12. 1899, in 
Kbnigsberg, then lbe capital of 
East Prussia. He studied medi- 
cine at the university there, as 
well as in Berlin and Munich, 
and he took his MD degree at 
Berlin in 1922. 

During the next four years 
he studied chemistry in Am- 
sterdam with .Ernest Laqueur. 
in Konigsberg with Hans 
Meerwein. and in Berlin with 
Otto Meyerhof. He was 
awarded his PhD by Berlin 
University in 1927, but did 
not consider that his 
“apprenticeship" to his cho- 
sen subject ended there, and 
spent a further three years 
with Meyerhof at the Kaiser 
Wilhelm Institute in Berlin 
and Heidelberg. It was only 
after this that he embarked on 
his independent scientific 
career. 

His first interest was the 
“Pasteur effect” and the non- 
fermentive metabolism of sug- 
ar, research he pursued, at the 
newly-opened Biological Insti- 
tute of the Carlsberg Founda- 
tion in Copenhagen, after a 
year (1931-32) on a Rockefel- 
ler Fellowship in New York at 
the Rockefeller Institute for 
Medical Research. Lipmann 
remained in Copenhagen, 
where he had^gone as assistant 
to Albert Fischer, from 1932 
to 1939 , a period which [aid 
the basis for his subsequent 
decisive observations. 

In 19 39 he went to the 
United States, working initial- 
ly at the Cornell Medical 
School, and from 1941 at the 


Massachusetts General Hospi- 
tal in Boston, where he was 
head of the Biochemical Re- 
search Laboratory. It was 
here, in 1945, that he and his 
students isolated coenzyme A, 
the substance which assists in 
the process of converting fatty 
acids, steroids, ammo acids 
and haemoglobins into 
energy. 

Lipmann's discoveries ex- 
plained much about the fun- 
damental nature of certain 
biochemical processes in the 
cell, and the advances in the 
understanding of intermedi- 
ary metabolism that they rep- 
resented made possible the 
dramatic expansion of meta- 
bolic chemistry' which subse- 
quently took place. 

He was appointed to a 
professorship in biological 
chemistry' at Harvard in 1949, 
and from 1957 was Professor 
of Biochemistry at the Rocke- 
feller Institute (from 1965 
Rockefeller University). 

In addition to his Nobel 
Prize, honours were showered 
on him by scientific institu- 
tions all over the world. But he 
never erased from exploring 
fresh avenues into his subject 
Made Professor Emeritus at 
Rockefeller University in 
1970 he continued to run a 
highly active laboratory, and 
was conducting research there 
until shortly before his death. 

His autobiography 
tt andcrings of a Biochemist., 
which appeared in 1971, lesti - 
fied to the restless spirit aif 
inquiry that informed bis 
work and life. 

He married, in 1 931, 
Elfreda M. Hall, who, with 
their son. survives him. I 


MR PATRICK CAMPBELL 


Mr Patrick Campbell, MC, 
who, as a schoolmaster, had a 
long and distinguished career 
which culminated in his ap- 
pointment as! Master of West- 
minster Under School, died 
on June 26. He was 88. 

S. G. B. A. writes: 

Patrick James Campbell 
spent his childhood in south- 
ern England, winning a schol- 
arship to Winchester. His 
schooldays ended as Britain 
was in the middle of the battle 
of lbe Somme. 

Thus began his first career 
as a soldier iii the Royal Field 
ArtiJleiy ana’ he went to 
France in 1917. His experi- 
ences in that war made a 
profound impression upon 
him; however, his sense of 
duty in the face of adversity, 
earned him the Military Cross. 


war and started his second 
career as a schoolmaster. 
Those whom he taught re- 
member him as a compassion- 
ate man who loved teaching,. 

His experiences al Winches- 
ter had given him a talent for 
preparing boys for the rigotj rs 
of public school; but (he 
problems of administration 
were difficulties that he did 
not enjoy. 

He retired to Devon in I*)62 
where he began his third 
career as an author. The JEbb 
and Flow of Battle (1977), and 
In the Cannon "s Mouth (1979) 
are sensitive and vivid ac- 
counts of his First World War 
experiences.. His time as a 
schoolmaster is detailed in 
Refiige from Fear (1982) and 
he lived to see the j recent 
publication of his autobiogra- 
phy, Blade of Grass. J 


He went to Oxford after the 

AIR CORE D. D ARCY GRE£IG 

Christopher Oriebar writes: 


In your obituary of Air 
Commodore D. D’Arcy Greig 
(June 1 1), you say that he was 
captain of the winning 1929 
British team. 

In May, 1 928, D’Arcy Greig 
became the senior pilot of the 
High Speed Flight of the 
Royal Air Force, when he was 
asked to make an attempt on 
the world airspeed record 
following the death of another 
member of the flight during an 
attempt on the record earlier 
that year. 


Then, in January. B929, my 
cousin. Squadron" Leader A 
H. Oriebar, was posted as the 
new captain of the Higrih Speed 
Flight, which included Flight 
Lieutenant (as he tfien was) 
D'Arcy Greig. j 
On September 12. J 981. Air 
Commodore D’Arcy Greig 
was among the passengers on 
a Concorde which! I. as a 
Concorde pilot with British 
Airways, chartered .and flew 
around the 1931 Sichneider 
Trpphy course in order to 
celebrate the 50ih anniversary 
of Britain's final win.. 


Science report 


Protecting plants 
against weed killers 


By Andrew CoghJan 


Some weed killers used by 
farmers are so powerful that 
unless applied with precision, 
they can kill the crops they are 
desigHed to protect. 

Geaetic engineering is helping 
to solve that problem. By tinker- 
ing with die genetic make-up of 
plants, scientists are learning 
how lo make crops resistant to 
the lethal effects of week loiters 
or herbicides. 

In the latest issue of the 
ma prine Science, a research 
gronp in the laboratories of 
Monsanto, one . of America's 
largest chemical companies, de- 
scribes bow it made petunia 
plants resistant to a herbicide 
using the tools of genetic 
engineering. 

Although not a valuable crop 
in itself, petunia was used as an 
experimental plaitt for the tech- 
nique to demonstrate its poten- 
tial application for economically 
important varieties. 

The researchers, led by Dr 
Ditip Shah, of the company's 
molecular sciences division in St 
Louis, produced genetically al- 
tered petunias that could with- 
stand four times the dose of the 
herbicide. Roundup, needed to 
kill unaltered petunias. 

This b of crucial importance 
to Monsanto, which makes 
Roundup, one of the most potent 
herbicides available. The aim is 
to sell farmers a package which 
includes both the herbicide and 
a variety of crops made resistant 
to it by genetic engineering. 

The biocidal Ingredient In 


Roundup is a chemical called 
glyphosate. Ft kills by 
supressing die production of an 
enzyme, E£PSP (5- 
Enolpyruvylshiltimate-3-Pho5- 
pbate), which <ls vital to tike 
survival of 


Researchers 
glyphosate resit 


isolated a 
strand of 


DNA from a fckferM variety of 
petunia. They f found tint it 


produced so ml 

times more tha i 


EPSP - 20 
normal - that it 


vras immune to] the herbicide. 

The next step was to insert 
this bey strand of genetic ma- 
terial into oonhal petunias. 

Dr Shah aisd his cofleagoes 
did this by [inseilmg genetic 


material bearfj 
resistant Dl 
bacterium cal 
uunefocienz. 

This bade, 
like gall grot, 
infects but, r, 
able to 
into a host p 

By infectb 
with the bac 


, the ghrphosate 
strand into a 
Agrobocuoittm 


causes tumour- 
on the plants it 
importantly, is 
genetic material 
as welL 

normal petunias 
the research- 
ers succeeded in transferring the 
glyphosate ilesistant 'strand into 
tbs hosts, making them iwmnm> 
to Roundup. [ 

Much res search is needed be- 
fore crops fkb wn by farmers 
be endowed with an equal degree 
of resistant e, bat the Monsanto 
scientists d aim that their results 
"represent a major step towards 
estabiishln ; selective herbicide 
tolerants M crop plants* 

Source: &pe 
volume 23 £ 


S p nulla . 

July 2S, 1986, 
es 478-481. 


Police claim 
success for 
Brixton raids 


Continued from page 1 

advance by an undercover 
detective and policemen from 
the train removed the section 
and immediately surrounded 
the club. 

At the same moment anoth- 
er 150 officers arrived at the 
front of the club in four heavy 
BRS trucks which had been 
hired by Brixton police for the 
operation. The front door of 
the club was smashed down 
and the officers rushed in. 

Before they left the building, 
the police video-recorded ev- 
ery room to demonstrate that 
they bad not wrecked it during 
the search. 

Immediately the raid start- 
ed, other officers at Brixton 
police station telephoned 
more than 50 political and 
community leaders to tell 
them what was happening, 
and at the same time uni- 
formed officers began distrib- 
uting 2.000 leaflets in the 
immediate area of Raflton 
Road, which had been cor- 
doned off. to explain the 
necessity of the operation. 

The leaflet said in part: 
“Police have been concerned 
at the growth of the illegal sale 
of drugs in the Brixton area 
and members of the local 
community have shared that 
concern..... 

“Over a considerable period 
police have made every effort 
to prevent .this escalating 
problem by other methods. 
The matter has been raised at 
the community police consul- 
tative group, discussed with 
Lambeth council and with the 
interna] management com- 
mittee of the Afro-Caribbean 
Club. 

“There has been a great deal 
of goodwill on the part of all 
agencies, who have genuinely 
tried to resolve the problem. 
However, the situation re- 
mains that there is an escalat- 
ing degree of street crime in 
the area, much of it closely 
connected to drug trafficking 
in and around the front line 
area. The operation has been 
absolutely necessary to stop 
and prevent a further increase 
of these serious crimes.” 

Chief Superintendent Joe 
Webber, who is in charge of 
the Brixton division, said: 
“We will not turn a blind eye 
to what has been happening. I 


have had no complaints from 
the community about what we 
have done. Indeed I have been 
inundated by phone calls of 
support from the community 
and | particularly from the 
black community in the 
Railton Road area. 

“ My officers have also had 
an enormous response from 
the street People are saying 
that it was time something was 
done, that we did well that we 
should keep it upand that they 
have been waiting for this for 
years.” 

Early in May the dub, 
which receives a £75,000 a 
ye$r grant from Lambeth 
council and the Department 
of the Environment as a 
“drop-in centre”, was dosed 
after Mr Astel Parkinson, the 
chairman of its management 
committee, became alarmed 
by those using the club. 

It was estimated that almost 
80 per cent of those regularly 
using the dub were from 
outside the area and his 
closure order came after a 
series of disturbances. Howev- 
er, it was closed for only two 
weeks and then reopened on 
the orders of the Labour- 
controlled Lambeth council. 

But, police said that local 
people — both black and white 
- had complained repeatedly 
that drug-related violence as- 
sociated with the centre was 
increasing and demanded 
action. 

In March a West Indian 
man. aged 28, was shot in the 
leg during a violent feud 
involving local drug dealers. 
Only three weeks earlier an 
Eton schoolboy, aged 17, was 
stabbed as he conducted 'a 
school project in the area and 
innocently took pictures. 

Police officers were also 
attacked recently by 20 men 
seeking to free a suspect who 
had been arrested. 

Miss Linda Bellos, the lead- 
er of the council, said yester- 
day: “It should concern and 
alarm everybody in this com- 
munity when you have such 
an unnecessarily large opera- 
tion involving 1,000 officers 
in riot gear and with guns 
sealing off streets. The events 
of yesterday have soured rela- 
tions with the police. I have 
indicated my willingness to 
meet them in the past but they 
have refused to meet me.” 


Solution to Puzzle No 17,107 

BmT 



Solution to Puzzle No 17402 


lv2H 
BEK 

inDElsfS 


E E FEB 
IE, (LASSIES 
h „ n e e 
nrosH e n 

0 P3 f=ES«li« 
nHUEDE G5 
d E E E 
i^snniinrara 
ej m n n ! 

!3 E E 

rc lilSSBEEl 



Competition PO Bax 486 . 1 Virginia Street. London, El 9XN. 
The winners and solution will be published nest Saturday. 


The winners qf last Saturday's competition are: K Newell 80 
Lod'vr Road, Newcastle upon Tyne ; J T O’Brien, 12 Caledonia 
Place, Clifton. Bristol; Alan Black, 201 Sefton Road, Stevenage. 


Nam e ... 

Address 


Tihe Times Crossword Puzzle No 17,108 

i 



ACROSS 


DOWN 


1 One usually has a second 
' helping (8). 

5 Who’s a pretty boy, then, at 
university? (6). 

10 Single issue of new coins (5h 

11 Very small chaps, those old 
sokuers irt America (6-3). 

12 Successful! shot enables him 
to rescue ttie game (9). 

13 Effect of nlountain air? (5). 

14 Eg Beaujolais opening put 
back — owing to his delay? 
(7) 

16 Promote pawn first - to ac- 
claim (6). 

19 Novel site for cricket (6). 

21 Refuse maldng~a black mark 
Ol : . 

23 Most of egfji-white is such a 
binder! (5). 

25 Draw at Maltese resort (91 

27 English pod wine? The 
limit! (9). 

28 Game pie tab nothing in it 
’ (5). 

29 Uncle's assurance? (6). 

30 Footmen witfi arms (8). 


1 Give the lie to tuber that is 
upside down? (8). 

2 Poor living - sixteen, 
roughly, going to cborch (9). 

3 After a breather, I find ma- 
terial for girders (5). 

4 Red-hot water-boiler, say 
Ol 

6 Lay sacks in marine con- 
tainers (5-4). 

7 Traveller crazy to follow 
Japanese drama? (5). 

8 Legs in movement make 
one run (6\ 

9 Capture in French bunker 

■ ( 6 ). 

15 Where Walther won the 
European Song Contest? (9). 

17 Puffin’, we bear, like Cap- 
tain Flint (3,6). 

18 Tyres can burst in race (8). 

20 Dealer in ~ ornamental 
clocks? (6). 

21 Light rubber helped by 
powerful spirit (7). 

22 Thing to end telephone 
conversation, we hear (4-2). 

24 Trains champion couple (5). 

26 Supernumerary 8, for exam- 
ple (5). 


Concise crossword page 13 






•re**** 


\05tV* 


i.~ * ,£53* 




Mgn bid 

for Berry 


The Brixton Afro-Caribbean Cultural Centte,' 



ig on to the Victoria-Clap ham commuter line (Photograph: Peter Tneynor^ 

Police 






s ■ ■ r^rca- 




vr- 


err 




v/hf 

U ? 




ByMaikEffis ... 

West Midlands police have those people who thinkthej. 

can get away with it” .1 


denied allegations that dings 
were planted-on suspects dur- 
ing a raid on Thursday in tbe 
Handsworth area of Birming- 
ham, where riots last August 
left two people dead and 
compensation claims totalling 
£16 minion. 

Yesterday youths outride 
the cafe and a betting -office 
where 12 arrests w ere made in 
Villa Road, Handsworth, 
rfaiwtwl that-the potice thnist 
drags into the hands of sus- 
pects as they were pinned to 
the floor. 

“We won't accept tins ha- 
rassment, and they can't 
Uame us if it causes riots,” one 


Superintendant Martin 
Barton, of the West Midlands 
poUce, and a former, sub- ' 
divisional commander of .the 
Handsworth area, sahh^Tbe- 
polke will not be deterred from 
enforcing the law in relation to 


Fire of the J2 men arrested' 
appeared In court yesterd ay , 
and .were remanded -On 
tioaal bail until August Kbj . 
Bir mingham magisfrafeg . 

AH five, are acrined «f 
possessing.; cannabis. - Three 
heed additionaJ chaiges' Of 
possessing the drngwmk. 
tent to supply ami two are 
charged with snpplyiag 
cannabis. 

■ The other men are 
to appear at a later date. - 
The five* who appeared yes- 
Cerday were: Ernest Welfiatfsa,: 
' 56, of Crocketts Tfani,' 
am; Selvin Macro, 
of Long Nuke Road, 
Wesley Gnat, 
aged3& of Finch Drive, Satina 
Coldfield, Birminghaim Derek 
Sanmda. aged 30. of. Vicarage 
Road, Astern, BirminghaHi; aad 
-Dcav3 Johnson, aged 26 i of 
Park ■ Road, Hockley, 
Binmngbaip. 


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Gas date 


Ik 


THE TIMES INFORMATION SERVICE 


or 


Today’s events 


Royal engagements 
The Queen presents Colours 
to the 3rd Battalion 51st High- 
land Volunteers. Stilling Castle, 
10.45. . . ^ 

New exhibitions 
Centennial in Pictures: photo- 
graphs by Roland Adams; Re- 
gent Centre, High St, 
Christchurch, Dorset; Mon to 
Sat 10.30 to 5 (ends Aug 1) 
Photographs of South Africa 
by David Goldblatt; Of 
Mutability: an installation by 
Helen Chadwick; Ikon Gallery, 
58-72 John Bright St, Bir- 
mingham; Tues to Sat 10 to 6 
(emu Aug 23) 

Artists in Industry; Walsall 
Museum and Art Gallery, Lich- 
field St; Mon to Fri 10 to 6, Sat 


10 to 4.45 (end Aug 23) 


Rycotewood College Ex- 
hibition; Cheltenham An Gal- 
lery and Museum, Clarence Si; 
Mon to Sat 10 to 5.30 (ends Aug 
30) 

Built Up Areas: Urban land- 
scapes from the Arts Council 
Collection; Oldham An Gallery. 
Union Su Mon to Fri 10 to 5, 
Tues 10 to I, Sat 10 to 4 (ends 
Aug 16) 

Five Years With The Face: 
photographs of 100 famous 
Faces; Smith An Gallery & 
Museum. Dumbarton Rd, Stir- 
line Wed to Sun 2 to 5, Sat 
10.30 to 5 (ends Aug 24) 
Music 

Concert by Das Junge Badh- 
Collegium; St John's Church, 
Gtastoubary, 7.30. 

Recital by Victoria Matthews 
and Edward Hope-Preston (pi- 
ano); Danbury Church, Chelms- 
ford, 8. 


Tomorrow 


Royal engagements 
Toe Queen, accompanied fey 
The Duke of Edinburgh, attends 
Morning Service, Canongaie 
Kirk, Edinburgh. 11.15; and, 
accompanied by Prince Edward, 
attends Commonwealth athlet- 
ics events, Meadowbank Sta- 
dium, Edinburgh, 2.45. 

Mnsic 

Bournemouth 
slra; Boarne- 
Garxfens, 8. 
Organ recital by Margaret 
Phillips; St Andrew’s Church, 
Colyton, 7 JO. 


music 

Concert by the Boun 
Symphony Orchestra; 
mouth Winter Gardens, 


Songs of the IStfa Century by 
on; The 


Alan and Michelle Johnson; . ... 
Castle Museum, Nottingham, 3. 

Talks and lectures 
Wikilife in my Garden, by 
Jane Ratdiffe; Lake District 
National Park Visitor Centre, 
Brockhole. Windermere, 3.30. 


The pound 


Australia S 
Austria Sen 
Belgium FT 
CanwiaS 
Danmark Kr 
FUandHkfc 
France Ft 
G ermany Dm 
Greece Dr 
thing KongS 
WandPt 
Kafr Unr 
Japan Yen 
W eU a alamfa flM 
Norway Kr 
Portugal Exc 
Samh Africa Rd 
Spain Pta 
Sweden Kr 
Switzerland fi- 
lls* $ 

Yugcnlevta Dnr 


Bank 

Bank 


Safe 

241 

2335 

2215 

69-20 

6540 

2135 


1251 

1156 

852 

752 

10.74 

10.19 

3535 

2155 

21950 

20650 

1150 

1140 

.1.123 

1563 

228050 

218050 

24750 

23300 

374 

255 

1156 

1155. 

22750 

21650- 

5.10 

450 

21150 

20050 

1053 

1038 

270 

255 

1547 

1477 

64050 

59050 


Retafl Price Mbe38U 


London: die FT ludartckmad dawn W at 
1263-7. 


In the garden 


The many weeks of dry 
weather in many parts of the 
ceMintry have encouraged the 
onset of plant diseases. Pests too 
are increasing fest- 
. Check roses for mildew and 
black spot and pests, and look 
round the garden for green and 
black fly.They are attacking 
dahlias and lilies, and other 
plants. A dual purpose 
insecticide/fungicide spray 
saves time and does an excellent 
job. For diseases, a spraying 
every 10 days seems more 
effective than the 14 day inter- 
val normally recommended. 

Shrubs like philadelphus 
(mock orange), caenolhus and 
Buddleia altemifolia and weige- 
las which have finished flower- 
ing may be pruned now. 
Sometimes the pruning is to 
keep the shrubs within bounds 
but mainly to thin out branches 
if the shrub is congested. 

Onion sets planted last au- 
tumn survived the cold winter 
well and are ready to harvest 
Bend the tops over, and loosen 
the bulbs with a fork; then in a 
week or so lift them and dry 
them off in a dry airy place. 

Sow parsley now. Plant Brus- 
sels sprouts, leeks, winter cab- 
bage and sprouting broccoli. 

Give particular attention to 
all trees and shrubs planted last 
autumn or this year. Many are 
now showing signs of water 
shortage in the parts of the 
country that have had little rain . 
in the past seven or eight weeks. 
Check the soil moisture at root 
level Soak thoroughly if dry and 
repeat several times a week if 
necessary. RH . 


Roads 


Gardens open 


P* Plants Itor sal* 

TODAY and dnriy 

Warwickshire: Warwick Caste: superb 
restored Victorian rasa garden with vast 
coitedion of old shrub, cfrntjmfl and tjusft 
roses: 10 to 6. 

TODAY AND TOMORROW , 

BocfcmgtansMe: Wooon Underwood. 
Histone waMd garden by George London 
In three parts. Also cottage garden, 
herbaceous, roses etc. Tees avattmto. 2-6 
pm. Sat and Sun 26 and 27 Jufy. P. 
TOMORROW ■ 

- " feeriand: fight gardens 


at 


Newtorough; a wide variety of gardens, 
from a pocket hantfwretwf to a manor; 
art and craft exHbttion. vmtme vehicles. 
Hst and map at wBaga centre: CT.5D admits 
toaB; 12 to 6. 

Essex: Hortiam Hal, or B1051 between 
Thaxted and Braided: lovely garden, 
roses, lake, we«ed garden; P: 2 to a 
Argyft Ardchattan Pnory, North CooneO. 
12m from Oban; herbaceous borders, 
shrubs, roses, walled garden; on Loch 
Etrve. 2.30 to 5.30. __ 

Oxford sh ir e: StansfieU, 4? Hah Street 
Stanford- tho-Vate, 3Krii SE Of Fanngdon. 
off A417; itt acres, on alkaline 
soil:intormal borders, year round 
aoneraet coloured fakage. unusual 

shrubs, perennials, herds, aWnes, 

r„2 to & ateo by 


Kascombe Court, 3y,m S£ ol 
off A2130 between Hascombe 
and GodaCnha targe garden, woodlands, 
herbaceous, rases. Japanese rock and 
walsrgmden;2to6. 

THURSDAY 

Norfolk: Hokham Hal 2m W of WteBs. S 
ol A 149 Walls-Hunstanran road: 
aboretum, many rare trees ana shrubs, 
formal torraoBd^^rden, roses: 


pottery exhibition; 1 30 1 


Anniversaries 


TODAY 

Births: John Field, pianist 
and composer, Dublin, 1782," 
George Bernard Shaw. Dublin. 
1856; Carl Jung, KesswiL, 
Switzerland. IS 75: 
TOMORROW 

Births: Johann Bernoulli, 
mathematician. Basel. 1667; Sir- 
George Airy, astronomer royal 
1 835-81. Alnwick. Northumber- 
land. 1801; Enriqne Granados, 
lianist and composer, L&rida, 
pain, 1867: 


The Norite MIS: Roadworks between 
junction S (Thorne) and junction 7 (M62J; 
contraflow m operation. Southbouxt odt 
skp road ana northbound access at 
junction 8 aredosed-MSI: new motorway 
sflp road being bute at Wtetaq Summit. 
Left-hand lane closure on north and 
southbound carriageways. M52:resur!ac- 
tegbetwaen junction 19 (Heywood)and21 
(Miterow); contraflow; tone closures. DK 
versrans are Bwnpostrd- 
Watea and the West This weekend Is the 
busiest weekend for traffic headtag to the 
West Counfty; expect delays on 04, MS, 
A30 and A32 M4: Outside bne ciosad on 
east and westbound carriageway be- 
tween Junction 2* (Newport) and Zf (High 
Cross); delays expected. M& tone era- 
sures northbound between junction 25 
(Taunton) aid 26 (wefirnton) tor mainte- 
nance work. A3f» The Yeovtton air show 
takes ptoce at the ngval air stebon, on the 

Scotland: MS: ~ Bridge wOrk between 
junction 9 and 10 {Sorting); northbound 
carriageway dosed: two-way on south- 
txxncL M74: Motorway extension work 
north ol Uamahagow. two- way traffic 
northbound. 

Cnmmenweaflh Gamer AI roads Into 
Ecfinburjte are very busy. FoBow the AA 
cotour-coded signposts, 
information compeed and auptdlad by 
AA Roedwatch Unit 






For nsders who may hare 
missed a copy of The Times this 
week, we repeat below the 
week's Portfolio mice changes 

I ^today's are on page 21). 

| M* Mn Ite M Thr M M 

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BUI 


Weather 

forecast 


.:rr» J Ote. 
JO* 
S&\ 

. r' a* 

Ml# 


A troogh of loir pres- 
sure wfll move east across 
most areas during the 
day. 

After a dry start in 
some eastern areas at 
first, outbreaks of rain in 
western and central areas 
will soon spread to 
remaining areas. 


6 am fo midnight 



; il 00 m issue 


. .i: fiSKt 

- prt 




SST’.-V" 


% purchase 


London, SE, Caotml S, HW, Centml N 
' Rfidtenda, Chmwl to; Dut- 


High Tides 


breaks of rain, foftiwod by ttunny kitorvsto 
tored shawms. Wind s, vowing 


and scattered : 

SW; moderate, iocaly trash. Max temp: 
20C (6dFL ‘ 

E Angfta, E, NE Eng to ixfc Rain soon 


spreatJng trom the W. Drier wtth a w y 


Roles and how to play, page 26 


intervals later. Wind S veering 
moderate, iocaly fresh. Max tamp: 20C 


England, Writes: Mbty with out- 
breaks ol ran 8J first ft 


with i scattered showers. Wind SW weerinp 


bscamora brighter Hpfrbcad 
s. Wind SW veering HUB 


W; fresh, locally strong. Max temp 
ft 601- 

Lake District Is st Man, SW, NW 
Scotland, Glasgow, Cenbaf High bund*. 
Argyfl, N Irebmct Cloufr with ram, heavy 
in places, taBowad by brighter weather 
with showers. Wind S veering SW; fresh, 
iocady strong. Max temp 17CH53F). 

Bowtofi, Edtabwoh. Donee, Aber- 
4toan, Morey Firtb. NEScaHent Cloudy. 
Ram soon spreading tram W, cfoanng 
later. Wind SE veeriig SW fresh. Max 
temp 18QB4F). 

Orkney, Shettond: Scattered showers, 
totowadby rain. Wind SE kght inaBasing 
fresh. Max temp 15C(59F). 

Outtook tor t o monew and Mon da y; 
Rather cloudy with outbreaks of rain m 
places, but later becoming txtghter wtth 
showers in the N; windy at times. 


TODAY AM 

London Bridge &08 
Aberdeen 5.17 
Avo n mo u ft . 11J* 
Beifaat 3.05 

CmdUl 11.19 

Dovonport 10.19 
Dover 3.08 

FUmootfa 049 
Glasgow 4.44 

2.19 
1021 
10-19 
Lakh 047 

Uverpod 3.15 
lowvstttl 1M 
M— g— 424 
Bntcxd Haven 1031 
Newquay 925 
Oban 9-47 

Itona a nc e 928 
Po rtland 11.15 
Portsmouth 322 
3.13 
255 
1038 
T««S 7A3 

Wfton-on-Nze 354 


HT PM 

7-2 6.16 
42 005 
122 1151 
35 3.40 
112 1126 

52 1026 
62 320 
42 956 
42 547 
39 420 
55 251 
74 11.03 
841042 

53 725 
93 340 
22 129 
45 422 
64 1052 
64 947 
34 1018 

5.1 935 
13 1127 

■ 45 434 
53 344 
42.333 
351059 
5-3 330 

4.1 431 
TWe i 


TOMORROW. 
London Bi klg a 


650 

631 


HT 

63 
36 

123 

32 BeHast 1 . 351 

M3 Canfitf 1154 

31 Dovo n port 1047 

64 Dover 350 

43 Falmouth 10.17- 
43 Glasgow . 523 

33 i to wB oh • . 454 

43 HoMwad .332 
06 Hear • fi32 

85 Mmeomba 1056 

5.1 Lakh. 735 

36 L i verpool 356 
25 Lowestoft 234 
45 Margate ' 532 

65 MMardbevdn 1139 

65 . Newquay 1034 

36 Oban . 1020 

52 Penzanca . 958 
23 Porftond 1148 
43 P ortsmouth 435 
63 ’Shorahaei 354 

43 Southampton 241 
27 ■ Swa pw u e.. . 11.14 
43 Tees 834 

4.1 WVoiMteMte 435 
In metres: 1ntt32S08fL 


HT 

63 

43 


656 

649 

123 

427 


25 
105 
43 1053 
63 434 
45 1023 

43 .653 
27 533 
53 386 

72 1144 

73 1120 

5.1 213 
83 421 
2f 2.14 

44 .530 
63 1131 
21 1027 
321131 
43 1034 
12 \ 
44_448 
52-421 

4.1 420 
83-11.40 
5.1. 945 
43 442 


HT 

87 

35 

117 

21 






4 
83 
4.7 

42 
33 
47 
63 
83 

43 
82 

-25 
.43 
21 
82 
33 
43 


-ft 

£5 

Etta*. 

- 

“■* am- 


down 


Ttor. 


43 

S3 

4.1 

83 

43 

43 


- - * rm»k 

:r . -i.rMgfrtfc, 
V --..'fl i';SlT4 

• • - -\i.Thc 

rrigmpd.: 




ien » mtt* 



StHiriMK 

Sun.antK 

TOMORROW Son rises: 

■■ Swi sate 


| 5.15 am 


pp^^ra-. 5.16 am 

257 put 



Mooiusets: Moan rises 
1124am 11.14 pm 



Moon sets: 
1239pm 


•toon rises 
.1125 «n 


Vel Trust 


Last quartan July 28 


V «*H1 


Last quarterf Tomorrow 


Around Britain 


SllnRten 
hre in 


Maoc 
C F 


37 19 68 surety 
34 19 66 sunny 

- 19 BS bright 

- 20 68 bright 

- 21 70 sunny 
31 21 70 brigra 


tHaoe sky: bc-Mw sky and cloud: c- 
ctoudy; o-overcast: f-foo 


J-ros: d-ditute: h- 

haib imsi-nusb r-ratn: miww; in- 
thunderstorm: p-showers. 

Arrows show wind dlrectkm. wind 
speed <mph) dieted. Temperature 
centigrade. 


EAST COAST 
Scarbore 94 

MMngtow 103 

Cromer 83 

Lpw aJto ft 73 

Clacton 11.7 

sn^CMST X 
FoSceston* 125 

Hastings X 

Eastbourne 125 

Brighton -125 

Worth in g 113 

UMe ha gl i i 123 

SguUnH 

Sfidown 123 .17 20 68 sunny 

ShanfcSn 123 .14 18 64 sunny 

Boumemtb 135 - 20 68 sum 

129 .14 21 - 70 sum 
- 19 66 sunny 
18 64 sunny 


Tenby 

CoteynBay 


43 20 68 Sumy 
36 19 66 sunny 
31 18 6* sumw 
33 18 64 sunny 
.07 19 66 sunny 
.11 19 66 sunny 

12.6 37 19 66 sunny 

12.7 22 20 6® sunny 


Carom 


Lighting-op time 


TODAY 

London 928 pm to 446 am 
Bristol 928 pm to 456 am 
Effinburgh 1032 pm to 457 am 
Manchester 946 pm to 4.46 am 
Penzance 944 pm to 5.14 am 


Swanage 135 
Weymouth 143 - 
Eanoutb 13.1 
T fi g nm oa Bi 133 

SBS5. 'X 

P tnz a a m 62 
HI . 

west coast 
ScWy tola* 34 


- 21 -70 Sunny 

- 21. 70 sumv 

- S3 70 sunny 

- 20 68 brip 

- 20 -68 sunny 
21 70 sunny 


anRaln' Max ' 
hre to C F . 
ioa - 21 70 stray 
114' - 19“ 66 
7.1 X 18 « 

7.0 .03 19 .86 
7.7 20 16 - 61 'ehowte* 
53 38 14 57 dtedB 

6NGLAND ANOl WALES’ 

. 125 - 22 72 sunny 

?1»«.A*rpt 113 .02 22 72 rein 

- 20 ear.smy 

- 2t 70 suwy 
..T..16 61 rain 
.03 17 63 rate 
-01 20 68 rein 
.14 2l '70.-rate 

- 21V 70. rain 

31 16- 61 rate 

‘SCOTLAND 

l* 32 15.61 rain . 
53 .10 15 59 rate 
-06 16 61- rate 
23 13 SS-rate 
.13 13 55 rate 

- 15 *53 tunny 
37 15 59 «ln 

66 rate- 
70 rate 


Lbu 
’'-K'UtSmt 

««my 

/ -.- --'t dae oM- 

■ 1 - 7 -' Mary wfe. 

' a>*kj 

■ • <f ?irn far : 


-£i 


V--. 

ft:- 1 ' 


■TctHP 


105 

113 

:.53 

73 

.85 

11.1 

95 

.82 


Tg«e 

Stenoteay 

Lantech 

Wick 


43 

1.0 

23 

7.7 

83 


- 19 66 bright 


Abroad 


74 37 19- 

113 .02 21 «„ , 

sir tI -s m sc?** 

BMwmw 72 32 is 5ff sum fcr -- ~. ***1-7.^ 



TOMORROW 

London 927 pm to 4.48 am 
Bristol 926 pm to 458 am 
Edteburgh 1030 pm to 429 am 
Manch este r 9.44 pm to 447 am 
Penzance 9.43 pm to &15 am 


Atax’ikfa 

Algiers 


LC F 


Yesterday 


MDDAY: c, douefc <L drizzle: f .lair; fg, log; r , rain; s* s^pi; sn;' snow; t thunder. 

C . F .. C F 

s 27 81 Cotovte' T 16 61 
s 29 84 Cphnji 1 19 66 
I 29 84 Corfu s 31 88 
8 31 .88 DuUfa C 16 61 
d 16. ft Drtxowfc s.28 .82 Mateeo C 


M ato Vn a r 7 45 


- O.F 

3 28- 82 Room v26 79 
4ft 23 73 Sehfang f 20 0 
8 38 S7SPitora* s 17 O 


Athens 

Bahrein 


s 32 98 Fare 


Bhutan 


Temperatures at midday yesterday; e, 
cloud; i, fan; r. rate; s. sun. . 

C F 

01559 CkNmaey 
C1964 bweroen 

c 1599 Jersey 
c 1968 London 
e 1966 amchster 
f 1763 


Canon 

Edinburgh 

Glasgow 


C F 
fg 1559 
■ e 1457 
r 1661 
-c 2068 
C 1457 
1 1861 


c 1763 Runaway «1559 


_ NEWSPAPERS- UM TTE P. 
. Printed bv London .Pop tPniu- 
ersi Linuted of 1 Virginia street. 
London El 9XN. Saturday. Jnv 26. 
1936. Re^stered as a oewsteDer ai 


Ctera 3 
ilh 


Cape To 
CWenca 


lice. 


Chicago’ 

Clfctotrdi 


c 24 -75 -Funchal 
f 30 86 Genava 
C 21 70 Gtorakar, 
t 19 66 Hetoinld - 
I 29 84 Hong K 
s 21 70 ten au tk 
s 24 75.istanlx4 
c 15 ^ Jeddah 
c 16 .61 Jkftng* 
c 19 66 Karachi 
s 19 ttLPatoras 
s 33 91 Lisbon 
J 17 63. Locarno 
f 23 73 LAqgdbT 
s 30. 86 LmtendiH 
f 17 63 Madrid 


s 22 72’ 

S 29 84 Man. 

C 20 88 
f 21 70: 

S 23 73 MwMt 
s 24.75 toak uM 
s 24 75 Nantoe 

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i. I 


BUSINESS AND FINANCE 


THE 



TIMES 


SP0RT27 

TE LEVISION AND RADI031 


SATURDAY JULY 26 1986 


^Kenneth Fleet 

^Executive Editor 



STOfeK MARKET 

FT 30 Share 

1283.7 (-0.5) 

FT-SE 100 

1545.8 (-1.9) 

ilns 

*6 V 



THE POUND 

US Dolla r 

1^0 (-0.0115) 

W German mark 
3.7 B27 (-0,004$ 
Trade-weighted 
73.0 (+0.2) 


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Ensign bid 
for Berry 

Ensign. Trust, the restruc- 
tured Murray Growth Trust, 
whictus 80 percent owned by 
Merchant Navy Officers Pen- 
sion Investments, yesterday 
offered £86 miltian for Berry 
TrUst — part of the GT 
Management stable with 11.7 
per cent of GT. 

Berry immediately called 
the bid unwelcome. Mr Bertie 
Boyd, joint managing director 
ofGTsaid Ensign was trying 
to pick up Berry cheap. He 
added that Berry had one of 
the most outstanding records 
of investment trusts in the last 
10 years and also over the last 
12 months, Berry’s many 
small shareholders sitting on 
large capital gains would be 
disadvantaged by Ensign's 
bid. 

. Mr Philip Henderson, in- 
vestment manager of Ensign, 
said Berry Trust’s perfor- 
mance, after stripping out its 
GT investment which had 
been exemplary, was not all 
that good. In the recent GT 
flotation Berry reduced its 
stake from 28.2 per cent 

Gas date 

Dealings in the shares of the 
privatized gas industry are 
expected to start in late No- 
vember, Mr Peter Walker, die 
Energy Minister, said 
yesterday. 


** Z N*J Wen u t 

ZI-'jQpg £400missue 

... • W r 


V. • \ ^ 



ii^h ridrs 

IN S’ 

/>'TT ^ j|- 

i 


;rr 


S’ 

31.' : 5 Jl 



«*£**■ 

•Vr- 


' n; 4 Britain 


aSSili* 

!l 

'*£■ 

.T -■ 

. - 


. - The Bank of -England is 
■ issuing, by tender, a further 
£400 million tranche of 2% per 
cent, index-linked. Treasury 
stock, 2016, payable 40 per 
cent on tender and the balance 
on September 8 . 

City purchase 

Five Oaks Investments, the 
property company, has bought 
Pountney HD1 House in the 
City of London for over £5 
million from Richard Ellis, 
the firm of agents acting for 
the receiver for Miller Buckley 
Developments. There is con- 
sent fora 23,596 sq ft develop- 
ment on the site near Cannon 
Street. 

Preedy down 

Allred Preedy & Sons, the 
Midlands newsagent chain, 
suffered a sharp rail in pretax 
profits from £ 1.01 million to 
£383,000 in the year to March, 
on turnover up from £107.4 
million .to £113.6 million. The 
final dividend was left at 
2.875p to make an unchanged 
annual total Of 3.875p. 

Tempos, page 18 

Travel Trust 

Our report (July 15) about 
the Travel Trust and Virgin 
Atlantic litigation said that the 
action had been stayed be- 
cause of Travel Trust's failure 
to provide security for costs. 
In -fact, though the security 
ordered by the court, due on 
June 12^ was paid on June 24, 
vir g in Atlantic was not told of 
this until July 1 5. The stay was 
not lifted until July 23 and the 
action is not yet set down for 
triaL 


Grand Met to buy 
Ruddles for £14m 


By Cliff Feltbam 

Ruddles, the country’s best 
known brewers- of real ale, is 
selling out to the Watney 
conglomerate Grand Metro- 
politan for £14.2 million. 

The deal — which was 
immediately condemned by 
the Campaign for Real Ale — 
is being backed by the Ruddles 
family and holders of 54 per 
cent of the shares. 

Grand Metropolitan, which 
has been sellingRuddles beers 
throughout its pubs in London 
and East Anglia, says that 
brewing will carry on at the. 
Ruddles brewery at Langham 
in Leicestershire, home of the 
business since 1858, and will 
be managed as a free-standing 
subsidiary within its brewing 
and relating division. 

On the stock market. Rud- 
dles shares jumped more than 
£1 to 290p, just below the £3 a 
share terms being offered by 
Grand Metropolitan. 

Ruddles, which made its 
reputation through sales of its 
County draught beer, sold its 



Tony Roddles/'Good news 
for connoisseurs'’ 
chain of 38 pubs in 1977 to 
concentraje on selling into 
other brewers’ pubs, such as 
Grand Metropolitan, and to 
supermarkets and off-licences, 
where its profit margins have 
been squeezed by heavy 
discounting. 

Mr Tony Ruddle; 50, the 
chairman and grandson of 
George Ruddle who took over 
the business soon after it was 


set up. said that the takeover 
would enable it to promote its 
beers into pubs throughout the 
country by taking advantage 
' of Grand MeuopUitan's na- 
tionwide distribution net- 
work. 

He said: “I think this is 
good news for real ale connois- 
seurs who can be assured that 
the quality will be maintained 
and our beers will be available 
to a much greater audience. 
When you are drinkinga good 
pint it does not matter wheth- 
er ownership is in the hands of 
a few people ora large group.” 

A Grand Metropolitan 
spokesman said: “We have 
been selling Ruddles beers in 
500 pubs in the South-east and 
another 250 in East Anglia. 
The future belongs to strong 
brand names, and Ruddies is 
the best." 

But Camra said it deplored 
the takeover. It said: “Grand 
Meiro|»liian might claim 
they will protect the name of 
Ruddles, but that does not 
mean they will be committed 
to keeping the brewery going 


or endeavour to maintain and 
improve the quality of the 
beers.” 

Mr Ian Andrews of the 
stockbrokers Buckmaster and 
Moore, welcomed the get- 
together “The two companies 
have had strong trading links 
and the deal should be good 
for sales of Ruddles beers. ” 

Ruddles, which came to the 
Unlisted Securities Market 
four years ago, has' been 
making profits of about £1 
million a year. 

In the past few months 
Ruddles has been spending on 
a specialized television cam- 
paign in the Anglia region to 
promote sales of its beers. 

During the early part of the 
century the brewery was one 
of 47 then in existence in 
Rutland and neighbouring 
Leicestershire catering for the 
local formers. 

After the First World War it 
followed the trend towards 
public house ownership, grad- 
ually acquiring an estate be- 
fore selling these in the 1970s. 



Bitter rivals no more: Watneys and Ruddles in a London pr.b 


Interim dividend cut by 
50 per cent at Britoil 


By Teresa Poole 

Britoil. one of the financial- 
ly strongest independent oft 
companies, yesterday halved 
its interim dividend. It gave 
warning that if the oil price 
remained at the present level it 
would make no profits in the 
second half of 1986. 

The shares fell 26p to a 
record low of HOp after the 
announcement that net profits 
in the first six months bad 
fallen from £91.4 million to 
£34.5 million. 

Bri toil's crude o3 produc- 
tion jn the first half increased 
slightly to 33 million barrels 
but the foil in turnover from 
£968 ndBkm to £ 364 million 
reflected an average price of 
£1153 per barrel, compared 
with £22.71 In 1985. Over the 
first half of this year the oil 
price has Jalten from S28 to 
bekm £10 a barreL 
Mr Bob Speir, the finance 


director, said the company bad 
to accept toe possibility that 
the oil price wonld not recover. 
He added that a decision 
concerning paying a final divi- 
dend would not be made on til 
the full year results were 
known. 

Yesterday, oil traders re- 
ported an extremely quiet 
market with both buyers and 
sellers holding back for next 
week's meeting of the Organi- 
zation of Petroleum Exporting 
Countries. One cargo of Brent, 
for delivery in September, 
hands at $9-47 a 


If the Opec meeting ad- 
journs without any agreement 
on production quotas, the mar, 
ket expects to see a fail of np to 
$2 a barreL 

Mr RDwanu Lukman, Opec 
president and Nigerian oil 
minister, said yesterday that- 
qootas would have to be agreed 


before Opec production — now 
running at more than 195 
million barrels a day — could 
be reduced. He was optimistic 
that agreement would be 
reached. 

At the June Opec meeting, a 
majority of ministers agreed to 
a 1741 million barrel ceiling 
and were given proposed qno- 
tas to consider by next week's 
gathering. 

■ Dr Sobrato, Indonesia’s oil 
minister, who drew np the 
proposed quotas, said yester- 
day that Opec was unlikely to 
split up but that difficulties 
remained in reaching 
agreement 

Dr Mans Saeed af-Otefha, 
the United Arab Emirates oil 
minister, said the organization 
faced an impossible mission on 
Monday and toe conference 
would be the hardest since 
Opec's inception. 

Tempos, page 18 


£15m retail 
scheme 
for PHIT 

By Judith Huntley 
Commercial Property 
Correspondent 
Property Holding and In- 
vestment Trust, the subject of 
a hostile £108 million take- 
over bid from Greycoat 
Group, the rival property 
company, is to develop a £15 
million, 27.5 acre retail park 
near Leamington Spa in War- 
wickshire significantly adding, 
to the 20 per cent of retail 
property held in its portfolio. 

PHIT has been negotiating 
for the £8.5 million purchare 
from a local charity for some 
time but the announcement of 
the scheme comes at an 
opportune moment for the 
company, which is keen to 
convince the market that it is 
an active developer. 

Greycoat in its offer to 
shareholders accused PHIT of 
being too reliant for growth on 
buying investment, rather 
than development properties, 
often let on long leases. PHIT 
says it is continuing to widen 
the portfolio. 

The company is telling 
shareholders to reject the 
Greycoat bid. Its defence doc- 
ument is likely to appear early 
next week. The company can 
probably count on support for 
30 per cent of its shareholding. 


MARKET SUMMARY 


STOCK MARKETS 


New York 
Dow Jones 
Tokyo 
Nikkei Dow 
Hong Kong: 


_ 180121 (+1859) 
1805939 (+2435) 


184057 (+7.57) 

. 1851.7 (+21-2) 



Commerzbank 

Brussels: 

General — 

Paris: CAG 

Ztncfc: 


“ ~ 

Us-”' - : i -• $ 2 ? 

I**? fU-ss 

w*- — r - 
irfjt * tj ? J ? 1 


SKA General 

Loodon dosing prices Page 


646.74 (+3.22) 
— nfa 


n/a 

21 


INTEREST RATES 



London: 

Bank Base: 10 % 

3-mortti hrtwbai* 

3-month eOgfote Wtts3V9 l »x'% 
buying rate 

Prime Rats 8% 

FedensJ Raids 6»t8% 

3-month Treasury BMs 5.80-5.78% 
30-year bonds SeX-OtP* 

CURRENCIES 


London: 

£: SI- 4810 
£: DM3.1827 
LSwfW-5703 
£: FFr102959 
fcVen234J)7. 
E: |nrifur.72LO 


New York: 

e$1M25 
S-‘ DM2.1475 
$: Index: 113.4 

ECU £0.663857 
SDR 23.789920 


main price changes 


RISES 

New Cavendteh 
Conroy Pet 
Renoid 



Trafalgar 
Lex Service 
Saga Holidays 
Gus’A’ . 

Portland 
Mercury frrtamat - 
Speyhawk — - — 
Sungei Besi Mines 


GOLD 


235.50) 

Smof»M-0tW49^0 


NORTH SEA OIL 


Brent (Sept) — $9.85 W ($9.77) 


AE says £174m bid 
‘totally inadequate’ 


By Lawrence Lever 


The unwelcome £1 74. 1 mil- 
lion bid for AE, the high 
technology engineers, from 
Turner & Newall, the mining, 
engineering and automotive 
group, was condemned as 
misconceived and totally in- 
adequate by- Sir John Collyear, 
AE*s chairman, yesterday. 

AEs defence document, re- 
leased yesterday, points to the 
discrepancy between AEs 
share price and the value of 
Turner & Newall’s bid, and 


describes the bid as having no 
industrial logic. 

Sir John says in his letter to 
shareholders contained in the 
defence document, that the 
bid “represents an attempt by 
Turner & Newall to alleviate 
the many problems posed by 
its dependence on asbestos by 
buying a successful but unre- 
lated business'*. The defence 
does not contain a profit 
forecast 


Societies gain freedoms 


% Martin Baker 


Building societies have been 
granted important new finan- 
cial freedoms in toe Building 
Societies Act which yesterday 
received royal assent 

The provisions of toe Act 
will take effect at the begin- 
ning of next year; concern nad 
been expressed by the Build- 
ing Societies Association 
(BSA) that the Act might be 
driayed.until spring. 

The single, most important 
new freedom will be the ability 
to grant unsecured loans to 
individuals of up to £5,000. 
This will permit building soci- 
eties to offer the equivalent of 


bank cheque accounnts, com- 
plete with the facility to 
become overdrawn. 

Other changes in the law 
will allow societies to convert 
themselves to limited compa- 
nies, subject to the aproval of 
their members, and to raise up 
to 20 per cent of their funds on 
the international capital 
markets. 

The buflding societies, both 
individually and through the 
medium of the BSA, have 
been pressing for a change in 
the law for more than five 
years. 


Profits up 
sharply 
at Lloyds 

By Richard Thomson 

Banking Correspondent 

Lloyds Bank yesterday be- 
gan the clearing bank interim 
reporting season by announc- 
ing a sharp profits increase 
over the last six months, 
almost exactly matching the 
forecast made by the bank, a 
month ago as part of its 
abortive bid for Standard 
Chartered Bank. The results 
show a surge in profits from 
the bank's domestic UK oper- 
ations while overseas banking 
operations required a lower 
level of loan loss provisions 
than last year. 

Lloyds produced a pretax 
profit of £335 million com- 
pared with £264 million at the 
same time last year. The bank 
had forecast a profit of £333 
million a month ago. But 
because of a lower tax charge 
post-tax profits moved ahead 
even foster, to £214 million 
compared with £141 million, 
an increase of 52 per cent. 
Domestic UK operations 
moved ahead by 32 per cent to 
£136 million. The interim 
dividend has been increased 
by 1.25p, from 5p to 6.25p. 

Mr Brian Pitman, the chief 
executive, said, “compared 
with the corresponding period 
of 1985, we achieved a sub- 
stantial increase in earnings 
per share and improved our 
return on both equity and 
assets". He added that the 
results showed the bank’s 
emphasis on profitability rath- 
er than balance sheet size. The 
bank's assets hardly grew dur- 
ing the period 

Net interest income moved 
ahead 6 per cent to £49 
million, but non-interest in- 
come, such as credit cards, 
estate agency, insurance 
broking and merchant bank- 
ing operations, jumped by 15 
per cent to £46 million. At the 
same time the' merger of 
Lloyds Bank International 
into toe main frank helped to 
contain costs to an increase of 
6 per cent. 

Provisions for bad debts fell 
from £126 million last year to 
£1 i 1 million this time while 
the bank's tax charge dropped 
from 47 per cent to 36 per 
cenL The lower tax rate was 
due partly to foiling corpora- 
tion tax rates and was helped 
by a greater reliance on special 
provisions for bad debts 
which receive favourable tax 
treatment unlike general 
provisions. 


New finance chief 
for Standard 

By Our Banking Correspondent 


Hong Kong Wharf trims its 
title and lifts profits 


From Stephen Leather, Hong Kong 


Tbe company with the long- 
est name on the Hong Kong 
Stock Exchange — The Hong 
Kong & Kowloon Wharf and 
Godwin Company — is to 
change its title to the more 
manageable one of The Wharf 
(Holding). 

In addition to the new name, 
Mr Peter Woo, the managing 
director ami son-in-law of 
shipping tycoon Sir YK Pao, 
yesterday announced that pre- 
tax profits had almost doubled 
to HKSU65J2 million (£106 
million) in the year ending 
March 31. 

Hie name change is to 
reflect the 100 -year-old firm’s 
new status as an investment 
holding company, with inter- 
ests in property, hotels, retail- 
ing, transport and financial 
services. 

Shareholders are getting a 
one-for -10 scrip issue and a 
special one-fbr -10 centenary 
warrant to subscribe for 


shares at HKS7.50 each at the 
end of 1990. 

Turnover during the year 
more than doubled from 
HK$1 530.2 million to 
HK33247.9 million (£290 miL 
1 km), though much of that 
increase was dne to the 
HK32500 million acquisition 
of Wheelock Maiden in 
March last year. 

Analysts have been expect- 
ing profits to increase by 30 
per ceuton last year's 
HKS577.6 miffios. “ft was a 
good, solid performance this 
year," said Mr Woo hi Hong 
Kong yesterday. “There was 
bo real star that outshone the 
rest” 

The integration of Whee- 
lock Mantes bad gone “rela- 
tively smoothly," he said. 

“Certain unprofitable or 
non-strategic subsidiaries 
have already been sold or 
ceased business. Wheetock’s 
businesses in trading and re- 
tailing, manafactaring and 


commercial services have re- 
ported satis fa c t ory results,” 
be said. 

He added: “With the satis- 
factory recovery of the proper- 
ty market in 1985, the group’s 
substantial interest in the 
property sector has recorded 
increased profit.” 

The company has plans to 
improve services and Increase 
revenue on its Hong Kong 
trams and the famous Star 
Ferry service. The proposed 
relocation of the tram depot to 
two new depots at either end of 
the system has been approved 
by the government in princi- 
ple, thereby leaving the Wan 
rhfli site free for a planned 
HKS750 million development. 

The company plans to pay a 
final dividend of 23 HK colts, 
malting * total dividend of 31.5 
HK cento per share for the fall 
year, an increase of 50 per 
cent. 


Standard Chartered has 
moved fost in appointing a 
new finance director with the 
announcement yesterday that 
Mr Richard Stein, currently 
the finance director of BOC 
would be joining the Standard 
board in late September. 

Mr Stein will be replacing 
Mr Stuart Tarrant, who re- 
signed as finance director on 
Monday. There was specula- 
tion that Mr Tarrant had 
supported the Lloyds Bank 
bid for Chartered and found 
his position at the bank unten- 
able when the bid foiled. 

Mr Michael McWilliam, 
chief executive of Standard, 
said: “BOC have been very 
accommodating in letting Mr 
Stein go so quickly. It seemed 
to me we should move fost on 


the appointment of such an 
important post at this particu- 
lar time.” 

Mr Stein, who is 51, is a 
chartered accountant and en- 
gineer who began his career in 
the corporate finance depart- 
ment or Samuel Montagu, the 
merchant bank, in the 1960s. 
From there he moved first to 
Reckitt & Cobnan and in i 975 
to BOC. He has been chief 
finance director of BOC since 
1980. 

He will join Standard as a 
full board director. Mr 
McWilliam said that he was 
well qualified for the job 
because he is in charge of both 
the computer and finance 
areas of BOC which are the 
same areas of responsibility he 
will have at Standard. 


NMC in £8m takeover 

By Our Gty Staff 


NMC Investments, the fibre 
board containers and invest- 
ment holding group, yesterday 
announced its first major 
purchase since the Saatchi 
brothers, Charles and Mau- 
rice, took their 30 per cent 
stake earlier this year. 

It is paying a maximum of 
£8 million for Interpoly, a 
manufacturer of specialized 
polythene bags and sleeves, 
which Last year made pretax 
profits of £451,000 on a £3.8 
million turnover. 

The deal is being financed 


by a vendor-placing of £7 
million NMC shares to insti- 
tutions at £1 a share against 
the market price of 117p 
before yesterday's announce- 
ment. Shareholders in 
Imerpoly are taking a further 1 
million shares. NMCs share 
price dosed 6 p up yesterday at 
I23p. 

At the same time, NMC 
announced its results for the 
year to March 31, showing 
pretax, profits of £167.000, 
against a loss of £183,000 last 
time. 


Oil price 
fall hits 
trade 
surplus 

By Graham Searjeant 
Financial Editor 

Falling oil prices have cut 
the surplus on the current 
account of Britain's balance of 
payments to £1.07 billion in 
the first half of this year, 
compared with a £1.53 billion 
surplus for* the same six 
months last year and a Budget 
forecast of a maintained £3.5 
billion surplus for the year as a 
whole. 

The surplus on oil trade fell 
to £ 2.8 billion compared with 
£4.4 billion a year ago drag- 
ging the visible trade deficit 
from £1 .4 billion to almost £3 
billion. But this is more than 
made up by invisible earnings 
from investments, the City 
and tourism, which are esti- 
mated in advance to be earn- 
ing a £700 million a month 
surplus. 

The June trade figures, re- 
leased yesterday, show a small 
increase in the overall current 
surplus to £77 million from 
£34 million in May and little 
change in the picture of slug- 
gish imports and exports. 

The improvement is entire- 
ly accounted for by a sharp foil 
in oil imports from £370 
million to £237 million, their 
lowest level since January 
1974. Oil exports fell more 
gently by £57 million to £526 
million, raising the oil trade 
surplus from £212 million to 
£288 million. But this is little 
more than a third of the 
monthly surplus last autumn 
before the collapse of oil 
prices. 

There was little reaction to 
the figures in the foreign 
exchange markets, although 
the non-oil visible trade defi- 
cit was higher and the overall 
June surplus somewhat lower 
.than most Gty forecasts. 

The roost wonrying element 
r.n the trade picture is the 
continuing upturn in the non- 
oil trade deficit since a sharp 
foil in ApriL Excluding erratic 
iti?ms such as gems, silver, 
sh ips and aircraft, as well as 
oiL the visible deficit edged up 
from £995 million in May to 
£ 1 .12 billion last month. 

, Non-oil exports rose by 
ortiy £17- million suggesting 
thait British goods are not 
proving more competitive in 
expiort markets that remain 
slmigish. 

Imports fell chiefly because 
of a fall in ajrcraft 
deli veries.Tbe deficit on trade 
in manufactures for the sec- 
ond quarter as a whole, at 
£57;l million was still sharply 
dowrn on the £1.42 billion 
regisiered in the first quarter 
and 1 he Government believes 
that there has been a slight 
underlying rise in the level of 
non-oil exports 

- Sonne analysts in the City 
also suggest that toe estimate 
of £700 million per month 
surplus tin invisibles used 
since April may prove 
optimisTic. 


TARGET 


JAPAN FUND 

INVEST IN THE LAND OF RISING OPPORTUNITIES 


Fbr many years, Japan has been a 
favourite choice for investors looking to 
diversify their portfolios overseas. They 
love not been disappointed. Japan has 
provided investors with outstanding 
jetumsi We believe that Japan should 
consistently merit a place in investors’ 
portfolios. Certain recent developments 
lead us to believe that Japan now looks more 
attractive than for some time. 

W>rld oil prices have fallen 
significantly. As a huge im- 

porter of ofl, Japan stands 

to gain from the foil of ofl prices perhaps 
more than any other industrialised nation. 

The Japanese authorities 
are looking to reduce 

interest rates and stimulate 

the domestic economy into higher growth. 
With inflation continuing to fall, we also 
consider that the rise in real incomes will 
further encourage domestic expansion. 

Japanh long tram commit- 
ment to industrial growth 
and technological develop- 
ment should, we consider, ensure that it 
continues to rank high among the worlds 
leading economies. 

Since the launch of theThrget Japan Fluid 
in December 1982, it has provided inves- 
tors with an impressive return of over 
297%* well above the average of 246%.* 


Please send me a copy of the Target Japan Fund Fhct Sheet 
SEND TO: TARGET TRUST MANAGERS LTD, FREEPOST, LONDON EC4B4EH 


Tf 


Tf 


Tf 


FREE FACT SHEET 

The Manager of the Ta rget Japan Fund 
has recently returned from Japan where he 
undertook an in depth study of potential 
investment opportunities. 

Wfe have presented his findings in the 
form of a fact sheet 

Tb receive your free copy, simply 
eompleteand return the couf on below. If you 
have a professional ad visa* and wish to 
invest in the Target Japan Ftind, we suggest 
you contact him without dela y. 

Remember, the price of units and the 
income from them can go down, as well as up- 


Wl figures taken 
from OPAL statis- 
tics. offer lo hid, 
net income 
reinvested. 

To 32nd .July /-gr 
1986, » -**’*? 



■«w». 


Name:. 


Ad dress - 



Name of Professional Adviser. 


— TARG ET 

TARGET GROUP Pr r 

UNFf TRUSTS 

Member of the Unit Trust Association. 



BUSINESS AND FINANCE 


THE TIMES SATURDAY JULY 26 1986 


WALL STREET 


COMPANY NEWS 


tempus 


Shares stage recovery 


New York (Agencies) — bitting reso 
Shares rose in early trading A recovei 
yesterday, erasing most of ed soppo 
Thursday's loss, although the that intei 
1,800 level continued to be a crease sul 
stopping point for the Dow jog sto< 
Jones industrial average. It declines b 
rose by 6-38 to 1,7 9&D, after million sh 


crease sul 
ing snx 


nance at 1,799. 
jy in bonds prorid- 
l easing concern 
st rates may m- 
tantialfy soon, Ris- 
& outnumbered 
three to two on 15 
res traded. 


M JU 
24 23 



• JACKSONS BOURNE 
END: Total dividend 6p (same) 
for the year to March 31. 
Turnover £5.46 million (£4.82 
million). Pretax profit £105.000 
i (£435.000). Earnings per share, 
before extraordinary items. 43p 
(16 3p) and after. 23.2p (20.5p). 

• TACE: Six. months to March 
31. Interim dividend 2JB4p 
(2. Ip), payable on SepL 3. 
Turnover £1137 million (£9-34 
million). Pretax profit £1.7 mil- 
lion (£132 million). Earnings 
per share 14Jp (7.7p). The 
board reports that, but for 
adverse exchange rale move- 
ments, the half-year's profits 
would have exceeded £2 million 
and earnings per share would 
have more than doubled. But a 
further material increase in 
profits for the foil year is 
expected. 

• VIEWPLAN: Year to March 
31. Total dividend I -26p. Turn- 
over £5.09 million (£2.87 mil- 
lion). Pretax profit £367.000 
(£704,000). Earnings per share 
4.03p (5.97p). 

• LADIES PRIDE: Half-year 
to May 31. Interim dividend 
0-5p (same), payable on Ocl 13. 
Sales £336 million (£3.93 nit: 
lion). Pretax loss £13,000 (loss 
£138.000). Loss per share 0.1 5p 


Turnover £43.15 million 
(£41.42 million). Pretax profit 
£1.03 million (£728,000). Earn- 


ings per share £48p (6-52p). 

• EXPLORATION COM- 
PANY OF LOUISIANA: The 
company has bought the in- 
terests oilhe John W Mecom Co 
and certain associates in about 
40.000 gross acres of land in 
Cameron and Calcasieu par- 
ishes. Louisiana, for about S23 
million (£1 5.4 million). 

• RAINE INDUSTRIES: The 
board has signed a conditional 
agreement for the acquisition of 
Miller Wheeldon. a private 
building and contracting com- 
pany. Miller has itself agreed to 
acquire C Price and Son. The 
consideration for Miller, en- 
larged by Price, win be 13 
minion ordinary shares and up 
to 83 million deferred shares in 
Raine. * 

• BENSONS CRISPS: No 
dividend (same) for the 26 
weeks to May 31 (27 weeks last 
time). Turnover £4.72 million 
(£4.91 million). Pretax profit 
£1 1.000 (£48300 loss). Earnings 
per share 03p (1.0 loss). 

• SAC INTERNATIONAL: 
The company is to purchase 
Focus Technical Services for 
£7CKL00Q, satsfied by the issue of 
614,035 ordinary shares (an 
increase of 5 per cent in SACs 
issued capital). Focus, provides 
technical authorship, graphical 
and illustrative support ser- 
vices. Its diems are mainly 
leadim technology companies. 

• BESPAK: Total dividend un- 
changed at 435p for the year to 
May 2 Turnover £i 137 million 


(1.63p). The group is on course 
fora return to profitable trading 
by the end of the current year. 

• BARRIE INVESTMENTS 
& FINANCE: Year to March 
31. Dividend trebled to 0.3p, 
payable on SepL 17. Pretax 
profit £1 million (£845,000). 
Earnings per share 0.62p 
«X49p). 


iiiiW SJ 1 * . 1 Vi 1 , j 1 Y" 


warehouse and now has plan- 
ning permission for an apart- 
ment- hotel. _ _ 

• INGERSOLL-RAND: First 
half of 1986. Pretax earnings 
$57.7 million (£38.6 million), 
against $563 million. Sales 
$ 138 billion ($ 1 39 billion). _ 

• WPP GROUPS The group is 
to buy Oakley Young Asso- 
ciates. which specializes in 
packaging, environmental, cat- 
alogue. point-of-sale and 
promotional premium design. 
An initial £1 million in cash win 
be paid on completion. Further 
payments in cash or shares will 
be made, based _ on pronus 
‘subject to a maximum of £6 
million. An additional payment 
of up to £13 million may be 
made in 1991. conditional on 

STuNITED FRIENDLY 
INSURANCE: The company 
has signed an agreement with a 
syndicate of banks, led by 
Schraders, for a £50 million 
term-loan facility. It will be used 
to finance variable-rate mort- 
gages for endowment 


Future looks bleak 
for Britoil investors 


policyholders. 

• BIDDLE HOLDINGS: The 
offers by Kone (UK.) have been 
declared unconditional i n all 
respects and will remain open 
until further notice. The in- 
creased ordinary offer has been 
accepted by the holders of 236 
milli on shares (about 643 per 
cent). The preference offer has 
been accepted by the holders of 
28,100 shares (about 103 per 
ce nt). 

• TENNECO: Six months to 
June 30. Net income more than 


Tiiyr.’.wr,' ;*77i 


INGS: Six months to March 31. 
Interim dividend I30p ( 1 -25p), 
payable on SepL 5. Turnover 
£1432 million (£12.79 million). 
Pretax profit £839,000 


(£743,000). Earnings per share 
4.69n (4.24 d). The board is 


4.69p (4.24p). The 
confident that group profit will 
be a record for the third year in 
succession. 

• HETTON HOLDINGS: No 
dividend for the year to April 
30. Pretax profit Ii£237,000 
(£221,700), against a loss of 
Ir£339,000. Turnover In£273 
million (Ir£27.48 million). Loss 
per share 1.41p (5.0 lp). 

• J&J DYSON: Year to March 



£808,000 (£236 million). Earn- 
ings per share 43p (17p). The 
board explains that the results 
for foe second half were, as 
expected, substantially better 
than foe po or first half 

• ELBIEF: Year to April 30. 
Total dividend lJB9p (i.72p). 
Pretax profit £603,000 
(£521,000). Turnover £43 mil- 
lion (£3.82 million). Earnings 
per share 2.6 Ip (2.45p). 

• HAROLD INGRAM: Terms 
have been agreed for the pur- 
chase of 1 7 Bloom St, Manches- 
ter. for £250,000 in ordinary 
shares. They will be placed in 
foe market before completion. 

property is used as 


(£136.77 minion), against $98 
million. Net sales and operating 
revenues $7.67 billion ($737 
billion). Earnings per share 
51.16 (49 cents). 

• XEROX CORP: Second 
quarter to June 30. Net income 
51223 million (£82 million), 
against $2203 million. Sales 
$1.13 billion (SI. 02 billion). 
Earnings per share $1.13 
($2.17). 

• IU INTERNATIONAL 
CORPORATION*. Half-year to 
June 30. Net earnings $61.72 
million (£4138 million), against 
a loss of $43.61 million, includ- 


ing an extraordinary credit of 


APPOINTMENTS 



■ titx- a-yuc cUiwou-kp i»9o kwz 


Tin decision likely soon 


A decision on the 
tion by Camon Consoli 
for government money 
keep its Cornish tin mi 


open, is likely to be made 6n 
Tuesday, Mr David Hams. 


Tuesday, Mr David Hariris. 
Conservative MP for St Ivres, 
said yesterday. 

Mr Harris and fellow fyRPs 
Mr Robert Hicks (Cornwall 
South-east) and Mr Dafvid 
Mudd (Falmouth ind 
Camborne) met the PiSme 


Minister to put the case for 
saving the industry. 

They also met Mr Paul 
Channon, Secretary of State 
for Trade and Industry, and 
Mr Peter Morrison, the Minis- 
ter of State. 

Mr Harris said be believed 
reports that the Treasury was 
blocking willingness by the 
Department of Trade and 
Industry to support the tin 
mines. 


Philip Crosby Associates: 
Mr Lance Arrinftfon has been 
elected a board member. 

Charterhouse Investment 
Management Mr Paul Field 
has bom made chief adminis- 
tration director, Mr Nigel 
Watson a director and manag- 
ing director of Charterhouse 
Fund Managers; and Mr JI 
Mackenzie and Mr DA 
Beatata directors and joint 
managing directors of 
Charterhouse Portfolio 
Managers. 

Center Parcs: Mr Peter 
Moore becomes director of 
marketing. 

R S Kennedy & Co: Mr 
KPA Lewis is now chairman. 
Mr CD Harvey is joining the 
board. 


Institute of Directors: Mr 
Graham Mather is general 
director, economic affairs, 
succeeding Lord Harris of 


High Cross. 
CT Bowri 


CT Bo wring & Co: Mr a 
Harter and Mr J Monro are 
now directors, Bowring Space 
Projects. Mr T Madig&n is a 
director,Bo wring Macalaster 
& Alison Aberdeen. Mr GM 
Worrall is a director. Bowring 
Robertson Mitchell 

C & W Walker Holdings: 
Sir Anthony Jolliffe becomes 
chairman. 

HTV Group: Mr Tim 
Knowles becomes managing 
director. 

