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1 M s • 

S 

spirjj 


No 62,480 



WEDNESDAY JUNE 11 19&6 


TIMES 


ygjicis awaited on ‘resorts campaign’ plot rlmrges 


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- hc Ptiirf J* 


By StCTwtTeirfler, Crane Reporter 

daySSd 1 ^ JdST Scottish Conservative Party, 

the Provisionai IRA **£? in ihe beginning of the tnal 

foe Grand HoteL BrigSon in Grand J5 e “ A&y the court was told by 
1984 and killing five w»^£ % pten " ¥ r ^' l AmIot ’ Prosecuting, 

attending th?Consei?Sve S5J 9 ’ f 1984 ‘ - He ™* S 31 ?*» bomb at the Grand 

Party annual confaS* - Sf E? tel 30 “<* of 

9*P‘. as,0 J 1 wt October 12 . being the Provisional IRA's 
At ihe Central Criminal i/V^7 vheD the bomb went off most devastating explosion". 


* <**»-* juiung nvc people 
pending the" Conservative 
Party annual conference. 


At ibe Central Criminal ,9 5^^hen the bomb went off 
Court Magee, aged 35, from at 2.54amon -foe night before 
Belfest, was convicted of ^ lastday of the conference. 
plantiM the bomb in Septem- the explosion, 

ber 1984, causing the explo- “* i T une Minister and senior 
sion the next month, and mem bers of the Government 
murdering five people. we £ 2 staymg m the hoteL As 

Ua „„„ r , „ wep as foefive people killed. 

He Was Found cmvTtv An 7A nuUu . r_ ■ _ .i w * x * 


He was found guilty on 
seven counts after a jury of six 
men and six women had 


— h~vp*v luutu, 

34 ofoerswere injured. 

Yesterday-Magee was found 
guilty of the murders of Sir 


or me muraers ot Sir 

■JSwBSA&jrf: *** **<*—*• 

24-day trial. 


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After hearing the verdicts, 

Magee looked up to the public 
gallery and wiiiked. 

Bearded and wearing a 
gown leato jacket, Magee 
half turned his bade to the 

judge and called “good ludcT* ^ 

up to the gallery before being 
taken down. . : 

Magee has also pleaded not 
guoty, with four other defen- 
dants, to cohspiriQg to carry 
opt a bomb campaign last year 
aimed at 16 taigets-m London ; 

and various British resorts. ; _ 

After giving the Brighton Mr Justice. Boreham^ who police in a room*Magee alftS 
bomb verdicts, the fo reman sent the jury to an hoteL «Dy booked under a felse 
said that the jury had hot MP ' ~ and address in mid- 

reached venhets on Magee or JSSTw™? -4 June. ' 

the others m the con^Scy . Shattock, ' During the trial the prosecu- 

case. Mr Justice Boreham sent ^7|£ 2, ^“ eo ^ chairman tion alleged it was no coinri- 
the jury away for the night toa P^* dence that a false name and 

hotel after the foreman said he ?f st ^ area ^5?cT^lor,a^d address had been used by 
did not think any more delib- ofthe Conserva- Magee at the Grand Hotel in 

erations yestetday would re- ™ ™y’s ^ north-western Brighton and a felse name and 
5ultin verdicts. - - - . wwnta^ Anne address had been used for the 

Ma** ^a -1* , sentenced 

l&SES&tSQS&S 




Mr Roy Amlot, prosecuting, 
that the bomb at the Grand 
Hotel came "within an inch of 
being the Provisional IRA’s 
most devastating explosion". 

Magee placed a timed de- 
vice in the bathroom of room 
629 in the month before the 
party conference. He used a 
false .name and address to 
book into the hotel over a 
weekend, paid cash and may 
have been joined by another 
person. 

After the bomb exploded 
the registration card for room 
629 was examined by a Scot- 
land Yard fingerprint expert 
who found a palm print aw* a 
fingertip print which he told 
the court matched fingerprints 
belonging to Magee. 

Magee . was arrested last 
June when Scottish police 
raided a flat in Glasgow. He 
was arrested with the other 
four defendents. They, are 
accused ofaplortoexplode 16 
bombs last summer round the 
country. Magee is said to have 
planted the first device in a i 
London hotel opposite Buck- 
ingham Palace. 

The bomb was found 'by T 



Finnish Sales of 
radiation child 


v?' *V J 


the jury away for the night to a 
hotel after the foreman said he 
did not think any more delib- 
erations yesterday L would re- 
sult in verdicts. ' 


J fie bomb was fonnd fay 

police in a room Magee alieg- Trxmrwt 

edly booked under a felse 1 OWflS ill ll 

name and address in mid- 

' Diufogthe trial the prosecu- ^UjUUO i6lt 
tion alleged it was no coinci- i 1 

dence that a felse name and illllTTI^hlfpkCSCf 

address had been used bv MUllIvlviJij 




Magee, who winked at the public gallery after the verdict. 


Magee wffl - bt .sentenced 
oni» the jury, has finished 

HiVM/firiiv tivA I-**-*’ - «■ - !1 ^ 


address had been used for the 
London hotel where his fin* 

08 the hotel 


“Bed been discovered em the 

dUCftuug nre otj^oreidjct& ; _ 54^ wife of thedtamnan cCthe: registratimi . 

Tomorrow C^mtaons Poll shows ISSS 

South Africa clash on collapse in deepened, there 

BA choice Tory seats S5 

crossroads T * 0 " fc 







World C 

result 

and rf 

-- . 7 .;.‘ ( 

i :> 5 -^ 

■ V U 


Times Profile of 
Soweto, ten years 
after violence 
engulfed the 
township home of 
\V* million of 
Johannesbui^s 
blacks 


• The £4,000 prize in 
The Times Portfolio 
Gold competition was 
won outright yesterday 
by Miss Annette 
French, of Heme! . 
Hempstead, Herts. . 

• There is another • 
£4,000 to be won today. 

• Portfolio hst,page 
26; rules arid how to' 
play, information 
service, page 20. 


ByPhilipWebster 
and Edward Townsend 

The -Prime Minister, de- 
dined yestoday to intervene 
to Force British Airways to bny 
£700m ■; of. aircraft -engines 
from Rolls-Rqyce rather than 
from the- Americans. 

Under questioning in the 
Commons from Mr NeD 
Kinnbck who had urged ber to 
“bat for BritanT,Mrs Mmga- 
ret Thatcher .declared that 
Rolls-Royce would have to 
“win op merit” • ' 

It did no good for the 
efficiency of British industry 
to protect it from foreign 
competition, the Prime Maris- 
ler said. . 

Their clash came after re- 
ports that ;BA preferred the 
US-built GtmeraT Electric en- 
gines to power its next fleet of 
Boeing jumbo jets. 

Although a spokesman for 
the airline; due to be priva- 

lized pext year, described the 
reports as qjeculaticm ^yester- 
day and said that RolbRoyce 
had not been ruled out as a 


Correspondent 

A collapse in support for the 
Government in three parlia- 
mentary seats bdd comfort- 
ably by the Conservatives at 
foe last general election was 
indicated by a survey ofvoting 
intentions published last 
night 

In afl three, Bolton West, 
Bristol West mid Welwyn 


i - From Michael Hornsby 
I Johannesburg 

" The South African Govero- 

meatwas reported last n^ht to 

be mi the brink of re-iinposn^ 
a state of emergency 'after 
faffing to resolve a paffiameu- 
tary deadlock that fcr Hocking 
foe passage of two cantrover- 
skl new security BHb. 

As the eonstitutional crisis 
deepened, there was renewed 
fighting between rival Mack 
gronps in the Crossroads 
shanty town outside Cape 
Town. Over the past two days 
14 people have been kilted and 
an estimated 20,000 left hooe- 
fess after their shacks and 
tents were burnt down. 

Four journalists covering 
the fighting, three of them 
cameramen and one a reporter, 
wne among a t least 20 people 
injured. One of the wounded, 
Mr George De'Ath, a camera- 
man on a freelance assignment 
for ITN, underwent surgery 
for serious head injuries In the 
Groote Sebum hospital in 


Hopes of cheaper 
home loan 
rates recede 


By Darid Smith, Economics Correspondent 


cheaper mortgages, were LTulZS' £ 0uld ^ rc ‘ 
knocked yesterday by foe lhe - 

annouuceiSrfa sh^iriJ fa a sharp cat m foe cost of 


-* — ■ — uiv 

announcemem of a sharp rise 
in the money supply. 


— r woi vi 

Dorrowing, 

The last base rate cut, to 10 


The Bank ofEndand indi- t ne last case rate cut, to 10 
cated that it would be main- May 22- A 

taininc an extremelv mmini.e ??• J 3 ^ v f? s expected 


Hatfield, it is the Labour Party S™ 01 * Sch«mr hospital in 

rather fo^n foe Alliance which Cap* Tkwun- 

tms made massive inroads. -According to one report, Mr 

Tbe soevns. conducted for 


taining an extremely cautious 
attitude to base rate cuts as a 
TOuIt of foe 3 per cent rise in 
the sterling M3 measure of 
money last month. 

The figures, ironically, were 
bad enough to, book the 
pound by 2 cents to $1.5165 
against foe dollar, because 
dealers believe an early base 
rate cut has been ruled out. 

The Stock Exchange took 
foe news badly, with the FT 
30- share index closing 15.1 
I tipwn at 1,314.4. Later in New 
York foe Dow Jones industri- 
al average fell 13.86 points in 
rooming trading to 1826.29 

In foe House of Commons, 
foe Prime Minister again re- 
jected foe idea of taking the 


this week, probably followed 
by a further reduction before 
the end of foe month. 

. Now, the cut to 9.5 per cent 
is highly unlikely this week, 
and by no means certain this 
month. Building societies 
were poised to reduce mort- 
gage rates by 0.75 points from 
the present II percent if base 
rates bad dropped. 

The Prime Minister, in 
answer to a question in foe 

Kenneth Fleet, page 21 
Market report, page 23 


I alert a 
mystery 

By Our Foreign Staff 

A monitoring station on 
Finland's southern coast near 
the Soviet Union has detected 
radiation levels higher than 
any registered after the 
Chernobyl nuclear disaster 
Finnish officials said yester- 
day that they had sent up 
aircraft to determine the 
source of the radiation, which 
was detected on Monday night 
when winds were blowing on 
lo foe Finnish coast from foe 
direction of foe Soviet Union. 

Rea d ings of 1.8 milliroeni- 
Stn per hour were recorded on 
Monday night and by mid- 
tftemoon on Tuesdav foe 
eadings, which were ofradia- 
ton in the air. had dropped to 
1.03 miiliroentgen. close to 
lormal levels. 

Mr Anni Vuorinen, head of 
-inland's Bureau of Nuclear 
Radiation Safety, said the 
eak consisted of two mea- 
iirements both lasting under 
0 seconds. Because of this it 
as difficult to make any 
efinite conclusions. 

It was possible such peaks 

ere the result of ChemobyL 

it “if we do not receive * 
kiiliona] information it is ‘ 
*y difficult to identify foe J 
use of the peak". ■ 

Finns were advised that no 1 
rergency precautions were I 
eded. i 

“It was not a meter fault," 

_ Interior Ministry safety * 
Icial said, confirming that ! 
— trials had checked instru- J 
ments which first detected foe c 
radiation. Officials also said * 
the sudden peak in radioactiv- S 
ity could not have corae from 0 
nearby Finnish reactors. 1 
Mr Leif Moberg, of 0 
Sweden’s Radiation Institute, ^ 
said: "We don’t know where ” 
■ foe doud came from, where it 
went or what could be foe “ 
reason." No monitoring sta- ° 
tions in Sweden recorded any F 
unusual readings. cl 

Other officials such peaks 
occur about twice a year. 8> 
Sometimes they go unex- bl 
plained, and sometimes it is a a 
question of faulty s 5 
instruments. as 

. In Britain, there were no ® 
signs of an increase in radia- 
tion levels. ra 

In Vienna, a spokesman for 
foe International Atomic En- eh 
ergy Agency said there were no sni 
grounds to suspect any further t0i 
radiation leakage and there 401 
was a "high suspicion" that 
the increase in radiation was de| 
foe result of “an anomalous t™ 
meter reading". 


aspirin 

banned 

By Pearce Wright 
Science Editor 

a 

i The general sale of 

j children's aspirin and ail ju- 
1 nior medicines containing as- 
> pirin was banned by the 
Department of Health and 
. Social Security yesterday. 

) A letter sent from the 

■ Committee on Safety of Medi- 
i cines (o 165,000 doctors, den- 
tists and pharmacists advises 
that aspirin should not be 
gnren to children aged rmAe* 

Dr Donald Acheson, the 
department's chief medical of- 
ficer, said that there were a few 
illnesses for which aspirin, 
which has been in use for 1(H) 
years, might be foe preferred 
treatment under prescription. 

Bnt, for all other cases, foe 
DHSS yesterday recommend- 
ed _ alternative preparations 
I which have paracetamol as 
1 their active ingredient, includ- 
ing Panadol Elixir, Calpol 
Irfant Syrup, Paidesic Syrup 
and Fa (zone. 

Since aspirin is the most 
widely used non-narcotic pain- 
killer available over foe 
counter to parents, mannfac- 

Leading article 17 


, hirers are to ensure their 
» products are removed from 
supermarkets and local shops. 

The versions prepared for 
children are mainly those 
labelled as Junior Aspirin and 
Junior Disprin, which are 
often fruit-flavoured tablets. 
But parents should also avoid 
giving infants diluted versions 
of nighttime drinks, such as 
Lemsip and comparable prod- 
nets, which are sold to combat 
foe aches of colds and 
influenza. 

There will be labels on all 
new packs of preparations 
containing aspirin, warning 
parents not to give them to 
children aged under 12 . 

The decision comes after 
growing evidence of a possible 
link between a rare bnt acute 
condition known as Reye’s 
syndrome, and the bm of 
aspirin as a treatment for 
infants with feverish colds. 

The syndrome, which is very 
rare, affects foe brain and the 
fiver. It has occurred in some 
children after a viral infection 
such as influenza. The symp- 
toms include severe vomiting 
and impaired consciousness 
which may progress rapidly to 
delirium and coma. The condi- 
tion especially affects the liver 
Continued mi page 20 


inster 
ng its 

;rtsey) 
icr of 
/ .News 
; Press, 
ipleied 

L APV 
IT 2p to 
ted its 
ent to 
rt Ben- 
v acting 
another 
iPV at 

r a total 
ares, or 
? votes. 
: 955p. 


:i office 
lent car- 
it is co- 
mpleted 
million. 

:r re- 

SVEST- 
Second 
,73p for 
>. I486. 
Ip. This 
Ij rectors’ 
crim re- 
5pand a 
Kriod to 

CORP: 

I. 1986. 
n f£6.58 
£333.052 
per share 
p). The 
rompany 
e second 
auction 
s and it 
crop and 

ci ion. 

OENtX 
lf-\car to 
urnover 
Loss be- 
. 31.914). 
36.1 7p 


Knighthood for Geldof 

Tha H... . .. 


gramme, were taken in three 
Their clash came after re- seals where foe Alliance re- 
thatlBA preferred foe caved respectable showings in 
US-built General Electric en- June 1981 

« nCXt fleet 0f ^ results are likely to 
cause further conceruon foe 
Conservative back benches 
foe airline, due to be pnva- where MPs with maiginal 

n.v . . ■ scats have been growing in- 

. fngta m ent 4 cieasingly anxious about re- 

, ■ , - - cent opinion-poll trends and 

toredpext year, deserfoed the foe results of the local govem- 
reportsas qjecui^on yester- merit elections and pariiamen- 
hS that i5 J ° ns ' Royce “V by-elections last month. 
““ ^ ol °? t “ a The most striking result is 

suppher, wifom BA a prefer- in Bolton West where a Con- 
ence tot foe General Electric servative lead over Labour of 
■engjite is being stated: In the' -14'per ant has, according to 

se 2^YwJ^!2 d u - p ?° pnva ^“ Are survey, been replaced by a 
zation foe antine is keento be 20 per cent Labour!^ over 
seat to be bating all its foe Conservatives. In that seat 
purchasmgcfecisjons an stnet the Affiance had gained only 3 
r commercial judgements.. - percent. 

-_'.In Bristol West, represented 
W^wmian, Wsld^svc, 


> IUUW. UUUOI v t 1X11 1H1U5 D _ m m j HIV 

The airvew De AUl « * wWte South Afiri- P°“ d *? l ° foe exchange rate 

the can, and Nfr AndUe Sosi, his ^edianism of foe European 

grammfwereteSjl black soundman, who received . Mo P^y System. Business 
vfoa?fo?An«ISr?^! l esser were attacked Iea£te fs have aigued that EMS 

by a mob wielding knobkerries would have pro- 

^dreroectabtefoowmgsm and pangasTK hroatWrfad- ^ Britain with stable ex- 
. ' • ed knives. The two men were c “ an 8 e rates and improved 

The results are likely to foond lying next to a house. prospects for bringing down 
rause further concern on foe Meanwhile, fighting be- mtercst rates. 

Conservative hack benches tween rival groups was also * n foe money 

where MPs with marginal reported to have erupted in su PP'y was three tiroes that 
seats have been growing in- Alexandra, a black township f*P«ted by analysts. The rise 
^reasingly anxious- about re- north of Johannesburg, after a month brings the increase 

<ent opinion-poll trends and student leader was shot dead tiie past 12 roontiis to 
he results ofthe local govern- by nnknown gunmen. 19.5 per cent, against an 1 1 to 

nept elections and partiamen- In the south-eastern Trans- * * per cent official target 
ary by-elections last month. vaat a white schoolboy and It had been hoped that a 

The most striking result is two black farm workers were 1°°^ ' »t of money supply 

figures, coupled with foe an- 
nouncement on Friday of a 


Co nti n ued on page 20, col 3 


House of Commons from foe 
Liberal leader, Mr David 
Steel, was firm in her rejection 
of EMS entry. 

. “At present, there is no 
intention of us joining the 
EMS,” she said. “To do so 
would deny us an option 
which we have at the moment 
When you get speculation 
against sterling, foere are only 
two ways of dealing with it. 

“One is using up precious 
reserves, which can only be 
done to a very, very limited 
extent; and secondly, by 
sharply putting up the interest 
rate. One is denied the option 
if taking the strain on foe 
exchange rale.” 

Although foe Prime Minis- 

Con tinned on page 20, col 6 


The Queen yesterday 
awarded an honorary knight- 
hood to Bob Geldof, organizer 
of the Band Aid campaign to 
®elp the starving In Ethiopia 
and elsewhere, the Foreign 
(/nice announced. 

Because Mr Geldof, a pop 
singer, is an Irish national, he 
will not call himself Sir Boh 


Geldof; bnt Mr Bob Geldof 

KBF- 

Thf award was made on the 
recommendation of Sir Geof- 
frey (jlowe, foe Foreign Secre- 
tory, in recognition of Mr 
GeldoTs work, which included 
a Band Aid record, a Live Aid 
concert and Sport Aid events. 


Gower sacked, replaced by Gatting 

By John Goodbody, Sports News Correspondent 


% 


E" 

on 


per cent. The Alliance bZ 
mg yo ma not wm indl risen to 30 per cent. 

However, a decision by BA'" - Welwyn Hatfield, JLa- 
to go for foe American option ' 5 ? ur has jinnped from third 
would nndnivhfpdiv mwa, p fac c m 1983 to Icsd the 


would undoubtedly cause 
widespread hostility on- the 

Conservative, tack benches. 


place in 1983 to lead the 
Conservatives by 3 per cent , 
with foe Affiance, which was 

en~»j ~ inoi . ji: : 


David Gower has been dis- 
missal as England cricket 
captain and win be replaced 
for the remaining, two Test 
matches against India by Mike 
Gatting, of Middlesex. 

Gower. was given the news 
by Mr Peter May, foe chair- 
man of selectors and a former 
England captain, after India’s 
five- wicket victory in foe first 
Test at Lord’s, which was only 
foeir second Test win here 
since they first toured England 
m 1932. 

It was England’s sixth suc- 



TOUT&UO*.*. ucutnes. . f .—r" cngiano S stXtn SllC 

Continued oepage 20, col 1 19 * X traUm8 m 24 “«we . defeat and foe four- 

^ unmywrpugpawyCT i percent teenth m 26 Tests under the 


S52£5*® f 29-year-old higher profile on foe field. 

left ' hander - OBB* who hos been Mid 

Gower, who is expected to captain since 1983 and 

remain as a batsman, said- “I !«* England twice in foe Car- 
guess my seat depended large- ibbean last winter, was sur- 
ly on what happened in this Prised at the derision. 

J I had to win “When we got off foe field I 

or draw but it did not work out was asked by Peter Mav if I 
£Jti5S Idon ^ , . eldown couW do foe jokT wanted a 
ney med life time to think about it. so 
our second 1 he 5itoied at firsL It was not a 
innings collapse. great ambition to captain 

Gower knew he was on trial England But now ft has come 
After losing all five Tests in ‘ , , lJ .“'!f7-S° od lo do so. 
ihe West Indies last winter, 1 feel veI » “"V for 

foe selectors told him to be uavia 
more forceful and adopt a 


falMiJr ' 


Hone News 2-6 
Oversets 7-12 

Appts Z8U5 

Arts 19 

Bbths. deaths, 
raurag w 18 

Bashes 21-26 

Chess 9, 

Court 18 

CresswonteM3 
ftuuy 16 

Events . to, 

Ffcuwes -14-16 


Lew Report 2$ 

Leaden 17 

Lrtters 17 

CMAuuy 18 

ParBaarnt 4J6 

Property 3233 
Safe Room 2 . 
Sdasce 2 
&ort - 36-40 

[TvIru^ » 

Weather 20 
WO* . |g 


*****/ 


Transport Editor . 

Transatlantic air feres wfll 
be at their lowest ever for the 
next ax tweeks, .with, -flights 
from Gatwick to New York 
reduced to £56 one way* by 
Virgin- Atlantic; and £66, ' by- 
| People Express 

Civil Aviation Authority . 

. approval was announced yes- 
terday as foe first of British 
Airways: 5.700 firee-seat win- 

nets flew m by CoACOnle from 

the United States in a further 
effbrt fo boost flagging Allan- : 


m 

tic travel in the wake of Libya 
and .ChemobyL. Bookings 
have been cut by up to 30 per 
cent oh last year. 

- But foe CAA gave a warning 
■ that the cheap feres may not 
last; whjle ft was important to 
fry to boost travel now, artifi- 
cially low prices throughout 
foe' peak summer season 
would.be against the long- 
term interests Of both airlin es 
and passengers 

The’ £56 fere will go to the 
Viipfr ■■ sai§ frf yestt^^.^& 


naining passengps will pay 
standard one-way feres of 
£149 to £199. - 

People Express’s £66 fere 
will also go to the first 30, with 
a £99 fere available on some 
flights for another 70 and £133 
fora further 1 00. After that foe 
unrestricted fere of £166 
applies. 

Approval was also given for 
a £50 cut to £ 149 for advance- 
purchase feres by Viigin from 
Gatwidt to Miami. The return 
fere of£299 was £141 cheaper 
than .on any other airhne. 
Virgin said. 


There are already- signs that 
t he c heap offers have begun to 
attract passengers back after 
American fears of terrorism, 
and radioactivity. 

Virgin said- ft had 2,000 
bookings for foe cheap feres 
before CAA approval was 
announced and that ft was 
flyingSO per cent full. 

At British Airways, foe free- 
seat competition had captured 
American imagination from 
coast .to coast. Mr Cotin 
Marshall, BA chief executive 
said. Forward bookings were 
rising at an encouraging rate. 


Test match report, page 40 

Moves to oust 
Shah may 
be under way 

_ Journalists* on Today be- 1 
lieve that an. attempt to oust 
Mr Eddy Shah from control of 

the newspaper’s owning com- 
pany has bom launched 
A board meeting was held 
late into Monday evening but 
investors and directors would 
disclose nothing; Employees 
suspect that an attempt to 
remove Mr Shah and either 
buy out foe newspaper or 
introduce new investors, has 
failed for the time being. 



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Quality in an age of change. 











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HOME NEWS 


Undercharged private 
patients are putting 
NHS lives ‘at risk’ 


By Richard Evans, Political Correspondent 
Life-saving operations in 
some National Health Service 


hospitals are being put in 
: or su 


jeopardy by the cost of subsi- 
dizing private patients, a Na- 
tional Audit Office report 
revealed yesterday. 

In many cases private pa- 
tients who undergo major 
operations in NHS premises, 
including bean surgery or hip- 
replacement. are not being 
charged the full cost because 
of deficiencies in the existing 
charges structure. That leaves 
health authorities hundreds of 
thousands of pounds out of 
pocket 

Because of the rapid ad- 
vances in sureery in recent 
years, much of it very expen- 
sive. the problem is likely to 
get worse. 

The investigation by Sir 
Gordon Downey. Comptroller 
and Auditor General, which is 
bound to lead to a Commons 
dispute, disclosed how some 
hospitals providing specialist 
treatment such as bone-mar- 
row transplants are making a 
loss of up to £1 3.000 a case. 

One health authority. 
Blackpool, Wyre and Fyide. 
estimated it 'was failing to 
recover about £30,000 a year 
for hip-replacement treatment 
to private patients, while the 
Lewisham and North South- 
wark authority made a “loss" 
of £1,500 on each of 172 


private patients cases involv- 
ing coronary artery by-pass 
grafts and a shortfall of about 
£2,500 on each of 47 private 
cases or heart valve replace- 
ments — adding up to a total 
under-recovery in one year of 
£376.000. 

“This authority considered 
that the under-recovery of 
costs was such as to jeopardize 
its continuation at present 
levels of those types of treat- 
ment to NHS patients,” the 
report says. During 19S4 and 


1985, 10 English health au- 
>ld the 


thorities told the DHSS of 
instances “where costs of 
treatment given to private 
patients had greatly exceeded 
the charges raised". 

The DHSS has insisted that 
while the high cost treatments 
given to some private patients 
were not fully recovered by 
the average charges, in other 
cases involving low cost care 
the charges exceeded the costs. 

But the audit office said if 
the “swings and roundabouts" 
charging system was effective 
in meeting the total costs of 
private patients treatment it 
was necessary for the numbers 
and types of treatment to 
private patients to dosely 
mirror those given to NHS 
patients in those hospitals. 
After a detailed examination 
of three regional health au- 
thorities, north-east Thames, 


south-east Thames and south 
western, the audit office dis- 
covered in each case the 
proportion of private patients 
who had undergone major — 
and more costly —operations 
was greater than for national 
health patients. Similarly they 
had undergone fewer — and 
less costly — minor oper- 
ations. 

The DHSS is carrying out a 
fundamental -review of the 
methods of charging “in the 
light of the type of treatment 
now being given to private 
patients in NHS hospitals". 

Sir Gordon concluded: 
“With the increasing sophisti- 
cation of medical techniques, 
and the advances made in 
recent years in surgery, there is 


s strong probability that the 

K< 


rang? of cost between the least 
and most expensive opera- 


tions is widening.' 

lael 


Mr Michael Meacher, 
Labour's chief health spokes- 
man, said last night: “For the 
first time an offical govern- 
ment publication has openly 
admitted that continuation of 
under-recovery of private pa- 
tient costs is ‘such as to 
jeopardize' present levels of 
those same treatments to NHS 
patients." 

AT/S: Le\ei of charges for private 
resident patients (National Au- 
dit Office, Stationery Office; 
£2.40). 


‘New tactics’ plea 
to print unions 


By Peter Evans, Home Affairs Correpondent 


Mr Douglas Hurd, the 
Home Secretary, appealed 
yesterday for a change of 
tactics by print unions over 
News International's new 
plani at Wapping. to avoid 
violence and intimidation 
outside the site. 

Police were being diverted 
from fighting crime, while 
mass picketing had been al- 
most wholly ineffective, he 
told the Association of Chief 
Police Officers in Torquay. 

Mr Hurd said he was sad to 
see that the dispute was to 
continue. 

He said it was not for him or 
for the police to enter into the 
merits of the dispute. The 
police were not for or against 
Mr Rupert Murdoch, the pro- 
prietor. Their duty was to 
prevent disorder and protect 
the rights of those who work at 
Wapping and who distribute 
newspapers from Wapping. 

Mr Hurd said: “On behalf 
of the citizens of London, I 
would ask the print unions to 
consider very carefully how 
they now intend to conduct 
the dispute. 

“As some of the union 
spokesmen have now recog- 
nized. the mass picketing at 
Wapping has been almost 
wholly ineffective in inhibit- 
ing the production or distribu- 
tion of newspapers." 

Mr Hurd emphasized that 
as long as there was “violence 
and intimidation" at Wap- 


ping. the police would have to 
be there to tackle it. So for. 
more than 400.000 man-hours 
had been spent in that way. 

“1 would far rather these 
hours were spent making the 
streets and homes of London 
safer for Londoners. I ask the 
unions to find ways of exercis- 
ing their rights which do not 
involve this enormous waste 
of men and money." 


Referring in his speech to 
hippies, he said ministers were 
considering whether or not to 
ask for fresh powers. Most 
chief officers remained reluc- 
tant to be involved in trespass 
before there was any question 
of criminal damage, intimida- 
tion or breach of the peace. 
And new laws could not be 
applied only against unpopu- 
lar groups. 


Mr Hurd said he shared that 
cautious approach. But he 
hoped it would be possible to 
work out in law the common- 
sense distinction between the 
casual passage of unautho- 
rized persons across private 
land and the mass occupation 
of private land. 

• Robin Shirfield. aged 46, of 
Clyde Road, Wood Green, a 
former print worker on The 
Times, was sent yesterday by 
Clerkenwell magistrates fin- 
crown court trial, accused of 
wounding Mr Christopher 
Warman, aged 49, the paper’s 
property correspondent, who 
was injured in a public house. 


FitzGerald 
now leads 


a minority 


By Richard Ford 

The Irish Republic's Prime 
Minister now leads a minority 
government after the resigna- 
tion yesterday of a backbench- 
er from the coalition's junior 
partner. 

With his party trailing in the 
opinion polls and doubt over 
the outcome of the referen- 
dum to remove the constitu- 
tional ban on divorce. Dr 
Garret FitzGerald is under 
pressure to avoid defeat in the 
Dail and a forced general 
election. 

He is anxious to remain in 
office until next year when his 
government's term ends.. He 
hopes an economic upturn 
will aid his party’s electoral 
chances. 

However, Mr Charles Hau- 
ghey, the 9Pposition leader, 
will be anxious to precipitate 
an issue on which all opposi- 
tion deputies will unite. 

The coalition was reduced 
to minority status when a 
Labour deputy resigned from 
the party in a dispute over 
who is to succeed him on his 
retirement His decision re- 
duces the government’s 
strength to 82 compared with 
a combined opposition of 83 
seats. 

Both Fine Gale and Banna 
Fail have suffered defection to 
the new progressive Demo- 
crats, who now have five 
deputies, but it is thought 
likely that they, too, will be 
anxious to avoid an early 
election 


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Unde r graduates at Oxford University 
in happy mood at the end iff their find 
examinations yesterday, while police 
and proctors claimed a success for then- 
campaign to stamp out the rowdyism 

which has marked previous celebrations 

The history finals ended last 
night(Robin Young writes), bet although 
a crowd of several hundred assembled on 


pavements outside foe examination 
school to welcome 300 students who had 
completed their papera, there were no 
arrests 

When foe main group enraged, three 
girls on a traffic island shed their outer 
dofoing to reveal bathing costumes and 
undies, dashed across foe road and 
lavished congratulatory fcfewes on one 


student, bm the party quickly made off 
in the direction of Magdalen College 
before the bowler hatted mriversity bnH- 
dog could pounce. 

Mr Malcolm Deas, of St Antony’s 
College, foe mimsity's senior proctor, 
said; “I flunk we may have scored one iff 
foe few victories for sweet reason in foe 
past decade. 4 * 


Hatton in 
threat to 
quit job 


By Nicholas Wood 
Political Reporter 

The deputy leader of Liver- 
pool City Council, Mr Derek 
Hatton, was on the brink last 
night of resigning his job with 
a neighbouring Labour coun- 
cil. 

Mr Hatton, who earns 
£1 1,500 a year fora 17%-hour 
week as a community liaison 
officer with Knowsley council 
is angry about a change in his 
working arrangements. Al- 
though they do not mean extra 
hours, he claims that harmony 
has been wrecked by Mr Alan 
Pearton, director of leisure 
services. 

Mr Hatton, who feces ex- 
pulsion from the Labour Parly 
for his alleged membership of 
Militant Tendency, is refusing 
to appear before tomorrow's 
meeting in London of 
Labour's National Executive 
Committee 

Mr Tony Mulhearn, who 
has already been expelled, will 
apply today for a High Court 
injunction restraining foe 
NEC from going ahead with 
its decision. ' 


Landowners told 
to block hippies 


By Hugh Dayton, Environment Correspondent 


The Country Landowners’ 
Association told members 
yesterday to put barriers 
across entrances to their land 
as rural organizations closed 
ranks against the fragments of 
the hippie convoy. 

Mr Jonathan Cheal foe 
association’s legal adviser, 
said there were many legal 
dangers for those whose land 
was occupied by hippies, espe- 
cially if an owner could be 
held in law to have “acq- 
uiesced" to their presence. He 
said that grudgingly allowing, 
convoy members to draw 
water from springs or to take 
firewood might be considered 
“acquiescence". 

Mr Cheal said owners might 
be held liable in law for 
allowing farmland to be used 
for a no n-agri cultural use, for 
allowing health hazards to be 
created, and for causing a 
public nuisance. 

Mr Cheal said that foe 
association believed it possi- 
ble to bring an offence of 
criminal trespass into public 
order law without endanger- 
ing ramblers who trespassed 
by mistake. 


The Masters of Foxhounds’ 
Association joined the British 
Field Sprats Society yesterday 
in supporting appeals by the 
Country Landowners’ Associ- 
ation and National Farmers’ 
Union for “changes in the law 
that will make it easier for foe 
police to end such 
incursions”. 


• Judges are to be consulted 
on ways of speeding up civil 
proceedings in cases of tres- 
pass (Frances Gibb writes). 

Two options to reform the 
law so that land can be 
repossessed more quickly are 
being considered, first, a 
speeding up of the summary 
procedure by which an order 
can be obtained to repossess 
land. 


The second change being 
proposed is that where defen- 
dants are known and therefore 
must be named in the sum- 
mons, foe procedure be am- 
plified for obtaining a special 
court direction to. allow foe 
summons to be nailed on field 
posts, rather than served 
personally. 


Farmers 
urge dog 
fee rise 


By John Young 
Agriculture Correspondent 

The National Farmers* 
Union yesteiday urged the 
Government to increase foe 
dog licence fee rather than 
scrap it, in foe fight of 
increasing concern about at- 
tacks on livestock.. 

Television pictures of sheep 
attacked by dogs belonging to 
the hippie convoy have been 
followed by reports from three 
police fortes m South Wales 
that killings tot year were up 
by a think Other areas with 
many attacks were Cumbria, 
Surrey, and Devon and Corn- 
wall 

Mrs Peggy Fenner, Parlia- 
mentary Secretary at the Min- 
istry of Agriculture, said that 
some 10,000 farm animals 
were killed or maimed every 
year by uncontrolled dogs. 
The solution, she said, must 
rest with responsible dog 
ownership. 

However, the main animal 
welfare -organizations . have 
joined foe NFU in calling for a 
steep increase in foe licence 
fee. 


Methodist 
debate on 
use of civil 
opposition 


By Patricia Dough 

Leaders of Britain's f.4 
million Methodises win be 
asked whether they condone 
civfl disobedience, particular- 
ly concerning nuclear weap- 
ons. in a debate ai their annual 
conference starring in Stoke- 
on-Trent next week. 

The c o n ference is also ex- 
pected to set up an order of 
foil or pan-time lay people to 
help with the ministry and is 
likely io approve foe admis- 
sion of young children, to 
Conununioa. 

In a dosed meeting before 
the conference,. ministers will 
follow the Church of England 
m tackling foe problem of 
broken m a rriages among foe 
deigy 

The most agonized debate is 
likely to be foe question of 
civil disobedience, an issue 
with which a Methodist work- 
ing party has struggled for 
three years, only to admit ihai 
it is divided. . . 

In a length)’ report to the 
conference, the group of nine 
states that non-violent civil 
disobedience can be justified 
under certain circumstances 
but it was split five-four over 
whether those circumstances 
exist in Britain today. 

The minority feels that it 
could be justified over issues 
such as nuclear weapons, en- 
vironmental questions and 
racial and inner-dry prob- 
lems. 

The Rev Brian Beck, secre- 
tarv of the conference, said 
yesterday that he expected foe 
conference would agree with 
foe majority that such action 
is not justified 

The recruiting of deaconess- 
es, which was frozen petuiing a 
review of the whole ministry 
after women were allowed to 
take orders 12 yeais ago, is 
likely to start again. 


Soviet envoy 
thanks British 


The Soviet ambassador to 
Briton, Mr Leonid Zamyatin, 
has written to The Times to 
express “most heartfelt 
itude” for the hundreds of 
of sympathy sent to his 
embassy in foe wake of foe 
Chemooyi accidenL 
Many contained offers of 
aid and donations and came 
from public figures and politi- 
cians, trade onions and other 
Organizations, and from ton- 
flies and individuals, he said. 

Letters, page 17 


Sale Room 


Bust of the Bard could 
fetch up to £200,000 


By Geraldine Norman 
Sale Room 
Correspondent 


How much is Shakespeare 
worth? The question is fur- 
rowing foe brows of connois- 
seurs at Christie’s, the art 
auctioneers. It has a magnifi- 
cent marble bust of Shake- 
speare for sale on July 15 by 
John Michael Rysbrack, one 
of the greatest sculptois work- 
ing in Britain in foe eighteenth 
cenluiy. 

A little curled moustache 
ornaments the Bard's upper 
lip, with a neatly trimmed 
beard below; the noble brow is 
emphasized by a receding 
hairline and crisp curls. The 
marble eyes seem penetrating. 
Christie’s is Suggesting that be 
is worth £1 50,000 to £200,000. 

It is a famous image of 
Shakespeare but foe marble 
bust market has proved capri- 
cious over the past 1 8 months. 


saved for the nation at 
£518,400. Last December, he 
was joined at foe National 
Portrait Gallery by Rysbrack’s 
Alexander Pope, the eigh- 
teenth century writer, at a 
price around £400,000. 

Then came foe relatively 
unknown Earl of Winchilsea 
by Rysbrack who made 
£52,800 at Sotheby's last April 
and, finally, Rysbrack’s Benja- 
min Franklin, one of the 
founding fathers of America; 
no one wanted him tot April 
and foe bust was unsold at 
Christie’s at £85,000. 

Christie’s was astonished; 
be was not in good condition, 
having stood outdoors, and a 
few people are now muttering 
that it was not of Benjamin 
Franklin anyway. 

Shakespeare ought to fea- 



Tang Bactrian camel 
sold for £319,000 


tore among foe high flyers. He 
tor sale by 


In April 1985, a Roubiliac 
f Lc 


bust of Lord Chesterfield, a 
little-remembered diplomat at 
foe court of George IL was 


has been sent 
Captain James W West of 
Alscot Park, near Stratford, 
whose ancestor commissioned 
the marble from Rysbrack in 
foe 1750s. • 

Whether a bust carved in 


Shakespeare, by Rysbrack 
the 1 750s can trader a faithful 
image of a writer, who died in 
1616 is questionable but 
Rysbrack turned to the right 
sources. 

Only two likenesses of 
Shakespeare are thought to be 
authentic, foe memorial bust 
in Holy Trinity Church. Strat- 
ford, and an engraving by 
DroeshouL Rysbrack worked 
from those and foe more 
dubious Chandos portrait. 


ByHnon MaOalien 

The great pottery figures of 
the Tang Dynasty were only 
introduced to European and 
American collectors in the 
first decade of this century and 
up to about three years ago 
were in great demand. . 

Yesterday Sotheby's offered 
a collection of fine examples 
which had been assembled 
during the 1970s by a Europe- 
an collector. The 39 lots, 
which included bowls and . a 
few items of contemporary 
metalware, produced a total of 
£2,061,620 with only 1 per 
cent bought in. 

The most expensive item, 
was a splendid striding and 
bellowing Bactrian camel with 
formidable teeth and tongue 
and shaggy fur on the neck, 
bump and flanks. That went 
to foe London dealer Eskenazi 
at. £319,000 (estimate 
£100.000 plus). 

There was also a large 
superbly modelled and elabo- 
rately accoutred model of a 
Fereghan horse, which went to 


a different bidder at £192.500 
(estimate about £200,000). 
The most expensive piece of 
metalware from the collection 
was a tittle cast bronze sleeve 
weight modelled as a pair of 
billing birds which sold for 
£126J00 against an estimate 
of from £40000 - £60,000. - 

In a mixed property sale of 
Chinese ceramics held by 
Sotheby's in foe afternoon, a 
rare Mmg blue and white stem 
wine cup was sold for 
£363,000 to a Far Eastern 
private collector bidding by 
telephone. 

At Christie’s a morning 
session of Japanese works of 
art . produced a total of 
£137,758 







bourn Lf 46: Madalra Oc MPOM 





Science report 


Study cuts Andes age 
by 50 million years 


By Andrew Wiseman 


Some sections of the South 
American Andes are at least 
50 million years younger than 
has been assumed ami could 
have beat fanned as recently 
as the early palaeozoic, which 
is thought to have begun 570- 
million years ago. Those are 
the findings of a group of 
researchers from the universi- 
ties of Tucumau, Argentina, 
and Munster, West Germany, 
under Professor Hubert 
Miller. 

The group studied the 
orogen, formation of moun- 
tains, in a small spar of the 
Andes range in Argentina, 
about 66° west and 29° south. 
It lies in the Siena de Ancasti, 
a massif about 2,000 metres 
above the Pampa Plain. 

Professor Miller is now 
convinced that the “entire 
history of the uplifting of the 
Andes in this region did not 
occur In the Pre-Cambrian 
period". 

The area studied was an 
ideal laboratory. It was rea- 
sonably accessible and the 

generous rainfall characteris- 
tic helped to expose the rock in 
the beds of the numerous 
streams. 

That provided the scientists 
with a wide selection of tire 
samples they needed. 


Because the Andes has 
fhang pj many times through- 
out its history, any fossil 
evidence which could have 
pointed to its origin has been 
destroyed by nature. As it was 
no longer posable to deter- 
mine the age <rf the original 
rock by standard geological 
methods, new ways had to be 
found appropriate to the com- 
paratively deep-lying roots of 
an old Andes formation. 

The researchers recon- 
structed the sedimentary 
rocks, the basic material of the 
original mountain having first 
analysed their geo-chemical- 
characteristics. Then they 
concentrated on the process of 
the rocks we t amorphism, by 
ascertaining the relative age of 
individual folds and layers. 
Finally they established die 
exact period of each of the 
various metamorphism stages, 
by using isotopes to determine 
their chronology. 

Professor Miller says that 
doing all that was “tike trying 
to conduct a paper-chase 
through dense bush”. But his 
efforts were rewarded. He 
proved a new date for the 
origin of the Andes and found 
that the range had developed 
as a result of four .separate 
successive phases. 


TOMORROW 
COULD CHANGE 
YOUR LIFE. 


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HOME NEWS 




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■• ‘^[V^ 

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‘tio J 


’So^ iet envoy 

i hanks Brithi 


■••”• itilt 


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trian camel. 
£ 319.000 


£100,000 
bail bill 
for brother 

Ian Smalley, a Leicester 
businessman who is refusing 
to leave the United Stales to 
stand trial in Britain accused 
of supplying arms to Iran, 
landed his brother with a 
£100.000 bill in the Hi& 
Court yesterday. 

Lord Justice Woolf; sitting 
with Mr Justice Macpherson 
in the Queen's Bench Divi- 
sional Court, upheld the order 
ofa Crown Court judge in July 
1983 that he must forfeit the , 
£100,000 surety he put up for 
his brother as a condition of 
bail pending trial 

Mr John Smalley, an econo- 
mist of Sandown Road, 
Stoneygate, Leicester, had 
agreed to give the surety while 
his brother awaited a hearing, 
in October 1982 of charges 
against him relating to the 
unlicenced export of tank 
engines: 

Fart of the bail conditions 
was that he should surrender 
his passport* But in July that 
year it was varied byahe High 
Court to allow him to visit the 
United r States for •five weeks. 
:Biit .when . he arrive^. in - 
America the next month he. 

was airesied and charged whh 
illegally shipping arms worth 
millions of dollars to Iran and 
Iraq. He was later acquitted by 
a jury in Dallas, Texas, but by 
then had missed his trial 

Judge Harrison Hall sitting 
at Warwick Crown Court, 
then ordered Ian Smalley to 
forfeit his £25,000 personal 
surety and his brother to 
forfeit his £100,000. 

Mr John Smalley claimed 
his brother, who is believed to 
be living on a yacht off the 
Florida coast, had been re- 
fused permission to leave by 
the American authorities. 





Dr Sinclair: recorded talks 
. with superiors 

Scientist 
had secret 
recordings 

' Secret tapes made by Dr 
Cathy Sindafr, a scientist, 
woe played to an in d ustrial 
tribunal yesterday where she 


World link 
for school 
computers 

By Bill Johnstone . | 
Technology Correspondent 

An international schools 
computer network has been 
launched which could link 
Britain's secondary schools to 
their counterparts in Canada, 
France, Italy, Japan and 
China. 

The network allows com- 
puter messages and lessons to 
be sent around the world in 
seconds. 

The nerve centre of the 
international project is a com- 
puter housed at the University 
of British Columbia, which is 
capable of sending leaching 
material from its electronic 
libraries to schools and ccA- 


SDP plans 
subsidies 
for rented 
housing 

. By Nicholas Wood 
' Political Reporter 

A radical plan to rejuvenate 
■the moribund private rented 
housing sector through state 
subsidies was unvoted yester- 
day by Dr David Owen. 

The Soda! De m ocratic Par- 
ty leader said rents should be 
brought down to "affordable 
and attractive' 1 levels by a 
system of government support 
on a par with that already 
available to home owners 
through mortgage interest tax 
relief 

Under the scheme, land- 
lords would qualify for a 
subsidy equivalent to 25 per 
cent of their annual costs and 
pass the savings on to tenants. 

Young, single people denied 
priority on council house 
waiting lists and those needing 
to move frequently because of 
their work would be among 
the main target groups. 

Dr Owen told the Institute 
of Housing Conference in 
Brighton that the current as- 
sured tenancy scheme, which 
removes rents from the scope 
of the Fair Rent Act. had 
failed to get off the ground 
because costs were too high. 

He said’ “A central feature 
of the SDP strategy is the 
development of new forms of 
non-council rented accommo- 
dation. A new sector of soda! 
housing for rent needs to be 
created, to be managed by 
housing associations and oth- 
er approved landlords.” 

At a fringe meeting at the 
conference. Mr Jeff Rooker. 
Labour spokesman on hous- 
ing, confirmed that his party 
would not remove the right of 
council tenants lo buy their 
homes. 

Steps would be taken to cut 
the costs of buying and selling 
a house and to protect home 
owners in difficulty with 
mortgage repayments. 


-Hr’ 




MW 


ft; 


■: ‘ iv-V 

a 5 * 


Lord EHon framed yesterday by one of the lime trees which his department is planning to 
replace at Hampton Court Palace (Photograph: Peter Trievaor). 

Keeping faith with Wren 

By Hugh Clayton, Environment Correspondent 


Some reb uildin g in the gat- “They have found almost a None of the trees is original, 
ted wing of Hampton Court complete chandelie r,** Lord although 25 date back to the 
Palace would be done without Elton «H. “The immediate eighteenth century. The Gov- 
exact reproduction of the origi- job was to put a protective roof eminent wanted to replace the 
nal materials, lord Elton, on. What we are now con- present mixture of old and 


None of the trees is original, 
although 25 date back to the 


nal materials, Lord Elton, on. What we are now coo- 
Minister of Stale at the De- cemed with is the establcsb- 
partment of the Environment, meat of authenticity in the 
said yesterday. That would be restoration.” 

w . h ?f md : Lort Eton Us. 

T??- that as weQ as restoring the 

be more efficient - Wren extension, badly ffa ra - 
te aged riie fire, the Govern- 

” ere being ment wanted to spend more 
sifted by archaeologists in a £4QJ)00 on replacing the 
search for fhymmts of the semi-circle of lime (reesthat 
or^iiiai Ot^s and stmetme ^ ^ H 

that route be us ed again , he conceirod by Sir Chrisopber 
said at the palace yesterday. \fna. 


on. What we are now coo- present mixture of old and 
cemed with is the establish- recent trees with 198 new ones, 
meat iff authenticity in the each 15ft high, which would 
restoration.” reproduce the pattern planned 

Lord Elton announced also by Wren almost 300 years ago, 
that as wefl as restoring the “P ® P" 55 *™ *** 
Wren extension, badlydam- character of “Ei^Iaiid’s finest 
aged in the fire, the Govern- of gardening in the 

ment wanted to spend more ^ raia “ manner , he said. 


They would make a fitting 
symbol for the celebration in 
1988 of the 300th anniversary 
of the accession of William 

in. 


Architect to restore old heart of Edinburgh 


ZrZJZ kg** in all the member coun- 
has complained of sexual tries at the same time, 
harassment. - j|j e lessons would be dis- 


By Ronald Fanx 

Mr Jim Johnson, a London- 
trained architect, has been 
given the job of restoring local 
life, bringing new employment 


of Holyroodhouse, that at- 
tracts tens of thousands of 
tourists each year. But, as Mr 
Johnson, the new director of 
the Edinburgh Old Town 


and enhancing the character of Committee for Conservation 
buildings in Edinburgh old and Renewal told a press 


. Dr Stecbte, aged 37, a played in typed form on the 
personnel adviser with Esso, school or college computer, 
the oil company, taped coaver- having been transmitted ei- 
nations with her smjeriois by tber by cable or satellite link 


Controls on crossbows 


■»* 

-■ • -■ 

« ” 

• ■ r 
* ■ '*■& 



jo 


IBS F 01 


The Home Office is tighten- 
ing controls on the sale of 
crossbows because of worries 
about their increased use by 
criminals and poachers. 

Shopkeepers are being 
asked to check that buyers are 
bona fide members of archery 
clubs. That is the same meth- 
od of control as brought in 
earlier this year for weapons 
used by martial arts enthus- 
iasts. ‘ . . . 

A group of MPs, including 
Miss Janet Footes, Conserva- 
tive MP for Plymouth, Drake, 

French unveil 
contender for 
fleet market 

By Cfifford Webb 

Motormg Correspondent - 

The Renault ' 21, a new 
French rival for the' Ford 
Sierra, VaaxhaD Cavafiec, and , 
Austin Montego, is bunched ■ 
into the already fiercely con- 
tested medium family saloon * 
and fleet car sector of the-* 
British market today. 

Bached by a £4 nation 
advertising campaign, the 
four-door, five-setter saloon 
with 1.7 or 2rKtrc eaagfoesvriH 
be very competitively priced, 
ran g in g from £6,485 te 

AO versioas have frant- 
wheel drive and five-speed 
gearboxes bat, unusually, only 


tiding 'a tape-recorder in her from the Canadian computer. 
desk and handbag. ' The network is expected to 

She said “I did not use a appeal to language students 
tape recorder nntfl I realized X since the lessons ormessages 
was being discriminated are in the tongue requested. 
against.” Italian students can practice 

fg^srss 

B^Ma gp o tt iiK^uxmK TOntte , French and Italian with the 
who wonted at tsso s cneuu- appro riate member of the 
il plan^t Abmgdttn, (Miwd- network. The- system allows 
** the members to communicate 
.eadmg. Berkshire, , that she eaf ^ l other in spite of the 

"“•“5 time differences. ' 

766 creatoIS of rixe system 
Mr Colin Titman, manager jgy- “it’s as though students 
rtb^re^uch base, said that were in conference. The infor- 
“ ” rae urn complained potion is exchanged almost 
bote tadjleuied hanssnenL ^THhc Italian 

Le was not aware of any ocner students send their messages 

to Canada at 4am (Canada 
The tribunal continues time), they are held automati- 
*tey. caOy until the ranaHian stu- 

: ; “ — : dents com&to schooland tarn 

notwcici krvnm on their terminals.” 


Viaduct wins 
a reprieve 

British j Rail has been re- 


town, which, through neglect 
and planning blight, have 
been allowed to decay on a 
large scale. 

It is the old town of Edin- 


conference. these splendid 
buildings bid many neglected 
doses, gap sites and wynds 
that were in terrible condition. 

Shopping facilities for local 


bnr^h, with its Royal Mile ; people were poor and the area 
linking the castle to the Palace ' had too many disused and 


derelict buildings behind the 
tourist attractions. 

“You cannot treat such an 
historical area solely as a 
museum. You have to bring 
back some life, jobs and 
people living there per- 
manently.” he said. 

Mr Johnson, who has 
worked on architectural pro- 
jects in Glasgow, including 
pioneering work on the dty's 
tenements, said that some 
mistakes bad already been 


made in the Old Town with 
buildings that did not fit the 
surroundings. 

It was crucial to maintain a 
mixture and diversity of 
buildings to make the most of 
the myriad of old alleyways 
that criss-cross the Royal Mile 
and the streets around it. 

While tourism would 
doubtless benefit from any 
improvement, the emphasis 
bad lo be on people living and 
working in the area, he said. 


‘Cavalier’ 
barrister 
rebuked 
by judge 

A barrister who twice failed 
to appear in court was rebuked 
yesterday by a judge at the 
Central Criminal Court 

Judge Hazan. QG who 
recommended a cut in die 
legal-aid fees paid lo the 
barrister, Mr Patrick O'Con- 
nor. because of his absence, 
said that it seemed he had 
treated the matter in "cavalier 
fashion” while being paid by 
the public. 

A threat to lake contempt of 
court proceedings, or report 
Mr O’Connor to the Bar 
Council for disciplinary ac- 
tion, was withdrawn by the 
judge. 

Mr O’Connor, who was 
defending two men, offered a 
“foil and frank" apology, an 
explanation as to why he bad 
not been present, and an 
assurance that it would never 
happen again. 

He tola the court that be 
had been engaged on cases at 
crown courts in Southwark 
and Sheffield and had not 
been able to be present. He 
regreited any discourtesy. 

Judge Hazan said that he 
should have informed officials 
at the Centra! Criminal Court 
before leaving the court and 
taking on other work. 

“This is a time when the Bar 
is pressing for an increase in 
legal -aid fees and the highest 
standards must be 
maintained.” he said. 

MPs protest 
to save clinic 

MPs in the Parliamentary 
All-Party Penal Affairs Group 
are protesting to the Govern- 
ment at a threat to the future 
of the Portman Clinic, inter- 
nationally renowned for its 
psychotherapy for offenders 
and sexual deviants. 

Hampstead health authority 
and the North East Thames 
regional health authority say 
they have not enough money 
to run the clinic as a national 
centre. 

Child aged 
four raped 

A girl aged four was raped in 
west London on Monday, 
police disclosed yesterday. 

Scotland Yard has appealed 
for information from anyone 
who saw a girl with long fair 
hair with a man-in the Fulham 
Palace Road area of Hammer- 
smith at about 5pm. 


shire, has told the tribunal at 
Reading. Berkshire, that she 
twice had to reject sexaal 
advances from colleagues. 

Mr Colin Thmaa, manager 
of the-research base, said that 
one of the men complained 
about had denied harassment. 
He was not aware of aay other 

incident. ' . 


and Mr' Donald Dixon, La- 
bour MP for Jarrow, have 
been campaigning fora ban on 
crossbow sates. They have the 
support of the Police Federa- 
tion and the Royal Society for 
the Prevention of. Cruelty to 
Animals. • 

Ministers do not believe the 
problem is serious enough to 
warrant legislation to outlaw 
their sale. But the success of 


Case opens 
for £15m 
damages 

The parents of a severely 
brain damaged girl who 
nursed her to an astonishing 
recovery after a road accident 
yesterday began their High 
Court battle for almost £1.5 
million damages. 

“This is a remarkable and 
unique case of courage and 
persistence,” Mr Michael Bur- 
ton, QC, for Wendy, aged 20, 
told Mr Justice Stuart-Smi th- 
in June 1982, the girl then 
aged 1 6, was knocked down by 
a car after she had left home in 
Lodge Lane, Collier Row, 
Romford, Essex, to meet a 
group of school friends. She 

onpsa Rail ,uas oeen re- 32^ W S5 1 S2?S? 
fused permission to demolish 

rather than restore a dn piy d 7^*7 pessimistic about her but 
12War railway vtetoTt ^dbeen “enormousfy imp- 
SmSeGiT m olmbria resse ^- * ™P"> v ement 
after a public inquiry last 
March. 

British Rail had appealed 


WHEN YOU SPEND 
SO MUCH TIME TRAVELLING, 

YOU SHOULD 

^CHOOSETHE RIGHT, 


she bad matte. 

“She was in permanent 
danger of death from choking 






“«r tnesweep oi BBSS or infection. She was being fed 

the guidelines for the sale of gainst Eden District 1 u - d food a 

weanons for martial arts led I ConuciTs refusal to allow ^7 081 

destruction ■ of the listed 1 m Kurton saicL 
structure. 


weapons for martial arts led 
them to adopt the same 
approach foe crossbows. 


3 £± 1 vr 





the i;7 _eagfees are mounted The new carfe^ importance to 

tansweaxty. ... the tess-makfog, staftMmsed 

. lop . speeds of between , French mmpany te empha- 
llOmph and 125inpb are sized by the decision to Immrh 
daimed together with very tow it in fetoin three month* after 


fed consumption and class 
leading aerodynamics dring a 
drag factor of only 0.29.' - 
The Reaaidt 21*8 prfedpal 
target is the fleet easterner. He 
te expected to account for mere 
than 25,000 sales te a fen 
year, er one in three of aU 
Reaanlts bought here. 


lb home debut 

M Gay Bergeaad, m a n ag mg 
director of Renault UK, said; 
"The 21 should dre oar rivals 
a real run for their money. We 


In June 1983, she was 
allowed to go home and, as a 
result of die special stimula- 
tion treatment by her parents, 
she had made “though not 
quite miraculous, a very, very 
substantial recovery indeed,” 
Mr Barton said. 

The hearing continues 
today. . 

£300,000 for 
paralysed boy 

Lews Chee-Ho Tse. aged 
five, of Thistledene. Thames 
Ditton, Surrey, who was left 
paralysed in a road accident 
when he was seven months 
old, was yesterday awarded 
£300,000 agreed damages 
against his father in the High 
Court 

The boy was on his 
mother's lap in the front seat 


|Vjj, ■ 


already have launch stocks of ofa car driven by his felher, 
6,000 cars, and aim to sell Mr Hermanm Yui-Wah Tse. 


14,000 by the end of this 
year.” 


when it veered off the road 
and hit a lamp-post. 


Gossip columnist accused of lying in libel suit 

Taki TheodOTacopulos, a Marcie-Rtviere, who ’ was was a vindictive woman. • The columnist broke off his 
xiety columnist for The cros^exafflinmg him on the. He was asked by Mr Hartley evidence to complain to Mr 
pectaior, was accused of lying fifth day of the action. : whether setting a trap at the Justice Otton. “The plaintiff 
'hile giving evidence yester- Hie . columnist, claims ho fonch party would not have keeps gasping. I don’t mind, 
ay in the High Court libel was trapped into going to', been “ihe craziest thing in the hut my wife is coming to rive 




Taki Theodoracopulos, a 
society columnist for The 
Spectator, was accused of lying 
while giving evidence yester- 
day in the High Court libel 
action brought against him by 
Mrs Rosemarie MarcierRivi- 
ere, a wealthy socialite. 

Mrs Marcie-Riviere, aged 
71. alleges that an article he 
wrote in his “High ..Life” 
column in August 1982 made 
her out to be a “high class tart” 
and a “coarse and ill-man- 
nered woman of loose -sexual 
morals” 

Mr Theodoracopulos. aged 
48, was accused of lying by Mr 
Richard Hartley, QC .for Mrs 


^ v| * Richard Hartley, QC, 

\s\y>y 


was trapped into going to been “ihe craziest thing in the hut my wife is coming to give 
lunch with Mrs Marrie-Rrvi- f or Mrs Marrie-Rivi- evidence and she is nervous,” 

ere at her home in Greece so ere lo da Mr Theodoracopulos. the 

she could humiliate him by Mr Theodoracopulos re- publishers of The Spectator, 
throwing him out “like a dog . “The plaintiff is a and its former editor. Mr 

Mr Hartley , said; “I am - strong-willed woman. People Alexander Chancellor, deny 
suggesth^ you are making if do.nol say no to her because a ^belling Mrs Manne-Riviere. 
up as you go along.” lot of her friends depend on iThey plead justification and 

The columnist replied: “Are' her for financial means.” fare counter-claiming damages 
you suggesting ! am lying , Mrs Marcie- Riviere gasped \>ver an interview given by her 
under oath?” Mr Hartley said in: court at that point. Her m Women's Wear Daily in 
be was. , ; " gasps hal punctuated much of October 1982 in which she 

: ‘Mr. - 'Theodoracopulos.. the eight hours of defence said the columnist's article 
claimed'- that the' fiveiimes ; evidence given by Mr Theo- .was all li«. 
married Swiss-born socialite, -.‘ doracopulos. .* The case continues. 


T» SJB- 


When a company provides v f T- ftPSlI 

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ml r^s to less than a metre > ^ lfeV' 

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«al integrates commnmcations p- n O ■ ****£■?- - v - - “ * ’£■77 „ 

packages round satellite : * 

terminals where National < y* ~ * •' - :• -JZ'l-ZZ. \ \ 

Defence is an issue, not only j . : .. s -i $ * 

most th^krow a lot about 2 „ ( 

dedreuks, tat fast respmsey/^ ' * ; 

field service is crucial. j 

Fromapofigreeaf manyyrars / S 

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Venture Gitmp launched 
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pbnBBgac o m p r^attrae _ Ptease send me dians on year ceflolar phones 

J Hease^ arrange for one of your agents to gmn» a demonstration 

hare their ovn engineers | Name 

trained specifically in _ ” " " 

eleefronks, to support 9 Contpai? ff applicable) 

Ibeir Dealers aulCiBtonias 

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For the mao on the more, time _ 

is money aad when be reBesm I ~ ~ " " “ 

a ceOular phone, fart efficient ■ Telephone Nnmber V 

servkeaqywt is vital Hi H Bfli MB BHfe Bl Hi Ml 


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Cellcoll 

call on experience! 


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TEL 01 283 1122 TELEX; 88M947 BPILDW G 


As for the phones themselves. 

1 Cell call can easOy d emo nstrate 
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H standing charges for (ess than 
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CeDcaD is ran by an aggressive 

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ent to 
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i acting 
another 
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lenicar- 
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1R RE- 
ViVEST- 
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ip. This 
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e second 
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THE TIMES WEDNESDAY JUNE 1 1 1986 


PARLIAMENT JUNE 10 1986 


Higher education • Corporal punishment • Aero-engine order 


Minister against banning cane: £20m 
more for GCSE books and equipment 


EDUCATION BILL 

Conservative MPs would be 
allowed a free vote on whether 
to retain or abolish corporal 
punishment in state schools in 
England and Wales, Mr 
Kenneth Baker, Secretary of 
State for Education and Science, 
said in his first major speech to 
MPs since taking up his new job. 
when he moved the second 
reading of the Education Bill. 

if the decision went in favour 
of abolition, he said, it would be 
extended to Scotland, where 
abolition had long been the 
polio 1 . 

However, Mr Baker made it 
clear that he would vote in 
favour of keeping corporal 
punishment, because he felt it 
was essential to the discipline 
that was necessary in schools 
and that head teachers, parents 
and the governing bodies should 
be allowed to retain it in a 
particular school if they wished. 

He also announced that a 
further £20 million would be 
spent on books and equipment 
in schools in the current year for 
the introduction of the new 
GCSE examination. He also 
indicated that: 

• He intended to leave in the 
Bill the clause relating to politi- 
cal indoctrination in schools. 

• He accepted the clause in- 
serted by the House of Lords 
about sex education in schools 
being provided in a way which 
encouraged due regard to moral 
consideratiosns and- family life. 

• The Government would 
move amendments safeguard- 
ing freedom of speech in higher 
education. 

The Government would in- 
troduce amendments intended 
to ensure that local industry and 
commerce were represented on 
the governing bodies of schools. 

He was keen to see the role 
and influence of bead teachers 
extended. 

Discipline could not be sepa- 
rated from education. Without 
discipline, no learning could 
take place. 

The Bill accepted that it was 
not possible to leave discipline 
to elected councillors on the 
local education authorities. 
Rather, discipline was the spe- 
cial prerogative of the head and 
the governing body. 

The House of Lords had 
amended the Bill with the 
intention of abolishing corporal 
punishment in state schools. It 
aid not completely do that and 
the amendment itself would 
have to be amended if it was 
fully to achieve its intended 
aim. 

In many schools, the head and 
the governing body believed 
corporal punishment should be 
kept as a sanction. (Conser- 
vative cheers). To deny it would 
weaken their position. 

Wc believe (he said) that the 
whole House itself should de- 
cide whether or not corporal 
punishment should be retained. 

We propose he continued) 
that Conservative MPs should 
be allowed a free vote on this 
question. 

If the decision is for abolition. 


that would extend to Scotland, 
where abolition has tong been 
the policy. 

It would be appropriate for 
me, as Secretary of State for 
Education and Science, to make 
mv own personal views known. 

Retention or abolition should 
he essentially up to the govern- 
ing body, head and parents. 

If thqr wish to retain h in a 
particular school, they should be 
allowed. That would be denied 
if the House derided to abolish 
it altogether in the state sector. 

He would vote for retention 
of corporal punishment. 
(Conservative cheers). 

If the view prevailed that it 
should be derided at local level, 
be expected that new governing 
bodies in England and Wales, 
with their higher parent- 



Men I will vote far 
corpora 1 punishment 
representation, would agree that 
a suitable arrangement would be 
needed to recognize the finding 
of the European Court of Hu- 
man Rights that the philosophi- 
cal convictions of any parent 
should be respected. 

He would monitor arrange- 
ments and would then have to 
consider giving parents the legal 
right of exemption. 

There had to be sanctions 
against bad behaviour otherwise 
the head and governing body 
had no power. 

If the structure, collapsed, no 
learning could take place and 
children became confused and 
bewildered. (Conservative 
cheers). 

The ultimate disciplinary 
sanction was expulsion. Under 
the Bill, governing bodies had a 
right to exclude a pupil which 
could be overridden by the local 
education authority. He in- 
tended to strengthen the po- 
sition of the governing body in 
such a case where there was a 
difference of opinion between it 
and the LEA by introducing an 
amendment providing a right of 
appeal for the governing body or 
parent. 

His intention was to leave in 
the clauses relating to political 
indoctrination. The principle 
was not in dispute. There was no 
place for that in their schools. 
They owed it to then- children to 
ensure that the Bill was as 
effective as it could be in 
preventing political 

indoctrination. 

He was glad that the Lords 
had added to the Bill a clause 
requiring sex education to be 
provided in a way which en- 
couraged people to have due 
regard to moral considerations 


and the value of family life. 

It was important to remember 
that sexual relationships should 
be taught and understood only 
as an element of wider personal 
relationships. It was crucially 
important to emphasize the 
moral dimension as well as the 
value of family life. 

This was a difficult task for 
teachers and the parents must be 
involved. A draft circular on sex 
education in schools which was 
shortly to be published would 
emphasize that parents should 
be given the opportunity to see 
for themselves the t e a ching 
materials to be used. 

Il was also important that 
pupils should be helped to 
recognize the physical and emo- 
tional risks of sexual 

promiscuity. 

We owe u (he said) to the next 
generation to build up children's 
respect for healthy family life. I 
hope this danse will do that. _ 

There was considerable public 
unease about the way in which 
le had been denied 
at 

_ Poly- 
technics. MPs had been ex- 
cluded from universities and 
physically threatened and at- 
tacked. This sort of campus 
censorship was unacceptable. 

The Government proposed to 
move amendments safeguard- 
ing freedom of speech in higher 
education. The House would 
then be able to consider the 
various interests of principle 
and practice which arose. 

It was his sincere wish that a 
spirit of partnership rather than 
recrimination could soon be 
restored between the teachers 
and those who set the 
framework and secured . the 
resources. 

The key role of local 
authorities could be fully 
effective only if it was 
informed by systematic 
appraisal of teachers. The 
purpose of appraisal was to 
help all teachers realise their 
full professional potential by 
providing them with better job 
satisfaction, more appropriate 
in-service training and better 
planned career develpment- 

lt was his strong hope that 
agreement would be reached 
voluntarily on a national 
framework for appraisal in the 
current Acas talks. But it might 

g rove necessary for that 
araework to be provided or 
supported by statutory 
regulations. 

He saw the relevant clause in 
the Bill, allowing the Secretary 
of State to make such 
regulations, as a reserve power 
as appraisal should be secured 
by agreement. 

'Another clause proposed that 
in-service training should 
generally be financed through a 
new specific pant. 

Funds for next year would 
have to be determined as part 
of the overall local education 
authority settlement for 1937- 
88. The Government’s 
intention was that most types 
of expenditure on in-service 
training should be eligible 
under the new scheme. 

Pupfls would begin the new 
GCSE courses in September 
and the first exams would be 


taken in the summer of 1988. 
The purpose of the GCSE. 
which combined O level and 
CSE grades, was to raise 
standards. It should help all 
pupils show achievement in 
positive terms. 

All GCSE syllabuses were 
expected to be m schools this 
month. The Government had 
committed £10 million towards 
in-service training for the 
GCSE and was allowing 
schools to dose for two 
training days this term. 

The . Government bad 
already said it would pay 
education support grant in 
support of exua books and 
equipment for the GSCE op to 
a total of £10 million in 1987- 
88 and at least a further £10 
million in 1988-89. 

Over and above the 
substantial provision already 
made, be had been considering 
whether it was right to provide 
additional resources for books 
and equipment for GCSE 
courses. Local education 
authorities had already 
budgeted to spend £40 million 
on books and equipment this 
year for this purpose. Bat he 
was satisfied that in addition to 
the funds already committed, a 
further increase in expenditure 
was needed. 

He had decided a further £20 
million on books and 
equipment should be spent in 
the current year. 

The additional expenditure 
now proposed amounted to 
over £4.000 per secondary 
school and over £30 for every 
fourth year pupil. In total, 
between £60 million and £70 
million was now being 
large tied on the introduction of 
the new examination. 

Mr Giles Radice, chief 
Opposition spokesman on 
education.moved an 

amendment criticizing the Bill 
for failing to provide an 
adequate frame work for 
consensus in the government of 
schools and doing fitxJe to 



McLoughUn: There must not be 
political indoctrination 
encourage parental 

involvement 

He said in a number of key 
areas schools were desperately 
short of cash. Teachers were 
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as the HMI warned, the crisis 
in the schools could not be 
overcome nor the demand for 
raising standards met without 
substantial' extra funding for 
buildings, books .and 
equipment, teacher training 
and teachers' pay. 

The Bill commi tted no 
significant extra resources to 
education but be congratulated 
the new Secretary of State on 
bis decision to announce more 
resources for the GCSE 
examination. 

Every week he visited 
schools in different parts of the 
country. Morale in staff rooms 
was at an all time k>w. Unless 
the Government ensured 
teachers’ efforts were properly . 
appreciated rewarded then 
all the clauses 'in -the Bill 
designed to improve teach er 
quality would prove 

ineffective. 

The Labour Party strongly 
supported the increase in the 
number • of ' ■ parent 
representatives, but toe Bill 
still did not do enough to 
recognize the need for 
partnership and balance. 

Teachers were under- 

represented and there. was no 
provision for pupil 

representation. 

He did not believe a general 
clause in this manner really 
helped to ensure sex education 
was properly taught in schools. 
It was a matter better dealt 
with by the Secretary of State's 
own inspectors issuing advice 
and ensuring it was earned out. 

The present situation on cor- 
poral punishment on which, in 
most authorities, the decision 
was left with the school, contin- 
ued in direct confrontation of 
the United Kingdom's obliga- 
tion under Article 2 of the 
Convention on Human Rights. 

Mr Baker bad said that the 
Government would allow a free 
vote on the issue but bow free 
would the free vote be? What 
would the payroll vote do? 

Some MPS Be whipped. 


Mr Baker A free vote is a free 
vote. I marfg my position dear 
because I am the present holder 
of this office and it was right to 
give the House and the ttluca- 
tional system my personal po- 
sition, but that in no way binds 
any other, member • of the 
Government 

Mr Radice: We shall be voting 
for abolition. The Secretary of 
Slate has been yielding to pres- 
sure from the Prime Minister, 
and to pressure from his right 
wing. 

Mr Patrick McLoughlin 
(Derbyshire West, C), in his 
maiden speech, said although 
there were some bad- teachers 
who should be removed or 
retrained, the vast majority were 
excellent and. dedicated. They 
needed their reward. But it was 
no solution at ad just to throw 
money at the problem. - 
This was a good Bill provid- 
ing for a fundamental shift to 
governing bodies in the manage- 
ment of their schools. Schools 
had to be seen not as political 
instruments, but as places where 
study could take place without 
political indoctrination. 


Thatcher 
says Rolls 
has to 
compete 


AERO-ENGINES 


It did no good for the efficiency 
of British industry to protect a 
from foreign competition. Mis 
Margaret Thatcher, the Prime 
Minister, said after bring ques- 
tioned about the purchase of 
aircraft engines by British Air- 
ways. following press reports 
th at British Airways plan to buy 
£700. million worth of t hem 
from America. ‘ , 

The subject was first raised by 
Mr Nefl Kinnock, Leader of the 
Opposition, who asked: Can she 
give an undertaking that she wifl 
use ihe full powers of her 
Government to ensure that 
British Airways' huge engine 
order is placed m Britain. 

Mrt Thatcher British Airways 
have asked all three mqjor aero- 
engine manufacturers to pro- 
vide quotations — as they 
usually do when considering a 
new type. 

When they have- considered 
the evaluations and made a 
judgement about how many of 
the aircraft they wish to acquire, 
they will put their proposals for 
approval to the Secretary of 
Slate for Transport. 

- There ate reciprocal arrange- 
ments between General Electric, 
Pratt and Whitney and Rolls- 
Royce. The essential " thing is 
that Britain wins orders on 
merit ami performance. 

Mr Kwnwi*- I fully acknowl- 
edge rhar, but first it is necessary 
for British manufacturing busi- 
ness to stay in business in order 
to bid. The Government of 
which she was a member rightly 
rescued Rolls-Royce From 
extinction and she should be 
much mote forthright and pos- 
itive to ensure that the interests 
of that company, its workers 
and technologies, are property 
safeguarded. 

Mrs Thatcher He should agree 
that an efficient company 
should be able to win orders on 
menu Rolls-Royce does. Why 
does he. not concentrate on the 
possibility of Rolls-Royce win- 
ning on merit? It is for British 
Airways to assess the quotations 
from a technological point of 
view. Rolls-Royce provide most 
of the engines for British Air- 
ways. 1 hope that Rolls-Royce 
will win on outright meriu 
Mr Kinnock: Is she going to bat 
for Britain? (Cheers) 

Mrs Thatcher Yes, but you do 
not bat for Britain by prot e c tin g 
industries. That is not batting 
for Britain, but backing in- 
dustries which win on merit, as 
this Government has done. 

Mr Kevin McNamara (Hull 
North. Lab): Can she believe 
that France, Germany Italy or 
the United Stares arid all our 
other competitors, if placed in 
the position of British Airways 
with a major company having a 
contract* would in hny circum- 
stances aHo<w it to go abroad? 
Mrs Thatcher: Like other in- 
dustries, they have to win on 
merit. . If Mr McNamara wants 
universal protectionism, that is 
bad for exports and the standard 
of living. 


Good women needed 
for residuary bodies 


HOUSE OF LORDS 


A Government minister was 
accused during question time in 
the House of Lords of being 
offensive and patronizing in hfe 
remarks about women is pnbfic 
life. 

The exchanges began when 
Lord Elion, Minister of State for 
the Environment, was asked by 
Lady Stedman (SDP) whether 
and when the Government pro- 
posed to appoint any women to 
the residuary bodies following 
abotitou of the GLC and metro- 
politan comities. 

Lord Elton: The Secretary of 
State for the Environment (Mr 
Nicholas Ridley) has no plans at 
present to make farther appoint- 
ments fa the residuary bodies. 
However, if it becomes nec- 
essary or desirable to make 
additional appointments, he will 
be guided by a person's srdtabO- 
ity and availabffity; be wiD make 
no distktion between men and 
women for this purpose. 

Lady Stedman: In an earlier 
written answer be told me that 
10 women were considered out of 
220 people considered for 
nominations. Is he 
that only 10 women in tins 
country ought be considered for 
such a job with all the egepertise 
we have among women in gov- 
ernment and local government? 

The Sex Discrimination Act, I 
would have thought, placed a 
doty on ministers to have regard 


to tiie appointment of women to 
public bodies. 

Lord Elton: The Government 
has not discriminated against 
women in its search for people to 
sore on these committees. It 
considered 220 names and the 
search extended to the top ranks 
of public administration, toe 
legal, surveying and planning 
professions and local b u s ine ss. 

The fact is that there were not 
enough names forthcoming to 
satisfy the criteria Lady 
Stedman applies. As the tone of 
public and comme rcial fife 
changes it is a question of good 
women working their way 
through to the top and they hare 
sot all arrived there yeL 
Lord Avebury (Lk Many people 
will find his remark about good 
women fighting theft way to the 
top offensive and patronizing, 
women will never get to the top 
as long as the Government sets a 
bad example. 

Lord Elton: -The Government 
sets a good example by the 
c om p o sition and leadership of 
the Cabinet. The Government 
also welcomes the rise of good 
men to the top*. 

Lady Madeod of Borve (C): 

What fa his definition of a good 
woman? 

Lord Eltom The same for these 
purposes as a good man, bat 
rather more attractive. 

Lady Burton of Coventry 
(SDP): There was a tune when it 
was said a woman had to be 
better than a man to succeed. 


Baker reaffirms 
commitment to 
university sector 


FUNDING 


Mr Kenneth Baker, in bis first 
Commons question time 
appearance as Secretary of State 
for Education and Science. 

eri bis comnritmear us 
a very strong university sector. 

He also reaffirmed the pldege 
of his predecessor. Sir Keith 
Joseph, that the Government 
would consider additional re- 
sources for universities if they 
demonstrated commitment ‘ to 
the pursuit of improvements m 
academic standards and cost 
effectiveness. . _ ■ 

Mr Alfred Dubs (Battersea, Lab) 
bad asked what recent 
representations Mr B aker had 
received about resources for 
universities and polytechnics. 
Mr Baker 1 have received 
representations from the 
University Grams Committee, 
the National Advisory Body for 
Public Sector Higher Education, 
institutions of higher e d u c a t i on, 
MPs and individuals. 

Mr Patrick Conuadt (South 
Staffordshire, Ct Does Mr 
Baker have confidence^ in the 
competence of Britain’s vice- 
chancellors? If so can he tell us 
how many of them are happy 
whb the recent allocation? 

Mr Baker Some of them; yes, I 
have confidence to some. I do 
not know them all yet. Those 
that I have met seem decent 
chaps (Laughter). 

I have already met the 
CommineeofViceGlnmceDors. 
During the next few weeks and 
months 1 will be meeting many 
of them, and of course the UGC, 
to discuss ihe level of university 
fending. 

Mr Derek Fatcbett (Leeds Cen- 
tral, Lab): It seems somewhat 
strange that the allocation of 
resources by the UGC to univer- 
sity departments is on the basis 
of research only without any 
reference to the standard of 
teaching. 

Mr Baker 1 think the UGC 
report on the relevant merits of 
various types of research is a 
very interesting document. 1 
agree that it does not take into 
account the twwhiqg of the 
universities. That is so m et b u n g 
that Iras to be considered in the 
full round of the funds that arc 
available to universities. 

Mr Michael Latham (Rutland 
and Melton, C): Following the 


speech in which Mr Baker sad 
“enough is enough", would hr 
confirm that (his Go v er nmen t 
attaches great importance to the 
university sector, believes it to 
be an essential national resource 
and wants to see it develop 

effectively? 

- Mr Baker: I certainly confirm 
that. Tire universities asked for 
level funding for 1987-88. My 
predecessor made dear on May 
20 t*"* the Government will 
consider adcfitional resources if 
the universities demonstrate 
their commitment to toe pursuit 
of improvements in academic 
standards, cost e ffecti v e ness and 
efficiency. I wish to 

confirm that pledge. 

Mr Kerin McNamara (Hull 
North. Lab) raid Hull Univer- 
sity had suffered particularly 
badly in recent years — minus 22 
per cent isthe past seven vears. 

Wfrai (he asked) is Mr Baker 
going to do to raise the morale of 
teachers in these universities, to 
encourage students to go to 
them, and to recognize the 
enormous economic influence 
ofa university in cm area of great 
deprivation and high unemploy- 
ment Any cut affects the whole 
community, not just the 
university 

Mr Baker 1 pay tribute to Hull 
University. In my discussions 
with the university vice-chan- 
cellors and the UGC over the 
romrpg months 1 will make it 
dear that ( am absolutely 
tYfln imrtPd to a very strong 
university sector. 

Mr Giles Radios, chief Oppo- 
sition spokesman on education: 
I congratulate him on his 
appointment and on saying be is 
co mmitted to a strong higher 
education sector. 

This (he said) strongly implies 
an increase in cash, because the 
fact is that higher education has 
been cut in real terms over a 
Tinw her of years and is threat- 
ened with cuts in the future. 

Mr Baker In the period of this 
Government there has been an 
increase of some 80,000 stu- 
dents in higher education. When 
he next takes advertising space 
to comment upon the higher 
education policies of this Gov- 
ernment. perhaps he could say 
that in the Thatcher years there 
has been an increase of 8&000 
students and what he wants to 
see is a return to the Labour 
years when there was a cm of 
2.600/ 


Minister denies plans 
to close universities 


Replying in other exchanges to 
Opposition charges of expen- 
diture cuts, Mr George Walden, 
Under Secretary of State for 
Education and Science, told 
MPs that he knew of no plans to 
dose universities. 

Mr William Hanntam (Central 
Fife. Lab) had asserted that it 
was shocking that after seven 
years of Conservative Govern- 
ment, there should be talk about 
the possibility of dosing one or 
more universities. 

In the past seven or eight 
years. Scottish universities had 
suffered overall a cut in funding 
and resources of more than 10 
per cent in real terms. In the 
coming academic year there 
would be further substantial 
cuts. 

He wanted education min- 
isters to undertake that they 
would fight like tigers in Cabinet 
for an increase in resources. 

Mr Walden said the University 
Grants Committee had not 
discriminated geographically. 
Mr Spencer Batiste (Ehnet, Q 
and Mr Michael Forsyth (Stir- 
ling, C) said there should be a 
fairer method of selecting which 


research-projects were to receive 
fending. In addition, there 
should be an appeal process for 
those who ended op feeling 
a ggrieved. 

Mr Walden said such judge- 
ments were not arrived at 
haphazardly. Consultations 
went as wide as the Royal 
Society, die research councils, 
medical authorities and other 
learned bodies, as weD as distin- 
guished individuals. If that 
impressive list was not enough, 
who could make such 


Hr Clement Freud (North East 
Cambridgeshire, L) said that 
poor pay and poor promotion 
chances were the major factors 
affecting recruitment into 
universities. 

Mr Walden said the Govern- 
ment hoped that the university 
authorities, vice-chancellors 
and the Association of Univer- 
sity Teachers would come up 
with some movement over 
flexibility, structure and ap- 
praisal which would enable 
another look to be taken at 
academic pay. 


Absence causes a stir 


ALLIANCE 


of divided opinions on 
ce policy between the two 
halves of the Alliance were 
responsible for loud laughter 
from all sides when Mr David 
Steel, leader of the liberal 
Party, rose, to ask the Prime 
Minister a question in the 
Commons. 

Dr David Owen, leader of the 
SDP, who usually speaks for the 
Alliance ax Prime Minister’s 
question time on Tuesdays, was 
absent from the chamber and 
Mr Dennis Skinner (Bolsover, 
Lab) said, amid the noise and 
pointing to Mr Steak It was 
Owen’s turn today! 

There was renewed laughter 
when it became apparent that 
Mr Sled's question was un- 
related to defence issues. 

He said: Now that the Foreign 
Secretary (Sir Geoffrey Howe) 
and her former policy adviser. 
Sir John Hoskins, have both 


advocated Britain joining the 
EMS. for how long is she going 
to resist it? 

Mrs Thatcher l give him the 
same reply as I have previously 
given to the leader of the SDP. 
(Laughter) 

There is. at present, no inten- 
tion of joining the EMS. To do 
so would deny us an option we 
have at the moment. When 
there is speculation against ster- 
ling there are only two ways of 
dealing with it if you join. The 
first is to use up precious 
reserves, which can only be 
done to a very limited extent. 
The second is by sharply putting 
up the interesi rate. 

One is denied the option of 
taking the strain on the ex- 
change rate, i do not think it 
right to deny us that option. 

Later, responding to a Conser- 
vative backbencher, Mrs 
Thatcher said the Conservative 
Party was the only party with a 
dear, united policy on defence, 
and it would make this country 
a reliable ally in time of trouble. 


Biffen hint at restoration of lost Friday 


Mr John Biffen, Leader of the 
House, made clear in the Com- 
mons that there is likely to be an 
extra day for private members' 
motions to make up for the day 
lost on Friday because of an all- 
night filibuster by Conservative 
backbenchers. 

Replying to a point of order 

K [ by Mr Peter Shore, shadow 
der of the House, he in- 
dicated that' when he announced 
the forthcoming business on 
Thursday he hoped to make a 
positive response to Labour 
demands for the extra day. 

The National Health Service 
(Amendment) Bfll, removing 
Crown Immunity in hospitals 
from the food and hygiene 
regulations, received an un- 
opposed third reading in the 
Commons in the early hours of 
today (Tuesday) despite long 
speeches by Labour MPs — in 
retaliation, it seemed, for the all- 
night sitting that prevented Mr 
Tam Dalyeil (Linlithgow. Lab) 
from making a Commons attack 
last Friday on Mrs Thatcher. 

Shortly before midnight, eight 
hours after, the start of the 
debate, Mr Brian Sedgetnore 
(Hackney South and Shore- 
ditch, Lab), intervening on a 
point of order, said it was 


rumoured that the Government 
would accede to the Opposition 
request for a private Members’ 
day in place of the one lost as a 
result of last Thursday night’s 
ould i 


go 


filibuster so that MPS cot 
to bed. 

If this is going on behind the 
scenes (he said) should we not 
have a statement from die 
Leader of the House as to what 
is being arranged and what we 
are being offered? 

The Deputy Speaker, Sir Paul 
Dean, replied that he knew 
nothing about these matters. 

Each group of amendments 
bad been discussed for about 
two hours and the Opposition 
bad forced a succession of 
divisions, but not long after Mr 
Sedgemore’s intervention for 
the first time a sex of amend- 
ments was withdrawn. 

Mr Charles Kennedy (Ross. 
Cromarty and Skye. SDP) said 
later be was glad, despite the late 
hour, that the debate seemed to 
be slightly back on course and 
that those who were released 
from their cages on the back 
benches of the Labour Party 
seemed to be chained up once 
again and were backdiscussing 
this slightly more seriously. 

As far as I am concerned (he 


added) one ride is as bad as the 
other. Last week's events are no 
better than some of the things 
that happened earlier this 
afternoon. 

After the Bill had been read 
the third time, Mr Terry Davis 
Hill Lab), 


the Opposition, ' said they 
expected die Leader of the 
House. Mr John Biffen, to make 
a statement about matters raised 
on Monday. 

We were led to believe (he 
continued) that Mr Biffen had 
come here az this late hour to 
make a statement about future 
business. 

Mr Biffen said he understood 
that discussions were still 
proceeding. 

Today, afterquestion time, he 
repeated that discussions be- 
tween business managers in alt 
parties were still continuing. 

Monday’s sitting ended at 
2.51am today. . 

•If the Prime Minister ap- 
proved of the filibustering tac- 
tics used by Conservative MPs 
to force the cancellation of 
Friday's business, when Mr 
Tam Dalyeil was due to move a 
motion strongly critical of her 
conduct, was it because she was 


“frit”, Mr James Craigen (Glas- 
gow, Mary hill. Lab) asked dur- 
ing Commons questions, 

. Mis Thatcher replied that vary- 
ing parliamentary tactics were 
used by MPs in all parties. She 
did not recall the Opposition 
complaining when opponents of 
the Unborn Children (Protec- 
tion) Bill tried, as a result of 
parliamentary devices, to pre- 
vent a motion by Mr Andrew 
Bowden (Brighton, Kemptown. 
Q being readied on June 7, 
1985. Mr Dalyeil and Mr Peter 
Shore, shadow Leader of the 
House, had participated in that. 
Mr John McWJBBam (Blaydon, 
Lab): Will she condemn those 
Conservative MPs who denied 
Mr Dalyeil the right to have his 
opinions expressed and debated 
in the House? 

Mrs Thatcher Labour MPs 
cannot bear tactics on this side 
of the House which they fre- 
quently have used themselves. 

, On March 25, 1965, the late 
Richard Crossraan, assisted by 
bis PFS, Mr Dalyeil, dragged out 
debate tp prevent discussions of 
a private member’s Bill in- 
troduced by the late Mr Airey 
Neave on pensions fin the over 
eighties. 



3 




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THE TIMES WEDNESDAY JUNE 1 1 1 986 HOME NEWS 






Antique dealers in legal 
action threat over 
choices for annual fair 


antique dealers are threaten- 
mg to take their professional 
body to couh in a dispute over 
selection procedures for the 
Grosvenor House Antiques 
Fair, to be opened by Princess 
Margaret today. 

They are incensed at the 
system for choosing partici- 
pants in the annual lair, 
organized by the British An- 
tiques Dealers’ Association, 
and they maintain Tha t ft 
contravenes the law. 

On the basis of legal advice 
the half dozen dealers believe 
they have a strong case against 
the association on the ground 
that it is giving the BADA 
regular exhibitors at the lair 
preferential treatment over 
those who have yet to set a 
pitch. 

They say that as a company, 
as well as the trade’s leading 
professional body, the associa- 
tion is required under the 
Companies Act to treat its 
shareholders, the dealer-mem- 
bers, fairly and give them alt 
an equal chance to participate. 

The dispute has Hared up in 
the wake of the so-called 
“royal row” over the stand 
secured by Princess Michael 
of Kent in the Grosvenor 
House hotel foyer on behalf of 
MacCoonal Mason, the Duke. 
Street dealers who made her a 
partner earlier this year. 


By Frances Gibb, Legal Affairs Correspondent 

A group of leading London In spite of successive appji- liques in which they 

cations for a stand at the fair, specialized. 

Mr David Mason says his “We cannot just throw peo- 
company was turned down pie out if they have come up to 

repeatedly. After this '“*•** - — '—~ A • • — » *• 

the Princess 


refection the Princess man- 
aged to persuade the hotel's 
owner, Lord Forte, to allow 
the company to use the foyer. 

Defending the company's 
~ action, Mr Mason said it was 
high time the selection proce- 
dures were made more open 
and regularized. “I am abso- 
lutely fed up with all this and 
shaD be contacting my lawyer, 
Sir David NapJey, to see what 
steps can be taken.” 

His company had been a 
member of the association for 
50 years and yet had been put 
on the waiting 1 1st for the past 
four years. 

There are 95 exhibitors at 
the lair and a waiting list of 
100. Established exhibitors in 
the main are readmitted, un- 
less their exhibits fail to come 
up to standard, and would-be 
newcomers, who do not have 
to be association members, 
must join the queue: 

Yesterday Mr David Pet- 
tiler, president of the associa- 
tion, said that when the lair 
was re-started at Grosvenor 
House in 1983 people were 
asked if they wanted to partici- 
pate. Those who did not are 
on the list and have to await a 
vacancy in the field of an- 


the required standard, 
said. But there was a 
mortem at the end o: 
to see if any dealer should be 
refused entry in future and 
that did happen. 

He added that because the 
lair had proved successful, 
everyone suddenly wanted to 
join- in. “I expect if no 
Americans came over and we 
sold only 6% pence worth of 
goods, everyone would be 
dropping out.” 

The original Grosvenor 
House antiques fair left the 
hotel venue some years ago 
after nearly 50 years when it 
was disrupted by industrial 
action and has since been re- 
established at Burlington 
House. Lord Forte re-started a 
fair at his hotel in 1983 with 
the association acting as orga- 
nizers for a fee which at that 
time was £10,000. 

That arrangement has been 
criticized by some past presi- 
dents of die association and 
chairmen of the fair who say h 
is inconsistent with the 
association's role as a profes- 
sional and regulatory body 
and ft is some of those same 
dealers who are now threaten- 
ing the legal action. 


Melina Mercouri, Greek Minister for Cnltnre, attending a 
Greek theatre exhibition yesterday at the Lyric Theatre, 
Hammersmith (Photograph: Chris Harris). 


Sculpture 
in Kent 
‘could be 
Celtic god’ 

By Nonnan Hammond 
Archaeology 
Correspondent 

An radergroand chamber 
found during recent roadworks 
in Kent may be a rare type of 
Celtic shrine, according to its 
discoverers. Among the finds 
was a chalk sculpture of a 
human figure, perhaps repre- 
senting a Celtic deity. 

The discovery was made 
during archaeological investi- 
gations ahead of constrpctioQ 
work at Deal, east Kent, when 
a shaft was found cut into the 
chalk bedrock. It was 2.5 me- 
tres (&5 ft) deep and led to an 

underground clumber. 

The chamber had a flat Door 
root with slightly concave 
walls, and was 1.4 metres 
(5 ft) high, so (hat any activity 
bad to take place in a exoueb- 
ingor seated position. 

The shaft and chamber had 
been backfilled with layers of 
rubble and dirt, which con- 
tained Roman domestic rub- 
bish, including pottery. That, 
say Mr Keith Parfitt and Mr 
Geoff HalihrelL, of the Dover 
Archaeological Group, in Res- 
cue News, dates the chamber 
to the late first or early second 
century AD. 

In the fill was a chalk 
figurine. The body is a rectan- 
gular shaft, taping to a long 
neck 

The figure’s base is cut on a 
bevel, so that ft could not have 
stood upright. 


Government fails 
to reply over 
research funds 

By Richard Evans. Political Correspondent 


The Government has failed 
lo respond to a highly critical 
Commons report about its 
record of funding scientific 
research ... and it is now early 
a year since il was published 
by a Conservative-dominated 
select committee. 

It is an unwritten but usual- 
ly strictly observed rule that 
Whitehall departments reply 
to reports produced by select 
committees within 60 days of 
their publication. 

But for no apparent reason 
the Department of Education 
and Science has pul off pro- 
ducing a formal response and 
is saying that it hopes to lei the 
education select committee 
have its views by the parlia- 
mentary recess next month, a 
year after the report appeared. 

The MPs" report on the 
science budget, produced after 
a year's inquiry which took 
evidence from leading figures 
in scientific research, conclud- 


ed that the science budget was 
chronically under-funded and 
emphasized the crucial impor- 
tance of science research for 
the nation's future, it made 
several recommendations to 
improve the position. 

Mr Robert Key. Conserva- 
tive MP for Salisbury and a 
select committee member, is 
angered by the delays. He said 
yesterday: “This shows that 
the DES is hopelessly over- 
whelmed by the volume of 
work. 

“It is the slowest depart- 
ment to respond to MPs’ 
correspondence and I have 
even heard one minister is 
resorting to taking in his own 
typewriter to make some 
progress." 

He said that some of the 
research councils who had 
given evidence to the select 
committee were desperate 
about the inertia of the gov- 
ernment machine. 


Greaves apologizes 


Jimmy Greaves, who was in 
England's 1966 World Cup 
squad, yesterday apologized 
for “an unintended slip made 
in the heat of the moment" in 
his career as a sport 
commentator. 

He suggested on television 
that Mr Peter Willis, the 
referee, sent off a Manchester 
United player in the 1 985 Cup 


m 


Final “to get his name 
historv before he retires". 

Mr "Willis sued Mr Greaves 
and London Weekend Televi- 
sion alleging libel 

In the settlement an- 
nounced yesterday in the High 
Court, Mr Greaves agreed to 
meet legal costs and make a 
payment to the Referees' As- 
sociation Benevolent Fund. 


Architect 
says flats 
must go 

By Charles Kneritt 
Architecture 
Correspondent 

The Hawkridge tower 
block, in Camden, north Lon- 
don, cannot be repaired and 
should be demolished, Mr 
Sam Webb, the architect who 
is advising the tenants, said 
yesterday. He also said that 
problems with the block, built 
in the Reema system erf con- 
struction, were not an isolated 
incident 

Camden council announced 
on Monday that the mam gas 
supply will be turned off on. 
Friday, after last week’s dis- 
closure in The Times that the 
block does not comply with 
the structural regulations in- 
troduced in the wake of the 
Ronan Point disasterin 1968. 

It plans to strengthen the 10 
and 14-storey block, linked by 
a common landing, and 
lifishaft, and restore the gas. 7 

Mr Webb said: *The block 
is not safe, whatever the 
council does with it” . 

The architect called for the 
counrifs chief engineer to be 
brought in and order a full 
analysis of the structure, its 
behaviour in a fire and the 
quality of workmanship which 
went into its construction in 
1964. 


Half duty 
GPs get 
called out 

By Robin Young 

Half the general practitio- 
ners on call expect to leave 
their beds at least once a night 
to visit a patient, and nearly a 
quarter expect to go out" on 
two calls or more, according to 
a newly published survey. 
Almost two thirds expect their 
sleep to be interrupted at least 
once to answer the telephone. 

The survey, carriedout by 
Taylor Nelson Medical for the 
medical magazine Adse, also 
showed that only an eighth of 
GPs did no night duties, and a 
twelfth were never on rail at 
weekends. At the other end of 
the scale 9 per cent were on 
call every night of the week, 
and a si milar proportion for 
more than 40 weekends a year. 


Stalker move 

Mr John Salker, Deputy 
Chief Constable of Greater 
Manchester, had a meeting 
esterday with Mr Donald 
baw, Assistant Chief Consta- 
ble of West Yorkshire. Mr 
Rodger Pannose, solicitor act- 
ing for Mr Stalker, said there 
would be no further statement 
for 14 days “unless disciplin- 
ary inquiries have been con- 
cluded before then". 


Violent crime: 3 


When survival is 
the main target 


Al one jail prisoners who 
have committed violence en- 
courage each other in group 
therapv to face the honors of 
what they have done. At anotn- 


haxd or too long. One said that 
he had acted to redress a 
grievance; another that his 
was a crime passionnel. 

The man who is arguably 
... . . , the best potter in the pru 

or, lifers face days merging system - he has awards to 
into years. Peter Evans, Nome show for ft - has £566 in his 
Affairs Correspondent, tneets building society and 
one prisoner who almost did - Yamaha Portasound in , 

ceN with a keyboard that c 
, r . turn simple fingering « 
The old murderer, long wise something more. The 


to the ways of the nick, looked officer lends him sheet music, 
up and raid: I was within two The pots are special The 
hours of the death sentence technique has only .recently 


when 1 was in the condemned 
cell for eight weeks at Win- 
chester prison. 

“It was to take place at 8am. 
1 had my last meal brought in 
at 6am: eggs and bacon and 
some toast and a big mug of 
tea. ! didn't ask for nothing; ft 
was automatically brought 2 
didn't eat it. 

“I’d stayed up all night 
playing cards with two officers 
on duty, Mr Palmer and Mr 


been revived, the Victoria and 
Albert Museum says in corre- 
spondence. Thai prisoner 
helped to revive it The money 
comes from the sale of pots 
through outlets created for 
prisoners. 

Doing is surviving for him, 
after 13 years inside. He has a. 
sense of hum our but “remorse 
doesn't go out of my system. 
You just think, if you could 
only turn the clock back. Alas, 


Broad. The deputy go vernor you can’t. Sometimes you get 
. 1 . - — * . jjfk is the 


came in with a statement 
saying I had been reprieved. 

“How the judge summed up 
before he put his black cap on 
counted in my favour. About 
eight doctors had come into 
the visiting room. I bad tried 
to take my own life. They re- 
examined the evidence." 

The sentence was commut- 
ed to life imprisonment Al- 
bert came out once on licence 
in 1971, got married and had 
six children, he says, but be 
was recalled in 1981 after 
trouble with a neighbour. 

Now survival is the name of 
the game. “I keep myself to 
myself I’m very hitler about - 
what is happening to me. Only 
the atmosphere of Kingston 
prison keeps me sane. It is free 
and easy and more relaxed 
than other prisons. 

"My wife divorced me, I 
never see the children and 
don’t know when I am going 
in get ouL" 

Kingston, Portsmouth, is 


rough nights- Taking I 
bottom of the barrel' 
Prisoners at Kingston want 
to get out as soon as possible. 
At Grcndon Underwood "pris- 
on, staff say “quite a lew” 
prisoners will decline to be 
considered for parole when 
their time comes because they 
feel they need more therapy. 

They face up to what they 
have done — murder, . stab- 
bing, wounding, rape - in 
frank group discussions. 

But behind the mask, of 
toughness, the violent offend^ 
er may attack out of fear. One 
.said he attacked a man be- 
cause be did not like the way 
he was. talking to him, “He 
kept calling me ’son', made 
me look small in front of the 
o there." He now admits he felt 
fear, because the man came 
across as aggressive 
U I had the image of a hard 
little man. It’s the first time I 
have accepted fear. Before 1 
came I would never have 
the lifers’ prison. But -it does admitted . I was scared.^ It 
not house the most vicious . doesn't go with the image." 
killers. Kingston's- may have 

hit too hard, squeezed too Concluded. 


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HOME NEWS 


■ THE TIMES WEDNESDAY JUNE 1 1 1986 


***** * st- 


.».! V . 


THE BRIGHTON BOMBER 


Magee guilty of ‘one of worst acts of terrorism 

w O %} . ,i ■' 

itsmt' ‘we.'Z- Z.lESi? u. r fee ri 










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The Grand Hotel at Brighton bathed in light after the explosion which wrecked several rooms and claimed five tires, and the resc* ofMri Nonnan Tebbit, *ho ^ ** ?«"*» wff \ H V 
p. . -r «h* n nen m nniiro miw nn a flat in The iuTv will continue todav Hotel in London, opposite and a fingerprint expert about dent George tc Pi^ , Mvn > mm, *n ? hi> mun. Mr A * ^ 


By Stewart Tendler 
Crime Reporter 

A jury at the Central Crimi- 
nal Court found Patrick 
Magee guilty yesterday of 
“one of the Worst acts of 
terrorism in this country’’ 
when they convicted him of 
the Brighton hotel bombing 
after a trial lasting more than 
five weeks. 

Magee was accused of plant- 


ing a bomb with a limed delay 
behind a panel in the bath- 
room of room 629 at the 
Grand Hotel. Brighton, before 
the Conservative Party’s an- 
nual conference in 1984. 

When the bomb exploded, 
early on the morning of 
October 12. it killed five 
people and injured 34. The 
court was told that some 
victims suffered the “night- 
mare experience" of falling to 
the bottom of the building and 
then being covered by debris. 

Magee booked room 629 in 
mid-September for a weekend. 
The bomb was said to include 
20 to 301b of explosives and 
had a one-hour timer coupled 
to a 24-day timer. 

Room 629 was taken on 
September 15 in the name of 
Roy Walsh, who came in off 
the street to make the booking. 


He paid more than £180 in 
cash and £50 later for other 
items when he checked out 
During the trial evidence 
was given that the occupant of 
room 629 ate one meal in the 
hotel restaurant during the 
stay, and had a number of 
items of food and drink 
brought by staff - . One waiter 
remembered delivering items 
to die room when he thought 
that two people were present 
After the explosion police 
checked registration cards for 
room 629 and found the card 
for Mr Walsh, who lived at an 
address in south London. He 
was not known at that address. 


police raid on a flat in Thejury will continue today 

Langside Road, Glasgow, last to consider its verdicts on 
June 22. almost a year ago. Magee and the others for the 
During the trial Mr Roy conspiracy charge. 

Amlot for the prosecution. The court was told that the 


told the court that the police 
discovered what he claimed 
was “an outrageous plot to 
wreak havoc", in which timed 
devices were to be left in 12 
resorts or ports and at four 
targets in London. 

With Magee in the flat were 
Gerard McDonnell, aged 34; 
Peter Sherry aged 30: Martina 


cache was found in a cellar at 
James Grey Street, Glasgow, 
near the first address that was 
raided. The cache, prosecuting 
counsel said, was “one of the 
most significant and deadly 
collections of terrorist equip- 
ment ever found in this 
country". 

Bombs were to have 16-day 


Anderson, aged 34, mid Ella or 24-day timers. On an 

VI All hfiiiA UawiU rvilan^nr 


O’Dwyer, aged 27. All have alleged bomb calendar, found 
pleaded not guilty to conspira- on Mr McDonnell were de- 
cry to cause explosions. tails of a device at the Rubens 


Hotel in London, opposite 
Buckingham Palace Mews. 

The police found a device in 
room 112 in a lunch box. It 
was booby-trapped and con- 
tained 3felb of gelignite. 

Mr Amlot alleged that 
Magee booked into the hotel 
on June 15 last year using the 
fake name of T Morton and 
an address in Watford. His 
fingerprints were discovered 
later on the hotel registration 
card and the alleged bomb 
calendar. 

Magee did not give evi- 
dence in his defence on any 
changes. Mr Richard Fergu- 
son. QC, questioned police 


and a fingerprint expert about 
the evidence, telling the jury 
that Magee had been framed 
by police trying to redeem 
their credibility after the 
Grand Hotel bombing. 

During tbe defence case the 
court was told that Magee was 


dent George Stepney, of Scot- 
land Yard’s anti-terrorist 
branch, told the court that he 
did not know Magee had been 
interned between 1973 and 
1975. 

He told the court that the 
fingerprints of several people 


couri was ujiu uiai ii***&-^ ••“a*-*™***— » — r: 

brought up in Norwich, where suspected of being involved in 
he had three convictions as a the 1978-79 explosions had 


juvenile. In 1979 a warrant 
was issued for Magee after 
explosions in 1978-79 in the 
south of England. 

An attempt to extradite 
Magee from the Netherlands 
in 1980 Med. 

Under cross-examination 
by the defence, Superinten- 


been found at addresses in 
London, some of those prims 
had been identified as those of 
Magee. Two men, Gerard 
Tuiie and John McComb. had 
stood trial for the explosions 
and Magee was awaiting triaL 


victims in the Brighton bomb- 
ing were giv en :o the court. Mr 
Gordon Shattock described 
felling from the sixth floor of 
the hotel to die basement. Sir 
Donald McLean also de- 
scribed the moment when the 
bomb went oiT and his wife 
was killed. 

The court was told that Mr 
Sbattbck’s wife was blown 
through a wall, across a corri- 
dor and into another room. 
She died instantaneously. 

Mr Norman Tebbit. who 
was then Secretary of State for 
Trade and Industry- and his 


-AT 

... ? . • 

, ?.■*** 


fr *'.3 


During the trial details of wife were in a room near the 
the injuries to some of the explosion. The court was (old 




Walsh proved to be the only 
nest in the hotel over a 48- 


guest in the hotel over a 48- 
day period who was not 
accounted for. 






Police fingerprint experts 
who worked on the registra- 
tion card discovered a palm 
print which was matched to 
records for Magee. A second 
print was later also matched to 
Magee from the card. 

A handwriting expert told 
the court that there were 
similarities between Magee’s 
handwriting and the hand- 
writing of Walsh on the regis- 
tration card. 

Magee was arrested in a 



i v*. . 


k. 4? 


mx: 


.... 



The victims: Sir 
Anthony Berry 


Mrs Jeanne 
Shattock 





how Mr tebbu lay trapped b> 
rubble before he and his wife 
were found by a fireman. 

Mr John Wakehazn was 
trapped by the legs and in spite 
of severe pain was worried 
about his wife who had been 
in bed beside him. She died as 
did the wives of Sir Donald 
and Mr Shattock. . 

The court was told that 
rooms numbered 28 on each 






floor collapsed in a column 
with the biasL The Shanocks 
were in 628, the Taylors in 
528, the Wakehams in 428. the 
Bern's in 328. and Mr and Mrs 
Tebbit in 228. 


Mrs Roberta 
Wakeham 


Mrs Muriel 
McLean 


Mr Eric 
Taylor 


SOMETIMES IT TAKES 







THE TIMES WEDNESDAY 


11 1986 




-‘ TV '~i 
r.ivtiJC 



..... t 

"• ‘is* 
*aki * 


: '^Y 

y> ^ 

" 1 r ‘ C •> 

:';-■■■* r t ~ 

••"-71 •■ 
•" .•: V* . 


resigns in wake of 


The ^swift departure of Dr Waldheim’s decisive election 
Fred Smowatz from the Ans- victory, 
triao ChanceUorehip was fol- 
lowed yesterday afternoon by Supporters of Dr Waldheim 

tne resignation of Dr Leopold said dial whatever happens to 
Gratz. the Foreign Minister. Austria. Dr Sraowatz’s resig- 
Dr Gratz. who is widely S?ti<to alone-- had mack Dr 
known to be hostile towards Waldheim s election as Pres- 
Dr Kirrt WaJdhdm, who was daa worthwhile for 'the 
elected ‘ President on^ Suntfcy, counlJ y’ - . 
was expected to resign wnh Radical Sodah'st politicians 
w C ^f^ ol ^ on Monda y' said that the, only hope of the 
but dtjaved the announce- party's renewing itself was to 
mart while debate contmued jettison the Ghancdtor and 
about a possible successor. ministers who had been idea- 
The position of Foreign tiffed iri the Austrian mind 
Minister is of vital importance with the crises of the last three 
to good relations between die years, a leading Socialist jour- 
Austrian Chancellor and the nalist claimed. 


President. No successor has . « . .. ■ . 

yet been The Social istsconcede that 

Dr SmowatzTs departure, fol- 
The swift departure of Dr lowing Dr Waldheim’s eieo- 
Sioowatz from the Chancel- tion, was virtually inevitable, 
lorehip, and his replacement Not' only was ft necessary to 
by Dr Franz Vranitzky, was satisfy the party’s desire for a 
hailed by both left and right scapegoat, but many Socialist 
The conservative . People's politicians believed that Dr Si- 
Party saw bis resignation as nowalz’s remaining in office 
the first sign of panic in the would have caused consider- 
Socialisl camp following Dr able friction between the Gov- 


satisfy the party's desire for a 
scapegoat, but many Socialist 
politicians believed that Dr Si- 
nowatz’s remaining in office 
would have caused consider- 
able friction between the Gov- 

Man In the News 


banker in top role 


From Onr Correspondent, Vienna 





eminent and the new head of 
state. 

During the nin-up to his 
ejection. Dr Waldheim had 
made no secret of the fact that j 
he would expect an apology I 
from Dr Smowatz. whom he 
bolds personally responsible 
for having 'instigated a cam- 
paign against him. 

Dr Sinowau's quip a few 
months ago that be accepted 
that Dr Waldheim had “not 
been a Nazi; only his horse 
had been a member of the SA 
(Sturm Abtejfung)” provoked 
an animosity between the two 
men which went deeper than 
political differences. 

Dr Waldheim, asked yester- 
day about accusations about 
his wartime record, said that 
he approved wholeheartedly 
of the call by Mr Simon 
Wiesenthalj bead of the Jew- 
ish Doouneotation Centre, 
for an international panel of 
military historians to examine 
his record. “They would soon 
see that there is no evidence 
against me.” 


|VE BIRD P, 



New Z e a lan d town ef Otorohanga proudly proclaiming Its new identity as HarrodsvUte with tongue-in-cheek 

HarrodsviUe takes on London store 


Dr Franz Vranitzky, who 
will be sworn in formally as 
Austria's Chancellor on Mon- 
day, has enjoyed * meteoric 
rise unparalleled in the history 
of Austrian politics since the 
Second World War. 

A banker by , profession 
whose pinstriped suiting cots 
an unusual figure in the Aus- 
trian Socialist Party, Dr 
Vranitzky. aged 49, has only 
had 18 months of Cabinet 
experience. 

Younger on 
Athens visit 

Athens >-* Mr George Youn- 
ger, the British Defence Secre- 
tary, paid a working visit here 
yesterday for talks with his 
Greek counterpart Mr Yian- 
nis Ha ralam bopoulos (Maria 
Modiano writes). . 

The British Embassy said 
that the ministers ted agreed 
to “explore areas for joint co- 
operation in the 1 field of 
armaments and . the arms 
industry”. ; 


Before joining Dr Fred Despite his lack of political 
Sinowatz’s Government in experience, he is also a wise 
September 1984, as Finance choke in view of the country’s 
Minister, Dr Vranitzky was general election next spring, 
the general ifirector of tire In the: event of a grand 


From Richard Long 
Wellington 

Signs have gone up all over 
the little New Zealand town of 
Otorohanga proclaiming that 
the settlement is now calle d 
Harrods. 

The clothing, shops did it. so 
did the banks. Even the Chi- 
nese takeaway sprouted the 
new place name. It was all 
because the Kensington de- 
partment store bad sent 
solicitors* letters to several 
businesses in New Zealand 
complaining about their using 


the name Harrods, even 
though, in the case of a 
restaurant in the city of Palm- 
erston North, it was owned by 
the Harrod family. 

Otorohanga. pop. 2.500, de- 
cided to cash in on the 
controversy and change the 
name of the entire town to 
defy the London estab- 
lishment. 

“Harrods seemed to be 
gi ving New Zealand retailers a 
bit ofa hard time, so we will be 
giving Harrods a whole town 
to think about,” the business 


association president. Mr 
Rocky Climo, said. 

“We think we are bigger 
than Harrods. With 73 shops 
in the central business area 
we’ve got over 200 depart- 
ments on the ground floor 
alone.” While tire local coun- 


By dint of prayer, the chief 
is supposed to have stretched 
out his meagre provisions to 
last his party on an overland 
journey to Lake Taupo, in 
central North Island. 

The name means; “a very : 
little food stretched out by 1 


cil erected a sign proclaiming supernatural means to last for 
HarrodsviUe, the retailers all a long journey”. 


used tire shortened version of 
Harrods on their signs. 

Otorohanga is named afiera 
loaves-and-fishes exploit by a 
warlike Maori chief according 
to Wise’s NZ Guide. 


• LONDON: A spokesman 
for Harrods said yesterday : 
“The latest developments are 
being discussed. I really can- 
not say yet whether we will be 
suing the whole town.” 


Austrian L&nderbank. His ex- coalition between the Sorial- 
jiertisc turned that concern ists and the opposition 
virtually ovenugto from a loss- People's Party becoming tire 
making , overstaffed organ Lea- only meam of allowing the 
turn into one of Austria's most Socialists to retain power, Dr 
pinfituMni haniML Vranitzky is a more acceptable 

■ choice to the oDDOsition tfafi 

* 

Nyerere parity doubts 

Lusaka (AP) — The former He remains a dominant 
Tanzanian President, Mr Jn- figure in Tanzania’s one- party 
Bus Nyerere, has - expressed state as chair man of the only 


;£?s| newm^vS Chirac beset by staff and employers 

move ior From DramGeddes, Paris 

te opposition DClTUl PCSICB _ Phris Metro and bits ser- As well as the freeze on that despite the measures ft 


doubts about the -viability of 
the one-party political system 
hi his country, Zambian news- 
papers said yesterday. 


legal political movement 

“Party leaders in some areas 
(of Tanzania) have become so 


• Mr Nyerere, aged 64, said complacent they don’t even 
•that the sragterparty system hold any meetings,” he said, 
breeds complacency among before holding talks with Pres- 
ihe electorate and their elected idem Kaunda in Lusaka. 


representatives because “there 
is an absence of political 
challenge to keep the leaders 


of . the ruling party on their *? 

tnes” • • nationhood. 


He has often contended that 
a one-party state is necessary 
in Africa to foster a sense of 


Beirut — An Iranian envoy 
who has launched new efforts 
to secure a ceasefire between 
Shia Muslim militiamen and 
Palestinian guerrillas yester- 
day said he will not leave 
“until a truce is consolidated” 
(Our Correspondent writes) . 

Mr Mohammed Ali Becha- 
rati, Iran's deputy Foreign 
Minister, said that his mission 
included efforts to bring about 
peace between the Shia Amal 
militia and Sunni Muslim 
groups, which fought fiercely . 
in West Beirut in a spillover of j 
the Shifl-Palestinian confron- 
tation last week. 

Like previous efforts by 
Algeria and Syria, Mr Becha- 
ratfs peace mission has foiled 
to stop the fighting, but the 
battles in the camps have 
subsided into sniper fire and 
sporadic grenade attacks. 
Lebanon's Mad hole, page 16 


Paris Metro and bits ser- 
vices are expected to be 
brought to a standstill today as 
unions strike in protest 
against Government cutbacks 
in subsidies on public trans- 
port and a freeze on public- 
sector wages. 

The 24-hoar strike is one of 
a series of actions planned to 
follow the one-day strike by 
television unions and railway 
workers last month. Farther 
stoppages are planned tomor- 
row on the railways and in the 
gas and electricity services, 
and a “day of action” has been 
called for Tuesday by dvfl 
savants and post office staff! 

This, the first wave of union 
protest since the right-wing 
Government came to power in 
March, comes after a period of 
remarkable industrial peace 
under the racialists, with fewer 
days lost in strikes hist year 
than since J946. 


From Diana Geddes. Paris 

As wed as the freeze on that despite the measures it 
public sector wages, the onions has taken to lift restrictions on 
are unhappy about plans to the economy — including the 
seQ off nationalized industries, abolition of price and ex- 
eats in government spending, charge controls and cuts in 
red actions in the real value of company taxes - employers 
pensions and sickness benefit, have not been fulfilling their 
and abolition of government side of the bargain by increas- 
permission before laying off ing investments, taking on 
workers. more workers, and boosting 

Union Hears were reinforced exports, 
by publication ofa confidential The hectoring tone adopted 
circular from die head of the by the Government toward 
main employers' muon, the employers has recently been 
CNPF, ad vising that the re- changed for a more concOia- 
dundancy Bill would allow tory, pleading tone, 
companies to lay off up to 10 m Jacques Chirac, the 
people a month. Prime Minister, has harried to 

The Government is also soothe employers' ruffled 
faring problems on foe em- feathers by insisting that it 
ployers* front. Industry lead- was not the Government's 
ere are complaining that it has business to demand that Sn- 
oot been moving fast enough dustry invest more, and that 
or radically enough with its companies did not Invest “to 


promises to liberalize the 
■economy. 

The Government complains 


give pleasure or support an 
idea”. But he expressed the 
“hope” that they would do so. 


HOME NEWS 


US jumbo 
freed by 
Peru after 
fine paid 

Los Angeles (AJFP) — A 
PanAm jumbo jet, held for 
eight hours in Peru for stray- 
ing into Peruvian airspace 
without permission, arrived 
here after the airline paid a 
$5,000 (£3,350) fine. 

A PanAm spokesman de- 
nied rumours that the Boeing 
747 had been forced down by 
a fighter, saying that the pilot 
agreed to land on instruction 
from Lima control tower. He 
played down the incident, 
adding: “We were in the 
wrong; we did not have the 
right to fly over their space.” 

US civilian aircraft have 
been barred from Peruvian 
airspace since 1984. when 
Lima foiled to renew an air 
traffic agreement. 

Karpov keeps 
chess lead 

Bugojno, Yugoslavia (Reu- 
ter) - Anatoly Karpov of tire 
Soviet Union maintained his 
lead in the chess Grand Mas- 
ters Tournament after ad- 
journing a game with Yug- 
oslavia's Ljubomir Ljubojevic 
in the 12th round. 

Karpov said that this is his 
last tournament before meet- 
ing his compatriot, Gary 
Kasparov, for the world title 
in London next month. 

Berlin riot 

Berlin (AP) — Sixty demon- 
strators were arrested and 19 
police officers injured in West 
Berlin when about 300 people 
protested against alleged po- 
lice brutality against anti- 
nuclear demonstrators in 
Hamburg over the weekend. 

Eta warning 

Bilbao (AFP) — The mili- 
tary wing of the Basque sepa- 
ratist group. Eta, has sent 
letters warning 200 embassies, 
travel agencies and foreign 
media that tourists are in 
danger from its Mediterra- 
nean bombing campaign. 

Wages of sin 

Messina, Sicily (Reuter) — 
Signor Calogero Lo Ricco, a 
wartime airman who was 
given a suspended three- 
month jail sentence for “inde- 
cency in a public place” for 
kissing his future wife in 1 94 1 , 
now stands to lose his 
veteran's pension because of 
his conviction. The Treasury 
wants him to repay the £5,700 
he has already drawn. 


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on 


-au-Prince halted 
as pressure 
increases 




From Christopher Thomas, Port-au-Prince 
Thousands of impoverished 
$3-a-day workers - baseball 


equipment makers, electronic 
assemblers, lathe operators 
and textile machinists - went 
-on strike in Haiti yesterday.. In 
Port-au-Prince, the capital, 
they flocked to church for the 
ftineral of a victim of the 
unrest gripping the island. 

The drab grey factory units 
at the edge of the city were 
deserted save for some men 
aimlessly sweeping the road. 
Normally 9,500 men and 
women swarm through the 
gates for the 10-hour day. 
carried from the slums in 
gaily-painted little buses 
known as Tap-Taps. 

Yesterday the normally 
teeming streets were miracu- 
lously empty ofTap-Taps, and 
of the hooting, yelling and 
cursing that they inspire. If 
people had wanted to get to 
work from the big slum called 
Garrefour. where most of the 
workers live, they would have 
lefivi 


had to walk the five miles each 
way. 

At Wilsons, which makes 
baseballs for the American 
professional leagues,- raw 
upon row of closely-packed 
Dickensian wooden benches 
stretching the length of the 
factory stood empty. 

Nearly every shop m Port- 
au-Prince was dosed. Few 
vehicles were in the harrow 


streets, perhaps out of the 
knowledge that smashing 
windscreens is good sport in 
limes of strife. 

At 10am an enormous 
crowd marched sombrely to St 
Gerard's Church to bury 
Dumy Debestre, aged 23, who 
was shot last Thursday by 
soldiers in Carrefour. - 

The affair has seriously 
damaged the considerable 
goodwill the peasants have for 
the Army. Dumy Debestre 
eras in a crowd that was 
attacking a police car with 
sticks and machetes while two 
policemen cringed inside. 

Gonaives, 60 miles to the 
north of the capital, did not 
join the strike, preferring to 
make its own battles with the 
authorities. 

Genera] Henri Namphy, 
president of the ruling Nation- 
al Council, has asked to speak 
to the town's leaders m the 
hope of ending then campaign 
'of civil unrest. The town held 
a mass meeting on Monday 
night and failed to agree on the 
terms of such an encounter. 

Ten miles away, people 
danced feverishly in the 
streets of Carrefour Alexis 
after murdering a voodoo 
priest and burning the bouse 
of a woman associate. Voodoo 
was a weapon of the ousted 
Duvalier regime, and thus it is 
now rejected and its priests 


Tragedy of Crossroads 


Old guard battles 



From Michael Hornsby, Johannesburg 

of the tragedy of apartheid umbrella group. 

The old-guard leader is Mr 
Ngxobougmna, 


The 

tiw blade shanty 
town outside Cape Town, go 
back more titan 10 years, ohm 
impoverished rand blades be- 
gan settling on land left vacant 
for an exteusxm of the airport 
They came overwhelmingly 
from the Xhosa-speaking trib- 
al homelands of Transkei and 
Cisket several hundred miles 
to the east, driven by the need, 
to. find a livelihood for them- 
selves and their families. ' 

The influx conflicted with 
the “pass laws” used to deck 
the flow of blacks to the cities. 
In tiie Weston Cape , these 
were donUy severe,' as prefer- 
euce was^jveu to Coloureds in 
the allocation oQgpig. 

Despite repeated f police 
raids and demstitxm of the 
corrugated tin ihfr/vtood 
shacks. Crossroads, grew 
steadily. Before the fighting of 
the past few weeks, It was 
estimated to boose between 
HMkOOO and 200,000 people. 

At its simplest, the conflict 
is betweenold-gpanl leaders of 
the setder community, some of 
whom have been resisting 
removal for; a decade, and 
more recent arrivals: young 
radicals committed to the wht 
political struggle that is 
apart scores of Mack 


er 


The youths call themselves 
“comrades”, the genera; term 
in the townships for the Yoimg 
Tories belonging to the myriad 
bodies affifiated to the United 
Democratic Front, toe anti- 


Johnson isgxohongwana, a 
Crossroads veteran who has 
seen off many rival groups in 
his time and who once ran the 
settlement as his private fief- 
dam, exacting tithes and rents 
from ocher squatters. 

