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I 



THE 



No 62,393 


SATURDAY MARCH 1 1986 


Russian spies 


‘listen to’ 


defence calls 


By Philip Webster, Political Reporter 


Soviet spies have been able 
to listen to telephone rails 
between officials in the Minis- 
try of Defence, it was dis- 
closed last night. 

And staff have apparently 


not heeded warnings against 

jr ! ■ ■ 'tdon 


discussing classified informa- 
tion on the telephone. 

Mr George Younger, the 
Secretary of Slate for Defence, 
is so concerned about the 
potential danger that he has 
called in a signals unit of the 
Royal Air Force to tap the 
telephones of defence ministry 
stan to discourage them from 
breaching instructions. 

He said in a parliamentary 
written reply last night “The 
risk of interception by hostile 
intelligence services of official 
telephone calls, including 
those made on the Govern- 
ment telephone network, is 
growing continually. 

“My department’s security 
regulations contain explicit 
instructions warning against 
the discussion of classified 
information on the telephone 
but I have decided that further 
action is required to ensure 
that those instructions are 
complied with.” 

It was confirmed that the 
ministry's 14.000 staff in Lon- 
don. in addition to hundreds 
of others at RAF. Army and 
Navy bases elsewhere, "could 
be the subject of the telephone 
“monitoring exercises'* to be 


carried out by the signals unit 
over the next few months. 

Mr Younger said that the 
investigation would be con- 
fined to certain internal Min- 
istry of Defence lines but it 
was confirmed that staff could 
use their internal phones to 
make external calls. 

“Calls on the public net- 
work will not be monitored,” 
he said. 

Staff are being advised of 
the move in letters, and the 
unions have already been 
informed. 

They are being told that if 
they have to talk about classi- 
fied matters they should do so 
face-to-face, or using the 
“safe” telephones that are 
available. 

Whitehall sources said last 
night that the level of abuse 
was not known, it was said 
that the idea of the move was 
to see whether classified mat- 
ters were being discussed on 
open telephones. 

“Wc know that hostile intel- 
ligence services are capable of 
monitoring telephone conver- 
sations on open lines,” a 
spokesman said. 

Asked whether it was 
known that Eastern European 
intelligence services had been 
listening in, a senior source 
replied: “It would be unwise 
to assume that they were not 
We have to assume that they 
arc.” 


The proposals seemed cer- 
tain last night to cause a row 

Mr Gerry Robson, secretary 

of the Council of the Civil 
Service Union at the ministry, 
said: “Our reaction is one of 
complete astonishment that 
they should find the need to 
do such a thing. I am absolute- 
ly appalled.” 

Mr Michael Mates, a mem- 
ber of the Commons Select 
Committee on Defence and an 
expert on intelligence matters, 
said that he bad “not the 
slightest doubt” that Russian 
spies were monitoring the 
telephone services. 

He said: “I am perfectly 
certain that they have infiltrat- 
ed the network. 

'They will have people in 
British Telecom. It is the way 
they operate. They will be 
using every single part of their 
technology to learn what we 
do and how we operate.” 

Mr Francis Pytn, the former 
Foreign Secretary, said he had 
no doubt that they had tried to 
listen in. “Everyone tries to 
listen in on everyone else.” 

Mr Robert Atkins. Conser- 
vative member for South 
Ribble, whose question pro- 
duced Mr Younger's an- 
nouncement, said last night: 
“This has been a matter of 
concent for some lime. Securi- 
ty needs tightening up on all 
sons of things.” 


Next week 


MONDAY 


Glimmer 
of hope 



New research on 
schizophrenia has 
profound 

implications for the 
families of those 
who suffer from it 


Iron maiden 

She's tough, 
Thatcheme . . . 
and French 


WEDNESDAY 


Art or 
craft? 



Fs the Getty 
museum’s $6miliion 
old master a forgery? 
The experts decide 



There is £22,000 to be won 
in The Tones Portfolio compe- 
tition today — the £20,000 
weekly prize and £2.000 in the 
daily competition. Yesterday's 
£2.000 daily prize was shared 
by three readers. Mrs K 
Cooper of London SW18. Mr 
Smart Wright of Whetstone, 
London N20, and Mr R 
Kembcr of Watford, Herts. 

Portfolio list page 32; how to 
play, information senice.page 
16. 


Marcos Sim 


A US Air Force plane brought 
more than $1 million in 
Philippines currency to Ha- 
waii. now home of former 
President Marcos Back page 
Economic alarm, page 6 


Haiti threat 


The new Government in Haiti 
has announced it will press for 
the extradition of Mr Jean- 
C'laude Duvalicr. the former 
dictator now temporarily liv- 
ing in France Page 4 


Home News 2-4 
Overseas 4-6 
Appeimintta* 25 
Art* 7 

Business 23-32 
Coon }D 

Crosswords I<j-W 
Obry 8 


Leaders 

Letters 

Obituary 

Parliament 
Science 
Sport 


TV 4 Radio 
Weather 


9 

9 

10 
4 
10 

11-13 


* * * iv 


Mubarak show of 


strength after riot 


From Robert Fisk, Cairo 

Having dismissed his Interi- automatic weapons around 

Ihe police camp. Perhaps the 
actually believed 


or Minister and ordered his 
Army to crush the remnants of 
this 


week's police mutiny. 
President Mubarak, of Egypt 


tried to demonstrate 
ihe credibility of his regime by 
driving in a motorcade to 
within a few hundred yards of 
the barracks from which the 
mutiny broke out, announcing 
blandly that his near-bankrupt 
Government would repair the 
£120 million damage. 

It was a significant perfor- 
mance. Less than 30 minutes 
alter Government soldiers 
had stormed into the police 
barracks at Giza — shooting 
their way into the compound 
and ordering some of their 
prisoners to crawl from the 
gates on their hands and knees 
- he arrived by helicopter 
beside the Pyramids for what 
looked more like a victory 
visit than a display of political 
selfconfidence. 

He came protected by four 
Gazelle helicopter gunships, 
by Jeep-loads of blue- 
helmeted Presidential Guards, 
four armoured personnel car- 
riers and — just down the road 
from the old Mena House 
Hotel — by an M60 tank. 

Yci there was no doubting 
Mr Mubarak's fury as he 
toured the gutted luxury ho- 
tels. Wagging his finger, he 
turned angrily to the ministers 
standing beside him. “Take 
this to the military pros- 
ecutor.” he shouted. If the 
police arc tried by military 
courts, the hearings will al- 
most certainly be in secret 

The last hours of the police 
mutiny at midday yesterday 


muti oe.s 
that »hev • ould receive help 
from thi. •-..i -an population 
< Libyan Radio has been urging 
Cairenes to take to the streets 
to support a “popular up- 
rising”) for the Government 
said later that five policemen 
had started the final, brief 
battle. 

As the sound of rifle fire 
crackled against the sides of 
the pyramids, ministers began 
arrivingat the presidential rest 
house behind the tombs to 
receive the President 

When, in the desert valley 
below, the Army at last sent 
iroops into the police com- 
pound. it all ended swiftly. 


Cairo's sermons 
Leading article 


Page 5 
Page 9 


Four wounded men were tak- 
en out by ambulance, about 
100 prisoners were led from 
the compound. And perhaps 
20 policemen headed off into 
the Sahara. 

It was to all intents and 
purposes the end of the muti- 
ny. just as it had. a few hours 
earlier, been the end of 
MrAhmed Rushdi’s career. 
The Interior Minister had 
been sacked by Mr Mubarak, 
as he must /have known he 
would be. / 

It was. / after alL bis police 
force that had embarked on 
the orgy of shooting and 
looting this week. General 
Zakyoadr. Governor of Asyut 
province in Middle Egypt was 
appointed in his place. Since 


Asyut is the centre of Islamic 
were marked by three sus- .• fundamentalism in Egypt he 
laincd outbursts of shooting has some experience in queU- 
from heavy machincguns and jog signs of revolt 



John Detnjanjnk, flanked by (wo Israeli policemen, taking his first steps on Israeli soil after 
bis arrival from the United States at Ben Garion airport 


‘Ivan the 
Terrible’ 
in Israel 


From Ian Murray 
Jerusalem 


The man who the state of 
Israel believes personally exe- 
cuted one out of every nine of 
the six million Jews extermi- 
nated by the Nazis arrived m 
the conn try on board a jumbo 
jet yesterday to stand trial for 
mass murder. 

In his rumpled brown suit 
and open necked shirt, John 
Demjaqjuk looked less tired 
than the other 460 passengers 
arriving on the 11-boor direct 
El A1 flight from New York. 
He had travelled in compara- 
tive style in a curtained off 
area of the business class, with 
an escort of Up marsfauiWand 
Israeli security guards. . 

As he stepped out of the 
aircraft “Operation Justice” 
swung into action. He was met 
by police officers, court offi- 
cials and a Ukrainian inter- 
preter who advised him of his 
rights under Israeli law. He 
was told be would be prosecut- 
ed under the Naze and Nazi 
Collaborators (Punishment) 
Law of 1950. 

Under this law, anyone who 
had “done during the period of 
the Nazi regime in an enemy 
country an act constituting a 
crime against the Jewish 
people—is liable to the death 
penalty.” 

He was marched into the 
specially hired armoured car 
which whisked him the short 
distance to Ayalon top- securi- 
ty prison at Ramie, where 
Adolf Eichmann was held 
daring his trial nearly 25 years 
ago. Eichmann was bulged 
and cremated near the prison. 

Only three days earlier the 
prison service had been asked 
to prepare a special cell and 
the glaring bright yellow paint 
on the walls is scarcely dry. 
His seven personal guards will 
keep him under 24- boor 
watch. 

Yesterday, the 66- year- old 
prisoner was given a medical 
check up before being led 
through four sets of security 
doors to his cell. 

The guards have been spe- 
cially selected from among 
serving Drnze and Sephardic 
Jewish officers. The prison 
authority wanted to be sore 
Continued on page i6.coM 


BA fears further delay on sell-off 


The Government is be- 
lieved to be close to a decision 
on whether to delay further 
the privatization of British 
Airways, which has been held 
up for IS .months by legal 
battles. 


There are /ears within BA 
that the sale may be put back 
beyond the preferred date of 
June or July until after the 
British Gas flotation. 


Although Lazards. the mer- 
chant bank advising BA. and 
its lawyers are keen to go 
ahead, it is understood that 
the Govemement's advisors. 
Hill Samuel and the Treasury 
are cautious about proceeding 
until a series of actions in the 
American courts have been 
resolved. 

Mr Nicholas Ridley. Secre- 
tary of Slate for Transport, is 
expected to reach a conclusion 


next week, and the matter 
could also go before the 
Cabinet. 

A delay would be a bitter 
blow to BA's management. 

The delay has been caused 
by actions in the Los Angeles 
District Court against British 


Airwavs and other airlines for 
ife 


loss of earnings because of the 
collapse of Laker. That could 
come to a conclusion on 
March 17 


Ministers appeal 
to Ulster people 


By Philip Webster, Political Reporter 


The Government is appeal- 
ing to the Protestant popula- 
tion of Ulster over the heads 
of its leaders in an attempt to 
persuade them that a cam- 
paign of disruption will not 
weaken its adherence to the 
Anglo-Irish agreement and 
can only damage the province. 

Senior ministers predicted 
yesterday that intimidation by 
“loyalist” hardliners would 
probably make Monday's one- 
day strike in Northern Ireland 
ffective, but they warned that 


realised by the organizers of 
Monday's action. 

The Prime Minister, who 


was said by her colleagues 
to ha 


Unionists would be misguided 
if they felt that a campaign of 
disruption could force the 
Government to go back on an 
agreement approved by an 
overwhelming majority of the 
United Kingdom Parliament 

The Prime Minister called 
on unionists yesterday to 
think long and hard before 
embarking on a course of 
strikes and stoppages, action 
which could only damage 
ordinary people, particularly 
the ekleriy and sick, and harm 
the economic life of the prov- 
ince. 

But it is clear that ministers 
believe that the strike on 
Monday, and any subsequent 
action, could turn to the 
Government’s advantage if it 
shows that the Protestant 
community does not want to 
defy the British Parliament 
and go down the road of 
industrial disruption. 

They believe that the .cir- 
cumstances are far different 
from 1974 when loyalist action 
brought down the power- 
sharing executive, although 
they wonder whether that is 


yesterday to have felt badly let 
down by the volte-face by the 
Unionist Party leaders this 
week, said yesterday in a letter 
to the Archbishop of Armagh, 
whom she saw with other 
Church of Ireland bishops oh 
Wednesday, that the Govern- 
ment would not be deflected 
from its determination to 
implement the agreement 

“A strike carried out osten- 
sibly in the name of the Union 
is ail too likely to lead to the 
erosion of support for the 
Union in the United Kingdom 
as a whole,” die added. . 

There is” exasperation 
among ministers at the behav- 
iour of Mr James Moiyneaux. 
the Official Unionist leader, 
and the Rev lan Paisley, of the 
Democratic Unionists, and a 
fear that that they have lost 
control of the hardline ele- 
ments in their parties. 

But the Government is 
expected to take a low-key 
approach to Monday's strike. 
Protection will hie provided as 
far as posable for people 
deciding to go into work, but 
there is clearly a feeling that 
the action could rebound on 
its leaden. 

If the action continues and 
it 'remains clear that the 
Government will not budge 
over the agreement it is 
argued, the hardliners will 
eventually be blamed by the 
community for the jobs that 
will inevitably be lost and the 
discomfort caused. 


Cheaper 
oil sends 


pound 

lower 


By David Smith 
Economics Correspondent 


The pound fell sharply yes- 
terday in response to renewed 
oil price weakness. Sterling 
dropped 3.1 cents to $1.4522, 
and was later quoted in New 
York al $1.4470. 

The pound also fell by six 
pfennig to DM3.2327, anoth- 
er record dosing low against 
the mark. 

The foil came as oil prices 
slid towards $12 a TarieL 
North Sea Brent crude oil for 
delivery in April was quoted 
at $13.70 a band, but Brent 
oil for May delivery was 
trading at $12.70 a barrel. 

The latest decline for ster- 
ling has upset hopes for an 
early cut m base rates, al- 
though the general expecta- 
tion is still for a small 
reduction about Budget time. 

Money market interest rates 
improved by up to Vi point 
yesterday, although they are 
still consistent wub a reduc- 
tion in base rates. But share 
prices were upset by the sharp 
foil in the pound. The FT-30 
share index fell by 4.1 points 
to 1277.4. 

The dollar, which has been 
under heavy pressure recently, 
stayed on the sidelines yester- 
day, as attention switched to 


the pound. The announce- 
ment rof a record $16.46 


billion (£1 l.t billion) US trade 
deficit for January left the 
dollar unscathed. 

This was despite the feet 
that Mr Malcolm Baldrige. US 
Secretary of Commerce, had 
said that the dollar needed to 
go lower to correct the trade 
deficit. 

The Bank of England yester- 
day announced additional 
special facilities of £1 billion 
to help ease money market 
procures in the peak tax- 
paying season. ' 

There was a record £1.8 
billion money market short- 
age yesterday. Although the 
pound’s foil against the Euro- 
pean currencies will help ex- 
porters — in two days it has 
dreppe&ifrpfcnhigs : against 


the mark - industry .is getting 
fiityof 


restive about the volatility 
currencies. 

This week the pound has 
been both the strongest and 
the weakest major cu; 
almost rising above $1. 
earlier in the week. 

The latest drop in oil prices 
will further limit the 
Chancellor's room for ma- 
noeuvre in his Budget 


Weather 


puts 

freeze 


on sport 


By Robin Yoimg 

Wintry weather has laid 
waste the weekend sport 
ag a i n , after a month in which 
not a day passed without 
snow (ailing somewhere in the 
British Isles. 

By. last night 10 first class 
football matches in England, 
and eight in Scotland, had 
been postponed. Though the 
two rugby international 
matches at Cardiff and T wick- 
enham are definitely on, most 
dub rugby in the South is just 
as definitely off. 

Even the Irish will again be 
without horse racing this 
weekend, as hopes of their 
staging- a meeting at either 
Navan or Leopardstown final- 
ly succumbed to the freezing 
temperatures. Ail horse racing 
on mainland Britain has been 
abandoned for the fourth 
successive weekend. 

The Torpids college boat 
races at Oxford and the Lents 
at Cambridge are both off 
because of ice covering the 
rivers Isis and Cam. 

The Thames Water Author- 
ity sent engineers with pick- 
axes, sledge hammers and 
blow-torches in an attempt to 
free frozen weirs and lock 
gates and maintain water lev- 
els in the river. . . 

Stewart Wrighlsonf the in-: 
surance broker, says that most 
sports organizers do not in- 
sure against postponement or 
cancellation and are thus suf- 
fering financial losses. But 
Stewart Wrightson has itself 
decided not to insure its 
sponsorship of the annual 
Army v Navy rugby match to 
be played at Twickenham on 
March 8. 

The group says there is no 
record of t the game . being 
postponed because of adverse 
weather, and the last time any 
match was postponed at 
Twickenham, where there was 
a pitch inspection yesterday, 
was m the notorious winter of 
1947. 

British Gas announced lhat 
gas output set a record of 
9,197 million cubic feet during 
the 24 hours , to 6 am on 
Thursday, beating the previ- 
ous record of 9, 1 07 million 
cubic feet which was set on 
February 4. 

The London Weather Cen- 
tre last night confirmed that 
last month had proved the 
coldest since 1947 and the 
second coldest this century. 
But it had been drier than 
HSuaI - Forecast, page 16 


Life firms fight claims 


Leading life assurance of- 
fices are fighting claims for 
hundreds of thousands of 
pounds on policies and pen- 
sion funds sold through a 
broking firm now in liquida- 
tion. 

The receipt of the contribu- 
tions. largely from pension 
funds and life assurance pre- 
miums. is disputed. 


In one action. Clerical Med- 
ical feces a £186.000 High 
Court action brought by the 
trustees of a company pension 
scheme. A £25,000 claim is 
being disputed by Friends 
Provident Scottish Provident 
has been accused of failing to 
cany out adequate checks on 
the broker’s credentials. 

Family Money, page 30 


Hitch in 


teacher 


pay talks 


By Lucy Hodges 


Talks to resolve the 
teachers' pay dispute were still 
going on in London last night 
after seven hours. 


The provisional pay agree- 
ment reached at the Advisory, 
Conciliation and Arbitration 
Service was due to be ratified 
by the Burnham Negotiating 
Committee yesterday, but 
there was a hitch when the 
biggest teachers’ union said it 
was illegal. 

The National Union of 
Teachers, which opposes the 
Acas settlement, claimed that 
the agreement could not be 
ratified by the Burnham Com- 
mittee because it covered 
conditions of service issues as 
well as pay. 

It said this contravened the 
1965 Remuneration of Teach- 
ers Act 


KGB reveals big swoop on state spies 


From Christopher Walker 
Moscow 


The KGB has recently com- 
pleted a big swoop in Moscow, 
which led to the arrest of a 
nun her of Soviet employees of 
ministries and other important 
state organizations on charges 
of passing secret information 
to the West 


said. This remark was inter- 
preted by foreign diplomats as 
meaning that some, if not all, 
had been shot. 


facilities and research 
institutes.” 


The arrests were disclosed 
for the first time yesterday 
when Mr Viktor Chebrikov, 
the man who has headed the 
shadowy security body since 
1982. addressed Soviet and 
foreign delegates attending the 
27th Congress of the Commu- 
nist Party. 


No further details were 
available about the round-op, 
on one of the few occasions 
when the Kremlin has been 
prepared to acknowledge 
openly the large-scale penetra- 
tion of Moscow by agents 
recruited by the West 


“These persons received 
strict but jnst punishment in 
accordance with the law,” he 


Bat Mr Chebrikov told the 
congress that the US and Nato 
secret services ' “undertake 
persistent efforts to compro- 
mise the Soviet Union's do- 
mestic and foreign policy. 
They seek to acquire our 
political military, economic. 

scientific and cechnkal se- 
crets, to penetrate into state 
institutions, important defence 


Mr Cbebrikov. a full mem- 
ber of the Politburo, delivered 
a uncompromising Teport 
which was semi by Western 
observers as underlining the 
tough line which Mr Mikhail 
Gorbachov, the Soviet leader, 
intends to pursue a g ain st Son- 
et “refuseniks” and other 
dissidents. 

The well-received speech 
followed the praise lavished on 
the KGB during Mr 
Gorbachov's five-hour address 
at the opening of the congress. 
The Soviet leader made dear 
that the activities of the KGB 
would be expanded to counter 
what he described as growing 
subversion in the Soviet Union 
by Western intelligence agen- 


Earfier, fresh doubts were 
raised about the s taging of (be 
second superpower summit 
later this year, when senior 
Soviet military and pnlMral 
officials launched a bitter 


attack on recent statements by 
hinted 


CMS. 


President Reagan, and 

that the Soviet Union may 
resume unclear testing when 
its unilateral moratorium ex- 
pires ou*March 31. 

The time of the remarks at a 
(devised press conference 
tuned to coincide with the 
congress was more hostile 
towards Mr Reagan than any- 
thing heard here since last 
November’s summit in Genera 
heralded a thaw in US-Soviet 
relations — a thaw now threat- 
ened by fnndamental disagree- 
ments over arms control. 

US finny, page 5 


Rank may 
sue IBA 
over bid 


By Cliff Feltham 


The Rank Organisation is 
planning to take the Indepen- 
dent Broadcasting Authority 
to court in its battle for 
Granada, the motorway ser- 
vices and leisure group. 

Rank Iasi night set the IBA a 
deadline of 10 am Monday to 
reconsider its decision not to 
let Rank acquire the Granada 
television franchise for £740 
million. 

Mr Michael Gifford. 
Rank'schief executive, said: 
“We believe there are grounds 
for saying that the IBA has not 
discharged its duties in accor- 
dance with the 1981 Broad- 
casting Act”. 

Earlier this week, the IBA 
ruled the Rank bid for Grana- 
da unacceptable. It has since 
refused to discuss its reasons 

A statement from Rank last 
night said it had told the IBA 
it needed to know whether the 


decision would be reviewed. 
“Unless a satisfactory reason 
is forthcoming by.. .Monday, 
Rank intends to commence 
high court proceedings for a 
judicial review of the I BA's 
fulfilment of its duties under 
the 1981 Act. 

“Rank has taken this step 
on the advice of leading 
counsel and after consultation 
with a number of major 
shareholders of Rank and 
Granada, with tfie objective of 
speedily securing for Granada 
shareholders the unfettered 
opportunity of making a prop- 
er evaluation of the bid.” 

The statement added: “The 
IBA are not saying we are 
improper people to lake over 
the franchise. They are simply 
saying it is not their policy to 
allow franchises to change 
hands and that is the end of 
the affair. We believe their 
responsibility should go be- 
yond this.” 


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HOME NEWS 


THE TIMES SATURDAY MARCH i 1986 


* v 



By Pearce Wright, Science Editor 


A renew of ihe risk to the 
first generation of Magnox 
nuclear power stations to 
earthquake shocks is being 
made by the Nuclear Installa- 
tions Inspectorate. 

The study is a response to 
assertions that the two earlier 
stations at Calder Hall, in 
Cumbria, and Chapelcross. on 
the Solway Firth, built for 
producing plutonium, could 
collapse if struck by a seismic 
tremor. 

In an interim statement 
yesterday, the inspectorate 
said it was confident that "the 
margin of pessimism** built 
into the original calculations 
ensured that the stations 
would withstand earthquakes. 

Although the threat of 
earthquakes had not been 
considered when the Magnox 
series of nuclear stations were 
built, the inspectorate had 
subsequently looked at the 
risk. 

The reassurance from the 
Government's safety organi- 
zation. which issues licences 
to operate nuclear power sta- 
tions. provides some respite 
for British Nuclear Fuels, 
which operates the two sta- 
tions. 

Eriiish Nuclear Fuels last 
night admitted that its stations 
were not designed to resist 
“seismic effects” when they 
were built in the I950s.But it 
emphasized that it was confi- 
dent that plutonium-produc- 
ing reactors were safe. 

The reactors supply electric- 
ity to the grid as a by-product 
of creating plutonium for 
weapons. The main reactors at 
Calder Hall form part of the 
Selialield site, at which a team 
of 16 scientists and engineers 
from the inspectorate began 
an audit on Thursday. That 
investigation comes after the 
recent leaks at British Nuclear 
Fueis reprocessing plant on 
the Sella field site. 

The company said a de- 
tailed technical reply about 
the possibility of the reactors 
collapsing was being prepared. 
British Nuclear Fuels was 
confident that the safety of the 
rcaciors had been confirmed 
by the assessments that had 
been sent to the inspectorate 


and were now under consid- 
ered. 

it is those assessments that 
are at the heart of the new 
dispute. They were requested 
by the nuclear inspector six 
years ago. after a seismic 
tremor in December 1979. 

The disturbance was the 
third largest earthquake re- 
corded in Britain, and its 
centre near Carlisle was only 
IS miles from the Chapelcross 
power station. 

In common with Calder 
Hall and Chapelcross. the 
other commercial power sta- 
tions were not designed specif- 
ically to be resistant to seismic 
c fleets. 

The work used the same 
approach now being applied 
in the design of new nuclear 
plants, such as the plans for 
Sizewell in Suffolk. 

Analyses of the type of 
components and equipment 
was made for British Nuclear 
Fuels by the consultants. Prin- 
cipal Meehan ica. using vibra- 
tion testing where possible. 

But the work was done in 
two stages, and there were two 
reports. In the first, by a group 
working with Mr Peter 
Phelan, and submitted in 
1983. the likelihood of col- 
lapse because of a tremor was 
pul at between one in 100 and 
one in 1,000. > 

The explanation was sim- 
ple. The nuclear cores at the 
Calder Hal! station are con- 
tained in steel vessels, which 
are enclosed in a concrete 
building. 

• Four anti-nuclear cam- 
paigners failed yesterday in 
the latest round of their 
attempt to take the Govern- 
ment to court about its de- 
fence policy. 

At the High Court in Lon- 
don. two judges refused Mr 
Tom Richards. Miss Joyce 
Appleby. Mr Eddie Dougall 
and his wife, Helen, leave to 
challenge the refusal of a 
magistrate at Bury St Ed- 
munds in Suffolk to allow 
them to start a criminal 
prosecution against the Prime 
Minister, the Foreign Secre- 
tary and the Secretary of State 
for Defence! the Press Associa- 
tion reports). 



■ww .. , . ■» ■ 0 ,-fc ... 

\ ; 4 ., .'•.■.'Xvjl'p-*’-?, 

4 /"* \ • •' •••• ‘ •» ’?/.**', * 

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The 600-ton coaster. Stem, left high and dry on the beach alongside Wellington Pier at Great Yarmouth, Norfolk. 



ims head 



Prominent hardline mem- 
bers of the Rev Ian Paisley's 
Democratic Unionist Party 
are expected to lead Monday's 
strike throughout Northern 
Ireland against the Anglo-Irish 
agreement. 

Increasingly the joint cam- 
paign of opposition to the 
Hillsborough pact is seen to be 
directed by the DUP, with 
diminishing influence from 
the larger Official Unionist 
Party, under Mr James 
Moly neaux. 

\i the same lime the DUP 
deputy leader. Mr Peter Rob- 
inson. aged 34, MP for Belfast 
East, is emerging as the domi- 
nant leader of the uncompro- 
mising school of Lfoionists 
and !he real power behind the 
now markedly subdued Mr 
Paisley. 

!i was Mr Robinson who 
revealed on Thursday that the 
“ 1)5-0 Worker's Committee” 
had been set up to direct 
Monday's protest. . 

Mr Robinson said the com- 
mittee was made up or shop 
stewards and did not have 
politicians or paramilitary 
representatives as members. 

The committee, however, 
has a two-tier structure. There 
is an inner committee ofabout 
a dozen shop stewards chaired 
by a little known DUP mem- 
ber of Belfast City Council. Mr 
Frank Leslie. 

A wider grouping, includes 
delegates of the DUP and 
OUP. the much smaller Popu- 
lar Unionists and Progressive 
Unionists, both virtually one- 
man bands. ihe“ loyalist” Or- 
ange Order and the 


paramilitary Ulster Defence 
' Association. 

The inner committee last 
met for two hours at the 
DU P's headquarters in east 
Belfast on Thursday night. Mr 
Robinson, the Rev William 
McCrea, MP for Mid-Ulster, 
and Mr Gregory Campbell 
the DUP Assemblyman from 
Londonderry, were also 
presen l 

Mr Robinson* had told re- 
porters that a committee 
spokesman would be avail- 
able. but in the event only a 
brief uninformative statement 
was issued under Mr Leslie's 
signature and no one was put 
forward to answer questions. 

The statement gave no de- 
tails of actions planned for 
Monday, but merely accused 
employers of harassing em- 
ployees who wished to support 
the protest and the trade 
unions of intimidating work- 
ers by telling them not to 
stnke. 

Mr Leslie works for the 
Northern Ireland Electricity 
Service and his committee is 
known to include other repre- 
sentatives from the almost 
wholly Protestant power 
workers. Their support in 
1974 was crucial to the success 
of the loyalist general strike 

During that 1 5-day strike 
the hardline loyalist strangle- 
hold on electricity services at 
one time reduced Ulster to the 
output of a single gas turbine 
generator. Power cuts in 
Northern Ireland on Monday 
are certain if workers at 
Ballylumford. the largest pow- 
er station, fulfill their pledge 
to strike. 


TUC talks 
on print 
dispute 

At talks last night between 
News International and the 
electricians' union, the 
EEPTU. the company agreed 
to hold a meeting with Mr 
Norman Willis, TUC general 
secretary, to establish the basis 
fora possible further round of 
negotiations on the Wapping 
dispute. 

Mr Bruce Matthews, man 
aging director of News Inter- 
national. is to meet Mr Willis 
early next week. 

But in a statement, the 
company complained that the 
“atmosphere at present being 
engendered by the print union 
leaders made talks very diffi- 
cult indeed”. 

Mr Tom Rice, national 
official in charge of the print- 
ing industry for the 
electricians* union, has react- 
ed angrily to allegations that 
members working at the new 
plant at Wapping, east Lon- 
don, were on the verge of 
mutiny. 

He said:”! am appalled at 
the irresponsible misuse by 
the hardline Morning Star 
communist newspaper of 
letter from our members at 
Wapping. 

“This was written in sup- 
port of our un ion's attempt id 
secure a resumption of talks 
with News International to 
achieve a negotiated settle- 
ment of the current dispute. 

He added: "It appears that 
the Morning Star art prepared 
to wreck any initiative which 
the EEPTU may take in line 
with their TUC agreement. 
This politically motivated 
intervention can only beat the 
expense of the print workers 
involved and must be de- 
ptored by all those seeking an 
honourable settlement" 

< Three men were last night 
being questioned by detectives 
at Hoi born police station in- 
vestigating an assault last 
week on Mr Christopher 
Warm an. The Tima' property 
correspondent. He received 
neck, wounds from a broken 
glass in a public house near the 
newspapers former premises 
at Gray’s Inn Road. 


New editor for 
Daily Express 

Mr Nicholas Lloyd, recently 
appointed general manager of, 
London Post (Printers) Ltd. 
yesterday resigned from News 
International to become edi- 
tor of the Daily Express. 

Mr Lloyd, who is aged 43. 
was editor of the A m of the 
World when it became" tab- 
loid. For the past 12 months 
he has been working for the 
company on a study of news- 
paper and magazine manage- 
ment in the United Suites as 
well as attending the Ad- 
vanced Management Pro- 
gramme at Harvard 
University. 

A News international 
spokesman said: “Mr Lloyd 
leaves ^ us with our best 
wishes". 

Sir Larry Lamb, the present 
editor of the Express, is to 
leave "by mutual consent” in 
April after completing three 
years in the post Express 
Newspapers announced yes- 
terday. 

Sir Lanrv. aged 57, had heart 
surgery last year. 


GEC has to count cost of 
Nimrod project challenge 


GEC appears to face a high 
risk challenge if it is to 
complete the Nimrod Air- 
borne Early Warning aircraft 
project after the outline agree- 
ment announced by Mr Nor- 
man Lamont. Minister of 
State for Defence Procure- 

menL 

The agreement, announced 
on Wednesday, seems to be 
evidence of strong political 
determination that GEC 
should find a solution to the 
problems of Nimrod. But that 
it should also fully share the 
risks involved with the Minis- 
try of Defence. 

The company has been 
given six months to produce 
firm proposals for completing 
the project to the full perfor- 
mance standards demanded 
by the RAF. 

Meanwhile the Ministry of 
Defence will be seeking possi- 
ble alternatives such as the 
American Awacs, the 
Grumman E-2C Hawkeye or 
the Lockheed P-3C Orion. By 
about September, the ministry 
will make a choice between 
the competing systems. 

If it is decided at that stage 
not to proceed with Nimrod 
then GEC stands to lose up to 
£25 million out ofa maximum 


By Rodney Cowton, Defence Correspondent 

of £50 million which it will standards which were under 
have spent during those six discussion, but in a few re- 
momhs under an agreement in spects they will demand dra- 
which costs are split 50-50. matically improved 


But if it is agreed to com- 
plete the project under a firm- 
price contract, the really 
serious risks will begin. 

The risks lake two forms: a 
higher level of performance to 
be achieved within two to 
three years than had recently 
been contemplated, and seri- 
ous financial penalties for any 
failure to achieve those stan- 
dards within a fixed lime. 

Until very recently negotia- 
tions have concentrated on 
achieving a minimum operat- 
ing standard which in some 
respects was far below the 
standard the RAF wanted. 
There would then have been a 
second phase to achieve the 
full standard. That approach 
has now been abandoned. 

Instead GEC and altema-. 
live contenders for the project 
will be given a list of probably 
about 300 performance char- 
acteristics which are needed to 
meet the RAFs full standard 
and will be asked to submit a 
firm price and time bid to 
achieve them. 

These standards may not 
differ very much from the 
minimum initial operating 


performance. 

There will probably be a 
requirement for tbe aircraft to 
be able to track many more 
aircraft for a longer period of 
time, and handle the problem 
of over-land “d utter” much 
belter than has so far been 
managed. 

Ail this is a large technical 
challenge for the company 
handling it. GEC Avionics, 
and in particular for Mr Derek 
Jackson, the chief executive at 
its Borehamwood establish- 
ment who will be leading tbe 
team of about 1.000 GEC 
employees, who will be in- 
volved on this development 

One of their main tasks will 
be to see whether a much 
faster and more powerful 
computer wit! be able to 
handle all the information 
generated by the aircraft. 

. ir the company derides it 
has a solution to all tbe 
performance problems, and 
puts in a successful bid for the 
contract to lake the project to 
full operational standards, it 
then faces financial risks if it 
fails to fulfil the contract on 
time. 


Prisoners’ 
table, salt 
victory 

By Alan Wood 
Parliamentary Staff 

Prisoners have succeeded in 
their campaign of protest 
against restrictions on the 
amount of salt in their diets. 

La view of objections by 
inmates, prison medical au- 
thorities have been asked to 
re-examine the restrictions 
with a view to allowing more 
salt in the diet without damag- 
ing health. 

In the Commons yesterday, 
Mr Alfred Dubs, an Opposi- 
tion spokesman on home af- 
fairs, asked in what 
circumstances and by what 
authority prisoners were re- 
quired to pay for table salt. 

Mr David Mellor, a junior 
Home Office minister, said 
that no prisoner was required 
to pay for table salt. He said 
that as part of a review last 
year of dietary "scales** for 
prisoners salt was made a 
scaled item instead of being 
issued without limit as in the 
past. 

The object was' to ensure 
that salt Intake would not 
significantly exceed a level 
regarded as acceptable for 
maintaining good health. - 

Objections had been raised 
by some prisoners about the 
reduction in the amount of salt.. 


Report of 
provoked 
coal strike 
‘nonsense’ 

By Phtiip Webster . 

Mr Ian MacGregor, chair- 
man of the National ' Coal 
Board, was said yesterday to 
have described as nonsense 
claims that he bad said that 
Mrs Margaret Thatcher had 
deliberately provoked the 
miners’ strike. 

Mr MacGregor had what 
was described as a routine 
meeting Yesterday morning 
with the Secretary of Slate for 
Energy. Mr Peter . Walker, 
when reports about Mr 
MacGregor's forthcoming 
memoirs were raised- - 
Whitehall sources said that 
Mr MacGregor had -told Mr 
Walker that the reports were 
nonsense. 

Reports said that in his 
memoirs Mr MacGregor tells 
how he and the Prime Minis- 
ter met in (be autumn of 1983, 
six months before the strike 
began, to plan the best way of 
provoking a dispute. 

He was also said to have 
alleged that the Prime Minster 
lost her nerve half way 
through the strike. 

But senior ministers said 
yesterday that such reports 
were “fanciful” .and 
"ridiculous”, as were sugges- 
tions that Mrs Thatcher bad 
lost her nerve at any lime. 

But Mr Neil Kinnock, the 
Labour leader, said he was not 
surprised by the allegations. 

Mr Kinnock, speaking oo.a 
visit to Oakdale Colliery- in his 
South Wales constituency yes- 
terday, said, the' suggestion 
that Mrs Thatcher and Mr 
MacGregor had conspmed 
with the deliberate purpose of 
conducting affairs in the way 
they had "is not beyond the 
realms of possibility". - 

• A temporary ban obtained 
by the National Union of 
Mineworkers preventing the 
coal board from taking steps 
to close Bates Colliery at 
Blyth, Northumberland, was 
lifted by a High Court judge in 
London yesterday. 

Mr Justice Maepherson said 
it was impossible for the 
injunction to be continued 
because the union would not 
p've an undertaking to meet 
inancial loses the coal board 
might suffer as a result of the 
injunction. 

The board said there was no 
evidence that the pi 1 would 
ever make a profit. 


No stamp 
on Irish 
passports 

The Home Office has or- 
dered an end to the illegal 
stamping of Irish Republic 
passports by British passport 
offices. 

The assurance came from 
Sir David Hannay, Britain's 
Ambassador to the EEC, who 
said the Home Office accepted 
that stamping an EEC citizen's 
passport in another EEC coun- 
try had been outlawed by the 
European Court of Justice 
Mr Tom Raftery, the 
republic's Fine Gael Euro MP, 
tested the system when he flew 
into •' Heathrow airport last 
month. He presented his nor- 
mal passport instead of bis 
special Euro passport. 

After it was stamped by an 
official he look the matter up 
with the Brussels Commission , 




Man in tbe news 


Moderate victorious in union ballot 


By George Hill 

The new general secretary 
of the National Communica- 
tions Union, Mr John Gol- 
ding. MP, claimed yesterday 
that his election by a decisive 
majority marked a watershed 
is the union's history. 

Tbe moderate candidate in 
the election, he secured twice 
as many votes as the left-wing 
runner-op in a ballot of the full 
membership of the anion, 
formed last year by the amal- 
gamation pf unions represent- 
ing clerical and engineering 
teJecomffltmkations workers. 

“For the moderate to have 
such a massive majority does 
mean that the union is at a 
turning-point after having 
been under left-wing domina- 
tion for the last three years”, 
Mr Golding said yesterday. 


The union's executive re- 
mains under left-wing control 
but Mr Golding expects that 
new elections, to be held on an 
all-member ballot basis for the 
first time, may change its 
complexion before he takes 
over, probably in June. 

"The election will be very- 
complicated, because of the 
constitution of tbe amalgamat- 
ed union, and members may 
not know the candidates very 
well 

"Bnt if the voters know who 
the moderates are, then the 
moderates will win,” he said. 

- ' In the past, executive elec- 
tions have been by conference 
delegates wielding the whole 
block votes of their branches, 

which gave an advantage to 
the left. 

"It has been a marked 
feature of the election for 


general secretary that moder- 
-ate branches have polled 
heavily and left-wing ones 
lightly,” Mr Golding said. 

The new general secretary is 
ready to stay on as Labour 
member for Newcastle-under- 
Lyme anti) the next general 
election, although he is leaving 
that decision to his constituen- 
cy party and the Labour Party 
national executive. 

Mr Golding's wife, Llin, has 
already announced that she 
will be standing for selection 
as Labour candidate for the 
seat when it becomes vacant 

"I am confident that the 
constituency will not be ne- 
glected. Ill be giving my wife 
more constituency casework 
than now; she does most of it 
already” he said. 

Mr Golding had a relatively 
tight 5.6 per cent majority at 


Sale room 


Castle’s state bed fetches £20,900 


2 MAJOR AUCTIONS 

OF THE UTMOST IMPORTANCE AND URGENCY 

We regrettably announce that due to prohibitive and unobtainable Insurance rates 
currently aflecting shipments in and around the Persia Gulf, valued m excess of D0.000.000. 

AN ISLAMIC COLLECTION OF: 

PERSIAN CARPETS 

RUGS AND RUNNERS 

and others from the more important weaving centres of the East 
being an ancient artlorm which were accumulated vn both Europe and the United Stares tor exhibition 
and repatriation to the foUowing countries of Iran. Iraq and Turkey. 

Due to these unforeseen circumstances and the economic unfeasibility the project has been 
irrevocably cancelled and whilst the rugs were being held in transit rn Her Majesty's Bonded 
Warehouses, Heathrow Airport, and others, they now have been removed and must be disposed of 
immediately by Auction. 

Due to the vast number of pieces and value 'mvofved the auctions have been divided into sixteen 
separate collections thus affording everyone art equal opportunity to acquire one or more of these 
masterpieces. 

The first session of Auction Sales will be held on Sunday 2nd March, f986 
at the following locations. All Auctions will commence 
at 3.00pm local time. Previewing 12.00 noon prior to auction time. 


tBAU-INGTON GRANGE LTD. HAMPSTEAD 
AUCTION ROOM. 28 ROSSLYN HILL, 
HAMPSTEAD. LONDON NW3 
TEL: 01 -794 5PI2 



2. THE ENGLISH SPEAKING UNION 
DARTMOUTH HOUSE. 37 CHARLES ST.. 
BERKELEY SQUARE. LONDON W1 
(Adjacent to Chesterfield Hotel! 


Payments win be accepted in Sterling, U.S. or Canadian 
DoHars, Swiss Francs, Deutsch Marks or French Francs 
and aif major Credit Cards with 12). 

Pactong and forwarding tacffiUes available for those wishing to re-export their rugs. 


By Geraldine Norman 
Sale Room Correspondent 
The stale bed from Leeds 
Castle. Kent was sold at 
Sotheby's yesterday for 
£20.900 (estimate £15.000 to 
£20,000) to an unknown bid- 
der. 

The Queen Anne tester bed 
has an elaborately moulded 
cornice applied with eigh- 
teenth century yellow silk 
from which contemporary 
pelmets fall with scrolling 
edges: the backboard is also of 
scrolling outline. 

Something so grand is rarely 
on the market but is also of 
very limited appeal because of 
its size: almost 13ft high and 
more than 8ft long. 

State beds were mainly for 
show, to dcrorate the state 
bedroom, in case the king or 
queen dropped in to stay, 
which they rarely did. In this 
case. bo«c\er. it had been 
adapted for use by a recent 
owner. Mr David Style, an 
antique dealer and decorator, 
and is supplied with well- 
matched modern silk curtains 
and coverlet. Christie’s sold 
his home at Watering bury in 
Kent in I97S and the bed 
fetched £8.250 on that occa- 
sion. It is believed to have left 
Leeds Castle before the last 
war. 

Sotheby's sale of fine En- 
glish furniture totalled 
£815.353 with 8 per cent 
unsold. A number of pieces 
brought unexpectedly high 
prices. A George II mahogany 
tripod table soared to £33.000 
(estimate £10.000 to £15.000). 
the highest price in the sale. 

in New York on Thursday 
the Americans paid unusual 
honours to the talent of Philip 
Wilson Steer, the gifted British 
impressionist painter, normal- 
ly only sought after by British 
collectors. 



a* -lit — J-- Jr‘r*Syrili. n 7rY-M 


Jane Posgate of Sotheby's sitting on the Leeds Castle state 
bed before yesterday's auction In London. 

His colour ilustraiion. “The 
morning room”, decorated the 


cover of Sotheby's catalogue 
of important nineteenth cen- 
tury European paintings and it 
was bid to S84.TIX) (estimate 
$12,000 to $!8.000l or £56.845 
by a London dealer. Ir is a 
striking 1908 portrait ofa girl 
in a chintz chair 


Another exceptional price 
was the $132,000 (estimate 
$30.00 to $40,000) or £S8.5y0 
for a portrait of an ancient 
turbanned Mamcluk by Anno 
Louts Girodet-Trioson. one of 
the firs: generation of French 
Romantic painters. The sale 
made £2 million, with 2b per 
cent unsold. 


Compensation given to 
musician after arrest 

By Stewart Tendler Crime Reporter 

<■&?* compensation of incident last April involving ’ 
£2.386 have been *■« Dr ' r ~~ - • 


paid by 
West Midlands police to a 
rock group musician who 
claimed false arrest after he 
was held for allegedly assault- 
ing a police constable. 

The case against Mr Keith 
Smart, aged 39. drummer with 
the Rockin' Berries, was 
dropped at a Birmingham 
magistrates' court last Sep- 
tember. 

The Police Complaints Au- 
thority is considering a report 
on the incident sent to them 
by the police after Mr Smart 
made a formal complaint. 

Yesterday Mr Aidan Cotter. 
Mr Smart’s solicitor , said Mr 
Smart was arrested in an 


BR offer rises to 5% 


British Rail increased its 
pay offer to 120.000 employ- 
ees to a rise of 5 per cent 
yesterday. 

In addition, an extra £1 a 
week would be paid to those 
earning less than the mini- 
mum earnings level of £97.95. 
For those workers, fewer than 
10.000. the offer is worth 6.32 
per cent. 

Executives of both main 
unions; the National Union of 
Railwavmen and As I ef. arc to 
discuss the offer on Monday 
and Tuesday. They will then 
reach a decision jointly at a 
meeting of the Federation- of 
Railway Unions on Wednes- 
day or Thursday. 


British Rail's chief negotia- 
tor, Mr John Palette, made 
clear that it was a "final” offer. 
The previous offer was 4.5 per 
ccnL He emphasized the 
board's desire for a quick 
settlement and to “talk up” 
the • industry after recent 
freight losses. 


* ?■ ".a?. 


PW 300. 


C\ DNM 70 iO[IU: Denmark Dkr «a nn' 

.Bffivfanw ™ 80ft 


German: 

Orw 


RlWMft 400 Italy L 2 500 Lu««n 

Mornr.ro Dir ipm rwtfwau |J? 

i-i?? ?* ib Mwac* 

v 


AJ&0DJB 


CLOSING 
DOWN SALE 

DRASTIC 
REDUCTION 
ON ALL 
QUALITY CANE 
FURNITURE, 
CERAMICS ‘ , 
AND BASKETWAJLE 

781 FULHAM RJ> .. 
LONDON, SW6 


V f 


tbe last election, in a- seat . 
where a Conservative was 
rtnmer-op 'and a Liberal sen 
cured 20 percent of the votes. . 

In his election to the general 
secretaryship, Mr Golding re- 
ceived 41350 votes, Mr PUL . 
Holt 18.599 votes and Mt. 
David Norman 13,068 votes, r 
while two other candidates ' 
gained fewer than 3300 votes 
between them. The turnout ' 
was just over 51 per cent 

Mr Golding’s ejection will • 
increase right-wing influence 
on the TUC General CotmriL ■ 
He has been a member of 
Labour's national executive 
since 1978, and is a former 
junior minister and Labour-' 
whip, and chairman of the- 
Commons select committee . on 
employment between 1979 and 
1982. 


PC Lee Moore in Corporation' 
Street, Birmingham. • ■ • 
According to Mr Smart, be -» 
was handcuffed and arrested ' 
for no good reason. Tbe 1 
policeman alleged he had been 
kicked by Mr Smart in the r 
course of the incident. 

Independent witnesses - 
came forward after a newspa- • 
per report appeared in the * 
Birmingham Evening Mail ■■ 
The charge was dropped. - 
Mr Cotter said the police ' 
have paid £l.5Q0-fn compen- 
sation and £886 in costs. 1 • 

"Had witnesses not come \ 
forward there was a real 
chance Mr Smart would have • 
been convicted,” he said. 


f 


4 ' 




'r 




0 




f HE TIMES SAiUkijAY IvIaivcH 1 i 


Tory 


MP’s wife tells of 
£80,000 gifts to save 
man from the devil 


A Conservative MFs wife 
told a court yesterday that she 
gave nearly £80,000 to help 
save a seif-styled satanist, Mr 
Deny Main waring Knight, 
from the deviL 


Mrs Susan Sainsbury, aged 
47, the wife of Mr Timothy 
Sainsbury, MP for Hove and a 
member of one of Britain's 
wealthiest families, was dear- 
ly nervous as die sat in the 
witness box at Maidstone 
Crown Court. 


Mis Sainsbury, who was 
wearing a pendant crucifix, 
said she' first heard about Mr 
Knight through a friend and 
later met the Rev John Baker 
at her London home. 

She said: "Baker told me 
that Mr Knight was involved 
in a Satanic church and want- 
ed to commit himsdf to 
Christ. But in order to do that 
certain items of regalia that 
belonged to the church of the 


satanic order had to be bought 
and destroyed. 

"According to the rector, 
Mr Knight was being groomed 
to be the leader of this group 
when this regalia, which had a 
certain hold on him, would 
come into his possession and 
he could destroy them to 
break this hold." 

Mm Sainsbury gave seven 
cheques totalling £79,785 to 
Mr Baker between July 1984 
and the end of February 1985. 


had spoken to him on 
telephone telling him 


the 

she 


The final payments in Feb- 
ruary of £28.000 and £20,000 
went towards lire purchase of 
a throne, which she bad been 
told would cost about 
£200,000. 


Mr Knight, aged 46, of 
Dormans Land, Surrey, denies 
19 charges of obtaining 
£203,850 by deception. 

Although Mrs Sainsbury 
did not meet Mr Knight, she 


for his deliverance 
jm the deviL 

She believed in the power of 
prayer "passionately” and 
end it was a powerful influ- 
ence against saianism. 

Mis Sainsbury also said, in 
evidence which lasted 90 min- 
utes, that the £80,000 she gave 
Mr Baker for Mr Knight had 
"no conditions attached”, and 
tiie did not expea proof of 
purchases. 

"As long as it was being 
applied to buying the re galia 
that was all right by me. I 
believed all along what I was 
being told by Mr Baker,” she 
said. 

She agreed with Mr Michael 
West, QC for Mr Knight, that 
saianism "was far, fir more 
rampant than most people 
think in this country”. 




itiitive 



Sir Georg Solti, former principal conductor of the London Philharmonic Orchestra, in London this week with the 24 
Grammy awards he has won since 1958. The twenty-fifth came on Wednesday for his recording of Schoenberg's Moses and 
__ Aron with the Chicago Symphony Orchestra (Photograph: Soresh Karadia). 


Disputes 
about dogs 
led to feud 




Disputes over dogs started a 

longstanding feud between a 

Lloyds underwriter and his 
neighbour, a retired wing com- 
mander, a county court was 
told yesterday. 

Mr John Rew, aged 46, an 
underwriter, of Thornhill 
House, Stalbridge, Dorset, 
told the court that be objected 
when Mr Paul Evans, aged 60, 
brought dogs to his kennels 
where he had housed a 
favourite three-legged Labra- 
dor called Bramble, which had 
recently died. 

He said that Mr Evans, 
whose cottage is on the estate 
he owns, had no rights on his 
land and that the action over 
the dogs had increased a 
"frostiness” in their relation- 
ship. 

Mr Rew denied that in 
subsequent incidents be had 
placed a laughing machine on 
tire bonnet of Mr Evans's car. 
had to be restrained from 
throwing a bucket of water 
over Mr Evans's wife Evelyn; 
and knocked Mrs Evans to the 
ground in a dispute over a 
terrier. 

He claimed that in the 
dispute over the terrier Mr 
Evans struck him two or three 
times on the tide of the head, 
knocking off his glasses and 
causing him to fill. "I was 
bleeding quite heavDy" he. 
said. 


Mr Rew was continuing his 
evidence on the third day ofh 
hearing at Yeovil County 
Court, sitting at Wincanton. 

Mr Evans is asking the court 
to consider jailing Mr Rew for 
allegedly breaching a 
magistrates’ court onfer, made 
last year, prohibiting him 
from molesting or assaulting 
Mr Evans's family. 

Cross-examined by Mr Si- 
mon Russen, for Mr Evans, 
about evidence he gave yester- 
day, Mr Rew denied that he 
was the first to suggest that his 
neighbours might be bought '< 
out. It had come out in 
discussions with his solicitors. 

The hearing continues. 


Musicians 9 £%m damages 


Vangelis, the composer 
whose hits include the theme 
music of tire film Chariots of 
Fire, and two musicians were 
awarded £250,000 agreed 
damages yesterday, with inter- 
est and costs, by the High 
Court against a record compa- 


Queensgate, Kensington, 
south-west London, had won 
international acclaim, Mr Ja- 
cob said. 

In 1971 Vangelis took part 
in an experimental recording 
session with two musicians. 
Brian Odgers and Tony 


ny which illegally released . Oxley. Mr Jacob said that 


some of their early work. 

The damag es were against 
Rye Record Safes which, in an 
earlier bearing, had consented , 
to judgement bang entered 
against it for breach of copy- 
right. 

Mr Robin Jacob, QC. for 
the m usicians, told the Vice- 
Chancellor, Sir Nicholas 
Bro wne-W ilkinson, that his 
clients recorded several pieces 
of music in tire early 1970s 
which Vangelis regarded as 
"inferior". 

Since then Vangelis, of 


Vangelis decided not to re- 
lease any of that music, but in 
1978 Pye got bold of forged 
documents of title and records 
of the works started appearing 
in Britain and in Europe. 

• Alan Lancaster, a member 
of tire Status Quo pop group, 
launched a High Court at- 
tempt yesterday to stop the 
other two members of the 
group from "cashing in on 
their most valuable asset” 
without him. 

Francis Rossi, lead guitarist, 
and Rick Parfitt are planning 


Arthritis 
drugs 
‘may kill’ 


By Alan Hamilton 

Some drugs used in the 
treatment of arthritis nay be 
killing as many as 200 old 
people every year. 

The warning comes after a 
study of all patients admitted 
to tiro Nottingham hospitals, 
with bleeding peptic nkers 
during a two-year period. 

Doctors in the city’s Univer- 
sity Hospital, writing in the 
latest issue of The Lancet, say 
they fonnd a “strong 
association” between the pres- 
ence of such idem in patients 
aged over 60 and the hsc of ■ 
non-steroidal anti-inflammar- 
tory drugs prescribed for 
osteoarthritis. 

Out of 290 patients with 
bleeding ukeis in that age. 
group, more than 60 cases 
were probably caused by the 
drag treatment, tire doctors 
say. 

Doctors point oat, however, 
that j n spite of tire possible 
side-effects, the drugs are 
greatly beneficial in control- 
ling a disabling ami distress- 
ing ailment. 


Social worker jailed 
for sexual offences 


A social worker who lured 
young boys in his care into his 
bedroom to commit sexual 
acts was jailed yesterday for 
eight years. 

Kenneth Scott, aged 34, of 
Harrison Close, Market 
Harborough, Leicestershire, 
who was in cfaaige ofa county 
council care home, admitted 
five offences of gross indecen- 
cy with three boys aged be- 
tween 12 and 16. 

Thejudge, Mr Justice Rare, 
said Scott "bad committed 
horrifying offences and had 
abused his position of trust” at 
the home in Market 
Harborough, which is now 
dosed. 

He said: "It is difficult to 
think of more outrageous and 
despicable behaviour from 
someone who is in charge ofa 
children's home.” 

Mr Geoffrey Solomons, for 
the prosecution told Leicester 
Crown Court that Scott re- 
peatedly lured the boys into 
his room and showed them 
pornographic books and films. 

Scott paid them money and 
bought them dothes to com- 


mit sexual ads with him over 
a number of years and be even 
took photographs and video 
films of them, Mr Solomons 
said. 

Police found photographs of 
the boys in obscene poses. 

Mr David Price, for the 
defence, said Scott had 
worked bard at the home and 
had a good tide to his charac- 
ter. 

• A “happily-married'’ sexual 
offender yesterday offered to 
be castrated. Neil Scorer, aged 
35, who admitted molesting 
five boys aged from seven to 
II, said at the Central Crimi- 
nal Court that he would "do 
anything” to rid himself of his 
"terrible tendencies". 

Scorer, a clerk, of St 
Georges Road, Kingston, Sur- 
rey, was jailed for ax years. 

Judge Thomas Pigot, QC 
told him: "This is a very sad 
case. You are entrapped by 
your own nature and you have 
repeatedly cried out for help. I 
ho pe that if there is a chance of 
restoring you to a normal life 
every effort should be made to 
treat you in prison." 


Nagging 
sister was 
killed 


A shy, gentle man killed his 


sister, a religious fanatic, after 
enduring 20! 


years of nagging. 
Sir James Miskm, QC Re- 
corder of London, was told at 
the Central Criminal Court 
yesterday. 

Daniel O'Sullivan never an- 
swered back untQ his self- 
control finally snapped one 
August morning, Mrs Barbara 
Mms, fix' the prosecution, 
said. He pushed his sister, 
Bridget, aged 63, to the ground 
and put his foot on her throat, 
killing her. 

O'Sullivan, aged 56, of 
Sandicambe Road, Rich- 
mond, admitted manslaughter 
and was ordered to be de- 
tained under the Mental 
Health Act 

Mrs Mills said that 
O'Sullivan, a schizophrenic, 
had been a gardener at Kew 
for nearly 20 years and had 
lived with sister, who was 
house-proud and a fanatical 
Roman Catholic. 

"She thought be was not 
sufficiently interested in reli- 
gion. Matters came to a head 
when he was ill and Bridget 
nagged him about housework, 
handing him a note telling 
him to move and live 
elsewhere." 

Mr Robin Grey, QC for the 
defence, said: "This tragedy 
was brought about as the 
result of a clash of two 
abnormal personalities. 

"It is remarkable that in the 
20 years he lived with her 
there had not been any 
arguments. 


Bailiffs visit 
dealer’s home 


Bailiffs yesterday removed 
fittings and carpets 


furniture, 

from the home of Mr Harvey 
Michael Ross, a bullion deal- 
er, who is believed to be in 
Israel 

Mr Ross, aged 38, of 
A1 woodley, Leeds, is due to 
appear in the High Court 
sitting at Leeds on Monday to 
answer a bankruptcy petition 
and six county court orders. 


Hull jobs loss 


Three hundred jobs will be 
lost, from a staff of 800, and 
there will be fewer buses, 
under the provisions of a Bill 
to privatize the transport de- 
partment at Hull 


Boxing comeback is counted out 


The British Boxing Board of 


Control yesterday washed its 
hands of a comeback 


fight 

planned by Jin Wilde, a 
former world heavyweight 
champion. He hopes to dis- 
play his skills before 10.000 
people at the Swansea City 
Football Ground. 

Mr Wilde, who last fought 
40 years ago. is now aged 70 
and his opponent, Mr Colin 
Davis, is aged 63. . 

The former professional 
fighter, who lost to Tommy 
Farr, accepted the challenge 
after Mr Davies offered to go 
five rounds with anyone over 
the age of 60. 

Mr Davies, of Derwen-fhwr, 
Swansea, said be made his 


By Hm Jones 
challenge to prove that people 
of pensionable age were not on 
the scrap heap. "We are a lot 
better than many young 
boxers,” he said. 

“Every boxer, young and 
old, risks physical damage, so 
our fight mil be no different 
from any other. I'm not 
worried about what the ex- 
perts say, I can look after 
myself” 

The former amateur had 
planned to spar, swim, lift 
weights and give up smoking 
to shed two of his 1 6 stone for 
the big fight. 

Mr Wilde, who had more 
than 100 professional fights 
said: "1 may be old, but I am 
still fit enough to make a 


comeback. AH X need to do is 
buy myself a new pair of 


gloves and I'm ready to teach 
Galii 


lin a boxing lesson.” 


Thor planned encounter 
was condemned by Mr Ray 
Clarke, general secretary of the 
boxing board. "I think it is 
pathetic and diabolical and 
anyone who has anything to 
do with it needs their heaos 


examined. In the fight gam 
34 isconsidererd oldr he said. 


The board's chief medical 
officer. Dr Adrian Whiteson, 
said the men could be risking 
their fives. "A heavy blow 
could result in a cerebral 
haemorrhage or permanent 
brain damage " be said. 


i 


SL. 


to release an album and make 
public appearances without 
Mr Lancaster, the bass player, 
and want to use the name 
Status Quo. 

After a disagreement over 
the recording of the new 
album, Mr Rossi and Mr 
Parfitt went ahead without Mr 
Lancaster. They claimed that 
he had withdrawn from the 
trio. 

The name Status Quo as- 
sures sales and success, Mr 
Kevin Garnett, for Mr Lan- 
caster, told the court. Mr 
Lancaster bad no intention of 
being dismissed by the others. 

The hearing continues to- 
day. 

• George Michael has con- 
firmed that his duo Wham! is 
to disband after a farewell 
concert at Wembley, London, 
this summer. 


Jail for 
constable 
in crash 


A policeman who crashed 
Into another car virtually de- 
molishing it and fatally injur- 
ing the driver was sent to 
prison for two years yesterday. 

Police Constable Paul 
Scanlon, aged 24, resigned 
from the West Yorkshire force 


on Thursday. 

He had drank almost two 


and a half times more than the 
legal limit when the accident 
happened at Caton, near Lan- 
caster, on May 9 last year, 
Preston Crown Court was told. 

Scanlon, a bachelor, of Ray- 
mond Drive, West Bowling, 
Bradford, pleaded gnflty to 
causing death by reckless 
driving. 


Keeper acquitted 
over illegal traps 


A North Yorkshire game- 
keeper was aquitted yesterday 
on charges of causing unneces- 
sary suffering to a cat and 
using an illegal trap. 

In Ley burn Magistrates’ 
Court, James Wood, aged 37, 
of Church View, Askrigg, 
Wensleydale, denied any 
knowledge of the trap. 

Lieutenant-Colonel John 
Hambly and his wife, Sigrid, 
of The Lodge, Askrigg, had 
found their tom cat Squirt 
caught in a spiked steel trap 
during a torchlight search of 
the overgrown orchard beside 
their home, the court was tokL 
The couple had heard cries 
of distress after Squirt had 
foiled to come in with their 


other cat. The trap was discov- 
ered a few feel from a pen full 
of partridge chicks. 

Colonel Hambly photo- 
graphed the trap and called the 
police who discovered a sec- 
ond gin near by. 

The court was told that 
several days before Squirt was 
caught in the trap. Colonel 
Hambly discovered -young 
birds in his garden. Thinking 
they were wild partridges, be 
set them free. They were later 
found to have been escaped 
birds from the pen. 

Mr John Winch, for the 
defence, said that anyone who 
disliked Mr Wood could have 
set the trap to incriminate the 
gamekeeper. - 


By David ffewson 
Aits Correspondent 

The executive producer of 
the BBC’s controversial inves- 
tigative programme. Rough 
Justice, is feeing disciplinary 
action after complaints Iff 
Lord Lane, Lord Chief Justice, 
about an edition, which result- 
ed in the freeing of a man 
wrongly jafled -for five years 
for burglary. 

Two BBC journalists were 
suspended mid given final 
warnings in January for ibeir 
pan in the programme about 
Mr Tony Mycock who was 
imprisoned . for a burglary, 
which the programme proved 
did not take place. 

But Lord Lane was critical 
of the methods that the Rough 
Justice reporter, Mr Martin. 
Young, and the producer, Mr 
Peter Hill,, used in obtaining 
interviews with Miss Anne 
Fitzpatrick, who claimed that 
she was the victim of the 
buigtary. 

BBC journalists now believe 
that Mr Elwyn Parry Jones, 
the series’ executive producer, 
feces severe disciplinary ac- 
tion for his conduct concern- 
ing the edition, although a 
rough cut of the programme 
was also seen by Mr Michael 
Grade, Controller of BBC 1, 

Journalists at the Lime 
Grove current affairs depart- 
ment believe that severe disci- 
plinary action ■ against Mr 
Parry Jones, could result in. 
another editorial strike which 
could embarrass the corpora- 
tion as much as last year’s 24- 
hour blackout over the 
banned. Real Lives pro- 
gramme. 


Royal patron 

The Princess of Wales is fo 
become patron of the British 
Lung Foundation, Dr Mal- 
colm Green, chairman of the 
charity, which was launched 
last year, said yesterday. 



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HOME/OVERSEA S NEWS 


THE TIMES SATURDAY MARCH 1 1986 


Plastic bullets a better 
last resort in riots 
than Army, Hurd says 


' Using plastic bullets against 
rioters was better than police 
chiefs having to call in soldiers 
armed with live ammunition 
as a last resort, Mr Douglas 
Hurd. Home Secretary, said 
yesterday. 

Mr Hurd returned to 
Handswortb in Birmingham, 
where two people died in riots 
last September, to deliver his 
warning that chief constables 
must have plastic bullets 
available in extreme cases 
where lives were at risk. 

On his last tour of 
Handswortb, the day after the 
worst of last year’s noting, the 
Home Secretary was pelted 
with stones and bottles and 
bad to flee from the area under 
police protection, but 
yesterday's visit was peaceful. 

He told journalists that in 
extreme cases, such as that at 
Tottenham when a shotgun 
was used against police, it was 
probably belter that the police 
should have plastic bullets 
than that their only resort was 
to call in the Army with live 
ammunition. 

“When a chief officer thinks 
that for the protection of his 


By Craig Setoa 
men or citizens be needs 
them, rather than to call in the 
Army with live ammunition, 
then I think be should have 
them. 

“But, that is as a last resort, 
absolutely defensive and, it 
comes when and if everything 
else has failed”, Mr Hurd saicL 

“But. the great thing is to 
have that last resort never 
happening.” be added. 

Mr Hurd has already prom* 
ised Mr Geoffrey Dear. Chief 
Constable of the West Mid- 
lands, that he can have plastic 
bullets if his Labour-con- 
trolled police committee con- 
tinues to withhold permission. 

The chief constable has said 
that plastic bullets would have 
been justified and effective 
during the Handsworth riots; 
a claim rejected this week in a 
report on the disturbances by 
Mr Julius Silverman, a barris- 
ter and former Labour MP. 

Mr Hurd said yesterday that 
he hoped local police authori- 
ties would make it possible for 
chief constables to have plas- 
tic bullets for the safety of 
their men and the public. 

“If they do not, I believe I 


have to. I am not prepared to 
see the police helpless under 
the kind of attack they en- 
dured in Tottenham.” 

Asked if he feared more 
riots this summer, the Home 
Secretary said he hoped that 
good sense would show people 
who might be tempted that 
rioting harmed only them- 
selves and their community. 

He said another report into 
the riots by five black people, 
which had dabbed Birming- 
ham as a capital of racism, bad 
not been worth the effort and 
he added: 

“I am slightly tired of the 
approach that it is all because 
of racism on the part of the 
police, just as I ket slightly 
weary of police officers saying 
they are asked to police black 
communities more lightly 
than white.” 

The Home Secretary's tour 
began at a Handswortb em- 
ployment scheme where trad- 
ers and comm unity leaders 
complained about high unem- 
ployment and delays in paying 
compensation for the £16 
million of damage caused by 
the riots. 


Brewers’ 
fears on 
single duty 

Fears that EEC plans to 
harmonize taxation on alco- 
holic drinks conld red nee the 
wide choice available to Brit- 
ish beer-drinkers are raised in 
a report by MPs, published 
yesterday. 

The Commons Select Com- 
mittee on European Legisla- 
tion says that the plans raise 
questions of political impor- 
tance. 

Securing agreement on a 
consistent relationship be- 
tween tax on beers, wines and 
spirits has proved difficult. 

In evidence to the committee 
the Brewers' Society pointed 
out that the British market “is 
unique in the wide range of 
beers of different strengths on 
sale” and said it feared that a 
single rate of doty would lead 
to “the disappearance or modi- 
fication of many popular exist- 
ing brands”. 

Teatk report from tke Select 
Committee oa Europtaa Legisla- 
ture (Stationery Office; £3.70). 


Inquests highlight 
plight of aged 


The plight of old people 
living alone through the se- 
vere winter was highlighted 
yesterday alien inquests were 
held into the deaths of four 
hypothermia victims. 