Thorn EMI: Mr Peter 
Hayman becomes director, 
corporate projects. 


The Towry Law Group: Mr 
Christopher Biackhoose be- 
comes a director, Towry Law 
.& Company and Mr Richard 
Palmer a director, Towry Law . 
(Pensions Services) and 
Towry Law (Pensions 
Consultants). 

Walter Judd: Mrs Veronica 
Lindsay and Mr W illiam 
Ferguson have been made 
associate directors. 

Integrated Visions Systems: 
Mr Dick Roper is now sales 
and marketing director. 

Alphameric: Mr John 
Barrat becomes systems direc- 
tor, Mr Richard Oppe 
commerical director, Mr Er- 
nie Harris divisional director 
and Mr Alain Reynal manag- 
ing director, France. 


What looked like a Tory 
blunder last August when 
small investor demand for 
Britoil shares was severely 
underestimated could now. 
with hindsight and charity, be 
seen as the cautious act of a 
Government anxious not to 
give wider share ownership a 
bad name. 

At lS5p per share, the sale 
of the Government’s 49 per 
cent stake was four times 
over-subscribed. Investors 
who were furious about the 
maximum 150 share alloca- 
tion should ponder the 26p 
fell in the share price yester- 
day to 1 10p, 

For worse is to come In the 
first half the company’s aver- 
age price for a barrel of oil 
halved to £1 133 a barrel and 
□et profits dived from £91.4 
million to £343 million. If 
the oil price stays at the 
present level — about £630 a 
barrel for delivery in Septem- 
ber - profits win simply 
disappear for the second half. 

There will also be consider- 
able write-offs for capitalized 
exploration and pre-project 
spending on North Sea fields 
which are no longer econom- 
ic. Up to £300 million could 
be at stake but Britoil, being 
conservative, had previously 
resisted from taking the 60 to 
70 per cent tax relief which 
was due and which will now 
numb the pain of it afl. 

Exploration and staff cuts 
take time to feed through, 
although the interim figures 
already show a reduction in 
exploration expenditure from 
£1 10 million to £70 million. 
More immediate is the dra- 
matic fell in the provisions 
for petroleum revenue tax 
from £197.7 million to £16.7 
million. Once again, Bri toil's 
previous accounting policies 
should mean that there are 
write-backs on the way. 

Halving foe interim divi- 
dend to 2p has still not' 
maintained the cover and, if 
the company is heading for 
breakeven in foe second half 
it is a brave analyst who 
forecasts more than a nomi- 
nal final payout That would 
mean a 2.6 per cent yield and 
a prospective p/e ratio of 16 
— foe sort of rating that used 
to be seen for a speculative 
tiddler. 

Shareholders have tittle to 
hope for. Next week’s Opec 
meeting is unlikely to bring 
cheer and foe Government’s 
golden share blocks any 
chance of a bid. Perhaps foe 


wildest fantasy is that foe 
Labour Party’s concept ot 
renationalization “without 
speculative gain” could, m 
foe case of BritoiL mean an 
offer from the next Govern- 
ment at the original issue 
price of foe shares. 


Lloyds Bank 


Lloyds Bank surprised no- 
body when it opened the 
clearing bank interim season 
yesterday with a result mar- 


ginally better than its own 
forecast a month ago when 
still in the middle of its bid 
for Standard Chartered. The 

large jump in profits is almost 

certain to set the tone for the 
Other banks’ results to come 
next week. 

Lloyds produced a pretax 
result of £335 million, com- 
pared with its forecast of £333 
million —a 26 percent rise on 
fast year’s first half. The 
interim dividend of 6L25p 
exactly matches the forecast. 

.Lloyds has always been 
good at handling its tax 
charge and this time has 
managed to reduce its tax rate 
to 36 per cent from 47 per 


ever. Lloyds may be looking 
for some purchases in foe 
United States. One of foe 
jewels in the Standard crown, 
after alL was Union, its US 
bank. _ 

More certain is foat more 
effort will be put into improv- 
ing foe Far East and middle 
eastern operations which arc 
holding foe bank back from 
its aim of IS per cent return 
on shareholders funds . Th ere 
will also be more investment 
in non-interest earning in- 
come, which is proving such 
a success in the present year. 


Alfred Preedy 


cent This helped produce foe 
post-tax profit result — a 
figure Lloyds is keen to stress 
— of £214 milli on, a 52 per 
cent increase on last year’s 
£141 million. 

There are dearly features 
in its results to encourage 
optimism. The redeployment 
of low yielding assets in more 
profitable areas has so far 
proved a success. It has 
farther to go: there is the little 
matter of reinvesting foe 
$263 million (£175 million) 
soon to come in from the sale 
of Lloyds Bank California. 

The news from Mexico on 


debt rescheduling has opti- 
mistic implications for 
Lloyds’s Latin American ex- 
posure, but in any case the era 
of rising bad debt provision- 
ing appears to be over. It is 
aim encouraging that foe 
bank has managed to hold its 
operating expenses down to a 
6 per cent increase. A merger 
with Standard Chartered 
would surely have pushed 
this figure through foe roof 

Lloyds is unlikely to be 
looking for another big take- 
over victim, though a second 
go at Standard cannot be 
ruled out if another bid 
emerges for foe overseas 
bank. 

After foe divestment of the 
Californian subsidiary, how- 


Alfred Preedy is a much 
slimmer animal than rt used 
to be, but has found little 

comfort in rationalization. 

The wholesaling, Ronson | 
lighter and printing, aha i 
school contracting divisions 
have, all gone, lea ving the 
company a purely retailing 
operation, with more than 
160 confectionery, tobacco 
and newsagent (CTN) 
outlets. 

- Both sides have had their 
problems, as witnessed by the 
pretax profits slump from 
£1.01 million to £383,000 for 
foe year to March 29. Preedy 
lost £208,000 after rational- 
ization costa 

Operating profits were' 
down 1 7 per cent at £2 -14 
million, with CTN margins 
squeezed by foe continuing 
drop in smoking, the stagna- 
tion ofofoerlinesandaoper 
cent pay rise ordered by foe 
industry wage council. Mar- 
gins were up in the other- 
stores, but on msufiictenl 
volume to compensate fof 
sharp rale and rent increases. 

Preedy is trying to get out 
of its jam by putting more 
high-margin goods, such as 
books, stationery and cards, 
through its larger outlets, and 
following the trend to conve- 
nience stores which offer 
groceries, alcohol and extend- 
ed opening hours. The group, 
hopes to open two new 
convenience outlets this year 
and extend the range of goods 
on sale at several CTNs. . ' 

The shares slumped l2pto 
lOOp after the results yester- 
day but, as an afterthought, 

__ii: _ j 4— T?-. :r*t 


rallied 4p. Even if the outlook 
is not that exciting, Preedy 
has strong asset backing and 
could well become foe subject 
of take-over talk again, de- 
spite foe large family holding.. 



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iONDONFlNAN 


TRADITION A 

























'1 HE TIMES SATURDAY JULY 20 1980 


BUSINESS AND FINANCE 


19 


STOCK MARKET REPORT 


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s;^L tlr '..=enai„ 

Strifes* 

3 Z-: 

iin CVi 

A Ir. . 


Blue Circle tumbles as gloom 
grows on profits outlook 


By Michael Clark 

Shares of Bine Circle Indus- 
tries tumbled 2Qp to 573p 



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yesterday, wiping £25 million 
from the gpup’s stock market 
value as Gty analysts contin- 
ued to take an increasingly 
pessimistic view of its pros- 
pects for the current year. 

The rot set in on Thursday, 
following a meeting between 
the company and Kitcai & 
Ajiken, the broker. Kitcai is 
said to have come away from 
the meeting in a bearish 
mood. 

Later m the day, a seller of 
oyer. 500.000 shares appeared 
in the market, but was unable 
to- find a buyer. The shares 

• Talk among the indus- 
trial cleaning contractors sug- 
gests that Sunlight 
Services has put its Pall Mall 
Qeanmg subsidiary np for 
sale. Problems with privatiza- 
tion contracts and 
squeezed margins were 
blamed for last year's ' 
£500,000 profit decline and 
now Sunlight may have de- 
cided to concentrate is efforts 
elsewhere. Theshares 
were unchanged at 21 dp. 

may still be around. Then, 
ypterday, .Savory & Millo. a 
rival broker, added to Blue 
Circle’s misery by reducing its 
forecast of pretax profits for 
1986 froth £135 million to 
£123 million, compared with 
£H6.9_mil!ion last year. 

■Mr : Mark Stockdale^ an 
analyst at Savory, said that 
thereare a number of reasons 
for bis pessimism. The bene- 
fits of increased efficiency and 
lower fuel costs at the group's 
Cauldon and Dunbar plants 
have been slow in coming 
through. 

Blue Circle spent £70 mil- 
lion on revamping the plants. 


which between them account 
for 25 per cent of Britain's 
ccmcni production. The bad 
weather at the Sian of the year 
has also hit profits and the 
group has been unable to pass 
on the cost of a 5 per cent pay 
rise for its workforce: 

Mr Stockdale says the 
shares are excellent value in 
the long-term, yielding 5.2 per 
cent and with all the benefits 
of increased efficiency and 
lower energy 8 costs still to filter 
through. But. in the short- 
term, the share price is likely 
to remain depressed until after 
the interim figures, due next 
month. These should show 
pretax profits sliding from 
£52.3 million to £48 million. 

The rest of the equity 
market ended the account on a 
quiet note following 
Thursday’s shake-out stem- 
ming from the gloomy eco- 
nomic and political outlook. 

The FT Index of 30 shares 
finished 0.5 lower at 1.263.7 — 
a fall on the two-week account 
of 73.6 points. Its broader- 
based partner, the FT-SE 100, 
slipped by 1.9 to 1,545.8 
yesterday. Dealers reported 
only minimal new-time buy- 
ing for the next account 
despite a brisk start to trading 
on Wall Street. 

The latest trade figures, 
showing a visible deficit of 


FT 30 

SHARE INDEX 


SomKOBtastream 


1400-1 


1300- 


1200 - 


iioo-F- 



JAN 


FEB ' MAR ‘ APR 


T MAY * JUN ' JUL. 1 


£623 million, were much in 
line with expectations. Gilts 
enjoyed gains of up £’/» in thin 
trade. 

But the Government broker 
felt confident enough to issue 
a further £400 million of 
Treasury index-linked stock. 
2016. “A", by way of lender. 
Investors will pay an initial 
£40, with the balance on 
September 8. 

Further reflection on ICI’s 
second-quarter figures 
prompted a rise of 12p to 
994p. 

But the building sector was 
under a cloud, worried by 
reports that the European 
Commission was pressing for 
the Government to charge 
VAT on new homes. Tarmac 
fell 8p to 442 p, Hepwortb 


RECENT ISSUES 


Ceramic 7p to I97p, RMC 
Group I Op to 642p, John 
Laing “A” lOp to 445p. YJ 
Lovell 3p to 41 8p and Trafal- 
gar House lOp to 2J2p. 

USM-quoied G Ruddle, the 
Rutland-based real ale brewer, 
leapt 89p to a record 285p. 
after announcing the terms of 
an agreed bid from Grand 
Metropolitan, the Wataey- 
Truman brewery and hotels 
group. 

The offer is worth £142 
million and values Ruddle at 
300p a share. Ruddle's share- 
holders will have the choice of 
accepting cash, or the equiva- 
lent in Grand Met unsecured 
loan notes. The Ruddle direc- 
tors and their families have 
already accepted for 158 mil- 
lion shares, or 54.6 per cent of 


the capital. Grand Met shed 
Ip at 370p. 

The rest of the brewers 
appeared unsettled, with small 
gains in Belhaven, up Ip at 
60p, Greenall Whitley Ip to 
I85p and Greene, King 2p to 
2 1 Op. Bui losses were recorded 
in HP Bulmer, 2p to 1 59p. and 
Whitbread “A” 2p to 266p. 

Speculation grew that Mr 
Michael Ashcroft's Hawley 
Group would counter BET'S 
bid for Brengreen, when 
Hawley — down 3p at I02p — 
announced it had picked up a 
further 2.22 million shares in 
the market This brings the 
number of shares purchased 
by Hawley in the past couple 
of days to 5.22 million, raising 


• Ensign Trust's unwanted 
bid for Berry Trust is likely to 
focus attention soon on 
Ivory & Sime, where Ensign 
owns a 23.6 per cent stake. 
The shares of Ivory & Sime 
were languishing at a low 
of 148p yesterday, valuing the 
group at £3.6 million. 

Dealers claim that the Edin- 
burgh investment manager 
could be Ensign's next bid 
target 


EQUmES 

Annua Secs (115p) 
Asfitey (L) f13Soj 
BBB Design [57 p) 
Beaverco <145p) 
apel 37 1-{2pf 
Borland (1&p) 

Bredero (l45p) 

Chelsea Man (I25p) 
Coaled Sectrodes (84p) 
Evans Halishaw (iwp) 
Fletcher Dennys (70p) 
GT Management (2l0p) 
Guthrie Corp (I50p) 
Harrison (150p) 


Hille Ergonom (92p) 


130 
208-2 
71 
148-5 
42+', 
140 -2 
150 
129 
88 
117 
73-1 
195 
155 +1 
157 -1 


Hughes Food (20p> 
MET Cash & C (l00p; 
Morgan Grenfell ' 
Shield ( 


% 

(SoSp) 


(72p) 

Smallbone (16Sp) 
Soundtracks (4 Op) 
Stanley Leisure (110p) 


TV 


(130p> 


Task Force (95p) 
Tenby Inds (112p) 
Thames TV p90p) 
Tlbbet & Bntten (120p) 
Yehrerton (38p) 

Uni lock (63p) • 
Wnidsmoor (106p) 


96+6 
23-1'r 
89 
440 
130-5 
160-2 
38-2 
124 
141 +2 
110 
129 -1 
223-1 
125 -1 
\ 
68 
110 


RIGHTS ISSUES 

Abaco inv N/P 
Antofagasta N/P 
Cdoroli N/P 
De La Rue F/P 
Dataserv N/P 
Erskme Hse F/P 
Expamet N/P 
Inti Signal F/P 
Leigh interests N/P 
Top Value N/P 
Wight CoOns F/P 


(Issue price in brackets). 


17-1', 

625-10 

20 

£10 '• - 
31 -1 
138 
5-4 
230 -3 

u 

2 

458 


LONDON FINANCIAL FUTURES 


Dec 88— 

Mar 87 

Juii'87 

Sep 87 ; 

Dec 87 

Previous day's total open Merest 14828 
Tbme Month Eurodotar 

Sep 86 93.47 

Dec 86 ...... 93.40 

Mar 87 9326 

Jun87 9305 

USTntsawy Bond 

Sap 86 97-02 

Dk88 96-17 

Mar 87 : — : — - NT 


FOREIGN EXCHANGES 


Opm . 
90-25 

aSie 

Low 

9020 

CtOM 

9020 

EstVoi 

1301 

90.43 

9036 

90.41 

90.41 

340 

9(L43 . 

. 9043 

9028 

9037 

85 

9021 

9031 

9021 

9024 

3 

NT 


•w* 

90.09 

0 

NT 

— 

— 

89*9 

0 


STERUNG SPOT AND FORWARD RATES 


MutntmaBO 




S 5 


Short OH 
Sep 88.. .r. 
Dec 86 — 
Mar 87 — 

Longhair 

Sepia- 

Dec 86 

MarB7..— 
Jun87 — 


FT-SE 100 
Sep 86 — 
Dec 86 


premus day's total open tntereslIBl 12 
93.47 93.44 93 j44 1276 

93.40 93J7 93^7 812 

33_26 9324 9324 224 

93 JB , 93.03 93^)3 62 

Previous day's total open interest 7799 
97-07 9823 96-24 3691 

96-17 96-10 96-10 16 

Interest 1073 


Previous day's total open merest 
1tXF58 10040 ' ■ 100-62 .100-52 87 

NT ... — — _ 10052 0 . 

,=« *■■■ W- 100*52 . 0 . 

” ~ ■” ' Previous day's total open interest 18026 

- 1 30 07 121-04 12lH>S 120-07 B538 

' “-= — raws — o 


N York 1.4795-1.4910 
Montreel 2.0520-20703 
Amsdam3, 5846-3. 6057 
Brussels 65.8366.64 
C’phgen 1 19557-12.0532 
Dubwi 1.0715-1.0801 
Frankfurt 3 . 1 84 2-3.204 1 
Lisbon 21926-221.64 
Madrid 202.B9-20450 
Mien 2180.04-220.01 
Oslo 11.1261-11.1973 
Paris 102993-103530 
SficNm 10.4890-109492 
Tokyo 23392-23549 
Vienna 22-40-22S2 
Zurich 2.5687-2-5853 


July 25 

I. 4800-1.4815 
2.0520-2.0556 
3-5846-3^912 
86.16-68-37 

II. 9557-11.9826 

I. 0747-1 J0757 
3.1842-3.1897 
21926-220.97 
202.89-20329 
218064-218521 

II. 1261-11.1447 
102983-102201 
104890-102071 
23392-23448 
2240-22.43 
2JS687-2S742 


0.42-0.40pram 
028 - 0 . 1 Bprem 
1 %-IKprem 
17-12prem 
IK-Hpram 
6-par pram 
IR-lwprem 
70-1 65ds 
35-65dis 

2-60 is 
4V5Sdte 
2X-1 '/.prem 
Kprem-Xdis 
Ih-'/iprem 

9X-akprem ' 

IX-Xprem _ 


3 months 

121-1.17prem 

0.65-0.42prem 

3V3ttprem 

47-38prBm 

5-3 V. prem 

6prBm-5dis 

4V4-3'Aprem 

190-470cfe 

110-150dis 

8-1 2ds 

13-1 4* dts 

6%-5’'*prem 

X-pareram 

3-2Xprem 

2fi!V23Xprem 

3 ’A - 2 % prem 


Staring kipBx compared vrilh 197S was up at 710 (day's range 72^73.1). 


NT 

NT 


— 1162B 

' — 119-28 


Previous day's total open Merest 2375 
157.60 157.60 15620 15690 355 

NT — — 159.75 0 


TRADITIONAL OPTIONS 


— OJHER5TCRL1MG RATES 

Argentina austraT 12522-12547 

Australia dotiar 2.4631-24677 

Bahrain ckiar 0259045630 

BrazB cruzado 20.46-20^9 

Cyprus pound 0.7320-0.7420 

Fnand marka 72240-7664 0 

Greece drachma 204.70-206.70 

Hong Kong tfcSttr 11.6132-1 1.6219 

Inda rupee 1B55-1675 

Iraqdmar — n/a 


-DOt 1 AR-SPOT HATES- 

Ireland 1.3855-12865 

Singapore 2.18762.1885 

Malaysia 2.6450-2.6470 

Austrafca — 0.6028-0.6035 

Canada 12665-12870 

Sweden 7.0825-7.0875 


its total holding in Brengreen 
to 12.29 million shares, or 
18.9 per cent of the equity. 

Meanwhile. BET. which has 
made an agreed offer of 4Sp a 
share for Brengreen, has also 
picked up 250.000 shares in 
the industrial contract cleaner. 
That takes its tally this week to 
1.5 million shares (2.3 per 
cent). 

BET, also battling for con- 
trol of HAT Group, fell 7p to 
408p. Mr David Telling the 
chairman of HAT, has already 
rejected the £93 million bid 
and says he will be writing to 
shareholders shortly giving his 
reasons. HAT closed steady at 
I26p. 

Oil shares took a beating, 
despite the firmer price of oil 
on the spot market where 
Brent crude for September 
delivery rose by 1.25 cents to 
$9.70. The interim figures 
from Britoil were every bit as 
bad as feared, with net profits 
tumbling from £91.4 million 
to £34.5 million and the 
interim dividend halved. 

The share price responded 
by slumping 26p to an all-time 
low of 1 1 Op. The other pro- 
ducers also suffered. BP lost 
JOp to 563p. Bnnnah 5p to 
3S7p, Car less Cape! 6p to 5 Op. 
Clyde Petroleum 2p to 33p, 
Enterprise Oil 5p to lOOp. 
London & Scottish Marine Oil' 
Ip MS 93p, Ranger Oil 25p to 
-2J3p.Triceutn>l 5p to 45pand_ 
Ultramar 6p to 155p. Shell 
managed to restrict its fell to 
Ip at 785p. 


COMMENT Kenneth Fleet 


Rover deals could 
delay state sale 


The Government's record as a 
whole in privatizing bits of industries, 
which seem less than saleable, is 
looking ragged. 

It was surely not envisaged that the 
sale of British Shipbuilders' warship 
yards would have raised only £160 
million, resulting in a book loss of 
£248 million. The rush to sell ev- 
idently produced a glut in the market 
at a time when the different cash 
priorities of the Ministry of Defence 
did not leave enough orders to go 
round. That suggests a triumph of 
immutable instructions over planned 
privatization. 

Graham Day. who followed his 
instructions to the letter at British 
Shipbuilders, was moved to BL (now 
Rover) when the Department of 
Trade and Industry thought a similar 
process would have been well-nigh 
completed. Land Rover and Leyland 
Vehicles stayed (for how long?). 

Bui the command that there must 
be sales remains. Hence the distinctly 
odd disposals of both Leyland Bus 
and the majority of Unipan. In the 
latter's case, the process of preparing a 
successfoi enterprise for sale, partly by 
the unfortunate addition of Edmunds 
Walker and partly through disentan- 
gling parts deals, has made Unipart 
much less valuable. 


The sale of loss-making Leyland 
Bus to its new management looks 
equally messy. It will eliminate last 
year's loss of £33 million, out of an 
operating loss of £52 million for 
Leyland Vehicles as a whole, but 
Rover will have to pay much of the 
restructuring cost, and part with a 
share in the combined parts business. 
It does not look as if the quoted state- 
controlled company will see much 
extra cash. Nor does this type of sale 
offer tjny obvious industrial benefits. 
The corporate plan could as easily be 
used inside the group. 

Indeed, the whole thing smacks of a 
distress sale, at the bottom of the 
market in the case of the bus 
company. 

Non£ of this would matter if it 
aided the long-term goal of returning 
basic businesses to tne private sector, 
the object of the privatization pro- 
gramme. In the case of Rover, 
however, it is likely to have the 
opposite effect. Austin-Rover is hav- 
ing another tough time in the show- 
rooms and is not so big or clear about 
its position in the market to offer 
much of an investment alone. The 
combined group is a better long-term 
proposition. 


Acting under a false name 


What’s in a name? The answer, in the 
context of unit trusts, appears to be 
everything in marketing terms, but 
sometimes precious little in 
substance. 

Trendy fund titles have come in 
waves — oils and energy in the mid- 
1970s, Japan in the early 1980s, and 
more recently Europe. But fashions 
change, and when they do the gap 
between the marketing image of a 
fund and the reality of its underlying 
investments can widen. Recent muta- 
tions in energy and commodity funds 
are particularly instructive. 

The slump in oil prices has driven 
certain fond managers into a difficult 
corner it is not easy to invest with 
confidence and marketing aplomb in 
companies trading in a depreciating 
asset The smarter among them have 
used ingenious tactics to squeeze 
gains, oral least smaller losses, from a 
declining market 

They moved out of explorers and 
into utilities before the end of last 
year. Now the search is on to find 
investments which might, if you have 
a sufficiently creative imagination, 
fall within the trust’s accepted invest- 
ment criteria. 

In feet," the industry’s' brighter" 
sparks have shown such powers of 
imagination “that tfre Department of- 
Trade and Industry has decided to 


bring out^a consultative document 
next month to deal with creeping 
changes in investment strategies. The 
law does not provide that unit trust 
deeds should set out their investment 
objectives in detail, and the DTI is 
believed to* want the arrangements 
more formalized so that radical 
changes register themselves in altered 
names. 

Energy unit trusts such as Target, 
and most recently NM Rothschild's 
Energy Resources Trust, have already 
taken the plunge and sought a change 
of name and ^investment policy. The 
Rothschild unitholders received cir- 
culars last week informing them of a 
complete change of .course: the man- 
agers propose, to merge their units 
with those in the Australasian Smaller 
Companies fUnd. 

Flexibility in investment manage- 
ment is undoubtedly a good thing, but 
here we seem to have a confession of 
error combined with financial 
paternalism. The nature of the fund 
which was the essence of its original 
appeal should not- be dispensed with 
because the managers are not as clever 
as they thought they were. The 
labelling must not be a fashionable 
deception, or turned into one in the 
-light— of-subsequent -shifts- in the 
market. 


72175-72225 
._ 8.0975-8 1025 
. 2.1485-2.1500 


FMDMUnga 

July 21 
Aug 4 

■ lie 


Aug 1 


Last DrcMolion FUrSuttenMoi 
Oct 23 No* 3 

Now 6 Nov 17 

Nov 21 Dec 1 

iACO. Bntoi, PraSMctL hUtstkrni.MrCML 

Hepburn, intafvtakjn, 4FB. Newman. Motel Ctos., 

^ Loxtey. sound QH. Phoenix Prop. Ptessey, Dwelt, ASDA. Amstrad, 

Pony Reck. Nohon. Thenrrax. Yoik Equity. May Leisure. Frian Corp. Nodon, Payton. 
Put & CaJh Vtigtao. Amstrad. 


Kuwait (knar KD 

MataysadoMar 

Mexico peso. 


0.4300-0.4340 
32317-32375 
920-970 


AmDer Day. WeBeome. Barrow 
Pwkdala. Marshal 


New Zealand doBar 22073-2.8200 

Saud Arabia riyal 5264522045 

Singapore doBar 32517-32S54 

sash Alrtca rand 3.7969-3*190 

UAEdrham 5.4460-54960 

TJoydsBenk 


Norway 

Denmark 

West Germany 

Switzerland 1.7335-1.7350 

Netherlands 24220-24240 

France 6252022570 

Japan 158.05-158.15 

S3y\ 14742-1478.0 

BetgfcmKComm) 442344.40 


Hong Kong 
Portugal — 

spsr. — 

Austria 


_ 72125-7*130 
_ 14820-149.40 
_ 137.00-13720 
15.11-15.13 


Rales aappied by Baideys Bra* HOFEX end Exiet 


LONDON TRADED OPTIONS 


'■*" 



, r -:x 


:v 




Series 

CsBs 
July Oct 

Jan Jrfy 

Puts 

Oct 

Jan 

ABed Lyons 
(*325) 

300 

330 

360 

40 

20 

9 

50 

33 

15 

58 

37 

18 

6 

a 

40 

B 

23 

45 

11 

25 

48 

BP 

(“563) 

500 

550 

600 

75 

40 

13 

85 

50 

23 

58 

30 

4 

20 

55 

8 

28 

57 

37 

60 

Cons Gold 
(*«*) 

420 

460 

500 

30 

17 

7 

50 

32 

18 

55 

37 

23 

52 

85 

35 

60 

95 

42 

67 

Courtaulds 

rzfiB) 

ISS 

300 

330 

23 

15 

7 

4 

33 

20 

13 

7 

44 

32 

7 

19 

35 

63 

15 

25 

36 

64 

19 

29 

Com Union 

raw) 

300 
. 330 
360 

24 

11 

5 

34 

20 

11 

42 

28 

12 

29 

57 

14 

30 

57 

16 

31 

Cable & Wire 

C643) 

600 

650 

700 

750 

75 

35 

13 

8 

95 

55 

28 

15 

110 

75 

45 

17 

35 

68 

110 

22 

45 

75 

115 

27 

55 

90 

DistMrs 

tmsi 

iS 

700 

120 

80 

42 

E 

- 

4 

12 

30 

E 


GEC 

nwj 

180 

200 

220 

18 

9 

5 

26 

15 

8 

32 

20 

6 

20 

38 

9 

22 

38 

12 

24 

Graodklet 

r370) 

327 

355 

360 

382 

55 

35 

£i 

46 

58 

5 

9 

23 

17 

20 

ia 

f®4) , 

900 

950 

1000 

1050 

107 

72 

47 

22 

132 

97 

70 

47 

115 

80 

57 

9 

25 

50 

84 

17 

32 

57 

84 

<2 

65 

90- 

Lane} Sec 

P317) 

200 

330 

360 

31 

13 

5 

40 

22 

11 

49 

31 

17 

5 

17 

42 

7 

20 

43 

10 

22 

44 

Marks & Span - 

09$ 

180 

200 

PM! 

25 

12 

5 

32 

19 

10 

39 

25 

15 

4 

11 

24 

6 

13 

27 

9 

16 

29 

ShM Trans 

085) 

700 
750 ' 
800 

100 

62 

30 

120 

83 

50 

98 

88 

7 

17 

42 

14 

25 

48 

33 

50 

Trahrtgar House 

(■252) " 

260 

280 

300 

15 

7 

4 

24 

14 

70 

31 

21 

15 

33 

50 

17 

34 

50 

23 

36 


Series 

Sep 

Dec 

Mar Sep 

Dec 

Mar 

Beecham- 

360 

390 

420 

460 

52 

30 

16 

6 

62 

42 

28 

15 

73 

52 

37 

22 

2 

TO 

30 

62 

7 

20 

37 

67 

12 

23 

40 

67 

Boots 

P255) 

240 

260 

280 

24 

11 

4 

33 

20 

11 

40 

29 

6 

17 

26 

9 

18 

28 

12 

21 

BTR 

1*293). 

280 

307 

330 

25 

8 

20 

18 

S 

18 

25 

25 

Bass 

(75S) ■ 

750 
000 
- 850 

38 

18 

8 

68 

32 

20 

80 

53 

30 

22 

50 

95 

30 

50 

95 

40 

65 

96 

Blue Coda 

rsnj 

600 
650 
. 700 

17 

5 

3 

38 

17 

8 

52 

33 

33 

80 

130 

40 

80 

130 

43 

80 

DeBoers 

1*600) 

600 

650 

700 

750 

45 

22 

15 

7 

70 

45 

34 

22 

*5 

55 

30 

65 

105 

150 

50 

75 

115 

160 

65 

90 

Dixons 

1*326) 

300 

330 

360 

32 

14 

5 

44 

24 

11 

52 

32 

a 

3 

13 

36 

10 

18 

38 

13 

24 

42 

GKN 

r327) 

300 

330 

360 

390 

40 

18 

8 

3 

48 

31 

17 

S 

41 

23 

15 

4 

15 

34 

64- 

6 

18 

36 

64 

21 

39 

66 

GtBXO 

(-95S) 

600 

960 

1000 

1050 

95 

66 

45 

30 

25 — . 

95 130 
75 105 

55 85 

25 

45 

75 

15 

38 -- 

55 70 

90 -100 

20 125 



Hanson 

pTB) 


150 

160 


»• , - - 
15 23 


28 3 


1 - T 





Ml 



Puts 



Series 


Dec 

Mar 

Sop Doc 

Mar 

Hanson corn 

180 

B 

1314 

17 

13 

15 

18 

200 

2 

6 

9 

31 

31 

34 

Jaguar 

rate) 

500 

33 

47 

60 

18 

27 

33 

550 

12 

Zl 

38 

50 

55 

bO 

600 

4 

15 

23 

95 

too 

(05 

Thom EMI 

420 

37 

55 

57 

7 

17 

23 

f442) 

460 

18 

30 

45 

30 

35 

40 

500 

4 

17 

27 

62 

62 

b5 


550 

2 

7 

— 

110 

110 



300 

70 

w 

— 

2 

_ 


f3S8) 

330 

43 

52 

— 

3 

8 

— 

360 

22 

33 

45 

10 

20 

20 


390 

6 

12 

27 

35 

38 

40 


Series 

Aa 9 

Now 

Feb 


Nov 

Feb 

Bnt Aero 

460 

22 

37 

55 

15 

30 

33 

r*63) 

500 

8 

20 

3S 

48 

50 

53 

550 

3 

9 

20 

95 

95 

SW 

BAT Inds 

380 

37 

SO 

57 

6 

7 

13 

(*393) 

390 

17 

70 

37 

13 

20 

25 

420 

3 

12 

23 

32 

38 

42 


460 

1 

5 

— 

72 

75 



460 

66 

80 

92 

3 

8 

13 

rsi7> 

-500 

32 

45 

65 

15 

22 

2/ 

550 

7 

18 

32 

45 

50 

55 

Bnt Telecom 

180 

7 

18 

23 

9 

14 

19 

1*180) 

200 

2 

8 

12 

26 

28 

30 

220 

1 

4 

6 

48 

46 

40 

CedhurySchumps 160 

10 

17 

23 

4 

9 

12 

063) 

180 

4 

9 

13 

18 

21 

22 

200 

2 

4 

7 

.38 

39 

40 

Imperial Gr 

r*5> 

300 

330 

57 

27 

65 

40 

z 

1 

3 

2 

6 

— 

360 

12 

22 

— 

20 

23 

— 


300 

42 

48 

SB 

2 

-4 

7 

(*338) 

330 

18 

27 

38 

7 

11 

13 

380 

5 

13 

21 

23 

29 

29 

LASMO 

90 

12 

20 

23 

6 

ir 

14 

(*93) 

100 

6 

12 

19 

12 

17 

22 

110 

3 

91 

13 

22 

22 

25 

P&O 

460 

33 

45 

65 

6 

15 

22 

(-483) 

500 

9 

22 

1 40 

25 

37 

45 

550 

3 

8 

18 

70 

72 

75 


600 

1 

4 

— 

120 

120 


Racer 

160 

18 

26 

34 

4 

7 

10 

1*170) 

180 

/ 

15 

22 

14 

15 

19 

200 

2 

8 

13 

32 

32 

32 

RTZ 

550 

23 

55 

72 

15 

P5 

32 

(*552) 

600 

7 

30 

42 

54 

56 

65 

650 

3 

15 

2 1 

102 

105 

107 


.700 

2 

9 

18_ 

152 

155 

157 


45 

9* 

11V4 

13% 

1 

2 S 

4 

(-53) 

50 

41i 

rt> 

9* 

3 

5» 

7 

60 

1 

.4- 

514 

11 

12 

14 


■ Series 

*s_ 

Nw_ 

War 

Aug 

Now 

MW 


238 

e 

19 

— 

8 

10 

— 

(-238) 

240 

— 

— 

24 

— 

— 

20 ' 

255 

2 

9/j 

— 

23 

24 

— 


260 

-re- 

— 

14 

■ 

— 

35 


273 

1 

414 


41 

41 



Series- 

Aim now- Feb Aug 

Nov 

Feb 

Tr11fc l *i 1991 

106 

214 

Vn 

— 

3 » 

1 

_ 

C2108) 

108 


IJl* 

IS 

IK 

l'i 

2X 

lift 


?4 

IS 

2“.» 

3% 

2P» 

_Tr 11W*> 03/07 
(-£118) 

114 

116 

118 

3 

lit 

•‘re 

4tt 

314 

5% 

4S 

K 

S 

2K 

IS 

2X 

4»u» 



120 


244 

3S 

2* 

4>hi 



122 


m- 

2S 

4 H 

5K 

6K 


124 

X 

1 J » 

— 

6'w 

7 



jar Aug Sept 

Oct 

Jtd 

Aug Sept 

Oct 

CT.RF 1550 

-14 33 

SO 

70 

17 

Z7 

33 

40 


index 1575 
(1541) 1600 
• 1625 
1650 
1675 
1700 
1750 


20 37 57 

13 27 45 

7 18 35 

4 11 27 

2 7 20 


35 43 455 


60 

B5 


62 65 

__ 85 85 

110 110 110 
135 135 135 
159 - - 

210 - - 


53 

72 

90 

110 

135 


July 25 1986 ■ ToW oartnws 13747 . Cals8168. PutsSOT. 


■Underlying security price. 


MONEY MARKET 
AND GOLD'' '• 


BseeRs»es% _ 

Ctsamg Banks 10 
Finance House 10 

Macount Marks' Loans % 
OverraodJ High: 9% Low W 
Week um£?D-9X 

Trassmy Bat* (Discount %) 

Buying SeUng 

2mnm 9 X 2mrtn 9fc 


3mrth 9% 


3mrth 9U 


kB&tsfDtoxrtSU 
1 mnth 2mmh W-9"n 

Omntft 9%-9’Vr Bmntft 9 *b-9*m 

Trade BOs (Discount %) 

1 mnth 10'w 2 mirth 10K 

3 mnth 10J4 6 mnth 10*» 

Interbank (%) 

Overnight: open 10 dose 1 1 
1 week 10-9>4 6 mnth 9'*i*-9K 

1 n»lh 10-9J-V 9 mnth 9 "■*-9% 

3 mnth 104*i 12mth 8*»i*-9* 

1 mnth 9% 3 mnth 954 

6 mnth 954 12mth 9« 

Load Authority Bands (*) 

7 mnth IO'4-ID 2 mnth 1054-10 

3 mnth 1051-10 6 mnth 1051-10 

9 mnth 10'4-10 12mth 10*54 


1 nvlm''9 3, w-9’ , ■"' 3 mnth 9’;i#-9*u 
6 mirth 954-954 12m0i 

KS9BU 3 mnth &50-&45 
6 Rvrth 8.50-6.45 12mlh 8.60626 


EURO MONEY DEPOSITS % 


7 days 6V6* 
3 mnth 


6*>«-6'w 


7 days 4".»-4 ».b 
3 mnth 4*4454 
French Franc 
7 days 754-754 
3 nxrth 754-7% 
Saris* Franc 
7 days 1454-1454 
3 mnth 554-5 
Van 

7 days 5-454 
Smith 4 ,3 w-4 ,, i» 


1 mnth 
6mnth 
ad 
1 mirth 
6 mnth 
cal 
1 mnth 
6 mnth 
cal 
1 mnth 
6 mnth 

cafl 
1 mnth 
6 mnth 


7-6 

6»ie*'w 

654-6)4 

5-4 

414-454 

414-494 

754-654 

754-7% 

7 , ii»-7 4 i» 

2-1 

551-554 

5'<*-4«>,« 

4X-3K 

454-454 

4 1 


GOLD 


Gotft*34920-35020 

(§34 ^-23525) 


. 00 ) 


■Excludes VAT 


TREASURY BILLS 


r. £543 2m afctectnOOm 

__ £37.615% received: 3% 

Laatweek: £97295% ' received: E&4% 
Avge rate: £95315% last wk £35826% 
Nest week: El 00m neptecaCiOOn 


ECGD 


Fixed Rate Sterling Export Finance 
Schema IV Average reference rale for 
interest period June 4. 1506 to 
July 1. 1986 inclusive: 9.824 per 
cam. 



and earnin' 




Sec months 
ended 30 Jane 1986 

Sur months 
ended JO June TOS 

Tuvtve months 
ended 31 December IW 

Profit Before Tax 

&335 million 

£264 million 

£561 trillion 

Profit After Tax 

&214 million 

£141 million 

£331 nillion 

Post-Tax Return on Average Total Assets 

0.97% 

0.64% I 

0.77% 

Post-Tax Return on Average Equity 

17.8% 

13.5% 

151% 

Earnings Per Share 

40p 

27p 

62p 

Dividends Per Share 

6.2 5 p ^ 

5.00p 

14.00p 


The main features of the first half of 1986 were; 

□ Record profit and earnings per share. 

□ A significant strengthening of our equity base. 

□ Cost and tax savings from die merger of Lloyds 

Bade Pic and Lloyds Bank In tern ational 'into 
one bank. 

□ A substantial i mpr o ve ment in international 
pro fits. 

□ Sovereign debt provisions strength e ned. 


“Afier an accdcr ano n in performance last year; this 
half-year shows a further advance, with post-tax profits 
52 per cent up on the first half of 1985, ‘and 13 per cent 
up on the second half With good growth in earning and 
strong dividend covet; we have been able both, to im- 
prove our capital base and ro increase the dividend.” 

Slr/crrmt'MpnfcCJwinnon Bank Ptc. 

Further details of Lloyds Bank's results for tfie first 
half of 1986 may be obtained from: \ 

Corporate Communications Division, Thames Towei; 
Princess House, 152/156 Upper Thames Street; * 
London EC4R 3UJ- * 



Lloyds 

Bank 




A THOROUGHBRED AMONGST BANKS. 


Lloyd* Binlc Pk. 7! Lombard Strm. EOP 3BS 










AND FINANCE 


THE TIMES SATURDAY JULY l<b iy»0 


THE TIMES UNIT TRUST INFORMATION SERVICE 


Bd Ollar Cnga YMd 


ww«r 

ENd Offer Oige YMd 


Bkf Offer VWd 




Ml HMD Inc 

OCuj 
rrtf Ottawa 




Grid A Gw 
fen uuui* 

Prop Sbmea 

XZJZg 

Amar Growth 
Amar Inco me 
Amar SnMMr Go t 
AlHtGrtWA 
Euro Snaler 
Far Can 
Hong|Kong W 

Japan PM 
Jaoan Smater 
Enapt 

Exempt Market 

mowNSMner 


19 w a ou 

UK 196 
1093 116.6 
410 49.1 • 
WO 153* 
170 18.1 

09.1 737 

408 433# 

400 432c 
928 990 
57.5 813 

22.1 236* 

58.1 590 
147 157 
498 53.1 
343 355* 
35.7 38.1 
757 807 
160 180 
813 85.0 
6«7 S 77 


-07 47S 
MM 
-13 207 
*0.1 215 
•03 303 
-01 050 
-03 1.00 
*0.1 1.71 
*0.7 087 
*1.1 339 
. 533 

-oi oar 
-13 206 
n» 

*12 OB* 

*03 256 
*0.1 134 
*05 


9-i7. Pwynoum l 
0444 458144 
F4BDM1 

SnwerOo s acc 
D a team 
Hgfttoesww 

Man Pdrtfcfiofac 
Do Acc 

Norm Amancap 

Orient 


m Haywards Heath 


1238 1331 
2285 2*72 
M7.9 1591 
650 706 
745 800 
58 5 644c 
100.1 107.7c 
590 64.4# 
895 920 


. 096 

-04 371 
*07 408 
-03 3.16 

-04 . 

*0.1 130 
*04 073 


BOCXmSTCTMAWAfltMEMT 

The Sack Exchange London EC2P 2IT 
01-586 2868 


General Inc f*l 
DO Accum (41 
Mm Fund 13] 
Da Acaan O) 

fed Inc 131 

Do Wean B I 
Smarter fee W 
Do Acaan (SJ 


3101 22 QJB* -04 300 
3355 3530 * -07 300 
1016 1071 402 

T 7 &J 1070 482 

1253 131.1 177 

1657 1734 137 

£1137 1203 # 252 

E12.11 12835 293 




Li' f iV"iV~ 'i -^ 1 



08 FUND MANAGERS 

125. Higli HtfDOm. London WC1V SPY 

01-242 1148 


01-242 1148 

CS Japan Food 


854 900 *03 074 




CANNON FUND MANAGERS 

JiKl”. ■— * 0,0 

Grow® 274.4 231.9# +1.8 294 

toeome 3205 341.0# *3.1 435 

Far East 2000 2127 *00 032 

Norm Amorfcan ISO* 1600 +0.1 037 

Gfetal <76 58Se *02 150 

Eunuean 497 523 +02 1.00 

japan 573 612 *02 050 

CAPS. (JAMES) MANAGEMENT 

PO Boa S51 Ban Mart* London EC3 7JO 
01-821 0011 

Cap** 3520 377.4 -05 153 

fecoma 3822 3010 -05 402 

Norn American 2840 3047 *01 087 

CATER ALLEN 

1. Kng Man SL EC4N 7AU 
01-623 6314 

G4| Turn 104.1 1112 *051078 

CafTRAL BOARD OF FMANCE OF 
CHURCH OF ENGLAND 
2 Fore Street. London EC2Y 5AO 
01-588 1815 

hi* Fund 41135 430 

Find fer 1470 c .. 973 

□epos* 100.0 940 

CHAWTCS OFFICIAL BIVESTlieNT FUND 
2 Far# Sow. London EC2Y 6AO 
OT-568 1815 

Income 30039 • 483 

Accum £105441 

'Depose 1008 950 


Nan Plan. Bristol BS2 OJH 











iVrmkl 


Amar Grown 227 

Equity Mgn feesaw ei.B 

European Grown 256 

OMall Equity 378 

Gil 6 Find W can 29.7 

Get 6 Fend me 246 

index Secunms 257 

Japa n Growth 329 


242 ..150 

447 -02 470 

273 +07 250 

<05c -03 270 

313c .. 370 

258# .. Oiffl 

268 .. 270 

Si# *05 050 


COUNTY UT MANAGERS LTI 
161. Dieamde. London EG2V BHJ 
01-736 1999 

Energy Trust 435 483 

Extra home . 158.1 1697c 

Hnanoal 1S57 175.7* 

GW Strategy 56 5 577 

Own townsman! 2S8.1 2B62# 

income 6 Grown 354 41. 9c 

Ja panese 8 Pacific 177.1 1883 
ram Amar Growth 1008 Hf75 
Ml Recovery i07S iitta 

Smaaar Go's 2095 2228 
'300* toe Tst 565 598# 

Special Ses Ace 2787 2 955 


-04 385 
-07 546 
-0.1 151 
.. 1.73 
-18 274 
-0.1 402 
*25 083 
*07 087 
*03 178 
-0.1 157 
-01 582 
-15 189 




CROWN UNTY TRUST SERVICES 
Crown House. Woking GU21 1XW 
0*882 5033 

Higfa toeome Treat 237.4 2519 . . 5.15 

Growfe Truat 2172 2327c . . 310 

American Trim 127.1 1355* .. 074 

CRUSADER UNff TRUST HAMMERS LTD 
Haaah). Sunw RH2 88L 
073)2 42434 

UK Income 488 518 .. 4*7 

UK Growth Accun 484 518 .. £43 

Do Dot 484 515 -.243 

Eucpean GrowUi 495 53.1 +02 183 

Pacific GrowUi 528 502 *03 

EFM UNIT TRUST MANAOBtt 
4. Matvfla Cnani EdnbuMh 
031-228 3482 

American Fund 715 786 -02 £22 

Cap(# Fomfl MS 100L7 -03 189 

Grown 8 fee Fund 1295 1385c -07 433 

tfiefi DM Fund 107.1 1145 -03 550 

Marrartonal Fond 1894 2028# -02 1.11 

Hasamcoa Fund 185 192 -02 052 

Sure Jap Co's FOd 384 415 . . . . 

Tokyo Fund 1718 1838c *22 OOO 

(Ell Amar (2} M55 1507 . . 355 

(Ex) Japan (3] 1120 118 6 .. 0.19 

+57 074 

+15 0.10 
*02 378 


(Ex) Pacific w 
(Ex) Smafear Jap 


1455 1507 
1128 1186 
2842 2934 
(4 221-3 2285 
245 288* 


EAGLE STAR CMT TRUST MANAGERS 
Bam Road ChaMrtam. Gfeucnar GL53 7LQ 
0242 S213H 


UK Balanced fee 888 717* -05 248 

Do Aceum 875 724# -08 243 

UK Growtn toon 805 807 -OS 152 

UK Mi Inc fee 637 675 -02 S7C 

N American Acaan 644 88.7* +07 05* 

Far Eastern Aceum 989 103.4* 4-1.6 0.15 
Ewmaan Acaan 727 77.1c +08 057 

UK Gfl i R he 535 575* +0.1 877 

Do Aceum 958 SO 3* +0.1 882 


Eurodoan Accun 
UK Gfl a H toe 
Do Aceum 





UNLISTED SECURITIES 


H 


tjj 

11’» 


0.6 52 108 

so 


21 42 114 

114 


16 12 162 

40 

-1 

11 7J 112 
A8f .. .. 

40 


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200 


28 11 63.7 

113 

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7.7 66 . . 

285 

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92 15 146 

130 


23 tO 1A0 

103 

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150 

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26 16 14 A 

260 



220 



333 

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132 


86 86 70 

588 


112 16 252 

33 

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. .. 82 

193 

-7 

11.4 56 83 

93 


86 &8 216 

71 


14 26 176 

195 


7.1 36 156 

82 


K6b 83 96 

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6.4 107 56 

1 82'- 


06 27 233 

50 

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146 

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246 

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56 

443 

• -7 

86 1.4 24.4 

16 

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25 


13 43 106 

42 

+'/ 

121 


6.4b 51 186 

213 


50 23166 

140 

-2 


20 


1.1 55 1O6 

125 


66 46 86 

165 

-5 


115 

-1 

7.10 16 1A7 

223 

-S 

126 57 107 

55 


46 73 106 

303 


56 1.7 153 

180 


36 23 214 

300 


116 33106 

3 



77 


14 4 A 11.4 

160 

• 

26 16 156 

6'- 

_ 

1.4 254 33 

31 

ISO 

+1 

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eg 



68 


23 4.4 136 

123 

+2 

16 23 153 

330 


173 54 123 

112 

• 

11 26 115 

100 



129 


IT 24 212 

7 


10 426 .. 

233 

• .. 

52 2.1283 

14'/ 

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90 


16 1.7 103 

155 

22 

32 


33 21216 



88 


56 54 102 

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153 


11 20 28.1 

35 


53 

104 


16 1.7 302 

SO 

-3 

7.1 M2 316 

280 


5-7 26 153 

88 


17 18 116 

120 


26 21 176 

360 


74 21 256 

M) 


21 15 153 

105 

• 

7.6 72 W 

no 


26 15183 

73 

+3 


88 


16 1.1 146 

43 


263 

173 

• 

17 10 149 

85 

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11 24 7.0 

23 

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1.4 13 106 

197 

+2 

43 25 213 

74 

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36 43189 

2< 


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1<4 



47 

• 

23 69 9.1 

131 


23 22 181 

85 


54 64 54 

91 


10.7 118 AI 

IK 

-10 

76 36 16.4 

435 

+5 

56 13 29.1 

21 


03 1 4 162 

48 

+3 

25 54 1.42 

MO 


11 £2249 

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04 1.7 173 

745 


86 IS M B 

74 


e . 900 

379 

• . 

96 26175 

118 

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46 19 187 

87 

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9 

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23 25 127 


14 156 4.0 

155 

♦5 

71 46 115 

23b 

• . 


235 

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36 13 243 

58 


06 87 208 

B1 


1.7 AI 1.7 

125 



73 

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36 43 170 

45 

*4 

... 02 

198 


as 

40 

-S 

. 154 

88 


43 43113 


220 145 FranchGonn 180 

100 65 Fraatxxfta 99 

055 420 FudarSaMi-A' 655 

148 94 Gubed 142 

ISO 05 GaejChtf) 98 

47 38 Qtw/BOOXfl 41 

80 72 Gtaxxi Lyons 78 

165 100 Gibbs Uew 140 

17 11 CW&ert House 11 

60 32 Gkxnl Go 48 

186 69 GwhwWMran 125 

124 68 Goodman Prmt 122 

>28 103 Go« (Laiaunca) 118 

91 60 Grartyfe Surface 63 

124 116 Green (EmesB 119 

38 19 Graemwch Cable 30 

115 93 Growenor SO » 

180 180 Guernsey Adandc 180 

110 38 HB Bad 100 

92 58 Hampden Homacaro 70 

49 38 Hamms _ 45 

210 133 Huvay 6 Then*) 175 

255 196 Hnetock Europe 223 

46 26 Health Caro 42 

«40 383V Maxima «0 

390 293 V Do A' LV 390 

145 143V Henderson Prune MS 


+5 

76 

<3 

uri 

-3 

27 

27 

186 


166 

24 

111 


4.1 

25 

20.1 

-4 

17 

15 


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24 

58 

124 


56 

84 

142 


17 

26 

486 

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550 

+1 

12 

76 

112 

+5 

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26 

176 


43 

36 

183 


51 

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36 

46 

116 


43 

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m ui-Pcex 
HtaMand Pi 
mix Ergen 
Hobson 

Unitodrtn 

rfocKpon 

HbkfcHyC 


133 105 HoUen Hydroman 118 
6»a <12 Holmes * MarcnnOSO 
159 115 Holmes Piwecaon I2fl 
203 MS Horne ([robani 185 
183 134 On 'A' ITS 

340 200 Howard Group 330 
24V 22 HuffMS Food 33 

14 B Huiftnd Bee B 1 / 

166 115 Murder Sfipfxr 138 
255 188 HunBmgSTech 3JS 
230 185 NSTEM 175 

31 18 Imtec 17 

115 44 fed Scot Energy 88 

103 68 totalled 81 

353 215 fewroumoe Teen 21S 

9 3'/ kxervoion 5 

141 IS Do 7% 138 

32 25 fereel (Jeck U 28 

165 85 JSOCOwp 145 

340 233 JS Pafeongy 325 


37 27 187 
ao 5.1 ISA 
87 17 417 

5.06 27 117 
5.0b 27 107 
OO 18 207 
07 37 105 

0.4 4.7 OS 

35 26 187 

21 17 24.7 

32 17 157 

37 177 21 
107 

77 07 104 

27 


M8 105 JohneenAJorg 125 
11B 73 J o n naw nes Penes 111 
70 it JW RUflar 63 

330 253 KLP 30Q 

90 87 Kentltahn) 78 

800 220 Kanyon Gees 285 

03 55 tuwdtsyswns 76 

113 67'/ Mark-Tufa* 75 

113 87 LPAfed 83 

63 37 LBdaw 60 

US to uwflaw Thomson iqq 
43 32 iflumtov 42 

118 ica Lewmer 105 

91 79 Lodge Cam 79 

140 95 Lon & Oydanfe 121 
196 133 Lorfn Sbct 188 

62 18 Lysaxtor PW 18 

90 86 M6 Caan 1 Cwy » 

245 160 liMTCon* 2*0 
160 101 afcLaughtn A Her 123 
125 55 Mamfic UMWafe 58 
a 54 MfiaH 68 

176 92 Mam (RmaU) isi 
35 18 Mnfavfet U 

116 101 Mayfair CW 105 
135 93 liaynewsftMda 131 
263 185 M ea dow Farm 220 
220 145 Mad* Tssn 145 

SB 75 Meaenmre 98 

19 9 Maimy Com 13 

75 25 Mwtcomfedrtdg* » 
148 MO MemMr-Swasi MS 
3 90 350 Mandoam Wine 355 
138 95 Mat* BuRaw 115 
9'. 4 Maal Soancas 7 1 / 

102 71 MMiec 96 

95 59 hfichaal (John) 73. 

780 360 MdraBn 645 

220 118 UttofeBa 145 

47 22 Mctomk 36 

183 8? MtJfend Maris 173 
385 231 kRdswanar fens 385 

218 134 mbs 33 190 

M3 m Mim/Bn , wn 185 

230 130 UKS world 190 

47 13 Mnenm 18 

159 108 MoorgataGp 146 

124 82 Monks 5 Crana 124 

158 152 MOrUVOe 182 

50 35 Moffay (Rb) 48 

23' IS' Itorm (W*bti) 18 

115 70 Moss Adxamxig 75 

142 125 Muamfen 142 

367 237 NMWCongi 300 

31 13 Naw Cl feW Res 13 

5 1 Do Wmfe I 


Enoano Preps is 
Ifffa £85 


95 75 Do 10% 

21 10'. IHnslo 
136 91 Norenk 
190 68 Nonan 
130 83 Noncm HottH 
48 M mn Sw A Gan 


6jB ZB 202 

10.0 &1 7.1 
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. 932 

AJ 29 21.7 

4L3 4.1219 
l.l 08 17.7 
54 UIU 
59 32 120 
43 49 229 
232 . 2.1 

6.0 192 1.7 
39 29 146' 
7.8 22 185 
81 59182 

39 39 M l 
\3 23 17.7 
29 0*681 
5.7 39 119 

19 S.0 159 

5.7 39 784 
26 09 289 
21 1.T 127 

36 19 402 

7.4 as iao 

20 1 .4 27.4 
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21 4.4 229 

■ 84 
39 47 9.0 
42 20 122 
88 29 183 
24 185 14 


49 39 17.1 
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34 28132 
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37 22 
383 180 

35 s * 23 
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2SS 168 

79 58 
158 130 
560 206 

52 10 

53 30 

175 143 
152 80 
148 63 

39 23 

200 135 
27 16 

34 28 

116 24 

73 31 

98 88 

36 25 

1 78 115 
283 115 
245 120 
158 83 

143 118 

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80 63 

290 145 
139 115 
126 73 

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130 10* 

178 138 
112 73 

195 120 

106 71 

26 7 

350 171 
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220 168 
105 110 
101. 60 
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2Z» 136 
205 131 
IBS ISO 

131 96 

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162 113 
31 12 

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63 48 

38 20 

99 87 

71 65 

220 85 

70 3S 

100 71 
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83 58 
125 110 
230 175 

£5 150 
200 110 

134 117 
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110 110 
178 52 
148 103 

365 104 
205 135 
188 130 
138 70 
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78 83 
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75 43 
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135 93 

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46 

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115 



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21 

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43 

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Sfe Otar Chge YiNd 



M* Offer . Cnjfe Y*d 


28. St Andrews So. 

B3V858 910! 

fed income Una 148.1 157 9 

Do Aceum 219 9 2339 

SCOTTWHUFE >MESn»m 

19. a Anowa Sej. Ednough 
031 225 2211 

UK EmCV 179.1 181.6 

AnMon 14&S 1579 

paefi: 1772 1834 

European 2182 233.4 

acomsH mutual wvranaBRT 

MMlViaM 

109. Vncem St Gfesgow G2 8HN 
041-748 6100- 

UK Botfly 1829 1734 

Gil A Fbid U02 1287 

UK So* CO'A Eq 1462 165.6 

Europen 180.1 191.6 

NAmencaa 1092 MBS 

Pacflc 1732 1843 


SCOTTISH UM I IRUM 

29. cnariou So. Edfeiupb 
031-228 4372 ■ 

Picric 64J 

Wono Growth 382 

N Amencaa 389 . 

tactXJ* Fund 442 

Bropeso 383 

N Amar fee 263 

UK Grow* 307 

Extra Inc 31-5 


-i3 13a 
+4X2 131 
+22 £05 
*03 032 


-1.0 237 
*03 808 
-03 2.12 
+12 117 
*01 1.49 
+33 042 


*0 7 032 
+02 1.04 
+01 0.18 
-02 430 
+0.4 097 
-02 295 
-02 199 
*0.1 530 


SCOTTISH WIDOWS 

PO Box 902. Edfettflp EH16 5BU 

031-05 5000 

Pin Eq fee 227 5 2*2.1 -05 333 

fc Accum 2613 2782+ -02 333 


SEWTINS. FUNDS MANAG EM ENT 
38 City Bd. London EC1Y 2AY 
£1-633 6011 

Amar Tech 6 Gan 7069 1M3 
Pacific -1032 2067 

Sec feconro Fhd 167.6 1792* 
Special SCuebona 2024 218.6 
b« Grow* 299 32J0# 

Amancan MBpora 712 7EL7 
Sana Co s 382 41.4 . 

Jwea Tech 3 Gcrt 1113 1183 
fef mab c n* income 55.4 509# 


Anrnr Grow® fee 

Bk9 889* 

.. 125 

"Ob Accun 

664 7U4 


Fund kw T*t he 

196 216 

V. 254 

Do Accun 

246 266 


ihakt me 

Do Aceum 

1235 1315 

+07 86S 

2054 2158 

+16 .. 

tat Recoitry fee 

1019 1086 

+06 192 

Do Accum 

1075 1145 

+06 .. 

Japan Grow® fee 
Do Aeeun 

1026 1081 

+14 042 

1024 1056 

+14 .. 

S major Co * fee ' 

1610 1716 ' 

.. 259 

Da Acami 

2125 2287 

+4LT Tib 

UK Ea Crow® me 

251 296 

DO ACcun 

451 489 

+0.1 .. 

Wbridmae Tech Inc 

395 419 

-02 1.T9 

1 Do Accum 

396 425 

-06 

1 Lfi CIMT TRUST MANAGEMENT* 


CopmeA Aw. EC2R 7BE 

1 feOomo Fund 

454.1 4834c 

.. 468' 

Hemmanai 8 Gen 

2375 2*2.1 

. 0.75 

LEGAL* GENERAL UMT TRUST' 


MANAGERS 

gJMS&j P"* 1 

kentwood Earn 

1 

0277 234834 



Eouty DtaHuxx 

2846 2824 

-1.7 256 

Da Acam- 

4127 4814 
996 857* 

-24 296 

Do fecome 

-02 5.10 

Eurapaan 

664 7l£o 

*05 157 

Far Eastern 

Ob ires ■ 

1096 1155 

+1.1 061 

713 829 

+0.1 696 

kit Managed 

Natural Res 

71.7 811* 

-OI 161 

456 536 

-06 262 

N Amancan Treat 

752 815* 

-05 152 

UK Spec* Sts 

61.1 655* 

.. 156 

LLOYDS BANK UNTT TRUST MANAGERS 

Rbgxm CM. Gonop-Bir-Sae. Wannfeg. W 

Qnacflv 

0444 459144 
OehncBO 

1786 1896 

-49 123 1 
-16 323 1 

Do Accun 

3M7 3385 

Energy toil 

458 52.1 

.. 263 ; 

Da Accum 

535 575 

-0.1 253 : 

Extra incoma 

1526 1625 

-04 532 

Do Acaan 

2744 2BS4 

-07 532 

German Oh fee 

694 635 

+06 0.19 1 

Do Accun 

594 835 

+06 0.19 

fecome 

2827 2809 

-06 454 

Do Acaan 

517.1 5810 

-15 454 

bfl Tech 

173.7 1857 

+14 046 , 

Do Accum 

1815 194.1 

*15 0.46 

Japan Grown 

826 886 

*05 092 

Do Accun 

812 889 

*02 092 

N Amar 6 Gan 

1025 1094* 

-04 095 

Do Accun 

1105 1181* 

-04 095 

tefle Barer 

1279 1367 

+04 0.19 

Do Accun 

1335 1427 

+04 0.19 

anMar Coe 6 Hoc 

1895 2024 

.. 159 

Do Accum 

2116 2285 

.. 159 

Worxfwida Growth 

1915 204.4 

+06 090 

Do Accun 

2687 2875 

+09 060 

UK .Growth Rmd 

46-1 495 

-02 263 

LONDON 5 MUNCHeSTBt 

Whshde Pari, Exeter EXS IDG 


0382 52155 • 
General Tnat 

41.7 447 
367 885 

-05 360 

fecome Ttufe • 

-02 820 

hi»wmoi*l Trust 
Amancan 

m sr 

+04 070 
*02 260 

■fepwi _ 

445 477e 

+04 190 

Treat 01 to* 

286 300 

-0.1 250 


UK Geeural 
Ema Growth 
Euro fecome 


5297 5683* 
326 349 
299 320 
384 41.1 


. 02 * 
+13 GOD 
-1.1 4.15 
1.49 

•. 0.18 
-ai 0L31 
-04 137 
+13 ttOO 
..'53* 
-182 225 
-04 1.81 
-02 022 
-82 430 


SIMON a COATES 
1. London Wat S km. Laxfen BC2M 5PT 
01-888 3644 Ext 30 
Spaa* Sts (5) 492 53.1 

STANDARD UFE 

1 George St SHwgft BB 2XZ 
031 2252552 

fecome UMt* 2*4- >202 

Do Acaan Una 27.1 2SO 

STEWART, IVORY DMT TRUST 
MANAOCRS 

<5. Ctadcme S* Edfebmjyi . 

031-225 3271 


CaartmodHie. Stew SL Head. ShelHfd Si 3RD 
0742 789842 

Capital fecome 74 3 793* -05 249 

Do Aceum 101.7 80S4# -07 248 

Commodity 8 On 1087 1074 -13 330 

Do Accun 1423 1514 -13 320 

Extra H*B me 585 623* -0.1 7J4 

Do Accun 682 727* -0.1 774 

Gfl A Fixed Me 544 588 +0.7 931 

Do Accum 889 928 +02 901 

KOI Yield 1539 1632 -02 551 

Do Accun aS89'2772 -03 531 

income 1675'178A -09 173 

DO Accun 2723 2909 -13 3.73 

Japm A PadSe 3835 3023 *8.1 009 

Do Aceum 2972 3173 +13 8L09 

N Ammon Inc 1113 1187 -0.1 138 

Do Acaan 1334 1422 -02 126 

Bap aw fee 1119 1183. +08 1.19 

Do Accun 1333 1*29 *0.7 1.19 

O m e feer Cos fee 
Do Acaan 


American Fond 
Do Accum -. 
Dd Whftdtaul 
Australian Fund 
Do Accun 
Stum Fiona 
Dd Acaan 
European Ftaal . 

Dd Atom 
Japan Raid 
Do Accun 
SunsFFP 


226.1 2405 
2539 2705 
1597 189.1 
944 1005 
963 1023 
5827 6313 
7983 6503 
2744 2923 
2S®9 3073 
3303 3513 
3315.3515 
1894 1784 


*05 £32 
+13 232 
+03 232 
-25- 131 
-25 131 
-27 442 
.-35 442 
*07 093 1 
+07 053 
+33 021 
+33 031 


1124 1195* +0.1 2.13 
1209 1279* +0.1 £.13 


MURRAY JOWSTOHE UfeETTRUST 
MANAGOkKHT . 

ISI. Hope Street Qaagow G2 3UH 
041 221 9252 s’ 

Amarfimn 1165 1243t" *03 396 

Euopnan 2273 2*25 +4.1 1.12 

Smafew Goa 2095 2239 -03 192 


NATIONAL PROVUEHTDIVESTliENr 
MANAGERS 

48. Gracectxach CL B»i 3HH 
01-023 4200 Ext 289 
NPI UK * ’ 1955 2089 
DO Accum 815.7 3359 

NPI Owaaaa 556.1 rau 

Do Acaan 6807 7*8 


Far East Acc 
Amancan Acc 
Euro p ean Acc 
WkatdMda Acc 


+19 250 
-17 250 
*08 070 
+19 070 


859 9TSC +015 £10 
575 619* .. 130 

489 52.1 +03 080 

404 515 +£2 140 


SUN ALLIANCE 

Sun Akwca Haa. itanani, Soaaa 
0*03 56293 : 

Eqtaty Treat Acc 3775 4015 -32 250 

N Am 1>»t Ace 673 809 +0.1 1.11 

Pm East Treat Acc 839 883- +07 090 

WMWN Bond 489 52.1 -0.1 853 

TSSUNtmtUSTSLTD 

Keans House, mow. Hama. SP10 IPG 
026* 56789 DafeOng* 0284 63432W* 


Amartcmi lac 
Do Accum 
Extra fecoma fee 
Do Accun 
General Unit Inc 
Do Accun 
GR 5 Fixed Inc 
Do Accun 
income 
Acaan 
Pacflc fee 
Do Acaan 
kfl fee 
Du Accun 
P ale ci ad Oppu he 
Do Accun 
Natural Fta» 

Do Accum 


1187 1237* 193 

1205 1287* .. 193 

1147 122-1 -09 5.17 

1349 1429 -07 5.17 

1529 181.8* -13 251 
2609 2895* -15 291 
494 619* *0.1 836 
8&4 883* +0.1 836 
2113 22*7* -19 445 
3293 390.4* -15 445 
182.1 1725* +21 038 
1874 178.1* +21 026 
3113 331.1 +1.1 132 


The prices in this 
section refer to 
Tharsday’s trading 




3843 4085 
813 653 
673 713 
389 423 
407 434 


♦1.1 132 
+13 132 
-03 192 
-0.1 132 
*03 226 
-03 228 




TARQET TRUST IUHAGERS 


Tmy ^Houae. GMahouae Rd. Ayfesbury Bucks I 


0298 5941 

Amar Eaflfe . 725 773' 

Aumta 163 <33 

Conanufly 665 7T3 

Bmn 30.1 323 

Equty __ 1235 133.1 

European Spec SO 983 mi 

Extra fecoma 1155 1243 

Financial 2635 ®13 

G* fecoma 10*9 1089 


725 773* -03 003 
183 173 -04 0.10 

865 7T3 -04 140 

30.1 323* -0.1 135 
1239 133.1 -07 334 

983 1021 +05 213 

1153 1243 -0.1 592 

1839 8819 -17 197 

1049 1089 +0.1 738 


Last^ Thursday of month. 


worteng day of month. (32) 20tfi of roorth. 

ifl5ih of rnonttLHf 

21m ofHIH 



INVESTMENT TRUSTS 


M5F1 Low Company 


138 
275 
IIS 
97 
127 
138 

231 18* Gtweu Strategy 
350 2*4 Gmanbtw 


UMJOrtCOaMOOITY 

EXCHANGE 

G W Jayiisa* and Co raport 

SUGAR (Fran C. Cundhow) 
FOB 

Aug 147.6-45.4 

Ocf 151.0-50.6 

Dac 1502-56.0 

March JS6.D55.8 

May 171.0-70.0 

Aug 175.0-73.0 

Vrf 3783 


1419-10 

1439-33 
— . 1473-71 
— - 1500-06 

151049 

1532-21 

— 1540-36 
3763 


122 96 

199 155 
225 201 

321 89 

170 118 
106 140 
118 BOV 
17* 139 
160 135 
305 237 
370 300 
207 157V 
Ml 112 
94 79 

28B 2T7 
■ 62 33 
7* 58 

115 85 

210 181 
358 286 


TO oty a Lon Did 107 
TR fed 8 Gan 189 
TO Natural Res 218 
TO Nam America 91 
TO Pacific Bam 170 
TO Property 179 
to Teen 103 

TO Trustees 159 . 
Temp* Bar isi 

inorgmofTon 282 

TTrog Seaawf Gap 335 
Irene Ocearac 1S5 

Tftexie - 127 

Tjpomt fee Si 

USDobankire 289 

v*mg na aoureafi M 

ifenuroanam Egy 106 

Wflen 194 

Yeoman 382 


56b 59800. 
+3 . 57 39 *09 

'•-1 119 54 234 

+1 29 29 482 

+1 • 14 09 .. 

• 57 32 397. 