Mr 'Ngxobongwana’s vigi- 
lantes are known as witdoeke 
(white cloths), from the white 
arm and head bands' they 
wear, and also as “the 
fathers", a term widely used in 
toe. townships for older conser- 
vative Macks. 

A complicating element is 
avenvhehniig evidence —from 
eye-witnesses as well as affi- 
davits lodged by Crossroads 

residents — that the police and 

Army have aided and abetted 
the wfufoefte in their attacks 

ob other groups. 

Another factor was toe. 
Government's decision last 
year to redevelop Crossroads 
as permanent . bvos*« for 
those settlers who had been 
there the longest. The more 
recent immigrants were to be 
moved to Khayelitsha, a black 
boosing area started in 1983 , 
on samly coastal scrubland 20 
miles from Cape Town. 

This was the prize for which 
Mr Ngxobougwana and his 
followers had long been strug- 
gfog. But as tost as squatters 
were moved — by a mixture of | 
persaasiou and coercion — to 
Khayefitsha, still more flooded 
into Crossroads, threatening! 
to delay toe redevelopment. 


Mines hit Natal border 


From Onr Own Correspondent, Johannesburg 


A white schoolboy and two 
black farm workers were , in- 
jured yesterday in two land- 
mine explosions near Volks-, 
rust, on the border between 
South-Eastern Transvaal and 
North-Western NataL 
Martin Coetzer, aged 18,. 
was said to be in a serious 
condition in a local hospital. 
He was on his. way to school In 


Volksrust when the forty in 
Ungaeto- 


whicb he was travelling 
naied a mine at about 7.20am 
near his parents' farm. . 

A tractor detonated a sec- 
ond mine buried ip a dirt ioad - 
on another form m the area at 
about 10.15am. Two black 


workers, Mr Efias Shabangu, 
aged 23, and Mr Loras 
Lushaha. aged 25, received 
chest and leg injuries. 

About a dozen whites and 
blacks have been killed or 
injured in. landmine explo- 
sions in remote rural areas in 
the past seven months. 

The first incidents occurred 
along Transvaal's northern 
border with Zimbabwe at the 
end oflast year and there were 
then several in the Eastern 
Transvaal. 

Responsibility has usually 
been claimed by the African 
National Congress, 


Chastened Nasa 
starts to rebuild 


willing to spend : ; the .$2.8 
billion (£1.8 billion) to get the. 
shuttle programme back on 
track. 


From Michael Binyon, Washington 

The United States space 
programme can never be the 
same after the devastating 
Rogers Commission report; 
all the more telling' for its 
restraint and refusal to appor- 
tion direct blame. . 

The inevitable shake-up at 
Nasa has already begun, but it 
will take years for the troubled 
agency to regain the self- 
confidence and the manage- 
ment expertise to pioneer the 
way ahead. Until then, there 


Congress has given a warm 
welcome to the commission's 
report, chaired by Mr William 
Rqgerv which it briieves pin- 
points the technical and psy- 
chological .failures at: Nasa. It 
has also been encouraged :by 
the contrite attitude and pro- 
mises of thoroughgoing re- 


wflf be farther delaysin the ■ ^«Fl«cber, 

shuttle launches, with indefi- ' he fwmer Nasa Admmistra- 


nite postponement, of the “cit- 
izens in space" programme 
and expensive redesigning of 
components. 

Questions will also inevita- 
bly arise over the wisdom of 
staking so m uch on space tech- 
nology. especially the develop- 
ment of the Strategic .Defence 
Initiative. The Administra- 


tor brought back to bead it. 

But Congress yesterday ^ 

gan hearings of its own, and 
will have to deride, whether xo . 
increase Nasa funding 


The agency has promised to 
implement the reforms , out- 
lined in the report: a tighter 
and more centralized manage- 
ment structure, greater cm- 


tion will be hard pressed to. .phasis on safety and internal 
counter public scepticism with: communication, less reliance 


the space programme. 

One immediate- issue, iff. a 
derision on whether to replace, 
the Challenger. President Rea-, 
gan has indicated that he is 


on cosy arrangements with 
monopoly con tract ore, and a 
mission schedule that is both 
realistic and affordable. - 
* leading article, page 17 


hounded. The priest was left 
lying in a ditch, white the 
woman's bouse bunted, with 
her body inside. 

The success of the strike m 
Port-au-Prince is a serious 
blow to the military-dominat- 
ed government, which had 
hoped its promise of elections 
next year might. have calmed 
the atmosphere. 

It is now under even greater 
pressure to meet the political 
leaders* main demand to dis- 
miss Colonel Williams Rega- 
la, a member of the junta and 
the. real power in the belea- 
guered government. 

If he went. General 
Namphy would have little 
choice but to disband the 
Government and uy to form 
one more acceptable to the 
political leaders. 

Fiftypeopte called one local 
radio station in Port-au- 
Prince yesterday morning to 
say they had not gone to work 
because they were afraid. 
Government officials insist 
that most peasants would 
have worked had they not 
been intimidated. 

Some moderate political 
leaders expressed reservations 
about the strike hours before it 
started, but in the main it had 
overwhelming support from 
the many politicians now 
trying to fill the poetical 
vacuum. 



Hu turns 
tourist on 
second day 
of visit 


Mr Hu Yaobang chats with a group of schoolchildren on the bank of the river Aron daring his visit to Stratford yesterday. 


Russia looks at fallout compensation 


From Roger Boyes 
Budapest 

The Soviet Union has 
raised the possibility of paying 
compensation to foreign food 
producers who suffered from 
the effects of the Chernobyl 
nuclear disaster, but stresses 
that financial losses were al- 
most impossible to calculate: 


that when the damage could 
be seen, measures could be 
taken; “We are holding discus- 
sions in a very concrete way." 

He said that Sweden could 
receive compensation if it 
could be proved that damage 
to crops was the result of 
fallout from ChemobvL 


Mr Valery Legasov, of the 
Kurchatov Nuclear Research 
Institute, said yesterday that 
he was not an economist, but 


Hungarian officials say that 
Hungary could lose some£100 
million as a result of the EEC 
ban on food imports from 
eastern Europe last month. 


and Poland estimates its losses 
at £33 million. 

Mr Legasov said that an 
application for compensation 
from West Germany was ren- 
dered more difficult because 
of a domestic nuclear leak. 

He said that if citizens 
abandoned their work because 
of misinformation and exag- 
gerated reports then this eco- 
nomic damage should be laid 
at the door of the media rather 
than blamed on the nuclear 
power plant management 


• MOSCOW: Two elderly 
Soviet women stayed secretly 
in their homes near the 
Chernobyl reactor for more 
than a month after the April 
26 disaster, until being discov- 
ered and taken to hospital 
(Christopher Walker writes). 


Anastasia Semen yaka. aged 
85. and Maria Karpyenok. 
aged 74, avoided the initial 
evacuation and came out into 
the open only at the end oflast 
month. 


By Rodney Cowton 

Mr Hn Yaobang, General 
Secretary of toe Central Com- 
mittee of the Chinese Commu- 
nist Piarty. yesterday ranted 
tourist for the second fall day 
of his four-day visit to Britain. 

His visit is one of the most 
important paid to Britain by a 
member of any Chinese 
hierarchy. 

His itinerary took him to 
Stratford-upon-Avon and Ox- 
ford, and a dinner given for 
him fry Lord Stockton, Chan- 
cellor of Oxford University, at 
Baliiol College. 

This relatively relaxed day 
followed a busy schedule on 
Monday which had included 
two hours of conversations 
with Mrs Thatcher. These 
covered a wide range of sub- 
jects, but were dominated by 
relations between the ^ two 
countries over Hong Kong, 
and the desire of both to 
expand their mutual trade. 


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a memorandum of understand- vPV at 
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Dear Mr Shackleton, we’re sorry but... 





. . .As a polar explorer you were highly successful, but 
as an employer you leave a lotto be desired. 

The advertisement above may be the most famous 
“employment ad" ever written, but it would be completely 
unacceptable to the YTS. 

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out half the population; the YTS has a commitment to 
equal opportunities. 

“Hazardous Journey". Unacceptable. Before em- 
ployers can be considered for the new 2 Year YTS they 
must provide safe working conditions. 

“Long months of complete darkness, constant 
danger, safe return doubtful”. Unacceptable. What went 
at the South Pole definitely doesn’t go in South Shields, 
South Glamorgan or Southampton. 

Well-lit, warm and healthy working environments are 



a basic minimum for an employer applying to get on the 
2 Year YTS. 

“Small wages”. Unacceptable. Nobody’s pretending 
that YTS trainees get a fortune, but they do get a reason- 
able allowance while they’re gaining skills that should 
be useful and profitable to them in the future. 

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THE TIMES WEDNESDAY JUNE 11 19S6 


OVERSEAS NEWS 


II 


Arms strategy across East-West divide 

Secretive Pact leaders 
weigh the value of 
open Gorbachov policy 


The leaders of the Warsaw 
Pact yesterday huddled, secre- 
tive as cardinals in conclave, 
in a Budapest government 
house to discuss a new arms 
proposal to the West 

Outside, the secret police of 
seven nations guaranteed the 
security of their leaders, and 
western reporters waited, as in 
Rome, for smoke to rise from 
the chimney. 

This has been the best- 
publicized Soviet bloc summit 
in more than a decade, pan of 
the new marketing style of the 
Pact under Mr Mikhail Gor- 
bachov, the Soviet leader. Vet 
it cannot completely shed the 
dead weight of bureaucratic 
secrecy. 

The publicity is supposed to 
highlight the peacenil inten- 
tions of the Pact at a time 
when the United States is 
abandoning the Salt 2 arms 
agreement The secrecy is 
supposed to camouflage any 
disagreements among the 
Eastern allies. 

The Soviet idea, to be 
announced when the summit 
ends on Wednesday, is to side- 
step the Vienna talks on 
conventional force reduction. 
General Nikolai Cherbov, an 


From Roger Boyes, Budapest 

arms specialist in the Soviet 
delegation at Budapest, hinted 
on Monday night that Mos- 
cow regarded the talks — 
which deal only with the seven 
countries along the Easi-West 
divide - as ineffective. 

Instead, it seems. Moscow 
would like a broader forum, 
perhaps including the 35 sig- 
natories of the 1975 Helsinki 
treaty on European security. 

Western diplomats are scep- 
tical that such a conference 
could ever work. 

But Soviet bloc sources say 
the idea has its merits, taking 
the arms control dialogue 
away from a purely technical 
discussion about numbers ot 
soldiers and the size of arse- 
nals to a more flexible ap- 
proach to peace. 

In that spirit, the Warsaw 
Pact will also prepare a “Buda- 
pest Appeal" for peace, along 
the lines of an appeal in 1969 
that, according to the Eastern 
bloc, paved the way for the 
European security conference 
in Helsinki. 

There appears to be little 
scope for disagreement within 
the Pact about this Moscow 
initiative. The frictions that 


Nato predicts a 
breakthrough 

From Frederick Bomuurt, Brussels 


The deadlock in arms con- 
trol negotiations may be bro- 
ken in the near future. There is 
cautious optimism in Nato 
that three recent connected 
events will lead to results. 

At their recent meeting in 
Halifax, Nova Scotia, Nato 
foreign ministers had empha- 
sized the importance of arms 
control in what senior diplo- 
mats present called “a re- 
markable show of unity". 
They now expect a reasonable 
Soviet reply. 

“At least Gorbachov has got 
round to saying things which 
previous leaders have not 
said,” one diplomat remarked. 

Although President 
Reagan’s rsnonneiation of fur- 
ther adherence to the unrati- 
fied Salt 2 treaty beyond 
December met with opposition 
from all of America’s allies, 
there is a strong feeling that 
the Russians have a case to 
answer concerning the alleged 
violations. 

Some diplomats, however, 
feel that it would have been 
more politic of the Americans 
simply to have exceeded the 
treaty's limits themselves 
without making a song and 
dance about it, thus patting the 
onus of accusation on Moscow. 

The Soviet response has 
also been less sharp than 
expected. 

Much importance is at- 
tached to the Soviet leader's 
April proposals for reductions 
in conventional forces. In spite 
of a lack of success In the 
Vienna troop reduction negoti- 
ations, now in their fourteenth 
year. Nato likes Mr 
Gorbachov’s new formula. 

The concept “from the At- 
lantic to the Urals” — which 
coincides with the geographic 
definition of the Stockholm 
disarmament conference — 
would meet the West’s concern 
that any nuclear balance had 

Britain and 
US blamed 
on test ban 

Stockholm (Reuter) - One 
of the world's leading peace 
research groups, the Stock- 
holm International Peace Re- 
search Institute (Sipri), has 
criticized the United Slates 
and Britain for having failed 
to join the Soviet Union ban 
on nuclear weapons testing. 

The Sipri director. Mr 
Frank Blackaby. said in an 
introduction to its yearbook. 
World Armaments and Disar- 
mament, that it was hard to 
see how they could say that 
they were determined to end 
nuclear testing while refusing 
to join the moratorium. 

The institute's report said 
that the Geneva summit meet- 
ing between President Reagan 
and Mr Gorbachov last No- 
vember showed improved 
prospects for arms comrol- 
Further meetings between 
the two superpower leaders 
might also force some progress 
in arms reduction, as neither 
side would be happy with a 
series of unproductive talks. ^ 
Sipri said that China s 
nuclear capacity must be in- 
cluded in arms control talks- 
or the world's nuclear balance 
may become destabilized- 
It said that China’s impact 
as a nuclear power was un- 
studied and unknown. . 

It said ihai there was mad^ 
quate evidence to support l j 
charges that mycotoxin weap- 
ons - known as yellow ram - 
were supplied by Moscow for 
use in South-east .Asia be- 
tween 1976 and 1985. 

But Iraq had used chemical 
weapons against Iran in 
Gulf War several times in the 
last three vears. 


to be matched by a balance of 
conventional forces in the 
whole of Europe. 

A Nato task force is being 
set np “to work urgently 
towards this objective.” This, 
a senior British diplomat said, 
had been one of Sir Geoffrey 
Howe's main aims at Halifax. 

The potentially most far- 
reaching event, however, is the 
May 27 Soviet offer made in 
Geneva to trade deep cuts in 
offensive nuclear weapons 
against an American assur- 
ance to adhere to the strict 
interpretation of the and- bal- 
listic missile treaty for the 
next 20 years. Although not 
officially released, this offer 
has certainly been made. 

Ft would achieve one of the 
mala arms control objectives 
of the US Administration by 
‘reducing nuclear weapons in- 
stead of just limiting them. At 
the same time, however, it 
woakl also slow down the 
Strategic Defence Initiative 
(SDI) project by confining it to 
tiie laboratories. 

All these initiatives have 
their advocates and oppo- 
nents. Mr Caspar Weinberger, 
the US Secretory of Defence, 
has not been slow in express- 
ing his opposition to the Soviet 
offer which would interfere 
with his SDI plans. 

However, there are others 
within the Administration who 
feel the pressure of financial 
restrictions imposed by Con- 
gress on the need to improve 
conventional defences now re- 
quired by the alliance. It 
would certainly be welcomed 
by most of the European allies. 

The Halifax meeting has 
“put the cards on the table” 
the diplomat said, bnt Mr 
Gorbachov has yet to prove 
that be means what he says 
and can get his ideas across. 
“The problem now,” he added, 
“is to translate words into 
action”. 

Chemical 
weapons 
ban close 

From Alan McGregor 
Geneva 

Hen- Hans-Dielrich Gens- 
cher. ihe West German Vice- 
Chancellor and Foreign Min- 
ister. said yesterday that all 
technical and legal points of a 
chemical weapons ban had 
been examined. Political deci- 
sions on verification alone 
were required for agreement 
Addressing the 40-naiion 
UN disarmament conference 
summer session, he empha- 
sized that achieving a chemi- 
cal weapons convention was a 
race against time. If an accord 
were not reached before Sep- 
tember 1987 the US would go 
ahead with plans to produce a 
new generation of binary 
chemical weapons, he said. 

In the verification area, no 
country should learn more 
than needed to monitor treaty 
compliance. But procedures 
must ensure that there could 
be no avoidance of the inspec- 
tion visits essential for deter- 
mining effective compliance. 

For the unresolved major 
issue of verifying non-produc- 
tion of chemical weapons, 
there must be international 
on-siie inspection to monitor 
substances that could serve as 
key precursors in chemical 
weapons production. 

The other remaining issue, 
he said, was that of on- 
challenge inspection proce- 
dures necessary as a safeLy net 
for eventualities that could 
not be covered by regular fix- 
ed inspections. Such decisions 
were political, so flexibility 
and a readiness for compro- 
mise were needed. 


do exist - on the level of 
defence spending, ihe appro- 
priate response io the US Star 
Wars programme and the 
relative weight of independent 
foreign policy — hardly figure 
at this summit. 

The Romanian leader, Mr 
Nicolac Ceausescu. however, 
frequently tries to bend such 
summits to make explicit 
concessions to Bucharest. He 
is not a popular figure in 
Hungary. which is locked into 
a running verbal battle with 
him over the Hungarian mi- 
nority in Romanian Tran- 
sylvania. 

But the summit yesterday 
appeared to be marching re- 
lentlessly, speech by speech, 
towards the previously agreed 
communique. 

Although the publicity ma- 
chine could not actually dis- 
close new (acts, it was still a 
remarkable departure for the 
Paci. The Soviet Union has 
established its own press cen- 
tre on the first floor of the 
Budapest Hilton, and Soviet 
expens on the Chernobyl 
disaster. General Cherbov and 
others regularly hold briefings 
and even informal chats with 
western correspondents. 



Girls at a massage parlour in north-eastern Thailand wait for customers under a banner exhorting citizens to rote in next 
month's general election. The message is: ‘July 27 U election day. If you loro democracy, you must vote/ 


Bonn secretary spied with camera in a lipstick 


Bonn — The ingenuity of 
East German spy masters was 
revealed in Bonn yesterday in 
a report on a senior secretary 
who was given a camera 
concealed in a lipstick to 
photograph documents at her 
desk in the West German 
President's office (Our Corre- 
spondent writes I. 


But she was unat-’s to 
manage the gadget, ard had : j 
take the papers home to 
photograph with s norma! 
camera. This is beiievsd 
have helped Wes: Gerrr.4-. 
security men to unmask her as 
a spy. 

The secretory. Frau Margar- 
ete Hoke, aged 50. who had 


worked at the Presidency for 
25 years, was arrested in 
August. She is still being 
questioned. 

The story came out in a 
report on internal security for 
presented yesterday by 
Herr Friedrich Zimmerman r. 
:r.e Bonn interior Minister. 

Frau Hole was one of 18 


W-st Germans arrested last 
year on suspicion of spy ing for 
the East. 

Herr Zimmermann said 
that left-wing terrorism had 
increased in 1*185. with I.&04 
acts of violence, compared 
with 1.26 ^ Jn 1 9S4. Terrorist 
attacks, such as bombings, 
rose from } 48 to 221. 


Israel’s 
£135 atlas 
censored 
by minister 

From Ian Murray 
Jerusalem 

A page is to be removed 
from all copies nr the presti- 
gious new Israel Atlas on the 
orders of Mr Dai id Levy, the 
Israeli Minister of Housing, 
who says that there is a 
political message in two 

paragraphs. 

The Atlas, which costs 270 
shekels (£135). has been pub- 
lished in Hebrew and English, 
with 3.000 copies sold to 
Macmillans. 

It is produced by the Survey 
of Israel, which comes under 
Mr Levy's ministry. The of- 
fending paragraphs were writ- 
ten by Professor Dai id 
Amiran, of the Hebrew Uni- 
versity. chairman of the atlas's 
editorial board. 

In his article he said that the 
inevitable result of these set- 
tlements would be a binational 
stare. The settlement policy, 
he said, was carried out with 
nationalist religious elements 
as Ihe primary agents. 

Mr Levy ordered the article 
rewritten because he descibed 
it as intolerable that politial 
views should appear in a gov- 
ernment publication. 

The professor said he had 
put forward an objective pro- 
fessional analysis and that the 
coalition Government appear- 
ed to have opposing policies on 
settlements- 


. tbs 
that 
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tit its 
next 

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from 
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insor- 
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ipleicu 

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How has it fared in practice? 

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Altogether, a total of 443 companies have 
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expansion. Of those companies, 55 have made the 
transition lo a full listing. SI have been absorbed by 
mergers or acquisitions. Only a handful 



have ceased trading. .And the vast majority have 
sought capital in order to expand. 

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seeking relatively high-risk invest men Is < because 
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There is no doubt that many of those who have 
invested in companies liried on the USM would not 
have chosen lo invest in small, young and large! \ 


Tne jDove I& o' companies, is compicit- a n\ 5m April, ] 9S6 

unknown companies if those companies had not been 
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nf The Stock Exchange. 

The companies, their workforces, their inves- 
tors and the country as a whole have all benefited 
from the USM. 

Vet il is only one of many major innovations 
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m 










Nakasone lunch helps 
party rivals to offer 
electors a united front 


Tokyo (Reuter) - Mr 
Yasuhiro Nakasone. the Japa- 
nese Prime Minister, yester- 
day patched up divisions in 
the Liberal Democratic Party 
in order to present a united 
front for next month's general 
election. 

He held a lunch at his 
residence attended by the 
Foreign Minister. MrShintaro 
Abe. the Finance Minister. Mr 
Noboru Takeshita. and a for- 
mer Foreign Minister. Mr 
Kiichi Miyazawa. 

All three, seen as Mr 
Nakasone's rivals far the party 
leadership, agreed to his re- 
quest to “do our best with the 
(party) president” in the July 6 
poll, acording to party sources. 

Mr Nakasone's aim was to 
rebut alleguians in the media 
and in political circles that his 
decision to call elections 18 
months ahead of schedule had 
divided the leadership. 


Under party rules he must 
step down as party president 
and Prime Minister in Octo- 
ber. because he will have ser- 
ved the maximum two terms 
of two years each. He has den- 
ied that he will seek to change 
the rules to gain a third term; 
but opponents are sceptical. 

His apparent success in 
rallying party unity was un- 
dermined, however’ when pa- 
pers reported that Mr Abe had 
expressed displeasure at a sep- 
arate meeting with the Prime 
Minister over the 31 1 Liberal 
Democrats named on Mon- 
day as candidates for the 
Lower House. He was said to 
be unhappy that only 1 1 of the 
26 new nominees of his fee- 
lion- had been approved. 

The strength of support 
available to party faction 
chiefs will be vital in deciding 
the shape of the post-election 
leadership and the Cabinet. 


The sources said that it was 
agreed yesterday not to alter 
the tax system for the time 
being. Opposition politicians 
have said that the Govern- 
ment was considering a value- 
added tax. 

In the 1 979 general election, 
the Liberal Democrats, led by 
the late Masayoshi Ohira, 
suffered a severe setback after 
having included taxes as a 
campaign issue. 

With his own political fu- 
ture hinging on the party's 
showing in the polls, Mr 
Nakasone has set a modest 
target: a simple majority in the 
512-seat Lower House. 

“We need at least 257 seats 
to get Bills approved (but) 
would like to add as many 
seats as possible." he told a 
party officials. The party had 
249 seats in the old House and 
had to rely on eight votes from 
a coalition partner. 


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Taiwan editors go to jail for libel 


Taipei (Reuter) — Three 
Taiwanese dissident magazine 
editors began jail sentences for 
libel yesterday after a demon- 
stration through the night by 
thousands of supporters. 

The editors of Seo-Formosa 
magazine, draped with floral 
garlands, were cheered and 
clapped as they drove to jail 
from the offices of the Taipei 


city council where they staged 
an 1 8-hour protest. 

Opposition politicians 
spoke in support of press 
freedom as about 5.000 well- 
wishers turned the rally into a 
noisy party. They accused the 
courts of trying to muzzle the 
Opposition. 

The three were jailed for 
eight months each and the 


magazine was fined two mil- 
lion Taiwan dollars (£34.000) 
for printing articles accusing a 
philosophy professor of pla- 
giarizing an academic thesis. 

One of the siifTesi libel 
verdicts in Taiwan, it has 
resulted in a temporary freeze 
in relations between the Op- 
position and the ruling Na- 
tionalist Party. 


Villagers of Siritnra, near Trmcomalee in 
north-eastern Sri Lanka. looking down on 
the bodies of fellow Sinhalese villagers 
killed recently by Tamil extremists. 
Government security forces are expecting an 
attack on their main Northers Province base 
at the J affna Fort, according to security 
sources (Vijitha Yapa writes). Military 


VITAL NEW INFORMATION 
ABOUT ASPIRIN FOR CHILDREN 

As of today, we advise you not to give junior aspirin or any medicine containing 
aspirin to any child under 12 years of age, except under medical supervision. Product 
contents are printed on all packs of home medicines. 

This advice is given in consultation with the DHSS, because of concern about a rare 
but serious illness called Reyes Syndrome. 

WHAT IS REYE’S SYNDROME? 

It is an extremely rare disease which affects very few children, less than I in 1 00,000. 

The major symptoms of the illness are prolonged vomiting and unusual behaviour, 
especially after a feverish illness. If your child ever displays these serious symptoms, don’t 
hesitate - cal! your doctor, as this kind of condition will require medical treatment, even 
though it is most unlikely to be Reyes. 


Unfortunately research has found no definite cause of Reye’s Syndrome. But it 
seems that it only occurs when there is a chance combination of several factors, and 
some studies suggest a possible link with aspirin. 

Even though Reye’s occurs where no aspirin has been taken, we are still advising you 
not to give aspirin to your - children without medical advice. 

ASPIRIN AND THE REST OF YOUR FAMILY. 

The active principle of aspirin has been used in some form for over 2,400 years. 
It has been more widely used than any other medicine and, used correctly, is safe and 
effective for everyday pain relief- the reason for its widespread availability. 

Additionally, doctors prescribe aspirin for many medical conditions arid beneficial 
new uses for aspirin are stiff emerging. 

So you can continue to use aspirin with confidence - its a valuable everyday home 
remedy. * 

Until we know more about Reyes Syndrome, all we ask is that you don’t give aspirin 
to children under I Z without medical advice. 

Issued by the Aspirin Foundation in consultation with the Department of Health and Social Security. 


wealth 1 


From Keith Datom, M**a» 


intelligence is believed to have intercepted 
signals between TaraS guerrilla groups 
indicating preparations for an onslaught by 
the Liberation Tigers of Tamil Eelam. 

In Colombo, President Jayewardene is 
expected to brief his Cabinet today on a 
letter from Mr Rajiv Gandhi, the Indian 
Prime Minister, on the crisis. 



A total of S750 million 
(£480 million) in cash and 
property believed to have 
been acquired illegally by Mr 
Ferdinand Marcos, the de- 
posed Philippines president, 
and his associates has been 
seized by a government com- 
mission widely known, as the 
“Raiders of the lost wealth". 

In a report on its first 100 
days of operation, the five- 
members of the Commission 
on Good Government have 
reported to President Aquino 
that it had seized bank depos- 
its, jewellery, cars, aircraft, 
ships, real estate and shares in 
218 companies. 

A boat 80 per cent of the 
assets are owned by Mr Mar- 
cos and 18 family members, 
relatives and cronies of. the 
former president, who fled to 
Hawaii in Febroary aftfiT being 
toppled by a civilian-backed 
mOitarv revolt. 

The sequestered assets do 
not include an estimated S10 
billion that Mr Marcos, his 
family and friends are alleged 
to have deposited abroad dur- 
ing his 20-year regime. 

The commission said that 
more than 16 billion shares, 
with a par value of S10.7 
million, were sequestered, as 
well as $73 million in Trea- 
sury bills, bank deposits and 
currency. 

Sequestered jewellery was 
appraised at SJ5.5 million. 

In addition, two jets and 
five propeller-driven planes, 
eight vessels and 70 vehicles, 
including luxury, vintage and 
sports cars, were seized. 

Among 46.6 million square 
yards of sequestered property 
were 21.7 million square yards 
of the agricultural land of Mr 
Eduardo Cqjuangco. one of 
the closest business colleagues 
of Mr Marcos. 

Mr Cqjuangco. known as 
the “Coconut King”, who fled 
with Mr Marcos, now wants to 


S Korea: 


Soh Joon-Shik 

By Caroline Moorebead 


return home and h prepared 
to fece charges against him. 

according to his lawyer. Mr 
Gabriel VfflareaL 

Mr Cqjuangco. : who has 
been stripped of his control- 
ling mures in the San Miguel 
Corporation, (be biggest m the 
Philippines. is accused of hav- 
ing amassed a huge personal 
fortune through questionable 
business dealings with the 
consent, knowledge or backing 
of Mr Marcos. 

Together with more than 90 
people who accompanied Mr 
Marcos to Hawaii. Mr Coju- 
angca Iras had his passport 
revoked by the new Govern- 
ment. restricting bis move- 
ment to wtibm the US. He is 
now in California. 

If his passport is returned 
and he is allowed borne. Mr 
Cqjuangco might assist the 
Government with its "bidden 
wealth” inquiry. Mr Villareal 
said. So fer Mr Jose Yao 
Campos, an industrialist. has 
been the only former high- 
ranking business associate of 
Mr Marcos to co-operate with 
the commission. 

He confessed to being a 
front-man for the deposed 
leader. In return for immunity 
from prosecution. Ire turned 
over to the coznnthsioa land 
holdings amt 37 “easfly- 
disppsabte" companies, val- 
ued at SI 46 million. . 

- The commission chairman. 
Mr Ramdn Daz, said that 
seven prominent associates of 
Mr Marcos had contacted the 
commission to offer infor- 
mation. 

He refused to name the 
businessmen, swing that pre- 
mature idenutifrcauaD could 
leave them open to possible 
reprisal by Mr Marcos, whom 
Mrs Aquino accused on Mon- 
day of fomenting anti -govern- 
ment street rallies in Manila. 


[PRISONERS _ 



OF CONSCIENCE 


Mr Soh Joon-Shik, a Kore- 
an born in Japan, was a stu- 
dent aged 23 at Seoul National 
University when he was arres- 
ted in April 1971 and charged 
with spying forwards Korea. 

He had taken part in dem- 
onstrations against tire deri- 
sion to amend the constitution 
to allow the President, then 
Farit Chnng-Bee, to stand for 
a third term, and the conduct 
of the sabseqireat elections. 

He has been held ever since, 
first on a seven-year sentence, 
and after 1978 in Cheongjn 
Preventive Custody Centre on 
a series of two-year detention 
orders allowed where the au- 
thorities believe there is a 
“strong possibility” that the 
prisoner may commit the same, 
crime 

Mr Soh, who was 38 last 
month, has just learnt that 
another two-year custody or- 
der has been nnposed. 

His case is notmtusaai. Asa 
new report from Amnesty Int- 
ernational, South Korea: Vio- 
lations of Human Rights. 
makes dear, thousands of 
people have been arrested and 
imprisoned since the early 
1970s for the non-vioJeat exer- 
cise of their r^htto freedom of 
expression. 

Although many have been 
released under presidential 
amnesties, some remain in det- 
ention after 15 years. At least 
10 political prisoners are 
known to have been executed 
since 1975. A number of those 
arrested are Koreans normally 
resident in Japan, who are 
prosecuted for espionage in 
trials that make much of the 
threat of invasion and the 
subversive activities of North 
Korea: 100 people are serving 
sentences. 

Some have been tortured 
into “confessing” to such 
charges as spying. 

During Mr Sofa's trial in 
1971 the main evidence by the 
prosecution was his own con- 
fession of gnflt. Later he 
disdosed that it had been 
extracted under torture. 

Prisoners of conscience in 
South Korea include teachers. 


journalists, trade nmamsts 
and farmers. Some are held for 
taking part is demonstrations 
fikdy to cure unrest, or for 
rircaistmg “false ramonrs". 

Those held for longer or on 
die more serious charges of 
spying or being “pro-cam- 
nranist" are interrogated by 
the Anti-Communist Bureau 
of -tire National Police, the 
.Agency for Nations! Sec uri t y 
Planning or the Army Security 
Command. 

AH three, according to the 
Amnesty report, are known to 
ore torture, though the 1980 
co n s ti tu t i on specifically pro- 
hibits ft. Pris o ner s have re- 
ported having their heads 
immersed in water, being suf- 
focated with wet towels, and 
being hung from a rod and 
spnn aroma) — the “ba rbecue d 
chicken torture". 

Amnesty, which sent dele- 
gates to South Korea in 1984 
and 1985. has urged that sev- 
eral measures be takas to halt 
the abases, including retrials 
for those, like Mr Sofa, deemed 
to have been denied a fair trial, 
and for an end to prolonged 
solitary confinement 

Sooth Korea, which in its 
1980 constitution stipulated 
that “all citizens shall enjoy 
freedom of conscience", has 
replied that It is committed to 
protecting human rights. 

South Korea: Violations oj 
Human Rights (Amnesty Inter- 
national. S Roberts Place, Lon- 
don EC1R OEJ. £3.95). 



Mr Soh Joon-S hik: made b’s 
.confession under torture 


Japan’s new war text 
makes Peking fume 


Peking (Reuter) — Chiiia is 
demanding changes in a histo- 
ry textbook proposed for use 
in Japanese schools, claiming 
that it distorts facts and 
glosses over atrocities during 
the Sino-Japanese War. 

It fails to describe Japan's 
military activities during the 
1937-45 war as ‘ aggression; 
and says that the facts of the 
1937 Nanking massacre, in 
which Japanese soldiers killed 
thousands of Chinese civil- 
ians, were still under debate. 

■ The Chinese Foreign Minis- 
try has sent a “stern note’' 
about the book to the Japa- 
nese' .Embassy,. according to 
the New China News Agency. 

The book, prepared by a 
conservative group called the 
National Conference to De- 
fend Japan, Was approved last 
month i?y a Japanese Educa- 
tion; Ministry panel, paving 
the way for Its .use next year. 

.. “Japan' has explained that 
the book haS yit to get final 
approval, and China hopes the 
issue mil be seridiisly handled 


and swift and effective mea- 
sures taken to rectify its 
erroneous accounts," the news 
agency said. 

1702, after diplomatic moves 
against textbook revisions, a 
senior official promised that 
Jai^n would “examine hs war 
against China" in any. future 
changes. “The Japanese Edu- 
cation Ministry failed to hon- 
our inis commitment fey ap- 
proving the textbook." it-said. 

China, South Korea, Tai- 
wan and other Asian countries 

denounced Japanese attempts 
J9S^ a? 5*2? lexlbo °ks to 

Ukry ^ 

That revision used words 
such as advance" rather item 
invasion" to describe the 
progress of JaparSseTuow 

subsided when Japan 
to amend the paS^ aEreed 
x .- n ? e Japanese Education 

raent on the new version. 






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REG ENT CIROIS^ 


Taboo's the word: can a cleaned -up Soho avoid falling victim to Covent Garden syndrome? 


To John Galsworthy, Soho was 
“untidy, full of Greeks, Ishmaetites. 
cats. Italians, tomatoes, restaurants, 
organs, coloured stuffs, queer 
names, and people looking out of 
upper windows". 

A generation or two later, it was 
London's own Bohemia, with pros- 
titutes in the streets. Absolute 
Beginners, drinking clubs, strug- 
gling artists, and a community of 
ebulliently louche characters whose 
exploits are recalled in literary 
journals and in the precincts, now 
tainted by fame, of the Coach and 
Horses in Greek Street. That Soho 
died too. to be replaced in the mid- 
Sixties by the sleaziness of the sex 
shop, the X-film and the tattiness of 
the T-shirt generation, instant food 
and instant drugs. 

Now, Soho is on the verge of its 
fourth reincarnation of the century. 
Next Tuesday the Westminster City 
Council assumes new powers to 
shut down all but a few of the 
establishments given over to sexual 
gawping and fantasizing. 

By the end of the 1970s there were 
nearly 200 premises of various 
kinds used for sexual titillation 
(quite a pan from those used by 
individual prostitutes) in the two 
dozen or so short streets that make 
up the active part of Soho. Legisla- 
tion in the early 1980s gave the 
council the power to licence shops 
selling books, films and sex-related 
objects, and more than a hundred of 
them dosed down as a result. Only 
six managed to persuade the council 
to grant them a licence. 

But others found ways to evade to 
escape the new. narrowly defined, 
legal restrictions by changing their 
activities. Soho today has almost 60 
sex establishments which, until next 
week, are beyond the scope of the 
licensing laws. These include peep- 
shows (watching a nude model 
gyrate, sometimes on a bed. when 
they are advertised as bedshows): 


topless bars and near-beer bars 
(selling non-alcoholic drinks); nude 
encounter parlours and studios 
where customers pay to photograph 
nudes. 

Westminster Council intends to 
give licences to only 10 premises. 
Peter Hartley , chairman of the 
council's environment committee, 
says: “We will award licences to 
responsible businessmen who do 
not have a criminal record, who will 
keep proper accounts and who will 
generally run the place efficiently 
and honestly." The rest unless they 
can find some other loophole in the 
law. will shut to the great relief of 
Soho's 3.000 permanent residents. 

Tbe owner of a small snack bar. 
his shop's sign almost invisible 
among the ganshness of peep-show 
invitations, refused to give his 
name. “I've got to live with these 
people. They haven't done anything 
to me personally, but I wish they'd 
go. People just don't like coming 
into this street. My trade suffers." 

“Our opposition has nothing to 
do with morality", explains Doro- 
thy Donaldson-Hudson. vice-chair- 
man of the Soho Society, which 
campaigns of behalf of residents as 
well as local businesses. “Soho has 
always been a slightly raffish area, 
and we like it that way. We don't 
mind unobtrusive well-run clubs 
that cater for the sex trade. They’re 
not a nuisance. But we do object to 
the way that most of these places 
have changed the environment for 
the community — the noise, the dirt, 
the kind of people that they attract, 
the unpleasantness of being 
accosted." 

Paradoxically, the existence of the 
sex industry contributes to Soho's 
relatively low crime rate. Residents 
claim they feel safer there at night 
than they would anywhere else' in 
central London. “Because we've got 
ail this night life, there are lots of 
people around, places open and it's 


well liL I wouldn't walk in Covent 
Garden alone at night, but I'm not 
scared in Soho", says an elderly 
habitue. 

Most complaints to the police 
from non-residents are about being 
cheated. There are inevitably some 
robberies and muggings, but tbe 
shadier elements are usually content 
to earn their keep through deception 
rather than violence. 

Often, the police can do little 
about it “People complain that 
they've been charged £1 5 for a glass 
of coloured non-alcoholic liquid", 
said one constable. “But when we 
investigate, we find that there's 
usually a price list displayed some- 
where. ft may not be displayed 
prominently, but it's probably just 
enough to keep within tbe law." 

The Soho sex shops and parlours 
of the last two decades will not be 
mourned in the way that the days 


‘People just 
don’t lie 
coming into 
this street’ 


when prostitutes roamed finely are 
now recalled with nostalgia. But 
what new Soho will emerge? Will it, 
like Covent Garden, become a twee 
and soulless place, artificial and 
hardly habited, existing only to 
service the demands of tourists and 
guzzlers? The council and the 
majority of Soho residents would 
like to see the sex premises replaced 
by small retail shops and small-scale 
businesses catering directly to the 


needs of the permanent community. 

That may be a forlorn hope. 
There are already signs that increas- 
ing rents are driving away existing 
traders, even before the further rises 
that redevelopment of the former 
sex premises are expected to bring. 
George Micaleff, who owns a small 
butcher’s shop in Archer Street, is 
seriously thinking of leaving Soho 
following a more than 20 per cent 
rise in his rent. He knows of several 
small traders who have recently had 
to do the same. 

Next door, Powell & Co, Gents’ 
Outfitters, demonstrates the possi- 
ble future face of Soho. It sells 
relatively pricey stylish clothes, 
specializing in period styles like 
mid-century American. “We don’t 
depend on passing trade, we’re 
known through word of mouth, so 
we're very happy here. But I don't 
know how the small traders can 
make a living". Mark Powell says. 
Other clothes shops aimed at the 
well-heeled are already starting to 
creep into Soho. 

The restaurant trade, one of 
Soho's staples, seems to be going the 
same way. Restaurants recently 
opened in Soho have tended to beat 
expense-account levels, catering for 
the affluent media-man who is 
increasingly moving his advertising, 
public relations, publishing or tele- 
vision production office into the 
area. Cheap eating places are not 
showing the same growth. 

David Barton, headmaster of the 
Soho Parish School, the only school 
left in the area (there used to be a 
half-dozen), sees the trend as inev- 
itable. “People moving into the area 
are quite well-off middle-class. Ten 
years ago 60 per cent of ray roll was 
Cantonese speaking. Most of tbe 
remainder were Spanish, Italian and 
Bengali. Today about 45 per cent 
are English middle class, and the 
proportion of Chinese is down to 10 
per cent” 


y r>. v y 


Soho, for all its still strong 
community identity and the enthu- 
siastic binding activities of the Soho 
Society, has not escaped the effects 
of second-generation dispersaL The 
children of the Greeks, Chinese and 
Jews who lived and worked there 
have largely chosen to live else- 
where, even if their businesses are 
still in the area. Only tbe Italians 
among the traditional Soho nation- 
alities have remained in relative 
strength. 

Up to now, speculating residen- 
tial developers have been kept at 
bay by controlled rents and a strong 
housing association: but the associa- 
tion says that' prices, even for 
property in poor condition, will 
soon rise beyond its reach. Peter 
Hartley is conscious of die dangers, 
of Covent Gardenization. “The 
judgement we made was that unless 
the takeover of Soho by the sex 
industry was reversed tbe place 
would become a rag-bag of tbe worst 
elements of inner city life. If it's a 
choice between upgrading the area 
with a possibility that it would i 
become a bit too up-market or 
trendy, or leaving the place to 
become an absolute junk-heap, the i 
council has taken the view that the , 
first was better.” 

Mildred Salisbury has lived in 
Soho all her life, since before the last 
war. She looks on tbe imminent 
changes with a mixture of relief and 
apprehension. “I'm glad the sex 
places are going to be dosed. It's 
bound to be an improvement. But 1 
don’t think we can go back to the at- 
mosphere of the old days. And I 
don't think you'll get tbe old-style 
shops back. There isn't the. dose- 
knit feeling there used to be, and 
there aren’t many families with 
young children. You can’t turn die 
clock back by dosing down a few 
nasty shops." 

©T*ms Newspaper* Ltd. 1968 


The dispute concerns two . 
powerful research teams and 
renowned laboratories in 
biomedical science. One is 
led by Dr Robert Gallo at the 
National Cancer Institute of 
the US National institutes of 
Health in Bethesda, Mary- 
land. The other, at the 
Institut Pasteur in Paris, is 
led by Dr Luc Montagnier. 

The significance of their 
work is immense, given that 
less than three years ago 

doctors were in despair. Then 
came the key discovery that a 
virus was responsible for the 
Aids infection. And with the 
discovery came the dispute. 

The two threads to the 
argument are academic pride, 
concerning which group has 
prior claim to the identifica- 
tion of the virus associated 
with the Aids symptoms; 
and, second, the patents and 
profits connected with the 
blood tests for diagnosing 
Aids-related conditions. 

The wrangle over patents 
could take years to resolve. 
Signs of trouble were appar- 
ent early last year. A Febru- 
ary, 1985, report in The 
Times indicated that a rash to 
be first to publish scientific 
papers had led to discrepan- 
cies in the classification of the 
Aids virus. 

The consequence of such a 
mistake could be to misdirect 
other research teams at a time 
when scarce resources were 
being switched to investigat- 
ing the problem. At the time 
the issue appeared simple — it 
centred on the names tbe 
French and American teams 
had given to the virus-like 
parades they had isolated. 

The choice of name origi- 
nated from the differing re- 
search methods for the 
isolation of the infectious 
agent, and reflected a varia- 
tion in the ideas of the two 
team leaders about the posa- 
ble nature of the virus. Rob- 
ert Gallo saw a similarity 
with agents ih&t invaded the 
lymphocyte cells circulating 
in the blood. Suspecting it 
might be a third member of a 


Doctors in dispute Dr Gaflo, 
top. and Dr Mantagnter 

series, the name Human T- 
ceD Lvmphotropic Virus , 
HTLV-HL was adopted in 
November 19S3. 

Luc Montagnier saw evi- 
dence of a link with another 
category of viral disease. 
Hence, the French team had 
chosen the name 
Lymphadenopathy-.Associat- 
ed Virus, or LAV. in May. 
1983. An unprecedented ava- 
lanche of scientific papers 
followed the discoveries of 
Gallo and Montagnier. They 
introduced a convention in 
scientific journals for describ- 
ing the infectious agents un- 
der study as HTLV-IH/LAV 
type. 


E minent scientists, af- 
ter more than a year 
of work, negotiated a 
new name for the 
virus, which avoided the 
dispute over priority of dis- 
covery. The form adopted 
last month was HIV, stand- 
ing for Human Immunodefi- 
ciency Viruses. But, even 
before it was announced, this 
provoked another controver- 
sy — the name was accepted 
by only !2of!he 1 7 members 
appointed to die task 3nd 
Gallo, for oue, is against the 
change. 

The Pasteur institute has 
already filed a legal suit 
following a patent awarded 
for a test developed by 
Gallo's group to detect ami- 
body molecules in the Wood 
revealing the presence of Aids 
virus. Tbe Pasteur claim is 
that the American group 
misappropriated materials 
and information supplied by 
Montagnier on the condition 
they were used only for 
research. In April, tbe US 
Patent Office appeared to 
give the Pasteur a prior right 
and an out-of-court settle- 
ment looked likely. But the 
US Department of Health has 
challenged the judgement. 

Pearce Wright 


THE TIMES LEISURE SUIT OFFER| Pentagun law 


CONCISE CROSSWORD NO 973 




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increasing demand for new, comfortable 
sports and leisure wear. 

W e have selected this Ugh quality 
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the classic American leisure suit The top is 
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flock on the left-hand breast The trousers 
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ankles. Both the top and trousers are in 

grey- 

T he leisure suit is made of 50% cotton, 
50% acrylic and is hilly machine 
washable. The soft fleecy lining is warm in 
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T he wide range of sizes should suit most 
people and axe as follows: 

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40in. chest). Large (42m.-44in. chest). 
Extra Large (4b in. chest). 

Prices: 

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AU prices are inclusive of post and packing. Please 
allow up to 21 days for delivery. If you are not satisfied 


can only be despatched to addresses in the UK. 

The Times Leisure Suit Offer. Bourne Road. Bexley. 
Kent, DA 5 1BL. TeL- Crayford 53316 for enquiries 


below. (Indicate no. required of each size 


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Near the end of Top Gun, one 
of the United States' top- 
grossing films, there is a 
spectacular aerial dogfight In 
which US Navy pilots shoot 
down four Soviet MiG fighters 
over tbe Indian Ocean — in 
peacetime. 

Some critics have been less 
than enthusiastic about the 
film, which stars Tom Crnise 
and Kelly McGOlis. Bnt at 
movie theatres throagboot tbe 
US, its bellicose dimax Is 
drawing explosive cheers from 
youthful audiences stirred by 
its Ramboesqne triumph over 
■the forces of Communism. 

Top Gtui is generally receiv- 
ing high praise for its aerial 
sequences. Some critics have 
called its scenes of Grumman 
F-14 Tomcats and Northrop 
F-Ss (which, painted black 
with a red star, masqnerade as 
MXJs) the most dramatic ever 
filmed of jet fighters in action. 

According to the makers, 
tbe realism is a result of two 
factors: a decision by the 
American Navy to allow them 
virtually on limited access to 
its flight operations; and, for 
some scenes, the work of a 
small team of special-effects 
experts. 

Tbe Navy made available to 
the film-makers technical ad- 
visers: about 20 fighterpilots; 
the aircraft-carriers USS En- 
terprise and USS Ranger; 
Miramar Naval Air Station at 
San Diego, and a small fleet of 
£24.8 million F-14 jets, charg- 
ing, Scott said, only for the 
planes' fuel — £5,100 for every 
hour in the air. 

In exchange, the Navy was 
allowed to approve the script 
With its favourable depletion 
in Top Gun, it seems to be 
settling scores with its rival, 
the air force. And the Navy is 
regaining some of the public 
relations ground that it lost 
during the nwlrti^g of An 
Officer and a Gentleman, the 
Oscar-winning 1982 film star- 


America’s latest 
Ramboesque film 
stars government 
hardware in an 
aerial spectacle 



Cruise mission accomplished 

ring Richard Gere and Debra 
Winger about Navy student 
pDofs whose script occasional- 
ly cast the service in a less 
than positive light, causing the 
Navy to refuse to cooperate 
with its producers. 

Scott, who worked as an 
artist before going into films, 
said be prepared for tbe aerial 
scenes by drawing a picture of 
every scene he intended to 

photograph, a technique 
known as “story boarding". 
Tbe frame-by-frame advance 
planning made possible by 
storyboarding allowed him to 
get exactly the footage he 
needed to tell his stray when 
the planes were in the air. 

This reduction of wasted 
shooting was important be- 
cause, even thoogb the Navy 


did not charge for tbe nse of its 
equipment, tbe fuel costs alone 
made tbe film an expensive 
project. At times, as many as 
six planes were in the air at the 
same time. 

During the filming of some 
sequences from rinfian air- 
craft, a longtime Hollywood 
stoat pilot, Art Scholl, was 
lolled when his biplane 
crashed into the Pacific. 

While real F-14s and F-5s 
were providing most of Top 
Gun’s action, dozens of spe- 
cial-effects experts were simu- 
lating a pivotal crash in the 
movie. Colossal Films — a wry 
name for a company that was 
founded in a tiny San Francis- 
co garage — used models and 
animation to air-to- 

air “combat". 

The work was supervised by 
Gary Gutierrez, a special- 
effects wizard who earned his 
reputation in The Right Stuff, 
a film about flyingana the first 
Mercury astronauts in which 
vfrtually no real aircraft; only 
models, appeared. 

Although winning the 
Navy's backing for the project 
took time, Scott said, the 
Pentagon asked for relatively 
few fundamental c h a nge s to 
the script. Once the bade story 
line was approved the biggest 
ilkpntw nmtf “over four- 
letter words", but Na vy advis- 
ers eventually surrendered hi 
tbe interests of realism. 

What stray fine there is to 
die film is a relatively simple 
and familiar ok in Holly- 
wood: a maverick, hot-shot 
pilot, played by Crnise and 
appropriately nicknamed 
“Maverick", joins an elite 
group of Navy aviators called 
“Top Gun". He tries to back 
the system, finally accepts 
some of its conformity and 
then becomes a hero in an 
undeclared war against the 
Rnssians.- 

Robert Lindsey 

@ NV Tkms Naws SanfcB. W 


ACROSS 

l Priest’s handwash (6) 
4 Original West In- 
dians (6) 

7 Cate (4) 

8 Vacations (8) 

9 Tsar's daughter (8) 

13 Ulster police (1,1.1) 

16 Pirate's coins ( 

17 Sea inlet (3) 

19 Careless (8) 

24 Jap beef dish (8) 

25 Without charge (4) 

26 Longest British river 
(6) 

27 Spoiled (6) 

DOWN 

1 Mass (4) 

2 Caracas republic (9) 

3 Yellow-orange (5) 

4 French colonist (3) 

5 Impolite (4) 

6 Sluggish Louisiana 
river (5) 

10 Swamp grasses (5) 

11 Alto violin (5) 


EIBS3 


mu 

paw 

IQI 


m\ 

3 ■ ■ 


aiiimi ana 
_■ ■ ■ ■ ■ ■ 


P « Habituate (5) 

43 28 Take instruction (5) 

14 Quote in evidence ( 4 ) 21 Lighl deviator (5) 

15 Legion standard ini- 22 Shoot (4) 

tiaisO.I,!,]) 23 Rip(4) 


SOLUTIONS TO NO 972 

£££°^o Ulim P£? Setter ’Trimmed UBulTseye 13 

S 7Aara 18ASSCSSOr 21D«bok» 22 

J? 0 *™- * Unb! 3Rar 4 Petty sessions 5 Dais 6 Romanov 7 

sS^oti 01 ^* 12S0n I4BU * 16So ™ 1 » 


4 i a. V. f 
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Augi^M^fhG day when the D registration 
pfotfa hits me streets. If you're thinking 
abouta now car, don't miss Motor. 

Eoch week we hove the run-down of every new cor 

on the market... price.. .performance 
...haw last?... haw thirsty? And in the 

run-up to D-Day well be looking at 
the top 10 best sellers. 

At your newsagent 65p 


























THE TIMES WEDNESDAY JUNE 11 1986 


WEDNESDAY PAGE 


15 



babies % 


Tim Bishop 






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Sower or talar, every 
parent of a teenager has 
to lace i be problem of 
bow to react when a 
“steady” of the oppo- 
site sex is brought 1 mm* to 
stay the night 
For several years I bad 
wondered how 1 would cope 
when and if such a situation 
arose. Would I be liberal or 
censorious? Would I deliber- 
ately accommodate them in 
separate rooms, or would I 
automatically assume they 
were sleeping together? 

Like so many parents of 
today, I had no personal 
precedent to guide me. When 
I was a teenager in the 1960s 
and living with my parents, 
there would hare been no 
question whatever of a boy- 
friend staying the night in the 
same room as me. 

Bed this generation are 
different. They seem to take it 
absolutely for granted that it 
wfl] be pofectly all right to 
bring a boyfriend or girlfriend 
back for the night — no 
questions asked, no parental 
approval sought. 

That, at least, ha* best my 
experience. For some months 
my 1 7-year-old son had been 


Sleeping 
partners 
in your 
house? 


FIRST 

PERSON 


world that his girlfriend 
should sleep with him in his 
own bedroom. 

So completely relaxed was 
my son that it did not occur to 
me to feel peculiar about it 
either. When Emma finally 
appeared for lunch, hairing 
ba thed , washed her hair 
put on her make-up. we 
greeted her as an old friend. 

Since that time, Emma has 
been to stay the night on 
several occasions. She always 
sleeps in the same room as my 


go&sg out with the same girt 


son. I have not said anything. 

Indeed^ 


^ Py y = D.^whh^chn.fra.A^Oeft) „d n— - ^ ^ ^ 

While arguments rage over test-tube babie s and the rising Daniel home when he was just 
rate of abortions, some couples unable to have fhiMr Ptt TnH ” 

have to wait a decade before they can adopt The process 
can cause considerable distress, as Sally Bromaton 


Wfl 


“This is Josie", reads the 
careful lettering in Adam 
Davis's life-story book. 
“Adam came from Josie's 
lummy. She loved Adam very 
much." 


The picture of the young 
woman in wedding dress is 
not, however, that of Adam’s 
present mother, Pauline. Her would adopt “In my family 
photograph is at the beginning it's the natural way to have 




of the book m a family group 
with husband, Kevin, and 
baby Adam above the caption: 
“This is Adam with Mummy 
and Daddy." 


•- r\ 


The reason for this circum- 
locutory baby talk is that 
three-year-old Adam is adopt- 
ed, and these days adoption 
agencies prefer, the children 
they place to grow up knowing 
that they are adopted- It is, also 
an indication of an increasing 
stringency on the part of the 
agencies, aimed at ensuring 
that the children they place get 
the best possible deal. 

Certainly, when it comes to 
adopting babies, the agencies 
are in a position of strength 
since changfr 

wider use o r 

and abortion have meant that 
there are now fewer than 1,000 
healthy white babies adopted 
by strangers in Britain each 
year. 


children**, she says. 

a When she and Kevin mar- 
ried IOyears ago they immedi- 
ately-- wrote to Lewi sham 
- Social Services near their 
home in south-east London 
saying they would like to be 
considered for a white baby or 
toddler up to the age of five. 
The council told them to 
reapply when they had . been 
manied two years. When they 
did so they were fold that the 
adoption books were dosed. 
“We were shattered” says 
Pauline. “There we were with 
a lovely home, both earning - 
good money. . We thought it 
would he easy.” .... 


to understand everyone's 
else’s point of view. 

Two months later Pauline 
and Kevin were visited by a 
social worker. “She wanted to 
know bow much money we 
earned and how we would 
survive on just one wage”, 
says Pauline. “She went all 
over the house, chec king on 
what facilities there were fora 
baby, making sure we would 
be able to provide. Then she 
came back a second time to 
talk about how our femitiff 
would accept an adopted 
child On. her third visit she 
just talked, about the things 
we’d gone over before and 
what we thought about the 
workshop.” 


:i\0* 



In foci, the chances of 
adopting such a baby are so 
slim that most potential 
adopters do noteven bother to 
apply, according to the British 
Agencies for Adoption and 
Fostering (BAAF) which rep- 
resents the 130 local authori- 
ties and 40 voluntary societies 
dealing with adoptions in 
England Scotland and Wales. 

There is, however, a con- 
stant need for adopters of 
older or handicapped cfail-. 
dren, or those' in groups of 
brothers and sisters, or from 
ethnic minority groups. But 
; for childless couples desperate 
for a baby the process is a 
lengthy and often heart-rend- 
ing experience. “You can sit 
on an agency waiting list for 
six or seven years and.stiE be 
disappointed”, says Tony 
Hail, spokesman for BAAF. 

Pauline and Kevin Davis 
waited eight years before 
adopting Adam and by the 
end Pauline was dose to a 
nervous breakdown. A prima- 
ry school teacher who suffers 
from a rare hereditary disease 
which led to the removal of 


attitudes and , ***“ YT° te 35 j*ters *0 

StSSwKn to 81 authorities and mdepen- 
contracepnon dent adaption agencies all 

over London. Only' a dozen 
bothered to reply initially mid 
they offered no hope. “That 

made me fed even worse**, _ w »„ na n , l, ■ .. 

would be easy’ S&3*! 


‘We had a 
lovely home. 


babyP She thought I was 
mad.” 

By the time she and Kevin 
met Adam at bis foster home 
six weeks later they had seen 
his photograph and knew his 
background. “We were really 
nervous”, says Pauline.. “I 
remember saying to Kev on 
the way home ‘I don’t love 
him*. I expected to meet this 
baby and automatically love 
him. And Kev said: ‘Don’t be 
daft. That comes later'.” 

Over the next few weeks 
visited Adam half-a- 
- times. He was 10 
months old when they finally 
took him home: “For the first 
three days I had a continual 
knot in my stomach”, says 
Pauline. “I kept thinking 
‘What have we done? I was 
really frightened.” Their prob- 
lems, however, were for from 
over. 

Adam’s natural mother 


seven weeks old. Today, wfth 
their years of tribulation be- 
hind them, Pauline and Kevin 
feel as if they have been 
parents all their lives. Daniel 
is nearly one year old and 
Ada m regards him as his 
brother. “To them we are 
Mum and Dad, and that’s the 
bottom line” says Kevin. 
“They are happy and we are 
happy and we couldn’t wish 
for any better.” 


British Agencies For Adoption 
and Fostering publish general 
information leaflets ana a 44 -' 
pageguide coded Adopting a 
Child which incorporates a list of 
tut Britain’s adoption agencies. 
For a copy send £1 JO to BAAF. 
11 Southwark Street, London 
(01-407 8S0fff 

Jbe following self help groups 
offer information, advice and 
support to prospective adopters: 
Parent to Parent Information on 
Adoption Setyices, Lower 
Boddington. Govern m North- 
amptonshire (0327-60295); Na- 
tional Association for the 
Childless, 318 Summer Lane, 
Birmingham (021-3594887). 

CPlnm Newspapers Ltd. 1988 


never knows, of course, 
and hardly likes to ask how 
“serious” these relationships 
are, but 1 got the impression 
(hat this friendship was long- 
er-lasting than most The girl 
was also 17 and, like my son, 
studying for A levels. 

One night, long after I had 
gone to bed, I woke up to hear 
footsteps on the stairs. Sleep- 
ily 1 looked at the dock: 3am. 
1 vaguely sensed that there 
seemed to be more than one 
pair of footsteps but soon 
went back to sleep and 
thooght no more about it. “At 
least he's back” I thought. 

The next morning, a Sun- 
day. my son made an appear- 
ance at his usual rim* of 
Ham. “Oh, by the way”, be 
said casually, “1 hope you 
don't mind. Emma missed her 
train and I brought her back 
here to stay the night” 
“Where did she sleep, 
then?” [ asked naively. The 
door of the spare bedroom 
was wide open and no one was 
there. 

“In my room,” said my son 
coolly. “She's still there. I'm 
just wring to make her a arp 
of coffee and some toast.” 

The penny then dropped. 
This was, so far as I knew, a . 
“first” for my son: he had 
brought his girlfriend back 
for the night Was there a 
shred of embarrassment the 
slightest trace of discomfi- 
ture? There was not Did he 
look guilty, 31 at ease, ready 
to be on the defensive? He did 
not There could not have 
been less awkwardness on his 
part 

From his point of view it 
was the most natural and the 
most expected thing in the 


nor has my husband. 

what could we possibly say? 

My younger son, aged 15, 
is also quite unembarrassed 
about it all. His view is that 
“of .course” his brother and 
Emma would sleep in the 
same room. Where else? 

There is also a reciprocal 
arrangement and my son has 
stayed the night at Emma’s 
home a few times, although I 
have not asked what the 
sleeping arrangements are. I 
doubt if they are any differ- 
ent 

Perhaps this business of 
staying the night which, for 
my generation, would have 
been a momentous event lead- 
ing to unpleasant confronta- 
tion, is simply a natural 
extension of the kind of lives 
young people lead today? 

Ever since they were both 
quite small, my sons have 


been in tbe habit of slaying 
oiernjght with friends and 
having people to stay with 
them. As they grew older, it 
was not unusual to find four 
or five complete strangers 
staying for breakfast. At the 
local teenage parties, the 
parents simply seem to put 
down rows of sleeping bags 
into which the guests drop 
when exhausted. There ap- 
pears to be no sexual segrega- 
tion in these makeshift 
dormitories. 

There is a tradition, at least 
in the circles where my 
teenage children move, that 
they will stay overnight at 
-friends' bouses rather than 
risk walking the streets after 
midnight, and rather thsui 
calling, parents to fetch them 
at two in the morning. 

1 don't feel that, as a 
parent, I am particularly 
liberal or super-tolerant: it 
was just that there seemed 
little point in making a great 
foss about a fair accompli. 
Anyway, what was there real- 
ly for me to object to? No 
discernible harm bas been 
done and, besides, my son is 
virtually an adult. 

I wonder, though: would I 
have felt the same if my son 
had been a daughter? Would I 
(hen have felt the need to 
discuss contraception, the 
moral issues and so on? I 
certainly would not presume 
to talk about these matters 
with either of my sons who. I 
am sure, know far more about 
the subject than I do and who 
would squirm at the idea of 
cosy chats about sex. 

Looking back, I believe 
that my son would have been 
genuinely surprised and tak- 
en_ aback if I had raised an 
objection about his girlfriend 
staying the night. Bnt 1 
simply wouldn't have known 
how to go about objecting or 
what opinions or sanc- 
tions 1 could have of-( 
fered. How do other 
parents feel about this 
delicate issue? 



\T7_ ji i . •. Adams natural mother 

W C thought it want£ ti him fostered on a 
^ - long-term basis rather than 


Crazy thoughts kept going 
through my mind, tike going 
to Brazil, picking up a couple 
of babies and bringing them 
back.” 


Already suffering from the 
psychological effects of not 
being able to have a baby 
herself, she started taking 
tranquillizers and anti-depres- 
sants. But at last letters came 
from three different agencies 
saying that they were ready to. 
begin, adoption proceed- 
ings.“We just plumped for the 
nearest, which was the Inde- 
pendent Adoption Service”, 
says Pauline. 


Four months later the cou- 
ple heard that they had been 
approved. “By then we felt as 
though we had been thorough- 
ly gone over", says Pauline. 
“We’d even had to sign con- 
sent forms for them to check 
up on us with our doctor and 
the police.” That worried 
Pauline. She was still taking 
tranquillizers and tbe social 
worker had told her that she 


High Court order making 
Adam legally theirs. “What 
people don't realize is that 
you’re going through heO be- 
fore the judge finally bangs his 
hammer”, says Pauline. “The 
strange 
wards 

Set- 

agoraphobia and 
ened even to go into the 
garden. All the strain had 
taken its toll on me and I 


did not believe anyone should depnssed. My 

be bn a “medicinal crutch” 


The agency arranged for her 
and Kevin to attend a four- 
afternoon adoption workshop 
designed to “prepare and 
educate” applicants while al- 
lowing the agency to assess 
them. Supervised by two so- 
cial workers, they and three 
other couples discussed their 
fedi 
up .. 

imaginary child and -role 
played, enacting scenes be-, 
twees natural parents, grand- 


“She said she wouldn't put us 
up to tire adoption panel until 
I was off the tablets. So I lied 
fb her. I told her that I'd 
.stopped taking them although 
.1 still had about three years' 
supply in my medicine 
cupboard.” 

It was another seven 
months, before the social 
worker rang Kevin to ask if he 

unrl Dnulivkik «u...u t 


me that I ought to 
see a psychiatrist but warned 
me that it would probably ruin 
our chances of adopting a 
second child. But by that time 
I was so desperate I just 
wanted to get myself better.” 

Tbe psychiatrist put her 
back on anti-depressants, pre- 
scribed' a low dose 
tranquillizer and suggested 
counselling for Pauline. Three 
months later she and Kevin 


I . f ■ ™ UUVUlUi IWIH. ULV. KlillH I- 

her ovanes at tire age of 18, parents and adoptive parents. 
Pauline always knew that she aimed at helping the couples 


- . gone 

hospital to have her tonsils 
removed. “I can remember 
sitting on the bed crying and 
the nurse a*lring me what was 
wrong. I said: ‘We’re having a 


able to prove our success with 
Adam, the agency agreed to let 
us have a second child ", says 
Paulina 

She and Kevin brought 


A lesson in changing shape 



When pupils of Central 
Cabarrus High School, North 
Carolina, welcomed bade their 
visiting maths teacher from 
England this spring they got a 


How Dinah Player 
shed seven stones 


shock: her name, her golden 
life v 


ra ayear and slid 






hair and her ready sniife were 
all the same. But the overall 
shape had practically halved. 
Dinah Player, from Charters 
SchooL SunningdaJe, Ascot, 
was a shadow of her former 
self. 

Since Dinah’s first three- 
week educational visit in 1984- 
two things had happened; in 
the first year she continued to 
pul on weight until she ; 
reached 16‘A stones. In tbe 
second year she took herself 
firmly in hand, joined a 
slimming club and in U . 
months shed 7st 3Jb. 

Last May, Dinah took a r 
party of Charter pupils to the 
school's outdoor pursuits cen- 
tre in Wales. “In January 
1 985 1 had not started my diet. 

I remember thinking ‘How on 


down the Squeeze. 


earth am I goingio manage all 


was 



these a^viueS? There 

pot-holing, caving, climbing. I 
was really far too large for any 
ofttiaL - 

Bui by May, she had already 


lost 4V6 stone and she sEd 
through the “Squeeze” pot- 
hole with the best of them. . 

“The guls were- actually 
taking bets as to whether I’d 
get through. When I did there 
was a mumturoFsurprise.” 

Duiah's achievements -have . 
* -not gone unsung. Earlier this 
year she was ’ voted Weaght 
Watchers Member of the Year, 
and. the United Kingdom's 
highest achiever “not only, for 
the amount she has lost in 11 ; 
months -but in the improve- , 
raem to. her lifestyle”. Since’-, 
she reached her 9st 61b goaf 
weight, Dinah has takes njf 
windsurfing,- competitive* 
squash,- swimming, sailing, 
and is planning a new hobby — 
Formula One car racing. 

So how did a race giri'Hke 
this find herself in such a gross 
Txxfy? “Easy “ she says.-. “It 1 
just went on- very, very grado- 



teaching job here at Ascot I 
boughta car and settled down 
to a life of school dinners. The 
weight piled on. 

“As- my thirtieth birthday 
approached I thought: this bas 
got to stop. 1 can’t help being 
30 but I can help being fat. But 
it was when a colleague be- 
came worried about being 1 1 
stone that I really got a jolt. I'd 
always thought she was a 
beanpole. If she was going to 
do something about it, then so 
was I. 

“We didn’t go to our local 
dub here in Ascot for fear of i 


being recognized by any par- 
fhat firs 


Figuring 


„ „ (mt: super-sHm 

maths teacher Dinah Player 


afiy. Mostly it was between the 
ages of 22 and 30. 1 come from 
. a family of big eaters. When I 
was a child at school I was not 
frit blit T suppose my weight 
started to creep up when I was 
a teenager. When I was at 
^Cambridge I was about 10% 
.stone, and with my 5ft 4in 
.framed didn't look too bad. As 
soon as I got my fuD-time 


ents. That first evening was so 
funny. We laughed hysterical- 
ly in tbe car park before going 
in — allnerves.” 

With help from her parents 
in the shape of low-fot milk 
and high-fibre cereals, the 
slimming club did the trick, 
although, as Dinah says; “It's 
a terribly difficult thing to say 
ihai you don’t like how you 
are, that you are going to sort 
Watch i 


yourself out 
her on tbe race course. 


out for 


Vivien Tomlinson 

©Tomb Nampapm Lid, is» 



, the 
that 
rt in 
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CORPS 

i. 1986. 
n {£6.58 
£333.052 
per share 
p). The 
rompany 
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■ auction 
g and it 
crop and 
iction. 
OENIX 
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urnover 
Loss be- 
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Suddenly this summer? 



irain and 


Remember summer? that hot bit of the 
year that makes running a business such a joy. 

The staff wilt Productivity fails off. Tempers 
fray, ft sneaks up every year and takes you by 
surprise. So this year why not prepare for it? With 
Toshiba air conditioning 

Toshiba can provide wail or ceiling mounted 
units or a discreet cassette system according to 
your individual needs. They are easy to install, 
quiet to run and fufly guaranteed for three years. 


And Toshiba’s remarkable heat pump tech- 
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It makes good economic sense to keep the 
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Dial 100 and ask for freefone Toshiba. (Or write 
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It pays to keep cool withToshiba. 







THE TIMES WEDNESDAY JUNE 11 1986 



THE TIMES 
DIARY 


Pretoria 

rebuff 

The report of the Commonwealth 
Eminent Persons Group, to be 
published tomorrow afternoon, 
wants that without concerted 
action by the Commonwealth 
countries there will be “The worst 
bloodbath since the Second World 
War”. The spectacularly gloomy 
conclusions, revealed in the fullest 
leak from the report so Far. are that 
Pretoria has (ailed on each of the 
litmus tests designed by the 
Commonwealth summit: there is 
no evidence that the government 
is ready to dismantle apartheid: 
the state of emergency has been 
lifted in name only: far from 
greater dialogue across the colour 
barrier, the escalation of violence 
seems to have left no hope of ibe 
establishment of a representative 
government: political freedom, if 
anything, has been curtailed; 
Mandela and other black political 
leaders ore still in jail. In a last* 
minute counter-attack the South 
African government. I under* 
stand, has written a letter in the 
past few days accusing the EPG 
itself of having broken off dialogue 
with Pretoria. It seems unlikely 
the group will bother to answer the 
charge. 

Inquest check 

The coroner whose long-awaited 
inquest into the death in custody 
of a Hell's Angel held back a 
London Weekend Television 
documentary on the subject last 
year has not heard the lost of the 
rase. Flanked by his own lawyers, 
he will now appear at a judicial 
review of the jury’s "accidental 
death” verdict The High Court 
has granted the seven Hounslow 
police officers who were sus- 
pended after the inquest on John 
Mikkelsen leave for the review on 
the grounds that the coroner may- 
have misdirected the jury. The 
High Court had previously 
banned LWT from staging a 
reconstruction of the incident 
until after the inquest which was 
held in March. If the verdict is 
overturned by the review, to be 
held in two or three months' time, 
there would have to be another 
inquesL 

Big sleep 

Is there no end to the violence on 
the streets of America? Police in 
South Burlington. Vermont are 
searching for a gunman who 
kidnapped a life-sized statue of a 
man from outside a restaurant 
shot it in the head and dumped it 
naked in nearby woods. Thejpolice 
have still to establish a motive. 

Convictions 

David Gilroy Bevan. MP, has paid 
a price for bis public opposition to 
the government's BL sell-off 
plans. The Tory back-bencher is 
the proud owner of a giant Range 
Rover V8. paraded at "Keep Land 
Rover British" rallies at the height 
of the controversy. Unfortunately, 
the much-photographed six- 
wheeler cost Bevan a fine of £20 
and £18 costs this week after he 
admitted to Sutton Coldfield mag- 
istrates that he had wilfully driven 
on the footpath at a shopping 
centre. “If necessary 1 am pre- 
pared to again be obstructive over 
the Land Rover sale - but not 
quite like that." he says. 

Peace person 

These days. Blue Peicr presenters 
do more than demonstrate various 
uses for washing-up liquid bottles. 
On Sunday, bubbly Janet Ellis 
made a pretty fair show of her 
libera] sympathies, when she 
turned up at a CND-sponsored 
"peace fair” in Richmond. Surrey. 
At the Marble Hill Park fair she 
released a symbolic “dove of 
peace" drawing, attached to a 
balloon. Programme editor Biddy 
Baxter apparently knew nothing of 
her charge’s appearance. Yes- 
terday. the BBC said: “What Janet 
does in her own time is her own 
affair." Charles Mosley, a vice- 
chairman of lady Olga Maitland's 
newly rechristened Families for 
Defence, lakes a different view. 
He is threatening to complain to 
the BBC governors about a 
children’s show host wading into 
politics on her day off. 

King of King’s 

Is King’s Collrae. London, falling 
under (he influence of Rome? 
King’s has appointed a Jesuit. 
Father John Mahoney, to the chair 
of moral and social theology. The 
appointment will surprise those 
used to (he college’s Anglican 
tradition, which dates from its 
foundation in the last century as a 
counter to the godless influence of 
the Benthamites at University 
College. Is the appointment a 
reflection on the crisis in Anglican 
theology? Not at all. Outgoing 
Professor Keith Ward says: i 
“These days even an atheist could 
be appointed. Roman Catholics , 
used to be thought of as having j 
medieval ideas, but now they're in 
the vanguard of theology.” 

Moralists 

“Asking Pat Wall to have nothing 
to do with (he Militant Tendency . 
is like asking Terry Wogan not to 1 
appear on television.” said SDP 
chief whip John Cartwright as j 
reported in yesterday's Times. Not ' 
originally, he didn’t. “Like asking 
Joan Collins to have nothing to do 
with sex,” was Cartwright’s own 
choice of metaphor — but his staff 
toned it down in the interests of 
protecting public morals. 

PHS 


John Hoskyns argues that Britain looks 
at spending policy from the wrong end 

The tax world 
turned 
upside down 


The current debate on tax cuts 
displays the familiar British mix- 
ture of good intentions, hypocrisy 
and superficial analysts. It" is based 
on a failure to understand the 
relationship between the produc- 
tive and dependent pans of the 
economy. 

In Britain a population of about. 
17 million currently in work in the 
private sector must pay for some 5 
million people working in local 
and central government About 
l. 7 million work in public 
corporations. Together, those 24 
million workers must then sup- 
port themselves and a dependent 
population of about 32 million. 
This dependent population lives, 
in effect, on “dividend income” 
from the working population, 
largely provided or spent through 
the mechanism of the welfare 
state. If the 17 million producers 
are sufficiently productive, the 
dividend can be generous. Con- 
versely. if the dividend policy is 
too generous, the total tax over- 
head borne by the producers will 
eventually make them uncompet- 
itive — and thus unable to pay the 
dividend the dependent popula- 
tion expects. That is Britain's 
terrible dilemma, the inevitable 
consequence of nearly 40 years of 
earning like a poor man and 
spending like a rich one. Britain’s 
post-war dispensation was the 
work of politicians apparently 
unaware of this simple modeL The 
present debate suggests that many 
of today’s politicians still do not 
understand it. 

Of course, the total tax burden is 
not the whole of Britain's prob- 
lem. any more than is the control 
of overheads in business. But it is 
a large pan. The World Bank 
study of the connection between a 
economic growth and public' 
spending in 20 different countries. 


the performance of the low- 
spending Pacific basin economies, 
the employment effects of Presi- 
dent Reagan's tax cuts, the growth 
of Britain's black economy — all 
these merely tell us what we 
should have been able to work out 
for ourselves. 

British governments decide 
what they are going to spend first, 
then how to raise the tax revenue. 
This back-to-front process — the 
opposite of the way in which 
companies or individuals order 
their affairs — is unavoidable, 
given the huge numbers, the lad; 
of selectivity or any insurance 
principle, the qualitative dis- 
connection of the consumer from 
the supplier, and the open-ended 
financial commitment inherent in 
Britain's welfare state. It is a 
system that cannot work without 
fundamental redesign. The Prime 
Minister and the Chancellor have 
shocked political opinion by 
reversing this process and making 
the tax rate an objective instead of 
a consequence. They must now 
explain why tax cuts are an 
instrument of economic policy — 
part of a medium term tax and 
spending strategy - not simply 


the fulfilment of a manifesto 
pledge. 

The British Establishment still 
does not even understand that 
such a strategy is needed. Few of 
its members seem to grasp the 
connection between the level of 
the total tax burden and the 
performance of the economy. 
They assume that all economic 
activity is essentially a zero-sum 
game, "in which no one can get 
richer except by making someone 
else poorer. They scoff that a few 
pence off income tax will not 
suddenly transform the national 
culture, because they do not 
realize that behavioural norms 
change at the margin, by a long 
and subtle process of example and 
emulation. They seem to start 
from the assumption that all 
personal income really belongs to 
the state. They therefore dismiss 
tax cuts as electoral bribes (as if it 
were possible to bribe someone 
with his own money). They see tax 
cuts as an optional reward for 
superior economic performance, 
not as pan of its cause. Enjoying 
well-paid and interesting jobs, and 
having no doubt bought all the 
imported consumer durables they 


themselves fancy, they warn that 
cutting taxes will simply en- 
courage people {!.&. “ordinary” 
people) to buy more foreign goods. 

If these views were right, then 
our economic problems could be 
easily solved by massive tax 
increases. After all. if present tax 
rates need not be reduced, are we 
saying that, by some happy ac- 
cident. their present level is op- 
timal? Or could they be increased 
further? If so. is there any limit? 
We could up-erid the argument 
that lower spending and taxes lead 
to greater competitiveness and 
growth, more jobs and the scope 
for higher spending. Instead we 
could agree that higher spending 
produces more jobs, fester growth 
and greater competitiveness. 
Taxes could be high enough to 
depress demand to the point 
where there were no imports at all. 
The catastrophic effects of this on 
domestic demand could be eased 
by the greater public spending 
made possible by the higher level 
of taxes. And so on. 

The Chancellor’s critics, who 
press for higher spending on our 
present unworkable welfare sys- 
tem. seem to have learned nothing 
since 1945 when the process that 
got us into our present predica- 
ment began. By starting from the 
other end, and resurrecting Sir 
Geoffrey Howe's original aim of a 
25-pence basic rate, the Chan- 
cellor raises the fundamental 
question: how big a lax burden can 
the productive economy bear, if it 
is to perform in a competitive 
world? Getting the right answer to 
that question is the first- step 
towards the destination everyone, 
including the big spenders them- 
selves, wants to reach. 

The author is director-general of 
the Institute qf Directors. This is 
an extract from a talk at the 
Manchester Business School. 


Robert Fisk on the anarchy beyond anarchy that has broken out 
in West Beirut since the departure of the Palestinians 

A black hole in Lebanon 



Muslim militiaman on the Green Line battlefhmt dividing the city: the influence is increasingly Ir ani a n 


Beirut 

How often the Lebanese Muslims 
of West Beirut wish the Palestin- 
ians were there now. The senti- 
ment is not a happy one, and the 
civilian population of this muti- 
lated city says it only with 
reluctance, like someone who 
does, after all. regret the passing of 
a black sheep in the family. 
Certainly, the emotion does not 
accord with Israel’s contention — 
that the Palestinians operated a 
brutal state- wiihin-a -stale from 
which the Lebanese were freed by 
the Israeli army — but it is none 
the less a reality. 

Before 1982, the Palestinians, 
reviled and resented by the Leba- 
nese themselves, did at least 
maintain some semblance of law. 
however corrupt: some framework 
of redress, however flawed, 
according to which most people 
lived ihetr lives. Now they have 
nothing. To call West Beirut a 
place of anarchy is both a cliche 
and an underestimation. It has 
become an ideological battle- 
ground in which the Lebanese 
themselves are now being trans- 
formed. their economy in cata- 
strophic decline, their Christian 
neighbours driven out, their West- 
era-orientated culture torn to 
pieces. In a curious way, it has 
ceased to be part of the Lebanese 
capital. 

Almost every Western embassy, 
save for the Greek and German, 
h35 abandoned the west of the diy. 
Word has it that the Goethe 
Institute is about to close. Even 
the American University, that 
most venerable of Middle East 
institutions founded by Protestant 
missionaries in the last century, is 
in danger of shutting its doors 
after the kidnapping and murder 
of its senior staff The American 
University hospital has itself now 
been afflicted with abductions, 
particularly of Christian doctors. 
The three major Western news 
agencies in the city have all talked 
of leaving for Cyprus. 

Ii is difficult to exaggerate the 
anti-Western campaign. The sus- 
picion and contempt that you find 
in West Beirut — not among 
friends and ordinary Lebanese 
civilians, although there is some- 
times a ghost of it there too - is an 
obsession for some of the political 
groups, particularly the more ex- 
treme Muslim factions, Sunni as 
well as Shia. It is an almost 
tangible distrust of foreigners 
whose institutions and nations 
have, in their eyes, interfered with 
and shamelessly used the cycle of 
tragedy for their own ends. 

There are forces at work here 
which even associate the national- 
ist or “neutral" Christian commu- 
nities — the Greek Orthodox and 
the Armenians — with the West. 
The results have been both 
predictable and terrifying. Thou- 
sands of Christians have left West 
Beirut after the kidnappings and 
murders of the past 1 2 months, 
while dozens of Armenians have 
fled their homes after the savage 
murder of four of their commu- 
nity. For some reason, the killers 
simply approached their victims 
at work — a dentist, the owner ofa 
photography shop, for example — 
and shot them carefully in the 
right eye. 

Kidnap victims over the past 
two years have included Ameri- 
can, British. French. Irish. Italian, 
Cypriot, even South Korean na- 
tionals. not to mention hundreds 
of Lebanese. The oldest man 
abducted was an 84-year-old 
Frenchman. “Don't you realize 
what they are thinking now?” a 
friend remarked at the weekend. 
“They think that every Westerner 
was a spy and that anyone who 
stays is a bigger spy. You cannot 
reason with them.” 

But just who “they" are remains 
as fearful a mystery as “their" 
activities. On the surface, it is not 
difficult to identify one of the 
nations which influences events 
here. In many parts of West 
Beirut - not just the Shia suburbs 


of Bouij al-Barajneh, Basra, Hay 
el-Sellum and Chiyah but in Ouzai 
and even near Verdun — it is the 
Iranian rather than the Lebanese 
flag which hangs from lampposts 
and buildings. Sometimes they 
snap in the breeze alongside green 
and red banners bearing Koranic 
quotations, at other times they are 
draped in unhappy alliance with 
the rather older flags of the 
Lebanese nationalist Amal militia. 

A new generation of giant wall- 
paintings has appeared on the 
walls. Ayatollah Khomeini and 
Imam Moussa Sadr, the Lebanese 
Shia leader who “disappeared” in 
Libya in I97S, gaze down pos- 
sessively in vivid blacks and 
greens. Broadsheets demanding 
the liberation of southern Leba- 
non from the Israeli occupation 
army contain not political en- 
couragement but ideological insis- 
tence that the struggle must be 
taken “to the gates of al Quds 
(Jerusalem)". 

It is among the Shia comm unity 
that these emotions have struck 
the deepest chord. Traditionally 
the most deprived and definitely 
the largest community in Leba- 
non. the Shias were treated with 
contempt by the Palestinians, 
suffered four years of sometimes 
brutal occupation by the Israelis, 
were shelled by American war- 
ships and betrayed by the Syrians. 
Only in Iran, it seems to them, did 

It is difficult to 
exaggerate the 
anti- Westernism 


spiritual power produce physical 
victory. Not only was the Shah 
overthrown, but Iran’s army of 
potential martyrs is now fighting 
on Iraqi soil. 

And it is for this reason that the 
Shias of Beirut are now turning 
away from the nationalist leader- 
ship of their own Amal move- 
ment. increasingly giving their 
loyalties to the pro-Iranian (and 
Iranian-financed) Hezbollah, lis- 
tening not to political claims for 
equality but to spiritual demands 
of the purest, most unobtainable 
kind. The hundreds of Hezbollah 
"party of God” militiamen I 
watched standing in the streets of 
Ouzai last week - many of them 


holding brand-new anti-tank 
rocket launchers — bad come to 
listen to Sheikh Muhammad 
Fadlallah telling them of the 
prophet’s message and of their 
religious duty to oppose all foreign 
“plots” as they struggled for the 
return of their holy city, Jeru- 
salem. It was a message as simple 
as that given by any 1 2th century 
Christian crusader. 

Yet the artlessness of such 
appeals contrasts uneasily with a 
much darker conflict going on 
within West Beirut, where the 
intelligence agencies of a number 
of Middle Eastern countries now 
operate virtually unchecked, kid- 
napping Westerners and Leba- 
nese. funding militias, supporting 
rival political groups in order to 
maintain their own balance of 
power. The Syrians are now trying 
to prop up their erstwhile Amal 
allies besieging the Palestinian 
camps in Beirut while at the same 
time tacitly permitting Yassir 
Arafat's own Palestinian guerrillas 
to return to Beirut to counteract 
the growing power of the' 
Hezbollah. 

The latter, so close to Iran in 
their aspirations, now find them- 
selves politically besieged by the 
steady breakdown of relations 
between Iran and Syria The 
Libyans, who still maintain a 
hundred or so regular troops with 
attendant intelligence officers in 
the Bekaa Valley, exert a dis- 
proportionate influence over 
events, largely because their plain- 
clothes agents can purchase the 
temporary loyalty of Muslim gun- 
men — which is how they came to 
buy (quite literally) the two British 
teachers who were murdered in 
retaliation for the American air 
raids on Libya. 

So promiscuous has the 
environment become that from 
just one small area of West Beirut, 
followers of the Iraqi Dawa 
party — under the name Islamic 
Jihad — are now able to shift 
France's policy' towards Iran by 
the simple process of keeping up 
to nine French hostages in secret 
locations in the city. Already. 
France has been prevailed upon io 
repay millions of dollars of loans 
to Iran and to remove up to a 
thousand Iranian dissidents from 
French soil to gain the hostages' 
release after one of the group 


announced the "execution" of the 
younj» researcher, Michel Seurat 

It is typical of the chaos in 
which such deals are made that 
Seurat appears to have been the 
victim of an appalling error by his 
kidnappers. Some of the hostages 
are believed to have been trans- 
ported between secret locations, 
drugged and sleeping inside cof- 
fins. Although there is no proof of 
Seurat's death, the French authori- 
ties have been told that he was 

No foreign power 
dares to 
send in troops 

accidentally overdosed during one 
of these trips. The kidnappers 
subsequently released a picture of 
“Seurat's” body in a coffin with a 
cross on its lia — not so much a 
concession to Seurat’s religion as a 
result of a Christian hearse being 
the method of hostage transporta- 
tion. 

The basic immunity of foreign 
correspondents — accepted al- 
most without question throughout 
the world for more than four 
decades — has broken down in 
Lebanon. The foreign correspon- 
dents working here are currently 
outnumbered almost two to one 
by those of their own colleagues 
being held hostage in Beirut. 

The conspiracy and fear is a 
little like that in Vienna after the 
Second World War. although at 
that time three major world 
powers were present to maintain 
control. The United States, the 
only world power to put its troops 
into Beirut — in 1982 — withdrew 
them in ignominy 18 months 
later. The Soviet Union is now 
showing its own interest in the 
Lebanon, appointing one of its top 
Middle East specialists as -new 
ambassador to Beirut, repeatedly 
announcing its concern for . 
Lebanon’s unity. Few other people 
talk about it, least of all the 
Lebanese. 

There is, in reality, no foreign 
power, not’ even the’ Syrians, 
which would now dare to put 
troops into West Beirut. The 
major nations of the world are 
going to let event sphere take their 
course — even if this leads to total 
disintegration. 


Des Wilson 

Not in front of 
the patients 


Rarely has the arrogance of pro- 
fessionals towards the public been 
better illustrated than in medical 
reaction last week to the Data 
I Protection Act provision for in- 
dividuals to inspect their records. 
Despite the view of the British 
Medical Association Council that 
such access “can improve the 
quality of the record by correcting 
factual errors ami reducing 
misunderstandings", the asso- 
ciation's consultant com mittee 
last week opposed any access 
whatsoever. 

The chairman stated that 
“psychiatric patients would be 
particularly at risk”, a view hardly 
consistent with American experi- 
ence. The American Journal of 
Psychiatry reports that psychiatric 
patients “value accurate accounts 
of their behaviour and are not 
harmed by reading [them]. In fact, 
most are quite relieved ip find that 
the records are more innocuous 
than they had imagined.” 

That we should be entitled to 
see our medical records is not just 
an t?™? of principle. There are 
four practical benefits: 

First, records frequently contain 
factual errors that could have 
serious consequences if acted on 
by the doctor, or could cost 
patients the benefits of treatment 
they should receive. (For example, 
a 20 -year-old student would have 
been committed to a course of 
ami-convulsive tablets if be had 
not pressed tire doctor on what 
they were for. He was told it was to 
control the after-effects of the 
removal of his brain rumour. He 
had never had. a brain tumour. 
There had been a clerical error.) 

Second, allowing people to 
check and challenge what has been 
recorded should prevent prejudice 
or unsubstantiated comment in 
their files. Anyone who doubts 
that this happens need only read 
the opinion expressed in this 
newspaper recently by an Aber- 
deen consultant that files should 
not be available to patients be- 
cause they contained "apparently 
insulting or objectionable” re- 
marks. For example, he described 
one patient in his files as “a 
hypomanic chap — on his way to 
becoming a rich fool”. The consul- 
tant couftf not see that it is to 
protect people from such entries 
(which may remain on their files 
for life) that access to medical 
records is proposed. 

Another doctor wrote to a 
medical paper: “AH GPs, I imag- 
ine, have al times in moments of 
pique written unfair and maybe 
even untrue things about trouble- 
some patients on their records. 
Are patients to have free access to 
read those things?” The simple 
answer, of course, is that they 
should not have to read them 
because they should not be there. 

Third, people have to take 
many crucial decisions about their 
own lives and are entitled to all the 
necessary background informa- 
tion about themselves. 

Fourth, the very existence of 
secret records causes unnecessary 


and harmful suspicion- If people 
believe they have not received the 
treatment they are entitled to they 
may attribute it to prejudiced 
comment they fear exists on the 
record. A sun-ev in an Australian 
hospital showed that some pa- 
tients with chronic diseases had 
become convinced doctors were 
concealing the fact that they were 
suffering from cancer they were 
enormously relieved when they 
saw the records and found that 
this was not true. 

Manv consultants and prac- 
titioners act as if access to medical 
records Its never been tried. Not 
only is there overseas experience 
but a number of doctors and 
practices in Britain have in- 
troduced it and found it heipral. 
One team of London doctors 
reported hi the. British Medical 
Journal in March that “doctors 
and patients have either reacted 
undramaucaliy or been extremely 
positive mid excited". Signifi- 
cantly, 12 per cent of patients 
found errors. Many other studies 
ha vp documented the problems qf 
inaccurate and incomplete medi- 
cal records. 

Of course, professional oppo- 
nents will say that some patients 
will be harmed by being con- 
fronted with some details at a 
particular time. Advocates of ac- 
cess to records accept this, and 
most proposals, including the 
Access to Personal Files Bill being 
promoted for ihe private 
members' ballot in the autumn, 
contain a mechanism to enable 
doctors to withhold information 
where disclosure would cause 
serious harm. 

Consultants also say that access 
to the files could worry patients by 
disclosing speculation about un- 
confirmed illness, but the pro- 
posed built-in delays of obtaining 
access allow plenty of time for the 
necessary tests. 

The key to this whole debate can 
be summed up in a simple 
question: are the majority of 
people capable of coping with the 
real facts about themselves and 
are they better off for having 
them? The consultant w hose study 
was reported in The Times clearly 
feels the answer should be no. He 
notes that 42 out of 100 patients 
had such comments on their files 
as “very high blood pressure”, 
“chronic hyper-tension" or “seri- 
ously ill”. He felt this information 
would be loo alarming for the 
patients. 

But our health is not just a 
matter for doctors or consultants. 
It is, first and foremost, our own 
business and our own responsibil- 
ity. How can we take proper care 
of ourselves, understand what our 
medical practitioners are saying 
and join with them in confronting 
illnesses. If we are treated like 
children and dented basic infor- 
mation. We trust doctors with 
most intimate details about our- 
selves: it is time they trusted us. 
Des Wilson is chairman qf the 
Campaign for Freedom of 
Information 


moreover . . . Miles Kington 

Y ou can’t beat 
flour power 


ft seems strange that the so-called 
hippies’ convoy should only re* 
cently have hit the headlines, even 
though it has been winding its way 
round Britain for years. No doubt 
it was because they provided the 
media with a ready-made story, 
about the fanner whose land was 
invaded and whose crops were 
squashed, causing him to have a 
heart attack. Ever since, the 
hippies have been portrayed as 
evil monsters rampaging through 
England, deliberately ruining land 
and ignoring MOT regulations. 

But what of the other side of the 
picture? 2 managed to secure an 
interview with one of the hippies, 
called Ken, who had just under- 
gone a severe heart attack as well 
ft was brought on by seeing what 
the fanners have done to the 
landscape of Britain. 

“We may have caused a little 
mess here and there,” he gasped 
“but these fanners have radically 
changed the face of the country- 
side. They have removed almost 
every hedgerow from East Anglia, 
they have ploughed up countless 
rights of way. they have brutally 
flailed hedges, they have spread 
chemical poisons over the whole 
country, they have killed off 
enormous amounts of wildlife.” 

“I can understand your 
distress,” I told Ken, more to 
humour him than anything, “and 
it may well be true that these 
farmers have rained the country- 
side, but at least they didn't 
commit the cardinal sins of driv- 
ing untaxed vehicles and leaving 
litter” 

“When you're driving on pri- 
vate property you're not subject to 
MOT rules,” Ken said, “so these 
farmers can drive as many un- 
taxed, untested vehicles as they 
like. As for mess — have you ever 
looked behind the average farm- 
house? At the rusting old saloons 
and broken-down farm machin- 
ery? Don’t make me laugh. And 
next time you meet a farmer, ask ' 
him how much of his tax he 
omitted to pay last year.” 

Happening to meet a farmer 
soon after. I asked him how much 
of bis tax he had left undeclared 
last year, and to my surprise he fell 
on his knees, imploring me not to 
confiscate his property and send 
him to prison. 

“I’m not . from the Inland 
Revenue,” I said. “I just want to 
know what your -answer is. to 


accusations that you have turned 
the English countryside into a 
sterile wasteland, hostile to wild- 
life and the human passer-by 
alike.” 

“Well” he said, “we're doing 
our best, but we haven’t got there 
yet” 

“What is the government going 
to say when it becomes aware of 
what you’re doing to the land?” 

He looked surprised. “The gov- 
ernment is behind us. They make 
it more profitable to rip up hedges, 
use chemicals and so oa Chemi- 
cals and pesticides are big busi- 
ness, and the government likes big 
business. If only the hippies' 
convoy could be made to look like 
a money-spinner in some way. 
then the government would give 
them the sort of big subsidies that 
we get, instead of the paltry £24 a 
week they actually get Amazing, 
isn't it? Poor old hippies are 
accused of being a burden to the 
taxpayer, but nobody says die 
same about farmers, even though 
we're getting far more. It's hardly 
fair, is it?” 

He grinned to himself. He then 
told me he had taken up farming 
because he was tired of just 
drifting about In life and wanted to 
get back into the rat race. It was a 
hard life, but there were satisfac- 
tions in assaulting the landscape 
that he couldn’t explain. • 

_ "And what about the ebb and 
flow of the seasons?” 

“How do you mean? Ob. the 
year “ding in April, and 
VATevery three months, that sort 
of dung? Well, we've just got to 
put up with it, haven't we?” 

. But it may be that the good 
times for the fanners are now 
en “ in |r with subsidies being cut 
EEC directives biting into 
arm practices. Some farmers are 
sud to be suddenly close to 
bankruptcy, as lower prices and 
over-production make them un- 
“Why don’t they leave us 
one , asked me. “All right, 
so perhaps I have made a bit of a 
mess on the land, but I never hurt 
anyone. I just want to be left alone 
ti> get on with my way of life, but 
the way the government's treating 
us right now, I don't know if 1 can 
survive. 

I looked closely at him again. It 
wasu i actually a fanner, it was a 

foe convoy.But it 
seemw a good summing up 
for both shies. 







THE TIMES WEDNESDAY JUNE il 1 986 



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1 Pennington Street, London El 9XN Telephone: 01-481 4100 

THE WAY TO THE STARS 


> 1 ’. i'S 


* 1 

^ * 

* • i 

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no'' 


beat 

ver 


When the presidential 
commission began .its in- 
vestigation of the destruction 
of the Challenger space shuttle, 
little hope was held out of 
finding the precise cause of the 
explosion. The i«»Hgr 0 f the 
group’s specialist accident 
analysis panel, Major-Genera] 
JCutyna of the United States 
Air Force, said: “1 don’t 
believe that we will home in on 
any one specific action that 
caused this failure." ' - 

In a perverse way he was 
correct For in the subsequent 
weeks the hearings, headed by 
the former Secretary of State, 
Mr William Rogers, uncov- 
ered a scandal. The litany of 
engineering faults and human 
errors is contained in the 
official report to President 
Reagan, published this week. 
Even allowing for the revela- 
tions over the course of the 
inquiry, the indictment is 
damning. 

The stark conclusion that 
the accident should never have 
happened, and seven as- 
tronauts need not have died, is 
bad enough. But the disclosure 
that managers in the National 
Aeronautics and Spsce 
Administration, Nasa, knew of 
technical faults in the design of 
the shuttle launchers but al- 
lowed the launch to go ahead is 
particularly damag in g The 
agency even encouraged the 
programme to proceed beyond 
an experimental phase, allow- 
ing civilians, including the 
schoolteacher Christa 
McAuliffe, to join the crew. 

Evidence from the astronaut 
corps showed a growing 
resentment of this cavalier 
attitude on safety by NASA 
managers. Hence the Rogers 
Commission has uiged that, 
astronauts play a greater role 
in approving launches — along 
with engineers and contractors 
who were overridden by Nasa 
bureaucrats. More specific 
recommendations include de- 
sign proposals for safety 
hatches, which would allow 
easier escape from the shuttle 


either by parachute or water 
landings at low altitudes. 

The report also confirms 
that the accident was caused 
primarily by faulty design of 
the joints connecting the seg- 
ments of the solid rocket 
booster, the “Oring” seals, 
which failed. In eight out of 
eight tests conducted for the 
commission, under the same 
temperature conditions, the 
same type of seals failed. 

Warnings about their safety, 
delivered by engineers and 
contractors the night before 
the launch, were ignored be- 
cause NASA officials were 
anxious not to miss another 
deadline. The alarm was also 
sounded by Allan McDonald 
and Roger Boisjoly, engineers 
at the seals’ manufacturer, 
Morton ThiokoL But the call 
to postpone the launch was 
overruled by management at 
both Nasa and the company. 

In unravelling this sequence 
of. events, the commission has 
identified an attitude at Nasa 
that amounts, at the very least, 
to intellectual corruption. 
Nasa runs a procurement sys- 
tem which ignores com- 
petition in .favour of sole 
source contracts. Judgement 
by officials is thus substituted 
for technical merit adjudicated 
in a competitive market One 
of the results of such a process 
is to discourage dissent about 
innovation, which is the very 
life-blood of technology. It also 
generated a strange view, of 
accountability. For instance, 
the two. engineers who op- 
posed the launch decision were 
fired by Morton Thiokol for 
revealing the truth in evidence 
to the inquiry. They were later 
.reinstated at the Insistence of 
the commission. 

The indefinite grounding of 
the three remaining shuttles, 
and the end of the Titan and 
Delta launchers, denuded 
America for the fiik time in 20 
years of an immediate ability 
.to launch either a large mili- 
tary or commercial satellite. 
Among other things, it put 


INNOCENT TELL PROVED MONOPOLISTIC 

The continuing CJtyiakeoyer , This exemplifies, the Jear, competition remains: the lies 
boom has inevitably .put a jyoic^ mostconspicuously by basis for . testing mergers 
strain both on- the-mechaoics - t 'the Bank of England director. When important new issues o 
of the system of vetting merg- : Mr David Walker, that bouts of excess crop up, excep 


ers and on the confidence, of 
Ministers in their own policy 
of trusting market forces ex- 
cept where they create 
monopolies. Two decisions 
yesterday illustrated the prob- 
lems. 

It took nine weeks for the 
Trade Secretary, with advice 
from the Office of Fair Trad- 
ing, to announce that he is not 
to refer the takeover lad for 
Woolwortbs to the Monopo- 
lies Commission. Had. a for- 
mal investigation been 
ordered, the whole process 
would probably have taken 
nine months — a damaging 
period of uncertainty. 

The derision to send the 
unwelcome bid for the Wedg- 
wood china group to the 
Commission raised different 
dilemmas. It was fonnally 
made oh quite legitimate com- 
petition grounds. The ref- 
erence will also be seen as a 
reponse to criticism that City 
shareholders in Wedgwood 
were — before hearing the 
. competing arguments — happy 
to sell out a company that has 
made, most of the right long- 
term industrial decisions and 
occupies a strategic export 
role. - 

Racism in class 

From Mr Andre*' Kurowski 
Sir. I have recently been the victim 
of a totally groundless accusation 
of racism By a parent simply .. 
because she disagreed with the 
disciplinary action I had taken' 
against her child. In spite of an - 


increasing competition in the 
Gty is forcing investment 
managers to maximize short- 
term profits; in turn obliging 
companies to eschew long- 
term development This is a 
worrying argument for the 
Government since it implies 
that financial markets could 
introduce a consistent and 
damaging distortion rather 
than make occasional mis- 
takes in commercial areas 
where interfering politicians 
get it wrong much more Often. 

Mr Chaim on’s response to 
these ditemmas has been to set 
up a departmental review 
under Mr Hans liesaer, who 
conducted, the last review in 
1978. Since the policy frame- 
work is already flexible enough 
to suit most tastes, the biggest 
option for change would be to 
abandon the presumption of 
innocence unless a merger is 
shown to be against the public 
interest Mr Liesndr previously ' . 
-favoured a neutral approach , 
but this would, change the 
climate in. favour of Whitehall 
interference; Mr Roy. 
Hattmley would like to re- 
verse the presumption of inno- 
cence altogether. 

The emphasis on tests of 

hies could be full of prejudices but 
not racism. 

What I also -find -disturbing Is 
the thought that the ORE should 
wish to become involved simply 
because a member of an ethnic 
minority cries^racisC. Is this hew 
lb become common practice?‘Are : 


my schod that, far Born bring a- 


racist 1 had a long and enviable 
record of being especially sensitive 
io' the needs and difficulties of 
ethnic minority pupils, an official 
from the Commission few Racial 
Equality decided to become in-, 
volved. 

During our meeting, at which 
others were present the CRE 
official implied that I may jiave- 
taken disciplinary action ag a inst 
ibis pupil because he was "black, 
big and loud”. According to her, 
“coven" racism was common, 
even among well meaning whites 
who were thus racist unintention- 
ally. By implication I was one of 
them. * . ' '' 

She seemed to suggest that afl 
white people were racist -and only 
those who had attended race 
awareness courses could be pre- 
sumed to have been cleansed of. 
their racism. Thus all white people 
are presumed to be guilty of 
racism until they can prove their 
innocence. 

When i askedher ifbiack people 
could be racist the answer was no; 
only whites possessed these innate 
attitudes and feelings' of racial 
superiority towards ethnic minor- 
ities. Members of ethnic, tumor- 


competition remains- the Best 
basis for . testing mergers. * 
When important new issues or 
bouts of excess crop up, excep- 
tions could be made without 
embarrassment, if markets 
need encouragement to take a 
more rounded view. 

The mechanism for vetting 
mergers does, however, need 
reform. The Monopolies 
Commission has become too 
blunt an instrument so that 
references to the Commission 
rather than its conclusions 
often decide mergers, es- 
pecially. when a subsequent 
rival offer is not referred — a 
bad practice that should go. As 
a result, informal Whitehall 
vetting has assumed too great 
a role. 

The whole process should be 
halved in length, principally 
by speeding up the six month 
Commission deliberation. 
This will require more intense 
working than the one and a 
half days a week that part-time 
Commission members are ex- 
pected to devote to investiga- 
tions. If the mechanism were 
brought into line with the 
fester tempo of business life 
today, much of the pdticial 
soul-searching and business 
and public disquiet over basic 
competition policy might be i 
unecessaiy. .j 

Brunei, whose law department is 
of comparatively recent origin, or 
of the financial resources available 
for -research at Cambridge com- 
pared to the younger and smaller 
Brunei, which does not have the 
benefit of scholarships or endow- 
ments. 

Worse, no acocunt is taken of 
the undergraduatuate research un- 
dertaken at Brunei, where law 


letters to the editor 


military reconnaissance at 
risk. Titan was the only vehicle 
capable of carrying a KH-1 1 
spy satellite into space, and it 
had one on board. Now only 
one. is in orbit and nearing the 
end of its operational ltie. A 
new unmanned rocket capable 
of the job is not expected to be 
ready until late 1988. 

But Nasa has been at crisis 
point before. On January 27, 
1967, the crew of the first 
Apollo spacecraft died when 
they were working through 
tests of equipment An in- 
vestigation subsequently pro- 
duced a devastating report 
which uncovered shoddy qual- 
ity -control and demanded 
* some 5,000 alterations. Re- 
design of the safety hatch alone 
cost $40 million. That crisis 
was eventually overcome — 
and NASA went on to produce 
the shuttle, still an achieve- 
ment without parallel. 

If the case for continuing 
space travel needs arguing, the 
reasons go far beyond the 
romance of space or national 
prestige and security. It has 
taken less than 20 years for the 
girdle of satellites, providing i 
global communications, to be 
taken for granted. Without 
them there would be no inter- 
national television pro- 
grammes beamed into the 
home or direct dial telephone 
calls to friends and business 
contacts, overseas. Future 
scientific developments have 
been glimpsed that will come 
only through pushing the fron- 
tiers of space technology. 

If the United States com- 
mits itself to lead the world 
into the next century of space 
exploration, the current dis- 
array at NASA will not be 
allowed to stop it for long. 
James Fletcher revived the 
agency when it faced the 
earlier crisis of confidence. His 
return as its Administrator at 
the request of President Rea- 
gan is the first hopeful step in 
restoring NASA to the level of 
superb efficiency with which it 
led mankind into the heavens. 


them? _ . obtain their degrees, something 

Yours faithfully. , , quite unheard ofi at Cambridge. 

ANDREW KUROWSKI, : . - Even with the gentlest probing 

19 Bread Walk. . there is every reason therefore to 

Blackheath, 5E3, ... believe feat if fee UGCs own 

June.l. ..... 1 research were put forward for 

t 7,"' , ■ rr .' funding any competent coramit- 

University ratings tee would dismiss it as unsound 

From Mr Gavin PurveT^ > ■ 

Sir. Within my. profession, the gaWNPURVES. 
few, those who insst feat The u^ZmotcounseL 

ITottenham Road, 

Answering back 

hat fee red-brick Brunel;ior From Mr Keith Roberts 
example, as simply "average": Sir. We used to see that our boys at 

There appears to have. been no .fee junior school of which 1 was 
comparison of fee relative size Of headmaster always wrote a thanlc- 
the two - law faculties -or.Jahy you /letter. I remember on one 
recognition -that there are. yery • occasion a very young boy walked 
many fewer stafFand postgraduate : down the steps and said to fee 
students available .for. research' , person who was taking him out. 
work at Brunei. ; . _ ’ ~Here is my thank-you letierT 

No account is taken -of the .Yours faithfully, 
volume' of resources.for research ; KEITH ROBERTS, 
available to lawyers at fee eentii- ' The Old School House, 
ries-oid Cambridge compared to " Stra than, Loch in ver. Sutherland. 


s Chernobyl aid 
acknowledged 

From the Soviet Ambassador 
Sir, May I rely on fee good offices 
t of your newspaper io express most 
heart-felt gratitude for hundreds of 
letters of sympathy which came to 
fee Soviet Em hasty’ in the wake of 
the Chernobyl accident. Many 
contained generous offers of aid 
and donations. We highly appre- 
ciate these expressions of good will 
on the pan of the British political 
and public figures, trade unions 
and other organizations, families 
and individuals. 

I should like to stress fee 
necessity of greater international 
cooperation in this sphere of 
peaceful endeavour to ensure safe 
use of nuclear energy. 

Could ! mention feat Moscow 
Narodny Bank Ltd. SI King 
William Street, London EC4P 
4JS. has opened an account for the 
Chernobyl Relief Fund 
(No. 14 1 505 CRF). 

Yours faithfully. 

L. ZAMYATIN. 

Embassy of the Union of Soviet 
Socialist Republics. 

Kensington Palace Gardens, WS. 
June 5. 

Nuclear challenge 

From Mr Graham Ckainey 
Sic, "Let us not extend the 
illusions of uni Lateral ism from 
nuclear weapons to fee wider field 
of nuclear power", says Mr Robert 
Jackson (June 2). Perhaps we are 
looking down fee wrongend of the 
telescope. The danger at the 
moment is the widespread uni- 
lateral development of nuclear 
power, not anyone's abstention. 

I have so for seen no mention of 
any response from anywhere in 
the world to Mr Gorbacbov's 
remarkable proposal (repon, May 
15) that there should be an 
^Internationa] regime of safe 
development of nuclear power” 
among all fee nations concerned, 
and I Tear that a vital opportunity 
may have been missed. 

Nuclear power, unlike any pre- 
vious form of energy, presents a 
challenge to the human race as a 
whole. We have seen how its 
misuse, or incompetent use, may 
affect not only those immediately 
involved but also innocent people 
in the for corners of the world, 
beyond political frontiers or fee 
pate of ideologies. 

Surely common sense tells us 
feat it is potentially too dangerous 
— and too important for fee 
technological advance of fee 
whole planet — to continue to be 
managed on a secretive national 
basis. If an advanced nation like 
fee Soviet Union can perpetrate a 
Chernobyl, what must we fear 
from some of fee less developed 
hatK>nS? To the lessons of 
Chernobyl must be added those of 
BhopaL 

Of course it must remain wife 
individual nations to deride 
whether they wish to employ 
nuclear power, and many may 
now fed that fee risks are too 
great. But all should be entitled to 
full knowledge of, and participa- 
tion in, fee construction and 
maintenance of installations be- 
yond their territorial borders, 
fours, faithfully, 

GRAHAM CHAINEY, 

47 St Barnabas Road, Cambridge. 
June 2. 

Forest forecasts 

From Mrs B. M. Burley 
Sir. The folklore rhyme quoted by 
W. J. Burroughs in his article on 
fee weather (June 4) contradicts 
that which I remember - perhaps 
he is from another fart of fee 
forest? Briefly, fee version I know 
is: oak before ash. in for a splash; 
ash before oak, in for a soak. 
Brewer’s invaluable dictionary has 
fee complete lines. > 

The fire and smoke mentioned i 
in Mr Burroughs’s rhyme have 
surely only been part of our late I 
summer scene for a very few 
I recent years, and farmers, not the < 
weather, have been the cause. 
Unless his rhyme dates from 
Viking times? 

Ash did come into leaf before 
oak locally this year. Perhaps we ■ 
should all plant Quercus Ilex in 
the hope of better summers. 

Yours faithfully. 

JOANNA BURLEY, 

Kingsway Cottage, 

Leewick Lane. 

St Osytfau Clacton. Essex. 

Softly, softly j 

From Mr M. H. C. Dyer i 

Sir, If Mr Pertwee (June 3) wishes 
to stop people slamming his car's i 

doors he has only to label them i 

“This door has zero torque”; i 

everybody will then be scared of 
going near them, let alone slam- ] 

ming them. j 

Yours truly. : 

MALCOLM DYER, , 

ThePlech, ■ • < 

Much Mancie, t 

Ledbury, Herefordshire. I 

June 4. \ 


Resolving conflict within Alliance 


Cleaning up 

From Mr Brian Hobfey 
Sir, Mr Richard Branson, in bis 
new role of chairman of “Opera- 
tion Facelift”, should include fee 
removal of graffiti in fee clean-up 
scheme for Britain. There can be 
no doubt that spraycan graffiti are' 
on fee increase. British Rail 
properties and equipment in Lon- 
don are particularly subject to this 
New York foshion for huge, multi- 
coloured letters — e.g- Kilbum 
High Road Station. 

Unless society as. a whole 
combats this architecturally 
destructive vandalism immedi- 
ately. fee visual quality of our 
cities will be destroyed and fee 
cost grow beyond the remedy of 
both Government and the private 
individual. Tourism will ul- 
timately be affected wife the loss . 
of important revenue. 

• Owners should be obliged by 


From Mr M. Steed and others 
Sir. The.well-puUirised difference 
between Dr Owen and the com- 
promise policy reportedly recom- 
mended by fee Liberal/SDP 
Alliance's defence commission is 
only part of a bigger problem 
facing the Alliance. 

The well-established Liberal 
opposition to fee principle of an 
independent British nuclear deter- 
rent is as dear a position, held 
wife as much conviction by most 
Liberals, as Dr Owen's commit- 
ment to replacing Polaris. Since 
Liberal policy is made by its 
assembly and council, fee pro- 
posed compromise may well 
prove as unacceptable to the 
Liberal party as it evidently is to 
Dr Owen. 

The bigger problem for fee 
Alliance, of which each of us is a 
member, is that it lacks a machin- 
ery to take decisions in common. 
On most issues, our separately 
reached policies are dose enough 
to allow common position to be 
found by negotiations between our 
respective policy committees. 

But any attempt to resolve our 
clear differences on defence by 
imposing a decision reached at fee 
top would fail to carry the support 
of a large number of candidates 
and only expose our divisions, and 

The hippy convoy 

From the President of the Country 
Landowners Association 
Sir, Your leader (June 7) on fee 
“peace" convoy deserves a reply 
from fee Country Landowners 
Association, which has been lead- 
ing fee campaign for law reform 
ever since fee present problems 
became really serious a year or 
more ago. 

You emphasise fee "the tele- 
vised tears" of our member, Mr 
Attwell. and the Forestry 
Commission's desire to protect its 
properly do not of themselves 
“make a sound case for revision of 
fee common taw of trespass". 
However, these recent matters are 
merely the well-exposed tip of a 
very nasty iceberg; Similar inva- 
sions of, and damage to, property 
have been continuing unabated 
and unchecked for a long time. 
Revision of the law of trespass is 
urgently needed; greater pre- 
ventive powers for fee police and 
quicker ejectment powers for fee 
landowner are also required. 

You rightly call for fee speeding 
up of fee civil procedure for 
obtaining possession orders. The 
CLA seeks this too, and we are in 
close touch wife the Lord Chan- 
cellor, who knows of our pro- 
posals. 

As for police powers, you clearly 
do not appreciate the inadequacy 
of fee Public Order Bill when you 
State that it "will increase consid- 
erably the power of fee police to 
deal wife all manner of collective 
action”. As" fee Bill is currently 
worded, feat is not true. 

There is a very large and 
obvious loophole in fee pro- 
visions dealing with public assem- 
blies, through which convoys, and 
others wife astute legal advice, 
will be quick to jump. This is that 
police powers (to impose pre- 
ventive conditions on assemblies 
which threaten disorder, damage 
and disruption) only apply to 
assemblies which are held on land 


Alternative energy 

From Prqfessor Sir Hermann 
Bondi, FRS 

Sir. It was kind of your Science 
Editor, in his article on May 27, lo 
recall wife such favourable com- 
ments my time at fee Department 
of Energy. But, in fairness to my 
predecessor and my successors, I 
should emphasise that fee aim of 
the investigations 1 inherited and 
supported was to study the dif- 
ferent means of energy produc- 
tion, in order to see which should 
be pursued further. 

It was wholly to be expected that 
such studies would lead to fee 

Britain and Unesco 

From Mr Cyril D. Townsend, MP 
for Bexleykeath (Conservative) 

Sir, Rosemary Righter’s argu- 
ment, in her article of May 29, that 
current developments in Unesco 
justify Britain's derision to leave 
fee organisation at the end of fee 
last year is hardly surprising in 
view of her past strong advocacy 
of withdrawal: but to others who 
have followed the Unesco crisis 
from a more objective viewpoint, 
this is standing logic on its head. 
Things have indeed turned sour, 
and many of the developments are 
worrying but where does fee main 
responsibility lie? 

It was quite dear at fee end of 
last year that if Britain persisted in 
pulling out despite all fee progress 
achieved towards reform and fee 
unanimous appeal from our 
"Community and Commonwealth 
partners to stay and work for 
further change from within, there 
would be a strong third world 


law to remove or paint out graffiti 
within days, hopefully, en- 
couraged by Government 
compensation. This will not be 
expensive in the long term because 
graffiti encourage more graffiti. 
Bein| realistic, in that these 
activities reflect a form of mis- 
directed creative energy, it would 
be advisable to redirect them to 
designated hoardings chosen in 
areas of concentrated spraycan 
vandalism. 

Yours faithfully, 

BRIAN HOBLJEY, 

Chief Urban Archaeologist, 

The Museum of London. 

London WaJL EC2. 

June 4. 

From Mr Mark Stevenson 
Sir, Like Mrs Thatcher, who has 
apparently had her eyes closed for 
some time, I have been appalled 
by fee amount of rubbish linering 
British streets. 


fee weakness of fee machinery for 

- co-operation between fee two 

- parties, during fee next general 
; election campaign. Better than 

that would be two separate, clear 
s party policies. 

1 But better still would be a 
l common policy, properly agreed 
by fee parties in common which 
" must involve at some stage a 
j democratic majority vote. Our 

* two parties m ust consider urgently 
1 fee machinery for this, involving 
' necessarily a common repre- 
sentative meeting such as a joint 

! session of our two party councils, 

’ perhaps followed by a one-person 

* one-vote ballot of all members of 
! both parties. 

If fee issue could be resolved 
. that way. all candidates would 
[ respect the legitimacy of a demo- 
cratic decision; the Alliance would 
be brought together; and its 
I credibility strengthened in fee 
eyes of the electorate. 

Yours faithfully, 

■ MICHAELSTEED. 

MARGARET A HOLMSTEDT. 
MICHAEL TAYLOR, 

ELISABETH M. WILSON. 

Wood Cottage, 

Ewood Lane, 

Todmorden, Lancashire. 

June 8. 

to which fee public or a section of 
it is expressly or impliedly granted 
access. 

Unless those important pre- 
ventive powers are extended to 
cover all types of land (as fee CLA 
has for so long been urging) fee 
police will be hindered, potential 
damage to property will be greater 
and fee convoys will be en- 
couraged to trespass to avoid the 
imposition of those conditions. 
This loophole really must be 
closed 

Yours faithfully, 

JOHN NORRIS, President, 
Country Landowners Association, 
16 Belgrave Square, SW1. 

June 9. 

From the Reverend P. J. W. Raine 
and the Reverend T. J. Selwood 
Sir, We are parish priests working 
in the parish of Minstead which 
includes on its borders the airfield 
of Sioney Cross on which a 
number of "nomads" have re- 
cently arrived 

We took the opportunity over 
June 2 and 3, in between other 
parish work, to spend about eight 
hours visiting these "nomads" in 
their encampments. Almost 
invariably we received a friendly 
welcome as we listened to their 
accounts of their aims and fife 
style. 

We were saddened to hear the 
language used in fee House of 
Commons by fee Home Secretary 
and other members of Parliament 
describing them as "medieval 
brigands” or in similar intem- 
perate vein. Such emotive 
langugage gives an entirely false 
impression of a group of people 
whose lifestyle we have no desire 
to emulate, but who we feel 
deserve fee consideration and 
facilities offered to other nomadic 
groups. 

We remain, yours sincerely, 

P.J.W. RAINE, 

T. J. SELWOOD, 

The Rectory, Minstead 
Lyndhurst, Hampshire. 

June 4. 

conclusion, in some of fee cases, 
feat fee prospects did not justify 
further work and I am not 
surprised that this conclusion has 
been reached for wave power, 
largely on economic grounds. 
Wind power has gone ahead well 
and it is surely a matter for 
satisfaction that fee biggest US 
contract in this field has gone to a 
British firm. 

Neither wave nor tidal power 
can be described as "cheap" as is 
clear from the published figures. 

Yours faithfully, 

HERMAN BONDI, Master, 
Churchill College, Cambridge. 

reaction, fee reform process would 
be seriously set back, and British 
staff and consultants would be at 
risk. 

Rosemary Righter having 
determ inately called for milk to be 
spilt, now complains feat fee floor 
is dirty. In doing so she foils to 
mention that the British Auditor 
General had already offered to 
resign and that undear Unesco rules 
the Auditor must come from a 
member state. 

She also forgets to point out that 
those most bent on driving out 
British staff and influence are not 
fee Director General and his third 
world supporters, but fee Rus- 
sians who naturally seek to profit 
from the short-sighted decision to 
withdraw which has damaged 
Britain's reputation and interest, 
and the cause of Unesco reform.. 
Yours faithfully. 

CYRIL D. TOWNSEND. 

House of Commons. 

June 2. 

The remedy is quite simple, and 
has already been adopted in 
several states in the USA A 
deposit (I would sugget five pence) - 1 
is charged on allpaekaging — j 
whether it be a cigarette packet, a J 
box for a lake-away pizza or < 
whatever. This deposit would be 1 
refundable at fee place of purchase I 

or similar outlet I 

This simple scheme does not 1 
put up fee cost of living (except for 1 
those too lazy to return their \ 
packaging) and imposes fee bur- ( 
den of fee neat disposal of rubbish I 
on those who profit from fee 
original sale. £ 

Just us I collected bottles to aid r 
my childhood finances, so would i 
you find armies of young people r 
willing to collect rubbish in ex- r 
change for the financial reward. E 
Yours sincerely, \ 

MARK STEVENSON, F 

Upper Gwydir Street \ 

Cambridge. S 


ON THIS DAY 


JUNE 11 1878 

The death toil in feu disaster uuu 
thought to be 789. In this year at 
least 550 miners were killed in 
major pit accident. 


THE WOOD PIT 
COLLIERY EXPLOSION. 


I (FROM OUR 

r CORRESPONDENT.! 

r WIGAN, Monday Evening: 

; The hope feat the number of 
lives lost by the Wood Pit explo- 
[ sion at Haydock on Friday would 
be only about 180 will, it is feared, 

[ prove groundless, and present in- 
i' formation leads the management 

to conclude that the death roll will 
contain the names of over 200 men 
and boys- To-day the relatives of 
1 the sufferers have been receiving 
the usual general allowance — £10 
for a foil member and £5 for a half 
member of the Colliery Sick and 
Burial Fund, and from the particu- 
lars furnished by them it has been 
found that there were in the mine 
at the time of the accident many 
more poor fellows than was sup- 
posed yesterday. This is accounted 
for by the foct that some of the 
colliers employ their own drawers 
or assistants. This seam is said to 
be a very good one for fee colliers, 
and, having had a few days’ 
holiday, they were working hard to 
* get out as much coal as possible, 
and some appear to have had two 
and even three drawers removing 
fee coal from their working places 
to the pit eye. In these circum- 
stances, the correct number will 
not be obtained until inquiries 
have been made throughout the 
district, which is a scattered one. 
and this is at present being done. 

The work of exploring the mine 
has been continued without inter- 
ruption since the accident oc- 
curred, but, considering the large 
number of men at work, only slow 
progress has been made, showing 
that the This been both 

difficult and dangerous. Much gas 
has been met with during fee 
inspection, and the moving of this 
has given much trouble, and, in 
addition, large falls of roof blocked 
the road. Mr. Hedgiey was in 
charge during last night, and to- 
day Mr. Dickinson and Mr. Hafl 
were down the shaft. The explorers 
have reached the top of the rise 
workings, and it is expected fee 
bulk of fee bodies of those killed 
will shortly be found. About 20 had 
been found up to this afternoon, 
and ferae will be brought to the 
surface to-night. 

Thirty-nine of the recovered 
bodies have been identified. . . 