Mr John Budd, the Black- 
pool Coroner, was told that 
Mrs Edith Davies, aged 83. a 
widow, had only a two-bar 
electric fire to provide heating 
in her bungalow in Oldwater 
Avenue, Thornton, near 
BlackpooL 

She used only one bar of the 
fire, according to neighbours 
who found her, fully dothed. 
collapsed on a bed on Febru- 
ary 13. 

Mr Budd recorded an acci- 
dental death verdict on her. on 
Mrs Amy Bailey, aged 82, of 
Newhouse Road, Blackpool, 
who died on February IS, and 
on Mr Jack Harrison, aged 89, 
of Barmouth Avenue, Black- 
pool, who died on February 7. 

Mr Harrison, ■ a widower, 
collapsed behind the front 
door and lay for a consider- 


able time in freezing condi- 
tions. His temperature had 
dropped 17 degrees below 
normal when the police broke 
in and found him. 

Mrs Bailey, a widow, was 
found sitting in a chair at her 
home where she lived alone. 

The house was always cold 
and the only form of heating 
was a gas fire - 

Mr Budd said many elderly 
people seemed to be fright- 
ened to turn on healing be- 
cause of the high cost. 

In Sheffield, the coroner. Dr 
Stefan Popper, was told that 
Mrs May Oxley, aged 84, a 
widow, of Cookson Close, 
Parson Cross. Sheffield, had a 
small stroke in bed and fell to 
the floor. 

Dr Christopher Smith, a 
pathologist, said she might 
well have recovered from the 
stroke, but it left her unable to 
call for help or get back to the 
warmth of her bed. 

The coroner recorded a 
verdict of accidental death. 


Powell’s 
attack 
on Ulster 
accord 

By George HID 

The Anglo-Irish agreement 
and the acceptance of Europe- 
an courts* jurisdiction were 
helping to bring the institution 
of Parliament more funda- 
mentally into question than 
perhaps ever before, Mr 
Enoch Powell, Official Union- 
ist MP for Down South, said 
yesterday. 

Speaking two days after the 
European Court of Justice 
upheld a woman's plea a gainst 
having to retire early because 
of her sex, be that 

Parliament was no longer 
regarded as the unique and 
ultimate guarantor of Britons’ 
rights. 

“The House of Commons is 
not even asked for its permis- 
sion when the Government 
grants to radhridual citizens 
the right to ask a forei gn c ourt, 
the European Court ofHnman 
Rights, too v crt HTO not merely 
the judgements of the Queen’s 
courts, but the Acts of her 
Parliament as being incom- 
patible with the rights, if not of | 
a Briton, at any rate of a 
human being (whatever that 
may be)”. Mr Powell said. 

Addressing a St David's 
Day dinner in London. Mr 
Powell accused the Govern- 
ment of applying different 
standards to Northern Ireland 
and Wales, another pan of the 
United Kingdom where a 
minority wished to withdraw 
from the parliamentary union. 

Wales’s role as a full partici- 
pant in the United Kingdom 
was secure, he said, but the 
Hillsborough agreement was 
the climax of a policy by the 
British state “to wont with 
secrecy and determination to 
eject” Northern Ireland. 

It was an unprecedented 
agreement that directly repu- 
diated the principle that it was 
Parliament which “affords to 
aU minorities every protection 
and status”. 



f Mrs Simone Duvalier, the mother of Haiti's former dictator, 
arriving in Paris for medical treatment. 

Haiti wants to lay 
hands on Duvalier 


No action on 
keel sale bid 

No further action is to be 
taken against the mmi who 
allegedly tried to sell the keel 
design of Britain's America's 
Cap entry fir £18,000, police 
said yesterday. 

Anthony John Brown, aged 
27, of Port Isaac, Cornwall, 
had been allowed police bail 
on December l after the 
failure of the sale to a New 
York-based syndicate. 


Welsh march to dramatize a ‘forgotten strike’ 


From Tim Jones 
Cardiff 

More than IJDOO people win 
march through a North Wales 
town today to revive public 
interest in what has become 
the forgotten strike. 

The dispute, between slate 
workers and two brothers and 
their brother-in-law who own 
three quarries in Blaenau 
Ffestiniog, has been going on 
since last August. 

It has bttterty divided the 
small Welsh-speaking com- 
munity in Gwynedd and 
turned former friends into 


enemies. Families who wor- 
ship together in the chapels no 
longer speak to each other in 
the street 

The dispute began when 
workers at one of the quarries 
refused to accept new work 
practices, which they claimed 
would reduce their wages from 
£170 to £140 a week. 

One of the strikers, Mr 
Barry Williams, said yester- 
day: “We were perfectly will- 
ing to increase production 
from 16,000 to 21,000 dates a 
week without any extra pay. 

“But we were opposed to 


doing so fix* less money. We 
did not ask for nor expect any 
increase in wages, but it 
seemed very hard to pay us 
less for more work." 

Since the strike began, some 
of the men have drifted back 
to work and they are now 
shunned by their former col- 
leagues. 

Mr Williams's wife, Julie, 
said: “We have three young 
children and tike other fam- 
ilies are suffering real hard- 
ship. 

“Unpaid bills are mounting 
and there is no money for any 
small luxuries. But we are 


determined to stand by our 
men.” 

Trade unionists, and in 
particula r t he So uth Wales 
miners, are assisting the fam- 
ilies with cash and food 


The quany men hope that a 
meeting arranged for tomor- 
row under the auspices of the 
Advisory, Conciliation and 
Arbitration Service win help 
to find a compromise that 
could end the strike. 

No one from the three! 
companies was available yts-| 
texday for comment 


Purt-an-Prince (Barter) — 
Haiti has announerd that it 
iriR press for the extradition of 
Mr Jean-Oaade Dataller, the 
former dictator who left an 
February 7 lor exile. A aun- 
m tmiq nfe from tire Justice 
Minister, Mr Gerard 
Gorague, said Mr Duvalier 
would sooa be the subject of an 
extradition request 
The commmique, read on 
teferisHm on Thursday night 
added that the five-man Gov- 
ernment Council, which has 
been rumring Haiti since the 
departure of Mr Duvalier. 
would also seek the extradi- 
tion of the former police duel, 
Mr Albert Pferre* from ex3e in 
Brazil. 

The statement, issued after 
two days of violence and 
looting, responded to growing 
public pressure for action 
a gains t Uw ilprT ai*4 officials of 
the former dictatorship. Ac- 
centing te diplomats the coun- 
cil showed no incfiuafion hi Its 
first two weeks to take action 
against Mr Duvalier and his 
aides. 

Haitians sus pected of 
crimes co mmitted during the 
dictatorship would aot be al- 
lowed to leave, the statement 
said. 

On Sunday, the Govern- 
ment allowed Mr Fiore, who 
won a reput ati on for brutality 
in his three years as pafice 
chief, to leave for BraziL He 
was given an army escort to 
die airport, a pro ce du re re- 
peated a day later for the 


former secret police chiefs Mr 
Lac D£sfc. But the attempt to 
let him go led to violence at the 
airport, with troops firing into 
the air nying tear gas 
« w > a l iumdred dem- 
onstrators. 

The conxmumqob said the 
state would seize the property 
of people “denounced by pub- 
lic damenr” an apparent 
reference to the Duvalier mili- 
tia, the Tontons Macoute. 

in another move to defuse 
mounting public criticism of 
the Government, the emmefi 
announced reductions in the 
price of sugar, flour and petrol 
and reiterated that ft was 
hying the groundwork to es- 
tabfish democracy. There 
would be general elections 
after a c onsti t u ent assembly 
had drafted a constitution and 
electoral laws. No timetable 
was given. 

Mr Duvalier is stiD in 
France. The French Govern- 
ment has been wwahle to find 
another country willing to take 


• PARIS: Mr Duvalier** 77- 
year-old mother, Mrs Simone 
Duvalier, arrived in Paris from 
the Alpine resort hotel where 
the former dictator has been 
staying with his faaihr since 
arriving in France (Reuter 
reports). 

Mrs Duvalier said she was 
iH and had left the resort of 
Talloires to seek medical help 
m the French capitaL. She 
declined to comment on her 
son's plans. 


Referendum approval 

Pragmatic Danes 
look to warmer 
links with EEC 


From Christopher FoHett, Copenhagen 

ity government and its pro- 
European policies. 

But the size of the ”no'* vote 
— which was much greater 
Than expected — indicates that 
Danes remain highly suspi- 
cious about ihrirmembersbip 
of the EEC In 1972 the vote to 
join was 63 per cent for and 37 
. per cent against. . 

Mr Uflfe EBemannJensen, Virtually all the poli tical 
the Foreign Minister, greeted parties have said they win 
the result as a ^ “clear-cut Aspect the result and the 
endorsement” of the reforms reforms are now expected to 


■j]je Danish Government, 
having won by a fair ly com- 
fortable majority its referen- 
dum on EEC reforms, has 
called fro- a domestic politi cal 
truce on the issue and urge d a 

spirit of co-operation to hop 
to relations with Bros- 


u«ly 

Thun 


and - a signal to ihe outsise 
world that Danish member- 
ship of the EEC was beyond 
question. 

But the Danes voted grodg- 
for the reforms on 
ifrsday. from a se me of 
pragmatism rather than from 
any great enthusiasm for Eu- 
rope. 

The vote in favour of the so- 
called Luxembourg package of 
s to the Treaty of Rome 
was 562 per cent, with 43.8 
per cart Turnout was 

put at 74.8 per cent of the 
country's 3.8 minion elector- 
ate. 

Although a quarter of the 
voters stayed away, the result 
is seen as a solid victory for 
the riding centre-right minor- 


be ratified by Parliament be- 
fore Easter. 

Thursday's referendum,- the 
eleventh m Danish history, 
was called by the Government 
after a left-wing parliamentary 
majority. Jed by the powerful 
but divided Social Democrats, 
rejected the proposed EEC 
reforms cm the grounds that 
they threatened Danish na- 
tional sovereignty. - 

Opposition parties ex- 
pressed sa ti sfaction with the 
high percentage of objectors 
and relief that support tor the 
package had not been as high 
as foe opinion polls had 
predicted. 

The Danish Foreign Minis- 
ter left for The Hague for foe 
signing fast night of the Lux- 
embourg 


Spain cuts 
price 
of petrol 

From Our Own 
Correspondent 
Madrid 

The Spanish Government 
has cut the price of petrol for 
the second time in three 
months as foe first of a series 
of measures to take advantage 
of faffing world ofl prices and 
reactivate the economy. 

Other measures due to be 
implemented in the next few 
weeks aim to stimulate invest- 
ment and help Spanish firms 
face competition from EEC 
countries. 

The petrol cuts are obvious- 
ly designed to put the voters in 
a favourable mood when they 
vote in 12 days' lime on 
whether Spain stays in Nato. 
The other measures will take 
effect gradually . 

Meanwhile the Govern- 
ment allowed a parliamentary 
debate on the Nato issue. The 
Prime Minister, Sefior Felipe 
GonzAJez, responding to 
crticisnts by the Opposition 
and the media that the count 
might be rigged, acted quickly 
to reverse the petulant deci- 
sion of his own party’s leader- 
ship on Tuesday to bar all 
debates until after the referen- 
dum. 

Senor Manuel Fraga, the 
right-wing opposition leader, 
answering the Prime 
Minister's denial that the rul- 
ing party was stifling 
mentary debate, said: “It is of 
the greatest importance that 
our national problems should 
be tackled in Parliament. 

In Britain this happens 
even in the micMif of a 


PARLIAMENT FEBRUARY 28 1986 


Tobacco sponsorship defended 


Chirac sets terms to govern 


THE ARTS 


It was op to arts 
organizations to decide whether 
to accept tobacco sponsorship 
or not, Mr Richard Lace, 
Minister for the Arts, said in a 
debate on business sponsorship 
of the arts in which backbench 
MPs from all parties bad 
criticized the tobacco 
sponsorship. 

It must oe for them to decide 
(he said) whether they feel it is 
right or wrong to invite tobacco 
companies to sponsor in the 
field of arts. 

He told Mr Clement Freud 
(North East Cambridgeshire, L) 
who condemned an industry 
geared to killing being allowed 
to sponsor the enhancement of 
life, and particularly when such 
comriubitions were matched by 
Government mosey, lhai be 
did not feel it was wrong - 
because he allowed it to 
happen in his present scheme - 
to facilitiate the prospect of 
tobacco . companies* 
contribution being matched. 

He told MPs who .urged 
extended tax concessions in the 
Budget for businesses donating 
to the charities and the arts 
that he noted, their remarks 
with care and would convey 
them to the Chancellor of the 
Exchequer. Of course be was 
keen to see the arts growing by 
attracting additional private 
funding in line with the 1983 
manifesto commitment to 
examine ways to of using the 
tax system IO encourage further 
growth in the arts. 

Sir Wafim van Smabnue 
(Wokingham. CL opening the 
debate, said tobacco companies 
should be just as acceptable as 
that from any other source. 

There was anxiety about the 
source of some sponsorships 
but he hoped there would not 
be argument that a separate 
judgement should be formed 
over the source of such money. 

Surely (hfe said) the test 
should be: Is the activity in 
which the commercial 
company or partnership 
concerned is engaged, legal or 
not? I know there is some 
unease about sponsorship by 


companies, 

is going to for m these moral 
judgements, about that 
particular activity it should be 
remembered there are other 
activities, perfectly lawfully 
carried out, which u carried to 
excess, are very harmful such 
as eating sweets and over 
eating generally. 

With the Budget in pn 


he hoped foe Chancellor of foe 
Exchequer would find it 
possible to propose that 
contributions made by 
individuals or corporate bodies 
to charitable objectives could 
be fully tax deductable. That 
would unleash a surprisingly 
large source of funds. 

There was an dement of 
hysteria about foe admission 
charges for some museums and 



Van Stemb raree A ppeal 
tofoeChaaceQar 
cathedrals. Visting such 
institutions abroad one 
expected to pay ones way and 
bearing in mind (be very 
heaving running costs, why 
should the same not apply here? 
This should not be to make 
these establishments self 
financing, but should be in 
addition to Government 
funding 

Mr Tony Banks (Newham 
North West. Lab), former 
chairman of the GLC arts and 
recreation committee, said he 
had no ideological objection to 
the concept of- business 
sponsorship or to marketing 
the arts in a more imaginative 
and profitable way. But there 
were certain companies whose 
Products or sphere of activity 


made them unacceptable as 
arts funders. 

Much bosmess sponsorship 
was very specifically targetted 
towards high culture and 
prestige events such as op e ra , 
ballet and the Reynolds 
exhibition. It was relatively 
easy for such events to get 
business funding but the small 
seedbed areas with not much 
kudos attached bad great 
difficulties. Most companies 
avoided the avant garde and 
innovative such as ethnic M 
community arts. 

Mr Toby Jesse! (Twickenham, 
O said he saw no compelling 
reason why the Government 
should not look favourably on 
the proposal that bosmess 
should obtain relief from 
corporation tax and other taxes 
on once-off donations to the arts 
and charities. 

This would be a great en- 
couragement to the charities 
and to the arts, it would 
encourage businesses to do 
more m s up p ort of them, and by 
promoting and expanding the 
arts in this country would help 
to improve the high standard of 
excellence still further, en- 
couraging an increase in tourism 
and visitors who generated in- 
come and employment and 
would repay the Government in 
tax yield more than the relief 
directly given. 

Mr Clement Freed (North East 
Cambridgeshire. L) said, on 
tobacco sponsorship, that be 
had always believed that a 
company or industry geared to 
killing should not be allowed 
also to enhance life. 

One was basically un happy to 
have the purveyors of death 
enhancing the arts of this coun- 
try. but one was substantially 
unhappy when such contribu- 
tions were matched by Govern- 
ment money. It was quite 
appalling the youth of this 
country were how led to believe 
they coukl not play cricket 
decently un le ss they smoked 
Benson and Hedges or that part 
and parcel of driving racing cars 

was foe inhalation of Marlboro. 

Mr Roger Sms (Ch isle bum. Q 
said he felt less strongly about 
tobacco sponsorship of an than 
he did about sport. He hoped 
eventually for a complete re- 
moval of advertising and 


promotion of tobacco products 
altogether. Meanwhile they 
must start with sport and per- 
haps art would be foe next step. 
Mr Norman Buchan. Oppo- 
sition spokesman on foe arts, 
said while welcoming the 
development of business 
sponsorship of foe arts it could 
not be regarded as a substitute 
for proper public funding and it 
was impossible not to express 
deep co n c ern about what was 
happening in refsoon to fending 
at both central and local govern- 
ment leveL 

The trend for museums to 
introduce admission charges 
was to be deplored, partkohtrty 
those in South Kensington 
which were largely educational 
establishments. Previously it 
had been possible for a family to 
visit the Science Museum, the 
Natural History Museum and 
the V&A. but a triple change 
would make that impossible for 
many. 

Mr Luce, replying to foe 
debate, said foe Government is 
and would remain a major 
source of arts funding. It had 
pledged itself to maintain arts 
provision and that was a dear 
commitment. There was too 
ready an assumption that 
wherever there was demand for 
growth it must be financed by 
the state. But the slate was not 
the biggest funder of (he arts 
and nor should it be. 

The future health of the aits 
depended on plurality of 
fending, obtaining fends form 
a variety of sources. There were 
those who said the arts were in 
dire straights, a state of 
constant crisis, and those who 
preached an atmosphere of 
‘loom and doom and 
indency. Even the word 
geddon was used. This 
was absolute nonsense. 

Of course abolition of the 
GLC a and metropolitan 
counties had caused some 
uncertainty over the 
transitional period, but the 
abolition proble m s were being 
resolved try foe am council in 
conjunction with the local 
authorities. The real stale of 
the aits was actually very 
healthy. The record of succes 
was not based on monolithic 
state support but on diverse 
funding . 


M Jacques Chirac, the man 
most botly tipped as France's 
next Prime Minister in the 
event of a rigfct-wrmj election 
victory on March 16, has laid 
down four conditions which 
must be fulfilled before any 
right-wing politician agrees to 
form a Government under 
President Mitterrand. 

M Chirac, leader of the 
Gauffist RPR party, said in a 
television interview this week 
that for a right-wing govern- 
ment to be formed the two 
main opposition parties must 
first win an overall majority in 
the new Parliament 
The man chosen as Prime 
Minister, he said, must have 
the confidence of that major- 
ity; he must undertake to carry 
out the joint programme of 
the two parties “without com- 
i raise or concession”; and 
cadent Mitterrand must 
ive a dear undertaking that 
e will allow the new govern- 
ment to carry out the policies 
on which it was elected. 

Asked whether be would 
accept the post of Prime 
Minister were it offered to 
him, M Chirac replied coyly 
that he would save his re- 
i spouse for M Mitterrand. 

Although he has never 
made explicit his willingness, 
and indeed eagerness, to ac- 
cept such an offer, his aides 
have recently caused consider- 
able irritation in opposition 
ranks by insisting that M 
Chirac is the only possible 
choice. 


Fran Diana Geddes, Paris 

Until recently, opinion polls 
had indicated that the RPR 
would have a significantly 
larger number of seats than its 
ally, the centre-right UDF 
party. M Chirac was therefore 
seen as the obvious candidate. 

But tbe latest polls are 
showing a marked narrowing 
of the gap between the two 
parties, leading several UDF 
leaders to start staking out a 



lr 


claim for one of their own 
members as tbe next Prime 
Minister. 

Under tbe constitution M 
Mitterrand has the power to 
appoint whoever be pleases, 
and there is some speculation 
that he may yet decide to look 
behind tbe official party lead- 
ers and appoint a moderate, 
such as M Jacques Chaban- 
Delmas, foe former Gauffist 
Prime Minister, or Mine 
Simone Veil, a former minis- 
ter under President Giscard 
d’Estaing. 

Much will depend on the 
size of foe expected right-wing 
victory on March lo. If foe 
UDF-RPR alliance fails to get 
the absolute majority it is 
seeking — and the latest polls 


indicate that it could be touch- 
and-go - or if it gets a -very 
small majority, M 
Mitterrand's margin for ma- 
noeuvre will be that much 
greater. 

Meanwhile, foe Socialists 
seem best on discrediting M 
Oirac as a possible Prone 
Minister. M Laurent Fabrus, 
tbe present Prime Minister, 
said the RPR leader “appears 
to have forgotten that he has 
Already been Prime Minister, 
and that he was one of foe 
most mediocre Prime Minis- 
ters ever known”. 

No one had foe right to 
dictate conditions to the Presi- 
dent regarding his choice of 
Prime Minister, he ■arid 

Mme Veil asked about her 
own prospects, said that who- 
ever was chosen must come 
from foe largest victorious 
party in foe new Parliament. 
She was astonished to hear M 
FaKus say that foe President 
could choose whom he 
wished. 

• Topless bam Tbe right-wing 
weekly Minute was on sale 
normally here yesterday, de- 
spite a _ court iqjunction 
against its current is ww: . 
sought by M Fabius, because 
its front cover has a topless 
picture of his wife. Franchise, 
sunning herself on a beach . 

Tbe editor, M Jean-Oaude 
Goudeau, who claims that he 
was never ad vised of toe court 
bai^ risks paying damages to 
M Fabius and his wife total- 
ling 1 5 million francs- 


Season of 
goodwill 
in Poland 

From Roger Bayes 
Warsaw 

The gfada) relations be- 
tween the Polish leadership 
ant the Roman Cathsfic 

Church are drawing hi «tid- 

pation of a new pflgrfaaae by 
foe Pope to Kris homeland. 

Although foe Government 
has not yet is s ued a formal 
invitation, toe Pope is expect- 
ed to attend an ttpdrfut 
Eucharistic conference fa Po- 
land in June next year. 

At foe time of his second 
trip to Pofand in 1983 — the 
first, in 1979, helped to spam 
tbe Solidarity movement - foe 
authorities were nervous that a 
ft would trigger unrest, revive | 
the opposition, or make foe 
Church mere mffitut. But foe 
Government survived and is ■ 
therefore more confident fa foe . 
face of a third pHgrimage. 

The question » tow both 
sides should profit torn foe 
negotiations. The Chmeh 
knows ft can at fart |fo 
dBw«i a greemen t ea estab- 
lishing a fund to fauurl to- 



Professor Lopatka: deal on 
Walesa slander charges. . 


to private 
of the 


Sous of dollars 
farmers, a pet sc 
Pope. 

The authorities have beat 
Muring for some frrtfUf font 
they are ready to strike a deal 
os this ideologically sensitive 
scheme, tat the Chwch, frus- 
trated by 18 mouths of fruit* 
less talks, wants to «nsme that 
foe next meeting with foe 
Government really is decisive. 

Although foe .West has 
Pledged $26 iu&Km (£17 3 


A ^ftfupdotprogreunw; 
foe Church senses a waning af 
mtoest. To speed foe process, 
ft has ghresa way on me 
Gove rnment dema nd : that foe 

fand should net include Mr 
M Walesa's Nobel Peace 
Pnze of S2MMXM. 

Behind-the-scenes aeestia- 
tiows can be detected in other 
recent events. It seems that a ■ 
me&tt between foe Minister 
for Re&giea, Professor Adam 
I^Patka, and a senior churcb- 
man. Bishop Jerzy 
Dnbvowsla, paved the way for 
foe slander chains against 
MrWalesa to he mopped. 

The chnrcfc kadeeshfa is 
afao reattfeg with sensitivity 
to official coapfafats about 

®P®"*y- . Fither^°*AdoSf 
Cbojpaeka, who spawned a 
foag hunger strike by dfari- 
d«£ at faisehnch fa atotorb 
of C racow, has been trass- 
fevrwt to a qaiet rural parish. 

T^reare^QHia^mnsof 
wenea which mar become 
faflamed > Am Swgfoe 
Commanist Party compress fa 
June. Batehservcssemdct foe 
fa Mw fresh ges* 
******* goodwffl&oa! both the 
Pgriy and foe Ouwcb hierar- 
chy. 


A thoroughly English welcome for Queen 


From Stephen Taylor 
Christchurch 

The most English of New 
Zea la nd cities laid on a thor- 
oughly English welcome yes- 
terday for the Queen and tbe 
Duke of Edinburgh. 

Looking happier and more 
relaxed than at any stage so far 
on this incident-filled visit, 
the royal couple went on a 
walkabout through Christ- 


church city centre, where 
about 8.000 people bad clus- 
tered as the cathedral bdls 
pealed out a welcome. 

The crowd was foe biggest 
spontaneous gathering ofthe 
tour and seemingly die most 
enthusiastic. 

The route from the airport, 
where the Queen arrived from 
Wellington and Nelson, took 
her past the willow-lined 
banks of foe River Avon and 


more cheering and flag-wav- 
ing crowds. 

A demonstration by fewer 
than 10 people along foe route 
again drew attention lo the 
Trea ty of Waitangi, but there 
were no incidents. 

In Wellington, foe Maori 
activist, Mr Dun Mihaka, «nH 
his wife were released on baft 
after appearing in the District 
Court,, having been held over- 
night in custody. Both were 


with danoerons driy- 

^BaTesulf^toddoa 

meorede oo 

m 

tn drawing to a dose; 

to be followed by Australia, 
gibers of foe royal bouse; 
hokl are acknowledging that 
the size of crowds turning out 
Queen have aenctri- 
KJSffaaBter than on any of 
me seven previous visas hens. 


* 







New currency launches Cairo’s 
Brazil’s life or death s | r ™® ns 
battle against inflation 

Din An rim Min- numlltinn Ihilt ” " " ■ 


k ryyit 


^ Rio dc Janeiro (AP) 
^President Sarney of Brazil, 
declaring i >rar. of lift and 
-death against inflation” yes- 
rjertfry* announced sweeping 
-Economic changes that in- 
1 ciyde a new currency, the 
cruz^do. io replace the cmzei- 
;ro.' A Cruzado is worth . 1,000 
•cruzdrds, about5p. ■ 

'■ Seiihor Sarney decreed a 
; total price freeze and an end to 
^automatic cost-of-living cor- 
rections. kndWn as. indexing. 
.Shopkeepers Who raise prices 
?nd businessmen and land- 
lords who index rates may be 
4?iled, th? President said. 

The Government said infla- 
tion had reached an annual 
’ fete of 255 percent, the worst 
-in Brazil's history. President 
“Sarney called inflation ““public 
-ehemy. p umber one", and said 
;it wps stealing bread from 
'Brazilians* mouths. 

Workers will get pay rises 
today, but thereafter cost-of- 
JHring raises will he deter- 
.mined by the- Government 
according to a so-called flexi- 
k bte scale. Previously there 
were automatic cost-of living 
increases twice a year. 

- - The minimum wage in- 
creases today to the equivalent 
of about £39- a month, from 
the current £29. but then it is 
■to he frozen for a year. 

-The President also eliminat- 
ed the federal treasury bond 
unit used as the basis for 
indexing.- The bond was 
known locally by its Portu- 
guese initials. ORTN. A new 
unit, OTN, has been created, 
with its value frozen for a year 
at 106.4 cruzados, or just over 
£5. ' 

Rents and mortgages have 
-been -frozen at current levels 
for a year.'.' Previously they 
were - increased every six 
months, and- in some cases 

Go-ahead 
for cruise 
; by Dutch 

V From Robert Schnfl . 

' 4 . A msterdam i 

•‘^-The Putch Lower House ofl 
Parliament- has-' finally ap-j 
braved the -deployment of 48| 
IIS - cruise- missiles in The) 
■Netherlands by the end ~ec 
3988, - 

Although six -left-wing • 
Christian Democrat MPs vot- . 
M widf-ihe socialist Opposi- 
tion on Thursday against 
ratification of the deployment 
treaty with the United States^ 
the ruling centre-right coali-j 
jjqu. of- Christian Democrats! 
apd Liberals had a majority ' 
jjvuhithe support of three small] 
ji^bi-wing parties. ] 

k The house rejected an oppo-t 
Si lion proposal' to hold a} 
"referendum on the issue. 

; Pleas by the Opposition not! 
to jalte a decision at this time_ 
b^ause of the present Ameri- 
can $uid Soviet proposals and 
pbu n ter-proposais on missile 
njjjuttion, also fell, on deaf] 
government' ears. However,! 
Mr Hans vdn den Broek. feej 
Foreign Minister, said he 
would continue to strive for 
the ."removal of all Euro- 
missiles in both East and 
t W«L 

t> The Labour Opposition 
•wjwed to keep campaigning 
h gainst deployment in the run- 
up ib parliamentary elections 
in May. It says that if it wins 
ipewer it will review the treaty. 
$wt observers- point out that 
even if the socialists gain the 
targes*' number of Lower 
House seals they will probably 
jiot be able to form a coalition 
that could muster a viable 
Majority. 

* ft seems more likely that the ! 
.present centre-right coalition 
yrifl remain in power. 


Three French 
j. expelled by 
'Iran as ‘spies’ 

. Tehran (Reuter) — Iran has 
expelled three Frenchmen, ac- 
cusing them of espionage, and 
ordered the departure of the 
Tehran . correspondent oi 
^groce-France-Presse. 

• . The Iranian news agency 
ima quoted the Interior Min- 
istry as saying the French 
nationals -were involved m 
“gaining information and es- 
pionage activities to distort 
Iraq's downing of an Iranian 
airliner". 

. Iraq shot down an Iranian 
Fokker Friendship on Febru- 
ary 20 . . 


every three months, in accor- 
dance wife inflation. 

-- Government-guaranteed 
ravings and loan accounts, the 
main form of savings for tens 
of millions of Brazilians, will 
now pay inflation correction 
every three months/instead of 
monthly as before. This was 
the only exception to fee 
general year-long freeze on 
indexing. The Finance Minis- 
ter, Scnhor Dilson Funaro. 
said fee rights of individual 
savers would lx guaranteed. 

The daily devaluation of fee 
cruzeiro-cruzado relative to 
fee US dollar has been 
stopped. The Government 
will in finure determine when, 
and by how much, fee ex- 
change rate will change- The 
rate yesterday was 13.84 cru- 
zados to the dollar. 

AJ1 banks were ordered to 
dose yesterday by Govern- 
ment decree. They are to 
reopen on Monday. 

- Senhor Sarney, speaking 
live on radio and television 
from Brasilia, the capital, said - 
yesterday’s measures werethe 
result of “a serious and diffi- 
cult decision”. He denied they 
were copies of measures taken 
by any other country, a refer- 





President 1 
will be 


ence to press speculation feat 
Brazil was following fee anti- 
inflation policies adopted last 
year by neighbouring Argenti- 
na. ... 

BraziPs monthly inflation 
rate is now regarded as among 
, fee highest in fee world: 1 6 per 
cent in January and 14.3 per 
cent in February. Argentina 
has reduced its rate to about 5 
per cent, and Bolivia has 
achieved similar results. Se- 
nhor Sarney said fee new 
economic measures would- not 
interfere with economic 
growth, estimated in 1985 at8 
per cent, fee best since fee 
1970s. 

• LIMA: The Peruvian Gov- 
ernment has indefinitely post- 
poned an IMF mission that 
was expected to arrive here on 
Monday to review fee econo- 

simkesmM^announcc^^e 

^liH the visit was unnecessary 
(Reuter reports). ! 

Under an IMF provision 
known as Article Four, mis- 
sions conduct annual econom- 
ic reviews of fee fund’s 149 
member states. “When we 
studied Article Four, we noted 
it did not mean feat a mission 
. had to come here,” aGovern- 
- meat finan ce official said. 
“We saw we could offer 
information the Fund wanted 
and could send it to them.” 

The mission had planned to 
review fee state of the econo- 
my, studying statistics at fee 
Central Bank and at ministries 
before drafting a report. 

President Garcia bas criti- 
cized fee IMF for imposing 
colonial-style policies in Latin 
America, and his Government 
stopped payments on its debtj 
to fee fund in August- Peru 
must dear $72 million (£48.6 
million) in arrears by April 14 
or risk losing borrowing rights. 


Russian’s air time 
enrages Reagan 

' From Michael Binyon, Washington 


The White House has sent 
an angry protest to the head of 
ABC television news express- 
ing President Reagan's out- 
rage that a Soviet 
commentator was allowed a 
seven-minute response to Mr 
Reagan's -nationally televised 
speech on. Wednesdays The 
network admitted it made, an 
“errori*. 

. *i don’t know why fee hell 
the media is so willing to lend 
support to the Soviets," Mr 
Reagan told a congressional 
leadership meeting at the 
White House on Thursday. 

Mr Patrick Buchanan, fee 
White House director of com- 
munications, told ABC he was 
“astonished" feat the network 
had given “a trained propa- 
gandist for fee Soviet Union 
equal standing with fee 
President”. 

He said Mr Vladimir 
Posner, a commentator for 
Moscow Radio, was given “a 
standing he does not merit, a 
legitimacy he does not 
deserve." 

Mr Buchanan added: 
“Would you have felt it an' 
expression of fair and bal- 
anced journalism if in the 


1930s, Mr Churchill's calls for 
fee rearmament ofhis country 
were immediately followed by 
fee BBC's granting of an 
unrebutted commentary to 
some functionary of the Third 
Reich?” 

• ' Mr Posner, who grew up in 
fee US and speaks fruitless 
En glish, was : -bitingly " de- 
nounced in Co ngr e ss by Mr 
Bob Dornan, a : California 
Republican, as a “little 
flunkey” and a “disloyal, be- 
traying little Jew.” 

He said: “I’m tired of 
having my Government in- 
sulted by paid communist 
toadies. Vladimir Posner was 
born a Jew. And be coven up 
fee anti-Semitism in fee Sovi- 
et Union. It's an affront to 
decency and to Jewish people 
around the world.” 

A vice president in New 
York said he agreed 
“reluctantly” that Mr Posner 
was allowed too much scope 
on the programme. 

The While House has fre- 
quently complained bitterly 
feat Soviet officials are given 
access to fee air waves in fee 
US whereas Americans are 
not able to put their views to 
Soviet audiences. 


Quebec party leader 
will steer new path 


From John Best Ottajra 


Mr Pierre-Marc Johnson, 
leader of fee Parti Qu£b 6 cois 
(PQ), has given notice that he 
intends to steer fee party 
further from fee goal of inde- 
pendence for Quebec. 

He told fee party’s national 
council in Montreal feat it 
must realize that Quebec is 
part “of fee Canadian federa- 
tion to which fee people have 
decided to continue to 
belong”. The concept of sover- 
eignty-association — a PQ 
code name for independence 


— must be“ updated”, because 
it “does not appear pertinent 
at this time for fee people”. 

Mr Johnson also said the 
party must re-examine its 
social democratic labeL “It is 
time for a profound reflection 
on these two pillars of our 
political orientation,” be said. 

The party lost power to fee 
Quebec Liberals in December 
in an election which Mr 
Johnson called within weeks 
of taking over as leader from 
Mr Rene Levesque. 


From Robert Fisk 
Cairo 

At the AJ-Azhar mosque in 
Cairo, one of the most venera- 
ble of fee country’s Ifeac 
teaching institutions, fee 
faithful were urged yesterday 
to protect their Muslim neigh- 
bours and fee unity of fee 
Muslim state. 

The sheiks of AI-Azhac are 
government appointed and 
there was little doubt as to 
what fee message was sup- 
posed to mean: tint Egyptians 

sbonld go on supporting Presi- 
dent Mubarak and ignore 
those who daim feat it is also 
an Islamic duty to refuom. fee 
Mubarak regime. 

Outside fee 1,000-year-old 
mosque ami university the 
plainclothes security police, 
puffing on their cigarettes at 
fee wheels of battered cars, 
had no need to watch for signs 
of sedition. 

Such sermons, however, are 
fast becoming irrelevant in 
Egypt, where fee collapsing 
economy, the lack of direction 
within fee Government, and 
the frustration of the 
of Cabo's pom point towards 
only further insurrection and 
instability. 

Mr Mubarak is not a bad 
man; his opponents do aot try 
to revile him in the way they 
cursed Sadat — for corruption 
and nepotism. But his prob- 
lems now appear insoluble aad 
the bovine features of the 
President feat still hang on fee 
advertisement hoardings 
along Giza Street reflect fail- 
are and weakness rather than 
post-Sadat stability. 

Hardly a month now goes by 
without serious dvil distur- 
bances in Egypt. If students 
are not rioting over America's 
seizure of an Egyptian mrtiner 
carrying the AchOle Laura 
hijackers, cotton workers are 
striking for pay increases at 
Mahalla eTKobra. 

No sooner had Mr Mnbarak 
suppressed the disturbances in 
the Nfle delta, that followed 
the death in prison of fee 
Egyptian policeman who nu> 
dered seven Israelis in Sinai, 
than the security police then- 
selves mutinied. 


Africa aid 
officer May 
be closed 

By Our Diplomatic 
Correspondent • 

A dispute is brewing over 
whether to close the United 
* Nations office for emergency 
operations in Africa when Mr 
Bradford Morse, the Ameri- 
can administrator of the UN 
Development Programme, 
who has been coordinating 
African relief operations, re- 
tires at the end of June. 

Some senior UN officials 
believe that the office which 
Mr Morse was asked to set up 
at the end ofl9S4 in response 
to the famine in Africa should 
be wound up, even though 
there are still 11.6 million 
people whose lives are at risk 
because of the drought. They 
‘ argue that the UN’s relief 
effort was intended to be only 
a limited operation and that 
the wont of the drought is 
now over. 

Others fee I that the office 
should be scaled down but 
kept going at least until there 
has been a decrease in the 
number of people at risk. 

Mr Morse, who said yester- 
day the UN still needed to find 
$680 million (£460 million) 
this year to sustain its relief 
operations in Africa, made it 
clear that he felt the office 
should be kept going, even if 
on a reduced stale. “But it is 
not my decision whether to 
close or not to close the office 
— it is up to the UN Secretary- 
General,” he said, adding that 
relief operations last year had 
been remarkably successful 


Greece calls for help with oil blaze 


From Mario Modiano 
Athens 

Greece has sent for a British 
fire-fighting expert for advice 
on how to control a Maze that 
has destroyed an ofl tank 
complex west of Salonika in 
northern Greece. He was ex- 
pected in Salonika late last 

night. 

Six firemen and a customs 
officer were injured when the 
fire, which had been subdued 
after efforts lasting five days. 


suddenly revived after mid- 
night causing a powerful ex- 
plosion which turned the area 
into an inferno. A local villager 
who fled in panic died of a 
heart attack. 

The flames and the pall of 
thick black smoke were visible 
from Salonika, spreading 
alarm, but the Government 
reassured the population that 
there was no threat to die city, 
although fee snbarhs nearer 
the site were evacuated. 


By Order of Q.H. Gilbert aca, Liquidator of P&O Carpets Ltd. 

Complete winding up of one of the United Kingdoms former most 
prestigious and long-established internationally renowned 
Persian and Oriental Carpet Distributors. 

AUCTION OF BANKRUPT STOCK 

A VAST EXTREMELY VALUABLE CONNOISSEUR SELECTION OLD CONTEMPORARY, 
CHOICE. HIGH A EXPORT QUALITIES GENUINE HANDMADE RETAIL & WHOLESALE 
STOCK DECORATIVE & FINE PERSIAN, TURKISH, CHINESE, CAUCASIAN, 

■ AFGHANISTAN, INDIA, PAKISTAN CARPETS, RUGS S RUNNERS 

URGENT LIQUIDATION 

EVENING AUCTION 

AT 7.00 p.m. ON SUNDAY 2nd MARCH 

.. INSPECTION FROM 5.00 p.m. OF THIS PORTION, ON THE PREMISES OF 

P&O CARPETS LTD (in liquidation) 

.63 SOUTH AUDLEY STREET, LONDON W1 


Army units, firemen, and 
local people are conc en trating 
on buildiiig earth dykes to 
isolate, the disaster area and ; 
stop the fire from spreadmg to 1 
a arista aring refinery where i 
there are stocks of petrol and ! 
liquid ammonia. 

The bhae has now spread to I 
all 12 tanks in the depot owned I 
by Jet Ofl, a Greek distribo- 
few company, including one I 
containing 50,000 teas of i 
crude ofl. 1 

500 teachers 
arrested 

Dhaka — Police arrested 
about 500 teachers in Bangla- 
desh yesterday in an attempt 
to end a week-long strike 
called to bring pressure on the 
Government to nationalize 
more than 1,500 private sec- 
ondary schools (Ahmed Fazi 
writes). 

The strike has shut down 
almost 90 per cent of schools 
and threatened the March 6 
nationwide school final ex- 
amination. The teachers warn 
nationalization because .it 
would bring their salaries up 
to parity with the higher pay in 
state schools. 




"saw* 


A group of conscripts of the Egy] 
after the rioting that left at 


a security police under army guard "in a Cairo suburb 
1 36 dead and 300 wounded earlier in the week. 


Egypt’s ofl revenaes have 
(alien by 50 per cent in oily a 
year and the country’s tourist 
industry was faffing even be- 
fore fee security police assault 
on two of fee lnxmy hotels at 
die Pyramids; the Achflk 
Laura affair h««f tulran care of 
fhar 

With little hope that the US 
Congress will increase aid, a 
cut in food subsidies for bread, 
sugar gad flour can be only a 
month or two away; and it was 
a cot in bread subsidies that . 
cansed the huge food riots that 
ah— St overthrew the Sadat 
regime in 1977. 

As a result the social fabric 
of fee country can now only be 
held together by fee one 
pivotal force which can ensure 
internal security; the Army. 
The dismissal of Mr 
Mubarak's oa popular Interior 
Minister, Mr Ahmed Rnshdi, 
has come two years too late for 
most Egyptians and there are 
growing rumours feat senior 
army officers now donbt. Mr 


Mobarak'g ability -to appoint 
credible ministers. J 

More and more people are 
talking of Field Marshal Mu- 
hammad Abdel-Hatim Abu 
Ghnzala, the Minister of De- 
fence and Deputy P rim e Min- 
ister, as a future president; 
which would effectively mean 
rule by the Army. 

This is the real significance 
of the mutiny by Mr RashtiTs 
tfl-^aid and poorly-treated 
conscripts this wefck. Treated 
wife hrar-cootempt by -their 
middle-class officers, the thou- 
sands of black-uniformed se- 
curity police simply vented 
their anger on the most con- 
spicaons symbols of the wealth 
they were denied — the two 
large tourist hotels outside the 
gates of their camp at Giza. 

r Bat it is also significant that 
the conscripts came hugely 
from rural areas of Egypt — 
Mr Rnshdi had effectively 
given the security of Cairo, to 
dissatisfied hut armed mem- 
bers of peasant families 


These , were men who were 
brought np is traditioua] Mus- 
lim villages and who are now 
most influenced fay the Islamic 
jfpndaiseflralfora that has tak- 
en root among Egypt’s poor. 

The results of all this nay 
soon . be . manifest. Mr 
Mnbarak will no doubt try to 
soldier on. but the economic 
forces against. Mm — not to 
mention the internal dissent — 
are almost overwhelming. 

;■ If Mr Mubarak were .to m 
there would always, be ’the 
Army and .■ the pro-Western 
Mr Abu Ghazala, a man for 
whom fee Americans hold 
some affection, to take his 
place. 

In fee immediate future, 
however, there is only the 
prospect of farther unrest 
each new outbreak of violence 
more serious than the last mid 
each pointing ever more pain- 
fully tor some kind, of funda- 
mental upheaval in the Arab 
world’s largest poorest and 
most influential nation. 

Ugdjuaitifieipqge? 


UK seeks Syrian help on hostage 


By Nicholas Ashford - 
. Diplomatic Correspondents 

Britain is to ask Syria for 
bdprto obtain the release of 
Mr Alec Collett a British 

S urnalist . held hostage . by 
uslim guerrillas in Lebanon 
for almost a year, when Mr 
Farouk Sharaa,. the Syrian 
Foreign Minister, starts an 
official visit to London on 


Monday. .7 v -. - 

- -Mf Collett who was work— 
ing for the United Nations 
Relief and Works Agepcy fo£ 
Lebanon.- was kidnapped last 
March and has not been seen 
since, although -two videos 
have been released showing 
him in captivity. . 

His abductors are the Revo- 
lutionary Organization of So- 


cigti$t , M 
. headedLhK. 




. .MrXoJlgtCs capwgs hflVe, 
•said he will Be freed only* in* 
exchange for ‘the release of 
Arab guerrillas held in British 
jails, a -reference -to the men 
who shot the Israeli Ambassa- 
dor to Britain, in 1982, an 
action that triggered fee Israeli 
inyasipn of Lebanon. 


votes to 
allow 
live TV 

Washington (Renter) The 
US 'Senate has'vdted to aUotf 
television broadcasts, despite 
feats that ite-fengfey debates 
might put the country to sited. 

After years of worrying 
about how they wifl look, 
senators finally voted 67-21 to 
lift fee curtam on “the workTs 
most exclusive dub” for a 45- 
day test of live coverage from 
June 1. - 

Peaeegirl • . 
check denied; 

Boston (UPI) “ The ’FBI 
denies investigating Samantha 
Smith, the Maine -schoolgirl, 
who became a peace ambassa- 
dor after she wrote to Presi- 
dent Andropov. , 

But it is keeping secret 1 1 
pages of material, containing 
her name, because other .peo- 
ple are involved. The. Boston* 
Herald reported. . . 

Train kills 31 

Delhi (Reuter) r- At least 31 ‘ 
people died and and about 10 O. 
were injured- when an express 
train ploughed into a crowd 
watching a fireworks display, 
as part of a religious festival 
north .of Cbdun, Southern 
Kerala state. 

Trial delay 

Detroit (Renter) — Mr John 
DeLorean's trial on charges of 
defrauding investors in his' 
bankrupt sports car company 
bas been postponed to Sep- 
tember 8 ,' 

Safe Brie 

Pari? . ;(ARP), ■*- French 
cheeses are iiow covered. ,by 
guarantees of safety, the 
French Agriculture Ministry 
said, responding to US 
warnings that some shipments 
contained harmful bacteria. 

Warder’s fury 

- Belgrade (Renter) — A Yu- 
goslav prison - warder ' who 
recently had treatment at a 
psychiatric clinic has been 
arrested after fee random 
shooting dead of eigh t people 
near Doboj, police said. 

Faulty line . 

* Oevefrhd^lfoiih^ 
(Reutert-^-A man is ‘injait 


jiTWJ jTWT i TmT^EiTiTi « £ ■ 


dialled to, buy .dfctigs turned 
ouLtorfae a police hot tine. He. 
.was arrested when he tried uv 
close an $18,000 <kug deaf. 

Explasi^eTcffe 

Nicosia (Reuter) — A car 
explosion which killed a Cyp- 
riot couple on a mountain 
road nears secret British rddar 
station was probably a lovers’ 
Suicide pact, police said 


- - 


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OVERSEAS NEWS 


THE TIMES SATURDAY MARCH i 1986 


The Philippines after Marcos 


i A , “f, % 

> ' i i 

■ i. '• 


Heavy run on bank fuels economic fears Britain over 


A massive run on the 

Philippine National Bank yes- 
terday underscored the jittery 
stale of the country's economy 
as the new Government tries 
to take a national accounting. 

Hundreds of people queued 
from early morning to close 
accounts and make heavy 
withdrawals at the bank's 
branches both in Manila and 
in the northern home prov- 
ince of former President Mar- 
cos. 

Because the run was nation- 
wide it will not be possible to 
make a full assessment until 
the banks open again on 
Monday, but it was sufficient- 
ly heavy to alarm the Govern- 
ment and exceeded 
withdrawals made during Mrs 
Corazon Aquino's boycott 
campaign. 

The run started after the 
Minister of Finance. Mr Jaime 
Ongpin. said he was consider- 
ing the closure of the bank, 
which is go\ eminent owned. 

In realitv there was no risk 
to depositors because the Cen- 
tral Bank is bound to give its 
support, but the run is a clear 
lesson to Mr Ongpin and other 
ministers about the dangers of 
making what one banker 
called an '■imprudent” state- 
ment. 

The Governor of (locos 
Norte. Mr Roque Ablan. tried 
to stop the run in the north 
yesterday by relating the story 
of one unfortunate who with- 
drew 30.0CK) pesos and 
promptly had it stolen. 

The bank lost seven billion 
pesos last year and has a string 
of non-performing assets be- 
cause the Marcos regime used 
it to finance dubious projects 
set up by friends and asso- 
ciates of the former President 
and his wife. 

“A lot of the loans were to 
the cronies, but there were 
also loans to a lot of small guys 
which were not properly se- 
cured or their projects were 
not properly evaluated before 
loans were made. Others sim- 
ply paid bribes to get loans.” 
said one banker. 

"Over the last few years 
good government money has 
been poured after bad to prop 
up the bank. Mr Marcos had 
complete power to shift mon- 
ey from one ministry to 
another. He could dip his 
hands into the entire budget 
and do whatever he pleased. 
More* than half the time 
Madame Imclda was doing 
the same thing, 

"What the Government has 
to do now is to bite the bullet 
and sian with a clean slate by 


From David Watts, Manila 
admitting that most of these 
assets arc wonh nothing." 

Mr Ongpin and the Budget 
Minister. Mr Bert Romulo. 
arc now engaged in a full-scale 
assessment of the 
Government's financial posi- 
tion. but it is such a complex 
problem that it is expected to 
take about one month before 
they reach any conclusions. 

The Central Bank did man- 
age to recover the 65 million 
pesos (about £2 million} in 
new notes that Mrs Marcos’s 
brother. Commodore Alfredo 
Romualdez. tried to move 
through Manila in a van on 
Wednesday. 

Commodore Romualdez. 
who commands the coast- 
guard and owns a shipping 
company, has apparently 
changed lack. Several crates 
containing millions more pe- 
sos were later spirited out of 
the country by plane, accord- 
ing to the local press. 

The money was allegedly 
the proceeds of the Manila 
Casino and the Philippine Jai 
Alai, an amusement corpora- 
tion which Commodore 
Romualdez opera Led. 

His brother. Mr Benjamin 
"KoKoy” Romualdez. the 
Ambassador to the United 
States, has already lied the 
country but the Government 
is either unw illing or unable to 
stop the the cronies that 
remain behind from lining 


their nesis for the harder limes 
ahead. 

Mrs Aquino has now- con- 
firmed that ail political pris- 
oners. including leading 
communists like Mr Jose Ma- 
ria Sison. alleged chairman of 
the Communist Party of the 
Philippines, will be released 
from jail. 

However, those who have 
had charges filed against them 
will still appear in court. Mr 
Sison was arrested in 1976 
with his wife Juliet and Mr 
Bcrnabc Buscayno. founder of 
the Communist Party's mili- 
tary arm. the New People’s- 
Army. 

Many of the detainees now 
being held have never been 
charged with any oficnce- 

The releases will go ahead as 
soon as the papers are pro- 
cessed. Mr Juan Ponce. Entile, 
the Defence Minister, who 
said he was “bound by the 
President's orders”, said that 
if Mr Sison did not renounce 
violence the military “will 
have to deal with him”. 

A group of pro-Marcos law- 
yers. the Lawyers League fora 
Better Philippines, have 
meanwhile filed a suit naming 
the entire Cabinet, in which 
they claim that the proclama- 
tion of President Aquino and 
Mr Salvador Laurel is uncon- 
stitutional and illegal because 
it has not been declared by 
Parliament^ 



Feudal leaders put faith in Ferdinand Junior 


From Michael Hamlyp 
Laoag, northern Philippines 

It was a scene reminiscent of 
feudal tunes. In the provincial 
capital of the northernmost 
province of IIocos Norte die 
governor was receiving testa- 
ments of fealty from his 
mayors and members of pro- 
vincial boards. 

The province used to be the 

exclusive bailiwick of the de- 
posed President Marcos. His 
26-year-old son. Bong Bong, 
or Ferdinand Junior, was the 
titular governor, but ao one 
doubted who the real boss was. 
The local MP was the 
President's daughter, Aimee 
Man otoc Marcos. The other 
officials were largely his crea- 
tures. 

The former President was 
born three miles down the road 
from here in Sarrat; he built 
himself a fine wooden palace 
on the shores of Lake Paoay 
and surrounded it with a 


I LUZON 
Manila 


VLOCOS 

NORTE 


■ " J Laoag 
Soutti China ./ q 
' Sea ' ? q Sarrat 

' ' to Laka Paoay 

10 mttes . ,y Paoay 


classic golf course (maintained 
by the Ministry of Tourism). 

When Mr Marcos was chal- 
1 Caged by supporters of his 
opponent. Mrs Corazon 
Aquino, and forced into retire- 
ment there were 50,000 volun- 
teers in the province ready to 
take up arms and go to his 
defence, should be have ever 
called them. 

“I was shocked that he did 
not,** said the vice governor, 
Mr Roque Ablan, son of a 


previous governor of the prov- 
ince who went down In history 
as the one man who declined to 
surrender his province to the 
Japanese. “Mr Marcos is an 
experienced and intelligent 
military strategist and be 
knows how to deal with a coup 
d'etat" 

Now Mr Ablan has decided 
tit take over the reins of the 
governorship himself, quoting 
a section of the law that 
permits him to act in the event 
of the incapacity or the incum- 
bent for a period of three 
months. 

“But I don't have to wait 
three months," he said after 
the homage of his tributary 
vassals. “Now that the gover 
nor has gone into exile a 
different situation arises." 

Mr Ablan held his meeting 
in the white-painted shiny- 
floored governor's office, un- 
der a red . and white cameo 


TO 






■jx ■=<.>; 


medallion of a younger and 
more vigorous Mr Marcos. 

In addition to paying him 
tribute, and falling in line with 
whatever his wishes were, the 
mayors and board members 
were food in their appreciation 
of Mr Marcos. 

“History will vindicate his 
name," said one. “He is one of 
tile greatest Filipinos, of 
today. 

“We shall wait for genera- 
tions before we see his tike 
again," said another. “We all 
feel sorry as we should feel 
sony for the loss of a great 
leader who has made history."' 

But, they all indicated, 
things should be accepted as 
they are and co-operation 
given to the new leadership of 
the country. “He was 
cheated," said one speaker, 
“and be wanted to protest, but 
for the sake of unity, for the 
sake of relieving the people 
from political tension he had 
to withdraw." 

Mr Ablan pvt it well: “I 
remember the President's own 
words. He said: T would rather 
be great than be president I 
would rather suffer on my own 
than let the people suffer for 

it 

me . 

The meetingjended with the 


sending of a telegram to the 
feudal superior of them all, the 
new President, despite die fact 
that she belongs to a hated 
opposition party, despite the 
fact that their man was “cheat- 
ed of victory", despite the 
feeling that her triumph was, 
die work only of Manila, and 
that the rest of the coanfiry, 
would speak differently. De- 
spite all these things, they 
pledged their co-operation 
with her, and offered their 
congratulations. 

Afterwards, in true feudal 
style, they all retired to their 
baron’s home for the lunch- 
time feast, and tucked in to 
fish, meat with peanut sauce 
and without, rice and banana*. 
Tbe talk then was rather to 
Marne the United Slates for 
their misfortunes. 

“This pressure for a snap 
election, when it was not doe 
until 1987, didn't that start it 
all?" asked the governor's 
daughter, Mrs Annette 
Gningon. 

But perhaps the most feudal 
statement came from another 
mayor. Addressing the gover- 
nin’, he said: “Von governor 
Ablan have our support, but 
we believe that one day out 
IIocos Norte will prod nee an- 
other great leader . . . Onr 
governor, the young Ferdinand 
Marcos, Is one such . . . 


Escape on ice floes 


leaked reproach 

From Michael Hornsby, Johannesburg 


A warm welcome for Mr Rani Mangbtpns, a former Philippines senator, on his arrival at 
Manila airport after spending 14 years in exile in the United States. 


4m 




! Bonn (AFP) — Two young 
! East Germans wearing 
frogmen’s suits fled to the 
West during Thursday night 
l in sub-zero temperatures by 
floating across the river Elbe 
on ice floes, the West German 
border police reported yester- 
day. 

The two men, aged 22 and 
25, made their escape over the 




East-West border from Wit- 
tenberg, in East Germany, 
when the temperature was 
about — 25C (-I3F). 

They were carried away by 1 
the strong current and man- 
aged to reach the western bank 
of the Elbe only by scrambling 
on to ice floes, all the lime 
having to avoid patrol boata 
with searchlights. 


A diplomatic sqoabHe has 
erupted between Britain and 
Sooth Africa over what the 
Pretoria Government consid- 
ers to be unwarranted British 
interference in its internal 
affairs. 

The row began when the 
British Ambassador, Sir Pat- 
rick Moberly, called on the 
Deputy Foreign Minister. Mr 
Ron Miller, in Cape Town last 
Tuesday to deliver a message 
from the British Government 
expressing concern about vari- 
ous aspects of South African 
policy. 

These included the handing; 
of the recent unrest in the 
Mack township of Alexandra, 
on the northern outskirts of 
Johannesburg, and the deri- 
sion to grant “independence” 
to the KwaNdebele tribal 
“homeland" at a time when 
Pretoria claims to be abandon- 
ing apartheid. 

Tire contents of the British 
message were released to the 
press in Cape Town and 
London and it is this, as much 
as what was said, which seems 
to have provoked South 
Africa's ire. 

The first response came 
from Mr Miller in the form of 
a sharp statement accusing Sir 
Patrick of basing his allega- 
tions about events in Alexan- 
dra on hearsay and 
“unreliable press reports". 

Press coverage of the Alex- 
andra unrest was necessarily 
based on hearsay as the 
Government prohibited jour- 
nalists from entering the town- 
ship and reporting at first- 

Key town 
falls to 
Museveni 

From Chaiies Harrison 
Nairobi 

Five weeks after capturing 
Kampala, President 
Museveni's troops yesterday 
were in control of Lira, the 
first important town in north- 
ern Uganda to foil to them. 

His National Resistance 
Army (NRA) met only limited 
resistance in Lira, the centre of ' 
former President Obote’s 
home area. 


hand oa what was going on 
there. 

On Thursday night speak- 
ing at a function in Pretoria, 
the Minister of Law and 
Order, Mr Louis Le Grange, 
described the Ambassador's 
remarks as “astonishing”, and 
sand South Africa had not seat 
its Ambassador in Loudon to 



Uganda remains divided, 
with the NRA holding the 
south and troops of the former 
Ugandan Army, commanded 
by General Basilic Okelio, 
controlling the north and 
north-west 

With its hold on the south — 
the source of virtually all 
Uganda’s export crops — well 
consolidated, the NRA has 
been slow in advancing north. 
Reports in Kampala say Gen- 
eral Okelio is prepared to 
make a stand at Gulu and 
Kitgum, the main towns of his 
own Acholi tribal district 

NRA forces are moving on 
two fronts: in the east through 
Soroti and Lira, and in the 
north from Kampala via the 
Karuma Falls bridge. 

President Museveni may be 
content to wait, knowing that 
the opposition can only get 
weaker as its petrol and other 
supplies dry up. Coffee, the 
main export, is now flowing 
.out to overseas markets. 


Mr Le Grange: angry with 
' British action. 

protest about race riots in 
Brixton last year. 

Yesterday it was the tom of 
Mr R- F. “Pit" Botha, the 
Foreign Minister, to weigh in 
with the comment that it was r , 

not unusual for one Govern- 
ment to express concern pri- 
vately to another, but it was an 
“unfortunate new and bad 
habit to leak the contents". . 

A spokesman for the British 
Embassy in Cape Town agreed 
that It was more usual for 
diplomatic exchanges to re- r- 
main private, hut said it was 
“not without precedent" 

Zimbabwe 

spurns 

Amnesty 

From Jan Snath 
Harare 

Zimbabwe has denied a — 

suggestion by Amnesty Inter- 
national that troops were 
reponsible for the murder of a 
missionary couple in the west . 

of the country in November. j . 

Mr Luke Khumalo, aged 58, j - 
and his English-born wife. # 

Jean, aged 54. were shot dead ’* 

at Thekwane Methodist mis- 
sion. 70 miles west of the 
Matabeleland city of Bula- 
wayo. on November 25. The 
Government said armed in- 
surgents loyal to Mr Joshua 
Nkomo's Zapu party were 
responsible. 

Earlierthis week, in areport 
delivered to the Government, 

Amnesty International said 
there was evidence which led 
it to believe that the killings 
were committed by “support- 
ers of the Government, with 
or without the Government’s 
knowledge”. 

Mr Henry Mukurazhizha, if. 
the Commissioner of Police, - 
said in a report carried yester- 
day in the staunchly pro- 
Government newspaper, Thp 
Herald, that the murder was 
the work of “nothing blit 
bandits". A letter left behind 
by the killers, cited by Amnes- 
ty, which said that supporters 
of the ruling Zanu (PF) party 
had been responsible, was 
“cheap propaganda which 
only fools can believe". 


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fur 




THE TIMES SATURDAY MARCH 1 19S6 

THE ARTS 




* / * » 

jf irfif,.-: 

» - i i 




Television 

The notion that ther<* I* 

by aa Ameri- 
has become part of 
/Syfef* setfnnage- Lovtjoy 
i-J* j K * charming dr ama 
Wriesderomd to ttedaW 

- *“» of <his concept 

-J™ f^eloped by la* La 
Frenais from the books by 

1 JoMttom Gash aboot an jS 

hjw dealer hi East Anglia. 
^ h«» i$ sHghtly broE 

• ^5^o*«ghty abort passing 
.off juofc for more tfoin iTfe 
. wwth to ignorant punters, but 

™ - a ttsalt be begins 
episode about to puffin# 

- m ^°r scam, make some moo- 
;;ey and fascinate a beautiful 

fOtooo- He is then overcome 
»y a general sentimentality 

* “ddmtrmted by aflfectita for 
& choke objet fart, and so 

-coBseqnently • fails on " nil 
■.counts. - 

: had successes with two carter 
* ««■ s about beautiful losers. 
Shoestring and Bergerac. 
Lofejay has all die potential 
charm of its predecessors. It is 
sharply toothed on an attrac- 
tive corner of niral England; 
the plots are intriguing; die 
characterization is delicious. 

Ian McSfaape in; tbe title 
role is louche, foxy, sardonic 
and handsome. He was born to 
speak in Ian La Ftami& 
corny pick-up lines. In real life 
he would be the answer to any , 
maiden's prayer, especially a ! 
maiden who bad beta reading - 
too many Georgette Heyer 
romances. .. ; 

There are some minor flaws j 
which also make the series ! 
1 less saccessfhl than itoogbtto \ 
be. Some of .the. casting 'is ^ 
unhappy. The editing is rather j 
idle so that the action is slowed 
down by meaningless shots of 
impicliiresqDe country lanes or ! 
empty rooms. j 

On the whole Lorqfoyaeena 
to be suffering from the same 

.lackofconvfctkaasitscent^ 5 
character lnd it is still near tbe " 
beginning of tbe. first series J 
and there a plenty of time for r 
improvement: . .1 . .. - v 


Owe Boma 


on the 
ihof 


a giant catch 


Otello 
New Theatre. 
Cardiff; V 


Celia BrayOeld 


■ The .Welsh . National Opera 
t this week have the contented 

: smite of an angler who has 
r landed a big fish that turns out 
to be even iaiger than expect- 
i ed. With them tbe. German 
director Peter Stein' has mad e 
what' is, to ail Intents and 
purposes, his opera debut. His 
previous foray into the genre. 
The Ring for Paris, was half 
aborted before it opened M 
is now virtuaUy forgotten. His 
true starting point has -to be 
Verdi \ Otello m Cardiff and 
after its triumphant opening 
here there are likely to be 
many Stein opera productions 
to follow. 

He begins with thunderbolts 
crossing the • Mediterranean 
sky as the storm at sea reaches ! 
its peak and that sets the 
tension level for the evening. 
Stein through his singers, 
throagh his groupings, 
through his ' lighting,- : even 
through simple props Kke a 
shielding red curtain or a 
sword thrown to the ground, 
strips bare toe human emo- 
tions created by Shakespeare, . 
Verdi and Boito. It may all 
look direct, but everything is 
bttih up with the most careful 
-artificer the sta gin g is toe 
construction made by meticu- 
lous planning 

Lucio Fanti's tawny sets 
make -the smaQ stage of the ' 

, New Theatre smaller still with 
I a second proscenium and 
liaised wooden platform. Side 
walls are surfeces split to let in. 
shafts of light cutting bn- to a 
solitary figure or creating a 
black silhouette. The tack 


■ panels part to reveal a starlit 
night, a stormy sea or a posse 
of Venetian envoys. Moidde 
Bickers costumes have a re- 
naissance cut-bill they trade in 
character Otello is in black 
throughout, Desdemona in 
white and Iago, the two-faced 
man, in clothes that split 
. down tbe middle, half crimson 
and half red. 

From this Peter Stein cre- 
ates a swiftly moving series of 
pictures from some, well-en- 
dowed art gallery. a"di Chirico, 
a Raphael here, a Vermeer 
there. But his action is any- 
thing but museum-tike. He 
thrusts his singers as far 
forward as is physically possi- 
ble so that Iago eyeballs the 
audience during the Credo 
and is finally arrested within 
an inch of tolling into tbe 
orchestra pit 

He draws firora his ringers 
performances of an extrovert 
intensity' not encountered in 
bouses where the main con- 
cern is only the next note. 
Jeffrey Lawton's Otello on 
record or radio, would proba- 
bly sound raw; an unha ppy 
close to the Love Duet a lack 
of tenderness for the final act 

On- stage it comes close to 
working because of Lawton’s 
commitment to the black bull 
goaded beyond endurance by 
a w hite lace handkerchief 
rather than a red cape: This 
Otello is animal force, lumber- 
ing and hirsute — no surprise 
that Stem's next theatre pro- 
duction js The Hairy Ape . 

Donald Maxwell will proba- 
bly never exceH his Iago, no 
creeping creature but half a 
down taking. pleasure in de- 
riding the indifferent minds 
around him. He is the manip- 
ulattHY taking foil vengeance i 



Rich, resonant security: Donald Maxwell as Iago in Otello 


for being passed over in the 
promotion race. He capeis, he 
leaps, be wins every trick but 
the final one, and above all he 
sings with a baritone resonant 
and rich in its security. 

Helen Field’s Desdemona is 
another interpretation of high 
accomplishment, apart from 
an awkward moment in act IL 
The voice is gaining by the 
month in power while still 
retaining the girlish timbre for 


OteUo's child bride. The Wil- 
low Song complete with a 
moment's self annoyance, 
could offer lessons to many 
better known sopranos. 

Some of the supporting 
roles need to be strengthened 
vocally, but no such require- 
ments for a chorus on peak 
form. Richard Armstrong's 
orchestra was on peak form 
too. conscious that the hap-' 
penings on stage could cast 


them in the shadow. They 
stayed in the sunlight 
The WNO have landed 
their big catch. Other opera 
houses are likely to be after ii 
and arrangements are already 
under way with the Monnaie 
in Brussels for a Stein ex- 
change. Otello is going to be 
one of the milestones of toe 
Brian Macro aster rule here. 

John Higgins 


Frr- 

f • 


1 l -f 


•• f 


Theatre 

Across from the ; 

Garden of Allah - -honor. 

* Comedy . . 

"By my count, this is Charles place t 
Wood's third theatrical on- nndad 
slaught og the American film , . Dougla 
industry; and, ^ain^ it con- ag 
veys toe impression that he * 
has spent as much time in ' that - sh 
collecting ammunition a gain* 1 Dougla 
the studios as in writing screen oto . ^ia 
plays for them. Seldom has tbe reseata 
feeding hand been bitten to hot call 
greater comic effect than in -temptai 
Mr Woods Veterans wd Has rxwa& 
Washington Legs? -. 

However, if you are looking . friends 
for anything along the tines of Both nr 
Bcrnic toe Volt (the ultimate wood is 
■' philistine technician) or Sir «sed to 

* John Gielgud, abandoned ona Doipa 

cardboard horse, threatening n*e tool 
'to withdraw his labour, yon tof me. 
wiO not find it in The Garden has wo 
of Allah. The earlier pieces none- 
were racey, front-line reports T?e P 
from the slide area. The new obvious 
play presents an aloof long- of toe e 
shot of Hollywood, and im- .wb* 1 P* 
plies that toe author has had fo** 
enough of all that madness hotel, i 
and is now bidding it a spective 
contemptuously detached tion am 
•farewell. . -"PPd w 

The title refers to- a croce commei 
-celebrated, now; demolished surroun 
Zbotel on Stms« Boulevard, meant t 
Whose decline k mirrored in ei ^7> ‘ 
-toe fortunes of the English 
' couple who have booked mto .«■ m 
. a hotel across toe way. Doug- Ia P s “® 
'las is a screen, writer who has suwMya 
"had nothing produced for 10 As thi 
years. He is' now wtoking on nothing 
jiis second re-write of Vile so tor, 
* Bodies: and^ courtesy of toe amends 
Studio -{Wagner^ -Bean, . and _ second a 
he has brought his wife rashly t 
on her first, trip to Catifcwnia. desolate 
Barbara is an oki hand at picked t 
conference calls linking New police; < 
York, Honolulu, and Ban- and hor 
bmy; and she tikes toe idea of conditio 
seeing Myrna Ley’s footprint have to 
in Grauman’s Chinese . The- mass ral 


atre. Otherwise, toe responds 
to toe place with mounting 
honor. 