29 29489 

-1 6u3B <9 37.1 
81D 54 264 
119b 42337 

59 29489 
•-J 49 3.1 364 

-V 159 17.4 82 
*9 99 36 519 

• 2flb 86 167 

22 39 417 

39 81 481 

49 24559 

181b 49 383 


FINANCIAL TRUSTS 


47V 35'* 
Ts 31 
49 21 

154 118 
22'- 13'* 
20 '. 12V 
158 131 
1*0 90 
247 187 
108 88 
750 97S 
» 77 

33 ^ 

218 183 
440 320 
290 ISO 


American Express E41V 

* 0 ) 4 " - *8 

Bausuad 30 

Brmnxa Arrow 138 

Daiy M#i £19 

DO 'A' ■ E1B'. 

Been mi 

Eng Treat 122 

Era 214 

Erofenean 101 

Fr xo flngton 750 

Rom CfcT 89 

Goode SIS & M) lie 

Henderson AlfeW 8*3 

KW 193 

MAI - 370 

816 335 

MonmnUe House saw 

Pacflc fev Tjt no 

Do Warrants 22 

South New Gam 157 


89 

• TOO 

• TOO 

+1 5l9 

49 
60 
39 
- 99 
84 

-8 26 

S 17.9 

, 129b 

-5 22_9 

S.1 

180 

• +1 05 

-2 . 

• 109 


COMMODITIES 


— 107 60-890 


110.00-990 

11390-690 

— - 11590-790 
114.00-890 


LONDON METAL EXCHANGE 
Unofficial prion 
Official Turnover figure* 
Pric# hi £ per metri c to nne 
aver m pence per troy ounce 

RudoNWfaif& Co. Lid report 

COPPER GIUUIE A 

— -r -- 0969089690 
Tnrea MonttB . 915,00-91690 
Vol 1 Q 2 S 0 1 

Tone fitnsriv 


I SILVER SMALL. 

Cash 

33750-33750 

Three Months . 

345,00-346-00 

Vol . 

*a 

ALUMWH1M 



78250-783-50 

Thru Months. 

77250-77390 

Vol 

2500 

Tone 

Steadier • 

NICKEL 


Cash 

— 2855-2660 

Throe Months - 

_ 2695-Z700 

Vol 

▼mm 

186 
- m, f. 


— ScBKy 


Open - Close 


STANDARD CATHODES 
Cash 8^90409.00 

Three Months . 889JXmi90 
yo* m 

Tone kUe 

LEAD 

Cash-.. 25290-253.00 

Three Months . 25d 00-25850 

Vol 

Tone Stoadar 


SOYABEAN 

12&046.0 


126^25.8 

Dee — 

Feb 

1265-25.7 

129^-28.0 



Aug _ . 

128J2-27.5 


ZINC STANDARD 

Qsti 5259053090 

Voi Na 

Tone Wte 

ZINC HIGH GRAOE 

SS49M55JOO 
Three Months . 549 00-55090 

Vol 1200 

Tons BaralvSiearfv 


COMMISSION 
Average fafstockpricMi at 

■ rapfea e rt a fit a ra a ri ta U an 

2SJMy 

GBtCBBfc. M.12p par kgtw 

(-0.48) 

Glfc Sheep I64.07pper.kg est 

cwt”- 57 ) 

GB: Pp, 74^27p per kg l»r 
(+190J 

engtaad and WHIM 

Cattle nd8 down 4.6 itave. ' 
Dnce.9497p(-(137) 

Sheep nos. down 0.7 %.*«*. 
Drag. i6d46p(-il.G6j - 
Pig nos. down 1 1 9 %. an*/ 
pncB.7497p(+190) - 


1 (1MY1M 

POTATO FUTURES 


Epertoma 

Month 

Nov 

Fob 

ts; 

NOV 

Opan Ctos* 

. T 14.00 116.00 
12590 126-00 
190.00 180-20 
.195.00 198^0 
8140 87250 

' Vol: 1655 

siFHait 

QJU. Freight Ftetuna LM 

report. Slflrpar Mix pokfi. 

' MgUhdn 

JJ86- 

Oct86 

In* D7 

Hgtylow dosa 

564S-564J) 5645 

6«M474) . 64M 

JWT of 

Apr 87 

Joi 87 

Oct 87 
Jan 87 
Apr 87 

679J) 

745J) 

— . aftLo 

. toast 

, 800D. 

. *0-0 

V0C481 

. ... 


LONDON GRAW^UTUnES 
' Epertonna • 


GAS 01 



1000-99.75 



Nov 

105 50*5.00 


SBLVHf LARGE 

ttsh 33790-33790 

Three Months. 345.0(^34690 

VOI 1 

Tone Out* 


Canto nos. down 1.4 %, ava. 

191) 


10309 up 05 on 2477/80 





















—^dd— ; 

. Rw" your _ponfblia card check your 
ciShi share pnee movements. Add them 
up to give you your overall total. Cheek 


j , • v ' “ I Hit IUI 4 J 

oa , ‘y prac money suhmL If \ou are a 
winner fallow the claim procedure on the 
back of your card. You must always have 
your card available when claiming. 


iItH I W T ilVil l g i V 


rraft Wrrm 








—$§c 

Id — 

DAILY 

WEEKLY 

DIVIDEND 

DIVIDEND 

£4,000 

£8,000 

Claims required 

Claims required 

for 

for 

+36 points 

+ 131 points 

Claimants should 

1 rinc 0254-53272 


Industrials L-R 


K hlrtfi .TTm llazUAJi tg .T ra » a « i 

■H^HHHpErrr!T^K-zii 


•966 

togh LOW Company 


F*ncr Chge pones 



13 S ICC RanKMP (J) HU 125 

360 260 Royl Bn» Of Seal 316 

14 5 Senradm C6'. 

864 416 SOM Owl 75 ? 

818 813 Un m G98 

71' 43 . WOU FWOD EES' 

330 220 Wmsust 285 


Im Thomson 


Bristol Oil 


Ccmrovinca] 


Slow Carpets 


SmHctii St Ssaichi 


Undpon-tiundr^ 


Presiwich Hldgs 


Propcit 


Textiles 


Paper. PrinL Ad* 


Industrials A-D 


IndusuiaH A-D 


Indun rials a-D 


Industrials L-R 


Industrials A-D 


Industrials E-K 


Industrials L-R 


Tex I lies 


Banks. Discount 


Bui Idmft. Roads 


. Please be sore to take account 
of any mirtny signs 


Weekly Dividend 


Please make a note of your daily totals 
for the weekly dividend of £8.000 in 
today's newspaper. 




BRITISH FUNDS 




CUyten Son 
Cctwn 1A1 
Coen*! Go 
CombmCd Tool 
Concentric 
Con irjionaty 
Coo* (Wot) 

Cot* son 
Copson <Ci 
Cosau 

Cburmey Pope 
Cowan Do 6 toi 
O mi fWenotw. 
frown Mouse 
Cummins 3 'a 
DSC 
DPCE 
Da-jety 
[Xuvj 

Damn 3 Mel 4 
Daws & Newman 
C«<y 

Oe La Rue 
tWn 

Dontond Surnpmg 
Oet'MtHr 
brum Heel 
Diplanu 
Dabsen Pam 
Don 

Domenon mi 

Dw ex 

Diw (JfrJl 
Do A 


1D0 72 92 

154 33 711 

7 1 3 7 14 8 


22 

9 

Tianwood 

14 *. 



269 

90 

53 


74 


ai 

Ol 612 

144 

7 H 

Tr«*k 

137 

• .. 

29 

21 1*9 



Turner 8 NewaJ 

19 * 

-6 

10.70 


261 

05 

u»o 



71 

30 113 

125 

75 

Un^rowp 

100 

-2 

10 


17 




■ 'to 










286 

212 

V 3 d> 

260 


73 

28 144 


293 

Vickers 

*20 


106 

*4 121 


102 


126 

-2 

60 

54 109 


120 

Un.ten 

137 

■2 

23 

1 7 230 1 


134 - 

vewswagen 

£145 

4 




116 

WSL 

182 

-1 




128 

v. aqe Penanes 

135 


44 


236 

156 

LUgcn he. 

233 


121 









196 

161 

IVaBJams 

106 

-2 

51 

27 266 

375 

239 

Wt^mM 

321 


14 3 

4 S 105 


69 

W 0 sf 

112 





180 

weieome 

181 

+ 1 

39 



1 * 

WcUnun 

41 ' 

- 2 *. 




55 







78 

Wests 

114 


79 

69 157 


210 


280 


35 



02 

tvnevae 

94 

-2 

79 


263 

177 

Wnaecroti 

217 

• .. 

120 

53 114 


137 


158 

-7 

86 




BWLarn, Hags 

035 

-10 

171 






-5 

86 

61 




52 t 

• -2 

15 0 D 












37 


1*8 







36 


09 

64 

WyntfiBm Eng 

6 * 

• .. 

26 b *.l 127 

170 

135 

Young |H| 

140 





GKXMI N Res 
Goal Pel 
Ci western Res 
C Gas 
ICC o* 

lUB 

KCA DnJWIfl 
LASMO 
Do Urals 
New London 04 

Penocci 

Ptenxr 

Royal Discn 

Sms 

5-skciene 

Sovereign 

TR Energy 

Tncamrol 


14 44 121 

29 50 

• -3 23 9 6 0 104 


aj 391 37 

-7 1?4 187 32 

-?0 142 89 3 

-l 

86 91 113 

-1 152 

- 226 4 J 

-4 500 63 7 B 

-1 86 5 2 25 5 

. 15 

II 3 

-7 71 165 13 


OVERSEAS TRADERS 


INSURANCE 


FINANCE AND LAND 


AMtOWOrttl 223 

MfcBA Hums 138 

Antofagasta 635 

Berkley Teal 205 

CaMU SIB 

Ganoavttr ZVI 

CMwn 30 

Fqisly 8 Gen 27‘ 

(vary 8 Sene 138 

MUKM 183 

Hoi Hama Loans 63 


IB 08 . 
1Q0 72 £8 

2750 4 3 62 

IT 1 10 722 

5 7 23 395 

1 7 62 K 7 

68 49 189 
89b 49 26 2 


' FbnndiH Treats appear on Page 20 


FOODS 


A50A-MFI 130 

Aicxne Dnecs 28 

Arms 313 

AB Food 290 

Assoc Fcnanes 99 

Avana 539 

Banks (Sidney C) 310 
Bark* 8 Dobson 
Barr (AG) 330 

Batten Foods 188 

Basnys 98 

Baum 170 



48 

36'v 

AKZO N/V Bearer 

£*3'v 

-u 

*00 

93 .. 

208 

160 

AMCcAMS 

198 

• -3 

36 

16203 

415 

291 

Amor shorn 

393 

m-2 

100 

23160 

247 

180 

Anchor cnernm 

237 


61 

26 119 

150 

106 

BTP 

143 

m 

6.4 

45188 

111 

78'v 

Bayer DM50 

E8ffv 


700 

8.1 .. 

132 

102 

Btegden 

120 

-2 

103 

86 18.1 

169 

112 

Brara Cnems 

144 

-1 

60 

43 166 

too 

57'- 

Br Benzol 

75 



. 166 

136 

82 

CaimgiW) 

109 

♦t 

SI 

4.7 163 

306 

245 

Cookie 

300 

• .. 

10.7 

$6 113 

167 

135 

Coates Bntt 

167 

+1 

66 

43 105 

160 

m 

OP A' 

152 

66 

43 98 

20 

15 

Cory (Horacel 

17 


09 

S3 5.7 

163 

127 

Croda 

152 

100 

66 158 

131 

100 

Do DM 

125 

•-i 


..130 ! 

245 

T72 

EBe 8 Everted 

208 


93 

45 14.8 1 

133 

111 

Erode 

122 

-2 

4.7 

3.9 132 

298 

215 

Foteco**nsm> 

236 

-3 

119 

66 96 

188 

113 

Hakraad (James) 

152 

_2 

64 

42118 

*53 

330 

Fkfloon 

406 


214 

52 108 

101' 

. 72 s 

Hoochn DM50 

E79’- 

4’. 

471 

4 7 li.i 

10' 

.734 

imp Cnem Ino 

904 

412 

410 

118 

333 

102 

ssr 

358 

103 

-a 

■ .. 

118 

54 

33 145 

52 150 

15*’. 

rill 

PNSU 

150 


2.6 

1.7 19 1 

85 

62 

Reanrook Mags 

81 

-i 

3.6 

44 83 

176 

129 

RaraoU 

1*5 

4« 

35 

24 162 

330 

210 

SWA BPD 

229 

-2 


II 708 

73 

36 

SutekHe Spaaknitei 

56 

-3 


233 

178 

HKwwtfuwa Rmk 220 

-1 

li'i 

50 24.7 

140 

67 

vorhsrwn Clam 

132 


43 

33 118 




- 

- 




Batten Foods <88 

Basovs 98 

Baum 170 

Bueorf Coni B8 

Br Venting (BVf) 123 

Cadbury- SOTMPPes 165 
Cans Using 155 

Quotas Panes 22S 

. Do 'K Mi 

CuBtra 205 

Dee 228 

FisMriAioeni i7« 

Facn Loom ?*i 

Glass Qoww lBB 

Ha atm cod Foods 828 
HUards 193 

HiUMOwn Hldgs 276 

Home Farm 90 

Iceland Frozen 514 

Itw* Sara 260 

Leas iJotm JJ 105 

Lovsl (GFJ 95 

Low IWm) 530 

Mon news (Bernard) 223 
Haul Trade Supp 103 

Monson (Kill MZ 

NwnqH. UNI (Vanto) 225 
Norman* 55’. 

NOW Foods 200 

Nurd* 8 Peacock 166 
Park Foods 182 

RHM 207 

Rownnee Mac 403 

Sawsoray ui 370 

Saivesen iCttstn) 152 

Somporrc* 21] 

Tam 8 Lv*0 560 

Tasso 358 

Umgaw 281 

Lhd Bitcuas 227 

Watson 8 Pnan 152 


45 33 149 

2.6 93 560 

111 35 14.0 

87 3D 113 
5 0 5 1 29.5 
17 1 32 139 

14 6 «.» 92 

1ST 40 9 4 
9 7 53 172 

31 32118 

5 7 3 4 203 
74 84 250 

20 16 220 

1 4 51 193 

6 55 85 

103 46 129 


100 4 4 243 

32 10 235 
150 62 H9 
58 31 143 
13 6 16 190 

4 4 23 170 

60 22 173 

46 51 93 

9.4 1 8 23 0 

74 20 191 
20 20 130 
50 53 89 

170 34 167 

39 17 201 

75 73158 
19 09 205 

6.5 3 B 140 
27 4.9 150 

114 4 1 139 
50 35 144 

60 37 131 

80 39 14 1 

174 4J 110 
70 21 215 

40 30 192 

321 57 114 

B3 23 204 
13B 40 134 
13 6b 60 123 
67 5.7 190 


HOTELS AND CATERERS 


CINEMAS AND TV 



AnpaTV-A 

Gramoun 

mvS/v 
lwt mugs 
6ca TV A- 
TVS N/V 
TSW 


250 • 130 56 13.1 

48 .. 20 60 69 

21B -2 11-4 52 30 

343 -0 213 83 135 

330 .3 150 45 10.8 

243 • 120 S3 118 


INDUSTRIALS 

A-D 


DRAPERY AND STORES 


OVER FIFTEEN YEARS 

m 9r-TY*» »a*.3jjjn 

109- , 89-Ganv »;£• «»'« 

IDfi . 65'. Con* 9*. 2000 ■* * 

137- TlT’.Tieas IJ^TSSW" 

iir • 9^' Coin ItN 2002 JOJ 

124- ICO - Each 12;- Jig 1 - 

103 90 Trees 9.2-2KB lB-4 

112. 93'. Treas 1D*» 2003 104 « 

139 - US'. Tubbs 13 2M 130 ‘ 
123' 104 Treas 11' •« BOW ’J*.: 

% 25' ££* 3’£ §§«. » - 

108‘ M • Conv 9 '>*45 ms 
109' 96' Con 9 

KJff. BO'-Crmv 9'*»Z«fc *“J. 

Iir 04 - EkTt iO' *o 2005 10B- 

134 .112. Tied* 12'J- ’|i!’ 
95' 79'. TIMS .Si 

107’. 102 Con- 9T- JS" 

127--104 Tjaas IV-'-aWjg 
24- 23 THUS B'.N 2007 =25 W- 

9d' 92' Treaa 8'.*» 2007 W - 
143' 115 -nets 13' u S** 0 * ’S- 1 

95 W'Tfiias »• 

72' 57' Treas I' S. . 

93 78'. Trees 7-J. M 2,15 86.1 
i3G m'.&ecb l&xnw isF- 

UNDATED 

48 38'' Consols 4*» 

aa 34'. War Ln 3' *• 

52 as.Conv 3 *■ 

3# 29' Tinas _3*« S'.- 

29 - 2« Consols 2 •• 

29 24’- Treas 2 ■ 

INDEX-UNKED 

122 11*' Trnas 6 2** IS". 

107'. 98' Tibbs B. 2S IWO 106- < 
122 108' Treas IL 2S 1995 
tor 95' 'Treas 62' *» 2001 IW - 
107 93' Treas H2' “* 

110- 96Miett<L 2^»» W. 

10B 1 92 ■ Treaa IL2"*» 2009 i«J 

111 97 7W*S IL2;-^ 

94 . 79 ■ Tre« 112' v 2013 Bg 
103' 87'- Tinas 112 *■ MIS 

100 a? Trees 02' *» 2D» 9* ' 


4.8 

2.7 11.1 

36 

58 222 

38 

43 123 

33 

23 301 

. . e 

30 

05 573 

0.7 

14 373 

161 

23 241 

6 B 

28 1B2 

32 

25 329 

31 

75 78 

121 

33143 

171 

36143 

96 

45 16 6 

67 

52 75 

88 

33 10.1 • 

13 

18 17.1 

43 

13214 

79 

1.8 TB.4 

35 

38114 

136 

2.1 246 

5.4 

3.1172 

6.1 

28 170 

2.9 

24 90 

5.7 

38 185 


m 

33 

■ 

74 


105 


£9 

229 

5 *2 

Eb 


240 




W2 


41 



9*2 

310 

s 

56 


CM' 


06 


70 




12*6 


182 

• . 

312 





•-5 

Ml 

-2 

56 


4MJ 


142 


720 


.399 


m 

-1! 

12b 


544 

*2 

J02 


*>12 

+3 

n»i 

43 

XM 


60 



ELECTRICALS 



11 < 

.12 2 


21 

13 1 

9-Z 

03 

03 4 

-05b 

10 

-10 

-5 

38 

1.4 

-2 

23 

13 1 


IS 7 

5.9 l 



38 


313 248 

221 158 
?77 214 
43'- S9' 
153 10?' 
28 • I7-- 
I0« bi- 
iS - 18. 
381 263 
»- 19'. 
164 134 
177' IJD'. 
143 112 

343 158 
?14 124 
415 315 

55 22 

42 36 

143 106 
76 60 

638 406 
67 35 

134 84 

63 31' 

123 100 
41'. 27' 
199 157 
67 48 

131 84 
385 256 
310 360 
116 60 
167 lOO 
■50 111 
11'.756'. 

344 194 
505 310 
1B2 1D7 
312 205 

10'- 6'. 
93 59- 

233 134 
162 126 

365 ISO 

280 230 
41 25' 

49 20 

191 141 
190 145 
116 98 
124', 116'- 

190 133 
275 175 
G23 431 
150 92 

190 81 

291 140 
301 99 

96 66 

142 122 

81 e? 

105 68 
285 I4B 
130 91 
310 234 
US BB 

366 207 'j 

191 119 

315 211 
2*6 255 
127 96'. 

615 473 
216 133 

44'. 226 
330 235 
140 66 

132 67 

3 21 

325 IM 
130 I 05 
298 230 
215 123 


E aster n Prod 

Eunro 

EtS 

E'MJl 

Eieco 

Eucvaui iAEI 'B I 
EJhotl iBj 
Email 

Engusn Ciena Clay ; 
Eimson iLMi B ! 
Er>«ie House 
Eu'opean Femes 
Do 5°. PH 
Ewcc 
Einikm im 
Edei 
FiK<n 

Fecdet A one bid 
Fenner (JMl 
File momar 
F>sorS i 

Fnrweton 

Fleirflo C&W 

Fnoet 

Foovry 

Fair Group N/V 
F diner gd S Harvey 
Frencn iTnomas) 

GEI Inl 

GkN 

GR 

Cjnon Eng 
Gnsiemer 
GwwM 
G'dlO 
Grmweo 
Gonng Kerr 
GramEuan Hiogs 
Granada 
Grove Den 
Hjon Precision 
Han Eng 
Hal iM) 
hs ace 
Habna 

Hampson Ind 
Henenei 
Hanson 
Do 8% Cn» 

Do S'". PT 
Do 10°. 
Hjrgrdjves 
Hams iPn*pi 
Hawker SnuMey 
HawKn 
Hay iNormmi 
Heoworm Ceransc 

Hesu» 

Muwni <J» 
teqngaia A Job 
HCP*S Bros 
Hou Ltcyd 
Hopkinsons 
HowtWn 
Hunmg Assoc 
Hunting Group 
HuKfisn vnumpoa 
IMI 

Ison on 

Jacksons Bourne 
jaraeie Mam 
Jonnuw Cleaners 
Jcftnson ktarmey 
Jomson S FB 
Jcnnsron 
Janes 8 SNoman 
joxnan iTnonas) 
Kalamazoo 
KJkm 
iwtsey Ind 
Kennedy Smale. 
Kemraw (A) 

■ Kleon-E-Se 


143 5l3 67 

10 7 55 12.6 

96 4 2 125 
27 69 142 

66n 42 117 


Abbey We 

Ale* A AASx 
Am Gan 
Bra Bioc* 

Bmannc 
Com linen 
tcudy & Law 
FA1 

Gen Accosm 
GRE 

Heim C E 

H3C3 FIMMISOO 
Legal 8 Gen 
London S Man 

un Un in 

Maisn £ Mclen 

Mm 

PBS 

Pean 

p-udentm 

Reiuge 

Rmai 

Se&pvck Gp 

Srewan Wr son 
sturje Hiajs 
Sun Aijanee 
Sun Lite 
Trace Indemnny 
WAs Fao*r 


99 54 .. 

100 40 .. 
■I S90 U 

65 23264 

*3 126 49 

-l 189 56 .. 
-2 96 18 .. 

I’ 31 4 3 6 20 9 

.2 411 4.7 2S6 

.. 349 68 77 

*l 117 4312B 

-2 117 4JS104 

-3 85 47 71 

. 24 6b 55 119 

2?0 51 

-1 114 44 124 

B-5 129 4! 206 

629 42 . 

-5 37.1 45 M3 

-1 196 4 6 

45 36 8 4 4 692 

«3 15 7 4 4 16 8 

-18 15 7 35 180 

-5 10 On 25 20 6 

45 250 3 6 823 

-3 339 19 . 



investment Trim eppaar on Pag® 20 


LEISURE 


433 

326 

Grand Mol 

370 

-1 

138 

36 125 

286 

200 

Kennedy Brookes 

216 


21 

i 0 113 

391 

312 

Loderoke 

338 


161 

48 161 

545 

447 

Lon Part HoWa 

520 

-2 

143 

28 156 

100 

76'.- 

Mourn Cnartotta 

67 


28 

23 14 3 

105 

67 

Prrea 01 w Hotels 

67 

-i 

. 21 

2 A 15.7 

79 

50'r 

Queens Moal 

67'. 

-2 

23 

34 14 8 

405 

370 

Savoy Hotels A 

370 


50 

1.4 1*6 

61 

56 

Sukii 

63 

-i 

16 

29 156 

209 

146 

Tiusmouse Fane 

152 

-1 

75 

U 15 1 


39 22 

317 241 
323 216 

75 42 

77 41 

34 16 

113 69 

86 64 

73 53 

35 23'. 
TiO 179 
135 99 
77 59'. 

227 155 
233 134 
480 3i9 
398 JOS 
115 64 
50 32 

393 M 
160 121 
73 43 

3W IBS 
125 78 

6U5 495 

79 52 

96 66 

143 55 

85 65 

805 52S 
194 128 
91 55 

78' 59 
125 7» 

198 183 

318 212 

42 20' 

215 158 

41 » 

153 92 
132 66 

66 43 

289 186 
258 M3 
4J8 247 
315 223 
960 525 
IB5 173 
603 383 
27 II 
135 88 

67« 332 
520 140 
14 775 
483 311 
96 51 

365 195 
323 2l5 
314 238 

151 95 

131 56 

190 H9 
158 123 
589 42i 
228 115 
138 98 
•WO 605 
SIS 118 
343 200 

10' 649 
173 132 
91 57 

102 86 
518 345 
39 21 

160 110 
90 53 

58 IB 

152 93 
343 151 

55 30 

150 128 
146 120 
3 fl 
162 116 
130 96 


LDM W 

LAP 253 

L«rd 242 

Lawtm 6b 

Lee 1 Arthur) 6J 

LrlKaie sn 

LneshaS 105 

LinreM 77 

LKNd (FHJ 67;- 

Locner |T| 24'. 

Lon lubound 198 

Do DW 103 

Lon £ Nmn 89 

Lon Hitt 188 

Lonaton kid 215 

Low B Bonar 430 

UL Hdgs ^0 

us n 105 

my H u tt n gs 43 

M.irar tnvs Pnami 370 

Madartane 1*0 

Madouan |P&W| 61 

McKecnr-e 214 

Magneto IM 

Manchuter sno 65S 

Manganese Bronun 63 
Monmg 71 

Marsnai (Lmieyl 113 

Marsna<b Unn 72 

Metal Bo* 675 

MeW Ckmees >36 

Meal'd* 80 

•Mend Cous 60 

Uncnei Soman H3 

Moms 173 

Morgan CfUHtae 258 

Noepsond B- 

Me* tJ> 16| 

Newman hub 36 

Newman Tonks 149 

Noble A Lena 130 

Norton « 

Nomos 240 

Office Qca Macn 223 

Pamm Knon A *03 

Park Place 330 

Pamsn JT 960 

ma 173 

Poarson 505 

Peek i9 

Pceness 

PegUrHanerUay K2 

Penaand ma 399 

PnotO-MC E12 

Piikatgion 403 

PUSK CONW 76 

Pomes 290 

Porter OwBurn 300 

Powea Duttryn 268 

Presmncfi Hugs 106 

Pmcnaro Swv 117 

RHP 182 

Radmrn Maul 150 

Rank Onj 484 

Ronsomo Sens iffi 

RaidrflS iGl Bndgel 126 
Fteckrtl 5 Ctwnan BO* 

RetHoam Glass 2W 

Reed Enocutnre 333 

Rrmd im 965 

Relyon 168 

Renola 76 

RestPiOr 90 

Reiners soo 

Reunore 3* 

Rrcaino Eng 150 

RtJwrd ILN3I 5 

(benaroson weei 37 

Rouensm Res S3 

Robmscn (Thomas) 325 
Rockwara 45 

Raoner 135 

DO A 120 

nousrmt 2'. 

Rotor* 125 

Russel IAI 96 


S7o 34 15.1 
BOO 47 
82 76 . 

0 8* .. 
79 *3 129 
132 51 123 
207 «Q1I4 
27 27 BO 

5 4 3 4 289 

103 52 165 

61b 39 182 
39 4675 
. . • . 26 2 

57 62 13 3 
10.7 4 4 9 7 

55 56 79 

11.4 *0 86 

06 B8 74 

75 4 6 136 

16 08 425 
66 34 143 

293 S3 15> 
36 1.9 126 

. e 158 
10J 3 4 122 

bs> 43 as 
53 50142 
29e 104 9 4 
1 7 57 207 

114 3.7 15.0 

290 1721 1 

21.4 7 8 228 
850 43 133 


05 1 5 205 

79 31 248 

-11 86 35 95 

.. 360 55 69 

» 33 4 9 9-5 

.. . .150 

.. 32 30 21X3 

36 <.7 61 

-I 54 80 90 

I . . 19 78 89 

142 72 11.1 

-I 74 107 120 
.2 66 35 188 

»-3 5.7 27 183 

-8 136 32 139 

♦2 11 10 28 219 

-2 07 0.7 150 

♦2 136 3 7 IBJ 

*3 3 5 25 186 

-2 2 7 4 4 113 

143b 67 103 
46 40 110 

86 1 3 225 

*3 68 74 

.. 23 32 86 

.5 5 2 *6 B 7 

29 4DT7S 

■ -35 27 1 4 0 9 6 

-3 9.6 7 0 20 7 

32 4 0 136 

61 10J 61 

■ -2 55 4 9 114 


Barr £ W* '•' 134 

Boosey & ttawkM 160 
Brent Walker 167 

Cancan *6 

(>1(54*5 187 

F*M Leisure 380 

GflA 52'. 

Henbu'Qer Brooks 65 
Hanron Tnvei .113 

n Leisure 126 

JukMUS Megs 39 

Lee mo 161 

Meemmster 142 

Pteisurama 318 

Really Useful 375 

Ruay Lenre 47 

Saga Horoavs 1*0 

Semirtisan Go 240 

Toiwnnam Hosour G9 
2ene«x 172 


MINING 


► -2 133 

*3 121 


143 29 189 
452 

9 On 73 166 
286 46 112 

it 03 224 
75 06 311 

19J 48 107 
40 53133 
105 3 6 125 

13 05 . 

21 7 81 194 

10 0.9 229 

38 31336 

6 4 35 135 

38 24 . 

225 4 6 17.1 
7.1 43 134 

36 29 48 
229 28 17.4 

29 t 4 121 
64 19 14 9 

321 33 131 

68 3 9 13 5 

29 38 95 
57 63 139 
46 09 378 

140 4 I 134 
4 1 2 7 183 

*3 48 SB 
.. 163 
36 39 100 

. *46 
107 

93 69 93 

U 71 U 
.. 12 
77 62 94 
23 24 246 


13- 4. 

tO 638 

57 33 

58 33 

40 22 

41 22 
198 120 
*» 2*0 
160 80 
21'. 9'. 

358 326 
09 *3 

534 119 
531 3-4 
200 105 
9' 4 - 

IT- 7** 
7 2- 

255 150 
m 258 
205 129 
195 85 

390 220 
4 2 ' 


10 6 
ID'- S . 

375 170 
150 91 
9- 4'. 
350 ITS 
81 47 . 

12' 5- 

6 - 2 - 
160 65 

13 * 6 . 
4ID 170 
157 6* 

28 15 
123 60 

26 14 

76 5 

9 5'. 
655 476 

5 . 2 

1*2 73 

44 25 

22 - 10 . 
128 90 
289 205 
25 8 

445 1?5 
69 16 

2S6 325 
791 511 

7 4 - 

10 fr- 

ies 70 
31 1* • 

556 288 
138 80 
138 75 

566 300 
59 31' 

544 233 
105 5? 

90 4 b 
17 10 ' 

545 288 
310 120 

29'- 15 
196 114 
265 113 
mo ao 

17 7 

56 20 

16' >0- 
58 26 


Ang Amer Cod) 
kng Am 

Am Com 
A AIT 

AngovjMi 
Ayer Htam 

BWvWS 

Bracken 

Bullets 

CRA 

Cam Boyd 
Cons GoOfirWB 
De Beers 
Doouraal 
Doombyimn 

Oneiomoin 

Dikhan 
E Qagsss 
Eurasraiw 
El Cro 
EKauiJ 
E Rand Odd 
E Rand Prop 
FS Cons 
FS Dev 

Geeror Ta» 

Genoel 
Gen Unirg 
GFSA 

GM Kalgoork 
Gcannfl 
Grootwei 
Kanroon Areas 


Kraoss 

Wont 

Wsto 

Uuncn 

Lomme 

VIM 

tidiayson Mnmg 

Mew E*o 
UhJigu>a 
i'.3» was 

U«K5 
New VMS 

r.in Brcwen HO 
Nib kaigiini 
fringe Free 
Petal mg Tin 
P**o wausend 
R anc rjnes Ltd 
Rand Mnes PiOB 
Ranaioruem 
Ren son 
R7Z 

Runenemg 
Si Hetona 
SA Lana 
Scuowaai 
Sturbmeai 
Sungri Be Si 
Tionon 
LHksal 
vaa> Reefs 
vemerspesi 
voktontem 
Vogels 

wnnkae CoAery 
neWm 
western Areas 
Western Deep 
Western kuimg 
Weta Rone Cons 
wnm Creek 
Wmkrts 
wn ttgei 
Zincm copper 
ZantKwri 


100 75 105 

240 

79 4 7 129 

14 30 13 3 

80 43121 
93 24 195 

44.1 
. . 42.5 
63 56 54 

71 58116 

43 11.0 182 

79n SB 95 
10 7 34 13 > 
16 1 43 15 * 

.. ..260 
6fi 47 110 
34 1*136 

5.7* 8J 125 
6.1 35 14.7 


54 0 82 
446 135 
271 63 

1*2 62 
■ 142 62 
475 339 
790 316 
280 306 
282 250 


350 .83 104 
iao 4 5 
40 3J .. 
92.0 20 7 .. 
IS 167 . 


120 37 . 

86 33 13.9 

14 0 14 7 
280 122 .. 


60 0 12D 
870 124 .. 
*60 82 .. 

20 0 44 4 
54 0 300 
5 4 3 7 328 

625 129 .. 
170 86 

3*5 64 
890 145 .. 
*0 0 13.1 . . 
29 0 387 . 

- 115 179 .. 


250 225 Assoc Paper 239 

45 31 Alii 5 Wicong 3? 

158 143 Banter fCnariM) i*J 

190 138 Bemros# 166 

357 217 Boase Massmv 244 

30« Ml BPCC 272 

186 M3 Btuuuna 178 

185 142 Do R/V 175 

222 155 Burul 205 

930 720 Canton Comm 830 

225 173 Chapman 2ii 

355 178 Cropper (James) 350 

314 109 ORG 2B0 

1B6 T43- Djvdson Pearce UJ 

483 360 EucetvPkrs PuO 450 

281 172 Ferguson ind 280 

465 375 Fitch De*gn 410 

90 53 • Geers Cara 79 

233 200 Gold Gieemns 2C0 

100 103 Good Relations 1O8 

293 186 Humrprmt 2JB 

123 11O Loon 1 ifl 

420 311 Lowe H5 C-E 388 

235 MO UcCorouoaare 135 

135 61 More OTerral 135 

155 123 Notion Opa> 135 

» 19 - Ogwrv » Warner £21 '. 

46 28 0k ms Paper 44 

B65 51J 6t l»vts Gp 715 

905 680 Saxcr* 6 Saatrni 700 

150 112 Go 6 J*i Cnv PiMU 

222 124 smurkf uetli 222 

220 200 inner VJafcer 210 

215 1*0 Vain Pouen 1*0 

75 40 Wace 71 

955 565 Wadomgidn (J) 890 

29' 235 ViaDnoutyt 235 

565 320 Wgm Cowns 463 


-10 69 37 143 

• I 77 

-2 71 42 606 

r 6 20 3 4 IS? 

-I 17 lb 63 22? 

70 39 4*6 

-3 70 40439 

4 3 ?3 2l0 

• 55 1 1 273 

• 120 5 7 216 

• 39 1.1 7 9 

-4 110 42 12.0 

36 25 1*7 

71 1677 

113 40 175 

87 21 223 

*J 5 5 212 

-3 4 1 2 1 21 8 

70 65 102 

-3 B.9 35 9 1 

-2 0 6 22 229 

-3 88 45 194 

57 4 6 15 B 

-3 5 0 3 7 14.0 

’ ’ 415 

.. 129b 1 8 302 

• *2 22 9 3J 145 

90 60 

*5 4 7 2 1 

104 50 97 

• 17 1 2 2B 7 

197 

• -5 37 1 42 16 5 

-J 93 40 H6 

61 13257 


PROPERTY 


•10 17.0 28 3 .. 


-a 100 2.1 

230 77 .. 

♦ 1 

+ 1 *. 


12 0 65 61 

551 131 .. 


31 4 57 73 

26.0 45 434 
125 204 . . 
180 231 
118 72 .. 


.15 460 132 .. 

♦ 556 158 .. 

540 21 B 

-5 150 273 . 

43 BG 63 

♦3 87.0 22.1 

.. 230 150 .. 

T71 105 . 
30 23 .. 

-10 129 100 .. 


88' »- 
0« 60 
92 70 

183 173 
124 85 

296 218 
595 440 
188 144 

170 138 

46 36 

23J 218 
290 200 
198 <60 
485 410 
070 700 

171 131 
279 164 

20 14 

MO 99 
177 117 
255 175 
755 470 

19 6 

175 MS 
120 47 

120 105 
181 140 
112 83 

172 5! 

70 36 

200 170 
192 140 
274 ac 
16'- 11 
<00 204 
495 432 
48S 417' 
240 130 
325 233 
310 270 
IBS 155 
320 273 
75 54 

340 276 
695 358 
266 147 
366 218 
ITS 151 
353 288 
300 275 

126 90 
- 118 105 

50 44 

195 125 
77 60 

555 173 
9'. 510 
775 364 
108 82 

20 (S' 

130 73 

81 43 

282 255 
235 72' 
230 176 
155 107 

127 10G 

13' 8 

660 320 
645 313 

297 253 
272 153 
T03 70 
103 142 
445 260 

173 144 

93 66 

50 45 

260 198 
140 95 

900 525 
8Si. 675 
610 475 
28 IT' 
175 1*2 


Aoaco 66 

ARM Lon 79 

Apex 92 

Anxigro Secs <73 

Bergrave 123 

Bxityi |P) 292 

Braflfad 5*5 

Br Land 167 

Bruton 159 

C#>d IAI &5ans A3 
Cap 6 Counties 233 

Caron Prop 290 

Centrcimcial 170 

CnasKtiaM 465 

CALA 870 

Curve Nckcas 16? 

Carmens 256 

Control Secs 16' 

Cowry 8 New <2< 

Counry B 156 

CuttrtS 255 

Daepm 670 

Dares 16' 

Estates 8 Agency 1*5 

Egencm Trust 93 

Estates Gan . - 1*2 

Estates Plop ■ 181 

Evans 0» Leeds - 108 

Federated Housxig 152 

Fnre Oats 62 

Ffcxynore 209 

i3r Remand 180 

Greycoat 248 

Hailwood Gp T12' 

Hamcro Country* >aeJ’0 
Hamper son 440 

Do A 4 26 

Hanover Druce 2*8 

ar*' s 

Jetmyn 105 

U**J Prop 303 

Land kweslors 75' 

Land Secunues 3<7 

Lon 8 Ean Th 660 

Do 8 ■« 556 

Lon 8 Prov Snap 243 

Lon Shop Prop 172 

US £2 

Mcmemey 100 

McKay Secs 116 

Markneam 51 

MerWrtt Moors 175 

Marnorough 70 

Marun EM 540 

Mounwmgh ra 

Moimtwew 720 

MuCklow (A8J1 104 

Mmccjai £18 

New Cuvendcji 120 

Parwtaie 81 

378 

Pr-esi Marians 235 

Prop S Roy 222 

Ft 0b H«g» 142 

Prop Seamty 125 

Raglan 13 

Regawm 595 

Fttnenaugn 590 

flusn 8 Tompkins 2TO 


flush 8 Tompkx 
Samuel 
Seal Met 
Slougn Estates 
Speynawk 
Sund Bees 

Stock ley 
Town Centra 
TraKora Para 
UK Land 
urn Real 
Warner 
Warn had 
wen I Jos) 
west 4 Country 


r -2 03b 05 

-1 20 2.5 18 7 

29 3 2 193 

• 6< 53*32 

• -4 17 1 59 146 

• -5 154 30 188 

• -1 4 3 2.6 14 0 

-2 B 1 51 18 7 

BE 3 7 216 
36 09 

.2 66 51 2<3 

. .. 171 3 7 19 3 

. 25.7b 3 0 129 

90 55 242 
60 23344 

31 

• , 27 22 281 

56 34 55 

BE 3 4 57 B 
. 200 30 137 _ 

5' 1 43 30 532 

• -3 07 08 

36 32232 
121 67 158 

■ . 57 53 131 

-4 4 7 31 16 0 

-at- 87 

lOl 49 130 
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99 

5b 

90 

49 

528 

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373 

103 

195 

120 

179 

94 

18* 

122 

154 

107 

16* 

99 

52 

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136 

75 

153 

103 

990 

703 

53 

32 

303 

100 

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388 

35 

26 

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94 

41 

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326 

228 

235 

163 

104 

128 

153 

71 

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345 

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96 

253 

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98 

74 

210 

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248 

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587 

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95 

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64 

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198 

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no 

91 

236 

69 

333 

203 

341 

252 

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93 

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106 

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462 

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£34 

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122 

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2.7 206 

37 


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1 1 250 

260 

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200 


86 

4 3 152 

174 


76 

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153 


57 

3 7 93 

106 

80 

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79 

73 106 
359 

570 

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82 121 

506 

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37 187 

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+3 

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23 219 

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40 119 

110 


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306 


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189 

75 69 

222 

86 

43 16 3 

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68 

4 3 15 7 


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Aamward .128 

Aimsacng -124 

B5G 45'. 

Biume* Bros 
BramDl (CO I 292 

Br Aerospace 463 

Br Car Auctions 122 

Cahvns 226 

Come ITt 183 

Dsns (GodVayl 107 

21 » 

EW “5 

FR Gran 3® 

FdM Motor ire 

■3ates 1 Frank Gt <6 

General Mow 239 

Gun herd Lawrence 80 
Giouo LOWS 129 

Hartweas 93 

How Motor *33 

Jaguar 505 

JeSSuPS 126 

hwW-Frt 

Lav 39 

uokars 162 

I ..rvk 543 

Party go 122 

ftanons IGBI 69 

Quck (HJi 82 

Rover 3| 

Supra 60 

Wooonead (Jonas l 61 


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Assoc Br Pons 26J 
B> Corrunonwaailh 256 
CaleoorM 233 

Fisnei tjames) 2 

Gia^ 

Jacob* UI) <- 

tieesey Pocks 34 

Ocean Transport ?1S 

psom 403 

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Tipr-pok 325 

TummOl So* 3?S 


7 1 2 7 1* 4 

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53 16 201 

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114 62 Peuiil 106 

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M3 9 3 96 
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114 76 60 

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Cojws IWmi 
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113 

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Five million in line for a share 



If you were a buyer of British 
Telecom, then don't miss the 
TSB which promises to be the 
most profitable new issue yet. 
Sir John Read, chairman of 
the Trustee Savings Bank, this 
week, at last, gave the formal 
and public declaration that the 
notation would go .ahead, 
though be was coy about 
giving the exact day in 
September. 

Private investors should 
keep an eye on dates for 
completing the formalities of 
applying for shares, because 
all the signs are that it will 
prove to be a bonanza of 
British Telecom proportions 
for anyone lucky enough to get 
shares. 

It is the largest share launch 
ever seen on the Stock Ex- 
change, excluding the 
Government's privatization 
programme, and the bank is 
keen to attract as many pri- 
vate investors as possiblel It is 


hoping to get more than a 
million. 

The flotation was to have 
gone ahead last year, of 
course, until some Scottish 
depositors put a spanner in the 
works by insisting that the 
bank was owned by its deposi- 
tors. This contradicted the 
view of the Government and 
the bank that no one owned it. 
The subsequent legal wran- 
gling dragged on until early 
this month when the Law 
Lords finally deckled that the 
Government and the. bank 
were right, leaving the door 
open for the delayed flotation 
. to go ahead. 

Owning TSB shares should 
be a bonanza for several 
reasons. It is, to begin with, 
literally a give-away. As no 
one owns the bank, no one 
owns its £800 milli on reserves 
or its fixed assets — until its 
shares are sold. In pumping 
their money into the bank. 


investors will automatically 
be picking up the ownership of 
all these assets at the same 
time; 

City analysts are virtually 
unanimous in believing the 
shares will rise rapidly in price 
after the launch, just as BTs 
did. “It’s bound to go well” 
says Tim Clarke, of stockbro- 
ker Scrim geonr Vickers. “It 
has all the makings of an 


looks a good institutional 
buy,” says Mr Clarke, “but a 
lot of institutions will get 
fewer shares than they want” 
With an significant new bank 
entering the stock market, the 
institutions will need a lot of 
TSB shares if they are to 
maintain an even spread of 
holdings in the sector. This 
will create a heavy demand for 
shares, much as institutional 


The institutions will almost certainly 
not get the qnota of shares they need 


extremely popular -issue." 
Once this sort of opinion 
becomes widespread in the 
stock market, it tends to 
become self-fulfilling as every- 
one wants to get in on the 
action. 

But the biggest upward pres- 
sure on the share price is likely 
to come from the large institu- 
tional investors. “The TSB 


buying -did after the BT 
flotation. 

The pressure will be all the 
more intense as there will not 
initially be all that many 
shares to go around. The bank 
intends to reserve around half 
the issue for sale specially to 
staff and' customers who had 
accounts with the bank before 
December 17, 1984. Five mil- 


lion customers are eligible, 
and if they all apply for shares 
only half the issue will be 
. available for all other private 
and institutional investor^ 
The institutions will almost 
certainly not get the quota of 
shares they need from this and 
will be all the more eager to 
buy in the secondary market 
after the launch. 

The share issue win proba- 
bly contain features designed 
to minimize "slagging “ 
buying shares in order to sell 
at a profit immediately after 
the issue — and multiple 
applications will also be dis- 
■ couraged. There will probably 
also be perks attached to the 
shares as there were in the BT 
issue but the TSB has not 
revealed any details yet. 

The somewhat arbitrary 
date of December 17, 1984, 
was chosen, some time ago as 
the cut-off date beyond which 
new customers are not eligible 


for preferential treatment 'm ' 
the allotment of shares. How- ~ 
ever, the .five million people 
who were customers before 
that date will still' not be - 
eligible unless they register 
with the batik before Septan- . 
ber5. V , 

A full-scale publicity cam- '- 
paign. cutely featuring bOwler 
hats to signify investment has ; 
now got under way and infor- 
mation packs -are ^ available 
from TSB branches.- But' foe ; 
simplest way to findouUttiouf • . 
the flotation is to ring foe - 
Share Information Office (ra - 
other borrowing fiom ife-Bj ; 
issue) on 027Z 300-3001 '^The. ; 
office will not only serid!you, : ; 
the information pack but fegr, : 
ister your name so that .you. ■ 
.will automatically receive « - 
share application form on? fop : 
appropriate day. 

Richard Thomson 

Banking Correspondent 


Leave the PEP to 
the plan manager 


Farther details emerged this 
week on how the new Personal 
Equity Plan, which will be 
available to investors from 
January L, win work. 

The PEP, revealed by the 
Chancellor in this year's Bud- 
get, allows indhriaaftls to in- 
vest up to £2,400 a year in a 
mixt u re of shares and unit 
trusts and to enjoy tax relief on 
the dividends, while sales 
within foe plan will be free of 
capital gains tax. 

The most popular way in 
which PEPS are likely to be 
marketed is in a form similar 
to unit trusts. The Government 
has given foe go-ahead to 
common management 
schemes whereby foe money 
that investors want to be pot 
into a PEP win be pooled 
together by a “plan manager", 
who would make all the invest- 
ment decisions. 

The major plan managers 
are likely to be institntions 
such as unit trust companies, 
banks and building societies. 
Barclays Bank, for example, 
announced this week that it is 
to offer PEPs through a new 
stockbroking service. 

PEPS will ran on the baas 
of the calendar year rather 
than foe tax year and yon will 
be able to take ont only one 
plan a year. This is the case . 
even where you do not pot foe 
maximum permitted amount — 
£2,400 a year or £200 a month 
— into a PEP. 

1 For example, if yon put 


£1,200 into a PEP next year 
yon will not be able to start np 
another PEP with, say, a 
different fund manag er, until 
the following year. 

However, this does not auto- 
matically restrict you to one 
plan manager a year. If yon do 
not like foe investment perfor- 
mance yon are entitled to 
switch your PEP to another 
plan manager 'without forfeit- 
ing your tax privileges. 

This may prove an expen- 
sive a business. It Is worth 
hearing in mhvt that foe 
Government is not putting any 
limit on the amount yon can be 
charged by the plan manager, 
although the charges will have 
to be dearly stated. 

One interesting aspect an- 
nounced this week is that, once 
an yoor investments have been 
made, yon or yonr plan manag- 
er can switch the unit ami 
investment trusts into shares. 

However, foe converse is not 
allowed, so yon cannot convert 
foe shares into unit or invest- 
ment trusts even where foe 
maximum thresholds for these 
types of investments within 
foe PEP has not been readied. 

To secHre the PEP tax 
breaks foe PEP most be 
allowed to rim until December 
31 of foe year after the starting 
year of foe plan. So if yon 
begin a plan in July 1987 it 
must be continued, without 
withdrawals or other breaches 
of foe PEP requirements , 
until December 31, 1988. 


Pick up our heaviest returns. 



• The new 90 DAYS Account pays | — 
out ourtop rate of&25% net And all i 
you need is £500 to open an account, i 

• Give us 90 days’ notice of with- 

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90 days’ interest on the amount 
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MattoMdSBtavincUIB«uWiagSi»c>ety. 

Address 


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tnba l nv eitt d In « W Pays Account 


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You won’t 
get rich 
on the 
Imperial 
roubles 


Interest in Russian Imperial 
Bonds surged last week after 
the British and Soviet govern- 
ments signed an agreement to 
unlock £45 million to com- 
pensate British , holders of 
financial and property assets 
seized in the Bolshevik revo- 
lution of 1917. 

But what does the agree- 
ment hold for the ordinary 
individual who bought Rus- 
sian bonds? The answer in 
most cases will be not very 
much. 

One investor who will be 
leaving his Russian bond on 
foe office wall is Michael Bliss, 
chief executive of Frasers 
Financial Services. 

Mr Bliss, aged 54.. was one 
of a number of readers who 
called The Times to seek 
advice on what to do. Unfor- 
tunately his 1913 City of St 
Petersburg bond has a face 
value of 189 roubles, equiva- 
lent to £20, leaving him ripe 
for a payout of about £2^0. 
Although the bond was a 
present, the frame cost rather 
more than that. “I don't think 
HI be retiring just yet," he 
said. 

The £45 milli on bounty 
being paid out for the bonds 
comes from bank accounts of 
the Imperial Russian Govern- 
ment frozen in London when 



Pretty but paltry; Michael Kiss with his St Petersburg bond, worth £2£0 today y 

have been known to fetefc: ^ 
hundreds of pounds: ; : v • 


Lenin came to power. It will 
be used to settle claims worth 
an estimated £400 million 
which must be lodged with the 
Government by December 31. 

The money will he used to 
settle ah the tfaims, which: 
means foal if everyone efigfbfe 
applies a payment of about 
Up in the pound will be 
made. The fewer who apply, 
foe higher the percentage 
payout. However, the pay- 
ments will be made only, on 
the value of foe investments In 
1917. For holders of property 
and other physicaf assets that 
means ho .account will be ' 
taken ofinflation. For holders' 
of bonds, it means no com- 
pensation for 69 years, of., 
missed interestpayments. 

So before yon 'smash your 
metalled frames, take _a 
minute to work out flow much 


you paid for your bond and 
how much you axe likely to get 
back from the Government 


Those who bought their 
bonds on the stock market 
through a broker might have- 
paid only £3 per £100 bond — 
the price they traded at foe day. 
before the Government's an- 
nouncement For these inves- 
tors, it might be a good idea to 
cash them in with the Govern-. 
ment a move that might 
treble their money. 

r However, people. . who 
bought the Donetz Railway 4. 
per cent bonds of 1.893. and 
others for their aesthetic, ap- 
peal in a specialist collectors’ 
shop might do better to forget 
any ideas about raising a little 
extra cash. Prices on the high 
street vary, but some bonds in 
particularly good condition 


Any lingering temptation to 
take up the Government’s 
offer,, may also be kilfed 2$. 
other considerations. _.How 
much did it cost to frame .the. 
print? How much wifl it dost 1 
to send the bonds and applica- 
tion forms off to the. Foreign : 
Office? ■ 

. And are you prepared to 
wait while the government.' 
bureaucracy cranks . slowly 
Into, action?. Despite official 
promises to do tilings as" 
quickly as possible, it wifl be. 
1987, and iKrisibly 1988 or. 
later, -before a cheque, courte-g; 
^nof the Imperial- Russian; 
Government lands, tin" your., 
doormat- •. J , 

RldmrdLander 


Suddenly, the interest battle hots up 


The Chancellor's attempts to 
turn us all into share-owning 
mini-capitalists seems to be 
working. Figures this week 
reveal that unit trust invest- 
ments last month exceeded 
the amount going into build- 
ing societies. 

The societies say competi- 
tion from 31st issue National 
Savings certificates and unit 
trusts, coupled with falling 
returns from their own invest- 
ment accounts, have caused 
the decline. National Savings 
certificates pay 7.85 per cent 
tax-free, comparing very 
favourably with building soci- 
eties, most of which are paying 
7 . to . 7.5 per cent. Savings 
certificates are particularly at- 
tractive to higher-rate tax 
payers: 

However, the past couple of 
weeks have seen a rash of new 
extra interest accounts from 
the societies. Anglia, for exam- 
ple, has increased foe rate paid 


on its Instant Gold account for 
sums of £20,000 or more, to 8 
per cent, which is just below 
the 8.05 per cent paid fry the 
market leader, Cheltenham & 
Gloucester, bn its Cheltenham 
Gold Account for £10,000 or 
more. 

But, as always, the smaller 
societies are offering the best 
rates. On foe instant access 
accounts or those with rela- 
tively minor restrictions, the 


Aid To Thrift Building Society 
tops the list, closely followed 
by the Teachers, but these 
returns will be available only 
until August 1. Of the instant 
acbeSs accounts, Wessex. pay-' 
mg 7:85 per cent for invest- 
ments of £1 or more looks the; 

best bet from August 

Sussex County is paying' 
8-25 per cent on hs 90 days' 
notice account for sums. of 
£5,000 or more, while the 


Lambeth is offering 8.15 per 
cent on its Premium Shares 
for relatively small . invest- 
ments of £250 or more. Three 
months’ notice- is required.. 
Haywards Heath Building. So- 
ciety is paying 8j25 per cent 
for £5,000 dr more op three, 
months' notice while foe MeR 
ton Mowbray offers 83 per 
cent on its Supreme 60 ac-. 
count for £500 or more on two' * 
months’ notice.- 


little notice. BUILDING SOCIETY BEST BUYS 

SMALL AMOUNTS Account Type Net 

FEW RESTRICTIONS hae % 


Compound 

annrate'% 


Minimum 
Investment £ 


. Olher 

nj-i njeiflii^ eji O 

.conoraoTOx 


AW To Thrift 
AW To Thrift 
Teachers 
Wessex 
Ftome Seiwood 
Harrow 
Paddington 
StPancras 


Share 


Shares 
Ordinary Shares 
U Days Notice 
7 Day 

7 Day Notice 
High Yield Shares 


- 

8.75 

844 

• 0. 

— 

8J50 

8.68 

: o 

- 

825 

8.42 

500 

- 

7.85 

840 

0 

— 

7^0 

7.95 

1,000 

— 

7.75 

7.90 

: 500 

— 

7.75 

7.90 

100 

— 

7.75 

7J90 

500 


B 
A B 




Annual Contractual rate 

8.oo% 

8.30% if compounded monthly 
8.16% if compounded half yearly 

SUPER SHARE ACCOUNT 

Equivalent to 11.27% to Basic Rate Taxpayers 
Our assets now exceed £39 million. 


Trie Peckham Is pleased to announce that the 
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If this advert seems too good to miss - youre 
right! Fill in the coupon below and send a cheque 
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too good to be true, fill in the coupon and tick 
the box for further information. 


Bqifcfmfl 

Society 


Peckham Building Society, 
Gravlaw House 
i coners cope Road 
Beckenham. Kent BR3 inb 
T el. 01 -658 7221 


Call Freephone 
Peckham for 
fun details. 


interest Rate 
may vary 

tffnm* 0 Wf mnto'TAi'tct’fln SP«r*r tnav (»* Arianq'tttiKmAwStfKn 

lb: Peckham Building Society, FREEPOST Beckenham Kent brS iUF 
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□ i would like to invest £ In Peckham super Share 

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■ [*rolUic Unit Trans is [i* trading name of ' !■ II: ' in’irara — 

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BUSINESS AND FINANCE 




~V^f 

■i****.. *N 



S!H 

n« _ 


Advice on 
boot booty 

■ They have spies almost 
everywhere; not even car boot sales 
are safe- Rumours abound of 


■5S5JS 


w 60 k 6 fid institutions. t»r boot sates. 
Money made is income, which 
could wen be taxable. And your car 
registration number coukf . of 
course, be a useful lead to your 
home address. 

“We have no direct access to the 
Swansea registration centre," said 
the Revenue spokesman, “and 
we're not interested in people's beer 
money. ; ft* the character with a 
boot fan of merchandise from Hona 
Kora that we'd look at. We have 
to coitect the correct amount of tax — 
not too little nor too much." Very 
fair-end reasonable. But if you see a 

dMesmirtwast^dtfamenmtsto 
sen a few choice items, be 

careful. 



X Hidden charges 

^ ■Eurocheques, so we were fold, 

were'to tea^te^ovement on the 

guarantee card and cheque book 


‘All I know is I haven’t been able 
to make head or tail of my account 
since we went metric* 

for obtaining cash at banks when on 
the Continent Quite apart from 
the fact that Eurocheques are more 
expensive than the old system, it 
seems that there are some 
unexpected charges on top. in 
Italy, Eurocheque users wiH not only 
pay the £4 charge for the 
Eurochequecard and cheques, plus 
the 1.6 per cent of face value, 
commission on each cheque written, 

but also a bank fee of 300 fire a 

cheque plus stamp duty of 500 Ike. 

To add to the inconvenience, 
some banks give you the 500 Bre 
stamp and sbefc it on the back of 
your Eurocheque. You then have to 
go to a post office to get it 
endorsed and validated. What you • 


do if there is no convenient post 
office is anybody's guess. 

Maze made easy 

■ National Insurance 
contributions lor the vast army of 
employees are nothing more man 
an irritating deduction from pay. But 
for thousands of small 
businesses which do not have 
specialist wages staff, and 
controlling directors, they can be a 
nightmare. 

To help you find your way 
through the maze, the Institute of 
Chartered Accountants has 
published a Practical Guide to Social 
Security Contributions, which 
covers m detail aU aspects of both 
employee and employer 
contributions, as well as 
contributions for the self- 
employed. Easy to understand and 
wen written, it is available at £6 
from the institute at Gloucester 
House. 399 Silbury Boulevard. 

Wttan Gate East, Milton Keynes MK9 
2HL. 

BES stop-press 

■ The Business Expansion 
Scheme season has not yet got 
under way but this week sees the 
launch of BESt Investment. a 
newsletter covering the BES field. 
Clearly, as the number of BES 
companies seeMng finance 
increases towards the end of the 


Brave policy 

■ Investment managers M & G 

are celebrating the 25th anniversary 
of their life company and to 
mark the occasion have tracked 
down one of their first investors 

who bought a E2-a-fnonth pofley in 

March lm Mary Monisons 
payout from her investment in M & 
G*s General Trust Fund was 
E4.053 Tor a total investment of 
£800, which after tax relief cost 
har only £500. Had she put the 
money in a bullring society it 
would have been worth El£72. If 
she had Invested ft in a with- 
profits policy from a leading life 
company it would now be worth 
£2,943. Even if she bed bought the 
shares that make up the 
Financial Times Index her £600 
would stffl be worth only £3*453. 
"This works out at an annual 
compound growth rate of 14 per 
cent net of all taxes," said David 

year, the newsletter will have to 
expand. But the first 1 6-page issue 
covers topics such as how to 
claim your BES tax relief, reviews 
the 1985-66 BES scene, and 
gives the low-down on those BES 
prospectus issues and funds now 
open to investors. 

BESt Investment is, in effect, free 
to the serious BES investor. The 
annual subscription to founder 
subserfoers is £95 (£125 after the 




Afrs Aforrisotv £4. OSS payout 

Hopkinsen, managing director of m 
& G. Presenting Mre Morrison 
with a carriage dock, Mr Hopkinson 
congratulated her on her 
courage and shrewriiess. “M & G*s 
trust assurance plan when It 
began in J9H was a very 
revolutionary idea Indeed,” he 
said. 

launch period). And a panel of 
brokers — Philips & Drew, Kteinwort 
Grieveson and Greenwel! 

Montagu — are prepared to give BES 
advice and rebate the total cost 
of the subscription to everyone who 
makes a reasonably substantial 
investment through them, during the 
current financial.year. 

Details: BESt Investment, 100 
Fleet Street, London EC4Y IDE (01- 
353 0301). 


into action. 


The world’s largest unit trust group has 
advanced plans for this new tax efficient 
investment 

For our preview and your free invitation to 
Fidelity’s PEP seminar, post the coupon now. 


FRiiE PEP SEMINAR 


To: Fidelity Investment Services Limited, River Walk , 
Tonbridge, Kent, TN9 1 DY. 

Please post me ray PEP preview and my seminar 
invitation. 


Full name Nlr'Mrj/Miss 
4 Block ktwrs please) 




Fidelity 


maxing money make money 


A risky relationship Legal aid snag for ex-wives 




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A report published this week 
surprisingly revealed that 
even among young people 
there is little evidence that 
cohabitation is actually re- 
placing marriage. But there is 
considerable data indicating 
an increase in cohabitation as 
a prelude to marriage. . 

Marriage and living togeth- 
er, are legally two very differ- 
ent things. However many 
years you cohabit with some- 
one,, you are never entitled 
legally to the protection that a 
numage bestows and the 
resulting rights on a split-up. 

Ideally you should take legal 
advice at the outset of cohabi- 
tation. This can avoid horren- 
dous problems later on. A 
■V solicitor, Peter Grose Hodge, 
advises: “If yon are not mar- 
ried you must be businesslike 
in your financial dealings with 
each other. I draft what I call 
an ante-nuptial settlement" 

.A couple of high-earning 
accountants from Islington, 
north London, sorted out 
everyftiing when they started 
living together. 

Now, seven years later, they 
are splitting up. They ex- 
plained their position: "We . 
put the house in joint'names, 
and we had a joint bank 
account for the mortgage, 
bills, and other outgoings. We 
also had a joint petty cadi 
Ibdok for everyday expenses. 

1 "We are now splitting the 
sale proceeds of the house and 
the items of furniture equally. 
It is all quite orderly and 
amicable and as a result we do 
not need solicitors to sort it 
out.” 

This organized split-up may 
be easy for high-flying yuppie 
accountants who put pen to 
paper and sort out their affairs 
in advance.. But for other 
cohabiting couples, breaking 
up can produce a financial 
shock. 

Cohabitees have no right to 


other, . regardless if one of 
them is a millionaire and the 
otter has devoted all her time 
qg. to bringing up their children. 


A mother who has been 
cohabiting is, however, enti- 
tled to claim maintenance for 
any children, though not for 
herself Nor can she insist that 
ter former partner provides 
her with somewhere to live or 
money to buy somewhere. 

A solicitor, Judith Wicks, of 
Mackworth Rowland, ex- 
plained: "A husband has a 
duty to maintain his wife and 
the court has very sweeping 
powers on divorce to sort out 
what the financial needs of the 
parties are. When yon cohabit 
there is no duty at alj.” 

Sorting out what happens to 
the home can also be a 
problem. Ifa husband who is a 
sole owner and mortgagor of 
the home stops paying the 
mortgage, the bank or building 
society has to accept mortgage 
payments from his wife. She 
can, therefore, prevent the 
lender from malting her home- 
less. A cohabitee has no such 
rights. 

Out on the streets 
with no money 

Furthermore, merely being 
married gives you both an 
automatic right to five in the 
home, regardless of which of 
you actually owns it You 
cannot evict each other with- 
out a court order. 

- /But when cohabitees split 
up, the.partner who does not 
own the home could finish up 
on the streets without any 
.money. If the home is owned 
by one party only, there is no 
automatic right for the other 
to live in the property or to 
have a share in any proceeds 
of sale. 

A cohabitee who is not the 
owner will have to show that 
he or she is a licensee. 
Basically, this gives the right 
to occupy the home for a 
period of time, but it is not 
relevant to the question of a 
share in the proceeds of sale. 

The best protection is to 
show you have an "interest” 


in the property. But to do so 
you have to rely on the strict 
rules of property law. If there 
is no written documentation, 
such as a declaration of mist, 
or if there are Qot substantial 
financial contributions to the 
purchase or mortgage, the 
rigid application ofproperty 
law, unlike divorce law, is 
loath to take into account 
other contributions to domes- 
tic fife. 

A judge in a recent case said: 
"Setting up house together, 
having a baby, making pay- 
ments to general housekeep- 
ing expenses (not strictly 
necessary to enable the mort- 
gage to be paid) might all be 
referrable to the mutual love 
and affection of the parties 
and not specifically referrable 
to expectation of an interest in 
the house." 

If a cohabitee does manage 
to show that be or she has an 
interest in the property, or 
indeed even if the couple are 
co-owners, what the court can 
then do with the property on 
the split-up is severely limited. 

On a divorce, the court has 
wide-reaching powers to deal 
with the matrimonial home. 
Not only can it order a sale of 
the property, but it can also 
transfer the home from one 
spouse to another. But on the 
break-up of a cohabiting rela- 
tionship, the court has no 
means to transfer the home 
from one cohabitee to the 
other so that one of them can 
remain in the home. The court 
can decide only on a person’s 
share in the property and 
when the property should be 
sold. 

A useful book is Going it 
Alone. Your Rights and Rela- 
tionship Breakdown — A 
Guide for Unmarried Women. 
by Anne McNichoias, and is 
available from SHAC, 189A 
Old Brampton Road, London 
SW5 OAR, at £2.50, including 
postage. 

Susan Fieldman 


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BOND 


Some husbands may welcome 
a recent High Coart ruling in 
which a judge decided that the 
former Beade Ringo Starr was 
entitled to "bay off" bis ongo- 
ing maintenance conumtments 
to his ex-wife by making a 
single lump sum payment to 
ter. 

Bat, while such a move 
could be seen by many as a 
means of finally shaking off 
die financial shackles of di- 
vorce, many ex-wives, even H 
they agree to such a more, can 
find an unpleasant sting in the 
tail of such aa arrangement. 

This was spotlighted in 
another recent High Court 
decision and can mean that the 
ex-wife will receive in her hand 
only a fraction of the sum her 
former husband has agreed to 
pay ter. 

In such situations wires who 
hare received legal aid to fight 
their maintenance battles — 
and the bulk of cases of this 
type are fended in this way — 
will hare to reimburse the 
legal aid fend out of the lump 
stun they receive. 

This applies only to lump 
stuns. If there has been an 


THE 

Gome “R> drum 
U pTneiogr 


agreement, or a court ruling 
that maintenance should be in 
the form of "periodical 
payments” then there are no 
provisions for legal aid to be 
reimbursed from that 

The situation means that 
ex-wires, whose former hus- 
bands wish to bny out their 
ongoing maintenance commit- 
ments with a once-and-for-all 
lamp sum payment, most 
beware. 

They most take steps to 
ensure that any lamp smn they 
accept or are awarded, takes 
into fell account their legal 
costs. In a recent case before 


Mr Justice Latey feat raised 
this point, a wife who had 
agreed to accept £7,000 from 
ter former bos band in lien of 
maintenance payments found 
herself faced with the unex- 
pected prospect of paying back 
around £4,600 she had re- 
ceived from legal aid support 
The res olt was that she had 
“sold” her maintenance 
rights, not for fee £7,000 die 
had agreed to bot for a mere 
£2,400! The judge refused to 
rule that the legal aid pay- 
back should not apply to lump 
sum payments nude in such 

cases * Roger Pearson 


If you are about 
to invest for 


ca pital growth 
listen to the 


ex perts. 



To find cj: which markets anc 
sectors currently offer the best 
investment opportunities, 
telephone Target, and listen. 


01-831 6373 


TARGET 


TARGET GROUP PLC 



TR USTS- LIFE ASSURANCE -PENSIONS ■ FIN ANC1 \L MANAGEMENT 


TargetGroup PLC., 7/9 Breams Buildings. London EC4A1EU 



First Half Results from Britoil 


Consolidated Profit and 
Loss Account (Unaudited) 


Six months Six months 

ended 3CMx86 ended 30.6.85 
£ million £ million 


Turn over 

Operating profit 

Net interest (payable VrecdraUe 

Profit on ordinary activities before taxation 
Ikxatioa 

Petroleum revenue taxes 

— excluding UK safeguard 

— UK safeguard 

UK corporation tax/orerscas taxes 

Profit for the financial period 

Dividends 

Amount set aside to reserves 
Earnings per share 
Dividend per share 
Funds generatedfrom operations less 


(206.6) 

8.9 

(75.6) 


Additions to fixed assets 192.5 330.9 

Dividends 

The Directors have decided, in view of the reduced 
profits in the first half of the yeaq to pay an interim dividend 
of 2.00p per share as against 4.00p in the corresponding 
half year of 1985. Payment will be made on 1 October 
1986 to shareholders on the register at the close of business 
on 21 August 1986. 


MARKET CONDITIONS 

In response to the adverse market conditions in the 
first half of the yeat; when the ofl price fell from around 
S30.00 per band to lower than S10.00 at times during the 
second quarter; the exploration budget that had been 
proposed for 1986 has been cut by 40%, overheads have 
been cut and future plans are under review. If the present 
price of oil persists throughout the second half of the year, 
no profit will be made for thar period. 

THE SEX MONTHS IN BRIEF 

* Turnover decreased to £546.1 million. Revenue from 
equity production at £432.4 million and sales of purchased 
petroleum at £1 13.7 million were down 44% and 41% 
respectively on 1985. Average sterling realisation (Brent 
blend) fell from £22.71 per barrel to £11.53 per band (49%). 