Nothing has as yet been discov- 
ered which gives any clue to the 
cause of the disaster. Without 
doubt, a large quantity of gas must 
have found its way into the 
workings, and it is supposed by 
some that this gas has come from 
the Wigan six-feet mine, or what is 
known in this district as the fiery 
nine fret, which is met in almost a 
direct line on the opposite side of 
the fault by the Florida seam, the 
one in which fee explosion oc- 
curred. As showing the force of the 
blast, it may be stated that a train 
of empty waggons which was 
running down fee tunnel at fee 
time of fee explosion was driven up 
against the roof with such violence 
as not only to smash them into 
pieces, but also to force them 
through fee brick 'archway forming 
fee tunnel. Probably this impeded 
the blast and saved the shaft and 
other portions of the workings. 
Beyond this point in the mine not 
a single soul has been brought out 
alive, and it is believed that all in 
the workings from this spot must 
have been killed in an instant by 
the terrible explosion. 

TO THE EDITOR OF THE TIMES 

Sir.- At a time when the riotous 
behaviour of Borne of the men of 
Lancashire has shocked the community, 

I cannot resist calling the attention of 
your readers to points of chancier of a 
ar more encouraging d e s cr iption which 
I saw in the crowd around fee pit’s 
mouth on Friday evening last. 

It was about three hours after the 30 
volunteers went down. A single consta- 
ble had no difficulty in keeping back at a 
distance of some 20 yards from the 
mouth of the pit a dense crowd, silent, 
motionless, and respectful. . . Was it a 
panic's spell that bound them there hour 
after hour, without an attempt to buret 
through and see for themselves what 
could be done for their brothers, 
husbands, sons, or fathers in that pit? 
No. There was little of terror in the 
fierce eagerness of fee. roes that 
thundered from a hundred deep throats 
or the yearning desire of a hu n dred 
outstretched hands, as though it was the 
one darling wish of their lives when a 
request was made for volunteers to Sh 
the places of those who were being 
carted away through their midst 

All this and much besides— especially 
the respectful dignity with which the 
men stuped into their places in the cage 
to be lowered — must have been seen to 
realize with what a majesty these 
co [here face a cold-blooded math in 
living tombs. 

Alas! one had not ridden four miles 
from the scene before it became 
manifest that the appalling news bad 
swept through the country and left, it 
almost indifferent. The pigeon, the dog, 

the drinking and swearing had already 
resumed feeir sway, and the bitter 
reflection suggested itself. What a 
people this insight be if fee crust of 
short-sighted folly and ignorance could 
be broken through and the latent 
splendour of their character brought to 
Ugfatl 

I have the honour to be, Sir, your 
obedient servant, 

A- J- SWINBQURNE. 

A parfit knight 

From Captain R. Hamilton 
Sir, LORJNC, Sir Nigel, b 1327. s 
of Eustace Loring (killed in action, 
1340). Knighted on battlefield, 
Poitiers, 1356. m, November 

1356. Mary, d of Sir John 
Buttesihom; one d, Maude, b 

1357. Constable to Earl of Salis- 
bury, 1373. Address: Twynham 
Castle, Hampshire; Tilford 
Manor, Surrey. 

Your correspondent. Sir Nigel 
Strutt (June 6), will surely forgive 
me for putting the earlier etfues 
oraeclarus in nis correct century. 


jnsor- 
n, tiie 
il ser- 
lOpto 
iygain 

inster 
ng its 
ensey) 
her of 
/ Yen s 
s Press, 
npleted 
n. 

it, APV 
er 2p to 
iicd its 
eni to 
■rt Ben- 
k acting 
another 
VPV at 

r a total 
i ares, or 
; votes, 
i 955p. 


ei office 
icnicar- 
i! is es- 
.mpleted 

million. 
•R RE- 
\VEST- 
Second 
.73p for 
J. 1986. 
}p. This 
Jirertors’ 
erim re- 
5pand a 
jeriod io 

CORP: 
J. 1986. 
* f£6.58 
£333.052 
per share 

pi- The 

rompany 
e second 
i auction 
g and it 
crop and 
iction- 
OENJX 
If-year to 
u mover 
Loss be- 
i 31.914). 
- 36.l7p 


S. 


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xV 8256 


rmatton 


lication 
mi tried 
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;£499 ex 
a rage, 
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(worth 


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£49.95 



itain and ituv 


praeclarus in nis correct century, 
not in the reign of William n (not 
really a Good King) but in that of 
Edwairi III (a rather Better King). 
Yours foitbfully, . 

R. HAMILTON, 

West Dean, 

Salisbury, Wiltshire. 










COURT 

AND 

SOCIAL 


Forthcoming marriages 

Dr K. C. Flncham Mr F. J. Klein Mr A. C WIUussob 

and Miss A. J. Whaley and Miss P. J- Bailey and Mbs D. Brisco-Webb 

The engagement is announced The engagement is announced The engagement is announced 
between Kenneth Charles,, between Frederick, elder son of between Andrew. second SOD Of 
of Dr and Mis Paul Mr and Mis F- w_ Klein, of -Dr and Mrs WilHam Wilkinson, 




COURT 

CIRCULAR 

BUCKINGHAM PALACE 

June 10: Today is ihe sixty- 
fifth Anniversary of ihe Birth- 
day of The Duke of Edinburgh. 

The Right Hon Margaret 
Thatcher, MP. (Prime Minister 
and First Lord of the Treasury ) 
had an audience of The Queen 
this evening. 

The Princess Anne, Mrs Mark 
Phillips today visited the Three 
Counties Agricultural Society- 
Show at Malvern. 
Worcestershire. 

Her Royal Highness was re- 
ceived by Her Majesty's Lord- 
Lieutenant for Hereford and 
Worcester (Captain Thomas 
Dunne) and the President of the 
Society (Mr B. B ulmer). 

The Hon Mrs Legge-Bourke 
was in attendance. 

CLARENCE HOUSE 
June 10: Queen Elizabeth The 
Queen Mother today visited the 
County of Tyne and Wear, and 
in the' morning visited Loblite 
Limited. Team Valley, 
Gateshead. 

Her Majesty subsequently 
visited English Estates to mark 
its 50lh Anniversarv. 

In the afternoon Queen Eliza- 
beth The Queen Mother opened 
the Third Phase of the 
redevelopment of the Queen 
Elizabeth Hospital at 
Gateshead. 

Her Majesty returned to Lon- 
don in an .Aircraft of The 
Queen's Flight 

The Lady Grimthorpe. Sir 
Martin GiUiaiand Captain Niall 
Hall were in attendance. 

Lady Elizabeth Basset has 
succeeded Miss Jane Walker* 
Okeover as Lady-m-Waiting to 
Queen Elizabeth The Queen 
Mother. 

KENSINGTON PALACE 

June 10: The Prince of Wales. 
President The Friends of 
Coveni Garden, this morning 
attended a meeting of the Coun- 
cil and Committee of Manage- 


ment at the Royal Opera House, 
Covent Garden, WC2. 

Captain Alison Ewan was in 
attendance. 

KENSINGTON PALACE 
June 10: The Princess Margaret. 
Countess of Snowdon. President 
of the Girl Guides .Association, 
attended the Annual General 
Meeting of the .Association held 
this morning at Commonwealth 
Headquarters and this after- 
noon at the Westminster 
Theatre. 

Lady Juliet Townsend was in 
attendance. 

KENSINGTON PALACE 
June 10: The Duke of Glouces- 
ter today visited Nene College, 
Moulton Park, Northampton. 

His Royal Highness travelled 
in an aircraft of The Queen's 
Flight. 

Lieutenant-Colonel Sir Simon 
Bland was in attendance. 

YORK HOUSE 
ST JAMES'S PALACE 
June 10: The Duchess of Kent 
today opened the Nuclear Mag- 
netic Resonance Scanner at the 
Sutton Branch of the Royal 
Marsden Hospital, London 
SW3. 

Miss Sarah Partridge was in 
attendance. 


The Prince of Wales will present , 
the 1986 Enterprise Award for 
Small Businesses at BBC Pebble 
Mill. Birmingham, on June 25. 
In the evening the Prince of 
Wales. President of the Prince’s ; 
Trust, accompanied by the Prin- 
cess of Wales, will attend a 
concert given by the City of 
Birmingham Symphony Or- 
chestra at the National Ex- 
hibition Centre: 

The Queen will start the 
Common wraith Games Relay 
Message from Buckingham Pal- 
ace on June 26. 

A memorial service for Helen 
Isabella McMorran will be held 
in the Chapel ofGinon College, 
Cambridge, on Saturday, June 
21. 1986. at 3 JO pm: 


Birthdays today New chairman 


Mr James Bo stock. 69; Mr 
Michael Cacoyannis, 64; Lord 
Cameron of Lochbroom. 55; M 
Jacques Cousteau, 76: Sir 
Thomas Davis. 69; Mr Justice 
Evans, 52; Mr Athol Fugard. 54; 
Vice-Admiral Sir Robert 
Gerken. 54; Miss Beryl Grey, 59; 
Brigadier Sheila Heaney, 69: 
Mrs Rachael Heyhoe Flint, 47; 
Mr Paul Mellon. 79; Mr Jackie 
Stewart, 47; Major-General Sir 
Nigel Tapp. 82: Sir John Terry. 
73; Sir Edward Thompson, 84; 
Mr Richard Todd, 67; Sir 
Gerard Vaughan. MP, 63. 


Royal Society of 
Medicine 

The following have been elected 
honorary fellows of the Royal 
Society of Medicine: 

Emeritus Professor D. Court, 
Emeritus Professor J.C. 
Goligher, Emeritus Professor 
N.H. Maclagan and Mr N.H.L 
Ridley. 





Viscount Whitelaw, CH, 
the Leader of the House 
of Lords, who is to be the 
new Chairman of the 
Carlton Club in London, 
in succession to Lord 
Boyd-Caipenter. 


Christening 

The infant daughter of Made 
and Lucy Price was christened 
Claire Sally on Sunday, June 1, 
by the Rev David Eyles, at St 
Michael's Well The godparents 
are the Hon Gerald Maitland- 
Carew, Sir John Ropner, Mis 
Sandy Henderson and the Hon 
Mrs David Dugdale. 




Alison Jane; elder daughter of 
the late Mr F. R. Whaley and of 
Mrs Whaley, of Marlborough, 
Wiltshire. 


Mr M. Ferny hough 

and Miss A. Gough 

The marriage will take place 

quietly in the Outer Hebrides, in 

July, between Michael 

Fernyhougb and Annette 

Gough. 


Mr L. W. Garni 
and Miss P. M. Stokes 
The engagement is announced 
between Leslie, son of Mr and 
Mrs William Gawn, of Luton, 
Bedfordshire, and Penelope, el- 
dest daughter of Mr Hugh 
Stokes, of Manama, Bahrain, 
and Mrs Diana Stokes, of 
Hampton Wick, Kingston, 
Surrey. 

Mr M. H. K. Hamer 
and Miss V. H. Walsh 
The engagement is announced 
between Kenneth, youngest son 
of the late Mr and Mrs Mark 
Hamer, of Southampton, 
Hampshire, and Victoria, only 
daughter of Dr T. J. Walsh and 
th elate Mrs Walsh, of Wexford, 
Ireland. 


Mr R. A. P. Hewisea 
and Miss E. J. Bolton 
The engagement is announced 
between Robert, son of the late 
Mr R. J. P. Hewison and of Mrs 
N. C Hewison, of London, and 
Erica, daughter of Mr and Mrs 
A. E. Bolton, of London. 

Mr M. R. Hutchinson 
and Miss E. A. Wood 
The engagement is announced 
between MichaeJ. youngest son 
of Mr and Mrs P. H. Hutchin- 
son, of Seaford, Sussex, and 
Elizabeth, youngest daughter of 
Mr and Mrs w. E. Wood, of 
Folkestone. Kent. 


Mr D.T. Kahns 

and Miss M.L. Brooko-Edwards 
The engagement is announced 
between Donald Thomas, only 
son of Mr Donald J. Kahxs, of 
New Canaan, Connecticut, and 
Mrs Barbara McArthur, of Lo- 
cust Valley, New York, and 
Michaela Louisa, youngest 
daughter of Mrs Elena Brooke- 
Ed wards, of Eaton Square. Lon- 
don, and the late Richard 
(Dickie) Brooke-Ed wands. 


Gold medals 
for bravery 

Two police gold medals were 
awarded yesterday for acts of 
outstanding bravery by mem- 
bers of the public helping the 
police during 198S. 

The first went to Mr Richard 
Whittaker, aged 39, a restaurant 
owner of Cheltenham, who 
detained an armed man after a 
raid on a post office, and the 
second medal was awarded to 
Mr Edward Scott, aged 40, an 
unemployed lorry driver, of 
Clayton,- Manchester, who died 
from injuries sustained, while 
struggling with a burglar 

The awards were made at the 
summer conference of the 
Association of Chief Police Offi- 
cers of England. Wales and 
'"orthero Ireland, in Torquay. 


Births, Marriages, Deaths and In Memoriam 


BIRTHS, MARRIAGES, 
DEATHS art 01 MBHORIAH ! 
» i Em + J5X VAT 

(mimrmmi 3 lines) 

\mioumxnwmi. authenticated bv ibe 
name and permanent address of ike 
sender, may be mil to: 

THE TIMES 
P0 BOX 484 
VirgiaH Street 
Lradoa El 

or telephoned Iby telephone mbs- 
embers only) Ur. 81-481 3024 

Announcements on be received by 
telephone between 9.00»m and 
5J0pm Monday to Friday, on Satur- 
day between 9.00am and 12 noon. 
Hi-481 W9 Mr). For publication the 
(Wowing day phone by I.30pn. 

FBHIHCtUnre KWMMgg. WPHHI6S 

etc on Court and Social Page CB a faa 
+ 16% VAT. 

Coon and Social FagP anoounav 
menu can not be accepted by 
telephone Enquiries to: 81-822 9953 
(after 1030am). or send wr 
l. r—iiaflim Smut bwlM El. 


Who Knoweth whether then art com 
MOW Wnadom far such « Urns os BUefl 
Esther 4: 14 


BIRTHS 


CAMERON On 9th June, to Gaby (nte 
BapHone) and Andrew, a son. Oliver 
Christopher. 

CARTWRIGHT - On 31st May to Julie 
(trie Nelson) and PhfUp. a son. Henry 
William, a brother for Georgina. 

CLAYTON On Jibw 6th to Jane and 
Richard a son, Thomas Gerald. 

FAWLS On 8th June 1986 at Queen 
Mary’s Hospital. Roehampton. to 
Lydia and Richard- a daughter. 
Cortona. a staler foe Dominic. Oriel 
and Teresa. 

FELLOWS On 26th May to Sally tote 
Smith) and BID a son. Henry. 

FOX On June 6th at the John Raocttffe 
HospUaL Oxford to Sara utte Lock) 
and Peter a son. Edward Charles 
(Ned), a brother for Daisy. 

FOX SAVOUUWS On 6th June In 
New York to PatU and Otmltrl a son. 
Mihails Mark. 

SOUGH On 4th June at the City Hospi- 
tal. Nottingham, to Ann (nfe Fraser) 
and Andrew, a daughter. Elisabeth 
Cotta. 

-HICKS On Ttft Jane la Sally and Ian a 
son. Nicholas William, a brother for 
Caroline and Richard, 

NEWS On 5th June, to Clare (nee 
Denham) and Lionel, a son. Edward 
Alan William, at the jonn RadcUITe 
Hospital Oxford. 

LA RUE On June 6th at U.C.H. to 
Diana tale Bone; and Michel, a 
daughter. Claire Louise, a sister for 
Charlotte. 

LEtGHHBRAMWELL - On June 9th. 
1986 to Isabella Kite Robb) and Brian 
a son. Robert Philip. 

■ARfOtAM - on 4Ut June al Chase 
Farm Hospital to Liz uwe Davtaj and 
Andrew a daughter Kane Charlotte 5 
weeks early 

MEWS - On May 27Ui in Sydney to 
wee Kboon and Richard a son. 
Gavin Luke Che. a brother for E wan. 

MOWCT On 6th June to Barbara dW-e 
Milne) and Robin, a daughter. Lucy 
Rebecca. 

WSSGN On June 7th to Juliet (nfe 
Marcel) and Rtchard. a son Oorge 
Mark. 

PATTEN On 10th June 1986 to Louise 

(nee Rowe) and John, a daughter | 

VIDAL On May lOUi in Guatemala j 
aty to Catrln (nee Wallen) and Lau- ; 
rent a daughter. Alexandra Martstte. 

WILKINSON On May 23rd to Anita 
into ouckltt) and Ian. a obi 
Genevieve Roxanne Rachael. 


WISEMAN - On June 9th. to Karan 
Elizabeth and Steven Leonard, a 
daughter. Charlotte Anne, a sister for 
Hannah Louise. 

WOODLAND On 8th June. 1986 at 
Redhm General Hospital to Susan 
inee Watson) and RoMn a daughter. 
Kale Susan, a sister far Emfly. 

YOUNGER On 6th June to Amde 
(Spencer) and Sam a son, Edward 
Kenneth Spencer. 

MARRIAGES 

BECKHWHAM: WOODCOCK On June 
7th at St. Mary's Church. Presto ury, 
Gloucestershire. Andrew to Alison. 

DOBBIN: CHAW At Greyfrters Tot- 
booth and Highland Kirk. Edinburgh. 
On 7th June 1986 by Rev. J. 
McLean. Waiiam-WaUace. eldest son 
of Mr and MR W. DobMn. Abo 
DhabL lo Morag. younger daughter 
of Mr and Mrs J. A. Craig, of 
Bathgate. West Lothian. 

DEATHS 


ASHCROFT - MichaeJ Tanstey. SLA- 
DM.. DSC: M-R.CJP.. aged 6a of 13 
Harass Road. Oxford, and Fachwen. 
Caernarfon, suddenly on 7th June In 
Oxford. Much loved brother of June 
Clarke, and unde of James and Liz. 
Service at Oxford Crematorium. 
Headlngton. al 12.46 on Thursday 
12th June. 

ASH On Sunday. 8th June, peacefully 
at home. Marjorie, loving wife of the 
late Gerald Ash and the very deady 
beloved mother of Rosemaiy. Fritter- , 
a) Service at SL Mary's Chord). 
Charlton Kings on Tuesday. I7to 
June at SL30 pm. followed by crana- 1 
Don. Flowers may be sent to Setim . 
Smith & Co. Cheltenham. 

BOULTON - Phyllis Evelyn Flatter 
<n*e Bennett) aged 86. peacefully at 
Aabfelone Nursing Home, stoke 
Bishop. Bristol on Sunday. 8tti June. 
1986. Wife of the late John of 
Cholstrey. Leominster and CUfum. 
Bristol. Funeral al 2-50 pm on 
Monday. 16th June at SL Marys. 
Stoke Bishop. tnterment at 
Kutgsland. Herefordshire taler 
Family Dowers only please. 

BOUNDY • On June 9th 1986. I 
peacefully at home. James Reilly. I 
aged 70 yean. Beloved husband of 
Margaret and father of John and 
Peter. Funeral sendee private. , 
Family flowers only, bat donations. 

If desired, to Mount Vernon Body 
Scanner Appeal, c/o T. A. EBement 
dr Son Ltd. 21 Bridge Street Planer. \ 
Middlesex. j 

BUCKUUB On June 8ih 1986. peace- 
fully at her daughter's home to 
Worthing. Syfifi Mary (nee JUvett- 
Camac) in her tooth year, beloved 
mother of AurtoL Diana and John. 
Grandmother of Vanessa. Lindsay. 
Timothy. William. James and 
Edward, and Great-grandmother of 
Sybil Rose. Edward and WUUam. Fu- 
neral Sendee at Easthantpstead Park 
Crematorium. Bracknell on Friday 
June 13th at 7.00 pm. Family flow- 
ers only to Jordan & Cook. 80 High 
SL Worthing. 

BUENO DE MESOUITA ■ Eileen 
Renault, peacefully on Friday. June 
6th. widow of Reggie and mother of 
Jenny. Funeral on Monday. June 
I6tti at 2.30 p.m. at Holy Trinity. 
Brampton. Flowers to J H Kenyon. 
49 Marines Road. wa. 

Teh 01 937 0757 

COOKSON - Dr Harold. FRCP, on 
June 6 Ul at Poole General Hospital, 
alter a long Ittness. Private ftmeral. 
No flowers please. 

COWERN On 8th June 1986 at Ms 
home. 41 Irish SL WMMiaven. Cum- 
bria. Raymond Teague. R A- CD**) 
much loved. No ibwns please. Any 
donations Mease to the Artists Gener- 
al Benevolence institution or to the 
Marie Curie Memorial Foundation. 9 
BNgrave Mews South. London . 
SW1X 8BW 

CROWHURST . On June 9. peacefully. 
Cecil Percy (Tiny) aged 78. Dearly 
loved husband of Audrey, beloved 
father of Elizabeth and Jennifer 
Cremation on Friday, June is. 2.30 

pm at Putney Vale Crematorium. 
Family flowers only, but donations 
may be sent to Atkinson Motley Hos- 
pital. Wimbledon. 


DOUGLAS BARD on June 8th. Jean 
Constance UaddeL loyal widow of 
greatly cherished Raymond. Remem- 
bered with affection by her frailly 
and friends. Funeral Service at Salis- 
bury Crematorium on Monday. June 
l6Ut al 3 pm. Donations may be giv- 
en to RSPGA. 

GERMAN On 8th June hi SL James' 
HospUaL Wandsworth. Uzzle (Betty) 
wife of ihe late Oscar E. German. 
Funeral at 2.16 pm on Monday I6to 
June at the South Lawton 
Crematorium. 

HOLBROOK On ath June. 1986. John, 
aged 57. beloved husband of Patri- 
cia. to Bath- after a short Illness, 
private funeral. Service of thanksgiv- 
ing to be held later. 

KING OB 8th June 1986. Peacefully 
Lady Dorothy V M. long, late of Riv- 
erside House. Borrowash. Derby- 
shire. widow of Sir Robertson King 
and mother of Robin and GOtan. Ser- 
vice al St Mary's church. Ilkeston. 
Derbyshire on Monday 16th June at 
1.15pm followed by cremation al 
Bramcote Crematorium. Floral trib- 
utes to Bamfords. Shakespeare 
Street No tamtam please. 

LATHAM Major Tony Sth Royal hurts- 
killing Dragoon Guards Passed away 
at Ids home to Stoke-on-Trent on 9th 
Jane aged 61. Funeral at T Id worth 
Garrison Church at 2-30 pm on Fri- 
day. 13th June. Flowers to 5 Inn Is 
Da Tldworth. Hants. 

LOWREY On June 4th. suddenly at Us 
borne to West Ealing. John Andrew, 
dearly loved twto brother of Frank. 
Funeral Service to be held at VI .00 
am on Friday. June 13th at SL 
Mary's Church. Wansfead. roOowed 
by cremation. Enquiries and Rowers 
to Messrs. Wkfcxaiden & Son Ltd. 
Funeral Directors of 72 Northflekl 
Avenue. West Ealing W13 9RN. 

MAHSEL On 6th June, suddenly at 
Selbanie. Archie Anne, wife of the 
late Major Rhys (Saved Mansei of i 
Smedmore and Ropiey. Funeral at 
3.30 pm on Monday. V6th June at 
Ktounertdge Church near Wareham. 
There may be a Memorial Service la 
Hampshire to be announced later. 

MATTHEWS - On June 3rd Roderick 
Wallace Yates, predous husband of 
Mariorie (nde Bounchfer). Private i 
cremation at Bournemouth. 

MCCARTHY Bernard (Barney) on 
Monday 9th June peacefully to hos- 
pital. Sadly missed by his wife. Vera. | 
and his children Rosaleen. June and ; 
Jim and ids grandchildren. Requiem ; 
mass at St John's Church. Tadworth i 
on Thursday 1 2th June at 1 Dam. fbF i 
lowed by interment at Epsom ! 
Cemetery. Family flowers only. 

McLAREN - Suddenly on Sth June : 
1986 at We of Arran War Memorial I 
Hospital. Lanuash. Hugh Cameron ! 
McLaren. Emeritus Professor of 
Obstetrics and Gynaecology. Bir- 
mingham University. Thanksgiving 
service in Birmingham at a later 
date. 

PATTMSON - On June 71h 1986. 
peacefully at his home. Broadtowns I 
19 Rtversdaie Road. Thames Duron. I 
Sumy. James Frederick, aged 87. ! 
husband of ihe late Molly, father of : 
Moira and grandfather of Sharon | 
and Nola. Former managing director I 
of 20th Centnnr Fox Film Corpora- i 
don. Dearly loved and sadly missed. 
Funeral to be held at 130 p.m. Frt- ] 
day 13th June at Kingston 
Crematorium. , 

MC K F O HP - On 7th June -1986. at ' 
Peel Hospital. Galashiels. P mtre m w i i 
Ralph W- beloved Husband of Ruth 
Bowyer. Funeral service at Glasgow | 
Crematorium. MaryhUL (Old Cha- 1 
pe*>. on Wednesday JIth June at 3 
pm. No flewets please. 

POND - On June 4th. suddenly, at 
RlngwooCL Hampshire. LQy May. 
aged 80. of Mldhohne. The Steed. 
East PreNon. Sussex. Widow of Hor- 
ace Rume Pond, dear mother of 
Graham and Ian. beloved mother -in- 
law. and loving tpandmattier Of 
Jacaueitoe. amort. Katherine, Chris- 
topher. Alison and Stephen. Funeral 
service on Tuesday. June 17® at 
Worthing Crematorium at 2-00 pan. 
Flow era to F A Holland & Son. Ter- 
ralnm Road. LUUehamptoo. Sussex 
(Tel; LStOehampton 713939). 


REEK On June 6th 1986 Suddenly 
Farid Amin, beloved husband of 
Susannah loving tether of Farida, 
and Samir. Dearly loved broBier. 
brother-in-law and unde or Edward. 
Frances. NaybL'Aflue. and Amin. 
Funeral oervtra 2 pm on Thursday 
June 12th at Ihe Greek Orthodox 
CatherdaL Moscow Road. W2. Fol- 
lowed by Internment at 
Gunnenbury Camay. Flowers and 
enauUes to J H Kenyan 144. 49 
Mariaes Rd. London W8. 01-937 
0757 Donations If desired to Father 
Samir Ghoutam c/o J H Kenyon Lid. 

RUSHWORTH - On Sunday. May 2BU> 
1986. Nick, to a trade accident to 
Madrid, aged only 21 years. A 
Memorial Service wffl be announced 
shortly. 

SEXTON • On 4tti June, suddenly at 
Gatwick Airport. John Sexuo. 
RJLF. Squadron Leader Reid. Re- 
cently retired from Caa. Most 
beloved husband of Shefla. Trea- 
sured father of Tina and Jonathan. 
Adoring grandfather of Oliver and 
Toby and greatly loved by all his 
family. Private family farewell 16th 
June 1986. Family Oowm only to E. 
R. Hlckmott and Son. 41 Grave Hm 
Road. Tunbridge Wells. 

SNELL Fr Alfred Antony SSM on 7th 
June at the Durham Priory. Requiem 
Durham Cathedral at LOO pm on 
Friday. I3ih Jane. 

STERN- On 9lh June. 1986. peaceful- 
ly. use. dear mother of Kenneth and 
isgrid and the late John, grandmoth- 
er and great-grandmother. Service at 
QoUere Green Crematorium on 
Monday. 16th June at 11.45 am 
(East ChapeO- No flowers but dona- 
tions. H desired, to Imperial Cancer 
Research Fund. 

STHXMAN Mary Family Funeral at 
SL Nicholas Chapel. Hambam on 
Friday. 13th June at 2S0 pjn. 
Thanksgiving Service at 2J30 pm on 
Saturday. 28th June at SL Raufs 
Church. FTshetton Street. Salisbury. 

WARBURG Jeremy Fredric Greatly 
Moved husband of Team and father 
of Madeleine. Oottn and Richard and 
proprietor of the Thorn Press. 
Passed away peacefully after a long 
fttness at Ids home on 9th June. Pri- 
vate funeral. M an of Zntenuon at SL 
Osmunds' CaiboUc Church. 
Casteftxau. Games. London on 22nd 
June at 10.30 am. No dowers. Dona- 
tions lo Cancer Research/ Marie 
Curie/ Dorothy House. No phone 
calls Mease. 

WICKS - On June 6th. at Hampshire 
Clinic, Basingstoke, after a short Al- 
ness home with characteristic 
courage. Doris l.man. aged 83 years, 
beloved a ant of Peter Huxtabte. and 
dear friend df Etizabetii and Rosalind 
Pool. Funeral service to be held at 
Hartley Witney Methododfst Chapel 
on Friday I3tn June at 10 JO am. 
Family flowers only but donations if 
desired to The National Childrens' 
Home. 

WOMB WELL Ob June Sth at York. 
Captain victor Malcolm wombwell. 
aged 93. Husband of the late EHoen 
Beryl. Funeral Service at SL 
Michael's Church. Ooxwotd on Mon- 
day. June 16Ui at 2.00 pm. Flowers 
to Chapmam Medd, EastogwokL 
York or donations to Purey CnsL 
NuffhSd Hospital Appeal. York. 


MEMORIAL SERVICES 

ROSS A Memorial Service for Profes- 
sor Charles Ross win be held M The 
Lord Mayor's Cha pet. College Green. 
Bristol on Friday. 4th July ax mo 
am. 

IN MEMORIAM - PRIVATE 

THOMAS Geoffrey Weyburn Darting 
Boy lovingly remembered always 
and especially on his Mrthday 
WMGATE Rachel Onto to unfading 
memory of a most dearly loved sta- 
ler. June urn. 1955. 


States, and Prudence, younger 
daughter of Mr J. P. Baaey and 
tbeTare Mis D. D. Baiky, of 

Panfieid, Essex. 

MrS. J- Lyle 
and Miss a. L. Jessop 
The engagement is announced 
between Stephen, eldest sod of 
Mr and Mrs D. C Lyle, of 
Wokingham, Berkshire, and 
Abbe, younger daughter ofMr J. 
W. Jessop, CBE, and Mrs 
Jessop, of Fhmham, Surrey. 

Ing A. P- F. D. M. Ricci 
and Miss D- L Janrett-Kerr 
The engagement is announced 
between Alberto, only son of 
Barone Ilindo Ricci and the late 
Baronessa Rjcd. of Rome. Italy, . 
and Diana (Dodiek only daugh- 
ter of Lieutenant-Cbionei C E. . 
Jarren-Kerr, MBE, and Mrs 
Jarreit-Kerr, of Shurdington, 
GlonceszershirB, 


Mr N. Street 
and Miss S. J. Traynor 
The engagement is announced, 
between Nigel second son of Mr 
and Mre P- R- Street, of 
BakewdI, Derbyshire, and Sa- 
rah Jane, daughter of the late Mr 
L. M. Traynor and of Mrs A. 
Travnor, of Sheffield, 
Ytwrfedhire. 


Mr R. Templeton 
and Miss B. S. Timlin 
The engagement is announced 
between Richard, son of the late 
Captain J. Templeton and of 
Mrs Templeton, of Radyr, Car- 
diff, and Belinda, daughter of 
Mr E. J. Timlin, of Hook 
Norton, Oxfordshire, and Mrs 
P. G. Mackesy, of Heyfhrop, 
Oxfordshire. 


Mr A. T. Wadsworth 
and Miss P. L. Rome * 

The engagement is announced 
between Armand, son of Mr and 
Mrs T. Wadsworth, of 
Kasterlee, Belgium, and Penny, 
only daughter ofMr and Mrs M. 
L, Rome, of Calcutta, India. 


Mr a A. Weafhesiake 
«ad Miss C L. DerHn 
The engraemem is announced 
between Brian, son of Mr and 
Mrs John Weatheriake, of 
Wargrave, Berkshire, and Cath- 
erine, daughter of Dr and Mrs 
Henry B. Devlin, of Fountain 
Hills, Arizona, United States. 


Diana, dder daughter of Mr 
David Brisco- Webb, of 
Johannesburg, and Mrs Anne 
Webb, of Zimbabwe. 


Marriages 


Mr G. J. Wcddowrs 
and the Hob Mrs A. Hartley 
The marriage has taken place 
quietly, between Mr Geoffrey 
Widdows, younger son of- Air 
Commodore and Mrs S.C 
Widdows, of St Peter Port, 


Leeds, of Hokby, North 
Yorkshire. 

Mr L Alabaster 
and Dr R. Hancock 
The maniage took place ora 
May 31, 1986, in Clifton Cathe- 
dral, Bristol, between Mr Jan 
Alabaster and Dr Rosemary 
Hancock. 

Mr S. J. Crowder 
and Miss S. B. Plowman 
The maniage took place on 
Saturday, June 7, at St Norbert's 
Church, Spalding, of Mr Ste- 
phen John Crowder, sob of ihe 
late Mr and Mrs John Crowder, 
of Fairfield, Liverpool, and Miss 
Susan Bernadette Plowman, 
only daughter of Mr and Mrs G- 
B. Plowman, of Spalding, 
Lincolnshire. Father Anthony 
Baxter officiated. 

The bride, who was given in 
marriage by her father, was 
attended by Miss Anne Fbtdds, 
Miss Elena O’Malley and Miss 
Caroline Plowman. Mr Andrew 
dements was best man. 

A reception was held at the 
home of the bride and the 
honeymoon is being spent in 
Greece. 

Mr R. L. Thomson 
and MBss R- A. Atchtey 
The marriage took place on 
Saturday, June 7, at St Mary-Ie- , 
Strand, London, of Mr Robert 
Lindsay Thomson, elder son of 
Mr and Mra Donald Thomson, 
of Burnley, Lancashire, and 
Miss Rosemary Amanda i 
Atchley, only daughter of Mr 
and Mrs Brian Atchley, of 
Epsom, Surrey. The Rev Ed- 
ward Thompson officiated. 

A reception was held al 
Middle Temple HaJL 

Dr R- S. Twymsn 
aid Miss J. C. White 
The marriage of Dr Roy 
Twymatf and Miss Joanna 
White took place last Saturday 
in St John’s Roman Catholic j 
Cathedral, Norwich. 



Latest wills 

Mr William Hubert ChIITs, JP, 
of Cheltenham. Gloucestershire, 
left estate valued at £1,498,674 
net After bequests to his staff, 
Cheltenham Ladies College, 
Cheltenham police and 
Gloucester prison, he left the 
residue to Sidcot School 
Winscombe, Avon, for new 
buildings and charitable 
purposes. 

Professor William Homan 
Thorpe , FRS, of Upwood, 
Cambridgeshire, a leading 
authority on comparative ethol- 
ogy, leu estate valued at 
£214,238 neL 


Royal Society 

The Council of the Royal 'Soci- 
ety has awarded the following 
medals for 1985: 

Copley medal: Sir Rudolf 
Peieiis, FRS; Rum ford medal: 
Sir Denis Rooke, FRS; Davy 
.medal: Dr A-G. Ogston, FR& 
Darwin medal; Professor J. 
Maynard Smith, FRS; Hughes 
medal: Professor M-M. 
Wooifton, FRS. 


Appointments 

Latest appointments indode: 
Mr LH. Davies 16 be a Circuit 
Judge on the South Eastern 
Circuit. 

The following to be recorders: 
Miss VJL Mairants -(South 
Eastern Circuit), Mr BX Cnl- 
fieid and Mr RJ. Scholcs 
(Nonhem Circuit), Mr. AXL 
Car file, QC, and Mr JL& Lew £1 
(Wales and Chester Circuit), 
and Miss MS Viner, QC 
(Western Grant). 

Mr Waiter E3.tis to be Economic 
Director of the National Eco- 
nomic Development Office id 
September; In succession to Mr 
Michael Posner, who is to be 
Secretary General of the Euro- 
pean Science Foundation. 


Royal 

of St 





died on June 7 at the age of 63. 

His most feroous film, Rpv- 
a t Family . which appeared tn 
19 S 9 , was the first television 
programme to give a rounded 
picture of the Monarchy and 
.©Her an intimate look at the 
Queen in bar domestic as wcu 
as her public life. . . 

As a result of his association 
with Buckingham Palace be 
was asked to produce the 
Queen's Christmas Day 
broadcast, and did so from 
1970 until last year. 

He was largely responsible 
for changing it fro® a 
speech to a more relaxed 
occasion, in 

Queen’s words would often be 
spoken over specially taken 
footage of members of the 
Royal family on and off duty. 

Cawston was born on May 
31, 1923, and educaiedal 
Westminster School and Oriel 
College, Oxford. He served in 
the Royal Signals during the 
Second World War, ending 
with the rank of major, and 
joined BBC Television in 
1947 as a film librarian. 

He quickly worked his way 
up to editor and in the early 
1950s be produced Television 
Newsreel before moving into 
documentary. 

He became one of the 
pioneers of the form, a master 
of the an of visual story-tefling 
ip which images were chosen 
and edited for maximum 
impact 

His first important film was 
a study of his own 
organisation called This Is the 
BBC, which ^ was first shown in 
2 959, and two years later be 
explored the wider aspects of 
the broadcasting medium in 
Television and the World. 

Other notable programmes 
included studies of The Law- 
yers and The Pilots, The 
Search For the Nile and The 



Life and Times of 
MountbattetL 

In 1977 he coUabomted 
with Sir Huw Wbridon on 
Royal Heritage, a major series 
on the royal art treasures 
which was shown in the year 
of the Queen's Silver Jubilee. 

His work won many nation- 
al and miernauonal awards, 
including the Italia Prize, and 
he was greatly admired among 
his fellow film makers for his 
prafessionalism and taste. 

From 1965 to 1979 he was 
BBC Television's head of 
documentary programmes 
and tinder hts leadership the 
department was responsible 
for developing new documen- 
tary techniques in such series* 


as The Tuesday Document an. 
Inside Story. Sailor and The 
Voyages of Charles Damn. 

He retired from the BBC in 
1979 to become a freelance 
film-maker and consultant, 
but continued to work on the 
Queen's Christmas broadcast 

Cawston. who was made a 
Commander of the Royal 
Victorian Order in 1972, is 
survived by his second wife, 
Andrea, and his sons, David 
and Timothy. 


GROUP CAPTAIN PETRUS HUGO 


Group Captain Petrus 
Hugo, DSO, DFC who has 
died at the age of 68 in South 
Africa, was a fighter pQot who 
served with distinction in the 
Battle of Britain, and after- 
wards in sorties against enemy 


rubber dinghy, shouting en- 
couragement to his squadron, 
still battling the Luftwaffe 
overhead. 

When Fighter Command 
went onto the offensive in 
1941, Hugo and his wing df 




lions bj which he became one 
of Fighter Command's ac- 
knowledged experts. 

Born in 1927, in Cape 
Province, he was educated at 
Witwatetsrand Technical Col- 
lege before- coming to Britain 
where he was commissioned 
in the RAF in 1939. - . 

He became one of the high 
scoring pilots of the Battle of 
Britain, being credited with 
over twenty kills by the end of 
the war, and won rapid pro- 
motion, to become a Group 
Captain at 25. 

Known to his comrades as 
“Dutch", Hugo was noted - 
even in that debonair compa- 
ny, which included his great 
compatriot, “Sailor” Malan— 
for his daring, and willingness 
to engage vastly superior num- 
bers of the enemy. 

Once, when shot down over 
the Channel, a few days after 
his wedding, be was found by 
foe rescue launch sitting in his 


I fTi- 1 


particularly effective against 
Axis shipping in the narrow 
seas, ana were credited with 
destroying or severely damag- 
ing thirty-five vessels. 

Later he look pan in fighter 
sweeps in the Mediterranean 
and North Africa where he 
commanded a Spitfire wing 
which claimed over 30G coin- 
bat victories. 

His drills and bravery 
gained him foe DSO. DFC 
and two Bars and he was also 
foe recipient of foe Croix de 
Guerre as well as being deco- 
rated by the United States. # 

In foe latter pan of foe war 
he was an instructor, 
specialising in training plots 
for attacks on shipping. 

After foe war he bought a 
farm os the Western slopes of 
Mount Kilimanjaro, but in 
1971 he was expelled from 
Tanzania without warning, 
and eventually returned to 
South Africa. 


MR H. E. FRANCIS 


Mr Hugh Hvet Francis, QC, 
a distinguished member or a 
formidable generation of 
Chancery silks, died on June 
7, aged 79. 

As a junipr he acquired a 
high reputation as a draftsman 
and conveyancer and was for a 
number of years one of the 
editors of foe legal classic, 
Lindley on Partnership. 

As a silk he was a forceful 
and determined advocate, the 
Welsh lilt which he never lost 
making him always attractive 
listening. 

Francis was born on March 
28, 1907, foe son of Maurice 
Evan Francis. He was educat- 
ed at Machynlleth County 
School, University College of 
Wales Aberystwyth, and ■ St 
John’s College, Cambridge, 
taking first class honours at 
both. 

He was called to the Bar 
(with a certificate of honour) 
by Gray’s Inn in 1932, practis- 
ing in foe capital and on the 


Wales and Chester CimriL 

During the Second World 
'War. he served in foe Royal 
Artillery and foe Judge Advo- 
cate General's department, 
being mentioned in 
despatches. 

He became a Bencher of 
Gray’s Inn in 1956 and Trea- 
surer in 1974. In I960 he took 
silk and was made Chancellor Jft' 
of the County Palatine .of 
Durham in 1969. 

Francis was he last holder of 
his ancient office which was - 
abolished by foe Courts Act of . 
1971. 

He chaired a- number of 
tribunals and committees, 
most notably foe committee ■ 
on foe Rent Ads. 

The committee, which re- 
ported in 1971, recommended 
that security of tenure should 
not be extended to tenants of 
furnished property. It was a 
recommendation that tenants' 
groups were to criticize as a 
“landlords’ charter”. if 


MR NORMAN AINSWORTH 


Mr Norman Ainsworth, 
MC, MRCS, who made one of 
the first research surveys 
which led to foe discovery of 
the importance of fluoride in 
foe prevention of dental car- 
ies, died on May 24, aged 91. 


Soon, mottled teeth, immu- 
nity from decay, and a high 
fluoride content of foe water 
were linked together. 

Ainsworth was appointed 
dental surgeon to the Royal 
Dental Hospital of London 



The 

offio 

St George 

PreNarsL 


IIOD- 

Mr John 

man. Mr Bnm 


teeth offois area had half foe Beefcake” 

OMMaml mtk ^-lUtKe epithet as ihe 


d^ay of teeth compared with wot* thing anybody 
other regions. to W” * yooGy 


ever did 











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T ‘ a t for & ^ 




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.:• ■••• li S* 

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II 1986 


Television 


THE ARTS 

The South Bank, post-GLC, is destined to be a centre of innovation: Paul Griffiths reports 

Bringing London’s music up to date 


have very definite ideas about what 
they want to do. In the autumn of 
! 988, which is the first period when 
they wfll be in effective control of 
programming, there is to be a 
festival of contemporary music to 
. include celebrations or Messiaen, 
Carter, Stockhausen and Steve 
Reich as well as, most ambitiously, 
the instant reprise of new works 
that will have been introduced at 
new music festivals (Sirasburg is 
already plugged in as a source, and 
obviously negotiations would also 
have. to be opened with Donau- 
eschingen, Metz and Venice). 

.. There are also to be festivals in 
thesame season devoted to Barttik 
(under . Solti), Strauss (under 
Ashkenazy) and Brahms and 


an endrof-the-pier _show of Tory-. Schoenberg (with Previn due to 
bashing, while things went on extend his repertory in an unlikely 

made the hails mainly as before. direction). Even before that, in 
Now that it has been awakened, 1 987-88, a new fece is to be brought 

however, the daemon of an artistic i 0 the smaller hails with a festival 
policy refuses to go back to sleep; of electronic music, while plans are 
and, where the GLC railed to make going ahead for the conversion of 
any fundamental change, their the QBH into an opera theatre, 
successors, the South Bank Board, ' with the promise of an adventur- 


review ■ AXAX t? AAA t> 

The brave new signs of ownership have very definite ideas about what ous repertory 

Within the BBC it is a nave all been obhteratpa -fipra the they want to do. In the autumn of Birtwisifegivt 

commonly held truth Drat the p 0 ™ ?ank, ted palm ihe 1 988, which is the first period when Covent Card 

only effective way for jnudue- longest shadow of tne-iate GLC has they will be in effective control of tioual Opera, 

ere to communicate with the £5* , to WL In the .old days the programming, there is to be a Opera and Oj 

management fc via the Duty the Queen Elizabeth festival of contemporary music to Sinfonietta. 

Log. Most producers reserve ™1 the Purcell Room were .include celebrations of Messiaen, One docs m 
this hot tine for their own ■l BSt boxes mto which th ings w ere Carter, Stockhausen and Steve Lariy limorou: 
programmes. Placing a hand- put orchestras and -managements Reich as well as, most ambitiously, ' stand a tittle ; 
kerchief over the -telephone, could hire them and then do pretty the instant reprise of new works ' the undertak 
pinching their noses and im- J°uch wanted. It was the that will have been introduced at Snowman, the 
' personating a lioence-payer GLCwbo decided there ought to be new music festivals (Sirasburg is of the South 
from Upper Swell, they tell the a PpKcy fertile haSs. But, though already plugged in as a source, and aware of the p 
poor Duty Officer time 'the *® r - interference - was roundly obviously negotiations would also • Revolution* 
programme they have just dej»loicd.-g Eurned opt to be of the have -to be opened with Donau- expensive: fu 

watched was othing short of a mudest cafe and craft-shops eschingen, Metz and Venice). from comme 

masterpiece and the sooner it grouted in' the foyers, there were .. There are also to be festivals in structural alte 
is repeated the better. This P erb2 PS a »* morc evenings the same season devoted to Bartdk and for esiabl 
information is typed oat and ' devotedto non-European cuimres, (under . Solti), Strauss (under ipu« c system, 
relayed next day to t fre gadfly ' g bd ferae gmnmcr there might be Ashkenazy) and Brahms and al bodies are 
Floor, whp treat it as a an end-of-the-picr show of Tray-. Schoenberg (with Previn due to when it com 
blueprint tor their summer things went on extend his repertory in an unlikely music here. T 

schedule (haring bone in mside the hulls mainly as before. direction). Even before that, in old (if never v 

min d fft nf repeat agreements ] Now that it has been awakened, 1 987-88, a new fece is lobe brought as a borne of c 

for a programme only last a however, the daemon of an artistic to the smaller halls with a festival will not, says 
specific time). In .l ime the policy refuses to go back to sleep; of electronic music, while plans are cbestras and c 
chickens ofUpper Swell cone and, where tbe GLC felled to mate going ahead for the conversion of arrange their s 
home to roost. any tundaineatal ramge, their the QEH into an opera theatre, operatic peifh 

For those who have sickest- successors, the South Bank Board, with the promise of an adventur- have to perfbr 

ed of. watching football — by " " * a' " 1 * 1 

now, I suspect most of the 
nation — last night was * low 
point- in the television calen- 
dar. About the only original 
programme on BBC! was 
Points of Frew.. Not that 
everything else was bad — or 
as bad — but it was recycled. 

The most charming repeat 
was The Home From (BBC1). 

Fondly produced by Francesca 
Kirby-Green, it was a record of 
how the small village of 
Apsley Guise coped, with the 
Second World War, What 
made it particularly riveting 
was Dkk Sxnfield's home- 
movie which was shown, forty 
years on, befrae the assembled 
communi ty. Watching the ihn- 
pid colour footage of these 
stalwarts as healthy children 
on VE Day was like flicking 
tiirongh a nation's family 
snaps. 

Among those who recog- 
nized thezryonnger selves was 
the lady of the manor, ah 
evacuee from London who had 
never Semi a rabbit, and a 

action. bondM Narrative power Nigel TenyfrighJ) with David de Keyser in Pm 

in friendship by the war. TTv^o+t*** 

Uniting them today was the 1 IlvflUC 

tangibly, aeaXiSwwS Fihiv Film, Film Prairie du cMen/ 

ins and wilting in fiut motfeiu asters meanwiufeare squab- « 

SEa^gera coming upon Shaw •: bhng over the timisting-new 1 he Shawl . 

Apsley Guise stew- doubt ‘ " ■ - star ofthanfite. Fatter 

treated to honey and - tea. ^ ^sonie • i ^ 
Castration was once tire fifeof ~ blanMbetwoh ShatespeaHte UpStkifS - 


ous repeilray fmm Monteverdi to 
Birtwistie pven in association with 
Covent Garden, the English Na- 
tional Opera, Giyndebourne, Kent 
Opera and Opera Factoty-London 
Sinfonietta. 

One docs not have to be particu- 
larly timorous or conservative to 
stand a tittle aghast al the scale of 
the undertaking, and Nicholas 
Snowman, tbe new artistic director 
of the South Bank Centre, seems 
aware of the problems. 

Revolutions, one suggests, are 
expensive: funds will be sought 
from commercial sponsors for 
structural alterations to the QEH 


which might be intriguing. The big 
orchestras, one goes on. win never 
agree: but here Snowman's experi- 
ence is interesting. 

The system is not, after all. to be 
so totalitarian as it might appear. 
Tbe byword is flexibility, and the 
various themes and festivals will 
not gobble up the whole schedule: 
there will be dates for orchestras to 1 
present their own programmes, 
though priority is going to pro- 
grammes that fit into the grand 
strategy. And, as it turns out,, the 
orchestras are not at all resistant to 
the Snowman scheme. The Phil- 
hanuonia, for instance, have found 


and for establishing an electronic- _ with iheir Mahler-Stranssaad posi- 


ipuric system, while foreign cultur- 
al bodies are expected to chip in 
whte it comes to bringing new 
music here. Tbe QEH wfll lose its 
old (if never very satisfactory) role 
as a home of chamber music: no.it 
will not, says Snowman, but or- 
chestras and quartets will have to 
arrange their schedules around the, 
operatic performances, and may 
have to perform within bits of set. 


Debussy series under Simon Rattle 
that there is an audience for 
intelligently planned concerts. 

Moreover, all the orchestras 
must have discovered that their 
repertory is being nibbled away 
from the past end by chamber 
orchestras and the “authentic” 
schooL It is now almost impossible 
for a large orchestra to play Bach or 
Handel, and tbetr opportunities to 


play Mozart and Haydn are declin- 
ing, partly because few soloists now 
want to play classical concertos 
with a big band in the Festival Hal], 
If they do not move a little further 
into tile twentieth century, they 
may find themselves eventually 
hemmed into the period from 
Brahms to Mahler. Perhaps that is 
why the LPO, not hitherto very 
radical in their programming, have 
come to Showman with the idea of 
a complete concert performance of 
Messiaen's St Francois d ‘Assise. 

What needs to be discovered is 
whether audiences win be similarly 
adventurous. Snowman's hard-line . 
modernist experience, with the 
Loudon Sinfonietta and then with 
Boulez’s Beaubotug research insti- 
tute. may appear daunting to 
people for whom music died 
around 1918, but in fact his 
experience proves that be has an 
ear for the new and vital, and that 
public confidence in contemporary 
music can be gained. No doubt 
there will still be larger audiences 
for Tchaikovsky than For Carter 



Nicholas Snowman, new artistic 
director on the South Bank: 
hard-line modernist experience 

one cannot expect modern music 
to offer the same satisfactions. But, 
since orchestras who played only 
Tchaikovsky would soon be play- 
ing him veiy poorly, the health of 
musical life in London can only be 
improved by a few humane shoves 
to counteract our seemingly innate 
lethargy. 



Donald Coapar 


jNMSVSS 

Narrative power: Nigel Terry . (right) with David de Keyser in Prairie du ekien 


Concerts 


Ameling/ Jansen 


St John’s/Radio 3 


To hear the soprano Elly 
Ameling and the pianist Ru- 
dolf Jansen at work in the 


French and German song 
repertoire is to observe two 
kindred musical spirits in 
unshateable alliance. The de- 


scription “instinctive”, or 
“telepathic” springs to mind. 
Bui that really only describes 
the illusion that the partners 
create; their artistry is actually 
the opposite of improvisatory. 
Every ' 
been 


according to a long-considered 
scheme. 


Just once in this lunch-hour 
of music-making did the two 




in Faure’s “Mandoline 


where Ameling needed more 


time for her ironic nuances technique im 
than Jansen, wittily imitating upper regisu 
the eponymous instrument “Fruhlingsgk 
with quick and spiky figure- the vocal ii 
lions, was prepared to allow. Fruhling” wi 
Elsewhere, however, the recit- of lone to po 
al was a triumph of rappon, and produci 
whether the duo were match- vibrato-less, 
ing a milky vocal legato to sound for ti 
languid keyboard arpeggios junge Nonne 
(as in Fault’s “Soir”) or 
maintaining tight ensemble 
through - the vivid pictorial 
Knm.bl' of Poulenc’s “D 

There is perhaps an element 
of compensation abonl “ f _. 


technique instead: floating the 
upper register effortlessly in 
“Frthlingsglaube”. infusing 
the vocal iine of. “Gott im 
Fruhling” with sudden gushes 
of tone to point up key words; 
and producing a haunting, 
vibrato-less, choirboy-like 
sound for the cries of “Die 


2 oi improvisatory, of compensation about 
le note wiBteve” Aoielin & s sophisticated and 
Ssl id ralouS! hnagmalive treatment of Lie- 
der. Her basic tonal quality 
does not readily supply the 
natural freshness that would 


In the Faurt and Poulenc 
groups she revealed more of 
her palette of colouration, and 
demonstrated once again her 
rare ability for seizing on the 
essence of these complex, 
sensuous songs and conveying 
it with serene assurance. Only 
Poulenc’s “Violon” seemed 
outside her emotional ran 
For all her game glissan 


liotuim iioimro uwi. vvuuiu t . . . __ 

ideally suit the group of ? ere ’. °“ . co ““. 001 rally 
Schubert “spring” songs with “SEE. 


works extraordinarily hard to gyP 7* Jld *“* fiddIe - 
entice the ear by superb Richard MomSOD 






Theatre 


those who stumW«f e:' .i tibe 
Afar warriors in the.Etfafcphm 
desert. J|fot however WfflBred 
Thesiger, who m ike? 5930s 
poked his swooping no« it 
this nomadic race. The Pun- 
ishing Tribes of Africa (Cnan- 
nel 4) sat him In the 
Travellers’ Onb and let Sim 
make some wry observations 
about his ancient journey. 
This was, juxtaposed, rather 
spuriously, I thought, with 


.tomf pnd flie so ap*paufc - leantinK ^ “ enoiigh)pn a ptrochime.”" / 

values David Matriet'sdaublebaijof 

- operating- ^ India's Hoby- pew receiving here its tyre, has Mr de 

weod the- play •' fa- entirely European preini€re, r is an. exer- fflore 

disapPoimEc^. Far too many rise in American chiaroscuro, charartenslvatify garnilous 
the bare bones .of King ^ daddy written. A Each plot hinges, curiously, on tf 1 ™ 

^ ear - ■ car accident is stagedcleveriy, the burning of an item of red finessing confidences^ out of. a 

A veteran procurer trades by the Dutch distriorUvS frinak apparel; both pioduc- 
to retne.rHis two elder dangh- C Postma; ted the appear- tions are enbvened ty short who wishes to get in 

ters convince him that they ance, stage left, of the nose- explosions of violence, either t0, i cft . WIt “. #e LSP eil S rK 
will ctery on the femily tradi- cone ofte Air India Boeing physical or verbal; and the part^mother. Wjth i a land of 
tfon, supplying what the pub- introduces an uncommon^ whole evening shows once SjUjf 
he wants to see, and he gives nic effect. again, the skill of the chafect b0Ta & 111 ? n ,, her . mat ^ al 


narrative provide the meat of 
the script, with the gin players’ 
laconic exchanges dovetailed 
in by way of counterpoint; the 
play itself chines over as an 
anecdotal short story of ihe 
period, even ending (boldly 
enough).on a punchline. 


St Johannes 


Passion 


Union Chapel 


Goetz Plage's excellent film of ^ wants to see, and be gives 
today's wilted community. Ur- them each a film studio. • It 


Lear. - 

A veteran producer derides 
to retire, flis two elder dangh- 


tion, supplying what the pnb- 


again.tbe ski 


shows once 
of the dialect 


gent commentary tried to im- 
pose on the present tribe some 
of their old savagery, implying 
that any man sitting frmocent- 


Tbe rare moments of par- 003011 Joan Washington. 


comes as no surpnse when tiie <jdy work best Zia Mohyed- Prairie dn chien, iprpecca- 
yonngest dangnto^tels rum din delivers his more sayable fcdy directed by Max Stafford- 
the films he has been makmg fijpes with the wftiplash of Cterk, devolves very late one 
for 40^years are reactionary authority, and Nrzwar Kiranj night in 19l0 on a train 


ly by his solpharous water- trash. “Tate her awayf” cries gives another of his attractive between Chicago and Duluth, 
hole was a threat to the lhe outraged rather, m one of (though not always clearly 00 one ride of the plush 

fhonlovV Wor liniv U T ot ' , . ■ .1 J II •• i, ,<• I • V- 


passing tourisfS genitais.. 

Nicholas 

Shakespeare 


. the play’s better lines. “Let her 
ideas be her dowry!” 

Off. she- goes to mate a 
documentary that wins a prize 


A MIDSUMMER NIGHT^I 


spoken) performances as the “parlor car” Michael Feast 
FooL He catches the irrepress- and Jerome Flynn are starting 
iblc cheek but not the pathos, their Nth hand of gin rummy; 
of course, becauseit isnot that on the other, Nigel Tcrcy is 
land of play. An attempt is favouring David de Keyser 
^ made to bring together, stage with a laborious and rather 
i performances and filmed epi- Poe-like story of infidelity, . 
sodes. This does not work m order and suicide; before 
either. tiic™ lies a boy, apparentiy 

Jeremy Kingston s only does Mr Ten-y's . 


Richard Eyre, - has Mr de 
Keyser : reuniting in - more 
characteristically garrulous 
form as a bogus clairvoyant 
finessing confidences out of. a 
rich bourgeoise (Connie 
Booth) who wishes to get in 
touch with her recently de- 
parted mother. With a kind of 
mellifluous hesitancy he 
homes in on her material 
quandary, whether to contest 
her mother's wiiL 
This is a finely crafted 
opening, scene, beautifully 
played, but. when it is fol- 
lowed by Mr de Keyser ex- 
plaining his gainful technique 
to the louche young man who 
shares his apartment (Michael 
Feast), much of the piece's sly 
allure evaporates. There fol- 
lows a thumpingly stagy se- 
ance whose outcome I shall 
not divulge, save to say that it 
owes something to the climax 
of the Claude Rains movie 
The Clairvoyant 

Martin Cropper 


to emphasize tbe chasm be- 
tween Christ (a fittingly 
terformance by Mi- 
nted Pilate (John 
Potter). In a generally undulat- 
ing melodic atmosphere the 
In a programme-note for his stark, rising scale that first 
l28JLwprfc. St Johannes. Pas- occurs in the courtroom dia- 
sion, the composer Arvo Part Iogne about “truth” and then 
requests “infinite patience” permeates Christ’s last 
from his audience. Certainly phrases has a chilling effect; 
■tins austere, deceptively . sim- and the gradual muting of the 
pin choral- rirnal demands (already dark) instrumental 
patience^ It- is an 80-minute colours, allied .to increasingly 
act of artistic self-denial which lengthy silences, also make a 
barely acknowledges the Latin profound impression 
text’s dramatic possibilities or British prexnifcre, di 

rected with appropriate devo- 
tional solemnity by Paul 
of the 19tfa or 18th. One is Hiilier, opened the Almeida 
reminded most_ of the unao- Festival, and a large audience 
compaiued, plain song-inflcct- ^ with unusual stillness 
ed Passions of the I7ih- 


century composer Heinrich 
Schutz. 


But the rewards for listeners 


are not infinitely postponed. 
The recurring minor-raoded 
cadentiai patterns; the slow- 
moving, unmetred rhythms; 
the restrained aptness of the 
note-against-note instnimen- 
tal counterpoints: all this 
quickly casts an hypnotic 
spelL 

In this rarefied atmosphere 
little details acquire large 
meaning. A slight change in 
the registration and texture of 
the important organ part 
(neatly played by Christopher 
Bowers- Broadben t) is enough 


throughout 
The Evangelist’s narrative 


is split by Plan between four 
voices, singing either alone or 
in different combinations. of 
astringent homophony: mem- 
bers of the Hilliard Ensemble 
struck the right vein of ascetic 
lyricism -here. Their music is 
enhanced by a quartet of 
instruments- (well -played by 
members of Capricorn) which 
are often employed singly, 
.providing . disarmingly . un- 
complicated echoes . of . the 
voices. Pain also makes limit- 
ed but telling use of a larger 
chorus, given bolder harmo- 
nies and framing the work 
with the most explicit emo- 
tional outbursts die composer 
allows. The chorus Western 
Wind (a new one to me) 
managed this with exemplary 
intonation and clarity. 


R.M 





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inster 
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20 


THE TIMES WEDNESDAY JUNE 1 1 1986 


VAT relief for 



sent overseas 

By Philip Webster, Chief Political Correspondent 
The Government is to stop is payable on goods donated 

for export, even though ex- 
ire relic 


charging value-added tax on 
goods sent overseas by 
charities. 

At present donations by 
traders of such items as shoes 
and dothes which are sent to 
relief organizations abroad at- 
tract VAT. . 

Mr Peter Brooke, Minister 
of State at the Treasury, 
announced the concession in'a 
letter last night to Mr Robert 
Hayward, Conservative MP 
for Kingswood. 

Mr Hayward had raised the 
case of a constituent a second- 
hand shoe dealer, who for 
many wars has sent thou- 
sands of pairs of shoes to 
Polish relief organizations but 
has had to pay VAT. 

The tax is not payable on 
goods donated for sale by 
charities established primarily 
for the relief of distress. But it 


ports themselves are relieved 
of VAT. 

Mr Brooke told Mr Hay- 
ward that he accepted there 
was an anomaly in the law. He 
went on: “The zero rating of 
goods donated for sale by a 
charity established primarily 
for the relief of distress will 
now be extended to goods 
donated for export by such- a 
charity.” 

Customs and Excise was. 
unable to say last night how 
much was collected each year 
in VAT on such goods. • 

But Mr Hayward said: 
“This is a marvellous step 
forward for people and firms 
who send clothes and other 
goods to relief organizations 
for floods and disasters. It is a 
most welcome move by the 
Government" 


Thatcher and Kinhock 
clash on BA choice 


Continued from page 1 

While ministers are unwill- 
ing to speculate on what 
would happen if BA did buy 
American, some of them be- 
lieved that the Government 
would be forced to intervene 
to prevent that happening. 
Some Conservative back 
benchers believe it unthink- 
able that the Government 
would allow Rolls-Royce to 
lose the order when it is 
committed to privatize the 
company some time next year. 

The political controversy 
will grow today when Rolls- 
Royce. led by their chairman 
Sir Francis Toombs, give evi- 
dence before the House of 
Commons select committee 
on trade and industry. 

BA plans to replace up to 20 
of its ageing 747 aircraft by the 
end uf the decade with the new 
Boeing 747 - 400 capable of 
flying 8.000 miles nonstop 
and the choice of power unit 
will be crucial to the fleet's 
operating costs. 

The choice is between the 
GE CF6 - 80C2 and the R - R 
RB2U-524D4D. both new 
technology, highly fuel-effi- 


cient engines. Replacement of 
BA's TriStar jets by the end of 
the 1 980s could mean that the 
total order for engines could 
. be worth £700m. 

Mrs Thatcher appeared , to 
some MB to be hinting that 
the . Government would not 
stand by when she said in the 
Commons that after BA had 
considered . the evaluations 
and decided how many air- 
craft they’ wished to acquire 
they would have to put their 
proposals before the Secretary 
of State for Transport, Mr 
John Moore, for approval. * * 

Mr Kinnock told her she 
should be much more forth- 
right and positive to ensure 
that the interests of Rolls- 
Royce, its workers and tech- 
nologies were properly safe- 
guarded. ■ • 

- Asked by Mr Kinnock 
whether she was going to “bat 
for Britain" Mrs Thatcher 
replied: “Yes, but you do not 
bat for Britain by protecting 
industries. You bat for Britain 
by backing industries which 
win on merit." 





"•NiW £ ■ 

v A resident of the devastated KTC squatter camp outside Cape Town, part of Crossroads, surveying the nuns of his home destroyed in the fighting. 


20,000 township homeless 


Continued Irani page X 

injured in landmine explosions 
on two farms near the town of 
Volksrnst 

The violence in Crossroads 
broke out around lunchtime as 
the police used tear gas and 
birdshot to drive young mili- 
tants, known as “comrades," 
off a ridge overlooking the 
settlement. They had lined up 
there opposite conservative 
vigilantes, whose white arm 
and head bands have earned 
them the name whdoeke (white 
cloths). 

The renewal of tbe interne- 
cine warfare in Crossroads on 
Monday and yesterday bas 
halted the relief operation 
mounted by tbe St John 
Am balance and the Red Cross 
for die estimated 30,000 refu- 
gees from the first boot of 
fighting last month in which 
44 people died. 

The Urban Foundation, a 


private business lobby group, 
last night joined MPs of tbe 
Progressive Federal Party, the 
official opposition in the white 
chamber of Partiament, in 
railing for a judicial commis- 
sion of inquiry into the Cross- 
roads violence ami allegations 
of police support for the 
vigilantes. 

The p arliame ntary deadlock 

over the two security Bills, the 
Public Safety Amendment Bill 
and the Internal Secsrhy 
Amendment Bill, means that it 
Is now virtually certain that 
they cannot be passed by Jane 
16, the tenth anniversary of 
tbe 1976 Soweto uprising, 
when widespread disturbances 
are expected. 

The Government is under- 
stood to have warned Indian 
and Coloured MPsthat a state 
of emergency would have to be 
declared if the Bills were not 
passed this week. 


The crisis came to a head at 
a meeting yesterday of the 
joint standing committee of the 
white, Indian and Coloured 
chambers at which the Minis- 
ter of Law and Order, Mr 
Look Le Grange, refused to 
amend the Bills in any signifi- 
cant way. 

The Bills would give the 
police even wider scope for 
summary arrest and detention 
than at present, and enable Mr 
Le Grange to assume the 
equivalent of emergency pow- 
ers in any part of the country 
deemed an “unrest area". 

The other journalists in- 
jured yesterday were Mr Pat- 
ride DwsumI, a photographer 
working for the French agency 
SIP A, and Mr Bert van Hees, 
a reporter for a South African 
newspaper, who was shot in 
the arm by a sniper. 

Crossroads tragedy, page 9 


Hopes for cheaper 
mortgages recede 


Continued from page 1 

ter has rejected EMS member- 
ship before, tbe liming of her 
latest statement is highly sig- 
nificant. The Chancellor, Mr 
Nigel Lawson, and the Foreign 
Secretary, Sir Geoffrey Howe, 
have been pushing for mem- 
bership. and there is a clear 
Cabinet majority in favour. 

But it is recognized that entry 
beyond this summer will be 
difficult because general elec- 
tion pressures could then start 
to affect the pound. 

Over the weekend, the Insti- 
tute of Directors said that 
Britain should time her EMS 
entry to coincide with the 
assumption of the EEC presi- 
dency. on July 1. 


There has been much talk of 
impending EMS membership 
in the money markets. Mrs 
Thatcher's rejection helped 
the pound to gain two pfen- 
nigs to DM3.37 against the 
mark. 

The poor money supply 
figures, while hitting immedi- 
ate interest rate hopes, may 
also expose policy differences 
between the Bank of England 
and the.Treasury. 

The Treasury said yesterday 
that there was no reason to 
suppose that monetary condi- 
tions are lax, pointing to a £1 .7 
billion erratic item in the 
figures. Bank lending, which 
also increased by £1.7 billion, 
rose at a dower pace than over 
the previous six months. 


Children’s 
aspirin 
sales are 
banned 

Continued from page 1 
ami brain, and can produce 
permanent dr* 1 "*!** 

In Britain there are annual- 
ly between three and seven 
cases per million children aged 
under 16. Althoagh tbe Alness 
is sometimes managed - suc- 
cessfully in hospital, the dea A 
rate has been abeat 50 per 

cent. 

Dr Acheson said: “We get 
about SO cases a year in 
Britain, and only a few of those 
are believed to be due to 
aspirin. Evidence in Ibis coun- 
try and the United States 
points to aspirin as one possi- 
ble contributory factor." 

Tbe first indication of an 
association between aspirin 
and the disease came from 
American studies . between 
1989 and 1982. Subsequently, 
the American Food and Drag 
Administration and mannlac- 
tarers warned parents not to 
give the preparations to chil- 
dren and teenagers with influ- 
enza or chicken pox. 

Consequently, the amount 
of aspirin taken for children's 
ailments has dropped signifi- 
cantly. More important, the 
incidence of Reye’s syndrome 
was cut by more than halt 
between 1984 and 1985, from 
033 per 100,000 aged under 
18 (204 cases reported) to 0.15 
per 100,000 (or 91 cases). 

When that information was 
compared with a new study 
completed in Britain by the 
Paediatric Association and the 
Public Health Laboratory Ser- 
vices Communicable Diseases 
Surveillance Centre, covering 
229 cases in the British Isles 
In fonryears between 1981 and 
1985, die medicines committee 
decided to act. 

There are important differ- 
ences in the pattern of tbe 
disease between Britain and 
foe US. The age at which it 
occurs in Britain is much 
. lower; the median age of 
patients in Britain is 14 
months, and. 93 per cent of 
cases are in children aged 
under 12. 

Mr Jack Ashley, the La- 
bour MP for Stoke-on-Trent 
Sooth, said that Mr Norman 
Fowler, Secretary of State for 
Health and Social Services, 
should be called to account for 
his failure to take earlier 
action. 


THE TIMES INFORMATION SERVICE 


Today’s events 


Royal engagements 

The Queen opens the new 
medical precinct of The Royal 
College of Physicians, St. 
Andrew's Place. Regent's Park, 
330. 

The Duke of Edinburgh 
presents the Royal Association 
of British Daily Fanners 1985 
Prince Philip Award and Certifi- 
cates of Merit. Buckingham 
Palace. 10: and later visits 
Cambridge University to confer 
Honorary Degrees. 12.40. 

Queen Elizabeth The Queen 
Mother attends the anniversary 
performance of The Rambert 
Ballet Sadlers Wells. 7.25. 

The Prince of Wales visits the 
Pelcnna Mountain Centre. 
Neath. West Glamorgan. 10.05: 
and the Community Pro- 


gramme; BP Oik Uandarcy, 
Neath, 10.50: then, accompa- 
nied by The Princess of Wales, 
he performs the opening cere- 
mony of the modernised strip 
mill .at the British Steel 
Corporation's works. Port Tal- 
bot. 1.25; and later they attend a 
concert at the Barbican Centre, 

7.25. 

TTie_ Princess of Wales opens 
the Princess of Wales Hospital, 
Bridgend, Mid Glamorgan, 

10.25. 

Prince Andrew opens the 
Imperial War Museum's new 
"superhanger", Duxford, 
Cambridgeshire. 11.30. 

Princess Anne opens the 
European headquarters of 
Amdahl Corporation. 
Dogmersfield Park, Hartley 
Wiiuncy. 1 1: and later, 'as 
President, the Riding for the 
Disabled .Association, visits the 


The Times Crossword Puzzle No 17,069 


This puzzle wus solved within 30 minutes by 38 per cent of the 
ineham regional final of the Collins 
Championship. 


competitors in this years Birmi, 
Dictionaries Times Crossword ' 



ACROSS 

I Fish from a rod (5). 

4 One of those heard o'er the 
lea. example of a small type 
(5.4). 

9 7t. say. is very exact (9). 

10 Dull cheer-leaders for such a 
sporting competition! (5). 

11 Sound French article cut (6). 

12 Crumbs! Svengali has gone 
mad! (SI. 

14 Describing Pythagorean 
theorem subsequently in 
examination (10). 

16 Roman author of "The Full 
Moon and Sixpence"? (4). 

19 Statesman's tug (41. 

20 Boat people look inside fora 
gourd (5-5). 

22 Standard means for churn- 
ing cheese (8). 

23 The captain stands here, 
where glasses are kepi (6). 

26 Potential seed finds free 
love around university (5). 

27 Dropping punishment 
involving an awful jerk (9). 

28 Brother changed forenames 
(9). 

29 Lets rip in front of society 
<5|. 

DOWN 

1 Work that is blocking the 
floor (9). 

2 Vaughan Williams's piece of 
orchestral phantasy (5). 

3 Main route to Scotland, 
though it takes longer (4.4). 

4 Circle Line? (4). 


5 Lost opportunity with exam 
questions — scrap the an- 
swer (5,5). 

6 Expel Burner's form (6). 

7 Cracked anvil tone of 

extraordinary volume (4-5L 

8 Characteristic spirit and en- 
ergy initially needed by 
Thomas the contractor (5). 

13 Foot-long skeleton of Suma- 
tra set in order (JO). 

15 Hidden underground in case 
it is blown up (5.4). 

17 Hairy, like Byron as 

acquaintance? (9). 

18 Motorway turning right is 
hardly the thing (8). 

21 Deliver ransom (6). 

22 Penny, on the tiles, is tight 
(5L 

24 The way our brains go 
empty? (5). 

25 Measure of the catch for 
which many dashed (4). 

Solution to Puzzle No 17,068 



■IH'SIFiHiElRlPl 

Concise Crossword, page 14 


Andover Group, Andover, 
Hampshire. 230. ' 

Princess Margaret opens the 
Grosvenor House Antiques 
Fair. 2.50. 

Princess Alice; Duchess of 
Gloucester, visits London 
House for Overseas Graduates, 
Mccklen burgh Sq, London. 
4.30. 

The Duke of Gloucester at- 
tends the Fellowship of 
Engineering's annual soiree, Na- 
tional Institute of Agricultural 
Engineering, Wrest Park, Silsoe, 
Beds- 7.30. 

The Duchess of Gloucester 
attends the Computer Industry 
charity bafl. The Hilton Hotel, 
7.55. 

The Duke of Kent opens 
Southampton University’s 
Chilwonh Research Centre, 11; 
and later attends a reception for 
the Secretary of State for Trade 
and Industry, Queen Elizabeth 
II Conference’ Centre, Broad 
Saniuary. Westminster. 6.45. 

The Duchess of Kent attends 
a lunch in aid of the MacIntyre 
Foundation, the Manion House. 
12.45. 

Prince Michael of Kent dines 
with the Royal Naval Reserve 
Officers Cub. Tbe Nava] Club, 
Hill St. Wl. 8. 

New exhibition 

The Art of the Architect: 
Treasures from the RIBA's 
Collection; Newcastle Poly- 
technic Gallery. Library -Build- 
ing. Sandyford Rd; Mon to 
Thurs 1 0 to 6. Fri and Sat 10io4 
(ends July II). 

Last chance to see 

Sculpture by Patrick Crouch: 
Trinity Arts Centre. Church Rd. 
Tanbndge Wells; 10 to 2.30. 
Music 

Concert by the Halle Or- 
chestra: De Montford Hail. 
Leicester. 7.30. 

Organ recital by Allan Wicks; 
Holy Trinity Church, Folke- 
stone. 730. 

Concert by the Wacrmland 
Ensemble, Sweden; Coventry 
Cathedral. 1. 

Organ recital by Marjorie 
Bruce: St Andrew ana St 
George. George St, Edinburgh. 

Recital by the Alexandra 
String Quartet: Pump Room, 
Bath. 7.30. 

Leominster Festival: Early 
Music and Dance with the 
Aldwyn Consort of Voices. 
Passa mezzo Early Dance Group 
and the Leominster Early Music 
Consort: Priory Church, Leom- 
inster 730. 

General 

Discovery day for the handi- 
capped: Civic Hall and 
Blackshots Playing Fields, 
Grays Essex, 10 to 8. 


The pound 


AustrafiaS 
Austria Sell 
BatgtumFr 
Canada $ 
Danmark Kr 
Finland Mfcfc 
Frame Fr 
Germany Dm 
Greece Or 
Hong Kong S 
Inland Pt 
Italy Lira 
Japan Van 
Nottiertonds CM 
Norway Kr 
Portugal Esc 
South Africa Rd 
Spain Pta 
Sweden Kr 
Swttzartand Fr 
USAS 

Yugoslavia Dm 


Bank 


24.40 

71.70 

2.17 
1230 

US 

11.09 

1495 

21000 

12.05 

1.18 
2390JJ0 

285.00 
332 

11.90 

232.00 
4.70 

22230 

11-31 

288 

1.575 

58030 


Bank 

Sons 

215 
iMn 
67.90 
207 
1225 
“ 7.75 
1254 
2315 
20200 
11J5 
1.10 
227000 
25100 
273 
114 0 
22140 
290 
W.0O 
HUB 
273 
1.505 

540-00 


Ralafl Price Mas 38&3 

London: TTm FT Index dosed down 15.1 

at 1314.4. 


TV top ten 


Natkmaltoptm i i i i B Htte p io fl ranHnaBin 

the weak andng June i : 

BBC 1 

1 EastEndCfS fThure/San) 2030m 

2 Ea3tEhdere{ruM/Sun)ia25m 

3 News and Weather (Sun 21.-15) 
1235m 

4 That’s Ufa 1230m • 

5 Mastermind 1Q90ni __ 
i-l&effifn 

. , io.4fjm 
Great and Small 

1020m 

9 Dallas lO.OOn 

10 News, sport and Weather (Sat 
215Q) 16Hfcn 

nv 

1 Lhw and Let Die ttv 1465m 

2 Coronation Street [Wad) Granada 
1420m. 

3 Coronation Street (Mon) Granada 
1335ai 

4 World Cw 86* Itv 11 20m 
Tains of i 


o Masmnnm iimwi. 

6 Cagney and Lacay-Hu 

7 Dynasty n^thaGbbys’ 

8 Ai Creatures Greet 


’ 1030m 


the Unexpected Angle 


Emnwntate Farm (Tubs) Yorkshire 
10.80m 

7 Crossroads (Wad) Central 10.70m 

8 Crossroads (Tubs) Central 10.85m 

9 Crossroads (Thurs) Central 10.40m 
10 Alfred Hitchcock Presents (Sun) Itv 

1020m 


1 Page 3 Gils 535m 

2 MoontWittrg 5.05m 

3 A Very Peculiar Practice 4JS0m 

4 Your Lite in Their Hands 430m 

5 MAS H330m 

6 Gardeners’ World 3.70m 

7 Cricks* (Mon 1530) 345m 

8 Open Space 3.10m 

9 The V I P's 3.10m 

10 A ChafiengeFbr Robin Hood 230m 

Channel 4 

1 Written On tha Wind 535m 

2 Brookstde (Tuea/Sot) 5.H5tn 

3 Brookstde (Mon/Sat) 530m 

4 Pans. Texas 3.70m 

5 Cheers 3.55m 

6 Who Dares Wms 325m 


10 MOion DoUarMarmaU 290m 

DUMmHJH IHWWW IW iUVfUdyu 

weekly figures for audiencas at peak 
times (with figures far parenthesis 

showing tha reaoi - the number of people 

who viewed tor at leas! Hires minutes}: 

BBC1: Breakfast Time: Mon to Fri 

13m (73m) 

TV-am: Good Mon ting Britain Man to Fri 
23m (11.1m) Sat 23m (5 3m) 

Sunl.On 

Broadcasters' Audwnce Research Board. 


Roads 


The Midlands Ml; Road- 
works continue between junc- 
tions 15 (A308) and .16 (A45); 
contraflow. MS: Mqjor' road- 
works between junctions 4 
(Bromsgrove) and 5 
(Droitwicbh contraflow. A5: 
Traffic reduced to a single 'lane 
ai Weston Under Lizard, E of 
Telford; temporary lights. 

Wales and West MS: Road- 
works between junctions 23 and 
24; N and southbound outside 
lanes dosed. M<fc Lane restric- 
tions between junctions 2) and 
22 (Severn Bridge); delays ex- 
pected. A3& N and southbound 
lane dosures on the Plymouth 
to Exeter road and the Ivybridge 
to Ashburton Rd. 

Tbe North: M6: Rebuilding 
work on concrete section be- 
tween junctions 32 and 33; both 
carriageways affected at dif- 
ferent times. M63: Major 
widening scheme at Barton 
bridge. Greater Manchester; 
various traffic restrictions until 
June 20; avoid if possible. A49: 
Work in connection with 
construction of Tarporley by- 
care required N and S of 


5cotbu»LM9: Roadworks be- 
tween Pirnhall and Kinnaftri; 
inside lane on both carriageways 
dosed. Glasgow: Southbound 
carriageway closed on 
Berryknowes Rd between 
Carham Drive and Kingsland 
Drive; two way northbound. 
A95: Roadworks and 

consiructin work one mile east 
of Gran ton on Spey for approxi- 
mately one -mile. 


Parliament today 


Commons (2.30): Motions on 
social security benefits. Finan- 
cial Services Bill, progress on 
remaining stages. 

Lords (2.30): Gas Bill, 
committee, seventh day. 



Times Portfolio GoM rules are as 
ftriiowv 

1 Timm PortfoUa Is free. P u rc ha se 
of The Tiroes ts not a condition of 
uking pan. 

2 Times Portfolio list compri se s a 
group of public comp a nies whose 
shares are listed on the Stock 
Exrhaiw and quoted In The Times 
Stock Exchange prtew pone. The 
compantei comprising that Ira will 
change from day to day. The. list 
(wfifcn ts numbered 1 -45 j is divided 

mio lour randomly distributed groups 

of H shares. Every Portfolio card 

contains two number, from each 

group and each card contains a 

unique set of numbers. 

5 Times portfolio -dlv-Mcmr win be 
the figure tn pence which represents 
me optimum movement to prices u.*?. 
tne lamest increase or lowest km) of a 
comblnaben of eMtii (two from each 
randomly muribufedgnxip within the 
44 shares) of the 44 shares which on 
any one day compose The Tiroes 
Portfolio list. 

4 The dal Is' dividend will be 
announced each day and the weekly 
dividend win be announced each 
Saturday in The Times. 

5 Times Portfolio list and details of 
the daw or weekly dividend will also 

be available for inspection at Die 

offices of The Times. 

6 If the overall price movement of 
more man one combination of shares 
equals the dividend, the pmr will be 
eoually divided among the claimants 
holding mow comtanaUara of shares. 

7 All claims are sub 

before payment. . 

card nun is defaced. - 

Incorrectly printed In any way win be 
declared void. 

8 Employees of News international 
pic and its subsunancs and of 
Europnm Croup Limned (producers 

and distributors of me cant). .or 

members of their Immediate fsmMHes 

9 All kuntcipanH will be suoiect to 
these Rules. AM insiructtons on "how 
to play" and “how le <saim“ whether 

unbUMiifi in The Tunes, or in Times 

Portfolio cards will be deemed to be 
part cl tnesc Rules, tiw Editor 
reserves the right to amend me Rules. 

10 In aav dispute. The Editor's 
decision ts final and no correspon- 
dence win be entered into. 


re subject to scrutiny 

Any Times Portfolio 
ced. tampered with or 


11 R for any reason. The Times 
Price* .Page is. not nubittied to the 
normal way Times Portfolio wot be 
suspended Tor mat day. 

Hot* um - Otety DMdaMl 

On each day your unique set or right 
numbers will represent commensal 
and Industrial shares published In The 
Timm Portfolio USI which win appear 
on Ihe stock exchange Prices page. 

In the columns provided . next to 
your shares note the price change C+ 
or >- to pence, as published to that 
day’s Times. 

Alter llaong the price changes of 
vour mi snares for that day. add up 
all eight share changes lb give you 
your ov eran total plus or irtfnus (+ or - 

Check your overall total against The 
Times Portfolio dividend punched on 
the stock Exchange Prices page. 

_IT your overall lotoi moieties The 
Times Portfolio dividend you have 
won outright or a share of the total 
prize money stated for mat day and 
must claim your prize as Instructed 
below. 

Portfolio total 

Add these together to dMermtiM 
your weekly Portfotto total. 

if vour. utal matches the published 
weekly dividend figure y ou ha ve won 
autnont or a snare or the prize money 
slated for that week, and roost cuun 
your prize as instructed below. 

MW to t lMkm 

HO atoms can bs K cspm fl — 


You must have your card with you 
when you telephone. . 

If. you are unaUe ***&£* 


someone «*m> can culm on your 
gaTd Ol . 

daima line 


tojriHcjrmwt have our card and can 


The 

between we 

foMailure^^jort™ ctoJmSjofflar 
for any iokm within the anted 
hours _ 

The " above' instruction* are ap - 
plicable to both A mt weekly 
dividend debus. . 


Weather 
forecast 


nufl^ROfkTISWm^ Odd ^ ^ oSESft 


A depression to the N of 
Scotland will move away 
slowly N^ and fitt. ’ A 
further small , low will 
move across SW areas. 

6 am to midnight . 

London, SE. E, ce ntral N, NE 
England, East AngKa, MHtandK 
Sunny periods and isolated show- 
ers: wind W to SW, Sght to 
moderate,, becoming variable; max 
tamp 17C (63F). 

Central S, SW England, Channel 
(stands, S Wales: Rather doudy 
rain in places, dealing later; wind 
SW, backing S to SE f ' 
moderate; max tamp 16C (6 
(W Eni ’ 



N Wales, NW . 

District, Isle of Man, 
Edinburgh, Dundee, SW 
Glasgow, Central Highlands, 
Northern Ireland: Sunny Intervals 
and scattered showers; wind W to 
SW, light to moderate, becoming 
variable; m 


max temp 15C (59FV. 
Misraeen, Moray Firth, NE Scot- 
land. Orkney. Cuudy with out- 
breaks of rain, clearing slowly from 
S: wind W to NW, fresh to strong, 
decreasing later; max tamp 12C 
(54F). 

Argyfi, NW Scotland: Sunny inter- 
vals. scattered showers; wind NW, 
.fresh, decreasing later; max temp 
13C (55F). 

Shetland: Cloudy, with outbreaks 
of rain; wind BgW variable becoming 
W to NW, fresh; max temp 12C 
(54FJ. 

Outlook f or tomorrow and Friday: 
Cloudy with soma rain tomorrow, 
although only small amounts in the 
S. Dry with sunny Intervals on 
Friday. Becoming warmer to the S 



9.17 pm 


Mood suck Moon rises: 
1214 am 738 am 
First quarter: June 15 


Anniversaries 


Births:' Ben Jenson, London. 
1572; John Constable, East 
Beigholt, Suffolk. 1776; Mrs 
Humphry Ward, novelist, Ho- 
bart' Town* Tasmania, 1851; 
Richard Straws, Munich; 1864. 

Deaths George 1 (reigned 
1 714-27), Osnabmck, Germany, 
1727; Sir John Franklin, ex- 
plorer, King William bland, 
1847; Alexander Keren * 
revolutionary. New York, 1 


Tower Bridge 


Tower Bridge will be raised 
today ai 8 am, 1 1.20 am. 5.45 
pm and again and 6.15 pm. 


- - — _ . — - — . LI MIT ED . 

by London Post (Print- 
ers) Limited of 1 Virginia Street. 
London El 9XN. Wednesday. June 
I1.1S B6. ft H te nd as a newspaper 




High Tides 


b-w™ JtoWus c- 

SdpOMT B*. 


cloudy: o-pvercasL Ho* 
ttaiL miswntsU r-raln: 
uumd^ntorm: n-shqwgrs. 
Arrow* show ' 
speed anew 
centuradr. - 


vrind direction, 'wtnd 
circled. Temperature 


TODAY 

AM 

HT 

PM 

HT 

London Bridge 

453 

6.6 

533 

66 


4.11 

33 

453 

3.7 

Avomnoutli 

10.17 

113 

1035 

11.4 

Belfast 

2.03 

33 

23/ 

23 

CanSff 

1032 

1U.5 

10.10 

106 

Dewonpott 

051 

4.7 

9.00 

49 

Dovnr 

1.48 

6.U 

2.W 

61 


&2t 

45 

630 

4.7 

Glasgow 

Haisnch 

330 

2.45 

4.6 

07 

4,06 

259 

43 

3.7 

nomm 

1.10 

9.13 

8.1 

63 

136 

9.47 

43 

64 

Ilhaco-o* 

931 

OO 

9.13 

8.1 

iMtfa 

533 

43 

636 

43 

liMKWtol 

230 

83 

234 

83 

Lowcalott 

1235 

2.1 

12.20 

23 

■ SSwgaS® 

2 Wl 

44 

339 

44 

-NHondHavaa 

9.18 

6.1 

932 

63 

Nempiny 

839 

61 

834 

83 

Oban 

R51 

33 

04/ 

35 


753 

47 

633 

45 


955 

15 

1032 

1.7 

Portamerth 

2.12 

4.1 

2.48 

41 

■ Sboretam 

1 £0. 

S5 

235 

.55 

Soutbampfeai 

135 

4.1 

2.12 

4.1 

Twin anil 

939 

02 

939 

63 

Tees 

639 

43 

712. 

4.7 

Wlton-on-Nzo 

041 

33 

2.47 

35 


Around Britain 


Lighting-iip time 

London 247 pm to 4.13 arA 
Bristol 936 pmto 423 aw - 
Edinburgh 1028pm to 337 sm . 
Manchester 1007 pm to 4.10 am 
Penzance 10.01 pm to 442 am 

Yesterday 

Temperatures at midday yesterday: c, 

dowf. I. teto r, raft 2 sun- p 

Belfast r 948 Guernsey 5 1355 

f 1559 tmrenwss r 745 

1 1355 Jwrey 11559 
f 1355 London 11661 

OtMt f T35S M’nchster 11254 

EdriMfe r 846 Newcastle r 1254 

Glu gow r 745 fMdsway r 1152 


Sun Ram 
bra In 

EAST COAST 
Scsrtwro 4 A 32 

SridEngton 1.6 - 

Cromer 83 

Lowestoft 7.1 - 

Clacton . 4.1 - 

Ma r gate 9 A 

SOUTH COAST 


Max 
C F 

20 68 cloudy 

19 66 cloudy 

20 88 bright 

18 64 bright 
17 68 sunny 
20 68 sunny 


Sun Rain Max 
his in C F 

.7 .32 17 63 

Tarty - 30 13 S5 

CoJwyn Bay 23 .05 18 64 

4.7 33 18 61 

3.7 .48 14 57 



BIGLAND Alto WALES 
London 1.7 
BTiam Airpt 
Bristol (CM 
Cardiff (Cm] 


231.11 
23 39 


Nottfntfwn 

NPctFn-Tfoe 



SCOTLAND 


14.1 

Gueimey 132 
WEST COAST 
Seay Mac 13 
Nnferttf 


Presto** 
Ghunnw 
Tire® 
Stornoway 
. Lerwick 
Wirt 
ramose 
Aberdeen 
St. Andrew 
EfCMwgh 


43 34 
3 M 
3 .75 
.1.7 ,30 
73 .14 
7.7 .07 


13 55 
16 61 
17 63 
13 55 
9 48 
12 54 

17 S3 
20 68 

18 64 


rain 

cloudy 

ram 

rain 

rain 

rain 

she* wars 

bright 

bright 


14 57 sunny 

15 59 ran 


63 .14 
83 .12 18 64 bright 


HORTHStN IRELAND 
Belfast 53 35 


16 61 showers 


H»sa are Monday's figures 


Abroad 


MIDDAY: & doud: d. drizzle: f. t 

C F 

5 22 72 Cotonw s 
t 28 82 tTptSgn s 
I 32 90 Corfu r 
8 25-77 Oubln r 




(g. fog; r. rain: s, sun; sn, snow; t thunder. 

F C F C F 

75 Majorca 6 23 73 RonW a 23 73 
a 24 75 Safebug a 25 77 
66 Malta s 13 55 S Fftsco* 

0 12 54 Santi a g o- c 13 55 

1 23 73 8 Paolo* f 23 73 

f 31 88 Seoul I 29 84 

* 24 IS StegTpor f 31 88 
8 21 70 Srabobn s 21 70 

5 2B 79 Stnnb-rg s 25 77, 
a 22 72 Sydney I 16 fit* 
c 21 70 Toigter 1 S3 73 ! 
s 27 81 Tetaviv s 33 9t„ 

6 41106 Tenerife f 23 TS? 

* 26 79 Trttyd* S 25 77 1 

> 23 73 Toronto* s 20 68 ‘0 
C IS 5B.Titofa s 24 75 
1 24 75 Valencia s 24 75? 
B 32 90 Vbnc'ver I 18 8* i 
C IB 61 Venice s 24 75 T 
« 21 70 Km e 22 72; 

i ? 45 wanew s 20 68 ■ 
f 24 76 WasbTon* S 29 84 > 
S 21 70 W ar n ton r 13 55 » 

„ . . a 41106 Ztetch s 34 76 f 

figures are lalaai avaUabie 


72 
77 

73NriroU 
18 64 Nnlee 
29 84NO«W 
75.Mrortr* 
75 Mm 
SB Oslo 
57 Parts 
s 35 95 Peking 
f 21 ~ — “■ 

























iS 


WEDNESDAY JTJNE- M 1986 


THE 


p mmm. 


TIMES 


. ‘ ■ J, 9 Uipfc ^ 

!fcv 

-■ysS 

:v 5 'SS. 


■■ "';™ a •*,' 

■—-,r p,ria w 

■x^Ai 

• - “*vase ~ *} 
- ''a*: 

'• **4 

. f! »-n 


- - ! ^n Z * ! 
. * a "W C*. 


: : ;*£?*!& 

'"** sO 

" ^•mK a, 
-V- / r ^wi fi, J 
... \V-'ir«J7 

•; • 

■• - r, 

.?• it 

• “ 

/••••rf-ihMfjJ 

w Brfoi k l 

- ; ■ t ' r;v *-Wnfa, 

.... 

■'•— ‘-taut, 


ffipaiE; 
r ‘ - WKs- 

&fc 

I v **■%' 

Enua i : 
1 aiB: 


J- -. 

':' Mdi»:. 

•- 

i-< \di- 

> .i'i-JBSS 
-TV f: St. 


£< & 

K\ *J 

— - \ w * 

. ■ ,-i * 


nishls 


, v i 




. ■** 

" 'S . A 


FINANCE AND INDUSTRY 


FT 30 Share 

1314.4 (-15.1) 

FT-SE 100 ; 

1586.4 (-18.2) 

.Bargains 

24710 

USM (Datastream) 
121 .62 (-0.13) 


USDoliar 
1-1.5185 (+0.0200) 

W German mark 
3.3680 (+0.0211) 


75.9 (+0. 


Liberty 
Life bid 

Liberty life, the largest-life 
assurance company in South 
Africa, yesterday announced 
an agreed offer for Contmen- 
.tal and - Industrial Trusty a 
* general investment' trust, 
through its British investment 
subsidiary,' Transatlantic •. In- 
surance Hidings. 

The offer , forms the latest 
move “by the South African 
company in a poficy of devd- 
. oping its financial services 
interests in Britain. 

Transatlantic is- offering 
nearly £150 million for Conti- 
nental which has a net asset 
value of about £153 million. 

It plans to replace rite 
management of Continental 
and change the' company’s I 
investment policy to one of! 
specializing in the financial 
services sector. 

The deal includes an ofierof 
863p in cash to CantinentaT 
sharehdderrs, with: the choice 
of accepting new Transatlantic 
preferred ordinary shares or a 
combination of both. Yester- 
. day Con tinea taTs shares stood 
.at 840p, 23p below the cash 
offer price. 

Metal Box dip 

Ptetaxptpfits at Metal Box 
(HI from £68.1 million to 
£65.8 million in the year to 
March 3L Turnover- was 
down; from £1.13. billion to 
.£ 1 . 1 1 billion and the dividend 
is up froml 7 Jp to 19p. 

Tempos, page23 

Dividend up 

'JEIectrocompicuiehc^4hndiS' 
iribut or^decfrp me g ontgo-. 

mflbojv in die -year to J$&ega 
31. Turnover rose frbnf £164 
million to £200 million and 
the final dividend iy4j4p,np 
from 3.7Y>- 

. Tensas, page23 


The £150 million bid by the 
London International Group 
.for the Wedgwood china .and 
pottery company lapsed yes- 
terday after being referred to 
the Monopolies and Mergers 
Commisstoa. , 

However LL a drvcrcfied 
consumer products group, 
vowed to. fight an and retain 
its 10 :per cent stake in 
Wedgwood until the result of 
tire.' commission’s enquiries 
-are rcfemed. 

The decision , by the Office 
of Fair Trading was apparent- 
ly based on worries over the 
share <t£ the UK ceramic 
tableware and giftware market 
which would-be controlled by 
LI if it were to me rge Wedg- 
wood with its Royal Worces- 
ter Spade division. - 
Wedgwood maintiinied than 
a combined operation would 
control some 26-1/2 per cent 
of^the market, -although ' II 
argued that . the figure was 
slightly below the25 per cent 
yardstick which canbe crucial 
in such referrals. 

Wedgwood enhanced the 
good news fry-amtonntinga 29 

SIB ceiling 
maybe 
£ 50,000 

. By Oar City Staff 

The level of compensation 
to individuals suffering loss 
through the failure or fraud of 
investment businesses autho- 
rized' under the new seif- 
regulatory regime is likely to 
be fixed at around £50,000 by 
the Securities and Invest- 
ments Board. 

Hits would be an increase 
cm the £30,000 ceiling origi- 
naflypnt forward by the board 
in December, bin it is substan- 
tially lower than the amount 
for which the Government hie 
openly declared a preference. 

' The Financial Services B31, 
which begins its report stage in 
the Commons today, provides 
that the board, as the designat- 
ed agency, -.must make the best 
practical provision for com- j 
pensation,^biit it does not 


percent rise in pretax profits 
from £15.1 million to £19.5 
million in tire year to March 
31. Sales increased by 13 per 
cent at home and 7 per cent 
abroad, with record figures 
reported from Australia, Can- 
ada and Japan. 

Earnings per share rose by 
44 per cent after last 
November’s one-for-five 
rights issue and the final 
dividend was raised- from 4.5p. 


By Richard Lander 


to 7m to make an annual total 
of 1 tip against 7 J5pL 
The results exceeded City 
expectations and Wedgwood 
shares, whicb had fallen 40p to 
303p since the weekend on 
expecations of a referral, 
bounced bade to end the day 
just 2p lower ax 326JX 
Wedgwood’s chairman. Sir 
Arthur Bryan, who has based 
his defence campaign on the 
contention that LI lacks expe- 


Dixons wins more time 


- The Takeover Panel last 
right effectively stopped the 
clock on tiie Dixons Grosp 
takeover bad fire Woohrorth 
Holdings, airing Dixons more 
time In raise its bitterly con- 
tested £2.5 billion oiler. 

The panel was reported to 
have ruled that the omission of 
certain it+nifi reformation 
from Woohrorth’s profit fore- 
cast last Friday meant that the 
crucial 39th (fey of the take- 
over process did not happen on 
that day. 

It -wfll take place when 


Woolworth’s provi d es that in- 
formation. The takeover code 
allows a new bid to be made 
ontfl the 46th day and the 
delay means that Dixons has 
until at least next Tuesday to 
revise its offer. 

Earlier the Office of Fair 
Trading confirmed it would 
not be referring the proposed 
merger to the Monopolies and 
Mergers Commission. 

Dixons, which has received 
only minima l accep tances so 
far, is widely expected to raise 
its bid to around £L9 bilfian 


1600-1 

| DOW JONS 

1500-1 INDUSTRIAL INDEX 


f FT ORDINARY? 
^ SHARE INDEX $ 


J J A ' s O'N* D’J’ F" M * A ‘ M ‘ J 

UK shares hit by 


By OnrCSfy Staff 


. ' / ' Bid accepted 

V r R H 1 ic mvunnxqulTnD 


. KFD is recommending the 
increased and final offer fry 
WardleStoreys, but pointsout 
lo shareholders the value of 
the cash alterative. Wardle 
has indicated that it will offer 
SOp in cash for each preference ! 
share. 

Mann offer 

. The partial offer % Ham- 1 
bros to acquire 9.94 milli on 
Mann and Cb tiiares has been 
declared unconditional as to 
acceptances with 59^ per 
.cent. Mann’s own offer fire 
Bairstow Eves received 99.6 
per oeut acceptances. 


-•'SIB fact put forward re 
cenlralized compensation 
scheme, whkh-wouJd be conn 
pulsoiy fire those businesses 
auihonzed directly by. the SIB 
but optional fire self-regula- 
lory organizations, - which 
could set up^ compensation 
schemes for their own 
members. 

" This may, however, be re- 
placed by a mandatory com- 
pensation scheme which all 
seffregulatory organizations 
havetojoiiu : 

This is because of the fear 
that the centralized compen- 
sation scheme — ' H is to be 
funded fry krvies from the 
participants would be con- 
siderably weakened if - mem- 
bers " of- self-regulatory 
oiganizations such as the 
Stock Exchange and the Inter- 
national Securities Regulatory 
Organization do nottake part 


The Loudon Stock Ex- 
change yesterday showed (ace 
again its tendency to follow the 
lead set by Investors In New 
York. Wall Street’s largest 
ever one-day. fell on Monday 
sent jobbers sconryiag to mark 
down prices yesterday suarn- 
rag to deter sellers. - 
- Although prices started to 
rally daring a qnet morning's 
trading, the red ink came oat 
again in the afternoon after 
disappointing British money 
stipidy figures. ' 

. . Ftother. looses on Wall 
Street added to the goom. The 
IT 30-share index aided 15J 
points lower at L3J4i Hie 
index was 17^ lower at 
L311^ soon after the opening 
and gained around 8 points in 
listless business before sliding 
On Wall Street, die Dow 
Jones industrial average tran- 
Med a record 45.75 points on 
Monday to L846JL5, reflerting 
worries about interest rates, 
inflation and the effects on 
corporate profits If the radical 
reform of the US tax system 
comes into law. 


Mr Monte Gordoe of the 
brokoage boase Dreyfus Cor- 
poration, suM^Seepflc fa n on 
lower interest rates and rising 
inflation, has added a. note of 
fear. "The market has .been 
dinging to the dinririshing 
hope that the. second half 
would be good. Now ft’s got its 
feet planted firmly in nud-air.’' 

Although Monday’s fall was 
a record in absolute terms, the 
percentage drop of abort 15 
per cent was far lower than the 
125 per cent record of October 
28, 1929, file day before 
“Black Tuesday” and the 
stock market collapse that 
initiated the &eat Depres- 
sion. 

Investors were again in 
sombre mood on Wall Street 
yesterday and by midday the 
Dow Jones average was down 
a farther 14.4 points at 
1825.75. 

On the bullion markets, 
preoons metals snrged higher 
reflecting concern over the 
rising tide of amest in South 
Africa, which supplies most of 
the West’s gold and pfetinnm. 


film deal BL chief executive resigns 


FKi Electricals is to issue 
13.77 minion new shares to 
buy Laurence, Scott Sc. 
Electromotors and Laurence, 
Scott & Electromotors (Wol- 
verhampton) from MS Inter- 
national for a total of £11. 
million: - - . „ . 

90 % accept 

The offer by PWS Interna-, 
tional for Howard Group has 
been declared' unconditional 
after acceptances fiw 90.05 per- 
cent of Howard shares. J. . 

Ratners rise 

Ratoeis has increased its 
offer for H Samuel's 4.7 per 
cent preference shares to IOOp 
a share.. 


By Edward Townsend, Industrial Correspondent 


Mr David Andrews, theiBL 
chief executive who master- 
minded file ill-feted attempt at 
a -management buyout of 
Land-Rover, yesterday an- 
nounced his .resignation from 
all directorships at the state- 
controlled motors group. 

. Hiis departure was widely 
expected following the ap- 
pointment of. . Mr- Graham 
Day, the finmer chairman of 
British Shipbuilders, as chair- 
man and chief executive of the 
entire BL group. 

Mr Andrews, the chief exec- 
utive of Land-Rover Leyfcmd, 

; has been on leave ance Febru- 
ary to. concentrate on putting -- 
together the Land-Rover HIA 


Following the collapse of 
talks between the Govern- 
ment and General Motors of 
the United States over the sale 
of the Land-Rover Leyland 
group, the BL board derided 
not. to sefl Land-Rover sepa- 
rately. It bad regarded GM as 
the preferred bidder. 

Mr Andrews was not avail- 
able for comment yesterday, 
but it is understood that there 
has been uo major rift between 
him and Mr Day. 

The new chairman replaced 
Sir Austin Bide, who ran BLas 
part-time and nonexecutive 
chairman with Mr Andrews 
and Mr Ray Horrocks, for- 
merly chairman of BL Cars, 


both holding senior executive 
responsibility. 

Mr Andrews’s resignation 
seems certain to be followed 
fry that of Mr Horrocks. who 
has made no secret of his 
anger at not being promoted 
to chairman. 

He has stated pnblidy his 
belief that he was barred from 
the job because lie opposed 
the Government over the 
recent proposed Ford take- 
over of Austin Rover. 

He is running the Land- 
Rover Leyland commercial 1 
vehicle operation while Mr 
Day concentrates on the car 
division. 


d rience in the fine china indus- 
try, was encouraged by the 
y OFT derision which he said 
d would "give us a chance to get 

0 the frets about Wedgwood on 
n tiie table”. 

1 Disappointment and stir- 
s' prise in the L! camp were 

mixed with a determination to 
r see tire matter through and 
i retain the 10 per cent slake in 
e Wedgwood which was bought 
- from Warburg Investment 
Management. 

"The board is confident that 
clearance will be given for a 
i- new offer to be made.” said 
e Mr Richard Heley, a director 
e of Li's advisers. Hill SaraueL 
e "Bui we’ll have to see if the 
s jolt of a bid makes Wedgwood 

0 do things over the next six 
months that could make it less 

r attractive for us to bunch 
j another bid.” 

j LTs three-for-two share of- 

1 fer, which valued Wedgwood 
at 3l0.5p, had attracted onlv 

I minimal support. Analaysts 
> had expected an improved 
» offer with a cash alternative 
i had the OFT decision gone tiie 
other way. 

BM lifts 
stake in 
Benford 

ByCHff Felthani 

Blackwood Hodge, the 
earthmovmg group, briefly 
emerged yesterday as the 
white knight suitor for 
Benford Concrete, which has 
been fighting offa £1 9 million 
bid from BM Group, port of 
the CH Beazer housebuilding 
conglomerate. 

Bui within hours of wel- 
coming the new offer Benford 
found itself back on the ropes 
when BM raised its terms and 
in a stock market buying spree 
lifted its holding in Benford to 
around 29 per cent 
Last night Mr Roger Sbirte, 
the chief executive of BM, 
said: "We have been studying 
Benford since 1984 and be- 
lieve we can really make it 
work. Quite frankly 1 am 
amazed at the move by Black- 
wood Hodge. The effect on 
their earnings a share will be 
astronomical.” 

BM picked up a block of 3.3 
million shares in the market 
paying up to 90p a share 
against the 84, 5p cash alterna- 
tive offered by Blackwood 
Hodge and the 13-for-8 share 
swap. 

Benford has a sizeable share 
of the UK market for site 
dumpers and despite fierce 
competition from imported 
plant, sales have gone up by 
144 per cent between 1981 and 
1985. 

Blackwood Hodge said that 
the acquisition, if successful, 
would transform its own posi- 
tion in the lighter end of the 
construction market 

Japan venture - 
forC&W 

Cable and Wireless has 
I agreed with C Itoh, a large 
j Japanese trading company, to 
| undertake a feasibility study 
onseuing up and operating an 
alternative international tele- 
1 communications service in 
, Japan. Techn ical s upport wfll 
come from NTTL a substan- 
tial Japanese telecommunica- 
tions venture. 

Other members of the new 
serviceare expected to include 
Toyota and General Motors, 

Subject to the agreement of 
the Japanese ministry of posts 
and telecommunications, tiie 
consortium would use existing 
facilities at the outset, and it 
would play a major role in the 
establishment oi a new com- 
petitive trans-Parific fibre op- 
tic cable link with the United 
States. 


STOCK MARKETS MAIN PRICE CHARGES 

New York RISES: . . 

Dow Jones 1 825.75 (-14.40) Etectrocomponents — 389p <+~t0p) 

Tokyo COtoroBGroLD _ — : — 203p(+6p 

Nikkei Dow 18967.69 (-4(165} DevenisfrfJA) — — 890p (+30# 


Kong Kong: . ... 

Hang Seng 1751^6 (^123 

Amsterdam: Gen — : 2854 M La 
Sydney: AO 1222:1 i-ari 


Commerzbank 1965J? (-6-2) 

Brussels; 

General 1- 64156 (-£25) 

Paris: CAC 344.1 (+1.1) 

Zurich: 

SKA General - n/a 

London dating prices Page 26 


Cotorofi Group 
DeverasfrfJ.A). 

Lee tit 

Metal Box 

Hostair 

Ftteh AGo 

Mountvtew 


Labour Party ‘would take 
stake in collapsed banks 9 


43Gp(+1£ 


Cawe&wjrtiass 
Godwin Warren .„ 
. Atkins Brothers - 
Western Motor'— 
Red Housing ™__ 
AJ Gefter Z 


GOLD 


London Rxbn: . 

AM $347^5 pn+$347.7D 
dose $348.7534025 (£23000-- 
23050) T - 

New Yoric 

Comex $347^0-34780 


INTEREST RATES' 

London: 

Bank Base; 10% . 

3-month Interbank 9? 3 iir M T^6 ' 
3-fnontt>.efigt^eU8s^H-9>5% 
•buying rate . • - - 


FALLS: 

Beocham^ ; 



Cadbury.: 

RoydJnsurance 
Certain — : 

Srit Afiromacs __ 

Bestobeft 

tWeyarnGmup . 
Lex Servtea _____ 
-Reed J- 

Ceftyns — 


-.675p(+l5p) 
B70p (+10p) 
_103p(+10pj 

— 21 Op (+20p) 
-loppmsp) 

— 162p (+1Qpj 

-~i®pf+ap) 


3B3p(-8p 

=&$» 

— 508p 7 1 &>) 
414p -l5> 

— 148p -10p) 

— 377p -17 d 


Prime Rate 050% ‘ 

Federal Funds 6%% / _ 

3<non)h Treasury BBs0i2O&2B%f 
- 30-yeer Mods 9^03^ . 

?i“ Z ■?-' jp. \7 -J, " 5/ 


. . CURRENCIES 

London: / , New Yoric . . 

£81^485 i «: *1^200 ' 
fc OM33680 ' Sc DM22180 : ^ 
« 8WFK.7735 ■ . S: hxfejc.1154 - 
J&fftia7206 

ftYen2532B - ecUEnfr , 
fi tidwc75J r SDR ,£0.777735 ^ 


A fatee Labour government 
wooM take aa eqnity stake hi 
any British bank which had to 
be rescsed as a result of an 
international debt crisis, Mr 
Roy Hattersley, the Shadow 
Chancellor, said yesterday. 

. .. Outlining future Labour 
Party policy on aid to derelop- 
iBgcoflattfes and ktenatieaal 
finance, Mr Hattersley said 
that the c ons equ ences of a big 
dearing bask collapse in file 
UK would be so catastrophic 
.that there would be no alteraa- 
tive to public m tavent fo a. 

. He added: "If the taxpayer 
fo'to sikodfer fire badea of 
'^iriite sector debt, tire ararri- 
hstioa should be matched by 
the acquisition of equity in the 
baric ooeceraed.* 1 This would 
mean' votes and pabfic repre- 
sentation at beard JereL 
The Labour Duly would 
also review the levd of protec- 
tion -for; UK inrestofS aBd 
might aatsider introduring u 
iEorenesd-nq sebenteto re- 


By Teresa Poole 

pay depositors ia a failed 
bank, shnOar to die American 
Federal D^Xksit Iasnranee 
Corpmation system. 

In a speech hi the Overseas 
Development Institrte, Mr 
Hattersley said fire £22 bflCos 
net transfer of resources in 
1985 from tiie Third World to 
the developed world meant 
that the poorest comtries were 
sfiB subsidizing the richest 
He said the leading Weston 
governments had foiled to 
respond to the ssccera of Band 
Aid, Live Aid and Sport Aid. 

On the question of interna- 
tional debt, a labour Govern- 
mentworid swport 

• The conversion of the 
debts of poorer countries — 
particularly of snlHSahanu 
Africa — into grants. 

• The rescheduling of the 
remaining debt of Third 
World countries, with an ex- 
tension Ob the period for the 
repayment of the printip&L. 

• A ceding on interest rates 


at concessionary levels for 
developing countries. 

• An increase of the Inter- 
national Monetary Food’s 
Special Drawing Rights over a 
five-year period to the equiva- 
lent of S156 biOkm to sapport 
debt readjustment recovery 
and development 

• A maximum of 20 per 
cent tor the proportion of debt 
repayment to export earrings 
for developing countries. 

The Labotn- Party also be- 
lieves that all countries, in- 
cluding Britain, should 
increase development aid to 
0.7 per cent of gross domestic 
prod act and fiat this weald 
create *a additional two mil- 
lion jobs in OECD cmratrtes. 

Mr Hattersley again caBed 
for co-ordinated reflation in 
Europe and. said that the 
Labour Party two weeks ago 
bean discussions with the 
SPD, the German Socialist 
Party, abort such co-opera- 
te* 


Executive Editor Kenneth Fleet 

Money figures hit 
City for six 


The May money supply numbers 
were released just as the Indians were 
hitting the winning runs against 
England at Lord’s. It is hard to judge 
which caused the most dismay in the 
City. But when the talk is of a delay 
rather than abandonment of base rate 
cuts, it begins to look as if the 
Chancellor has won his battle to 
topple sterling M3 from its pedestal. 

However, hopes, including those of 
the Chancellor, that European Mone- 
tary System parities for the pound will 
fill the void vacated by broad money 
targets were dealt a telling blow. Mrs 
Thatcher’s rejection of full EMS 
membership, amid all talk of the 
grand gesture when we assume the 
EEC Presidency on July 1, had an air 
of finality — this side of the election at 
least — about it. 

Sterling M3 rose by 3 per cent 
against market expectations of a 1 per 
cent rise on average, 1.5 per cent at 
most Growth over the past 12 
months has been at a Heath-Barber 
19.5 per cent pace, making mockery 
even of an over-generous 1 1 to 1 5 per 
cent target range. Annualized growth 
over the past three months was 39 per 
cent, one economic record that is 
unlikely lo find its way into min- 
isterial speeches. 

The rise in bank lending, of £1.7 
billion, was rather higher than ex- 
pected but not significantly so. There 
.was underfunding of £500 million 
which served to convince the gilt 
market that a sales drive by die 
authorities can be expected in the 
coming months, hence the exag- 
gerated fell of I x h points in long gilts. 

But stealing the show, as in Novem- 
ber last year, were the “other 
counterparts** — external and foreign 
currency transactions by the banks 
and net non-deposit liabilities in 
sterling. These can usually be safely 
ignored, over the past 12 months they 
have been contractionary by an 
average of £200 million a month. This 
is just as well, because they are 
impossible to predict and, to judge 
from the head-scratching at the Bank 
of England yesterday, no easier to 
explain. 

The other counterparts boosted 
sterling M3 by £1.7 billion, or just 
under half of the 3 per rent increase. 
Should they be ignored, on the 
assumption that they will unwind, 
over the next few months? The Bank 
is unwilling to rule out the possibility 
that they are simply picking up flows 
whose rightful place should perhaps 
have been in the bank lending figures. 

Stephen Lewis at Phillips & Drew 
takes this view. The other counter- 
parts were probably boosted by a 
change in the Bank's money market 
tactics last month he says. In changing 
the mix of paper it took from the 
money markets — and in particular 
switching to Export Credits Guar- 
antee Department paper rather thazn 
commercial bills — the Bank was 
probably responsible for boosting the 


other counterparts and depressing 
bank lending. 

The sharp rise in broad money last 
month has, according to the Treasury, 
not affected its position that monetary 
conditions, taken as a whole, are not 
lax. The Bank, having seen a rapid 
build-up of liquidity reflected in 
buoyant asset prices, remains con- 
cerned about the release of that 
liquidity into more general inflation. 
A half per cent reduction in base rates 
a month, which will just about be the 
case with a delay until next week, may 
be the compromise which fits both 
Bank caution and the Treasury's 
desire to keep people from paying too 
much attention to sterling M3. 

British Gas warms up 

Domestic gas users are to be offered 
big incentives to buy shares in British 
Gas when it is floated on the Stock Ex- 
change in November. The Govern- 
ment is planning to introduce a 
voucher srfieme which will entitle 
purchasers of British Gas shares to a 
discount on their gas bills. 

The scheme, which will be similar 
to the one used to help sell British 
Telecom to the public in November 
1 984, is part of a package of outstand- 
ing privatization matters which is 
expected to be agreed shortly between 
Sir Denis Rooke, British Gas's chair- 
man, and the accommodating Sec- 
retary of State for Energy, Peter 
Walker. 

Subscribers to the British Telecom 
issue were offered vouchers worth £18 
each which could be set against their 
quarterly telephone bills provided 
they remained loyal and held their 
British Telecom shares for at least 
eight months after the flotation. 

Something very similar to the 
voucher scheme is being planned for 
British Gas which now looks certain 
to come to market with a price tag of 
around £5 billion. Among other issues 
close to resolution are the level of debt 
that British Gas will be floated with 
and the detail of the formula for 
controlling gas prices . 

Sir Denis would plainly have liked a 
debt-free corporation to bring to 
market but that was never a realistic 
proposition given the scope it would 
have given the company for substan- 
tial acquisition making. Reluctantly 
he has agreed to the injection of some 
£2.5 billion of debt reducing the value 
of shares to be sold in the City from 
around £8 billion to £5 billion. 

The other aspect of the package is 
the X factor in the formula for 
controlling gas prices. After prolonged 
discussions between the Treasury, the 
Department of Energy and Sir Denis, 
a formula allowing British Gas to raise 
prices annually by 2 per cent below the 
rate of inflation appears to have been 
agreed. 

All is now set for the marketing 
hype proper to begin. A low key start 
to the campaign is planned next 
month. 




In March 1986 Grofunds 
competitive management sent its 
European TYust to the number I slot 
for unit trust performance, with 
record 75.3% growth over 12 
monte. 

Now Grofunds competitive 
management is paying off in the 
performance of its Japanese Fund, 
up 119.4% since launch in July 1984. 

And that growth rate is still 


PERFORMANCE COMPARISON 

I Grofundlapan Trust—— 

22 Q I Opal Japan UrC Trust index — — 


IV * 1 u ' m 1 rv 1 1 


Source Opal DC 


Upwardly 

mobile 

accelerating fast presenting an Fbr the prospective investor; 

outstanding opportunity for new Grofund offers a balanced range of 
investors trusts covering a wide spectrum of 

This excellent record has investment areas. Telephone now 
been achieved through sensitive for further information on 
reaction to markets, combined with 01-588 5317. Or write to 
a fast and flexible approach to fund Grofund Managers 
management a policy that has Limited, Pinners Hall, 
pushed4outofthe6Grofundtrusts 8-9 Austin Friars, PJ 

inEothetoplOoftheunittrustseaor London 
performance tables. EC2N2AE. 


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CORPS 
I. 1986. 
.n (£6.58 
£335.052 
per share 
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company 
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g and it 
crop and 
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OENIX 
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Loss bo- 
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FINANCE AND INDUSTRY 


WALL STREET 


THE TIMES WEDN ESDA Y JUNE 11 1986 


FOREIGN EXCHANGES 


f * ir * ^ ^ 


COMMODITIES 


New \ark (Agencies) - 
Share prices fell farther in 
early trading yesterday as the 
selling which had coo turned 
from Monday — when the 
market suffered its biggest 
one-day slump in history - 
gathered momentum. 

The market's failure to peo- 
etrate Monday's dosing tevel 
in an attempted rally and 
scattered sell programmes 
also lent bearishness. 

The Dow Jones industrial 
average slipped by a further 


J*28 points to 1330.87. On 
Monday, it slumped bv 45.75 
points to 2340.25. 

The number of stocks fall- 
ing outnumbered rising ones 
by three to one on 39 million 
shares traded. 

The market's weakness was 
again broad-based, as in 
Monday's drop. Once more, 
shares ignored the initial 
strength of the hood market. . 
John Blair rose by 1 to 19 'a. 
Madadden has raised its bid. 


EI2S22EE 32232E 


Jjjjp 

« a 






Jun Jun 

9 6 


ES 355 E 23 ZZ 









Bg rg ^i 


BBBigBi 


LONDON COMMODITY 

EXCHANGE 

GWJcynaoo and Co report 

SUGAR fftom C.CanftowJ 
FOB 

» r ISitS 

Oeo 1M.0-B7.D 

Marcti ITlMfl 

-- 175.0-76.0 

178JMO.O 


PriMtoCparmMctaM 

SftwinpwJwpwttoywoc* 

Rudolf uMaca Lamport 

ecmnoGHGMse : 

Cash — 9G2AAQ5 

Thrparnonmt ~ 

Wot 

Ton* Barely Steady 

STANDARD CMHOOtt 

Cash 94OM4E0 

Thrao Months 

Wot —75 

Tone .oaa 


man mo 


. N ? 

* 

! 0--"' 




Si 


Cash- i Snpandatf 

Thru* Month* 

Vol _ 

Tons — — 

two 

cash — : g u W 

Throe Months ZK5-27T5 

Vdl 1925 

Tone O M Mi/auiM 

ZBfC STANDARD _ 

Cash 4800-4900 

Thrse Months 

Vd w 

Tooa ■ M» 

ZMC HIGH GRADE 

Cash MIAMI) 

IHMMonhC — 5435-54*5 

VW 2650 

Tom Smadtfouiac 

gUfaUAHOE , mnM _ 

Cash 352D-353 j0 

Thraa Months — 3WJW61.0 

vw_ JW 

Tone Wte 

SLVBI SMALL 

Cash 3SL08S&Q 

Three Months — 3SU>-a&L0 

vol- r« 

Tone .Mte 

AUaRWUM 

Cash 79KMOO0. 

Three Months — 783^^783^5 

vol ; 8250 

Tone Bwar 

ass 

Three Months 27*9-2750 


A 


ma «s 
nan 




■ifi? 


10825 1MJJ0 

Iffl-JO 167,80 

no.is mass 


LONDON MEATRmllES 

EXCHANGE 


INVESTMENT TRUSTS 


tact China peace » W 


LONDON FINANCIAL FUTURES 


Three Month Staffing 

Jun 66 — 

Sep 86 

Dec 86 

Mar 67 

Jun 87 

Sep 07 

Previous day s total open i 
Three Month Euradotar 

Jun 66 

Sep 86 

Dec 86 

Mar 87 

US Treasury Bond 

Jun 68 

Sep 86 

Dec 86 

24% I 

29% I Short Git 

Jun 86 

34% I Sep 86 

Dec 86 

435 Long©# 

% Jun 86 

% Sep 88 

X • Dec 88 

54 Mar 87 

FT-SE100 

Jun 86 — 

Sep 88 


Open Htab Low Close EstYot 

9038 SOM 9Q.2G 5022 U56 

90- 99 90.39 90.70 90.71 *080 

91.09 91.09 90,85 90.84 68* 

91.02 91.02 90.80 9080 93 

90.90 90-90 90.77 90.65 3 

N/T 9045 0 

Brest 18407 

Previous day's total open Merest 22310 
92.92 9255 92J1 92-94 645 

92.81 9283 92.74 9279 3473 

92.55 9289 B2.SH 92.62 720 

92.46 92.46 9234 9237 247 

Previous day’s total open interest 5 155 
92-10 92-10 91-30 82-09 11 

91- 22 91-23 90-25 91-21 5685 

N/T 9030 0 

Previous day's Iota) open interest 1 1 62 
102-80 102-60 102-80 102-34 2 

102-62 102-62 102-38 102-38 107 

• N/T 0 

Previous du/s total open interest 18322 

123- 31 123-31 1224* 122-13 74 

124- 12 124-13 122-12 >22-21 10740 

123-29 123-29 122-20 122-19 4* 

N/T 122-19 0 

Previous day’s total com Merest 2423 
16020 160.90 159.2& 15930 562 

162.10 16235 181.80 1B2JXJ 22 


150 
374 

152 790 
S3'j 75 
156 «» L. 
107 B F* 
193 142 FA 
28] 237 
3*8 257 
120 as 
5553 460 
133 145 
345 234 
124 54 ‘j 

140 109 
702 480 

151 123 
’1*7 123 
162 143 
097 322 

801 65 
MS 92 
179 118 
164 138 
330 275 
143 115 


lib 27 

298 

*0; 

** 

13 

u 

281 

as 

08 

38b 

15- 

18b 

08 

2.7 

481 

07 

18 I 

21J 

521 


13 

300b 

, 16- 

05 

02 

12 0 

OS' 

1*8 

*51 

1.8 

05 

1 A 

02 

7.7 

is : 

09 

081 

*7 

35 

56b 

181 

58 

17: 

20 

221 

20 

151 

w 

151 




£ 


FINANCIAL TRUSTS 


*P. 3S'+ Araan cw i Bpw 
71 31 ArfflM 
*9 M Bwstnd 

154 US Beanw Arena 

1B’« 13-> Da*r MM 
IS* I2-. 00 ”A" 

155 131 Sam 
120 90 Eng Tran 
2*7 M7 Eot 

100 IS6 Exp hmR u n 
660 37S WM OO 
94 77 ftertCfc 
102 77 Good* (0 < U) 

IS 980 Handataon MH 
21S 163 04 
*48 320 MAI 
975 700 MAG 

ssgg- 

26 16 do Wrew a 
206 15*. Son Mm Cowl 


«37 -a 
tir-s -*• 
nr* -j. 