Into her “scrawny” fifties 
she feds miserably out of 
place among the crowds of 
nndad youth. She is on to 
Dougls tike tightning *t the 
first sight of *. wandering eye; 
wfrffe also becdpiing obsessed 
that toe is being qued on. 
Dm^las, meanwhile, grinds 
out his script with growing 
resent men t that WBL have 
not called him, and increasing 
temptation to sign on with a 
new agent whose only stipula- 
tion is that he should make 
friends with her stuffed dog. 
Both finally realize that HoHy^ 
wood is no place for them. “I 
used to enjoy coming here”, 
Douglas ays “Now you made 
me took at h, you've spoilt it 
for me.” In other words, be 
has work there -and she has 
none. 

The play does not make that 
obvious print; and for much 
of the evening it is hard to see . 
what point it is making. The 
first aa takes place in the 
hotel, be ginning . with retro- 
spective bedroom .conversa- 
tion and then moving to toe 
pool with much dismissive 
comment from Barbara on the 
surrounding company. Is this 
meant to reflect her physical 
envy, or is it Mr Wood 
laftii^Then, oat of the Woe, 
one of the fellow guests col- 
lapses and dies — evidently to 
supply a first art curtain. 

As though recognizing that 
nothing much has happened 
so for, Mr Wood makes 
amends with an event-packed 




Radio 

A driving force 




Slidly^tod stipes: Nigel Hawthorne anti Glenda Jackson 


ook T/ft, sprilTit ^ ? J elic0 f t ^ r bnzz " heraelf °* talking to us?) Miss 

“teaSSwJSriS jog their window. It is more Jackson projects an indis- 

work there and she has ^.^toAmencan mtot- c riminate general derision 
wore mere -ana sne nas 1|nare ^ ^ work Q f a that 1o ilu±Qlic ^ 

ie play does not make torn hic f9rw hustend along with ihe whole 

oos riint and for much ■ ^L Woo ? 1 . does tosastcr a«a. Mr Hawthorne 

e evStog it is hard to see £**» with some scathingly comes oyer as a thorougb- 

: poSTis making. The fU “ y 5“^ ‘ - , - . ( ? 1 f Qcha ? ll ? d . P ro ^ 

an takes riace m the ^ ^° n Datoels s produc- sionai with comic insight into 
i hMmnim will r*tm- tion stars Nigel Hawthorne his own weaknesses; but with 
ive^TOm ronveS ^ Glenda Jackson there is no insight into his partner. A 
tto danger of the visiting Mexican waiUris ? uberantiy 
with much tosmissive cou Pl e emeiguig as Mr and sketched by Andy Lucas; and 
nmtfioro Barbara on the Mrs Average-Thetrouble is Ralph Koltai’s brutal setting 
wndina company. Is this that their relationship remains at once convey opulence and 
it to reflect her physical - undefmed. Whether in con- squalor. 

^°TTien, out o^theW^ monologue (is she ti^ng to Irving Wardle 

Short Change Jamies a wckssM- 
Iy_ a act cutiain. ^ ■ Theatre Upstairs ^MtalphwSL 0 ) k£ 

though recognizing ttet — no opportunity, to humiliate 

ing much has happened introducing the Theatre the menfolk in pub or betting 
ar, Mr Wood makes Upstairs’ season of new plays shop, and makes plain his 
ids wito an event-packed by Northern writers (which prurient interest in the daugh- 
id act in which toe couple, .sounds , a mite patro ni z in g ler _ without, however, con- 
i' t ake a walk on the already), Tony Heaton's dog- fronting her in person, which 
ate streets where they are ^ed domestic drama was pre- leaves a narrative thread dan- 
d tip and grilled by the miered at toe Liverpool pimp Like many new ptay- 
r; and returned; shaken playhouse a month ago. The- wrights* Mr Heaton appears to 
humiliated, to tteir air- matically and stylistically, it havea wealth of (presumably) 
itioaed prison only to seems to- reach yet further well-observed material to 
foeir peace rent by a back in time; to toe naturahs- hanH without having much of 
rally of prostitutes down tic tow-rent movies of the ^ j^ea of how to extract 


second aa .in which toe coupje. .sounds. . a mite . patronizing 
rashly take a wlk on toe already), Tony Heaton's dog- 
desolate streets where they are ggd domestic drama was pre- 
jncked tip and grilled % toe miered at toe Liverpool 
police; and returned, shaken playhouse a month ago. The- 
and humiliated, to their air- matically and stylistically, it 
conditioned prison only to seems to- reach yet further 
have their peace rent by a ; back in time, to toe naturalis- 
mass rally or prostitutes down pc tow-rent movies of toe 

eariy 1960s. It surely cannot 
■ have taken the theatre a 

quarter of a century to catch 
up whit the cinema. 

Tbe set-up is simplicity 
itself: a failed family on a 
council estate in Newcastle 
held together • not by the 
embittered unemployed father 
(Art Davis) nor by toe boorish 
unemployed son (Buster 
Scott) let alone by toe washed- 
out, recently dehospilalized 
mother (Sheila Reid), but by 
toe bright resolute daughter 
(Tracey Wilkinson), an A- 
level student given to threat- 
ening imm inent departure in 
order- to set up as a singer in 
her elder sister's footsteps. 

■ Vicariously preying on toe 


r ‘-vin i ixhbu an 

uBnYrsatum?!** whoi 1 
talk to jfiHiTSf tf." 

n ALBERY ♦ 

_.i i 

b 

>! 

i 

i 

*! 


dramatic mileage from it. 

The most absorbing scene 
has toe daughter bringing 
.home a tentative young man 
for a nice cup of instant, only 
to have her amorous inten- 
tions thwarted, serially, by her 
intrusively demanding family. 
Miss Wilkinson works very 
well wito Michael McNally in 
this episode; later, .she turns 1 
into a pep-talking pain, and 
Thn FywelTs production pro- 
ceeds by means of agonizingly 
prolonged exchanges as j 
stretbhed as his company's 
gallantly essayed Geordie 
vowels. 

Martin Cropper 


If ever a programme demon- 
strated that legislation is one 
thing, culture another, it was 
toe third in toe four-part 
series. Women — Equal Sex ? 
(Radio 4, Wednesdays; pro- 
ducer, Mary Price). The series 
as a whole is examining 
women's attitudes to equality 
as seen through toe eyes of a 
different subject each week 
and to its credit it has taken 
note of the fact that not all 
women want equality in the 
sense in which it is commonly 
used: matching toe menfolk 
point for point. 

Bel Mooney is toe inter- 
viewer and she asks excellent 
productive questions though 
sometimes, as it seems to me, 
a few more than tie comfort- 
ably with an easy conversa- 
tion. All toe same, she got Sue 
Forrester to talk last Wednes- 
day, no doubt about iL 

Mrs Forrester is wife, moth- 
er and bus-driver. “Oh God*, 
exclaimed a passenger board- 
ing her bus, “it’s a woman...” 
The passenger was herself a 
woman. Sometimes Mrs 
Forrester takes it on the chin, 
sometimes she asks such ex- 
claim ers politely whether they 
would have said in other 
circumstances, “Oh God, it's a 
man”. 

It was quite a struggle to 
become a woman bus-driver 
in Yorkshire, but you need to 
listen to this lady for only half 
; a minute to know that toe is 
an amiably determined, intel- 
ligent and able woman. So she 
made it as a driver, took some 
1LS.A. exams and presented 
herself as a very well qualified 
candidate for inspector. 

She was turned down, time 
and again, uninterviewed. Fi- 
nally. goaded by well-funded 
suspicions of discrimination, 
she took her employers to toe 
law and won. Mrs Forrester is 
not what anyone could call a 
feminist, but enough was 
enough. 

From this the talk widened 
to home life and attitudes and, 
yes indeed, when her husband, 
who also works for the buses, 
gets home each afternoon, he 
takes off his jacket, puts on his 
slippers, sinks into his 
fo-vouriie chair and it's “Put 
toe kettle on. eh love?”. She 
gets out of her uniform and 
into an apron, gets toe tea and 
does toe day's housework. It 
probably wouldn't occur to 
him that things could be 
otherwise. 


She turns it over in her 
mind, but she's nothing if not 
a realist and has come to toe 
conclusion that women are 
more adaptable than men; 
both making changes and 
accepting toe status quo are 
less trying for her own sex. 

So, she reasons, if it were 
between his job or hers, it 
would be better if she lost hers. 
She could cope. Now how 
does anybody legislate to alter 
that? Anyway, I often think — 
and always when I hear toe 
less of Mrs Forrester— that it's 
not toe women that need 
equality, it’s toe men. 

Immediately after this of a 
Wednesday evening, Peter Ev- 
ans is presenting a series of 
The Mind in Focus (Radio 4; 
producer, Daniel Snowman). 
This is not five half-hours of 
the latest thing in neurophysi- 
ology, or the relationship be- 
tween brain and mind, but a 
string of mini-features-cum- 
discussions, each looking at a 
different aspect of human 
behaviour, for example, sexu- 
al attraction, forming and 
holding opinions, religious be- 
lief and — next week — 
humour. 

Maybe this is fair enough; 
according to one persuasive 
view, behaviour is the only 
evidence for the existence of 
mind that we have. On tbe 
other hand, by toe time Mr 
Evans's illustrated introduc- 
tion is over, that leaves a bare 
twenty minutes for him and 
three experts to chew each 
topic over and this is plainly 
not enough. 

On yet another hand, no 
amount of lime of whatever 
duration has ever been found 
sufficient to bring these evi- 
dences of the human mind 
into anything that might be 
called focus. But on toe fourth 
hand, you can do better or 
worse even wito impossibility 
and I would have liked to hear 
a discussion about belief, for 
instance, that did not hive off 
toe religious version as if it 
were a thing apart. . 

Readiness to believe is toe 
basic condition and it will 
apply itself like paint to 
anything. You might also say 
that belief is an unacknowl- 
edged synonym for ignorance, 
since what you know you do 
not have to believe. 

David Wade 


Concerts 

Surprise jewel 


Philharmonia/ 
Salonen 
Festival Hall 

It does not often happen that 
the most rewarding item in a 
concert is toe overture. Such, 
though, was the case — if you 
could demean Ligeti's 
Mefodien of 1971 by dismiss- 
ing its function here as one of 
merely raising the curtain — in 
the Philharmonia Orchestra's 
concert with Esa-Pekka 
Salonen. For one thing, it 
proved that there is nothing 
quite like concentrated, ex- 
posed writing to encourage 
musicians to give of their best. 
Ligeti's delicate textures de- 
mands toe finest control, in 
dynamic as well as in pitch 
and tone quality, for nothing 
in this jewel of a work is 
wasted. 

It is music that presents 
itself very much as an abstract 
but dynamic canvas, painted 
on a complex background of 
micropolyphony whose slow ly 
changing colours provide a 
sense of constant harmonic 
tension. 

Against this, at first in 
hesitant wisps of sound, 
emerge half muscled melodic 
fragments which gradually 


grow in their assertiveness and 
proliferation as Ligeti realizes 
the fertility of his initially 
apparently innocuous 
backcloth. But the melodies 
remain fragmentary and hint- 
ed at rather than fully realized, 
and eventually they recede 
into a beautiful, spare coda. 
This was a conspicuously neat 
performance from the 
orchestra's reduced forces. 

U is sad to reflect that if 
Beethoven's “Emperor*' Con- 
certo had not also been on toe 
programme, far fewer would 
probably have come to hear 
such a beautiful example of 
post-war originality. As it was, 
John LilL deputising at short 
notice for Alexander Toradze, 
seemed strangely uninvolved 
in toe earlier work, and toe 
otherwise admirable power 
and light and shade of his 
reading sat rather pertly on the 
music’s surface. Salonen's ac- 
count of Neilsen's Fourth 
Symphony, the "Inex- 
tinguishable”, itself scarcely a 
crowd puller, was likewise 
disappointing. There were too 
many rough edges in the 
playing, and toe work's epic 
nature was somewhat com- 
promised by something ap- 
proaching pedes trianism. 

Stephen Pettitt 


Complex individuality 


Purcell Quartet 

Wigmore Hall 

Listeners in toe baroque peri- 
od were just as spellbound by 
the instrumental virtuosi of 
their day as 1 9th-cemury audi- 
ences were by Paganini and 
Liszt Wito good reason, too: 
music written for their own 
use by brilliant fiddlers tike 
Locatelli and Tartini. or the 
unrivalled viola da gamba 
wizard Antoine Forqueray, is 
not only technically strenu- 
ous, pushing baroque instru- 
ments and fingering to their 
ultimate achievements. It is 
also witty, impro victory fare; 
full of rhetorical echoes, 
quirky digressions and weird 
but effective cadences. 

The Purcell Quartet a “trio 
sonata” combination of two 
violins, gamba and harpsi- 
chord. is currently presenting 
whole programmes of the stuff 
on an Early Music Network 
tour, and very entertaining 
evenings they make. 

One reason for toe success 
which this group has achieved 
in a comparatively short time 
(it was formed only in 1984) is 
the players' persuasive ability 
to find and convey the indi- 
viduality of each piece they 
play. Even baroque trio sona- 
tas have unique features, if 
one knows where to look. 

Thus a D major sonata by 
Locatelli was delivered in a 
sustained, tonally full style, 
well suited to its arresting 
modulatory twists and sensu- 
ous chains of sixths and 


thirds; while a much more 
airy, scurrying and impulsive 
reading underlined toe eccen- 
tricities of a Johann 
Rosenrauller sonata. 

Sacked from his organist 
post at toe Thomaskinrhe in 
Leipzig (half a century before 
Bach’s day) for offences in- 
volving choirboys. Rosen- 
muller displays more admira- 
ble deviations in his bold 
harmonic and structural 
imagination here. 

The Purcell Quartet's excel- 
lent tuning and consistently 
unified approach was demon- 
strated in a cleanly bowed and 
stylishly nuanced perfor- 
mance of Purcell's Sonata in 
F. toe aptly named “Golden 
Sonata”. Elsewhere, individ- 
ual prowess was apparent 
Richard Bootoby showed the 
gamba player’s art at its most 
intricate in three pieces from a 
Forqueray suite, though the 
soloist's sepulchral double- 
stoppings sometimes failed to 
stand out sufficiently from the 
COntinuo background. 

Violinists Catherine Mack- 
intosh and Elizabeth 
Wallfisch respeaively project- 
ed the farmyard imitations in 
Biber's Sonata Rappres- 
emariva and the “devil's 
trills” of the celebrated Tartini 
sonata with finesse: this showy 
music could, one suspects, 
have borne even more extro- 
vert treatment. But there was 
plenty of rough vigour in 
Robert Woolley's delivery’ of 
two Scarlani sonatas. 

Richard Morrison 



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THE TIMES SATURDAY MARCH 1 1986 



Three men and a vote: Bel Mooney watches the long wooing of the electorate in Fulham 

nghis Khan among the 






f a casting director were 
responsible for choosing the 
three prospective candi- 
dates in the forthcoming 
Fulham by-election, the 
accusation of stereotyping 
would be hard to avoid. Un- 
labeiled. they could be identified 
with ease. 

Matthew Carrington is the epit- 
ome of Tory breeding: tali, craggy 
and pinstriped — as befits a man 
who works for a Saudi Arabian 
bank. Nick Raynsford’s good in- 
tentions shine from bis healthy 
bespectacled face, giving him the 
look ofa corduroy -coated primary 
teacher keen for extra duties, 
despite Labour leanings. Since 
1973 he has been director of 
SHAC. an organization that cam- 
paigns for the homeless. 

And Roger Liddle wears a well- 
cut navy overcoat and speaks with 
great precision, as though trying to 
convince himself of his own 
meaning, which — considering he 
defected from a family Labour 
allegiance to the SDP - he prob- 
ably is. He once worked in the 
electricity industry and is leader of 
the Alliance on Lambeth counciL 

All are of an age (around 40)- it 
appears that each would make an 
excellent constituency MP and 
each carries a burden on his 
shoulders. For Liddle it is the 
locally unpopular alliance made 
by Liberals with the Tories on the 
local council. For Raynsford it is 
the strong leftward move of the 
London Labour Party as a whole: 
the Bemie Grant syndrome. For 
Carrington, who is defending a 
Conservative majority of almost 
5,000. it still could be the Prime 
Minister herself — although he 
maintains that her support in 
Fulham as strong as ever. 

Certainly that would seem to be 
so in Stokenchurch Street, where 
Carrington canvasses on a bitter 
night (since the date of the by- 
election is still undecided, he is 
careful to call this enthusiastic 
activity' “meeting people**). In this 
road of late Victorian terrace 
houses the Tory vote looks as solid 
as one can guess, given puzzled 
nannies who cannot answer for 
their employers, the woman who 
hands him Uie cordless phone on 
the freezing doorstep so that her 
dentist husband can engage him 
lengthily on dental charges. 

One man announces that he will 
support Carrington “as long as 
you support Mrs Thatcher**, assur- 
ing ihe-prospective candidate that 
his whole household is “right of 
Genghis Khan". This is fashion- 
able Fulham, where good taste and 
money have convened workers’ 
cottages into Homes and Cardens 
interiors. 

Carrington knows he's on his 
own temtorv: his whole de- 
meanour is pleasant and con- 
fident - discounting gloomy fore- 
casts for the Tories after Westland 
and British Leyland. denying that 
they would have had a better 
chance of holding Fulham had 
they selected a “wet**, or at least . 
someone who would distance 



himself from Margaret Thatcher. 
Carrington's response would 
heaneo Tory stalwarts: “She is the 
leader of the party and her job is 
not finished yeL She has a lot left 
to do." 

As every candidate knows, vot- 
ers confronted on their doorsteps 
will usually utter whatever re- 
assuring. words are guaranteed to 
get rid of their visitor quickly, 
especially if an icy wind is sucking 
the centrally heated air from the 
stippled hall. A foray into Fulham 
with Roger Liddle yields a much 
more mixed impression. Faced 
with the Alliance candidate, peo- 
ple are likely to murmur that 
Westland was a bit of a shock, so 
perhaps . . . ? 

.An expensively dressed, upper 
middle-class woman in her fifties 
announced: “No. Tm going to 
vote for Maggie.** But if it was 
dearly a straight contest between 
the Alliance and Labour, would 
she shift? “Oh yes. anything to 
keep Labour oul To be frank. I'm 
tempted to vote SDP anyway, but 
my husband would strangle meT 

In Kempson Road the fabled 
demographic variety of Fulham is 
apparent. 

e meet a teacher 
who used to vote 
Labour but now 
doesn't know; a 
woman who 
used to vote 
Tory but now doesn’t know; an 
aged Pole who thinks the police 
ought to have weapons; an elderly 
Tory lady who is unhappy about 
the party but thinks that to vote 
SDP. even to keep Labour out, 
“would be like the rat deserting 
the sinking ship”; and a harassed 
working-class woman dutching a 
baby who says, “You'd better 
speak to my husband — he does 
all the politics, like.** Inside, a 
male voice shouts, “Is that the 
SDP? Tell him Fm voting for him 
this lime.” So will she vote SDP 
too? “If he does we all do.** 
According to Liddle. some of 
the traditional Labour votes on 
council estates are going “soft", 
and public unease with Mrs 
Thatcher's style will benefit the 
SDP — which is busily construct- 
ing its electioneering structure 
from a converted shop in the 
North End Road. But the prob- 
lems inherent in such optimism 
become clear if you take Robin 
and Sarah Barrett as typical of 
professional Fulham. 

.He is 40. an international 
marketing man; she is now a 
housewife with two small children 
but once worked as a secretary to 
Edward Heath, and is keenly 
interested in politics. When Liddle 
caught them at home the response 
was promising; “A lot of people 
like us whom you label Conser- 
vative are uneasy about the way 
things are going in this country.’’ 
So might they vote SDP? They 
might — and would certainly at- 
tend a town ball meeting with 
Shirley Williams. 

A few days after that meeting. 



.v ■ ;■ 


Roger liddle on the doorstepping trail: voters who don't know, voters who might 


however, when I visited them 
minus the SDP candidate, they 
were disappointed. Liddle had 
been hampered by a cold, Mrs 
Williams was unimpressive, they 
heard too much waffle and not 
enough about policy. The waver- 
ing vote was already stabilizing 

The Barretts epitomize decency 
and concern: anxious about what 
Robin calls “the north-south 
dichotomy" and uneasy that Mrs 
Thatcher appears to have no 
understanding of “how hard it is 
for some people" In a by^leciion 
they would vote “more on local 
issues". Nevertheless it is dear 
that, incapable of voting Labour 
(“a weak opposition — destroyed 
by Militant") and reluctantly un- 
excited by the SDP (“though we 
still have open minds") they are 
likely to vote as they always have. 

“We’re all agreed about Mrs 
Thatcher, but what is the alter- 
native? What scares us is that 
there will be more situations 
where we have to confront ex- 
tremism. The Kinnocks will not 
do it That is the bottom line. It is 


the tough Mrs Thatchers who 
make it a safe world." 

Though much is being made of 
the gen trifica lion of Fulham, in 
assessing what effect it will have 
on the by-election it is a mistake to 
regard this as a sew phenomenon. 

Fulham has been shifting for 
over 100 years, and the. most 
significant demographic alteration 
occurred at the very be ginning of 
the 1970s. 

M axwell Road, a 
stone's throw 
from the Chelsea 
football ground, 
is a paradigm of 
social change. It 
was built in 2868, and inhabited 
by labourers, carpenters, railway 
workers and market gardeners. A 
little later the area went “up” with 
the arrival of architects, a waiter, a 
smith and a coach-painter. There 
were even one or two houses in 
Maxwell Road with servants. 

By the 1960s the street was 
distinctly latty, and the Labour 
council bought up the houses for 


demolition. Conservatives, vic- 
torious in the 1968 local election, 
dedded to sell them off creating 
fierce controversy about pushing- 
out working-class people who 
could no longer afford to live 
there. By 1972 Maxwell Reed was 
a patchwork: faded, peeling coun- 
cil and private rented houses 
alongside rehabilitated or gutted 
ones. 

At that time I met Jack Lafbery, 
a theatre electrician who had lived 
in the same rented house in 
Maxwell Road since 1915, when 
he moved there as a boy with his 
parents. In 1972 his wife Jean told 
me placidly, “I don’t think it’s fair 
‘the way they turn out all the 
•working class and put them into 
pokey fiats when they've been 
used to a big house with a garden." 
One year later their house was 
demolished. After a battle over 
their requirements, the council 
rehoused them in Walham Green 
Court, with its graffiti and empty 
windy walks. That is where I 
traced them this week. Jack and 
Jean, now 86 and 85. have just 


celebrated 61 years of nu 
and 12 years in the fiat The. _. 
miss the old street community. 

Houses in Maxwell Road now 
cost about £200,000. The owners I 
found at home assured me they 
would vote Conservative. As for 
the Lafberys, they have always, 
voted Conservative too, only this 
time they will change, Nick 
Raynsford is the factor. Jean 
Lafbery explains: “All those years 
ago be was a councillor around 
here and you could always go to 
him with your problems. I think 
he's a good man, and we want an 
MP whom, you think of as a 
friend." 

Raynsford is certainly a strong 
card for the Labour Party, always 
moderate in Fulham. He has lived 
in the constituency since 1968, 
was a Labour member of Fulham 
and Hammersmith Council from 
1971 to 1975 and has &n excellent 
reputation. 

He believes that the “ynppie” 
SDP vote is over-emphasised, and 
m ai n tai ns that he has found strong 
support in the smart flats of 


Barons'Court. He is couennatrag 
his campaign on hard social 
issues. “Like unemployment — . 
one in six men in F u l ham out of . 
work. Apart from that the two big ; . 
issues are bousing and the NHS, - 1 
with people very worried about 
proposed closures of St Stephen's 
Hospital and the West London 
. Hospital . . • 

“And there are other issues. For 
ntt pmrg. there are chUdren at risk 
in Fulham who have not got a 
social worker allocated because 
the social-work complements are 
16 per cent below establishment 
leveL” 

R aynsford has been - ; 
door-stepping with a 
petition against the 
hospital closures, in- 
stead of asking the 
usual straight ques- c . 
lion , “Are you going to vote for 
us?" It is a subtle strategy. In the 
busy and rough North Bod . Road 
market, the Labour Party cam- 
p rigping ambulance is parted in a 
side street 

People whom you might expect 
to cross the street to avoid party 
politics make a detour to sign the 
petition. There are many words of 
encouragement — “The country is 
in a terrible state and it’s aB A 
. because of that woman" — mostly 
from women in headscarves. 

Raynsford makes capital ofhis 
local links: his three daughters 
were born in the West London, for 
example. He is most confident of : - 
his vote in the big estates, such as 
the “Oem Attlee" and the “West r „ - 
Ken", where 3 population of single 
mothers, pensioners and famines • : 

with the other unemployed may 
well be disaffected by government j ~ * 
meanness. In a three-candidate ra- 
dio phone-m this week he was , .r. • 
served well, since the bulk of the % 
questions were about housing, his 
speciality. . 

Callers were concerned less with 
Mrs Thatcher's personality and 
mistakes than with issues that 
affected their everyday lives. That, 
after all, is the bedrock of politics, 
summed up with admirable 
simplicity fry Robin Barrett: 

“Look —all people want to get on, 
to improve their lot in life, and 
without too much confrontation. 

That is a need which has nothing 
to do with social class." 

The “right-of-Genghis Khan" 
man in Fulham may bark that J 
“consensus politics don’t work”; 
yet,' curiously, the three Fulham 
, hopefuls represent in different 
ways the broad and civilized 
. centre of British political fife, deny 
it as they might. 

A; spell of two weeks: around 
Fulham-before the by-election is a 
reminder that although people 
expect political change to occur in 
great waves, and politicians to 
have the skill of surfers, the local 
reality is far less dramatic: The sea 
is slightly choppy, as it always has 
been, and the three candidates 
paddle about, somewhat help- 
lessly, unsure of the likely direc- 
tion of the wind. 




\ \ 




Woodrow Wyatt 


Give Botha enough time 
to bury apartheid 


The wond has so long convinced 
itself that a government controlled 
b> Afrikaners would not initiate a 
dismantling of apartheid that it 
cannot absorb that this is happen- 
ing fast. 

1 spoke last Tuesday to Colin 
Eglin. once again leader of the 
Progressive Federal Party. He, 
too. was sceptical. When I pressed 
him he said he would be delighted 
to support the government' if it 
implemented its promises, which 
he doubted. 

The African National Congress, 
which gels us funds from abroad 
and its arms from Russia, is 
thought of overseas as the main 
mouthpiece of the non-whites. 
Though it is strong, chiefly in the 
black townships, this is far from 
true. The ANC not merely pro- 
fesses disbelief of meaningful re- 
form but fears iL Its propaganda 
message to blacks — that the way 
forward is through the gun. to be 
followed by a one-party black state 
- is seriously weakened as reason- 
able black demands are meL 

I met a more typical black 
reaction as 1 went through the 
slum township ofCrossroads, near 
Cape Town, when? 250,000 blacks 
live, from an intelligent secrciary- 
cum-rcccptionist of a black 
community centre. She said if the 
pass laws were abolished and 
educational standards for blacks 
were radically improved as prom- 
ised the government would “get 
the thumbs up" locally. I heard 
similar comments touring well- 
housed black Soweto. Reform, not 
revolution, was desired 

It all depends on President 
?. W. Botha, with whom 1 had a 
long talk this week. He struck me 
as determined and straight, a man 
who having pledged a course will 
not abandon iL because his hon- 
our is involved 

The pass laws were designed to 
control the massive influx of 
blacks from rural areas into the 
towns, with ail the destitution 
such a move emailed. Blacks, not 
whites, have to carry a reference 
bock showing their tribal clas- 
sification and place of origin. 
Failure to show it on demand can 
bring arrest, imprisonment and a 
fine. 

The president agreed with what 
Harry Oppcnheimer of Anglo- 
American. which employs many 
thousands of blacks, had told £ie: 


most blacks who want to go to the 
towns have already gone therc. 
The unnecessary reference- books 
will be replaced through legisla- 
tion to be passed in the next few 
weeks, by a brief identity card. 
.Anyone, white or non-white, who 
has not got it on him will be given 
time to produce iL The president 
was emphatic about this. 

He was emphatic too about 
equal standards for black educa- 
tion. A population bulge among 
blacks has resulted in a shortage of 
black qualified teachers but there 
is no escaping his determination 
to honour his expensive pledge. 

The Group Areas Acl designat- 
ing where those of different col- 
ours may live, is already (raying. It 
will take time to provide new land 
for mixed housing and many non- 
whites are not happy about too 
abrupt a change. They fear that 
house prices, particularly now that 
non-whites are being allowed free- 
hold ownership, could slump. But 
this form of apartheid is going. 

Certainly there are pockets of 
segregation left after so many 
years but the tide of change is 
destroying them rapidly. The most 
visible manifestation is the cheer- 
ful mixing of black and white in 
public places and the warm 
friendliness shown by blacks to 
whites. The notion ’that South 
Africa is nothing but a battlefield 
of racial conflicts is absurd, as I 
saw everywhere I wenL 

In some townships intimidation 

a la Scargill by the ANC is rife. 
While I was in South Africa Helen 
Suzman, on a TV discussion 
programme, demanded the re- 
moval of the army from the worst 
affected areas. She was rebuked by 
a black man from a township who 
told her she did not live in one. 
and those who did expected 
protection from the organized 
ANC rioters. 

The policy of apartheid is 
officially and actually dead. The 
battleground has changed to a 
normal struggle for political 
power. The ANC demands a 
straight handover to itself alone. 
The president wants a constitu- 
tional conference on power-shar- 
ing. However much it is denied by 
the ANC. he says. South Africa is a 
nation of minorities. 

The six million Xhosa (from 
whom the main leaders of the 
ANC come) would not willingly be 


ruled by the six million Zulus and 
vice versa; the seven million in the 
homelands, with considerable 
autonomy, would not accept ANC 
domination; -nor would millions 
of moderate blacks in foe niral 
areas and in the townships. 

John Kan e-Berman, foe re- 
spected director of foe South 
African Institute of Race Rela- 
tions. told me that in a genuinely 
free election the ANC could not be 
sure of a majority even in foe 
major townships, and certainly 
not in those with a large Zulu 
elemenL 

The president has invited foe 
ANC exiles. Nelson Mandela and 
all, to negotiate power-sharing in a 
constitutional conference over 
which he will preside. Reasonably, 
he wants the ANC to forswear 
violence during negotiations. 
Hammering out a solution 
satisfactory to all the interests 
including foe five million whites 
and foe four million Coloureds 
and Indians will take, in my view, 
at least two years. 

The ANC rejects the invitation 
because it is afraid of being 
exposed as failing to be the 
principal voice of non-white opin- 
ion. The president is set on getting 
his conference and if the ANC 
refuses to come it will lose much 
ground. Black South Africans are 
reasonable: they don’t want to lose 
what is easily the best standard of 
living of any blade Africans. 
Foreign governments and media, 
instead of encouraging the ANC to 
win minority power by the gun, 
should be pursuading the ANC to 
talk realistically. 

Only President Botha can guide 
while opinion to total acceptance 
in their hearts of the blacks as 
equal citizens. It would be calam- 
itous if he were not there for the 
next, dangerous, two years. Unless 
the West has decided that it does 
not care if South Africa descends 
into anarchy and a Marxist 
dictatorship under Russian su- 
zerainty, it should back him. 

Meanwhile foe well-equipped 
South .African army is capable for 
some years of preventing the ANC 
from making South Africa un- 
governable - if that is the arid 
alternative the ANC prefers to foe 
genuine search for power-sharing 
among foe disparate groups that 
comprise South Africa. 



SPORTING DIARY 

Simon Barnes 


La 

difference 

So this is what they mean by sang 
(roid. Monique Berlioux, the for- 
mer executive secretary of the 
International Olympics Commit- 
tee, is senior consultant to the 
Parisian Olympics committee, vy- 
ing to be host of the 1 992 Olympic 
Games in competition with Bir- 
mingham, Barcelona and the resL 
The Mayor of Paris, Jacques 
Chirac, recently held a meeting of 
this group at the Automobile Club 
de France. La Berlioux, however, 
was stopped at foe door - women 
are not permitted to enter the dub. 
A message summoned Chirac and 
his men on to the pavement, 
where she suggested that they 
move foe meeting elsewhere. But 
the Parisian Olympians haussed 
their epaules . . . and went back 
in to continue the meeting. 
Monique stayed out in foe cold. 

Putney oar bust 

The oarswomen of Britain are 
marching on — despite the refusal 
of Henley Royal Regatta to have 
anything to do with them. Next 
Saturday's Women's Eights Head 
of the River Race will be held for 
the first time over foe same full 
course as the men's event — from 


Mortlake to Putney, or foe Boat 
Race backwards. The new dis- 
tance is experimental, but is likely 
to be retained. 

Street-wise 

Johann Cruyff, once the darkling 
centre forward of Aj 
Amsterdam football dub, and 
now their manager, wants to bring 
back street fboibaiL That was how 
he learned, be says. So be has 
turned part of the Ajax car park 
into a mock-up of pavement 
pitches, so local lads can drop in. 

• David Brown, 

Warwickshire County 
Cab, is to try a new method of 
controlling his bowlers' propensity 
to ao ball — Hii™ them. A shame 
Bob Willis has retired: Brown 
would have made a fortune. 


Trot vite 


BARRY FANTONI 



•Don’t they know that once 
he settles in. it’s a devil of a 
jcb IS get him out?* 


The freeze which has wiped out 
horse raring across the country 
has driven some desperate betting 
men to plunge into the unfamiliar 
world of French trotting races. 
They have had to endure an added 
frustration, however finding 
horses disqualified in mid-race. 
How can this happen, they have 
foundered? The answer is that if a 
trotting horse breaks into a gallop 
it is disqualified. 

Racing Tiri 

Limerick Junction Racecourse in 
Ireland will now no longer be 
confused with Limerick Race- 
course. which is 40 miles away — 
its name is being changed la 
Tipperary. Occasional errors in 
newspapers (these things do hap- 
pen sometimes) have caused big- 
ger crowds to arrive at the wrong 
racecourse than the right one. It 
has only been called Limerick 
Junction Racecourse since 1916. 

End of run 

This week’s events in the Phil- 
ippines cal! to mind foe Manila 
Marathon, held a couple of years 
back. At a reception Ferdinand 
Marcos apologised for the city's 
dtrty streets. He suggested:" Next 
time we should run the marathon 
in the rain forest where we train 
qur men in guerrilla warfare." 


AnneSofer 


No end: perhaps 
a beginning 


The lunchtime news headlines 
yesterday were dominated by the 
end of the teachers* strike: “End? 
What end?" is what many parents 
must have thought to themselves, 
as they surveyed their own chil- 
dren kicking their heels at home as 
teachers take action against the 
latest Burnham “sellout”. 

The action has been very bad 
around here. It is a strong NUT 
area, increasingly militant as 
frustration mounted over foe 
years. Since last November, when 
foe balance of the Burnham 
teachers panel changed and the 
national press began to talk of 
peace, the local mood has hard- 
ened in the opposite direction. 
The local NUT decided on 
suerrilla action”. They split the 
official half-day a month strike 
into 10 and 2&minute splinters, 
informed the heads that the whole 
school would be made inoperable, 
got backing from the national 
NUT for this tactic, and — taking 
everybody totally by surprise, 
politicians, head teachers, and 
parents most of all — closed the 
majority of secondary schools in 
foe area for all but examination 
classes lor two weeks in Decem- 
ber. The tactic was repeated in ’ 
February, spreading to some pri- 
mary schools as weU. and it is also 
planned for March. 

The mood of parents has 
changed. At the beginning support 
for teachers was strong. Everyone 
agreed their pay was disgraceful, it 
is the sort of area where a large 
traditional working-class commu- 
nity and more recent trendy leftish 
parents combined to support any 
good education strategy. But the 
attitudes of those same parents 
when their own children have 
been out of school for four whole 
weeks, with another two to come, 
can swing sharply. 

Betides, there is a sense of 
unfairness. The press reports that 
it is the areas represented by 
Conservative ministers that are 
being targeted for action. But 
everybody knows that it is far 
worse in Frank Dobson’s Labour 
Holbora and St Fanoas than in 
Mis Thatcher’s Conservative 
Finchley. 

Non- NUT teacher classes are 
attending normally while NUT 
teacheis classes g« sent home. 
Many staff rooms are divided and 
biUef places. Some public meet- 


ings called to explain the issues to 
parents have ended in inter-union 
wrangling and recrimination. 

Atone meeting a parent asked 
• the NUT representative why his 
union was not prepared to join 
negotiations with foe other # 
unions, and was told that the 
reasefa was foal most of foe other 
unions were not TUC-affiliated. 
There is a wrong assumption tha t 
parents share foe same shibboleths 
and vocabulary of industrial strug- 
gle as themselves. 

The people who do share that 
vocabulary are of course die 
Labour politicians, who are now 
spinelestiy floundering while call- 
ing on foe head teachers to “hold 
the situation". But I fear NUT 
members are marching them- 
selves into a cul de sac — pledged 
to fight to the bitter end, under the 
banner of Houghton, fast losing 
their friends even on foe left, at'Jfr* 
risk of embittering and bewilder- 
ing both children and parents 
when they read “school strike 
over” on the newspaper hording. 

At a recent .parents’- meeting 
which I attended, many local 
Labour luminaries spoke up ask- 
ing foe NUT to call off the strike 
and join foe talks. One distin- 
guished local authority leader 
actually suggested that the “teach- 
ers lave to accept defeat, like foe 
rest of us have ...” 

That seems to me quite the 
wrong way to put iL I do not think 
the teachers should accept defeat, 
and I am sore that those whc*. 
conspire to present the frail settle-^ 
meats which have been readied as 
a defeat" are doing foe country 
and the profession no good az afl. 

All eyes should now be on next 
yearns settlement. Teachers are 
starting 1986 with salaries 8Jj per 
cent up. They had hopes .of an 
improvement above foaL If they 
can actually agree to sit around the 
same table (rad ifLabour, Conser- 
vative and Alliance- employers 
can, surely they bargain 

ove ^. whole range of pay, 
conditions and structure together, 
they might even have tbe strcngih 
fo wntte more than the current 
onw oT£IJSj- billion out of Sir 
Keith. By then the Conservative 
government may be glad of peace, 
even at a higher priceT 

Jf/Qjf kor is SDP member of the 
GLC/lLEAfor Si Pancras South. 


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iii.u x. i 





THE TIMES SATURDAY MARCH I 1986 


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Ii c • of a 

“sprderiy" curreocy market 
uarf to be one in which 
exchange rates moved more 
wan ^onc per. cent in a single 
,oay. On that measure, we now 
live in perpetual disorder. Ah. 
up or down in the pound's 
external value of several cents 
- even half-a-dozen pfennigs - 
“5 s l*coine a daily feature of 
ufe. Speculators* meat, how- 
■ ever, is other men’s misery: 
this volatility excites thfr sus- 
picion of the world's traders 
and travellers that the inter- 
national currency system, is 
out of control. 

:. It ii ironic, but not fllogical, 
that this suspicion should tah» 
hold at precisely the moment 
when the five governments 
responsible for the world's 
major currencies should be 
attempting joint currency 
management for the first time 
in over a decade. The same 
phenomena that have dis- 
turbed their citizens ■ have 
made governments" anxious 
too. Their intentions, , how- 
ever, need to be clarified. 

The markets are presently 
upset by a changmgperception 
of the alLimportant dollar, 
from a super-strong currency 
which can only be held down 
by concerted, action, to a 
vulnerable commodity whose 
price is dangerously likely to 
go into free- frdL They are 
further preoccupied with a 
fallin g oil price, which has 
made the pound a convenient 
alternative to s^L 
The risk of a “hard landing” 
for thedoflar has been exacer- 
bated by the confusion in 
Washington. America’s trade' 


. Mat, for which another fear- 
ful monthly record was struck ; 
yesterday, is at the heart of the 
problem. It causes the likes of 
President Reagan's Commerce 

- Secretary . . to ; hunger for a : 
cheaper, more competitive 
doUar, wfaile to the likes, of his 
central bankerit demonstrates 
.the: danger that a dollar re- 
alignment might accelerate 
into. a rout As Mr Malcolm. 
Baldrige and Mr Paul Volcker 

- (to say nothing of present and 
past Treasury Secretaries 
James. Baker and' Donald 
Regan), exhibit shades of dif- 
ference of opinion . On the 
.'dollar, so its. rate oscillates in 
the listening marketplace. 

This tension in American 
poUcy was evident even at last 
January’s meeting of the 
“Group of Five” finance min- 
isters and central bankers. It is 
not duly in Washington that it 
most be resolved. The dollar’s 
recent gyrations led recalls for 
another hasty meeting of the 
“Group of Five”; for having . 
taken on the task of currency 
management, ihese five gov- 
ernments cannot now take 
their hands Off the wheel. 

The responsibility fora “soft 
landing” of the dollar also rests 
with Japan and Germany; the 
remaining two of the five, 
France and Britain, have their 
own local preoccupations. 
Sterling, weakened by falling 
oil - prices and outside the 
European Monetary System, is 
a lonely target every time the 
dollar steadies. - 
. The most obvious way to. ‘ 
take the heat out of die . 
exchanges is to achieve; a 
greater co-ordination of in- 


terest rates. It is not only 
dollar-users that stand to bene- 
fit. As the pound's further 
lurch yesterday demonstrated, 
the British have little chance of 
substantially lowering interest 
rates unless the others do so 
first 

’ Such dose co-ordination 
cannot ' sensibly be managed 
throu gh occasional, and now 
highly-sensitive, meetings of 
five finance ministers. The 
system itself must change. Yet 
even if the Group of Five forge 
closer day-to-day links, it is 
not evident that they can cure 
the volatility of the present 
exchange-rate system. 

The urge to co-operate came 
from concern that the world’s 
most important currency was 
selling at a dangerously in- 
flated price. Although the diffi- 
culty of adjusting this price 
smoothly has added to cur- 
rency market volatility, there 
is another underlying cause: 
the rapid growth in the world- 
wide, 24-hour business of buy- 
ing and selling currencies. 

It is this market power that 
makes governments fearful to 
intervene. Even in today’s 
disorder, there is no real 
support for a return re fixed 
rates. Rather, there is an 
appetite for some kind 
ofiarget zones” within which 
currency oscillations would be 
confined. That would still be a 
long step on from the present 
system of private half-under- 
standings between the Group 
of Five - a system which is 
even now showing severe 
strains. It is, however, the only 
possible next step along this 
particular path. 


Theriots which erupted in 
Egypt this week havegiventhe 
world a glimpse of the instabil- 
ity which lies so dose to the 
surface, ill Egypt as. .in many 
other countries of the Middle 

.East* ■ v . ;■ 

. .Hye years ago. President 
Mubarak succeeded in avert- 
ing' the threat to Egypt's stabOr 
ityposedbytheassassmatkm 
of Anwar Sadat HewasaWeto 
give Egypt the solidity to 
withstand the threat of resur- 
gent Islamic fundamentalism^ 
He succeeded in staving off the 
worst effects of economic de- 
cline and he started to give 
ordinary Egyptians . a little 
more say in the naming of 
their country. 

. What he was not able to 
supply was the measure of 
vision and the 'high inter- 
national profile that his prede- 
cessors had brought to the 
office of President. This de- 
ficiency is no w telling . 

The immediate causes of 
this week’s unrest remain un- 
clear. There is the alleged 
rumour that three ypaurs of 
conscription were going to 
become four. There is the 
undoubted dissatisfaction on 
the part of the conscripts at the 
contrast between their own 
lifestyle and that of the rite 
people they were protecting. 
There is the possible involve- 
ment of religious or political 
provocateurs. Bui beneath 
everything lies deepseated 
frustration affecting all but the 
uppermost layers of Egyptian- 
society. 

For the poorest — among 
whom this week’s rioting con- 
scripts are numbered “ it ts 
frustration that they will never 


be ableto improve their living 
standards, let alone attain to 
the riches they can see around 
them. For rite mukBe.cfaases.it 
is rite recognition that any 
improvements they have 
experiencedinthe pastwifl not 
; be repeated. The country's oil 
revenue has plummeted; tour- 
istshavebeen frightened offby 
inflatio n and terrorism. Even 
government promises of a 
better life -axe not heard any 
more. V- 

' The result is a questioning of 
the fundamentals on which the 
role of Sadat and now Hosni 
Mubarak has been based: in 
particular, the dose relations 
with the United States, and the 
Gamp David accord with Is- 
rael.. Both were held up as 
guarantees ..of economic 
prosperity and social equity in 
the future. To many Egyptians, 
now, those guarantees look 
worthless. 

American- involvement in 
the Egyptian economy has not 
brought the riches that were 
promised- Nor has it solved 
any of Egypt’s social problems. 
And when the Americans 
forced down the Egyptian 
plane carrying the Palestinian 
hijackers to Libya and free- 
dom, that only confirmed for 
ordinary Egyptians what they 
had long suspected: that their 
country was little more t han a 
colony to the United States, to 
be treated as a minor irrita- 
tion, and nothing more. 

The consequences of the 
Camp David accord have 
aroused similar misgivings. 
Whatever the letter of the 
accord, Israel appears to many 
Egyptians to have betrayed its 
spirit, by continuing to found 


settlements in the occupied 
West Bank, by maintaining a 
presence in Southern Leba- 
non, and by continuing to 
occupy disputed territory on 
the Red Sea. In other words, so 
many Egyptians believe, Egypt 
ceded its leading position in 
the Arab world for nothing. 
President Mubarak has not 
been able to use his authority 
to persuade his people of the 
.enormous benefit of peace. 

But if the underlying causes 
of this week’s unrest in Egypt 
are more profound and com- 
plex than the sudden and 
localized mutiny of police 
conscripts would suggest, so 
too are the implications, both 
for the future of Egypt and for 
the Middle East generally. 

For Egypt, continuing in- 
stability - and it hard to see 
how this can be avoided —will 
only help to strengthen the 
appeal of groups hostile to 
President Mubarak. Both Left- 
wing groups and the Islamic 
fundamentalists would bene- 
fit, and the ascendancy of 
either would threaten Egypt’s 
existing measure of democracy 
and its pro-Western stance. 

But any change of this order 
would reach far beyond 
Egypt's borders. If Egypt re- 
turned to the Arab fold — as 
Syria has appealed to it to do 
following the unrest this week- 
this would alter the present 
political completion of the 
Middle East as a whole. It 
would make Israel's leaders 
fear even more for their 
country's security than they do 
at present and make the Mid- 
dle East even more volatile 
than it is already. 


A. Schutzer- 


Newexam 

From Mr M. 

Weissmann ■ 

Sir. Mr Nash's letter (February 12) 
about the GCSE examination 
deserves farther attention. While 
the introduction of the new exams 
mnv Wdi be used by some teachers 


a$ an occasion for continuing their 
squabbles against their employers, 
everyoo e should heawarei^itee 

GCSE exams may do real damage 
io the whole education system in 
this country- 

Although education in school is 

not coSd within the tents of 
an exam rt be 

understood that a system of putt* 
examination - 
specifically intended fo 

•“teg * 

^ on all that is actoaRy taught m 

bur secondary schools- 
This presumably, is 
uoaWW is lately « It* «5» 

Jesuit Generations who »ay 

^ramoflhSr WaaUW ^ 

**e ^ £ 

out rf cominuous 

written ? -P3fr, ^ don a 

a ^? n ?eraaS«iaiidfdhng 
in t a tom £ adult bteracy 


Furthermore, the whole scheme 
is so thoroughly utilitarian as to 
defeat its own object: employers 
cannot be expected to have any 
dear idea of the abilities guar- 
anteed by GCSE qualifications 
when those responsible for this 
exam appear to have only vague 
ideas of its objectives and insanely 
confused ideas of its criteria for 
assessment • ■ • ■ ' _ 

An imderstandable fear of 
appearing elitist may have pre- 
vented the Headmasters' Con- 
ference .from raising many 
objections, but then 'children at 
independent schools have less to 
worry about GCSE requirements 
can be more easily adapted to the 
needs of a proper education within 
an already established academic 
framework. • „ _ . 

It is children m State schools 
who are likely to suffer most from 
an examination system which 
reduces their education, to a 
satisfaction of the demands that 
the nation’s present economic 
situation imposes upon them. 

WEISSMANN, ’ ' 

Amberiey, 

The Avenue. 

Sherborne, Dorset. 

Forgotten disease 

From the Director of the National 
Schizophrenia FeUovtship 
Sir. Norman Fowler claimed (fea- 
ture, February :17) . that your' 
interviewers were exaggerating the 
problems of getting treatment for 
sdrizophrepia sufferers. P er ha ps 

. r • ’ 


he would change his mind if be 
read only a tew of the 10.000 
letteis from agonised relatives 
responding to “Zero Options” — 
the ITV programmes on schizo- 
phrenia — or heard just a selection 
of the experiences of our 5,000 
members. 

1 wonder what he would say to 
the father of a social worker killed 
by- a paranoid schizophrenic who 
was refused admission to hospital 
or help from social services? Or to 
the neighbours of the agonised 
sufferer who tried to burn die 
house down? 

How would he respond to the 
ex-psychiatric patients who have 
had their papers marked “Do not 
re-admit under any 
circumstances” to those who in 
desperation commit suicide, to the 
sufferers who sleep rough, or the 
families who have had 20 years of 
worry about their children with 
schizophrenia. All of these were in 
my mail-bag last week. 



.Je supportive community — 
fecilitiles the outlook for sufferers 
can be much brighter. We need the 
£200,000 Norman Fowler men- 
tioned to test the effectiveness of 
community care, but we also need 
two billion pounds to provide that 
care. 

Yours faithfully, 

JUDY WELEMINSKY, Director, 

National Schizophrenia Fellow- 
ship, 

,78 Victoria Road, 

Surbiton. 

.■Surrey: ' 

February 22. . . . 

* '• a. 


LETTERS TO THE EDITOR 


Keeping balance on Sunday trade 


From the Cardinal Archbishop of 
Westminster 

Sir, Having publicly supported the 
“Keep Sunday Speciat 
Campaign”, I am particularly 
sensitive to the charges made by 
Government apologists in their 
recent articles in the religious 
Press that “we Christians are 
beginning to look like hypocrites”. 

With remarkable unanimity, 
the churches are opposed to the 
Government’s plan for complete 
abolition of the legal framework of 
Sunday trading, what do we seek? 
We are not so narrow as to 
overtook the traditions of dif- 
ferent faiths which hold other days 
as sacred. Nor are we unaware of 
increasing secularist trends. 

Nevertheless, we seek one day 
of the week which is a holiday in 
common, free from normal pres- 
sures, providing opportunities for 
rest, recreation, and alternatives 
in life, amongst them time for 
reflection ana for worship; a 
psychological space, when fam- 
ilies, friends, groups, clubs, local- 
ities have an occasion to do things 
together. 

In this country Sunday is the 
only practical contender ai the 
present time. The Christian holy 
day has laid the foundation for the 
holiday which society needs. In 
the complex and rapidly changing 
conditions of today, total de- 
regulation of Sunday allows holi- 
day and holy day to be broken up 
to the detriment of both society 
and Church. Individual time off 
does not compensate for loss of 
shared leisure. 

Of course, recreation, leisure 
pursuits and social habits have 
changed. Sunday occupations may 
involve purchases, travel, 
organised recreation, and some 
systematic and commercial pro- 
vision of goods and services, to an 
extent unkno wn in the past. Some 
forms of shopping can be a family 
leisure activity in themselves. 

There is a balance to be kept 
here. The freedom to pursue 
leisure interests for some involves 
others in the obligation of work. 
Seven-day opening by large 
companies to increase a. market 
share may mean forced opening 
and loss of business for smaller 
local shops. New retail outlets 
create, as well as follow, consumer 


demand. Providing opportunities 
for some is disturbance for others. 

This conflict of interests ex- 
plains the failure to agree on the 
various legislative compromises 
put forward, h is not that any or 
all of the amendments are imprac- 
tical, but that they favour various 
interests. It is a Government's 
duty to mediate between particu- 
lar conflicting interests for the 
sake of the common good. To 
abandon the task on the pretext 
that it is too difficult is to 
surrender the function of govern- 
ment. 

Christians recognise the need in 
today’s society to compromise 
between the requirements of 
Christian- worship, reasonable 
opportunities for leisure, and 
continued protection of people at 
work. But to maintain such a 
compromise requires a legal 
framework. 

Compromise does not mean the 
abandoning of all principle. The 
Government's propaganda has 
made great play of the arbitrari- 
ness of the present legal situation. 
We need a new recognition of 
principle to establish a com- 
promise that secures the common 
good, otherwise the outcome is 
victory for the powerful. 

We must beware lest the prin- 
ciple prevail that the market 
should rule supreme seven days a 
week. Our principle is that there is 
more to being human than supply 
and demand* there is more to 
social life than trading and com- 
merce. 

For all its shortcomings the 
regulated Sunday is a sign which 
points society beyond itself and 
affords people the opportunity of 
standing back, of renewing them- 
selves. That is the meaning of 
“recreation”, without which hu- 
man beings are not truly human — 
thty are drudges. 

Genuine humanism requires 
such a perspective. It is confirmed 
by the Christian vision of Sunday. 
We observe the Creator’s rest 
from his work and we celebrate the 
day on which Christ rose from the 
dead, the day of our re-creation. 
Yours faithfully, 

BASIL HUME, 

Archbishop's House, 

Westminster, SW1. 

February 26. 


Arms for Uganda 

From Dr M. Louise Pirouet 
Sir, When Milton Obote was 
ousted from power in Uganda last 
year, Britain suspended military 
training for the Uganda Army and 
fought to promote pace and an 
end to the civil war which had rent ■ 
the country since 1981. 

There were other good reasons 
for suspending military aid: the 
outcome of the war was uncertain 
and the Uganda Army was wholly 
discredited by reason of its indisci- 
pline and the mayhem and looting 
which had become its hallmarks, 
as well as its systematic use of 
torture, which had been exposed 
by Amnesty International. Be- 
sides, it was dear that, in spite of a 
change of regime, violations of 
human rights were continuing 
unabated. 

We now learn .from today's 
Times (February 19) that although 
official military training had 
ceased, the British Government 
seems to have approved the 
employment by the Uganda Army 
of Defence Systems Lid, a British 
company winch, wt are told, does 
not operate abroad without the 
knowledge and approval ofWhitc- 
halL Defence Systems Ltd was 
apparently called in when an 
Italian company refused to fit out 
helicopters as gunships. 

No doubt the reason why the 


British Government condoned 
this company's involvement was 
that they were making money, 
boosting Britain’s exports. But to 
do so in such a situation not only 
displays the uncaring face of 
capitalism, but suggests a measure 
of cynicism about the peace 
negotiations. 

Indeed, these failed and the 
National Resistance Movement, 
against whose forces British mili- 
tary aid was used, is now the 
government in power.' 

Mrs Lynda Chalker has done 
well to have succeeded in restoring 
a measure of confidence between 
the new Uganda Government and 
Britain in spite of this incident and 
other questionable aspects of 
Britain’s recent dealings with 
Uganda. 

Less diplomacy might have 
been needed if respect for human 
rights had been placed higher up 
our foreign policy agenda, and 
commercialism reduced to more 
proper proportions. 

The incident also highlights the 
need for legislation which will 
place tighter controls on the 
export of military expertise as well 
as of arms, defence technology and 
surveillance equipment. 

Yours sincerely, 

M. LOUISE FIROlfET, 

8 Gddart Street, 

Cambridge. 

February 19. 


'Nuclear safety 

From Dr C.H. Neville- Smith 
Sir, One reason why spokes- 
persons for nudear power have 
lost credibility is that the state- 
ments they propagate are often 
found some time later to have 
been wholly inaccurate. Mr 
Allday, writing his centre-page 
article for The Times on February 
20, is no exception. He states (para 
5) that “Uranium is the most 
common element in the earth’s 
crust— "and so, be implies, harm- 
less to mankind. 

In point of fact oxygen is the 
commonest element of the earth’s 
crust, followed by silicon, 
aluminium, iron, calcium and 


sodium. Uranium is quite a rare 
element, with workable deposits 
sprinkled thinly over the face of 
the globe. ■ 

Further, Mr Allday is oddly 
reticent about the composition of 
those 400kg of uranium that were 
discharged into the Irish Sea. 
What proportion of this effluent 
was the relatively stable isotope 
U238, and bow much of the far 
more fissile and dangerous U235? 
Those living up-tide from 
Sellafield might weU like to know. 
Yours faithfully, 

G a NEVILLE-SMITH, 

7 Princes Road, 

Saltburn-by-th e-Sea, 

Cleveland. 

February 21. 


Obscenity and law 

From Mr D. J. Marks 
Sir. I normally admire and value 
the balance and good sense of your 
leading articles. Yesterday’s (Feb- 
ruary 24) gave an unpleasant jolt 
to this esteem. 

Reduced to its crude basis, what 
yon are saying is that the need to 
shield the developing young from 
overplayed, unbalanced and false 
impressions of real life is simply a 
factor to be traded against “the 
rise of the cultural industries" — 


leaving it to parents to struggle 
with the problem unaided. 

Hard pressed we may be to 
promote industrial recovery — but 
to wbat end if we corrupt our 
national life in the process! 

Yours faithfully, 

D. J. MARKS, 

12 Leicester House, 

Ditton Close, 

Watts Road, 

Thames Ditton, 

Surrey. 

February 25. 


Lenten framework 

From the Acting Headmaster of St 
Benedict's School Baling 
Sir, Clifford Longley (“Frail 
framework of Lent”, February 17) 
writes, “it is medieval Christianity 
which is relevant to the popular 
practice of “giving something up 
for Lent”. He also makes the valid 
point that a period of self-denial is 
popularly recognised today as 
beneficial, independently of for- 
mal diunfa allegiance. As some 
today are wont to eschew aU things 
“medieval” as accretions, it might 
be helpful to point to the origins of 
this “medieval principle of self- 
denial”. 

Way back in the days of the 
Didache (?AD70 - 7.ADI50) we 
find the author insisting op a 
period of fasting before baptism. 


This was still the practice 
CAD215/218 when Hippolytus 
was writing his Apostolic Tra- 
dition. 

A strange nun from the fourth 
century provides us with further 
evidence. In the Travels of Egeria 
(perhaps better known to classical 
readers as an example of degen- 
erate Latin) we read how in 
Jerusalem, AD370, the 40 days’ 
period of preparation for converts 
who were to be baptised at the 
Easter Vigil was now being ob- 
served by all. 

Perhaps one of the most for- 
mative books on the spirituality of 
Medieval Christianity was the 
Rule of St Benedict (written early 
sixth century). In his chapter on 
“The Observance of Lent” he says 
that the life of a monk should 


always be lenten in character, but 
as 

few are strong enough to manage 
this, we recommend all during these 
days of Lent to keep their life 
perfectly pure and to wash away the 
negligences of other times during 
these holy days. This is worthily 
done if we keep ourselves free from 
■faults, and apply ourselves to prayer 
with teare... Therefore during ihese 
days let us add a liule io our usual 
round of service by way of private 
devotion and abstinence from food 
and drinlu. all the while looking 
forward to the Easier festival with 
joyous spiritual longing. 

Yours faithfully. 

GREGORY CHILLMAN. 
Religious Studies Department, 

St Benedict's School. 

Ealing. W5. 

February 21. 



Far-away places 
for EEC milk 

From Mrs Susan Shepherd 
Sir. Reports of EEC surplus beef 
being sold to the Soviet Union at 
silly prices have caused us to 
wonder about milk powder — 
source; the Brussels milk lake - 
now turning up in shops in China. 

I have worked in China for four 
years and have noticed the grow- 
ing trend among Chinese to enjoy 
milk and dairy products which, 
being difficult to produce here, 
traditionally did not form pan of 
the Chinese diet 

The EEC product bearing a 
label, “Specially prepared to com- 
ply with the standards of the 
Ministry of Public Health of the 
People's Republic of China”, is 
sold at a price equivalent to just 
over £2 for one 454-gram tin. That 
is about one tenth of a local 
monthly wage packet but the 
product is popular, even though it 
can't be bought in local currency, 
only in hard to come by foreign- 
exchange certificates. 

.Are we cynical in thinking the 
Hong Kong agents who are selling 
the product to China are creaming 
off, or is it the State here that is 
exploiting EEC milk of human 
kindness? 

Yours faithfully. 

SUSAN SHEPHERD, 

PO Box 557, 

Tianjin, 

Tanggu. 

People's Republic of China. 
February 18. 

Sources of finance 

From Mr John Dodwell 
Sir, A recent column by Kenneth 
Fleet (January 29) mentioned 
possible areas for revision in the 
business expansion scheme. I 
hope that the Government will be 
extremely careful not to throw out 
the baby with the bath water. 

Undoubtedly a number of 
changes are needed to the present 
arrangements — it is ridiculous 
that there is a last- minute panic to 
invest before April S in each year 
— but the underlying benefit for 
new or young businesses should 
not be ignored. 

There is a belief that all new 
companies require small amounts 
of capital and I make a plea that 
larger new companies should not 
be inhibited. 

Our group is currently involved 
in the launch of a new company 
seeking about £1.3 million from 
the public, which will generate 40 
jobs — considerably more than 
most new companies create within 
their first five years. 

Kenneth Fleet also suggests that 
the Government should review 
whether the business expansion 
scheme is providing money for 
areas which other sources will 
finance anyway. It is our painful 
experience that many City institu- 
tions will not support new busi- 
nesses. even where substantial 
sums of money are needed, and 
the business expansion scheme is 
the last resort for the required 
capital. 

Yours faithfully, 

JOHN DODWELL. 

Chancery Securities pic, 

12 Northington Street. WCl. 
February 26. 

Ancient and modern 

From Mr Jack Sykes 
Sir, This is not the first letter 
written to you by an 84-year-old 
reader but I would be interested to 
learn whether it is the first using a 
word processor? My purpose in 
writing is to encourage fellow 
citizens of either sex to have a go 
and not to be put to shame by the 
sight of young children non- 
chalantly poking a finger at a 
computer keyboard. 

I am proposing to close up the 
two ends of my car port and 
convert it into a computer room as 
soon as planning permission can 
be obtained. 

Yours etc, 

J. SYKES. 

7 Hill Top, 

Lingards. 

Slaithwaite. 

Huddersfield. 

West Yorkshire. 

February 22. 

Called into service 

From the Reverend Roger Thacker 
Sir, For some, privatisation and 
diversification are accepted politi- 
cal shibboleths. I found this well 
illustrated by the mass delivery in 
the Marble Arch area of the new 
confetti-like pink-and-white col- 
oured Telecom directories. 

They were being distributed 
from a large white pantechnicon 
boldly inscribed “The French 
Croissant Company Limited’ 1 . 
Yours, 

ROGER THACKER, 

St Paul's Church, 

Queen Caroline Street, W6, 
February 19. 


MARCH 11850 

Don Paeifico was a Gibraltar-born 
British subject who brought a 
claim of about £26,000 
compensation against the Greek 
government for the burning down 
of his house during anti-Semitic 
riots in 1847. In a belligerent 
mood Lord Palmerston (1784- 
186b), who was running the 
Foreign Office almost as hie 
private concern, using the threat 
of naval units which hod been 
moved to the Dardanelles in 2849 
as a precautionary measure of 
support for Turkey, demanded 
that payment be made to Paeifico 
and others. 


[DONPACIFICO] 

Of the more novel branches of 
industry which modern ingenuity 
has brought to perfection, that of 
the professional claimant on for- 
eign Governments would seem to 
be the most attractive; and in the 
ranks of those fortunate and 
unblushing speculators who prac- 
tise it with eclat Don PACIFICO of 
Athens claims an illustrious pre- 
eminence. AU that is required to 
start in this business is to have 
undergone a little destruction, and 
to retain a vast deal of importunity. 
Be prepared with half-a-dozen 
national characters, in which you 
may figure like the late Mr. 
MATHEWS at one of his enter- 
tainments; crouch like a Jew, 
threaten like a Spaniard, cheat like 
a Portuguese, rail like a French- 
man, swear like a German, bully 
like an Englishman. It will be hard 
indeed if wrongs that speak so 
many lpn p ia g pn are not under- 
stood; but they will stand the more 
chance of profitable redress when 
they are backed by a competent 
allowance of personal antipathy 
and political resentment — Dorn 
PACIFICO represents them with 
equal variety, not in their rights, 
but in their injuries. The very 
domestic utensils of his dwelling 
have a national susceptibility in 
them... You see in him [Paeifico] a 
manifestation of the occult govern- 
ment of the world. Abroad, you 
would scarce have met a needier 
man in Athens — within his 
chambers you would find the 
furniture of palaces and the orna- 
ments of the great; — but, above all, 
in a few scattered leaves of fumbled 
paper there lav the grand arcanum 
of the PORTUGUESE CLAIMS. 
You imagine they are as worthless 
as the dead leaves of the magician's 
casket, but they are bearing inter- 
est at a higher rate than you can 
count. You know that Portugal 
recognises no such demands, which 
date from the days of Dom 
MIGUEL. Portugal will not be 
troubled with them, for Greece is to 
pay them. Therein lies the gran- 
deur of Don PACIFICO's inven 
tion. Other men have sometimes 
transferred their liabilities; he 
transfers his active claims. Let him 
but set foot on your territory, and 
before the year is out you may owe 
him half a million instead of the 
GRAND SEIGNIOR or the 
POPE. When one considers the 
imaginary quantities he is dealing 
with, one is as much astonished at 
his modesty as at his address. That 
box might just as well have 
contained the national debt of a 
German principality, the repudiat- 
ed bonds of Mississippi, or the 
crown of Hungary. Whatever it 
contained was not there: so Greece 
must pay for all and a bill is drawn 
in full on the Treasury of Athens. 

TTius far the enterprise might 
have been carried by a more vulgar 
practitioner, but the art of Don 
PACIFICO had far greater re- 
sources in store. What he now 
required was to bring a British fleet 
of seven line-of-battle ships and six 
steamers of gigantic power, with 
their 7,000 fighting men, their 
cannon, and all the mighty appara- 
tus of naval war, to give a little 
reality to those obsolete or unac- 
knowledged bits of lost paper. His 
little bill was good enoiq'h, but its 
value mainly depended on the 
names on the back of it. The 
drawer might inspire the world 
with as little confidence as the 
drawee, but in a generous hour that 
same bill was endorsed by Lord 
PALMERSTON in the name of 
England.. . 


Disabled drivers 

From Dr Gerald Michael 
Sir. A 60-year-old lady came to see 
me this week. She and her 
husband have been patients of 
mine since 1963. 

She has some difficulty in 
walking — she nowhere near fills 
the criteria, however, for an 
orange badge for disabled drivers, 
but she and her husband genuinely 
feel she does. 

It would have been absolutely 
impossible io have refuted this 
request which would have ap- 
peared io have been a total 
rejection of them, and therefore I 
agreed. Unfortunately, this is a 
common occurrence and many 
people are driving round with 
orange badges who are not 
substantially disabled. 

I suggest that certificates for 
disabled badges should be given 
only by independent doctors and 
never by the patient’s own GP. I 
realise they would have to pay a 
fee for this but I am sure they 
would feel it was worth while. 
Yours faithfully, 

GERALD MICHAEL, 

23 Treiawn Park. 

Mill Hill. NW7. 

February 19. 

Meaningful terms 

From Mrs Antony Jones 
Sir. On the outskirts of Oxford one 
see si$ns to a Public Waste 
Reception Centre. In Berkshire, 
dose to our village, the same 
convenience is signed Public Rub- 
bish Dump. 

Yours truly. 

H ARRIET JONES. 

Meadow House. 

Ashford Hill. 

Newburv. Berkshire. 


4 


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jjS» 

J"-y 


$ 


in 


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& 

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10 


THE TIMES SATURDAY MARCH 1 1986 



COURT 
AND 
SOCIAL 


COURT 

CIRCULAR 

BUCKINGHAM PALACE 

February 28: The Princess 
Anne, Mrs Mark Phillips, Chief 
Commandant. Women's Roval 
Nava) Service, this morning 
inspected the Passing Out 
Course and Took the Salute at 
Ceremonial Divisions at HMS 
Royal Arthur, Corsham, Wilt 
shire. 