* Pre-tax profit decreased to £105.1 million, down 
£259.6 million (71%) on the 1985 half yeat and after-tax 
profit to £34.5 million, down £56.9 million (62%). 

* Ofl production (including LFG and condensate) averaged 
182,500 bands per day (178 300 barrels per day in the 1985 
half year) and gas production 308 million cubic feet per day 
(256 million cubic feet per day in the 1985 half year). 

* Installation of die module support frame and topside 
modules for the Britoil operated Clyde development was 
completed. The topside modules for the Shell operated 
North and South Sean platforms were also installed. 

* Annex B approval was granted for the development of 
the Vanguard, South Valiant and Vulcan gas fields (the V 
fields). An appraisal well on the Britoil operated Amethyst 
gas field was successfully completed. 

* The company participated in 21 (19 in 1985) UK wells 
spudded (20 ofijfcore and 1 onshore) and was awarded 19 blocks 
in 4 licences in the First Round of UK onshore licensing. 

* Overseas activities continued to expand with the award 
of further licences. 


Bcjraajpy crfttetoteriraReportpIc^cornpfeteandreuinithe "I 

n coupon to tbe Company Secretary Britoil pic. 150 St \ mcera ■ 

I Street. Glasgow G2 5 IJ-' Existing shanrholdcrs wUl rrcemr the J 

| Report shortly | 


Name 

Address 


Postcode 


i Britoil 

I Energy at Work for Britain 


















BUSINESS AND FINANCE 


THE TIMES SATURDAY JULY 26 1986 


FAMILY MONEY/3 




KSliSISEiii 





ill 


PROPERTY 


Eff'" ' 'v • V- 


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When Sbeelagh Barron moved 
her family into a new £98,500 
bouse just before Christmas 
she thought her troubles were 
over. The family had sold 
their house in London the 
previous March. Since then 
they had tried and failed to 
buy another home no fewer 
than five times. 


PPff v*V> 


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4 V' ’ -• '* 

>- + 


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The new house in Bracknell, 
Berkshire, was supposed to be 
finished by October- But even 
by the middle of December 
when the Barron .family 
moved in it was not complete. 


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“We were desperate,” says 
Mrs Barron. “We had been 


l 4 ;^V,-^r>r^ ^ • \ . 

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Rawest 4.375 per 

Girobank 455 per cent Pxed to™ 

deposits £10000 to 

mS6525 per 

6.625 per cent 6 month s 650 per 

cent (National WestnJrWter): 1 

month 026 per cent 3 nwntte 

per cam, 6 months 656 pflf 
(Mfefland). Other banks may differ. 

MONEY ft«g8 TBbBhooa 

Fund . Net CNAR Totophona 

JSSJS?* ‘ ft9T 7.13 OlSgggO 
SS&K* 796 7.29 0162880® 

BsnStays Kgtw Rate 

SSSSST* eg*™ "gits 

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EVoS&SST 6K 6.78 01^1567 

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SeSsvis 183 .SB* 

Ha Udno n Money 

cK£i Account 796 7.29 <GSf5S5! 

itaSnSv 7.20 7.40 01 626 1SOO 

i&OHKA 696 7.19 01628*588 

6.75 692 07020999 

ffOOOOsndom 790 7.19 07*220999 

NatUtatKgh 

8 7J05 017261000 

gKfSSr 790 7.19 01 7261000 

Opoentamer Money 

w««s 

over £10000 7.01 7.19 0l236Mg 

SSPCsSl . 690 690 0708 66966 

673 69* 2£*®7733 
owrEI P.O P ff 691 7.13 070582773? 

T & R7 bay 7.2* 7.38 01 ,2 360952 

TyndaBciB 707 796 0272732241 

TtncuA 7 day 7.13 7.32 0272 7322*1 

SErjfliy 691 7.09 01626*681 

Western Trust 

1 ffw ^i 7.01 724 0/62 26 1 1 6 1 

LSGHghmtDeiJ.725 728. 01OT832H 
CNAR — Conoouidsb Net Annual Rat*.. • 

Hguns are m latest avaUile Attn Hm of 

gong to press. BMWWh D- Bean 
National Savings Bank A_ 

Ordinary accounts — Ha minimum 
balance of £100 maintained for 
Whole of 1388. 6 per cent Interest 
P 2 l for each compete month where' 
balance Is over £500. otherwise 3 
per cait Investment Account.— 
10.75 per cent interest paid without 
deduction of tax. one months', 
notice- of withdrawal, maximum- 
investment £100.000 . . 

National Savings Income Bond 
Minimum Investment ESLOOQ, maxi- 


living in rented accommoda- 
tion for months with a one- 


year-old child. I was expecting 
our second baby in February. 
We moved into the house on 
the understanding that the 
problems would be rectified. 
-We just wanted to start creat- 
ing a home again.” 



7.75 am 


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A woman at war with the b adders: Sheelagh Barron in her problem boose 


□ I enclose my first month’s £9. Please tell me about the a 

Child 1 am sponsoring. □ 1 enclose a donation. § 

□ I am interested but would like you to send more details, g 

□ I would like to pay by Access/Vi sa. g 

(Credit card payment to become a sponsor must be semi- o 
annual or annual.) 


Signature 

My card no. is. 

Name 

Address 


.(Mr./MrsyMiss) 


But seven months later the 
Barrens* library of 2.000 
books is still stuck in a 
wardrobe. Last week the 
builders were fitting a new 
front door after several abor- 
tive attempts. The wooden 
ceiling in the kitchen still 
awaits renewal and the peeling 
paintwork still needs to be re- 
done throughout the entire 
house. 


‘Inconvenience and 
misery for months’ 


Developing co mmuni ties throughout 
Swam the Third World since 1937. 

To: Elizabeth Liddell, Foster Parents Plan, 315 o 
IIIIUU Oxford Sc, London W1R lLATcl: 01-493 0940 2 . 
mmw (24 hours). Charity Registration no. 276035. 

>DnoDBBnOoaOD0DDO8BD0DDOMOaO0ODMaaBYf 


that in a year from moving in, 
I shall be very surprised.” 

In Januaiy Broseleys, one of 
Britain’s biggest house-build- 
ing firms, agreed to repaint the 
house. Work wonld start in 
June. “I didn't want people 
painting in the house when I 
had just had a new baby 
because of the fumes,” says 
Mrs Barron. “But they had 
plenty of other things they 
could have been putting right 
meanwhile.” 

Mrs Barron says coving on 
ceilings was coming adrift in 
places. There were crooked 
door frames and a front door 


fact that Broseleys seemed to 
be able to take as long as they 
like to put things right. Sec- 
ondly, there seems to be no 
way we can get adequate 
compensation for the months 
of inconvenience and misery 
caused. We couldn’t even sell 
the house in this state.” 


Like all new homes, the 
Barrons’ house is covered by 
the National House Builders 
Council (NHBC) certificate. 


‘Our experience 


is a warning 


through which you could see 
“It was only after we moved daylight, cracking under the 
in having completed the pur- windows so bad that moulding 


chase that we realized just how had to be inserted, poor joins 
much needed doing and re- ,n the plasterboard and many 


doing," says Mrs Barron. “As oth er unique features in dire 
with all new houses, you put nee d of correction. 


your deposit down on the The wooden ceiling in the 
strength of seeing the kitchen started sagging even 


showhouse. Frankly, if this before the Barrons moved in. 
one is up to the standard of Broseleys put -up another one 





J§^, 


which in its turn now needs to 
be replaced. In fairness, 
Broseleys have twice tried to 
renew it but each time the 
wood has been too damaged to 
use. 

“It makes me furious,” says 
Mrs Barron, “to see the build- 
ers building other houses on 
the development while it has 
taken us so long to get them 
back here to pul our home 
right. It took till the middle of 
May, five months after we 
moved in, to get the builders 
to start work. They were 
supposed to be finished in six 
weeks but they are still here. 


“There are two things I am 
really cross about. First, the 















IINVESTME 



k i >1 JYil >1 m 


Over the last thirty years you probably could not 
have held a unit trust with a better performance than 
M&G SECOND GENERAL 

£1,000 invested at its launch in June 1956 would- 
now be worth £67,208 with ail income reinvested, 
compared with £8404 from a similar investment in a 
building society. To have maintained its purchasing 


SECOND GENERAL PERFORMANCE TABLE. 

Value of £LO00 invested on 5tn June 1956. 


' Virtually no building society, 
» for instance, will lend money 
s on a house that is not covered 
[ by the NHBC warranty. 

From the purhasers’ point 
of view it means the NHBC 

• can be invoked if the house 
1 they have bought is not up to 

• standard. The NHBC has a 
■ conciliation and an arbitra- 
1 tion procedure for dealing 

> with disputes between cus- 

3 lomer and builder. 

- According to Clare EHis- 

• Jones, of the NHBC, the code 
lays down that problems 

> should be sorted _oui within 30 

4 days of the conciliation proce- 
1 dure. The snag, however, was 

5 that the Barrons did not 
1 approach the NHBC. 

P “There was no dispute,” 
„ says Mrs Barron. “Broseleys 
agreed to put it all right 
! Therefore, we didn’t go to the 
NHBC What we didn’t realize 
was that we were going to wait 
so long. Really in this situa- 
i tion the customer is well nigh 
. powerless.” 

mm Dennis Frost regional di- 
rector of Broseleys, says: “We 
have had a lot of diracullies 
on this Bracknell site because 

I of management changes. But 
we have admitted liability. We 
are doing the work as quickly 
as possible.” Mr Frost said be 

I bad “no idea” that the NHBC 
code stipulated that defects 
should be remedied within 30 
days. 

So it appears that by admit- 
ting liability voluntarily 
H Broseleys have no obligation 
■ lo work to the NHBC time 


scale. Moreover, even the 
NHBC code does not include 
any provision for compensa- 
tion. which is what Mrs 
Barron is now seeking,. 

She says: “Really we have 
been unable to even start 
making the house into a home 
during all these months. Of 
course, our mistake was to 
complete the purchase before 
it had all been put right. It’s 
just been a nightmare. People 
should be warned from our 
experience.” 

Mrs Barron believes she 
ought to gpt substantial com- 
pensation. Broseleys have so 
far offered her £500, which she 
regards as derisory. 

“I asked for our £9,800 
deposit lack,” she said. “That 
is what it would probably have 
cost Broseleys to put us all up 
in a hotel while they were 
putting things right. The only 
thing 1 could do would be to go 
to court, but as everyone 
knows that costs a lot of 
money.” 


01236 9362 
012369362 
0708 68966 


second. 325 par cent huhaimd. 4. 
per cent in the fourth, and 5.25 per 
rent in the fifth. Veka o* Retirement 
Issue Certificates purchased in July 
1981. £145.19. including bonus and. 
supplement 3rd Issub to be with- 
drawn 31/7/86, 4fo issue oil sale 
1/8/88. ... i 

jung.'RPI 385-® • (The new ftPf- 
figure is not announced until the 
'triird week of tbefotawing montii}. . 
National Swings Certifleate - - 
3ist issue. Return to&Ry free of r 
income and capital gains tax, equfw 
alwrttoan^uT^ rntrastf rate owe 

Gwwn^extensfon rate, for hokfeff*; 
of ear&er issues- wWdt have 
reached maturity, is fiLOl “ V 
National Savings Yesriy Ptaii-^ 

A one year reguMr- savings pin. 


converting rite 4-yeflr savings car-, 
tificates. Mbrnnim. £20 a month. 


673 69* 07i» 827733 

691 7.13 0705827733 

799 793 012360952 

79* 738 01 2360952 


707 796 0272 73ZW 
7.13 792 02727322*1 


01626*601 


mum £100.000. Interest 11.25 per 
cent variable at six weeks' notice 


tificatss. Mmnnum £20 a month, 
maximum £200.-.- Return over five 
years 8.19 per cant, tax tree. 4 . 

National Savings Oeposk tkfod -. 
Minimum investment £100 man- 
- mum £100.000 Interest TtJZS per 
cent variable at six weeks' notice 
credited anrwaliy: without deduction 
of tax. Repayment at three montin 4 . 
notice. Half interest wily pad on 
bonds repaid during ftrstyrar - y 
Locd Authority taring Bonds -. 
. 12 months fixed rate investments; 
interest 9<»u pier ctert baskrrato tax. 
deducted at- source (can be- re- 
claimed by norMaxpayer},uwiimum 
investment- £1 ,000, purchased, 
through stockbroker or bank. 
G uarante ed tricorne Bonds 
Retom pad net. at basic rate Mr 
higher ran taxpayers may have ar 
further tiabSty on maturity, lyr 
Credit A Commerce. 7J5 percent 
2yre Credit -fir Commerce, 7.25 per 
cent; 3yrs Financial Assurance.?:? 
per cent; 4yrs Prow Capital 7.75 per 
cent 5yrs Fin Assurance 7.6 per 
cent- 

SSSy^ Saoco untt- 5£5 per 
cent Extra Interest-accounts usuat^ 
W pay 1-2 per cent over ordinary 
share rate. Rates quoted above are 
those moat c o mmonly uttered, texfe 
vfduai bufidng societies may quote 
different rates. Interest on a* ac- 
counts paid net of basic rate tax 
Not rectaimabte by non-taxpayers. 


Maggie Drummond 


tax. Repayment of 3 months' notice. 
Penalties tn first year. 

National Savings Indexed Income 
Bond 

Start rate monthly income' for first 
year, 8 per cent . increased at end of 
.each year to match increase in 
prices as measured by Retail Prices . 
index. Cash value remains the 
same. Income taxable, payed gross. 


Rates quoted by Rothschild's Okf 
Court International Reserves 048L 
26741. Seven days' notice is re- 
quired for withdrawal and no charge 
is made for switching c u rrgfc teS - : 


USdoter 

Yen 

OMark , 
French Franc 
Swiss Fivnc 


8.12 per cent 
S9i per cent 


591 per cent 
396 per cant 
ajpperjpmt 
696 per cent 
852 per cent 


^ % 


apnvJ® 


\\ 




m si 




0^ 
w 

« BS «s sW 


V f H'i'I? '~ i m 






few- vUvjKsr--- - 
iraitMv I®' 



l] 

I * 1 V 

1*1^ 



TrFTF 

■ HTtii ■ n i rrrriiTi Niyrn r 

1 1 :■! j ■f«Wfl»)pfl*///<Kff .-/f 

TTlVihl'ini 


power over the period, £1,000 would need to have 
grown to £8,748. 


grown to £8,748. 

The British Stockmarket has been strong for a 
number of years, which is why many investors are 
now looking at overseas markets for new investment 
opportunities. But concentration in one particular 
area can produce very volatile investment results, 
and this year's high flier can often be next year's poor 
performer. You should be wary of short-term per- 
formance claims, such as the “Over 50% growth in 
just five months" quoted recently for a European 
unittrust 

M&G has two International Funds which solve the 
problem by spreading your investment effectively among 
tiie major stockmarkets of the world. 

The M&G International Income Fund aims to 
provide a high income, and one that can be expected to 
increase over the years, from an international portfolio of 
equities. 

The M&G International Growth Fund aimsforall-out 
capital growth by investing in the major stockmarkets of 
the world. 

If you remain optimistic about the British Stockmarket 
and want a balanced portfolio, look at M&G SECOND 
GENERAL, which ainis for consistent growth of income 
and capital from a wide spread of shares mainly in British 
companies. 


Date 

M&G 

SECOND 

F.T. Ordfaaiy 
Index 

Building 

Society 

5 June ’56 

£1,000 

£1000 

£1000 

31 Dec '66 

£2,996 

£2,472 

£1699 

31 Dec 76 

£7,812 

£3,859 

£3,437 

5 June '86 

£67^08 

£21042 

£8,104 


NOTES: AH flaxes include reinvested income net of basic-rate tax. 

Trie BuWngSodety figures are based on an extra interest account offering 


V- 2 % above the avi 


Association), 


! the average yearly rate (source: Building Societies 
i. M&G SECOND GENERAL figures are realisation values. 


To celebrate M&G SECOND'S thirty-year performance 
record weare offeringan extra 1% unrtallocation if you invest 
£1,000 or more and 2% if you invest £10,000 or more in any 
of these three unit trusts before 31st October 1986. 

The price of units and the income from them may 
go down as well as up. This means that unittrusts area 
long-term investment and not suitable for money you 
may need at short notice. 


A high guaranteed 

monthly income 
from gilts. 


INTERNATIONAL PERFORMANCE TABLE. Vteieon 1st July 19S6 of 
£L0(X) invested at the launch of M&G 's two international Rinds. 


[ Launcri 

M&G 

Building JH 

Date 

Unit Trust 

Society 1 




International 

Income May ’85 £1,085 

International 

Growth Dec ’67 £11351 £4,531 


NOTES: AH figures Include reinvested income net of basic-rate tax. 
to BurangSocraty figures are based on an extra interest account offering 


It }% above the average yearly rate isource: Budding Societies 
Association.) m&g figures are reataa non values. 


* Since July 2nd, all gagns from British GovenrnicntSeamties • 

Gcnown as gilts) are exempt from Capital Gains Tax. 

* Wgiin certain deady defined limits, a regular retain can K> trifap 
from g ifts qy converting the interest that accrues day by day into. a 
capital gain which can be paid without deduction of tax. 

°5 Sy0n a , co ™P rient “d efiBrient vray ofimestiitg 

^ to £5,000 direct}y into gilts. These are held by an independent 
custodian and you would fee die faetiet p^l nun iw ■ - . 


FURTHER INFORMATION On 23nl July 1386 Offered prices 
and estimated gross current yields we 

income Accumulation Yield 
International Income 60- lp 61-7p 5-19% 

International Growth .773-lp 1233-Op 1-85% 

SECOND GENERAL 743-5pxd 1467 -6p 3-73% 
Prices and yields appear daily -in the financial Times. The 
difference between the ‘offered" price [at which you buy units] 
and the ‘bid' price fat which you sell) is normally 6%. An i ratal 
charge ol 5"v is included m the offered pnee and an annual 


SPECIAL OFFER CLOSES 31st OCTOBER 


%u can fixyour return for a period up to 10 yeais. 


AS applications for £1,000 or more received by 31st October. 1986 will be given an extra 
1% allocation of units, focreasfogto 2% for applications of £10, OOO or more per Rmd. 

To: M&G SECURITIES LIMITED, THREE QUAYS, TOWER HILL, LONDON EC3R GBQ 
Please invest the sum(s) indicated below in theFund(s) of my choice (minimum investment in 
each Fund: £1,000) in ACCUMULATION/FNCOME units (delete as applicable or Accumulation 


Yew can choose to receive regular paymenfc^ 
quarteri^ halfyeaify or annually 


,, Gjijare on* °fth£ most secure investmerite and cany the baddrnr 

or the Bntisn Government We inviteyirafosciuiforapctsohal-- 

quotation, which wiH showthe precise return we can guarantee you. 


Distributions 


Next distribution 1 Dec 
for new investors 1986 



igsiigH 




You can buy or sdl units on any business dajt Contracts far 
ourdusear S3*e vita be due for settlement two to three weeks 
latec Remuneration is payable to accredited agents; rates are 
available on request The Trustee far Intemanonal ’Growth e 
Barclays Bank Trust Co Limited and far tntematiorai income 






'&y[m 


u'lmvant.i.it 


wider -range investments and areauthonsed by toeSecretary ol 
Slate for Trade and Industry. 

M&G Securities Limited. Three Quays. Tower Hffl, 
London EC3R 6BQ. Tel; 01-626 4588. 

Member of the Unit Trust AssooahCrt. 


«fl?S Sli^una 


THE M&G GROUP 









mu 




B EACH V/ 


SINTER SIN fron t 


_5Q Laflnn 


f 


MONKS 











car bmak 












fHE TIMES SATURDAY JULY 26 1 986 


HOLIDAYS & VILLAS 




551 * ^ 




Germany 
from only 


BEST OF FLORIDA 

* Oriando - Gulf Coast Specials * ViDas • Holds - Apartments 
■ Bona Discooms * Please Tel for Colour Brochure 

USA PRICE CHECK 

Retva Prias Start Pro* 

(IMn El 12 Lai inta 024 LM ST A.VW 

Duvon u» Hu gos £ArQ f VKfcS Ot'OTTD 

g|» EET g$S CHALTONT TRAVEL 

lltma UV> Dbw (ofel tlW /AIEIi DOflO^w 

IMtolafi f!«l HaiHon ( 0753 ) 00»77 

laTviaT 014 T o»a 4 *o £» ' ' 

Nn Verk CX) T«mpa 012 ABTA 4 TW 9 


return. 


COLOGNE, DUSSELDORF £63 RETURN 


£75 RETURN 
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£84 RETURN 
£85 RETURN 
£100 RETURN 
£110 RETURN 


Sooet«. 


r® ^ s«ocsfa 


BREMEN 

FRANKFURT 

HAMBURG, HANOVER 

STUTTGART 

MUNICH 

BERLIN 


AVAILABLE NOW. 

' Early Saver fare. Book 14 days in advance on 
designated flights. For further details of these and 
other low fares contact your travel agent or British 
Airways travel shop. 

British Airways 


The worlds favourite airline 




BEACH VILLAS 


WINTER SUN from SSI for 1 week 

Seff-catering villa holidays inclusive ol flight for 1 or2 
. weeks from Galwki.Uiion and Sfanchesferinthe 
A|pwe t to igarote. rta c r te»eatnra,CiPBladdSoi t 
Costa Bhoa and Anton. 

Long stay holidays at Beach Vffla Oubs from £7 per 
petscnperWekinducSDo vfltaand Sight 


Call us on 


l»:srai«M8 


kg society 


..... sT/.'JSt- 

ovt n crx 


FctSTZiQj a '* u 


UfTMUA. Wl Amort 8 to 2 t- 
umicy-artT cammed man-air 
MO. *m» 4. £600 2 weeks 
acton only, on* 760090. 


D 


k' -j. r ■£ rtY i :t Tu 


TUUIK, Beach MM. port, bar 
iwrw 24 i.FiTC(*rhw.FRn 
£85 ow. 10903 ) 892101 . 



1 North American K 




Travel Club USA-Z 

12 Sac.-.v !:c Sure:, l-.'d: WH 20 £ 


QUICK GET/HW 


The richest sportsground in the world 

Uf:j/ Come to The Bahamas to erjoy your sport at its best 
Play on superb championship golf-courses. ~ 

Dive in he crystal dear Bahamian waters. Jg- p**-*'- ■■ j 
Or sail and fish in the most spectacular g- ; 

waters in the world FROM HgHjlBsiA C\ 

"j You may not want to £ ft /?/? ‘i.\ 

do it alL but it’s nice to oU^rOO 

knOW ffS there. (SUsed to avaiUulityi jrLiiiri 


SflUHER FLIGHTS 

PALMA 

3/8 

£117 

GEftONA 

1/1 

E11S 

AUCAHTE 

3/a 

£124 

FARO 

31/7 

2135 

MCE 

Z/8 

£135 

MALAGA 

31/7 

£148 

CORFU 

3/8 

£149 

ATHBiS 

Z It 

£158 

NAPLES 

3/S 

£158 

TBOFE 

3/8 

£179 




See vour tool trawi agent or contact The Bahamas r" Vygoj*— 
Tourist Office. 33 Old Bond Street London WLX 4 PQ. ■ - 

Teh w -629 5238 . Tfe TtetfprTn Thp Bahamas. 


SPEEEftflNG 
01 486 9356 

ATOL ’Sc- 


SOLA AIR TRAVEL 

UV COST MB TOMB. 
ATM SB. MALAGA. COBRI 
AUCAHTE. CRETE. FABO 

mom 

ATOL 2173 
Othw destinations 
SK 1 ATH 0 S, BARCELONA 
IBIZA. C ANAR EES 
BOOK NOW! 

Tut 01-431 3802 


AIR F ARE wceuusn Sydney 
o W £396 rtn £ 696 . Auckland 
a w £420 rln £ 785 . ACburfl 
o w £306 rtn £409 U» Anae- 
ma wC 2 > 5 rin£ 40 G London 
ruin Onlrr 01-370 6332 

LATIN AMOK CA. Low rod 
IIMMs r a Rm CABS. Lima 
£495 rm. IhO Small Qoup 
Holiday Journeys irq Peru 
KM £3501 JLA 01 - 747-3100 

MUML JAMAICA. M.YOBK. 

woruwmr rhoapoa l*in 
Rtrnmond Travel. 1 Dune a 
■HOuaand ABTA Ol 940 4073 


Fr. £165 rtn. 
Savilie Travel & 
Tours 

01-499 5101 
Atol 2042 


COHUIITEM ON maM hob 

la Luropr. USA A mart destma- 
bom Dmtamal Trwvrt: 01-730 
2201 . ABTA IATA ATOL. 


Latl minuir hoJmay*. 10923 
7712661241 ml Tnnsway Holl 
daw ABTA . ATOL 1107 . 


LOW FARES. WORLDWIDE - 

USA. S Amrnoi. Mid and Far 
CM. s Africa TmnTUe. ae 
Margam street. Wl. 01 580 
2926 ivm Accepted) 

N'TOBK Miami LA. OwaoMI 
(am on maior US. scheduled 
carriers. ABO IramaUaMir 
rhanm A niglill to Canada. Ol 
504 7371 ABTA 
BARGAIN HUNTERS. Rina now 
lor Australia. N Z. Middle eao. 
India. Far Casl ABTA. duo Air 
Travel Ol 629 2684 . 

LOW COST FLIGHT*. Mml Euro 
prin destination* Valexandrr 
Ol 402 4262 0052 ABTA 
61004 ATOL I 960 


Jottsnj t «99 luKrt C 7 « 

Touxca £769 5 Fan 079 

ton* E 3 T 5 lien E 329 

Sicny TUa fcrykok [35 

L Anoem 079 Vancouver OC 9 


HOT TURKEY. AuguM » 4 II 
Spend a wrrt, relaxma al our 
private oeorh hotel, men a 
week miKma on oar yachi lor 
C 450 UK- OL h/b. free 
u/soora twk a. oUht comtM 
luiilom pen Atao fU» only fr 
£ 99 . Ol 326 1005 


MOROCCAN HOTELS and holl 
day ten Km through Moroccan 
bound train me Moroccan Sac 
naiitu. Goit Ik enred and AMa 
MHM Tel Ol 734 6307 . 
Tlx 27376 . 

ONE CALL tor some ol Uw bed 
dealt in rugniv apartments, ho- 
tel* and cat hire. Tel London Ot 
636 5000 . Mancftesler 061 B 32 
2000 An- Trace! Adi Kory 
Bureau. 

STD/MEL £618 Perth £645 All 
nuuor earners lo A US NZ. Ol- 
584 7371 . ABTA 

U 8 JL R enable n Ignis al bargain 
RKn Umglobr Trasel 01379 
5959 ABTA. Visa. access. 


LOWEST FARES 

Pans [69 N YORK CTO 

Fianatun no uusf tsss 
Lagos £320 Man Tim 
Manotk £325 Sai wgrona £420 
Jotug £450 Banghc* £335 
Caro £205 Katmandu £440 
DeVBooi COS Rangoon £350 
Hoi) Kong £510 Calcutta C 4 S 5 
Phan Eril 
SUN ft SAND 
21 SuM* SL iMdaa «1 
OHM 7 WMP 0537 

major dam rcccpteo 


UP UP & AWAY 

Nairobi. Jo'Bur^. Cunt. Dubai. 
Istanbul. Singapore. k.L Delhi. 
Bangkok. Hong Kong. Sydney. 
Europe. Sl Tbe Arocncas. 
HaningB Tm*d. 

76 Shaftesbury A>«ne 
Loodaa V 61 V 7 DC. 
01-139 0102 
Open Saiocda} I 0 B 8 - 13 JM 



UTC Open Sal 0763857035 . 


LOW COOT PARCS to U S. A. M* 
lor Travel 01406 0257 IATA 


TUNBU. Perfect . bcachc& (or 
your Himmer holiday Call lor 
our brochure non Tunisian 
Travel Bureau 01373 4411 . 

OTA, CANADA. AND EUROPE. 

LOWEST AIR FARES Alio 
Club and First HESTTAHE Ol 
394 1642 . Alni 1400 

AUCAHTE, Faro. Malaga etc 
Dunond Travel ATOL 1783 
Ol 681 4641 . Horsham 68541 
AUSSIE. NE. South Africa. 
Li.S A. Hong Kong. BeSI Fares: 
01 493 7775 ABTA 

TURKEY GOLDEN HORN Travel 

t A 2 wkv 2 crnlrrs.fly-dnvr. 
laliffi). UK) lli norm Charier & 
scheduled or nignis only July 6 
Aug Or- us avail. Brochure Ol 
434 1002 V Ol 788 B 030 124 
hrsl ABTA ACCESS VISA 


MALAGA. CANARIES 01441 
1111 Travrtwise AMa Alol. 


SWITZERLAND Scheduled ntghu 
Ol 424 2388 ABTA ATOL 


SICILY £ 248 , al the wen-apoolnt 
pd ELI HOTEL in secluded Boy 
ol Sani'Alesuo. only 7 mUe* 
from I he eteganl miemanonal 
resort ol TAORMINA Price 
inn 7 nights had -board in twin 
room, return daytime Gandrl 
Ills every Tuesday Pool ft pri- 
vate beach transfer* A airport 
lax No htdcU-n extras SICIL- 
IAN SUN LTD 01 222 7462 
ABTA ATOL 1907 

SOUTH AFRICA Jo'burg from 
ue 5 Ol 684 7371 ABTA. 

TENERIFE. Creek Islands. Algar- 
ve. Menorca. Villas, aots. 
pension*. lavernbs. 

Holidays flights. brochure* 
inslanl bookings. Ventura Hon 
days. Tel 01 250 136 S. 


DALMATIAN 

ISLANDS 

Op 36 Bertii two-Utsw. Too 
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ton 4GB2E ATOL an 




OF 


THEtoHBtnMES 

CLASSIFIED 


EAicafioii: University Appointments, Prep & 
Pabfic School App ointm ents, EdncationaJ 
Courses, Scholazsbips and Fellowships. 

l^Ciemede la Creme and other secrctaxial 
aiyoh umeuts. . . 

— TUESDAY 

Computer Horizons: Computer Appoint- 
ments with editoriaL 
Le ad Appointments: Solicitors, Com- 
mercial Lawyers, Legal Officers, Private & 
Pubfic Practise. 

Legal I* Creme for top legal secretaries. 
Pubic Sector Appointments. 

=WEDNE5DAY= 

La Creme de la Creme and other secretarial 

appointments. . 

Property! Residential* Tt wo & Country, 
Overseas, Rentals, with editorial. 

Antiques and CoB tect aMes. 

“^THURSDAY 

General Appointments: M a nag e m ent and' 
Executive appointments with edito rial. _ 
La rAwi de la Crane and other secretarial 
appointments. 

FRIDAY 

Motms: A complete car buyer’s guide with 
editorial. _ . 


franchises etc. with editoriaL 
Restaurant Guide, 


SATURDAY 

■■FIT. 


UK TWK OPT lo Ml Am- 
tfrtTUn*. BruoOTk. Brujm. 
Gnaw. Undone. Tlta 

Hague. DoMta. Rouen. BoUr 
logne ft Dieppe. Tbw Off. 2 a 
C hester CMoe. Lo wdon . SW 1 X 
7 BQ. 01-236 8070 . 


you use Magic. 

Holds ud villas with 
swimming pools on tbe 
fabulous coast of Amalfi. 
Sorrento, Lake Maggiore, 
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xmfonpmabte nights Oust 
imagine die days). 

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ABTA/ ATOL OHinl 


WfB VELU MB have ovaO- 
abdtly Sunday lO. 24 Ul 
Augurt tor 2 wka beautiful vtnm 
or ihe Peach Bam Grtvdch- 
Onen Sal. Pan World HoUdava. 
Ol 734 2662 . 


cheaper, BnMy Stmert SlmW 
SMI Holidays. Ol 373 1933 . 
i nto. Unspoilt Manda. cnaap 

agUa.VtU reniart etc. Zeua H« 
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views. From 34 th Aug. From 
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PAINTING 

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' BOOK NOW: JULY-OCT 
Rnglcipaial mn. kom fr ET 3 D S dm 
BU * Ink Sort ntart HrtBf « 



'M i » l»^*; 


Lowly private^ owngd 
vfc. stoops 7 . pool, maid. 
awHttito 24 July - 7 Aug 
and 21 Aug - 4 Sept Also 
avafttota oif season. 

BHO par anak Inc. 

Tel 07131 248. 


C ANCE L Ldno ws Luxury v*ua 
wBN PHvale port. 3 rd A ugrt 2 
weeks holiday (or £376 sp in- 
cluding mgMs. Mi nimu m 6 
•baring. Call now City Travel 
Ol 680 8191 . ABTA. 


I6/B7 ttOCHURES NOVf OUT! 
• 47 Resorts m SdtmtnL 
Austria. France ft BaSy. 

The BwBst Chocs On Shis/ 
ExGstnck. Ufon. Manchester, 
Glasgow ft Ednbugb 

01 785 2208 

MpacS. Dept. M22 71121 


SELFCATERING 


Uhl Apis ft Taverna u> fll all 
prtev ranges ft ad age groups. 
1 JJ ft 4 bedrma avML Trt 
Menarcb vuias ft Aoanmems. 
( 0882 ) 466773/419898 ABTA 
ATOL 1821 


SELF-CATERING 


PROVENCE. Charming cottage in 

- olive grove between Chaaae and 
Cannes. Sleeps 4 / 6 . available 
1 7 th . 3 lsa August. £300 pw. 
Phone: Ol 236 7486 . 


CORNWALL & DEVON 


Seafood yfetmiront 

A restaurant wsh rooms on tho quayMle H Padsiow. 
SncaoporRig 1i years ago. the Soatood Restauram has gctaOkshod 
a nasonal reputation for ffig Irosiwst ol Wi and shaMsh. cooked u 
The Good Food Gussa once sad '-wafer a <rtwks throw ol ttm 
quoywe'. 

m 1984 aa won the RAC/SvndayTms Tostuol Britain Aaord 1 lor 
the bast rostRyam in B^and 

Now wa also nave eight rooms M wWi stews ovar tha harbour and 
Canal Estuary, an wan a ba t hroom or shower room, al witn televi- 
sion, and Indga wefl stoefcod wMh half botttos al chUod whHa wtoa. 
From £13-00 par person with braakfasL- 

away lor ft fow days to Psdstow. You win be agreeably ■ 
how very pretty a to. 

Riverside Pndtrtorw Cornwall 
Telephone 0841 88 Z 48 CT 


PENZANCE LUXURY AIRKXdlo 
18 th Cnuury home, steeps 4 / 6 . 
garnem. colour TV. dot sea 
/town. Vacant 9 th - 30 ttl Au- 
gust owning lo cancellation Trt 
K 37 36 ) 61615 after 7 pm. 

TDSNXUtr/MARRU COURT s/C 
luxury aoarlinetUs. unrivalled 
views of Torbay* Marina. 2 6 
persona, tram E 13 O-S 60 O ♦ vrt 
pw. Torquay ( 0803 ) 27612 . 


COntWLM - 2 Farm Conign 

Comfort and character. Steeps 
3 4 or 6 * 6 . August 2-9 and an 
September. £ 160-170 per 
wet* Trt . 0463 64780 



F VOU ARE WtSmiG 
RWBAY IMS SUMMER 
YOU MUST SEND fOfl 

The Eooldi Mricra 


Entertriament GoUe 

diHMBly hi ed. IW Sip. 
Samois Cm dtoghts ol Tortiay. 
Once yonw sa no** to read on 
guft da lemp&mi to vst ad 
prove irasSMHar 

JBdER PUBUSHNG 
13 HYDE ROM), PAIGNTON 
Trt: MQ 551488 
. (A* 24 Mart) 



ML STOW-ON-THE-WOLD, love- 
ly period hse on vmaoe gn. 
Sleeps 8 Avail Aug 16 -Sept 6 . 
£200 pw. Tel 1060871 ) 8030 
BURFOBD AREA. High aandanL 
deUghUul charaeter conagea 
and api. Avail from lftdi Aug 
Pets welcome. 0993 641776 


1094031 224 . 

KESWICK ■ 2 miles. Fabulous 
views Oerwmuwairr House 
s lee p s 4 6 Avail irom Sept. 
Flam £ 88 pH-. TeLO& 368 I 3769 
I Sen Catering. Cot 

ugrs. Cnaira etc. Grey Abbey. 
BTOCh: 10946 ) 3773 . 


EAST ANGLIA 


WALDRWGFtELD Suffolk Bcou- 
ufully renovated coll. W beach. 
Stm S. Lovely estuary setting. 
FT Ctaopw. TeL 047336 671 . 
SALTHOUCC. DrtKFitruily fur 
iMmA collage o. lootang 
marshes to sea. 089 56 74172 . 


— SCOTLAND^ 


FERrHHORC Srttr cottage avaB 
Irom July. Ups 23 .- Sandy 031 
225 6579 Quote TER 261 . 


SECL U D ED COUNTRY Mouse 
Flat OXooks R. Tay. Stan 4 / 6 . 
9 m NE Perth. Newly Available 
From July. Details 026083334 
DBBUHH. 2-3 Persons, cen- 
tral naL avail during (estival. 
£110 pw. Q 31 334 3179 . 
VMMJMM suo tom con. nr to 
vernesE. Stos 4 . From Aug 9 on. 
Fin £150 pw. TrtD 667 T 291 


EXMOOR Lovely Georgian style 
country guest house Magnffl- 
renOy snuatro. Fresh baked 
rah. douad cream, licensed. 
OB* a £ 1 * 1 - 50 . Trt 03984 203 . 


WORTHING luxury sea iron! IM. 
Own parking. Sleeps 6 . £206 
pw. Trt 0903 776506 . 


HEART OF ENGLAND 


THE OLD BLACK LION 

HAY-ON-WYE 
HEHEFORO HRS SAD 

Enjoy i m| Dtseneri Irak > (hs-cternano old Wctah Caxhng Inn. oHerng 
naly comtoitaMe Kconunodaori. id moms. B witn pnvm shoast and wl 
H lfow StCOWHAmSOOKSHOP TOWN Sa m pansque coamyaOL 
Wye Vaflry. Bbck MouiImb and Brecon Bacons. Salman Idling an the Wye. 
tsxse long and at partng lac*ws. Dme an Oe best rf WeGb and Empon 
food, pi our oak bascMd dm room, or bos yousehes to snacks will a 
dtterence m ou (nenoy ba. Open ovn Chrisona and Nor Yw. 

Far defalk Mephoae 
( 0497 ) 820*41 


ON WYE 


ii. 


14 Si Cutset Cmctoag bw 
' Centre al Ross an Wye ideal tase 
lor tarty Wye Vrtey Any two days 
£4950 pp ul Ensute badvooms. - 
M Obon a a one-menu. coku. 
tv lo/coflio botes. . . 

KINGS HEAD HOTEL 
0989 63174 AA~ 


P RE TTY COTTAGE to South Ox- 
fordshire Onllcmt. S teep* 3-4 
£90 pw. Trt 01-940 2801 . 

1 STM CENTURY APARTMENT In 
secluded country house. TeL 
Rrmorldge <a 6 « 47 > 649 . 


LONDON 


KENM NCT ON Wll Lux Serviced 
apis. COI TV Unicorn Lid. 16 
Elgm Ores. Wll Ol 451 3094 


ENTERTAINMENTS 


Continued from page 12 


CINEMAS 




Warm. comtortaUe. seckded 500 
yr old manor. Ongkd character, 6 
matey ansuto bedrms 4 poster. 
\tay Dost rt food besWy cooked. 
thmr B&B £ 27. ftteCt access 
onto Dartmoor. 

Mn Swm, 

Crttows Umar Cali y Itooia. 


DORSET, HANTSb, & 
LO.W. 


i li 1 n rf i 


AA*' HL MBid AWARDS RAC** 
ASHLEY COURTENAY 
A nrtkw and ntam SOOyear-oW 
hcRL 11 rooma. 9 omcdib. C/TV. Er- 
celeR acme reUSng wgrtvan 
menu. Best wafts art bwbet m 
West Duma so king yaur dog! 

PJL HUES 
PHONE (0297) G6339 


Hotels, Fbrfits ctc. 


iSsaSessssesea— 

I Gx* & Social 

i ^ ro 

l V^hh toeeL Loodoo El 9DD- 


■RfTFANT AND 
Houses and apartments. Augul 
avail Irom £176 P-w. 0226 
337477 OT 0226 336761 . 

ii aaiar wdy. nnsMe «o- 

Wva^r broil (UL 

New*, all toPdc atoLftlM P'R- 

Avail AU 9 - 0702 685360 . 

ST R A PRA El AWL 2 ' a - 9 v *r. 
looking aea Ava il 23 A,ng - 6 
Sent and Oct onwards- Oxford 
< 0866 ) 64286 

OH MJFERR REACH VHtts/APts 

AW tm ° n 

gf.CBHl 0222 700749 . 

VENCC - VBto tor * wnn wool 
/M- tr-u u 2 io uridy- 
Jffp p H i 049 4 B 1 ) MU. 


SELF-CATERING ITALY 


w»a mm s am id torm- 

reasonable rain Ol 623 7292 - 




AHaUEUY. Holiday Conages 
and apartments overlooking 
sea. Own healed swimming 
poaL I emus courts, bowls, 
smoker, taole tennis. 90 If. fresh 
water and sea Itsbfna. Sandy 
beach. Trt: 0407 860789 

piatdanan TrnrdSv Bay. 

SUPERB WEST WALES. De- 
tached luxury country nonage. 
Every amenuy. lovely virwi. 
Sleeps 4 . unsunabie for small 
chtldrea. £226 per week, all 
dales. Phone 0633 62867 . 

FERWROWEI IIIBff court village. 
Period detached eonaoe. hlgb 
slandmrd.slps 4 . From £ 160 pw. 
Tel 0372 63666 . 



MT.toMrrrr 

1 44 - iT^ . j T^ v 'rj'j/V ' - i M . 4 


BALES UmBBAL PARK 

Cmnuu. tarty run Gaorgan 
Hanoi House, set in pan sadrted 
grand s. oftemg Iresh mad and 
good moa Ce nwMg 'Pg^art 


■ JUIYS IB RE • Unique period 
s. c Hal to Msiortc WHUsworth. 
SIPS *. <062982) 2681.-4940 


NOUDAY M WALES on toe 
Brecknock Monmouthshire Ca- 
nal. winding us way umwh 
toe Brecon Beacons NP Ft* “ 

our lux 4 6 berth rvarrow 
boats. Pegtnnerr welcome. fuM 
tnStrnctXMts. Trt 0874 86217 . 




the IdUs. 4 double bads. Own 
pool. Dramaoc views to Dwsaa. 
August 22 nd onwards ££78 
per week Trt : 0083 702246 


ALOHA. Nr P Bam*, lux villa, 
sleeps A fro* golf. 9 August for 
I wreh for £ 400 . Ttl (061 979 ) 
6084 or (061 2361 ,1667 


ALTEA. New bac apt OOP Manna. 
Sleeps 4 . Avail August- £t 0 O 
pw. Yck 043 « 6046 . 


FEMME CAMP • Oxford- Jono- 
man Markson Tennis Camp . 
flumes 31 Auo hueoatve 
coaching hy up profoslomNs 
for ak ages ft standards, bid 2 
■pedal weeks (or adults only. 
For frrr colour brednire write 
to Jonathan Markson. Tennis 
Camp. Hertford College. Oxford 
or Trt- 01 737 48 ii 124 nru 


LOQC 4 mites. 6 /C storrt cottages, 
lovely overt sxuaUon. 6 acres, 
sierp 2 - 6 . Carpeted, ned town, 
duvets. CtV. Of. Brochure 
Canute Cottages. PetytiL Looe 
PL 13 20 H. Trt- 0803 - 20486 . 


M» luxury 2 be dro om Apart- 
ments. Use ot ground*, pool 
courts. Spectacular views. Fr 
£160 pw. SMMMtBh 8929 

corrish cMiNTinr’ manor 

House- Pteniy to da. see and 
eoT Special £B 9 per wtek. tan- 
ner. BAD. Trt. 0822 - 832 * 42 - 


10 DAYS HOLIDAY 
FOR AHTHHmS SUFFEflStS 

toacesdomm mretw — « ** **■ 
Ost« mfeWKrt Sdmndnp. W 
SMI SstaBMMum Gocdnom 
ackng. 0 ws 9 ii>tort'ants- 
y^OPCHE bp* QcBBn D tod tf 1S6. 
Iim ions tOwsQOO 

For tetter Uorroafta 

Meptate; 

(0892) 890412 


YORK 

Enoy B» *rt»y accommodalito. tarns 
axM m ( nan s ule otn e . yoaE 
MJadanaft 5 Hro sakr toOty 
WaK. vsmo Ccmib Mam En- 
ow. col w. lea natag. cv puk. 

ff 730 apsK VAT. tow fiomWJO 

THE BUIEBfflDtt HOTEL 
HSHERGATi. YORK. 
TEL (0904) 21193 


ODEON LEICESTER SQUARE 

1930 611 H Info 930 4290 / 
4 2 S 9 R ARMAH AMD HER 
Nirnu 1151 Sep prom Doors 
open Dally 2 D 0 B.D 0 8 . 0 a Late 
saglil Show Ft! ft SM Doors 
open 11 . 16 pm. Credll Card Hoi 
Line 1 Access /VM /Am£x )839 
1929 . 24 hour service. £ 2 -EO 
seam avaUoMe Monday afl 
peris. Ah prom bookable In 
advance. 









205 . 5 . 00 . 8 . 06 . 11 . 16 . Tickets 
bookable in advance. 






ZAMAHA GALLRT 1 Cnxnwalt 
CaTOPIW. SW 7 504 6612 . CEN- 
Tumcs OF COLD- Tito Cotaan 
■f toiftsvrt IsfatoL Until 6 on. 
Tun- sal 106 . 30 : Gun 12 - 6 . 30 . 
Adm £ 1 . 



























































































































PERSONAL RENTALS 


Al) djssificd utvauseinenis 
can be accepted by telephone 
lesccpt Announcements). The 
deadline e SJXtpn 2 daya.pnw 
to pubfrcauoa (ie 5.00pm Mon- 
day for Wednesday). Should 
you wish ra send an advertise- 
ment is wmmg please include 
vour daytime phone number. 
CUSTOMER SERVICES DE- 
PARTMENT. If yon have any 
queries or probfans relating to 
your adveneaneni once n has 
appeared, please contact our 
Customer Services Department 
by telephone an 01-481 4100. 


FOR SALE 


GERMAN QUALITY KITCHEN 

i'l mmdMi direr! from Gcrnto 
m MMnr 526 X 2*5 fms 
Aak rtbiir oak nnlir Ourtjual 
«mI lop indUHii' oak profile 
notate- smK. frMarfmwc aim 
funs bon. w-iMilsior under met 
nr U4» THeMwne 01-681 
7H0T 


JULY SPECIALS at Tops Col TVs 
ii ten intros ir C99 91 Lower 
SkMnr SI 5W I 730 0935 


ANNOUNCEMENTS 


LACOCtt ABBEY, wilts Barooue 
musk- Uiwme J*umo I 3 Au- 
gust 630. 7 00 pm Easy 
yrmW Tel 034 975 227 or 
Ot 937 0684 


Bi MARCH FOB OBC MMDS. 

bom 1924 In Trinuua. mease 
on a touch with Christian? 
Muller who to bow Using IB 
Cermany Phone iWniOrma 
ny ’ 0661 614 98. Merowlnurr 
Siren 75 5600 Trier Etnoo. 
Wnt Germany 


ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS 


(JMDOW Mn DmvUw unow 
and family wtsn w thank an 
friends and former rolleaaues 
ot Gerry tor ihew suooon now 
cn and donations lo Aston 
Dowanl Church or Cricket 
Club 


SERVICES 


STATE REGISTERED NURSE 

would share her lovely Worces. 

I cr shirr home with three 
etdertn persons Individual 
earn and attention Please letc 
Phone Romsley i05o2i 71051 S 
UNBHmSH lo uy lo win? Non 
sense Be on apprenliee 
riianiinon an apprenliee mil 
lionaire? Now write for the 
pool- lo guide iou lo A MAC 5 
Berkeley Square W! \ 5HG or 
leai e soul IHimDer wilh 01 404 
5011 i?4 Uhl 

FRIENDSHIP, Love or Marriage 
■Ml aues areas Dateline Dept 
■C'i6i 23 ADitutdon Road. Lon 
don we Tel 01 956 ion 
BREAKAWAY. London's dub lor 
professioual urMIlalched people 
25-43 Over 200 events monlh 
Is 24 111 rnlo tape 997 7994 
SELECT FRIENDS Exclusive in 
liPduruoiis lor the unattached 
5b Maddox Street. London WI 
Telephone 493 9937 
SAINTS OR SINNERS? Lef 
Britain s MvKlinq experts trace 
VOIR ANCESTORS Write lo 
ACHIEVEMENTS >1961 1 Lid 
Nt-nhoaie Canierinni Kent 
CTL IBAT Tel 0227 462618 


BRIGHTS OF NETTLEBED. Solid 
Br.iril44u Mahogany diumu H 
hb-x in Uw Sheraton A 
ChuweiHtaie manner made to 
rlmls spenfiraUom. LnliMiW 
rlioice Ot r hairs sideboards. dK 
plat rant nets & book caws 
NetUened nr Hen lev oo 
TtMines <04911 641X15 

Boumemoulfi I0202J 2 95S80 
Top-Jiam Oman '03828ft 
7443 Berkley Ck» <04531 
810952 . 

•RIGHTS Of NETTLEBED. Sobd 
Brazilian Mahogany ibmng la 
hkx ui the Sheraton & 
Chippendale manner made to 
rbcnls sperUKDlMiiS Lnlmmed 
choice ot mam Odeboanb. da 
plus rniupris A book roses 
Netuebed nr Henley on 
Thame- l04“l ) 641116. 

Bournemouth (020ZI 293580 
Tooxnam Devon iOM28ft 

7443 Berkiiey GtOS iCUSSI 
810962 

CANAL NARROW BOAT HOLI- 
DAYS: Last mumfe van July & 
August tor availability 6 aslant 
hookings Phone BLAKES Holl 
siix Wriniun 9am 5pm on 
060S5 3221 

FINEST Quality wool canids At 
trade prices and under also 
available 100's extra Large 
room sue remnants under hah 
normal price- Chancery Carnets 
Ol 405 £MS3 

THE TOMES Z79S-S.9BS. Other 
Hues axad Hand bound ready 
for presentation aha 

"Sundays - Cl 2 50 Remember 
When Ol 688 6325- 
TTCKET5 FOR ANT EVENT, Cats 
Starlight Lxp. Chess. Les Mis 
All theatre and sports 
Tel 82I«6X6 8280495 
A Ex Visa Diners 
BIRTHDAY Due 7 Give someone 
an original Times Newspaper 
dated the very day Ihey wen 
born Cl? 50 0492-31303 
OLD YORK FLAGSTONES, cob 
tile sells elr Nationwide 
deliveries Tel <03801 860039 

■whim 

SEATF1NDERS Any even I Inc Lei 
Mrs CD vent CUn. Starlight Exp. 
Cli nddMume Ol -828 1678 
Maior cr edit cards 
FRIDGES /FREEZERS. Cookers, 
elr Can you buy cheaper? B A 
S LM 01 229 1947 8468 
OLD YORK FLAGSTONES lor 
sale Beautiful condition Tel 
061 223 0881 061 231 6786 


WHEN M LONDON rent a TV or 
video bv day wk or monlb 
TOPS TV 01 720 4469 


RESISTA 

CARPETS 

SALE NOW ON 


FOR SALE 


DISPLAY 
KITCHEN SALE 


50^ oti PoggenooM & cuter 
lop name displays 0pto40> 
ot) Metl 4 onw tfsuav a Bal- 
ances otters subfecl 10 
amabtUy 


JUST KITCHENS 

242 FULHAM RD. 

. SW10 

TEL 01*351 1616 


Wool mo Berbers horn £3 95 per 
sq yd + VAT 80% Wool Heavy 
Domestic WMuw £1185 per sq 
yd -i- VAT Gortepbst Wes £3.75 
per so yd A many other yea) 
reductions. 

148 Wandsworth Bridm fid, 
Paistus Breen, SW6. 

Teh 01-731 3368/9 

Fiw nsfiaHes - Expert flntag. 


THE CITY 
COBBLER 

HanhnaK male to measure Shoes 
Prices from £70 

215 CITY ROAD, 
LONDON EC1 
TEL Q 1-251 8658 


ANNOUNCEMENTS 


WANTED 



ALEXANDRIA— 

EGYPT 


H you have boat outline 
senpts tor honor or 
monster films please 
sufimrtto;- 
Chris Webstar 


Were you u your rdwves Oibp in 
the ah 7 Geiman T v Haw* is 
icakmg far home-movies or 
pteujgrauts for a docunentaiy 
Comacc 


01 437 7921 

in office hours. 


Shepperton Studios 
Studio Road 


StucSo Rood 

tssr 


ARTIST URGENTLY requires 
large wonnhop in any ronai 
Hen within 1 hr w London io 
rem/purrhave 01 385 053b 


Cancer 


WANTED - LARGE TABLES. se|* 
of rnain. targe nun-ore. book 
rasrx. desks A our earn. Ol 586 
0 148 2 28 2718 day mgm 
WANTED. Bulgarian lurtt? arlhn 
In rule TH 0953 462 162 


Together we can beat it. 

W? lund over one ihird of 
all reseanrh imo (he preren- 
uon and cure of cancer in 
iheljK 

Help us by sendinga dona- 
tion or make a legacy io 



CASH REGIS I ERS Bras national 
disposal of ornate col lection, 
earn reonier with shipment 
dale S restored lo perfect work 
i no order From £600 each & 
appreciating 021 622 5642 


Cancer. \V 
Research V 
Campaign at 


DRESDEN PORCELAIN Coach. 
18 mi long- 3 figunnes. Glided, 
cvguatielv decorated. Retail 
value aixaii £2.600 For quick 
sale C9SO.OO Tel Esher 63261 


21 arllnn HniiveTcrravc 
(Di-pi TT36/7 L l ondnn SW11 SXR 


Before you write your Will 
think about committing suicide. 


An attempt at suicide is 
a ay lor help. So is a call 
to The Samaritans 
The difference b that it's 
a cry that will always be 
answered. MUST always 
be answered. 

That's why we’re making 


our own call for held. 

Please remember us in 
your Will. 

Please call Slough (0753) 
32713 or write to: David 
Evans. The Samaritans, 

17 Uxbridge Road, Slough 
SU 1SN for further details. 


The Samaritans. 


SOUTH KENSINGTON Luxury 
vcnicpd 2 douMc bedrooms. 2 . 
rrcppnonx. bathroom with w.c 
xrperale cloakroom Near lube 
and Imkm C35O.00 per week. 
Co in only Pbon» Monday* 
Salimas iaoO am 800 m 
Ol 581 5109 


CHELSEA KMflhbbridqp. Brigra 
via. PimiKo. WetmiMkr 
Luxury houm and fiats avail 
able for long w short kk 
P fcsaw nno for current Bsl. 
Codex, m Burkmoham Raiorc 
Btf SW1 oi 828 8251 


WWI ISPUH fiai. 2 double bed 
room, large living room, and 
nxmurden Well furnished and 
erwrUmt rarmnunitaiions Co 
W available lmnNd»My 
U25BW nq. T«|: 01 603 9215 


AMERICAN EXECUT IVES Seek 
lux flaw houses: £200 £1000 
p w Usual fees req Phillips 
Kay 4 uwa South of me park 
Chrtsea Office 01-302 81 1 1 OT 
North Of Uh* Park Regcd's 
Park office. Ol 586 9882 
HOLIDAY APARTMENTS. We 
have ihe best 9Ht<fion of toco- 
tv furnished flats tn 
KenaUiglon. CMHk 

Kmgtuabndge. Mayfair. S». 
Johns Wood and Hampstead 
From C200pw Ol 244 7365. 
KNHHT5SMIGC. Spacious 1 
bed 1 st floor balcony flat m gar 
den square thing room, 
kiicnen. bain, utility Full OL 
Meal Co let for stiM*e person 
£185 pw TH: 073081 5367 
BATTERSEA. Bcautlhd rial over 
looking Park Newly dec It 
rtiurb a able beds. 1 sgie bed. 
igr men. me filled ml baih rm. 
sep WC CZSOpw OI 2235608. 
KEMStNCTOM W14 Luxury 9 * 
den flat in I8lli c hsc Tastefully 
furnished, dine bedrm. recnL 
Mi/dfner. bath. £14£pw Inc 
Sun couple 602 1130 
WE .LET FLATS AND HOUSES. 
Contort Richard or Mirk Davis 
toootfc A Co 402 7381 


MUSICAL 

INSTRUMENTS 


(LACK STEMWAT LOright 
No79622 Beautiful instrument. 
£1.650 THepbone 01946 
0*67 


BECHSTEtN. «fl Grand Piano 
Rosewood No 42405 £ 3-000 
Ofro 051 928 7619 


ANIMALS & BIRDS 


NORFOLK TERRIER 2 pedigree 
doq puppies, born late June, 
ready end August- Cl 40 Tel. 
04o2 32146. alter 7pm 
LHASA APS O PUPPIES. Very 
pretty KC Peg Phone. 
WoMrlooxilie <07O6i 255269 


EXCHANGES 


AUSTRALIAN Couple, late 50‘s, 
wijiin lo even beach flat in N 
Sydney with car. for home in 
Eng from Feb 87 for about 6 
mnlhy Write lo Cdr James 
Board. 9/13 Surfview Rd. 
Mona Vale NSW 2103. Austra- 
lia or trt 010.61.2 9975125. 


HOME & GARDEN 


FREE! BKMTH new bulb Cata- 
logue 64 rotcurfui pages 
Hundreds of colour pictures ot 
bulbs and (lowers Hus useful 
growing hints With 38 ramec- 
(line gold medals ai Chelsea, 
you're assured at the best 
Wnle Ron Worn. Dept Til. 
Leavesden. wauord. WD2 
78H. Or phone 0923 672071 
<24 hrsl 


9I0RT LETS 


SWISS COTTAGE 30 mlnufes 
lube Wad End. family house, 
garden, skw S. August 8-30. 
CTOO pw 01328 6380. 
CHELSEA. Com en lent m. 1 bed. 
1 creep, k 4b. £1 75 pw Free to 
end S(«. 584 6597 
NMNQATE VILLAGE MS. Luxury 
bouse, with garden. £60 per 
day. Ring Ol 340 7408. 
LUXURY SERVICED FLATS, 
cenirat London from £325 pw 
Ring Town H»e Ano 3 73 3433 
9 WK WESTMWSTER. sunny 
guiet pb fiai. 2 bed*, newly dec- 
orated. £525 pcm. 73S 2194. 
WILLCSDCN. 4 bed hue. AH 
amens. Avail 10 end Aug. £200 
p w Me MUk 01-452 4526. 


FLATSHARE 


SW2 large double room, pm hse. 
CH. 2 prof pen. share bath/ Ml 
with 1 outer Close bus/Tube. 
£30pw each or £48pw single. 
Tef: Ol 674 1 Baa after 5pm. 
WANTED SW LONDON/ KINGS- 
TON. HOoefuUy nr River Room 
& Parking for middle aged bud- 
ims man. 3 Nights per week 
bW weeks rale 07S3 864709 
CMSWKH prof ref male read to 
share charming gdn flat near 
river, own room £210 pcm 
Tel 01-998 4267 
HAMPSTEAD/HMMGATE Bor 
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Security Service newspaper ban stays 


Attonrey General v The Ob- 
server I i t d and Others 
Attorney General v Gpardian 
Newspapers Ltd and Others 
Before 5ir John Donaldson. 
Master of the Rolls. Uwd Justice 
Mustilland Lord Justice Nourse 
[Judgment given July 25] 

The Court of Appeal contin- 
ued interlocutory injunctions 

against two national newsp ape rs 
restraining either of them from 
further publishing allegations 
relaxing to national security 
which had been made by or 
attributed to a former member 
of the British Security Service. 

The injunctions had been 
granted by Mr Justice MiUett on 


THE MASTER OF THE 
ROLLS said that the injunc- 
tions. being interlocutory, 
would not finally determine the 
rights of the parties. 

They were essemiaBy a hold- 
ing operation involving the 
exercise by the judge of a 
judicial discretion with which 
the Court of Appeal should not 
interfere unless the judge had 
exercised his discretion wrongly. 

The background to the 
proceedings was that Mr Wright 
had been for many seats a 
member of the British Security 
Service, popnlarh referred to as 
the “secret service” Untfl re- 
cently. there had been no official 
admission that the service ex- 


it! the instant appeal, account' it might have obtnined injunc- 
bad To be taken not only of the tions to prevent H_ ’ ' 


total inadequacy of damages as 
an alternative » injunctive 


Failure to prevent publication 
did not amount jo authorizing; 


reiie£ but also of the relative it. and did not, destroy the 
seriousness of the consequences essential confidentiality. jQf 2be 


of. alternatively, an unjustified material. 


restraint upon tire newspapers’ The newspapers ; had also 


freedom to publish- or an un- alleged that - they were -justified 
justified publication of in publishing any allegation of 


confidential material. so 

In the course of the Australian eu 
proceedings, two affidavits had - 
beat filed in support, of the su 
injunctions by the Cabinet Sec- on 
reiary. Sr Robert Armstrong, tin 
who was the Prime Minister’s ini 


serious wrongdoing by tire se- 
curity service. : V 

Toe service was-as rand] 


subject to the law as any 
ordinary citizen, it wassa«L and 


the public bad a legitimate 
interest'll] knowing of aad being 


principal official adviser in rela- able to bring pressure to bear to 
non to matters of security and restrain any breach by ft of tire 


July II. 1986, pending trial of isred. 



two actions by the Attorney 
General against (1) The Ob- 
server Ltd, Mr Donald Trelfora. 
Mr David Leigh and Mr Paul 
Lashmar, and (2) Guardian 
Newspapers Ltd, Mr Peter Pres- 
ton and Mr Richard Nonoo- 
TayJor. . . . 

Under the inj uncu . ons ' each 
newspaper was restrained, sub- 
ject to certain exceptions, from: 

1 Disclosing or publishing to 
any person any information 
obtained by Peter Maurice 
Wright in his capacity as a 
member of the British Security 
Service and which they knew or . 
had reasonable grounds to be- 
lieve to have come from or been 
obtained, directly or indirectly, 
from Mr Wright; or 

2 From attributing, in any 
disclosure or publication made 
by them to any person, any 
information concerning the 
British Security Service to Mr 
Wright whether by name or 
otherwise. 

The Attorney General had 




That feet Htastrated the 
unique character of the obliga- 
tion of confidentiality which 
was implicit in acceptance of 
appointment in the service, a 
lifelong obligation unaffected by 

retirement. 

Mr Wright had occupied po- 
sitrons in which, prior to Ins 
retirement in January 1976, he 
would have had access to 
information which was 'and 
remained highly sensitive. 

Mr Wright had come to the 
conclusion that the service had 
been penetrated by foreign 
agents and that over the years 
members of the senice had been 
guilty of unlawful conduct. 

He approached the chair man 
of a select committee of the. 
House of Commons and sought 
an inquiry but when no inquiry 
was held. Mr. Wright, who lived 
in Tasmania, decided to pursue 
the matter by publishing his 
memoirs in Australia. 

That was aprima fadebieacb 
of his dutv of confidentiali" - ' ‘ 


the 


also the head of the Home - Gvil law or of the country's treaty 
Service- • obligations. - : 

Sir Robert had deposed to the That the service was subje 
scope of confidentiality and the to the law was not in donbLNj 
feet that a great deal of the was the feet that a seciiri 
information to which Mr sendee which was de. facto ab 
Wright had had access was still to depart from obligations undi 


That the service was subject 
to the law was not in (tonbL Nor 


sst sensitivity, 
of the security ser- 


to depart from obligations under 
the law as and when it saw fit: 
would constitute a major and 


vice, unlike those of all other quite u n accep ta ble threat, to. 
departments, were never depos- democratic freedoms. 


ited . with the Public Record 
Office for ultimate public 
inspection. 

The publication of secret 
information by Mr Wright 
would, be said, damage the woric 
of the British Security Service in 
the following ways: 


There could therefore be no ; 
doubt of the pubtic interest in 
ensuring that allegations , of - 
wrongdoing were ' investigated . 
and appropriate action taken. . - 
: Mr Lester rightly submitted' 
that the more serious the alleged 
wrongdoing, the greater the 


1 The security services of public interest involved: 


friendly foreign powers, with 
whom the British service based, 
would lose confidence; 


By his Lordship could not: 
accept that a sufficiently serious ; 
allegation automatically . jus- 


2 The British service would lose tified publication to force an 
the confidence and cooperation investigation in the public in* 


of other organizations; 

3 There was a risk that "other 

persons employed by die British 
service might seek to publish 
confidential information. 

In hts second affidavit. Sir 


teresi- - : . ' - / ' 

Where there was confidential- 
ity, the public interest in its 
maintenance bad to bis over- 
borne by a countervailing public ; 
interest in publication. T, 




information obtained by him in 
the course of his employment 
with the British Security Ser- 
vice, Mr Wright would be in 
breach of a duty of confidential- 
ity. 

The newspapers appealed 
against the injunctions on the 
grounds that they were thereby 
prevented from publishing 
information which they and 
others had already published, 
which was well known in the 
public domain, and which re- 
vealed government iniquity, if 
they knew or believed the 
information came from Mr 
WrighL 

They were "also prevented 
from publishing new informa- 
tion which they knew or be- 
lieved to have been obtained 
from Mr Wright, and which they 
obtained from a wholly in- 
dependent source, such as a 
former CIA agent or Soviet, 
defector, even if it revealed 
serious government iniquity. 

The Court of Appeal dis- 
missed the newspapers' appeal 
but varied the injunctions to 
permit the newspapers to pub- 
lish a fair and accurate report of 
proceedings in (a) either House 
of Parliament in the United 
Kingdom whose publication 
was permitted by that House, or 
(b) a court of the United 
Kingdom sitting in public. 


to restrain him and the publish- 
ers from so doing. 

After The Observer and The 
Guardian -newspapers bad pub- 
lished articles outiimng allega- 
tions said to have been 
contained in Mr Wright's mem- 
oirs, the Attorney General ap- 
plied for the injunctions in the 
present case. 

In considering that applica- 
tion. the court had been in- 
volved in weighing competing 
aspects of the public interest. 


position to particularise the 
un quantifiable damage which 
would be caused by specific 
disclosures without thereby 
making further disclosures of 
confidential information. 

On behalf of the newspapers, 
Mr Lester submitted that al- 
though the protection afforded 


by equity to the maintenance of 
confidentiaOry extended to what 


exposure of wrongdoing would 
justify communication to the. 
police or some such authority of 
material unlawfully obtained, it 
-would, also justify wholesale 
publication of that material in 4 . 
national v newspaper: see, 
Francome t Mirror Group tfeua^. 
papers ([1984]>i. WLR892), 


Mr Anthony Lester. QC and 
Mr Stephen Nathan for The 
Observer Ltd; Mr Anthony Les- 
ter. QC and Mr Desmond 
Browne for Guardian News- 
papers Ltd: Mr John Laws and 
Mr Nigel Pleming for the Attor- 
ney General. 


The judge, having referred to 
Lion Laboratories v Evans 
fl 1985] QB 526), said that the 
conflict should be resolved in 
favour of restraint unless the 
court was satisfied that there 
was a serious defence of public 
interest which might succeed at 
the trial 

Before discharging the injunc- 
tions. he had to be satisfied that 
there was a legitimate ground 
for supp o sing not that . disclo- 
sure would be of interest to the 
public but that it would be in 
the public interest, and for 
supposing also that that interest 
outweighed the conflicting pub- 
lic interest in favour of preserv- 
ing confidentiality. 

In his Lordship's view there 
was undoubtedly a balancing 
exercise to be per fo rmed. In 
American Cyannmid Co v 
Ethicon Ud ([I975J AC 396. 
406) and elsewhere it had been 
referred to as the “balance of 
convenience". ■ f - ] 

That was an unhappy phrase. 
“Balance of inconvenience" bet- 
ter described what was essen- 
tially a damage limitation 
exercise 


confidentiality extended to what 
Lord Chief Justice Widgery had 
described as “public secrets" in 
Artomev General v Jonathan 
Cape Ltd (J1976J QB 752) (the 
Crossman Dianes case), such 
public secrets had a special 
character. 

The newspapers asserted, a 
public interest in being in- 
formed of what was being done 
by the state and its executive on 
behalf of the public,- which 
would -not nonnafly arise in the 
context of private secrets. 

Furthermore there was a pub- 
lic interest in the exposure of 
wrongdoing by -officers of the 
state. 

But h did not follow from that 
that the balance was automati- 
cally tipped in fevour of free- 
dom from prior restraint of 
publication. It depended on the 
ferns. 

Mr Lester submitted that 
since the subject matter of the 
statements attributed to Mr 
Wright were now public knowl- 
edge. they had lost their 
confidentiality. 

But that assumed foe Original 
publication "had been an-' 
thorized/ of which there was no 
evidence. All that could he said 
was that if the Crown had 
known of the. intention to 
publish and had moved swiftly. 


The newspapers sought free- 
dom to publish- in thetrinews-- . 
papers, not to publish to' the. 
Prime Minister, the Security 
Commission, Privy CoundDois, 
the Director of Public Prosecu- 
tions or even the police. ' , 
Given the special nature, of 
the confidentiality which ap- 
plied to any aspect of the wont 
of the Security Service, such 
wide and . indiscriminate- 
publication could not possibly 
he justified an Jhe evidencn at 
p re sent available 
-Mr Wright' was nio doubL; 
distressed that bringing the: 
allegations .to the. notice of the: 
select : committee • had not^ 
brought foe results for which he 
bad hoped*. v : '"- r . r 

But the piiblfc interest did not • 
require him to ventilate his 
allegations in ever widening 
circles until either he obtained ' 
satisfaction 

For those reasons, his Lord- 
ship could see no reason for 
bolding that the judge erred in 
principle in deriding to grant the; 
injunctions. V.. 