M7 -2 

ire >1 
to -a 

95 *1 

ere -re 

87 •-) 

*1 -J 

£17 -h 


15 • 

ax -3 

9Qi -1 
27 -1 

15* •— a 


THE TIMES UNIT TRUST INFORMATION SERVICE 


Bd OHvr dug YW 


OWr Crag YU 





BU Othr Ong YU 


BM OMtr Cing VU 


taxULte Paton 73,0 77.7 -06 128 
High hcoma TnoT 710 -798# - -0.4 4,etf 
off A Flow ht 55.3 519 -OS 80S 

TO 01 ha T>ust5 643 US' ' -05 1.90 

SpaaM Sra Trust 7SQ BOB' -08 234. 
SnAroer Tiuu 592 838 -12 1.74 

Fa rmi~ Trust 74 J 793 -OB 068 


ran Amar Trial 
fm E M Wm Trust 


eatiiYAuiw 

St Ceorja HM Coqnraaon Si Coventry CV1 
ISO 

0203 563231 

.UK Growth Man 1452 15*2 -02 148 

Do income 1284 1314 -06 148 

HOW tec Acasa 3412 2563 -1.7 428 

Do haw# 1942 2063 -13 «2T 

QtcJRxM Mon 1037 108.1 -0.1 223 

Do man* 86.7 933 -0.1 223 

Nm Amor Tet Accum 1386 147.7 -11 055 

Fa EM Tst Man 1375 1402 -07 072 

Euro Tst Acorni 1415 1502 +02 138 

Generel Trust 2303 9452 -2.1 2M 

iFACUNtTUMUGEMENT _ • 

1. Lnirencs Poutney m. LasJor* EC4R DBA 
(71-6234690 

MnencHn Fund - • 75-2 805 -1.6 036 

ClMal And 1062 116.4 -15 0*0 

Income Fund 793 855 -02 427 

Far Eastern Fund 69.1 74.0 -05 038 

Oversees ftmma 6*2 9B.1* -03 191 

And rawest 56.7 S25e . 930 

Natural Hes Fund 37.7 404# -03 459 

Eaopean rasma 892 745 -03 333 

F*MVES7H8riMNMS» 

190. West Gemge St Gtaagow 02 2PA 
0*1-332 3132. 

BilwicM On he *15 *43a 120 

Do Accum 423 4431 . 

Ineoma Gh tnc HE 421# 50C 

DO Aixum 41.S 44 1 

Serves GO’S he 44.7 475* 120 

Do M ean 453 4&1W 

RDEDTYIKTBWTftNAL 

■nmr vm. T arowfc 7W toe 

0732 

Aomean 1032 1102 030 

Hirer Equay Income SIS 343 4.71 

Hirer Spatial Sos 515 S5« 031 

Far East Inc 310 310* 336 






m 


ou. 


Hmar Spodaf &» 
Far Em Ine 
GB A Fowf M 
OnMdi A mcome 
Japan SpeoW Sto 
Japan Trust 
Wsreged M Tat 
Max hcoma Eqrey 


Souti ejm asm Tm so* 211 
Spaoal 54* 1575 1683 


313 327 -*03 168 

973 1D4.ie 4.44 

385 412 

1183 1244 

132.0 1*05 . 0.02 

75 1 awe 402 4.72 

335 357 +0.1 2.46- 

284 2B.1 __ 058 

1570 1683 -02 057 


8 Creasy Sq. London EC3H 8HN 
01-038 5658 

AiMdcn Exempt £3682 3742 -<427 120 
Japan Exempt kites 3825 +1132 1.19 
Am Prcoarty Tit S1O71H.0 520 

Proparty TruB £20330 625. 


1 Lonoon WH Bugs. London 
EC2VI 54*0 

01-020 5lB1 


Amar A Gen he 
Da Accum 


2382 2S3.4 
2*14 2388 


CLEfflCALMEDICALUWrTWJBT 

UANAOERS 

Mrrpw par. Bristol BS2 QJH 
0600 373383 

Amar Qrawth 2*3 2ES 

EtMty Ugh Inaxre 42 1 442* 

Euopaan Onowth 2*5 28.1 

General Edixiy 38JJ e0£ 

0* & need ht Oh 30.1 32.1 

GSI A Ftxsd me 255 Z7S 

rndex SecuntM 252 275* 

Jaoan GromrBi 27 3 2 37 

COUNTY SANK UMT TRUSTS 
161. CneapMTa. London ECW SEU 
01-736 1*S 


Amar Tumamd he 2is * 2303c 


Do Accum 
Canal Tst he 
Do Accun 
Com 6 G»1 he 
DO Accum 

Extra tnc Tat he 
Do Aeon 
income Trim 
Do Accun 
M Grower Fd he 
ttj Accum 

Jan A Gen me 
Do Acan 
Momwy h coma Fa 
wcowy 

Do Accum 

Emoeen he 
Do Accum 


2250 2372c 
1962 2016 
2380 251 0 
898 952 e 
1172 1248c 
1600 1702 
1702 IBIS 

117.0 1244* 
1210 1305# 
1688 1792* 
187.4 10B2W 

784 854 
792 842 
602 BS29 
1365 M7S 

150.0 159 4 
514 568 
33 A 568 


-2.4 oise 

-25 056 
-28 1.12 
-27 1.12 
-08 227 
-08 227 
-02 511 
-02 5 13 
+05 430 
-08 *30 
-05 *27 
-05 427 
-Z3 
- 2.1 

+0.7 006 
+0.8 006 
-04 4.44 
-1.6 1 74 
-18 1.7* 
-02 Q_9* 
-02 094 


MURRAY JOtVCSTOME UMrireJST 
MANAGBtBfr 

163. Hope Straw. GWsgoar G2 2UH 
J041 221 9292 

American 1128 T2B.1 -26 327 

Eurooaan 2215 2388 4*7 05* 

Smaller Cos 2078 2218W -29 1 03 


m 


*rrr^ 


■ NATIONAL P ROVU WM V O TM P ir . 
UAMAGBS 

4f. orecnchurefi St«3P»« 

01-623 4200 ea 289 

m UK 2005 21386 -15 110 

DO Accum 3239 3448* -22 lid 

NPI Oaanaas 6 *43 5797 -115 080 

DO Aoan 66* B 7U7.1 -1*8 OLBO 

Far Esst ACC 728 773 -05 OTO 

DO Dot 725 773 -05 0.10 

Arrencac Acc 578 815* -14 180 
Do Ota ‘ 671 608a -14.180 

NORWICH UIHOH 

po B oa *■ N orercn HR1 3MG 

Oreua Trust - £11 75 1236 -0.10 355 

Winn 1268 1352 -1.7 1.10 

oty p a ut t Horn MAHA gewn ff 
58. Cannon Street London EC4N 6AE 
dsMngs 01-236 3686 fi/7/Bfi/0 
rawa s no nW Qrawth 13*.* 1438 -0.1 086 

hcoma A Gn»«i 848 685 -10 184 

.ukxnMde Rec BtS B77 w -07 lO 

Amencwi Growth 3*8 W3 -07 029 

Japan Grow* 558 5B8W +0.1 r 05 

fa cpsan O rawBi S8.7 625 +®6 2-12 

UKOWth 338 S7.6W -09 058 

FacAcaowtti 481 5V5W +03 181 

Hjgh tnoome 325 3*8 +02 7.15 

*Sa*X hcorne 51. B M l -03 221 

OO’Mewn 31B 998 -05 221 

PEARL TRUST 

El High HoSxxn. YVC1V 7K 
0MQ5B441 

thawth Fund he 879 S35 -08 209 

Da Haora 1321 1405 -1 1 209 

Income Fund 11BJ 1257 -0.7 371 

hfl Effliry he 12*2 132.1 -1.1 129 

DoMcum 1242 1321 -1.1 IE 

Ural Trust he 1248 1322* -08 258 

DO Moot 2152 2268* -1* 288 


Da Haora 
Eoropren he 
155 Do Aaara 
1.10 ON A Fixed he 
Da Accra 
Gold Fond he 
Do taw 


PERPETUAL UMT TRUST 

48. Hart arret Hrnhy On Thames 

0*91 576688 

MOrewm 25B3 2772 

tncome 1918 2055 

M4»M«rtts Rec 1*58 1572 

Amar Growth 705 7S7 

h9 Bnwu Co's 782 84J>» 

Far East Grwth 68.7 738 

Ewopsan Gw 538 S78 _ 

prourc rear trusts 

^j^r UB * nHa 

h wmM on al 1118 1198 

W^I hsvre 817 355* 

ConvAGW 97 8 10*2* 

Far Easwm 1565 16BJ 

North Ams nersn 1316 1*9.7 

Special SM 712 765 ■ 

Tknnotow 1W 6 mow 

Em hcorne 824 63.1c 


-15 085 
489 
+05 S55 
-12 000 
-2-7 086 
153 

-12 080 
-04 458 



Bd otter crag ns 


.ease t ; ; ! 


01-7361® 

CstMSI Accum 

CAud mconiB 


2638 301541 
,431 468 
1824 1727 
1584 1885 
56 0 5776 


frsnos Pflovreen- mahaocrs 
Pnmwn End. Dunong. Saner 
0309 686055 


-42 166 
-08 175 
-18 506 
-22 207 
-01 1.00 
-25 2*9 
-02 420 
063 
-23 ore 
-18 1.87 
-34 171 
+05 584 


G» ^atagy 56 0 97 7* -01 1.00 

Grow* knererem 2778 2953 -25 2*9 

hcoma A Grawei *02 *2.79 -02 420 

JapONS* A PacdK 1392 1*88 063 

N*i Anmr Orm« 1058 111. AW -23 079 

hd Rneuverr 1094 1163 -18 1.87 

Brnraar Cos 2020 2148 -34 171 

OoMheTW 668 605* +05 584 

crown iMr trust Bounces 

Crown House, waung GU21 ixw 
04862 9083 

HgA hcorne Tiutt 2108 3658 -18 5.11 

GrowSi TruB 2209 3302 -0.7 306 

Amercan Truer 1312 1425 -08 070 

Ouaaoar Unt TTuet Uanamrj ud new—. 
Surrey RH2 8BL 
07372 4242* 

UK hare 500 480 

UK Grow* Accun 500 249 

DO tM 500 249 

European Growth 50 Q 18* 

PecVfc Grower 500 

era* urarymsT managers 

4. IWMi CmeM EoerauMI 
031-239 3*92 

Amrac an Rnd 889 747 -18 228 

CaprW Fund 910 995W -05 1.71 

(»«<•>«! A he Find 1298 1336 -06 4J3 

ritfiDotFtmd 1064 113 B« -08 993 

hMireacnal Fund 1868 1907 -ZO 1 13 

naaoecaa Fund 195 208 -02 048 

8n* Jap Co m Fnd 942 388 +07 

Toho Fihd 1423 1522 -03 0 16 


FP Equity OW 
Do Accum 
FP Rrao mi ore 

Da Accum . 

8 mw aw n m Dot 
Do Accum 


1948 2089* 
3248 3*480 
1101 12350 
1321 1405* 
1598 1760* 
171.1 1818a 


GT WOT MANAGERS 
8er Ftaar. 9. DenaraNie So. 
01-263 2576 Deaimg 01-626 
UKCSpna Me 965 

Do Accum 137 7 

Income Fund 782 

Rmran Exempt 1621 

I m umaao na l 1643 

US A Gwiere 812 

Teen A Graww 71 8 

Jaooi A Gnrai 212 1 

Far East A Gen 921 

Eixopean Fund 2102 

Gawn sn y Fima 618 


I Erl 4 mra 
(Eu Japan CS 


1423 1522 
1413 I4SO 
1000 1013* 
Z3*0 


(EDPacdtoW 29*0 2645 036 

feu Srrehr (4} 1S1 0 1972 0.10 

EteoOnd 235 251 198 

EAGLE STAR UNIT YRU87 MANAOBtS 
Bjh Road. Qraaneiptn. Ghuavstar OL53 7LQ 
02*2 921311 

UK Bal an ced he 664 738a -02 208 

Do teum 695 74 ia -03 209 

U .S S'?** 1 ««■ 8» 0 96.4a -I 0 1 30 

UKHwinehe 619 SB 2a -08 Ai8 

H American Maim 655 655 -1 9 1.43 

nr Easram Aoeum 61 B 872 -08 057 

Braoean Accum 702 7*9 +04 1 17 


-08 230 
-09 230 
-08 620 
-05 200 
-1.1 1.00 
-12 080 
-18 100 
+OI 020 
-03 080 
+01 070 
+08 1 10 


01+B3 1212 Owing 01-623 5766 OaaMg 01-623 
6606 

American Trust 920 985a -24 am 

Areueren Ihra 1*9 isoa +01035 

Bnesn Ta Aeaan 954 59.4 -q 8 23s 

_ Do OW _ 48.7 922 -08 235 

Corewaiy 9nra 508 SU* 1 51 

EnopeanTruai 412 445 +04 048 

ExnhcamuTnre 430 493a -04 643 

Far Eastern Trust 1180 1283 006 

Fired kreraat Fuw 265 28J -03 962 

G* Trusi 278 2&SC 8,47 

Hot** Fund Aeewn 1587 1689 -04 023 

Doom 1612 1909 —OS 023 

Gutt Shane That 103 109 *0 1 266 

Keageo American 301 322 -07 0 10 

t*0i feoome Trust 1375 1*73 -13 533 

Hcrg Kang Trust 254 27 1 +01 105 

hcoma find 738 78.7 -07 130 

hewrace Agendas t*«32 4? W -063 133 
Jaaan Trust 1285 1365a +1 2 0.00 

Mareraa Examai 2093 275.4 +18 £98 

W iBreoy Trust 31.1 333 -413 130 

Specw S<ra True! 91 2 973 -08 080 

UKSrttk C aRteTM 70.7 758 -1.0 1 6* 

GOVETt (JOHN] UWT UANAtSKEKT 
"rarer rea tt Lexicon Vwc. Londcxi EC2N 
IDA 

01-588 sex 


NLA To». AddRccrabn Roaa Ctijyacn 
01-686 4365 01-639 6011 
Briwh Trust una 5198 5538a -as 127 
Capeel Trust UnttS B7.3 1016 -13 271 

Octor Trust UMS 1822 1919 -10 10S 

Erxcoeen Tnat 116.1 1216 -03 080 

F*r East Trow 1122 119 *c +2.1 200 
Fmancre That 3590 3823 -1 5 232 

ae Reed W he 290 300a -o.i 443 
Do OrowW 442 4£9 -03 73S 

KOI YNtO T/UCt 64 0 681a +00 505 
Income That B2 2 878a -08 *48 

htemeacn a 115.7 1211 -1.7 134 

Japan 1%t* TM ' 3*6 309 +02 0*0 

Natural Roxanas 31 1 315 £48 

Sea**? Trust 181 7 1S3.3 -1.7 285 

S ara na r Ooa 68* 9*.i -06 101 

Specwl S« 96.1 1012 -OS 2*3 

B1 FUM1 MANAGERS 

32 CheraAanes Gate. London SW1H 9AS 

01-222 1000 

IBI Bm A (7 seam . 1310 I39.«a -1 1 1 70 
St Hign hcoma '5*4 578 10.00 

e> Soar*/ (Hr 56.4 50.1 200 

a w retire m Tat Pnd ' 658 7U.la -05 140 


KL D NW0R T 5BNS0N 
20, Fantf ra C R SL London EC3 
01-823 8000 
Anar Grown Inc 868 71.0 

Do Accun 885 728 

Fuad hv TM UK 198 212 

Do Acan 258 26 J 

X Yaid he 1233 131 S* 
Aeon 3354 2198a 

ht Recovery he 100 0 1065a 
Do Accun 1053 1121 

Jaoan Grown he 91 4 962 
Do Accun Or! 973 

Streear Go’s he 1615 1720 
Do Acnen 2102 22*6 

l» Eq Growth he 27.9 300 
DoAeea* 459 483 

wortdwrae Tetfi he *15 4*3 
Do Accun 42.1 4*8 

LA C 1MKT TRUST MANAGEMENT 
pqroy wouse. Doom Are. ECZR 7 
01-586 2300 


PRUOETfTIAL UMT TRUST 1 
51-ra. Mow hu. 9kiR> Eaa 
01-478 3377 

Hohoro Equty 3B3.1 

Eurooren 8*8 

HoBam Comm* 535 

Hoharn Han he ss.7 

Hohorn hff 930 


19, St Anarowa Sq. EdnOugh 
031 229 2211 

UX Eaixty 1797 1922 

Aimdren . 1488 160* 

PKrtc 1592 1703 

Etropean 2115 2288 

JOGTTWIlreTUAL JNVESTIWir 
MANAuERS 

109. Vhoerrr SL Ghsgora (B SUN 
0*1-848 8100 

f 1«4 1793 
a* A Rrerj 119* 127.1 

UK Sb* Go's Eq 148.1 1664 

Euopean 1714 182.4 

1088 liu 
1505 1802 


-18 183 
-38 138 
-03 088 
+13 08* 


77.7R -15 089 


LEGAL! QEWRAUMT TRUST 


+08 081 
+0.7 

232 

-03 544 

-01 

-03 1.75 
-03 
+17 
+13 

+14 IBS 
+08 

+Q1 0.70 
+03 

-02 017 



Hohom Spec Sts 838 675 -05 259 

Hotxxn UK Growth 805 898 -05 286 

Ht— I CM TruB 1868 1933 -08 253 

QULTBt MANAGEMENT COMPANY 
31-49 Grtsham SL London ECZV 7LH 
01-600 4177 

Quadrant QanarM 428.1 *513 ' 289 

Quadrant hcoma 3*18 2574 516 

Qiaorant InO M . 87*7 38*5a 1.14 

Ouadm Recovery 2623 279.1 251 

W9H01H9CHILD miETMA 114021117 
Si Sentans Lane. London eC*P *DU 
01-280 5*56 

NCAmenea he 285 7 3059 -65 087 

DoAoeun 3073 3269 -70 087 

NC & argy Res 1353 1438 -11 283 

NChcomo 87 8 631a -07 133 

NC Jams 1735 16*5 -06 001 

NC SmaSer Goa 1373 1*8.0 -18 106 

NC Sb* Eitctp Co b 1507 1608 +04 Q45 

NC Ereaw £W38 1300 847 

rCAmerPnra 81157 12.18a 

NC Rropanj 1728 1829a 

ROWAN IMT TRUST 

m-63B 3 Xre m ' 3Er ** t ' Lmk3n ECm 9*3 
Arrertean (G 2380 2410 132 

Secenrem ffl 7295 7445 +355 213 

High Yield (5) 1700 1715a 573 

Merth.CT ■ ■ 369.0 3978 150 

fixed Hawst 1715 17*5 -10 2*4 

Hgntnmst 12 9.0 1300c -1 011.77 

Fm- EfB m 2020 2055# +45 022 

RtTYALUFE PUNDIMNAOBenr 
New Hal Place. Uverpool L09 3HS 
051-227 4*82 


scornsH UNIT TRUST 
»• Crer teBa Sq . EMiWuibU 


Wo ng Qow m 350 375# 

N Ame rican 345 378# 

hcoma Fund 4*7 *7.9# 

Furrv —a 378 405 

N Am# he 25J 278 

UK GnxMtl 305 310 

Eras be 318 3*1# 

focrrnsNwreows 

£2 &***'tf> EH'6 »u 

031 -as eon 

Pag Eq tnc 2298 3437 

Do Aeeua 3837 3608 


Lonoon 

GV638 6011 
Amar-T aai a Gan 
PeuM 

Sac mcore Rid 


+03 OM 
-013 089 
-05 153 
-05 480 
+<L2 084 
-05 300 
-05 340 
-02 5.11 


Snad Co's^ . 
Japan Tam A Gan 
raemaaorei ineoma 
Exersor 
IXGenaral 
Eira Growth 
Eaa Income 


1037 111.0 
1638 1751 
1727 16*6 
2024 224 . 1 # 
27.1 250 
705 754 
37.4 *00 
654 1021 a 
554 595 # 
5«15 579.1 
325 348 # 
294 314 
3*8 378 # 


-14 058 
-08 081 
-18 * 5 * 
-12 270 
-18 0.13 
+07 HI 
-04 1 . 4 $ 
-18 081 
41 *96 
283 

-as 282 

-07 083 
-18 *00 


G* TruB 
US Troct 
Psobs Bean Tat 


Do Accum 
US GrowCi 
00 Acton 


61 9 8.4# -04 254 

70S 7*9 -05 156 

273 217# -01 881 

325 3*5 -08 1.42 

365 32S -02 065 


1168 1284# -09 146 
1868 177.8# -15 i.*9 

91 1 678c -25 458 

10*9 111.7a -38 *38 

5*2 S7.7 -06 1 J* 

553 889 -OB 1 U 


SMORACaun 

Special Sts (St 468 524# 

8TANDAR0URE 

OG S W J ^E«»-ghEH2 2« 

hcorne Urea 24 7 26Sa 

Do Acorn Urata 375 295a 

9tEWANr. |WORy 1RKTTHU8T 

Airenren Fuat 2Z75 3*13 

DO Acorn 2551 3715 

DO MBidreaM 1995 1668 

raraoifUd 1155 1228# 

_ Do Accum 1175 13*8a 

BMi fiM . 5565 6248 

Do Acan 7900 9*15 

Ewopean Fred 2867 277 7 

. Do Aeon 2748 362.4 

Japan Font 2633 3124 

DO MORI 2948 31*8 




Airenren final 2Z75 3*15 

Po Mara 2SS.1 2718 

DO MBidreBM 1995 1668 

raram find 1155 1228# 

_ Do Accum 1175 13*9# 

BMi Ram ggi 6248 

Do Acan 7900 8*15 

Ewopean Fred 2867 277 7 

. Do Aeon 2748 362.4 

Jaren Font 2633 3124 

Do Acora 2646 31*8 

Soma PPP 1582 1668 

SUN ALLIANCE 

ga^fr.^s-ra 

Bq^TVioiiee 3829*13.7 

HAmTireiAcc 80 6 844 

Far Ea ar Truat Hoc 713 765 

worramde Bona 475 503 

T58UWT TRUErS 


621 M D**Jhg*O064 8*32 
rajgnttnhc 1168 1265 

- PO ftnw -- 1234 1215 - 

©** hcoma he •• tub 1200 

Do Accun , *31 6 tag,, 

Gonww War Mo. 1505 7807' 

• Do Aoeum 3*6* 282i 

□BAFtadhc- SOI S2,r 

DO-Aisgre. 1 B5 880' 

hoano - 2111 gJ Kfl g 

Mourn - . 305 aa£# 


-58 258 
-84 268 
-48 258 
■05 1.09 
-08 1.09 
-7.1 44* 
-28 44* 
-04 182 
-04 182 


grararanOcre 165 17* +27 0 16 

reaac Bawn Enow mj iS8# 050 
9»aaan 8M Oh 815 854 -08 OJl 

Qnma Mae Rid (885 1024# -08 880 

HOT 1 *”"- 

S Pra q* Fu nd - 875 654 -01 089 

Govt Bond Fd a*08 SOI -01 

wwreaoBTRus r MMuaaa ltd 
rarerar Horea. 83. Nngsway. Loudon WC2B 

01-409 8331 

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THE TIMES WEDNESDAY JUNE II 1986 


FINANCE AND INDUSTRY 


23 — 


C TEMPUS 


Exxon muscles in on 
London exchange 


When the biggest ofl compa- 
ny in the world decides that 
the time has come to seek a 
listing on the London Stock 
Exchange, there is a niggling 
reeling that it . is the Gfty 

which has arrived rather than 

Exxon. 

The impression is rein- 
forced when chairman Clif- 
ton C Garvin, on being asked 
what were the advantages ofa 
London listing, 'replied that 
he “really did not have a good 
answer tor that." 

. Certainly there is a percep- 
tion that with New -York a nd 
Tokyo, London is one of 
three pivotal financial cen- 
tres, but Exxon is not seeking 
a Tokyo listing. 

Then there is the advantage 
of round-the-clock dgaHwg 
But Exxon can already be 
dealt in around the world for 
most of the 24 boors there are 
in a day. The big US brokers ' 
will make markets in net' 
prices in London and other 
financial centres until the 
floor in New York opens at 
230 in the afternoon British 
time. 

Everything may change af- 
ter the big bang, but right 
now, it tends to be rather a 
dull market for US shares in 
London, whether they have a 
listing or not. 

Most fund managers prefer 
to wait until New York , 
opens, rather than tracfe in 
the net shares market This is 
unlikely to change for as long 
as the primary market re- 
mains in ' New York. The 
sterling quote - will be a 
straight translation of the 
dollar price in New York. 

A more concrete advantage 
is that- in a takeover of a 
British company, it may be 
more acceptable to be able to 
offer UK ' paper. Further- 
more, the company will be 
better understood by the 
financial community once its 
British brokers start produc- 
ing research on it Exxon will 
also have a higher profile 
among the people they do 
business with. 

It seems unlikely that ft wiD 
make much difference to the 
number of British sharehold- 
ers, and Exxon will never 
know anyway as its stock is 
held in bearer form and there - 
is no register of shareholders. 

As -an investment, Exxon 
ranks as being of the highest 
quality. It is so flush with 
surplus funds that it has been 
able to spend $7 billion (£4.6 
billion) buying in 17 per cent 


of its shares since 1983. The 
average price was $45 per 
share, not a bad investment 
considering the present price 
is $59. 

At the current yield of 6 per 
cent, Exxon is yielding less 
than BP (8-2 per cent) and 
Shell (7.1 per cent). It is also 
on a higher p/e ratio than 
either of the major British oil 
companies. So there is no 
need to rush out and buy 
right away. 

Electrocomponents 

Bectrooomponents has come 
through a, difficult patch in 
fine shape. Tough competi- 
tion. barely dented margins 
last year and. prospects are 


The main distribution 
business supplying own label 
components by mail order 
had a better second half than 
expected, so that the compa- 
ny made £35_2 million before 
tax in the year to March 31, 
up from £29.6 million. 

The result reflected bene- 
fits from the move to 
Weldon, in the Corby enter- 
prise zone in Northampton- 
shire, where 

Electrocomponents is enjoy- 
ing a rent-free period until 
1991. 

The other businesses were 
slightly disappointing, with 
Electro plan, the distributor of 
measuring instruments, and 
Radio Resistor both perform- 
ing below best 

The newly acquired Ameri- 
can business contributed very 
little but this year there 
should be a fell year’s contri- 
bution from both it and 
Rctron, the German compa- 
ny acquired in November. 

There was a cash outflow of 
£4 million last year after 
spending £1 1 million on ac- 
quisitions. At the 'year-end 
there , was net debt of £13 
million, and the company 
says it plans further Ameri- 
can acquisitions 

The company looks on 
taiget for £39 million this 
year, making a p/e' ratio of 1 5 
with the shares at 381p. That 
looks about right 

Metal Box 


Metal Box is putting well- 
established accounting rules 
to the test 

Yesterday it announced 
profits of £653 million before 
tax, down from £68.1 million. 
The figures were helped to the 


tune of £800,000 by a switch 
in accounting from year-end 
to average exchange rales and 
a £5.7 million reduction in 
. pension contributions. 

Most controversially Metal 
Box charged £42. S million 
reorganization costs below 
the line in a £26.9 million 
extraordinary item which 
benefited from a profit on the 
sale on an American can 
manufacturer. In another 
group these reorganization 
costs might well nave been 
charged above the line, but 
presumably Metal Box was 
anxious to avoid cutting prof- 
its and earnings: 

Of tfae.£42.8- million; £123 
million relates to the reloca- 
tion and reduction in size of 
the head office, £17.8 million 
to redundancies in general 
packaging and £12.8 million 
to redundancies in food, cen- 
tral heating and engineering 
None of these businesses 
was discontinued. 

Price Waterhouse, the au- 
ditor, has not qualified the 
accounts, but whether it 
would take such a relaxed 
attitude to Metal Box's ac- 
counting practices in the 
future remains to be seen. 

A revised version of the 
relevant accounting standard 
is at the printers 
and this is expected to make 
clear that only those reorgani- 
zation costs relating to dis- 
continued businesses can go 
below the line. If this hid 
applied to Metal Box last year 
it would have had to charge 
all the reorganization' costs 
against pretax profits. 

There was' an element of 
clearing the decks in last 
year’s figures. 

There were various encour- 
aging pointers including a rise 
in royalty and licensing in- 
come from £5.1 milli on to 
£8.2 million and a promised 
tumround in Italy which last 
year lost £7 million. 

The cheque printing com- 
panies in America acquired a 
year ago should make a good 
contribution and the compa- 
ny is hopeful about its joint 
venture with Alcoa to devel- 
op and make a new genera- 
tion of plastic food packaging' 
in America. 

Yesterday the market was 
more impressed with these 
prospects than the accounting 
devices used in reported re- 
sults and the shares rose 50p 
to 805p. At that level they 
look fully valued. 


Lease of life for Wah Kwong 


Hong Kong ” (AP^Dow 
Jones) — Citibank NA, a 
subsidiary of the US bank, has 
signed a 90-day extension ofa 
critical operating scheme for 
Hong Kong's troubled Wah 
Kwong shipping group — 10 
days after the original pact 
expired. 

In a brief statement yester- 
day, Citibank and Wah 
Kwong. said the bank, .one of 
Wah Kwoag’s 46 main credi- 
tors, had agreed to the exten- 
sion after settling a “difference 
of opinion" on how one 
particular ship would be dealt 
with in a future restructuring 


of the Wah Kwong group. 

Citibank has exposure to 
that ship — the Shannon 
Venture — and had insisted 
that it be excluded from a 
permanent restructuring and 
that the bank be permitted to 
assume control of the ship as 
soon as the interim operating 
scheme expires. 

Citibank's refusal to sign the 
interim accord, which allows 
Wah Kwong to usecharterhire 
payments from its 65 vessels 
to cover operating expenses 
and some financial Obliga- 
tions, had jeopardized Wah 
Kwong's future. 


Wah Kwong is using the 
time provided by the interim 
plans to permit its financial 
advisers, Amex Asia, to draw 
up a permanent restructuring 
for the group, which has debts 
of more than US$850 million 
(£561 million). 

Without signatures from all 
46 of the group’s creditors, the 
interim pact would have 
lapsed and Wah Kwong might 
have run out of funds. 

Nearly all of the group’s 
banks signed the extension by 
the end of May — when the 
original agreement expired — 
or last week. 


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THE SUNDAY TIMES 


UKand 
France 
unite in 
trade row 

‘ Paris (Reuter) — British and 
French foreign ministers said 
yesterday they were agreed on 
the need for a firm and united 
EEC response in_ the 
community’s dispute wilh the 
United Stales over fens 
exports. 

Sir Geoffrey Howe, 
Britain’s Foreign Secretary, 
and M Jean-Bemard 
Raimond, the French foreign 
minis ter, said after talks they 
were agreed on the need for a 
specific list of countermea- 
sures to be taken if the US goes 
ahead with threatened quotas 
on EEC products such as wine, 
beer and chocolates on July 1. 

France is trying to persuade 
its partners to take a tougher 
line on the US quotas, which 
Washington says are. retalia- 
tion for the loss of agricultural 
markets in Spain and Portu- 
gal, which joined the EEC this 
year. 

M Raimond said there was 
no difference of substance 
between the British and 
French positions and their 
talks had brought them closer 
on questions of procedure. 


£90m floating 
notes offer 

Midland International Fi- 
nancial Services BV, a subsid- 
iary of Midland Bank, is 
offering DM300 million (£90 
million) of 12-year floating 
rate notes paying 1/16 point 
over three-month London in- 
terbank offered rate at a par 
issue price, the lead manager, 
Trinkhaus & Burkhardt, said. 

The floating rate notes, 
callable after five years at par, 
are guaranteed on a subordi- 
nated basis by Midland Bank. 

Commissions total 0.20 
point, comprising 0-08 point 
as a selling concession and 
0.12 point'for underwriting 
and management combined. 

The lead manager quoted 
the bonds as trading above 
par. 


STOCK MARKET REPORT 


Shares tumble as hopes 
fade of early rate cut 


By Michael Clark 


The worst-ever, one-day 
performance overnight on 
Wall Street combined with 
some disappointing British 
money supply figures to knock 
the stuffing out of the London 
stock market yesterday. 

Government securities bore 
the brunt of the selling as 
hopes of an early cut in bank 
base rates, by half a point to 


Pamnore Gordon, the bro- 
ker, wfll be expecting to repeat 
the success of Spri g Ram and 
Polypipe on the USM with its 
latest issue, Task Force 
Group, the computer person- 
nel employment agency. 
Panmnre is placing 1.2 million 
shares at 95p, valuing the 
company- at £5.19 million. 
Task Force has seen its pretax 
profits climb from £7,000 to 
£351,000 since 1981 


9 V* per cent, suddenly receded 
following the latest figures, 
showing a 3 per cent increase 
in sterling M3. 

Economists had been look- 
ing fora rise of less than I per 
cent. Prices, which had fallen 
by more than £Vc on Monday 
in the wake of nervous selling 
on the US bond market, 
extended their losses to £2. 

Share prices were also 
marked sharply lower initial- 
ly. after a fell of 45 points in 
the Dow Jones industrial aver- 
age in New York. The FT 
index of top 30 shares opened 
17.6 lower as the market- 
makers took defensive action 
to discourage the sellers. 

In the event, they encoun- 
tered a few cheap buyers in the 
thin conditions and prices 
started to rally. But the rally 
proved short-lived with the 
gloomy economic news catch- 
ing everyone on the hop- After 
reducing its deficit to just 9-2 
by lunchtime, the index again 
started to drift and eventually 


closed 15.1 down at 1,314.4. 

The loss on the broader- 
based FT-SE 100 was extend- 
ed to 18.2 at 1,586.4. 

Those stocks with an inter- 
national flavour lost ground. 
ICI fell Up to 91 6p. Glaxo 
I3p to £10.20 and Cadbury 
Schweppes 6p to I70p- Even 
Jaguar lost an early lead, to 
finish unchanged at 508p, 
after 515p. 

FH Tomkins slipped 4p to 
306p. still looking to win 
control of Pegler-Hattersley, 
2Gp cheaper at 614p. Mr Greg 
Hutchins, the chairman of 
Tomkins, has been visiting 
various institutions with his 
broker. Cazenove, hoping to 
convince them of his cause. 

Delta Group lost another 
lOp to 222p. after a 
downgrading of profits by the 
broker, de Zoete & Bevan, 
from £58 million to £54 
million. The downgrading 
also boiled over into the rival 
IML 2p lighter at I80p. 

But reports that a line of 
about 100 million ordinary 
shares in Hanson Trust were 
doing the rounds following the 
acquisition of Imperial Group 
turned out to be wide of the 


mark. The price slipped 4p to 
I70p. 

Other sources are now sub- 
scribing to The Times' view 
that the fell-year figures from 
Hazlewood Foods next Mon- 
day should make interesting 
reading. Brokers like de Zoete 
& Bevan, which has been 
forecasting pretax profits of at 
least £10 million — compared 
with £6.1 million last time — 
could be pleasantly surprised. 

There is even talk now of a 
possible share split and further 
good news. For 1987. the 
market is looking for a final 
figure of about £16 million. 
The shares held steady at 
843p. but some dealers are 
talking them as high as £10. 

Fitch & Co, the design 
consultant, continued to re- 
spond to the news that it has 
been awarded the contract of 
the “new corporate design 
formula" for the Debenhams 
stores group, including its 
flagship in Oxford Street. 

Work has already been 
started and should be com- 
pleted in the New Year at a 
cost of some £10 million. That 
should provide Fitch's profits 
with a substantial boost Fitch 


RECENT ISSUES 


EQUITIES 
Afomasc (iSOp) 

Antler (130p) 

Arlington f115p) 

Ashley (LI (I35p) 

Barter (Charles] (150p) 
Blick (U7p) 

Br Island (60p) 

Clarke Hooper (I30p) 
Combined Tease (125p) 
Datepak (107p) 

Daves DY (I55p) 

Dean & B (50p) 

Debtor (I30p) 

Sadie pap) 

Evans Hallshaw (120p) 
Balds (MRS) fl40p) 
Green (E) (I20p) 
Haggas (J) (W 


P-E Inti (165p) 
Savage (loop) 


145 

121 

160-2 
191 -1 
153 
135 +2 
61 

151 -3 
133 
12S 
216+4 
62 
138 
37-1 
113 

125 

126 
145 
94 
155 
127 
188 
104 


Splash Prods (72p) 71 

Templeton (215p) 188 -2 

Tech Project (I40p) 117 -1 

Tib Top Drug (160p) 173 -2’ 

Usher (Frank) flOOp) 94 

Westbury |145p) 155 

Worcester (Hop) 142 


RIGHTS ISSUES 

Cater Allen N/P 135 -10 

Cliffords Dames N/P 38 -8 

Crean (J) N/P 335 

Feedex N/P 9 -2 

Garrard N/P 36 -2 

Harris Qway N/P 12 -5 

Lap N/P 18 -2 

McCarthy Stone N/P 16 

Molynx N/P 48 

Nat West N/P 253 +2 

Nei & Spencer N/P I’i -V 

Prudential N/P 156 -7 

(Issue price in brackets). 


spurted 15p to 430p. after 
440p. 

Shares of Whatman Reeve 
Angel, the laboratory equip- 
ment supplier, were suspend- 
ed at 275p. awaiting details of 
the proposed tender offer to 
buy 400.000 of its own shares 
(1.9 per cent). Mr Andrew 
Smithers. the chairman, says 
the group is currently generat- 

UDO Holdings, the repro- 
graphics group, is k»o king 
forward to strong growth over 
the next couple of years. Its 
sales force has been doubled 
and analysts are now looking 
for pretax proGts of at least 
£2.5 million, compared with 
£805,000 last time. Next year, 
the figure coaid be as high as 
£3.5 million. This has still to 
be reflected in the current 
price of I28p. 

ing more cash than it needs 
and the most efficient way of 
returning some of it to share- 
holders is by way of a tender 
offer. 

The group is offering 320p a 
share and all offers of up to 
275p a share had to be scaled 
down. 

The £62 million rights issue 
from Costain, the construc- 
tion group, was worse than 
originally feared and the price 
tumbled tumbled 20p to 54Qp. 

Profit-taking clipped anoth- 
er lp off British Benzol, at 
S9p. despite the fell- year 
figures on Monday showing 
pretax profits lopping £1 mil- 
lion, against just £200,000 for 
the previous year. Quilter 
Goodison, the broker, is fore- 
casting pretax profits of at 
least £3 million for the current 
year and the group itself is 
ready to hit the acquisition 
trail 

Grand Metropolitan, the 
brewery, leisure and hotels 
group, lost another 7p to 393p 


MAKE - THFM - NX/QRK » FOR • YOU 



Every year, oil becomes more of an offshore 
industry. Something which we can fully support, 


Offshore oil is the boom industry of modem 
times. Over the last two decades it has grown and 
grown, and today accounts for around 25% of world 
oil production - a figure which will probably be nearer 
35% by 1990. 

With the stakes so high and the challenges so 
enormous, there has naturally been a demand for ex- 
pert technical back-up, and the offshore oil support 
business has burgeoned alongside the main industry: 
some $20 billion per year is now spent on the goods 
and services provided by companies such as OJJUour 
offshore oil support division. 

Given the incentives, it’s hardly surprising that 
many companies have been attracted to the sector 

Given the hazards and difficulties, it's also 
hardly surprising that few have remained profitable. 

ButOJLL.has. 

• We've been in the business since 1971, and 


now have 34 specialised vessels (the largest UK-owned 
fleet of its kind) operating as far afield as the Persian 
Gulf the North Sea, the Gulf of Mexico and the West 
African coast 

Of course, given Oceans 100 years in shipping, 
we had something of an advantage when we went into 
the business. 

All the same, it has only been by developing 
new skills that we have grown and prospered. Today 
we handle everything from onshore engineering to off- 
shore maintenance of drilling platforms - a range of 
services marrying our long-held marine expertise to 
our more recently acquired oil industry’ know-how 

And proving 
that, contrary to 
popular belief oil 
and water do in feet w X7 - i •, 

mix rather well We can handle it. 


oceftN 



OCEAN-TRANSPOST & TRADING pJc. 47 RUSSELL 5QUARE. LONDON WC1B4JP 


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i'lxc xliviicS wcMlncSDAY JUN£ li jyoo 


Lloyd’s chief predicts 
PCW case settlement 


A settlement of the PCW 
case, in which Lloyd's names 
face losses of up to £200 
million, would be achieved by 
the end Of this year, Mr Alan 
Lord, Lloyd's deputy chair- 
man and chief executive, pre- 
dicted yesterday. 

Mr Lord said that the idea 
of the PCW names pursuing 
legal action in the United 
States this summer appeared 
to "have dropped out of 
sight." Negotiations for a set- 
tlement of the PCW affair 
were still at a preliminary 
stage, and would not be easy. 

However, he expected that 
there would be a negotiated 
settlement — “hopefully be- 
fore the end of this year.” 

Mr Lord denied reports that 
the council of Lloyd's was 
anxious that the results of the 
Department of Trade and 
Industry inquiry into Unimar 
— the offshore company into 
which Mr Peter Cameron- 
Webb and Mr Peter Dixon are 
alleged to have siphoned 


By Lawrence Lever 
names' money — should not 
be published. 

He said that, if the DTI 
wanted to publish the report 
Lloyd's would welcome iL 
The report might contain 
things tha t Lloyd's own inqui- 
ries had not unearthed, and 
these might require action to 
be taken in the interests of 
Lloyd's own members. 

Two parliamentary ques- 
tions about the publication of 
the DTI report were tabled 
yesterday by Mr Brian 
Sedgemore, Labour MP for 
Hackney South and Shore- 
ditch. He will ask whether the 
Government will publish the 
report and what action it 
proposes to take. 

A spokesman for Lloyd's 
said yesterday that there 
would be a written response to 
the questions by the end of 
this week at the earliest. 

Mr Lord did not think that 
the PCW negotiations would 
mean that the accounts of 
Lloyd's would need to be 
qualified, although he refused 


to he drawn further on this. 

The standstill agreement on 
litigation over the PCW affair 
has been extended from 
March to the end of Septem- 
ber in the hope that a settle- 
ment can be reached. 

Mr Lord also revealed yes- 
terday details of underwriting 
agents registered by the com- 
mittee of Lloyd's under the 
provisions of the underwriting 
agents by-law, introduced af- 
ter the missing of the Lloyd’s 
Act 1982 and the requirement 
that broker ownership of man- 
aging agents should be 
separated. 

By the May 31 deadline 162 
underwriting agents had been 
registered. Mr Lord estimated 
that the final number would 
be around 240 out of about 
338 potential agents. 

Agents not registered by 
May 3 1 are required to inform 
the names whom they repre- 
sent that they will not be able 
to act for them unless registra- 
tion is completed by July 22, 
1987. 


M6 store 
to raise 

£5.5m 

By Cliff Fdtham 

Customers regularly dock up 
100 miles of motorway driving 
to shop at the M6 Osh and 
Cany wholesalers which this 
month makes its stock market 
debut with a value of more 

Han £8 millin g/ 

Originally a family business 
— with three West Midlands 
depots all within easy reach of 
the M6 at Haydock, Crewe 
and Brierley H31 — it passed 
into die almost complete own- 
ership of J Rothschild Hold- 
ings hi the early 1980s. 
Rothschild will be reducing its 
stake to around 30 per cent 
and raising about £5.5 miUum. 

Profits have shown steady 
growt h . last year totalling 
£670,000 on turn ove r of nearly 
£60 million. There is no profit 
forecast for the cnuent year 

The shares are coming to 
the Unlisted Securities Mar- 
ket through an issue by 
Barclays Merchant Bank and 
Kitcat and Aitken, the 
stockbrokers. 


Costain rights call for £62.4m 


Costain Group drew attention 
yesterday to the growing capi- 
tal requirements of construc- 
tion companies by launching a 
£62.4 million rights issue. 
Shareholders are being offered 
one share at 465p for every 
five they already own. 

Mr Terrel Wyatt, the chair- 
man, said: "The rights issue 
will give us further headroom 
for expansion.” 

The company was increas- 
ingly involved as both inves- 


By Clare Dobie 


tor and builder in 
construction projects. The 
Channel Tunnel project 
would absorb less than £10 
million and the Dartford 
crossing over the Thames in 
London would require even 
less capital, be said. 

A contract to build the 
Northern Ireland coal-fired 
power station, for which 
Costain is one of three poten- 
tial bidders in partnership 
with Foster Wheeler, would. 


however, require Costain to 
put up substantial amounts of 
money. The power station 
might cost £400 million to 
build. 

In .America, Costain intends 
to spend up to S30 million 
(£20 million) on developing 
Nicor Mineral Ventures, a 
small company which it re- 
cently agreed to buy for $6 
million. Nicor mines silica, 
gold and talc 

The ratio of net debt to 


shareholders' funds was 1 2 per 
cent at December 31. Current 
spending plans would take 
that ratio to 3S per cent by the 
next year-end . 

The company has invested 
£216 million since 1979 on 
diversifying into coal mining, 
housebuilding, property de- 
velopment and specialist engi- 
neering. 

The shares fell 2Sp to 540p 
on the news. 


Bond close to victory at Hampton 


By Michael Prest 


Metals Exploration, the 
Australian mining company 
controlled by Mr Alan Bond, 
appeared dose yesterday to 
taking control of Hampton 
Gold Mining Areas. It raised 
its bid- for the natural re- 
sources ami engineering group 
from !30pto lSOpa&hareand 
announced that it held, or had 
acceptances for, 31.5 per cent 
of Hampton. 

On Monday, Hampton ad- 
vised shareholders to reject 
the Metals Exploration bid 


and tried to bolster its de- 
fences by revaluing its assets 
to 205p a share and repotting a 
sharp increase in earnings ter 
the second half of the year to 
the end of March. 

Mr George Livingstone- 
Learmoulh, Hampton's man- 
aging director, attacked Mr 
Bond for being oppportunist 

But, yesterday, sources dose 
to Metals Exploration argued 
that the revaluations of 
Hampton's gold, oil, nickel 
and coal properties were based 


on optimistic assumptions 
about raw material prices and 
discount rates. 

The sources also pointed 
out that Hampton's pretax 
profits of £2.38 million were 
little more than in 1985 and 
that a £10 million extraordi- 
nary charge caused by the 
collapse of oil prices left 
Hampton, which is being ad- 
vised by Samuel Montagu, 
unable to pay a final dividend. 

Mr Livingstone-Learmouth 


said on Monday, however, 
that the company would try to 
pay a special interim 
dividend. 

Metals Exploration, which 
is being advised by Morgan 
Grenfell, yesterday bought 
just under 10 per cent of 
Hampton in the market. It 
also obtained from MIM, 
formerly die investment nran- 

K ent division of Samuel 
lagu, an undertaking to 
sell 9.4 per cent to Metals 
Exploration. 


fi 


METAL BOX 

OPENING UP THE FUTURE 

STREAMLINED, REINFORCED AND REPOSITIONED 




23JL% 



Metal Box has emerged from a long period of con- 
solidation in a strong financial position. We serve more 
customers than ever before. 

© Each Metal Box Division operates as a free standing 
business, eliminating a complete layer of management 
structure. 

Further year of earnings growth. 

10.1% increase in dividend. 

Four for one share split recommended by the Board. 


1982 1983 1984 1985 

RETURN ON CAPITAL UP 60%* 


1986 


70i5p 



YEAR IN BRIEF 

1986 
£ million 

1985 
£ million 

Turnover 

1,1143 

1,130.1 

Trading profit 

85.4 

91.9 

interest (net) 

(19.6) 

(233) 

Profit before taxation 

653 

68.1 

Net borrowings 

- 453 

33.0 

Earnings per £1 stock unit 

70.5p 

68.9p 

Dividend -net 

19.0p 

1735p 

Return on capital employed 

23.1% 

22.5% 


1982 1983 1984 1985 

EARNINGS PER SHARE UP 330%* 


1986 


£507.0m 



£1 14.5m 


1982 


1983 


1984 


1985 


1986 


MARKET CAPITALISATION UP 340%* 

“Over 5 year period 


Abridged figures from the 1986 Annual Report 

© Metal Box benefits from its long standing commit- 
ment to Research and Development One of our unique 
strengths is the depth of our technical knowledge and 
our experience in designing and manufacturing a full 
range of packaging for today’s needs. 

© A key strategy is to develop and expand in America. 
Recent investments in the U.S. include security printing 
and cosmetics packaging. 

© We have established a major joint venture with Alcoa 
to exploit a broad range of our high barrier plastics tech- 
nologies and aseptic packaging systems in the U.S. 

© The Group’s capital investment programme con- 
tinues to strengthen its U.K. base. 

© We are developing a new plastic pnocessable food 
container at our plant in Worcester. We will open a 
new factory in Southport to manufacture toiletry and 
cosmetic packaging i 1 

flnri arp I in-orariina • Ptesseffll in ttilscaupwi fora copy crfthel966 Metal Bax 
anu a IC glauillg J Annual RBportand send rt to: The Company Secretary 

our Carlisle beverage | 

plant. | The report will be avaitabletram July 1st 1966. 

© Weantici pate that | 
the action we have | 
taken to streamline 1 
our operations, re-| 
irrforce our organis-j 
ation and reposition j 
our business will I 
show through in the I 
current and in future i 
years. 


Name. 


Address- 


Metal Box p.l.c. 

[_Openjng up the future] 


L" 


U 


\ y IE vni I'DE cni I D| lA/llfcl#* Wur company car fleet is an expensive depreetatingasset costing you time, money 

Mm IV E 91 ILL DU T 11 and effort to run. Which Is why more and more Arms, irrespective of stee, are 

COMPANY CARS MAYBE YOU w r^ re . a 

****_” ■ w w c on tract tailored exactly to your needs, you finance trie cost out of revenue. 

SHOULD iR ADE IN YOUR ***** mont ^ v payments, your cash flow forecasting wfli be easier too. AH adding 

FINANC |/\L If your financial adviser tent already on to us-perhaps he deserves a piece of your mlndl 



ADVISER! 


Coventry 0203^85121 London Mccadmy) 01-495-6425. Nonufdl 0603-484021 


RFD agrees £29m 
Wardle offer 


By Richard Lander 


toreys, 

uiufac- 


RFD Group, the mini-con- 
glomerate with interests rang- 
ing from specialist textiles to 
defence and safety products, 
has finally agreed to a take- 
over bid from Wardle S 
the plastic sheeting man 
Hirer. 

After fiercely opposing 
Wardle's initial offer and then 
advising acceptance of a rival 
bid from a white knight in the 
shape of the Sea pa Group, the 
technical products company, 
RFD yesterday recommended 
Wardle Storey’s raised £29 
million offer. 

However, the tone of the 
RFD acceptance indicated lin- 
gering unhappiness with the 
Wardle offer, and the compa- 
ny is thought to be talking to 
another party in a last-minute 
attempt to escape Wardle. 

Wardle’s managing direc- 
tor, Mr Brian Taylor, has said 
he is interested only in RFD’s 
defence and safety sides, and 
that he will consider selling 
the textiles division to Scapa 
or other parties. 


Scapa, on the other hand, is 
looking to retain the textiles 
side and dispose of the other 
divisions. 

With management buyouts 
seen as possibilities by both 
suitors, the RFD board rec- 
ommendations have been 
made by tbe company's non- 
executive directors. 

Sea pa’s managing director, 
Mr Bill Goodall, said yester- 
day that his company was 
examining all its options. 

Wardle has offered a 1 6-for- 
25 share swap which values 
RFD shares at 203p, 2p lower 
than yesterday's market price. 

However, RFD's accep- 
tance yesterday suggested 
shareholders might be better 
off taking the 205p cash 
alternative which, it said, had 
more certain value. 

In either case shareholders 
will get the final RFD divi- 
dend, which is being raised 
from 2.71p to 4p. Scapa's 
paper offer is worth 1 94p with 
a cash alternative of 195p. 


Devenish to call time 
on dozens of tenants 


By Our City Staff 


Mr Michael Cannon, the 
new head of the J A Devenish 
chain of more than 300 public 
houses, is preparing to give 
dozens of tenants their march- 
ing orders. 

He believes that many are 
paying for too little for their 
tenancies, and he wants to 
bring in his own managers. 

Mr Cannon has been plan- 
ning the shake-up since he 
reversed his Inn Leisure busi- 
ness into the bigger Devenish 
group. 

The move will obviously 
make Mr Cannon unpopular 
with many tenants- 

Mr Cannon is also likely to 
upset Whitbread, tbe brewing 
group, whose investment arm 


backed his merger and still 
owns 15 per cent of the 
enlarged group. 

Mr Cannon says that terms 
for buying Whitbread beer are 
not good enough. He will this 
week stop selling Whitbread- 
supplied lagers in 30 of the 
Devenish-managed public 
houses. 

He is also stepping up the 
pace by launching four new 
Devenish beers, two directly 
angled at the younger market 
— Great British Heavy and 
Wessex Stud Bitter. 

The merged company yes- 
terday announced first half 
profits of £1.2 million, an 
increase of 36 per cent, on 
turnover of £1 5.2 million. 


Nippon comes to UK 


Tokyo (AP-Dow Jones) — 
Nippon Telegraph and Tele- 
phone Corporation yesterday 
announced that it had opened 
wholly-owned finance subsid- 
iaries in Britain and die 
Netherlands. 

The company said NTT 
Finance (UK) in London was 
capitalized at $10 million 
(£6.6 million), and NTT Fi- 
nance (Holland) in Amster- 
dam at Fl-300.000 (£78,950). 

NTT. a government-run 


communications monopoly 
before it was privatized in 
April last year, has decided to 
open the -subsidiaries in an 
attempt to effectively deal 
with dollar-based equipment 
purchases overseas, company 
officials said. 

The company bought 36.9 
billion yen (£147 
mi!lion)wonh of equipment 
from other countries in fiscal 
1985 ended last March 31, and 
the volume is expected to 
continue to rise in the future. 


St Piran 
inquiry 
urged 

Two companies' formerly 
controlled by Mr James Rap- 
er, the financier, had been 
stripped of their assets and 
required investigation, a High 
Court judge said yesterday. 

Mr Justice Hoffmann made 
compulsory winding-up or- 
ders against St Piran and 
Gasco Investments UK, on 
petitions brought on their 
behalf by Mr Ian Watt, who 
was appointed Receiver last 
December. 

Mr Simon Mortimore, 
counsel for tbe Receiver, told 
the judge that tbe petitions 
were based on insolvency 
“and the fact that during the 
course of last year all the assets 
were removed out of St 
Piran.” 

He said the only director 
was Mr Raper, who was out of 
the High Court's jurisdiction. 

The judge said he was 
satisfied that the companies 
had been stripped or all their 
assets. 

“St Piran seems to be 
unable to pay its debts, and 
Gasco has no assets and is 
completely defunct. 

“To put it at its lowest, there 
are matters which require to 
be investigated as to the 
circumstances in which these 
assets were disposed of” 


ENI ‘to stay 
in the black' 

Rome (AP-Dow Jones) — 
Ente Nazionale Idrocarburi 
(ENI), Italy's diversified stale 
oil company, expects to re- 
main in the black despite the 
volatility in oil markets as a 
three-year “housecleaning'' 
programme continues to pro- 
duce results. 

Senior officials now claim 
the company has finally recov- 
ered from the muddled and 
depressing period it endured 
in the late 1970s and early 
1980s. 

The company has reduced 
ns presence in loss-making 
coal and nuclear energy and 
has concentrated on its core 
oil and gas business. 


BASE 

LENDING 

RATES 


ABN 10.00% 

Adam & Company 10.00% 

E2~— 10410% 

Citibank Savinqsf 10.75% 

Consolidated Crds 10.W% 

Continental Trust 10.00% 

. 10 . 00 % 
10 . 00 % 


Co-operative Bank. 
C. Hoare & Co 


H»fl Kong & ShaijhaL._. 10.00% 

Lloyds Bank*. 10.00% 

Nat Westminster 1(LQ0% 

Bank of Scotfand 10.00% 

_ 10 . 00 % 

ttftank NA .10,00% 

f Mortgage Base Rate. 
























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-■ ■- s y 


l \ . * i 4'f „ 


> ;, i] tin:- 

l In. 

! p*: 

■ wililiiL 




THE TIMES WEDNESDAY JUNE 1 1 1986 


APPOINTMENTS 


Fears grow that Mexico Craddock 
may stop debt payments as 


Mexico City (Reuter) — 
Speculation is mounting, that 
Mexico may slop repaying its 
huge foreign debt as its eco- 
nomic condition worsens, ■ 
pushing the peso still: lower 
against die dollar. 

Almost exactly four years 
ago, failing oil prices and 
rising interest rates forced 
Mexico to detonate the so- 
called Latin .American . debt 
bomb by suspending interest 
payments on the $80 'billion 
(£53 billion) it owed overseas 
creditors. 

Now with the debt nearly 
$100 billion and oil prices 
again well below their psngl 
levels, fears are growing that 
the country will once again 
stop paying, a move which 
would throw world financial 
markets into disarray and 
possibly set a into train similar 
moves by other Latin Ameri- 
can debtors. 

In the past week the free- 
raarket peso has slumped to 
around 730 to the dollar from 
just 520, unsettled by 


Tuesday’s street violence and 
-depressed by Mexico’s wors- 
ening economic condition, 
bankers say. 

More than 200 peopve were 
injured and about 80 arrested 
in a riot when Mexico beat 
Belgium 2-1 in a World Cup 
match. 

Fuelling the rumours have 
been confusing statements 
from the Finance Minister, 
Senor Jesus Silva Herzog, who 
in the past week has said 
Mexico may have to suspend 
payments on the $9 billion in 
interest it owes this year, yet 
has assured reporters there is 
enough in central bank coffers 
to pay. 

‘‘Our principal creditors are 
the Mexican people," Senor 
Silva Herzog said last week, 
echoing President Miguel de la 
Madrid's warning in February 
that Mexico was not prepared 
to sacrifice its base develop- 
ment by using 45 per cent of 
its export earnings to fulfil its 
interest payments this year. - 

“It’s more 'won't pay' now. 


whereas it was simple ‘can’t 
pay* back in 1982.” said one 
European banker. 

While the authorities re- 
main vague on whether Presi- 
dent de la Madrid will try to 
regain political popularity by 
declaring a moratorium, ru- 
mours fly about various op- 
tions being examined. 

Most bankers discount a. 
simple payments halt. The 
. United States would strongly 
oppose such a measure and 
would press its banks — to 
which about one third of the 
money is owed — to come up 
with either fresh money or a 
compromise accord. 

A possible solution might be 
a negotiated payments pause 
to give the country breathing 
space, perhaps through allow- 
ing repayment in pesos, which 
would allow Mexico to keep 
its precious dollars and the 
banks to continue classifying 
their loans as “performing” or 
interest-attracting. 

Another might be the inclu- 
sion in airy deal of more exotic 


devices such as the banks 
agreeing to' accept shares in 
state-owned companies in lieu 
of hard cash — anathema to 
the bankers — or taking bonds 
linked to the value of a barrel 
of oil. 

More likely, they say, is that 
agreement will finally be 
readied with the International 
Monetary Fund, allowing seri- 
ous talks to go ahead with the 
banks on lightening the debt 
load through easier payment < 
terms. 

Finance Ministry spokes- 1 
men dismiss the theories as ( 
rumours but offer no concrete j 
information. 

Neither has the Central 
Bank made any comment on 
the sleep fad of the free-rate 
peso beyond saying the more 
important government-con- 
trolled rale, which accounts 
for 80 per cent of foreign 
exchange dealings, has kept 
calm, losing only 13 pesos 
yesterday to 547 to the dollar. 


Cartier 

director 

Cartier Mr Aleck Craddock 
has joined the board. 

Kennedy Brookes; Mr Nidi 
Newland has become group 
director of finance. 

American Medical Interna- 
tional: Mr Gene E Burleson 
has been made executive vice- 
president and chief operating 
officer. 

Conder Group: Mr W C 
Robinson has been named as 
group managing director. Mr 
R T Paramor has become 
managing director of Conder 
Southern. Mr A E Simpson 


I* 


Iran speeds up refinery building 


Tokyo (AP-Dow Jones) — 
Iran is moving ahead with 
plans to expand its domestic 
refining capacity by 400,000 
barrels a day despite mounting 
concern that it races a chronic 
hard currency shortage. 

Japanese, South Korean 
and European companies 
have been invited to bid for a 
$1.5 billion construction con- 
tract for a refinery at Bandar 
Abbas, a Gulf port. 

Several of the bidding com- 
panies said that the Iranians 
wanted the project completed 
by 1989— the same target date 
as that for the completion of a 
refinery at Arak. near Tehran. 

The plants are each de- 
signed to add 200,000 barrels a 
day to Iran's 700,000 barrels- 
a-day refining capacity, which 
is about 200,000 bands-a-day 
short of self sufficiency. 




. -• .ys-v 

j 

- - I 

• - M 




The new refineries would 
add between $Z5 ' billion 
(£1.66 billion) and $3 billion 
to the country’s foreign trade 
bill, making some potential 
contractors wary of Iran’s 
ability to follow through its 
ambitious plans. 

Unconfirmed reports that 
Iran has been seeking to 
borrow several billion dollars 
from Japanese banks' in ex- 
change for crude oil have 
added to apprehensions 
among Iran's trade partners, 
that the country is heading for 
a cash crisis. 

Iran missed the first dead- 
line on the repayment in 
February of 104 billion yen 
(about £400 million), bor- 
rowed to finance a petrochem- 
ical complex, and banking 
sources say that the Iranians 
have not yet indicated when 




they intend to begin. 

“Their reliability is not so 
dear,” said an official at a 
Japanese trading company 
which is considering bidding 
on the Bandar Abbas project 

Another trading bouse offi- 
cial said that Iran seemed 
intent on speeding up the 
construction of both plants, 
but that they might eventually 
choose to complete only one. 
“My personal assumption is 
that they will go ahead with 
just one,” he added. 

To minimize the required 
foreign borrowing, Iran origi- 
nally planned to build the 
Arak refinery with its own 
engineers, importing only key 
units which it could not easily 
build at home. 

Experts who visited Iran 
recently said that parts pro- 
curement had begun but that 


construction had yet to start 
One said that the state oil 
company appeared to be torn 
over whether to invite in more 
foreign help. 

The Iranians have asked 
bidders on the Bandar Abbas 
plant to accept payment in 
crude oil or petroleum prod- 
ucts. “Their first choice is to 
have us agree to a (refined) 
products counter purchase,” 
said one trading house official. 
Alternatively, repayments 
could be made partly in 
products and partly in crude, 
he said. 'Hie Iranians consider 
an exchange involving only i 
crude a last choice. 

Mitsui and Co., which sold 
Iran the as-yet uncompleted 
and unpaid petrochemical 
plant is one of 10 companies 
expected to bid on the Bandar 
Abbas project 



, Sir James Cteminson 
! becomes a director with re- 
sponsibility for the IEI 
companies. 

MRB Group: Mr Tim 
Bowles is made group manag- 
ing director. 

Eastern Counties Newspa- 
pers Group: Sir James 
Ciemmsoa has been appointed 
a non-executive director. He is 
also to become chairman of 
the British Overseas Trade 
Board. 

Cooper Estates: Mrs Eliza- 
beth Roberts has been made 
the director of the US property 
division and Mr Richard 
Maylam director of the UK 1 
property division. ■ i 

Sasco: Mr Jim Cullnmbine I 
has been promoted to sales I 
director. 




Abankwhkh spans 







The Pacific basin. 

Today, the arena for over half the world’s 
trade. 

And today as for many years, home ground for 
Standard Chartered Bank. 


p 


c 




P 














Standard Chartered has built a presence 
throughout the Par East which remains un- 
rivalled today. 

While Union Bank, now a leading business 
bank in California, represents a successfiil US 
acquisition by a British bank. 

The result is a geographical spread -of over 
250 branches in the Pacific basin -which is now 
the envy of many banks scrambling for footholds 
in the region. 

It is a powerful example of the way that 
Standard Chartered’s management strengths 
have built an international network, of more than 
two thousand offices in over sixty countries. A net- 
work which is highly-integrated, built on common 
procedures and information systems: but made 
up chiefly of offices which play a central and 
established role in their domestic markets. 

And thus, a network ready to serve the needs 
of international business, of local business and of 
private individuals. 

To find out more, contact your nearest branch. 

SlRBIGfHIll 

ACROSS 


FINANCE AND INDUSTRY/LAW 


Japan and Germany in 
firing line over growth 


By David Smith, Economics Correspondent 


Japan and West Germany 

look set to i face an increasingly Congress in the autumn. vided yesterday 'in figures 

difficult time convincing the Its trade surplus with the from the Economic Planning 
rest of the world that they are United States last month was Agencv 
doing enough to foster growth. $4,058 billion, the third big- Orders for machinery re- 
Yesterday it was an- gest on record. However, one ceived by Japan’s manufactur- 
nounced in Tokyo that Japan crumb of comfort for Mr ers were "down by 5.2 per cent 
hfjda record trade surplus of Yasuhiro Nakasone. the Japa- on a year earlier, the fourth 
$7.53-. billion (£5.02 1 billion), nese Prime Minister, was that consecutive month in which a 


protectionist push in the US Japanese economy was pro- 
Congress in the autumn. vided yesterday in figures 


had a record trade surplus of 
$7,532 billion (£5.02 i billion). 


more than double the surplus imports from 


a year earlier. 


ipons from the United I2-momh rate of decline has 
- . _ . _ . , , . . —axes were a record $2,874 been recorded. 

Mr Beryl Spnnkel, chair- billion, 25.6 per cent higher TTiere has beed a partial 
man of President Reagan’s than a year earlier. drying up of investment in 

Counol of Economic Advis- Mr Nakasone has launched Japan as a result of the yen’s 
ers, told an audience of Japa- a series of drives to increase rise, which has led to some 
nese businessmen that the awareness of imported goods companies delaying capital 
trade surplus must be reduced, among Japanese consumers, investment until they see what 
or the yen will be forced the latest of which was in is left of their export markets, 
higher- . April. Again, the answer, as out- 

Tne present imbalances Even so. Japan's exports to lined in Maekawa report pub- 
are politically and economi- the United States were 2 1 /: iished last Anril. is to divert 


States were a record $2,874 




TT7I 


Standard gg Chartered 

STANDARD CHARTERED BANK, HEAD OFFICE 38 BBH0P5GATE LONDON K2N 4DE. 


or the yen will be forced the latest of which was in 
higher. April. 

“The present imbalances Even so. Japan's exports to 
are politically and economi- the United States were 2 1 /: 

cally unsustainable.” he said. — . ■ 

West Germany announced a p ar PYr ™f c ihe> 

I per cent fell in gross national CXpOnS IO Mo 

product in the first quarter EEC Were UD by 
yesterday. GNP was only 1.6 _ i c.nw 

per cent higher than a year & QrainatlC 167% 

earlier. ■ ■■■ ■■ ■— 

The two sets of figures are times her imports from there, 
part of the same story. Japan is at $6,931 billion - 
failing to achieve strong Officials in Tokyo suggest 
enough growth in domestic that trade figures in dollar 
demand to reduce the trade terms are misleading because 
surplus. of the yen's sharp correction 

Similarly Germany, which against the dollar— it has risen 
is adopting a highly cautious by more than 50 per cent — in 
approach to fiscal and mone- the past year, 
tary policy, despite the fact But in key sensitive areas of 
that on a 12-month basis trade, exports remain strong 
prices are felling, is growing in dollar and yen terms and in 
too slowly to make major volume, 
inroads into unemployment Car exports to the US last 
or drag in larger quantities of month were 31.6 per cent up 


imports. 


on a year earlier, bus and truck 


The Japanese trade figures exports rose by 52.2 per cent, 
are a major headache for the Exports of television sets rose 
Tokyo government, which by 49 percent, compared with 
faces an election test in a May 1 985, and computer sales 
month’s time. The May stir- increased by 36.1 percent 
plus of $7,532 billion com- The strength of Japanese 
pared with the previous record exports is not confined to the 
of $6,827 billion in April US markeL 
Exports in dollar terms rose Last month, car exports to 


of $6,827 billion in April US markeL 
Exports in dollar terms rose Last month, car exports to 
by a strong 24 per cem to the EEC totalled $423.7 mil- 
$ 1 7.889 billion, while imports |j 0 n. a dramatic 1 67 J per cent 
fell by 6.3 per cent to $ 10.357 up on a year earlier. Truck and 
billion. bus exports rose by an only 

Japan has now posted slightly less surprising 119.2 
record trade surpluses for per cent to $58.9 million, 
three successive months and The other side of the coin 
feces the prospect of a major on the yen’s rise and the 


investment until they see what 
is left of their export markets. 

Again, the answer, as out- 
lined in Maekawa report pub- 
lished last April, is to divert 
some of those potential ex- 
ports to the home market by 
policies which encourage 
stronger growth in domestic 
demand. 

Germany has been pursuing 
a rigid line on economic policy 
since the winter fall in oil 
prices, despite having gone 
one better than the achieve- 
ment of zero inflation — prices 
last month were 0.3 per cent 
down on a year earlier — and 
the considerable leeway of a 
trade surplus rendered larger 
by lower oil prices. 

The consequences of this 
came home in the first quar- 
ter. when gross national prod- 
uct was I percent down on the 
previous quarter. 

But the figures are unlikely 
to produce a change in the 
German viewpoint. The Eco- 
nomics Minisiry in Bonn 
believes growth has resumed 
in the current quarter.. 

The sluggish first quarter 
performance, it was claimed 
in Bonn was partly due to poor 
weather and a pause in domes- 
tic demand during the adjust- 
ment to lower oil prices. 

Even so, the German econo- 
my has some way to go before 
robust growth can be claimed. 
.As with Japan, sluggish 
growth accompanied by large 
trade surpluses is a recipe for 
trade frictions. 


t;?- ?" 'COMPANY T 


• STEAUA ROMANS The 
company has closed its New 
York office as a part of a cost- 
cutting exercise. Us US operar 
lions now being conducted from 
i he Dallas, Texas, office. 

• STEWART ENTERPRISE 
INVESTMENT COMPANY: 
Dividend for the year to March 
31. 1986, unchanged at 0.4p 
(same), payable on July II. 
Shareholders' fends £7.59 mil- 
lion (£7.84 million). Pretax in- 
come £77.000 (£70.000). 
Eamings per share 0.32p 
(0.24p). Shareholders' funds per 
share 48.lpl49.7p). 

• BARTON GROUP (subsid- 
iary of Caparo Group): Divi- 
dend for 1985 8.29p (4.14p). 
Turnover £47.77 million 
(£49.01 million). Pretax profit 
£1.85 million (£919.000). Earn- 
ings per share I0.03p (2.77p). 
The board explains that the 
profit improvement reflects in- 
creased efficiency and some 
market recovery. Further profit 
growth is expected in 1986. 

• CONTINUOUS STA- 
TIONERY: Year to March 31, 
1986. Total dividend 0.9p 
(l.75p). Turnover £4.05 million 
(£4 million). Pretax loss 
£132:000 (£51.000). Loss per 
share 1 .88p (0.59p). The board 
reports that, in spite of the losses 
of the last two years, the balance 
sheet remains sound. 

• STRATA INVESTMENTS: 
No interim dividend for the 
year to Ocl 31. 1986. but the 
board expects to pay a final. 
Pretax revenue for the period to 
April 30. £284.245. In the seven 
months since the company was 
launched, the money raised has 
been invested in small compa- 
nies worldwide. 

• HOLDEN HYDROMAN: A 
final dividend of 2.275p making 
3.25p (3.25p) has been an- 
nounced for the year to March 
31. With figures in £000. turn- 
over rose to 5,817 (3.850) and 
pretax profit to 522 (304). 

O STANDARD FIREWORKS: 
An inierim dividend (in lieu ofa 
final) of 3.83p has been an- 
nounced for the year to March 
3 1 . Consolidated operating prof- 
its slipped to £978,592 
(£1.255,167) and consolidated 
profits after tax to £648.140 
(£746.109). 


• property holdings 
and INVESTMENT: Divi- 
dend 2.95p (2.5p). Rents re- 
ceived for the year to March 31 
(£000): 8.823 (7.975): properly 
outgoings 643 (842): net income 
from properties 8.180 (7,133): 
other income 346 (593): net 
rental and other income 8.526 
(7,726): administration ex- 
penses 825 (596): interest pay- 
ments 1,828 (1.363); profit on 
activities before tax 5.873 
(5.767k tax 1.235 (2.4321: earn- 
ings per share 5.86p (4.26p): 
before loan stock convened 
1 7 1 p (160p): after loan stock 
converted (fully diluted) I58p 
(147p): shareholders funds per 
share before dividends (fully 
diluted) 5p (3.6p). Properties 
revalued as at March 31 totalled 
£161 million (£140.7 million). 

• NEW AUSTRALIA IN- 
VESTMENT TRUST: Valid 
acceptances of the offer on be- 
half of Mosskirit have been re- 
ceived in respect of 1.334.255 
New Australia ordinary shares 
(26.68 per cent). Mosskirk. 
which immediately before the 
offer period held 2.089,899 or- 
dinary shares (41.79 per cent), 
has not acquired or agreed to 
acquire any ordinary’ shares of 
New Australia during the offer 
period other than pursuant to 
the offer, which is now uncondi- 
tional. 

• WESTFIELD MINERALS: 
The company is planning to 
raise Can$5 million via a pri- 
vate placement and a rights 
issue. Agreement provides an 
option which would net a 
further Can$3 million if all 
shares are taken up. 

• CENTREWAY TRUST: 
Agreement has been reached for 
the acquisition from Mr A P 
Alderton of Soundcasu which 
has net assets of £27.800. mainly 
in cash. Cenlreway will issue to 
Mr Alderton 66.198 ordinary 
shares. He will then own 
286.198 ordinaries (7.5 per cent 
of the enlarged capital). 

• HOPKINSONS HOLD- 
INGS: Mr Roger Bentley, ihe 
chairman, told the annual meet- 
ing that the figures for the first 
quarter of 1986 show a signifi- 
cant improvement on the 
corresponding period last year — 
itself a group record. 


• LOPEX: The offer for sale 
attracted 1.437 applications for 
1.59 million orainary shares 
(50.8 per cent) and these will be 
satisfied in full. Of the applica- 
tions. 220 were from preferen- 
tial staff applicants for 314.624 
shares - the maximum avail- 
able to preferential applicants. 
The balance w ill be taken up by 
the underwriters. 

• FIRST SECURITY 
CROUP: The formal document 
dealing with the offer from the 
British Car Auction Group has 
been posted. It incorporates a 
letter from the chairman of First 
Security, advising shareholders 
not to accept the offer. 

• CHARTER CONSOLI- 
DATED: National Mine Ser- 
vice. a 51.2 per cent -owned US 
subsidiary of Anderson Strath- 
clyde (an offshoot of Charter), 
has agreed in principle to sell the 
assets of its mining machinery 
division to Baker Mining Equip- 
ment, a subsidiary’ of Baker 
International. The proceeds will 
enable National Mine to reduce 
long-term debt. 

• EMPIRE STORES (BRAD- 
FORD): The chairman told the 
annual meeting that despite tbe 
weather, all sections of the 
spring/summer catalogue were 
doing well. After the first four 
periods of this year sales were 1 3 
per cent up on last year and the 
company was on target to 
achieve the increased level of 
profits planned. 

• HOME COUNTIES 
NEWSPAPERS HOLDINGS: 
The chairman said at the annual 
meeting that the group's news- 
papers continued to perform 
satisfactorily and the effects of 
VaT on advertisement have 
been marginal. 

• PROPERTY AND REVER- 
SIONARY INVESTMENT: 
Final dividend 3p. making 4. 5p 
(4. Ip): net rental income for 
the year to March 31 (£000) 
3.845 (3.227); pretax profit 
2.584 (2.557); tax 983 (390): 
minorities debt nil (I): extraor- 
dinary credit 6S (420): 292p 
(272p): earnings per share 5.9p 
(8p). Following a revaluation 
including new acquisitions 
totalling £6 million, the value of 
group's property has increased 
by 16 percent. 


Law Report June 1 1 1986 


Solicitor at risk cannot open 


' Bahai v Rashrdiau and 
AnotherfNo 2) 

Before Mr Justice Drake 
[Judgment given June 101 
Order 62. rule 8 of the Rules of 
the Supreme Court which dealt 
with the personal liability of a 
solicitor for costs, did not confer 
upon him the right or compul- 
sion to open an application for 
costs against him by showing 
cause why the order should not 
be made. 

Mr Justice Drake so held in 
the Queen's Bench Division in 
ruling on a preliminary point, 
refusing an application by a 
solicitor against whom an order 
was being sought under Order 
62, rule 8. to open the applica- 
tion for costs. 

In the main action on Decem- 
ber 12, 1984, Mr Justice Drake 

S vc judgment for the defen- 
ms. They then became the 
claimants by making an applica- 
tion, .which was adjourned, that 

the solicitor for foe plaintiffs, 
Mr Michael E. Harris, should be 
made personally liable for tbe 
costs incurred. 

Following- that adjournment, 
an application was made on 
behalf of Mr Harris that the 
issue should be heard by some 
Other judge so as to ensure a fair 
hearing. The Court of Appeal 
refused that application holding 
that it was the duty of the trial 
judge to adjudicate on the 


matter (The Times October 9, 
1985; (I985J I WLR 1337). 

Mr Colin Brodie. QC. Mr 
Alan Steinfdd and Miss Eliza- 
beth Weaver for the claimants: 
Mr Jack Hames. QC and Mr 
Peter Cowell for Mr Harris. 

MR JUSTICE DRAKE said 
that on April 16, 1986 he gave 
directions., inter alia, that the 
claimants should open their case 
fully. 

Mr Brodie sought to open the 
case for the claimants, but Mr 
Hames objected, claiming that 
Mr Harris had the right which 
was provided for by Order 62. 
rule 8 and by observations made 
in the course of the appeal in 
Bahai v Rashidian and was 
consistent with remarks made 
by Lord Denning. Master of the 
Rolls, in R & T The if Lid »■ 
Reeves ([1982] QB 1283). 

Counsel for Mr Harris said in 
particular that no order should 
be made against the solicitor 
unless he was given the opportu- 
nity to appeal in court and show 
cause. 

His Lordship said that he did 
not read Order 62 as conferring 
upon the solicitor die right or 
compulsion to open the applica- 
tion by showing cause why be 
should not pay costs, and he saw 
that the court had jurisdiction of 
a compensatory nature but it 
must not exercise its jurisdiction 


in such a summary fashion that 
it deprived the solicitor of the 
right to show cause that the 
order should not be made 
against him. 

His Lordship did not see how 
it could be right that a solicitor 
should get up and have the fell 
thrust of the burden of showing 
cause without knowing die full 
charges against him. It would be’ 
unfair to the solicitor and 
unworkable in practice. 

In this case Mr Harris had 
been given the fullest opportu- 
nity to show why claims should 
not be made against him and his 
Lordship could see nothing in 
Order 62 or the authorities to 
suggest oiherwise. Either the 
rule or his Lordship's order of 
April 16 should stand. 

The application was mis- 
conceived and any complaints 
against his Lordship's order 
should have been made to the 
Court of Appeal. 

Solicitors: Max Bite) Greene 
&. Co: Gasquet Metcalfe & 
Walton. 

Correction 

In .1/. //. Smith (Plant Hire) 
Ltd v .tlainwaring t/a Inshore 
(The Tunes June 10) it was not 
made dear that the plaintiff 
company had in feet been 
dissolved and not merelv 
wound up at the date of the 
commencement of proceedings. 


>nsor- 
n, the 
J sev- 
lOpto 
iygain 

inster 
ng its 
ertsey) 
her of 

1 Sens 
5 Press, 
npleted 
h. 

ilAPV 
er2pto 
tied its 
ent to 
.rt Ben- 
k acting 
another 
\PV at 

r a total 
lares, or 
: votes. 
1 95 5p. 


ct office 
tent car- 
ii is es- 
implcted 
million. 
■R RE- 
MVEST- 
Sccond 
.73p for 
). 1986, 
3p. This 
li rectors' 
crim re- 
50 and a 
xrriod to 

CORF: 
I. 1986. 
m (£6-58 
£333.052 
per share 
P>. The 
company 
e second 
i auction 
g and it 
crop and 
iction, 
OENIX 
[f-year to 
urnover 
Loss be- 
i 31.914). 
I 36.17p 


S. 


op into 


W 8256 


rmation 


•lication 
jm tried 
:h our 


(£499 ex 
:orage. 
ger 11 
V It 

r Prestel. 
(worth 


....£99.95 


...JS99.00 

ms for 
....£49.95 



team and may 


'i-w 




- 







-<8M- 

From your jxmfofa'o card check tout 
tight share pnce movements. Add them 
up to give you your overall total. Check 
this against the daily dividend figure 
puWtsfied on this page. If it matches you 
have woo outright or a share of the total 
daily prize money stated. If von are a 
winner follow the daim procedure on the 
bade of your card. You most always have 
your cam available when claiming. 



Equities and gilts retreat 


ACCOUNT DAYS: Dealing began June 2. Dealings end on Friday. §Contai 
§Forward bajgains are permitted on two previous 


ty June 16. Settlement day June 23- 
ess days. 




Ow or 

Nb- Caerpeey 

Creep 

less 


cuoron Gp 




Hgttge Po m ps */ 


* VM 
!_Pano» % g 


Lowe H-S C-E 


IHP1 


IKT 


GmskB Wtuifcy 


•PrrtJLAdv 


Brtwenes 


EJccmcaU 


» in RWMOGal 3M * .. MS 41 9,1 

<4*. 5% Semen £7h *>• 1M U Ml 

55 33 SMBlStMpt 64 1 a U u 

69* 419 SWOCM 814 .. 413 04 Bfi 

810 613 UMA 743 .. 320 7A 74M 

65% U « West Fargo £84% -% .. 

320 220 Wtamai 280 7.1 &9 178 



IDE3EH! ■! 

m 



M 248 
MO 620 

a as 

14* R 
S00 375 
16? 147 
540 40$ 
515 410 
910 640 
20* 155 
243 183 
355 275 
468 406 
91 » 

179 TSS 
288 173 
114 77 
ZS1 217 

2*6 14$ 

234 I S3 

41'. 30*i 
540 3KJ 
313 223 
3iS m 
251 IBS 
510 dtO 
319 195 


BREWERIES 


AflMHym 333 

BAM 770 

Btfmn 44 

BcdOnraora 135 
Brown p*tthe« J 465 
Bdtaor (H PI IE 
fiWWRMQQOavN S5S 
CMUMW) 610 
OMMU A) BIO 
Qrami WMtUy 178 
GmanBKtag 2ia 
fiukHMm 2S9 

Hardys & Hnon 488 
H^SnaOW H 

tiWpWi DM 164 
MXM 225 

WiW Ttamnon 1M 
Morton 246 

sa Brawanra 149 
SMlNW 20B 
Seagrew EB 1 . 

Vain *25 

wwtvMd 'A* aaa 

00 S' 273 

nwiw iw 218 
WtArluini ID 508 
Yorng *A* 2m 


138 <1 ISA 
21.7 28(64 
1.1 28 243 
4.8 3.4 17A 
200b 4 a 17.1 
7A 43 13.1 
IAS 28 110 
10J 21208 
18jB 20283 
7ih *5 125 
72 34 16.1 
iaa os iia 
241 49 120 

29 24 173 

M AI 105 
27 .. 
37 127 
9.1 37 13A 

IOO 40 140 
41.1 10 .. 

180 30 184 
11.1 AT 110 
11.1 A1 IIS 
106 49 280 
127 20 ISO 
104 37190 


BUILDINGS AND ROADS 


FJ E E3B2SM^1 

mi 

mi i 



Aoertaan Canto 252 


ft 

I SBr 0 "" .£ 


ft w rtn m anu a w 

g“5£T 


Bwnsa&HrtMi 


• . . 11.4 40 230 

• -3 1S7 31 140 

.. 0.1 02 SO 

-1 21 30 TAB 

-6 11A 24 122 

.. 102 30123 

-4 MO 70 .. 


Weekly Dividend 

Please make a note of your daily totals 
for the weekly dividend of £8jOQO is 


MON 

TUE 

WB> 

THU 

na 

SAT 








BRITISH FUNDS 


Corortryride 
Crouch (DaWO 139 

Daw fame] 102 

Ocwjtt* (Ptfc) 110 

&3l 98 

Fn 7B 

DO 'A 1 56 

FMaiOg so 

Gtotopw 9t 

C*M & DM) OTO 130 

<h»w PAo am 

MAT 105 

HeietaBar 200 

77 

i t e.wooo MAaras 232 
MgjltHa 568 

Siim & 

w £ 

Lawranca (VMM) 90 
ItasyiFJC) 

Louiprj) 

S Sou* 
Manden 

MroanTOTO (Hrttax) 
Mil H9MI 

S£5*S»‘* - ** 

ssisr" 

Non tag h — Brick 


1988 

H^iJMSodr 


SHORTS (Under Five 

99% 95% TM* 8'.-% 

96% 94'. Each 2’iW 
1Q2>. 100'jErtll 14%. 

IDO 100% Bid) 13%* 

100’. 33 '» Trees CIO'.A 
97'j E’.Euh 2'.-% 

101*1 87% Extfi 10'iW 
BIP* 93% Fund 9'.-% 

10i'. 95N Trees 10% 

97*1 BO'.nms 3% 
f04'> 97’. Treo 12% 

9M ViTmH TVS 
104 Si 98%E»*I 10'iS 
102% 94*. Trees C9%% 

94% K’iTmm 3% 

102% 03% Tien 9'I% 

107% 33': Ti*as 11'. ■% 
loss 95'.- Treat iO*A 
iO*': 93'.-Erom 10% 

111% M’.Exth low 
99% W.Exd* J'A 
M’t 89 Tom 3% 

107*1 94 Esril 11% 

93% 94% Trow 5% 

108% 94%Ex» 11% 

103% 90% Trees C8'.-*u 

lUVinVTM 13% 
ItaMOl'iEstft 12*1% 

89% 79% Hess 7% 

100% 89%TViM I'A 
106% 02*. Hen 10% 

FWE TO FIFTEEN YE 

112% 99 Tien ii*« 

94% 04': And S%% 

110*. 98% Era* 11% 

118% KH Tren 12%% 

107% 91 '.Tress io% 

109% W.' Trees Cl 0'.% 

117': 100% End* 12’A 
123% tlB'.-tscn ID' .% 

109 94% Trees 10% 

12l>, 103% Tress 12%% 

91% 79% Ana 8% 

(28 1tl%Trs*S IT.% 

133% 105, Tress 14*:% 

122% gr.Esch 12’:* 

127% llO'rExdi ID'.* 

103% 88'. Tress 9% 

120 100’. Tress 12% 

78-% 68% Css 3% 

110% 91% Dad 10'.% 

126 lM'*TrsaS 12%% 

133*. 112*1 Tress 14% 

100% 87 Tren 9% 

147* 122 '.Tress 15’.% 
130V111%EMI 13'.% 

84% 74% Rants 3% 
l06%104SCaov 10% 

131 110 Tress I3'.S 
ICS WV-Esoi 10 ■% 

101% 79% True B’i% 
142%122’iEjxti IS*. 

88‘f 73- Tress 8’.% 
i07% ag'.&an «%■« 

147, l»'« Tress IS'-% 

124% 105 "Eidi 17. 

10.-. Hi Ties* 9'i*« 

12V. 1W.Es* «'.*• 

114 95% Traaj 10’.% 

112 % 94 ' .'C0«r 10 .% 

133% 111% Trass 13*. 


Yeats) 

»•:: 

101 % 

102 % -% 
100 % -*. 
97'; ♦'. 

'ft 

w?. 

103% 

98 

102*. -■« 

ICM'jO-’. 

9<%o-% 
un -% 
106 .% 

106% -1% 


Sherpe l Raw 122 

w & 

t&rissr s 

WthM 40$ 

Ties a 

TisnW 105 

ssr- % 

sssrsur 2 


CHEMICALS. PLASTICS 


no% e^s 
94% .. 
108% -% 
US's -1% 
104*. -1*. 

IS ii% 
ISi :]% 

1l7*e»>1** 

i!2 * :U 

i»% -i% 
118% -1*. 
123% -1% 
100 -1% 
lift -1% 
77% - i 
105% -1% 
121% -1% 

-t% 

E% 

1W*, -1% 
I25'i -1% 
107% -1% 
97 -1% 

137 -1 ■ 

84% -1% 
102% -l'. 
142 u -1% 
118’.' -1% 
102 •-!% 
170'. -1% 

io«r. -i% 
106'. -1% 
127% e-1'e 


4 38% 
196 160 
383 291 
Ml 180 
158 108 
111 78% 

138. 102 

in ii2 

IX 57% 
136 82 
285 2*5 
ISO 138 
142 112 
30 15 

163 127 

131 IX 
245 172 
290 215 
160 113 
453 330 
101% 78*4 

10 734 
410 333 
118 102 
225 179 
R5 62 
176 (3* 
330 216 
70 36 

213 178 

132 67 


Andes Chemksl 
BTP 

gasj*® 0 

arum Cheme 
Be Benzol 
Canning fWJ 
C04M 

Cones Bros 

gv? (Horace) 
Croaa 

PosecoMneap 
MIM Uemesi 

mdoon 

HoeraOMSO 
imo Chem Ind 


SWA BPO 
Sumtte g e wiera n 
Wdwmtnenw 
Yorfcemro Chan 


154 -1 

* >1 

12S • 

*71 •-! 

M3 e-rl 

137 «-1 
17% • .. 

158 • 

129 • 

202 

29 9 a-i 

3 - 

£81 -*.- 

916 -II 

351 -2 

toe -2 

234 

71 •■.2'; 

134 -1 

216 -36 

89 

195 «8 

138 -S 


400 92 . ■ 
U 1.7 20.1 
81 24 182 
81 27 m 

% n** 
’S iig 

i *t A12IA 
7 M102 
88 A8 9A 
68 A8 88 
03 5.1 52 
MO 84 182 
.. .. 184 

88 44 17.7 
1 28 4| IIA 
64 A5 HA 
21.4 40 I1J 

47.1 5.1 103 

118 34 144 
54 S0 157 
19 1.7 188 

34 5.1 51 
86 24 168 

" tOJ 
11.1 67 215 

43 33114 


CINEMAS AND TV 


235 176 ArWtt TV A' 
50 27 GrSnpsn 

240 176 KTVS/V 
356 263 tWTMwgs 
350 188 Scot TV%t - 
238 (53 TVS N/V 
43 31 1SW 


220 

1X9 

50 15.1 

0 a+i 

20 

50 71 

210 

11* 

54 9.6 

350 

210 

61 140 

348 

150b 43 <10 

235 

1 1A 

4* 112 


26 

65 MO 


DRAPERY AND STORES 


FIFTEEN YEARS 

!C*v 2001 IDS'. -1'! 
9*.% 2X1 104 -2 

9% 2000 98*4 -1% 

l«*. 199*01 131% -2 
1C% 2002 105% -2 

12% 199MZ 118*4 -3 
9'.%MC2 104 -2 

10% 5X3 106% -2 

(3*.%2tWWn 133% -2 
11'.% 2001-0* 117% -Z 
10% 200* USB’; -2 
3’ A 1998-W 58'/ »-1 
9'.% 2004 105% -2 

9'.-%S 2005 102% S'* 
S’*. 2005 102'. -2 

1C.% 2005 111% -2 

irv.axms i2?% -2 

9*.30ED6 X. -V. 
9t% 2006 104'. -2 

M V, 2003CT 120 , -J. 
13'.% X04-09 IX -2 
6% 3009 « -2 

S':% 2008-12 86 / -2 
7'.% 2012.15 «7-i -l». 
12% 2013*17 l28'.*-2 


UNDATED 

r WaOenuts *% 

34% Wv t/i 3 .% 

5JU 44% Com 3i% 

34% 29% Haas 3% 

29% 24’; Census 2'. 

3% 24% Trass 2'A 

INDEX-LINKED 
122%(I4*aTras) A 2% 1988 
107% 98'.- TretS A 2*. 1990 
122 1M*. Tress (L 1% 1»B 
107% »% Tress tL2 .-% 2X1 
tor. 93': H%*1 M'.N a»3 
W» 96%Tra*A.J%OT5 
108% 92% Trass B-2 :% W» 
111% 97 Trass 42 9% 2011 

94% 79% TraM It2 .-% 20)3 
10?% 87>,Ttea nJ % 2018 
100; 86’; Trass U':*. SOSO 


BANKS DISCOUNT HP 


bnkOnoM 
am uunr UrlB 
BveismW 
BM 01 ScassnO 
wosjis 
Bmm Sneftjr 
Csnr Attn 
CMS 

Cnsss Vsntmosn 

g£T 

Can B»* whm 
C ornnentim 
Oeutscne Bar* 
Frai u«r franc* 
Come nst 
□omen Pest 
HsnOros 
m Esewsl 
N« Shsnga 
jessen lueepUcU 
Uig A Snsxscn 
Klennon BsnseA 

umn 

Maroon 
1*e*eury WH 
Do 6*k 'A 
MUsrid 
itn Auufl* 

Net west 
Onemse 
ROndam 
RH Bras 
fleemwu) tw 
ftM m 0> cm 


^ * :: 
241 

£117. -% 

3SS *-3 
»% 

2*0 

387 -2 
478 ^ 

605 

338 e-5 

Wi -1% 

«’* $ 
n 

as % -i 

037% ■& 
194 

337 s-2 

« a-3 
220 * 
383 -4 

57% +’, 

*26 

182 • .. 

745 -10 

532 -7 

38 
718 
134 
522 

273 -3 

437 r «s 
£118 
313 
96 

122 -» 

£13% ■*’* 


90 30 . 

. .. 428 

150 62 . 


160 67110 
200 57 65 

266 36 69 
133 22 251 
296 88106 

U A? 152 
139 52 .. 
206 5J . . 
36 12 9.1 
34 44 128 
60 Q1 .. 
200 51 .. 
40 21 116 
22-ltt &6 102 
29 UtA7 

n .. 92 

162 49 65 

174 ST 223 
126 7.7 13.7 

267 34 108 

302 66 57 
22 64 137 


2720 50 *8 
600 51 92 
156 4.7 11.7 
18 27 196 
6 S 52 146 


79 Beane (Janes) A' 
135 BerasJh 
6% Btrcfci Lea 
3*7 Body Shop 
ease 
Brown (N) 

Bieian 
Csnsxs 'A' 

08401 

Cass VlyMs 
ContHied Engkih 
Coats (Fan) A' 
OAKS Smpean -A' 
Denh»8l (U) 
ODOtl Qrp 
Dwftd 

Era AOohhMer 
Dy» (WraUsdOn) 
Enrora Stores 
Enm 

EkSCulex (Mies 
Few An o«v 
Ford IMaeil 
Forowaw 

F raemsns 
Germ lAJj 
Genl Sn 
CoWCmg (A) 
QWSMt Op 
crsnm 
GUS 
00 -A' 

Hsms Oueenwr 
tMane Of undon 

House OfLaroee 
Jots* (Ernest) 
Lanes Pride 
ia> 

Lee Cooper 
Uw*1V 

LraOR KSgour 
mom & Spew 
Mawes powi 

WMI IMM 
Moss Bros 

fteedr (Aftedl 
wsmera (Jirnee ra i 
Bjwse* 

220 RMIAusud 
135 DO A 
31 S 8 U Stores 
IX SmrM IH) 

72 Dd A 
UB SssK 
234 Smen gVH) A' 

aederfAdl 
StorshouM 

&HSHH8MI 

ov 1 1 v - J 
Sunns CUM 
SwOva Sens 
Tim rmmiis 
Tee Pmouai 
T« T()o Drug 
IMsmaods 
ww Group 

wan Mr 

WgW 
WpgMTOl 


36 50 24/5 
• 11 42111 


U 42121 

32 20 233 

30 05593 
0.7 15 343 

16 1 25 915 

65 25 165 

33 23 353 

3.1 7.0 85 

121 39 125 
17.1 34 151 
95 42 20 1 
67 56 95 
85 25125 
T.B 1 4 £08 
A3 12385 
79 15 165 

35 47 92 
118 2JJ 23.7 
54 25 165 
61 2.7 162 

29 25 65 
5.7 37 145 


7.1 14 258 

250 A3 155 
25 il 185 

24 13 233 

113 33 105 
93 31 153 
3 Be 27 .. 
i«3n t7 185 


ELECTRICALS 


355 160 
143 130 
604 lM 
99 81 

90 63 

300 205 
» *6 
2a 140 
370 240 
136 64 
537 379 
280 217 
112 75 

19 11 

15? 8* 
738 566 


AB EM 3*8 

AOismsnc 163 

Amtrad 577 

Aoncgt Caimdm 87 
Antn TV 

ADsnsc Camp 275 

Audo Msstf 55 

Aim Sec 10 

SfCC 303 

BSR 10 

Bcmenroe 632 

Br Telecom 23* 

Brow. Keen Kan 0 
0^1 (AF) 'A' 13 

CtMlfMU US 


+W 1M 33 M 0 
. 19 09 »9 

-7 15 03417 

-3 2 ip 25 65 

;■ 3B 13 S3 

i i-i i i &! 

•-2 167 52 171 

-2 24 23 71 

• -2 105 19 164 

*2 65 A* 14 7 

• *1 45 4/4 92 

. 19 146 302 

S 19 21 77 
*6 136 25 221 


H-gtiUft Compsry 


Uv VU 

wee Ofgt pew * are 


a a*» 

365 2H 


cmmfgt Ban 248 

DO 7'a% OV 196 

^fyreFwi 330 

CrryDict 220 

O UMOV 171 

t Derowa »' 6i 

Domino 33$ 

,S 

OsarocOToonsras 363 
Beam*: Uadi ai 

Becoortc Banuas ST 

BiwHUghtAB 317 

Erooths^ 3ZO 

Fans* Bea m 

Farm 128 

Fcwyu Ttch 48 

OK 204 

Oesvsnar IX 

&**»•* 6 

Kadi 200 

lee MMgmden 263 

&S* £ 

, SSTbc *7? 

MUD Focus 170 

NUKUW Beet *8 

Hurra* Bea 55 

, imrom (Uxmi m 

NH 107 

CKxaia 20 

Orion) kuauan r il MO 
Phtaw 27 

Plftl f%i 5*4% £143 

I gem imps N/v C14% 

EVCO IK 

Do -A’ Ltd Wring 145 

P Qo ADR a K1% 


IS S3 

^k ,CH, 

31% Eouss DOhahr 
H BTC 
iu Sun me 

a,*-**" 

170 Ttenhona RsrSTO 
170 ThOrpeffW) 

™ Its** 

206 UB 
213 Unaseh 
3*8 Iftd Leasing 
MB UriSaenMo 
32B vmnanmarm 
225 Van 

S* Wuern S s T iedP h 

m WumrtiQw 
230 Whtse s rii Rang 


200 -4 

3X e*12 

585 *B 

111 

0 1-1 

MB 

10 -6 

110 -2 

cist. -% 

230 e-3 

% *? 

300 


10 e-3 

4W *i 
313 

0 93 

II 


105 A3 145 
2.1 19 .. 

.. .. 1U 

11 06 184 
45 14 SU 
65 18 143 

64 9.1262 

15 05 ■ 

- 15 25 114 

£5 07225 

2.1 45 117 
AI 29163 
79 2.1 235 
10 13 .. 
4* 61 224 
79 28 223 

65 61 173 
XI 1.7 1M 
29 19 17.4 
67 19 187 
U 29185 
63d 62 115 
35 17 125 
17 64 89 

U 0.4 ., 
10.7 47 104 

7.1 36 4)3 
179 85 102 

149 05 165 
1*5 4.0 110 
A3 14349 
07 19 113 

AO* 89 26L1 
O.in 03 .. 
199 65110 
78 79134 

1.1 35 AO 
29 04303 
15 39 134 

375 AO .. 

75 AI 10ll 
75 62 79 

72 33 183 

XI 25 175 
.. -.124 

49 22125 

7.1 19 205 
314 69 134 

27 24 207 

09 15 75 
.. .. 1X7 

65 IS 104 
06 05 273 

109 49 1X1 
25 AO 25 
56.0 65 167 
XI X7 113 
25 08 207 

73 27 209 
63 39117 
65 XI 62 
AI AS 103 
X6 05 28.1 
114 16 110 
49 X1 189 
22 25 123 
89 49128 


FINANCE AND LAND 


246 20 AMVNorVi 
13* 128 AritanHone 
625 300 AMgaat 
190 110 BUtmTM 
26 19% camem 

2H 19* Canoorar 

17 ShTt’Es#" 
IBS 163 May 8 Sbna 
iH IH sums 
IS TT SlHw» Lot 
H H Do SW 
148 H4 dew ma i M t 


239 -1 19 09 .. 

762 -4 113 B5 89 

525 .. 275 U 49 

193 

£19% 17.1 09 789 

2£5 -. 67 29404 

38 -2 

0 .. 19 89 11.7 

10 -6 99 49 235 

182 •-« X3b 49 2X1 

T7 • 

£94 

140 


ASOA-MR 144 

Mm onr*s » 

ArnA 320 

Atf Food 319 

Asm Ffehsnss m 

Am SH 

BsMm (Sdnsy C) 290 
Barter I Doiaan 16 

Birr (AG) 2B1 

Basssfl Foods 1« 

sadays i« 

Briam 1B3 

BUKndCari as 

oSw- 


Fbflar (AttwrQ 
Rich Lora* 
sum omer 
iwdemxx) Foods 
mam 

msdnmHdga 
Horn Front 
taatend From 
Mh*8m 
L sM (John J) 

w 


Mast Hade 9upp 
Morton (W) 
ttthots UflCVhnW 
Horouro 
Mwn Feus 
North 6 RSiCoCk 
Part Foods 
HHM 


Taro S Ljw 
Teseo 

UM^Scub 

wemlBH 


AI 26 1X4 
25 7.8 .. 
11.1 35 165 
XT 25 125 
60 45 32.1 

165 XI 165 
1A8 60 85 
.. .. 2*2 
1X1 42 19 
B.7 57 107 

39 2J 125 

67 87 169 

74 78 Z79 

29 17 224 
84 AB 195 
X6 63 89 
105 44 189 
109 63 112 

1098 49 244 
X2 18237 
145 65 199 
55 25 17.0 
114 14 272 

44 19 20-1 
69 23 167 

45 69 82 

94 19 23.7 

74 39 181 
XI XI 1A3 
A3 6109 

175 XI 1X2 
39 1.7 21.1 

75 6317.1 
19 09 212 
89 At 1X8 
29 AI (XI 

104 89165 

68 XS 145 
64 39 144 
80 ' 88 1X0 

174 *5125 
75 22 189 
AI 291X8 

3X1 64 1X2 
83 24 184 
1X4 45160 
168D 64135 
63 54 04 


HOTELS AND CATERERS 


433 

32B 

Grow Mat 

393 

-7 

1X0 

14 

1X2 

266 

208 

KanruOj Brookes 

231 

a-i 

XI 

00 

110 

361 

312 

Lsdbnfce 

351 

a-a 

181 

*0 

187 

5*5 


Lon tart Horns 

520 

a .. 

143 

28 

1&0 

100 

7B’ 

Maura Ororuca 

78% 


XO 

25 


105 

67 

tanceOI WHobri 

78 

-2 

XI 

2-7 

1A1 


70 Sfl% Oussns Most VTi -1 29 34 14 8 

*05 371 Srroy HoMf 'A' 378 .. 59 1J 1*5 

81 X SMS* _ 0 -1 15 25 179 

209 146 TrusoouM Font 167 -X 79 60 168 


INDUSTRIALS 

A-D 


AAH 

AGa (I s T en ch 


*93 333 
S3 37% 
350 2S3 
89 43 

as ih 

*50 383 

as at 

30 277% 
*83 237 
202 10 
»* 19 
835 420 
310 ?16 
no 10 
174 111 
*95 in 
57 «0 

305 IX 
X 21 
241 138 
H *7 
630 151 
428 3(8 


Ash S Lacey 

Aaa?r 6j«% 
Assoc Hen 
Aurora 
Avon Rudder 

AgShreMTOri 

BET D« 

BETEC 

BOC 

BTR 


Burro md 

Bertram 
Barlow Rend 
Barron Nephron 
Barton Trronppn 
Bayne. (Oartam 
Bestson darks 


-1 161 
je 

-1 B2 

-a 1X8 

-I 60 
-2 112 
95 

67 

-6 65 

.. 08 
-2 03 


114 

• .. 200 
-% 14 

• +5 89 

... 29 

ro-5 29 
-3 219 

• .. ze 

-2 Ml 
-2 69 

-i ias 

•*10 27> 
-2 102 
63 

• . . 29 


wmioroi 


28* 1*7 
358 2BS 
20 220 
19 ■% 

353 20 

S’, m 

123 15 
383 323 
0 B 
43 33'.- 

W 35 

169 MO 

19* 138 
10 IIS 
245 1 0 
10 87 
323 iM 


0e*a n (OF) ** % 

3& u ft 

PS Su m 3s 

EkrrTM O l iro n MS IX 

Brock Arrow iBO 

MU 3* 

BAn Anon 333 

Bafteoro 260 

Bookar UcCBthI 3*8 
Bens 249 

soukon (Wm) 19% 
BDUiro 918 

Borramr Inc HB 

BTUmaMOrp 105 

B am e 30 

BraswBT S3 

a®7TO* 38 

Bnogsnd Gp 4S 

Sndon 10 


10 164 
30 10 

303 200 
244 10 
n 59 
32 si 
n a% 
0 0 
«o za 

80 M 

W; 25% 
8 5 

23 13 


SST 1 a 

Broken M 30 

ftwe sa nro Inda 110 

Bn» End 23 

Brtotro Tod 0 

Brown l Tam* 172 

BnwiUcfsq 2g 

fruraens (Mad « 

SAngfl 276 

Bness 238 

aaftw-MvMrsao 75 

cromonl Eng 0 

CaprooM 0 

Cape Md 81 

Croup Big a» 

C«W9i 78 

Cansotn 35% 

Crwri 6 Shear S'; 
Cumawor M » 

Cli UO 92 

cnarnesna* Ri 87 

ChrontNrtbi I H9 91 

Porter Cons 238 

Cnemmg 599 

ChnstssM 288 

Qmty Hurt 55 

QokefCwnenq 240 

Carur S»r MO 

Cohan (AJ 529 

Coerce dp 2og 

ConOiM TsOt II 

Concrom 10 

Cora Saaanenr 4* 

Cook OH 10 


JS 12 11 9 
25.7a 16 92 
X2 79 . 
107 48 t$3 
38 &« 87 
60 25 166 
16.1 4.1 163 

is 30 348 
150 67 119 

75 XS 95 
XI A7 74 
88 21 235 

69 1544 0 

20b *5 109 
95 25 1X6 
M3 60 XS 
60 44 1X8 

K *J 1X4 
63 1X7 
84 AO 135 
24 09 238 
.. ..67 

17 X* 26.1 
68 33 105 
17.1 A8 150 
101 AI 1X2 


1X0e1X4 .. 
175 61 165 
82 39119 
XI SH 114 

Qj 1 1 no 
7.1 4* 105 
74 39 1A8 
09 07 71.1 
95 49 164 
49 87 IU 
lOfl 34 126 

19 i j 2A2 
OJ; 102*9 
29 64 79 
86 65114 


• .. AS 
-8 119 

-2 Mb 

< 13 

4? “e 
-3 179b 

•-2 43 


-1 34 

65 

.. 10 
*2 15 7 

.. 195 

+2 79 


.. 65 

.. WO 
154 
*6 7.1 

•-1 66 
.. 13 

64 


Ugh low carnaiy 


dross 
dh Vld 
' pend* * « 


570 » 
75 32 
98 0% 

40 at 

81 SO 
172 121 
212 IK 
ZlB'rMB'j 
48 0 
310 207% 
80S 208 

225 17B 
11S 9B 
10% 715 
259 171 
250 10 
316 10 
19% 17% 
371 j£3 
10 % 0 
110 M 
11B S5 
137 57'; 
IX 26 
91 81 

0 72 


fitoksai 

GapieMFt 


cm MUribon 
Crown Houss 
Cuimns 3%% 

gr 

DM* 6 Met. 'A' 

OawM i H sa m oi 


Demand SHi0qg 
□HDUMt 
Ohtro Hero 
Ortma 

Dodson p«k 
Door 

DOonSon H 
□koort 


% ■-* 

93 +1 

30 

70 -t 
10 

10 ' +2 
£168% •-! 

S\ 

310 

290 • .. 

£20% •>% 

213 •-& 

10 * -3 

Cl IT. 

222 >10 
ft *?. 

17*t • 

270 B+2 
IM *2'i 

ita 

112 *4 

133 

101 +1 

88 
re 


Erftra 213 

BB 2*0 • 

Bum SB 

am iu -t 

BKVcha (A® B £25% -% 

awa (Bj 87-s 

Erodart £24*. •-% 

eHOhCHhaCWf 325 «-! 

bSui (LU) -fl- £2S +% 

Erakm# HOWS 163 43 

EcropMn Ferries 141 •-! 

DC 91k W 133 a-a 


IX 

203 +2 

378 +2 

42% 

H T-8 
IH -X 


Fheon 

Faedn Arote I 
Fmroufi) 
fh mdniro 


fS^O tou p NN 
Fodnrga AHsrray 
Franen (Th0**D 
gs tra 
GXtt 
OR 

Gromn Big 


Gong Kerr 
GrronpAn Md0 


Do 8% on 
Do SMbPI 
Dp 10% 

U ro g reeii M 

%2^S3SUr 

OLsm . 


Hort Uojd 


Huarom Bey 
Hwang Mho 
F kmkrn Qrojp 
Hunan. VAanoro 

rm 

bodor 

Jacksons Borons 


Jemoi Itrothsy 
Jotrocn X FB 


570 m+'i 

SB 

no -e 

51 -% 

113 

32% • .. 

1 T83 

SB 

131 4-1 

SO -4 

306 • .. 

118 • 

140 -1 

10 • .. 
no% -% 

306 s-e 
*20 
Mfl 

2*8 -4 

7 -% 

IB 

23* -I 
13* •-* 

232 

3 0 

37% -% 

32 -I 

170 -4 

£178 

112 -1 
£119% -% 

17A 

223 -2 

581 *0 

117 ■-! 

118 ft .. 

202 a-a 

.IB *47 

90 
WO 

« -1 

91 • .. 
238 

99 -2 

£13*. 

275 

iia -3 

342 41 

IX -2 

20 0 

285 -5 

105% ♦% 

887 -3 

191 -* 

35 -1 


Joins 6 ORmroi 120 -2 

Journal (ThonaR 118 ■ .. 

Kalamazoo 23 -1 

KTOon X 

SSU M ~i ft 

ssasaf ft 


M.1 XI TA2 
XI XX 1X1 
45 49144 
IU 84 IU 

82 AS 319 
68 XI IM 

I" 

375 Z2 . . 
0.7* 17 .. 

83 07 01 
179 69 99 

42 AB II 
1 A3 67 68 
63 61 109 
67.1 44 125 
93 44 119 
114 46 93 
16* 87 T15 
09 34 194 
75 29 16.7 
74 74 1*3 
7-t 89 114 
73 7.1 64 
39 ZS 168 

67 65 214 
67 751X5 


143 67 64 
107 60 87 

98 45 1X2 

25 891X1 
C A 61 1X7 


01b 60 IU 

y Q4 .. 
1$ 223 
45 104 
7.1 39 . . 

5.0 1.7 160 

A# 65 1*5 
84 AI 1XX 
143 35168 
07 19 9*4 

2.1 64 KM 

7.T 67 185 

5JJ 7.9 163 
79 14 2E4 
1.0 1J .. 
54 48 85 
05 12 61 

XI 54145 
20 62 75 
1X5 Xfi 144 
41 7.1 .. 

84 84 194 
17.1 49 113 

109 39 84 
5.0 42 89 
XI UIU 
47 39 184 
167 15274 
12.0 39 153 
160 681X1 
67 39 1A7 
10.1 39 113 
07 KLO 38 
25 39 115 
1X0 54 ias 
64 48 101 
IU 68164 
22 09389 

1.7b 45 133 

67b 24 161 
BOO A5 .. 
89 79 .. . 

0 34 .. 
1JD 4 JO 199 
01 54 214 

20 7 88 128 
27 29 U 
64 45 219 
K>3 61 168 
61b 32 165 
85 43 79 
.. s .. 27.1 
.. .. 825 

67 63 128 
107 45 94 
45 48 89 
se.0 A3 .. 
114 AI 65 
85 75 83 

75 A2 1X0 
18 0.7 45^ 

85 39 M5 

293 49162 
07 04 215 
. . K . . 175 
103 35 119 
65 AS XO 
59 45265 
28 s 128 7.7 
13 67 154 
114 45 1X4 
2Sb 13 21.1 
214 75 23.0 
7.1 45 828 


Lon M(9end 
DO D<d 
Lon * MBnr 

Lon me 
ungros tad 
Unr X Sanro 
0 Ndgs 


230 179 
135 99 

78 89% 

227 158 

2 28 13* 
40 319 
390 306 
115 64 

50% 32 


i» >21 Mtcfawm is3 

73 *3 Madedtn (RCMQ SB 

2H6 IK tAaLechfVe 258 

125 78 UndS _ 125 

80 486 MencrwrterSWp 890 

78 Bt U o roeieii Bronze 77 

135 toi uaney 122 

86 86 UMhrg 76 

100 65 Mrovol (Lradey) 00 

0 K MannaBt Urn 74 

663 360 Mararnro 620 


194 12S 

91 X 
78% 81 
123 70 

IM 163 
315 212 
139 as 
42 20*1 

218 10 
41 ZB 
U4 92 
55 *8% 

272 188 
256 203 
43* 2*7 
30 223 
915 525 
505 363 

27 n 

135 88 

67« 332 
760 200 
14 776 
*83 311 
98 61 
310 105 
30B 215 
31* 236 

164 55 

131 68 

213 97 

190 ns 
130 123 
5M <21 
220 115 
»3t 88 
900 505 


91 S7 
102 Bt 
475 3*6 
34 21 

ISO 11D 
S3 M 
98 19 

152 05 
3*3 151 
6b 30 
150 128 
10 122 
l o* 5 

162 IIS 
130 M 


Mofce 

Morgan OuOOhi 
Mora (Hcdnri) 
rtaaoswid 
MSB IB _ 
Neuron tads • 
Nfeseo) Tonka 
Neman 
Norcrt* 

OTOcs Bod ITOdl 

Parker KimM A' 
Park Plaoa 
Parroti JT 


Psgror-HsBroriajr 
Rnriend tad 
PhOUMs 


Prtdianl Sara 
RFD J 

RHP 1 

Redtam Msad 
Rrow Org * 

Roaoraa Stars 
RatctKi (Gf Brtdgs) 1 
BoctoB & cotaon ( 


wearto Eng 
RkTiiro (Lrocsl 


F kxorteon Res 

Rooroon (Thomas) i 


98 17 
27* 2T* 

99 56 

90 « 

ft ft 

135 120 
170 04 
184 134 
ISA 12* 
104 99 

52 a 

138 75 
153 103 
990 703 
53*/ 32 
TO 180 
10 83% 
MO 388 
82% 26Pi 
131 B* 
*1 30 

326 228 
225 183 

194 IS 
153 71 
118 BB 
Isa a 
96 « 

508 3*5 
500 35* 
1W 88 
236 170 
» 75 

210 153 

220 m 

296 180 
264 80 
0 12 

221 160 
5S7 30 

195 113 
230 198 
5^ » 

e% n 

8% 5% 
95 64 

165 123 
110 31 
227 68 

273 132 
333 203 
30 288 
243 200 
IH 124 

22 9% 
00 58 
124 78 
241 73 

2B1 85 


17 SI 

04 arosTkoy 
55 Smrtun 
40 SowM Gordon (JJ 


Bet* Nenoota 
Boon 1 R n osW a on 




aw Eng 
Su Hurrirad 
g*e«yy 
SKF 

Bnati 8 Nephew 
Srash Wwsiw W i 
Snaps tad 

Sulfa Rao ane a 
Brag Furman 
Sandrod n rawpr ki 
star comp 


3Tr -I 

80 48 

76 • 

74 -2 

40 -4 

112 

178 -2 

IBS -2 

ih -a 

ITS -3 

99 ~S 

47 -1 

122 W-2 

ia 

570 -8 

» • 

2K 8—4 
127 0 

08 -d 

£32% ♦*. 


sariwit 6 np 
^.sara 

S-Ve Paaae •*’ 


TOT 

TSL Themro 

TOroat Chan 
is Eat 
Tefea 

MS 

Thomsen TAaia 
Trims 
lomtdns (FH) 
pafatarHoun 
Tranxcnanamri 
Trinipnrt Dev 
Tromnood 
Treka 

rm 

TroarCima* 

UKO 


TM 0 

182 -4 

12S 0 

106 
i ia 

as *2 

606 

08 -12 

103 

2= 

78 

198 

208 B-4 

272 94 

100 a-1 


7A 11.0 91 
BJ ZB 218 
AI XO 28.1 

«J5 XI 1AX 
11.1b XJ217 
0J OS 1X0 
M XX 1X8 
IU X7 1R0 
U X3Z0J 

27 AB 104 
TM 60 1X6 

AB IB 11-5 
XS 1X284 
A3 56 BO 
M « 4 23.4 
23 10 92 

IS 5S& 

IIO 18 2X1 
846 XI 1X1 
96 X0210 
32 4.1 1XX 
XI X8 70 
10 4X223 
113 X2 XS 
1X1 18 170 
A7 10 1A5 
0.1* 03 170 
mo 6-8 82 

1.1 XI 840 
103n 7.6 11J 

V* X7 573 
1X3 40 1X6 
1X1 5.1 X7 

15 0 10 140 
8t5 20 270 

143 XS 180 
.. .. *M 

0On 73 180 
35.7b SO 1X1 
XI 03 21.1 
73 07 2BO 

170 *D 102 
AO *3 161 
105 SS 1X4 
10 05 .. 
212 7S IA5 
1-0 00 2X0 

16 21»D 

BOb X9 253 
64 30 1X2 

30 Z8 .. 

21S 40 180 

7.1 *317.7 
U U AS 
2X9 X6 170 

28 12 M3 
SO 10 222 

SX1 3.4 106 
60 30 110 

13 12 IIO 

67 63 130 
40 13 3A3 

1 Ah 53 10.4 

4.1 XS 160 
A3 62 82 

. . 140 
XI U 143 
.. .. 4X4 

.. .. a* 

U 88 99 
93 7/4 80 
.. .. IJ3 

7.7 48 118 
2D 28 540 


23e 7.1 &9 
93 30140 
10 2*380 
30 4.7 170 
173b 30 10.1 
A3 SO 160 
A3 SWISS 
10 X* 164 
1.7 13 3X6 
13 13 320 

*4 34 198 
24 61 142 
30 32 63 
1X8 103 70 
T93 20 170 

is u no 

121 A7 BO 
78 U1I3 
2X8 50 1X5 

U 2>ttl 

0 4 1.1 252 

ftfl 24 2X0 
86 43 UA 
7.6 42 1X6 
570 45 70 
78 78100 
53 18 118 

233 AT TAQ 

ias 4.i ix9 

i?? 

to 108 80 

128* &2 124 
7X0 28 2U 


144b 73 7.6 
1X5 X817.0 
. b .. .. 

*3 22 102 1 
85 18 210 


J% 




80 

-m 


4.8 

45 

18.4 

128 


81 

48 

1X5 

110 

a "I 

XI 

£0 

IU 

218 

-6 


265 

-3 

63 

13 

340 

W 

-4 

05 

1.1 

266 

2fl7 

a-3 

189 

84 

21 

SSD 

-B 

90 

4.4 

182 

174 

— 1 

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81 

150 

18% 

-% 

a 


3*3 

71 

• .. 

oil 

all 

587 

229 

a -6 

ft* 

X* 

5.i 

185 

88 

235 

•a 

7.1 

XO 

100 


Q Tin P l e ro sp a g m 

DAILY DIVIDEND 
£4,000 

Claims required for 
+41 points 

Claimants should ring 0254-53272 


iflekera 

TkcrPmui 

ww 

voWwaoen 

vSr^ 

MUero fAu^tee 

Mgr tad 
wSSrtMGtaaa 
WaWMRs 
Wedgwood 


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WMN Wgs 

SVOSGP 


WsdWMlRk 
wyndhtM Eng 
Vrorow 
Young (H) 


Grosa 

*r tld 

wiee Oi-gt penes % rye 


16 15 943 
5X2 *4 148 

67 XB 127 

166 At 1X0 

68 88198 
AM 12 24.1 

II «I4 

4 A XO 147 

11.1 6* 16S 

18 17 1X6 
51 28 278 

107 83 13* 
AI 14 64 
18 18 2*0 

43 61247 
78 88158 

65 .. .. 
73 U 108 

111 A7 120 
93 17 109 

17.1 28 258 

66 78 925 

168b U W.7 
25 47 1X2 

1A« 87 183 
53 4.4 1X2 
28b S3 143 

200b XS 177 
47 02148 


INSURANCE 


226 IM- Abney LPe 
26. a Atet Alas 
28% 23 Am Gen 


301 23S 
431 213 
95* 701 
SS4 720 
708 632 
30 267 
280 231 
22* 179 
420 201 

68% a*. 

285 230 
XB 223 

1*L 12 
90 718 
489 361 
957 788 
4S0 32B 
42* 30 
445 400 
772 520 
227 772 
550 120 
474 307 


Cm LkUon 
gj-yAUW 

Grot AockSn 
ORE 

Hash C E 
Hogg fUbtnxm 
Legal t Gwi 
London X Men 
Lon IM bw 
Mvw&Moen 
MfM 
PWS 


167 

-3 

90 

63 .. 





£25*. 

-% 

890 

34 .. 

283 

*3 

70 

27 206 

827 

-7 

426 

52 .. 

300 

-0 

189 

50 .. 

230 

•-3 

M 

86 .. 

365 

-10 



789 

•-13 

31 A 


622 

•-16 


MZI 

«N 

• .. 

240 

80 90 

29* 

-6 

13A 

AB 140 

246 

-e 

11.7 

AB 104 

IM 

*♦> 

85 

40 73 

403 

• .. 

21A 

50 107 

£26 


220 

50 . . 

226 

• *3 

IIA 

50 109 

283 

• .. 

120 

*6170 


SadgwU* Gp 
sawn W'son 
aage JMgs 
Sun AOarca 
Swi LM 
Tradt tademrpy 
mraFrotar 


£11% 

7B -2 

303 -5 

8*4 -80 

80 -8 

884 a-3 

*27 *3 

f a-16 
-10 

807 -S' 


Ml 9* 
103 32 

1S6 187 
ITS 135 
381 278 
375 226 
94 4* 

228 187 
360 255 
SS SI 
183 125% 


LEISURE 

Ban X vka *A- 119 

Boons 8 Hearts* 170 
BraraHWer 188 •- 

Csmose 0 

OrysTOa 150 • 

Fkirt Lscun 355 

GRA » 

Hamburg* BrocOa 68 
Hor^onTrareT 115 

n Lawn ics 

JUtarm'C Hugo *2 • 

Las M 158 

HxMntar 140 

PHraroams 288 . • 

B*My DMA* 3® 

fSy Leetoe #* 

Saga HCWteyj 1» 


MINING 


13% 9% Ang Amro Coro 
10'. 608 Ang Am 
57*. SB Am Gokt 
58 33 AA17 
*0 25 Arntoveal 
*1 24% Do 'A' 

196 1 20 Mro HHsm 
*25 an strwocn 

160 85 Etradaw 

2V» 12% Brfftaa 
358 258 CRA 

89 0 Carr Boyd 

534 *27 ConaGahriTOda 
531 314 Da Bat 

200 ns oetaaro 

9'. 5 Coomtonteki 
13% 8 DftftnWi 
r. 3% Drotarr 

%% a 

186 12B EJ Oro 
193 96 Briaeg 

390 £0 ERaj(M) 

4% 2% E Rona Prop 

9 3 rs Cm ^ 

213 103 FSOe* 

75 20 GeewelM 

8% *>. GnabeC 

10 8 CWMrtog 

10% 5 GPSA 

478 813 BMWgocrt 

ii 

350 200 Hroee. 
r 31 Jrtwnroa 
12-! 6% nrvOM 
A 3% tarot 
180 70 Lsria 
13% 7% Ltaanon 
*10 190 Lorttae 

157 it MB* 

2B 13 MTObyatan Mtatag 
123 70 Mmb 

23 14% Mama bro 

H 7 imanguri 
8 5% Hdriaww. 

