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TIMES 


No 62,494 


FRIDAY JUNE 27 1986 


<25g) 


6* 


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• EEC. leaders meeting In The Hague 
were still deadlocked test night on 
taking sanctions against Sooth Africa. 

• Mrs Thatcher has told Mr Kinnock 
that Labonr’s sanctions proposals 
vonh hot lead to peaceful change; 


Mis Margaret Thatcher and 
other EEC leaders agreed yes- 
terday on the need to send a 
“signal to Pretoria”, but last 
night' they were still dead- 
looted over whether to im- 
pose . sanctions on - South 
Africa. • 

Deep divisions arose among 
the 12 nations at the EEC 
sammiton adopting an imme- 
diate package of measures. 

A passible compromise so- 
lution, discussed by EEC lead- 
ers over dinner at . the 
medieval town hail here; is a 
declaration of intent coupled 
with a diplomatic dialogue 
with the South African Gov- 
ernment desired to avert the 
need for EEC measures. But 
the measures would be intro- 
duced if Pretoria did not lift 
the slate of emerpency and 
make necessary reforms, offi- 
cials said. . 

Sources said Britain was not 
isolated over the issue, and 
Mrs Thatcher was far from 
being the only EEC leader to 
resist sanctions. Pressure is on 
Chancellor Helmut Kohl of . 
West Germany to support a 
c o mpromise package. 

Sir Geoffrey' Howe, the 
Foreign Secretary, told; the 
summit Britain - wanted a 
peacefril solution to the South 
African crisu through negotia- 
tion' and dialogue, ana any 
EEC. measures had to be 
“largeted to meet that end”. 


From Richard Owen, The Hag n y 


• Pretoria’s Minister of Law and Order 
has said that there will be no early end 
to the nationwide state of emergency. 

• Two versions of the arrest of a Cape 
Town congregation have revealed 
wide gap in reporting events (page7). 


Sources said Britain was 
willing to consider reluctantly 
limited “negative” sanctions, 
provided they were combined 
with positive measures, such 
as legal and financial aid to 
black opposition groups. “The 
British emphasis is on positive 
measures,** one EEC official 
said. 

The split over sanctions 
became swiftly apparent yes- 
terday when Heir Hans 
Dietrich Genscher, the. West 
German Foreign Minister, M 


Parliament . 
Information- conflict 
Geoffrey Smith - 
EEC summit 
David Watt 


4 

7 

7 

7 

16 


Jean-Bemard Kaunona, the 
French Foreign Minister, and 
Mr Peter Barry,' the . Irish 
Foreign Minister, foiled to 
attend a Foreign Ministers' 
meeting called by die Dutch to 
try to hammer out an elev- 
enth-hour agreement 

Herr Genscher’s absence 
was crucial, officials said, 
since no progress could be 
made: without West German 
agreement' 

The-three ^negative” sanc- 
tions put toward by tire Dutch 
presidency^ are: a tan on 
imports dfSouth African fruit, 
vegetables and wine; a ban on 
coal and steel imports from 
South Africa; and a ban on the 


sake of krugerrands and other 
gold coins. 

In addition, the summit 
noted a report by senior EEC 
officials that apartheid had 
created “a political climate in 
South Africa which is 
unfavourable to foreign in- 
vestment, die provision of 
credit facilities and the pro- 
motion of tourism and trade.** 

Officials said Mrs Thatcher 
supported the third option — 
die ban on krugerrands, since 
Britain had itself imposed 
such a ban earlier this year. 

But a ban on South African 
fruit or wine' would have a 
negligible effect for the EEC as 
a whole, while damaging the 
interests of Britain, which 
accounts for half of the ETC’s 
annual imports of South Afri- 
can' fruit at a value of £80 
miltiom Britain .objected that 
the ban would benefit other 
EEC countries, such as The 
Netheriand&iltaly-and Fiance, 
while increasing the cost of 
fruit and vegetables 

Officials said Ireland, 
Greece, Spain, Denmark and 
The Netherlands, were all in 
favour of .negative sanctions, 
but the French took the view 
that any -ban- had to -have, a 
basis in EEC law. 

This view was also support- 
ed by. Belgium and Italy, while 
Portugal shared the British 
reluctance to support any 
“negative sanctions** at all 


Tomorrow 


Irresistible 
force : - 



Can anyone stop 
Diego Maradona? 
Stuait Jones 
previews the West 
Germany-Argentina 
World Cup final 





• The Tones Portfolio 


Gold daily competition 
ttrf £4,000 was 


prize of 

shared yesterday by 
four readers: Mrs 
S.Pontin of Burgess Hffi, 
West Sussex; Mrs 
D.fCChatterton of 
Ferring, West 
Sussex; Mr A^iackson 
of London, S.W.6; - 
and Mrs EBJake of 
DingwaH, Ross and 
Cromarty. 

• Portfolio fist, page 
24; rules and howto 
play, information 
service, page 20. . 


• Tomorrow, £12,000 
can be won - £8,000 in 
the weekly 

competition and £4,000 
in the daily. 


£450m barrage 


A: £450 million barrage is 
for the river Mersey, 
the oossMity of tidal 



electricity 


Page 3 


On This Day 

Our correspondent writes 
from Appleby, Westmoreland, 
oflhe high feelings, brawls and 
abuse accompanying General 
Election hustings on June 27, 
1526 ’ Page 17 


Tripos results 

Tripos examination results 
from Cambridge in land econ- 
omy. chemical - engineering 
(parts. 1 and 2\ computer 
science and. . mathematics 
(pans 2 and -3) are published 
today . - Page 12 


HomeNar523£ 
Crescas . 7-12. 

Anas 27 

Alts 19 

BgTfrj.riMtfB. 

man ag es 18 
Business 21-27 
Cunt . 2| 
CiwststirfsiO 
Diary 16 

Fe atur es . 14-16 


Lodes 

betters 


Obituary 
nujfauwit 
Sale Kaos 
Science 
Sport 
IhcatK&efe 39 
TV & Radio .39 
Universities -12 


17 

17 
33 

18 
4 

18 
18 
3 M* 


No early end for 



.n* •; 


. From Michael Hornsby, Johannesburg 

. South Africa’s Bureau for missed as ‘‘speculation 
Information reported that an- 
other five blacks were killed in 


the 24 hours up to 6 am 
yesterday, and a senior gov- 
ernment minister served- no- 
tice that there would be no 
early end to the country-wide 
state of emergency. 

Speaking in Nejspruit, in 
the eastern Transvaal, Mr 
Louis Le Grange, the Minister 
of Law and Orda;. said the 
Government would not repeat 
the mistake of suspending the 
emergency regulations too 
soon — presumably a reference 
to the partial state of emergen- 
cy lifted on March 7 after 229 
days in force. 

“We are determined to ap- 
ply all aspects of the regula- 
tions mid are not prepared to 
negotiate with any hostile 
forces," 7 Mr Le Grange said. 
He claimed that there had 
been a dramatic reduction in 
thefevdof violence since the- 

state of emergency began. . 

Mr Le Grange’s • remarks 
reinforced comments made by 
President Botha earlier in- the 
week -in an interview with the 
Milan daily; newspaper, II 
Gtomnle. in which he dis- 


as "speculation by 
journalists” suggestions that 
the emergency would be lifted 
at the-end of the month. 

Many newspapers here ha ve 
discussed the possibility that 
new security legislation rail- 
roaded . through Partfement 
last week by the Government 
might soon replace the emer- 
gency regulations. The new 
laws give the police the equiv- 
alent of emergency powers 
without the need for a formal 
declaration of an emergency. 

A small number of trade 
union officials, including .Mr 
Piroshaw Camay, the secre- 
tary-general of the Council of 
Unions of South Africa, one of 
the main black labour federa- 
tions, were released from pris- 
on after 14 days in detention 
under the emergency; pro- 
visions. 

Thor release came after 
several days of talks between 
the Government and business 
leaders alarmed about the 
impact on industrial relations 
of the detentions. Protest 
strikes by hundreds of black 
workers have /'plagued the 
retail industry for The past two 
weeks. 


Thatcher still opposed 
to general sanctions 


Tlie : Prime Minister and 
other ministers continued yes- 
terday to voice opposition to 
general ' economic sanctions 
against South Africa even as 
EEC ministers met to discuss 
a package of measures (FhiHp 
.Webster, Chief Political Cor- 
respondent,. writes^ - 

As tfceFrime Minister trav- 
elled to Tbe Hague, Downing 
Street issued a letter from Mrs. 
Thatcher in which die spoke 
of the serious risk that sane-, 
irons “would, increase vio- 
lence arid bloodshed.” 

In a fetter to MrfNdT 
Kinnock, die said the general 


economic sanctions proposed 
by the Labour Party would not 

lead to peaceful change. 

In the Commons Mr John 
Biffen, standing in for the 
Prime Minister at Question 
Time, said mandatory and 
comprehensive sanctions 
would be disastrous. 


Mr Kinnock said last night 
that the Prime Minister must 
nor miss the opportunity pro- 
vided by ThC Hague to fey the 
basis for a united Common- 
wealth and EEC approach on a 
package of “strict measures” 
to promote a non-violent end 
to apartheid. • 





Anne Hobbs powering her way to a second-round victory 
over. American Zena Garrison at Wimbledon yesterday 


Driver 

banned 

‘under 

limit’ 


Hobbs win 
over 

No 9 seed 


By John Goodbody 
Sports News Correspondent 

Anne Hobbs, the British 
champion, put np her best 
^lerformahee* LirTO- yem -of 
pfey at WtpHedon yestgqby 
by jJefefttrag America* Zena 
Garrison, a semi-finalist last 
year and the No 9 seed, by 6-4, 
0-6, 6-4 in the second romd. 



Another Briton, Tararioa’s 
AWlrew Castle, also fighting 
is yesterday's second round, 
nearly palled off one of the 
biggest upsets in recent Wim- 
bledon toomamests when he 
took Mats WUauder of Swe- 
den, the No 2 seed, to fire sets. 
Castle, ranked 285 in the 
world, lost 6-4, 6-7, 7-6, 4-6, 0- 
6 to WQander after 3 boors 45 
minutes. 


Andrew Castle: standing 
ovation after 5-set battle 


team manager, said after- 
wards: “It was one of the most 
heartening performances I 
hare seen from a British 
player at Wimbledon for many 
years and to get a standing 
ovation from the crowd on 
Court No 2 was a magnificent 
achievement.’’ 


Bast Hutchins, the national 


Ticket forgeries page 3 
Reports, page 40 


By Craig Seton 

In the first case of its kind in 
Britain, a motorist has been 
found guilty of drink driving 
and banned, even though the 
amount of alcohol in his blood 
was well below the legal limit 

West Midlands police called 
in a forensic scientist to 
estimate how much alcohol 
would have been in the blood 
of Mr Stephen Gumbley, aged 
35, of Brixton, London, after 
his car has crashed in Bir- 
mingham city centre, killing 
his brother Gordon. 

Mr Gumbley was taken to a 
police station, but he was not 
subjected to an breath test 
because he complained of 
feeling unwell. A blood test 
was not taken until four hours 
and 20 minutes after the 
accident while he was being 
treated at a Birmingham 
hospital. 

The test showed his sample 
comained 59 milligrammes of 
alcohol per 100 millilitres of 
blood — well below the legal 
limit of 80 milligrammes. But 
it was estimated the motorist’s 
alcohol level would have been 
a minimum of 110 
milligrammes and a maxi- 
mum of 1 62 at the time of the 
crash. 

After the hearing. Superin- 
tendent Kevin Birch, the dep- 
uty head of West Midlands 
central traffic headquarters, 
said the successful prosecu- 
tion meant that no drink 
driving motorist would be safe 
from prosecution, even if he 
or she escaped giving a speci- 
men for analysis many hours 
after they were slopped. 

Last night. Sir Michael Ha- 
vers, the Attorney-General, 
tonight came under fierce 
pressure to amend the drink- 
drive law “as a matter of the 
utmost urgency”. 

Mr Nicholas Brown, the 
Shadow Solicitor General 
said: “This is a very worrying 
development and certainly 
was not what Parliament had 
in mind when the original 
legislation was passed.” 

Dr John Havard, secretary 
of the British Medical Associ- 
ation, claimed that back-cal- 
culations were against the law 
and unscientific. 

Mr Gumbley appeared be- 
fore a special sitting of Bir- 
mingham magistrates and 
pleaded not guilty to driving 
with excess alcohol and foiling 
to provides a breath speci- 
men. He admitted driving 
without due care and 
attention. 

Mr Gumbley was found 
guilty of the drink driving 
charge and banned from driv- 
ing for a year, with a fine of 
050 and £100 costs. 


Sahara air 
heralds 
hot spell 


By a Staff Reporter 

Britain basked m a. mini- 
heatwave yesterday with tem- 
peratures reaching 84F in the 
West Oniony and weather- 
men predicting a hot weekend 
up to 10 degrees above the 
norm for fete June. 

In London a stiff breeze 
kept the temperature down to 
77F(25Q while in Glasgow 
thermometers • tou che d 75F 
(24C), but the hottest place 
was Bristol where tempera- 
tures reached 84F (290- 
Only the threat of occasion- 
Ihunderstorms spoils the 
outlook for the weekend, as 
warm winds sweep up from 
Spain and north Africa. 

The' London Weather Cen- 
tre said: “We’re getting some 
Sahara air, although it's wan- 
dered about a bit before 
reaching 'us, and there, 
shouldn't be any radical 
change until • after the 
weekend.” 

June, however; whicb start- 
ed cool is hoi expected to 
furnish an average tempera- 
ture- much different from the 
70F(21O norm. 

. The weather centre is pro- 
viding Wimbledon with fore- 
casts every two hours. 

Weather forecast, page 20 
- Match report.page 40 


Lawyers’ revised pay 
offer to remain secret 


By Frances Gibb, Legal Affairs Correspondent 
The Lord Chancellor’s re- statement explaining that they 


vised pay offer to lawyers in 
England and Wales for crimi- 
nal legal aid work will be put 
to both branches of the profes- 
sion today in secret 
- Both the Lord Chancellor’s 
Department and the Law Soci- 
ety, the solicitors' professional 
body, had expected that the 
offer would be made public. 

But the Bar has requested 
that the offer be made in 
confidence on the ground that 
once it-was public, it would be 
difficult for negotiations • to 
take place or for the offer to be 
improved. 

Yesterday the Lord 
Chancellor's Department and 
Law Society issued a joint 


were prepared to agree to the 
Bar’s request. 

“The Law Soceity is con- 
scious that the solicitors' pro- 
fession could justificably 
expect to be kepi informed.” 

The society nevertheless be- 
lieved that solicitors would 
appreciate that the continuing 
negotiations “may be more 
productively carried out" if 
the Lord Chancellor's propos- 
als remain confidential. 

Under the binding timeta- 
ble for talks agreed after the 
Bar's legal action against Lord 
Hailshtun of St Maryiebone, 
the Lord Chancellor most 
make his proposals by today, 
and his final offer by July 16. 


Falklands flights deal 


Virgin Atlantic, Mr Richard 
Branson's airline, announced 
yesterday that it had won a 
short-term Ministry of De- 
fence contract to operate 
Boeing 747 flights to carry 
servicemen, contractors and 
cargo to the Falkland Islands. 

The service will operate via 
Ascension Island. The value 
of- the ..contract was 
notdisdosed, but it is for three 
round trips next month. 

Mr Branson said yesterday. 


shortly before leaving New 
York for his Blue Riband 
record attempt: “I am delight- 
ed to hear that private enter- 
prise has won this contract for 
the Falklands. in spite of stiff 
competition from the major 
airlines.” 

The aircraft to be used, 
called Scarlet Lady and cur- 
rently operating on routes to 
the US, will be flown by Virgin 
pilots. 

Branson tries again, page 20 



engineers 


Law Report 35 1 Weadw 2fl 


it * * a & it 


Lagos (Renter) — Two Brit- 
ish engin eers held hr Nigeria 
for more than two years yes- 
terday -won— their appeal 
against 14-year jail terms for 
conspiracy ami theft of an 
exeeatirejeL 

' Kenneth Clark, aged 39, and 
Angus Paterson, aged 4L were 
arrested in May 1984 when 
twoBritish-pBotsffewtfeeHS- 
125 jet out of Nigeria, defying 
a military regulation ground- 
ing ^private planes. 

In the Appeal Court Judge 
Owofebi Kobwale, dfschaig- 
ing the engineers and quash- 
ing both their, convictions ami 


by the Nigerian subsidiary ef a 
British firm. Bristow HeUcop-. 
*ers. They were accused of 
conspiring- with the pilots to 
get the plane away. 

Their lawyer said she was 
gbixs immediately to Kiri Kiri 
maximum security jail just 
outside Lagos, where the two 
are being held, to arrange for 
thrirreiease. •' - 

The two, whose families fire 
in .Aberdeen, Scotland, were 
hotla.cdart. They were expect-, 
ed tofeave Lagos last night' - 

Mr Ian Kydd, a British 
High Commission spokesman, 
said that immediately after the 


jail terms,. criticized the trial .ruling, British officials had 
judge, saying he had commit- visited the prison to break the 
ted “serious errors of few”; ■ . news-wad the two men woe 
The two men are- employed “overjoyed” 


-$• 


The judge said there was no 
evidence of conspiracy be- 
tween the pfloC&t Mike How- 
ard and Katrina Spalding, and 
the two engineers as the pilots 
had come to Lagos tegitiraale- 
jy to repossess the aircraft. . 

The pilots flew the plane to 
nearby Ivoty Coast where, it 
was impounded after the au- 
thorities were alerted by the 
Nigerians. The jet was later 
returned to Lagos. 

■ Much of the court proceed- 
mjpiook place when relations 
between Britain and Nigeria 
were seriouriy strained. 

Soon after Genoa! Ibrahim 
Babangida seized power, from 
General Mohammed Bohan 
ih Augnst last year, .Sir Geof- 
frey Howe, the Foreign Secre- 


tary, used a visit to Lagos to 
press for a speedy and equita- 
ble settlement of the case. 


• LONDON:Tbe Foreign Of- 
fice yesterday said that British 
High ■ Commisskw officab 
were completing formalities at 
the court with a view to 
expediting the. return of the 
two men to England (Paul 
Vallely writes). 

News of the court decision 
was yesterday passed to Sir 
Geoffrey in The Hague for a 
Common Market summit. 

Mr dark's wife Cathie said 
yesterday from their home in 
Aberdeen: **I am delighted. I 
bad been fearing the worst 
after the court had postponed 
its dedaou for a week.”' 


Trade deficit 
hits £666m 
as oil slumps 


A slump in the value of oil 
expons to their lowest level 
for six ypare helped produce a 
£666 million trade deficit for 
Britain last month. But ser- 
vices and the other- invisible 
items of trade pushed the 
current account into surplus, 
by £34 million. 

The deficit on viable trade 
so for this year. £ 2. 33 billion, 
exceeds the total for the whole 
of Iasi year, mainly because of 
the collapse in oil prices. 

The Bank of England, in its 
June Quarterly Bulletin . em- 
.ptiasized the need for a cau- 
tious approach on interest 
rates. Details, page 2! 


MPs support 
quick decision 
over Stalker 


By Richard Evans and Peter Davenport 
police investigation Stalker inquiry, which began a 

and forced Mr 


The 

into Mr John Stalker, deputy 
chief constable of Greater 
Manchester, is to continue in 
spite of his protests that he is 
innocent or any wrong doing 
and mounting concern from 
MPs. 

In the Commons, Mr Mark 
Carlisle, a former Conserva- 
tive Cabinet minister, yester- 
day warned the Government 
that the Stalker case appeared 
to involve an element of 
“character assassination”. 

Mr Carlisle, QC, a former 
Home Office Minister and 
Secretary of State for Educa- 
tion. was cheered by MPs on 
both sides when he said it was 
essential if disciplinary 
charges were to be brought 
against Mr Stalker that they 
should be formulated quickly, 
or he should be “rapidly” 
restored to his present post. 

Two other lawyers in the 
Commons, Mr Alex Caiiile, 
QC, Liberal MP for Mont- 
gomery, and Mr Cecil Franks, 
a solicitor and Conservative 
MP for Barrow and Furness, 
joined to protest at the treat- 
ment of Mr Stalker, who was 
removed from the inquiry into 
an alleged shoot-to-kill policy 
by the Royal Ulster Constabu- 
lary after allegations about his 
own conduct. 

Mr David Steel the Liberal 
leader, called for a Commons 
statement next week on the 
Stalker case, while Mr Robert 
KJlroy-Siik, Labour MP for 
Knowsley north, attacked 
“this disgraceful public trial, 
where innuendo and rumour 
had been given currency and 
Mr Stalker had received no 
oponunity to defend himself 
and state his case.” 

Mr Douglas Hurd, Home 
Secretary, insisted that he had 
no power to intervene in the 
inquiry. He would only be- 
come involved if an appeal 
was made to him against any 
disciplinary offences. 

But he told MPs: “The 
sooner this matter can be 
cleared up under the proce 


month ago 
Stalker's removal from the 
RUC investigation, was deliv- 
ered yesterday to the Police 
Complaint’s Authority by Mr 
Colin Sampson, chief consta- 
ble of West Yorkshire, who is 
leading a team of 10 detectives 
on the case. 

Mr Roland Moyle, deputy 
chairman of the authority and 
the supervising officer in the 
inquiry, also held two hours of 
talks yesterday with Mr Nor- 
man Briggs, a 'Labour council- 
lor and chairman of the 
Greater Manchester Police 
Authority, and its clerk, Mr 
Roger Rees. 

Mr Briggs was expected to 
come under criticism for his 
handling of the affair at a 
meeting of the Labour group 
last night Some members 
want Mr Stalker to be allowed 
to return to his desk, insisting 
that he has been unfairly 
treated. 

After yesterday’s meeting a 
spokesman for the Police 
Complaints Authority said 
that it was satisfied with the 
progress of the investigation 
and that the allegations de- 
served further careful 
investigation. 

He said: “If proved to the 
required standard, they are 
capable of amounting to the 
disciplinary offence of bring- 
ing discredit upon the force.” 

It is expected that the 
inquiry will take at least 
another month to complete, at 
the end of which Mr Stalker 
will be formally interviewed 
under caution. 

The allegations against him 
centre around his long friend- 
ship with Mr Kevin Taylor, a 
Manchester businessman, 
and, in particular, concern a 
holiday they shared and four 
social functions they attended 
together between 1982 and 
1985 at which known crimi- 
nals were said to have been 
present. 

At a press conference on 
Wednesday. Mr Stalker de- 


dupes laid down by Parlia- ,_ n !^d ^ associating with crimi- 
menu the better for all nals.and that be had done 
concerned.” anything to breach tne police 

An interim report on the Continued on page 2, col 5 


Armstrong to stay on 
as Cabinet Secretary 


The Prime Minister has 
asked Sir Robert Armstrong, 
the Cabinet Secretary, to stay 
on beyond his expected retire- 
ment date until the next 
general election (Philip Web- 
ster. Chief Political Corre- 
spondent writes). 

Sir Robert, who is also head 
of the Home Civil Service, has 
been Cabinet Secretary since 
1979 and was due to retire on 
March 30 next year, his sixti- 
eth birthday. He has agreed to 
the Prime Minister’s request. 


Downing Street said in a 
statement last night that Mrs 


Thatcher had asked Sir Robert 
to stay until not later than 
September 1988 “so as to 
leave the greatest posssible 
degree of freedom tor deci- 
sions after the general election 
about the organization of 
functions and distribution of 
duties at the centre of 
government." 

Mrs Thatcher is known to 
hold Sir Robert in the highest 
esteem and there was no 
surprise among her colleagues 
last night that she did not want 
a change in such a sensitive 
and key post so close to an 
election. 


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I **?l *9sf1 tin o*t !-KF*s i'VJrfJ 111 MSI y»j:S!X I I i *c i-. 


HOME NEWS 


THE TIMES FRIDAY JUNE 27 1986 


Workers have 
never had 
it so good, 
Tebbit insists 

Bv Nicholas Wood, Political Reporter 


Mr Norman Tebbit yester- 
day defended Lord Young of 
Graffham's remark last month 
that the 87 per cent of people 
in work have never had it so 
good. 

The Conservative Party 
chairman told businessmen at 
the Cullers Feast in Sheffield 
that the truth of his Cabinet 
colleague's observation had 
been partly obscured by the 
“blinkered criticisms'’ of the 
opposition parties and sec- 
tions of the press. 

It was denounced as an 
“insult” to the unemployed by 
Mr Gerald Kaufman. 
Labour's home affairs spokes- 
man, and also came under 
attack from Tory backbench- 
ers on the left of the party. 

Mr Tebbit said: “David 
Young had it right: those in 
work have it good, and they 
want it better. But they had 
better look at the 
consequences.” 

Spiralling unit wage costs, 
which rose 8.25 per cent in the 
first quarter of this year, 
would price those in work out 
of jobs and keep the unem- 
ployed on the sidelines. 

Mr Tebbit rebuked both 
managers and union leaders, 
saying manufacturing indus- 
try appeared to have within it 
“too many people who have 
learnt nothing in the last 
decade” 

Mr Tebbit coupled his 
warnings about the dangers of 
excessive wage rises with a 
typically robust assault on 
those, within and outside his 
party, who are pressing the 


Government to try to boost 
employment through higher 
public spending. 

Thai approach was “danger- 
ously wrong” and would lead 
to inflation and economic 
decline. 

“1 will argue long and hard 
against those who claim that 
the way to more jobs is 
through more spending.” 

Mr Tebbit also discounted 
the middle way, a small 
increase in taxes to bring more 
jobs and help the unemployed. 

Although be applauded the 
motives of those ready to 
make that sacrifice, they had 
to realize that it is the size of 
their pay packet that deter- 
mines the outlook for jobs. 

“Lower pay increases can 
save jobs. Lower pay increases 
can make jobs. And lower 
taxation can raise take-home 
pay for those in work without 
risking jobs or prejudicing the 
chances of those seeking 
work.” 

Nearly one million new jobs 
had been created since 1983, 
but they had not cut the dole 
queues because the population 
of working age had risen by 
one and a half million in the 
past 10 years and there had 
also been a sharp increase in 
the number of women going 
out to work. 

This year the Government 
is spending £2,500 million on 
employment and training 
measures aimed at equipping 
people for work, but although 
those were necessary, they 
were not the “real answer” 
Mr Tebbit said. 


Firm chiefs joust 
for top Tory post 


By Our Political Reporter 


A big behind-the-scenes 
straggle is taking place in the 
Conservative Party over who 
will take over as chairman of 
the powerful National Union 
Executive Committee. 

Superficially, the battle is 
being seen as a contest be- 
tween the grandees and the 
Thatch erites, but the differ- 
ences between the three candi- 
dates centre more on style 
than political substance. 

The post, which is held for 
five years, carries enormous 
prestige and inflaence. As 
representative of the voluntary 
wing of the Conservative Par- 
ty, the riiamna n hq«; untram- 
melled access to Downing 
Street and his term of office is 
normally rewarded with a 
peerage. 

Added attention is being 
attached to the election, the 
subject of speculation and 
political machination at Cen- 
tral Office, because the next 
term of office is almost certain 
to coincide with Mrs 
Thatcher's departure and the 
selection of a new leader. 

The executive committee 
oversees key areas such as 
party discipline and 
res election of MPs, and exer- 
cises a vital function in acting 
as (he eyes and ears of Mr 
Norman Tebbit, the party 
c hairma n. 

The three contenders are all 
wealthy businessmen: Sir Ba- 
sil Feldman, aged 59, a mnlti- 
mflikraaire dotting magnate; 
Sir Peter Lane, aged 61, a 
senior partner in a firm of 
chartered accountants; and Sir 
lan McLeod, aged 59, who was 


born in South Africa and runs 
a computer company. 

The party establishment, 
with Lord Sanderson, the 
shadowy outgoing committee 
chairman playing a prominent 
part, have united behind Sir 
Peter. They want to see the job 
go to someone who can contin- 
ue the tradition of exercising 
influence with discretion. 

Sir Basil, with his 
showbusiness connections and 
flamboyant, gregarious, wise- 
cracking manner, is being seen 
as too brash a figure to elect to 
such a sensitive post 

Nevertheless, he is said to 
enjoy Mrs Thatcher’s support. 

Mr Tebhit's view on the 
succession is not known hot 
Mr Jeffrey Archer, his deputy, 
is said to favour Sir Peter. 

Politically, Sir Jaa is proba- 
bly the driest of the three. 

Sir Basil appears to be the 
victim of a whispering cam- 
paign, with suggestions that 
senior party figures fear he 
would irritate Mrs Thatcher 
over footling matters. 

Sir Basil has held various 
party posts and is a vice- 
chairman of the National 
Union of Conservative Associ- 
ations. Sir Peter, like his chief 
rival, is a former chairman of 
the onion. 

Sir Basil's chief power base 
is in London and the East 
Midlands and it is being 
suggested that Sir Ian is 
standing solely to split his 
vote - an allegation he strong- 
ly denies. 


Heseltine 
calls for 
inner-city 
subsidies 

By Hugh Clayton 
The Government has not 
done enough to help economic 
revival in the inner cities. Mr 
Michael Heseltine. former 
Secretary of State for Defence 
who resigned over the West- 
land affair, said yesterday. 

He called for extra subsidies 
for new small companies in 
deprived areas. They would 
include payment of loan costs 
in the first year of business 
and freedom from rates in the 
first two. 

“There is a growing number 
of Conservative colleagues 
who share these views,” Mr 
Heseltine told reporters before 
speaking at the annual confer- 
ence of the Chartered Institute 
of Public Finance and Ac- 
countancy in Bournemouth. 

He would not say if he had 
proposed such changes unsuc- 
cessfully when he bad been 
Secretary of State for the 
Environment in the early 
1930s. He pioneered task 
forces to regenerate deprived 
inner cities after riots in 
Toxteth, Liverpool, and 
Brixton, south London, in 
1981. 

“I am not prepared to 
become involved in discus- 
sions of what 1 did and did not 
do when 1 was in 
government.” Mr Heseltine 
said. 

“I am making proposals 
about the structure of govern- 
ment which it would not have 
been appropriate for the Secre- 
tary of State for the Environ- 
ment or Defence to do within 
the collective consensus of 
government" 

He called for the Secretary 
of State for Trade and Indus- 
try to be given the same status 
in the Government as the 
Chancellor of the Exchequer. 
“The concern of governments 
in this country has been with 
economic strategy, but it is not 
concerned with the minutiae 
of industrial strategy.” 

The Japanese, French and 
West German • economies 
have been more successful 
than the British. There was 
much that Britain could learn 
from them, 

“Our industrial decline is 
not the product of one party or 
one government it has flowed 
over time because the divi- 
sions within the capitalist 
system have been exploited by 
politics.” 

Labour gives 
rates pledge 

Central government should 
allow local councils to set their 
rates without using the grant 
mechanism to penalize high 
spenders, Mr Roy Hattersley, 
the shadow Chancellor of the 
Exchequer, said (George Hill 
writes). 

He told the annual confer- 
ence of the Association of 
District Councils, in East- 
bourne, that a Labour govern- 
ment would remove the 
“coercive element” from the 
rate support grant formula. 

“Councils must be allowed 
to assess their own needs and 
raise whatever level of local 
revenue is, first, necessary to 
meet them and, second, ac- 
ceptable to the local voters.” 

Labour has been committed 
to repeal the Rates Act, 1984, 
with its machinery to penalize 
councils setting their rates 
above a determined level, by 
cutting grants by £ 1 . 20 . or 
more, for every £1 by which a 
council's rate exceeds its 
assessment 

“Of course I know that a 
promise to remove the coer- 
cive element will provoke 
some newspapers into orgies 
of prophecy about rate in- 
creases under Labour,” Mr 
Hattersley said. 


Thatcher wants more women MPs 


Mrs Thatcher says she 
would like to see three or four 
times as many women in 
parliament as at present al- 
though she thought many 
would not like getting up and 
making speeches in public, 
because they tended to sound 
too strident 

Speaking on the Central 
Television programme Cen- 
tral Lobby. Mrs Thatcher said 
■it was a “great 
disappointment” that the 


number of women MPs had 
not increased over the past 50 
years. 

There are only 26 women in 
Parliament about 4 per cent 
of the total of 650 MPs. The 
proportion which has re- 
mained virtually unchanged, 
in spile of the fact that women 
account for 52 per cent of the 
electorate. 

The Prime Minister said 
women were shrewd, percep- 


tive and good observers of 
human nature. “Many of the 
qualities which we display 
quite naturally in our jobs 
here, are just those very same 
qualities that a woman who is 
running a home has — she has 
to be a good manager. 

Mrs Thatcher said geogra- 
phy was also an important 
factor and that she might not 
have been able to pursue her 
political careeer if she had not 
had a London constituency. 


Kinnock’s 
onslaught 
on Star 
Wars 

ByFaolVaQely 

The US government’s Star 
Wars programme is more 
likely eo cause a massive 
escalation of the arms race 
than bring an end to ft, Mr 
Neil Kinnock claimed 
yesterday. 

The Strategic Defence Ini- 
tiative (SDI) wqnld also desta- 
bilize Nate, take critical 
nodear decisions oat of human 
hands and give them to com- 
puters, lead to a new brain 
drain os British scientific 
talent, and be extravagantly 
expensive. 

He was speaking in London 
at the launch of a wide-based 
aati-Star Wars pressure 
group. The aims of The Coall- 
sfea Against Star Wars also 
received the support of Dr 
David Owen, leader of the 
SDP, and Mr David Steel, 
leader of the liberal Party, 
along with that of an extensive 
collection of nodear physi- 
cists. computer experts and 
environmental and peace 
groups. 

Mr Kinnock described the 
concept of an invulnerable 


obs fantasy” which created 
false notions of seemrity. He 
quoted the words of Mr 
George Ball, a fanner US 
Ambassador to the United 
Nations, who had denounced 
President Reagan’s Star Wars 
suggestion as “one of the most 
irresponsible acts by a head of 
State in modern times”. 

The SDI plan was contrary 
to the best strategic defence 
interests of the West, Mr 
Khtaock said. It would add a 
new dimension to the arms 
race which would invite the 
Russians to respond with mas- 
sively increased numbers of 
missiles designed to pierce or 
evade the SDI system. 

Mr Steel, in a statement to 
the meeting, described SDI as 
“a programme not only in 
search of a strategy hot 
abo~of feasibility”. It was a 
“quantum leap into a political, 
strategic and technological 
abyss”. He also attacked the 
financial returns of British 



Mr Nefl Kinnock at yesterday’s branch of the CoaHtion 
Against Star Wars (Photograph: Chris Harris). 

rarelrmest, which were now Nat® since it might be per- 


seea to be only a tiny percent- 
age of what had been 
promised. 

Dr Owen said that the SDP 
did not oppose prudent re- 
search into space defence sys- 
tems; bat SDI, he said, idled 
on technological progress the 
feasibility of which was 
unknown. 

“It is designed to be effec- 
tive only against ballistic mis- 
siles ami would have no effect 
on cruise missiles-Jt might 
therefore impose strains on 


ceived as the first stage of an 
American disengagement from 
the European allies.” 

SDI, even in its early re- 
search stages, would also draw 
resources away from other 
areas of defence effort, 

NucSear physicists and com- 
puter scientists at the meeting 
attacked the scientific 
premises on which the Star 
Wars scheme rested. These 
were based on fantasy rather 
than what was scientifically 
possible, they argued. 


Walker 

restates 

nuclear 

policy 

By Teresa Poole 

.The Western world feces a 
severe recession if it aban- 
doned nuclear power. Mr 
peter Walker, Secretary of 
Stale' for Energy said 
yesterday. : . 

For the first un»w mans 
history, a world crippled by a 
shortage of energy had become 
a possibnUyJie iokl the Ei®; 
neering Employers 
Federation. ■ . 

"The eradication of nuclear 
energy has dangers that cannot 
be raeL The Third World 
could not enhance its living 
standards. The developed 
world would plun&i tolower 
living standards”, he said. 

“if we care about the stan- 
dards of living of generations 
yet to come, we must meet the 
challenges of the nodear age 
and not reueat in. to the 

irresponsible course of leaving 

oor children and grandchil- 
dren a world in deep and 
probably irreversible decline.” 

The recession and massive 
unemployment that came af- 
ter the 1973 oil shock had 
been nothing compared with 
the likely impact of eradicat- 
ing nuclear power, he added. 

Mr Walkert speech comes 
at a time when public faith in 
nuclear power has been se- 
verely shaken by the nudear 
accident at Chernobyl. It ap- 
pears to put the Government 
firmly on the side of fu rther 
investment hi nudear power, 
just three months before toe 
public inquiry an the pro- 
posed £1,300 million Sizewdl 
B pressurised water reactor is 
due to report. . . 

Mr Walker admitted that 
the Chernobyl incident had 
activated the “fear of the 
unknown", but said there 
were no alternatives which 
were likely to be available 
within the near future. 

Mr Stewart Boyle, energy 
campaigner at Friends of the 
Earth, said Mr Walker ap- 
peared to be preparing the 
public for a quick decision on 
Szeweli B, regardless of what 
the inquiry recommended. 


Meacher pledges 
£3bn NHS boost 

By Nicholas Wood, Political Reporter 


Mr Michael Meacher, Op- 
position spokesman on health 
and social security, yesterday 
committed a future Labour 
government to spending- £3 
billion on the NHS over five 
years. 

He said his party would 
follow the Tory example over 
defence and guarantee three 
per cent growth above the rate 
of inflation to erase the “pio- 
tune of decay and despair” 
bequeathed by the 
Government 

Mr Meacher denied that the 
target was “over ambitious”, 
saying that both France and 
West Germany spend 50 per 
cent more on health as a 
proportion of gross national 
product than Britain. 

“Under this Government 


Britain is the lowest spender 
on health of any Western 
country in OECD, except 
Greece and PortugaL " 

.Mr Meacher regaled dele- 
gates at the annual conference 
of the health workers’ union 
Cohse, with a catalogue of the 
Government’s alleged neglect 
of hospitals and general 
practice. 

G aiming ministers had ad- 
mitted that the NHS had lost 
£566 million in real terms 
over the past seven years, he’ 
pledged Labour to cutting 
waiting lists. 

He also promised action to 
improve community care, 
preventative mediane,post- 
natal services and to begin 
comprehensive cancer screen- 
ing for women. 


Charity tax relief 
scheme unveiled 


By Mark Dowd 


Details of the new payroll 
scheme for charities, an- 
nounced by the Chancellor in 
bis March budget, were un- 
veiled in a prospectus issued 
yesterday by the Inlan d 
Revenue. 

It is an entirely new tax 
relief for charitable donations 
of up to £100 a year and forms 
part of a wider package which 
will increase substantially the 
tax reliefs available to individ- 
uals and businesses who wish 
to make charitable cont- 
ributions. 

It is envisaged that the 
Inland Revenue will set up 
agencies to co-ordinate the 
scheme. An employer who 
wishes to make the scheme 
available to his employees will 


then register with such an 
agency, giving his employees 
tax relief under a “net pay” 
arrangement — the donations 
would be deducted from j 
before calculating the PA 
tax due, 

• The scheme would be en- 
tirely voluntary, with employ- 
ees having to “connact in”, 
whilst retaining the freedom 
to stipulate winch charities are 
to be benefited. 

The agencies would then act 
as clearing houses. 

Charities racer ved £433 mil- 
lion in the last financial year 
from the private covenant tax 
relief schemes. 

Comments on the proposals 
will be welcomed by the 
Inlan d Revenue until July 31. 


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This merchandise is the property of a number of principle (Steel importers in the UK.’ ■ 
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Every Hem guaranteed authentic. Expert advice avatetste at time of viewing. 

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Police sue 
Government 
for more cash 

The West Yorkshire Police 
Authority claimed in the High 
Court in London yesterday 
that its £50.17 million grant 
for the coining year from the 
Secretary of State for the 
Environment was not enough 
to carry out its statutory 
duties. 

It is asking Mr Justice 
McCowan to quash the 
minister's decision that the 
figure for gram-related expen- 
diture was sufficient to meet 
its needs. 

Mr Alan Fletcher, QC, for 
the authority, told the judge it 
was seeking a declaration that 
the ruling under the 1980 
Local Government and Land 
Planning Act was contrary to 
the law. 

He said the minister had 
erred in law by failing to take 
into account the feet that the 
Home Secretary had deter- 
mined the authority's level of 
expenditure under the 1984 
Rates Act at £60.16 million. 

Mr Hurd had indicated that 
he was proposing to increase 
the level at a later date to 
#63.269 million which he said 
would allow the authority to 
discharge its statutory duties 
under the 1964 Police Acl 

The judge was told that 
another authority. 

Merseyside, had intended 
bringing a similar action. But 
the minister had agreed that 
the result of West Yorkshire's 
claim would apply to 
Merseyside as well. 

The hearing continues 
today. 


Stalker affair 


Investigations from within 


By Stewart Tendler, Grime Reporter 


The Police Complaints Au- 
thority came into being in 
April 1985, succeeding the 
Police Complaints Board and 
created by toe Police and 
Criminal Evidence Act passed 
late in 1984. The chairman of 
toe authority is Sir Cedi 
Clothier, the former 
Ombudsman. 

The authority is made up of 
a chairman and at least eight 
other members appointed by 
the Home Secretary. .Two of 
the eight at as deputy chair- 
men and one of these is Mr 
Roland Moyle, a former La- 
bour jmrior minister. 

Members of toe authority 
are appointed for three year^ 

Within the authority there 


are two divisions. One deals 
with discipline cases and toe 
other handles toe supervision 
of complaints. 

Some categories of case 
must be referred to the author- 
ity such as allegations that a 
policeman's conduct has M to 
death or serious injury. Cases 
can be refereed to the authority 
by a chief constable or police 
authority and the authority 
can take over an investigation 
if the authority thinks it is in 
the public interest.. 

Both chief constables and 
police authorities can also 
refer a matter to the com- 
plaints authority if they_ be- 
lieve an officer has co mm i tte d 
a crime or breach of discipline 


which should be passed to the 
authority because of the gravi- 
ty of what is said to be 
involved. 

When toe authority takes 
o ver a case it approves the 
appointment of an investigat- 
ing officer who works with a 
member of toe authority. The 
authority member oversees the 
work and the authority can 
pass the final report to toe 
Director of Public 
Prosecutions. 

Since the authority began 
operations its members have 
been involved in the investiga- 
tion into the shooting of Mrs 
Cherry Groce, which led to the 
Brixton riots in south London 
Parliament, page 4 


MPs back call for speedy decision 


Coninued from page I 

disciplinary code. He ap- 
pealed to be allowed to return 
to work. 

The Greater Manchester 
Police Authority is to discuss 
the affair at hs next meeting 
on Monday when it is expect- 
ed there will be demands from 
some members to allow Mr 
Stalker back to his desk. 

The immedate fete of toe 
deputy chief constable is now 
in their hands. If they decide 
to allow him to end his 
extended leave and go back to 
woric it is likely the inquiry 
against him will also finish. 


In a separate move, Mr 
Hurd disclosed he was “deep- 
ly centered” about the ami- 
police activities of Manchester 
City Council and criticized Mr 
Gerald Kaufman, a Manches- 
ter MP and Labour home 
affairs spokesman. 

Mr Hurd lauched his attack 
an ami-police activities after 
two Conservative- MPs had 
referred to a “scurrilous” pub- 
lication produced by the coun^ 
cil. which appeared to accuse 
the police of “conniving'' at 
murder and believed 
neighbourhood watch, 
schemes were an exercise in 


setting up a secret police force. 

Mr Hurd said: “i am deeply 
worried about what is coming 
out of the city of Manchester. 
They seem to be following the 
worst examples of the worst 
London- boroughs in their 
anti-police activities.” 

Turning his attack against 
Mr Kaufman, Labour MP for 
Manchester^ Gorton, he add- 
ed: “These are the right hon- 
ourable gentleman's followers 
in the right honourable 
gentleman's city. What we 
don’t yet know is whether he 
has toe power or the win to do 
anything about it” 


‘Deplorable’ behaviour of judge on court plea 


Judge Pickles behaved 
“deplorably” in repeatedly 
blocking a banister's pleas not 
to send a young first offender 
to prison. Lord Justice May 
said in the Court of Appeal 
yesterday. 

He hoped there would be no 
Further cases of Judge Pickles 
preventing lawyers from 
putting forward mitigation. 

Lord Justice May, Mr Jus- 
tice Kenneth Jones and Mr 


Justice Alliott allowed an 
appeal by Derek Hams, aged 
18. by reducing his sentence of 
21 months' youth custody to 
12 months. 

Harris, of Moresdale Lane. 
Leeds, was sentenced by Judge 
Pickles on February 18 for 
burglary and theft. 

His counsel. Mr William 
Hirst, told the Court of Appeal 
that he bad tried to recom- 


mend a npn-custodiaJ sen- 
tence for Harris. 

But he had “faced a 
haranguing” from Judge Pick- 
les. who said the teenager had 
to learn the hard way that 
burglaries could tun be 
tolerated. 

Lord Justice May said: “It 
seems to us quite dear that, on 
about six or seven occasions 
in the course of Mr Hint's 


submission^ , the judge inter- 
rupted and effectively pre- 
vented him from malting the 
mitigation he wanted to make. 

“That is to be deplored. 
Judges should not descend, 
into the arena in this way, nor 
make the denigratpiy and, 
indeed, offensive comments, 
offensive to* both- counsel and 
defendant,' which were made 
in this particular case.” 

Law Report, page 35 


New plays 
lead £7m 

TV drama 

festival 

lUe BBC announced a 
£7 atiffira summer festival of 
drama yesterday, which wifi 
feature 35 new plays and fifca* 
(Our Arts C or respo nd ent 
writes). ... . , 

Both channels wifi show a J 
play a week from nett month 
until toe end of October, some 
by writers new to tetevoton. 

Pad Scofield appears in a 
BBC Scotland production, 
Otdv Yesterday, by Julian 
Gloag. toe novelist, along with 
Dame Wendv Hitter, on July 
13. Connie Chapman, Barry 
Foster. Sheila Gish and John 
Stride pfev leading roles in 
Bom in the Gardens. Clive 
Swift a mem in Altogether 
A far, and Jean Hickson plays 
a criminal ia Daytigk 
Bobbery. 

Stofiasenf, page 4 

19 held in 
fraud swoop 

Nineteen people were being 
' ~ " the pofee last 


labour a fraud cosspuacy 
r raids by detectives on a 
score tiffanies in toe Reading 
and Maidenheadareas. 

They were held daring Op- 
eration Bodkin, described as a 
lengthy investigation involv- 
ing police, social security ia- 
vestiganss and members of 
tlx Post Office investigation 
unit. A detective e mphasized 
that the people bdd are not all 
claimants. 

Militant plea 
is deferred 

Mr TooyMuTheam, president 
of Liverpool district Labour 
party, who was expelled from 
the national party last month 
because of his finks with 
Militant Tendency, failed in 
the High Court yesterday to 
win an order compelling the 
executive to disclose what 
they said io each other in 
considerins ltis case. 

But toe judge said that Mr 
Mulhearo must renew the 
application today when he 
seeks an mnraction to stop toe 
executive from implementing 
their decision to expel him. 

Banister is 
suspended 

Mr Vivian Price, QC, has 
been suspended from practis- 
ing as a barrister for six 
months from Jtme 17. - 

The^distipUnary tribunal of 
the SCh ate erf the fims of Court 
an<r toe Bar imp osed toe 
sentence after finding proved 
two chaiges of profes s ional 
misconduct,, relating to Mr 
ftfoe’s doovkuoD by London 


Value Added Tax returns, anc 
later proceedings for failing to 
pay the fines. 

Vets’ anger 
at slaughter 

Veterinary surgeons are out- 
raged at toe suggestion that 
ritual slaughter of animals 
without stunning was to con- 
tinue, toe British Veterinary 
Association said yesterday. 

The Farm Animal Welfare 
Council has recommended 
that legislation permitting 
such slaughter should Jbe re- 
pealed, but although ministers 
are studying the report, their 
: delay in making a response 
has been widely interpreted as 
an unwillingness to act. 

£16m school 
vandalism hill 

Vandalism and arson to > 
school buildings cost 60 edu- 
cation authorities £1 6 million 
last year, it was disclosed 
yesterday. 

Mr Chris Patten, Minister 
of State for Education, said his 
department has sent councils 
a discussion paper on meth- 
ods . of protecting schools 
against damage and theft, 
which are committed by out- 
siders as well as pupils. 

£400m Rover 
deal in US 

Austin Rover has won a 4 
deal to sell 30,000 of its new 
Rover cars in the United 
States. 

li is worth at least £400 
million in the first year and 
supplies of spare parts will add 
millions more to the order. 
American dealers were im- 
pressed when they saw toe top 

model, the Sterling, at a steak 
preview a year ago. 

New outbreak 
of swine fever 

A new outbreak of classical 
swmc fever, the eighth so far 
this year, was confirmed yes- g 
tertiay on a farm at Milton 
Abbot, Devon. 

Several hundred pigs fare 
slaughtered and the Ministry 
of Agriculture launched an 
immediate investigation. 

Gun charge 

Nezar Hindawi, an Arab 
charged with trying to destroy 4 
a jumbo jet -'at Heathrow 
Airport and conspirir* & 
murder, his pregnant g*” 
friend, was fimher accused 01 
unlawfuflv having a sent* - 
. automatic pistol and two mag" 
azides containing’ 9 mni 
bullets when he appeared on 
remand at Lambeth 
Magistrates* Court yedtfi rtoty- 





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THE TIMES FRIDAY JUNE 27 1986 




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Urgent recruiting drive 
will combat shortage 
of specialist teachers 


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' Urgent consultations on 
ways to combat the teacher 
shortage m mathematics and 
' physics- and craft, design and 
technology were announced 
yesterday by Mr Kenneth 
Baker, Secretary of State for 
Education and Science. 

Steps taken in recent years 
10 improve the supply of these 
teachers ha ve^ failed and a new 
approach is needed, a draft 
consultative document pub- 
" fished by the Department of 
Education and Science and the 
* Welsh Office says. Comments 
are invited by the end of 
December, and the Govera- 
1 ment says it will consider 
proposals. 

ray levels and career pros- 
pects are recognized as impor- 
tant factors in recruiting and 
retaining subject specialists, 
which is why the Government 
wants to see these issues 
reformed in the Acas talks. 

Other initiatives being un- 
dertaken are the recruitment 
of extra teachers from: 

• People with the right A 
levels or degrees; 

• People with limited qualifi- 
cations in these subjects; . 

• Mature people with rate-* 
vant qualifications or experi- 
ence, including people 
transferring from other 
employement; 

• Qualified teachers returning 
to teaching; 

• Serving teachers of other 
subjects; 

• Serving teachers of mathe- 
matics and physics or craft, 
design and technology who 
need further training to be- 
come as effective as their 
colleagues. 

Sex book 
for young 
upsets MP 

By Mark Dowd 

. Many adults still have only 
a vague understanding of bask 
sex education, a family doctor 
claimed yesterday at the 
bunch of his book. Growing 
Up. 

Dr James Docfcerty's book 
r _. Is aimed at 11 to 15-year-oMs 
and their parents; and con- 
- tains tb-ee-dimensional Ulas- 
' " (rations of the -infernal sex 
organs, and sequels show* 
l~ ing coitus andconceptiaii. 

;T. It has been diecked and 
^ approved by the Royal Sodety ; 
■ ;r tf Medicine, but Mr Harry 
i;‘ Greenaway, Conservative MP 
^ for Ealing North; has de- 
scribed die' publication as a 
“hard core pornographic 
magazine”. 

In response, Dr Docherty 
sahfc “In this Imok, sex Is srt 
in an ethical and moral con- 
text, reiterating the impor- 
tance of the non-physical 
aspects of a relationship. It is 
-- not merely a manual of sex.” 

’* - Growing Up: a guide for children 
i.: and parents (Modus Bodes, 

** . £9.95 and £5-95). . 


Last year recruitment to 
teacher training in mathemat- 
ics and physics, and craft, 
design and technology reached 
only about two-ihirds of the 
target. 

Applications suggest a fur- 
ther fall in recruitment this 
September, with teacher train- 
ing colleges having to lake 
students “whose chances of 
success may be questionable” 
the document says. 

Although figures for un- 
filled posts are not very high, 
tuition in mathematics and 
physics and craft, design and 
technology is often given by 
inadequately qualified teach- 
ers, so there is a hidden 
shortage as well 

A survey in. 1984 showed 
that 13 per cent of mathemat- 
ics and 17 per cent of physics 
lessons were taught by teach- 
ers without degrees in the 
subject. 

The figures are worse if 
subsidiary higher education 






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studies are excluded: only 45 
per cent of mathematics and 
57 per cent of physics lessons 
were taught by teachers with 
main qualifications in these 
subjects. 

ff fewer pupils take these 
subjects in public examina- 
tions, this will affect numbers 
going on to degree courses, 
and eventually finding their 
way into teaching. 

The fall in pupil numbers is 
unlikely to help because so 
many serving teachers in the 
shortage subjects are leaving 

There was a marked in- 
crease in the loss of mathe- 
matics and physics graduates 
in 1984-5 mid again in 1985-6. 
In the last year the rate of loss 
of mathematics graduates 
reached 10 per cent Popula- 
tion changes in the next 
decade wul exacerbate the 
problems because the propor- 
tion of young people enter! 
the employment market * 
be shrinking; at a time when 
the secondary school popula- 
tion, and -therefore teacher 
demand, will be rising. 

Among the initiatives is a 
government plan to set up 
with the local authorities a 
national network to provide 
information and advice on 


mg a 
rular 


particular focus on students 
whose expertise is in short 
supply in schools. 

The document asks whether 
teacher trainees in the short- 
age subjects might receive 
more in the way of a grant 
than other trainees. At present 
they receive . a bursary of 
£1.200 in addition to the 
ordinary grant 


College calls for 
reprieve on funds 

By Om- Education Correspondent 


Birkbeck College in Lon- 
don, which feces an uncertain 
future because of a 30 per cent 
cut in fending during the next 
four, years, is preparing a 
detailed document to defend 
itself. 

The paper will be consid- 
ered at a meeting of the 
University Grants Committee 
on July 10, at which the 
committee will review 8its 
new formula forfunding part- 
time students at.half the cost 
offeH-timera " ' ; 

: ’ Birkbeck, where all students, 
are part-time, working during 
the day and studying at -night, 
stands to lose more than 
£2 million. 

The document being drawn 
up for the committee aims to 
show the special nature of 
Birkbeck in the university 
System. It is the only universi- 
ty .college m the country 
concentrating entirely on 
teaching part-timers, and be-, 
lieves that it should therefore . 
be funded adequately. The 
Government gives high priori- 


ty to the education of mature 
students. 

Professor Roderick floud, 
head of Birkbcck’s history 
department, said that the doc- 
ument would demonstrate the 
efficiency with which the col- 
lege does its work. 

“Birkbeck. is special and 
therefore has to be treated 
specially rather than in con- 
junction with all other kinds 
of pan-tirae student,” he said. 
“Birkbeck is a very special 
part of the university system 
and the UGC has bren fund- 
ing that special role for a long 
time.” 

In the past London Univer- 
sity had been funding Birk- 
beck at the rate of 0.8 of that 
for full-time students. 

Professor Floud said: “We 
want an appropriate evalua- 
tion of the costs.”Studenis at 
Birkbeck have been collecting 
signatures for a petition, and 
the staff has passed a motion 
deploring the committee's 
decision. 

Leading article, page 17 





The Queen seeing off the first runners 
from the forecourt of Buckingham 
Palace yesterday in the relay race 
which Wul carry her message for the 
opening ceremony of the Common- 
wealth Games through Britain to 
Edinburgh. She handed the message, 
in a hollow baton of sterling silver set 
with Scottish gemstones, to David 


Mom-croft (second from right), the 
5,000 metres champion at the 1982 
Games, which were held in Brisbane, 
Anstralia.He was flanked by Debbie 
Ff intoff, Australian 400 metres hur- 
dles champion in the 1982 Games, 
and David Hemery, Olympic 400 
metres hurdles champion in 1968. 
Nearly 1,000 dob athletes and several 


thousand schoolchildren will run dis- 
tances averaging 1.5 miles each in the 
1,500-miJe relay. Royal Mai] staff and 
vehicles will support the runners, and 
the Royal Mail's Data post courier 
service will fly the Queen's message to 
the Channel Islands and the Isle of 
Man. 

Photograph: Tim Bishop . 


Qub set to 
foil tennis 
forgeries 

By John Good body 
Sports News Correspondent 

Wimbledon has secretly 
changed the printing of centre 
court tickets to try to prevent 
forgeries. 

Lost year counterfeit tickets 
circulated at Wimbledon with 
more than 20 people ou some 
days being affected. 

The All En gland Club said 
yesterday: “We recognize that 
we have been extremely fortu- 
nate in the past, but last year 
we suffered. We have now 
tightene d up by altering the 


forgeries were so expert 
tint they deceived many offi- 
cials. Some spectators arrived 
at their seats to find people 
already occupying them. 

With £18 seats for the men's 
final on July 6 already reach- 
ing £400 ou the black market 
outside the poand, there is an 
umnense temptation for tick- 
ets to be forged. 

“We rage people not to buy 
tickets from touts. They 
buught tiie forgeries last year 
and they and a tew members of 
the public SHffered,” the dub 
said. 

One company, Earluxmut, 
which sold hospitality pack- 
ages for the fortinght includ- 
ing centre court tickets, went 
into receivership owing 
£100,000. Mr Steven ShaJson, 
its director, Mamed the 


year police believed 
that thousands of counterfeit 
tickets were destroyed after 
they had discovered that they 
had been printed. 

Match report, page 40 


Mersey barrage 


Tidal power switch-on plan in 1996 


. years 

rj $ 5.000 


By Peter Davenport 
and Derek Hams 

' Plans to build a £450 mil- 
lion barrage across the river 
Mersery were unveiled yester- 
day along with the prospect of 
'tidal-powered electricity by 
-1996, 

r The Mersey Barrage Cotn- 
pany, a consortium of J_7 
~ - companies and financial insti- 
w 1 tutions, has begun a two-year 
feasibility study into the 
- ' project 

* The study, which will cost 
£800,000, will examine two 
- > suggested sites for the barrage, 
-'one across the-.mouth of the 
’■ river from New Brighton -to 
^'Liverpool and the second, 
further upstream, from Rock 
Ferry to LiverpooL 
The barrage* would take 10 
to complete, provide 
jobs in an area of high 
nem. 



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the tourist industry by creal- 
; ing a huge lake to be used for 
water sports. 

The barrage, which will be 
the first in this country, would 
. harness the tidai power of the 
Mersey to generate 0.05 per 
‘cent or the electricity demand 
of England and Wales, worth 
£1 million a week. 

The Mersey's tidal move- 
ments of 30 to 3 6 ft are among 
the greatest in the world. 

■ Mt Peter Walker, Secretary 
of State for Energy, said that 
tidal power bad its problems 
.because its variable nature 

■ meant it would not necessarily . 


coincide with peak electricity 
demands. But he estimated 
that it could provide up to 8 
per' cent of present electricity 
demand. 

The company is under the 
chairmanship of Mr Desmond 
Pitcher, who is chief executive 
of Linlewoods. 

Mr Pitcher said: “It is a 
caphal programme that will 
make money. The expectation 
is for a return on investment 
of 8 per cent” The actual rate 
of return will depend crucially 
on oil prices when the project 
becomes operational, he said. 

It is expected to take 25 
years to cover the cost of the 
project. 


The barrage could bring a 
whole new dimension to em- 
ployment prospects in the 
area. Mr Pitcher said. Port 
facilities would become more 
attractive with deep-water 
berths readily able to take the 
largest ships, such as tankers, 
and offering a time-saving 
with motorway connections to 
key parts of the country. 

Recreational use of the lake, 
which would be created up- 
river of the barrage, would be 
enhanced by present work on 
reducing pollution in the riv- 
er. Mr Pitcher said. 

A barrage was first suggest- 
ed seriously in 1980 but 
yesterday's announcement is. 


the first big step towards 
realizing the project 

The Department of Energy 
is already supporting explora- 
tion of the possibilities of a 
tidal barrage on the Severn 
estuary. But it is unlikely to be 
completed before the end of 
the century, Mr Walker said. 
The maximum energy output 
was likely to be the equivalent 
of 5 per cent of Britain’s 
current electricity demand, he 
added. 

Southern Tidal Power 
Group, a consortium of con- 
structional and engineering 
interests, has shared the cost 
of a feasibility stndy which has 
now gone to Mr Walker for 
consideration. 

The only other scheme be- 
ing actively pursued locally is 
for a barrage at Cardiff 
harbour. 

While Mr Walker pointed 
out that tidal power was 
unable to provide a consistent 
supply, the proponents of this 
source of energy have argued 
that this can to some extent be 
overcome if barrages were 
sited in a number of places 
around Britain to take advan- 
tage of different tides. 

A possibility being explored 
for the Mersey scheme is for 
the turbines to be used as 
pumps, employing off-peak 
electricity, to increase the 
head of trapped water so that 
more electricity could be gen- 
erated for hours of peak 
demand. Even without that, in 
each 


Swords will not be worn, Mr Gieve decrees 


* t 


Si 

9 V* 


By Alan Hamilton . 

The class of person being 
invited to next month's royal 
wedding in Westminster Ab- 
j. bey is the class of person who 
. ' . would have been schooled 
^. almost from birth., to. Avoid 
.‘such . sartorial solecisms ' as 
t ■ wearing a sword while sitting 
-*ina church pew. Help is at 
band, however, for those few 
./.who might be uncertain af die 
71 finer points of the day ’s dress. 

Mr Robert . Gieve, vice- : 
/ chairman of Gieres and 
' Hswkes, tailors to the Royal 
' Navy and therefore to Prince 


Andrew, yesterday announced 
an advisory service fra both 
ladies and gentlemen anxious 
not to appear in the abbey 
nnsaitnbly attired. 

Mr Giere conceded that, of. 
about 1,700 guests expected at 
-the union -of the Prince and 
. Miss Sarah. Ferguson, per- 
haps om. more than 2 per cent 
would need his advice. 

According to Mr Gieve, it is 
good form for gentlemen to 
polish the instep on the onder- 
' side of theSr-shoes, much la the 
vray^ that the hooves of House* 
hold Cavalry horses are 
pkkedand pousbed. 


Guests, unless they are 
immediate &mSy or ushers, 
should eschew the buttonhole. 
Officers, unless they are on 
duty as attendants or ushers, 
should not wear their swords; 
there- would be an mholy 
datter 'from* the body of the 
kirk if they.did. 

Brocade waistcoats are re- 
garded as de trap, and shirts 
should sport cufflinks rather 
than buttons at tiie wrist For 
ladies, an eqpal/anx pos would 
be to, arrive without gloves, or 
to wear*, broad-brimmed hat 

Black ®r Ascot grey morn-. 


ing coate are equally accept- 
able for men. But medal 
ribbons would not normally be 
worn on $nch an occasion. 
Overall. Mr Gieve's guidelines 
counsel moderation for ladies 
and mi absence of over-fessy 
accoutrements, such as fancy 
shoes, for men. 

“The wedding is the bride's 
day; it is not like Ascot where 
people are trying to catch the 
eye," Mr Gieve said yesterday. 

Guests may find Mr Gieve's 
advice entirely unnecessary; 
the invitations state quite 
plainly that lounge suits are 
perfectly acceptable. 


BMA conference 


Call for random breath test 

By Nicholas Timmins, Social Services Correspondent 


Doctors yesterday called for 
random breath testing outside 
public houses and restaurants 
to cut the death toll of 

drinking and driving. 

By a large majority, the 
British Medical Association 
backed the call for breath tests 
to be used where they would 
have most effect 
Dr John Marks, chairman 
of the BMA's council said be 
wanted the police “to sit 

outside my local pub or 

restaurant to catch chaps who 
are going to drive far in excess 
of the legal limit. 

“We want the police to have 
the power to sit quietly out- 
side to stop people who are 
going to drive, at any time of 
day, before they finish up 
either putting themselves or 
someone else in hospital." 

Dr Myer Goldman, a con- 
sultant radiologist from Liver- 
pool, said; “Any accident and 
emergency doctor will not 
need reminding of the increase 
in accidents after 11pm on 
Friday and Saturday nights.*’ 


Accidents caused by alcohol 
were the biggest single cause of 
death in people aged under 25. 
“This carnage is a scandal and 
it is largely preventable", he 
said. 

Only one in 250 drivers who 
do drink are caught, he said. 
“No wonder most decide to 
take a chance." 

When the breath test was 
first introduced there had 
been a drop in drink-driving 
offences, but the numbers 
have crept up again. 

People argued that random 


tests were an enfringement of 
liberty. But “the liberty to 
drink and hurtle a ton of metal 
along the road at 70mph can 
no longer be tolerated", he 
told the association confer- 
ence in Scarborough. 

The conference also called 
for the Government to ban the 
sale of Skoal Bandit, the fruit 
and mint flavoured “tobacco 
tea-bags" that can cause oral 
cancer. And for an end to the 
allowance of duty-free ciga- 
rettes given to some Royal 
Navy personnel 


Nuclear choice defined 


The association is to stndy 
toe criteria for treating pa- 
tients after a nuclear attack. 

Doctors told toe meeting 
that normal ethical consider- 
ations would hare to be 
abandoned. 

Diabetics and others on 
long-term treatment would 
probably have to be denied it, 
as might young children, the 
elderly and others, to preserve 


people with skills crucial to 
survival. 

Dr John Dawson, bead of 
the association's professional 
division, said that after a 
nuclear attack “yon would 
have to consider who yon are 
going to save; who would be' 
valuable in the long term". 

The issue would have to 
have been discussed and 
agreed openly. 


‘Fighting 
spirit 9 
treatment 
for cancer 

By Thomson Prentice 
Science Correspondent 

Cancer patients are to be 
encouraged to fight for their 
lives ana taught how to cope 
with the psychological impact 
of the disease, in a £1 million 
project announced yesterday. 

Doctors, nurses and other 
health care workers will also 
be offered training in giving 
emotional support to cancer 
victims and their families. 

Studies are to be carried out 
to assess whether a “fighting 
spirit" attitude helps patients 
with incurable forms of cancer 
to live longer than those who 
adopt a fatalistic approach to 
their illness. 

The Cancer Research Cam- 
paign, which funds about a 
third of all British research 
into the disease, is setting up 
two centres, in London and 
Manchester, to investigate 
psychological distress among 
patients and to develop thera- 
pies to relieve it. 

Among the 20.000 women 
who develop breast cancer 
every year, 40 per cent may be 
so emotionally affected that 
they require psychiatric help, 
Professor Tim McElwain. 
head of the section of medi- 
cine at the Institute of Cancer 
Research, said. 

“Progress in treatment is 
not enough. People must be 
restored to a full emotional 
life as well" he said. 

Dr Steven Greer, director of 
the new centre at the Royal 
Marsden Hospital, London, 
said there was some evidence 
that a “fighting spirit" could 
affect patients' survival 
Among a small group of 
women with breast cancer 
who have been studied, 75 per 
cent of those who displayed 
such a determined attitude, 
were still alive five years later, 
compared with 35 per cent 
whose attitude was of either 
stoic acceptance or 
hopelessness. 

“We want to try to reinforce 
those positive attitudes and to 
try to encourage others to 
adopt them in the hope that 
this might just might im- 
prove their duration of 
survival.” Dr Greer said. 

Dr Peter Maguire, director 
of the new centre at the 
Christie Hospital, Manches- 
ter. said one of their biggest 
problems was the attitude of 
some doctors and nurses, who, 
because they were dedicated 
and concerned, found it diffi- 
cult to. get dose to their 
patients' and to understand 
theic worries. 


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4 


THE TIMES FRIDAY JUNE 27 1986 


PARLIAMENT JUNE 26 1986 


South Africa crisis • Crime prevention • Stalker case 


Concerted action 



SOUTH AFRICA 

Mandatory and comprehensive 
sanctions ' would be disastrous 
for Britain and for relationships 
with South Africa, Mr John 
Biffen, the Lord Privy Seal and 
Leader of the Commons, told 
Mr Neil Kiuaock, the Leader of 
the Opposition, during noisy 
Commmons questions when Mr 
Biffen stood in for Mis 
Thatcher, who is attending the 
European Council in The 
Hague. 

-The Government's decision 
to meet Mr Oliver TarabQ, 
President of the African Na- 
tional Congress, underlined, he 
said, the Government's 
determination to have a forward 
policy on the issue, but it must 
always be related to effective- 
ness of cooperation with 
Britain's allies. 

Mr Kinnock called for inten- 
sified pressure by the Govern- 
ment on South Africa in the 
light of the South African 
Government's reaction to the 
meeting with Mr Tam bo. 

Referring to the crisis. Mr 
Stanley Thome (Preston, Lab) 
said: He will have seen the 
statement of the Eminem 
Persons' Group which says that 
unless there are economic mea- 
sures taken against South Af- 
rica, the cost will be counted in 
millions of lives. What is (he 
Government going to do about 
that catastrophe? 

Mr Biffen: Initially we shall 
discuss this matter with our 
allies. That is precisely what is 
happening in The Hague. We 
shall determine a policy which 
will lake account not only of our 
desire for peaceful change in 
South Africa, but also of na- 
tional interests. 

Mr William Cash (Stafford. C): 
In a radio broadcast last week, a 
member of the South African 
parliament, an Indian, said the 
people who had given that 
particular report should have 


taken careful note of the effect it 
would have on the South A£ 
rican blacks and be resisted the 
idea of economic sanctions be- 
cause he believed it would not 
be in their interests. 

Mr Biffen: I note what he says 
and these are all views that can 
be decided against the develop- 
ments that wiU proceed from. 
The Hague conference. We are 
wise to proceed with a dear 
commitment that whatever 
shall be done shall be seen to be 
effective in the context of co- 
operation with our allies. 

Mr Kinnock: Win he also note 
that the non-white members of 
that so-called tripartite par- 
liament walked out when Botha 
used the President's Council in 
order to overrule their objec- 
tions to the Internal Security 
Act, which gives totalitarian 

powers? 

Can I welcome the 
Government’s belated but none- 
theless significant decision to 
meet Oliver Tam bo of the 
African National Congress and 
also invite him to treat the claim 
of Radio South Africa this 
morning that this was “capitula- 
tion to terrorists" with the 
contempt it deserves? 

The reaction of the South 
African regime to that modest 
and sensible act of dialogue is 
evidence of the need to intensify 
pressure against the South Af- 
rican Government since that is 
the only language Botha will 
ever understand. 

Mr Biffen: The Minister of Slate 
at the Foreign Office (Mrs 
Lynda Chaiker) made quite 
dear the terms under which 
discussions took place with Mr 
Tam bo. 1 think they underline 
this Government's determina- 
tion to have a forward policy in 
these matters, but one which 
above all will always be related 
to the test of effectiveness 
within which we can cooperate 
with other colleagues in Western 
Europe, North America and 
Japan. 


This is a realistic policy and 
stands in total contrast to what 
heconstantly reaffirms, which is 
bis commitment to comprehen- 
sive and mandatory sanctions, 
which we believe will be disas- 
trous for ibis country and 
disastrous for relationships with 
South Africa. 

Mr Kinnock; I am prepared to 
accept that be at least wants to 
see an end to apartheid. Does be 
think the steps taken by the 
Government so far have been 
effective? 

Mr Bifieb: The test of effective- 
ness is the way in which we can 
cooperate with all others en- 
gaged in titis enterprise. 

Mr Kfamock: If he and the 
Government want these sanc- 
tions to apply to all, why did the 
Government veto mandatory 
sanctions at the United Nations 
last week? 

Mr Biffen: We should move in 
dose cooperation with our 
allies. 

Mr John Carlisle (Luton North. 
C): Would he agree that peaceful 
reform in South Africa is fer 
more likely to take place in 
conditions of full employment 
and economic prosperity than 
devastation and destruction as 
proposed by the Opposition? 

Would be give a message to 
the Prime Minister in The 
Hague - that this Government 
should be thinking of positive 
measures to increase investment 
in South Africa and the 
influence of British companies 
in that country so that this 
initiative will be received by the 
South African government in 
the way of helping them rather 
than hindering them towards 
that reform? 

Mr Biffen: I think the initial 
task of the Prime Minister and 
the Foreign Secretary at The 
Hague is to concert a policy in 
conjunction with our colleagues 
that can be put on an effective 
basis and which will have clear 
and determinable objectives. 


Increasing 
readiness 
to say no 
to heroin 


HOUSE OF LORDS 


There are early signs of success 
in the Government's anti-her- 
oin campaign. Lady Hooper, the 
Government spokesman, said 
during question time in the 
House of Lords. 

Asked about progress of the 
two year campaign she said: The 
anti-heroin campaign is being, 
independently evaluated by two 
companies, one using a quanti- 
tative survey of 700 young 
people and the other interview- 
ing small groups in depth. 

The evaluation has indicated 
that the campaign has increased 
young people’s resistance to 
heroin. 

Lord Rodney (Cy. The solution 
is ultimately to eliminate the 
demand for drugs and for the 
Government to continue with 
this campaign to ensure that 
these encouraging results 
continue. 

Lady Hooper: The evaluation 
provides evidence that the 
percentage of young people who 
said they would reject an offer of 
heroin increased from 74 per 
cent to 83 per cent during the 
first year of the campaign. 

There has also been an in- 
creased awareness of the con- 
sequences of using heroin. The 
campaign will definitely 
continue. 


Royal Assent 

The following Acts received the 
Royal Assent: Drainage Rates 
(Disabled Persons); Corneal 
Tissue; British Shipbuilders 
(Borrowing Powers); Horti- 
cultural Produce; Armed 
Forces; Civil Protection in 
Peacetime: Safety at Sea; Health 
Service Joint Consultative 
Committees (Access to Informa- 
tion); and Land Registration. 


Should the Davids sit side by side? 


ALLIANCE 


Dr David Owen. Leader of the 
Social Democrats, and Mr 
David Steel, Leader of the 
Liberal Party, amid loud 
interruptions, protested in the 
Commons that Alliance policy 
on Sooth Africa had been 
distorted by Mr John Biffen, 
Leader of the House, who was 
replying to questions in the 
absence of the Prime Minister. 

Mrs Thatcher was at The 
Hague for the ^European 
summit 

There had been several 
questions . about South Africa 
put to Mr Biffen, notably by Mr 
Neil Kinnock. Leader of the 
Opposition. However, Dr Owen 
chose to put a question about 
the number of people living at or 
below supplementary benefit 
level, representing, he 
maintained, a 30 per cent 
increase since the Government 
took office. 

Before replying on the point 
Mr Biffen commented: Could I 
say how much I enjoyed almost 
all of his remarks on the radio 
this morning in relation to 
South Africa which clearly puts 
him with us, if not with the 
Liberal Party. (Laughter) 

After Dr Owen, amid 
tremendous noise, had 


like. That is what democracy is 
ail about 

After Mr Steel had 
complained that the Prime 
Minister on Tuesday and the 
Leader of the House that day 
had distorted the policy Dr 
Owen and himself had been 
pursuing on South Africa, Mr 
lan Gow {Eastbourne, Q 
weighed in with reactions that 
Ted to uproarious laughter. 


below the gangway on the 
Opposition side of the House 
and Dr Owen sits on the front 
bench below the gangway.] 

*In raising the issue at the end 
of question time, Dr Owen said: 
If Mr Biffen wishes to associate 
with the policy of the liberals 
and Social Democrats of 
wishing to support a ban on new 
investment in South Africa, a 
ban on direct air flights — 



Steel and Owen: Alliance policy distorted 


put 

S lints of order, the Speaker (Mr 
ernard Weatherili) 

commented that he was not 
responsible in any way for the 
content of answers. 

He added to prolonged cheers 
by Conservative and Labour 
MPk We frequently hear things 
in this House that we do not 


Mr Gow said it was (dear that 
the points of order raised by Dr 
Owen and Mr Steel had been 
brought before the House 
because of the exposure of the 
profound differences of view 
between the two men. 

He put to the Speaker Would 
it not be of assistance to you if 
the two leaders of the Alliance 
could sit beside one another, if 
they could possibly bear to do 
that. 

[In variably Mr Steel sits in the 
corner seat on the second bench 


The Speaker He most raise a 
point of order for me, not ask a 
further question. 

Dr Owen: If Mr Biffen wishes to 
associate with those policies ~ 
(Interruptions) _ I am going to 
beheanL. 

Tbe Speaker He must obey the 
roles and pul a point of order to 
me. 

Dr Owen: It is to you. It is saying 
to you, through you _ (Protests) 
The Speaker I think I know 
what has upset him, but would 
be put a point to me and I will 
see ifl can deal with it. 


Dr Owen: If Mr Biffen wishes to 
associate with our policy sorely 
he should do so directly and not 
abuse question time by 
answering a question on 
supplementary benefit and the 
nine million people living at or 
below the poverty line. 

You would not allow anyone 
else m this House to answer a 
question id the way Mr Biffen 
sought to and that was an abuse 
of question time and should not 
be allowed. 

There has been an abuse of 
question time procedure by the 
Leader of the House. If anyone 
else had sought to answer a 
question which had not been put 
he would have been palled up by 
you. 

If Mr Biffen wishes to 
dissociate himself from the 
policy of his party he should do 
it in another way. 

The Speaker He knows this was 
an open question and I am not 
responsible in any way for the 
content of answers. We 
frequently hear things in this 
House that we do not like. That 
is what democracy is all about 
(Cheers and laughter) 

• Dr Owen's question was: 
Does Mr Biffen believe that 
more than 9 million people 
currently living at or below the 
supplementary benefit level 
appreciate this Government’s 
policies and what is he going to 
do about it since there has been 
a SO per cent increase since the 
Government took office? 

Mr Biffen: It seems to me that 
the repon by the Low Pay Unit 
should be taken alongside the 
feet that under this Government 
supplementary benefit has 
increased. 


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Concern 
about 
anti-police 
stance 


MANCHESTER 


Mr Douglas Hurd, the Home 
Secretary, said at question time 
in .the Commons that he was 
deeply worried about Mncbes- 
ter OtyConicti wbkh seemed to 
be fahwing the example of the 
worst London boroughs hi its 
anti-uollee activities. 

Mr Gerald Kaof- 
V Gorton, Lab), 
the chief OppMi&a spokran 
ob home amusi he safdb These 
are his supporters in his coostit- 
ueacy. What we de not yet know 
is whether he has the power or 

the wffl to do anything about it” 

He had earlier ssid that he 
was encouraged by the increas- 
ing support for the 
Government's initiative in crime 
prevention. . 

On Monday (he coatinuciQ-I 
had the opportunity at ear latest 
seminar to discnss the farther 
development of that policy frith 
a wide range of practical people 
representing industries and 
mrioas, central and local govern- 
ment, police, education and 
others. 

Mr Neil Hamilton (Tattoo, Q, 
whobegaa the exchanges, asked 
if the Home Secretary had 
received representations on this 
subject from Manchester City 
CoandL 

The strategy (or crime preven- 
tion (be went on) which that 
council, enthusiastically sup- 
ported by Mr Kaufman, carries 
eat and the Police Committee 
Support Unit, the sole parpose 
rtf which seems to be attacking 
and undennining the police and 
publishing a scurrilous publica- 
tion called Police Waich which 
seems to accuse the Greater 
Manchester Police Force of 
connivag at murder and seems 
to believe that the 
neighbourhood watch scheme is 
an exercise hi setting qi secret 
potioe and not an effective crime 
prevention strategy. 

Mr Winston Churchill 
(Davyhulme, C): The Gty .of 
Manchester wfll widely welcome 
neighbou rh ood watch schemes. 
Those who oppose them are the 
criminals and also Manc h ester 
City CoundL la it not a matter 
for grave conce r n that rather 
than supporting the schemes the 
City Coudl finances oat of 
ratepayers’ money the scarrUoas 
anti-police publication called 
Police Watch? 

Is It not sheer hmnbng by Mr 
Knnfrum to seek to lectaie tins 
Government about law and Older 
when be has not got the eats to 
condemn his fellow-socialists on 
Manchester City Council? 

MrHurdL- 1 agree. Now that Mr 
Kaufman has been converted to 
mine prevention I' hope be wfll 
go and tell his supporters or bis 
masters on the City CoancO 
what it is all about bestead of 
seeking to find imaginary diffi- 
culties they shooM set about 

S *ng people to Iran in 
sues. 

Mr Kaufman: Any thin that 
this Government has a crime 
prevention strategy could only 
come from a Home Secretary 
who is a writer of imaginative 
fiction. With foar millioa serums 
crimes last year In Great Britain 
this Government's law and order 
policy has completely collapsed. 

These crime prevention semi- 
nars which the Government 
holds in Downing Street are 
meaningless gimmicks that, are 
almost completely non-produc- 
tive. When is the Government 
going to take action ora serious 
nature to bring dm crime level 
down? 

Mr Hurd: If he thinks that the 
kind of measures we were 
discussing on Monday are gim- 
micks he is a long way from 
reality. 


Tough moves against 
fraud in new Bill 


CRIMINAL JUSTICE 

The Government is to bring in 
legislation in the next session of 
Parliament to tighten the law 
against fraud, Mr Douglas 
Hod, the Home Secretary, 
made clear during questions in 
the Commons. 

He said that the report of the 
committee on fraud trials under 
Lord Rosidll provided an 
excellent basis for legislation 
and the Home Office was 
considering the many 
recommendations including 
those affecting the investigation 
of fraud. 

Mr David OeHand (Tyne 
Bridge, Lab), who opened the 
exchanges, asked why so much 
emphasis was placed on social 
security frauds and so little on 
tax frauds. For every one person 
charged with tax fraud, 30 were 
charged with social security 
fraud, hesaid. This was a further 


indication that the Government 
bad one rule for the rich and one 
for the poor. 

Mr Hurd rejected the charge. 

If Mr Cldland would put a 
question to the Chancellor of the 
Exchequo-, he said, he would 
find out how much effort the 
Inland Revenue was putting 
into tax fraud. 

Mr Ivan Lawrence (Burton, 
C) said there was little or no 
support for non-jury trials in 
fraud cases. 

Mr Hnrd said that on 
extradition he had announced 
that the Government intended 
loan. 

As for non-jury trials, this was 
one of the tricky matters under 
consideration. 


Parliament today 

Commons (930): European 
Communities (Amendment) 
Bill, continuation of committee 
stage. 

Lords (11): Dockyard Sendees 
Bill, report stage. 


So this is what they meant 
by a big sales drive. 



Ex-Home Office minister 
complains of Stalker 
character assassination 


ALLEGATIONS 


The investigation into disa- 

S ilinary allegations against Mr 
ohn Stalker. Deputy Chief 
■Constable of Greater Manches- 
ter, had been set in hand by a 
derision of the Greater Man- 
chester Police Authority and 
had been placed under the 
supervision of the independent 
police complaints authority, 
and it was they and now Mr 
Colin Sampson, Chief Con- 
stable of West Yorkshire, to 
whom- they had entrusted the 
investigation, who bad the 
responsibility under the law, Mr 
Douglas Ham, -.the Home Sec- 
retary, said during Commons 
questions. 

Mr Mark Carlisle (Warring- 
ton South, O, a former Minister 
ofState at the Horae Office, had 
said there appeared to be a 
degree of character assassina- 
tion of Mr Stalker. 

[Mr Stalker was, after disci- 
plinary allegations, recently re- 
moved as bead of the inquiry 
into the Royal Ulster 
Constabulary’s alleged shoot-to- 
kill policy. Mr Stalker is on 
extended leave. Mr Sampson 
has also replaced Mr Stalker as 
bead of the inquiry.) 

Mr Hard agreed, for reasons 
given by Mr Carlisle and others, 
that the sooner ibis matter could 
be cleared up under the proce- 
dures laid down by Parliament, 
the better it would be for all 
concerned, 

Mr Carlisle had said: While 
dearly any allegation against a 
senior officer is a matter which 
'must be taken seriously and 
investigated by the police com- 
plaints authority, nevertheless 
to an outsider there appears to 
be a degree of character 
assassination. 

It was essential if any disci- 
plinary charges were to be 
brought, that they should be 
formulated rapidly and the nec- 
essary procedure take place or, 
alternatively, that Mr Stalker 
should be rapidly restored to his 
present position. 

Earlier.Mr Alexander CadOe 
(Montgomery, L) said dear-up 
rates for crime were connected 
with wholehearted commitment 
by senior officers —such as that 
shown by Mr John Stalker. 

In showing that commitment, 
Mr Stalker nad recommended 
the prosecution of officers in the 
Royal Ulster Constabulary for 
conspiracy to pervert the course 
of justice. Why had Mr Station- 
been suspended? 

Mr Hard said be was surprised 
that Mr Cariffe had got ratio that 

ta/-lr ... 

Parliament had" taken care in 


emhHvhiwg procedures and 
responsibilities fin- investigating 
allegations against police — se- 
nior officers or otherwise — and 
such allegations ought to be 
seriously examined. 

But Parliament had not given 
the Horae ; Secretary, or any 
Home Office officials anypower 
to intervene ip those proce- 
dures. He would have no 
responsibilities over, them un- 
less or until he was required to 
decide on appeals against de- 
cisions made tn respect of what 
was ;a .police-: disciplinary 
offence. 

Parliament bad established an 
independent police complaints 

authority to investigate cases 
such as this. 

In this case (he said) I hope 
the procedures will be operated 
thoroughly and quicldy so that, 
the matter can be cleared upi 
Mr Cecil Franks (Barrow and 
Furness, O said that at that 
moment, the Chief Constable of 


which MPs were entitled to 
answers:. 

Who was responsible for the 
decision to take Mr Stalker off 
the inquiry?; 

.Would Mr Stalker’s work and 
recommendations be included 
in the final report?; ■- *- 

Since Mr Stalker and Mr 
Kevin Taylor (the Manchester 
businessman who is said to baa 
friend of Mr Stalker’s) had bon 
under investigation for scrap 
weeks now, should they not be 



Hrad: Quicker the matter 
denied *p the better 

West Yorkshire was meeting the 
police complaints authority 
regarding Mr Stalker. 

In the interests of natural 
justice (be said) some statement 
of some kind should be made by 
the authority later today. 

Mr Hurd said that in view of the 
final responsibility that be 
might have as the appellate 
officer, be bad better repeat that 
he hoped the procedures laid 
down m these matters by Par- 
liament would be operated thor- 
oughly and quickly. 

•Later, during business 
questions, Mr David Sited, 
Leader of the Liberal Party, 
asked Mr John Biffen, Leader of 
the House, if he would have 
words with, the Attorney 
General, the Home Secretary 
and the Secretary of State for 
Northern Ireland and arrange 
for a statement next week on the. 
Stalker case. 

..Even before completion of 
that, there' were matters upon 


cleared? 

Mr Robert Kflroy-SfHc 
(Knowsley. North, Lab) said 
MPs should have a change to 
discuss tins disgraceful public 
trial, where innuendo add 
rumour had been given currency 
and Mr Stalker bad received 
opportunity to defend hit 
and state his case. 

Mr Stalker was emitted to tm 
impartial and Independent 
investigation and, if necessary, q 
fair trial. 

Mr Seamus MaOeo (Nevny and 
Armagh, 5DLP) said he had 
tried three times to raise the 
Stalker affair in the Commons*; 

. There was grave concern in 
Northern Ireland over Mr 
Stalker's removal from the RUC 
inquiry that he had bedn 
carrying out so professionally. '-' 

If such a thing had happened 
with an inquiry into police 
matters in Greater London or 
Greater Manchester, there 
would have been a ministerial 
statement long, long before nowr 
(Cheers) r 

Mr Franks called it a “most 
bizarre situation.” Once the 
inquiry had been completed r 
and hie hoped that would be 
soon — there should be a debate 
on the circumstances 
surrounding the affair. 

Mr Patrick Duffy (Sheffield, 
Atterdiffe, Lab) referred to the 
allegations of the shoot-to-kill 
policy of the forces in Northern 
Ireland, as well as coven cross^ 
border incursions into the Irish 
Republic 

These were matters of grave 
concent, not only m Dublin, b&f 
here also. They were likely to be 
discussed by Mrs Thatcher and 
the Irish Prime Minister (Ds 
Fitzgerald) in the next day or spr 

MPs should be able to debate 
how the Government allowed, 
this inquiry to become involved 
in fiunbliiigs, mismformatioiT 
and murid ness. 

Mr Biffen said he was mob 
responsible for the matter, as rt 
was now before an inquiry. 

The inquiry also inhibited 
what the Home Secretary migjre 
do. But he would make sure that 
Mr Hurd knew about what had; 
been said. "*» 

. 


DuCann warning 
on EEC Bill 


SOVEREIGNTY 


Any attempt to suggest that the 
European Communities 
(Amendment) Bill was a minor 
matter merely to facilitate ther 
worldugs of the Common 
Market would be a confidence 
trick. Sir Edward do Canu 
(Taunton, Q said in the 
Commons when MPs began 
discussing further amendments 
during the resumed committee 
stage of the legislation. 

He said the Bill's title was 
misleading. The Bill gave effect 
to an international agreement, 
the Single European AcL That 
Act was a new treaty, at least 
equal in significance to the 
'nal treaty which set up the 
the Rome Treaty. 

That measure (he said) is of 
supreme constitutional 
importance. It is a huge step 
towards the creation of a 
European super state and a buff 
step towards the creation of a 
European political union. The 
astounding thing, the regrettable 
thing, is that this Single 
European Act has never been 
discussed in either House of the 
British Parliament. 

The Bill amends the 
European Communities Act 
1 972 by including in the 
Community Treaties those parts 
of the Single European Act 
signed at Luxembourg and The 
e in February which relate 
to the European Communities. 


■Moving tbeftrst of a series of 
amendments, he said the Bill 

f ive extra powers to the 
uropean Parliament to 
influence Community 
decisions. There was already 
great controversy about the 
extent of the increase in those 
powers. 

The purpose of the 
amendment was to exdude 
these proposals from UK Law 
and thereby to try to preserve 
the sovereignty of this 
Parliament 

Mr George Foulkes, an 
Opposition spokesman ou 
foreign and . Commonwealth 
affairs, said they supported the 
amendment and, if the 
Government was not prepared 
to accept it, would divide the 
House. 

The Bill represented a 
significant transfer of power 
Scrutiny by the Commons 
would be even more difficult 
The opportunity to veto or 
block by the UTC Government 
was greatly reduced and 
compromise would be much 4 
more difficult because of the 
second stage in decision making. . 
Mr Enoch Powell (South Down, 
UOP) said whatever was ar- 
rogated to the Assembly by this 
legislation was deducted from 
what was available to the House 
and the people it represented. 

They woe discussing an ac- 
tual deduction from the powers 
of the House in order that they 
could be exercised by other 
bodies over which they bad no 
control. 


Peacock report and 
reaction next week 


FUTURE OF BBC 


The Peacock Committee -r 
on the future financing of the 
BBC and the Government's 
initial response to it are to be 
published next week, Mr Doug- 
las - Hurd, the Home Secretary, 
indicated during Commons 
question time exchanges. 

He predicted there would be 
wide discussion about it. 


Mr Alfred Morris (Manchester, 
Wyihenshawe, Lab) said that 
any attempts to privatize Ra- 
dios One and Two would be 
fiercely resisted as would any 
move to force the BBC to sell on 
any of its services. Would the 
Home Secretary, he asked, con- 
rider the damage that would be 
done to independent radio if 
Radios One and Two were sold? 
Mr Hard: He is leaping ahead. 
Mr Morris may have an 
opportunity to comment when 
the report is published. 




Need to help;; 
young people,: 
get work "i 


WAGES BILL 


If young people were priced into^ 
work by removal of the- 
protection of the wages councils 
it would only be until they 
became adult when they would"; 
be dismissed and rej' 
another young person, 
McCarthy (Lab) said during the’ 
resumed committee stage in tifo- 
- House of Lords of the Wages. 
Bill. ™ 

He was moving atf 
amendment, later rejected by 
1 10 votes to 84 - Government' 
majority, 26, which would have, 
retained wages councils - 
fuoctions for workers under 21,"- 
L«rd McCarthy said iMh 
Government had not been, 
prepared to make any estimate 
of the number of fobs for young 
people that would be created by 
the removal of regulation and it 
even accepted that some of 
those jobs would be at the 
expense of adults. 

The Government's arguments^ 
were dangerous, un;us|* r 
unsubstantiated, implausibly* 
tenuous and would lead to tire- 
exploitation of a weakly? 
unionized and vulnerable group 
of workers. - C 

Lord Rochester (L) said there.' 
was a case for wages councils to', 
be able to produce graduated;- 
scales of pay for the IS - 21 age' 
group. The Govern ment's^ 
proposals would enable a young* 1 
person to get their first foot ou . 
the employment ladder but only^' 
so long as they were cheaper to - 
employ than an adult. «: 

Lord Sainsbury (SDP) said tier? 
evidence had been produced to . 
support the Government's 
claim that wages councils'* 
hindered job creation andL 
caused unemployment. M jy 
Lord Trefgarne, fee' 
Government spokesman, said* 
all the pay protection in tife? 
world was worthless if a young t 
person could not get a job < 
because it was illegal to pay him 4 
the wage he was prepared to' 
accept. - : 

The Government accepted ■ 
that some of the jobs created : 
would be at the expense of; 
adults, but the overriding., 
concern was to help young* 
people get access to the first rung * 
of the employment ladder. \ J 


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►fficc 


THE TIMES FRIDAY JUNE 27 1986 


HOME NEWS 


5. 



* 


Minister gives pledge 
to sell off all the 
state-owned industries 



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. A blanket- commitment to 
sell all state-owned industries 
is given today by Mr John 
Moore who, until last month, 
was the minister responsible 
for the Government's privati- 
zation programme. 

- Mr Moore, now Secretary of 
Slate for Transport and the 
newest recruit to the Cabinet, 
says that by the end of next 
year the Government will 
pave nearly halved state-own- 
ership of industry since h 
came to power in 1979. 

T- in a statement on privatiza- 
tion, published by the free 
enterprise organization. Aims 
eflnduary. Mr Moore says: 

-- “It is already dear to me 
Who mainly prospers through 
privatization. The sharehold- 
ers of the companies we have 
jsold prosper, the employees 
prosper, and most of all (he 
customers and the whole na- 
tion prosper. 

.'■‘“That is why privatization 
in the United Kingdom has 


By Michael HorsneU 

and economic transforma- 
tions that has taken place in 
the last 15 years." 

When - the; Conservatives 
came to power the proportion 
of industry controlled by the 
State was at its highest, ac- 


... 

- Mt 

file programme wDl continue 
imtil all state-owned commer- 
cial industries are returned to 
where they belong — to the 
private sector." 

— Mr Moore describes the 
programme . as “one of the 
most extraordinary political 


Peers fight 


‘ to save our 

.* •"•■T 

■' sausages 

: By Sheila Gann 

H 

■ 

«: Peers are outraged at EEC 
plans to ban family butchers 
from making their own 


counting for about lOper cent 
of Britain's gross domestic 
product, a seventh of total 
investment in the economy 
and about 10 per cent of the 
retail price index. 

The industries employed 
about 1.5 million people, 
dominating the transport, en- 
ergy, communications, steel 
and shipbuilding sectors of the 
economy. 

“In 1979 to halve the 
amount of state ownership 
and double the number of 
shareholders within the space 
of two parliaments seemed an 
impossible task", Mr Moore 
says. 

To date, more than 350,000 
employees have obtained 
shares through privatization 
in the companies employing 
them and privatization has 
been a big factor in doubling 
the number of shareholders in 
the United Kingdom. 

The British Telecom sale 
alone is thought to have 


attracted about a million peo- 
ple who had never owned 
shares before. 

“Without this approach I do 
not believe that privatization 
would have been so quickly 
accepted as an irreversibly 
beneficial process", Mr Moore 
says. 

He points onl that privati- 
zation has meant: 

Profits have doubled at 
British Aerospace in zhe five 
years since privatization; in- 
creased sevenfold at National 
Freight where the value of 
employee shares in the consor- 
tium has gone up twenty- 
seven-fold; and increased 
Jaguar car sales from 3,000 to 
18,000 between 1981 and 1984 
in the United Stales where 
customer satisfaction has ris- 
en from 30 per cent to 90 per 
cent. 

The immediate future pro- 
gramme of nationalization in- 
cludes British Gas, British 
Airways, the National Bus 
Company, the British Airports 
Authority, Rolls-Royce and 
the water authorities in En- 
gland and Wales, 

Privatization in the United 
Kingdom by John Moore (Aims 
of Industry, £2-20). 


" V.. j 


— it* 


. - - nt 

i 


rmn 


<? 

*■% 


Need tchsh 
\ : ” flS 
■ ,;.;»ori 


sausages. 

Under proposals from Brus- 
sels, anyone making sausages, 
pjes or other meat products 
timid have to install 18 sepa- 
rate rooms to comply with the 
new health regulations. 

But a Lords' committee wffl 
today urge the European Com* 
mission to redraft its directive 
making public health stan- 
dards common in all the 
member states. 

The European 

Communities' select commit- 
tee said it would be impossible 
for small butchers to comply 
with the requirements of the 
draft directive. 

“The fsm3y-rmr botcher, 
who wishes to continue ^pre- 
paring such items as sausages 
to a time-honoured redpe for a 
local clientele, should, in oar 
opinion, be allowed to continue 
to do so." 

- .Jt warned tire EEC Commis- 
sion to “take into account the 
interests of the small butcher 
and his customers as well as 
the large manufacturing 
interests". 

•It said these plans should be 
scrapped without lowering 
health standards. 