Lord Justice Mostifl and Lord - 
Justice Nourse. delivered; 
concurring judgments. - 


Solicitors: Turner Kenneth 
Brown; Lovell White & King; 
Treasury Solicitor. , 


No magic formula in warning to jury 


Regina v Spencer and Others 
Regina v Smalls and Others 
Before Lord Hailsham of St 
Marylebone. Lord Chancellor, 
Lord Bridge of Harwich, Lord 
Brandon of Oakbrook, Lord 
Mackay of Clash fern and Lord 
Ackner 

[Speeches sold July 24] 

Where a prosecution case 
depended wholly on the un- 
corroborated evidence or pa- 
tients at a secure mental hospital 
the trial judge was under a duty 
to warn the jury of the dangers 
of convicting on such evidence 
by reason of their mental con- 
dition and criminal connection, 
but in so doing did not have 
specifically to use the word 
•danger" or “dangerous". 

The House of Lords so bdd in 
dismissing an appeal by three 
nurses. George Glenville 
S mails, Kenneth Ball and Paul 
White from the order of the 
Court of Appeal (Lord Justice 
May. Mr Justice Drake and Mr 
Justice Anthony Lincoln) (The 
Times November 8, 1984: 

[1985J .QB 771) against their 
convictions at - Nottingham 
Crown Court (Judge Hopkin 
and a jury) on October 12, 1983 
of ill-treating patients at 
Ramp ton hospital contrary to 
section 126 of the Mental 
Health Act 1959. 

However, their Lordships 
held that three other convic- 
tions. of Alan Wlddison Spen- 
cer. Dennis Mason and Kenneth 
Ball. on. June 24, 1983. were 
unsafe and unsatisfactory be- 
cause jurors discussed the case 
with one of their number after 
his being discharged during the 
trial following displays of bias 
and the discovery that his wife 

worked at an associated hos- 
pitaL 

Mr Wilfred Steer, QC and Mr 
Brian Sommerville for the 
appellants: Mr Jeremy Roberts. 
QC and Mr Richard Dixon for 
the Crown. 


cases, quite correctly in his view, 
were reluctant to insist on any 
magic formula or incantation 
and stressed instead the need 
that each summing up should be 
tailor made to suit the require- 
ments of the individual case. 


LORD ACKNER said that in 
both trials (before the same 
judge) the convictions arose - 
from substantially similar facts 
and were the subject of a tingle 
judgment in the Court of Ap- 
peal. 

The judge's direction to the 
jury in each case had been in 
substance the same. He told 
them to approach the patients' 
evidence with great caution. 

He dealt in detail with each of 
their characters including their 
previous convictions and the 
views of the psychiatrist em- 
ployed at Rampton as to their 
personality defects, for example, 
that they were each prone to 
fabricate without any con- 
science and to pursue wrong 
without any feeling, with a 
tendency to resentment against 
authority. 

Before the Court of Appeal it 
had been submitted that the 
appeals could not be distin- 
guished on the facts from R v 
Bagshaw fl 1 984] 1 WLR 477). 

In that case, concerning 
Rampton nurses found guilty 
under section 126 before the 
same judge on tie uncorrobo- 
rated evidence of patients after a 
warning in similar, though per- 
haps stronger terms, a dif- 
ferently constituted Court of 
Appeal had held that because 
the judge had not used the 
words “ft is dangerous to 
convict" the convictions were 
unsafe. 

However, in Bagshaw the 


of the word “danger” was 
inadequate in any case analo- 
gous to those of the three 
established categories where the 
rule of practice required that the 
jury should be warned of the 
danger of relying on uncorrobo- 
rated evidence: accomplices, 
complainants in sexual cases 
and children. 

His Lordship did not agree. In 
the three established categories 
where the “full warning” was 
obligatpry, the inherent un- 
reliability of the witness might 
well not be approm to the jury: 
hence the well established rule 
of practice. 

In other cases the potential 
unreliability of the sole or 
principle witness for the 
prosecution was obvious for all 
to see. The present appeals were 
such cases. The complainants 
were men ofbad character. They 
bad been sent to Rampton 
rather than to an ordinary 
prison because they were men- 
ially unbala nced . 


Notwithstanding that the 
possiblity of their evidence be- 
ing unreliable was patent, the 
judge nevertheless told the jury 
in the clearest possible terms 
and repeated himself, that they 
bad to approach the patients' 
evidence with great caution. He 
then identified the very dangers 


which justified the exercise of 
great caution. 

■ While ittouid often be convo^ 
nient to use the words “danger^ 
or “dangerous", the use of such 
words was not essential to an 
adequate warning, so long a& die 
jury were made fully aware of 
the dangers of convicting on 
such evidences 

For the sake of clarity his 
Lordship would add that R r 
Beck was rightly decided arid 
that in acase which did not fell 
into the three established cater 
gories and where there existed ' 
potential corroborative ma- 
terial, the extent to which- the 
trial judge should make rdK 
erence to that, material .de- 
pended upon the facts of ea&i 
case The overrid i ng rule , was 
that be must put the -defence 
feiriy and adequately. 

■ However,' tire convictions of 

Spencer. Ball and Mason wottid ' 
be quashed because of incidents 
relating to the conduct of. a 
member of the jury both before 
and after his discharge from the 
jury which- made the verdict 
unsafe.. ■ . *. ' ... .. . 

' Lord Bridge, Lord Brandon 
and Lord Mackay agreed. . 

Solicitors: Victor Mishcon & 
Co for Tracey' Bartow Furoiss & 
Co. Worksop; Director of Public ' 
Prosecutions.. 


Absolute offence 


Court of Appeal did not had the 
benefit of full argument and 
were not referred to R v Beck 
<[1982] 1 WLR 461). The Court 
of Appeal in the present case 
was therefore fully entitled to 
conclude that they were not 
bound by Bagshaw. 

The appellants bad argued 
that a warning without the use 


THE LORD CHAN- 
CELLOR. agreeing with Lord 
Ackner. said that the modern 


Greenwich London Borough 
Council v Millcroft Construc- 
tion Ltd 

The offence of making an 
excavation in a highway, which 
consisted of or comprised a 
carriageway, without lawful 

authority or excuse, contrary to 
section 131(1) of the Highways 
Act 1980, was an absolute 
offence and did not require the 
proof of mens rea. 


Accordingly, mere ignorance 
of the absolute prohibition 
could not provide a valid de- 
fence or amount to a lawful 
excuse, and the absence of 


knowledge of the requirementto 
obtain the permission of the 
highway authority before mak- 
ing an excavation did not 
constitute an • . excuse within 
section 131(1) of the 1980 Act 

The Queen’s Bench Di- 
visional Court. (Lord Justice 
Stephen Brown and Mr Justice 
Otton) so held on July 9 When it 
allowed the appeal of the«oub- : 
cu against the decision of the 
Greenwich Metropolitan 

- ■«- It 


Stipendiary Magistrate dismiss- 
>ng an information laid against 


rag an information laid api«)U 
..the defendant company alleg in g 
an offence contrary, to 
131(1). ’ 


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Oxford University Class Lists 


THE TIMES SATURDAY JULY 26 1986 


UN IVERSITY 


The following Class Lm are 
announced 

Honour Moderations - FngiMi 
Ungnafieand Utenusre 
On* If J M I? Bahvr. Si j. MmTuor 
Taylor a SL NorlhwoM: E L bwmii, 
aiAme. Kins ttJwara vnist 

WifewnsS 

*®|saa?Bis 

. _a wans. Or. Caw- ion Cmumf ? 
Tay. Mood. Hlyhoalr S; M JL H Forw 
S« J Dame Allanji cins s. 

C j Fox. Som. Kino FilHiMO VI HS 

Birmingham: j w Garth. & Anm! 


M Jn hm ofi. warn. BrUbh S Bruvieh. 
t^l jnnmw. 81 cam. Dr cnanonrr‘« 
CS. Aiwnoam: P J Joniuon. BNC. 
CaMIe 6. Trwrratav. Z r Johmon. SI 
Mild. Cortr HUh Cpprr s: A M jonrs. 
hi Hugh. Carr iron Comp S r Jones. 
WMK Alleyn’s. London, v £ JawpTi, 
SI Hixjft. Aymoury HS. CHE. 


KaiMiath Mhi n^llnikanV a e Uirn l-Rx. uni. IHVHWI. HEW. 
KpUpT! kihlV o?nSSiS™. m Mavinw Girls S. V A Day. Sar 

e£S!J£rSi SWa!?SS3?*S? UKly S _Canxrnl Senior if. AWi 


Koble. Cordoroioun. Shers'll D 

Odun. 81 Oath. vandertHli Unn. 
NMtHfnr. J A Cherry. Henf. Simon 
HS: □ R Chinn. L>nn . Si Paul^ SlTJ 
Cooper, si j. Kirn Henry VTII s. 
Coventry c l l Dai us. umv. H.iutiieu 
S. .terwy K P David. LMH. WakefieM 
Qirh HS. E. K L Dawwn. KrMe. RoVal 
Som. Our 


Cheoenlum Larm-T CL A M 

84 p - wqtmwiaeiT M r 


Mmchcil 

USSU - „ . 

in %j&sn 

P F Keaiiwy. Lmc, SI LouhI 


Kt: 6££SfflW 3?® 

FS«^: 
BE A-my^siL^St 

^“jfo WSSSLX jV ° wen - 


iSK- Bye..6*'~Amo^^ChsSma; m "b 


Parwin. 

. rd: M B 

«lun HS. Crov 


Dm. 2^1h. John' 

HS: C L Mmufh. SI J. KiiHfft s 

w^WJ^hfts 

— — d_Brven:. H M War Kim. Tnn 
Port S. Eiwalh D P D webbl 
jl Jtendcomb C:SJCg Welter 

Anne- WMw jehG nK.. J jm® 

R WorTnaM - - 

tVE Adye. Si HikL Council at 
Edwaiion. London: ME Agar: 
Aitu tefort h: G £ Audrae. Ware. 

G V Barber. Som. Norwich HS: 

: J Bartow, si Anne. Cheatne Hutme 
: OBairlndtOn.WanL S H1U. OxirirS 
“ P BartUL Si Hi kl. Si & 

-alia: F M Bell. St Anne. Barton 
- . verti -Sixth Form CL IM Berwick. Si 
Cath. Aik- OUley S. Worcester H Le 
M EHbbl LMH. Si Albans S: N BEaPe, 
New. Alley ns S. Dulwich: KaOunne 
>Ue. Joxus. Furze Plan Comp. 
. C L BoiUtvj. si. Ea H. ifirardi 
FijS. Wimbledon; R HU Brooki 
" H. Sedberaii; C F R Bryan- 
. _ a. SI Hugh, oiic Hester cms HS. 
. > E Bull. Unc. Bradford Girts GS: J E 
thinyan. SI HiHL'Banon Pneni sixth 
Form C: A„1 . Bintdhin. LMH. Burlmo- 
too Danes S: K A £ Bumdae. Si HiH. 
king James C. Henley: OTP 
F^rwale^vyorc. Raorale CS; R M 
Carter. CCC. Carmel R C Comp: C H 
Crtherwopd. Si J. Mill Hill S. A Chen. 
SI Hugh. SI Benedict’s S: S J 
Chesworth. Som. Guildford HS: J P 
Oargo. St P. Maodaien Coll. S. 
Oxford: R P Clark. Stcaih. Warwick 
S: V M Connolly. Or. OoUvers Sixih 
Form C. Horsham :E C Cboke. SI HI Id. 
WestallT Girts HS; s m Corcoran. 
Unc. SI Mary’S Comeni. Amoi. 
Catherine P corner. Som. Loreto C. 
Mandjgler: WJ" Crowe. Unw. Motd- 
sume CS: C M Cun. Or. CaOierham SL 
» E Cwsk. New- « Mary ■» S. 

A M Oarhishire. Ball. 
3 Use: l l Davof. Si Ed H. 
T S _Davidson. LMH. 


De. Wadh. WHltedeld S: S J de 
Ex. Bishop Core S. Swansea: D _ 
Ducktndge. CCC. Th union Upper S: 
M J-M Eden. Pantb. Queens Cate S: A 
flld. Ran 


C Kennedy. SI Ed H. Hulme Girls CS. 
QkUuip. A J Kerr. New. Merchant 
Tav tor* 8. Cro»y: S M Khan, Herd. 
Westminster cuy S: R D Lamoan. cn 
Cb. MaiKtieww cs. N K Lannmo. 
LMH united Nations biiemahotul S: 
D G Lawson. Bad. Bnitenhead: M S C 
Lee. Inn. Gorman Swo& Inter 
nauiwi M Sr. H ong Kong: M P Upton. 
Henf. Bromtord Comp, wicMord; C L 
Loyd. Herd. Lawrence Sheriff S. 
HiW» J M H LOvegrove. SI Calh. 
Radlrv E E J lheD. Ban. SI 
JJ C HS. C M Lion. 51 
Chrtsl I he King S, boulhpon; F 

, Jdlesa. t'mv . BaHvrlare 1-& j M 

Marey-Dare. KtW. 51 AIMn S: J M 
. Strain. Magd- Charterhouse: s J 
MrLauMihn. cn Ch. Lady Margaret. S 
C J Maple, heme. Bedford Modem S: 
A G Mann. Mini. University Cui S; 

k V 

Heruwd; R Mead. Unix. Weymouth 
GS; M W MeniwnneL SI Aiuie RGS. 
Newcastle unon-Tyne: J B Millard, 
lie rt f . Great Barr S. Bimungham: B S 
Ml Ido. Prrnb. Hymen C. A S N MKra. 
Mansi. Mure Oak Comp: F I 
Mowbray. Si Ed H. Si Paul’s dirts S- J 
K Murray. Wodh. St PhiloOH-naV 
Canhahon: R NashaK. LMH. George- 
»wd Lniv. USA: P J Newion. New. 
Ashby GS. T L Ogtesfav. SI Ed H. 
Havant sixth Form CEL Oldham. 
Jejus. WygoBsion a Queen CUzabcUt 
I C. Letcesten C M A O’Neal, si Anne. 
Mawe n F.nefgn. Reamna: A M 
Onirtv. Henf. Qtwo Elizabeth's GS. 
Blackburn; ABE Owen. Keble. Long 
Road SulIH Form C. Cambrldoe. MJK 
p*wort«. SJ cath. Dr CnaUoners CS: 
L F PengHly. SI p. Benneil Memorial: 
G W Per rival. Ou. AdwtcX S. 
ponrasier. S 1 Persaud. Wadh. North 
London CoOegule S: A Peialas- 
Miranda. Si P. Don: S S Ptuuipv. 
Mori. Wellington: 8 J Pialten. St 
Anne. Dante Alice Owen's. Pollers 
Bar: J L H Pollard, Unc. Huis Road 
Sixth Form C. Cambnugr: D H Poser. 
Wore Harrow. R E C Presion. SI 
Hild. WeM lands HS. GooNeton: S M 
Read. 9 Ed H Tavistock £ S G Rees. 
Som. GodoiptUn & Latymer 5. A M 
Retd. Mart. Edinburgh Academy- J A 
Retd. St Cath. Dundee HS: M C 
Robertson, si Calh. Fieri wood 
Hevketh HS and Smlh Form C: J S 
Rouse. Jesus. Otctua Comp. Swansea: 
M P Roy. Henf. Wotsev Hall Tutorial 
C. M J Sanson. Unlv. Hlghdown S. 
Reading-. T J B Saul. Jesus. Dulwich 
CMC Scon. Ch Ch. Westminster: K 
M Seal. Tnn. Si John Rigby RC Sixth 
Form C.JC seddon. Mansi. Merman! 
Taylor's S . Crosby: K E Seekings. Si 
Hugh. Sherborne Girls S. S 
SMvdauor. si Cam. irOvertrroeks. 
Oxford: F J Short. SI Anne. Solihull 
Rixih Form C. A E Sim. Unlv. 
Edinburgh Academy: H P SUnmonds. 
Si Ed H. Gosforth HS: P L A Sive. 
hlaqd. Si Albam S: A M M Sladen. 
BaU. Lnn ervilv Coll. S. London; A J 
Smith. SI Hu - ‘ ‘ _ 


M Edwards. St HIM. Ranelagh S. 
Bracknell: P E M Edwards^OCC. 
Westminster: R M Eduards. Jesus. 
Ysoot Cyfun atari taf. Cardiff: F D 
Eger! on. KeMe. mature student: K 
Ealnm. Unh, . Kingsbury HS: G M 
Eurfdge. Or. Canford 5: R m Evans. 
BNC.-BHbennead S; C R A Ferguson. 
LMH. HarcfieM County HS: J 

gssau 1 ? . JtnS^C AM 

New. Rosebery S. Erpom. E J Fisher. 
Ban. Manchester Girls MS. N E 
Fteming. Wore. UrsuUne Convent K& 
Wimbledon.- S C Follows. Keble. 
Bancroft's S: M E Freeman. St P. H 
George's C. weybridoe: o M Frilh. 
BNC. Halleybury: D MFrosi. St Cain. 
Portsmouth GS; S 8 Fume$*Glbbon. 
Ex. Bloxham S. Batibwv: C A 
' lagher Tnn. letcester S; C V 
-IbaKH. Greyf. Si Joan of Arc: K A 
yjor. SI P. Wydlffe C. Ook T L 
1. Oakham S. M J Glyn. 
.... _._..juh Hall: p Coldfn. si 
ne. D’Cevcrbrwk’s Tutorial CL B 
r. SI Hlld. wymesion A Queen 
cabeth I CL J E Gosling. St Hugh. 
Platt Comp: A P Ctoslyn. SI 
Alice Offley S: M A Gave. 
Robert Gordon's C; E a 
i. St Hugh. Rosebery S. 

. L C Craltam. BNc. Ludlow 
Form C: I Gram. wadh. 
Ashlngton HS; JR A Grant. Tnn. 
Uantwti Major Comp, darnorran: R 
Gnngras, 61 CaUt. Suckport gsTc C 
Gwinn. Mans/. Dulwich ' C: L J 
Hacker- Wore. Westminster: E K 
Hamer. St Calh. Winchester: R A 
Hall. MerT. Stonyhunl; K J Hailing. 
LMH. Omden Girls S: J K Hamilton- 




P~. Edward. Greene's 
Me. Mart- 


Si . . 

CL C Hare. Ke! ..... . 

D J Harm, ch Ch. 
GS. York; T K Harrison. 


Crov don HS: K L Squirrcll. SI Anne. 
Hitkmanswonh S: S E K Stephenson. 
Magd. Beverley HS: S Steward, si 
Hugh. Berkhamstead Girls S: T C M 
Siobbv. Si Ed H. Cnarfernouse: a M 
Slone. Mamf. -Btshop Vaughan RC 
comp. Swansea; S L Summers. Jesus. 
Trvfan S. Bangor. D F Swords. Wadh. 
Wimbledon G D L Snyder. Line. 
Rainhill HS. C L Taylor. New. 
Bnghlon & Hove HS: M Thaicher. SI 
Anne. Cant on lan HS: E K Thomas. St 
Hi Id. Rugby; M L Thompson. Unc. 
Beacomfirtd HS. v j Thompson. St 
Anne. SI Chrbiapher S. Letchworth: L 
M N Tregear. &l p. Bryanslou: M M 
Turner. Henf. King Edward's S. 
Birmingham. D M J Tusa. Magd. 
Winchester: J C C Urouhart. Ex. 
Felles. B H Walter. New. Bryanaton; 
J F Wallace. Wadh. Lalyimr Upper 8: 
A F Walsh. Tnn. stand C. wnitrleid: S 
A J WesL LMH. Alleyn's S: A R 
While. New. Dul wich C; V S Wiggins. 
Or. North London Collegiate S: A E 
Wilrock. Som. Ftotnev HS: J D 
WUkmson. Unc. Houghlon S: R A 
Wlllcock. Si Hild. Tneale Green S. 
Reading. N M Williams. COC. Win- 
chester J C wniis. Som. AU Saints. 
BKjxnam. p R wood. Si Anne. Judd S. 
Tononooe. C J Woods. SI Ed H 
Mai bank 5. Nantwfch: M T Woollacoi. 
Pemb. Oakham S; P M Wragg. Wore. 
Oundie. A □ WnglU. Huef. Hulme 
Old ham 

IDA Coales. Keble. SI Albans 
s 

Jurisprudence 

Class ItCM Andrews. Keble. Hutton 
CS. Presum; RAP Brtmelow. Keble. 
Walllngion HS: C Y Y Chang. BNC. 
Low] her C. Rhyl; A J N Coals. St J. 
Slower j W - Co Kings. MerL Win- 
chester: C J Denno. Ex. Weymouth 
GS: M N R Evans. £ J. Bristol GS; M 
J Ford ham. Herlf. Spalding CS: T M 
Fox. Unlv. Lvntn Oughlrtngton HS: D 
A Foxlon. Magd. Glasgow Academy: 
R M Franks. BNC. Wesictiff Boys HS: 
J B Gardner. New. Glasgow Acad- 
emy: D J Goddard. Unlv. wcilinqion 
Umv: R W Grime. Wadh. Halsey S: M 
R HalL New. Newcastle RGS: S J 
Han key. SI J, Queenl Unlv. Canada: 
S J HannafnrzL Line. Chaiefltouse: A 
F Ham not on. si Ed H. Harrogate CS: 
S A HaifSskl. Line. PorttromdhHS: E 
G Johnson. Ch Ch. Lancing: D A 
Jukes. St Cam. Shrewsbury Sixth 
Form C: M a G Kent. Luc. Queen 
Elizabeth Cs. HorncasUe: R I Lambert. 
SI Ed H. Chesterfield S: T A C Leech, 
wadh. Lancaster RGS: A w Lkfbetiar. 
Wore. Ehltam G: Stephanie Matthews. 
St HIM. Pontypool Ternary CL R N 
Papworth. Ch ch. King Edward VI 8. 
Louth: J D Peacock. COC. Nunthrope 
k: w E 


. .._ln«|don. 

M j Dean. Pemo. Poole GS C M 
D>mnv. Ch ch. si Duneun's c. s p 
Devonshne. Magd- Kino^t S. earner 
bury. M S Dlghero. JeniK. 
HabcnUMiprs' Aake's. Ehirer: ALdl 
lor io. £4 Hugh. Cheltenham Ladies C. 
J M OmoemaiK. Mansf. Radlry. G L 
Duddy. Mansi. Kmpvway Comp: ft A 
5 Durrani. Som. King Edward VI 
cans HS. Birmingham; KE Cidrrd. 
som. SI Bnnedjcts. Ealing; M W 
Luton, si J. Glasgow Academy. .1 
Elm. bnc. wmiam Huime'a GS. J s 
EJliS Wore. Hereford SFC: DSCw.nl. 
Tnn. Hamilton GS: T retllourfiekl.Si 
Lfl H. Berkhanntea: ft N Firth- Ctl Ch. 
Noiimaham KS: O A (Day. Maud. 
Cuherhav ft. Bam: IE Ctertdto- SI Ed 
H. Mjnmcver CS. P j Cnoui. M»rt. 
King toward VI HS. Stafford: J E 
Gillies, si P. Cheltenham Latin C.SE 
Godvnn. New. tuunlvTs S: P A 
Gooovon. Mansi. King Edward's. 
Birmingham. A Gore. Jnu». 
wood rush HS. Birmingham: S 
Greenan. Hprlf. Si Mary’s HS. 
ChrilrrlMd. rJ E Crtimhaw, Keble. 
Klnm Manor S: 1 P D Hardee. Keble. 
ctmam C: S J Harman. Tnn. 
Wycombe Abbuy S: T P Harris, cn 
Ch. Harvard Umv: K S Harvey. Keble. 
Peter Svmonds SFC. Winchester. T 
Hasan. Pemb. Kinguey S.- £ C Hayes. 
SI Ed H. Lalvmer Upper S. Hammer 
smilh. S M Heaty. BNC. TrtnUy S. 
Leamington Spa: A J I ten d er von. Sr J. 
Lancing: 8 R II low ns. Magd. Bn viol 
GS: J K W Hn. BNC. Calholic Junior 
C. Singapore. V P Hyte. New. Dollar 
Academy: D H Innev Tnn. Lords GS: 
M D B Jamm. Unlv. Cardiff HS. J P K 
Kelly. BaU. Sionynurvl. S L.-M. Knoo. 
Som. Hwa Chung Junior C: J A 
Killick. Wadh. OXI ed County S: S P 
King. St J. Haberdashery Ashe's. 
EMree; K L Kirkham. Jesus. Cavtell 
Alim HS: A P Kteanlhous. BNC. 
Merchant Taylor* - . North wood: M S 
Lake. Or. King’s S. Worcester: H F R 
Lawson. BNC. Pcrve Gina S. Cun- 
0 ridge: S K R Um. BaU. Aanatd Umv: 
P A Lloyd. SI Anne. St Mary’s C. 
Crosby: N Lobbennrrn. Magd. Shrews- 
bury: D i Lonsdale. R*o. Pk. Kelly C: 
□ / McCall. Maod. BKtmp Corse S. 
Swansea: F A Mentally. BNC. Lomond 
S: J E Mrttendrtck. Wadh. Brdofrd 
hs. M w M R MacPhee. Or. 
Edinburgh Academy: M May. Wore. 
Sir William Bor laws 5. Marlow. E A 
Maybury. SI Ed H. Rrlgaie C: A D E 
Metzer. wadn. Haberdasbera' Aske’i. 
Elsiree. M R MHIward. Or. 
Summerhlll Comp. S. Klngvwinford: 
N Mlrcttandam. Wadh. CHchfa Comp. 
8. Swansea. D P Nayyer. St Hugh. 
Newslead wood Girts GS; J C Neal. 
Wadh. Gateway SFC. E A K Otserte. 
Si Hugh. Johns HopKItn unh.-. C D 
O’Shea. Unc. Si Man's Comeni. 
Cambridge. P B L Palmer. Herlf. 
Bewdlev HS: C J Parr. Ex. Sir John 
Rlgoy src. Wigan: A B Pearce. LMH. 
Abbey S. Reading: A Pearson. Unlv. 
BOilon Boys ft: L G T Perez dr Jerez. 
Wore. El on. G I Phillips. Unlv. no 
school 

CS. SI 

R Power. New. Law rence Sheriff S. 
Rugby: I M Poynlon. CCC. Wllmslow 
Harefield HS: T D Price. New. 
Hampton S: G J Proudfool. Unh-. RGS 
Ni-wrasile - lido n-Ty rte . F J Rail Lon. 
BNC. Selby HS: T J Hffl Jesus. 
Momxton Senior Comp: D L Randall. 
Or. Otiht.t comp: s J Rose. Maod. 
Perse S. Cambridge; A G Ryde. Wadh. 


C R Whitfield. iSt Ch. MUlfMd S. B V 
Williams Hertl . 0* ror ,V ’■ 
Harpendei.. Mrs R M WlHon. LMH. 
Mature Student. P Wlwatpallarakul. 
Wadh. Thamitusal Unlv. Thailand: M 
C w young. 51 Ld H. Princeton umv 
Class h A A Akinola. Or. Howard 
umv. USA j p h vre«T. Mansi. 
Adams- CS. E Kurz. SfAnne. 
CumiMMuls Kreuzoaxee. Colo gne. M 

R H Macnulet,', turn. Qvteenv Unlv. 
kuHiucm. D MacPnrrvm. Qu. Adwivk 
Comp. M Pother LMH. Taunlpn ft. 
Jacqueline A S?H , 9" , 1 , l . i A.J?' 
with) nmon Girls S. F M Smith. Pemb. 
Ballrun HS. S vvesner. Si Anne. 
Carmel C. D F V Yau. % Hugh. &t 
Paul's. Comeni S. Hong Kong 

Prizes 

The Examiners in the Honour 
School of Jurisprudence have 
awarded the following Prizes: 
Martin Wronker Law Prize for 
the best overall performance: D 
A Foxton, Magd. Proximo 
Access! t; C J Dering, Ex. 

Prizes for the Martin Wronker 
Law Prize Fund for the best 
performance in the following 
papers: Jurisprudence: C M 
Pigden. Mansi. Tort: A J Stolen, 
Som. Land Law: E G Johnson. 
Ch Ch. Trusts: M N R Evans, St 
J. Administrative Law. S M 
Healy, BNC. 

Slaughter & May prize for the 
best performance in Contract: C 
J Dering, Ex. 

Richards Butler prize for the 
best performance in Inter- 
national Trade: AJN Coats, St 
J. 

Norton. Rose. Bouerel! and 
Roche prize for the best perfor- 
mance in Company Law: R N 
Papworth. Ch Ch. 

Classics and Modern Lang u ages 

F: This letter indicates the name 
of a candidate who was ad- 
judged worthy of distinction in 
the oral use of the French 
language. 


1 qivpii: J M Pirion. Or. Retealr 
; K Potter. New. arencmer S:C 


Minister S. Southwell: M J Saiterty. 
Wadh. Town mouth HS; C Saul. Wore. 
Slock ion SFC: B A Schwartz. St J. 
Brown Unit: m R Schwarz. Hert. 
Lancaster RGS: L G A Seoul. Ball. 
Harvard GSJ Shooter. Co Cn, cion: 
C C Shultteworlh. Ex. Ablnodon: J S 
Slorarn. Jews. Dollar Academy; N J 
Sommers. Line. Sir WUliarn Perkins’s 
S. Chertvev: M J Sunn. SI Calh. 
Harrow. R Sinter. Henf. w.ud 
Academy. A J Stolen. Som. 
Immingham S: M J Sul ion. Ex. King 
Edward VI C. Stourbridge, r a M 
Tail. Magd. Kirnbie Kendal S: S n 
Thai. Ex. South Eugene & USA: J M 
Theobald. Reg Pk. WalUngion Glrlv 
HS: M J Thomas. Won-. Portsmouth 
GS: A C Thompson. Wore. Slellen- 
Row+i: T P Thorne. SI Cath. 
Walllngion HS: r J Usocbnann. Pemb. 
European &. Culnam: R V Cheftv. 
Ball. Royal C. Port Louis; v Verma. 
LMH. Lester B Pearson Pacll k: C_ M R 
m Votttn. Wore. Bruansion: J Walker. 
Ball. Fa I Nw Orth S: R C P Weber. 
Herlf. El on. DAW Weir. BNC. 
Sloneyhursi. S Y Wltang. Men. Leys 
S. Cambridge. D Whelan. SI Ed H. St 
Kevin's Como. Klrkby: C J Wilkins. SI 
Ed H. Charterhouse; J F W W llk-ox, 
Keble. Solihull SFC: R M Yalden. 
Wadh. Queen s Unlv. Canada: B K' P 
\’u. si Hugh. Diocxesan Girls 5. Hong 
Kong. 

Class 3 nitv ID: M J Ashford. St J. 
Newcastle under-Lyme S; V M 
Barbour. Si P. Bedford HS: J Berry. 
Wadh. PonieJand County HS: M 
Binks. Ball. King Ecnbert S. Sheflleld: 
D J Brooks. St Hugh. Hens A Essex 
HS: M H Cameote. Or. Melbourne 
Unlv: C J C Chappie. Ch Ch. Lancing: 
CAE Cozens. Wort. ShenOeld S: S C 
Dallal. Keble. SS Helen A Katharine. 
Abingdon: B E Fung. Si Calh. Forest 
S. London: K J George. Men. 
Bowdoin C. USA. K A C Guilty. Si 
Anne. Wycombe Abbey: R I Glynn. Si 
Ed H. Leeds OS: D L Courti. a Hild. 
a Margaret's Convent S. Edinburgh: 
P R Harper. Som. Pale's Girls S: J A 
Heggarty. SI HlkJ, Oxley Senior 
Comp: R S M Henke. Wore. Howell's 
S. Liandalf: C £ J Henry. SI J. 
Coleraine HS: K M HeweteU. St Hugh. 
King Henry Vilh Coventry; M B R 
Hill. SI P. RCS ■’ 


CS. York: 


Newcastle 


INC. Loiyroer Upper S; C V Hart, st 
; Sl Bede's JCHS. Orttoklrk A 
i sane HS. CroxteUr. C E Hellyer. 
XC. Woodbridge SAL Hairy. Ex. 
Mel hod 1st C. BeKasU A J HIH on. LMH. 
Lancing O H L Hlrd. _St HIM. 
Chichester GOT* HS: L S J HobM. Ol 
Ch. islands. Hong Kong: C Holland. 
Sl HlkL Ruskln C. Oxford: F K M 
Holmes. Magd. Wvcombe Abbey S; D 
M Horrorks. ONBarnatey Sodh Fonn 
Ci S S Howarth. Magd. Tronl C. 
NoUlngham: D W Hubbard, a Bern. H. 
Malvern: T S Tltee. Perr*. Exrter S: 

soffit fs 

J Jackson. SI Hugh. Chosen Hill Si G 


RCS: C M Pigden. Mansf. Verulam. SI 
Albans; P A Prmvae. Sl Cath. Latymer 
Upper 6:- M H Pulver. LMH. Merchan! 
Taylors.- North wood. C M Scon. St J, 
McGill Unlv: J E SnatPUa. St Ed H. St 
John -Rigby SFC. Wigan:. J C Steele. 
Jesus. Kent C- Canterbury: J S Vaux. 
Ch Ch. Sales&n C. Farnborough: L M 
Weston Snutli. Ex. Marlboro ufllv - 
CMS Z CDte I): P J ■ Aldrich. Pemb. ST 
Wilfrids Com. S: J^Aitot. Sl HUd. 
Ecctesbou me S; I M G Andrews. MerL 
Merchant Taylors S. Northwood: R E 
C Barham. TTtn. CWgwdi S: E M 
Barmes. New. MayfleM S. SI Leon- 
ards. E F Barry. Sl Hugh. Leonard s. 
SI Andrews: 1 C BLUchford. Mansf. 
Richard Taunlon C. Solon: E. J 
Bradshaw. St Anne. Leeds GS: D W H 
Brooks. KeWe. No school given; C J 
Butl Unc. Dame Allan's Boys 8. 
NewcasUe-on.TVne: S J C Caidow. 


W B Ho. Qu. Malaya umv: s R 
Humphries. SI P. Abbey S. Reading: 
M B Hurren. Umv. WUmslow Co Bowl 
CS: R p lm Thurn. Wore. Amptefortn: 
V C Jackson. Qu. lichen SFC. 
Southampton: M D k’mgnane. si Ed 
h. Harvard Umv. A M Kinsetia. Ball. 
Allan He C: S A KtdgnL Trtn. 
Godolphln A Latymer: K M Leonard. 
Ball. Sl Genevieve's HS. Belfast: JOS 
McKay. Sl Ed H.- Pelerttouse. Zlm- 
babwet. M L Marshal L. LMH. 
Freslum's a Norfolk: D Massey. SI 
Anne. Manchester GS: S M Money. 
Hertz. SI Mary's C, Newcastle; D 
nman. Ball. JFS Como: P D Ozhi. 

C. Wolllngiord: A M 
... Calh. Haberdashers' 
Aske's: E J9 C Potter. Pemb. SS 
Helen A Katharine. Atongdon; P J 
Rawnsley. Wore. Wood house Grove 
S. Bradford: D S , Russo. CCC. 
Bowdoin C: 8 J Tahlr lOiell . Magd. 
Lower Merum HS. USA; s M Taylor. 
Magd. MaKtsione CS: S D Walker. SI 
P. Epsom C;TM Wan. Keble. AUanUc 


It F E M B Buss fFrt. Som. 
Puincy HS; J M Dench iFri. Ea J. 
CuUdlord HS: S C Donovan fFrt. 
Keble. CasUeflefd S. Dorchester: F R H 
Webb (FrL som. Rugby 
Clue 2 (Hr D.-JH danchy fFrt. Sl 
Anne. Crony Watson’s C. Edinburgh: 
B T Clark iFrj. Maod. SI CuUiberFs 
HS. Ncwcasuempon Tyne: D H Fle« 
1F1. Jesus. Yale SFC. Wrexham: S P N 
Macklow Smith iFri. New. No school 
given: J L Seddon (FI. Wadh. 
Beacons! le Id KS F P J S Turkman 
(Fr). Univ. Camden Girls S 
CUM 2 (Dtv U): K J Inga mrlls iFri. Sl 
Hugh. King Edward VI Girts MS. 
Edgbasion. 

Theoiogj- 

Ctau li R A Cross. Keble. Solihull S. P 
R Cay. Rip. Coil. Sl Ca marine's C. 
Cambridge: 1 R Lane. Rip ColL 
Bradford CS: N I Moir. Wycl. H. 
Conville and Cams C. Cambridge. J a 
sieiia. SI Ben. H. SI Philip's OS. 
Birmingham: D G K Taylor. SI Anne. 
Oundie: R E Warner. Reg. Pk. York 
Unlv 

Class 2 (Dtv l): T C B Atkinson. Ban. 
SI Paul’s S: R - E Bond. LMH. 
Merctuml Tavtors Girls S. Crosby: E 
N Burgess. Si J. Cheltenham CS: D £ 
Butler. Jesus. No school given: J L 
Caddie k. RIP. Coll. SI John'* C. 
Cambridge: s D Danes. BNC. Wor- 
th log Sixth Form C: M Drew. Crest. 
Gregorian Umv. Rome: W R Cuy. SI 
Anne. Lanuley Park Boys S. Beck- 
enham; P Ham Melon. Line. Stoke-on 
Trent Sixth Form C: J R Heaton. SI 
Sleph- H. London School of Econom- 
ics: M S Hudson. Reg Pk. Ouider Hill 
Upper 6. Rochdale. M A Jenkins. Sl P. 
Rugby HS: N J Massey. Wyd H. 
Birmingham unh K J Parmmier. 
LMH. CoHyer's Sixth Form C. 
Horsham: M j Powell. St P. Rewon: V 

g Raymer. &» Stepn. H. Harvard Unlv: 

T W Taylor. Wycl. H. Bristol Unlv. 
p Van no ai. Rip Coll. London Unlv: N 
C A von Malaise. Rip Coll. Radley: S 
D E Weeks. Ball. Winchester: J A 
wig ley. Keble. Nottingham Clrte HS. 
Clast 2 (OKI M): j O W Ashcroft. Or. 
Rugby: C E Boddlngton. Keble. 
Malvern Girts S: C P Brunker. SI J. Sl 
George's C. Weybndge: W A Buck. 
Rip Coll. Manchester Umv: D J A 
Burton. Reg Pk. Bacup A Rawtenstall 
GS. F C Cork. Pemb. Queen 
Elizabeth’s CS. Ashbourne: C J 
Dobson. St P. Norwich HS: C M 
Dunstan. Ou. Kinq Edward's HS. 
Birmingham,- M P D Fava. St Ben K. 
Salmon C Farnborough. H J Fellows. 
Reg Pk. Oks Palace S. Cray don A 
walllngion HS: D M Foster. Reg Pk. 
Bedford S: C J French. Keble. King's 

S Taunlon: A Hadwin. Pemb. Queen 
crabeih’s cs. Blackburn: S J 
Hembery. Reg Pk. Colchester RGS: 
Bronwen M A Jones. St Hugh. 
MirfieW HS: J R M Lawrence-Hall. 
Wore. Bmhlorv. Hove A Sussex Sixih 
Form CKA May. Ch ChT Southend 
Boys HS: C L Meynea. Keble. 
Woodford County HS: B C P 
Robertson. Ball. R« worth S: D A 
Rogers. Reg Pk. London Untv: Lynda 
K Rose, wyrl H_ Exeier Unlv: C 
Royden. Wycl H. Wlrrgl CS: R J 
Sedgwick. Wore. Tunbridge Wells 
Girts GS: G m Shackle. T rtn. Sutton 
HS; H D Shllson. Ex. Sl Paul's S: S J 


UfRndeit. Wyd H. Downing C. 
Cambridge: S F Vaughan. SI Hugh. 
King Edward VI Girts HS. nr- 
mingham: J p H S woHT-Ingham. 
Keble. Boumside s. Chen en ham: J M 
Wood, wycl H. Queens. Cambridge. 
Class X C J Browning. SI Ben H. 
Warwick S: p W Egglestone. Reg Pk. 
Sheflleld unlv: P JlTerrldge. Reg Pk. 
Heaihfleld Senior HS: M M Wade. Reg 
Pk. Si Day-id's Secondary S: N P 
Wheeter. 

Boys GS: .... . 

Parks! one CS. 


Essex University degrees 


Essex University has announced 
the foDowing degrees: 

BSc 

blolodoal CMobtry 
On fc A Letmg. SI Bcnedlcl's. 
CoKlHSter and Goicbesler teal: A 
Pentdis. Moral ns S. Pateo Psych ko 
Attwm. 

Clan 2 Q): K R Dean: D Pollen. N P J 
Price: S Singh: P Swallow; K M 
WyaB 

CtoM I (2): C Baxter: R J Cooke: J P 
Halted: A R Hibbie: J H Murray: N L 
NbhoUs: D Shahiwalla. 

Class 3B H Edwards: C- Y Hp: S Kay: D 
Pawl: P M Ptmslone: N J Unwuu J D 
Vyce 

Pm Q M Ayenl: □ R Jow: J M 
Morns: N K PaieL L M Piearce 
■ CM vmtmy 

Class 2 CO: R DhOlon: M Jager C L J 
Wong. 

Pass R C Beale 

BtotoMfinil iclBini - 

Sh^ t fj c ®£& J * Mar ' tyD 

a53i^w D N E E c BStenT ^ 
VrtlSSfD K Whitiaker P F wuiiam- 
oon-- - • 

Call BMo&f _ 

« f i m 2 Cl): G K Bailey: S R Hassard: 
M A HwiW 1 H John: R A M00««: 
D W Payne: B J Powell: S L Turner 
Ctm IffiiJH Dawson; O Thakar T 
Warwick.- J D wan*. 

Clan IBS Ch ana 

awtra nm—te l Blolo«sf 

Qan fc v m Hyde. Laiyiner S. 
Edmonton. SJ Price- Wimbtedon HS 
and Luton CHE _ 

Ctas* 2 0)1 S C Russell: B M WUl. 


Kong 


; feCC FBI. SKH Tano Shlu.Wn 

Sec S. Hong Kong and Hong 
PMy 


Class 2 miK K A Clwn: C J Fox. W F 
%SP SParkes: M E Walie 
" J — "”)CH Burisch: N Chan, w K 
* Lee: W T Kevin Lfu: W T T 


Mak 




P L 


ang. 
Lam: P 


Pass H B Bl Island: 

Rounson : . 

Congutar awl Mtemprsoassar SyWW 
CteH 2 CDs M Armltage 
Class 2 fit M J Haberfleld. I W 
Hscketh ZH Hay at; p J Hulme; N 
Mohammed; CS WUliarruon 

X M raidoost: M R Owen. A K 
: K N Tan. 

Oaotranki B ubMi bg 
film H A Barbour. Leighton Park S. 

ssss 

^/£rc s sS” s N j 

Pub-K Mlah. R D Palmer 

HwaLNtortSon Hill Tech InsL Hong 

Prion M. F Sha rgo: J Singh. H C B 
Tkang; K Y M Tsanfl- 


MauMnUos: 

Class 2 (1): C Adamidls. C R Clarke: M 
j Faulkner: S Panchal. 

Class 2 <2)s J E Berry. PJ Chan I : S 
Hankins; A C Lewis: K L Moore; J 
williams 

Class x 1 S Samra: M W Wong. 
Pass: S Abbixts; S BxrtlngMn: M R 
Harvey. A I Ramsden: S M Smith 
Mathematics and C a m pu i lng 
Class U S P Bun. Tunbridge WeUs HS: 
A M Byrne. Moundown Sec S. 
SourhamMon and Totten C; R V 
rmlow. Purtey HS for Boys. 

Class 2 (1): J Goody rr: K K M Hid: A 
E Payne 

Class ID): K H Barker: K G Baxter. D 
G J O’Reilly. M Pope. 

Glass IS J Pci-rett: N W Tang. 
NuheatailM 

Operational Rosaamh am) Ewnoadis 
Class I: J R Dixon. S Wh«on HS. 
Leicester and couniesmorpe C. Lrtces- 

IPT 

Qua 2 (1)!TA Khan. 

Class 2 IDs J P Flew. 

Class 3; K E Jones 

Physics 

Class 2 (1): J H Shaw 

ffwi 2 (2): D A Bennott: S A 

Gainings. S J Zammatbo. 

Class 3: J R C Smith: J H Taylor 
AppUad PhyslM 

Clan X B Dobe: D M CuesL M S 
Sahota. A Wnglcy 

Physios until Laser TaehMtacy 
Class 2 (l): R A Cooper. J L Martey 
Class 2 (»: P M Ahmet: M R 
Brougham: J Clumnm: Y T ChenaUB 
A Mann: J F Roohteaaegan: R J Yeo 
Class * T J N Banyc E Gheveley- P R 
Sale 

Physios *rtth Mtoroktecaraakw 
Class 2 CD: R K C Mixoro 
Thonratloal Physics 

Cass is H Feam. Manor CS. Mans- 
field. NoUlngham 

Cass 2 (1): C p Ptiintps. 
casi 2 (2>I R M -vrceU. 

Cass 3: S M Adams: J F Elmer 

BA 

Accou nta ncy. Finance 
Cims It E Tong. La Salle C. Hong 
Konj and Dacorum C- Hemel Hemp- 

Class 2 CDs A C Bradley: M Bridge: K 
p cia>-lon: B M Duncan: M Oliver T 
C Pal el: C M wong. _ 

asi?«!ii?sTiKa®52 

N.iDior: C M M Nft: N K-L So. S A 
Teng: C V Wu 
Class 3= A L Rowe 

Art HUtmy and History ■ 
Cass 1: C Baker. Edooasion HS for 
Ctr“ D Povey. Ilford ^ ^ 

and E London C: ™ 

Hampshire and I 
shire 

Fitenuniir L C 6 Mllwaid. C L 


Kgnnlngion and City and E London C: 
D A Head, waigeb Copse S. Wodley. 
Reading. 

Class 2 (1)1 P E Baker I R Chambers; 
S H Chri-fc: R W Collls: NE Deans: I O 
Dormer B Evans. J M Gardner; O R 
Carman. S Goldie: D S Crank P S 
Hoi 1 CBM Brown: C Michael: p w 
Middlemans, R Mura: E Oghene: A F 
Sosj Hernandez: GTS Swveung: D H 
Thame: c R TToner: M w Tuvey R H 
S Yeniham 

Ctass 2 C2>: W MHAndllw PJ E 
Beardmore: U H Carlisle: S R T 
Davies: N S Gtedhlll: S Hayes: N J 
Jaggon: M A McDermoU: S T Mill&on: 
P a Reynolds: D I Waller 
Class 3: B A Spencer 

GmnwM and SMMO0 
Class ft D S Marks, Ctarenumi HS. 
Harrow 

Ctaas 2 (1): J P Kelly J A Linton: C A 
Nelson 

History 

Class It R M woowon. Preston Manor 
HS. E Wembley 

Class 2 (l): J M Bambndge: S J F 
Bender: L J Blewen: KR Francis: P M 
GlbUd: A Hein mg: . e A Jones: J 
Mack ness: L A Morris. 

Class 2 (1): S L Clark: C S Cooper: C 
M Folan. 6 Coldsmlth: P A Coodall: 5 
T Upscomb: B M Para men: D L 
Sayers: V Williams 

H tot ary and E cnmu o hii 
Class 2 CD: S E Manning. 

Clast 2 CO: J S Wrtghl 

Htsnxy and Cte a r wumit 
Class 2 CD: N P Goldsmith. G J Tree: 
A N Woolf: L E Zac 
Class 2 (2): A Ctempson 

History and Literature 
Class 2 CD> T Beads’* Orth, c A 

Hik< liflfll 

Class 2 CD: J M Akam 

Mstary and 8 o r t o lo g y 
Clan 2 CD: J l- Todd 


LNaratm and Art History 
Class 1: N Z W toiler. Teddlnglon Boys 
S and Richmond upon Thames C. 
Ctess 2 CD: j Barnes: E Bracey 
Class 2 03: C m Brownniff: L E Darby: 
S J Richards; A Sanderson 
Utaratura and SocMkwy 
Oast 2 CO: w Holloway 


C&us i:AS Bones. Biddings ComnS. 
Scunthorpe and J LeggoU SFC. 
Scunlhorpe 

Clan 2 CD: s D Wan 


Clan ft J C Marsden. Arnold HCI S. 
Not l Ingham. 

Class 3 Ci): J A Bolton: N C 
Crawshaw; M J Howe E T Kennedy: 
K A Nutt ALA Seifert S J Spec* 
Ctau 2 CD: D L Thorp: G H winch. 
Clast a: J W Mormon 

PNteMUrfiy and Art HMeqr 
Class 2: A A Anderson 

Phttosobfay and Coa gm saanf 
Class 2 CD: S E While 

Phfloseidqr and LMantna 
Clan 2 (1): R A Brock 

PotKjMteWnf and AdMMlstndon 
Clan 3 (l): C A Cracknell 
Class 3 H)!J K Alia: R 1 Harwood: D 
Hepworth: R K Serumaga; F E Wall 
Ps ysh H wi M st k ir 
Clan 2 CD: P R Whiting 


Clan l: J F SfwfkHi. Newbury Girls 
CS and Newbury and Chippenham 
ToGhC. Wiltshire 

Clan 2 CDs J R A colt: A J Blrtti: R J 
counts: 5 J rosr.. M Dturadj m.-ic: P J F 
Coodtellow: C M Coss: E J Pmnell: S 
E PrtesUialt K E Role: E Schwienlao: 
A Way 

Ctau 2 CD: G Ashworth. S L Emery: J 
C HorrrtL T P Howe: <5 A Johnston- 
Wood: M R Jones: N A Kcnnard: J H 
Momson: A C Osborne: 1 C Robards: K 
Robllng: A J Scohi K M walls. 


HS and City 
Wilden S. 
Hamp- 

Ctau 2 CDS A .Cooper: ■! j!. I *SlS ln: ^ f 

Freem. ~ 

Thomas. 


Clan RJD woStesioa. Highbury Hill 
HS London and Colchester AduU 
Educalion Centre 

Class 2 CD: S Doganray J Tockewteh 


Class 2 <l)s L A Fleming: M 
Yerolemou. 

Ctau 2 (D: P B Brady. NP Khoo: R A 
Llewellyn: D G Trafford 

Saolotogy 

Cbss 2 Cl): & C A Causwril. S R 
cmnhiwi.1 A Devan: J A Durasow: 
A L Lord: T J Nelson: R L Pnte: R C 
Pryor: R H Rogers: 5 R Sheridan: S E 
Warren, 

Class 2 (2): P R Cotes: K G Roper S L 
Smith 

Sociology and Social Pokey 
Ctau 2 (1 J: S j Anderson, s A Brose R 
j k’lrlon. W T MOaUhodl: P Sareen: S 
E Shields. 

Ctau 2 CO: C R Ward: R D Young. 

(lotted Metes SWdtal 
Clan 2 CD: D Hlnks: J R M Hodge: P 
A Leon: SEA Persaud 
Ctau 2 CD: G J Buiien. J R Hlbba. 


LLB 

Ctau 2 <D:p QAwonlvI. P Barnes: J 
P Boulter- H E Giles: L T Ctenon: T L 
James; L A jwwkl; C VI king: CB 
McClure: G McPhie: A J OklfMd: S M 


Tuny 


S Gossaln- H 




. 9 , .. _ 

AHA ’fidbjhbeh: D 
Hp: P T Ng: P M Pickup: 

oSS"* S J Chool: RDKamanL D H 
lOrkham: A K SantfwwJ s 

Ptt M E K Baka; D Hlotakakns- S 
Krishnan 

EhtewM 

»d Ngee Ann j 


JfF Chin. C K ChU~: D I 
A Foley: J P FOX: K J r 
rryenS J^HI^: IDH? 


K J hm-: DR Horns: 
: T H HrL-. p c v Kw 


Ctau 2 CD T_J 
HeskMi: c 

RautKVJ 


Osborne: 


-Ji J-r.-.-P* 




.- ■ ” t , i ■’ 


T Lau: S 

EmvoaM 

< 

Out 2 < 

feff¥sam 

eowen. WLF Ota. SO 
R-RKiterts 

MG D OHS- C W Kwan 

Aegrotat: R Jaffar 


- Y T Au Yeung: P R 
liv clock; A P Liunb 


CtaU 2 (2): J M Booth: E Dawson. N L 
Gavaghan: H A Insinger 

EmmmmhIoi 

Ctau l: T S Callen. scteoiw -sS. 
Harpendcn: 

Hs. Ipswich: M Walsh. Enhorne rts. 

‘ Hanwell. London 

nuj (»>:J C Bearma n : ^DBotoon ■ 

' French: A P . 
. . _ .-fackell: L K L 

_ , „ 1 R Humphries: KM 

HuWqTp s V Kwan: P W Lanser: L A 
Lomun^ D Q Neve: M I Norrtiffe: L T 
KS-Tr O Page: R Patel: J SSagoo: I 
A scon: J C selwyn: W H Thomson. 
S P Vahry: M Ylaisemldes. 
ntmm c * m: I C Askew: N R Bale: S P 
Benzlkle: MBoydj A A H 
Bunrv: P DonneUy: A A Finch. M 
Fouladga r. J Gosranl: D A Hands. D 
JatfnT V Lai; P H Leung: . A P 
Lnfsnon. KKH Lfu. K’YJ Ljiik: S Y 
J J Olszanskl: S J E Osborne: C J 
Gvenham: M E Pawley: h’Rainl: S J 
Rilctue: M Singh: Ml L Sraffli: P J 
Smith: L Sti lwnou; M K Tang. H L 
Ymcrni. L T Wang: D R F Ward- J M 
WafdSe. W M Wong: C Z®urdoum« 
CUSS SLR Clean. T M Lo: S M All 
Eoonobdc* aad euMimilU 
dan 2 (1): A Beadle: C A Hodgson 

Uua2 (»: L F Clark. T J Cohen. M P 
rSSShl M H Wyhe 

dau TflliCl Bariol In. P A Cape! la. 
jc Loulli 

Framdi Utemaet wWh SoeMW 
Cliia 2 (2): R K Emlatvua 

CovenoMat 

nan is R j aemnits. OmrtMJi H& 

Middlesex and Uxbridge Tech_ C. LA 
□avrtutK. Archbp Tensson s GS. 


CEntftah) 

Class 2 (Q: NAM Omar S M Rashid 
Ctess 2 (Z): R A Rashid: R A Rauf: N 
A Bakin-: R A Ramly: H Arts: A 
Haharuddln: A M Jan: S. N M Non N 
M Nordln: Z M Saleh: N M Sailed; F 
ptiteh. R A R, YusoHi N R T M 
Maasum: N H Uleh 

Lathi Amertsaa Stedtes 
Ctau 2 CD: K A Evans: C Helmer: S M 
Humby: P L Jackson: M CMaCautev: 
{? Mfffer: J C HendeJl Dunn; PN 
Stokes: L C Timms. 
rj—c 2 CD ■ P D Wlliock 

■ ki|iatdi]t 

dau 2 CD: M Chin 
Pass: T Taras 

Ungdftlns and Lanina e> Patbolcgj 

dau liSP Whlieslde. International S. 

Mmhl. Tanzania 

dau 2 O): E J Bromley 

I l-gw-tto. and Lomai 
Class a iZJ: J Lever P A Long. 


Clou 2 (pi E T Addy T Ballard: C E 
Breen: P W Bryon: L &nneU: L 
Caramazzai A Carter: C J Qiatyna n: E 
P K cneah: F O Co fceT. A T Edwards 
5 F Fann. S A , Farrtmond; S W 
HlnchcliHe: E H W Ho: K Javcd: D C 

MjhmSit^^Metota . a T MlB Si: DC 

E Surender: M B Toms: M A. Van der. 
Swan: S A Wander J A Webb; M T T 
L Wong. 

Ctau x K Chan 

Pass: A P Barker A F McTlsue; G 
Shannon. .1 Tnher 


dau Is R M Bingham. Ravensboum* 
s tor Bov*. Bromley A w Marino. 
Sired ly S. 

VWEi A 

ChffWd: SM CoteCkHigh; G F 
oJteSEn: M V CummliWKDFttz 
wrald: P J Galvan: B Hornsby: P 
3S52 JJ Jougtiln: M A Mlnaohl: C M 
Prif-rr C M Savage: K M S Gupta; A M 
SiKerwood 

Ctau 2 (p: J Bailey T A Bowhay; J K 
nmwn: S E Brown. E A- Came: J M 
• caption: E Duffy: A M Eiaiw W H 
Feehalty. G L Clbson: DC CIIW^R A 
Hopkins; M C Howelbr. D M hllbridr. 
J MaredMi: S May: AMNIXOIL M AC 
PpYlon, D A Richards A J Rickma n: J 
L shorew; H U I Smith: O A Smilfwrs. 
k r SnHwove: C Turner. S J Wales. 
D C WNkS^J L Wauah^ T Wilson. 
M J C Woods. I- F Zamnut 


Corrections 

In the list of first-class honours 
from the University of Wales 
ihe names of L G Allen. M J 
Peacegood and B A Pope were 
omitted from the BSc. geog- 
raphy, section at the University 
College of Wales, Aberystwyth. 
A T Evans, I L Morris ana S 
Williams were awarded degrees 
in physics, not geography. The 
heading UCNW Bangor was 
omitted from the second col- 
umn of the list. 

In the degrees awarded by the 
University of East Anglia the 
names of Debora A Margerum 
and Charlotte L K Moriey were 
omitted from the BA. School of 
Art History and Music, section, 
class H. division 2. 


MOTOR RACING 


Speedy Rosber 
to retire after season 



From John Bltuisden 

Hockenheim 

Yesterday belonged to Kcke 
Rosberg here, and Ihe Finnish 
driver was the cenire of atten- 
tion twice in a matter of hours. 
Shortly before practice for the 
German Grand Prix tomorrow, 
he issued a statement announc- 
ing his decision to retire from 
motor racing at the end of the 
season. Then, during the first 
qualifying period, he delivered a 
firm message that he does not 
intend to ease up until his final 
chequered flag. Rosberg. aged 
37. set the fastest time otuie day 
in his Marlboro McLaren, just 
pipping Nigel Mansell for the 
provisional pole position. 

Both drivers had timed their 
cfTons well during an hour-long 
session which was punctuated 
by light drizzle, causing the 
majority of drivers to rail to 
deliver times appropriate to 
iheir potential. Nelson Piquet 
had set the early pace before the 
first shower, and Mansell's im- 
mediate effort to answer his 
team partner's lime was 
thwarted when he was baulked 
on two c o m er s by Aynon Senna 
and his JPS Lotus on their 
warming-up lap. Mansell was 
visibly annoyed, but he found a 
dearer run for his final effort 
eight minutes from the end of 
qualifying, only to lose out to 
Rosberg two minutes later. 

In announcing his intention 
to retire. Rosberg was generous 
in his praise for the McLaren 
team, whom he joined this year 
after four "mostly memorable 
and successful" years with Wil- 
liams, with whom he became 
world champion in 1982. "The 
most professional team in For- 
mula One" is his judgment on 
McLaren, and he makes it 
abundently dear that despite his 
relative lack of success with 
them this season he has no 
regrets and is happy to end his 
Formula One career “in this 
pleasant but extremely 
compeia live atmosphere". 

In a pointed reference to his 
predecessor in the team, Niki 
Lauda, whose recently pub- 
lished autobiography. To Hell 
and Back, "didn't have one nice 



Rosberg: pips Mansell 

word to say" about McLaren, 
Rosberg says he » disturbed that 
Lauda's words have given a 
misleading impression about all 
the people at McLaren. 

Who will replace Rosberg at 
McLaren is only one of many 
items of speculation concerning 
the movement of drivers, en- 
gines. and even complete teams. 
Later today it is expecied that 
Honda will confirm that they 
have signed an agreement with 
JPS Team Lotus to supply them 
with engines next season. This 
will ensure the continuing 
presence in the team of Senna 
and the chief engineer, Gerard 
Ducarougc, bat rt could also 
mean that Senna will have a 
Japanese No. 2 next year in 
place of Johnny Dumfries. 

Furthermore, it is not ex- 
pected that the Lows-Honda 
deal will affect the supply of 
Honda engines to the Williams 
team in 1987. and this could be 
sufficient to persuade Mansell to 


sign a new contract with Wil- 
liams. with whom he has been 
so successful. 

Last week, Mansell and his 
manager visited Ferrari at the 
invitation of the 
Commendazore. when various 
propositions were discussed. "It 
was a very interesting 
experience," he said, “but I'm 
not about lo make any rush 
decisions about next year cither 
way. Right now I'm concentrat- 
ing on 1986 and trying. to win a 
few more races. That's my total 
preoccupation at presenL" 

The Lotus deal is bad news for 
Renault, and although the 
French company have long 
staled that their aim is to service 
just two teams instead of their 
current three, the implication is 
that one of them must be a very 
top team. That effectively 
means McLaren or Brabham. 
PRACTICE TIMES: 1, K Rosoarg (FinJ. 
Marfeoro McLaren- TAG, 1M2.478sac: 3. N 
Manses (GBL Cannon WBSams-Monda. 
1:42.696: 3. A Pros! (Fr). Marboro 
McLaren-TAOL 1:43^73: 4. N Pknxn (BO. 
Gannon WStems-Honda, 1:43.853: S. R 
Amoux (Frt. Lrgwr-RcrrauB. 1:43891. B. G 
Berger (Austria). Benetton-BMW, 
1:44.433: 7. P AIM (Fr). Ugw-RenaulL 
1.45.047: 8. A Senna (Br), JPS Lotus- 
Renaurt. i :45^1 2; 9. R Patrese (li). Cfcwtti 

Brabham-BMW. 1:46.094; 10. M AJboreto 
(it). Ferrari. 1:5&319; 11. S Johansson 
(Swe). Ferrari, 1:56 .847 : \ 2 , J Palmer 
(GSL West Zakspeed. 1:47 1 67: 13. P 
Tambav (FrL Haas Lota-Ford. 1:47.221. 
14. P sir erf! |Fr). Data General TyrreS- 
Renatat, 1:47.371. 15. J Dumfries (GB). 
JPS Lotus-Renautt. 1:47.845: 16. □ War- 
wick (GB), Olivetti Brabham-BMW, 
1:48-206; 17, T Boutsen {Bel). Barclay 
Anows-SMW, 1:43-240: IB. M BnxicUe 
(GBL Data General TyrrcS-Retiauit 
i:<9.406: 19. C Danner (WG). Barclay 
Arrows-Smitn BMW. 1:49.439: 20. A 
Namunt (IQ. Minardi-Moderra, 1:50.221, 
21. A de Cesaris (It). Mtnardl-Modemi. 
1-50.900: 22. A Jones (Aus). Haas Lota- 
Ford. 151 5I& 23. H Rottwngattor (Nath). 
West Zakspeed. 1:52.461; 24. A Berg 
(Can). OseUa-Atta Romeo. 1*6.959; 25. T 
Fata (11). Benetton-BMW, 12:12.563. 


jgyxFUsy Lyle 
decides 
to stay in 
Europe 


START/ 

FINISH 




Lap record: Alain Prost 
1m 53.538s 133.915mph 


By Mitchell Matts 

Sandy Lyle has definitely 
decided to withdraw from the 
US PGA championship in To- 
ledo. Ohio, next month. He was 
concerned that by competing at 
Toledo he would tax his energy 
to such a degree that it could 
affect his performances through- 
out the rest of the European 
season. 

"I thought long and hard 
before making the final 
decision." he said. "But I have 
already played 19 tournaments 
this year — 12 in .America and 
seven in Europe — and 1 have a 
busy schedule ahead of me. 

"I feel that I will be able to do 
more justice to myself certainly 
this year, by missing the US 
PGA championship. That will 
not always be the case and 1 
hope to be able to arrange my 
schedule in future years so that l 
play m all four of the major 
championships." 

Lyle does not have to play in 
the 15 tournaments required of 
members of the US PGA Tour 
because he finished 1 32nd m the 
money list last year, thus gaining 
entry to events in 1 9S6 through 
sponsors' invitations. 

Lyle, who won the Greater 
Greensboro Open in North 
Carolina in April, has not won 
on the European tour this 
season, but he has a punishing 
schedule ahead of him. 

He will play m the Scandina- 
vian Open, which starts in 
Stockholm next Thursday, then, 
afier a one-week break, he will 
compete in five successive tour- 
naments, taking m the Benson 
and Hedges Internationa], the 
Bell's Scottish Open, the Ger- 
man Open, the European Mas- 
ters and the European Open. He 
is likely to make three or four 
more appearances on the Euro- 
pean circuit before completing 
his year with trips to Japan and 
Hawaii. 


RACING 

Asmussen 
to shine 
on Acushla 

From Our Irish Racing 
Correspondent, Dublin 

After some ticklish negotia- 
tions, the services of the French- 
based American jockey. Cash 
Asmussen. have been secured 
by the Vincent O'Brien stable as 
a stand-in for Pat Eddery at 
Phoenix Park this afternoon. 

O'Brien was particularly Jceen 
to get a top class jockey as the 
programme includes die group 
three Baroda Stud Phoenix 
Sprint in which he is very keen 
on the chance of Acushla. 

The last time she ran over this 
course and distance, Acushla 
was made favourite but had the 
misfortune to be drawn in a 
starting stall that went out of 
action. She was moved to the 
outside of the field and Eddery 
believes that this cost her (he 
race as she was beaten less than 
a length by London Tower. 

She renews rivalry with Lon- 
don Tower on 81b better terms 
and shonid surely reverse-the 
placings- John Reid partners 
Charlie Nelson's recent York 
winner. Eastern Song, but she 
does not appear quite up to this 
standard. 

Apart from Acushla. 
Asmussen will also ride Euphra- 
tes and Golden Dome for 
O'Brien and Loud Applause for 
John Oxx. The most intriguing 
member of this trio is Golden 
Dome. Lhe first member of the 
first crop of Golden Reece to 
race m Ireland. He is certainly 
bred in the purple as his dam, 
Lisadell, a sister io Patch, won 
the Coronation Stakes at Royal 
Ascol 

Acatenango to 
extend his 
winning run 

Acatenango. winner of the 
Grand Prix de Saint-Cloud three 
weeks ago, can extend his 
winning sequence lo 10 at 
Dusseldorf tomorrow. Steve 
Cauthen rode him at Saint- 
Cloud but the stable jockey, 
Georg Bocskai, takes over for 
the £33.898 Grosser Preis von 
Berlin, a group one race over Hfc 
miles. . 

His main rival is likely to be 
the Irish challenger. Theatrical 
(Michael Kinane). Last year's 
Irish Derby runner-up failed on 
his only outing this season, 
when favourite for the Hard- 
wire Stakes, but may still be 
good enough to take second 
place. 

Tarib (Richard Hills), a win- 
ner at Baden-Baden in May and 
only just touched oft by 
Polykratis at Sandown on 
Eclipse, day. can gain a second 
German success in the £13,277 
Ostcrmann-PokaJ over -six fur- 
longs - at Gelsenldrchen-Horst 
today. - 

In France. Thrill Show (Al- 
fred Giben). who has won both 
his races in good style, can 
successfully step up to group 
company in the £19^466 Prix 
Daphnis at Evry today. 

Peter Scudamore and Richard 
Dunwoody are among seven 
British-based ridere in action in 
the Glen International Cham- 
pion Hurdle at Ovrevoll tomor- 
row night. Brent Thomson is 
one of four visitors riding in the 
Norwegian Derby Trial on the 
same card. 

Fourteen stallion nomina- 
tions. valued at more than 
£100.000. will be auctioned in 
aid of the Stable Lad's Welfare 
Trust and the National Associ- 
ation of Youth Clubs at 
Goodwood on August 22. The 
nominations include Salmon 
Leap, donated by the Coolmore 
Stud and WassL 


LINGFIELD PARK 


Going: good 

Draw; high numbers best, but on soft ground 
low numbers favoured 

5.45 MANIFESTO MAIDEN FILLIES STAKES {Div I: 
2-Y-O: £998; 6f) (15 runners) 


3 0 BLEU CELESTE R Hutctanson 8*11 

10 0 COLOR ARTIST JVKntar 8-11 

12 DRAQUSA K Brassay 8-11 

IS 0 FtftAL RUSH D OuQtttor 8-11 

22 0 LADY’S MANTLE (USA) J Duntoo8-11 

23 00 UDY WESTGATE MUsiwr 6-11 

24 0 LINDA'S TREAT R Armstrong 8-11 

25 00 USASHAM PMakm 6-11 

31 00 MISS LAWSUIT MBIanstard 8-11 

34 00 HAJABA C Bonsaad 8-11 _ 

40 SHMBELLAPWalwynB‘11 

44 0 SFY GIFT M Stoute B-ll 

49 TOP COVER DBswoith 8-11 -. 

51 2 VEVILA LCunam8-11 

53 


P HnttMawa (3) 1 

S CatahaB 10 

S Whitworth G 

BCresrtoylt 

PWMdrael5 
. M WrttamS 

PTrtkS 

. T Warns 12 
NON-RUNNER * 
B RouseS 



20 00 LYNDA BROAD P Bumoyne 88. N Adams 15 

23 0302 MUSICAL CHOMB (B) Q Stum 8-6 ABondl 

25 000 RELAMPEGO K Ivory M GMwganll 

25 000 SOLENT GOLD B Stevens 86 A Mackey 12 

2-1 Musical Chorus. 9-4 Jetmore, 9-2 Gone For It, 6-1 
Aidnacross. 8-1 Kibara. KM others 

7JS RADIO MERCURY HANDICAP (£2,998: 7f 
140yd) (17) 

1 01-0 COINCIDENTAL M W Dickinson 4-9-1 1 S Cauthen 15 

2 0000 STEADY EDDIE P Mffchel 4-9-2 G Carter (3)6 

4 0004 HELLO SUNSMTE L Han 4-8-9 PWrtdrtMlO 

8 0324 BOWL OVER (BJPMaJan 36-7 Pa Eddery 9 

9 -001 EMERALD WAVE (USA) R Armstrong 38-7 

10 0010 LYRIC WAY (BF) B H2i* 4-8-6 MHA>3 

11 0023 RED RIVER BOY R Hodges 3*6 R Durant 12 

12 0413 KING OF SPEED (C-DIBWise 7-8-5 B Rouse 7 
IS 30-0 HIGHLAND IMAGE R Hutctmson 4-8-1 

P Hutchinson | 




00 WOO AND WAVE D Lairg 6-1 1 WNotMMsO 

5-2 Vewta. 5-1 SlwheBa. 11-2 Cokx ArdsL 6-1 Spy GdL B-1 
's Manta. Lindas TreaL ID-lFInal (flush. Lady Westgate. 
others. 


lingfield selections 

By Mandarin 

5.45 Color Artist 6.15 Mexican Honey. 6.40 
Jetmore. 7.5 Hello Sunshine. 7.35 A1 Amead. 8.5 
King's Crusade. 8.35 Russian Logic. 