Her Royal Highness was re- 
ceived on amval by Her 
Majesty's Lord-Lieutenant Tor 
Wiltshire (Colonel Sir Hugh 
Brassey) and the Commanding 
Officer (Commander A 
Mastenon-Smith. RN). 

The Princess Anne. Mrs Mark 
Phillips this afternoon visited 
PJ. Parmiier and Sons Limited, 
Agricultural Engineers, Tisburv, 
Wiltshire. 

By Command of The Queen. 
Lieutenant-General Sir John 
Richards (Marshal of the Dip- 
lomatic Corps) called upon His 
Excellency Dr The Honourable 
H. McD. Forde and Mrs Forde 
at I Great Russell Street, Lon 
don. WCI this morning in order 
to bid farewell to His Excellency 
upon relinquishing his appoint 
ment as High Commissioner for 
Barbados in London. 

KENSINGTON PALACE 

February 28: The Prince of 
Wales. President. Business in 
the Community, this morning 
visited the St Helenss Trust. 
Watson Street Works. St Hel- 
ens. Merseyside and later 
Gostins of Liverpool Limited 
Workshops and Training 
School. Halewood. Knowsley. 
Merseyside. 

His Royal Highness. Presi- 
dent, The Royal Jubilee and 
Prince's Trusts, and President. 
Business in the Community, 
this afternoon visited the Albert 
Dock Complex, Liverpool. 

The Prince of Wales, Presi- 
dent Business in the Commu- 
nity. subsequently visited the 
Cavendish Workshops, Birken- 
head. Merseyside. 

His Royal Highness, attended 
by Mr David Roycroft. travelled 
in the Royal Train. 


. The Pnnce of Wales, accompa- 
nied by the Princess of Wales, 
will receive the honorary 
brotherhood of Trinity House. 
Trinity House Lane. HulL on 
March 5. and later, as Patron of 
Operation Raleigh, also 
accompanied by the Princess, he 
will visit the Operation Raleigh 
Support Centre. Queens Gar- 
den, HulL 

Princess Anne. Patron of the 
Riding for the Disabled Associ 
a uon. will visit the Stocfceid 
Park Group at Stockeld Park. 
Wetherby, North Yorkshire, on 
March II. 

The Prince of Wales, President 
of the Royal Naval Film 
Corporation, will attend the 
annual meeting and luncheon 
on board HMS President on 
March 12. 

Lady Rose Windsor, daughter of 
the Duke and Duchess of 
Gloucester, is six years old 
todav. 


Birthdays 


TODAY: Mr Harry Belafonte. 
59: Mr David Broome, 46: Mr 
Douglas Bunn, 58; Sir Keith 
Falkner. 86; Sir Maurice 
Fiennes. 79; Air Chief Marshal 
Sir Lewis Hodges. 68; Lord 
Justice Kerr. 65: Professor 
James Lister. 63; Commandant 
Dame Nancy Robertson, 77; 
Professor Lord Swann. 66; Ma- 
jor-General P.T. Tower. 69. 

TOMORROW: Sir John 
Ackroyd. 54: Miss Margaret 
Barbieri. 39: Mr Harry Blech, 
76: Lady Moyra Browne. 68: 
Baroness Burton of Coventry, 
82: Lord Cottesloe. 86: Lora 
Crook. 85: Sir Leonard 
Crossland. 72: Rear-Admiral Sir 
Charles Darlington. 76: Lord 
Elton, 56: Sir Donald Gosling, 
57; Mr fLE. Groves. 66: Sir 
Cyril Haines. 9 1 : Lord Howie of 
Troon. 62: Cardinal Basil 
Hume. 63: Mr John ManduelL 
58: Dame Naomi James. 37: Mr 
T. Mervyn Jones. 76: Mr Daniel 
Meinertzhagen. 7 1 ; Dame Pattie 
Mcnzies, 87; Lieutenant-Gen- 
eral Sir Robert Richardson. 57: 
Mr Robert Simpson. 65: Profes- 
sor B.GJ. Upton. 53; Mr J.P.R. 
Williams. 37. 


Forthcoming 

marriages 

Mr S J. Marsh-Smith 
and Miss J. Reid 

The engagement is announced 
between Stephen, only son of 
Mr and Mrs David Marsh- 
Smith.. of Penrhosfeilw, An- 
glesey, and Jennifer, second 
daughter of Sir Alexander 
Reid, Bt and Lady Reid, of 
Kingston Wood Manor, Hert- 
fordshire. 

Captain IX Bayless 
and Miss W.L. Bobbitt 
The engagement is an- 
nounced between Ian James 
Bayiess. RA, of Mons, Bel- 
gium.. eldest son of Mr and 
Mrs R.B. Bayless, of Durban. 
South Africa, and Wendy 
Louise, youngest daughter of 
Mr E.W. Bobbitu of North 
Carolina. United Stales, and 
Mrs W.R. Grey, of Whitley 
Bay, Tyne and Wear. 

Mr C.J.C. Hilling 

and Miss J.W. Mackintosh 

The engagement is announced 
between Christopher, son of 
Mr and Mrs Neville Hilling. 
Glanrhyd. Radbrook Road. 
Shrewsbury. Shropshire, and 
Jean, second daughter of Mr 
and Mrs AX Mackintosh of 
Mains of Buthlaw. Peterhead, 
Aberdeenshire. 


Mr P.M. Clayton 
and Miss T-L, Price 

The engagement is announced 
between Peter, youngest son 
of Mr and Mrs G.C. Clayton, 
of Woking. Surrey, and Tina- 
Louise. only daughter of Mr 
and Mrs F.R. Price, of Upton- 
Si-Leonards, Gloucester. 

Mr AX Coeibo 
and Miss C. S. Bigwood 

The engagement is announced 
between Anthony John, elder 
son of Mr and Mrs James J 
Coelho. of Roehampion. Lon- 
don. and Catherine Sarah, 
daughter of Dr and Mrs 
Anthony M. Bigwood. of 
Clevedon. Avon. 

Mr P.B. Mabley 
and Miss CJAI. Cox 

The engagement is announced 
between Paul, son of Mr and 
Mrs C.G. Mabley, of Park 
Road, Hampton Hill. Middle- 
sex. and Caroline, elder 
daughter of Mr and Mrs J.A. 
Cox, of Henwick Close, 
Thatcham. Berkshire. 

Major D.K. Maclver, RAMC, 
and Miss T.L. Gould 

The engagement is announced 
between Duncan Kenneth 
Maclver, of East Twicken- 
ham, Middlesex, and Tessa 
Louise, elder daughter of Mr 
and Mrs Harold Gould, of 
Hove. Sussex. 


Hope beyond the apocalypse 


It has become a cliche to say 
that we are living in apocalyp- 
tic times. So-called “high” art 
resonates with images of de- 
struction on a grand scale, 
men's hearts failing (hem for 
fear and the powers of heaven 
shaken. 

In modem music, Gyoigy 
Ligeti's Lux Aeierna. in its 
static almost Tallis-like po- 
lyphony. conjures the image of 
a derelict landscape after the 
holocaust. Stockhausen says 
he is composing music “for 
the apocaly pse". 

In painting, the livid ico- 
nography of such as Francis 
Bacon points to a world 
mu 13 ted by unprecedented 


the lurid imaginations of reli- 
gious cranks. 

As recent techniques in 
literary criticism have shown, 
the power and authority of a 
text exercises a force and an 
influence of more far-reaching 

consequence than that was 
intended by its author. 

When a writer of genius 
concentrates all his force into 
the effort to describe how 
things really are in the world, 
and how they will be. his 
words take on a significance 
which is timeless; and there 
are overtones to his message 
which pursue future genera- 
tions down the nights and 
down the years. This depth 


trauma. The violent stories of and universality of meaning is 


our more successful novelists 
prophesy a world berserk, and 
so bereft of moral significance 
that they make the nihilistic 
fiction of Samuel Beckett 
seem like tales of comfort and 
hope. 

Popular art in the cinema 
and on television offers vi- 
sions of the final battle be- 
tween good and evil, light and 
darkness. Images are polar- 
ized. We live in a new age of 
cosmic romance. It might be 
called Technological Mani- 
chaeanism. 

A good antidote to cliche is 
to return to what is original, to 
the prophecies about the end 


what makes us call a work 
“inspired". 

Revelation purports to be 
about the end of the world - an 
end which all generations 
before our own imagined 
would be initialed by God 
himself. But in our age. man- 
kind has the power to pour out 
the apocalyptic vials of wrath 
upon his own head. 

The words of Revelation are 
remarkably consistent with 
what we believe a nuclear 
holocaust and its aftermath 
would be like: and the 

third part of trees was burnt 
ups and all green grass was 
burnt up ... as it were a great 


of the world in the Book of mountain of fire was cast into 
Revelation. This strange and the sea ... and a third part of 


powerful book is more than a 
phantasmagoria of improba- 
bilities. or a playground for 


the creatures that were in the 
sea died ... and the third part 
of I he ships were destroyed”. 


There is the destruction of 
“a great star from heaven 
bunting as it were a lamp” and 
some words which strangely 
prefigure one of the main 
effects of nuclear fallout. 
and many men died of the 
waters because they were 
made bitter”. There is men- 
tion of what seems like a 
nuclear winter “And the third 
part of the sun. the moon and 
the stats were smitten so as the 
third part of them was dark- 
ened, and the day shone not”. 

All those examples are from 
chapter 8. Chapter 1 1 is 
reminiscent ofa horrible scene 
portrayed in Barry Hines's 
film. Threads: “And they of 
the people and kindreds and 
tongues and nations shall see 
their dead bodies _ and shall 
not suffer their dead bodies to 
be put in graves”. 

Revelation has long been, 
notoriously, a playground for 
fanatics, but men of sensible 
opinion may also learn to see 
in those chapters an accurate 
description of events which 
make us turn cold in our beds 
as we think of them. Of 
course, the author of Revela- 
tion was speaking first to his 
own age and not to a world 20 
centuries distanL 

Much of his work is allego- 
ry, veiled reference to the 
tyrannical power of the Ro- 
man Empire. But great vision- 
ary poetry resonates beyond 
its own time and speaks forms 
of truth to all ages. 


Revelation deserves the 
closest critical attention be- 
cause, happily, the images of 
fire and brimstone are not the 
only ones to be found there. 
The apocalypse is destructive 
but it is also final consumma- 
tion. We may learn to draw 
comfort from other images to 
be found there: “The rivers of 
the waters of life”; “the tree of 
life”; “the heavenly city”. 
There is too the prophecy that 
“God shall wipe away ail tears 
If we find the images of 
destruction pertinent, may we 
not come to see in those 
symbols of integration the 
beginnings of hope? Hope out 
of hopelessness and life out of 
death are themes at the heart 
of historic Christianity. 

Perhaps more artists and 
writers will come to see vi- 
sions of hope beyond the 
darkness of our apocalyptic 
age. But meanwhile, in case 
anyone should think that 
these words are only the half- 
crazed night thoughts of an 
insomniacal country parson, 
here are some words of C.G. 
Jung, from his own prophetic 
book. Answer to Job: 

“Could anyone in his right 
senses deny that St John the 
Divine correctly foresaw at 
least some of the possible 
dangers which threaten our 
world in the final phase of the 
Christian aeon?” 

Peter Mullen 

Vicar of Tockwith, 
North Yorkshire 


OBITUARY 

NIGEL ABERCROMBIE 
Arts Council expansion 

Mr Nigel Abercrombie, who the Arts with an entourage of 
died on February 17 at the age civil servants. 
of77 was Secretary of the Arts To these matters - and a 
Council of Great Britain from change of government and 

1963 to 1968. Prior to that he chairmanship - he brought the 

had had an academic career at experience of femdiamy with 
Oxford and at the University thecomdors of Whitehall 
Co liege of the South West. The advent of Jennie Xre as 
Exeter and held senior posts Minister and Lord Goodman 
in the Civil Service. as Chairman resulted in a 

Onel j n ^ growth of arts activities 

came a lecturer in French at throu Jf oul ^ country. The 

Council's work in the regions 


Magdalen in 1931 and then 
'anguages fram /936 to 1940. 

H.e published a number of y^is interest in the regional 

associations made it natural 
°f Jansen - that on his retirement he 
ism sh °uld accept appointment as 

French Classical Tjungftf Chief Regional Adviser and< n 


(193) and he was responsible 
for editions of Moliere's Tar- 
tuffe and Le Misanthrope. 

In 1940 be entered the 
Admiralty, rising to become 
an Under-Secretary, and from 
1 962 served for a year in the 
Cabinet Office. 

His five years at the Arts 
Council came at an important 
stage in its development. He 
had to handle the preparation 
of a new charter and the major 
change resulting from the 
appointment of a Minister for 


his new job be was able to 
continue the work of their 
consolidation until his retire- 
ment in 1973. 

He went on writing. The 
State and the Arts (1980); 
Studies in Sussex Church His- 
tory (1981) znAChaikmer and 
his Church (1981) being sup- 
plemented by a number of 
short stories contributed to 
anthologies. 

He was married to Elisabeth 
Brownlees, the opera singer, 
who survives him. 


REAR-ADMIRAL J. H. WALWYN 


Appointments 

Latest appointments include: 
Mr M.O'D.B. Alexander, aged 
49. Ambassadorat Vienna, to be 
United Kingdom Permanent 
Representative on the North 
Atlantic Council at Brussels in 
succession to Sir John Graham, 
who will be retiring from the 
Diplomatic Service. Mr Alexan- 
der will hold the personbal rank 
of ambassador. 

Mr Hedley Roberts, head of the 
fund-raising commerce and iik 
dustry unit of Ox fern, to be 
campaign director of Population 
Concern from April I in succes- 
sion to Mr Eric McGraw. 

Presiding judges 

The Wales and Chester Circuit 
is to have two new presiding 
judges. Mr Justice Anthony 
Evans, who became a Hi 
Court judge in December, 19; 
will take up his post at once. The 
second new appointment is Mr 
Justice Roch, who became a 
High Court judge in November. 
He will take over from Mr 
Justice Leonard, the present 
senior judge, in December. 

Mr Justice Rose is to be a 

esiding judge on the Northern 
Circuit from next January in 
place of Mr Justice Russell. 

Mr Justice Swinlon Thomas 
is to be a presiding judge on the 
Western Circuit from next Janu- 
ary in place of Mr Justice Stuait- 
Smith. 


Albert Medal 

The Royal Society of Arts has 
awarded the Albert Medal for 
1985 to the Prince of Wales “ in 
recognition of the diversity of 
encouragement which the 
Prince has given across the full 
spectrum of industry and the 
arts". 


oetry medal 

The Queen's Gold Medal for 
Poetry for 1985 has been 
awarded to Mr Norman 
MapCaig. the Scottish poet. 


Memorial service 

Ltenteoant-Coloiiel K. Cantlfe 

A memorial service for Lieuten- 
ant-Colonel Kenneth Camlie 
was held at St Michael's Church. 
Chester Square, on February 26. 
The Rev Antony A use 11 offici- 
ated and the lessons were read 
by Mr Ian Grist. MP. and Mr 
William Ward. An address was 
given by Mr David McKenna. 
Among those present were: 

Mr Hudh Canute uoo) Mr and Mrs 
Paul Canute and Mr and Mrs Bruce 
Canute (sons and daughters-to-law). 
Mr Charles Canute igrarctsan). Dr 
James Canute. Gordon Canute. Miss S 
Canute. Mrs Jean Stewart. Mrs Tom 
Hay ley. Mr Clive Hay ley. Mr and Mrs 
Outer Cross 

The Ambassador of China. Mr 
Michael Hesemne. MP. Sir Berkeley 
Caqe. Mr James and Lady zinnia 
Judd. Lady Osborn. Sir Richard 
Osborn. Lard Green ran of Harrow. 
Ltd y Cectua McKenna. Sir Robert and 
Lidy Mackenzte.- the Hon Mr* 
Mary belle Drummond. Count Carl 
Joseph Henclcel von Donnersmarck. 
Baron Dieter von Malsen-Ponlkau. Sir 
Janies Colyer-Fergusaon. 

Mr Maurice Chandler (honorary 
secretary of the conservative Weal 
Africa Committee). Mr Michael Loewe 
•Faculty of Oriental Studies. Cam- 
bn dor i. Mr J F Ford t r epre s entlna the 
Chairman of the Royal Society of 
Asian Affairs), Mr John Scott -Morgan 
i Direct or of the British Overseas 
Railways Historical Trust). Mr Arthur 
TaWer ir w r wwn un the institute of 
Mechanical Engineers. Railway* Dt- 
vtstonj. Mr Ian Johnson (Chairman of 
the Stephenson Locomotive SodetyL 
Mr L Hand ley -Derry i represent! no the 
China Society l_ Mr Cheng Kexttng 
'correspondent. Xinhua News Agency. 
London Office). Vice-Admiral Sir John 
Gray (secretary. China Society). Or C 
Y Fang and Mr Frauds Lee (Free 
Chinese Society). Mr K C Nl (Flee 
Chinese Centre). Mr A HaOTalch 
e Science Museum) 

. ... Robin Sootqhl icttatr 

man of the Military Commentators 
Circtei and Mrs Spatghl. Mrs Edward 
de la Mettle (honorary secretary to U>e 
Conservative Foreign and Common- 
wealth Council). 

Miss Elizabeth Altdradl. Dr 
Brown. Mr Andrew GUI In. Mi» 
Wendy Riga. Mbs Annette Pians. MBs 
Caroline Griffiths. Mr Jim Jarvis. 
Colonel Andrew Eartey. Mrs Gillian 
V laser. Mr j van Rtemsduk. Mr A 
Burrell. Brigadier J Plan. Mr Richard 
Tddesiey. Mr T Kerr. Mr peter 
Marshal. Mhj M Usher. Mr K 
Wrighbrnan. Mr C W Pel. Mr H f H 
Hunter. Mr John BtyQi. Mr George 
Karting. Mr C DoWe. Mr W E Grtson. 
Mr James Nicoil. Mm David Linums. 
Mr John Lowndes. Mr and Mrs 
George Bracher. Mr Ronald Waring. 
Mr Dmls Daytes. Mr Malcolm moss. 
Mr and Mrs Nicholas Harris. Mr R J 
Law. Mr S Davis. Mfi J J A Horton. 
Mr E O Stratton^hrtderaon. Mrs A 
Soowrrs. Mr T C Modi*. Mr* W 
Lund. Mr Peter Lund. Mr Andrew 
Steel. Mr R M Davies. Commander M 
Ousey. IX YSChen. Dr E J Undgren. 
Mias Jenny Maclean. Mrs Pamela 
Codflngton. Major J Haywood. Mr 
and Mrs Christopher Haywood, and 
Mr Ceorge Carpenter. 



Rear-Admiral JJL Walwyn, 
CB, OBE, who died on Febru- 
ary 24 at the age of 72, was a 
gunnery specialist who had a 
brisk war and later became the 
last Flag Officer Flotillas in 
the Mediterranean. After his 
retirement from the Navy he 
joined British Oxygen where 
he was Chief Executive, Per- 
sonnel 

James Humphrey Walwyn 
was bom on August 21, 1913 
and entered the Royal Navy in 
1931. From 1936-37 he was 
ADC to his father, Vice- 
Admiral Sir Humphrey 
Walwyn, who was then Gov- 
ernor of Newfoundland. 


and substantially damaged be- 
fore both got away foam' 
Renown in a snowstorm. 
Seven months later with 
Renown now Somerville’s 
Force H flagship in the Medi- 
terranean, Walwyn participat- 
ed m actions against I talian 
battleships and cruisers off 
Sardinia, and also in the 
bombardment of Genoa dur- 
ing which the battlecruiser 
pounded military positions 
with 300 tons of shells 
He was also present during 
the pursuit which ended in the 
destruction of The Bismarck. 

In 1942 Walwyn was ap- 


After this he specialised in ■ g 0 .^ of *** 

nery and jomed HMS J*™* gun crmser Newcastle 
3 - - and served in her for most of 

the rest of the war, in the 
Mediterranean and the Far 
East 

Among his postwar jobs 
were staffs ship -and flotilla 


town in 1939, serving in 
her for two years and playing 
his pan in the many gun 
actions the battlecruiser 
fought in that period. 

After a short period with 


Force K operating out of commands, and his final ap- 
Freetown in the operation to pointment as Flag Officer 


Receptions 






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Cbjesmort School 
The Council of Claycsmore 
School and the Headmaster, Mr 
Michael Hawkins, held a recep- 
tion yesterday to mark the 
annual Clayesraore lecture 
which was delivered by Mr 
Michael McCrum. Master of 
Corpus Christ i. Cambridge. 

HM Government 


Mr Nicholas Edwards. Secretary 
of State for Wales, was host 
yesterday at a reception held at 
ihe Welsh Office in London to 
celebrate St David's Day. 
Ambassadors. Members of both 
.Houses of Part ia mem and repre- 
sentatives of London Welsh 
societies, public bodies, in- 
dustry, the arts, the church, 
sport and the media were among 
those present. 

Dinners 

Lord Underhill 

Lord Underhill entertained the 
members and guests of the 
Internationa] Cultural Exchange 
at dinner in the House of Lords 
last night. Among those present 
were: 

The High Commissioner for 
The Gambia and Mrs Sarr, the 
Ambassador of Senegal and 
Mme Fall and the chairman. Dr 
R.U. Hingorani. 

Royal College of Radiologists 

Mr W.M. Ross. President of the 
Royal College of Radiologists, 
and Mrs Ross gave a dinner at 
38 Portland Place. Wl, last 
night for members of the council 
and their guests. 


St David's Day London Welsh 
Celebration 
Mr Enoch Powell, MP, was the 
guest of honourat the Si David's 
Day London Welsh Celebration 
held yesterday evening at the 
Savoy Hotel. Mr Neville Penry 
Thomas presided and the other 
speakers were Mr Ben Jones. Mr 
Justice Kenneth Jones and Mr 
Ccnydd Howells. 

Service dinners 

University of Wales Air Squad- 
ron 

The annual dinner of the 
University of Wales Air Squad- 
ron was held last night at RAF 
St Athan. Air Marshal Sir Eric 
Dunn. Chief Engineer (RAF), 
was the guest of honour and 
speaker. Squadron Leader A.L. 
Hooper. Commanding Officer, 
Dr Gareth Owen. Vice-Chan- 
cellor and Principal of Univer- 
sity College of Wales. 
Aberystwyth, and Mr R.A. Ross 
also spoke. 

Oxford University OTC 

General Sir Thomas Morony 
was the principal guest at the 
annual dinner of the Oxford 
University Officers’ Training 
Corps held last night at Rhodes 
House. Oxford. General Sir 
Frank Kitson. Honorary Colo- 
nel. and Lieuienam-Cokraei 
J.M. Craster. Commanding 
Officer, received the guests. 

The Essex Regiment (TA) 

The annual dinner of the Dining 
Club of officers of the 4th and 
5th Battalions The Essex Regi- 
men i (TA) was held last night at 
die Officers” Mess. 2nd Battal- 
ion The Royal Anglian Regi- 
ment. Colchester. 


Mr Kenneth Cooper (teftX chief executive of the British Li- 
brary, and Sir Michael Tippett after the formal presentation 
to the library yesterday of the sheets of the composer's or- 
chestral and choral work. The Mask of Time, representing 
the collection recently pwchased from the Michael Tippett 
Musical Foundation (Photograph: John Manning). 


bring the German pocket bat- 
tleship Graf Spec to bay. 
Renown sailed north where 
her first major test of strength 
was against the German 
battlecruiser Scharnhorst and 
the cruiser Hipper off the 
Lofoten Islands in April 1940. 

As second gunnery officer 
Walwyn took part in 
Renown's dud with these 
ships, Scharnhorst being hit 


Flotillas, Mediterranean, 
1962-1965, was the last before 
the abolition of the posL 
He was head of personnel at 
British Oxygen from 1965 to 
1975, and fiis experience in 
this field was put to good use 
in his membership of the 
Central Office of Industrial 
Tribunals. 1978-82, and of the 
Central Arbitration Commit- 
tee, 1978-83. 


Services:Third 
Sunday in Lent 


MBA- P RtteirfniSPTl «5 i 7£; CWMWUm RepaW IHOUteUSL anon 

*RMt«Sch*ar. 


CANTERBURY CATHEDRAL: 8 HC 

9.30 M. Rw P R tteartfteM; 1 1 Sung 
Euch. MiSH Brrvtt 1 
Ute v«tv l 

Archdeacon 

(ByrdrO Lord too* down (Btttttttfllt: 
a JO ES. Rev F W Phillips. 

YORK MINSTER: 8. 8.46 HC: X0.18 
Sung Euch. Mbsa O quart gtartoeum 
(V utorta'. The Dean: 1L30 M. 

Lamenuuora fBai rs*ow)_ Benedict u* 
(Tallis). 4 e. Stanford in a. O Lord ra 
thy wraUi (Gibbons). Rev (an Eltery. 
9T PAUL’S CATHEDRAL: 8 HC: 
1030 M. BenetHctte (Jackson in Cl, 
J rax late Stanford tat C. Ri Rev 
Kenneth Wooucomtoe: 11.30 HC. 

Missa Sanctl Dotmnkl (Rubbra). Let 
my graver be set forth (Middleton t 
3.16 E. Collegium Sanctt Johanrus 
mppetU: Like as me hart (Howells). 
The Rev Graham Dowell. 
WESTMINSTER ABBEY: 8 HG 10.30 
M. Miserere lAllegrii. Call to remtn- 
branoe. (Farranl). Rev John Harper. 
1 1.40 HC. Purcell to B flat. Salvator 
mundl (Blow), Rev Anthony Harvey: 

6.30 ES. Rt Rev EG Knapp- Fisher. 

, SOUTHWARK CATHEDRAL: 9 

HC: 1 1 Euch. Harwood in A flaL Hear 
my prayer (Gtobsi. uta carttas iptain- 
song). Canon Gerald Parrott: 3 E. 
Brewer In D. O Lord the maker 
Uoubertl. The Bishop of Woolwtch. 
WESTMINSTER CATHEDRAL: 
7.8.9.12.5 30.7 LM; 10.30 HM. Mtssa 
Brevis (Palestrina). Ad le levavt 
twratei: 3.30 v. Majpmcai term lore 
(de Monl ci, Ag nus Dei (Mortey). 

ST GEORGE'S CATHEDRAL. South- 
wark: a. to. 12.15. 6 LM: II KM. 
L'Hora Passa iVladana). Super 
Flumina Bahytonts (Palestrina). 

CHAPEL ROYAL. St James's Place: 
8 30 HC 11 IS Sung Euch. Man 
Papes Marceffi (Palestrina). Ven R 

OGfphTS CHAPEL OF THE SAVOY. 
WC2: 1116 Sung Euch. short service 
(EtyrdL A etema Qinstl M (in era (Pale- 
strina). Rev Hugh Rota. 

GUARDS CHANEL. Wellington Bte-. 
nd&SWl: 11 Sung Euch. Rev £ w 

LINCOLN'S INN CHAPEL 1 1.30 LM. 
Ave verum corpus (Arthur WilUs). 
Rev F v a Boyse. 

TOWER OF LONDON. ECi 9.15 HC: 
11 M Benedict te ajotooni. tn Murao 
et (Telu (Ta)lts>. the Chaplain. 
TEMPLE CHURCH. Fleet Street 8.30 
HC: It. 18 HC. Lamentations 

(Bairsmwi. Bencdlcrte (Ireland Ln CL 
The Master. 

ST CLEMENT DANES (RAF 
CHURCH) EC4: a 30 HC: II Choral 
Euch. Mass for four voices (ByrdL Rev 

8 Half penny. 

CHAPEL ROYAL. Hampton Court 
Palace: 8.30 HC: >1 Sung. Euch. 
Salvator Mundl (Tams). The Omplaln; 

3.30 E. Chrtste Qtd Lux Es (ByrdL 
Miserere Met (ByidJ, The Chaplain. 

ALL HALLOWS BY THE TOWER; U 
Sung Euch. The Rev Peter Detency. 
ALL SAimSjMaraairt Street. WlVS. 
6.15 LM: 10 20MP:ll HM. Quand to 
pens idi Lasso! Rev C HamelOoolce: 6 
solemn Evensong. Fawcbourdons 
(Victoria). Rev j S W Young. 

ALL SOULS. Langham Place. Wl: 

9 30 HC. Rev Richard Bewes 
CROSVENOR CHAPEL. South 
AixOey Street: SIS HC. l| Sung 
Euch. Maas for Five Voices (Byrd). Aid 
le tea an oculos meos I White i. Rev A 
w Marks. 

HOLY TRINITY. Brompton Road: 

8.30 HC II SM. Rev J A K M liter: 
630 ES. Preb J T C B OoUlna. 

ST ALBAN'S Holborn. ECU 9JO 
SM: 1 1 HM. Miau Brevfe (Lelghlon). 
When oaild heard iTomkins). 5.30 
LM. Father Oasketl. 


ST BARTHOLOMEW-THErCREAT. 
Srrdthftek) 9 HC: 11 Choral Euch. 
MIsh Brevta tSeiberv. Ave Verum 
Corpus (ByrdL the Rector: 6.30 E. 
Canticles (Ruffe * Nanlnl) Audlvt 
media node (Tank) the Rector. 

ST BRIDE'S. Ftert Street 8 JO HC: IX 
M. Benedict le. Sumskm In B Flat 
Collegium Regale iHowellsL Canon 
John Oates: -- -- 

Nunc 

Hosts rpurrefl). Cat 

ST CLrraBERTTSL PMibeach 

dens. SW6. 10 HC: 11 Sung Eucn. 
Bow down Dune ear (Arenafcyi. Rev 
John Vine: 6 E and & 

ST GEORGE'S. Hanover Square. Wl: 


RIGHT REV V. J. PIKE 


The Right Rev V. J. Pike, 
CB. CBE. who died on Febru- 
ary 25, aged 7 8. was Chaplain- 
General to the Forces from 
1951 to I960 and a former 
Bishop of Sherborne. 

Victor Joseph Pike was bom 
on July 1, 1907 in an Irish 

8 so: It suno Eum. Coburn Reg*, i countiy rretory, son of Canon 
otoweto). Mbaerere vaS^td. rii William Pike, and one of 1 1 
st james^. ptcradtnyr 8.30 hc: tx ! children, most of whom dis- 

Suna Euch: 6 Evening Prayer. 1 
ST JOHN'S. Hyde Park Crescent. W2: 

S HC: XO E. Rev Boh Callaghan: 6-50 
Prayer and PraHe. Rev Roma King. 

ST LUKE'S. Chelsea. 8. 12.15 hC. 

10.30 Sung EuCh. Mam in Four 
Voices (ByrdL Remember O Lord 
(PurrellL Canon E James. 6 30 E Give 
ear unto my prayer (Arcaded). C 
Supe rtnlcnai tnt C am gate. 

ST MARGARET'S. West m in s ter IX 
SunjjMEucft. Ca non T revor Btaan. 


oulngue 
9& do- 


st MARY ABBOTS. KenstnpUm: a 
12 30 HC: 9 JO Sung Euch. Rev S H 
H A cl amt 1 1 IBM, The Vicar. 6.30 
E. The Vicar. 

ST MARY'S. Bourne street: 9. 9 AS. 7 
LM: II HM. Western Wind ~ 
(Taverner). Hear my prayer (purcellL 
Miserere (AJiegrIL Dr Brian Horae: 
6 1 5 su lions or Ute Croat and 

Benediction. 

ST MARYLEBONE7S. 

Road a. II HC. 

vocthus (ByrdL St ... 

mine (TauisL Rev C K Hamel Cooke: 
6-30 Laying on of Hands. Rev R 
McLaren. 

ST PAUL'S. Robert Aoam Street. Wl: 
ll Aitvorose Mason: 6-30 
Cassidy. 

sr PAUL'S, wrub Plate. SWI: & 9 
HC: XI Solemn Euch. Mima OCtavl 
tool CLasun). Turn owe unto me 
'Boyce). Mger mtoh) and sPIowmim 
L ord (Thomas WeeUrasL Rev R C 
Ra eU. 

ST PETER'S. Eaton Souare. SWi: 
8.15 HC: io Family Mas: XI Solemn 
Mass. O vos omrnt (GesiuddaL Rev D 
B Tlffver. 

ST SIMON ZELO T ESu MHner «reet: 
HC B. 12.15: XI MP: 6-30 E. Preb J 
Pearce. 

THE ANUNCIATION. Bi ya nst o n 
Street. Wl: ll HM. Mtaa LJHora 
Patsa (Vteoana). nrtsercre Me( (BynO: 
6 LM and Stations of Die crass 
ST COLUMBIA'S CHURCH OF 6C 
LAND. Pool Street. Swr. IS 
John H Burns: 6-30 Rev J FT 

CROWI'?COtJ’RT CHURCH OF SCOT 
LAND. Cov-eflt Garden: IX. 15. 6J0 
HC. R*rv Keith M McJfet*. 

THE ASSUMPTION. Warwick Street. 
Wl: a lO. 12. 4. 6 LM: 11 
Wester n wind M aa (Tavern erL _ 
FARM STREET. Wl: 7.30. 831 IO. 

’ A IS. 6.15 LM; XX HM. 

HATORY. Braraxon Road: 7. i 
_. -a 12 JO. «-30. 7 LM: X X .HM- | 
Mtsea ouartl tore (Victoria). Homo 
■Vitus (WHOyeL 3.30 V. 
con verte re (Lavrusr 
ST ETHELDBEDA’S. Ely Place: IS 
HM. Mass for Three . Voices ( Byrd). 
AMERICAN CHURCH H LONDON. 
Wl: II Rev F AlUson. 

HINDE STREET METHODIST 
W|; II Rev 


tinguished themselves, three 
becoming bishops. 

After graduating at Trinity 
College, Dublin, be served a 
local curacy. In this time he 
became well known in the 
international rugby world, 
winning 14 caps for Ireland. 
This brought the fiist curie of 
lifelong friends. 

The next wide aide started 
when he joined the army in 
1932. There followed a distin- 
guished career, rising through 
senior chaplaincies at divi- 
sional level to Assistant Chap- 
lain-General, Eighth Army in 
Italy, and ending as Chaplain- 
General to the Forces after the 
war. 


Many must remember with 
gratitude his help and encour- 
agement in war and peace; 
Nor will his ability to hold an 
audience either in the open air 
or in the Guards Chapel be 
easily forgotten. For this work 
he was made CBE in J950.nd 
CB in 1953. He was appointed 
Chaplain to the Queen from 
1953-60. 

There was still another ma- 
jor work ahead. In 1960 he 
was made Bishop of 
Sherborne and for 16 years 
travelled throughout Wilt- 
shire and Dorset, visiting and 
raring for clergy, and counsel- 
ling or comforting a whole 
range of people. 

This work he continued m 
retirement and his stamina 
was astonishing. 

■Throughout his life his sim- 
ple, but forthright proclama- 
tion of the Gospel attracted 
and inspired many people. He 
leaves a wife, one son and two 
daughters. 


MR ALBERT SIDDALL 

Mr Albert Siddall, CBE, In 1946 Siddall became 
who died on February 22 at chief production engineer of 

the group’s electrical company 
h “““n the task ofrehabili- 


the age of 80, was a Lucas 
Group 1 engineer responsible and 
for the manufacture of much 
wartime weaponry and associ- 
ated equipment, notably the 
wings of Spitfires. 

Bom in Leeds on December 
16, 1905, he began his engi- 
neering apprenticeship with 
the Yorkshire Patent 
Steam wagon Company and 
joined Lucas in 1932. 

During the years 1938 to 
1 946 he oversaw the planning 
1 and^tablishinem of the man- sermfon thT Adviso'iy Conv 

grot 22 . 6-jo ufacture of a wide range of mittee for the Ministry of 

Dpmvr sniuor mnavmiiN I U/Mrvmc gnit in, -v- l , . oi 

weapons ana war equipment; Technology and was a founder 

besides Spitfire wings this - ‘ 

included the gun turrets for 
Boulton Paul Defiant fighters. 


CHURCH. 


’ Kan HowcrofL 


rating factories for the produc- 
tion of electrical systems for 
vehicles. 

In that year he joined the 
board of Joseph Lucas (Elec- 
trical) Ltd and in 1 967 became 
deputy managing director of 
Joseph Lucas Ltd, joining the 
board of Joseph Lucas (Indus- 
tries) two years later. 

From 1968 to 1974 he 


REGENT SQUARE PRESBYTERIAN 
UBC. Tavistock Place; 1 1 Rev Wesley 
Workman: 6.30 Rev John Miner. 

ST JOHN'S WOOD UPC: 11 Rev 
John MUter 


member of the Advisory 
Board on Relations with the 
Universities. 


Science report 

The search for home-grown dough 

By John Young, Agriculture Correspondent 

membrane inside the eudo- 


The Agricultural and Food 
Research Council has allocat- 
ed £42.000 to Kent University 
to find ways of replacing 
imported bread making wheats 
and soya beans with home- 
grown cereals and legumes. 

The characteristic elasticity 
of dough made from wheat 
floor, which gives bread its 
lightness and texture, is attrib- 
utable to a number of proteins 
known collectively as gluten. 
But although they are nutri- 
tionally important, they have 
not been fully studied and 
relatively little is known about 
tbem. 

The gluten proteins of dif- 
ferent wheat varieties are sub- 


tly different, and the 
relationship between differ- 
ences io protein composition 
and the suitability of specific 
wheat varieties for 
breadmalung is only just be- 
ginning to be understood. 

The gluten proteins in a ripe 
wheat seed are found within 
the starchy part of the grain, 
known «s die endosperm. 
They originate from aggre- 
gates laid down inside the cells 
of the ripening grain, and the 

aim of the research is to 
discover how the aggregates 
are initially formed. 

The newly made gluten 
proteins appear to cross a 


sperm cell between synthesis 
and deposition, which appears 
to be analogous to the process 
which tabes place in animal 
cells. 

The study will also attempt 
to ascertain bow the 
disulphide bond which holds 
the gluten mass together in the 
dough is originally formed. 

Dr Neil BulleuL who will be 
in charge of the project, will 
collaborate with scientists at 
Rolhamsted Experimental 
Station, who have already 
isolated and “cloned" the 
genes for many cereal pro- 
teins. 


University news 

Oxford 

Professor William Hayes has 
been chosen as president of St 
John's College. Oxford, to suc- 
ceed Sir John Kendrew. who 
retires on July 31. Professor 
Hayes is head of the Clarendon 
Laboratory at Oxford and Prin- 
cipal Bursar at St John's. 

Bristol 

Professor C.Bruce Perry, emer- 
itus professor of medicine, and 
Sir Reginald Verdon-Smith. 
pro-chancellor, have been ap- 
pointed honorary fellows of the 
university. 


VICTORIA ELLIOTT 

Victoria Elliott, leading so- 
prano at Sadler's Wells Opera 
for some fifteen years, has 
died at the age of 63. 


Meeting 

St John’s College. Southsea 

Lord Young of Graflham. Sec- 
retary of State for Employment, 
was the sues] speaker' at a 
meeting of the Politics Society 
of St John's College. Southsea. 
yesterday evening. Mr Patrick 
Sullivan, vice-chairman, pre- 
sided 3nd Mr Manin Nolley. 

secretary- also spoke. 


Bom at Gateshead in 1922, 
she first sang locally in choirs 
and then, during the war, with 
ENSA. 

In 1944, she joined the Carl 
Rosa Opera as a chorister, but 
soon graduated to small solo 
parts and eventually to princi- 
pal roles such as Marguerite 
(Faust). Antonia (Tales of 
Hofmann) and Madam But- 

A short period away from 
the stage, devoted to concert 
work, followed before she 
went to Sadler's Wells in 1951. 
While there she undertook all 
the major parts suited to her 
lyric-dramatic voice, notably 
Tosca. Tatyana (Eugene 
Onegin). Rosalinde (Die 
Ftedermaus) and Luisa Miller 


She was the first Judith 
when the company mounted 
the British premiere of 
Bartok s Bluebeard's Castle 
and she created the rale -of 
Lady Hamilton in Berkeley's 
Nelson in 1953. 

Miss EUiott once had the 
distinction of singing 
Santuzza ( Cavalteria 
Rusticana ) in Welsh at an 
Eisteddfod. 

Her performances always 
had dramatic integrity and a 
true involvement with the 

character concerned, helped 

by her strongly projected, 
vibrant voice and personality. 

Latterly she devoted herself 
to the cause of musical thera- 
py for mental patients. 

Karel Vlach, the veteran 
Czechoslovak swing and pop 
bandleader has died in Prague 
aged 74, the official Cetekg 
news agency has reported. 


* 





THE TIMES SATURDAY MARCH 1 1986 


SPORT 


11 


FOOTBALL: HOW THE GArt riw Awi t p THE WINTER OF DISCONTENT 





should turn up the 
and keep on the grass 


The disclosure yesterday 
that the ami-plastic lobby arc. 
to press for a total ban on 
artificial surfaces was cme 
event w^ich would Jbave bene- 
, m a postponement 
With the pools panel sitting 
for the fourth success! veweek 
and many dubs faced with 
senous cash .flow problems, 
because of frozen pitches it 
was not the smartest tune to 
start knocking nice, playable 
plastic. . . . 

Ninety- five per cent of 
Football League dlubsmust be 

wishing -right now That they 
could look forward with -confi- 
dence io a . fixture today as do 
Luton Town who receive 
Sheffield Wednesday on the; 
green, green plastic of their 
Kenilworth Road ground. 
Having said that three dubs, 
today will provide- proof that 
the real thing can still see off 
its modem adversary if prop- 
erly equipped. 

The inexpensive undersoil 
healing at Goodison Park, 
Maine Road and Boundary. 
Park will ensure that the 
matches of Everton jv Aston 
Villa), Manchester City (v. 
Oxford United} and Oldham 
Athletic (v Mill wall) go ahead 
at minimum expense. 
Everton's system cost £58,000 
to- install - and 'has a life 
expectancy of 20. years. When 
in continual operation the cost 
is £7 an bour-but it is also 
thermostatically . controlled. 
Their most expensive fuel bill 
to date was for the Manchester 
City game which.was preceded 
by four nights of sub-zero 
temperatures. The bill was 
slightly less than £1,0001 

Jim Greenwood, the 
Everton secretary, sakt “I 
cannot -for the life of me 
understand why more dubs 
do not install them. I mean 
£58.000 doesn't even buy yon 
a decent player." (Howard 
Kendall, the club's manager; 
might disagree with him about . 
that having recently paid 
£50,000 for Ppmion, one of- 
the most exciting: young foil 
backs in .the country). Mr 
Greenwood added: “Noone's 
denyinglkat artificial pitches 
have immense, economic ad- 


van 

to make a fortune the cby^they 
design .a perfect one. Every 
one wifi want one. But at tbe 
moment they just - do not 
compare with sand .pitches 
which have made enormous 
strides in the last five years." 

• No fear then, of Everton 
looking enviously .at another 
■man's grass. Today they may 
have reason to thank every 
blade of their -ground for 


By CUve White 

seem that the only enchanted 
observer were those close sit 
hand judging by some of the 
rave notices England’s perfor- 
mance received in some des- 
patches, notably one's sent 
filter when chauvinism had 
had a chance to gather itself 
At least Bryan Robson’s 
display was deserving of the 
highest accolade and that 
must make Ron Atkinson, his 
United manager, as happy as 


providi^ them wifo .the op- . h r^es Bobby’ MnTlS 
portunrty lo steal a ax-point - national manager. Robson re- 
n^rch on the rest at the head turns from his two-match 
of the Jim division. Fresh : suspension at the Dell 


from their ‘ thoroughly de- 
served triumph, at. Anfidd last 
week they take on a rusty- 
Aston Villa side whohave not 
set foot on any kind of surface 
for 25 days. 

. Consequently, Gray. the in- 
spiration of Villa's Milk Cup 
run and ofEverton in a variety 
of competitions' Iasi season, 
has been unable to serve out a 
suspension and misses an 
emotional, --return- to 
Goodison.; It gives Stainrod, 
their top scorer, the chance 
again to stake a claim which 
once encompassed interna- 
tional honours with England. 

One Everton player Jleid, 
who was unable to add to his 
in midweek because of injury, 

, is optimistic of recovering 
from injury as are, arindden- 
taQy, two others, Lineker and 
Van den Hauwe, who were 
unable to make Middle .East 
trips in midweek. Another, 
BraceweU, who in my opinion 
should have done had it not 
been for a shin injury, , is still 
incapacitated, a legacy, you 
might say of a bruising game 
at Newcastle on the first day of 
the year. Spink, an England 
fringe goalkeeper, has won 
back his place in the Villa 
team from Poole after injury 
and Bradley, an impressive 
midfield player, s u cceeds 
Glover. 

With the weather refusing to 
relax completely its icy grip 
many of us at home found 
littie warmth or encourage- 
ment in England's 2-1 • win 
Israel in Tel Aviv, 
say that distance lends 
^ndhantmem but it would 


Southampton and United 
need him desperately to sur- 
vive bans and bruises if thej 
are to overthrow the champi 
ons, Everton. Bailey, whose 
poation as No2 goalkeeper for 
England is slowly being erod- 
ed by the form and applause 
for Woods, now finds his 
position as United's No 1 
under serious threat. Turner, 
signed from Sunderland last 
summer and outstanding in 
the recently televised game at 
Liverpool, continues to bold 
finn ■ between the United 
posts. Chelsea are one of nine 
first division clubs optimistic 


this weekend 
on a Stamford Bridge pitch 
that is not renowned for 
braving the elements. (Only 
Nottingham Forest and West 
Bromwich Albion were forced 
to postpone their matches 
prior to today). Chelsea's sea- 
son seems to have fallen apart 
following their cup defeats to 
Liverpool and Queen's Park 
Rangers recently but their 
league opportunities are still 
vibrant. 

It has not been made obvi- 
ous to many outside SW6 but 
should Chelsea win their three 
games in hand over Evertoo 
they would overtake the 
champions by a point. Wat- 
ford, ambitious themselves lo 
gain a more creditable league 
position than 12th, will pro- 
vide a good test of the resolve 
and bruised spirit of Chelsea's 
youngsters. 

Footnote: There was some 
cold comfort from abroad 
yesterday. The Swiss league, 
returning after their three- 
month winter break, were 
expecting to stage only one 
first division match this week- 
end because of heavy snowfall 
and frozen pitches. 


Hearts’ secret 


By Hugh Taylor 


The postponement of 
Scotland's match of the day, 
between Aberdeen and Dundee 
United, because Phxodrie is 
frostbound has given the league 
leaders. Heart of Midlothian, 
added incentive to try to make 
Tynecastle playable for their 
match this afternoon with St 
Mirren. 

Not only would victory put 
Hearts agarafourpoints dear az 
tbe top of the premier division, 
it would enable them to equal 
the record for- an unbeaten ran 
set by Rangers 10 years ago. 

One of tbe members ofthe 
Rangers side which played 21 
games without defeat was Alex 
MacDonald, the Hearts man- 
ager, who said yesterday that it 
was-from the feat of his framer 
team that he had discovered 
what appears to be the secret of 
football success. “It is simply 
that a settled side wins the 
honours," he said. “ With one 
addition, a touch of luck." 


Certainly, Hearts have been 
fortunate in that they have ha d 
to make tew changes in the side 
during their astonishing run and 
have avoided missing games 
despite tbe severe-winter. “ We 
are twwter than pwt 

dow that the Aberdeen game has 
been cancelled,' to ensure that 
our grou nd is c leared o f snow 
for the game with St Mirren, " 
MacDonald said. And adbering 
to thi s theory of c ontinuity, he 
said that Hearts' will field tbe 
team w hich gai ned one of the 
best results of the season last 
wee k, a dra w with CdtfcTi 
ParkheatC . „ ^ 

He will not, however, be 
treating the erratic St Mirren 
lightly. Just before Hearts began 
their run, which saw them surge 
almost from the bottom to the 
top of the division, they were 
trounced 6-2 by their opponents 
of today. 


JUDO 


Gordon’s chance 

B-y JPMGp Mc&saa V- ‘ ' 

While thwcanbef^dotiErts champion 1 KJtabfl BOoftshev'&t 
bat the European bronze medal tbeJKgmnmg only to be crushed 
rinner, Elvis Gordon, of; by a - combination of the 
Volverhampion, has ail tbe^ Russian's root couragp and 
linkings of a European heavy-. Gordon's own surprise at what 


weight champion, tire question 
c mains whether he can discard 
be bronze medal mentality that 
as limited bis progress so far. 

He is given another opportu- 
ity to make progress in Boda- 
est today in the heavyweight 
ategory of the.. Hungary Cup 
hen he meets strong oppo- 
ition from rhe Soviet Union, 
ast Germany. Hungary and 
ranee. 

He has to overcome a basic 
ick of faith in himself which 
■as evident in ; his last two 
iternaiionals — in Paris where 
be Frenchman. Christian 
’action, won a tac t i cal battle 
nd in Brussels in the European 
am championships where he 
brew the Soviet European 


he had done. 

Even here in Budapest the 
dub players have a healthy 
regard for Gordon. Few; heavy- 
weights have the combination of 
speed and strength that the 
former poweriiftcr possesses 
and as it becomes increasingly 
translated into judo technique 
(Gordon was a late' entry into 
the sport), he presents for- 
midable opposition. 

Now 27, Gordon is currently 
topping 130 kilos which he 
admits is too heavy for his style. 
“I want to lose between five and 
ten but this shouldn't be diffi- 
cult with the Hungary Cup 
followed rapidly by ibe West 
German Open,* train i n g week 
m West . Germany and the East 
German Open all in March." 


CYCLING 


Hinault’s glitter 

From John WDcockson, Ghent ' 

After nearly - a month of Flemish hills from Ghent, ai- 


preparatory events, in France, 
Spam and Italy amid freezing 
weather, professional cyclists 
metaphorically take off their 
gloves this weekend for the 
year's first major road races. 

While today the five-time 
Tour de France champion Ber- 
nard Hinault, twice a winner in 
February, tackles the ragged 
140-mile Het Volk circuit here 
in Belgium, tomorrow Britain's 
home professionals grther at 
Aintree, Liverpool, for the 50- 
mile County of Merseyside 
grand prix and men like Robert 
Millar, Phil Anderson and Sean 
Kelly set out on the eight-day 
Phris-Nice race with a five-mile 
time trial between Berey and 
Vincennes. 

The winner of . the past two 
editions of the Het Volk classic, 
Eddy Planckaert of Bel g iu m , is 
favoured to complete a treble in 
a race that loops through the 


though Hinault's participation 
gives the event a glitter it 
normally lacks. 

While Hinault was winning 
his two races in Spain last 
month, Liverpool rider Joey 
McLoughlin and brother-in-law 
Phil Thomas were showing good 
form for the ANC-Hjufoids 
team on the French Riviera. 

A fifth place for McLoughlin 
at Cannes and a sixth for 
Thomas at Antibes prove that 
they will both be ready for their 
home-town race tomorrow. 
Their Sheffield team-mate Mal- 
colm Elliott waits in the wings 
with his powerful sprint that 
almost overcame world number 
one. Kelly two weeks ago at 
Albaceie, Spain. 

Kelly is already in winning 
form and is the obvious 
favourite to win Paris-Nice for 
the fifth successive year. 


<.<<■ 


SKIING: WEST GERMAN SUCCESS IN WORLD CUP SUPER GIANT SLALOM 

Zurbriggen 
races to 
convincing 
victory 

Hemsedal (Reuter) — Pirmin 
Zurbriggen of Switzerland raced 
to victory in a demanding men's 
World Cup super giant slalom 
yesterday in 1 min 37.44 sec. 
beating Markus Wasmeier of 
Wesi Germany by 0.18 of a 
second. 

Wasmeier, who heads the 
super giant slalom World Cup 
standings, and Zurbriggen com- 
pleted the course more than a 
second ahead of Leonhard Stock 
of Austria, who was third in 
1:38.72. 

The race was a triumph for 
West Germany, who finished 
with three competitors in the 
lop six. Herbert ftenoth was 
fourth and Hans Stuffer. who 
finished second on Thursday in 
a giant slalom here, again per- 
formed impressively to finish 
sixth. 

On a very steep course, which 
lessened the chances of slalom 
technicians such as Ingemar 
Sienmark. winner of a giant 
slalom here on Thursday, racers 
lucked into downhill skiing 
positions as soon as they left the 
starting box. 

RESULTS: 1. P Zurbriggen (Swttz) 1mm 
37 .44 sec, 2. M Wasrrwer (WG) 1-37.62, 3; 
L Stock (Austria) 1:38.72; 4. H Renotti 
jWGL1.38.77. 





Going dow nhill fast: Zurbriggen on his way to a convincing victory yesterday 


.H Stuffer 
1:39,41:8. 


GOLF 


Sixes and sevens for Oosty 

From John B allanti ne, Coral Springs, Florida 


For the first time in Lhe eight 
tournaments played on the 
American tour so far, there was 
a strong likelihood of there 
being no Europeans in the 
qualifying field at the halfway 
stage of the Honda Classic on 
the very diffiruJi^nd long, Eagle 
Trace course in hot windy 
conditions at Coral Springs on 
tbe edge of the Everglades. 

Each of the three Britons 
experienced problems other 
than those of the usual niggling 
difficulties of this frustrating 
and awkward individual game. 

Sandy Lyle was robbed in his 
tel room of $3,000 in 
vellers' cheques and a $2,000 
special shock-proof wrist watch. 
The upset this caused, with 
.telephone calls having to be 
■made home to his wife Christine 
and police inquiries going on all 
afternoon, undoubtedly helped 


to produce his unsteady 78 and 
made it seem improbable that 
he was in the right frame of 
mind to score the low card that 
was needed yesterday to qualify. 

Ken Brown and his wife 
Dawn suffered rather similarly 
in Honolou a fortnight ago when 
their passports, credit cards and 
about $1,000 cash was stolen, 
and the echoes of this setback 
were apparent in the Scot's 
disappointing 78. 

In (his wealthiest of countries, 
nothing is more difficult than to 
get banks to the purse strings 
(they say it is all in your own 
interest!) and consequently the 
Browns are short of ready cash 
to pay their British caddy and to 
meet other expenses. 

Peter Oosterhuis. whose card 
of 80 contained two sevens and 
three sixes, is finding out again 
how it feels to be under the 
pressures of qualifying “Oosty" 


did not finish in the leading 125 
last year and so has to wait for 
sponsors' invitations. 

Scores generally were very 
high with Jack Nicklaus taking 
73 and experienced former tour- 
nament winners such asWoody 
Blackburn and D A Wei bring 
taking 81. Winds gusting up to 
25 mph and the artificial lakes 
guarding the greens and fair- 
ways caught any but the per- 
fect! y-h it; Lyle and Oosterhuis 
each sent three tee-shots into tbe 
water. 

Fust- round leader Kenny 
Knox grew up in North Florida 
and so knows all about these 
local conditions. He putted 
brilliantly on bis way to a 66. 
two ahead of the 50-year old Chi 
Chi Rodriguez and young Bill 
Glasson, with Edwin Fiori and 
Andy Bean not far away. 


HOCKEY 


Eligibility debate 


By Sydney Friskin 


The competitions committee 
of the Hockey Association need 
to review the rales on the 
eligibility of players represent- 
ing more than one club during 
the same indoor season. A few 
complaints were heard when the 
final stages of the Royal Bank 
indoor club championship be- 

S i at the Michael Sobell Sports 
otre yesterday. 

Tbe squad of 12 players 
announced by Stouiport for the 
competition included Ken 
Partington and Imran Sberwani, 
both of whom played for Slough 
this season in the Truman 
indoor league. Slough won the 
title for the tenth year in 
succession. Tulse Hill, who 
played against Siourpon in the 
quarter-finals of the indoor 
championship yesterday, had 
Mark Donnelly and Chris 
Gladman on their team sheet, 
both having played for Old 


Loughtontans in the Essex in- 
door league this season. 

The argument advanced by 
clubs who encourage this form 
of dual representation is that 
they are free to choose players 
who are not cup-tied, that is to 
say they have not played for 
another dub in the indoor 
knockout competition during 
the same season. 

Outdoors, the five remaining 
matches in the second round of 
the Hockey Association Cup are 
to be played tomorrow. The 
fourth round is scheduled to 
begin on March 9. Southgate, 
the holders, will play their 
postponed second round match 
against Old Kingstonians on 
March 8, probably at Neasden. 
If they win. they will play their 
third round match against 
Hounslow the following morn- 
ing. 


YACHTING 

Gaiming 
a record 

By Barry Pickthall 

Pierre Fehlmann. skipper of 
UBS Switzerland, the current 
•leader on the third stage of the 
Whitbread round the world 
yacht race, was jubilantly claim- 
ing a new noon-to-noon sailing 
record yesterday after his 80 foot 
maxi had covered 360 miles, an 
average of 15 knots. 

• The Swiss yacht, which also 
leads the race on total elapsed 
time, holds a 60-mile lead over 
Atlantic Privateer, in second 
place, a near sister-ship skip- 
pered by Peter Kuttel. of South 
Africa and was hopeful yes- 
terday of rounding Cape Horn 
late tomorrow night (Sun). 

LEADING POSITIONS: 1. UBS Switzer- 
land; 2 , Atlantic Pnvawer (US): 3. Cote 
d Or (Bel); 4. Drum (UK): 5. bon New 
Zealand. Leaden on handicap: l. 
L'Eapnr d 'Equip (Fr): Z Rucanor Tristar 
(Bel); 3, Philips Innovator JNetn): 4. Equity 
and Lew (Netn); 5 Fazer Finland. 


Pramotton fit) I^B.Ssf^O. A Steiner 
(Austral 1-39.71: 11, D Mahrer rSwrtzj 
139.75: 12. G Marxer ILwSi) 1:39.90; 13. 
M Eder (WG] 139.91: 14. G Mader 


(Austria) 1:40.03; 15. 1 Marzola (It) 1:40.09. 

• FURANO (Reuter) - Maria 
Walliserand Brigitte Oertli gave 
little comfort to the rivals ol the 
Swiss women's World Cup team 
yesterday with confident prac- 
tice performances for today's 
downhill race in the Japanese 
resort. 

The race marks the resump- 
tion of women's competition 
after a pause of nearly three 
weeks. The Swiss were the 
dominant force before the break 
and Walliser. the overall World 
Cup leader ahead of four of her 
compatriots, showed yesterday 
that none of the edge has gone 
from her skiing by producing the 
third fastest time of Imin 
2l.55sec behind Oertli (1:21.40) 
and Olga Charvatova (1:21.52). 


SNOOKER 

Fortune 
smiles 
on Davis 

Steve Davis edged 4-3 ahead 
against Alex Higgins in their 
Dulux British Open semi-final 
in Derby yesterday. Davis drew 
first blood with a break of 30 to 
take the first of the 17 scheduled 
frames 76-30. 

Higgins, drinking lager, in- 
stead of milk that had fed to 
Davis calling him The Milky 
Bar Kid, counterattacked im- 
mediately with breaks of 46 and 
30 to charge through the second 
game 76-0 and then fought back 
from 48-0 down in the third to 
forge 2-1 ahead. Davis levelled 
at 2-2 before moving 40-1 up in 
the fifth. 

Higgins rallied and then rat- 
tled home a break of 30 before 
misfiring to leave the last red 
hanging over the top right-hand 
pockeL allowing Davis in for a 
34 clearance to the pink. Higgins 
parried the thrust by recovering 
again to 3-3 but was unlucky in 
the seventh. He watched in 
horror as Davis first fluked a 
snooker behind the blue with 
two reds left and then later 
fluked the yellow to win the last 
frame of the session 80-40. 

The winner tackles Willie 
Thorne in the weekend's fight 
for the £55,000 first prize. 


FOOTBALL, RUGBY AND OTHER WEEKEND FIXTURES 


football 

3.0 urtass steted 


Scottish second division 

AEbion v E Stirling 


First division 

Birmingham v QRR 
Chaisea v Watford . 
Everton v A VBa .L. 


Ipswich V Leicester 

Luton v Sheffield Wed — 
Man Oty v Oxford Utd 


Newcastle v Arsenal 

Nottingham For v West Ham p 

Southampton v Mai Utd — « 

West Brom v Coventry p 

Second tfivision . 

Barnsley v Middlesbrough p 

Blackburn v Portsmouth — — . — 

Bradford v Gnmsby Town — 

Brighton v Fufftam 


Cowdenbeath v Berwick 

Meadowbank v Arbroath 

Queen's Park v St Johnstone 

Raid Rovers v Stranra er 

stenhsmuir v DunfermBne — 

Sfiring v Queen of Sth 

Vauxhall Opel League 

Baking v Epsom — 

Bfflertcayv Tooting — ■ 

F&mbonough v Croydon 

Kingstonian v Stough 

Walthamstow v Hayes 

Wokingham v Sutton — 

Worthing v Dulwich 
Yeovil v Hitchin 


GREAT MUS WESTERN LEAGUE: Pre- 
uhr Arista: Bktafbrd v Taunton; Bristol 
City v Weston Super Mvk Bristol Manor 
Farm v Torringta Cttippen h e r n v Shspion 
Manet Oanoown v Chant UakeanJ 
Athletic v Roma; MangotsTietd Untied v 
Barnst ap le: Mtttaham v Plymouth; 
pandon Hows r Cfewdon; SaJtssti 

United v Exmouth. 

BURJXNG SCS9E EASTERN LEAGUE: 


C Palace v Stoke — 

Huddersfield v Sundertand 

HuH v Nor w ich , — — — 

OkSiam v Ltifiwafl 



Sheffield Utd v Leeds UW 

Shrewsbury v Cwttsie — ■■ 

Third division 

Blackpool v Bristol cay - 
Bristol Rovers v Swansea 
Bury v Notts County 


Darlington v Bournemouth — 

Derby v Caitiff — — 

Uncoin v Woharhaatipto* 1 — - 
Plymouth * Bolton 
Reading v Doncestor — — 
Rotnemam * Brentford — - 

Wigan v Chesterfield 

Voric vfibffingham 


Fourth division 

Burnley v Peterborough 
Chester v Stockport 
Hereford v Preston 


Northampton v Rochdale 

Orient v Wrexham — — - 

Port Vate v CoKriesfor 

Scunthorpo v Alderttwt — — -■ 

Southend* Mansfield p 

Torquay v Crewe — ^ — “ 

Spottrabpremi^^ 

Aberdeen v Dundee 

DuftSW v Clyfltt*nk 

Huns v Sf Minan — -r*r* — 

Motherwell v Cette . * 

Rangers v Htoaw®*' — — 


OOLA LEAGUE: Altrincham v Banwt 
Boston v Muinona; DagantwnvTatord: 
Nuneaton, v r^onfcS^mdv 
NoUftwrtG Tegprd v WygxnbtL Pty- 

* Bath v Knowing: -Cheltenham a 


imitwheatt Lewes v St AStana uty: 

aresgSgaeBsg. 

Haringey Bot; Va md« jl 

W uh wrtPBvWaraSaea rtdl ^ ^ 
Brack/** v EtisttxxjmeUrtted; Eghamy 

fwfcna: florkwim Htb v rwuiam, 

s&jssrffigs. 

TBarSSd Ath: Sou*"** * South* 

VftytBttattvHtmgtffOrtL 

gsgwwgjyag 

SSSw fWddtirti v Moor. W ? 
jSOBlWftWY * 

Qarinttws v Cai r fymge u« 
WW .www jtoojg Dunstable; 

SSStilfwbrA v . Trowbrldaei 



Scottish first division 
Breehm v Aloa 
Qyde vAKdrto -- 
eijtt jbffinn if E Foa 
Fafcirk vParW* 

Party v Hanlo n - 
Mtoamock a MflrtrtW 
Morion v Ayr — 



Bddog PattolawB Cop: Saoonc. 

Hawn* ROWM* v Gt 'femiouth: Sudbury 
v Colchester united Third ratal ± 
Siovmmm v. r Nb a tows. Laagaa: Bury v 
By City; Clacton v March Town; Gorieston 
a Chattels; Lowestoft v Goftsm Town 
Rangers; Henrico And P v Wisbech; 
Newmarket v Brantham Attu Thetford v 
Brtemrae: Tiptree v Wston. 

SOUTH EAST COUNTBI LEAGUE: Fhet 
dMaton (aB 1 IjO): Charlton v Portsmouth; 
Chelsea v Orient Ipswich v Gasngham; 
mm* v Futiiam; Norwich v Watford 
QPfl • Cambndga Untied Southend v 
Araeoat: Tottenham v West Ham. Second 
dM Non: Brighton w Colchester Untied 
Bristol Rovers v Bournemouth; Crystal 
Palace * WknbMon; Luton v Tottenham; 
Oxford United v Swindon; Readfcio V 
Southend: Somhampcn v Bren tf o n l 

LEAGUE: Coo- 
Tmpfiy: S aa l fi n afc 
i Town: Goaaknbw v 
MeManVMe IN— terdhtetewAih Untied 
v BAe Weybridge; CoWare v ViraMa 
Wtitec Cow v Hwtey; Fleet v Mandfim; 
FricWey Green r Chobham; Hadley 
WtameyvCranteigh; Wesd ietd vFamhem. 
NOrtH WEST OiUifratS LEAGUE: Rot 
dhriteme Accrington Stanley v Leyland 
Motors; Bootle v Fonnby B 
Penrtti emmmti Hanley v 
Gkmop v St H el lin g; Leek Town v 
Wtnsford United; Prescot Cables vQnan 
Ashton; Redeliffe Boro v Idem; 

Celtic v Haetwood. Lan- 
i TVopfqr: Thhd round: 
Wlren Rowers »f" 

NORTHERN COtiNTlEB EAST UWBUE: 
Premier dMetem Anrohorpe WeBare > 
Roflngbem v ThacWey 
s Eas twood: 

Trinity v Hewm; 

AJkanx -Sutton * 

Fkmifi miMt Boston v , 

United v Belpen Guisley v Shefflekt Long 
Eteon United v Bradley Rangers; Ponte- 
(net v Hasten. 

SUSSEX SENIOR CUP; Fomflt remtd 
rept^EastborsTteTownvBognorHe^s. 
SOS&EX CHAMTY CUP; SeanfroaKt 
Three Bridges v Mdhtnt And East- 
bourne. 

SUSSEX COUNTY LEAGUE: FM Jh 
vteidKAnmdWvLancteCMctiastarCEfr 
v Whttelwwk; . Horffiam Ymca v 
Bh o rehem ; Uteehampun v Ringmer 
Ponfiete v Peecehwen^ And Tel*»mtaL 
URTBROW3HS NORTHERN LEAGUE: 
Rret dMakm; Wnghm * 

South ' Bank; Bishop Auckland v 
Untied: Creek Town 

Athletic v . 

Town; Gretna v Brandon United; 
pool « North Shields; Pateriw New Town 
v Ryhcpa Ck Tow Law tom v ay* 
Town v vmflay Bay. 
BMC LEAGUE: 


LONDON SPARTAN LEAGUE; Premier 
dMftaK Amersham Town v Beckion 
United; BeaconeMd United v Den»n: 
Bdmsdown Rovers v Yeadna Crown And 
Manor v Cotter Row, Norihwood v 
Thatcham Town; Pennant * Rw*t* 
Swsiley Town v Edgware; Waltham 
Abbey v I tan w fl Town. 

SURWY COUNTY LEAGUE Premier 
dhriateR AsMoid Town v Spnngfiiild 
Hospltai: Chesslngtion Untied v WMey end 
Dtetncc Dtton F and SC v Marrow; 
London Rre Brigade v Toiwonh; Mono- 
type Sports, v Frmton Rovers; Worcester 
Park v Pyrford- 

BUGBY UNION 

MTERNATKINALS: England v Ireland let 
Twickenham. £45* Wales v France (at 

MERIT TABLE A; 
Go3torth v Sale; Heatfngiey v Nottingham 


JMERJT TABLE BtOrnttv 

Bedford. 

CLUB MATCHES: Bath v Camtoornr. 
Cambridge iJrwversfty » Uchfiekt F Nde v 
Boroughmuir (2-30): Harrogate v Shef- 

Oxford itfWw OTfty ¥ Rugby; RomOhay v 
BtfiMnoham. 

RUGBY LEAGUE 
MTBWATWNAL Great Britain v Ranee 
(at Wigan). 

OTHER SPORT 

ATHLETICS: National men’s cross-coun- 
try championships (at Newcastle. 1JW: 


TOMORROW 

FOOTBALL 

First division 
Tottenham v Liverpool 
Fourth division 
Swindon v Hartlepool 

RUGBY UNION 

JOHN PLAYER SPECIAL CUP-. Fourth 
maid: Postponed: Btackheaih v Wasps; 
Saracens v (koucastar. 