J-The new standards would 
hinge on a health certificate 
which would have to accompa- 
ny meat products in transit in 
Europe. 

-House of Lords Select 
Committee on the European 
Communities. I3th & 1 4 th re- 
ports on the Internal Market for 
Faodsmffs and Meat Products 
(Stationery Office, £9. 10). 


Paroled rapist 
strangled girl 

'Miss Kare n W aters, aged 
17, was murdered by a man 
who was out on parole licence 
after a conviction for rape, 
Nottin gham Grown Coart was 
toW yesterday. 

-Philip Wright, aged 32, of 
Bailey Rd, Newark, told police 
that be -killedMiss Waters 
after she threatened to report 
his rape conviction to his 
employer. He was jailed for 
life. 

‘Miss Waters had suffered 
Mows to the head and there 
were several stab injuries to 
her chest. When seen by poBce 
Wright broke-down and said: 
“She brought it up about the 
rage. I got my lie off and just 
P> 


Catholic Church 
accused of racism 

By Clifford Longfey, Religious Affairs Correspondent 


Many black Roman Catho- 
lics in Britain are becoming 
increasingly alienated from 
the church, according to a 
report commissioned by the 
Archbishop of Westminster, 
Cardinal Basil Hume. 

The paper, prepared by a 
committee of 10 members of 
the black community, said 
that it was common for black 
Catholics to experience racism 
from the church as an institu- 
tion, and from individual 
white Catholics. 

Half the committee mem- 
bers were not Catholics, and 
the most senior churchman 
among them was Canon Ivor 
Smith Cameron, a member of 
lhe General Synod of the 
Church of England. 

Cardinal Hume announced 
that he was following the 
report's recommendation and 
setting up immediately a steer- 
ing committee ofblack Catho- 
lics from his diocese to 
consider the report's other 
proposals. 

Miss Leela Ramdeen, chair- 
man of the committee that 
wrote the report, who was 
boro in Trinidad, said that 
racism in society and in the 
church was an “oppressive 
reality" about which outspo- 
kenness was needed. 

“There is a rage for justice 


in the black community, and 
the chinch must take a lead." 

The committee recom- 
mended a new “pastoral re- 
source centre" for black 
Catholics in London, in place 
of the present Caribbean Pas- 
toral Service. It called for a 
campaign to win more black 
candidates for the priesthood, 
and said that practices and 
attitudes in Catholic schools 
were regarded by many black 
Catholics as biased against 
blade people. 

Nevertheless, it added, 
some black Catholics did not 
experience racism in the 
church, and there were “pock- 
ets of good practice". It said 
that all Catholics should de- 
velop a deeper awareness of 
the nature and effects of 
racism. 

■■ Cardinal Hume said that 
the committee's “trenchant 
criticisms" needed to be bal- 
anced by recognition of the 
devoted and imaginative work 
of some priests. 

“This in no way denies that 
there are gaps and deficien- 
cies, and much remains to be 
done," he added. 

He proposed extensive con- 
sultations with diocesan agen- 
cies, on the report, particularly 
about schools, youth work, 
and recruitment of priests. 


FitzGerald’s last ditch 
plea for divorce vote 


Voters in the Irish Republic 
went to the polls yesterday 
with both sides calling Tor a 
high turnout in the referen- 
dum to remove the constitu- 
tional ban on divorce. 


Dr Garret FitzGerald and 
his wife, Joan, were among the 
first to cast their votes in south 
Dublin and the Irish prime 
minister continued his cam- 
paign for a “yes" decision 
until the last moment by 
placing ah advertisement in 
newspapers urging women to 
back his proposal to allow 

limited civil divorce. 

“I call on the women of 
Ireland to vote “yes’. Yon are 
being misled," Dr FitzGerald 
wrote. 

His message was armed at 
the large proportion of women 
who have charged theinninds 
on lhe issue after a campaign 
by anti-divorce groups giving 
a wanting that they could be 
divorced, without their per- 
mission and of the effects of 


By Richard Ford 

divorce on property and suc- 
cession rights. 

However, the government 
may have left its fight-back 
lob late and already recrimi- 
nations were beginning within 
the coalition government par- 
ties as defeat appeared a 
distinct possibtity. 

Early indications were that 
the turnout in the tenth refer- 
endum to amend de Valera's 
1937 written constitution may 
be higher than previous poll^. 

A total of 2,436,836 people 
are entitled to vote on the 
proposal removing the bon 
and introducing restricted di- 
vorce where a couple's mar- 
riage has felled and they have 
lived apart for five years. 

The latest opinion polls 
suggest that when the votes are 
counted today the proposal 
will he defeated and that Dr 
FitzGerald’s gamble will have 
failed, leaving Ireland and 
Malta as the only countries in 
Western Europe without civil 
divorce. 


. t'- 

■; i i 


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i 1 


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Two face drug 
charges in 
Channon case 

A tailor was yesterday re- 
manded in custody until July 
3 after the death of Olivia 
Chan non, daughter of the 
Secretary of State for Trade 
and Industry. 

Richard Lundin, aged 31, of 
Kilbum, north London, is 
charged with supplying heroin 
and cocaine and conspiracy to 
contravene the misuse of 
drugs Act 

The prosecution toW magis- 
trates in Oxford that it will 
take six weeks to compile the 
case. There was no application 
for bail. 

In a separate hearing, Paul 
Dunsian, a pop song writer, 
was remanded in custody by 
Oxford magistrates on seven 
drugs charges, including sup- 
plying heroin to Miss 
Crannon. 

Mr Dunsian, aged 31. of 
Ellesmere Road, Wlllesden, 
north-west London, was re- 
manded in custody until July 
l- 

Miss Channon died at a 
party on June 1 1 to celebrate 
the end of final examinations. 



Paper to 
pay Coe 
over libel 

Sebastian Cue, the Olympic 
gold medallist, was awarded 
substantial libel damages in 
the High Court yesterday over 
eged revelations by a former 
girl friend. 

The athlete, aged 29, who 
has held world records at four 
distances from 800 metres to 
a mile, was said to have 
suffered a “deeply offensive 
and libellous attack" in a 
series of articles in The San 
newspaper in October 1984. 

Mr Richard Walker, for Mr 
Coe, told Mr Justice Michael 
Davies that the articles, based 
on interviews given by the 
former girl friend, were a 
“sensationalized attack upon 
his character and 
personality". 

He said that there were 
inaccuracies and untruths in 
the allegations that “went to 
the root of his personal con- 
duct and his behaviour to- 
wards his family, friends and 
fellow athletes". 

News Group Newspapers 
Ltd, the newspaper's publish- 
ers, bow recognized that the 
allegations were entirely wfth- 
ont foundation, and expressed 
their sincere apologies to Mr 
Coe. 

They agreed to pay him die 
undisclosed damages and all 
his legal costs. Mr Coe is to 
give the money to charity. 


IRA bomb trial 


Magee charges put on file 

By Stewart Tendler, Crime Reporter 

Patrick Magee, sentenced regard to the convictions on a gas plant at Greenwich. 

Magee for 


earlier this week to a mini- 
mum of 35 years’ imprison- 
ment for the Brighton 
bombing, is not to face trial on 
charts of taking pan in a 
Provisional IRA bombing 
campaign in London in 1978- 
79, it was stated at the Central 
Criminal Court yesterday. 

Indictments alleging his in- 
volvement in this campaign, 
and in later plans to bomb a 
public house near Blackpool 
that was used by soldiers, are 
to be placed on file. 

Mr Roy Amlot, for the 
prosecution, told Mr Justice 
Bore ham: “We would not seek 
leave to proceed against him 
unless it be in the unlikely 
event of a successful appeal 
for the main case. 

“Both indictments involve 
serious offences but having 


against Magee tor so many 
serious ofiences...and having 
regard for the fact he is serving 
eight life sentences with mini- 
mum recommendations, the 
crown takes the view there 
really is no point in proceed- 
ing against him further." Sir 
Michael Havers, the Attorney 
General, had been consulted. 

Magee was convicted earlier 
this month on eight counts, 
including the Brighton bomb- 
ing and an IRA plan to bomb 
resorts last summer. 

Counsel for Magee said 
yesterday said that there was 
no opposition to the outstand- 
ing cases being filed. 

The 1978-79 London cam- 
paign included car bombs 
outside the YMCA, the Oasis 
swimming baths, and in 
Windmill Street, and an attack 


During Magee's recent trial 
the court was told that Gerard 
Tuite, who escaped from 
Brixton prison, and John 
McComb had both stood trial 
for their part in the campaign. 

Magee's fingerprints had 
been found in London fiats 
linked to the campaign, it was 
stated. 

During McComb's trial in 
1983 the Centra] Criminal 
Court was told that the IRA 
campaign had been called 
Operation Oxo. and an IRA 
unit had been set to work in 
Britain. 

McComb. sentenced to 17 
years, was alleged to have 
made a tape-recording of VIPs 
worthy of attack including the 
Duke of Gloucester, Mr Mi- 
chael Heseltine and Lord 
Carringjon. 


Shortage 
of housing 
hits jobs 
in South 

Efforts to provide employ- 
ment in the South-east are 
being frustrated by planning 
constraints which restrict the 
supply of housing, the House- 
Builders Federation says to- 
day. Its conclusions come 
after a report it com missioned 
from the Institute of Manage- 
ment Studies. 

It states that the dear 
message from the report. 
Housing Constraints in the 
Mid-Berkshire Labour Mar- 
ket , is that hopes of reducing 
unemployment in the South- 
east, and so in the country asa 
whole, could be dashed be- 
cause of restrictions on the 
supply of housing. 

Mr Tristram Reynolds, for 
the federation, said: “Mid- 
Berkshire is representative of 
many similar areas in the 
South-east, like Gatwick, 
where it is now clear that 
employment which could be 
created just is not, because 
firms cannot find the right 
people. They cannot find these 
people because there is not 
enough of the right kind of 
housing." 

The main findings of the 
report, commissioned to sup- 
port the federation's submis- 
sion to the Berkshire structure, 
plan inquiry* show that em- 
ployers are finding it increas- 
ingly difficult to recruit for a 
wide range of skilled craft, 
technical and professional 
occupations. 

Some organizations con- 
sulted reported that housing 
constraints were a key impedi- 
ment to their attempts to 
overcome a limited local sup- 
ply of skilled manual person- 
nel by recuiting over longer 
distances. 


The most common difficul- 
ty was the high cost of bousing 
The federation has argued 
that the shortage of land in the 
South-east means that the 
price of available land, and 
therefore of the houses built 
on it is sometimes prohibi- 
tive. 


Scrabble firm seeks curb on words contest 


The manufacturers of 
Scrabble, the word game, 
sought in the High Court in 
London yesterday to stop its 
being used in a tournament 
that rivals their own National 
Scrabble Championships. 

JW Spear and Son have 
applied for an injunction ban- 
ning Mr Thomas Fmlay, who 
organizes the . Word masters 
Tournament, from referring to 


or talking about Scrabble. Mr 
Finlay contends that he is 
within the law to incorporate 
Scrabble in his tournaments. 

The application was ad- 
journed for a week by Mr 
Justice Macpherson to allow 
him time to offer more 
evidence. 

Mr Finlay, married with 
four children, of Compton 
Pauncefoot, Queen Camel, 


near Yeovil, Somerset, has 
been a Scrabble enthusiast for 
more than 20 years . 

He began publishing a 
newsletter about the game, 
said to be the Queen’s 
favourite, in 1983, but signed 
an agreement with Spears in 
August last year that he would 
cease publication. He also 
agreed not to organize an 
international tournament 


Spears, who introduced the 
game to Britain in 1954, claim 
damages for breach of contract 
and seek an injunction to 
prevent Mr Finlay passing off 
any game, not being the game 
of Scrabble, as being connect- 
ed with it 

Mr Rnlay denies breach of 
contract and is fighting the 
claim by Spears to the exclu- 
sive rights to the word game. 


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N.. > 


THE TIMES FRIDAY JUNE 27 1986 


OVERSEAS NEWS 






m&ss. 

■ • zsiLju 

*3» 


jSr?.‘ <&■. . 
>-\\V *««•*■' 


r I;v f, 


-JaL- 





South Afri can emergency • Official and unofficial reports • Dominant topic at EEC summit 

Two versions of church 


round-up reveal wide 
gap in reporting events 


ifpS^o 

'% 


An interesting comparison 
between the official version of 
events put out by South 
Africa's Bureau for In forma- 
tion and the recollection of 
private citizens has been pro- 
vided by proceedings in the 
Cape Town Supreme Court. 

Court proceedings, like 
those in Parliament, are not 
subject to the slate of emer- 
gency regulations in force 
since June 12, which limit 
what can be published without 
official approval. 

The event in question was 
the arrest and detention on 
Sunday, June IS. of the entire 
congregation of St Nicholas's, 
an Anglican church in Elsies 
River, a mainly Coloured 
(mixed-race) residential area 
near Cape Town. 

It was not until June 18 that 
Mr David Steward, the head 
of the Bureau for Information, 
admitted that the incident had 
taken place. He then reported 
briefly that two whites and 
187 Coloureds had been ar- 
rested because "it was a 
political gathering, not a 
church meeting”. 

Asked to explain why it had 
taken so long to release this 
information, especially as the 
bureau bad received a report 
of the incident by Monday, 
June 16, Mr Steward replied: 
“We are still in the process of 
perfecting the free flow of 
information” 

According to an affidavit by 
the rector of the church, the 
Rev Devaraj Laban, the 
church's youth group had 
asked him for permission to 
hold a service in the church on 
June 1 S to commemorate the 
tenth anniversary on the fol- 
lowing day of the start of the 
Soweto rising. 

“I made it quite clear to the 
group that any service to be 
held was to be a church 
service, and was not to be 
political in any way. When I 
was given an assurance to this 
effect, I agreed that the service 
could be held”,. Mr Laban 
said. 

The service began at 3pm. 
He himself had arrived only at 
3.50pm, as he had another 
engagement A member of the 
youth group was recounting 
what had happened on June 
16. 1976. This was a straight- 
forward account Mr Laban 
said, and contained nothing 

Britons are 
held after 
UN death 

Lusaka (AP) — Five foreign 
nationals, two of them British, 
have been arrested in north- 
western Zambia after a killing 
in a United Nations refugee 
camp, the government-owned 
Zambia Daily Mail reported 
yesterday. 

The newspaper said the five 
were being held in connection 
with “various offences, in- 
cluding possession of auto- 
matic rifles and ammunition 
and illegal entry into 
Zambia". 

The arrests took place near 
the border with Zaire. Police 
said two people had been 
arrested at the Maheba refugee 
camp near the provincial capi- 
tal of Solwezi after a man was 
found dead with a bullet 
through his head inside the 
camp. 

Greeks make 
jet protest 

Athens — The Defence Min- 
istry has said that Greek jets 
intercepted Turkish military 
planes which penetrated Aege- 
an air space under Greek 
control 38 limes on Tuesday 
and Wednesday. A protest was 
being lodged with Ankara 
(Mario Modi an o writes). 

The two feuding neighbours 
are holding military manoeu- 
vres separately in the same 
Aegean regions this week. 

Pit cave-in 

Warsaw (AP) — Rescue 
crews were searching for seven 
coalminers trapped in a cave- 
in Lhai killed two miners and 
injured another in the south- 
ern Polish town of Bytom, the 
official news agency Pap said. 

Escape bid 

Berlin (AP) — West Berlin 
police said that an East Ger- 
man soldier was apparently ’ 
shot when he tried to escape 
across the Berlin Wail into the 
Western part of the city. 


From Michael Hornsby, Johannesburg 


Custer’s men 

Custer Battlefield, Montana j 
(AP) — The remains of 37 
cavalrymen who died in the 
most famous battle of' 
America's Indian wars have i 
been reburied at Custer Battle- 
Held National Monument in 
south-eastern Montana, exact- 
ly 1 10 years after they, made 
their Iasi stand with Lieuten- 
ant Colonel George .Arm- 
strong Custer. 

Ordered back 

Jerusalem (AFP) — The 
Israeli Health Minister. Mr : 
Mordccbai Gur. issued a back- I 
to-work order to 1 1.000 nurses j 
staging a pay strike. | 


subversive or provocative. third raid in which South 
A lecturer in Biblical studies African police detained large 
from the University of the numbers of people inside a 
Western Cape (the main uni- church on the 10th anniversa- 
versity for Coloureds) had ry of the Soweto uprising have 
then given a talk. reached Amnesty Intemaiion- 

A candle-lighting ceremony al in London (Paul Vailely 
followed, a song was sung, and writes), 
a few moments of silence More than 100 people are 
observed for those who died in said to have been detained 
Soweto on June 16. 1976. The when security forces entered 
rector, according to his ac- St Peter Gavier's Roman 
count, then gave the benedic- Catholic Church in Duncan 
tion. and the congregation Village. East London, on 
began singing “Nkosi SikelePi- Monday. June !6. 

Amka” (*‘God Bless Africa"). No service was in progress 
This Xhosa song, composed but the church had been 
at the end of the last century, opened for private prayer “for 
has become identified with the peace in South Africa", 
outlawed African National in the preceding days a 
Congress (ANC). number of priests in the black 

As the congregation was township and in nearby 
leaving the church, Mr Laban Pcffcrville had been detained, 
said, the police arrived carry- Two days before. Father 
ing “either long whip-like Graham Cornelius was arrest- 
instruments or rifles”, and ed, according to two indepen- 
began arresting everyone, dent reports, 
claiming the service had been One source said that he was 
— now detained under armed 

Tmirnnlicf Imvpc Suard in ^ rere Hospital sufifer- 
JOUmailSl leaves mg fr om fecial injuries. 

Johannesburg (AP) — The A pastor of the “Coloured” 
Sooth African Government Dutch Reformed Church Mis- 
has rejected an appeal by a sion, the Rev Eddie Leeuw. 
Newsweek magazine cone- was detained the day before 
spondent, Mr Richard Man- the anniversary, 
ning, against expulsion. Mr “About 120 people, without 
Maiming immediately rushed a minister, were inside the 
to the airport to board a flight church when the security 
oat of the conn try. He said the forces arrived. They arrested 
Home Affairs Minister, Mr everyone. 

Stoffel Botha, had toM him Reports reaching The Times 
that he most leave by direct from South Africa indi- 
mid night. cated that the two new securi- 

Mr Manning was the third ly Bills approved last week by 
foreign jonrnalist ordered to the President's Council were 
leave South Africa in two expected to become law at 




Mrs Thatcher and Sir Geof- 
frey Howe are facing the most 
severe test of British diplomat- 
ic skill since the Lancaster 
House negotiations on Rhode- 
sian independence. 

How can they avoid outrag- 
ing either the Commonwealth 
or a substantial section of their 
own party in their response to 
the Sooth African crisis? 

Much of the talk about 
possible withdrawals from the 
Commonwealth is probably 
exaggerated. Most of the 
members have no desire to 
leave, no matter bow angry 
they may be with Britain. 

Bat some of them could £et 
themselves in the position 
where they had threatened to 
inarch out so loudly that they 
had no alternative. 

In any case, there will 
undoubtedly be a great deal of 
indignation at the mini-Coin- 
mon wealth Conference in Lon- 
don early in August if it is felt 
that Britain is still refusing to 
take effective action. This 
indignation could reach a point 
where British interests were 
hurt in a number of countries. 

So it would be to Britain's 
advantage to do enough about 



had no alternative. er measures the Community 

In any case, there will had imposed that would be 
undoubtedly be a great deal of ideal for the British Gov- 
indignation at the mini-Com- eminent, 
monwealth Conference in Lon- Perhaps that would be ex- 
don early in August if it is felt pectiog too much. But it would 
that Britain is still refnsuig to be important for Mrs Thatch- 
take effective action. This er that anv additional steps 
indignation could reach a point taken by the Commonwealth 
where British interests were should also not require legisla- 
hurt in a number of countries, tion by Parliament. 

So it would be to Britain's By the time the Common- 
ad van tageto do enough about wealth leaders begin their 
South Africa to assuage such proceedings on August 1 the 
feelings. 1 still do not believe Government will have taken 
that economic sanctions would care to see that the parliamen- 
be a $ood way of improving tary recess has started. 


conditions in South Africa. 


If I were an MP I would for 


weeks. midnight. 

"■ ■ ■ 1 Under the Internal Security 

an illegal gathering. Amendment Act existing de- 

“With the arrival of the lainees could be kept impris- 
po lice men pandemonium en- oned for another 180 days on 
sued. People ran for shelter the authority of a senior police 
towards the altar and the choir officer. 


stalls. They were unable to 
leave the church by the only 
open door as the police had 
entered through this door.” 

The entire congregation, in- 
cluding the rector, were held 
in prison until the end of last 
week, when they began to be 
released in batches. The 


The TUC said here it had 
learnt that three prominent 
trade unionists detained last 
week had now been released. 

They are Mr Phirosaw 
Camay of the Council of 
Unions in South Africa 
(Cusa), Ms Dale Tifflin, 


released in batches. The women's officer of Cusa, and tackle the Cor- 

rector's affidavit was made in Mr Basher Vally, organizer of Sn* whL fann 
support of an application for the Commercial, Catering and ” toworkM reriaSuS 
the release of a journalist who Allied Workers’ Union. Two ^ F? rr - he 

SAfiftSSlS SfiEfiSSS 

• LONDON: Repots of a « - “ * 


Sir Geoffrey Howe, the Foreign Secretary (right), being greeted by Mr Leo Tindemans, his 
Belgian counterpart, at the start yesterday of the EEC summit in The Hague. 

European Blue-chip security 
d fackie° at casino 

UlL'IkiV From Our Own Correspondent, The Hague 

lAnc 1 C 611 A blackjack and roulette wise precaution or in a show 

JUUiJ lijiSUv tables at the Kurhaus. Hoi- ofBritish independence, chose 
rw.» land's l0 P seaside casino, fell to stay at the residence of the 
* r °Ti^ C H^m,y WeQ silent yesterday. The Hague's British ambassador instead, 
inenague 1400-strong police force. The Dutch, normally a 

With divisions over South which normally has little more calm, tolerant and understat- 
Africa dominating the opening to deal with at the Kurhaus ed people, appeared to have 
yesterday of the two-day semi- than the occasional over-excit- been seized with last-minute 
annual EEC summit in The ed holiday gambler, moved in alarm at the thought of an 
Hague, European leaders en masse to protect the leaders outrage at the summit, which 
moved towards agreement on of the EEC, who had chosen it marks the end of The 
less contentious issues. as their accommodation for Netherlands’ presidency of the 

These include a British- the two-day EEC summit. EEC and the beginning of 
backed move for tackling En- It was. even by the stan- Britain's six months in charge, 
ropesn unemployment by dards of most international There are no doubt lessons 
encouraging initiative and re- meetings nowadays, an almost in the security surrounding the 
moving constraints in the la- unprecedented exercise in summit for Mrs Thatcher and 
hour market The proposal security. Sir Geoffrey Howe, as they 

was presented by Mrs Thatch- The Kurhaus Hotel at Sche- consider the arrangements 
er, and British officials said it veningen. a fantasy in stone Britain will have to make, 
had been warmly welcomed. resembling a cross between Security at the Kurhaus was 

The summit also discussed Harrods and Brighton's Royal echoed at the ultra-modern 
the need for “concerted Pavilion, is a Dutch national Dutch Foreign Ministry in the 
action” by the EEC In a global monument (opened 1885. re- centre of The Hague, where 
context to tackle the distor- stored 1979) and the authori- the formal summit sessions 



Four die in 
homeland 

Mr Enos Mabnza, the Chief 
Minister of the black Strath 
African homeland of 
EaNgwane, above, announced 
yesterday that four youths 
were killed there on June 16, 
the anniversary of the 1976 
Soweto uprising. He said a 
number of other people were 
injured in the incident in 
KaNyamazane township. 

Mr Mabuza referred to the 
deaths in a speech to the South 
AfricarBritain Trade Associa- 
tion in Johannesburg yes- 
terday. 

He gave further information 
to reporters later. But the 
details he gave of the riremn- 
stanees of the deaths may not 
be reported under emergency 
restrictions on media reporting 
of political unrest. 

No comment was immedi- 
ately available from the Sooth 
African Government's Bureau 
for Information. 

Pretoria set up the home- 
lands to give blacks a degree of 
autonomy. 


IH Talks with 
Tambo 
denounced 


From Our Own 
Correspondent 
Johannesburg 

The meeting in London 
between Mr Oliver Tambo, 
president of the outlawed 
African National Congress, 
and Mrs Lynda ChaJker. Min- 
ister of State at the Foreign 
Office, was denounced here 
yesterday as being “a capitula- 
tion to terrorism as a political 
weapon”. 

The accusation was made in 
the South African Broadcast- 
ing Corporation's Current Af- 
fairs commentary, which re- 
flects government views. 

It said Britain had aban- 
doned its policy of not talking 
to the ANC while the organi- 
zation used violence. 

On his arrival here on 
Tuesday, Mr Denis Healey, 
the Labour Party’s chief for- 
eign affairs spokesman, called 
the meeting a significant shift 
in British policy, adding that 
his party drew a clear distinc- 
tion between the ANC and the 
IRA. 

“The ANC represents a very 
large number ... of the black 
population inside South Afri- 
ca who have no political rights 
whatever. The IRA represents 
a very small proportion of the 
Catholic population in North- 
ern Ireland who all have foil 
political rights.” 

The comparison between 
the ANC and the IRA is one 
frequently made here. 


trade. Farm subsidies will be 
discussed al the new round of 
Gan (General Agreement on 
Tariffs and Trade) in mid- 
September. 

The summit reviewed 
progress on completion of the 
internal market which, like 
unemployment, is high on the 
agenda for Britain's presiden- 
cy of the EEC Council of 
Ministers, which begins next 
week. The summit noted that 
half the 300 decisions needed 
to remove barriers to trade by 
1992 shoold have reached the 
Council of Ministers by the 
end of last year, bat in fact 
only 132 proposals had been 
tabled. 

The summit marks the 
handover of the EEC presiden- 
cy from Mr Hans van den 
Broek, the Dutch Foreign 
Minister, to Sir Geoffrey 
Howe, the Foreign Secretary. 
British officials yesterday 
emp hasized the need for conti- 
nuity in EEC policies rather 
than dramatic new initiatives. 

The drive for enterprise and 
the reduction of administrative 
burdens on small and medium- 
sized businesses is a direct 
reflection of Mrs Thatcher's 
own philosophy, although ii 
remains to be seen bow far it 
can be realized during 
Britain's relatively short pres- I 
idency, which ends in Dec- I 
ember. I 

The summit considered 
ways of making the EEC more ; 
relevant to its citizens. 

The summit is intended to 
give impetus to the “People's 
Europe” programme, under 
which the EEC has approved 
an EEC passport and an EEC 
flag and proposes to introduce 
an EEC health card. But the 
Commission, represented by 
M Jacques Delors, its presi- 
dent, said the EEC had failed 
to do enough to simplify 
frontier formalities and pro- 
mote exchanges. 


tables at the Kurhaus, Hol- 
land's lop seaside casino, fell 
silent yesterday. The Hague's 
1400-strong police force, 
which normally has little more 
to deal with at the Kurhaus 
than the occasional over-excit- 
ed holiday gambler, moved in 
en masse to protect the leaders 
of the EEC, who had chosen it 
as their accommodation for 
the two-day EEC summit. 

It was. even by the stan- 
dards of most international 
meetings nowadays, an almost 
unprecedented exercise in 
security. 

The Kurhaus Hotel at Sche- 
veningen. a fantasy in stone 
resembling a cross between 
Harrods and Brighton’s Royal 
Pavilion, is a Dutch national 
monument (opened 1885. re- 
stored 1979) and the authori- 
ties in The Hague close by 
were anxious that it should 
not be subjected to the indig- 
nity of a terrorist attack just 
because EEC leaders were 
using its famous rooms. 

Mrs Thatcher, either as a 


ofBritish independence, chose 
to stay at the residence of the 
British ambassador instead. 

The Dutch, normally a 
calm, tolerant and understat- 
ed people, appeared to have 
been seized with last-minute 
alarm at the thought of an 
outrage at the summit, which 
marks the end of The 
Netherlands' presidency of the 
EEC and the beginning of 
Britain's six months in charge. 

There are no doubt lessons 
in the security surrounding the 
summit for Mrs Thatcher and 
Sir Geoffrey Howe, as they 
consider the arrangements 
Britain will have to make. 

Security at the Kurhaus was 
echoed at the ultra-modern 
Dutch Foreign Ministry in the 
centre of The Hague, where 
the formal summit sessions 
are being held, and at the more 
modest Ministry of Agricul- 
ture next door, where more 
than 1.000 journalists are 
gathered to observe the sum- 
mit discussions on sanctions 
against South Africa. 


But Britain owes President once be confident that 1 could 
Botha no political debts and I book my holiday for the 
see no reason why this country beginning of August. Then 
should damage its national when Parliament reassembles 
interest by clambering into the in the autumn policy towards 
last ditch alongside him. South Africa may no longer be 

such a hot issue, provided that 

Restriction by M legislation has to be in- 

i i f _ trod need. 

OaCKDenenerS Because British ministers 

— need to tread such a very 

This suggests that Mrs nari ^ r line between what 
Thatcher should be prepared d much offence 

to take just sufficient action c, “ ier the Lommonwealui 
against Sooth Africa to relieve °, r t0 their own backbenchers 
Britain from international they may be tempted to play 
pressure. But her freedom of of a ,ead “S role « 

manoeuvre is restricted by her Hague. 


own backbenchers. 

No donbt the Whips could 
bring a number of critics into 
line once Mrs Thatcher had 


The danger is that they 
might assume too much re- 
sponsibility for measures that 
are unlikely to achieve more 


committed herself. Bnt Con- than modest success. They 


serrative rebellions from the 
right always tend to be more 
nncom promising. 

This suggests that whatever 


could then find themselves 
being held accountable for 
their failure in a year's time. 
Mach better, for example; 


farther measures Mrs Thatch- that Sir Geoffrey Howe should 
er might agree to shoold not be one of three European 
require legislation at West- foreign ministers undertaking 


minster. 

This will no doubt be very 
much in her mind during the 
current European Community 
summit at The Hague. 

If the European leaders 
were to settle for a ban on 
certain specific bn ports from 


another diplomatic mission to 
South Africa than that he 
should take on the thankless 
task by himself, it is prudent 
in politics not to claim sole 
responsibility unless there is a 
reasonable chance of success. 

If Britain could bring peace 


South Africa that could be and stability to Sooth Africa 
imposed through regulations then it would be right to take 
issued by the Commission all necessary risks to do so. 
without the Parliament of any Bnt there is no point in risking 


member country haring to do 
anything. 

If the Commonwealth lead- 
ers were then to adopt whatev- 


the national interest in a futile 
attempt to exercise more influ- 
ence than this country now 
possesses. 













Hatred dooms Beirut truce 

From Juan Carlos Gomucio, Bourj ai- Bara jo eh 


“Yon killed my son,” shout- 
ed an elderly Shia Muslim 
woman as she threw herself at 
a Palestinian housewife who 
was trying to enter the Bourj 
al-Barajueh refugee camp with 
'three bags of oranges, lettuce 
and coffee. 


“No food for the 
Palestinians,” she screamed, 
snatching the bags from the 
woman amid loud laughter 
from a group of haggard 
gunmen of the Shia A mat 
militia who began collecting 
the fruit and packages from 
the footpath. 

“Now we have good coffee,” 
joked a young fighter,' an 
AK47 assault rifle dangling 
from his shoulder. 

Two blocks away, two young 
women who were also trying to 
enter the camp were stopped 
by gunmen. “Don't let them in. 
They are Palestinian spies.” 
ordered a man emerging from 
a bullet-scarred bouse. 

After 300 soldiers of the 
Lebanese .Array's mainly Shia 
6th Brigade took positions 


around the besieged Sabra, 
Chatilla and Bonrj al- 
Barajneh camps in accordance 
with a Syrian-sponsored 
ceasefire, fighting between 
Arnal and the Palestinians on 
Wednesday subsided to spo- 
radic sniper exchanges — a 
remarkable departure from 
the rocket, mortar ami heavy 
machine-gun battles that per- 
sisted for 36 days. 

But the legacy of hatred, the 
volume of available weaponry 
and the political deadlock 
between Syria and the PLO of 
Mr Yassir Arafat, cast serious 
doubts on the future of the new 
truce. 

“Maybe ten, twelve days of 
calm.” a Shia fighter predict- 
ed. “Then, boom boom again.” 

Less d»n SO yards away, 
young Palestinian guerrillas, 
sunbathing ou the skeleton of 
a house scored by roclut- 
propelled grenades, agreed. 
“They think they can win,” 
said one. “They want to kill all 
of us. Let them come, yon tell 
them to come,” be said. 

Apparently unshaken by the 


long siege, the Palestinians 
denied reports that they were 
suffering from a shortage of 
food. 

Sporting a dean Palestinian 
T-shirt. Samira, a young nurse 
at Chatilla's field hospital, 
said: “We can provide food to 
whoever wants it, even outside 
the camps.” 

The Palestinians seem to be 
facing other difficulties. Dr 
Chris Gianon, a Canadian 
surgeon working for the Red 
Crescent, said on Tuesday that 

the Chatilla hospital was run- 
ning out of medical essentials 
after more than 60 operations. 

Reliable medical sources 
say the overall number of 
wounded is as high as 1.000. 

“Too many people are dead. 
Peace now is impossible if the 
Palestinians stay here," said a , 
man iu bis 40s w ho said he was j 

a Shia Muslim electrician 1 
firing on the fringes of Bourj 
aJ-Barajneh, but whose eri- ; 
dent authority among gunmen ! 
hinted at a rather high militia j 
command post “They (the ! 
Palestinians) must go.” I 


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THE TIMES FRIDAY JUNE 27 1986 


OVERSEAS NEWS 


The Contra aid Bill; triumph in the White House, anger and defiance in Managua 


Jubilant Reagan hails 
vote for ‘democracy 9 


Hitler 


From Christopher Thomas 
Washington 


I*, 


A triumphant President 
Reagan praised the Democrat- 
conLroMed House of Represen- 
tatives yesterday for finally 
agreeing to approve a desper- 
ately needed Si 00 million 
(£63 million) to revive the 
Nicaraguan Contras. It ended 
one of the most emotional and 
remarkable Congressional 
battles in years. 

Even as he flew to Califor- 
nia on board Air Force One on 
Wednesday afternoon for a 
five-day holiday at his ranch, 
he continued to call Demo- 
crats by telephone. The. vote, 
221 to 209, was far more 
decisive than the White House 
expected. 

The Administration 
thought it was so desperate for 
votes that it brought in a 
Republican House member 
who has advanced cancer. 

Mr George O'Brien, from 
Illinois, his voice breaking, 
gave a few emotional words of 
appreciation to colleagues, 
which most people recognized 
as a farewell speech. He was 
applauded loudly as he was 
wheeled from the chamber. 

Mr Reagan said in a state- 
ment from California that the 
vote signalled a step forward 
in bipartisan consensus in US 
foreign policy. “Once again, 
members of both parties stand 
united in resisting totalitarian 
expansionism and promoting 
the cause of democracy. 

“We can be proud that we as 
a people have embraced the 
struggle of the freedom fight- 
ers of Nicaragua. Today, their 
cause is our cause. With our 
help, the people of Nicaragua 
will win their struggle to bring 
democracy to their land.” 

Mr Reagan's aid plan drew 
the support of SI Democrats. 
The unrelated Bill to which it 
was attached now awaits ap- 
proval in the Senate, which is 


Washington - The aid plan, 
which was attached to an 
unrelated SHI providing funds 
for US military construction, 
means the Contras wffi receive 
5100 million In three instal- 
ments; $70 million of it for 
military equipment and the 
remainder for humanitarian 
purposes, mainly food, medi- 
cine, clothing, and shatter 
(Christopher Thomas writes). 

An estimated 10,000 Contras 
wilt be helped. The first $40 
million win be available immedi- 
ately, although delivery of mili- 


tary equipment must not begin 
before September 1. The sec- 
ond instalment of $20 mtffion 
wiH be available on October 15, 
and the final $40 million can be 
released on February 15. The 
military aid is mainly for rifles, 
bullets, vehicles, and basic 
jungle warfare equipment. The 
measure also lifts a congres- 
sional ban on covert activities 
by US intelligence agencies 
against Nicaragua, and pro- 
vides $300 million in economic 
development funds to Hon- 
duras, Guatemala, B Salvador 
and Costa Rica. 


jibe by 
Ortega 


v>? 

-.: x ' 

-A- 


* WJ.I v<_. «? , >• 

**• =' V» Ziir< -1-J-V-* • * 


virtually assured in the near 
future, before die money can 
start flowing. 

The President told a Las 
Vegas fund-raiser on Wednes- 
day night that the House vote 
was only round one — “but, oh 
boy, what a round”. 

In March the House turned 
down the plan by 222 votes to 
2 1 0. The about-turn is a direct 
result of Mr Reagan's intense 
lobbying, sweetened in a num- 
ber of cases by various politi- 
cal deals with individual 
Congressmen. 

The long House debate 
demonstrated that there was 
immense confUsion among 
Democrats about the best way 
to tackle the Nicaraguan Gov- 
ernment Many who ex- 
pressed fears about a 
Vietnam- type entanglement 
in Central America voted for 
the aid plan, apparently to 
avoid being branded as “soft” 
on communism. 

Much of the debate centred 
claims by the General 


on 


Accounting Office, the Con- 
gressional watchdog, that 
much of the $27 million that 
Congress approved for the 
Contras last year was misused. 

There have also been allega- 
tions of drug dealing, and 
atrocities against Nicaraguan 
peasants. “We are being asked 


Washington view 


President with 
the magic touch 


President Reagan's success 
in securing mllhajy aid for the 
Nicaraguan Contras is a per- 
sonal triumph, the impressive 
reinforcement of his almost 
unassailable political 
authority. 

.It is also testimony to the 
extraordinary powers of per- 
suasion In a President whose 
patronage now brings little 
tangible benefit bot who re- 
peatedly confounds critics who 
call him a “lame duck”. 

- Without doubt Mr Reagan's 
vigorous intervention saved 
tbi' aid package. His achieve- 
ment in getting the House of 
Representatives to vote by a 
larger margin than expected 
for a measure it had already 
decisively defeated only three 
months ago is particularly 
impressive. 

The Democrat-controlled 
House has repeatedly rejected 
any military help for the 
Contras for the past three 


By Michael Binyon 


years. Mr Thomas O’Neill, 
the Speaker, has thrown all 
the weight and charisma of his 
person and office into the 
opposition. The issue itself is 
unpopular with the electorate. 
And recent disclosures of 
fraud and human rights 
abuses by the Contras have 
made even Republicans wary 
of embracing such dubious 
allies. 

Against such odds. Presi- 
dent Reagan lobbied unstint- 
ing!}. He made speeches on 
the issue almost daily for three 
weeks; he appealed on televi- 
sion for national backing over 
tbe heads of congressmen; be 
invited personable Contra 
leaders to appear with him at 
publicized White House meet- 
ings; he sent a stream of 
messages to individual con- 
gressmen. asking waverers to 
tbe White House, 
channing,coaxrag and pres- 
suring. albeit with genial bon- 
homie, those of both parties 
whose support could be 
garnered. 

Even as be flew west to his 
California ranch, he tele- 
phoned Congressmen from his 
plane: winning, as a White 
House aide said yesterday, 
four more crucial votes during 
the last minutes of the debate. 


What is the secret of tbe 
Great Communicator's 
cess? On Nicaragua, there are 
several factors. Fust, Mr R« 
gan repeatedly emphasized the 
threat to US security, painting 
lurid pictures of common ist 
subversion, of an Internationa] 
terrorist centre on tbe Ameri- 
can mainland, of floods of 
refugees swirling north into 
tbe United States. 

To sophisticated liberals it 
seemed an absnrd exaggera- 
tion; to ordinary Americans, 
already alarmed by hordes of 
illegal immigrants, the spectre 
of a second Cuba is very real, 
as Congressmen seeking re- 
election know. 

Secondly, the White House 
“hit men” — propagandists 
such as Mr Patrick Buchanan 
— made speeches impugn it 
the patriotism of Contra a 
opponents, suggesting that tbe 
Democrats were soft on com- 
munism. 

The tactic was crude, but 
effective. No Democrat can 
afford such a label in the run- 
up to tbe November elections. 
By himself avoiding coarse 
name-caUmg, Mr Reagan rose 
above partisan politicking, 
making tbe appearance of! 
disinterested statesmanship 
that much more persuasive. 

And thirdly, he used his 
unerring personal touch. “One 
of oar Democrats had a per- 
sonal call from the President 
and changed his vote,” Mr 
O'Neill said ruefully. “He has 
never talked to a President 
head-to-head, and he told ns *1 
was so thrilled, I thought I was 
Calking to the Pope’.” 

A minor important factor, 
however, is the momentum 
already bolt np from earlier 
successes. Mr Reagan rescued 
an equally moribund proposal 
for tax reforms from certain 
oblivion in the House last 
December, sweeping it for- 
ward to a Congressional tri- 
umph. This month be won an 
important foreign policy vic- 
tory, overturning tbe Senate 
opposition to an arms deal 
with Saudi Arabia and pre- 
venting a successful challenge 
to his veto. 

Beyond this, however, is bis | 
long-term achivement in rais- 
ing the status and authority of I 
his office. 

Leading article, page 17 


Suicide bid by hijack 
case Palestinian 


Novara (Reuter) — One of 
the Palestinians on trial in 
Italy in connection with last 
year's hijack of the Italian 
cruise liner Ach ille Lauro tried 
to hang himself in his cell on 
Wednesday night, officials 
said yesterday. 

Signor Giovanni Salamone, 
the director of Novara jail, 
said the Palestinian made 
“what appears to be a suicide 
attempt." using a sheet. He 
said he could not give details 
or identify’ the man. 

But in Genoa the president 
of the court where three 
alleged hijackers and 12 al- 
leged accomplices are on trial 
announced that the man who 
attempted suicide was Said 


Gandura. He is accused of I 
having helped the alleged 
hijackers before they boarded 
the Achiile Lauro is Genoa 
last October. 

Prison sources said guards 
slopped the man as he was 

trying to put his head in a 
noose. 

Gandura appeared in court 
as usual yesterday and com-, 
plained bitterly about prison 
conditions. 

The three hijackers. 
Gandura and another 
alleged accomplice, Muham- 
mad Abbas, are the only 
defendants appearing in court. 
Ten others are fugitives. The , 


to vote to send $ 100 million to 
drug-dealers, gun-runners and 
embezzlers," Representative 
David Bonior, a Democrat 
from Michigan, said. 

The House roundly rejected 
a move to delay a vote until 
autumn. The Administration 
argued forcefully that further 
delay could doom the Contras, 
who seemed to be on the point 
of disintegrating for want of 
funds. 


Mr Robert Michel, the 
House Republican leader, 
said: “Systematic delay is not 
a policy, it's paralysis. Let’s 
have the guts to fight commu- 
nism and nurture democracy 
in our hemisphere now, not 
later.” 

The vote will dismay the 
Coniadora countries of Co- 
lombia, Venezuela. P anama 
and Mexico, which are at- 
tempting to negotiate a region- 
al peace solution. 

Their attempts are currently 
bogged down in detailed bar- 
gaining about tbe weaponry 
each country can hold. Presi- 
dent Reagan and President 
Miguel de la Madrid, of 
Mexico, expect to meet in the 
late summer, in the US. to 
discuss the Central American 
crisis, and, additionally, to 
seek solutions to Mexico's 
chronic debt problem. 


From Alan Tomlinson 
Managua 

President Reagan was “a 
terrorist and a fascist worse 
than Hitler”, President Orte- 
ga of Nicaragua said after the 
approval of renewed US mili- 
tary aid to the anti-Sand in ista 
Contras. 

Addressing a press confer- 
ence here within an hour of 
Wednesday’s vote by the 
House of Representatives to 
reverse an earlier decision 
refusing Contra aid, Sefior 
Ortega was unable to conceal a 
deep personal animosity to- 
wards Mr Reagan during an 
otherwise cool and measured 
response. 

The comparison to Hitler 
was apt, be said, because Mr 
P»wgfl n had failed to evaluate 
the wartime era of fascist 
terror before deriding to act 
the same way as Hitler had 
against a small country de- 
fending its right to setf-deter- 
mination and independence. 

The decision of the US 
legislature had made the reali- 
ty of the war in Nicaragua very 
dear H was a confrontation 
between the US Government 
and the people iff Nicaragua, 
not an internal conflict. 

Sedor Ortega said his Gov- 
ernment would not negotiate 
with the Contras, because they 
were "instruments of terror”. 

“The Contras are not going 
to overthrow the Nicaraguan 
revolution; not with $100 mil- 
lion (£63 million) or with 

$1,000 mill in n." 

The decision of the House 
dealt a grave blow to the 
Coo tad ora peace initiative and 
would serve only to destabilize 
the region further. 

The Reagan Administration 
was dragging tbe US towards 
the “Vietnamization” of Cen- 
tral America, and the direct 



Colombo 

hurries 

devolution 

proposals 


From Vjjitha Yapa 
Colombo 


An angry President Ortega at a Managua press conference deplores the passing by the 
House of Representatives of President Reagan's $100 million Contra aid package. 


intervention of North Ameri- 
can troops in Nicaragua. 

The inclusion in the aid 
package of US military advis- 
ers for the Contras placed 
America “in the same risk as 
the mercenaries themselves". 

In a hint that renewed 
Contra aid might lead to a 
tightening of emergency laws 
imposed in Nicaragua because 
of the war, Senor Ortega said: 
“Whoever tries here to super- 
impose an internal problem 
will be acting as an accomplice 
of the North American 
Government's terrorist policy. 

“We are not going to give 
room in these circumstances 


for the North American Gov- 
ernment to open np an internal 
front of accomplices in sympa- 
thy with it.” 

The Foreign Ministry 
spokesman, Seoor Alejandro 
Bendana, said after the press 
conference: “Militarily, this 
m ean* that our people must be 
ever more prepared eventually 
to confront an American inter- 
vention, because a giant step 
has been taken tonight in that 
direction." 

Noting that a recent US 
opinion poll indicated that 
most Americans were against 
aid to toe Contras, be said: 
“We insist, along with Mr 
Lincoln, that not all people can 


be fooled all toe time, but 
evidently certain Congressmen 
can." 


Earlier on Wednesday, two 
Cubans, who fled to the United 
States during toe Marie! 
boa Clift in 1980 and were 
captured this month by the 
Sandinista Army, told a press 
conference here bow they were 
recruited in Miami to fight 
with toe Contras. 


The}’ said they were offered 
several hundred dollars by a 
Caban American whom they 
identified as Mr Rene Corvo, a 
former CIA agent and veteran 
of toe 1961 Bay of Kgs 
invasion. 


Proposals for devolution 
and elected provincial coun- 
cils in Sri Lanka would be 
presented to Parliament as 
legislation by mid-August, 
President Jayewardene said 
yesterday. 

He said he hoped to have 
elections to the provincial 
council soon afterwards, but 
did not give a time frame. 

He said it was difficult to 
say whether all elections to the 
nine councils would be held 
on the same day. 

Asked whether the Bill for 
devolution would be put to 
the people at a referendum, he 
said the issue did not arise, as 
the proposals were within the 
concept of the unitary state of 
Sri Lanka's constitution. 

Referring to tbe discussion 
he will be having on the 
proposals with recognized po- 
litical parties in mid-July, he 
said any amendments pro- 
posed by them should not 
diminish or reduce the powers 
to be granted to the provincial 
councils. 

He said he would go ahead 
with the proposals even if the 
Tamil separatists, who are 
based in Madras in South 
India, object to them. 

He said the proposals were 
not to solve the problems of 
the Tamil people of Sri 
Lanka's Northern and Eastern 
provinces but were a result of 
education and progress. 

He said that the proposals 
will have to be approved by 
the government parKamenta- 
ry group who will be given a 
free voice to speak at the 
group meeting. 

i Commenting on the de- 
volution proposals on 
Wednesday, President 
jayewardene said that Sri 
Lanka was a multi-racial, 
multi-religious country, not 
mighty-racial, mighty-reli- 
gious as reported yesterday. 


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THE TIMES FRIDAY JUNE 21 1986 


OVERSEAS NEWS 


The Chernobyl aftermath 


Huge plant sited near city 


From Christopher Walker 
Vilnius 

As a gesture of faith in 
Soviet nuclear power, it has 
been announced here that a 
giant reactor of the Chernobyl 
design, but 50 per cent greater 
in capacity, will begin operat- 
ing later this year. 

- It will be at a new nuclear 
plant now under construction 
less than 80 miles from the 
Lithuanian capital, a city of 
500,000 inhabitants. 

The 1,500-raegawatt 
RMBK reactor is nearing 
completion at a vast but little- 




rests near the -town of 
Ignalina, from which it takes 
its name. It will join one of 
similar size which has been 
operating for two yearn, with 
two more due to be built by 
1990, making the Lithuanian 
nil dear complex one of the 
biggest in the world. 

The new reactor will be 
sited only 300 miles from the 
stricken !, 000-megawatt reac- 
tor at Chernobyl now being 
buried in thick layers of 
protective concrete. 

A new town is being built 
next to the plant to bouse 
workers, similar to the now 
deserted town of Pripyat 
which housed those who ran 
ChernobyL 

The derision to press ahead 
with the reactor has caused 
concern among the residents 
of Vilnius. Anxiety in the city 


'LITHUANIA 

r v _ tn»»c& 

-£tgna&n»> 




mo Kiev''-,. 

UK RAlNE^y 


200 mugs 

has been higher than in many 
parts of the Soviet Union 
because the full scale of the 


covered through Polish radio 
and television broadcasts 
which can be easily received. 

“Many people have written 
to the Central Committee of 
the Lithuanian Communist 
Party expressing their worries 
about what is happening at 
Ignalina," one Soviet source 
said. “As a result, the party 
leaders went there and came 
back to reassure us that it is all 
safe." 

Diplomatic sources said 
that the staning-up of such a 
large reactor m the Baltic 
region would also cause new 
concern in those countries 
which were worst hit by the 
fallout from Chernobyl, in- 
cluding Poland which borders 
part of Lithuania. 

The announcement about 
the new reactor was made to a 
small group of journalists on a 


rare official trip to Lithuania, 
one of 1 5 Soviet republics. 

Senior Soviet officials were 
openly dismissive of concern 
expressed in the West. 

Mr Bronius Zaikauskas, 
chief of Lithuania's economic 
planning organization, con- 
firmed that the new reactor 
would be of the graphite- 
moderated type which explod- 
ed at Chernobyl and whose 
design is unique to the Soviet 
nuclear industry. He claimed 
proudly that the plant would 
be the hist of its size. 

“Since Chernobyl, a team 


has visited Ignalina to inspect 
the reactors and to take care of 
environmental protection," 
Mr Zaikauskas said. “A num- 
ber of extra safety measures 
have been introduced and we 
are satisfied with them." 

The official did not spell out 
what the additional precau- 
tions were. But inspection of 
the 30ft-!ong, illuminated 
model of the gigantic plant, 
taking pride of place at the 
exhibition “of Lithuanian eco- 
nomic acheivemenis". re- 
vealed no sign of the type of ' 
containment vessel common 
in the West 

When Ignalina is complet- 
ed. Lithuania will become a 
net exporter of electricity to 
other parts of the Soviet 
Union, as opposed to an 
importer, as at present. Al- 
though both the south and east 


of the republic were directly 
hit by the Chernobyl cloud, 
officials tried hard to mini- 
mize the effects of the April 26 
disaster. 

But one spokesman from 
the Lithuanian Foreign Minis- 
try disclosed that two weeks 
after the explosion in the 
Ukraine, the republic's Minis-, 
ter of Health had made a 
special local television broad- 
cast designed to reassure the 
3.S million citizens. 

The spokesman said that 
the broadcast was necessary 
because of “wild rumours" 


-v u-'-WAaiT’rnr 


Solidarity woos ‘red devils’ 


Poland is gearing up for its 
first Communist Party con- 
gress in five years. White- 
capped traffic policemen are 
checking car boots for leaflets, 
flower tubs have been set up, 
and red flags flutter beside the 
Polish emblem on lamp-posts. 

Even Solidarity, the out- 
lawed union pursued with 
some ferocity in the past few 
weeks, has entered the festive 
mood by producing a remark- 
able appeal to the party 
delegates. 

It comes in a makeshift 
newspaper called the Congress 
Gazette, which is unsigned, 
though dearly written by 
union activists with dose ties 
to the party. Most under- 
ground publications dismiss 
the Communists as red devils, 
alien implants on Polish sofl. 

The Congress Gazette , how- 
ever. strikes a different note, 
one that suggests some com- 
mon ground between sodalist 
dissidents and the more re- 


From Soger Boyes, Warsaw 
form-orientated members of 
the party. 

Poles should stop looking 
for scapegoats, says the docu- 
ment “Yon don't believe 
either that Reagan and the 
extremists are to blame for 
every eviL You, like ourselves, 
are perfectly aware that other 
East bloc countries, despite 
tbeir dependence on the Sovi- 
et Union, are managing much 
better than Poland." 

The distinction between 
those in the right — who 
support everything proposed 
by the Warsaw leadership — 
and those in the wrong, who 
oppose everything that social- 
ism represents, is a false one, 
say the authors. In feet, there 
are opponents of soda! justice, 
people who believe only in the 
sanctity of money, in both 
Solidarity and the Communist 
Party. The aim should should 
be to build a bridge between 
democratic reformers within 
and without the party. 


“You are told all the time 
that Solidarity was and is an 
anti-sodalist force, but have 
we been charged with any- 
thing concrete? Is it anti- 
socialist to want self- 
government? If we oppose 
concentrating too much power 
in the hands of a few appara- 
tchiks, the point is not to 
overthrow but to improve 
sodalism. 

“Let us start exchanging i 
views instead of slander, and 
we will find that what divides 
us consists mainly of militia 
cordons and propaganda 
cliches." 

The appeal seems to be 
made in the hope that some of 
the more than 1,000 delegates 
support greater internal party 
democracy. As the clandestine 
paper makes clear, the leading 
supporters of expanding de- 
mocracy within the party have 
been pushed out of power 
since the last congress in 1 98 L 


reports of the precautions 
being taken there. 

But a 30-year-old Vilnius 
woman confirmed that, be- 
hind the official protestations 
of calm, concern about the 
nuclear issue was the main 
topic of concern in Lithuania, 
one of three Baltic republics. 
• Ukraine switch: Ukrainian 
authorities are bringing more 
nuclear reactors on stream 
and economizing on electric- 
ity use to make up for power 
losses caused by the Chemo- 
‘ byl accident, Tass said (Reuter 
reports). 

One 1,000-megawatt unit 
will come into operation this 
autumn at Rovno in the 
western LHcraine. and another 
will start producing electricity 
at Zaporozhye near the Sea of 
Azov by the end of the year, 
Tass said 

Iran frees 
French 
prisoner 

Paris (AP) — A Tehran- 
based employee of Air France, 
accused by Iran of taming his 
home into a “centre of 
corruption" and held for more 
than a year, has been freed. 
Air France said yesterday. 

Jean-Yves Albertini, direc- 
tor in Tehran for France's 
state-run airline, was arrested 
on April 18 1985 allegedly 
daring a party at his borne 
attended by about 50 Iranians. 

Charged with “inciting 
Mas lints to debauchery" and 
“forbidden sexual practices," 
he was sentenced on July 9 
1985 to a year in prison. 

The French Government 
has been working for his 
release. His case was men- 
tioned to Iranian authorities 
daring a December visit to 
Tehran by a four-man French 
parliamentar y delegation. 



Americans! Pressure 


optimistic 
on Geneva 


still on for 
Shin Bet 


arms talks inquiry 


In the shadow of his leader. Mr Max Kampelman, chief US 
arms negotiator, addressing the press yesterday in Geneva. 


From Alan McGregor 
Geneva 

The fifth round of US- 
Soviet negotiations on nuclear 
and space weapons ended 
yesterday on about the most 
optimistic note the American 
side has permitted itself since 
the talks began almost 16 
months ago. 

“We hope the round has in 
some areas opened the way to 
a serious dialogue which will 
narrow oar differences and 
lead to agreement," Mr Max 
Kampebnan, the chief US 
delegate, said. 

In contrast, his Soviet coun- 
terpart, Mr Viktor Karpov, 
when asked about progress, 
said: “I have not noticed any". 

Mr Kampelman said the US 

R reposal originally made on 
[ovember 1 for a 50 per cent 
cat in strategic nuclear arms 
remained on the table, while 
the Soviet side had pnt for- 
ward a new option envisaging a 
lesser redaction. 

Also on the table was the 
February 24 US proposal on 
elimination of long-range in- 
termediate missiles (such . as 
the SS20). alongside an earlier 
Soviet one. 

“In the defence and space 
area, we have in this round 
received modified Soviet pro- 
posals." 

These had been described 
by President Reagan as indic- 
ative of a serious effort by the 
Russians, possibly leading to a 
turning-point in endeavours to 
make the world a safer place. 

Mr Kampelman said: “I do 
not want to 

minimize . . . differences re- 
maining between us, 
but ... in some areas we may 
now have fresh opportunities 
for serious and constructive 
discussion." 


Shcharansky plea for immigrants 


From 

Israel's best-known recent 
immigrant, Mr Anatoly 
Shcharansky, has expressed 
strong criticism of the way in 
which the country treats its 
immigrants. 

Speaking to a meeting of the 
Jewish Agency Assembly here. 
Mr Shcharansky told of com- 
plaints he had heard from 
other Soviet Jews he has met 
since his release from prison 
in Russia in February. 


Our Own Correspondent, Jerusalem 


They had difficulty buying 
houses and finding jobs, he 
said. Many had told him they 


did not feel needed in the 
country. 

.Although be has decided to 
live in Israel, he urged the 
assembly not to do anything to 
prevent Soviet Jews granted 
exit visas from going to the 
United Stales. 

About 70 per cent of those 
allowed to leave the Soviet 
Union in the past decade have 
crossed the Atlantic and are 
referred to in Israel as 
"dropouts". 

He warned against seeing 
his release as a reason for 


detente, and argued that Israel , 
must not try to establish I 
diplomatic links with the So- 
viet Union at the expense of 
emigration. 

Immigration to Israel is at 
its lowest ebb. and criticism of 
the wav its immigration policy 
is applied has led this week to 
a top-level meeting chaired by 
Mr Shimon Peres, the Prime 
Minister, who is seeking ways 
to reduce the bureaucracy 
faced by migrants and to 
interest young people in visit- 
ing the country for academic 
courses. 


From Ian Murray 
Jerusalem 

Mr Yitzhak Navon, the 
former President of Israel, is 
leading a campaign to open an 
investigation into Shin Bet, 
the counter-intelligence 
agency. 

Such an investigation was 
virtually ruled out this week 
by an amnesty granted to Shin 
Bet leaders by Mr Chaim 
Herzog, the present President. 

Mr Navon. who is now 
Education Minister, voted in 
support of gran ting the amnes- 
ties in the I G-man inner 
Cabinet on Tuesday morning. 

Bul along with most of his 
Labour Party Cabinet col- 
leagues. he is now critical of 
the deal, which made it impos- 
sible to prosecute any Shin Bet 
officers involved in the killing 
two years ago of two Palestin- 
ians who hijacked a bus and of 
then arranging a cover-up. 

Mr Moshe Shahal, the Ener- 
gy Minister, who is also a 
lawyer, says that he will ask 
the full Cabinet meeting on 
Sunday to set up a full-scale 
commission of inquiry. 

He argues that, as the Shin 
Bet chief no longer has any- 
thing to fear, it is essential that 
the nation finds out what the 
role of the politicians was. 

Mr Amnon Rubinstein, the 
Minister of Communications 
and a lawyer, has threatened 
to pull his small left-wing 
Shinui Party out of the gov- 
ernment coalition if no inqui- 
ry is set up. 

But, despite this, there 
seems little or no chance of an 
inquiry, given that the Likud 
members of the Government 
are all firmly against the idea, 
which would expose their 
leader. Mr Yitzhak Shamir, to 
a damaging investigation into 
whether he had given his 
permission for the two men's 
death and the subsequent 
cover-up. 

Mr Shamir said yesterday 
that an investigation “would 
reveal those things which 
should not be revealed". 
There was no country in the 
world, he said, which would 
allow an inquiry into the way 
its security services worked. 

Mr Avraham Shalom, who 
resigned as head ofShin Bet as 
part of the deal, had told the 
inner Cabinet that he acted 
with the full backing of the 
politicians responsible - a 
pointed reference to Mr 
Shamir. Prime Minister at the 
lime of the bus hijacking. 




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OVERSEAS NEWS 



Death sentence 
Australians 
win reprieve 
of two weeks 

From M. G- G- Pillai, Penang 


T he two Australians due to 
be hanged for drug trafficking 
have been reprieved for at 
least a fortnight 

>esierda> the Malaysian 
High C ourt said it would hear 
arguments on July 4 for a stay 
of execution Until then, the 
Government assured the 
courts, the warrant of execu- 
tion would not be issued. 

rhe scene has now shifted 
from the families of Brian 
Chambers and BnUsh-bom 
Kevin Barlow to the law 
courts. 

Although the Pardons 
Board rejected clemency peti- 
tions it did not convey this to 
the two men or their lawyers, 
nor did it advise the trial judge 
to issue the warrant of 
execution. 

It was on this lacuna m the 
procedure that yesterday's 
case was heard. Mr Subash 
Chandran. counsel for Cham- 
bers. asked for an undertaking 
that the warrant would not be 
issued until after the hearing. 

**I do not want my client to 
be playing the heavenly harp 
while I am stumbling at the 
first step,” he told Mr Justice 
Edgar Joseph. 

It was Chambers who initi- 
ated the present proceedings. 

Barlow had taken another 
route, arguing that the Par- 
dons Board should have al- 
lowed his counsel to be . 
present to rebut any adverse 
reports. 


Since both were arrested, 
tried and convicted together, 
if either were to win his action 
the other would automatically 
benefit. 

In Kuala Lumpur both Mrs 
Barbara Barlow and Mrs Sue 
Chambers and their children 
were visiting die condemned 
men when an Australian High 
Commission official amved 
to letT them of the reprieve. 

“The sun has come out 
again.” said Mrs Chambers. **I 
have been holding my breath 
for so long that it is nice to 
have some oxygen.” 

In a rare comment Datuk 
Sen Mahathir Mohamad, the 
Prime Minister, said that the 
harsh penalties for drug traf- 
ficking had been on the books 
for more than a decade and 
even with 36 people hanged as 
drug traffickers, few govern- 
ments, including Australia, 
had complained about them 
until now. 

The official view here is that 
the sooner the hangings take 
place, the more humane it 
would be for the two con- 
demned men. 

• KUALA LUMPUR: The 
two Australians were the first 
Westerners sentenced to hang 
under the law requiring the 
death penalty for anyone 
found guilty of trafficking in 
more than half an ounce (IS 
grammes) of heroin (UPI 
reports). 


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-Unix _ 

PKton _ 

■n. 



g'S?"*-"*- J 


_ and _ „ 

St Bartholomew's s 
Miry and Fllzw H Tohuda, 
a Untv and Pemb. M H Turn,*! 

. awl S3w J M P C Turner 
Durham may and Down. DNJ wins. 

OS and Cath. A A Wood. 
S and Magd 
Qnf 3: M J Bennett. DdwKh and 
Maod. A T Harriman. Radley and 
A c Hastings. Paisley C of 
nd Magd. F IF Hagan. Wales 
Unlv and Edm 

Clraiical Engineering Tripos, 


HS. BJe or WlohL and 

R E Hancock, feleworth JM 
r and Tnn O C H«im. St 
omeirt. Newbury and Trill 
Bolton S and DouwlN 

: 

ujm j?" u. WE** 

Mdkahazn and Mood KA James. 
Fatima c. Trinidad, and Orion. R A 
Janb Elizabeth C~ fiienwey. «id 
Job J JadwMK Asxmote S- London, 
and Emma o E Jensen. SI Peters 
RCS Bournemouth, and Cai. G E 

and Christ's l J Leary rnnsurk g 
and Trin BA Lgesc. ManrtyHer GS 
and Joh S w Lord. Kind's s. 
Worcester and Emma. D c low*. 
Pene S and Cta. R K law*. 
HewcasUe Upon Tyne RGS and Ou; A 
R Lyons Tiverton s and King s. A 
Maoocia. O Watson s C- Edinburgh, 
and Pemb T M Mortimer. St Albans S 
and Job B Moselle. K Edward's 5. 
Birmingham and Trin. M J Newman. 
Wyggaaon and Q Elizabeth I C. 
Leicester and SM. K OWMolu, Harm- 
stead comp s and Newn. M E Ortiz. 
City of London S and Pel: A 
pamsogouios. wtittams c. US. ana 
Emma- m w ParLKh. Britfan S of 
BTUMefc, and CJa; I C Peacock. Forest 

J w Sam. Reigate GSand Emma: T M 
Samoto. St Araano-S and King's: M 
Stevenson. Redtwrne S. Bedford, and 
Ktng'fj.M^F Wade, awrtiorne and Jk 

and Trin, . 

London and Ou 


ge. and TrttCAi 


part 1 

Ed war 


markiiig the centenary oftbe statue. It was the first to amve of a number of big filing ships reirfng part in the festivities. 


t D J Edward, 

. S and Fllzw: p J HoMn. _ 
nuotTs C and Sehv. H $ Kumar. 
_.jtraer Upper S and Joh: J A 
Pturniey Bexhill C and Cal: S M 
Phillips. Aylesbury CS and Rob: R j 
r P Symonds C and Qiur 


Jj A 


Aquino names peace team 


From Keith Dalton 
Manila 

President Aquino yesterday 
named her Government's two 
negotiators for peace talks to 
end the 17 years of communist 
insurgency in the Philip pines. 
But she rejected Communist 
demands for participation in a 
coalition government 
Mrs Aquino said her key 
negotiators were Mr Ramon 
Mltra. tile Agriculture Minis- 
ter, and a former senator, Mr 
Jose Diokno, chairman of the 
Presidential Commission of 
Homan Rights. 

“Negotiations wiD soon take 
place,” Mrs Aquinq said. She 
did not say where or when. 


although prerioasly Mrs 
Aquino said the peace talks 
would be secret. . 

The Communist Party and 
its military wing, the New 
People's Army, earlier named 
Mr Satur Ocampo, a former 
journalist and ranking Com- 
munist Party member, as their 
chief negotiator. 

Meanwhile, Mr George 
Shultz, US Secretary of State, 
has told the six members of 
the Association of South East 
Asian Nations (Asean) that 
their BHwfflingness to open 
markets to US goods could 
undermine President Reagan's 
efforts to counter protectionist 
moves in Congress. 


He made the remarks at the 
start of two days of talks with 
the Asean states — Singapore, 
Thailand, Malaysia, the Phil- 
ippines, Indonesia and Brunei 
—and officials from their main 
mdnstralized trading partners. 
They had complained about 
growing protectionist trends in 
the United States. 

Mr Shtdtz told the Asean 
states and representatives 
from Japan, Australia, New 
Zealand, Canatfo and the Eu- 
ropean Community % criti- 
cism of American protection- 
ism would only weaken Mr 
Reagan's efforts to Hunt the 
impact of tiie anti-free trade 
legislation before Congress. 


Indonesians 
order £6m 
French radar 

Paris (AFP) — The Indone- 
sian civil aviation authority 
has placed an order worth 
about $9 million (£6 million) 
with French Thomson-CSF 
for four radar stations. 

It is in addition to existing 
Thomson-CSF radar arid oth- 
er equipment supplied to In- 
donesia over the past 10 years. 
• JAKARTA: President 
Suharto sat in a French-built 
Mirage 2000 advanced fighter 
as be toured planes at Indo- 
nesia's first air show (Reuter 
reports). France is competing 
with the US to sell fighters to 
Indonesia. 


.£rg5' 

and Chrtsrs.- 
Edwaru vi s. 


Tbbberer 
Ctas 2 
Westminster <31 
Barry. H Wyco 

Norwich, and Coro'S D Cmiroa 
Fanes and Joh: I OOugh. HCartlon 
Corap S. Loughborough, and Tim: p 
T Cootes. Portsmouth CS3 and Magd: J 

A Fartow. Oentote CDOegtate S. 

CS and Job: 1 S Uvender. 
am S and Down: R JMadmL 
and Dowmjv VT Madden. 


- mid Jes: P A Bernal. 


Cambridge, and Peit*; R H Bland. 
Epsom C and Qu: S C 


C Bowaier. H 

and Qu: M V 

Chelmsford, and Chur B I Brown. 
Haberdashers' Ashe's and CUu P W 


P j Brittain, 
neknsfc 


Down: M 
>rd S and 


and Trin: . w S 
's How S. Horsham. 
N Maurice Jones. 
Pemb: J MCVa^ 


and 


Memo. Coventry S and Row. D J C 
Renton. Astrvuie C. Harrogate, and 
Down. 

Down: J N A Hague. Merchant 
TaykXK S. North wood, and Pemb: C 
HE Harding. King's S. Olouoester. 
"" Ponb: A C Herring. E 
S J MHMgy. Watford 


aSt 


British Rail is 
changing trains. 


and 



asr* ^£eSSe s 

Murray. Gordonatoun and Trtn: M R 
PoMt zer. pa ngbonme C and Pemb : B 
N Robertsoci. Sedbergh and CnrbTs: 
M A Skaife. PockUngton and Ctec TM 
watt. Wamngcon Boys HS and Fttzw. 
cans a J F Hueaton. Tiffin am and 
Clrton: J M KWghtev. Rue dxa S. 
Liverpool, and Down: S McAaklc. 
Newjard Hs. Kingston upon Hull, and 
(ft** H: M P Perrett. Qrvcdcn Comp 
S and Fttzw: T P Stroud. Suooo 
Manor Boys HS and Magd. 

The MoHl Chemical Engineering Prize 
b awarded lointly to D J Edwards. 
NonhampUM Bovs S and Fllzw. and 
h”S Kumar. Latymer Upper S and 
Joh: the Dr P M Sultan Memartai 
Prize is awarded lo J McVay. 
Headlands S. Swtndon. and Joh. 

Chemical Engacering Tripos, 
part 2 

Ctess isJC Castilla RubW. Sevcnoaks 
S and Down: p j Coates. Bristol os 
and Down: M A EherUn, NomnghMi 


HS and Pel: J F Had 

Gtrts HS and Sid: O H McKinley. R 
Hale S. Hertford, and Down: T H c 
Saunders. Cirencester s and Trin: p 
W Warren. Coventry S and Fttzw. 
g t MM h C P J Bains'. 
inteMi and Qu: a G Barton . 
Watford^ Boys OS and Pet E F Clark. 
Prior Purw&ove-C and Trin: N C A 
Evans. Bedford Mod S and Qu: A K 
Hartree. Bradfield C and Cal: R M 
Moore. Sherborne and Jes: I Rayner. 
Judd S and Qu: N P Roberts. Q 
Elizabeth* S. Fa V«rrst) am. and Trin: R 
A Smith. Gowenoa Conip s and Cont. 

t! « ^ 
CoWildqe. SoHhidt S and Tr H: N R 
»tvles. Haberdasher*' Ashe's Boys S. 
E3stree. and Jes: R A Edwards, 
Sullivan Upper S. Down, and TrtnTS 
M Grace. H Wycombe RCSaod Pemb: 
PA Green. Kent C and TVK: N J HaiL 
Prices SFXL Fareham. and Trtn: M T 
Jody. H Wycombe RGS and Qu: J s 
Kemp. Cheadk? Huhne S and Rob: S A 


Lujgard. D Hughes Sec S. 

Bridge ifod Down: F M MCKeever. St 


Michael's Sen HS. .. 
R K Moon, Jodd 



PACER 



455 



ELECTRA 


We're introducing new, fester, more 
reliable and more comfortable trains: 

in feet, we’re investing £2 billion over 
the next five years on new rolling stock 
and stations, as well as electrifying lines. 

For example, cross-country routes 
are getting a fester, quieter diesel train 
called the 'Sprinter 1 

ft cuts up to 10 per cent off journey 
times, gives travellers a fester, deaner 
journey, and makes lightly used lines 
more economical to run. 

Then, for the local urban and shorter 
country routes, meet the 'Pacer.' Its ideal 
for rural journeys where, the train is so 
important 

Finally, in Network SouthEast, new 
trains to operate out of Waterloo and 
King's Cross will be making commuting 
easier. 

By contrast Intercity has ordered 
the sleek, high-speed 'Electra,' designed 
to haul new coaches at up to 140 mph 
on the electrified East Coast main line. . 

It'll be speeding passengers from 
London to Leeds in 1989, and onwards 
to Edinburgh in 1991. 

It all adds up to BR's biggest renewal 
programme since the 1950's. 

New trains fora renewed British Rail. 

Arriving soon at lots of platforms all 
over Britain. 


. I Dawn: 

and mc G 

, — ~ — .j C. Msuriduk 

and Emma: M R Palon. Hamilton OS 
and Maod: M N Raffle. Lancaster rgs 
and Pemb; C A Rnnsey. ptyimtoek S 
and Qu: G B Rotrfnson. Bradford Boy* 
GR and- Pet: J P Shoctls. Liverpool C 
and Pet I C Taylor. Pflgriin s. 
Bedford, and Sid: C J Vale. Oakham S 
and Selw 

Ctasa x P J Bradley. Leasowes HS. 
Halesowen, and Kina’s; A D Brinson. 
Whltgffl S. Croydon, and TrR GJ 
Dunn. Mthgate S and Qu. 

All the candtoiea above have been 
awarded the Ccttficace of Advanced 
Study In Chemi cal Engineering. 

The TBC Fax Prtn Is awarded to M 
A. Eberl in. Nottingham hs and Pat: 
ihe North Carolina Stale University 
Prize B awarded to J F Han. 
Manchester Girls HS and SkL 

Computer Sctaaot Tripos 
One-Yew Candidates 

Ml: DairiSmei. Portsmouth CS 
and Qu: P J.McBrten. wirnWedon C 
and -fern M J Parsons, enuraton G6 
and enrtars. 

CUs*, 1 rt h drl sp lr j c Cutal. 
Ampteforth C and. _ Emma: s J 
Marctw-jr. Kingston CS and Orton: P 
C wtlktes. Martwood S. Bristol, and 
R MJamcs. Hereford Cathedral 
CS and_Ctel:_T J Miller. Exeter S and 

'SSufSSV 

t MMi 2t S W Perry. 

Newcastle under Lyme S and Emm* 
M T vere. Ayleobury and Magd: DC 
Glert. Warwick Bo tun SPC flKdr 


.... .. Fllzw; 

C M ZhrdHer. WyggesUm and Q 
Elizabeth I C and Setw; ft L Storm?: 
Newcastle upon Tyne RCS and Cam. 

* W p Anthony. 

Pet: D J DaMeMh. Westminster 
and Down: B P Salmon. Enhekl 
and Beacon S. CTO " 

Rob. 

The foaowtag have been gran ted an 
allowance towards the ordinary BA 


BryuL Cordonstoun S and Christ's: J 
E Burden. N London OoUeqiaU S and 
Tr H: B S K Cheung. Ipswich S and 
King's: A R Cooper. Monmouth S and 
Trin: G A Cone. Malvern and dirtsTs 
A Colton. Alasager Comp S. Stoke, 
and Fttrw: S C Crisp. Ilford Co HS and 
Down: R L Croie. Maidstone S and 
Chur: M P Croohenden- Johnson. K 
Edward vii S. ShefflriO. and CaUv P 
r P Cunningham. KulclUIr C and 
Down: J E Dalton. Theale Green S. 
Reading, and King's: P A Dando. 
Rests S. Wolverhampton, and Clrton: 
T M DaiTtiigtoo. Sutton Manor HS 
~ Chur: j E Davidson. Penglais S. 
..-Btystwyth. and Trin: C M Dev- 
ervux. Loughlon HS SF Centre and 
Newn: A M Dickinson. H Wycombe 
RGS and Joh: C M-A Dickson. NesJon 
Co Como S and Newn: F W DUke. 
Winchester and Cau J A Domtney. 
Aytesbmy HS and Qu: P e Dorey. 
Abtngdon S and OmR J DowungTk 
Edward VO S. King's Lynn, and Std: J 
B A D*Souza. Dulwich C and Joh: G 
Dunham. Latymer Upper S. London, 
and Os: ACL Dyson. Leeds CS and 
Trin: ft J EastatL Ittswich S and 
Christ's: A M EHlott. Worthing SFC 

and Down: J D M Evans. Yt 

Ystalyfera. Swansea, and . 

Ev ans, vale SFC. Wrexham, and i 

M H FeMham. Winchester and Jes: D 
W Ford. Bp Wordsworth S and Jes: P 
D Foy. Whllclirfe _ Mount S. 
Checkheaiqn. and Rob: G P Freeman. 
Merchant T^y tors'. North wood, and 

and'&T S- w^Sen 

atkitsessstisutt 

NewouUe under Lyme, and anon: P 
A P Grtsdate. Formby HS and Trim D 
J Gurr. Theale Green S. Reading, and 
King's: p D Haines. SI Paul's S and 
Ml: M A HalL Pene Gtrts S. 
Cambridge, and Jes: P W Hammenan. 
j Pott S. Derby, and Cal: S T 
Harding. BpHatftetd GtrlsS andCath: 
R A HkkirigboOwm. BureduRi CS and 
Trin: M L MUeL Mosriey S. Cheadte. 
and Down: I Hodklnson. Runshaw C 
and King's: s M Jenkins. Cardigan Co 
Sec S and Trin: S G Jennings. Ctyn s. 
Ew ML and CU: M J Jones. Q Man's 
CS. Walsa ll, and Joh: R D Khforcley! 
Alton SFC and Ski: C R D Lantftam. 
Ennam C and Qu: P J Law. Oodotehm 
6. Salisbury. Westminster S and Rob: 
M S Lee. Putney HS and Tr H: A R 
LighL Worthing SFC and Joh: M A 
Loach. Nottingham HS and Sid: C 
Main. Wymesion and Queen Elizabeth 
■ C. Letceswr. and Cbion: D Meacher. 
W Ellis S. London, and Fltzw: A 
Midba. J Lyon S. Harrow, and Cadi: 
AG Miller. Q EUzabeth Comm C. 
CredHon. and Pemb: N w Mllbr 
SnUUi. Westminster S and Trtn: M P 
Mltchen. long's C S, London, and 
Rob: D N Moore. CukKord RGs and 
Qu: A J Newman. Haberdashers' 
Ante's mwl Trin: tt F NteoL Kings HS. 
Warwick, and Newn: A T Nlnd. 
Bryanston S and Selw: J F Owen. 
Merchant Taylors'. Croshv. and SM: I 
D paezek. Walbotne HS and Fllzw: j 
H Palmer. Brentwood S and Joh: N 
Patrick PutterMge HS. Lulon. Luton 
SFC and New H; C E “ 
Famhorough SFC and Trin: 
Porieous. Quarry Bank __ 
Liverpool, and Cal: N T 
Maidstone CS and Magd: M G J 
Richardson. Tonb ri dge S and Cla: J E 
Roberts. Birkenhead HS and Newn: T 
J RWnaap. Birkenhead S and Pet: A 
J Robson. Leeds Girls HS and Newn: 
K E Rotte. HarrOgate GS and Down: 
M P. Rowtey. Handswortb GS. 
Btrmilmahain. and Catti: j . d 
R usttman. Hornsea S and Mand; J M 
Russell. King Edward's Girts H& 
Birmingham, and Newn: 

T ^ _ Magd: JM 
H S and Christ's p 
hFE 


A B 
& 


Bacon. Christ* C. Finchley. 

1 ft B ScotL Exeter C and M 


G Shentan. 


Corp: E *C D 
and Trin: C J 


P C FernfcHaraptoh^^and Trim R p 


Hart. K Edward vi 
and Rob. 


Chelmsford. 


Cotuputer Science Tripos 
Two-Year Candidates 




and Pet: . 

Birmingham, and Emma: . 

Westfield S. Sheffield, and Christ's: A 
Enaes. Guildford ROS and TT H: J B 
t. R HutehC and Cora: ft S 
— _otL _Cutverhay S- Bath, and 
Emma: I C Mercer. Loughborough CS 
and Jh: A w Moore. Bournemouth S 
and Tr H: J ShgmmL LI m thorough 
HSand Hulme GS. Otdhara. and Rob. 
2 AeMon t: G M Andrews. 
Sand 


Taunton 


Magd: M B Atherton. 


.Ben. 


Merchant Taylors’. Crosby, and Joh: 
E Atkinson, si Swtthun'9. Win- 
tester, ana Cam: E J R r 
. inchester and Joh : T G 

Lancing rad Qu: J R BO 

AUeyrtes. Stone, end Chur: P J Flltetd. 
Mdlvem and Tr H: A J Fraser. 
Waltham ToB Bar S. Grimsby, and 
Emma: A D H aanu i. Judd S, 
Tonbridge, and Jes: H Hs u. Un lv of 
Michigan. IS. and Joh: G B Ban. City 

of London S and _ ----- 

City of Lo 


1 Amans S and Selw; L _ 

Stlcock. nii ley GS and New H: E P 
simonceiu. Harvard Unlv and Klng^; 
p Singh, s Stringer S and Comm C. 

Coventry, r 

Convent G 


i P E Smith. CUoma 

..... .... yd on. and Chur: J 

Swtnton. Windsor S and King's: N M 
Twyman. Westminster s and Rob: j 
Tyrer. Sllverdale S- Sheffleid. and 
Chun A D Warden. Greenhead C. 
Huddersfield, and Chur: P WaUdnson. 
fortceiUHead S_and Trin: T C West 
BtuvOT and Pemb: A E Whalley. Q 
QtotortTTs GS. Blackburn, and Now 
H=. p . T , <2. Wiirtuns. Ruthin S and 
Ma^d^A C_ Wilson. CMtteuham " 


, RE Woolam. Stoke SFC l 

Newn; M H WorralL Nunthorpe GS. 
York, and Chur; » N Yanney. 
MambeRte- GS nd Trtn: J A Young. 
Hertter Co HS. Mamas, and Qu: 

Junior Optimes 

J Wart. HaMWd t5> KS. Wlbnstow. 
gonTyteBos“StosS' N^^^! 

Li°n and ^rt n; C^J*cfa?te.' 
Lowlands SFC. Harrow, and Rob: M 
Eke. Huddersfield New C and Trin; H 
M Evans. Buiy OS and Tnn: T a 
H eap. St PeterS. York- and Trin: J C 
F Holding . MillfleJd and New KVL 
Huynh. H Taunton C. Southantnton. 
and Magd; C H D Johnson. KfortCO 

RCS ee S. tekenham. and Canon: J w 

The followlna. who Is not a candidate 
for honours has been framed an 
allowance towards the ordinary B A 
degree: ft J Bailey. Lewes Prior S and 
Pemb. 

Mathematical Tripos, port 3 
(• denotes award of Certificate 
of Advanced Study in 
Mathematics) 

The following candidates have 
obtained honours: 

A Agboota.* o. Bedford 5 and Pet: D 
D Asptey.a. Aicester GS and Chun a 


London S and 




Mansion. Shrewsbury and Qu: R j 

" Panb: D “ 

_ and Selw. „ 
Grange Co GS 
i paiombo. 


Millar. Belfast HS and 

Mllward. Portsmouth GS and Selw: 

J Montgomery. Camay — - 

and Chur: J B 

oac Trtn: D J Warwick. 
OS and ChrisTs: R J 
. . parse S and Sid: t D Wilson. 

Winchester and J«s. 

2 J jgfm . as c h Austin. 

_ dashers' Asia’s and C?a; j a 

Bum Cohen. HaberoasheriT' Aokos 
and Oaf C J BmUey. Ossen S and Qtn 
R D BoidL TUHu and Joh; M J Burt. 

and CaL ft I OoulL 
~T 1 «hd. Chur: A C 
_ . ^ S»r J Smith's S. Carodford. 

and Emma: M F GTermiade. 

Sd d SSSS; 

DW K MaXToueen^cT Tairam. and 
Rob: o Ma tey. K Edward VI SPC. 
aourbrklge. and Emma- P Rudln. 
Dauntsevs S Smd Pemb: W Tonu. 
DMpua 6. London and PeC D M 
Tedds. NoOinghani HS and Joh: M G 
Thomas. San&wn isle of Wight. 

~ *y Rail 


M.Briaoi.* •. Stockport OS ana Trtn: 
J L b«vwa Avery HJU C. London, 
and Trim SDBeU-vfijJC Edward. VI 
S- Soumamoton. and Emms: D M S 
BU1U>. SI Georae-s Oteta S. Edinburgh . 
and Cla: D J Burns. • m. Si Mary's C. 
Middlesbroug h, a nd Rob: N P ByotL? 

Howard sTGOUngham. and Selw; A 
T Cates, m. OKIon and Trin: D N 
CortYetd. •. Duiwicti and Trin: E J 
MHz.- •.Oxford KS and TOnr ft 
Diwnatey." •. Winchester and Trtn: 
S Downes. ■ m . A Mellows vinage C. 
Peteraorpagh. and Down: S P W 
Dratterto. Cfc Aston S. Markel Rasen. 
ma Won: J F Felnsteln.- •- Perse S 
and Trin j p •.Crest wood 

s. Brte rtaf Hill, and OOi: a h 
F° q-SL * •■ tgaaagw Acad and Trtn: 
w TGowcis’ • Eton and Trin: a ft 
Halford.*. Beauchamp C. Leicester. 
?S5. E SS!??' J J K Edward 

Pgmp Hill s and Trtois C Howard.*. 
Wimbledon C and Christ's: J . R 
Humor.-* MartSu ^ytors" 

Crosby, and Trin: I G Knowles.*. 
RSUrford I H&a Heiens-nndSnfo?; D 

A Union.- *. Manchester OS and 

BWSptsrM 1 s °r&S: 



_ -ambe. Crtrtiia Comp. 

Swansea, and Cal: T C waste. Si 

saapB'&as’ts- a 

upon Avon and Trtn. 

Londonderry C.amd Caih: J Em 




*2 » snaw. sir w Boriaseis 

WM Coro; L R somervme. Eton fexi 


The roouwmg has been granted 

Btimlngham and Down. 

Mathematical Tripos, port 2 
Wranglers 

L J Barter. Latymer uppers. London, 
and. Joh: p W H Barker. vrfSwS^ 
Wrillngborough. and Fltzw: R A 

terGIrta HS and King's: L T Dworidn 
Hj'tertohert' Asfce % anddurCM 
Oiwanss. H Wycombe RCS and tjt^ 


Woreed er. .and Trin: D a Manna. 
Michigan Unlv. US. and Magd; A J 
§! Bartholomew’s. 
f SW, SS!l y ' SS- 0 ^ N Afford 

BTOlk.- •. ttJlwtch OTd Trim m i 

SNKSAKauaa 

Trin: A w Woods.* *. Dulwich ana 

kiOVli 

The lauowtng who art? not candidates 
for honoun. have attained the huo. 

* 

WMSStFasMaa 

linn and Darw: M j Campbell. UMv 

and Chun G F 
psand^oteRl 

BaLUol 






SFC. 

Akala. 


_Abercromw«\^ ^ 

toitanbledon arid Joh: RE 

Bofloy. Portsmouth O S and Cla: O 
Bakewen. Kingston CS and Trin: P J 
Barden. Seutord Head S and Chun A 
P Barham. BrockenhuTSt C and 
Chrisrs. C D Barry. Wesl minster S 
and Tnn. B J C Baxter. Oty of 
Lowitm S and Trin: CE Head. 
Gainsborough HS and Ctrl on. s E 
Belcher. SBarthototncWb. NeWtnnv. 

HHK Road SFC. 


and 

Unlv 


and Joh: 
C. Oxford. 




TR M Ejgon, Coventry :S ck l lg a SS WfwtS.rI!!l5? Zfl b awarded lo a W 

fcwrS atlMSSfi iSsffi 


and Newn: j c vj» *i i Uw^~ 











v- 


;-f r 


to ^4 *5; ^^w* 

:W : V^. 'N> v 




V >^v.V- 


THE TIMES FRIDAY JUNE 27 1986 


Howa doctor 


Thankfully Dr Borel was a much better 
doctor than he was a cocktail mixer. 

His most famous concoction was in fact a 
mixture of pure alcohol, detergent, water and a 
medicine which hi; 
called Cyclosporin. 

A mixture he 

Needless to say this potion made him rather dizzy 
but a blood sample taken some time later made him smile 
for quite another reason. 

For he had proven that Cyclosporin could be 
absorbed by the human body Something which previous 
tests with less interesting cocktails had failed to do. 

This new medicine (now reformulated) has since 
helped save the lives of thousands of people who have 
received organ transplants by dramatically reducing the 
risk of rejection. Together with improved medical and 
surgical techniques it’s made transplant surgery a highly 
successful method of treating life threatening illnesses, 
such as kidney failure. : 

But better control of rejection is only one example of 
the ways pharmaceutical research has helped to m 
transplant surgery a successful reality 

Anaesthetics, antibiotics and medicines for control- 
ling virus and fungal infections also play an important part, 
although new medicines arid sirrgical skills are still not the 

only vital ingredients. 

In Britain last year, well over 1,000 of those 
waiting for a kidney transplant were unable to have 
one. The reason for this was a shortage of donor 
organs. 

If the pharmaceutical industry is going to carry the 
responsibility of research, the least you can do is carry a 
donor card. 


Whitehall, London SWlA 2DY 


The Association of the 
British Pharmaceutical Industry 


■ 7 ?" 



14 


THE TIMES FRIDAY JUNE 27 1986 


SPECTRUM 









'.: !»<* ••: i '*'»y>'s , j" — . ». 


The Somme’s undying echoes 


*Tliroi%]i a nriiied landscape into a wall of mar h in e-gmi fire 1 : left, going over the top on the Somme, and right, a 6in 26cwt howitzer being manifixnwi tfarongh the mod near Pdzfiera 


There will be voices whispering 

down these wajss. 
The while one wanderer is left 

to hear. 

And the voung life and laughter 
of old days. 

Shall make undying echoes 

Geoffrey Win tiro p Young 

O n July l, 1916. 

Kitchener’s volunteer 
army awoke to find a 
light rain falling 
through morning mist. 
Lieutenant Chetwynd-Stapleton, 
on air patrol above the front saw 
“a bank of low cloud” on which 
"one could see ripples...from the 
terrific bombardment that was 
taking place below. It looked like a 
large lake of mist, with thousands 
of stones being thrown into it" 
Lt-Col Crazier, commanding 
the 9th Royal Irish Rifles, thanked 
his cook-seigeani for having ba- 
con rashers, fried bread, jam and 
tea ready for his riflemen. Major 
Jack, a company commander of 
the 2nd Cameronians, wore his 
new silver spurs for the occasion, 
and his servant gave him “a final 
brush”. At the last moment the 
men received a tot of rum, so 
strong that two privates of the 
1 1 th Suffolks passed out. 

Along the front — Gommecourt, 
Beaumont HaraeJ, Thiepval, La 
Boiselle, Fricourt — men were as 
ready as they would ever be. At 
7.30am, to the shrill of platoon 
commanders' whistles, they 
climbed their scaling ladders and 
went over the top to win the war. 
Within the first hour of the Battle 
of the Somme 20,000 were dead, 
another 40,000 wounded. The 
battle dragged on into the winter, 
by which time the British casualty 
list had grown to 419,654, with a 
further 200,000 French. 

The British Expeditionary 
Force of 1916 was one of the most 
extraordinary and patriotic forces 
ever to have taken the field; and 
the Fourth and Third Armies 
assigned to the Somme were 
typical of the kind of units which 
composed it. Of the 143 battalions 

ithe;a 


engaged in the slaughter, 97 were 
Kitchener or New Army; they 
were a volunteer army, the “Pals’ 
Battalions'*. 

When Lord Derby promised 
that he had Kitchener's guarantee 
that those “who joined together 
should serve together”, the young 
men of Liverpool’s business of- 
fices came forward in battalion 
strength. So did miners from 
South Wales, fishermen from 
Grimsby, dockers from Poplar 
and Shoreditch, journalists from 
Bloomsbury. There was the so- 
called Public Schools Battalion, 
the 1st Football Church Lads, the 
1st Public Works — old pals, every 
one. 

They were commanded by offi- 
cers whose accents they could 
hardly understand. Yet in this 
apparently infertile soil a kinship 
took root. Siegfried Sassoon de- 
scribed how trust, even self- 
surrender became visible in the 
feces of his men as he inspected 
their feet at the end of a route 
march. And if they trusted their 
platoon commanders, what confi- 
dence must they have placed in 
their staff officers — who had 
explained in reasonable terms that 
on June 24 would commence an 
artillery bombardment of such 
unparalleled intensity that the 
opposition would be reduced to 
token strength by the day of the 
attack. Furthermore, approxi- 
mately one million shrapnd-filled 
1 8-pounder shells would have 
obliterated sections of barbed wire 
through which the infantry would 
stream unimpeded. 

But there was a mortal error to 
this palpable superiority, the bom- 
bardment may have lowered the 
enemy's morale, dislodging moun- 
tains of muddy soil, destroying 
every standing tree; but it did little 
damage to wind and limb - and, 
except for limited sections, it left 
the barbed wire intact. 

And it was the barbed wire that 
caused the wholesale massacre of 
18-year-old farm boys, insurance 
clerks, welders and fitters — lines 


Kitchener promised that those who joined 
together would serve together. Seventy 
years ago the Pals’ Battalions died together 
on the grim battlefields of the Somme. 
Michael Watkins relives their hour of glory 


Exhaustion: a British soldier in a trench at Thiepval 


of uncomprehending youngsters, 
numbered about toe neck. Inade- 
quately trained, drugged by sleep- 
lessness, many suffering from 
gangrenous trench-foot, dragging 
through a ruined landscape into a 
wall of machine-gun fire. For if it 
was the wire that stopped them, it 
was the German machine-guns 
that applied the final seal of fatuity 
to the British General Staffs 
miscalculations. A trained rifle- 
man could get off 15 shots a 
minute, to the machine-gunner’s 
600. 

The men who went over the top 
were exterminated by a 
convevorbelt technique; those 
who refused were shot in their 


own trenches for cowardice. 
Small wonder Sassoon comment- 
ed in his diary; “I am staring at a 
sunlit picture ofHelL..”. 

On June 30, 2nd Lt John Eogall, 
of the 16th London Regiment, 
wrote home that this was “the day 
before the most important of my 
life— 1 took Communion yesterday 
with dozens of others who are 
going over tomorrow and never 
have I attended a more impressive 
service. I placed my body in God's 
keeping and I am going into battle 
with bis name on my Gpsu.’* 

He died outside Gommecourt. 

Years later, almost to the day, I 
looked for John EngalTs grave. I 
looked in Coramecourt Wood 


New Cemetery, in Bucquoy Com- 
munal Cemetery, in Rossigaol 
Wood Cemetery. And I looked in 
Owl Trench Cemetery, so small 
that I paced it, 15 by 10 paces, 
where there are 24 headstones 
only — all Yorksbireraen. 

• The graveyards, like every one I 
saw, were immaculate, the grass 
mown, edges trimmed, the flowers 
colourful, weedless. The- head- 
stones were so white, they must be 
regularly cleaned. Many graves are 
marked “Unknown, but known to 
God"; and in most cemeteries a 
tablet reminds visitors that “Their 
Name Liveth For Evermore*’. But 
there was nothing to remind me of 
John EngaU. 

Next I searched the Thiepval 
Memorial, commemorating 
73,412 of the Somme dead who 
have no known graves. So many 
thousands, and too young to fell 
asleep for ever — except that that 
euphemism really won't do: they 
didn't fell asleep; they died pain- 
fully, horribly, mid alone. Espe- 
cially alone,' buried in the mod in 
which they fell I never did find 
John EngaU. 

A t Beaumont Hamel the 
battleground has been 
kept as it was in 1916. 
The place has a brood- 
ing quality that cannot 
be entirely in the imagination. If 
you believe, as I do, that hundreds 
of years of prayer impregnate the 
fabric of a church; that generations 
of birth, laughter, tears, leave a 
mark upon an old house — then it 
should not be difficult to sense a 
ghost army on the move. 

To Arthur Leech, at least, the 
dead are far from absolutely dead. 
He is a gardener, caretaker by 
proxy if you wish, of 21,490 souls 
lying within the parish of his love. 
He look me in his Deux Chev aux 
to his bungalow in Beaumont He 
poured me a glass of Pernod, 
adding water so that it douded 
like Dettol in a tooth mug. And he 
txM me about his job. 

It's in the family, this looking 
alter the fallen. His lather, who 


emerged from the Somme un- 
scathed, returned to the field to 
work for the Imperial War Graves 
Commission; to care for his old 
pals. Arthur carried on in his 
footsteps. “They 're my friends. 
They’re still alive to me — the 
battle goes on.” I am just telling 
you what he said. 

There is a comer of a foreign 
field to which I am particularly 
drawn. It is called Blighty Valley 
Cemetery, quite near Beaumont 
Hamel. As I approached it there 
were poppies, bright as the blood 
of the New Testament. Every 
cemetery has a roll of honour and 
as I glanced through Blighty's, 
hoping for something familiar, I 
noticed a street I knew in Nor- 
wich. It is where, in July 1916, Mr 
and Mrs J. Baker lived, at 115 
Beaconsfield Road They would 
have been there when the telegram 
arrived informing them that then- 
son, Private Horace Samuel Baker 
13266, had been tailed on the first 
day of battle. He was 19. The roll 
gave his position as Row V.F.19. 