By Our Newmarket Correspondent 
5.45 Vevila. 6.15 Ghanayim. 6.40 Kivari. 7,5 
Emerald Wave. 7.35 Simla Ridge. 8J Final 
AJma. 8.35 Flaming Dancer. 

6.15 MANIFESTO MAIDEN FILLIES STAKES (Div 
II: 2-Y-O: £991: 6f) (14) 


wJ3)4 
L Jones (o) 17 
AMcGtooa 14 
N Adams 2 
AMackayfl 
TWtaraia 
NL Thomas 16 
DMcfcay 1 
S Dawson 11 

_ , JW 

5-1 Bowl Over, 13-2 ComodantaL 10-1 Doily. 12-1 
14-t others. 


IB 0034 DOLLY 00 A Moore 4-7-13. 

19 000 MCKY MCK M Usher 5-7-13 

20 0441 MISS MAMA J Ffltch-HeyBS 5-7-12 
23 0040 HUNTS KATIE CHrtmes 4-7-7 

27 032- HAUTBOY LADY M Madowfck 5-7-7 

28 003- GUEST IMAGE G Law*4-7-7 

28 000- KALA PAMS Dow 4-7-7 

31 2800 BLACK SPOUT H O'Ned 5-7-7 

7-2 Emerald Wavs. 4-1 Red River Boy. 9-2 King 

- - -- ,| tfunj-s 


2 0 BLANDELL BEAUTY M Bolton 6-11 

9 _ . 3 CLEAR HER STAGE J SuttMta 8-11 


HMcGMn7 
M MBs 14 


7.35 JOHN ROGERSON HANDICAP (£3,707: 5f) (8) 

1 0040 AMIGO LOCO (B) (0-01 K Efrassey 5-104) S Whitworth 2 

2 0000 FAYRtlZ (B) (C-D) W O'Gorman 3-9-10 M L7horaw6 

4 4041 AL AHEAD (0) C Banstead 6-3-4. _ BRousaS 

5 600 GREEN DOLLAR TO BGubOy 3-9-2 WNewnes7 

6 -040 DUCK FUGKT (CTO J Dougta&Home 4-8-fl S Cauthen 8 

7 1300 SBILA RIDGE (DHBF) A Hide 4^-fi Pat Eddeiy 4 

B 1000 DOWNSVIEW (CVD] A Move 4-8-4 A McQonr 3 

9 0410 MUSIC MACHME (D) PHaslam 5-7-10 TWMamsI 

3-1 smda Rtdge. 7-2 Af Amead. 5-1 Music Machine. 11-2 
Amigo LOCO. 8-1 Fayruz, 10-1 Duck F&gW, Green Dollar, 12-1 
Down smew 

845 UTHO-TECH MIDSUMMER HANDICAP (3-Y-O: 
£1.979: 1m 2f) (15) 


GHANAYNIUSAIH Thomson Jones 8-11. A Murray 5 
GRANNY BIMPS (USA) R Shealher 8-11 — RGuestf 
KWSHAM DENE JDougias-Home 611 WNnmesIS 

MARIE BABY CVMdman 611 PartEdd«y3 

MEXICAN HOfffiY (USA) H Cecil 611 — SCartheaB 

0 MOUNT VENUS G BnW«g 611 RWMverlO 

0 OUT ON A FLYER D Elswonh 61 1 A McGtana 9 

RAHWAH C Bonstead 611 B Rouse 12 

0 SHOOT THE MOON P Mtehefl 611 — G Cartar (3) 2 

0 STAMSBY GKtL H Voorepuy 611 SWWwanhB 

TAMASSOS G Harwood 3-11 PtfEdderyll 

00 WHffSZOOMW WHO G Lewis 611 P Waldron 1 
9-4 Mexican Honey. 62 Tamasdsos. 4-1 dear Har Stage. 
61 Ghanaynn. 61 Rahwah. 161 Kmsham Done. 12-1 Out On A 
Byer, 14-T others. 

6.40 SIREN SELLING STAKES (2-Y-O: £986: 6f) 
(15) 


16 

17 

21 

28 

30 

33 

3S 

38 

41 

45 

47 

52 


S Whitworth 5 
Pat Eddery ID 
P Wakfcgo 3 
8 Cauthen 7 
G Carter (3) 11 
R among 
AMcGioneA 
R Quest 1 
W Carson 15 
MMghsmS 
L Jonas (S) 13 
_ . B Rouse 9 

20 0000 GREGORIAN CHANf P Welwyn 68 Paul Eddery 14 

21 04)0 RIVER GAMBLER TO J SutcMte 68 M Ms 2 

22 0000 FORWARD MOVED A Wilson 67 John Vftfcnra 6 
11-8 Tralawney, 4-1 Latnata. 11-2 Kmg'5 Crusade. 61 

God's Path. Stdkxi, 161 Cosmic Fight, 12-1 others 


2 -004 LE MOUUN K Brassey 67 

3 006 TARLETDN'5 OAK G Harwood 65 

. 5 4042 KING S CRUSADE (BF)Q Lewis 64 

7 034 LAJMATA R Johnson Houghton 62 

8 0100 STHJLOU (D) P MitcheS 61 

9 0112 THELAWNEW Hodges 9-1 

10 0000 GOITS PATH D BswwW 60 

11 0000 FINAL ALMA L Cuman 60 

14 060 COOL NUMBER J Dunlop 611 

15 4000 COSMIC FUGHTM Usher 611 

18 006 COME TO THE BAU. R Hannon 611 

19 0120 MATELOT ROYALEJCI A Dawson 610 
I CHANT Pi 


3 00 AKROTRU BAYL Hod 611 

5 0 CALYPSO KOPBurgoyna 611 

7 0 HEY-AMADEUS P MncneB 611 

8 000 JABE MAC L HoO 611 — R Wm«t9 

9 020 JETMORE TO R Hannon 611 PatEdds«y2 

10 LANTERN TOY B Wise 611 .. — B Roma 14 

12 00 RAJIVS DEBT JScncfdfe 611 M HHslO 

15 4230 AR0NACR08B J Douglas-Home 8-8 S Cauthen 4 

17 000 GONE FOR IT R Howe 68 P D'Arcy 13 

18 Grenville LASS M Madgwck 68 RGuestS 

19 0 KBARA PHaslam 68 7 WfrsmsJ 


P Waldron 7 
IWugtanB 
. KBrtwS 


835 SUNSET MAIDEN STAKES (3-Y-G £959: 2m) 

( 8 ) 

3 060 FARAWAY LAD D Ringer 60 H Wigham 1 

4 0004 LUCKY LAD W Brooks 60. S Cauthen 5 

5 400 MAR1CAMACHorgan60 Paul Eddeiy 3 

6 OUR GENERATION Pat Mirchefl M MMrter2 

7 222 RUSSIAN LOGIC (USAHBF)G Harwood 60 

Pat Eddeiy G 

10 -200 FLAMING DANCER J Winter 611 W Canon 4 

12 0000 MAANOL VENTURE R Akefiurst 611 B Rouse 8 

13 TELL 'EM NOWT R Voorspuy 611 SWWiwortti7 

1-2 Russian Logic. 11-2 Flaming Dancer 61 Maricama. 16 

1 Faraway Lad. 12-7 LucAy Led. 20-1 otters 


WARWICK 


Going: good to firm 

Draw: low numbers best iri to 1m 

6.20 GARRICK MAIDEN FILLIES STAKES (2-Y-O: 
£846: 51) (14 runners) 


2 0040 ARMORAD PHaslam 4-63 


G French 2 

3 00-0 ClARAXy^^g^-* 0 " 65 _ D WHtams (7) 15 


4 4000 GRAND CELEBRAT 


40 HOLD ON PLEASE (USA) (BFl I Bakftig 611 AOwfef 
HOLTS WAY DHeydn Jones 611 DWnasms(7J8 
00 MDIAN SET G Lewis 611 - GSaxtnn12 

mmc M Jarvis 611 W Woods (3) 2 

ITS BEEN RUMOURED R Simpson 611 : -_~r 3 

JOVFU. MISTRESS P COW 611 KPowdraDfriJ 
LADY WESTOWN R Htfder 611 tJotesooll 

LITTLE BOLDER A Stewart 61 1 _ M6mner9 
0 M&fTDRESS D Money 611 - OBwctarS 

4 QRDMA (FR) LMhm 611 R Cochrens 13 

PARADISE COFFEE 0 D^|eb 611 - — ■ 

32 THAT CERTAIN SMILE (BR R J Wfliams 8-11. — 14 
0 TRY DANCER J Winter 611 — 

320 ULTRA NOVA P Cole 611 - TQtannl 

n-4 That Ceram S^. 61 Otdjna. 61 Ui^ nwb, 
61 Hold On please. 7-1 Paradise Coffee. 161 Lntte Bolder. 
14-1 Try Dancer 161 others 


6 

7 

9 

10 
11 
12 
13 
15 
21 
22 
23 
28 

29 

30 


1(B) (USA) R Simpson 4-63 

5 600 QULPHAfl C Bnttam 4-63 G Baxter 1 

6 0000 MASTER FRANCIS M Buns Hard 4-63 R Cochrane 12 

9 0-00 THATCHIT B fteece 4-63 „ W Wharton 10 

10 2232 TRACK MARSHALL J Davws 44-3 , 

12 0032 ANGIES VIDEO R Holder 4-60 A Proud 5 

14 1000 SOHO SUE D Anefl 3-8-6. GDu«eld3 

19 -000 SPLENDID MAGNOLIA S Dow 3-66. _ PSm»(7}6 
Cl 0000 THE MOON AAB) BACK M FetnersaxvGodtev 3-84 

LRigffO(7)11 

22 006 CLAP YOUR HANDS F Y«*y 3-63 I Johnson 13 
24 640 GO FLAMINGO A James 663 — 9 

27 006 LOW RATION K Bddgwatar 663 — 4 

114 Kavaha. 4-1 Track MarshaB. 61 Armored. 7-1 Master 
Francs, 61 Grand Celebration. 161 Gulphar Angies Video. 
14-1 The Moon And Back. 161 others 


7.50 STRATFORD UPON AVON FESTIVAL 
NURSERY HANDICAP (2-Y-O: £3,042; 51) (7) 


6 4331 DUTCH COURAGE (D) 0 Wwtey 613 
. — 1 H 0 ^ 


Warwick selections 

By Mandarin 

6.20 Ultra Nova- 6.50 Millracer. 7.20 Angies 
Video. 7.50 Lucralif. 8.20 Debco. 8.50 Fleet Bay. 

By Our Newmarket Correspondent 
6.20 Thai Certain Smile. 6.50 Millracer. 7.20 
Gulphar. 7.50 Dutch Courage. 8.50 Seven 
Swallows. 


7 301 MICRO LOVE TO HO Ned 67 
9 1 LUCRAT6 (FR) (D) I Saujng 68 

11 010 OUnE SO TOW Jarvis 64 

14 4004 BAY YOU WILL P Mahtn 613 

15 4211 FIVE SIXES TO N Tmkler 68 
17 010 MISS MARJORIE (C-D) J HoH 61 

11-8 LucraOI. 62 Five Sixes, 62 Micro Lcwe. 11-2 Dutch 
Course. 12-1 Quits So. 161 Say You Wtf, Mss Marjone 


C Rutter (5)1 
I Johnson 2 
P Cook 7 
R Cochrane 5 
T Oum 6 
J Lowe 3 
LRiggio(7}4 


8.20 SWAN MAIDEN STAKES (3-Y-O: £706: 1m 6f 
150yd) (5) 


6.50 ENTERTAINERS HANDICAP (3-Y-O: £2,624: 
1m) (11) 

5 1100 pROHSTTEn (CD) P CoW 67 T Qrtnn 3 

7 -030 HALO HATCH tB Fj.K BrMSCy 64 . AOtek l l 

S 0000 UTTLE PIPERS JWmwr 63 AKtabady2 

10 -302 KALANDAHIYA R Johnson Hougnton frw RC#ctow#4 

11 2400 STRIVE M B a n sna r d 612 — G Baxter 1 

15 314 ADAAKTOWNTOU Prescott 69 GDutfirtdS 

16 HI |«U^aER(USA)MJ«w6a W Woods (3) 8 

17 0004 atPREUE KINGDOM R HoHnstwid 67 S Porta 6 

20 0000 SONG AITDANCE MAN M McCOurt 84 — M 

™ MOO NEHRYMOLB M McCourt 7-11 —7 

22 -030 HAYWAIN B His 7-10 R Street 8 

15-8 Mikacer 9-2 Kaiandartya. 11-2 Adantsoam, 
61 Supreme Kingdom. 161 Halo Hatch. 161 Strive. 
Prtavbfted. 14-1 Marrymolas. Haywam. 161 otters 

7.20 WATERSIDE SELLING STAKES (£879; 1m 2f 
170yd) (15) 

t 0001 KAVAKA R Hannon 4-94 JJankiH? 


1 U DEBCO (USA) J Durtop 60 TOrtmA 

8 0041 CUPBS BOWER A James 611 — 2 

11 0 FRANCHKE R Jonnson Houghton 611 D Price 3 

13 602 NEWOUAY (Bn G Harwood 611 A dark 1 

14 040 PLUM BOSSY (B) M Usher 611 C Rutter (5) 5 

4-6 Debco. 64 Newquay 7-1 Franchise. 161 Cupids 

Bower Ptan Bossy 

8250 MARY ARDEN HANDICAP (£1,427 1m 2f 
170yd) (14) 

1 3011 8LENDBU CHOICE K Brassey 4-161 (Sex) 

C Rutter (5) 14 

3 0140 RAPID lADJSpeanrw 6610 PCookl 

G 1000 SEVEN SWALLOWS H CcAngndge 5-64 MRknmar2 
8 0030 DANCING BARRON TO MBNnshard 662 G Baxter fi 


to 0000 KUWATT MOON J Francome 4-60 
13 006 JUST HCTBHft 6610 
IS -000 CLtPSALLTO JScaian4-6Q 
IS -200 PEARL PET P M*ui 4-68. 

17 000 BELSANGB-R HoHnrtie8d467 

21 -000 RICHARDS FOLLY P Bariey 6MJ 

22 0-01 PLOT BAY THaKatt 67-13 

23 -000 R HON COURT D 
21 00-0 CRISP AND KEH4 K 


R Cochrane 4 

QDuffiaUS 
R Mona (5) 10 
T Quinn 13 
R Adorn* (7)8 

»-S- ,1d ™TlS, , I 


26 m HAVEN’S PRIDE (USA) M Castefi 7-7-8 P Barnard {?) 11 
64 Fleet Bay. 7-2 Bendare Choice. 61 Danong Barron. 
7-1 Juu Met 61 Rapid Lad. 161 Seven Swalkws. Pearl P« 
12-1 Crisp And Keen. U-i omere ^ 








or vi\ & 


1 riil x JuAriiiO UiM/n i JUi<i AV a >«>U 


RACING: ASCOT SHOWDOWN EXPECTED TO REKINDLE MEMORIES OF EPIC 1 975 KING GEORGE BA T TLE BETWEEN GRUNDY AND BUSTtN O . , 

Ivestonde 


Dancing Brave’s ability 
to accelerate should 


prove the crucial factor 


By Mandarin (Michael Phillips) 


While il may be a trifle 
unfair la those other good 
horses who have contested the 
race since 1975, the fact 
remains that this year's King 
George VI and Queen Eliza- 
beth Diamond Stakes is being 
hailed as the most exciting on 
the course since Grundy just 
touched of Bustino on the 
corresponding occasion 1 1 
years ago. 

The reason for all the 
hubbub is the rematch be- 
tween Shahrastani and Danc- 
ing Brave, who have not met 
since their controversial race 
in the Derby seven weeks ago. 
In the meantime they have 
gone their different ways: 
Shahrastani to the Curragh to 
capture the Irish Derby: Danc- 
ing Brave to Sandown where 
he won the Eclipse Slakes. 

If my memory serves me 
right the 1975 epic was a case 
of the quickener (Grundyljust 
managing to wear down the 
galloper (Bustino). Now, in 
taking Dancing Brave to get 
his revenge on Shahrastani, I 
am again looking to the horse 
with proven powers of accel- 
eration being able to wear 
down the relentless galloper. 

Having ridden Bonhomie 
into second place behind 
Shahrastani in Ireland, Pat 
Eddery is only too well aware 
of the enormity of the task that 
faces him this afternoon as he 
steps into the hot seat on 
Dancing Brave in place of the 
injured Greville Starkey. 

But deep down 1 sense that 
he thinks that he can pull it 
off. Eddery points quite right- 
ly to the col ossal amount of 
ground that Dancing Brave 
made up in the straight at 


Epsom to finish just half a 
length behind Shahrastani He 
will also be at pains not to give 
his principal rival such a start 
today in what is bound to be a 
fast run race on a track which 
has a notoriously short 
straight 

What I like about Dancing 
Brave is the fact that he has 
beaten top class older horses. 
To do it by four lengths when, 
to quote his trainer, Guy 
Harwood, “We only just man- 
aged to get him there because 
he had to have a rest after his 
Epsom ordeal” was a perfor- 
mance of real merit in my 
book. Now the word from 
Pulborough is that Dancing 
Brave is better than he was ozt 
Eclipse day. 

If that turns out to be the 
case he will be a very tough 
nut to crack indeed and he is 
my nap. even though 
Shahrastani is one of his 
opponents again. 

The presence of pacemakers 
brings memories of 1975 
flooding back. On that occa- 
sion Dick Hern fielded High- 
est and Kinglet to blaze the 
way for Bustino in the hope 
that they would find a chink in 
Grundy's stamina. They did 
not And I believe that the 
same ploy will fail again today 
when Boldden and Vouchsafe 
are there solely to do all the 
donkey work for Petoski, the 
winner of the race 12 months 


ago. 

. Also in 1 975 it was the lot of 
the crack French filly. Dahlia, 
to follow Grundy and Bustino 
home in third place. Now that 
prize may well be the best that 
the connections of Triptych 


four lengths by Dancing Brave 
in the Eclipse. 

Earlier in the season Trip- 
tych finished three lengths 
ahead of Petoski and Shardari 
in the Coronation Cup. While 
Fm sure that those two four- 
year-old colts are better than 
that, the overall pattern of 
form suggests that they have it 
all to do this afternoon against 
their two talented younger 
rivals. 

Princess Anne has a good 
chance of riding her first 
winner on Cresta Auction in 
the Orloff Diamond Stakes. 
Yet I still prefer Mawsuff, 
whose rider. Franca Vittadinl 
has won this race four times. 
Her experience could be deci- 
sive in a fast-run race. 

Gentle Persuasion and 
Mountain Memory, both un- 
beaten. can be expected to go 
well in the Princess Margaret 
Stakes without being quite 
good enough to give weight to 
Hiaam, who ran so promising- 
ly at Newmarket first time 
when she was beaten a length 
by Canadian Mill. Significant- 
ly, the latter has not been 
asked to reoppose 51b worse 
terms. 

The EBF Granville Slakes 
has long been a favourite 
target of Peter Walwyn who 
has won it for the past two 
seasons and can complete a 
treble today with Failiq. 

At Ayr. there is a good 
chance that Lord Derby's 
famous colours will be carried 
successfully three times: ini- 
tially by High Tension (3.0); 
then again by Teleprompter in 
the Land of Burns Stakes and 
finally by his younger half 


can hope for. She was beaten _ sister, Table-Turn tng (5.10). 

Finally, following that com- 


BIG RACE FIELD 


3.20 KING GEORGE VI AND QUEEN ELIZABETH 
DIAMOND STAKES (Group I: £152,468: 1m 4f) (9 
runners) 


301 


210-000 BOLDDEN (b c Bold Lad - Golden Keep) (Dowager Lady 
Beaverbrook) W Hem 4-9-7 P Cook 5 


302 


303 


(beaver brown, maplgleaf green cross beds, redcap) 

112-113 DIHISTAN (BF) (C) (b c Tyrnavos - Damosa) <H H Aga 

Khan) M Stoule 4-9-7 - A Kimberley 7 

(green. ndsash) 


304 


2011-33 PETOSKI (BF) (CD) (b c Niniskf - Sushila) l 

Beaverbrook) W Hem 4-9-7 - Wi 

(beaver brown. maple leaf green cross belts and cap) 

11-241 SHARDARI (CD) (be Top vale -Sharmada)(HH Aga Khan) 
M Stoute 4-9-7 S Cauthen 8 


Today’s course 
specialists 


305 


I green, and chocolate hoops, chocolate cap) 

0-11330 SUPREME LEADER (be Bustino- Princess Zena)(CaptM 
Lemos) C Bnttain 4-9-7 A Murray 2 


306 


(royal blue, white hoop, sloped cap) 

0-041 Do VOUCHSAFE (b c Bustino - Gracious Consent) (Dowager 
Lady Beaverbrook) W Hem 4-9-7 B Procter 4 


307 


(beaver brown, maple leaf green cross beds, vrhitBcap) 

03-4212 TRIPTYCH (b f FUverman - Trillion) (A Ctore) P L Biancone 
(fir) 4-9-4... Y Saint-Martin 9 


308 


309 


(tight blue. Uua and mauve halved stones) 

11-1121 DANCING BRAVE (b c Lyphard - Navajo Princess) (K 

Abdufla) G Harwood 3-8-8 Pat Eddery 1 

(green with pink sash and cap. white steams) 

2-1111 SHAHRASTANI (ch c Nijinsky - Shademah) (H H Aga Khan) 
M Stoute 3-8-8 W R Swinbum 3 


(green, red epaulets) 

5-4 Shahrastani, Dancing Brave, 13-2 Shardari, 14-1 Petoski, 20-1 
Triptych, 50-1 Dihistan, 66-1 Supreme Leader, 500-1 Boldden, Vouchsafe. 

FORM: DIHISTAN (9-13) 31 3rd to Dutaan (9-5) at The Curragh. previously 
(8-9) beat St HSarion (9-0) %l at Royal Ascot (1m 4f, £371 19, firm, June 20. 
10 rani. SHARDARI (9-0) 31 winner at Newmarket from Baby Turk 
PETOSKI (9-5) 1541 away 3rd and hi 


ASCOT 

TRAINERS: G Harwood. 37 winners from 
155 runners. 2&9%; J Tree. 15 tram 71, 
21.1%: J Sutcliffe, 5 from 26 at 19.2%. 
JOCKEYS: W Carson. 41 winners tram 
253 rides. 162%; Pat Eddery. 40 from 
251, 15.9%; A Murray, 8 tram 63. 12.7%. 

AYR ‘ 

TRAINERS: Q Prttehard-Gordon. 14 wjn- 
im from 46 namers, 304%; M Stoute, 6 
from 26. 23.1%; M H Easterly. 17 from 
103.165%. 

JOCKEYS: T Ives. 23 vrivwrs from 113 
rides. 20.4%; DNtchoflS. 20 from 131, 153 
%; N Cormonon, 14 from 104, 135 %. 

NEWCASTLE ' 

TRAINERS: J Dunlop, 12 wtonere Own St 
dinners. 38.7%; G Prttchartf-Gonkm. 10 
tram 48. 205 %; B HHs. 9 from SO, 180%. 
JOCKEYS: M Birch. 27 winners tram ISC 
rides, 13.8%: J Lowe, 21 from 216. 9.7%; 
L Chamock. 12 from 138. 8.7%; 

WARWICK 

TRAINERS: G Pntctard-Gordon, 8 win- 
ners from 32 runners. 185%; S Norton. 7 
from 41, 17.1%; B Hffla. 14 from 94, 14S 
%. 

JOCKEYSGDuffieid.11 winners from 81 
rides, 135 %; P Cook, 12 from 86, 145%; 
G Baxter, 10 from 81. 125%. 


his pacemaker 


1 July 8, 6 ran)_ Last season 


fa- 


unplaced (1m 4f, £28221 , good, July 8 

1 D} _ be ^_ Fr ” Gu0St O' 3 ) IS at Newbury (1m 4f, good). PETOSKI (8-8) won 

On So Sharp (8-5) on firm ground. 
ANCfNG BRAVE (9-0) W 


this race fast 
SHAHRASTAi 




a neck from 



G BRAVE (9-0) JSi in The 
eat Bonhomie 


DANCING BRAVE (8-8) beat TRIPTYCH (9-4) 

(1m 2f, £134,460. good, July 5, 8 ran). THI 
beaten Altheus (8-1 1) a short head at Longchamp, Baby Turk (8-i 3) 
head back 3rd (lm4f, good to firmLEarfier TRIPTYCH (8-11) short hi 
— - tepbe (9-0), PETOSKI (9-0) 31 away 3rd and SHA 


rastani (9-0) beat I 

id, June 28, 17 ran), and 
The Eclipse at Sandown 
IPTYCH (8-8) had previously 
“ - Turk (8-1 3) a short 
1 1 ) short head Ep- 


UNGFIELD PARK 

TRAINERS: H Cecft, 19 winners tram 38 
runners. 50.0%; G Harwood. 37 from 154. 
24.0%; J SuKSfte. 14 tram 85, 165%. 
JOCKEYS: PM Eddery. 23 winners from. 
115 ndes, 205%: S Cauthen. 23 from 121. 
19.0%: W Carson. 35 from 189, 1 85%. 


Blinkered first time 


som 2nd to Saint Estepbe (9-0), PETOSKI (9-0) 31 away 3rd and SHARDARI 
(9-0) /jI back in 4ft (im 4f, £49086, good, June 5, 10 ran). 


Selection: SHARDARI 


AYR: 250 Mavwfiyn Gate. 35 MKaxens. 
4.40 Gold Justice. 5.10 Table Turning. 
NEWCASTLE: 3.15 CoccoiiAo, Hawaidea, 
3.45 Danum Dancer. 

LINGFIBJh 85 River Gambler. __ 
WARWICK: 720 Grand Celebration. 820 
Plum Bossy. 


Q 


COMMONWEALTH GAMES 


o 


WE'LL TIME 


THE 10,OOOm 


TO ONE 
HUNDREDTH 


OF A 



OR THIS MUCH OF A FOOT. 


Q 


OMEGA 


6 


OFFICIAL TIMEKEEPERS OF THE 
COMMONWEALTH GAMES. 


N 


9 8 


6 



as first 



Balding 


Eiiis?; 


Ian Balding confirmed yes- 
terday that Tony Ives wi# ride : 
as first jockey to the Kingsetere 
stable next season. The 
announcement followed ,.tves*s 
statement on Thursday that -he 
would be moving on from Bill 
O'Gorman's Newmarket yard. 

He concluded negotiations 
with Balding yesterday Mow., 
ing the trainer's return from the 
Keendand sales 'and the move 


to 


ad) 

disa 


York 


3* 


r'.n: 


predicted switch to' ride; 
Khated Abdulla themore likely. 


Eddery had .frequently ridden 
for Balding : 


; this season but ives 
took over at the Newmarkei 




Head-on confrontation: Dancing Brave (Jeft) and Shahrastani, whose second meeting conM draw a record crowd to Ascot 


The m akin gs of a perfect 



mendable performance at 
York, Rotherfield Greys 
should be all the rage to win 
the Greenall’s Brewery Handi- 
cap at Newcastle where Mail'd 
can surprise her owner’s other 
runner, Wabarah, in the 
Norham Stakes. 


By Michael Seely 

This afternoon's dash be- 
tween Shahrastani and Danc- 
ing Brave at Ascot irresistibly 
recalls those battles between 
Sebastian Coe and Steve Ovett 
in the early part of die decade. 
Shahrastani, the proven stayer 
win, like Coe, be forcing the 
pace some way from home to 
attempt to sap the energy from 
Dancing Brave, who, like 
Ovett, possesses a formidable 
burst of finishing speed. 

Just as between the ti nman 
athletes, tactics may prove to 
be the decisive factor in what 
has widely been billed the race 
of the century. At the Moscow 
Olympics in 1980, for exam- 
ple, Coe tried to lead from 
start to tape in the 800 metres 
but burst himself in the pro- 
cess allowing Ovett to sprint to 
victory. 

Then, a few days later in the 
1500 metres, the tables were 
turned when Coe showed more 
discretion by piling on the 
pressure later in the race with 
the result that be was able to 
fight off the late attack of 
Ovett, who finished third. 

In dlls afternoon's drama 
die brain work will have to be 
supplied by toe jockeys, Wal- 
ter S win burn and Pat Eddery. 
And the strength of the gallop 
set by the riders on the three 
pacemakers — Dihistan, 
Boldden and Vouchsafe — wifi 
also play an important part 

The two superstars present 
a striking contrast in appear- 
ance. The chestnnt 
Shahrastani is toe lengthier 
individual, being the epitome 
of the high-class middle dis- 
tance animal. The dark brown 
Dancing Brave looks burlier 
and more robust and is built 
like a typical miler. 


Shahrastani is extremely 
relaxed, thereby allowing his 
jockey to lie dose to the pace 
without releasing too much 
adrenalin too early. Dancing 
Brave, however, is like a coQed 
spring and Eddery wfi] be 
forced to wait as tong as 
possible before pressing the 
button which will produce 
those explosive powers of 
acceleration. 

The best method of pin- 
pointing the issues involved is 
to study toe sectional timing 
recorded by the two principals 
in key races. This difficult 
work has been carried out by 
Michael Tanner, a schoolmas- 
ter from Sleaford in 
Lincolnshire. 

In toe Epsom Doty, for 
example, Shahrastani covered 
the Last quarter in 2356 
seconds with for long tones of 
1156 and 12.0 respectively. 
Dancing Brave's eye-catching 
late run ora- the same section 
was recorded in 2220 seconds 
with a phenomenal penulti- 


mate furlong of 10 JO seconds 
slowing down to one of 1 1 - 80 . 

“Dancing Brave's penulti- 
mate 220 yards was extraordi- 
narily quick for a middle 
distance horse and, according 
to my figures, has only been 
approached by Sir Ivor's last- 
furlong sprint a i 1058 seconds 
in the 1968 Derby Tanner 
says. These figures represent 
speeds of 43.40 and 42.1 3mph 
respectively compared with 
the 37m ph that is normally 
recorded by the leaders at toe 
viral stage of an average truly- 
run high-dass contest 

Tanner then explained his 
theory. ‘‘Contrary to what 
most people think, the average 
tone per quarter in the Derby 
was not all that slow in this 
year's Derby. And to my mind 
the most significant feet is that 
Dancing Brave was slowing 
down so mnch in the last 
furlong, even though he was 
<rffli travelling faster than 
Shahrastani. ” 


How the principals shape up 

DANCING BRAVE SHAHRASTANI 


Haight: 16 hands (64 ins). 

Weight T, 075<b. 

Data of hMe May 11, 1983. 
Jockey: Pat Eddery. 

TMnac Guy Harwood. 

Ownec Khalad Abdulla. 

Colours: Green, pink sash and cap. 
white sleeves. 

Breeder: Sen Oak Farm, US. 
B reed i ng: Lyphard - Navajo 
Princess. 

Prize money won: £354,254. 
Recent form: July 5, Sandown Park. 
Coral Eclipse Stakes (Group I). let 
June 4, Epsom, Ever Ready Derby 
Stakes (Group Q. 2nd. 

May 3. Newmarket General Ac- 
cident 2,000 Guineas (Group I). 1st. 
April 1?, Newmarket diaries 
Hadesiecfc Champagne Craven 
Stakes (Group III), let 


Height 15 hands 2X ins (62% ins). 
Weight 1,050ft. 

Date of birth: March 27,1983. 
Jockey: Walter Swinbum. 

Trainer: Michael Stouta. 

Owuen The Aga Khan. 

Colours; Green, red epaulets. 
Breeder: The Aga Khan, US. 
Breeding: Nipnsky — Shademah. 
Prize money won: £641,179. 
Recent form June 28. Curragh, 
Budweiser Irish Derby Stakes 
(Group I). 1st 

June 4, Epsom, Ever Ready Derby 
Stakes (Group i). 1st 
May 14, York, Mecca-Danta Stakes 
(Group IQ. 1st 

Apr3, Sandown Park, Guardian 
Classic ' " 


: Trial (Grouplll)--1st ; 
(Compiled by Paul Wheeler) 


“The whole case history of 
Shahrastani shows him . to be 
an ideal middle distance type, 
capable of running three quar- 
ters consecutively at a strong 
gallop. The Mecca-Dante was 
s^nificaM is that respect as, 
after decreasing the gaOop in 
the penultimate furlong to a 
time of 12.44 seconds, be 
raised the tempo in the final 
tme to 12JS. This showed his 
courage and the fact that he 
found extra pace. 

“The pattern of most races 
is that the vital action takes 
place m the third quarter from 
home. In the Irish Derby, 
when Bonhomie was kicking 
for home, chased by- 
Shahrasteni, they did a fast. 
21.98 slowing down in a final! 
two quarters of 2&22 seconds 
and 2759 seconds. The winner 
was practically walking in a 
last furlong of 14^8 seconds. 

“The problem for Dancing 
Brave is that, althongh he is 
dearly the fastest horse in the 
race, the fact that he covered 
the last quarter of a mile in the 
2,000 Gmneas at a speed of 
4l50mph is further proof that 
be wifi have to keep in touch 
with the leaders in what insure 
to be a «pnrchii»8 gallop- . . 

“Eddery wfiTaLso have to 
time his effort to toe split 
second as toe horse's burst of 
speed only appeared to be aNe 
to be maintained for just over a 
furlong. So, unless Swinbum 
loses his head, which is most 
unlikely, and does aCoe in the 
Moscow 800, I think 
Shahrastani wonld beat Danc- 
ing Brave in the King George 
rone times but of 10.” 

- For. my money I. find.it 
difficult to disagree with. the. 
findings of the Iiifcfrteriure 
sage~ -V-.V ‘ . 1: ■ 


July meeting, where 
partnered ' die. prom fat 
veniles. Chasing Me 
and Forest Flower, to ykiory. 

The new combination were 
quickly in action ai. Ascot 
yesterday when Ives- partnered 
Musical Review for Balding in 
the Vngjnia Water Maiden: 
Siafces blit- the combi nation 
could only finish fourth behind , 
the even-money favourije*: 
Gayane, ridded' by Steve 
Cauthen. . - 

The 'day's riding Honour, 
though, went unquestionably lb, 
Willie Carson, who had been 
grounded For the best part- of a 
week with a bad .back after beiug 
thrown in - the parade ring at • 
Newbury. Gason. looking has 
very strongest, proved bis fit-" 
ness to team up wiihPefOskMh 
today's big race by ridinga 
1000-1 treble on Sa t isfact ion . 
Cree Bay and Petrizzo. 


r. _»■ 




**?- 

* 

& ?*.:■ 




t 


fViCf 
•• *r L\*rfl 






■ ?n- 


y: 


Evening cards, page 27 
Results, page 29 . 




In the Cranbourne 
Maiden Stakes. Girsoa mskfe. 
his move on Satisfaction at 
same time as Cauthen’ din t 
odds-on favourites . Millf^s 
Dusl The two marched strides 




<zP 

• •: t:*r 






throt^i the Iasi 250 yardsVbut 
Satisracdc 




ion. just-gained the up- 
per hand to win by a head. ; 

The stewatds interviewed 
Carson and Hem's assistant, 
Alex Scott, about Satisfaction's 
improvement, compared with 
his ninth to Celestial Storm at 
Newmarket a fortnight ago. 
They were told that .the colt 
came to the front two furlongs 
out at Newmarket whereas be 
was held up here, and that he 
also' appreciated the easier 
ground.: They:' accepted the 
explanation.- ' 

- The Rous- Memorial Handi- 
cap could not have been run 
better for the -seventy ear-old. 
Cree Bay, who has to be covered 
up as long as possible: The. HM 
chance was trackmg-a wall- of 
horses for. Jive of the- six 
furlongs, then had to be 
switched — which maintained 


- ' 


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z.y~. 


s * 

r- 

r* 

i.-rv. a 






Hampshire 


8v PHV 


:-{■ 


•*c 

Z- t';-*; 




p. He 


his interest — .to. find a- 
burst between Gold 
.and the favourite. .Chummy's 
'Pet. well inside the final furlong 
to score by half a length, i 
Peirizzo rrturijed.io'bis bert 
form and gave Clive Brittain a 
welcome, winno’ when beating tZ , 
Newsells: Park, and Western ~ 
Dpifoer'in ZiUt. 'Brdwn.. -Jack' 
Stakes.' '. - -. •*. f. > 


u> t aut 

- m ■■ 

. : .-*■ tbr . 

• -"Us: ami'" 

I." ' 

.. - of 


ASCOT 


Televised: 2 JO, 2.35, 3^0 

Going: good 
Draw: no advantage 


2.0 ORLOFF DIAMOND STAKES (Ladies: £4285: 1m) (17 runners) 

— G 

Amanda Harwood 2 
_ Bains Brunson 8 


101 

102 

104 

105 

106 
108 

109 

110 
112 
113 


001041 AVEC COEUR (IlSAHD) (T Ramsden) A Bairn 4-10-3 

120004) BIG PAL (Mra G Hanraod) S Hanraod 11-183 

042030 DERBY DAY (NSpmadbury) DA WBgon 5-108 


04)0000 DERRYMNG 
204)010 ICT1YAR (DJI 
32204)0 NJHJMAM 
14)0020 MAHSHH 
220113 VAGUE IS 


13-1 


91 HARBC (C 
123 CRESTA AU 



114 

115 

116 
119 
121 
122 
123 


Pam Ritchh-HaMa7 
H Gavers) G PriteftanMSoroon 3-9-6 

Aaw PMSps (3) 17 

1124)4 EVPS ERROR (ShaKh Mofwmoatf) M Stauta 3^6 ttedna JuHar 15 


12-1003 HLLSBIDI 


0212 MAWS UFF (Hi 

M Ii 


04)000 mu miiiiijiiiM 
0004)00 SCUrntlATCfl (A Lyons)! 
223-020 DASA QUEEN (JUpKXriTl 
0-40004 DAVEMMA (Mra J Sawte) P 


Mohamned) B Mb 3-M Psmjr HKa 10 

H TTiomswi Jon«s 3-9-6 — Franca VHtadMIl 

A Hide 3-93 Soe Brawn (3)1 

C Booth 3-9-3 Mma Urqrtart 16 


Oafia Radband 4 
. Sank Kalaway 5 


4-1 Crntaa Auction. 9-2 Em's Error. 11-2 HOs Bid, 7-1 MawsufL 81 Vague 
Melody. 10-1 Davenana. 12-1 Iktiyar, Big PW. 14-1 Kufuma, Avec Caeur, 16-1 otfwrs. 


FORM: KUFUMA laatof 5 latest start, in 1985(9-9) 1 1/ 

i, 31 ran). VAGUE MELODY | 


martiet pm If). E37430. good to Ann, Oct 5, 

Try To Stop Me (8-1 1) at Newcastle (1m. £3837, Nrm, June 26. 8 rsnL 
(8-12) 2141 3rd to Then Again (8-8). winner last week, at Pontefract (1m 2f, £3078. good to 
soft. Way 23. 6 ran). EVPS ERROHja-12) 71 4tto# 5® Faraway Dancer (8-12) at Chester 
nm33 85yds, £16960. soft May MLLS BIO (8-5) Kl 3rd to Premised tsla (8-11) M 
Sandown (1m 2f, El 2447, good 10 firm, July 4. 11 ran). DQtRYRWG (7-11) was 4«l back 
at6tfi. MAWSUFF (91 (!) nfc 2nd Of 5 to In Fact (9-1 Q) at Brighton (6f, El 8 m), “ ‘ “ 

5 ran). 

Satertfoir KUFUMA 


.ftnaJu^.a 


Ascot selections 

By Mandarin 

2.0 Mawsuff. 255 Hiaam. 3.20 DANCING BRAVE (nap). 355 
Failiq. 4.25 Lastcomer. 455 Aventino. 

By Our Newmarket Correspondent 
2.0 Kufuma. 255 Hiaam. 350 Shahrastani. 355 All Smith. 455 ' 
Lastcomer. 455 Dorset Cottage. 

By Michael Seely 

2.0 Eve's Error. 3.20 SHAHRASTANI (nap). 4.25 Lastcomer. 


255 PRINCESS MARGARET STAKES (Group III: 2-Y-O fillies: 
£10,614: 6f) (6) 

202 1 GENTLE PERSUASION Rl) (The I 

203 1 MOUNTAIN MEMORY (C4» (Hesmond i 

205 433213 BLUE TANGO |D Garftekl) D Lalng M. _.. 

206 2 WAAM (USA) (Maktoum Al Maktoon) H Stoute 8-8 . 

208 4114 NATURALLY FRESH (BF) (G Swopstwe) J Winter 84L, 

209 202402 SURELY GREAT (J Livock) D Thom 8^. 


■ 8-13. PaulEdikryC 

W Canon 4 


ML Thomas 3 


2-1 Hteam. 4-1 NattiraRy Fresh, 9-2 Gentle Farsuasion, 6-1 Mountain Memory. 8-1 
Bfue Tango, 14-1 Surety Groat 

FORM: GENTLE PERSUASION (8-6) pushed out to beat BLUE TANGO (8-6) *1 at 
Newbury (6f, £7713, good, June l£ 6ranLMOUiaAMBteMORY(8-ll)rna(laaatiobeat 

Simple Taste (8-11) 41 in newcomers race here (6t. E7152. firm. June 21, 5 ran). BUIE 

TANm3(8-9) 7 1 3rd to Forest Rower (S-O) at Newmarket (K. Group a £25776, good. 
July 8. 10 ran). SURELY GREAT(8-9) was 3h) back si 7th. NATURALLY FRESH ((Rfl vm- 
abte to quicken when 4«f 4th to Forest Rower (5-6) here (5f. Group 4 £24322, firm. June 
18. 13 ran). 

SefedfOK NATURALLY FRESH 


3^0 KING GEORGE VI & QUEEN ELIZABETH DIAMOND STAKES 
(Group I: £152,468: 1m 4f) (9 runners). 

(SEE RUNNERS AND RIDERS ABOVE) 

355 EBF GRANVILLE MAIDEN STAKES (2-Y-O C & Gt £7,035: 61} (6) 


401 

402 

404 

405 
407 
409 


ALI SMITH (Mrs G Boss) R Boss 94), 


BtRWAZ (F Salman) P Cote SH) 

FAILIQ CT) (H AJ-Matewn) P Watwyn M 
KASTAMOUN (H H Are Khan) R Johnson I 


. Y Saint-Mania 6 
, NON-RUNNER 5 


NAHEEZ 


Khan) R Johnson Houghton 94). 
" OBswonh^O 


Pad Eddety 2 


S Cauthen 3 

. WRSehboml 
Pat Eddery 4 


(J Brody) G Harwood M. 

9-4 Zarbyev. 11-4 Kastamoun. 4-1 Faifiq, 6-1 Naheez. B-i Al Smith. 

425 SANDRINGHAM HANDICAP (£7,070; 1m 21) (6) 

503 34-2011 ROYAL HALO (USAXD) (Mrs DConpbefl)G Harwood 5-9-8 (4cn0 

PatEddayl 

0312-30 WNISfUIORE ISLAND A Fergusori) J Ourtop 3-9-7 WCanoaS 


504 

505 

506 
508 
511 


060000 MERLE 


S Cauthen 2 


C Rotter (5)5 


210-000 PATO (ft (Lord Matthews) l Matthews 4-9-4 

1-001 LASTCOMER (USA) (Sheikh Mohammed) M Stoute 3-9-1 _WRSwfabum4 
300042 snTMG BULL (ft (BH (SfrPOppsnheimnrtGWrBgg 4-8-9- Pad Eddery 3 


15-8 Lastcomer, 2-1 RoyM Halo, 7-2 Sitting BuD. 7-1 Ifihi Sh more Island, 14-1 Pato. 
20-1 Merle. 


455 CROCKER BULTEEL HANDICAP (£7,327: 1m) (13) 

602 2101-00 ADVANCE) 


6K 2101-00 ADVANCE (C-DXBF) (K Abdufa) J Tree 5^-7 

603 04)0010 POSTQRAGE (POintfy) MMctomadt Wi 

604 30-2000 DANOWi ZETA (B) (HI)(P1 (Rodvala Lh^ P Keteway 3-8-5 


. Pat Eddery 5 
R Wtmhamfi 


606 

607 

608 


6t0 

612 

613 

615 

616 
618 


134004) BARRACK STREET 
1-03201 DORSETCOTTAGEj 
000000 OUAUTAIfl FLYER] 
02^231 PROMISED iSLEtel 
31-0440 nmANHALiDllMnRl 
204)002 ROCKMARTIH (D) (Coi J| 
04)30(8 ACONTUM (OSHJ f 
111113 AVENTMOft)#! 
002142 SUPB1TWPpF)W 
0-30000 RfMuamRicianaic 



Ml 


444 (Se4 — SQuana (7) 11 

i 4-8-12 G Brawn 11 

Lady Hertas 58-10. A Miany 10 



(A Smith) JSutdWe 38-2(500 MHbl 

Maxwell M FetherttorhGofflsy 5-84). 


1 4-7-8.. 


C Rutter (5) 13 
ML Thomas 4 


11*4 Aventino. 4-1 Promised We, 98 Dorset Cottage, 6-1 Rockmartm, 7*1 
Acontum. 8-1 Advance, 10-1 Super Trip, 12-1 othere. 


Going: good to fiim 
Draw, low numbers best 


jo 0000 AfthOMMAMP (ft Mrs G Heveiay 64TO _ n ». 

It 0020 T0BBIM0RY BOY (ft(B^RWNtal«'9W 


13 2104 TANFBMffnT Grata 54H 
MumiraiiiraS 




2.30 P G TPS TEA CUP STAKES (Amateurs: 
£1,830: 1m 2ft (8 runners) 

5 304) NONSENSE (C-ft R WTkakar 5-10-12-. Sandy BnokO 


14 1123 
18 0044 FQOLSH TOUCH (ft 


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4.10 LAND OF BURNS STAKES (£8,605: 1m 2Qf5) 

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By Mandarin 

2.30 MisaafT. 3.0 High Tension. 3.30 Bpot Polish. 
4. 10 Teie prom pier. 4.40 Mughtanim. 5.10 Table- 
Turning. 

By Our Newmarket Correspondent 
230 MisaafT. 3.0 High Tension. 3 JO Matou. 4.10 
Samilti. 4.40 Mughtanim. 5.10 Fandango Kiss. 


8 4133 SANTUUM Stouts 37-12. 


484). 


WMJ. 


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C Dwyer 2 


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By Mandarin 

1.45 Ortiea. 2.15 Kind Lady. 2.45 Rotherfield 
Greys. 3 . 1 5 Coccoluto. 3.45 Mafd. 4. 1 5 AUaluxn. 

4.45 God's Law. 

By Our Newmarket Correspondent 

1.45 Parts Is Parts. 3.45 Wabarah. 4.15 Deserted. 


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4 1382 GODS LAW (BF) Mrs G 

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THE TIMES SATURDAY JULY 26 1986 


SPORT 


29 


CRICKET 


Ellison keeps 
steady nerve 
to disappoint 
Yorkshire 


By Richard Stocefan 


. 1 . '-C 

.hIS jfr 

- R *-den ^ 


**&Z S’ 

. Oi ni. 


SCARBOROUGH: Yorkshire 
(4fns) drew with Kent (6). 

* Kent loss six wickets in an' 
hour before their last pair. 
Ellison and lagtesden, sur- 
vived the final 10 overs to 
thwart Yorkshire. It was a 
dramatic finish to a match 
which seemed to have lost its 
competitive edge as Kent 
found a .target of 298 in 60 
overs too much for them. 

Yorkshire's inability to 
snatch the last wicket was a 
bitter disappointment for 
them after their seam bowlers 
had Kent reeling. Peter 
Hartley had a spel l of 3-4 in 14 
balls before Jarvis dismissed 
three taifendeis. 

Ellison, though, remained 
imperturbable through 26 
overs and Igglesden in only his 
fourth match was also im- 
mune to die pressure, as the 
Yorkshire fieldsmen crowded 
round, the bat. 

Nor was the failure to 
complete victory Yorkshire's 
only setback. Sharp joined 
Boycott and Sidebottom on 
their casualty list with broken 
bones when he was struck on 
the right foot by Alderman 
while' batting. Sharp’s big toe 
was fractured in two places. 

The light was poor but the 
pitch remained in good order 
as Kent began their run chase. 
Benson and Hinks provided a 
good start with 46 in 10 overs 
before they were out m 
successive overs. Tavare and 
Taylor looked to have rebuilt 
the innings when Tavart was 
leg before to Garrick. against a 
ball that kept low. 

Kent's hopes finally subsid- 


ed when Hartley bowled 
Aden. as the batsman made 
room, and two balls later 
Hartley caused Cowdrey to 
edge an outswinger and Car- 
rick held a fine right handed 
catch at slip. Hanley then had 
Taylor caught behind. 

Jarvis dismissed Marsh in 
the fourth over of the last 20 
and in the 10th took the 
wickets of Underwood and 
Alderman with successive 
balls. Nothing, however, 
could shift the 1 0th wicket 
pair. 

Yorkshire declared 20 min- 
utes after lunch after Robin- 
son. making his first 
championship appearance this 
year, missed a second hundred 
in th e match by nine runs. 

YORKSHIRE: Fi rs t In nlnus 341 for 7 floe (A 
A Metcalfe 123. P E Robfoon 1M net out) 
Second hongs 

A A Metcalfe c Marsh b Atowmsn 26 

K Sharp retired hurt.. 25 

SN Hartley notout 51 

PE Rotmsonc Taylor bAstatt Si 

J 0 Low not out t 

Extras (b 2. to 1. w3. ntofi )-— 12 
Total (2 wtaa Oec, 46 overs] — _ 206 
FALL OF WICKETS: 1 . 5 a 2-199. 
BOWLING: iggtesden 7-0-260; Alderman 

1 1- 2-39-1; Cowdrey 7-0-23-0; Underwood 

12- 2-600; ASM 9-1-56-1. 

KENT: First Innings 2S0 tor 2 dec (M R 
Benson 94. C J Tavare 62 not out) 

Second inmnaa 

M R Benson b Hartley 23 

S G Hinks c Macrfe o Dennis 17 

CJTavart tow b Carrick ..23 

WR Tavtor cBarstowb Hartley 34 

OGAsfattb Hanley - _ 26 

*CS Cowdrey eCvnckb Hartley 0 

RM Enisonnotout— 25 

tS A Marsh tow b Jarvis 4 

DL Underwood cBahmwbJarato -10 

T M AfoHrman Or* h Jarv K - n 

A P igglesden not out _________ 8 


r Tr..r^. £ 

v -: -WftS 

>••• 

“V . v W:!* d '*t 
- . ’ - * - ibriosli . 

r? Hampshire do it again 


Extras (b 2. to 16. nb 4}.. 
Total (9 wkts). 


- 22 
.192 


FALL OF WICKETS: 1-46. 2-48, 3-82, 4- 
123. 5-123. 6-142. 7-156. 8-166. 9-166. 
BOWLING: Jarvis 15-0-724: P J Hartley 
18-3^4: Dennis 84-23-1: Shaw 2-1-44 
Canick 16-11-20-1; lave 1-0-10-0. 
Uflipm: R Pabner and D 0 Ostoar. 


V" r ' x •U'i ittit 

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By Peter Mareoo 


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A fine innings of 144 not out 
by Gordon Greenidge- and an 
excellent performance on the 
part of Marshall. Tremleti and 
Connor, who together took nine 
wickets, enabled Hampshire to 
score their fifth success at 
Portsmouth, yesterday. A gal- 
lant effort by Derbyshire's bats- 
men failed five runs short of 
their target of 223. 

Hampshire had started out 
again at 34 for one. During the 
fust session 48 minutes had 
.been lost to rain and bad light, 
tytnd when an early lunch was 
taken Hampshire had got to- 87 
for one. a lead of 55. Greenidge' 
had moved to his half century 
by now. the seventh time he had 
hit 50 or more runs against 
Derbyshire at Portsmouth. 
Hampshire's second wicket pah- 
then cut loose to put on 197. of 
which Paries made 80 before 
Nicholas declared at 254 for 
two. 

Derbyshire now made an 
uncertain start, losing Maher at 
14. and Barnett at 21. but 
Morris and Hill began to make 
the right kind of noises in a 
stand of 80 for the third wicket, 
and after Morris had been taken 
for 78. Miller and Marples kept 
Derbyshire's pot on the boiL 

Sussex got home at Hove to 
win by five wickets against 


Worcestershire. Set to maice 29 1 
to win. Parker provided the 
right kind of encouragement in 
an innings of 97. and at the last 
Alan Wells made 42 not out, 
and Gould 35 not out in an 
unbroken stand of 77 for the 
fifth wicket. 

In the morning Worcester- 
shire had been 121 for two and 
leading by 198. when Hick, 46 
not out. and Smith. 14 not out 
walked out to take guard. Hick 
moved quickly to his half 
century, and quicker still in 
reaching a splendid hundred off 
another 29 balls, as Worcester- 
shire pished on by 92 runs from' 
21 overs before declaring at 213 
forfivt 

Alikhan and Green survived 
half a dozen overs before lunch, 
and although Green departed 
soon afterwards to a catch 
behind off Pridgeon's bowling, 
the seeds to a fruitful partner- 
ship between Alikhan and 
Parker were sown here. These 
two had batted well to put on 
100 for the second wicket when 
Alikhan fell to a catch by Neale, 
again off Pridgeon. Lenhara 
helped add another 55 runs, but 
it was at this point that Newport 
came to play a part by bringing 
down Parker, three runs short of 
a hundred. Lenham. and Colin 
Wells. 


H57 V; 


7 . ‘ : ***** 


M4-2SK STAKES^ 


Hants v Derbyshire Sussex v Worcs 


i> - ■ 


IF 

• . PW. 


AT PORTSMOUTH _ 

Han*ut*BPtptQI*atD*tyst*»(6)by 
5mns. 

HAMPSHHE: Fir* Mnn IMfM C J 
Mchotas 55; M A Hokfino 5 lor 88) 
Second tnn&igs 

CGGreandge notout M* 

V P Terry tow b Hokflng 2 

tfl J Partes c Bwneb b Maher 80 

T C Middtoton not out 8 


AT HOVE 

Susse* (20p& boat Wooxswnhire (T) tv 
5 ymcksfs. 

Dt ^ ^Second inntog. 

D B O-OKvBfca c Lanham b Scott 
T S Curtis b Lenham 


Extras (b 8. Ib 8. w 2. nb 2) 
Tottl (2 wkts dec) 


•- * f*. 




Maber6S;TM1taNnl8tt 51- 
Second hvakws 
*KJ Barnett tow b Marsh* - 

B J M Maher b Marshall 

A m c Parte b Tremlett 



. 20 

254 

FALL OF WICKETS: 1-32. 2229. 
BOWUNG: Hokfing 123-37- 1;Morta ns«i 
9-4-11-0; wamer^ 10-3-28-0: Monte 11-0- 
800; Maher 11-002-1. 

DERBYSMRE: (B J M 

16 

3 

24 

J E Morris e Tarry bCcwn or TO 

B Roberts cM™l«onbiMB^w4-~. 10 
I S Anderaon c Greenidge b Marshal -4 
G MBarc Pateb Connor ^ 

A E Warner nai out ” 

OHMorta n aannotoid 0 

Extras (b l.to 3. nb 6) _22 

Total 217 

fall of'wickeiS: i-14. 221 . 8 - 101 . 4 - 

1^5-UO^'tIBS, 5- 200, 9-210. 10- 
BOWUNGi MuttuM 

UME54-2: James 9-2-33-0; CL SmKb 4-0- 

20-0; Tremtett 11.1-0523. 

Umpirwe D J Constant and B J Mayer 


G A Hick c Parker b Lenham 
DM Smith c Scott bCMWrtN. 
PANeatebCMf ‘ 


tS J Rhodes not out . 
PJ Newport not out 


Extras (b l.to 4. nb 3) 
Total (SwMBdec) 


- 19 

- 36 
100 

- 21 
_ 4 
_ 19 
— 6 
_■ B 
, 213 


FALL OF WICKETS: 1-34.2-102.3-175.4- 
183.5-193. 

BOWLMG: le Roux 110-41-0; Scott 5-1- 
23-1: Lenham 16-1-84-2; C M Wete 1 4-1- 
56-2 Mays 7-3-220: Green 1-1-00. 
SUS8EX: First trmlncn 203 (R I AMdian 67, 
AMGrMn 60: R K Ttengworth 4 for 54) 
Second tmteigs 

R I AHtfian e Neale b Pi^won 56 

A M Green e Rhodes b Pridgeon ,9 

P w G Parker c Neate b Newport — 97 

N J Lenham b Newport 24 

CM WeftS b Newport 18 

A P Wetis not out « 

*ft J GouW not Old — 35 

actras (to 6, nb 5) n 


Total (5 wk 


292 


FALL OF WICKETS: 1-15.2-115,3-170, 4- 
206.5-215. _ 

Pn^eonlggggrln rtwe Hi 
14-4-320; Newpon 160-723: Wngworth 
29-2-1200: DTMtwlra 0.40-4-0 
Umpres: M J Kitchen and K J Lyons. 


Victory for 
Morris in 
first match 
as captain 

By Irtt Tennant 

LEICESTER : Glamorgan 
(1 7 pis) heat Leicestershire (4) by 
13 runs. 

Glamorgan have won a 
championship match, and whai 
is mote they have done so in 
Hugh Morris's first sub at the 
capuincy. He must thank his 


predecessor as much as anyone. 
On tong took four wickets, as did 
Thomas, victory being achieved 
with 13 balls and as many runs 
to spare. 

So it was a close run thing, too 
dose to suggest as yet that 
Morris has the Midas touch. 
When Bobu and Cobb were 
together, adding 143 in 38 overs, 
it seemed it would be Leicester- 
shire who would be improving 
their position at the opposite 
end of the table. 

Glamorgan had batted on for 
almost an hour in the morning. 
The contributions were of no 
great significance since Leicester 
were (Hearty bowling for the 
declaration. They were left to 
score 287 in a minimum of 79 
overs. 

Butcher and Baiderstone went 
cheaply, leg before to Thomas 
and Hickey respectively. The 
pitch still had some life in in for 
the quicker bowlers, as Base also 
showed when he had Potter, 
cutting a ball (hat lifted, caught 
at second slip. 

Cobb and Boon saw them all 
off. and Holmes, whose five 
overs went for 33. Boon still has 
plates in a leg from the car crash 
that kept him out of cricket last 
summer, but in no way does this 
affect his batting or his running. 
Theirs was a determined 
partnership. 

The picture changed when, in 
sucessive balls. Ontong bowled 
Boon and had Bowler caught at 
silly point. Boon had made 80. 
including 10 fours. Not long 
afterwards Cobb was taken at leg 
slip, having scored 77. 

Gift. Leicestershire’s acting 
captain, made a brave attempt — 
literally as well as metaphori- 
cally since he damaged a knee — 
to hold the innings together. He 
made 49 with the assistance of a 
runner before Thomas had him 
caught behind and went on to 
deal with the taiL 



Feeling the strain: Peter WiUey, of Fjigland, at Lord's 
yesterday (Photograph: Hugh Rontledge) Test report, p32 

Border’s defiance 

By Marcos Williams 


GLAMORGAN; First innings TBS (M P 
Maynard 5ft P A J Da Mm 4 tar 44) 


Second (ratings 
bOS., 


DSPBuHnecTaytorb 
■H Morris c sub b Potter — 
GCHoftnasc Gib Potter 
Yaunte Ahmed not out — 


M P Maynard b Da Fi 

R C Ontong c Batcher b Pott e r. 
J G Thomas not out 


33 
15 
.. 9 

48 

11 

4 


Extras (bl. nbQ- 


Total <5 wkts. dec) — : 150 

FALL OF WICKETS: 1-47. 203. 254. 4- 
81.5-112. 

BOWUNG: De Freitas 10-225-1: Taylor 
11-4-24-0; C«t 12224-1; Pottar 144-37- 
3: Bowler 7.4-0-380 
LBCESTBtSHSiE: First imkigs 47 tor t 
dec. 

Second mugs 

J c Baktatslone tow b Htckey >4 

1 P Butcher tow b Thomas 1 

— 77 

15 
BO 

.a 

49 

14 

4 
8 

5 


A A Cobb c Steele b Omong 
L Potter cSteetebBeee — 
TJ Boon b Ontong 


P Bowler cHokneebOrtOng — 
PB cat c Dawes b Thomas — 
P A J De Frahai tow b Thomas 
JPAgnewe Base b Ontong — 

P GO c Hickey b Thames 

L S Taylor not out 


- 18 

.272 

FALL OF WICKETS; 1-5. 25. 234. 4-177 
5-177. 6-204, 7-241 . 5-260, 9-280, 10-273 


Extra# (b 2. Ib7.w1.ib6). 
Total , 


BOWUNG: Thomas 2532324: Mckav 
OntongZ7-3324; Base 10-2 
221: Hoknea 50320; l 


122301;! 


I 27-288-4; Base 
L - -5 Steele 5*20- 
Umpires: B Laadbeaterand K E Palmer. 


THE OVAL Surrey (8pts) drew 
with Essex (5) 

A masterly 138 by Allan 
Border, the Australian captain, 
who has only four more 
championship matches 10 play 
for Essex, saved them from 
defeat by Surrey yesterday. 
Border's defiance lasted through 
62 oven and 258 minutes as 
Essex, 198 behind on the first 
innings, eventually reached 276 
for seven by the time Surrey 
called it a day with 10 overs 
remaining. 

Following the loss of two 
wickets for 41 and then a stout 
35 by the promising young 
opener. Stephenson. Essex ap- 
peared to have saved the match 
comfortably at tea, when they 
were 186 for three with Border 
and Hardie well set in a stand 
eventually worth 101: but then 
the menacing Gray, helped by 
two expert catches at first slip by 
Stewart, prised out Hardie and 
Bums to add spice. to the final 
session. 

Border, bristling defiance un- 
der his Essex cap and dealing 
severely with the loose ball in 
hininga total of 16 fours, had by 
then reached his third 
championship hundred of the 
season - he has also scored eight 
halfcenturies, so will be sorely 
missed if Essex are to mount a 
serious challenge for the title in 
the final month of the season 


after his departure to lead 
Australia in India. 

On a pitch that had become 
easy-paced, though offering a 
little movement to seam and 
spin to prompt watchfulness 
from the bastmen. Border of- 
fered Surrey no encouragement 
until an edged drive oft Gray 
flashed past Thomas's right at 
third slip. Border was then 1 1 1 
(the dreaded ‘Nelson*, although 
Australians worry more about 
87) and Essex were only 2 1 runs 
on with 25 overs to play. Almost 
immediately Thomas atoned 
with East’s wicket, thanks to 
another fine slip catch by Stew- 
art. and though Border even- 
tually played on. pulling at the 
persevering left-arm spinner. 
MedlycoiL Turner completed 
the rearguard action. 

ESSEX: Fx9 innings 250 (A R Border 52 
AH Grey 4 tor 50) 

Socono Imings 

J P Stophonson c Sww wtn Thomas 35 

C Godwin tow b Doughty _ _ — 5 

PJFnchvdcMBdiycoabGray 13 

A R Bondar bMadycott 1 38 

*B R Hanim c Stawan b Gray 
N D Bums c Stewart b Gray 


1 E East c StBwart b Thomas . 

S Turner not out — 

I L Pont not out . 


Extras (to 4. w t. nb 18) . 
Total (7 wkts) 


25 
_ 7 

— 4 

- 25 
1 


— 23 
_ 276 

-FALL OF WICKETS; 1-11 241. 282. 4- 
193, 2209. 6-228. 7-262. 

BOWLING: fray 24-2-733; MonWtouSe 
84-1 20. Doughty 1 1-1-401; Thomas 12 

1- 44-2: Neeoum 21-220: Mectycotl 21- 

2- 621; Lynch 3020. 

SURREY: First Innings 448 tar 5 dac (T E 
Josty 221. M A Lynch 85. A J Stewart 67} 
umpirer □ Q L Evans and N T Flews. 


Rediscovering an old knack 


SOUTHPORT: Lancashire 
(4pts) drew with Nottingham- 
shire (Sj. 

In spite of leading the 
championship in the early 
weeks, Lancashire's batsmen al- 
ways seem more adept at saving 
games than winning them. Re- 
cently they have even lost that 
knack, but they rediscovered it 
yesterday, bailing out the day to 
deny Nottingham shire the 
chance of closing the gap on 
Gloucestershire, ' the present 
leaders. 

-Needing 162 to- avoid an 
innings defeat on a wicket 
offering slow turn, and occa- 
sionally something more vi- 
cious, Lancashire needed 
someone to take root In the 
event both Mendis and Uoyd 
did so. batting for 172 and 153 
minutes respectively, while 
Fowler at the beginning and 
Waikinson at the aid scored 
useful runs, as important a 
fed or in the equation as time 
alone. 

From the moment Hemmings 
appeared in the attack at 1130, 
it became a war of attrition. The 
ofTspinner has been awarded a 
benefit next year, and be cer- 
tainly earned it yest e rd a y, plug- 


By Peter Ball 

png away persistently for 37 
overs from ihe Town end as 
Pick. Such, Rice and Cooper 
alternated from the other. 

This time, however, Lan- 
cashire met him with more 
resolution if not with total 
conviction as he made the 
occasional delivery rear and 
turn spitefully. Fowler and 
Chadwick succumbed in quick 
succession to cause some alarm, 
which was exacerbated as Abra- 
hams, for the second time jo the 
match, was bowled giving him- 
self room to CUL 

Hemmings ended Mendis’s 
resistance with a beautifully 
flighted delivery, and Hayhuist 
followed before the deficit bad 
been cleared, and the odds were 
still stacked in 

Nottinghamshire’s favour. 
Lloyd, however, in only his 
fourth championship match of 
the season, proved the stum- 
bling Mock, defending watch- 
fully and driving with all his old. 
familiar power. 

Hemmings was subdued at 
last, and although he came back 
to remove the Lancashire cap- 
tain, who smashed a long bop to 
cover. Waikinson took over to 
taka the game out of read) with 


an aggressive fifty, one of his 
two sixes landing on the South- 
port to Liverpool railway line. 
NOmNOHAMSHIRE: Ffcte Imfogs 350 
for 8 doc (R T Rohuteon 97. B C Broad 51) 
LANCASHIRE: Firet Innings 182 (C May- 
nard 59; E E Hammings 5^ tor 70) 

Second fnnmcs 

G Fowter c Nawoi b Hammings 37 

GD Mantes c N«w« b Hammings _ 69 

MRCfudntoktowbSucn 0 

J Abrahams b Hamming s 16 

XH Lloyd cBWib Hammings 75 

A N Haynuna c NawaU b Sueti 3 

tC Maynard c Bn»d b Hammings ..... 13 
M Watkmson 


1 notout 

P J W Alott not out 

Extras (b 4. to 4. nb 5) . 
Total (7 wkts) 


58 
_ 17 
- 13 
301 

FALL OF WICKETS; 101. 2-70, 2121. 4- 
138. 5-153. 6-190. 7-252- 
BOWUNG; Cooper 11-2-38-0; Pk* 120 
420; Hammings 4214-105-5; Such 26-2 
902: Rica 104-120. 

Umpxes: J BKfcenshaw and P B Wight 

Welcome return 

Worcestershire hope to have 
Dipak Patel, the all-rounder, 
back to face Gloucestershire, the 
championship leaders, at New 
Road today. Patel made 128 
against Essex on Monday while- 
suffering from influenza and 
was replaced by Stuart Lampitt, 
a newcomer, in the current game 
against Sussex. Lampitt and 
Steve McEwan, the reserve pace 
bowter, are in a squad of 13 


FOR THE RECORD 


- r, e - 




TENNIS 


_ . M 


.. z ;s : 


,v - 

. . r 


: r. 

- . ..V 

;V o . 

...rt 5‘ 
. - >■: if 

-• .. . 


BAST AD; SwodMi Op*m ctamptawWg* 

•ms. 

(Sol. P Cane m W »* ' 

Hi. 63. 7-S. M Wtonder t * T Hogfoffl 0-4 2 
2: M Pnmfora bl D Kttmc WM 7- 
SOuartM Bnof : Wander WEJetenlWGJW) 
6-i. M Moor |Cz) n r Famttra ** s 


IdHig MUSMrtSxl MM fi* E Santtw 
13237-I 




6-36- 


Neison (U5-J6-1 6-4. ft* 


_ L pimak ecu « H 
22, 6-2: H Sundsttom 


and K K*tfn«andL M.JH. MPa J 

Sndw 0; S Wassoman H C LmdqvM. 63. 