CLUB MATCH: Neath v Waterloo. 

RUGBY LEAGUE 

SLALOM LAGER CHAMPIONSHIP: 
Foamerctone v casdeford (3 30); Hid v 
Wtaarc Oktevn v Hufl KR; Si Hejan v 
HaStex; Swinton v Dewsbury: Widnes v 
Leads. Postponed: Bradford vWWring- 
ton. Second dMUBR Barrow vRiawornH 
----- - V Fuftiem: Cartels v 


J; Keighley v Doncaster; Leigh 

v Wakefield (zaojt Rochdale v Himstet; 
Sheffield E v Workington; WMehave v 
Brarntey. Poatponwfc Mansfield M v 
Bailey; RochdMe v ftensiet 

OTHER SPORT 

BADMINTON: National under-18 

DAHTO Scotland v England (« Playtiouse 
H^BA^BrSfttogurc ariterthead 


English schooigirts' cro&s-country 
raider-18 


d ie rnpkiinsti^sJ I 

mmmm uwpo&v 

Robert Jan kiro(MiqtKtw Sport s Osntre. 

J«wor ri^mpreMtiiMM 


SLO). BrtiUi 


U>15 Boys (at KaHw Sports 
U-15 QMS (4% U-19 


Centre. 9am); 

HOOCE^MF V Hounslow (at Bteham 


Brine North of _ 

Unw Rret Otetekw tahun v 

port Heetoo Mersey V awffleld Urwer- 

sty; IWtor v Chwfe; OH Hdantana 
Stefc Urmsteri v 0W VttOPiiaw. Dmnd 
nneslny Cop: Rnak Ashton B v 

Lonttoi unWersky; Qiipstend v 
Cartridge VttenXf, Ha metead jr 
Httcrott: Keitton v Purte^Srrcood ««- 
vWon; Beckenham A , v Buck ljyte ; Htt K 
Oxford Urtvwstiy v Mtchn; Puriey A v 
KflnHslon A. 

REAL TSNB; ScottMh Open (at Troon). 
SNOOKBfc Duka British Open (at Derby 


refioHlat 

Wrqht Sports Centre, S Wtonde, 
ZIO, Mkflendt si leegoe: Wohrerhampton 
Si Pewrs v Woiw PaiyJ 83_B » George 
Blot (at Wolves Poiv). Mtt ■ mmal 
leegoe: Mmem WNwHdd Me gps » 
Swnd Ladies (at ftathastene Spom 
Centre); Katewood Forum v Rober t Jan - 
tons (at Netheriey Coratnuiwy Schott. 

2.a 

HOCKEY: HA CUP: Second round: Lewu 

v Gore Court (at Fettnam School ,1250); 
Long Sutton v WknUedon (at Fettham 
Scnooi. 11 Sk Disaster v Wtonngton « 
PrescoL IflK Wetcefieid v Sherfited (at 
Presort. 1.0). Third round: Ptctarek v 
Ford; Boumvtte v Trojanss Isca vLecas- 
ter Westagh; Taunton Vale v Often & 
W.W.; Bowdon v West Herts; Wetton v 
East Grinsteatt Oxford Hawks v Beck- 
enhant Bognor v Richmond; Plymaan v 
Aktortey Edge: RAPC v. .Bahop'a 
SWfttord Representative match: Kent v 
Bandtis (at rantathury). County matefi: 
Sucfonoftamsfinv Essax (W Brenowod). 
County mutches- Women: Buckinghem- 
ettire A v Essex (at Cttchesteri: Cartes XI 
v East U-21 (at Bssax Unlvs Coteheeter): 
Lincotesttre v Letoswrstiire (mwadjig- 
tont torfoft v Bedford CHE (at Trtev 


Busy Bee East 
Sussex Open tat Lew raSC); Wjgon'a 
Greater London Ojwnjrtgtnpea SC). 


Final round (at The Rye). Club 
tournament; Worcester dubs (at 


HELLENIC I 
I Abingdon | 
kiondabary 


Town 


r nr - JENIUH 


MsMMM: 

JS^Sj^Land vtSttB^last Ham v 
Sffi^wbrid fl«wnh -Bower*; 

glared v Bdrthssn, 


. v Stawpnasa; Famd Town vi 
Town; Bnnera Lane v Moraton Town; 
Shora w ood Untied v t i a kten h e ad Town; 
SupennHlne v Pagans Juniora; Thwne 
united v .w a nt ag e Town; Yen Town v 
Hounslow. 

<»*»««*£ SENIOR CUft Second 
ESS SfeeearT own v eynsham. TIM 
' — Anatmrs v Osbenai 
.Mprrte Mons v Oxford meet 
t Town v Pressed SteeL 


8 & 


temue: Fkw dMotac Mem OBCRwtov 
raorta (at 

Bembrendi v Redw ood Lo dge ftt Bqrart 

testUftt, BJSOk NwrcealtojiSinS vfcW- 

ory, (at S Moonands LC, 7M$; Spark 
CrebkLogvSpeertMti Rucanor (tt Crook 

Brtovii* v Speedwes Rucanor (at Britan- 
nia LC. 2Jt)S CrtttteStef l Bkimnrtwm 
PPG ua Unhwrsrn of Essex. 5,1 5); 
Ashcambe v Bradford MytebratiarsM 


REAL TDOCS: Scottish I 
SNOOKER: Dulux British 


Busy Bee East 

Sussex Open (at Lewes SCL Wfeon'e 
Greater London Open (at Gtripee 
VOLLEYBALL; Roytt Bank. EngSxh 
lttv»E Rret d tri slon; Mem Lnwpott v 
Capital Cm Brtxm m Bort teSter tan; 
Liverpool tfly v Newcasae 
HatewoodSCi- 

CroHon LC. Z3 0). — . - 

Speeflwofl Rucanor tUnhwarty oJ&BteL 
iLlffi Bntenrw v Bhrangfiam PPG (at 
Britanm LC, Sort v Bradford 


Wftwwich(«£teyiM«Sd*«Cu^ Ashe«rt»v Sate (at BewtjushLC.il ^8. 


OXFORD TORPIDS 

Weather wins again 


Competition on the third day 
of Oxford University Torpids 
was cancelled yesterday morn- 
ing. A notice on the locked 
boathouse door at the deserted 
waterfront summoned college 
captains to a late-night meeting 
to consider their options for the 
completion of two more days of 
racing. 

One college waterman fore- 
cast unrowable conditions until 
after the weekend, but Barney 
Aimslie, president of the local 
Falcon Rowing Club, thought it 
within the power of his mem- 
bers and oarsmen from Oxofrd 
Polytechnic to clear any ice and 
salvage the Imer-Polyiechnkr 
Regatta, projected for tomor- 
row. 

Thursday's bumps: 

Men 

DIVISION b Christ Church text Oriel lh 
Worcester bod Lmcoln. New College bpd 
Si Catherines. 

DIVISION lb Trrtty bpd Magdalen. 
DIVISION Bfe Oriel Ul bpd Lincoln lk 
js Christ! bpd Worcester: Merton 
University II: Pembroke U bpd 
II; Bresenose H bpd Mansfield 

IV: Brasonose II bpd Si Anne's: 

St Catherine's ll bpd St Anne's; New 


I St Edmund HaB ll: St John's 
l Hall ll; Hertford ll bpd 
l bpd BalboMl; Jesus ll 

boo Worcester III. 

DtVtSION V: 5t John's 111 bpd Exeter III; 
Wolfson ll bpd Exeter Ul. Kebie Ul bpd 
Onei IV; OnelV bpd One! IV; Lmacra bfxf 
Jesus III: Lady Margaret Hall ll bpd Jesus 
HI: Tnrtry II opa Wednain III. 

DIVISION Vb One! vi bpd Queen's HI; St 
Peter's H bpd Cnnst Church IB; New 
Cofega ill bpd Brasenose ill; Hertford bpd 
Brasenose IU; Lady Margaret HaU 111 bpd 
Brasenose 111. 

DIVISION Vtfc New Coltoge IV bpd 
Hertford IV: New CoHegeV bpd Lxicoln III: 
St Edmund HaU HI bpd bncoln III: 
University IH bpd Wadham IV. 

Women 

DIVISION t Osier House bpd Si 
Caihenne's: Somenrife bpd Lady Mar- 

E HaD; Wadnam bpd Worcester; Jesus 
it Anne's. 

ION It Brasenose bpd Trinity; 
WUson opd Corpus CnnstL New College 
bpd Corpus Chnstc Queen's bpd Hert- 
hwd; Si Edmund HaB Bpd Hertford. 
DIVISION HI: Sj Edmund Hal bpd St 
Hilda's II; Christ Church bpd St Hugh's III; 
St Peter's bpd Si John's; St John's ll bpd 
Treaty ll; Si Edmund Hal II bpd Trimly II; 
Pembroke II bpd Trinity 11. 

DMStON IV: Urrivwsity U bpd St Hugh's 
IV: Worcester U tod St Hurt's V; New 
College II bpd St Hugh's riftSt Hugh's VI 
bpd Jesus IH; St Catherine's H bpd Jesus 


uf-H 


; Hanford B bpd Tnmty Ilk Hertford ll bpd 
Jests DL 


FOR THE RECORD 


TENNIS 


BASKETBALL 


OAKUMkH 

aecend round 


_ . of CaBomfae 
unlass stared): W Tumcwl 
(Ant) H A Croft (G8) 84. 2-8. 6-t: H Sukova 
(CZ) M A Henrojksaan 8-1. 6-1: R White u B 
6-4, 2-6. 7-6; C Uoyd bt R Loue 6-1.6- 


: VimMe 
radium 
Croft (GB) 1 


UNTIED STATES: Nafletul Aatsdation 
(NBA): Houston Rockets 117. Denver Nun- 
oats ill; Utan Jazz 109. trxfcana Pacers & 
Seme SuperSomcs 107. Ponrand Trad 
Blazers 94; Wasbngton BuSeQ 1 14. Golden 
State Warners 102. 


LA QUINTA (CALIFORNIA): La Quinta Clas- 
sic: tart round: M WUandar (Swe) bt A 
Kneksttm (US) 7-5. 6-1; T Tutow (Fri M J 
Anas (USl Va. 64; Y Noah (Fr) bt D GoUe 
[US)M. 7-8; M Fsrrfors (Swe) bt M Schapera 
' i) 6-4. 7-5; J Nystfom (Smi) bt B Pearce 
6-3. M: B Becker (WG) bt J HtiuttftS 
, 6-2. M. D Pate (US) M M Vajda tpr) 6-r, 
l;JComors(US)KJYzagt(Pen46i.6-2. 


CRICKET 


n 


SHEFFIELD SHELO: Queensland 240 tor lour 
(R Kerr 1 02. K Wesseis 92. R Holland 4 tor 46) 
« New Sown Wales Dwonport Tasmana 
234 far seron (E Hams 49. D Buckmgnamcai 
v Verona. Perth: Soutti AustraM 2*6 tor « (P 
Steep ns not our) v Western Auaraha. 


GOLF 


BADMINTON 


RHEMHONHAUSEia Weal Genera Open: 
Metre Ito tp ra: rift rou n d. WShaby (Den) DIP 
Sutton (Wfid) 15-11, 1S-4; Permed (Indtt W 
Knudean Den) 8-1 S. 1M, 15-12; T Carfcan 

M tH PMwwtty (Netn) 11-15. 15Z 158; 

sen (Don) bt Susamo (Inda) li-1 1 . 15-9. 
Thomsen (Den) Dt S SevnAov (USSR) 15-5, 
l5-1;Kiouma(todo)WKH»ctwr(Auoirta)9- 
15. 15-8. 15-7; IMranata (Indot W G Robson 
(Noth) 15-7. 15* M IGrideen (Den) bt H 
fisaw (Aussia) 15* 1516; j Henwrdn 
(Swe) R G Treidngar (WGi is-7, 19*S-B 
Peril (S Mart M Manato (moot IH. 15* K 
Brodereen(Den) R Sannes (Neth| 1 S-*. 15 * 
N Ymbs (Eng) bt Ruessater (WGj 15* 15* 
B+l Q 10 I (SKor) bt F Hodamns (WG) 157. 
15-2. Women'e NnjtieK flnt rent Y-J Kim 
ts_ Kort tt J McDonald (Aunt 11-2. 11-ft F 
BWtfegiMH Krimieueiwb) I 1 -*. 1 7-5: L 
Saw-Lawfateen tDem a Bauson (USSR) 
12 - 10 , ll^-.MHLnreKortRMBonrtsan 
fl* iMiSHYbolSKori MGGowera 
11* 11-4; C Mamusson (Swe) bt 
. 1 (PW) 1 1-4. 11-47HTn*e (Engl W S-Y 
Chung pKo04-11.11-fi.il -3. 


HONG KONG; OHheyPacifte Aten Second 
rewtt 140: hmIi vuSnu (Tait 0 Turner (NZ1: 
J Rudedga (Can). 143: k TakanuM (Japan): 0 
Black life), ho Mng Cnung (Tfaj. Part. Sn 
wan (S wn 144: 1 Baker-Fmcn (Aush G 
Brand Jr (GBl: S Gmn (AusL B Jones (Aus); C 
CoQkson(GB) 

CORAL SPRINGS (Roridat Honda CUaato: 
Fk»t round (US unless Stated) Knew Cft 

C Rodngues: w Glasson. 69: E fin M Rert. 
P Stewart T Sntnscn. a Beaa 7ft j Muact C 
Ron, 6 Hoc ft. R Street: M McCumoec B 
Fabei. p Blackman K Fergus. 7t: j Deism- T 
Weskopf: K Moe. H mm: T Purcer. 7i J 
Simons: M Haves; R MgrRry; A Magee. G 
Bums; B Urtzke: C Sutter. W Rogers: M 
Sufcvan; A NOrtfr. B Gattner M N<ttMU; C 
Perry, R Gauer. W Pwrot; T Moms. 


ICE HOCKEY 


NORTH AMERICA.- National Lamm (NXU 
New York Rangers 8. Pmsburgn Angiins 1 
Wasimgton Capaais Z Bason Brians 1. 
Calgary Flames 7. PrMeoe49ft>a Fivers 4. 
Cttcago Bteck Hawks 6. Los Angeles Kmgs 3. 


NORDIC SKIING 

Bronze for 
Britain 

By Michael Coleman 

Martin Watkins led the Brit- 
ish 10 another warn bronze 
medal in the 30 kilometre race 
which brought the Lowlanders 
championships to a conclusion 
at Oslo yesterday. 

Louise Mackenzie did like- 
wise for the women in their 
10km event: but nothing could 
stop the French, the tall, 
bearded Eric Vaurs gathering 
another gold, his lime of lhr 
22min 33.9sec being more than 
three minutes faster than any- 
one else, and Valeric Laurent 
leaving the other women strug- 
gling 

The Lowlanders contest is 
consigned to countries or re- 
gions which have snow for less 
than two months of the year 

RESULTS: Woman's lOkras 1. V Lau- 
rens [Frt, 32:131; 2. M Gudbaurd (Frt. 
34:00-9; 3, J Snepnard (Aus). 35:00. 
British pteemar B. L Mackenzie. 3621.3; 
7. S O Mafley. 36.223; 16. J HoDowgy. 
39:18.5; 17, D Chamberlain, 4036.2. 
Teams t. France. 1:41:34.1; 2. Denmark. 
130:434; 3. Seat Bmam. 1:5202.7. 
Men’s 15km: i. E Vaurs (FrL 12Z333: Z 
T Klausen JOenL 1 35.40.8. 3. M HeJmann 

a 1:25.50.2 Brittaft ptedngs 4. M 
ns. 1:2633 A 5. J Sootswood. 
1:26:29.6: 10. A Wyhe. 157:30J: 11. K 
Smth 157S1A 15. P Winterton. 
1 2923 4: IB. B Muirtuad. 1.29:10Z' 19. E 
Mackenzie. 129:16 3. 

Teams: Franca 4:16-33.1: Z Danmark, 
4.1BJ1.0; 3. Great Britain 4^0:62. 


OLYMPIC GAMES 

New Delhi 
withdraw 

Lausanne f UPI) — New Delhi 
withdrew their candidacy for the 
1992 summer Olympic Games 
yesterday, reducing the field to 
six cities. An official at the Swiss 
headquarters of lhe Inter- 
national Olympic Committee 
(IOC) said New Delhi had sent a 
message saving iack of govern- 
ment "backing tod prevented 
them from pursuing their bid, 
but they hoped to try again in 
19%. 

Delegations from Amster- 
dam. Birmingham. Brisbane, 
and Paris presented their official 
bids vesierday. while Barcelona, 
lhe favourites, and Belgrade will 
be pulling in (heir claims today. 
The IOC will make their de- 
cision on October 17. 


vi 

v 


k 

kV4 


r 


in 


b 


1 


•3s 


t - 








12 


SPORT 


THE TIMES SATURDAY MARCH I 1936 


CRICKET: WEARY ENGLAND GREETED BY PROTESTS AND RAIN 


TENNIS: BECKER RECEIVES SIXTH WARNING 


Delay is an omen for Gooch 


The England team turned 
up at the Queen's Park Oval 
here yesterday morning Tor ihe 
sum of their three-day match 
against Trinidad to find half a 
dozen demonstrators awaiting 
them. When rain stopped play 
after an hour's play, some 50 
of them were gathered across 
the road from the main gate 
chanting anti-apartheid slo- 
gans. England at the time were 
37 for no wicket. 

As disconcerting to the bats- 
men were the open ing overs of 
Tony Gray, who bowled with 
such success for Surrey last 
season. Several' balls lifted 


From John Woodcock, Cricket Correspondent, Trinidad 
awkwardly at Gooch, two. of than 10 hours to move from 


which he edged low through 
the slips for four. The pitch 
was sufficiently- well grassed 
for ' Nanan. /Trinidad's one 
Test player/tS put England in. 


21. and playing his first game 
hotef to hotel. Having regis- for Trinidad. A tail left-aimer, 
lered in the early - hours of he becomes one of only a 
yesterday-morning, Gower was small handful of Tobagans to 


losing the toss - soon after 
breakfast. The crowd was very 


have played first-class cricket. 


but it was-aoi fast. Gomes and ! small, a consequence no doubt C/>nrnhnnrH 
Logic, the two Tripidadianstm .. of, the boycott, and the weath- MVUicuuat u 

f kn' oe t ' 1 bi>caAii 


the' West InattfB. v Test ■ e^soon dereriorated- 
pAny^were nrisan^Gbrneyto; /Jn-the^xuiespondUig.mafch 
take a nest and Lope because /fryc years ago, the first day's 
of a stomach ailment. • - ' - ' /'/.jrfay was washed out after only 
The worst pair-of England V- three overs. Oh that occasion 
visit here so far was the flight . Gooch made a hundred- Yes- 
from Jamaica: With stops' at ..terday he had reached 2D by 
Puerto Rico. St Martin. Ami- the time the nun closed in. 
guaand Barbados, and defays-Gray's opening bowling part- 
all along the line, it took more ' ,ner was Games 'Gilman, aged 


• EMGUUHfeFtetWntags 
<3 A Good) not out 


RT Flabmsan not out . 
Extras ~ 


Total (no wkt) i — 

*D t Gower. O'M Smith, Vf N Sack. P 
eh. J E 


N French. J E &nburay. P H 


: A Foster and L&TaylOr to 


ITONKMOs P V Stmrnons. M I 


. . .1 R Mw rtf su n. 

N Gomez. A Rajah. DJ Mohammad. M 
nan. D WBkams: A H Gray. G. 


Bodoa. "RJHanan 
Gttnan. Q MatMDWr 

Uniplwa e UHosam sp SJMQhamneO. 



^Nicholas 
more tours 
abroad by B teai 


Mark Nicholas yesterday 
urged the Test and .County 
Cricket Board (TCCB) to send 
future England B teams abroad. 
Nicholas spoke forcibly in fa* 


submit our reports 
umpiring, but it would not be 
unreasonable to say that things 
went against us on that score: 
England in addition to not 


vour of the tour to Sri Lanka in - winning any of the Tests, went 
which all five unofficial Test down 3-2 in the one-day inter- 


Deraonstrators line the way as England's cricketers arrive 


Border and Waugh 
keep Hadlee at bay 


Christchurch (Agencies) - An 
unbroken sixth- nickel partner- 
ship of 1 50 between Allan 
Border and Steven Waugh res- 
cued Australia on the first day of 
the second Test match against 
New Zealand here yesterday. 

The pair came together 
shortly after lunch with Austra- 
lia straggling at 74 for five after 
an opening burst by the New 
Zealand fast bowler. Hadlee, 
and they took the score to 224 
for five at the close. Border, the 
Australian captain, was 84 not 
out. and Waugh, aged 20. whose 
previous best score in three Test 
matches was 1 3. 65 not out. 

Australia lost five wickets for 
17 runs after another fine open- 
ing stand by Marsh and Boon on 
an excellent Lancaster ' Park" 
pitch. They had put on 57 runs 
when Marsh was -bowled by 
Hadlee shortly before lunch. 

After the break.. Hadlee 
quickly picked up the wickets of 
Boon. Ritchie and Matthews to 
take his Test career tally to 306, 
one behind the mark of Fred 
Trueman. Chatfield chipped in 
with the wicket of Phillips to set 
the scene for Border and 
Waugh's rescue operation. 


Waugh was dropped early at 
third slip off Troup, but there- 
after mixed sound defence with 
splendid driving. Border played 
a typically gritty innings, mixing 
care with powerful shots in his 
stay of 236 minutes. 

The Australian pair prospered 
as the New Zealand attack lost 
its edge late in the day. Finally, 
the New Zealand captain Co- 
ney, who had asked Australia to 
bat. took the new ball for the 
88th and final over of the day. 
Hadlee, who finished with four 
for 78. immediately troubled 
Border. 

AUSTRALIA: First Innings 

G R Marsh b Hadlee 28 

D C Boon c Coney b Hadlee __ 26 

WBP^TOcSnwthbOnrtfiekd 1 

"A ft Border not out . : 84 

G M Rncfte Ibw b Hades a 

GR J Matthews c Smith b Hadlee 6 


matches were drawn. 

On his arrival back at 
Heathrow airport. Nicholas 
said “There is enormous value 
to be gained from these tours 
with the right structure. I shall 
cenainly be advocating their 
continuation in future years. 

“The most value gained is by 
the players on the verge of Test 
cricket. On a seven-week trip 
like this, you can learn more 
about many aspects of the game 
than you can in a whole season 
in county cricket." 

Nicholas continued “For a 
bunch of new tourists, it look us 
a month to knit together, but in 
the last three weeks our cricket 
was outstanding.“lfthe tour had 
gone on for another month we 
would have been a formidable 
outfit. Unfortunately we suf- 
fered one or two early defeats 
when we were not ready for the 
strength of the opposition. 

“I do not think we played too 
much cricket in such a short 


nationals, prompting Nicholas 
to add “It was not particularly 
successful in playing terms. We 
drew all the five Tests, but they 
were played over four days and 
the local dements made ft 
difficult for us to achieve victory 
in three of them. 

The Worcestershire wicket- 
keeper. Rhodes, was the unqual- 
ified success of the tour. 
Rhodes, released by Yorkshire 
in 1984. averaged 48.66 in the 
first-class matches, as well as 
being an inspiration behind the 
sumps. 

Nicholas said “The outstand- 
ing plus was Rhodes without 
question. He is the most out- 
standing young cricketer I have 
played with or against, since I 
began playing cricket in 
England." 

Rhodes was, however, in- 
volved in a flare-up in the final 
unofficial Test when he was 
convinced that he had caught 
the century-maker, Tiflekeratne, 
off Lawrence. 



a nojsie 
attitude to 
Games 


•T 


Boris Becker* the reigning 
Wimbledon champion. Is seen 
in action during his third- 
round victory brer Jos6 
Higneras in U Qmnta, Cati- 
fornia (Richard Evans writes). 
For the fifth time in fire 
matches in the United States, 
Becker was ttffitaaly warned 
under the “no toaefeuv rate* 
and after the game said be and/ 
his coach, Gan ter Bosch felt 
they were being victimized. . 

Ion Tiriac, of Romania, is 
Becker's manager and a 
man far from popular with 


Americnur -> grand . prix. 
offialdom Jtlrith Johnson, duty - 
supervisor hi La Quota, de- • 
nied any victimization of ; 
Becker, bat said an official 
had “dearly detected** Bosch. . 
making hand signals to Us. 
player. Tiriac disagreed, say- 
ing; “They treat yon . tike a 
child and just quote rules at 


protested, be was . told that 
Becker himself had been seen 
making . head -gestures -to 

Bosch. “So now Becker is 
apparently not allowed to coa- 
ch his coach. They are on* the 
look-out for him," Tiriac said. 


Paris - To inflate tfrU global 
awareness of their bid to host 
the 1992 Olympic* Games, the 
Paris committee is inviting 
t00 foreign journalists with 
experience of big events to 
spend two days inspecting 
tfceir planned facilities in a ■ 
months time. They arewelt 
aware that, with the t bids i 
formally lodged with ibe Inter- - 
national Olympic ComHattee - 
(IOC) yesterday, the -heit is ■■ 
nowon. 

Yet thw offeror fide accent- > 
modatioa to aticmnpethorsftxrr 
the Paris village is possibly.* 
misguided. Birmingham - are'-' 
prepared to offer the same, bot J . 
have been advised tbatv tbe-; 
IOC -consider th» can encoars - 
age Olympic “tourism". Nev*. ’• 
ertheless, I found Alain Danet. 
the executive president of tfce^ 
Paris committee* in 'an opti- ■ 
mistic mood in his "offices at 1 , 
the Racing Clnb de France thfe^ 
week, even tf .beneath tifc* 
surface there are some prob- v 
fems for the French cg ididacy.^ 

“Paris does not aeed the - 
Games in order to be Paris*” Z. 
be said expansively; vut if Jje\ 
was exercising a certain. . 
tone superiority over Binning^ 
ham, who ceold blatne ton? 
“We are the only candidates: 
with a deficit built iritti onr 
budget. We do net want ^ to-: 
make money. We are offering' 
the ‘Games to the Olympic 1 
family is the centenary of thfr/ 
foundation of the IOC because : 
we betiere ir is time to. have a*-' 
rest from' boycott and contra-'. - 
rersy.Tf we are not successful ■: 
this time we shall noT^te** 
bidding again,**,. - 

These are loobte i^tim^fesL-. , 
Yet Oanet. . and -Jacques ” 


West German reporters at. 
the tournament are staking y 


you_Uhey are so inc 0 $istent.it- bk play of the fact that, as 

L L!^ a Jf 


is terrifying.' 

Later in the day Becker was 
waned a sixth time, while 
partnering Slobodan 
Zivojinovtc .. When Tiriac 


there, .are .no big American 
stars now, apart from Con- 
nors. United States' officials 
are trying to keep- Europeans 
from becoming tosuccessfuL 


space of time. The balance 
between playing and resting was __ « 

2iiJS Kent profit cut 

Kent County Cricket Club's 
annual report, to be presented to 


ATHLETICS 


ts J Waugh not out Cu 65 

Extras (no 8. <b 2| IQ 


Total [5 *»WS) 224 

tT M Zoehrer. R J Bngnt: D R GBMn 
and B ARetd io bat. 


FALiOF W1CKECS: 1-57, 2-58, 3-58. 


SWUNG: Hadlee 234L78*: Troup ISO- 
580; ChatfieW 22-HW5-1 . Sraoewea 16- 
7-21-0; Coney 7-0-26-0; Crowe 2-1-40. 


BraoawnH.GB Troup. E J ChatflakL 


high 

batting and fielding. Their one- 
day sides would be among the* 
best fielding outfits in the 
world." 

- The manager. Peter Lush, 
echoed the views of Nicholas 
and will be rftaking a favourable 
tour report to the TCCB. 

As a new touring captain. 
Nicholas was understandably 
diplomatic on the question of 
umpiring, which appeared ad- 
versely to affect England in the 
Tests. 

Nicholas added: "We have no 
concrete complaints. We did 



members at this month’s annual 
meeting, reveals a net surplus of 
£1 .704 last year compared with 
£32.261 the previous year. The 
county's own trading resulted in 
a deficit of about £218,000 but 
this was offset by their share of 1 
money received from the Test, 
and County Cricket Board of 
just over £219,000. 

The report said the main 
reason for the setback was that 
during the year they instituted a 


The - English 
country" ch. 


By Pat Butcher, Athletics Correspondent 


in 


senior, cross- . winning the Belfast' raofc 
amptonships on January. (985. “ 

Newcastle’s. Town Moor this.: - - - * ; - 

afternoon should be ihe moist... However, after , exactly- a 
open and exciting, race for sennet, years , poor results* Hutchings 

re-emerged with'** win 


Cram, will ^not chance his 
slender legs in a race, which be 
.was. only ever gping to Treat as-.] 
an extended. training. ran. 

The real* -opposition ft 
from 


their catering operations. . 

No plans at present to alter law that has stood since 1744 


Mar- - 

S te v e I -express* 

Lewis has wo n I te : - % nni i ^W** - 

English-domestic races this wirt- PariS iwo TfutchiOs. Dave MurpfiyrandJoo facb- 

ter, and has opted to miss, said yra^yi.^h^ver ^was artfa. all fa^fthj a Strong chance 
today's “national” ond rely < i- «r .u*. 

savings scheme for capped play- j gening one of the three places 
era and had paid £212125 into it { the world cross-country tea 
Kent had also made a loss on 


22-yard pitch remains in favour 


said 'yesterday: y> 

. . - .- -- - - • shwJ<i 

the 

... x 

that the selectors now leave , dauy. foods and red meat, is to ' next month, 
open.- ^p wergftt.trammg. AruLIVe.- Hackney, who worrthis vears 

lost over half a stone aad.feel a- —«-.*• — -i. « -• 

lot better for it But I do think 
the race wjll he a bit qf a lottery 
on the hard, kfy ground, f bright 
even pull .out if J think. its 
dangerous.' and hope tfyai ' the 


England’s batting problems 
against the ferocious West In- 
dian pace attack have once again 
raised the question whether the 
traditional 22-yard cricket pitch 
should be lengthened. Those in 
favour of extending the pitch, 
perhaps lo 22 metres (24yds 2in) 
argue that batsmen would have 
more time to focus on the balL 
Injuries, therefore, such as the 
recent one to Mike Gating, 
might be avoided. 

At the moment the Test and 
County Cricket Board have no 
plans to debate any increase to 
the pitch's length. It was dis- 
cussed five years ago and they 
deckled it was neither desirable 
nor necessary;. “I know all the 
arguments, though, and 1 am not 
saying that the door is dosed for 
ever more,” Donald Carr, the 
board's secretary said. 

“But it certainly is not a 
subject being talked about at the 
moment. I personally feel a great 
deal of experimentation would 
be necessary before anything 
was done." Mr Carr added: 
-England woaM certainly never 
act unilaterally on this sort of 
thing and the matter would go 
through the InternatiooaJ 
Cricket Conference." 

Those saggesting the change 


always point out that the pitch's 
22 yards is the game's only 
measurement which has re- 
mained unaltered since the 1744 
laws, the earliest surmmg code. 
While wickets have become 
higher and wider, and the ball's 
circumference and weight have 
varied, the batsmen has always 
stood within the same range. 

This makes no acknow- 
ledgement of the fact that man's 
physique and muscularity have 
developed over the past 250 
years, bringing a further dis- 
crepancy to the balance between 
bowler and batsman. A *ist to 
any museum visit where clothes 
or armour from bygone ages is 
on view will confirm the trend: in 
the early 1 700s an Englishman's 
average height was hardy 5ft 
Sin. 

It has risen to anxrad 5ft lOin 
today with consequent increases 
is strength and coopted, of 
coarse, with advances in sport- 
ing techniques. Only recently in 
athletics, for example, the sport 
has changed its specifications 
for the javelin because the 
throwers were achieving dis- 
tances which endangered on- 
lookers. 

In Test matches more and 
more fast bowlers are now 


bowling the ball at speeds pitch to 21 metres (22yds 2ft 
reaching 90mph, faster than iO^in). 
ever before. It must be remem- Top cricketers tend to he 
bered. too, that the distance*, conservative in their approach to 
from the ball leaving the - law changes, with seif-interest, 
bowler's hand, to where the predictably, never far away. 


However, ibe likelihood is 
that the.first eight rather than six , 
in today's rare will be selected 
for the world charopionships-in 
Neuchatel on March 23. since 
Lewis is .the only one with, 
sufficient credentials' to be in- 
cluded without competing to- 
day. 

Lewis himself nominates 
Hutchings for victory. Follow- 


Belfast rate from the Paris] 
winner. Roussefax. is ' in an 
invidious position today. For he 
could become English- cham- 
pion and not go to- Neuchatel. 
Although Hackney fives in and 


^ •• competes for Aldershot, he has 

for V 


batsman waits, is usually nearer 
20 yards than 22. 

Jon Henderson, a former 
Renters cricket correspondent, 
once calculated that a batsman 
has Q.4S5sec to react over 20 
yards against a 90 mph balL The 
time- rises to 0-497sec over 20 
metres. In this context .the 
additional 9223 per cent more 
time for a batsman's reflexes to 
react is significant. 


Self-interest 
never far away 


Before the. 1744 laws the 
teogth of the pitch tended to vary 
in different parts of the country 
but 22 yards became the most 
commonly accepted measure- 
meat. It was almost certainly 
derived from the old fashioned 
chain measurement then used in 
a gri cu lt ure. If 22 metres is 
considered too drastic , an in- 
crease, some people feel a start 
could he made by amending the 


Fred Trueman, the former En- 
gland fast bowler, for instance, 
came near to apoplexy some 
yeans-age when lengthening the 
pitch was suggested in his 
presence. 

It would mean inevitable 
adjustments for everyone, not 
least spioners and seam bowlers. 
Compensation could be provided 
for them, possibly, by enlarging 
the stamps again or reducing the 
bat's width. To laymen these 
adjustments might seem small 
matters bat cricketers under- 
standably acquire a “feel"- for 
soda technical issues. 

-. A classic example, often cited, 
came at Chesterfield in 1946. 
After Derbyshire had faced two 
overs against Yorkshire, the 
pitch's length was queried by 
Leu Hatton, so the story goes, 
from as far away as deep third 
man. ft- was remeasured and 
found to be 24 yards long and the 
game haiho be restarted mi a. 
pitch of legal length. 


races as proof of form.’ - ; run for Wales, in the pasL Bui, 

NfQSt .Of the . ice has .efis- . . having missed the world 
appeared- from the Newcastle championship for the last, four] 
course, 'but the organizers ’ate year^ihe selectors, have ,'qpr-i 
ing his second place in the 1984. arranging for dozens of helpers sponded by not selecting him fori 
world cham pionship. and his to I read-down the thick snow Oh their work! championship team. * 
fourth in the. Olympic 5,000 . some pans of the three mHc lap:- And ibis, despite- Hackney,-beai- 
metres later that year.' this morning. However, those ing Steve Jones in the Services j 
Hutchings ran well in .sub- _ conditions, allied to-;anotb«r.- cflampianship- : fa 5 t weekend, 
juent cross-country* evebts, -'ankle injury' sustained fn triun- * HBckney’is the only mten to-beat 
fore suffering a largely .ing last Monday will probably Jones in the Welsh champion- 
inexplicable loss of form after mean that the local hero. Steve ships in the last 10 years. 


who, as leader of. the 
right-wing. R£R party, « pre-^ 
paring far- a general election .V 
next knows. that. a_.- 

mood - of generosity and a- - 
concentration on^rench sport-. ; 
ing, phOosophical andaritoral 
traditions' is their strongest 
card with the IOC and agftfqst 
the Spanish-Latin holy ‘ .of 
.Barcelona. Daaet is aware that 
at least a quarter of the IGCs 
-92 memberemay beiadmed to-- 
vote for a country, oca. -city, 
-such as Spain or Bindfogbam ’ 
which have not had the Games 
previously as^ Paris havehatE '*■ 

The French betiere they wifi 
'have solved theft* irttu^pfot? 1 
problems by the use of Sprictal 
“free rates” similar to thtose 
already in use foe buses' 2 pid 
taxes, and by an exdhsftify 1 ’ 
during the Games. of Tihe_ 

" 'resswayonffiebA'rfTWB*' 
finJong the prttoosieif 
new main stadium at Bqts'de * 
Jincennes, the villagtCaiid , 
indoor sports palace, lit jw^rej, ? * 
.god the teunis > _j5''#aU^ ar& 
equestrian events at' ffie south 
.west of the Bois de Bout^gne. v . 

The difficulties in ebrng^ric 
- son with Paris and Barcelona. v 
apart from international 
awareness on which they -are 
working dHtoently, k finance. 
The Paris Committee has ;a .? 
guarantee rf half its expenses 
from the government; Bir- 
mingham, who estimate they 
urbeseT 


Jones cashes in on Boston offer 


<vin.>,UKvuiiuiicair lOTy unu ..wunu» ■ juuta . uiaw*.y gying D^CK .IO VX'iJ, -~ . .' 

raUiorc runner, has ac- revealed his ambition fowin the- . besnin danger of folding in the a S a,I1 f , •^- 
.hatisbeUqvedtobelhft nve. -imema^qnal rcfassic" > pasj.. three, years since the fra-. , than Barcelona, \yal 

»vnr flmvflrtirif#* mnnpv Jtm itiafstf hnTii« HA hnc nlrv>aJv a-nn JifrnnoVirt nroAw;^ ' ;■/ filin nf ih 


RichardStreeton 


Steve Jones, the world's lead- 
ing marathon, 
ceptedwhat 

biggest ever appearance money 
offer. S 100,000 (£67,5001. to 
compete in the Boston Mara-’ Fukuoka in Ja 
than on April 21, which means ‘ and'Bostdri. 
that he will not be defending' his' 

London title the previous day. 

Successive victories in the 
Chicago Marathon, including 
his 2hr 7min I3sec last October 
which was one second outside 
Carlos Lopes's world best time, 
has made. Jones the most de- 
sirable acquisition on the mara- 
thon circuit. - 1 

After his 'second Chicago vie-' 


ByPat Butcher, 

four ..months ago. -'Jones. 


histo^-gqing. b?tck .to FS97, has 


CTJJ- De setf-fiaancing not: only ^ 

faa+e sifoe, ' 

£250 million - the television ^, 
rights fees they can expect out 
of American prime time. They. ^ 

Uy^seceive.oo'u&Td thmrJEf^R 

million. 

Danet J4as alsq^ I snsbect, 
made a n&scalatiatMHi tfbout 
tetecornmnukatiqiis. He sug- 
gested to mq ffiatTiris , WealS 
have greater protection 
piracy, of ito ; satellite 


marathoirfs- H^./ias already .won . di((piiaiisj organizers tried io 
Chicago siod London. Which left ‘ keep ir an- amateur e^im: and 
■New York " refitsfed.-.' to pay 'appearance 


Before leaving for a rpad'racb'. 
in Phoenix today. JoneS saidi-It'^ 
waS always my 'intention idrtiri : 
two marathons th H986. the'-' 
European championship race in 
Stungan being the main, an* 
bilion. Having studied .all . the 


money.:. prize-money dr -even 
expenses. ■= «■ 


But faced with the ipfrrstige 
garnered by Chicago arid* New 
York with, their big budget races, 
the Bostpn city fathers and other 
race, backers stepped in, after 


options. I've decided that Bps- another mediocre field last year 
ton in tljc spring would be the and put more than Si minion 


best challenge. 

The Boston Mdraifton^with a 


, into' thtf budget ftrf 'titis year’s 
90tif^hnlverisa*y-race. '■ 


By Michael Phillips 

While the cold weather has 
stopped the valuable and often 
informative Tuncform Chase 
from being run again at 
Ha>dock Park today, nothing. I 
am glad to say. has prevented 
the same stable's annual review 
of the Flat season from appear- 
ing on the bookshelf. 

while some will regard £49,75 
as a lot to spend on any book, let 
alone a specialist subject, the 
qualification does not apply to 
Racehorses of !'*S5 which." has 
been published today. For. like 
its predecessors, this blest vol- 
ume is a world leader in its field. 

The annual runs to half a 
million words, contains 400 
photographs of last season's big 
races and best horses and deals 
in 1.060 pages with more than 
7.000 horses. For each there tv 
an individual commentary 
containing every fact of con- 
sequence be it age. colour, sex. 
breeding, distance, going, plac- 
ing. conformation, racing 
record, analysis of character and 
rating. 

The elite — in This instance 
120 or so — are dealt with in 
essay form with no punches 
pulled when it comes to criti- 
cism and tw praise too great 
when it merits. Whether >ou 
agree or not with the opinions 
expressed it still makes compul- 
sive reading 

On 136.'. the Derby winner. 
Slip Anchor, who tiiey.,a*ns«lcr 


RACING: LITTLE HOPE OF IMMEDIATE RESUMPTION BU T NATIONAL HUN T FESTIVAL ORGANIZ ERS REMAIN,;QPTI1MISTIC 

Manager dismisses 
Cheltenham doubts 


Pebbles given star billing in annual review 


one of the 4 m»Ktfn>etwprl£s^ 
(teqt^dkt^.tlug araT-tetfs 
that* by WZ Bbxielopa's- ^ 
technolrwy/irooM probably . be .*• 
ahead of any country fa E»- 
. rope otter than WestGenfi*-’ >& 
ny - and they tesides, '» 
hayf^ ^the sdvauta^e bver I^ris . 
and Binoitlgl^uirof frite eve- ■*’ 
ning sbdaic^to^wh^jyBL^ 
accommodal^ -Starting 
conventeat- to afternoon -week^ v 
end- viewing in America which ‘x 1 
will be worth, Say. another £3^ H 
waffioif'- on' -fte 'television ,K 
' rights. ‘ : - ' -• *; * -\t» 

The main nmlilaL ft., a!.-:, -'ll 


however, ties ^-with. Atetrilie, . J. 
France's bid. " 





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Games, ft is., certain that .the w 


s. 


the best middle distance horse, 
has the highest rating of any 
horse .but Pebbles, rated just I 
lb below him. gets the accolade 
■' Timcform Horse of the Year". 

Their other aririudl awards 
have gone to Huntingdaie (best 
two-year-old colt); Femme Elite 
(best two-year-old filly); Never 
So Bold (best sprinter): Shadeed 
(best milen and Oh So Sharp 
I best stayer).. 

During their essay on Pebbles 
the authors say that the decision 
to persist with her as a five-year- 
old is most welcome and under- 
standable. Proof of her slaying a 
mile and a half came at Aque- 
duct last November when she 
wop the Brcedere' Cup. and this 
gives her trainer more scope to 
plan her campaign with a wider 
range of targets, including the 
King George VI and Queen 
Elizabeth Diamond Stakes and 
.possibly tfie Prix dc I'Arr de 
Triomphc as well as the top mile 
and a quarter events. 

■ “Providing she trains on". 
Time form rays, n will take a 
truly exceptional horse to beat 
her. We rate her as one of the 
.best middle-distance fillies in 
.-our experience, the equal of 
Coronation V and Dahlia and 
only marginally behind Allez 
France." They believe that 1985 
was a vintage year and that 
along with Pebbles. Never so 
' Bold. Petoski. Shadeed and Slip 
Anchor also made valuable 
contributions to its excellence. 


to me one of the top 10 sprinters 
to have raced in Britain in the 
past-war period. 

Slip Anchor's performance in 
■the Derby marked him - un- 
mistakably as superior to the 
general run of Derby winners: 
his time figUre-an exceptional 
1.70 fast— being by some way the 
best recorded over any distance 
during the season. 

The men of Timeform also 
heap praise on Oh So Sharp- 
While conceding that her win- 
ding lime for ihe Oaks was one 
of the slowest in recent years, 
they maintain that the time 
value of her performance was 
exceptional after taking into 


account the conditions under 
which it was recorded. 


Shadeed* gets high praise and a 
good , rating on account of the 
way that he won the Queen. 
Elizabeth II Stakes at Ascot in 
September. That established 
him dearly as a miler of the 
highest class. At Ascot his time 
figurc-1 -24 fast— was the fastest 
recorded by a miler during the 
season. Looking ahead to the 
coming Flat season. 1 searched 
the pages for dassic hints and 
unnearthed the following tit- 
bits: 


1.000 Guineas: Baiscr Vole 
(winner of Prix Robert Papin 
and Prix - de' La 
Salamandrer:--Takihg every- 
thing into consideration we 


IOC - would- jsutr contemplate Xo 
approving tw French cities : 
simultaneously and CIffltc -t 
Tias “already' said titer ft is 1 - 
’’ffieoessaiy. to fcavfToaJy c*nd£ 
flo4b vn.i_rv_.S- 


Ahhoi^ft bboftritalreiiFtite*e' : ^wearife£-is forecast, there is Unte 
reduced their odds from 5 20*1 to -' prospect- of racing .'making an 

... 2-1 against any. of foe three days imo^ediatc. resumption. Stew-.*,,-- - 

believe that with another year . pf lhe ; National .Hunt. Festival arris at. Winder and Leicester, j “"“v Bah|tei^; j^aj^t v - 

over her head. Baiser. Vole yrill be called, oft &frvard t where racing is due to iakeplace 1 ™ an Oi ' (he AHreftVifle .% 

probably Stay a mile and could tiillrinie. inc miwriI manaver nn Mnnit,, inlinUim. hru. ■+ l iunimltM ■« _*"-- 

well follow in Ma Biche's exam- 
ple in the Guineas:*' , optimisne aomit the " meeting respectively. ■'* •' [ withdraw. However i fewK>ri«^ r ‘ 

“» ■ ^ ass - ^sI.-'!!®iSsRSK.s 

e §« start talking a bo u Lite meeting -“Frankly, we -need a miracle, to 
u_: “ v'- saye our final, jumping meeting. 


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The Derby. Bakharoff (win- 
ner of the William Hill Futurity 
and second in the 
Dewhursir-.May even become 
the first Futurity winner to add 
the Epsom classic to his tally". 

The Oaks: Midway Lady 
(winner of May Hill Stakes and 
Prix Marcel Boussacf... Is more 
certain than most of the leading 
two-year-old fillies to stay a mile 
and a half and is an excellent 
prospect for the Oaks.” 


Gay Harwood, trainer of 
Bakharoff, who Tiraefonn 
say may lie the first Futurity 


Never So Bold, they consider- - winner to triumph at Epsom 


2.000 Guineas: Truly Nure- 
yev (beat the subsequent 
Dewhurst winner J-fumingdaJc 
in the third of his three 
racesJ”...The fast three winners 
of the 2.000. Lomond- ET Gran 
Senor and Shadeed have been 
either sons or grandsons of 
Northern Dancer, a likely can- 
didate to extend that sequence is 
Shadccd's stable companion. 
Truly Nureyev. 


. _ _ up . 

two-year-olds as a whole 
brains behind Timcform lake 
different view to . the Jockey 
Club's handicap per. Geoffrey 
Gibbs, who judged Huntingdaie 
io be the worst Dewhurst winner 
since the international 
classification was instituted -in 
IQ78. In rating him -132. 
Timeform ’s scouts have put him 
above the average of most 
recent winners and so paid the 
overall crop a compliment too. 

5ure Blade and Bakharoff 1 are 
only 21b below Huntingdaie. 
Interestingly. Sheik Moham- 
med. the owner of the Cham- 
pagne winner. Sure Blade, 
bought Truly Nureyev during 

the dose season for what ! 
imagine was a far from insignifi- 
cant sum. Ahmed AI Maktoum, 
one of Sheik Mohammed's 
brothers, is the lucky owner of 
Wassl Touch, a.bcauufully-bred 
but lightly-raced three-y car-old 
colt. 


being off already.” Mr Gillespie 
‘Said yesterday. "We "only need 
some rain, or two to three days 
of milder weather — the festival 
is still 1 1 days away. 

“Ideally we would .like, the 
..thaw lo-set In early ncxriweek so 
that Sundown will be on and 
people -can get back' into the' 
swing of things. But even if the 
weather is still bad next week- 
end we would not consider 
calling. off Tuesday's card until 
Monday afternoon at the 
•earliest.” 

• Although slightly less cold 


ambitions for the future and beX 
needs Chirac’s -"patronage;- ;■ 
Sanguine French, observers 
expect an eventual tadt deal 
leaving Paris in die dear. 




Jterid Miller 


If it is lost it will mean that eight 
of our 1 1 days this season -wilL 
have been abandoned, making 4 
our worst winter.” ■- 

. The .Windsor., deck . ofu.lhe 
course. Hugo Sevan, said 'yes-, 
tenjay: *There is no- snow hut 
the track rs frozen and .the, 
chances of racing are remote:” 

In Ireland, the Leopaidsfoi^.fo?y^^^.' : ?*^fCTCErrS: Squash 
stewards will inspect at '2pm to foe Olym- 

tomorrow io decide the fare of - - 

Monday's card. Today's Nairan Beits 
meeting was abandoned because 
of frosL 


New dates for point-to-points 


Roceh first's of IQRSf£49. 
Timeform. Halifax, ttest York- 
itun\ HMl l.XEi. 


. The state of foe ground on ail 
the courses where poinl-io- 
points were scheduled for today 
.was such that none survived 
after inspections yesterday 
(Brian Bed writes). This makes 
a total of 30 meetings out of 33 
either postponed or abandoned 
this season. 

New dates confirmed are: 
March S: Hurslcy Hambledon: 


West Percy. Match IQ: BicesU 
and Warden. March 1 5: 'ML. 
Ferry Fanners: Oxford UmVefri 
sitv. April 5: West Shropshire, 
April 26: Mendip Farmers. " 
The Beaufort. Pembrokeshire 
and South Cornwall meetings 
will be held at a later date but 
the Easton Harriers and South 
Durham, have, been abandoned 
for this year. - - 



‘has 

^Britain. 

■5 k: 


t inclusion 
be pan of 
mine in foe 
recognition 
the Inter- 
Rackets 
in 1967 
.(including 
its 56 


ro?- have 
Englfsh- 
successn-xs, 

undefeated 
scored lyf 







RUGBY LEAGUE _ 1 




GB lose 
three 
key men 


■a*. 

nO 


lw ? a l!?r a/ Jl beiwecn En ^«wi ^n»*»andCirvcNorimg.foe 
a no Ireland tad been akcn matt* referee and the man 
yesterday-, the thought inevita- who can decide, after today's 
Wy «we- as to whether it game has started, how soon it 
wood be one of Engtantfs w»swp. 
lekyU or Hyde days. We haw w^. ^ . ■- 

bad one of each *o far this „r .»!??* 3^?°^ c *»“ n ® 11 
season and, amid the freezing 

easterlies which win btiflS smted thc^pfaying surface as 

Twickenham today, it would ^S£ pe L!*2L bea ^ r ^ n on 
be a wanning ihoughuo know Thupday.btil workwifl fooa 

thal&^rtwS^ySthS lodtty-w*jn tte 

spun which typified ttoetr win ^ ° ve f L Th l 

over Wales in January. otify pfaymg enterpn m such 

3 cases is whether there is any 

Both coantries have played danger to the players and if it 
wch m pats this season, yet becomes obvious during the 
here are Ireland with two Same that icy patches are 
defeats under their beh and forming I have no doubt that 
lhe five natinntriiamp^^ Mr NoriingwiUcaS matters to 
gone all but mathematically.- a halt. . 

England, ^fter their brave- Fnrhmrf Iuilt mint j rT..rrr,. 
start reacted to defeat against 

M * elfter - . 13 allows only underexcep- 

When you mix m the wind tiooal arcumstances. But 
which wiR protaWy dominate eves -dw most accurate of 
the game ami ensure that it is . kickers may find conditions 
played almost completely ua~ trying, so who knows, we may 
der the Wert Stand- the area have a game decided on trio, 
of the ground wfaach has taken Both sides will welcome a 

the most u n fr eezi ng — and referee whose decioona will be 
Ireland's iU-fomme when they made manifest Ireland have 
had to make a late change to been handled by an Australian 
their side yester da y, then any and an Englishman, England 
predictions can go out of the by an Australian and a New 
window. Zealander this season and the 

.Enghnd^y^B^k 
of England ground yesterday 
and EehtmT indoors at St 
Paul's School, Barnes. neither 
team knowing whether Jre 

game would go ahead.- Offi- ^ -V,, nT. r*Zr 
dais from bJSammia in- * 

spected the playn^ surface »«*»**- 

shortly alter Ipm, among • Doyle sod Martin Green, 
them DesMcKibbm. Presi- h» English counterpart, 

TODAYS TEAMS AT TWICKENHAM 


England 

G H Davies IS 

0*wpa» . 

ME Harrison 14 


FJ dough ' 13 

(Cw*tM0»tMn. : 
KQ Stans 12 

tCwOriSWIMiS 

«, RUndyrwood :: fl 


NOMaMfe* 9 

IWWP4 * 

GJCMeott.. ... .. I.' 

/ 

SEBnria 2 

ICowKyJ 

GSPaarce 3 

(NorttempMl 

P 4 Winterbottom 6 

W A Dooley 4 

iw i owupwg 
M J Cddouflh 5 

(Sn rwaa) 

GW Row 7 

(TtHV*“U**-”*) 

/ D Richards 8 

(Lai r— e r ) 


Fid Back 
ngbcwfeg 

. ’ - C 

epvcmiv 
Left centre 

leftwfng 

' .Standoff 
Sorarahaff 

.ipip: ; •. 


Ireland 

BPWcH— 


RPKeye* 


A P Kennedy 
g tara toto ~j : 
CFRagerald* 

pr wf j cu ww 

DCFRqMM 


DC Unfean 

(Cork CoraOMon) 

BWMcCal 


mucwnauiAMo 

iTSWnMpNhk^m 

a o hmW <nw » 

S<no>a«(S*i«): 2t p w 


Ranker 


m£ noting (WMH} - 

£oo!fc- y * T HWW rgi 
eJ! 2^Sjm?S3wrSIi» 


Viiirwa rntj. MUC III I7VJ. UUU1 

in the back row which is the 
area where, I imagine, today’s 
game. win he won and lost 
England have reshaped theirs 
and will have no idea how it 
will geO until some way into 
the game. Much will depend 
on now Rees and Winter* 
bottom adapt to the demands 
of playing left and right. 

England played two open* 
side flankers in two toor 
matches, tn New Zealand last 
snmmer.an experiment which 
worked in the first match but 
not in the second. Bni Rees is 
a hdMayng forward and 
- Richards an effective support 
player, it would be no surprise 
to see a lot of dose support 
work between half backs and 
bade row since passing mil be 
a risky business in the coodt* 
tkms. 

The leadership of England's 
pack has passed from Brain to 
Cofckwgh who must ensure 
that the bigger home forwards 
give Ireland a testing time; 
The Irish lost Kearney yester- 
day when he woke up with a 
strained hamstring; he is re- 
placed by Marrow, the Bangor 
back row man who won a cap 
against France last month. 

Ireland's back division is a 
known and threatening quan- 
tity. England's less so. particu- 
Wy in view of the fact that 
many of the players have not 
had-a game of rugby for 
several weeks outride of inter- 
nationals. Clough's praises in 
lhe centre have long been sung 
in the North but we may not 
see the best of him or any 
other thieeqnaner today as a 
constructive attacking force 
because I think conditions will 
enforce a forward-dominated 
game; 

It is no use pretending that 
it wfll be easy to pby an 
expansive game whatever the 
wishes of players, c o a ches or 
crowd. The weather wBl see to 
that. For England it is much 
-like beginning the season all 
over again. Settling m the new 
radi. doing the basics correct- 
ly. dusting off the psychologi- 
cal cobwebs of their disastrous 
last outing at MunayfiekL 
: Jxefcrad need to convince 
fhcmsdvex that afl of last 
season's achievements are not 
completely losL Five of 
England's ride today were not 
involved against Wales, only 
six weeks ago. even as replace- 
ments. I have no qualms 
therefore, about inviting read- 
ersto select their own winner - 
and bear in mind that it might 
be the weather. 

Cup inertia 

Saracens have been forced 
to postpone their John Player 
Special Qn> fourth round tie 
Mama Gloucester for the 
third time: The game had been 
rearranged for tomorrow, but 

the Southgate pitch is still 
froz e n. No new date has yet 
been agreed. 


*r* 





soar.^w _ fr 

-T-w ^ ’ ... 

, m ■ 7 

..... -§ 

, : 7 : v. ' l 


Men of dedsfoa at Twickenham: Clive Nbrling (for left), the referee, and Bob WefghiU (far right), secretary of the RFU, 

sped the pitch with other officials. Photograph: Hairy Kerr 

Welsh can win with their wits 


By Gerald Davies 


France do not travel well to 
Cudiff That much has to be 
said. Although they won two 
years ago. it needed all the nous 
and experience of a much 
travelled campaigner (not to 
mention his deepnnooied am- 
bitious personal reasons). Jean- 
Piene Rives, to focus the 
energies of the other 14 players 
in absolutely the right direction. 

The victory had taken a long 
time in coming the time before 
that was 1968. More than any 
other side they perform indif- 
ferently away from home, which 
is one reason we should not 
presume too much of them in 
foe World Cop next year. For 
now. it is a mixed reception in 
Cardiff the passionate heat of a 
home crowd who are beginning 
to think that this season may be 
foe start of something big (well, 
biggish anyway) in contrast to 
the chill wind which will blow 
and has been Mowing for the last 
month and which has bitten 
deeply into foe Arms Park turf 

If it is remarkable foal Wales 
find, at this stage, foal (hey are 
involved in some kind of 
championship decider, it is just 
as remarkable that fob game 
should be played at alL It will 
not be exactly comfortable out 
there fob afternoon; nor will it 
be' that much bttter for foe 
spectator. 

If the sweet-smefting whiff of 
the championship has never left 
foe Frenchmen's nostrils, foe 
Welsh team, after several years 
in no-man's land faltering even 
on their patch, are once more 
gening a sniff however deli- 
cately or distantly, of something 
more potent in foe air than the 
immediate result. 

There b nothing blatantly 
convincing about foe challenge. 
No doubt some of foe players 
will wake up fob morning 
feeling pleasantly surprised at 
the prospects ahead, which once 
had been so bleak and un- 
promising- Without really ever 
establishing their authority, they 
have been borne aloft by foe 
kind of confidence foal comes 


from knowing that whatever 
they achieve will be a bonus to 
what was originally expected. 

Welsh weaknesses at forward 
are still there, although there has 
been some improvement since 
Twickenham, but so are there 
strengths in the back division. 
They have survived on their 
wits, which is just as good a way 
as any to survive and quite often 
infinitely more exciting. 

Once it was the French style 
too: but under their coach. 
Fouroux. whether by chance or 
design, they prefer to plan well 
in advance. Only then do they 
find, usually loo late, that fot 
game plan, as originally envis- 
aged. needed to be changed. 

It b based on their heavy- 
weight pack, and making heavy 
weather of matters; it b the likes 
of Blanco and Sella who remind 
us of the great charm of French 
rugby, and prove it to be their 
winning ways too. So it was 
against Ireland that they la- 
boured for most of the game 
only to let their hair (town at the 
end to gain a substantial victory. 

Charvei and Bonneval. 
appearing for the first time in 
the five nations championship, 
may be part of that style. They 
scored all five tries in their 
dub's win over Toulon in last 
year's French championship. 
Charvei b a stern tackier, too, 
and there to counter the mid- 
field threat posed by Dcvereux 
who has twice now. orchestrated, 
by Davies with Bowen as decoy, 
created tries by his powerful 
running. 

Dubroca. persuaded by 
Fouroux. will lead foe charge 
from foe front where they took 
the Irish to the cleaners, an 
exercise they could well repeat 
against Wales wbo are vulner- 
able in the scrums. Though 
Wales have improved here, as 
they have done steadily in the 
lincout. it b a fragile confidence. 
With foe immense height 
advantage or Exbani. Joincl and 
Champ at the beck of the line- 
out. it b Waters who needs a 
good game and to curb the 
threat of Condom in foe middle. 


The signs arc that France are 
simply too powerful at forward 
for Wales to make much im- 
pression; but then that has been 
the recurring story throughout 
the season so far. Yet. having 
lost the major portion of the 
contest up from in each of their 
games. Wales are still m conten- 
tion for the championship. 

Whatever the pros and cons 
of possession, they still only lost 
by a* whisker at Twickenham, 
they survived- against the 
marvellous Scots, and. in Dub- 
lin, are the only team so far to 
win away from . home. The 


French will be aware that there 
is no wide platform upon which 
Wales can perform .comfortably, 
but they have learned to 
manoeuvre precariously and 
excitingly on a tightrope wire. 
For all their desires to run. 
though, they do know that the 
safely net is there in the shape of 
Thorbum's bool. 

• The wing three-quarter Phil 
Lewis of Llanelli dropped out of 
l he Welsh team late yesterday 
because, of illness. The Cardiff 
centre Robert Ackerman was 
called into the squad. 


TODAY’S TEAMS AT CARDIFF 


Wales 

P HThcxbunt 15 


AN Other 
J ADevereux 

(S Glamorgan tnsQ 

B Bowen 

(South mm PcSce) 

A MKecfiey 

(CanStfJ 

J Davie* 


15 

Full Back 

France 

S Blanco 

15 

14 

Right wing 

(Btarrxz) 

J-BLafond 

14 

13 

Right centra 

(RaongCkjty 

PSefia 

13 

12 

Left centre 

(Agan) 

DCharvet 

12 

11 

Left wing 

(Toutoun) 

E Bonneval 

11 

10 

Standoff 

(ToutauseJ 

G Laporte 

10 


(NMft) 

RN Jones 

9 

Scrum half 

(Grartet) 

PBerbizfer 

9 

(Swansea) 

J Whitefoot 

1 

Prop 

(A0en) 

P Morocco 

1 

(CartSfl) 

WJ James 

2 

Hooker 

(Monttanund) 

D Dubroca* 

2 

(Abarmon) 

IHEktman 

3 

Prop 

(Agan) 

J-P Garnet 

3 

(Caftfff) 

P Moriarty 

6 

Flanker 

(Lourdes) * 

E Champ 

6 

(SlMflMU) 

S J Parkins 

4 

Lock 

fT«*x$ 

FHeget 

' 4 

{PontypooO 

DR Waters 

5 

Lock 

(Biarritz) 

J Condom 

\;5 

(Newport) 

DF Pickering* 

7 

Ranker 

(Boueau) 

OEriram 

7 

(UtneB) 

PT Davies 

8 

No 8 

(Agan) 

J-L Joinef 

8 

(Uanelfl) 



(Brtve) 



RafwM; B A Andsraon (Scotland) F 

REPLACCMBTrS; 18 M H TRtoy REPLACEMENTS: 18 B Hwwv (Hot*** 
(SunM); 17 M Oaccjr (Swanssa); 18 M 17 P-€ DMr (Moms); 18 L RotMguaz 
H 4 Dougttt (London Wefehfc 19 L (MonHteMw sw ft 19WMoe>a(Bfiy^20 
fume): 20 M Mohan* (Nun* P Lagtaptm (Bayonna); 21 M 
21 M Jonas (Neatn). E Wi h a nqn i (Pax). 


Scotland B 
aiming 
for treble 

ByfattMcT— rM— 

The Scotland B team bate 
travelled to VUdferaeterar- 
Sadnc ho peful of comparing 
their foiid victory over F ranro 
at this leveL The pm* hasaljgta 
covering of snow but the French 
are confident of foe gen* bong 
played tomorrow. 

The Scotland rejectee* nkw 
followed foe me paddba 
with fob team a* they da d wga 
the senior ride. The props, 
David Mime, yraer brother 

Ktumzngera hot foe locks, 
Hamilton and Parker, aremofe 
it home in foe ba±m then m 
foe boiler home of foe wm It 
most be seip rerec d ape* fo*“» 
however, that foe work m foe 
tight b vital for sa coeit - 


David Hands looks at England's investme nt in a man creating a tradition for dob and country 


Richards makes his point 

i~E SSS.SKSL'C S.££SS2S 


S S StjMg SSor^ rfnse 
in wage* to pby fer Efj fr** 
sad fen so wflfingty; he 
acce p ts with wry eqasmmdy 
Aahdt mari i *n Mra —te » 
few ham after finishing a 

StrS.’&s-* 

SsSTTSSrt 


He h«* crane to ial i rnafre a 

1 Hfri data* Lekvstec, wh* 
have ■* ffead repe rafien fer 

S^^Lntyinro^ years. 


forwards wha have phjei far 
foe dak in foe last 38 yens. 
Richards, who wins Ms first 
cap against Ireland at Na£ 
today, is gratdU far foe 
interest taken by each as 
Graham Willars, bow 
Leicester's coach, and David 
Matthews, who played mere 
times for foe dab than anyone 
dee. 

Rich ards bin his fort h fofl 

pfoyri for Engbnd Schools 
See times fa mi, alo n fMr 
Eras floojh, who alee wins 
his first cap today, and a 


meat for foe recendy-retixed 
Adev. He did rafDcfen tty wefl 
in 1983 to wfo an tavtatei to 
play for foe B arb a ria ns and a 
place hi England's Under-23 
Tow to R«nia when he 
played - for the only time 
before today - with Gary Rees 
as his flanker and Nferf 
Mdvflle as hie aerarn haK, 

If he was disappointed to he 
overlooked by foe Midlands 
for fob season's di v id e nd 
championship he masked it 
wefl. He has ca a ridetih l f 
respect for Graham R a b bin s, 
foe Coventry NeJI who was 
nicked ahead sf Mm for diri- 


■ C m I 


a iricktt! ahcrel rf ten 


of Bath, the mb with 
i he may wefl contest 
rad's Noi shirt for same 
of John 


end of Mas for dvi- 
Hitrj a n d wham he 
ices. Bat Robbins's 
s Coventry's style; 
b n faster phyer. 




Problems 
ahead 
for Ulster 

By George Ace 
Toddy's Ulster senior pro- 
gramme, according to tbe fix- 
tures book, bears very little 
resemblance to the one that will 
take place, weather permitting. 
Already ruled out by frozen 

B icbes are: Ballydare v Queen's 
Diversity. Collegians v Omagb 
and Enniskillen v City of Derry. 
Extremely doubtful are: 
Dungannon v High field, 
CTYMS v Fortadown, NIFC v 
Skerries and two lumtiJy ar- 
ranged fixtures, Malone v Ards 
and Instonians v Queen's 
Upiveirity. In the "reasonable 
hopeful category is 
Ballymena's away game at 
Btackrock, while another re- 
arranged game. City of Derry v 
Armagh has reasonable pros- 
pects of being played. 

Of greater concern to the 
Ulster branch is the 
postponementof next weekend's 
Senior League semi-finals, 
scheduled for RavenhiH, be- 
tween Instonians and 
Ballymena on Friday evening 

and Ards against Bangor on the 


By Keith Macklin 

Three of Great Bn tarn's most 
experienced players have been 
forced to drop out of today's 
international match against 
France at Wigan through injury. 
As a result. Great Britain have 
to make a positional switch and 
bring in four new caps in David 
Laws, Kevin Rayne, Neil James 
and lhe substitute, Tony 

Marcham. 

The full-back switch is a 
calculated gamble by the Great 
Britain coach, Maurice 
Bam ford. In place of Mick 
Burke, who has withdrawn 
along with Harry Pinner and 
Jeff Grayshon, Bam ford moves 
tbe Wigan winger, Joe Lydon, 
from the wing to tbe No. I 
position. 

Lydon has played foil back for 

Wianes and at junior inter- 
national level, but the move 
involves a risk by Bamford that 
Lydon may break down with 
one of ihe injuries that seem to 
have dogged bis career during 
the pasi 12 months. Since 
signing for Wigan for a record 
£100,000 from Widnes. Lydon 
has played only a few minutes 
reserve-team football, and there 
is also a question mark against 
his .total match fitness. 

Great Britain may miss tbe 
combined weight, of experience 
of Burke, Pinner and Grayshon. 
but once again there b plenty of 
running in the' side and the Hull 
Kingston Rovers winger. Laws, 
has both pace and determina- 
tion. Tbe new forward caps, 
Rayne and James, are also 
strong runners, and Great Brit- 
ain certainly have the power and 
speed to break down the French 
defence. 

However, Bamford is well 
aware of the threat posed by this 
new- look French team, who 
have improved remarkably 
since the Australian-born coach, 
Tas Baitirri. took over. Bailieri, 
according to Bamford, has in- 
stilled greater discipline into tbe 
wayward French, has tightened 
the defence, and has introduced 
several tactical ploys such as 
diagonal lucking for fast 
wingers. 