I found the pave; but as I 
looked down I heard no tunes of i 
glory. Of the Somme I find it 
impossible to glory in the incom- 
petence that turned battle into 
carnage or in the intransigence of | 
the Add commanders who refused 
to call off the attack. But then I am 
reminded of Sassoon's Memoirs of | 
an Infantry Officer ".it was 
unpatriotic to be bitter, and the 
dead were assumed to be glorious- 
ly happy". 

In Blighty Valley I thought also, 
of two promises we, the living, 
made to this fallen army. One was 
that at the going down of the sun 
and In the morning we will 
remember them. The other was I 
that this was the war to end all 
wars. A promise kept; and aj 
promise broken. 

hm—pw)w» lm, isbs 

For King and Country, an exhibition I 
of photographs from the Somme. «| 
showing at the Impressions Gallery. 
17 Cofliergate. York (0904 54724) \ 
until July 11 


Tuned 

into 

society 

At the Inter-Continental Hotd in 
Park Lane today Princess Michael 
tit Kent and a glittering gathering 
of musicians will ait down to 
luncheon with a purpose. They aim 
to raise £60,000 for the Nordoff* 
Robbins Musk Therapy Centre in 
Kentish Tows, north London. In 
the last 10 years this annual meal 
(he Silver Clef hmcb, has rased 
half a million pounds for the 
centre, which treats about 50 
severely handicapped children a 
week. 

Interest in mask therapy has 
grown steadily since 1958 when 
Juliette Alvin founded the British 
Society for Music Therapy, and 
there are uow three full-time, post* 
graduate courses in the subject. 

At a probation service day 
training centre in Camberwell 
south London, teams of probation 
officers and therapists help of- 
fenders to understand their own 
behaviour and break their pattern 
of offences. 

BiU, who had been sentenced to 
spend 12 weeks at the centre (not 
connected with Nordoff-Robbins) 
found it to communicate 

nine activities there. Bat after 
ttenmg to a duet at a music 
therapy session there was a break- 
through when he admitted be felt 
"shut out, isolated**. He was 
encouraged to improvise (on a 
marimba) some musk for someone 
he knew. Bill produced a piece 
about his son before telling a story 
of bow be had stopped the boy 
firora stealfog. 

Emma, who is in her sixties, had 
a stroke which left her semi- 
paralysed. Singing helped her to 
communicate again because the 
stroke had not affected the right 

Paula Youons 


side of her brain, which is 
to control melody. Josie, aged 
would not speak following a 
mental breakdown, bat after sever- 
al months of music therapy she is 
talking once name. 

But the most positive areas for 
mHsic therapy seem to be in 
helping young children, according 
to Leslie Bunt, who holds Britain 1 $ 
first doctorate in the subject. 
“Music therapy spontaneously 
motivates children to vocalize and 
to understand turn-taking”, be 
says. 

“Therapists use many different 
methods. My tiyle is based on 
observing carefully the normal 
interaction processes between, say, 
child and parent, and looking at 
musical parallels to see how music 
fits into these normal patterns.” 
Three years ago Bout established 
the Bristol Musk Therapy Centre. 
He now has a team at five 
therapists in the Avon area who 
help a wide range of people, from 
babies to geriatrics, and he would 
like to see similar centres set up 
through out the country. 

PetaLevi 

Onmna Nftwspcpon Ltd. 1986 


nnMEsi 


SATURDAY 


£12,000 to be won 



Observer 

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Andy Warhol describes his 
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Barber Benjamin Con able Jnr. 
the seventh President of the 
World Bank, is a red, white 
and blue American, wrapped 
in the traditional values of the 
small town American politics 
which shaped his 20-year Con- 
gressional career. The only 
things missing from his curric- 
ulum vitae are pronounce- 
ments on motherhood and a 
stated devotion to apple pie. 

Bui the man who has taken 
on what some observers call 
“mission impossible" also re- 
cites poetry, speaks Japanese, 
collects antiques and bears a 
strong independent streak. 

In 1984 he resigned a safe 
Congressional seat partly be- 
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administration was aloof to- 
wards moderate Republicans. 
And he refused lucrative offers 
to become a lobbyist for 
special interest groups, ex- 
plaining; “I do not want to be 
owned". 

At 63, Conable, a member 
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Boy Scouts of America, a 
decorated war veteran and a 
passionate collector of Ameri- 
can Indian memorabilia, em- 
barks on a new career, taking a 
position described by Robert 
McNamara, one of his illustri- 
ous predecessors, as “the best 
job in the world". 

Immediately after his inau- 
guration next Tuesday, he 
races critical decisions on the 
twin global crises of develop- 
ment and debL 

He must decide how the 
bank can continue with its 
traditional role of poverty 
alleviation, given the present 
cuts in poverty programmes; 
become the intellectual leader 
in sustaining global growth in 
a world frightened by enor- 
mous inbalances which threat- 
en prosperity: and seize the 
lead role from the Internation- 
al Monetary Fund in resolving 
the entrenched debt problem, 
pushing for repayment adjust- 
ments in countries like Mexi- 
co and Argentina. 


The new World Bank 
president is an 
apple-pie American 
with a penchant 
for reciting poetry 



Cooable: boy scouts" honour 


He must also convince rich 
nations to channel more re- 
sources to the poorest nations 
in sub-Sahara Africa and react 
lo growing pressure on Japan 
to recycle its huge trade sur- 
plus by establishing a spatial 
facility to a poor nation. 

Conable takes on all these 
problems and the others fee- 
ing the world's largest devel- 
opment agency - it has a 
7.000-strong bureaucracy dis- 
pensing SI 5 billion a year to 
the Third World — having, 
until now. managed nothing 
larger than a small Congres- 
sional staff. 

Critics say that only a 
distinguished person of broad 
international experience is ca- 
pable of restoring vision and 
purpose to the bank, which 
lost its way during the turbu- 
lent debt-crisis years. 

They fear that Conable will 
either succumb to the same 
sophisticated bureaucracy that 
defeated his predecessor. A.W. 
"Tom" Clausen, or he will 


turn the 149-nation bank into 
an adjunct of the US Treasury, 
run by his friend and former 
political colleague, James Bak- 
er III. 

But friends and associates 
warn against under-estimating 
Conable. The portrait they 
paint is of a man of strong 
convictions and formidable 
intellect. During his 20 years 
in Congress he became a chief 
architect of tax policy and 
mastered complex trade and 
economic issues, earning 
bipartisan respect for prag- | 
malic policies which set him 
apart from the ardent supply- 
siders who supported the Rea- 
gan fiscal deficits as necessary 
evils. Conable. the fiscal con- 
servative, . argues for tax 
increases. 

When he resigned from 
Congress he made no mention 
of discord He left, he said, 
because it was time to move 
on. “I did not want to partici- 
pate in a sense of personal 
decline." It was then that he 
turned down the lobbyists, 
accepting instead a job teach- 
ing political science at the 
University of Rochester in 
New York. 

Throughout his Congressio- 
nal career, when others were 
accepting big money from 
special interests, he refused to 
accept campaign contribu- 
tions of more than $50 for fear 
of compromising his integrity. 

Conable is a multi-faceted 
man and a stickler for accura- 
cy. There is also a quixotic 
side to his personality. 

His poetry recitals range 
from Longfellow to Omar 
Khayyam and he once startled 
a Lions dub audience by 
asking them to choose wheth- 
er they wanted a report on 
Washington or a poety recita- 
tion. The audience voted 
narrowly to hear about Wash- 
ington. Conable. interestingly, 
was disappointed. 

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THE TIMES FRIDAY JUNE 27 1986 

FRIDAY PAGE 


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/ r Is marrying into a ready-made family more 
^trouble than it’s worth? Lee Rodwefl spoke to 
vti struggling — and successful — ■ step-parents 


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*'"- t MorE tharr a mfllioa children at 
„ ..ready live with a step-parent and, 
w ' v^cawdh^g to estimates based on 
^Tcurrent trends, a farther one and a 
*T*half million are growing up with a 
^divorced or separated parent who 
.*^nuy remarry. 

>*-- Step^parcnting' may be common 
_ jenough, but it can still cause many 
probieans. One step-mother, Chris- 
^^ine Atldnson, feds that many of 
£"Ufese could be avoided if potential 
“step-parents were aware of the 
^ difficulties that can arise. 

Her book, Step-parenting, pub- 
X»li£bedearlier this month, offers a 
;.3gtai; deal of practical advice. 
^Thristine, whose own step-sons 
> ^Michael, Christopher and Robin 
£ywere 10. 14. and IS when she 
^married their lather, and who are 
• ir. tfow Snwn up, says: “A step- 
r Ananiage is rather like a skin graft - 
w you are the patch, taken from 
- ^dsewhere. We all know that it takes 
^ a long time for a skin graft to ‘take’ 
btft jt's important to appreciate 
“• that it may take a long time for a 
T^tep-fennly to ‘take', too. 

.*£ ; “Likes skin graft, a step-marriage 
Sft a delicate operation in the early 
postages but all too often we go ahead 
* J Without the consideration that is 
.^demanded.” 

Certainly Nina (not her real 
»?nhine) feds that she and her 

$— — — 

t step-marriage is like a 
£. skin graft — yon are tiie 
*: patch from elsewhere’ 


*;{hu$bandJim should have discussed 
l^the situation more folly before they 
-..married. At the time she was 27, Jim 
’ : was 42, his wife had died a year 
earlier and his three children; two 
.-boys and a girt were aged between 
l^nine and I4:„ . . ... ... 

ai Nina, a : teacher,,. .says: “Jim 
r/ seemed to think that- everything . 
v ' would feH into place, but it’s never 
L^as easy as that. To begin with, l - . 
■; .moved into the house that had been 
'"the family home. The idea was to 
'cause the children as little disnip- 
..lion as possible. Bnt, inevitably, you 
Alive In the past and as a result the 
• : children feel for more at home than 
\r.I do. There doesn’t seem to be a 
; ; room in the house 1 can call my 
- .own, even our bedroom. The chil- 
l 'dren were obviously used to walking 
* ^in when their mother was alive, and 
\ they still do it. 

“Then there is the kind of stigma 
t .that is attached to. being a step- 
i~ mother. Yon are always aware of the 
* . wicked step-mother ’ myth, you 
( -.think people are watching you the 
T way they wouldn’t watch a normal 
r mother. So, certainly at the begin- 
* f ning, I tried too hard. I was scared of 
doing or saying anything in case it . 


upset the children or reminded 
them of their mother, 

“It would have been easier if the 
children had been younger, but they 
were well established in their ways. 
Now we sometimes have dreadful 
rows. I think their own mother 
would have reacted in the same way 
to the same behaviour, but it still 
makes you feel guilty. 

“One of the problems is that you 
seem to have no rights, yet you are 
expected to do so much. 1 had a fiill- 
- time job, but I soon discovered it 
was too much to cope with on top of 
running a large bouse and looking 
after three children. So now 1 only 
work part-time — and! am resentful 
of thaLTbe money I earn goes into 
our joint account, yet I don't have 
any real say on bow that money is 
spent on the children. 

“The biggest mistake we made 
was not to talk about it at the 
beginning. 1 don’t think the children 
have ever talked about how they felt 
about their mother's death or about 
me. 1 have tried. I brought home 
booklets about step-famines and I 
asked Jhn to read it and then to pass 
it on to the children. He flipped 
through it and gave it to one of the 
boys. But no one has mentioned it 
since. It’s like banging your head on 
a brick wall I still feel like an 
outsider. All the time you are trying 
to understand them, hut no one is 
trying to understand you.” 

Even when step-parents are aware 
of some of the problems that may tie 
ahead the reality may come as a 
shock. Laura was 34 when she 
married a divorced man with a 
daughter of 12 and a son of id 
Laura had been a friend of the 
children's mother and had known - 
them since they were six and right 
She says: “Although I had nothing 
at aOiodo with the break-up of their 
parents* . marriage, both children 
were extremely hostile to me after I 
married their father. And meeting 
such implacable hostility, head-on 
was a bit of a shock. . 

“My step-daughter, for instance, 
would crane into the room to talk to 
her father and completely ignore 
me. Yet this was a child I had read 
stories to, taken, out for treats. She 
just found it extremely difficult . 
adjusting to the idea of me as a step- 
mother rather than a friend ofber 
mother. This is still a problem, even 
though her father and l have a 
cordial relationship with her mother 
and the man she is living with.” 

Laura admits that things im- 
proved slightly when her son, now 
three, was bran. “He has forged a 
link between me and my step- 
daughter: she is devoted to him. But 
as she has become less hostile, my 
step-son has become more so. He 
feels ambivalent about my son. He 
likes him, but he sees him as a rival 
too. He’s taken away the special 



place he had, both as the youngest 
and as the only son.” 

As Christine Atkinson would be 
the first to point out, every step- 
parent's case is different. The 
difficulties facing a couple who each 
bring children from a previous 
marriage may be different from 
those where only husband or wife 
has been a parent before. The 
problems which have to be sorted 
out by a step-family living under 
one roof may be worlds apart from 
those experienced by a foamy where 
Step-children visit only 
occasionally. 

Caroline, 36, who is married to a 
man -with two teenage boys who 
visit them one weekend every 
month, says: “In some ways it might 
be easier if we had them all the time. 
This way it’s like starting all over 
again each time. 

“If anything, it has got harder 
-since we had children of our own. 
Now I feel the older boys intrude 
into precious fomily-ttme, however 
hard I try not to think it, I’m for 
more critical of their behaviour 
than I used to be because I don’t 
want the younger children copying 
them: The things I nag them about 
arethe things that most mothers nag 
about — not eating tbrir food, 
watching too much television, not 




hanging their coats up. But the 
difference is that there isn't another 
side to the coin. 

“I nag my own children that way, 
but at the end of the day we'U have a 
kiss and a cuddle and a goodnight 
story. Bnt as a step-mother, there 
isn't any of that. So it's hard to build 
bridges, find ways to make contact. 
I know it's hard for the boys too. 
Perhaps the best we can hope for is 
to try to stay polite to each other.” 

Many step-parents agree that 
things often work out better if the 
step-children are young. When Rob 
Fletcher married Julie, she was 
divorced with a two-year-old daugh- 
ter. Charlotte is now eight and the 
Fletchers have had two more chil- 
dren, Nicholas, four, and Lauren, 
three. Rob says: “There was never 
any chance of ignoring Charlotte’s 
presence — instead of Julie and I just 
going out during the courtship 
period, there was always this other 
body that one had to make arrange- 
ments for. 

“As the relationship with Julie 
developed, she made it quite clear 
that iflmarried herTd be taking on 
a package deal and I accepted that. 
It was easier for me than for many 
men in the same position, because 
Charlotte was so young. I was a bit 
worried about what she would call 


THE PITFALLS AND HOW TO AVOID THEM 


Before becoming a step-parent: 

• Discnss with yow partner the 
basics of bringing up children. Do 
you agree on bedtime, TV, 
responsibilities, schooling, 
punishment? 

• Get to know the children 
before marriage. 

• Practice spending time as a 
“fondly”— perhaps taking a short 
holiday together. 

• Agree on the practicalities— 
where to live, finances, whether the 
wife will work or not, having 
more diildreii, choosing names. 


Once yon are a step-parent: 

• Agree on explidt house-rules. 

• TVy to find time, no matter how 
short, to talk as a family. 

• Remember that dashes are 
common in aD families: theyjnst 
tend to be more intense in step- 
families. 

• The National Step-family 
Association has been set up to help, 
aD members of step-families. 

Yon can reach a focal group 
through the bead office at Room 
3, Ross Street Community Centre, 
Ross Street, Cambridge, CB1 
3BS (0223 356322) 


me, but she solved the problem by 
calling me daddy quite spontane- 
ously. There's this feeling that kids 
can have two daddies, but that I 
can't be her father. 

‘'Actually meeting her father used 
to be a big worry for me. When he 
came to see her I never used to 
know whether I should be around or 
noL Eventually 1 did face him and it 
was all right, but the whole thing 
definitely made me fed anxious. I 
also had to come to terms with the 
fact that there was maintenance 
coming in. I feh guilty about that. I 
suppose part of me felt that if we 
didn't have to have his money, we 
wouldn’t have to see him either. But 
of course it wasn't tike that. 

“Another thing that brought the 
situation home to me was when we 
had our own child. 1 realized that I 
felt differently about him. I had to 
admit that to Julie — bin she said 
she had expected it, and that was a 
great relief. 

“I do love Charlotte, but in a 
different way. It's just not so intense 
at certain levels. I think she loves 
me. When she's niggled she some- 
times teDs me I'm not her real 
daddy, but 1 like to kid myself that 


Tt Is a real joy when yon 
see a little of yourself 
in the children’ 


she must feel really secure with me 
to be able to say that to my face. 

“If you are going to marry 
someone who already has children, 
you have to talk about it. You can't 
kid yourself that it mil be the same 
as for people who haven’t got 
children. It's not even the same as 
adopting a child; that’s a derision 
you make together and you leant 
about that child together. But when 
you become a step-parent there is an 
existing relationship between a 
child and an adult and you are 
intruding.” 

So is it all worthwhile? Christine 
Atkinson says: “My answer to this 
question would be an emphatic yes, 
though if I were to be caught on a 
bad day I might hesitate.” 

Christine believes that the joys 
and pleasures of step-parenthood, 
however elusive, are often deeper 
than the joys of “normal” parent- 
hood, for the very reason that step- 
parents often have to put so much i 
more effort into the relationship. 1 

“It is a real joy when you, as the 
step-parent, see a little of yourself in 
the children. For months you might 
be frustrated by the foci that these 
children are just the opposite of 
what you would like than to be. 
Then suddenly you might catch 
them quoting one of your favourite 
opinions, or defending certain stan- 
dards which you have tried to pass 
on to them, but never believed they 
would adopt 

“This pleasure is for greater, I 
feel than that which a natural 
parent feels, for you as a step-parent 
have worked so hard, often against 
the odds, at bringing up the fomily 
under no easy circumstances, and 
the rewards, when they come, mean 
a lot more.” 

She talks of the milestones — 
whether it is a small child climbing 
voluntarily on to your knee, a letter 
addressed to you and not the “real 
parent”, or the first time you feel 
fiercely protective about your step- 
child. “Sometimes you will look at 
your step-child laughing or telling a 
story and feel a great surge of love 
for no apparent reason, which sets 
you wondering if it’s really happen- 
ing at last” 

©TbnM Nmupapifa Ltd, 1988 

Step-parenting is published by 
Thonons (£4.99). 


Customer’s 
last stand 


6 It started innocently 
enough; like so much, R 
was my wife who began 
it all She examined the 
dishes critically as she 
unloaded the dishwasher. 
They were quite disgusting; 
cowed in rust marks from the 
machine's baskets which w ere 
corroding badly under their 
peeling plastic. 

I immediately sanctioned 
their replacement, sug ge sting 
a telephone call to the service 
department of the machine's 
■ well-known manufacturer the 
next day. 

Next evening, I inquired 
how the basket quest had 
gone. In her most otssal tone, 
’my wife invited to to grass 
,what price she had been 
qeoted for their replacement. 
“Ten pounds?” “Try 

a gain " 

“Twenty pounds?” “Try 
again.” 

“I give up." “£83J6p, in- 
ciuding VAT and carriage.” 

The girl in the service 
department shared my disbe- 
lief and had insisted on re- 
checking the price. When she 
called back, she could do little 
else but confirm the bad news. 

I think it was Lord Beaver- 
brook who was responsible for 
first printing the little red 
crusader on the front page of 
the Daily Express. I forget 
exactly what crasade R was 
meant to symbolize, bat at this 
point I nailed my crusading 
self to my personal masthead. 

“Leave R to me”. I said. “I 
absolutely guarantee that I 
will obtain those baskets for a 
fraction of the quoted price.” 

The girl in foe service 
department seemed as good a 
place as anywhere to start She 
exuded sympathy as before, 
but R was dear that her 
authority did not extent to 
departing from the official 
pricelist 

The best technique in such 
cases is to work up through foe 
hierarchy by constantly re- 
peating: “If yon can’t take the 
derision, who can?” This pro- 
duced, commendahly quickly, 
the Service Manager. 

Equally quickly, R was dear 
that the Smice Manager did 
not appreciate that there was 
inytiag odd or unreasonable 
— let atone commercially dam- 
aging to the manufacturer — in 
charging approximately one- 
foird of the original cost of the 
machine for two miserable ■ 
baskets. 

I tried every kind of argu- 
ment All were to no avaiL Yes, 
that was foe price. No, foe 
price was not unreasonable. 
Yes, as far as be was con- 
cerned I could write to Which?' 
Esther Rantzen, and every 
consumer protection organiza- 
tion this side of the North 
Foie. 

Yes, I could take foe prob- 
lem to the Managing Director, 
but there was absolutely no 
question of the Managing 
Director taking a line other 
than one completely coincident 
with his own. 

The Managing Director 
turned out to be no mere 
Managing Director, bat the 
Chairman and Chief Execu- 
tive. K pondered on the best 
method of attack. A detailed 


FIRST 

PERSON 


Peter Quentin 

letter bad often proved effec- 
tive in the past. But this meant 
a tedious relating of events so 
for. I derided oo a direct 
approach. 

The success of a direct 
approach depends on being 
able to corner the attention of 
the target on the telephone for 
sufficient time to relate the 
substance of one’s complaint. 
However, to get at the target, 
one must first break through 
the secretary barrier. 

Bitter experience has taught 
me that one should never leave 
a message but be prepared to 
ring back repeatedly in order 
to trap one's antagonist at his 
desk. Equally, only as a last 
resort should one show one's 
band in detail to his secretary. 

The Chairman and Chief 
Executive was no exception to 
the general rale. He was on foe 
telephone; he was in meetings, 
the frequency and length of 
which must have had no 
parallels outside foe Geneva 
disarmament negotiations; he 
was away for several days/a 
week/several weeks on an 
overseas tripJ^nally, I could 
bear it do longer. I broke all 
my rales, recounted the story 
to his secretary and left R at 
that. 

A tong period of silence 
ensued. I began to fear that 
this particular campaign was 
to be my Waterloo. But one 
afternoon foe telephone rang 
in my office. (To avoid accusa- 
tions of hypocrisy, I ought to 
emphasize that my telephone 
calls crane straight through to 
my desk.) 

The Chairman was on foe 
line. It appeared, he said, that 
we had a problem. Did he 
mean, I cautiously answered, 
that be had a problem or I had 
a problem? He was succinct 
and polite. The problem was 
bis. Clearly, be admitted, the 
price quoted for the baskets 
was outrageous. 

My spirits rose; I could see 
the dust of the US Cavalry on 
the horizon. It remained only 
to accept the surrender of foe 
Indian chief. 

What did I think a reason- 
able price would be? A burst of 
bazaar bargaining followed. 
We settled on £30. My thanks 
and his apologies were 
profuse. 

As I walked in foe door that 
evening, I could hardly contain 
myself sufficiently to tell the 
story with the correct degree of 
casnalness over the first 
course of dinner. Generous 
applause followed from my 
audience of one. 

The box containing the bas- 
kets was there a few nights 
later. As I unpacked them 
proudly and installed them in 
foe machine, I knew just how 
Wellington felt It had 
been a classic cam- 
-paign. But h had also 
been a damned dose- M 
run thing. ^ 


Playgroup danger to the pregnant 


P 

M 

□ 


Because play 
groups and 
good nursery 
schools are 
held to be es- 
sential to ' a 
child’s educa- 
tion, parents have been happy 
to tolerate the germs their 
children bring bade from 
them. But a report in the New 

haf 1 demonstrated^ that " the 
pool of infection created when 
children, -of- this age group 
congregate; contains organ- 
isms more sinister- than the 
acceptable coughs and colds. 

A-vinu dose to the herpes 
group, the cytomegalovirus, is 
causing particular interest as - 
its spread from playgroup 
children to tikar mothers has 
been shown to.be an impor- 
tant cause of adult infection. 
This is of concern as CMV 
infection in the pregnant, 
woman is one of the pauses of' 
congenital infection in the 
foetus, leading to hearing loss*' 
cerebral palsy or mental retar- 
dation in children. It is esti- 
mated that CMV causes 400- 
cases of brain damage -in 
England and Wales each year. 

Dr Robot Pass from foe 
Alabama School of Medicine, 
who carried rait the investiga- 
tion, points out that it is 
common for a second preg- 
nancy to occur while the first 
child is of pre-school age. In 
the series or cases be -studied 
he found that of 67 mothers 
who sent their children to a 
playgroup, J4 became infected 
wifo CMV. Of the 31 mothers 
who didn’t, none caught the 


Beating the heat 

■ mm m The Prince 
■■ SM® Ef 0 f Wales, play- ' 

* j 9 P ing polo.- and.. ■ 
i A fl ■ boxer Barry ‘ 

* mjffSJ McGuigan,' 

* mi ine 

1 W. . world JeatheP'’ 

J wcighl championship,^ both 


ter exercising in the unaccus- 
tomed heat of the southern 
• states of America. The English 
Joptbauteam, despite the prob- 
lems of low blood oxygen 
caused by the altitude in 
Mexico, fared better, suffering 
only from a nasty attack of 
Maradona. 

Dr Dene Eggleston, an ex- 
. pert in sports medicine at the 
London Hospital said that at 
; least three weeks is needed to 
adjust to a marked change in 
dimate, or altitude, before a 
games player can compete on 
equal terms with local people. 

. The newcomers’ blood adapts 
quickly , so that within a . week 
. to 10 days kisaxygen-carrying 
capacity is comparable to that 
of the residents, but it takes 
weeks Jbr the enzyme systems 
of the muscles to aehieve.fidl 
efficiency. The sweating mech- 
anism which controls hydra- 
tion also takes at least three ■ 
weeks to become accustomed . 
to a hot dimate. During this 
time the body's electrolyte 
levels (sodium, potassium, bi- 
carbonate and so on) can 
■ easily become unbalanced. 

However prolonged and ar- 
duous the training, some tem- 
peratures are so high and 
some exercise so -violent; that 
dehydration is inevitable. Few. 
boxers would remain . un- 
scathed after fighting 15 
rounds when the daytime tem-. 
perature is over 115°C. 

‘ Dehydration and subse- 
quent heat exhaustion can be 
countered by maintaining cir- 
culation wtth frequent drinks 
. of slightly salty water. Televi- 
sion viewers will have seen the 
water bags brought on by' 
substitutes during the. World 
Cup. . Salt ; tablets have . the. 
disadvantage that they cause 
gastric - .dehydration ■ and 
nausea..- 

Medical research suggests 
that, at .halftime, /other than . . 
- collapsing prostrate . on . the. 
ground asjhey.Jisten to their/ 
lidihe^p^rssh^dcordin-^ 


MEDICAL 

BRIEFING 


ue to exercise at about 60 per 
cent of their peak activity. The 
West German team ; for exam- 
ple. He -on their backs and do 
leg exercises: one reason, per- 
haps, . why they have reached 
the final. This also stimulates 
the circulation, particularly in 
the. quadriceps thigh muscles, 
thereby speeding the removal 
of the lactic acid, phosphates 
and potassium which collect 
after violent exercise and cause 
pain and stiffness. 

Not so dear 

Herds of domesticated red 
deer grazing in the English 
countryside may make engag- 
ing press pictures, but they 
conkl also provide a reservoir 
for the deer tick, Ixodes 
dammini, which transmits foe 
spirochaete Borrelia 
burgdorferi, the organism 
which causes Lymme disease 
in susceptible people. This 
disease, which can lead to 
arthritis, meningitis and heart 
disease, is a newcomer to 
Britain, bat has been spread- 
ing rapidly in those heavily 
wooded districts of America 
which have a high deer 
population. 

The disease was first diag- 
nosed in Lymme, Connecticut, 
in 1975. Since then it has 


• w > i 

i • - V 






IfeeeR mhe worae than its hark 


spread rapidly along foe 
north-eastern American coast- 
fine from Massachusetts to 
Mary land. It is now also wen 
established in Wisconsin and 
on the West Coast in Califor- 
nia and Oregon. Cases have 
been recorded in all age groups 
and at aD times of the year, but 
foe disease seems to have a 
predilection for children and 
young adults and usually 
strikes in foe antnmn. Treat- 
ment of foe acute stage is with 
penirilfin in - tetracydfoes. 

The British Medical Jour- 
nal recently reported the sec- 
ond. British case, a boy aged 
nine from the New Forest area 
who had been bitten hy a tick 
while visiting a country pork. 
He was treated in 
Southampton. 

- Lymme disease starts as a 
red, often raised, spot near foe 
site of foe original tick bite; 
the marie slowly increases In 
size and can sometimes reach 
a diameter of 50cm, die 
Hampshire boy’s was 30cm 
across. In half the cases other 
spots appear elsewhere. 

Fortunately foe nature of 
the countryside makes a prob- 
lem on foe American scale 
unlikely, but British communi- 
ty physicians are watching 
with interest. 

Pfll precaution 

Regular readers of Medical 
Briefing will have been aware 
- for some years of the possibili- 
ty of an association between 
Reye’s syndrome and aspirin 

so .that they will be used to 

treating their children’s minor 
ills with paracetamol 
(Panadol), 

Child health experts, while 
• agreeing that this change is an 
essential precaution, have em- 
phasized recently that al- 
though paracetamol in the 
correct dose is an exceptional- 
. ly safe drug, overdosage could 
cause severe liver damage. 

; Children, weight for weight, 
tolerate' paracetamol better 


than adults. Professor Peter 
Sever of St Mary’s Hospital is 
quoted in Pulse as suggesting 
that a child has to take about 
. 10 times the recommended 
dosage to suffer liver damage; 
this is unlikely to follow 
careless administration, but 
could easily happen if the drug 
was left where a toddler might 
find it. Paracetamol even 
more than aspirin, needs to be 
kept out of the reach of 
children. 

Sunshine risk 

Dermatologists 
jtei worry so much 

about excessive 
i/V sunlight that 

one well known 
consultant 
brought his 
children up behind drawn 
curtains. Although his col- 
leagues thought his real exces- 
sive, no doctor would disagree 
that the present epidemic of 
malignant me/anomata and 
other skin cancers is the result 
qf office workers burning them- 
selves during their annual 
holidays. Burning, and hence 
the risk of skin cancer, is a 
greater risk in fair or red 
headed people with a sensitive 
skin which initially reddens 
rather than browns. They 
should take particular care to 
tan slowly and always use a 
good sun screening lotion. 

A report in the British 
Medical Journal by a team of 
doctors from Edinburgh and 
Glasgow has shown that an- 
other group can now be added 
to those who hare to take 
particular care. An extensive 
study has revealed that people 
with a large number of benign 
moles are very much more 
likely 10 develop malignant 
melanoma than their spotless 
compatriots. They should now 
join anyone with a Nordic 
complexion under the 
sunshades. . 

Dr Thomas Stnttaford 


m 


y . A 

lllBgg 




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STARTS TOMORROW H 







THE TIMES FRIDAY JUNE 27 1986 



THE TIMES 
DIARY 

A watch on 
the box 

Conservative supporters reduced 
zo nightly apoplexy by pro-left bias 
on Television can take heart: the 
Tories are to set up their own 
broadcasting monitoring unit A 
Central Office apparatchik prom- 
ises that the unit will gather a 
whole range of evidence so that 
broadcasters can be taken to task 
at the highest level I gather that 
the move comes as a response to a 
constant flow of angry fetters to 
Smith Square, covering the whole 
gamut of broadcasting. So. is the 
BBC - that well-known hotbed of 
lefties — quaking in its shoes? 
Don't you believe it. “Good luck 
to therar comes the fearless 
response from a senior adviser to 
the director-general. “We’re never 
partisan. All politicians see bias 
when they're under electoral 
threat.” 

Blacked out 

So aftaid have examiners become 
of offending ethnic minorities that 
the word “Christmas'' has been 
expunged from a specimen ques- 
tion paper. The Midlands Exam- 
ining Group has produced a draft 
science paper and syllabus for the 
new General Certificate of Sec- 
ondary Education (GCSE), con- 
taining a question about electrical 
circuits, and giving the example of 
“Christmas lights”. This did not 
get past the sharp eye of the 
Secondary Examinations Council 
in London, the approving body. 
Out went the reference to 
Christianity, to be replaced by , 
“festival". The reason given was 
that “greater sensitivity must be ; 
shown with regard to the cultural 
diversity of society". When I was 
young we used to call the decora- 
tions “fairy lights", but 1 suppose ! 
that is also out of order these days. 

Deflected 

While at the RAF Club the other 
evening whom should I spot 
halfway up the stairs and looking 
uncharacteristically lost but Rob- 
ert Maxwell. He was, of course, 
bellowing — this time at the hall 
porter “Someone should have put 
a notice up to say where the party 
isT He had got his services crossed 
and misiaken the premises for the 
In an Out a few doors down. 

Overwhelmed 

For perhaps the first time in living 
memory, the nosegay traditionally 
presented to ladies on royal visits 
was put to its originally intended 
use yesterday. Touring the mill 
operated by one of the world’s 
oldest linen companies, the 250- 
year-old family-owned William 
Clark and Co, at Upper lands, Co 
Londonderry, Sarah Ferguson 
apparently found the smell 
emanating from the dyeing shop 
“quite disgusting" — and 


promptly buried her race in her 
bouquet of carnations. A few 
minutes later, in an oJeiactorily 
more acceptable zone, the posy 
had to be removed; it was giving 
Prince Andrew hay fever. 


BARRY FANTONI 



‘You wake up wanting to see 
yonr medical records? Don't worry, 
there's a lot of h about' 

Laser edge 

I detea a new dimension in art 
education. The Royal College of 
Art. under the thrusting leadership 
of Jocelyn Stevens, is now explor- 
ing the use of holograms, three- 
dimensional laser images. It is 
running a pioneering MA in 
holography and is producing some 
of Europe's first graduates in the 
subject, using its three lavishly 
equipped laser labs. Stevens tells 
me be sees it as part of the RCA's 
“constant expansion into new 
areas of higher learning”. 

Pumped up 

Readers are usually so helpful in 
my researches on cricket but this 
time you have dissappointed me. 
Two days ago I cited the figure of 
62 as being the record number of 
runs scored in a single over, 
thwacked by one H. Morely of 
Australia on an eight-ball over 
supplemented by four no-balls. 
Your silence has reduced me to 
the endorsement of apocrypha: 
my sole correspondent tells me 
that there was once a village 
fixture played on a ground in 
whose outfield stood a pump. 
Being one of the home side's more 
dependable fielders, the thing 
caught a firmly struck bail in its 
spout — so firmly that ft took 
several minutes for the two to be 
sundered, in which time the 
batting team scampered 160 runs. 
The runs were declared legitimate 
since the ball was visible all the 
while, and therefore not tech- 
nically lost. Beat that 

PHS 


Privatization has become one of 
the world's growth industries. 
Governments everywhere — in 
the advanced economies, the 
Third World, even communist — 
are divesting themselves of state 
holdings and activities. Japan, 
having privatized its tele- 
communications system and 
launched its stare tobacco and salt 
monopoly toward the private 
sector, has now embarked on the 
sale of Japan National Railways, 
which is 10 be broken up into six 
passenger and one freight com- 
pany. This sale will dwarf that of 
Telecom. Britain's biggest to date. 

Canada decided to sell its loss- 
making airframe makers. Can- 
adair and de Haviland. and 
Teleglobe Canada. Its privatiza- 
tion of the Canadian Arsenal, an 
arms manufacturing company, 
does not seem to have en- 
countered the problems which led 
George Younger to delay the sale 
of the Royal Ordnance factories. 

Britain could well be left behind 
by France, loo. where a cohabiting 
Socialist president and right-wing 
premier are selling the TF 1 public 
television station with an ease 
which puts Peacock to shame. 

World Bank consultant Elliot 
Berg has identified 30 cases of 
divestiture of state-owned enter- 
prises in Africa, not counting the 
privatization of SasoL the oil- 
from-coa! refineries in South Af- 
rica. He lists 165 examples from 
South America and 250 in Asia. 

The cases are as diverse as the 
systems of government Bangla- 
desh has sold most of its jute, 
textile, chemical and engineering 
industries. Pakistan has privatized 
rural rice, cotton and flour mills. 

In South American, democratic 
Mexico has privatized 73 of its 
467 nationalized companies. 
Authoritarian Chile has sold 18 
banks and 13 corporations, and 
turned its state pension system 


After John Moore’s pledge to sell off 
ali state nndertgkjiigs, Madsen Fine shows 
how privatization has swept the world 

British made 
—and exported 
everywhere 


into a private sector operation. In 
the Pacific Basin. Korean Airlines 
and Singapore Airlines have al- 
ready been floated, with the 
Malaysian Airlines System hard 
behind. All three countries are 
part way through massive pro- 
grammes of divestiture. 

Fidel Castro can hardly be 
accused of sharing Mrs Thatcher’s 
motives. None the less, the sale of 
state houses to their tenants in 
Cuba, on the Thatcher model, has 
been a huge success. The same is 
true in China, with 6.000 flats in 
Shanghai alone passing last year 
into the private ownership of their 
former tenants. 

Private food production in 
Hungary now accounts for half the 
total and people are being invited 
to bid for the right to run state 
enterprises for profit Meanwhile, 
across the Atlantic, the state and 
local governments of America are 
turning everything from bridges to 
prisons over to private, profit- 
making businesses. 

The pattern is a bewildering 
one. A capitalist government in 
West Germany privatizes many of 


the state banks and tourist offices. 
A communist government in 
China manages to get privately- 
owned restaurants and shops 
starting up at four times the rate of 
their state counterparts. 

A military government in Chile 
sells shares in ChUectra, the state 
power company, and in the insur- 
ance companies which handle 
what was once state welfare. 
Meanwhile a democratic govern- 
ment in Brazil sells shares in 
PKrobras, the state oil company. 

A country such as Sri Lanka, 
torn by civil strife, deregulates and 
privatizes its bus system, sells loss- 
making textile mills, and puts the 
telecommunications system up for 
sale. 

Nominally socialist Spain sells 
SEAT, the national car manufac- 
turer. while at the other end of 
Europe the rather more right-wing 
government of Turkey sells the 
Kevan hydro-electric dam and 
even the Bosporus Bridge. 

Not only do governments and 
economies vary, so do the meth- 
ods and the motives. It might be 
by public floatation, as with 


Singapore Airlines. It might be by 
private sale, as with Mexico's 
hotels It might be a manageraem- 
worfcer buyout, as with Britain’s 
National Freight Corporation, or 
the use of private contractors, as 
with American prisons. 

Some governments, like ours, 
do it inspired by a belief in free 
enterprise: These are compar- 
atively rare. Many, like Bangla- 
desh. do it because it works better, 
turning state loss makers into 
private, profitable and tax-paying 
enterprises. Some, like Sri Lanka, 
do it because the burden of the 
public sector is no longer tol- 
erable. Privatization reduces tire 
load on business and creates 
viable jobs where only subsidized 
ones existed. 

Some, like Mexico and Brazil, 
do it to reduce national deficits. 
Privatized companies produce 
state revenues instead of consum- 
ing them. They enable state spend- 
ing to be cut Some, like Japan, do 
it because it makes for greater 
efficiency and because com- 
petition means better services and 
lower prices. 

China and France do ft to turn 
their countries around. South 
Korea and Singapore do ft to keep 
them on course. There is so 
pattern and nowhere, except in 
Britain, » there yet a systematic 
policy. But the armulative effect is 
overwhelming. After more than 
100 years which saw the slow 
ascent to state activity and eco- 
nomic collectivism, the world is 
rushing back down that same 
slope at a dizzy, accelerating pace. 

The world is turning private: 
and the policy machinery which is 
turning ft that way was made in 
Britain, just as we made so much 
of the physiciai machinery of the 
first industrial revolution. 

© TfciNM NawapifNm, ires. 

The author is president of the 
Adam Smith Institute. 


David Watt 


Gan Britain stir 


Simon Lee contrasts the US Supreme Court with the British system 

Where justice is sovereign 


The one feet trumpeted about 
President Reagan's nominees to 
the US Supreme Court — William 
Rehnquist to succeed Warren 
Burger as Chief Justice, and 
Antonin Scalia to be an associate 
justice — is that they are both 
politically conservative in the 
Reagan mould. They are also 
widely acknowledged to be first- 
class jurists. But is it right for 
Supreme Court judges to reflect 
arty political ideology, whether the 
president's or even the opinions of 
a majority in the country? 

This question is vitally im- 
portant because the Supreme 
Court acts as the authoritative 
interpreter of the US constitution. 
The court, of nine judges, assumed 
this power in an historic case in 
1 803 and since then has resolved a 
number of crucial political issues. 
Why do Americans allow this 
unelected branch of government 
to trump the elected state legisla- 
tures, Congress and president? 

The American answer is that 
democracy is not just about 
elections and majority rule. It is 
also about respect for the rights of 
minorities. While the elected 
branches of government generally 
reflect the wishes of the majority, 
they are for that very reason not to 
be trusted with protecting minor- 
ity interests. Unelected judges 
with life tenure have no need to 
kowtow to a prejudiced electorate. 
They can take a stand on constitu- 
tional principle, as in the famous 
1 954 derision in Brown v Board of 
Education of Topeka, which called 
for racial desegregation in Ameri- 
can schools. The court tried to 
lead the country towards racial 
equality at a lime when white 
politicians making the same at- 
tempt would have courted elec- 
toral suicide. 

Indeed, Americans are puzzled 
by the British system which allows 
a transient majority (or even 
minority! government to abrogate 
rights through parliamentary sov- 
ereignty. Americans, and an 
increasing number of British poli- 
ticians and lawyers, think we 
might have something to learn 
from the US experience of the 
Supreme Court acting as referee of 
the constitution, using a Bill of 
Rights as its ratebook. 

Interest in the RehnquisljScalia 
nominations is running high since 
the Supreme Court is likely to 
consider a number of issues close 
to President Reagan’s heart in the 
next couple of years. Abortion, 
school prayers, affirmative action 
programmes for blacks and 
women, the death penalty, the use 
of illegally seized evidence in 
criminal cases, and federal/state 
relationships are all on the judicial 
agenda. If Reagan is opposed on 
any of these issues in Congress, he 
can influence judicial derisions on 

Warsaw 

Two months after the Chernobyl 
disaster. Soviet bloc countries are 
reaffirming their feitb in nuclear 
power and are planning a new 
generation of 1,000 megawatt 
reactors. But a debate has at last 
emerged in the form or small 
demonstrations, mass petitions, 
and scientists expressing unease. 

At a demonstration in Cracow 
earlier this month a young Pole 
held a placard on which was 
scrawled. “Chernobyl is every- 
where — except in the East”. 
Many of the demonstrations since 
Chernobyl — mothers walking 
with pushchairs through the 
streets of Wroclaw in Polish 
Silesia. Czech students who have 
been printing their own protest 
postcards — are not so much anti- 
nuclear as ami-censorship. The 
people want information about 
Chernobyl and a debate on every 
aspen of nuclear energy. 

There are, of course, committed 
anti-nuclear groups, for example 
East German church groups in- 
fluenced by the success of the 
Greens in West Germany. An East 
Berlin parish wrote to the govern- 
ment recently saying it believed 
the risks involved in nuclear 
power were too great and demand- 




-^ ** *.• , : *. . 


1 . ’ '}•,* > . 


Chief Justice Burger appointed 
by Nixon to reverse the 

liberalism of his predecessor 

them through his powers of 
nomination to the federal courts. 
That influence will extend long 
after the Reagan presidency ends. 
The 50-year-old Scalia can expect 
25 or 30 years’ active service on 
the Supreme Court. 

The new appointments will not 
dramatically change the political 
make-up of the court. William 
Brennan and Tbuigpod Marshall 
remain as the aging liberals, Byron 
White, Harry Blackmun, Lewis 
Powell and John Paul Stevens as 
the aging moderates. Rehnquist 
and Reagan’s previous appointee, 
Sandra Day O'Connor (the first 
woman on the Supreme Court) are 
now joined by Scalia. Burger must 
be counted as a moderate with 
conservative tendencies. At most 
then, the right-wingers have 
gained one surer vote as Burger 
departs and Scalia arrives. 

But quality matters as well as 
quantity. With so many judges in 
the political centre, the court is 
open to convincing argument, 
especially from a strong leader. 
For all his administrative 
strengths. Burger was a lightweight 
lawyer but Rehnquist is the court’s 
intellectual master, while Scalia 
too is a powerful legal scholar. 

Whether they are joined by 
further Reagan appointees de- 
pends on the health of the 
remaining judges. Their life tenure 
makes presidential opportunity to 
shape the court something of a 
lottery. Of the post-War presi- 
dents, Eisenhower and Nixon each 
appointed four justices and Ford 
one. Of Democrat presidents, 
Kennedy appointed one, Johnson 
two and Carter none. 

Although presidents try to ap- 
point judges with similar views to 
their own, they are not always 



Rehnquist: in the same mould as 
Reagan — but he need 
not be a slave to ideology 

successful. Eisenhower thought he 
was on to a right-winger in Earl 
Warren, who then established a 
reputation as the paradigm of 
liberal justice. Brennan similarly 
was an Eisenhower “mistake.” 
Nixon chose Burger to reverse 
Warren's liberalism but the Burger 
court went on to give the 1973 pro- 
abortion decision in Roe v Wade 
which has become the bite noire of 
American conservatives. 

Presidential mistakes and luck 
apart, there are democratic lessons 
to be learned. First, the constitu- 
tion does not dictate answers to all 
political controversies. It has to be 
interpreted. Different judges at 
different times \ m different 
circumstances w.\ interpret its 
broad principled differently. 
Brown was an heroic decision in 
favour of desegregation, but in 
1896 the Supremo Court had 
affirmed that racial segregation 
was constitutional Both decisions 
purported to apply the Fourteenth 
Amendment of 1868. The right to 
privacy which was held to permit 
abortion in the Roe judgment does 
not feature in the text of the. 
constitution. The role of the 
Supreme Court judge therefore is 
often creative. 

This does not mean that Su- 
preme Court judges have com- 
plete discretion to implement 
personal values. They might fed 
constrained by some vision of 
what is proper to their judicial 
role. American scholars nave ar- 
gued variously that the judges 
should decide according to rights, 
or natural law, or neutral prin- 
ciples, or consensus. In any event, 
the plain words of the constitution 
have to be supplemented to some 
extent. As Rehnquist once ob- 
served: “The framers of the 


Nuclear power: now 
an East bloc debate 


ing the immediate closure of all 
nuclear reactors. 

As in the West these protesters 
are also opposed to missiles and 
have their own internal problems 
of ideology and strategy. Hungar- 
ian environmentalists, supported 
by West German and Austrian 
protesters, have been demonstrat- 
ing against the construction of a 
huge hydro-electric dam on the 
Czechoslovak-Hungarian border. 
Until Chernobyl, the Hungarians 
were arguing that an atomic power 
plant would be a more attractive 
alternative to the dam. Since 
Chernobyl an opinion poll con- 
ducted by the authorities in north 
eastern Poland, which was af- 
fected by radioactivity, showed 
that most people were unhappy 
about the lack of information 
though Polish officials were 
remarkably frank about radiation 
levels- 

The general unrest puts some 
pressure, even on closed com- 
munist systems, to explain and 
defend. Almost 3,000 residents of 


Bialystok in eastern Poland de- 
manded that work be slopped on 
Poland's first nuclear plant at 
Zamowiec near the Baltic coast In 
a published reply the government 
said that shortages of coal oil and 
gas meant that nuclear power was 
essential, adding that the planned 
pressurized water reactors were 
safer than that at Chernobyl. 

The fact that Poland and Hun- 
gary are in the early stages of 
nuclear power development 
presents possible advantages for 
both sides. The Polish authorities 
can argue that Chernobyl is partly 
the result of the Soviet Union's 
early nuclear expansion and that, 
as a newcomer. Poland can exploit 
the latest developments in nuclear 
engineering and safety. But East 
European environmental groups 
may take advantage of the existing 
laws —for example over the siting 
of nuclear plants — to slow down 
the nuclear programme. There is 
also the problem of nuclear waste, 
which will be taken from Eastern 
Europe up the Soviet Union for 


constitution wisely spoke in gen- 
eral language and left to succeed- 
ing generations the task of 
applying their language to the 
unceasingly changing environ- 
ment in which they would live.” 

The second lesson is that, once 
in office. Supreme Court judges 
rise above their previous political 
affiliations where they think fit 
Even if Rehnquist seems unlikely 
to follow Earl Warren’s path from 
conservatism to liberalism, so 
president can be sure that his 
nominees will reflect his political 
ideology. 

The third conclusion is that, 
however strange ft seems from this 
side of the Atlantic, the system 
works- That does not mean that 
we should automatically adopt an 
American style Bill of Rights and 
Supreme Court. On the contrary, 
another lesson is that we should 
not transplant constitutions — as 
we did to our former colonies — 
without first providing the nec- 
essary social educational, legal 
and political infrastucture. 

Supreme Court successes, how- 
ever, must be set against its 
failures, such as the earlier accep- 
tance of segregation. And when 
the court makes a decision of 
which one disapproves, it is much 
easier to see the merits of the 
British emphasis on dec ted, and 
thus removable and replaceable, 
politicians as decision-makers. 
Liberals currently applaud the 
Supreme Court’s pro-abortion 
stance but if Reagan can engineer 
an anti-abortion majority, they 
will lose their enthusiasm for the 
court as supreme arbiter of rights. 

It is good that the court can 
stand apart from the pressures of 
justifying decisions directly to the 
electorate, but nevertheless there 
is a weakness in allowing the 
unelected branch of government 
such power. Abraham Lincoln pot 
his finger on the danger in his 
inaugural address in 1861. Speak- 
ing about the Supreme Court's 
Died Scott decision of 1857, in 
which it had foiled to protect 
slaves or to fet Congress protea 
them, Lincoln said: “If the policy 
of the government, upon vital 
questions affecting the whole peo- 
ple, is to be irrevocably fixed by 
decision of the Supreme Court, the 
instant they are made, in ordinary 
litigation between parties in per- 
sonal actions, the people will have 
ceased to be their own rulers, , 
having to that extent practically , 
resigned their government into the 
hands of that eminent tribunal” 

There will be much interest on 
both sides of the Atlantic in bow 
much governmental power the 
Supreme Court exercises under 
Chief Justice Rehnquist 

© Times Ncwafupm, 1988. 

The author isieaurer in law at 
King's College London. . . 

reprocessing. Some East European 
Greens say that the security of 
these cross-border transportations 
needs lb be scrutinized. 

Among SoWet bloc countries 
the Soviet Union has the greatest 
nuclear capacity, with 85 reactors 
in use or under construction. 
Czechoslovakia follows, with 13 
reactors and East Germany with 
1 1. In Czechoslovakia, which has 
its own uranium deposits, nuclear 
plants account for IS per cent of 
energy production, with plans to 
increase this to 60 per cent over 
the next 15 years — a commit- 
ment it is unlikely to abandon. 
Non-aligned Yugoslavia is the 
only East European country seri- 
ously to consider halting its 
nuclear programme. This mouth 
deputy heads of all Soviet bloc 
countries will meet in East Berlin 
to discuss Chernobyl, but are 
likely to confine the talks to safety 
aspects such as an eariy warning 
system and Soviet proposals for 
an international compensation 
law for nuclear accidents. 

Even so. Soviet Woe countries 
are beginning to be forced into the 
open on nuclear issues. 


The spectacle ofthe EEC heads of 
government, uniting in gran diose 
denunciation of South Africa 
while competing to kee p thei r 
individual cotnnierriai concents 
off the economic sanctions list, 
has been the main feature of this 
week's summit meeting at The 
Hague. It is the oldest of stones, 
repealed endlessly throughout 
EEC history: a gen ante sense of 
European common interest is 
aroused and proclaimed is the 
general but is rapidly undermined 
by strong national interests in me 
particular. 

Two other recent incidents — 
Star Wars and Gadaffi — illustrate 
the same point. In the firet the 
Europeans recognized, collec- 
tively, that President Reagan's 
Strategic Defence Initiative was 
strongly against the European 
interest because, if successful it 
1 wonW leave them at the mercy of 
Soviet conventional superiority; 
they then allowed themselves to . 
be picked off by Washington one 
by one. The British wanted to 
‘ preserve the “special rel- 
ationship” . the Germans got 
scared of offending the Americans 
and everyone, including even the 
French, wanted to get their trotters 
inloibe US technological trough. 

In the case of Gadaffi the 
Europeans could have united eariy 
on around a determined common 
opposition both to terrorism and 
to armed intervention by the US. 
But this would have emailed (a) 
much more concerted practical co- 
operation between security ser- 
vices, (b) a wiBragness to consider 
sanctions against Gadaffi fa for 
more suitable case for this treat- 
ment than South Africa) and <c) a 
readiness to lake, and stick to, a 
firm, concerted line with the VS 
administration, instead, there was 
no serious co-ordination until to 
was too late for anything except 
im'tffl hand-wringing and mini. 
mum united action. - 

Luckily none of these incidents 
has proved to be a calamity. 
Economic sanctions against South 
Africa win not make an atom of 
difference to what happens there; 
SDI is probably as expe ns ive 
political pipe-dream in any case; 
and the Libyan storm has blown 
itself out. But each represented at 
best a missed opportunity and at 
worst a potential disaster. To- 
gether they prove, once more, how 
for below its potential Europe as a 
collectivity is performing on the 
international scene. 

Can anything be dime about 
this? The question now passes to 
the British government Britain 
assumes tire six-month presidency 
of the EEC on July 1 — an 
opportunity for influence which 
will not recur for another six years, 
and one. can only guess where we 
shall have wandered to by then. 
Naturally a plan for the British 
presidency has been worked out in 
Whitehall and a variety of depart- . 
meats have put their shopping 
fists into ft. To some extent the 
issues of the next six months are 
already dictated. The perennial 
problem ofthe common agrictoral 
policy, the looming trade dispute 


with the Vi development of the 
internal common maim. . 

penally in services, the at tempt w 
co-ordinate some alleviation of 
unemployment ;„i afl toe are 

on the ag end a. But bey pad , 

lies a whole « prfmoi 
issues - East- West reunions, the 
Middle East, afi rela- 

tions with the US — on whictt - 
Europe has distinctive coUeorae ; 
iofa rests hat on wfnctjwc *■ 
Community has never managed to . 
exert its foil weight What is snfl tn 
doubt is whether Britain, as ; 
president, can generate the polro- 
cal win to make real progress in Six 
months even os the technical 
issues, let alone on any of the ; 
political ones. 

The omens are no* encouraging. 
For one thing, the size ana 
bistoricaltfivtrafty ofthe Commn- r 
nity, and the complexity of the 
interests involved, are capable of 
defeating anyone. For instance, if 
Britain has foe misfortune to * 
preside over a major crisis in foe • 
Community bodges this autumn 
(as to weS nay) its presidency will - 
inevitably founder oa the old * 
factional rocks irrespective or its 
own statesmanship or lack of to. ' 
Nevertheless some of the problem - 
still resides in British attitudes. 

In the five years since Britain . 
last held the presidency, a certain - 
amoam has changed in Whi^ail . 
but ft is hard to pat anc^ finger oa ■ 
quite what ft is. The Treasury has 
remained a pretty solid bastion of - 
autarky and suXpJQc® throughout ; 
the period; tte Foreign Office has - 
c ontain ed the bureaucracy’s; post . 
imaginative pro-Goiamumty en- 
thusiasts, but also a lord core of ' 
sceptics who look instinctively 
t owa rds the old relationship with 
the US rather than to Europe and 
who bare prospered nader Mn 
Thatcher's hMumbm, With the - 
removal of da old sore spot — 
Bream'S contribution to the Euro- 
pean budget— politicians of aQ 
parties have become less ag grt a - 
sive towards the Community and ' 
sheer habit and custom have got 
the g o v ernment and party ma- 
chines used so h a adfiag Comma- 
mty issues, to seriiv European 
angles and to naming from day to 
day on foe assumption that the 
Community framework is pama- 
nem. What is stifi missing is a 
consensus, led from foe top. that 
we are primarily a Europ e an , 
power and that Europe, for better 
or wane, a oar main external 
priority. & Geoffrey Howe; in his . 
cannons; lawyer's fashion, has 
recognized this, which is why be . - 
has raged that oar agreement to 
some sanctions a gai ns t South 
Africa is a necessary price of 
getting our . presidency Off .to a 
tolerable start. Mrs Thatcher toes 
it fitfully with her head tat not 
with ber heart; and some officials [ 
don’t really see to at afi. That » 
why one of them remarked tome 
foe other day that a struggle is • 
going on for the soul of British 
foreign policy. 

Perhaps by 1992 this battle will 
be derided, but until it is we' 
cannot realty expect to lead Eu- . 
rope to a more effective unity . 


moreover Miles Kington 


them in stitches 


Yon sometimes read that ex- 
pressionless line in a newspaper to 
the effect that “Miles Kington is 
on holiday". Strictly speaking, this 
column should be followed by the 
terse announcement “Miles King- 
ton is at this very moment 
wondering where he left the tickets 
and whether he will get to Ports- 
mouth in time for the ferry”, for as 
you read these lines I am now in 
that limbo which separates being 
at work from actually being on 
holiday. 

Medical science has recently 
come up with the finding that 
going o n holiday is one of the most 
stressful activities known to man. 
more stressful probably than run- 
ning a government or supporting 
the England football side: Well, I 
think the average holiday-maker 
was way ahead of medical science 
here; for years we have known that 
Organ izing a holiday combines all 
the worr y of setting up a new 
company and planning the inva- 
sion of Normandy, and that when 
we come back we sigh secretly 
with relief 

In fed yon could probably 
rephrase that terse announcement 
to “Miles Kington at this moment 
is wondering just why he is 
embarking on a holiday when he 
could be relaxing at a typewriter”, 
except that 1 do have two very 
good reasons for going to France. 
One is that the French need a lot 

of comfort at the moment after 
being knocked out of the World 
Cup, and who better to supply 
comfort than someone from Brit- 
ain. where we have had no fewer 
than four national teams knocked 
‘ out of the Worid Clip? 

The other reason is that this is 
something in the nature of a 
pilgrimage for me. We are aiming 
at that part of France which is 
poised between Brittany and the 
Loire estuary, very near a small 
port called Piriac-sur-mer. The 
last time I was at Piriac was in 
1961, with my brother. We arrived 
late in the evening and booted 
into a small hotel down on the 
quai. The bar was crammed with 
fishermen, the rest of the hotel 
seemed quite empty.- and we were 
shown to a bedroom which was 
almost entirely filled with that 
massive furniture of which the 
French seem so fond, and there we 
. unpacked in total darkness due to - 

Roger Boyes j 


.r . . 




bar, the whole place fen a tent as ■ 
the company stared at us with that . 
hooded curiosity of which the 
French seem so fond. 1 

“Tom va Wen?" . said the 
paironne. 

I wanted to say, in French, that • 
everything was fine except that we : 
couldn't put cm the light. From my ■ 
educational past floated tire 
information that the French for a ' 
knob is “on bouton”. 

“Oiti,” I said, “mais nous - 
n’avons pas pu trouver tes . ' 
boutons." " 

To my surprise this produced a 
gate of laughter from the entire 
company. Obviously I had raid - 
something pretty funny. Nobody 
would tell me what it was, but it 
was enough to have round after 
round of drinks pressed upon usl 
Finally a convivial pair of fisher- , 
men hinted that what I bod said - ; 
was, if not downright obscene, at ^ 
least highly ose, and that boutons ' 
were not normally referred to in 
polite company. They gave . as :■ 
another drink and asked if we ' 
would like to go sailing on their - 
fishing boat. We said we would ■" 
love to. Then be at the quay at 4 ■ 
am they said, and we will take yon 

We woe there at 4 am. We 
wafted until 5 or 6 atru,bm no- / 
body turned up. Next day we left, ■ 
but to this day my. brother and X 
feel that France owes us a'tiip on a ' 
fishing boat, and now at last I have . 
a chance to go back to' Piriac «id • 
claim my tong overdue voyage: It ! 
doesn't have to be the same two * 
fishermen. 

I® fejL l X have just received i .* 
g?P y of foe current leaflet about ’ 
rmac, written in that stiff, badly- ■ 
fitting English which holiday leaf- . 
lets like to use, and the people of >• 
Pinac are obviously still very . 
cautious about strangers. “The 
find anchorage 

possibilities at Piriac,” it says, ’ 
which is not exactly a * firm ; 
promise. The road to Pin y ft ; 
goes on to say, has “a tourist - 
amenity , but gives no hint as tn * , 
what this might be. finally, for all . 

those who think they will get a trip : - 

2! *1 fisi ^?L vessd » il says ond~ .1 
oonsly. Piriac is an artisan ‘ 
fishing sea poit, where we ran ’ 
^^.^fiwteaviag of boats:" ’* 
y° u had better 7 -- 





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Britain 


THE TIMES FRIDAY JUNE 27 1986 




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1 Penijingttjn Street, Xandon El 9XN Telephone: 01-481 4100 


A SPECIAL CASE 


Birkbeck College is the only 
institution in higher" educa- 
tion, apart from the Open 
University, which is dedicated 
to part-time degrees for adults. 
Its students are people who 
give up their own time and 
eifort in order to improve 
themselves and their prospects 
in life. They are the very model 
of . modern Thatcherites. (de- 
voutly though many of them ', 
would reject that description), 
the unconscious bearers of 
Victorian values, adherents 
(desprtethemsel ves) of Samuel 
Smijes; Self-Help . ‘ Mrs 
Thatcher’s father would have 
been proud of them. 

yet the University Grants ' 
Committee has proposed a 
scheme - of financial 
rationalization which would 
have the effect of closing 
Birkbeck down. It will be 
discussing the scheme. to fi- 
nance part-timers at one-half 
the fate of full-time students at. 
its-next meeting on July 10. Mr 
Kenneth -Baker, the Education 
Secretary, wants the scheme to 
be recons idered — and rightly 
sol In most colleges,: where - 
part-tuners are a small minor- 
ity .such a reduction could be 
Absorbed without too much 
pain. But since Birkbeck is 


exclusively geared to full-tim- 
ers, the college’s funds would 
be cut drastically — by some- 
thing like 30 per cent over four 
years. 

Birkbeck contends that this 
would effectively guarantee its 
closure. The UGC disputes 
that the effect would be quite 
so drastic and wants Birkbeck 
to support its broad argument 
with detailed figures — which 
the college will have to. do. But 
the crude figures — which 
show that the UGC plan 
would mean a cut in funding 
per part-time student from the - 
present 0.8 per cent of a full- 
timer to the proposed 0.5 per 
cent — are gloomy enough to 
establish that Birkbeck does 
indeed face severe retrench- 
ment. 

That is unjustifiable. Birk- 
beck can cite virtues other 
than the self-reliance of its 
students. It educates them 
efficiently — namely, they fin- 
ish their courses when a fault 
of much adult education is 
that students drift on foryears. 

It educates them, to a higher 
academic standard than its 
competitors like the Open 
University. And, finally, it 
educates them cheaply. 

To close such an institution 


GUARDING THE GUARDIANS 


In- Belfast and Manchester, the 
Stalker affair gathers mo- 
mentum* mostly propelled by 
accumulating rumour. In Is- 
rael, the chief of ffie Shin Bet 
and, three of his deputies, 
resigned and have: been, 
granted^ immunity . from 
prosecution in connection 
with the death of two Arab bus 
hijackers.' Both episodes bring' 
to the fore key issues raised in 
democratic -societies by pro- 
longed confrontations between 
governments and terrorists. - 


killings during the last three 
months of the year, almost as 
many as in the previous nine 
months. During that autumn, 
six men died at the hands of 
policemen in three incidents 
which are the subject of the 
investigation carried out by 
Mr Stalker and now continued 
under Mr Sampson. One sub- 
sequent trial heard evidence - 
so far uncontested r- that a 
police constable had been 
instructed by his.superiors to 
lie to the court about what had 


-The- resignations in Israel happened. It was suggested 
may effectively dose the mat- that this concoction was de- 
ter, since there will now lie iio signed to nrotect an informer. 


substantive- inquiry into the 
cifcumstaiices of the deaths 
and., the subsequent , conceal- 
ment or manipulation of ev- 
idence about whai.-happened.- 
Tbfc opposite appears^o be the 
case with' foe two- investiga- 
tions, .connected ,with Mr 
Stalker’s name. It is plain that 
much more information is 
destined "to emerge and it is 
plainly right that, given foe 
combination of' feet and 
conjecture so far, a fuller story 
should be available. These 
events should be judged 
against underlying principles 
of profound importance. 

Two trends have produced 
new problems. Lethal weapons 
in the hands of terrorists have 
resulted in policemen, most 
notably in Northern Ireland, 
being equipped with very 
much -greater firepower than 
has traditionally been the case. 
This armoury makes the con- 
cept of “‘minimum force” 
redundant in a number of 
critical contacts between ter- 
rorists and counter-terrorist 
forces. Secondly, threats to the 
lives of policemen, foe heavy 
use of informers who require 
protection and the growing 
sophistication of the intelli- 
gence war have all increased 
the secrecy of certain police 
operations. . . 

In the autumn of 1982, the 
Royal . . Ulster Constabulary 
was under exceptional- pres- 
sure. There were 47 terrorist 


signed to protect an informer, 
to -conceal unauthorised cross- 
ing of the -border with the 
Republic. and to avoid giving 
away damaging details cf 
; undercover operations. 

Such; secrecy could also; 
however, put a significant 
section of a police force be^ 
yond foe reach of accountabil- 
ity. -In doing: so it could 
undermine the very basis of 
society’s moral defence against 
subversion: democratic 
accountability, both of the law 
and its guardians. If a society 
facing terrorist threats wishes 
to make use of that defence, it 
is in no position to allow police 
forces to create forces- within- 
forces operating by different, 
secret rules, which are to be 
concealed by peijury. 

The essential safeguard is 
the existence of some public 
code or standard by which 
society’s servants, be they 
policemen or soldiers, are 
judged. Emergencies may oc- 
cur in which a community 
judges that such rules should 
be relaxed in order to remove 
disabling inhibitions which are 
weakening the defences. Israel 
is perhaps a good example ofa 
society which might contem- 
plate allowing its security 
forces the option to use lethal 
force against the perpetrators 
of certain crimes. What no 
security apparatus, no matter 
how hard-pressed, can do is to 
claim to operate under known 


different standards and then 
claim higher, secret reasons of - 
state for hiding their actions. 

The key decisions in the 
Stalker case are yet to come, 
but it is already clear that 
whatever the outcome of any 
prosecutions which may yet be 
authorised by the Northern 
Ireland Director of Public 
Prosecutions, there will have 
to be some form of additional 
inquiry into the circumstances 
surrounding Mr Stalker’s en- 
forced absence from duty at a 
critical stage in his RUC 
investigation. 

These areas may he hard to 
investigate, but that does not 
remove -the need for every 
effort to be taken to eliminate 
the .'doubts which have now 
been __ planted in the public 
mind. : ... 

They have been planted by 
the following simple equation. 
If .it is coincidental that Mr 
Stalker was taken off the 
inquiry, it is indeed one of the 
most extraordinary conjunc- 
tions of unrelated events. If it 
is not coincidental, what lies 
behind the apparently in*, 
substantial matters which 
precipitated his being re- 
placed? 

If no prosecutions emerge 
from the main inquiry con- 
ducted in Northern Ireland, a 
further inquiry will also be 
necessary. In the absence of 
evidence which the DPP might 
consider adequate to take to 
court, there is still much to be 
learnt which will be of value in 1 
shaping security policy in foe 
future. There have been many 
inquiries into police and army 
behaviour in Northern Ireland 
during the present troubles 
and while- they have never 
succeded in satisfying every- 
body, almost all of them have 
dug up necessary information 
and influenced future conduct. 
Above all, they have enhanced 
that visible accountability 
which is at the heart of policing 
a free society. 


sure. There were 47 terrorist laws, act according to quite a free society. 

CONTRA NICARAGUA 

Whatever else it may be, the gain some essential political consolidate a revolutionary 
approval by the United States leverage. Whether or not this dictatorship. They know that. 
House of Representatives of a signals the the beginning of the if the Contras can be 
$ 1 00m ' aid package for the end for Confadora as Wash- neutralised, time is on their 
rebels m Nicaragua is a victory ington puts more muscle be- side. They are also unlikely to 
of some political significance hind the military option is a fear diplomatic isolation, 
for President Reagan. Only matter for argument notably from the United 

two years ago the same House It does not look likely at States. Fidel Castro, after all, 
was leading a move to end present -that the $100 million has survival it, albeit with 
military help for the Contras, will lead in itself to a military support from the Soviet 
In March this year, driven by victory for the Contras. They Union. But continuing mili- 
opposition Democrats, it are stronger in numbers than tary opposition from the larg- 
threw out the Reagan package, in their organization. Their esi guerrilla force in Central 
Now it has changed its mind, appeal to the ordinary Nica- America — however disunited 
The vote was always . in raguan is in doubt And their is a severe obstacle in the way 
doubt The accompanying internal divisions make them of long-term Sandinista am- 
promise of more civil aid for difficult allies to deal with, bitions. 
the Central American democ- . Still, it should be remembered At worst the war being 
racies must have helped swing that guerrilla forces, including prosecuted by the Contras will 
many waverers to his cause, the Sandinistas, have some- delay foe Sandinistas in their 
But If it was a compromise, it times achieved remarkable consolidation of a Marxist 
was not so much of one that it victories from such un- state on the Central American 
should detract from the nature promising beginnings. isthmus. At best it might even 

of the Pr es ide n t’s triumph on What the aid package will prevent such a regime from 
theHilL do, however, is to help enable ever taking hold. Biit that 

The impact of the $100m ; the Contras to maintain pres- would certainly entail a 
upon political life in Wash- sure on the Sandinista govern- constructive political settler 


ington is arguably greater than meat in M a n ag u a and keep the 
that on foe military situation ' regime on foe defensive. It will 


• in Nicaragua. Of the total sum. 
■ only ■about two-thirds : is for 
military purposes. - What it 
' does, however, is to reinforce 
the twin-track American pol- 
icy in: the region — namely, 
encouraging the diplomatic 
solution still sought by the 
;■ Con tad ora powers, ■ while 
I- underpinning, the. Cbntras in . 
f their 'military, struggle. The 
overall strategy seems to be to 


force the regime to increase its 
armed forces — when it is 
already running into un- 
popularity over conscription. 
And it will damage the Nica- 

S economy, already in 
ties with half its annual 
budget being spent on its 
armed, forces 

Without this pressure, the 
Sandinistas would un- 
doubtedly use the time to 


dictatorship. They know that, 
if the Contras can be 
neutralised, time is on their 
side. They are also unlikely to 
fear diplomatic isolation, 
notably from the United 
States. Fidel Castro, after all, 
has survived it, albeit with 
support from the Soviet 
Union. But continuing mili- 
tary opposition from the larg- 
est guerrilla force in Central 
America — however disunited 
is a severe obstacle in the way 
of long-term Sandinista am- 
bitions. 

At worst the war being 
prosecuted by the Contras will 
delay foe Sandinistas in their 
consolidation of a Marxist 
state on the Central American 
isthmus. At best it might even 
prevent such a regime from 
ever taking hold. But that 
would certainly _ entail a 
constructive political settler 
ment acceptable to other coun- 
tries in the region as well as to 
the United States. 

The verdict on the this 
week's vote in the House must 
be— so far, so good. But it 
does not represent an end in 
itself— only a means to an 
end. Washington will need to 
raise the tempo of its dip- . 
lomatic activity too if it is to 
prevent the contingency it 
most fears. 


LETTERS TO THE EDITOR 


Pay barrier in prosecution service 


would be a plain contradiction 
of this government’s rhetoric 
of self-improvement It would 
also conflict with its recent 
stress on the importance of 
training and vocational educa- 
tion since adult students, when 
selecting a course of education, 
tend to place greater weight on 
its usefulness for their careers. 
It is a mockery of the concern 
expressed by Ministers for the 
education of mature students. 

In only one respect is the 
likely closure of Birkbeck in 
line .with the government’s 
conservative philosophy. It is 
an unintended consequence of 
reform. It demonstrates that , 
the wholesale application of a 
rational plan, drawn up by a 
centralized bureaucracy and 
applied without regard to local 
circumstances, will occa- 
sionally produce odd and in- 
defensible results. 

Mr Kenneth Baker should 
not shrink from telling the 
UGC plainly that financial 
rationalisation must on this 
occasion be subordinated to 
the need to encourag — or at 
least not to discourage — 
higher education for mature 
students. Birkbeck is a special 
case. If necessary, let it be' 
treated as one. 


From Mr AT. R. Swift 
Sir. There is no need whatever for 
i the crown prosecution service to 
be hampered in its work of 
l prosecuting in the magistrates' 
t court (report, June 23). If the CPS 
cannot find enough solicitors will- 
ing to prosecute there for £250 per 
‘ day, where is the logic in refusing 
1 to employ barristers who have 
i repeatedly offered to do the same 
i work for £120 per day? 

Contrary to the reported asser- 
[ lions of the chief crown prosecutor 
for West Yorkshire, there is an 
ample sufficiency of suitable 
members of the Bar throughout 
the country ready, able and willing 
to do the job. Instead of accepting 
the offered services of the Bar, the 
Government refuses to offer bar- 
risters more than £85 per day and 

E efers to triple its expenditure on 
wyers’ services by employing 
solicitors whilst at the same time 
failing to attract enough solicitors 
to do the work. 

How does a Government 
committed to cutting public 
expenditure justify such astonish- 
ing behaviour? The answer is 
quite simple. To pay barristers 
. more than £85 for a day in the 
magistrates’ court would highlight 
the paucity of the fees currently 
paid to banisters in the crown 
court, a situation which has 
already embarrassed the Govern- 
ment in the action by the Bar 
against the Lord Chancellor. 

Surely common sense, sound 
> financial management and de- 
clared government policy demand 
the employment of barristers for 
this work, both in the interests of 
economy and of efficiency. 

Yours faithfully, 

MALCOLM SWIFT, 

10 Park Square, 

' Leeds. 

June 24. 

No case to answer 

From the Town Clerk of South 
Ribble Borough Council 
Sir, Recent conversations have 
brought to light an apparent 
wariness on the part of the 
younger members of the Bar at the 
ambitions of barristers employed 
by local authorities to secure 
improved rights of audience as 
counsel in the lower courts. These 
ambitions exist They have been 
the subject of constant debate for 
decades, with varying response. 

Our objective has been to 
reduce the element erf dis- 
advantage which employed bar- 
risters have suffered in 
•comparison with our solicitor 
colleagues who, qua solicitors, 
have the right to appear before the 
magistrates and foe county court 
judge. 

The fear would appear to be that 
if banisters employed, say, in the 
legal section of a local authority, 
have the right to appear in the 
magistrates* and county courts 

British Gas price 

From Mr R. F. Knight 
Sir, It would be interesting to 
discover whether the Government 
have considered why the Crichel 
Down principles should not apply 
to British Gas particularly as foe 3 
per cent British Gas Stock now 
stands at 77'A. 

Is it possible that the Treasury is 
considering repaying this stock at 
par now as they are disposing of 
the assets which .were acquired 
with this paper? 

Yours faithfully, 

R. F. KNIGHT, 

Leyfield, 

Valley Road. 

Hannans Cross, 

Wareham, Dorset. 

Interest rate curb 

From Mr A. EL Watson 
Sir, I do not pretend to understand 
fully the various Ml, 2 and 3s 
bandied about on your financial 
pages, but one thing seems ob- 
vious to me; this country is 
moving rapidly from a property- 
owning society to a debt-ridden 
society. 

We seem to be heading to, if we 
have not already reached, a South 
Sea Bubble situation and I fear 
that the end will be the same as in 
1720 but with for worse results, 
since the unsecured debts are 
much more widely spread. 

The banks and financial institu- 
tions, haidng over-extended them- 
selves in the international market, 
now seem determined to do foe 
same in the domestic market. 

At least once a week and 
sometimes more often, I receive 
unsolicited offers to lend me 
money to buy unnecessary goods 
at exorbitant rates of interest. I put 
them straight into the wastepaper 
basket, but it seems from the 
article by Kenneth Fleet today 
(June 11) that many are being i 
inveigled into taking out such < 
loans. 

1 see that Mr Hattersley yes- 
terday suggested a ceiling on 
interest rates at concessionary 

Ordination of women 

From the Rev Francis Edwards. SJ 
Sir. As your leader of June 20 
pointed out, what are taken to be 
Jesuitical skills may not help foe 
Church of England in its present 
dilemma created by the proposed 
ordination of women. An undeni- 
able truth was clarified, namely 
that ever since Anglicanism was 
established by the authority of the , 
Sovereign in Parliament — still its 
supreme authority - by the two 
Acts of 1550 the character of that 
Church has been essentially Prot- 
estant ; indeed Calvinist by foe 
original 39 Articles. 

’ The Test Act of 1672 included 
an oath “that there is not any 
transubstantiation in the sac- 
rament of the Lord’s Supper ... at 
or after the consecration thereof < 
by any, person whatsoever”. 

This general trend against the i 
Catholic doctrine of priesthood « 


young practising barristers will to 
that extent be deprived of work 
which would otherwise have come 
their way. 

Apart from the fact that we area 
tiny band and only a handful of 
that band is likely to seek to 
appear for our authorities. I think 
it is fair to say that if we did not 
represent our authority then one 
of our solicitors (or even non- 
legally qualified) colleagues would 


be briefed when the need arose, 
whether a case was handled by an 
employed barrister or an em- 
ployed solicitor. 

Have no fears, junior brethren, 
we are not seeking to deprive you 
of your daily bread! 

I am, yours faithfully, 

R. N. L. HAMM, Town Clerk, 
South Ribble Borough Council, 
Civic Centre, 

West Paddock 
Ley land, Lancashire. 

June 17. 

Strident loans 

From Dr John Nicholson 
Sir, I am writing to comment on- 
your support (leading article, June 
19) for the introduction of student 
loans on the grounds that inter 
alia, graduates’ “lifetime earnings 
are likely to be substantially 
enhanced by their degrees”. It is 
my experience, though admittedly 
anecdotal, that this ts not so. 

I have a twin brother, who 
started work immediately after A 
levels: at the same time, by 
contrast, I began reading for a 
degree. That separated us 
economically, and now, some 13 
years on, we remain separated. 
Despite my honours degree, and 
subsequent PhD in chemistry, I 
still earn only some 75 per cent of 
my brother’s salary, and my 
prospects of catching him up, still 
less of overtaking him, are mini - 
maL Yet 1 am relatively well off 
since I have been promoted 
quickly, and by comparison with 
my contemporary graduates who 
became teachers, 1 am embarrass- 
ingly wealthy. 

I am not complaining about my 
lot As Bernard Levin points out 
elsewhere in the same edition of 
The Times, there are other forms 
of poverty than the merely finan- 
cial, and I value the education I 
have had, to the extent that, had it 
been necessary, I would have 
willingly repaid a student loan for 
it. Nevertheless, I resent foe 
implication that being a graduate 
ipso facto opens foe way to 
massive earnings. That is falla- 
cious and does nothing to enhance 
your otherwise well reasoned argu- 
ment in favour of student loans. 
Yours fiuthfully. 

JOHN NICHOLSON, 

63 Moriand Close, 

Nurserylands, 

Hampton, Middlesex. 

June 19. 

levels for developing countries; 
may I suggest that a ceiling on 
interest rates on domestic loans 
might be an even better idea. We 
might then have a sufficiently 
strong economy to help the 
developing countries even more. 

There would of course be some 
difficulty in fixing the ceiling, but 
surely rates of up to 30 per cent 
and more, such as are being 
quoted, are quite unacceptable but 
are presumably foe only way to 
cover the losses which occur with 
debtors unable to meet their 
obligations. Since, in my view, 
such loans should never have been 
made, I have little sympathy for 
the lenders. 

As such loans seem to be little 
more than gambling, and gam- 
bling debts are not enforceable a 
simple way to operate such a 
ceiling would be to make a loan 
agreement at above the ceiling rate 
unenforceable in the courts. 

Yours faithfully, 

A. E WATSON, 

12 Bourne Road, 

Colsterworth, 

Grantham, Lincolnshire. 

June 1 1. 

Change In S Africa 

From Bishop D. R. Feaver 
Sir, The Prime Minister, beset 
these days by much overheated 
exhortation, could take some 
comfort from her predecessor. 
Lord Salisbury, whom Queen 
Victoria called her greatest Prime 
Minister, when he described the 
bulk of such advice as “a display 
of moral vanity masquerading as 
virtue". He would add that a man, 
and a politician too, should always 
try to do right but never count on 
doing good. With the results the 
doer has nothing to do. 

Political and personal percep- 
tion is hereby sharpened, and 
good sense saved from the ex- 
cesses of sentimentality. 

Yours faithfully, 

D. R. FEAVER, 

10 Spens Avenue. 

Gough Way. Cambridge. 

continued until the 19th centiny 
Oxford Movement. This main- 
tained with zeal and not without 
learning that their Church had 
never lost its essential Catholic 
nature even in a sense 
recognisable by Rome. Many be- 
tievea. unlike Newman and his 
friends who crossed the divide, 
that the catholicising movement 
would leaven the lump until the 
Church of England as a body 
would be ready to seek reunion. 

The Times leader is a feu- 
indication of the overall failure of 
this movement. At most foe 
Anglo-Caiholics can claim a 20 
per cent allegiance. Further, “the 
Romanist who prays for the Pope 
knows he belongs with foe ardent J 
Protestant in the same religious ’• 
family: and he knows what he can | 
do if he does not tike it. too”. 

Is it now time for Anglo- 
Caiholics as a body to ask them- 
selves if they should not “tike” the . 


Tourist threat 
: to the cheetah 

i From Sir Christopher Lever 

Sir. Your Science Report (June 21) 
t rightly draws attention to the 
F plight of the cheetah in Africa, 
- where its status is officially classi- 
fied by the World Wildlife Fund as 
“vulnerable". 

In many countries, however, ft 
is not only a lack of genetic 
variability that is causing concern 
for the cheetah’s survival; one of 
its greatest threats is the increase 
in tourism. 

The cheetah is a timid creature 
which, especially when with cubs, 
needs to kill daily in order to 
survive. Whenever a cheetah is 
observed stalking its prey ft is all 
too often immediately surrounded 
by mini-buses loaded with tour- 
ists, all anxious to witness foe 
magnificent sight of the animal in 
frill flight after its quarry. This, 
however, they seldom see, since 
foe shy cheetah almost invariably 
abandons its hunt, with the result- 
ing starvation of its cubs. The 
African drivers cannot be blamed 
for acting as their clients demand. 

The only feasible solution, 
which I have long advocated, is for 
governmental wildlife and tour- 
ism departments in Africa to 
forbid all vehicles from approach- 
ing within a hundred yards of any 
cheetah. This would not only 
increase foe tourists' chances of 
seeing the animal making its kill, 
but should also help to ensure the 
survival of this beautiful but 
declining caL 
Yours faithfully, 

CHRISTOPHER LEVER, 

Newell House, 

Winkfidd, 

Windsor. Berkshire. 

Sex education 

From Mrs Victoria Gillick 
Sir, Alastair Service, of the Family 
Planning Association claims in his 
letter (June 20) that there is no 
sound research evidence that 
contraceptive information en- 
courages schoolchildren to experi- 
ment with sex. 

Of course he is quite correct 
For ft is the combination of 
contraceptive information phis 
their fro: and secret supply to 
under-age girls, that has en- 
couraged young men into ever- 
more frequent acts of unlawful sex 
with them. 

A survey of GPs has revealed 
that nowadays they prescribe the 
Pill to around 60,000 under-age 
girls annually — double what it 
was 10 years ago. 

So perhaps the time has come 
for the old guard in the birth- 
control world to quietly and 
judiciously bow out of the educa- 
tion scene. Their revolution has 
achieved its dubious goal, and it 
remains for others, better adjusted 
and qualified to pick up foe pieces 
of young lives, so horribly 
coarsened and debauched, dis- 
eased and devalued by that cynical 
breed of elders. 

Let those who actually believe 
in sexual morality, marriage and 
family life teach such things to the 
young. Mere lip service — even in 
The Times — never fooled anyone. 
Yours faithfully, 

VICTORIA GILLICK, 

2 Old Market, 

Wisbech, Cambridgeshire. 

June 20. 

Hampton Court limes 

From Miss Ann Gate 
Sir, Mr Matthews (June 23) is 
right: Tilia cordata is a more 
graceful tree than its large-leaved 
relative. It would, however, be 
inappropriate to plant it at Hamp- 
ton Court Mr Matthews should 
take note of Dr Oliver Rackham’s 
words in The History of the 
Countryside (1986): “Part of the 
value of the native lime tree [i.e. 
Tilia cordata] lies in the meaning 
embodied in its mysterious natu- 
ral distribution; it is devalued by 
being made into a universal tree.” 
Yours faithfully, 

ANN GATE 
Bell Cottage, 

Church Street 
Chari bury, Oxfordshire. 

Signs and portents 

From Mr S. J Blenkinsop 
Sir, Your report (June 21, early 
edition), that the Chief Constable 
of North Wales has refused re- 
quests for his police car signs to be 
in Welsh as well as English 
reminded me of my recent visit to 
that area of foe principality. 

It was most noticeable that only 
one group of English signs had 
invariably escaped the attentions 
of those Welsh nationalists who 
over-paint such versions with 
their Welsh equivalent. 

The signs read: “Bed and 
breakfast”. 

Yours sincerely, 

STANLEY J. BLENKINSOP, 
Wingrove. 

57 Macclesfield Road, 

Wilmslow. Cheshire. 

idea of seeking reunion with 
Rome? From the Anglican view- 
point this would obviate the 
danger of a schism in its own 
ranks; from foe Catholic, this 
could lead to a useful accession of 
new blood: from the general 
Christian, it would prevent tire 
rise of yet another sect 
One hopes that all Christian 
persuasions have at least reached a 
point in ecumenical rapproche- 
ment where they would not inter- 
pret this as an act of war or 
treason. The age of Elizabeth II, 
thank God. is fer different from 
that of Elizabeth I. 

I apologise if all this sounds 
over-simplistic. Perhaps Jesuits 
are not always as crafty as popular 
English legend still makes them. 
Yours faithfully. 

FRANCIS EDWARDS. 

1 14 Mount Street, Wl. 

June 21. 


ON THIS DAY 


JUNE 27 1828 

Our correspondent writes from 
Appleby but many renders of this 
extract may have the impression 
that he mas doing so from 
EatanewiU. The election was won 
by Viscount Lowther, later 2nd 
Earl of Lonsdale (1787-1872). On 
this occasion, as in 1818 and 1820, 
his opponent was Henry 
Brougham who achieved eminence 


as Baron Brougham and Vaux 
(1778-1868). Lord Chancellor 
1830-34. The parties at that 
period had not adapted a uniform, 
national colour; Lowther, the 
Tory, sported yellow; throughout 

the country blue, orange, pink and 

purple were among the hues worn 
indiscriminntehbyToTy and 
Wug. 


G ENERAL ELECTIO N 

WESTMORELAND 
Appleby, Third Day, June 24. 
Party feeling is at present run- 
ning extremely high in this town- A 
blue and a yellow, unless they are 
sot resident in the county, are 
seldom seen to speak amicably to 
each other. Neutrality is not 
admitted by either party, and he 
who ventures to profess it, u 
looked upon as a soy and an enemy 
by both. An anecdote, which was 
communicated to me as a good joke 
by a freeholder who was extremely 
zealous in the cause he had 
espoused, will show, more forcibly 
than any words of mine can, the 
angry state of the public wtnri on 
both sides. A freeholder, who bad 
got his thumb lacerated in the 
casual affray which took place 
yesterday, went to a surgeon to 
have it dressed. The surgeon 
washed the wound, previously to 
examining it. Having ascertained 
the nature and extent of it, he 
proceeded not to dress it but to 
inquire on which side his patient, 
who had lost the insignia of Ins 
party in the scuffle, had been 
fighting. Unfortunately, the pa- 
tient has espoused the colour 
which was abhorred more than his 
own pQI -boxes and potions by this 
electioneering surgeon. The decla- 
ration of that fact excited thoughts 
of revenge and punishment in his 
mind; and though the wound was 
an extremely alight, one and re- 
quired nothing more than a plaster 
to heal it, be determined that the 
poor fellow should have all the 
and bodily pangs of having 
it sewed up- He had punctured the 
heads of several of the doctor’s 
friends; and the doctor, thought, 
that as a good partisan he was 
obliged to avenge then as fer as be 
justifiably could, by puncturing to 
the letter the unlucky hand which 
had punctured them .... 

The poll did not close until five 
o'clock today, and the populace, 
who had assembled about the 
hustings at four, did not appear to 
be over and above pleased with the 
prolongation of the time for taking 
it They stood in crowds around it, 
casting bitter jokes and sarcasms at 
each other. A man of the name of 
Abbott who lives on a farm of Lord 
Lonsdale, at a place called 
Thirznby-gnmge, aid who is, I 
understand, one of the ablest 
wrestlers in a county where all are 
wrestlers, placed himself in a very 
conspicuous station in the front of 
the hustings, and began from there 
to throw out violent and insulting 
lan gnag p against the Blue 
party 

The man refused to stir, on 
which he was hailed with the title 
of a contented cuckcold, by a 
butcher in the crowd, whilst anoth- 
er man told him that if he would 
only send his wife to Kendal, there 
were plenty there ready to get for 
him that which he had never been 
aWe to get for himself — a parcel of 
young freeholders. Abbott, on 
hearing this abuse, became himself 
still more abusive, and the conse- 
quence was that three or four blues 
rushed upon the hustings, threw 
him on his back after a violent 
struggle, in which he exhibited 
uncommon strength, and dragged 
him down the steps into the crowd. 
They then began to pummel hi m 
most unmercifully, and it was only 
by great exertions on his part that 
be escaped from their fury, covered 
with blood, into one of the yellow 
houses. His appearance there was 
the signal for a general fight. The 
yellows sallied oik, and tire sticks, 
which the people in this part of the 
country generally walk with, were 
called into immediate operations. 
Those who were unprovided with 
these weapons of defence and 
offence, upset three or four stalls, 
which were standing in the market 
{dace, and by tearing the legs off, 
and by splitting the boards into 
pieces, furnished themselves with 
very formidable bludgeons. For a 
quarter of an hour, during which 
vollies of stones were buried into 
tire melee by the more distant 
combatants on both sides, the 
battle raged with considerable 
violence. The blues at length 
obtained a te m por ar y superiority, 
and chased their opponents into 
the King’s Head, where they broke 
all the windows and smashed in 
several of their frames. The yellows 
in consequence proceeded to work 
the same vengeance on the win- 
dows of Mr. Brougham’s principal 
inn. the Crown and Mitre, which 
their opponents had before worked 
on the King’s Head. The pavement 
was rooted up< and in a moment 
every pane of glass was demolished. 

Sale of the century 

From Mr M. E T. Titey * 

Sir, While I was looking for a 
suitable birthday card for my 
centenarian grandfather last week. 

I was astonished to find that a near 
by small newsagent had a selection 
of no less than four different 
preprinted cards for 100 year olds. 
Is longevity a Bloomsbury 
phenomenon? 

Yours faithfully. 

MIKE TI LEY, 

University College London. 

Gower Street, WC I. 

June 23. 



18 


THE TIMES FRIDAY JUNE 27 1986 



COURT 

AND 

SOCIAL 


COURT 

CIRCULAR 

BUCKINGHAM PALACE 
June 2 Kk His Excellency Mr 
Fakhruddin Ahmed was re- 
ceived in farewell audience by 
The Queen and took leave upon 
relinquishing his appointment 
as High Commissioner for the 
People's Republic of Bangla- 
desh in London. 

Mr A.E. Palmer was received 
in audience by The Quern and 
kissed bands upon his appoint- 
ment as Her Majesty’s Ambas- 
sador Extraordinary and 

Plenipotentiary at Havana. 

Mrs Palmer had the honour of 
being received by The Queen. 

He Majesty flirted the XHIth 
Commonwealth Games Relay 
from the Forecourt of Bucking- 
ham Palace. 

The Queen and The Duke of 
Edinburgh, accompanied by 
The Prince Edward, this evening 
attended a Reception at St 
James's Palace to celebrate the 
50th Anniversary of the forma- 
tion of The King's Flight. 

The Prince and Princess of 
Wales, The Princess Margaret, 
Countess of Snowdon, Prince 
Alioe, Duchess of Gloucester, 
The Duke and Duchess of 
Gloucester and The Duke and 
Duchess of Kent were present. 

Her Majesty and Their Royal 
Highnesses were received upon 
arrival by the Captain of The 
Queen's Flight (Air Vice-Mar- 
shal John Severne). 

The Ladies and Gentlemen of 
the Households in Waiting were 
in attendance; 

The Duke of Edinburgh ar- 
rived at Elgin Statin in the Royal 
Train this morning and was 
received by Her Majesty's Lord- 
Lieutenant for Morayshire 
(Captain lain Tennant). 

His Royal Highness sub- 
sequently presented Colours to 
the 2nd Battalion of the 51st 
Highland Volunteers at Cooper 
Park, Elgin. 

Major the Hon Andrew 
Wigram was in attendance. 


The Prince Andrew, 
accompanied by Mbs Sarah 
Ferguson, arrived at Royal Air 
Force Linton-on-Ouse from 
Northern Ireland this morning. 

The Prince Andrew, 
accompanied by Mbs Sarah 
Ferguson, this aJtcnioon visited 
the Northern Police Convales- 
cent Home (Superintendent Mr 
A. Outhwaite) at Harrogate, 
where His Royal Highness was 
received by the Vice Lord- 
Lieu tenant for North Yorkshire 
(Major General H.G. Woods) 
and the Deputy Chief Constable 
of North Yorkshire (Mr R. 
Cummings). 

The Prince Andrew, 
accompanied by Miss Sarah 
Ferguson, this evening attended 
the Graduation Dinner far 32 
Royal Naval Pilots Course at 
Royal Air Force Linton-on- 
Ouse, where His Royal High- 
ness was received by the Station 
Commander (Group Captain 
G.H. Rolfe) and the Senior 
Naval Office (Commander 
RJ5.G. Kent, RN). 

Wing Commander Adam 
Wise was in attendance; 
KENSINGTON PALACE 
June 26: The Duke of Glouces- 
ter. as President, was present 
this afternoon at the Annual 
General Meeting of the Cancer 
Research Campaign at the 
Royal Institute of British Archi- 
tects, 66 Portland Place, 
Loudon. 

Lieutenant Colonel-Sir Simon 
Bland was in attendance; 


The Queen will hold investi- 
tures at Buckingham Palace on 
July 22 and 24. 

Princess Anne, president of the 
Missions to Seamen, will attend 
their annual meeting at St 
Michael Paternoster on July 1. 

A memorial service for General 
Sir Ouvry Roberts will be held 
in the Cathedral, Christ Church, 
Oxford, at 11 am today. 

A memorial service for Major- 
General R. W. Madoc will be 
held at St Lawrence Jewry-next- 
GuikihaU at noon today. 


Marriages 


Viscount Parker 
and Mrs STL Mead 
The marriage look place re- 
cently in Henley-on-Thames be- 
tween Viscount Parker and Mrs 
Sandra Hope Mead. 

Mfajor HJL BaflHe 
and Miss SJ. Wfllway 
The marriage took place in the 
Guards Chapel, Wellington Bar- 
racks, on June 25, between 
Major Hubert Baillie, Grenadier 
Guards, younger son of the late 
Captain AM. Gucewicz-BaiUie 
and Mrs A.G. Gucewicz- Baillie. 
and Miss Sarah Willway, elder 
daughter of Lieutenant-Colonel 
and Mrs M.L. Willway. The 
Bishop of Truro officiated, as- 
sisted by Cation David Marri- 
ott, the Rev Neville Thomas 
and Father Alastair RussdL 

The bride, who was given in 
marriage by her father, was 
attended by Victoria and 
Antonia Craster, Olivia and 
Jessica Adams, Charlotte Clare 
Winser, Alexander Baillie, and 
Thomas Macfariane. Lieuten- 
ant-Colonel Michael Craster 
was best man. 

Mr J.W. Hareinek 
and Miss M. BendaH 
The marriage took place on 
Saturday, June 21, at St 
Andrew's Church, Ferring, be- 
tween Mr John Havranek. son 
of Mr and Mrs W.A. Havr&nek, 
of Ferring, West Sussex, and 
Miss Marlene BendalL of Hong 
Kong. 

The bride, who was given in 
marriage by Mr R.O. Price, was 
attended by Miss Roo Bendall 
and Miss Claire Alexander. Mr 
Paul Havranek was best man. 

A reception was held at Little 
Thakeham, West Sussex. 


M Y.G. Cattet 
and Miss STJ. Reeve 
Hie marriage took place on 
Saturday, June 21, at St GDes 
Church, Medbotune, of M Yves 
Gilbert Cattet, son of M and 
MmeG. Cattet, ofAixles Bains, 
France, and Miss Sally Fiona 
Jewell Reeve, daughter of 
Group Captain and Mrs Mi- 
chael Reeve, of Cobblers Cot- 
tage, Medbourne, 

Leicestershire. 

Mr AJTJB. Norman 

and Miss AJ.Hokroft 
The marriage took place on 
Saturday, June 21, at St Mary’s 
Church, Bentley, of Mr Andrew 
Norman, son of Mr A.V.B. 
Norman and of Mrs C.M.N. 
Norman, and Miss Alexandra 
Holcroft. daughter of Mr T.G.G 
Holcroft and of the late Mrs J.E. 
HolcrofL The Rev WA Rogers 
officiated. 