656 530 MlKSCO 
5% 2% HewWta 
1*2 78 tun BroMrt 10 

44 27 Nth KrogroS 

260 210 Nortf*g«tt 
22% 11% Oranos Rea 
126 90 RMftro Til 
289 2D7 PMO Aaisand 
25 13' I Rand Mtaes Lrt 
445 235 Rand Mina* Prop 
8B 16 Rndtonota 
as 225 Ramson 
7*1 511 HTZ 

7»- 4% Rinwnlwg 

10% 7% Si Helms 

158 75 SA LM 

31 18% SouSL’zal 

556 338 SWWnsto 
138 80 Sung* Bad 

138 75 Tronon 

586 350 UrnTO 
59'/ 35 VaaiRneh 
s*4 270 Vemsranc* 

105 55 VkrttroKra 

90 55 Yogsta 

17 10% wantoa briery 

50 298 VMetm 
310 10 wanem Areas 
a% 18% WtBtron Deep 
WH 10 Vta a to w *Wng 
2*6 123 Wes Hart Con* 
140 90 rthvn Creak 
17% 8% Mew* 

58 2B WMMgal 
16% 11*1 2roxa Copper 
SB 38 Zandpoi 


115 

£S% 

n 

S -i 

195 

•« Si 

ZD -3 

£5 

103 -6 


♦1% 

448 

114 .. 

+% 

271 

82 .. 


142 

07 .. 

♦*i 

1*2 

57 .. 


475 

285 .. 

-S 

780 

274 .. 

+5 

2S0 

230 .. 

♦% 

282 

203 .. 

+2 



♦2 

*2 

s§ 

70 100 
44 .. 


AO 

X5 .. 


620 

180 .. 


ft 1: 


4.13 460 11X .. 
+1% 566 163 

S*Q 21UJ .. 
40 130 21* 

A3 7X 72 

*3 87 J) 20.7 ’.I 

42 2X0 159 .. 

.. >71 10.4 .. 

+ 1 3Q 21 .. 

+2 1X0 9-6 . . 


MOTORS AND AIRCRAFT 


IH >38 
158 78 
1*1 70% 

0% 24% 


BSG 

Bunsi Bros 

g*» »W)CD) 

sss. 

Cow (J) 

Dane (Oorarey) 

ERF 

Ffl Qrow 
Raw ktotra 
Gatra (Frank CO 
Qansrro Metro 


172 • 

10 -10 

122 

0 % #- 1 % 
ft -is 

>H -1 

■ -1 

246 -8 

IH 

109 -1 

220 +1 

0 4-1 

ft *4 

78 • .. 


121 •-! 
ft *:3 t 

130 48 

579 «*2 

131 • .. 

70 “ 

47 Hz 


7 A A3 1X0 
7.1 48 X8 

22 1X16 2 
IJt 15 140 

ii!i ill 72 
2X8 A5 107 
50 X8152 

60 If 82 

52 52 131 
7X 23 188 
.. ..108 
55 12 202 

7.0 4.1 .. 

W S” 

II II 513 

aa *2 iia 

U 01 - 
12X ZA 10.5 
XI 50 02 
XO 22 147 
15.1 40 21A 

7.0 6A U 
1X7 XT 112 

6A 49 1X0 
6.4 62 10.6 

4.1 XB 12 
XI 5211.1 

ai u 119 


NEWSPAPERS AND 
PUBLISHERS . 


°rr 

wymPMMaig 
Hams Cdtdri H 
tadapandem 
H ThocHCn 


219 

-s’ 

81 

17150 

1017.1 

30^ 

• .. 

143 

47 160 

570 


320 

54 2X1 

411 

-5’ 

11.1 

24 205 

3*5 

-4 

11.1 

52 155 

168 

♦1 

A7 

XB 249 

3B6 

-6 

200 

U 19.1 

173 

• .. 

100 

55 110 

2B5 


1X0 

45 .. 

529 


1*0 

20 15.7 

ns% 


lAfl 

10 .. 

57® 

-» 

' BB 

1.7 802 

117 

• .. 

87 

40 IU 

410 


214 

83118 

MB 

-2 

220 

MMJ 


2*3 HO 
300 10% 
0 18 
US 96 


Atnpol 118 

MW Enrogy 10 

ABewcReawcn i? 
BrRahOMi 570 

r?as, 

Sdttro i7i 

awash 356 

CviaisCBM 70 
Canker MB 

OonwhW S 

ERWproa 117 

Garoar Enargy 3$ 
OotalN Ras 230 
GoriPM 34 

Oi W rao rn Baa 6* 

Sfa an 

KCA > Mag » 

LA8MO lig 

DOUrtO _ >80 

Wav Un don Qj SB 
PBTOran Til 


-Ifl 482 U 02 
-1 ■ . e . . . . 

1-3 28.6 85 1X2 

-5 189 1X9 42 

r . . 1626 XI 102 
89 52 1X2 
-* 7.1 60SXS 


14 AI 12* 
41 BA .. 
2X1 ^ 67 »2 

AS 33.1 ill 
17A ISA 32 
141 7X3 .. 


19H 

wyiUro Ortraair 


3* 2$ piMro 
2ZE no Ranev 

« ga?n«» 

SID S3 EM 

ft ft fraaSpi 

I s sw 

m a ss^ 8 


(bon 
tfr YId 

Pnoa Ch 'D* pane* % P/E 


23% 1X0 

ao in . 

H(% -*. 228 4A . 

783 ->2 500 84 77 
10 -2 16 52 229 

34 -3 22 

14% -% .. .. 142 

S3 .. 7.1 1X4 23 

118 -8 .. .. 1H2 

178 -2 1X0 X4 52 


0 81 
150 127 

2K> 1S3 
70 51 

SS 190 

280 190 
213 120 
B 30 
580 558 
284 01 
192 153 


OVERSEAS TRADERS 


Bartwpck 

Cftringun 
RrtiyuroM) 
Hrortton CraadaU 
Mm 
Jk*s [Yrtri 
Lonma 
Ocean Mson 
Pnoroon zorii 
Db 'A' 

Poly Pack 
EMe Dow 
Stem Bras 
Toaer rt rom h ij 
Tula Cano 


45 


or 

1.8 

125 

141 

•-a 

100 

71 

39 

81 


59 

73 

18 

336 

ro-7 


85 

125 

are 

• *3 

250 

80 

295 

33% 

• .. 

10 

48 

1X5 

247 

-t 

150 

E3 

1X2 

87 


43 

63 

85 

210 


&fl 

AI 

60 

210 

-i 

86 

4.1 

86 

US 

m 

-a 

70 

AI 

3-5 

<W 

565 

• *9 

220 

AI 

123 

ire 

-3 



620 

163 

• -3 

100 

u 

79 


PAPER. PRINTING, ADVERT'G 


215 Abbon Maad 
120 AddSon Page 
0 Adeem nr 
225 Assoc taper 
31 AuR 5 Wfcorg 
188 Brorvaaa 
224 Boas* k ta aW n k 
201 BPCC 
i0 Bna rtng 
M2 DbR N 

155 Brow 
720 Carton Coses 
173 Clrapmui 
178 gogpro WF- 


HX9 AB .. 
37.1b *9 50-3 
198 60 . . 

398 A* 882 
1X7 48 l BA 
1X7 AI 156- 
1Q0n 20 220 
ZO 40 568 


ioa xi xi 
.. ..a* 

78 48 1X8 
18 28 111 
BO 50 1X4 
88 24 182 

.. .. 4A5 


172 Ferauson tad 
375 FadToaafrt 
53 Goars Grass 
200 God GrMnWss 
110 Good RsWdOrs 
10 Hrortropnra 
311 Lana H-S C-E 
mo McConuktroa 
03 Mere 0-Fsrre* 
1Z3 Norton Opn 
19% Ogtary 6 Mataar 
2B Skit Paper 
513 St IMS Go 


Z31 

+3 

40 

1.7 

2X5 

133 

-2 




S3 

• +5 

16 

XO 

17 4 

320 


89 

30 

13.7 





OB 

Ififi 


7 1 

4.1 

973 



64 

27 

162 



17 It 

83 

2X2 

187 

-1 

70 

A2 


162 


7.0 

42 

*00 

200 

• .. 

40 

24 

205 

680 

a -io 

0-5 

1 1 

269 

713 


120 

56 

195 

290 

-5 

30 

12 


2M 

•-6 

118 

42 

1X2 

im 


30 

Xi 

172 




25 

b.B 

2BS 

0-2 

113 

42 

1ft 7 



87 



74 


*3 

5 B 

20.1 



4 1 

20 

33.'* 

150 


70 

47 

263 

256 

*5 

89 

3* 

96 

*Q3 

+2 

6.6 


738 

200 


65 

44 

1P9 

12S 

a-3 

57 

40 

188 

136 


50 

17 

14 1 

127% 

+% 




AI 




406 

790 


1?.9b 

16 

37.4 

TBS 

-6 

2X9 

Xfl 

IftS 


120 

Do G3% Gnv Prl 124% 

90 

12 

124 

Smwftt Mtaq 

in •-> 

4.7 

20 

200 

Utaror Waaar 

3jB a .. 

10* 

50 96 

153 

vrom Pollan 

17® -10 

13 

10 3*8 

40 

Wneo 

52 


144 

565 

waxangwn (J) 

790 -5 

357 

43 155 

263 

263 

93 

15 130 


68 58 55 
7 1b 68 &1 
*3 102 1X4 

78 56 U 

107 38 1X3 

01 AA 148 
.. ..843 

68 39 IA2 
&*b 1.1 . . 
57s UIU 
XI 37 142 


. . . . 75.1 

5A0 77 . . 


PROPERTY 


IU *2 .. 
M UIU 
14.0 140 .. 
2X0 112 .. 


17.1 562 12 
608 1X0 .. 
670 1X9 .. 
4X0 7 A .. 


SAX 2*9 .. 
X* XS 488 

6X8 IM .. 
179 XI .. 
30 X4 .. 
8X0 1X3 .. 
*O0 10JS .. 
290 3X7 . . 
115 169 .. 


100 1.8 .. 
230 7.7 .. 


£ 11 % -*• 

90 e . . .. 

227 *4 

£13% • 

240 #0 120 50 89 

£42 ♦% 551 111 .. 

6*2 a .. 314 AB XS 

£5% 2E0 XI 387 

£7% .. IH 189 .. 

1X0 21.7 .. 

118 7.1 .. 


H2 27 AbacO 53 

76 08 Abed Lent IS 

BO 70 Apn ao 

170 IBO Arkngton SeC8 * 160 

250 190 BCE 210 

124 85 BtagrsuB 110 

Z8J 218 Bilon (P) 280 

550 40 BradURl 5m 

160 10 Br L»W ITS 

170 ih Mean iso 

0 SB cam M ASons 41 

231 216 Cap X Conroe 230 

25S 200 CaroiH Rep 20 

198 170 Corarodnaro T85 

*75 *10 Owswrtrtd 450 

855 700 CALA 855 

171 131 COrka NfekOlB 171 

278 184 Comets 238 

20 14 Conor* Sacs 17 

1*0 09 Couvry (Nw 1Z7 

>77 117 County -B- «2 

250 MS Cusdna 2*0 

655 470 DsTOan 655 

20 8% Dana 18 

165 158 Emu a Agency 158 

10* 47 Egerun v (0* 

120 I1D Exists* Gan 115 

>85 10 Estates Prep 185 

112 83 Erans 01 LasOs 105 

182 51 FMaratad Housing T6Z 

76 0% FNa Osha 64 

201 170 Froranora 19* 

192 M6 Or PorttaW 188 

,250 202 Qrmcnta 252 

16% 11 HoVkxM Gp £11% 

49S 432% Hnrranrown 460 

465 417% DO -A' 40 

223 130 Hammer 221 

32D 233 tTOnlMVH 320 


332 276 Lrow Sscultros 816 

7*0 430 urn 6 Edin Tta 7JO 

07 - 147 Do 6'fk 237 

SH 218 Umlftm Shop 250 

171 02 ton Shop Prop 153 

325 266 Lvnsm 326 

380 275 MEPC 30 

126 90 Manamay 100 

118 105 McKay Secs 113 


78 80 MetCroough 71’ 

390 in Molar fir mq 

soo 510 Mororiogh 900 

TOO 36* Mowa ra w 700 

105 82 UUckkM (A4J) 98 

20 19 MtoKtoTO El9‘ 

75 73 NawCwroidHI 75 

63 43 partdaro 54 

260 255 Poach** MS 

18 8% mat naan* ElS 

208 175 prop S Rev 204 

137 107 PropHUgs 132 

123 108 PrapSacroky >18 

10% 0% Ragtan 10'. 

575 320 Regaton 575 

Bi« SIS Roeroou#! 685 

297 S3 Husti 8 Torrptwis 253 

270 (53 SomTO 261 

92 78 Scot Met 91 

175 7*2 siougn Estates 172 

4*5 260 Sw^rowk 440 

173 1*4 Stand Sara 173 

70 505 S»ek Conversion 710 

H 6B SxocUnr 85 

55 45 Town Cem 55 

26G 188 Trattort Pole 238 

1« 98 UK Land 136 

640 52S IM Real 640 

865 675 Warner BOO 

80 476- wrortara 5*0 

28 17% watt) (Jot) 23 

172 i« west B Corny 172 


-1% 03 0.4 62 8 

> .. 20 Zb ISO 

23 30 167 

-2 24 1.5 

-5 6 0 XS 7. 6 

» .. 171 XI 142 

1X9 28 22.7 

19 22 182 

I XI 51 183 

X8 37 212 
26 1 T 

♦7 X6 40 IB* 
k .. 17.1 37 17 8 

25 7 b 30 126 
k .. 90 53 H9 

XO 2.5 220 

32 

-2 27 21 ZS5 

.. 50 33 5> 

» 89 3.8 54* 

*6 l&fi 29 1X8 


36 XI 2X0 
.. 1X1 72 144 

-a XO 48 130 
♦10 4.7 29 171 

B0 

.. 101 82 121 
-2 10.0 6 2 27.5 

31 12 7X2 

138 30 280 
a .. 1X6 3 1 303 

5.0 23 17 4 
1*.0 * * 12 1 

. . 7.7 23 36.7 

23 18131 

10.0 XI 162 

.. 1.7 U426 

•-1 140 A4 201 

ta .. 12 9b 1.7 229 

a *3 92 33 . 

• . . X7 Z7 22 | 

76 50 185 
■ - 80 XB408 

•-5 1X7 A5 2X3 

4.9 42 19.8 
X1U BS 21 7 
+7 36 X0 170 

09 13 380 
43* 1.1 983 
142b 1 8 1X2 
♦25 64 0-0 148 

• . . 7.4 7J 152 

17.3 0.9 302 
17 22 330 
-4 21b 29273 

121 40 350 

-2 6.* 3 1 3A6 

42 32 2X5 
+1 180 XI 256 

01 1.0 . 
♦15 52 09 438 

lib OX . 

a . 109 43 111 

• .. 69 34 408 

+1 59 5.4 21 1 

79 40 17 4 

. 1X6 XI 2X0. 

59 34 195 
-5 1X1 1.7 310 

• I i * XS 3X7 

160 7.1 15.7 

20 0 3 1 282 

• . 276 32390 

243 *5 IB 4 

07 30 7A2 
114 80 92 


SHIPPING 


312%1C7 Assoc B> Pom 
386 285 Br Commonweals 
368 288 crosora 
9* 58 Fwhar (James) 

603 rao Grog 
78 54% Jacobs (Jl) 

>2% 5 MS 
41 H Mwesy Oorts 
, 270 180 Ooasn Transport 
578 42fl P & O do 
105 66 Rwx*nan IWTOtar) 
390 380 Tronfari Scott 


208 

k ■ 

71 

XX 193 

288 

a -7 

7 1 

25 203 

268 

-7 

8.1 

X3 »9 

56 

a -2 

47 

81 105 

500 

-5 

17.9 

38 340 

76 


51 

6 7 580 

■3 

-% 


04 

27 



.. 37 

T9* 


93 

48 80 

530 

-3 

223 

43 152 

105 

• . 

71 

88 185 

375 


1X9 

X* 300 


SHOES AND LEATHER 


290 FU 

1E4 Gamar Booth 
32 Haadtam Sms 


32S 


93 

29 117 

166 

a-2 

14 3 

86 103 

44 

-i 

07 

16 660 

198 


82 

*.l 10 8 

74 


*A 

50 22* 

106 


62 

67 74 

1*0 

-2 

11 4 

7.7 SB 

221 

-5 

04 

20 273 


TEXTILES 


STS 206% 
210 IM 
10 87 
104 » 

Ut 123 

as eo 

74% 53% 
315 190 
152 74 
Z7S 196 
57 42 

171 1!4 
SO 25 
HO 69 


Asrod Trod 
Aden* Bras 

grata Mam 

Bachman M 

Br kfonakr 

Borowr & UFA 

coran 

CMBriS 
Cra»tfi a> (J) 
D»»»ai 
Oabran 
Don Bus , 
Dora m 
Fostro (John) 


117 87 
m 85 
205 as 
IB 73% 
350 Z3S 


Ss’*** 

Pvtdand 'A' 
Rsoacut 
S ST 

Carpal* 

Svtar 

B rn ro Uh e w [ffl 

Stroud Rasy 
Tarawa Jersey 
Torriktsena 
Tootal 
VdrttydS 


200 -5 

210 +a 

125 
9* 

129 

H 

87 -'i 

280 a-3 
i60 a-i 

236 -2 

4Q -X 
170 
38 

75 • . 

IOO a-3 
50 -2 

10 -5 

TO S . 
76* a -2 

170 a . 

73% 

83 

82 -1 
18 

139 •-? 

38% <k-% 
722 

29 -! 

153 -2 

B6 -1 
109 -2 

183 ♦! 

1B3 *-5 

« •-% 
30 0*S 


93 16 179 
XI 33 54 I 
53 4.7 SA 
82 87 IIS 

80 67 8 * 

71 80 1 X 7 

67 05 . 

90 33 9 3 

XI 1.4 7 X 2 
X 9 10 15 I 

. SO 
*6 27 84 
5.7 150 SI 
50 07 
7.9 73 73 

b 490 

19 27 107 

*3 81 87 
64 33 106 
60 47 HO 
84 OS 238 
B 2 100 17 1 
60 72 133 

. a si 
S 3 50 ig .4 

20 60 09 

70 b 60 4.9 
25 e 1 DB 1 X 8 
§4 *2 1 X 3 

X 9 50 50 
36 XX 192 
79 4 J > 3.1 

68 47 146 
5.7 50 10J 
100 29 ll.i 


TOBACCOS 


*31 908 BAT 
372 239 imperial 
167 127 O ota Ba r g -B' 


“* 173 46 00 
■ 137 87 1X7 

8-1 M 5.1 


• fatfir Mand a Btafl b Forecast amend • Marini 
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it m 

























































i ; in/, i w »j.\m i «i^~ 


li| 

A 



as a 

at Senior Level 


Af our City Head Office a small, talented team of multi-skilled 
secretaries provide a relief secretarial service to Senior 
Executives - talcing over the duties of their regular secretaries, 
perhaps during holidays or sickness. 

This offers an opportunity to gain wide ranging experience at 
senior level in amutfi-nafiorraf company. 

We are looking for individuals with at least 4 'O' levels 
(including English Language) and a minimum of 100 w.p.m. 
shorthand and 40 w.p.m. typing. 

You must have previous secretarial experience, including word 
processing, together with an interest in new office technology. A 
smart appearance, the ability to cope under pressure and to fit 
easily into d variety of situations are further essential qualities. 
In return, you will receive a competitive salary and London 
-Allowance and a range of benefits including subsidised staff 
restaurant, non-contributory pension scheme and superb sports 
and social facilities. 

If you feel you have the right blend of skills and personality, 
please write or telephone for an application form, quoting ref. 
A. 327 to: Mrs M. Ogbom, Recruitment Branch, The British 
Petroleum Company p.I.c., Britannic House, Moor Lane, 
London EC2Y 9BU. Tel: 01-920 8590. 

BP is an equal opportunity employer. 

Britain at its best. 


JUST 

WHAT 

A 

SECRETARY 

NEEDS: 


SEE PAGE 9 


£1 cm VARtAi Rf rnirnMCNr 

— _ 

Temp To Penn 
Receptionist 
With Flair 
To £8,000 pa 

An expanding Chelsea- 
based Software House 
requires an experi- 
I meed young person to 
run its Reception Area, 
initially in a Temporary 
capacity but with a 
view to permanency in 
a few months' time. 
You will welcome cli- 
ents. answer calls, 
assist with typing and , 
provide visitors with 
refreshments. As this 
is the Company's focal 
point, poll shad presen- 
tation and an excellent 
speaking voice are es- 
sential. Your typing 
speed of 40 wpm will 
suffice. 

Please contact: 

Ian Archibald. 


01-4911868=1 


MEDIA- FINANCE -ADVERTISING -SALES- PERSONNEL 

l EXECUTIVE I 

3 SEARCH £10-12,500+ = 

Z We are handling a variety of an ngn axcots in the field of < 
z EsacattavB Search from thxoogh to FA to MD. q 

n Thm area nT hntnsa regains peep ie wfao are nmfroiioinl. U 
talce initiative and etm^wUogaiwnnrlmii aiidi Iota of A 
" mtonataonal contact. If due appeal* to yna and yon have ’ 
^ good aecmariai akdb please call n lo tfiacum frithsc, jrJ 

| PA to BOARD | 

i DIRECTOR £io,ooo ? 

• Oneo/thahugeat prhraieiy ovnedUKcompnmeareqaima 
PAtoadiKeUvafibcfrniambMnLTtakuxIaljob&ira jjj 

r- secretary wanting the security and pR&Mkxufimn that a < 
5; large and higWy esteemed company ran o Ore Age 2S+ m 
SJaB* Audio /Shorthand and SP. ^ 

ITHEATRICAL CO I 

| £7,000 1 

m Front line job on re cep ti on with «fa»n»gip Sum, pradoc- O 
tioo oo. h a ndl ing prereure. maarea of telephone caBa and a 
^ Steady typing Joad. Sound Tike you? Ape 18+ Stifle 50 ‘ 
S u 


§ HAZELL- STATON 


Judy Farquharson Limited 

47 New Bond Si reel, London, W1Y9HA. 
01-4938824 

SET DP A HEW OFFICE £12,000+ 

This small, dynamic team of Venture Capitalists 
need an ambitious serf-motivated organis er with 
proven ab»y. style and drive. Beautiful new W1 
offices and real potential for total invofvemenL 
The right candidate ariti be numerate, have top 
P A/secretarial skate and WP experience, an 
immaculate appearance, good education and a 
sense of humour. Age 28-35. 

FASHION PR 

Young assistant with energy and enthusiasm tor 
fast moving in-house department. Must be wefl 
presented, flexible and able to cope with pres- 
sure. Once experience and good typing 
esse n tia l. WP knowledge useful Age 21 - 25. 
Satiny c£8£00 

TEMPORARY APPOINTMENTS 

We are always keen to interview candidates with 
exceflent secretarial skOs for varied temporary 
assignments in the West End. We are curr®r% 
looking for 

1. An adtar screen typist operator with shorthand 
for can week in a PR agency 

2. Top shorthand PA for Literary Agents - 2 
weeks. 


FREELANCE 

SECRETARY 


We are curre n tly seeking a freelance secretary 
to work at our luxurious office in Park W m>- 

The opportunity we have is lor an experienced 
secretary to work for our Main Board Director, 
responsible for adrnmistration. for a five month 
period. Further assignments may be avaihbk 
in the future. 

The person we are seeking wiB have good secre- 
tarial skills including shorthand and attHHto 
typing. They should be well presented and able 
to communicate at all levels. 

The work will be carried out on a freelance 
basis with the person being regarded as adf i 
employed. I 

To disewss this opportmalty farther, please con- 
tact Miss D. Thompson, 12 Sherwood Street, 
London W1V-7RD. Teh 01-437 7788. 


?mm\ 


i Square; Lc 
: 01-439 61 


Q Tell 01-^39 602L ‘ z 

MEDIA- FINANCE- ADV+KTISING -SALK • PERSONNEL 


JFL 


Phis many other* - Ring tamiediatetyl 

RECRUITMENT CONSULTANTS 



Tmsthouse Forte PLC 


'ichp iakuil nfcnuiiMENr 
ccrMSiniAwrs 


Six Month Contract 
Expariaand PA 

Our dent is a go-ahead 
Computer Services Com- 
pany and tfuy require a 
long-term Temporary Sec- 
retary to provide two 
Senior Directors vwtfi fuB 
wo H t an i back-up from 
odd Jim. You shouU pos- 
sess good shorthand and 
typing skflb together with 
a kmjwtadgs of word pro- 
cessing and tha ability to 
work under pressure 
within a very varied rote. 
Aged 25-35 idsaffy, your 
hourly rate of pay w» m- 
ceed £10,000 per mum. 

Please contact: 

Ian Archibald. 

=01-491 1868= 


PERSONAL SECRETARY 
TO THE CHAIRMAN 
OF THE BAR COUNCIL 

The Bar Council is the barristers’ profes- 
sional body and the Chairman seeks an 
experienced personal Secretary from the 
1st September 1986. The position requires 
a high standard of shorthand and typing 
skids, an efficient telephone manner and 
the ability to liaise with afllevels of the legal 
profession. It is intended that when the 
current Chairman reaches the end of his 
term, in December 1988, the successful 
applicant wffl provide continuity with the 
next Chairman. The salary will be in the 


next Chairman. The salary 
region of £10,000 p .a. 


Mease apply in writiru, with fufl C.V. and 
the names of two referees, to 

Miss Anthe&Tatton-Brown, 1 Brick Court, 
Temple, London EC4Y 9BY. 



ADMINISTRATION ASSISTANT 

CUSTOMER SERVICES DEPARTMENT 

We are looking for an efficient person, 20+ , able to type (shorthand/telex 
an advantage but not essential) with a good telephone manner, well 
organised and ability to cope under pressure. Previous office experience 
required- Duties will indude arranging theatre tickets, ' hotel 
accomodation, transportation and the administration relating to these 
services- 

Salary a £8,000. 

Please apply in writing to: 

Mrs. Tricia Brash 

16-17 Berners Street 
London WL 



PH-7-30 PM 

To aB appficants If look- 
ing fora new job seems 
Bee trying to cut your 
way trough tha jungle 
why not let us make 
your path a Me easier, 
•tom us in n glass of 
Pmtms and hear about 
afl our new vacancies. 
We welcome cofleu 
leavers, secretaries. PR, 
sales and marketing 
personnel. 

*Stt Q1-S35 8235 


PA TO CHIEF EXECUTIVE 
TOUR OPERATOR (SV LONDON) 
PROFILE 

* Excellent sftnthand/audio typing & WP gfcSs. 

* Used to woriora at Director level 

* Versatile & flantie - vary hard sorting! 

* Capable of ruining office & working on own during Boss's 
absence. 

* Travel or hotel marketing beckgrouMl useful. 

* Knowledge of ample book teepran mold be tafyfuL 
This is a vary senior post and si excetait opportunity to assist 
in tite creation and devstopment of a new division within an 
upmarket tour operator. 

Salary £10,000 pa Commence July 1986 


=» 4 


PROPERTY COMPANY (CITY) 

Good shorttand/typing and WP sfcffls are reqdrad to work for 
two Directors td small company qwdalising in deuatopmertf of 
commercial properties. Vary varied and very busy. Pro age 25- 
35 years with good personality. (Parking avadabta). 

Salary £13,000 pa. 

■For more details and initial interview please colt 

C te Wi ae Page or tan M c HaffHw 
01-409 9612 


! ’ ’ .MW '■ L* 


(RlQ ffoTff) 

IB-22 Hand Court. High Hotbom, WC1V 6JF. 


Contemporary Art 

£10,000 

Leading contemporary art gallery seeks 
experienced secretary/ office manager This 
is a top-lewd position requiring excellent 
communicating skills, organising flair, 
Bejribiltoy and the ability to work under 
pressure: Close liaison with artists, 
cataloguing (8/9 shows per annum j and 
occasional travel oo overseas and fairs 
complements your busy administrative role: 
Skills 90/50. Age 24-35. Please telephone 
01-493 5787. 

GORDON-YATES 


pfccn iifmwwf OppaAniiH 


ADMIN SEC/PA 
MAYFAIR ESTATE AGENTS 

The Principal of one of May&irs most success- 
ful estate agencies is urgently seeking a Sec/P A. 
Sophisticated, able to work under pressure. 
Fasi accurate shorthand and typing plus ability 
to work on own initiative essential. 

£10,000 pa negotiable + exceBem propecis. 

Telephone A Lassraaa 
01-409 2020 


SECRETARY / 
ADMINISTRATOR 

HOLBORN 

For Company Secretary at head office of 
a group of companies in wholesaling of 
toys and domestic wear. Recently we 
have made a major acquisition in the train- 
ing and educational field. Whilst excellent 
secretarial skills are required, the position 
also carries considerable administrative 
responsibilities relating to the group sec- 
retarial function and the running of the 
group's head office. Salary around 
£9,500. 

TELEPHONE 

THE COMPANY SECRETARY ON 
01-405 0812 


SHORTHAND SECRETARY 
PERSONNEL £8,500 

Fail secretarial duties for Director in a busy 
Group Personnel Department, all contact Is at 
senior level and successful candidates, will 
be cross trained on the IBM display writer. 
For an immediate appointment call now on 

629 0111 

Helena Miller or Allan Telford 

ALFRE0 MARKS RECRUITMENT CONSULTANTS 
487 OXFORD STREET, (MARBLE MARCH END) 
LONDON WL 




ALFRED MARKS 


PART TIME BOOKEEPER 

Required for Barristers Chambers in the Tem- 
ple. We seek an experienced book keeper 
capable of operating (or learning to operate) 
our fee accounting computer. Hours negotia- 
ble. Please send CV with your reply to: 

.. Gilbert Gray QC, 

4 Paper Buudmgs, 

Temple 
London EC4. 


NATIONAL NEWSPAPER GROUP 
EXECUTIVE SECRETARY/PA 
Circa £10£00 

Varied adnw oneoWad posHm at tfes vny hot W Rrel SttuLlNsisa 
ten ora Wlllm tie ataman's bums* sate. Hitons odoq cwnnu- 
mcatons aod adnM state with axraflpn dJ/typtao mil pass WP 

Nem ul M MM 
01-734 

W Ws to. 

Stadtiw Jbndtan RnCokIS OruIhih Smt WI. 


TRAVEL/TOURISM 

PA Secretary to joint Managua Directors of 
Sapertmak Mini-Holidays Ltd 

We ot ioaUns for someone mill a brigM. marorc and Confi- 
dent pmonauiy who. having the appropriate level of 
eomrounieatioa sUHs (with some shorthand) to cope easily 
with the necessary secretarial duties, on develop the PA role 
as part of our spbD man a gement team. We are a young, but 
Gut dev doping company who have become one of the leaders 
m the UK shortbreaks holiday market. 

Salary £9.500 pjc + negotiable benefits. 

Phase telephone Jot n M.D. Christopher Dunnjnr an appoint- 
mem 

81-837 5718 

305 Greys tan Road, WC1 


SALES ASSISTANT 

HALCYON DAYS 

We need someone with lop retail experience to sell 
beautiful works of art and contemporary coamds 
and *lso lo fadp with administration of Stock. Very 
busy, happy atmosphere. Exceflent salary and 
prospects. 

Please write in confidence toi: 

Managfajt Directer, Halcyon Days, 

14 Braek Street, LndoiWlY IAA. 


VERY TEMPTING 

ffs hand to resist the temptation! Exceflent 
rates, constant work, super c li e nt s, friendly 
teem and our caring, personal approach. If you 
have skills of 80/1 OO sh or audio, 50+ typ + WP 
and are 18-25, succomb and ring us now. 

437 6032 

H&bstoneS 

A AaECBU>ru(OC0MMJII*M>0l^ 


PUBLISHING SECRETARY 

Mature secretary required for chairman of group 
of publishing companies in City. Must be highly 
motivated, able to cope with pressure in a very 
busy office. Good telephone manner essential. 
Salary with usual fringe benefits in region of 
£10,000 for right person. Apply in writing only 
with fell CV to: 

D L Bangs, 19-23 L odgat e Hill, 
London, EC4M 7PD. 

(No agencies) 


ART GALLERY 

Smafl private business requires receptionist 
plus; Wefl spoken, weH presented, hardwork- 
ing, efficient. Typing and shorthand skills 
essential. Languages a bonus. Salary by ar- 
rangement but generous. 

Ring 01-499 2240 



ADMINISTRATIVE & CLERICAL 
PERSONNEL LIMITED 

35 New Brocd Street, London EC2M.1NH 
■Tel. Ol’-sae 3S7E Tir. 857374 Me: 01-636 9210 


Opportunity to use supervisory, problem soMng and marketing skills. 

OFFICE ADMINISTRATOR 

SOUTH LONDON £8,000-£12,0G0 

SUCCESSFUL MAIL ORDER FASHION COMPANY 

Due to expansion, our client seeks an experienced Office Administrator, aged 25-35. 
Ideafly but not essentially with a retail background and/or P C. order processing 
experience, to take on the overall a dm inistrative management of this rapidly developing 
company. Rep o rting u the Managing Director, responsibffities will also include 
Supervision of staft streamlining procedures, assisting in market research, development 
of new products/designs, publicity material etc. A methodical but flexible approach, 
combined with commercial flak and a cheerful personality are all important attributes. Car 
driver/owner essential. Salary negotiable £8. OOO- £12, OOO + petrol allowance. 
Applications to strict confidence under reference OA290fTT, to the Managing Director: 






£ 15,000 - £ 20,000 
VERY IMPORTANT PERSON 

Are you interested in Top People? Do you understand what top secre- 
tarial jobs involve? Can you match people's skills and job requirements? 
Do you have high professional standards and an enviable pattern of 
success? 

I need an Executive Consultant to help meet the increasing rWanri for 
our type of personal selective recruit m ent. 

Write to me personally in total confidence 

Stella Boyd-Carpenter 
27 Old Bond Street 
London W1X 3AA 


JUST REWARDS 

£5.60p.h. (S/hand) £6.40p.h. fWP) 

Our senior level team is constantly in demand in central London. We are 
extremely busy and are looking lor first class secretaries to join the team 
which has established an excellent reputation over the years. 

You should have speeds of ICKHK), 2 years' Director level secretarial 
experience in London and proficient WP. skills, particularly on Wang and 
Multimate. 

Our skilled temps are all paid the same hourly rates and there are always 
permanent opportunities to explore. 

Make temping a rewarding experience by working at the level you deserve 
where you wiU be positively appreciated. 

Please telephone us now for an immediate appointmenL- 


01-4844512 (West End) 


01-5883535 (City) 


Crone Corkill 


RECRUITMENT CONSULTANTS 


Paid Holidays? 

Work for Manpower and start earning your holiday 
pay now. 

Do the ideas of paid holiday entitlement as well as 
excellent rates and FREE Word Processor training 
attract you? Then you should be talking to Manpower, 
the world's leading temporary help company. 

Call us now and start planning your holidays. 

©MANPOWER Tel: 225 0505 


Temporary guff Specialists 

Fluent French 
£1^000 -i- benefits 

The Chairman of a top City com- 
pany needs a PA to accompany 
him on business trips to the USA 
and Europe, handle highly con- 
fidential work and liaise with hfs 
business interests in France. Long 
hours but interesting work! Age: 
25-«- with rtun. skins 80/60. 


hour answering service J 

Start Tomorrow! 
to £9,500 

An excellent opportunity for total 
involvement In a fast-moving envi- 
ronment with scope to develop. 
The Export Dept of this US trad- 
ing company needs a bright 
secretary (early 20' s) with solid 
experience to give full 
secretarial/adfrimistrativB support 
French useful, skills 90/50. 


West End, Base 
Commander 

Secretary fi I B» £10,000 

HoRgeii Bnwrra cornultanU 
jwilhtf inlomewiog 
candidalesfor lop 
m-magcinenl iobs or on! of the 
office viwlirvRtheit n*\l 
client. I'm busy consultants 
ner<! their appointments, 
correspondence, research and 
general administration to be 
Al 

WP and shorthand arc 
essential, preferably tbng 
equally so an* initiative, 
personality and character lo 
prosper in a responsible team 
role. Age 25+. 

Male or female candidates 
should submit in confidence a 
comprehensive c.v. or 
telephone for a personal history 
form to HE. llerth or i H.E. 
Duvirs. Hogget! Bowers pic, 

1 7 Hjntuvr Street. LONDON, 
UTR9WB. 01-734 6852. 


PUBLISHING - RICHMOND, SURREY 

SECRETARY/PA 

YU MAHAGIHG DIRECTOR c£8,5Q0 

The "Grid's leading motosport book pubtishets require a 
tiroly. mtetfeent person who can woric on her wm initiative in 
this small, dynamic company, bi addition to first-dass short- 
hand and typing staKs she vnfl be required to help with 
financial co-ordination, office admmistraiton plus the running 
at an annual pre-publication campaign. Knowledge of telex 
and word -processor preferred and seise of humour essen- 
tial. Friendly environment - in attractive period buildina 
Successful applicant to start on 1 September 1988. 

Write wtt CV to: Ms Bhabctt Le Breton 
num s ini, tncnnuM, 

SURREY TW10 6RE 


HAZLETON 

PUBLISHING 


# 


No agencies please 


PERSONNEL 



AUDIO TYPING 
IN PARIS 

Audio typist with 
French to ‘A’ level re- 
quired by English 
Department of our 
Paris Office. Knowl- 
edge of WP an 
advantage. WDI train. 
Many perks. Salary 
A-A.E. Apply initially 
to: 

Van Ameyde 
01-466 6034 
(No agencies) 


ANTIQUES ISLINGTON. 

Hard worker required to 
manage successful export 
{justness and mantam cur- 
rent aggressive sales 


SENIOR BI-LINGUAL SECRETARY 
C £11,000 

Our efient is seeking a bMinguai secretary to 
work for the Administration and Personnel 
Management of their HQ base in SW1 . You will 
need sound commercial experience at senior 
management level, good shorthand and audio 
ability and excellent organisational and commu- 
nicative skills. Fluent knowledge of French is 
essential to converse and translate. The post 
wfll go into a senior PA role as the project 
develops. 

Please Tel Linda Heinink 628 6886 Alfred 
Marks Recruitment Consultants, 133 Victoria 
Street London SW1. 


ALFRED MARKS 


SENIOR SECRETARY 

required Tor the General Manager of a rapidly expanding 
publishing house based in the Fleet Street area. 
Applicants must possess a minimum of five "O' Levels, 


including English language: have a pleasant telephone 
manner; be able to work on their own initiative: have a 
sense of humour and preferably have some experience of 
personnel procedures. 

This is a job for someone seeking total involvement and 
commitment at rite very core of the Company. Our 
people are important to us and our Senior Secretary must 
have a wide and flexible interest in them. Excellent salary 
for the right person. 

Applications m writing, with CV please, to: 


Timothy Berm Publishing Limited. 244 Temple 
Chambers, Temple Avenue, London EC4Y 0DT 


VWl probably be batmen 25- 
40 and have had a 
commercial background. 

A knowledge ol Anbquoa not 
essential but must be seK 


5ft day week, hut clock 
watchers need not apply, al- 
most certainly a non smoker 
with a DL 

mwal sataray £15400 and 
yeatiy pons. 

la 225 0681 


SALES DIRECYOR’S SECREYARY 

Unflappable, experienced aeeretary/PA to join 
la&t-eipanding soup of companies in Fleet 
Street area, involved in advertising for regional 
newspapers. Typing, shorthand, writing; letters, 
filing, re-writing brochures, speeches, articles, 
presentation, minutes, looking after clients and 
making appointments are some of the day to day 
requirements of the job. A competent, dedicated, 
hard-working person could find this exactly the 
Stimulating career they were loo king for. 

Salary c £9,000 depending on experience. 

Please write with CV to Joanne WUbraham, 
MSB Group, 5 Pemberton Row, London EC4. 


npleied 

n. 

it, APV 
cr2pto 

acd its 
ent to 
■n Ben- 
k acting 
another 
tPV at 

r a total 
tares, or 
; votes. 
1 955p. 


ct office 
icni car- 
u is es- 
•mpleied 
million. 

*:r re- 
MVEST- 
Sccond 
.73p for 
J. l«86. 
3p. This 

L rectors’ 
erim re- 
Sp and a 
xriod to 

CORPS 

l. 1986. 
m (£6.58 
£333.052 
per share 
pi. The 
company 
e second 
i auction 
g and it 
crop and 
iciion. 
OENIX 
Jf-year to 
ufnover 
Loss be- 
i 31.9141. 
i 36.1 7p 


op into 


W 8256 


rmatton 

•location 
tm tried 
:h our 


(£499 ex 
:orage. 
ger 11 

r Pres tel. 
(worth 


....£99.95 


. . . .£99.00 

ms for 

....£49.95 



iram and may 


















28 


THE 


■DNESDAY JUNE it 1986 


LA CRLME DE LA CREME 



wt/ 

Si /mf</ Sb- trsistoersice St Atr-i 

eyteneA <// ^mi'/ 

Alison Jarvis 
Carol Martyr 
Claire Waddilove 


Trading Places £14,000 

The Chairman of this international trading company 
is an entrepreneur who ran offer his new PA the 
opportunity to develop a career in buying. Due to 
your boss's. extensive travel abroad you will have a 
demanding role as the UK link: attending meeting, 
handling customers and organising overseas delega- 
tions. A strong PA background combined with energy 
and flexibility are essential for the success of this pos- 
ition. Ag*- 22-35. Skills:- 10W6U. 

Organization Unlimited £11,000 

Join this expanding international company as it moves 


into an exciting new phase of development. You will 
be helping to research and set up new office systems 
including personnel and word-processing as your 
trouble -shooting boss improves every aspect of the 
company's operation. The ability to use your initiative 


/£• ym rsJ fr/c/tr /test* tyfice* 
fa a&ewtit x fTCf/s? sttwA d7/m*' ssiewe. 

S 'S&txX 

Siew/ 

3ZZ C/-43/ /3£0 


and work last under pressure will equipyou to cope 
with this no-nonsense boss. Age:- 22-30 SkiSs:- 
120/60. 

Receptionist £8,500 

Your flair for dealing with people will be a major asset 
in this responsible reception position. As the com- 
pany's ambassador you wiU greet visitors, cope with a 
busv sw iichboard and co-ordinate messenger services. 
Age:- 22-40 Skills:- 50 typing. 


a/it/ %Ltect*/fae •J'Ze&vftftjf&t/ 


Temping - Either long or short term assignments. 
Come and discuss temping with us. 


6th MEMBER OF THE BOARD? 


CL£14,000 


A first class PA. is required to provide the highest level of 
personal assistance and secretarial support to the Holding 
Board Directors of a successful and innovative firm of 
Lloyds* Reinsurance Brokers. You will attend all Board 
meetings so absolute descretion and the ability to prepare 
objective minutes are essential. Liaison, both at senior level 
and within the firm, is vital to the smooth running of the 
business so the ideal candidate will have confidence, person- 
ality and tact. Age 30-45. Skills 100/60/W-P. 

Please ring 588 3535 


SECURE YOUR 
FUTURE 
SEC/PAs 

£9,000 - £10,000 neg 


We are one of the City’s leading Computer 
Consultancies in providing specialist ser- 
vices to the Stock Market and Financial 
Sector. We are a young, dynamic, friendly 
and highly professional organisation. 


Due to expansion we now seek to recruit 
several high calibre Sec/P As. 


Crone Corkill 


These positions require initiative, adapt- 
ability', self-motivation, an outgoing 
personality and above all a sense of humour. 


RECRUITMENT CONSULTANTS 


If you are a professional with speeds of 
100/60. a minimum of 2 years secretarial 
experience, proficient WP skills and are 
confident you can offer a professional, smart 
and a polished approach with above average 
communication sH|1y 


Secretary to 
Chairman/ 
Managing Director 


Please write in confidence with C.V. quoting 
reference EAB/1 to: 


£13,000 


A major international Company based in 
West London requires a Senior Secretary 
for its Chairman/Managing Director. 


The chammg Vice President 
or ttns smaH company ser- 
vicing the oil aidustty needs 
a PA who is a sell starter 
and has a positive and flex- 
ible atbfasfe to cops m this 
international ermronment. 


y.T.imlwth Bonce 

Consultants (Computer & Financial) 
pic 

Eldon House 
2-3 Eldon Street 
London EC2M 7LS 


Candidates will be expected to have excel- 
lent secretarial skills as well as several 
years' experience at Senior Director level. 


An attractive salar 
benefits will be o 


with excellent 


Please write, enclosing your c.v. to: 


As he travels extensively, 
you «n8 work an your awn 
imtia&re. be My aware at 
everytteng going on aid 
have the Pscretion aid 
onpmsatevoi stalls neces- 
sary to hold the toct. harae at- 
ail l evels, o rganise travel 
arrangements and collate 
worfdwtfe data. 


Executive P. A 


£11,500 


Confidential Reply Service, Ref: ABS 9381 , 
Austin Kniaht Advertising. 17 St. Helen s 


State . msty . .shorthand/ 
65+ typing Age: 28-40 _ 


Austin Knight Advertisi 
Place, London EC3A 6 


Applications will be forwarded to the dient 
concerned, therefore companies in which 
you are not interested should be listed in a 
covering letter to the Confidential Reply 
Supervisor. 


WEST END 
OFFICE 
629 9686 


fl NCELA MflCTME P 


This City-based company is pan of a 
worldwide financial group. .As Executive 
Secretary to MD you will work at the highest 
level, participating in management 
meetings and coordinating liaison. He is. 
young, professional and go-ahead —’keen ' 
to involve you totally and looking for total 
professional commitment in return. Supetb 
presentation and excellent skills are 
essential Age 25-35- Please telephone 
01-t935787. 


MULTILINGUAT 

rarm Tt/^rn JLs 


GORDON YATES 


PA/C0MPANY 




Rrcmkmnw LonnJiixn 



£10,800+ 






Become the central figure ot 
a close knit happy team of a 
fast yowkig executive 
search ronsuRancy. In a 
hectic but stitnriatinp atmo- 
sphere you wil gnrn full 
secretarial back up to the 
M.D. (100/60 wpm). handle 
your own co rrespondence, 
orgarese oqupment and 
supplies, wiipte bookkeep- 
ing phis much much more. 
Smart appearance combined 
wttfi chamung personality 
and excellent telephone 
manner essential. Age 24+. 
Call SteUa on 734 2S67. 


Elizabeth Hunt 


YOUNG SECRETARIES 


£10,000 neg 


A leacSng firm of management consultants 
handling dient assignments at the highest level 
wish to recruit top calibre, successful secretar- 
ies. Their image is forward thinking and the 
atmosphere dynamic and very fast moving. 
They believe in high flying people who enjoy a 
non-structured environment, a varied workload 
and tee opportunity to use their initiative with- 
out supervision. Therefore the ability to take 


c+ 41 *. ‘ I and tee opportunity to use their initiative wtte- 

Atts* alEMA mi ■ I ^ supervision. Therefore the ability to take 
V Kccruftment I chart* and aet telnos done are essential auafe 




charge and get things done are essential quafi- 
ficabons. You'll be aged 22+ with a stable work 




history. Accurate 
essential. 


wpm audio ability is 






SECRETARY 


PARTNERSHIP SECRETARY 
FOR ARCHITECTS PRACTICE 


We require a graduate secretary to organise the secre- 
tarial functions of a growing practice consisting of 2 
Partners and 4 other staff. 


Bright gid required to work 
as pert of a team of four 
people, running s busy and 
successful resi d enti al prop- 
erty development business 
in Chefcee. 


Qizobe^Hur^ReaijftnientConsultQnfs 
B G osu on or Sheet London Wi 01-200 3531 


You will have to shoulder responsibility for the 
organisation of meetings, issue or minutes, the pur- 
chase of materials and services and the Keeping of 
Internal records. 


Baric bookeeping ekilta and 
a driving Kcence am 
essential. 


Our Intended move to new offices during the next few 
months will provide an opportunity for your 
organisational aunties. 


Salary £9.000 - £10.000 per 
annum please ring Bobby 
Fiber 01 564 6427. 


To carry out the function successfully you will need 
to be a skilled typist with a good telephone manner and 
have relevant experience. Your role will become In- 
creasingly r e sponsible as the practice grows. A salary 
In the region of £ 10.000 p.a. will be paid and a season 
ticket loan is available. 


CHAffiHAirS PA 

£11,000 - 12A00 


Please reply In witling to: 

ANTHONY COLE 


SRrS K Hi : ,a 


LONDON WC2E 9NW 


Exettent op enin g for 
personal assistant with 
good skOs (audio or 

shorthand) to be tight 
hand person to Chair- 
man of wel known Ca 

Ab#ty to lobe at aH 


THINKING ABOUT A 
CHANGE OF JOB? 


We would be detightad to try to help. We don't adver- 
tise EVERY job we haw on our ffes and we may have 
lust the one to suit your particular skids and personal- 
ity. One of our consultants would be happy to discuss 
job prospects with you and H we do not have anything 
suitable immedfartsiy we would keep you in mind and 
consider you for new jobs as they come in. We handle 
a wide range - from college leaver to the realty senior 
P.A. positions. If you have secret aria l skflte why not 
ring for an appointment to either our City office (588 
3635} or West End office (434 4512). 


SENIOR MEDICAL 


SEC J 
EPTKM 


RECEPTIONIST 


Crone Corkill 


For two GPs in new 
premises SW7. Private 
and NBS. Shorthand es- 
sential. 38 hours per 
week. Salary £8,000 - 

n o.ooo. 


RECRUITMENT CONSULTANTS 


Tot bet ween 
Sam to 5pm 
01-373 6557 


PUBLIC RELATIONS 


Two first class PA Secretaries needed by Directors of 

expanding PR Agency. Good typing, shorthand and 
organisational skins. Training on WP: regular client 
liaison; arranging press briefings; dient presentations. 
Superb new offices, dynamic environment. 4 weeks 
holiday, annual bonus, salary negotiable up lo £8,000 
pa. Esperience of PR. the Press or the City useful but 
not essential. Contact; Roth Westlake or Lynn Fuller 
on 01-489 1441. 


Design & 
Advertising 


group leqouo 


ex p er ie nced PA tor Managing 
Director. Ability to cope with 
pressure a essential. Skill* 
must inctode word processing. 
Salary cBJ.OCOl Age 22*. 

Please telephone: 

01 405 1854. 


We talk you listen, no. 


ALFRED MARKS 


PROPERTY 
SLOANE SQUARE 


Working as an essential part of a small team your 
duties wffl inducts lots of dtont co n tact and phone 
work and in return you wi* be paid an exceflent salary 
+ monthly bonus. If you are 19-23, we* presented and 
articulate please call: 

437 6032 


HobstoneS 


ARE YOU A MEGA-STAR? 
Salary to € 12,000 


Charming debonair Managing Director of Evely ideas 
Company <n SW3 needs an Executive PA. Apart from 
superior shorthand and typing, you must be prepared 
to plan trawl itineraries, entertain diems and join m 
with the bouncy team. Excellent perks. Previous sartor 
management experience vital. Age 23-30. 


Susan Beck 


RECRUITMENT 
01-534 6242 


3BTG 


British 
Technology 
Group 


Medical 



Secretary 


Z RECRDITMENT B™ 

*~C 0 M P A N y TEL- 01-831 1220 


Are you a secretary presently working in a 
medical environment and feel that your . skiUs 
and experience are not fuOy appreciated? If so, 
we may have the ideal postion for you. . 

We need someone to work for two executives 
in our Engineering Sciences Division, one of . 
whom is involved with medical work and tee 
other with farming inventions. It is a test 
moving environment and you must be able to 
cope under pressure. Your shorthand must be 
a minimum of 100 wpm. It is pref erable - that 

you have word processing experience. . 

British Technology Group (BIG) provides 
financial support tor research projects that are 
considered to have commercial potential. The 
offices are modem, air conditioned and 
convenient for London Bridge and Waterloo 
stations. The salary will be very competitive 
and there is a subsidised restaurant 


Interested? If you are, please forward your 
curriculum vitae for my attention or. telephone 
me on 01-403 €666 to discuss tee matter 
further. 


Miss E. Pitts. British Technology Group, 101 
Newington Causeway, London, SE1 6BU. 


: E13.M9 + FQWS . 

Dyaamc ootuowg overran ortre- 
morer seeks seoer eftcM 


SEQrFA to -ate charge ww cooi- 
DWr ran tke snow. Dnd 
u wofwtnmr tntti flnuness and 
penonaBf hindkng ■ bust Ut- 
ttylfc rots ndvdt wort salary 
paducB and use al at. Grate 
opocrfcm, io Irak out at tte 
SH/TVP nee. 

CITY: 01-4812345 
WEST END: 01-938 2181 


am • yoa ten. pvt? or 
scope far astao mean*. Uxs ol 
tekptoe sc pood trtrtaone 
nooner obito Pksb oNces 
and agba puuu c a ta the 
ngbi push 


CITY: 01-4812345 
WEST END: 01-938 2188 





Tasteful Temping... 

No hassles. No let-downs. Just plain, simple,’ 
high grade temping. 

A tasteful package of top jobs, elite rates and 
thoroughly professional service. 

If you have sound skills and experience, you 
should be talking to The ^ork Shop’. 
Telephone Sue Cooke on 01-409 1232. 


Recnritmmt CoriMilUnio 


Formosa who can convtnc a us of their aonty to meet our 
very high standards, remuneration tnckKfes board end todg- 
kig. Ski pass, van! oul arid back. Ml I n su mu c o cover. 

H yen are adaptable. hanJworfdna and would enfoy woridng 
tor S months m the Alps from the begtanlng of December until 


lor 5 months m the Alps from the Segtanhrg of December tat 
the end of April please contact ow 
ALPINE OPERATIONS DEPARTMENT on 01-589 5161 


RECEPTIONIST 

£7^00 


Expanding loiletries com- 
party requires noim, smart 
bdf motivated rtcepEwoisi 
for il*Or London m a tot tin g 
office. Excellent telephone 
manner and typing eacemiaL 
Please phone Jobe Godfrey 


Busy Kensington .PR 
Consultancy requires 
secretary/P A: Good 
typiag/eHorthand. 
Salary negotiable. 


Phone PBCI 
01-228 8225 


PA SECRETARY 
£8500 


mternauonal Hotel Grow 
are s e e k in g an excellent 
sec. tor their pmoniid 
dept; • Adtnfrr exp + gd sec 
skills are req for this busy 
position. Sosneene with gd 
persona Wy. 22+. Urgent, 
cai 01-570 1562 
MONROE REC CONS.' 



THE ROYAL 

Personal S 


Applications are invited for die post of Personal Secretary to 
the Assistant Secretary (Finance & ^.Estabhshni»^ MjjbjB vs* 
roonsible for one of the three divisions of the Society dealing 
with financial affairs and with personnel, 
social functions etc. The Personal Secretary will be expected to 
liaise with staff at all levels and carry out various activities to 
the Assistant Secretary in his work in addition to normal 
secretarial dimes.. 


Applicants must have good secretarial skills, a pleasan t person- 
ality, an ability to work with other staff and a strong seme of 
initiative and commonsense. 


Some work is done on a word processor for which training will 
be given. Some experience of audio-typing would be useful. 


The Royal Society is the foremost national body for science in 
the UK with a staff of 100 which supports scientific research 
through a wide range of activities nationally and internation- 
ally. It occupies pleasant buildings overlooking St James’s Park 
and within easy reach of Piccadilly and C h a rin g Cross 
Stations. 


Salary hi on a scale from £9,146 rising in five steps to £1 0,279 
per annum (including London Allowance). Leave entitlement 
amoun ts id 21 working days plus bank holidays and four 
‘travel* days. ~ 



Applications in writing (quoting reference: NBP) with CV and 
the names of two referees should be sent to Mr NJB. Parfitt, 
Assistant Secretary (Finance d Establishment), The Royal So- 
ciety, 6 Char lton House Terrace, London, SWIY 5AG. 


DIRECTORS’ SECRETARIES 


£14400 


West End 


An American, new to London, is here to bead op the European acu\> 
ties of a very large firm of Consultants. He needs a PA/Secreury to set 
up and manage bis London office. - 


£15*800 


Move into tee City in time for tee Big Bang and support a leadi ng 
Stockbroker with hts imernatUmd actrvincs. Ademaauiwbttt nsemax- 
ing role with some travd. • 


£14,000 


Hoteoni 


The Manning Director of a . Leisure Development Company needs a 
PA/Seoeutrv to back-up his activities in L on d o n and to assoc wrte.his 
architect uraf interests throe^toui the country. 


01-6299323 


StockbrokiRg 

£ 124100 ++ 


The Semtx Pa tnor of a 
renowned ton of stocto- 
brolafs seeks a profession^ 
-PA to- support hsti « st 
aspects at bn tnsness and 
persona) weak. 

The' ponton nil iwotira 
taBOBattbeta^NSttevtatn 
the City, ttg u ra g absohde 
tact asd ttoscraton. 

Soota prssanca. coaSdsKe 
anil irapecctok laeuuuiloR 
coohned wBi toperb 
(xgarasabom skfis and 
saaior-tad secra&nal ex- 
perience «n enable you to 
«eaf taflacton uidiB g rate. 
Age 25-35 Skats 100/60 


CITY OFFICE 
726 8491 


oKmm 


* CONFERENCES * 

CClOyOOO 


prastiqma US tranMa todang lor y «w« young 


iihv inniigiwB w * — — -n — r — ~ ■ 

secretary n low Hwmid yn M|AMrarg<rapAn">««-‘ 

m tM vgnsiMn of tunctooos betel UK UO U 


hi mo aroaoisation of funcaoos octet *r w» UK ana tevuw. 
SWb 100/60 nentitti. age 21*. C x cte ta rt tiewUs Bchioe 
mortgage subsdy. 


* GRAPHIC DESIGN * 

c£ 10,000 


needs a faraly. orgawd to 

offices and a fc». fnendhr anraMpbere. State tOQifiO ne«J«L 


pteaKWepW. 91-499 8070 
46 Old BondStreetLoflAwWI. 

CARO LIKE HH6 SECRETARIAL JffPQWTHafTS 


PERSONNEL 



Legal 

Audio 


Elizabeth Hunt 


OUT AND ABOUT 
to £10,000 


Don't bo desMxxBKi. join tins top property company 
based in WI as PA/secretary to -a young dynamic 
partner. He would Bee to train you very much as an 
assistant and wil take you out on site with him and 
encourage you to move out of a straight secretarial 
rale. 90/50 skids needed. 


TOP SPOT IN PR 

£ 10,000 


A taacBng firm of International PR consultants with a 


huge cSent base and a first class reputa tio n seeks a 
bnght. wel oraanraed secretary to their martaamo tfi- 


bright. wel Of 
rector. You s 
100/50 skOs. 


to their managing (ti- 
le career history and 


BaobeNiHuntlhKruibiMNitConsuftcinb 
18(k»ieoor Sheet London WI CB-2K3 3531 


£9300 


for Partner. Small 
progressive Fleet 
Street practice. Legal 
WP experience an ad- 
vantage. Initiative 
and mature approach 
important. 


BI-UNGUAL 
SECRETARIES 
French or 
German 

Do you have sound 
secretarial skills 
and languages to 


TOP CLASS 
TEMPS WITH 
LANGUAGES 
WE NEED YOB! 




We have a vari 


WP skills. Use 

teem with your 
languages and 


Jonathan Silverman 
on 01-583 7944 


PA IN 
PROPERTY 


Established Residential 
Cbdaes Estate Acenu seed 
you if you ere bright, nod- 
ligent and on banetj e 
sometimes pressurised 
situations m their gleaming 
new offices. Firet dam 
fypnjpWwfo aperieuee es- 
seotiaL Safany negotiable 
aae. - - 


For further mfoouatkA 
caQ 


Miss Morland on 
01-581 8464 


PALL MALL 


ExDerisnced Sec/PA for 
smati friendly conaStancy 


WP experience preferred. 


Siwthand/totog 100/60. 
Good EngQsn ami confident 



telephone manner. 


Busy, varied atmosphere, 
Ctent contact 


Exctelent Salary. 


Telephone 
01-839 3907 


DESIGN & 

ARCHITECTURAL practice 

for Dirwtor. 

20 Powis 





y\ 



































THE TIMES WEDNESDAY JUNK 1 1 198! 


LA CREME DE LA CREME 




-*r; 




S . “ - £ 

^ERHfiCES' 


=h;s dew 

■ J 

! * -a 

\-, ***** H|i f 

:f Plj J Ivi- 

ABjpU 1 

% c^C.200 


5 POT ** 

- -.0.000 i 




■ t 
«■ K‘- ‘ 




;N 



Home Secretary no 
City secretaries 





Secretary/PA to Sales & 
Maiketing Director 


C. £9,000 


We require a hright ' 
personable Secretaiy/PA 
for our Sales & Marketing 
Director based at our 
London Regional Office 
near Chancery Lane. 

You will be responsible 
for providing a full 
secretarial service, 
maintaining sales and 
marketing information and 
arranging and minuting of 
meetings for which some 
UJC. travel will be 
involved. 



NCCthe 

NATIONAL CENTRE 
FOR INFORMATION 
—TECHNOLOGY— 


You must have at least 
100 wpm shorthand and 60 
wpm typing speeds. 

A good educational 
background, numeracy and 
experience of working with 
senior management are 
essential. Experience in 
Word Processing and the 
use of Micro Computers 
would be an advantage. f 

We offer a starting 
salary around £9,000 p.a. 
within a scale rising to 
£11,000 pa. and excellent 
conditions of service. 

Please provide full 
career details and current - 
salary to:- 
Mrs.AMeikle, 

The National Computing 
Centre Ltd, •. 

11 New Fetter Lane , 

London EC4A lPU. j 


SUMMERTIME 

SPECIALS! 

GET INTO 

PUBLISHING! £12,000 

Become really involved in this busy Publishing 
Company. Working for the Advertisement 
Sales Manager as a ‘traditionaT Se cr et ar y you 
must have the ambition to develop your role in 
which communication is important Good tele- 
phone manner and sense othomour will bean , 
advantage. Refi 562/23004 

FILMS! £10,000 

A Senior position, sometimes deputising for 
the MD. This is a career orientated post, in- 
volving late nights when necessary. An ‘up 
tempo' role, h will suit a lively extrovert with 
proven Shorthand and Typing. Re£ 551/23025 

PERSONNEL! to £9,000 

A Canadian firm in the City wiS reward your 


WffSMITB 




• , <.»►}» v>OJK£' 

r X#&V&§l 


tation to be prepared in flexible working hours. 

Re£ 559/23018 

TEMPS!TEMPS!TEMPS! 

Lots af great TEMP assignments too— 
titter short or long team to soft your 
needs... at the highest rates in town for 
skilled SECRETARIES. SHORT- 
HAND, AUDIO, COFYTOPISTS AND 
WP*s *pbane or call in now and talk to one 
of ov caring professionals at any of dm 
following brandies; 

19/23 Oxford St, W1 TA 437 9030 
131/133 Cannon St, EC4Teh 626 8315 
185 Victoria St, SW1 Tel: 828 3845 
22 Wormwood St, EC2 Tel: 638 3846 


Recru iunent Consultants 


M Bear. tM Wgww St W1 


aovBmsmG 

I eiMM + MMS 

; This Int Advertising 
1 Agency needs a well 
presented sec/PA 21+ 

: with speeds of 90/60 to 
assist an associate Di- 
rector. This is a superb 
! involving Job with lob of 
variety and dient liaison. 

EXECUTIVE SEARCH 
£11,089 + BOWS 

Are you a polished ca- 
pable PA/Sec 25+ with 
good audio and WP 
state then the leading 
co requires you to assist 
a Director. This is a very 
busy job requiring 
someone who has a per- . 
suasive telephone 1 
manner. a born i 
organiser who can run ; 
an office 

01-935 8235 


LAC0MIS10NDE 
LAS COMUNIDADES EUROPEAS 
organiza 

so coBdirso de meritos, 
para Secretarios/as Priaeipales 
y Secretarios/as de Direction 
de carrera Cl reservado 
a nationales espaiioles: 

con un minimo de 18 arks de expe- 
rience professional. 

Para los detafles soJicitorar los anuncios 
de concurso a: 


AC0MISSA0DAS 
COMUNIDADES EUR0PEIAS 

ftrnaniT? „ , 

am concurso documental, 

para Secretarios/as Principals 
e Secreterios/as de Direccao 
de carreira Cl reservado 
aos nationals portugueses: 

com um minimo de 18 arras de expe- 
rience professional. 

Para maiores infwmacfles. pedir 
os avisos de concurso a: 


COMMISSION DES COMMUNAUTES EUROPEENNES 
Division Recrutement 
200 , rue de la loi 
B- 1049 BRUXELLES. 


ofleina de prensa e Informacidn 
Calle Serrano, 41 - 5a planta 
E- MADRID 1. 


Bureau de Presse ec information 
35, rua do Sacramento d Lapa 
P- 1200 LISBOA. 


v; ftiEklfl* fnMJiAMun ww nn.- - — t 

'4 miaittdfls fljsawiiy 


RECRUITMENT 

CONSULTANTS 


-v. if you possess 
•: vTauaseamatu*®. 

> ' searetaiy. 

. y g. You fcaare good, sec 


-‘ miiwn bb wpm. anflan 




Us g. Yotihase experience 01 

i .' f the IBM 5520. ■ andh en ff M a - 

Deloitte Hasting + SggV ' 5 f , UQCtf 
128 OuaenVlOttntoStre*, IJUvli 

' imSBSfflb': . ssSffi 




3+ ana oenauw. 

mis friendly and rspidiy - 

day time phone ; DelfHtte 

Hasiansi^ 

V nnoWT FROM OUR SKRLS 


Are you a Recruitment Consultant with at least 
one years experience? Do you feel taken for 
granted’? Do you feel insufficiently recognised 
(and rewarded) for your efforts? If so. then this 
could be the opportunity you are looking for. 

We offer an unrivalled remuneration package in 
terms of salary, bonus structwe and benefits, 
our commitment to develop your career with 
us, and the satisfaction of wonting for the UK's 
leading recruitment consultancy - 
AH enquiries wffl be treated in s tri ctest 
confidence. 

For further Information please contact Kelvin 
Zebedee (fired on 01 631 5262 Alfred Marks 
Recruitment Consultants. 105 Oxford Street 
London W1N9FB. 


BANKING/WEST END 

£10,500 ++ Mortgage sub etc 

Min 6 years banking exp, good sec skills 
(90/60) and WP exp req'd by the manager 
of the international lending department of 
this Wi bank. Second language an advan- 
tage. Age 30+ . 

£10,000 + 

Enjoy a pressurised environment? A WC1 
securities company seeks a secretary with 
an ‘A' level educ, outgoing personality 
and skills of 80/55 wpm. A team environ- 
ment, very WP orientated - a European 
lang an advantage. Age 25ish. 

£10,000 + mortgage sabs | 

Previous senior level experience (not nec- 
essarily in a financial env.), excellent 
grammar and skills of 90/60 wpm req'd 
by the deputy general manager of a Wl 
bank. Age 40ish. 

City 3778600 West End 439 7001 | | 

Secretaries Plus 

h 77 k Secretarial Consultants! fUS 


INTERNATIONAL BANKING 


SECRETARY 
TO DIRECTOR 


SALARY Cil 0,000 

+ ggRCT o as (nuking benefits 
tindadiag mortgage subsidy) 


We are an International Bank based in the City and wish to recruit a senior 
secretary to work for one of our Directors. 

The position is varied and challenging and will suit a mature, intelligent 
individual who can communicate effectively at all levels. The successful 
candidate will be highly competent, able to use their own initiative, absorb 
pressure and have good organisational skills. Personal qualities required 
include a cheerful, friendly and professional disposition, enthusiasm and 
dedication. You must be prepared to work overtime when necessary. 
Secretarial qualifications of 100 wpm shorthand and 60 wpm typing are 
essential. Banking experience or an international financial background 
would be a distinct advantage. 

To apply, please ring the Personnel Officer on 01-606 9931 
or write to Box. No. J50. 

NO AGENCIES 


PRODUCTION CO-ORDINATOR 


BARNES SW13 


AROUND £10,000 


J&foDtnecZor 

£ 10,500 ; 

This is a high calibre opening for a career 
secretary; within a leading UK tic. He is 
young, already running one of their major 
divisions and rising fast within thecompany 
You will work dosdy with him, handling 
problems in his absence; setting up 
meetings wish other sensor staff and 
OKxdfoatHTg his professional life.’ The job 
can be pressurised; die bouts sometimes 
long SkaHs 100/60. Age 23-30. Please 
telephone 01-493 5787. 

GORDONYATES 


R eentmegQwdna i 


r OSBORNE ^1 RIOiARDSON N 

PR HI HAMMEBSMTTH £10,000 

Our efient, a forward thinking international 
consultancy seeks a capable secretary/ 
administrator in their PR department. You 
wriU liaise with the press end pubfic and 
organise confer e n ce s. They wffl endeavour 
to capitalise on your talents and potential 
100/60 + w/p skate needed. ^ 

NO SHORTRANO' £10,500 . N 

Working for a senior manager of this 
management consultancy you wiU Seise with 
clients m both the pubfic and private sectors 
of induszry and co-ordinate his team. 55 
wpm audio ability. 

Please caU Oebbn Berkovitch. 

Anna Friend, Jutfi Osborne or 

Eileen Ric hardson , 8am - 6.30pm. 

4092303 ABamaR cotmm 
^ am ]maKmS uaanm 


BOYCE BI-UNGUAL 

GERMAN 

-Ctty SoHdtom «aak ■ conpoMM Sacratarr whs tm had t-e wan 
wortc aaperwBB. Lage hnowMsa is a naat (flwraa ibm «muW to 
KtsaQ. You wMnaad your apokan and iMttanQsnnan far atido and 
copy typing, tatoc and soma ta nanma n a . Piafarrad aga: raid 20‘a. 
Senary; £ 35500 . 

^ • GERMAN 

bank fa teGh^^eMdfabaSS^^flaSS^aaihad^a 
wi Mitt l iBte rt and raeagdm far « w fint-faw morahs. 
Gfflwan raotbanongus pnfanad. E7-fijOOO + bantong perM 

. .. FRENCH INSURANCE 


CLERICAL ASSISTANT 
Is required by 
DAKS Simpson 
To commence. aluly 

This position carries a variety of duties within the 
Export/Customer Services Department Would suit a 
young person. 18+ with fast accurate typing wWng to 
learn ample computer procaeduBs. Some shorthand 
and knowledge of European languages useful but not 


Please wile with details qf education end experience to 

The Personnel Executive (London) 
34 Jermyn Street, SW1 


ASSISTANT 

required for LEADING COUNTRY SPORTS 
MAGAZINE to work closely with manager. Age 
21-28 with excellent -typing, good -te lepho ne 
manner a tactful ana dnrfomsric personal- 
ity. Shorthand essential flexibility and initiative 
a must. Would suit someone with a -country 
background or a teen interest in country pur- 
suits. Lots, of scope , for involvement. Clock 
watchers need not spptyH Offices dose kj 
B latidriars station- For fumer details end salary 
etc please telephone 01-353 6000, ext 525: • _ 


01-236 5501 

7 Utigafe Sq, EM (opes A38 - US) BftP AGY 


P A./ SECRETARY 
To C hairma n 

Well educated and experienced PA./secretary 
required for 47 year old Chairman of successful 
private company in ECLL First class shorthand 
and typing essential: Initiative and ability to 
communicate most important: City, experience 
an advantage. - 

Excellent salary & prospects 
commensurate with tire experience required. 

Please apply tn writing and send GV. to: 
Valerie Byford 
10 Snow HQl 
London, EC1A 2EB 


ASSISTANT 
TO SALES DIRECTOR 

Required for the. small London sales office of a 
leading executive aviation company. Respon- 
sibility for general customer contact and data 
base requires a bright and o rg an ised person 
with enough computer knowledge to make full 
use of oar IBM PC and DispJaywrhers as sales 
aids. Organising adv ert is in g and airshovre axe 
also part of the job. Good salary. 

Phone AEce Thome on 01-245 9837. 


SECRETARY/PA. 

Small, friendly latgrn a t iop al Law office hi West End 
seeks -graduate PA. with WJ>. experience, good tele- 
phone manna; numerate, well oqjmiwd, sdf motiva te d 
and wiQiiig' to get involved in all aspects of the firm. 
Legs) am. not req u ired - age 25 to 45, non smoker, 
salary £10,000- + aegotaahte pha med plan. 

' ThiesAosa 01-409 1903 
- ft* 1 * agencies) 


SUPERSTAR PA 

ftotion has when in Marketing for weB educated and 
highly motivated PA to work at MD levd in this test 
moving company. Career orientated, well presented 
personality with plenty of common sense & confidence 
css. E sc SH secretarial skiQs needed. Salary 
£i2.000/earty review/snper benefits. Age 26-35. 


O’SEAS PROP & HOLIDAY CO 

in Kfltehtsbridge are rapidly and very successfully 
expanding! They are seeking staff with Travel Agy 
expr. or similar, and/or good secretarial stalls (90/50). 
This dient also needs expr. book-keeper*. Salaries are 
up to £11 X00 sae + superb perics ind. travel discounts. 


ARE YOU A TOP 
LEGAL 
SECRETARY? 

A busy senior Partner engaged in varied 
and entertaining work needs your help and 
your sense of humour. Good ealaty, pleas- 
ant offices, and friendly colleagues. 

Please Ring> 

01-242 5159 


WP OPERATOR 

For Barristers Chambers in EC4. 
Must be experienced and able to 
work under pressure. Good salary. 
For further details ring 

01-353 7356 


Prospero Software is a fast-growing software house selling micro 
computer languages to a world wide market. We need a Production 
Co-ordinator to organise our busy production and shipping depart- 
ment This involves supervising a software technician, ordering 
components, repairing labels, assembling, packing and despatch. We 
are looking for someone who will work hard and also approach the 
job in a creative way. WP or computer experience useful. Good 
education and work experience essential. Ground floor opportunity 
in a small friendly company. 

Please write to Andrew Lucas, Marketing Manager, 
Prospero Software Ltd. 190 Castelmau. London SWI3 9DH 


A Time to Temp 

What do you look for from temporary work? 
High rewards, certainly — but more besides? 
The question is \alkL because in todays 
market \ou do have a choice. 

Our own temporaries form an exclusive, 
high calibre ream.- our dientde amongst the 
most prestigious in London. With good 
secretarial skills, quite frankly you can make 
good money anywhere. But if you want the 
best, in every sense, then give me a caff Sara 
Dyson, on 01493 5787. 

GORDONYATES 


I R c c natm a tt Canmfcara. 

TWO LEGAL VACANCIES- 
£8,500 to £11,500 neg 

LEGAL AUDIO PA/PERSONNEL - small 
friendly, rapidly expanding West End solicitors 
require legal audio secretary with administration 
ana personnel experience preferable to assist 
Partner whose work is varied with bias towards 
commercial litigation. 

LEGAL AUDIO SECRETARY - applicant 
must have mixed legal experience. 

Both positions demand ve secretarial stalls ind W/P exp ft 
ability to ntainura sense of bumoar whilst noriang under pres- 
sure. Congenial practice. Prestigious air conditioned offices and 
modem equipment. 

Please reply with CV to ref ’MS’. Sooftias & 
Sookias, 1st Floor, Henrietta House. 9 Henrietta 
Place, London WJM 9AG. (Private & 
confidential). 


ADVERTISING 
CONTACT 
£9,580 + benefits 

Mariana contact and amftc 
I fataa at faa top at the aduerts- 
bq protesslao. Ogaos* the 
business dub and tram stted- 
, dea. Hand's c arf dartal and- 
peraonai mattes arib dEcrabon 
and effa—a r. Saatate seas- 
brity mB riot progression n a 
profar nkatry- 


. EXPORT SALES 
CORRESPOWgiGE 

(mb - Secretarial} 



SEC/PA 

Bentleys Estate Agents 
urgertly. require a Sanior 
Shorthand Sacretwy/PA to 
assist in trie running of 
their busy Hampstead 
office. An taste opportunity 
tor those wishing to use 
their organtaftonalialanis 
I and earn a eatery n excess 
[of E8JXXL 

: Exporlenoe in Estate 
> Agency p re fe rable but not 


M/Sacretaiy 


mmi m% KatamsM ■ i 

01 794 om 


SMIMNW 

A ctatenc O g postion offalng 
uw eflan t mapecte faai* 
motafad M nidi poise fa act as 
n^a land to Hie danring Ita- 
fong ftrettor. Ctent bhn aid 
tote tnutamnL Rut tf SH & 
goanuftg. ftp 25+ 


11-2409384 


LESS SKILLS, 
MORE IDEAS 
£10,000 + benefits 

' BerwuttoktiKtonasdlnaia- 
bwrator Uanbenlgedoniour . 
secrateai ^nds.Tbe netef ap* 
ptwafl UD el ths West Lcraton 
oteiuiteHl senacc o»>to »* 
aetoonanwileacaiidenfiKBi- 
aan tram fas PA. Eaptore areas in 
Otangaad arau Be uaut, aith 
(be mwun of supenrisap. 

CaO Yvonne Dolphin 
499 7781 


GRADUATE 
TO C 7 r 900 

TVra taesBc n pp aw ai Kii far 
pteuans or K tael caadtoftas 
who haw rseartfy cwn p ta d a 
sacretaral couse and mouU be 
rtarastoi n mtintfi to an aca- 
dmc nwttofQBai fW ad 
itoc.- 

M Rfarii ffaurir 


vuwnssa ivunm 


HffiB TECH 
EONPHERT 
LEASOfi CO - SW1 

Erthustasac audfa sac. 
No S/H - good prospacts 

Salary £9,000+ 

CV - Ruth PorceiS 
IruBOtor. Corporation int. 
3 S OU Quean street, SW 1 


EXECUTIVE/ 

PA 

£11300 

The owner and dtiocwr af a 
1 * 9*1 auccsssfu war- 
national tjusiMM operating 
from a pnnota frone ie 
meeting a very- competent, 
capable and affident PA- 
with oraanfaetional Bbttty. 
You wfa be wraWng on your 
own rttfative es the ctiractor 

has maty efiverse titferesls 
and often travels. Some 
pnsond wok. Age. 26-45 
§t»6<W0.WP experience 
and car driver essentia. 

01-499 0092 
01-493 5907 

Senior® 

Secretaries 


i AOMIN SEC. 

c£8,000 

+ early review 

jate Bid. ptees so ja i t a a awjiw i 
IM aa unmet) nrad qmg 
mohrag etna nanaoeacnl. 
Ois oaae t m traneig. As PX id 
U>* Beserai Secretary }« we Brie 
U raswosihfai’ lor the nnong ol 
the socefr eopjeon oaosfre an- 
lao *te ns menbaB Bee u gt i tbs 
aite^eteunet functions ufrcti ni 
tel aka attend. Typing nl WP 
essaanal - Si intend 

CAUL 

283 1555 


4 TEMPORARY f 
A MEDICAL 4 
J SECRETARIES J 

W Jom the epeoia is ta W 

r . PnvM) pfWCa^KHS A 

A Choice at booktrns W 

W Al areas of London r 

A EaseM rates * bonus A 

4 ^W—aBKhL—f 

~ JT b Jr a 


ESTATE AGENTS 
C £10,000 

Bine cfa^i estate a geota rivaling in M yl mii * 
residential poverty need a calm, efficient and 
socially confident sec/PA to help one of their 
successful young partners to ran their new 
Kensington Branch. 

Your day w31 be fuB of variety, meeting top level 
clients, and being involved in interesting neg- 
otiations over beautiful London bouses in this 
highly responsible key role. 

For. more details ring 01-499 6566 

Ha 

GROSVENOR; 

ISSSSSSSSBuMUUSSi 

ADVERTISING 

We are a large multinational advertising agency 
and are seeking a young, experienced secretary 
for our International Department, to work for a 
world-wide dient services Director. 

You will need excellent organisational skills, 
initiative, a pleasant telephone manner and 
good shorthand typing, to work as part of a 
small team yet enjoying the benefits of a larger 
group. 

If you have an interest in advertising and enjoy 
the challenge of dose involvement in and con- 
tact with one of our major World-wide clients, 
please contact Sue Dickin on 01-629 9496 or 
write to 

J Walter Thompson Company Limited. 

40 Berkeley Square, London WlX 6 AD 


THE NUFFIELD 
FOUNDATION 

Requires a secretary to work for the Deputy Director 
and Assistant Director. Work entails dealing with 
grants made by the foundation in science and social 
research/experiment. Applicants should have some 
years secretarial experience. Ability U> use a wp would 
be an advantage. 

Starting salary in excess of £7^600. Benefits include 
24 days holiday, subsidized lunches, contributory pen. 
sion scheme. Hie foundation win shortly be moving 
to new offices in Bedford Square, WCl. 

Applications in writing to The Nuffield Foundation. 
Nuffield Lodge. Regents Park. London NWi 4R3 
(Enclosing C.V.l by the 23rd June 1986. Further in- 
formation is available on request (Tel: 01-722 8871) 


PROPERTY PA 

£11,000 

a* cflsrts are d wo i ap in g 

propartos all over London. 
TtavMD is in dm need of 
a secretary to corrttine so* 
gains sec. skis ( 9 fy 5 Q) to 
naraJte me* weMncreaskig 
client oasa Calm and ira- 
Aappatte nature essential 
Ring OPUS now 
91-485 7921 
(Rec. Cons.) 


SECflETABY 

For RestoenfaaT department 
of West End Estate Agency 
tmring Safas and Rentals 
of central London proper- 
lies. Good auttio typing am 
» become m- 
VDhmd to aS aspects of die 
mk are essential Expari- 
«• h ■ sen** mdusny 

I and of W.P. or computers an 

advantage. 

Mephone Rosafaxt , 
worn cat 

01 831 5313 


inster 

ng its 

ertsey) 
her of 
/ News 
s Press, 
npletcd 

;Iapv 

er2pto 
-,tcd its 
ent to 
rt Bcn- 
k acting 
another 
iPV at 

r a total 
lares, or 
* votes. 
1 955p. 


ct office 
lent car- 
ii is es- 
.mpleied 
million. 

■:r re- 

STVTST- 
Second 
.73p for 
). 1986. 
Jp. This 
iireciore* 
crim re- 
Spand a 
x'riod to 

CORP: 
1. 1986. 
<n <£6.58 
£333.052 
per share 
p). The 
company 
e second 
i auction 
g and it 
crop and 
iction. 
OENIX 
If- year to 
urn over 
Loss be- 
i 31-914). 
l 36.1 7p 


s. 


op into 


vV 8256 


rmation 


•lication 
im tried 
:h our 


(£499 ex 
:orage. 
ger 11 
l* It 

t PresteL 
(worth 


....£99.95 


...£99.00 

ms for 

....£49.95 



itain and m iy 









THE TIMES WEDNESDAY JUNE 1 1 1986 


22-25 


OUT OF THE ORDINARY £10,000 

joation would ideally suit a company cars, private medical schemes, and 


interesting position would ideally suit a 
secretary wanting to move into a more admin- 
stiative role. With only 505c secretarial content 


company cars, private medical schemes, and 

recruitment of senior executives. 

Excellent opportunity to 01*4999175 


>■011 win be involved in dealing with aD aspects of exercise your organising 
the company’s administration, leasing of abilities. "Skills 90/50. 


French speaking secretary 
for Belgravia. 

An experienced bilingual {French) SH secretary 
with WP skills is needed for an International company 
based in the Belgravia area. 

If your English skills are also good, you could talk 
your way into a permanent position. 

Contact Victoria Martin today for details. 


rp- « i i»'i i r:l 

SRSRTfi 


01 - 439 0601 


Secretary Required by 
Director 

of Leading Advertising Agency 

ABBOTT MEAD 
VICKERS 

Requires a secretary to assist 
our Chief Accountant 

This position entails full 
Secretarial Duties including some 
administrative responsibilities. 

Financial experience helpful but 
not essential. 

Salary negotiable to include usual 
benefits. 

Applications in writing please: 

Christine Palmer 
32 Aybrook Street, 
London W1M 3JI 


Sector’s Secretar 

£ 12^00 

1 1 Tie Marketing Director of a tmjor oil company 
A needs a PA/administraror who can make a 
genuine oomributioo on the marketing side. 

Your dutie, «iD include monitoring trends 
maintaining databases. devising and improving 
mfonnariOQ systems within die department, and 
actively paroapaong in specific projects. Some 
secmana J back up will abo be required (90/60). is 
well as tbe supervision of a junior secretary. A flair lor 
client contact rod function organising would be a 
great asset. 

Tbe ideal candidate will hare a sufficiently robust and 
sophisticated personality to enjoy working in a 
cosmopolitan, extrovert environment, coupled with a 
rial interest in computers and their appEcauxu. 

Age indicator 25-35. 

Benefits include an extended holiday allowance md 
personal loan faalines. 

Phase contact 01-437 1564 


Sc Associates Ltd 
01-4371564 

Rac m i tm c u t Consultants 130 Regent Street, 
London W1R5FE 


AWay With Words 

£ 11,000 

Our dient, one of the world's leading 
publishes of serious periodicals, urgently 
seeks an Editorial Administrator This is a key 
role, co-ordinating all aspects of article 
programming except for actual commission- 
ing and editing Empathywith writers, an eye 
for detail, an interest in editorial work and 
excellent taping ate all essential airrihnres 
Age probabh' 25+ . Please telephone 01-493 
5787. 

• GORDON-YATES 


_F02Ll*i AN_ 

BANKING 

JUNIOR PA 

£ 6^000 

Well established, expanding. City recruitment 
consultancy urgently requires a junior sec/PA to 
work for its Directors. Candidates must have 
accurate typing, and ideally some WP expert- 
enfce. although training will be given. 

This is an ideal opportunity for a college leaver 
or someone with a little experience, who would 
enjoy a lively, informal, but hectic environment 
Duties are very varied and will include extensive 
client contact: therefore a good telephone man- . 
ner is essential We require a min of 5 “O’ levels 
including M & E, ‘A’ levels would be preferable. 
Please Call Sandie Robinson on 01-236 1113. 
Penman Recruitment Services (24 Hours) 




32S3SE3fi3EI 


SECRETARY 

for 

Chairman’s Office 

International top-quality 
clothing - West End 

Applicants aged 24 upwards need to have 
excellent secretarial skffls gained at se- 
nior level, be able to respond to 
challenges and to use initiative. Excellent 
salary and benefits. 

Please send c.v. to: Personnel Officer, 
Aquascutum Limited. 100 Regent Street, 
London W1. Teh 01-734 6090. 

.Aquascutum 


University of London In sti t u te of Education 

SENIOR SECRETARY 

£9,366 - £10,779 inclusive 

To lead team of 4 providing administrative and 
secretarial support for academic staff In History 
and Humanities Department Duties include 
planning and co-ordinating secretarial work, 
course administration and servicing commit- 
tees. Previous experience essential, preferably 
in an academic department Shorthand (100 
wpm) and typing (50/60 wpm). Word process- 
ing experience desirable. 

For further details and application form please 
ring Mary Griffin, University of London Institute 
of Education, 20 Bedford way, London WC1H 
OAL on 636 1500 ext 254 giving ref. CS.H.1. 
Completed applications required by 26 June. 


INTERNATIONAL BANKING 

£14,000 MX). 

PA to Managing Director. Gty Merchant Bank. He is responsible 
for ail bosineu in eIk Asia ana Pfcafic rcjsoos. Banking experience 



Top of the Hill 

to £ 10,000 

This is a new position iu one of Mayfair’s most stylish 
and exclusive estate agencies. Working as part of a 
small team you will become totally immersed in the 


secretarial role in this young, friendly environment 
Good skills (80/60) and experience essential Please 

call 01-409 123 2. 

HmMBW Be wuUuen tCoMu lten ts ■■■■ 


PA TO MD 
WOKING 
c£10,000 

Why commute? Tbe MD of A£X, an international 
company with offices in Woking, seeks a seif assured 
PA secretary. You will have a real opportunity to 
organise, use your initiative and administrative ability. 
Shorthand and typing akOb will be of an excellent 
standard and your knowledge of word processing and a 
willingness to team new technology will enable you to 
cope with this busy, d em a nd i ng and varied position. 
Please apply to: 

J1H Davies, Manager. 

Select Appointments Ltd, 

Premier House, Victoria Way, 

Woking, Surrey. 

Tel: 04862 26791 


and euctlem presentation essential, 
profit share etc. 


fonpge sab. 


£10,500 Personnel 

.Admin s ecr et ary for Director, American Bank - Per sonn el area. 
Ideally relevant experience btn exocffem skflb (100/70). numeracy 
and outgoing personality important. Monroe, bonuses etc. 
£10,500 neg French 

Director. City Bank re qu ires Sec/PA with fluent French- Extremely 
busy post in absorbing en v iron m en t. SH 80/typing 70. Mortgage, 
profit share etc. 

£11.500 PA 

Head of Investment Are*, international Bonk requires PA prefera- 
bly with a knowledge of German. Absorbing interesting post. 
Mortgage etc 

430 1551/2653 

DULCTE SIMPSON APPOINTMENTS LTD 


SHANGRI-LA 

INTERNATIONAL 

Secretary 

Sales Co-Ordinator 

Immediate vacancy for young energetic secretary - sales 
coordinator working for leading Far East hotel com- 
pany. lan g ua ge ability Genian and French. This busy 
sales office in Knigh abridge handles individual and 
group reservations. Excellent salary. 

Please call Thn Retd oa 01-581 1011 


SECRETARY/ 

ADMINISTRATIVE ASSISTANT 

Required by large expanding Civil Engineering 
Company presently based in NW1 but moving 
to Tottenham in N17 In Autumn 1986. 

The successful applicant wifl work as Confiden- 
tial Secretary ana Ad m in s tr a tive Assistant to 
certain Company Directors and the Group 
Chairman. Secretarial skills of a high order are 
essential and experience in a similar position 
where confldentiafity and discretion were re- 
quired will be a distinct advantage. Salary 
negotiable commensurate with ability and 
experience. 

Please apply in writing giving full particulars of 
career to date to:- Newton and Gamer, Char- 
tered accountants, Apex House, Grand Arcade, 
North Finchley London N12. 



A successful record company based In Park 
Royal with Its own compilation label needs an 
enthusiastic secretary to work for 2/3 Direc- 
tors, providing fuO sec. and admin, support 
The atmosphere is fast moving, noisy ana can 
be hectic but teamy, fun, informal and very 
rewarding. 3 years sound sec. exp. ess. 
100/80. Age 20's. Please cafe 

„ ,437 6032 

H&bstoneS 

A AaCCBVTUINiaVCHAMNT^B^ 


ATTRACTIVE PA SECRETARY 

to senior Conservative MP for business and con- 
stituency work. Ability and experience of 
working on own initiative essential. Salary nego- 
tiable, depending on experience, £9,000 to 
£10,000. 

Tel 01-437 6666. 


LEGAL AUDIO SEC 

Admin and personnel duties for partner, »l. 

9 JO am start. £11 300 pa. Pkase ring or send m CV to: 

Top Fight Secretaries, 

26 The Broadway, 
Wimbledon, SWl$ 

01 947 0319 or 01 946 4424. 


DELA 


Private Secretary 

Personnel 

£6,159 - £9.776 pa. inc. 

(jjnder review) 


Wb are seeking to recruit a first class secretary for the 
Head of industrial Relations based at our Headquarters 
offices near SL Paul's on the Central line, hfis work is very 
wide ranging andyou would therefore fiffoyounajties 
both interesting and demanding. 

To be successful in this post, you win need to have a 
high level of secretarial ddfis, including shorthand, and a 
maturity which comes from working for an executive or 
manager in a large or metfium sized oiganlsatioa, 

The office and equipment you will work with are 
modem and the benefits are those you would expect of a; 
good employer. 

Existir^holkiayarrangemerTtewil1behonoifl?ecL 
Applications In writing only stating fuH relevant 
details, including age and current salary should be 
forwarded to the Group Personnel Officer, CEGB 
Sudbury House, 15 NewgateStreet, London EC1A7AU 
as soon as possible. Quote reference 175/86/MG/T. 

The CEGB is an equal opportunity employer. 


^ Graduate PA 

Television Industry 

ITCA is the trade assodaiion. of the pa&ImS 

and co-ordination of those policies. 

As n result his PA’s role is vwy v?uiedand*mt^«. SSiS? * 
real challenge for someone wishing to become taUHytnvw 

You will provide a foil 

ring* seowtarial sms, including 100 w&m. shorthand. 

We offer an excellent safety. fogferwM » tbe mmi comply 
benefits, indudhig 5 weeks' annual leave. ,o« 

If vou are interested, and can.be available from l SegjMWjrlW. 
voi^SiiS^^^ne for farther details or wntc, cndqsm g CV, ro. 

The Personnel officer, iflB 

j Kntoiton House, 

^ san. Independent Tdeviaoa 

aI'^i ojpomn.it, Emptosrer. Compan ies Assod^ 


The CEGB s an equal 
opoorttrtveraolovw . 


ranwu.Ba3HnTyBBewra®taoo, 

HEWOMRIERS 



SECRETARY - 

INTERNATIONAL ORGANISATION 

Ad International Trade Association seeks an experienced secretary to 
handle the administration of several important committees, involving; 
some overseas travel Candidates should be aged 26-33, have several 
years work experience, possibly within a Trade Association, be fluent 
in French and German (Pfa gfah mother (tongue) and have first class 
shorthand and audio typing skill*- Experience of micro’s and 
Wordstar will be advantageous. Non smoker. Salary £10,000 pa, 5 
weeks holiday per year, contributory pension scheme, Beeson ticket 
loan. Please apply with full CV to: DrL MJ3- Loveitt, 6 Bathurst 
Street, London W2 2SD, quoting ref. PC. (No Agencies). 


ASA LAW SECS - London’s leading specialist Agency for Law 
Secretaries offers many opportunities for Senior Legal 
Secretaries. 

If you are currently seeking a new position and are looking for 
an agency that will offer you a professional semtx and lake 
great care in actually listening to your requirements amaaot 
waste time sending you on fruitless interviews: We would like to 
hear from you. Call Sandra Kernazt on 236 1682 or send 8 copy 
of your CV to 

ASA LAW SECS 
7 Lodgate Square 
off Lodgate Hill 
London EC4N 7 AS - 



EUROPEAN 
INSTITUTE OF 
BUSINESS 
ADMINISTRATION 




CALLH6Q 
TOP TEMPS! 

UP TO £*4K> P JL 

■ ■■ act io n of crottag IMP booM n gt 
Ityaudto mo* win loo/co + W TO 

(In partoriv OLIVETTI ETJS1/BM 
08PLAYVWTHW8M PCJWHQJ 
MULTIMATE S WORDSTAR}. 

. Join oar pm a wla re l MM tixfoy* 



- e 



PB ? 


EX 

PI 


RECRUITN 

IE 

RT G0HSI1 

£ 

18 

ik 


PACKAGE 


Bfljtttua] [En^sh/Freoch) 

Location on edge of Horett. 
Interactional llnhtraij 1 
cnvitonracnL note send 
detailed currinrfum vitae 
business references. photo. 
he Service dn Fcnonad 
INSEAD Bd tie Constance 
77302 FONTAINEBLEAU 
CEDEX. 


CRROUflE m 

SATURDAY 
. COFFEE & CROISSANTS 
^Temporary & Permanent** 

Wa mdMUsd Hut fern is prates domg tl* wak rod at 
anwtetttor Msraam to m m opening ipate* *w |«i» SMUR- 
DAY lAlfi JUNE tarn 10 undl 2pn. If you'll tootong fortenparo y OH 
pgnnmnt work. com and pin os Hu for cofln md oosaatfs! I yon 
would rafoar anaaga s ittaniMw Mots, please triaptwm us 
(nanst Ida Green Park} 

. 01-499 8070 

MHOUHEKBIGSKRETARlALAPPWniHBfTS 


1/ NIGHTSBRIDG C 
A SECRETARIES *- 


SECRETARY/PA 
to Commercial 
Director 

- - HAMMEBSMITu! 
SALARY ca £9,000 pa 
+ BENEFITS . 

This fe an opportunhy for a St?>er Secre ta ry 
with excellent shorthand typing wp ririlfe 
and above aB a lively personality to assist the 
Commercial Director is business development. 
Ample scope for initiative in this high pressure 
but interesting travel business. 

Please telephone the Personnel Officer 
Mark Allan Travel Limited 01-741 9861 


•46 9767 or md written details to 228, 
Hi — t Street, London W1. 




A PA/AUDK) SECRETARY 
TO COMPANY SECRETARY 
£10£00 

Is required to writ In Uk Mod deeartnwtt or Ms tegi organ tea don. 
Good ctiiaatifflta tac fc unm ] ptas mniwn 5 — 1 * am u i a ti a l wqwi- 
m to work a tbs ssror lovtL Exceflcnt appominlty. Legal experience 
wm WP and shortand pretared tax rot BssentaL Age 25+. Good 
b w i e He. 

Fling Doreen: 623 9®)6 
Law Staff Agency 


l;rrr?.rrrrurr? 


WBh a d We rence 

V s ti« just that this is a tab hi fensNy eqopped offices - no 
expense spared, or tint It's the ffl) of a brae, mH-knom 
company, and pot of a vast ootTMwc l afeflaie. or own flat 
ifs a small detached executive suks. the big tfitoronce is 
where. Not W1, briEI. SoifjQulmE,MEorSEaf Tooil 
it's ideal. YouH moot and greet a lot of people, ail tapes, aO 
levels. Opente the tent m Ngh-iech. switchboards (Moo- 
arch), handle the post/fax. type a bit - maybe. To Eva up to 
it you need a good education and excellent «nanr 
ptoming - and. although not ’traffty’ wefl lunljf 
spoken, not ’gor bimtq- atther. OVOTOD 

’£&££.' ** on 01-734 7282 

Maiy O i ei t oiRanMnaMlld. gPlcxaxMf.laadQB.WlV9W. 


SECRETARY/PA 

£9,500 

A firm of Accountants m modem offices sear 
Regents Park require a Secretary /PA for a Se- 
nior Partner. Applicants should be mature, well- 
educated, intelligent and adaptable with 
co nsiderab l e secretarial experience, excellent 
shorthand and typing and preferably knowledge 
of WP. Written and spoken German an 
advantage. 

Write with CV to Mr Milne, BHcfc Rothenberg & 
Noble, 12 York Gate, London. NWl 4QS, or 
telephone 01-486 011L 


SUPER SECRETARIES 


National Heart And Chest 

Personal 

Assistant/ 

Secretary 

Needed to help run a small charitable estate, compris- 
ing both commercial and residential properties, . 
belonging to (his Hospital Group in South Kensington. 

This interesting job covers all aspects of day to day 
managemenLand would suit someone who has already 
worked in proppty management or alternatively is in- 
terested in gaining experience in this field. Good audio 
secretarial stall* are essential and applicants must also 
be enthusiastic, well organised and able to use tbeir 
own initiative. 

Salary within range £7,275 - £9,21S. 

Application forms obtainable from The Personnel De- 
partment. Brampton Hospital. FuQtam Road, London 
SW3 6HP. Tel: 01-352 8121 ext 4456. (24 hour answer- 
ing service) 


ADMIN. 80% 

Prestigious Property Company seeks confident 
PA to run the office, org an i zi ng receptions, 
conferences etc. Minimum use of good skBs 
including shorth a nd. 224-. El 0,000+ 

Merediih Scott Recruitment 

17 Flea Si, Lomtm BC4Y IAA Ttt 0J-5S3 1034/MSS 





ftaqimsa aerator for an Ana 
EflHUrn. KnowMgi of WJP. 

umM. ataty agofe. 
Ha, free haute and aare 
uM loa uAMa. Vtafiti trad 
taMMiai mrk lad. 

Please send C. V. to r 
■ BA EC, 

35 Befgraw Square, 
London SW1 X8QN. 


boxhkws eeeooa snun 


kew enrol. naMom. im 

arawina r«Mential prooerty 
■MtianatiMiu amwv wing to 
6MTWW pw w nnel rcalre rufl 
ttme NteoUrtH-. SuH MQvcr 
sradina. career girl or ntw> 
wUdaw to pentue MCand ca- 
reer. Umwtlc. confUMM ami 
adwHabte secctartal ana am ■ 
inn w e ntuii. WJ>.. accounting 
and tangungra an attvaatage. 
Tel Ol 900 OSS5. 


VOU CtXSK victoria. JC&2QO 
plus Wt of bonoOU. Well 
known (unoor drains. Busy 
but rw ctotlo natty friendly MM. 
WHI tram oond copy typtst. CaU 
HobM RoMnson. Offtn Angtii 
t. a suidafr Montrooe Racnsu- 
tnenl Consultants. Wl. 01-0X9 

0777 


SECRETARY/ 

RECEPTIONIST 

Smdl friemfly Ann of office 
rrftritishco Dear HoBvjoj 
Vbdau. reqgire ro aU-roond 
Kcniaiy «bo Ekes a varied day 

with abtlny la nark oo own 
nriuuive. Goad typing and ide- 
piiooc manner rsscnltaJ. £B_500. 
Fhne Linda Presto* os 


TYPIST, 


WM edueatad adaptabta 

y *N"fl PS"** *«i good 

■ Salary ME. 
Tataohua: B1-621 M31 


RELOCATION ASSISTANT 

Major brienntMoal Service OtynWai n ftusl 
reqrares bright, akrt penioo to assist in ti* adnrinltstratien of our 

Mttioa. Good ooniiiwiiiicatioB akfife araahtial, weflaa abflity to 
worft under pressure. Danae - A level stonfanL Typtn* 50. 
■teibanri M. Salary £7;).X)pIna gencrooa benefits. Ffawe reply 
with fun CV or call Miss BKadwth CiBott «n> 01-623 8222. 


* R cto cattaD Man a gem ent I n tent s t i o ua l LTD. 
New Bond StoMt. London W1Y SPA 
to o Agendea) 


SECRET AEY/PA 

required forwnail company iu SW7 (Kensington). Short- 
hand not essential but must hold frill driving licence and 
be aged around 20 to 35. Salary £8,500 approx, according 
to age and experience. 

Please telephone 

Mrs. Jakcmaa on 01 937 4074 for further details. 


bmm onojuaznL v m «iw 
work) na under prenure ud ba- 
■no nan nf a youne vital taam. 
IMS varied Job with a Manaos- 
mem Consultant will suti you. 
You should have up la one 
years experience and MW not 
to keen to a strict 9-S rooctna. 
No shorthand. 20 - 2a vra 
c£9^oa Phone S83 0066 Mer- 
edith Scott fracnatnient. 


acMMn sccncnurr swu on 

Ca. 0MOsii plus afnaraus 
perks. Lots at Mvotvemeni. 
Worldns w«h very a et d o t raan- 
aoemenl and nMMnr 
nuurmBh. IBM PC 
(Xary/Travei arraaoernenc*. 
CaU ROOM Robinson Office An- 
oeta la Stnetatr Montrose 
Reer uUme nt Consultants Ol 
639 0777 




YOUMO UCQAL SBCfUCTMV 

£9.000. Wt Least PracOor. 
wnh your ewenence and an. 
ihusissm you wm thrive with 
this o v e r wor ked Mom of law- 
yers. They need you now! Call 
OU« Rtnornse Office AneeM 
l a StnCefr Montrose RecruU- 
menl Consultants 01-629 0777 


AUDM/tXOAL me West End 
SohcUors J».OOOfcph- Varied 
routine wnh busy yrous at con- 

veyanano «xperts. Bun 
2nd 3rd iabber. Can Cuve 
Rmorose Office An«a W l /a Sa- 
naa- Mont rose Conauiqnis oi- 
029 am. 


OHC or LONDON'S LEADBM Ea. 
Isle Agents require a youdq. 
encroebr. hndwOfUnt Secre- 
tary ta three negotiator ■ good 
amag sod aconont tetenhone 
manner snenaBi. ET.OOO. Con- 
tact Satxtan Btythe Ol «09 







; A n . 


rmro : ; il '£ 


SHWTWT CIOXXW 
SohCUpr based nr Oudcery 
““<■ Wonting with young- <vv 
"«JMe ieotri team. Some WP 
CaDjtfnoKwoutee Anortst a 
gjnoair Montrose Hec wn tnw m 
Con*UlUh» 01429 0777 


‘- r. W 


ffijr ,1 L 








no.ooa Large e nartatwJ Ac- 
oountaney Group. SaU starter 







CorimatA m ute3Vr 





































Howard Minter & Company 


SLOANE SQUARE SWI 


RM^to mow into win now carpata. cunafra. bathroom* and fifty ottod kMermnpmt Mstpfed. 

tar 

U^CTS£SE lf E?b! eW GAS HEATING AND LOOPS) HOT WATER SYSTEM. 

2UWGE INTERCOMMUNICATING RECEPTION ROOMS vrth bay. nd MM. SPACIOUS 

5 BH3ROOMS (* DOUBLE). 3 BATHROOMS (2 «n suite). Show room watt wash tart*, cloakroom. 

M “* y now Wrehon **> *•«* «**ig area. Fifty oqUppad with AEG and SiaiENS 
TO W3*r UNFURNISHED OR FURNtSHEQ. 

AOW^^LSTAFF FLATS AVAILABLE AND FURTHER OMJLAR APARTMENTS. APPLY TO 


28 Cariogan Place London SVV1 235 2832 


THE TIMES WEDNESDAY JITNF 11 1986 


i^thini Graham 


PROPERTY BUYERS' GUIDE 

London Properly 


tvwnt 


nan 


4 Bag Fag 2 M m 

WJB.IHBT.Wi; IWp EffTCK IMUI 

3 Baa Ham Mdi SMa l BH FW 

I MB pa - CMOUk 0MMME Wl (»H 

jjMtMAr 

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rear 


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soarwYSTRar. no * sm m 

3 Bad Ham wh Tam 
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Hfr- 

■sruetH 

tfOMHoua. 


tat pm 


«»p 


enewn; «s 

OWLDOlBMI) 

Lsssrsw, 

rewVSs.w* 



£280 

Conveyancing by City Solicitors 


AH fireet bsDSe/Nat 
sates at IV* %. 
Ring Tin WetberfiL 

SW10 Staoous 1st floor 
flat < beds. 1 recpt k & b. 
£ 95 . 000 . 

SW6 Unify oasonsttB, 3 
beds. \ fttot, k & a. 
EiMjm 

HE BLEYS 01 736 008 S 


31 


iimm 


BRUCE 




K!"T \RY Pi 


•rr^^rciai 


{ • • r,r 

.1 \ >/A 


■ ; ' "> ' ‘ 1 : \ 



Hampton & Sons 


EATON PLACE. SW3 

«W tor cntettntaL anlten- 
lyKs Mmg mom, dWng roan, fioSj tt/btjst 

ra«L raw hokoom «uST 2 tatter taSLSS- 


WC. tfudyXTSBi* 
Tte fla has a mow tpw ■ baJcony. 2 douM 


toamiBns.2 

Wy MM kitchen. 


A SELECTION 


WHOOSHED RENTALS 

PARADISE WAUL SW3 
BaMW appanafl.OTj roodamtew Inn in Ms 
ctem»o P« d ott CWsa. Yl» horn bo i gt- 
nga. gam nd am fames. 1/2 nantoR maws. 

WW 08HD totnrOTL F7(J0 DM. 

WMNSTTON PLACE NORTH, SWI 
A ctenanapanod cottage Daft* tawed h aecfenM 
n Bfitgrna; xcanwataBoa ndudes. 2 bad- . 
ooiite racvdon room, teoran red 
Wdw. eatfpja. 


_ ba l c on y. _ _____ 

0o*l# iBcretkxnwxn and moon, ten 
S4TOB.*. fifty fitted to 

FROM OUR M 


REGISTER. 


6 Adingtcm Street, London SW1A1RB 


01-4938222 



*>1 


MmMjBBMBnMJ 

Antnojonn. 

bawMmancan kit with afl madms. access to can- 
raw* gardens. AwNable 6 months pks. £475 pw. Co 

MYimm WUJL Spacious comfortable famty bouse 
Available 1 yr plus. £T 75 pw. 


reep. Co leL 


bUM am lor tea ca lat 

EHD WammBm 


»: 


iwiMMFF bt'aSl 

m In taq Ca UL £ 258 PR 

%B ROME *T. SM 

hHygcoirttadttO 


MaaaanmgeodtWdnfl 

S2W5 

I teg Ca Lat EKB W 


01-7308682 


OVtNOTON ST SW 3 . £600 pw. Charming house 
which has Just been comptotsiy redecorated. Con- 
sisting of dbla recep room with balcony, study, 
Wtchen. dWng room to sett 8 - 10 . 3 bads, 2 batta. 
sep cfoaiuwan, pretty waited gdn, available partly 
furnished or unfurnished. 


For buying or selling your home in the usual 
way, we charge £280 (+ VA.T. and disburse- 
ments) for prices up lo £60.000. Please 
telephone us for a quotation on figures higher 
than ibat We can also help you find a 
mortgage. 


SUMOTON. UNIQUELY onotnal 
Iww in amunaliM area. 
0 "cy « CHvgun Bakery, now 
arranfM a> imtmy uiptrWy 

rralneo a I -2 storey house. 

4 5 Bedroom. 2 3 ncfrooiH. 
stunning hMhroam. 2 thowrr 
rooms, siudto. ndoar water 
mroen. wtn» tel Ur. Preuv M 
Bo garden. FH L2Z9jOOO. Tel 
22 a egos for tw to new. 


BARRETTS 

49 QUEEN VICTORIA ST 
LONDON EC4 

TELEPHONE: 01-248 0551 


Superb ceorgaui 

Mouse on lour floors, 
nuxternned lo lhr very highest 
ttoiKUid. 3 4 bedrooms 2 
bathrooms WC. 2SH knrhen a 
through dlnntngrocm. recap- 
tion. utility. Fob ecu. 
LatuHraped south (octag oar 
0*11 C23QXWO. Tel: 01 607 
6*778 


LOWNDES SO. ESSO pw. Charming flat ktaafly to* 
catacL ConafeBng of kitchen, recaption room, dbtag 
room, 2 <&ie bedrooms and 2 bat hr oom s. Avaftabie 
for kmg/Bhoit lets. 


Gf.ORGK KMGH 1 1 lie Getting Ajjent 


HAMPSTEAD VILLAGE NW3. 

Tucked s»ay m a quia bee adRBM to i&otM sod tube ir (We 
dtnactcrftil cousgc with umny rooT icnace. Two donNe bedroom*, 
cadi with adioinaH bathroom. 2 teergtiog rooms. Utjc Hirhm unb 
eauai ana. OmtemMy bruistied and smbMHbr oae year ia>< 
taafly to company tenant 11 £Z 8 S a udi 


SWISS COTTACT NW3. 

A quite exceptional audio flay with van curved Jvindcma onto a 


ttnice add wdteiaiMaiMd ernkn Huge. b£> .cpnnced ceHwged 


room wtih gsllerv licrpwa 

" ' Ren sad badnpotn. 


Separate cat-m kKctaeti 

tedani at COO a week. 


and 


ABOUND TOWN 

120 ffeberf Park Aye, Wit 


ADDISON SONS. WT4. 
Spacious, totally refurbfshsd 
fasnfiy hse. 8 dbte battroa. 2 
recap m» Hading to tusce. 
2 bffihnns. attractive ffl kit 
wflh afl macranes, 
C8Sar/UtSty(TB.CDtaL 1yr+. 
£425 p*v. 

01-223 99GB 


diniBS «• 

teams to company 


Tire of the vast sdadSoe of Ibe viewed amt i 
properties ftroagb oh HssrIiN office. *1-794 1125. 


i MAN VGKMFAT KXPKRTISK 


jp BENHAM &REEVES 


m NOW OPENING IN KENSINGTON 

after 25 yrs » the karfing lettii* agency in NW London 
require quafity properties in sur ro un ding areas for 
la Qua Corporele & Dipkmnhc Appficants. 


01-938352 



BARBICAN CITY 
EC2. 


Selection of 1,2 & 3 bed 
fiats fufty furnished from 
£170 p.WL inclusive. 


FRANK HARBIS& CO 
01 387 0077 



CANNONBURY SQ Nl 


Swnf* wo e Z Ig Beorpan hnse. awng open apeas wtt> *ght aamy 
atOTimoaftm. reonng oenoo temaes tatmfldg a terwy iwtse cd 
ogi warn ml eiagaei. coramuae, anaped mi toora omy nftwinteay. 
v*pu^"i 'BgpWP <2B * t££ ) wtti i twneows tnom ad r». sep dr.nc nr. 
WhiUMJ Wtn/toa rm, luxury easier aearoonj/UHiwom suae. S hrtner 
teRooins. wawnora 2 srecStewBiwc. sep tWey.weUdraapedzM steeled I 
reded gneniGO a 24j, gu CH. Q97JM FA 
jearr sou ksert: 

H0TBUCK DESIAT0 01-226 0160 
HOLDEN MATTHEWS 01-226 1313 


WATCWWLD 
OPRI S««e batchejor flat 
newly decorated, avail septan 
ber. 1 b rtr w. kit. hath, loungr. 
rtv. chw. Loirly odna. sunout 
parking L. H. £B6JXX> lo In 
Clude carpet*, cuitatn*. indge. 
cooker and some /until ure. Tel 
01 99B 7911 alter 6 pm 


STBPHENMUt RB 5 W e Cetn- 
lonabie. 2 double bedroomed 
1*1 floor flat, with large recep- 
tion. Hurd kitchen 
bathroom C CH- 99CH year 
Lease £70.000 ono Teun-TM 
797S IW>|MS -after 6 pml Ol 
031 51 79 (day k 


UNIQUE PROPERTIES 

VAST DESIGNER FLAT 


[W2 CtUnUNC MAISOMICTTE 
ml tocabon in ouief elegant 
ml-de-Mc. 3 bed*, large sll&ng 
room & kitchen. Bathroom 
Beaubful airy staircase, all: 
Morage. Wauled roof lerrao. 
original feature* ciaBJOOO 
freehold. Tel: 01-229 0836. 


l OT a nt K D am C Ta tlW. On he Soara.»t»wctiedpacxi»ijedK a 
^g^^HTTOrsg^BHrmMUiMgteteBHm.^ 


I NWal IM Umb fte idteMd Omg itn. toed tt. omi'foi i*xi pmo 

ffionKm (ft ip* moon m mwwradnm 

bmg bn. Onsg ten. fftesl MmdUBdRLtnDbvCaBBdy 


01-938 2311 


MASKELLS 

ESWE AGENTS 


Am ON COMPANir 

0(1 HOLIDAY 1 m . 

ONLY - 
STUDIOS 'v. - 
MwN bi b m finwe. «2 - riMn 

ia ft sudo in PB bfc. opso phn 

Wctefl. £80 im 

Pltai MTilVI - SNHfb 

dUe studn m mod Uk. jkkbl BL 

CH St, at Ufcten & totem 

VWtendb St, W1 - Ute opdara 

b tegh swan Uu d&a ixrtm, 

me to rm. ftd tateten, £140 pw 
LMWd Gdns. SW7 - BwutnuHy 

ten M BtaMt-fift. ponsr ate 

£330 on 

2 BEDRH FUTS 
Ctevetead S%. HQ - Unusual but 
snow iwr omt It fla mQi ps- 
tn. 080 pw 

ftehettay Gm«. W2 - hPB Uk 
ci utrt Axatm. CH nd £200 


Cm 


ML W2 - Attract 2 dbte 

Wrra Nh n mod tec. £250 pw 

tips Pk PMtt, W1 - HM naiad 

b ton (i PB bft «t» 1 mn 

Martte Arab. E375 

3 BEDBM FUTS 


bobs Aidneci desvmd 

MM kted toWoo. om of amm 

‘ S. £500 pw 

SL Wl • Sax* tot n text*. 

2 Mtents. ttoonn sic. E7W1 pw 

CARLTON ESTATES 
723 9612 



tenrSIRK. 1HA 2*00001 HM 
■|MkCta«Bbrte|Clte 

csBm- • 

H JMB mu !■ of ft JOM 
HMdkma «w uhh, • s 

MMlmWlkiteiite. 



ggStnasea 


•I 72C.MB 


FKAT flKff SW5. Spacious 
fsaBy bass doss to Pjrt red 
steps, in stperti t teega wa trtec. 
5 bote, BQBfl n>L tedng rnL fBD- 
ly rm. itnfy. mod lot. 3 bite. 


I Iff (gtoaAwa oow. Long Co. 


«a 

! imuns fuce nti O0Q- 


«g COfiage in qrts stmt, 
Tlmiagb reap. ptei. fflte 


mod Wand tateioi^ 
par. Lmg or Short Lsl 


l»1 2216 



CMWSM DONS. SMI - WEYMOOni ST- VI 
ABncOvt to floor to wifi NL 2 Bright and spaoous inn. 4di to 
tote. ikhlU. tt. twh- lire ol w t&wfeSTpcm. 3 beds, 
gzriws. 050 owl 2 reaps, tt, 2 bate £400 pw. 

ST. LtDSAHM -fan. SW3 ST. JOHN’S W000 HW8 
DehgWN mn iowt homt 1st Pwite bftBtegaiaDng.b^i^ 


floor flat witli btezny. 2 dbte 
beds. Ate racep. f f. W. 2 tods. 
E 4 D 0 pw. 

wnoo* crofflT sm 

ExEBiteid «twor designed (pound 
floor flat. Just oft. Soane Sq. 2 


tfL potter, foatures ttes . 
flat with etterei w vtews of lon- 
don. Kite bod. recap, to and bath. 
£25 pw. 

BMW MUD. mn 
Itewly retebisted 3rd flr flat will 


dbte beds, dbte reap. ti. UL 2 fifi. portor. dbte bed. reap. W and 
baas. £47Ppw. twit. Ind. CH/OtW, ElMow. 

STOTH0F THE BMW NflHTH Of THE PASS 

SI-352 Sill IMS* 8882 


PHH1KIKW& LEWIS 



High ceilings. 3Cr recep. 2 beds. 2 baths, stunning terrace 
tor entertaining. 123 yrs. £290.000 


HOLLAND PK HSE OUT OF THIS WORLD 


DWe recep. dining rm. 4 beds. Ige peaceful garden. Free- 
hold. £700000 


I Wl UPKR MOMTAQU 

2 fliM period HOfek All bad* 
mbd»miMiiu>n done. Each 
prockh- 4 beds. 2 3 baths 
large Ml dining. 26ft draumig 
rm. itidiiy. tun rm. small palm 
£260 Cm each. Mortev London 
4 Partners: Ot 723 B699 iMon 


373 7047 (anytime) 


WESTBOURNE 
PARK ROAD 

Wall 


Mod p b (lat. 2 bed, fit kiL bath. 
Ih rm. CH. Quiet pm rd. Near 
HTurry & is sin. Wbury Fields, 
tcnnn.swim. t 20 yrk-as* Pur 
chase freehoM Doidmg 
Cham. £64.000. 01 369 8040 


Facing south over 
Westboume Park 
Road a bright first 
floor flat in need of 
redecoraiion. 

2 dble beds, recep, 
good sized lot, 
bath. Gas CH, dbte 
glazing, balcony. 
88 years. £66,000. 


MARSH S PARSONS 

01-727 9811 




■ - -v^ r-| 

^FREEIfc 

V'-Z&k-U', 


| Wll LnHrue l bed mpln la 
floor flat lb tradJbonal block 
wtih rscaped gdn*. and porter 
Iminac (and 4 v sunny, recep 
i 6 't 12 *. l - shaped kit.diner 
L«sne 136 yrs. £64.950 view 
Today 221 2243 irves . 


BAVSWATER W2 Coa. brtght 
flat, excel coma. 1 Ige dble bed 
room. 2 snW bedrms. Ige recep 
area. 2 bathrms. hallway, en 
trance pn. Porter secure Long 
lease £1 UXOOO 01-828 2549 


, . Computerised 
Property Register 
01 -809-4693/4677 


HLUUVM. sm feng fiat 
presligfous block mertooking 
Cadogai Cure 3 bed. 3 boUts. 
dole nee & fully (U mi. Lse 95 
yrs. £395.000. Joint sole agents 
Twany Estates 246 6767 


W2 


CHICHESTER 
WEST SUSSEX. 


barnard 

marcus 


Pertad tattewse to let fu 
one year ItanwM or pvt 
tumefied. 2 recepfions. 3 
bedroom, 2 tatbrooras. 
eoitraf beatmo. doAte ga- 
OSL tnaotemd w acre 
Bvriao. 

Jahnan Wdod b Co. 

(824^ 374711/2. 



CAD 08 MI MUWKM 8 ML 

Stmteg tatertor ooijrwd 1* 

floor toL 2 dbte teds, 2 tote 


p«s*srw».^s 

OK nd. AkW trad Ana ID mid 


tadco UBai 834 7316 

WYNDMM STtSET WL 
Spactes oomd floor note witfi 

Rfesfa 

pw. Go's ortv. 

Mayfair OfSca 483 8889 


TOTTERBDGE N20 
Benkring Green Belt 


In Sombt after rendeaiul 
area a fluty 


’ modenated fam- 
ily houw wiiMn 7 mi notes 


ground 


if Tottcridte tmder- 
(Nonbeni Line) and 


dt»e to men bch. with golf 
courses, pone 


beds. 2 


ruling etc. J 
reaps, batlnuotn. 
sqannewx.Au oewty deco- 
raud and ihruished. Tens I - 
l ymt bj^McBtjaiioa. 

TeE 6 ” 1 

Ricfanf Gontofc 349 4621 


Douglas y 1 

^Gordon! 


MIEU. STREET, SM MM ar-| 


ggjgd condottaMy farnWwd Ml 


.. . «n basenwrt HOUffi o*| 
I W Groan. Loop Lte. £600 par, 

WHUHEMTS DROVE, SV9 

ncteteii temfied Bb floor FLAT1 

■ p tone waD nn UodL 2 doutteft 


badrooms. recaption ro era, lerge 

’ batnroens. Long liL 


baton. 1 H 
£300 per 

T«h 01-790 0686 


l« Plaza Estates 


OOCKUWIM. SermondMy - Slo- 
rtta m fabvkrat refuniBhad 
buMdrug. fully MUfpped. rent 
nsopw Wappfltg - 2 bed 0*1 
nee oC Tower Bridge, beam 
new and fofly equipped. re*t 
C1SO pw Oofcfitarbotp EU4 ■ 
StuMNnn rt*er W* 2 bed flat 
la HOW bUddlDB £200 pw. 
Carteian Snath a Co. 01-488 
9017 


BEAimRn.3 brnnoemetf Camuy 
house hi- WM HenMmd. 
Fully Wh-d kitchen wUh all ma- 
chines. large reception room, 
haa a oom. shower room, knrty 
- garden- Owner"* own home, 
available on company lei at 
£350 per week. Ol 79* 246d 


Firmer b b u l cnwving tm. , 
cr \iew»i Sown perron flat ooge I 

tube pane H 2 bedrooms. Obi 1 
recep diner, kitchen, br 
room Only JUOO pw 
L> HAMS. 7H9 5004 


W11.I 

Maondscem 2 toed Oat us ctegaal. 
Wtorian lerroce BeauMOtf 
view overtooking private gar 


FUICH1SHEO UTTMte negotia- 
tor me onr ffterxfly Fuiiwn 
branch Ttas Is pn addihoim 
post and cants an aUMIH 
Tmanicai package tor an expert 
encid person Tel: N MaasfMU. 
LVHAMSi 736 6503. 


HOME HE SV3 

AOKtiffi tttn 


floor tot n^bteck wib HlmJ 


Tib 


pateragB. 1 dbtetKdnn. bsteiik 

raJ£. tafcw£1ffl,w 

fteuca 


HAD sm 

carwrtBd. Hgta. 2nd floor 
tettottSta wSd 2 aft 

3 MM5T - 

61-561 7646 


- Lae exec rerouted 

k 3 baths, dbt race pi- 


, 0 * 4.4 both. 

£ 400 pw cow. Tet 01381 3790 


ftUM-IUUU In Elystan place 

SWa tHewl of cateheal. Degreit 

and beaoflruoy appontted wub 

no expense spared. Ns Ba< ef 

Wars the j m base far the 

dbern tog bortn uu peeven. £140 

PW CP ML 344 7383 IT). 


■COBOfte mu. Lnasy BMOP- 
. ny IM. nownulc view of 
nier- 2 dble bedrooms, lounge, 
krtchep. bathroom. 5 Mins sia- 
non & shops. £186 pw Tel: 628 
6S91.104 or 020188 4349 AT- 
tor 6JO pm. 


CHagjL Ql gBfc Kte nJM. Lui 1 bad na. 51b floor. PA btee*. Uft porter. 