Much depends on whether 
France fall foul of the their 
notorious inability to travel 
welL Great Britain were rather 
lucky to get a 10-10 draw in 
Avignon a fortnight ago. bat 
French sides tend to fold up 
when put under pressure away 
from home. If Baitieri can 
motivate the French at Wigan 
today Bamford and his team 
will have their hands fulL 

BOBSLEIGHING 

Gamble to 
earn 

dividends 

From Chris Moore 
KOnigssee 

Nick Phipps's gamble of 
changing bis crew on the eve of 
the four-man competition at (he 
world championships here like 
paying dividends here today. 
Phipps brought in Lenny Paul, 
the Array sprint champion. 
From Maik Tout's crew for 
yesterday's final practice which 
was reduced to only one run. 

Phipps, a physical training 
instructor in the Royal An- 
glians, who ran (0.4sec for the 
100 metres in this year’s Army 
championships, took over on 
the brakes from Alan-Cearns 
who moved up to no.3 in place 
of Colin Harris, a former Great 
Britain high jumper. At their 
first attempt the new-took Allied 
Sted crew pushed their best stan 
time so Ear of 5.26sec and are 
confident of going under S.20sec 
today. 

Their final practice tune of 
49.72sec was only the tenth 
fastest overall, bur Phipps was 
still well satisfied having had the 
disadvantage of being last but 
one to go. 

"Given a reasonable draw in 
the race 1 will be looking to 
finish in the top six," said 
Phipps, wbo admitted he was 
taking a risk in changing the 
crew at the last minute. "It left 
us with only a minimum 
amount of time to practice with 
Lenny, but bis extra speed made 
all tbe difference." 


IN BRIEF 


Yorkshire switch 

Yorkshire county cricket dub 
have switched their three sched- 
uled matches at Bradford this 
season to Headingley while 
ground improvements are car- 
ried out at Bradford. The 
matches affected are: John 
Player Special League v Somer- 
set (May 4); Britannic Assur- 
ance County Championship v 
Warwickshire (June 28-30) and 
v Glamorgan (August 9-12). 

Mendis ruling 

The Test and County Cricket 

Board disciplinary committee 
has rejected allegations by 
Sussexthat Lancashire made if- 













14 


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THE TIMES SATURDAY MARCH I 1986 


O'NEIL DONHELL0M Or John 
Of 21 Mwr Ldiw*. Eshni. slid 
dmly an 2bin FrMniary 
•frarly mi rd huuund of Mar 
got and (altar of Cai 
■CrIlRiiir) and IMit Rraui- 
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Esher. loan Fn&a 7th 
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boom* drsirad nnrMokwy 
Vmiutr, Omura I ri Cbm 
Molnn. Sonar. 


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onu SIB* <3 8 utori iHaunrai 
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Cams 
iflM iiiolH 3rd March. 
I h n iw M M ft amnnrt A 
Bow. «2 Odd sum. Samoa 


BIRTHS 


lo airMM 
Ryani and Coward. a dough 
Irr. Jutta Morearrl 
Rosemary al ihr Portland 
HospRaf. London on Febru- 
ary 77Ui. 

BAILEY on FrOruary 23rd 
1 986 al Mih* outre. Id Mary 
Lou iwr ErUuonl and 
non. a daughlrf. Lauren 
Elinbrih. 

BUC MU on 77lh Frtruary 
1986 ol wuuam Money 
HoidUI. Ashford. KrnL lo 
Plow infr Hrakrtit and 
Room, a daughter. Hannan 
Loose. 

SIMM on 24 Feb toSltefie into 
Pant, and Graham, t 
Darren Mirhari. and thanks 
to Royal Burks hommui 
CMMUI WW an 27lh 
February lo Kalie and John, 
a daughter. 

MXMLAS on 24 th February 
al Whdttngton Hospital ro 
Kathryn inee Kennardl and 
Atasdav. a daughter. AUrr 
Jon e. 

DUCKWORTH • to Hillary and 
Sarah, on 21si February, a 
dau ghter. Laura Rebecca 
FELL OWES on February 27th 
al The Roue Maternity Hos- 
piiai C f bWdgr m John and 
Alison a son. Charm. 
NARMNO-ROBCim to Penny 
and Peter, a daughter. Cam 
rune Louse i kaUri. 

HUDSON - on 2Mb February 
lo Jane into Leslie MeUHiei 
and Philip, a daughter 
Susanna. 

POLLARD On 1 1th February 
la Anne 'nee BnwKk) A Do 
stdason Beniamin Thomas 
ROBERTSON on 214 Febru 
ary ut Rms de Janeiro fo Jane 
into Semen and Rootar. 
son. Both weu. 
f MOTOR on February 24th to 
Adrian and Katharine iner 
MadJryl. a daughter Angrh 
ra. staler to Thomas ana 
Hugh 

WATSON an 2IM February to 
Epoy i nee Parker) and 
Charles, a daughter. Emily 
Eiuabeth. A staler for Zsa Tsa 
and a ski-ing hoi May for ut 
all ne*l year. 

WHITAKER On February 2Bih 
at Milton Key net to Sara into 
Lowei and Rimard. a dainm- 
ler. U»cy Clair Victoria, 
usirr for Sophie. 


al St Pars Cathe- 
dral On 27m February load 
ewrfrih at the Sue Ryder 
Hum. UtUangnn Court. 

Irr m tana 
wbh write 
68. much 
tas«d and impeded Print. 
Fraser ni at Si James Cfnnrn 
Origgapa C ampden Thurs- 
day Marc h 6n al i.aoora. 
lulhn id by crrtnauoii No 
n m»fi al hta request, dotia- 
taooe M deatred lo Church 
IIUMonaij' Sortery or Can- 
Ca m pa i gn. 
Sen ire in 9 


STSOet to rear arriimiibiaoii 
jM 90.000 Cri Vriur JOraox 
C30.000 Often oh C5 OX) 
ruO Oeuifv Mr rial 8, 5 
W iM rete n M Poole BHli 
tBWMMM nun- Iqimih-. 
Hrmrrel. ror.il. mubti 
4trM on C87S Ol 777 4914 
WAMTCD: Anlmue Wjjhmg 

Cuo Tel Ol sea B9»>8 rjiiv 
mormiigs o* nr*. 


MUSICAL 

INSTRUMENTS 


net 0306 0606*6 or Ol -730 
6019. 

WMJUR0OR on 26 Feb 1166 


DEATHS 


Cnwneflsw *rttkltnon O BE. 
betas rd buriiand of Dttys and 
dearly toted father of Bin. 
Oat id and Sony. Service 
AnsirOi Parish Church. 
WigrifRrif. North York 
siurv. Tuesday 4ih March 
torn No flowers please, but 
aonaiiana to Alan Yales. The 
Thor arte UnH Research 
Fund. Guys Hospital. SCI- 
WR.TSJORC on Thursday 27Ih 
February 1986 peacefully M 
High Wyco mb e General Hos- 
ptlaf. Sybal Normah of High 
View 58. The Sraighl Bit. 
Black writ MriiiL Bucks. Cre- 
mabon OiiRems 

Crenuforlufti 3.30pm. 
Wednesday Sth March 1986. 
Ftowers W WJf. Easterling. 
Braybraofce Hoad, 

wargrate 


PlMnunullv 
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pnm Ol 485 1805 
BIOMWAT uarMhi. fun insiru. 
menl. good (ondilMM. Cl 300. 
Trl Ol 874 3095 


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DORSET. HANTS*. & 
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REONSTOtUC HARTS hu dr. 

larnrd Hour for imimui lei 
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HEART OF ENGLAND 


WSAR LUDLOW Timbered barn 
romertee into 4 beaulnul boll 
taav rouagn »T-t A*. aid m 
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HR STRATFORD LPOK AVON 

Cmi re Atresler atlraflitr 
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IN MEMORIAM 
- PRIVATE 


YACHTS. PLANES & 
SPORTING 


LAUHOtnr FACILS 7 

immie ilii. 
n mew F»fVl uw. rarass 

0 27 2010 Hoinnor.ucTc 
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(Mrkinir. t90 U-* oWm I mo 

627-2M0 HoniFMfjloi* 

RW 1 bntrin Hal errepi .haMi- 
1*4-. C70 pw ni rim too, 627 
3610 flemrloi alms 
SW l bedrm Hal. leerp. PH. nul d 
°**. CaO p*. Others too. 677 
36 10 Ht m nnaw* 

WO. L usury 7 brdroam. 3 luw 
1 rami lui Ml iur Co Crd 01 rU 

Llm p — Ol 370 0730. 

WEST END! I I— dm.fLM ueMh. 
rrrrni. i*Mm. CO? a*, oil— r* 

677 2610 Hon—tordlort 

mm. HAUTITUL 1 noubir 
bedracm Hal. 1— *»lv fleroi alral 
■npiian Vilrtni balhirawti. 
Cl 50 per -seek. Tel 366 0041 
PKD-A-TnfOL Lane mi er Calr 
dbinrdim.ireeo- pniah-patio. 
HlkiiM Full. Inmrshed 
CMzsk 10401 150700 
ST IMHS WOOD | bedrm 
bill ilen flat O-sn i-m/amr 
KaH. reeeo I uiurl person 
HOP W. Tel Ol 263 6069 


Entertai nm e n ts 


LYRIC HAMMERSMITH hi 741 

2J1I li.-« 7 45 wm SLlls. 2 30 

!».ls 4 o A 7 45 

DOtW LUCIE'S 

PROGRESS 

Iteerlert In OnM Hne n 
lie-aiinrn In 6»| W Rgu 

LYRIC S7UDW Em OfM rirawpC 
SATIE DAT-MCHT by Arirtaa 
MA<tefL Directed bj RWiard MR- 

B— . Onteta bf Tw TtlPp. 


ST MARTKrs Ol R3o 144 i sn- 
■ ui ft: h» jwotw iiiaso 
I lie. ? 45 Ml 5 O .mil H 4 

34IS yr mt A&ATMA CHmtlTt 

THE MOUSETRAP 

semrv no 1 rtlirrr-i prnrs licrni 

| an*- 1 ml — al* hmih.imr 

11 ran CJ 30 


LTWC THCATKf Mullrslnm 
,t»e U | 01 437 3686 T Ol 4 34 
1090 ('t: Ol 434 1550 Ol 734 
3160 7 rust Can 74 hrurr 7 ilat 
■ * lw*ine Ol 740 7200 


STRAIT ORlMfPOM-4 VON. 
ROYAL SMARESriEARC COM- 

PART.07H9. 39So23 Bra-kiim 
mens 5 M.aab Inr ke*. -w-.paai 
him hew Swan rhralrei s-nri 

vU inr k-aiKS 


A AMANDA 

LCRMCR A LOWE'S MUSICAL 

GIG) 

ixrecleil In fotw Dev lei 
~Cl nrinj min 'lima riot** 

appijii*e" nan* l.ipiss 
Lsvs 7 30 Sals SO 6 8 13 
is re Mais So 
Ctntip Sams Ol 930 0133 


STRATFORO UPON AVON Re* al 

Sh.iki-4K-.pp Cnmbetii .07891 
799623 Braikrnq* wh 3 j*|. H , b 
lot Nn» Sr.naa tmrliuliirtj Npw 
ThTdlroi wrtMl b ■% I. i or 

ItrIM 


THEATRES 


01628 8795 f 658 

Mori hue Itam Bpmi 

MAKOKARC 


C OMPANY 

BARBICAN THEATRE the 

S.1ERA* WIVEhOr WlhDSUR la 
das 3 OO A 7 30 RhC. ROYAL 
HVhL RANGE ARMCHAIR 

PROMS 3 8 Marrb slalK *eals 
C4 5 0 Ir ani 8 SOam on Ibe oa* 
THE PIT PHIUSTINCS BN Masim 
Corkv Ion! 7 SO MELONS hr 
Bernard Porarrari- -an -sll dor 
dinar* uon" Tunes tills atari 6 
Mar 2Pm 


t Etas Off ire 

01 930 7378 Firsi Cad Ta-bour 7 
•ias re Mg* Ol 740 7300 
(2LXMOA 
J AC H SOR 

ACROSS FROM THE 
Garden of allah 


Dnmrd try _ 

Evg* Monfi, SOSat 3 SO L 8.30 


LTTTELLTON "S' «» 7237 CC 
• Ndlio.ua rnealie's prasreiNum 
slaia-i Today 7 IS How pr*rr 
mall 4 7 45. (hen Marrh 12 In 
IS THC BUCttOd OF MALF1 
bl krtwn Man 7 45 ihen 
Maim 4 a BA Maim 70 lo 35 
MWHTC 

MAYFAIR S CC Ol 6 
SOSo 741 9999 Mat! Thu 

r«t mi 6 ao a a 10 

RICHAR D TOD D 

LAROCR AHRCTTK AND 

THE BUSINESS OF 
MURDER 

The bri Un-urn bv R—tiard Ham* | 
"The best mnUet k* veers'' S Mu 


THEATRE OF COMEDY 

COMPART 

"Tne \ err best at Bnlau.'s rmnK 
Lrirre ■ Dari. Mail 

WIFE BE CMS AT FORTY 
See Ammssad n rs Thealie 
RUM FOR YOUR WIFE 
Tier miernn Tlvsalre 
WHEN WE ARE MARRfCD 
her Whitehall Thralie 
A MONTH OF SUNDAYS 
See Durhrsa Theatre 
SHAFTESBURY THEATRE. 
NOME OF TKS THEATRE 
OF COMEDT COBPPANT 
See —oar air riurv 

VWKVEU,W<2] Bos OIIKr 

ami CC Ol 836 9967 5645 

I trsa CeO -CC 94 turn 

Ol 740 7700 

ties 7 30 Wed Mats S 30 

bats 90 A 8 15 


TONIGHT 
of 7.30 


Box Office] 

01-8363161 
Credit Cords j 

01-2403238 


mmm 

BUTTERS 




'ENO has cDMtmrimiwr 
on Its hands" Punch 


SWDBTtiUli 

C&SOlramMSI 




COTTESLOC ■S’ 976 2237 CC 
National TheaffrY (man 
auriiloriumi Today? 308 T 30. 
Men. Tue 7 30. Inen Marrb 75 
4 26 THE ROAD TO MECCA by 
A I hoi Sugaid Presiesr* Marrh 
B lo IS Ooem Marrb 17 al 
7 OO Then Marrh 18 
FUTURISTS. 


THEATRE 
SPEARE WORKSHOPS l IMIf 
Mar. M 14 Mon rn af 11 SOam 
Met mam 236 5568 fm ortdU. 

j MERMAID CC 00 book mo feel I 
Of 23« 5008 or T41 9999 rr -Ug 1 
I Fret ya hr 7 rim 740 7300 Cro 
■am 01 93O0I9S ctesaarua. 

Baa 30 A 80 

NTS AWARD-WINNING 


•A FLAT TO SEND THE SPIRITS 
IPAAPIB. NUCILT ENJOY ABLE 
amo arnxueEMT revival- 
D atari 

VICTORIA PALACE Ol 634 1317 
l.Ot 7 30. Mals sal 2 43 

MICHAEL CRAWFORD 
in B.ARNUM 


BARBKAN ART CALLERT. B.U 

bu.ur Cei.Ur CfJ Ol 638 
4141. I mil 27 Apul ART • 
TIME, kMkiiiH al lime aim II— 
4H| <timel-*o» Ml n*o*le.i 
Aftm Li V) and ?So Tim Sal 
ieLifN6 45on. Bau d MAC 
day, rv. epr B mi* 

[ CHRISTOPHER MULL. I 
MMrnmh Nirrrl. Lunrlml Stt | 
255 0500 201 h CENTURY 

ORIGINAL PWNTS ■ Ouwll. 
Hm. k net . Hodgkin. Mn * 
Merer. Pifevi Ronaidt el. 
CMRfSTOPUEH MULL. 1 

AMi nnui bireei London St*- 1 

7 15 050 20»h CENTURY ORtC- 
IMAL PRINTS -Otmall 
Ho kne. . Hodriin. Miro. 
Moore. Pifasso. HaMril El. 
'NATIONAL BALLCRV. Traiakiai 
1 Ntjuai Loinlcn WC2. Ol 639 
3321 Rerdrrtrrl urio Ol 839 
3526 Wliks 106 buns 2 6 Vt; 
lOLISITfON IN rOCtb. -Mi and 
Mr* Goflman' h\ Wa Hjhl ol t—rtol 
l IMH April 27. A dm Tree 

NATIONAL PORTRAIT CAL- 
LERT. bl MartmN Plare 
LoiwIonWG? T.-IOl 930 1552 
JOHN BELLANV: NEW POP 
TRtITN l mu 18 Mat Adm 
Free STARS OF BRITIS H 

SCREEN: 1930* lo 1900* I 

7 Mai Adm SOd Mon InlOS 
Sal 106 Sun So 


| MUSEUM OF MANKIND. Bur 

li.iutmi C.udrns Lmnfon *s 1 
LOST mack: KINCDOOH AND 
Six PAPER MOONS. An r smw. 
Mill, ne.ileil In EDUA RD O 
PAOLOZZI. Mnii *al IO S buri 
7 We A.tm lire 


VICTORIA AND 
MUSEUM- The Nannnal's Tlea 
mu i- House. > hriisimdon- 
H t T*i F RUM INDIA. KNIT 

tin*:: r rovi ihl i*a 

GULLLcriON JLWELLCRV 
BV FRNK BAITR lonlll 15 
Alar. In. Tt.YTtLE POW 
TRAITS 1 71' TAPCSTTO 
rpotl THi: \ A A COLIFC 
TUJK. BRITISH TEXTILE 

prsicNs. French lac 

PB V WINGS. SWISS STAINED 
CLASS DESIGNS. PHOTO 
GRAPHS BV ROGER MAVNE 
VtkiH-s 10 OO 5 SO Sun 2 30 
3 90 uoserl Kir HenMdedtnlo 
Ol 5dl -1894. 


londaaCOtaauR Si Mortar* ton* 
tendon WQ 


HONG KONG 
PHILHARMONIC 
ORCHESTRA 
MUSIC DIRECTOR: 

knwfiA banmmrrlHMri 

Pru—imri Raw. 

Aw l a m hMpd 
he* mid Sioku. 


PreMUkri Bawriom* 

-in ro* er nttew P i bn RUTS 


The abate paunawe MB tu 
* am m isi h i H i m u r i lotto 
Piebmmart . m a nwm writ be 


SOMERSET & AVON 


BkFtAKI B.V. (Beni 1902- 
1963 In memory o* a dearly 
toted husband, father and 
vandfaiher. Sadly mined 
bill always Hi our thoughts. 
Erie* A larnily. 

WOn OAR Donatd tntyn on 
Marrh HI |98«. A wonder- 
ful grandfather sadly nusaed 
CaroUnr. 

Wien a vers kY of Thanksgh - 
ing for the life and work of 
Or. fUchard Week. CBL had 
been j rr a nged for Tuesday. 
18 Marrb ai 12 noon ai Hie 
Church of SI dies. 
Cnpptegale. London EC2. 


I TROUT and ukmn fly Inbinn 
raunrt Orton CMUei Biug- 
(Un*. Tet Chriiaton 281. 


FOOD & WINE 


ANNOUNCEMENTS 


RdUDAV 

mcNCH/Dum 
daughter H2i a 

l-V country 

tOkwHnmSiril Treon.enm 
Karin hobdav tor Engtan yd 
t am e age. ui nrltinge mRoh 
MMM lor our daugh- 
' L3i 94 


IHDm Susan (n#e WooRanD 
ronqratutaUons on obuming 
Ph D. in CenrUcs from Lon- 
don Unftrrsity. With love 
from your mother. Bernard. I 
Christine and family. 


irorrvo. Plea— reMy lo BOX 
C6d . 

80 90 *11 David happy lflih 
tyrihday. love Mummy. 
Daday and Sarah. 

0N1IAMS Manlpe b e r Modern 
Art CflUT— * See EduraiMn 


BIRTHDAYS 


Man • Gerald Arthur 
B E. M . R.N. iRldj. formerly 
of BtallOD Otlrr College 
Chk-hesirr. suddenly al 
home February 26Ui Crema- 
tion In Chichester. Tuesday 
March 4th. M 2pm. Family 
flowers only please, don* 
Uons to CardHMhoractr 
Instilule. MMhirisl. 
BCNTNAU. - On Feb 25 sud- 
denly Mary iMayj wife of ihe 
tale Rooen BenlhaU and 
murh toted Aunt and Great 
aunt She will be greatly 
missed by her wide circle of 
friends Sertlc* al 2.30pm 
on Thursday. 6lh Marrh at 
St Columba's Churrh. Pom 
8r»«. London SWt. No 
flowers please, but donations 
may be sen! lo SI Columba's 
Church for Kcston College. 
COLE fnee ColHnsL Frances 
Morion, dearly loted wile of 
George, ut Wanganui. New 
Zealand, peacefully after 
Stroke Memorial Seri Ice in 
Flngesi Church hi be 
ranged. Music was her life. 
Donations to lieu of flowers 
■o The Musician's 
Benetotan) Fund. 

ORTSDALE • on 27ih Febru 
ary 196b. peacefully at 
home. 30 Mktmar Gardens. 
Edinburgh: G.W. Tim 

Drysdaie. brfotrd fntalMnd 
of Qrtita SeiAtre at 
Mortonhafl Crenulonum. 
Edinburgh, on Tuesday 4lh 
Marrh al J.JKtpm. Family 
ftowrrs only. 

FARADAY. John Alexander 
Mul toy. MC. KTM. Lair Irish 
Guards and Palestine Police. 
Husband of ine late Chtoe 
Faraday, peacefully al home 
on 27th February, alter 
tang period of pain and suf- 
fering Funeral Directors. 
William Buckle. 24* Fulham 
HoMSWIO (01-352 0953) 
MARRIMAN - John XH ijarhi 
OBE. peacefully in Lima, on 
27in February-, aged 80. 
dearly betoted husband 
Brenda, much toted faihcr of 
Elizabeth. GfUian and John. 

ROARS on February 271h. 
peacefully In hospital. 
Margaret Efspein. aged 83 
yearv of SI nan House. 
Sandwich. Pm ale rremaiton 
followed by Sen rce of 
ThanksgHing ai 2 aSom . 
Wednesday. 5lh Marrh. al 
the Parish Churrh of SI. 
Clement. Sandwich. Family 
flowers only but dceialion* if 
desired lo The Pilgrims' 
How. Canterbury 

HUGHES* On 22nd February 
1986. Mane bobH. aged 77 
years, at Honey Lane Hovpi- 
laf. Waltham Abbey. Very 
murh loted mother, sadly 
mneed. Funeral service to ! 
lake place al 2 30 on Monday 
3rd Marrh al All Sainta 
Church. ChmoTord. followed 
hr (Filer menl. Onnqford 
Mounf Cemetery. Enouinm 
lo Daniel Robinson and Son. 
Tet. <0079 1 20990. 


“AJJ- Darting. On ihn your 
Birthday, my tote now and 
forever. Preilv Facer 


RUBY ANNIVERSARIES 

STEW ART-TRACE. On Febru- 
ary 9. 1946 ai St Nicholas 
Church. Cranlelgh. Captain 
Peter H Slew art. R.H.A lo 
Ann Trace, k R NS., now 
al PO. Box 9244. Dubai. 
U.A.E. 

ANNOUNCEMENTS 


The more 
you help us, 
the more 
fll find oi 

sh Heart Fount 


As teen on BBC2 Food & 
Drink Programme 

Ai lari a real (iiuMv deraf 
lei ran rd lea atailaMe 6k mail 
order. 

write for dels 8* to 

« tarn'. Tmm Ud. 

Da* T. 

Ur taka L|M NWM. 

i K 
i EC4V 3FA 

01-24* 4117 

■ WerkiUys Only! 


[ FINE MflHC MEffCKANTS 1982 
CUrria, 1977 \ ullage Pori. E» 
replHMial ollrr. keen prirev Ol - 
584 9855 


SHORT LETS 


DCUGItmiL FLAT overlooking 
Montague Square W 1 1 Bed. 1 
rerpl CIH5 pw oi 9355393 

LUXURY SERVICED FLATS. 

rmlral London from im* pw 
Ring Town Hv Apb 373 3433 


FLATS RARE 


BATTERSEA home prof frm 
n smoker 103 Own ream, 
tlwre all ament Lon. Nr BR 
and lurie ClOOpminr Trt. Ol • 
350 1998 

LAMROHC OROVE prof male 
or female 20 30 Beauiiful rat 
lane with 9ardvn Own room, 
use of families CSO pw inr! 
loeol Tel 221 5644 e*rs 

FLATMATES Seiertlir Sharing. 
Well rslaP inlroourlorv ser. ire 
Ptae trt for appl oi S89 5491. 
313 Bromplon Road. $W] 
IDEAL FOR CITY Young Pro* In 
■nr Hu l>w 5 garden in M 
Oil £250 pen Trt Oil oi- 
280-2580 or Hm 2S4 7036 
WCI LA ROC FLAT. Male proles 
■tonal, n v to share with rpie 
E20O orm - wilt Ring Ol 380 
i 282 sal lOam 2pm. 
ISLBfOTOR. 5 min. lube D rm. 
to heaulnul shared dal G C H 
W machines 3S9 6498 
MI0.ft2Z C H. Lge romf O R 
»i LAO with 7 <4 her oenk* C42 
pw inr Ol 888 5557 pm Mease 
Wf Lad* to share beatdiluHl dec- 
orated large house CTO pw 
me* Trt Ol 466 6565 


DOMESTIC 6 CATERING 
SITUATIONS 


OVERSEAS AU nu* ABOtCV 

87 Regent IX reel. London Wl 
TW 439 6514 lorViK Otrt-wvn 
AHo m helps dams | 

lemp perm 


Mol roflaoe* 

Quin selling, rlow lo nunv 
Wares of interest Brorhure Tel 
Bovre 074989 482 

[ BATH eh hse. mu. nuu-i .. 

xnll <jdn goe C Tt . reawnaote 
terms, ir 27 Mar 0934 74249o 


SUSSEX 


RVE HARBOUR. Pretty harbour 
iron! collage Sips 4 5 No pets 
Please Trt: 0742 306859 


WALES 

**AY -Ota- WYE. Town <8 hooks 1 
mile Charming ana rarntatl 
ante beookririe roluw 
Brrron National Park Trout 
firiilng. sleep! 3 4 Brorhure 
0497 870554. 

| SWOWDORtA. Llannens Pae* 
Orltghlful 2 bed cottage Sure 
■arular mtnmuin « im*s Mdsf 
dales atari Tel. colour TV rtr. 
rel 1060871 1 8044 
|WILD WELSH MARCHES ISIh 
Ccnlury mn Tr«lifNfiui Cnro 

lcvl% Brorruif^. Tftr H^ro O M3 

Radiwr. Prmfngne. Powys 

.054 421 1 655. 


.CRTTERtOfL S 930 5216 CC >79 
6565 379 6433 741 9999 

Gioup* 836 >967 ILtg* 8 OO. Thu 
mat 2 30 Sal 5 30 & 8 30 

'■BRITISH FARCE AT ITS BEST" 

O Marl 

The Tlv-alre of Ortnrdy Company 

ERIC SYKES TERRY SCOTT 
ERHARD BRESSLAW 
JAR HURT HELEN GILL 

OAH^TH* HURT 

RUN FOR YOUR WIFE! 

Vyrrlien and dirmled w 

RAY COONCV 

Over 1 700 **de sotrilmg perlnr. 
manres “SHOULO RUN FOR 
* S Exp Seats C5 OO lo 
ClOSOThealre dinner Cnlerlon 
Bravsene txaus or Carrie £17 25 

DOMUBOM THEATRE TIMC- 
HOTLINF. Ol SBC* 8*45 Bov 
Olfur Ol 580 9562 3 Or 
| Ol 63o 8538 9 nisi Con 24 hr 
7 Dav CC 836 2428. 

Grp Sales 930 el 23 

DAVE CLARK'* 

TIME 


CUFF RICHARD 

AH THE ROCK STAR - 
| THE PORTRAVAL OF ‘AKASM' 

LAURENCE OLIVIER 

| Red Prh-e Press from Mon 24 
Marrh Opens Wed 9 April M 7 
Mon -Tn 7 30 
Tnu Mai 2 30 Sal 5 A 8 


GLENGARRY GLEN ROSS i 

by O..KI Mamrt 
Dnerted ns Brti DrvdrD 
Ttys pla v rontams 

Other NT. shows see National Th 

NATWRAL THEATRE Sir. Bank 

NATIONAL THEATRE 
_ COM PANY 

See SEPARATE EHTOT CS under 
OL IVIER /LTTTELTOWl 
l-UIIULK Cvreuem efwap 
seals Oafs of prrK an (heal res 
irom io am RCSTAURAMT <978 
20331 CHEAP, EASY CAR PAR, 

S OF THE ULMM imr 

' NT «uonmmM 

I HEW LOMDOM Drury Lav WC2 
II 405 0072 CC 379 6433 E*es 
7 45 Tue A Sal 300 A 7 46 

ANDREW LLOYD R EIMtE H 
(1£ ELiOT MU S 4CAL 

CATS 

Gra Bookings 01 405 1567 or 01- 
930 6123 I Apply doily |g Bov 
Ofltre lor rrturnsl Postal 
atm m- at tom now being aetxvded 
umn Auguri 3a 

out VK 928 7616. CC 261 1821 
Gro Sales 930 6123 Marrh 11 lo 
April 19 


DATS TO SATURDAYS S.O AM I PARKIN GALLERY. 1 1 klolr rants 
TO SJ1PM FOR CURRENT BOOK- SI London Sta 1 Ol 239 81 44 

Fianriy MO i *hall 1901 1980 

Poimlry K IlIfnlfAlOr 

ST 2"? ^ °!^S^dri ai eaIdl ROr * L *e»0®** OF ARTS Bur 
?17! ylwr 7 hnnk in” anty** d | l""U1on House. Puradilii- Ol 734 


9032 


CHARI FSOW OMFFfTNS 


DAVID 

LYON 


STORRV 


COURSES 


| BONHAMS 6 wk. full lime. CTCXh 
V eatiai krta Courw slan* 28lh 
April. Apply PTHKipai 01 084 
0067. 


TUITION 


ENGLISH FOR foreign sludenK. 
IimIi* idual lull toil hi Qualified 
learner, reasonatxr rale* Trl 
Ol 994 IS74 or Ol 624 9717. 

JAGUAR & DAIMLER 


JAGUAR /DAIMLER 1981 86 
curare of 45 whole range 
Co 995 Cl 9.000 Csi 19 years 
PK. Tel 01 .554 9833 .Ti 


RENTALS 


CH ELS EA. Knaghtfbndoe. Brtgr» 
*k>. PlmlriCpL West mil rrirr. 

■usury homes and Hals avail 
aide lor long or snarl 
Please rag for rurrrnl list, 
cooif-l 69 Buckingham PaLrie 
Road. SWJ. Ol 878 8251 


WAREHOUSE 240 

8730 CC 379 6966 «AM Lnlil 
Marc h 15 . Eve. 7 >0 DRUID 
THEATRE CO < rom Irrland 
frtuTiv with the** urinl slun 
mug sivrrvs MLECMCMK 
6* Tom Morphy, sumos 
SHMHAN —■BERRA. Lalrrom- 

er* ca.iy aom.iusl ai inter. M 

| DUCHESS WC2 836 8243 240 
9648. rim Cod CC 3*0 7200 
<24 he* 7 days* 

| Eves 8. wed Mai* 3 Sal 5 A 8.30 

GEORGE COLE 

| “An r alula rating dnpklk of ronur 
I mu no" Grin 

A MONTH OF SUNDAYS 

•W I rt»l 'i am stay 

I "GLOWS WITH HL MOL R. WIT 
AND COMPASSION- - D Mad 

I "A TREMENDOUS SUCCSSS-BBC 

DUKE OF YORKS 836 5122 CC 
856 9837 741 9999 Grp Sales 
930 6123 rim Can 74 Hr 7 Dak 
CC 740 7200 Ctes 80. 

Thu Mai 3. 501 8 A 8 30 
2nd TEAR OF TNE AWARD 
WRR R HO COMEDY NIT 

STEPPING OUT 

-TRIUMPH ON TAP” C»e Sid 

The HU Comedy 
bv Bernard Harris 
Oirmed by -lulu MrKennr 

COMEDY OF THE YEAR 

Standard Drama Award 1984 
-L4LCH VOLWSELF SILLY“ 

T Out “Had the audrrnre vrllwig 
for more-- O Mai -Mini suref* 
l4ke the town Go NOW D Trt 
'-Roars al aooraial'' Tim*-* "ir%| 
9o*i ig la iap.iap.lap forvs. rr" Now. 


AFTER AIDA 

Ol retted by Howard Davies 
new play By tarirar MKthrB 
I based on Ihe Bfe A trier work of 
| M»»mr Vordl with a rau at 
imrrnaiton opera ringers. 

|OUVKR T 928 2282 CC UW 
Itonal Thealrys open Mage> 
Today 2 00 ik>w prirr mall 6 
7 IS PRAVOA - A FM Strata 
C * — *f by Howard Bren loo 
■nd Da* id hare Wrturns May 2 
porial booking opera 29 Mark 
low prirr pre* <ews Marrh 6 lo 
12 Opera Marrh 13 41 7 00 
Then Marrh 14 


WHITEHALL SWI. 01930 
7765 939 4465 rr Ol 179 f 

6506 6433 741 9999 Cl PS Ol- 
836 3992 

Ro4 Price Pern ntaS Mar 4 
Open* 5 Maren 7 00 Mon rn 9 OO I 
Wed Mai i OO. Sal 5 OO V 8 30. I 

THEATRE OF COMEDY COY 
BILL FRASER 
JAMES GROUT 
PATRICIA HAVES 
BRIAN MURPHY 
PATRICIA ROtmxOCC 
PATSY ROWLANDS 
PRUNELLA SCALES 
ELIZABETH SPIOGGS 
TIMOTHY WEST 

WHEN WE .ARE 
MARRIED 

Bv J B Prieriley 
Dir cried by Rouato Eyre. 

WVNOHAarS 836 302B rr 579 I 
6565 379 6433 Crm 836 3962 
RCDlCED PRICE PREVIEWS 
ONLY C3 50. Zb M. C9 SO 
Opens 12 Alar 7 pm Mon lo Fn 8 I 
pm . Sri 9 A 0 30 
i Wed mals 3pm (rom 19 Marrhl 

CAFE PUCCINI 

bv RORlIV RAN 
Based on rhe Inr a min*r of 

CIAC08I0 PUCCRO 

YOUNG VIC 92H 6363 CC 379 
64 W L'Uftl Marrh 22 Ives 
Tur sal 7 SO. ALMs Mon 2 O RO- 
MEO AMO JULIET. "Grip* and 
ran* mres "D Tel. "Bououets 
to every bod* -Sid 
YOUNG VK STUOKh 928 ej£5 
Lari Nigni Toniutn 8 pm 
Qian Thralrr Produetioii 
TRAVELURO NOWHERE 
tXirsrt* r» os Ihe gypsies see u* 


CONCERTS 


TRINITY COLLEGE 
OF MUSIC 

MoricnCr trier IjwWi HIM Ml) 

VIOLIN MASTERCLASS | 
BELA KATONA 

tw\ 

Saturday 15 Marcfa ai 4 poi 


RETNOLOS 

| Open 106 daili mn Sunday <re 
iimyl lab- -suim.iv until I 4Bpnii 
\.lnn**ton U L2 < on 

rale EDUARDO PAOLOZZI UN- 
DEROROUND ADAi Cl 50 Cl 00 
CL ItoOklm* Ol 741 9999 

TATE GALLERY, AfilflMirk SWI 
. FORTY TEARS OF MODERN 

ART 1945 1985 Into 27 An 
■Vlin Tree Wkdav* IO 5 SO 
Suns 2 S 50 Rivoi fled mlo 
Ol 821 7128 


WEMREB ARCHITECTURAL 
GALLERY 36 store 

*In*'i WCI PnruM-li * nr**.. 

a.l nlhrr IIKIIHW. Moi. Fn 

lOepm s.ik io l pm 


ENHIBITIONS 


CINEMAS 


8* lip avia. PHnl.ro Weslmrn 
Stef Luxury houses nd flair 
atari able lor long or shqrl lelv 
Please mg lor mrrenl irsl 
Cories 69 Buckingham Pilar 
Road SWI. OI 628 82SI 


Lroenliy require flaks A houses 
inrenlral London Horn CISC lo 
E2 000 PW Please ran Sally 
Owen or Lorraine Campbell on 
01 937 9684 


PROPERTY TO LET 
LONDON 


&ACKMCATN SE 13. Imnur 
a r I urn lui DOI bv . | room, 
kll . 6 shower CW 3 mill* *la 
lion 1310 prm inr gas eler. 
Trt. 31 6 495Q ir*e*i. 


•**■** FLATS * MOUSES 

ad A reqd. I or diptomai*. 
.-Xenriiies Long A shon lels n 
all areas. Lufnnd a Co 48 
-V turmeric SI Vvl 01 499 5334 


lluv Rrgrf*rv villa aflfo* 
rilmev. 3 bed., newly der . lge 
gdn Ctoae all amemiies. C750 
pw. Trt.Ol-679 4642 


FORTUIK s CC 836 2238 7739 
7419909 CveBFn Sal 6 a 8 40 

COMEDY OF THE YEAR 

LoAurmo- Oittirr Av*^rd IA84 

UP AND UNDER 

Hy Jonn Goober 

“A WONDERFUL COMEDY” s 
Times - SPLENDID - O Trt 
“One of ihe limniesl and leas! lire 
ten I tom plays you are e*er Ung 
to see. TOTALLY HY S T ER I CA L" 
Obv - Cvrilrmeul and hriartly 
Penuadlno Ihe H d wir r to flap 
and cheer- S Trl - A JOT" S Exp 

BURY LAME THEATRE ROYAL 

Ol 836 8108 Ol 740 9066 7 
Fn-u Call 24 hour 7 dav rr bkg 
240 7300 

Da rid MonieS'* 

•J:nD STREET 

A SNOW FOR ALL THE FAMILY 
WINNER OF ALL THE BEST 
MUSICAL AWARDS FOB ISO* 

Voled 


PALACE THEATRE 437 «B34 
CC *51 8831 nr 319 6435 
__ Grp Sairs 930 6123 
THE MUSICAL SENSATION 

LES MISERABLES 
“IF YOU CANT GET A 
pCKET-STEALONElSid., 

Tve* 1 30 Mria Thu k Sal 2 30 
LaU-cgmcrs no) adrallrd until ine 
inlerval 

NEAT TNE TO UTS NT ENOUM- 
DM FOB RE TURNS AT TOEDOX 
OFFICE NEW BOOIUMCS 
PCRWO TO OCT 4 MOW OPEN 

PROERIX 836 2294 rr 240 9661 
or 74 1 9999 E» ei 8 Mai Thu 3 SOI 
G A 8 30 24 Hr 7 Day First Call cr 
240 7200 

BEST MUSICAL OF 1985 

standard Drama Awards 

MARTIN SHAW 

*1 Din Presley 

T* AWT AMAZING THE 
PERFORMANCE IS A 
LANDMARK" O EZ 

ARE YOU LONESOME 
TONIGHT? 

- rrs MAGNIFICENT" Dbg 
Ra> .fewer* will play Elvn Preriey 
Mi Monday Eves only 

PICCADILLY THEATRE 437 
A 506. 7 34 WJi Credit Card 
Holline* T7V IMS. 741 P9M 
tiro Sales 838 3*62 >S3D 6123. 
”A rirMKata orar MNuT BBC 

DAVID FRANK 

ESSEX FINLAY 

MUTINYI 

TREAIERDOUS SPECTACLE - 
Gdn 

Our XOO f l w riui Or octane 
Evm LO Mata Wed 3 A Sta S. 


Cancer 


SCOTLAND 


Together we can beal «t_'J 

Wfr fund aver oik? third of 
ail research into ihe preven- 
tion and curr ol'cancrr in 
ihr UK. 

Help us hy v-ndinga doiu- 
nonor nukt-jfrjic) io. 

Cancer ^ 
Research 


CRAfONtSH CASTLE AROVL 

Bair r**om Hal. sleeps 9 now 
aiail.ibir idr 1996 lets 07478 
11219 


PORTUGAL 



ALGARVE - >shn Hill has a. ail 
ataMs a* sale do loho and 
ViLunraira lor Easier „i»l moh 
w-» Rim Ol 940 8171 lor 
drtaiM 4BTA 

ALGA R VE; duplex aparlmrni. 
lull* rurmsned. on annor- 
lisiiiito » ■ Kara* Sun roupfe C95 
per week alter April I Ham 
S.175 Tel <04t>93> 5467 


MEWS FLAT - REGENTS PARK 

rdbiebedv. fully turn Park mg 
Co HI £275 PW Trt 402 6390 

| AMERICAN EXECUTIVES S-rk 
lux ilals homes up io 1500 
■ w l.sual lee* reg Phillip* 

Kav A Lrwii, Sonin of the Park 
Chrtwa DflKr 01 J52 HI 1 1 or 
North of Ihe Par* Regeni's 
Park oflire. Ol 722 SI 35 
AVENUE ROAD RWB. Maqnri 
• era apartment overtookinQ . 
parkland 3 a bed* 2 baliw. 2 GARRICK. 5 O! B36 4601 CC 
rrrep* elks, lux k if hr* porfer I379 i* 4 33 a C C 24 hr 7 da* 240 
oartung. «• ye. £349.000 Ora Sale* 9»6173 C*«w u 

RARGETS 407 9J94 lorn ** pd n <ar 3 O Sal 5 O and 8 O 

NO SEX. PLEASE- 


FRIHCE OF WALES 01 UO 

H6H1 2 CC Hot la Ile Ol 930 
oeaa 5 6 Croup Sales Ol 930 
6173 K Prowse Ol 741 9999 
urc-r i<iirie-.i Fled Can 24 hr 7 day rt bookmp* 

BEST MUSICAL 740 770001 3796433 c.m 7 so 

STANDARD DRAMA AWARDS Mali Thur A Sal al 3 0 "Owe Of 
Voted Rm Grata-Grata Knkde" 

lAu^^S^^iLARD ’’S’MsrJST' 'JSST* 

u,u ” ,,c ‘ N 0 ^ 1 ” GUYS 4 DOLLS 

best MIMICAL Ro^r'^ 

_ * FATIHS ROIMNCTON 

LONDON TO**™*: CRITICS ANDREW C WADSWORTH 
AWARD TfOCX W1LSOM 

C* to 8 0 Mala wed 3 O "WonderfW Cntarfatarieta" S Tel 
n, “A Ctoaric <x .1* kind- D. Trt 

Group Saks Ol 930 6123 "Byoaarrila" D Mail 

NOW BOOKING UNTIL Nov * "“Hm unni ura -26 
JAN 1987 


2CalhMI HrMivrTefrjrr. 

Cvpi TT/1/3 1 1 . flNfvn SWIT 5AS I 


IS. A. 


SERVICES 


WU1ICMATM17 Skilled rating 
ttaftrh on POimiidiiv ftTeEimiul I 
riari*. Peter Ol 487 3283 Re. 
re to ref* 


WHEN M LONDON rent a TV nr 
12*?. 5; rt 4» wk or mouth i 
TOPS TV Ol 770 4469 

FRIENDSHIP, Lovr or Marrwra- 
AJJLjtor - *. area a OMrtmr. Dept 
l7STl ®S Abingoon Road. Lon- 
don W8 Tel. Ol 9J8 ion 
HR 7 For ravenliai evperi ad* hi- : 
rR ' cs - 


VK ISLA ND SV* Florida fully 
I urn 'Slumped hivurs hsr 
w kli mnrilhlv reiUal l 9 6500 I 
pw Mai no* Boat at. an wine [ 
POBo* 512 Bokeeha Hr HU 
33972 lk-l Trt 813293 3076 


GENERAL 


wanted 


JACKSON Ronald Gordon. M 
irr a tong illness, peacefully 
in Hospital on 26fh Frbruafy 
1 986 Funeral for ciesr fam- 
ily and friend.*. Friday 7lh 
Marrn I pm al Cambridge 
Crrnulonum Flower* lo L 
Fulmer Lid. BO wmimg 
Si rm. Bury Sf Edmonds 
For further iniormalun 
please ronlorl C M B John- 
yon Solirllar. I CKlIMrn 
Parade. Cockfoslm. Trl 01- 
441 1556. 


KLr ik. on Fibruwy 27W. 
pear (-fully a Her a short 
illness, in The Norton, and | 
Korwirn Hosprial. Kalhleen. 
beloved wifr Of Ptulip and 

motner oi Sn«n- cui and . 
Hugh Funeral sen ire ol The 
Trimly VnllrC Hrformro ' 
Church. LnllwKik Rood Nor 
wien. or Twsdjy- Marrhl 
4lh. al l«pm. lolioKnd l 

hs- rremaiton al Earlham 1 
Crrmalorkum. Norwirh , 
Family flowers onl» 
Dorulions. II for Tne j 

Arthritis and Rheumalrsm ] 
Council lo. Prirr Tartar FU 
neral Servirrs. 8S Lnthaiih I 
Rood Norwich. 


_ „ 1 A Mirror* 

Desk*, fiookraveeir 4 Pre 1940 
furmture Tel Qs s«tS 0148 or 
Ol 728 2716 


FIESTA OHM 3100. A ine* 

i’ll. rnamiMqnF* 9 <if] 1 5 OOO 
irn lOmliiKMi 

L3 8SO raw Windsor 865384 


OPEL MANTA GTE black, lukh 
hark C I -* 3 SOOrrw SOOOrr 
L 6.000 Ol 94i 5191 

FORD CAPM 2cb 1984.81 
blur -alter Alarm, r Ira king 
undi-i-eat many extra*. TSH 
io«J«no siaidennead 33467 


FOR SALE 


- CREME DE LA CREME 


resista carpets 

SALE NOW ON 

Maadvc storks of wool 
Blended Dn ta n from 
E3 95 * VAT. Plus many 
bargains In room etna. In 

all quail (to*. 


Tel: 01-73! 3368/9 


estimate - 
filling. 


in l ■Jru.- ran 

rm ru* on Ov^iv ViAlh 

mUrK ) r Crr L«*n ki» 

C 1 Trl OI A5 2 H±se 

CWCI . 5F A Qgtrt. spafrtw- 2 rah 
mom. 3 rrrr pi tee mansion fial 
Li r h . cnlrkpnone. no sharers 
C165 » w_ 45 8 420 } 

REAR I t a CI ri i oriO GRtatGE refur 
brvhed Virlorun * r uarnejied 
flat douMe A tingle hmroom 2 

rer r p ftoit* X A B CH Non smok 
er Company k-l pteirrred 
CI35per week Tr* Ol 892 2773 
OLD riR OM FTU H RO. 2 
b-sleornned nUrnMW II.ll large 
ren-piion. dimng imii m.'d'rr. 
ruin (dam A kiirnen £725 pw 
Co Let Trt Ol 748 9727 41 lei 8 
pm 

SWI. Must be seen Liisnr* *onr 
level rial Opiimuw. petition on 
WNrirtt vgviaie Larur irr at 
kiirnen. 2 ooumt iwi* ruin, 
loo. study area All wewilkei few. 
no rl Min I >rai (235 p w 
Tel Ol TM 7637 
STOP SCARORffGl 1700 pure* 
In rtwo*e froni. ii* min *77 

2610 Hometoratoi* Renlal 
arrom PuOhsnri* 

ST PAUL'S CT to 14 th-gam 2 
lied town hse. min iee 3 mm* 
lite LI70pw mn L H l>r 
leave Ol 748 7442 
CENTRAL! Bed sal, e*%n kn TV 
prune. CSOpw Other* too 677 
7610 Horaeioraiors 
C W iSmCH I ben garrrt liar 
would wn ptol male CH. 
prayer too pw T--i 91-1 i-Vw 
CLAPHAM. nr tube. Lu* nral, 
•n* 6 C odn ilat 1 lor rm i«ri 
A o C85 pw 874 I I4g 


Part* Rale* Availahte So I 3a' 0120 439 

3849 439 4031 rirsi C4JICC 24 
hr 240 7200 CroSJkv 930 6121 
Cm-" Hpra. Wed A Sal Mas 3otn 

MAGGIE EDWARD 
SMITH FOX 

"FIVE BRAVURA , 

MARCH IN TMS SHARP 
SARDONIC. ELE 

COMEDY." S Tim 

INTERPRETERS 

New May By I 


WE'RE BRITISH 


Expert 


_i from TOPS 
Colour T k-a from £50.00. 
Video's from £99 OO 91 Lower 
Stoarw Street. SWI. 7300934. 


L STORE t W A MONO WM Beau- 
til ul veiling New .jluiinn 
£6 000 Trt 01-767 5833. 


■KNFrs inr any r* ml. CMS. 
StariKinl Cap Chew. Lev Mn 
All lll.-.llin .uul spoil* H7I 

bblOiM.-H 0495 

A E-V/'iw. Diitof* 


INTERNATIONAL 
TRAVEL ORGANISATION 


SECRETARY.- PA 

tPtfiUUm TRAVEL DEPARTMENT 


SECRETARY .'PA 


CMieqr in»* er* ronuormi The vinlanae aotaieenta muri pe n r u 
Pitman* anorllund al DOwpn. and lypna speeds of sChen. 
■vnowirdgr oa German wouad be an ad* ame gefor me poulion in 
ihe Sprulred Travel Oratfunenl. Three are responweie BOM- 
Iwm and amply lo use your own inn lain, r B eumiui. os you 
w.n or ra-aUng mm •n-phone rain Iron. Brrvt and pnnnneh 
during the stanagert- irruuenl atnenn- from Ine oflire Hours 
.■re 9 io 3 Monday lo Tnday. and salary CC 7.000 plus in nor 
nenrtits. 

Plra^r wtNi* mrlovng CV v 


tZm S< 6— m < I tm I 

Landed WIN KA 


m 


437 -.597 Crst Call 
24 Hr 7 Dai cr 740 7200 
Grp Sate* 9JO 6123 
Andrew itota Webber 
|lor The Brails l-etul Theatre Co 
prevent* 

[ DEMIS LAWSON. JAR FRANCS. 
RONALD NOLGATE. 

JONN riARRON 

LEND ME \ TENOR 

A Corned* n* Ken luduw 
Queried ny David Grimoce 
L* rs H Mals W ert 3 O Sal 4 O 
■NOW PBt VIC WING 
r««4 Signi Mairn 6 at 7 OO 

GREENWICH THEATRE Ol 858 
L-.ei.iiio* 7 as nui Sal 

2 *0 ONE of UI III BURN 
CHAPMAN srtn ANTMONT 
ANDREWS. DAW 

HOROvrrcH. ian ocb.vt aim 
' qUAYLE "4 rapa'al 
D Tel *f avrinal.ng 4 
nd pi ra? nr non" Cuaidian 
HAMPSTEAD 727 9301 Pin* 
Thin* Hr* re A ed ei yen. 
J eff F ahey A A lb art ftauy in 
ORPHANS !■* l.l* 1 l i-s-aei 
NATMARKET THEATRE ROYAL 
«.-•* nilu-r « r. Ol •)* 8932 Til SI 
Call 24 r.1 7 day i c bkg* ?ao 7700 

PETER O'TOOLE 

lilIB 

BERNARD 8RAPKH 
DORA RRYAH 
MICHAEL DCMtaON 
MARIUS CORING 
GEOFFREY KEEN 
MOIRA LISTER 
BREWSTER MASON 
PAUL ROGERS 
OIMAM SHERIDAN 
DAVID WALLER 
and 

SUSANNAH TORN 

THE APPLE CART 

8. BERNARD SHAW 

L > «r* 7 JO vial **al ? *0 


Opened to PetaF Ta 


ROYAL COURT S CC 730 1745 


Thonsfe Vbddteitui and How, 
Barker Direned by wuuam 
Gaskill Cves 8 O Sal Mata 4 O 


ROYAL COURT 
UPSTAIRS 01-T30 *SS4 U*rr 

luen plainnuve present 
SHORT CHANGE bv Trrrv 
Hraloll Elis 7 30. Sri mat 
3 SO 


275 mi 

r.r*l Can 74 hr 7 dat CC 240 
7700 Cves 7 30 bal Mai* 2 30 

JEANNE 


Mon A T l __ 
AMERICAN DANCE SEASON 

a DOI IO M.I. 10 
Inter irai* Ban i ocm Theatre Pas 
.KU-iia Orae Oirltesna. Rosalind 
Vrsnuii Jk Oanr.es BlH T Jnni* 
6 All lie /aw Ring 278 0855 Idl 
CC'IOIH B> or burr 


HER MAJESTY'S 9jo 40-T- 

’iJO 16K .. H.. I line 74! -Miug 

liisl I a'i ,4 'em "da. 

■ » uyan.p .’in 72C*J 

-A Wewderful THUnuUi UtaeL 

If Ini n ed In *ur Ih e .1 tar 

rinntm" O Mart 
DONALD StHDfN ,n 

THE SCARLET 
PIMPERNEL 

- A ■fuiiiiine ndapf ilton— . ay* era 
• Thralrr mreay" Ii I -I 


SAVOT Bn* Olive oi R36 RHK8 
I LI OI 179 6219 use. 0479 tig* 
16. Malmre* kvednesdai 3 0 
I tsiiunlai- 5 O tk 8 JO 
-MUil-VI. 1BIVVS AWARD 

uisvivg r«a sow ik its 
1 4 r»l * L IR ra STILL OVE or 
THI ri '-V-IEVJ things is 
1 IJW a* ' S T i me* 16 2 Kp 
■ HRISTOPHLR CC'DWIS 

sxrPMiT.ir high 

LOLL P IDEHC* 

MV H \CL COC HO »<SC 

< oi r r ri tikvjth* 

'AU.su* 1 IBLTOk 

■tones OFF 

On in mk:h *t| Bl_ MtCMi'RC 


I 1 "the spe< V real arty, tagvr- 

ki-thiy metadrerae" Mail M. •*.»■ 

I ■ T ? JO *l.ils Wert A NM al 3 C 


i '.••.!»>*. Mvii mn si 

THC MIT MUSICAL COMEDT 
DIRECT FROM BROADWAY 

LA CAGE Al A Fix LES 

p|r**rw, lp.ll .V 

In. I Li.il.r VI.U ' 

.II..-IU- d 4 j -,r 2- 
'34 «w,| I mi i .,11 74 III - Ik..* 
i r i <. e.* gee 74r 7. ’1*0 Hi.. ..iln.- 
mi.* ill* ia Ini i*mOiial i .ulry * tali 
•sn— — <•>.. 


SMAFTESriURT J7g Si'ea |U 

'll *■*■"•*. .'79 tJ jj ri. a l— *|| 24 
Hi 7 I la* l.l *4 07200 
LHP hales -wio hi 71 

ROWAN ATKINSON 

THL iv£W Hr *< L 
l>Pf SS7VI INCH 
WitI pi n f Pir%ta J|ri ^lli Ai pjlh 
Mhuh, yf m <s.U 5 V? A 

e* 30 


$TftAro,'tcr oi bjo ?eon 

61^0 %«nnfn r»«fb HO 

Mhi ta«9| ? >:> 'W.n S 30 .s H JO 

LI-1MH IWJK 

• Iia!|.ia< i unni .1 in* if beh-iM • 

wi "irm«i«ii Hum*" » Inins 
HA II .RD ■ l*Dl 

* I.U-.US III I I IMJI4M 

LOOK. NO HAMS! 
iir.iiH-ii. in in»n I luinnan and 
'l"l. I’rl'-e di|.*l—l h* 
'1.*- L» Held MUST END 
MARCH I ■■■•a !•• n.m.1 Jas-jli s 
7 * > QllutullHeHt* 


ACAOCMT I 437 2081 DANGER- 
OUS (ROVES fPOi Prog* ri 

2 00. i IKK Sum 4 IO. 6 20. 
8 40 

ACADEMY R 437 5129 THE 
EMPTY TABLE (PC), rum ol 

3 IS. 5 45 8 70 
ACADEMY IB 457 8819 THE 
WANDERER | PC). Prog* al 

4 Op, s 10. 8 20 

MUHDCAR CINEMA 01 628 

8798 srudnu redder* ri all 
peris Tifkets bookable Today 
Kids Curb 6 1 7 year oM <Mem 
hers only i ALICE IN 
WONDERLAND <L> 1 1 OO A 
2 SO A CHORUS UHt iPGi 

6 00 A a 15 

CAMDEN PLAZA 488 2443 -Opp 
Camden Town | une l Peier 
Creena wav '* A ZED A TWO 
NOUGHTS (1SL Film ri l 45. 
4 oo. 6 20. a 45 MIST FAD 
THlRV. From FBI 7 M-\R 
Godards DETECTIVE (1SL 
rum 41 1.00. 3 00. 5 00. 7 00. 
900 

ClNtZOM MAYFAIR Curron 
bhert 499 3737 Coral Browne 
tan Houn "Superb 

performjrtrr*” F Time* in Den 
III* Potter'* DREJUHCIRLD |PO) 
■■Sheer Chchatilrrw-M - S Evp 
••A rdnurirte Inumch" S Trt 
Film at 2 OO iNm Sun) 4 10. 
620 A 8 40 

CURZON WEST ENO snri Irshur r 
Avenue Wl 439 4805 Jessica 
Lange. Cd Horn* in SWEEET 
DREAMS 1 1 St Film ri 2 00 'Nol 
Sum 4 10 6 20 k 8 40 Irom Fn 
kurouwaa RANtlSt BOOK 
NOW 

GATE CINEMA. Nouinqtull Gale 
T27 4043 newly rente ated 
npw luxury seating. Doth* 
Urreo KISS OF TW 
SMDMWN IS EL SIS 
4 30.6 50.9 05 Lale mqhl Sal 
»* 11 '**;_ 6 da y* Start* Fn 
Mmrh 7 KUROSWAWA** RAN 
list ad.aneed hooking. No 
mt-mliershiB reomrea _____ 

,MMnu kmghtwhdce 

2364225 Glmda lark son a. Ben 

. _ k ie ai l n 

"TURTUt DIARY-- |PQ| 

(Laly: 3.0. 6 O. 7.0. A 9 O. 


ART GALLERIES 


, «« FRANK bl the World 1929 
1945 exhibition Mall Gallery 
The Mall Pali M.1II 1 3 Teh - 2 
Marrn ]086 Dailv 10am a 
pm AdntoAran Free 


REGIONAL TV 

From (lie facing page 

SATURDAY 

BBC1 WALES iai5-S.(Bprn 
— 1 Grandstand i ncteomg Rugby 

Champronsfyp. 


Umon. fiiw Nations 
* Franoa - 1 
lOtEnglanc 
enhsm) 5.1S-U0 


Wales v Francs - foftowsd byctosing 
_ - nu y Ireland (Track- 


Sports News Wales 
CoOwnl 


stages! 

enhsmi 

SCOTLAND ft2n9J)0Bifi Mag is 
MogS.T5-5J0pm Scottish News and 
Spon NORTHERN IRELAND 4i5- 
5.05pm Results (opt-out from Grand- 
stand) 5.154*20 News 1235- 
12J0am Nears ENGLAND 5.15-5J0poi 
London - Sport Soutfv-Wwt - Spor- 
hghi News and Soon. All Other English ra- 
gwns - Regional News and Sport 

CHANNEL As London 
Len/aivncL e «cepf tun The 

Greaiest Amencan Hero 1 1-59 
Weather 2.1S-2AS Mr Snth 8.00 Murder. 
Mystsry. Suspense. Any Second 
Now 12.15 Rck SprmgMC 01.15 WWttk- 
er. close. 

TYNE TEES 


11-00- Momma Glory 11.05 The Little 
House on the Frame 5.05 Mmd your 
guaoe 12.15 Poet s Comar VLXa 


Larv 


TVS As London except: 

— ° 114» The Greawst Amencan 


Hero 11 J7-12JJ0 Weatner 2.15 Rick 
Spungfteid 1.15 Company. Close 

HTV WEST As London 
— 1 except- ii.os Rre- 
baH XL5* 11.30 CapiamScartaf and 
me Mysterons 1138 HTV News 2.15 
Super car* 5.0S-5JS Terrahawks 
12.15am Weather. Oom 

-HTV WALES 

8-OOpm-8JO One Thousand Voces 
8J0-9.4S S«e- Stops 

■ GRAMPIAN 

12J» The Greatest Amman Hero 
2.15-2^5 Small Wonder 12.15m Rettec- 
Bons 1220 Oose 

As London 
except 11.00-1200 
The Greaies> Amencan Hero 2.15- 
1*5 Small wonder SD5-SJ5 Mrs and 
Ms 1115»ni Ooso 

BORDER *■ London ex- 
— Dvnwcn cbp,. n. oo-il 00 The 


CENTRAL 


Gf eaiesi American Hero 115-145 
Sman Wonder 54S-*Si35 Dreams 
12.15am Close 

. YORKSHIRE 

starts 1UM}- 12.00 The Baron 2.15- 
2.45 Sman W oncer 5.05-535 Ask rv 
questions 12.15am Festival Foth 
12-45 Close 

SCOTTISH AS London 

— 2 agy -LI > ? . n . e*cePL 11 JO The 
Glen Mtcnaei Ca*einoe II .«S- 1100 
AOveniures of Jeremy 115-145 Sman 
Wanoer 12.15am Late Can 112c 
CV«e 


BRITISH UBRARY. C3 Rusvtl. 
wri MIRROR OF THE 
WORLD: A t Lists, map* 4iMf 
Cte**— Wkdvs IO 5 bun 2 30 

•\viin 


Kin Ihr ML I and Imri auk 
luw* Kd hr hrtd m t in .ta n 
on I2lh eta* I9W6 Motah la 
sridiv rita oi l ow di wra Ida Hip 
prats loner flora 
•IKSI 2.250 IO KNSI4DIO 
■Ihr mlumr rrir ilurtunar. 
rtl I rtnuHV 1491 Ihr I4TKM 
Ll ■HKSI 1 1 Hrtuii 

»rrt* 

Iw-riUi 4fid tpslrumnil urix 
rail. < own iranrav 

suprnwnuriHM vim- end 
hoif mojgrt Honan ora mrtud 
nd in Ihn l onlrorL 


r to km ■ frame rtoril* atobnu 
posuion rid iNmimi and 
mrtouna *rtf Uriiynl ad 
djistad rtisrtapn to. 

Audnion Sccrrun 
Hong Kuitg Ptnlharmuaic 
Orchesua 
15 Baring Close 
firovc Park 
London SEI’ (RiN. 


COMPUTER 

HORIZONS 


EVEITk' TUESDAY 


DP MANAGERS ■ SOFTWEAR SYSTEMS ENGINEERS ■ 
SYSTEMS ANALYSTS ■ PROGRAMMERS & DESIGNERS ■ 
SALES & MARKETING + TECHNICAL AUTHORS 
A wide range of compuierappoinlmenisappeais every Tuesday. 

TUESDAY 

MAKE SURE YOU GET 
YOUR COPY OF 

THE*gftteTIMES 


ANGLIA ** UBXton «■ 

— gasaS cant iij» 
TerrahawKs TT JO- 1240 The Flying 
K ira2.1 5*2A5 Smafl Wonder 12 .iSm 
S hared Prayer. Close 

ULSTER _ ^Lorxtan ex- _ 

^rori 115-145 sK’ M ^ 
Showbiz 4-55-54)0 Sporrs ResultsEfn 
UJ^News 
1 2.10am News 

S4C*-3f Hygbi «.io Fimr 

Composer and court 525 How goes vour 
g HawWrart 7 JO 
»«»T0c6ori 7.45 Stumnu 8.15 can I 
Gynxii aoo Y Maes Chwaroe 10.10 
Saturday Lira 1 1-40 Brothers 12.10 Close 
GRANADA AsLo ndon 

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THE TIMES SATURDAY MARCH 1 1986 


15 


Weekend television . and radio programmes 
Edited by Peter Dear and Peter Davalle 




* 




i, . 

**%’ 




&30 Hunter’s Gold. Part nine of 
the adventure serial set in 
New Zealand during me 

-T860s (0 £L55 

Bananaman. (r) 

WJO Saturday Superstore, 
managed by. Mite Read ■ • 
Jipalfish expert Chris 
; goes on an 
underwater safari to a 
coral reef* 

12.15 Grandstand introduced by 

Desmond Lynam. The ■ 
line-up Is: 1&20 FootbaH 
Focus includes 
of the 1982' 

game between Italy and 
Brazil; news at 1.00; 105 
Rugby preview; t20 
Hockey; Royal Bank 
Indoor Hockey Club final; 
1-55 Boxing: John Moody 
v-Lenny Howard; Z1 5 
R a tying from Yorks 
the National Breakdown; 

2.35 and 3-30 Rugby 

Union: England v Ireland; 
3-25 Half-times; 4.15 
Rugby Union: Wales v 
■ Franca highlights; 4.45 
• Final score 

5.05 News with Jan Learning. 
Weather 5.15 1 
Sport/Rsgional news. . 

5.20 The Muppet Show 
includes Raquel Welch 
with a song and dance 
routine. 

5.45 J&nH Fix It. Among those 
for whom Mr Savile has 
fixed it is a nine-year old to 
dean a hippo's.. 

teeth. (Ceefax) - 

6.20 The Dukes of Hazzard. 

The first of a new senes 
and part one of a two- 
episode story in which the 
likely lads are lured back 
to the motor racing track. 


705 


Every Second Counts. 
Paul Dank 


C* 


m 



lieis with another 
edition of the comedy quiz 
for couples. - - 
7.40 The Lite© and Large 
Show. A new comedy ? 
series starring Syd and 
Eddie, this week aided and 
abettedby-Magnus „ 
Magnusson r Ten 
andTotb Coeto. (O 
8.15 The CoB e c I o is. Episode 
one of a new drama series 
about a Customs aftd 
Excise operatioafGeefaxV 
9.05 News and sport With- Jan- 
Leemmg. Weather. 

9.20 Film: Fear is die Key 
(1972) starring Bany 
Newman and Suzy 
Kendall. An Alistair 
Mac Lean thriller about a 
man who escapes from 
court after shooting a 
policeman and taking a ; 
women hostage. A - 
dramatic chase across 
Louisiana state ensues • 
with the hunted man being 
driven on by the thought of 
revenge for the murder, 
three years before, of his 
wtfeand-child. Directed by 
MfchaelTuchner. 

11-05 Film: Ruby (1977) starring 
Piper LaurieandStuart. . 
Whitman. Horror movie 
about a former nightclub 
smger, now the manager- .. 
of adi 1 w^cineina.wnciH£~ 
beginsto believe thattha-- 
serres of murders at her 
cinema are the work of the 
supernatural and ’. 
somehow connected with 
her mute daughter. 
Directed by Curtis 
Hamnqton. 

1235 Weather 


- £$S: regional report at 
, • ^08; sport at 7.15. 
7J0 The Wue Awake Club 
Indudesnewsand 
weather at 8J& 


itv/london 


9.25 


iisJofm 

^ Is also a video' 

Dee C Lee 



sends in a boy i 

dressed as a gW fb 

Stewart , 

12-05 Samt and Greavsie. lan 
and Jimmy discuss the 
football news in particular 
and other worts in 

general 12.30 

International Athletic*. - 
The United. States Indoor 
Grand Prix Final from 
.' Madison Square Garden, 
New York. 

1-20 Alrwdf. Hawke and 

Dontinta are given the task 
. of recovering a number of 
stolen thermo nuclear 

detonators 2.16 Benson is 
best man at Pete's and 
Denise's wedrfrtg. 

205 Snooker. The opening 
session of the three-part 
final of the Dulux British 
Open. 

445 Results service. 

5.00 News. 

5.05 Blockbusters. Bob 

Ho) ness presents another 
round of the general 
knowledge game for 

535 TTmA^wun. This week 
the irregular but 
resourceful quartet do - 
battle with corrupt police' 

" offk»re who moonlight as 
hired kilters (r) (Oracle) - 
6.30 The Gr um b to wecds - . 
Show. More comedy 
sketches and musk: fiom ; ' 
the crazy quintet 
700 The Price is Right. Leslie 

• s .. Crowther presents 

another edition of the 
- game show. 

84M fine One of My Wives is 
. Mssing (1975) starring 
Jack Ktogmart A made- 

• • for-tetevSion thrfller about 

a newly-married man who. 

oTbtewtfe. 

priest turns up with a 

woman the husband has 
never seen in his life who 
- claims thstshe is his wife. 

. Directed by Glenn Jordan. 

9.45-News and sport 
1000 Aspef and Co mpany . 