The bride, who was given in 
marriage by her father, was 
attended by Miss Caroline 
Holcroft, william Newhouse, 
Lucy Taylor, and Michael Simp- 
son. Mr Timothy Wright was 
best man. 

Mr G.V. Stopfoid 
and Mrs M. Munro 
The marriage took place quietly 
in Winchester on June 14 
between Mr Vyvyan Stopfbrd 
and Mrs Edith Munro, widow of 
Brigadier Malcolm Munro. 

Mr J.P. Wheeler 
and Mrs S- Greenwood 
The marriage took place on 
Sunday. June 22. in Leicester of 
Mr Jonathan Wheeler, second 
son of Brigadier and Mrs Guy 
Wheeler, of Warn brook, Somer- 
set, and Mrs Susan Greenwood 
second daughter of Mr and Mrs 
Harry Yates, of Birsiall, 
Leicester. 


Saleroom 



prices soar 


Sotheby's sale of postwar 
European art set nine new 
auction price records yester- 
day for udfridiial artists and 
Araonstrated that this market 
is raoringfntotbe big money. 
Ttfc not quite up with the 
Americans yet, bat the- gap is 
narrowing. 

.Fontana, the' Italian who 
specializes in - slashing 
canvases, secured the top price 
at £143,000 (estimate fSKMMW 
to £120, A00) with his “Lana a 
Venezia" of 1961, a big white 
moon on a hhdt canvas with a 
penumbra of holes. The previ- 
ous high for his work was 
£5730. 

A big Poliakoff patchwork 
of colours ■■ entitled 
"Composition' 1 made £83,600 
(estimate £60,000 to £8030), ' 
another auction record. An 
outstanding price ' was tire 
£7930 (estimate £55000 to 
£70,000) for a bine sponge on a 
bine plaster stand by- Yves 
Klein. 


By Geraldine Norman, Sale Room Correspondent 

Manzonf is. another fop 
runner. A white canvas of his, 

. entitled “Admane", set a new 
auction price records! £45,100 
(estimate £20,000 to £30,000) 
when Sotheby's sold the 


and contemporary art on 
Wednesday, night.- 

The Johnssens werecoOect- 
ihg in the 1960s and early 
1970s. The Mairami would 
have cost them mock tire same 
as Julio le Parc’s “UntMed", 
which was left unsold at 
£2,600. 

The selectivity with which 
artists have been picked owt 
for fovom was nhderiboed by 
the foot that 39 of the 84 lots 
on offer were left ansoUL Two 
bin paii rt fa ffg failed to sell: 
Mai com Mor ley's “New York " 
City Postcard” at £140,000 
and Howard Kanorite's “The 
Opening” at £30,000. 

At Christie'S yesterday the 
phenomenal demand fin 1 good ' 
English fnrnitare was nnder- 


lined yet again by a sale 
totalling £1 -6m, with only 4per 
cent unsold. 

There were two unusual 
commodes attributed- to Chip- 
pendale and Hug at £48,600 
and £7030. Urey were made 
for die Hoare family who are 
known to have employed Chqn 
pendale and have several de- 
sign features found in pieces 
that he is known to have made. 
Furniture securely attributed 
to his workshop is my rare. 

Top-quality or quirky pieces 
are the front runners. A Queen 
Anne yew wood table with an 
unusual ivory plaque insetin 
its top, depicting a manor 
house with a formal garden, 
sold for £29,160 (estimate 
£6,000 to £8,000). 

Even minor hens shared hi 
the boom. A George HI ma- 
hogany tray sold for £3,456 
(estimate W tt £1,500). 
The top price was £91,800 
(estimate £30,000 to £40/J00) 
for a Chinese scarlet ami gold 


lacquer six-leaf screen reput- 
edly presented by a Jesuit 
in China, to the Arcfa- 
doke Leopold of Austria ob his 
election as Holy Roman Em- 
peror in 1700. 

In Faris on Wednesday a 
sepia drawing by Goya a* 
man ghootmgwitii his dog was 
sold for 1.7mllion francs (esti- 
mate lmfrX or £355,000, in a 
Deurbergve auction. The sale 
also iadndedR Gangoin mono- 
type- touched up with 
watercolour entitled “Nave 
Nave Fenim”, depicting a 
naked South Seas woman, 
which sold for Unfr (esti- 
mate 800,0006), or 073,000, 
to a British bidder. . 

The morning sale of books 
from the collection of Lionel 
Robinson, a famous London 
bookseller,' made £366,256 at 
Sotheby’s with less than 1 pm 
cent unsold. A Missal pub- 
lished in 1527 wftb fllnmnmt- 
ed decoration made' £5730 


Forthcoming 

marriages 

Mr MJ. Booth 
and Miss SJ. Mardrington 
The engagement is announced 
between Michael John, eldest 
son of Mr 'and Mrs Eric Booth, 
of Hale, Cheshire, and Sarah 
Jane, younger daughter of Mr 
and Mrs James Marchington, of 
Bowden, Cheshire. 

Mr JjC. Carter 
and Miss EXJL Gray 
The engagement is announced 
between Jonathan Charles, 
younger son of Mr and Mrs 
David Carter, of Leamington 
Spa, and Elizabeth Louise, 
youngest daughter of Dr and 
Mrs Ian Ramsay Gray, of 
Warwick. 

Mr GJL Ehwthy ' 
and. Miss F. Mtehebnore 
The engagement is announced 
between Charles, elder son of 
Mr and Mn Peter El worthy, of 
Craigmore, Timaru, New Zea- 
land, and Frances, younger 
daughter of Mr and Mrs George 
Michel more, of Wfaitegate Cot- 
tage, Litileboume, Kent. 

de Heer JX. Falkeabarg 
and MissSLLB. Foster 
The engagement is announced 
between Hans, son of de Heer 
and Mevrouw Leo J. 
Falkenburg-Vogel, The Hague, 
The Netherlands, and Sara, 
eldest daughter Mr and Mrs 
Firank S.R. Foster, Cuckfieki, 
Sussex. 

Dr D.T. Griffin 

and Miss Si. Price-Thomas 

The enjEagemcnt is announced 


between David, only son of Mr 
and MrsT. Griffin, of Bamacre, 
Lancaster, and Suzanne, elder 
daughter of LieutenantColond 
D. Price-Thomas. RAMC(retd), 
and Mrs Price-Thomas. of 
Broadgate Farm, Cookbury, 
Devon. 

Mr AAA. Hargreaves 
and Miss &C PUaayiotOB 
The engagement is announced 
between Adrian Anthony 
Augustine, youngest son of Mr 
and Mrs P. Hargreaves, of 
Wailington, Surrey, and Susan 
Catherine, only daughter of Mr 
and Mrs D. Panayioiou, of 
Wimbledon, London. - 


Dr MJA. Dwyer 
and Miss CJ. Hide 
The engagement is announced 
between Mi chad, son of Mr and 
Mrs DA. Dwyer, -of Woburn 
Sands,. Buckinghamshire, and 
Charlotte, daughter of Dr and 
Mrs D. Hide, otuffbrd, Suffolk. 
Mr G.W. Fold 
. and FMkea GAM- EGassen 
The engagement is announced 
between Gregory, younger' son 
of Major and Mrs CJELW. Ford, 
of South Farm, Pawlett, Somer- 
set, and Inger, only daughter of 
Herr and Fru G. Eliasson, of 
Varberg, Sweden. 

Mr CW. Milne 

and Miss CH. Messer 
The engagement is announced 
between Christopher, younger 
son of the late Mr W.M. Milne 
and of Mrs Babs Wise, of 
Putney. London, and Carey, 
younger daughter of Mr and Mis 
Cholmdey Messer, of the 
Manor House, Normandy, 
Surrey. 

Mr CAJf. Pm 
and Mks SJXN. Ckmgh 
The engagement is announced 
-between Charles, eldest son of 
, Major John Poe, of Coiscombe, 
Dorset, and Mrs William Ged- 
des, of Liyswen, Brecon, and 
Susie, ddest daughter of Mr and 
Mrs Peter Clough, of 
Hampsthwaiie, Yorkshire. 

Mr J.W. Scrodis 
and Miss SLP. Punirar 
The engagement is announced 
between John; only son of Mrs 
G. DeBoise and ibelate Mr J.A 
Scrodis, of Cbdsfield, Kent, and 
Soraya, only, daughter of Mrs P. 
Puxrwar and the late Dr NA 
Punwar, of Chisleburst, KenL 
Mr JJP. Smith' 
and Miss J. Medwin 
The engagement is announced 
between Jonathan Peter, son of 
Dr and Mrs Dennis G Smith, of 
Cowbridge, South Glamorgan, 
and Jayne, daughter of Mr and 
Mrs Terence- C. Medwin, of 
Swansea, West Glamorgan.' 

Dr SJ. Squire 
and Miss JJVL Whitehead 
The engagement is announced 
between Bertel, second son of 
. Mr and Mis Hugh Squire, of 
Fenny Compton, Warwickshire, 
and Jane, younger daughter of 
Mr and Mrs John Whitehead, of 
Dulwich, London. . 


Latest wills 

Air Chief Marshal Sir Walter 
Hugh Merton, of Wflton^ Salis- 
bury, former Chief of Staffi 
Allied Air Forces (Central Eu- 
rope), left estate valued at 
£144,121 net. 

Major General Alfred 
Lockwood Gadd, of Erinington, 
Devon,- for the past 20 years a 
regular compiler of crosswords 
for The Times, left £48,707 net. 


Mrs Vera Benkms, of Moreton 
in Marsh, left £1,1 13339 net 
Mis Eileen Elizabeth Mason, of 
Guildford, left £976,970 net 
Other estates include (net, be- 
fore tax paid); 

Calver. Mr Herbert John, of 
Stradbroke. Suffolk — £473,794 
Davies, Mrs Muriel Gladys, of 
Rustongton, West 

Sussex £381,619 

Frentz, 'Mrs Mabel', of 
Parkstone, Dorset £376,672 


Buckingham 
Palace luncheon 

The Queen held a luncheon 

party yesterday at Buckingham 

Palace at which Princess Mar- 

garet was present. The guests 
were: 

Jane mover i conductor), Mr Kenny 

feiecut] ve rtlrertor K2). Mr Nicholas 
Phillips. QC (recorder of (he Crown 
Court; Mr R are tiid ar Strati, terlnctoto 
lecturer In economics. Bradford and 
fiuay Common icy College. Bradford!. 
Mr Terry Walla tadviaer M (ho 
ArchlUshoo of Caiwertrary an Aft- 
oilcan Communion Affairs) and Mr 
william wiud«son ccaattrroan. Nun 
Conservancy Council). 

Luncheon 

Royal College of Surgeons of 
England 

Professor Sir Geoffrey Slaney, 
President of the Royal College 
of Surgeons of Endland, 
accompanied by Lady Slaney 
and members of council, yes- 
terday entertained at luncheon 
members of the court of patrons. 
Before the luncheon Mx. Bruce 
A Dawson and Mr Arnold 
Ehon were admitted as mem- 

bers of the court. Among those 
present were: 

fa- A W Sadenougta. Mbs Cecilia 
coHedge. Mtrfh cowen. Mr w f 
D avis. Me Jocelyn O Hamhro. Mr 
John B Kinross, vtocount LevcrhuliH. 
Mr Percy R Levy. Mr and Mrs Peler 
Lard. MrHRL Lumley. Mr R E W 
unnley. Sir Revfrcud Murlcy k^- J 
Pemberton. Lord PorrttT Mr Ronald 
w Raven. Mr J L Reed. Sir Thomas 
Holmes Setters. Sir WUUaam Shaoland. 
Lord Steff of BrtmMon. Lord Smith. 
Mr Stephen Steen. Major O L Wet*, 
and Sir DavM and Lady tenet 
williams. 


Dinners 


Peat Marwick 

By courtesy of the Lord Mayor, 
Sir Allan Davis, Peat Marwick 
gave a dinner on June 25 at the 
Mansion House to mark its 

sixth International Banking and 

Finance Conference. The guests 

were received by the senior 

puttier. Sir John Grenside, the 
deputy .senior partner, Mr P. 

James Butler, and the speakers 

were Sir John Grenside, Sir 
Allan Davis and Mr Robin 
Leigb-Peraberton, Governor of 
tire Bank of England. The guests 
included: 

Lanl Bather. Umd Boardman. Lord 
Lever of MwciKVd. Lord Ron of 
linden. Sr Michael Palmer, sir 
Robert Armstrong. J3y Donald Barron. 
Sir Kenneth. -Benin. Sr Timotey 
Bevan. Sir Brian Hayes. Sir Jasper 
Hollom. Sir Pvter Middleton. Sr John 
Read. Sir Thomas Risk. Mr C 
BlOnden. MrC AE Hambro. Mr M J 
HaWKes. MrR-PHam&y. Senator RR 
Jeunr. MrRE.B Lloyd and Mr C R 
Reeve*. 

GoM and Silver Wyre Drawers* 
Company 

The Gold and Silver Wyre 
Drawers* Company held a (tin- 
ner at Chartered Accountants* 
Hall last night to celebrate the 

affiliation of the Royal Army 
Ordnance Corps to the com- 
pany. Mr Ronald R. Elliott, 
Master, presided, assisted by Mr 
Richard M. Thorpe, Mr God- 

frey Davis, Mr Peter G. Nathan 


and Mr Malcolm J. Hollins, 
Wardens. Mr Alderman Bryan 
E. Toye and Major-General 
Wi. Whalley also spoke. 

Patternmakers' Company 
Mr AN. Eskenzi. Master of the 
Patten makers’ Company, pre- 
sided at a court dinner held at 
the Inner Temple Hall last 
nighL Judge Mason, QC, was 
the principal gnest and speaker 
and Judge Vemey also. spoke. 

Glaziers' Company 
Colonel M. H. Seys- Phillips, 
assisted by the Wardens and 
Court of Assistants of .the 
Glaziers' Company, presided at 
the St Peter's Day Quarter Court 
dinner held at Glaziers' Hall last 
night Mr Denys Randolph, 
Master of the -Cutters* Com- 
pany, was among the guests. 
Metropolitan . Special 
Constabolary 

The annual dinner of the Metro- 
politan Special Constabulary 
Commandants was held at The 
Brewery, ChisweU Street last 
night 1 Mr Arthur Hammond. 
Chief Commandant was in (he 
chair. Among those present 
were: 

Grates*-. Mr R°»te Matmews. Mr 
G^ofr cbotairy and Mr John HBL 

Service reception 

RAF Support Command 

Air Marshal Sir John Sutton. 
Air Officer Commanding-in- 
Chiet; -RAF Support Command, 
and Lady Sutton, received the 
guests at the annual reception 
held at RAF Brampton yes- 
terday evening. 

Service dinners 

Royal Yacht Officers 
Rear-Admiral J. Gamier pre- 
sided at a dinner held at HMS 
Nelson last night for officers 
who have served in the Royal 
Yachts. Among those present 
were: 

Admiral Sta" Guy Qranteam. Vk*- 

- - vie*- 

Rcir 


Pnbcr Dawray. 

PnUip wtbm. 


Admiral Sic 

Admiral Sir . 

Admirals Sir Pate GrwnlM. 
jMpch Heni«y. Sir Hnoh Janan. Sir 

Richard Twwbuap. A A Lockyw. H 

D Nbnn and J C K Slater. 

1st Pa a jab Regimental 

Association 

Members of the 1st Puqjab 
Rcmmental Association held 
thor annual dinner at the Naval 
and Military Club last night 
Major-General -J. G. Elliott pre- 
sided and. Lieutenant-Colonel 
A. A. Mains was the principal 
guesL 

Mountain Artillery 
Major-General BJP. Hughes pre- 
sided at the annual dinner of the 
Mountain Artillery Dinner Club 
held at the Naval and Military 
Cub last night. Major-General 
C.G. Comock was the principal 
guest. 


Births, Marriages, Deaths and In Memoriam 


BIRTHS, MARRIAGES, 
DEATHS md II MBKOMAM 
£4 a Km + 15X VAT 

(mrannum 3 lines) 

Announcements. mihoiDcdcd by ibe 
name and permanent address of ibe 
lender, may be ini me 

THE TIMES 
TO BOX 484 
Vrrgnua Street 
LonkM El 

or Idephoncd (by tdepbone subs- 
aben only) Kr. B1-4S1 JOS 

AnnawKanems can be icrnnd by 
icfephooe between ‘>.0Om and 
SJOpm Monday 10 Friday, on Saiur- 

® p between d.OOtmi and 12 noon. 

■4SI «H0 ItaM. For paWknuoa ibe 
fodonrng day phone by I -30pm. 


etc on Conn and Social Page a ■ Em 
+ 1» VAT. 

Cowl and Social Page announce- 

ments can not be accented bv 
telephone. Enquinca n B1-S22 I9S3 
(aheT KLlOamL or wnd to; 

1. FlMgM Sum*. Mm El. 

Please allow al least 48 bouts before 
pa M uaiioa. 


Many are the afntotoni or tee rtoMeouc 
nut me LORD denverete Mm out a I 
them ML 

PuM SO: 19 


BIRTHS 


BASMALL - On June 9Sih. 1986 Id 
Nicola urfe Flrcks) and Martin, a 
dauohier. Francesca Mary Spence. 

CARTER On 21 si June al Uw Prince** 
Christian HomtUL Windsor, to Janie 
i nee WUson) and Ntrt. a daughter. 
Prudence Ann. 

COLCBY • on ZSOi June al Queen 
Mary’s Hospital. Roetiarnpton to 
Sarah into Plummer ) and Anteony. 
a daofltur. Gcwgma Lucy. 

CUSHMAN . On May 23rd. to Artenr 
m«e Gould) and Robert a daughter. 
Chloe. and two sons. Alimony and 
MHrtieU. 

FERRARA • On June ilte, 1986 in 
Boston. USA to Flora into Watson) 
and James, a son. Andrew Wifiiant 
Stewart 

FOSTER -On June 15. to Howard and 
Rachel into Trougmon Smite), a sec- 
ond sol MatUiew waham Hugh, a 
brother tor Patrick 

CUfNMBS - On June 19th. 1986 to 
Viuenne into van Ameronoen) and 
Kieran. a son. Malachy. 

HARRIS - On June 2SUt. In Hong 
Kong, to Judl into Lerwflll. and 
John, a son. Nicholas Peter Lerwtll. a 
brother for Timothy and also (or 
Thomas. 

JOYCE On 24th June 1986. to Kathy 
inee Hastate) and vineetu at Royal 
Sussex County Hospital, a daughter, 
Lucy Kathleen, a sister (or Luke. 
DC. 

KRUSSMAH/de PASS - On 21st June 
lo Richard and Anna, a son. DanM 
Peter 


LYMf-EVAMS ■ On 36th June « 
Queen Charlotte's Hosfltal to Jude 
into Walbeafre-Wllson) and Julian, a 
daughter. Lucy Sarah. 

.LYONS - (hi 25th June to Joanna (nto 
Shtres) and DavM. at the Portland 
Hospital, a son. George DavM 
William. 

MERCY - On 25th June at the Princess 
EUzabeth HospuaL Guernsey, to Di- 
ana into Penn) and Robert, a 
daughter. Rachel Diana Louse, a sis- 
ter (or Alexandra and Olivia. 

FACET On 17th June at Basingstoke 
District Hospital, to Richenda (nto 
Central and Richard, a daughter 
Emma RactieL 

ROBSON - On 24th June at the Port- 
land Hospital. London to Linda (nto 
Maxwell) and Peter, a son. Benjamin 
Alexander, a brother for Edward 
Julius. 

n aa m - On 24U1 June. 1986 at Sc 
Teresa's. Wimbledon to Carodne 
into CrUnston] and Richard, a 
daughter. Stella Frances Leah. 

STRANGE - On 24th June at Lincoln 
County Hospital to Jackie (nto 
Fleming) and Peter, a son. Tom 
Charles, a brother (or wuuam. 

WELLS-COLE • On June 14th. to 
□avid and Catherine (nto Roberts) at 
Epsom District HospUaL a daughter. 
Zoe EUzabeth. 

WILLIAMS - On June 260> to Joy (nto 
CleggJ and Nefl. a daughter. Ctdoe 
Joy. 

WOOH/ W ALLEY - On June t3th at 
the Quern’s Medical Centre. Matting- 
ham. to Pamela and Graham, a 
daughter. EUzabeth. 


DEATHS 


ANTED - On 24th June tn Lewisham 
Hospital. James Eric. Hearty loved by 
his wife Rosemary, children Michael. 
Jennifer. Jane and Felicity, an etev* 
en grandchildren and abler Audrey. 
He will be sadly m is sed by all who 
knew 1dm. Funeral Service at 6L 
Margaret Lee on Thursday. 3rd July 
at 2.00 pm. followed by cremation at 
Lewisham Cniinaurtam. FamBy 
(towers only. Donations, if desired, 
to Lewisham HospltaL Ward B9. wa- 
ter Bed Fund. 

BLAKE On 24Ui June. Pnytts Lucy 
into Turner) aged 88. banister .and 
much loved wife of Anthony Moraan 
Blake of Sparrows. Lias. Hants, after 
a short and merciful ffiness. the reso- 
lute and a dmi red aunt of tenthe rad 
Bysshe, strong to Ihe end. Funeral tl 
am. AOUi June at St Marys. Lias. 

nJkXLAND - On June 24th. peaceful, 
ly. John David. Funeral service at 
Trinity Hospital ChapeL Oun. 
Shropshire. 9.00 a.nu Monday 30th 
June, fottowed In* committal service 
10.40 a m. al Shrewsbury Cremato- 
rium. Family (towers only pleoae. 
Donation. If desired, to Amnesty 
international or RJ&P3. 

CURRY George Ramshaw. M-A. (Can 
tab'. Camp. L Mech. E. - On 26th 
June, peacefully al home, at EMOOi- 
Deepty loved widower of AUSOd- 
frtend of Joan, father of Nicholas. 
Timothy and Verily joubert amt 
grandfather of Haytey-Emma. 
Nicola. George and Katy. Funeral 
Service and cremation at Randalls 
Part Crematorium. Leather head. 
Surrey on Wednesday. 2nd July at 
2.00 pm. No flowers by reouest but 
dooanom, if desired, to the PrimteM 
Alice Hospice. Esher. Surrey. 


CLARFELT - On Wednesday. 2Sth 
June, peacefully after a short IBnets. 
George, aged. 62 . loving and drarty 
loved husband of Myra, and beloved 
father of Angela (Marsdon) an d 
John. Dearest Mher-tiMaw of Hugh 
and Dinah, and adored Grandpa. Fu- 
neral al The Jewish Cemetery. Little 
Bushev Lane. Bushey. Hertfordshire 
on Friday. 27th June al 12 noon. 
Ptoase. no flowers. 

EVANS - On 25th June, aged 74. 
Peacefully at Ids home Hoo Mifl. 
ingestre. Stafford. Cotonel Rupert 
John Carless Uactt Evans. T.D_ D.L. 
Loved h u sb an d of Barbara, father of 
EUzabeth. Hilary and Ptp and proud 
grandfather. Req ui em Mass at SL 
Austin's. Wolverhampton Road. 
Stafford al 2.50 pm. Monday. 80th 
June, fottowed by a private family 
burial at Siowe-by-CharUey. All en- 
quiries to wiauun Emery & Sons. 
Stafford 61206. 

EVANS-TOOHE - On June 26th 1986. 
peacefully at Kestrel Grave. Bushey 
Heath. Mrs Nellie Evans-Pughe, aged 
95. widow of The Rev Joseph Evans- 
Pughe. Funeral on Monday. 30th 
June at 2.00 pun.. St Peter's, Bushey 
Heath. Hens. Family (lowers only. 
Donations to Ibe Royal School of 
Church Music. Addington Palace. 
Croydon. 

FMIY - Sir Moms and Lady Mary 
win both be cremated at 3.00 pm on 
Friday. 4th July at Cambridge City 
Crematorium. Huntingdon Road. 
Cambridge. No flowers please. A 
Memorial Ceremony will be held In 
Cambridge al a later dale 

FREEMAN - On June 25Ui at home. 
John Martin. Dearly loved husband 
of Jean and lather of John. Patricia 
Hamilton. Michael. Mark. Qulntln 
and Tom. and much loved grandfa- 
ther. Funeral Service al SL Peter's 
Church. Henflekl on July 2nd al 12 
noon. 

COUSA ■ CM June 25th. 1986. peace- 
fully at SL Joseph's Hospice. 
Hackney. Lea. aged 87. of Rookitafd 
Avenue. Muswen HU1 NIO. She will 
be much missed bv her many friends. 
Cremation at Chy of London Crema- 
torium. Manor. Park. . E12 on 
Wednesday. Judy 2nd at 12.10 pm. 
Enquiries to Mullens. 01-650 8822. 

GREY - On 34Ui June 1986. Dr Paul 
Ouranowsky Grey. ' Funeral 
Mortlake Crematorium. Tuesday, lit 
July at 4.00 p m. Enquiries to H. A. 
Barker & Sons. 01-385 0866. 

ROWE • On June 22nd. 1986. sudden- 
ly in Brussels. Catherine, aged 28. of 
14 FtagtKtti Road. Canford cufto. 
Dorset. Much tovod daughter Of Rex 
and Joan Howe and sister of Sarah. 
Rachel. Frances and Thomas. May 
she rest m peace- Funeral Service. 
Tuesday. July la at 12 noon at the 
Church Of The Transfiguration. 
Canford caffs, followed by inter- 
ment of ashes at Parkstone 
Cemetery. Roses or garden flowers 
may be sent to the Church or to 
Dcric-ScotL Putman Lodge Funeral 
Home. Bournemouth. 

HUGHES (nto Cftrto»€adle) - On 
Wednesday. 2S(h June 1986. peace- 
fully at HetiHre. Ruthin. North 
Wales, Eitid Hughes, JJ>.. MJJ. Bfr- 
losed wile of Trevor Hughes and 
dear mother of auhoi. DeUa. John 
and Phystda and much hned Naira 
of ad her grandchliaren. Funeral 
Service at St. Peter's. Ruthin, Mon- 
day. 30lh June al 2 JO pm. Flowers 
and ewwtnes to Dowell. Funeral' Di- 
rectors. Ruthin (08242) 2763- 


- Peacefully on Monday. 
23rd June. Madeleine, de Baudoy. 
formerly of rvy Hatch and. on retire- 
menL bved In Hopgarden' Lane. 
Sevenoaks for many years. Dearly 
beloved wife of the late Michael 
Edmund, mother of Alastair and 
g ra n dmother of Richard and Brace, i 
Service at 2X0 pm. Thursday. 3rd 
July at SL Lawrence Church, Seal 
Chan. Stone Street near Seal. 
Sevenoaks. Flowers to Francis 
Chappell & Sons. 3 London Road. 
Sevenoaks. or donations lo Cheshire 
Homes. 


Pamela EUzabeth of 
Nanscawen Par. Cornwall. Beloved 
sister of Hobd and Ella. Peacefully 
after a short Illness on 24th June 
1986. Funeral Service. Friday. 4th 
July at 2-SO pm. Tretarwny ChapeL 
PenmounL Truro. GomwatL Family 
only. No flowers by request please. 
MELLON - On 24th June. John Leigh, 
beloved husband of Mavis and father 
of Oorinne and Julian. Requiem at 
SL .Mary's Parish Church. Hendon 
NW4 on Wednesday. 2nd July at 
11.00 am. foBowed by burial at Hen- 
don Cemetery. Enquhtes lo Doune A 
Co_ 39 Brent Street. London NW4. 

Id. 01-202 8008 to whom flowers 
or. If preferre d , donations to . the 
North London Hospice Group should 
be senL A Memorial Service will tie 
announced later. 

OUVKR- On June 20th. 1 986 al Pad- 
dington Community HoapHaL Ethel 
Monamy F ar mborough, aged 92. 
Loved auni of Evelyn Newnham. 
great aun l and great peat aura. 
mOCTOft, Sir PhUlp K-B.E- K St 
John. : Died Peacefully at Mary Pot- 
ter Hospice, on June 22nd. 1986. 
aged 84 years. Dearly loved husband 
of Hilary Frances, and much loved 
father and (attwr-(n-Law or Jenifer 
and Donald Green. Jeremy and The- 
resa. Susan Proctor. Mary Jane and 
Gary Higgins. Judith and Philip Lee 
Can nan and Julian and Ruth. Oeariy 
loved yandpa of Richard. Katherine. 
Stephanie. Fiona. Margaret. Marie- 
Therese. Catherine. Justine. James, 
kabefle. Sarah. Natalie. Richard. 
PMMo and Louise, loved brother of 
the late Dorothy Jean Proctor, and 
brother-in-law of Alteon and Robin 
Rutherford, and loved unde of Mark 
and Andrew. Messages to Flat 6. 
Landscape Apartments. 125 Austin 
Street. Wellington, interment took 
place at Wellington. New Zealand, on 
Tuesday. June 24th. 1986. Lychgate 
Funeral Service. FJJ.A.NX. 
VAUGHAIMOtaS - On June 20th. 
. peacefully. Thomas George Clayton. 
O.&E- of Folkestone, aged 78 years. 
He win be sadly missed by hb broth- 
er. son. daughter and grandchildren 
and -numerous friends. Cremation 
Private. 

mu KOIZE John. EUzabeth. Sacha 
and Leonte - Tragically in a road 
accident on 23rd June i486. Beloved 
parents and sisters of Samantha, and 
family of Isabella and Alexandre and 
Maty Edmonson. Funeral Service 
private. Memorial Service thereafter 
at St. Mary the Virgin. Tetbury on 
Thursday. 3rd July at 3.00 pm. to 
which all friends are invited. 

WATT -On June 24th. 1986. peaceful- 
ly In hospital after a shut illness. 
William Wamock (BW) of Sheri ff- 
hales. Shropshire. Dear husband of 
Joan. To be loved and remembered 
by ms family and his mends. Private 
cremation. No flowers please but do- 
nations- If wished, to Ihe Shropshire 
Welfare TrosL c/o Tranter Lowe. 66 
High SL Oawiey. Telford TS4 2KD. 


WARMER - On Tuesday. 24th June 
1986. Rex. quietly and bravely at 
wauingtord Community HospltaL 
Deeply mis sed and mounted by Ids 
wife. sons, daughters and grandchil- 
dren. Funeral service at St Leonards 
Church, waungfard at 2JS0 pun. on 
Monday 30th June. Flowers from 
family only- Donations. If wished, to 
St Johns ward. Wallingford Commu- 
nity Hospital- Al) enquiries to J.W. 
Marcham. 66 Wood Street. Teh 
0491 36143. 

WELSH On June 2«to. Dame Ruth 
Maty Eldridge of The Bury Odtoam 
Hampshire, born 2nd August 1896. 
Daughter of William Robert Daboefl 
and loving mother of Michael and 
grandmother of Piers and Jotyn. Ser- 
vice 12.00 noon. Tuesday. 1M July 
at AH Saints OOIham. Donations If 
desired to RJLF. Benevolent Fund. 

WHITEHEAD Lesley Jean Code Carter) 
on June 24th at Guy's HospltaL 
Mtxh loved wife of Stman. mother of 
Matthew and Rebecca, daughter of 
Joan and sister of Denise Carter. Fu- 
neral at SL Giles Church. Buy Lane. 
Codteote. Herts on Tuesday. July 1st 
at 2.00 pin. Flowers, or donations 
made out to the Impe ria l Cancer 
Fund or the Welwyn Hatfield Hos- 
ptcrCsre Sendee, e/o Geo. W. Blow 
A Sons Ltd. 12 Prospect Place. Wel- 
wyn. Herts AL6 9EN. 


MEMORIAL SERVICES 


ROTAMAN Harry Thompson 
Sunbury-On>Thames who died LBQi 
May 1986. Manorial service at 
Ashford congregational Church. 
Clarendon Road. Ashford. Middlesex 
at 250 pm Wednesday 9th Jtfly. 
RUSSELL - Memorial Meeting for 
Dora' RosseH - celebrating Bre fenU- 
PM, educations, socialist. pacfllsL 
• homaiittet - at Conway Han. Red Lion 
Square. Hmdon Wd.cn Tuesday. 8 
July 1986. beginning at 730 pm. 


IN MEMORIAM - PRIVATE 


COWELL • Jeremy ' James Ccweti, 
M J.. B.S.. passed away In a Are In 
London. June 27th, 1966. Bonn July 
13th. 1941. Lovingly remembered 
■b y Mu mmy. Ann. Timmy and Di. 

FOSTER • Thanks be -to God tor 
Charles Foster. PrtasL of Winchester 
who went to God foorteen years ago 
today. 

LEDEKMAN Manuel died June 27th. 
1984. Remembered with modi love. 
Vera. ■ 

SUSMR Hope - Just a year ago. WUh 
warm memories and love from Tim. 
Janet. Katy. Jeremy and all her 
many friends. 


FUNERAL 

ARRANGEMENTS 


CLARKE Gerald Hastings. The Rmeral 
service for family and dose friends 
will cake place U St Mary's Church. 
Leigh. KenL on Wednesday. July 
2nd. at £ pm. fottowed by private 
cremation. No flowers please. buHio- 
nations If desired to the British Heart 
Foundation. </0 w. Hodges A Co- 37 
Quakers Hall Lane. Seven Oaks. 
Kent A Memorial Service, to be held 
al St Michael's Church. Corn MIL 
London on SOdi July 1986 at 12.00 
noon. 


Birthdays today 

Mr Michael Alison, MP, 60; Sir 
Sydney Caine, 84; Mr. Alan 
'Coren, 48; Vice-Admiral Sir 
Roy- Halliday, 63; Mr Rupert 
Hambro, 43; Sir Thomas Har- 
ley, 91: Mr Ron Hayward, 69; 
Mr Bruce McGowan, 62; Profes- 
sor Nicholas Marisergjb, 76; Sir 
Alan Mocana, 79; Dr Tburstan 
Shaw, 72; Captain Bernard 
Thorpe, 91: the Very Rev A.C. 
Warren. 54; MrHugh Wood, 54. 


Fishmongers’ 
Company 

The following have been elected 
offioers of the Fishmongers’ 


KindereKy: Third War den. V teopum 
LevertiuhuK Fourth Wrtm. *fetor- 
•General the Duke of NortoOcnmi 
and Renter waixlen. Mr Q.R.C. 
Shepard: Stem Warden. Mr PJ-S. 
Lumsden. 


Glendower 
Preparatory School 

'A meeting of the Glendower 
Association will be held ax 87 
Queen's Gate on July 18, at 
.6pm. Any former members of 
staff or pupils who have not yet 
been contacted are invited to 
telephone the school for details. 


Literary award 

The Royal Society of 
Literature's Hernemann award, 
worth £3.000, has been won by 
Brian Moore for his novd. 
Black Robe, published by Jona- 
than Cape. 


OBITUARY 

MR REX WARNER 

Novelist and translator 
of the Classics 


- » 


Rex Warner, foe novelist, 
classicist, historian, teacher, 
poet and translator, died on 
June 24, at the age of-81. 

He was perhaps best known 
as foe author of three novels 
(foe earliest of a dozen) which 
foemedra' break entirety, and 
with unusual success, wrth the 
British fictional tradition. 
Chief of these novels was foe- 
first, The Wild Goose Chase 
(1937), an expressionist alle- 
gory which has continued to 
be read and discussed. 

Rex Ernest Warner was 
bom on March 9, 1905, the 
son of a vicar of Amberiy, in 
Gloucestershire. His mother 
was a school teacher. 

From St George’s School, 
Harpendcn, he won a scholar- 
ship in Classics to Wadham 
College, Oxford, where be 
gained a First in Mods fol- 
lowed by a degree in English. 

While there, he became 
associated with a group of 
young writers which was led 
by Auden and included Ste- 
phen Spender, C Day Lewis 
and Christopher Isberwood. 

But he was very different 
from them, and as a young 
man took an altogether subtler 
and more distinctive political 
line. As he was later to say: 
“most of my novels have been 
in some sense *politicaT ". 

After ' .leaving Oxford 
Warner taught at various 
schools, and at one stage took 
up an appointment in Egypt 
But he had now achieved a 
considerable reputation. In 
1937 C. J. Greenwood, owner 
of the Boriswood publishers, 
had the acumen to issue The 
Wild Goose Chase, written 
mainly in Egypt in 1933. 

' There had previously been 
some half-hearted attempts to 
imitate the style and manner 
of Kafka in English but, being 
little more- than pastiche, they 
had not attracted much notice. 

Warner took his unnamed 
country and its frontier 
straight from Kafka, by whom 
be was profoundly influenced; 
but his three brothers and 
their quest for foe wild goose, 
symbol of spiritual regenera- 
tion and hope, constituted a 
markedly original dement for 
which Warner drew upon his 
understanding of mythology 
and on his reading of the 
Brothers Grimm, rather thar 
on Kafka. 

Next came The' Professor 
(1938), on the conflict be- 
tween totalitarianism and lib- 
eral principles, and then in 
194! The Aerodrome, regard- 
ed by many critics as Warner’s 
most perfectly accomplished 
novd. 

The Aerodrome is written in 
a mode hovering between 
realism and the express! onis- 
tic. It is a gloomy book, 
prophesying a total abdication 
of human values arising from 


foe new spirit of nihilism and : 
the attitude later to be de- ; 
scribed as “existential ; 
atheism”. 7 

Warner later expressed fois 
point of view in non-fiction 
form in a book of esshys^, 
entitled The Cult of Power > 
(1946). Hie most, eloquent of 
them was “Dostoevsky and 
foe Collapse of Liberalism”; a 
disturbing study of the precar- 
ious position ofhumane val- 
ues in foe 20th century. ■' 

Immediately after the war 
Warner worked for the ATbed 
Control Commission in Ber- 
lin. He then became director 
of the British Institute in 
Athens, fioin 1945 10 1947, 
and there cazne to know 
George Seferis, whose porary 
he later translated. . 

Subsequently he held a vmi- ■ 
ety of professorships at Ameri- 
can universities; from 1 9 64 .to 
1974 he was Professor trf\ 
English at foe University of 
Connecticut. 

His attitude became mark- 
edly, although not dogmatical- 
ly, more Christian, and 'he 
directed his energies into ihe 
creation of a series of non- 
fiction historical works and 
into faitfrfuli translations of 
the Greek Classics. *; 

His retelling of classical 
legends achieved wide popu- 
larity, and his translations 
from Euripides ( Medea, (Tm- 
polytus, Helen), Aeschylus . 
(Prometheus Bound) and from ' 
such Greek historians as Thu- 
cydides and Plutarch, are' re- 
garded as foe best available. f - 
He also wrote some graceful 
minor poetry. 

Worthy of special mention 
is his version of Confessions' of 
St Augustine (1962), a thinker 
who came to mean more and 
more to him as he grew older. 

From The Young Caesar 
(1958) onwards, Warner’s fic- 
tion had become less imagina- 
tive and more expository, 
rather as if his creative powers 
had ceased trying to make way 
against the new surge of 
irrationality. 

But this novel and -its 
successors were fine examples 
of their genre - the scholarly 
and lively historical novel 
based on all the known faets. 
Imperial Caesar (1960) won 
the Tait Memorial Prize. ; 

Buriy and rugged in aspect 
Warner bad a vigorous zestfor 
life, and made many friends. 
He played darts as brilliantly 
as he argued philosphy, wa&an 
ardent bird-watcher, and had 
a fine, taste in wine. 

He was married three times. 
His first marriage was in 1929 
to the former Frances 
Cfiamier Grove, by whom-he 
had two sons and a daughter. 
This marriage was dissolved 
and in 1949 he married Barba- 
ra, Lady Rothschild, by whom 
be bad (me daughter. In 1966 
he remarried his first wife.-; 


MR SAM ALLEN 


Mr Sam Alien, who died on 
Jane '21, aged 81, was for 20 
years a director of News 
International. 

A man of wise counsel and 
quiet humour, he made a 
considerable contribution to 
tire newspaper and advertising 
industries. 

His direct involvement with 
newspaper publishing began 
in 1959 when be .was asked to 
represent foe late Professor 
Derek Jackson, who lived and 
worked in France, on the 
board of the News of the World 
of which Jackson was part- 
owner. 

. When Mr Rupert Murdoch 
acquired the newspaper, he 
invited Allen to remain on the 
board as' a nonexecutive 
director. 

In addition to his business 
experience he brought other 
qualities; unfailing courtesy, a 
warmth devoid of any selfish- 
ness, and complete integrity. 

Allen's career began at an 
early age. He left Eton at foe 
age of 15 on foe death of his fa- 
ther 10 join his mother and 
brothers in running the family 
printing firm ofDavidAGen & 
Sons. 

The industry went through 
lean times in the years after 
foe First World War, and it 
was largely owing to Allen's 
foresight that the transition 
was successfully made into the 
profitable - new industry of 
outdoor advertising. 

Frances Scott Smith, the 
only child of the author, F. 
Scott Fitzgerald, and his wife, 
Zelda, died on June 18 in 
Montgomery, Alabama. She 
was 64. 

■Known as “Scottie”. Mrs 
Smith herself became a short 
story writer and journalist. 


David Allen’s became the 
market leader in Scotland, 
Ireland and the north ;of 
England. •" 

The firm merged with Mills 
& Rocldey in 1959 to become 
the publicly quoted Mills & 
Allen, now a leading 
moneybroker but with con- 
tinuing interests in outdoor 
advertising. , 

It was typical of Alien that 
when David Allen’s, after L03 
years, ceased to be a family 
affair, he insisted on retaining 
a financial and personal link 
on the board in order /to 
safeguard his former 
employees' interests. f 

Throughout his life he was a 
devoted family man. His first 
wife, Barbara, having died in 
1952, he married, in 1953, 
Patricia, the mother of two 
children. 

For 33 years their marriage 
was the bedrock of |iis 
achievements. At their home 
at Lath bury, as well as -his 
other interests, he managed 
his farm, a pastime which rhe 
turned into a business after his 
retirement r 

Sam Allen was a long- 
standing member of ihe 
Carlton Cub, and a life mem- 
ber of foe St Moritz bobsleigh 
club. * 

He is survived by his «$d- 
ow, his two sons, Michael mid 
Robin, and two step-childqen, 
Ann and Marie. v 

Archbishop Anaehri, foe 
head of the Macedonian Or- 
thodox Church, died on Jifne 
15 in a car crash > 

Benjamin Francis ‘‘Whitt** 1 
Ford, the former Grand Ole 
Opry humorist better known 
as foe “Duke of Paducaft”, 
died at Nashville, Tennessee, 
ou June 20. He was 85. 




Science report 


Zoo fights for Komodo dragons \ 


"New York (New York Tana 
News Serried — The last Ko- 
modo dragon in the United 
States, an agios female whose 
potential mate died six months 
ago, may yet become a mother 
and thereby help her .race of 
man-eating lizards to survire, 
thanks to a technique being 
-pioneered by scientists at the 
■San Diego Zoo. 

Komodo dragoos.are fearsome 
lizards that grow to 8ft, mow at 
high speed and occasionally 
attack human beings. Named 
after the Island of Komodo, an 
l8-aito4ong splash of land in 
Indonesia's Lesser Snnda 
Archipelago, the Komodo 
dragon is foe largest lizard in die 
world. 

Only on estimated 7,000 exist, - 
the great majority confined to 


Komodo and the ne i ghbo u ring 
gland of Flores- Accor d ing to Dr 
John A, Phillips, comparative 
physiologist at the San Diego 
Zoo, the savannah grasses and 
brash of Komodo are aow as dry 
as tinder, and a Mg fire could 
devastate tibespedes. 

Several types of Card in 
various parts of the world, as 
well as sea turtles and some 
other reptiles, face even more 
precarious futures. Hie tech- 
nique bring developed for San 
Diego's lone dragon may even- 
tually save other reptile specks. 

The big reptiles, first discov- 
ered. by western explorers in 
1912. do not fare fid] or 
reproduce In captivity. Their 
large enclosures most be main- 
tained at 1000 F- 
- Dr Phillips and his colleagues 


befieve that the female at San 
Diego can be stimulated 7to 
ovulate by administration oiC a 
substance called gonadotropin- 
releasfng hormone, which ^is 
commercially derived from 
chickens. > - 

Before the attempt to impreg- 
nate the female Komodo dragon 
begins later this year with sperm 
tn coM store taken earlier Mm 
the last male at foe zoo* a 
cap^fe containing the hormone 
vrfli be implanted under a flatT of 
her skin. ■ ^ 

Inside the capsule is a mmip 
powered by the osmotic pressure 
of the anlmaTs own lhuds!io 
release the hormone a tittle m a 
ti me. W hen ovulation begtes, 
napregjostiofl by semen from Ibe 
dreeased male dragon will 4* 
attempted. 














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THE TIMES FRIDAY JUNE 27 1986 

THE ARTS 


Television 

Spanish 

swindles 

- When those slaiey Welsh 
jj' emigrated to Patagonia last 
' > centnry, sick of the English 

- apd their weather, they sailed 
u the belief that they tvere 

‘ beaching up is paradise. It was 
a belief partly instilled in them 
by a brochure which promised 
.rolling green pastures where 
. cattle lazily chewed their end 
. and a natural port with easy 
1 access to the world's trade 
rontes. The reality was trau- 
ma ri cal ly different. “Darwin 

.said Patagonia was a bed of 
~ shingles'*, moaned a Reverend 
3ooes hot-footing h back to 
the . valleys. “He was quite 
-tight." 

. /Judging from last night's 

■ [TV Eye (Thames), die spirit 
behind that brochure is alive 

"and well and Irving on the 
..•Spanish coast, where this year 
125,000 British will bay a place 
1 in the sun. Peter Gill's tren- 
xbant report, San, Sea and 
~ Swindle, . examined bow, for 

- ‘man y, the dream home be- 
‘ dunes a nightmare. One man 

"told how, selling np and 
, risking all, be bo tight a prop- 
Igrty which turned out to be a 
’ complete building site, without 
"shops or amenities. Another 
,iljtrw be paid £39,000 to a 
jxooked Belgian called David 
‘ itfhe had no authority to sell, 
land so be had to pay twice 
Oyer. 

'?;*r What seemed astonishing 
*' was the way in which cautions 
_ people nearing retirement 
1 were tinned by the midday 
/ Spanish son into pathological 

- spendthrifts — without a legal 
document to show for it. (The . 
programme's one shortcoming 

. . was to omit an examination of | 
. precisely what contracts were 
/signed and why die guilty 
. .partners coaid not be brought 
. Up book.) Lawyers tend not to 
/ loom large in one's dreams, 
'bat to part with a life's savings 
, on -the word of some chummy 
.Brit who says you do not need 
: ; them does seem a mad-dog am. 

. Apparently 80 per cent of 
...these frauds are perpetrated 
_ by our fellow countrymen. 
One. whom the researcher 
David Perrin did well to dig 
'^np, was a Captain Grimes 
-figure in beard and shorts 
called Paul McCrea- His com- 
pany, Hendicott (si), seemed 
.pretty slack about paying the 
rent on holiday lets. ''For an 
ex-public school boy",' splut- 
tered one of his fetching 
-^victims (like many of the 
: . -women in this programme, a 

■ Second wife), “be was a down- 
right villain." Among those 

. .whom it was alleged McRea 
-bad not paid was an electrical 

- -wholesaler called Sid. Sitting 
in his villa (El Cid), be told 

, how-, oh terminating his con- 
tract with McCrea, the beard- 
ed brute had broken in, 
-rchanged the locks and anda- 
. tiously let the house out again. 

!: Interviewed by Peter Gill, 
McCrea swore “I don't owe a 
..bleeding thing" and then 
: snatched the radio mike. 

In Too Hot to Handle 
-(Channel 4). the second of 
three programmes on nuclear 

- -power, William Wool lard pad- 
ded about various installations 

: -rooking like an abominable 
snowman. Swallowing many of 
-his words, be gave a brief 
resume of the nuclear process, 

- 'and the sense that in hamess- 
‘ -mg this power our grasp is a 
■'child's on a runaway horse. 

Some workmen urinating from 

- : a scaffold might be enough to 
■ jeopardize a county. 

Nicholas 

Shakespeare 


Cinema 


Drama of action with 
pauses for thought 




Runaway Train ( 18 ) 
Warner West End; 
Cannons Haymarket, 
Tottenham Court R oad 

Bring on the Night 
(PG) 

Prince Charles 

The Money Pit(PG) 
Plaza 

Blue Mountains 

ICA Cinema 

Andrei Konchalovsky, the Soviet 
director of the epic Siberiade, spent 
his first four years in America 
working up scripts, waiting for 
phone-calls that never came and 
seeing his resources dwindle. Then, 
suddenly, he was embraced by 
Golan and Globus, boisterous 
entrepreneurs of Cannon Rims. 
They financed Maria’s Lovers 
(1984), a commercially unsuccess- 
ful portrait of postwar malaise in 
Pennsylvania, and backed their 
protege in the present Runaway 
Train, a vigorous action drama 
with pauses for thought, nominat- 
ed for three Oscars and presented 
in competition at Cannes. Like 
Whoopi Goldberg from The Col- 
our Purple. Konchalovsky now 
finds himself a hot property. In 
Cannon's voluminous production 
schedule, the director is earmarked 
for three films: a project from his 
years of idleness (Shy People V. a 
Paul Schrader script for Al Pacino 
and the Tom Kempinski play Duet 
for One. From a director wasting 
away through inattention. Kon- 
chalovsky has become a chame- 


leon. living in a whirlwind, his 
creative personality under threat. 

In Runway Train , at least. 
Konchalovsky manages a tentative 
balance between the demands of 
American market forces and his 
own sensibility. The film offers all 
the sirightforward excitements ex- 
pected when a driverless train 
thunders through the Alaskan 
wastes with two escaped convicts 
and a token girl (a railway employ- 
ee conveniently asleep when the 
driver suffers his fatal heart-at- 
tack). Action switches back and 
forth from the passengers variously 
jousting with late to the authorities 
computing disasters ahead: an 
obstructing goods train, a rickety 
bridge, an industrial plant at the 
end of the line that would send 
toxic chemicals "from here to 
Kansas". 

Bui Konchalovsky, working 
from a script by Kurosawa much 
adapted by other hands, is not 
content with simple American 
thrills and spills. Characters cany 
heavy burdens on their shoulders 
and lips. "One must count on 
oneself — no one else" cries Jon 
Voight, giving an ebullient star 
performance as the battle-scarred 
prisoner determined to worst the 
vengeful prison governor. “Some 
things can't be explained" says the 
train supervisor Kenneth McMil- 
lan as his computer whizz-kid 
ponders on the limits of technol- 
ogy. Throughout Konchalovsky 
bashes the gongs of human will, 
destiny and man's bestial nature: 
icy Alaskan settings strengthen the 
echoes of Russian doom and 
gloom. The combination of comic- 
strip action and philosophical 
speech-balloons ultimately proves 
a little ludicrous, but the film, like 
the train, escapes derailment. 

For this Konchalovsky must 
lake the major credit: he directs 
with furious energy and skill, 
whether staging a collision with a 


caboose or pinpointing the manic 
gleam in Voight'sgold tooth. As for 
his future with Cannon, we must 
hope it does not lead to Charles 
Bronson and Death Wish IT. 

Rock music documentaries often 
give the appearance of being filmed 
by a fly with a 16mm camera who 
hangs from dressing-room lamp- 
shades and buzzes round perform- 
ers. trying to catch them on the 
wing. Not so Bring on the Night 
made by the film-producing arm of 
A & M Records: this portrait of the 
British rock musician Sting prepar- 
ing for a Paris concert is a highly 
studied affair, staged for the 
camera's benefit. Instead of re- 
hearsing in some subterranean lair. 
Sting and his excellent group of 
black jazz musicians prepare their 
numbers amidst the historic splen- 
dour of the Chateau de Courson, 
just outside Paris. The musicians 
are interviewed before the chat- 
eau’s romantic greenery; Sting 
meanwhile delivers himself of 
inflated comments sitting in a 
pullover in a dark, refined interior. 
Later, he stands in a green hospital 
smock, assisting at the birth of his 
fourth child — an extraneous 
personal event wheedled into the 
film to dubious effect. 

It is a pity that Sting and his 
director. Michael Apted, opted so 
much for the grand, pretentious 
style. For there is much joyful 
music-making on show, and the 
backing group prove a lively 
bunch, spouting tales of dubious 
past employment and the hard- 
ships of playing when no one wants 
to listen. The reverential tone is 
also punctured whenever the man- 
ager Miles Copeland is present, 
spelling out the jazz musicians's 
negative market-value or castigat- 
ing the stage designer for her grey, 
boring costumes ("He wanted it to 
be Brechtian" she bleats in de- 
fence). But the film belongs, for 
belter or worse, to Sting, the soulful 






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Ebullient star performance: Jon Voight on the ran, do or die, in Runaway Train 


troubadour. He sings his material 
with conviction, polish and ease. 
He also offers a persistent bizarre 
echo of the young Laurence 
Olivier's looks and manner: re- 
move the guitar, dye the hair, and 
Sting could easily be Hamlet 
skulking at Elsinore. 

The world first had an inkling 
that The Money Pit might be bad 
when the trade paper Variety 
enclosed an advertising supple- 
ment in green, pink and violet, 
shaped like a baby's bottle. Not 
that this comedy — directed by 
Richard Benjamin for the ubiqui- 
tous Steven Spielberg — concerns 
motherhood. The topic, rather, is 
the perils of home-ownership when 
the newly -purchased home is near 
ruin. A few knocks and the front 
door falls down; then the staircase 
collapses, brown goo fills the bath, 
electrical circuits erupt into flames 
and riff-raff construction workers 
have a wreckers' ball. 

Almost 30 years ago the same 


story' was filmed as Mr B/andings 
Builds His Dream House, wherein 
Cary Grant and Myma Loy battled 
with financial straits, decorator 
bandits and. for good measure, 
marital jealousy. David Giler’s 
new script makes some allowances 
for contemporary fashions: the 
suburbanite couple, played by Tom 
Hanks and Shelley Long, are now 
unmarried; the object of jealousy is 
no Melvyn Douglas charmer but a 
bratlish conductor-superstar with 
long blond locks. The principal 
ingredients, however, go back to 
Bfandings and beyond, to the silent 
days when comics repeatedly 
crashed through walls, sank 
through floors and turned into 
whitewashed ghosts. 

In Mack Sennett two-reelers, 
such mayhem could be dispensed 
without recourse to logic; a feature 
film, however, must tread more 
carefully, and here The Money Pit 
fails badly. The house, we hear, 
gobbles up the couple's limited 


money, yet wc never learn how the 
huge final repair bill is meL Were 
wc laughing, we might forgive and 
forget, but the dialogue remains 
mundane while the collapsing fix- 
tures soon become showy exercises 
in Spielbcrgian special effects. The 
cast play second fiddle to debris; a 
pity the talented Shelley Long had 
to be among them. 

In April I wrote enthusiastically 
about Bine Mountains. Eldar 
Shengeiaya's comic portrait of 
Russian bureaucracy: this thor- 
oughly engaging film has now been 
rewarded with a limited public run 
at the ICA. The setting is a 
publishing house stuffed with un- 
read manuscripts and incompe- 
tence. Shengelaya describes the 
staffs comings and goings along 
labyrinthine corridors with a 
sprightly array of running jokes 
and a keen eye for human foibles. 


Theatre 


Only the ruthless 
last the course 


The Relapse 
Chichester 


One glimpse of Di Seymour's 
set puts paid to the idea that 
this is going to be an elegantly 
frivolous revival put on so as 
to supply an occasion for 
Richard Briers to give his 
Lord Foppington. Played 
around mobile scaffolding 
against a half-constructed 
classical facade, it rather sug- 
gests that Vanbrugh knocked 
off The Relapse during tea- 
breaks on the site of Castle 
Howard: an impression un- 
derlined by the sight of a. 
company variously attired in 
18th-century costume and in 
blousons and Wellington 
boots. 

It is also dear from Mat- 
thew Frands’s direction of the 
opening scenes that the usual 
comic emphasis is being dis- 
placed. Instead of the blank 
boredom of the Restoration 
countryside, we have a Love- 
less (David Gwillim) happily 
trudging around with a wheel- 
barrow, dressed as a gardener. 
This is followed by the first 
appearance of Foppington's 
destitute young brother, Tom: 
played by John Sessions not as 
a virtuously spirited youth but 



a capering trickster with a wild 
mane of hair, who is evidently 
a figure of fun even to his 
servant Lory. 

I think it is Mr Francis’s 
purpose to lake the title in 
earnest: to suggest that Lon- 
don is a place where only the 
ruthless and greedy survive, 
and that Loveless and his wife 
would have been all right if 
only they had stayed in their 
garden. 

At all events, the expected 
comic high-points of the play 
are missing. Mr Briers goes 
through the narcissistic mo- 
tions of Foppington's toilette 
— emerging from a wrapper 
and hair-net into lull purple 
plumage — but it is quite a 
modest performance by past 
standards, and the central 
focus of the scene remains on 
Tom waiting for a sign of 
recognition from his unfeeling 
brother. When they do get a 
scene together, it comes over 
not so much as an encounter 
between brothers as between a 
foolish skinflint master and a 
wily and revengeful servant. 
This certainly has the theatri- 
cal advantage of intensifying 
Tom's determination to cheat 
Foppington out of his heiress, 
and redoubling his powers of 
intrigue once he arrives in Sir 
Tun belly’s domain. 


Rock 

INXS 

Albert Hall 

If you hire a car in Australia 
the chances are that you will 
receive an automatic vehicle 
with a device which will, if 
desired, set the car travelling 
at a fixed speed, while you 
take your foot off the accelera- 
tor and enjoy the ride. INXS, 
who come from Australia, 
where they have enjoyed 
widespread and increasing 
popularity since 1980, are a 
gifted rock group who share 
many of the characteristics of 
a vehicle set on automatic. 

Not that their songs are all 
the same speed, nor even that 
their arrangements and instru- 
mentation are too constant. 
But in an hour and 20 minutes 






- ISir-i 




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mp 




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An ogre defending his castle: Harold Innocent (left) with Richard Briers 



THREEPENNY 

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However, the nature of the 
fraternal relationship is that 
the livelier Tom becomes the 
more he drains vitality out of 
his companion. Not only does 
Mr Briers play Foppington 
from the stan as a loser. He 
also stifles the magnanimous 
amiability which is a great 
charm of the role. Mr Briers 
despatches it with much excel- 
lent status-conscious business, 
but the character shrivels into 
a peevish, nutcracker-jawed 
fool who finally brings the 
comedy to an end on a note of 
spite. 

.As for the title intrigue. 


they betrayed a stultifying lack 
of variation in the intensity of 
their performance and a pau- 
city of wit in their one-track 
vision. 

Dressed in black, Michael 
Huichence looked like an 
Identikit rock vocalist, wig- 
gling his sinuous hips like a 
walking composite of Mick 
J agger and Bob Geidof. 
Around him the group hacked 
their way competently 
through a collection of main- 
stream rock songs that harked 
back to all those bands like 
Bachman-Turner Overdrive 
and Boston who in the mid- 
Seventies were known vaguely 
in Britain but who sold al- 
bums by the truckload in 
America. 

INXS have the advantage of 
being better-looking than 
those bands and, as Hutch- 
ence took a stroll over the top 
of the PA speakers, bared his 
chest or threw water over the 
front rows, screams of excite- 
ment penetrated the raucous 
sound coming from the stage. 
Andrew Farriss and Kirk 
Pengilly played brief inter- 
changeable guitar solos, and 
Pengilly sometimes honked 
on a saxophone. Of the tight, 
precisely executed repertoire. 

the most familiar songs were 
best — “Original Sin”, “Listen 
Like Thieves" and “This 
Time" - but they lacked the 
inspiration to mint new gold 
from the devalued currency of 
such mainstream rock. 

Only on the final, carefully 
planned encore, a rousing 
version of “Red Sun", did 
they show any sign of moving 
out of the middle lane, but by 
then it was too late to gain 
significant mileage from such 
a well-worn route. 

David Sinclair i 


Loveless is tom between two 
ladies classed as absolute mor- 
al adversaries. It is hard to 
imagine how they ever came 
to be friends. Paula Dionisotti 
plays Berinthia as a fatal 
temptress, serpentine of body, 
lecherous of eye. displaying a 
cold, long-practised seductive 
technique worlds removed 
from the spontaneous mis- 
chief usually associated with 
this role. Against her Kate 
Buffery. a huge-eyed beauty in 
the likeness of a Caroline 
Pallas Athene, goes through 
London scenes in a state of 
gradually mounting horror. 


Concert 

RPO/Previn 
Festival Hall 

Much has already been re- 
vealed on this page about the 
content of Peter Maxwell 
Davies's new Violin Concerto, 
both by Paul Griffiths in his 
review of last Saturday's St 
Magnus Festival premiere and 
by the soloist. Isaac Stem. 
Now, perhaps, something 
should be added about con- 
text, since this first London 
performance naturally shifted 
attention away from the 
work's Orkney genesis and 
towards its standing in Max- 
well Davies's career. 

To write a conventional 
concerto, especially for the 
fiddle, is (however ingeniously 
contemporary composers may 
juggle with resources) basical- 
ly to endorse the Romantic 
tradition of the virtuoso, the 
continuing musical suprema- 
cy of the symphony orchestra, 
and time-honoured notions 
about concert programming. 
For Maxwell Davies, once the 
areh-debunker of musical con- 
ventions, to compose one is 
not so surprising: anyone can 
change his mind. 

But for him to produce such 
a sober, mainstream concerto 

- in which earnest if undeni- 
ably impressive cerebral pro- 
cesses replace the rebellious, 
instinctive spark of his youth 

— was a surprise and. for me. a 
disappointment. Possibly, 
too. the inspired folksiness of 
his violin writing in earlier 
works led one to expect more 
imaginative demands on 
Stern's talents than the rather 
routine assembling of double- 
stoppings and stratospheric 


reaching her peak in a speech I 
had never noticed before: 
“Would the world were on 
fire", she says to a bringer of 
bad news, "and you in the 
middle of it." 

This is an austere treatment 
of the play: less funny than 
usual, but more in touch with 
the feelings underlying the | 
intrigue. Appropriately in this I 
context. Harold Innocent 
plays Sir Tun belly not as a 
rustic booby but as an ogre 
defending his castle. j 

Irving Wardle | 


octaves found in the cadenza 
here. 

Nevertheless, the Violin 
Concerto has some marvel- 
lous things in it. Repeated 
hearings will probably lead to 
greater appreciation of the 
turbulent, heavy textures in 
the outer movements, always 
threatening to overwhelm the 
soloist but eventually collaps- 
ing before his unruffled lyri- 
cism. The slow movement, 
though, is immediately ap- 1 
pealing: the point where stark 
brass fanfares break into the 
soloist's haunting “Scottish" 
theme is masterfully dramatic. 
Indeed, the orchestration 
throughout is highly original, 
if mostly of dour colour. 

One could imagine the solo 
pan's many upward thrusts of 
figuration being attacked less 
circumspectly than by Isaac 
Stem here. He also had his 
moments of idiosyncratic in- 
tonation. But Stem did con- 
vey well the shifting moods of 
the three movements, and his 
whittling down of timbre to 
project the slow movement's 
ingenuous quality was the 
work of a seasoned virtuoso. 
The real revelation, however, 
was the superbly assured play- 
ing of the Royal Philharmonic 
Orchestra under Andre Pre- 
vin's careful direction. They 
perform this modem stuff 
rather well: they should do it 
more often. 

Previn had opened with 
Vaughan Williams's Tallis 
Fantasia, where the strings 
happily sustained Lhe illusion 
of Phrygian phrases wafting 
round flying buttresses, even 
in this hall's less than cathe- 
dral-like acoustics. He closed 
with a well-pointed account of 
Debussy's La Mer. 

Richard Morrison 


Dance 

Ballet Rambert 

Sadler's Wells 

The last programme of Ballet 
Rambert's London Season, 
continuing until tomorrow, 
contained yet another pre- 
miere by yet another choreog- 
rapher new to the company. 
Richard .Alston has certainly 
succeeded in putting the 
stamp of his own mind on the 
repertory in the short time 
since he was appointed direc- 
tor. and he has done it as 
much by his choice of new 
collaborators as by his own 
contributions. 

It is also notable that from 
all the new choreographers. 
Ian Spink, Michael Clark and 
now Ashley Page, he has 
secured cogent, well devel- 
oped pieces. It seems that we 
have here a real director in the 
tradition of Rambert herself 
and her first successor Nor- 
man Morrice. with a flair for 
guiding others without rob- 
bing them of their own 
personalities. 

Ashley Page, much the most 
gifted choreographer to 
emeige within the Royal Bal- 
let since David Bintley. has 
already had some experience 
working with dancers from the 
avant-garde, and he adapts 
easily to a style that suits the 
Rambert dancers, an attrac- 
tive mid-point between his 
own academic background 
and (he more mainstream 
contemporary experience. 

The music is by Harrison 


Geoff Brown 

Birtwistle, a piece he wrote in 
1977 called Carmen Arcadiae 
Mechanicae Perpetuum, 
which also serves as the name 
of the balleL I feared the 
possibility of a significant 
acronym but lucidly that 
thought proved unworthy. 
Scored for 14 players, half of 
them on wind instruments 
plus marimba, piano and 
strings, it is a fragmented 
work, the total pattern of 
which proves elusive at first 
hearing. 

The dances reflect those 
qualities, being fragmentary, 
almost kaleidoscopic. The 
movement is lively but not 
fussy, and its textures vary 
with those of the music. There 
are some mildly mysterious 
exits and returns towards the 
end. and touches of humour, 
especially in a solo for Aman- 
da Britton who begins unex- 
pectedly with a pas de chat 
appearing from an unexpected 
opening in Jack Smith's 
backcloth of vivid abstract 
patterns on a black ground. 

The designs, the painter’s 
first for the theatre, make the 
ballet look handsome. The 
costumes, tights painted pat- 
terns of primary colours, son 
the dancers into groups, the 
three men toghether, the 
women divided into a trio and 
a pair (who are perhaps rather 
two loners). No anecdotal 
reasons for this appear, but the 
groupings gain impact from it, 
just as patches of colour and 
the often rotary movements 
show each other off to best 
advantage. 

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20 


THE TIMES FRIDAY JUNE 27 1986 


Tougher 
fire niles 
for sport 
grounds 

By Nicholas Beeston . 

The Home Office yesterday 
proposed tougher fire safety 
legislation, especially at sports 
stadiums, in the wake of last 
year's fire at the Bradford City 
football ground when 56 fans 
were killed. 

Stricter fire and safety stan- 
dards are being imposed on 
another 66 football, rugby and 
cricket grounds by the begin- 
ning of August 
But the Government also 
wants a new safety certificate 
10 be mandatory for all sports 
venues which accommodate 
more than 500 spectators in 
one area. 

The proposals would re- 
quire all outdoor sports 
grounds holding more than 
10,000 spectators to pass rig- 
orous tests for fire and struc- 
tural safety. Local authorities 
would be given the power to 
decide whether smaller 
grounds would have to 
comply. 

For indoor stadiums, the 
new legislation would make it 
mandatory to have a special 
licence. 

Among the 66 sports 
grounds immediately desig- 
nated by the stricter controls 
are ail six Test match cricket 
grounds: Lord's, Old Traffond, 
Headingley, Trent Bridge, the 
Oval and Edgbaston. 

Also on the list are 26 non- 
Football League soccer dubs, 
three Rugby League and 16 
Rugby Union dues. All Foot- 
ball League grounds were 
made subject to the require- 
ments before the beginning of 
lastyear’s season. 

The proposed changes were 
put forward in a joint discus- 
sion paper by the Home Office 
and the Scottish Office and 
would mean amendments to 
the 1975 Safety of Sports 
Grounds Act, 1975 and the 
Fire Precautions Act 1971. 
The proposals were molded 
from recommendations in the 
Popplewell Report into the 
Bradford disaster. 

Lord Gienaxlhur, Home Of- 
fice minister responsible for 
fire safety, said that the cost of 
safety improvements would 
have to be met by sports 
organizations. 


Branson tries again for ocean record 




En route to the Bishop Rock: Virgin Atlantic Challenger n passing the Verrazano Bridge outside New York Harbour at the.start of its crossing. 



The record and airfine ty- 
coon, Mr Richard Branson, 
and his five-man orew, set-sail 
Cron New York yesterday 
confident that they will finally 
break the record for the fastest 


Second time lu 
salute as 


In a telephone link-op to the 
Association from his 
72ft power boat, Virgin Atlan- 
tic Challenger Q, Mr Branson 
said: “We nave a great crew 
and a good chance." 

In May 1985 Mr Branson's 
first by at the record ended in 
fiulnre when the original. Vir- 
gin Atlantic Challenger sank 
138 miles short of takkg the 
Bine Riband for the Cutest 
crossing. 

Now, with a new tlVi 
million boat and an experi- 
enced crew - again indading 
the top yachtsman, Chay 
Blyth - Mr Branson is back 
with n strong challenge. 

The record fin the fastest 
crossing is held by the find; 
United States, which complet- 

honrs, 40^m«i ates in itS? 

Mr Branson and his team 
hope to read Bishop's Rock, 
2549 mfles from New York off 
the Isles of Sdlly, by Sunday 

Atlantic Challenger II, bnilt 
by the British firm, Brooke 
Yachts, has a top speed of 
aboat 65 knots and is expected 
to average abont 45 knots. 

On the first attempt, Mr 
Branson and his <xew had to 


cky for the Virgin team? A confident Richard Branson throws a snappy combat exhaustion deptes- 
as he and his crew set off on their three-day transatlantic voyage. sloa and hafindnatkms. 


Blast at 
Madrid 
airport 

From Richard Wigs 
Madrid 

A terrorist bomb, hidden in 
a suitcase, exploded during a 


Ai airline counter in Madrid's 
Barajas airport yesterday, in- 
juring seven people, three of 
them seriously. 

A man, described by eyewit- 
nesses as young and of Arab 
appearance, was detained 
shortly after the explosion in 
the departure lounge. 

Among the three taken to 
hospital with serious injuries 
was the Israeli airline’s securi- 
ty man at the check-in 
counter; who caught the full 
force of the explosion as be 
was inspecting the suitcase of 
a passenger bound for Tel 
Aviv. Waiting passengers said 
the young Arab was the owner 
of the suitcase. 

The other two taken to 
hospital were a Spanish po- 
liceman who was badly in- 
jured in one arm, and a 
passenger. 

The H Al security man 
apparently noticed smoke 
emerging from the suitcase 
and was able to warn several 
passengers. ' 


Letter from Durban 


Healey in the 
Zulu wars 


Mr Denis Healey, the La- 
bour Party’s shadow foreign 
secretary, really got into his 
stride yesterday. He took 
many photographs and kissed 
lots of babies, assuring each 
successive mother that bet's 
was the healthiest, prettiest 
infant he had ever seen. 

He was in Durban, Natal, 
and visited the very poor 
township of Claremont be- 
fore going on lo-see the ruins 
of the Mahatma Gandhi set- 
tlement at Phoenix. 

Last year the settlement 
building was burnt down by 
Zulus, who have always re- 
garded it as their territory. 
There is, unfortunately, a 
tong history of racial tension 
between Indians and Zulus in 
Naial - indeed, Gandhi origi- 
nally founded the settlement 
(in 1904) to promote 
reconciliation. 

Mr Healey seemed horri- 
fied by-wbat -he saw, and 
denounced Inkatha, the Zulu 
movement headed by Chief 
Gatsha Buthelezi, which he 
held responsible for the 
destruction. 

He said that when he had 
been in South Africa in 1970, 
be -had regarded Chief 
Buthelezi as a co-belligerent 
against apartheid. He was 
sorry to see that since then 
the chief appeared to have 
come to terms with the South 
African Government, and 
abandoned the radical cause. 

At Phoenix, a Casspir anti- 
riot vehicle appeared on the 
horizon. Mr Healey seemed 
delighted to see it, and rather 
disappointed that it kept its 
distance. 

Emboldened by the pres- 
ence of the law, he reprated 
his (illegal) call for sanctions. 
He said that he had discussed 
the issue with the leaders of 
the frontline states, who were 
prepared to put up with 
hardship in order to shorten 
South Africa's agony. 

When he first arrived in 
South Africa, Mr Healey was 
circumspect in expressing his 
views on sanctions. As the 
days have passed, his lan- 
guage has grown stronger and 
stronger, but more ana more 
reminiscent of Question 
Time in the House of. 

Commons. 

After Phoenix, Mr Healey 


Emphasis on 
Irish angle 


' When asked by various 
churchmen about his own 
religious beliefs, Mr Healey 
emphasized his Irish, rather 
than his Yorkshire origins. 
He also described himself as a 
fellow traveller with religion. 

Among his hosts yesterday 
were five of the six men who 
in 1984 spent some weeks as 
rather embarrassing guests of 
the British Consulate in Dur- 
ban, where they had sought 
refuge from the South African 
police. 

They included Mr Archie 
Gumede, a co-president of 
the United Democratic Front 
anti-apartheid coalition, to/ 
whom Mr Healey presented a- 
copy of Healey s Eye \ aif. 
anthology of his photographs.- 

While Mr Healey was in' 
Durban, his deputy, Mr Don- 
ald Anderson, went to Port 
Elizabeth to see local church- 
leaders and black townships./ 

The role of deputy to Mr 
Healey is not an easy one: the/ 
boss has decided opinions, 
and rarely feels the need for 
much advice. So beyond- 
slicing the lemons and open-'; 
ing the tonic, there may not 
be much to do. But. Mr 
Anderson seems endlessly 
resilient 

Mr Healey was disappoint- 
ed that he was unable to see 
Mgr Denis Hurley, the Ro- 
man Catholic Archbishop of 
Durban, who was away. Mgr 
Hurley, a former rugby play- 
er, whose family came from 
Limerick, is a burly, ruddy- 
featured, jovial and ebullient 
character. I suspect that the 
two Denises would have tak- 
en to one another. 

Brace Anderson 


went to the Ecumenical Cen- 
tre, for discussions with black 
political church leaders. De- 
spite the ecumenism, Mr 
Healey's visit to Durban was 
organized by the local Roman . 
Catholic clergy, and ft must f* 
be yirf that they are much 
better at it than the Johannes- 
burg Anglicans. The Catholic 
tradition of authoritarianism 
makes for efficient 
scheduling. 


■ 


THE TIMES INFORMATION SERVICE 


Today’s events 


Royal engagements 

The Queen opens the Horse 
Show 10 mark the Sesqui- 
cen tenary of the Metropolitan 
Police Mounted Brandi, tmber 
Court, Surrey, 12.10. 

The Princess of Wales, Pa- 
tron, the Malcolm Sargent Can- 
cer Fund for Children, attends a 
charity concert in aid of the 
fond, given by the Suzuki 
Children, Tetbuiw Parish 
Church, Tetbuiy, Gloucester- 
shire. 7.20. 

Princess Anne attends a meet- 
ing of the Paediatric Section of 
the Royal Society of Medicine 
on Paediatrics and Child Health 
in China and Africa, the Royal 
Society of Medicine, Wimpole 
Sl Wl. 

The Duchess of Kent, Patron, 
attends the general meeting and 
launch of the 75th Anniversary 
Campaign of the National Soci- 
ety for Cancer Relief, Kensing- 


tenTown Hall, Hornton St, W8, 

Prince Michael of Kent. 
Commonwealth President of 
the Royal Life Saving Sodety, 
attends the dosing ceremony of 
the sixth Commonwealth Con- 
ference, St James's Palace, SW1, 
10.05. 

Princess Michael of Kent 
attends the Silver Chef Lunch 
for the Nordoff Robbins Music 
Therapy Centre and presents an 
award, Hotd Intercontinental, 
Hamilton Place, Wl, I2J0 

New exhibitions 

Hunter-gatherers, past and 
present: Music makers, Pitt 
Rivers Museum, Balfour Budd- 
ing, Banbury Rd, Oxford; Mon 
to Sat 2 to 4 (permanent) 

Last chance to see 

Terraria by David Young, 
Mid - Pennine Aits Association 
Gallery, 2 Hammerton St, Burn- 
ley; 9 to 5. 

Paintings by Barrie Cooke, 


The Times Crossword Puzzle No 17,083 



ACROSS. 

1 Frenchman walked back 
outside to disappear (6). 

5 Bini authority, extremely 
ethical (8L 

9 Drink time — big cask 
wanted (8). 

10 Turning-point about a cer- 
tain river (6). 

11 An excuse, of course, for di- 
version (8). 

12 Man in last place to try once 
mare (6). 

13 His rolling stone gathered 
no moss (8). 

15 Tiller in crid tin hat (4). 

17 Depravity is very sweet (4). 

19 Make a fuss about football 
back - a low fellow (S). 

20 Calendar the West is out la 
nullify (6). 

21 Gin made one cock-eyed, 
it's thought (8). 

22 Grudgingly admired. I've 
changed in consequence (6L 

23 Qualified to be a partner, 
this worthy (8). 

24 Fruit used for port made 
during war (SL 

25 Having swellings, being 
without medicine? (6). 


vcl the score in match (S). 
“charm" a new version of 
old word? (5). 


4 Forerunner — before (or af- 
ter) the dogs (9). 

5 Walton's way to fish? (15). 

6 Nuclei of officers, say (7). 

7 Sort to resist a poet and 
painter (8). 

8 Purify- of desire ro scold (8). 

14 A remarkable person climbs 
on it somehow, howling (9). 

15 Hooter broadcast from a 
tree (8). 

16 Persistent wish to wash up 

( 8 ). 

17 Competed, ardour rising 
within, and made good (8). 

18 Nostrums the secular Left 
push out (4-4). 

19 Used by Peeping Tom on . 
the highway? (4-3). 

Solution to Puzzle No 17,082 



ra ns H.s n cn a r*i 
«Pns tiaiEntscjEincEs 

w w GW n IE 

■ iiassaEsciRiiii 


Concise Crossword, page 14 


Arts Council Gallery, Bedford 
St, Belfast; 10 to 6. 

Ruslan School of Drawing 
and Fine Art Degree Show 86, 
128 BuDingdon Rd, Oxford; 10 
10 4. 

Paintings by Stzmaya Mc- 
Intyre, Ginnd Gallery, Lloyds 
House, 16 Lloyd St, Manches- 
ter; 9 to 5-30. 

Works by Pamela Gatworth 
(oils). Rose Gfiliog (batik), Amr 
Oakley (sculpture and oils) and 
Myfanwy Shrapnel (collages), 
Halesworth Gallery, Steeple 
End; II to 5. 

Music 

Concert by the Bournemouth 
Symphony Orchestra, Trmro 
Cathedral, 7.45. 

Organ recital by Nicolas 
Kynaston, Clifton Cathedral, 
Bristol, 7.30- 

Jazz by the Peter King Quin- 
tet, St David’s HaH, The Hayes, 
Cardiff 9. 

Harp recital by Vanessa 
McKeand; St Mary's Church, 
Sraw-enm-DtHminghHi, Berks, 
8 . 

Concert by the Defler Con- 
sort: Boaghton Alnph Church, 
7.3a 

Concert by the Worcester 
Concert Band, Pershore High 
School, 7 JO. 

Piano recital by Rosalind 
Runcie with The Dunxnore 
Singers, St Patrick's Parish 
Church, Whitehead, 7 JO. 

Concert by the HalK Or- 
chestra. Free Trade Hall, Man- 
chester. 7. 

Redial by Musica Donum 
Dei. Ail Saints Church, 
Mfsterton. 7.15. 

Talks and lectures 

The am, past, present and 
future by Jonathan Miller, 
Aisher Hall, Sevenoaks School, 
8 . 

General 

Rower Festival, Parish 
Church of All Saints, Odiharn. 
Hams, today, tomorrow and Fri 
10 to 7 JO. 


Pollen count 


The pollen count for London 
and the South-east issued by the 
Asthma Research Council at 10 
am yesterday was 66 (high). 
Forecast for today, similar. For 
today's recording call British 
Telecom's Weatherfine: 01-246 
8091. which is updated each day 
at lOJOam. 


Roads 


. jest Hold-ups m 

traffic h SW London, partcuteify on 
A219A217A3. A3*, because of Wimble- 
don tennis. Carpenters Rd. StraUonL 
dosed between High St and Wanext Rd. 
M3: Northbound carriageway closed be- 
tween functions 8 and 9 ( Winchester/ 
Fophanft signed (Eversions via A33. 

MfcflandK MS: Lam restrictions and 


overnight carriageway closures on 
weekdays between unions 4 ( 
Bramsgrow)and8(M50J. M5e Long-term 
JOedworia between junctions 4 ( 
Etansgrove) and S ( Droitwicb). Rtf: 
Roadworks be t ween junedona IS and IS; 
contraflow now removed. 

Wetes end West MS: Contraflow on S- 
bound camageway between Bateson* 8 
(MM) and 10 iCbebfttham}. lift Outside 
lana dosed N and S-bound between 
22 (Weston Super Mare) and a 
Venous Isne dosures 
junctions 25 ( Taunton) and 28 


MB: Stogtefne traffic on 14- 

bound exit and entry sip roads, OresWre. 

Mtfc Contraflow between Junctions 31 

(Prnton) and 32 (Blackpool), Lancs. 

Traffic rOoWig S-bound carriageway tram 
MS5/A6 restneted to one laneJKIilnside 

lane closures on N and S-bound carriage- 

JWWM Blacow Bridge, junction with 

Scotland: in QutmJfl lane dosed on 
both N ana S-bound carriageways be- 
tween (unctions 19 (Oydebartt) and 33 ( 
flown ] M9: N-bound camagaway ctooad 
between juncaons 9 and fOnr Sdrlna: 
two^ay traffic S-bound. M74; Two-wS 
W ffieortmw N-bound c a r ria gew a y N of 

■uRAsdbyAA 


Food prices 


As was only to be expected, 
home-produced lamb prices 
have dropped dramatically this 
week. Loin chops are down 
between 19p and 25p a pound; 
whole legs by about 18pa pound 
and whole shoulders by between 
13p and 1 tip a pound. Som- 
mer prices are down again at 
Billingsgate this week and there 
are. lots of excellent - quality 
rainbow trout which should 
retail at about £1.40 a lb for 
small fish and £2.00 a lb for 
larger fish. Haddock, plaice and 
squid are plentiful and 


and there is superb 
which is ideal lor barbecueing. 
Boned, fresh herring and fresh 
mackerel are down abont 2p a 
pound. Lemon sole, large cod 
and codling fillets, plaice and 
smoked haddock are also 
cheaper. 

Good offers available at shops 
and supermarkets this week are: 
Dewhurst and Baxters, family 
barbecue packs of four spare- rib 
chops, eight chicken drumsticks 
and four pork sausages, at £3.99 
a pack, and braising steak at 
£1.79 a ftx Presto fresh chickens, 
up to 31b ISoz, at ti8p a lb, and 
Chinese - flavoured spare rib 
chops at £1.24 a lb. 

The best value strawberries are 
probably the French, Dutch and 
Belgian strawberries, sold in lib 
punnets at 90p to £1 a punnet. 
Peaches are the pick of the week, 
at 12p-22p each, or kilo punnets 
at 90p-£l JO a punnet 


Parliament today 


__ Commons. (9.30): European 
Communities (Amendment) 
Bill, continuation of committee 


. (H): Dockyard Ser- 
vices Bill, report stage. 


Top Films 


The top box-office fhma in Lon- 
don: 

A Room WKh A' View 
Down and Out in Beverley 
HUs . 

House 
fltt Weeks 
After Hours 
Out of Africa ' 

Jaaoed Erioe 
The Jewel of the Nle 
PoSce 
Biggies 

The top (Bras in the provinces: 

1 Down and Out in Beverley Hite 

2 Jewel of the N9e 

3 Fright Night 

5 Jagged Edge 

Siaitw by Scnaon uwfcmf 


1" 

l/i 

5 3 
65 
7(7 
8(6 
98 
10(9 


Top video rentals 


1 (1) Mad Max-Beyond Thunder 
dome 

2(17) Cocoon 
(14) The Emerald Forest 
Code of Stance 
Witness 

Nightmare on an Street 
Best Defence . 

Pale Ritter 
Invasion USA 
Re-Animator 
Supplled by 


Anniversaries 


Births: Charles Stewart Par- 
nell. Avondale, co Wicklow, 
1846; Ivan Vazov, writer, Sopot 
Crow Vazovgrady, Bulgaria, 
1850; Sir John Monash, en- 
gineer and general, Melbourne, 
1865; Helen Keller, author, 
educator, who was blind, deaf 
and mute. Tuscumbria, Ala- 
bama.. 1880. . 

Deaths: Giorgio Vasari, 
painter and an historian, Flor- 
ence, 1574; Joseph Smith, 
founder of the Church of Jesus 
Christ of Latter Day Saints 
(Mormons), murdered, Car- 
thage, Illinois, 1844; 



Time* Portfolio Cold rules are as 
follows; 

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of. The Tunes ts not a condition of 
taking part. 

a Times Portfolio list comprises a 
group of puMlc rompantn wnose 
shares are listed on the Stock 
gKhaim and quoted in The Times 
Stock Exchange .prices page. The 
companies co tn prtst no that list woi 
change from day to day. The list 
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Into four randomly dWranxed groups 
of li shares. Every Portfolio card 
contains two numbers from each 
group and each card «wiik»« a 
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II If for any reason The Times 
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normal way Times Portfolio win be 
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Weather 

_ An , anticyclone will 
cover North ;Sea- arid a 
shallow depression to W 
of Bay of Biscay will 
move slowly N. 

6am tn midnight 

canbaIN 

periods, 

; wind 
>840. 
Sunny 

thunderstorms devetopfna; wind • 
SEj moderate: max temp 28 to 28C (?9 to 
82FL but coder on coasts. 

. Cfcsmwl Mauds, SW Eagtend. S, N 
WbIob Rattier cMidy. thundery showers: 
wmd mairty SE. 8ght max temp24 to 20C 
(75 to 79F), but cooler on exposed coasts. 

ton. SW, NW Scodand, Giaa- 
goti, cantrai WgMends, Atrafl, Nortfiem 
I t e l end . Rather ctoudy^hundety showers; 
wind SE, fight; mex temp 21 to23C(70to 
73B. 

NE Engtamf, P ordar i- Mainly dry, 
swiny periods, misty on coasts with tog 
patches; wind SE. moderate; max temp 22 - 
to 24C (72 to 75F). but cootar on coasts. 

EdtobwMi, Disidea, Aberdeen, Moray 
Rrtb. ME Scotland, Orkney: MaMy dry, ' 
sunny periods, misty on coasts with tog 
patohssjwnd SE moderate: mex temp 20 
to 22C (68 to 72FL but coaler on coasts. 

Shebamt Bather ctoutW. scattered ■ 

showers; wind S or SEt. light: max temp 

16C(Bin. 

Oidtook for fenanm and Sunday: 
Thundery showers, some prolonged In W. 
but northern anas becoming mostly dry. 


Cbasttl log L „ r 

Generally very warni or hot. but much 

cooler on coasts, aspectefiy In E.' 


a 


Sun rises: Gwisate: 
4-45 am 522pm 


1233 am 
Last quarter Jtsie 29 


11.10 am 


Lightmg-ap time 


London 9-52 pm to 4.16 am 
“ ’ J " 10.01 pm to 4J8 am 

Opm . .. . 

10.12 pm to 4.12 am 
10^)6 pm to 4^5 am 


EcEntwgh idS pm to 3JS0 am 



MT PM HT 
7.1 643 07 

4j0 6.46 .3.7 


b-blue afar; bc-biue sky and doudt c- 
ctoudy. oovertatt Mob Mtteta h- 
ball: inbJ mlst: r-ratav sonow: Qv 
thunderstorm: pdwwos 
Arrows show wind dlretuon. wind 
speed (mph> circled. TcmpwMure 
centigrade. 


3^9 

35 

4.12 

OI 

11.46 

107 



1Ob0 

43 11.00 

55 

3.36 

6.1 

349 

63 ‘ 

1 020 

45 1030 

45 

4^7 

43 

540 

.43- 

4.30 

33 

444 

35 

2A7 

04 

339 

-45 

10-AfL 

7.1 1138 

S.4 

1048 

8.1 

11.13 

83 

7.14 

342 

02 

95 

756 

4.12 

H 

2.16 

22 

153 

•24 

448 

45 

449 

•45 

11.02 

6.1 

1136 

S3 ML 

957 

63 1032 

6A 

10.23 

.3.1 11.03 

■34- 

1001 

45 10.12 

ST 1 

1144 

15 1153 

13.. 

344 

43 

434 

45 

337 

55 

4.16 

"55 

323 

4.1 

4.10 

42 . 

1156 

83 1131 

5A 

8.16 

5.1 

9.05 

■4 T- 

4.18 

4.1 

438 

. 33 - 




i metres: 1 m^ 2 aoarc 


Aronnd Britain 


Yesterday 


Temperatures at . midday yaatarday: c. 
cloud; £ fair; f, rskv a. sun. 

CP “ " 

c 1968 , 

s 2475 te w ema i l 



Sun Rain Max 

In In C F 
Htaconte 8J3 - 24 75 

Tenby 7.8 - 21 70 

GotwjmBay 7.1 .08 21 70 

6.4 .02 19 86 

10.8 ill 17 63 

BIGLAMD ANDLWJUJES 

8.6 - 25 77 

SA - 23 73 

5.7 .01 25 77 
6£ .02 23 73 
93 JOB 18 64 

11.1 j04 20 68 

4.7 - 22 72 

2A 81 22 72 

lOiJ xe 23 73 
US JH 20 68 


SCOTLAND 
rs b dte e mui r 5.7 29 

Prestwick 53 JXf 

Ofl SX2. 
Him 1.8 iM 

0l9 .02 
Lerwick ' 3 a - 

Wick 9.0 - 

Ktokm 5.8 - 

Aberdeen 6S 

St- Andrews 8.0 JQ2 

Ed tabu rgb 9.1 

NORTHSDi IROAND 
Betas* 7.0 JB 


17 63 
20 68 

20 6B 
16 6T 
15 59 

.13 55 

19 66 
Z1 70 

20 68 

21 70 
21 70 


sunny A 
sunny 
Sumy . 
any 
army ‘ • 

BHJ 

ongm 
bri^it- . 
sunny- - ■ 
sunny ; 
sunny' . 
bright 
showere • 
surmy '■ 

Mate.’. 

bright - : 
sunny •, - 

bright". 

shottssra • 
rain 

doudy . 

Ongnt .. 
Sumy 
Sunny" 
sunny."- 


21 70 BhOSMRL. 


ere Wednesday's figores 


Abroad 


WODATi'C, dotd: d, drisasa; I. lair: jg, tog; r, rate; 3 , sun; 3n, snoar L thunber. 

Ajaccio 
MmM 


C F 
8 26 79 COtodM 
a 29 84 <7plMgn 
8 28-82 Corfu 
a 39102 DubMn 



business. 

Price tedac 386. 

London: The FT Index dond &3 up at 
1353.1. 


Our address 



Informs lion for Inclusion tn The 
Times information servic e should be 
senl lo.The editor, ms. The Times. 
PO Bok 7. 1 Virghua Street. London. 
Cl 9XN. 


Bemaitta* 

Biarritz 

Border 

BouTn* 

B ra w n 


■APERS _ 

_ London Port 

era umlWd of. 1 Urobu 

London Cl 9XN. Friday, Wimr ZT. 
1986; Regracred ns a ne w s pa per al 
Ihe Post Office. 


B Abes' 
Cairo \ . . 

CapcTn 

Cbtanca 

Chicago* 

Cb'Chdtoh 


C F 
a 26 79 
s 22 72 

8 30 86 

. __ — f 18 88 MefcTne c 1152 a 

* 24 75 OBfarpvnlk s 26 79 Mexico C* c 21 7Q S.__ 

f 28 82 Faro f 22 72 Ataod* 8 33 91 Scad 

s 31 88 KRm 
S 28 78 MorknMT 
c 20 68 Moscow 
s 28 79 Mradeh 

9 28 79 Nairobi 
s 27 81 Naples 
c 28 82 NDeH. 
s 25 77 N r«r 
f 22 72 Mcs 
a 36 97 0ato 
■ 18 54 Parts 
f 93 91 Peking 

sag™ 

f 28 

C 19 

3 25 77 Wo da J 


C F C 

3 34 93 Rom s 29, M. 
S 27 81 Stfibuy S 24 75 
3 30 88 SPrtscS' s 19 85 

s 15 sa. 
c 21 70 


s 37 99 Fl orence 
r 25 77 Frankfurt 
f 28 79 Fbncfnl 
9 28 82 Oenan 
f 21 70 (taretar 
s 26 79 Hetatad 
f 28 82 Hong K 
126 79 bnSrak 
s-31 88 Wanted 
3 26 79 Jeddah 
9 25 77 Jrtmro* 
f 24 78 Karachi 
S 16 61 L” 

S 36.95 

9 21 70 

a 23 73 L Angela* 
f 21 70 ' ^ 

r 5 41 




•t 


• denotaa ; Wednesday's figures ana latest avafiatee 


a S IISSiCL c 29 84 

f g gWra nta- a 29 84 
C 13 » gbaab- iB a 27 81 ,. 

* ^ 73 a 17-33. V 

c 21 70 Tangier f 23 73 . 

6 32 90 ToHnlv a 29 6* 
c a « Tatartte f 24-75 
J 2 S I** 0 C 24 75 

* ® ® rmor a 18-64 
s ra 73 Tome g 31-83 
» 08 82 vataBda g 29 -84 
c 27 81 Vsnctoer* » 15 53 

a 24 75 Vienna - ! 24 75 
1 13 K Warsaw ( 22 72 
fi WeeWen* 3 23 -jj 
c 21 70 W e fn ton c 848 
8 42108 Zurich S ta n 


■I-.. 


. _ . v .f - . 









FINANCE AND INDUSTRY 



VBPB, ttepfosterboaid man- 
ufacturers increased profits 
'from £78:6 million to £1032 
million before tax in the year 
10-31 March- Turnover was up 
from £564 million to £616 
million and the final dividend 
is 5.5p, up -from 4.6p, taking 
the total to 9p. up from 7.7p. 

- Temnns, pace 23 

£20m 1S£ bid 

Industrial Scotland Energy, 
the oil exploration company, 
has received a bid of 90p a 
share, from Texas Gas Re- 
sources Corporation, a United 
Slates ' transport group, valu- 
ing ISE at £20J million. 

Tempos, page 23 

Sovereign rights 

Sovereign Oil & Gas an- 
nounced yesterday that it is 
raising £23 million by a rights 
issue. 

Tempts, page 23 

Liffe expands 

The - London International 
Financial Futures Exchange 
(Liffe) will spend £12 million 
over the next two to three 
years to increase fivefold its 
capacity, now running at 
50,000 contracts a day, to cope 
with expanding business. The 
exchange also hopes to reduce 
trading costs. 

Metals ‘value’ 

Mr Alan Bond's Metals 
Exploration Group said it 
believes its lSOp-o-share offer 
for Hampton Gold Mining 
Areas represents "full and fair 
value," despite the /strong 
opposition in Hampton’s sec- 
ond defence document Met- 
als owns more than 32' per 
cent of Hampton's. shares. . 


Bank of England sounds 
alarm on interest rates 


US Dollar 

1.5180 (-0.0020) 

WGerman mark 
3.3715 (+0.0077) 

Trade-weighted 
76.0 (-0.1) 


American 
joins ICI 

I Cl has made Mr -Thomas 
Wyman, US chairman and 
. chief executive of Columbia 
Broadcasting Corporation, a 
nonexecutive director. Mr 
Wyman, 56, has a wide knowl- 
edge of American business. 

ICI has US sales worth 
Peariy £2-5 billion (£1.6 bil- 
Hoo) or 15 per cent of the 
group's total sales, with Amer- 
ica its lamest single market By 
the' 1990’s ICI hopes for 
American sales to account for 
25 percent of its total. 

Evered bid 
attacked 

~ McKechnie Brothers, the 
Midlands engineering group, 
last.'nighi launched a bitter 
attack on Evered Holdings, 
which has made a £171 mil- 
lion takeover bid for the 
business, saying Evered had 
feiled to show that its manage- 
meht style was more than a 
“brittle piece of public rela- 
tions hype." . . 

Share issue 

The issue of preference 
shares tn Billingsgate City 
Securities, the single asset 
company set up to sell securi- 
ties m the 1 85,000 sq ftCSty of 
London- office development 
next to the former Billingsgate 
Market, dosed yesterday. 
Goldman Sachs and" Baring 
Brothers, the merchant 
banks^re offering to buy the 
.shaiesat 99paud jeffat I04pu 
The tssueprfce was lOOp.- . 


' The Bank of England has 
given warning that there are 
enough worrying -signs in the 
economy to justify an ex- 
tremely cautious approach to 
interest rales. 

Strongly rising unit labour 
costs and a rapid increase in 
liquidity in the economy are 
regarded by the Bank as 
danger signals. The danger 
could be realized if the level of 
interest rates is allowed to fell 
too quickly, it says in its June 
Quarterly Bulletin, published 
yesterday. 

Despite foe 39 per cent 
annualized growth in the 
broad- measure of money, 
sterling M3, in foe latest three 
months, the Bank, says that 
there is little indication, taken 


Ferruzzi * 

unveils 

strategy 

Ry Richard Lander 

Ferruzzi, the Italian agricul- 
tural group which holds a 23.7 
per. cent stake in S&W 
Berisford, reaffirmed, yester- 
day that it was still seeking 
control of Berisford* s British 
Sugar subsidiary. 

However;. rather' than an- 
nounce an immediate foil bid 
for Berisford, it revealed a 
“hearts and minds" strategy 
designed to allay foe fears of 
regulatory authorities, British 
Sugar employees and farmers 
in Britain over its intentions 
towards British Sugar. 