C^H. CJiW , Merely. £150 pw. 


JOIOS M®00. Manor Hastened Z bad Ac. PJjjtect LA mar 

HjSk&H. CH* MagMcrtT^r. So Z. m 

Bdde»u M i. w «. niU u t „ 

SWt Id who atebtte on anfeMon. 

IMPERIAL ESTATES 
123 REGENT STREET, Wl 
Tat 01-734 3953 . . 


THREE unmodemised 
freehold mews houses 
for sale. Quick ex- 
change required. 


SPECIALISTS 


Bi ram oarpwuuuHA spacious 
bed 2nd fir flat. VC Can aver 
looking Manna with own 
parking space. CH.+ crph 
£52^50 Call Det rare. <OT53i 
868133 iOr Ol 9*8 0*41 [Ml 


£350 f 000. 

Tet 01-935 8370 


Telefax 

0 ! 

2252370 


M 


Telephone I 
01 

2252377 


EATOteFLACC A beaublul sunny 

2nd floor flat. 2 receps. 3 beds. 

2 baths, shown- room. dknn. 

heavenly new iglchen. lift. Ml 

cony CH CHW Lse 34 Vevs. 

£39 4BOO. Tel: 01-236 3955. 


CARRINGTONS 


Sronb P ad a T ent nhh dokblr 
bakoofB. Lap MtipiSM mk 
bafcra) sad Tinrd kudiai Avail 

tom m&h£o£iS! J ”- 

Pre tty Sts dio flam die bun gf 

JUnptrente Bty (tool 
tairfei and ta*nx«n. Avail 
no*' Sr togg Co. lo fIMl pn. 

ROLAND QUICK 

MANAGEMENT 

01 351 7575 


W11 STANLEY CRESCENT 


Aten tom. 2 bad. flat, naptf- 
cad mk reartodipte 


teanKi^* caret, gas crti. tafiy fd- 
“* "iB5 or mk- 


H laL, conpaqr 1 aL £ 

HAMPSTEAD HEATH 

foacaos gadan fta taunga. 2 
beat- tea. kn./reaatet tin, 5 
nwi- tee. caiready kL £190 per 

Tet 0932 57380 


010 CHURCH STREET SW 3 
•tody rduibBbed ia Care 8 a. 2 
beds, f bun. 1 Mutnoa nod 
Mcwn Lilt and Aster. £325 pw. 


OABSD 08 ST 8 ST SWJ 
Matey dacorated madontta. 3 bed- 
raems. 2 badsam I rxetaot t 
UdKfl/brealdast room. £375 pw. 


ORR-EW1NG 
ASSOCIATES 
D1-581 8025 


ALDERNEY ST, SWT 

toaanre Harter decorated flat 
1 dbte bed. recap, ha. bath. Co 
let- 6 rote. £200 pw- 
RICHARDS PLACE. SW3 
Cbaimra Mews house n greet 
ft 1 dbte. 1 sdl badms. recep. 
tat bath. Co let 1 yr plus £300 

MAUENDIE ft CO 
. 01 225 0433 


CatANIXY CARDOtS, SWT. 3^ 
pert tnw r l u i doMgnwl 
maisonette Antique fined 
recep. 3 beds. bath. shwr. kit 
access tons, maid service. £680 
pw. Cooles 828 8251 


i wen 


furnished Art 3 Hue'S**. __ 

enus drawing, dmlng rm. lot. 

KUh. 2 * WC. PtW».TV£H a 


HW ail uirl. LlfL Porter. casO 
pw Tet 01-960 6636 


MOLKMT in St Katharines Dockf 
Debghtxui a bad. 2 recep col- 
tope, fully equipped, garden, 
garage, views of manna. Rent 
£320 pw ndume Carlewn 
SmjW A Co. 01-488 9017. 


arraMATKMAL EXECUTIVES 

Urgently require Hats & houses 
hi centra] Leaden from £iso to 
£2X500 pw Please caB 6Hiy 
Owen or Lorraine Campbell on 
01-937 9684. 


dens Large recep. K A B. £2001 
244 7363 


pw 244 


IT) 


W2 WESTBOURNE PARK FuOy 
emupted 5Y sunny 1 bad dal 
ladng. Mensh-e pardons EJ56 


I 01-229 0770,-362 9150 


■tcttiwom/mw 4 beds. mod. 
rum. (own nse Nr tuoe. Kew 
pdm £296 pw 01947-1066 


fUKteM PLAT* _ 

aiafl & rood ler opfemare. 
HMuilm Imp t Sheet lets W 
alt ar«*> LMOraD & CO 48. 
AlbemaileSI Wl Ot 499 5334 


HAmr ctm i DMtm naL raept 

phene, sun cpto CM pw. Out 
rh o27 2610 Hpmrtoc 


HNHM1L 2 bed garden no, 


£300 pm Inc Trt 5*8 1200 

nenlnos 

WNMN0TOK. Mub- decorated 

3 topo w t MUX £380 pw. 

Andre Lanamra 323 OSW. . 

KEHUUeT0Hrtud|p.£llOpw. l 

bed flat. £120 pw 2 bed flat. 

£153 pw oi nrwnm 
NR HHC Mr bedut. own kbrh 
«V bhoae. £73 pw «he«627 

zoi o HomtesaMn 1 au&. 

NWI OtreOeni 'flU 3 beds. 2 

r*rt». k A b. OCH CO Lat 

£185 pw «mnT«rt»2sre 

MMHUBOte Mttft. urge a bed 

modern ftaL-M ■"S.STSL? 

itnnv S« Garag e . JA 4S nw. 

- Prtor* «» O4O406S-. 


MAMA VALE MEWS. HOUSE, 
aftracubly forn. - lg> 
rec ep dlruno area. TV. IM hit. 
waaner -oner all appliances, 
bath. wc. Ige dtH b-on. 2 shape 
b rm. pmm. CH HW. Co lot. 
£23 8PW TeLOl 624 8289 


mn mmon mu_ sunny, 
dean. NUOf. 1 bed ftet . tv. 

MUt ES» pw. 01-886 2220 
HW LOMBOK Luxury 3 bed serais 
from Cl 90 pw xaoopw.coiet 
agl 460 43T5. 

FI1HJ CO Ptoasanl .1 bed vmtio 

flat Nd ntfls. £110 pw 0,12 
months 01*253 dObO «d 292 
BOAUry PLATE » HOUSES. 
Short A fare -lets. 
CSramoOMdU 340 8273. 
KnnH2 bedroom reoac flat. TV. 
. phene, ran*. £86 pw Others 

637 3610 Homctoeatow. 
m. LET FLATS AMO MDSO. 

ra m mn RKhatd or UcLOnb 

• to44 Urn A Ob 402. 7«l 
W HOLE ST WL 4 . beds. 2 
rtm K A a.-£7AOp-BBLr & F 
far s*tr 01499 2910 rrj - 
MK UHQON Lam 2 bed saw* 

£150 pW Cb Irt ad *58 .4373 


WL Cawndng 
cemraf. funs- font flat. 2 bed. 
recep. K A a 1/4 vrv £180 
pw. Trt: .01-656 068a 


NEOOTlAT04t required by last 

. gowag company M Kew ■ 

RUnmaid area. See Soiger See- 

reUnes. The Tunes today. 


« te"8» Wt WhL Vants from 

S*rorod. 3 4 bed Has in pop- 

utor.blPCk^Newly die fell 

btgft standaro. From £376 pw. 

-JLongfcl.373 4091. £ 62 0352T 

WX. SniaB town hse Quiet mews. 

2 dM beds. 2 recep. well 
swapped klL OCM. £280 pw 
Cotoj.Noapewap.eTrt^ 

A— EMCAM flank ugenttp re- 


jMM atety y flaa and ho m es 


from £2 00 £1.000 BW- RTno 
floweasErtatr AgentoHSl 6156 

AVMUBUMOH LUkurv flats & 

borne* Cbcttea. KMgMsbndge. 
Mpnvta. zaooZsjxxjpw 
Tel: Bo rpew sai 6156. 
atom < 1* mbs mm) nai for 2 

to etegaat penod mm. own 

entrance ftm lam. team gar- 

den. £440 PCM. Ol 741 0978 
BCMK » WTeftaFF tor unary 

mmruoMn Si Aaiuw Wood. Re 

««5 Park. Mama Vile SurfH 

Cgh ft Hampstead 01-680 756! 


LONDON.' r central 
Doe ■ 3-Bed. 2 bath, newly rood 
Fee Or. Irt £200bw.Moagen- 
rtrsTrt Ol 749 2075. 
CMUHIEN/FCTS wetcome- 3 
'dhto . bMtrm fwe. reepi TV. 

9hoab.ggLMn.£uoiiw Ott 

«n'6Z7.2f a HomeMCBtors. 


POLAND CAROCNS FW7 1 bed 

naL long let. £iso pw me C H 
HeycoCK A CO 684 6865. 


W8WBLCDON PAINUIDC SWS8. 

Luxury 4 bed. 2 bam SM so 
machines Lift and porter aw 
pw tael CM -CHW. Priory 
Msngemeot: oi 940 4566 . 


PqCMLAMto. Homes and (Ms 

throughout me dod- lands arm 

to fee txxk rands Property Cen- 

tre- 01488 4802. 

FULHAM. Attractive turn flta. 1 

dM bed. 1 recep. kb.- diner. 

barh.OLgdn Cliore Co lm 

wet. 01 736 0950 OT 736 6379 

BUNT MW 9 bnltta mass. 2 

reepto. TV. washer, ptionc. gdn. 


MATOA VALE W9 

Bonuiful family borne oo 4 floors 

very weft fareahed roll indoor 
heued mnnnuaj pool overioofc- 
tiw Bte a fonnal prim 5 
bedrooms J mopubos. 3 bMh- 
reodts. pteaowi Rdty fined 
Soidica nitd nadnaes. 

LONG LET £LSN p- 
SHOitT LET MO*E MONEY 

PALACE PROPERTIES 


01-486 8926 



■M1KUB mu M7 Spurn 

bOMWBa bawl d KOpstnlgt 3] 

taregg^ltereBmyajttyLl 

8Tjitem4wiJ 


w 1 war + QC 0 p»n 
IPteMfeeltainl 


W E2ZS0W. 


HftlMANS 


coubx mn sm 

firel floor aims Sft L 

recg|toin.reo bedrooms, 

ft doritfoom. Lf. 
Wchen. Long/cbort Ift £200 pw 
RBKUK PUCE. SWTB 
Efegate raasonette teal lor m- 

totemms- Rocep. room, d ram 

hal, IJ. fctetoa 4 bedraons. z 

WtFOoms. balcony. Long M 

£425 pw. 


ra«1 370 1781 


BOCKLANMSK18 lOreinsCfty. 
5 Bed. end terrace 2 yr old bse. 
Recep. nued UL bathrm. targe 
gdn. £62600 01-920 6027 / 
8761 Office hours 
TWICKENHAM OAKEN 2 beddol- 
lage 1865 Lovely setting fully 
-Wirt N*w carnets, machines 
etc. £79.960. 01-892 8071. 


.Fi'rcn:i?i Serc.'ce: Ltd 
•Sfi H.v.'.ng'xh.r.ci'S.S'Xv iES.- 

/ u^f- • T-*. .' V ; r»rr • N'i;K Cv. rj _ 


FULHAM Nr Rher. Victorian N>d 
floor flaL 2 bedims. I recep. 
kitchen A bathroom. 7H1 gdn. 
Gas CH. new mted carpets, bn 
maculate decoration. £ 81.600 
Trt. 01 219 4471 lofftcej 


NORTH OF THE 

THAMES 


A«faNM| 

:un&Th 

Spwous double fronted Edw- 
dan bo me in premcr befton. 
tetoteUy maRtainMt and in- 
proved and ra&mg onginte 
toabrts. 4 bete. 3 rerapts. 2 
bate baton, cedar, large gar- 
to- hateq. S13ZJB0 

01 883 0055 


»— Itentfaf Mnrtjsnee 

!tm ffi £250X00 '? 1103% 
954b ID £975X»0 w 11% 


Cate Itoiteig tor Mortgages 

95% to E2SOXWO ® 1 1.59b 


HOLLAND PARK. Lower Addk 
son Garden, tmertor designed 
studio, kitchen, bathroom, di 
reel access lo communal 
gardens, immediate possession 
£55.000. tel: 103861 SS5747 


tmntmeBt A Commercial 


75% No! 

Part biwesstMnt Mortgages 

9D% No Maunun 


•T AFFORD TERRACE. MTS. PO- 
tenual superb 5 bed & 2 recep 
2nd A 5rd Hr mats. Slunmng 
roof lire Elegant ms. Long lse. 
£266 000 Scandinavian ProO 
Service*, oi «9i 5823 m. 


RENTALS 


P/b 


Wl LAME Luxury rutidshed 
flat 3 bed*. 2 recent, kitchen 
and 2 baths 1 1 eo suite), gae CK 
Chw All appliances. Long irt 
pert. £550pw. Trt 01429 
6102. ft). 


4 bedrooms, a bath, furnished 

house Only £150 pw. A* 

owner's departure imminent. 

Forest Bureau 01-602 1T17 


CTTY Boruran 2 bed flat, ihi a 
porter. £275 pw Long Irt IS- 
LINGTON IO mins City. 1 bed 
Odp flaL 6 RKKiUs £1 76 pw me. 
Hevctek A Co 584 6865. 


F.WAWF IManagernetii Ser- 
ncest Ltd require properties in 
central south and west London 
areas for waning applicants. Ol- 
221 8858. 


LAWSON A HERMAN Dtpkmvus 
* executives urgently seek 
bwalfty moperoes in. all central 
Wesl London areas. For atten- 
tion please nng 01-938 5425. 


FtmbET By Dte nver - octet gar- 

SSLS^wiSr 1 - MWW-.MlV 

mted Mtehm. c/h. good tranv 
P«L Shops, long Co tel. 
£160pw. TrtDt-748 8119 


mrnMOMD Beauttfui reft con- 
tained flat. Would suit smote 
prof pewjou 1 bed, large recep. 
kn & baih £90 pw incl. oi-22j 
3151 day 01-892 1852 eves. 


W HAMPSTEAD tux 2 bed flat 

£150 pw. Swiss Cottage lux 2 

bed flat £230 pw. Muswell Hill 

lire 4 bed house £290 pw. Swiss 

Cottage Ira 4 ted noose. 2 

bam*. £450 pw. 01-431 319! 


lux ground floor !M- 1 bed- 
sunken lounge. Extremely wtd 
equipped, on bed. swivel TV. 
stereo. w dtTDw p ve. startling 
machine etc. Ige garage leading 
from nan for Dante* or car 
Long ro Irt preferred. £210pw. 
Tet . 01-584 7527 or 0892 

860667 

M A LONELY AND FH I. I | 1 

fra floor flat in a ou*rt reskteti 
hal area of Sws I've a double 
bftfroran. bnghi lecepuon room 
and a nice ktichen and bath- 
room. To rrnl me at £125. per 
week ptoase call Douglas. Lyons 
and Lyon* on 236 7933 lor 
mote details 

TO 1XT Hants Dorset borders 
Good lamuy house- edge of 
New Forest Fishing mailable 
4 bed. S recep. modem kttch. 3 
barns, gararen* OF-CH Lease 
5-7 years. James Hams 5 Son. 
Chartered Surveyors. Jewry 
Chambers. Winchester. Trt: 
r0962l 52556. 

QUBMMTI SW7 Art gaum 
owner** newly converted flan. 
beautHofiy decorated. 2 beds, 
bath targe peep nut. kit. ports 
maid. £275 pw. Pert Men. Co 
Irt prof, no agerni*. Trt 01-235 
6151 bet lOopcn w < ,0980. 
862204 

AHK1BCAN EXECUTIVES Seek 
lux flats houses. £200 £iooo 
p w Lfeiai fees req Phi i bps 
Kay A Lewi*. South of me Park. 
Chefcca office. Ol 352 81 1 1 or 
North Ol the Park Regents 
Park of Are. 01 586 9882. 

MONTPCLKR WALK SWT. Spa- 
clous house in the beari 
KawhubrMpr. 3 bedrm*. a 
bathrms. recep. Int- CH. Avail 
now i year *. C3O0pw. Doug- 
las. Lyons A Lyons Ol 256 
7935 

CENTRAL LONDON with oft 
■street parking Lux flat Uv rm. 
kiL bath ♦ shower, upaalrs 
open bed -dress rm. Everything 
provided EloOpw CO Lei 1 
year min TerOI 585 0919 

ML SHAFTESBURY. Beautiful 
u ab te con veroon. 3 large bed 
fun 


A 


emr EC« l bed I recep not In 
preenqe Mock c hoe Law Courts 
?4 nr P'raor. hfts. etc 92 yr Iw. 
£70.000 Frank Hama ft On 
587 0077 


VIP ESTATE 
SERVICES 


Buying a house or an 
apartment in London but 
ran i spare the lime and 
effort? 

trt the specialist 
Act lor you 

TefepboaefOt) 740 6527 
Tetau 897121 


I minute 
HofTOds 2 5 beds. Rec. well III 
ted kllcnen. Bath. Sap wc. Lye 
65 yr* £195.000. Sole agents 
Tiffany Estates 245 6757 


MAVFABt FLAT. 2 bed. recep 
Lit. bath. CH Courtyard 
enlerancc. Porterage Parking- 
990 yr he Good condition 
£175.000 Tel 0905 812 275. 


CHELSEA 


fine Denod Douse tebnq me 
nvsr. many re-modaflefl. S bed- 
rooms. 4 bathrooms. 2 superb 
reception rooms, soft surte and 
lovely kiicften. LANDSCAPED 
GARDEN WITH SUMMER 
HOUSE. 92 veai lease. 
£895.000. 

BriUOn Poole S Bums. 

Tft 01-584 4231. 


TEDDDWTON 3 4 bed modern 
lownhotee Lovely setbnq. 
trees, duckpond. Internal « 
raoe CH. baUO. £82-600 
Tel.Ol 977 6851 


HOLLAND PARK. 2 bed IUL PB 
Mock LOW outgoings £67.650 
No offers. Phone ol -629 1942 
eves. Wend* 245 9931 w'dayv 


SWS Newly decorated 3 bed. CH. 
1st Floor end terrace flaL Kit. 
barn. reep. 91 yrs lease. 
£86.000. Ol 381 5S44 


VALE Randolph Ave 
nr mac 2 bed flat, long lease, pvt 
sale £92.000. Trt. 01 289 4X27 


ST JOHNS WOOD 


Ou<ei. secure. 1 double 
bedroomed tol wttti reception, 
totenen and bathroom Purpose 
bull Dock Usual services CMse 
ball amenmes. Set m wail man- 
tamed gardens Paflang. 

£ 54 , 000 . 

83 year ieade 

Tel: 01-286 8956 


Mil Spadoos 1 st floor flat 1 bed. 
CH. Gdn. 2 mins tube. £41.960 
01-361 0548 eve* 


WANTED URGENTLY flat Wl or 
nearby area. Any condition up 
lo £60.000. Reply to BOX Lid 


CHISWICK W4 


W NW C klt specialists are 


o. ktaa nr ntac. £86 aw. outers 

627 2610 Hometocrtcre. 


627 

MATFJU*, HVM PARK. The 

mart luxurious iana. RhoM let 

etas. Iwk, lyr. 1 8 bedroom*. 

W.T P. Ol 936 9512. 

MW10 Lge 2 bod ndee TV rpew. 

phone, parking nr tube hraung. 

£lOO pw. Others 627 2610 
Hsmtoratos open 7 days. 
OUTSKIRTS} Mod fiat, rests. TV. 
wmtier were, nt tube, CH. 
£90 pw. others too 627 2610 
Hometauors IUJ 9. 

■ow tour ruwRiwa. waft- 

ow capital ooiuy. Fvr 
-Immediate ten-tee at onracllro 
pete**, ting Mr- Michael 
Kortxnr. -Jonn Strand Oxv 
trect e Uo- Tel 01^86 8615. . 
WEST PUTNEY- MHC 3 bed 

terr hse to Meal post ck»* Com- 

mon A m*r. a few rains walk 
to lube. Dote in. kfl ’brk. 


hath shwr. Samy.gg *186. 


pw Posmu Warren 


i 6229 c j 


currently seeking good quaiHy 

rental iccenncrttan In 
central London tor waning 
company tenants 01-937 9681 

AMLEKH ESTATES weciabse 

U renting * letting, to the wesl 

End ft Central London, tram 

sample (tudtea to* luxurious 

ap art m e n t* Contact 4090594. 

CROYDON. Magmftecm bow 

newly dec and turn 10 a very 

hWi mndari. 3 4 Bedrooms. 

1 1 recep*. K ft 8. gdn. CH. 

£155 pw. 24* 7355 IT). 

HYDE PARK SQ, Marble Arch 

Uoourtous targe 1 bed nu 6 I 

Htiare. All ararniHn Long co 


Ig^EggO Pwjnc heating. «B60 


or 402 9461 (U 
MTUDOR DESKNERV Hamp- 
stead FlaL 3 studio re*, 
hil amino, utility bain etc Lrp 

gdn. avail end June end Sept 

£560 pw TCL-Qt 436 6103 

KMriTuH ML I , Surrey. Lovely 

tuay furolstved flat » -uteet 

■rag lor long M. Ckot- to ail 

amentum. £400 pan Trt- ot 
6 «« 0666 . 

ROTNEV KHASWIS. Very smart 

and uaaoui flat Ideally iacuM 

close to transport 3 dWbedL 2 

raiK. hugsi dble rxebh fully 

eowoced hit £200 pw 244 7553 


C. H. Set nt ourtf rural seduded 
location. Initial lease I vr £580 
PCm Trt Wylye 1098561 317. 
WET ft attractive s c f turn I 
gntd II flat I large, t small [ 

bed, lounge, kn -dmtng 

bath. £120 pw 01 -444 0779 
SOUTH KEN Charming mews 
flat. Dbte bedroom, iccep. hit ft 
hath. £126 pw 01-581 8977. I 
eve 605 8565 T 
SWi. LOVELY tst fir rial i 
oTooWng gdn 8Q. 3 beta _ 
recep. KftB. CD Let £275 pw 
JCH 828 0040 

SWI /PORJCO Debghtful com- 
fertabto bale hour. 2 beds, 
rerot- targe sunny terrace. CH. 
£IW pw. 85 4 0178. 

***** COTTAQC. Lge 2 bed. , 
Wk k A b. flat CH. Phone 
«5 pw Co ot holiday tel. Tel. 
79e 6989. 

**T S8S1 The n umb e t toretnem- 
ber When seeking pea rental 
Prooeroan In central and prune 
London areas £ 1 50/ £2 ooapw 
VHITMC LONDON? Allen Bates 
ft Co 1 have a targe Mteoton ol 
flats ft houses avail for I wh ♦ 
from £200 pw 01-499 1666 
WLL Luxury f ,/ a bedroom I 
“tertoretefte ut anraezh e square 


Detarched vtctonan vifla. 6 
double bedrooms, 3 targe 
reception. 2 bathrooms, 
toty fitted totehm with living 
mom. uaiity room, celiar, 
CH. Itriiy modernised, tame 
garden £280.0X1. TetOI- 
747 3261 


MANIA VALE. IO mm* Marble 
Arch. Chftan Court, imposing 
rudor style block msui grand 
dnv ewav.sparkbng spacious 
rial on garden level aftracDve 
hail, ige lounge, spacwu* dmtng 
rm. 2 OOtc t single bed rms. l. l 
ku wnn brklasl bar. mod baih 
rm with WC. additional clock 
rm. I f qualilv wardobes. im- 
maculate. decorated in 
Magnolia througihoui. almost 
new carpets and curiam*, am- 
ple storage space communal 
gdn. porter, oft street parking. 
56 yr he £115.000 lor Quick 
private sale. Tel: 01-431 1344. 

C HES T ER TERRACE. Mn. bn 
presuve and elegantly 
decorated House m Regents' 
Par) The spaoette accommo- 
dation mclude* a large master 
suite vim Dressing Room and 
Bathroom on one more floor. 
The house, which ha* flic bene 
HI of a hit and a garegr ai the 
rear of me property, a ottered 


RAIDA VALE. W9. Stunning MHll 
level penifMe apt for only Unse 

wub dtscerning lasle 5 bed*. 5 
baUis 2 en state Cuesl Oka. dt4r 
n-Cfp. Kll brk. Full sartvas. 

125 VTV £200000 WipVwcnh 

stso 7001 open 12 [HI 2 today 

prince albert rd, mil lx 

aling toad a terra in mod block 
opp Regents Park raoinnng 
TLC. Dble bed. recep. 
bath. Fidl service. 79 sm 
£79.950. Wtokworth 586 7001 
-Open 12 uu 2 today 
ST JOHNS WOOD. Ugbl grnd ftr 
mansum ful nr immaculate 
c omnium 3 dbte bedrm*. baih. 
cloak, ktichen. TV rm. dining & 

lounge mire prmnm mranwft 

126 yre. £230.000 499 9981. 
Sunday IO- 5pm 470 8743 T 

UNMODCRfOSCD Uttfa Vaaln 
Mansion IUL 7 room*. 23ft re- 
ception room. kitchen, 
bathroom. Period leatufi 
eluding ornate llreplace*. 
£ 1 WAOO. 85 year team. 01 
955 3011 
BLOOMSBURY WCL An wnraac 
interior designed 3 DM. 2 recep. 

2 baih flat with custom bom 
kurhen Close lo all ameMbeg. 
78 vr lse. £149.950. BaUy Ste- 
ven" Good Ot 636 2736. 

BR 4 M HA M CONS SWS. Superb 
iwwly mod Mate, recep. luted 
kd. 2 dble beta. 2 ham* Bate, 
use of Gdn*. tod Gas CH. 98 
yre. £ 160 . 000 . HOLMANS. Ol 
370 6781 
CHISWICK wl 2 family house* 
avail m presagtoos nvenMc de- 
velop 3 and 4 bed*, comm 
gdn*. Cl 49.960 and £179000 
respectively. T«*- Kllson + King 
878 4942 
FULHAM. Impchlns 6 bad 3 baih. 

3 recep. 1 d family residence, 
dorse Parsore. Green Fully mod 
MUSJ be viewed. £525 000 

Samuel ft Go. 756 9000. 
FULHAM SW6. Anreoiir mod 
b*e. dote Parsons Green. 2 dbte 
bed*, recep. duvmg rm. ui. bfst 
rm. brthrm. elk rm. tin icng pa- 
uo. CW*. gaa ch. f hid 
£112.500. Vanston* 736 9822 

HAMPSTEAD QDN 

NWSX F H Edwardian cottage 


CLAPHAM SWA. 3 nuns. lube. 2 
bed cent cried top floor flu. im- 
maculate- fonptUon. prune 

sunny location, m c Ti. rutM 

carpels. £56^00 ono. Irate 
hold Tel: Ol 720 6828 lev ess 


PUTNEY Penthouse Panoramic- 
UrsA.2rwt.2MV.CCH.ta> 
glarad entry phone ExceUeot 
condition LB6.9G0 on* 
Teifll 870 «fl07 eves • Ol 7Z3 
0208 na 2277 day 


SW8 Gnanrang 1*1 floor mod 2 
ben flat in pop mgefow Rd. good 
ran, wnn sunny root terrace, 
and vacitae kuchen. dinner. 
£63500 IHi 622 3234. (Wl 899 
8800 rx 2225. 


6 

oco roomed Edwareun wnti. 

Original tcalnro*. Potenupi tar 
flat Nr viuagr. lube, schoort. 
No agentv £229.000. Day Ol- 
382 5903 E*P 946 2959. 


, the 
that 
st in 
extra 
lesby 
ete is 
•ut its 
■ next 


BATTERSEA Brynmaer Rd too 
yds Park. Newly restored and 
evirated penod 5 bed novae. 
£250.000 freehold. Tel 022 
1208. 


its, at 

from 

jllion 

£725 

£900 


CLAPHAM SWA- Spaoous IM. 
one bed. one recep- C«q*e to 
common. Lvtl dec order. GOL 
Large sunny garden. £49.900. 
Quick sate. Tel: 01 720 1700. 


msor> 
n,the 
J ser- 
lOpto 
ygain 


CLAPHAM Moderntord len a c e d 
house between co mm o ns - 3 
nun* Ctepham Sm lube- 2 
recep*. 5 bed*, gdn. £ 1 18.000 
01 350 0708 day ft ev e*. 


m ncefleni roren. 2 bed*., | 


CLAPHAM OLD TOWN brrttn. 
sunny conversion 2 nd fir 1 bed 
flaL K and B. Ac ch. nr tube 
and shone. cortSOO. ideal trt 
buy! eves. Ol 022 2662-9192 


dm front and rear, gas 
carpel* £90 000 Howard Es- 
tates £89 OlO* 6555. 

MAMA VALE W8. Delightful 2nd 
nr llai in com hse opp tad Bee 
2 beds recep in ft baih 90 yrs 
C85 000 . Sole aoem* 
vunkwonh 586 7001 Open 12 
llll 3 today 

MAMA VALE W8 Setechoh - 
new lux cons. WWOous elevated 
around floor fUl with 22' rnn 
£69.950. And 2 bed at 
r?6.ooo Howard Cautes 289 
0104 6555 
Nl. A newly converted 2 bed gar 
den rial with Mted knehea. 
moep Gas CH. newly laid car 
pet* Must be seen 99 yr he. 
Sole Agent* £76^00 Baity Sta- 
sen* Good'. 01 656 2756 
ARCHWAY NX9 Choice M 2 new 
lire con* 1 bed with patio. 
£42.500 Large 3 bed manon- 
ene £65 000 Howard Estate* 
28° 0104 6555 
FULMAML Lge 0 DM ton hse. 
Main rd posn. Dole rec. bath, 
large kit/orkfu rm. w/fcg gar- 
den. £XC. value at £140.000. 
Samuel ft CD 736 6000. 
FULHAM 5W6, Mod flat in tmmi- 
iar street . 1 dble bedrm. 

bamrm. 16* recep. ML rth <cng 
paiio Con Gas ch Long he. 
£55000 VarsUMH 736 9822. 
MUNLTON TERRACE NW*- Su 
penny modernised lsl floor flat 
In efeganl period houae. Recep. 
5 beds 2 lux bath rms. Fit. 
£tB5.ooo Parkers: 724 4455 . 

IAMFSTEAD 0DN 

NW11 tmmar 2 bed tmertor de- 
signed p b flat with balcony 
£75.950. Howard Estate* 289 
0104 6555 
MAMA VA1X. SPactou* 3 bed 
garden (laL enrtlenl location, 
suit family, dir eel access onto 4 
acre garden. Porterage 
£105000 Trt Ol 289 9762. 
MAIDA VALE WB LaH remaining 
lux 2 bed cons, with ruled Ml 
and carpets, gas CH. £66.000. 
Howard Estates 209 
0104 6556. 

ARSONS BREEN. Attractive 4 
bed hse in delightful tree lined 
sireel 2 recep*. 2 baths, clkrtti- 
tgektt txeaVlaurm £ 206 . 000 . 
Samuel ft Co 756 5000 
SWI ELAT. Division Bell area. 
Reception room, dining room 
Cum klirtien. bedroom, bath- 
room 1 1 7 year tease. £69.000. 
01 821 6506. 

SWT shinning 5 bed flaL newly 
mod to \ high standard recep. 
Iilled kit. bath. shwr. CH. 92 
vr*. £169.600. HOLMANS. Ol 
370 6781 
SWY.tmtnac and nr Hrigton 
High ceiling Lge recep. bed. 
bath, idled Ut. drawing rm_ CH. 
96 yrs £89.600. HOLMANS. 
01-370 6781. 

WE5TBOURNE TERRACE M2 3 
bed com with benefit ot porter 
ape and lift FuU CH. Good 
condL £140,000. Howard Es- 
tates 289 0104. 6555. 
CHEPSTOW RD W2. A grteedao 
of I & 2 bed conv fh*. rully mod 
With tang he*. From £68-000 
Reed ft Lewi*. 01 244 8377. 
EAUNC WS. Lae gnd flr flat. 6011 
9dn. Bed. bvmg. duusa jm. V 
and 8 GCH 99 yr* be 
£77.000 Ol 228 8798 fT>. 
HORNSEY NB 2 bed flat with gar 
den in need of some -mod 
Jt*7 .500 Howard Estates 289 

0104.6668 

■SUNBTON Bantsbury Road 
Spacious I b e dro o m garden 
ftal GCH Long leone. £57.000. 
01-033 2007 After 6 30 pm. 
MORETON TERRACE WL Su- 
perb 3 - 4 bed hee. lge recro rm. 
in kll. sep 1 bed rial. £310.000 
FH Best Gapp 01.730 9263. 
NX2 Edwardian elegance In Rev. 
Rd Lge 4 bed. 3 R«*P. Halls 
Adi .send ortg Feaiurrj sw 
Gdn. £107.500. Ol -34* 28 15 
ST JONNS WOOD BORA. Srter- 
lion of lge 5, 5 bedim flats ut pb 
block From £90000 for quick 
sale 373 4091 262 0352 (Ti 
ACTION. Charming mid Ice hse. 4 
bed*. 2 recep*. tartaSL kit. GCH. 
gdn £76.000. 01 228 8798. IT) 
DOCKLANDS Houses and Hals 
for sale. Dockland* Property 
Centre. 01-790 9560. 

ISLE OF DOBS House* and Rats 
(or sate Docklands Progeny 
Centre 01-790 9660 l 
LJME HOUSE Housrsand flats for 
sale Dockland* Property Cen- 
tre 01-790 936a 
MEWS HOUSES. Holland Park 
Mews from £230.000 
£350 . 000.01 hers 435 6086 m 
Nt. PERIOD HOUSE of 4 beta to 
quirt location £165X00. D 
Terry 628 4567. 

PARSONS ORE EM 5 min* under- 
ground. immac 2 bed flaL 
C8A.CC© Trt Ol 731 7949. 
PIMJCO 2 bed. grd floor fll. 64 
vr lease. £85 000 GCH Tel 828 
9051 dal 854 651 1 eve 
PIMUCO Superb luxury 1 bed 
llal. new lui. Freehold. 
£83.750. Tet: Ol 892 0908. 
SELUNOor buying £100.000* 7 
He offer personal service al 
lowest rate 01-466 c086. iT> 

ST JOWtS WOOD SpaCMMB 1 bed 
flat in prestig Mk. Lang He 
£76.000. CCM Est 01-499 0642 
ST JONNS WOOD NW8 2 dM bed 
nioi4ihflr Good rod. porter ft 
IHI. 9Syr. £77.000. 546 5611. 
THE HOLLAND PARK- 1.2 bed 
balconi flat £150.000 London 
Property. 938 2222. 

W1Z. I bed flat on 5 floor* 
£65.000. London Property. 

958 2222. 


[ EMU ROAD. LONDON LWJ 

Immac 2 bed. IM floor flat whh 
roof terrace and dining MUL 
Long lease. £ 61^00 to mrtuda 
fine caroct*. Trt 370 0309. 


W A MP S WORT H Twixt conanon. 
Magmf. Tudor style 4 dbte bed 
semi home, balcony. Secluded 
gdn. Del ggc. Get). Mus be sera. 
£220.000 FH Trt.Ol«29 1718 


inster 
ng its 
crisey) 
ner of 
1 News 
5 Press, 
a pitted 

£apv 

er2p_io 

iied its 
ent to 
n Ben- 
k acting 
another 
vPV at 


BA RNES tor house near Conv 
n. 4/6 bedim*. 2 recepL 
large kuchen. garden. 
£160.000. Tel. Ol 229 3760 


HARD WORK KHTIT7 
Ring J-M-F Homefmders. well 
help you. 01 946 4876. 


r a total 
lares, or 
; votes. 
I 955p. 


BARNES VILLAGE. Fully mod 
and extd Ed seral-drt Me HI in 
quiet residential rd only a lew 
mtn walk shop* and Nation. 
6.7 beds. 2 baih*. lge open-plan 
kii .-family rm. conservatory- 
drawing cm. sludy/TUv bed. 
utility. doalc*. GlCH. BcauUlto 
8011 Westerly gdn. F. H 
£250000. View today: 990 
3007. Theraafter trt: Ktaon ♦ 
King 878 4942. 

. VME RO. imprasrtve 
drt fam hse with ige mature 
lawned gdn o'looktog Barnes 
Common a few nuns walk to 
station 5 beta. badi. e/s chow- 
drawtng rm. dimno rm. 
family rm. ML cloak. OCR 
Rw garden. gge. F H 
£549X100. Tel: KUSon + KM 
01 878 4942. 

A £47,000 Spill Level 2 bedim. 
Luxury Freehold flat on QuMt 
Tree lined Jcrningham Road 
SE14. Just 12 in litotes rail West 
End ft dm. Own garden, cus- 
tom Bum kitchen Fined carpets 
ft curtains GCH. Low 
outgoing*. 01-286 8040 T 
BATTERSEA/ WANDS WORTH 
SWI |. 6 yrs oto. 4 bad end of 
1 err hie 1 Ige reeeo. L shape f'f 
Ml din rm. lux bath, sep WC 
Carpeted Otroughoul. GCH- 
Beautiful Irani ft rear gdns. 
Dnv parking Os all amen too. 
Quick sale £78.000. 870 9572 
NORTH BATTERSEA Superb A 
bedroomed Victor tan terraced 
home in excel tent condt 
throughout Gas Ch. 
Kitchen breakim. large 

mrotqM recpL Irani and rear 
gdn. £I3S£XX> Freehold- John 
Dean ft Go 01 228 1860. 
CLAPHAM OLD TOWM. Substan- 
tial untaod 12 roomed Victorian 
property 13 dm structural or- 
der. Magnificent original 
feature*. 3 bath*, lge gdn. 
£2101000 Freehold. E Hugh 
Henry ft Ca 01 720 1208. 
NORWOOD PARK SC19 QUICK 
SALE UPWARDLY MOBILE 
TYPES to buy 4 8D superior 
refurbished CH -LOUNGE DR 
KT DR private GDN dose 
sctMKHs shops uacV Up after* an 
£73.000 - 761 0714 
THE - TONSLEY'S Newly Con 1 
bed errin flaL finished to a high 
Standard. GCJf kii wtih tiled 
worktop and white Neff appli- 
ance*. large Rep with recessed 
UghUng- door* lo pat»L £59.950 
Tet 01-870 0764. 
BLACKHEAHL Newly renovated 
2 bedim ut flr flat, penod n>a 
In quirt road dose Greenwich 
Park. 99 yr be. Mighty rerora- 
E07JOOO. BUmtnons 
Eves 01 858 7860. 

CLAPHAM SWA Etau Road. Vic- 
torian *emi -drt house with 
many aria rearms- 6 bed*, 
baih. cellar, conservatory. 


;i office 
lent car- 
11 is cs- 
mpieted 
million. 
■R RE- 
MVEST- 
Sccond 
.73p for 
). 1986. 
3 p. This 
linectors’ 
erim re- 
Spand a 
xriod to 


CORK 
I. 1986. 
-n f£6.58 
£333.052 
per share 
.p). The 
company 
e second 
1 auction 
g and it 
crop and 
iciion. 
OENIX 
If-year to 
urnover 
Loss be- 
» 31.9141. 
1 36.17p 


OCH. 60ft rear^in. £185.000 


SOUTH OF THE 
THAMES 


F h. Trt 622 
PUT1KY bnmar 2 bed Etfwann- 
" IW in quirt rd nr lube. 
Large. BUM lounge ft dining 
area. *ih lacing balcony Pleas- 
ant views. Tastef any decorated. 
£92.600 Trt 01-874 5016 
SWI8 PUTNEY BOMBERS. 
BeauoiuUy matotaiiied ige vie 
end of toirare. 4 Beds- orig fea- 
ture*. Oulrt location GCH. 
Principles only £l«3-Doa F/H. 
Trt OI 7890724. Ol 874 5022. 
WEST NORWOOD. Exr 3 bed flat. 
Sparsovre very gd dec order. 
New bauiroore. Use ot 80 p gdn. 
Lovely aspect Close to bra 
routes rully carpeted curtains 
I hc. £5 3.000. 701 3364. 
MTTERSCA • vicarage era*. De- 
nghiful 3 bed martuon naL 
Comm gdn* ft porterage. 121 
ITS £741300 AODOMDury Es- 
tates 38 1 667 7 

WEST PUTNEY Q e conta walk 
Irom river. 3 bed vie end lerr tn 
v good order. Many ong lea- 
lure*. £125.000 F.'H. Hugh 
Henry 789 7077 
EARL*nELD SW17. Modernised 
3 DM collage, gdn. fW kh. 
bathrm. sep shower. £67.000. 
Tel: 01-439 B99I idsVL 
WANDSWORTH immac I bed 
flat, prestige Mock, car pk 'gdn 
long lea&r-fow out 90 fngv. 
£49.950. 871-2488 
BERMONDSEY Houser and flats 
lor rale Docklands Progeny 
Centre 01-257 6454. 
DOCKLANDS House* and flats 
lor sate. Docklands Property 
Centre 01-257 5434 . 

PUTNEY 2 rm. k ft b. *>c model 
flaL elegant area. 99 yr lease. 
£47.500 ono. Ol 789 1668. 
ROTMERH1TKE House* and flats 
for sale. Docklands Property 
Centre 01-237 5454 . 

SURREY DOCKS House* and 
flats for sale. Dockland* Proper- 
ty Centre Dl-237 6464. 


s. 


op into 


W 8256 


:es 


rmation 


•lication 


)m tried 


:h our 


a long lease al an asking 
price ol C79S.r - 


MAIDA VALE W9. 
RANDOLPH AVE 
Large luxury maisonette. 


bedrooms, very large kitchen, 
n. Plus {Fanny flat 


fitting room. __ m _ 
Fifty fitted cantata throughout, 
balcony. 3 acres of comnuiai 
gardens. 125 year lease. Bar- 
Barn, reluctant sale. £210,000. 

Tel 01-458 4356 

ANY TRUE 


rq IN.-Bi-ofs. £160 pw. TeL Ot- 
I 0686 or 868 1606 x 3857. 


22 


WEBT KDBMSTDN a aetoetton 
of thaimiug f. I 1-4 bed apart* 
Al town hto*. £12O-£300 pw 
incl. un shares) Ol 673 1896 T 
W MB LE D 6N. DeUphtfUl s. C Stu- 
too flat wdh gge. sua couple. S 
khns SoutMtelds Tube. £76 p w 
Co Lrt only. 01 871 0566 
A 8 a bo ard 1 me bedrm ftal. 
piw^nr n As. £7& pw. outers 
637 2610 Homrtocaier*. 
BATTERSEA Exrce rtal. TV. 

PhOM. £90 pw. Other* too 627 

2610 Homrtocaton W 9. 
0 KLMTF PARK Newly furnished 
Hat ra*soneHF. 2 dble bed* co 
IM mf £300 pw 0| 406 4323. 
BBJLi PAID Dble shtolo. carpets. 
* c. heaano. 156 pw. ouwre 
637 2610 Horaetacatore. 
CHELSEA imntaridale ftal wtoi a 
view Reep. bedrm. k ft b. Co 
Lrt £135p.w. TfiiOl 3626799 
w«U«A uwn tax BaKony rirt. 
Double bedroom. Keep, hits, 
port era- Long M. 622-0826. 
DOCKLANK New- I Md lur- 
msned flat £aso pcm. 
Company tet Tel 0Z79 813886 
tOUtH KOL Aaracttve garden 
RU. Super modem kneben. 2 
Beta. Co Lrt pre f e iml . Avail 
50th June £160 pw 389 9007 
,Daynme gnty 


CARSWELL & SUCKLING 
DOMESTIC PROPERTY 
CONSULTANTS 

rtwni to rata borae 
fanDg nm far Dot people 
afta «a me bar ta wrae bra 
kvfaj X papains ra ■ faa 
wdh Dear rraraf to tsose 

SriUra on 01 -373 06d6 

ro 




|f>! j mi r r nnr - 1 1 11 u 1 ■ 1. 1 


FULHAM 

Fuflv modafTHsea terraced 
house noor Bishop's Park. 
Large recap. Khctwnfdinar. 
Superb rrtsstar bedroom 
rom waUt-fn cupbo euta A an 
sw® botfintoin. Firttier 3 
bedroom * * b e t h roo m . Car- 
dan & large root tw*Ke. 
Gas CH. 

Freehold £178^00 
01-731 3152 Cron iDS e , 


ooa a suxe 
TION OF MEWS HOL'SES m 
Berate vis are aKo ai aitaMe 
upon requert to Barnngion 
Lauranre: 01-009 a 222 
LITTLE VEMCE. 8LOMFSLD 
Rd. Superb refutMthed haute 
toeing min over ranrt. Moi 
lurd in. 4 beds <2 atari wen 
envuiie baih. Sluho or ath 
hrorm wilh inner, garage 
Mudv. dbte aspect lounoesrn » 
2011 Seonauc MKtien 20 fi x 16 

II. all appliances Attractive 
Ironi ft rear patio son mature 
odn. F H £4OS/>0O. Sunday 
IO 5 and eve*. 870 4705. 
wkdays 493 99*1 T 
HAMMERSMITH. Umoite oppnr 
lumiy Ip pure have beautifully 
mined Victorian terraced 
houve and large garden Double 
BrtrpUcm. dmer kiKhen- stone 
patio flower and herb garden. 
4 Beds. Bathroom, root terrace. 
GCH. piu* original learure*. 
Offers in the region of 
£170.000. Tel OI 748 6447. 
PARSONS Often SWS. stun 

nina and s p a cwm* mien or drv 
sunny I am ill' hie. tmmar Lge 
rerrp. kdrhan diner. 4 bed*. 2 
baih*. gdn. roof ten-. Gas CH. 
Ono frauire* Hut be seen 
Highly rec. £225000 freehold 
Minkwonn 01 751 5308. 

ST JOHNS WOOD HIGH ST. Srtt- 

sanonal 4lh hr flat with 
ewepupna) views, a Mds. 2 
balds, guest ell*. 2 recep. «ump- 
luous MI Dr I Full eervirn 
140 »Tv £580000 Jomi vote 
agents Wfnkworth 586 7001 
Open 12 UU 2 today 
CfOSWKK. £xrep|»nal 7 bed 
iKlitilniw Older Uirauon- 
put 2 baths. 3 rare. kK brk. 
Ong fireplace* Gas rh. Off st 
Parking. 100' 46uUt facing gar 

den. C2 SBjOOO View today 

Whitman Porter 90S 5335. 
BOH BARNET Urliioxmi; 
nuns tube. 8 mm* M 2 &. unmac 
run. 2 rec I to lull, wl bk 
game*. Omni, ha both 4 dM 
bra*, gar. lor gdn. Incl HIT 
carp cur vac pom. £ 1*2800 
449 3715 

WAPTONC Houses and nab lot 1 
sate. Dors. tends Property Cen 
ire 01-790 9660. 


BARNES 


Choice o< 2 «c 3 bed tees. 
dose to Common. Oog lea- 
tures. Lge rms both with 2 
barhrms & fined kitft- Dble 


WHITMAN PORTER 
tog iu now! 
748 2641 


kgnvJ fir 
of targe Regency houve standing 
in its own grounds On Pnv. 
EM few rnm* walk Iran Greers- 
with Park ft Btackheath 
Siuion- <v*c .Charring X.-Ctty 
15 minvi. Gompnsuig. splendid 
drawing rm- dinning rm ft a 
other tge rms. 1 with conserva- 
tory. i used to be Mllard rm 
i par a flr*. All but one Ol tew. 
ft lined kiKtwn have glass dr* 
operand onto soaemn garden. 
Bathroom and shower room. 
GCH dole glazing, long lease 
Best oiler over £200.000 
cure*. TeL 01-852 1666- 


smurr cottage 
overlooking grren. SW9 Newly 
mod evet condition, f Beds. 
Baih WC. 5 Or racep diner, 
kilcti conservatory hep wt 
Prrtty garden, curve to Mi* ft 
lube incl carpelv £86-500. Of. 
lye 589 3400 Ext 126. Home 
733 7522. 


EAST PUTNEY. DrtlghHul family 
muse In much sougni after ron- 
•ervBhOD area 4 bads, r imp. 
bathroom vnehen. wc .'cloak, 
room, otiiuy room, mivgrai 
garage. GCH. ouHtanduvg front 
and rear gardens. Beautilully 
mwternrwd FH. £174^00 
TeL OI 871 0357 anytime 


BMHKS fLftue Chefsrai Dadghi- 
nu 4 bedroom house. L rnapM 
P'ug room, new comerv-mon-. 
newly mted lolchen. bathroom, 
pew roor Pieit y ao looi souin 
facinn garden. £140.000 Trt 
01 221 0720 1 day >01 878 4152 
lives and w ends) 


ELMS CRESCENT LWA m qid 
H sheet Valor ten terraced 
house, some Original foature*. 4 
bed. 2 bains double recepnon 
targe h lichen. GCH. suitin' gar- 
den. ciao.oco. Tet 01-220 
0314 Ml OI 720 8965 


MORTLAXE. TradHtonal. aoUd 2 
bed cottage Re-roMed. 
ptombed. wired. GCH. 27 ft Uv - 
im room, mted ul bathroom. 
Gmdm £79.1X30 Freehold Trt: 
Mr CMr 856-9663 Dm' or OI 
789 2544 Eve* ft. Ml/E 


DllLWCH 


f£499 ex 


NORTH DULWICH nr lUUon. Ed- 
wardian serm. a B«K 2 rec*. 
GCH. new roof. £95X00 F. h. 
Ol 737 5507. 


WEST DULWICH. Dbte fronted 5 
bedrm Viet family hoe. F.hkl 
£140.000. VMher ft VolkerOl 
701 6225. 


ACCESS NOW trendy SC 19 fmfy 
home lovingly maintained 3 4 
BD utiluy salon DR mode rn 
Ml. diner cellar tg nai gdn banal 
facade must view Better claas 
Tory only pfeau ran 761 0714 
try £74.976. 

3 BED TOWNHOUSE- Immac 

rood. Clove Mn £76.500. Scad 
James 771 0211. 

C OL L EGE ROAD <MI TolTOMe. 4 
bed bungalow £165.000 Scon 
James 77 1 6211 Open Sun. 


:orage. 
ger 11 
).*It 

r Prestel. 
(worth 


CHELSEA & 
KENSINGTON 


....£99.95 


KfffCtmSMDCE SWI. Charm- 
ing luxury nouse in quirt hom 
tocabon wnn anew fo garden 
square wiih TWIN GARAGES. 
Leasehold £585.000 unrow 
Ltd 01-602 6554 
MIL BEACH GARDENS SWS. A 
seleelian ot l and 2 bed rm with 

I and 2 both*, completely 
relurb lo a very hnh standard. 
125 vtv From £99.960. Geed ft 

lewis Ol 244 8377. 

LARGE SUNNY PATHl/garden 

central learure of smart 1 2 bed 
ftal in Lrtcham Carden*. 
£B5.«» Leave 84 years Teh 
01 573 4065 

OLD BROMTT0N RD quirt three 
double nedr. 2nd fl flat. 24x18 
reran toe kitchen. 2 balhre. 
£1 60.000 T HdWdns 01-730 
995 7 

SW7 PRETTY newt houve. 2 
beds. I dbte with baih en suite, 
reran wilh open fire, kaldwn • 
dining rm. sen WC. oa» CH. 
r 1 58.000. Ten 01 9&E 3137. 
CHELSEA Ned Guynne H*e. 
L mou# modern fop floor studio 
i bra nai. erg 7£o tm ol bbi 
I 2<>5 or 01 385 9600. 

k ilrhrn with aQ mod ron* 95 yr 
M. f7S JOO. 01 244 8509. - 
WDHLD I wo douMe baft. 
n**i tiouse. dinmg kutb ft 
Mtivng room £.152300 T Ho*, 
kin* Ol 750 9937. 

ONE ROOMED FLAT rl Kmtne 
*■“ tyuiei moarm otoct 
Hrtfw 0l 7!O 


....£ 99.00 


ms for 

....£49.95 



nain and indv 


IG 


C49 730 
9037 

HODCUFf SQSWlO. A suorth*! 
bed gdn fli m Hm sought ariPr 
*9 Mn* £1 TS.WOBNdi 
Ltok 01 244 8377 • 

^^OARKNS-Sinwrb t ^ 

S-Sig^rSS^ 00 ^; 


CostiRBeo ob Deq 


;rs- 


<a 






























32 


THE TIMES WEDNESDAY JUNE 1 1 1986 


PROPERTY BUYERS’ GUIDE 


LONDON PROPERTIES 


“ACT TODAY, DON’T DELAY” 
REMORTGAGES 
FOR ANY 
REASON 

MORTGAGES FROM 105% (11. 4% APR) 
WE OFFER: 

* Mortgages with tax relief deducted at 
source, lower Riffldmg Society 

* 100% and low start schemes for first time 
buyers. 

* Non-status mortgages (NO income proof). 

* Written quotations and NO foes. 

For hither Mwami— without obligation contact: 


Mortgage Services 
01-486 8305 or write to 
Freepost, London SW3 1YZ 

9am -8pm Weekday* 

10.30am-2.30pm Saturdays and Sundays 


Redcliffes 

P-tni. Agents 

London Boose. 266 Folium Bond, 

London SW10 9EL 
Telephone: 01-361 7633 

HOLLAND PARK Wll: 

Pretty freehold house n cobtfcri 
raws dose Part Gfies-C/Wnu: rax 
fitted ttchen: 3 bad: 2 bates real 
retrace page. £297,000. 


LENNOX GARDENS SW1: 

M Be top td one of these sought 
after penal tosses n KBgMsbndge. 
3 bad. ftfi writ 2 rec tatdtere 2 
bafts. Low Outgonps. £165,000 
L/H 

CHELSEA SW3: 

Easy waft Bate Janas and Stas 
Square Underground- Bngfa PB. flat 
m immaculare utm*. Ree tatchen: 2 
bads bath, c/1®m porterage 
£140.000 120 yr. lease. 


noGHTsanoGE swi: 

OnV moments from Hatreds a wtf 

maHfined 2nd floor Rat wfii 

C/btng. and ponaraos. Bee kdchen: 

bedroom: bath. E140.000. 68 yr. 
lease. 


LONDON’S MOST UNUSUAL FREEHOLD 


Hidden i 
portent 


’ in SL John’s Wood one of London's im- 
Kttle known Historic FreehoUB. 


A charming Victorian chapel which has been 
and hnmriously adapted to create a unique studio _ 
residence with flexible acco m modation on 2 Doors only 
offering 3/S bedrooms. 3/4 reception areas inchading 
adjoining self contained garden wing. Fabulous large 
walled landscaped garden with free form swimming 
pod. 

£1 MILLION 

GROSVENOR INTERNATIONAL 
01-586 0088 


CHESTERTONS 

R ESIDENTIA L ^ 


CRANMER COURT, 
SLOANE AVENUE, SW3 

Sdedroti of attractive nun abed 
flan m tins popular block vrf 
placed for amenities of Kirigbts- 
bridge. Kings Road and CMn 
Green. AD fan have fatty fitted 
knebem and bathrooms A are fight 
and stn ci oii*. 2 beds, targe reccpi 
24 hr poncrage. £330-273 per «•& 
Chelsea Office: 

•1-589 5211 


MAIDA VALE, W9 
Super pretty garden 
flat leading onto com- 
munal gardens. 3 
bedrooms, double re- 
ception room, kitchen. 
Outstanding value 
£200 per week. 

Venice Office 
01-289 4856 


CHELSEA A 
KENSINGTON 


QUEENS MU SW7. txrrobon- 
dU rjutlous and tastefully 
im-dnnrwd POUO DM In small 
PB MOTH S doufah- beds. 2 
boms it Ri sane). 26 n nrcen- 
llan. [amrrvatory dining 
room Long lease Low 
ouigilnw. Realistically rested 

hw quirk sale £176.000 w*o 

No agrnu. Of 245 1061 lOt Ol 

SB9 21 S3 iHv 


MUTTON OAROCNS. Sanerb. 
sponoin 1 bedroo rn ed apart- 
rwni m immaculate ronduion 
m prrMtgtow central location 
All aMiem. CH. lulls' fined 
kilt hen. portrr. enliv pnora- 
Hr Long lean* L75JJOO coo 
runner drum pnane osw 576 
448 iw ends). Ol 3TO 7672 
w days after 7 p m i. 


Wit Magnificent, targe 6 bed 
room rial in ante! cm n o sac 
Interior deimneo and decorated 
in I he higlu-u -Tandard Helen 
tom room, la roe lull. balhroom. 
2nd sliawer loren. 22* Italian 
nim luiiy (ium neff 
hllctien brcjMasl room, luu-b 
ny. lilted carpets, car park 
£12*1 oSO Tel Ol 60J 82M 


MW. Surprisingly Igr 3 bed flat 
wiih ov n odn direct access to 
Ptntbejdi Cdm Totally 
imxKTi iWed throughout. In 
eludes lined Kii a rm. loe recrt> 
rm wiib patio doors lo qdn 
GCH. tse 121 yry £96.950 
Tel. Ol 244 9012 eses Wends 


PfHNCC OF W*U* Drlce SWI t 
No parking inmcum. 
£31.500 125 m S c studio 
Hal. I rm. hit. both. w c Cmd 
Or Managed block Rea m res 
complete irfurb No agents 
TetOI 720 1664 025 663593 


BEST BART W14 BeautUndv rr 
furbished spacious 4 bedroom 
llal UIU1 super nnV lulrtten and 
emm bath Long lease in p b 
hlork OuK* salr LloS.000 
Trl Ol 603 4877 


HOTTMO MU Wll. Sunny and 
spgnous 2 bed maiwK'tfe in pe- 
riod bUHding Large drawing 
rm. balhmi fitlirt Nil GCH. 
Low oUlooings. Long lease 
£85.660 Tel Ol Ml 3234 


KENSINGTON SMS. l uxury low 
built laimly house. 4 bedroom, 
d bainrocsnv S rrcepnons 
mull gaidm and parking. Free- 
hold £315.000 Lutross LUL Ol 
602 5554 


KBGHTSnmHV flat wun 3 
b«lTv 3 baton. A staff Ujl 2 
rtegant tecTp room, good 
mum lac. slews auus location 
cl llanods £465 000. T Has 
him. Ol 730 9937 


QUEENS GATE, S.W.7 
Laps immacUare ntou de- 
tipind flat on 2 flows. M aaer 

bedroom Wti i nt u h baft 
wO jacuzzi. 3 further bed- 
rooms. 2nd bathroom. Mgs 
sttng room, now German 
kitchen. Prorate pan. 125 year 
(east E27BJM0 for qwek sale. 

Cd 01-370 2362 or 
01*370 3970 


BMACUIATE POfTWISE 

WITH JACUZZI 
fteu smi u i i data gland bM- 
laiwtWn. 2 ItaMjffli 

a tm bras mutt/wea re- 
pm. i tarts tndrom. 
Hied enftomt *, 2 karey Inda- 
rereu. 1 to sum mdi pram . 
Sesafic &pre> fatdn wU 
dre* More, gdi amt sp- 
too. aby phn. nare eiuas. 9G 
rear laare ntim n bum 
E175JW) 

Tat 01 221 1039 (bona) 
01 946 7812(offka) 


L'nusu 

aOy large Audio Hal. newly 
converted property Ut one of 
London's n«w aur active 

squares. Separate fully fitted 
kurbrn. luxury batbroom. luny 
carpeted. GCH Long Lease 
£58.500 Tel 573 8786 
CARLYLE MAMMON* CWX OH 
Oiesne WaU, AbsotHJy fanlas 
nr 4 bed. 3 bath. 2 huqh teceps. 
lit totally trfurtHslied to an ex 
ireracty hMli standard 990 yrs 
Share ol f H C3JOOOO Reed 
A Lewi s Ol 244 8377 
WBERR NEWLY modernised 
and very light 4Ut floor apart- 
mem m nresliqKna block 
between Harr cuts and The 
Park 2 large mepUorn. 2 bed 
rooms, ideal for enlertalnlna 
£225X300 Trt 01 584 7787 
BUOtl COTTAGE. 'CHI Earn 
Court Roads a dMe beds. Igr 
kitchen, front and rear gardens 
I'nbHiceaUlv peareful. Rest- 
oence parking £177.500 FWd 
PoliU A Cu 01 499 9876. 
CAMPnoi WLL we. Charming 
Odn flat in Him moH popular lo- 
cale DMe reren. kit. b last rm. 
1 bed. dressing rm study 
Comm gdns 998 VTS £85 OOO 
Plata Lslae*. 01 681 7646. 
HOLLAND BARK Wll. Etegam 
ground floor rial with views 
over tennis courts. 2 beds, beau 
nfid receo. k * b £196.000. 58 
vra Heritage A woods: SSI 
8921 

HOLLAND PARK WM. Modem 
tot* n hse offering extl acccom 
4 beds. 2 Mins. 2 receps. studio 
rm. kiL gdn. 2 root lerrs. gge. 
75 itv £310.000. Plaza Estaes 
Ol 581 7646. 


Entire mrw's nmvling of to 

house's and garage's, mainly 

varum And IrcetioM 

£750,000 tamos. Ltd 01-602 

CSB4 



BOON BOM SHG 
DeH MU t*n» badreon HC- 
tonai More dree re 
Hriigten. Ooghtd (cobra ft 
omn qm»- « Bnngp 


nurruH coobt. ana 
kwnBin Lowr gnnd na« 
flat RpfHBpMldr Tire bML 
L*ue Brap. Lia H KL, Bah- 
rain. On c^l m Law 

OHSUM nnBB. SW7 

Shnwg mtMMtH « ground 

red Uwv grant fleers rA 

Area ateas fa Brekns . " 


KndHL IhielEeds. lte titta. 
Gh C/H. Chn*. 62 yeas. 
JB76J BI ‘~* 

soBren 

Stgwb id floor H adh Mn 

bderen. Sour Nm. Tun 

tads. T»a bats. Danbta 
hop, Bt/Aner Gb C/H. n 

nt mum l/h 
«mGAR,W7 
SfdMhd TaO 8eoi 


Ongud Rkbil Lur inym, 
Tn double bah. 2 baflau-fr- 
SL Bdconr. En C/H CapeiL 

9V6a94» . 



robins & CO. 

01-581 1152/5 
FETHIS8AM PUCE 
SW7 

a pNty nma basi In Ms attt ode 

M mna WM retag Mm of 

Xmintfre fiadres. n* ban* is k 

MdM iW reJte Mtaf WWre dwtt 

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BtaiTt)ogtBU«c8>iit»Hoe*L 

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TURULOE STRSr SW7 


mvd re wgtaum 

PiessPf turd is Dsoon sogoy & 


_ . K30H 2ND 

. _ BATWOOHS. CUNt- 

.OFTStflffM FMPC W®. 

TO &UNC OWENS UFt. 

PMMIE OFT SfflEET CM? IVtRKHC 

fRffilOlC HR SMI M35JW0. 

22 G iMCHter Read 
SW7 4KB 




BafiRAHA/GHELSEA: 
la remnWy MOV wbtnp Mi 
In » Etnra con) and m OMt SL 4 
tads. T bNt& 2 new. '•* 

RUST ST. SW3: 

A chnreg potad tee in red and 
n m pitme toctaa*. Orawrag nn. 
daw nn. fit. dd m. 3 dd bate. 2 
baths, pan. F/H hi the rtgoi 0 1 
E32WJTO 

RELD HD. SW1«: 
in and 2 nd fk ms mb Ndtorar 
rooms. Dnmg nn. dtang im. IHf 
dM tads. I sn*. MOl La 990 
yis. EMOOOO. SalB AgsntL 

01-352 0113 


JMISTB&AI. 


CHELSEA SW10 

An B n di a nHnn houn on only 3 
floore ia goad decorative order 
dbnted m a quiet street in 
CMsai. 3/4 betamis. 2 
hate, double rec aption room , 
tUng room. itndy/beikraHii 4. 
Ktctrai/breddast room. West 


01-225 2577 


KENS1RGT0H, W14. 

Magndicent penthouse mai- 
sonette with West-facing tool 
tBnace. Supert) tup floor recap 
(28 x 18). fit St 3 beds. bath, 
sltwr rm en sure. FGCH. 
£148^00 Leasehold. View to- 
day nng Wtuman Porter 603- 
1133 open 10-2pm. 


■•**. SrduM Oanlen rial. 1 
dMe. 1 sinaie bed. large bam- 
room. 17ft drawingroom with 
open IHeptoce- mod. (Died ML. 
30 ft. watted Harde n. £90 .000 
for quick sale. 373 9777. 


HAMPSTEAD & 

H1GHGATE 


BELSIZE PARK 
r rt eb eM Wdeftan Readesce 
dost Ta Wo) End 
Luxury Penthouse mai- 
sonette with owstandsig 
■news oner London. 

3-4 cbie bedrooms, triple 
aspect reception room 
with ongirni flrapiacss. 
Private root terrace witti 
paoo doors. Very large 
tuty Med Mtchen. large 
luxury bathroom. 2 WCs. 
In good decoraftve grow 
throughout Very Low 
ouigtfaiqs A communal 

^10,000 ONO 

Tet 01-722 2477 


OONDAR QA ROOMS NW6 3 bed 

nuHnicnr. 2 albcv. GCH. II kiL 
prefly ISO' garden. tSOyr 
iw £130.000. 01-794 8465 


NS MOKATE. Rerenl flat Cnnv. 
97 jr he 2 beds. Ill Ml. carpet* 
etc Superb views from aloe the 
hill £SbJ00a 01341 8573. 


NW1 1 PnttV 3 bed country sale 

milage bi fuPMTvaUon area 

dmgned by LUlyreK. Lee Pine 

kU 'diner. DMe aspect lounge. 

lux bath rm. panniel floors. 

panelled doors- invert carpets. 

throughout Front A rear gdnv 

verturted TrrracoUa pain. 
Ready lo move into, price for 

quick vale to genuine buyer 

£121.900 Tel: net 01 *58 

9375. work Ol 380 6628 


ar=Wlnkworth=v 

* MORTGAGES X 

TERMS NOW AVAILABLE 


3*A times income or 2% times 
jobt in come 

100% mortgages avaBable 
No evidence of iacomte required 
for leans up to £200,000 for 
quEfyntg Applicants 
MIRAS MMy available over 
£30,000 

Ring 01-235 0591 
For full Information 
Open nntQ 8pm today 


v 


Winkworth 
Financial Services 

25a Motcomb Street 
London SWI 


/ 


LB 


MORTGAGE NEWS 


“NON -STATUS” LOANS AT 11% 

Residential up to 75% of purchase price or 
valuation, which ever is lower. Status up to 95% at 
11 % 1 

RE-MORTGAGES FROM 11%% 

Other "Status’ ’ and "Non Status" loans atl 
competitive interest rates on both residential and[ 
commerical property - unlimited funds. Initial! 

underwriting of the faeflity to be completed by this| 

company. 

Please reply without delay to 

LB (life and Pensions) Ltd 

10/12 Exhibition Road London SW7 2HF 

01-225 1841 


4 


INSURANCE 

HOME 

+» IMPROVEMENT 

/ MORTGAGE * 


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PERSONAL 


LOAN ^ 


BUDGET 

ACCOUNT 


CHEYNE GARDENS, SW3 

Close to Sloane Square, a beautifully decorated 
and lavhhly appointed family house, with large 
west facing garden, in a quiet location off 
Cheyne Walk. 

5/6 bedrooms, 4 bathrooms (3 en suite) superb 
drawing room, 3 further reception rooms, 
kitchen, self contained staff accommodation. 
Gas centra] beating. 

FREEHOLD FOR SALE 


HMASKELLS 

107 Walton Street, 
SW3 

01 581 2216 


9 Ode Street 

enn 

01 352 1484 


HAMBSTCAO. Lux refUb. Mews 

house. 2 ensuta beds, spilt level 

lounge, study /3rd bedroom. 

during are*. LuU.Wm.TH 

01-878 6572 levesj or Ol 586 

6555 (day) m 
mar HAMrSirCAD. 3 bed gar- 

den flat In central pcstrion. new 
CH. kUchen. bs theoom. 98 year 

lease, private garden. £89.960. 

0860 613789. 

WEST NAMPSTKAD. Star 2 bed 
fUL cure Mu. exceptional 
ronvn Cdn A views, Ige dble 

bed. recep. ML parking- tease 82 

years. £99.950. 01-604 9096 

HWHCATC NS. Huge top Ifrcanv 

1 9' rec 2 dble beds ail lux. Mb* 

village ft lube. £75.000 Ntdio- 

laa Ghcpberd. Ol 883 UML. 


RICHMOND A 
KINGSTON 


fUCMWlID PARK 

(SHEEN GATE) 

Just a stral from the Pa*, an 
mnac S yr aid da tan It res afltr- 
ng 4 gd Rdnng. 2 In mvms (1 
an sum, g Eta s b pect dratag 
iw. etocant dim im. rb( N Wy 
ti ut. d* m Gas dv DWs 0am. 
Gdn m. Ggo. So*w in feng bnd- 
’ S. Oftas rented in tta 
5195300 1/taL Sat iw 
‘ Ttoetfer TaytorDnm 
Por» 876 Dili 


Mn Cwsl WaMloo 35 nuns. 

Modern Ceorgun type house In 

exclusive small devetopemenL 

set in 4 acre* of the debgbHul 

grounds of Garrick's Villa, next 

la Ihshy Park 3 bedrooms. 2 

bathrooms il raoiipi. further 

bedroom or shirty ft bamroom 

or uiHty room on grmmd floor 

Open plan 32 foot lovnvjr. 

dining room, kucfieo. double 

garage, full gas CH. £1 79.95a 

Tel. 01^79 0734. 


EAST TWICKENHAM Spacious 3 
bedroorned numwttr. close lo 
Thames and Marble Hut Part. 
Larar lounge, sep during room. 
GCH. many ongsnjd vtctarun 
.fnainrev view Today. 
£79.950. Td 01-891 4708 


IB Cl MONO - 2 mb* town center. 
Unusual 3 bedroorned cottage 
burn Hilo wall of Richmond aut 
Me grounds with fantastlr 
views Character bouse with 
umaue pcrsoaaUty £ 160.000 
tree hoM Tel: Ol 948 4026 


I Irnnur vicl 2 bed OF 
flat in truiel rut de sac nr Rxtm 
Hill. 2 mins from town centre 
CH Fined nam & kll. low out. 
£74.250 Cab Drtrdre ICI753I 
868155 101 01 948 0441 ihl 


TCODSN6TON cturmtng early 
Victorian cottage 3 beds, 
lounge duung rm. Me kitchen, 
oukrt rutdesac. near station ft 
shoos. £89.960 TW 943 2941 
IH1 406 641S iWl 


R WH O WO pretty Atben cot- 
tage. 2 beds, kn baflxnpceas, 
rxrellaiH dec order. £85850 
TeLOl 940 7977 


TEtHMNBTOML Large Edwardian 

detachrd l amity house In ainet 

position dose station- Full GCH, 

Lop lull, big cdur. dta/WC. 

20lt Mi b last rm. 2 receps. S 

dtde beds. 900 gdn. £176.000 

Find Tel Mr Cbrt 01 977 2468 

or Milestone A Col Us: 977 1166 

EDWARDIAN Hse. drt dble 
ironird. nr Nartaum stn. 3 Ige 

beds. 2 rrcepts. spaetoia triple 

aspect ml conservatory Park- 

Ing. soil t> Itoog gdn (86000 

nno Teltn 549 H3B 


Mag m ncc n t 

IN fir apt with far rnadring riv- 

er slews. 3 beds. S baths it eh 
MHtel. 2 ree*. fu IHL £164.000 

lseh Id Phone Taylor axon 

Portor 01 B91 1282. 

CAST StKZN park /river IS min, 

deughUul 4 bed won. Ige Inge. 

Ml'dnr GCH. sunny «r ndn. 

Cl 20.000 mw. 01 876 712& 
mCHMQHD MUL Bright x» 

clous 2 bed flaL CH- toungri 

kHchrn. bath garage in ouWt 

road. C72.960- TM- 940 3619 


WIMBLEDON 


WIMBLEDON 


He art 


seetaag c /5 

yw house m 


ft rnua oe n tta wBgyi area « 

good onto. Mh bus central 

neaong. 1 south w swift wa 

laong ankut and oarage. If 

a nBHfangofSNtnin'iiur 

« aid it fth-tfie above 

nvmitafls. pAttU eodoct 

the box no. takw: 

Bwty Is HHJZ2 


SUBCSfl M Floor apa et m e u t In 

victonar dotiMc frooled house. 

overlooking South Park gar- 

den*. Gaumed imrting. &E. 
lacing lounge (19ht 16*1. 2 dM 

beds. CxceUem fully llited kach- 

en. lux. bathroom j sep shower. 

Drlwr way to garapr ■ F re ehold.' 

£86.000. Ol 540 8646 rtf) 01 

739 6641 (OL 


Stnn. Charming aenri-dettched 
interior designer** bmlly 
house. 6 tied. 2 bash + separate 
shown- + downstairs 
ctoakrooin/utlUy room, 
rrcep . fully fitted kitchen. 
GCH. Sumy 80 ft. gtodoi with 
•nracw. FrcdtoM. Must tresses. 
£112000. 01-947 8031. 


QUINTON SCOTT ft CO. WM***- 
don luxury laodcreped 
devetonmnil of new Bungalows 
and houses. Superb Suer, a 
beds. Uvtng. tot bam. Full Gas 
CH. Carden. Parking. From 
£75X100. F/H: 01 946 9600 
Open Sun ll-3om. 
wnwiro oN nut. enc s d 3 
bed. 2 rec. bath. kK. gge ft GO 1 
gdn. £71.000. T«auy Estaim 
346 6757. 


PROPERTY TO LET 
LONDON 


8ATTEBSEA/ 

VANDSWOSTU COMMON 

Samoa flew riepgped. nraa*- 
tak 4 dm. 2 tan. Itamn Hse. 30 fl 
Dmsig Rm noli Francs doore B my 
pretty pm £ qdn Lis read btcbm 
Vtebng noctme. fcn resiw. tunble 
dryer ree lerel own Ifasta tad/ 
btaream e» sute ■ al befflooms bead 
trerdratas 

CO LET OftY E380 PW 
m 01 228 2815 
OR M 075 SMS 


OVER 100 
PRIVATE HOMES 
AVAILABLE 
to rent throughout the 
Capital 

1 week to year. Special 
rates to companies. 

01 437 6518 


C2. 5 mm* L. pool Si. exci. ? bed 

apt, m com Viet School views 
over park, fullv lumtshed 
£600 per month Ol S88 0131 
f work 1 Ol 9 81 4470 revest. 
lAYSWATU S*4f contained Hal 

2 bedrooms, cenl healing, sun 

lenarrl L2SO pw 402 4502. T 

HAMPSTEAD spacious flat. 2 

beds living rm. 2 batftv. toe kll. 

£lbO PW. Ol 45S 8695. 
MAIDA VALE Self contained floL 

2 double- beds, central Iteaung. 

UOOpw 402 4302. T 
W1 Office 2 rooms. 330 sq fl + 

shared bawd room. £7.200 pa 

ire. Ol 486 9445. 


COUNTRY PROPERTY 


Luxury Retirement 

Rats In a beautiful 

rtverstdesetdng- 
Stjotats Meadow 
Retirement 
community at 
Cirencester- the 
capital of the 
CotswoWs 



ShoravtoDe 
ennancea to become 

tlwuirsflrsttotajcare 

community— home 
mmership for an, mam 
thelustnetiracrtome 
fraUeWerty. 


SMterad Homes Umttcd 
TDt (0285)69681 


THE PERIOD PROPERTY 

REGISTER 

Each month The MgfcW 
Catalogues hundroijs of 
ottl and historic honwta 
(or sale nationwide. 

Buyrg or settling contact: 

TIM His t or i c RuMjnaa Co, 
CboUiam (BJ24 8HQ 
T«1 09005-7983/8128 


OVERSEAS PROPERTY 




i • . 



A flavour 
of Venice 
across 

the river 


Colonial design provides the style, and 
the inspiration of Voice and Amster- \ 
dam the setting, for Port Liberty a new 
village opposite the Statue of Liberty 
and Manhattan ■ 




Port Liberty is an unlikely venture — an 
attempt to bring European elegance 
through the examples of the water-borne 
cities of Amsterdam and Venice, in New 
England colonial style, to an area of New 
Jersey opposite New York which has lain 
dormant for years. 

It will be launched on the American 
public on July 4, the 100th anniversary 
of the Statue ofliberty, which is its focus 
and to which it looks across the Hudson 
river. Tt will eventually provide 1,700 
homes, including town houses and 
apartments, with mooring for 900 boats. 

Port Liberty is intended to be a year- 
round community, embracing holiday- 
makers and yachtsmen and commuters 
to New York and elsewhere, in a modern 
seaside village designed by the sailor- 
architect Francois Spoerry, who was 
responsible for Port Grimaud on the 
French Mediterranean coast, and this is 
in many ways the mode! for Port Liberie. 

As Port Grimaud was inspired by 
Venice’s canals, so will Port Liberty draw 
inspiration from ancient Amsterdam, 
Venice and Port Grimaud. Spoeny, by 
coincidence, comes from Mulhouse in 
France, home of Bartholdi, sculptor of 
the Statue of Liberty. 

At present the project, on 176 acres of 
land, is in its earliest stages but the first 
residents are expected to move in by the 
end of the year. The consortium behind 


By Christopher Warman 

Property Correspondent 

the scheme, including Prince Ferdinand 
von Bismarck, great grandson of the Iron 
Chancellor, emphasizes its international 
nature and hopes the final community 
will be about 80 per cent American and 
20 per cent from overseas, predominant- 
ly European. 

With Spoerry and Prince Ferdinand as 
partners in the venture are Pierre Barrier 
Labouchfere, a Swiss, and Paul Bucha, a 
West Point graduate who won the 
Congressional Medal of Honor in Viet- 
nam. The plan emerged in 1983 after 
Spoerry determined that the site could 
provide bis Port Grimaud on the river 
Hudson. Hie following year his group 
was designated as the developer of the 
area by the Jersey City Redevelopment 
Agency, from 40 applications. 

It is undoubtedly an imaginative 
conception. More than 1,000 inquiries 
were received after it was jNiblicuttd in 
two New Jersey newspapers in April, and 
.more than 150 applicants have reserved 
homes. Described as a yachting village. 
Port Liberie is nevertheless planned to 
appeal to all groups of people, with about 
10 per cent of of be units bought by in- 
vestors to be rented, widening the mix. 




In addition to the 250 town houses and 
1 ,440 apartments. Port Liberty will boast 
a yacht club, a tennis and health dub, a 
hotel, restaurants, shops, an office 
complex, a marina and a sanctuary for 
wildlife. The blocks will lave indoor 
parking and optional boat slipways. The 
total sales value of the project is around 
$600 million, with the first phase of 362 
units costing $80 million. 

One of the attractions is that although 
Port Liberie is close to Manhattan, prices 
are considerably less. The initial prices 
are estimated at about $303,000 or $208 
per square foot, compared with at least 
$350 per square foot in New York. The 
state and city tax rate is also lower, and 
Pott Liberte has been granted a partial 
real estate tax abatement by Jersey City. 

Prices in the first phase range from 
$1 1 5,500 to $223,500 for a one-bedroom 
apartment, to $280,500-$505,500 for 
three bedrooms, and $410,500-$779,500 
for a town house. The first phase is 
expected to be completed by early 1988, 
and the whole project by 1995, trans- 
fonning an area last used as an army 
railroad terminal, and providing v/bat is 
thought to be the largest singly owned 
marina on the east coast 

The American headquarters of Port 
Liberte are in the World Trade Center, 
Manhattan (212 433 2000), and an office 
is shortly to open in London. 


BERKSHIRE 


BRACKNELL 

Luxury 4 bad. 2 bath vJmo« 
inw CtnriM Church hotm on 
faranigou* dBMtopomgnL 5 
maw Iran Ascot and 
BradcnoB. London Watartoo 47 
nuts. Hooftrow 20 nans. 
Closa to M3 . M4 and MS. 

A rare nranota nl 

eiaijSi 

TM 0344 485 624 
or 0344.589 33 


■ASTBCRKSntBE. DGJ MUUug- 
lon. Solicitor. War grave. 

Berkshire RGIOSQJ to MMrucI 
rtd lo Invite offer* ova 
£ 210.000 tar an atfMUntl 

roiugc properly on an oat 
■landing Ole of 2 am - In * 
wcliwal filiation WWI views 
MTW56 to own land M a rovnv 
He. Easy access lo M4, London 
45 itilos.. M4 M25 Interchange 
20 mins. Suitable either for oc 
cuniliomaamiail readoiceor 
tar meofion lo a consMeraMe 
orogeny for wtilcti pfenning 
perniMton and archUccl's Plans 
are available. Tet (7735 
223231 


M4 7 MUXS. L 

MILES. Spacious noted house 
with superb south lacing views 
across the Kenna Valley. 4 rec. 
billiards room. 5. 6 mam beds. 
3 both. 5 further beds i ideal lor 
flail OH healing- Stabling. Pad 
■tecta. About 9 acres. Guide 
£450.000. Dreweans Oovtatrv 
House Department Newbury 
'063&I 38393. 

HAMBSTEAD MMHEYS. Geor 
roan village property greatly 
extended to family house. 
Newbury 7 mUcs. Han. 2 rec. 
Ige kncli. uUWy. 5 beds. 2 bath. 
flbl garage, garden flanked by 
River Pang £146.000. 
DKwntU Coon try House De- 
partment 106361 38393 

RCADHM STATION 2 mile*. Al 
tractive. wefl-equipoed. 

secluded bungalow, about ' 
acre. 6 good sited rooms. 3 
bathrooms 12 ensuUek luxury 
k lichen. Gas CH. mcc Ue id deco- 
rative order, twin garages, 
cause bus routes. Offers around 
£150.000 TeU0734> 474109 


BEDFORDSHIRE 


^ J U*k-d 

character collage superb condl- 
lion located in l of BedtardsMn- 
n»st sought after villages on 
■he village green Open lire’s, 
exposed beams 1 double bed- 
room ensuife shower. 2 furths- 
double bedrooms, bathroom, 
luxury farm house kitchen. sH- 
img room. rtliMng room, 
cloakroom, ututty roam, on 
Itred C H. double glared, go- 
rage and out buUdmgon *i acre 
landscaped garden. 3 nuns 
AIM. London Kings X 40 
mim £139.500. Tel 1076727) 
0*0 


BUCKS 


NORTH 

Grade 11 UWd 1 71b Century 
■Mamed village house In beau- 
Id id gardrm of >' acre. Milton 
Keynes 15 miles. Aylesbury 16 
miles Oxford 25 mltak Hall. 3 
receptions, breuktecl kucfien.4 
bedrooms, bathroom. Gas (Bed 
CH oarage. outbuUdlnga. Offers 

In TOW. of Cl 50.000 Further 

detain from Andrew nuersoii. 
25 Beaumont SL Ocfctfd; 0666 
50669 or weekends 02*026 
3362 


A DMuUtcd 

house wllh Ml wonderful gar- 
den!. secluded and Including 
heated swimming pool. S beds. 
3 recep s . superb kuctien. ad in 
immactdaie decratatse order. 
OCH. d. glw. cas Ins. 
£183X00 Tei- 1049461 494a 


— ^ M4Q 6 miles. 

Charming period del cottage. 
Coni rendition. Large hall, liv- 
ing room, fully nt tot. 2 
bedrooms, bathroom. CH. park 
Ing. £70 jOOO. ruffoty 

BncMoM. 084421 0971 


DEVON A CORNWALL 


MOUSEHOLE Individually de 
figure det cottage, secluded 
Boulton, superb sea views 2 
dMe bedrooms, filled IdKhen. 
bathroom, large lounge wnh 
stove, night storage heaters. 
Good sued garden. £49.960. 
Tel: Penzance i0756> 731092 
SOUTH DEVON. Tofgp Ealuary 
wllh gwocMuo views Luxury 
resktoncc Gemi rural Mirrowid- 
ingv Imp ressive, emeraiv 
duality duora tor indoor nrefed 
swimming pool. £2SaOOO Ref 
RIP Waycam 6 Fled SL Tor 
giuv 0803 212831 


UEIACIIEU bungalow 3 beds, 
lounge/ diner, kttdwn/ break' 
fust room. Utility. UaUuoom. 
guidon with barbeaue/ patio 
Sea views. Garage. fiGBuOOO 
Mevaginay 0726 843832- 

NKWQtlAY Modem Z bedroom 
holiday house In lovely park 
wrung shared pool, stoma 6. 
£19.960. TM 066 886 642- 

TMTACELcwall. Hutortod bed. 
3 rec H». 36m cum view. 2 
Mh. ehower. KM. Sun rm. UTB 
rm. MUrty. «■ acre. £65.000 

TOMMY SPactow 60i Facing Oet 
Hre. &-6 Beds. 2 Rees Double 
Gge. Private Garden. Ch/Dg> 
£84.000. TM- 0803 500459 


EAST ANGLIA 


NORFOLK / SUFFOLK COAST. 

(enn lap MMttlan taorWM: 
vmmi modem detaclwd a bed 
bungalow, bathroom, separate 
w c. lounge, sep sun lounge. 
kH. diner. dMe glaz. chJarge 
gge. work Shan. Urge pM- nr 
gMf and sportoctubi . Ideal hob 
day retreat or perm mkbire 
£85.000 no Inrtude carpets and 
some limllurcl Tel Pabner < 
06021 89277 or 10493) 604010 


ESSEX /SUFFOLK 

Clare Substantial turn ol centu- 
ry rK-farmhouse. set back from 
road 3-4 beds, bathrmm- 
Idlchen. 4 recep roams, full cen- 
tral healing. «* 
ovrtnul lamps Ooboa far rariher 
Vi acre Offers around £92.960 
TM: (0787) 277333. 


Ml In S acres surround ed by 
woodland where wild deer 
roam freely RkUng school 
nearby SrkuiwajM- 4 beds, 
lounge /diner. ML utility rm. 
bath, let dM garatto'bani. Sta- 
ble £116 j000. 0394 411709. 


BUCKLEY, SUFFOLK, country 
cottage. Lge Ml. dmer. lounge. 2 
beds. bath, bnmac throughout. 
Sanaa gdn £ 36J300. 0394 
411709 


EAST SUFFOLK. Irthertaghani 
Mill nr WaodbrMge A nOUMe 
ft completely muaue country 
property Hurtom Tudor rest- 
dence 7 beds. 2 baths. WHh 
prtaieiouc orig waler ndH. <hU 
fiabUng * conversed 2 betfrra 
outage wub 4V- acres gdns ft 
paddocks, on riser Ddwn In 
non Uda) stage. Op« to thapvto- 
Hc - annually- sptondid 
commercial aspecL OH«v 
around £240000 woodcock ft 
Son 16 Arcade SL IPSWiA.TM 
104751 543B2. 

UHCOm— E COAST. Staton 
on Sea. superb fully mod det 


dlmg rm. hue ltd ML 4 beds, 
bath. GCH. fid rets and ertra 
OirougtiouL Sactnded sth (ape 
pom Oufea sale £59^00 Be- 
g ency EMatoa 062 1 41166. 

ungdan. C16 BiaKhed twrape 
o-Mokbig village gwn wllh 

Nperaie mnuner hse In Drtvato 
walled landscaped gdn of 1/3 
acre. 40 mm King’s 
£63J2g ft TM: 04875 544. 

BETEM8 


6 mins station. 

30 mins London. Exclusive set 
Una deughUul views. 4 bed dM. 
lax kit. nobly sep dbung. en- 
suite GUs central healing. Not 
Umber framed. £67.600. 0733 
26897B. 

WAVENEY VALLEY IO IPS Ot»- 
15 miles coasl. line Suffolk bam 
and oulbufMlngs. Set m acre; 
newty ranverud to spacious 6 
bed house and studla- vrork- 
shop. £96,000 037986 730 

MARKET nr Alfaro. Lines DM. 
Bung. Large L shaped tounrdft. 
3 bed. study doub.-gar. 5M 
from mu £29.780 (06071 
605087 

EAST AEOLIAN PROPERTY 
SEARCH. Norfolk. Sufta®. 
CamBndge. Essex. Completo re- 
locaUau swvtoo. 0284 810931 


ESSEX 


JACOBEAN PfUKTS HOUSE 

iGrada 2 ) on mnlnN tantaita 


FaRnehBnta5fim.il 
bon fn. TIbxIkL ftaKh C . 
bwra Ennv l al. 2 m &m [ } 

. 2 bsteroK (Mtad wrt- 
raoa&V. oewnst fcfcflm.BSKr nw. 
T&'Mto. Wl Ew*rt 


M0QHV8 order WaW_ ffrtew 
SuMfi fw oral cnfiia Ccmnent 
WR8MH ■ ■ 

EJ5JB8 
0371 “ 


JUSTED HOUSE. lBUlC OrKPItal 
beams, very spac i ou s . I 2 l» 
mmon. 3 4 bedrooms, ceojr. 
excMInH dregcauve order 
GOL&ecujdal garden. 80 nfin- 
um London. 2 nuns ueaen. 
STOJOOO Tol:QS6S S03703 


KXSBX/mwraLK UR. 9b 

■ roues ttti. Close saftna (rnoortno 
BvaKaMrl. Spectady bunt 9 yr 
old dM hub country lo ca tion 
•Min 1 aa«. Ota. 2 rec. 00 IdL 
4 beds. 2 baths, gas ch. mains. 
stabling. £98 JOOO. Woodcock ft 
Son Ipswich TM 10473) 64362. 


GLOUCESTERSHIRE 


NR STROUD Gonsentatloa vfl- 
bpe. b d e nJ I y 2 ittfta*. 
channino 4 bed stone cottage. 
open U ni. OCH. foBy 
model nlsevl. large garden, 
perb views £69.960 Teh 
046387 2638 8unday/*veo 


Ynna Doctor 

must sea superb i bedroom 
ground floor flat In 17ttiOentu 
ry tpwle 2 Haled c ountry 
mansion. Recent convei iluii. 
unpeocabie bnerlor deeoraUen. 
Large living room wlui (men 
windows lo own private waned 
garden. Fmed tot + batting. 
£39-500. Tel: 0452 728699 
COTSWOU HOUSE with turret 
tai unloue seduded poMUon an 
Common. Beautiful views. 4/6 
beds. *7 acre garden. Offers 
£180.000. TW 0483 882278. 

STROUD Cm. Grade 2 Listed end 
Terrace CobwoM Cottage 400 
yrs oM £36500. 0761 418788 
for detain 

PAfMSWKIL Superb views 
valley Del 3 bed bungalow.CH. 
gae.gdnJC69.05O. 0452 812773 


HANTSJDORSET, A 

L0.W. 


HEW FOREST 

PVniUKHUl HbI ■tsilnitft MlMdta 

ranywooG. ueunenea ensm 
bur^siow. 4 doubto bod- 
rooms, 2 ba ftroo m i. gas 
CH. gnsfljr spit Mo granny 
anex. Ample space tor cara- 
van or boat 

E76JHHL 

ffingwaod 04254 3398. 


FLEET Lumry 4 bed modern de- 

tached house. 2 bathrooms 11 
en vuUeJ . 3 iwoOto. large 

kuctien breMfast room, uttbty 

room. GCH. 3 garages. 2 sheds. 

Greenhouse The Main feature 

at Ute house nil position. Ideal- 

ly located 200 yards from town 
centre but lotatty secluded. Set 

boclc 30 yards from outot road 

in ■* acre garden Station 1 ssiOr 
(Waterloo 42 nuns). £166.000 
Tet Fleet 613846. 


Detached XlXlh Gent. Cottage 

In lovely viOory clow Shops. 


Brick bum. Hied roof, tastefully 

decorated UiroufitoUL 3 Berts- 

Batb.. 3 Recep.. KU . OtaBerva- 

tocy. Garage. Beautiful Garden. 

Cenl Hfg £90000 Pouesiton. 
CHAPMAN. MOORE A 
MUGFORD Agenta for West 

Countiy PlQMIlta. TM: 0747- 

2400 


BATH 

A WARD- WINNING 
NORTHANGER COURT 

RENOWNED FCW QtUUJTY and noe floalhoomplncd. oonneque 
env-renm- Has have no* beta meosnued at die beg hnwy drveiop- 
vcni by ibe-Whai Hour mmb fat IHIS. 

Superbly vHoKd bende ike River Avnv die Oka eutdc quMiiy m 
even agen ordrain and cwcpdop Ftatam indudr InRyrtiaal wbd 
■mod Incbcn. \axuy bathroom wnh imanauvr bine and Ambon 
floornw- The nugnacnn nwftjw none tuMmg is «i umdsi ddchlful 
laadKKMd ctnmwib irovidaie dftfMfal nmnindratv wnhon the 
dradgciy of m u ntm n n ihcm Viewov nesMMM nanapiSBrsiuqn 
of Ibe qsfiit) ac ofler 

PR1CE& nsju*04&m 

Brochure from; 

UTHODOMOS LTD 

Saks Office. I Nonlaser Court. Grove Send. Bub BL2 6PE 
Tet BmS fSZJSI *6«7 at MM6 


JAMES HARRIS & SON 

WINCHESTER 


HAMPSHIRE 

A CHARMMQ WLL HOUSE ON THE RIVER DUN 
A TrSiutny of tha Tost 
3 principal bedrooms and 4 recaption rooms 
STABLES WITH PLANNMG CONSENT 
PADDOCK - 195 YARDS OF FKMMG 
ALSO ATTRACTIVE 2-BEDROOM ED COTTAGE 
IN ALL ABOUT Z17 ACRES 
Soto Agimtto- James Harris A Son. Jew? Chambers. 

HampsMra. (Tal (0982) 62355). 


NEAR WINCHESTER. 
EXTON, MEON VALLEY. 

A CHARMING SMALL DETACHED 
THATCHED COTTAGE 

In need ol modernisation. Mata weefcand retreat on a quiet tida 
lane wtth a pretty ga rden. 1/2 bedrooms, bathroom. Bring 
roam, kitchen, jprage. Price gukto E6&000. 

PENYARDS COUNTRY PROPERTIES 
TEL 0962 60300 OR 01-491 7888. 



HERTFORDSHIRE ASHRIDGE PARK 


sol cone and 410 acres VA Trust WoodUnd. Del house in 
nature 1 acre pU irapeccabty montfinoi and nuteitewL Hecept ha*, 
louqe. drag. brealdasL equmed Mciwn. 4/5 bats. 2 baths, cloaks. 
G/h. mpte garage, otters on 060000 

Td 0923 42201 


WBiCHkl IBM. Spacious elegant 
early vtotortan town hse. V cen- 
ra. 4 RecepUons. 4 beds, a 
baUrv. Mtohen. dock, garage, 
garden, fuoo.ooo. 0960 65823 


tow by Cdlen- PVM 3 Woodley 
Garden, mare forces sale of 
besi positioned detaclwd proper- 
ly with gar 09 ? odl arenL 
£74.960. Trt WB 64850 Of- 
Ifce or 0483 273205 Horae. 



i 9 


j •* 

; tf 


j .b 
1 !? 


i r 


i a 




& 


They’re all 
under one roof 
at NatWest 


V 


So if you're looking for a mortgage, 
* bridging loan, insurance cover, a personal 

loan or a budget account, why not step into 
your local NatWest for written details or write to- 
The Home Loans Manager.Naiional Westminster 
Bank PLC Marketing Department, FREEPOST 2. 
London EC2B2ED. 

& NatWest 

The Action Bank 

Sminry «rd insurance is require Loans subject 10 sums 4 i«t conditions. 




V. 














































125 ACRES 


SUSSEX 

Easawome 5 nrtss. 

THE JEVMSTDN PUCE ESTATE 
An fetportam rediftntfal anil equestrian estate 

A n nncoatn o 5 wuroom iTth/iSm wn an UsM toure (wift 4 secondary be tf ooret 
a vktiw itashmarii wnn a eons and Hat over tame* sub»e Week wall vim redevaoomeni potemoL Two 
ujimng mod bams sunaMe for eonwraon. Secondary staMeianJ noth 13 owes. 

Frn bamiMi Mwmg pennant! lor conversion. fO cottages (9 JsUpaddocte.araofe art noodtatipte f mde 
own. 

Avaion ?»o July at 330 pm a The Wne Kan Hofei. Lewes. Sussex (unless prewosiy sou) 

Lewes Office: zoi K*n Street Teh {0273j 4754 U 



the house. The earty tSth-cerrUiry building 
of brick and Mint has four bedrooms, a 
32ft drawing room and two further 
reception rooms: 


i'J 

'* J> i- »T if * 






- «Aj «* 


■ Combe House, at Heathfiekf, East 
Swg». 5 ® pretty country house, bust 
m 1910, with three reception room* 
and four bedrooms, and stamfing in 
about IQ acre*. What makes ft 
different is that it has a two-acre 
vineyard, estaMtehed-about eight 
years ago, which can produce up to six 
Ions of grapes. At present these are 
sold to Lamtoettwrst vineyards. Savitts is 
asking for offers around £200,000. 

Home in a tower 


2 AftEAS 

! , AMENITY WOODLAND 

KTENWNCJ TN ALL TO 4B0UT IS ACMS 

I FOR SAJL^^AWHOIZOR^ 8 LOTS 

(TayloriiTester 


Hampshire, was built in the early 19th 
century by the Admiralty as one of a 
dain of towere to link communications 
and shipping movements between 
London ana Plymouth using Rear-Admiral 
Sir Home Riggs Popham's semaphore 
system. The agents. Lane Fox and 
rartnerjhbeJieve this is the only 
surviving tower house and are seeking 
offers of around £1 50.000 tor this 
most unusual property through their 
Winchester office. 

■ Stocks Mil House at Witterebam, 
late of Sheppey, Kent, is a 16th-century 
fisted building of brick and timber 
frame, with four reception rooms, two of 
town oak-panelled, and four main 
bedrooms. The house stands in sight 
acres ofgrounds, including a bam, 
built in 1725, and a Bated windmill now 
owned by Kant County Could!. Strutt 

& Parker's Canterbwy office is asking 
often around £265,000. 

A king’s house 

■ Clarence House, The Vineyard. 
Richmond. Surrey, — not to be confused 
with Clarence House in The Mall — is a 
fisted building started In about 1695 and 


in the latter part of the 18th century,- 
giving the house its name. The brown- 
Erlek nouse. which stands in about three- 
quarters of an acre on Richmond Hffl, 
has recently been renovatad.it has a \ 
gaUeried and panefled hallway, four 
reception rooms, two bedroom suites and 
five further bedrooms. The 
landscaped gardens include a swimming 
pool Offers of more than £850,000 
are invited by Sturgis's Richmond office 
and Knight Frank SRutfey. 


All manner ofbuildings undergo conver- 
. sion lo provide modem homes in an 
Older shell, and a transformation at 
present in progress is that of a convent 
beautifully situated overlooking 
Rottingdean, East Sussex, between the 
South Downs and the sea and with a 
view of both. 

The convent was built in 191 1, a solid 
: brick building which remained a convent 
until the late 1970s. It was bought by 
Jarvis Brothers and Brewster, a subsid- 
iary of British Land Company in 1984. 
Since then, the company has totally 
refurbished the original buildings, start- 
ing by removing the religious adorn- 
ments to begm the process of 
secularization, to provide 43 apartments, 
and in addition to build 14 new town 
houses in complementary style. 

.The development has an emphasis on 
security, an increasingly popular trend 
nowadays, with electronically controlled 
wrought-iroo gales and a secured perim- 
eter providing an assurance of safety and 
seclusion within. It is the. first time that 
the agents, Chestertoos, have bees 
involved in a development outside 
London, but they are confident of its 
attractions, partly because of its location 
and nearby amenities. - 

Nigel Conradi, the managing director, 
says the ease of access — with Gatwick 
Airport half an hour away, Heathrow 
one hour by the M25, the Newhaven 
ferry close by, and London an hour and a 
half away by car — will appeal to many 
London ana international clients. He 
says; “The logic Of commuting is clear, 
while for a weekend retreat Rottingdean 
Place is ideal. Iri addition, our Far 
Eastern investment clients will appreci- 
ate (he excellent air links and be quick lo 
realize the prime letting potential-” 

The development includes one- 
bedroom, two-bedroom and three-bed- 
room apartments, two penthouses and 


environment, although there are double 
garages for some of the units. Within the 
complex there will be a swimming pool, 
a tennis court, lawns and gardens. 

Apart from its easy communications, 
Rottingdean Place is well placed for 
leisure and culture, with the Brighton 
Marina, die town racecourse and 
Glyndebourne within reach. 

There is strong interest from abroad to 
invest in property in Britain and agents 
expect sales from expatriates, particular- 
ly from Hong Kong where the develop- 
ment has already been shown, and from 
Britons seeking second homes. It is 
dearly a well-located home for the 
weekend, and in addition there is a ready 
market for company lets because several 
international companies are based in the 
area. 

The first units at Rottingdean Place 
are on sale this month from £86,000 for 

Penthouses with views 
over the countryside 

an apartment with two bedrooms, two 
bathrooms and one reception room, to 
£193.500 for a town bouse with four 
bedrooms, two bathrooms and two 
reception rooms. Two penthouses In the 
main body of the old convent are now 
being completed, and will have excellent 
views over the countryside. They are 
likely to go on sale at around £100,000 
for the one-bedroom unit and £120,000 
for the two-bedroom liniL All the 
apartments are provided with car park- 
ing at no extra cost. The bouses are 
freehold, while the flats are sold on 500- 
year leases. Service charges range from 
£1,000 to £2,000 a year. 

Gifford Dann and Partners, of Lewes, 
are joint sole agents with Chesierlons, 
and can manage the letting of property. 


Iflusnued particulars from Seven oaks Office: 

I Onset Street, Sevenoaks. Teh (0732) 456! S4. 


SURREY 

IN THE HEART OF THE EXCLUSIVE 
ST. GEORGES HILL PRIVATE ESTATE, 
POSSIBLY THE FIVE FINEST BUILDING 
PLOTS AVAILABLE FOR SALE. ’ 
Uustrated colour brochures available from: 
Joint Agents; Joye* Leppard. Teh (0B92) 31156 
John D Wood, Berkeley Square Office 


BUCKINGHAMSHIRE 
Near Henley-On-Thames 

Principal house with superb accommodation. 
Integral guest or staff accommodation, integral 
games room, sauna, shower room and cloakroom. 

Superb heated swimming pool. 

Gardens and grounds extendbig to about IS acres. 
Jond Agents: Joyes Leppard. Tel: (0892) 3115G 
John D Wood, Berkeley Square Office 

Joint Agents: Joyes Leppard 
John D Wood, 23 Berkeley Square 
London W1X SAL Tel: 01-629 9050 
v (RehDCM/MPB) ✓ 


three-bedroom and four-bedroonw- which is likely to be needed by many 

houses, : frilly equipped, with, mainly - ; buyers. ' . 

underground panting to preserve the cw 


By order of Rt. Hon The Etui af Lichfield and other vendors 
38 LORDSHIPS OF MANORS 
Manorial tides located in Berkshire. Cumbria, Devon. Essex. 
Gloucestershire. Hampshire. Lincolnshire. Norfolk, 


Staffordshire. Suffolk. Wiltshire and Yorkshire. 
Auction in London 27th Jane 1986. 

Many excellent histories, valuable documents, various 
Manorial Rights including Manorial Lands. Quit Rents and 
, Rights granted by the Crowrr 
Illustrated catalogues, price £4 from Auctioneers 



BAHTS. NR HTERSnUA U*t~ 
ed tarm buildings. “Hi pUAMng 
domain for converakvi wiy#4 
bed. i rec. Mom. Apout 2 
M ret OMmlnVHnL HILI-ARY 
& CO- MndNi Td OtlX>- 
60801 

BOOK. UrwmWe. II r oonw / 
"r acre in bMMW mwm* 
Waterloo X hr MS id* new 
£140.000 HOOK 2534. 

NEW FORCCT nrewicct aeMm 5 
MhnnMaw.fMrww.iN- 
Hi active retirement. £ 102 - 000 . 
Tel 3BEB2 eves. 

SOUTRSCA nr m«I rant S .'D UK 3 
BR maisonette & 0 BB .Fiat with 
4 )n Home plus in come. 
F-hoM £68-300. 0706 

017383. 

BOURNEMOUTH. Del mod toe. 6 
bed*. 3 Oathv. 30(1 WMe. 
Cl 39. BOO m 0202 297171 

STH DORSET Twlxl Dorchester 
A ABfcotstJury. onKwc nal None 
soil) lev toe. panoramic sen** 
o r Lime Bay. 3 db bed. hWi. 
shower rms. rent* wtui bale. 
Ml- diner, beautiful auw set- 
Hng. £02-600- 103061 871639 
MAVLMO ALAND 'Hotly BtotT. 
one Brte home of w.T-Sfrad - 2 
Rec. KtRhrn Sun Lounge, w C 
3 M> Bamroom Gas DL 
Large Parra. S ecW W Ondm. 
£89.760. TM 0706 46372S. 

NR ANDOVDL fipndoux pretty 
collage ui "■ acre 0 *rdftn. 3 
bed*. 2 bam. a r*o- uten. dm. 
dble garage, guide £ 120-000 
Dirweana Newbury UNKSSj 
46000 

BETWE E N BOURtOMUTH A 

Porte End towfllmac / ihm- 
souefte. 2 beds, bun 3 VT». 
OCH. dM glazed, garage. 
£75.000. TM. Q302 762626 
RVDC, K>W Conservation area 
TWO Mipenor oAOmMg BnB6- 
Ing Dirts wtm P P Chart 
protect rd wooM semnp new 
to sea. Trt 01 992 3959 
Sum ii— ii M h Executor flat- foil 
roM*ni». garage. 108 yrs Lease. 
Modem Biorfc um kwngr. 
ulooo Tet iaaoe> 2771 a 
DORSET COAST 4 yr eW cilNet 
Inge dug Room 5 Bedrm. K«. 2 
D»e Beds 2 BJhrms GFCH Oge 
D.O £82.750 D42S2 SOOS 
DORSET /SOMERSET BOARDS* 
DM 3 bed Couniry Mar m i 
acre, often on CT9.000 Tel 
Evental 093685 660. 


HEREFORDSHIRE. 
WORCS, & SHROP 


WLLAOC SCTTHK OVERLOOK- 

MC THE WYE. 4 IBB 

MBO ■ 440. S Hereford. Oiarae- 
bt stone ofacwo Housf- 3 
Receouon. Bun lounge Bias! 
K«I 4 Beds SlUOfflM-CN Lge 
Ope acre. £96.000 COLES- 
KNAPP * KENNEDY 1 . Romdn- 
Ws-c 090963563 
SHEMLCY VRXACE Detaerhrd 2 
bedroom bungaKn*. gas central 
heating, small garden, painig 

7un.cKHeAl.M2S £65.950 
0927a 43e9 

■N0IV1DUAL Count rv bungalow 
Sfiit-M tbury 5 mb- 4 Garages^ 
anus. 3 brdrooim. J>_aci» 
£65.000 region 0743 733c>3. 
LEOMMEIElt Modermsed geflpd 
larmhoute. 4 Beds. 2 Bain. Ex 
lemiLF Bams. IB Arres. 
£96 500 TM 056 886 542. 




CHARACTER PROPERTIES WITH LAND 

SHROPSHIM/POWY5 BOBXfERS 
A baMwal UbOuOU fl Dadbummid 1 tuauB r turns Horn uadaaa ta My aaaay 
pBiDpabiMn«gll«>-- 

■ ■ . ffletaun 

SHKOTSamyHESEFOKDSHlBE BORDERS 
TTB noM iRuBastf pnggR aUdi eoowiNa N < aoaRB tnRr fnpN. rvga R 
uwu os non M dabto wl 78 m of gun M. 

HK£ osjm OAft - 

SHBOPSHIRE/POWYS BORDERS 
TW dvsmta aqaalmi Wdag. um eenmt of a MicBd mm casue vd Ml 
kuc. tarfRH and nMOn tnwy tWRas W*bi "HU 9 h aew of pan (WL 
AUCTION SALE 

fdr ronrn wto rmati ow tmthow . 

SUCARINEYS KNIGHTON (K(7) SZNZ1 



Lane Fox & Partners 

with Ry la rids 


FARMS A 

smallholdings 


BRECON NAT PARK- Total TOO 
acres- 2" hr* London. Mod 
15324 DM to* Summery MW . 

agrmmi a tall Q Wer> 
£160.000 0639 730828 ’S99 




BCAonnx. mwatiHt iw 
deuaied 8 bea 2 bam nousc hto 
wonderful ™wi all round. ® 
on lugh ground abote 'T*"? 

witn 5- 4 acoe garden mat bMto 

an lo mem acres of JowHy 
NIMIIM area. RP7STON SOL 
lO imns gius GJ imto hlNCp 
X 20(1 x son bvmg rmavun 
KILbhUI tuning area, (nirffal 
dbl ope cum tmjto nn- 

£l«WJOO TeL 01-402 6757 OC 

01-468 loOl 



HAMPSHIRE - 403 ACRES 

Alton 2 mites. Oflnm 8 miss. Baringstote 10 mbs, 
London 48 odes - 
AN EXCEPTIONAL COUNTRY ESTATE 
- Standing to a totaBy unspoit rural postftw. exirenttoy wU 
mamtamd and toduding a Rne Georgian Family House 
4 Reception Rooms, 6/7 Bedrooms, 3 Bathrooms. 7 Attractive 
Cottages. Excellent Outbuidngs. Extensive Faro; buttings. 
Vtoune anti productive Arable Land 
FOR SALE BY PRIVATE TREATY AS A WHOLE OR IN 6 LOTS 
Mat- Agents: Weller Eggar Fane Jtgeecy, 
Farnhaa Tel: 0252 71S2iraid LaecFexawl 
Partners with Rylaads 
Leaden Office: 01-499 4785 


HAMPSHIRE - 129 ACRES 

Alton 1 mile. Basingstoke 11 miles, Famftam 10 mites, 
London 48 mites 

AN OUTSTANDING RESIDENTIAL AND EQUESTRIAN ESTATE 

Exceptional Listed WSam & Maiy House 

Standmgin a superb nnl position overlooking hs own grounds 

3/4 Reckon Rooms, 4 main Bedrooms. 3 Bathrooms, further 
Secondary Accommodation. 

3 good Cottages 

Stud Yant with 20 Boxbs. Excellent FamrtxiMinfls and Tradi- 
tiorati Bam 41 acres rated Paddocks 
ABOUT 129 ACRES 

Loedee Office: 01-499 4785 


OXFORBSHBE - Oxford 14 miles. 

Leaden 63 miles 

AN UIPRESStVE FORMER RECTORY IN IMMACULATE OROER 
on edge of small village. 

4 Reception Rooms, 5 Main Bedrooms, 3 Bathrooms. 4 Sec- 
ondary Bedrooms/Separate Flat 
2 Bed Cottage, Tennis Court Swimming Pool. Timbered Gar- 
dens & Grounds. About 2vt Acres (4* Acre Paddock also 


KEHT - 480 ACRES 
RB TEHTERDEM 

AN EXCEPTIONAL RESIDENTIAL AND AGRICULTURAL ESTATE 
Superb Period Country House and Grounds 
hi an outstanding rural positron 

3/4 Recaption Rooms, 5/6 Bedrooms. 4 Bathrooms. Guest 

Annexe. Staff FteL 

5 Good Cottages 

Excellent Farmbtiltings 

FOR SALE AS A WHOLE OR fN 5 LOTS 

Jebrt Agents: Asbendens Tet 0622 54162 

and Lane Fex & Partners wrifth Hylands 

London Office: 01-499 4785 


HAMPSHIRE — Winchester 4 miles 

Basingstoke - 12 miles 
M3 {Exit 7} - 8 mil os 

& ATTRACTIVE PERIOD FARMHOUSE REQUIRING 
MODERNISATION WITH SOUTHERLY VIEWS OVER FARMLAND 
2 reception rooms, kitchen, utitty room. 4 bedrooms, batiroom. 
garden, paddock. 

TRADITIONAL FARMBUtLDKUGS WITH PLANNING CONSENT 
FOR RESIDENTIAL USE 
About 2.(1 acres in aH 

For safe by auction as a whole or in 3 lots (unless previously 
sold) 



RAMSGATE. Imuucutut Ooor- 
«aa ( BHdDW y TflWAfM! 4 
Uprer Houaf . 2 reffUrta. 4 .6 

0843 680376- Office aui oiiy- 
0803 594901 


NORTH WEST 


Bantory Office: 0295 710592 




LecWadB 1 mfie, Faringdon 7 miles. Grencaster 12 miles 

A. FASCINATING PART 17th CENTURY MILL HOUSE 

Beautifully situated on the River Leach 

Reception Had over the Ml Race 

4/5 Reception Rooms, Games Roans, 8 Bedrooms. 

4 Bathrooms 

Staff Cottage. Lovely Grounds with Maze. Tennis Court. 
■Paddock 

H mile of double bank Fishing 
ABOUT 6* ACRES 

Cirencester Office tek 0285 3101 


City Centra 3 miles, London 55 miles 

AN EXCEPTIONALLY APPOINTED FAMILY HOUSE 
to unspott rural surroundings 

3 Reception Rooms. 7 Bedrooms. 4 Bathrooms. Excellent In- 
door Swtmmmg Pool. 

Tennis Court Garaging tor 4. Outbuildings. Stabling. Gardens. 
2 Paddocks. 

ABOUT 7 ACRES IN ALL 

Banbury Office: 0295 710592 


6LQUCESTERSMRE - HR VMCHCOIffiE 

Cheltenham 7 miles. Broadway 8 miles 
DELIGHTFUL LISTED GEORGIAN FAMILY HOUSE 

4 Reception Rooms. 5 Bedrooms, 3 Bathrooms ( 1 en suite) 
W central heating 

Coach House wfth garage. Garden. Paddocks 
ABOUT 3 ACRES 

Cirencester Office: 0285 3101 



E 


mm umniMiY-bwce 

4Nnrtnt rrtf bn ru urMiUfi 
Coomb a mm s nmv bam- 
v.c- boi na. MKauubrMikMM 

tWdca onto 

on pwin r- | root, to Vjctoru 
IW do £71.000 CjrMBJOtW 




lafAL D6UMTRT IW man « 

MilM Ifrtti 8w om Owpin 

2 bed Jacobean CoUase. fully 
modrrnbtit. ton- Houno riw 
gr##n in onabbtlwJ ChUtnn Vp- 
uw orw* eioaoqo. pmim 
TurMUe Hrath 763 for dtUUlfr 
and aMOtounmi is vtcw 


THAME Tbw QuaMhan comae 
(3 up /2 sown). 4 mb from 
M40. Nr town centre Mtonncai 
nMwdiDni win GUzoSrlh lot. 
2 DMe bednto. toanqr/Dlner. 
Mete Patio Gdn Parknvj for 2 
cam. Prh drbe. Beauitfuiiy re- 
storM DiHHMIyjiiUiNrlDr, 
rouse- or lor a men n lerre. 
£67300 Tel: office nr- I0296J 
31533. name (064d?l) 3617 


A oeTATCHCD GMARACTOt 
House sanding to 7 itcrn. of 
PbsIutv 6 Wooded land on uv 
NC. Ed9e of ow Cdtswokb. Good 
sm mmnManni wim 
many inhmmtmg Imurm m- 
cHidmg. «wral tulKMe. 
m union styled windows A fea- 
ture fireplace Adiaceni to 
recently nltnON Coir Oourw 
£125.000. fluchttr & Bollard. 
Cnumma Norton (0608) 3131 


WILTSHIRE DOWNS 

Between Swindon 5 mbs and Devues 14 mbs. M4 
7 mieS- 

An Bxcaptionatiy wen appointed 18tii cen 
tury house to a pteturesqm bamlet with fine 
views over the Marttiormigti Downs 

Hall. ckBfcroom. drawing room, dmmg room, sntmg 
mam. uWny room, rachen. 4 oeoioans. 5 
tuunoms. 

On ch ontmo. statAng. outttdngs. deSgmrul 
waded paroens loaddock avariue) 

TO BE LET FULLY R1RMSHSS 
For one to three years oa terms to tie agreed 
Cheltenham Ottfca; 6 imnenai Snare 
Tor (0243) 45444 


(Per UA206) 



KENT - NR. CANTERBURY 

Camertwry 4 mSes. (Vcura 83 (mutes) A2/M2 l 
m*e. 

An attractive Grade I! listed mainly 18tfa 
century boose to an unspoilt rural area 

Large douNe (ececuon mom, ttowg mom. 5 bed- 
moms. 3 bathrooms. Oil central heawfl. Detaeiiec 
garage, findens aid grounds. 

About 1H acres 
Re^oa 

Cantertnry Office: 2 a Margaret's strea 

Tet (0227/ 451123 

)Rel.asC2636) 


KENT - WfTTERSHAM 

flyB 4 mites. Tauerden 6 mJes 

Soparb IGA century house on the edge of a 

small (yjiOT fei 

4 receouon rooms, garden room. 6 bedrooms. 2 
batmooms. o4 central heatng. Hard tens sun. 
garaynq. Gardens and paddocks. 

About Wt acres 
Regfim E265.B01I 

Caatertmry Office; 2 Sr Mamarea street 
Td; »S7) 451123 

(RH88C26T6) 


Norancti 25 m4ts. Hall 5 mdes. 

MELTON CONSTABLE HALL 
.A wry lire and axtersive Grade I feted House to- 
netHf wdi large staolr Counyard and 4 cottages. 
Fonred nutans, tala, vnxtoiano and fields Covenant 
over adionng deer park. 

About 36 acres 

Suable lor a nuntwr d uses compaCOfe wun reten- 
tion ol listed buddings and conservation of (bar 
nutslntoig settings. 

For sate by tenter 
Norwich office: 4 upper Kum street 
Tel (0603} 617431 

(Ret 9802080) 


KENT - CHARING 

AsMord 6 Dries. Madstone 11 miles M 20 2 mles 
A line Weafden timber framed hall house 
situated in a lovely rent position. 

2 large reception rooms. 7 bedrooms, bathroom, 
shoot t mom. Garage, loose Maes. OtfMbngs. 
Gardens and paddocks 
About 7 acres 
Region £175400 

Caatertmry Office: 2 st Msuwi s street 
Tel: (02277 451 123 

(Rel.8BC2626) 



CUMBRIA 

Penrtfi 12 ntfes M6 Motorway 11 rales 
A bsanftflly sitsated csouby house test 
above the snore ol Lake Ullswater lad ea- 
joyfefl superb laNetend views 

Entrance nail, 3 reception rooms, 5 bedrooms. M 
camral heating, cellar, detached cottage, garegmg tor 
3 cars. Landscaped garden and grounds. 

About 3tt acres 

Harrogate Office: 13 Pmces Square 
Tel.. (0423) 61274 

(flef 1068695) 


KENT - LYMPNE 

SBbon 3 rales. Ashton) 8 rates. 

A secluded cotthy house la a steoaug es- 
carpment setting with panoramic views over 
Romney Marsh and the Channel. 

4 recaption moms. 5 bedrooms. 2 bathrooms. Qd 
central heating, Detached cottage, hard urns court & 
same. Beautiful gardens, wooded grounds amt 
paddocks. 

About 14 aaas 
Region 82711,1180 

Canterbury Office: 2 a Margarei s Street 
Tet (0227) 45M23 

(BetBBjggg) 

KENT - WAREHORNE 

Station in rales. Ashford 7 rales. 

A saperfa Regency house with secluded 
y oure or tin edge of a snail tillage. 

3 recefxen rooms, study. 4 bedrooms. 2 bathrooms, 
od central twang Coach house. outtuMmgs. Gar- 
dens and pasture land. 

Abut 30 acres 

Canterbury Offices st Margaret's Street 
Tel: (0273) 151)23 

(Ref SBA2619) 


SAVILLS 


OXFORDSHIRE— Thame 

FVnwcs Rutvrnuj^i 9 irnfcs, .\HC5 '?tiiAs. 

Central LonJun 4S mis. 

Charming mill bouse, with complere mill 
workings, with spacious and well decorated 
accommodation situated in peaceful rural 
surroundings. 

Hall, sit ring rv«n. dining room, 
drainng room. 5 kdroom», 

2 hub rooms. «tudi- area, 
attic accommodation. ' 

Office, music room. 

StaHes. Garage. 

Gardens wnh mdoot saimmmgpool. 
ftddocL Trout tanL 

About 9 Acres. 

SAVTLLS, London. 


BUCKINGHAMSHIRE 

ChalfontScGfies- 

Sr Gilo I vdt. NWCVM?5 .Accss 6‘ ; miU 
CnerolLondon 25 miLa, Wirjiiiw5l mmuies 

An imposing family boose with spacious 
accom m odati on . weO positioned in the 
presngicMis Nighdntefcs Lane and dose to 
Central London. ( 

Hall. hud'J'ast room, drawing n»m. dmmg 
room, silting room, 6 bedrooms, dreeing 
room, 3 bamroenu. 

Stables, rack room. 

DouHegara*^. 

Mature i^rdem and paddock 

Abour 2'/i Acres. 


SAVTLLS, London. 


CAMBRIDGESHIRE 

Great Shelford About 15 ACRES 

Camfrafer 5 imfcs, M II AViV 3 mile, 

AiUL-x End 9 mta (LnwpoU Strux Suunn. 

Lorutin pppimmuidy bC mn bam 

Snperiorcountrv bmue in an drifted 
position with man-eUirus iiew^ on-edooldng 
surrounding countryside and occupying one 
of the finest locations dose to Cambridge. 

7 bedrooms. 5 buthroenw. drawing r.x«m r 
dining room, sitr/ng rc<om. kirchea-lnealdast 
n-om. famib room. snxJc 
Additional second floor accommodation. 

' Corr.ige. Paddorics. Swimming pool. 

Mature gardensand grounds. ■ 

SAVILLS. St. Mm^ House. 

47 High Street. Trump mEton, 
Cambrid^CBZ 2HZ. Tel: 10223) S44371. 


SOUTH OXFORDSHIRE 

Thmc 4‘-: mix MA?i rads. Hudmu27 mile. 
CrnrrJ Lrtvi ^ 42 rats. 

Classic Queen Anne bouse in immaculate 
decorative condition standing in a secluded 
rural setting within ea>y reach of Central 
London. 

Hall, stud* drawing room, gillerv. dining - 
room, mtmg rown. kHtheniVTtatea.>£ rocm, 
b bedroonto. 4 bathrooms, dre»mg rvom.’ 
Barn 1 -jjujNc (tr-ccmverMon subject to 
planning permission). 

Garage. 

Gardens, liani rennisojurt, paddock. 

About 5 Acres. 

SAVTLLS. 21 Horse Fan Banbun; 
Oxfordshire OX 16 OAW. Tel; 0295 3535 . 

SWILLS, Urndon. 


20GtosvenOTHill, Berkeley Square, London WlX OHQ 

01-4998644 



GLUTTONS 



NEAR SALISBURY. WILTSHIRE 

.Salisbury 5 miles, Wilton l'A miles, London 87 miles. 

Charming and imaginatively converted Mill idylUcally situated in a village on Tbe River 
N adder. Entrance Hall 26' Drawing Room. Dining Room. Kitrhen/BreaJdast Room. 5 
Bedrooms. Dressing Room. 3 Bathrooms. Oil CH. Garaging for 3 Cara. Workshop & 
Summerhouse. Lovely Gardens and Grounds overlooking tbe Mill PooL About I fe Acres. 
Leasehold Interest Tor Sale. Offers Invited. 

Bath Office Tet (0225) 69511 


LITTON. NEAR WELLS, SOMERSET 
Bath and Bristol 14 miles. Wells 1 miles. 

Rne residence built mainly in the I8ih Century set impressively within a mature walled 
Garden, in quiet position. Entrance Hall. 4 Reception Rooms. Kitchen. Utility Room. 
Cloakroom. Boiler Room. Cellars. 7 Bedrooms. Sewing Room. 2 Bathrooms, sep WC. 
Garaging. Stabling. Workshop and Stores. Gardens and Grounds of Approx % Acre. For 
Sale By Tender on 16th July, 19S6. 

Wells Office Td: (0749) 78012 


HAYWARDS HEATH, MID SUSSEX 
London (Victoria & London Bridge) 45 mins 
A spacious and well equipped family House with landscaped Gardens in select Residen- 
tial ana dose to excellent commuter travel facilities. HalL 2 Cloakrooms, 3 Reception 
Rooms, old pine fitted Kitchen, Breakfast Room. Utility Room. 7 Bedrooms. 3 Bath- 
rooms. Nursery. Wine Cellar/Games Room. Gas CH. Double Garage &. Workshop. All 
weather Tennis Court. Colourful protective Gardens. About I Acre. Sole Agents. 