: Michael AspeFs guests'; 
mis week are George - . 

;. Michael ofWhaml, .. 

' *'Jacqwefine Btsset and ■■■" 

. - Peter Cook" .. .“ 
ia45CWTNew»tW»dfines 

foBowedDySridplter^Ihe 

. second session qf the, • 

Davies from the Assembly 
Rooms. Derby. - 
12.15 MgMThougitefrarri 
Canon Ivor smith- 
.Gameron. 


little and Large: back on BBC 1, 7.40pmJlight 
Peter McEnery:The Collectors (BBC 1, 8.15pm) 


BBC 2 


600 Og@n U n ivers i ty. Until 

105 FifntThe Los Vegas 

Story 4 (1952) starring Jane 
RusselL A mystery thriller 
about a former nightclub 
singer who returns to Las 
Vegas with her wealthy 
■ husband and meets an old 
ftame. Directed by Robert 
Stevenson. * 

3.20 FDm: Underwater! (1954) 
starringJane Russell. 
Gilbert Roland and 
Richard Egan. Sunken 

- treasure adventure set aft 
the coast of Cuba. 

Directed by John Stui 

405 Laramie. Jess's It 

sister rides into town with 
the body of her dead 
husbandJr) 

5.45 Deutsch efirekt! Part 1 8 of 
the German conversation 
course for beginners (r) 

6.10 Horizon: The CtUkfren of 
Eve. A documentary 
examining a new theory 
about where we came 
from (r) 

700 NewsVtew. Jan Learning 
with today's news; Moira 
Stuart reviews the week's 
news in pictures with 
subtitles. Weather. 

740 Inter na t i onal Pto- 
Cetabrity Golf. Arnold 
Palmer and Gary Player 
are joined by Terry Wogart 
and Tom Courtenay. . 

8.30 The See at F^ttu Part two 
■' of Don Cupitfs series "• 

- exploring' the ideas that 
- have led to the 

crisis of faith, (i 

900 Stuart Burrows Sings in 
the National Concert Hall. 
Dubfin. With Bernadette 
. . • Greevy (mezzo-soprano), 

' Dense Kefly (harp) and the 
RTE Concert Orchestra. 
10.10 Saturday Revtew. Jack 
Lang, France's Minister of 
' . Culture explains why the 

arts are so important to 
.- the French people;. 

George Meity tafts about 
- artist scottieWHsoru and 

.- David Rudkin discusses 
. .’ his play, The Saxon 
' Shore; 

1100 Globe Theatre: Due to an 
-Act of God.- A hi 
. praised German tel 
drama set in toe year 
: 1999, aboutthe 
consequences of a 
coffiskxt in a Saxony 
- vBlage between a liquid 

tanker anda - - 
carrytog 
nuclear waste. 

1240 Jazz 625: The Coleman' 
Hawkins Qidntef* . 

of a concert 
in 1964 at 

Wembley Town HaD (r) 
Ends at 1.15. 


department (Oracle) 

1100 FtemSonofFrankesteiri* 
(1939) starring Basil • 
Rathbone in the titlB role, 
a man who returns to his 
. lather's . town and revives 
• the Creature (Boris 
KariofQ-Directedby ... -> 
Rowland VLee. • . - 
1200' Return to Glenrincauf* 
(195l>stanrir^ Orson 
Welles. A ghost story 
about a man who gives a 
hitchhiker a lift on a ionely 
road to Dublin. Directed by 
HHton Edwards. 

1.15 The TaU Tate Heart. An 
, animated film version of • 
Edgar Allan Poe's classic 
tale. Ends at 105 


FREQUENCIES: R«So 1:1Q53kHz/285nr 1089kHz/275m; Ratfio 2r 693kHz/433m; 909kH/433m; Racfio 3: 1215kHz/247nr VHF -90- 
92.5; Radio 4: 200kHz 1500m: VHF -92-95; LBC: 1152kHz/261m; VHF 97^; Capitafc154SkHz/194m: VHF 95.8; BBC Radio London 
1458kHz/206m: VHF 94.9: World Sanrica MF 648kHz/463m. 


i. Ut 

ijf 


n 

i ? 


‘Al ■ - - 


' ( Radio 4 ) 

5.S5 Smppmq 6.00 News briefing 
6.10 Prelude (s) 600 
News: Farming Today 

600 Prayer ftx the day (si 
6.55 weather Travel 

7.00 News 7.10 Today's 
Papers 7.15 On Vow 
Farm The importance of the 
Church m rural 
communities 7.45 In 
Perspective (with the Rev 
Roy Jenkms) 700 Down To 
Earth 705 Weather 
Travel. 

800 News 8.10 Today's 
Papers 8.15 Sport on 4 
8.48 Yesterday m Parliament 
8.57 Weather Travel 
9.00 News 

9.05 Breakaway. A practical 
guide to holidays. 

9.50 News Stand. Lee 
• Rodwefl reviews the 
weekly magazines 

10.05 The week m . 

Westminster, with 
Michael Efeott Of The - 
Economist 

1000 Loose Ends with Ned 
Shemn and studio 
Quests 

11 JO From Olt Own 

Correspondent. Life and 
pokocs abroad, reported by 
BBC foreign 
correspondents • 

12.00 News: Money Box 
12-27 Just A Minute (S) 1205 

Weather. 

1.00 News 

1.10 Any Questions 9 with 
Chris Patten. David 

BlunketL Margaret 3*7 80(1 
Ned Shemn. 105 




»■> 


jT. 


- riA 


l 





200 News: The Atemoon 
Play: The Stranger Jn My 
Head by SjH Lyons with 
Marian Domond and 
Tom Wdkinson. (r)(s) 

3.00 News^ireemaBonai 
. Assignment. BBC 
ccrrespondems report from 
' around the world. 

330 The Saturday Feature: 

The Long Hour. When 
WiBiam 1% stood up m the 
House Of Commons to . 
begirt the process that would 
teed to the abortion of 
slavery. Narrated by Kemy 
Lynch. 

*■15 Not Another Diet 
ProgrammfrDr.A!aw . 
Maryco-Oavis presents a 
_ practical gurfe to qemng 

the best from our wed. 

4-46 Persona Grata . Nige< 
flees on three of fas 
fjvounte characters from 
fiction 

500 The Uvmg Wald. News 
of wddhte andthe- 

5J5 Satirical 

rwew of the weeks 


news 500 Shipping. 505 
Weather: Travel 
6.00 News: Sports Romd-up 
605 Conversation Piece. Sue 
Macyegor talks to * 
Scottish artist Mary Armour, 
stifl painting at 63. (r) 

600 King Robert of Sicily. 

Robert Powefi reads The 
Sicilian's Tale from Tales of 
a Wayside Inn by 

LongteSow 

705 Stop The Week with 
Robert Robinson. With 

Gary Howard (s). 

7.45 Baker's Dozen. Richard 
Baker wkh records ( 5 ) 

800 Welsh Drama: Three of 
Swords by Mike Darren. 

With Mike Hayward. Murder 
yam. with a police officer 
as the suspect (s). 

10.00 News 

10.15 Evening service fs) 

1000 The Turn of the Tide: 

Keith Ward on ways the 
Christian faith is changing (3) 
Faith and Philosophy 
1100 Science Now (Peter 

Evans) _ - • 

1100 The Good Human Gukte. 
With the National Revue 
Company. 

1200 News: weather 1203 
Shipping Forecast 
VHF (available m England and 
S. Wales only) except 
505-600 am Weather; Travel. 
3.00-500 pm Options: 

300 View At The Top. 300 
Biwfcs and Mortgages. 

4.00 Ray Gosting gets a taste 
of Yiddish 400 Deutsch 
Direkt!. 

( ■ Ratio! ) 

60S Weather. 700 News 
70S Aubade: Gounod (Petite 
Sympbonte); Chopin 
(Scherzo No 2, Op 31: 
Fbchterplano); Chabrisr 
(Suite pastorale): Bartok 
(Rhapsody No l, op 88: 
W3flnsch,ce4to and Hendry, 
panok Charpentier 
iDepuis le jour, with 


(prelude, manneet 
chansons); Suck 
(Dnwaies du Styx.v«h 

Danca soprano 

(Syntohony No S*® 0 
News. . ; 

105 Record Rewewrlnckides 
Edward Greenfield 
■comparirwrecordings of.. 
. fbefsen'SSytnphorry No 
4, and Arnold WhitlaB on 
recordings of muse of 

8 ie present century. 

10.15 Stereo Reteffla . .. . 
Shostakovich 
(Symphony No 6): Lipkm 
(Pastaateh Stravinsky 
fTWee Pieces: Pay . dam> 
Britten (Suite No 1 , Op 
72: BajJbe.ceUo). 


1105 Boston SO: Handel 

(Concerto a due con. No 
2 in R; Mozart (Serenade in 
D. K 320); Schubert 
jStymphony No 2). 100 

105 Early Music Network: 

The Musicians of 
Swanne ADey.Works by 
B^d.Dowiand.Thomas 
Campion 

200 FurtwenglenWeber ( 
Eoyanthe overture); . 
Schumann (Symphony No 4); 
finale of Act 1 of 
Beethovens Fidefio:cast 
includes Mod, Frick, 

Jurinac, Edeimano/Vienna 
PO: Handel (Concerto 
Grosso in D minor. Op 6 No 
10k Brahms (Symphony 
No 4). 

4.00 DeSaram Clarinet Trio: 
Faure (Sonata for ceto 
and piano, No 2, Op 117): 

FI went Schmitt 
(Andantmo in C, Op 30 No 1); 
d'lndy (Trio, Op 29)- 

500 Jazz Record Requests: 

545 Critics Fororrcwith 
Anthony Curtis, Gilbert 
Adair, Jim Hitey and HiJard 
Spurfing-Topics mdude 
Aten Bennett's BBC TV play 
Insurance Man. 

600 Music for the Iron Voice: . 
.organ recital. Wader 
Hfflsman plays works by 
Dumfle. 

7-15 BBC PhfflwmonJcrwim 
. FredeU Lack (violin). Part 
1 . Messiaen (Les offrandes 
oubteesk Goktinark 
(Violin Concerto); Brahms 
(Symphony No 1). 

9.00 Richard Markham and 
David Nettie: piano duet. 
Works include Kenneth 
tj^ghton's Sonata, Op 
92. and two Old English . 


9.45 


songs by. Frank Bridge. 
VerabFouri J 


Sacred 

Pieces (BBC Welsh SO, 

BBC Welsh Chorus) 

1030 BotteSint ; 

InstrumentsHsts King. 
TurmeU. Halstead and-Martin 
play the Gran Duo: Duo 
Concerted on themes from J 
Purtiani. 

1100 La Petite Baxte: . 
Tdemarei (Quartet mG 
major); Haydn (Smtonia to B. 
flat HI lOfiKGossec 
. (SwnphanylnAnu^or.OpB . 
No 4). - 

1107 News. 1200 Closedown, 

VHF orty£.35am K> 655jum. 

Open University Dr Benjamin 
Spodc. 


( Radio2 ) 

News on the hour urita 10(^m. 
then 100, 6.00, 7 . 00 and hourly 
from 1100. He^ftnes 600 am, 

700. Sports Desks 1102 am, 1002 
pm. ' 


400 am Martin Stanford (s) 

600 Steve Truelove(s) 805 David 
Jacobs (s) 9.00 St David's Day 
Celebration (s) 1000 Sounds of the 
60s (Keith ForayceHs) 1100 
Album Time (Peter Clayton) (s) 1.00 

K Ken Coders Palace of 

tghterl.30 Sport on 2 includes 
Rugby union: (England v 
Ireland and Wales v France). Also 
racing from Haydock Park. 500 
Sports Report 600 Folk on 2 700 
Beat the- Record (Keith 
Fordyce) 700 Band Parade (Syd 
Lawrence and Iss Orchestra) 

900 String Sound (BBC Radio 
Orchestra) (s) 1005 Martin 
Ketaer (s) 1205 am Night Owls (sj 
100 Jean Chafe presents 
Njffltride (8) 3.00-400 A Little Night 

( Radio 1 ) 

News cxi ttw half hour until 
1200pm, then 200. 300. 500, 

700, 900, 1200 midnight 
6.00am Mark Page. 8.00 Adrian 
John 1000 DaveLee Travis 
100pm Adrian Juste (s) 200 My 
Top Ten. Sting talks to Andy 
Peebles (s) 300 The American 
Chart Show with Gary SynJ (s) 

500 Saturday Live with Richard 
Skinner (s) 600 In Concert 
featuring Huey Lewis and the New 
is) 700 Armemarie Grey 900- 
1200 The Mktoight Runner Show 
with Dixie Peach, featuring 
Simon Townsend. 

VHF RADIOS 1 8 2 400am As 
Radio 2 1.00pm As Radio X 700- 
4.00am As Radio 1. 


WORLD SERVICE 


600 NewsdesK 700 News 70S Twenty- 
Four Hours 700 From tne Week im 7.45 
Network UK BJM News BJ» Reflections 

8.15 A Joiy Good Show 900 News 909 
Renew of ttw British Press 9.15 The 
Wortd Today 9J0 Financial News ft40 
Look Ahead 945 The Music Busmeas 
1000 News' 1001 Thai's Trad 10.15 
Lenar From America 1000 People and 
Poetics 11.00 News 1109 News About 
Britain 11.15 About Britan 1200 Radio 
Newsreel 12.15 ' Anytnmg Gobs 12.45 
Sports Roundup 100 News 109 Tiwn^ 
Four Hours 100 Network UK 1^5 Country 
Style 2.89 News Summary 201 Music 
Now 200 Saturday Speoal 300 Redo 
Newsreel 3.15 Saturday Specs! 400 
Wood News 
Saturday L 
toy SoeaaTfUM News 809 Twenty-Four 
Hours 015 What's New 900 People and 
Poetics 1000 News 1009 FtrxirOur Own 
Correspondent. 1000 New foeas 1000 
Reflections 10.45 Sports Roundup 1100 
News 1109 comnemare 11.16 LenMxu 
1100 FfetSVWe USA 1100 News 1209 
News About Britem 1115 Rat» Newsreel 
1200 Baker s KaK Dozen 100 News 101 
Play of the Week Bnftf EncPuntec20O 
News 209 Review Of The Brash Press 
Z15 Breakfast at Tiffany's 200 Album 
Time 300 News 309 News Aoout Britain 

3.15 From Our Own Correspondent 300 
My word 1 4.00 Newsoesk 400 Jazz from 
Europe 5-45 Lana' From America. AM 
time# in GMT. 


ews 409 Commentary .4.15 
Special 500 News 501 Satur- 
Biam News 009 Twenty-Fow 


BBC 1 


645 


SET 


University. Until 


CHANNEL 4 


1.00 The Flowering of the 
pacific Banks* 
Ftoritegium. A 
documentary about the life 
of English botanist Joseph 
Banks. 

2-00 Film: Royal Wedding 
(1951) starring Fred 
Astaire and Jane Powell 
as a brother and sister 
‘ musical comedy team who 
take thBir Broadway show 
to. London at the time of- 
the 1947 Royal Wedding. 
Directed: by Stanley ■ 

Do nen. 

345 The Saphead* (1920) 
starring Buster Keaton in 
his first feature-length film, 
as a supposedly thick- 
headed son of a Wall 
Street financier. Directed 
by Herbert Blache and 
Wtochell Srnitb. 

5.05 Braokalde. (ri (Oracle) . 

6.00 Family Ties. Domestic 
comedy series. 

630 Unforgettable- This 

week’s guests are Mark 
Wynter and the New 
Vaudeville Band. 

7JXJ News summary and 
weather followed by 7 
Days. Robert Kee talks to 
Eric Heffer aboutthe 
expulsion of Liverpool 
Militants; AJ .Ayer's 

l °Itica! lyreeppra^d by 
Professor Stuart 
Sutherland of King’s 
CoBege, London; and . 
there rs a discussion on 
■ By Cathedral's decision to 
charge visitors an entry 
fee. 

730 Down Home. The first of a 
new four-part musical 
series tracing the story of 
fiddle playtng. 

830 Saturday Live. This 

week's alternative comedy 
- show Is presented by Hale 
and Pace. 

1030 MB Street Bines- One of 
FurfBo'smen is shot dead 
by a gun stolen from the 


835 Play School with Fred 
Harris and Jane Hardy. 
9.15 Articles of Faith. 
Rediscovering religious - 
belief with the Rev 
. Rosemary Wakelin. 930 
This is the Day. A simple 
service of worship from a 
viewer s home in 
, Bletchley. 

1 10.00 Asian Magazine. Henry 
Wilson, a British 
photographer, talks to 
Reginald Massey about 
his cook on the Hindu holy 
dty of Benares 10.30 L- 
Driver. Lesson four of the 
six part course for those 
whose second language is 
English 1035 Deutsch 
cfirektL Part 19 of the 
German conversation for 
beginners course 1130 
Tefe-Joumot. The news 
as seen by viewers of 
Spain's first channel last 
Monday (r). 

(1145 Nothing But the Best A 
parents' guide to 
secondary education (r) 
12.10 Sorry, Mate. I Didn’t 
See YouL Advice for thB 
young motorcyclist (r) 
12.35 Farming includes an 

item on Scottish farmers 
in Canada 12J58 Weather. 
130 This Week Next Week 
Environme n t Secretary. 
Kenneth Baker, on nuclear 
dumping and the crisis iri 
nemment 2.00 
‘ndere. (rXCeefax). 
100 Match of the Day Live. 
Tottenham Hotspur versus 


435 The Pink Panther Show. 

Cartoon series, (r) 

530 Brat Farrar. Episode three 
and Brat is welcomed by 
the Ashby family who are 
taken in by his 
impersonation of the dead 
Patrick Ashby. But is 
Simon convincedItCeefax) 
5.50 The Living Isles. Part nine 
of Julian Pettifer's series 
on the natural history of 
Britain and Ireland focuses 
on the wildlife that has 
sought shelter with man 
(Ceefax) 

630 News with Jan Looming. ■ 
Weather. 

640 Songs of Praise from 
Cape! Mawr, Denbigh 
(Ceefax) 

7.15 Hancock’s Half Hour* Our 
hero is furious when he 
. discovers that the last 
page from a book he 
borrowed from the library 
is missing, (r) (Ceefax! 

7.45 Bluebefl. me final 
of the dramatized 

. of&fLnous Bluebell 
- Girts troupe of dancers. 

■ Starring Carolyn Pickles. 
(Ceefax) 

835 Mastermind. The 

specialist subjects this 
week are: the life and 
reign of Louis XI, 1423- 
1463; tiie American War of 
. Independence, 1775 : 1781; 
the life and work of Peter . 
Warlock; the life and 
writings of Lord Macaulay. " 
9.05 Newswitti Jan Leemtrig. 

"Weather.- 
930 That’s Life. Consumer 
affairs investigated.. 

1035 The Hammer and the 
Cross. This last 
programme in the series 
examines the state of tile 
Ethiopian Orthodox 
Church today. 

1045 You Can’t See the 

Wood~David Bellamy • 
continues his series on 
trees.(r) 

11.10 Secret Nature. Part three 
of a series about a Dorset 
farm through the year, (r) 
1140 Weather 


TV-AM 


635 Good Morning Britain 
begins with a Thought for 
a Sunday; cartoon at 7.00; 
Are You Awake Yet? at 
735; the What’s News 
qwzat 730; Jerri Barnett's 
Pick of the Week at 8.10; 
news headlines ax 837. 

830 Jonathan Dimbteby on " 
Sunday. 


ITV/LONDON 


935 Wake Up London with the 
Vicious Boys (r) 935 
Woody and Friends. 
Cartoons 945 Cartoon 
Tima with Roger Ramjet 

10.00 Morning Worship from thB 
Auld Kirk of Ayr where a 
new stained glass window 
is being dedicated to the 
Boys' Brigade. 1130 Link. 
How are the disabled in 
Britain's etitnfc minorities 
being served? 1130 
Natural Resources. How 
much longer can we take 
water for granted? 

12.00 Weekend WorieL Brian 
Walden interviews Michael 
Heseltine on the Tory 
alternatives to Mrs 
Thatcher's economic 
policies 1.00 Pofica 5. 1.10 
TheSmurf8. (r) 

135 FHnr Miss Mactaggart 
Won’t Lie Down (1966) - 

starring Barbara Mullen as 
■ the woman who, on 
returning from Glasgow to 
her home village, 
discovers her own name 
on a newly -erected 
tombstone. With Pat 
Mason and Andrew 
Downie. Directed by 
Francis Searie. 

2.00 LWT News headlines 
followed by Encounter. 

Pop singer Sal Solo talks 
about how he found God. 

230 Snooker. The third and 
last session of the final of 
the Dulux British Open. 

6.00 Abion Market Derek 
continues with his 


wedding preparations; and 
Geoff and Eileen end up 


asgow’i 

dthe 


rade) 

630 News. 

640 Highway. Sir Ha 
Secombe visits * 

Royal Infirmary and! 
Cathedral. 

7.15 Catchphrase. Game show 
presented by Roy Walker. 
(Oracle) 

745 Surprise Surprise, 

presented by Cilia Black 
and Bob Carojgees. 

845 Crazy Like a Fox. Harry 
discovers a forged $20 
note in the poker pool he 
won. The counterfeiter 
wants it back and when 
Harry's secretary tries to 
help she only succeeds in 
getting both herself and 
Harrison kidnapped. 
(Oracle) 

9 45 News. 

10.00 Hot MetaL Comedy series 
about a Fleet Street 
tabloid, starrirw Robert ' 
Hardy and Geoffrey 
Palmer. (Oracle) 

1030 The South Bank Show. A 
profile of Elisabeth 
Schwarzkopf who talks 
about her fire and work. .. 
There is also rare archive 
film of her performances 
in both opera and lieder. 

1130 LWT News headlines 
followed by Mapp and 
Lucia. The first of a five- 
part series, based on the 
humorous novels by 
E.F.Benson, about the 
social in-fiqhting in. English 
village life between the 
wars. Starring Prunella 
Scales and Geraldine 
Me Ewan (r). 

1235 Night Thoughts. 



Derek Jacobi as Harold Pye in the television version 
of Mervyn Peake's Mr Pye (Channel 4,9.15pm) 


BBC 2 


6.50 Open University. Until 
135. 

2.00 international Rugby 
SpedaL Highlights of 
England v Ireland and 
Wales v France. 


3.00 Film: Virgin Island (1958) 
starring Virginia Masked 
and John Cassavetes. 
Romantic comedy about a 
well-bred young 
Englishwoman who, whilst 
on a Caribbean cruise, 
fails for an American 
archaeologist Directed by 
Pat Jackson. 

430 Cotour Rhapsody. Dog, 
Cat and Canary. A 
Columbia cartoon. 

435 The Great Art CoBection. 
The works under 
discussion this week are 
Bonnard's Nude Against 
the Light; Leger's The 
tedding; ana Mondrian' 


Wedding; 

Flowering Apple Tree. 
' mal Darts. 


l'S 


5.10 International i 

Scotland versus England. 

630 Ski Sunday. The Men's 
Slalom from Geilo, a . 
Norwegian industrial 
village between Oslo and 
Bergen. 

630 The Money Programme 
indudes reports on the . 
Vickers Shipyard sale; the 
Philippine economy; and 
Austin Rover 
management's 'national 
service'. 

7.15 Previn on Concertos. ' - 
Andre Previn conducts the 
Royal Philharmonic 
Orchestra in a - 
performance of 
Beethoven's Fourth Piano 
Concerto. The soloist is 
Vladimir Ashkenazy. 

8.05 Nature. On the day the 
Spanish bullfighting 
season opens, a report on 
the controversy 
surrounding the sport now 
that Spain is a member of 
the Common Market 

845 Thinking Aloud. The 
'.future of broadcastfng is '• 
discussed by Jeremy 
Isaacs, Michael Tracey 
and Brian Wenham. 
Introduced by Bryan 
Magee. 

935 Architecture atthe 
Crossroads. Modem 
houses of character, 

. ..filmed to France and ' 
Germany. 

10.05 Screen Two: Hotel du 
tael Anita Brookrier's ' 
award winning novel 
starring Anna Masssy as 
the novelist who escapes 
to an hotel on a Swiss 
lake, after narrowly 
averting a marriage-on- 
toe- rebound, where she 
meets a variety of . 
characters and the 
possibility of a lasting 
relationship. (Ceefax) 

1130 International Darts. 

Highlights of the Scotland 
v England match. Ends at 
12.00 


CHANNEL 4 


1.00 Irish Angle - Hands. The 
.. workers in Dublin's last 

remaining woollen mill. 

130 Face ttw Press. Enoch 
Powell answers questions 

put by The Mirror's Julia 

Langdon and Ed Moloney 
of the Irish Sunday Tribune 

ZOO Pob's Programme. The 
guest is Polly James. 

230 ram: Up in Central Park* 
(1946) starring Deanna 
Durbin, Dick Haymes and 
1 Vincent Price. Romantic . 
comedy musical, set to 
New York during the 
1870s. Directed by William 
A Setter. 

4.10 Rim: Destination Death* 
(1956) starring Russell 
Napier. Scotland Yard’s 
Inspector Duggan 
investigates toe death of a 
man found at London 
- Airport Directed by 
Montgomery Tully. 

445 Double Piquet A Dublin 
day-tripper misses his 
coach home. . . 

5.15 News summary and 
weather followed by The 
Business Programme. 
Fifteen years after Rolls 
Royce was rescued by the 
government, lain Carson 
reports on preparations to 
return the company to the 
private sector. 

6.00 Second Glance. The first 
of a series of documentary 
films withoutwords. 

6.15 International VofleybaH. - 
China v a team of allstars. 

7.15 Patterns of LifedHome 
Sweet Hole. This opening 
programme of a new 
senes concerns the 
bricklayers, engineers and 
carpenters of toe animal, 
bird and insect world. 

8.15 My Britain -Jim Prior. The 
former Conservative 
cabinet minister, now 
chairman of GEC talks 
about fns home, politics 
and the turning points in 
his life. 

9.15 Mr Pye. Episode one of a 
four-part adaptation of 
Mervyn Peake's fantasy 

, tale, starring Derek Jacobi 
and Judy. Parfitt The story 
. concerns a retired bank 
manager who embarks on 
a private crusade to bring 

< - love and peace to a cynical 

< world. He chooses the 

i people of Safk as tire 

community to be toe first 

: of his conquests. 

% 10.15 FSm: The Knack — And 
How to Get tt- (1965) 
starring Rita Tushingham. 
Michael Crawford and Ray 
Brooks. Award-winning 
comedy about an innocent 
schoolteacher's attempts 
i to become as experienced 

as his smooth fellow- 
lodger. Directed by 
Richard Lester. 

11.50 Snooker. Highlights of the 
final of the Dulux British 
Open. Endsat1Z45 


( Radio 4 "") 

535 Shipping 600 News 6-10 
Prelude (s) 630 News; 
Morning Has Broken. 635 
Weather; Travel 
700 News 7.10 Sunday 

Papers. 7.15 Apna Hi ■.* 
Ghar Samajhiye. 7.45 Befisf ' 
730 Turning Over New 
Leaves. 

800 News 8.10 Sunday 
Papers. 8.1S Sunday. 

830 JOanna Lumley with the 
Week's Good Causa 

9.00 News. 810 Sunday 
Papers. 

9.15 Letter from America by 
Alistair Cooke. 

930 Mommg Service from St 
Petroc's Church, Exeter. 

10.15 The Archers. Omnibus . 
edition. 

11.15 Pick of the Week with 
June Krtox-Mawer rs). 

12-15 Desert island Discs. 

Michael Parkinson talks 
to John Dankworth (s). 

1235 Weather. 

1.00 The World This Weeked: 
News. 

200 News; Gardeners' 

- Question Time. 

230 The Afternoon Play. 
"Inukshuk" by Rachel 
Wyatt With Irena Mayeska 

345 Veetotai Now. Richard 
Kelly teas the story of the 
Victorian entertainer. Joe 
Wilson, (n. 

4.00 The Food Programme. 

Derek Cooper on the 

- unhygenic side of the food 
business (r). 

430 The Natural History 

Programme with Fergus 
Keeltoa and Lionel Kelieway. 
500 News; Travel 
505 Down Your Way. Brian 
Johnston visits 
Penzance and Newlyn to 
ComwaS. 530 Shipping. 

6.00 News. 

5.15 Weekend Woman’s 
Hour. Highlights from 
past programmes. 

700 Travel; Lord of Misrule. 
Historical drama senes 
by Gareth Jones set at the 
time of toe Jacobite 
Rebellion (4) (s). 

7.45 Streams to tne Desert 
Meditation for Lent. 

8.00 Bookshelf with Hunter 
Davies. 

830 Law In Actior uln terview 
with the Attorney- ' 

General about Government 
law officers giving legal 
advice to coffee 
900 News. Jude the 
Last episode of the 


dramatization ot Thomas 
Hardy's novel.. 

1000 News. 

10.15 The Sunday Feature: Out 
for the Count Why so 
many British adults tall to 
team to deal with 

' mathematics on a practical 
baste and how their 
difficulties might be 
overcome. 

1100 Before the Ending of the 

11.15 to Committee. The work 
of Pari laments Select 
Committees. 

1200 News; Weather 

VHF (available m England and 
S.Wales only) except 
535-600 am Weatner Travel. 
7.00-8-00 Open University: 
700 Romantic Poets. 7.20 
Pope's ‘Essay on Man* 

740 Technology: Bridging the 
Gap. 4.00-600 pm 
Options: 400 Modem 
European Authors. 430 
Digame) 500 Get by in Arabic. 
530 Deutsch Direkt ! 

( Radio 3 ) 

635 Weather. 7.00 News 

705 Schubert and his 
. Contemporaries; 

Schubert (Symphony No 4); 
Tomasek (Two Edoques. 

Op 47 Nos 2 arid 3: 

Stepan .piano); Reicha 
(Wind Quintet, Op 91 No 3); 
Giuliani 

(Introduction. Theme wtrh 
variations): Beethoven 
(Symphony No 8). 9.00 
News. 

9.00 Your Concert Choice: 

Field (Piano Concerto No 
2: John O'Conor.piano); 

. Krommer (Partita lor 
wind ensemble, 0p7t);Harty 
(John Field suite); Billy 
Mayeri(Marioold: Richard 
Rodney Benriettptano). 

1030 Music Weekijcmdudes a 
conversation with Esa- 
Pekka Salonen, and Alan 
Tyson on Mozan Horn 
Concertos. 

11.15 to or Oistakh and Natalia 
2ertsatova: violin and 
piano. Beethoven (Sonata to 
C minor, Op 30 No 2; 

- Sonata In F, Op 24 

12.15 Froin the 85 Proms; BBC 
SO, BBC Singers, 

Donahoe (piano). 
Rozario(soprano) and 
Roberts (baritone), - 
Stravinsky (caritata:Le 

roi des etoiies); Gerhard 
(cantata: L'Alta ndbrenca 
del Rei enjaume); Bartqk 
(Plano Concerto No 2).. 


1.10 Worc&a talk by Sits 
Narasimhan. 

1.15 Proms:part2. Stravinsky 
(Rite of Spnnq). 

200 Andras Schrtrprano 
recital. Bach (English 
Suite No 3): Schumann 
(Etudes symphontques. 

Op 13): Cnopin (24 Preludes, 
Op 28). 

330 Cupid and Death: James 
Shirley's masque. Musk 
by Locke and Gibbons.With 
. Brian Sanders and 
'Joseph Cornwell as Death, 
and Poppy Holden as 
Cupid.Witfr the Consort of 
Musicke. 

5.15 In the Shade_of. Spring 
Leaves: compilation of 
writings by Higuchi 
ictnyo:Witn Helen Breck 

' and Mark Straker. Narrator 
Leonard Fenton. 

6.00 SaHinen and Holmboe: 

BBC Welsh SO. Satlinen 
(Symphony No 2); Holmboe 
(Symphony No 5). 

630 Bntten and Judith 

Bingham: BBC Singers. 
Britten (Rejoice in toe Lamb); 
Bingham (A Winter Walk 
at Noon). 

730 God: play by Woody 
Allen. With Tony Roberts. 
Avery Schreiber.and Woody 
Alien. 

8.10 Haydn and Alwyn: 

Bochmann String Quartet. 
Haydn (Quartet m D„ Op 20 
No 4): Alwyn JQuartet No 

900 David Wilde: piano 
reate I. Beethoven 
(Sonata in A flat. Op 110): 
Schubert (Two 
impromptus. D 899, No 3 in in 
G fiat: No 4 in A flat 

930 The Mask of Time: by 
Tippett. BBC SO, BBC 
Symphony Chorus and 
soloists Robinson. 
Waiker.Tear and Cheek. Part 

one.Part two at 10-20. 

1135 Albert Sammons; Elgar 
Violin Sonata In E minor. 


Op84.wtto 
Mu 


urdOCh.pianO-Mono. 
1137 News. 12.00 Closedown. 
VHF only: 6.35am to 655 Open 
University. Poe try: The Radical 
1790s. 


C Radio 2 ) 

News on toe hour. Headlines 
730am. Sports Desks 1202 pm. 
602,10-02. 

4.00 am Martin Stanford (s) 

600 Steve True love (s) 7.30 Roger 
Royie is) 905 Melodies For You 
(s) 1100 Desmond Camngton (s) 


100 pm John Dunn presents 
Two's Best (s) 200 Benny Green 
(sj 3-00 Alan DeU (si 4.00. Jazz 
Classics in Stereo (9) Music is my 
Mistress: Duke Eltingion. 430 
- * ‘ ~ ' (Cliff 


Castle's 
Comer (With Roy CastteV730 
The Gentte Touoi (ins Williams) 
800 Cynthia Glover Sings 5.30 
Sunday half-hour from Holy Trinity 
Church. Hastings. Sussex. 9.00 
Your Hundred Best Tunes (Alan 
Keith). 10.05 Songs from the 
Shows (BBC Radio Orchestra). 
1030 Acker's Away. 11.00 
Sounds of Jazz (Peter Clayton) 
1.00 am Jean Chafe (s) 3.00- 
400 A Little Night Music (s). 


Q Radio 1~) 

News on toe half hour until 
1130am, men 230pm. 330. 430, 
730, 930, 12.00 midnight 
6.00am Mark Page. 800 Adrian 
John. 1000 Stave Whght 1230 
pm Jimmy SaviDe's Old Record 
Club. (i960. 1974 and 1968). 

230 Classic Concert (featuring Lex 
Zeppelin). 330 The Great Root 
'ri Rod Trivia Quiz. 4.00 
Chartbusters (Richard Skinner). ' 
500 Top 40 (Richard Skinrter)(s). - 
700 Anne Nightingale Request 
Show (si. 900 Robbie Vincent (s). 

11.00- 1200 The Ranking Miss 

P (SJ. VHF RADIOS 1 1£ 4.00 am 
As Radio 2. 5.00 pm As Radio 

1. 12.00- 400 am As Radio 2. 


WORLD SERVICE 


6.00 Nawsdesk 730 News 7.09 Twenty- 
Four Hours 730 From Our Own Corre- 


eftecaons 8. IS The Pleasure's Yours 
930 News 9.09 Review Ot The Breen 
Press 9.15 Seance m Action 9 l 45 in Holy 
Contemplation 1000 News 1001 Short 
Story 10.15 Classical Record Renew 
1030 Sunday Service 1100 News 11-09 
News About Brltam 11.15 From Our Own 
Conesponoem 1130 Baker’s Half Dozen 
1200 News- 1201 Play ot the week: Bnef 
Encounter 100 World News 109 Twenty- 
Four HOWS 130 Sports Rowteup 1.45 
The Sand) Jones Request Show 200 
News 230 Pnde and Prejudice 330 Ramo 
Newsreel 3.15 mtematfonal Recital 400 
News 409 Commentary 4.15 Faces 4.45 
Lend From Amerce 500 News 509 
Reflections 5.15 Meridian 800 News B09 
Twenty-Four Hours 9.15 The Pleasure's 
Yours 1000 News 1009 Breakfast at 
Tiffany's 1025 Book Chocs 1030 Reb- 
oots Swvce 100 News 101 The Star 
Wars History 105 Enafcsh Swig 200 
News 209 Rewew of the British F 


2.15 Peebles Chocs 230 Soence m 
Acton 300 News 309 News About Bmam 

3.15 Good Books 330 Anyttwg Goes 
400 Newsdesk 430 Foreign Affavs 5.45 

Al times in GMT. 


Recording dthe Week, i 



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16 SATURDAY MARCH 1 1986 THE TIMF.S < 

Marcos President Aquinokeeps it in the family 

ships in — — SL — J 

fortune 


★ ★ ★ ★ ★ ★ 


Fits? published 1785 


m pesos 

From Michael Bin yon 
Washington 

Some glimpse of former 
President Marcos's private 
wealth was gained when crates 
stuffed with more than $1 
million in Phillipine currency 
began arriving at Hicluun 
Airbase in Hawaii, where the 
former President and his fam- 
ily were yesterday spending 
their third day. 

Federal authorities said the 
money arrived on Thursday on 
a US Airforce plane bringing 
the private possessions of Mr 
Marcos and his party. 

Customs officials have be- 
gun an investigation why the 
money, some 26 million pesos 
in new Philippine currency, 
was not declared. US law 
requires all visitors bringing in 
more than 510,000 in Ameri- 
can or foreign currency to fill 
out a form. 





jiV * ■'« 



£.*'■ • ... 








Mr Larry SpeaJkes, the - ' ' '■*« sS&m 

White House spokesman, said r ' hitjm 

officials had not checked Mr ! V V , 

Marcos's baggage as a conrte- •"<- [ ■ • VjiV- - , 

sy, but he bad undergone a Nl. J 1 • \ 

com ole te customs ev^unmation S' .J J? ’2*111 


Letter from Warsaw 

Black market in 
the classics 

“Pst! — does the gentleman dealers. 26 of whom will soon 
want Hemingway? John le face trial. Over the past few 
i Carre in unofficial transla- years the gang has netted 
lion? Mailer or Amis? Per- several hundred thousand 
haps Grimm’s Fairytales, pounds from stolen books — 
unavailable in the shops?” hardly surprising when a 
For some reason 1 have history 1 of philosophy is of- 
never been, offered dirty post- fered by sleazy dealers at 
cards by a man in a black 6.000 zloties (£2 d| — two 
plastic 'mackintosh, but 1 weeks' average wages and 
imagine it to be a similar more than six times the 
transaction to the dealing on official price, 
the book black market in The racket is simple. The 
Warsaw. Main Book Warehouse sup- 

Books are valued here bev plies books to the whole 
cause of the high level of country — bookshops, librar- 
iiteracy. the abysmal quality ies. universities. The boxes 
of lelevison and above all the are loaded into lorries and the 
shortage of paper. numbers entered into the 

Although there are print- dispatch registers, 
runs - especially on leaders' The transport guard signs a 
speeches and school text- logbook and lakes the books 
books — the communist to the post office, where the 
world has few Harold Rob- clerk gives him receipts wife- 
bins. fewer Jackie Collins and out counting the boxes. Three 
positively no Jeffrey Archers: or four boxes are held over 
no best sellers on the galrgan- and either go straight to black 


n 


tuan scale of the West. 


market dealers or. less iucra- 


complete customs examination 
on his arrival. The second 
plane, however, was examined 
by customs agents, who video- 
taped the inspection. 

It is not dear whether Mr 
Marcos has violated US law, 
but the incident will probably 
help President Aquino's at- 
tempts to recover Mr 
Marcos's vast assets in the 
US. 

Yesterday the Philippine 
Government’s transition com- 
mission began to make an 
inventory of the art works and 
antiques In a house owned by 
Mr Marcos in the name of the 
Philippine Government in 
Manhattan. 

The building and contents 
are valued at 515 million and 
include Chinese vases, Persian 
carpets, gold bathroom fix- 
tures and antiques. But other 
works of art were missing, and 
the commission members said 
large crates had been removed 
before Mr Marcos fell. 

As the Marcos group rested 
at the airbase, his family and 
Hawaii officials were discuss- 
ing his possible permanent 
residence. 



' . ■ % H 

■ ■■ * * 




■ ■■■■ - V". 

* 

I •• . 






, “ '* J-V / . I \ 

r Mr First fs^uly: fr«Went Aquino of the Philippines (centre) with her family. Her four daughters are, from left to right, Kris, Bollsy, Pinky and Viri. 
in the 80 ^ *hose husband Eldon is standing (right), is holding their son, Jnstin Benigno. Also pictured is Mrs Aquino's son, Noy-Noy. 

[innine Manila iReutcr) —The new important from the inessen- £ Y <r n*i on w m • y i~a i 

ke°an P’ ncs * s being run from a and* create a presidential bu- | ‘Ivan the Terrible in Israeli prison 

seventh-floor office in the reaucracy as they go along. 

Cojuangco building, head- The only bizarre touch in 
quarters of the Aquino family Mrs Aquino's appearance is 


Continued from page 1 palled out girls, raped and the West and emmigrated to 

that none of those on duty were shot them. Some of the weaker the United States in 1952. 
Ashkenazi lews with relatives People he killed with his bare The Israeli case is that he 
or friends among the 900.000 bauds. was captured while serving 

who were killed at Treblinka Only about ISO of the with the Soviet Army hot that 
death wmp near Warsaw in 900,000 who went to he then won his release by 
1942 and 1943. Treblinka survived the war volunteering to serve as a 

n „ Tit. “d only a few of those are still prison guard at Treblinka. 

a,ive ’ J® of tbem b> Israel. His kgal battle to prove that 

Their evidence will be crucial be is IS one of history's 

was neJwnallZ m iden ^ f > in 8 Mr Denqaiqnk greatest mass murderers be- 
SSSuei Iv “ *■»* Terrible-. gan in 1979. Since then he has 

virtinKinin thZ He has consistently denied lost his naturalized USritizen- 

servia ^ “ Treblinka and ship and an appeal court has 
Sf c, *ims instead that he was a upheld the first extradition 
imknn fhmle pnB, * ,e ^ 1,1 **** simple soldier fighting with order granted against an al- 

the Red Army on the Eastern leged war criminal by the US 
Sometimes he conld not wait Front. The evidence against federal courts, 

he 30 minutes it sometimes bun, he insists, was fabricated He will appear for the first 

ook his victims to die. He by the KGB after be escaped to time in court tomorrow. 


polled out girls, raped and 


that none of those on duty were s b°t them. Some of the weaker 
Ashkenazi Jews with relatives People he killed with his bare 


company in the commercial the yellow plastic trim 10 her «S3S hands. 

did riel of Makati h_ ,Wc <* mentis among tM VUU.UUU 


disinct of Makati. spectacles, to match her dress 

A curious crowd, among and to symbolize her 
whom peanut vendors do a husband's ill-fated return, 
roaring business, jostles out- She laughed off a question 
side the building. about how many hours sleep 

Visitors are dosely searched she gets each night But she 
by security men. Upstairs the says: “The campaign was a i 
anterooms of the President's breeze compared to this.” 
office are thronged with aides. Asked if the presidency had 
official visitors, friends calling changed her personality, she 
to give their congratulations said: “I guess one always 


who were killed at Treblinka Un *r 
death <*gmp mur Warsaw in 900,000 
1942 and 1943. Treblinks 


about ISO of the 
who went to 


and hungry office-seekers. 

A presidential staff* of vol- 
unteers. most of them women 
and most of them wearing 
yellow dresses, tries to sift the 


changes. ! am more assertive 
now. I guess I realize there is a 
time when people must know 
1 mean business and they had 
better be careful or else.” 


1 • j , 'S. '■ - . ' \.,-s 


Solution to Puzzle No 16^76 Solution of Pazde No 164W1 


1942 and 1943. Treblinka survived the war 

- . . ... and only a few of those are still 

That was when a Ukraman alive , / 0 of them in Israe 

Their evidence will be crucial 
ttemcbiame of Ivan fee jj, identifying Mr Denqaqink 
Terrible . He was personally r Vfln y f!rr .*i,u« J J 

p ^S5 B JSl He denied 

serving in TreblinlTaS 
mntnr^bL^mminpJ^ii ebtims instead that be was a 

S? dSS " ith 

i>uiaw »uu fee Red Army on the Eastern 

Sometimes he conld not wait Front. The evidence against 
the 30 'Urinates it sometimes him, be insists, was fabricated 
took bis victims to die. He by fee KGB after be escaped to 


order granted against an al- 
leged war criminal by the US 
federal courts. 

He will appear for the first 
time in court tomorrow. 


. Interesting and popular au- lively, to crooked bookshop 
thors can sometimes receive managers who pay half the 
print-runs of 10.000 or cover price and pocket the 

20.000 — the number is resL 

always stated opposite the Police informers however, 
title page — but few seem to began to conon on to the gang 
reach the shelves. after a few years of operating. 

The effect is to benefit the There were the men who 
political underground and spent freely and knocked 
the criminal underworld. The back Russian champagne at 
Polish underground press Warsaw racecourses. There 
ranks as the biggest uncen- was the overheard restaurant 
sored publishing combine in conversation between mm s- 
the Soviet block. Tunning off port guards as they loudly 
dozens of novels, political discussed ways of disposing 
essays and history books a of encyclopaedias. S 

year. A tram driver-cum-book- } 

A poeL instead of waiting dealer was trailed to his 
three years or more to publish home, where detectives dis- 
his verse officially, can pub- covered a huge library of 
lish clandestinely in three stolen books. Some posi of- 
months. fice clerks were caught red- 

In some ways his lot is handed. A series of raids last 
belter than a British poet’s, year resulted in the arrest of 
He can expect an edition of the managers of Warsaw's 

2.000 to be sold out within a best bookshops. 

““A hiS J “"X The clean-up has improved 

read it and will undHstandall , he situalio / a Iinl £ ^ 

h.sallusionsHe will grta fair numb er of stolen paroeb has 
pnre. and he is spared an ^ ^ b wo ^ b 

inremew wih Mel vyn Bragg suspicion, gaps 

But n is die undepvorid 0 n the shelves, 
that is really thriving. A 
police raid recently led to the 

arrest of a gang of 50 book KOger BoyeS 





y -S' 




THE TIMES INFORMATION SERVICE 



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The Times Crossword Puzzle No 16,982 

A prize o/The Times Atlas of World History will be given for 
the first three correct solutions opened next Thursday. Entries 
should be addressed to : The Times. Saturday Crossword 
Competition. Box 4S6. I Tirginia Street. London El 9DD. 
The winners and solution will be published next Saturday. 
The winners of last Saturday 's competition are: Mr J. K. 
Brown. 19 Lindsay Park. Cardigan Road. Haverfordwest. 
Dyfcd. Mr M. F. Wintcrfload. La Baleine. Sark, Channel Is- 
lands. and Mr Roger Stevens. Klaven. Meavy Bourne. 
Yelverton. Devon. 


Today’s events 


MllSic tp*** a«d Souttv-Mst A406c North 

An Evening orMozuit Read- 

ing Festival Chorus and City of w and Haather Part Drtv*cor«BMion 
London Sinfonia. conducted by «P «tBd w Naasdan. wemftiey and 

Hall. South BankuSEl, 7.4o. Wesfway dosed from 8am unM 

Ernest Read Symphony Or- 5 pm betwe en wrweOty and Paddwgton; 
chestra, concert for children: *25215^ «. - - - 

sg.WiJifWrt SIS? 

Vienna, London Concen Or- , * ata * ■< *■»* = moke Snfc*n 

5 a ™ 1 mi - 

South Banket 1 . 7.30. Iran (tain to 5pm an Sawn BndaaJUO; 

The Raglan Baroque Players: Several seteot temporary h^ts between 
Sheldonian Theatre. Oxford: 8. 

Bloomsbury Sinfonietta. Sue camagemy closed tar iepan between 
Hartley (soprano), Alan Lamb |unctioni3 and 14 (A572 Wbraloy) and 
(baritone): St James's Church, JW ^ 

piccidiHv: 7.3°. sffiWBasBsssatBss 

Dvorak s Stabat Mater. Cray- g (Pnncess Partway It Doncastar to 
don Philharmonic Choir and SheWta Mto* road dosed: dwerawnssign- 
London Philharmonic Or- 47R . „ „ r M ^ 

chestra. Fairfield Halls. Croy- CaiTSTandge^Sri^T end 
dom 7.45. GalowayA9: Singia-taie traffic Sam M 

Oare. String Orchestra; 


Roads 


In the garden 


. Galo^yAa Shxjie%ie traffic Sam H 

Oare String Orchestra; ^ 

Alexander Centre, Faveretuim; crease: cam. tricars, caravans. 4$ 

7.3 infer 12 seats. 40p; coaches 

Musical Evening by students »«ts . 70p: commar od vertd eg. 

or South Downs College si 23SSSCS 

Brune Park SchooL Military 
Road. Gosport, Hants: 7.30. 

Choir and the Manchester 
Camera la, Manchester Cathe- 
dral. 7.30. 

Concen by the Chilingirian 
Siring Quartet. Assembly 
House. Norwich; 7.30. 

Morriston Orpheus Male 
Choir. Si David’s Day Concert; 

St George's, Brandon HilL Bris- 
tol; 7.30. 

Mass in B Minor (Bach) by 
the Canonbury Chamber Choir 
St Giles Church, Barbican. Lon- 
don: 7.45. 

The Morriston Orpheus Male 
Choir, perform opera, comedy 
and negro spiritual music: St. 

George's. Brandon Hill. Bristol; 

7.30. 

George Russell Orchestra: 

r™ Cen,re - Bir_ I at Litomsy. now Czechoslova- 

nungbam. 8. ( , ■ . a -i , rw, t i,-. 


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ACROSS 

1 Posh decoration by novice, 
this flower duster (5). 

4 Found one passage to cen- 
sure (9). 

9 Wine from the Leningrad 
collection? (9). 

10 Catch the old boy — he 
made a fortune in India (5). 

11 Son of look you get from a 
literary don (6). 

12 No representative has look 
in — the boss is here! (8). 

14 Stan working to seize power 
(4.6). 

16 Protuberance in the back 
row (4). , 

19 Live on the Spanish river 
(4). 

20 It’s spent so badly it's an 
irregularity ( 10) 

22 Intolerable acts followed 
one such social gathering (3- 
5). 

23 He won't work, but within 
limits can ski very well (6). 

26 Consumer admits husband 
is the master ( 5). 

27 Old puffer reverses order of 
the Cavalry Club |4.5l. 

28 BA changes gown and gets 
jumped on by supporters 

29 About which some girls 
used to be waspish (5). 


DOWN 

1 Was she in front of house 
when it fell? (9). 

2 Do dancers prop it up? 
Quite the reverse (5). 

3 Has ample lime to see lurid 
version (8 k 

4 Wall-eyed saint? t4). 

5 Candle maker, said to be 
from Wales ( 10). 

6 Peri with no love left for this 
Cretan girl (6). 

7 This conveyance is invalid - 
look at lire crosses on it (9f 

8 Board the coach by the mo- 
tor way. we're told (5). 

13 Below par on the greens — 
it's disconcerting! (3-7). 

15 Lines cut off by Porlock 
businessman (5.4). 

17 Rising again. River Ure gels 
name for turbulence (9). 

18 Vehicle worth a pile to the 
dramatist (8). 

2! School that stirs up clods 

(6). 

22 Signal for a lift — one or 
those lhai go up or down 
15). 

24 Little weight would be at- 
tached to this composer's 
judgement (5). 

25 Continue to fool (4). 


Tomorrow's events 

Music and recitals 
Bach. Handel and Chalmers 
in concert by the Pillars of 
Hercules. St Lawrence. 
Whiicchurch. Little Sian more: 
7.30 to 9.30. 

Jazz Sunday (trio): Riverside 
studios. Crisp Road. Hammer- 
smith: 12 to 2. 

Artemis Trio: Ro'-aJ Festival 
Hall. South Bank. 5EI. 12.30 to 


Anniversaries 


Today 

Births: Frederic Chopin, 
Zelazowa Wola, Poland. 1810: 
Augustes Pugin, architect and 
designer, prominent in the 
Gothic revival, London 1812. 

Deaths: Thomas Campion, 
poet and composer. London. 
1620; George Herbert poet 
Bemerton. Wiltshire. 1633; 
Gabrile D" Anmrazio, poet 
dramatist and politician. 
Gardone Riviera. 1938. 

Tomorrow 

Bedrich Smetana was bom 
at Litomsy. now Czechoslova- 
kia. 1824. Deaths: John Wes- 
ley, London, 1791: Horace 
Walpole. 4th Earl of Orford. 
London 1797; DJi. Lawrence, 
Vennce. Antibes. 1930: 


If your paperboy, postman 
and other visitors take a short 
cut across the lawn, why not do 
as they do in the parks of 
Hamburg? There, on street cor- 
ners, they plant beds of a dwarf 
berberis such as B. wilsonae or 
B. thunbergii, both of which 
grow to about 4ft and have a 
spread of about 4 to 6ft There is 
a smaller form of B. thunbergii, 
called “Atropurpurea Nana." 
measuring about I to i'/tft. All 
have yellow flowers and red 
berries. 

As it is prohibited to put 
strands of barbed wire where the 
public might bump into them, a 
berberis hedge is a good barrier 
to stop small boys from charging 
through the front garden. Holly, 
of course, has the advantage of 
being evergreen, but it sheds its 
old leaves and these are a 
nuisance when one is weeding or 
clearing up near the hedge. The 
spines on the old leaves seem to 
get harder and more vicious the 
older they are. 

Branches of forsythia. cut 
now and placed in water, will 
soon open their flowers. So. too, 
will branches of flowering cur- 
rant. but do not be surprised if 
the flowers of the pink or red 
forms turn out to be white when 
they open in water. 


Weather 


The pound 



The Concise Crossword is on page 21 


Roy Vaughan (piano) and S222T3 
Richard Lyon (double bass). 

Royal Festival Hall. 5EI. 8 to iretendP 
10.20. Kaiy Lira 

of Praise: Favcrsham 
Parish church. Farersham: 6.30. Nanny i 

The Christian Rock Band; Penugai 
Sittingbourne Town HalL fgff 5S 
Siuingboarne: fi. sSsSmI 

Lectures and seminars 

Thousands are Sailing: the Yugaam 
sior> of Presbyterian emigrants . 

to the United States in the eSvass 
eighteenth century - . Riverside Dirferani 
studios. Cnsp Road. Hammer- 2* e 2fr s 

Ueneral events Loouemi 

Swale Majorcncs Twirling otiZ7B4 
Championships; Kcmslcy Con- 
cen Hall. Kemsley Village: 9 to 

b- ^ pgrk 

Sports Competition: Rowens 
Spons Centre. Sitringboome: 2. — 

In Your Own Write. Youth The 
Drama Festival. The Theatre nounce 
Royal. Sawclosc. Bath: 10 to 6. first tin 

Isle of Wight Musical Com- car par 
petition Festival; for informa- nonula 
lion contact 0983 52434 J; (ends hS- 
22 March). 

Antique and Collectors Fair. wni , 
Battersea Town Hall. Lavgndor J rar - ** 
HiiLSWl. 11 lo 5. the Tit 


Bank Bonk 

UAS US 

Austria SOI 23.G0 22.43 

BalgwnFr 69.50 65.70 

Canada S 2.15 2JX 

Danmark Mr 1255 1 1.85 

Finland Mkfc 7.75 7.35 

Prance Fr 1IL38 9^3 

Geramy On 133 220 

Greece Dr 247 222 

HongKengS 11.70 1120 

Ireland Pt 1.12 1.06 

nary Lira 2^90 2,170 

Japan Yon 275 261 

Netherlands GW 3.79 1 R 

Norway Kr 1IL65 10.10 

Ponugai Esc 221 210 

South Africa Rd 3.15 sac 

Spam Pta 210 138 

Sweden Kr i(UC 10J1 

Switzerland Ft 2.BS 2.70 

USAS 132 1,45 

Yugoslavia Dnr 510 450 

Rates lar smel denomination sank notes 
onhr as iupt*aa oy Baraevs Bank PLC. 
Different raiea apply 10 travellers' 
cneoues and other foreign currency 
Business. 

R«1a* Price bide* 379 7 

London: me rTlndei closed down -3.1 


Park charge 


The National Trust an- 
nounced >csterday feat for the 
first time they are to charge for 
car parking a’t Tarn Hows, the 
popular beauty spot between 
Hawkshead and Coniston, 
which the Queen visited last 
sear, it will cost 50 p to park in 
the Trust's carpark there. 


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A trough of low pressure 
will edge slowly north* 
wards into far S while a 
ridge of high pressure 
persists across Scotland. 


LondorvSE, central S, SW En- 
gland: Mainly cfoudy, snow at times: 
wind E strong to gate force max 
temp 0-2C (32-36F). 

East AngK^EW Mdtands^ 
Wales Rather doudy, occasional 
snow flurries: wind E, strong to gale 
force; max temp 0-2C (32-36F). 

EfE England: Sunny periods, 
scattered sleet or snow showers: 
wind E fresh or strongjocally gale: 
max tamp 1-3C (34-37F). 

Channel Islands: Mostly cloudy, 
rain at times; wind E strong to gale 
farce: maxteiw) 3C (37F). 

N Wales, NW, central N 
Lake District Mainly dr 
periods-., wind E fresh oi 


SunriMK 
6.47 am 


6-35 am 

Last quartar Match 3 


Sun sets: 
5.40 pm 


Moonnsss: 
12.28 am 



V Sub rises: Son Ms: 

6.44 am 5.42 pm 

Wkmnnses: lloon sets ; 
12.26 am &56am 

tomorrow 


Lighting-up rime 

TODAY 

London 6.10 pm to 6.14 am 
Bristol 620 pm 10 624 am 
EdMbwgh 6 16 am 10 6.33 am 
Man ch e ste r 6.16 pm to 625 am 
Penzance G24 pm to 624 am 

TOMORROW 

London 6. 12 pm to 6.12 am 
Bristol 6 22 pm to 622 am 
EdMaoBh fi.ifl pm to 6.30 am 
Mancheatar 6 18 pm to 823 am 
Psiuanctf 6.35 pm to 6.32 am 


Sun Ram 

EAST COAST ^ 
Scwbmu 
BmSkigton 54 
Cromer 8.0 
Lowestoft 85 
dacron 84 
Margate 
SOUTH COAST 
- Folkestone 02 
Hastings 69 
Eastbourne 57 
B r ighton 82 
Wo rthing Q 5 
LMtctimptn 91 

BognorR 92 
Soudisea 8 9 

Sandown 5 5 

ShonftJJn 62 - 

■ Boumerotb 87 

Poole 70 

Cranage 7-5 

■ Weymouth 7.1 

Eamouth 5.j 

Teigmnoutfi 4 8 

Torquay 4 7 

Falmouth 01 

Penzanco 10 

Jers^f 26 

Guernsey 49 

WEST COAST 
Scitty isles 1 0 

Newquay 0.8 


2 38 cloudy 

3 37 Ought 
2 36 sunny 
0 32 9urmy 
t 34 sunny 

sunny 

0 32 gale 

1 34 sunny 
t 34 Onght 

2 36 sunny 
5 41 sunny 

4 39 sunny 
4 39 sunny 

4 39 sunny 

3 37 Sunny 

3 37 sunny 

5 41 sunny 
a 41 sunny 

. 3 37 sunny 
5 4i sunny 

4 39 sunny 

4 36 Sunny 

5 41 sunny 
4 39 ctouOy 
3 37 ctoudy 

1 34 cloudy 

2 36 sunny 

3 27 sumy 

4 39 bright 


Sun Ham 
hre m 

Bfracomfae 

a.7 - 

ColwynBay 33 . 

Morecsmbe 7.4 - 

Douglas 

ENGLAND AW) WALES 

London 9 2 

Alrpt 9 5 

Brtatol(CtH) g.T . 
Cardiff (Ctrl) 82 

AfS*e*»V 95 

B'poolAIrpt 95 - 

ItendiMtar 9.0 . 

Nodmgham 97 
ycd-n-Tyne 5 2 . 

Cwfcale 68 

SCOTLAND 

EskdalermBr 8.0 

Prestwick 8.6 
Oasgow 43 - 

Thee 8.9 . 

aommmy 0.4 - 

ter* «<..», 

tontoss 93 
fhenleen a O 

n'un l V Sr,> ! U * 2.3 003 
“WJwgh 03 002 

e22S BU<w ff. ND 1 


Max 
C P 

2 38 sunny 
3. 37 -sunny 

2 36 Ongrn 

3 37 sunny 


2- 36 snow 

4 39 -sunny 
3 37 bngni 
3 37. sonny 
3 37 cloudy 

5 4T sonny 
5 41 sonny ■ 

2 38 sunny 

1 34 sunny 

3 37 snow 

2 38 .snow 


3 "37 sdnny 


Yesterday 


Temperatures 
Cloud. I. lair: r. 


Bristol d 

Cardiff I 
Etknb m gh 91 
Glasgow sn 


at mdday yesterday: e. 
rain: s. sun. 

C F CP 

439 O uc nu ey si 032 
337 Inverness s 1 34 
337 Jersey sn -1 30 
236 London t 134 
134 MYrchster s 337 
236 Ne wc as t le sn 439 
236 ITnbUwsy 


Abroa d 

"aBOOAY: C. ctouct d. la,: fg. tog: r, ram. ^ ^ tl 


ApCOO 

Akrotel 

Atex'dria 

Aigiera 

AmsTdrn 

Athens 

Bahrain 


C F 

f ]S 59 Cologne 
s 17 63 Cp3ga 
16 Bl Corfu 
c 23 73 Dubfin 
B 1 34 Duhrvnfc 
I 8 46 Fora 
S 20 68 IT ore u ce 


§ Jisjffis? 

1«BL 


C - F 

a 16 61 Rome 


c 16 51 SPmao M 

SPriKo 


® ? Si L_. - c .1 34 Stafltaoc: 


Our address 


SSSds l M S ESSS S ? il man c T 34 

1 fr S ™*Twi s 1 34 fifnntimil r 

BHtate c 14 57 Funehol / 14 57 Mwoo l \l cS 

c -1 M Mmttch 


Inlormauon lor inclusoa In Tho 
Times In/ormaliun service should he 
-* 1 * 1 to. The Editor. Informauon 
Smiw. t. Pmnmgian st. London El. 

fTlMK NEWSPAPERS LIMITED. 
i486 PnniM Mr London Pon l prtm 
ersi Limited Puuuhnl by Times 
Newspapers Limited. P O Ron 7, 200 
Cray’s inn Ruad. London, wet x BEZ- 
Cnound Saturday. March 1. 1996. 
Rnnsiered as a nrmoaper at Uw Pou 
Office. 


Bermud a 

Btantu 

Bourne 

Borde'x 

Brusseta 

Burtrpr 
B Aires 
Cairo 
CapeTn 


_ _ G «•« C -1 30 Urndf* 
5 g Mofsmlci a -6 21 Kanias 
B 17 ra B , l a . I ’S 

c , -iiSsS3‘ t liSSiS* 
‘ojljSSS s31 “p2b 

f 18 64 Lobon .q 12 54 Pngt 
? I? Locarno C 2 -38 H 


•C 12 54 
C 2 -38 


in s 19 Locarno c ? -tr nnAi^n ” „ wmnna 

£hianca c 16 84 Unemba c ■* pk c 2 30 Warsaw 

fflBriasMrj lasS -sii^ 

« 1 «totas figures era latest av^w * 


* 29 8* 

I 9 48 T*J 

* 23 ra TaoeriSr- 
a -3 27 Tokyo 

S !S 2 Toronto 

* -S 23 TUnis 

s -2 28 Valencia 
a 2 38 VaSw 
■ 29 84 Venice 

* I 19 Vienna 
c 2 38 Warsaw 
3 12 54 WashTun 


. C F 
£ -7 45 
a -3 27 
-f a i 88 
-S. 13 56 
'*7» 79 
:■( 1 34 
t». 88 
. *- -2 28 
-»i-S23 


d 46 61 
A 9 46 
>f-10 14 
I 18 84 
c i3 SS 
1 11 S2 
c 0 32 
t -7 19 
e -3 27 

r'14 57 
O -5 23 


( 










1 - 7 March, 1986 


wmw 


TIMES 


A weekly guide 
to leisure, entertainments 
and the arts 


T ; . 


in 





I first became acqusiiiied 
with gambling one June. 
21. Born on me first day 
of summer, I approached 
the gamuts tables with firm 
resojve on the evening of my 
twenty-first birthday. I en- 
tered the -Palin Beach" in' 
Cannes with a godfather on 
either - side ; of me,' both of 
whom were am used to .witness 
my debut on the green baize. 

In those days in Cannes at 
the.end.of'Jun?, some of the 
most, famous patrons of the 
PainiBesudi would come face 
to fece. Darryl Zanuck was 
there, • as wt^ I think, the 
Cognac r Hdtws5ys, and Jack 
Warner; ami other giants 
among Cte^e^ gamf^eis of 
all time. Wlself, 1 was kept 
away from this - table ana, ' 
more bewildered than im- 
pressed, merely observed die 
conflict among Titans.; I 
learned the roles of ckemin de 
fir , learned that on a single 
hand of just , two cards, with a 
combined value of 8 or 9 one 
stood to win SO milhon oki 
francs — although one then 
had to stake tbo* winnings 
double or quits on the next 
hand, against- just two cards. 
More than the enormity of the 
sums involved, it was the 
speed with . which, they 
changed hands that fascinated 
me. 1 fancied myself gambling 
with my destiny, just like that, . 
in two quick hands. 

! ended up with my guard- 
ian angels, or rather my 
demon spirits, at a- little 
roulette table, where I was 
amazed to discover that my 
favourite numbers were 3, 8 
and 1.1 - a feet of which I had 
been totally unaware and 
which turned out to be nnal- 
teraWe. I discovered that I 
preferred black- to red, odd 
numbers to even, tow to high, 
and, other instinctive choices 
that- .would no doubt be of 
great interest to . psychoana- 
lysts. . 

And something else T dis- 
covered for myself was that, at 
life gaming table more than 
anywhere else, it was impor- 
tant to conceal one's emo- 
tions. In the course ofa single 


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The dement where the .. 

. temperatere was high 
but the players were cool 

evening I had seen^ it all, 
betrayed on . people's feces 
with the kind of intensity and 
exaggeration affected by cer- 
tain ham actors: , distrust, cre- 
dulity, disappointment, anger, 
passion, stubbornness, exas- 
peration, relief exultation 
and. even more unconvincing- 
ly. indifference; And so I 
decided that, come what may, 
whatever the blessings- or 
blows of fete, I would meet 
them always with smiles and 
graciousness. 

I will not seek to explain 
here the appeal of gambling; 
either you are susceptible to it, 
or you aren't- You are a born 
gambler just as you are bora 
with red hair, or intelligence: 

Jt is true that gambling is a 
profoundly absorbing pas- 
time. Ix is true that you can 










keep the peirson.you love most 
waiting for two hours if you 
are involved m a game that 
affords any relish. It is true 
that you can almost complete- 
ly forget your debts, con- 
straints and restrictions in 
pursuit of the croupier's shoe, 
only to come to an hour later 
. and find your problems have 
increased tenfold. But what an 
hour! Your heart races, you 
lose all notion of lime, forget 
the value of money, forget the 
tentacle-like shackles of soci- 
ety. ’ 

It is true that as yon play, 
money becomes once again 
what it should never cease to 
be: a game, chips, something 

thatDHisttatradedforsome- 

tfaihg dse and that in itself is 
meaningless. It is also true 
: that real gamblers me rarely 
wicked, miserly or aggressive. 
They have . a toleration for 
others shared by all those who 
are not afraid to lose what they 
have; those who consider that 
all material possessions and 
moral tenets have no' lasting 
value; For them every setback 
is no more than a stroke ofbad 
luck, and every victory a gift 
from heaven. ■ 

One summer I rented a big, 
dusty, dilapidated house 
above Honfleur, and I was all 
ready to spend the month of 
July swimming in the sea 
when I discovered two situa- 
tions dial, alas, went hand in 
hand: the sea was always miles 
out, but the casino at Deau- 
ville was always open. Instead 
of days spent in the sunshine, 
there . were nights without 
deep. For Bernard Frank, 
Jacques Chazot and me, there 
was only the dawn and the 
night, with sometimes a 
glimpse of grass in between. 

* The singing of birds was 
drowned by the dick of chips, 

green baize took the place of 
green fields. 

On August 7. the day before 
I was supposed to vacate the 
house, we went for what we. 
thought was the last time to 
the large white casino. Soon 
ruined at a game of chemin de 
fir , I withdrew to the roulette 
table where by dawn," tha nk s 
-to the 8 which came up 


♦ 



mm i 

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Thomas McAvoy, Lite Magazine ©1955. Time Inc 

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immediately and continued to 
do so, I was in possession of 
80,000 new francs (this is 
I960). 