At foe centre of foe strategy, 
disclosed by Mr Rani Gardini, 
Ferruzzi’s president, is an 
unusual request to the Gov- 
ernment that its holding in 
Berisford be referred to foe 
Monopolies and Mergers 
Commission, as is the case 
with a proposed bid by Tate & 
Lyle, Britain's other main 
sugar producer. 

If foe commission permits; 
Ferruzzi would then attempt 
to gain control of British 
Sugar, either by increasing its 
slake in Berisford or pursuing 
its original intention of buying 
British Sngar and arranging 
management buyouts forofor 
er .' Berisford businesses. Mr 
Gar dini said Ferruzzi had 
some £555 million, at its 
disposal for new investments. 

Fernizzi held talks with 
Berisford on such a move 
earlier this year when its stake 
was 9 percent It increased Its 
shareholding by purchasing s 
14.7 per cent state from 
Hillsdown Holdings whose 
bid was referred to the Mo- 
nopolies Commission along 
with Tate & Lyle's last month. 

Although : a bid- from 
Ferruzzi would almost cer- 
tainly be referred as well, 
yesterday’s pre-emptive -move 
was dearly designed to soften 
British resistance to an Italian 
takeover. 

Al foe same- time, Ferruzzi 
announced foe appointment 
of Sir Richard Butler, (Resi- 
dent of the National Farmers 
Union until February, as 
chairman of its new British 
subsidiary. Agricola- UK, 
which will hold foe group's 
shareholdings Berisford. = 

Asked what Fenuzzi would 
do with British Sugar, Mr 
Gardini said foe company 
“hasuil foe qualities to remain 
as it is.” 

A Ferruzzi document enti- 
tled “Our commitment to foe 
UK” also promised close rela- 
tions with British formers and 
unions and management at 
British Sngar and said there 
would be no factory closures 
or redundancies. 

If the bid for British Sugar 
was succesful Ferruzzi would 
control some 22 per cent of 
EEC sngar production: 

The bid talk pushed 
Berisford shares to 239p, but 
they ended 3p lower at 232p. 
valuing foe group at £443 
million; - ' 


By ; Dayid Smith, Economics Correspondent 


overall, that monetary condi- 
tions are loose- 

It dies foe performance of 
narrow money: MO, which is 
still growing at the lower end 
of its 2 to o per cent official 
target range, and the exchange 
rate, -which has risen by an . 
average of 3 per cent since 
early March. 

However, the Bank is keen- 
ly aware of foe big build-up of 
liquidity in the economy, 
mainly as a result of increased 
competition between banks, 
building societies and other 
financial intermediaries. 

“On balance," foe bulletin 
says, “there is tittle indication 
as yet that liquidity is unwill- 
ingly held at current real 
interest rates." 

But, any sharp rundown of 


Hquidity could take a number 
of damaging forms, including 
excessive pay settlements, 
sharp movements of funds 
abroad by financial institu- 
tions and' too rapid a rise in 
consumer spending. 

The stress on real interest 
rates is important, but Bank of 
•Pn giand officials are unhap py 
about- reading too much into 
the performance of the retail 
prices index.. 

Like the Chancellor, they 
expect a rale of about 3 per 
cent at the end-of the year, but 
-do-not expect a further decline 
next year. 

However, the Bank says, 
there are other measures of 
inflation, and these display a 
less satisfactory picture. 

The gross domestic product 



UK trade deficit 
doubles to £666m 

By Ora Economics Correspondent 


. Britain had a trade deficit in 
goods of £666 million last 
month, more tfcin double foe 
April figure. Hie current ac- 
count, after allowing for the 
invisible items of trade, 
scraped into surplus by £34 

millin a- 

. The anrent account surplus 
for the first five months of the 
year Mulled £997. 
compared info foe Treasury’s 
forecast of £3.5 trillion for foe 
whole of 1986. 

. .Treasrary officials said yes- 
today that foe forecast could 
stflj he achieved as the effects 
of lower 63 prices start to come 
tbriragh in stronger noo-off 
exports, haring so far bees 
mainly reflected in a declining 
oO surplus. /. 

The viable trade deficit of 
£233 billion in foe first five 
months iff fob year exceeded 
its total of £2.14 MBoa for the 
whole of last year. 

The main factor ia this 
sharp deterioration has been 
foe fell in foe value of Britain’s 
oil exports. In the March-May 
period, oO exports dropped by 
£1.6 billion compared with foe 
previous three months. Last 


month, file o3 export total fell 
by £79 mflfioa to £583 million, 
foe lowest since December 
1980. 

There was also a drop last 
month in exports of aircraft, 
included among the so-called 
erratic items of trade, which 
fell by £214 million in totaL 

Excluding pH and the erratic 
items of trade, exports, which 
fell by £167 ntiQion, to £537 
bflfioo, would have recorded 
an increase, officials said. The 
trend for non-oil export vol- 
atile is now regarded as fiat, an 
improvement on . the earlier 
decline from the middle of last 
year untiTthe early sprmg. 

Imports rose by £234 mil- 
lion to £634 billion, although 
again trade In aircraft pro- 
duced abiasmthe figure. The 
underlying fiend of imports is 
also regarded as flat 

The difference between the 
£666 million deficit on risible 
trade and the £34 Bullion 
current account sraplns is dne 
to foe surplus on invisibles, 
now estimated to be £700 
milfioo . a month, from, an 
earlier estimate of £600 mfl- 
fiou, despite foe prospect of a 
loss of tourist earnings. 


Oppenheim advances 


Mr Nick Oppeoheim, foe 
financier, yesterday took a 
decisive step forward towards 
winning has battle for the 
Aitken Hume financial ser- 
vices conglomerate. He 
claimed last night to hold or 
have received acceptances for 
36.81 ■ per cent of Aitten’s 
shares after increasing the 
terms of his all-paper offer by 
i! percent. 

On Wednesday, Mr 
Oppenehim announced that 
his original bid had atiramed 
818 -per- cent acceptances to 
add to the 12 per cent he 
already owned. However, 
yesterday's new bid attracted 
another 26.81 per cent 
pledges, although 3.85 percent 
of these cannot yet be counted 
as valid under the terms of the 
takeover code. 


Among those believed to 
have accepted the new offer 
are clients of Laing & 
Cniickshank, foe stockbroker, 
who were advised to take Mr 
Oppenbeim's offer. Among 
the Laing clients accepting 
was said to be Mutual Shares, 
an American fund which 
speaks for 12 per cent of 
Aitken's .equity. 

Mr Oppenheim's quoted 
Tran wood group is now offer- 
ing 10 shares, rather than nine, 
for each Aitken. The new bid 
values Aitken at around £87 
million and each share at 
about 190p- Aitken shares 
closed 3p lower yesterday at 
164p. 

Executives at Aitken were 
not available for comment last 
night. 


deflator, foe index of all home 
costs, was up by just over 5 per 
cent in foe first quarter, 
compared with a year earlier, i 
Unit labour costs for foe 
whole economy were rising at 
a 5 per cent rate in the fourth 
quarter of last year, and the 
Bank does not expea any 
slowdown this year. 

The British economy 
paused in the first quarter, as 
did most other major 
economies. 

The prospect of strong 
growth in real incomes should 
ensure a resumption of 
growth, the Bank says, al- 
though ~tbe consequent rise in 
unit labour costs, may hold 
Britain back compared with 
competitor countries. 


Thames 

attracts 

£873m 

By Alison Eadie 

The offer for sale for 
Thames Television was over- 
subscribed 26.9 times, with 
£873 million chasing £323 
million worth of shares. 

A total of 102,628 applica- 
tions were received for 459.4 j 
million shares. Investors will 
not receive nearly as many 
shares as they applied for. 

Those who asked for up to 
3,500 will go into a weighted 
ballot and the successful ones 
receive 200 shares. Those 
applying for 4.000 to 10,000 
shares will receive 200 and 
those applying for more than 

10.000 will receive 2 per cent 
up lo a maximum of 50,000 

Dealings in foe shares start 
on July 2. 

The tender offer for Morgan 
Grenfell was also oversub- 
scribed, attracting more than 

40.000 applications. 

The smiting price looks like 
being pitched at about foe 
480p mark, against a mini- 
mum tender price of 425pi 
• Dee Corporation’s 1473 
million share offer, cum plac- 
ing was only 25.4 per cent 
subscribed. The level of take- 
up is somewhat ironic as the 
institutions persuaded Dee to 
treble its allocation to all 
shareholders from 25 to 75 per 
cent of foe new shares lo give 
them, a fairer chance. 

The increase cost Dee more 
than £1 million in extra 
commission. 


Guidelines for 
open market 
shares revised 

The' Stock Exchange yester- 
day revised its guidelines on 
open market share purchases 
to give more flexibility and 
avoid the sort of off-market 
scramble for shareholding po- 
sitions which characterized 
the Westland battle. 

In future foe broker acting 
for a buyer building up a stake 
will have to declare “to foe 
world al large" what price he is 
prepared to pay and how 
many shares be is seeking. 

As a further move to have 
foe business transacted inside 
foe market, the Stock Ex- 
change Council is reducing the 
minimum period during 
which foe offer must stand i 
from one day to one hour. 1 

It is felt that one reason for 
foe off-market for shares in 
Westland was that this avoid- 
ed foe risk of having an 
attempted purchase in foe 
open market spoilt by a rival 
oner which foe original broker 
would have been unable to 
counter until the next day. 


Opec close to agreement 
on new quota system 


MARKET SUMMARY 



Agreement on a new pro- 
duction quota system appears 
close to being- reached by foe 
13 oil ministers of foe Organi- 
zation of Petroleum Exporting 
Countries. 

The new quota system is 
designed to force prices back 
up tp a target of $78 a barrel. 
Details have still to be worked 
out. but several Opec minis- 
ters are now confident that an 
agreement can be reacted. 

Opec’s official spokesman, 
Mr James Adu. said yesterday 
that “good progress" is being 
made at foe ministerial meet- 
ing io Yugoslavia and that he 
was hopeful of an agreement. 

However, foe Nigerian oil 
minister; Mr Rilwanu 
Lukman. who succeeded to 
the chairmanship of Opec at 
foe: start of foe meeting, said 
he would prefer to mate no 
official statement on progress 
until he had something con- 
crete^ io announce. 

The ministers are meeting 
at -this ' Yugoslavian island 
retreat formerly President 
Tito’s summer residence, to 
conduct a. round of informal 
discussions which are being 
used ibpaich over some offoe 


From David Young, Brioni 

cracks which have appeared in 
Opec's public facade. 

.Yesterday’s meeting was 
initially limited to the 13 
ministers with each having 
one adviser at his side, instead 
of foe usual support teams of 
economists and financial 
advisers. 

It appears to have -resulted 
in an agreement to work ont 
new quotas, which will allow a 
slight increase in oil produc- 
tion m the fourth quarter of 
this year to meet winter 
demand, but- which will also 
be strictly adhered to so that 
present over-production is 
hailed. 

- Libya, ban and Algeria 
would still: prefer to see a 
sharp cut in overall produc- 
tion. which they feel could 
send prices back up to $29 a 

' barrel 

The other Opec ministers 
now appear to be having some 
success in persuading them 
that this is unachievable un- 
less Saudi Arabia cuts back on 
its production to half its 
present 4VS million barrel a 
day level, a level which Saudi 
.Arabia has made clear it has 
no intention of returning to. 
The other dissenting 


voice is that of Ecuador's oil 
minister. Mr Javier Teran, 
who yesterday suggested that 
Opec should set a taraet of 
sending the price up to $20 by 
foe end of tne year. 

Opec is now being encour- 
aged by soundings it has taken 
from non-member oil produc- 
ers such as Malaysia, Angola, 
Mexico. Egypt and Norway. 
All have indicated that they 
would trim their oil output 
once Opec agrees on a new 
firm quota, although there is 
considerable confusion among 
the Opec ministers about 
whether the non-member pro- 
ducers should announce pro- 
duction cuts before or after 
Opec announces what cuts it 
plans to mate. 

The fact that Britain has 
remained totally disiant from 
Opec on foe issue of North Sea 
production has led to foe 
usual outburst of criticism 
against it from Opec. 

Senor Arturo Grisanti. foe 
Venezuelan oil minister and 
until thfs week Opec’s presi- 
dent. said: “I believe that low 
prices .cause the most serious 
problem for countries with 
limited resources and high 
production costs. This is foe 
ca|e of countries tike foe, UK." 


Executive Editor Kenneth Fleet 


Will Borrie stir it 
for the brewers? 


The beerage traditionally is a stout 
supporter of the Tory Party, to the 
benefit of both. As an electoral 
influence the demon drink may not be 
as strong as in the past but, given the 
choice, die Government, any govern- 
ment, would prefer to lower the price 
of a pint in advance of a General 
Election than to put it up. 

The question is whether the knight 
of the shining countenance, die 
Director-General of Fair Trading, Sir 
Gordon Borne, will dare to venture 
into these deep and dangerous waters 
with an election no more than two 
years away and the party collection 
boxes on red alert. Will he recom- 
mend to the Secretary of State, and 
will Paul Cbannon agree, that the 
brewers* tied-house system should be 
examined again by the Monopolies 
and Mergers Commission? 

There is mounting evidence that the 
tied estate is yielding too many 
dividends to the brewers (70 per cent 
of all beer sales are made through tied 
houses) at the expense of the drinking 
classes. Not only is a pint costing 
more than it should (it has risen more 
than the rate of inflation would 
justify), but the people’s choice be- 
hind the bar seems to be shrinking. 

Scottish & Newcastle and Bass, 
which between them have about 90 
per cent of the Scottish market, in 
rapid sequence have put 2p on a pint 
Scotland is where the national round 
of price increases normally starts. As 
for customer choice, the Morning 
Advertiser cm May 21 bravely wrote in 
an editorial headed “Ale and the tie 
lesson”: 

“It seems obvious that the attitude 
some brewers are taking towards 
national beers is having the effect of 
restricting the market leaders that 
customers can buy... Brewers never 
seem to learn.” 

Sir Gordon Borrie, given his charac- 
ter and belief in die competitive 
virtues, must be sorely tempted to 
recommend another investigation of a 
system that seems to sustain monop- 
oly pricing and the power to restrict 
the choice of drinks available. Neither 
practice should commend itself to a 
government dedicated to the free 
market, especially as a reform of the 
tied estate would almost certainly lead 
to lower prices for beer and other 
drinks sold behind the bar. 

Even if the tie remains inviolate, 
the structure of the brewing industry 
will undergo radical changes within 
the next two years. Sir Derrick 
Holden-Brown is confident that the 
Monopolies Commission will save 
Allied-Lyons from the clutches of 
Elders, the relief might be short: other 
impressarios are waiting in the wings, 
contemplating a group that is both a 
brewer and a break-up situation. One 
interested spectator of the brewing 
scene is Anheuser-Busch, the Ameri- 
can Budweiser giant, which is 
uniquely capable of bidding for the 
market leader itself, Bass. 

Meanwhile, eyes are sharply fo- 
cused on Grand Metropolitan, which 
owns Watney Mann and Truman. 
Although this week's meeting between 
Sir Stanley Grinstead and Alan Bond 
(Americas Cup, Bond Corporation, 


Swan and dealer in Screen Entertain- 
ment) has been categorized as routine, 
there is no question that Mr Bond 
would like to bid for Grand Met, a 
house where it is said in the business 
there is no longer a meeting of minds 
between Sir Stanley and the managing 
director Allen Sheppard. Mr Bond 
may wait until the MMC has pro- 
nounced on Elders and Allied. 

It would be a fascinating irony if the 
three knights. Sir Derrick (63), Sir 
Derek Palmar (Bass and 67) and Sir 
Stanley (62), all bowed out to the 
sound of successful bids. Apres trots , 
les deluges. 

And who would bet against a link 
between James Gulliver, the laird of 
Argyll, and Scottish & Newcastle? 
Agreed, of course. No more costly and 
bruising takeover tattles. S&N cer- 
tainly has to move. A second bite at 
Matthew Brown is always a possibil- 
ity, but much less attractive than, say, 
a merger with Courage to create a 
formidable national brewer. 

Courage, acquired as part of Im- 
perial by Hanson Trust, is available. 
Lord Hanson's asking price is £1 
billion, a figure that so far has been re- 
ceived with a mixture of mirth and 
terror. If the Office of Fair Trading 
were to add the gunpowder of a 
reference to this heady brew of mix 
and merger, the noise would rival the 
big bang. 

Going Dutch 

Lord Rothermere wishes to transfer 
the Daily Mail & General Trust — and 
thereby control of Associated News- 
papers — to Holland. He is seeking a 
judicial review to establish that the 
legal requirement for Treasury per- 
mission for the move conflicts with 
European Community law. The Trea- 
sury is likely to oppose this strenu- 
ously; not least because the most 
obvious motive is to avoid British 
taxation. 

It is easy to see the frustration of the 
Harmsworth family. If the trust were 
authorized, it would avoid internal 
capital gains tax. But it cannot be 
authorized since most of its assets are 
tied up in a half-share of Associated, 
publishers of the embarrassingly 
patriotic Daily Mail and Mail on 
Sunday. So the trust operates its 
remaining £70 million portfolio at a 
disadvantage. 

Moving to Holland would enable it 
in effect to start again by revaluing its 
portfolio at present prices, though it 
would still be liable to Dutch tax on 
future gains. 

This makes sense if the trust wants 
to make a once-for-all switch in its 
portfolio, for instance to sell British 
shares and buy foreign ones. It makes 
nonsense of die spirit of harmoniza- 
tion but that would be nothing new.. 
The move would enable the Hanns- 
worths to hang on to Associated 
without the tax penalties. But the 
really big tax benefits of moving to , 
Holland would come if the £200 
million stake in Associated were sold. 
That is surely not the present inten- 
tion. But Lord Rothermere is 60. His 
son and heir is 1 8 and few things in I 
Fleet Street now look permanent. 


BPB 

INDUSTRIES 


Gypsum-based products and other building materials 
Paperboard and packaging 
Wireline services 

30% Profit 
increase 


Year to 31st March 

Turnover 
Profit before tax 
Attributable profit 

Earnings per share 
Dividends per share 


1986 
£ million 
616 
103 
63 


1985 
£ million 
564 
79 
48 
P 

25.1 

7.7 


Copies a* the Annual Report and Accounts wtd be available from the Secretary. BPS IrxJuslnes pic, 
Langley Part: House. Uxbridge Road. Slough SL3 6011 (TeL Slough (0753) 73273) from 2nd July 1986. 
















finance and industry 


THE TIMES FRIDAY JUNE 27 1986 


SL 


WALL STREET 


FOREIGN EXCHANGES 


New York (Agencies) - 
Shares were slightly lower in 
early trading yesterday as 
profit-taking interrupted a 
two-day rally. Hie Dow Jones 
industrial average slipped by 
133 pouits to 1£83.72. 

Analysts said that investors 
have been concentrating on 
interest-sensitive stocks. Utili- 
ties continued to rise yester- 
day, while the market indexes, 
as well as the bond market. 


Declining shares outnum- 


bered rising ones by seven to 
six on a vol ume of 51 million 
shares. ITT led the list of 
active stocks, op by 3(4 to 
52%. 

ITT reported that talks, it 
has had with Compagnie 
Generate D’Electridte of 
France about joint ventures 
have not resalted in an agree- 
ment “at this time.” 

On Wednesday, the Dow 
Jones industrial average 
dosed 930 points higher at 
1,88530. 


STERLING SPOT AND FORWARD RATES 


Sterling, more than a cent 
down aeamst the dollar at one 


I r«;\r« jm 


w 


m 


DOLLAR SPOT RATES 



Jun Jun 
25 24 


Jun Jot 
25 24 



ggaam 

MONEY MARKETS AND GOLD 


awing Sinks 10 

Hranca Howe 1054 


Hong Kong 


EURO MONEY DEPOSITS % Sp£ 


1 nmth 7-654 
6 room 7-6% 


SEIBSEI 


r~£E 


wm 


f) jn?tr-n 44^5 


as 


EXCHANGE 

Q W Joyman md Canpoit 
SUGAR IFtan&Canim) 

139L6-3&8 
147.4-47.0 

1 KMUD 
100.8-60.0 
166.6-64A 


COMMODITIES 


*4 


STOP 


1655 185.5 
1S5l 5 185.5 
Vofcn/s 

LONDWI 

POTATO FUTURES 

epartonm 






■vJ 






SILVER LARGE 
fti+h ' 

Three Months __ 
VU 

Tone 

SILVER SMALL 

331.0333.0 

33SUM41.0 

KB 

Idto 

Cto * 1 

331JJ-3310 

Three Months _ 

3395-341.0 

Vot 

NB 

AUMMUM 



7M.0-765.C 

Thren Months — 760.0-781.0 

Vol 

5868 

MCKEL 

Cash 

mm 4WHWVI 

.. 2670-2676 

Threo Months — 

_ 2690-2695 

Vol 

Tow _ 

.702 
Steady 


Jull 
Oct 
Jan 
Apr 
Jull 

10255 101.75 I Oct 
1&55 104^0 I Jan 

Apr 


LONDON BEAT FUTURES 

EXCHANGE 


INVESTMENT TRUSTS 


iv*a 




LONDON FINANCIAL FUTURES 


TTmlfoaSiSMng Open 

SapBB 9632 

Dec 66 9096 

Mar 87 N/T 

Jun 87 __ HfT 

S«pB7 ; HfT 

Dec 87 N/T 

Pravlous day's total awn hnarast 1 4884 
TTrae Moan EUnxMH' 

Sop 86 8301 

DSC 86 9022 

Mar 87 _ 9003 

Jun 87 B2J2 

US Treasury Bond 

Sep 86 96-03 

Dec 86 97-06 

Mar 87 HfT 

______ 

Jot 86 — ■ N/T 

Sep 86 102-04 

Dec BS N/T 


Wnh Low CtoM EatVM 

9084 9079 • 9032 1163 

9097 9095 9096 78 

9038 0 

8087 0 

9053 0 

90.40 0 

Previous day 's total open Interest 17843 
9336 9328 T»24 3235 

93.27 9319 9026 731 

9006 9000 9005 70 

92.73 92.71 92.75 106 

Pmtousdoy^ total open interest ®T69 
98-20 97-20 98-15 5652 

97-06 97-06 97-24 4 

.0 

Previous day's totajopen Interest 994 

102-12 102-04 102-12 120 

0 


Junes 

Sep 86 

Dae ns _ 

Jun 87 

FT-SE1M 

Jun 86 

Sap 86 


„ Preview days tote! open interest 21 003 

- 122-11 122-12 122-99 122-03 300 

- 122-12 122-28 122-09 122-27 7442 

- N/T 122-18 0 

- N/T 122-06 0 

_ Previous (tty's total open interest 2824 

- 16065 16455 160® 1 SC 16 110 

_ 16050 16085 16640 16690 183 


THE TIMES UNIT TRUST INFORMATION SERVICE 


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Seed* SH True! 772 8Z2 -0.1 388 

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Fb Eastern TruM 76.1 81.0 b *03 088 


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UK Growth Aaron 1483 158.1 +05 340 

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102.4 110.T 
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Do Aaron (8) 


2138 2244* -08 3.10 
3412 35ft 7* -08 3.10 
IBM 1088 .. 522 

1102 191.1 5£2 

1252 1308 .. 145 

1«5 173.1 .. 1*5 

£1134 13820 .. 280 

<1138 1285c .. 280 


CS FUND MANAGERS 

128. Hah Hotaom. Lonoon WCiv SPY 

01-2421148 

CS Japan Fred 7ft* 834 +08 028 

CMWOHFUeaUNMVtS 
1- Wynne W 7 . MWitot y . HAS ONB 
01-802 8378 

Growth 2852 3034c +08 £80 

taeom 332.1 SSUc +14 337 

For Em 1855 197 7 +08 08* 

tarn Araanean 15*4 1848 +23 056 

9 ■004 47.6 503 +01 130 

Eunnwan *7.9 51.0 +02 100 

Japan 508 533 +08 050 

C*KL (JAMBS) MAfMOEMKHT 
p° Bro JSl Bane MM* London ECS 7 JO 
01-621 0011 

Caoaal 3590 38*0 +2) 189 

Inoona 2908 3107 +Ofl 426 

Norm American 2950 3156 +44 088 

CATES ALLEN 

1. King MMUm Sl 6C*n 7AU 
01-6238114 

« Trust 1058 1128 -0.11081 

CENTRAL BOARD OF FOiANCC OF 
CMJRCX OF ENGLAND 
£ Rrt StraaL London EC2Y SAO 
01-588 1815 

tav Fond 40855 . . 488 

Farad m 1*925 .. 656 

OejnM 1000 .. 1080 

CHARITIES OFFICIAL MVeSTMBtT FUND 
i (m SOM. London EC2Y SAO 
01-588 1815 

taeema 37385 * .. 438 

Aaron n 0 7933 

Deoow 1000 .. 685 

CLERICAL INEnCAL UNIT TBU9T 
HANAOm 

Narm Pan. Bnsliil BS2 GUH 
0800 373393 

Amur Crown »2 253 +02 180 

Equt* High tacomo 430 45 M +01480 
Eroopron Growth 24.7 263 .02 280 

General EfTOty 391 418 +01 280 

G4t ft Firta in, Qn 207 Ju .. nan 

G* 5 Fned inc 251 288 .. 980 

hide* Secwim 256 273 .. 220 

MOm Growm 283 308 . . 080 

COUNTY UT RUMMERS LTD 
•Bi. Qmaosda, London ECZY 8EU 
01-128 1999 

Saptu Apron 285 1 3033* .. 1*8 

Bwbv That 446 47.4 +05 4AS 

|*tra tacai* 1838 1737 +03 5.19 

fiwmol 182.1 17.4c +02 188 

W5W® 582 S7W» ,70 

Growth tanmont 27BB 2965c -22 245 
tacom ft Grronn 40 6 431 * + 0 ., 4+0 
JROTesn & Pacme use 1552 -13 on 

JW ft** Groash 1065 (112 +08 083 

bvRecawy in 0 nan +05 iw 

SnaaerCo* 207 7 2209 -02 (84 

Ooeal tac Tit 560 59 5* +03 iff 


FtCUMTIIAHAmWMn. . 

1 . Lauranc* Poutnay *«■ hatai EG4R OBA 
01-623 4880 

US swear C01 ,788 328 +04 Og 
Capnd Fund 1078 1150 +03 0*2 

Srefira fend 804 880 +05 455 

F*r Eaatani fend *5 748 +02 D-35 

Owjraras taama H2 709* 1M 

Rad karat Sft£ 623* . . B.00 

Natural nn Fund 385 39.1* +05 455 

Eropw tacom 898 748 +09 385 

FBMVESTMWTMAHMen 

190. IIM Granga SL Gttagow G2 2RA 
041-332 3132 

BaMcadQditac « <M ..180 
Do Aocum 410 457 

taramaOmtae «3 429* .. MO 

DO Attn* «3 455 .. .. 

Sanaa art tac 455 485 . . 180 

Do Accum 48.1 400 .. .. 


FIDELITY MTERNATIONAL 
ftSf jBfc fta uupo 1W IDT 

U/3Z 302322 


10*8 1115 
Amor Eraaty Income 3£2 345 
Amar Spaoro Sta »G 5*2 
Far Em tae 3i.i 33 1* 

G4 ft Rod tat 309 522c 
Gftmei S taam 978 10*8* 
Jipan Sgecfel SU »4 02 
Jaosn Tha 1182 1255c 

Maiauud H Tat 132.6 141 1 
Mv mama Eouay 770 828i 
PiDtaotaonW 001 335 333 

Soon EM AM Tal 2E8 283 
Bpactal SM 1589 1700 


MEtafSUanl 


ft OusbySa. London EC3A 8AN 
01-838 H58 

Anranean Eompt £3714 379.6 
JOptai E*ampt £3728 3333 
Am Procany Tal SlttTBB O c 

Property T/ust £20338 


CROWN UWT TRUST SERVICES 
Crown Hcuh. Waam GU2I 1XW 
04962 5033 

Hah tacom Turn 7*31 2800 . 503 

Growth TnaJ 223.6 239 1 . . am 

Amman Tries 1345 W33c .. 070 

CRO3A0BI UNtTYRUST HANAOBI9I.TD 
d a na a . Surrey HHZ 8BL 
07372 *243* 

UK tacom *|| 520 +03 447 

UK Growth Accum 486 51.7 -03 2.43 

Do Dot 488 517 *03 243 

Eurooeon Grow* 478 508 *gi ijn 

PJOhC Growth 482 513 -04 .. 

EFta OTIT TRUST MANAOStS 
4. Mahno* Crmccm. Eoamugn 
IBI -226 3*82 

AraaraanFuad 729 779 218 

Captai Fim 94 6(012 188 

Growm 6 me fend 1312 i«03 428 

HMO+iFiM 1075 1150 587 

u eimufeW I Fund (886 201 7c . 1 (2 
Raaotrcaa Find 189 202 050 

5Mr Jap Co I Fnd 353 07 7 
Tokyo Fund U69 157I 016 




Omo vu 


T-g g ' 1 . 1 1 ' 1 1 " n 




Amadcan 
Eiapaan 
Smlor Goo 


117.1 12B8 +08 3.15 

219.7 23*8 +08 1.09 

2118 223.4* .. 1JM 


NKIIOlULPMnOGKriNVEIimT 

msmsms 

48. (hoaclivdi GL EC3P 31*1 
.01823 4200 EM £9ft 

NP1 UK 20*4 2178* +04 £80 

Do Accent -' - 3802 3518* +03 290 

Wt-Ovanoa 5682 5918 +38 0.70 

Du Aaron 0785 7213 +45 070 

Bar EM ABC 748 793 +05 0.10 

Do OR 748 795 +05 0.1© 

Anwtefel Aac 593 835* +05 150 

Do DA 50.1 828* +05 130 




NORinCN UTMANAOmft • 

PO H a 4. N dnwdt NR1 3NG 
0003 

Group TTuat mo? 1273 +081 35B 

nllVuat 1283 1328 +05 141 


OPPQ ft g — H T R U I T MANa OCI R O f r 
88. Caraion Sam. UHMn EC4N SAE 
oaataff 01-238 3888/V7A/IVa 
ta tame ii B M Grown 1388 14&5c +03 089 
tacom 8 Grown 835 68.1 +0.T £81 

WondwidaRoe 828 884* .. 058 

Amartcnn Growth M3 37.7 +03 080 

J*rwn Growth 365 W.6 +08 1J0 

Broaon Grown sap aai +02 aoo 

ux Grown 9*4 sit* +02 ass 

PWA. Grown 488 3£5* +03 022 

HVi Inam 333 353c +02 7.02 

PmdKta mean* 927 58.1 +08 28* 

Do Accum 958 101.4 +05 £84 


11 . Deronam Sq. London I 
01-833 4373 

Eatay Eon 4105 i 
Do Aocura 519.7 * 

UKMarkat FaoMM 754 
Do Aaron 778 

Japan P Womu oBO i3as 1 
DO Accun 131.4 1 

US Specol Fantonn 685 
Do Accun 89.5 

GoM ft Prackluc Mat 363 
Do Accum 374 

US So-JCUV tac SftJ 
Do Accun 61 9 

Euopean Pad Me 758 
Do ACaa 788 


+25 283 
+3-3 233 
-0.1 156 
-0.1 158 
- 0.1 0.12 
-08 012 
+02 086 
+08 058 
+08 18* 
+05 154 
-08 438 
-05 4.76 
+08 1.10 
+05 1.10 


MLAUNTT TRUST MANAdBIEirr 

99-100. Banana Rd. Mamma. Km 14614 in 

0022 67*751 


KARL TRUST 

glH^Hc«»»Ll«1V7EB 

Growth Fond tac 904 988 +05 283 

tto Accun T35B 1445 +09 £03 

Income Fuw 1227 1305 +05 358 

h* Etanly tac T2B5 1348 +08 128 

Do Aaron 1265 1345 +08 186 

U* That tac 1254 1365* +0.7 273 

Do Accun 2225 2385* + 1.1 271 

FBRFLIIML (ROT TRUST 

41i HwtSkM, Harttay Oo Uairaa 

0*01 578868 

tad atowttf 281-7 2805 +08 080 

tacom 134.7 2085 +04 481 

WnrtewM* Rac 1*83 1505 +0.7 184 

Amor Grown • 738 78.7 +05 B.72 

M EmmMl 798 632 +05 051 

Fir EM Own 6B8 74.1 -0.1 090 

' Butman Gn .523 585 +05X48 

PROLRCUBHTTRUSTS 

b —nalta nnl 1il5 1108 . .. 096 

Hgt> Income 828 66.1a .. 422 

Conv S Q« 988 10*4* . . 68* 

Far BaMem 157.7 188.1 .. HCO 

Nun Amwtcan 1378 1475 . 089 

SpacWSH* 703 7580 .. 185 

Tachnotofly 1104 1288* .. 080 

Extra tacoma 855 935* .. 438 

PRUDBITUL UNIT TRUST RUMMERS 
Sl-69. ttad HB. DM ESWX. (Gl SOL 
01-478 3377 

Hoboro Equiy *025 4285 +25 3.13 

Ewapowi 665 908* +03 0.8B 

Hetaom Cana 6*8 57.6c +0-3 080 

Hoaam mui tae 068 tom .. 1133 

Hobam tnff 952 1013 + 0.6 086 

Jj Rranoa* 888 BZ.4 +02 0.05 

N Amman 785 815* +21 058 

Hotaom SMC 38a UJS 6850 +08 256 

H ofcom UKGrDwtn 625 07.5 +05 2.1+ 

Hotaom GW Tha lffii.6 1845 +04 252 

SMLTW MANAOn a EM TCOMPAiar 
31-45 Gragwn Si London ECSv 7LH 
01400 4177 . . 

Ouabaffl Ganand *81-5 450.1 255 

Ga dran* taroma a*55 S6I Oc S12 

Oodrant tac Fh 3702 3961 1.13 

Oodram RaccMny 2885 2855 . 248 


scomui lire nvEBTwna 
19. St Anuaws at. BdtaBuph 
on 225 2211 

UK EOUb IBS IK 


1835 1983 +15 138 

lSOJi 1618 +1.1 158. 

1003 1718 +04 086 

2125 2274 +1.1 054 


SCOTTISH MUTUAL ttfVTSTNENT 
■ANAG6R8 

105. Vtacan) SL Gbagow G2 5KH 

041-248 BUB 

UK Edrty 1715 1N5 

G® & Rod H8£ 1258 

UK So*- Con Ed 1 «2 1573 

Europan 1724 1845 

NABNrton 1121 1195 

Pacific 1525 16E5 

SCOTTISH UNIT TRUST 
29. cturfUM Sq. Eduagn 
031-236 4372 


§ 5 615* 
2 37.7* 
35-t 37.6* 
454 48JG* 
375 405 
£65 285 
315 345 


MLA Ganaal 
MLA maroawi 
MUGIUH 


334 854* +01 2.11 
503 33.7 -04 096 

2*3 2S.8* . . 10 15 

415 *43* +0-1 507 
273 239 .056 


(E*j Amar ffl . 

lEil Jaoan (31 1012 10*5* 023 

l£»l Patite 1*1 2610 2695 . 037 

ieo Smaar rop (*j i«o so* a 0 10 
EuRduM 238 252c 197 

CAGLE 8TAA IM7 TRUST MAHAGERS 
Ban ROJO GNMum. Gtaucotar GL53 710 
0242 52131* 

UK Balanced me 69 0 736* +02 207 
Do team 701 7*5* +03 283 

UK Grown Acnm B2 7 H3* + 051+7 
UK Hrjh tac tae 65.1 894* +0 1489 
n Ameraan Accum 67 7 rue + 0*139 
Far Eastern Accun 84.3 Bage +08 058 


I47J 1521 
1012 10*5* 
2610 7695 


Hum, CMhaB Am. B2R 7BE 
2600 

tacom Fund *505 *997 
Hamnonxi ft Gan 2*05 2*85 

LEGAL ft GEMOIALUHT TRUST 
MANAGm 

^gJKRMd BraumdEHTO 

Equty DstrCusn Z752 29*5 + 1 1 

Ds Aaron *305 4583 + 2 ; 

Do Income 613 06£c +0J 

Euopean MB «3 +0< 

Far Emaan, 963 1(05 +G 

GW Trust 79 8 843 

tat Managed 772 825* +0j 

Nanrt Bw 50.4 53.9 +0. 

N Amancan Trufl 791 848 +2. 

WSMMl&ta S25 883* +IL 


MMd Grown 

N Amancan 

tacctne Fu nd 
Bmbnb 
N Amnrtae 
uk Grown 
Extra tac 


SCOTTISH wnows „ 

PO Box B02. EdtaOcrpn B+16 SBU 
031-885 8000 

Pro ER tac SHJ53 K08 

DO Accun 2714 2S83 


+05 058 
-ft! 1JK 
+05 151 
+ 0 l 2 *33 
+03 151 
+02 234 
+ 0.1 151 
+05 554 


ROYAL UFE FUND HUUWOEHEHT 
* 2*8- LMarpoG LBS 3HS 
051-227 4422 


30. Qt* Rd. London GPY SAY 

m-MTSOn 

AM Thdi A Can 1 O 6 J 11*4 

Pacific 1684 1815 

Sac Income’ nn iTB.T 188* 

SpacM SmwBons 21SS 2315* 

M* Growth 27.7 29.6c 

Aamnn Mapra 735 783 

tedCa'i 998 4t7 

Joan Teoi ft Gan 985 1084* 

MMnaton* Inom 555 895 
Eaemot 651.7 SBS5c 

UK 0W>WW 33.7 365* 

Euo Grown 285 3a® 

Euro tacoma 350 375* 


SOON* COATES 

T. London HM a 

01-568 3844 En 3 


+ 1.1 415 
+£8 148 

+01 ai6 
+09 031 
+ 0.1 1.67 
+05 080 
+03 55 * 
-- 225 
+07 181 
-02 052 
+03 400 


i. London EC2M 5PT 
610 584* *2.0 034 


EradwTha 
hnl Tiyg 
C* Trust 

us That 


3-1 £ -• +02 247 

24 77 fl -HIT 132 

7 0 284* .. 8.10 

35 355 +03 143 

73 4Q2 +05 055 


20 Wnn 9 l London £G2 

01 -KB mil 

6Mv DW . ITU 1»3* +02 148 

. Do Accun 1085 1785* +05 148 

HOT tacom Tha ses 988* +0.1 431 

JoAccun 1074 1143# +0.1 431 

US Groan ms 815 +03 185 

00 Accun 395 83.1 +05 1JB 


SpfleU 9a (3] 


8 TANDAOTUPE 

lagan Unto 265 27 s 

Do Aocuo unto 283 303 


Enro Gm tac 
Do Aeon 
Smaar Co* me 
tm from 


+6. Ondoto So. I 
031-228 3271 
fmetm And 
Do Aceun 
DoTWOTawai 

Aumban Arad 
Do Accun 
Braun Fund 
Do Aaron 
Europan fend 
Da Accum 
Jana feno 
Do Accum 
SOUKS PPP 


26* 0 2B14 
1855 1755 
1083 1168* 
U£6 11B5# 
600.7 643.1 
813 1 8863 
2613 2783 
ZB4 2935 
m6 3195 
3009 3306 
1645 1727 


SUN ALLIANCE 

EnNtoaHN.NnMn.ftm, 


JJHSSWW fig 

flttw Ef nl -?! 

ra» UNIT TRUSTS 

,Pa 

Amrian tac 1213 1295a +15 nny 

y Aqai" 1282 1343s + 1 ? nw 

Bn boa tae 1143 1223 *00 457 

_Oo AC qjm 1345 1426 + 5 ? <87 

OtataTOl UuKtaG .1835 1834 +Sft Sro 
Oo ACCUti SS13 8873 Vu ZT2 

GB.ft.Rrad Inc 095 515- .. B 30 

. Db Accun 6*5 673 + 0.1 A an 




1213 1295a +18 qny 
1202 1342a +1? oaf 
1143 1223 +08 4»7 


1143 1222 
1345 1426 
1638 1834 
2813 2873 
493 515 
643 878 


*22 AXI 

♦03 487 

+04 272 
+1.1 2.72 
■ ■ 820 
+ 0.1 820 


2174 231-3* +05 4.16 


Last nrnmay ot month. 



























































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^ 3 


THE TIMES FRIDAY JUNE 27 1 986 


FINANCE AND INDUSTRY 


23 


l TEMPUS ) 

BPB surprises with 
high-rise profits 


Shareholders in BPB should 
be forgiven if they found the 
tugfr to take profits almost 
irrestible. Their shares have 
risen, from a low of 21 2p a 
year ago to 51 Ip yesterday, 
up 23p on the day. Better- 
than-ex pected results for the 
year to March, however, indi- 
cate that even at their new 
level the shares are not 
overvalued. 

Profits rose from £79 mil- 
Uon- to £103 million before 
tax. British building materi- 
als, mostly poster and plas- 
terboard, increased their 
contribution by 1 1 per cent to 
£52.4 million. 

Canada - and France 
showed the largest increases, 
reflecting better demand. In 
Canada's case, the fell in the 
Canadian dollar against the 
American currency helped 
exports. And a good market 
in France means that rival 
French plasterboard compa- 
nies should be less anxious to 
penetrate the British market. 

Healthy cash flow elimi- 
nated the company's debt 
and at the year-end there was 
net cash of£10 million. Since 
the year-end, however, BPB 
has spent between £25 mil- 
lion and £30 million on 
juisitions on the Continent 

ombre are planned. These 

are likely to be for cash rather 
than paper. 

The company seems no 
more concerned lb raise hs 
profile in the City generally 
now that it is valued at nearly 
£1 billion than it did a year 


million, preferring in- 
stead to concentrate hs atten- 
tion on existing shareholders. 
If would be fair to conclude 
from this that BPB is unlikely 
to expand hs shareholder 
base in the near future. 

Estimates for the current 
year were being hnniedly 
upgraded yesterday, with 
£125 million now the target 
for some analysts. On that 
basis the shares are trading on 
a multiple of 12. 


Sovereign Gas 


&O0 


Shareholders who have been 
wondering what has hap- 
ted to Sovereign Ofl & 
s’s 19S5 annual report 
need wonder no longer. It is 


to be posted today with 
details of the seven for 30 
rights issue announced yes- 
terday. At 23p a share, the 
issue will raise £2.5 million. 

Sovereign has also negoti- 
ated revised terms for toe 1 
Sovereign Explorer, a deep- 
water semi submersible drill- 
ing rig which has three years 
to run of its five-year 
contract. 

The oil price fall and 
consequent drop in drilling 
activity has caused a slump in 
drilling rig rates. Market rates 
are not much more than 
$20,000 (£13,500) a day for 
rigs of all types, compared 
with $81,000 for the Sover- 
eign Explorer when working 
and $53,000 when not 
working. 

Without renegotiation. 
Sovereign’s cash-flows, al- 
ready severely squeezed by 
the oil price, would have had 
an additional burden placed 
on them by the rig 
commitments. 

The agreement is designed 
to give Sovereign flexibility, 
and toe company believes 
that it has bought survival 
until 1 992 in terms of toe rig. 
Clearly it wants to do more 
than just hang on for toe next 
six years, but for that it needs 
an increase in the oil price. 

The deal involves a retain- 
er of £10 million spread over 
the next six years and payable 
out of 25 per cent of 
Sovereign’s surplus cash. If 
there is insufficient cash, 
(which will occur if toe oil 
price does not rise) then the 
year’s payment is waived 
until 1992. Depending on the 
rate of repayment, there wiH 
be an additional maximum 
surcharge of £2 milli on. 

The company is paying all 
its cash-flows from the For- 
ties and Claymore oilfields to 
the banks. This leaves Brae, 
where 70 per cent of cash- 
flows are committed to loan 
and interest repayments. 
Consequently, unless the oil 
price rises, there probably 
wiD not be enough of a 
surplus to repay any of the • 
retainer this year, or even 
next 

The rights issue is support- 


ed by four of its biggest 
shareholders who own 49 per 
cent of the stock. They will 
take up their rights and 
underwrite the balance: £2.5 


million should see the com- 
pany through the short term. 

Sovereign has bought time 
in which iimusi hope that the 
oil price rises to a level which 
makes toe North Sea a com- 
mercial proposition once 
more. The shareholders must 
hope that it happens quickly. 

ISE 

For Industrial Scotland Ener- 

E , it has been a short life, but 
r the shareholders not a 
particularly merry one. 

Barely two years since the 
company was introduced to 
the USM at I lOp. Texas Gas 
Resources Corporation, the 
American transport group, is 
offering 90p a share in cash in 
a bid which values ISE at 
£20.5 million. 

On hopes of a bid, the 
market price has risen strong- 
ly since the middle of March , 
reaching its present 86p from 
its low point of 40p, where it 
sank after the rights issue at 
120p in January. As a result 
of toe rights issue, it has 40p- 
a-share cash on its balance 
sheet. 

Since the departure of Mr 
Malcolm Butler, former man- 
aging director, toe company 
has been running down staff, 
fuelling speculation that 
itwas up for sale. Employees 
are now down to six in 
London, two in France and 
one ax Houston, Texas. 

In- relation to the asset 

value, the new manag in g 

director, Mr Colin Leslie, 
described toe offer as fair; 
and hr recognition of the 
commercial realities, the di- 
rectors are recommending ft. 

The main attractions to the 
purchaser are toe exploration 
blocks in the United King- 
dom southern gas sector and 
the onshore acreage in toe 
Paris Basin. There were 
severaldisappointcd bidders 
in the last French licensing 
round which attracted 170 
bids for 1 1 blocks and ISFs 
blocks could be attractive to 
other potential bidders. 

It seems that ISE has been 
talking to a variety of parties, 
but given the depressed stale 
of toe oil market, Mr Leslie is 
not optimistic that there will 
be a higher bid, which is no 
comfort to those shareholders 
and underwriters who took 
stock in the rights issue at 
120p in January. 


Attack on 
textile 
trade 
barriers 

By Edward Townsend 

Industrial Correspondent 

Britain’s clothing and tex- 
tile industries yesterday 
bunched a c on certed drive to 
persnade the British and Eu- 
ropean governments to act 
against countries that have 
thrown ap trade barriers 
against British goods. 

The panoply^ of import re- 
strictions, farms, quotas and 
bans operated by many coun- 
tries against British dotting 
and textiles is costing thou- 
sands of jobs and stifling 
farther investment, according 
to the joint Economic Develop- 
ment Committee for the 
industries. 

In a comprehensive study of 
practices in 109 countries, the 
EDC, representing employers 
and trade unions, argues that 
countries such as Brazil and 
South Korea are no longer 
struggling developing nations 
and cannot justify stringent 
import restrictions. 

With negotiations on the 
renewal of the controversial 
Multi Fibre Arrangement, 
which governs international 
trade m textiles, due to be 
completed by the end of next 
month, and a new roonri of the 
General Agreement on Tariffs 
and Trade under discussion, 
the EDC said it was timely to 
impress on all concerned the 
gravity of toe problem facing 
Britain. 

Mr Harry Leach, the presi- 
dent of the British Textile 
Confederation, said yesterday 
that the report would be going 
to politicians and trade groups 
throughout Europe. u we are 
going to ram it down then- 
throats,” be said. 

The study, heralded by the 
EDC as one of toe most 
detailed investigations of 
world import restrictions, 
shows that 70 per cent of 
United Kingdom do tting and 
textile exports are sold to 
totally open markets although 
they account for only 20 per 
cent of world gross 
product 

In contrast 13 per cent of 
United Kingdom exports go to 
markets that are difficult to 
penetrate but which together 
account for 40 per cent of 
world GNP- 

Lifttag the Barriers to 
Trade, NEDO Books, Nation- 
al Economic Development Of- 
fice, Millbaak Tower, < 
Mil] bank, London SW1P 
4QX. £9.50 


STOCK MARKET REPORT 


Dixons raises its holding 
in Woolworth to 5.3% 


Mr Stanley Kalms, Dixons’s 
chairman, was playing a dar- 
ing game of brinkmanship 
yesterday as he geared himself 
up for toe final stage of the 
£1,900 million battle for con- 
trol of rival Woolworth. 

According to the Dixons 
camp everything is going ac- 
cording to plan. Until now. 
Mr Kalms has purposely 
avoided buying Woolworth 
shares in the market and left 
the price to drift Earlier this 
week, it touched 720p, com- 
pared with Dixons' cash alter- 
native of 805p. 

This was done to show City 
institutions that if they miss 
the boat now and reject the 
offer, it could be some time 
before they see Woolworth 
above £8 again. 

Having made the point 
Dixons's broker, Cazenove, 
marched into the market on 
Wednesday night to test the 
water and, within the space of 
24 hours, bad mopped up 2.7 
million Woolworth shares at 
760p. taking its total holding 
to 5.3 per cent. 

Dixons's shares seemed 
pleased with toe efforts yester- 
day, rising 4p to 340p. while 
Woolworth advanced I5p, to 
close at 760p. 

Having peered into the 
abyss, Mr Kalms is now 
hoping that the big fond 
managers will throw their 
weight behind Dixons* offer. 
They have until next Wednes- 
day to make up'toeir minds. 

Yesterday also marked toe 
start of trading in Dixons’ 
shares on the traded options 
market But. apart from some 
support from brokers such as 
Scrimgeoiir Vickers, turnover 
remained low. 

The rest of the equity 
market put up another solid 
performance, helped by the 
overnight buying on Wall 
Street and the introduction of 


By Michael Clark 


“new time” buying for the 
new account next week. 

Dealers claim that money 
will soon stan to trickle back 
into the system once investors 
know their allocations for the 
Morgan Grenfell and Thames 
Television issues. 

Leading shares led the way 
higher, helped by selective 
support from New York. ICL 
up 1 8p at 984p. Beecham, 3p 
at 306p, Cadbury Schweppes, 
2p at 184p and Reuters, 6p at 

Ocean Transport & Trading at 
206p stands within a whisker 
of its year’s high and looks set 
for better things. Mr Richard 
Lake, chartist with thebroker 
Savory Milln, has noted recent 
support for the shares and 
recommends them as a buy. 
Next stop should be 250p, he 
says. 

SOlp, after 508p, are all still 
firm favourites with the 
Americans after enjoying fur- 
ther strong support overnight. 

Elsewhere, turnover re- 
mained thin, but dealers are 
confident that it will start to 
pick up soon. The FT Index of 
30 shares ended 8.3 points 
higher at 1.353.1. while the 
FT-SE 100 rose by 8.1 points 
to 1,637.5. 

Gilts spent a quieter day, 
still waiting for toe next cut in 
bank base rates. Early losses of 
£'A were soon recovered, but 
prices appeared mixed at toe 
close. 

Shares of Dowty, toe mining 
equipment supplier, were a 
firm market after hours, 
climbing 5p to 229p on hopes 
of a bid later today. Smiths 
Industries, 2p heavier at 290p 
and Hawker Siddeley, lOp 
higheral 569p. have both been 
mentioned as possible suitors. 

Comtanlds closed lOp up at 


290p after learning that a party 
of 20 City analysis had gone 
on a trip to one of toe group's 
textile factories in Barcelona. 
The market is clearly hoping 
for some good news about toe 
company on their return. The 
shares of Courtaulds have 
been enjoying something of a 
re-rating over the past 18 
months and are expected to do 
even beuer in the short-term. 

In foods. Be jam, toe frozen 
foods retailer, stood out with 
an i Ip rise to 167p following 
some hefty buying of the 
shares by several big funds 
managers. There is also talk 
that a bid may be imminent. 
Once again toe name of Tesco 
is being mentioned. 

Addison Page Chetwynd 
Streets, the advertising and 
public relations consultant, 
held steady at I33p as several 
directors decided to unload 
stock on toe market. Mr 
Michael Page and Mr Steve 
Smith have both sold 575,000 
shares each for an undisclosed 
price. 

The sale reduces Mr Page's 
holding to 4.396 million 
shares and Mr Smith’s stake to 
4.399 million. Earlier this 
week, A PCS — soon to change 
its name to Addison Consul- 
tancy Group — bought Taylor 
Nelson, a market research 
company, for £4.8 million. 

Meanwhile, a rival, Charles 
Barker, is linking up with 
Nihon Keizaisha Advertising, 
a Japanese financial commu- 
nications company more com- 
monly known as Nikkeisha. 

Barker says it hopes to pick 
up business from Japanese 
clients of Nikkeisha which will 
benefit from on-the-spot ser- 
vice which cannot be provided 
from Tokyo. The market 
seemed to like the idea and 
marked Barker’s shares 2p 
higher at I53p. 

The big insurance compos- 


RECENT ISSUES 


EQUITIES 

vb (i2Sp; 
Alumssc (150p) 
Anttar (I30p| 
Arlington p15p) 
Ashley (L) (135p) 
Beeverco (145p) 
B8ck (147p) 

8 r Island (60p) 
Brodero (I45p) 
CampfteS 
Clarke Hooper 
Costed Bectrodes 
Dalapack (107p) 
Dean & B (50pj 


S?53y 

ear odes (84p) 


(110p) 


141 
149 
IIS -3 
185+2 
211 
151 
137 
56 
163 
103-2 
151 
91 
128 


Densrtron (58p) 
Eacfte C39p) 

Evans Halshaw (1 
Fields (MRS) (140p) 
Guthrie Carp (I50p) 
Hagges (J) (I40p) 
Hodgson (85p) 
Jurys Hotel (115p) 
Lopax (145pi 
Monotype (57p) 
Savage (100p) 
Smalfbone (1 
Soundtracks 
Task Force 
TemplBton (2lSp) 


62 Tenby Inds (112 


63 

40-2 

119 

120 
155 +1 

143 

91 

102 

128 

153 

104 

179 

35-2 

106 

210+2 

118 


RIGHTS ISSUES 

Amari N/P 4*2 

Antofagasta N/P 100 -13 

Cfiftords Dairies N/P 30 

Ciean (j) N/P 355 +5 

De La Rue N/P 140 

Five Oaks N/P 10 +1 

Friendly Hotels N/P 5 

Gerrard F/P 337 +8 

Ibstock Johnson N/P 26 

Molyn* F/P 92 

Nat West F/P 507 

Pswappte N/P 12 

(issue price in brackets). 


ites extended their recent rally 
following the overnight 
strength on Wall Street wrth 
Commercial Union 3p up at 
308p, General Accident 22p 
higher at 839p, Guardian Roy- 
al Exchange I Op to 877p, 
Royal Insurance a similar 
figure at 877p and Son Alli- 
ance 7p better at 694p. The 
market is now discounting 
fears about moves to reduce 
premiums in the US. 

Among insurance brokers. 

Allied Lyons rose another 5p 
to 358p yesterday, making lOp 
in two days. Dealers repotted 
a big turnover on the traded 
options market Elders £XL is 
expected to be given Monopo- 
lies Commission permission 
soon to proceed with its bid 
and may come back with a 
higher offer. 

CE Heath firmed another Jp 
to 545p following toe shake- 
out earlier in toe week stem- 
ming from reports of a $ 1,000 
million lawsuit facing the 
company in the US courts. 

Stewart Wrightson stood 
out with 20p rise to 41 2p in a 
thin market, while Willis 
Faber continued to reflect its 
holding in Morgan Grenfell, 
toe merchant bank, where 
dealings are due to start next 
week, with a 7p rise to 429p. 

The Kuwait Investment Of- 
fice has reduced its holding in 
toe company to 3 million 
shares, or 6.56 per cent of toe 
total 

Mutual Shares Corporation 
has been buying more shares 
in Lonrho, Mr Roland “Tiny" 
Rowland's overseas trading 
group. It has bought an extra 
2.5 million shares and now 
holds, through its various 
funds. 23.25 million shares. 
AH of them are registered in 
the name of Bank of New 
York Nominees. 

Lonrho responded to the 
news with a 6p rise to 249p. 

Vickers was buoyant, with a 
13p rise to 473p, after reports 
that toe European Court is 
expected to rule on its claim 
for compensation from the 
Government on July 8. 

The group, which owns 
Rolls-Royce Motors, is claim- 
ing about £1 50 million follow- 
ing toe nationalization of its 
shipbuilding and aircraft pro- 
duction interests in 1977. 


NEXT WEDNESDAY IS 
YOUR LAST DAY 
T0REJECT 
THE DIXONS OFFER. 


f 

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10LW0R 

THv 


WOOLWORTH HOLDINGS PLC 


TMS ADVD?IT5OiEmiSPUBUSH6DBy¥K)0WlOintiHttI)toCSPLCP/l0(XJII0lftHn.T>tOTH^0RS0PWi0tW0RT>IASE'WEPERSCW5®SP0NSI8LEF0R 

*Wn0N COfmSD IN THIS ADVERTBEMENL the BEST W THEimtffflWlEOff AND BEUEF OtfMNGJAK£N AIL REASONABLE CARE^ TO THAT SUCH IS TttttSE) 

' .'.TIC KfOHMfraJN INT^ ^ACCORDANCE WItH TICFaSSs, TW DIRECTORS OF W00WWTH ACCEPT RE5P0N$I6@Y ACC0RDWQ.X 

• • -f w - v vo-iir s'r’-f 1 * ' *- ” " • - 




If you think the time has come to expand your company through 
acquisition, spare us a moment and read oel A few seconds’ thought at 
this stage could well prevent many hours of worry in the future. 

First a few questions about your business. What are your strengths 
and weaknesses? How does the acquisition fit in with your corporate 
objectives? Is it the right time to diversify? How can you marshall all die 
resources you will need? What return should you expect? How can you 
identify the right target? What benefits will accrue? And what problems. 

Secondly, a question about our business, shouldn’t you talk to us? 

We’re one the world’s largest and fastest growing firms of 
Chartered Accountants, wife over 450 offices in more than 
90 countries. We offer a positive, integrated and 
proven consultative service to individuals 
and companies proposing a major 
acquisition. Our aim is to enable 
your Board to reach a sound and 
successful decision first time by 
assigning our multi-disiplined 
specialist team to assist you with 
all or any stage of the acquisition 
process. 

Our leaflet ‘A Specialist 
Acquisitions Service’ outlines how 
we can help you- For your copy, just 
call Ian Mclsaac cm 01-353 8011, or 
return the coupon. 












FINANCE AND INDUSTRY 


THE TIMES FRIDAY JUNE 27 1986 



STOCK EXCHANGE PRICES 



Further gains by equities 

ACCOUNT DAYS: Dealings began June 16. Dealings end today. §Contango day Monday. Settlement day July 7:. 
§Forward bargains are permitted on two previous tmsiness days. 


Q Tuntt Nt w jpa pcn LwriWil 

DAILY DIVIDEND 
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■132 10! RonHnUUHM 124 *3 60 UIU 

10'. 13b Royl Bnh Of Can CIS 1 . 

380 SOD floyi ft* 01 Scot m a+fl Hj U U 

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818 813 Union TIN *19 929 75 714 

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134 34184 
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7.0 42 135 
144 26 122 
107 41204 
184 14 284 

79 42 IU 
72 03152 
104 3.1 120 

24.1 44 148 
48 34184 
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9.1 37 1V 

104 4.7 144 

41.1 14 . . 

164 34 18.1 

11.1 08 134 
11.1 34 105 
10.6 47 284 
127 43 204 
104 34 184 


BUILDINGS AND ROADS 



114 44 213 
157 82104 
0.1 02 84 
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114 43204 
102 34 123 
102 74 .. 
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10.0 94 20.1 

S*n 8.1 1B4 
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44 54144 
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07 K7 
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2.1 224 


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48 

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180 

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50 27 (fcsntpan 48 

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363 263 LWTHUgS 383 

350 108 Scot TV'S' 3*0 

295 153 TVS N/V 255 

43 31 H5W 43 


134 54 134 
£4 54 7.1 
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ISO 4 4 112 
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25 80 114 


BANKS DISCOUNT HP 


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433 328 Grand UM 410 -3 134 34 117 

206 208 K a raiart y ftwlra 238 • .. 2.1 04123 

391 312 Ladbroka 348 -2 111 44118 

5*5 4*7 Lon Park HeM# ESS . . 143 27 111 

100 78b Maura ChartOM 88 • .. 24 23 143 

105 67 FYMO* Of W MOWS 88 4-1 31 24 184 

79 88’* Oman# MOM 72 23 32 118 

405 371 Sarny Hotels 'A' 375 ..54 1.3 1*75 

01 58 EMU* 70 14 24173 

209 148 TlMOMUMRMI 188 74 44 117 


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24i 75 Ilmira 3 Nmal 
251 B5 UHO 
126 78 uragraop 
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274 212 vrara 
540 293 Vldn 
130 102 VWra AoMO 
195 123 VMan 
204b 137 Vnliawapn 
193 It* WSL 
163 128 Wadi RqbwM 
20S 156 Wigon M 

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190 101 W tuft a m* 

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OVERSEAS TRADERS 


INSURANCE 


1 


228 182 MtaayLd 
2Bb 22 Mb 8 Aj 
2Bb 23 Mn Gan 


Ckn Union 
Em8y 2 Law . 
FAI* 

Gan Acddant 
ORE 

Haa* CE 
Hogg Robtoscn 
L * o 9 & Grai 
Lraraon I Mrai 
Um Udknr 
MarafiAMcUn 


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S» fWjSX 

Sim Ufa 

Tana Mramnay 


188 .1 
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398 +3 

275 •+* 

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877 ra+10 

540 ra-4 
290 -1 

270 S *4 
208 a *3 
403 

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195 

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810 34 .. 
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118 54 .. 
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314 17 21.1 

41.1 47 2G4 

3*9 03 8.1 

134 43133 

11.7 43 114 

83 4.1 02 

314 S3 107 
220 S3 .. 
114 *7117 
193 43 183 

Iran Afi 

37.1b *4 583 
104 43 .. 
364 43 714 
1 17 44.18.1 
157 U 1U 
Iffiffln 24 213 
253 33023 

HJ) 43 .. 
43 24 7.1 
123 23 20.7 


53 31 BolflMiEh 

isa 127 oaanaM 

lOT 77 FMy (Jan 


37 28b jacu rang 
283 183 Lonmo 
72 51 Ocnan Mon 

258 190 PUrason Zoctl 
aso 190 Do bi- 
as 128 MS Peck 
50 30 £* Dany 

589 558 BMW Bra* 

22* 61 Tour Karatty 
193 153. Yim Cano 


51. .. 078 141*4 

133 • . . 104 74 W 

BE «*2 SB 73 1*4 
385 •« 28 8 7 -5ISi 

308 **3 259 8-7 30.6 

34 • 13 *.7120 

249 *fi 133 M 113 
72 +5 43 18 93 

213 .. 10 4.0 7.0 

218 83 40 7.0 

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48 *1 

570 «+5 229 44124 


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104 54 B3 


bmsbMol Trnata oppMW ora Past 22 


LEISURE 


1*4 98 

220 120 

171 90 

58 34 

2E5 1SB 
388 325 
82b 49 
81 65 
129 93 
131 9* 
103 32 
180 137 
175 138 
391 278 
8S5 325 
8* 43 
22B 165 
aao 255 
71 51 

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Barr 8 WA 'A' 115 

Boom 6 Hanks* 200 
Brant WsMr 157 

carnpart 49 

Cnrysa** 100 

Hrat Lafwni STB 

GHA 54 

H ramugra BracKa 88 
Horizon mm in 

M Lawn 112 

Jrim'i Hags *1 

ImMI 175 


5*g* HoHm 1« 

Saimiatsan Gp 2B9 

Tanartrara Heomur 70 
Zaaras 1B8 


•-4 104 87 04 

2BS 

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+1 64 23 183 

454 


a 

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35 

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317 

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241 

70 

30 217 

323 

216 

279 

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71 

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77 

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68 

30 

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88 

89 

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30 

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86 

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230 

179 

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MJ 

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15b 

99 

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110 




76 

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6Gb 

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114 H4 

227 

159 

Lon M 

211 


60 

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226 

134 

LOngvw tad 

218 


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20 160 

393 

306 

M.Hdjjl 

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11.16 20330 

115 

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07 

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43 


10 

30134 

393 

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378 

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130 

30 IU 

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131 

Madartena 

153 


30 

30 200 

73 

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a 

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27 

30 130 

268 

165 

McKadnki 

358 

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1400 50120 

125 

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120 

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40 

40 IU) 

(Aft 

495 

Mencfwner Ship 

835 

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80 

10 310 

79 

n 

60 

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Mraywuaa Bonn 

71 

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29 97 

115 

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683 

360 

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616 


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MoM Bar 

780 


27.1 


ID* 

128 

Mew Cteowas 

146 

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90 

30 210 

91 

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MeWm 

73 


30 


78b 81 

WMcau 

ttb 


8.1 

80 8.7 

123 

70 

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130 


00 

40 121 

m 

163 

Mokns 

180 


110 

60 84 

318 

212 

Morgvi CrtrtUe 

303 


12.1 


138 

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218 

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100 


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100 


M. 

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47 


10 

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272 

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256 

203 

Onto Beet Midi 

338 


121 


4*8 

247 

PBrtier Knad -A' 

433 

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150 


349 

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P** Piece 

333 


90 

29 083 

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626 

Pvnen JT 

940 



528 

363 

Pmon 

531 

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27 174 

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333 

Pegtar+fanaraleir 

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690 

280 

Pramraid m 

820 


21 


1* 

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70 


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311 

PMngKxi 

406 


190 


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82 




385 

195 

Ronra* 

3*0 


100 

3.1 147 

■323 

315 

Pw* Qtraljwiil 

316 

-5 

10 

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314 

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238 

95 

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riuauAUI mm 

296 

116 

+2 

217 

10 

74 V*7 

00 350 

131 

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127b 


30 

30 360 

215 

97 


301 


70 

30 207 

190 

119 


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128 




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517 

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226 

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m 

96 

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SUB 


900 

805 

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271 

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173 

132 

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171 


60 


91 

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102 

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180 

110 

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3.1 

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343 

161 

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m , 

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128 


138 

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90 

80 90 

1*6 

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Op 'A* 

125 

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182 

116 


151 



130 

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96 


20 

21 510 


13b 5 tag taw Cokf 
JOb 638 tagtal 
57b 3* te SiBfi 
51 33 AMT 
*0 23 AmlcwM 
*1 23 DoV 

198 120 Am-HKam 
>435 2H '4m 
160 82 araftan— ' 
..21b lib BufMs . 

560 250 CRA - - 
w 45 Crar Boyd •• 
53« *19 Cana rmiBraii 
531 aid 0* Bam 
200 105 DMftrad 
9b «b DoondonMa 
J3b 8'» DnafunlWn'l 

7b 3‘o Dorfjan 

255 ISO E Daggas 
594 258 BnSnl 
198 129 B Oro 
185 85 Balkan 
390 220 E Rwd<Md 
*b- 2b E RwfTYop 
B *b FS Cons 
213 n FS Dm 
75 - 29 GaarorTbi 

8b «S Gtsnbd 
10 8 Gan IMm 

10b 6 GFSA 
478 313 GM Kragoodl 
83 35 Gopeng 

iE 70 Graranarai Hu 
375 188 GraonW 
168 91 Haramon Aran 

P» 4b I WINCIM 

350 185 Marnai 
81 47b JohonW 

12b V. KWob* 

8b 8b Kloof 
160 65 Lama 
13b 7b Uranon 
410 TO Lome 
1ST 06 MM 
28 15 Mab yi ra n Man 

123 63 Umerale 

23 14b MaWB Exp 

<28 8 Mnangm 

8 J.MJa Ma 
635 330 Mnooo 
B-j 2b Mew wm 
1*2 78 NOi Brokan HI 

44 27 N«i KMgwfl 
280 207 NtartifK 

22b 11 Orangaftn. 

128 90 RssjSsj Th 
209 207 Peko waisand 
25 11 Raid Mlnaa Ud 

*46 200 Rand Mmai Prop 
89 tb R ara d uura ki 
296 225 Raraaon 
791 511 R1Z 
7b 4b Ruxrantarg 
10b 6b 81 HMans 6 >j 
10a 70 SAlaad 

• 31 14b Soramwa 

956 300 BMforanU 
138 80 Swgal Oasf 
138 79 Tronofi 

569 300 UnM 
50b 33b Vaal Raafi 
54* 238 VanHOPOSt 
IBS ED V l akl oraaln 
go 45 Yoga* 

17 ID 1 * Waota* CcStary 
545 288 WaSwn 
310 12a Waraeni Aran 
29b is>. wraan Oaep 
196 131 wanranunng 
265 123 WaRRmd GMS 
1*0 90 Whan Crank 

I7b r, Mntala 

56 25 mt+cgai 

IE&i 00 "* 


+1 13 SA 50 

+* 7.18 13 80 

• « 40 IIS 110 

+io 70 10100 

• .. lor ae laz 
.. Ill 42 150 
290 

+1 80 40 K1 

... 3.4 10 .. 

.. 17a 11 127 

.. 11 30 140 


■ *b .. ..721 

*26 6*0 70 .. 
+2 448 124 .. 

42 271 60 .. 

+! 142 17 .. 

#1 M2 17 .. 
.. ,473 330 .. 
+15 790.270 .. 
+1 260 200 .. 
+b 362 2L4 .. 


a 36® 11100 
180 40 .. 
+10 *0 30 .. 

+b SS0 170 .. 
+b 128 t*4 .. 

120 si 

.. 18 80118 
+5 1*0 150 .-. 

+0 . 280 11.1 .. 

f :: :: 

-8 .. .. 1.1 
+b 800 120 .. 
+b 870 120 .. 
+b 460 80 .. 


3 54.0 280 .. 

• 14 a® 8*0 

+b B2JI 12H .. 
.. 170 80 .. 

♦fib 343 87 .. 
.. 090 14® .. 

I .. *00 110 .. 

.. 290 317 .. 

.. 115 150 .. 


+7 170 240 .. 

I! a I! II 
♦b 

+10 100 10 .. 
+b 210 14 .. 

+2 

+‘i 


■ +15 . 720 50 19 

+2 551 120 .. 

■ .. 314 50 70 

,2^«f?. U ‘ W 
+8 180 211 .. 
118 70 .. 

-13 

.. .. a .. .. 

♦13 460 120 r: 

+1b 558 150 .. 
+2S 540 1S4- .. 
.. 13.0 23.1 .. 

40 80 19 


in 21.1 :: 

■1.1 30 .. 



I 


MOTORS AND AIRCRAFT 


250 138 AE 
168 78 AdpfMtrd 
i«i 70'. Anioacaiu 
4BV 21V BSG 


Brain** ICO) 262 

Hr AranMOB 523 

Or Car AucMM* 139 

BL $4 

CMlyra 263 

Own) 187 

Dan* (Gotfray) ill 

Dmrty 299 

ERF - 75 

FH Group 387 

RW Mora IK 

Quae Frank G) 91 

Gernran Motor 268 

GWnMd Lamm 00 
Group Lons 133 

Hanvrata 02 

Honda Motor *82 


IMaa % 

Lien SB 

Perry gp 130 

nutm <go) 70 

Orach (HJ) 78 

Sun H 

woomid wam) 48 


74 30 174 

7.1 11 60 
22 -1.7 170 

10 12 150 

11> 19 IU 

220 40 110 
50 30 150 

70 10 “ 
50 25 90 
64 as m 
70 12170 
.. ..118 
85 13 200 
70 30 .. 
40 14 110 
250 97 .. 

" " 510 

38 t.l 110 
38 D0 .. 
120 20 110 
61 30 12 
30 29 1*8 

111 39 21.B 

7.6 *9 90 
15J 20120 
9.4 40 110 
84 91 IS 

4.1 14 10^ 

11 40 120 
0.1 02 120 


512b 187 Amoc Br Prat* Ui %-a 

398 273 Br C lkUUM iaa B Wl 273 «... 

386 338 cra n araa 2to m-i 

94 56 Rshra (Janasl 74 

603 tea Gran *95 

78 Mb JasUUl) 74 

12b 5 M 5 

41 36 Umorn/ Docks 39 

210 180 Qcaan Trantpon 205 -1 

878 428 PI 0 DM 510 +1 

106 86 Runcanan (WahnO 105 • .. 

390 380 TunttuSScon 375 


7.1 24 113 

7.1 30 190 

7.1 30 419 

4.7 14 114 
170 1823.7 
IV ISt^S 

38 

93 40 9.4 
229 4.4 148 
71 S0 115 
120 34300 


I 


SHOES AND LEATHER 


3SD 290 n 310 

208 185 Gamer 60001 155 

*5 32 HesdfBm Sona 43 

218 168 Lanmn Hawata 188 
83 88 NewkSd 6 BuROn 76 

114 82 PUMP 105 

1B7 118 Strong 6 RstW 1« 
273 158 Sfyto 238 


81 20120 
1*3 82 BB 

07 16813 

82 44 TOO 



NEWSPAPERS AND 
PUBLISHERS 


I 


Assoc Book 228 
Assoc NliiTpWr 338 
SW*(A8CT^ 300 
Bnsn 625 

COta* (Wraj 455 
Dp A 350 

EMAP 192 

Htjrtra iPubfaUng 376 
~ Horn* comas iao 
163 todnandam 273 
404 kqfhanwon 563 
820 Htwi ii'wuaOuuM e?4b 
Ooopua 5*5 

PmPMMBiSraid iiB 

Tmty kU 406 

UM W k n p a para 303 


+10 80 
+12 81 
» . . 140 

+10 329 
-5 11.1 

.. 11.1 

+2 04 

. 200 
+7 iao 
120 
1-7 140 

140 

96 

k W 

214 

220 


■: Ana Text 315 

Afluia Bros 240 

Baara (jpnnj m 

Baaanan (A) id® 

Br Mow 130 

Burner s Lump 97 

*. Corah 73 

CowiairtH 290 

Dowltwr U| 153 

Dawson 254 

Deoftm *8 

Dos Bum 170 

Dm W 33 

Feawi Mono) 79 

atswi Bnumaam 101 
Hama Pwaenat 45 
Ingram (Vtarold) is? 
Jerome (Si to 

Umax i?2 

Lends 171 

Law 92 

^glHogh) 1” 

Mraraxi 17 

Prawend A 1*5 

Hnwcut 37'. 

SEET 126 

Straw Carpets 24 

Sedra IS* 

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StrouO R4ay tig 

Jbumw Jwsoy 18* 

Tonaontona 178 

•• Toaw 101- 

YorMyde 320 


90 30910 
mo 40113 
&3 40 IS 
80 10 If. 7 

88 60 04 

? 17 0 17.1 
6l7 70 - 
93 12 9.7 
2 1 10 130 

60 15 13.7 
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40 27 14 

6 7 17.3 44 
50 60 49 
70 70 14 


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323 

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333 

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280 

16 110 

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158 

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110 *4 

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258 

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167 127 noVmana 'B- 


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“4.* •"' 


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26 


FINANCE AND INDUSTRY 


THET 


! T >ix 


FRIDAY JUNE 27 1986 


fef Roffc -Roy cg. 

It takes at least three months to make it One hour to fall 

in love with it. 



There is nothing quite like driving 
a Rolls-Royce. An hour behind the 
wheel is more persuasive them words 
can ever be. 

If you would like to experience a 
new Rolls-Royce first hand, one of the 


dealers listed below will be pleased to 
arrange a test drive for you. 

A brief glance at the classified 
pages will also give you some idea of 
the range of Rolls-Royce and Bentley 
motor cars available for resale. 


GLASGOW 

HacSey Groan Garage Gatads of Glasgow 

Paul Green O1-44082S2 Martin Straw 041-6823381 

BOURNEMOUTH 
Arnett at Bournemouth 
Ron Norton (0202)570573 


Italy Garni 


01-988769) 


Bristol Motor 
MfcftaafVMurfcfc 


266491 JERSEY 


H. R. Owen 
JuBanCutts 
GUILDFORD 
waanam wngor 
Berin Boyce (0483)63207 


(0828)83188 


Dutton- r ora he w Went 
UnSlgfls (0622)65461 


Hon^sfWasr) 

Dwfci Johnson (0722)333251 


Ksnninga 

CoflnBaricsr (0742)761141 


aavnens ( vremanwr 

Derek Purdy (0825)682806 


SL Hater Garages 


Homes Motors 
John Hubbard 


(0222)502883 


S. P. Broughton 
BobDurrans 


(0534)31341 

^ Sn'-Swtar 3”° (0532)482731 

(0242)578552 f^T&wrton 
jolPowtes 


Heniys (Mktend) 

PotorTodd (0244)318801 

DUDLEY 
Evans Kabhsw 

Roger Smith (0384)53201 

FAfttMAM 
Romans of Famhem 


((633)548757 


01-8287444 James D. 


Pater Parker 


(0252)727070 Raymond 


Mann 
Mfchaei 
LONDON 
Jack Barclay 
Malcolm Sargent 
MamEgarton 
PaulFtereD 01-4898342 

H. R. Owen, BenBay Centre 
Ari Sperling 01-8288060 

H.R.O«mn 


01-5848481 NaaiCtelro 


Murray Motor Co. 

George Paterson 031-6852284 

NORWICH 

Mam jetton 

Anthony has (0600)628883 

NOTTMGHAM 

MamEgarton 

RayHusWaaon (0602)780780 
PEB WH 


(0788)25481 


Dumn-Ftaahaw North West 
Martin Patts (0772)22111 
PWBOROUGH 
Harwoods otPdboro u gh 

(07862)2407 


BSSomarvtte 021-746 6586 

ST ALBANS 

MamEgarton 

PhBpMTfltey (0727)86522 

THORPE BAY 
SMAC Group 

MchasIGofctanth (0702)582233 

TORQUAY 

H.A.R3K 

Evan Bradshaw (0808)24321 

TMMDMM 
Reg Vardy 

MOcaAlan (0783)842842 


Weytoridge Aiaomototefi 
Kakh Hopkins (0832)48225 


WAfANTED 


© 


Offered exclusively by the authorised Rolls-Royce and Bentley dealers of Great Britain. 


This advertisement is published by S-G-Wfartwrg& Co. Ltd. on behalf of Dixons GrqtgipIcfDpcong"). The D ir ector s of Dixons are the persons 
responsible lor the information contained in this advertisement Tbthe best of their knowledge and belief (having taken ad reasonable cmloefiwm 
that such is the case) the information in this advertisement is In accordance with the facts. The Directors of Dixons accept reeponsttRy accordingly. 



OFFER FOR 
WOOLWORTH 


DIXONS INCREASED OFFER WORTH 


826*1p 


WOOLWORTH SHARE PRICE 


760-Op 


DIXONS BID HIGHER BY 



Dixons increased offer is final. Acceptances should 
be received by 1.00p.m. on 2nd July, 1986. 

The increased offer will close at 1.00 p.m. on 2nd July, 1986 unless It has by or on that date become 
unconditional as to acceptances. Dixons has reserved the right, however to revise, increase, and/or extend 
the increased offer in a competitive situation. If you require copies of documents, further information, or 
assistance in completing your Form of Acceptance, please contact S.G. Warburg & Co. Ltd. at 
33 King William Street, London EC4R 9 AS, telephone 01-280 2222. 


The value of Dixons increased offer [based on the value of Dixons 
securities being offered In exchange for Wool worth Shares) has 
been computed by reference to a price for Dixons Ordinary 
Shares of 340p. based on market prices at 3.30p.m. on 26th 
June. 1 988. after adjusting for Dixons forecast 1985/86 final 
dividend of 2.4225p [net) per share, and an estimate of the value 
of a Dixons Convertible Preference Share of 99.30p. 


Cazenove & Co., stockbrokers to Dixons, have confirmed that, 
based on market conditionson 28th June, 1988, a reasonable 
estimate of die value of each Dixons Convertible Preference 
Share would have been 99.30p. 

The value of a Wfootworth Share, which is quoted on an 
sx-dividend basis, has been based on market prices at 
3.30p.m. on 26th June, 1988. 


Company profits fall 
after reaching their 
highest for 12 years 


By David Smith 

Etoflernks Correspondent 

Companies* profitability 
rose last year to its highest 
level since 1973, according to 
an article in the Bank of 
England Quarterly Bulletin. 
published yesterday. 

However, figures from the 
Central Statistical Office show 
that, in the first quarter, 
company profits fell by 4 per 
cent . 

North Sea companies re- 
corded a 24 per cent dump in 
profits compared with the 
fourth quarter of last war, 
more than offsetting a 4 per 
cent increase for other 
companies. 

The Bank’s annual article 
on company profitability and 
finance records that pretax 
rates of return for non-North 
Sea companies rose to 8 per 
cent last year, the fourth 
successive annual rise. 

The pretax rate of return for 
all companies, including the 
North Sea oil companies, rose 
to \2S per cent, the best since 
I960, before North Sea oil was 
exploited. 

There was a marked con- 
trast between the experience 
of North Sea and non-oil 
companies last year, 
to the article. North Sea 
profits were hit by the slump 
in sterling oil prices, and a 
slowdown, to 2 per cent, in the 
rise in production. 

But, for other companies. 



profits were buoyant, and die 
main factor was a widening of 
profit 'margins because of a 
declining rate of increase of 
fuel and raw material costs. 

Last year, industry’s output 
prices rose by 5.5 per cent Of 
this, 3.1 per cent was doe to 
higher unit labour costs, 0.6 
per cent to raw material costs, 
and 1.9 per cent to a widening 
of margins. Margins have 
recovered by an average of 2 
percent a year since 
3.7 per cent in 1980. 

Unit labour costs rose last 
year at the fastest rate since 
1981, mainly because of the 

productivity slowdown. 

Without this, the boost to 
company profits from the 
improved picture on Taw ma- 
terial and fuel costs would 
have been even more substan- 
tial , assuming that the savings 
were not all passed on to 
customers. 

Another reason for the im- 
provement in profitability last 
year, the Bank says, was more 
efficient use of capital and, in 


particular, improved stock 
control 

Despite improved profit- 
ability, companies siffered a 
loss of cost competitiveness 
last year, mainly because of 
fast rising unit labour costs. As 
a result, they were obliged to 
bold back on export maigtns, 
instead widening domestic 
margins. 

The Bank is not optimistic 
about further improvements 
in company profitability this 
year. 

Last year’s increases could 
be attributed to the windfall 
gains of lower ofl and raw 
material prices. This year, the 
rale at which such costs are 
felling has declined. 

As a result of this and the 
pressure from strongly rising 
labour costs, the Bank con- 
cludes, companies may be 
finned to squeeze margins. 

The fell in the pound's 
value the EEC curren- 
cies since the middle of last 
year has cushioned this effect, 
out “margins may come under 
increasing pressure later this 
year as companies strive to 
maintain the competitiveness 
of their goods.** 

The Bank sees no diminish- 
ing of companies’ appetite for 
external finance, but expects 
that a greater proportion of 
this wifl be rathe form of long- 
term bonds and commercial 
paper in the coming months. 


Howard calms liability fears 


By Derek Harris, Indnstrial Editor 


Implementation in Britain 
of the European directive on 
product liability should not 
have any significant effect on 
either the availability or the 
cost of product liability insur- 
ance, according to Mr Michael 
Howard, Minister for Corpo- 
rate and Consumer Affair s, 
yesterday. 

Mr Howard made this claim 
in a dear attempt to allay 
industry fears about the effects 
of tightening up regulations. 

The “ continuing 

nightmare” of product liabil- 
ity law in the United States 


BASE 

LENDING 

RATES 


ABtL 


Man & Company. 
BCCL 


. 10 . 00 % 

. 10 . 00 % 

.1040% 


Citibank Swings! - 
Gonsohtated Crts_ 
Continental Trust— 
Co-operative Bask. 
Cl Hoare & Co. 


.10.75% 

. 1000 % 

. 1000 % 


— 1000 % 
— 1000 % 
Hong Kong & Shanghai — 1000% 

Lloyds Bank 101)0% 

MWestmntar 1000% 

Royal Bank of Scottal— .1000% 

T5B 1000% 

GSbOtNA 1000% 


would not be repeated in 
Britain, he maintained, be- 
cause the system would avoid 
certain features of the US 
system. 

In Britain there would be no 
jury system, with its US 
history of awarding high dam- 
ages, nor two other features 
Named for such awards — the 
practice of punitive 
and the contingency fee 
system. 

In Britain the principle of 
contributory neghgenoe, virtu- 
ally abandoned m the US with 
some absurd results, would be 


• ELECTRONIC DATA 
PROCESSING: Turnover in 
the half year to March 31 " 
(figures in £000) rose to 3,180 
(2,109) and group profit on 
ordinary activities before tax to 
419 (310). Earnings per share 
were 3.73p (3.33p). 

• BICC: The group’s Australian 
subsidiary. Metal Manufac- 
turers, is to be capitalized at 
Aus$250 minion by a public 
offer for sale in Australia of 30.5 
million shares (20 per cent of 
capital). BICC will receive about 
AuSl48 million (£22 million) 
from the issue after expenses. 

• WIGHT COLLINS RUT- 
HERFORD SCOTT HOLD- 
INGS: A final dividend of 3pt 
making 4J5p (2.75p) is being 

it 6. Turnover for 

(36067) 


maintained in Britain, Mr 
Howard pointed out. 

Some confusion seemed to 
-exist about the general effects 
of the European directive, said 
Mr Howard. He added: “In 
my view, based on evidence 
from a vast range of sources, 
fears about a repetition of the 
US nightmare here are largely 
unfounded.” 

Since November, the Gov- 
ernment has been consulting 
industrialists on the legislative 
changes necessary to bring 
Britain into line with the 
European directive. The result 
is expected shortly. 


Mexico in 
last-ditch 
debt talks 

From Bailey Motris 
Washington 

United States^nd Mexican 
officials are meeting m Wash- 
ington in a last-ditch attempt 
to negotiate anew debt financ- 
ing plan before- a crucial 
repayment deadline on 
Monday. “ ‘ • * . . 

Senor Gustavo Petncioh 
has new financing proposals, 
including one that would link 
repayments of Mexico’s $97 
billion (£64 billion) debt to oil 
revenues, officials said. 

The new proposals,, which 
had the strong backing of 
President Miguel de la Madrid 
were presented to U.S Trea- 
sury and International Mone- 
tary Fund officials. Mexico’s 
foreign reserves have plum- 
meted to $2.5 billion, not 
enough to meet all of the June 
interest and principal pay- 
ments. 

Senor Pe.tricioI» said 
Mexico's ability lo meet the ^ 
payments hinge on progress in 
the new negotiations, is addi- 
tion to IMF officials, be is 
meeting the Federal Reserve 
Board rheirman, Mr Paul 
Volcker, and the US Treasury 
Secretary, Mr James Baker. 

Both officials have prom- 
ised emerg e ncy assistance if 
Mexico agrees, to undertake 
stringent domestic economic 
reforms. 

Mexican officials said the 
new proposals indude some 
controversial' suggestions, 
aimed at allowing the country 
to achieve growth of about 3 
per cent to 4 per cent next 
year. , 

These included a proposal 
that banks accept a new 
repayment schedule to cater 
for Mexico’s oil earnings 
which have dropped sharply a 
proposal for lower interest 
rates and other “options”. 

Meanwhile. IMF officials, 
who have been under strong 
pressure to relax the condi- 
tions attached to a new loan 
from Mexico, said they were 
dose to reaching a compro- 
mise on the critical issue of 
domestic deficit reduction. 

Senor Petridoirs mission in 
Washington is to formally 
request an IMF standby loan i 
of alxwt $1.3 billion. Once it 
wins IMF approval Mexico 
will seek $3 billion in addi- 
tional money from govern- 
ments and institutional 
lenders and another $3.5 bil- 
lion from commercial banks. 


paid on October 6. _ 
the year to April 30 
£000) rose to 56,!' 


TOTAL 


TOTAL COMPA@£E FRAN^AISE DES PETROLES W 1985 
Annual Shareholders' Meeting erf June 20, 1986 

Tha Ordinary General Shareholders' Meetin g of T OTAL CFP, held 
on June 20, 1986 with Mr Fran^ois-Xavier OfiTOU, Chairman 
presiding, approved the accounts for 1985. All lha resolutions were 
adopted. 

In his address, the Chairman, without wishing to prejudge the 
consolidated results for the year as e whole, noted that as fir as 
the first half was concerned, cash flow and economic performance 
would show a substantial increase. These improved results wifl 
only be sufficient however to partially offs e t stockholding losses. 
He also noted that if prices were to remain atjxesent levels the 
greater part of the stockholding losses for 1996 would have been 
recorded during the first half . 

With regard to the second haff, resutts wffl dearly depend on 
variations In crude prices, which are as ever 8n unknown factor. 
Moreov er, it may be hoped that the downstream sector wiN 
confirm the recent return TO positive margins. 

resources and experience not only to confront 
shock* but also, n possble, to use it as e means for further 
development h is with a view to increasing this capacity stW 
further that the Company recently decided to effect a capital 
increase, the results of which have to date been very encouraging. 

1985 in brief 

Financial p e rfo rmance 

19SS has seen further recovery despite stockholding losses 8S a 
result of the decline in the dollar. 

The consolidated financial statements at year-end show a cash 
flow of 73 billion francs and net income amounting to 14 bflfon 
francs. 

Investments totalled 8 bilfion francs, of which 5 bilton want to 
exploration, production and development and 1.7 biflron to refining 
and marketing. 

Activities 

VC8T 88WZ 

-an Increase in total riflings (49 mil Son tons of oil; 5.7 biffion m 3 
of gas): 

- development of the Group's International tracing position; 

- encouraging results in exploration, notably in France; 

- the merging of the refining and marketing sectors in France; 

- the change of name Of COMPAGNE FRANCHISE DES 
PETROLES to TOTAL COMPAGNE FRANCAISE DES PETTOL£$- 

The General meeting exended the term of office of Mr Rsnfl 
GRANIER de ULLIAC, Honorary President, as a director of the 
Company and appointed Mr Jotime M0N0D a director. 


Soma figures for 1985 
on the Soup 
-Resources; 

Oil (millions of tons) 49.0 

Gas (billions of nrr 1 ) 57 

- Financial data teonsofidated in hiftore of francs) 

Sales 173.0 

-in France 58.0 

-outside France • 117.0 

Cashflow IS 

Earnings 14 

Net Investments &Q 

on the p ar en t company 

Sales (in fail tons of francs) ■ 76. 0 

Net income fin billions of francs) 16 

Dividend per share: 20F (■*■ tax craft of IDF). 

Date of dividend payment; June 27 


The brochure 'TOTAL COfltfAGNIE FRANCAiSE DES 
PETROLES m 1985“ can be obtained in Engli sh and French 
from Service Diffusion-5, rue Mtchel-Ange-75781 Paris Cedex 
16- France. 


COMPANY NEWS 


and pretax profit to 2,61.1 
(1,484). ftmmp per share 
jumped to 2ft64p (I l.74p): —• 

• MK ELECTRIC GROUP: 
Turnover for 52 weeks to March 
29 (figures in fmillion) -was up 
to 128.S (127.1), with pretax 
profit slipping to 

17.7 (18.1) and earnings per 
share to TJAy (30 jpV 

• ANDERSON STRATHCL- 
YDE: A dividend of Z72p (nil) 
is included in the results for the 
year to March 31. With figures 
tn £000. turnover rose to 
175,277 (170,787) and pretax 
profit to 3,614 (3J54 loss). 
Earnings per share rose to 6p 
(6. Ip loss). 

• CHANNEL TUNNEL INV- 
VESTMENT& Income for 
1985 from listed investments 
(boss) slipped to £14,087 
(£14,354), with pretax profit to 
£2,661 (£3.230) and earnings per 
share to 0.(3p (0.15p). 

• AG BARR: An interim divi- 
dend of 2-5p (l.75p) has been 
declared for the half year to - 
April 25. With figures in £000, 
group turnover was up to 16,887 
(15,785), trading profit to 1,312 

( 1 ,235) and earnings per share to 
17.03p (l4-35p). 

• BOC GROUP: The company 
is raising up to £50 million, 
using starling commercial pa- 
per, to supplement other sources 
of shon-term borrowing and to 
replace existing borrowings. 

• ELDRIDGE POPE AND 
CO: An interim dividend of 
3JL5p (Z4p) is included in the 
results for the six months to 
March 31. With figures in £000, 
turnover rose to 12,838 
(11.331), pretax profit to 1,428 
(939) and earnings per share to 


ll.4pf7.lpL 

• MOO - 


ORGATE MER- 
CANTILE HOLDINGS: The 
final dividend is l.lp (Ip), 
making 1 .6p (1.4Sp) for the year 
to March 31. With figures in 
£000 turnover was 25,824 
(24.586). operating profit was 
3,629 (2.5 84X interest payable 
2,590 (1,754). Pretax profit 
1.039 (830) and tax 420 (265). 
Earnings per share were 2.6 lp 
(2.55p). 

• EF HOLDINGS: There will 
be no dividend. Turnover for 
the year to March 29, with 
figures in £000 was 71,028 
(72.798). The profit on ordinary 
activities before interest and 
exchange fluctuations was 2,872 
(2.136). 

• BORLAND INTER- 
NATIONAL: Schraders an- 
nounces that 1,217 valid 
applications have been received 
in respect of 13^229,200 shares. 
Applications by Banque Paribas 
and Prom in vest for a total of 
2,650.000 shares, in respect of 
which irrevocable commit- 
ments to apply were given, will 
be allotted in fiilL 

• HARGREAVES GROUP: 
Year to March 31, 1986. Total 
dividend 5.5p (4.5p). Turnover 
£306.12 million (£397.75 mil- 
lion). Pretax profit £9.02 million 
(£7.1 million). Earnings per 
share 15.1p(9.8p). 

• CREST NICHOLSON: 
Half-year to April 30, 1986. 
Interim dividend 1.75p (Up). 
T umover £69.27 million 
(£60.47 million). Pretax -profit 
£2.6 million (£2.4 miuion). 
Earnings per share 2_54p 
(2J2p). The board is confident 
that 1986 will be another good 
year for the enlarged group and 
that 1987 should benefit to an 
even greater extent from the 
merger with Pearce. 

• COURTS (FURNISHERS): 
Year to March 31. 1986. Total 
dividend 4.7p (same). Turnover 
£90.21 million (£86.9 million). 
Pretax profit £6 million (£6.99 - 
million). Bantings per share. 


before extraordinary item, 17. Ip 

• •TrtSrrONWOOD- BREW- 
ERY: Year to March 31, 1986. 
Total dividend I0.8p (10p). 
Turnover -£30.46 million 
(£25.28 million). Pretax profit 
£2.04 million (£2.8 million). 
Earnings per share (adjusted for 
rights issue) 35. Ip (52.7p). 

• OCEAN WILSONS 
(HOLDINGS): Total dividend 
for 1985 3.75p <2.95p). Turn- ... 
over £46.26 million (£47.64 r 
million).. Pretax profit. £4.88 
million (£4.71 million). The 
board proposes a one-for-two 
scrip issue. Earnings per share 
8.5p (8.03p> ' 1 

• BROWN A JACKSON: No 
dividend (same) for 1 985. Turn- 
over £52.55 million (£136.47 
million). Pretax profit £540,000 
(£73,000). Loss per share 0.1Ip 
(l- 33p) . 

• BTP (formerly British Tar 
Products): Year to March 31, 
1986. Final dividend 3p (com- 
pared with the interim forecast 
of 2J5|i). making 4.5p (3.Sp). 
Turnover £49.61 million (£38.7 
million). Pretax profit £43 mil- 
lion (£4.01 million). Earnings 
per share 83p (7.62p). The 
board reports that the current 
year has started well, BTP is in a 
strong financial position and 
prospects are good. 

• JAMES LATHAM: Year to 
March 31, 1986. Total dividend * 
]4.25p (13.25jj). Turnover *- 
£37.01 million (£35.33 million). 
Pretax profit £1.9 million (£1 .65 
million). Earnings per share 49p 
(47.9p). 

More company news 
on page 27 . 

• C H INDUSTRIALS: Year 
to March 29, 1986. Total divi- 
dend 2.4p (2,1 lp). Turnover 
£3039 million (£22.77 million). 
Pretax profit £2.1 1 million 
(£1.45 million). Earning per 
share 837p (7.05pk 

• SUPERDRUG STORES: 
First quarter to May 31,' 1986. 
Turnover (excluding VAT) 
£44.06 million (£35.47 million), t* ■ 
Pretax profit £1.92 million 
(£1 .82 million). ■ 

• ADAM LEISURE GROUP: 

No interim dividend (same) for 
the half-year to Feb. 28. 1986. 
Turnover £4.86 million (£539 
million). Pretax loss £325,000 
(£494.000). Loss per share 1 JOp 
(0.94p). The board is now 
confident that the group has a 
much stronger product range for 
1986 and ly87, which will go a 
long way to assist in hs contin- 
ued recovery. 

• CENTROVINCIAL ES- 
TATES: Total dividend un- 
changed at 6p for the. year u> 
March 31. 1986. Gross- rental 
income £9.21 million (£8.85 
million!. Net revenue before tax 
on ordinary activities arising r 
from investment properties’ 
£3-45 million (£2.89 million). 
Earnings per share 7p (!2.34p). 

Net asset value per share 235p 
(28 Ip). Based on projections, 
and current market conditions, 
the board reports that there 
should be a substantial 
improvement in earnings for 

• CHE WRING GROUP: Half- 
year to March 27. 1986. Interim / , 
dividend 6p (5p). Sales: home 
£6.76 million (£3.29 million) 

£1 * 2 minion 

(£815.7000). Pretax profit £1.28 
million (£753,800). Earnings per 
share 25.8p (20.6p). 