Mayfair Office Teh 01-499 4155 


127 Mown Sum. Mayfair. London WIY 5HA. Telephone OMW 4155 ‘ I 

Also at London-Westminstcr. Kenanaioo. Chelsea. Arundel. Baih. Canterbury. Edinburgh. Harrogate. I 
Oxford. Well*. Bahrain. Dalai. Kuwait- Sharjah I 


BECKLEV 

Femur Coatiing m om i74Q 
Stone no# prate n tons! totftrv >es- 
uKoce Also lam mb cmetsan 
por graaL P acp etponi b tenen. mreno 
fill sumo ttSMiQ nn. study □ 
s c cW Maswr bedfiYi an 
sum oarirm. 5 aatemat DMrms S 2 
bartirms. Sottes. outaklBS. *n*a 
Queta Am sunmertuuse m omds 
rt 1 sere, -r 4 acre pattuefc. Access 
ID M40. 50 rrms cwtrU Looooa 40] 
rms HeaOnon 7 mtos Cay ot Ox- 
tad Otters a> the regm of 020000 
■Med 

VERNON ft SONS 

ZM Baakury M. SonmrtMn, 
OdonL B885 516161 




THAMES 

ISLAND 

Hr (Mwlt toh CHALET, a^om- 
no IB acre told + mad acess 
EXTENSIVE MOORINGS & 
FISHING 

AUCTION 16THJUNEBY 
HfCHAaSI»B«ffl.FJUtS 
42 St Ettas. Oxford 
Td (6665] G1392S 




CHAOUM6TON Nr Burtord. DM 
modem bungalow Pwttuiui. 
■age location Ideal for 
rewemrrU 2 teems. Z beds. Wl. 
utility, ealhrm Exlemeon posa 
CH. I me Mns. «ge £62 500. 
AH nun Esiaip Awnb. Chipping 
Norton 0608 3087 
HENLEY e mins MaUc town Del a 
bed-5 rec . 2 bailie 1 st old 
nouse. Dele go* Immac condi 
non Vac Pom 50 June £]55K 
NHBC. Henley 571897. 


SOMERSET & AVON 


MEAN TMINTOH 16th Cenlurv 
larmhoiac. 3 receouon. G beds,. I 
S baths, cloakroom- CH. * 9 *. 
•eon ale barn. deiaHed plannino 
consent onnonaL oarawna 
«X»e Box. In a 1 '- sews 
£167.000 Ten 0*381 2601 95 


MTM Auradlic mature tee on 
preUMuous UMdown 3 4 
tjeds. MautiiuJ wounds 1 acre, 
oners around £130000 TM 
EMIh CU2S 51051 6 icscning* 1 


BRISTOL— SMEYD PARK. Ad 

irtrthtt Downs- Immaruiaie 3 

bed BiiiKMiou uiin double <u 

raw and walled •uroen 
Ouooito TrtcVs. OflTS 751 


BATH CENTRE f - mttei 2 bed 
wound 1 tow nat. oas 439 . pars 
toft- qarden. mtnvK decor 
OJ7.9SO tci oaasessMs. 


ilSMBa THE aCAUPORTS. 

Vacant S storey IrUed Georwan 
Town House Carefully reno- 
rated over last 6 yr-- Many 
onouul tejiurrs tnraci 5 
bedrrt&. 3 receouon rms. superb 
■ drawing net aita" ' IbV 
How Itghi & airy basement Gas 
CH bunny Waited Carden An 
excellent family home For lur 
1 her detain Tel Bain 66103 
Andrews Esl alc Agents 
Bristol corrnc. Waierfirmi 
flab, trom £59.990 CUV Cen 
lie Balcony, 3 beds. Cat C H 
Call I rene Marlin op iaZ72i 
277383 Thursday 10 Monday 
IO 50 am 10 6 30 pm. or Jean 
Ofcen on iQgT3t <35001. 

SCOTLAND 


(ELE or Bum 3. The Conans. 
Port Banna line - modernised 
rouniry house twin 1933 m 
Panoramic rural situation 
'anile from Mam Road, regular 
car lerrj- from Rothesay lo 
Mainland close 10 Motorway 
Mtwon. l_»er ■ a rooms. 
Batnrnom Ground ■ kitchen. 2 
rooms, bathroom acre 

approv Crw area Tetepbone 
Mai belli & MarlMan Rothesjv 
107001 51 S7 

A PLACE M THE e<HJNJTTY? In 
iislina holiday Chalet, siiuai-d 
in small meumse stir in oeauii. 
tut Countryside Wilhut easy 
reach ail Scontm ciues. and 
mans' fanlihe* nearby Write or 
leteflhqne Andrew Sneddon. 
Sian ma tone. Bdfeedir. hm 
loss. K> 13 7HC I0S9384I St 7 


CootimrerJ qq x&i pa ae 


nster 
ng its 
;risey) 
ler of 
1 .Wens 
i Press, 
ipleted 

LAPV 



mother 
iPV ai 

r a total 
ares, or 
: voles. 
955p. 


:i office 
tent car- 
11 is es- 
mpleted 
million. 

:r re- 

sJVEST- 
Second 
.73p for 
I. 1986, 
Ip. This 
li rectors' 
erim re- 
5p and a 
icriod 10 

CORPi 

i, 1986. 
n (£6.58 
£333.052 
per share 
p). The 
company 
e second 
• auction 
g and it 
crop and 
iciion. 
OENIX 
lf-year to 
urnover 
Loss be- 

[ 36.17p 


■op into 


W 8256 


rmation 


»licatior\ 
>m tried 
± our 


(£499 ex 
:orage. 
ger 11 

>r it 

r Prestel. 
(worth 



....£99.00 


ms far 
....£49.95 


team and nia\ 































34 



WEDNESDAY 




PROPERTY BUYERS’ GUIDE 


VERSEAS PROPERTY 



1 * Montpelier Street, London SW7 1110 
Tel: 0 ! -589 5400 Bath; 0225-539055 
Manchester: 061-S59 338G 


PORTUGAL - Algarve 

Old Village* VUamoara 

A beautiful village in classical style. 

• 2 x 18 bole golf comses, 1,000 
berth marina, tennis, and riding. 

• Casino, cinema, nightclubs, and 
those femous Algarve beaches. 

• Fun management, rental, and 
maid service. 

• Village gard en apartments 
£24.000. terrace apa rt m ents 
£47,000. penthouse maisonettes 


I SOUTH OF FRANCE L 

Mont d'Azur, Route de Biot 
Unrivalled panoramic views to the coast 
and mountains. A luxurious private estate 
of spacious and beautifully designed 
country houses. 20 mins, to nice and 
Cannes; 5 mins, to Biot and Valbonne. 

• Golf, riding, and marina« nearby. 

• 4/5 bedrooms, 2/3 reception 
rooms, enclosed courtyard, large 
garden, swimming pool, and maid 
service. 2.190.000 FF. 




lift: 


rOTtUi^Ji: ; 3'-‘ 

Spa.-:: Si .O,>508 


EXHIBITION 

Montpelier International pic invites you to: 
LOMPOW BOUBWEMOOTBI ISLE OF MAW 
The Hyde Park Hotel Kmghtstaldge, London 
on TbuiSw 12th June ft Wed. 25th June or 
Vinters HoteL Douglas. Isle of Han, 11th June 
HighclMf Hotel Bnn wiHiKnifli. 11 th June 
All times 10 JO am - 8.00 pm. 

Buy directly, with confidence, 
from the British developer - 
Montpelier International 
who exclusively provide continuing 
management services, at these developments 
for atf owners. 

|^lonl^eliei^Ju^Verbier^wtoCTtendJ| 
Enquire for a unique opportunity - 


SOUTH OF FRANCE 

Croix Valmer - Soper Valmer 
Provencal villas set in die tranquillity of 
a wooded green zone with stunning 
views to the lies d71y£res. 

• The best beaches of the South of 
Ftance nrimxtes away. 

• Golf, tennis, and marina nearby. 

• 3 bedroom, houses; large 40m 
terraces, maid service. 990.000 FF. 



SOUTH OF SPAIN - flimeria 


Port Village, AJmerimar 
The resort of AJmerimar Is on the 
unspoilt South Eas ter n coast of Spain 
and enjoys Its mildest winters. , 

• Once, only opportunity to panebase 
freehold penthouse 
wa te rfr o n t property . 

noth large roof V . 

terraces mid V A 

panoramic views - __ 

£35M»0. . ;< V 

• A mature ebampfotf 

ship gotf course, " -Z »■ 

1XMX> both imThn " jjaT" * 
mfles of beaches, “ .. 

and riding. 




The finest climate in the world — TENERIFE SOUTH 

Fairways Villas — Four Owners £15,950 • Detached Fairway Villas £49,000 
Beachside Apartments From Only £23,000 

Complemented with sun, sea, scenery; a low con ofttving, limhrri taxes ever yth ing that one ever dreams of — except golf. Tb complete this dream, 
ore can novr offer not one bat two long-awaited 18-hole golicoiusesdesigned by Donald Steel ofCocmn PenninkSteel & Partners, London, who created 


THE ROYAL HEIGHTS 


Complemented with sun, sea, scenery; a low cost ofttving, limnrd taxes ever yth ing that one ever dreams of — except golf. Tb complete this dream, 
weean now oiler not one bat two tongroraiied 18-hole golicoiusesdesigned by Donald Steel ofCocmn FenniiikSteei & Partners, London, who created 
this coarse in Singapore. You can aiso relax at the 19th, play tennis, go swimming, borsc riding or just admire the fabulous views. The Amarilla Golf 
and Country Club (not to be confused with San Miguel Golf Course), an Anpjo-Canamn project, will be the largest and most sophisticated 
development in the Canaiy Islands and will offer a large selection of apar t m ents and villas 10 soil all tastes. 

Full management and letting income. Inspection flights every weekend. Please telephone for a brochure 





BIRMINGHAM OFFICE LONDON OFFICE 

021-643 7025 (24 hrs) 01-938 2516/7/8/9 (24 hrs) 


ST. MARTIN'S HOUSE, BULL RING, BIRMINGHAM B5 SDT . 


€L PUERTO D€ 

SolbGR4ND€ 


Spain’s Uttle Venice. 15 miles from Gib 

S oiogrande was one of the first major developments 
on the Costa del Sol and remains today one of the 
finest offering practically even’ amenity under the 


S otogrande was one of the first major developments 
on the Costa del Sol and remains today one of the 
finest offering practically even’ amenity under the 
sun. A wide range of apartments and villas, with 
championship golf courses, tennis courts, horse riding 
and sailing, and even polo and skeet-shooting. all set in 
over 1000 acres of glorious unspoiled countryside. 

And now a marina toe*, currently under construction 
at the exclusive new El Puerto de Sotogiande. When 
completed in Juh 1987. it will make Sotogrande the most 
complete resort in Europe. 


A strictly limited 
development of just 250 
two and three bedroom 
apartments of the 
very highest quality 
overlooking a 
superbly designed 
yacht marina. 




A unique development, 
conceived and constructed by one 
pf Spain's longest-established and 
most respected developers, with 
Venetian style architecture and a 
quality finish 10 the apartments that 
will be unrivalled anywhere in 
Spain. Light, air-conditioned rooms, 
many leading out to a seduded 
terrace; all marble, en-suite 
bathrooms; and superb kitchens 
complete with fridge- freezer, 
washing machine, dish washer and 
high level cooker 


are surrounded by 


walkways with all 


the shops and 
restaurants one could wish lot And 
just yards away an? seemingly 
endless stretches of sandy 
uncrowded beaches with glorious 
views 15 miles along the coast to 
Gibraltar. where rhe recently re- 
opened airport cuts down journey 
time from London by hours. 

The amenities in (he spacious 
marina are equally comprehensive 
— so much so that 40".. of the 500 
or so moorings have already been 
purchased at prices ranging from 
£6000 to S 180.000. 


No building trill exceed 3*2 
storeys in height — ami no mote 
will be built once die 250 
apartments are completed, 
guaranteeing each apartment a 
splendid sea view The wide open 
piazzas so reminiscent of Vfeniee 


The apartments too are in 
demand, and no less than half of 
those so far completed have already 
been purchased. The prices, 
which range from S55.GU0 to 
5 1 10.000. represent outstanding 
value for money — a value which 


SCOTLAND 


has already increased by IT"., since 
the first brick was laid and is 
forecast to increase substantially 
more by completion. 

The future inland 
development of a second stage 
marina will in no wav’ disturb the 
seclusion or exclusivity of the first, 
and can only serve to further 
increase properly and mooring 
values. 

As befitting the reputation of 
the developers only the most 
experienced and trusted U.K. 
agents have been appointed to 
assist iheir London office. For full 
details send the completed coupon 
direct to the London office of 
El Puerto de Sotogrande &A,- 
27 HOI Street. London W1X 8ASL 
(Tfel. 01.493 1333), or telephone 
any one of the appointed agents: 
Chesterton*, leL 01.937 7244 
Flncasol, TfeL 072226444 
Euro Property Advisors, 

TfeL 9722^30847 

Cand i da Nicholson OJLP. Ltd. 

leL 0240293152 

Pteue neni im.-lulldi'trtbul El Puerto dr S«.* *randr jj 

lam particularly interested in ■ i 

Apartments. S55.000-S80.000 □ I 

Apartments. £85,0004110,000 □ I 

Moorings in tbe marina □ » 


£ 

I €LPU6RTOD6 BPrerradeSoMy i g B . 

WHast-Loodoo 




I^rTTriiln 


A UNIQUE 
TO P8CHASE A SUBSTANTIAL 
BEACH FRONT VILLA IN GREECE 

This splendid property, located outside Patras, 
150 miles from Athens, In it's own 10,000 sqjn. 
mature, landscaped garden, is offered telly fur- 
nished, rocftxfing works of art 
Six bedrooms, five bathrooms, four receptions, 
spacious balconies, separate staff quarters, 
tennis court, swimming poof and private beach. 
Extensive garage and store room s . 

Offers in the region of £600,000 to 

Brabbock International Ltd, 
51, Kensington Place, London W.8. 
01-221-5902. 


MARBELLA 


MARBELLA 

nnwes K US GQUMDffiMM. 

Srcwtonl M floor oxlret wtti nroflofl vomiM woks of 99 
maatws. cn mptgwg 2 d&ta bets. 2 tafenns. spona Huge Mb 
tMng an tearing to tage (enact. Mb feat Indian m flak oak HA, 
bywe n t mawa ad l a riagnl car curing. VL dose to batti 

Farty WM Mb rare atone actoring Mfps 2 G“ sMlMfll 
teteptee. dtskozster. AEG m Oat rim. eomuntte dbto bed settao. 
ateonc BBQ Mir. tenant bm bed km avdmy. otoery. WM 
— M taaraw decor Bragina. 

Oflos to excess of .£100.000. Met be wml 
Teli p biei May MM dtttag etBca bears «c 

TEL 01-407 6191 


ST0PHAM, 

PULBOROUGH 

Sapobty modernised 16 C 
boose in walled garden. Prin- 
cipal Suite. 4 fairber bedims. 
2nd battann & ensure 
sfawrm. Sitting no. Dining 
rm. Stody/femlly im. Ragged 
h»flc Q o ata w Su- 
perbly fid kuebm/bfast nn. 
Cellar. Gas Bred central heat- 
ing. DMe garage. Offers in tbe 
Region of £265.000. 

Cubit & West, 
Petworth Office 




CMntoOURNC. Luxury 2nd Or 


1SoK)GR4ND6 


OL0L«93 1333) 


aXSHOTT. Suneft) SouOi views 
to eornffl w wtoo roantton. 
77R touneo. Dtalny/san room. 
3 beds. (MU and atiower mom. 
Balcony. Large MrnM. Garage 
and parking- £166.000- Owner 
Oxanon 3082. 


WALES 


SURREY 


Mt BMMARTMM Swansea 22 

mis. country hou se. Views. 16 
acres, arboretum, garden, sto- 
res. pool. 6 beds.mtha. 2 flats. 
CH. £200000 TekiQ5G64) 610 


ABERLADY MANSE 
For sale stone mat detached house of character in 
wounds of some 1.35 acres tn attractive East Lothian 
village 17 mile* rrom Edinburgh. Contains 3 pubUc 
rooms. 6 bedmts. idtchen. pantry, tnthrm and extensive 
basement accommodation. Planning p e ril H a ste n for ad- 
ditional house on part of grounds which can be 
purchased separately. Rateable value £17S& Viewing 
dally 2pm to 4.30pm and 7pm to 9pra from 5th to 18th 
June or by arr a ngement • telephone Atwrtady 439. 
Further particulars from The Secretary. The Ouum of 
Scotland General Trustees. 121 George Street. Edtn- 
4YR 1031 226 6722 EM 2661 lo whom 
offers should be sent to be received by 12 noon on 3rd 
July. 


FODDEB TY LOOS E, 
STRATHPB+St 

Extawve tagfttend lodge with 2 
seif catsing flats and Z holiday 
cottages, it hour drm front 
tnreniess. 

O te l k fcflm 

fMaysan Hughes. 
Anlgay. Sotetlnd 
(08632) 553. 


CROFT for sale. Hanmur 
Croft- Nairnshire. Traditional a 
room cron ^ tune construe- 
bon offered wild me adjoining 
jaMock or 7 18 acres. Id aiuet 
tonuan wnMn easy commuling 
OKUnce of tatemess ft Natrn: 

aho convenient for Inverness 
Airport wtu, regular fkgntj to 
S g. Selling Agents: 

Hu gnes. 40 Church 
5v.*R gag A TVt I DR. Tel: 
«««» 224343. TdCte 7044b 


MOMV ut FOftHES Modernised 
counuy house, to* ay setting. 5 
r kvss. « oeds. a dronng nrn. 2 
bat ns. mod ktt etc. Apprac 3 
acres plus leased paddocks. 
Chalmers & Co 0900 73161. 


MOKAYSHnre UMrietnoutli . al- 
ter sands. Supertt hodday 
Chalet on beach. AU amenities. 
Good investment. Offers 
around C9.BOO.Tet 0309 
70060 034381 2961 


"SfMWSJ BIMC. Spry Valley. 
Country house hotel m 2 acres, 
bewuuint conver si on private 
house lfci£ £86.000 ono. Re- 
ply to BOX A 18 


Birgham, Rear Kelso 

SMIDDY COTTAGE 
& THE OLD SMIDDY 

A c har ming stone txjflt cot- 
tage with artettng SmfcMy. 
s^MtUy renovated In keep- 
ing with the badltwn a l style 
and character. Situated in 8 
quiet unspoilt vi Rage in the 
heati ot •» Scooiah Borders 
owriooWng me River 
Tweed, ideal r e finemen t 
home. Large Lounge. 
Ki tche n / tiraa d a a room. 3 
bedrooms, bathroom. Spa- 
cious sachided garden wnh 
patio area facing south. 
Larae Smiddy ideal as stu- 
tflo { workshop. 

BERWICK UPON 

TWEED/KING'S CROSS 
4V4 HOURS. 

PRICE IN REGION OF 
£30.000 

MORTGAGE AVAILABLE 
(Ref. 110) 


; 1 . 7 1 a; 


South facing waterside posi- 
tion. own tatty, ckrtgy 
outhauL Dm fBstdence. S 
bees. 2 bathe, mod fdcchen. 
Arm room. 2 recap, ga- 
rage. gas CH, hotted pool, 
maffifcent views, easy 


Offers over £25IU>N. 
Td 8243 573142. 


Course, good vAagc pups 
amenities. Tel. 09906 IDO. 

COHMd— virtually demoted 
wmg of country raanwoa witn 
spaciou s a Mdrooiued 
ac om n sma i ton and tovety rural 
views 1 acre plot with river 
toomage. £23X000. Ooodrlck 
Mecch. (0483) 220343. (Scm- 
day 0932-63746). 

OXS1ED Amctiva S/O bedroom 


LUXURY PLAT OH SKA PROMT. 

Ow to Royal Troon goir 
Course. Comprising 3 public 
rooms. 4 bedroo m s. 2 bath- 
rooms. granny flat, gara g e arm 
stable. C6&QOO. Contract j c 
RWAurtti A On Ltd . 17 Ayr St 
Tram 0292 314313. 


mjanc/MKET 


TORREVEIJA 

COSTA BLANCA 


Cf,.r nr 

yCOroS ress sre. ■■ ■ ■■ ■ ■■ »■»■ 

1 Bedroo m Apartmc 

2 B edio om Chalets. 

3 Be dr oo m Chalets . 


from £8^00 approx. 

„ from £10,630 Approx 
-from S17AQ0 approx. 
..from £18,000 ap prox. 


Golf Coarse. 
Apartments- 


MANY M088 PKO»tTES FOR SALE 

STOP PRESS 

ws at the VBa Muitiue 

omse .from £22.222 approx. 

eats , from £18^666 approx. 


SELLING FAST 


If Via Martine Goff Course preferred please quota 
when acquiring brochure. 

M our p ro perties are freehold- finance a r r an ged. 
Formightfy inspection fitghr. 

Send for our 66 page brochure today 

Telephone: 

0603-615692/616221/632379 
SUNRISE OVERSEAS PROPERTIES 
44/48 Ha§tfalefl Street, Norwich «3 1JE 
Tetex 9975491 
















SAN PEDRO marbella| 

Beautiful villas with private 
gardens and poo! £38,500 
JARDINESdelSOL 

colour brodamTri; 0789 293111 


In Menorca. P 
Ol 937 4274. 


For sate - e fflaoa bas e - 
campMaly ransvalEd 
80m 2 firing area. 2 tofts, 
outbuittiogs. IK ha. 
grounds, furwshed or son 
fewshed. Wnte PBW - F 
66220 FOSSE 
Tefc ‘010JJ3.68J9.1420. 


merit or cm»-erstan required 
urgratly. 466 6086 rp anyttma 


(tost 8a OMtapes eontoo Mac 

tamai 9-14/6. c/o ». P. 
Tsasjras. Un Twel TttOl «46 


WANTED 

E sta Mh fa wl age nc ta for 
property sales m Sou* of 


RH fi ir t fare infijnOZUOB 
please write w 

Vika Duuiaine De Vd 
De Mer No 16 . 3420 La 
. Croix Valmer. France. (T) 


s 


. MORTGAGES 
REMORTGAGES 


FOB EX-PATS. 

(Sty & Provincial 

Mortgage Broken - 

12. Howtey Place. 
Londou W2 lXA. 
Ttt 01-402 2309. 


property or 15 ta. ol 


ffUrmnm. at cental tnt- 
riB.,4/5 bedrooms. 2/3 nxeps, 2 
bathrooms. 1 with vx. 1 sepa- 

tanmanea QKauipnui ax to#. 


dangBoafed ttaanohout lac age. 
BeariU luri stoaaw tut not 
isolated * acre bad. 

£70,000 OnO. 

Tei 01 385 3013 


0EN1A 

HearonteD wnei nua sell mao- 
ntaa Mate «tia owtaceimg 
oraqe grows. Dem. castle S sea 
WmMRri fantay aeconm ynvped 
n 2 S/C ftOR 6 beds. 2 ut dang 
gS-Zh ts.* bate, Gge. bje bool 
MW tana anas. Qdns m 
tattnaa. Exd man uomoL toe 

nautamarnmn 


■ 6uu of St Tropez 
Detached 3 bedroom vteas 
with sea view and pool 
from FFR t ^38.000 
Also a p a rt m en ts and 
tiAdtog bid 

Rx»e: Mr T iroi ne n i a a a 
on t» 439 8541 or 

France 01 033 94 7977 69 


acffltopKtaeHdaUe 

nteheeBiorapctecte 

dkflEoadMtaoflaihlio 

MteflenaadUotoaBasof 

ftanpcta.Ugaxla 

BBOtaariotii Bi tMtfc 

a r_*». i 

tyopeuiAssociBjanJcY 

O qiar*^ A 

oaMlfaWeI7A 
rKMOBtoato, Mg 


SWITZERLAND 


*wier. tradiumiM a»yw 3 m 
S?™ 1 luxury daw juh off 

SfeSasS.-if* 


•hmeshaiie overseas 


MUIWIM AMudta. Double 
sruffio apanziwBB. FH. F/f and 
f ■ To ntgii standard. Tbp Rr of 
eccnmre comp tox. una. CH. 
iwrniwxa. gdos and tennis etc 
OMd IrtUnA rcCdM. Bargeto 
price T*. 01-732 09SS. . 






































y\cx,\$£b 



AO ctauificd advertisenumis 
can be accepted by idephtne 
\uccjk AmKHmeancoUV The 
dodhor is 5.01pm 2 days prior 
lo pu Mica boa ire S-OOpm Mon- 
day lor Wednesday 1. Should 
ww "B* to send an advenisr- 
mow m writing please include 
yourdayiimc phone. Dumber. 
CUgIPgEH SERVICES DE- 
PART tfENT. if you hare any 
queries or pnobieint relating to 
your sdverwetocm once il has 
appeared, plane contact oar 
Customer Services Department 
by tekphom on 01-481 *100. 


ANNOUNCEMENTS 


PLEASE help Tire National Be- 

oovotmt rune lor Ihr A«M lo 

providr Ino' machines for the 
rruef of Mn In rondulans like 
«lhrll» £eO buys a macMFre. 
DalUInm Mease to Use Vto- 
«"»“* TonwanUy. Chairman 
MlfA. 3S. |vlew Broad 61 Lon- 
don. ECO M1NH. 

F.S. from John, raced lo speak. 
PkU&c ring 0332 864191 DP- 

IwrnOOOa.m BM&OOpm. 
on Friday. 13lh June 1986. 
*WM summit FARM JOBS. 
Aho grapesMCfting in France i 
Switzerland Send urge SAE lo 
VW1. 9 Parti End St. OxlonL 
LfFTLt BEAR rm stm (airly fond 

of my rainbow 

RWH SILVERMAN For all uw 
ininpi I didn't w. Tm oorry. 
For an the UUnpt you ranAfu 
dare loieei. lam sorrier Loimn 
you, Eie 


DIAMOND 

ANNIVERSARIES 


CARUSS MtTCHELL On June 
11UL 1936. id Aden Street. 
Congregational Chapel. K«n- 
wigion wa. James Ktogdoft 
Cartes* to Ruby Manr MdcheU. 


WANTED 




wanted 


RUTUER VALET mao Friday non 
wrvauer Woking far permanent 
po* 1 tWti id London. 29 yean «- 
pMtfiwre. AMIoil reference*. 

SSSafiST' w ' fw ™ : 


MARRIAGE G ADVICE Bureau 
Katharine AUen UX formgnOC? 
W»l personal MenSwa.T 
Sen® PI. Wl. OJ 499 2SG6. 
CALIBRE CW imifimkiimiiii 
ProtfiwSwStcu- 
°" aa * 

M M MWF, Love or Marriage 
Ad ages, areas. DnteUnepM 
KWSi S3 AtanMon Rod. !«■«- 
don W8. Tel: OtTgse lOlv^ 
RKK SILVERMAN For all (he 
things I wont cay. rm to*?? 

wi? Ei l S rt ' , "" 10fneri L ® vlft » 

ULIEw TO BOOKS, m Ihe Cor or 
ai hom e Traveller*' Tates, u- 
-j?JL° n .Tye. 030« aia wi 

c ”*f lpo *WA L In veodga items & 

AwtQnnHmtB tRMtoibKfln 

Wortdwwe 0860JTCMO^ 


HUMP ANY GtMJF Days nnrmlfnd 
(or iblf or cudomera. Any to- 
*SWWn Tel 0734 872739. 


MUSICAL 

INSTRUMENTS 


dritMWAY ns. 139606 t6‘ 
3 i. re rand Stetmtairs I9B3 
Mu»mjni ImlriitnenL peautl- 
lul cond. £8200. Oder* 
ratwaoerecL eves 021 443 3261 



“SCOUKT FARES worldwide: 
01-73* 1812 JiuMtnr Travel. 


OHVOMmCD A GROUP FARES. 

C.T.C Open Sal. 0753 857035 


MA1ACA. CANARIES 01-041 
llli Traiownc. aqu - auk 


SWITZERLAND Scheduled fl tanas 
01-724 2388 ABTA ATOL^ 


SHORT LETS 


USA If Cl IB Stogie. £210 rtn 
High Season Farm Mgwr trav- 
el. 01 485 9257 IATA 


ncAKtr mum w/wmc . 

Ben? Travel. T« Oi 386 60 1 a 


CHEAP FLIGHTS Wortdwioe 
HoymarU* Ol 930 1366. 


LATIN AMERICA. Low tou 
nigha eg. RM £483. Lam 
£483 rm. Also Small Oroup 
Holiday Joofneyi.tcg Peru 
Irani £3501 JLA 01-747-3108 
LOW FARES WORLDWIDE 
USA. S America. Mid and Far 
rw S Africa. Trays aie. 48 
Margarei Sneer. Wl. Ol S80 
2928 (visa Accented) 

N/YOML Miami LA. CDeapot 
fares cm malar UR. ached wed 






wm m m 






SELF-CATERING 

SWITZERLAND 


SWISS BARN charmingly TOO- 
'flirt into flats Nr QuMu 
D-Oea Sleeps 4 an dales avail 
abte (0488 83390). 


SELF-CATERING 

PORTUGAL 


ALGARVE. Apt with nmrti 
ocean nm in usurer vutaiara 
All mmiiMJ me resL 
Snook, pm beach Avan June- 
On Ol 409 2838 vmawortd. 
NR ALMJFEMA Lame Private 
Vina by sea. lO nuns ornate 
beach. E del beds. 5 balm. Sun 
12 Fully equipoad. MM mail 
£60-C85 pp pu. oi 851 191 9 
ALGARVE ALTERNATIVE. Vma 
Hobdays of damnrtion for the 
very lew. Tel 01*91 0802. 73 
SJ. James's Sheet. SW1 
ALGARVE. Lire villa wild pool. 
S#S 8- Avail Alio Seat- oi nag 
2838. vma wpru. 

VALE DO LOBO. 3 bed mi vma 

ALGARVE vmw with pools. Tire 
VUIa Agency. 01-824 8474 


SPECIAL INTEREST 


SU MMER BKRNG and achvny 
holidays hum in me French 
AIM. availability 28 June only 
£14900. For further informa- 
tion reman su Vai on Ol 903 
4444 or OL 200 6080 )24hn). 
ABTA 50431 A TOC 1162 


U.K. HOLIDAYS 


SUMMER SUPAWAV ai Si 
Brides Hurl SaundeerfooL nyf- 
ed one of Warn kneum rerun 
hotels between June iju and 

Juoa 29tn. 3 ntahn oed and (uH 
Welsh utmiim £gg per a per 
k*h ananng a double room. 
AA RAC»» m phone 0834 
812304 lor nwruiun. bro- 
chures. snort break and 
CBrMmai leaflets 

WILTSHIRE Holiday conaoe 
available Immediately on Mart 
borooort Downs WondrrtUI 
riding Comenlenl for Martbor- 
ougb Com egr Bummer School 
0672 86232 

OXFORD. HOI let Luxurious 
house on mer Sips 9 iron in 
July Tel 0672 86252 


CORNWALL & DEVON 


Bownwir SeaiMcd v. c ax 

lage Sra views, guns. Sleeps 
2 4 £160 pw. 0736-731643 


COfISWOLDS 


GOTSWOLD Residence. Same 
bum bungalow A parage 5 
beds, gas C H. Lge recep. fined 
luicnrn and bathrm. Grounds 
and pool Med for acme hobby 

+ pleasant refine m ent. Descrip 
inadequate, adv ne i iewing. 
Furnished tf required. £68.000. 
Tel 045382 3231. 


LEGAL NOTICES 


ASHTON formerly GBO$£ nee 
WALKER ELSIE ASHTON lor 
mem- CRO&E. nre WALKER. 
WIDOW la» of 46 Burlaw 
Conn. Slabon Road. Wmcldlr 
on Sea. Enrs died AI WrsicUlfe 
on Sea on Id January 1986 iEs- 
laie about C6 400i 
BELL. FRANCIS JOHN HELL Wire 
of 6 College Road. Bngium. Eau 


ANTIQUES & 


EAST ANGLIA 


SUFFOLK. MWTHWOLD. Pretty 
house (tips ai on sea MW -July 
MM- Aug L600 0473 211440. 



ASCOT BOX urgently reotured 
lor July 25«1 Thdi Tel: John 
Dawson. Office Ol 377 9876 


ROVAL ASCOT BOX wanted any 
day. K yog can hem Please M: 
0763-861282. 


TKXCTS WANTED lor Wimble- 
don. fa Cup Final. * other 
events. Ol 223 4560. 


FOR SALE 


Bizet Doing Nothing? 
Writing uie Choptn Liszt 
8e sure to include MarksonW 
Our Pncas cant be mturd 
Itof « H*f tnwn My Elb pm) 

MARKSON PIANOS 

Albany Street. NWt. 

01-935 8682 
Artillery Place. SElB 
01-864 4817 


WORLD CUP SENSATION Tbps 
win with CEC full prog video 
only 019. Tops TV. 91 Lower 
Sioane SL SW1 01-730 0933. 


FLATS HARE 


MAB>A VALE Prof m I to share 
lux Dai. own shower rm. must 
be vegetarian rbut can m mhi. 
£45.00 per week HdiahL Tel 
01-289 6625. I A LOT 6 00 pml 


*E24 Prof i s— fa own room in 
Hal wim l wo others Xiao «m 
•Ml. TO 01-753 8163 after 
6JOpm 


NX Prof m> c. o r. snare ML MUt. 
lounge etc. £150 pan exrt Tel. 
Ol 837 1817 after 7 30 pm. 


STREATHAMf HAL female 3CT*. 
o r. n,s. |ge gdn fUL LI 50 
.PGM end 674 6336 evenings. 



DISCOUNTED FARES 

Jb&ufl/Har e3o £4te’ 

Naeata C20 £325 

two V30 mo 

Unos £235 E335 

Driiftm £230 £3f0 

flunebrii [195 £330 

Odiou £420 

Alfa Asian Trard LU 
1K/1U Int a *1 
TEL BT-43/Saj/6/7/B 
Ute & BnwQ BoWangs Hietame 


CRUISE & SAIL ABROAD 


FANCV A TRANQUIL Monday 7. 
Our tnoreMMd DKmny 3 
Mindvurf vilbigr at secluded 
Abeiiki Bay Ml among the obv a 
groves of MeganU bland may 
be Uw place for your family 
Not a disco for miled Still some 
availability 1 wk £265 2 wks 
L296 line DtsJ. FLOTILLA 
SAILING HOLIDAYS 01-969 
6423 5)40 ATOL 2165. 

CRUSE Torbay 12 berm dewed 
mol or yacht 2 wits June 
17. July 1st £366 pp KK fils 
wnoie boat available other 
weeks from L1000. Free 
W Wans. b b. oi 326 1005 
A lul 2091 


GENERAL 


mm 






Kk£ 2I 


Utualnabtrv LUL 01 839 1888. 
WIMBLEDON TKR8TS WANT. 
ED Bea pneev paid, mure' 
court. or tour) 1 01 737 SS32 
WIMBLEDON an tickets wanted, 
noi for resale. Bel prices paid. 
Ol 930 4536. 

WIMBLEDON TICKETS WANT- 
ED Crain- court or No i. Arm 
dJV 01 4 39 0300. 
WIMBLEDON TICKETS WANT- 
ED good price's Tel 01-780 
3753 

WIMBLEDON TICKETS wanted 

Top prices paid. COD or collect 
01 703 5989 / 0836 590922 


25 Yfew Ajunasary Appeal 


a!0i ul-itH 


CENTRE 

1961-1386 

\faur suppon is mol to Hie 
cortmumg researcti into ttK 
problems oltcjecoan of 
rranspbms oi heart, kidney: 
cornea aid skin, treatment ol 
burns, and the causes ol many 
serous teeases founded in 
memory of Sir ArenSald 
Mctodoe 

Dtntiass is Appesb DMattr. 

EAST GRINSTEAO j 
RESEARCH TRUST 

East GrissbM), W Sossex. IWISOT 


CHESS. CATS. LBS MIS 
&iarlighi.toiiTiblMMi TeonU. 
Wham available now. OI 439 
0300 Afl credu onttMtrpM. 

SEATFWDCRS Any event inc Lm 
Mb. Cm rat Con. Starlight Ehp. 
WunUedoiLCtyndebome. 01 
828 1678. Maior credit cards. 

WIMBLEDON, CATS, SMTlWhl 
txp. Chess, tvs Mis AH theatre 
and sport. T« 631 3719. 537 
1715. All maior credit cards. 

WIMBLEDON -TKKEn. Buy 

^HunbtedOP TkxML' Bought & 
SOM TOP prints bud. 01-831 
1080 81 or 01-831 1306. 

BOUGHT A SOUL Wimbledon 
Tickets Chess A Pop Concerts. 
01-831 J080.BL. 

F WW I Et /FREOER&- Cookers. 
* Can yon buy cheaper^ B dr 
S LM. Ol 229 1947,8468. 

URGENT WBMBLCPON HCKETS 
Best seals bougtU.'BOkL 01-778 
9373 anytime. 


Bought and sou Tel 01-881 
3347 or OL-79L 2286. 
WIMBLEDON and afl Pop events. 
Tickets bought ami sola. 
01-9S&OZ77 or 01 9300098 
WIMBLEDON TICKETS. Bought 
or sold. WluiW Queen. Chess A 
Cab for sale. T k OI 701 8293. 



BEBENTURES 
MID BALLOTS 
WANTED 

Tor pnvatc ronip ai M S. 

Tag pnees pad. 

D1 228 0423. 

01 223 8173 


WE HELP CHILDREN 
TURN MOUNTAINS. 
- INTO MOLEHILLS 



CANCELLED 


V (IjMKlAT 


13 Catfigory A 
World Cup Flna 
Tickets- 
OFFERS TO 
PAULA 
01-858 5221 

I9Bn - 5pm onfy) 


day. 674 8672 rvn. 

NWU 3rd F. n », shr lux me. Nr 
Heath, o r. £260 pcm. Tot 221 
1008 (day) or 455 3785 level i 
SWG. Prof F N 6 for O R In tux 
. fU Nr Tube £190 pcm. Tel: Ol 
248 9165 e« 3132 day 
SWB Lge dMe rm avail for Nnole 
Pro/ M Tui lge lux flat £55pw 
duel. Ol 582 9698 afier 5pm 
IW*. Prof M O. R in comfortable 
flat nr Tube. £180 oan rna. 
Tel: 385 4519 Pfter 6pm. 
SWS. Prof Mole share lux h&e 
wuh 2 gnu. own double room, 
gdn. £55 Pw oj- 381 5281 eves. 
W2 2 I o ms. lus h*- in pretty 
Bayswafrr Sg^£S0 pw mcL Ol 
229 8082 wen morning only 
W*. S c Bedurorr-- SuuaMe lor 
prof m f. n,*. CH. Ootvstani 
HW £4250 pw Inc. 262 COST 


AUCTIONS A 


UP UP & AWAY 
Nairobi. Jo'Bug. Cairo, Dubai, 
Istanbul, Singapore. K.L. Delhi, 
Bangkok. Hong Kong, Sydney, 
Europe. A The Americas. 

nunfngo Travel, 

76 Stafirsfwry Arcnne 
LoRdM W1V 7DG. 
01-439 0102 , 

Ope* Sstandsy IDlOO-UJO 


FANTASY TREKS 


Journey 

To flu Stewes 
of Russia 
Up the Nile 
To Katmandu 
On an African Safari 
Down the Amazon 
Ron E3flfl far IB days 
To £3£60 for 28 wfcs 
Ring now 

FLIGHTS v 


[•TarZw-tya 
01*636 6963 *’ 


* ALL RIGHTS BOffflED* 
★★HUGE DISCOUNTS# ★ 
★★TOURIST CLASS** 
★★CLUB CLASS** 
★★1ST CLASS** 


TAKE TIME OFF 10 Pars. Am 
UOTdam. BnsMb. Brwn 
Geneva. Berne. Lausanne. The 
Hague. Dublin. Bouen. Bou 
loqne A Dteone Tune Off. ?a. 
Chmer Close. London. SW1X 
7BO. Ol 235 8070. 


SELF-CATERING 


LUXURY VILLAS with poab and 
staff Mill avail. South of France. 
Mar bet la. Algarve. We* Indies. 
Gonnnemal VUlasOl 245918! 


A last minute 
villa with no 
surprisesl 

We are otways able to offer 
quality villas at short notice, 
with the emphasis on Ihe 
high standard and service our 
brochure has promised For 19 
years. Thera ore no nasty 
surprises to peel you on 
arrival. We hove villas In 

Portugal, 5auth of France, 
Creek Islands - Corfu. 

Ci Me, Pangs. Also (he 
Relazzn Belmonte in Italy. 
From the very luxurious and 
expensive - to the very 
simple and modestly priced. 
Ask the vlfla specialists for 
their brochure - quKMy. 

ABTAM 01 cv Travel or 

P 43 Cadogan Street 
London SW3 2 PR 
01-581 0851/ 
01-5848803 

(589 0132 - 24 

.rara^.iw.. brochure service) 


SELF-CATERING 

BALEAJUCS 


MCNORCA villas, apartroenu. 
cam-mas. all dales avail. June 
speoob. high saason from 
Stag- Oeldc Hobdays, at sod 
7 070 * 0608 677071 or 0622 
677076 (24 tVTW AMI 1772. 


SELF-CATERING 

FRANCE 


MID WEST COAST 
ROYAN 

We haw a hmitM y* talimam 
sebaiw of peramaCy unperkd 
praperoes abns (he ooest In t*i>- 
konsUf reamu. or usepoSl netifcy 


1 y ; rf ;h a ■ w j : n.' 


T* Brighton (92731 562454 



* SIDNEY 

* PBOH 

* KOawr 

9 X Buffi 


* MOBtxwe * 

* EnsBWE * 

* A0ELM3E * 

* s« n* 


By Order of us Ew a roo 
of Iks. EWm Stood OB£. 
SALE OF THE 

OF 


RJUaUND * RNBUMTUN* 

* FU * *pr MORESBY * 

* MMWW * * KKYO * 

* SMStfOI * * MNKA * 

* DUUI * * BMUK * 


* MS) EAST * * 


CARPETS 

SPECIAL OFFERS 

Wsanders CorWptesf Tiles, 
design natural only E&B5 per sq 
yd + VAT Wool mot Barber 
carpets 4m me Hesson baked 
£435 per so yd + VAT. WMfl 
slocks last. 

182 Upper t li riH i o Pd Road 
London SWK 

Tete 01-876 2089 

Free estmaes- Expert fttng. 


ENNT HANDBAGS and Purses 
Lou- cnees LralhershcP 
Febxaowe 272449 



* luswm * 

* IORONTD 6 

* L MC&FS * 


9 * HARARE * 

* * VANCOUVER * 

* « MIMO 9 



* OUMB6M * wGHUNClSCt) * 
*4 SOUTH ANBOCA *n 
* USA * USA * USA *U3A * 

SUNWORLD 

TRAVEL 

fEsfd 1969) 

59 South Sl Epsom . Surrey 
(03727) 27538/25530/271W/ 
2531 S/24832/36W7 

“BOOK SUNWORLD 
-BOOK SECURITY^ 


SELF-CATERING 

GREECE 


FOR HIM 


Seniyai- FahwaTbaraup ri 
Mru el ctampassM and a r^id 
uwiisu: ixnanaloMtgr 
Orto L-nvenasr^Sshdan 
Man, raojlvcafloo-anid 
chanpenr t aO mm any 
r jn z jrt rrfc BoarteBSon! 
Piofcaa* brartcadanand 



TAYLOR ft TESTER 


TUESDAY 240i JUNE 1988 
at 1A30 8JBL 
ON VIEW 

SATURDAY 21st JUNE 
10 us. la 5 pun. 

CATALOGUES Plica n (Adrak 7) 

■tan Tailor ft Tester 
3 Kteg SMd. 

EssJ Brinstead, 

RH19 30L 
Tek fS3«S) 2MT8 


OVERSEAS TRAVEL 


IT S ALL AT 
TRAILF1NDERS 


Sir John Betjeman 
General MacArthur 
Kenneth More • Doris Smith 

What do they have in common? 


Par kmson’s Disease. 

It strikes men and women everywhere , FVrhaps : even 
you- Researchers need your help- So ”\° I ^ than 
100 , 000 sufferers in the United Kmgoom. 

Please support t 

Paridnson’s Disease Society 

36 Rwtfcnd Place, London WIN 3DC- Tel: 01-323 11 *4 



SWITZERLAND 
FROM ONLY 
£99 RETURN 

Save with Swissairt 
Super Apex. 

London to Zurich or 
Geneva, daily on con- 
venient afternoon 
flights. And daily 
flights to Basle 
(except Sundays). 
Book and pay 14days 
before departure. 

Stay in Switzerland 
at least until the 
Sunday after arri vaL 
Bookings and fuD 
conditions from 
travel agents or 

01-437 9573 




Free Flight to Sicily 
.... and back 


£289 7 nights 

Ai toV< nwM> Imv toad bmp. fla 
m— —taBbtay ivy as»ral otar 

d ammg Snob MAmmo n 

■amuiaglniBHnlMW 


Itakhr lnta IS n i C s wn o b. 

IStawar *- "-t- 1 — — 1 r »■** J r~ 
aoirl af T«nala». ■ |Mns« pnoai taikk 
nowias 6 i riM n8 ii Bf» w l M M 

■nHUBICnSMIUantitali BiW 

IMbm 


P0S5RDE TO P0BBDI5E 
IfSUrrfHl UfllEB^D Of I5LH 

QiERBQ & LEFKfll^ 

Hi 



lyiar/capc 



IUOS ISLAND 
YS 

ABTA MTO ATOL 1452 


CORF U BARGAINS, beautiful VO 
las Sunday 1622J29 June 1 wk 
L169. 2wka £199 ex Caiwlck. 
Pan world Holidays 01 734 
2562 

6 WCCCC. Urspmh iBianas. rtvnp 
nigib.vUa rentals etc. Zeus Hoi 
KUy*. 01-434 1647 AIM Alio. 

PELOROMfESC- comfortabta bul 
notated villa by s» Sips 68. 
£160 p w Tel 01-727 4065. 

RHODES 18 '6 save £!OOm> Lux 
api hate only £129. Also 25 -6 
2-7 Stroma 0705 862814 


SELF-CATERING ITALY 


ISCHIA /GAMLAil grades Of h» 

teto & character pensions. 

Holiday bunds 01-8364385 


UCHIA/CAMILAII grades Of ho- 
tels 6 character penStORL 
Holiday Islands 01-8364385 


END. bKkngF yourself., you 
dnene ll. A weekend m Ven- 
ice. FVxhcc. or Rome Ear 
wdl. Ortrik weu. shoo well and 
fowl about England's depress- 
ing weather Or combine a city 
weekend wtoi a week by the 
sea- Free brochure from Magic 
Of Italy Teh 01 749 7449 124 
lire service). 

CENTRAL VENICE. Apartments 
10 renL Prices from £180 per 
week QuMir Travel 01-586 
9451 


SELF-CATERING 


TERRIFIC HOT TURKEY. Spend 
a week relaxing oi our private 
oeacti hotel, then a week aim 
ina on our yacht lor £350. me 
ru. H e. free w 'soora,.1wii a 
other nmxnuion) pom. Also 
nre only from £99. Ol 326 
1006 



GO BACK IN TIME 
TO THE DAYS OF 
OLD WORLD COURTESY 

a high standard of service, exceflenl (god and wine, log fi/rs 
and emy comnm. Jt is our pleasure io wefcome you to; 

wadgbon country mansion hotel 
WHJTLaNQ. dyfed 

a Granoan Miuuioa recently nrtwred with greai care and now 
heautiralfy appomied. Siuutcd in own grounds. A mile off 
A 40 wiihin easy reach of Pcmbrokc%hiir's irunv fin; sands 
bcadm. Nautmal Pari, beamy- spots, fishing and numerous 
Insure artivnes. 10 lovely bedrootm cacti with private tu th- 
rown. colour tdevtsioa. radio and direct dal telephone- Enjoy 
friendly and relaxing atmosphere and personal aucntioo of the 
proprietor 

PLE.4SE SEND FOR BROCHURE 

Te! 0994 240232 


GENERAL 

APPOINTMENTS 




TRAIN FOR A NEW CAREER 

An established consultancy is locking for 
intelligent and amoitibus men and women aged 
22 + with dnye. initiative and sood 
communicative skills, to join them as trainee 
sates executives. £7.000 (negotiable regulated 
^? rn * 5 BP scheme). On target first year earnings 
£ 12 , 000 . Phone for details. 

01-222 1607 


INTERVIEWER/ 

CONSULTANT 

c£20,000 O.T.E. 

(Ho targets) 

Wb are currantly seekrg a fuf- 
tlter 2 Conodlams to be based 
ifl after our West End or City 
oftces. You would need to be 
a sefl-starter with a genuine 
desire to succeed and a sin- 
rare interest in people. Wa 
would prefer you lo lave lad a 
proven track recml in the re- 
airtment industry aftnugb we 
■aid consider good trainees 
firm commercm/sales envi- 
ronmants. Please contact 
Sharon Landau (West B«n 01 
734 2567 or Ken Fanam (City) 
01 236 0869 dretng office 
hours or Sharon Landau on 01 
981 5432 eves / weetands. 

StdU 

VRecmflmcwt 


PERSONNEL MAHJIGER 

£22.000 neg Initnuuonal Cliy 
Bank Age 30-40. Superb BOH 
lion for pereott with extensive 
knowledge In a Banking or 11 
lurictal personnel department 
Take control of all aspects relat- 
ing la uarr Trieplmnv ror opal 
Chrtslm* on 030 T066.-67. 


THREE TRAINEE MANAGERS 

Rebuked £7.000 neg reguUHA 
earnings erneme. Probably drai 
year earrungs £12000 Rmg 
01 222 8972 



COURSES 


WOLSEY HALL: honw study for 
CCE. Degrees i London BA. BSc. 
LL8 Warwick mbai. Prospec- 
tus: The Principal. Dew AL9. 
Wohev Hail. Freepost Oxford 
0X2 6BR. Tel: 0806 52200 124 
hrsi 


PUBLIC NOTICES 


DOMESTIC & CATERING 
SITUATIONS 


YOUNG, 

ENERGETIC, 

ENTHUSIASTIC? 

Imaginative cook with 
some experience and a 
definite sense of humour 
wanted to join a small , 
bat rapidly expanding ca- ' 
terine company on full 
time oasis. HND, Cordon 
Bleu or «wHfl»e qualifica- 
tions. 

Reply to BOX J51 . 


MATURE MANNY for 111 baby 
Accompanying parents lo Bn 
Ion USA Cooking dalinrt 
advantage lo Inexpenenced 
cnoiher 037204 it 17 


SOLENT ANCILLARY SOCVtCE 
ha* auxlltarv mines, general 
aides asaitaMe lor ail types of 
dHornesuc snuanom in Pcrts- 
■nouin. F arena in and 
surrounding areas. Tet 0329 
663984 'OBV i 

MONTE CARLO Nanny required 
for 2 cnitarpn Own teprraie 
acc Fry Start Conraltnu Aioer 
Shot Td 0262 316369 
OVERSEAS AU PAIR AGENCY 
87 Regent StreeLLonoon Wl. 
Tel 439 653d .Uk Overseas 
Also m.heun done mtop perm 


TEMPTING TIMES 


£11,000 p-a. 

Medical Conference Sec- 
retary- Previous 
conference experience 
essential plus word pro- 
cessing ability. Position 
tuU-Ume front now until 
1st October. Situated in 
Mayfair within a Travel 
Agency Organisation. 
Please telephone Mrs 
Green 01-629 6460 or 
write with C.V. lo; 

Vi p International 
Conference 
Services Lid 
42 North Audiey Street 
London W1A 4PY 


BENTLEY &C9 

now urgently require to purchase 

DUM0NDSANDDUM0NDJEWE11ERY 

itnnredlate cash offer. Valuations made. 

66 New Bond Street. W.l. Telephone 01-629 0651 


nster 
ng its 
jnscy) 
ter of 


AMERICAN BUYERS SEEK 

CUE?) Umoue and Modem Jm B tare. waicnrs Sdm m Plato 
” BWM, Enamels More. JaM Prow. Ctocas. 

Ptajnro. Psrcihi. Gass. Oats. T«« and Trtd* (Ran «r Par 
. .. J? 1 ? 5 Puttas. S>im Puc nwrt Ouas, Sampms. Coaume 

"522. '-**■ »* Masaw. flwro Ow muwa Mims & instrumms 

tnunera* cast br iBiwn lor JtmtMery Wa Mena sere by pml 
?* W 1 P" ** to mi « oB wsmaUy ttUoul Mduoans. Oncn Mon - 
Sit 9 0 - 5 JO 0 m 

GWENS ANTIOie OALUERtCS, 117 KoiWnttN Chun* StoM. London 
MIUL1A W-22B WB. 

[Also m n«w vortj 


The 

Nanking Carco 


SECRETARY 

3 days per week 

To assist Financial 
Controller, Marine in- 
surance co, WC2. 
Suit capable short- 
hand typist 40+, 
Olivetti typewriter, 
start asap. 1 month, 
possibly more. Very 
attractive rates. 



i Btl i l dltawC Ii— !* »■ 



Top bounty paid tor the 
tMoro. dewi or alive, of aiqi of 
tbe MaKnifScent Severn 
urealy Botes. Audramra 
Moonpnase, PlajteL Carter. 
Vkmtob, Patrfc and the 
notorious Gold “Rppealer" 
Pocket Watch. 

Send by Regutercd MaiLor 
bang them in 10 claim soar 
reward. 





2 People required for ma- 
jor U.K Company. The 
applicants should he 25+ 
honest, intelligent, of 
smart appearance and be 
prepared to undergo vig- 
orous training, leading to 
professional qualifica- 
tions after 2 - 3 years. 

Cod Gfyn Moss 

01-493 1035 


ALL sees. SH. Audio, copy. 
WP Jam Office Overload* 
team of temp* nowand reap the 
benefits Top rates, hoi pay amt 
lots more Ring Moira on OI- 
229 9244 for details. Of/ira 
Overload Aw 

PA SECS with lop mill* (too 60 
wptn> urgently reg for hnmed 
bookings. Top rates, tiol pay 
and Iota more Ring Moira 16 
day lor details ou 01-229 9044. 
Office Overload. Aov. 

EKOTING YOUNQ record co reos 
IBM 3620 Secs. Top rale* + 
*UI( care package Ring Moira 
tor detail* on Oi 229 9244. 
Office Overload Agy 

WORDPLEX 82 Op* urgently req 
for long A short ierm assHn- 
mrat*. Top tale* t Mart core 
package Ring Moira on oi- 229 
9244. Office Overload Agy. 


PASTORAL MEASURE 1983 
Trie Church Oomnusreonrrs have 
prepared draft redundancy 
scheme* providing for tne appro 
pruiion of Ihe redundant churcn 
of Bristol Si Jude lo ihe lor of flee* 
and purntue* ancillary thereto 
■ Brwol diocese i: lor ihe appropn- 
al»n of the redundant enuren of 
West Vale SI John the Evangebsl 
to un for storage punun 
iWakefiekl dice eiei: and the ap- 
propnohon of the redundant 
churcn of SolbySl Peter to uw os 
a monument and for purposes an- 
cillary thereto 'Lincoln diocewi. 
Copies ol Ihe draft scheme* may 
he obtained Irani Ihe Church 
CommtMioncrs. i MUtoatik. Lon- 
don. Swi p jjz io whom any 
represemanon* should be sew 
within 28 days of the publication 
of Uds notice 


f:E1j 

AUSTRALIAN MUTUAL PROVIDENT SOCIETY 
AMENDMENT OF BY-LAWS 

NOTICE OF 

SPECIAL MEETINGS OF MEMBERS 

NOTICE is hereby given that the Board of the Australian Mutual Provident 
Society has pursuant to By-Law 6 convened a special meeting of the Society to be 
held at the offices of the Society, Sydney Cove, New South Wake, on Wednesday 
the 23rd day of July, 1988, at 11 JO a-m., to consider and if thought fit to pass and 
apptOTO the Resolution shown below. 

NOTICE is also given that, contingent upon the Resolution being passed and 
approved by the Requisite Majority at this meeting, the Board has convened a 
confirmatory meeting to beheld at the same place on Wednesday, the 27th day of 
August, 1986, at 1 1,30 ajn, for the puipoee, in accordance with the Society’s Art of 
Incorporation, of finally passing and confirming the Resolution. 

The Resolution is aa follows: 

“that the By-Laws contained in the printed document submitted to the 
Meeting ana for the purposes of identification signed by David Outran] 
Ande rs on, the Chairman of the Society, be approved rood passed as the By- 
La wBoft be Society in substitution for and to the exclusion of all the existing 

A letter from the Chairman giving reasons for the Resolution and a copy of the 
proposed By-Laws will be supplied to any member of the Society who applies, 
either personally or by post, at any office of the Society. 

The By-Laws have been revised and various amendments have been introduced. 
Hie more important of these are described below. 

(A) GENERAL MEETINGS 

Officaa, employee*, agents and rwxreaeoM trees who ore members of Mae Society are to be 

(B) Mtarings muout the Chairman's c on sent being required. 

fa fatere. members of the sftf-enohqred persons md personal SqpenimiaatioD funds and 


FREE STAMP 
VALUATIONS 

For tale through our auction 
or Private Treaty Saks with- 
out charge or obligation to 
sell We are prepared to 
travel to your home. Write or 
telephone for free brochure. 

PLUMRIDGE & CO. 

(Esl 1898) 

6. Adam Street. Strand. 
London. WC2N 6AA. 
Td; 01-836 8694/0939 


ROYAL 

DOULTON 

TOBY JUGS, 

FIGURINES. 
ANIMALS, ETC., 

WANTED. 
01-883 0024 


LETTERS. DOCUMENTS, kUnu 
srrtm*. Mtaied ptMHoaraBhs. 
etc- bouanl a wto Cataiogui- 
fre*. Jofui Wilson. 50 Acre Lna 
SL EvnSkam. Oxford. 1OB0S1 
880883 

TELEPHONE BOXES lor valr Ex 
GPO. 1936 K6 model* Many 
item, excellent investment Irom 
£295 * VAT ChetmbrKtae Lid 
Brighton 0273 600320 anytime , 

SNOOKER TABLE - COnnntacur* 
full size. (OUecter* marker cabi- 
net. ong ivory ball*, cue 
Carousel Tol-021 427g284 pm 

VICTORIAN CAST NMM spiral 
Stair Case. 9- Rise. 15 » 24- 
Treads Offers. Plume 10750' 
20501 office bourn 


Ad opportunity id 
purchase a wide selection 
of Lhis fine porcelain. 
May be bought by telephone, 
delivery arrangements made: 
Open weekdays & Sundays. 

Roger Bradbury 

Antiques 

Church Street. CoItishaO, 
Norfolk NR127DJ. 

Td: (06031737444 


JEWELLERY TO saL? 

Long established tjrr.Jv troerters 
■rail '0 pure nose 5 koto lung 
iroatev tad amnaif atuaat 
clocks m add rg ou vaned and 
■reereSing conecfon 
Write nr call in cwtfitfeace tic- 
AH MCUfi- WINSTON LTD, 
43 BurfitqKM Arcade. 
Uindao INI. 

Tel. 01-493 8S37 


GOLD 

Wanted - Gold - Silver 

JsiweAefy 

any condition any quamty Top 
Hatton Gsftten prices st Oaity 
h* - Trade w«*»me Aegis- 
wed pjrcefe o«e r by pnone 
Goto Shop 189 Praed SL W? 
□pp Poddington StaUoo 
Tel Q1-2SB 3068 


CAMPAIGN STYLE FURNITURE, 
all wood. Itand mad* br.iw in 
ling* UlorV available. Jf-M. 
draitrm. cl-«~U *rc Trt 
CulkttbTd 10083' 6TD74 

COMPLETE COLLECTION of 

l «75 86 Voq u * and Harnrr* 

AI*o international maganne* 
Offer* over L200 Trt 01 -493 
3412 

ROLEX, CARTlERJEWELiERY 

anugurs. watetm rtt 
Bought void Ot 625 5003 


CHINA HEADED DOLLS C35 

Cl. 200. boot any rondiiun 
Mr* Leaner l Par kaaic Cottage* 
Cnebliold. Kent 0959 34681 


PART TIME VACANCIES 

PART TIME SECRETARY 

Required from September. Mornings only 9.00 
a.m. to 1.00 p.m./or 3 full days per week (not 
Friday). Occasional requirements for full time. 
Good shonha nd/typing is essential and experi- 
ence of working at senior level would be an 
advantage. Applicants wiih details of education 
and experience should be sent to: 

The Personnel Executive (London) 

34 Jermyn Street 
London SWI 


MAKE A PART-TIME COMEBACK 

We have cxceflem opportunities for wdl trained secretaries, 
bookkeepers, aemomanev. reception and general dental suff 
wfi& warn a pcrmanani pan-liraejob I. i 3or4dajs per week or 
pan or even day. 

Ring Julia McJndoe or Ann Ln for an appoinimoni on 

01-437 3103 
Parttime Careers Lid 
10 Golden Sqaarr 
Londeo Wl 


(0 Brady, the rocmg sesfe is to be calculated on s p remium bans, instead of a sum insured 
bans as at present, with one vote for every 100 AusL Dofian of Annual Pre uuum payaUe. 
Suiteblc equrvalente for s arttritfes . rin^e prenritaas and paid up potieiea are proposed. This 
basis is con si dered to be teller having regard to changes in the type of btwinMs being 
written. 

(3) Aa large pobeiea an bow more common, the maximum number oT rates of any one member 
■ lo be mocased from 200 to 400. 

(D) APPOINTMENT AND ELECTION OF DIRECTORS 

fit The minimum number of noo-eaecutiw Director* b to be in cre e md Emm 10 to 12 (the 


Zealand. |» in VictoTM- and rat in cwti n thur AnsosluQ Stow, 

(3) The masiisam number of non-executive DiraeUn* is Ia he iacreased ten IS to tfitoalkm 
far rnntii ig r ii ri es such aa the Northern Territory henriining an Australian Stele, or the 
appointment ai additional Directors. The Board would have the right by resolution to set 
the total Cron tame to time in the racer 12 lo 16. 
ran A Director must be a member in reaped of e Pobey which ia hetdaoltiy by him. Under the 
existing By-Laws, a Director needs to he a member for the imtnediaieJy preceding Eve yean 
in respect of Polio** *hh ctriain mintmam vafon. 


\VE FLY 
HORSES 

And we iwd a down-to- 
earth secretary Ui 
Wandsworth. 5 days a 
week. 1.50 - 6.00 pm. 

TEL: S7I 0944 
9.00 a.m. - 1.30 p.m. 
For derails 


PA TO M AMACIMO DiRECTMt 

MD at Computer Software 
House seek* rvDnwiKN indi 

vtatual ror re-tpemihlr pcealton 

in cm- office £C1 Hours I Own 
until 2pm. Monday IO Friday 
Sotarv to CSJJOQ with 4 v.«u 
paid hoMtav Tetepnone. 01 . 
263 1340 far appoinuneni. 


NON-SECRETARLAL 


PANT TIME SECRETARY Rft 

ouired by Propenj Campon*- 
Cnanm) Crtwv Embank men! 
aroa vaned wort *bortnond 
and lypina Hvenual Hour* 

4 So l 03 MS or os agreed 
Good salary Phoned W J Cur 
ll* 01 9» 31 pO 


NUMCRY SCHOOL kemlngion 
miuiro* awntaat (or Term lime 
morning* only from Septemner 
Rrrtlr lo BOX J07 


LAYOUT TYPIST. prm«fc**u! 
and IMrtligrnT uiih rxpera-nro 
ol rwmon U pev,nier and will- 
ing lo learn WP Interesting 
pay I ion Negotiable salary ptu* 
brnHiW. Call Mr* Parkin 75« 
9J72 No agenrw* 

COLLECTORS CARS 

TR S 1973 unmarutaie tea TR 
wire nrheet* *ub*tar'luUy re. 
bull. 1984 aaraaea sinre. new- 
part* loo nuroerou* to mention 
bul bills available, genuine 
men for ule L4.50O Irt 3S4 
J5c7 flay or 886 2172 eve* 


Ated with banknig. merchant hanking or piafaMnnal nparanmiatioa management tor 
external cheats (provided that if in a particular case any such person does not hove a 
siriwtantinl conflict of interest with the Society, the Board may so declare and that person 
wffl not br drequalified)- 

Hw eCtotmg By-Laws provido that not Islsa than one-thini of the Dheetois res ide nt in New 
South Waka and not less than one-third of those resident anteide that State shall retire 
each pm. It is penpoeed that in fatfare. retirement should be by rotaim iireapectiee of 


SELF-CATERING SPAIN 


MAHMLLL Lux viua wan pool 
Stos.7 Avail Jane to S«pt oi 
409 2358 vnuwortd 
IWAEANROW B VSH 20% r* 
duruon*; 14th June villas, am* 
Beaai Bay Hois 0432 270186 


residue * * , with the proviso that M leant me third of the total number of Director* mat 
mure each year and reoeraBy this number shall not include more than two Dtrwiore 
resident ifl New South Wales, one m each other State and one in New Zealand. 

<R» AUDITORS 

Atafa. p ttw ito Mia hare been l e tfi e ita d h Knewfah aode m accoencng praedra. *n>e propoued By- 
Lowe provide far the appomnDem of a Brat or company as ms|de auditor and (br approval of ai 
kwt two of tbe pannera or prineEials by the Lite Insurance Comnuaeioner tmder Section 4? of the 
Lite insurance Act 1945 las Amended!. They also provide for continuity of office of the Auditor 
_ rather tha n Annual EteaiML 
(P) POLICIES 

The By-Laws rriatinc to nuseteufflost and rorfeitnre are to be br&upki into baa with the 
fasunne* Contract* Act 1964 and the Life Inmrence Act. 

(G> JNVESTESSKNT OF FUNDS 

The types af a atlm rtead mveetmauta am to be extended to recognise the greater range of 
inwjEnuata fori* available. 

HEAD OFFICE: SYDNEY GOVE, BY ORDER OF THE BOARD, 

NEW SOUTH WALES MJEL RYAN, SECRETARY 


mcae rm 

is looking for sophisticated sales staff 
for her Sioane Street and Hampstead 
branches. Do you have an intrinsic 
sense of fashion with the intuitive abil- 
ity to dress our discerning clientele 
with clothes that wiii reflect their life- 
style? 

if you feel you frt the bill please contact 
Jacquie Beer on 01-981 3931 


i acting 


ares, or 
r voles. 
95 5p. 


it office 
tent car- 
ii is es- 
mpleted 
million. 

:r re- 

wEsnr- 

Sccond 
.73p for 
). 1986. 
ip. This 
lireciors’ 
erim re- 
5p and a 
Kriod 10 

CORPi 

I. 1986. 
n (£6.58 
£333.052 
per share 
p). The 
rompany 
e second 
• auction 
g and it 
crop and 
tetion. 
OENIX 
lf-ycar to 
urnover 
Loss be- 
; 31.9141. 
: 36.17p 



op into 


VV 8256 


rmation 

ilication 
3m tried 
:h our 

(£499 ex 
:orage. 


r Prestel 
(worth 


....£99.95 


. . . X 99.00 

ms for 

. . . £49.95 


BOOK-KEEPER sought by small 
Bioombury chanty, to work 2 
or 3 das-* per week Pn-viota 

MERCEDES 


e*p*iK-nce ideally to T B. re- 
quested Some keyboard suns 



Please teleohone 01-193 6787 
Cordon Yales Consultancy 

lb- — i ===== 

Immraiaie or Auauvl 1*1 delft 
erv All model* 0203 

5E2787iT! 

itain anj muy 

































































































36 


-SPORT 


RACING: DE CISION TO SWITCH CHESHIRE O AKS WINNER FROM EPSOM CLA SSIC SHOULD REAP REWARD 

Salchow should 


::a. 




!W 




give Hern 

reason 
celebrate 




good 


to 


By Mandarin (Michael Phillips) 


Salchow is napped to give 
Dick and Shelagh Hem a 
particularly sweet taste of 
success at Newbury today bj 
winning the Ballymacol) Stud 
Stakes. The sponsoring stud is 
owned by Sir Michael Sobell: 
his son-in-law. Lord 
Weinstock. and grandson. Si- 
mon Wei n sioc L who have all 
enjoyed so much success over 
the years with die horses that 
they have had in training at 
West Hsiey. 

Significantly in my opinion. 
Salchow missed last 
Saturday's Oaks to wait for 
this opportunity. Although 
she managed to win the 
Cheshire Oaks over a mile and 
a half at Chester the underly- 
ing feeling is that today's 
shorter distance will suit her 
rather better. 

To date Salchow’s only 
defeat occured on this same 
Berkshire track last October 
when she lost the Rochford 
Thompson Stakes narrowly in 
a driving finish to Colorepin. 
But with the latter running so 
well recently to finish fourth 
the Oaks that defeat was 


While that performance cer- 
tainly pointed to Henry 
Cecil's filly being a cut above 
average, i feel that it goes 
against the grain to oppose a 
filly with Salchow's sound 
overall credentials in a race of 
this nature. 


in 


obviously no disgrace. 

As West Ilslev have a line 
on Old Doomsday Book 
through another of their good 
fillies. Pilot Bird, the main 
question seems to be can 
Salchow beat Bishah who 
trounced Mount Olympus by 
10 lengths at Redcar last 
month. 


Now that he is running over 
six furlongs again. Highest 
Praise should give his backers 
a good run in the George 
Smiths Memorial Handicap. 
When he was beaten into third 
place behind Vague Shot and 
Kedron at Hay dock last Fri- 
day. the distance was seven 
furlongs and he weakened 
only in the last 100 yards. 
Before that he had beaten 
Chief Pal decisively over 
today's distance at Pontefract 
and the form of that race has 
been endorsed in the mean- 
time when Chief Pal won at 
Warwick. 

As a line through Singing 
Steven and Tez Shikari gives 
Floose the clear beating of 
Lucianaga in the Berkshire 
Stakes, the question now to be 
answered is can Floose beat 
The Dominican, who came 
good at long last at Epsom last 
Friday after three near misses. 
My feeling is that he can. For 
like his elder half brother. 
Sarah. Floose is clearly brim- 
ful of ability, judged on the 
way that he beat the more 
experienced Tez Shikari at 
Leicester first time out 



Eddery is 
first to 
reach 50 




The Dominican, a leading contender for this afternoon's Berkshire Stakes at Newbury 


Twelve months ago the 
High Top Hermitage Stakes 
was won by Kufuma. Now the 
conditions look right for Geoff 
Huffier' s four-year-old. who 
finished second in the Cam- 
bridgeshire last autumn to win 
it again. Kufuma was far from 
disgraced in his only race this 
season, although in the end he 
did finish last behind Bedtime 
at San down. 

Following that encouraging 
effort behind Insular ai New- 
market. Newsells Park could 
be one of three winners today 
for John Winter in the 
Netheravon Handicap. His 
stable companions. Saxon 
Star and Kind Lady, are 


expected to go close elsewhere. 

Saxon Star, mv selection for 
the Hilary Needier Trophy at 
Beverley, was beaten only 
about four lengths at Sandown 
towards the end of last month 
when she took on those fast 
colts. Risk Me. Whippet and 
Zaibaq in the National Slakes. 
And that 1 suggest was a 
performance that was superior 
to anything her opponents can 
boast this evening. 

The Fleggs Selling Stakes 
represents a drop in class for 
Kind Lady at Yarmouth, 
where Trikymia is a particu- 
larly interesting debutant in 
the Fritton Lake Maiden 
Fillies' Stakes. By Final Straw. 


my selection is out of that very 
fast mare. Slilvi. whose list of 
successful off-spring already 
includes Tachypous. Tromos. 
Tymavos. and Tanaos. 

Kenaga. also from Henry 
Cecil's yard, and another good 
ride for Steve Cauthen's un- 
derstudy, Willie Ryan, who is 
doing so well, can be expected 
to make a bold show' in the 
Merchant’s House Maiden 
Fillies' Stakes after finishing a 
close fifth behind Vianora at 
Kempton over a distance 
short of her best. But I just 
prefer Transcendance, who 
caught my eye at York fast 
month when staying on nicely 
in second place 


' pa Eddery drove the short- 
priced favourite. On Tenter- 
hooks, aHrart inside the final 
furlong of the Levin Down 
Maiden Stakes at Goodwood 
yesterday to become the first 
jockey this season to achieve a 
half century .of winners. On 
Tenterhooks got home by a neck 
from Canadian Star to confirm 
the revival in the fortunes of 
Jeremy Tree, the Beckham pton 
trainer. . 

Tree was encouraged at Ep- 
som last week by the victories of 
his four-year-olds, Pennine 
Walk, and Stately Form, but 
has been his three-year-olds that 
have been badly hit by the vims 
and On Tenterhooks was the 
. first of his second season horses 
to reach the winner's enclosure 
since Donna's Dream scored in 
ApriL 

Tree said: “It’s certainly 
beginning to look better. I think 
Chi Tenterhooks is going to 
make a useful slaying bandicap- 
per without being too am- 
bitious. I told Pat before, this 
race that 1 was frightened this 
mile and a quarter might be a bit 
too short". 

Land Of Ivory was backed 
from evens to 6-4 on in the West 
Dean Fillies' Stakes to give Pat 
Eddery a double. She hit the 
front with just overtwo furlongs 
to go, but her moment of glory 
was short-lived- She may not 
have been liking the firm ground 
and was quickly passed by 
Smooch, who came away to 
score by three lengths from 
Great Dilemma 

When Eddery rode Smooch at 
York last month he told Kim 
Brassey, her trainer, that she 
would be a decent filly on firm 
ground and Brassey said: “I 
think that all she has been 
wanting is this going, but it may 
also be that she is only just 
coming to herself. She's in a 
couple of group three races 
abroad and may now go to 
Hamburg for a nine nirlo 
event 


jng 


NEWBURY 


Going: good 
Draw: no advantage 

2.0 WEST ILSLEY MAIDEN FILLIES STAKES (2-Y-O: £3,864: 5f) (13 
runners) 

1RHarmon8.il NON-RUNNER G 


101 

102 

104 

107 

108 
109 
111 
112 
113 
115 
IIS 
121 
122 


ATM YU (P Qanw) R Har 
CHASING MOONBEAMS ( 


i (Loti Poretastw] (Bung 8-11 — SCmdhmU 

DANE DOLLY jMrs A Yatasi P Burawtw 8-11 MWahanlO 

FtnStOVEIMs W HefnjWHem (j-11 W Carson 9 

FRIVOLOUS FANCY (R Reynolds) M ESanshard 8-11 J Raid > 

MTERVAL |K AbduBa) J Tree 8-11 PH Eddery 3 

KWG OF CLASS (Mrs A Oattn) J Dunlop 8-11 B Rome 7 

LADY LUCMA (W Fox) R Smyfy 8-11 NHewS 

|a-S1 N Adana 12 


MISS LAWSUIT {T McHrov) M Btanshi 
NAPARIMA (J Lazzaril R Hannon 8-11 


R Wantoni 2 


NOT ALONE (J Redraondl J Mfimar 8-11 . 


SEULEMENT (G Wad) D Arouthtw 8-11.. 


SPOTTER (Lord Romero**) W Han B-11 
9-4 ctusng Moonbeams. 3-1 Interval. 95 
Alone. 12-1 Spotter, 14-1 Frivolous Fancy. 18-1 


WRSarintml 

J WOnts 4 

— 8 Praetor 11 


11-2 King Of Class. 10-1 Not 


Newbury selections 


By Mandarin 

2.0 Interval. 2.30 Kufuma. 3.0 Highest Praise. 3.30 SALCHOW 
(nap). 4.0 Floose. 4.30 Newsells Park. 

By Our Newmarket Correspondent 
2.0 Not Alone. 230 Presidium. 3.0 Sharpetto. 3.30 Bishah. 4.30 
Newsells Park. 

By Michael Seely 

3.30 Salchow. 4.30 NEWSELLS PARK (nap). 


230 HIGH TOP HERMITAGE STAKES (£7,869: 1m) (5) 


W Canon 5 

MM3er3 


202 2211-00 BIG BEEF (Mra VGaucci del Bora) J Dunlop 4-98___ 

204 23220-0 KUFUMA (C-0)(BHamoud)G HuBer 4-9-3 

205 12/03-10 PRESRMIM (t» (Lord H de WWoan) H Cec* 4-8-3 

206 40021-0 THE JOKER (FR1 (Lady Harris) G Baking 6-9-3 

207 3113- CONOUERWG KERO (USA) (H Sangaser) M Stoute 98-9 _ W R Svrinbura 4 


S Carton 2 
R Warner 1 


13-8 Kufuma. 2-1 Preskfiura. 9-4 Conquering Hera, 8-1 Big Reef, 25-1 The Joker. 


FORM: BIG REEF (88) 8lh beNnd Supreme Leader (8-12) in Sandwort YYeSttury 

tstk) wimor 


Stakes, compteted 1985 by (9-71 running out a 3 Ne 
41. £1451 , good. Oct 8. 10 ran). KUFUMA (8-lffl 81 k 
appearance, won this race last year(88) by 41 from 


out a 51 Newcastle winner tram Rrara 
Sliest gf 7 Mend BadtBne 


appearance, 
boa 1*41 C ambridgeshire 
PiffiSHfiuM vw 


iMm 

10) on ra- 


the race last year (8-2) by 41 (ram Sheer Cfiff (8-2) and (9-9) went on to 
2nd to Tremulant (98) (1m 1 f Listed, £37430, 


good to firm. Oct 


to firm. Sept 26. 10 ran). 
: KUFUMA 


3.0 GEORGE SMITH MEMORIAL HANDICAP (3-Y-O: £4,220: 6f) (IQ) 


301 0-33003 

302 01010- MYRA’S SPECIAL 

304 001 SHARPETTO 

307 0228 RIVERA SCENE 

308 043-201 SATTAPOUR(B) 


(Mrs J ! 


{MFusBwSPaMm 98. 
YetaRJDuntapS- 


) A Ingham 9-7 , 
1 9-7 


. RCuranl T2 
TOdkn9 

•3 


309 

311 

312 

314 

315 

316 

317 

318 

319 

320 

321 


403813 HIGHEST P RAISE 
000-000 WEBSTERSHM 


I (PWazeflS Norton 


(H H Aga Khan) R Johnson Houghton 

9-2(7ex)S 

_ I Batting 8-13 {7ex)_ J" 

(L Orohham) M McCormack 88 R 


■ T4 


Troeflar) R Simpson 8-4_ 
loum) C Benstead 8-1 . 

M Dans) R Hannon 8-1. 


11-12430 ROVE® 

100020 PLATTMEy 
00-0222 

424000- LYDIA LANGUISH (Dl (Mrel 
3000-20 CELESTIAL DRIVE (Mrs G 
01000 OUT OF HARMONY (HAS J 
413000 MBOW HOLES — MM 

0080 tachoeterH 

040083 aLVBi FORM (Mrs H Newton) W Wightman 7-7 


. J Lom 4 


SVMrarthZ 
.B Route fl 


Tramway) l 

Jackson) C Hongarr 7-12_ 


R Hannon 7-13. 


MtfcCoun 7-10. 
7-7. 


. L Jonas (5) 16 
- AMcGbneS 
. TOTfioratlS 
R Small 


. OHdcoylO 
N Adana 13 


3-1 Safiapour. 10080 Hirtwsf Prase, 4-1 Sharpetto. 118 Row* 198 Atohtaris, 9- 
l OfHannony. 14-1 others. 


1 Riviera Scene, 12-1 Out I 


1L 


FORM; MYRA’S SPECIAL (97)^^MBH| 

■ERRYMOLES (8-fi) 11 away 3rd (6f, 22824. Oral, ti 

short head York winner tram Esf ahan (8-11), haying 

good, May 14. 11 ran). RIVtBlA SCENE behind on reappearance, lest season (9-0) If 

Goodwood 2nd to Governor General (98)(6f mdn, £2476. good to fton. Sept 30, 1 2 ran). 
SAT1APOUB (8-7)8 FbfcBstonewewar from Sir Amoid (84) (W.E684. good 10 ten. Jme 


from Kgmbus (9-8 
Sept 18. 9 ran). SHARPETTO 

I been clear If out (71 mdn. 


Sanction: MERRVMClLES 


(98) at Sandown (5f, 22590, good, May 27, 14 ran). 


3*30 BALLYMACOLL STUD STAKES (3-Y-O fillies: £8,142: 1m 2f) (10) 


401 

402 

403 

405 

406 

407 
409 

411 

412 
416 


01084 SUSTARA 
1240-1 MK9YAS 
1112-1 


8 - 12 . 


Stfman] P Cole 8-12. 


WK«n)W Hern 8-12. 


Paul Eddery 9 
.TQaion7 


W Carson 4 


200-101 AMONGST THE STARS (USAHD) (Mrs M KeoWi) S Norton 8-9 — J Lowe 8 
HCecfl88 SCartwul 


0-13 

4 APPRKA 
30 

0 LOREEFp 


MaktownJM Stoute 88 „ 

(Lord Dartiyjj WMer 8-9- 


Lady Beawrtnxft) C Britan 88- 

ie LkQ P Ketteway 8-6 

J Dunlop 8-6 - 


. WR Sukdrara 2 
G Starkey 6 

B Rouse 10 

AMcGtae5 


, B7heraaaa3 


58 Salchow. 10080 Bishah. 9-2 Lavender Mist, 118 MMyas. 8-1 OH Domesday 
Book. 10-1 Benarosa. 12-1 Bustard. 14-1 others. 


FORM: BUSTARA (8-12) Jus* over 21 4th behind Danzica (8-1 2) in Italian 1 000 Gtdrwas (8f 
□roup 1 . £41 562. good to soft. Apr 27. 1 7 ran). NKMVAS (8-9) K1 SaBsbury Gtineas TnW 
winner from Swem Adelaide re-1 3)(7f.K7i 2, good® sort. Apr 9. 4 ran). SA1XHOW (9- 
" ChesfwToafcs (lm 41 Listed, ■*- 


B on to beat AHhrna 

WM7. 9 ran). WSmAh ( 

nm3J.ES34.goodtofimi.Ml 


ran). SALCHOW (9- 
KL E15G86. good to 


winner! 

sofu£w7. 9 rmJ.BISHAH (8-1^. 

- ',11 ran). LAVENDER BUST (8-1 3) 31 Yak i 

. — 12. 7 ran), impressive Chester (im 2f) winner OLD 

not get nwch room when. (88) 21 end a head 3rd to PBot Bird (8- 

6) here (lm 21 Listed. £8506. good to sott. May 16, 10 ran). BENAROSA (8-Q ill 
UngfieW 6* behind. frW t>i The Him (ML pravtousiy (8-5 ) 6W Newmarket 4th to 
GesedehJS-IO) AMONGST THE STARS (88) 4f beck Wl (Im 2f Listed. £8864, good. 


May 1. 12 ranL 
Bol e cd on: SALCHOW 


4.0 BERKSHIRE STAKES (2-Y-O: £3.700: 51) (4) 


502 1 FLOOSE 

505 4123 

507 3221 THE 

509 2 LUCIANAGA (BF? 


Satmm)P Cote 8-11. 


(G Howart8pmk) H Hannon 8-11 . 


w Carson 2 


B4 Hoosb. 138 The Dominican, 98 Samleon. 7-1 Lucanaga. 


) B Hta 8-11 B Thomson 4 

■WtfwynM Pas! Eddery 1 


o*. to nr m. may ■■ rBnt.aMaL£UN(»«awiaraor TU Den 

A UigHeM (51 . £2805. good to soft. May 10). TIC DOimMSAN fak 
I to Iboaknagrirth tw &Q) beattog Quick Snap (98) an easy 1 VU at . 

SetocdoR FLOOSE 


430 NETHERAVON HANDICAP (£3.876: Im 5f 60yd) (9) 

601 001008 KING OF COMEDY (L LazaruslC Morgan 4-9-10. 

602 31/0020- BRQAWEAF K5.(A FWtsds) D Harris 588- 


. P Cook 4 


606 4312/P -2 NEWSELLS 

608 P02-201 HLLBTSTALEp^^^H 

609 330100/ FANDANQO UGHT 01 FiOtneM I 
— I llllliri PONT RMB ME (C Tateson) W 


. J Winter 5-S-O 

BaUng488. 

MDEfeworth 


588. 


DOIfT RING ME (C Tateson) W Hasfengs-Bass < 
JOUVENCELLE (H Mould] H Candy 4-7-11 


ANDREA DAWN (D Mttum) A Tumol 5-7-7 


158 Milters Tate, 2-1 NewseOs Park, 3-1 JouvenmSe, 7-1 Don't Ring Me, 10-1 
Kmg Of Comedy, 12-1 others. 


FORM: KING OF COMEDY behind test dme. lest season (7-1 
• iVil at Goodwood (im 41, £4032. good to tom. Sept 14,8 ran] 
2nd to Western Dancer . 

21. 19 ran). NEWSELLS P 


41. £4032. good to firm. Sept 14, 1 

(881inTheEbor ai York (Im 81 Listed, £41560. good to sott, Aug 
i PARK (9-2) having first outing lor owrayear when l v*l nnw- 
up to insular n0-01aJ Newmaiket (Im 6 Si. £3174. good 10 firm, May 30. 12 ran). 
ShLLOTS^ 7Att (98) 1 1 BrWrton winner from Waldsin (Mfwilh sametoing In hand (Im 
41. £2103. good to firm, May 29, lOranj. JOUvigcaxk(7-12)3l2nd toRoctarat9-lO) 
---.fBayai.Btaifl. 


im 31. £2516, j 


Goodwood results 


Going: good to firm 

2J30 (Im 21) 1. ON TENTERHOOKS (Pat 
Eddery. 6-5 favfc Z Canarfiao Star (T 
Lucas. 10-1); 3. Akcrattie (B Thomson. 
20-1). ALSO RAN: 4 Enswne, 138 Miss 
Staley (6th). 12 Shanuyda. 20 Ebotfto 
(4th), Ashshafak. Home Heat Rattle 
Along. 25 Fufl Speed Ahead. God’s Path 


. 33 Caputet 50-1 Lucky Lad. Nora's 
f. Richmond Street Risk 


. . Out Yonder. 

Another, Ptadda Process. 19 ran. nk. WL 
SI. 11. hd. J Thw at Beckhampton. Tate: 
£2.00; £130. £480. £520. DF: C3950. 
CSF: £1592. ante 12-BOsec. 


38 (51) 1. VIVA RONDA (J RekL 94 H- 
tar% z Pink Pinddn (J Matlhes. 5-2); 3. 


Survival KB 
RAN: 8 Jan's 


Hollow (5th). 25 Bonn 
Tima 


L94 Jt-fov). ALSO 
[4thL 20 DonneBy's 
j (6tni. 6 ran. NR; 


Good Time' GoL 101. 21, 7L nk, 8 Pat 
Mdchefl at Polecats. Tote: £240; £1.30. 
£2JXL DF; £6^9 CSF: £7.69. 1 nan 
02.74sae. Wnner bought In for 3,600 gns. 
3J0 (Im) 1. SMOOCH (S Whitworth. 6- 


CH (S WTWwc . 

1). Z Greet DBemma (B Thomson. 50-1 


Eddery. 48 


O-lk 

n 


ALSO RAN: 6 Sliming Pm^ 


3 . Land Of Ivory (Pat f 
) RAN: 6 Shining 
Hanoo((4th]L 16 Shining Stan. 

Wave. 25 ftam i d a bta Dancer (5lh). 50 
Alceba. Mistral Magto 10 ran. 3L a 1L 3t 
2L K Brassey at Upper Umbatan. Tote: 
£880: t1.SD. sa&srm DP: £1^57-50. 
CSF: £17832. 1 min 44 81 sea 
4JI (Im 61) 1. SARFRAZ (A dark. 138 
favL 2. Onisky (T Quten, 7-2); 3. Tap 'em 
Twice (W Carson. 9-4). ALSO RAN: 14 
Murfax (4th), Norfdc Sonata (6«iL 16 
Longghum (5thL 6 ran. Kl. S. 4L 201. Kl. 
G HSwood at Putborough. Tom: £280; 
£130. £1.50. DF: £380. CSF: £7.17. Wn 
0B28ne. 


YARMOUTH 


I to firm 

-Im, high numbers slight advantage 

2.15 FLEGGS SELLING STAKES (2-Y-O: £65& S) 
(7 runners) 

1 082 BLOW FOR HOME (BFJDModay 8-11 GDuftWdB 

2 BUDSHEAD M TampknsS-l 1 MHtamwr4 

3 804 DORtESTONE LAD(Q R Stutlb3 B-11^. J Brawn p) 7 

6 8 ROAN BEff (B) Mrs N Macaulay 8-11 — W Wharton 3 

7 002 ARDNACROSS JDouglas-Hanie88 RGochrm2 

10 4 KBffl LADY JWftntOf 8-8 T Ives 5 

14 40 SPARKLJNG JUDY J Sctften 58 AMackayl 


345 WREN HANDICAP (£2JX& Im 6f) (7) 

10080 TDUCHEZLE BOS M Tompkins 58-10. RCodaenel 
2 2431 WESSEX WNTbtor48-W^^-MBniatomra 4 


3 0304 SUGAR 


TOR 


TlwS 


4 1318 LOVE WALKS) W Holden 58-10. R Morse (9 S 


5 -an QLOMALTONJ' 


188. 


P Robinson 2 
I GDUMeMT 
BOesatayS 


6 040- BBS MAWETBMGBkm 4-7-ML 

7 800 FAR TOGO M Chapman 4-7-11— 

11-4 Sugar Palm. 3-1 Lore Wafted to. 98 Wessex, 118 

Old Mafton. B-1 Touchoz Le Bote. 10-1 Far To Go. 

4.15 MERCHANTS HOUSE MAIDEN FflJJES 


STAKES (3-Y-O: £964: Im 3f 100yd) (20) 


158 Ardnacross. 10080 Budshead. 4-1 Dormestora Lad. 
6-1 Blow For Home. 8-1 Kind Utty. 12-1 Sparkling Judy. 16-1 
Roan Reef. 


0- ABSCOMDMGM Jams 8-11 

0 DUSK APPROACHES J Winter B-11 

O GONE OVERBOARD (USA) A Stewart 


. T Ives 2 


PHMfaiaB9 


Yarmouth selections 

By Mandarin 

Kind Lady. 2.45 Trikymia. 3.15 


0-30 HIGHEST NOTE GBkm8-11 

03 JAME-OM Ryan 8-11 

0 JUMLEE JAMBOREE A Hde 8-11 ■ 


5-1 IM Roberts 20 

■Hitawlt 


08 KES> HOPING EHrftor 8-11. 

0 KENANGA H Cecfl 8-11 , 

0 LA CA2AD0RARJ WHm 8-11. 


PRabinaon 17 
. PBntt(7)10 
GSaxmS 


480 (Im 4f) 1. TAX1ADS (Jane ABson, 
6-1): Z DominMe(Mr D Benneyvtocth. 10- 
1). 3, Aittcot (OebbB Albion, 33-1): 4, 


Socks Up (Gate Johnson Houghton, 12-1). 

Tbe M a sis Bi ppian 


ALSO RAN: 10080 fav The 
(5th), 7 Arges. 15-2 Marsh Hamer. 10 
Coral Harbour, Palace Yard (6ch]. 12 
14 Tournament Leader, 16 
Of Summer, Pan* North. 25 
, Janaato, 33 Hackers Jewel, Pandl 
Rosanna Of Tedfoid- 18 ran. 2KL 9, 


hd. 31. 2L C Nelson at Upper Lamboum. 

lOKOm £2.30. 


Tricaat 


Tote: £450; £1.60. E2.1 
DF: £1520. CSF: £87.16. 
£1,717.26. 0 t*i 44j42sbc. 

5J)(8t) 1. DOMINO FIRE (W Carson. 9- 
2); Z MazSer (G Starkey, 54 lav); Z Bay 
Window (J Reid. 9-1). ALSO RAN: 6 
Apnac, 9 Love Train (4tt>). 12 Fburth Led. 
Peter Moon. 14 Nawwar. 20 Emma's 
Whisper. Persian Dynasty. 25 Beryl's 
Joke (5to), 33 French King. KeeL Party 
Match. Trava. Tropical Boy (8th). 16 ran. 
NR: Serwsbea. 2L 3L XI, a. 21. J Otanlqp 
el AnmdeL Tote: £6.00; £1/40. £180. 
£330 DF: £8.10 CSF: £11-74. 1n*i 
16.73980. 


580 (54 1. WOODFOLD (B Bouse, B-lk 
Z Fountain Beta (G Starkey. 78): 3. 


Braun Beer Bn (W Carson. 118 
6 Bteteor Mise. 8 ' 


ALSO RAN: 6 
12 Utoe Starchy (5th J, 16 Commander 
Mbs den (4th). 20 Shared, 50 Battvww 
(6th). 9 ran. 1X1. KL5L2KL XI. J Winter at 
Newmarket. Tote: £8.70; £2.70, £1.10, 
£1.10. DF: £1580. CSF: £3581. 1mm 
0283*80. 

Jackpot not vran, Piocepot £7X05 


Yarmouth 


Going: good totem. 

2.15 fit 25yd) 1. BORN TO RACE (T 
Ires. 1S»: Z Uurtaa Warder (E Guest 
Z Wak (S Cauthan. 1-4 lav). ALSO 


10 


Newhaw 


5 ran. NR; Spanish 
iLlPtec 


16 


1XL dead haaL 10. 1XL L Piggott at 
" TOTauries 


Newmarket Tote: £580 £2.70 


Warrior £2.10, Mfsk 50p- DF: Bom To 
Race A Laurtes Warrior £12.10, Bam To 


Race & Mate £1 J20. CSF: Bam Tb Race & 
Warrior 


Laurtes Warrior £4433. Bom To Race & 
Mbk £4.85. No official times 
2ASgfflJ1. MARTON BOY (T Ives. 12- 


l):2. 1 


r do Hustle (S Cauthen, 3-1); 3, 


Bateau (A Bond. 8-1L ALSO RAN; 2 lav 
Boris (6th). 5 


Una Tent^(4ffi) 6 


Young 

Dates Smith (Sth). 1 6 L’Etoile de 
ran. sh hd. XL *L 21. nk. S Wiles at 
Wakefield. Tore: £1180: £4.00. £1.70. DR 
£980. CSF: £44.72. No bid. 


3.15 (lm 2f) 1. ATOKA fR HSs. 11-4 jt- 
Rmsian Notaia <W R SwvUxm. 11- 


fav):2. 


4 it-favk 3, Sondnan (A Geran, 8-1). ALSO 
RAN: Bill 


The Howard (4th). 8 Bel Oscar. 11 
Roman Bech^ethjjSama Wood {5th). 16 


Heathgnff, 


Timber Merchant 33 


£1.90. Dft £680. CSF: £10.79. Trtcast 
£48.76. 


3AS (5f ZSyQT 1. SBJEMT MAJORITY 


te 2. The M echan ic (RHffla. 
Ridge (P RotMnson.5-1): 4. i 
l (TWraons. 15-2). ALSO R 


10- 


£ 


hres.7 
3. 

Mechtoa (T Wlttams. 15-2L ALSO RAN: 9- 
2tev Laleston. 5 DaviB (Sth). 10 Pmetun. 
Show Home (6th), 12 Hifrnay. 14 
Gassom, zo Alice fin 
ence. 2S Princess 

PMaco. 33 Mr Panache. Shtevoan. St 
Terramw. 17 ran. NR: Rapid Nk&S. 1X1. 
1X1. KL 1L «l. W O'Gorman at New- 
market Tote: £9.40: £2.10. £4.10, £3.40. 
£280. DF: £4680. CSF; £7986. Tncast 


4.15 (Im 6f) 1. RHYTHMIC BLUES (S 
Ceuthor. 6-1); 2. Motgioi u ArneBrysttW H 


Swanbum. 1 i r IO^to^3. Chafice 


(T kies. 15-2). 


RAN: 7 Dunston. 


(fth^ktoridey Down, 16-2 CuMn SouxL 


... FMftarMthfc 40 Bedhead (Sto), 

Btelran Nevflte, BdofSon. Dive Encore. 
MasBeteL 12ran.1L«TlL 4l.5LHCec4 
at Newmarket Tote: £440: £1.80, £1.10, 
£2.60. OF: £3.40. CSF: £1382. 


MDYANS Cauthen (28 lev): 


7-2 Lord 


(6111, MXIYAN S 
QTUjylkm (M H 
ter R3 Ouffieftt l 
rd CoBns (4thl. 


HO*. 12-11: 3. Nag 

alsoraS 


. 16-1). _ . . 
(4th). 16 BN Lavender 
eoi). Mmnes (6th), 40 Fartown. Oriental 
Dream, Shane. Trompe tfOeA lOran-SL 
2L3L XI. nd-H Cedi at NewmerkeL Tots: 
£180: £1.10. £240. £280. DF: £1080. 
CSF; £7.71. Ptacopofc C9.70 

• Henry Cecil was mystified by 
the defeat of his 4-1 on shot 
Misk at Yarmouth yesterday. 
The newcomer had worked 
brilliantly and Cecil had ear- 
marked him for Royal Ascot. 
However, those plans have been 
shelved after his defeat by Lester 
Piggotl's Bom To Race in the 
John Hoidricb Slakes. Cecil will 
not have a two-year-old runner 
at the Royal meeting. 


115 Kind Lady. 2.45 Trikymia. 3.15 AI 

Zumurrud. 3.45 Old Maltou. 4.15 Transcen- 
dence. 4.45 Black Diamond. 

By Our Newmarket Correspondent 
2.15 Kind Lady. 2.45 Trikymia. 3.15 AI 

Zumurrud. 3.45 Old Mai ton. 4.15 Transcen- 
dence. 4.45 Mr Jay-Zee 


LOUVEOENJIE3 (USA) 0 Dounb 8-11 . 

MY ANNADETSKYAMadvnr 8-11 


W Ryan 4 
IM&14 


G Thorns 1 
5 


14 008 

16 8 OUnNaORAF Durr 8-11 G Fmdi 6 

16 2200 SAY SOMETHING (B) J Writer 8-1 1 A Macke* 12 

17 SLYWffiSIfUSMBttBbiayWI- AGnamit 

18 800 SOKOLOVA M Pipe 841 QDofSHdIS 

19 0 STRAW BOATER L CunaM 8-11 R Guest 7 

20 0 STRIKE HOME M Stoute 6-11 A KMwrtoy 13 


» 02 TRANSONSCE^SSJB Hatouy B-n_-_G BnwB 


25 428 WARM WBCOffiG^tlWBjg 8-11. 


2.45 FRITTON LAKE MASJEN FILLIES STAKES (2- 
Y-O: £1,180: 5f 25yd) (8) 

1 0 BAY WONDER G Pritchard-Gcrdon B-11 -. GMfieU 3 

2 BE CHEERFUL J Winter Ml Thru* 2 

3 CRISP HEART J Winter B-11 AMactayS 

B 0 FLRTWGR Hannon 8-11 R Cochran 7 

8 00 KAMSTARD Leake 6-11 W Wharton 6 


WM1H DBM7WG G HufKr 8-11 B Carter (^11 

5-4 Kenanga. 10080 Strike Home. 5-t Straw Boater. 8-1 
Transoandenoa, 10-1 Say Somettung, 12-1 Louctaones. 

4.45 HEYDON HALL APPRENTICE HANDICAP 

(£1.450: 7f) (20) 

1 0000 JOIW PATRICK W0Gonnan 5-108 ACoteane2 

4 088 S0IGMG BOT A HUa 5-9-1 P Brat! 5 

6 081 MRJAY-ZBENCBlMlhen4-ft4ffiai4 SOnm4 


NANCY NONESUCH (USA) R Armstrong 


TRKVMMH OKI 8-11. 


6-IIGSextoal 
W Ryan 4 


8 180 CUPSALL {□] J Soon 488 AJQwau15 

FASHION (USA) D Ode 488 P Stratbara 19 


WABARAHH Thomson Jones B-11 A Murray 5 

8-11 Trtkyirta. 7-2 Wabanto. 6-1 Be ChaarfUL 8-1 Crisp 
Heart 12-1 Nancy Nonesuch. 14-1 others. 


S 080 ELEGANT 
110080 MR PANACHE M 
12 3840 HOPEFUL KATIE (B) .. 

15 083 BLACK DIAMOND A Janil 383 

16 3400 HOKUSAN K Ivory 488 

17 800 CATS LULLABY fll)S Dow 488. 


Chapman 48-7, 

(gig O tjwte 488 Stogo ry^)9 


N Canon 8 

9 


■ PSfareeli 


3.15 RADIO NORFOLK HANDICAP (3-Y-O: £2.448: 

1m21)(6) 


18 008 WMTER WORDS (D) Mrs CUoyddontS 

78-1 Wendy Jonas 1 

19 -200 ABSOLUTE MASTBIM Jante 3-7-12 R Hatton 12 


A Hooey 2 
.REkraetS 


1 213- MBAAFFH Thomson Jonas 9-7 

2 282 CHNOISERiE (U8ANBF) L Cunanri 98 . 

4 318 KBWY MAY SMGM Ryan 8-10 PfMftasouB 

5 0-12 ALZU4URRUO(BF)R Armstrong 63 G Baxter 1 

6 0220 CAROmNCafeghanBO GDaftaM3 

9 080 RANKAGH WHoSen 78 R Horae (5) 4 


21 008 DALLAS SMITH (USANDIM Chapman 5-7-10 11 

22 080 EUCHARB A Hide 4-7-10 MadtGtas20 


23 080 HJEOLKHAffl) A Hide 4-7-9 

(uGHTY M Tomptans 3-78— B Cook (5) IS 


138 Chtookwria, 3-1 Mtaaafl. 4-1 AI Zumurrud, 3-1 Kerry 
May Sing. 10-1 Icaro, 12-1 Ranabgh. 


34 008 NAUGHTY 
250038 MGHLY PLACED EEkfci 4-78 
26 9(0- SPBCET BtL (BJ G Gracay 9-7-7. 

28 280 TROTCO P Hastem 3-7-7 

31 OpO SWEET ANDY G Gracay 7-7-7 „ 


SChfidsS 


GRtaglS 

NOfHHMieiia 


LRiggn 10 


. G Bmtaaf G 


1 Black 


3-1 My JByZee. 78 HigMyPlBsed. 5-1 Absolute Muter. 3- 
: Diannnd, 8-1 Hopeful Katie, 10-1 Hokusan. 


BEVERLEY 


7J5 HILARY NEEDLB) TROPHY (2-y-o ffflles: 
£4347:5f)(8) 


Good toftrm 


Draw: high numbers best 
HURN 


(0) J Bb ering te n 88- 


6.45 HURN APPRENTICE SELLING HANDICAP 
(£1 ,007: Im 21) (19 runners) 

4 480 DUBAVARNAC Gray 5-9-7 MMedtay5 

5 0320 MURQJjO (Bl F Carr 10-9-5 JC*rt2 

8 -004 MUStCAL (MJ. (PIT Faktiurst 48-4 C Coales 11 

7 IDS- EARL'S COURT RRikS 1088 SP Griffith* 15 

9 am UTILE DMPLEBPraece488 n Adore* (7)7 

10 823 VERBADMG rafinWS Norton 488 JGMram(h 13 
12 840 CADBdTE M Camwho 4-3-13 E Quasi B 


2 31 GLOW AGAM 

4 01 QUITE 50 

5 144 SAXON STi 

6 1 UPPER (0) 

7 0302 AW OF 

10 832 KALA’S MAGE 
13 0422 MMIZENLASS 
15 42 SPAMSHSLVPER W Haigh 34 


M Wood 2 



MBkch 4 
KOedcy 5 
N Day 3 


58 Upper, 78 Saxon Snr. Quito So. 9-2 Sow Again. 8-1 
Kolas (mags, 10-1 Air Of Spring, 12-1 others. 


8.5 WELTON MAIDEN STAKES (3-y-o: El ,160: 2mj. 


13 082 BUNDLING BED R WocxflMusa 4-3-11_ S Hwttar (7) 14 

14 800 JOHNNY RBiCHMAN A Itatson 58-11 A Woods (7) 4 


( 8 ) 


15 00-2 TARUETONPRolai 98-11 

16 280 FQXCR0FT (mjnPKariam 38-11- 

17 W43 RECORD HAULS! WKatgh 48-11 _ 

18 008 PENMLESS DANCBI TKwsey 78-10 M Mcftartison 2 

19 000/ mNSANTO LAD K Htning S3-' 

20 000- 


JQekn17 

Pm (7) 19 

JH Brawn 18 


WYOMWGTKarsay 48-lfi 

□RTWC wens 688. 


no. 


Gay KaBawayO 

David Eddery 3 
■ASbooRs 16 


480 DEMON FATE (USA) F Durr 98- 
082 QOOOTHis HAL J Hlndtey 98 . 


_0 SB CHESTER GOttWd 98 

■ a«WRRE CHAP H Wanoo 98- 


KQadey? 

MHMsB 


0 TUWA MSA) M 
0 MARBLE MOON 


U Jarvis 9-0- 


220008 ROYAL EXPORT 
23 OOCg CROWFOOTS COUTURE J Parties 588 R Viekm (7) 1 

27 340 FOREVBI YOUNG GOMnwd 27-10 PBnfce(7)9 

28 0000 RAP® STAR G Harman 3-7-9 —10 

11-4 Burafflng ged, 78 VetbacSng. 98 Tarieton. 118 

Musical WM, 7-1 Murtta, 181 Record Haider, 12-1 Lktfe 
Dfmpta 14-1 ottiere. 


RHoCnshaadS-ll. 

14 008 WCOL90 Jawny ftogan*! 8-11 . 


GDufiMdS 
DWchota2 
.GGosaayO 
_ T Lucas 4 
_ S Perks 1 
_ M Birat 3 


Beverley selections 


By Mandarin 
6.45 TarletcnL 7.10 In Fact 7.35 Saxon Star. 8.5 
In Dreams. 8.35 Stanford Vale. 9.5 Miami In 
Spring. 

By Our Newmarket Correspondent 
6.45 FoxcrofL 7.10 John Russell. 7.35 Saxon 
Street- 8.5 In Dreams. 8.35 Lost Opportunity. 9.5 
Great Topic. 

Michael Seely's selection: 7.35 Saxon Star. 


138 in Dreams, 58 Goodtime Hrt, 3-1 Demon Ftte. 8-1 
Ttanba, 14-1 Mart* Moon. 20-1 others. 

845 ‘RACE-A-ROUND* YORKSHIRE HANDICAP 
(3-y-o: Cl .735: Im 100yd) (19) 

4 0001 BLACK COMBIYG Lewis 311 PWM*re>12 

5 2231 STANFORD VALE C Nelson 9-10 ; — J Raid 15 

8 890 ROYAL ROUSED R HtaSnsfieed 9-7_ S Parka 11 

9 020 SAALtB H Thomson Jones 37- P if Anar 7 

10 008 H0rUWNGFC8rr98 S Moots 1C 

12 0002 COUNT ALMAVIVA M Banshaid 9-4__ R Cochrane 19 

13 000- FLYMG BKJDY^HA) J hinday 92 MHMs2 


14 008 QURRAT AL AM M H Easterty 98 . 

15 000- ROSS BLAKE M Britain 32. 


IE 4-20 LOST OPPORTUNITY BHarfeuy 32 


18 1-00 MPPY CHIPPY ffilMWEasiertra 313- 
TCUUAXJWtaORi 


11 . 


March 18 

KDartay 10 
- 4 Low* 5 
. T Lucas G 

flDMIMf4 


7.10 BISHOP BURTON EBF STAKES (£3.168: 51) 
(7) 


22 (ms GAPSTNANO 

23 rn PELLS CLOSE MWEasttby 311 KHodoaon3 

24 -004 F«E ROCHET P Cote 310 T Oaten 1 

25 G» BRADBURY HALL K Sum 310 P Robinson 13 

26 -003 MOKSTROSA J Spearing 8-9 — DMchotaB 

87 ms JOHNSTAN BOYC Tkikter 39 M Wood 9 

28 080 COtWTRUlSI Denys Srrtth 88 M Fry 17 

29 801 HARE MJ.P Rohan 38 JBtaredaie14 


78 StanftnJ Vata. 98 Hare FW. 118 Black Comedy. 31 
Saalt). 31 Court Aknaviva, Lost Opportunity, 131 HreRoduL 


3 BUnWOB ARROW K Bridgwater 488 PifArey 6 

4 0002 CRETE CARGO (D) M Eftaids 38-12- SWlrtanrth7 

5 3«l TRIE NORA mCNfllsui 388 

8 23 IN FACT J Tree 38-5 H 


9 


JOHM BUSS ELL M Ryan 3-1 

■■^HHPUUSEmi 


. JReid4 
)3 


SL5 BEVERLEY HANDICAP (3-y-o: El ,455: Im 4f) 


. PRobknonl 


LADY ST CLAIR (B) deron 
4 0040 raSCVI£IB)GLewts98. 


1 -DM 


SMtfi37. 


10 030 NOR1*RN«PUSE W (BF)BL_^ cDb|i ^ 2 

13 804 PACKAGE PBWECnONTFMurat 

332 J Catalan (7) 5 
34 to Fact 4-1 True Nora. 31 Northern braxAse, 7-1 Crete 
Cargo, 131 John Rustefl, 12-1 Package Perferatan, 231 
Bumng Arrow. 


:LCbraaock4 
. P WaidronS 


6 080 GREAT TOPtoqn GPntchan«5ordon 30 G Duffiaid 2 

7 311 MMHMSPRKG (UR Stubbs 30 perg D MchoBa7 

9 @140 STAN00N MILL J Vlfeon 36 KDedayS 

12 0043 NOT A PROBLEM (B) Denys Smltfi 33 TOtteaS 

13 003 nBER GATE R KaSnslied 31 PH*(7J1 


138 Mtenfi In Spring, 10080 Not A Problem, 98 Lady St 
Clair. 7-1 ttsdple. 31 Standon MB. 131 Great Topic. 


Course specialists 


NEWBURY 

TRAWERS: H CecB. 40 winners tram 100 

runners. 37.7%: M Stoute. 23 from 66. 

204%: C Brtoatn, 14 from 106. 138% 
JOCKEYS; Pat Eddery. 35 winners from 

1S6 rides, 17.9% S Cautoen. 43 from 246, 

17.5% G Starkey. 19 from 148, 133% 


YARMOUTH 

TRAMER& Hi Cee4. 58 wtenera hum 160 
runners. 38.7% A Stewart, 7 from 29, 
24.1% W ggorman. IB from 90. 20.0% 
JOCKEYS: A fOmtHfley. 11 wkmerelram 
50 rides. 22-0% R Guest 11 from 68 
132% 


BEVERLEY 

TRAWERS: P Cote. 5 winners from 13 
runnera 3&S% h Thomson Jones, 12 
from 33. 36.4% a Henbura. 7 from 29. 
24.1. 

JQCKEISe W R Swmburn, 17 winners 
horn 57 nd89, 29 -B%; A Muntor. B from 27. 
29.6%: J Rekf. 9 from 48, 138% 


Blinkered first time 


YARMWmfcXiS learo. 4.15 Say Some- 

BO^^I^wSliorlhem fmpUas. 95 
lady St Ctair, Great Topto, Drtepte- 


Saint-Martin 
is injured 


Yves Saint-Martin dislocated 
bis collar-bone when Big Sink 
Hope fell after finishing fourth 
in the Prix Faucheur at Saint- 
Cloud on Monday. X-raysat the 
Jockeys' hospital at Chantilly 
yesterday revealed the damage 
and the 15-tiroes French cham- 
pion will be sidelined for at least 
a fortnight 

The stewards decided that 
Henri Samani, who rode the 
winner of the race. Putting, was 
to blame and suspended him for 
ISdays. 

Ivor’s Image, who won the 
Oaks d'halia last lime out, will 
represent Michael Stoute in the 
Prix de Diane Hermes (French 
Oaks) at Chantilly on Sunday. 
Also in the line-up will be the 
Irish L000 Guineas second. 
Lake Champlain. 


Goodwood - Tuesday 


Going: 

course: 


course: good, round 
firm 


6.15(71)1. NatireOakJS Cauthen. 118 
favfc 2, Georgia River (7-2); 3 , OW® By(2S- 
n.9 ran. a. 1L H Cecfl- Tote; £2.1 0: £1 .10, 
£1.10. £4.40. OF: £280. CSF: £&23. 

6j45(fm 4f) 1. FteMiMl (VV Oraon, 7- 
ik 2. Waioieln ra-ik 4 Khete King Q2-1). 
14 ran. 1X1. Al SVM 1S&2k 
£1.90, £1.50, £433 Dft £8.10. CSF; 
£42.03. 

£7.7a CSft £22^9. Iricaat: E150SS. 

7.45 fflfl 1. CaraTa Domra (B 
son. 5-6 tevt 2. Samella Gray H3lfc 3, 
Tender TW&ffl- 5 ran. NR-.HardAeL»L 
41. B Hits. Tote: £180: £1^0.2280. DF: 
Q«LCSft£a27. 

8.15 (ini) 1, A ven lta o (ftot Eddtey. 311 

SfSSliBSfai^Stf 

£t JO. £1 JO. DftSADL CSF: P.11- 
axs pm 20 1. SOtau (T WMams, il-it 
2. Farewell To Love (48 fa* 3, H uane n 
(6-1). 9 ran. sh hd, 10. P Mam. To®: 
£1580: £440, £1.10, £L20. D Pi £930- 
CSft£2050. 

Ractpob£S70 . 


1 Thoov 


BOXfNG 



of attempt 
at world title 


Tory Marsh's dream of 

becoming world Kghl-w riicr- 

- wciglti champion was sharteiw 
vesterrfay by tbe news that the 

Work! Boxing Association title 
holder. F airia o Oliva, of Italy, 
has pulled out of shear contest in 

Monte Carlo next month- 
The Basildon fireman be- 
lieved he had realized bis life’s 
ambition when he teamed he 
was to get a chance on July >2of 
adding the world title to his 
European crown. 

But Marsh was told yesterday 
that Oliva's manager has de- 
cided not to go ahead with the 
bout and that the Italian wiD 
now voluntarily defend his title 
against a different opponent. 
Brian Brunette, an American. 
The news came as a huge 


diuppftinuitcr.t ft) Mm* amf 

his tramef. Ernie Tossey. who 
believes ihe Italian’s decision to 
back out is a tribute to the 
quality of Marsh's test perfor- 
mance — a seven-round knock- 
out of Ricky Kaiser, of the 
United Stares, at .Alexandra 
Pavilion last month. 

Three of Frank Bruno’s 
smbtemates win be on the 
supporting progra mme at Wem- 
bley Stadium on July t9 when 
he challenges Tur. Witherspoon 
for the W B \ heavyweight tide. 
Jim McDonnell defends his 
European featherweight title 
against Salvatore BotugJien. of 
Italy. Horace Notice meets the 
.American heavyweight Mark 
Lee. and Mark Kayior meets 
Tony Cerda. 


ROWING 


Pembroke 
are still 


favourite 


By a Special Correspondent 


Pembroke look likely to hang 
on to tbe headship of < 


the May 

bumps in Cambridge. Last 
year's deposed head boat. 
Downing, does hot appear to be 
dangerous, although they re- 
tained the headship of the Lents 
last term. 


In the Lents Pembroke were 
the outsiders. Starting fifth the).’ 
ended up in the challengers 
position after missing a bump 
on tbe first day. Ironically, the 
crew considered by many to be 
Pembroke’s main threat — Caius 
— also start fifth and again it all 
depends on the first day. Caius. 
fastest college in the Head of the 
Cam at the beginning of term, 
rhurep the slower Lady Margaret 
who. in turn, chase slower 
Emmanuel. If Caius can catch 
‘Maggie’ before they bump 
Emmanuel then a good race for 
the headship is in prospect for 
Saturday. 


Lower down, 1st and 3rd 
Trinity, surprise winners of the 
premier eights event at Cam- 
bridge regatta, could well win 
their oars. 


MOTOR RALLYING 


Siuxdstrom 
makes it 
look easy 


RESXAT&I.MS<eiestrom(Rfl. Peugeot). 

3hr 54nw 27sec2. M Loves (Eng. Ford). 


(EnaForri), 

44XL433. B WWdegMRS (Srae. Teyotoi. 
4:54 43. 4. D GMnriera (Scot. Metro). 
4:09-005. R Brookes (Eng. Opel MantaL 
4J029- Ovanril pwrtlnna (after lour 
rounds): 1 . Brakes. 47pls, Z Low*. 45; H 
Mlduta. 40: 4. D Lleraeeyr. 34; 5. J 
McRae. 27 


SWIMMING 


Battle is waged 
for Cowley’s 
right to Gaines 


Swimming officials are to 
continue a right to get the South 
African-born Annette Cowley 
into the Commonwealth Games 
in Edinburgh. 


gave the athlete. Zola Budd. the 
go-ahead because die owns a 
house in Guildford. - 


Wigan Wasps, the club of the 
freestyle- swimmer, aged 19, 
have asked the Games Council 
for England to consider her 
eligibility again. They will also 
consult a barrister specializing 
in sports law in a bid to 
strengthen their case. The Coun- 
cil yesterday ruled that Miss: 
Cowley, a University of Texas 
student with a British passport, 
could not compete in 
Edinburgh. 


.. The Wigan dub havx asked 
the council for a personal hear- 
ing for Miss Cowley, who won 
two titles az tbe recent national 
championships. 


At tiie same meeting, they 


Tbe secretary. Jean Hodges, 
said: **We believe she should be 
given tire opportunity to speak 
on her own behalf. We have 
already taken some legal advice 
and are convinced that like Zola 
Budd. Miss Cowley can com- 
pete in the games. On the face of 
it the only difference between 
them is that one owns a house 
and the other does not," 


SQUASH RACKETS 


Harlow looks safe as 
the Bank of England 


By Colin McQuillan 


The Dunlop Champion of 
Champions tournament moves 
through regional quarter-finals 
at Whetstone and Wandsworth 
towards North v South grand 
finals on Saturday. 

The northern field is domi- 
nated by Lorraine Harlow, the 
Brenfield champion, a Bank of 
England officer fervent in her 
amateurism and generally re- 
garded as the best part-time 
player in the country. 

In the South a trio of young, 
dedicated near-professionals is 


likely to be resisted only by 
‘ ~ ' " ‘ Yard 


Amanda Pugh, a Scotland 

solid tor and a Civil Service 
champion. Senga McFie, aged 
16, the Richmond Town cham- 

g ion, who holds the under- i 9 
ritish title, is. likely to be too 
strong for Pugh in the semi- 


finals, at which stage the undcr- 
16 British champion. Sue 
Wright, of Howdon Cub. will 
probably meet Natalie Le Serve, 
-aged 18. who surprisingly won 
the Champion of Champions 
title two years ago and coaches 
part-time at the Sutton and 
Cheam Squash Cub. 

NORTH REGION QUARTER-FINALS: 
Woman L Harlow (Bronfieta) bt F Lynham 
(MranajJW. 98, 9-0; A WOains (St 
Atoens) M S Johnson (Wansteae!) 9-7. 98, 

SSAjfWS'HWhS! 

Mauris (Stodeehams) M L Fernando 
(Cheabunt) 98. 108.9-3; A Gough (Oeste) 
WM Toppng (Hendon) 9-4. 48. 98. 78. 

SOOTH REGION QUARTER-FINALS: 
Womb: S Mcfte (Richmond Town) bt K 
Prescott 98. 9-7,98: A Pugh (Wtatotodon 
SquasM H C BajiJtatd (Sparrows Farm) 9- 
0^-4. W-MeraM Baker (Surbiton) M H 
Of*®®*** W. 98. 9-7: S Radtey 
gtewWdden^ ut L Goss (Purtey cq 98 


POLO 


Lloyds mark 
foundation 
with victory 

By John Watson 


A large crowd turned out at 
Smith's Lawn, Windsor Great 
Park, yesterday to witness the 
match for the Tudorbuiy Tro- 
phy. the inaugural duel to mark 
tire foundation of the Lloyds of 
London Polo Cub. 

Their opponents were Wind- 
sor Park, who are based on 
Galem Weston's medium-goal 
Maple Leafs, whh tire Austra- 
lian four-goaler, Derek Reid, 
replacing two-goal Weston. 
Thus, by aggregating the high- 
goal 17 handicap, Windsor were 
playing on level terms. 

. Ronald Ferguson opened tire 
Lloyds account, and Charles 
Graham that . of Windsor. 
Bearmao, the Uoyds captain, 
then put his team into a lead 
they never lost. In the fourth 

lea, Paul Withers scored 

twice to put Lloyds ahead at 5-3. 
bur- in. the fast ebukka 
Graham reduced Uoyds” victory 

to 5-4. • 

LLOYDS OF LONDON: 1. G Bearmah 
2. 3 Tomfca on P WKhera (7); 

R 


1, D Raid (4k Z G 

Gntfwn KH3, AOevncti (7);Bacit»HRH 


ThaPriocoonwes^ 


TODAY’S FIXTURES 


CRICKET 


BEMSON AND HB3GE8 CW 

QuJ ft* ■ 

anna -units 

WORCESTER: Woroesierslarew Kent 

Harrogaar YofkstwB w 

* FS; Brtdgnorta Hong Kong v 
g™ MATCH: Cote ratee. hetend « 
SECOND H CHAMPIONSHIP: c tothr. 

SSnaeteasate 

WtmSWr - 


OTHER SPORT 


A222ta E I'a.“? , ^2? , • rteo,, Shield: 




NaSS^aJr* 8 *" apWB ** w 
Srkto h women's amateur 

SSSSSSJfl^^Ftoin Lvm v 


,*g yh. owo rd y sheHteto . 

gBasa gap*- 






Mikael Sundstrom. of Fin- 
bad, finished a dear winner of 
the Lloyds Bo« maker Scottish 
rally m 'Glasgow yesterday. 

Driving a Peugeot 205, 
Suiidsmxn - the overnight 
leader — came home six minutes 
ahead of the Somerset dnver. 
Mark Lovefl. in his Ford RS20Q, 
with Bjorn Waldegaard 
(Tovou). of Sweden, third. 

Sundstrom. aged 28, took 
over the lead when Malcolm 
Wilson was forced to retire on 
Monday morning and gradually 
extended his advantage during 
ihe closing stages of the 40-siage 
event. 

Russell Brookes, the reigning 
British champion from Worcev 
ter. finished fifth after a con- 
trolled drive in his Opd Manta 
and now has a two-point lead 
over Lovell at the top of the 
Shell Oils RAC championship 
table after four rounds. 


- - *4' 


Hefelier di 


id enc e 


sbabv.e fai 
wain K ( 1 



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e nie 


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Fi.f 


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Hiv 

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W:?' 


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wid & 


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: V«v7 


THE 


WEDNESDAY JUNE \ 1 1986 


TENNIS 


Jeralmer survivor of 
‘Russian roulette’ 
with English No. 1 


Mike DePalmer, an Ameri- 
can left-hander who beat Jim- 
my Connors at the. Queen's 
Club last year and has not set 
the Thames or any other river 
on fire since, managed to 
attract most of the attention 
on the secon d day of the Stella 
Artois championships. 

As both Boris Becker and 
Jimmy Connors were per- 
forming on the adjacent centre 
court, this was no mean 
achievement but beating the 
British No. 1 is always a 
sound thing to do if you want 
to get noticed and beating him 
6^1, 4-6, 19-17. as DePahner 
did John Lloyd yesterday, just 
ensures you will get noticed 
longer. 

It was not a remarkable 
match as far as quality was 
concerned and there were 
moments during the protract- 
ed third set when one won- 
dered why a regular series 
event on the Nabisco Grand 
Prix tour shook! do away with 
the convenience of a final set 


' By Richard Evans 

strong a term — of Russian 
roulette. 

The American, "dark and 
thick-set and generally more 
adept at doubles than sin gl y 
was serving first in the mini 
set so it was Lloyd who was 
under constant pressure. That 
pressure was increased by the 
fact that for long stretches he 
seemed quite unable to get a 
backhand service return over 
the net 

When he managed to do so, 
at 1 1 games &Q, it was a fluke; 
the miscued shot falling into 
the far comer of the court. As 
DePahner had fallen on the 
previous point be might have 
been forgiven for' thinking his 
luck .was running out But 
even though Lloyd reached 
break point no less than five 
times m that game, once with 
a property hit backhand of 
smooth brilliance, the Ameri- 
can held on. 

By the time Lloyd wasted all 
that effort by double-feu] ting 
when DePalmer reached 
match point for the third time, 
Becker had been' and gone, 
crunching another American 


hledon champion in the Aus- 
tralian Open last December 
but he could make little 
impression on Connors who 
looked as if he bad been 
keeping himself in good shape 
during his enforced respite 
from the tour. 

In feet, apart from three 
exhibition tournaments, he 
insisted he bad done nothing 
for four and a half weeks 
except enjoy himself with his 
family. 