7- 5; a Downes M H OarUstrom. 6-2. 2 4 ; S 

Wassaman and A Oewes hjCLto dcwgand 

H DsMskom. 22. 6-4. Swrite Wa l, 

H o — la 0: N ByWwm M F Cut—. 21, 

8- 7: L Sawcftanfco « O W« 6-L 2ft S 

Oarttomonkoand NZnrma MOMDMantf T 

Taefto. 63. 7-6. todawaate 2. Nwr ZmMw d 1 

midoivsian names Mr Y B**uW « J 

SSSSon. M. 00: S Angmr Kuauma bl B 
ShSTM. 6-ft Yar jTluaM ana sg 

Utamannsto lost to J Rdu rdaon and B 

cSSmSt7-6. 7-6. Gmca 3. Mad O: O 

TwbopciSou M R Howatt B-0. 24; A 
Kanetopoolou W L OTIaBnan, 6-3. 23: A ■ 

Ki^oSou and X Anottasw kw M R 

xZgn Po and LSan Duan. 24. 23. 

- - - - 12 . Batyl- 


Grow* 


> ft Dertiyshta ft Hampshao and Me ol 
4; Mddaaas 6. NOteno ham ahao 3: 
mrsMo 5. Budcmghwnsfitm 4. Poola: 

Qnd Be Cambndgema 9. Conawafl ft 

Oxtordstara 5, Somaraat 4; st t ord aH re 5. 

Qtaucastarahired. 

YACHTING 

LOWESTOFT) Princ* oi Wates Caps 1. W 

Hen d e rson and B Gran ptdwnor SaOno 

CUR: Z J Tinner and R Pi sto n tSIdmoutfi 
Sag ng OuDjs 3. N and D fcteOonald (WNrsattl 

ltSbofl:r - — ‘ • 


BOXING 


NEW YORK; MldHtoiai gac Iran Bartdsy (US) 

» Barents Bianco (Vany r»C_«m. rtti»T- 
mU* Ranaldo Snmas(US)l® Dennis Fykas 
(U5k 2 nd. 


RkMe Race 4; Fast 

irt (5* 2 M 


Shrtvar U B egy/LG 

i(Arg)WJC»rtsson<S»eL|^-®- Oa—oy 2. BBwito 
tf«*a«tCan)biJAguMra(SDL6- uatoeiia tBD M. 2> 


—PT. Samo a rd 2 No 1002 Adia 

Cooper. Slow HaraScap: 1 Minor No 8*380 A 

Lynham and C Lynham latas 1 No 107060 

Paul Karakuaevfe Wgfa w s. 1 NO 8146 

Swollen Laws and Andrei Lawa. Tcppars: 1 

MMMBCoan Sana Raras Fan Handicap: I 

Satoovd o» ft 1 No 1000 Adam 


CROQUET 

HURLUWAIto 

CMmocfca Opan 

eh a nikwah lp: TMM wiat R. JaSaon PI K 
Aeon plus 17. ptos 2ft J Prmca M B 
Ounasakara otos 17. f 
Lewis ptos 26. pus 

Sofomon ptos 1 ft. r „ 

Jackson bl J Greenwood ptos 15. pan 17 

: OnarWr-Onat R 

Pearson and P 


. Enrft. E Webber Ran), w H u mphre ys . E 
(FT). A Chandtor. P CirtgiTR Lea. L 
Stapnan jAust □ J RusseB. D SnWtfi (traL P 
Way. B Gsfaefter. M Motdand. D Fahem. N 
Crcsby (USL R Dnaramnd. J Anderson (CanL 
Fjjtobio(^raEDa my(lmLJ C rLaa ry(WL 

TORONTO: LPGA teuraaBMBfcrFIrat round 

toadara (US mass stated): 67: C Johns on; 

CftJ Camer; 7ft P Sheehan, C Morse. C 

Jfiftnsm. N Scranton; 71; N nMta (Can), S 



ras 17. ptos 16: N Aspnal H S 
pus 26 (tPk O Ctoonsftaw bl E 
Ifft Ptos lAGwawr ttnrt 


Rod: 87; j Cctoan. j .c. Snaad, T Byrum. J 

Rudedga. H Twffly, 8 Fnon: 66: H Suboii. T 
Planar. D Graham (AuSL T Kite. P Jacobsen. 
K KnoL Bdtoi seen 75: P Ooeiemuls. 


SHOWJUflUPfNGH 


Cooper. 

bMi 


CYCLING 


- AM ’ 1 
: " ' . -■■■ ■' 


izsxsggsisiisssr* 


ft 21 ;AXra*s*in 

0. 21. J Anas 


kncksiln (US) MMa^oy <« 

■Kma (US) « J wwd enipy L/ 
13 Third roun d rUS irtoss staid): M 
F Lw 


2 

7-6.2 

VmTtS Ato&trtnML 

m.,— (CZ) 2TS3S T i W “. M . 

ttrfkata Csedwtow Ua 3. H 

ca,.<r_^i h« a MbiHr. 64. 3-6, 64 H 
MandBftona be W TUmO tAL 3-R 2 1j» 



and Ohm Wato. Laser* 1 No 122343 Roger 

KanL Way&nrs: 1 No 22 Deal, Bowler and 

Ncfc BpMer. Toppers 1 No 281 92 Tony 


TOUR DE FRANCE (Womee): ThHa 

■tag* flsaoim to Oeneort T enaBd. 


Projpwa. 

TROON: 




PBi tx J PofibL 64. 6 -a G sabaari ! 


IMP 








*■ ,.A 

^ ilr, 

- * • ..v 


sarsit'saasiMs* 

Hobos bl M Suonpsa. 2ft M A CtolttP 
M Sucrpaa.anp p Ttioran. 2 ft 6-1 




MSCasarettD.1 

Bonos, to F B&moeBL 23. 2ft R 
aod C BanoK tx S Cuntto mlf 
g Aiuwis 21. 21 The Hatoadande s, 

M Van DerTordlwJ HT«r-RWWGf*BiiBerv 


3. Un^ayft R 


PRUDENTIAL COUNTY dm: Mem !~ 

fwfwm g Q/apr 1: MWdeiBr 6. Error ft 

Kent 8. Somerset 1: IWpNrr 7. Bttodng- 

mmw ft Cwmtor.Qwepft S ujray LW W 
of Scodand 3: _ Dat1iyslika 7 . Br rtetle ft 

Lammsntre 8. LN ceawn ra 1. S ou tt rt — : 

gSfcWarwxMlle 6. Oiwhw ft Norm 

Wetos 8. Hentordshn 1: Awn ft East 
Scotland 3. Huntortom 

MU Worcester 6, Noungfumsliire 3: itento- 

shrr and Me of Wont ft Oxford 
Wales ft Sussex T. Matoame (tog S 
uneolnshn 5. GtouoestoielWB 4; NwJ» 9. 

NomtamptonaMra 0; Dorset ft De*on 3 

Cambridge: Stoop ft WatSTWe*. Suftak I. 
cta awfclc Qwp 7! South of ScoPand ft 
gSaSMnari: Qeitom ft We of Men ft 

CefflnnagesMB 8. Norm of Scotland 1; 

Durham and Ctovetomf 7. Snropsfike 2. 

Hftsneir C b a Uenh a m. Gram 1 HompNw* 

and isle of WflW ft tftcestei 3: Mi ddNeex 7. 

- ft Eamw a ; Gmp t 


Race Them 1. 8 Albnen 



Wsmon (Royel Gburoek VC). O ae w ft 1. S 
6 ptr ft B Altman (L7; 3, J W at so n 


Pender 

28.7. 


£E3;ftT£ SoL« p rEga 


mbaak Leading ptocto^: 1. M Cantos (IQ 
1mm SlrZflsaefft I Thompson (US) at 1mm 
31 sac ; 3. J Longo (Ft). M 233; 4. E Hole 
4 ; SLD Bonnoron (ft), at daft 


Faistarba, Sweden: Hattons Cop: 1. Great 

Breen MHtas: ft West Germany. 49: X 

Sweden. SOOerndtogs tor toe Pttoet PhNp 

Trophy: 1. Qeal Bnean. 35pt»: ft west 
Gemimiy 28: 3. France 27. 


SPEEDWAY 


pte: ft B Atonan 1 


CWebeln ® jartne). 1 aftg: ft Just erutt (A 


4; Yorfcslw 7. Devon 2: Sunw 

8 Sussex 1 WbrtMng: Qnp ft Awn 5. 

1 «w-a«wr i» 4; Horlok ft WWMCksMra 1; 

UraNM ft Chaste. 3. Chetoebamr 


Robert*)- 1*50 

wmnerLCWtortoe 

ft CneftMn. 20.76: 3. Jeygea (R 
2575. 

BASEBALL 

AMERICAN LEAMfc Kansas QryRoya tal, 
Detroe Tigers 0: Baaimora ftmlae 1ft 
Chicago WMe Sox ft Texas Rangers 7. 
Cleveland Indians X „ 

NATIONAL LEAGUE Houston Anna ft 
PNadetoMa males ftLO* Angalaa OoTOm 
9. PsKflurgh Pastes ft Ctocmrao Reds 10, 
Montreal Spot 2 {eonwtotlng game 


3&17-X7; ft Longa M IS3S ft Thonweon. 81 
2235: 4 Heppto.a3256;5 V Sbnomat (FO. at 
34*9. 


GOLF 

HOORUWUX: Detoh Opan: 

meed aceree (GB unless ! 

Fernandez lArgL SfcSfla~ ' 

Hegoarty. AiOtaabal (S 
Mrenero (Sp). M ASan 2 
Murray, V Somers (AusL I . . __ . 

G Brand Jor. C Moody. P ParidnTTft G Marsn 
OtSoLtonf 


.SBennen. 




8nr. A Gamdo( 
Conanm (U§. U Harwood 
ro 


ad on July Montreal Expos $. Ctodmae 
Reds 5 tecbaoM gem*)- 


Lun* f .. 

(Aus). W Longmuk, j RNaro 
BZabneki (l».7ft A Chan* 

I Woosrom, Hpaoccta (SA). 

Gate (Aua).0 Moore (Au * 

M Ponon, A Johnsacna 

Dava(Aus), C O'Connor ( 

M BembnOge. G Turner. _ 
Lle an * pi . L Catooeeto (Artf. 75t M l 



NATIONAL LEAGUE: Arena Essex 44. 

Ryenou9e 33. MdStesooreusyr 50 . mnoe- 

(ton 2ft 

End of a range 

The new £300.000 shooting 
range at Musselburgh win be 
demolished when the Common- 
wealth Gaines end on August 2. 
The demolitionwill cost the 
Games another £30.000. but 
East Lothian district council. 
. who granted only temporary 
planning permission, want the 
site for a bird sanctuary and a 
golf course. The Lothian 
smallbore rifle association has 
appealed to Robert Mr*»«*h 


YACHTING 

Capricious 
winds may 
make race 
a lottery 

From a Correspondent 
Palma 

On yet another day of light 
and fluky winds the One Ton 
Cup fleet yesterday started out 
on the second offshore race of 
the event here. The 153-mile 
course takes them around the 
Cabneta Islands on the southern 
tip of Majorca, then west on a 
60-mile leg to the east coast or 
Ibiza to round two small islets 
before recrossing to Majorca lor 
the finish. 

Forecasters arc optimistic of 
some steady, and possibly 
strong, winds but like all the 
other races so far. this race has 
already had a taste of the patchy 
winds which are turning this 
year’s event into a lottery, rather 
than a test of sailing skilL After a 
delayed start to allow the fickle 
wind to stabilise, the 33-boat 
fleet crossed the line in around 
five knots of patchy breeze on a 
short windward leg. which even- 
tually greatly favoured those 
boats on the portside of the 
course. 

This, nhui, was not an area 
that had been chosen by die 
British team whose highest 
placed y acht la y in 20th position 


RACING 

Ascot results 

Going: good 

ftO (1m 20 1. SATISFACTION (W 

Carson. 12-1V 2. OTix'i Dl»t (SUM 

Cauetan.a-11k 3. PtktcaOntcfB Baxter. 
33-1). ALSO RAJ* 4 Dare Say. 12 North 

Lake (501). 16 lAmk: Vision, Sftamiyda 

(481), 33 Poderoso (fth). Rescue Package. 
9 ran. NR: Galactic Hera. hd. 4L TftLW. 
*L W Hern at West BStey. Toe: 020: 

£140. £1.10, £7 .7ft OR £7.70. CSF: 

£2001. 2mto KL79 sec. 

200(60 1.CREEBAYflN Carson. iMk 

2. CbuTOny 1 * Pet (Pal Eddary. 3-4 lev); 3, 

Goto Pnwpaet (T bum. 3-1). ALSO RAN: 

7 Touch Of Gray. 10 Young Inca (Stffl. 

TyroUta (4th). 12 Ho W Chaih. 16 


StreeL & Amigo Loco. Sundead (6th). 10 
Id. nk. 4L 1SL J Speanng « 
Tola: £11.40; e2Mr tf. 70. 


ran. KL hd, 

Atcestar. T . . 

£1.60. DF: £10.50. CSF: £3095. Tncaat 

£7657. imto 1708aec. 

30 (00 1. GAYANE (S Cauhen. Brens 
tanf, 2, Beaudnop Buzz (W Carson. 

3. Not AkM (B Rouse. 33-1 L ALSO 
6 Ao OI Treason (5th). 13^ Muscat 
Review (4th). 20 Taustaff. 33 Perfect Foi 
(6th). Quean’s Lake. 56 Mss Jasrene. 9 
ran. 11 nk. 2KI. BL 27rL H Cecd at 
Newmartcat Tote: £2.10: £130. £1-50, 
£300. DR £400. CSft £5/47. Imai 
18.11MC. 

300 (2m) 1 . PETTOZO(W Careon. 21); 
2. NewsMte P*k (W R Swmbum, 7-2); 3. 

Westcni Dancer (P Cook. 2-1 tow). ALSO 

RAN: 5 Mtan Bum. 10 Ayres Rock (5 8 13 
J Reid). 14 King Of Comedy (Sth) 
Morgans Chocs (&tA 20 Desroyer (4th) 
8ran.4Lhd.3Lre.4LC Brittain at 

Newmarket. Tote: £5.00; £10ft £100. 

£1.60. DFflQSO. CSP: £2503. 3min 

3 R5 0 W - 

45 (70 1, CLASSIC TALE (W R 
Swntoum. 21 1 fork 2. BeesM rt Qumn.S'- 
T): 3. Dspidy Governor (T toes. 7-1 L ALSO 
RAN: 1 ZBZOB (5th)L 14 Cokaus (5d4. 25 
TragaBgto, 33 Ca)un Dancer (4thl 7 ran. 
71. 4L &. 1KL dead haaL M Stouta at 
NewmartcaLTota: £1.70; £1.40, £1.60. DR 
£2.40. CSF: £3.47. Imin 32.04S8C. 

405 flirt) 1, FAffl COUNTRY 

-1 Effort 

__ .... A Qles. 

Pratoda (6th). 10 

Asswan (5th). 14 Dick's Fody, 16 Oam- 
biars Dream. 25 Safe Custody MlM. 33 
Count AbnavivB- 9 ran. 1L2L 4L 2L Sn IxL 
D Bmorth at Whfcsbiay. Tala: £200; 
£1.40, El .20. £l.7a Dr £300. CSF: 
£9.1ft Imin 455Qsec. 

Jackpot: not won. Ptacepot £1JS. 


Carlisle 


3. 

RAN 


GotoffhanL 

2.15 (60 1. AFRICAN SPKHT(G DlMaU. 

~, Bold Craaadar (W Ryan. 4-7 tayt 

«ie Eyes (A Matica*. 6-1 L ALSO 

16 Tokanda (8th). 20 Penbreasy 

(5th), 25 My Serenade (4»). 33 Golden Air. 

Ootono. 8 ran. 1L SL 24M. nk. 10L M 
Prescott at Newmarket Tote: £4 -40; 

£100. £100. El 50. DF: £200. CSR 

£509- 

Z45 (80 1. DtffFHfS DANCER (M 

tavt ALSO RAN: 11-2 GflkJen Disc (4th[. 
T2Carpantare Boy. 14 GrwCW<5fftfc2& 
Vta Vitae (Bh). 7 raa nk. SL %L Z. 3L W 

Paarce at Handeton. Tmk £1 1 .7ft £200, 

£2.10. DR El 0.7ft CSR £2703. 

3.15 nin If 80yd) 1. PWCEOFLOVE (J 
Quton, 7-4); 2. Good N Sharp (N Roof 
21k 3. Tat Singh (R Vickers. Ml 
ALSO RAN: 12 Seottsh Grew fSOt). 
Manlx J4tti). 5 ran. NR: Nfigwy Supremo. 
*1 II. S. Mi hd. D Moflab atOmnS. Tata: 
£ft4ft £100. £200. DR £9.1 ft CSR 
£853. 

305 flm If 8Oyc0 1. KOUS (W Nawnaa, 
' “ Mrjtoftoy (J Lowa. 04 tov^ 


2-1k 2. 

Taken 


> s-u. 


i Mth). 14 La Manga 
NR: Rtoo Melody. 2L 44. 


The 

RAN: 5 Fire 

Prince (5th). 5 ran. Nft Rtoo Melody. 

nk. 251 R Smpeon at Upper Lamboum. 

Tots: £3.00; £1 .70. E10ODF: £300. CSR 
£503. Bought In. 

4.15 (1m ir 60yd) 1. LAIOSK! (W 
Newnes. 6*0:2, Satty Sam So (J Lcree. 5- 
4 fav); 3. Ctotoepotot (M wood, 5-1). 3 
ran. hd, 6L R Simpson at Upper 
lamboum. TotK £2.10. DF: £150. CSF: 
£303. 

5-2fcft SegMSteeJ IA Cuto3r!ft9-4 faA3, 
fnelHW— MptOtoQ. 21). ALSO RAfee 
Country JUim Sttft 10 Kamphaft 18 
Symbolic (4thj, Skama Spark. 20 The 
Rusk (6th). 33 Biondoni. 9 ran. hd. 1L S. 
hd. 5L Denys Smdh at Bishop Auckland. 
Tola: ES0 k £100. £100. £1.1 ft DR 
£2.60. CSR £8.45. 

Ptaoapee £1750 

Chepstow - Thursday 


Going: round course: 
course: Ann. 

600(501. 


hard, straight 


600 (50 1, Manrkth (A Murray. 21); ft 
Lady Patni-4); 3, Summer Sky (5-6 tav).4 
ran. -SSI, 4L H Thomson Jonas. Tote: £3.10. 
DF: £4.10. CSR £905. 

70 ftm 40 1, Jatren&e (T Lang, SSK ft 
Stoneorokar (7-1 k 3, London Contact 
2L Angtos VUao 94 ta». 7 ran. nk. 1%L t 
Com^Tote: £4.00: £100. £3.40. DR 
£8.40. CSF: £17.72. 

700 Em) \ Zaubmr [B Thomson, 4-9 
ftjn Fbr You- Wte 


fart ft 

(6*1). 4 .„ 

CSF £251. 

ftOOmMI, 

mSSSfea Owtefc- TotaT £1 

£1.40. £1.1 ft DR £300. CSR £40ft After 
8 stewards’ Inquky the rasuR stood. 

800(60 1. Myra'S Special (M H Bs. 4-1 ); 
ft Dancing Sarah (7-^; 3. tWRamtae 
g4tew^5 raa 1*. 1K-L J SiteWte. ^a: 

£1602. 


-_. r Yore Vlfo (4-1 1 3. Pnok 

(6-fi. 4 ran. 3L 1 5L B Htts. Tata: « 0ft DR 
few. CSF £2 51. 

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100. £150. DF: £ft30. CSR 

90 (70 1 . Tte-WoM (B ThanBon. 221): 
ft Canadten Guest ^4 M S. &asm 
Commend (3-1). 11 ran. 1L «L MPte 
Tote: £1400; £200. El .40, El 00. DR 
£3400. CSF: £4453. 

Ptocepot £S106 

Hamilto n - Thursday 

Going: Arm 

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( 4-7 la*). 2 ran. nk. S Norton. Tote: 


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£240. 


7.15 (50 1. IB» Dnenremd P0m 
Ttoktor. 122k ft Hugo Z Hadrevrtoush 
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Tow: Cl 40; £1.1 ft £200. DF: £4.70. CSF: 
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PfaMpofc £850 to a SOp Make 


TENNIS 


Surrey women’s 
win recalls 
the Boer War 

By Hex Bellamy, Tennis Correspondent 


For the 38th time in 76 
championships the Surrey 
women's team have won the 
Prudential County Cup com- 
petition, a doubles event played 
on grass. They heat all their five 
opponents at Eastbourne and 
Yorkshire were the only team to 
cause them c o nc ern. When Sur- 
rey achieved an impregnable 
lead over Essex yesterday they 
had won 33 out of 41 matches in 
the week. 

Surrey's first pair. Pat 
Braiisford and Claire Pollard, 
won 13 out of 14 matches while 
the championship was still in 
dispute. Surrey used five other 
players for the remaining two 
pairs and at different times 
everybody contributed to an 
ultimately overwhelming tri- 
umph in a championship that 
began with a Surrey success in 
the same year as the Boer War 
(not many people know that). 

The men’s championship was 
inaugurated four years earlier at 
a time when Marconi and 
Rontgen were making bigger 
news with, respectively, long- 
range wireless signals and X- 
rays (not many people know 
that either). This week's version 
boiled down loan exciting finish 
featuring last year's winners, 
Essex, the traditionally domi- 


nant Middlesex team (37) 
championships), and Kent, who 
had never won the title. 

Essex, who used seven dif- 
ferent partnerships during the 
week but were consistently well 
served by Robin Drysdale and 
Paul Reekie, were the first of the 
three contendere to drop out of 
the running yesterday. Middle- 
sex used eight pairs, notably 
Stuart Bale and Chris Bradnam. 
who additionally puzzled a vari- 
ety of their opponents by indulg- 
ing in on-oft experiments with 
stubbles of beards. 

Middlesex beat Buckingham- 
shire yesterday but it did them 
no good, because Kent's margin 
of success over Essex was just 
enough to give Kent the 
championship. There may be 
some sort of lesson in the fact 
that Kent called on the same 
three partnerships every day: 
Paul Bourdon and Richard 
Whichello, Martin Gunirip and 
Steven Matthews, and Peter 
Hannon and Chris Wells. 

So we can salute new cham- 
pions — who made their little 
piece of history on Devonshire 
Park courts where tennis was 
first played in the year Na- 
poleon 111 declared war againsi 
Prussia (not many people know 
that, either). 


Repton cane St Paul’s 

By a Special Correspondent 


Repton won the YouB Cup 
public schools doubles 
championship for a record six 
times in a row yesterday when 
they defeated St Paul's in dev- 
astating fashion at Wimbledon. 

With an equally strong squad 
available next year, Repton are 
likely to equal and then surpass 
St Paul's overall record of seven 
wins since the tournament 
inseption in 1947. 

St Paul's couldn’t have had a 
worse start to a final. Their first 
pair. Jeffrey Hunter, the No.l 
singles player available after 
missing all the previous rounds, 
and William Orr. lost the first 
seven games in quick succession 
againsi Ulfur Gudjonson and 
Richard Lowther. 
_Tto_Rggion_boysscrved well. 


hit consistent returns and. 
above all. were punishing with 
anything loose at the net 

The second pairs match, 
which finished ten minutes 
later, was much ihe same siory. 
Here. St Paul's (Chris Gottlieb 
and Richard Brown) fought 
hard but lacked confidence and 
flexibility againsi Andrew 
Creighton and Julian Crossley. 
Creighton dominated on his 
service and completed the 
match with three aces. 

St Paul's under- 1 6 pair, 
Geoige Wells and Urn Thomas, 
gave the school a consolation by 
beating Stowe (Chester King 
and Alexander Astley) 6-3, 6-2 
in the Thomas Bowl Cup. 
RESULTS: Fkst pairs- Repton M St 
Paul's. 6-0, 5-3; Second pairs: 6-3. 6-2. 


SHOOTING 

Missing 
out by 
a point 

By Our Shooting 
Correspondent 

Andrew Tucker, winner of the 
Bisley grand aggregate, yes- 
terday tost his chance of this 
year’s Queen's Prize when he 
foiled by one point to qualify for 
the final. Shooting in a wind 
which varied in both strength 
and direction, he dropped six 
points at 500 yards, the middle 
of the three ranges, which 
brought his total down to 142 
out of 150. Yet about 10 
minutes later he won the Prince 
of Wales prize by beating three 
others in a tic-shoot. 

Scoring was lower than usual 
in the Queen's semi-final, with 
nobody reaching the highest 
possible. The top individuals, 
who have an advantage today 
because scores are carried for- 
ward. are Sergeant A C Band 
(West Mercia Police), Paul Kent 
(Surrey), Rob Courtney, one of 
Guernsey’s Commonwealth 
Games marksmen, and Pat 
Evans, of Quebec Canada. 

Former winners who won 
their places in the final were 
Dick Rosling (1972), George 
Arnold (1970). aged 70. and 
Charles Trouer ( 1979), aged 62. 

RESULTS: Grand Aagra na te : 1, A St G 

Puckar (TVadcenhani) 595; Reshoot tor 
2nd and 3td pfaces - J BairingBr (Old 
Epfiomfans). CltA Curmtoqham (Ocra) 
and J M A Thompson (Centra Bankers )al 
sag. rntriwun Aggregate: 1 J H 
Carmichael (Br omsg rove) 322; ft Puckar. 
320: ft D Richarts (Manydmm) 32ft 
No rt M a nd Agngtonr 1. S Betther 
( U pping ha m VTC) 179; 2. Pucker, 178:3, P 
G Kent (OU Eosomfans) 17ft Aastw 
Ttopfty (Oftfctefy cofractod ro u te: 1 , 
Gresham's A 395; ft Gresham's B, 388; 3. 

WeKngton. 387. VHmgram Trophy: 1. 

House at Commons, 656; ft House at 

Lords. 639. Huikiiteara Cup: 1. London 

University. 566:2, Bristol Ufi veraBy . 562; 

ft Durham University. 553. ChanceAora 

Cup: 1. Cambridge Ontoaretty. 1128; 2m 
Oxford Untoersty. 981. Kotapora Cop: 1. 
Great Britain. 1169; ft Jersey. 11B2; 3 
Canada. 1158. Jwtor Kotapora: 1. Watt 
Germany. 562; ft Zimbabwe. 561: ft Hong 
Kong. 557. Undar 25 Trane 1. 08. 580; ft 
Canada. 574. County Long Rang e : 1. 
Devon. 284; ft Herts. h82: ft Lancs. 282. 


POLO 

Rotherhill 
spoil it 
for Novaes 

By John Watson 

The eight-goal Brazilian po fo- 
ist. Silvio Novaes. was back in 
the saddle for the first time since 
bis rib injury early in June, to 
play No 3 for Richard Guess's 
team, the Greyhounds, against 
Rotherhill when the first round 
of the tournament for the me- 
dium-goal Harrison Cup contin- 
ued at Ambersham, Sussex. 
yesterday. Rotherhill, who are 
put together by the Angto- 
Colombian banker, Carlos 
Mejia, won 7-4. 

With Novaes still short of 
fitness. Rotherhill. working 
more cohesively on the axis of 
the Lucas brothers, James and 
William, and the five-goal Chil- 
ean Rodrigo ViaU pressed the 
Greyhounds' goalmouth persis- 
tently for the last two chukicas. 

Novaes is all set to resume his 
original place in Cowdray Park's 
high-goal squad for next week's 
Cowdray Park Challenge Cup. 
Meanwhile, for the Harrison, 
his fellow Brazilian. Juarpgui 
Santos, fills the No 3 position, 
with Cowdray’s regulars. With- 
ers and Glue, supported by the 
tyro. Tim Walker. 

Against Lord Milford 
Haven's Brent Walker. 
Cowdray. though starting with a 
half-goal handicap lead, 
paid the price for presenting 
Alan Kent with too many 
penalty opportunities and lost 8- 
7«6. 

ROTHERHILL: 1.C Meta (I* ft RVW(5); 
ft J Lucas (St back. WLueas (4). 
GREYHOUNDS; 1 , R Guess (2): ft N Evans 
(3): ft S Novaes (8); baefc, 0 Waddkngton 

BRENT WALKER: 1 . Lord MMord Haven 
(1): ft W Roberts (3): ft A Kent (B): back, D 
Jamison <3. 

COWDRAY PARK: 1. T Walker (fa; ft U 
ChJB W 3, j Santos ff)r hack. P withers 
(ri- 


WEEKEND FIXTURES 


TODAY 

CRICKET 

Cnriil Insurance Fast Test 
(11.0. 96 Overs) 

LORD'S: England v New Zealand 
Britannic Assurance 
County Championship 
( 1 1 . 0 . 1 1 0 overs minimum) 
ABERGAVENNY: Glamorgan v 

Northampton: Northampton- 
shire v Middlesex 
GUILDFORD: Surrey v Sussex 
EDGBASTON: Warwicks v Lancs 

WORCESTER: W0TCS v GkMiCS 

SHEFFIELD: Yorkshire v Notts 

WOMEt eSUNMffT EON&P AY 
■fTERNAHONAL: Oxto i l ey: England v 
India. 

OTHER SPORT 

AMERICAN FOOTBALL: Budwetoer 

Lrnrair- Cranial Conference: Dwfitable 

Cowboys ■ Cotter Bow Orfers (30)- 

Cbennei Co n t in en c e: Bratton B52s v 
Bournemouth Bobcats (630). 

HORSE TRIALS: Hotter Hail, Cumbna. 

SHOOTING: Oueen's Pnw (at Bisley) 

T PMS- Punlu toa l county cup {para 

corat cttom p fe na M pK Men: Eastbourne. 

Cromer. SouBtsea. Hunstan to n. Malvern. 

Cambridge. Chiswick. Women: 
Ea&tboune. Worthing. Cheltenham. 
Exmouth. Poole. Camtorfaga. Fetotsiowe. 


TOMORROW 

CRICKET 
John Player 
Special League 
(2.0. 40 overs) 

EB8W VALE Gfams v Derbyshire 
SOUTHAMPTON: Hants v Lees 
NORTHAMPTON: Norttianls v Kent 
TAUNTON: Somerset v Lancashire 
GUILDFORD: Surrey v Sussex 
HEREFORD: Worcs v GtouCS 
HULL: Yorkshire v NOUS 


MOTOR COUNTIES CHAMPtONSMP: 
KUmote End: Berkshire v Somerset ft 
Sherborne School: Dorset v Cheshire. 
Doss, Grimsby: Uncmnshae v Northum- 
berland. Stone: Staffordshire v 
Cumberland. 

WOMEN’S IM-VfTE ONE-DAY INTER- 
NATIONAL: Banstewfe England v hxfca. 

OTHER SPORT 

AMERICAN FOOTBALL (20 ratten 
stated): British League: National Con- 

ference: Birmingham Buds v Notting ha m 
Hoods; Ettnburgh Blue Eagles v Man- 

chester Aflstanc Glasgow Lions v Man- 
chester Spartans (2.0); MRton Keynes 
Bucks v Leicester Panthers: Tyneside 

Trojans v Mansfield Express: Walsall 

Titans v Eatoig Eagles. Anglo Con- 
ference: Locomotive Derby v Coventry 
Bears; west O ron wch Firabafis v Black 

Country Natters CL30): Stoke SpUfees v 

Crewe Ratooadsrs (200); Knffs U/m 
Patriots v Norwich Devtts: Luton Fhers v 

North Herts Rakfers; Medway Mustangs v 

(Kond Btockha«*sjftfa; Merton Admnfe v 
Witney Wildcats (200); Newmarket Hor- 
nets v Sumy TtemderbOBs (20); Ayr 
Burners v Strathclyde Sheriffs: Johnstone 

Crusaders v Cfedesdale Colts. BMmlsar 

Besddon Braves v Fulham CteSnfa 

KfiEL S *” v rtenham 

Knights (2JO): Grays Saxons v 77tsner 

X?" 8 * T522L 55555. v ***»* 

Conors. Channel Conference : Green- 

wich Rams v Crawley Raiders (20v 
Streattiam OJympfans v Southampton 

Saahmks (ftCfcBnstol Bombers vSraih 
Const Sharks (200); Cotswttid Ban v 

^aaiauBss 

*Wit Rhinos v South Star Scoritona 

SSa gewB fflKas 

Windsor Groat Part). 









■‘3 

■■ii 


30 


SPORT 


THE TIMES SATURDAY JULY 261986. 




Storming victory 
for gold medals 


Boxing veto 
causes difficulties 






1 986 
COMMONWEALTH 
GAMES 


Smith’s easy win 
in Games regatta 


Badminton team’s 
match win surprise 


Cheers can 


again 
inspire an 
outsider 


By Pat Butcher 
Athletics Correspondent 



There is the 
same warm wel- 
come and the 
same cooling 
breeze as 16 
years ago when 
we ran aroand 
Arthur's Seat in brilliant early 
morning sunshine with the Forth 
Estuary glistening below. We 
were a group of decent dub 
runners, some more than decent 
— in fact, oae of our number, 
Keith RoHasoo, of Tipton, 
nicknamed “Killer'' because he 
worked in an abattoir, had won 
the national jnaior cross-country 
that year. 

We had borrowed a small 
marquee and 12 of ns were 
camping on the Dalkeith Road. 
We were haring a great lime. 
But we had a problem. We had 
got tickets for all but the opening 
session of the 1970 Common- 
wealth Games. But we were not 
going to miss the 10,000 metres. 
This was the stuff we had been 
weaned on; cross-country in 
winter meant 5,000 and 10,000 
metres on the track in summer. 
What is more, it was going to be 
one of the great 10 , 
races. 


There was Nafiafi Tenia, the 
title-holder and reigning Olym- 
pic champion. Tema bad beaten 
the legendary Ron Clarice. 
There was Dick Taylor, who 
lived on the other side of the 
Midlands from ns in Coventry. 
The wisecracking Taylor bad 
rewritten die British record 
books at 5,000 and 10,000 
metres. He had even beaten the 
legendary Clarke. And then 
there was Clarke himself. 


The Australian was the world 
record-holder, who had broken 
not jnst one world record by the 
age of 26. Yet, somehow, Clarice 
had managed not to win a gold 
medal in an international 
championship. This was his last 
chance and with little thought of 
jingoism, even allowing for Tay- 
lor, whom we knew, we wanted 
Clarke to win. Not too many 
people, even in Scotland, gave 
Lachie Stewart much chance. 


But Stewart, who got “a great 
kick" oat of taking part in 
Thursday evening's opening 
ceremony, recalled yesterday 
that “few people realized that I 
went into that race with the 
second fastest time of the sea- 
son. I frit 1 could get a medal, 
but HI admit I didn't think it 
would be gold." 


Running of heats 
annoys competitors 


Steve Ovett will be required 
to run a heat in the 5,000 metres 
after all. Only 17 entries have 
been received, but two heals 
have been scheduled for Mon- 
day with eight men in one race 
and nine in the other. Twelve 
wilt go through to the final .on 
Thursday. 

Gordon Wright, the athletics 
manager of England, was an- 
noyed when he beard of the 
decision to go ahead with the 
beats. Tim Hutchings, from 
Crawley, ranked third in the 
Commonwealth, said: “It is 
ridiculous that we are not 
running a straight finaL There 
was a bigger field for the two 
miles in Birmingham last week- 
end and it looks as though the 
organizers have opted for heats 
to fill up their programme 
without any consideration for 
the athletes." 


If the Scots did not rate 
Stewart before his surprise vic- 
tory, they have certainly rated 
him since. He now works as a 
dental mechanic m a health 
centre. “1 suppose that makes 
me a bit more obvious to people, 
but hardly a week goes by when 
somebody doesn't mention ft." 


We solved the problem of our 
tickets easily enough. Those 
were the days of innocence, two 
years before the Munich massa- 
cre. We jnst pot on oar track 
suits, ran through the open gates 
of Pollock Haft, the athletes’ 
village and got on an official bus, 
which took ns straight into the 
stadium. 


We saw Tema and the rest 
drop away, leaving Clarke and 
Taylor, who were alternating the 
lead, and Stewart “People 
asked why I didn't do some of 
the leading, bat I wasn't asked. 
Clarke and Taylor were having a 
wee word to each other, agr e eing 
to lead alternately. I knew with 
two laps to go I could win. Bat I 
left it to the last 100 metres to 
make sme. The noise from the 
crowd was just f anta stic ." 

And it is that . same 
Meadowbaak roar that can lift 
Ailister Hutton over Jon Solly, 
Mike. McLeod and Steve Biuns, 
the English favourites, ami 
Steve Jones for Wales and the 

Other five contestants who are all 
'within seconds of each other. 
Jamie Marsh and Pan! Sheard, 
of Guernsey, have to be dis- 
counted. And as Stewart says of 
the unfortunate boycott victims: 
“It’s their loss, not ours." 


The y«*wi«apr is less afflicted 
by absence, and should be a 
straight fight between Dave 
Smith and Matt MOeham, of 
England, Martin Girvaa, of 
Northern Ireland, and Joe 
Quigley, of Australia. Kim 
H agger and Jody Simpson re- 
new their dose rivalry in the 
heptathlon, with Daley Thomp- 
son beginning his latest ra- 
ylanght on the decathlon world 
record tomorrow. Odin Jackson, 
of Wales, the world junior title 
holder, w|D net a glimpse of jnst 
how good Mark McKcy, of 
raMifa, is in the hurdles heats 
this afternoon, while Ben John- 
son. the outstanding favourite, 
runs the 100 metres heats. And, 

. with the loss of the Nigerians 
and Jamaicans. Roger Black 
now looks to be the only 
contender to Darren Clark, of 
Australia, in the 400 metres. 


BOXING 


Federation veto 


increases 


considerable 

confusion 


By Srikmnar Sen, Boxing Correspondent 



Boxing, which 
has been the 
worst hit of all 
the games by the 
boycott, reduc- 
ing 168 compet- 
itors to 86, was thrown into 
further confusion yesterday 
when the Commonwealth 
Games Federation derided to 
veto the special three-cornered 
tournament between England, 
Scotland and Northern Ireland 
to bolster the Sunday pro- 
gramme which bad been re- 
duced to four bouts. “Our aim 
was to give the public value for 
money." Frank Hendry, the 
director of £he Gaines’ 
said yesterday. 

No reason was given by the 
Federation for the ban but it is 
believed that they were annoyed 
that permission was not sought 
first before going ahead with the 
arrangements and releasing the 
news to the Press. Another point 
of view is that the Federation 
believed the tournament might 
have further downgraded the 
Games' boxing. 

The ban means that the 
boxing will either have to be 
spread even more thinly over 
the original 11 sessions or be 
reduced to eight or even six 
sessions. The hopes of Kevin 
Hickey, the England coach, that 
James Oyebula, his super- 
heavyweight, might have an 
easy passage into the final of the 
three man division, were dashed 
when the draw yesterday pitted 


Oyebula against Lennox Lewis, 
of Canada, the 1985 world 


Canada, 
junior champion and silver 
medal winner in the 1985 World 
Cup. 

Nor did Hickey have much 
hick with his other gold-medal 
hope. Rod Douglas, at middle- 
weight Douglas has run up 
against yet another Canadian, 
Egerton Marcus, who won the 
silver medal in the world 


championships in Reno this 
year. 

At flyweight John Lyon, of 
England, the five times ABA 
champion, meets the winner of 
the bout between Drew 
Docherty, of Scotland, and 
Steve Beaupre. of Ca nada , two 
who have already been beaten 
by the Englishman but are 
thirsting for revenge. If Lyons 
gets through he is afmoBl certain 
to meet yet another old rival 
who is wanting to square the 
account Kerry Webber, of 
Wales who has drawn Leonard 
Makhanya. of Swaziland. 

In the heavyweight division 
the home countries come up 
against each other quickly. 
Kevin McCormack, of Wales, 
meets Douglas Young, of Scot- 
land and the winner faces Eric 
Cardouza, the Englishman. At 
the light heavyweight England 
and Scotland appeared to have 
fared rather better. Harry 
Lawson, of Scotland, has drawn 
Noel Thomas, of the Cayman 
Islands and Jim Moran null be 
meeting Pu'a Don Ulbeig. of 
Western Samoa. But Byron 
Pullen, of Wales must take on 
Gerald Storey of Northern Ire- 
land. 

It is typical of these Games 
that after the draw was made 
everyone including officials, 
boxers and the media were given 
a fright They were told that the 
draw might have to be made 
again if the Welsh pulled out 
their team because of a threat by 
the Commonwealth Games 
Federation to ban two athletes 
who were called op at the last 
minute to make up the numbers. 
It was feared that other coon- 
tries to might want to bring in 
late entries if the Welsh were 
allowed to do so. Apparently, as 
there was no chance of this 


happening at this late stage the 
Games Fi 


federation have re- 
lented and as a result the Welsh 
withdrew their threat 


Cooper succumbs 


X 


Malcolm Coo- 


per. England's 
flag-bearer at the 


opening cere- 
mony, bad the 

spotlight taken 

, away from him 
by a Canadian student, Sharon 
Bowes, aged 19. who is half bis 
age, when the shooting com- 
petition began yesterday. Coo- 
per. winner of six medals in 
Brisbane four years ago, col- 
lected another bronze in the air 
rifle pairs with Robert Smith, 
but the Games record was 
shattered by Bowes, an attrac- 
tive blonde, the only woman 
taking part, and Montreal bank 
teller, Guy Lorion. 

Tbey won the gold with 1,167 
points and Bowes was the top 
individual scorer with 590. only 
10 short of the maximum.’ 
Australia, through Wolfgang 
Jobst and Anton WurfeL were 
second with 1,151, five points 
ahead of Cooper and Smith. 
Alister Allan and Bill MacNeilL 
of Scotland, the defending 
champions, finished only joint 


fourth with Guernsey, with a 
score of 1.137, coincidentally 
the same as their winning total 
in Brisbane.“You couldn't print 
what I really feel about my 
performance today ." Allan said. 

Cooper, an Olympic gold 
medal winner in the three- 
position rifle event, said after 
scoring 579 points in his weak- 
est competition: “I was hoping 
to get close io 590. 1 was below 
parso maybe I'll be above par in 
my other events. I'm not nor- 


mally as quick as I was today 
lldon't 


and I don't know why that was.' 

The winner of a record six 
medals in the 1982 Games, 
Cooper was the first to finish his 
60 shots. Bowes used up all but 
two minutes of her two and a 
quarter hours. But die finished 
wiih.the oniy maximum 100 in. 
any of the six rounds of shoot- 
ing. including an incredible 17 
successive bulls, to make up for 
the disappointment of Los An- 
geles, where she missed the 
Olympic bronze by one point. “I 
nearly always start well and 
finish wefl." 



BOWLS 


Welshman scares Thomson 



Andy Thomson, 

ef F.w gtapri i one 

of the leading 
contenders in the 
Commonwealth 

Games 

beat Ray HBL of 
Wales, 21-19 in his opening 
match at Balgreen yesterday. 
Thomson’s relief at tire end was 
plain to see for HBL n re tired 

h > aitma ef » r | hwrf r im him m m»h 

doser than at one time seeme d 
likely. 

Thomson, howling con- 
fidently, led 16-9 before HHI 
scored four shots on one end to 
change the complexion of the 
game. Later the sttoation was 
19-aD with Hill bolding at least 
one shot. But Thomson took out 
the shot bowl with his last wood 
to score 2 for victory. 


By Gordon Allan 

The youngest competitor in 
the singles, Richard Corsie, of 
Scotland, who is likely to be in 
hot pursuit of Thomson, proved 
the point by <wnhn from behind 
to best Peter Frag, of Ffp, 21-18 
and Mike Smith, off Guernsey, 
21-17. He was 7-12 and 10-17 
down a gonist Fong and 5-15 
down again^ Smith. On the last 
end Fong held three shots for 
victory but Corsie removed them 
all with a drive. 


Corsie. who plays Thomson 
this m or ni ng, said be was dis- 
appointed with the way be was 
playing, bat he was wise enough 
to make the point that the time 
to start talking about possible 
gold medal winners woald prob- 
ably be next Tuesday. 


Wendy Line, of England, beat 


Davis sends a warning sign to rival 



Victor Davis 
posted a chilling 
message for 
Adrian _ Moor- 
house as the two 
breaststroke ri- 
vals set up their 
Commonwealth 100 metres fi- 
nal showdown in Edinburgh 
yesterday. 

The Canadian, aged 22, re- 
corded the fastest time in the 
world this year — 62.56secs — to 
head the qualifiers. It was more 
than seven-tenths of a second 
quicker than Moorbouse, who 
was the second fastest with 
63.21. 

Davis has dominated the 200- 
meires breaststroke for the past 
four years but has never won a 
major 1 00-metres title, and 
Mooriiouse denied him the gold 
medal in Brisbane four years 


ago. 


The C-ansutifln camp ex- 
pected Davis to go dose to 
Steven Lundquist's world 
record of 61.55 in last night's' 
final 

But Moorhouse was far from 
despondent having recorded 
63.2 1 sec. This was only 32 of a 
second outside his British 
record- • * * 

Sarah Hard castle's -perfor- 
mance in the 400-metres medley 
topped an encouraging start for 
the England team. Already fa- 
voured fo win both the 400- and 
800-metres freestyle golds, the 
Southend teenager had a real 
chance of a treble by setting the 
fastest qualifying time for the 
medley. She produced a per- 
sonal best of 4min 50.02sec to 
finish .30 ahead of the Austra- 
lian. Suzanne Landells 
Kevin Boys, of South 


Tyneside, set a personal best of 
3min 55.48sec achieving the 
second fastest qualifying time 
for the 400-mctres freestyle. 

Nicola Fxbbens; of Hertford, 
was just one-hundredth of a 
second slower than Jane Kett, of 
Canaria, who beaded the quali- 
fiers for the women's 100- 
rhettes freestyle: Miss Fibbens 
recorded 57.64sec while 
Annabella Cripps swam 58.59. 

Cumbernauld's Jean Hill 
slashed over three seconds off] 
her Scottish record in the 400- 
metres medley final in 4min 
56-19sec. 

• The chief swimming judge, 
Leslie Turberville. ended up in 
the pool yesterday while trying 
to take a doser look at the stroke 
of one of the competitors in the 
women's 400-metres medley. 


COMMONWEALTH GAMES RESULTS 


BOWLS 


Men’s singles 

FIRST ROUND ; R ( . . 

(Fiji) 21-18; I Setback (Aus) M M 
(Bot) 21-4; S E&pfe IN III) K D U 
Merguand (Jed 21-6; I DMtison (NZ) bt R 

Young (Maw) 21-16. 

Men’s pairs . 

ROUNO 1: L PnrWns and S VWsNre WW) 
bt C WM and D Ward (Ena) 21-19: <3 
Knox and G Adrian (Sco) bt CTuragfcecI 
and J Srngn (fi?) 30-1* A ataefc and IK 
Herricks (Aust) bt R Ma scaranhas and J 
Thackray (Bot) 21-13. 

Men's Fours: 

FIRST ROUND: Scotland (M Graham. G 
Robertson, W Harkness. J Boyle) 28. 
Guernsey (G Pitsdoi. B Murohy. C 
BtondeLB Sfcnon) 11; Wales (R Weafe. W 
Thomas. H Thomas, J Morg*i) 19. 

r.L Bowden, Jfta»e*.P 
Ftp (K Gaunter. E 


REPECHAGE (first tour to final): 1. P 
Tatamafi (Cart 7mm 2139sec: Z J 
Armstrong (N Ire). 726.87; 3. R WSams 
(Wal). 7.38.75; 4. D Usher. 7-3330- 

SingleScufls 

MmMttofAaaes quaSty for teat nwrari- 

REftT^E1^Powe»(Aus)7n2^4;2,E 
Verttonk (NZ) 723.74: 3. M Hughes (Can) 
7:38.96: 4. R Howe* (WW) 7M.49 
HEAT TWO: 1. ST 
Z P M oar mastor 
Armstrong (N be) r 
(Gib) 8:1093 

Heavyweight sfcigtes sods 

REPECHAGE (flraMbur to final): 1. E 


SHOOTING 


G O'Meaghejl 
H Abrahams. 0 


MPU 
bt A 
bt 


. 17: 

Cavaduadua.P 

22. Swaziland 
Thompson. J 

Women’s Singles: 

FIRST ROUND: S McCron* 
rosier (Guo) 21-1; M Lura 
Davraxi (Wat) 21-19; E Bed 
MBiattmann (Jer) 21-14: 

Womens’* pairs; 

FIRST ROUND: S Godfrey and H fijehen 
(Aus) bt s Swiss and M (been (Bot) 24- 
16, J Mchofie and M Smith (Goer) bt J 
vans and 8 Stunbrigs Eng) 21-14; N 
MuMland and GBarie (Sort MW Fong 
and J Gaurriar (Fp 18-14. 

Women’s Fours: 

FIRST ROUND: Northern Ireland (K 
Me wrath, H HamHton, M MaJton, N A Hew 

23. Hong Kong (L King. J HofSss, R 
O'DomeS. H Wong) 1?: Australia (C 
Power. 8 Schenke. A Hettord. P Smith) 
l& England (B Atherton. M Alan. M Phce. 
8 FuBer) 18: Malawi (EHafcirig. A Ross, I 
Hartley. M Penman) 19, Scotland (S 
Gourtay.A Evans. J Memos. FWhyn) 19: 
Botswana (O Leacftttsr E Thomas. Y 
Richards. J Rhodes) M Mataw®. 22-13; 
Guernsey (F Bougotid. J firtgaa P FWv 
H White) bt Canada (M Paterson, D 
Mogndge, J Wintemute. E Jones). 20-12: 
Ausvart bt New Zeeland (D te Breton, V 
bridon. D Pane. J SriBBOni. 27-13. 


Rapid fire pistol pairs 

POSITIONS (after first stage): 1. England 
(T Turner and B GfcSngl 585: 2. Wales (G 
Irving and M Jay) 580; 3, HongKong 
(Gilbert U and Chung Km Ho) 574; 4. 
Guernsey (A Breton end GLsMatoe) 573; 
5, Scotland (H Lowe end H Hunter); 


Australia (P Murray and J Mast) 572; 7, 
(M Howkins 


and A ChevTSfite) 


Canada 
570. 

Air Rifle Pairs 

FINAL: 1, Canada (G Lotion end Miss S 
Bowes). I.l67pts (Games record): Z 



1pm, Synch r oni se d swknmmg figures 
ua Men's loom butterfly fineJ; women’s 


200m incftrldual m e dley trial; man's 400m 

ricfividual medtey Gnat; women's 20ftn 
breaststroke final; men's 4 x 200m 

freestyle relay trial; 9.15 Synchronised 


swimming duet uiuBuuiarim 
WEIGHTLIFTING (at Pteyhouse Theatre): 
2pn. 60kg dess; 730, 67J5kg dess 


TOMORROW 


ATHLETICS (at Meadowbenk Stadum): 
10am, Decathlon 1 00m; 1045, Decathlon 


tang jump; 12.15, Heptathlon long jump; 
1230, Men's 400m semifinals; 1235, 


Decathlon shot; L55pm, Heptathlon lav- 
' “ “ “ ' mas final; 2.1£ 


efin; Z Men's 110m hurdles 


Women's 1 00m semMrials;23&0ecatt- 
i's 100m semi- 


ton high lump; 240, Men's 
finals'. 3. Men’s 3,000m i 
semi-finale; 330, Women's 400m final; 
3-32, Men's 4Q0m find; 335, Women’s 
discus final; 4. Heptath lo n 800m; 425, 
Women's 100m friah 435, Men's 100m 
final: S, Women's 3.000m final; &3S, 
Oecathton 40ftn. 

BADMUFFON (at M ea dofbank): 10am. 
Team semi-finals (Winner group one v 
runner-up group two: winner group two v 1 
nmwHujyjroup one): 2, Thrif place play- 

i.j _ _ . gam, Men's 3*y 

i's slngtes. tours; 
. women's ario tes . 
pars, tours: 6, Man's singles, pairs, lours: 
women's pars. 


Victor Davis, of Canada, setting a Games record for the 
tin 256sec 


CYCLING (at Meadowbank Vetodramefc. 

OOOmincOvJo- 


230, 1 .OQOm spring heats: 4.000m i 


100m breastroke of Intin 


and Scotterd (A Allan and W MacNe*. 


in yesterday’s beats repechanj? ?D 00 m 7 'in&£Su£ pursuit 


1.137: 6, Wales (S Camay and D Arnold). 
1.132: 7. New Zeeland (E Adtem and S 


Patterson. 1.11& 8. Northern Ireland (M 
Maca and C Ogle). 1 .098; 9. Isle ot Man (H 
Creevy and S Wattarson). 1.084. 

Shotgun Olympic trench pairs: 
FMAL: 1, England (I Pool and P Boden) 
ISfipte: 2, Northern Ireland (EFurptiy and 
T Hewitt) 183: 3. Australia (T Rumbei ami 

D Etaz) 183: 4. Canada <J Primrose and G 
Leary) -183 (stiver and bronze medals 
decided on couitback): 5. Scotland (U 
Grvant 


Women 
100 metros freestyle 


HEAT ONE: 1 . 8 Thorpe, ( Aus) 58 £5secs: 

“ “9.17: 3. F McLay, 


Zealand-. Nfc Norfok islands; N be: 
Northern Ireland; Scot Scotland: Stop: 
: Swaz SwazBamt Wat Wteas: 
■Western Samoa: Van: Vanuatu. 


quarter-finals. 

SHOOTING 


SmaM bore itfia three 


(at Musselburgh): 9Jtto m . 


Pleasence, 


2, L DonneSy. (Sco) 59. 

(N2) 59^2: 4. S Wsteon, (SCO) 59.70; 5. A 
Chitsw. (JS1) imri 0208: 6. S Lewis. 
(Wahl 04.35 
HEAT 

2.PRa».i . 

59^7: 4. F Ng. (HK) Ii 
Medina. (NiH) 1 01.01. 

10158 


TODAY 


Air pistol pairs. 
nntEMMm 


rtn e three postfen pairs: 
Edrburgh Urtversky: 1200, 


ATHLETICS (at Mswfcwbank Stadium); 
IQBrt Heptathlon 100m furdtos; 1045. 


SWMBHNG (a Royal Commonwe al t h 
pool): 10am, Women's 400m freestyle 
heats; men's 100m freestyle heats; 
women's 100m backstroke heats: men's 
200m backstroke heats. 1pm, Women’s 
hightxnrd diving: men's sp ringbo ar d dhr- 


6. 5 Lee. (HK) 


H eptathl o n high jump: 1pm Hammer final; 
i's 100m heats; 2.15, Heptathlon 


CYCLING 


-WEIGHTLIFTING . 


HEAT THREE: 1 . J Kerr. JCjw) 57-64sac Z 


100 kaometre road team time 
trial: 

FMAL: 1. England (P Curran. D Davie, A 
Goms8,K Reynolds) 2hr13min 1638c 2. 
New Zealand. 2:1450: 3. Northern Ireland 
(J Barr. A Irvins, C McCann. M Quinn) 
215.13; 4. AiStrafe, 2:1841: 5. Canada. 
2:18.19; 6. tale el Man (0 Hatcher, M 
Kelly. P Kermaugh. S Porter). 221.15; 7. 
Scotland (K Clark, D Hannah. M Lime. B 
Melrose). 222.49; 8. Wales (S coles. J 
Evans. N Hughes, K Jones), 22827; 9, 


Under-52 kg 

FINAL POSITIONS (no attar or bronze 



A Cnpps. (Eng) 58Jft 3. P Noa*. (Can) 
59 14: 4. m McKrinel. (War) 59.70: 5. N 
CunBenns (Wal) 1mm 0096; 8. Celesta 
Hung. (HK) 1.01^3 

HEAT FOUR; 1. A Hams. (Ausj57J5sac 
2. J Pugh. (Aus) 58.48: 3. D Gore. (Eng) 
59.83: 4 C Jackson. (GUE) 1mm 0058: 5. 
J Guflier. (NIP) 1.01 .31; 6. S Hume (NZ) 


1.01 JBk 7. K Torrance, (NZ) 1 . 02A4 

INAL: Kerr. Ftobsns, 


.SWIMMING- 


QUALIFIERS FOR Fit 
Harris. Pugh. Thorpe, Cnpps. Hal. NoalL 

400 metres individual medley 

HEAT ONE: 1. D McGinns. (Can) 4mm 
54 42sec: 2. J Clatworthy. (Aus) 

4_55.03sec 3> J H *- (Sco) 4^6.19; 4. K 


Malawi. 


Men’s 400m Freestyle (i 

qualified for last night's fi 

HEAT CHE: 1. M Davidson. <M ‘ 


iht 


ReadJEnsfl 5.00R4; 5. 8^^^, (Can) 




3mri 
3. J 


rowing: 


8.1 


Men 

Ugtitweigtit single sculls 

Winners of beets quahfy for frist remain- 

HEAT afe Tc ai wh (Bril 7mri 


Zeatand) 7:41.55; 4. 
7MJB3. 


R WHiams 


Phjrnnier. (Au^4 J 
4.0436; 5. 1 Rosaer. (Wal) 4. 09J 
Nelson, (Stool 4. 09 A6. 

HEAT TWO 1. 0 Armstrong 3mri 
54.91sec Z J Davey. (Eng) 3S7.6S: 3. S 

neat’ THR ei:*i 7 K 80yd. (Eflrt »nri 
55 A&ec 2.T O'Hare. (Can) 3, M 

McKenzie, ( Aus l D 

Crutakshaik. (Sco) 4.0335: 5. M J«or. 
(NIR) 4. 0439:6. S GwynneJWaO 4.05.01; 
7. P Diamond. (SWZ) 4.4438 
GuaWters:' Armstrong. BowL'-Darey. Flow- 
ers. O'Hara. Cay. Bowie, ! 


533.07: 6. A RatdKf. (Sco) 5.12.! 

HEAT TWO: 1. S Hardcastts. (Eng) 4min 
50.02aec (Games record); 2. S Landafis. 
(Aus) 430.32: 3. M Pearson. (Aus) 
436.11; 4. G Stanley. (Eng) 437.02; 5. J 
McEfcoy. (Can) 5.01.74: fi. S Smart (SCO) 
5.0328 

QUALIFIERS FOR FINAL: Hartcastie. 
Landelte. McGjnms. Clatworthy. Pearson. 
HU. Stanley. Reed. 


•2. Woman! .. . 

shot; 3.10. Men's 100m second round: 4, 
Men s 110m hurdles semi-finals: 420 
Heptathlon 200m: 440 Women's 400m 
seml-flnats: 5, Men's 400m 2nd round: 
S.10 Men's 10.000m final 
BADMINTON (at Meadowbank): 10am, 
Guernsey v isle of Mam Scotland v Hong 
Kona; England v N. Ireland: Australia v 
New Zealand; 2, Canada v we of Man; 
New Zealand v N. Ireland. Scotland v 
Guernsey; Auetraka v Wales; 7, England v 
Australia; Canada v Scotland; Hong Kong 
v Guernsey: Wales v New Zealand. 
BOWLS (at Balgreen): Sam, Men's sto- 
gies. fours: women's singles, pevs. 1pm, 
Man's pairs; women s angles, — - 
fours. 6, Men's saigtes. pars, 
women's fours. 


ng; 6-30, women's 400m fteutyte triak 
men s 100m freestyl e trial; women's 
100m backstroke final: men's 200m 
backstroke final; women’s 4 * 100m 
freestyle relay finaL 9.15, Syncrirontaed 
swemring solo find. 

WEtGHTLFnNG ret Playhouse Theatre 
2pm, 75kg class: 730pm, 82-Sfl dess. 


TV TIMES 


BOXING (at righston): 230, Prelimnaries; 
Prefrmaries. 


7JO, 


Today 

BBC1: 9am-7pm (Grandstand, todudtog 
atHtocs. rowing and swimming); 935pm- 
1135. 

BBC2 7(xn-B2Q (swrimfing) 

Tomorrow 

BBCl: 9.55em-1 235pm: 9.56pm- 
1135pm. 

BBC2 1.55pn>6.0Sprn; 630pm-83pm. 


England row into 






if- 




ByJimBaOtDD 



The regatta 

opened at the 

County Park m 

Strathclyde yes- 
terday with six 
races in the 

men's sculling 

events, aimed at eliminating 
four crews from the Common- 
wealth Games competition. The 
unlucky scullers were Jim 

Sloane, of Scotland, and Leslie 
Grech, of Gibraltar, in the 
lightweight single sculls and 
Patrick Armstrong, of Northern 
Ireland, and Stuart Bensdden, of 
Gibraltar, in the heavyweight 
singles. Lightweight singles 

sculler Cart Smith opened up 
England's account with an easy 
victory qualifying directly for 
today's finaL 

Smith ns the first winner of a 
Commonwealth regatta event 
for 24 years. The last time, 
towing was included in the 
programme was in Path m 

But the class lightweight 
sculler yesterday was Peter 
Antonie, of Australia, who went 
off fast and led to finish, with al- 
most five lengths to spare over 
Peter Tatersall, of Canada. 
Antonie's time beat the 
Commonwealth Games record 


for heavyweight single scufls sei 
by Strart . Mackenzie, of Austra- 
lia, on LLynPadamm Wales in 
1958, by more than 7sec_ 

If Steve Redgrave, of En- 
gland, had aoreferated.i»e would 
have joined the few wbfc have 
beaten the seyen-ritihirte bonier 
over 2,000 metres in Vie singe 
scuds. - 

Yesterday's-, heal- 1 from 
Redgrave was easy ’ Q his quest 
for- three Commonwealth 
Games gold medals to add to his 
list of battle honours. By the 
fi nish, he was almost. hr slow 
motion, but fortunately, .not 
freeze-frame rating as he fin- 
ished 22 ahead of iPluHp 
Kittermaster (Scotland ^Patrick 
Armstrong . (Northern behind) 
and Bensaden. 

Northern . Ireland s Artn- 
strong family are here in force. 
Brothers John and Patriefc ccmj- 
tested the tight and heavyweight 
singles scuitt while John’s wife, 
Kathryn, is a member, of foe 
Northern Ireland lightweight 
four. The sculiersYfa- 
iher, Mike, was a member trffoe 
Northern Irish eSght hi 1958 / 

Seven gold medals - will be 
decided in .-today's .V finals, 
inciuding the - men's heavy- 
weight eight. 




- 


1 *s‘r - 

**£■ . 


:te 


■ a 






g-: 


■vf ‘ * 


:> 




* 1 . 


Rolling aloi^: A Northern Ireland pair sway to curve of the wood (Photograph; Ian Stewart) 


Auckland 
men beat 
favourites 


Storming 
to a win 


By Richard Eaton 


Arm Dainton, of Wales. 21-13 hi 
the women's singles. Mrs Line 
plays Scotland's r epre se nt ati ve, 
Senga McCrooe, today. 

England lost all their fonr 
matches in the morning. Those 
weU-known brot hers from Cro- 
mer, Chris and David Ward, 
went down 19-21 to Lyn Perkins 
and Spencer WHshire, of Wales, 
and Pfp BranfiekTs rink failed 
by the same margin — 27-29 — 
against the Welsh side skipped 
by Jim Morgan. 

Mach the same fate befell the 
English women's pairs and fours 
against Gnernsey and Anstralia. 
But defeat at this stage matters 
less than ft mi ght late; riace 
eaph erent Is run on a le ag ue 
system and up to 11 matches 
remain in which to repair any 
early rinmagp 



The burden of 
bong 1 expected 
to win all six 
old' .medals 
ooked heavy 
when the mens 
doubles fa- 


vourites And yG oode and Nigel 


Tier were defeated by the New 
Zealanders yesterday. 

It may not matter very much 
because the European women's 
doubles champions. Gil) Claric 
and Gillian Gowers, were soon 
completing a winning 3-1 lead 
with a straight-games win over 
Kauin Lockey and Karen Phil- 
lips. Afterwards, Tier admitted 
he was unwelL 


It was a magnificent effort by 
Graeme Robson and Pbil 
Home, who are the British 
Airways Masters champions. 
Home does not (day on the 
world Grand Prix circuit and 
Robson had to spend his own 
money to do so. 

One suspects that England are 
still vulnerable to Scotland mid 
Wales in the men's doubles, just 


as they were when they beaten in 
earlier in the 


the Thomas CupM 
yea*, ' ' 

The Welshmen. Orris Rees 
and Lyndon Williams. looked 
like beating Bill Thompson mid 
Rikki Keag in straight games. 
Thai helped Wales to a £-2 wm 
over Northern Ireland, who beat 
them in the European 
championships. _ . 


and gold 



England’s . cj- 
efists struck gold 
In style on foe 
outskirts- of 
Edinburgh yes- 
terday wifa. ' a 
storafoqt- victory, 
in the 100km team time trfaL 
And Nerfoeru Irehmd made ita 
great apemng day far foe lurae 
c oaut ries by takfag tte hune, 
their first medal m Cmmasn- 
weafth Games cycling history. 

■ Gold rad wfady- though / foe*i 
condhaRS woe, uothmg cotddTf' 
detract from the Joy felt by the 
r EDgBslniKit,M Canon, Dene 
Davie, Alan GomaU, and Keith 
Reynolds- The four, defending n 
tide England on in Brisbane 
ioar years ago, mad e a perfect 
start and were never o ver tfldcnk: - 

Gsraifl'M^ieamatte fine, 
was Msec .ms they oo^pietedfoe - 
623-mBe coarse in 2hr, Dfo, 
lbsec. New Zealand ejected 
foe saver medal while Ntnfocsn . 
Ireland were 177sec down on 
fa tfevd place. - 
Curraa and his tooOeagws 
never gave foe 11 other taams a 
dunce- I^efnn-riders stayed in 
perfect lormatira alm o a t nutll 
foe end, when Reynolds- was . 
dropped. Aff but one of foej^-" 
jdnds-- Northern bdnd-rltu' 

#■ mi at vital 'stages and 
effectively rained their chances. 

Nerthon Inland, amanwhOe, 
were starting their own cdelWa- 
tions after pnsbmg Anstrafiatod 
Off the hraoze medal position by 
28seo . . -• 


err* 




jswfi-; 


a ’■ 




*• -' . 


- ;^J» 

■ •'■'A. 


-jf s* ’ 

iv? • _ 




.» - n 


*3 





KEY 


CYCLING (at Memowfenk veJcCromet 
7pm, 1 ,0OOin IndtvWual trim trial 
ROWING (at Stratodyoa Courary Parti): 
Ham, Women's ooxless pairs firm; 1130 
Men's ogms final: 12, women's double 
scutis final; 1230 Men's Figmwetght stogie 
scuts final; iprt men's sngte sons finaH 
130 Women's eights final: Z men's 
shl eoxteSB loura final. 


Jb\ Mumetourgh^ 


A* Australia; Benre Bermuda: Bot 
Botswana; Car Canada: Caw Cayman 
Islands; Cook: Cook islands: Ena En- 
gland: Falc Falkland islands: FBI; 6b 
GiOraltarC — ■■ 


Small tiara 
fire pstol pairs: (at Kippen): 


Shotgun skeet pairs. 

SWIMM — ‘ _ 


prone para: 1130 Rapid 
1130, 


MG (at Royal Commonwealth 
i's 1 0dra I 


i.Guan Guernsey. HK Hongkong; 
KMC iste of Man: Jen Lee 


Lesotho; M at Malawi; Malta; 


Nan 


pool]: 103a Men s IbOm butterfly heats: 
women's 200m intondual medtay heats: 
men's 400m indwiduai medtey heats; 
women s 200m oreaststroka haatr. men's 
4 x 200m freestyle relay neats. 


The Pjrgfish Amatenr Boxing 
Assodatira hare .tunied down 
an invitation to take parkin an 
international toomament m N»- 
geria later this year. The iuvfta- 
tion reached foe ABA only two 
days before the Nigerians an- 
nounced then- boycott of the 
Co m mo n w ea lth Games. “We 
are not a politically minded 
body, but if we went to Nigeria, it 
woald only satisfy their 
go v er nme nt,'" eUve Howe, the 
ABA secretary, said. 


REGIONAL TELEVISION VARIATIONS 


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SATURDAY 


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tarta Ctovor 536 John ShertsTree- 


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Gohagyn 


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tSe&ii* 



THE TIMES SATURDAY JULY 26 1986 


31 


Saturday 


Weekend television and radio programmes 
Edited by Peter Dear and Peter Davalle 


Sunday 


for fw 

S^sJ 

sa^bfsi 

$ 5 *$* 



BBC 1 


6.45 Open IMvwsity. Until 
- 8. 25. 

a 35 The Ffintstonw. Cartoon 

adventures of a modem 

Stone Age famfly. 

940 Grandstand introduced by ■ 
Desmond Lynam from 
Edinburgh. The fine-up is: 
XUI Commonwealth 
Games: track and field 
events including the finals 
.. of the hammer and the 
men's 10.000 metres: the 
rowing finals: and 
. swimming. Plus news of 
bowls, badminton, boxing, 
cycling, shooting and 
»»eigWifang;Crtekot: First 
\ Test third day's play in 
v . the match at Lord's 

between England and New 
Zealand. The 
c omme n ta tors are Richie 
Benaud and Tony Lewis 
with summaries by Ted 
Dexter and Bob Wfflis; 


OriotT Diamond Stakes 

LOO); die Princess 

f Stakes (235); 


and the King George and 
Queen Elizabeth Diamond 
Stakes (3.20). The race 
commentator is Peter 
CSutievan. News 

summary and weather at 
■ 1-00- 

7.00 News with Jan Learning. 

Weather. 

7.10 Cartoon. 

7.15 RncBfflonDoflar Brain 
(1967) starring Michael 
. Caine as Harry Palmer. 

Len Detghton's anti-hero 
■ secret agent, in this 
^ adventure, on a mission to 
... . Finland with a 


“ «fts> 

H l * 

m ftrdij ^ 

in Jbe MOltBoJft* 

: ^>-®nbtn ifcSft 

^«ix opening d»SS 

I lt«r first niSVn^ 
S "Wdth Games 

1 “ d *** tW . 