• CECIL GEE: The annual 
meeting was told ihat the board 
«pats both the half-year and 
tne full year to show a signifi- 

^improvement in trading 


a 

XI 

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‘■^ywttarit- nny. — ... * 












la 3h<l 


THE TIMES FRIDA Y JUNE 27 1986 


FINANCE AND INDUSTRY 


27 


ears m 


' *a 2 H* 




Hambros: Mr JM Clay has 

been- made vice-chai rman aM 

Mr JKX Kesvrick and Mr CH 
Sporboig joint deputy chair- 
men. Mr AM Soritin becomes 
a director and Mr CJ Perrin a 
deputy chairman. 

Cooper, Macdonald & Part- 
ners: Mr Robert Austen, Mr 
Don Brown, Mr Loais Solway 


APPOINTMENTS 


Reshuffle at Hambros 





and Mr Bob Starter join the 
partnership. 

Cripps Harries Hall: Mr 
Duncan Rawson-Mackense 
becomes a senior partner. 
Slkoiene Lubricants: Mr* 


Adrian J Parsons has become 
group chief executive and 
chief executive of Dalton. 

Calendars & Diaries of Bris- 
tol: Mr Michael Franks has 
been made chairman. 


Steetley Brick & Hie: Mr 
Anhui Barnard becomes mar- 
keting director and Mr Mike 
Hams sales director. 

Rank Amusements: Mr 
John Morphy has been ap- 
pointed managing director 
and Mr Ray Mercy finance 
director from July 14. 


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COMPANY NEWS 


• SPICE: Six months in March 

31. 1986. Interim dividend 
0.26p (nil). Turnover £9.87 
million (£8.86 million). Pretax 
profit £35 1.000 (£294.000). 

Earnings per share 5. Ip (4.5p). 
The board is confident that the 
full-year results will be a record. 

• BANKERS' INVESTMENT 
TRUST: Half-year to April 30. 
1986. Total revenue £2.12 mil- 
lion (£2.08 million). Earnings 
per share J.28p (I.l6p). Total 
assets, less current liabilities, at 
April 30 rose by 2S.S per cent to 
£119.01 million. The directors 
consider the revenue outlook 
favourable for the second half 
and that total earnings will 
adequately cover the minimum 
dividend of 2.7Sp which has- 
been forecast for the year. 

• KEWILL SYSTEMS: Year 
to March 31. 1986. Dividend 
).2p (Q-28pj- Turnover £4.21 
million (£3J million). Pretax 

t on ordinary activities 
26.000 (£504.000). Earnings 
per share 6_76p (5.14p). 

• CPI HOLDINGS: Half-year 
to March 31. 1986. Interim 
dividend Ip (same). Pretax loss 
lr£S78.000 (£520.000). against a 
loss of Ir£88.000. Sales Ii£22J3 
million (lr£20.8S million). Loss 
per share 4.7p (0.70p). 

• WALKER & STAFF HOLD- 
INGS: Year to March 31. 1986. 
Dividend 2p (1.7pk Turnover 
£5.58 million (£4.55 minion). 
Pretax profit £313.791 
(£1 19.756). Earnings per share 
7.2p(3.0p). 

• STONEHILL HOLDINGS: 
The company is reporting for 
the 53 weeks to April 6. 1986. 
compared with the previous 
.•ear. Total dividend held at 6 p- 
rumoverf 17.56 million (£18.6 
million). Pretax profit £38,000 
(£1.04 million). Loss per share 
0.86p (earnings 9-56p). The re- 
organization of production facil- 
ities is gradually taking place 
and. by the end of the year, 
Stonehill should enjoy signifi- 
cant economies — which wul be 
reflected in profits. 

• WELLMAN: Year to March 
31. 1986. No ordinary or pref- 
erence dividends. Turnover: 
continuing business, £40.01 mil- 
lion (£43.52 million) and dis- 
continued business, £377,000 
(£3.59 million). Pretax profit 
£674.000 (loss £1.84 million). 
Earnings per share (net basis) 
3.97p (loss !4.23p) and fully 
diluted. 2.42p (8.3p loss). 

• ST MODWEN PROP- 
ERTIES: Six months to March 
31. 1986. Turnover £433.000 
(£544.000). Pretax profit 
£ 1 82.000 (£66.000). To bring all 
group companies in to line, the 
accounting period is being ex- 
tended to Nov. 30, 1986. The 
company will report for the 14 
months to that date. 

• CLYDE BLOWERS: Six 
months to Feb. 28. 1986. In- 
terim dividend O.S2p (same). 
Turnover £1.52 million (£1.52 
million). Pretax profit £71.000 
(£55.000). Earnings per share 
4.6p (loss 5-5p). 

• CHILLI NGTON 
CORPORATION: Total divi- 
dend for 1985 5J»p (5p). Turn- 
over £12.41 million (£11.13 
million). Profit on ordi: 
activities before tax £1.75 
lion (£2.27 million). Earnings 
per share: 25.0p (38. 4p) and 
rally diluted, 24.7p (33.8p). 


Portsmouth and Sunderland Newspapers, p!c 

Points from Sir Richard Storey's statement to shareholders 

Development Costs Reduced Profits 


There were l»o main reasons Tor I he 
Company's disappointing results during the 
year ended March. 1986. Difficult muling 
conditions led ro lower profits in two 
publishing centres, and increased cosls were 
accepted by investing in long-term 
enterprises which do noL offer short -terra 
returns. These are the development of free 
newspapers and cable television at Croydon. 

In combination, these factors produced a 
Group pre-tax current cost accounting loss 
of £166.000, and a historical profit of 
£1 ,303.000 - 53 per cent reduction on last 
year's £2,769,000. 

Lower profit in the Portsmouth and 
Sunderland centres coincided with vigorous 
development in free newspapers. To 
consolidate and safeguard the Company's 
publishing bases by developing its own Tree 
newspapers has meant the conversion of 
some paid-for titles to free, with a large 
increase in distribution costs which has not, 
at first, been fully supported by revenue. 

Last year I said 1 would be disappointed if 
the Company’s total profit did not again 
improve this year. That expectation of 
improved profit was not fulfilled. In 
retrospect the reasons can be seen. It is 
always difficult to forecast annual profits 
from a glimpse of the new financial year, 
too optimistic a view was raken of the 
results at Croydon: and the number of free 
newspapers launched by the Company in 
Croydon was substantially increased. 

In June. 1985, there was a bonus issue of 
one 10.5 per cent cumulative preference 
share for each eight ordinary shares held 
and the dividend thereon is equivalent to 
l.31p per ordinary share in a full year. 


Use of Technology: 

It is ironic to report so poor a profit in' the 
year that the Company made a dramatic 
breakthrough in the introduction of single 
keyboarding. This event was recently 
referred to by a commentator on the whole. 
posi-Wapping newspaper revolution as 
“perhaps (he greatest breakthrough”. 

This success was achieved when Portsmouth 
management made an agreement with staff, 
the National Graphical Association, and the 
National Union of Journalists, for the 
introduction of single keyboarding there. 
This was (he Forerunner of several 
a gree men ts in (he industry. 

I trust that orderly agreements made in the 
provincial Press will herald an approach to 
industrial relations based less on 
brinkmanship and more on co-opcratioQ- 
Such co-operation is desperately needed to 
permit the industry to meet, more 
efficiently than its competitors, the ever 
more pressing demands of customers. 

With local a gr eem e nts for (he proper use of 
technology, and in the face of more 
competition, some companies are 
questioning the desirability of national 
agreements. It is increasingly necessary to 
match higher wages to higher efficiency. 
That can be done effectively only at local 
level. 


Putting the Customer First: 

A campaign has been sinned - styled 
''Putting the Customer First” - to improve 
ai every level and in every way, the service 
that the Company offers its customers. As 
production methods can now be expected to 
operate io a very high standard, the 
Company will concentrate more directly on 
developing its services io customers. I look 
forward ro the Company being as successful 
at this as ii has undoubtedly been in 
pioneering production methods. 

Even more erfons are being made to 
increase newspaper sales. Nationally, ir is 
impon am dun their success be measured 
not by the number of copies sold but by 
the number of people who read them - and 
for how long. In the same way the success 
of television is measured nor by sets bur by 
viewers. 1 am glad ro say that this change 
of measure is gaining support rapidly. It 
will also differentiate better between paid- 
for and free newspapers because there is 
much evidence that paid-fors are 
considerably better read rhan Trees. 

There must be an effective national 
organisation to promote and sell the 
provincial Press to advertisers. While the 
Regional Newspaper Advertising Bureau, 
which represents part of the provincial 
Press, does a good job, it is hampered by 
lack of funds and less than full support 
from the provincial Press. 

Sobs! diary Interests: 

As reported last year, an investment of 
£500,000 has been made in the business of 
providing cable television services in the 
Borough of Croydon. The first phase of 
construction, making cable available to 
15,000 homes, started in June, 1985. The 
proportion or houses taking up the service 
offered to them is regarded as promising. 
With total construction planned to take 
three years, the enterprise will not be 
trading profitably before 1988. 

The Company got back all iu money 
invested in News (UK) Ltd., publishers of 
Today, as pan of the arrangement which 
brought in new capital from Lonrho. There 
were two main reasons Tor withdrawing. 
First, this Company now has better uses for 
its funds. Secondly, after Wapping and 
Eddy Shah's undeniable achievements, 
competition in the national newspaper 
industry has been greatly intensified. To be 
successful. Today will now need to develop 
iu editorial and marketing policies and 
introduce highly professional management. 

The Good News Production Company Ltd. 
has broken into the market producing 
television advertising commercials and 
fashionable pop videos. Ogilvy and Mather 
Lid. and C.B.S. United Kingdom Ltd. were 
notable clients in these respective sectors. 
This company also produced an outstanding 
film for the Financial Times. 

While remaining as Executive Chairman. I 
have relinquished my position as Chief 
Executive to Mr. Charles Brims, who has 
joined the Company in that capacity, with 
considerable managerial experience, 
especially in marketing. I look forward with 
the greatest pleasure to working with him. I 
know that he will achieve considerable 
success in and for the Company. 


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. The Whitbread Annual Report is now available. It contains 
the full story of another successful year: pre-tax profits to 
1st March 1986 were up to £129.6 million, a 17.7% 
increase on 1985. 

BEER, BREWING 
AND WHOLESALING 

Beet; brewing and wholesaling achiev- 
ed a 14.8% increase in turnover to £586.3 
million. Operating profits of £81.2 million 
(a 15.2% increase) accounted for 48% of the 
Group's total operating profit 

In a market which was around 1% 
down on the previous yeai; beer volumes 
were well up. Heineken and Stella Jjj 
Artois, supported by Kaltenbeig Diat 
Pils, pushed lager sales to :47% of our 
total beer trade, while Whitbread Best 
Bitter and Whitbread Trophy did well 
and the regional ale brands such as 
Flowers, Wethereds, Welsh Bitter; Fremlins 
and Chesters sold strongly. 

Our take-home market share 
reached its highest level for many years, 
and Breweries Division maintained full 
supply throughout die year; with product 
quality better than ever before. 

RETAILING 

Retailing tumovervras up^ to £633.2 
milli on, a 13.1% increase. Operating profits 
rose to £55.5 million, 33% of the total opera- 
ting profit 

A high level of capital investment 
in Whitbread Inns was maintained, and 
they performed well, with a substan- 
tial growth in profit 

Beefeater, Thresher and 
Pizza Hut all traded strongly, and 
there were encouraging perform- ^ 
ances from newer businesses such 
as Roast Inns, Aureon Disco- 
theques, Coaching Inns and ® 

Country Club Hotels. 



WINES AND SPIRITS 

Despite a decrease in turnover of 4.8% largely 
due to the impact of foreign exchange movements, opera- 
ting profits increased by 26.2% to £33.2 million. 

Stowells and Langenbach produced 
good profits, and Long John exports were up 10%. 

Whitbread North America exceeded 
its profit budget and gained market share. 
It's now among the top ten suppliers of 
wines and spirits in the U.S. with brands 
such as Cutty Sark, Scoresby Rare, 
Canadian LTD, Benedictine, Delamain 
Cognac, Laphroaig, Antinori and 
Bollinger 

THE FUTURE 

In the first three months of 1986, 
off-licence and restaurant sales have 
increased, and beer volume is well up on 
last year 

We're confident of achieving 
another satisfactory annual result, and by 
way of celebration, we'd be delighted if 
you'd have one on the house: telephone our 
Publications Department on 01-606 4455, 
or complete the coupon and we'll send 
you a free copy of our Annual Report 

PLEASE SEND ME A COPY OF THE 1986 
WHITBREAD ANNUAL REPORT AND ACCOUNTS. 


POSTCODE 


WHITBREAD 

PUBUCATOW pf RWTMEMT, WHITBKAD AND COWWJT R£. BREWBK 
CHEWEli STREET, LONDON KlY 4SQ. TElfPHOHE 01-606 4455. 





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THE TIMES FRIDAY JUNE 27 1986 


29 


SUMMER DRINKING/1 


f( FOOT 1ST) 


A SPECIAL REPORT 


All ready for the 
sweet fizz 
of summer 


OfBiMlnBs by Joy» 


MacOonaftf 


Sunburnt noses, frayed tem- 
pers and overheated cars were 
not the only outcome of oar 
recent, and long overdue, 
heatwave. As the mercury rose 
so did the sales our hard 
pressed wine trade who look 
forward every year to a hot 
summer, with wine sales to 
match, l>ut are mostly reward- 
ed. with a damp squib. 

Long, hot summers are 
good for the booze business. 
And anyone who pops into the 
comer off-licence for ice or a 
cold soft drink, on a sweltering 
day, generally comes out with 
a cool bottle of wine or spirits 
at the same time. 

Quite why the British have 
to wait for a heatwave before 
they start to enjoy none in a 
similar fashion as, say, the 
French or Italians must be as 
much of a mystery to wine 
merchants as it is to me. 

But there it is. On bot 
summer days pubs are so busy 
that customers spill out onto 
pavements, restaurateurs 
squeeze tiny tables outdoors 
and the popping of corks is a 
fami liar sound in the back 
gardens of Britain. On cokl 
days, if those marketing men 
are to be believed, I suppose 
we must all ignore the plea- 
sures of wine and concentrate 
on the joys of the kettle 
instead. 

Keeping cool, calm and 
collected in hot countries has a 
lot to do with the moderate 
intake of alcohol. The latest 
drinks trade phenomena is the 
cooler, those mostly sweet 
sticky. ersatz combinations of 
white wine, soda water and 
fruit juices in which passion 
fruit-mango flavours appear 
to predominate. Hot countries 
such as Australia and the US 
(especially in California) are 
already cooler crazy but so far 
UK cooler sales are encourag- 
ing rather than exuberant. 

The best of the coolers 
available in the UK is still 
Castaway about which I first 
wrote last summer. This is 
chiefly because it is a blend of 
about fifty percent of a French 
yin blanc (which gives it a 
higher alcohol level than other 
coolers of 6 per cent) mixed 
with ten different tropical and 
citrus juices. The end result is 
a dryish appealing mango 
dominated drink that makes a 


pleasant summer refresher 
(69p from Fmefere, Sco tland 
only). 

Marks and Spencer have 
recently introduced a Tange of 
canned coolers, convenient 
25cl servings, priced at 55p 
per can that have obviously 
been aimed at the lunchtime 
office worker and picnic mar- 
ket The cans certainly deserve 
a prize for presentation, for 
they have been beautifully 
illustrated, but the contents 
within unfortunately do not 
always five up to their classy 
packaging. The best by for is 
the 5.5 per cent Spritzer a 
dryish fresh, dean, lively lem- 
on-zest drink. . . 


Coolers are 
the latest 
drink fad 
to hit hot 
climates 



Sweeter tooths will enjoy 
Orange Fizz, a blend of orange 
juice and white wine, that 
makes a palatable sweet, 
frothy drink as does the 
somewhat sweeter 

blackcurrant pastille-like Kir, 
a mix. of white wine and 
blackcurrant crush, whatever 
that might be. The Marks and 
Spencer Lemon Fizz and 
Tropical coders with then- 
sweet synthetic jelly-baby like 
tastes are unlikely to convert 
anyone to cooler tippling. 

Convenient though coders 
are it is both cheaper and 
pleasanter to make your own 
summer wine cup. One of the 
most moreish simmer tipples 
is the Bellini, a heavenly 
Italian invention, that official- 
ly combines champagne and 
fresh peach juice. I cheat by 
using an inexpensive sparkler- 
such as the fresh, - lively, 
appley G F Cavalier Brut 
(Oddbins £2.59, Majestic 
Wine Warehouses £2.55) com- 
bined fifty-fifty or so with the 
puree’d peach juice. 

Equally delectable is Straw- 
berry Fizz made by mixing the 
fizz with crushed strawberries. 
Later on in - the summer 
raspberries can also be sub- 
jected to the same treatment 


but, make certain you nib the 
raspberries through a plastic 
sieve first, in order to remove 
the pips which look both 
unattractive and get stuck in 
your teeth. ■ . 

All of these summery drinks 
can be made in huge quanti- 
ties for parties but if you want 
a simpler combination try a 
Moselle _ Punch. For every 
bottle of Moselle add a bottle 
of soda water to the punch 
bow] together with a measure 
of brandy and any orange 
based liqueur. 

A large block of ice and 
slices of orange and lemon are 
the final addition to the punch 
bowl and the end result should 
provide ten servings with ease, 
if you prefer wine in all its 
simple, straightforward, un- 
adulterated glory then one of 
the most summery white 
wines I know is Montana’s 
stylish Marlborough 
Sauvignon Blanc. This ’85 
New Zealand wine made in a 
space-age, stainless-sted win- 
ery at Marlborough on the 
northern tip of the south 
island has ail the lively fresh 
gooseberry-green charms of 
the Sauvignon grape at its very 
best (Peter Do minie £3.99, 
Oddbins £3.99). 

Champagne is perhaps 
everyone's idea of the perfect 
summerwine at home in En- 
glish ice-buckets everywhere 
from Wimbledon to 
Glyndeboume et aL Vintage 
champagne is the luxurious 
summer drink bar none, but 
most alas are priced at well 
over the £15 mark now. It is 
therefore something of a sum- 
mer give away that 
Sainsbury’s are. currently 
stocking Penier-Jouet's well- 
made rich, . golden, biscuity 
1979 vintage for just £ 10 - 25 - 
. • Sainsbury’s are also selling 
magnums of Duval Leroy’s 
delicious and appropriately 
named Fleur de Champagne 
non vintage Brut for £16.95 
which works out at just £8.47 a 
bottle. This fine flowery 
champagne is a considerable 
step up from Sainsbury’s own 
label Extra Dry Cham 
(also produced by Duval 
roy) and which would look 
ma gnifi cent on a summer 
picnic or dinner table. Here 
comes summer! 

Jane MacQnitty 



P ink moves back into vogue 


Wine is as susceptible to the 
fickleness of fashion as every- 
thing else is in life. And poor 
old pink wines which have not 
been in vogue for the past 
decade, are it seems only just 
becoming chic again. 

While the big-selling, cheap 
sweet pink wines, as typified 
by the fizzy Mateus Rose, did 
much to wean drinkers off 
beer and spirits and onto wine, 
they have also served to 
relegate rose to the wine 
drinker’s second eleven. A 
pity because there are good 
and great pink wines to be 
had. But until now, other 
European nations have mostly 
kept these underrated wines to 
themselves. 

In recent years the wine 
trade has made a concerted 
effort to restore our faith in 
the pinks by seeking out well- 
made and unusual ros£ wines 
from all over the world. And 
these diligent wine merchants, 
with their superior pink wines, 
have been rewarded with in- 
creased sales. 

The most notable increase 
amongst these upmarket pinks 
has probably been that of rose 
champagne whose UK sales 
have more than trebled in the 
last three years, up from 
170,314 bottles in 1983 to 
685,642 bottles in 1985. 

Ros6 wines are made by two 
different methods. The quick- 
est and cheapest rose is amply 
to mix red and white wine 


together until the requisite 
shade of pink is achieved. 

The more expensive macer- 
ation method is both trickier 
and more time consuming to 
execute. The red grape skins 
are left in contact with the 
fermenting juice, just long 
enough for the wine to be 
stained a delicate pink. Judg- 
ing the right moment to 
remove the skins is not easy 
and ros& wines that have been 
made by this method do not 
usually have a consistent col- 
our from vintage to vintage. 

Foreigners find the English 
disregard for pink wines hard 


a dark pinkysred hue. Avoid 
those ros& wines whose pink 
has taken on an unattractive 
dark amber-orange colour, for 
these wines are past their best 
and have oxidised 
Apart from the colour, the 
other great attribute of pink 
wine is their gulpable, easy-to- 
appreciate style. Exactly the 
sort of wines that are perfect 
for picnics and parties. Serv- 
ing pink wine at any outdoor 
event is sensible for, while 
grand white or red wines tend 
to be rather over-awed by the 
great outdoors, pink wines 
cope remarkably welL Cer- 



Until now most European 
countries kept the underrated 
rose wine to themselves, but 
o ver the last three years sales 
of pink champagne to the 
UK have more than trebled 


to understand. The French 
drink pink wines everywhere 
whether it be on the beach or 
in cafes, as do the Spanish and 
the Italians. 

These European nations 
realised long ago the numer- 
ous advantages of drinking 
pink. The first of course is the 
pretty pink colour of ros6 
wines, these vary from the 
palest of rose pinks through to 


lainly any spicy outdoor fare 
such as barbecue'd dishes 
marry well with rose wines, as 
do any garlicky or curried 
dishes. (Rose wines are one of 
the few that can tackle the 
hefty flavourings of these 
dishes). 

Most pink wines, with the 
exception of vintage rosS 
champagne, should be served 
cool and drunk young. They 


are especially suitable as thirst 
quenchers on long hot sum- 
mer days. One of the cheapest 
and most impressive ros£'s 1 
have come across recently is 
the '84 Vins du Haut Poitoux 
Cabernet Ros£, from that 
impressive Haut Poitou co- 
operative south of Tours, in 
the eastern Loire. 

Priced at just £2.69 from 
Majestic Wine Warehouses its 
firm, dry, fruity flavoursome 
style should go down well with 
most palates. Don’t be put off 
incidentally by its fluorescent 
day-glo pink colour I find it 
attractive but I imagine not 
everyone will. 

Majestic also stock another 
of my favourite pink wines the 
'85 Chateau Thieuley Rose 
from Bordeaux. Made by 
Monsieur Courselle, an 
exoenology professor, this 
rose has a beautiful jewel-like 
pinky-red colour plus a deli- 
cious, rich fruity redcunanr 
like taste stemming from its 
blend of Merlot and Cabernet 
Franc grapes. (Majestic Wine 
Warehouses, £3.95, Adnams, 
The Crown, High Street, 
South wold, Suffolk £3.74.) 

Finally my vote for the best 
non vintage pink champagne 
goes to Fliniaux Rose whose 
positive fraise de bois charac- 
ter is as delicious as 
ever.(From the Champagne 
House, 15 Dawson Place, 
London W2 £10.98.) 


Up and coming from Down Under 


The Australian wine industry 
has overcome major hurdles 
at home and abroad to gain 
recognition as a serious pro- 
ducer of quality wine. Al- 
though it has a history of 
nearly 200 years, it is only now 
starling to come of age: 

In the late 1940s and 1950s 
the biggest problem facing 
Australia was that few people 
believed the countiy could 
produce anything other than 
indifferent fortified wines. 
Having overcome that prob- 
lem, the wine industry was 
then saddled with a framing 
problem — and the belief that 
Australian-produced wine had 
to correspond to a French 
wine type, hence Australian 
claret or Australian burgundy. 

Now Australian wme is 
being produced and sold on its 
own merits by grape type, and 
the era of the varietal wine has 


labels that cany a wealth of 
information, including grape 
type, alcohol by volume, bau- 
m6 at harvest as wd! as a brief 
description of the type of wine 
and with what food it would 
be most suitable. 

Since January this year 
Australia has had one 
appelatiart contrbfee system 
backed by legislation. As it is 
based in Tasmania, _ which 
produces some fine wine but 
in extremely limited quantity, 
the system is of little value 
nationwide at this stage. 

Under the Tasmanian 
scheme, called appdation of 
origin, winegrowers will regis- 
ter with the licensing board 
full details of their operations 
before vintage. This will be 
followed by audits by the 
board and the Department of 
Agriculture during and after 
the vintage. Producers 



vintage, producers can 
arrived. Most good-quality apply for appdation for partic- 
Australian wines now have ular types of wme. 


.. ~«r>. 

A growing reputation: The Sahram winery, Angaston, in Sooth Australia 

and cheap. It still is relatively of all wine consumed in 
cheap despite the tax. Australia is in casks, 

that 



THE BRITISH 
SUMMER. 


ONE THING 
YOU CAN 
RELY ON. 


San Rafrido- simply 
the finest Fino sherry. 
Save it chilled. Anytime. 


In New South Wales a 
consortium of six winemakers 
has introduced the Hunter 
Valley accreditation scheme. 
The Margaret River region of 
Western Australia has a simi- 
lar voluntary scheme, as has 
the Mudgee region of New 
South Wales.. 

The prime aim of the Hunt- 
er scheme is quality rather 
than district of origin and as 
such has been criticized as just 
a marketing tool rather than a 
serious attempt at some form 
of appelation control. Under 
the scheme there are two 
gradings of quality: Hunter 
Valley classic quality wine and 
Hunter Valley benchmark 
quality wine. 

In Victoria there are plans 
to bring in an authentication 
system which would require 
grape growers and wine pro- 
ducers to furnish details of 
yields, varieties, region or 
regions of production and the 
number ofbottles produced or 
to be produced. The idea being 
that control would be kept 
over “shandying” of varietal 
wines. 

Though Australians have a 
great reputation as beer drink- 
ers, wine has made spectacular 
strides in the past decade. 
Today Australians consume 
21.4 litres of urine a bead each 
year. 

To put that figure in con- 
text, in 1974-75 Australians 
drank 187 bottles of beer per 
head of population and 16 
bottles of wine. Both of these 
figures were a record. Today 
the beer consumption has 
dropped to 160 bottles per 
head while the consumption 
of wme has risen to 30 bottles. 

Naturally the beer industry 
is warned and after much 
lobbying, .managed to per- 
suade the federal government 
to impose a sales tax on wine 
in the .1984 budget. Before 
that, wine had been free of lax 


It is unlikely tnat any 
country in the world has as 
good quality vi/i ordinaire as 
Australia. For vi/i ordinaire 
read casks or wine in a box. 
With most casks of four litres 
(six bottles) selling in su| 
markets for $A5 to S A6 (f 
to £3j, there are few countries 
whicn could match the price 
either. 

The wine cask, Australia’s 
gift to the imbibers of the 
world, has played a vital part 
in the enormous rise in popu- 
larity and consumption of 
wine. The versatility of the 
cask which allows you to 
consume a glass at a time, has 
made wine drinking an every- 
day event in many homes. 

introduced to the market 
seriously in 1971, the casks 
have become the great level- 
ler. They are equally at home 
at a Sunday lunchtime barbe- 
cue or an intimate dinner 
party. More than 65 per cent 


The Australian wine indus- 
try is developing in two dis- 
tinct parts- At one end are the 
cask and cheaper bottled vari- 
eties. usually marketed na- 
tionally, rather like soft 
drinks, and the recently intro- 
duced coolers, a mixture of 
while wine and citrus juice. At 
the other end prices are on a 
par with good chateau wine in 
Britain. Increasingly the mid- 
dle range is confused and 
highly competitive. 

The division has also led to 
the rise of the so-called 
“boutique” winery, a small, 
often owner-operated, winery 
producing excellent wines of- 
ten using some of the little- 
known grape varieties and 
charging high prices. 

The boutique wineries have 
grown up around such areas as 
the Yarra Valley outside 
Melbourne. 

Tony Dubondin 



Wine -storage at Lyndoch in the Barossa Valley 


No frontiers for 
the great whites 


Two great white grape variet- 
ies contend to provide the 
classic while wines to accom- 
pany summer food. Their 
rivalry originates in their na- 
tive France, but their interna- 
tional popularity has now 
pitted them in combat in 
almost every countiy in which 
they can be successfully 
ripened. 

Different grape varieties, 
just like different varieties of 
any other fruit, have particu- 
lar characteristics of their 
own. But it is a rash “expert” 
who claims to be able to 
distinguish infallibly with 
which grapes any particular 
wine has been made: 

The wines can vary subtly 
or dramatically depending on 
the climate, the soil in which 
the grapes are grown, and of 
course the method by which 
tbe wine is made. That said 
Chardonnay, the grape of the 
great white burgundies, and 
Sauvignon Blanc, the source 
of the Loire Valley’s Sancerre 
and Pouilly Fume, offer a 
contrast in wine styles that 
even the untutored palate will 
quickly appreciate. 

To generalize 
then, Sauvignon is for those 
who want crisp, dry, refresh- 
ing wine, pointedly aggressive 
and direcL In a short life it 
cuts incomparable dash. 
Chardonnay, by contrast, is 
gentle, plump, rich and round- 
ed, endowed with the ability 
to grow old gracefully and 
with increasing opulence. 

AH over the world 
Chardonnay is synonymous 
with quality in white wine. 
The grape thrives in places as 
far-flung as New Zealand and 
Australia, Bulgaria and New 
York State as well as in 
Burgundy and California. It is 
grown in almost every wine 
producing country in the 
world — and if it does not 
emerge in recognizable form 
in the wine glass, it is not the 
grape's fault but the 
winemakers'. 

Classic Chardonnay from 
the villages like Meursaultand 
Puligny-Montrachet in the 
Cote de Beaune are now 
almost unapproachably ex- 
tisive. but Lay & Wheeler, 6 
Jver Street West, Colches- 
ter. Essex, have an unrivalled 
selection from great growers. 
1983 is the formidable vintage 
to have bought for future 
consumption, 1981 is for fur- 
ther keeping, but the 1982s are 
good and just about ready. 

For economy's sake, 
though, it is worth searching 
the Maconnais. Thevenet’s 
Domaine de la Bon Gran 
(Adnams. The Crown. 


Southwold, Suffolk) is a good 
wine at comparatively little 
price (£4.60), and Sl Veran is 
an appellation on which the 
Young household's enjoy- 
ment of white burgundy has 
come heavily to depend. The 
1984 from the Cave Coopera- 
tive de Prisse (Corney & 
Barrow, 12, Helmet -Row, 
ECl) is excellent (£5.18). 

Continued on page 30 


The answer 
lies on 
the rocks 

Man is the only creature that 
laughs, manages a boat and 
drinks when he is not thirsty — 
so goes the ancient, cynical 
definition. Not to drink any- 
thing at all in company can be 
quite anti-social, not to say 
pussy footed. Now the preoc- 
cupation with health and fit- 
ness means that everyone has 
a reasonable excuse for not 
drinking alcohol. You don't 
have to be an ex-alcoholic, or 
pregnant to find plenty of 
drinks that are acceptable in 
company. 

My father, who was in the 
refrigeration business, trained 
us all to ask for ice with 
everything. (My eldest brother 
has gone into the family trade 


Many acceptable 
alternatives to try 


as the captain of a Canadian 
icebreaker). My summer 
drinks include ice with pure 
lemon juice, Ribena and wa- 
ter, ice with water and a dash 
of Raspberry Wine vinegar 
(£2.63 at David Mdlor), ice 
with Ashbourne Water 
straight from Dovedale. omit- 
ting tbe suggested recipes us- 
ing sweetish fruit juice. 

If you want the last word in 
drinks for the thirsty, try The 
Non-Alcoholic Cocktail Book, 
by David Bevan (Ebury Press, 
£4.95). He agrees with me 
about ice (“Ice makes a drinks 
sound like a drink”). In nearly 
a hundred recipes be covers 
some fairly exotic 
thirstquenchers — Crystal Cup 
— equal quantities of cold 
Lapsang Suchong tea and dry 
ginger ale, over ice, with fresh 
mint leaves. He offers fruit 
cups, party punches, yogurt 
and mint leaves (with salt and 
pepper). There is always the 
stuff from the tap, even if it 
isn't exactly designer water. 
How about water from the 
deep dark springs of Jack the 
Ripper’s Victorian Hackney ? 
With ice, of course. 

Philippa Toomey 


JULY WINE 
OF 

THE MONTH 



CAMPO-NUEVO 

NAVARRA 


RED WINE FROM SPAIN 

Navarra, in Central Northern Spain is the home 

OF SOME LOVELY FRUITY RED WINES. Of THESE CAMPO 

Nuevo is a shining example. Its full warm flavour 
is easy to enjoy mid is 

IDEAL FOR PARTIES AND 

barbeques. Selector 

CODE: MEDIUM BODIED 
AND FIRM. 


E. ITS FULL WARM FLAVOUR 

£ 1 $) 



Discount on 6 bottles or more. 

THE VICTORIA 
WINE COMMNY 

AtaaiwareTaatoaeotoalJaMi tCm ‘ 

io jnininb IS Ottos WHO bmiiwi! toowmodutf onn 








..1 — 


i Ik 




TkS TIMES FRIDAY JUNE 2/ l^&o 


t FOCUS D 


SUMMER DRINKING/2 


Some like it 
cold when 
it’s hot 


Drinking wine in hot weather 
is more sensible than it 
sounds. Wine waiters and 
wine snobs may sneer as you 
call for an ice-bucket for the 
v/'» rouge, but it is they and not 
you who will be missing out 
on a splendid summer treat. 

Not all red wines take 
happily to the cool cabinet 
treatment. Most New World 
reds are too big and beefy for 
the icc-bucket as are most 
tannic, full-bodied European 
reds made from the Synth or 
Cabernet Sauvignon grape. 
And obviously it would be a 
waste to treat first growth 
claret or grand cru burgundy 
in this fashion. 

Apart from these exceptions 
the majority of the world's 
light, fruity reds are in warm 
weather just as delicious 
served frais as they are cham- 
brc. Warm red wine makes a 
thoroughly unpleasant mawk- 
ish mouthful. 

The most notable cool sum- 
mer red is Beaujolais whose 
Gamay grape is even more 
gouieyant, or guipable, when 
presented at this temperature 
in summer than it is in 
November. The best summer 
Beaujolais thirst-quenchers on 
sale now are those from the 
1985 vintage whose combina- 
tion of vibrant, youthful fruit 
and refreshing acidity, when 
chilled, should take the heat 
out of many a sweltering 
summer afternoon. 

Haynes, Hanson & Clark 
(17 Lettice Street. London 
SW6) have a superb example 
in their pretty carmine-col- 
oured. classic tutti-frutti tast- 
ing 85 Beaujolais Villages, 
Domaine des Niveaudienes 
from Vins Dessalle for £3.87. 
Another good Beaujolais buy 
is the fresh, fruity Beaujolais 
Villages. Chateau des Luges 
from The Market and Le 
Provencal priced at £3.85 a 
bottle. 

Apart from being light and 
fruity in style the best summer 
reds are those that also have 
high acidity which, when 
chilled, will appear more re- 
freshing to the palate than 
(hose without. Any northern 
French red should provide a 


successful choice especially 
those redcurrant-Iike 
Carbemet Franc dominated 
wines from the Loire. 

Now that Chinon and 
Bourgeuil have become so 
expensive turning to the less- 
er-known Loire reds such as 
those of Saumur is a good 
idea. (Yapp Brothers. Mere, 
Wiltshire £3.60.) 

Judging the exact tempera- 
ture lo serve your summer red 
at is not difficult. As a general 
rule the more expensive the 
wine the less time it should 
spend in the ice-bucket. Top- 
notch Beaujolais and other 
fine summer reds should 
therefore be served at 55°F, 
while slightly less distin- 
guished summer reds are hap- 
py at the 50°F level. 

A 10-minute dip in the ice- 
bucket or about twice that in 
the refrigerator door should 


It takes 
icecubes 
and soda 
to drown 
the alcohol 
in the heat 


achieve about 50°F. If it is a 
very hot day, or your selected 
summer red is of humble 
provenance, then by all means 
chill the bottle down to 45°F. 

Avoid the ice-lolly level 
because at this temperature it 
becomes impossible to taste 
the wine. This degree of 
coolness has, however, helped 
many a pernickety' holiday 
palate to down the local red 
hooch. Another useful warm 
weather tip. to cheer up a tow 
quality holiday red. is to 
drown the high alcohol and 
hefty tannic taste with lots of 
soda water 'and ice cubes. 

A shot of crime de cassis. 
blackcurrant liqueur, or creme 
de framboise, raspberry li- 
queur, mixed with red wine 
and ice is another useful 
holiday cooler. 

The light, plummy Pinot 




Noir grape also responds well 
to chilling— but save your fine 
bottles of red burgundy for 
colder days. Instead, try a 
good value for money Yugo- 
slav Pinot Noir from 
Teltscher Brothers, who are 
best known for their ubiqui- 
tous Luiomer Riesling, East- 
ern Europe Pinot Noire are 
generally disappointing but 
this pale garnet-red wine had a 
lovely, soft, fruity damson- 
like smell and taste that priced 
at just £2. 1 5 from Peter Domi- 
nic is practically given away. 

The most stylish summer 
red to serve this year though is 
Kindi ian 1986 from the Care 
Valley in South Australia and 
the first red wine of the year to 
arrive in the UK. Australia's 
answer to Beaujolais Nouveau 
is made from the Shiraz and 
Meiiot grapes, by a variation 
of Beaujolais maceration 
carbonique method. 

This captures the freshness 
and fruit of these red grapes 
without the alcohol and hefty 
tannins. The result is an 
impressive velvety, fruity 
mouthful with all sorts of 
intriguing flavours on the 
bouquet and palate that range 
from violets to cherries. 

Fuller and fruitier than 
Beaujolais Nouveau and 
priced at just £2.99 a bottle 
(from Peter Dominic and 
Bottoms Up) Kindlian 86 is 
my idea of the perfect summer 
red. 

Jane McQnitty 



Anyone for sherry? 


ENOTR1A WINES LIMITED. 4/6 


It is easy, given the seasonal 
demand for alcoholic drinks 
especially in the hectic weeks 
before Christmas, to overlook 
the fact that folk drink a lot in 
summer too. 

The Ministry of Transport 
caught up with reality this year 
when it noticed that road 
accidents associated with 
drinking were not merely a 
yule-tide phenomenon, but 
tied to summer drives to 
country pubs as welL 

There is a growing health 
and safety-conscious tendency 
to lower the alcoholic strength 
of drinks for everyone, and 
not just the driver — for whom 
a selection of unconvincing 
but palatable non-alcoholic 
wines and beers is available. 

In the rush to light table 
wines and mixed long drinks, 
some old favourites have been 
cruelly and undeservedly 
thrust aside. This means that 
there are some treats in store 
for those who care to turn 
their attention in unfashion- 
able directions. 

Sherry is paying the price 
for years of mistreatment at 
British bare. The complacent 
notion that middle-dass folk 
would always drift up with the 
old catch phrase, “just a sherry 
please”, left the trade ill- 
prepared for the buffets of 
sharp recession and the cap- 
ture of large parts of the 
industry by finan cial interests 
which proved finally to be 
unsoundly based. 

Customers used to drinking 
over-aged sherry at over- 
warm temperatures from un- 
der-sized glasses proved false 
friends when the wine drink- 
ing boom got under way. 

The industry has now taken 
itself in hand and new quality 
controls have eliminated most 
of the cheap, unpleasant wines 
that were overloading the 
market and damaging the 
name until last year. 

In the popular market the 
signal success story is 

-T 


Harvey's Tico, a sherry specif- 
ically designed as a mixer 
drink and aimed at young 
people interested in tighter, 
longer draughts. Taken with 
ice and lemon, soda or tonic, it 
works wefl. But it reminds 
most people of an unusual 
vermouth rather than sherry. 

The other encouraging tiling 
is that more people are now 
showing an interest in sherry 
of real quality and individual 
interest Hence an increasing 
number of de luare sherries ana . 
the interest in “almacenistas” 
sherries, unblended mature 
wines specially chosen by 
individual stockholders. 

Another phenomenon is the 
rash of Palo Cortado wines 
offered by wine- merchants 
and even supermarkets. 
Though in some cases one 
suspects that the style has been 
achieved by ample Mending 
rather than the capricious 
whim of nature that the 
makers suggest makes this 
style a rarity. 

There is, too, a growing 
awareness of how to treat the 
drink fairly for its proper 
appreciation. Finos and man- 
zanlllas especially (which have 
been protected from the air by 
a layer of flor yeast until they 
are bottled) depend for then- 
bright bite and tangy appeal 
on freshness. 

Harvey's most recent 
launch, a range of premium 
quality sherries under the 
name 1796 (not a vintage, of 
course, but the year the com- 
pany was founded) are bottled 
in Jerez partly for the sake of 
extra freshness. The intensely 
astringent manzanflla, sup- 
plied by BarbadiDo, shows 
something of the benefit, 
while the fino is unusually 
fruity. 

Asa recent Harvey’s tasting 
showed, sweet sharks can 
. develop and mature in fasci- 
nating ways in bottle. Some 
specially bottled Bristol 
Creams emerge as quite exqui- 


site nutty sensations, but dry 
sherries need to be drunk as 
quickly as white wine if they 
are not to be dulled by 
oxidation. 

Served chilled and kept in 
the fridge after opening, sher- 
ries sweet or dry make an 
appetizing and relaxing sim- 
mer drink. 

Port too is in need of a 
revivaL Ruby port and lemon 
(the first drink I ever enjoyed) 
is now decades out of date, 
though chuck in some ice and 
you could revive the love 
affair at once. 

Dry white port, well chilled 
or on the rocks with a twist of 
lemon peel is an appreciable 
aperitif, more favoured oddly 
in warmer dimes than our 
own; while port shippers in 
their hot vineyards happily 
take refreshment from thirst- 
quenching port and soda. 
Tawny port with ice and a 
twist of orange is another 
variation. 

White spirits such as gin, 
vodka and nun need no 
advocate since they will suety 
continue to find their way into 
all sorts of exotic creations in 
which they provide the hidden 
kick. But it is, bf course, a 
popular misconception that 
colour is somehow indicative 
of strength and warmth. 

One recipe for using up 
some of Scotland's whisky 
surplus advocates a mix of 
three parts whisky with two 
creme de cassis, one coconut 
cream, and two each of pine- 
apple and grapefruit juices, all 
blended and decorated with a 
kiwi slice and a strawberry. 
This prize-winning formula is 
dedicated to the royal wedding 
summer, but personally, come 
rain or shine I shall continue 
to take my whisky (single malt 
preferably and Springbank or 
The Macallan at bet) with 
rather less sophistication. 



A taste for the 
right mix by 
the younger set 


Vineyard break: Enjoying the grape in Vendagnes, France 


At last the great table vine 
boom seems to have popped 
its cork. Five years of spectac- 
ular growth, which increased 

our consumption by three 
quarters, are apparently to be 
followed by a breather. 

This year the trade expects 
no more than a S per cent 
increase in- trine sales, which 
have been damaged by 
successive wine scandals is 
Austria and Italy. Greater 
hopes are now pinned on 
novelties such as wine coolers, 
ready-mixes, mixer drinks and 
newly introduced brands. 

If the sun shines for the 
marketing men there is no 
doubt that coolers will be the 
vogue drink this summer. 
Already, with no super sum- 
mers to sell ux, they have made 
one-fifth of the adult popula- 
tion at least aware that then- 
product range exists. About 
one in 2S has tried at least one 
of the burgeoning number of 
brands with names like Cast- 
away, Mardi Gras. Splitz, Sun 
Country Refresher and St. 

Leger. 

Coolers are low-alcohol 
blends of white wine with fruit 
juices and other soft drinks. 
None has more than 6.5 per 
cent alcohol by volume, so 
they have an appeal to the 
active and the health con- 
scious who are looking for a 
thirst quencher. Their appeal 
is principally to the young. 

Wine from 
cans and 
casks are 
PJ) a fairly 
new idea 
for most 



and in particular young wom- 
en, and many who try coolers 
have not been regular wine 
drinkers before. 

, In the United States, where 
cooler sales have been increas- 
ing more than 200 per cent 
every six months, there have 
even been attempts to market 
champagne coolers with fla- 
vours such as Kir Royale and 
Mimosa. But cooler buyers are 
not primarily the affluent 
yuppies and premium priced 
Mends have been difficult to 
move. 

In Britain it is certainly 
significant that Marks& Spen- 
cer, with limited shelf-space 
for a wine selection compared 
to most supermarket chains, 
are revelling in the success of 
their new five-strong cooler 
range. The St Michael 
Spritzer is a mix of white wine 
with lemonade; Tropical 
blends orange, apricot and 
pineapple for a fruity taste; 
and Orange Fizz is a mild and 
sweetish approximation in the 
direction of Buck’s Fizz. 

The one variety that lags in 
sales, interestingly, is the one 
that sounds (but does not 
taste) closest to a wine lovers’ 
traditional mix — the Kir. In 
this case blackcurrant juice 
(and not liqueur) with white 
wine. With no summer sun to 
speak of, yet, the other coolers 
have been marching off the 
shelves in their 25 centilitre 
(two-glass) cans priced at 53p. 

The idea of wine (or coolers) 
from cans is fairly new to most 
people, and viewed with scep- 
ticism by many. In feet it 
works well, and over the past 
year Grants of SL James's, for 
example have trebled the sales 
of hock and Lambrttsco in 
cans, which they now rate one 
of the most successful conve- 
nience packs launched in the 
last five years. 

The aluminium cans, pro- 
cessed through tungsten-car- 
bide rings, treated with an 
impervious lacquer and elec- 
tronically tested to ensure the 
liquid makes no contact with 
the metal itself do deliver 


Continued from page 29 

From ChaMis if is hard, this 
summer, to find better value 
than that of Marks & Spencer 
(£5.50). Their Wane de Wanes 
premier era champagne 
(£8.99), of course, presents 
Chardonnay in appropriately 
sparkling form. 

In Mind tasting compari- 
sons, though, the honours 
often go these days to New 
World wines. Chardonnay is a 
cult in both California and 
Australia, whence some of the 
most richly full-flavoured ex- 
amples come. Simi (Comey & 
Barrow) and Robert Mondavi 
and Edna Valley Vineyard 
(Les Amis duVin and Cullens, 
19 Charlotte Street, Wl) are 
lop stars from California. But 
less expensively you may 
snatch up the same style in 
Hawk Crest 1984, the second 
wine of the Stag's Leap vine- 
yard (Windrush Wines, The 
Barracks, Cecily Hill, 
Cirencester. Gloucs., £4.95). 
As an introduction to Califor- 
nian capabilities Sainsbury’s 
Californian Pinot 

Chardonnay (£3.45) is an 
excellent advertisement. 

From Australia Rosemount 
Estate’s Show Reserve 1 985 is 
good value from Sainsbury. 
Waitrose, Bottoms Up and 


Great whites from around the globe 


elsewhere at prices from £6.75, 
and Seppelt Reserve Bin 
Chardonnay 1984 from 
Eklridge Pope, Weymouth 
Avenue, Dorchester is a blunt- 
ly welcoming wine at £4.76. 

In a lighter, well-flavoured 
style New Zealand produces 
Montana Marlborough 
Chardonnay 1984, cheerful 
and honeyed (Oddbins £3.99), 
and Bulgaria the light dean 
and lemony Novi Pazar at 
£34.60 a dozen from Wines of 
Westhorpe, 54 Boyn Hill 
Road, Maidenhead, while 
from South Tirol both 
Lageder (Oddbins) and 
Tiefenbrunner (H. Allen 
Smith, 24-25 Scala Street, Wl) 
produce characterful diarm- 
ing wines, the latter rather 
flowery and aromatic, and the 
former delightfully 
straightforward. 

The more you pay for 
Chardonnay the finer the fish 
that should accompany ft. 
Sole, turbot and salmon wel- 
come the rich flavour of the 
wine, and ft simply levitates 
lobster. Chardonnay should 
not be served as deeply dulled 
as most white wines, and a 
simple rale of thumb to 
determine what foods to serve 
h with is that the key descrip- 
tion applied by Californians to 


its taste is “buttery richness”. 

Sauvignon, fry contrast, is 
the pungent, thrustfu! stuff 
with which get the tastebuds 
working at the start of summer 
meals. High in acidity and 
often distinctly sharp, you 
may not be able to stomach it 
right through the meal! The 
indication Tor Sauvignon is 
food on which you might want 
to squeeze a lemon — fish and 
chips, smoked fish and shell- 
fish obviously, but also stuffed 
mushrooms, veal stew, fatty 
steak or chicken. It also goes 
admirably with ofly fish (her- 
ring, mackerel) and goat's 
milk cheese. 

For a snappy exemplar in 
the fresh and fruitiest style try 
the 1985 Chateau Thieuley 
Cepage Sauvignon (Adnams, 


£2.95) from Bergerac. The 
young Sauvignon of Haut 
Poitou (Majestic, £2.79) is also 
delightfully direct. The wines 
from the classic producing 
region of the Loire late a little 
longer to mature, and 1984 
was not too happy a year. Hie 
best at reasonable price in the 
High Street is possibly 
Sancerre Cl os du Chene 
Marchand, at £5.55 from Peter 
Dominic. 

But again there are interna- 
tional contenders appealing 
for attention. Rosemount 
Estate's blackcurranty 1985 
Sauvignon Blanc at 
Salisbury's and Oddbins 
(£4.99) makes an interesting 
comparison with their 
Chardonnay (and shows there 
is still some possibility of 
confusing the two). Mondavf s 


Zealand also offer a direct 
comparison. Their Sauvignon 
(Oddbins, 0.99) smells, inter- 
estingly, of canned asparagus. 
And from Chile Santa Digna 
Sauvignon Blanc 1985 (Arthur 
Rackhara, 5 High Road, 
Byfleet, Surrey) offers a fresh 
aridity and delicate fruit fla- 
vour typical of the achieve- 
ments of the famous Spanish 
winemaker, Miguel Torres. 

RY 


£4.03) from Bordeaux, or oaky Fume Blanc (Californian 
Chateau 2a Janberne Blanc Sec for Sauvignon) rubs the lesson 
(Majestic Wine Warehouses, in further. Montana from New 



HQSC&T DE BE&OHEUffi-VENia 
DOMAINE DE DURBAN 
BERNARD LEYMER 
A defeat sued «kh mb a „ 

E7&D0 pH 12 MMs (he. VAT 
Redtstti S Ttoderay Wines, 

Common Lana, 

Sanson. 

cSdge C82 4HW. 

Tet Cambridge 833495 




EEJV BUTLER 
WINES 

are preparing 
tor a scorching summer! 

They stoefc- 

DE CASTELLANE ROSE 
CHAMPAGNE 
ROSE DTJNE NUTT 
Methods Champenoiae 
and many delicious still pink 
wines. Including 
- JUST IN - 
from the scented 
Isle or Corsica.. 
CHARME DU MAQUIS 

Write or Phone Anna McNsB 

KJ.BUTLER & Co. Ltd 
R* Btrehes Industrial Estate 
East Srinsteetf, ftweyt 
Teh (0342) 313955 


S * 

f * 



wine in which the flavour 
remains true. 

No doubt the sound of a 
cork easing gently from the 
bottle-neck has peculiarly 
pleasant associations that are 
denied to a ring-pull can. But 
then not every vinous indul- 
gence is going to take place in 
a context of polished wood, 
white linen and soft candieight 
reflected in the sparkling sil- 
ver and crystaL 

For a summer picnic or 
barbecue the can offers the 
considerable advantages of 
being light to cany, easy to 
pack, unbreakable, and quick 
and easy to chill. Certainly, 
with limited shelf-life, they 
will never cany fine wine but 
for a! fresco and occasional 
drinking they are fine. Current 
estimates are that total sales 
are likely to reach 36 million 
cans by 1990. 

Indeed Marks and Spencer 
are sufficiently attracted by 
the packaging to be using it for 
their newly launched spirit- 
based ready-mixes also, as 
well as a couple of regular 
wines. That M & S find room 
for own-brand whisky and 
American dry, rum and cola, 
and gin and tonic now in 100 
stores is a strong indication of 
the puMic interest in ready 
mixed drinks in convenient 
packaging. The range sell at 
£1.09 for 25 centilitres. 

Similarly James Burroughs 
claim to have been doing 
“excellently" with their range 
of “mixed doubles” in glass 
pots with ring pull seals. The 
recent addition of vodka and 
tonic (for the sophisticates of 
the south and midlands) and 
vodka and lemonade (for 
sweet-toothed northerners) 
and a rum and cola compila- 
tion (aimed at the young) has 
redoubled the range since last 
summer. 

For those who like mixed 
drinks at full-strength and 
who have faaMtualiy felt able 
to mix their own, the world 
has become slightly more 
complicated. The major ver- 
mouth bouses of Martini and 
Cinzano have decided, in face 
of cut-price competition from 
lower strength Riccadonna 
and Ganria. to reduce their 
brands' alcoholic strength and 
lake the advantage of a lower 
rate of excise duty. 

One new competitor in the 
well-subscribed sector of ver- 
mouths, aperitifs and increas- 
ingly exotic speciality drinks is 
Monterez. This* is a zingy 
blend of Spanish white wine, 
brandy and tangy orange, 
chosen in trials against 36 
rival formulations and aimed 
primarily at young women for 
whom it is claimed to have 
“high taste appeal". 

Other newcomers since last 
year include a brisk pepper- 
mint schnaaps with specially 
reduced alcohol content called 
Minttu, marketed as a “young, 
outdoor exciting drink" with 
the slogan “a breath of fresh 
air". The idea is to associate it 
with activities such as 
windsurfing, and the risk, 
supposedly; that it might re- 
mind some people irresistibly 
of the minty toothpastes mar- 
keted on similar assumptions. 

“If people find it mixes well 
with milk", says the general 
manager of the firm which 
worked on the product for two 
years before its launch, “who 
are we to argue? Trust me, 
though. It only makes milk 
taste weird.” 

Casino Royale blends vod- 
ka, passion fruit, guava and 
blackcurrant, in a Md for the: 
attention of “young, female 
consumers across the social 
spectrum who are of the 
generation weaned on 
Ribena”. If it does not sound 
sufficiently mixed-up already, 
the makers claim ft has tre- 
mendous mixability, and mix- 
ing it is all the rage in the 
current search for further 
sales. 

RY 


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We appear to 
have the knack of making 
pears go bananas. 

We’re the people responsible for turning 
the humble pear into Babycham. 

A sparkling success by any standards. 

But we were far from finished with the 
pear, not while there was still more profit to be 
squeezed from him. 




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In 1980 we launched n "«Uli 

a still peny called Country Manor. 

It has proved so popular that it already 
sells 10 million bottles a year. 

Sales have grown by an average of 72% 
a year for the last four years. 

Over Christmas alone they were up 82%. 

Last year Country Manor and Babycham 
helped Allied-Lyons achieve a record pre-tax 
profit growth of 23% to £ 169.5 million. 

Country Manor is one of the biggest 
single success stories the off-trade business 
has witnessed throughout the 1980’s. 

For us, it seems, 1 T 

success comes in pears. r\iiIC CL - ljyOnS 

Jo ROWING 


GOING ON ■/GROWING 




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THE TIMES FRIDAY JUNE 27 1986 


CAR BUYERS’ GUIDE 



//v/v7W\ 



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DeBrett 


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The largest selection 
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M 


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Phone for prices and 
specifications 


12B Bug Dud, Hs w anto . 
Lsadsa MOW. Tab B1-748 8821. 
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KUCUT MS CK, 84. red. B 
door. 8000 mUes. exc condl 
Uon. radio, can oulck site 
CM SO CM 01289 6S4A 


RANGE ROVER VOGUE 198S C 
Bn- Mr tame sifter. 8000 
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£15.600. 0676 61318 WUUin 


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malic Estate. notched in gold 
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LTD 


BMW 735 BE 1963. «iHi any 

concmabie extra m 

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£13591 

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Gtiatds red £7.995. 


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RANGE ROVERS New Itnragy 
lered. aum or manual with ak 
rand. LHD and RHO from 
£13.900 Otwne 0252 317640. 


HONDA CHOC SHUTTLE Auto. 
12.500 rules. 1963. £3.130 
qno. Tel 0493 8S7 824. (Tl. 


CRAXADA 3JB Scorwo Pam 
Blue. Asad immediately or ‘Gr 
reg del. Fidl dealer faauues. 
091 284 2352. r. 

GRANADA SCORPIO Auto 85 & 
Full Spec + extras 21.000 mfe- 
£11.430. Details God&tonr 
108831 843979 T. 

LAND /RANGE ROVER Personal 
npoH lax free sales weiatlsL 
D * A main dealer. 061 224 
2208 . 

RENAULT 29 WB In) Only 12 
mlhs old. 18.000 mb. c<M 
£15£»Oi*ew. DM saving al only 
£8.950. Tel: 0759 71333 
85 ■ GRANADA 2JI SCORPIO 
AUTO £10.850 Sunday 0631 
3331 Wkday 0432267151 Ul 
ESCORT CABRIOLET 1.8. 
While. 20.000 nds. B reg. FSH. 
£6.960 Tel. 0327 61(920. 
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sp. 9.000 mb Met Bine. 
£16.930- 0902 763030 nU T 


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SAAB 9000 Tiftn. 
WJCSWAGEN GoS GT. 3/5*. 
VOLW 740. 240. 340. 
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Fulham SWfi 1 UE 


SPECIALISTS IN USED 
BMW AND OTHER RNE 
QUALITY VEHICLES 
Tri: 01-385 89441-385 399 


RANGE ROVER VOGUE RHO. 
Brand new. Unreg. Fuel mt. 
Caspian Blue. 4 rawed Auto. Ev- 
ery ranGOvaale ntM. MRP 
£24.968 £20.998 OOO PrH'ale 
sale. 01-300 3486 wfcend. CM- 
318 1326 day 


RENAULT * LE CAR 2 Turtle 
Baraatn. 13000 mis. B rag. 
white. Rnmae. eyecatching, and 
Cbl s. roof. rad. can. FSH. 
New ra5i-£6u&00. Vours for 
£5.730 ono weekends and ne 
nngs 352 7osi 


RENAULT *, Oner. 1986. creep, 
tow mileage, cut root, radio 
ram. Oulck sale by non-dmer 
widow. Only £45001 Tel: 0734 
64255 . 


KEANU ALT BULB A 

CAR. STRATTON HAVE' 

BETTER PRICE 088&688I3 
SAMBA CAERMLET 55 B. 4.000 

mm only. Peony mm. itnmae- 

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FOR THE BEST OFFERS 
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OF LONDON, WROTTESLEY ROAD, NWTOj 



MAIM IV EGERTON 


LuxuryUsed Cars 


86C -JAGUAR SOVEREIGN 
ODBALT/DOKXiN,4000 ML£S 
119250 


85B— JAGUAR XJS HE - 
RHODIUM MLVER'MVTLLE 
GRE1’. 1 4000 MlLti 120500 
84A- PORSCHE 924- 1961 - ROET 4 SDOY 

u miiu auv ncnn micc EIGHT - TWO-TONE BLUE. 
110995 4000 MILES P.OA. 

B3A - GOLF CD - All WHITE 
CONVERTIBLE. 36000 MHJES 
£7695 


85 B- PORSCHE 944 - 
GiUKIftKtlLhUMUXH-. 
I TIVO MILES 1172 S 0 


WIMBLEDON. Ask for Roger Hamilton. 

01 946 0123 (Wivkdav.s). 01 642 6604{Sunda\>).( 


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for AMY nunuen 
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WORUMHW 



1983 A GTVS. SBwr. 26J000 
mies. air cond. ono oonor. 


Ml htetora. E&99S. 
12 GTVB. 


1982 GTVa Rad. 29,000 
mies, M Mstonr, E4J595. 
ISM SPHMT GRES4 LEAF 
1J5. Black, ono ownor. 
29.000 nries. MS. 


Corshan WBtsMns 
0249 712201 




& P MOTOR CO 


1983/a BMW 529 fiuto.4Z000 
rafsjadia stereo. ouBOntan 

vAs am. 


1979/V COfimA Z3 EBB Ma 

taBM Ota e. s/mol £1595. 

19M/V AUSTIN MAX! 1750 
Ado. 54.000 mis, Kfemr 
Wtuadto £1295. 


01-943 3433 


Mnsumsfl colt 

5 DOOR SHOfiUH 

13 Dto Tvbo tan 85 C Reg. 8000 
rets, l (mw. mulk me hSi «to- 
niond oMw nek. caaM tadtug. 
low nr dadntx. BMx sort. Mid 
Antenon Slyta no) nek. Cobra atore 
WBi son. nraeer itnw 
no/BBamo Mb squ mdBw & 4 
spadogs. 5 r aky Meds. am 
Haogn spas. 

H1S9S 

TriH1-54G 2616 


'BMW 

AUTHORISED DEALERS 


BURTON & DEAHN 
LTD 


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KBfT 


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FOR NEARLY 40 YEARS 


49Z-G CH!SW!CK HIGH ROAD 
LONDON W4 5TT ^ 
Tel: 01-995 1SS3 W 


BMW. 


1UI 4 door, bnracuiaie. Heraa 
rad with black 4Hpes. RM May 
84. F f Sunotdiae roof, alloy 
wheels, new hnw. ramtUflMs- 
eiec windovrs, rear spoiler- cen- 
tral locking manner radio 
cnetle. 50.000 mtt. £8.950. 
Tel.OZl 306 04u ie\eslr021 
3S8 2436 iwkdaysi 


mo i OWUDLEr Automatic, 
while with wue lop. blue tmal- 
«r< USOO rallcB anlyi 1966. 
electric window*, pas. alloys, 
dnw In prHUiw condition' 
£16.000 ono TeliOl-876 2649 


aan metallic burgundy. C Reg. 2 
door. aulo. tery carefully used, 
under 5000 mies. auova. sie- 
rra. sunroof, prftjkle sale. 
£9.500. Tel 09904 4417. 


316 bunjumry. 2 door. S meed. 
Feb 84. 3BMO ndtes. v. wind. 
* roof, sierra cats £ 6 . 000 . 1 
owner Tel: Ascot 23580. 


Sffl 1983. annobeny red. many 
«tras FSH. 10.500 nuied. 
£10.900 ono. Tel: 0322 64454. 


*36 4 df B spd. sifter 
■nei chart grey tnm. pas. ans. 
factory i r. e (r wma. 86 C 
Bn cent Met t orws. tow 
prof-tyres. npenalvc radio ste- 
reo. front spots, mint rand. 
!L800 mis 1 owner £12.795. 
Green R oad Sh owroom. Hants- 
Gowcrt 107061 587746. 

635 cat H 2 v. warn wnn octoe 
Mdr 63.000 mts. aulo. ABS. air 
con. enme . « roof, stereo, 
computer. £10 996 . 01 631 
0070 dal 01 988 694 * m**. 


ry immaculate oondl 
£0J25O. 01-530 £019 m 


alloys, rad.'cass. 2.CX 
£13.995 ono. 0329 663862. 


oomputer. BWB. SS. under 


met CrnpfUte I 


pw.cars. Beaconsflefd 2727 


err Sam's in stock. 


BJM.W. WANTED 


on 0452 23406 m 


or settle for Is. 


COLLECTORS CASS 


M O H C A H 4/4. 

17.000 miles. 


leather inferior. 

tow bar unused 


lW. 


Tel 104917) 298 


astoh Biiurni va 


£13.600. Tel OS2S 220017 


FIAT 130 COUPE 


202 6667 


lug leather upholstery. 


Office Hours. 


FUntAK sm GTS tDtno spyder) 
1973 IM\ ROSSO/ Buck UL 1 
owner. 30000 mix. Superb cx- 
ample. £29.995. Pom PX 
THOl 508 6252 T 
MERCCDU 280CC 1979- Body 
restored, mechanics OKdfcnl 
A fine example of ibis \eiy rar« 
•worts c oupe, £4J»0. Tel 

UJ23J| 768993 

1963 TRIUMPH HERALD Son- 
UUneRoof Ortgtnal snowroom 
OmUMn. CnulM 28 TWO 
mu«. 1 Careful Owner. Based 
Essex. Offer* pis. 01-2723284 
DMA GT >874 Blue, Tan. Ovrr- 
urhe Son roof, low mileage 
lZmonimMOT. V OC £1.990. 
0233 85318 (Kent) 


Motorii^ by ClifFord Webb 

Home comforts on the road 


For a long time now I have . 
wanted to see more of the 
Scottish Highlands than was 
possible from my usual holi- 
day base in Edinburgh, so 
when an opportunity came to 
try Autohomes’ award-wm- 
mng Merlin motor caravan. I 
seized it eagerly. 

I bad considered towing a 
caravan but balked at the 
thought of all those miles at a 
maximum speed of 50 mph. 
The Merlin is not exactly 
small at IS ft overall but it is 
built onto Peugeot Talbot's 
Express van chassis/cab which 
I knew from previous encoun- 
ters with its front wheel drive, 
two litre petrol engine and five 
speed gearbox layout, handles 
like a big car. 

Let me confess at the outset 
that I am a complete novice 
with either but they obviously 
each have their advantages 
and disadvantages. The towed 
caravan enables you to set up 
base on a suitable site and 
then take off in an unfettered 
car. The motor-caravan is like 
a snail's home. It is always 
with you and needs 15 min- 
utes spent packing loose items 
before ft is ready to move. 

Now this is where I cheated. 

I made my expedition in the 
company of a friend towing a 
caravan. We didn't travel in 
convoy. That would have 
been too frustrating for both. 
But we did arrange to meet 
each evening on a selected 
site. In other worlds, I had the 
best of both worlds, the speed 
and convenience of the motor 
home to reach the site and 
then the freedom of my 
friend's car to explore the 
splendour of the highland 
scenery mid play golf. 

At £14,397 the Merlin is not 
cheap, but then you would not 
expea it to be after winning 
the Best Coachbuilt prize in 
the Motor Caravans of the 
Year Awards for the last two 
years. It is beautifully 
equipped with the option of 
deeping accommodation for 
up to six. Ours had a folding 
double bed above the cab and 
a second double bed immedi- 
ately behind the driver. Dur- 
ing the day the latter 
converted into a dining area. 
Both cab seats could be swiv- 
elled round to face the table. 

The central area is taken up 
by the kitchen. It drew admir- 
ing comments from the many 
visitors who asked to look 
around inside. Equipment in- 
cludes a sink and draining 
area, hot and cold wateron lap 
from an 18 gallon tank, and 
fast operating gas water heal- 
er, a gas oven complete with 
eye-level grille and three-bum- 
er hotplate, loads of drawers 
and cupboards, a refrigerator 
which operates on gas or 



House, East GnnsiKKt. Wen 
JSrRhi’BM' 

Diesel 


Antohomes Merlin: Rolls-Royce of a motor home 



Vanxhall Carlton 2300D: Diesel automatic alternative 


executive 

The Opel Rekori sold in 

Britain as . v “ x ¥* 
Carlton has carved itself a nice 

niche in the 

saloon sector and is ao»«* 
preferred car of an 

Sberofmidl^rantod^: 

ecntrves. U « a g** 1 W 
well-balarKed saloon 
hard to fault with spac ious 
seating, good ride comfort and 

iWS&toiM to 

much of its success to tBtWt 

that transport managers wrre 
so delighted with dwCg 
fiers that they proved fertile 
ground for VauxbalTs flea 
reps armed with lots of 
Cart ton demonstrator models. 
Bui now the Carlton seBs tm 
is merits with a choice of 1.8, 
2 and 22i litre petrol engines 
and a 13 litre diesel. Became 
; number of read- 
switching to 


ly luxurious. Crockery and 
glasses for four are provided 
along with cutlery, saucepans 
and a frying pan. 

The manufacturer is 
Autohomes UK. Ltd, 59 Old 

Wareham Rd, Poole, Dorset. 

early pari of our holiday wrong "gear. Owners of this 

coincided with the freak June CJ3T3-VHH VJUD ivdc quickly switched to driv- 

Acting on . the advice of *8^ Ilke a 


electricity and - a real show- 
off touch this — a cocktail 
cabinet with dips to hold four 
bottles and glasses. 

Near the cooker is a floor- 
level gas heater which was 
much appreciated when the 


an 

ers inquire al 
diesel engines I hav' just 
tested a diese l Carlton in 
automatic form. 

A few years ago an automat- 
ic diesel car was boringly oow. 
Except at motorway speeds — 
when any diesel is at its best- - 
it always seemed to be in me 


snowstorms which actually 
blocked some Highland roads. 

The rear quarter houses a 
pulldown wadi basin, shower 
and chemical toileL Alongside 
is the Meriufs unique feature, 
a dressing table with adjust- 
able mirror, upholstered stool, 
,folU 


two large face-level cuj 
for shirts, undies and toilet 


experienced friends, we stayed 
on sites ran by the Caravan. 
Club. On every out we were 
delighted with the friendly, 
helpful warden and wife teams 
who run tbem, the carefully 
selected locations, immacu- 
late toilets, showers, 

tion areas and laundry 


Before we set off my wife 
was apprehensive about being 
cooped up for a fortnight m a 
borne on wheels. However, as 
the days went by she came to 
appreciate the careful thought 
given to even the smallest aid 
to comfort in this Rolls-Royce 
of a motor home: 

It cruised easily at 65 mph 
and would hold 70 mph 
without distress. The dutch 
was light, the brakes efficient 
and within a few miles the 
long gear lever was being 
clicked into place with the 
polish of a veteran van driver. 

The upright commercial ve- 
hicle driving position seemed 
strange but as the miles went 
by I found it more comfort- 
able and certainly more con- 
venient than many cars I have 
driven in the past year. The 
steering was surprisingly light 
for a vehicle weighing over 
two ions. 

. For two people it is dedded- 


But the biggest asset is the 
dub members who use them. 
These are dedicated caravan- 
ners who help keep the sites 
the way they would their own 
homes. They are helpful to 
newcomers and within min- 
utes oflaying out your shaving 
gear you're bound to be 
mvoived in the gossip of the 
day's events, the last site, the 
next site, and the merits of 
Fred's new “van.' 


Vital statistics 

Model: Vauxball Carlton 
2300D saloon automatic 

Price £9,395 

food Engine 2260 ccdiesd . 

Performance: Maximum 
speed 99.5 mph, 0 to 62 mph 

20 secs 

OfBdal CTPSa np ttMC Urban 
33.6 mpg. 56 mph 47 mpg and 


75 nffAt 34 mp 


Length: 15.3 
Insu rance: Group 5 


The current Carlton dicsd 
with mod low power pulling 
qualities well-matched to the 
automatic's ratios is a very 
different proposition. I made 
several fast. 


_ . cross-country 

It coste £3 joining fee and journeys in times comparable 
£14 a year subscription if you to those set in only slightly 


join before July 31. . From 
August 1 to December 3! the 
joining fee is unchanged but 
the subscription goes up to 
£18. Average costs per night 
on site seem to be between £3 
and £4 for a caravan and two 
adults. On many sites, hook- 
up points are available for 
mains eTectritity at a small 
extra charge. Anyone interest- 
ed should write to The Cara- 
van Club, .East Grinstead. 


smaller petrol engined cars. 

But this GM diesel is a 
noisy brute; even for a dteseL 
Start-up datter is a threat to 
good relations with the neigh- 
bours; ft quietens down within 
a few miles but still loses out 
to rivals in the noise stakes. 

On the other hand, I aver- 
aged weH over 30 mpg and 
that will take some matching 
by a petrol-engined upper- 
medium dass saloon. 


ILGJL ROADSTER 


(1963) Tartan rad. Hack ib-w- 
hotsteratf interior win rad 


S . orunfUl doors, 12 
MOT an 


aid tax. tally 

retail 

emxtau 
very codacobieL 

£2,750. 

TdepfefH: 01-422 <810 


JAGUAR US Type. 1963. auto- 
matic. tegh dan example of mb 
unteue model, ouck wnn red 
hide mi. 66£X» m» only! 
Stored for IO yra- fcnmaculate 
inraugbouL ratal tyres. 
£2.730 ono TCU0302) 639012 

JAGUAR E-TYPE 2*2 V12 Man- 
ual OK 72. Regency red/biaefc 
leather. 32.000 miles. Mato- 
lameobyvecisUsf. Superb orig 
car. One owner. £9000. Tet 
Bristol (02721 4343ft 

■MW 2902 CafariaM 1973 
blue grey, recently compteteiy 
recandittoned. Dutfrail exam- 
ple of very rare model. FSH 
£5-000 ono 08S8 32683 

MORGAN 4/4. Ser 1. i960. 4 
water. Compteteiy rabuM. 
While wflh black hide. £9.000. 
Tel: 04674 5464 rventoss and 
wertends 

- MORGAN +4. 4 sealer. BR green. 

regtaered 1986. l.ooo allies. 

>. £13500. Tel: 0372 63900 
r (daytttoel or 066 477 360 
r. tevcs-wkendsi. 

2 

: MERCencS 220 Sl_ 2 + a. Oas- 
■■ sic White, green leaUier. 1 

I" owner. Reg Oct 1970. £8X00. 

'■ TeL 0323 22362. 

0 a-4 MORGAN B racing Omen, 

s. 1983. 14X00 mites. Radio / 

Cassette. FSH. i owner, 
r. VGC-E8J50 ono 603 3881 

k 

\ PORSCHE 

0 944 TURBO C 944 Reg oumoer. 

13X00 miles. LSD. sports srais. 

1 uroof. air con. metallic Cresr. 

). FSH. Phone 0266 781360 

PORSCHE 924 January 84. 
guards red. 11X00 mites - as 
new! Airconditioning, stereo. 

„ electwc windows, mirrors. 

» Alarm system. Full service 

‘ record. £11X00 ono TR: Bteh- 

_ ops Storttord (0279) 89801 

Anytime 

944 LUX 1986. black with beige 

J MieHrlpe Interior, sunroof. 

POML burster alarm. Pirelli 
lyres, irom fogs. PAS. 11.000 
f hiUhl FSH. 1 year Pwatw 

B warranty. Cl 6.230 or very 

near often TeL<0242l 378401 

PORSCHE 944 M C. Stock/ orey 
ini New Senes ESR. Fogs. 

S scatt. FSH. PDM. Low pro- 
file tyre*. Rear skins. Gobi css. 
7X00 mis. ri. yr manuf 
waranlee £18.730 0270 

623594 or 0660 618932 

PORSCHE 9283 Automatic- X 
reg. metallic blue with gw m- 
- lertar. excefteot ramnuon. 

. 48.000 mile* Tax and guaran- 

teed until Fctwaiy. £14.980. 
Tel Ol 439 6165 or 438 2926. 

911 CARRERA CABRIOLET 

1964 Aug 18V HUby Met._FPII 
Lealher. FSH. £22X00 Firm. 
Tel; 0484-720604 day <U 

L 

£ 924 LUX AUTO 10.000 mts. Red. 

" FSH. 1 owner. Every extra. A 
» reg. 4s new. £10.930 07842 

■ 91 302 Hm. 01892 3340 Off T 


828 Petrol Blue. Auto. E»e*f- 
MU rareL Reg 1978. Aivnge 
m«*«. Interesting number. 
£8.600. T«l: 0453 843807. 
•44' 1984. Red. 1 owner ran. 
Many extras Sunroof. 4 New 
»w profile D4's. Garage kepi- 
CJ3250 Tet 01 653 4011 
szs 8 1983. V rc«. manual, full 
Kfftlce history. I owner, excel 
trail rorxmmn £18-950 ooo. 
01-639 53SZ Office hours- 
CHEAP 944 G <M- F MSHXV- 
sunroof Plusa. ttnnueuiaie. 
EJ 2.690. 3652022 734 9601 
824 LUX US1 aula. Dart Slu r. 
43.000 mWK. stereo. FSH. 
£4.940 ono. 01 579 2213. 
924 U)X a Reg. 15JOOO mtaJUdL 

Ok a roof, rad <m Um 
Mr CX 0.760 084421 2097 



PORSCHE 92ft S 
SERIES 8 AUTO 
86 C Rag 


h» BbB KkL Sprca teafter 
L HWl VWT. tndv 


tran. Sunroof 
MOO mis. 


£37,750 

Tel: 01-90 S 54 U today ntf 
81-629 6266 office Hr 


924 CMBSM GT. Grants rea. 
sunroof. wMe wheels. FSH. 2 
owners, immaculate cowUUop. 
Unusual rewstrauan. £13.000 
ono. TMephaae 0604 710 792. 


944 Lb. Asm ‘86. 4.500 miles. 
Metallic Crypto! Green. Sun- 
roof. 215,60. PAS. £19.780. 
TM. Ol 486 02GCKWIO 
Ol 979 BSSlRwnw) 


911 SC CaOrtolel. 
Guards Red. 39.000 m. FuU ser- 
iM nWorv 1983. elearK 
windows, strrea. Imntoc. FSH 
£17.900 0761 70377 


911 1HISO 1980. Siher/mart 
lealher. ESR PDM. FSH. 2 
owners. Utterly supers. 
£17.950. Chevron Motors 0633 
24847. 0533 417633 fH) 


944 A RES 16000 miles only. 
Ruoy rad metallic, best offer 
over £14.000. Telephone Maid- 
enhead {06281 33306 


944 LUX Blade. May 83. 45.000 
miles. 215*0. SR. POM. AFM 
mat nial ned. mceUem condition. 
£10.950 ooo. Tel Ol 892 3339. 


911 SC CABRIOLET. 1963. 
ZZ.ooo miles. FSH. While. 
Buck Hide Interior. Spotless. 
£29.250 Tef. Ol 749 9664 


944. 1986 Stiver gray RMUIttc. 
19.000 Mb. Ira mac. Genuine 
reason for sate. Extras Offers. 
£16.000. TeL 0244 810563 off. 


PORSCHE 924. X re«. 44JOOO 
miles. Guards red. Sunroof, 
electric windows, healed /dee- 
trie mirrors, alloy wheels, 
rat »KW>!«e, Lady erwner. 
£6996. Phone (046061 3282 
HI SC SPORT Coarse 1982 V 
reg- In dark Oak Green tael. 
64.000 mtt. wm fun Porsche 
documented hmory. (rnmae 
cond. £16.230. 0622 861838. 
93* S 19SX Auto In Pewter. 
ESILFSH. 38000 mtt. £17.950 
PX Finance. 0272 8421 80 T 


PORSCHE WANTE 3 J 


PORSCHE 

WANTED 


ANY MODEL 

CASH PAID - 
WILL COLLECT 

HHLAY GORHAM LTD 
HENLEY-ON-THAMES 

0491 576407 

Any time 


V.W. AND AUDI 


BRONZE COLT Cam-toon Con- 
vertible. KartMAhh prepared. 
Cobra alarm and Pioneer corn- 

ponent stereo, ft man old. 

present ownw only. unmanuKt- 
£7 JOO 


TCCG2404 3831 


QUATTRO CBCTHE 


-86 C AOn OWITBO TURBO Tor- 
ndo rad. no mof. 

K G MJIX n OWTIRO GmML 

”c Mm wrnino oes& 

MJID ZknaB tor 80Q ato. 

aa FMca « amicaim 

Bert pn eta prad tar tax auSfW 

ISTERS BBS 90S 

Opn 7 Dan 


v.w 


range a dfemuu pr ic e s tom 
ICC. 01-202 8696. 


WHraGOtr CO I«V lR'IA BL*86 
B. tike new. SjOOO nBes 
£8^00 ono Eva 0268 41 BOSS 


AUM QUATmO TURBO 86MMh 
CL 1JMO MUes. WhUr/Ory 

Lalhar. Air Cond. San RooC 

Becker toko. RHO Expan De- 

livery. £17.500 Tet 0491- 
676407 or 0836-236547 «M ft) 


CGtJF CTI CTI OTLOcer 20 paw 
3 8 5 door models ta suck, 
many wllh factory Otted extras 
lac. power steering. 0682 872 
182. Open Son (Authorized 
V.W dealer) m. 


GOLF cn CO NVERT A H A8 
While. Limited EdBMm. tony 
Extras. 23000 MBes. A Reg. 1 
Lady Owner. £ 6JSOO. TeL- 
07S4-4783 (Eves). 

•9 SPOUT Red. July 1985. Sun- 
raof. Alarm. Sierra radio 
bnmacidaM. 37.000 miles. 
£6.80 0 ono. Tel Graham on 
01223 61749 office horns 

Aim 80 SPORT. A reg Aug 83. 
Black, sunroof, stereo, sojooo 
mtt. £4.150 ono. 0246 262022 
Office. 0621 892916 home. 

CUNVERTHLE OOLn. AH mod- 
els. colour chafes. Imraed deL 
0682 872 182 open San. (V.w 
dealer! CD, 

GOLF CTI 5 door, ddherly mOe- 
aoe- BtaCk. Sunroof. Tints. 
Alloys, sra. Best Offer or PEX 
Tefc093 23 41 199 Exfc2221 w 


GL A Gttb from su>ck only at 
Kenswordi. 0582 S72 182. 
Open sun (V.W dealer) 07. 
GOLF cn 1983 (O S door. 
13.000 miles, sflver. as new. 
£7.250 ono Tot 0752 872766 
GOLF STL 8 door, mw unrepto- 
lered. d ttc ou m . colour choice. 
0799 88426 24 hours. 
NEWVW AND AUM models. Inc 
GTL at dttcoum. rapid delivery. 
Phoradx 029 126 4676. 


MERCEDES 


MAY 90 200 <124 Series). Ascot 
grey, blue dcOt mmolstry. elec- 
tric windows. 1.900 irtles. 
£L3 jOKJ. Tefephooe 0044 379 
614. 


Reg. Biege. hood brawn, atno- 
manc. one owner, private sale. 
25.000 miles. £16.900. Tel 
0823 400 422. 


380 SL white with beige Int MB 
Tex. Aulo. E w. ABS. Cruft* 
com. HLWW. Rear seals, ste- 
reo. Delivery rmHage. £24.500. 
NanUMtoAnhD 3510 


229 1* ESTATE November 83. A 
Reg. 19.000 miles, automatic, 
sunroof, metallic sbier. one 
lady owner- £10550. Teie- 
pnone 0766 770 809. 


220 c 1970 . White. LHD. auto- 
matic. ESR. good raadmm. low ' 
mileage, mot £] . 800 <h». Tete- 
nhone 0491 574 789 . 


IM3SU. 340 TO ■STATE 1984. 
Red. 5 gear, sunroof, tow bar. 
£10500. TUrolunte 01-300 
3759 (HE 01-840 0634 CW5. 


HOtCCDCS 390 SL 1983 A Heg. 

wrote. Leather Interior, Rear 

Sul Gratae Ooulrd. Air Con. 

Alloys it Stereo. £22.730 Of. 

fered by Regents Part Motor 

Co Tec 01-722-3308 


NEW 300 IE ESTATE mm De- 
livery CX or Export DeL 
Classic WhHc/MB Tex. -Over 
G4.B09 Extras. £23600 Uf or 
CZ7J00 Export . Tel: (Of 0491. 
576407 or (h) 0836-23554T 
MS IO M UtoBSS 230 E. 
Blue. S speed, air cond. .stereo. - 
Hecmr sliding .redCr 1 owner. 
19.000 Rides, v £10999. 
NrwhoryiOOWn 49003 v-_ 


NEW 

MERCEDES 

HOTLINE 

0203-51611 


350 SL SPORTS 


1979. Only 47000 mb 
from new. Hard & soft 
top. ABoy wheels, cruise 
control. Electric win- 
dows- Unblemished 
MetaWc Ice Green with 
Tan trim. £12,995. TeL 
Southampton 601133 T. 


Z39 CK (19831 ReM bine imM- 
- ttc. ESR. MOVB. E.W. pas. 
BUupuinXl novo. 51.000 
ndcs FSH. exeedrau cond H ioo. 
£9.780. Tet 020881 4676 
(day) 020886 3676 feted 


EMC 84 A 3 2 .000 mffes. HgBI 
Kory. 1 owner, ten. rum. elec- 
tric roof and windows. 
BtounnmM stereo. £9.960. Ol- 
S02 0624 (eveg) y 01-304 3344 

(day). 


no CK 1983 (A) 9900 BdM 
auto, nwttiur green. FSH. sun- 
roof. akw wheels. Stereo. «c 
Immaculate £14 jOOO no often 
Tet 046 122100 


6000 

mites, very good condHton. row, 
champagne. Ian doth. ESRr 
window, alloys, stereo, etc. 
£14^00. Tel: 08832 3688. 


i rt. e 


190 E MOV CS Auto, e 
wds. aeoys. hd real 
cns. perfect cond. warranty. 
£13.750. 0491 671387, 


SHOWROOM CQSNHYaON. X reg 

230C auto. 28X00 rtn. aU re- 
finement* champagne. 

£8jOOOlooo. Tel 10089) 63183 


B, 23000 mfles. 
bragr. anto. es-r. 
“ - £10.600 


• w. 

DM. Tri. 0902 B7433 (day) or 
Oavertey 439 mo) 


290K A reg. Feb 84. Ughl Kmy. 
ABS. auto, electric roof, win- 
dows. Bfcnimutkt radto/cais. 
good condmon. £10230. TeL 
0707 326080. 


230 tUwHd, 86 C. elec s/r. snMfM 
silver met. raa -osa. front am 
red BHoy* enrome wheel arch 
Brin*. 0.000 rws. CidflOO, Ne 
dealers. 0476 62093 


UNO SO Petrel dk bine. PAS. 
aum. AC- ■ S. r. 1983 B reg. 
3200 nds. owner driven. Cost 
new rex ooo. Offers. 0788 

664944 anytime 
MERC 2M SC 84 S/Roof. Tinted 
windows. Alloys. Light Bhw 
MeL Wu e yetour IK 26JOOC 
. MS. E3S.99S Tef: 0023880747 
or Eves 0223680729 ID 
NOW 900 SC, &O00 ItUCS. Mif 
Raleu red. ABS. cruise control 
hradlamn WW. tMotr ophof- 
skary. radio nwrai*. ESR. 
£20.900. 0724 885240. 

200 TE AUTO Estate. 1982 
43JOOO mum. only. HWhtdee. 1 
WR7.M h«pry. Superb 
rand. £6.998. PX considered. 
PIS*te phone 0329 833616 T 

280 sowaw- 

mood blue. Hue velour Interior. 
COM m e. caos&e. Tef 0999 
0790 T . , 


Astro stiver. i3£oo mtsfftw 

«rreMy. El 1.996. Off 0703 
39644 sun 04216 63828.T-- 
MW.M/IQg. luuned DeL 660 
SEC. 420 SE. 300 SL- 230 TE. 
I90E 2UL16.190E Auto. T4X 
free Of UK Wmdaor 861S47.T 
8 . Blue s aver. 
Grey jralher. Mery nmstbteex- 

<« ana bo. tpl 

Ol 487 3800 nr 01 437 7831 
IK* ft* SBC Slier /Dart Gw 

Del POA 0491-676407/8 IU 
390 in, 83. Petrol fgtue green, 
blue reftmr.gr .ooo ml lev FSH. 
PKt rasJUA-TSO- 01 2420Q13.T 
-3K0SSU833 tfuirier. Petrol. Blue 
vemir. 37000 mtt- FSH. Ex. 
(rat. £13.960. 01 942 OOT2 T 
BMc. 

48000 Rifles, glade spotter 

. 207-3787 


MSEC 

New Mm. Wnoy. fflttte/Grey 
Ibdc. Fuflr OpOaDCd- 

Often Around 
£94,000 
ar Export Deflv y 
£43,000 
09274-26411 


230 E ISM AUTO MsaUte Bur. 
sunroof. i9u000 na tes . FSH. 
£0396 0243 862836 (Eves) 
0245 822181 iDayl 


1900 A oto. c. Mang. re- 
rawoe. eteo aerus. I 
E 4.950. Tel 06846 

68687 


I H 1982 hamac Cond. aU ex- 


Etc. £18.996 01 464 9067 


H SL 1978 Met 
Ota. 48000 mUn. FSH. rural 
U 1.760. 01-436 5226. 


X99TE, -83 1 owner, auto, elect 
windows, aflovs. tMd. ao.ooo 
mb. £8300 01-440 8926 


MERCEDES WANTED 


.For die best price OO 

your late low mUrage Mereode* 
mg 0703 766949 M 


anytime. 


009 SEC WANTED, wmw wttn 
tea (her. 85 84 as. Cash WW- 
tos. Private. TeL 0623 60283 


JAGUAR & DAIMLER 


A HEG 

jaguar xjs-he 


Blade wnii cha m p a gne In- 
terior. Air cand&tonlnB & 
tuber extras. 5 roUw 
waraniarofiteretL Finance 
available. 

£13/195 oh 

0260 270466 
office hrs 


SOVEREIGN Auto. 
1985. m a n aBtog director-* tar. 

otaB with doeOdn. 56.000 

rtflee. regtdally mauuwned. ud 

to <»«eUenJ condition. 

P- 9 *™ (06591 886552 Of- 

Ik* *r (06391 814196 Hoore-tTI 


¥ P* T1 T lc lto1»ter.aeaaOftfl. 
•nmMOMaia. mere M e Mue mm 
toteriorcumptetety 

wire wheels, roamui. 
£ 12.99 8 T« 01-894 6066 
rttoOnessor 506 tasar (Hornet 


X S!5 AS* brawn, 

totfreiraoira-. etertrtcwhxtows. 
wentop Stereo -cassette. FSH. 
•"jwrijt cmUMb, ex4lrecaon 


Maroon-bread*. 

yare enty wont raamteted. new 
£18.730. eve, 0664 


VMMLntavCREHM. 


.-tVWTST-'-r— 


77 




S . re- 







, r- 1 



m 





STATUS C * 



; M r. t:: uer 
' ut r*r 
m f .» 


-mmm 

- Oftl 

wsa 


LONDON ROAD 
OARAGE 


ipi 

(ROMFORD) LTD 

MofCBdas Benz main 


MOWS. UlUOfWVtlKNB 

for late and low mflo- 
age Mercedes. 


COIfTACT 


MMJH&M HCeOMHUI 

OH 0708 23511. 



*• -* '•-'rig— H 








.n 


-t 


v Mi . 


■- •*'***& - 








-«!H it • 


— 4 m 


- —-re »>ra 
' '.'"■“****- -***s4 


fl—fiam, J rt mod page 







■*, r 1 * 




*$\ 


THE TIMES FRIDAY JUNE 27 1986 



CAR BUYERS’ GUIDE 


AUTHORISED 




RtW 

MERCEDES 
HOTUHE 
.16111 


| LOOK BEFORE YOU LEAR 


io you ac r^it to be excq>yond|y parftutv about the 
whk £** 1 ** P® 1 ^ JPusetett to buy from. 

•*. * J*£ A PPfwed UsedCas Pnwamme 


jtesuse, afflwugh not ail models dtspfyed are jaguars or 
Qaftnfeis, eadi one has had Ks electric, mechanic, bodywork 


and trimbnxgti up to labor's uncompromsta standards ofexceOaxe. 

Eadiorn the sttane is under 3 years old from date of first 
registration and has less than 40,000 remntedmfles. Also included W/m 
m She price B a compretenslve 12 months pats and Wxxircwer MflP 
andRACmemlwship. 

AD considered vw think yarn find Jaguar Approved Used Cars offer betta- 
value for money and more prestige Bran many new cars anjuwt See what we 
mean — arrange a viewing with one of our Official Dealers total 



MOTORS LEASING 


JAGUAR A DAIMLER 


»*ci jiiny.i p j 



For die finest used cars 

choose Mann Ege rton . 


1970 Ho O a R oy ct Phantom 
VI Ubmosm. Midnght BW 
Grey; 870 liricK £108^00 

1985 Bendey Molsanne 
Turbo *R». Dwp OcWBdge: 
6A22nAs; £67,500 

1962 Rolls Ro y cc Camargae. 
SejdieSes BfexyMagDola: 6tfW 
nries £53,950 

1984 RoH»-Roycr Silver 

Spirit. CorakBd»:8j000ma«: 

£47.950 

1984 Rofis-Royce SOver 
Spirit. CoCndd Beige Brown 
Ewrfcc Dark Brown: 18JOO 
rafas £44,950 


1984 RoQs-Royce Silver 
Spirit. Light OceaiVDaifc Blue 
2WS0mIe*: £43,950 


■ Laurel Grerv'Tajn 5£00 mSes 
£38,500 

1963 RoOs-Royoe Silver 
Spirit Ice Gitm/Beige 2 1 JDOO 
nwes: £37,550 

1982 Rolls-Royce S2ver 
Spoib^toOjsteiiRed; 32JMO 

1W3 RoOs-Royce S3ver 
Spirit. Ocean BtadBdgc 39,000 
miles; £33,500 

1980 Rofls-Roycr Saver 
Shadow D. CUm/Bdgc 4,400 
mUo: £32,750 

1979 RoQs-Royce Silver 
Shadow IL Carribean BW 
Beige 28J70 ntfe* £23^00 


JACK ROSE LTD 
Walfington, Surrey 

1982 B0US BOYCE Star Soft 


HI BOLLS BOYCE Star 

State. SOM ids riSJ95S 

TS79 BOLLS BOYCE Star 
Shadow. 46000 <ta — CT7JS0 
«77 ROUS BOYCE Star State 
(senes H). 68000 mk._C163S0 
1978 ROUS BOYCE Star 

State 60000 mis £12358 

AH wtnr service history & mad- 
able Nitli 12 months warranty 

01-647 4473 


MANN - H 

egerton 


SHADOW n 

1979 in parted MWnut 
Brown with MaonBa hkte 
peed Brawn, eojjoo rats. 
FSH. ract n ry fitted suiuul. 
1 of the heat axam pte s of 
the yew. 

£16»000l 

Tel: 01-551 6784 off 
01-501 0522 Hm. 


74 rUHS AKCM enter Shad- 
ow. 4&000 rndes. fun Moory. 
Urgency Brens. Mateolb 
Hide. Unique Car. premie sate. 
£xaaao tw.- 0732 68005a 


ROLLS ROYCE 
SILVER SPIRTT 

Light Ocean Bte. Manta 
lade. 24,000 maem. FSH. WcJ 
Bog FSX 3B. 

£29395 
DERWENT 
VEHICLES 
TEL: 0532 775636 


SILVER SHADOW 
1973 (M) 

Lam Gran/Faro Me. i 
oamr m new. 40000 
gta. (te n b* Ley ad 
Ctatttw o«y. test cowfr- 
tna. daeuwote BB ferny. 

£11,850 
P/X Conddemd m 
Brighton 732403 


De Riche 
Contracts Ltd 

CONTRACT HIRE A VEHICLE LEASING 

NATIONAL CONTRACT HERE— 
per ramrtfr 

AUSTIN-ROVER RENAULT STL £I27.1D 

Metro Oty £11631 5TSE £169.46 

Maestro 1 MOL £15837 25GT5 £275 J7 

Momep* I60OL £164.16 _ 2SGTX £312.44 

mg SSSi 1 §1 SAAB 82 ** £248 - w 

MG Montego Efi £22731 900 4-dr £27537 

BMW 900 Turbo 5-dr £38637 

5IS £23830 CM VAUXHAJLL 
319? SZ 0 - 07 « A«n ijl £15837 

S20l £301.85 CSnaber 1600L £174.76 

„»«*=*» VOL r£^s'll 

TO S. .300 U«, £,».« 740 g^f! 

.. .sto’jggaa vw/audi MoC£IJ710 

“8StI««9 


Arafi Q«^t> Cotrpe 097] 17 

One monthly payment for yoar motoring overheads 

Short term cont ract him available 
3-6 month dnration- 

idephone for A*tnik 

Tel: (0922) 614014 
or Telex 335069 

for full d w a i l s and a written quote on any Company Car 
MAINTENANCE PROGRAMME INCLUSIVE 


WHO ARE 
CARET jOW? 

W« have been oMbUdwd dm 1969 and atm » um 

npartenced company, with a turnover In e n ow of £4 

million, m uii b wl na w i wi g d our (tend mm hew 
major eonip u nto and local audwrtMs 

RELEASE THE CAPITAL TIED OP 
IN MOTOR VEHICLES 
whh one of dw following schemes 
* Cootmct Hbe 


ktcoi Jar mny 
Any i 



su. VCx shadow ■ 1978. cans, 
nai rod. Booe otertar. FSH 
iwwcu tt t e ccodmoa. 37X00 
RlllM. £16-800. Td; 01-883 


For Anther details please ring us on 01-499 8342. 


DSeThe Bibulous 






II 

ROLLS BOYCE A 1 

[ 1871 SHADOW 1 flteyv 80000 




JAGUAR & DM 
WANTED 





MURRAY 


031-6653838 


Hue Interior. £7.000. Tirte- 
0600* 01-723 812*. private 


U» «ADOW M B3J00O BOB. 
wttMrwaB tyres, dark oji to nl 
blue wtm blue Hde tntaner. 3 
owners £18.000 uoo TeUOl- 
491 0145 London W1 



Thinking of Buying? 

Autoselect offer best prices 
to both private and fleet J j 

users, and supply any moke /L 
or model of car or van. sf'Tijni/] 

We can arrange finance, / \wm (( J 
leasing and contract hire, / fr" ' ^ 

SEHT SELECT 

(0773) 831 625 -you'll be glad you did. 


CONTRACT 

HIRE ?? 

LOOK AT THESE 
PRICES! 


mm MR 1984 (Ded WM- 
mjt. Magnota Pted Brown. 
Brown top roe. Mweui knee 

MB. Mdr roof Hnina. 1 owner. 

FSH. 102)00 Mfoaiy. niauum 
cent. £48.780. 01 362 7820. 


JAGUAR* 


I TYPE VIZ Manual 2+2. 2 pro- 
Wm ewnert. MUdM Mae. 
CWW. Index NO WUW 6. excel- 
lent ' original order. JC8.9SO. 
NeflottaMe. may PX 0702 
628362 daytime. 




■ B»UOiiM.lMi/ta 
nKta trim, as new. FSH. 29.000 
mtaa 1 owner. £16.750. Tel; 
0X409 8101 attic*. 