RESULTS; Men's ante Hrat 
found: 8 BecksrJWG) 5tic Ftoch 


(US). 6-2. 
OdttzorfNic 


.7-5.6-777-5;, 

Rartsbarg^SAJbt L Lavafle (Maxi, &• 
2. 3-6, 6-2; SZJvognovic (Yugfbt B 
Moir(SA)6-3, 4-6, 6-4; LWoocfrorde 
(Austrafia)bt G Donnefty (US) 7-6, 6- 
7. 6-4; M DePalmer (US) bt J Uoyd 
(GB) 6-1, 4-6* 19-17. 

• Annabel Croft, the British 
No. 1, was kepi waiting before 
attempting to rescue her first- 
round match cm the centre court 
at the Dow Chemical £85,000 
women's classic at Edgbaston 
yesterday. Croft’s first-round 
match with Niege Dias, of 
Brazil, was interrupted by rain 
yesterday with Croft, who bad 
two set points in the 10th game, 
finally trailing 5-6. But torren- 
tial rain overnight and again this 
morning prevented any play 
taking place, and Ann Jones, the 
referee, will have a further 
inspection of- the arena this 
afternoon. 

RESULTS: first round: P Fendick 
(US) bt C JofesaintjSwrtzL 7-5. 6-1; 
E Relnach (SA}bt B Cor&eO (NZ). 
6-0, 6-3. 


tie-break. For all the modem- P°“J tor the third tune, 

ization and improved market- Becker pad been and gone, 
ing that has gone on around crmjchuig another American 
here over the past couple of Kcn F3aciL - 

years, neither Stella Artois nor ?• ^ Connors, rcappear- 

(he Queen’s Club is Wimble- for the first time since ins 
don, nor should they try to be. 1 0 suspension, was al- 
. 3 , ready a set up against Michael 

i I ? Palm J er Schapers, a player Becker will 

Doyd were condemned to the remember ruefully. The big 
frustration — fear may be too Dutchman shocked the Wim- 



GOLF 


Smillie battles to 
beat elements 


By John Hennessy 


Connors: in action at Queen's after 10 weeks out of tennis 
(Photograph: Peter Llewellyn). 


CRICKET: LEICESTERSHIRE ON THE CLIMB AS THEY RECORD THEIR SECOND SUCCESSIVE WIN 

Fletcher digs in as Essex give Middlesex Compellin: 
up the chase for victory Hadtee act at H 


CHELMSFORD: Essex (6pts) win. GIi 
drew with Nottinghamshire (7)- catch to 
Essex, (he Britannic Assur- second ii 
a nee Championship leaders, this, tbei 
bravely chased a target of 293 in paced. 
260 minutes yesterday on a East ai 
dusty, worn pitch. As long as score to 
Prichard and Border stayed, the caught at 
match remained open. Both and Sort 
these two were out, however, towards ] 
either side of five o'clock, and 81. Prich 
the shutters came down. tury on 1 

Essex suQ needed 100 as composer 
Fletcher and Pont started the and cunii 
final hour. With Hardie nursing beaten by 
tom ankle ligaments, there was Border, 
little desire to risk, unneoessar- to mid-o: 
ily, a lengthy Essex mil. The early on, 
fifth-wicket pair switched to accelerate 
defence and stayed together 17 over 
until only three overs were Jefi. Hemming 
Fletcher was then caught ax ■ leg, made 
short-leg. It gave Hcmmlngs his took easy. 


By Richard Streeton 
win. Gladwin mis^faooked - a 
catch to tong when their 
second innings began, blit after 
this, their effort was shrewdly 
paced. 

East and Prichard took the 
score to 92 before East was 
caught at cover. Then Prichard 
and Border tilted the balance , 
towards. Essex with a stand of 
81. Prichard followed his cen- 
tury on Monday with another 
composed display of driving 
and cutting before be was finally 
beaten by Hadlee. 

. Border, who survived a catch 
to mid-off against Hemming? 
early on, was just starting to 
accelerate when he was out with 
17 overs left. He swept 
Hemmings and Hadlee, at tong 
leg, made a catch on the run 


Compelling final 
act at Hove 


10th wicket in the match, a 
milestone Foster had achieved 
earlier in the day. 

Nottinghamshire were handi- 
capped in the' dosing stages by 
the inability of Rice or Cooper 


Nottinghamshire, for tactical 
reasons, needed quick tuns, first 
thing when they resumed at 157 
for four, or more importantly, 
216 runs ahead. Once Rice was 
out, however, foe. wickets fefl 


to join the attack. Rice was off rapidly, and the- Nottingham- 
the field with a bruised shin, but shire captain was spared having 


is certain to play in today's 
Benson and Hedges cup semi- 
final at Lord's; Cooper, with a 


to gauge the right moment to 
declare. 

Foster and Childs, though 


twisted knee, is less confident . they both leaded to bowl too 


about being fiL 
Essex, who had to extract 
themselves from a first innings 
collapse, which left them on 94 
for seven, for a long time 
threatened to complete their 
recovery with an un exp ec t e d 


Zimbabwe favoured to 
retain ICC Trophy 


By Mike Bray 


The IOC Trophy, for the but Henrik Mortensen. their 
cricketing nations which are coach, says; “We are well pre- 
associate members of the Inter- pared both physically and men- 
national Cricket Conference, be- tally and are optimistic of doing 
tins in the Midlands today, well.** 

Zimbabwe, winners in 1982, are The Netherlands,' too. have 
Favourites to retain the trophy in high hopes. Their party includes 
the face of a committed and Paul-Jan Balckec, the Hampr 
confident European challenge. shire bowler, Steve AUdnsou,A 
On paper, Zimbabwe look Durham-born batsman who has 
formidable, even with Graeme qualified residentiaDy while. 
Hide. Worcestershire's capable teaching in the Netherlands , an d 
young batsman, opting ont of Rene Schoonberm, who is a 


the competition in order to 
pursue qualification for En- 
gland. The Zimbabweans have a 
blend of talent, important 
experience of grass wickets, and 
a resolve that is pointed towards 
the place on otter for the ICC 
winners in nest year's World 
Cup in India and Pakistan, 
perhaps with ultimate accep- 
tance as a full Test playing 
country. 

Denmark’s short term am- 
bitions are not so grand, but 
they seem the best equipped to 
trouble Zimbabwe. Key mem- 
bers of their side will be Ole 
Mortensen of Derbyshire and 
Sorer] Henri ksen of Lancashire. 
Denmark foiled to enter in 1982 


roscr 8IH. UUBS, uungD KR Pont not out I_ 8 

they both tended to bowl too M a Taster net out s 

short, shared the wickets, with Bmas(04.fci2) 

the initial breakthrough _ Total pwfcts)— : 222 

achieved when Rice chopped a 1_28 - 2 ^ 2 " 3 ' 173 > *■ 

for 69, which gave him 10 fccncperg-twa-q. 

wickets in a match for Essex for UrapInBg: B Laadbrattr and j w Holder. 

favoured to Maynard 
[I! Trophy makes 

his point 

-We are well pre- By I vo Tennant 

pared both physically and men- J 

tally and are optimistic of doing Edgbaston: Warwickshire (8 pis) 
well.** drew with Glamorgan (5). 

The Netherlands,' too, have A century by Matthew May- 
high hopes. Their party includes nard was, other than the proem* 
Paul-Jan Balckec, the Hampr ing of bonus points, The only 
shire bowler, Steve Atkinson, .a feature of a day much inter- 
Durham-barn batsman who has rupted by rain. Just 33.1 overs 
qualified residentiafly while, were possible in five attempts at 
teaching in the Netherlands, and play. 

Rene Schoonheim, 'who is a It was rather farcical and 
survivor of the Dutch side that dragged on all day. A colleague 
beat Bobby Simpson’s Austra- counted 51 spectators in (he firs 
Iran tourists in 1964. session. By the time Maynard 

Bermuda, the 1982. losing readied his century, his second 
finalists, Bangladesh and Can- in first class cricket, there was 
ada are the others objected to more applause from the players 
figure prominently. Singapore's than the crowd, 
withdrawal and the expulsion of . It was, though, a fine i n nings. 
West Africa prevent it being a lasting <82 minutes and includ- 
full entry of all the associate ing 20foursandasix.lt was also 
members, although Piapua New the second time this season that 
Guinea, Fiji, Kenya, East Africa he had been out hit wicket and 
and Hong Kong could all spring was his highest first class score, 
the odd surprise. But Malaysia, Incidentally, Maynard reached 
Gibraltar, Argentina, Israel and his maiden 100. against York- 
United Suites are viewed as little shire last summer, with three 
more than minnows in an event successive axes, 
that embraces cricketing ail- Both these counties are in 


the first time, though be had - Mike Garting, the new En-‘ 
previously achieved the feat for giaw d captain, has quickly 
England. turned his thoughts towards 

Foster also held two catches at county afiairs and Middlesex's 
deep square-leg as the batsmen Benson and Hedges Cup semi- 
hit oiit against Chil ds, who. near final a g»nct Nottinghamshire at 
the end, claimed three for 12 in ■ Lord’s today. His message to his 
26 balls. Earlier Childs did not players will be that they must 
l always have the best of luck. curb Richard Hadlee, the New 
yftrrmnu,uimwr.n_ _ Z ea l a n d aD-nmnder, if they are 
Johnson 123; N a Foster sfcrsff ^ to reach the final on July 12. 

ti r Meehastrflendone weU al 

m Humus h i jiut 43 LotcTs and ui the championship 

DWRancMcEKtb Foster 60 there in 1984 scored an un- 

2? bearen 210 and bad match 

jOHgT^Po^ * 1 i, figures of five for 69 when 

R J HadtoecFoatarDCMcts 3 Middlesex were beaten by an 

— tj inn ings and last season took 

K I CooST? tS&^hnhU r ’ 17 seven for 34 as Nottinghamshire 

J A Atom c East b Foster - a defeated, the team that went on 

Extras q> 7, fc 8, w 2) _i7 to take the championship. 

FAU^F WICKETS; 3-1 3^2 wfa p* e “ 

146,5-183, 6-1 92,7-196.8-201.9-225; io- Middlesex captain was the Ben- 
233. son and Hedges Cup in 1983, 

BowUNOt Lew 10-4-29-1; Foster 27_2- said: “We've got to concentrate 

on stopping Hadlee taking 

esse* First innings 340 (PJ AWwnj cts and getting an early break- 
147 ixx aw: EEi*wtTO^7 ion 02). through. Antoeal analysis for 

CGteWncC^^__5 ^??^ii5H DO0ghlfOrWhal ‘ 
tD E East csubbHerwnings — .47 ever be wants. 

h R 1 m . „ Gatting added: “We must n ot 
■K WRFtetcharc Randal b Hanuningi 9 fell into the trap of forgetting 


that Notts have many other 
match- winning players as weO, 
bat the priority will be to stop 
Hadlee running through us- We 
managed it in the last round 
against Sussex, when Imran 
Knan was their danger man and 
capable of winning the match on 
his own." Middlesex have won 
all five of their matches in the 
competition so fer this season. 

Andy Miller, the former Ox- 
ford University captain win 
play for Middlesex in place of 
Graham Bariow, their experi- 
enced opening batsman, who is 


By Peter Mareon 

The final act at Hove yes- 
terday. in what has been a 
compelling performance over 
the last three days, contained the 
best cricket, and with the last 
lines belonging to the bowlers - 
and in particular to de Freitas, 
who took five for 61 — it was, 
suitably, with a flourish that 
Leicestershire signalled their 
second successive victory this 
season in the Britannic Assur- 
ance county championship. 

This blest success, in which 
Sussex were beaten by 21 runs, 
takes them up the champion- 
ship ladder to second place, 
behind Essex. At the day’s start 
Sussex bad required another 265 
runs to win. But in a wretched 
begining. they lost Green to 
Agnew, and Parker and Imran 
to a decisive double thrust by 
Clift; three wickets down for 27. 

Lenham and Colin Wells took 
Sussex on by 89 runs, and after 
these two had been seen off by 
de Freitas, Alan Wells, in a 
spirited innings of 76, came 
dose to turning the match 
Sussex's way before he, too, fell 
foul of de Freitas. 

Surrey's victory against 
Derbyshire, whom they beat by 
nine wickets at the Oval, had 
been a small triumph, too, for an 
unusual fast bowling combina- 
tion formed by Clarice, a sea- 
soned campaigner, and BickneU. 
a raw recruit promoted from the 
ranks of the second eleven. 
These two joined to give so 
balanced a performance that 
Derbyshire's batsmen were well 
beaten for pace in two innings. 
Clarke came away with a match 
analysis of eight for 73. 

As Derbyshire began again in 


the morning at 127 for six. 
which was also a lead of 83. 
Bicknell pencilled in the 
season's second victory with his 
first 1 1 balls, when Miller, who 
had feiled to add to his score 
overnight. Marples and Holding 
fell to him for four runs. With . 
Clarke and BickneU each taking ! 
three for 30. as Derbyshire 
foundered at 138, Surrey were 
left 10 make 95 to win. Faulkner, 
another success, made 46 not 
out, and Lynch 45, as Surrey 
reached their target with time to 
cogitate on their sudden eleva- 
tion to third place in the table. 

At Northampton. Worcester- 


A fierce gusiing wind coupled 
with an unrealistic par of 71 for 
the West Sussex course at 
PuJ bo rough produced some un- 
flattering scones on the first day 
of the British women's 
championship yesterday. 

The standard scratch scone of 
74 is a much bener evaluation of 
the course; so that the 71 of Pat 
Smillie, of Alwoodley. was a 
superb achievement. The tough 
finishing holes might have 
threatened her score and she did 
indeed come up short at die 
1 6th and the 18th holes. But 
sandwiched between those two 
bogeys was a well played birdie 
four at the 17ih, where she 
pitched to eight feet and holed 

OUL 

Miss Smillie leads by two 
shots from the early leaders, Jill 
Thornhill, the English cham- 
pion, and Julia HilL more 
humbly the Cheshire champion. 
They were in turn one shot 
ahead of Vicki Thomas, the 
Welsh champion, and Ericka 
Maxwell, aged 19 and the 
champion of Western Australia, 
making her first visit to this 
country. 

Lillian Behan, the Irish holder 
of the title, recovered from an 
uncertain start around the green 
to come home splendidly in 75, 
sharing that score with, among 
others, Edwina Kennedy, a for- 
mer winner for Australia, Pa- 
tricia Johnson, the English 
stoke-play champion and two 
formidable French women, Ma- 
rie-La u re Taya and Cecilia 
Mouigue d'Algue. 

Some idea of the conditions 
may be gained from the feet Mrs 
Thornhill said she has never 
known such a strong wind at 
West Sussex. This is a player of 
long experience — a Surrey 
domicile who had played this 
course many times before in a 
variety of competitions. Teeing 
off after noon she was spared the 
morning's rain but had the 
worst of the wind and the 
mounting problems of dub 
selection. When in doubt she 
played for safety in the belief 
that it would be better to drop 
short than go through the green. 

The three shots she dropped 
to par were all attributable to , 
nagging doubts about which { 


club to rake. But she played 
solid golf overall and a birdie at 
the long 1 Uh, where she chipped 
to three feet, was no more than 
she deserved. 

Miss Hill, daughter of the 
Hazel Grove professional, had a 
more adventurous round in the 
rain, with three birdies and five 
shots dropped to par. A second 
into a bunker at the home hole, 
by which time the wind had 
swept over the course, deprived 
her at that srage of the outright 
lead. 

Later in the day, wind or no 
wind. Prue Ridiford created a 
stir by going to the turn in par. 
Now 62, Mrs Ridiford is a 
revered figure in women’s golf. 
Clad in her skins of yesteryear, 
it was too good to last and her fi- 
nal score climbed to 78, but she 
had done enough for pasting 
glory. 

LEADMQ SCORES: Pint round (GB 
antes stated): 71: p SmWe. 73; j HW. J 
ThomWL 74: V Thomas. E Maxwel fAust). 
7S: P Johnson. M-L Taya (Frj. C Mowgua 
d'Algue (Fr), L Behan (Holder). E Kennedy 
(Auet) M Koch (WG). 7B: A UznU. 6 
Piarca. M McGuire (NZ). M G Navarro 
* BMweH. A Gamins, K Davies, S 
77: E Hlggrcs, F Anderson. C 
Boutayre (Fr), E Orfcy (SwrttJ. J Moriey. T 
Hammond. L Brws (Au«) A CVSuKvasi. L 
Faadoogti. K Duckworth. 

• We unfortunately ran out of 
space yesterday in discussing a 
format that might be more 
appropriate for the Amateur 
championship than the three so 
fer tried. The final passage in 
yesterday's article originally 
read; An adaptation of the 
method used last week could 
forstall criticism. The principle 
change, as applied to Lytharn, 
would be that the 63 players on 
151 or better would lake their 
appropriate places in the auto- 
matic draw and that 12 players 
on 1 52 should go into a hat to 
find the one to occupy 64 ih spot 
in the first round proper. 

The draw among the remain- 
ing II would then proceed to 
decide who would play against 
number 64 in a preliminary 
round, who to play 63, 62 and so 
on. 

The draw system would also 
seem to be a fairer way to decide 
lies in the intermediate po- 
sitions. rather than the card 
count-back when two courses 
are used on two different days. 


PGA members will be 
asked to aid foundation 


The Professional Golfers 
Association is to launch a 
scheme to improve dramatically 
the finances of the golf founda- 
tion, the organization respon- 
sible for the development of 


shire made another 69 runs I junior golf in Great Britain. 


before declaring at 168 for six, 
leaving Northamptonshire to i 
make 250 to wm from 57 overs. 
Radford at once made that look 
a shade improbable as both 
Cook and Bailey fell leg-before, 
and with five wickets going 
down for 16 runs, Worcester- 
shire must have fancied their 
chances of celebrating their first 
victory at the County Ground 
since 1966. 

CHAMPIONSHIP TABLE 


Essex (4) T 

Lees ties 8 

Surrey (6) 7 

Lancs (14) 7 

Yorks (11) 6 

Worcs(ti 6 

Ghwcs (3) 7 

Notts (8) 7 

Somerset (17) 8 

Hants (2) 6 

Derfcys(t2) 6 

Wanmcksp5) 7 

Sussex (7) 7 

Kent (9) 5 

Mdxfll 7 

No'arrtsJID) 6 

(Sam (12) 7 


P W L T Bt Bl Pts 

7 3 1 S 18 IB 84 

8 2 2 4 21 22 75 

7 2 1 4 19 20 71 

7 2 0 5 19 13 64 

6 2 2 2 14 18 64 

6 2 1 3 13 18 63 

7 2 1 4 13 17 62 

7 1 1 5 17 21 54 

8 1 1 8 23 13 52 

6 1 1 4 13 15 44 

6 1 2 3 9 18 43 

7 0 2 6 21 18 39 

7 1 3 3 9 12 37 

5 1 0 4 7 12 35 

7 0 2 5 10 22 32 

B 0 0 6 13 14 27 


All the 1,000 club pro- 
fessionals who are members of 
the PGA are being asked to raise 
an average of £50 each in 
addition to any money contrib- 
uted by their clubs to the golf 
foundation funds . The aims is 
to raise around £50.000 a year 
on a continuing basis. 

The work of the foundation in 
introducing youngsters to the 
game, and providing for their 
tuition, has always been re- 
stricted by lack of finance, 
year only 250 of the nation's 
2.500 golf clubs raised money 
for the foundation. Its income 


from the annual appeal was a 
mere £28.788. 

PGA executive director, says; 
“We live in an age of Bob 
Geldof and of people supporting 
their favourite chanties. U 
seems natural that our favourite 
charity should be the gqlf 
-foundation which is in the 
business of finding the next 
generation of golfers and 
providing work for the next 
generation of professionals. 

The Ryder Cup golfer Paul 
Way. and Mike McLean, his 
former schoolmate, are the best 
known products of the founda- 
tion. Pro-am tournaments, raf- 
fles. fashion shows, film nights 
and cocktail parties are some of 
the methods club professionals 
will be encouraged to use to 
meet the £50.000 largeL 


BOXING 


Launching of Cruz 


By George Ace 


Qtam (12) 7 0 1 6 12 14 26 

1985 positions in tredfats 


Steve Cruz is a name that is 
not going to set the pulses racing 


on this side of the Atlantic — or Dave Gorman. 


managerial problems, until May 
1985. He is now managed by 


survivor of the Dutch side that 
beat Bobby Simpson's Austra- 
lian tourists in 1964. 


ada are the others expected to 
figure prominently. Singapore's 
withdrawal and the expulsion of 
West Africa prevent it being a 
full entry of aQ the associate 
members, although Papua New 
Guinea, Fiji, Kenya, East Africa 
and Hong Kong could all spring 
the odd surprise. But Malaysia, 
Gibraltar, Arge n tina. Israel and 
United States are viewed as little 
more than minnows in an event 
that embraces cricketing cul- 



YESTERDAY’S OTHER SCOREBOARDS 

Sussex v Leics 

AT HOVE 


on the other side for that matter. 
Bui he will play his part in 
keeping a lot of people up the 
small hours of the morning on 


Cruz has had five contests 
under the Gorman banner win- 
ning three inside the distance 
including that against Tommy 


Hadlee: danger man 


lures from almost every nart of need of points of any son. In the . „ . 

the globe. final se^on, which started at ^ ^ 

5.17, Warwickshire gained with a tack nnury. Net) Wtl- 

— — - . ■ * jj maximum bowling points to go hams will also be absent with 

Hampsten leads With their maximum batting 




1 jj ' 7 maximum bowling points 10 go uams wui mso oe aoseni wim 

Hampsten leads . with their maximum batting iw* Emburey, 

Winterthur Switreriand /API pointsand Glamorganbatied 00 who dam aged his side m the 

- SwttSSlS'S after 5.30 uj gain another point. Lord’s Tmt,- should be fit 

I983worto rfiam^ Soar least tfaeproceedings had enough to bowl his 1 1 overs. 

pton Greg LeMond for a 1-2 SSiuiK gB iw^TvStnrtein — - *— « Nottinghamshire .are hoping 
American finish m a race against to choose the same side that beat 

the clock opening the 5Dth Tour 9a, p A SmWi 75). Essex in the quarter-final but 

of Switzerland. Hampsten fin- GLAMORGAN: Ftot timings *• have named a squad of 13 and 

idled the eight-kflametre pro- 2522SlSK53' n * a ,» included Peter Such and Kevin 

(ague in llmio 06.86, 1.8 sec , Y<£nteAhr^ c*nd bSrSnZZT « Evans. Kevin Cooper, who has a 

ahead of Lomond. He averaged kmou* b sraift ; — 2 twisted knee, is not certain of 

an excellent 42204 kilometers M P Mward » v4at> Rwsons — 129 playing but Clive Rice, despite a 

nor hour on. the courre which TGihrae^OtobNm 32 bnused shin. is. 

featured a Sleep climb and a j Dferk* aw b Parsons _ — 42 •_ .. . . . 


an' excellent 42204 kilometers 
per hour on. tire course which 
featured a steep climb' and a 
downhill windup-. . -Nil.* 
Ruetrimaun of Switzerland took 
third place, 7.68 seconds be- 
hind. "■ 


■ 1 ?? pfeying but Clive Rice, despite i 
"32 bnused shin. is. 


LBXxstsrsftre (22pts) beat Susssx (4) by 
21 mm. 

LSCETIERSWRE: first rnrmgs 236 (P 
*tey59) 

Sacond bmmgs 199 (R A Cobb 67. L 
Pooar 55; Imran Khan 5 for 52) 

SUSSEX: First hmmgs 158 
Sacond Innings 

NJ Lenten caubbOe Freitas 40 

A M Green c sub b Aflrww 20 

PWtJPoterbCat 1 

Imran Khan bwb CMt 0 

C M Wtfsc Baojamat b Oe Freitas — 46 
A P wate c Potter b De FCbibs 78 

Oxford Univ v Kent 

AT THE PARKS 

Oxford University drm Kent 
KENT: first hams 590 tor 7 dec tC 3 
Ta«f* 123. E A E Baptise 113. N R 
Taylor 106. C Pam 84 not out, C S 
Cowdrey 53) 

OXFORD UMVERSTTY: first Inntogs 

D A fetei c and b C S Cowdrey 38 

A A G mm tow b Hinfcs 25 

M JKfeumc and b Java 8 

P C MacLaman tow b Underwood — 4 

T P«bi tow b Jams _____ 1 

NV Sterna 00* 25 

RARwton notout 7 

Bares (b 5. to 5. w 1) 11 

Total 0 wkts) 120 

t J Cope. J D Qum&n, TAJ Dawson and 

“M P Lawrence Ad not tat 

FALL OF WICKETS: 1-65. 2-74, 3-80, 4- 

88.5-94. 

BOWUNG: Jarvis 16-9-15-2: Bonn 16,4-6- 
38-0; Betters 9*2-24^; C S Cowdrey 8-2- 
19-1; Mntn M-10-1; TayW 1-1-Oft 
Underwood 11-8-3-1; GR Cowdrey 3-2-1- 
0. 

Umpires; M Hendnck end D SThompsetL 


Surrey v Derbyshire r 

at thf rwAi DJWSJbRadt 


fcsawesnotout 

SJSasecHunpageb Parsons * 

SJ Hickey not out 0 

Extras [lb 2. nb 3) -5 

Trial (9mMs.7B own) 300 

Goia at Molin'eBX Benson and Hedges Cup win. 

BOWUNG: Smal 23-6-71-3: Parsons 20- , , - _ 

Wolverhampton Wanderers . 445-3; Karr s-i-43-i; Snaih 10-2-57.1: Richard EUison returns from 

could be playing non-league Mmaon 7.-1-47-1: afoul 2^*4: Asif Din u» England side for Kern, who 

football next season. A unique jffl Vr r n tv — may be forced, though, to do 

rescue package bong prepared mtetetHoaroandBOuriaaton. without the fest bowling of 
by the ' Receiver, Adrian T . * Graham DiBev, who strained a 

Sianway, -includes a pton for JOUgllUl S tftSK hamstring against India and is 

Wol verfcamptQD to swop places Steve' Jonghin, who won the doubtfuL If he does not play, 
with tire Goto League cham- final stage of the Milk Race tost Kevin Jarvis is the man most 
pions, Fn field. “Wolves' great sanirday, wdll attempt to main- likely to step m. 
past - is P 11 ^ . . academre,” mia his overall- lead in the Worcestershire win be look- 
Stanway said. . If this is the only Mtchdm Spraw Cup aty centre fog to Graeme Hick and David 
way 1 canjoep a^chib m- CTele^ ai Northantpion to- sS ilht tbdr two festrscoring 
existence, then I .“aft- ,L day. Joughro is among 60 riders batsmen batsmen, to cany them 


GENERAL 

APPOINTMENTS 


THURSEMy . 

! MAKE SURE VCXJ GET 

YOURCXJFYOF 

TH&tfMTKMES . 


229,3-46,4-78. 

5.9-hBT. 


The other semi-final is be- 
tween Worcestershire and Kent 
at New Road, Worcester , where 
Kent are seeking to stay on 
coarse for a record fourth 
Benson and Hedges Cup win. 

Richard Edison returns from 
the England side for Kent, who 
may be forced, though, to do 
without the fest - bowling of 

Graham DiBey, who strained a 
hamstring against India and is 


AT THE OVAL 

Surrey (ZfeO|l best DMghM* (5; by ana 

D ER BVSWffii Prat tarings 179 (S T 
Ctarkfi 5 for 43) 

Second I mtaos 

KJBmwtl tow b dartre^ 4 

1 5 Anderson c Pocock b McnMxwm 26 

AKfilbQailte 0 

JE Moms c sub b Doughty 62 

B Roberts cRIcteUsbClarlie — — 10 

GMOercRictedsbBicfcnaB 16 

R J Finney tow b Rocock 4 

ff ;Msrpte eFOBcner bScknel 7 

A HottSng c sub b Bckney 5 

O H Mortensen run out — — 0 

M Jeen-Jccreies not out ______ 1 

Extras (bl.nb 2) 3 

Trial (49 A ou ere) 138 

FALL OF WtCKETS: 1-8, 2-6, 8-78, 4-94, 
5-1 10. 8-119. 7-127, 8-136.9-137, 10-138. 
BOWUNG: Ctartri ia4-«tK3; DougMy 
1 1-3-38-1; Stokhe0 11-6-303: MonknouW 
M-31-T; pocock B-4-8-1, 


•flj Gould c Boon b Oe Freitas 8 

D A Reeve b Oe Freitas 3 

ACS Pgott b C0!t 20 

A N Jones c Benjamn b Agnew _ — 13 

A M Bnmzn not out 8 

Extras (b 13, 107, nbl) 21 

Total 258 

FALL OF WICKETS: 1-28. 2-27. 3-27. 4- 
116, 5-121 . 6-135, 7-139. 8-191, 8-236. TO- 

KIWtWG: Ari»w 21-588-2; Boriarrin 
182 - 62 - 0 ; DeTreto 19-3-61-5; CMt 18- 
8-45-3. 

Umpires: R Juliai and K J Lyons. 

Northants v Worcs 

AT N0RTHANff 3 T0N 
Nonramptonslm (Sits) draw weft 
Worcestershire (7). 

WORCESTERStOE: first tarings 272 (P 
A Neele 78 not out; N G B Cook 6 tor 72) 
Second tantaas 

T S Curtis eWatortonbNGB Cook . 27 

D B D Otweire D N G B CooK 29 

G A Hick c Harper OGntfths 1 

0 N Ptuel c Watertrxi D Griffiths 18 

*P A Nsale c Harper b Gdffiihe 27 

+SJ Rhodes not oat 40 

N V Rariord C WatBrtDn b Griffiths — 0 

RKBmgworthnotout 17 

Extras (b4.to3.w1, nbl) 8 

Toni (6 wins dec) 168 

FALL OF WICKETS: 1-64. 2-59. 381. 4- 
99.5-112.6-112. 

BOWUNG: hMenoer 104-404: Grtffths 
155-554; NGSCoc* 26-10502: Harper 
34-12-0. 

NOTTHAMPTONSWRE: Fes* Inrtpgs 191 
(N v Radford 5 tor 6©. 

Second Innings 

■G Cook tow b Radford 2 

RJ Bate tow b Radford — — 9 

R J Boyd-Moss c OtTbroea b Pridbeon 0 

D J Wlu b Radford 68 

R G VWliafns c Sogworth b Podgeon _ 0 

DJ Capet bRsdtonl 0 

R A Harper tow bPridgean 4 

■fS N VWanrton nriout — — 58 

NGBCookc Rhodes b Radford 7 

N A Malon d or not out 1 

Extras (to 6, nb 5) 11 

Total (B wfcts) 160 

FAIL OF WICKE15: 1-12, 2-13. 3-13, 4- 
13. S-16. 6-23, 7-136. 8-156. 


June 24 when he attempts to Cotxiovi a highlTraied boxer. 

MrfV.'S? 8 !!!- He ^° rdova in "foe 

rounds in 135 Ve s as in Decem - 

h “, ! *S*“ ^y^ 35 * J®*? ber last year. That was the 
^! ev, * ed throughout tire second big shock the voung mao 
United Kingdom and Ireland by from Texas had provided- the 
courtesy of the BBC and RTE. first was in Las Vegas in January 

**■ 5? 1984. On that Occasion be 
itando Sosa, the South Amen- outpointed the hitherto un- 
can and Argenuman champion beaten Dana Rosion who was, 

. 5 at the time, ranked sixth in the 
eye rroubltA Texan of only 23 world Boxing Association rat- 
summers. Cruz is of Mexican fogs wjfo McGuigan at number 
descent, has been hanging 


around boxing gymnasiums 
since he was six years of age and 


In his last bout in February of 


after an outstanding amateur V®®*; scored a points win 
career during which he won g vei . “? e n* n “ d 


both Golden Gloves and AAU 
tides, and was unbeaten in six 
international contests, he signed 
professional a few weeks short 
of his 1 8 th birthday. 

In his 26 contests since 1981 
he has won 25, of which 1 5 have 


Rocky Garcia who took the late 
and great Salvador Sanchez the 
full stretch as well as drawing 
twice with Cordova in two 
torrid battles they still talk about 
in South America. 

It is these snippets of form 


ended early. His only defeat was that point to Cruz, in a desert 
when be was stopped in under setting with which he is familiar, 
three minutes by Lenny Valdez posing a very real threat to 
after lairing a count in the first McGuigan. who surely shed 


minute. Thai was in March some of his aura of invincibility 
1984. In June of the same year in his most recent title defence 
he won a 10 rounds bout against in Dublin Iasi February against 
the Salvatore Ugalde in his another substitute Danilo 
home town of Fort Worth, and Cabrera, from the Dominican 
did not box again, following Republic. 


RUGBY LEAGUE 


CROQUET 


Blue Dragons New Zealand 
find lack of pair find 
home costly touch in wet 


Blue Dragons Rugby Leag u e 
team, suspended from the sec- 


Tfte Austral ian-and New Zea- 
land players hj^l a long, wet day 


BOWUNG: Rad&xU 17-3-63-5; Pre»on 
9.5-2-10-3: Illingworth 12-3-32-0; 
mchmoro 34-134; Patti 10-324-0; 
DOtow* 2-0-124. 

Umpires: D J Constant and M J Khcfn. 

SCHOOLS HATCH: OMtonmt and Salop 
OS 1B84 Me. Crib's 173-3, 


ond divirion last season after yesterday at a blustery Bowdon 
being left without a home Croquet Club in Cheshire on the 


venue, are still searching for a 
ground. Eugene Caparros, the 
proprietor of the Welsh dub. 
tailed in his bid to make a base 
at Merthyr after council oppo- 


first day of the Westwood 
Internationa] series for the 
MacRobertson Shield (Keith 
Mac kiin writes). The lush 
Bowdon lawns played much 


No play yesterday ££ 

.4-5-30-3: Dourly Britannic Assurance for t 


sition- He now feces tire pros- heavier titan usual after the 
pea of his side being suspended downpour and players struggled 


SURREY: fra tarings 223 R J Doughty 
61, G ManMwuN 51) 

SaeeMlimiigs 

N J Ftenar nriout 48 

M A LynencsitoD Barnes 45 

A J Sttwsrt rat ovi 1 

Extra* (b 1. to 1.nb2) 4 

Ibttl (lurid, 285 ows ) 86 

FAIL OF WICKET: 1-79. 

BOWUNG: fateu 5-2-17-0: MOriHGen 
7-1-48-0: Raney WW: Banted 4.5-1- 
22-1; Mlar *3-1-0. 

Umpires. JHHarcte and R A Wttife 


Britannic Assurance 
County C ha ra p tonmhfe __ 

OLD TTUFfiORtk Lancashire 313 far 9 
dec (C H Lloyd 79, G D Merxtis 66. J 
Sanmone 61; SI P Hughes 4 tor 77, W w 
Dareri 4 for 9% MkWteex 58 tor 1 
(Bowling: Aftjtt 1G3-194: tteldnson 6-1- 
23-1: Slmnone 4-2-64; Wanonson 2-0-4- 
0^. Lancaartre (4pa) wtrfi Mttlesax 


'or the second year. 

The Dragons began at Cardiff 


to find their touch. 

Fortunately for New Zealand, 


in 1981 but, after switching to two players who found eatiy 
Bridgend three seasons later, control were their first doubles 


they managed only one win pair. Bob . 
from 28 games in 1983-84. Skinley. whi 
Attendances slumped below 200 lians. Neil $ 
and the team was forced to Latham 2-0 
move on once again. son won the 


ir. Bob Jackson and Paul 
in ley, who beat the Austra- 


pooner and Geor 
before lunch. Jac 




1 PBtanbritfK 
Jarvis 18-5-©- ; 


and the team nos forced to Latham 2-0 before lunch. Jack- 
move on once again. son won the first game with a 

The latest setback has meant seventh turn triple and virtually 
that Caparros. who blames apa- finished the second with a 
uty towards the 13-a-side game Straight triple, but stuck in 


inster 
ng its 
ertsey) 
her of 
i News 

s Press, 
npleted 
h. 

itiAPV 
cr 2p to 
oed its 
ent to 
,rt Ben- 
k acting 
another 
VPV at 

r a total 
lares, or 
: votes, 
l 95 5p. 


et office 
.lentcar- 
it is es- 
*mpleted 
million. 
iR RE- 
WEST- 
Second 
.73p for 
X 1986. 
3p. This 
lireaors' 
erim re- 
spond a ‘ 
period to 

CORF: 
I. 1986. 
.n (£6-58 
£333.052 
per share 
.p). The 
company 
e second 
• auction 
g and it 
crop and 
union. 
OENIX 
If-year to 
urnover 
Loss be- 
i 31.914). 
t 36.l7p 


S. 


op into 


sV 8256 


rmation 

»li cation 
tried 
:h our 

(£499 ex 
:orage. 
ger 11 
Y It 

r Prestel. 
(worth 


....£99.95 

...£99.00 

ms for 

....£49.95 



itain and may 


Hartley 2-1*24; Camck 28-11-51-2: * n South Wales, may have to penultimate before finishing 
»-1-1MI),Yoriatiie{6pta)cfrmri*stfi appeal to League officials in next turn. 


Lora 5-1-1 84). Yort 
Sl0ucesttratue(4L 


Leeds for more time. 


Featnre-Wire 38 









3S 


SPORT 


THE TIMES WEDNESDAY JUNE 11 1986 


FOOTBALL: NORTH AFRICANS IN HOT AND HIGH PURSUIT OF A WIN WHILE NORTHERN IRISH EYES ARE TRAINED ON A DRAW 


Morocco’s hopes rise 
with the altitude 


as they seek first goal 

juadalajara (Reuter) - dT ♦ Team officials said the rv 




Guadalajara (Reuter) — 
Morocco, with toe humidity 
of Monterrey a rapidly lading 
memory, have arrived here 
committed to scoring, their 
first goal in the World Cup 
finals for Id year&The North 
Africans have garnered two 
points from their first two 
Group F matches but have yet 
to score a goaL They drew 0-0 
with England and Poland 
Their manager, Jose Faria, 



"In feet, we were the only 
team in Monterrey to play 
three forwards,” be said 
“They are good enough. They 


knowing that a win over just have to learn to shoot 

DnHuml hiauM klo efvnSflht ** nk dwtArl 


Portugal would guarantee his 
side a place In the second 
round, plans to push more 
men forward today, although 
he denied that Morocco have 
played defensively so for. 


straight.'* Mohamed 
Timoumi, a sweeper turned 
midfield player, said he was 
going to move upfield and 
operate just behind his 
forwards. 


Team officials said the only 
injury doubt was AbdeUcriz 
Bouderbala, a. forward, who 
has a slight leg strain. They 
said morale, had improved 
since leaving Monterrey, 
where many ofthe players had 
breathing difficulties because 
of smog and high humidity. 

“U’s higher here but the 
weather is more like Morocco 
and the heat on its own does 
not bother foe players,” a 
team spokesman said. 

The squad undertook a 
month's altitude training be- 
fore arriving in Mexico but the 
spokesman said the benefit of 
this bad been lost during their 
stay in Monterrey. 


Bossio will miss Irish call 
Scotland match 


Miguel Bossio, of Uruguay, 
has been banned from the final 

S game against Scotland, 
ina his sending off against 
Denmark, but the Uruguayan 
camp, who were subdued after 
the 6-1 Denmark defeat, are 
determined to put matters right 
in their last Group E match on 
Friday. “All is not lost — we can 
beat Scotland,” Enzo 
Francescoli, their midfield 
player, said. 

Uruguayan players have 
sprung to the defence of their 
coach, Omar Bonus, amid re- 
ports that they planned to stage 
a "coup” against him. After the 
disastrous defeat by Denmark, 
reports from the .Uruguayan 
capital, Montevideo, suggested 
that the squad would take over 
team affairs, and described their 
actions as a coup against Borras. 

But the midfield player, 
Saralegui said: “If there's going 
to be a coup, it will have to 
remove us all because we are all 
to blame. Whenever there's a 
bad result, there’s criticism and 
condemnation." 

• Iraq have suffered three 
suspensions, one of them an . 
indefinite FIFA ban. Dameer 
Shaker was given a one-match 
penalty for accumulating two 
yellow cards, but is in for deeper 
trouble after spitting at the 
referee after the 2-1 defeat 
against Belgium. 

FIFA have said Shaker cannot 
play football again until they 
have reconsidered his case — 
and football's governing body 
warned Iraq about its players' 
future behaviour. The other Iraq 
suspensions were Haris 
Mohammed — two matches for 
insulting the referee after the 
final whistle — and Basil 


Goingies, two games for his 
sending off 

• The English referee, George 
Courtney, has incurred the 
wrath ofParaguay, who wa nt h is 
name removed from the FIFA 
list. Courtney, from 
Spennymoor. and the only En- 
glish official at the World Cup, 
booked five Paraguayan players 
and awarded a last-minute pen- 
alty to Mexico in the countries’ 
1-1 draw last Sunday. 

Paraguay have lodged an 
official complaint with FIFA - 
but with the world's governing 
bodies demanding a hard line 
from their officials, they are 
likely to reject the complaint out 
of band. 

•The Belgian coach, Guy Thys, 
has his team problems going 
into the Paraguay game only 
three days after the tough en- 
counter with Iraq. Anderfecht 
striker Vandenbergh, who in- 
jured bis knee in die 2-1 defeat 
by Mexico, is still doubtful 

Thys will also have to boost 
morale after a poor second half 
against the Iraqis when his team 
nearly threw away a 2-0 half- 
time lead against 10 men. The 
Paraguayans on the other hand 
are brimming with confidence, 
none more than Romero, or 
Romeriw as he is popularly 
known. 

Romero, aged 27, who plays 
for the Brazilian side. 
FI [immense, has scored both his 
side's goals in the draw against 
Mexico and the win over Iraq. 

The Paraguayan manager. Re, 
who played in Paraguay’s last 
World Cup appearance in 1958, 
is using Romero as the play- 
maker and orcbesuator from 
midfield, a role he has relished. 


time on 
television 

Northern Ireland plan to pro- 
test to FIFA about the lack of 
injury time in the second half of 
their World Cup matches so for. 
Observers are mystified at how 
frequently referees have timed 
the matches to end when the 
stadium docks show 45 minutes 
are up. There are suggestions 
that the reason is connected 
with television and its commer- 
cial interests. 

Dave Bowen, secretary of the 
Irish FA, said: "We have pot mu- 
own stopwatches on games and 
calculate that against Algeria the 
second half finished three min- 
utes early, taking into account 
injuries and stoppages. Against 
Spain it was worse. We lost a 
good five minutes and that time 
could have been significant We 
shall convey our concern to 
FIFA and if the stories about 
television are true, it is Obvi- 
ously a major issue." 

-The Irish will register their 
protest through Harry Ovan, 
their president who is also 
FIFA's senior vice-president 
and chairman of their referees' 
committee. 


Sr- 



Penney drops out 
of crucial Irish 
game with Brazil 


on 


Steve Penney has nrl 

ruled himself out of a W 
Cup meeting with Brazil 
tomorrow, amid growing hopes 
that ail Northern Ireland need is 
a draw to reach the second 
phase. 

The Brighton winger, aged 22, 
has aggravated an (rid ankle 
injury in Guadalajara -and says: 


they have to get that point and 
were relying on the undeniable 
skills of young Penney on the 


young 
right flank. 

Penney admits: "1 played with 
the injury against Spain and 
could have run on it all day if I 
hadn't twisted it I was just 
unlucky. So for, I have not been 

.. . . - able todo what I would like to in 

"1 will rest it completely mail ^ world Cup. But that is 
Wedmsday but 1 rant see because Billy Bingham insists 
myself being ready. It s a big that we stick to a pattern. 


blow because the match against 
Brazil was the one I was really 
looking forward to. It's every 
player’s dream u> play against 
Brazil in the World Cup. But I 
will get oyer it as long as we get 
what we - need ur stay in 
Mexico.” 

Against ah expeditions, there 

could j ust be a point against the 

three-tunes world champions in 
the Jalisco Stadium. Only four 
third-placed teams oat of six go 
through, and Hungary in Group 

C have already gone out of 
contention with two points and 
a minus-seven goal-difference. 
Bulgaria could go the same 
~ in Group A, leaving Ireland 
two points with a reason- 
able goal difference as one ofthe 
four outside qualifiers. First, 


"Our organization is why we 
have always done well but I was 
disappointed to be susbxituted 
in both games. When players 
tiie. the game opens out and I 
would like to have tried to 
exploit that" But tike all the 
other 21 members of the Irish 
squad, Penney believes that 
Bingham has proved himself a 
tactical master and accepts his 
instructions. 

The Newcastle winger, Ian 
Stewart looks fevourile to step 
in against Brazil, but Penney 
will have one big consolation if 
he has seen the last of the 
Mexico tournament. On his 
return on July 1, he marries his 
girl friend Valerie, and says: "I 
hope that will make up for any 
disappointment out here." 


Robson with Reid, the man who might replace him (Photograph: Ian Stewart) 

Robson booked for surgery 


France are taking 
nothing for granted 


•V-x 

. 


Bryan Robson feces one of 
two operations, common for 
sportsmen, to prevent his right 
shoulder from dislocating. 

When the England captain 
returns from Mexico he will 
have to undergo surgery on a 
joint which has caused contin- 
ual problems to men like Terry 
Holmes in his his disastrous 
Rugby League debut, jockeys, 
rugby players and judo players. 

The dislocation of a shoulder 
is the result of felling on the 
shoulder. The injury is caused 
by the separation of the fibre- . 
cartilage rim (the la brum) so 
deepening the cup of the shoul- 
der joint in to which the 
rounded bead of the top of the 
arm normally fits. 

Each time the shoulder conies 
out, the size of die pocket 
increases and so the joint dis- 
locates more readily. Until 
Robson's shoulder receives sur- 
gery he will become more and 
more likely to break down, as he 
did against Morocco. 

Rest is essential fin* a dam- 
aged shoulder. As Dr. Michael 
Allen, the medical consultant to 
the Jockey Oub, says: “lfyou do 
not lay off for six weds it will 


By John Goodbody 

dislocate if yon cough." 

After repeated dislocation a 
pocket forms at the front of the 
joint into which the bead easily 
slips. 

The two most common opera- 
tions are the Bankart ami Putti- 
Pfatt, which are both designed to 
retain the arm bone within the 
socket of the shoulder blade. 

The Putti-Platt is a compar- 
atively ample operation of 
shortening the tendon of foe 
sub-scapularis muscle — the- 
powerful muscle on the under- 


side of the shoulder blade. So 
the surgeon, in nautical terms, 
takes in a "reef ofthe tendon. 

The Bankart, which has many 
variations, is designed to restore 
the continuity oft he cup by so 
stitching together the capsule — 
the envelope that surrounds the 
joint, that the labium is 
replaced. 

Either way Robson will have 
to rest for at least a month 
before resuming training, and 
then exercise must be carefully 
monitored. 


Henri Michel the 
France, is a hard man to . 

After watching bis team qualify 
in style for the second stage of 
the world Cup with an em- 
phatic 3-0 victory over Hungary 
m their final Group C game in 
Ledfl on Monday night, Michel 
was still not satisfied: "The 
result was fine, but we were 
much too hesitant in the first 
half and missed a lot of 
opportunities,” be said. 

Even Platini, the French cap- 
tain and European footballer of 
1 the year for three years running, 
did not escape criticism. Michel 
said: "Platini is improving, but 


of Sergei Aleinikov were in the 


The Russians had to shrug off 
a disappointing first half before 
-Blokhin and Zavarov gave them 
a 2-0 victory. But Valery 
Lobanovsky, their manager, was 
not unhappy with his side's 
performance. He said: "Soviet 
football has such good potential 
that I was able to make all those 
changes. But we have to balance 
our strength here - that is 
tournament strategy.” 

Tony Waiters, Canada's coa- 
ch, admitted: "1 was surprised 
when 1 saw the Soviet line-up. 
but let's face it, almost any team 


caul- “Platan is improving, but out iet s race u, almost any team 
considering the amount of drill from Europe or South America 
he has it's not enough. He must could use any of their 22 players 


produce more." 



RESULTS AND TABLES 


Monday 
Group C (at Leta) 

ftmaT ' |i) 3 

Stan HI 
rgm 

fatetau 31.420 




14200 


o ossr 

Baton 

Zavarov 


Today’s games 

Group B 

W 0 M ex ic o v Iraq (Mexico City, 7pm). 
17V, live coverage of second half, 
7.45. 

Belgium y Paraguay (Toluca, 7pm). 
Group F 

England v Poland (Monterrey, 
M2 11pm). BBC 1. 

Morocco v Portugal (3 da Mam, 
Guadalajara, It pm). 



The last ofthe summer whine 


his first in international football 
- and Rocbeteau, a second-half 
substitute, swept France to 
victory against the lacklustre 
Hungarians and left them 
runners-up to the Russians on 
goal difference. Based on the 
resuslts of Monday, France were 
guaranteed a tough game in the 
last 16 — against either Italy or 
Argentina m the Olympic Sta- 
dium in Mexico City on June 
17. 

Despite making almost 
wholesale changes to their ride, 
the Russians, predictably 
enough, had Hole trouble 
overcoming Canada 2-0 in 
Irapuaro. Of their first-choice 
team only Oleg Kusnetsov, in 
defence, andlhe wridfietd player 


and still be very strong.' 

The Russians now wait to see 
who will be their opponents in 
the last 16 in Leon next Sat- 
urday. They meet the third- 
placed team from either Group 
A, E or F, the group in which 
England are involved. 

FRANCE: J BatK M Amores. P Bamston. 
M Bonis. W Ayache. L Fernandez. J 
M Platini. A Graraa. J P Papin 
□ Rocbetsauj. Y Stopyra (air 
mart). 

HUNGARY: P Dtaft S Saflaj, A Rogh. J 
Varga. J Kudos. I Garaba, L DaJka, L 
□atari, M Eatartiazy, P Hanrech, K Kovacs 
fl a t i ro n: C Vatenta (Portugal) 

SOVIET wmt V Ctanov; Q Morozov. A 
Bubnov, O Kuznetsov. A BaJ, G 
Laovchento, v Yevtushenko, 5 Atanftov, 
S Rodonov, O Protasov (sub: 1 Balanov), 
O Blokhin (Sub: A Zsvarovt 
CANADA: T Urttfert R Langrduzzl. R 
Samuel, I Bridge. 8 WBsoa R Ragqn. G 
Gray, P Jamas. D Norman, C Vatorwna. D 
MfcMl. 

Roforea: t Traore(Mafi)- - - 


WORLD CUP TABLES 



GROUP A 


"" 

— 


GROUP D 




P W D L 

F 

A Pt 


PW D L 

F 

A Pt 

Argentina 

2 110 

4 

2 

3 

Brazil 

2 2 0 0 

2 

0 4 

[taw 

2 0 2 0 

2 

2 

2 

Spain 

2 10 1 

3 

2 2 

Bulgaria 

2 0 2 0 

2 

2 

2 

N Ireland 

2 0 11 

2 

3 1 

S Korea 

2 Q 1 0 

2 

4 

1 

Algeria 

2 0 11 

1 

2 1 


GROUP B 





GROUP E 




PW D L 

F 

A Pt 


P W D L 

F 

A Pt 

Mexico 

2 110 

3 

2 

3 

Denmark 

2 2 0 0 

7 

1 4 

Paraguay 

2 110 

2 

1 

3 

W Germany 

2 110 

3 

2 3 

Belgium 

2 10 1 

3 

3 

2 

Uruguay 

2 0 11 

2 

7 1 

Iraq 

2 0 0 2 

1 

3 

0 

Scotland 

2 0 0 2 

1 

3 0 , 


GROUP C 





GROUP F 


t 


P W D L 

F 

A Pt 


P W D L 

F 

A Pt j 

USSR 

3 2 10 

a 

1 

5 

Poland 

2 110 

1 

0 3 1 

France 

3 2 10 

b 

1 

5 

Portugal 

2 10 1 

1 

1 2 1 

Hungary 

3 10 2 

2 

9 

2 

Morocco 

2 0 2 0 

0 

0 2 

Canada 

3 0 0 3 

0 

b 

0 

England 

2 0 11 

0 

* 1 i 


J U - •**«£*. 

Molby: overlooked 

Molby Is kept 
out of team 
by Sivebaek 

John Sivebaek, of Manchester 
United, has ousted Jan Molby, 
of Liverpool, for the vacant 
midfield place in the Denmark 
team to play West Germany in 
Queretaro on Friday. Sepp 
Ptontek, the manager, has opted 
for the versatile Sivebaek to fill 
the place occupied by Jens Jorn 
Bartlesen, who was carried off in 
the 6-1 thrashing of Uruguay on 
Sunday. 

Bertiesen was first thought to 
have broken an ankle, but the 
injury has since been dinnosed 
as damaged ligaments. Despite 
his successful season with Liver- 
pool, Molby has yet to make the 
Danes* starting line-up in 
Mexico. 


Let us take the positive view 
as we prepare to watch Enghwd 
play Polud taught Wife any 
leek, it will be the summer’s hut 
night of agony. Let as jnst hope 
wit England don't perforin any 
- ntiradea and qaafify. Bat with 
England selMestracting Hke a 
land of poor man's Scotland we 
look pretty safe. If only the lads 
can piny appaUmgly jnst one 
more time we wDl be all right. 

Watching England in the 
World Cephas ben disappoint- 
ing, bat then watching E nglan d 
is always disappointing. Jnst as 
the tronbles of Ian Botham stem 
from the world's and perhaps his 
own disappear Orient that every 
year is not an omr ntirabUis, 
Khe 1981, so the sharpness of ali 
the agonies one has suffered 
from watching England play in 
this and ether World Cops come 
from memories of 1966. 

The very joys of that tour- 
nameut have cast a shadow on 
every English football match 
ever since. Nothing in football 
will ever be qaite tike that again, 
especially te those of ns who saw 
it at an impressionable age. 
Indeed, bad it not been for those 



WORLD CUP TV 


few weeks ef sadden and joyftas 
obsession with the World Cop 
and the Uack-aad-white tele, 
vision (I stffl one the feet Oat 
my duties to my French ex- 
change person prevented me 
from seeing the Argentina 
mat ch), I do not think I would 
ever have written a word about 
sport. I would probably have 
written abont for more important 
nod far less joyful things. 

The 1966 World Cap estab- 
lished a standard for jsy: that 
tournament became what foot- 
ball really was. It was the true, 
the real, the actual thing. AD 
other matches and all other 
tournaments since then have 
been bat shadows on the wall of 
the cave, fa every match I have 
seen on the television ever since 
I have been seeking a trace of 
those joys of *66. 


When ft comes to World Cops 
and the flickering screens nemos 
the world on which I have 
watched them the demand is 
insatiable. Every one of 
England's matches ■ is ap- 
proached la the hive of refind- 
iagsaefa joys and in the certainty 
if animate disappointment Ev- 
ery World Op ever, since 1966 
has bees rather Hke going back 
to the unspoilt fishing village 
you used to love and d is coveri ng 
it has become St Ttopex. 

The ineritflHe disappointment 
has been made more sente by the 
fUasioa, sustained over the past 
year, that we had something of a 
football team on oor hands. The 
players themselves were g e t ting 
more and more bolfish about 
their chances. In bet, a thought 
began to whisper in their 
dreams, a thought that they 
corid dare to enndate the Boys 
oT66. No sooner did the thought 
strike than ft destroyed them. In 
the end, ft has not been fear of 
driest that has done for them. It 
has been fear of victory. 
England's failure today is a 
legacy of *66. 

Simon Barnes 


Nicholas on the mend 


Charlie Nicholas, the Scot- 
land forward, may still (day in 
the Group E match against 
Uruguay in the Nezahualcoyotl 
Stadium on Friday. He suffered 
an ankle injury in the I -0 defeat 
by Denmark and appeared to 
have no chance of playing again 
in the finals , but the d a m age has 
healed quicker than anticipated. 

Nicholas managed some light 
training yesterday before the 
Scots returned from Queretaro 
to their headqua r ters near Mex- 
ico City. He said: "I have been 
able to do some running without 
actually kicking the bail. I am 
confident that, at worst, I will be 
available as a substitute." 

Alex Ferguson, the Scotland 
manager, welcomed the news of 
Nicholas’s swift progress, say- 
"A lot depends on the son 
progress be makes over the 
next few days. It is great news 
that he is back in training again 
and if he can get fit in time he 
must be considered for the 
Uruguay game." 


mg; 
of p. 


Davie Cooper, the 
winger,who came on as a sub- 
stitute against West Germany 
and picked up an ankle injury, is 
likely to be ruled out for Friday's 
match. 

Meanwhile, Enzo Frencescoli. 
the Uruguayan forward, said 
yesterday: "Our pride is hurt. 
Nobody likes to lose as badly as 
we did against Denmark, but 
lucidly in soccer you get a 
chance of revenge. The Scotland 
game is our big chance," 

Uruguay wfll be without Mi- 
guel Bossio, their defender, 
following his dismissal against 
Denmark, and possibly also 
Jorge Barrios, their midfielder, 
who is still injured. 

Following the defeats of Hun- 
gary and Canada on Tuesday, 
Scotland still have an outside 
chance of qualifying for the last 
16 but they must wait to see if 
Northern Ireland and Algeria 
lose to Brazil and Spain respec- 
tively today to discover if that 
remains the case. 


SPEEDWAY 


Morton the daredevil 
has burning ambition 


By Keith Macklin 


Three riders have good cause 
to be pleased with themselves 
after Sunday's Commonwealth 
final of the world individual 
championship at Belle Vue. 

They are Jeremy Doncaster, 
who won the meeting with 14 
points. Chris Morton, the Belle 
Vue rider who is one of 
England's dark Horses for the 
title, and the young protege 
from Stoke in the National 
League, Paul Thorp. 

AH qualified for the next 
stage, the overseas final at 
Coventry, and Doncaster got a 
terrific boost just in time for 
next Sunday's pain final in 
Pocking, West Germany, an 
event in which he teams up with 
the Great Britain captain .Si- 
mon Wigg. 

Morion, a battier who makes 
up for his lack of sharpness at 
the gate with daredevil accelera- 
tion, Has put up some consistent 
performances both in world 
championship heats and in 
international matches against 

Denmark. 

This seasoned international 
has a burning ambition to win 
the world title, a dream he 
shared with another fanatic, the 
late Kenny Carter. He may not 
have the power to do it against 
ihc Danes but it will not be for 
want of trying. Morton is a form 
rider. 

The outstanding performance 
in Ihe Commonwealth final 
came from young Thorp, who 
rides for Stoke in what is 
effectively speedway's second 
(ft vision, the National League. 

Altbniich his tally of eieht 


points was six behind Don- 
caster, it was another outstand- 
ing piece of riding from a 21- 
year-old who is still learning the 
tricks of the trade against the 
hardened veterans and top Brit- 
ish League riders. 

If there were those who 
thought his qualification in the 
recent British final was a purple 
patch, this thought has been 
dispelled. 

If Thorp qualifies from the 
overseas final at Coventry he 
will have gone further than any 
previous National League pre- 
tender to the world throne. 
Quite an achievement from an 
unpredictable young rider who 
Iasi season was only third in 
Stoke's averages, and who had a 
spell as reserve during a tem- 
porary period of loss of form. 

Less happy after Sunday are 
Phil Collins and Neil Evitts, 
Collins foiled to qualify and 
Evitts just scraped through on a 
re-run after felling in a collision 
with the Australian. Steve 
Regaling, who was excluded for 
obstruction. Evitts is also nurs- 
ing a painful and badly bruised 
back. 

One rider out of world 
championship contention, de- 
spite his desperate efforts to get 
fit in time, is Lance King, 
Bradford's American inter- 
national, whose damaged verte- 
brae have not healed in time for 
him to compete in the American 
final at Long Beach. Another 
unlikey rider is Andy Smith, of 
Belle Vue, whose dreadful sea- 
son on the track has been 
worsened by a broken leg re- 
ceived in a recent meetme. 


The story of an unlikely boom sport 

Croquet is going down 
like a boned sweet 


The story of Sir Macphoson 
Robertson is a nineteenth-cea- 
tory rags-to-riches stray of 
classical simplicity. Born into a 
poor Scottish immigrant family 
in Melbourne, the young Robert- 
son determined to climb to the 
top- While at school he spent his 
spare hoars in a neighbourhood 
barber’s shop bt&sirag the cus- 
tomers and in the eariy morn- 
ings he delivered newspapers, 
earning the pocket money which 
be carefully put at one side as 
the bads of his eventual fortune. 

Macpbezson Robertson left 
school at the age of 10 and 
worked first for a butcher and 
then for a nuunffKtnring confec- 
tioner, who taaght him the art of 
making boiled sweets and toffee. 
In 1880, at the age of 19, be 

made his first sweets at home in 
a nail-can with sugar and 
fiavonriugs bought from his 
employer. 

They went down well, the 
orders for Macpherson Robert- 
son home-made sweets began to 
flow in from neighbours and 
friends, and soon Robertson 
opened a shop. By 1923 the 
Robertson sweet empire had 
made him a millionaire and the 
highest taxpayer in Australia. 
He was made a knight, presum- 
ably for his services to the 
Australian Treasury. 

Sir Macpherson was a keen 
croquet player and in 1925 he 
presented a shield, the 
MacRobertsos Shield, for inter- 
national competition. The series 
was held appropriately in Mel- 
bourne between Australia and 
Great Britain, and later New 
Zeal and joined the tournament, 
with the first triangular contest 
taking place in 1935. 

The Australian and New Zea- 
land international croquet teams 
are now hi Britain to take part in 
the 1986 MacRobertson Shield 
contest. Great Britain have won 
the shield six times. Australia 


three times and New Zealand 
twice. Great Britain are the 
holders, having beaten Austra- 
lia, the host country. In 1982 by 
one ittatfh. F«rh team play a 
series of three international 
matches against the other two 
and the shield is won fay the ride 
who win two series, four matches 
or a play-off. 

Officials of the Croquet 
Association at the Hnriinxiuun 
dnb are delightedly rhiming 
that croqaet is the new boom 
sport, not merely in Britain but 
iftwsagfejtaBt the world. Brian 
Macmillan, the adrafaiistration 
secretary, says: "Croqaet no 
longer has the Alice in Wonder- 
hud vicarage garden party 
image." He added that last year 
34 new croquet dabs were 
registered. This year, with the 
season jnst started, nine more 
have opened. 

The Croquet Association have 
appointed a full-time develop- 
ment officer and nine part-time 
officers. "Young people are 
flocking to the sport, with 
tournaments organized for 
schools, youth teams and 
universities," MaaniQaa said. 

Croqaet k a vastly more 
difficult ami skflftd game than it 
looks. It can be played in singles 
or doubles, with mallets striking 
balls coloured bine and black 
playing against red and yeDow. 
Each baU most ran a set coarse, 
going throash each hoop twice in 
specific order, and then having 
to hit a peg in the middle. 

It can get a bit ruthless, too. A 
player, if he hits another 
player's ball, places his own hall 
m contact with the other and 
strikes his own ball so that the 
other shakes or moves. This is 
known as “taking cniquer". This 
sort of extremely skiifal hustling 
Of opponents can take a player to 
victory. 

Keith Macklin 


FOR THE RECORD 


BASEBALL 


NORTH AMERICA: NoSonl Lame Pttto- 

doifMa PKWoa 3, Now YwK Mets2 no 

PrtWwr* ttam 8. CNcaoo Cute 5 fill 

Momma Expos 5. a Loute CanSna. . 

Houston Astros 6. San Dm Ptorra 3i Lm 

Angotas Dodgon & Cmdrvud Rods 5. 


■ taaaaos Toronto Bkm Joys 5. 
Fted So* 1; Ctowitad ftMbna Q. 
OMdond AMUca S: Mbwukm Brwww. 3. 
IMumoio (Mrios CoAtofitt Ainstt 3. 


CRICKET 


ARUNDEL: UndtartS mm plMon : Guam 
gefarsowSufmy 168 (J RoMraon 5BJ. 
Sown wan by 3S runs. . 


CYCLING 


LA DOHAIIA: Tow of CotonMo: Sfaoti 

(Oaxwwn irtssa sued): 1 , R D f 

«OWi 4Ssac; 2, A CanwrUk) (Sp). 

V Denxoenko luSSfl). hm Urn* 4. F 
Rata, am ww S, I Romano* (USSR), same 


STljondaia swia 


area. 


TTgqc B, H U rar. same time: 7, 

nw»wii?S4: L “ reaUmB;9 - A 

11 F CBSds. CTsec. 


GOLF 


WPOA RMS AMD BRYMER ORDER OF 

K UKtoottor (US). CH.7&40; 3, K Lin* 
MusQ. £7.961.25:4. A McMm, £7,06540; S 
L Neumm (Sw«J. £7.03000: 6, DM, 

HUMUS; 7, L Danes, QL3KL20: 8. B Hike. 

E6.l61.SS: 9, J OCmnadw. CL614D0; T0.C 
PwtOft tSfiOBO. 


TENNIS 


axaAS TOW. HmtoflBHto Dow C heefctt 

woMwi ciiirir Bnff rodwt £ Ptatt B| 

SCottBOJS). 6*7. 6-1. 6-2: C6wJ 

MS Reaves (Kantoj|aiMMaj 

pauhbeachH 


ttSRtews.ltoB^i^M: »i TowteffijS 


fap^e&xnfcac 


(Hung). S1 10287; 11, K Jortan 
S10S800; 10 6 SaMM^^CItn ~ 


S12.0 

GMufiM (US). C81JQS; ZQ, E SoqSQ fAut), 


30 


benefit* abound for a angbi. a»- 
unBtasOc sec. aoe 18-20 w*b 6 
imm Sec cxd- Working as part 
era small, friendly uam la dh> 
Personnel dcM- your good <MU» 
100/66 + w.p_ conoaetmt and 
BoAAeavmdi wD be amp or 
rewarded witn a mod sal. 
CC7-60CL mortgage subsidy at 
21. octBenl annua) bonus. 
LVa. STL. BUPA and 
Phase riot 437 
HoMones me Com, 


£8.000 ro mojsoa 

PA/ Administrator to UmM the 
MO and Consultants of an par- 
Uamentory consutiancy tswih 
TW» podUoo offers ranch be 
wrivement and srarMy for an 
experienced and pf O ten s too M 
sec. win, •xoeoeni str and WP 
sHU*. plus a friemny and flexf. 
Me nature. Cantor 
Lam. 01-031 If 


WT P mm i to erjooo. A coeege 
Leaver Is red'd tv tbts oneMf- 
<*ms design company dealing 
with the weaiUdeu cHenia. An 
PA to the Protect Maaasv you 
wHt imcorm Involved u eadUufl 
prefects and wfll be aMo to 
make a real cmoitnuiou. wmi 
scope » develop your rota, two 
a probably one of me most at* 
tractive vacancies of tha reason. 
Typtne ai 30 vrom. Sh an omh. 
Svneray. Ihe recruitment con- 
sunaocy. ohms? 9633. 

ADvnrmaw io c&ooo + 
£1.000 Bonus. TMi friendly ad- 
verUstoq compa n y is seeking a 
young PA to orvuise and ro- 
und evens at Asort and 
pantcmtlan to pMUatora 
award sebames- Carrying oul o 
sorted and u ropo n s t Mc rato In- 
volving adntfn. you wid bo 
toTOMits a boss win Hues to ad- 

eon*. SVHis 80/66 swam. 

Smew, the reendtaneu 
suttocr. Oi-637 9633. 

■AMKHM £7.000. CneOtM own 
ortuntly for a eoBepe Inver 
wttti good SUM of 90/46 and a 
sense of honour to Min the ae- 
curttM department of ttdi 
European bank to mo Wn a 
End. Together with outdance of 
a more senior seauCary yon 

win aseut wan m secretarial 

treks tor nos irtmTOy team. 
Word pnxHtugbalidaialvsL 
Telephone Carotae Ktay Ae- 
potnowaB. 01-499 8070. 


prafesfUaro PA sought for MO 

of Intenutiooai httoeti compa- 

ny in swi Ha travels 
Mlnohdr Uinwahotobte 
WOJVL Von vrtll avonttmie 
travel etc and deal direct with 
eUsots to IW aasMCo. Cood «du- 

rhmen 



Wl. Sec far a enarmtng chaoOc 

yotmo own. CoMfl* Invar con- 

starred- TO jS j t mo ^ACP Me 


Cm 01-638 
SMNBH C /LEAVER Secretary 
for tat tramo co and pUbbshUMi 

group- Morrow Crop Agy rm» 

Language Speetobno 6M 


young yec'PA cdowsro Lots of 

Fun crowd. £6.900 to 

IB* 01-457 0306 TTC Any 


£11,500- TW* fan-moving pns- 
lesstontd orgaresatkm is seeking 
a person to lake responsUHlr 
for m» tnamramaiB of a sman 
office, to addition to oreurtog 
ml afi runs smoothly, the abili- 
ty to supervise and rocruB staff 
is reo*tL Fictdbuiisr so carry oot 



paw Approx 4CM> 
content- organwnp comer- 
onces: morntOTtno protects: 
handling medtaiioMoa etc. You 
should he ItexWfe. com under 
presBop. (demy wtu> come PR 
or mated experience. Good 
afctos iao#60) essential. Aye 
20* Please tei Ol 409 1252- 
Tbe Work Strap. 

MBIT X. Sec /PA tor nsoiagn 
of large computer centre. Very 
varied role with progreauon 
prospects. Rusty shorthand, au- 
dio and good typing with WJ>. 


tuaooa + exeeneni benefits. 
Apr 26-S5. A39 7001 (West 
End) 377 8600 <CUVJ Secretar- 
ies Was - The Secretarial 
Consultants. 

pa MMwamr to ciojooo m 
jmd mis young partner in ttd» 
leading property company CWM 
and become many involved to 
Ms eMr w ue t y varied day. Mere- 
ly you are between as-3«. have 


and a confident, warm mm- 
amy Contact Ann CTOser OI- 
OS! lS4i price Jtoittaoti & 


far corporate 
varied dote 


to wont 
_ B learn, 
raw from typing 
. and spread sheets 

to liaise with dUnts and arrano- 

tag roehtau parties, nedbto 

aitttade required. £9 j 000 pa + 
banking benwia. City 377 8600 
End 43» 7001 Secretaries 
Rh» The 


**ek f kindred spirt! to took to- 
wr i nine bn of •cerythtag 
reception, secret aria l work and 
tols of running around (other 
dentn sreofas. thumb rto. 
CreMv* InsUncto tons common 
sense essrotilai. Acctnir typing 
fa. 40vnnnl vital. Age 18+. Sai- 
aiy G&fiOO. Please can 01-409 
1232 The work Shop. 

A wore M £10000 + early re- 
view tww on - - 


oig dotting wttn punuc totaresb 
and attotMes. WUh IhearaiK to 

move oeyand the see Held, you 
wu be totally tovrowd to a w 
M and ekOUng rofa. TVPlng at 
» "tot Runr *h an tom. 
Synkrgy. toe recntUmm con- 
suUanOr. 01437 9633- 

Top West End company seeks 

young secretary to wort with 

flnanoe director tniecesttne. 
VTOd M> ideally far someone 
with some secretarial expert, 
raw. Shorthand ana typing 
IflO/SOl- Age I P*. Pl ease Me- 

Wrane 01-4 93 5787 Cordon 

Yaus Oorauitoocy 


IXPOBT DEFT of targe trading 
company needs shorthand sec 
Mttt a mio of z years exp. to 
work far faur traders. French 
useful. Age raw atu +■ £S- 
9.000 pa. City 577 8600 West 
End «M 7001 Secretaries Pun 
The Secretarial Consultants 

STAMM SPEAKING £10.000 
top PA. - Sec sought by MD Of 
conummicatHras prow. Good 
■peortfrsUUt' esaenuaL Short 
hand and audio typing 
reddest ed. For further details 
please con oi-oop 1253 The 
won. Shop. 

ATTRACTIVE, ARTICULATZ. |n- 
teWgera. smart lough kr in De 
Adndidstrntor. RecepHonUL 
Secretary. Orgoniaer and MoiJv 
er tor SMento a young team of 
tmtomral Brokets to Wi . Ring 
Sosannah Fraser on 498 BaiS. 

RECCPnOMST - SLOANE SO- A 

OrtflUt yoteag Receodantst. with 

typing, ts needed far this wen 
Known Estate Agents. Salary 
£6.750. Cotohotd and Davis Re- 
OTiHmenl Ud> 86 SniMn 
Place. Wl 01-495 T7W. 


VARY For ' Marketing 
Department of tot nuance co. 
pKcflent salary plus benefits. 
Merrow Erm> Agy (The Lan 
gongespociauetatoi 636 i a*tt 


liaison with Parti ament 

leading mdusmakats. 
£V0«0. CMJI toned. AGP 
Cons 01-636 B9ST.-6380. 
DOWN OH THE FARM £*« 
Cfasety conne cte d to the ti 
tog Industry, loin our ciler 
secretary io their porflamen 

division. THIS deoartmail k 
aponsfaia far mm> 
vwteneat and ensuring 
farmers get a lab - deal. 60 \ 
audio aunty needed. Pt 
UMbhot* 01 840 3611/3 
i West End) or ot geo a 
iCHid. Eatatwth Hunt Rec 
ims* Corotfaaids. 
WUMOUAL PA - muss 
Nuvrormnercial intemav 
argon Isa utm seeks PA wWi 
enl French stus EnUSh s 
interest hTHcrnatlonal no 
useful- Translations + - 

travel. £8LOOO NET. TetOI 

? > ^ t> B un»» Inn 
Uontt Hereon net COunseUg 
coucoc tuna - E 
Agents. This ton firm, wtu 
Dees In the West End. nee 
weu educated College La 
rattti an interest In country 
an t» v Sneeds 90 46. Coe 
and Dons Recruitment Ltd 
Bruton Place, wi oi 
7789 

*wnmw secrtETARY r 

ed far MD of young trie 
Coodsiwrth 
audio. WP and snmuu 
salts required. A^aMOt 
ry of El 1-12,000 g*. City 
B 600 west End aast 7001 
Tlra socrec 

W «L"- rwruttti 
wftKAtonar Oenerai wedt 
aMUa«rei wtthaietdi arrr 
nucantL du. ■ 

fopwtiunfcauoji biuijs and t 

«Hh etukrtsma icrWDSft 

grjjiro^rora panto*. ljQo 

oWIrariq . ntufJO. WP ft 
wani tab mvoiv^nW Con 


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3 




drop. 

C - ial I# 

l|f h B t 


i-Hfc HM£S WiiOJN t&DA Y JL)N£ H lyjtf. 


’s televis ion and radio programmes and Peter Davalle 


6.0Q CMfut AM. News 

headlines, weather, travel'. 
^ _ and sports tiufietins. 

R50 BraaWast Tun* with Frank 


Weather at &S5, 7.25, 
7^5,8J5aTdt5^ 
regional news, weather 
and traffic ar&57.7JE7. 

- 7-57 and B27; national and 

International nows al 7JJ0, 
7-30, a.00, 8^0 and 9JM; 
World Cup news at 7.15 
and 8L15; the new Top . 
Twenty at 7.32; and a 
review of the morning 
newspapers at &37JPSUS. 
Beverfy Airs fashion 
advice. The guests tndude 
SandieShaw. - 

520 Ceefax 104)5 Ohmbm. 

.... This week’s edition of the 
"W0azk» programme for 

. Asian women deludes 
advice on the rights and 
entitlements of home 
workers tom social 
worker SaJeha Khan and 
DHSS officer Saeed • 
Ahmad; and there is ‘ 
advice on healthy teeth - 
and gums by dental health 
educator GeetaPateL : 
10JO Play School 


0.15 Good Homing Britain 
presented by Anne 
VD^no^andf&kOwen. 
News wWi Geoff Meade at 


an d 94»; exercises at 
6-55: cartoon at 7J2Ss pop 
music news at 7.55; video 
repOTt at ajas; choosing a 


Bnmieroale Farm actor tei 
SharrockatSLOSL 


fe taki, 
wgfaji 


uitoey with guest Brian 
Jameson. 

1050 Cricket PstBr West 

Introduces coverage of a 
Benson and Hedges Cup ' 
semi-final match. 

1.20 News After Moon wrth 
Richard Whitmore, 
includes news headlines 
with subtitles 1.35 
Regional news. The 
weather detaBs come from 
fen McCaskffl 1.40 Bertha. 
A See-Saw programme for 
the very young, narrated 
by Roy Kinnear with SheUa 


Thames news headSnes. 

080 For Schools: reSgkxis 
education 047 
Discovering Vienna 104M 
- How total! a story, or 
communicate, without 
using words 1CL21 Airport 
- form al ities 1033 A 
consideration of the roles 
of men end women- 114)0 
teffing a story through 
■ dance 4120 Using 
. language fo expnlws 
Drafiluda. For the hearing 
unpaired 11.40 Chemistry: 
" aroicationsofan 
•tectrccriamioafceH. - 
11J5 Courageous Cat Cartoon 
. 124)0 Pwttend BflL 

‘ Adventures of a 



•It is “How to” night on 
television: how to avoid heart 
attacks, how to team the 
facts of Bfe, and how to make a 
celebratory cate: The 
cumulative effect of the 
programmes should be the 
creation of a whole new nation of 
■ long-fivers without any sexual 
hang-ups, though over- 
indulgence in Mary Berry's 
rich sweetmeats which we see 
being prepared in COOKING 
FOB CQJEBRAT)OHS (17V, 
230pm) would not meet with 
the approval of doctors or 
Insurance compantesJ^fiss 
Beny wiftjiowever, merit the 


does not know what to do with 
Ti- baby's old bath-tub. Scrub iL 
■£ she advises, and use it for mixing 
s the cake fngreefierts. The 
outcome could be one of those 
heart-shaped cakaettat Mbs 


CHOICE 


Berry convinces us are ideal for 
»5asemant partes, in this, 
she snows herself to be a 
tredttonafist because, as w» 

GOTTA 

HAVE HEART (ITV, 9.00pm). 
the body's pump bears no 
resemblance to ihe romantic 

2M8MSWSBf- 

SBSSS 

an ai-gfitta ring Mi riam S toppard 
as compere, and lots of fumy 
and no t-sp-funny sketches about 
fattie s and womars and 
smokers, strung out on some 
femflar advice from Dr 
Stoppard about how to malm the 
simple and painless 
adjustments that eottid add years 
to our fives-There is a bizarre 


moment when Ernie Wise, 

patting his TV-viewer's 
tummy, tells us that watchtog him 
whfie slumped in our 
armchairs, is just asking for 
trouble. 

•Dr Stoppard, appearing for 
the second time tonight, m the 
non-cabaret WHERE 
TTffiHFS LIFE (TTV. 7.00pm) is 
singularly unimpressed by the 


arguments of Dr Thomas 
wfib teas her, and us, that he 
thinks chfidren should not be 
taught about sex but should 
find out for them selvas. 1 shall 
never know how Dr Stoppard 
and the studio audience 


Maw (Quartet No 2) 

10-00 Bizet French National 
Radio Orchestra play the 
Symphony inC 
1030 London VWnd Trio: 

Tomas! (Concert 

HoSinUSin.lor clarinet* 500 

bassoon). VDa-Lobos (Trio) 
11.15 Bournemouth 
S info ntettafundar 
Wtengenheim). Mozart (Las 
Petits Rians overture and 
baflat music), Hindemith 


Radio 4 


Back y ard, (r) 


Adolescents. Tfow do 
adolescents see their 
futures? Young people 
talk to Anna Ford about 
themselves and thek 

Coleman, director of the 
Sussex Youth Trust and 
Suzie Hayman; the author 
of a new book on the 


i nn the be 


Walker.fr) 

135 Cricket Further coverage 
of the 55-overs-a-side 
Benson and Hedges Cup 
semi-final match, 
introduced by Peter West 
332 Regional news. 

335 Up Our Street (t14.10 
Dogtartan and the Three 
Muskehounds. Cartoon 
series (r) 435 Take 'neb, 
introduced by Phfflip 
Schofield. The programme 
under discussion inthis, 
the last procramme of the 
series, is Lift Off! 

435 John Craven’s 
Newsround 54)5 - 
Moonflaet Part three of 
the six-episode adventure, 
based on the smuggling 
story by J. Meade FaBcner. 
(r) (Ceefax) 

535 world Ctq> Report,-. - 
introduced by Bob WBson 
. andEmtyn Hughes. A 
preview of tonight's crural 
match against Poland; and 
highlights of the games 
between Italy ana South 
Korea- and Bulgaria v 
Argentina. 

6.00 News with Nicholas - 
Witchefi and Antfrew - 
Harvey. Weather. 

635 London nua. 

7.00 Wogen. Tonighf s guests 
include Lbs Dawson; 

Frank Bruno. Gmette 
Spantor. and, with a song, 
Steve Winwood. 

7.40 Top of the Pops. 

- introduced by Mflre Smith. 

6.10 Dallas. Babby'spalabd ■ i 
busines partner Matt ' 
CantreB arrives at- • - ■ 
Southfork coacentetfover' 
whether or not Bobby's-' -• 
death wBI Jeopanfize the 
emerald mating operation. J 
Meanwhile, J.R. tasoovers 
the traitor in his ranks; and 
Miss Effie finds out why 
Clayton Js so troubled. 
(Ceefax) 

94)0 News with Julia Somervffle 
and John Humphrys. 
Weather. 

930 The Africans. In part three 
of his .series AB Mazni .- 
examines the continent's 
different religions. 

(Ceefax) 

1035 World Cap Qra nda ta n cL 
Coverage of the crucial 
Group F match between 
England and Poland. The 
commentator at the 
University Stadium Is 
Barry Davies, with • 
comment from Trevor 
Booking and Terry 
VenaWes. Plus, highlights 
of the Morocco/Parttigal 
game; Mexico and Iraq; 
and Belgium and 
Paraguay, introduced by 
Desmond Lynam and 
Jimmy HSL 

1235 Weather. 1 


1 4)0 News with Leonard 
Paridn 130 Thomas 
news. 130 The ■ 

. C ham pio ns S e cr et 
Service adventures, (r) . 
230 Cooking for Cel eb r ati ons. 
The first of a new series 
presented by Mary Berry, 
[see Choice [330 Tatotfie 
High Road. Episode one of 
a new drama series set in 
. the Scottish highland 
community of serkteiroch 
■ 335 Thames news 
- headlines 330 Sons and 
Dau ghte r s. . 

4.00 Portend EB8. A repeat of 
the programme shown at 
noon 4.16 Madame • 

• Gusto's Chens. Cartoon 
-series 4.15 Bass’* Joke 
Machine 430 
Razzmatazz. Pop music 
show. 43 5 Roatfamnar. 

- • • in David Bellamy's ' . 
conservation series 5L15 
Steer Spoons. ' 

.345 News with John Suchet 
' 630 Thames news. : 

630 Crossroads. Daniel 

attempts to prise hi$ sister 
away from the Iraier Light 
religious cult " 

645 Where There** 

Life-presented by Miriam 
Stoppard. How much 
. . should parents, teach their 
children about sax? The 
guest is American •- 
•• psychiatrist Thomas . 


635 Open Univ e rsity : 

Database - Management 
System. Bids at 730 
930 Ceefax. 

104)0 Daytkne ooltoo: for four- 
and five-year otds 10.15 ■ 
Ceefax 114)0 Words and 
pictures 11.17 Ceefax. 
1133 Problems for 10- to 
12-year olds 1140 A 
Jewish family in 
Manchester talk about 
their fives 1202 Ceefnc 
200 The Ufe of a Roman 
soldier jn Britain 2.18 
Examining Hght and dark 
In VWtshirB; and a model 
efiy of the future 240 ■ 
Animated films made by 

330 Cricket Further coverage 
of one of today's Benson 
and Hedges Cup semi- 
final matches. Introduced 
by Peter West The 
commentators are Richie 
Benaud and Tony Lewis - 
with c o mmen t f ro m Tom 
Graven ay and Geoff 
■ Boycott 

730 The Home Movie Front 
This second of two 
am ateu r-made films 

^SuSvSllld^ WarteSs 0 

the story.of the people of 
Beckum, a smal town to 
Germany imder Nazi rule. 

830 irorever England, the fifth 
of six programmes in 
which Beryl Bainbridge 
eramjnes the north/south 
divide. Tonight she tafles to 
the McLeans of Liverpool, 


have been married almost 
. 50 years and live in - 
Toxteth. - 

930 M*A*$*H. Tempers 
become frayed aftte a 
partcufariy noetic session 
in the operating theatre 
and Hawkeye and Frank 
come to blows when • 
Hawkeye accuses Frank 
of being inconmetent 
Frank takes no time in 
ret^ation when one of 
Hawteye’s patients takes 
a turn for the worse. 


2.10 Their Lordsh^rs’ House. A 
reseat of last night’s - 
hightights of the day's 
proceedings m the House 
of Lords. 

235 The international Skffl 
Olympics Highlights of 
the bie nnial e vent that 

pe^from^o^le 
worn with special craft 
and technical skils to 
compete agaiist each 
other, (r) 

335 Box Extra: AH the Queen's 
Man*. Kevin BWington's 
commentary-free account 
of the fife of members of 
the Household Brigade at 
home and abroad. Made in 

Guards on dutyand at play 
at home and overseas 
. including Aden, Borneo 
and Malaya. 

430 Dancin’ Days. JuHa, now • 
released from prison, tries 
to re-adjust to life on the 
outside, and begins to 
look for enlace to live, 
whfie her mend. Carmmha 
tries to make ends meet 
530 Alice. Tommy, out for the 
evening with Mel and his 
old Navy friend, Frank, 
now a recruiter tor the 
service, Is intoxicated by 
■ the taBc of fife overseas 
and deckles to enlist 
530 An Evening With the 
Family. An animated film 
from Sweden in which afi 
the characters are 
punctuation marks or 
letters of tie alphabet 
6.00 Fandy Ties. American 
domestic comedy series 
starring Meredith Baxter- 


On long wave. VHF variations at 
end. 

Burtnass News. 635. 735 
Weather. 730, B30 
News. 735, 835 Sports. 745 
Thought for the Day. 835 
Yesterday in Parfia merit. 

657 Weather; Travel 
930 News 

94)5 Midweek wfih Lbby 
Purvesfs) 

1030 News: Gardeners' 

Question Tune. 

1030 Morning Story: Winter 
Wind, by Rahsa Kten. 

Reader SMraen Shah. 

1045 Dafiy Service (pew every 

it* 

Choral To celebrate the 
150th birthday of 
Huddersfield Choral 
Society, chorus-master 

HTrhi i\ay tBttS TO 
choir's story (r) 

1148 Enquire WitiurtNei 
Landorandmqjwts 
answer listeners' questions 
1230 News: You and Yours 
1237 Afistair Cooke s . 

American Collection. 

Records from Ms private 
collection. The American 
Musical (2). 1235 Weather 
130 The WoridAt One: News 
140 The Archers. 135 


when Dr Szaz says: “If you want 
to know the atomic weight of 
carbon, you don't ask your 
mother. You go to the 
EocytopaeiSa Brttamvca." 

Peter DavaHe 

730 News 
735 Tha Archers 
730. In Business. Whattha 
Japwwsa are up to in 


745 Groundswek Whether or 
. not fanners are taking 
the environment seriously. 
8.15 Analgia. Wftwt success 
is dong to West 
Germany and the Germans. 
930 ThirtwMinute Theatre. 

Thfs Golden Land, by 
Dorothy Ostxime. With 
Susan Sheridan fs) 

945 Kaleidoscope. Indudes 
comment on Taming Of 
The Shrew at the London 
Haymarket, and an 
investigation mto the 
saxophone, with three 
top performers- John Harie, 
Patti BrotSe and 
Courtney Piite. 

10.15 A Book At Bedtime: 

Under tha Nat by iris 
Mtrdoch m. Read by 
Stephan Rea. 1039 
Weather 

1030 The Worid Tonight 

11.15 The Financial Vrarid 
Tonight 

.1130 Today In Parliament 

1230 News; Weather. 1233 


13). Beethoven.. 

n C minor. Op 30 No 2} 


I . r i ;rrn • 


Britten (Prelude and 
Fugue, Op »), Bridge 



530 MkficweNt Choice: 

Strauss (Festival 
Prelude), Vivaldi (Recorder 
Concerto te C major, RV 
444: with Hutehiins. 
sopranino). Defius pfano 
Concerto: CXirzon/BBC SO), 
HoweBs (Requiem), 
NovtecOtefln Sonata: 
Suk/Panenka), Liszt 
(Mazappa) 

730 Debut James Meek 


230 News; woman's Hour. 
Guest is Anne Muster, a 
Ctvfi Service top-grade 


7.15 Coron atio n Olr ae C Brian 
. . • wxl Sail have an * '• 
iWpplhtmeiTt at Austral 
House. (Oracle) 

745 World Cup 88, live 
' .. ^sbcondhalf ccrveregeof 
the GraiipB game 
r . between.MexJco and Iraq 
1 ‘ in the _ A 2 tae Btedkmv Phis, 

. _ . lih; 

mterievys from fee home 
countries cantos. ■ • 

9.00 Yoi/ve Gotta Have Heart. 
Lighthearted advice on ■ 
how to avoid heart 
tfsease. Presented by 
-Miriam Stoppard, with, * 
among others Ernie Wise, 
instem Sunshine. Andrew 
" Sachs-and James Bolan. 
(Oracle) (seeChofce) : 

. 1040 Hews at Ten with Martyn 
' Lewis and Carol Barnes. 
1030 Ffhn McO (1974) starring 
Jota Wayne and Eddie 
Atomt Retted detective, 
Lon McQueen, Joins 
forces with private 
detective Pinky Farrow in 
order to bring to Justice 
drugs baron Manny . 
Santiago who was also 
responsible for the death 
of McQ's colleague in the . 
police force. Directed by 
John Sturges, 

1235 Night Thoughts. - 


Rogers, Gary Burghoff, 

■ LorettaS wit and Larry 

-- Hinvftte(ri- ... 

935 A Very Peculiar Practice. 
Comedy series about a — 
medical practice on a red-. . . 
brick university campus. 

.* The new"; rdeafistic Dr 
Daker is asked by one of 
his colleagues; the far- 
rightWteg Dr Buzzard, to - 
help fefrito a research 


630 Flaiiiback.Thisfinai 
programme of the repeat 
sedes examines how 
tateviston examines how 
television reported the 
Fafldands confficL (Oracle) 
74)0 ChanaeCFour news with 
Peter Sissons and Afestak 
Stewart includes a report 
■ onjhe pfight of chfidloss 
couples waHteg for 
Nahoral Health Service 
treatmentfor infertility. ' 
730 Comment. This week's . 


of Sisters by R&b 
330 News; The Aftwnoon 
Play.Summw- 
Attachment, by Michael 
. Sharp. With (rebel Dean 
and Bryen Pringle. The story 
of a wktowwho meeisa 
- man whose wifehas recently 
•• left him. Love blossoms, 
but fate cniely intervenes. 


Davison, DavidTroughton 
•' Graham Crowden, 
Barbara Flynn and 
Amanda HSwood. 
(Ceefax) 

1030 N ew snt g b t The latest 
nationaland international 
news mdurfing extended 
coverage of one of the 
. main stories of the day. 
With John Tusa, Peter 
Snow. Donald . . 

MacConrick and.Ofivfa 
O'Leary 

11.05 Weather. 

11.10 CrickBfc Htahfights of one 
of today’s Berson and 
Hedges Ctp semi-final 
matches, (ntroducedby 
Peter West 

124W Open Unfvarsitn The 
. Natural History Museum 
1235 The Central 
. Nervous System. Bids at 
1235. 


-Weather. - — 

84W Galery. The final 
.. . programme of tire art quiz 

^^^^^^litfbrd are . 
joined by Timothy CSfford 
.and Gterakfine Norman. 

330^)tvsree Reports. This 
“ week’s ecfltion of the 
current affairs programme 
allows members of the 
hippie convoy to answer 

• tfte&critics. 

930 Dance on Four. The • 
Dance Theatre of Harlem 
- perform a baRst version of 

• Tennessee WBfiams’ play, 
A Streetcar Named Desire. 

930 F8ne Un Etrange Voyage 
(1981) starring Jean 
Rochefort - The story of a 
father's relationship with 
his estranged daughter, 
brought together by the 


347 EngSsh Now. Linguist 
David Crystal reports on 

etymology. 

430 News 
435 File on 4. 

445 Kaleidoscope Extra. 

John Irving, author of 
books such as The Worid 
Aooonfing to Gerp and 
The Hotffl New Hanpshire, 

t rite .to Christopher 

530 newsmagazine. 

530 Shipping? SS 
Weather. 

630 News; Financial Report 
630 Quote... Dnquote with 
- • Baenor Bron, Auberon 

i Wauctii, Charnel Cuar and 
Royrunhsai' 


VHF (Available in England and 
SWaies only) as above 
except S35«30aa Weather: 
Travet 1130-1230 For 
Schools 135330pot Fw 
Schools. 630335PM 
(confined). 1130-12.10am 
Open UnmersMy: 1130 1 

Mtton In His Times. 1130 
Foreground Betties. 

1230-1.10 Schools Mght- 
Tone Broadcasting: Radio 
hftstory: A-tevel 

( Radio 3 ) 

On medliBn wave- VHF variations at 
end. 

635 Weather. 7.00 News 
735 Morning Concert Berlioz 
(Rob Rw overture), Sor 
(Fantaise on Ye banks and 
braes: Artzt, guitar), 

Chopin (Three Ecoasatees: 
Ashkenazy, piano}, 

Britch (Scottish Fantasy: 
Kyung-wha 

Chung.vloSn). 830 News 
835 Concert 

(contd)3ononcM 
(Pofifemo overture), Solar 
(Fandango m D minor 


730 Liszt and the Piano: talk 
by Alan Walker 

8.10 Down by the Greenwood 
Side: Harrison 
Birtwistie'e dramatic 


Ensemble, with soloists and 
actors Penelope 
WalmsIey^CtariUohn Rath, 
David Actonjohn Altman 
and David Meyer . 

845 French Orchestral Music 
Parley of 


Dittersdorf (Sinfortia 
Concertante in D4cademy 
of St Martin-to-Fields), 
Janacek (Taras BuS»L94IO 
News 

84)5 Thfs Week’s Composers: 

- - Nicholas fBtaw. Richard 
Rodney Bennett. Bennett 
fSoSoquy, with Ctso 
Laine, and music from tite 

fflra BiSon Dotiar Brain); 


. Orchestra. Charpentier 
(Symphonies pour un 
reposoir), Rebel (Caprice 
in D), Couperin (Concert 

dans ie gout theafral) 

925 Sbc Continent s: foretan 
■ radio . 

broadcasts, monitored by 
BSC • 

945 Richard Rodney Bennett: 

. Lontano perform 
Commeoallfor 

JorewBmaSmS&iriay 
Commeda IV for brass 
qttintet 

10.15 New Premises: Stephen 
Gamre's arts magaziRa 

1130 Chambw Music from 
Manchester EndeHon 
String Quartet/ Andrew 
Marnn^T clarinet). 

Britten (Three Dhrartimang), 
Puccini ( I Crisantemi). , 


BrahmsTOarmet Quintet &i 
B minor Op115) 


1137 News. 1230 Closedown. 
VHF only: Open 
University. From 835am to 
fiJS. Open Forum: 
Students' Magazine. 


Radio 2 


12.16 Concert HaH: Pietro 

Rkjacci (r»ano). Chopin 
fmrae Mazurkes, Op 
SftBarcerofle in F st^p 
. Op So; Polonaise-Fantasy in 
_ A flat Op 61). 130 News 
14a Jazz by Arrangement: 

John Dankworth with 
records by Duke BUngton's 
Orchestra and others 
130 Ulster Orchestra (under 
Protheroe). Mozart 
(Impresario ovartws), Paiti 
: Reade (Jane Eyre suite), 
Copland (Musk: for Movies), 
Fauref Entr'acte etc from . 
ShytocxL and Walton 
(RlchardW) 

230 viola and Piano: Takeshi 
Shimizu and Gordon 
Back. Yreye (Au Roust, Op 


On medium wave. See Radio 
1 for VHF variations. 

News on the hour except 
1130pm (730, 1230 mSdnighT VH 
onM. Hsadfines 530am, 630, 
730, and 830. Worid Cup Match 
reports 8.02, 9.02. 

Commentary. England v Poland 
1130pm (mf only). General 
Oesfcs1.05pm, 232. 332. 432, 
54)5, 935. Cricket: Benson and 
Hedges semi-final 1132am, 
1232pm. Commentary at 
630pm (mf only) Scoreboard 
730pm 

430am Charias Nova (s) 530 


is) 930 Ken Bruce T130 jimmy 
Young (s) 135pm David Jacobs (s) 
235 Gtona hunnrford (s) (phone 
In) 330 David Hamfiton (s) 535 
John Dunn fe) contimring on 
I VHFoNy) 630 Cricket Special 
(Benson and Hedges Cup semi- 

W&T’ 

Yattjss) 930 Listen To me Band (s) 
955 Sports Desk 1030 The 
Trteder Box. Tommy Trtnder chats 
to a five audience 1915 The 


Houghton Weavers 1030 Chris 
Bite looks back 1130 Worid 
Cup Special. England v Poland 
1230am Round Midnight 
joining VHF) 230-43&m Mghtride 

( Fladio 1 ) 

On medium wave. VHF 
variations at end. 

News on the half hour from 
630am until 930pm and at 1230 
midnight 

530am Adrian John 730 Mike 
Smith’s Breakfast Show 930 
Simon Bates 1230pm 
Newsbeat (Steve Annett) 1245 
Gary Davies 330 Steve Wright 
530 Newsbeat (Steve Armed) 545 
Bruno Brookes, ind at 630, 

Top 30 album chart 730 Janioe 
Long 19-12.00 John Peel (s). 

VHF RADIOS 16 2> 430*01 As 
Radio 2. 630pm John Duran (s). 

730 Fo& on 2. 830 As Radio 2. 
1900 As Radio 1.1230 News. . 
12.05am Nlghtride (s) 230-430 As 
Radio 2 


WORLD SERVICE 

800 Nawsdeak 6 30 Meridian 730 News 
738 Twenty-four Hours 730 Short Story 
7.46 SportEWOrtd 830 News 839 ReBec- 
tais 915 Classical Record Review 930 
Brain of Britain 1986 930 News 939 
Review of the Mfih Press 916 the 
Worid Today 930 Financial News 940 
Look Ahead 945 Waltz King 1030 News 
1031 Omnibus 1130 News 1139 News 
About Britain 11.15 On The Box 1125 
Letter. From Wales 1130 Mendttfl 1230 
Radio Newsreel 12.15 Nature Notebook 
1225 Farming world 1945 Sportt Round- 
up 130 News 138 Twenty-Four Hours 
130 Sportsworid 135 Here's Humph 200 
News and Outlook 2«5 Report On 
Religion 33(LHadk> Newsreel 915 Site 
from Sevan Seas 330 Radio Active 430 
Nevis 439 Commentary 4.15 Couiler- 
polnt 945 Sports Roundup 735 Good 
Bocks 900 News 909 TwentyJFour 
How* 930 Assonant 900 News 901 
Sportsworid 915 Album Time a45 Re- 
cording of the Vtaek lOOO Nows 1039 
The Vrarid Today 1035 A Letter Rom 
Wales 1030 Ftoandal News 1940 Reflec- 
tions 1945 Sports Roundup 1130 News 
1130 Commentary 11.15 WorH Cup 
[ Soccer 1230 News 1230 News About 
Britain 12.15 Radio Newsreel 1230 Radio 
Active 130 News 131 Outlook 130 
Waveguide 130 Book Choice 1.45 Uvng 
' Wftn Drought 230 News 230 Review OT 
The British Press 2.15 Sportsworid 230 
Assignment 900 News 339 News About 
Bitei 115 Worid Today 435 Reflections 
450 Rroncwl News 5-00 News 539 
.Twenty-Four Hours 5-45 The Worid 





Iggpgt 



w the father's mother 
whfie on a train jouney 
between Troyes and Paris. 
Directed by Alain Cavalier. 
(Subtitled) 

1140 TT& Lordships' House. 
Highlights of toe clay's 
proceedings in the 
HGouse of Lonte. Ends at 
11^5 



REGIONAL TELEVISION VARIATIONS 


130 

Nms. 130 Gouitty Practice. 225- 
230 Hare Coofcay : 9 15 Qua Honeybun. 
520-945 Crossroads. 630 Today 
Sougi W est 9159 45 Emmardafe farm. 
1235am Postscript Ctosadown. 



U9120 iSSo 

325 New. 930- 

*£S7*JVDpdor». 9 1 5-t*5 Star 
Ooca 6OM20 Lookaround. 1226m 


Ctosadown. 




SCOTTISH Aa London ax- 

^S-S5SBgSlSg« a , 

LmMaSSS!i a,n - ,lXm ’ 


CHANNEL ^ggffiffy 

gonas. 120NSWS. 120 Short Story 
Theatre. 200230 ProWffn Page, XX> 
430 You ng Dogore. 91fr945Con- 
rw«gn^l (00 Channel Report 915420 

OKaric T hames. izaSea 

Ctosadown. 



GRAMPIAN **^*”«- . „ 

Gtocfcafl ^ 120 N ew^St-23?^ 

Era 'ttjgtssr** 

1235m News. Closedown. 

YORKSHIRE LaMon «- 

j- , "° nm ' re P t r1 230pw- 1 30 
Calendar Lunchtime lire. 120 News. 
130i»Falcon Crest 915445 Star 
Choice. 900-620 Calendar. 1235am 
Closedown. 

Green Bottles. 120 News. 130-230 
Hart to Hart 915-&45 Star Chfflca. 900 
Crossroads. 625-945 News. 

1235m Ctosadown. Jobfmder. 

ANGLIA S Londor a«apt 

spafcia 1230m-l30 Parlour 
Game. 120 News. 130-230 Country 
Pwft»91 5*45 Emtnerdale Famv 
900*20 About An^a. 1235m 
^nibndge Angle. (Soeadown. 

mETEES jaffSar, „„ 

Oeggs Paopte. 120 News.^^ m ' 
Where the Jobs Are. 130-230 Country 
Practice. 915-5.45 Star Choca. 

6-00-620 Northern Lite. 1235m WOrid 
Hope, Ctosadown. 


inster 
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another 
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OEN1X 
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•LAPOTAIRE 


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icain and mdy 


[CMtiMKd on pqgp js 







11 1986 


Gower loses 


captaincy 


after defeat 


By John Woodcock, Cricket Correspondent 


Lord's: India beat England by 
Jive wickets. 


Gatting* seemed more disap- 


Following India's splendid 
victory in the first Test match, 
sponsored by Comhili, yester- 
day, it was announced that for 
the two remaining Tests of the 
present series Mike Gatling, 
rather than David Gower, will 
lead England. After that the 
selectors’ indecision will have 
to end. for whoever is given 
charge against New Zealand in 
the second series of the sum- 
mer must surely take the side 
to Australia in October. 


pointed for Gower yesterday 


than pleased for himsel 

When offered the job by Peter 
May he asked for lime to think 
aboiut it, though when the 
chairman hummed a little he 
knew he must accept. He 
made the point that the atmo- 
sphere in the England dressing 
room these last few days, with 
the axe hanging over not only 
the captain but several of the 
players as well, had been 
depressing. 


Whether, if England had 
pulled this first Test out of the 
fire. Gower would have held 
the captaincy is not known. 
Personally. I doubt it It is 


more likely that the selectors 


decided "Some time ago to 
share the one-day internation- 
als and the Tests against India 
between Gower and his chief 
rival for the job. They might 
have felt obliged, otherwise, to 
lake into account the fact that 
Gower had to make do yester- 
day without the bowling of 
Dilley and Emburey'for much 
of India’s failings, Dilley hav- 
ing strained a hamstring and 
Emburey his back. 


Gower for his part was, as 
ever, gracious in defeat, he is a 
good loser and a generous 
winner. Of his 25 successive 
Tests as captain, be won five, 
drew seven and lost 13, 10 of 
the defeats coming at the 
hands of the West Indians. 
Even Kapil Dev had a word of 


Gower’s record 
as captain 


Gower has never made any 
bones about wanting to re- 
main as captain. It is right and 
proper that he should, just as 
it is that when the Test 
captaincy of any country be- 
comes an issue the candidates 
should have their credentials 
closely examined and publicly 
debated. To lead one's coun- 
try* is a great honour, and it 
matters to a lot of people that 
the best does iL 


Opposition PW D L 
1982 Pakistan 10 0 1 

1983- 84 Pakistan 2 0 2 0 

1984 West Indies-.. S 0 0 5 

1984 Sri Lanka 10 1 0 

1984- 85 India 5 2 2 1 

1985 AustraSa - 6 3 2 1 

1985- 86 West Indies — 5 0 0 5 

1985 India 10 0 1 


Total 


26 5 7 14 


Gower is not the first but 
the thousandth Test captain to 
find his job on the line and to 
suffer because of iL Whether 
the selectors have handled the 
matter very sensibly, or sensi- 
tively, is another matter. Pos- 
sibly not. but there is nothing 
new in that either, as Arthur 
Carr or A. P. F. Chapman or 
Mike Smith or countless other 
captains would aver. 


sympathy for Gower before 
rejoicing at his first success in 
21 Tests as India's captain. 

Yesterday’s start was de- 
layed by 20 minutes and it was 
a long time before India could 
feel sure they were going to 
win. They lost Srikkanth for 
nought, caught at second slip, 
and when, at 35, Gavaskar 
was also out to Dilley, after 
looking as though be bad the 
situation under control, they 
still had a good way to go. 


By then, though, Shastri had 
hit Edmonds for three crack- 
ing fours in an over, and in no 
time at ail Kapil Dev was 
rounding off a famous victory 
by pulling Edmonds high into 
the Grandstand. 


It was not so much that 
England lost heavily in the 
West Indies but the feckless 
nay they did it that first raised 
questions about Gower’s suit- 


Downton took a chance in 
going for the edge which 
Gavaskar got to a good ball 
from Dilley. It was heading 
straight for Gatling at first 
slip. But the wicketkeeper held 
it and that was thegreat thing. 

Gower seemed to have 


It is 54 years ago that India 
played their first Test match at 
Lord’s and their followers 
cheered them now from in 
front of the pavilion no less 
enthusiastically than West In- 
dians resident in England did 
when their side won at head- 
quarters for the first time in 
1950. “We can believe in 
ourselves now and win the 
series," Kapil Dev said. So 
they can. They bad played all 
the best and most enterprising 
cricket, much of it of great 
charm. 


St. 


£170,000 ticket sales 


months time more about 
Gatling's claims. He will cer- 
tainly be different For one 
thing he will be less easy going. 


He has had success with 
Middlesex since graduating 
with them under Professor 
Brearley; he is positive and 
unselfish, a very good cricket- 
er with any number of years in 
front of him, and well capable 
of providing the fresh impetus 
that England currently needs. 
What worries me a little is his 
tolerance level. As a rule, 
patience gets more out of a 
side than barking at them. 


Ad ranee ticket sales for the 
third and final Comhili Test 
match against New Zealand at 
the Oval starting on August 
21, have reached £170,000, 
which is comparable with 
sales achieved last summer for 
the match against Australia. 


Ian Childs, Surrey's mar- 
keting manager, said: “In 
1984 we set out to maximize 
international ticket sales by 
formulating a comprehensive 
marketing and PR plan, and 
we are delighted to have 
achieved such results." 


• Trevor Jesty, the Surrey 
batsman, yesterday dis- 
charged himself after a night 
in King’s College Hospital and 
has been told to rest for a few 
days. He was suffering stom- 
ach pains, thought to be a 
grumbling appendix, and will 
wait to see whether the trouble 
flares again. 

Grahame Clinton, who is 
recovering from food poison- 
ing, and Alan Batcher, who 
has a strained back, hope to be 
fit to open the innings for 
Surrey against Nottingham- 
shire on Saturday. 



MODERN 

PENTATHLON 


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Phelps has 
work 
cut out 


By Michael Coleman 


Six weeks before the world 
championships in Italy, most 
of modern pentathlon’s top 


competitors are gracing Bir- 
the five-day 


mingham for 
international event which gets 
under way today. 

Included among the 12 
teams lairing part will be 
Daniele Masala (Italy) and 
Anatoly Slarosiin (USSR), re- 
spectively ihe Olympic cham- 
pions of 1984 and 1980. Both 
clearly regard this event, the 
first international in Britain 
since 1984. as a useful work- 
out before gening to grips at 
the world championships in 
Montecatini Termi. from Au- 
gust 5-10. 

Italy have also sent the 
excellent Carlo Massullo — 
who finished fourth at last 
year’s world championships in 
Melbourne — and Cesara 
Toraldo, to make up the trio 
that won the team bronze in 

Australia. 

A phlegmatic Richard 
Phelps. Britain’s main hope, 
agreed the field looked “not 
too bad". It will be his first 
contest this year on British 
soil. So far this season he has 
competed at San Antonio 
(Texas). Paris. Warendoif 
(West Germany) and Buda- 
pest, where he finished fifth 
Overall-Backing Phelps will be 
Jim Nowak, Graham 
Brookhouse. Peter Hart and 
Jason Lawrence, all of whom 
will be hauling for places in 
the team for Italv. 
PROGRAMME: Today: 

Showjumping, Internationa} Arena, 
tpm. Tom o r ro w: Fencing. Haf 4. 


9am. Friday: Swimming, 
Baths. 5.30 pm. S»- 


Stetchwarth . 
unlay: Shooting, Hafl 4, 10 am. 
Stmaay: Crosscountry, National 
Exhibition Centra, noon. 


THE TIMES 


First pobBshed a 171g 


** * * ** 


SPORT 


jh t . ^ ■: . T : 


made up his mind in advance 
about two things — that he 
would do without a third man 
for as long as it made the 
slightest sense, and if the 
match were to be won it would 
be not by the spinners but the 
faster bowlers. Not until India 
were 60 for two did he drop a 
slip back to third man, by 
when a good 30 runs must 
have come in that direction. 
The fust spin came two overs 
before lunch, taken at 72 for 
two. 

Dilley and Emburey had 
both gone off by now, but 
there were some anxious mo- 
ments for India yet. At 76 
Pringle had Amamath leg 
before, and at 78 Edmonds hit 
Vengsarkar’s off stump as he 
pushed defensively forward. 



With victory meaning as 
much to a side as it must have 
done to India (they had won 
only once in England before 
and never at Lord’s) the 
tension they were feeling was 
shown when, at 110, Shastri 
and Azharuddin found them- 
selves at the same end. having 
disagreed over the chances of 
a second to Emburey. now 
back on the field at backward 
square leg. There was a long 
run there and it was 
Azharud din's call, but h was 
he who had to go. 




r ... - 

■..ft..,? ■ 

'* \ a -i=. '■ 


Star who lost his stripes: Gower after the Test match yesterday (Photo: Chris Cole) 


RUGBY UNION 


Australian calls for peace 
talks with South Africa 


As the world rugby crisis 
over South Africa deepens 
with more unauthorized tours 
in prospect. Australia has 
uiged the International Rugby 
Board countries to strike a 
deal with the South Africans — 
or else face the amateur 
game's immediate 

“ decimation ”, 

The call for peace talks, by 
Australia’s IRB delegate, Ross 
TiunbulL came shortly after 
the world's leading eight na- 
tions bad met in London and 
during the course of a meeting 
to revise the amateur rules, 
aired some of their grievances. 

In an interview with The 
Times. Turbull revealed that 
his union bad managed to 
stymie a well-advanced plan 
for an Australian rebel tour to 
the Republic this October, 
though only in exchange for a 
personal pledge to an official 
tour there next year. The 
official invitation extended by 
Dr Danie Craven came after 
Turbull demanded by tele- 
phone that South “desist 
forthwith”, and confronted 
his own players with revela- 
tions contained in an article in 
The Times last month. They 
informed him of their deter- 
mination to play in South 
Africa, whom they regard as 
their main rival for world 
supremacy, but agreed to hold 
their fire if an official tour 
could be arranged 


By Panl Martin 
South Africa is known to 
have already launched alter- 
native plans to bring either a 
French or a British Lions rebel 
team out later this year, and to 
challenge the winners of the 
world tournament immediate- 
ly after the event. Dr Craven 
dismissed England’s interim 
ban on players going to South 
Africa. “ They can do or say as 
they want I am dealing with 
the players not the 
administrators”, he said 


there. He said his union, 
whitfi receives “miniscule" 
financial support from central 
government,, could not be 
“bought off* nor intimidated 


Australians to 
state case 


The Australian Rugby 
Union is meeting in just over 
two weeks to deride the tour 
issue, but it will first forcibly 
state its case to the Australian 
Government, which has al- 
ready threatened reprisals. 

Turnbull argues: “One way 
or another our players are 


going to be induced to go to 
urn 


South Africa. If they go as 
rebels, that would lead to the 
destruction of our amateur, 
sport virtually overnight. The 
Government will have to 
come to terms with that’ 
Accusing his Government 
of “hypocrisy”, Turbull said 
his union would have to 
reconsider its past policy of 
adhering to. while not agree- 
ing with, the Government’s 
opposition to rugby tours 


He urged all IRB countries to 
negotiate with South Africa 
guarantees of regular interna- 
tional tours while preserving 
the authority of the IRB and 
its financial control of the 
game. This should happen as 
soon as possible, but the 
matter had to be resolved 
before next June, the date of 1 
the world tournament IRB 
delegates yesterday expressed 
concern mat the Sword of 
Damocles dangling over the 
game was frightening off spon- 
sors for the event and making 
it difficult for some countries 
to assure their participation. 

The Australians are con- 
vinced that their sport could 
not survive as a spectacle if , 
their top players were banned 
after any rebel tour — 
Turnbull cited the poor atten- 
dances at the official Austra- 
lia-England cricket series 
during the Packer rebellion. 
However, other IRB countries 
take a less pessimistic view. 
“We will not let world rugby 
be blackmailed by South 
Africa.” declared an IRB dele- 
gate who requested anonym- 
ity. “We are prepared to lose 
our top players worldwide. 
We'd survive the schism long- 
er than South Africa would.” 


SPORT IN BRIEF 


Bath home 
for Rovers 


Bristol Rovers Football 
Cub are leaving Eastvifie, 
their home since 1897. and 
will share Bath City’s ground 
at Twerton Park next season. 
Denis Dunford. the Rovers 
chairman, and Paul Richards, 
the chairman of Bath — a GM 
Vauxhali Conference club — 
signed an agreement 
yesterday. 

The agreement covers seven 
years with a break clause of 
four years should Rovers, who 
hope to save more than 
£40,000 a year by the move, 
find a new ground in Bristol. 
Dunford said: “This is an 
historic move and Bath have 
thrown us a lifeline. Financial- 
ly. it .is vital for the club’s 
future.” 

Bobby Gould, the Rovers 
manager, said: “This is a 
challenge and I think we will 
attract extra support" The 
club’s registered office and 
training ground will remain in 
Bristol. 



Harper tops 


Roger Harper, the North- 
amptonshire all-rounder, has 
won the Britannic Assurance 
player-of-tbe-month award far 
May. The West Indian Test 
cricketer earned the £250 prize 
for his fine start to the county 
championship season — scor- 
ing 392 runs m five innings, 
including 234 against 
Gloucestershire, and captur- 
ing a total of 13 wicket* 


Gould: new challenge 


Rescue plan 


Games date 


Karen Briggs, aged 22, the 
British world ana European 
bantamweight judo champion 
from Hull, heads a seven- 
strong England women’s team 
for the Commonwealth 
Games. Judo, along- with ca- 
noeing. is a demonstration 
sport in Edinburgbbut will be 
included in the fall pro- 
gramme far the 1992 games in 
Auckland. New Zealand. 


Middlesbrough, who have 
debts of £1.8 million and face 
a winding-up order in the 
High Court on June 30, could 
be saved by a financial pack- 
age being put together by 
Steve Gibson, a director of the 
third division football club. 


Manx boost *Kfi!!!!L?22 


Strong team 

Seven British' champions 
anda British junior champion 
havebeen named in England’s 
1 0-strong weightlifting team 
for the Commonwealth 
Games in Edinburgh. 


The Manx international cy- 
cling week in the Isle of Man 
will celebrate its golden jubilee 
year with a 20 per cent 
increase in entries. More titan 
2.800 riders, about 800 up on 
last year, and including sever- 
al national teams, will take 
part in the event which begins 
on June 15. 


Ray Harford has resigned as 
manager of Fulham Football 
Cub but has agreed to work 
on fora month while they look 
for a new man. Harford said: 
"I have told the club I am 
leaving but they asked me to 
work a month's notice and 
that is what I will do. I 
couldn’t just walk out and 
leave them in the lurch.” 


TEAM: SBtarSHsyw (Upton, East 
Midlands). 60kg: G Laws (Baft am, 
London). 67.5kg: D W3fe (Roth- 
erham, Yorkshire). 7Sra: no selec- 
tion. SSJk&'P May (Wafthamstow, 
London) and A Suppfe (Bir- 


mingham. East 


Boxes (BaJftam, London) and D 


M ai ne r (Mancfwsar). 
■Saxton (Oxfa 


A 

id) and O Dawkins 
ristofl. ' llOta M Giooafarfd g a 
(Deal. Kent). Reserves: 110kg: B 
Vina (Maidstone, Kent). 75kp A 
Chappie (Bristol). 


arduous as 

England stand 
at crossroads 


From Stuart Jones, Football Correspondent, Monterrey 


England have readied the 
crossroads. By the time that 
dusk has fallen over here 1 
today they will have set foot 
on a path that leads to one of 
five destinations. The sign- 
posts point back to Monter- 
rey, on to Mexico City, 
Guadalajara or Le6n and over 
to Heathrow Airport. 

They could, in other words, 
finish first, second, third or 
fourth in Group F. In view of 
the traumas they have en- 
dured over the last 10 days, 
that broad outlook is in itself 
remarkable. The disappoint- 
ment has been so deep that 
anyone would have thought 
tiurt they had already been 
knocked out of the 
competition. 

They could still win the 
group only because gbals have 
Been as scarce as genuine 
quality. Boniek, the captain of 
Poland, whom they meet here, 
has o min ously urged the local 
citizens to slay at -home and 
watch the game on television 
rather than be bored inside the 
stadium. 

Hie quartet are bunched 
together so tightly that En- 
gland could rise in 90 minutes 
from the bottom, where to 
their profound embarrass- 
ment they are sitting at the 
moment to the top, where 
they were expected to end up 
in the first place. 

The fate of all four nations 
will not be derided until 4.45 
pm local time, if England lose 
to -Poland in the University 
Stadium the result between 
Portugal and Morocco in Gua- 
dalajara mil be of no interest 
to Bobby Robson’s squad.' 
They will know that they have 
earned the right to go nowhere 
fait back home, where then- 
reception is likely to be less 
than warm. 

The same cold welcome 
awaits them also ifboth of the 
final two fixtures are drawn. 
To be left standing at the back 
of the queue for the second 
round would be demoralizing 
enough; but for representa- 
tives from North Africa to be 
ahead- of them would be 
humiliating. 

To avoid such an undigni- 
fied position, England have no 
choice but to attempt to lift up 
an iron curtain. Tbe analogy is 
appropriate. Of all their lust- 
round opponents, the Poles 
are by an appreciable margin . 
the most difficult side to break 
down. They are, by nature and 
tradition, disciplined -and 
defensive. 

Robson will not reveal his 
line-up until an hour before 




the kick-off but it is not 
expected to include either 
Bryan Robson or Hateley. 
That much mates sense. The 
fitness of the captain must be 
considered too modi of a risk 
and the contribution of the 
centre forward from AC Milan 
has been negligible. 

With Wilkins unavailable 
through suspension, there wilt 
be at least three changes in the 
pack Only one person knows 
whether the reshuffle will be 
more extensive, whether the 
formation will be altered, and 
he is not prepared even to- 


drop a frmL 
That 


Waddle, the left wing- 
er, should have wrenched an 
ankle on Monday could have 
been the twist of fortune that 
England required. Although 
heisexpected to recover and 
to be available, Robson may 
mercifully have been persuad- 
ed to shape bis ideas around a 
stronger and more solid foun- 
dation of 4-4-2. 

Robson will probably retain 
his defence, even though 
Butcher and Fenwick have 
formed an uneasy- partnership. 
He has few, if any, ready 
alternatives. Beardsley is al- 
most certain to replace 
Hateley and join Lineker in an 
attack that wall be based on 
speed and mobility, signifi- 
cantly the qualities that are 
lacking in the Polish 
rearguard. 

The key 


have played his last game after 


ovennres from 


reportei 
Ajax). - . 

- The permutations are com- 
plicated* In brief England will 
go through if they beat Poland 
by at least 2-0. If Portugal and 
Morocco draw Robson's 
squad will stay here as cham- 
pions of the group and face 
probably Denmark or West 
Germany in the second round. 
That would hardly be a pros- 
pect to relish. 

More World Cap, page 38 


GOLF 


Oosterhuis reaps the 
rewards of hard work 


From Mitchell Platts, Southampton, Long Island 


The first miracle of the 1986 
US Open occurred 100 miles 
from here- when Peter 
Oosterhuis qualified for the 
championship by virtue of 
scrambling through a play-off 
at New York’s Purchase Club. 

“I'm more surprised than 
anybody to be here,” 
Oosterhuis said after complet- 
ing his first practice round on 
the Shinn ecotik HiUs course . 
where the 86th US Open will ' 
start tomorrow. 

‘i’ve played so poorly this 
season that even missing the 
halfway cut by only one shot 
in my previous two tourna- 
ments was a- vast 
improvement 1 ” 

To earn his place here, 
Oosterhuis was compelled to 
compete in a 36-hole pre- 
qualifying examination. He 
followed a Best round of 71 by 
taking three putts on the last 
green at Purchase in a second 
round of 77. 

“I walked - off the course 


thinking it was all over,” be 


said. “Bat the scores went up 
in the afternoon and I got into 
a playoff. Five played for 
three spots and I made it” 
Oosterhuis deserves his 
place back among the “fat 
cats” of golf if only for coming 
to terms with the fact that he 
had not been devoting suffi- 
cient time and energy to Ins 
game. “Lately I've been work- 
ing much harder.” he said. “I 


YACHTING 


More crews turn back 


By Barry Kckthall 

As gale farce winds contin- 
ued to sweep the Western 
Approaches, .the list of crews 
competing in the C&risbexg 
two-handed transatlantic race 
who have been forced to torn 
back amounted to 20 per cent 
of the 49-strong fleet 
yesterday. 

Among those joining the list 
who retired are Richard Tol- 
kien and his. partner, David 
Bartlett*' • who put into the 
Scifly fries- yesterday -after 
thrir trimaran, Stockley Park 
Challenge, had sprang a leak 
in its porthole, , nod Peter 


return when the new mainsail 
set for the first time on his 80ft 
catamaran, Novanet, an hour 
or so before the start from Ply- 
mouth on Sunday, had split in 
two. 

Another struggling back to 
port yesterday was Almatur 
iu, the Polish catamaran skip- 
pered by Wojciech Kaiiski 
alter being dismasted m the 

Whh i? 11 * of c* e rooming. 

With no news from the front 

°Lih 5®?. yesterday, race 
omaris believed that Royale, 
Apricot; British Airways and 
Voortnekker HI, were most 


in yuiututs, wu v wnieKKer LLL were most 

Phillips, who was farced to UkeJy to be contekfa^I^ 





■ V-J 

9 '■ r— ' 


_ je key figure in midfield 
should be noddle. In the 
absence of Bryan Robson and 
Wilkins be is the man wbo has 
the outstanding ability to in- 
flict the most damage.He must 
be invited to wander where he 
will and be given as much of 
the ball as he is given at 
Tottenham Hotspur (for 
whom, incidentally, he may 


•arrow 

1 iVtf 


kills 

?13'^ 

sc mi 


- 


v- v 


■ - :■ •* ?. 



derided that plenty of other 
people do an eight-hour day so 
why shouldn’t!? 

“Back on the European tour 
practising was never a chore — 
it was always enjoyable. I felt 1 
bad an incentive to work 
harder because it could make 
the difference between coming 
fourth orfirsL 

“In America, with the lean 
times, I found it hard to be so 
enthusiastic. I was wrong. You 
get your rewards with hard 
wort" 

Oosterhuis, who has not 
entered the Open Champion- 
ship atTumberry in July, is 37 
years old. He has been a 
regular on the US Tour since 
1974. His <mly win in that 
time came in the Can adian 
Open in 1981. 

It is a miserable record 
when considering Oosterhuis 
led the European order of 
merit from 1971 to 1974. He is 
184tib in the US PGA Tour 
money-list with earnings' of 
$4,151. 

Severiano Ballesteros, Bern- 
hard Langer and Sandy Lyle 
are the European challengers 
with the impeccable creden- 
tials that suggest one of them 
could win this US Open. But 
Oosterhuis, like King Canute, 
belieyes.be can turn the tide of 
fortune. The difference, of 
course, is that his task is not 
impossible. 

More golf, page 37 


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