I «KKlit»ns »Bn. -Jr*' 

i JeasCTfroafcjjg# 

i teraasS 

s RejBoWs.TitebjTaJJ 
j t iue En gland sh ■ h# 
i tour >ears a«a aiieiil 
l ^artandutreBe^J 
: i Ttwir tlczonr 

; ! Vanall led ten™*! 

• ■ as 94ser as tin fmfcy 

; conwYSE 

"• low. Ne» 

. : ihr sil*«r medal 

• Ireland were I7?wckn, 

; England in third pin 

' j Curran and las ab 

- ■ r«*<rr ^aie [helleteBi 

• rhanre. Tb* frarrifaj^i 
i perfect fonnana 

■ ; rhe tni »ben tndfci 

• tm&td. Ul tanrffc 

; r;*4.'< - \ontmbhi-k 

- ; a cun at "irinjii 
: . effected) rained bite 
• , Northern IreiuLtte 
"• » K-crestaressiifflimril 

■ i Ate- after pn^riEHAmb 
“ • «.7 t'r.t broste ottU|ob 

: ZS%cc. 

. i ..-ar; vsWss* 

■ i ~^t^sr 

I TVS a^'SS 

■ s-rasssS 

, i 

C E NTRAL 

: — -s.tf assS 


Jhe meets his 

/adversary, Colonel 
Stock, head of Russian 
fntetligenoe. With Kiri 
Malden, Francoise 
Dorieacand Oscar 
Homolka. Directed by Ken 
Russell. (Ceefax) 

9.00 The Bob Monkhouse 
Show. The entertainer's 
guests this week are 
Robert GuUaume, Jimmy 
• Cricket, and Hale and 
Pace:(r) 

940 News and Sport. With Jan 
Learning. Weather. 

9-55 XIII Commonwealth 
Games. Highlights of the 
day's events including this 
- -evening’s swimming finals, 
introduced by Desmond 
Lynam. (Ceefax) 

11.55 Lste Night in Concert 
Anne Nightingale 
introduces highlights of a 
concert recorded in 
Melbourne by the 
Australian band INXS. (r) 
1X25 Weather. 



Alfred BreedeL BBC2, 9.00pm 


TV- AM 


255 Good Monting Britain 
presented by RJchand 
Keys. Weather at 6£8; 
news at 7 .00; regional 
report at 7.08: sport at 
7.10. 

730 The Wide Awake Cfub 
includes news headlines at 
&20 and a news special at 
900. 


ITV/LONDON 


025 Oat Fresh! 

bade in time to an i 
NorfoHc vWage. 1120 
Tarrahawka. 

12.00 News. 

12.05 WMstBng. Three bouts 
from Buxson PavtSon. 

1.00 FBmBiofKSeTalwsa 
Vacation* (1939) starring 
Penny Singleton and 
Arthur L ake. More comedy 

^aotic ? ^n^^a?family. 
Directed by Frank R 
Strayer. 

220 That’s My Boy. Comedy 
series starring Moffie 
Sugden. (r) 320 
Christopher Coturnbus- 
Part one of a serial about 
the celebrated saHor. 445 

Waft Disney Presents. 
Three Little Pigs. 

520 News. 

525 TheGrumbteweeds 
Show. The manic quintet 
in another series of 
comedy sketches. 

525 John Silver's Return to 
Treasure Island. Jim is 
arrested for murder. 

620 And There’s More 
Cricket Comedy series 
starring Jimmy Cricket 
7-00 We Love TV. A test of 
television programmes 
knowledge with questions 

Havers!xton ftendereon 61 
and Andrew Sachs. 

720 Summertime Special. 

Ve 

Maxi 

guest are Randy i 
and Harvey and the 
Wallbangers. 

820 AB Star Secrets presented 
by Michael Parkinson. 
What do Lynda 
Bellingham, Michael 
Bentine, Patricia ' 

Derek Jameson 
George Layton, have to 
h«Je?(Oracte) 

920 News and sport 
9.15 Fane The Way We Were 
(1973) starring Robert 
Redford. Barbra Streisand 
and Bradford Diliman. A 
love story, spanning 
several years, about a 
couple who first meet 
when at university in 1937. 
She is awkward, hard 
working and politically 
motivated; he is the 
opposrte-agokfen 
member of the rich set hell 



Leffc Gary Cooper and Grace Kefly: Hiah Noon (BBC2, 1025pm). 
Right: Elaine Taytor J*ef er EgamThe Organization (C4«920pm) 


625 




BBC 2 


University. Until 


bent on enjoying 
themselves. Directed by 
Sydney Pollack. (Oracle) 
LWTNcfws headlines 


1125 


11JKi 20 Years On.'The popular 
press is discussed by 
David Frost and his 
guests, Ian Botham, Ken 
Livingstone and Erika 
Roe. 

1220 StncHo 1 hi Concert. Rock 
■ and roil. 

125 Race Round Britain in 
■ yachts. 

1.40 Ntght Thoughts. 


125 Cricket First Teat Peter 
West introduces coverage 
of the afternoon session of 
the third day's play in the 
match at Lord's between 
England and New 
Zealand. 

6.10 Laramie. Western 
adventure .(f) 

720 XIII Commonwealth' 
Games, introduced by 
Steve Rider from the 
Royal Commonwealth 
Pool. Edinburgh, the 

venue for die swimming 

finals. The commentators 
are Alan Weeks and 
Hamilton Bland. Plus, 
news of the Games' other 
events; Ascot highlights; 
and the best of tee action 
from Lord's. 

820 News View. Jan Learning 
with the day's news; Moira 
Stuart reviews the week's 
events in pictures with 
subtitles. Weather. 

920 Liszt Week. The first of six 
programmes celebrating 
tee ufe of Franz Uszt who 
died 100 years ago in 
Bayreuth during a visit to 
his friend. Richard 
Wagner. The celebrated 
pianist Alfred Brendei, 
plays Annees de 
pelemaga; Book One - 
Switzerland, a work of 
nine separate pieces 
based on Liszt's travels to 
Switzerland when he was 
in his Twenties. Recorded 
at the Middle Temple HaH 
in London. 

10.05 Film: High Noon* (1952) 
starring Gary Cooper and 
Grace Kelly. A classic 
western in which Cooper 
won an Oscar for his role 
as a small-town marshal 
who. on the day of his 
retirement and of his 
marriage. Is deserted by 
his townsfolk when they 
(earn that the marshal s 
deadliest enemy and his 
gang are arriving on the 
noon tram, bent on 
revenge. Directed by Fred 
Zinnemann. 

1125 Cricket First Teat 
Highlights of the third 
day's play In the game at 
Lord's between England 
and New Zealand. 

1125 fibre Konga (1961) 

starring Michael Gough, 
Margo Johns and Jess 
Conrad. Horror movie 
about a mad scientist who. 
.. after, a year ioAfrica, 
brings back to London a 
baby chimpanzee on 
which he experiments with 
a growth serum. Directed 
by John LemonL Ends at 

12a 


CHANNEL 4 


125 Eco. Mike Harding rambles 
on a Peak District walk 
through some of the worst 
man-made environmental 
disasters imaginable- 
120 8kda at Britain. An RSPB 
film about tee mute swan. 

220 Hotel Barter (1945) 

starring Raymond Massey 
and Peter Lorre. Second 
Work} War drama set in a 
large, once luxurious hotel 
in bomb blasted Berlin. 
Directed by Peter Godfrey. 
325 FibK The Mysterious Mr 
Moto* (1938) starring 
Peter Lorre as a Japanese 
detective who has himself 
imprisoned on Devil’s 
Island in order to learn 
more about a gang of 
assassins. Directed by 
Norman Foster. 

525 Brookside. (rX Oracle) 

6.00 Right to Reply. Diverse 
Reports' Christine 
Chapman defends her 
programme. The Anti- 
Raost Tendency, against 
accusations of racism. 

620 1986 Tour de France. 
Stage 22 - Clermont- 
Ferrand to Nevers. 

720 News summary and 
weather followed by The 
Sons of Abraham. Part 
eight - the story of the 
Samaritan sect 
720 The Curative Treatment 
Christopher Hird 
investigates what happens 
to companies who are the 
subject of takeover bids - 
how tee bids are made 
and how the companies 
defend themselves. 

820 Newhart American 
domestic comedy series. 
920 The Organization. Part 
one of a seven-episode 
drama series, first shown 
in the Seventies, set in the 
public relations 
department of a large 
industrial organisation. 
Starring Donald Sinden. 

1020 HU Street Blues. The 
murder of a black suspect 
means trouble for Furrlto. 
(Oracle) 

1025 fibn: The Eyes Have K- 
(1942) stamng James 
Mason and Joyce 
Howard. Thriller, set on ' 
the Yorkshire Moors, 
about a teacher on hoOday 
who takes shelter in the 
home of a reclusive 
composer. Directed by 
Leslie Ariiss. 

12,25 FUnc The Hidden Hand* 
11942) starring Crate 
Stevens. Comedy thriller 
set m a mansion with 
sliding panels and lots of 
dead bodies. Directed by 
Ben Stoloff. Ends at 125. 


FREQUENCIES: Radio 1:1053kHz, 
95L5; Radio 4: 

1458kHz/206m: 



Radio 2: 693kHz/433m; 809kHz/330m; Radio 3: 1 21 5kHz/247m:VHF-90- 
ilnr VHF 972; Capital: 1548kHz/194m: VHF952; BBC Radto London: 


■ "£-?*■ ' 

»gZe 

5 ." -> 


,1*? 

gap 

‘ 

VJf? 

;HA 

. 

ijS-ri 

ITsK 

%■ 

v.-y 

L'f? 


( Radio 4 ) 

On long wave. VHF variations at end 

525 Shipping. 6.00 News. 6.10 
Proude(s) 

620 News: farming. 620 
Prayer. 625 Weather; 
travel 

720 News 7.10 Today's 
Papers. 7.15 On Your 
Farm (salmon farming). 725 
In Perspective (religious 
affairs). 720 Down to Earth. 
725 Weather; travel 

820 News. 8.10 Today’s 
Papers. 8.15 Spoil on 4. 

Tony Adamson meets 
competitors in tee 
Commonwealth Games. 8.48 
Parliament 827 
weather; travel 

920 News 

925 I’m Sorry, I Haven't a 
Clue (new series]. Panel 
game chaired by Humphrey 
Lyttelton (s) 

920 Ne^rs Stand. David 
Bradbury reviews the 


10.05 The week in 

Westminster. With 
George Jones of the Daily 

1020 Left with Ned 
Sberrin and guests. 

1120 From Our Own 

Correspondent Ufe and 
politics abroad. 

1220 New# Culinary 
Characters. Jane 
Grigspn. The Observer's 
food expert 

1227 The News Quiz (s). With 
Martyn Young. Richard 
Ingrams. Gay Search. Aten 
Coren. Barry Took. 1225 
Weather 
120 News 

1.10 Devon Journeys [new 
series] with Tom 


220 News; me Afternoon 
Play. Voyages by Ted 
Moore. With Valene 
Georgeson as the 

pregant widow. Drama^et in 

a smafl town on the 
North-East coast in 1939 as 

a family waits for the vrar 

raafly to get into its stride#) 

3.15 British Uars In America. 

Ray Boston draws an 
historical parallel with 


320 

International 

Assignment BBC 
correspondents report 

420 The Saturday Feature: 

Who Needs Adventure? 

The importance of 
adventure- training in me 

education of young people. 
Contributors inducing 
The Prince of Wales. 

445 In Keeping with Tradition- 
Veit to the housekeeper 
of a sporting lodge in me 

Hebrides. . 

520 The Living World. The 
influence of tee 

environment in dstamwi mg 
the. sex of animals during 

incubation^rt „ _ , 

525 We^c Encflito. Satirical 
review (s)l 520 SHpptng. 
525 Weateen travel 
620 News; Sports Roimd-up 
625 Stop the Week, with 
Laurie Taylor in Robert 
Robinson^s chav. Includes a 
song from Peter 
SkeSem^s) 

720 SaturdaymightTheam 
A Darkening of the Moon 


byJame 

Graham 


James FoHett Wlte 
ay and 

Biaci Fairman playing, 
respectively, the young 
man who becomes blinded 
when pushed Wo a 
bush, and Ns older self who 
recounts his story to his 
wffa A true story, based on 
the writer's own 
experiences^) 

820 Baker’s Dozen. Richard 
Baker with records (s) 

920 Thriller! Elizabeth 

Ironside's A Very Private 
Enterprise read by Lewis 
Fiancter (5). 928 Weather 
1020 News 

10.15 Evening Service (s) 

1020 The Good Box. Brian 
Redhead continues his 
exploration of tee Bible 
1120 Science Now. With Peter 
Evans. 

1120 Don’t Stop Now- It’s 
Fund ation. Comedy 
cabaret (s). 

12.00 News; weather. 1223 


(VlaRni 

feGraui 


Shipping 
VHF (available in 


England and S 


Wales only) as above except 525- 
6.00am Weather travel. 420- 


6.00 Options: 420 Ray Gosling 
gets a taste of Urdu. 420 Not 
Another Diet Programme. 520 
Jean-Paut Sartre 520 Back on 


Course. 


( Radio 3 ) 

On VHF only: i. 

625 Open University*. Education 
Bulletin 6. Until 625am 
On medium wave only: - 
625 Weather. 720 News 
725 Aubade: Chabrfer 

(Gwendoline overture). 
Scarlatti (Six Sonatas: 
Horowitz, piano), Handel 
(The King shaD rejoice). 
Mozart (Flute Quartet In 
C.K 285b: with NicoleL 
flute). Falla (Three 
Dances. Three-cornered 
hat). Chopin (Ballade No 
4 : Horowitz, piano). 

Gershwin (items from 
Porgy and Bess, with 
Roberta 

AJaxandersoprano). 

Copland (Four dance 
episodes, Rodeo). 920 
News 

926 Stereo Release: 

Beethoven (Rutes of 
Athens overture). Schumann 



Brian Blessed: on ITV, 535pm 


Sonata No 

Irauten/Paraskievesco), 

Tubin (Symphony No 5) 
10.15 Music from Court ot 
Frederick tee Great 
Raglan Baroque Players and 
Patrizta Kwetia, soprano. 
Works by Quantz, Hasse, 
Graun. and CPE Bach 
1025 Test Match; third day of 
the England v New 
Zealand match. Continues on 
medium wave until 
620pm 
On VHF only: - 
1025 Vaises nobles et 

sentimemaies: CaroSne 
Palmer (piano). Schubert 
(Vaises senfenentales. D 
779), Ravel (Vaises nobles et 
sentimemaies). Schubert 
(Vaises 
nobles. D 969) 

1120 BBC Welsh SO (under 
Marriner). BBC Walsh 
Chorus, and soloists 
Marshall, Hodgson, 

Davies and Tomlinson. 
Mozart (Symphony No 
35). Mozart (Requiem in D 
minor, K 626L 1.00 News 
1205 Payny and Holbrooke: 
Albion Wind Ensemble. 
Parry (Wind Nonet). 
Holbrooke (Sextet No 3) 
220 Chifcngirian String Quartet 
Stan h arnmer (Quartet No 
3), Rosenberg (Quartet No 5) 
320 Tosca: Pucom's three- 
act opera, sung in Italian. 
With CaUas. Gobbi and Oi 
. Stefano in the cast De 
Sabata contacts Chorus and 
Orchestra ol Teatro afia 
■ Sea la 

520 Jazz Record Requests: 

with Peter Clayton 
945 Quest for Queneau: 
documentary presented 
‘ Richard 

).Contrfbutors 

Ws Murdoch and 

Francois Naudtn (r) 

620 Organ music James 
Lancelot (at Blenheim 
Palace) plays works by 
Hindemith and Reger 
720 St George and the 
Pussyfoots: Alan Ball 
presents a toast to Professor 
George Salntsbury (r) 


720 Proms 86: BBC SO 

(under Ronald Zoflman). 
Part one. Debussy (Ballet 
Jeux), Bartok ( Four 
. Orchestral Pieces. Op 12) 


8.10 


Superior Savagery: 

David Martin, Professor 
of Sociology at the LSE on 
the erosion of tee 
authority of tee generation of 
Barbara WOotton 


820 Proms 86: Stravinsky 
(the opera The 
Nightingale). Sung in 
Russian. BBC Singers 
with soloists Bryn-Juison. 
Walker, Laurence, Gafey. 
Brocheter. Bastin.and 
Richard van Allan. 


920 Mendelssohn: Stuttgart 
PtenoTno. The D ranor 
trio. Op 49 

1025 Nash Ensemble: Mozart 
(Wind Serenade hi C 
minor. K 388). Wagner 
(Siegfried idyll). Strauss 
(Sutra JnB tlat Op 4) 

1120 The Jazz 

pjauiuLreuJuSngn made 
at last year's Pandiey Manor 
Jazz FeswaL With 
Charles Fox 

1127 News. 1220 Ctosadown. 


( Radio 2 ) 

On medium wave. See Radio 1 
for VHF variations. 

News on the hour until 120pm, 
then 320, 8.00, 720 and hourly 
from 10.00. Commonwealth 
Games reports at 1022am, 1122, 
1222pm. 922. 11.02. 

420 Dave Bussey (s) 620 
Steve Truelove (s) 825 David 
Jacobs (a) mod Sounds of the 
60s (s) 1120 Atoum Time with 
Peter Clayton (s) 120pm 
Huddwinks starring Roy Hudd 120 
Commonwealth Games special 

ia Hunraford and 


presented by Glori 
Renton LaJdlaw. O 


Other 


v New Zealand) and racing from 
Ascot Also cycling (Tour de 

France). 820 Tchaikovsky from 
the Royal Festival Halt (joking 
VHF). md at 820220 Internal: 
David Gltiard and Peter Schaufuss 
on Tchaikovsky and the ballet 
traditin 920 String Sound (s) 1025 
Martin Keiner (s) 12.05am Night 
Owls with Dave Geliy (s) 12ojean 
Chains presents Nigntride I 


ints Nightride(s) 
A Little Night Music. 


( Radio 1 ) 

On mertum wave. VHF 
variations at and. 

News on the half-hour untfl 
1220pm. then 220, 320. 520, 

720, 920, 1220 midnight 
620 Mark Page 820 Peter 
Powell 1020 Dave Lee Travis 
120pm Adrian Juste 220 The 
Best of Rod. Rod Stewart talks to 
Janice Long 320 The American 
Chart Show, with Gary Byrd (s) 520 
Saturday Live fe)620 In 
Concert (s) 720 Simon Mayo 920- 
1220 Midnight Runners Show 
(with Dixie (reach). VHF Radios 1 6 
2- 4.00am As Radio 2. 120pm 
As Radio 1 . 720 Tchaikovsky from 
the Royal Festival Halt. Antony 
Hopkins conducts a programme ot 
orchestral favourites. 920- 
420am As Radto 2. 


WORLD SERVICE 


&00 Newsdesk 6J0 Jazz for the Aattw 
7JOO News 729 Twenty-Four Hours 720 
From Our Own C or respondent 725 
Sponswcrtd 820 News 829 Reflections 
8.15 The Pleasure's Yours 920 News 928 
Review of Bmisti Press 9.15 Science m 
Action 925 Piano Ro* 10.00 News 1021 
Short Stay 10.15 O as scal Record Re- 
view 1120 News 1129 News About 
Britain 11.15 From our Ovm Corraspon- 
dent 1120 Play eltfw Week /Adventures 
of the Ingenious Genileman Don Oubcote 
da La hta«ha) 120 News 129 Twenty 
Four Hours 120 Sportsworid 145 Tony 
Myatf Request Show 220 News 2 20 
Uystary ot the Blue Tram 320 Radio 
Newsreel 3.15 Concert HaH 42b News 


Sports 


Commentary 4.15 Spor ts worid 545 
. is Roundup 820 News 829 Twenty- 
Four Hours 820 Sunday Half Hour 920 
News B2t Sportsworid 9.15 The 
Pleasure's Yours 1020 News 1029 Tm 
Macftra 1025 Book Choca 1020 Finan- 
cial Review 1040 Rsflecoorie 1045 
Sports Roundup 1120 News 11.09 Com- 
mentary 11.15 Letter from Amenes 1120 
A Word in Edgeways 1220 News 1228 
* Britan 12 


News About! 


12.15 Radto Newsreel 


1220 Ratagtous Sense 120 News 121 
Eficentne Travelers 125 Phfa Jones 
brass Ensmeie 2-00 News 229 Review 
Ol the British ness 2.1S Sportwrorkl 220 
Science ifl Action 320 News 329 News 
About atom 3.15 Good Books 045 
Raflections 450 Waveguide 620 News 
529 Twenty4=our Hours 525 Rscordng 
ot me Waek. AX times In GMT. 


Regional 7T on facing page 


BBC 1 


6.45 Open University. Until 
IL50. 8S5 Play SchooL 

9.10 Sunday Worship. A 
service to comm rsslon 
eight Methodist 
missionaries, held in 
Trsnteam Gardens. Stoke- 
on-Trent 

9£5 XIII Commonwealth 
Games, introduced by 
Steve Rider. Daley 
Thompson begins his 
Decathlon challenge at 

1 0.00 with the 1 00 metres. 
Plus bowls, badminton, 
swimming and shooting. 

1JL35 Farming. Would 

America n-styte share 
farming be the answer for 
Britain's young farmers 
finding difficulty in 
acquiring full-scale 
tenancies? Dan 
Cherrington investigates. 
1258 Weather. 

1.00 News headlines 1.05 
Bonanza. Hoss’a 
testimony sends a man to 
jail. Hoss then has to face 
the man's alcoholic wife 
and to provide for teeir 
child, (r) 1.50 Cartoon 200 
EastEndere. (rK Ceefax) 

3.00 FBm: Heaven Knows, Mr 
Afiison (1957) starring 
Deborah Kerr and Robert 
Mitchum. Second Wextd 
War story about a United 
States marine who is 
washed up on a Pacific 
island where the only 
other inhabitant is a nun. 

In between dodging the 
enemy, the odd couple 
come to terms with each 
other in a comic and 
sometimes moving way. 
Directed by John Huston. 

4.40 The Pink Panther Show. 
Three cartoons, (r) 

5.00 Great Railway Journeys 
of the WorkL Ludovic 
Kennedy crosses the 
United States from 
Pennsylvania Station. New 
York, to Union Station. 

Los Angeles, (r) (Ceefax) 

640 Wild Britain. This week, 
along with the bam owl 
family of stars, are bats, 
butterflies, a rabbit a hen 
harrier, and cheetahs. 

6.30 News with Moira Stuart 
Weather. 

6.40 Home on Sunday. Cliff 
Micheimore is m 
Launceston. Comwati, to 
talk to the poet Charles 
Causiey. (Ceefax) 

7.15 F3m: Misunderstood 
(1983) starring Gene 
Hackman as Ned, an ex- 
racketeer living in Tunisia 
and grieving over the 
recent death of his 
beloved wife. He throws 
himself into his business, 
neglecting his two young 
sons, placing them in tee 
care of a governess. How 
can he regain their 
tove?Directed by Jerry 
Schatzberg. 

245 News with Moira Stuart 
Weather. 

9J)0 Ptay: This is Ifistory, 

Gran, by Robert Holman. 
Lord Langbaurgh is 
strolling in the grounds of 
his country home when he 
makes a shocking 
discovery teat stuns the 
Chapman family from a 
nearby town. Starring Paul 
Jesson and. making nis 
debut Martin-WaScer. - 
(Ceefax) 

9£5 XUI Co mmon wealth 
Games .High! tohts of the 
day's events. (Ceefax) 
11.55 The Sky at Mght Patrick 
Moore talks to Dr Paul 
Murdin of the Royal 
Greenwich Observatory, 
about a supernova 
discovered in the 
Centaurus A system. 

1215 Weather. 


TV-AM 


6£5 Good Morning Britain, 
begins with ’A Thought for 
a Sunday* 7.00 Are You 
ake Yat?; 


Awake 

Extra. 


; 7.25 WAC 


I Berg £ 
Gordon Honeycombe. 


ITV/LONDON 


<L25 Wake Up London. The 
Vicious Boys, inspired by 


(09-45 

Roger Rsaqet Cartoon, (r) 

1050 Morning Worship from 
Tyndaie Baptist Church. 
Clifton, Bristol 11.00 
Getting On. A 
documentary profile of 
orgnto gardener Lawrence 

11.30 Reasons. Paul Sieghart 
asks three philosophers - 
Ronald Dworidn. Ted 
Honderich, and Neil 
MacComtick - if we should 
obey all rules, good and 
bad 1200 Jobwateh 
examines the free training 
courses offered to those 
thinking of starting teeir 
own businesses 1230 
Take 30. Terry and Jerry, 
the tour-piece. 
Birmingham-based band 
whose lyrics comment on 
aspects of Ufe In Britain. 

120 Catweazto. Ghost hunters 
are .called to King's 
Farthing and Catweazle 
joins in the hunt (0 1-30 
Tetebuga. Cartoon, (r) 

200 Survival of the Fittest The 
Aerial Ropes event of the 
Britvic 55 Challenge. 

230 News headlines followed 
by FMm: Susp e c t * (1960) 
starring Tony Britton. 
Virginia Maskefl and Peter 
Cushing. Spy thriller about 
a team ofgovemment 
research chemists with a 
traitor in their midst 
Directed by John and Roy 
Boulting. 

4.00 Dramarama: Look at Me, 
by David Blake and Alan 
Banham. An award 
winning play about a deaf 
boyand a 'nearing' boy. (t) 

430 The Campbells. Rebecca 
Simms comes to the aid of 
a runaway slave. 

SJ00 Albion Market (Oracle) 

6.00 Now You See it General 

knt 

6.30 Newswr 
Stewart. 

640 Highway. Sir Harry 
Secombe meets Bil/y 
Dainty in the first of five 
proepammes in which he 
meets old friends. Plus, a 
seiction of viewers’ 
fvourites from past 
programmes. 

7.15 Winner Takes JUI. 
presented by Jimmy 
Tarbuck. 

7.45 Return to Eden. The rift 
between Stephanie and 
Dan increases. (Oracle) 

8.35 News. 

830 World Cup Superstars 
Soccer. South America v 
The Rest of the World 
from tee Rosebowl, 
Pasadena, Texas. Britain 
is represented by Pat 
Jennings. Terry Butcher 
and Gonton Sfrachan. 

11.00 The Jimmy Yowig 

Television Pro gramm e, 
what kind of society does 
the government want for 
Britain? Norman Tebbit 
answers questions from 
the studio audience. 

11.45 LWT News headlines 

followed by The Irish RM. 
The Yeats s fa may 
Christmas is ruined. 

1240 Show Express. James 
Lastand lus Orchestra. 

1.10 Mght Thoughts. 



Paul Jesson, Martin Walker and Elizabeth Bradley in Robert 
Holman's This is History. Gran (BBC1. 9.00pm) 


BBC 2 


6J>0 Open University. Until 
1.55. 

1.55 Sunday Grandstand: XIII 
Commonwealth Games, 
introduced by Desmond 
Lynam. Athletics, Including 
Daley Thompson's 
decathlon attempt. 200 
1 10m hurdles; 3-00 
3.000m steeplechase; 320 
Women's 400m; 3£0 
Men's 400m; 4J25 
Women's 100m; 445 
Men’s 100m: 540 
Women's 3.000m; 545 
Decathlon 400m. Plus the 
final of the Women's 
discus; and news of the 
German Grand Prix. 

6.05 Foley Square. Alex 

Harrington has tee Mayor 
of New York's dinner on 
her mind when she is 
given tee case of a 
pregnant teenage girl who 
accuses a classmate of 
rape. But something about 
the girl's testimony makes 
Alex uneasy. Starring 
Margaret Colin. 

640 XIII Commonwealth 
Games, introduced by 
Steve Rider. Four 
swimming finals from the 
Royal Commonwealth 
Pool. 

840 Uszt Week. Alfred 
Brendei, following last 
night's performance of 
Liszt’s Annees de 
peierinage, book one, 
plays the composer's 
book two - Italy, a work 
consisting of seven 
pieces, ending in the 
famous Dante Sonata. 
Recorded in Middle 
Temple Hall. London. 

9.00 Hie Paul Daniels Magic 
Show. Topping the bill this 
week is the show's host 
who is at Silva rstone, 
trussed up in a crate, with 
Jackie Stewart driving full 
speed down tee track 
towards him. The studio 
guests are young 
mathematical wizard 
Arthur Benjamin from the 
United States; and tee 
Swede. Thord Malmstrom, 
who involves tee audience 
in his comedy act. (r) 

9.45 George Washington. 
Episode one of a six-part 
drama about the life and 
times of the first President 
of the United States, 
based on the award 
winning four volume 


irry Bt 

role, with James Mason, 
Trevor Howard, Jose 
Ferrer, and Jadyn Smite 
of Charlie's Angels fame. 
11.25 Grand Prix. Hfghtfihts of 
the German Grand Prix. 
run this afternoon at the 
Hockenheim circuit The 
commentators are Murray 
Walker and James Hunt 
Bids at 1205. 


CHANNEL 4 


145 Irish Angle. The problem 
I of protection rackets does 
' not officially exist. 

1 according to the Irish 

i government and the 

Ganfe. but research by 
RTE's Today Tonight team 
reveals how millions ot 
Is are being extorted 
Dublin businesses 
each year. 

140 Model Magic. Model 
aircraft (r) 

200 Kids' Kale. 


K ds 
Di 


Recipes for 
young people. 

240 Film: ChanHate* (1964) 
Rabindranath Tagore's 
taie of a lonely, neglected 
wife who finds solace with 
her husband's young 
cousin. Directed by Sajayit 
Ray. Bengali dialogue. 
English subtitles. 

4.40 Film: Bullet From the 
Past* (1957) starring 
Ballard Berkeley as the 
Scotland Yard inspector 
investigating the death of 
an insurancesaiesman. 
Directed by Kenneth 
Hume. 

5.15 News summary and 
weather followed by The 
Mind of David Bergfes. 
The first ol a series of six 
programmes in which the 
magician and psychic 
bewilders his audience 
andguests. 

6.00 1986 Tour de France. The 
23rd and final stage - 
Cosne-sur- Loir e to Paris. 

7.15 The Arabs. Basim 

Mu sal lam introduces this 
fourth part of the series, a 
programme about the 
Arabic language, (r) 

8.15 People to People: Please 
Don't Say We're 
WonderfuL A profile of the 
Women Against Pit 
Closures Movement since 
tee end of tee miners' 
strike. 

9.15 Country Matters: The 
Little Farm, starring Bryan 
Marshall. Barbara Ewing, 
and Michael Efphick. An 
H.E.Bates story about a 
farmer who advertises for 
a 

companion/housekeeper. 
Edna Johnson accepts the 
post and sets to work 


isoiatedfanmhouse. The 
friendship grows but her 
brush with the farmer's 
labourer leads to the man 
investigating her past (r) 
10.15 The Little Foxes* (1941) 
starring Bette Davis, 
-Herbert Marshall and 
Teresa Wright. A drama, 

- set in the American deep 
south at the turn of the 
century, about a conniving 
wife wno hatches a plot 
with her brothers to relieve 
her husband of $75,000. 
Directed by William Wyler. 
1225 Rooty Toot Toot A 

musicalcartoon about the 
story behind tee folk song, 
Frankie and Johnny. Ends 
at 1235. 


C Radio 4 ) 

On long wave. VHF variations at 

end- 

545 Shipping. 6.00 News. 6.10 
Prelude (s) 

640 News: Morning Has 
Broken. 645 Weather 
Travel 

740 News. 7.10 Sunday 
Papers. 7.15 Apna Hi 
Ghar Samajhiye. 745 Betts. 
740 Turning Over New 
Leaves. 745 Weather; Travel 

840 News. 8.10 Sunday 
Papas. 215 Sunday 
(Religious news ana views) 
840 ueryck Guyjer 
appeals lor the Turner Home 
for chronically sick men 
and boys 845 Weather; 
Travel 

940 News. 9.10 Sunday 
Papers 

9.15 Letter From America by 
Alistair Cooke 

940 Morning Service from 
WesleyVethodist 
Church, Newquay. Cornwall 

10.15 The Archers. Omnibus 
edition 

11.15 Pick Of The Week. 
Programme highlights 
presented by Margaret 
Howard (s). 

1215 Desert Island Discs. 

Roger Vadim, the writer 
and director is the castaway 
(s) 1245 Weather 

140 The World This 

Weekend: News. 145 


200 News; Gardeners' 

Question Time. Southern 
Gardeners' Club, Isle of Man 
230 The Afternoon Ptay. A 
Kind of Hatiowe'en by 
Gerry Jones. Cast includes 
Ray Smith. Peter Jeffrey 
and Jim Norton (r) 

340 More for Love than 
Money. What is involved 
in the post of a parish derk 
340 A SpJendxl Discipline 
(new series). Music and 
the cinema .With Diane 
Shelley 

440 News; The Other Orient 
Express. The delights of 
Canada's transcontinental 
railway 

440 The Natural History 
Programme. Human 
attitudes to animals. 

5.00 News: Travel 
545 Down Yota Wav. Brian 
Johnson visits East 
Leake. Nottinghamshire. 
540 Shipping. 545 
Weather 
c nil uoum 

6.15 Weekend Woman's 
Hour. Programme 
highlights 

740 Tne Ught That Fated By 
Rudyard Kipling. Part 2 

840 iwSood Read. A choice 
of paperbacks. With 
Vivien and Michael Noakes. 
and Brian Gear (r) 

840 The Music Makers. 

Edward Secker so n 
meets pianist Paul Crossley 

940 &s:AWoittln 
Edgeways. Brian 
Redhead and guests discuss 
medical ethics 
1040 News 

10.15 The Sunday Feature: 

Wild Justice. A 
dramatized account of the 
impeachment of Warren 
Hastings, ax-Govemor- 


Gerarai of Bengal 
Edward de Souza plays 
Hastings, with T P 
McKenna as Edmund Burke 
1140 Seeds of Faith. With 
Rabbi Anthony Bayfield 
f s ) 

11.15 in Committee. The work 
of Parliament's Select 
Committees. 

1240 News: Weather. 1243 
Shipping 

VHF:- (available in England and 
S Wales only) as above except 
545-640am Weather Travel 
740-840 Open University: 740 
Metabolic Pathways. 740 
Musical Drama. 740 Living with 
Technology. 440-640 Options: 
440 Latin America: A revolutionary 
utopia. 440 The Scots Tongue. 
5.00 Back On Course. 54D(3etBy 
In Italian. 

C Radio 3 ) 

On VHF only: 

645 Open University. Until 
645am. Italian 


Onmerfiumurave: 

645 Weather. 740 News 
745 Vivaldi (Concerto in B flat 
for strings. RV 163L 
Gasparini (the aria Primavera 
che tutt’amorosa: 

Sch refer, tenor). Vivaldi 
(Concerto in G. Op 4 No . 

12 RV 298, with Toso. violin) 
and other Vfvakli works 

including Nisi Dominus. 
Psalm 126. and Chamber 

Concerto in D, RV 95, La 

pastoral la 

640 Pierre Forurtec the 
cellist in recordings of 
Beethoven's CeBo Sonata In 
D. Op 102 No 2 and 
Dvorak's Cello Concerto. 
940 News 
945 Your Concert 

Cboic&Reaplghi (Betkis, 
Queen of Sheba ballet suite). 


27: Poftni-piano). I 
(Adagio, Symphony No 
loTSach (Suite No 4. BWV 
1069). and Stravinsky 
(Las noces ballet with 
Bernstein (tonducting 
English Bach Festival 
Chores and soloists 
Including Mory and 
MrtcWnson 

10.45 Prom Talk: with Alan 

Hoddnott, Mtscha . 
Donat. George Benjamin. 
Teresa CatiM. Giles 
Swayne and Roger Wright 

11.15 Barrfbne and piwio: John 
Shirtey-Qiark/Philip 
Ledger. Fma (Before and 
after Summer). 

Erod ( Vier Gasange), 

Ravel (Histoires naturaBes) 

1240 BBC Welsh SO (under 
Kaspryzk).Wtth Mark 
K apten (vtolinLBntlan (Sea 
Interludes. Peter 
Grimes). Mendelssohn 
(Violin Concerto in E 
jninorVScnubert (Symphony 
No 9) 

2.15 Spiritual Laments: 

Musics Annqua, 
Cotogne.wrtfi soloists 
zedtilus and Schopper. 
Brehns (De profundis 
cfemavi). T under (An 
Vfesswftussen Babylon). 

Weckmann (Wte begtdte 
Stadt) 

250 WaWtsch/Weinberg Tncx 
Debussy (Premiere 
rapsodie.for darineLpiano). 


Tate (Sonata lor 
darinetceUo). Mtirtinu 
(Variations on ttteme by 
Rossini) I 
340 AkJaburah FestiM 86: 
London Sinfonfetta/ Pike 
(tenor) and Waycer (guitar), 
Henze (Kammdrmuslk. 
1958). Schubert (Octet D 
803} / 

540 Nothing Sacred: The 
impact of new 

technology 
Cofin Tudae 
6.15 Lis stand 


Leslie Hl 

includes Hi 


(f). 
fsredtal 
ites 

ra&gteuses. 
atin, Hymnede 
'Cantique 


Hymnedui 
la nurt, anc 
d’amour , 

740 Lord Arthur Savie's 
Crime: Geoffrey Bush's 
one-act opera. Musicians of 
London (under Joly), and 

soloists Dawson, Pashfey. 
Collins. Johnston. 

Winfield, Watt, Maxwell. 
O'ReiHy, Moses and 

James. 

845 Royal Liverpool 
Philharmonic (under 
Libor PesekLWrth Silvia 


Marcovici (vtolin).Part 
one. Smetana (Bartered 
Bride overture). Mozart 

(Violin Concerto No 1) 

Thel" ' 


845 The Painters' Banquet 

verse about poetry and 

tee spectactor. Readers 

Edward de Souza. 

Patncia ILeventon. Natasha 
Pyne. Presenter: Vena 
Cork 

9.15 Concert: part two. Suk 
(Symphony in C minor. 

Asrael) 

1045 The Poisoned Thom: 

Graham Fawcett talks to 
tee itafian writer Dacia 

Maraini who was in a 
Japanese concentration 
camp 

1140 Stemdate Bennetfc(8) 

Ulster Orchestra with 
Malcolm Binns (piano). 

Haydn (Lospetiafe 
overture). Stemdale Bennett 
(Caprice m E. Op 22), 

Haydn (Symphony No 94) 
1147 News. 1200 Closedown 

C Radio 2 ) 

On medium wave. See Radio 1 
tor VHF variations. 

News on the hour. 



Bette Davis: ou Gi 10.15pm 


Commonwealth Games. Reports at 
10.02am, 11.02 1202 942 
1142 Cricket Scoreboard 740pm. 
4.00am Dave Bussey fell (LOO 
Steve Truelove (s) 7.30 Roger 
Royle (s) 945 Melodies For You 
with Richard Baker (s) 1140 
.Desmond Carrington (s) 240pm 
Commonwealth Games Special. 
Plus news of the John Pfayer 
League cricket. West German 
Grand Prix. Tour De France, 
and Federation Cup Tennis in 
Prague 840 Vernon and 
Maryetta Midgley 830 Sunday Halt- 
Hour from Dagnali Street 
Baptist Church, St Albans. Hertford 
940 Your Hundred Best Tunes 
(with Alan Keith) 10.05 Songs from 
the Shows 1040 The Gospel 
Truth (Bob Smfield) 11.00 Sounds 
of Jazz with Tony Russell 
(stereo from midnight) 1.00am jean 
Chalks (s) 340-440 A Utile 
Night Music (s). 

( Radio 1 ) 

On medum wave. VHF 
variations at end. 

News on the half-hour until 
11 40am. then 230pm, 340, 440, 
7.30, 940, 1200 midnight. 

640am Mark Page 840 Peter 
Pawed 1040 Mike Read 1230 
jimmy Savile’s 'Old Record' 

Club (1980. 1974 and 1968)240 
Classic Concert featuring 
Barclay James Harvest 340 Radio 
1 More Tima With Dave Lee 
Travis 440 Chartbusters (Bruno 
Brookes) 5.00 Top 40 (Bruno 
Brookes) (s) 740 Anne Nightingale 
Request Show (s) 940 Robbie 
Vincent (s) 1140-1240 The Rankin' 
Miss P with Culture Rock (s). 

VHF RADIOS 1 a 2- 440am As 
Radio 2. 2.00pm Benny Green 
(s). 340 Alan Dell (s). 440 Hinge 
and Bracket. 440 Sing 
Something Simple is). 540 As 
Radio i. 1240-440am As 
Radio 2 


WORLD SERVICE 


6IM Nawsdask. 6J0 Marxian. 740 
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the Weekbes. 7.45 Sporiswomi 840 


News. 849 Reflections. 8.15 A Jofly Good 

Snow. 940 News. 949 Rbmbw ofaissh 

Press. 9.15 World Today. 940 Francial 

News. 9.40 Look Anead. 9.45 About 

Bntam. 1040 News. 1041 Here's Humph! 

10.15 Latter From America. 1040 People 

and Pottles. 1140 News. 1149 News 

About Bntam. 11.15 Sportsworid. 1140 

Mendnn. 1240 Radio NewsreeL 12.15 

Anythmg Goes. 1245 Sports Rounkmu 

1.00 News. 149 Twenty Four Hour*. 140 

Saturday Special (Commonwealth 

Games! 240 News. 241 Saturday Spe- 
caL 340 Radw NewsreeL 3.15 Saturday 

Special. 440 News. 449 Comment a ry. 

4.15 Saturday SpeaaL 545 Sports 
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Hours. 840 Jazz for the Asking. 940 

News. 941 Sportsworid. 9.15 What * 

New. 940 People and Potties. 1040 

News. 1049 F ram our awn ~ 

dent. 1030 New idees. 1040 1 

1045 Sports Roundup. 1140 Nam. 1149 

- -.iLiSAPeriett^njo 

1209 News About Sittin. 1215 Rsfio 
NewsreeL 1230 Play of the Weak 

(Adventins ol tne ingenious Gent lema n 

Don Oulxote da La Mancha}. 240 News. 

209 Review of the British Press/US 

SponsMxto. 230 Album Tfcne. 340 
News. 349 News About Britain, 3.15 From 

I^Sf our Houre - 545 L®** tot n 

Amenca. 

AB times faiGOT 


Regional TV; on facing page 








32 


SATURDAY JULY 26 1986 


First published h* f78S 


Taylor call-up 


SPORT 



sets poor 


precedent 


By John Woodcock, Cricket Correspondent 


LORD'S: New Zealand \ with 
eight first-innings wickets in 
hand, are ISO runs behind 


England. 
Slo 


Slow progress was made 
yesterday in the first Test 
match, sponsored by Comhiit, 
with New Zealand again hav- 
ing rather the better of things. 
Having bowled England out 
for 307 they replied with 127 
for two. after being at one time 
five for two. 

Injuries prevented French 
from keeping wicket for En- 
gland and Willey from bowl- 
ing, French not knowing quite 
where he was after being hit 
while batting and Willey twist- 
ing the knee which already 
carries so many of the scars o« 
battle. French’s place was 
taken, most unconventional-* 
fy, by Bob Taylor, who was on. 
the ground in his capacity as &\ 
public relations assistant for ; 
the sponsors. 

Thought had been given to 
bringing Richards across from 
the Oval, where he was play- 
ing for Surrey, but that idea 
was abandoned. Instead, 
Aihey kept wicket for two 
overs before Taylor made his 
somewhat sentimental entry. 
On the form he showed he is 
probably still even at 45 and 
out of practice, just about the 
best in the business. 

He saw at first hand what 
hard work England End it 
these days getting anyone out. 
It is an easy enough pitch, but 
at the start of New Zealand's 
innings it was sufficiently 
cloudy and humid for the ball 
to move about quite apprecia- 
bly. England could well have 
made deeper inroads then 
than they did. It was not 
Dilley's fault that they failed 
to. Edgar took a long time 
digging himself in for New 
Zealand, but he was playing 
very well by the end and 
Martin Crowe is so good that 
he was seldom in trouble. 

England's last five wickets 
had added 59. as many as 
could be expected from a side 
with the Middlesex No 8 at No 
7, Nottinghamshire’s No 9 at 
No. 8, Kent’s No 1 1 at No 9, 
Essex’s No 9 at No 10 and 
Worcestershire's No 10 at No 
J I . . . especially when Willey 
was out after 40 minutes 
having added only 17 to his 
overnight score, and French 
had to retire hurt. For the 
seventh time in 10 Test in- 


nings Hadlee took five wickets 
or more. He finished with six 
for 80 in 37.5 overs, having 
delighted even the most fastid- 
ious of old-timers by perform- 
ing his wonders off a short run 
and mostly to a foil length. 

As a member of the same 
county side as Hadlee, French 
might have been expected to 
know what to expect from 
him. Perhaps, that being so, be 
would have feared the worst 
It was not a bouncer so much 
as a short bail which hit him. 
Hadlee dug it in. intending it 
to lift, and it did so. As French 
turned away, he was hit on the 
back of the helmet An anx- 
ious 10 minutes followed. 
French seemed to be shaking 
off the blow when he col- 
lapsed, much to the concern of 
those around him. 


Scoreboard 


ENGLAND: First Innings 
G A Gooch c Smith b Hadlee _ 18 

■ M D Monon due b Hadlee 74 

CWJAtheycJCroweb Hadlee 44 
D I Gower c M Crowe 

b Bracewell 62 

rM W Gatling b Hadlee 2 

P wmey Ibwb Watson 


f* H Edmonds c M Crowe 
b Hadlee 


fB N French retired hurt . 


G R Dffley c Smith b Hadlee 


N’A Foster b Watson 
N VI 


’ Radford not out 


17 

,8 


Extras (b 6, lb 7, nb 7) 
Total 


.12 

-20 

307 


FALL OF WICKETS: 1-27. 2-102, 3- 
196, 4-198, 5-237, 6-258, 7-271, 8- 
285.9-307. 

BOWLING: Hadlee 37.5-11-80-6; 
Watson 30-7-70-2; M D Crowe 8-1- 


38-0; Coney 4-0-12-0; BrsceweS 
5-1; Gray 13-9-29-0. 


26-8-65-1; 


NEW ZEALAND: Fust Innings 
JGWrig ‘ — 


fright b Dffley 
notout 


,52 


BAI 

KRRitfierfordc Gooch b Dffley 0 

M D Crtowe not out 52 

ExhbsfD 


, (lb 8, w 5, nb 10) 
Total (2 wfcts) 


,23 

127 


M V Co^ey, J J Crowe, R J Hadlee, 
tl D S\ Smith, E J Gray, J G 
Bracewdfl and W Watson to bat 
FALL ORWICKETS: 1-2, 2-5. 
BOWLING (to date): Dffley 15-5-26- 
2; Foster! 10-4-16-0; Radford 9-1- 
24-0; Edmonds 13-1-44-0; Gooch 
6-4-9-0. \ 

Umpires: H D Bird and A G T 
Whitehead. 


Considering the possibfli- 
ilpwasi 


ties, help was an unconsciona- 
bly long time coming, and it 
was with |the greatest relief 
after French had been carried 
off. that Ve beard he was 
resting with nothing worse 
than three stitches in the back 
of his head: When a side’s tail 
starts at No 7, as England’s 


does, it would be unreason- 
able for their last five batsmen 
to be exempt from having to 
face short-pitched bowling. At 
No 8 in the original order. 
French had to face the music. 
His mishap may prompt the 
England selectors to see the 
need to start blooding an all- 
rounder or two. 

I can only think it was 
because he had French's inju- 
ry on his conscience, which he 
had no need to do, that Coney, 
New Zealand’s captain, agreed 
to England's wicket being kept 
by Taylor. This seemed to me 
to be a wholly undesirable 
precedent Needless to say, 
Taylor kept wicket beautiful 
ly. though his doing so in a 
Test match should never have 
been countenanced. 

Among other former En- 
gland wicketkeepers on the 
ground were Godfrey Evans, 
John Murray. Jim Parks and 
Alan Smith. Also present were 
some who recalled Frank 
Woolley taking bis place be- 
hind the stumps against Aus- 
tralia at the Oval in 1 934 when 
Les Ames was injured. Wool- 
ley allowed 37 byes in 
Australia's second innings.. I 
remember Peter Parfitt mak- 
ing a perfectly good job of 
standing in for Murray at 
Sydney in 1962-63, when 
Murray injured a shoulder 
taking a catch at the start of 
Australia's first innings. For 
an outsider to take the gloves 
in a Test match, as Taylor did 
now, is. so far as I know, 
unprecedented. 

By the time New Zealand 
scored a run off the bat in the 
seventh over of their innings, 
they had lost Wright and 
Rutherford, both to Dilley. 
Wright played on. the ball 
hurrying through too fast for 
him. and Gooch caught Ruth- 
erford at second slip and at the 
second attempt Eleven overs 
passed before Edgar made his 
first run, by when bad light 
had held up the innings for 20 
minutes. At tea, with 16 overs 
bowled. New Zealand were 30 
for two, only Martin Crowe 
having put bat to ball. 

The longer the day went on 
the more Taylor looked to be 
enjoying himself and the bet- 
ter Edgar played. In the last 
hour, when the sun was out, 
there began to seem to be no 
good reason why New Zealand 
should not take a useful lead 


FOOTBALL 


Ipswich agree terms for Butcher 


Ipswich Town have agreed 
terms with Glasgow Rangers 
for the transfer of Terry 
Butcher. Rangers appear to' 
have pipped Tottenham 
,Hotspur and Manchester 
United in the race for the 
England defender with their 
cash offer of just over 
£700,000. 


If the deal goes through, the 
money will considerably re- 
duce Ipswich's overdraft but 
now it is up to Butcher to 
agree personal terms. 

Butcher said: “My wife and 
I would be more than willing 
to set up home north of the 
border as long as they meet my 
terms. I will be 28 soon and a 


four-year contract will see me 
through what will probably be 
my best playing years.” 

• ASCOLI: Liam Brady, the 
Irish international midfield 
player, has signed a one-year 
contract with the Italian first 
division club, Ascoli, follow- 
ing his departure from Inter 
Milan. 


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Comeback 

fora 


good cause 


From Gerry Harrison 
Pasadena, California 


‘Pat Jennings, who has been 
trying to retire gracefully for 
years, will be back in the 
firing-line • tomorrow night 
facing Diego Maradona and a 
squad of , South American 
talent j 

He is playing for the Rest of 
the World against the Ameri- 
cas i n the Rose Bowl to assist 
UNICEF, the United Nations 
children’s faint 

Jennings. , aged 4!, the 
world's 'most capped player, 
with 119 linternational 
appearaitaneep, cheerfully ad- 
mits that he hasn’t touched a 
football since the World Cup. 

“I am only here because it is 
a great honour to be picked 
and it is a good 'cause. Bui had 
it been staged) a couple of 
months later I wouldn't have 
played. You canfl fool around 
at this level and I've retired.” 


Also in Jennings's squad are 
Gordon Sirachan (Manchester 


United) and Terry Butcher, 
few friends in 


who made a 

high places through the speed 
with which he agreed to fly out 
here as a replacement for the 
injured FoereterJ of West 
Germany. 


But FIFA are annoyed that 
players like Gary Lineker 
(Barcelona), Platini and 
Laudrup (Juventus), who 
wanted to appear, pave not 
been released by their clubs. ■ 

However; the attraction of 
Maradona and a number of 
his World Cup winning team 
with five Brazilians! and a 
number of Mexicans for local 
colour, has ensured television 
coverage from 65 countries 
and a guaranteed minimum 
$250,000 (about £167,000) for 
the Mexican earthquake 
disaster fund. 



■■ f. **/(,■ t 


Heading for gold; the England cycling team in yesterday’s 100km team trial (Photograph: Tom Kidd) 


Data service gets its results in a twist 


By John Goodbody 

Competition in the Com- 
monwealth Games began 
amid more difficulties yester- 
day with the organizers en- 
countering problems with the 
results and communications 
service so essential to the 
smooth running of a major 
event Wige-Data, the West 
German company who were 
providing the service, were so 
frustrated because dust had 
got into their equipment that 
they almost pulled out of 
Edinburgh. 

Workmen who have been 


striving to get the Games 
shipshape used saws on the 
wood and asbestos partitions 
close to the sensitive areas 
used for computing the re- 
sults. Wilhelm Gemer, owner 
of Wjge-Daia, said yesterday: 
"We have bad to stop work for 
eight hours and that means 
our computer programming is 
also eight hours behind. It is 
the worst situation 1 have 
encountered anywhere in Eu- 
rope. We will be back to full 
operation by tomorrow.” 

One of the events that has 
been hit hardest by die boy- 


cotts are the lightest events in 
the weight-lifting. In the un- 
der-52kg trials there were only 
three competitors, but Scot- 
land, the host nation, who had 
two lifters in the division, still 
foiled to win the gold medaL 
The title went to the Austra- 
lian, Greg Hayraan, with a 
total for the snatch and clean 
and jerk of 21Z5 kilos. He 
finished 27.5 kilos ahead of 
the leading Scot Charlie 
Revolts. _ 

• Top athletes forced out of 
the Games by the mass boy- 
cott have been invited to an 
international meeting in 


HORSE TRIALS 


Top names 
for event 
in Cumbria 


CYCLING 


Hinault bows to 
relaxed LeMond 


By Jenny MacArihnr 


Virginia Leng, the world 
champion, and Lucinda Green, 
the former world champion, 
are among the formidable list 
of entries for this weekend’s 
Croft Original Holker Hall 
horse trials in Cambria. The 
event, which begins today with 
six novice sections, was start- 
ed just five years ago but in 
that time Tony Evans's big 
well-built courses, together 
with the good parkland going, 
have made it a favourite with 
the riders. Captain Mark Phil- 
lips, Princess Anne, Ian Stark 
and Robert Lemienx are 
among those competing. 


For most of the advanced 
horses the event is part of the 
build-up to the autumn three- 
day event Mrs Leng’s 13- 
y ear-old Night Cap, who is in 
tomorrow’s advanced class, is 
beading for the international 
three-day event in Poland in 
September. Mrs Green's two 
advanced rides, Shannagh and 
Brass Monkey, are destined 
respectively for next month's 
Lohmohlen three-day event in' 
West Germany and for 
Gatcombe. 


Captain Phillips intends to 
run both Distinctive and Car- 
tier across country tomorrow. 
Distinctive’s chief objective 
are the Scottish champion- 
ships on August 24 and the 
Polish three-day event 


From John WScocksoo, Clermont Ferrand 


"I feel I've finally woo it” 
sighed a relaxed, very relaxed. 
Greg LeMond after finishing 
the 21st stage of the Tour de 
France at the 5.000 ft summit 
of the stunningly beautiful 
Puy de Dome mountain, ex- 
actly six minutes behind Eric 
Maechler, the stage winner of 
Switzerland, but S2sec ahead 
of Bernard Hinault his only 
remaining rival. The Ameri- 
can, aged 26, now leads the 
Tour by more than three 
minutes, with only two stages 
left before the finish on the 
Champs Ely see tomorrow. 

Maechler and five other 
men reached the foot of the 
three-mile, one in eight climb 
of the Puy de Dome more than 
six minutes ahead of the main 
group after breaking dear 28 
miles earlier. In the group was 
Martin Earley from Dublin, 
who has won two races earlier 
this year with similar moun- 
tain top finishes, one in the 
Tour of the Basque country, 
the other in the Tour of Italy. 

“I used my brains to get in 
the break,” explained Earley, 
who attacked twice earlier in 
the 118-mile stage from St 
Etienne that traversed the 
delightfully green hills of the 
Auvergne on a perfect day of 
blue skies and no wind. 

Working well together, the 
six riders quickly established 
the three minute lead on the 
main group, in which the 


leaders were reluctant to make 
any efforts extra to those 
needed by the redoubtable 
Puy de Dome. 

LeMond soon outdistanced 
his two immediate rivals 
Hinault and Urs Zimmer- 
mann. while Andrew Hamp- 
slen. his American team-mate, 
rode away to take eighth place, 
just ahead of two other climb- 
ers, Yvon Madiot, the French 
champion, and Reynel Mon- 
toya, of Columbia. 

At last Hinault has conced- 
ed that LeMond is a worthy 
winner of the Tour. The star of 
the race stated, “If I had not 
ridden as hard as I did Greg 
would have had. a hollow 
victory. 

Robert MDIar. of Scotland, 
finally had to give best to the 
illness that has handicapped 
him for the past five days and 
he pulled out of the race 25 
miles from the end yesterday. 

RESULTS: Stage 21: (St Enema 


TENNIS 


A match 
worth 
winning 


Oetmont Fetrand): 1. E MaecMer (Swttz). 

5hr 32mn JCsec; 2 . L Peelers (Ben. at 

34 sec: 3. G Van Calstar (Ben. S& A. M 

Earley (Ire). 1 £2: 5. H Dawn (BaQ, 155:8, 

C Mattel (Fr). 20& 7. M Ramirez (Cal). 

4:08; 8. A Harosten IUS), 5:17; 9. Y 

Madiot (Fr). 522 10. R Montoya (Col), 


5-37. 


rpiaengs: 17, Q LeMond 
kuk At. e Ancereon JAus). 635: ' 
Bauer (Can). 8:35: 76, 5 Roche (Ira), 636; 


cbeflra), 

; 120, S Yates 
LeMond 98hns 


wit (Ft), at 3:10:3. U 

10*4; 4, Hampsten 


Zrnmtennann (Swttz). 

18:15. 5. C Cnqwefion (Bal}. 2436: & R 
Pensac(Fr). 2559: 7. N RutnmannfSwitz). 

30:52: B, A Pro (Sp). 3330: 9, S Rooks 

(Nem). 33:24; 10, Madiot 3327. Otter 

poaittonK 23. Bauer 56:02: 38, Anderson 

1:19:41; 46. Earley 1:3030; 48. Roctw 

1:32:30. 


SPORT IN BRIEF 


McEnroe 
in groove 


John McEnroe, after a break 
of six months, forced Ivan 
Lendl, the world No. 1. into a 
tiebreak in the final set before 
losing 6-4, 3-6, 7-6 in the 
Forum Challenge Series in 
Inglewood, California, on 
Thursday night *T played 
well con-sidering." McEnroe 
said. He is rated No. 7 in the 
world despite his absence 
from the game while Tatum 
O’Neal, the actress, gave birth 
to their baby boy. The boister- 
ous crowd was clearly behind 
McEnroe until be faltered in 
the final tiebreak to give Lendl 
the £75,000 winner’s cheque. 



leader, also confirmed that 
more money could be made 
available to help any consor- 
tium willing to take over the 
.threatened fourth division 
dub who are due back in the 
High Court on Wednesday to 
face winding-up proceedings. 


Glide path 


Wigg at helm 


Knockout drop 


The World Boxing Council 
are investigating claims by 
Mexican promoters that Rene 
Arredondo was given a seda- 
tive before he was knocked 
out by Tsuyoshi H a m ada. of 
Japan, in their junior-welter- 
weight title bout on Wednes- 
day in Mexico City. Jos6 
Sulaiman, the WBC president, 
said he was told by the 
Mexicans that Arredondo fell 
asleep before the fight after 
eating some food and then had 
vomited when he was woken 
up. 


Simon Wigg, of Oxford, will 
captain England in the speed- 
way World Team Cup next 
month against Denmark; the 
champions, Sweden and the 
United States. Jeremy Don- 
caster (Ipswich), Neil Erins 
(Bradford), Chris Morton 
(Belle Vue) and Kelvin Taium 
(Coventry) -complete 
England's team for the match- 
es in Gdteborg, Vojens and 
Bradford. 


During the next nine days, 
40 gliders will compete in the 
open class of the national 
championships at RAF Hull- 
arington to provide fierce 
competition for the six-man 
team for the world champion- 
ships in Australia ift January. 


Lee threat 


Michael Lee, the former 
world champion, yesterday 
pul his bikes up for sale and 
threatened to quit speedway 
after being transfer-listed by 
Kings Lynn. “If I can’t ride for 
Lynn,” he said yesterday, “I 
don’t want to ride for 
anybody.” 


.. .. Cash boost 


Poor England 

England were defeated 22-6 
by Australia in the third place 
play-off to return home emp- 
ty-handed from the world 
men's lacrosse championships 
in Toronto. 


Najib Daho will learn early 
next week whether his IBF 
world super-featherweight ti- 
tle bout in Manchester on 
August 23 against Bany Mi- 
chael of Australia, is to be 
recognized by the British 
Board, members of the rival 
WBA and WBC bodies. Barry 
McGirigan at Old Trafibrd is a 
possible prize for the winner. 


Northern Ireland canoeing, 
cycling, fencing, coarse fish- 
ing. handball sailing, squash, 
traxnpolining and tng-of-war 
will receive an additional 
£30.000 from the Sports 
Council to fund development 


Lighter load 


Wolves offer 


Wolverhampton Council 
have made a £1.1 million 
offer to buy Molincux stadi- 
um. John Bird, the council 


Ken Bates, the Chelsea 
chairman, has agreed to lend 
Gapton Football Gub £3,000 
until a Sports Council grant in 
October is processed to bring 
their lighting to Vauxhall- 
Opei League standard. 


From Richard Evans 
Prague 

As a piece of one-upman- 
ship there was nothing to beat 
it in the middle of a Federa- 
tion Cup competition that 
had. until yesterday, been 
totally dominated by Martina 
Navratilova’s return to Her 
homeland. Hana Mandlikova 
jumped: the. queue- at t^e 
Prague Town Hall and got 
married. 

When asked by a puzzled 
Czech journalist how she had 
managed to arrange this on the 
spur of the moment, as mar- 
riages usually have to be 
booked three months in ad- 
vance, she replied: “There is 
only one Hana Mandlikova.” 

The authorities may not be 
completely happy with the 
idea of Miss Mandlikova mar- 
rying an Australian immigrant 
named Jan Sedlak, aged 33, 
who left Chechoslovakia dur- 
ing the turmoil of 1968. 

Sedlak is a restaurateur in 
Sydney who will see his bride 
for a two-day honeymoon in 
The Netherlands next week 
and then whenever her tennis 
commitments permit. “We 
will try to be together whenev- 
er possible,” she said “But I 
intend to play tennis for 
another five years and this will 
not change anything.” Miss 
Mandlikova had her uncle 
and brother as witnesses and 
she wore a blue leather suit. 

Miss Navratilova beat 
Rafiaeila Reggi 6-2, 6-4. That 
was just as well for the United 
States, as Chris Lloyd had 
been beaten for the first time 
ever in Federation Cup singles 
play, 3-6, 6-4, 6-3 by Sandra 
Cecchinl 

Martina Had little 
difficulty in reclaiming the 
limelight when she and Pam 
Shriver ended Italy’s hopes 
with a 6-3, 6-1 win against 
Miss Reggi and Laura 
Gairone. 


Coe has 



to 




DAVID 

MILLER 



Gateshead on August 5. The 
Great Britain v Common- 
wealth match was originally 
designed as a> follow-up to the 
Edinburgh Games but the 
British Amateur Athletic 
Board have decided to include 
‘boycotted stars in the Com- 
monwealth team. Two top 
■400m runners, Bert Cameron, 
the world champion from 
Jamaica, and Innocent 
Egbunike, of Nigeria, plus the 
Jamaician sprinter. Grace 
Jackson, have already been 
confirmed for the match. 

Results, page 30 


Sebastian Coe stood ea the 
track in Los Angete f 
Steve Ovett after the Olympic 
800m final and remarked that 
they were becoming too old for 
ft. Yet here is Coe, two years . 
later and a month off 30, 
ppffriftg himself to a ttemp t the - - 
Commonwealth title at Miss, 
which he has nem 1 attempted, 
and the European title, which 
has twice eluded hinu More- 
over. in both cham 
he rs also .contea 
1500m for the first time, 
sti lt gives him the iriH to m? 

He is past that poinVat 
these two distances, in a gratt 
runner's career when. 6he mo- 
tive is, as Steve Cramrece^f 
described it, “I just want tote 
better and better -: in timeamjj 
against other runners.” 
cnmstances often thi^;. 
motivation. . V’ . 

Cram admits that defeat % 

Coe in the ISO&n f* Ten 
Angeles helped drive:, k® 
towards his record-breakn^ 
sequence last year side by A 

with Said Aoofta, comparable 
to Coe’s exceptional speBsfe 
1979 and 1981. Coe’s iffitfes fa 
1982-83, daring whidi &a* 
won the CbnumDwiealti&«^ 
ropean and World-- litfe&tft 
LSQQrn, contributed 


Pa 


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Olympic 


RACING 


Dancing Brave. 

doubtful for 
Ascot rematch 


Dancing Brave's participa- 
tion in today's King George 
VI and Queen Elizabeth Dia- 
mond Slakes is in doubt after 
rain at Ascot yesterday 
morning. 

Guy Harwood, the colt's 
trainer, said -at Ascot yester- 
day: “The horse is In tremen- 
dous form and we want to run 

him but the ground is good to 
soft at the moment It 
wouldn’t have to be a lot 
worse for him not to run. 

“If it stays as it is today, he 
would- take his chance but if 
there is heavy overnight rain 
we would have to consider 
withdrawing him. If the 
weather forecast is right, then 
he’ll run.” . ■ , 

A spokesman for the Lon- 
don Weather Centre said yes- 
terday evening: “It should siay 
dry overnight at Ascot but 
there are likely to be some 
spells of rain tomorrow, prob- 
ably from mid-morning, but I 
doubt if they'll be heavy.’’ • 

- Radeg, p27-28 


motivation in 

retain his Olympic titie^ _ ( 

A ’ bade Injury last yjaqr 
prevented Coe moving bp tf» 
5,000m: expediency 
Aids him pacing 
ground hi what should be 
outstanding double duel of 
Games in Edhdnngjfc. 

Bannister beat Landy in 
when there were fewer 
in Vancouver than there 
here, did anybody say the 
Games were a dfotester? 

_ “1 have to face the faet that 
Fm giving. away four five 
years to my rivals, but I canY 
be bitter about the test years (rf 
’82-43, which should .have 
been iny best, when I wajtffc 
2V*G»e says. “I should 
been stronger then — 

being older, and quickm' thaiaw 
hi 1981. As it is how, .I flunk sf. ‘ 
from the available evidence,:! . 
dip win medals hi both events 
at bMh championships.” 

Coe continues to pfon mom 
of his training with his fiafthiu; 
who feds that his sou's atti- . 
tude of mind enables him, jar- ' 
the same way as Mike Boifc^f 
Kenya, to maintain his shin- 
distance speed, when ap- 
proaching 30. ‘ Peter :0 ns 
stresses that ft would be V 
mistake to believe there was 
only one man to beai Jn 
Edinburgh or Stuttgart, -'B« 
reckons. Cram is the one Jet: 


• -ijm 

l 


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u 


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Mxqp 

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U«l! 
, .iod i 


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ua 


-kid 


•s&tfay's £8.000 
w< ; ) ;-t:o ;r- Th# :: 
^c^cGoki : 
critter was sham 
?»*ease?s: Mr 
gewCIcggof 

London ... 
R^Stoefolia 
fws*. ramfuwn, 
py. Mrs - Sigcki | 
F3*-' Seven, mr, 
tes of Padfottt 
Mrs M 


•"•Bfry. andMra 


beat for the gold medaL . . 

The general opinioii mind 
circles is that Cram shou)d*m . : j bprfcL?' 
both events in EdinbmglMd*' W J Sa S^ary, 

the 1,500m in Stuttgart. ”*■ y ; 

has looked stridently powrifeff 
in recent, weeks, even fifoigh ' 
he concedes be can never f ' 


to threaten Coe’s 1981 recsd 
for 800m of 1:4L73. YetCoe’s 
recent 1,000m, the seftoft 
fastest ever, makes _fiiC a 
fascinating scenario. ' • 

Since the 800m in 
burgh is unlikely to reach#* 
searing qaality of heals jb^b* 
a prohaWe 
final with Elliott 


: Mwassfiinrttto- 

; Sixers: Mr fiQ* ■ 

: 5^ =f North 


Ham, 


of 


Tokj 





Goeun worried 
tactical tho 


may 





mm 

Oacfont - 


early nnming. 

Cram to go for a 
run from 300m, wittTCeea(|us 
shoulder. Each lias had ft 
recent final 200m barst ollit 
over 25 seconds. 

“fm not worrying 
tactics; I thinlc I can cqa 
whatever happens,” Coe 
He is not yet at a peak, alon 
that for Stuttgart, but fims* 
ingly thinks be is “not iiLlSai 
shape”. Cnun says that he 
would rather be remembered 
for championships be - won 
than for records. Coe is timre 
to stop him over the next fire 
weeks: . . . - 

Peter Coe, without 
specific, thinks the 
bid could be the CSOOn - 
“There are mime variables in 
the 800m”- — ' and has:-bctt 
carefiil' not to overload recov- 
ery-time in fr aming interval- 

*■“' Whether or not thera 






pto“ 

servic*. 





ear bill 






'•--.-ar 


C to be 


cri2 


medals this smmnmv-V^ 





,Sh 


f* 

: '-hr 

2 ^ I f 


it. 


.a capacity to 
tain next year’s 
npfoaship fifiObm, 


er the duties of two and a half ' 
days a week as depoty chair- 
man ^"the Sports CoonrilwQI 
permit his son the necessary 

extra mileage. . ■ 

For- the moment, Crate wfll 
fee wantiiag rercnge fm- Los . 

Angeles. Coe, who 1ms refoted 
to become pubiidyr tovofted, 

woffiM no doobtftketo answtir, • 

P*ojp-nnn©. There 

sw« seats at; Me ~ ’ 
tedThnoibysri ! 


toll ua; 

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