CT te i Cta e Mt wwgrte 


STATUS CARS 




XR2 

Peugeot 
205 fiTI... 

XR3i 

Astra GTE 
Golf GTI 
BMW 3181. 
Mercedes 
190E 


Per Week 


from £36.23 

from £42.48 
from £43.40 
from £4626 
from £47.52 
from £58.00 

from £74.42 


Ptwnr 9-fioro on era 773 3dB7 


auunCUt OfttVCN 98vcr 
smnt ttady Mw rt BuUntor 
pm ale roe. 0279 784985. 


too TURBO lira. 8 door. 5 rod. 
silver, S'R- FSH- PX/ Finance, 
fiuoo. can M21S0.T 


.RIND NOW fOR AaUDTE 

| ON ANY MAKE OB MODEL 

01-328 2577 
021-771 0355 



// IlCir LEASING 
LTD 


Not fcnpotts, Vdmsod cwt 
brofcsro. Warranty £ servicing 
earned out by your local dealer 


a helicopter. 35 boost 
training is aU it tabs to 
private helicopter /obi 
md that will certainty, 





can By Asa 


43S Static fri Rcaci, 
irn-'inahart £1 ' 4AO. 


Cellimt 

*mn m w n m tr 

fuuniun rs. 


CoOecUan and IMtey 
Sm-vloe availabh 
Alao XflobBo 
Caamnlng UnU 


Opm 7 days a trade 
137 MEPHAM STREET 


Tbe Robinson R22 is the most 
economic way to own and By a 
private helicopter: Far as little as 
SSQjOOO (mdadingfhB t raining ) 


(fy- .pihtyoo ^ 

your will enjoy the privilege 

ofbeing able to By anywhere in the 
wold 


the Robinson will take you to new horizon. 


return the slip and Snd voarnsw 



moms 


** 5g 

g'x* 



Extend Ybttr Horizons 


THE ULTIMATE JAGUAR ENGINES 


ri2 

5.7 litres 408 ffiff 

6.4 Rtres 440 BHP complete 

6-9 litres 400 BMP 


mEEmmnmnmi 


interested in the utomate Jaguar 
engine-sea} tor a bractumir tet 


FORWARD 

ENGINEERING 



OFFERED FOR 
SALE 

mm a earner maw 

TUS80 (42JOO (TteBMtar 
«tih «te rmnor, QEjm 
ono. C*n fie yiemd k London 
SEPT 1381 FBHUUn. M 
CIV (MOO mfcs) Rad witb 
tan mda interior, Fonari 


Bott ears 1 emrtaDMt 
For festtar deUite ctf 

0224 722868 
(PHwtetoe) 


JrriCiAL DISTRIBUTORS 


HLB«SBHK*SnUIES 

PmsOpe selection of used 
Asiooltarta and Lagondas 

StrattM Motor 
Co (Korffrik) Ltd 


RCGBR G50c'-3£49 ‘ 
SENNiNGTON 


smun sm on 1979 35x100 

mte. Red. FSH. Excellent 
■browgbeut. C20.000. Tet 
Tanbndge 361659 davtUne. 


BRISTOL MOTOR 
COMPANY LTD 



0676 23526 

TB£X S12 475 fWO ENG-6 



WAiSH LANE. Nlrrl'OEN 
•»R COVENTRY 
'.VARVviCK CV? 7jY 


aoi Vi 




FARRARI 308 
GTB QV 

Noaenter 84, racteg red. 
ma^nfia ditto «aith rad pip- 
ing. air conditioning, tear 
aaratoL ratto cbssoBb. 
19.600 maa* FSH. 

£27^00 

Tetaptana 01-fiSI 42 SS 


tv* asm s a cuw v h i i b k x 

Dec as. w a nan tm with an m- 
trnor. 2X100 rndea only, mu 
serviced with 6 nuxitha 
warmly nmalnlno trarnaru- 
Ute condition. £13.460 
T elephone 0578 761 IT. 


FDdUia MOraNAX. 8 X n» 

40X00 mUea. red. Mack Miner 
tntener. air rand, tut htetory. 
tramferrasle warranty. 

£18^80. TM: 0625 520128 



X*a C reg. Mel saver.'Blue ve- I UTUS Bte For me beat no- 
tour. a*. 1 owner. Only 3.000 bonwlde cadi buyero. Phone 
mis. £7.460. Ol 853 2706 Off I Lotus Norfolk 060340776607- 


CHESTERTONS 

^ — R E S I D K N T 1 A L ^ 


ROLUUB PARK, VII BROWTM PARK, SW8 

Priat ia e raftndtehad period Soperiribr ted/tanaW 2 
boon. 3 dble A 1 agio beds, Wid- 

toft 1 A iEwe, 2 net me, kit, rag- I4 imaceytl pte, 
CHA3dW.Avrf6A2i«ta. 

S® P* im mw i Company le£ Pnns 

£245 par. 

Notthag HH1 Office: Offieac 

01-221 3500 Ol-tel 7244 


soum REKSOaBIOH X bedroom 
tat £1X0 pw. x year rain. Tel: 
oi Z89 3819 evea/wkeads . 


taWt l-ST ML 3rd /4th or. 
maH. 6 rooms. K* & £7.800 
po- NewGyr be. sotact In rte. 
Small BoymcM farex/ef by arv 
nnge. ReC SE8. Malhesoa 
4Q2 2341 



KAYFAK, Wt La 5/C Btf. 2 
Bedrms. me Heoe p. n ay 
equipped. From £22Spw. 
Std, tog let 01-493 7830. 


annuo flat to LCT. m petty 
France next to SI James* sta- 
tion. Tef.Ol 499 4273 daythaa 
or Ol 468 7016 evantaes. 



1^1 f Quraishi 


Constantins 


rxiBiarnw van. Funy fum 
b/c super l dble bearm flat wfth 
open Map to*. Ht/dto. Bath, 
views coram guns. Co ie». £126 
pw. Tel OX 720 5213 CT). 




01-244 7353 



ClOOpw. Priory: Ol 940 4656. 


FLATSHARE 


CLAPIUUfl prof F to snare wmi 1 
Ml IF. non siu o fcei . O, R. 
£180 pem exd Tab 01 720 
3674 kh 


KJMGSTON M. F. own roroa to 
snared house, gas CH. patte n . 
N S. £35 CO pw. TM Ol 390 
6636. 


•nr MOatewnM. Prof naie 
own room in lax gte Bat nr 
lube. £46 pw one Phone 60? 
8792 Sal after 830 UB. 


H8UDOH a.-r tar n,s P. to 
manning wen eoutoed on. 
TUbe BR. rosy poricing. £160 
PCM exd. Id 640 7093 


tail m c flat. Own M. NML 
tamge-dtoer. me dbm bedtra. 
tan. toilet. RIIM Wt- in em 
■wow mown gnntetoPpn roe 



ft 

i 1 mm 

■ r ■ 


-JT72 




Statal 



"WWW AU PM* AfiENCV 
87 Regent Street. London Wl. 
Tel 439 6534 UK Overseas. 
Aho m.tielpt/dMns lamp perm 


DOMESTIC & 
CATERING 

SITUATIONS WANTED 


** UT . . Etmaii. experienced, 
aero* Sommer PosL London/ 
Overseas. Reply to BOX A66. 


UMlCAhONSmeUW 


1,10 

sssa-Kssss?^ 


SSSS-^ 12 

SPACE-TEL LTD 

10 College Road Harrow Middx. HA 1 1BE 
Tel: 01-427 684B (10 Unesl Telex: 8951 182 


DIAL ! 00 AMD ASK FOR FREEFONE SPACE -TEL n 

01-427 6848 

Keeping the Business world In touch today 


SURREY 


CLAYOATZ ESMER Immaculate- 
tv p reve n ted send del. 
Edwardian home, prime loca- 
Uon. 4 Igr recepi mu. lux filled 
feU. break rm. sep taundry. 4 
Beds, superb en aufle bath. 2nd 
ham. d MB age. g r.h. potto, 
landscaped gOn. £200:000. TM: 
<03721 62961 



SWIMMING POOLS 


Holland Park W1J 

Lnadowne cxrnsemum 
area. Superb fiwrih bouse, 
iceaiily deanaied «Hh 
dnect aims w ororal 
(■fas 5/6 dMe beds 3 
tcceps. 3 tsUu. Bnhbaap Ul 
t*sndr> TO. wine cdtar. 2 
cloaks. cxithoBses. pstia 
F/H. Rriee pnde £585. 000. 

Tel: 61 229 5900 




BARCHEM POOLS 

Soimminf) pod spetisfists phone us now & Ml gel 

you in the swim for ‘88. We only IjuM tte best soW 
concrete remforead pools with all types of fMsbes& 






too £66 pw. Many others, 627 
2610. Hometocmr*. (9 9. 
holiday wwnon fin i 

week io 3 Mtmins Man OOO to 
£3.000 pw. 01-937 9681 
KEXJNS, nr Time. tUroMtad tta. 
2 3 ims. K & B. GCH_ CUJel 
ortty. £408 pern. 01 429 0184. 
KD8M6TM n fi taim FLAT. 2 
bdrro. phono, cks. £llC.pw. 
627a6ia ) fo« r wtoc alere .7teyx 
KCH m.FWB hsa/ote. 3/4bM. 
2 racro. X bath. 1 mower. Cp 
let. £380 pw. Teh 01 9S76128. 


GENERAL 

appointments 


LOTH’S KMOOL M food 6 wtne 

are looking lor 3 new Mcnara. 
We need 2 to Start September 
1st A a 3rd lo start September 
22nd. toterviewi July 23rd ■ 
25th. Phare ring virKy Os- 
oonw on 01-229 0177 A aek Tor 
an application term. 


PART TIME VACANCIES 


SOUTH OF THE 


PART TIME 






AT PAUL 14 note Odd «nh 

bteenre tor 300 carasaTO w 
aonais Good position on North 
Corum Coast. £220000 
oajlo. runner land available 
ceo 882 779 mol 




11/12 High St, HgtawnttL was. 


WERE 
OPEN ON 
SATURDAYS 


WHEN NO ONE ELSE IS. 

You can now phone in your 
advertisement to us any Saturday 
morning, from 930 ajn. to 1.00 pjb. 
This is a unique new service for all 
classified advertisers in The Times aftd 
Sunday Times — and it costs no extra. 

To book your advertisement 
phone 01 481 4000. 


THE SUNDAY TIMES 


MAKE - IT • WORK • FOR • YOU 





















































































THE TIMES FRTT>AY JUNE 27 1 986 


YOUR OWN BUSINESS 


New focus 
on risks in 
big mergers 

By Derek Harris 

This week's controversial report on the 
likely effects on small business suppliers 
to Plessey, the electronics company, if it 
were taken over by its bigger rival. 
General Electric Company (GEC), coo Id 
prove a watershed in the governmental 
approach to big mergers. 

This b the intention at any rate of 
Michael Grylls, chairman of die Small 
Business Bureau as well as of the Tory 
backbench committee on trade and 
industry. It was he who revealed the 
repent as an example of the widespread 
effect a big merger might have. More 
than 180 Plessey small business suppli- 
ers could be at risk it was c la ime d . 

It was the first study of its kind of a big 
company's supplier base, says Mr 
Grylls, who b urgently seeking a meeting 
on it with Paul Oiaiuum, Secretary of 
State for Trade and Industry. Mr Grylls 
said: **At the moment mergers are 
nodded through with nobody knowing the 
likely impact on small businesses which 
are supplies. That b nothing short of 
irresponsible.'' He believes such studies 
should become part of the assessm e nt of 
any substantial merger. 

The study threw np some fascinat ing 
insights. Plessey suppliers directly create 
16,000 new jobs a year, justifying the 
argument that smaller businesses are 
essential to job creation. Businesses with 
between 50 and 500 employees are 
demonstrably more efficient in some 
types of production and they rate highly 
for innovation, says the report 

It was striking the wide geographical 
spread of Plessey suppliers from Devon 
and the Isle of Wight in the south to the 
Midlands and Yorkshire, Lancashire 
and Northumberland in the north. 
Knock-on effects were traced as likely to 
affect second or even third-line sub- 
contractors. 

Smaller companies interviewed were 
dearly fearful of big company mergers. 


MR FRIDAY 






Fall steam ahead: The Royal Scotsman notching op profits 

The right track 
for nostalgia 



‘Damn! I fliinlt I would have won if only I 
hadn't forgotten to enter ft? 


By Derek Harris 

The British answer to the Orient Express 
is the Royal Scotsman which, 28 
pampered passengers at a lime, offers 
three and six-day rail trips around often 
little used Scottish tracks at a minimum 
of about £t .000 a head. It is a luxury ho- 
tel in eight vintage tail cars, one claimed 
to be the oldest dining railcar in the 
world. 

In its second year of operation it looks 
as if it will be profitable despite the threat 
of being caught in the mass boycott of 
Britain by American tourists. That is a 
big relief for those behind it, the London- 
based Leisure and Recreation Consul- 
tants, which now with 28 full-time staff — 
12 of them involved in the train 
operation — has built up in just over 1 5 
years a business with an annual turnover 
of £2.5 million a year. 

LRC not only offers a consultancy 
service in the tourism and leisure sector 
but also management of projects, its 
latest operational contract being for the 
Stoke-on-Trent garden festival. 

Fergus Hobbs, one of three main 
shareholders at LRC and of five senior 
partner consultants, said: “We tend to be 
doing things that are rather unusual 
which can be a bit ahead of their time. 
We were involved in the first hamburger 
restaurants outside London early in our 
history.” 

The train was not so much a 
development of the Orient Express 
concept of a nostalgia experience as a 
continuation of an earlier LRC project in 
which barges, fitted to luxury hotel 
standards, took tourists around the 
French canals. 

The Scottish train idea was developed 
during 1984, test marketed by using two 
vintage coaches. The first run of the 
Royal Scotsman, hauled by a steam train 
on part of its west coast route, was in 
May last year and in its first season was 
in profit. 

About 90 per cent of passengers are 
from overseas with Americans account- 
ing for just over half of them. The 
terrorism scare and widespread cancella- 


tions by American tourists inevitably 
raised a big question mark about this 
season's Scotsman bookings. But in the 
event there has been only 3 per cent of 
American cancellations, Mr Hobbs said. 

In the season to October luxury twin 
cabins and state rooms are almost fully 
booked. Rates for the ample state cabins, 
which like the luxury twins have private 
bathrooms, is £2,290 for a six-day tour. 
Three quarters of those booking take the 
six-day option. 

Mr Hobbs expects the train to carry 
almost its 1,400 passenger capacity for 


m 



No company can 
achieve its M potential 

when there's a cash 

flow problem. 

FoBow the example 
of the growing number 
of really soccesstt 
hnsmessnen and women 
convert y o ur invoices 
into cash with 
In t ern atio nal Factors. V. 

Instead of waiting /> 
three, four or more 
mfflghs, a3 approved *- 
invoices are paid in fii 
fay an agreed date - 
with an mmediate 80% cash advanced 

t , ±4 ! When we watch your 

mternatLOnai cashftnsdlthee&rt 


yon invest really pays off. 


Hr Intn inUml Factors Ldtaj. P.0, Bos 2S0, SomrignHnocv 
Mi Bml Ba^BW3WX.Wooe0273ZmL 
IwnttDeaatt.adiflovpnAlBBt-p>e2sea eod (l « a gi otyner 3e nka. 


>' * 

Y' 

I 


a 


j§ 



ffl 


NEW FULLY EQUIPPED OFFICE 

LONDON W- 1 . £20 PER WEEK 
ON LONG CONTRACT 

• 24 HOUR TELEPHONE ANSWERING 
SERVICE. 

• PRESTIGE MAILING ADDRESS 

• BOARD ROOM, LARGE CONFERENCE 
ROOM WITH VIDEO SCREENING, 
IN-HOUSE TRAVEL BUREAU. 

• FULL SECRETARIAL SERVICES, INCLUDING 
TELEX, FAX, WORD PROCESSING, 

photocopying, printing and 
translation service 

• HEALTH CLUB, JACUZZI AND SAUNA. 

• DIRECTORS BAR AND RESTAURANT 
(Open Day and Night). 


YVe are not jus*, a:-, acc omrruxia: 
vo U will be able to condor! \ol 
on the premises, in complete m 


01-582 3635 

CALL THE BUREAU DIRECTOR ON 01-589 1939 


SURVBLLANCE 
HONJTORtNQ 
and counter sMfcoa 
equi pme n t tar botit fteana- 



Good service: Fergus Hobbs of LRC 
with the train's chef 

this season, doubling turnover and 
profits compared with last year. It 
represents about £1 million in invest- 
ment, some of it raised from venture 
capital sources together with a small 
tourist board grant Work on the train 
cars included refurbishing, creating rela- 
tively spacious sleeping cabins and 
installing new electrics. 

Now LRC is considering launching a 
sister train, possible routes being in 
Wales, the Irish republic or a part of 
England like the south west The earliest 
launch year for that is 1988. 

What the train seems to prove is that 
exceptional service at a profit works 
commercially, says Mr Hobbs. He 
added: "Management is crucial in tour- 
ism” 


BUSINESS COMMITMENTS IN 
WEST GERMANY? 

In order to obtain the best n-adte. effeojvs co rar a nnfca Onn in 
the Goman binpmgr is Bwe nti e l 

We me ■ highlx gtnjuBiiilprofesHMia! oegansetion with offices 
m Germany ana the UK. ofeng a peri nfaed com m a nd t wang 
si thf QdnsB Imgoage §or boiQMfl piirpoifg. 

Other nrmi indnde t ra d it i on , aituimliug and i nUrn a - 
hoti a i represe n t at i on . 

Far farther deU3rd information please contact: 

Rita Hiller L ainuagi Service* 

PO Box 3107. 

D5901. Wflmsdaif 3, 

Weal Germany. 


MODERN - LONDON, E15. 

Warehouse (60,000 sq ft) - alarmed and secu- 
rity guarded. Complete break-bulk, 
consolidation, sorting and selection facilities. 
Computerized weekly stock and balance 
records supplied and maintained. Bonded facil- 
ities providing Duty and VAT free status until 
material dispatch. Full insurance cover, UK dis- 
tribution services with our own vehicles. 
Shipping and airfreight services Worldwide 
from our own offices. Contact Robin Howard 
(01) 986 9611 - telex 897841. 


TAKE OFF WITH 

ifia 

JUNE OFFERS 

V TANG 

Or F\CE ASSISTAXr 
- Daisy Pnr.to:. • 




091 2618861 (0) 
043460 4075 or 
043472 373 (H) 



cans) tithe East Hoang, tnw 
swpfcs snaarfxnvrg apaedy 
tor SooHtf-Oie-An fzuBlesi 


GR P; K wfar and otter 
mouldings. 

Desui. pate a art 
mownafcng aW*Y mihnim- 
ptata seamy prataffin 

SSnsr- 

Contact M-D* 
Teteplwwe 
0487 831477- 



Sate duo to retirement. 
Moctem fleet of over 50 
vehicles *vtth operator 
Boenoes. Extensive free- 
hold premises. Annual 
T/O me last 4 years In 
excess of £1 .000.000 per 
annum. Apply: 

KMgM, Frank & ftatey, 
20 Hanover Square, 
London W1H 0AH 
Phone 01-629 8171. 


SECURITY 

COMPANY 

South Wiest based alarm 
company. £25,000 pa 
from maintenance con- 
tracts. High Street 
premises. Vehicles, en- 
gineers etc. Good 
cornpany^image. 

Tab 0836 505805 


FOR SALE 

PUBLISHERS 

ProfltaHa N.W. based 

trade newspaper pubfish- 
era with expvting titles. 
£Km tfo. interested ? 


BOX AB9 


ME- 



COSTA 
DEL SOL 

Spanish country house, 
in 1 % acres, modernised 
and furnished. 20 min- 
utes from sea, ideal 
holiday letting, etc. 
£35.000 freehold. Tel: 
(0483) 505686 (241ns). 


OnH NATURAL. BOOYCAJK 
mmo or your own. cwnerten 
■Kr ran* 1 of natural Wl*w 
products aiaiuoip Hcitjurm. 
Cantrrtm. CT2 DPP 
E SUSSEX, a kxtfn canl coed 
Car minibus Nrf. Good con- 
tracts Pretty 1 7th r BAS wfth 
\araAt IMP 043S 8827B1 
OUUU MHE BAR (or tale 
Sunerb opportunity For owner 
manner 01-255 494} 

WX PMOTOORAPWC LABS, col- 
our a Blade A While (or rale 
Rcoty M BOX A9S- 


RUN YOUR OWN BUSINESS 


OUR Distributors earn on average £250- 
£350 p.w 

CAN you spare 2/3 days per week 
ARE you fit active & intelligent with a 
bright personality? 

WOULD you be capable of calling weekly 
on retail outlets to re-stock display 
stands? 

HAVE you got a reliable car, station 
wagon or small van? 

TOTAL Capital for stock & advertising to 
enable you to own and operate your own 
business as exclusive distributor in your 
area is £4850 

IF you can provide excellent references, 
this could be your opportunity to become 
self-employed 

AREAS ARE STILL AVAILABLE 
IN LONDON & THE SOUTH EAST 

Tel: Guy Stevens on> 

021 704 9083 



FOR EXPANSION 
AND 


iimiMia In.M 1 


Management 
marketing expertise 
and cash available 
for acquisition or 
investment in 
business with 
potential preferably 
with maritime 
overtones but others 
considered. 

Write Box Number 
J74, The Times, 

1 Virginia Street 
Wappmg El. 

Preferably 
enclosing balance 
sheets and profit & 
loss accounts for last 
3 yews. 


NYREE DAWN PORTER 
DERMOT PETER 
WALSH BYRNE 
IN 

FRANCIS DURBRIDGE'S 

DEADLY NIGHTCAP" 

WESTMINSTER THEATRE 
Opening June 19th 

Capita faction £40,000 
Unite of £1,000 available 
For i nf orm ati on: 

baa IK. 10/12 Ufc Su WQ 01-820 7373 



HIT HOLDINGS LIMITED IN 
RECEIVERSHIP 

HS-Te* Spechfist Otfxnss sn* Vdrides 
‘TROJAN" RdacafaUe Optntiig Theatres 

The Joint Receivers and Managers offer for sate 
the and business of the HT1 Group, lo- 
cated near South a mpton. 

Contact: 

P J R Snsfer «r P J Dfcfarea*. 
HOWARD TILLY * CO, 

fth Fleet, OwewwrifTt Howe, 

I Nw Orfari Street 

Lwka WOA IPF. 

Tel: IMB4 5541, Teles 21594 


SUBSTANTIAL FUNDS AVAILABLE 

for the acquisition of private comp ani e s . W3 con- 
sider joint ventures with estabuhed compa ni es 
currently under financed. Rffiirenient sales and man- 
agement buy-outs especially welcaned. Private 
share puchasera arranged. 

Telephone 01-935 5795 or 486 61391 


GARAGE/CAR SALES 

Business with superb 4 bedroom detached 
house plus stables and paddock, (deafly situ- 
ated 2 m9es West Yorkshire town and M62 in 
country position with panoramic views. On a 
main road. Present owner 14 years. For sale as 
a very profitable going concern £150,000 + 
SAV. Tel: 0422 201209/202654. 


WANTED 

New/seccmd hand 
Extrusion Press 

800/900 tons 
capacity. 

New drawing 
machine for 
aluminium tubes. 
Reply to 

Continental Metal 
Industries, E-27, 
Sector Vm, Noida, 
Dist. Ghaziabad 
(UP), India. 




TUT 


Business-minded woman with fcnited capital soffits 
mature, rasoineful partners), preferably South-West 
London based, who would wfficoma the opportunity to 
share ideas, experience and finance wtth a view to a 
Joint business venture. 

Brief details of background and/or expertise witii a. 
telephone number ttx BOX BOS so that meetings may 
be arranged. 



EXCELLENT 

West End 
rest/dub. High 
T/O. L/hokJ for 
sate. £275,000. 

Tel: 01-674 0564. 



ESTABLISHED 

COMPUTER 

COMPANY 

Marketing mffitkiser turn- 
key business systems, 
based on sophisticated 
4th generation software 
and the market leader 
mini computer system, 
wishes to expand existing 
sales space. As sociation 
is sought with a company 
or individual who provide 
marketing expert ise with 
some capital In v e st ment 
Reply to BOX A58. 


.’UTS : ANiJi'rU a’JSihsSi 
OPPORTUNITY 



MAKE 1986 


t j [\ r m i n 


YOU! 

Do yon bn* tine rayariiy (o 
rare CS0.000 jul? IT n, 
tiaiMori Fabric Care Core- 
prey require • OMinid 
MUtLiuf. partner. Mint be ra- 
pdJc^nretre urinln Earn 
and aAtunittwing s Kara of 
■abk operator*, covering 
tfac Toiloiriag arcaR V« 
Ceontry. Soatbere comae*. 
Ok VGA Ufa. Valca * >dl 
Nonbern arras. Td Mr 
Kins Bristol (0272) 
291998 


FRENCH 

BARGE 

CaovBtted to fidb 
equipped rBB t uurm it 
father uses pasdbie) 
128 ttx 16 ft, 120 HP 
Baudot rin engine. 
Wefl mamtafoad. 
Suit rherbank or marina. 
Offere rented 

Td (0590) 73883 



APRICOT XI 
10 Mb 

Hard Disc. 512K RAM and 
720K disc drira incJoding 
monitor & maraiab. EU2A9 + 
VAT. TANDON XT 10 Mb 
Hard Disc 256K RAM m- 
cfadra high res monitor A 20 
anil. £1,585 


DISTRIBUTORS AND 
AGENTS 

required in London and the Nome Counties to saB in 
innovative and unique materials handing product to the 
ranutacturing. cfctribution and retad industries. Excaient 
margins. UffiMted potential for sates profo sai o na is. 

Telephone POwer-Tech (UK) United on 
0243 786929 





WAREHOUSE/ 
FACTORY UNITS 1 
TO LET 

5^400 sq ft wtffi yard 
9,500 sq ft with mffin road 
frontage 

Rant Giants AvafaWs 
MTHODUCfllG AGSCIS 
FULLY RETAWHJ 


UN LX GROUP 


HHmnsenDSC SW3. Hrann & 
Brauty Studios- Lew for SM. 
4XOO ran. £l&000 ncr mum 
oclusns Offm Inritti SOLE 

AGENTS AMI inw * 
Burn 23 24 Marram StrraL 
London WIN 8U 



calbuw iBcnmc mux 

nms BrpceiQy raouirsd in an 
mao oy the UKs tarerat iade- 
pendnU MOMrela «Wf AO 
nuLet t modets woBded U ttan 
prtrrv Crilnel 4 Vodator* 
Esm 80 °. comma a so on OP 
Phone Mr Hardy Ol-OZf 4844 


TELEX & FACSIMILE 

In today's modern age of ad v anced communica- 
tions can your c o mpany afford to lose business by 
not having racsfmOe and telex? sshoueae industries 
supply. Install, service and train opera to rs in Max A fac- 
simile machines, on outright purchase, lease, or 
rental nationwide. 


01-882 4tSS 


INST ART LUXURY SERVICED OFFICES 

from as Rile as £70 per week. 

Includes: Itetre/Becvkity/Ctearing/Security/Mri Gym. 
Also o v o fl a bte : Itecaption/Tetex/Secrewial/PtxwxMpylng/ 
Phones /Fax etc. No-nonsense licences. New offices m 
Victoria opening bte September. 

NO LONG TERM COMMITfrliENT. 

CaN: Jane Wellcome 

01-439 1188 


COMPANY 

PROBLEMS 

Are «mdiioc» touting you? 
Am svppflare i nals ti ng an 
pr of or ma or CWO? 

Are befSHs About to levy the 
stock? 

Are aw banks batetlng you 
sign more personal 
guarentaes?- 

K fie answer to yes to any of 
these questions you need 
or help. If w cannot help 
you save your company we 
on advise you on IquBa- 
tien. Contact as today.- 
floss Wfficer 4 Aflsoetotss, 
Frewnst Loxtey, Warwick, 
CV35.90R. 

(0789) 8*1282 
or (0806) 77GS1? 


VfORLDWOE INCORPORATIONS 

Mstong-Tatoptons-Tetox. FOB secretarial services. We of Man. 
Chareti (stands. Otixaltar. Panama, tfaaria, Uosmtoutg. An- 
tflfas, UK. Ready made or apeetoL Aw explanatory booklet 

ASTON COMPANY FORMATIONS 

. . Dtpt Tl. S Vfcwria St 
Draatac. Us er Itore 
Tri: /M24J MflM 

Tctoc m&i SPIV* G 



PROMOTION, 
PUBLICITY A 


DISCREET 


mmm 


Also fuH range of 
professional cotxn® - 

stirveHlance 
equipment M.T. . 
Limttea, PO Box 133, 
St Peter Port, 


CAR PARKING 


Permanent imdergmund nr 
parldng spaces available. 24 
how access tqgetbar -witb 
car wMttng fecSties and full 
time car park atendant For 
tuU paticuias phone: - 
01-831 7551. 


Tet 0481-53316 
UK agent 

David Chamberlain 
061-8619616 


BRITISH 

QUALIFIED 

. accountant 
resident Spain 
seeks work. Teh 
ftI-488 2637 


MAKE 
FRIENDS M . 

end influence people. 
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lUtJT>cfTfM T 


PUBLIC NOTICES 


STORAGE* 

warehouse 



CH ANCE 
OF A LIFETIME. 

Ex mall cnlcr stocks of 
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toys etc. Offend at huge 
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t'4- 1 i:t 


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CHARTTY COMMISSION 
The Natlorui Anaaini for 
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35 





kMSSE. 


ANNOUNCEMENTS 


'TPP* - a W'* R'B B 
KS? m «£2S •sS’mw. 91 
l ~ WI - 


I r 1 

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RENTALS 

APPEAR 

ON 

PAGE 33 


ORXK HAAHD OF KASPAHOA. 

We still have aval lability 
throughout summer season to 
How Atlantia, a friendly family 
8 B hotel on the edge of 
haruwws Town. I0923i 
77 1 2£6>2dhrsi Timeway Holi- 
days. ABTA.’ATOL 1107. 


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BCK1A/CAFRLAU mdr» of ho- 
le** & maraner pensions. 
Holiday Blands 01-8364383 


SELF-CATERING 

BALEARICS 



SUMMER BARCAMS. Flights; all 
European oesUnattons. mdu- 
she honnays: sanTarlnl - 
Corfu. SunlMhi Holidays. Ol 
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LOW COST FLIGHTS. Moot Euro- 
pean dMtttialions. Vatexander 
Ol 402 4262.0062 ABTA 
61004 ATOL I960 
LOWEST AIRFARES Flonaa. 
Jamaica N. York. Toronio. 
Africa. India. Far East 01-757 
3162 0669 ABTA. 

■■AMI. JAMAICA. M.YWK, 
Worldwide cheapen lares 
RmnuMM Travel, l Duke Si 
Richmond ABTA 01 -940 4073. 
T1MUIA For lhai perfect holiday 
wtut sonny days A carefree ml 
■ deal Spring -Summer. Tunisian 
Travel 01 373 4411. 


SELF-CATERING 

FRANCE 


Nr MOOTECARLO Hobday apl to 
let. steeps 8. 28ui June to 
12th July. C400 pw ono. 
Tel^l 435 1806 


EMk Indulge yoursetl... you 
deserve II. A weekend in Ven- 
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drink well, shoo wen and forge! 
about England's depressing 
weather Or combine a Chy 
Weekend wim a we* by me 
sea- Free brochure from Magic 
ol uaiy Dew TT. «7 Shepherds 
Bush Green. W12 BPS Tel: Ol 
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SELF-CATERING 

PORTUGAL 


ALGARVE 4X00 reductions ■ 3rd 
July. 2wks. Lovely beach oou 
on Pertly sandy bay. pool . len 
nb. SIPS 2 4 reduced by £!0O 
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ALGARVE ALTERNATIVE. Vdla 
Holidays of wsUKUon lor the 
scry lew Trt:01-491 0802 73 
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ALGARVE. viUalara deluxe villas 
ft nob. All amenities me resL 2 
pools, wli. beach. Avail June 
Oct 01 409 2838. VUlaWorld 
ALGARVE. Lux villas with pools 
Avail Aug. Od. Ol 40g 2838. 
VUlaWorld. 




Italy. Greece. Port, canaries. 
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ALICANTE, Faro. Malaga etc. 
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DISCOUNT* 1st /Economy Uck- 
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BOOKERS 01-387 9100. 

ECUADOR TRAVEL sped Bibb In 
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SYD/MEL £618 Perth £546 AH 
major earners to AUS/NZ. Ol- 
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SOUTH AFRICA Jorburg Irani 
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CRUISE <& SAIL ABROAD 


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motor yacht 2 wks tr £466 cm 
Inc fits. Whole bow available 
other weeks from £1000. Free 
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ISLANDS W THE SUN 
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Showmeyou 

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• . says Harry Secombe 

'As one of fie I.OOO^XX) 

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GENERAL 


CHEAP FARES 
WORLDWIDE 

SpecielBe m 1st Business A 
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LUXURY VILLAS wim Doob and 
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large tecaoUHL baBaxw. patio, 
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Tal 01 452 5218 
(after 6-00 pm). 


CAIICL unspeIR uunb. cheap 
Ih0hl*.\mi rwnlabelc. Zms Hal 
Id ay* 01434 1647 AM Auo 
RHODES 28 6 4 75 July Itn. apt . 
Mb. Horn £129. Sirarna 0705 
862014 


SELF-CATERING SPAIN 


HARBELLA - Vina lor 8 wllii 
own pool ana tennis court, 
aval tMe AugusL Palmer ft 
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HARBELLA. Lux vlllos with 
poob. Avail June to OCL Ol 409 
2838 VUlaWorld. 


SELF-CATERING 

TURKEY 


TURKEY. Late availability 1.8 
Juty I wit lr£189. Turban De^ 
bgnt Holiday*. Ol 891 6469. 
ATOL 2047. 


U.K. HOLIDAYS 


S DEVON. Sea. Spacious family 
naliobcpl lor 2. 6 £84 £154 
pwCII -794 0257 .. 01 *74 6660 


CORNWALL & DEVON 


FERRY COTTAGE. River Tamar 
waterside. Plymouth 4 miles, 
sped views, sip* 5 6. OH. TV. 
all mod rons Easy tans: mo- 
torway. Dartmoor, beaches. 
Theatre Dmohy LtclUUes. First 
atherl. Phone: 0752 227898 
CANCELLATION. North Oomtsll 
Coast. 4 bed house. T m bearh. 
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pu Ol 748 7537. 

BRDUMM HARBOUR limnac col 
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HOLIDAYS AFLOAT 


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Law Report June 27 1 986 


Community loss 
is factor in 
deportation appeal 


Regina r Immigration 
Appeal Tribunal, Ex parte 
Bakhta or Singh 

Before Lord Bridge of Harwich. 
Lord Brandon of Oakbrook, 
Lord Brightman, Lord Mackay 


which the adjudicator's argu- 
ment sought to attribute to it. 

Moreover, then? were for- 
midable difiTculues in imposing 
any limitation on the natural 
meaning of the phrases “every 
relevant factor*' and “all the 


of Clashfem and Lord Goff of relevant circumstances” m para- 


Chieveley 

[Speeches sold June 261 

When considering an appeal 
against a deportation order 
made under section 3(5)(a) of 
the Immigration Act 1971, an 
adjudicator was wrong to dis- 
regard the loss to the Sikh 
community of the services of a 
priest and musician with a rare 
talent which would result from 
the deportation. 

The House of Lords so held in 
allowing an appeal by the appel- 
lant priest, Bakhta ur Singh. The 
appellant had appealed to the 
adjudicator against a deporta- 
tion order made by the Secretary 
of State for the Home Depart- 
ment on February I. 1983. The 
adjudicator dismissed that ap- 
peal on May 3. 1983, and the 
Immigration Appeal Tribunal 
refused the appellant leave to 
appeal. On March 2, 1984 Mr 
Justice Hodgson, on the 
appellant's application for ju- 
dicial review, granted an order 
quashing the tribunal's decision 
and remitting the matter for 
reconsideration. The Court of 
Appeal (Lord Justice Stephen- 
son. Lord Justice Fox and Lord 
Justice Pure has) allowed an 
appeal from that order on 
December II, 1984, and the 
appellant appealed to the House 
of Lords. 

Mr (an Macdonald and Miss 
Frances Webber for the appel- 
lant; Mr John Laws for the 
adjudicator. 

LORD BRIDGE said that the 
appellant's attack on the 
adjudicator's decision was di- 
rected at certain paragraphs in 
which, inter alia, he directed 
himself that he must disregard 
the loss to the Sikh community 
of the services of a priest and 
musician with a rare talent, 
which would result from the 
appellant's deportation. 

The adjudicator thought him- 
self bound by R v Immigration 
Appeal Tribunal. Ex parte 
Darshan Singh Sohal ([1981] 
Imm AR 20) to hold that that 
was a matter relevant for 
consideration only by the Sec- 
retary of State, not by the 
appellate authorities. Mr Laws 
sought to uphold that as a 
correct direction in law. 

The real question was 
whether the first sentence of 
paragraph 154 of the Statement 
of Changes in Immigration 
Rules 1982 (HC 66) ^ “In 
considering whether deporta- 
tion is the right course on the 
merits, the public interest will be 
balanced against any com- 
passionate circumstances of the 
case” - correctly construed as 
having the limited meaning that 
the only circumstances contem- 
plated as being capable of being 
against deportation were com- 
passionate circumstances of a 
personal nature, had the effect 
of restricting the ambit of what 
were “relevant factors” and 
“relevant circumstances” in 
paragraphs 1 56 and 158. 

Immigration rules made un- 
der section 3(2) of the Act were 
quite unlike onlinary delegated 
legislation. The rules did not 
purpon to enact a precise code 
having statutory force. If one 
concentrated on paragraphs 1 54 
and 155 under the heading 
“Consideration of the merits” it 
was at once apparent that 
everything following the first 
sentence had the character of 
expressing broad generalities. In 
such a context the first sentence 
of paragraph 154 could not be 
given the overriding effect 1 


graphs 156 and 158. 

The first was that paragraph 
I 156 was concerned with the 
• deportation of con vicied offend- 
f era who had no farther right of 
i appeal under the Act- It was 
. difficult to understand, in that 
situation, why the secretary of 
state, in a paragraph describing 
- the practice he would follow 
when making a final decision in 
exercise of bis discretion 
whether or not to implement a 
court's recommendation for 
deportation, should do so less 
than fully. 

The second difficulty was 
that, although there was the 
theoretical possibility of a 
distinction between what might 
be considered as relevant by the 
appellate authorities under 
paragraph 158 and other rele- 
vant circumstances available for 
consideration by the secretary of 
siate outside the ambit of that 
paragraph, it was difficult to 
suppose that the unappealable 
discretion of the secretary of 
state to depart from the rules, 
which was implicit in section 
19(2). had been conferred in 
contemplation of such a subtle 
distinction. 

The adjudicator’s argument 
encountered its final and in- 
surmountable hurdle in a 
consideration derived from the 
general law. On classic 
Wft/nw/u/ri'principles^WS] 1 
KB 223), in exercising his 
discretion whether to decide to 
make a deportation order 
against an overstayer, the sec- 
retary of state was bound to take 
account of all relevant consid- 
erations. 

It followed that to construe 
the rules in the sense contended 
for by the adjudicator would not 
only conflict with the general 
law but would also be ineffective 
to restrict the relevant matters 
which the appellate authorities 
might, and indeed must, take 
into consideration. 

Accordingly, the adjudicator 
misdirected himself in law. 
Having expressed that conclu- 
sion. it was appropriate to sound 
a note of caution. The only 
matters which the law required, 
or indeed permitted, to be taken 
into consideration either by the 
Secretary of State or the appel- 
late authorities in deciding 
whether to make a deportation 
order were matters relevant to 
the proper exercise of the statu- 
tory discretion. 

But to attempt to draw in the 
abstract precise boundary lines 
which separated the relevant 
from the irrelevant would be an 
unprofitable and dangerous ex- 
ercise. 

It was unnecessary to exam- 
ine the judgment in Darshan 
Singh SohaT. It mattered not 
whether it was right or wrong on 
its own facts. 

In the present case there was 
nothing “political”, in a sense 
which would take them outside 
the ambit of relevance to the 
proper exercise of the 
adjudicator's discretion, in the 
factors which he held himself 
bound to disregard. On the 
adjudicator's findings, the 
present was a simple case of a 
man of outstanding talent and 
dedication rendering services of 
outstanding value to a particular 
section of the community of 
which they would be deprived if 
he were deported. 

Lord Brandon. Lord 
Brightman, Lord Mackay and 
Lord Goff agreed. 

Solicitors: Karim Lax man: 
Treasury Solicitor. 


No protection for 
wild animals when 
not in captivity 


LONDON 


unmnaimcc aiiractnr in 
now S OMr bed flat Close 
Horrod*- Murom, room. j*U 
entrance £350 pw T« 01-947 
4648 <UV ole* 


SCOTLAND 


BRITISH OPEN 
ACCOMODATION 

fJSE£ , S222 rt LP “"J*® £“«ngijawn m «* 0 * Avralm's mat 
gggyac n omes. 20 ramtes troro Tumoeny. ouenookng me hub o* 
«)«■ ine property mar be mumd as a tMoie or m separate 
apartments. 

fipartomt 1 • steeps B - UJ 

jp>itaN2 - Sr 

M wHh sepnte temp), rtkwig. Uscten ft psbroom faoMas. . 

0292 45468 


Hndnoft v Campbell other ani 

Before Lord Justice Watkins fhc defen 
and Mr Justice Onon 

[Judgment given June 24J the police 

The cruel maiming of a Mr Cri 
hedgehog by repeated beating the hedge 
with a stick did not render it a captive a 
“captive animal” within the 15(c) and 
meaning of section 15(c) of the tion of se 
Protection of Animals Act 1911, that the ai 
nor did the beating of the animal maimed s 
amount to an act of dominion the word 
over it and so afford it the defendant 
protection of that Acl it to sue) 

The Queen's Bench Di- dominion 
visional Court so held when it He coni 
dismissed the appeal of the word “ma 
prosecutor, Michael Richard should be 
Hudnott. an official of the and not in 
RSPCA, from the decision of words “f 
Canterbury Justices on Decern- hindering 
ber 18. 1985. when they dis- cape fr« 
missed informations laid confineme 
against the defendant. Ian cisionofil 
Charles Campbell, alleging that Rowley v . 
he had cruelly beaten and 43) was wi 
caused unnecessary cruelty to Mr Aik 
the hedgehog, contrary to sec- 1911 Act 
tion 1(1 1(a) of the 1911 Acl only to < 
Section IS of the 1911 Act animals: l 
provides: . . (a) the ex- present ca 

pression "animal' means any animal wii 
domestic or captive animal . . . section 1. 
(c) the expression ‘captive “maimed” 
animal' means any animal (not isolation, 
being a domestic animal) of His Lon 
whatsoever kind or species . . . was nogroi 
which is in captivity, or confine- than that ^ 
mem, or which is maimed, decided, ar 
pinioned, or subjected to any be constru 
appliance or contrivance for the court in th 
purpose of hindering or prevent- Parker. Lc 
ing its escape from captivity or pp 50-31, a 

confinement.” pp 51-52. 

Mr Christopher Critcfilow for ® ^ 

the prosecutor Mr Hugh J* 1 * .F on! 
Allardycc for the defendant. Cmchlow; 

MR JUSTICE OTTON said reading i 
that ihe defendant was seen by a 
witness repeatedly beating the M * im ™ 

hedgehog in a road with a stick. as J^? r 'VI® 1 
The witness found the hedge- The 
hog the following morning »n the maimi 
the road still alive and she look J*' h,,c ,he y 1 
it to a veterinary surgeon. He bul °p>y ’ 
found that the animal was in a '?’ eTC _i? * 
stale of shock and collapse, was According!’ 
very sick and unable lo move, n B“ l to disi 
and it soon died despite neceiv- .^te ; 
ing treatment. dismissed. 

The justices found that the Lord Jusi 
response of a hedgehog to Solicitors 
danger or to a beating would be Harvie. . H 
lo roll up to a ball whereas most. Heme Bay. 


other animals would run away, 
and there was no dispute that 
the defendant admitted beating 
the animal when interviewed by 
the police. 

Mr Critchlow submitted that 
the hedgehog was at ail times a 
captive animal within section 
15(c) and so within the protec- 
tion of section 1. that the fact 
that the animal was reduced to a 
maimed state brought it within 
the word “captive” and the 
defendant's beating ofit reduced 
it to such a state and he had 
dominion over it. 

He contended further that the 
word “maimed" in section 15(c) 
should be construed on its own 
and not in conjunction with the 
words “for the purpose of 
hindering or preventing its es- 
cape from captivity or 
confinement”, and that the de- 
cision of the Divisional Court in 
Rowley v Murphy ([1964} 2 QB 
43) was wrong. 

Mr Allardvce said that the 
19U Act afforded protection 
only to domestic or captive 
animals: the hedgehog in the 
present case was not a captive 
animal within the definition in 
section 15(c) and the word 
“maimed" could not be read in 
isolation. 

His Lordship said that there 
was no ground to hold otherwise 
than that Rowley was correctly 
decided, and the 1 9 1 1 Act was to 
be construed as it was by the 
court in that case: see per ‘Lord 
Parker. Lord Chief Justice, at 
pp 50-5 1, and Mr Justice Winn, 
pp 51-52. 

The 1911 Act did not admit to 
the construction of Mr 
Critchlow; that required the 
reading of “or” between 
“maimed" and “pinioned". 
“Maimed” was to be construed 
as Mr Allardycc contended. 

The 191 1 Act did not cover 
the maiming of wild animals 
while they were still in that stale, 
but only when such animals 
were in a state of captivity. 
Accordingly, the justices were 
nghi to dismiss the summonses 
and the appeal had to be 
dismissed. 

Lord Justice Watkins agreed. 
Solicitors: Girling Wilson & 
Harvie. . Herne Bay; Pany's, 




















































SPORT 


THE TIMES FRIDAY JUNE 27 1986 


RACING: WEST ILSLEY COLT MISSES TOMORROW’S CLASSIC AT THE CURRAGH 


Lochtillum to 
give encore 
in Newcastle 
highlight 

By Mandarin (Michael Phillips) 


When the Chilton trainer 
Jamie Douglas-Home, son of 
the playwright William and 
nephew of Lord Home, our 
former Prime Minister, comes 
to reflect upon his career on 
the turf he will always have a 
soft spot for LirtiHin, the 
sprinter that he owns and 
trains. 

With eight victories to his 
credit during the past five 
seasons, he is what the hard- 
ened professional refers to as a 
grand old servant. 

Last year, atthe age of six, 
Loctfllum did Douglas-Home 
a particularly good turn by 
winning the Portland Handi- 
cap at Doncaster, in addition 
to the Gosforth Park Cup, 
which is again the feature race 
on tonight's programme at 
Newcastle. Locbllum has 
travelled north again today, 
from his stable near Didcot, in 
an attempt to retain the 
trophy. 

By winning at Bath 25 days 
ago he proved that another 
year has not blunted his speed. 
I believe that be has a good 
chance of repeating that vic- 
tory of a year ago on a course 
where he has won three times 
inalL 

LoctiUum is a horse who 
takes a bit of knowing. That 
perhaps explains why Willie 
Ryan, who had never ridden 
him before, found life a bit 
difficult at Sand own last time 
out when they finished only 
Uih behind Axe Valley. But 
he was not beaten all that far. 

This time the more experi- 
enced Ray Cochrane, who 
knows him so well having won 
the Portland on him, will be 
back in the saddle and they 
should take some stopping at 
the end of what is bound to be 
a very fast-run sprint with 


Dublin Lad, Clantime and 
Music Machine in the field. 

interestingly, LoctiUum has 
precisely the same weight that 
he carried to victory a year 
ago, but a vastly different 
draw. On that occasion he was 
drawn 17 next to the stands 
rails. This time he has been 
drawn lowest of alL 
Nevertheless, Cochrane 
should still be able to switch 
him off, drop him in behind 
early on, and from there keep 
him covered up until the last 

New Trojan out 

Dick Hern’s New Trajan has 
been withdrawn from 
tomorrow's Irish Sweeps Derby 
at The CuiTagh, aims with 
Bushido, Fioraranti, Simplon 
and Vienna Prince. The 11 
acceptors are: Bakbaroff, Bon- 
homie, Fighting Hard, Flash Of 
Sled, King Retain. Mashlumr, 
Mr John, Ostensible, Pacific 
Drift, Shahrastud and World 
Chart. 

possible moment, the way he 
did at Doncaster last Septem- 
ber and more recently at Bath. 

Simla Ridge; carrying only 
7st I lib, will be hard to beat a 
he runs as well as he did in the 
COrk and Orrery Stakes at 
Royal Ascot eight days ago. 
But in this instance the old 
advice to never trust the form 
of a conditions race when 
assessing a handicap could be 
well worth bearing in mind, 
just as it was before Hadeer 
contested the Royal Hunt 
Cup. 

Steve Cauthen, who was on 
LoctiUum this day 12 months 
ago will now be at Newcastle 
tonight to ride Star Cutter 
(8.15) and Undershaft (8.45) 
for Henry Cecil. Both should 
oblige, but at cramped odds. 

At Lingfield, Pat Eddery's 


LINGFIELD PARK 



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RAN: 5-2 lav 
ip Mumtaz 





Flatterer to upset 
gallant Dawn Run 

From Onr French Correspondent, PBris 


Flatterer, who has been cham- 
pion jumper in the United 
Slates for the past three years, 
can beat a strong field in the 
£45,998 Grande Course de 
Haies cTAuteuil (3m 1 l/2f 
hunfle), at Auteuil today. The 
race is due off at 330 British 
time. 

The American seven-year-old 
has only six opponents but they 
include the last three winners of 
thisrace, Melinoir(l983), Dawn 
Run and Le Rheusois, plus 
Gaye Brief, who established 
himself as the best longdistance 
hurdler in Britain, with a six 
length success over Crimson 
Embers, at Ascot on April 9. 

Dawn Run contested the Prix 
la Barka here, on June 2,a 2tn 4 
l/2f hurdle, which she had won 
prior to her 1984 triumph in the 
Grande Course.This tune she 
made numerous small errors 


and had to settle for second, 
three lengths behind the font 
running . Le Rheusois, who 
meets her on 71b better terms 
today. 

The veteran Point Vernal 
finished ten lengths back in 
third, followed at three lengths, 
by Gacko, who now meets 
Dawn Run on 221b better terms 
for 13 lengths. 

The -five-year-old Gadco, who 
is sure to take a- much more 
active part in the race this time, 
may prove the best of the 
French runners. But Flatterer 
bas a tremendous record of 14 
wins from IS races overjumps. 
Both the obstacles and the pace 
in America compare closely 
with what be will meet 
today and be can give Richard 
Dun woody bis first success over 

the course. 


Rouse compensated 
by Alqirm’s record 


Brian Rouse, disappointed 
that his intended Irish Derby 
ride. New Trojan, is now a non- 
runner in tomorrow's Curragb 
classic, started off with a winner 
at Salisbury yesterday on the 
record breaking Alqinn. The 1 1- 
4 favourite led inside the final 
furlong and soon had the race at 
his mercy, coming home two 
lengths clear of Talk of Glory. 

Three new track records were 
established at Salisbury on 
Wednesday, and it came- as no 
surprise that another tumbled 
here on the lightning fast 
ground. Akjinn’s time of 1 min 
39.35'sec was just over a second 
faster than the previous best 


FiIIq™ 



Easy Epsom winner Cbmtime contests tonight's Gosforth Park Cop at Newcastle 


spirited attempt to become 
champion jockey after a nine- 
year gap looks like being 
consolidated noth winning 
rides on Dream Launch (3.0) 
and Ebolito (5.0). 

Dream Launch, my selec- 
tion for the Heineken Refresh- 
ment Stakes, strolled in by six 
lengths from The Dominican 
over today's course and dis- 


tance last Saturday. Just on 
that performance he should 
prove too quick for AlkadL 
For earlier in the season there 
was little between Alkadi and 
The Dominican at Bath. 

Ebolito's fourth behind On 
Tenterhooks at Goodwood 
ought to be good enough to 
land the Flowers Best Bitter 
Handicap Stakes 


With six victories on the 
Surrey trade to his credit 
already, A1 Amead will com- 
mand a big following in the 
Fremlins Bitter Elephant Tro- 
phy in spite of the feet that his 
form this season has been 
unimpressive. But I still prefer 
Depnty Head, who came good 
with a vengeance at Bath last 
time out 


Alqinn was the first winner 
for Raymond Miguel, former 
chairman of the Bells Scotch 
Whisky Company. He lives in 
Scotland, but was advised by the 
colt's trainer John Benstead to 
come racing as his colt had a 
good chance of victory. 

Royal jockey Willie Carson, 
who starts a seven-day riding 
ban today, signed off with a 
winner when Who Knows made 


i Knows made 


virtually all and just held off the 
determined challenge of Dailey 
Knight in the Veuve Clicquot 
Champagne Stakes. 

The runner-up, who started 7- 
4 joint favourite with the win- 
ner, may have been unlucky. 
Dariey knight broke out of the 


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Cumbrian 

Dancer 

instep 

Cumbrian Dancer established 
a new six furlongs course record 
at Newcastle yesterday with a 
game threequaners of a lengths 
victory from Softly Spoken in 
the Wall send Handicap Stakes. 
The three-year-old. who had 
previously run on only soft 
ground, was well handled by 
Mark Birch, who swept through 
to lead at halfway. 

His trainer. Peter Easterby, 
who is enjoying a fine season so 
far with 21 winners, said “I 
worked Cumbrian Dancer over 
four furlongs on the gallops this 
morn ing and he wem really well. 
He will now probably run at 
Carlisle next week". Cumbrian 
Dancer's time of l min 1 134 sec 
beat Comobeau's i960 record 
by 0.26s. 

Knocksharry, who refused to 
enter the stalls at Wolver- 
hampton recently, had no such 
problems yesterday and battled 
On courageously to land the 
Stagshaw Selling Stakes by a 
neck from die 7-4 favourite 
Nation's Song. 

The 9-1 winner, well ridden 
by the 71b daimer Peter HU1, led 
two furlongs out and can . on 
bravely under pressure inside 
the final furlong. The filly was 
home bred by her owner Phil 
White and will re-appear in a 
similar race at Doncaster later 
this week. 




6-4 Msnzan Loss. 7-2S6fXten On Sam. 5-1 Ril Of Pride. 6- 
1 Beta Santo. 6-1 Locate, M-l others 




stalls before the start and trav- 
elled all the way up the course 
before being reunited with his 
jockey, Brent Thomson. 

Who Knows is trained by 
Dick Hern, who was winning 
this prize for the fifth time since 
1970. His previous winners 
were the legendary Brigadier 
Gerard, Fefoski, Hever and 
Solaboy. 

Little went right for Ian 
Balding at Salisbury on 
Wedbesday with several fancied 
runners setting beaten, but the 
Royal trainer was on the mark 
yesterday when bis newcomer 
Morewoods came with a storm- 
ing late challenge to lead dose 
home and beat 11-10 favourite 
Sanlella Boy by a length. 

Bought for SI 00,000 . 
Morewoods is the first juvenile 
colt to win for Balding this 
season, although the stable's 
two-year-old fillies have been in 
grand form. Morewoods was 
uneasy in the betting market, 
drifting from 4-1 to 7-1, but the 
style of his victory soggiest there 
is further scope for 
improvement. 

Blinkered first time 

IEWCASaE:7A5 StonaydBle. 

DONCASTER: 3.45 Jaiyan. 4.15 Mattond 
Tate. 

LfNGFKELQ: ZD Aatahafak. Queen's 
VWIA30 Euctaris. 


America’s Cup 
Diary 


sponsor 
to create 


Peter Lsler. winner of the 
recent Lyuringeon Cup match ; 
race championship, I”* walked 
out on the Courageous Syn- 
dicate, disenchanted withUon- - 
aid Greene, the chaiiaia n , 
whose prime concern now up- - 
pears to be to recover his 
570,000 entry deposit for the. 
America's Cap and win a prm? - 
leged position in the spectator ; 
fleet. 

lsler's place behind the wheel 
has bees taken over try Dave 
Viator who helped Greene pur- 
chase Courageous from Ted 

Tamer in 1981. 

• Though registered as Crn- . 
sader II, Britain's latest 
America's Cap contender de- 
signed by David HoOom slid" 
into the water last week without 
a name on her side. 

Graham Walker4he syn*-. 1 
dicate bead, who is in Fremantle 
this week to see how bis near 
boat performs against the earlier , 
Ian Hewlett design assures me - 
that this omissioa was not the'' 
result of any last minnte rusk 1 
Instead, be is hopeful that the . 
blank space will attract farther 
sponsorship and is waiting for ; 
the copywriters, lawyers and- 
commercial backer to agree a. ■ 
name or phrase. . 


Opposition 
is airborne 

Britain's 1987 America? 
Cup challenge took to the high- 
seas yesterday while the oppo- 
sition took to the air. The 
Royal Thames Yacht Qub' 
raced their two boats. Crusad- 
er I and the radically designed ' 
Crusader II, against each other ■ 
for the first lime in the heavy 
seas and 20 knot winds of the • 
Indian Ocean course. 

But members of the Austra- 
lian syndicate, which is led by' 
Alan Bond, the Penh million- 
aire, who will be defending the ' 
trophy in January, were not- 
far away. They were seen near' 
die British base and took to a 
helicopter in a bid to get a ' 
better view of Crusader II. 


• Hie Challenge Groups- 
were crying foal this week' 
when it was anderstood that 
the Royal Perth Yacht Club 
has put back the date that 
Australian syndicates can sub- 
stitute a challenging boat in 
the defence trials. 

Overseas challengers must 
Dominate their choke after the 
first Round Robin series of 
races in October. The defend-- 
ing groups can now substitute- 
their boats as late as Decem- 
ber when it will be dear which 
challengers appear to offer the - 
greatest threat .* 

*‘Tbey' , re moving the 
goalposts," David Evans, from 
the British challenge, said this 
week. The two-month delay 
gives the Aussies the opportu- 
nity to copy any breakthrough; 
ideas and means we most now^ ; 
keep details of David . 
Hollom's radical design firmly.. 
trader wraps." 

Tom Ehman, director of thfC , 
New York YachtClnb's Aniet-, . 
ka II challenge was less.*-, 
concerned about the change o«„ - 
dates. “All 12 metres have to.-, 
be boOt before September I so. I 
the two-month delay will make. , 
no difference there. What doea> 
concern me is bow the Aastra> _ 
lians piaa to differentiate b& * 
tween modification ami a new.; 
yacht Changes to the bow or , 
stern of a boat between series 
are quite acceptable bet we do , 
not want to see tbe Australians^ . 
cutting everything away be-^ j 
neath the sheer line and* , * 
welding on a new trail. I think, • 
it would be fairest to draw the-., 
line at the point where a new.,. 
Lloyd's certificate is?; 
repaired." 

• Jnst how difficult it is ty'. 
keep design details secret was " 
shown up this week in New-,, 
port. Rhode Island, where two. t 
rival 12 metres have been built- 1 
at Bob Director's yard almost^-' 
i within earshot of . Tom*. 
Etunan's America IL 
Bar talk centres on the 
benefits to be gained from the 
small rudder fitted dose to the 
bow on Gary Mull's radical „ 
second design for the West* * 
Coast Golden Gate Challenge. 

This is the boat that had to- 
and | be cut in half three weeks ag o 
tad to have an eight-inch . fillet 
added amidsliip and theories 
about tbe rodder's ability to ' 
improve list upwind and 
sharpen manoeuvring will be .' 
proved or disproved during the' 
coming weeks when the Toni' 
Blackaller-sldppered 12-me- 
tre begins trials against Mull's , 
earlier USA design which was. " 
also subject to much 
welding. 

The second new boat tq- 
come off the stocks at 
Director's yard this weekend : 
is Dennis Conner's fourth 12-' 
metre. Measuring 64ft 3in - -. 
overall, the new design 
shorter than earlier boats and". 
represents the end result of • 
$4® worth of intense research 1 
and development according to 
co-designer Dave Pedrick. ' 

• The Canadian Secret: 

Cove Yacht Club completed - 


IMLf »». Ii'' 




week to decide which 12 metre 
to send to Perth. By all 

accotmts, h proved a onesided ' 

affair with True North offer- * 
tag Uttle resistance against .’ 
Bruce Kirby's revamped Cana-,: 

da n design which got the nod ’ 

from all selectors. 

Barry Pickthall ■ 

























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THE TIMES FRIDAY JUNE 27 1986 

. — ^ CUP: THOROUGHBR EDS have been left behind in what has turned into a battle of stamina 



machine must 

put the block on 
the genius of Maradona 


Es fi; 

% 


.The World Cup is now not 
..1 so rrptch the thoroughbreds' 
. D£jrt>y of football, a classic -fiat 
mix, as a Grand .National: an 
endurance race .for steeple- 
chasers with stamina, where 
skill and judgement count, but 
luck and physical' strength 
rrray well be the most critical 
factor., There will be excite- 
ment, but also too many 
heartbreaks on die way among 
the. best runners. 

•In an expanded tournament 
lasting a month, the odds are 
now too long for comfort on 
e^etj the better teams. The 
competition has become 
something of a lottery. It is no 
coincidence that one of. the 
teams m the final. West 
Germany, and another in the 
• sefni-filial, Belgiuxn, are dia< 
tingtrisbed by their physical 
discipline more than any par- 
ticular level of skill. “This is 
th| fittest team during my JO 
years as national manager,” 
Guy Thys, of Belgium, said 
before they went down to a 
stunning goals by 


From David Miller, Mexico Gty 


m the game: a temperament 
which is backed by the 
soundest technique and tac- 
tics. They are capable of 
making it an intriguing final 
with Argentina, more so than 
would France have done in 
their state of fatigue. The 
German machine against the 
genius of Maradona can be an 
historic moment in the game. 
Neither team is exceptional, 
but Maradona is a soloist with 
magic in bis feet which we 
have not • seen since 
Garrincba, the Brazilian wing- 
er, a rich man's Jimmy 
Johnstone, blasted his goals. 
Maradona is, 1 think, more 
subtle and versatile, and even 
more dynamic in an increas- 
ingly defensive era. 

Because no individual de- 
fender nor any collective strat- 
egy can bait him legally— such 
is his astonishing acceleration. 


The - reluctant conclusion 
after fiance's defeat by the 
ultra-efficient Germans is that 
even, had France- somehow 
summoned once more the 
fading chords of a melody 
which had entranced os all, 
they could never have orches- 
"* '*■! nated .a commanding perfor- 
mance m die . final Their 
midfield line of 30-year-olds 
would have been embarrass- 
ingly overwhelmed by the 
genius of Maradona. It is he 
alone who threatens the clini- 
cal West Germans. 

<3ix matches were too much 
for the French, the more so 
when - they- abided with 
Germany's most proficient 
performance yet “When we 
have to marie, it is in our 
character and mentality to do 
d well," Franz Beckenbauer, 
their manager, reflected. 

* jFor as long as 'anyone can 
' remember, the West Germans 
have been marking and run- 
ning -and thinking with an 
unbending win which any 
opposition underestimates at 
tfieir peril. They outwitted and 
ota ran Hungary, the greatest 
of. all teams, in 1954; they 
came .from behind to force 
extra time againsrEngland at 
Wembley, they again came 
frpm behind to beat The 



control and balance which a 
low centre of gravity and 
powerful thighs give him —the 
wisdom of the referee on 
Sunday will be a fundamental 
factor in the outcome. West 
Germany are too often illegal. 

: 1 am sure that Argentina 
will win if West Germany are 
kept restrained within the 
boundaries of the law. Once 
Argentina beat England, it 
immediately became impossi- 
ble fofcthe referees committee 
to consider Courtney, of En- 
gland, respect for whom now 
finds him in charge of the 
third-place match. Under 
Fella, of Brazil, a positive 
Denning of the field who has 
been dearly the most authori- 
tative referee of the early 
rounds, West Germany will 
get away with nothing. 

Be sure they will try. They 
•kicked France sharply at the 
start tif each half and many 
other times as well, though 
intimidation was the lesser 
part of the process of subjuga- 
tion of the French. “We 
outplayed them in midfield, 
and that was decisive,” West 
Germany's scorer of the first . 


:! I - .-? 
2 


Netherlands in J 97^-Quy gtalfirdtine, said afierwards 
recovered from two goals wnb justification. 

Neither Rolff nor anyone 
else in the team, however, will 
be able to reduce Maradona in 
the way Platini was made to 
look ordinary. Platini’s even- 
tual capitulation: to an inferior 


goals 

down m extra time in the 1982 
semi-final against France. 

.Four times m the final in the 
laji.six tournaments, they are, 
without question, tempera- 
mentally the best competitors 


player who was determined to 
hound him revealed a flaw in 
his character and a weakness 
in France’s armoury which we 
had seen in 1984, especially 
when Fernandez and Giresse 
were being comprehensively 
over-run while Tigana alone 
was challenging West 
Germany's intellect 

Without the injured 
Rocheteau, France were once 
more punch! ess up front, and 
Amoros, a full back who has 
graced the final with his style 
in defence and attack, could 
not lifi their spirits or dem 
West Germany’s. The repeti- 
tive accuracy of Magath, 
Matthaus and Eder, the pace 
of Briegel down the left, the 
mobility of Allofs, all this will 
extend Argentina more than 
they have yet experienced. 
Can the West Germans halt 
Maradona? I do not think so, 
especially as FOrsier is possi- 
bly their weakest link in the 
centre of defence. 

Bobby Robson was yester- 
day excitedly claiming that 
England had run Argentina 
closer than had Belgium, 
therefore England could have 
been in the World Cup final 
but for a Tunisian referee. 
There isover amplification in 
this reasoning which does not 
bear scrutiny. The over-ruling 
of Maradona's illegal goal 
. would not have prevented his 
- second, which could have 
come at any time. And had 
Argentina not been two up 
against England, they would 
not have sat bade on defence 
with 20 minutes to go, conced- 
ing the initiative. Not to 
realise that England's perfor- 
mance in the first hour was 
negative and sterile is to 
remain blind to their needs in 
the future. One wrong deci- 
sion by a referee does not, I 
fear, turn England into a 
potential World Cup winner. 
They finished where they 
deserved. 

A last word on Maradona's 
handling. ] do not condone his 
cheating, though I am by no 
means convinced that his 
handling was intentional in 
the moment he out-jumped 
Shilton. That he did not own 
up to the referee on the spot is 
hardly surprising. We cannot 
expect Maradona to be some 
Corinthian symbol of probity 
mau sport in which every 
player is at some time cheat- 
ing, not excluding the English. 
As I have said before, 
Maradona has been infinitely 
more cheated against in his 
career than he has himself 
been a cheat. . I . 



Radford’s earned 
chance to test 
his England nerve 

By John Woodcock, Cricket Correspondent 


Magic moments: Maradona shows the s kill that his opponents have no answer to 

Argentina reap the rewards 
as Maradona calls the tune 

From Shunt Jones, Football Correspondent, Mexico City 




Too much of a good thing 


At tea past - seven on 
Wednesday -night I suddenly 
bt$»an to fed like James Bond. 
I often do, but is this case, I 
felt Ske James Bond on page 1 
of ThundtrbalL “The ate 
drtek too many signals itself 
mrinistakeably. His final 
wJSsky and soda in the luxuri- 
ous flat is Park Lane had been 
no' different from the ten 
preceding ones, hut ft had gone 
down reluctantly and had Left a 
bifter taste and an ugly sensar 
tiofi of surfeit.” : 

ft was not whisky that had 
left me in such a state, 
however. Zt was football. It 
was watching the World Cap 
onrtetetfsion. And the moment 
when France went a goal down 
tx tO '^West Germany, and the - 
match at -once degenerated 
into a display iff superlative 
ordinariness,- was die first time 
the Wtfrfd Cup had seemed too 
long. 

And it is too long, far too 
long. Four weeks of football is 
for the gounnant, not the 
gourmet It has been a great 
World Cup: a dire first week, 
tree, bat weeks two and three 
have been an endless sncces- 



WORLD CUP TV 


sion Of treats. Bat on into the 
fourth week: yon need some- 
thing far, far more than dever 
German organization to retain 
your interest Dammit, the 
Olympic Games only last for a 
fortnight or so, which is just 
about right for revelling in 
total obsession without tasting 
“the Hgly sensation of surfeit’’. 

Bat now, I am fed op with 
footballers, referees, the jeUy- 
beUied flag— flappers of lines- 
men, aad irith the s31y faces of 
aD the men in: the studio. I 
reserve a special portion of 
hatred for the tele visual men 
in Mexico, men obsessed by 
theiir need to pronounce the 
fenny foreign names of fenny 
foreigners, men who think 
“fanny foreigner” is a tautol- 
ogy. me n who endlessly boast 
about the impossible adw 
tare of taking a taxi from the 


hotel to the football ground, 
and who clearly see them- 
selves as Armand and 
Michaela Dennis discovering 
lost tribes of pygmies. 

Bat to make an entertain- 
ment last on into the fourth 
week yon most provide some- 
more than marvellous, 
might have supplied 
it, in gross partisanship, 
France, USSR, Denmark or 
Brazil might have soppfied it 
in sheer smnptmmsness. But 
the fourth week, as it tran- 
spires, is less than wonderful. 
It is amply too much. “She 
felt Boca's body slipping to 
the floor. When she let go his 
hair, be slumped down on the 
rug beside her bed. She care- 
fully shifted her position ami 
looked down at him. He was 
already asleep, with his bead 
cradled on foe inside of his 
forearm. The girl watched the 
dark, rather creel face for a 
moment-.” _ and then, I 
expect, she said to herself: “I 
knew he shouldn't have stayed 
op to watch the second semi- 
final.” 

Simon Barnes 


The so-called one-man band 
has marched ah the way to the 
World Cup final. Diego 
Maradona, who smoothed 
Argentina’s path through the 
first round, has since taken them 
almost single-handedly (lit- 
erally, in the quarter-anal 
against England last weekend) 
through to face the West Ger- 
mans in the Azteca Stadium on 
Sunday. 

Even If Argentina fail to 
regain the trophy they won in 
their own homeland eight years 
ago, Maradona has already been 
crowned as the individual star 
of the tournament. Having 
scored both of the goals in the 
victory over Belgium on 
Wednesday, be threatens to 
overtake 1 chum 

another personal title, that of 

the leading T wartrerrmn 
He requires one more to eqnal 
the total of England’s repre- 
sentative and three to equal ah’ 
Argentine World Cup record 
that has stood fix 56 years. It is 
held by Stabile, who was cred- 
ited with eight at the inaugural 
event in 1930. It would be no 
surprise if be surpassed both of 
them. 

Nothing be does should sur- 
prise anybody any more. Those 
privileged enough to see his 
display in the testimonial match 
for Andes at White Hart Lane 
in May suggested that be would 
not be able to spread his talent 
so freely in the confined spaces 
of Mexico, fort he has and 
against the likes of Italy, Uru- 
guay, England and now Belg i um 
too. 

Referee 
for final 

Romualdo Arppi will become 
the second successive Brazilian 
to referee a World Cup final 
after his appoinimnent for 
Sunday’s game between Argen- 
tina and West Germany. 

Arppi, 47, from Santos, fol- 
lows in the footsteps of his 
fellow-countnrman Arnoldo 
Coel ho, who handled the 1982 
final between Italy and West 
Germany. 

Arppi, who speaks Spanish 
but no German, took the first 
round game between France and 
the Soviet Union and the second 
round game between Mexico 
and Bulgaria. 

Semi-final results 


“We marked him weD in the 
first half” Guy Thuys said after 
his side had become the fourth 
in line of Maradona's helpless 
victims. “Two of our players 
had to fill that rule simply 
because we did not have one 
who is capable of doing it on bis 
own. 

“We were organized until the 
second half when be escaped 
more often and he punished os 
twice. He is incredible. Al- 
though the final should be fairly 
even, I think Argentina will win 
because of him.” He is not alone 
in holding that opinion, such is 
the stature of the tittle giant. 

Carlos Bilardo, forever being 
swamped with questions about 
bis captain, feels that Maradona 
has been “playing weft.” If 
requested to estimate how many 
people had watched the World 
Cup here and across the globe 
on television, Argentina's man- 
ager would presumably say “a 
few.” 

“We talked several times 
during last season,” Bilardo 
said. “Twice in Buenos Aires 
and three times in Italy. I asked 
him to devote himself for 30 
days just to football. I appointed 
him captain and told him that 
be should prove that he is the 
best player in the world. He is a 
capable man.” Nobody would 
dare to disagree. 

“We followed certain plans in 
order to reach our initial objec- 
tive of finishing first in our 
group. I advised my players not 
to argue with the referee or 
retaliate to fouls. We are strong 


but we don't want to hint 
anyone-” The damage that has 
been inflicted by Maradona 
alone has caused the severest 
psychological pain. Vercautrea, 
one of Belgium's most experi- 
enced internationals, conceded 
that Argentina had won “be- 
cause of him. We were tired as 
well after our two games against 
the Soviet Union and Spam but 
we did better than we expected. 
If we finish fourth, that will be 
the best that we have ever done 
in our history.” 

Thuys no longer attaches any 
significance, and little more 
interest, in tomorrow’s 
meaningless fixture against 
France in Puebla. “It is not 
important. The two teams will 
be so disappointed about not 
playing in the fi nal The tour- 
nament is over for us and I am 
not very concerned about it. 

“To have reached the semi- 
finals was an achievement but 
my players are tired. On Sat- 
urday I will play an those who 
have not participated so far. Our 
work is not over, though. Srifb 
and De Mol are only 20, 
Vervoort 21, Qaesen 23 and 
Gnm 24; five of the side have 
their days iu front of them." 

But the figure who is expected 
to be by far the most influential 
iu Sunday's final was bora in 
Buenos Aires on October 30, 
1960. At the relatively raw age of 
25, Maradona is a phenomenon. 
The computer, programmed to 
offer profiles of each player, 
could come up with only “there 
is little left to say about him.” 


If there was a valid excuse for 
England's batsmen finding runs 
hard to find in the second Test 
match at Hcadingtey. there was 
uone for their bowlers bowling 
as poorly as they did. The 
selectors win not, I am sure, be 
unaware of this when they sit 
down this evening to choose the 
side Tor next Thursday’s third 
Test match against India, spon- 
sored by Corn hill, at Edgbastort 
England’s attack last week 
was Lever. Dilley, Pringle, 
Emburey and Gooch. The last 
two may be exempted from the 
general criticism. Emburey was 
under-bowled and Gooch was a 
make-weight. The others were 
out-bowled by Madan LaJ and 
Binny, who, in their previous 66 
Test matches, had taken only 99 
wickets between them at 41 
apiece. 

It was profoundly ironic that 
the estimable Lever, whose 
accuracy is a by-word, should 
have been the one to give India a 
flying start His first eight overs 
cost 38 runs. Together with 
Gifford, Pocock and Under- 
wood. be is the most experi- 
enced bowler in the worid today, 
in terms of wickets taken: but he 
lightened up, just as golfers do 
on the first tee, or, more 
commonly, the first green, when 
they reach a certain age. 

Not that it is necessarily a 
matter of age. At Brisbane on 
the MCC tour of 1958/59 Fred- 
die Brown, the manager, asked 
whether Brian Statham might 
share my room. He and Peter 
Loader were inseparable com- 
panions, and Loader had just 
gone down with flu. With the 
trst Test match a few days away 
it was vital that Statham. 
Loader's room-mate, should be 
spared the bug. 

Although Statham was still 
quite young, we had been on 
several tours together, and I 
would never have thought of 
him as having a nerve in his 
body. To use the aphorism most 

Even Statham had 
Test butterflies 


often applied to David 
Gower, he was perpetually “laid 
back” — except, as 1 was to find 
out, on the first morning of a 
Test match. He could have put 
on a blindfold and still have put 
the ball on the spot. He was 
renowned for his accuracy. Yet 
when the Test dawned, he had 
butterflies in his stomach. 

So, at Heading! ey, did Lever. 
Nerves, you see, affect bowlers 
as well as batsmen. In the West 
Indies last winter, England’s 
faster bowlers also gave too 
much away. Botham, Ellison, 
Thomas and Foster all conceded 
runs in the Test matches at_ 
between 33 and 43 runs an 
over. There was a basic lack of 
control — of disciplined bowling 
— as there was at Headingley. 
This being so, the time has come 
to see how Radford fares as a 
property accurate bowler at this 
level. For the last season and a 
half he has been the steadiest 


wicket taker in English cricket, 
which must mean something. 

Ellison has dropped back for 
the moment, and Thomas is 
notcapiuring wickets, although 
Foster is. I should like sometime 
to see Foster and Dilley bowling 
together. The comparison 
would be interesting and the 
pairing could be effective. With 
Radford there as well, to put on 
the brakes, Gatling might feel . 
more in control than he did on 

Selectors should 
resist old-timers 

bis first outing as England’s 
captain. He will want five 
bowlers this time, I imagine, if 
only on principle. In most 
recent Test matches at Edg- 
baston, as at Headingley, four 
would have been enough. 

The selectors may be expected 
to resist the call to bring back 
other old-timers (as they did 
Lever) to try to teach those in 
possession a lesson in pro- 
fessionalism. Boycott is men- 
tioned most of aft in this regard, 
with Amiss and Underwood in 
the frame with him, and Radley 
and Gifford following along. All 
five are over4Q. But the fielding 
has to be taken into account, 
and important as it is to stop the 
present rot, the future has to be 
considered. If we were going 
nowhere this winter, rather than 
to Australia, there would be 
more to be said for bringing 
Boycott and Gooch together 
again, and for sending for 
Underwood, who, given the 
chance, would have bowled wed 
at Headingley. 

As it is. Lamb will probably 
make way for Gower, Lever for 
Radford and possibly Chris 
Smith for David Smith of 
Worcestershire. Lamb has be- 
come very much a part of the 
furniture, haring missed neither 
a Test match nor a one-day 
international since coming into 
the side in 1982. He has nelded 
splendidly and raised many a 
drooping spirit- But a highest 
score of 67 in his last 29 Test 
innings is no longer the form of 
a number four or five. It seems 
only fair to give someone else a 
chance, just as it does to give 
Radford one, and a rest from it 
all could well be to Lamb's 
advantage. 

Slack can expect another 
chance to show whether he is up 
to it and Atbey's technique 
impressed the selectors as being 
better than most at Headingley. 
panly no doubt through having 
been apprenticed in his York- 
shire days to Boycott. If they go 
on scoring well when the county 
championship resumes. Bailey, 
Benson, Fairbrother, Prichard. 
Whi-taker, and any Smith not 
already in the side could come 
into contention. 

In Yorkshire, they flunk they 
may have in Paul Jarvis an 
English fast bowler in the mak- 
ing. I hope they are teaching him 
that all the great ones have had 
control as well as speed. 

More cricket, page 38 


Poet who was an institution 

The McGonagall 
of the Oval 


Operation Armstrong 
for Robson in move 


47.500 


Unkn {2) 


(0)0 


Wl 
Mba Vote 


110.420 




Bryan Robson, the England 
and Manchester United captain, 
w3J have aa ope r a t ion on his 
troublesome shoulder today. 

Robson dislocated the shoul- 
der for the fourth time in 
Worid Cop match 
Morocco in Mexico and 
the knockout stages 
against Paraguay and Argen- 
tina. . 

Robson saw an orthopaedic 
surge o n hi Manchester, and the 
decision to operate was taken. 
He says be is determined not to 
miss the start iff the new season 
at Highbury against Arsenal 
and is convinced be will be able 
to start training In about four 
weeks tune. 

Gary Bailey, the United goal- 
keeper and their Irish inter- 
national Norman Whiteside. 
both back from (he from fee 
World Cnp, face knee 
operations. 


lest Bromwich 


Northern Ireland’s Worid 
Cup forward Gerry Armstrong, 
has joined Brighton on a free 
transfer from We 
Albion. 

Armstrong, 32, who has 
played for Tottenham Hotspur 
ana Watford, agreed terms after 
talks with Alan Mullery, 
Brighton's manager. 

He has over 50 caps. Mullery 
plans to use him as a centre 
forward as there is anxiety over 
the future of Justin Fashanu, 
who is still at a Royal Air Force 
rehabilitation centre recovering 
from a right knee operation. 

Since he returned for his 
second spell as Brighton man- 
ager, Mullery has persuaded five 
players to sign new contracts 
and lured CheTsea midfield play- 
ers Dale Jasper and Armstrong 
to join the dub on free transfers. 


ROWING 



Henley officials get in 
the mood for marching 


By JlmRaBton 


Henley Royal Regatta's .of- 
ficials were on the. inarch yes- 
terday and will be again 
tomorrow. Yesterday, Mr Peter 
Coni. QCV chairman Of the 
regatta's management commit- 
tee; stOfcaHv led bis admin- 
istrative staff of 20 from their 
pli&h new '£1 million bead- 
qiarters alongside Henley 
Bodge. There must have been 
some heavy hearts when they 
reached their destination — the 
teheed city inside the stewards* 
enclosure from where they will 
tl nm-the-Royai Regatta. 


the new headquarters before 
they leave en masse for Henley 
Town Hall with a profusion of 
pint ties, carnations and Lean- 
der blazers for the traditional 
draw (3pm), 

. Here competitors will wait 
with baited breath for their fate 
and there will be much dis- 
cussion over the selected crews, 
albeit Henley now tends to 
recognize the top crews for 
separation before the draw. Will 
Henley, for example, separate 
by selection the two Harvard 
University eights in the Ladies’ 


Apm ftot'they can hear, if ‘ Challenge fett? The Garda 
th£ wind is ngbl, the plaintive " Siochana and London Univer- 
pletis of frustrated. coaches beg- : sity will no doubt also expect fee 
Ting their ereuvto ‘hold fear , « un *° 51,1,16 ®n “ em ,n 
i&shes «n’ or 'steady on the -« vent A” wl! revealed 




slide’ and m almost -all cases 
-wftQdoneT at this stage. 

This evening' the guillotine 
begins to drop with qualifying 
ra^es {7pm) m- the Double 
Thames, Visitor’s, 

wyfotos, -Britannia, $ftver Qq5_ 
lettnd i he Diamonds' for places 
in;ilic first round of the Royal 
Regatta winch surts-thisyearori 
Wednesday. The qualifying, 
races this evening take the form 
Of timed head races over the fiiD 
regatta course. : ■ 

Another march, or rather 


tomorrow afternoon. 

AH 7.500 stewards’ enclosure 
tickets are sold for the Saturday 
and Sunday of fee regatta 
together with the maximum 

6300 for Friday. But tickets are 

still available so far for Wednes- 
day and Thursday of next week. 


if 




Malcolm signs 

The. Shrewsbury goalkeeper 
Paul Malcolm is to join Bourne- 
mouth for a fee of £5.000. 

, . Malcolm. aged 21, 

PtoCe&ion. may be viewed to- - Bournemouth’s first close-sca- 
taocrQw ax about 2 . 40 pm- There son signing, was previously wife 
*w stewards'. meeting m Rochdrfe - 


YACHTING 

Hindered Martin limps 
in for a moral victory 

From Barry Picldball, Newport, Rhode Inland 

John Martin, one of the South, five years.” 

Voortrekkeris steering prob- 
lems centred on a broken rudder 
quadrant carrying the control 
wires and not the rudder. The 
crew steered by hand using the 
emergency tiller for much of the 
race. 

Martin's closest BOC rival. 
Guy Bemadin, sailing Biscuits 
Lu, who was out of radio contact 

crewman, finished eight horns 

behind Robin Knox-Johnston's i30urs 

catamaran British Air**™ *« ""'"d v °ortrekker. 
take sixth place desni 
both self-steering and head sails 
during the 3 jOOO-mile voyage 


African entrants in this year's 
BOC single-handed Round the 
Worid race which starts from 
Newport at the end of August, 
scored a significant victory over 
three of his solo rivals when his 
60ft Tuna Marine Voortrekker 
became the first monohull to 
finish fee Carisberg Trans- 
atlantic race. 

Martin and Rob Sharp, his 


British Airways to 

iatey» 6 hr 13 nto; 2 . 


froirTf’lymoiJth. 

“We've had a terrible time 
with seven very bad storms,” 
Martin said. “The boat suffered 
more damage during the past 
two weeks man during the past 


- . _ _ Tag (lit Bin*. O Mousy, Cart. 
13:2230; 3, Apricot (A Uttonoro. W 
Greens, 05), fe&44; ft, Cfts 2]; 4. 
Brittii Nrtfcm (H Knox-johnsttxi. 0 

.e 9 k_ 17 *> 4 fca. AlCattUODanW. 

77*45: 6, Tuna Marina 


ir (J Martin. R Sfwp. SAL 

17:1452; 7. Bftcuft* Lu (G Benwflf). S 
Caflahan. FfJ. 1721:1a, 


TODAY’S FIXTURES 


CRICKET 
Tour match (IT .0 to 6.0} 
CAMBRIDGE: Combined Univer- 
srttesvNew Zealanders. 
Women’s fast Test match 
i England v India. 

ICC TROPHY; Ta rewords Kenya v East 
Africa. Bawfc*: Danina* v Mriayae. 
SoBwft United Stefas vtoraelH ui iae twi ; 
Papua New Guinea v B ermuda ■ 
yrf.rt a unw- WietBMs v aerator 
KnccrtK Hjra Hong Kong. 

$£$9ND XI CHAMPtONSHR I4 


Q ta uc a sM sH re » OS anoroan Bonn*. 
«*tB Harepsura v Kant nawadc Not* 

Bngton wW re v UflCMW. UtOEmrttE 
Leteestarsnire v NortnantplonaWro. 
H o re to n u Sussex v MMtosax. Nma- 
twx Waiwte UiMm v Wbrcoteorstm. 
Eland: YorksNre « Surrey. 

OTHER SPORT 

ATHLETKSc ku t f ua tfe nte notefe En- 


iSMflU aariec 

aw Main *: flaw ZMisnd 
ParfotonaL CMBanpa and Gitesy Tro- 
VtasoreanL Town s mans a 

■ m iTowrjg* 


MOTOR RALLYING 


End of the road looms 
for the “supercars” 


The end of “supercar'’ rally- 
ing is expected to be announced 
in Paris today when FISA, the 
governing body of the sport, will 
ban highly modified cars such as 
the Audi Quattro Spot, Metro 
6R4. the Ford RS20Q. fee 
Lancia Delta and the Peugeot 
206GTi from world champion- 
ship events. 

The move follows a series of 
final accidents involving the 
superears which have included 
serious fires- 

FISA are likely to rule that 
world championship cars 
should run in Group A. based 
on standard cars of which more 
than 5.000 models have been 
built for public sale. At present, 
the mainly four-wheel drive, 
Uirbo-cbarwd machines only 
require 200 cars to be sold to 
qualify. 

Three people died on the 
Portuguese rally in March, when 
a car crashed into the crowd at 
high speed and many of the 
works team drivers later held a 
meeting and refused to continue 
the event. On the recent Hessen 
rally in West Germany. For- 
mula One driver Marc Surer 
was seriously injured and his co- 
driver Michael Wyder killed 
when their RS200 hit trees and 
bum into flames. Surer is still in 
intensive' care, having only re- 
cently come out of a coma 
followifg the accident. 


But John Davenport, the 
Lotus sport director of Austin 
Rover, disagrees with banning 
cars such as his Metro 6R4 or 
the Lancia. He attended a 
constructors meeting in Paris on 
Tuesday, where the manufac- 
turers were against keeping the 
supercars. 

“The future for Austin Rover 
in Group A is almost impossible 
to predict. We don’t have 
suitable Group A cars,” said 
Davenport.** Banning four- 
wheel drive and turbo cars does 
not solve fee problem of safety. 
We have had mqjor accidents 
with our care and in every case 
the crews have been all right and 
there has been no fuel leakage. 

“I think it comes down to 
proper design and preparation 
of the cars and some manufac- 
turers have not done their job 
well enough. We have made a 
huge investment in Group B 
cam. which we expected to run 
for at least four years. For FISA 
to ban such cars now would 
place us in great difficulty.” 

So worried are some manu- 
facturers that Peugeot are 
threatening legal action against 
FISA if fee superears are 
banned. They are bating their 
case on written communica- 
tions from fee governing body 
which stated- that Group. B 
would run until at least 1988. 


A familiar and aflectionately- 
heW character at lt*wmn gt wn 
Oval — and other London cricket 
grounds, but especially the Oval 
— at the beginning of this 
century was Albert Craig, the 
“Surrey Poet”. You may still see 
his photograph, looking rather 
like a Methodist focal preacher, 
la the Ova] pavilion. 

Craig was a Yerkshiresnan, 
born in 1850, bat he tired of his 
life as a Post Office clerk, came 
south at the age of about thirty, 
and discovered an nnasoal, in- 
deed nniqoe way of earning a 
living. He wrote topical verses 
about the events at cricket 
matches, printed them on his 
own small press, and hawked 
them roand the ground, with 
considerable success. By the 
time anyone wondered whether 
be bad any authority to do iL he 
had become an institution, and 
was allowed to carry on, a friend 
of the players as well as the 
public, until bis death in 1909. 

Many a supporter 
gave his coppers 

His poetry was execrable — 
about the standard of an English 
McGonagall — but h had im- 
mediacy. Thus when Hobbs 
scored a century hi bis first 
champions hip match, and was 
rewarded with his county cap, 
Craig was first to praise him, 
with: 

Joy reigned in the PmBion 
And gladness ' mongst his elan 
While thousands breathed good 
wishes roand the ring: 

Admirers dubbed the youngster 
As Surrey’s coming man: 

In Jack Hobbs’ play they son the 
genuine ring. 

Twos well worth going to see 
Illustrious Hayward’s smile. 
White Razor Smith and Walter 
Lees 

Cheered with the rank and file. 

This I consider one of Craig's 
better efforts, and many a 
supporter contributed his cop- 
pers and carried a smudgy copy 
home as a memento, cherished 
as a scorecard might be, of fee 
great occasion. 

Generally speaking, we roast 
agree with Ronald Mason, who 
says feat most of Craig's verses 
were “of a paralysing badness, 
for his literary style tempered a 
cursive facility of cliche wife a 
dire metrical uncertainty”. But 
Craig himself made no claims 
for their artistic merits. Once OH 
his peregrinations a spectator 
called oat, “Call yourself a poet? 
Why, I could write better poems 
myself!" to which Craig courte- 
ously replied, “Doubtless, sir, oh 
’ less — but could you 
sell'enT” And such was the 
rapport with his customers, and 
his cheerful badinage, that sell 
them be did, ius packets visibly 
weighted down with the r e t ur ns 
as be completed his c iio dt 


He came to be quite an 
influential figme among the 
crowd, proudly calling himself 
“Captain of the Spectators”. In 
1906 there was a rough match 
against Yorkshire at the OvaL 
Surrey won, but for some reason 
fee crowd was displeased, and 
there was booting of the York- 
shire players afterwards. Craig 
raised his arms and his voice: 
“Three cheers for Lord Hawke 
and Yorks hirer 1 The cheers 
were given, and the malcontents 
shuffled away. 

This may have been an in- 
stance of Craig remembering his 
Yorkshire origins, but in bis 
writing be was often generous to 
coon ties other than Surrey. He 
wrote a stirring tribute to G L 
Jessop, which certainly bad a 
memorable opening line: 

Had! Prince among smiters, aU 
hail! 

Whose fame spreads o’er moun- 
tain and dale. 

When 0 C *° ruS 0 f. e * u * n 

Mtea bowlers wad fielders tarn 

pale. 

In the third verse, his metrical 
weakness trips him, hot he 
makes a brave recovery: 

You may perhaps get a “dock" 
now and then. 

Like Tom Hayward and other 
good mem 

Bat the foe is ia doubt 
Till the empire says u Oat n , 

And the enemy whispers 
“Amen". 

Became a little 
overbearing 

The fast verse suggests that on 
this occasion Craig may have 
been paying a visit to the west 
Yes, C helten ham delights In her 
son 

lathe glorious achievements he’s 
won, 

“Here’s your health ”, FU be 
brief. 

You’re a practical chief. 

As you stand undismayed at your 
gun l 

Towards the end of bis life. 
Cram perhaps became a little 
overbearing, as such people tfO 
when they come to think of 
themselves as “characters**. 
Jack Hobbs tells ns that “in 
course of tune, his scope of 
action became subject to certain 
limitations”, which may mean 
no more than that he did not 
have casual entry to the 
professionals' dressing-room. 
Bin he never really lost his 
status. 


He was a pleating, baroque 
ornament to the game in a 
decorative period. And it should 
comfort literary aspirants that If 
he , becn “.better writer, he 
would long since have been 
forgotten. 

Alan Gibson 









SPORT 


THE TIMES FRIDAY JUNE 27 1986 


GOLF 


Two-stroke advantage 
gives uncommon 
pleasure to Commans 



CRICKET 




Vengsarkar is in a 
hurry as the 
Indians win again 


From Mitchell Platts, Monte Carlo 


Ron Commans has played 
alongside Jack Nicklaus and 
Tom Watson, but in the 
Johnnie Walker Monte Carlo 
Open championship here yes- 
terday the American got more 
enjoyment playing with a 68- 
year-old Frenchman who was 
struggling to break 90. 

Commans scored a second* 
round of 63, forfeiting the 
opportunity of breaking the 
magical 60 barrier only on the 
closing stretch, while his play- 
ing partner, Albert Petissier, 
attached an 86 to his opening 

97 fora total of 183. 

“Albert is a fine 
gentleman." said Commans. 
**He was very supportive and 
also apologetic, though he had 
no reason to be. Let's just say 
he had a lot of bad luck on the 
greens." 

Commans, aged 27, can 
give M Pelissier 41 years. He 
could also have given his 
playing partner a 33-stroke 
lead and beaten him over 36 
holes. More importantly. 
Commans, with a half-way 
total of 129, which is nine 
under par for the Mont Agel 
course, has a two-stroke lead 
over Michael McLean (64) 
with Sandy Lyle (67) one 
stroke further adrift. 
Severiano Ballesteros, of 
Spain, is further back after a 
71 fora score of 137. 

“I had to borrow money 
from my father to buy an air 
ticket to come out for the 
Spanish Open in Madrid last 
month," explained Commans. 
“He also gave me S800 and l 


figured that' was enough to get 
through two tournaments. I 
would have gone home but 
fortunately I won $2,000 in 
Madrid." 

In fact Commans has subse- 
quently won the “Future 
Masters", the tournament on 
the satellite circuit played in. 
Nuneaton, but he is carrying 
his own clubs in order to save 
money. “It’s been a lough 
time, and I've had my back to 
the wall, but they say you 
should beware tne hungry 
golfer," said Commans. 

Commans, who started 
playing at the age of 13 in 
Westlake Village, on the out- 
skirts of Los Angeles, 
partnered Corey Pavm to 
victory during the 1981 Walk- 
er Cup when Paul Way and 
Duncan Evans provided the 
opposition. 

They both turned profes- 
sional later that year, but 
whereas Pavin is fast ap- 
proaching Si million in offi- 
cial winnings on the US Tour, 
Commans lost his playing 
privileges by earning only 
$4,334 for 206th place in the 
money list last year. 

“I played a couple of prac- 
tice rounds with Jack Nicklaus 
and Tom Watson but apart 
from that my efforts in Ameri- 
ca are best forgotten," added 
Commans. 

He made an inauspicious 
start, after teeing off from the 
1 0th, by dropping a shot at the 


1 1th. Bui he covered the nexl 
five holes in only 13 strokes, 
which indnded holding an 80- 
yard wedge shot for an eagle 
two at tire 15th, and be bid 
seven birdies altogether. 

With four- holes remaining. 
Commans needed two birdies 
for a 59 but he dropped two 
shots. He added: "I thought 
about breaking 60 after I had 
birdied the 14th. But in all 
honesty I was in such a state 
thinking only about my golf 
that I was completely con- 
fused by my overall situation 
to par." 

McLean, for the second 
successive day, did not drop a 
shot and with five birdies he 
provided the platform to beat 
his best performance hilhertc 
this season when eighth in the 
PGA championship Iasi 
month. Lyle began with three, 
birdies in bis five holes bat hr 
suffered on the green after 
that 


LEADING SECOND ROUND 
SCORES (G8 unless stated): 129: R 
Commans (US), 66, 63. 131: M 
McLean, 67, 64. 132: S Lyle, 65. 67. 
133: P Senior (Aus), 66. 67; R 
Stefan JUS), 66, 67; S E"- 1 — *“ 
fAus), 67. M: A GarrWolSp) 

34: J EBand (SAL 66, 68: C 


134.- J Bland (SA). 66, 68: C 
65, 69; O Seftera (Swe). ... 
135: M Martin (Sp),72, 63; D Smyth, 
68, 67; B Smith (US). 65. 70. 13fc J 
Rivero CSp), 68. 68; N Hansen, 68, 
8 Gafiacher, 68. 6a G Turner 
(NZ), 69. 67. 137: M McN"“" 

68, 69; A Stubbs, 70,67:0 
6a 69; W Humphreys, 67, 70; G Cafi 
(Ifl. 70. 67; S BaHsstaros (So). 66. 
71; J Mouhica (FrL 66. 71 : G Tbytor 
(Aus). 68, 69. P Thomas, 69, 68. 



Dilip Vengsarkar continued 
his superb form for. the Indians 
as die tourists comfortably beat 
a League Cricket Conference 
side by 72 runs in their One-day 
match at Chester-teStreet. yes- 
terday. , Vengsarkar,- who hit 
successive centuries at Lord’s 
and Headingley, scored a dash- 
ing 71,- including four sixes and 
four fours. 

With the rest of the players 
enjoying some batting practice 
on an easy- paced track, the 
Indians reached a formidable 
321 for eight from their alloted 
S3 overs. ■ 

Asked to score at Just under 
six an over, the Conference side 
were helped by a defiam second- 
wicket stand worth- 1-36 runs 
between the West Indian Carl 
Hooper, who produced an 
aggressive 73, inducting eight 
fours and three sixes, and John 
Foster {6 1). But the run-rate was 
always beyond the Conference 
side, who were 249 for seven at 
the end. 

INDIANS 

K SiMcamn c Hoooer b Merrick 24 


Raman Lrnnbn c Haynw b D*rfs 9 

MAmamatfic Hooper b Johnson __ 13 

SM Patio Haynes b Johnson 61 

M Aztouddinc Merrick b Haynes — 46 

D B Vengwfcar b H»yn«s 71 

*R JShestri bDavto— 40 


tCPaaftflOtM-— . 

M Prabhaker e Hooper b Daws 6 

N$ Vaclav rut out : ! 2 

Extras (to 7, w 4, rti 11) 22 

Total (8 wfcts. 55 overs) 321 

ManndorSJngticMnatbat ' 

FALL OF WICKETS: 1-38. 2-38. 3-71, 4- 

139. 5- 236, 6-242. 7-288, 8-306. 
BOWUN&Oavte n-068-3; Merrick 104- 
56-1: Johraon 11-0-55-2!; Nmfns 11-1-56- 
0; Haynes 10-067-2; Knowtos 2-0-22-0. 

- l£ Conference 

J Foster C Manlnder b Pall 61 

MBowwbwbAzharuddin — ; 6 

C Hooper c Hooper b AzhanxhSn — 75 

R Haynes cAimnathbPadl 20 

*B Knowles Ibw b Pan 3 

P wood not out 22 

-jra&orttwickcAzhaniddinbShBsiri 15 
W Dava e A ma m atf i b Snhtenth 20 

DLNevmsnotout 0 

Extras (b 4. to 10. w 5. nb 8) _27 

Total [7 wkte, 55 overs) 249 

A Metric* and 6 Johnson dU not bat. 
PALL OF WICKETS: 1-21 , 2-167, 3-164,4. 

178. 5- 139. 6-324,7:244. 

BOWLING: Pradhakw 6-1-350: Lamba 2- 
0-14-0: AzIianjcMln 8-1-29-2: Singh 11-3- 
19-0: Vaster 12-2-42-0: Patfl 11-1-50-3; 
Shestrt 34-33-1: Snkfcanto 3443-1. 
Umpires: J H Lownry and T Ftddea. 


Semi-finals in sight 
for European pair 


By Mike Berry 


Grandmother among leaders 


From John Hennessy, HHmsom 


A Finnish grandmother 
stands unexpectedly among the 
leaders after the first round of 
the Volmac Dutch women's 
open championship. In difficult, 
gusty conditions. Aija Sipronen 
had a level par round of 72 at 
Hilveisum (5,822 yards) yes- 
terday to lie two shots behind 
Kitrina Douglas, a former Brit- 
ish amateur champion, and 
Peggy Conley, of the United 
Slates, who bold the unusual 
distinction ofbeingthe youngest 
players ever to take part in the 
Curtis Cup match. 

We might, then, have ex- 
pected such a performance from 
either the British player or the 
American, but Mrs Sipronen, 
who has never finished higher 
than 28th in any tournamenL 

has missed the 36-hole cut in the 
three events she has so far 
played this season. She simply 
had not forewarned us. 

She missed four putts within 
four feet, so that her score could 
have been still more remark- 
able. But she was of a mood 


afterwards, unlike her caddying 
husband, to take things in her 
quiet stride. Particularly, she 
seems to be prepared for a 
reaction today. “I teed off at 
3.20 and my muscles wake jip so 
late." she explained. 

The highlight of her round, 
supposing that such a round was 
anything but highlights for a 
woman of 43 who is essentially a 
leaching professional, was her 
eagle three at the 422-yard 13th, 
which she subdued with a 
fouriron from the rough to five 
feeL But she paid her dues at the 
16 th. where she drove into the 
trees, so abundant at Hilver- 
sum, and took three putts when 
she finally readied the green. 

Miss Douglas seemed to- have 
the game for Hilversum, where 
accuracy and a shrewd golfing 
brain are paramount require- 
ments. Apart from driving into 
a bunker at the 1 1th, she was a 
model of discretion. 

Miss Conley is anything but 
precise about any round of golf 
she plays. She thought she may 

” POLO 


have bit a six-iron to about IS 
feet at the 3rd and holed the 
putt, and it was possibly a sand 
wedge she hit to four feet at the 
17th, but her mind at least 
reached back clearly enough to 
the 18th, where she took a free 
drop from behind the temporary 
stands and holed from 15 feet 
for a dosing birdie. She had 
dropped a shot, but even a 
crystal ball would not have 
dredged up the details. 


LEADING SCORES JOB unless slated): 
rtk PContoy {USL K Oougto*. 71: B Hi*, 
C Dbnah (Aus). K Espinasse (Fr). 72: A 


Driving at 65: Ore SeUberg, of Sweden, during second round | 

SWIMMING 

Games clash rules 
out top juniors 


Neumann (Swe). A Nicholas. B 
Bmndwynne (US). N McCormack. D 
Chuctetortj (VW3). S Mackenzie (Aus). L 
Oavtoa: 74s R. HaaL M. Saenz (CdombtoL 
C. PMrudktUS), M Johnson, V Marwiti 
Boozer (USL S Van Wyk (SA). K 
Lsadbetter (US). S Young, M Gamer, R 
HaaL M SccMnaTfeC. Lehmann OJSLC. 
Friend (USL CWate. P Grice- WNttakar. D 
Dawtng. A Jwnnaar (Noth, amateur), j 
Comacnan, M Burton. J Brown. J 
Soutsby. D Reid, P Grant (Canada). C 
Lehmann (USL L Kkwor-Grfmes (US), P 
Gonzalez (Col)- 


Rio Pardo put up a great fight 


The tournament for the High- 
Goal Warwickshire Cup (spon- 
sored by the Dorchester hotel) 
went into the semi-final stage at 
Cirencester Park yesterday with 
the match between Rio Plardo 
and Southfield, who won 6-5. 

Rio Pardo's two Brazilians. 
Mansur and Palma, having left 
on a brief visit for home, Ronald 
Ferguson and Ricardo Vial 
joined Graham Churchward in 
their line-up. thereby presenting 
a better balance image than their 
regular combination, and a bet- 
ter looking balance than South- 
field. too. 

The question was could Rio 
Pardo, though unfamiliar, grow 


together as 


convincingly 


By John Watson 

coherent squad in time to gain 
superiority over the much- 
vaunted Southfield. They nearly 
did so. Graham and 
Churchward curbed the nor- 
mally irresistible Rinehart-Kent 
Tandem, while Vial was nearly 
always forward to lake his 
opportunities 

Southfield led 6-3 at the dose 
of the fifth chukka. but Rio 
Pardo really came into their 
own in the sixth and reduced the 
Southfield victory to 1. 

The evening encounter was 
the first semi-final of the Bath- 
urst Cup. This was won 8-6 by 
Kennelot Stables against David 
Pearl's Rosa mu a do. This was a 
levd-pegging battle until half 


time when the score was 4-4. 
Kennelot's central strength, 
comprised of Howard Hipwood 
and Warren Scherer, got into 
their true stride, went 2 ahead 
and never seemed like losing 
thereafter. 

The semi-finals of both the 
Warwickshire and the Bathurst 
will be played off at Cirencester 
this afternoon. 

50UTHFELD: 1 . J YtananJIt 2. A Kant 
{Bfc 3, D Rinehart (9). Back, ti Jambon (3). 
fflOPARDO:1.R VM(S):Z P CtwctwwS 
(6fc 3. R Gralwn M). Back. R Ferguson (4L 
KENNELOT STABLES: 1 N. Lobfi(1fc2. W 
Scherer (4): 3. H Hipwood (9), Back, 6 BUs 

il&SAMUNDO: 1. 0 Peart (2L 2. J 
HofiMMfl (6L 3. D 3n**tas (7)76**. W 
Lucw(4). 


A clash of dates with the 
Commonwealth Games has 
robbed Britain of their two 
leading medal hopes in the 
European junior swimming 
championships. 

Mark Foster, the Millfidd 
School freestyle specialist, and 
Shona Smart, the talented Q’ty 
of Chester alt-round performer, 
have chosen to represent En- 
gland and Scotland, in Edin- 
burgh. rather than compete for 
Britain in West Berlin from July 
24-27. . 

Foster, from Southend, fin- 
ished sixth in the 100m freestyle 
in last year’s championsbp and 
is currently second in the Euro- 
pean junior rankings, while 
Smart won eight junior and one 
senior .title at the recent Scottish 
championships. 

Another absentee from the 
33-strong squad because of the 
Games is Gareth Williams, a 
Welsh backstroke swimmer. 

Alan Lawrence, the junior 
team manager, said: “We have 
this problem of clashing with 
the Commonwealth Games or 
Olympic Gaines every two 
years, and not having Mark or 
Shoha has obviously weakened 
the squad. Bat I'm hoping we 
will still discover a few 
finalists". 

TEAM: BOYS; TOOra freestyle: R Buflock 
(Portsmouth NcrthseeL S Dronsflald (SaE 


ford). 200n fl wel yta c M Radman (Saf- 
fordj. Butocfc. 400m Mk I Wfeon 
(Sunderland). Radman. ISOOmf 
Wfeon. 100m 
MWMcQ. 2Dt 
100m hn seHto ota : T Evans 
toga). J Karr (WarrandwL 200to treat 
■Srokec Evans. Karr. 100m butterfly: 
DronsfiakL 200m butterfly: Wfeon. 300m 
individual matSey: L Bennett (Gateshead 
Metro), Kerr. 400m individual medtoy: D 
Morgan (City ol Swansea), Kerr. 4 x 100m 
fre es tyle way: N Grenyer (Beckenham), 
BJkx*. DrorfeffeW, Radman. 4 x 200m 
l uiaaty t a. Redman. BuSock, OonsfWd. 
Morgen. 4 x 100m mefl te y : To be 
selected.. 

tmUA 100m freeetyle: P Rickard (Cfty of 
Newcastle), K Ptekorfng (Shnwrersl 200» 
freeetyle: H Mansfield — 

Rickard. 400m freestyle: 


Rickard. 200m lmekstroke: Page, 
Rickard. 100m bnmitatialte. H Frank 


rank. 

1 0tter butterfly: G AHdns 


Denmark and The Nether- 
lands pursue a joint celebration 
in their bid to promote the 
favourable acclaim of European 
cricket in today's penultimate 
round ofqualifymg group games 
in the ICC Trophy. 

the Danes, tuti-oi renewed 
cheer after surviving 
Wednesday's scare against Ke- 
nya, will join Zimbabwe as the 
other semi-finalists from Group 
One of cricket's mini-world cup 
if they beat Malaysia at Bewdley 
today. If not, they would need to 
defeat Bangladesh in their final 
group match on Monday to go 
through. 

The Netherlands take on 
Gibraltar in Group Two know- 
ing that their seventh successive 
win should guarantee top spot in 
the section, at the very least by 
the distinction of a superior run 
rate. The Dutch have a promis- 
ing blend of youth and experi- 
ence with Ron Elferink, who 
made a century in the 1982 
event, coming to the fore as a 
bonder. He has already taken six 
wickets on two occasions this 
time round. 

The other Group Two semi- 
final place is between the United 
States and Bermuda but the 
Americans, who have perhaps 
surprised themselves in staying 
in contention, have been hit by 
the departure home on financial 
considerations of both Jefferson 
Miller and Teddy Foster, two of 
their leading players. 


ICC TROPHY TABLES 

_ P W LPta 

Group 1 

ZfmtatareB 6 0 24 
Denmark A 3 1 12 
Malaysia 5 3 2 12 
Ea3t Africa 5 2 3 8 

Bangladesh 5 3 3 6 
Kenya 4 1 3 4 

Argantina5 0 5 0 

Group 2 

Nethertandae 6 0 24 

USA 7 6 1 -24 
Bermuda 6 fi 1 20 
Canada 7 4 3 18 
Papua NG 8 3 3 12 
■F*6 2 4 6 
Hong Kona 6 2 4 8 
bade o 6 o 
Gibraltar 6 0 6 0 

Second XI championship 

BOURNSftOUTH: Ken! II 201 and 161 lor 
OJS G Hlnks 124 not out): Hampshire II 
401 for 3 dec (□ R Turner 145. RJ Scott 
140). 

NUNEATON: Warwickshire I 109 (R K 
ffingworfh 6 tor 15) and 156 for 1 (W J P 
Matthews 91 not ouL R l H B Dyer 551 
Worcestersh i re II 236 (R K iBngwarth 83, 
S Monkhouee 4 for 75L 
HORSHAM: Sussex if 251 for 8 (too (I 
Wedey 80. J F Sykes 4 for 47) and 68 tor ft 
MUdtesex 383 forBdec(Kfl Brown 50. M 
A Rosebany 90. N R C Madaurfn 76. A M 
Brednfitor 134). 

ELLAND: Yorkshire fl 146 (Mediycolt 5 tar 
641 and 128 tor 3; Surrey B 276 (N Fatener 
137, Booflt41or 89. 

LYDNEY: Glamorgan I1 1 79 (A L Jonas 48. 
G A Brad&um 6 for 3Z) and .74 tor 1; 
Gloucestershire D 373 CJ P AckBson 163). 
NEWARK: Lancashire N 297 tar 5 doc (M 


NEWARK Lancashire N 297 tar S dee (M 
Chadwick 84. 0 P Hurtoas 72, N J Speak 
00 not out PM Such 4 tor 82) and 113 tor 


4(1 D Austin 52 not out); NottfctframaMni 
0 1 98 (M NawaH 78, D P Hughes 5 for 55. 1 
C Davidson 5 farm). 
LU MEHWUH IfeLriceswr ah ire 6330 tor 
9 dec (J C Baktorstone 159. P D Bowtar 
80. wnams 4 for 96) and 62 tor 4: 
N ort i sria iio na htre 1 1 248 (R WWams 98. M 
Briers 4 tor SSL 


(Port sm outh Northaaai M Bredtoy (Kaiy 
CoSege). 200m butterfly: D Evans (Wigan 
Wasps), Bredtoy. 200m luU tildual mad- 
ter- S Travis (Portsmouth Northsea), 
MarnfiekL 400m taArkfuM nmdtoy: 
Travis. Evans. 4 x 100m to ae a tyla relay: 
RUcanL- Mansfield. Pickaring. Atkins. 4 x 
»a Irea a toto relay: MaremU, Rickard. 
Mson, Pldterkm. 4 x HKhn maday: Tb be 
selected. Divinre tob^bore* P McCord 
Southend) an d S Jackson (ShefltoM). 

McCord. Synchronized 

svrtn u mpg: Solo: J Sartwp (Raadtog 
Royatsi J Pmsior (Bamef ■■■■ 
Duet: FYwnon.S Alan (Reading RpyafefcS 
Northey (Reading Rowto). A Daverexxt 
(Wateaa).T eneg Alcn. ueronport. V Bson 
Royals), S Loyd JBanwt 
Nontiey. Preston. S Mctierds 
IK Wtshart (CaUmdata). M 
fres: Bristol 


Hertfordshire’s tale 
of eastern promise 

Minor Counties Cricket by Mike Deny 
Hertfordshire, one of Minor success over Wiltshire last week. 
Counties cricket’s corps d’e/ite. They won the match when 
are again emerging as worthy of Wiltshire taii-ender, Nat 
a flutter for 1986 honours. Prosser, a newcomer to the 
Two wins in their opening Minor Counties scene this sea- 
four championship fixture^, an son at the age of 38, had to retire 
improbable last-over triumph to hospital with a compressed 
gleaned from a rain-shortened fracture of a cheek-bone re- 
match at Cumberland and a ceived from a short-pitched 
five-wicket victory over Noe- delivery by Keith Arnold. 



folk, have given them the early 
leadership of the eastern di- 
vision table. 


Hertfordshire are also still 
involved in the One-day Tro- 


Cumberiand also have two phy. the competition they won 
wins from four games, the first in 1984. They a re pi tted against 
of which was an innings verdict Durham, the current holders, in 
over Suffolk, last year’s di- the semi-finals on Sunday, July 
visional winners,, on a Carlisle 6- The other tie sees Norfolk 
wicket that has a growing notori- play Oxfordshire following their 
ety for low scores. Suffolk were record-breaking exploits m last 
twice bowled out for less than Sunday's quarter-final against 
100 to surrender on a ground Lincol n shire when they scored 
where Dnfum bad been dis- 336 for five off 55 overs, Steve 
missed for just 83 last year. Plumb following his two centu- 
Cheshire, Devon, Wiltshire ries in "the championship match 
and Oxfordshire are the western against Bedfordshire with his 
division winners so fir with the third consecutive Norfolk cen- 


Bracewell 
has the ■ 
students in 
a spin 

New Zealand took a firm grip 
on their game against the Com- 
bined Universities at Fenner s 
after they declared at their 
overnight score and then dis- 
missed the students for 1 58. __ 
Golding, Rutnagur and Ba- 
ofTered the main resistance to 
BraceweU’sspin bowlingand the 
pace attack of Watson. 
Bracewell finished with four for 
22 and Watson four for 31- fa 
the 105 minutes left. Gray hit 50 
and Franklin 30 in a score of 84 
for no wicket. 

Coney, the New Zealand cap- 
tain, sprang a surprise when he 
declared at288 for three, leaving 
Rutherford nine, runs short of 
his century. . 

Bail, of Cambridge, and 
Hagan, of Oxford, took the 
Universities' total into double 
figures after three oveis. Ster- 
ling kept finding the edge of 
both bats and, without a thud 
man, runs came freely with 20 
arriving in even time, out when 
the score was 38. Franklin took 
a fist low catch at third slip , 
Coney made his first bowling 
change when Gray's spin took 
over from Sterling at the Pavil- 
ion end for the 13th over. 
Watson's second success came 
when Bail offered no stroke and 
was raven out leg before to leave 
the Combined Universities 42 
for two. 

Watson, who bowled un- 
changed for an ho ur-and-a-ba! f, 
was finally relieved by 
BraceweiL Tooley was the next 
batsman to go with the total on 
54. He was caught by Edgar for 
five at extra cover after failing to 
judge Gray’s spin correctly, 
when Bracewell had Fell 
snapped up by Franklin at short 
leg. the students were struggling 
David Thorne, the Oxford 
captain, and David Price, his 
Cambridge counterpan, stayed 
together lor the last 30 minutes 
before lunch for an unbeaten 
fifth wicket stand worth 21 runs 
as the total reached SO for four. 
They added 1 1 runs after the 
interval but then both batsmen 
went in successive overs. 

NEW ZEALANDERS: firet Innings 288 
tor 3 dec (K R Rutherford 91 not out. B A 
Edgar 75, J V Corny 58 not out). 

Second Innings 

TJ Franklin not out 30 

EJ Gray not out— 50 

Extms(lb 3. nb 1) -4 

Total (no wkt) M 

COMBINED UNTOS 

P A C Bafi tow b Watson 22 

DA Hagan cFrankknb Watson 11 

DJFefcFranldkibBracewsB 9 

C D M Tooley C Edgar b Gray 5 

D A Thome b Bracgmrt 18 

*0 G Price c Btoin b Sterikn 12 

R S Rutnagur c Rutherford 6 Brscewea 26 

A KGokSngb Watson 28 

tAD Browne Crowe b Bracewell — 0 

A M G Scott not out 4 

J E Davidson b Scott 0 

Extras (b1D.toS.nbW J3 

TOW 158 

FALL OF WICKETS: 1-28. 942. 3-64. 4- 
59. 5-91, 6-93, 7-126. 8-126. 9-156, ID- 
156. 

BOWLING: StkSng 18-3-71-1; Watson 
152-5-31-4; Gray 198-19-1; Bracewel 
30-17-22-4. 

UmptreK H D Bird and K E Palmer. 

Gloucester’s ■ 
fast men 
are too slow 

Gloucestershire, who paid the 
maximum of £8.000 in fines last 
summer for not bowling their 
oveis quickly enough, are in 
trouble again. They have av- 
eraged 18.2 overe an hour in 
their first 10 matches against a 
required rate of 18.5. 

David Graveney, the county's 
captain, said yesterday that with 
only two matches left before the 
mid-season penalties are ap- 
plied his players have no 
chances of avoiding the fine 
“With two very quick bowlers in 
David Lawrence and Courtney 
Walsh it is difficult to keep us 
with the required over rate." he 
said. 

“When the wickets are as 
responsive as they have been for 
some of our matches recently 1 
have to keep the fast men on. 
But I must admit our high 
number of no balls, the equiva- 
lent so far of 19 overs, hasn't 
helped.** 

The county dub will pay half 
the fine, but the players must 
raise the other half themselves. 



latter claim rag a controversial tury in making 162 of them. raise the other balfihem selves. 


ENTERTAINMENTS 


CAMDEN PLAZA 488 2443 
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i<UO 61111 Info 930 4250 / 
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Doors open Dally 2.00 5.00 
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acmes. £2-50 MM* avai lab le 
Monday ail pwf*. 















r\~-. 



s the* 1 a 


THE TIMES FRIDAY JIJNF. 77 1986 


ft 




BBC 1 


Today’s television and radio programmes 


39 


Edited by Peter Dear 
and Peter Davalle 


l?Pin 

ft ; 

■ v„V 3 =d iLf 

: 

■jf 


: S*S t %' k '£iS 
. - 

; ‘°«n 


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an pair 


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r-'.. \ 

• a r . 

. *'■ . • 
. • "■ *r *.• ^ 

■ . rtj 
* W:;»n- 

' . ^5 

' •' ’'sa? 


(L5S Coofax AM. 

6J50 Breakfast Time with 
Debbie Greenwood and 
Nick Ross. Weather at 
R55.7J25, 7.55, 8^5 and 
8-55; regional news, 
waafter anchrafflc at-6L57, 
727, 727 and 8 l 27; 
fwHonal and Intamational 
news at 7.QO, 7 JO, uo, 
*-30.and 9.00; World Cup 
and Wimbiedoo reports at 
7.15 and A-ISiLynnFSittJ 

Wood s consumer report 

a t BJXk a review of the 

morning newspapers at 
; 8J37.PUK. the weekend’s 

T advice: ami the fatestpop 

* ' music news. The guests 

* Include actor Sbnon Ward. 
9.20 The Parent Programme. 

Elsa Ferri of the National 
■ GhBdren’s Bureau with a 
< . gokje to for parents on 

-finding the best ptaygrouo, 
nureery school or (fey 
*■■ care; and an examination 

: -SSSSEgS#" 5 

School.10.50 Ceefax. 

7 1-Q0 News After Noon with 
i . ._ Rtetrard Whitmore and 

* - : Moira Stuart, includes 

news headfines with 
; : subtitles 1.25 Regional 

news and weather 1.30 Mr 
.Bemifr) 

'1.45 Wimbledon 86 . The fifth 
. . - .day’s play, introduced by 
7 ttahy Carpenter. 4.12 
7 Rexona) news. 

‘ 415 . The Amazing Advenhaes 
of Hugh: Introduced by 


TV- AM 


6.15 Good Morning Britain, 
Rented byNick Owen 

and Jayne Irving. News 
Hcmeyoombe 

KKSSKT 

exer^saa at cartoon 
pop music news at 
7^55; Jimmy Greaves’s 

S^sASSlSttlSas 

aBaas" 


ITV/LONDON 


9 - 2 S Thames news headlines 
followed by FBim The 


. . jJimess, 

Jack Hawkins, Anthony 
Steel and Flora Robson. 
■The true story of the 
George Cross island as ft 
was defended by the RAF, 
ts, from the 

.Directed by 

Brian Desmond Hurst 
11 .25 Home Cookery 
CM*. The Perfect 
. Omelette, (rt 
1 11-30 About Britain. The history - 
of the Channel Islands 
wntinues with ihe story of 
Sark and Includes film of 
the lata Dame never 
before seen on television. 

1 12JM Teetime and Claudia. An 
animated story for the 
■ M 12.1b Rainbow, 
mma made fun by 



SuxhlhggdtnddanMetn 
Channel 4,1030pm 


BBC 2 


•Friday night summe r time 
TV. they say, is when we are 
supposed to hang up our 

brains, forget the worries of the 

week^lumpinour 

armchairs^nd im waves of 
undemanding entertainment 
wash over us. And, with two 

Striking exceptions, tonight's 

television conforms with that 

pattern .The only problem with 

these two odd-men-out is that 
you are going to need strang 
stomachs to cape with themJtat 
that this shotSdbe any 
difficulty If you have managed to 
survive afl the previous 
editions of the surgical series 

SSSMfU 1 TMBR HANDS 
(BBC2, 9.30pm). compered with 
wtvch tonight's fflm about a 
youngiady whose back Is sliced 
open© correct a spine 
deform ity.is practfoafly htoryfift ss 
C only two tablespoons of 


CHOICE 


are shed). It helps, too, that 


surgicafiy. Hence the ctose- 
jps of sliced scrotums, and 


the operation is also a bit of a 

comic. While looping wires 
around the steel rod that will 
bring the spine back to true 
rather Eke the bamboo sticks we 
use to tie up tomato plants, 
he makes the observation that 
the next time the girl goes 
throiKpi an airport metal- 
detedbn test she win nave 

ECSTACY (Channel 4. 10.30pm). 
a film about infertility and how 
medical science is trying to get 
round it rightly assumes that 
if we care deeply about this 
private misfortune, then we 
ought to be able to take 
everything the film throws at 
us, both emotionally and 


SL 

Upsof j 

womb mucus, and blocked 
Fallopian tubes, and the birth of a 
baby. And hence the sad 
stones of guilt feelings by 
childless couples .and the 
hopes - some dashed, some 
futfiBed - of those who try for 
a test-tube baby. 

•Shorn of its visual 
dimension. George Etherege's 
comedy of manners. THE 
MAN OF MODE (Radio 3,7.45pm) 
is devriishty difficult to follow, 

and I was forced to rely on 
famifiar voices (Jacobi Anna 
Massey and the late-lamented 
Nigel Stock) to supply the 
compass points I desperately 
needed to get through this 
witty maze of 17th century 
dalliance. 



Kugkens and Lucy Van 
DaeloeBo). Cramer 
(Studies in C.G*nd A minor 
Pleasants, tonepteno), 
Beethoven (Romance No 2: 
Szeryng /Amsterdam 
Concertgebouw), Bax 
ir Woods), 
i (Pastorale for 
fibm.strmg quartet). fLOQ 
News 
&05 ProkofteKthree 

unpublished dances from 
Romeo and Juliet. Milhaud 
(Le printemps: GUon 
Kremer.viottn and Bana 
Kremer.pi an tm). Dukas 
_ (Symphony In C).9JX) News 
9-05 This Week s Composer 
Sibelius. Tone poem. The 
Bard; Prelude and SiBte No 

1: The Terrmst Op io9; 
tone poem tapiola 
19-00 Junto Otake; piano 

recital. Mtnart(Variations 
in Bflat major. K500), Chopin 
(Mazurka In A minor Op 
17 No 4. and Nocturne in B 


Tony Hart (r) 420 
Dopnbni 


and the Three 
Mttskehounds. Cartoon 
series. (0 445 Fast 

- - Fwwant Video fun for the 

young. 

5.10 Qtnw Ben. Adventures of 
a young-boy with a pet 
bear.- 

5.35 World Cup Report 
400 News with Sue Lawiey and 
' Nicholas WftcheD. 

-Weather.- 
L35 London Ptus. 

-00 Wogan. Brian Jameson, 
sitting amongst the potted 
ptemsfor the last time, 
ghres agusWng welcome 

- to Pat Phoenix, Pearl 


1 J 0 


*- 


... . 

‘■fv. 


i provides the 

music. ■' 

7.40 No Place Uke Home. 

.. Domestic comedy series 
• starring WRIiam- Gaunt as 
•- toefraugftt father, tonight 


1 1230 Jobwatch. How German 
store-ownens train their 
shop assistams. (shown 
on Sunday) 

1-00 News at One with Leonard 
Parkin 1.20 Thames news 
presented by Trida 

Sasisr 

Conned. Thriller about a 
sister who, when her 
policeman brother is 
murdered, goes 
undercover to bring the 
kiflers to Justice. Directed 
by Charles Saunders. &00 
Take the High Road. 
Archie Menses Is upset by 
children tfintina in a 


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terms with the fact that hs 
own, unmarried, son is 
- ' about to make him a 
‘ _ -grandfather, (rt (Ceefax) 
8.10 Dynasty. Alexis discovers 
the existence of a long- 
tost Carrington and makes 
plans to bring him from 
Australia to stfr up more 
dirt in the Carrington 
J _ residence. (Ceefax) 

A 00 News with John Huraphrys 
v and Andrew Harvey. 

^ Weather. 

16-30 Big DeaLRobtry Box, 

* desperately trying to kick 
the cards habit tor the 
sake of Jan, becomes 
half-owner of the Dragon 

' Ckib. His hopes are snort-. 

* lived when a criminal 
associate of his partner 
. makes an appearance on 
the scene, (r) (Ceefax) 

1020 Mastermind. As a taster to 
Sunday night's final, 
Magnus Magnusson, 
Introduces the five finafists 
- Michael Formby. a 
chartered suivwor from 

* Aintree; Philip McDonald, 

: a schoolmaster from 

LnmpoobHendy 
" i Tarquhar-SmWi. a teacher 
from Stamford; Jennifer 
i Keaveney, a carews 

« information officer from 

Canterbury; and Owen 
. . Gunned, a schoolteacher 
from Bajham. 

10S Wkitoledon 88 . Desmond 
~ Lynam Introduces the 

Match of the Day. 

T.125 Film: The Silence of 
~ Donald tang (1979) 

V starring La Var Burton and 

Paul Sovrtno. A made-for- 
telavfsion drama, based 
ohatruecase,abouta 20 - 
r old deaf and dumb 
: youth accused of 
*• murdering a prostitiita. 

* Because na could not 

defend himself he is sent 
to an institution and his 
-*• - lawyer, also deaf, begins a 
five year crusade tor 
/ustice for his client. 

Directed by Frank Peny. 

:1.10 Weather 


i news headBnes 
320 Sons and Daughters. 
400 Rainbow. A repeat of the 
programme shown at 
12.10 415 The Moomins. 
Cartoon series, (r) 425 
Scooter Doo 450 The 


Bizz. Fashions and 

vkleoshow^ 

Kelly Temple and Usa 
Mfitrwnfl 

5.15 The Parlour Game. With 
Dave Ismay. Liza Goddard 

- and Alfred Marks. 

5.45 News with Aiaaair Burnet. 

620 The 6 O’clock Show. 
Michael Aspef and his 
team take a wry look at 

- London and Londoners. 

720 Me and My Girt. In a 

moment of madness 
Simon swaps jobs with a 
radiator painter. Starring 
Richard O'Sullivan and 
Tim Brooke-Taytor. ft) 

720 Memational Athletics. 
The McVKie's Challenge 

. match between England 

- and the United States from 
Gateshead International 
Stadium. The 

- commentators are Aten 

• Parry and Peter Matthews, 
(continued on Channel 4) 

920 The Practice. Drama serial 
set in a modem Health 
Centre. (Oracle) 

1020 News at Ten with Alastair 
Burnet and Martyn Lewis. 

1020 The London Programme. 

In The Next Paper Wan 
The Battle of the 
Evenings, John Taylor 


threat to the Standard 's 
five year monopoly of the 
London evening 
newspaper market 
Followed by LWT news 
headfaies. 

1120 HawsB Fiue-O. Steve 
McGarratt solves another 
sun-kissed crime. 

11J50 FBnc The Humanoid 
(1 079) starring Richard 
Kiel, Barbara Bach and 
Arthur Kennedy. Science 
fiction thrfiter sat in a post 
nuclear war wodd in which | 
a mad scientist has 
created a mutant human 
with which he plans to 
. take over the world. 
Directed by George B 
Lewis. 

120 WgttThckjglits. 


University: 

lament and the 
1 720 Weekend 
Outlook. Ends at 725. 
920 Ceefax. 

125 WfanMedon 86 . Action 
from the Centra and 
Number One Courts on 
the fifth day of the 100 th 
Championships, 
introduced by Harry 
Carpenter. Tm 
comm en tate s are Dan 
Masked, John Barrett, 
Gerald Wiliams, Barry 
Davies, Mark Cox, Bid 
ThreHaB, Ann Jonas and 
Virginia Wade. 

820 Gardeners’ World. Gooff 
Hamilton and Clay Jones 
visit Herterton House, 
Cambo, Northumberland, 
the home of Frank and 
Mario rie Lawiey. Ten 
yeara ago they decided to 
turn a derelict acre of 
farmyard into an EngRsh 
country garden, and 
among the results are a 
physic garden full of 

aromatta and medicinal 
herbs, arranged in random 
dumps of colour; and a 
wafledgarden. essential 
when 700 faet up without 
any tree protection, with 
over 2,000 hardy plants in 
beds of individual colotv. 
920 Entertainment USA 2 , 
Introduced by Jonathan 
King in Dallas, Fort Worth, 
Houston and San Antonia 
On his travels, Mr King 
Interviews Julio Igleslas; 
attends a rodeo; meets 
rock band ZZ; and talks to 
a Nasa astronaut and 
toHenry Thomas, star of 
the film. ET. Plus, the 
latest videos, film and 
television cfips, and the 
United States pop music 
charts, (revised repeat) 
920 Vow life to Their Hands. 
This final programme of 
the series features the 
treatment of Lisa South 
from Scarborough who, 
since she was 15 years of 
age, suffered from 
scoitosis, a Quasimodo- 
type deformity. She was 
fortunate teat Robert 
Dickson, Professor of 
Orthopaedic Surgery at 
Leeds University; had 
developed a new 
technique to deal with her 
condition, (see Choice) 
(Ceefax) 

1000 Dora Russefl. A repeat of 

Dora 1 R^Mfl.^rtfo^d 
last month, to Bel 
Mooney. She emerges a 

^^toSsrheait^ 
education, women's rights . 
and world peace - 
determined not to be 
remembered as merely 

the second wife of 

. , Bertrand Russefl. (Ceefax) 

1040 Newsnight includes a 
report from Dublin on the 
day the Irish people vote 
in a referendum on 
legafising (Svoroe In the 
Republic. 1125 Weather. 

1120 The Lords TMs Week. 
Christopher Jones 
reviews the week’s 
proceecSngs in tin House 
of Lords. 

12.10 Whistle Test A repeat of 
last Tuesday's 
programme which 
included interviews wflh 
the new 


2.15 Their 

220 Grove Music. The Grove,’ 
better known as the 
Netting HSJ Gate <flstrtct of 
London. Is a hot-bed of 
musical expression. Trite 

programme explores Hs 
diversity and indudes 
performances from a 1980 
concert during the area's 
carnival featuring Aswad, 
Sons of Jah, Brimstone 
and Junior Brown, who 
also talk about then- 
musical background, (r) 

325 Aston Arts. In part two of 
the series on Aston artists 
in Britain, The Tara Arts 
Group, Shaffique Uddin, 
Great Indian Dancers, and 
Alpana Sen Gupta 
entertain. 

415 Arrow to the Sun. An 
animated film based on a 
Pueblo Indian folk tale. 

49) Dancin' Days. The final 
episode of the week and 
JuBa is followed and 
watched by a strange man. 

520 The Chart Show. Pop 
music charts from tras 
country and overseas. 

545 Revid. A review of the 
week's video releases. 

620 SofidSouL This week's 
guests are Bill 
Princess and 
David. 

620 Tube Special: Wham 
Wrap! Paula Yates talks to 
George Michael and 
Andrew Ridpetey on the 
ave of thefr fareweH 
concert at Wembley 
Stadium. The programme 
Includes excerpts from 
their best video and 
television performances 
and cflps from thefr 
celebrated tour of China. 

720 Channel Ftour news with 
Peter Sissons and 
Nicholas Owen, includes a 
report on the abifity of our 
legal system to meet the 
demands of modern-day 
justice. Weather. 

720 Book Choice. David 
Lodge reviews VIkram 
Seth's The Golden Gate, a 


On long wave. VW v a r ia tions at 
end. 

525 Shipping. 620 Naws Briefing; 
Weather. 6.10 Farming. 


1 folk singing star, 
Suzanne Vega, and Steve 
W&iwood who talks about 
Na latest album. Back in 
the High Lite. Ends 1.15. 


relationships to 
California's ’yuppie' belt 
820 What tbe Papers Say, with 
freelance journalist 
. Michael Leapman. 

8.15 Looks Famiter. Robin 
Bailey, Frank Muir and 
Beryf Reid, prompted by 
Denis Nordem, reminisce 
about the en tert ai ners and 
entertainments of the 
Thirties and Forties. 

.920 Intamational Athletics. 

The McVitia's Challenge 
match between England 
and the United States, 
continued from ITV. 

1020 Cheers. Diane Is feefing 
depressed because she 
thinks she is being 
excluded from the bar's 
clique, so the bar clientele 
bend over backwards to 
make her feel at home. 
(Oracle) 

1020 Lite’s' 

. and the 

final progra m me of tiie 
series examines the range 
of options and tre a tment s 
available to childless 
couples, (see Choice) 

1120 Frinu Return Engagement 
(1983). A documentary 
centred on the stage 
debate between CGordon 
Liddy, the man behind the 
Watergate break-in, and 
flower power drugs 
advocate, Dr Timothy 
ted by Alai 


620 Tf 

720, S20 News. 

Business News. 625, 725 
Weather. 720,820 
News. 725, 825 Sport 725 
Thought for the Day. 825 
Yesterday in Parfiament 
820 Letters. 827 
Weather, Travel 
920 News 

925 Desert Island Discs. 

Jackie Stewart, the 
former racing driver, to 

conversation with 
Michael Parkinson (sMr) 

9.45 Feetfoack. Christopher 

DunMeyfoSows up 
toteners' comments about 
the BBC, Its programmes 
and potties. 

1020 News: International 
Assignment BBC 
correspondents report from 
around the world. 

1020 Morning Story: The 
Jumping Frog of 
Calaveras County . by Mark 
Twain. Read tv fen 
Glover. 

1025 Dafly Service (New Every 

11X. BSfcSSffl? 

West John Roberts 
reports on the worsening 
crisis in American 
farming, write its huge 
accumulation of food 
surpluses. 

1148 Natural Selection: The 
Watersfob. 

1220 News; The Food 
Programme. Derek 
Cooper celebrates 400 years 
of tha potato. 

1227 Tha Cabaret Upstairs. 

Some of the top acts to 
be found on tha London 
cabaret circuit 122 S 
Weather 

120 The World at One: News 

140 The Archers. 125 

220 Na^^oman's Hour. 

Meet the man who 
bought Morecambe Pier. 

320 News: The Man Who 
Was Thursday, by G K 
Chesterton, dramatized in 
four parts (final episoud 

t* ML 

425 J Kingston Platt... 


lifetime in show business. 
With Ptoer Janes. 

420 Kaleidoscope. A repeat 
of last toghTs edition. 

520 PM: News Magazine. 

520 Shipping. s-S 
Weather 

620 News; Financial Report 

620 Hit List Deryric Guyter 
picks six pieces of music 
he never wants to hear again 
— and explains why to 
Derek Robinson. 

720 News 

725 The Archers 

720 Pick of tee Week. 

Margaret Howard’s 
choice of the past week's 
programmes on BBC 
ratio. 

820 Law in Action. With 
Joshua Rozenbarg. 

845 Any Questins? with 
Secretary of State for 
Education Kenneth Baker, 
John Smith MP, Paddy 
Ashdown MP and Joan 
Barren, pub&sher of 
Company magazine. 

920 Letter from America by 
Alistair Cooke. 

9-46 Kalei d oscope, includes 
comment on Outside 
Broadcast, at Birmingham 
Rep; and Follies: A 
National Trust guide. 

10.15 A Book at Bedtime: Stffl 
Ufa. by Richard Cobb, 
abridged in 12 parts (1). 

Read by Cyril Luckham. 

10-29 Weather 

1020 The World Tonight 
11.00 Today In Parliament 

11.15 The Fmanckd World 
Tonight 

1120 Week Ending. Satirical 
review of thB week's 
news(s) 

1220 News; Weather. 1223 


major. Op 62 No 
ILScriabfnl 


VHF (available in England and 
S Wales orrfy) as above 
except 525-62 Qbri Weather, 
Travel. 125-220pm 
Listening Conner. 520525 
PM (continued). 1220- 
1.10am Schools Mght-Dme 
Broadcasting: Airtime for 
programmes affected by 
transmitter breakdown 
earlier in the term 


( Radio 3 ) 


On medium wave. VHF variations at 
end of Radio 3 listings. 

625 Weather. 7.00% 

725 Concert Mozart I 
Quartet to A. K 298: the- 


i (Sonata No 2) 
1040 Grieg: Phitearmante play 
Symphonic Dance Op 64 
No 1. and Gothenburg SO 
play Symphony in C 
minor 

1125 Musics Antipua,Cologne: 
Scheidt (Paduan in A 
minor. Cantus V). Blber 
(Partita No 3 in A) and 
works by Krieger. Handel . 
Bacri and Pachelbel (Air) 
1225 Bournemouth SO (under 
WossjL with Thomas 
Christian (violin). Part one. 
Mendelssohn (Ruy Bias 
overture). Bruch (violin 
Concerto No 2). 1.00 
News 

125 Concert (contxf): 

Bruckner (Symphony No 

220 Peter Katin: piano rectal 
Two Impromptus. D 899 
No 3. and D 899, No 2), also 
Sonata in B fiat D 960 
320 Pioneers: American - 
Inspired music toduting 
works by Varese 
(Hyperprism. 1923; 
ionrsatkxi. 1931; and 
Octandre, 1923) and 
Carlos Salzedo 
SdntiBatian 1936. and 
Sonata, 1925) 

420 Choral Evensong: from 
Uandaff Cathedral. 425 
Nows 

5-00 Mainly for Pleasure: 

Michael Berkeley 
presents recorded music 
620 Quits’ Music Sharon 
Isbin plays works by 
Bach, Bruce MacCombie , 
Gershwin (Prelude No 2), 
and Barrios 
725 Lisa Orchestral Songs: 

BBC Concert Orchestra, 
withAmeralGunson 
(mezzo). Works include 
Fast-Marsch zu Goethes 
Jubilaum-Felerand 

Kunstter Festzug 
745 The Man of Mow: satire 
by George Efoerege. with 
Derek Jacobi. Anna Massey. 
Nigel Stock. Sarah 
Bade), Maureen O'Brien, 
Kathryn Hurlbutt, Helena 
_ Brack and John Webb 

925 Stradetia: Capela 

Clementina. Sinfonia a 3 
in A minor, and Sonata di 
viteB'mD 
10-00 Edita Grutarova and 
Friedrich Haider: 
soprano and piano redtaL 
Includes works by 

Brahms, Debussy aznd Wolf. 

11.15 Egon Petri: piano redtaL 


Beethoven (Sonata m A 
flat Op 1 10), Liszt (Fantasy 
on two motives from 
Marriage of Figaro). Bujsoni 
(tndtarHschss Tagebuch), 
and Busoni arrangement of 
Bach's Chaconne In D 
minor. BWV 1004. 

1127 News. 1220 Closedown. 
VHF: Open University. 

From 625am to 625. 
Skinheads. 

( Radio 2 ) 

On medium wave. See Radio 1 
lor VHF 

News on the hour (except 
820pm. Cricket scoreboard 
720pm. Wimbledon starts at 
2.02 (mf only). 

420am Co On Berry (s) 520 Ray 
Moore (s) 720 Derek Jameson (s) 
920 Ken Bruce 11.00 Jimmy 
Young plus legal problems 
answered by Bd Thomas (s) 

1.05pm David Jacobs (s) Sum 
Wimbledon 86. 720 Hubert 


920 International Athletics 
(McVitie's Challenge 
international) 925 Sports Desk 
1020 Nial Murray Sings 1020 
Bemie Cfifton's Comedy Show 
11.00 Angela Rippon (stereo 
from midnight) 120am Jean Chaffis 
presents Nightride (s) 320-420 
A Little Nigm Music (s) 

/ Radio 1 ) 


On medium wave. VHF 
variations at end 
News on tee half hour from 
620am until 920pra and at 1220 
midnight 

520am Adrian John 720 Mike 
Smith's Breakfast Show 920 
Simon Bates 1220 News beat 
(Steve Annett) 1245 Gary Davies 
320 Steve Wright 520 
Newabeat (Steve Annett) 545 
' id Out (Janice Long) 720 
. Peebles 1020-12.00 The 
Biday Rock Show with Ian 
GiJIan (s) VHF Radios 1 A 2> 
400am As Radio 2. 2.00pm 
Gloria Hunnifond (s). 320 David 
Hamilton (s). 525 John Dunn 
(sy 720 As Radio 2 . 1020 As Ratio 
. 1220-420an As Radio 2. 


WORLD SERVICE 


620 Newsdesk 630 Mandian 720 News 

7 JM T wemy-foix Hours 730 Best o« 

Bntatn 7.45 Sporowo rid 620 News 629 
9*0 Music 

Now 920 News 929 Review of British 

Press 9-15 Work! Today 930 Ftnwdal 

News 925 Tims Machine moo News 

1021 Off the Baatsn Track 10.15 Mer- 
chant Navy Prcpramme 1120 News 1129 
NewsAbout Brian 11.15 Inthe Meantime 

1130 Meritfian 1220 Radb Newsreel 

12-15 Jazz lor the Asking 1245 Sports 
Roundup 120 News 1A Twenry-fbw 
Hours 130 SpOrtswortd 220 News 221 

Outloak 225 A Perfect Spy 320 Radio 

Newsreel 3.15 A Woman* No Inw- 

timoa 420 News 429 Commentary tl5 

SpOrtswortd 545 Sports Roundup 7^ 
About Britain 920 News 929 Twenty- 
Rour Horns 930 Sdence In Action B-00 
News 921 SpOrtswortd 9.15 Music Now 
945 Heat of the Dm 1020 News 1006 

WOrid Today103S <W from Northed 

tierind 1030 Financial News 1040 

Rahectlns 1045 ^xirts Roundup 1120 

News 1129 Commentary II.ISFtam tha 

WaekitelUO BBC Saigers 1220Naws 
About Britain 12.15 Radio Newsreel 1230 

About Britain 1245 Recording of the 

Weak 120 News 1221 Outlook 130 Off 

the Beaten Track 145 A Perfect Spy 220 

News 209 Review of British Press 2.15 

Sportswjrid 230 People and PoMes 320 

News 329 News About Britain 3.15 WorW 

Today 445 Reflections 430 Financial 
News 520 News 529 Twenty-Far Hours 
545 The Wodd Today. AM times in QMT. 


not reel ai nonte. 

i Cycle: The Agony 
heEctoscy.This 


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7200 iBkg Feel Grp Sales 900 
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STARLIGHTEXPRESS 

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ANDREW LLOYD WEBBER 
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24br7 DirCCMS 2428. 

Ore Sales 930 6125. 

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OAJUBCK S 636 4601 CC 179 
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T200. ElB 8 WM mal S. Sat 6 


BBC1 WALES &35pmh620 
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CupRoport lrtOam-1.15 News and 

weMhBcSq3 71AND63»m-72CRB- 

porting Scotland. 740-&lb 

tmNORTHSfN IRELAND 
40 TodB/sSport 540to20 

cup Rb- 

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Yeatefoay I.IOntel.f 5 News and weath- 
er. ENGLAND 635pm-720 Regtarte^ 
newsmagazines. . 

BBC2f 0HTHB,N WELAND: 

T^a fcTOLANDS: Them and Us. NORTH: 
Tl» Watehtower - Guantian of the 
Bomber Legend. NORTH-EAST: Vm by 
Two. NORTH-WEST: A Collection of 

[iK&ridu^SOUTH-WEST: Floyd on 

Food. WEST: Them and Us. 

S4Q D>ys 130 Birds 

J00 Skori Sbri Z f 5 In- 
WrvaltiL® Fim: Vacation from Mar- 

Ctim ajoy 545 Rwa 620 said 
Swd tM Tube Sperfel 720 Nstwddmn 
Sadh 739 Taro Tant825 V BydAr 
fHKagPWu 'Mtoan 93«f Kin and 

MBs 950 Flm-. Success is the Best 

Rwrenge 11 30 Athtstlcs 1230am 

TYNE TEES AsUmdonex- 

Lookaramd 130-320 FBne War of the 
Worlds 6.15i4S Now You See n 
620 Northern We 630 Me 5 My Girt 
720-730 Abort Market 10L32 
Wtifrre 12JMI M*a Hammer 120am 
Ctmstmi Calendar, Closedown. 


REGIONAL TELEVISION VARIATIONS 


HTV WEST AsLond o f ’«- 

. aptMSBiftirri- 
don Frie s 1020 ftiy 

BntairljMpa News 130-320 

iZ35ani Closedown. 

.H TV WALES SSSOL 

1020 Poseidon Files 62Qpev-72D 
Wales at Stir 1030-11.15 anor. 


BORDER 

1030 Fireball XL5 1025 Groovy 
Ghoules 1125-1 130 Cartoon 120pm 
News 130 FBm: Dublin Nlghtrnare 
245 Canon tathe Kitchen 3L00 Protectors 
230400 Young Doctors 5.15-54S 
Now You See IT630 Lookaround 630 
Take the High Road 720-730 Albion 
Market 1030 Return to Eden 1215am 
Closedown. 


GRANAD A M London »- 

cept 82Sa» Granada 
Reports 930 Man and Jenny 935 
§reoewatch 1005 Mfta1(L30 Jayce and 

tiie Wheeled Wamors 1120 Granada 

Reports 11.05 About Britain 1130 Con- 
nections 1135-1200 Granada Re- 
ports 120pm Granada Reports 130 
Week review 200-320 HoM 330- 

43° Young Doctors 5.15-5.45 Now You 
See 1 Gran^ n^xxts 630 Me 
6 My Girt 720-730 AWon Market 1030 
Celebration 1120 V 11.B FBm; Car- 
ry on Dick 135am Closedown. 


Gra mpian 

TNng930B8Btfniefwan Neonach 
9SSes»ne Street 1020 Struggle Be- 
nratii the Seal 1.15-1130 Toytown 
120 Newret30420 FBm; Checkpoint 
5.15-545 ConnectionB 620 North 
Tonight 720-730 Abon Market 1030 
Crossfire 1120 FBrrs Hw Uncanny . 
l25SJaai News. Closedown. 

TSW USemSesatro Street 

ssssssasss 1 *- 

West 625 Action South West eL30 
Spmtsweek 720-730 Albion Market 
l^ggrens F br Al 112 0 FBn: the 
Rlp-OM 1245am Postcript, 

Closedown. 

YORKSHIRE 

Rpboawy950 This a Ctobs Coun- 
hy 10.15 Qentoe 1(L45 European FoBc 
Tates 11.09-1 130 Gather Your 
premns12ton New* 2» Help Yourself 

ISSSSSKiSSSSSc* 

endar 630 Me 6 My Qri 720-730 


Story 10.15 Rakttow 1110- 

»Wc« 1035 Central Weekend 1200 
Ffen: The Honeymoon 140en 
Closedown. 


SCOTTISH *2S«n Sesame 
7 ; 1 1 W street 1025 Looks 
Tamaor 11.10-1130 GuBwer 120pm 
News 130 Countiy Practice 230 6ookkig 
tor Celebrations 320-330 Pnrawto- 
ners 5. 15-5. 45 Connections 620 News 
and&cttand Today 630 Report 
720-730 AUon Market lOMwaysand 
Means 1120 LatB Call 125 TJ 
Hooker 1225am Closedown. 
ULSTER 808m Sesame 

Street 102S Galwey Way 
1125-1130 Professor KltzeJ 120pm ' 
Urerttow 1 130-320 Ffcn; Grand National 
NtahT 5.15-545 Now You Saa It 620 

Dlfrrem Strokes 720-730 AWon Market 
1030 Witness 1040 Hotel 1135 Bar- 
ney Mjler 1220 News, Closedown. 


1030-1130 Black Orchxl 1. 


News 130 Fifty/FHty 330-300 Survival 
330-420 Country GP 5.15-645 Con- 
nections 620 Channel Report Goes 
French 825 Jane's Dtary t3&-7 J® 

Wrtd Heritage 1030 Prisoner CeSBtock 
H 1130 FBn: Craze 1.15m 
Ctosedown 


1030 Cartoon T 035-11 JO Poseidon 

E?i J BWS5eS^"“ 

Fftrc Dangerous Dawes -The Last De- 
tective 1.10am John Raraty in Par- 
son. Ctosedown. 

1030-1130 stack Orchid 120pm 
News 130 Fifty/Fiftv 230000 Sunrivaf 
330-420 Country GP 5.1 5-545 Con- 

Can Block Hit: 

Company. 




Gwcrno 


EXHIBITIONS 


ANTIQUE DDfTWL AND MEM- 




wrdnedw as June rSMuidw 
Z8 June.i Freeman A Son. Si- 
mon Kavr un. >8 Dover 
SireeL London wi . lOam to 

4wn (SaimOav lOwn lo inno 


OPERA i BALLET 


COUSCUM 8 856 5161 CC 200 
£258 

ENGLISH NATIONAL OKRA 

Toni 7 30 toll perf . . 

StaMtiPVou nan- cast binge 
radh- □hen rewm Jenny 
Dm ala] Tomor 7.00 Uot per I 


I S 856 5161 
CC ?XJ 62S8 

DANCE THEATRE 
OF HARLEM 

Tin W - l u Wyl 1-12 July 
GLYNOOKMOtNE FhUhI Opnra 

wm dm- London PtulTurmooic 
Orcbr U i a nmll 15Ul AoaUSL 


ALUWy Ah- Court. Oa«3A5B78 
00 379 6S65 CC 579 6455 
Croup Sale* 836 5962. 

ONLY mrc nom rrmui 

T0MHULCE 
THE NORMAL HEART 

by LAJWT KMHER 
‘A Mm Mtontow TtutoMal 
Imf Lato 

‘ M m*QHanmmr nmo. 
“NOTINNC SHORT OF 
ffismw s.exp - - 
-Eves 8. Matt Thirr 6 Sal 430 

AUWYCH THEATHE 01-8361 
« 01-379 6233 
Bed Pilee ftws from jLVy 21 
ODfPK J'llv jy al 7.0 

mvnc nun 

“Exrto Mia Su ccw Today 

ANNIE GET YOUR GUN 

IBflfflBlW 
“A popular hu- muaua more 
tomoui unw than any outer 
miMnl o« the century** Tunes 
T-ao Mato Wed 6 Sal EJO . 
34 Ur 7oayn boeuno on flnt 


| BAK8KAM 01 628 8796/638 

8891 CC IMoMSun XOaca-8pmj 

ROYAL SHAKESPEARE 

COMPANY 

MnCAM TVUTK looT 
7 JO. tomor 2.00 6 7 JO THE 
MERRY WIVES OF WINDSOR- 

42. 11-16 July red. price peril 

THE- DANTON AFFAIR by 
Pam Ore 

• TOE PI T tonT tomor 720 PHI- 
USITNES by Mam Go 

From 2 July - eves 750 

LIAISONS OANGEREUSES -• 
onry day uto mail 


«IM WOnn OF THE WORLD" . 

SExp 

CUFF RICHARD 

AS -THE ROCK STAR* 

TOE PORTRAYAL OF -AKASH* 

LAURENCE OLIVIER 

MorvFM 720 TtUl Mat ZJO Sal 6 , 

MteMA TS mi AV AHJUWX 
fW» TODAY'S PERFORMANCE. 

Special warwdin i a 
Tt« mat tor OAP*«. 


teEDMIOl THEATRE 01-888 

THE ORPHAN by Thomas Ot- 
way directed and daapned by 
Philip newse. “A 

BSK'.* 1 iJflK.* J- ,,w ta HT oto *- 

ETNAL WEEK. From IO July 
THEMH* naecRAGT ~ 
COWlEhT ay Bern Henley 


HAMPCimO 732 9501. Em 
8pm. Sals A 30 A 8pm. 

CIRCE A BRAVO by Oeual 
Freed. Run soM auL Returns 
rosy be a\aiLK>le on Die niqbi 
to Wp^teim'o 


OOHMAR WAREHOUSE Cm> Odn 

240 8230 cc 579 6S6S.6433 

T hc w p u plc pn La c nl s m July 6 

me. suns pasbara cook m 
concert. Tue 8. Weo«ai s A 1 1 . 

Sun 33 8 From 8 July 8 by S 


can oi-: 


7200 ibfcg fee) 


.J 01-930 
257a FmCau24hr7dayCC 
240 7200. Gre Sarea 930 6123 

Mon-Frl 820 SW 620 & 8M 

THE GAMBLER 

A mnkal com edy- 

wuu MEL SMITH 

-’-fentHanL-umessly sKIM aland 
iery runny todeed** One. “As 

unoi as Hcking mi a Royal 

Flush" o Tel. “A mes m eric 

m tili n g 1 * WPaTs On. "Hugely 
enjoy *o*e” ft. 

1Y 


MMnr LANE THEATRE ROYAL 

01-836 8108. 01-240 9066.-7. 
FMI cau 24-hour 7-day cc bkas 
240 7200 l no booWnq fee) 


42ND STREET 

A SHOW FOR ALL THE FAMILY 


voted 

BEST MUSICAL 


| HAYMARKCr THEATRE ROYAL 

1 Box onice&oc 01-930 9832 mt 
Call 24 hour 7 day cc booWnea 
01-240 7200 

750 Mats Wed and Sal 20 

“VANESSA REDGRAVE 

-few never been fan" D.Tel 

“TIMOTHY DALTON 

-Cfaariwatfc. — ft 

IN 

ANTONY & CLEOPATRA 

TonT 7.30 until July 2 unaU 
In Repertoire with 

THE TAMING OF THE 
SHREW 

Nerd perl July 2 level 
until July 9 (man 


VMM 

BEST MUSICAL 




r*r 


.pfc 



OOT PoaetHp neurm only 
BOX OFFICE 0273 813411 

ROYAL OPERA HOUSE. Covenl 
Garden. WC2 01-240 
1066/1911 CCSSundby tofb 
01-836 6903. Moo Sal ioam- 
wm- 63 atatmi seats avail from 
lg*m .on the day TKkets; 
Ow« (ram ET SO. BMM ire 
tso&- • 

gertMlfatort RMtot L*» 

Pjowtos ( Scenes ae- Ballet / 
™c Drf«n Tomor 7JO 

r* 90 ** «■ 

****^*1* Wm 278 8916. 

^wlhmb l- 


APOLLO THEATRE ShafleSbury 
As. AST 2663l 434 5698. Flrar 
can 01 240 7200. Gre Sales 01 , 
930 6125. Lad 3 peris. TonT 



Wdart to match IT 

D. Man 

ORPHANS _ 

-TOO PRIST SEE ORPHANS'* 
Sunday Times 
108 TOMORROW! 


eomnjoe ■** 92s 22s? cc 

iNauanal Thenre-s small audi- 

tortum) Pimtews Ton*L Tomor 

750 & June 30 to July T : Opens 

July 2 at 720. Then Juty 3 A 

Jtubr 10 to 16 NEAPTIM by 
Sarah Panleta 

I UHTMHOW Air CendS 930 3216 
CC 379 6565/ 379 6033/741 
9999. Crus 836 3962. Evgs 8.00. 

I Thu mat 2-3a sal Sjo A 850 

-t uam w FARCE AT ITS BEST* 
D Man 

SSV 1 SS£T“ CD SSSfi°£^ 

..WINDSOR DAVIES 


voted 

BBT MUSICAL 

PLATS m PLATERS 


NSW MAJESTY*. Humarkn 
930 4025/6606 2046/2856 
TickcfmaaHr 579 6131 

run cot cc 240 7200 

ANDREW LLOYD WH8ER 


AWARD 

eves ao Mate Wed 5.0 Sal 62 & 
8.30 

Oreup Sales 930 6123 

Parfa Ratoa Ai lDaMi 

DUCHESS 836 8245/240 964& 
ISt Can cr 240 7200 iMInT 
days) cr 741 9999/379 6433. 
El es 8 Wed mau 3 Sate 5 A 850. 


APOLLO THEATRE 437 2663 

MttvFn 820 Sal 4 50 * &ia 
. Thurs mate 3.00 
PREVIEWS 1 A 2 JULY 
QPPflNC 3 JLLY A T TPM 
PAUL SCOFKLO 
ItOWAffB ROLLMS. 

BURLHBW 

SECT PLAY 


nrm 


and 


THEATRES 


M THB SUPERB EVEtiMH 
; ASTDMMWMr* Btrmlngn-m Ftosl 


, BOULEVARD WiAars ONRt Wl 
*“?*■** or a*S tteoa/OMl I- *sr 2661 CC 579 6fS3 

Et«8 30S..™-teWO 

■SBaasw>* 


CHICHESTER 0343 78131 2 
TOE CHALK CARDEN 
.’..THE RELAPSE 
7,30. Mate- Thu A Sal 230 

Churchill" Bromley 060 6677 
Wtody Crate, MTrluel Ctot M 
Mare Mary Eiei 7 4 5. Mate 

Ttair&-&4 2J30 


RUN FOR YOUR WIFE 

wnuen and otrected by 
RAY COONEY 

I ‘WmWAWNPoStU^’^&t 


FORTUNE lAlr COndl S tr 836 
2238 KP 741 99990n) Sales 990 
6123 Mon to Fri 86al 850 Thm 
« sat 320 

JANE ROGER 

|HP0TAIRE ta REES 

DOUBLE DOUBLE • 

-n hnnek bars your raun m— 

I modern tiieoirtv-Ji could beraree 
a eter BBC " 

“U ma ifa i sk 


A MONTH OF SUNDAYS 

.by Boa Lareey 

MUST END 19 JULY 

I DUKE OF YORKS 836 5122 CC 
836.9857/741 9999/240 7900. 
E\rs 8 Thu 5 Sal 5 & 8.30 

CORffiDY OF THE YEAR 


THE PHANTOM OF THE 
OPERA 

Starring 

„ m. CRAWPORO 
Sarah Stole 

Bnotiinuo Barton 

Opera 9 On. 

■WWS KAO 296 1916 
HEYDAY Dnr 6 Show 7pm. 
C11.Q0, 8am. £820 

S&3SSV7*-'"***- 

Mraleal” Tune Ou3 




5S« SSSjfTEa* 5 * edwajid 

POX, BHCHACL SOUGH. -LH IH 
Paetoy ml TS ELIOT. Eves 8pm 


LYRIC YWATRC Shaftesbury 
A'eWI 01-437 3686, T 01-454 
1650. 01-054 1060- 01754 

5166.7 

COLIN BLAKELY 

“A brilhanl A toyoofty 
comie performancp-* F. Times 
In 

The National Theatre^ acctaiined 
production of 


A CHORUS OF 

„ disapproval 

"HrertbreaktiiDy funny - Gdn 
“Hilarious...-' 6. Times 

“A rare evening of 

cemtc exMlaraUon - Tlmci 
Evas 7.30. Mate Wed and Sal 50. 
Croup Sales 01-930 6123. 

B™* "re student A 
OAP Stand-by 

TOST CALL 24HR 7 DAY 

CC BOOKINGS ON OI 246 7200 
(NO BOOKMQ FEE) 

WINNER OF ALL 
THE BEST COMEDY 
AWARDS FOR 1985 


OLD VIC 928 7616 CC 261 1821 
Croup SWes 930 6125 Eves 
7.30. WM Mate 2-30. San -LO 
4 7 . 45. 

SmON WARD 
DAVID LANCTOH 


"OLAND CURRAM to 

ROSS 

by Terence Raltioan 
»»e.au Vic wfl part* Hran in 


PMBCZ OP WALES 01-930 8681 

2 CC BotUne 9300844/6/6 Crp 

Sale* 930 6123. Krtlb Prvwae 

741 9999. FtoB CrB 24 hr 7 day 

240 7200. 

*TOE-TAPPMG GOOD* O Mat! 

"SEVEN BRIDES FOR 

SEVEN BROTHERS” 


<R Arabto** Ob* 


performance*" LHC 


"1 DEFY ANYONE MOT TO 

ENJ OY IT- F.Tim. 

“9ZVEWTO WAVEN- F- Shorter. 
Eics 750, Mai Thur 6 Sal 3. 


OPEN AM RE GE NTS PARK 

486 2451 CC 579 6433 

cc HoUtru- 486 1933 
*_ .... HHP SU MB m NKHTS 
DREAM Todaj-. Sal & Mon 

7,48, SM Mal 2JB. ROMEO 

AM> JUJET Tins. Wed 7.46. 

Wed Mai 2.30 


«5JMU-oen»T s cc 730 1745 

Mon-Thu 8. Frt 546 A 8 45 
*° JlP by Jbn C an 
5T*9hi- "Vtory haii..*im 
debut. CO!" c Luma. 


LYTTELTON -S* 929 2262 CC 
iNaUuoai Theairr'h proscenium 
stase) Toni 7.46. Tomor 2.16 
now prtcr man a 745. men 
June 3010 July 24 July 8 to IO 
4 Mal Jnhr II BHIMr 
BEACH MEMOIRS by NeU 
Simon 


MAYFAIR 5 CC 629 3036. Mon 
Thu B Frt/SM 5.40 A 8.10 

RICHARD. TODD m 

~Tb» Best TfariBar far pura” S M 

THE BUSINESS OF 
MURDER 

'An unabashed winner" S e» 
"Sensational" Times 

6TH THRILLING YEAR 


STEPPING OUT 

“TRIUMPH ON TAP- SW 
Htt Comedy by Ricnard Harris 
Di rvfled by Julia MrKmtb 

■LAUG H VOU RSPJSRLV" TO 
■■PENP E CT DEUBKT" O Tel 


GLOBE 437 1592. CC 379 6453. 
Ftrv Call 24 nr 7 Ore CC 2AO 
7200. On Sam 930 61 25. E\ n 8 
Mate WM 3 Sat 4. 
Andrew, Liovd Webber Prams 


LONDON PAIXADHIM 437 7373. 
457 2055 . CC 734 8961. 3» 
6«33. Ml 9999. Firs CaU 24 Hr 
7 Day CC 240 7200 On, Sales 
930 6125. 

THE HIT MUSICAL 
COMEDY 

GEORGE. HEARN 
A DENS OLTUEY 

A FU LL-THROTTLE 
HEB I AM IM UH" D Mall 
Mon-Frl 7.30. Mate Wed 2.00 
sa 2.30 6 ac» 

BOOH NOW POR THE 
EVEMNC OP YOUR LIFE 


WjO. ■ 

WE DOUBLE DARE YOU 
TO DETECT HOW 
• ITS DONE 


JAW FRANCS 
- RBKAIV H9LSATC 
JOHN BARROW 

LEND ME A TENOR 


"A HLMAftKASLE PIECE. OF 

MUSIC THEATRE 4 

* MASTERPIECE.- Tima 
A CblUMV By Ken Ludwig 
Domed by Davu Gtiraore 


tegWkOWON Drury Lane VCS 
«K «372 OC 579 6453 Ei-ra 7.4B 
Tue 4 SalOO 5 7 * 5 

TUB MBMSV LLOYD WEBBER 
/TJL ELIOT MOS1CAL 

fi nra...»CATS 

PAB.Y TO BOX OFFICE 
- . _FO« RETURNS 

“S2"toOl-406 1667 or 
01-950 6123- postal BnBUcalioiu 

new., being, accepted nil end m 
> 7 - • November 


236 SS68 «r 741 
9999. FITS! Can CC 240 7200 <24 
Hr* 7 Day » Prev* from July 2. 
opens Jidy 7. Eves 8. Sal 6 6 850 

METAMORPHOSIS 

sagm by 

Steven BERKOFF 

UmHeu Season 


NATIONAL THEATRE silt Bank 

NATIONAL THEATRE 
COMPANY 

See SEPARATE ENTR IES under 
. OU V1ER/LYTTELTOM/ 
wil iH O I Exreurm rheap 

5*“* tfyatrr* 

from 10 am. RESTAUtANT 1998 
2033 1. CHEAP. EASY CAR PAIL 
into 633 0880. AIR OONO 


OUVKR ‘V 928 2262 CC 

i Nan anal T hear re's aoet, <Lwrl 
Ton i 7 16. Tomor zoo now 
price mart A 7 IS. then June 50 
A Jute 1—4. Ju ly 241026 TOE 
HMunMlT OPERA In- 
BriKhL wnn nmue ay kuh 

were (TninnJiA-uiBSttt 
7 16 Opera July 22 ai 700 
T hen Jul y Z3 & Aimal I lo 6 
JACOBOWSXY AND THE 
COLONEL 


PALACE THEATRE 457 6834 
CC 457 8327 or 3T9 6433 
Fil Call 24 Hr 7Day CC 240 7200 I 
_Oro Sain 930 6123 1 

THE MUSTCAL SENSATION 

LES MISERABLES 
-IF YOU CANT GET A 
TICKET- STEAL ONETsid 

ties 750 Mate Thu 6 sal 230 
Ulrrsmen «x adnuned 

until me uuenal 

BEAT THE TOUTS BY EHQMR- 


ROYAL COURT UPSTAIRS 730 
aSHExm 7.50. Sat Mate 3 0 
DA tm MAMET DOUBLC BRla 
Tl toBhaa ldlnjy Richard Eyre 
A Prairla Da Chian dir. by Man 
Stafford dark 


SAVOY Boa Office OI -856 8888 
CC 01-579 6219. 856 0479 Elm 
7.4S. Wed 5 Sal S A 8.30 
STH YEAR OF 
MICHAEL FRAYN'S 
AWARD-WINNING FARCE 
CHR ISTOPHER’ GODWIN 
STEPHANIE HUGH 

COLE PADDICh- 

. M ICHAE L COCHRANE 
COLETTE TIMOTHY 

CLEESON CARLTON 

^ _ NOISES OFF 

Oir by MICHAEL BLAKCMORE 


PHOEMDI 836 2294 rr 240 9661 . 
74 1 9999 Eve B Thu 3 Sal 6/850 

BKT MUSICAL OF 1985 

Standar d Dr ama Awaios 

MARTIN SHAW 

As Elite Presley 

ARE YOU LONESOME 
_ TONIGHT? 

BY ALAN BLEASOALE 

“ITS MAGNIFICENT" ora | 
LAST 2 WEEKS 


"GIVES A TRANSFIXING 
PERFORMANCE" Gdn to 


PICCADIL L Y THEATRE Air Can 
reiWMM 457 4006. 734 9555. 
Credit Card Moll torn 379 6S65. 
741 9999. Gre Sates 836 I 

3962 930 6123. 

DAVID FRANK 

ESSEX FINLAY 

MUTINY! 

-SPECTACULAR MUSICAL" 
Unto* Maeaanr 
Eves 8 O Mate Wed 3 5 Sal 8 


THE ENTERTAINER 

"NOTSMPLV A GOOD PLAY 
- A CHE AT PL AY- D Mall 
-CWORCETTABLE- D Tel 

flmT ftf* 

-OWI ISH TH EATRE 1 AT*ns 
BEST" Thne Oin 
579 S399 or 379 6453 CC 741 
9999 First Call 24 Hr 7 Day CC 
240 7200 Crp Sam 930 6123 
Mon Fn 7 30 Wed 3 Sat 4 11 


BY MARTWS 01-836 1443. Spe- 
nal CC No. 279 6433- Era H O 
_ Tueo 2 48. .Sal 50 and 80 

34Ui yr of AGATHA CtOHSTtETo 

THE MOUSETRAP 


PROM: EDWARD BOX Offm- 
734 8961 Fust Call 94 Hr 7 Day? 
cr Booking 836 5464 GTD Salts 
930 6125 

AS 1 i0 ° 

A GRAND HASTES 
«P A SHOW" Newtweck 

CHESS 

Mato baaklac to Mmt 2D 1M7 


QU03FS 01-724 H66. 73a . 

1167. 7M 0261 754 01». 459 
3649 459 4051. Finn CtBOcSt- 
«r 2*0 72QQ Gresalo 9306123 

Lad 2 parte. Tart ipa, Tararl 

MAGGIE EDWARD I 
SMITH FOX, 

“CUGUT, B-5LUANT 

BWMWlMw. 

interpreters 

“CLEVER, WITTY 
AND SPARKLM^* Sid. 

CHO* TOMOIUfOW( 


Sr'an®.?* » SS 

cr 340 7800 Gre Bales 9506125 

CARA RET 

™ DhJnely Deodml Musical 
SUmng 

WAYNE SLEEP 

nrvCM & C3)Qrroqr3pl)rd by 
C O k tn Lynm 
Prntewa from to July 
. Opera 17 July al 7 00pm 
hretvFri 7 45 mm Wed 3 00 
Sal 4 -SO 6 8.16 

BOOK NOW 


VAUDEVILLE. WC2. Box Oflitr 
ana oc 01 836 9987/6606 Fitel 
Call ICC 24 nmol -240 7200 rekn 
leer- Eve* 7.30 Wed Mate 2.30. 
Sate 60 6 8.16. 

SUSAN SBBON 

HAMPSHIRE CABELL 

JOANNA VAN CYSECH£M 
MARCIA WARREN 

NOEL COWARDS 

BLITHE SPOUT 

rgggCfcASfr B WGHT, I NTEL- 
THOROUGHLY 
CNJOYABLCTT Over looPerfa 


STOAYFORIMJPOH-AVOH 

(07891 293623 or TteketmaMer 
01379 6433 ROYAL SHAKE- 


Tontoto 7 3a Tomor 1 JO 

to and Md sar 7.30. no 


Perts Mon. Tue. WM 

wens July 3rd. Swan . ... 
iUBNaaaTontoni 7.30. Tomor 
I 30 Baary Nfiu» Tomor 7.30 

No perte Mon. TUe. Wed R arer 

ooeas July 3rd. For special 

meal /theatre deals and hotel 

Stop ewer rtnp i0789l 67262. 


| WYMPHAWTS Air Cnnd 836 3028 
CC 279 6565. 379 6433/741 
9999. OTPS 836 3962. Eves 8 
Mai T ue 3. Sate 5.30 8 8 30 
THEATRE OF COMEDY CO 

OAV1D ISlLUAMSON*S 

SONS OF CAIN 

“A MAGNIFICENT ADDITION TO 


THEATRE OF COMEDY 
_ COMPANY 

"The very best of Britain's comic 
lalenl” Dally Mail 
*LR He^h-d rtnrtei undfR 


WHITEHALL THEATRE/ 
WYHIHUUn THEATRE 


VICTORIA PALACE 

jowwdte Virtona Stilton) 

24 HOL'R 7- DAY PHONES 
OI -B34 1517. 01-828 4736 
FAUL CTO 

CHARI9SC 


SEE IT" Tt tn e Ou l 
LAST THREE WEEKS 

YOUMQ VTC STUDIO 928 6363 
~ie» 8pm. ChBdrelay Prat 

ART GALLERIES 


MJRO 

aapkfc WNta iBfiMi 

25 - 5 July 

Free Cataio^^ 
on rema 

cnouts 

Clmstie's 
Contonpoory Art 
B Hover Street London Wl 

01-480 6701 


NICHOLAS 
PARSONS 

CHARLIE GI RL 
a^MPHL '’“'“"Ta-H.Y 

MIOW-JOU NTAINS . nSz- 



a-SSLSSSS* *^'^«S3SS‘Iadi^S 

fSW ^L-PITlAVA GANT - j 9 ** 

™ S5S? oTO C^SSS I-®?*—. 4100. 

JHfWgHjSEE or GLAMOUR 

S"° E*pre» 

Lies 7 30 Mate Wed A Sal 2.46 


WO.IMUiSTTUl 01-834 0283/4 
rc 854 0048. Finu call cc 24 hr 7 
aai-s 240 7200 A tr 741 9999. 
Croup Sales 930 61 23 Etes 7.45. 
Wed Mate 3. teal 5 A 8.1 3 
HYKZ DAWN PORT ER 


WALSH 


Murder Mystery 

DEADLY NIGHTCAP 

“Tha very bret of ThrWiii" 


WUIILNALL SWX Air Cnnd. OI . 
930 7765 839 4455 CC 01-379 
6665 6423 741 9999. Oik OI 
836 3962 Mon-Frl 800. Wed Mai 
3 00. Sate 500 A 6.30 
*THE ACTDM IS SHEER JOY" 
■Ouarcuani 


PATRICIA HAYES 
DNL MAYHARO 


PATRICIA ROVTUDSE 
BATSY R019LANBS 
PRUNELLA SCALES 


TIMOTIIY WEST 

WHEN WE .ARE MARRIED 

By j.n Pnnuey 

Direr! ed by RonaM Eyre 
"YOU WILL HOT FMD A MORE 
PUMUIRAKA eVCWNB ANY 


MaijCllO N, OP BRITISH 
PABmuos 17th June ■ 31-u 
Jidy Exceptional examwra by 
B. Mcnohoru H Moore. Sir 
MAUhrw Smith. LS. Lowry. 
CSununaisd. R Spear. M. 
Xiwraab and A. Lowndn. 
Crane Kalman Cattery. ITS 
Brampton RtL London SW2. 
Tel 01 584 7566 Mon-Frl 108. 
Sate 104. 

[BARBICAN ART GALLERY. Bar- 
Incan Centre. ECS. 01-618 
July: CECIL 
■CATOH. Orel mawr retrrapre- 

btr with mtr 700 photographs. 

drawtnra. raa n me*. iwnora 

btua. Alton am Turn-Sat 
rOArn-o.JSpm. Sun A e Hols 
12-5 48pm. Cl read Maadim, 
eccew B Hole 

[BRITISH LIBRARY drral RuuH 
SW" WW. TNB CITY Ml 
NAPS, Mon-Sal. 106. Sun. 
2-306 Adm Free. 

ICWtt BEETLES LTD S. Ryder 
SL SI Jam ra-% SW1 930 8586. 

aqoovwH N.WJL 
•1S4S-1932I BO works for cate. 
wUl July 4Ui iQhS daily me 

Wkffifli 

I **T SOCIETY 148 Nnv 

§gjL PTU RE W i'n” am 

bAWD&N as war 


TOW aro 

arllv] 


WORLD" & Chprm 


MASTER ORAHRHCS* 

Junr Tacn julv i oik ji 
DOL WTS FIST ART. MDoS 

jlan-Fn IQ 5.30.Sal IQ. Ian 

FttOIER ITNE ART SO Ktofl SI 

James's ISW1 B39MU2 

TOUTO. BEAUTY AM) PCAon 

victor ia n. Emvaraian aou latrr 
lurtUlure. L nrii.27 jS^. kST 

Frl 106 .30 ' won 

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FRIDAY JUNE 27 1986 


First publish* fa 1785 


Lloyd hangs 
around for 
the practice 


SPORT 


By Rex Bellamy, Tennis Correspondent 


Chris Lloyd had a match 
point in the second set but 
took an hour and 55 minutes 
to beat Pam Casale of New 
Jersey 6-0. 5-7, 6-1, at Wim- 
bledon yesterday. 

Mrs Lloyd, three times 
champion, won 10 of the first 
1 1 games and six of the last 
seven. In between, Miss • 
Casale raised the level of her 
game to win six games out of 
seven at a time when Mrs 
Lloyd was immersed in one of 
those Centre Court trances 
that sometimes afflict even the 
best of players. 

For most of the match Mrs 
Lloyd played remarkably well, 
better in fact than she needed 
to. Her anticipation was such 
that she usually seemed to 
have advance notice of the 
next question Miss Casale 
would ask her. It did not 
matter much whether Miss 
Casale stayed back, as she 
usually did, or went to the net. 
Mrs Lloyd bad all the answers. 

When Miss Casale was serv- 
ing at 1-4 and 0-40 in the 
second set, it seemed that 
within minutes both would be 
back in the dressing room. 
That was when Mrs Lloyd 
became absent-minded and 
Miss Casale began to play very 
well indeed At 5-4 Mrs Lloyd 
had a match point but put her 
backhand into the net. A 
similar error eventually cost 
her the set but she was to lose 
only 12 more points. In short, 
Mrs Lloyd was never in 
danger of defeat but was 
grateful for some sharpening 
exercise. 

In the Royal Box, Geoff 
Boycott must have sympa- 


thized with her during that 
long period when nothing 
much would go right. There 
are times when even the most 
gifted of batsmen cannot find 
a gap in the field 
Two of the best pairs of legs 
in women's tennis vanish 
from the singles field Lisa 
Bonder, who was beaten by 
Anne Minter. of Melbourne, 
and Marcella Mesker, who 
had to retire from her match 
with Lori McNeil of Houston. 
Miss Mesker slipped fed and 
displaced a knee cap. 

This is turning out to be a 
hazardous tournament for the 
ladies. It is not much consola- 
tion that the revolution twice 
forecast in these columns has 
happened The ball girl has 

g me to work on the Centre 
ourt for the first time in the 
history of the championships. 

In considering the 
tournament's medical impli- 
cations, one has to express 
some surprise at the explosive 
power of Mike Leach's first 
service. Leach, left-handed is 
enviably well-built but by no 
means a Superman. So how on 
earth does he manage to hit 
the ball so awfully hud? 

I consulted two experts in 
muscles and all that stuff One 
talked about the rotator cuff 
and ancillary help from legs, 
hips and trunk. The other 
likened the combination of 
shoulder, elbow and wrist lo 
the steering wheel of a fine 
sports car but added: “It needs 
direction." All that needs to be 
added is that Leach was 
beaten 7-6, 7-6, 6-2 by Brad 
Gilbert. 

The most interesting service 


on view yesterday was not 
Leach's. It was that of Milan 
Srejber, who is 6ft 7ftin tali 
and — just to tidy up the 
details - takes a size 13 ft in 
shoes. When Srejber needs a 
dassy pair of walking shoes, 
large cows ■ live- in dread. 
Standing on the wrong end of 
Snsjber’s first service is like 
loitering at street level and 
Coming under fire- from an 
upstairs window. 

The velodty of that service 
remains hazardous even when 
the ball has rebounded from 
courtside furniture. And the 
right of 6ft 71km of tennis 
player doing double-lmee 
jumps, just to loosen up, is 
enough to remind any oppo- 
nent of the importance of 
going to church on Sunday. 
Heinz Gunthardt demonstrat- 
ed yesterday that be is a better 
player than Srejber. But 
Srejber beat him anyway. 

Like Srejber, Miloslav 
Medr is a Czechoslovak. Oth- 
er than that, the contrast 
between them is striking. 
Mecir is a gentle, dreamy, 
unassuming man who looks 
no kind of professional sports- 
man — not anyway, until one 
notices the amitipation and 
loping strides that seemingly 
make him omnipresent They 
call him “the big cat". Mecir is 
deceptive, too: his shots are 
difficult to “read". 

Mecir is an enthusiastic 
angler who knows how to play 
his fish. On grass courts, he 
needsa harpoon rather than a 
fishing rod — but he knows 
more about this kind of tennis 
than Ulf Slenlund does. The 
Swede was hooked and land- 
ed. 


Leconte in control Bassett in 

debt to 


By Richard Evans 


There was a time when 
Henri Leconte was considered 
such a wild young man that 
the French federation threw 
up their hands with a great 
Gallic shrug and allowed Ion 
Tinac to lake control of his 
career. 

The extent of the talent, of 
course, , was never in doubt, 
but even Tinac, not a man to 
tolerate any nonsense, found 
the delightful and maddening 
Henri a bit much and as soon 
as the Romanian guru saw the 
mighty Boris looming on the 
horizon, Tiriac and Leconte 
parted with a friendly 
handshake. 

Now, as Cofin Dowdeswell 
discovered on court two yes- 
terday, Leconte, married and 
matured, is only wild in 
spasms and the spasms are 
becoming less detrimental to 
his chances of victory. Even in 
a swirling wind Leconte ex- 
posed the limitations in 
Dowdeswell's hit-and-run 
style of tennis and won 6-1, 6- 


4,6-4. 

Hepatitis took Leconte off 
the circuit for the first four 
months of the year, a set-back 
that made his fine perfor- 
mance in reaching the semi- 
final of the French Open all 
the more praiseworthy. The 
resolution Leconte displayed 
in fighting his way bade to 
fitness with the help of the 
former French No. 1, Patrice 
Dominguez, revealed the new 
seriousness that has lifted the 
level of his tennis. 

Dowdeswell did his best 
and even broke serve to lead 
3-1 in the second set But the 
British No. 3, a bright and 
intelligent-man with a faraway 
look in his eyes, never exudes 
an air of confidence on court 
and by the time Leconte had 
whipped another top-spin 
backhand past the end of his 
nose, Dowdeswell seemed re- 
signed to the fact that Leconte, 
for all his eccentricities, is a 
very formidable player 
indeed. 


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INVESTMENT 


SERVICES 

T an 6 86YP I 


her family 

Carling Bassett has been 
leading two lives — those of a 
grieving daughter and a win- 
ning tennis star. Now, she 
says, the two are coming to 
terms with each other. 

The 18-year-old Canadian, 
seeded 11th, advanced to the 
third nmnd at Wimbledon 
yesterday beating Rosafyn 
Fail-bank of South Africa 6-1, 
7-6. 

It was her second tough 
game of the tournament, fm- 
tewing a three-set first round 
matets against Britain's 
Glynnis Coles. She dropped 
the opening set 6-1 before 
winning, J-d, 7-5, 6-1. 

Her lather, John Bassett, a 
former Canadian Davis Cop 
player and later owner of the ' 
Tampa Bay Bandits football 
team, died last month after a 
long struggle with cancer. His 
death came less than two 
weeks before die French Open 
championships. 

Miss Bassett decided to 
play at Roland Garros, hot, at 
her request, none of her family 
went to Paris to watch her. At 
Wimbledon she has them 
around her. 

“My sister (Heidi) is here 
and my mother is too. I am still 
a little bit uncomfortable, hot 
it's good to be with them. 


No 9 seed 
yields 
to Hobbs’s 
pluck 

By David Powell 

Anne Hobbs, having sur- 
vived near defeat by the lowly 
ranked Briton, Belinda Bor- 
neo, on Wednesday, yesterday 
achieved the finest Wimble- 
don victory in 10 years of 
playing the tournament. Miss 
Hobbs, aged 26, from Chesh- 
ire, defeated the No 9 seed, 
Zina Garrison, of the United 
States, to reach the last 32 of 
the women's singles. 

■ Miss Garrison fought her 
way into the semi-finals last 
year, at which stage she ran 
into Martina Navratilova. 
Yesterday the American en- 
countered the greater determi- 
nation which has been evident 
in the performances of most 
British players (John Lloyd 
excepted) this week and lost 6- 
4, 0-6, 6-4. 

Miss Hobbs, the national 
champion, buOt on her mo? 
ment of luck in the final set 
when a return of the 
American’s service from the 
baseline hit the net, appeared 
to die, but trickled over. That 
gave her the crucial break in 
the fifth game and, with every 
point that she won earning 
applause from the crowd on 
court two, she kept her com- 
posure to the end. 

Miss Hobbs said: “I started 
to get blitzed in the second set 
so I changed my pattern. I 
started to lob her and hit low 
slices at her and get a lot more 
balls into court to make her 
play a bit more." 

Miss Hobbs, who is 41 
places beneath Miss 
Garrison's tenth position in 
the world rankings, added: “I 
am just as rood as a lot of 
players and this match showed 
I can hold it together. I have 
never done it consistently 
before but have been this 
year.” 

The British No 3 has twice 
reached the fourth round and 
to do so again win need to beat 
the unseeded Robin White, of 
the United States. 


ATHLETICS 


Coe’s race in Holland 
crucial for Harrison 

By Pat Butcher, Athletics Correspondent 


Rob Harrison has every right 
to feel that being named 
captain of England for 
tonight's McVitie’s Challenge 
match against the United 
States in Gateshead is a 
dubious distinction in the 
light of his exclusion from the 
Commonwealth Games team. 
But considering what captain- 
cy did for Ray Wilkins and 1 
Mike Gatling, it could also be 
an invitation to further 
disaster. 

“It is ironic isn’t it," Harri- 
son said laconically yesterday, 
“being named captain of a 
team you are not even part of 
in three weeks time”. But, in 
fact, Harrison still feels that he 
has an outside chance of 
taking the 1,500 metres place 
being left open for Sebasian 
Coe in England’s Common- 
wealth Games team for 
Edinburgh. 

In Hengelo, The Nether- 
lands, this evening Coe will 
run a 1,500 metres against 
Jose AbascaL, the Olympic 
bronze medal winner, having 
switched from the 800. “IfCoe 
runs well in Hengelo, I don't 
think hell have any problem 
getting selected," Harrison 
said. “But if he doesn’t, I am 
trying to get into the race 
against him in Stockholm next 
week. There seems to be some 
hesitancy on Coe’s part to let 
me into the race in Stockholm. 

There has been talk of him 
malting a world record at- 
tempt. anti this is from a guy 


who was too injured to run the 
AAA last weekend". 

Harrison's criticism of Coe 
is due to the feet that the 
Olympic champion did not 
turn up at Crystal Palace last 
weekend to dispute his place 
for Edinburgh in what were 
originally called the final 
Commonwealth Games trials. 

The further irony- is that 
Harrison is still the fastest 
man in the Commonwealth so 
far this year at 1,500 metres, 
with the 3min 35.74sec be ran 
in winning the UK Champi- 
onships last month. He nuts 
the 1,000 metres tonight. 

Willie Banks, the world 
triple jump record holder has 
described his collection of 
colleagues as: “The best Amer- 
ican team to leave our ‘shores 
since the 1983 world 
championships". But they 
have not exactly raised a 
storm in Gateshead, since the 
majority of the team are 
unknown outside the US. 
The focus will still be on local 
hero, Steve Cram, who. runs, a 
mile against Peter Elliott, tire 
man who is to partner Crajn at 
800 metres at the Common- 
wealth Games. 

This will be the first oppor- 
tunity to assess Cram's form 
at his world record distance 
and the race should be rela- 
tively fast since James Mays 
has been conscripted to set the 
pace, as he did 1 1 months ago 
in Oslo when Cram set the 
current world record. That, 
incidentally, is the last time 
that Cram ran a mile. J 


SPORT IN BRIEF 


Big match 
dilemma 

. The publication of next 
season's Football League- fix- 
tures has produced a match on 
October 25 which threatens to 
adversely affect the atten- 
dance at the first rugby league 
international between Great 
Britain and Australia. With 
Ok) Tra fiord chosen as the 
venue for the match, the 
Rugby League were expecting 
a large attendance including 
thousands of Manchester 
United football supporters. 

But with the football fix- 
tures matching Manchester 
City against Manchester Unit- 
ed at Maine Road on the same 
day, officials at the Rugby 
League headquarters in Leeds 
- who described the fixture 
dash as “a sickening Wow” — 
are now hoping to persuade 
the two football .dubs to 
arrange an alternative date for 
their match. 

Holding on 

The British yachting team 
still have a chance of winning 
the Jaguar Cup series against 
the United States, at Cowes, 
thanks to a successful protest. 
The Americans were first over' 
the line in the first four races, 
to take what seemed to be a 
winning lead, but the fourth 
race has now been awarded to 
Britain. The fifth race also 
went to Britain and so the 
home team are only trailing 2- 
3 in the best of seven senes. 
Racing yesterday was post- 
poned because of rough condi- 
tions in The SoleaL 


Prosser, in charge 

Carrying on 

Ray Prosser has been re- 
elected as roach to Pontypool, 
the Welsh rugby union cham- 
pions, for the 1 8th' season in 
succession. Prosser first took 
the role in 1969 after a playing 
career in which he won 22 
Wales caps and toured New 
Zealand in 1959 with the 
British . Lions. His assistant, 
Ivor Taylor, has also been re- 
elected. 


Triple bid ; 

.The Aberrant club, in Pais- 
ley, are to stage the Gateway 
British Isles bowls champion- 
ship and home internationals 
from July 7 to II. Attempting 
to add to his collection of 
triples trophies will be David 
Bryant. England's former 
world champion, who will be 
partnering David Rhys-Jones 
and Keith Ffosl * 


Double take 

Oldham rugby league dub 
completed the signing yester- 
day of two Australian players 
— Gary Bridges, aged 24, a 
stand-off half, ami Bruce 
Clarke, aged 28, a 16-stone 
prop. Both ' play first-grade 
rugby in Sydney, Bridges for 
Balmain and Clarke for West- 
ern Suburbs. 

GUIs In trouble 

GiHingham. who narrowly 
missed promotion from the 
third division last season, are 
feeing a winding-up order 
from the Inland Revenue. It 
has been claimed the Kent 
club owes £700.000 of which 
£1 60,000 is due to go to the tax 
man . The Inland Revenue say 
that unless a substantial 
amount is paid to them by 
July 16, they will enforce the 
order. 

Just rewards 

Northamptonshire have 
awarded county caps' to' their 
two .Northampton-born all- 
rounders, Duncan Wild and 
David CapeL 


Honours even 

Diego Maradona, of Argen- 
tina and Manuel Negrete, ‘of 
Mexico, have unveiled 
plaques in the changing rooms 
of the A 2 teca Stadium in 
Mexico City honouring them 
for scoring the two finest goals 
seen at the stadium duringthe 
World Cup. 

World Cup news, page 37 


Tf 


Castle's 
spirit 
thrills 
fans 


By David Powell 

Andrew Castle, who spent 
his first night at Wimbledon 

walking the streets because he 

had nowhere to stay, found- a 
place in the hearts' of 'the 
British public yesterday -with 
the most courageous p^rfor^ 
mance by a home men's -sin- 
gles player since John Lloyd 
put out foe No 4 seed, Roscoe 
Tanner, in 1977. 

Castle, aged 22, seeded a 
wild card to gain entry into the 

du iopfe i ^ips but came with- 
in three games of defeating 
Mats WUaader, the Swede, 
who had been seeded to play*- 
Ivan Lendl in the final. Be 
eventually lost 4-6, 7-6, 6-7, 6- 
4,6-0. 

Castle, from Taunton, is 
imranlrpd fa Britain but per- 
formed well enough on foe 
satellite circuit to persuade 
Paul Hutchins, the national 
team manager, that he should 
be nominated for an invitation 
to play foe stogies here. On 
Sunday ni g ht , before heiwas 
due to play his first round 
match, he refused to stay in a 
flat he was renting because it 
was damp and was unable go 
find hotel accommodation un- 
til two o’clock fa the morning. 

Castle showed the saraT 
strong will yesterday against 
an opponent who, despite "bis 
tender years (WUaader is still 
only 21), has played In all of 
foe last three Australian 
finals, winning two. Castle was 
not afraid to involve himself h? 
rallies against a player who, 
with his day court experience, 
is perfectly suited to manoeu- 
vring rather than the serve aad 
volley tactics which tend to b* 
more profitable on grass. 

It was one of those match- 
fa which you did not have 
watch the tennis to know wh ; 
was winning the points: every 
time Castle strode a winners 
there was a thunder of ap- 
planse but when Wflander 
replied the quiet was deathly. 

Castle might have sown-up 
the match fa straight sets had 
his service been less erratic. 
He experienced little difficulty 
in the first, although WBander 
did have two points for the 
first break in the tenth game 
and took foe set with a fierce 
backhand return of service 

The Briton won each of his 
next three service games with 
an ace but was broken to trail 
3-4. At 3-5 doable faults began 
to appear more regularly fa 
Castle's game and he M4 to 
save two set points before 
polling bade- to 4-5. But, 
finding inspiration for the first, 
time against Wflander’s set'* 
vice, allowing the Swede only 
one point, an ace, he drew level 
and at that stage looked 
capable of taking a two sets to 
love lead. He will, perhaps, 
look back on the tie-break as 
his rain. He served two dou- 
bles, the only points won 
against service, as Wflander 
triumphed fa the shoot-out 7- 
3. 

Castle did rather better in 
third set tie-break but, the 
burden of expectation from the 
crowd on court one began to 
weigh too heavily on his mind. 

It seemed that foe oaljrpersoa 
fa foe arena who wanted 
Wflander to win was Wflander 
and he had his way. 


BASKETBALL 




EBBA give fa 
to the top 
dubs' demands 

Basketball's own “Soper 
league” rebels have won their 
battle for greater power. The 
country’s top dubs will be 
allowed to run the first divi- 
sion of foe men's 
league themselves from -the 
start of the 1987-88 season. 

The English Basket Ball 
Association (EBBA) said it 
would not be possible to hand 
over before that date and The ^ 
dubs accept that view. John * 
Deacon, the chairman of A 
company who represent many 
of the dubs, said: “We cut 
now face foe fature with 
optimism." 


Plea to MPS 
on loss of 
playing fields 

Peter Lawson, a top sports 
administrator. Is urging Par- 


WWW WMiAIUIlUL 

games opportunities Jar 
schoolchildren. As secretary , 
of the Central Councfl of 
Beoeatimi, 1 m wants 
afou debate and a free vote on 
™t he says are “escalating 
problems” caused by foe toss 
of school playing fields ■qd 
r poblidy-owned sports 
spaces. • 

Yesterday he sent a telex to 
foe chief whips of both the 
Conservative and Labour Par- 


of sport in this country it fa foe 
*rty of the CCPR to draw to 
the attention of Parliamenttfie 
devastating damage to British 
society caused by this wfl&l 

oeglect of; and casual indiffer- 
ence to, sporting faculties and 
artaagements for the