We returned to the house ra 
excellent spirits, only to find 
the owner himself at the front 
door. I was about to start 
going through the dreaded 
inventory with him when, out 
of the blue, he asked me 
whether 1 wanted to buy the 
house. I opened, my month to 
say that ! was a bom tenant, 
that I never. bought anything, 
when he added: “FU let you 
have it for80,000 francs." It 
was August 8, I had won on 
the 8. he was selling it for eight 
million old francs, it was eight 
o’clock in the morning — what 
else could I do in the circum- 
stances? I drew the banknotes 
out of my bulging evening bag 
and went to bed in triumph in 
what was to be — and has 
remained to this day — the 
only property on earth I own: 
a house that is stfll rather 
dilapidated, situated three 
kilometres from Honfleur, 
and twelve from Deauville. 

Let no one come to tell me 
of the evils of gambling or the 
misfortune that weighs on 
gamblers. I shall say nothing 
of the endless repairs or the 
various disasters that owner- 
ship of this country house has 
entailed — and with which any 
property owner will be famil- 
iar. Instead 1 shall cite the 25 
wonderful years during which 
I faithfully returned to the 
house, 25 years of sunshine 


. . * 


and rain and rhododendrons 
and the happy holidays I have 
spent there. Mortgaged 20 
times over, nearly sold on two 
occasions, a workplace for my 
working friends and a refuge 
for lovers, this house is today 
worth eight billion memories. 

And of course the same 
house has witnessed countless 
dawn returns, in triumph or 
despair, but always in that 
spirit of excitement and insou- 
ciance which accompanies the 
practice of gambling. Thou- 
sands of anecdotes surface in 
my memory, just thinking of 
those breakfasts drinking cof- 
fee or champagne, when doors 
were carefully closed without 
a sound if we had lost, or burst 
open on any unfortunate 
’ sleeper with cries of triumph: 
“We're celebrating. 1 " 

There was the time some- 
one made 60,000 francs, hav- 
ing started with only 100; and 
the time when, because I 
didn't speak clearly, my last 
hundred francs were placed on 


SATURDAY 


Willkommen, 
bienvenue. . . 
Liza Minnelli 
on stage in 
London, page 22 


Arts Diary 

Bridge 

Chess 

Concern 

Crosswcfrd 

Dance 

Drink 

Films 

Galleries 

Gardening 


22 Ont and About 21 
21 Opera 22 

21 Photography 22 

22 Radio 21 

21 Review 21 

22 Rock & Jazz 22 

18 Stopping 19 

22 Television 21 
22 Travel 18 

19 TV films 21 


the 30 and not on low by a 
harassed croupier, and the 30 
won. There was the time when 
a friend won back twice over 
everything his girlfriend had 
lost, and the time when anoth- 
er friend won enough to buy 
the car of his girlfriend's 
dreams. There was the time 
we all had to chip in to pay for 
the petrol to drive tack to 
Paris, not to mention the 
innumerable occasions when 
we had to borrow money from, 
the doorman to pay for the 
taxi Home. 

M emories of win- 
ning are always 
more vivid. You 
only remember 
the good times, just as you 
only remember congenial 
players. You cannot imagine 
the number of friends and 
acquaintances you can make 
in 25 years of gambling, and 
yet never know their names. 
You see the same faces night 
after night, for three months, 
then sometimes again the 
following year, then some- 
times for three years in a row. 
You do not talk to one another 
except to say hello: smiles of 
congratulation or regret are 
exchanged, depending on how 
the other is faring You share 
your fortune good and bad. 



The image of sang-froid: 
Sagan in the 1950s 

bound by ties closer than any 
that the most intimate confi- 
dences might create. There are 
friends like these that you do 
not lose (and there are a few 
whose death you learn of by 
chance, from a footman). You 
also come across gamblers 
who play too hard, whom you 
see at the beginning of August 
showing off in flashy cars, and 
who appear at the Bar du 
Soleil looking more haggard 
every day. and at the end ofa 
fortnight you learn of their 
urgent departure. "Adieu 
calves. cows. pigs, 
hefts . . . adieu to those dawns 
beneath the domed casino, 
adieu to the whiteness of the 
sea and the empty beaches, 
adieu to the galloping of the 
first horses prancing in the 
light that you flee, your eyes 
stinging with cigarette 
smoke . . 

It was after a run ofbad luck 
that I decided to go to 
London. My literary agent 
drew my attention to a sinister 
individual there, who was 
amassing a fortune at my 
expense. He owed me the sum 


of 25.000 francs, I believe, and 
refused to send it to me. I 
decided to set off with my 
agent on a mission to recover 
the money. 

On ihe very first evening, 
with my agent in tow, I had 
dinner with my charming 
friend. We dined at Annabel's 

— at that time, the place to go 

— and when we reached the 
dessert, my English friend 
pointed out that directly over- 
head. on the first floor, was the 
Clermont Club. I had heard 
several friends describe it. in 
tones of horror and delight 
combined, as a typically En- 
glish club, where the tempera- 
ture of the game was high 
though the players would dis- 
play all the coolness for which 
the British are renowned. So 
wc went upstairs. I was intro- 
duced by my friend, and 
knowing me all too well, he 
then left me alone for an hour 
at the chemin de fer table and 
went tack downstairs to drink 
my health with my agent, who 
was already suffering' some 
misgivings. 

1 surveyed the scene around 
me. It was a large, comfort- 
able. wood -panelled room, 
with leather- furniture and a 
few inimitable specimens of 

Continued on page 18 


- • ■ ‘ 


THIS-SUNDAY-ONLY 


END OF SEASON FINAL FANTASTIC REDUCTIONS 


0 ?em/vn vretf 




2nd MARCH 


9.30 am to 6.00 pm 



Why pay inflated retail prices, even at sale 
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Due to public demand, we are pleased to 
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This overwhelming selection covers everything 
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AccessAfisa/Amvl)iners and personal cheques accepted. 
Export orders VAT refundable. 


Budget Furs 83 


Silver Fox Coats rrp £7r995-- £2.095 


Silver Fox Jackets RRP £2*300- £499 


Mink Coats RRP •ETrSAO'— £4 7c* 


Mink Jackets RRP SS&er- £245 


Fur-lined Raincoats RRP 


Fox Jackets KKP 2t2»o-£99 




















SATURDAY 


THE TIMES SATURDAY MARCH 



TRAVEL 


A pearl of a place for 
seafood and history 


v.v V ■ X*. 


John P, Harris retraces the footsteps of two diarists and eats his way 
through mounds of shellfish in the charming resort of La Rochelle 



AN* 


The Craddocks stayed at La 
Rochelle's best hotel, the Comte 
d* Artois. They did not get much 
sleep, because of the bed-bugs. 

Mrs Craddock's diary of her tour 
of France in 1 785 has never been 
published in English. A pity. Two 
centuries later her observations 
have charm and value. Her manu- 
script was translated into French 
and published in Paris in 1896, and 
1 read it in La Rochelle's public 
library. 

No doubt resisting the temptation 
to have a good scratch, she admired 
"the immensity of the works of the 
Creator" on the beach. It was 
covered with "a multitude of men 
and women industriously scooping 
up oysters, mussels, shrimps etc." 

There were plenty of delicious 
etceteras on the two-foot-long pla- 
teau de fruits de mer my wife and I 
shared at Andre's fish bar on the 
harbour crabs big and little, 
langouslines, dams, cockles and 
winkles (pins provided) as well as 
oysters, prawns and shrimps, piled 
up on crushed ice and seaweed- 
immensity indeed, worthy of praise 
for all concerned, from the Creator 
downwards, and — with unlimited 
white and brown bread and butler — 
quite enough for a good lunch at 80 
francs each, accompanied by a 
bottle of Muscadet. 

Serge, also on the harbour, dem- 
onstrates his recipes on television 
and is better for elegantly cooked 
fish. But for what our children used 
to call scobbiers (a portmanteau 
word for lobsters, scallops and 
shellfish that go scrabbling or stay 
put) Andre is cheaper, and does a 
roaring trade among all classes of 
scobbler-lovers. 

The Comte d'Artois has disap- 
peared. A more eminent diarist, 
Virginia Woolf, stayed at the Hotel 
de France et d'Angleterre in 1931, 
and found it "exactly right". So did 
we. in I9S5: it is dean, quiet and 
well-equipped. It has a garage, an 
advantage that outweighs the five 
minutes' walk to the harbour. La 
Rochelle, for all its attractions, can 
induce trauma in the driver. 

We spent a sticky quarter of an 
hour navigating narrow one-way 
streets until we realized that the 



great square, to whose traffic jam we 
kept returning, is the Place de 
Verdun on the town-plan but the 
Place d'Armes on its buildings. 
Perhaps that is to confuse the 
enemy; La. Rochelle was occupied 
by the Germans longer than any 
other French town. 

Without a car. we might have 
chosen the garagdess St Jean d’Acre 
(slightly cheaper two stars instead 
of three) because of its splendid 
position right on the harbour. 

By "harbour'* I mean the Vieux 
Port, as distinct from the fishing 
port, the pleasure port with its 
moorings for thousands of yachts 
and lesser craft and — three miles 
away — the industrial port of La 
Pallice. with the femes to Ue de Re. 
The Vieux Port is the place to be; a 
fine man-made landscape, plus 
water and sky. and restaurants and 
cafes all around. Sitting on a raft 
terrace and toying with a beer, a nice 
cup of tea (well, fairly nice; this is 
France, where the tea is as pale and 
delicate as a Victorian heroine) or a 
Pineau des Cbarentes (the local 
aperitif, grape juice whose fermen- 
tation has been stopped by the 
addition of cognac), one contem- 
plates a foreground of strolling 
Rochelais and Rochelaises. some 
assorted foreigners, and well-heeled 
yachtspeople. and a background 
dominated by the great towers at the 
harbour entrance. 

The towers date from the 14th 


century. There used to be mighty 
chain slung between them every, 
night, to lock up the port in case of 
raiders. 

The town needed fortifications. 
Independent, prosperous and a 
centre of Protestantism, it was a 
thorn in the side of central govern- 
ment The Duke of Anjou besieged 
it in i 573. The inhabitants stuck it 
out for six months, helped by what 
they called their "incense- 
launcher": a device for casting 
boiling oil and pitch over the royal 
army, which gave it up as a bad job 
after losing 20,000 men. 

Cardinal Richelieu returned to 
the attack in 1627. The English tried 
to force the blockade and bring food 
in their ships, but Richelieu slung a 
long dyke across the bay, with 
soldiers and cannons on it leaving 
only a small gap for the tide. 
Starvation did the rest When 
Richelieu made his triumphant 
entry in October of the next year, all 
but 5.000 of the 28,000 inhabitants 
had died. 

Most of the fortifications, except 
the towers, were then destroyed. In 
place of the walls there is now a 
mile-long public garden, with the 
moat zigzagging through it conve- 
niently near the Vieux Port. A short 


trip by pleasure boat is recommend- 
ed. if only for the unforgettable 



On the waterfront: La Rochelle's harbour and the church of St Sauvear 


approach to the harbour. 

No danger of starvation in nor- 
mal times. Apart from all the fish 
and scobbiers, this is a land of 
cream and butter, drive south for an 
hour and cross by the ferry at 
Royan. and vou are in the Bordeaux 
vineyards; Cognac is a short dis- 
tance east: good beef in the mead- 
ows. and excellent lamb; and the 
Marais Poitevin is a stone's throw 
to the north; a curious region where 
the market gardeners divide their 
fields by canals and go about their 
business in little boats, producing 
succulent vegetables. 

In the environs, I went to Fouras, 
which has four beaches, facing u 
different directions, so whichever 
way the wind blows one can build 
sandcasiles, and bathe if the tide is 
in. When it is out. miles of oyster 
and mussel beds are exposed, and 
shrimpers shrimp. 


twisted in his mouth be said..." but 
Virginia Woolf just had coffee, silly 
girl The oysters were delicious, so 
cheap and such a lot of them. 
Marenrtes produces some 40 thou- 
sand tonnes a year, about 400 
million oysters. 

That is only about eight per head 
of the French population. Luckily 
there are big oyster beds in other 
parts of France, but the Marennes 
ones are among the best. Their 
sought-afier green colour comes 
from a unicellular seaweed, 
Navicuia Ostrearia , which appears 
and disappears unpredictably in the 
beds. They are just as nice when 
they are not green. 

I’m amazed that Leonard could 
stop after his first dozen. Perhaps it 
was Virginia looking squeamish. 
My wife eggs me on so we scobhled 
with gusto. 


TRAVEL NOTES 


Hotel France-Anqteterre, 22 rue 
Gargoulleau, 17(500 La R 
46 41 34 66. 76 rooms. 197-265 fr. 


Rochelle. Tel. 


Hotel St-Jean d'Acre, 4 place 
Chains, 17000 La Rochelle. Tel 46 41 
73 33. 49 rooms, 180-220 frs. 


Andre is at 5 rue Saint Jean. 

Serge is at 46 Cours des Dames. 
Office de Tourrsma. 10 rue 
Fieuriau, 17000 La Rochelle. Tel 46 
41 1468. 


Worth a visit is the tiny island of 
Abe, a 25-minute sail away, where 

ssr " 

Fortftei 

region; Comite Regional de 
Tourisme, 2 rue Samte- 

rrtune. 86002 Poitiers. Tei 49 88 
194. 


! being shipped to Sf Helena. 
2 whole Poitou-Charentes 


drink 





Dame Edna’s 
beverage 




Ask anv open-minded British 
wine merchant where the 
vogue recherchfe tipples ot 
1986 will come from and the 
antipodes is almost certain to 
be the answer. To this 
country’s more fashion-con- 
scious drinkers even Califor- 
nian wines now look 
positively old hat compared 
with the latest arrivals from 
Australia and New Z e ala n d. 

Thai has not passed by our 
largest wine retailer; 
Sainsbury’s has just delisted 
the no-Jonger trendy but still 
delicious Mondavi Fume 
Blanc from California in fa- 
vour of Australia's less distin- 
guished Rosemount 

Sauvignon Blanc, which car- 
ries twice the cachet. 

Considering that four years 
ago mpst wine merchants in 
this country did not know 
their Connawarra from their 
Hunter, the almost universal 
listing and acceptance of Aus- 
tralian wines is remarkable. 

New Zealand is perhaps 
slightly trailing in Australia's 
wake, but its cooL temperate, 
maritime-infiuenced regions 
provide in general a superior 
ape-growing dimate than 
at oflts hot, arid neighbour. 
Certainly there are many New 
Zealand while wine styles that 
are currently superior to those 
of Australia, especially those 
made from the Sau vignon. 
Gewurziraminer and Muller- 
Thurgau grapes. 

fine Wines of New Zealand 
(PO Box 476, London NW5), 
run by Margaret Harvey, a 
knowledgeable New Zealand 
wine lover, is a good place to 
find them. Ofher current crop 
of Kiwi wines John Hancock's 
classy Morton Estate '85 
Chardonnay (£6.50) and '85 
Sauvignon Blanc (£5) are defi- 
nitely worth trying, as are the 
Delegat’s ,’84 and '85 
Chardonnay. Montana's styl- 
ish ’84 Sauvignon Blanc is 
another classic New Zealand 
wine with a wonderful, in- 
tense. nettley. flowering-cur- 
rant smell and taste (Oddbins 
£3.99, Andre Simon shops 
£3.95). 


surprisingly 

Australia’s 

fruit. 


dry SemiUon. 
made from 
Barossa Valley 

This 'S3 SCmillon was ittadw 
by the award-winning Geo?| 
Nerril who. apart from boast- 
jng a pair of handlebar mous- - 
laches that Hcrcule Poirot 
would die for. is obviously one 
of Australia's 'best 
winemakers. Available in 
April from H. Alien Smith. 24- 
25 Sea la Street- London Wi, 
this wine is worth every penny 
of its £7.65 price. 

Rosemount wines from the 
Hunter are currently the best • * 
distributed Australian wires 
in the country. And although < 
their Chardonnay wines do 
tend to mature considerably . 
faster than any Cote d’Or 
■white burgundy l know, their : 
Show Reserve Chaidon«sfc 
does develop raw* of 
region's mature, buttery ele- 
gance in a fraction of the time 
and at half the price. 

Rosemount have recently 
introduced over here an ex- 
traordinarily good '84 Rox- . 
burgh Chardonnay whose 
impressive, foil, spicy pineap. . 
ple-fike taste comes from this . - 
estate's finest volcanic Hunter 
vineyard and is both ferment- 
ed and aged in new Allier 
casks. Not a bargain price at 
£12.25 from Majestic Wine 
Warehouses and £13 from . 
jusierini & Brooks* 61 St ; 
James's. London SWl/buj .. 
^-finitely worth experiencing 
he same. #’ 







However, the most magnifi- 
cent antipodean .wine I have 
tasted recently is a sensational 


finally, if you want to taste 
a great Australian red wine 
from one of Clare's most 
talented winemakers (that's a 
cool, mostly non-irrigated re- 
gion north of the Barossa 
Valley and Adelaide) look no 
further than Tim 
Knappstein's “82 Cabemei- 
Shiraz (Wind rush Wines. The 
Barracks. Cecily Hill. 
Cirencester. Gloucs. £5.27). 
This deep-purple, rich fruity 
wine, reminiscent of cherries 
and blackcurrants, is made 
from 35 per cent Shiraz and is 
glowingly described by 
Windrush’ as “a Wend of 
Latour and Hermitage La 
Chapclle”! 


Jane MacQirittf 



GERMANY 


“Once upon a time there was a magical, 
peaceful land of mountains sprinkled with 
flowerfilled meadows; of wide, rolling rivers 
that ran past vineyards, under the walls of 
many a noble castle, through ancient and 
beautiful cities to the sea; where the 
people loved food and music in equal 
proportion, and enjoyed their fill of both . . ." 


1 986 Germany celebrates the 200th anniversary 
of the Brothers Grimm, famous for their collections 
of fairytales. \fau can follow their footsteps on a special 
Fhirytale Road’ holiday. 


1 986 is also celebration year for two historic 
Bavarian Kings: Ludwig P. architect of classical 
Munich, and Ludwig II. fairytale King, patron of 
Wagner and builder of dreamlike castles: there’s no 
better year to visit his fantasies in all their grandeur! 

1986 There are even more holiday packages 
available by air, rail, car and coach, and for a lot less 
money than you would think. 


Bavarian Alps: In guesthouses at 

FROM 

Prien/ Lake Chiemsee. close to one of 
King Ludwig's castles: a marvellous 

£169 

railway journey via Munich. 

7 nights 

The Black Forest in the beautiful 

FROM 

heart of cuckoo-clock country — fly to 
Frankfurt guesthouse in Tnberg. 

£237 

7 nights 

Holstein Lakes: Take your own car ferry 

FROM 

via Hamburg, then self-catering in a 

£95 

chalet between two lakes at Malente. 

8 nights 


Please send me vour tree brochures oJ holiday offers in the Federal 
Republic ot Germany 


Continued from page 17 
English 


society: racehorse 
owners who. between each 
banco, talked only of the turf: 
two outrageous old ladies with 
flowery hats and enormous 
jewels; a degenerate young 
heir who bore the name of one 
of the best English families; 
and opposite me sat a socialite 
friend from Paris who rolled 
his eyes in horror when he saw 
me sil down at the awesome 
table. The stakes were all in 
guineas and I had no idea of 
their value. Someone mut- 
tered an inaudible explanation 
in my ear, the manager ar- 
ranged for a little pile of chips 
to be brought to me in 
exchange for a little piece of 
paper which I happily signed, 
■md play began. 

It was very pleasant, I must 
admit. The English are the 
best gamblers in the world, as 
everyone knows, and gam- 


Games of chance 


my remaining chips on a 9; 
they instantly disappeared. So 



The house at Honflenn bought with a night's winnings 

when 




f FARAWAY | 
5 HOLIDAYS I 

In just one brochure, wulliiod 5 

% the sun-drenched palm-fringed 5 
J beaches of Mauritius and the ' 
/ Caribbean, with a choice of self- > 
5 catering and 
> luxury hotels. 






And for 

families, Florida < 
is the ideal destination, with £ 
i\ Disneyworid the Space Centre * 

^and a choice of superb beach 5 
resorts. Just telephone *£ 



01-629 0999 and we g 


will send vou a copy of 3 


our Faraway Hoiidavs £ 
brochure, or visit vour J 
local Thomas Cook or 5 
F r a me s Travel branch. \ 


x. w «rw.vww n 


bling really seems to raise 
their spirits. To my left there 
was talk of horses, to my right 
it was regattas, and opposite, 
foreign travel was the topic of 
conversation. Meanwhile, my 
little pile of chips disappeared 
one after the other, to a 
general lack of concern, in- 
cluding my own. Hardly had 
one little pile disappeared 
than a splendid valet would 
place another on a silver tray 
in from of me. I would sign his 
little piece of paper and so it 
continued. 

I was awakened from this 
happy state of lethargy an 
hour later by the sudden 
appearance of my agent's face 
looming over me. He looked 
quite green. He too mumbled 
something incomprehensible, 
in which the words “ruined”, 
“disaster” and the like re- 


curred. That was 
noticed that my Parisian 
friend opposite had turned 
quite red, and far from rolling 
his eyes as he had done at the 
start of the game, he was now 
staring at me with a peculiar 
expression on his face, like 
that of a wounded sbe-wolf 
Feeling slightly alarmed, I 
discreetly asked the alacritous 
valet to write down for me on 
a little piece of paper the sum I 
now owed. 


H 






Brussels Poster 

Fora few copy of an 
attractive poster deLgfat- 
fa By iOucoaied by Andalie 
together with our 
brochure on individual 
inclusive holiday? to thil 
beautiful city, write to - 

Time Off LoL, 

2a Chester Close, 
London SW1X7BQ. 






PRESTEL *14 


Name- 


Address. 


Ter Germany National Tourist OHtae. (Dtetritjobon Centre). 
Park Farni- Folkestone. Kentcnssoz 


Germany; GERMAN NATIC 

More than just a holiday 


DEUISCME ZENIRALE 
FUR tOtjeiSMUSEV 
GERMAN NATIONAL MUCUS? OFFICE 







Fly south to Bari; and sample the 
specialities of Apulia 
Sunwashed beaches, unspoilt 
beauty. The architecture delights, 
the arts allure; the atmosphere is 
unique. And Citalia shows you 
the very best of Apulia with direct 
flights and concessionary return 
rail travel to Gatwick. Citalia 
shows you the best of Italy from 
top to toe. For your free colour 
brochure see your Travel Agent, 
phone 01-680 3100 (24 hrs) 
or write to; 


Citalia 


D ep a rtment 73 s 

Marco Polo House. 5 

35Lansdowne Road, Croydon CrS ILL 


e went over to speak 
to a tall, well-built 
man, who was very 
nice, and had been 
circling our table since play 
began. He was none other than 
the owner of the Germont 
Club. He did a quick calcula- 
tion. wrote a figure on a piece 
of paper and the trusty mes- 
senger brought it over to me 
with the same alacrity he had 
previously demonstrated. 

I glanced at iL I had to draw 
on all 'my moral precepts, all 
my strength of mind, all the 
good upbringing my parents 
had tried to give me and all the 
bad that I had succeeded in 
acquiring by myself, not to fall 
over backwards. My debt 
totalled £80,000 — its value 
would be twice that today — 
and I had nowhere near even a 
quarter of it in my bank. 

• ~C'esi a voits". the geniai 
person sitting next to me said 
in an atrocious accent as he 
pushed the shoe towards me. 
With what 1 hoped was a 
steady hand. I pushed half of 


1 passed on the shoe and tried 
to think. To pay off the debt, 1 
would have to give up the flat 
where I was living, ask my 
mother to take care of my son, 
find a one-room flat nearby 
and for the next two years 
work exclusively for the bene- 
fit of the taxman and the 
Germont Oub. It was a 
catastrophe. 

So catastrophic, I thought 
that if I was going to lose two 
years of my life anyway, losing 
four would make no differ- 
ence. I raised my hand rather 
distractedly and the alacritous 
valet was immediately at my 
side with the wretched little 
stack on his wretched tray. 
Once more I signed one of his 
wretched little chits and in 
ringing voice asked to play 
banco next time round. I won 
After that I played banco 
whenever I had the chance. 

I was gambling recklessly, as 
though there were no tomor- 
row as they say, and — what a 
miracle! — it was all coming 
back again. I watched my little 
pile become a big pile at a rate 
that was unbearably slow and 
at the same time prodigiously 
fast From time to time, ' 
would ask the footman 
relieve me of all these things 
that were getting in my way, 
and he would return one of my 
notes, having tom it in halt 

After an hour had passed in 
this wanton way, I discreetly 
enquired of the silk-stock- 
inged messenger bow I now 
stood with the house. He went 
and spoke to the proprietor 
who, it seemed to me from 
what I could see out of the 
comer of my eye, was much 
quicker in his calculation, the 
result of which was brought 
back to me on another little 
note, which I unfolded with- 
out betraying any baste. I now 
owed only fifty pounds. At 
this time. I might add. I had 
had to discuss the Epsom 
Derby with the person on my 
left and the attractions of 
Florida with the person on my 
righL 

1 stood up. suddenly weary, 
and cordially took my leave of 
everyone at ihe table, who 
responded just as cordially. I 


went to pay my £50 to the 
cashier. The proprietor saw 
me out 


. .“It was a great pleasure to 
have you play at my tables", 
said this very friendly man. 
“especially since the French 
are generally so lacking in the 
sang-froid when gambling." 

''Ob", I said, in a voice that 
seemed thin even to me. “oh, 
the very idea. One plays for 
the fun of it. don’t you agree?" 

. And I went down the steps 
tottering slightly on my high 
heels. My English friend found 
the story highly amusing, but 
my agent was dead drunk and 


we had the greatest difficulty 
getting him back to the hotel. 
When I attended a fashionable 
dinner party in Paris a week 
later. 1 realized that thereof 
my London adventure had 
already been told by the 
Parisian who had witnessed 
the event for 1 was treated 
with the kind of esteem and 
superstitious awe normally 
reserved for someone who has 
survived an aeroplane disas- 
ter. • ■ 


Extracted front With Fondest 
Regards, by Franqoise Sagan 
published this month 19 
W.HMlen. £9.95. 


So macb more besides the sea 


Quality hotels. apartments, friendly guest houses. Pine scented chines. 
Two thousand acres of garden s. Warm er sea- mBes of soft dean sandL 
Spring Special Events: ^ [ ".’’Wfa^Thirties Festival May 10-24. 

Flower Festival June 14-22J 
Sport of every sort 


Health Week June 8-14 jfc 
Sophisticated shopping, k 


TSske 1 
an early! 
spring 
break 





FIRST WITH THE GREAT 
1985 CLARET VINTAGE 

Chateaux: 

Cos d'Estouniei . 

La Lagune 
Haut BataiUey 


Kirwan 
Gloria 

Sociando Mallet 

and Iocs more to 


2 Canfield Gardens 
London NW6 3BS 
328 7317/624 0254 


^ a diii g flmgww flB 

74 Totteridge Lafte 
London N20 8QG 
446 2128/445 6685 








K 






.NO II IN 


* 


— SERJES Of lAGAWLIX LORE 




the times they are unchanging 



Uayulin. one ot the oldest male whisky 

e “t dlh ° n u* ri Jtan kI 1 ' ° f «*■» has 

existed for mote than a century. Thename 




pone, bur 


remain, jusr as the distinctive 


rasre ot La»avulin malt remains'the heart of 


the \XW Horse blend 
distillation flows, ■ waftT used 


in 


l*hs in the hilU rfshot' mVS has ' from nTO 


L'nchanpn.. wavs nn-k 
*• “in traditions 


ol Whitt Horse. 

Slended to let the mal, shine through. 
















>-v V 


/ > 




O V 












Aa-* 


THE TIMES SATURDAY MARCH \ IMO 


SATURDAY 


SHOPPING 

sun comes to SW 1 


Harrods has built 
an entire French 
> village to bring the . 
;» •' .Midi-alive in- 
Knightsbridge 

r A taste oflhe Coie d'Azur for 
: the cost of - a trip to 
Knightsbridge is on offer for 
. - the next six . weeks. . A step 
-away from ibegrey March- 
streets is a sunriy Provencal 
village full of fruit, faienceand . 
„:a 4 'A -ion fountain — the focal 
..point of a promotion of 
' French goods which opens at 
•; Harrods today. 

- This is no toy. IiisaM-aze 
t model . village of 10 shops, - 
, ■ - constructed in Wales to plans . 
i by a British designer who lives 

, in Marseilles. The £50,000 bill 
ti is being shared .by -Harrods 
and the regional council of 
Provence; Alpes and G&te 
dT Azure, and in return Pro- 
vence has a large share of the 
" £25 million Harrods is invest- 

- ing in produce from France. 

John Pendray, the designer, 
■■‘has been working on the 
~ village for more than a year. 

■■ He 1 began fay visiting and 
’ photographing a selection of 





|fSP- t > 

.. 


France at Harrods: cheeses, sausages, pates; herbs, flavoured oils and vinegars with pewter jug £165, goblet £29, Damn 
crystal goblet £34.5 0, G iea strawberry platter £3L50, brownjgratiii dish £3.95,pot of bouquet garois £645, gift-rimmed bar 
glasses £U5 eac&^haguette-sliaped bread knife £2450; antique coffee grinder £145, pie dish with duck head £51.95 


' typical villages in the region 

- with John McKitterick. the 
* display manager at Harrods. 

But as no single village exactly 
r fitted the . prescription of 10 
shops in 400 metres to fit into . 
-'the Central Hall, be had to 
>. amalgamate the ctiaracteris- 
K lies of several -and finally 
... arrived at- “something be- 
tween Valbonnft and Aix en 
, Provence". 

The entente appears to have 
-been extremely cordiale \ for 
.the model has beat built 

- without a hitch, at Vantage 
.. Design in Wales, by crsiftsmtn 
■■ who have never seen a French 


ALPIN 


A muprr rangrnf itm aiMtrou 
w» m wool I mr, Mkv.dnmt 
DMynior.wlk And Mvrart 
‘ira t wniuMn All hinr mi 
wW MMK lor contort Jed (tl i 
A (tin rangr-M (Moumuiil Um 
IO lo 24. prim jrom £SS.aa 
. #hn Cl GQIWP End |«r. far 
IU» «*Na»k and shade rard* tq 



village, approved by- French 
civil servants who speak no 
English and co-ordinated by 
John McKitterick who speaks' 
no French.. 

; “It all went like clockwork”, 
says -John Pendray, the multi-* 
lingual go-between. “The only 
problem was that the fountain 

Stepping out 
of winter 
into sunshine 


made by the French stonema- 
son has turned out to be a ton 
heavier than we thought, so 
we just had to strengthen the 
floor a bit more. 

“The idea was that people 
would step out of winter into 
bright sunshine, < with the 
smell, the sound, the architec- 
ture, the colour and the pro- 
duce of the region". 

The result is enough to put 
anyone in holiday mood. 
There are two stalls laden with 
flowers and sweetmeats, a 
wine shop stacked with re- 
gional tipples, a food shop 
brimming with specially fla- 
voured oils and vinegars, 
sacks of herbs and pots of. 
patfc. 

In the kitchen shop there are 
large terracotta pots, dried in 
the Mediterranean sun mid 
finished with green and honey 
giarac — prices from £15 to 
£129. The dining shop offers 
handmade traditional JSiottd. 
glassware with 1 its distinctive!.. 


bubbles. It conies in aquama- 
rine, watennint, rose quartz 
and dear rock crystal at £6.95 
for a large tumbler to £45 fora . 
champagne bucket With it is 
shown Lallier and Moustiers 
Vallonris earthenware in plain 
white or with a decoration of 
small flowers. 

SoJeiado fabrics in typical 
designs and colours are in 
several shops — tablecloths, 
aprons, 1 needlecases, even ice 
buckets and trays made from 
laminated fabric — and in the 
garden shop there is a range of 
attractive plain green or pink 
earthenware by Picbon which 
includes those- splendidly ca- 
pacious. breakfast coffee cups 
that are pan of the pleasure of 
waking up in France. - 

The" village is the focal point 
of the French promotion but 
there are specialities through- 
out the. store: Antique coffee 
grinders and small items of 
second-hand furniture are to 
be found in the "flea market” 
section of the third floor, and 
on the second floor is an 
exhibition of six centuries of 
French tableware — reproduc- 
tions of pieces from the collec- 
tion of the Musee des Arts 
Pecoxatiis in Paris which are 
sot usually available commer- 
cially. 

Pieces include an 18th-cen- 
tmy dinner service and an art 
deco tea service — not cheap, 
but beautifully executed at 
about £22 Tor a dinner plate, 
£68 fora coffeepot. 

Also notable for the table- 


are pewter items based on 
original Renaissance pieces — 
a wine jug is £165 and a goblet 
£29. There is also an interest- 
ing set of six plates by Gien at 
£58.50. 

Each has a different border 
representing a different period 
from 1875, and each is decorat- 

Delicious food — 
an abundance 
of temptation 

ed with strawberries. On the 
first plate the fruit is green and 
ft gradually ripens throughout 
the set until it appears on the 
final plate at its reddest and 
juiciest 

Don't go home without a 
feast from France. Delicious 
foodstuffs that I tried and can 
recommend from an abun- 
dance of temptation include 
Chaource and Gaperon 
cheeses, pork and chicken 
liver pate with Armagnac, and 
two ready-made souffles — . 
one au foie gras de canard at 
£X20 and the other au Grand 
Marnier at £220, both by 
Roujjpe. Each could serve two, 
one if you are greedy. 

No preparation needed, just 
pop them in the oven and no 
one will ever know your name 
is not Escoffier. After all, if 
Harrods can bring the South 
of France to SW1, it would be 
churiish to shatter the illusion. 

Beryl Downing 


CONSUMER NEWS 


Anyone who cares for a blind 
or partially sighted person at 
home will find helpful advice 
in a new booklet produced by 
the Royal National Institute 
for the Blind. - 

Called Designing Buildings 
far Blind People, it suggests 
features such as contrasting 
textures on floors and walls to 
help the totally blind identify 
rooms and good lighting and 
colour contrasts to aid the 
partially sighted. 

The booklet has suggestions 
for stairway, hall, living room, 
bedroom, kitchen, bathroom 
and garden and is also aimed 
at those who plan public 
b inklings. Free copies are 
available from the RNIB, 224 
Great Portland Street, London 
W1 (01-388 1266). 

Another free publication 
which is particularly nsefrxl at 
this dark time of year is the 
JtoSPA (Royal Society for 
Prevention of Accidents) 
Guide to Bicycle Lighting. 
Many cyclists seem to think 
that because they can see cars, 
motorists are able to see them. 

The leaflet RoSPA has 
produced with Ever Ready 
inclndes useful tips on fixing 
lamps, which reflectors to buy, 
lighting-up time and how to 
keep a bicycle in safe working 
order. . 

If you want it, send a large 
s.a.e. to The Ever 
Ready/RoSPA Guide to Bicy- 
cle l i ghting , 20 Bruton Place, 
London WLX 7AA. 


Waiting 
for the 
willows 


When the winter cold spell 
finally ends, one of the first 
signs of spring will be the 
willows showing that bright- 
ness of colour that appears 
before the new foliage. 

. The willow family is large 
but not all its members are big 
plants like the weeping willow 
— there are several which do 
well in small gardens. They 
are fast growers and are ideal 
plants for heavy, wet soil. One 
oflhe tragedies of the weeping 
willow is that it looks so pretty 
as a young plant but is often 
grown in small areas where it 
does not have room to devel- 
op properly and will become 
unmanageable in a small gar- 
den in less than 10 years. 

But although willows are 
associated with water and wet 
ground, they can tolerate most 
soil conditions and be planted 
in almost any situation except 
where the ground is too well 
drained or where it dries out 
in the summer. 

Propagation is easy. Many 
of the larger tree-type willows 
can be propagated simply by 
snapping off branches and 
inserting them into a moist 
sandy medium where they will 
root readily. Shoots can be 
taken at any time between 
November and March. 

Many large willows will 
accept hard cutting back but 
this stimulates root growth 



Willow in winter weeping under a layer of snow and ice 


and the many new shoots will 
spoil the shape of the tree. 
Cutting should be done 
now, which is also the time to 
remove any dead wood. 

Some willows are grown for 
their coloured stems which 
catch the reflections when 
planted close to water. They 
are ideal for smallish gardens. 
S. alba chermesina syn 
Briizensis has orange-red 
stems and is best when young. 
S. dapknoides ; sometimes 
called the violet willow, has 
purple stems which are cov- 
ered with a white bloom. 

Pussy willow, goat willow or 
S. caprea is more shrubby 
than tree-like and there are 


male and female forms. The 
male has yellow catkins and 
the female has silvery ones. It 
needs regular cutting and, as it 
seals freely, is often found in 
hedgerows. 

One willow which is almost 
a ground hugger is S. repens, 
the creeping willow. When 
mature, its branches, which 
are almost horizontal, are 4ft 
io 5ft above the ground; it has 
small silvery leaves which set 
off the yellow catkins niedy in 
April. On poorish soil it will 
remain small, but when plant- 
ed on moist ground it will 
become quite vigorous. 

Ashley Stephenson 


GROOM NOW - MOW LATER! 


jffimim 
c no-hassle low- 
cost way to 
all of Spain 


TAKE YOUR CAR ON 
HOLIDAY! 


Have your best Hofiday yet 
-ata price that will surprise you. 



Seal-only Morieysarere to 13 destinations. • All-indusive fares from* 
no extras to psy • Stay 6 nights -1 month. • Scheduled daytinK fligjhns— 
ro consolidations. • Daily departures from Heathrow and Manchesto; 

• Fufl details and instart computer rese^ your KDV travel agent 

Or ring Iberia; London (01) 437 5622 (30 lines! Birmingham (021) 643 1953 
Manchester (061} 436 6444, Glasgow (041) 248 &58L 
Ail major credit caids accepted. 



austral 

new Zealand 

ROUND 




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Country House Hotel 

spend trts Sprtig or summer 

m cadet luxury war me 
Metfomescuay Ow grounds, 
secluded awe ament food, 
write or phone for brochure 

M3wnan.Faknoutn. Comwaa. 

TEL: Fatmouttl 1052 B-K 0 -MQ 



CANVAS HOLIDAYS We have been providing 
highly recommended and widely praised holi- 
days for 21 years. Self-catering aaMmmodancrn 
In all mod-cons tents, cabins. caWnettes. gttes 
and mobile homes. Children under 14 go free. 
Special offers for couples. 

CAR HOLIDAYS Ybu can do the -Grand Tbur' or 
revive yourself with one of our short breaks -m 
individual hotels fufl of character. 

CABIN HOLIDAYS We also have a fine selection 
of luxmy cabins set in some of Scotland's most 

beautiful and 


RE HOtoAUS/HZ 


I Let lit show you where you | 
can get away from the 
I trbwd (yes. even la August) J 
. ... find * glorious sandy 
| beadi in unspoied Sardinia | 

or a curie on die 

I seashore, t* us show you | 

new aspects of old 
1 favourites Bee Amalfi. | 

Sorrento. Tuscany, 

| Venice . . - and vo much ( 
more. Let us show you 
1 i-omanric hideawa ys in I 
resorts and dries. Prices . 
I from only £135. FREE I 
cotow brochure. . 

1 MAGIC OF ITALY j 

I DepcT- - * 

■ 47 Shepherds Bush | 

1 Green. London Wf2«PS * 
1 TefcOt-749744? I 

■ pdhrbrediureseryfaie) ■ 

L — J 



BBS ' . £8S 

- 045 


SPEOftUSrcantftel 
01-242 5555 
TRAVEL IIATA1 


Dartaii 


... ci«hT*w* wo 
am £ 370 -Kao«M 

OKS* fWW***^® 
JCJ60 TtfortP 

*W1 

an 01*839 71** 


Mato** T«*1“ 

* .ji * .V 


THE SUNDAY 
LUNCHEON 

expresses 


r.\. 

— ■■' . - -*„• ~ w il 

-.r'-.c;’""'**'''* 

- c~.--e.--t.->-*':: 

... "JA C 

' t .-.-t- TA- h i 


^:&iterCity 


HOLIDAYS J-# 

sount «ffr ruM tice 

Win. canagri. fafirMuW. 
vumcc dr vacaoers. PenW" 

HnW « ww 

an in * “ 1 ■ 1 ■ 

an* wx r*i Know* 

fU IH pWnl 


MEUDON 

H O T! E L 

FWWT K 1 »tnHa3«wiU. 

TaiOSMZSBSW.TUEtC*™ 

SPRING BREAKS 

Spnrw cooks oriJ 
omidH * ow anpificeBl 
oJm InlOf W piv ** ««■ “W 

Si^VBBSS 

Unit* |4wi»* fc-faktare. 

Vo, fc 




42-fl EMU CMU BOAD 
L0HD0H M EEJ 

emt»«OS* ntfn 0VOJ7 5*00 
Lena Mad ngma 01403 1515 
in/SawaKi OM BUM W 
G u . nwnt Li cm aadJ Tten iM ri 
ABTA IATA ATQL USB 


AUSTRALIA 
FAR EAST 
WORLDWIDE 

TUc lowest cost ntgnis 

Eurocbeck Travel 

01-542 4613 
01-543 4227 

Estab 1970 


DENMARK. 

SttTDEN 

St'MMERHOUSES 

1 TnKfM DaniUt S**> SvmvJWB 

S CMUIWWOtnOirU-'UIHlVllHl 

rooMdl end tounlry nsuoin. 
CHILD CWsCOL NTS « LOW 
Aidin' pure* Fwmm 
i to LruoUML 

■CSMSCaH HOLBMTS 
01-248 MM 
l« Cot W«KB- 


UP UP & away 

feMioi*. Jo’Bwg tmro. Ou 
: IMIL tsi«HNd. Sjnwnpori*. k i 
LWIU. BotmLek. HOIS) Knug. 
j s«4nn, turepr. A 7nr 
I AnuTH-d. rumuioo Tr»rL 
1 i Nt<w OuHl w ■« Mirolr 
| .1(1 n Loudul W I H TDD 

01-402 9217/18/19 

upon iMiurday 10.00 isoa 


MELBOURNE BEACH FLORIDA, 

jukunoiB (mao Inm lown 
homr Prl\AIW ownM J M 
roams, fidly lunwhM. 
iHins. pool, all Will lies includ- 
ed. A, ad May Uirougti AU9UM. 
month lo month Si .300 pm. 
America 813 <9637742. 


COSTCUTTEWS ON lUptlK ntd> 
Lo Europr. LSA A most dcduia- 
tram. Diptomil Trod 01-730 
2201. ART A IATA ATOL. 


SWnZEMlJINOSrttMlidnl ntgtus 

Ol 724 2388 ABTA ATOI 

wmomc STEAMS, ronrtt end 
Fatryuli* rastlrt, iuu hour, 
tram cmiihmSp-. In the Ddpum 
ArtmrnM. Uir PowUMlIIrs are 
mdkso. a wralin ol arU\ ilrs arc 
ottered lor the wnoK- (amity. 
HoUdays Irom C30 pec pmon 
per week in rotlage*. (arms, (a 
ration (lUaprs or tuaets Fuid 
out more ask the Bdsud bro- 
rtiurr tram Brtqmm Rental 
Seislre. 173 Srhdm Park 
Road. S Crovden. Cr2 8JJ. 
Telephone Ol 651 6109 Or 
L en lente GordMle Bureau. 
DumpMon. MlnUan. AoeTdeen- 
■Jure. SrotUntL Tti 077 982 
240 Aina 24i5i or Comart 
(OUT local AMa Irate! Aqent. 

AUSTRALIAI HEW ZEALAND! 

\ ruling (trends and rrtanoni? 
Then ronton us lor Low Budget 
! lares. Free bromurn from Bar 
tie Tra(rl Sets ire. 42 High 
Mi eel. kind* Lanotev. Herts 
Phone t092T7i ni2b6 Open 7 
davs ABTA meniurr 
AUSTRALIA! NEW ZEALAND! 
X esillnu friends and relalMtK? 
Then roniart i» lor LOW Eu. D- 
GET lares Free brochures 
Horn Barrie Travel Sen. ire. 42 
Hart Siren. Kina* Latvjiey. 
Herts. Phone I09277| 612M9. 
Open 7 days. ABTA memoer. 
TAKE TIME Off lo Pam. Ant- 
sir, dam. Bniwh. Brinrs. 

Ones a. Benie Lausanne. TtlP 
Hague. Dunlin. Rouen. Bou- 
loune A Dieppe Tune Oil 2a. 
Chester CUv. London swix 
7BO. 01 335 8070 
temohfe. CHEEK ISLANDS a f. 
oarve. Menorrj. Villas Apts 
Peiruom Tavemas. Hohdav, a 
Fliytlls Summn . Winter Bio- 

rhure, tMtiMV only dliecl 

Irom Thr BpecialMs Veniuia 
Hoi mays. TH 01 260 1655. 
HIDE A VBUNG HORSE in 
helMKH tMWMIlul A rwied 
rotinlrvude. Higriund saiaris. 
Twirkersworlil summer bro- 
chure. OI B92 7606 i34 hr Ol 
tWi 1 7BS1 1 

SKI BONNE HEME. Catered 
chalets m Meribet * Cnurrhevel 
ir (ISO n n Iwk in travel 
Great lood. imUd winrAMcn 
siveotndiiiq 01 73326Ut757 
3Hni aitsapnone.i 
LATIN AMERICAN TRAVEL. 
Conlart the evoerts IO lalin 
.Unnira. cum A IM dim. Ca 
rihtman. LSA A Mevdro 
fauiaa 01 620 1130 
LOW COST FLIGHTS. Most 
Luroprwi Oc-ainaliom. 

SMexaiuter Ol «W 

aSpT 0062 ilBTV 

61008 ATOL lOUQ. 

MIAMB, JAMAICA, H.TOHH. 

worldwide rttruue^ (mrs. 
RH-hnxeid Travel. I Duke «J 

RH-hmond ABTA Ol- < uo«0?3 
TUSCANY Fully eauip i.trm 
hmne sunband^luiua llalslpv 
? I nun C75 pw Q1 246 
OflOe Ol < MO 3»S0 ISIS 
USA. « Votk C1SO Miami CI98 
l \ cw iin Ann amyN 
-»Dorlulr lit on m-iuM IS rain 
i-r» Ol 984 7371 .VBT-1 
ALICANTE, Fain. MaimM etc 
Udimntl Travis VTOL 1783 
Ol 581 *041. Hprslwm 08641 


AUSSIE. M2, Silt Aim. V S.A. 
Honq Konp. BeM Fares. Ol 493 
7776 4BTA- 

1YD/MEL 0,18 Perth C54S All 
nuw rtirltn to A US N2. Ol- 
684 7371. ABTA 
H HOMO £488 Banokok C3M 8**i 
C426 Other Far CaM deOma- 
IIOM Ol 584 7371 ABTA. 
SOUTH AFRICA JoHurv Ir £405. 
Ol 684 7371 ABTA. 


CRUISE & SAIL ABROAD 


QEZ USO-CMO PER CABIN oft 

MSenrd r tunes Alex Bristow 
Travel ABTA Esher 03072 or 
Woking 04031. 


0\’ERLAMDERS 


AFRICA ADVENTURE. Alnra 
Spena lists oiler 1.2 3.4 week 
rainttma adventures and expe- 
ditions Ihrouohoul Alnra. 
Mororro. Eavpt. Tan/ama. 
Heupal. GamtJW. Trans Sahara. 
Kenya. Fane. Rwanda. 2amma 
rroin C3e& Br or rune deiailiiui 
Ihese and other lono and short 
expeditions GimtM Llmilrd 
iST ■ Vsesilietd Hoviro. 
Weslburv. Mills BA13 SEP 
Tel BraUom 03801 830470 i24 
lusi. 


SELF-CATERDSC 


THE BEST VILLAS are In the 
Palmer A Parker tuue hook- i 
Available ui AMarve Marnrlb. 
South ot F'rntne. LSA. A Wesl 
Indies. Most have vialf. all have 
Mii.au- pools tv none are rheao. 
Brat nines i04d 4Sli 64 13 


MALAGA. TENERIFE 

Tiavrlwne 01 441 1111. 


MALDIVES, LAMZAROTE 

Islands Ol 836 4383 

TUNISIA For apartments or live 
Dial Cl Audalous Hotel al Port 
El hanUtoui. I hr holulAv lewel 
in Tunisia's noun, rail Painru 
M UdMOOd Lid 0240 817023 or 
01 058 6722- ABTA ATOL 
127b 

COTTAGE WW 2 4. s r. Iiiq. 
elerlrir cki . sMHs-er linen, hm 
quiet vrl near mkl towns 0233 
29060. 

N NORFOLK. CnmllMr ufluriftl 
rad hisloiir C union Park, sins 
4. <0idrn fishimi. uaikiiw. 
morn Tel Ci on in 701338 

PADSTOW anrarlne rollaqr nr 
naihcur. iitiiei rd. all rons. 
w nun. ifn n\. sunnv patio, 
pels MCkome 021 426 1433 

SAL COMBE quid retinal rauaoe 
unit view at eNuan nailed 
uartlen. Ino In in heds plus 
imre bunk touin. 0bO2 2SH32S 


SELF-CATERING 

BAL£.\RIC$ 


RECHARGE TOUR BATTERIES 

lli beaulrtirf M.uotr.in mouiil.uii 
sitla. supeili views, nnlv 
20 nuns Irani retuie anil ln\uh 
es-Fiwn IJBOpw 0! 6*31 6488 
inner osnti 


SELF-CATERING 
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LOS OIGANTE&, Tenet ilo 1 iivii 
n JiurliM. slee»n4 3 nom 

(Hill CVhhi lur 7 nuthl'. I in 
Iher details SH Bhvne Patk. T 
Is His TV1 HI T 

TENERIFE PALM Beam rluh His 
2 Uevl at>l steeds t,.M ks ?4 JS in 
perperinlv. prae Co^50 Ool 
4H5 7HM evus 

TENERIFE LUXURY apl sips o 
avail 7 21 Mar las linun.e. 
smash imim s>un.i avm sunn 
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TENERIFE. Beadi apt pool. lur. 
sleep. 2 6 If UlSwn. <W03 
882101 



rCNENXFC BAN COGORO Lux 
twin nrd app. afl (aruum 021 
783 8880 


SELF-CATERING 

FRANCE 


BEET OF BRITTANY Seaside ill 
las iluerl lieni Breton ovsneis 
Ilk'ludilH) (erneii A A4 5 War 
ins Biorhuie Enc Tun ell 
Travel Bourianon Is.iler 
ClosCIS* 2A2 10451 1 20°27 
or 22074 ABTA 
WANTED - South at Franre. v Ilia 
fm 6 1 or 2 weeks irom Sin Julv. 
Carden ewsilial. pool pre 
rrrred. small villaoe up lo 30 
km from f oast ronstderetl Tel 
0533 706051 aller 2pm 
8W FRANCE 3 bertroanwd house 
in Ainens-Minetsois Qmel ill 

IMr mu rounded hr inievaiUs 
30 duns Mrd COO C235 ow. 
Tel 0273 202325 
PRIVATE FLAT Nice. S Trance, 
taps 4. sea view, uarden. qaiaw. 
per wk liilv Slid C2O0. Auu 
C250. 111(0 Tl4 072 681 5<37S 
PROVENCE Lux Use in bnaid 
grin sips 8 PotdMaul. .iv 
Mas On C2O0 to CTOQ pw. 01 
87o 8457 

PROVENCE, llm SI Troprr 
Charnunu rotiaoe lulls 
muuipcsi Sips o June 23 Julv 
18 C200 pw 01 <M8 3806 
CANNES 9 mH rial sips 4 6 
Bra* h pool and lull* beaulilul 
uuiel, Ckl 20 836466 oi 836367 
NR ST TMOPEZ Sirs 4 House a. 
qoidi.ii dose beach duel atea 
Cl 20 tl 75 pw Ol 6T7 6008 
VALDTSEREK C aois lo lei. ren 
Ira I location lidl«enic(w lei br 
Ihe week. Tel Ol 483 6441. 


SELF-CATERING 

GREECE 


CYCLADES, Mykonos. Pains. 

htoMp.. Ins Mr Villas. Minnas 
A pensions Simpli Cheaner 
Simon super' Mmplv hunon 
Hoildai-s Ol 373 1*133. 

CYPRUS FAMILY m.ned 4 brlnu 

villa. 2 mile. sea. wmoT.inur 
new. own lOsa m potri irm 

C2». n« .Mm 0a*WB905»5 
UNDISTURBED Creek Wand o( 
SrkV ids ar(. In 1 1II.1 an he.1IHiliH 
samlv heairh June held 
L360PW OOW 422556 


SELFCATERING ITALY 


TUSCANY Resioicd larmhome m 

Iumii ni lauanli Ai.ul.iWe ham 
Ljslei in 0(1 Horn L200 pw. 
Sfto cl 04*4 00375 lor iM*uK 

TUSCAN BARCaM! Rtcu 1 uc 
1. 1 liausesluH ALiv 17 JI L100 
pw. Aug 23 50(140 Hsp-lp4 
Jim. hep 7 14 L80 Jul 13 20 
Cl 20 hftephPTd 0760 020*12. 
TUSCANY Reaulilul B*wm di I IH 
r.i Om loirl, sismpih tulheli- 
hniM. | p lu R people C1SO 
CT75 pw Mai Kin Mropuni. 
eiiw 010 3<* 6M3 07506. 
TUSCANY pm PH* (riiiiinmea* m 
Ihiili hH-niia HilK hks-ps B 

CJ10 170 p m 0252 8707 J'- 


SELFCATERING L.SA 


FLORIDA drain .tier att-a. lug 

Will mini. lv,n hiilluisnni Iiimhv 

iHUHiailmi. imnenieni rniiiki 

am ar uni r. C 220 per iirrt. 7*4 

0262 836671 


L’Ji. HOLIDAYS 


AkOARVC Owners vrrv PTTVJBr 
lux lirnihwee. in me hiiK 
auove TaiO iMd rtoir to Ml 
amenities 3 dl»lr hedrtns. 2’ ■ 
halhrms Maid . Gulden, own 
pool in secluded walled leirare 
nonC-KOpw AvaikvMr Irom 
22 Marrtv Ol 373 4529. 


CASTER IN ALCARVE in pci* rile 
ill Lis with pools & stall ■ 
Prilnm A Parker 01483 37JS 


ALGARVE Lame iilkis with on 
vale pools m baiuun prices 
□at- lliynis liom Uil . Brisioi. 
L Iricui 4. M C Bin lednruonx 
loi rnildimi undei it Run Poi 

Shipp. b*an mas. Camoottoe 
■02231 31I9VOO ATOL 61TB 
VILLAS lo renl in \ ale Do Lono 
and Oiunto Do Laao -Vkjane 
Pmuiyal also Menorca. Ph 
0372 06466 


SELFCATERING SPAIN 


CSTEPONA CoslH-Dei SW Apart 
nieni. si « 6 in ii.iIiuisi uaiden 
vuuue Sec I luted balronv wiin 
sea a nmuriain views F*oot. 
leslauriinl. bearh leiinis e(r 
ivilhin 100 rds C90C250 Du 
Tel Ol 647 1200 
COSTA BLANCA l mane villa in 
2 uries o/tookinq «eu 4 heel- 
ronnn* isleep. 8 JO*. 3 halhs. 
pin ale imkN. nbtitl seiiire 
L340 C670 pw Details 4 rol 

mu pnoios 02566-6517 
PLATA DC ARCO. CoMa Braia 
utn lo ns sips a. 3 beds. 2 luihs. 
Inc kit. iui ini sesi SOidstiom 
hearh TM »k davs onlv Ool 
663 I67T 

PUERTO BANUS Sm e-wl lux 
aiican vrl uums selliim pnol. 
iaru//i. Iuh ko rtuUlren irom 
L85 pis 031 226 7676 
6683405 es ns 1 

PUERTO BANUS 5 m Enel IllSil 
iv .n ru*ii ne* Indecr (Lrus 
seflimi pool, mi u/n. bar. iso 
Children Tram t*5pi« 031 
22o 7o76 668 3405 ei es 

CALPE MOMUtA villa wild so 
kumm sea news, sips 2 S 7 
mum rai lure. 047485 7MO 
A rvJL 231 

COSTA BLANCA. Hill irtlaoe nr 
Anea. shvps 4. 2 luihs. own 
pool LI 05 per week. UK. 
■xcMei Ph 0713 568o3 
COSTA DEL SOL Amarine apl 
Ini 2 in nmrlern .lparlolrt with 
m.14 i lews 111 Anu-niliiw Irom 
tD2 P w phone Ol 78** 4531 
E&TARTIT Insure ILK sleep 4. 
m-infi. palm. pmu. marina. 
Mill June. *!epl Del. » l.inra 
40 nds v:i25pw 1028141 2004. 
JAVEA ctelmhlhU villa, views ot 
Mniihin rtose tennis. Itawses. 
lar ip- iioai BtoJ. sleeps IO lr.an 
LlMhm. Phone 0424b 4448 
MaRBCLLA two bed iiILi With 
p», js .Hid lentils rruin tHsuh 
.UHl ikHI ipsiidi sleeps 4 o. 
limn U» P»- 633 

TORREVIEJA. Cosla Bl.mra Pool 
stile villa li* 4 o Mi pin wnidv 
Ir.n .\il spans Let all ii-ai 

Irom L75 TH On?d 13761 
GALICIA k Vi *sp.iin Model need 
umihonv *rtri5 12iiiursvsi 
I ram < 55 pw Ol 642 6758 

NERJA COSTA DEL SOL 3 bed 

apt vti heath swuhiiiuni pum 
let- 01 5B0 381! 

Tott 6»**>» Cdhd Hoi*. Virct 
Ifaiuse sJc'ps D H iu-.u ■ tie.M h 
JI id unH PI tone G5o44 2HQ 


SELFCATERING 

SWITZERLAND 


SWISS ALPINE rltaiel ill I Hi I le 
sue. vlrru e. all crmtions CloO 
C?tK)pw Minimal pi skuns 
Lhei loti 10233*61 277. 


WINTER SPORTS 


SKIING HOLIDAYS 


MARCH AVAILABILITY An. lot 

I a Lux rajei.*ct and 5 raleied 
hots Next 2 lists Pen ale har. 
5 pool hk!. school Inr Ills 4 
lavj lr«TS|ec II .C179 Ski Jean 
me 01 221 7913 
SPECIAL ZEU. AM SEC AL S 
TUI A 15 3 (IV Jwkn C269all 
inrlusive Ahn other otters bki 
Tdial .09321231113 
SUPERB SKIING, catered rtutel 
in voiilluTn rrenrh Alps, evr 
food. indivMiuM parlies wel 
come 0825 67898 
SKI FLATS. Lai Thorens. 
Trance 8 15 MM Aho Apr 
(BO PP pw Tel 01 948 237o 
SKI HORCMS f eal nea-punls 
aiaiiaiue lor Mar a Ami. Rintt 
0691 713520 


LAKE DISTRICT 


B1RKET HOUSES 
COUNTRY HOUSE 

Stop had in utni' and rnjnv 
PAU.V. iranquiluv and gra- 
vhhiv living in a hcauuiul 
manor hsc vl id 2U aerrs. 
Vn.-i.inan iti^uilv talh- 
rvpims. pmumv J ptAkt tviK 
fiivv candldiii dinners, 
billiard runtn i library, die. 

Lilts. 11(8 l»ll(l\ 

HIKkt 1 IIIM M>I 
VIINSim NR WINIM-KVIJRK 
Cl MMU I. 
n-l IAM2 MA 

UdooI^valleT cottace 

Scjperh new-. Fkretlrfil 
waikinu Old Vs octet alum 
sph-i e AU eleetrKs Steeps 6. 
C75LI25 09! 284 Loan 
LANCOAi.F 1 3 urakx in peak 
pt'iiori ii» sale in Lake peann. 
CJoi mus poMItnn 3 ned* 3 
luihs Sauna Sleeps 8. Keen 
ibm* 01 HTe 1151 
m-n LAKE DWTRICT Holirijv 

i.eekrnds lot mipar lovers, 
nannintv si.iftnm M.nrh 14m 
loth. Drtath 08636 235 


EAST ANGLIA 


ORNOTHOLOGtSTS' DELIGHT. . 

halllKHise O'tonkiuqniarsliesla ] 
sen De Karri lulls I III nisheil de 

Urhrvl inlLMf Rulslm. 74172 


DiDULOC vourseti at IheOtolpes 

lei JHcri'-l A (^MinliT Club PH Ihe 
ethie m i ne deiHiniliU rakumik 
unit. -Muash even Ski uerkiiMl 
l«e.iks 1 eleimnne. 0452 ES-AA 
I Kj lull rietaiK and colour 
mnettuie 

BEMBMDOE LOW Lame uruise 
nil'll 1 viltaur, ilnse hr.whes. 
IkHnnui, simps sleeps n la. 
slut 2 3 I. mu lies tidtilell lei 
0794 388255 


Inr one week In knur 

d OlllL Krinem i .iuV lull 

rKkilii via Lkni.uk Tinui 

TEL: 021 704 5222 
■LTOL* 162 1BI V 43771 


SCOTL\ND 


I1SH1NC IN N.W. NKHLANDS. 

sell rammu miiaui*. will* m 
i, Lllmiil icl On salmon. 
Seal i in ti rivet Oimliinq. tu*ai 
iihi. liuil s.-itchiiHi Good mod 
and iwdillite In* .tllv- v*U 
IlivnlaeliolLMies LnchBtonm 
l« l ll.iimoi. Russline Trt 085 
4K5T6?. 

SCOTTISH MCHLAND Mnltoai 
Hciiim Vm nulsLiiuiino ramie 
m sell r.ileriiiu iiDtakn homes 
ailil ml i.Ki*— . in Ihe i|loi iuiis 
5* ollnh Hwhl.u id. Send tin 11 
liisii.iied ill o nitre Lonia 
I iiitisdeti. taesiet llltunie lo. 
•\0i i.h iLin. Imet uc~s. T'd 
(MoJ kto?47 

HEY JHMMV1 Oar coH.vue lie.lt 
Liiemnie is Maw 1'tlllV n«*l 1 
em ri.s- Imal ihKi-. pwlius 
Obi- 6 D***ihkire041 332 2841 

ISLE OF SKYE. DrtmhMnll. win 

ailed t.irinhraise LvetillHI 

diimeis. fled A riirMkf.rsI Hmiie • 
t.mkiiH! in 047 072 21* 

LOVELY LOCMSICME ,olLme 
lasnilu ill lu h Ivivp l ceil 
usmhI home rantili Im.ini. 
mill L 70 110 t, I 0344 50° 17 

SCOTLAND ni Ikrlh 
Luiiiimi iu'i hodtiav « KiiLup-. sip 
c H m 10 lei ihe nli'.il IOUI1IHI 
Imve Ph 0738 812204 

WESTER ROSS Umrhvh hoi's 
tllV haul lea- M|h 7 pi.n U-l 
tv .Lite u. Udell limn C140 
pn Te|. 01 730 I4M. 


room, ■ some 131 hC ihul ad 
renl heated II Barpain break* 
1066621 2344 2558 
MOONFLEET MANOR Mr Wry 
moum 40 rim. Most onvaie 
hath Counlrvcade by the mb. 
f .imafv acritify hoMdays - 3 
■muMh roura. iro. indo or 
pool. qym. sauna, tenma. 
snook rr Cellar bar rtu6 2 
iMqhl nrraK DBS f ro £47 mrt 
pt> >03051 786648 
TME GRANGE Otennrre. 
-Shrops CimUsh Country 
mamMii nee ween Ckmic > 
KhrrwvlHirv ■ n port of 
Emdand you've never v hUrd I 
hrtore. 2 day break from ' 
C46 A it. mv your own i 
.home parly, brtdqe. rroouet. 1 
harowAIrnino etc. ■ 0601711 , 


THE FAMILY OF 
SMALL HOTELS 
AND QUALITY 
GUEST 

ACCOMODATION 
WITH GOOD ROOM 
AWARDS 

A HOLIDAY in OeOphtful Vfl- 

Lwe of Crasmerc Prnwrty 
run U-adilibiial Lakeland 
Omui Inn! I hotel Own 

(■round* by Rtvrr R of hay. 
L'cniloii Meu r ursine CH. 
litiv ret i mu-. Cot TV all 
I wm words worth rountry 
OAkBAMK HOTEL. Cras- 
me l r Cumbria iOQ665iS 17. 
FAIRMONT HOUSE HOTEL, 
(luislon. Tonuiay '08031 
005446 BeauiHid Virionan 
bruise m.Corkinoton ViUaqe. 
Amarine rim movl eu vude 
Wonderful home rooking, 
■omiorl htuiiui allmlian 
Palm vun tonnvr bar. Dow 
urtew Pruusntr rtdur- 
Hons DBS CIS 
■KNOW HHJ.S. Sommrt 
*MA Award winning Coun- 
try house hotel. DoMildul 
Views. Pees <m P»Hv 
moms with rol TV WUPOP. 
Ubj tires rantumi dining. 

iwcl rimme. fine umrv 
Cinsr M5. Brrslol WHO Bar- 
■kHh RieaK »OCl34H4l 31 OS 
PANFyltaOOD HOL'SE 

PEAK DHT1BCT 17ihC Ofd 
lull in Prak National Park 
Comlort 1*4 tires, superb 
loud All rooms en inir. 4 
posters Open all v rai round 
Dililiet BAB from C 17 SO . 
BKunnre MRS. MOFFETT. 
BICUN HALL BIGGIN BY 
HARTIM7T0N. BL-XTON. 
Id' RHYS .020K84I 4*1 
PEACEFUL nor™ NORTHUM- 
BERLANb Warm, frimdiy 
i fiimils run iwlei Lon litis, 
i muiiiv i er load iCoon 
l RoilJi Good Food ' Real Ale. 

| Haioaut Breaks NOW 1 Irom 
Cl*t DBaB Oturai (or mu* 

I rnasl horri-rs vm -Vi res, 
Htornme Irom ftVECftOFT 
HUTLL Wooier lOoeSi 
8145“ 

Far more uifnrmAlKiti pirate 1 
iiHiiari Hie hmrK oirert m 
viui 41 tor nom guide, io 

\MW f jsHIRE. 1“0 Church 
Hi I HU\ L East won BN3 




























Si BARBICAN CENTRE Si APRIL Sis BARBICAN CENTRE SS APRIL gS BARBICAN CENTRE ^ 


flM . LUNCHTIME CONCERT 


TbKday t Apfl«3dOIni 
EAri Itfl lB l B WHWBWB dBBB 
omaMnwg mole omand 
Sum* or Intern 
Hamte {tat* conductor 
Programme acMcs Hurt Bate* 

avrar8mawT||T>il«mmrwtB3tunao 
me Hu smgk MU* ta R> nk. wri 
Bbkei Ohmm oa B«xbt Rkymo. 
MflmftBUaRacfceL 
MiAs ESSO Obteran roter W CMO 



WMcctfjy B April 41 i-DOom 
PfeMf Franu 2nd M> HtAqr pom 

SdmbertAtapoxiA mma* 

UDcnssttmie', Senaa m B IM. 
FanttwnFrrunof 
Alseas £3 


0» teoraxe (toT. Pane Crnwno 

No 3 &rmgeonyNoS'PBtOfa’ 

E5.c5.no. sasn. taso 


I IDND3H f Hi‘.R4S V3NX C-r-CHESTSA | 


on a ee enn to m* ibzqs art 
Mtmg me warns or See* Jo*ta. 
M*t Boa m&m and a J Pirao «m 
TM Udw IWw nrfete a 

V. E5, CBO E75a C&50 


rr.f:T*loH CHSMEER OR.'^E 


Mcnitraa.Aorfa7.45om 

B—wiMaleat m caaflMcar 


J MOSCOW BALAi AiKA ORCHESTRA I 




HMsttew*AialiJi745pm 
NTtJtai Netoxmw oondoaur 


I® 


I LOS ODU FHILHAS VO.VCOPCHESiR* I 


Name m me Bobton Ooera 
Um Etuon. VMW» pprira 
Arts EM* 

An MAfArra oregramme at MaMa 
famimes. nckxkng Ktaa, and 
Russia tan songs 
£450. E&50. QU& E75Q. £850 


SPRING LOVE CLASSICS 


n mra 6 April at 730pm 
MtaaMradacoodedw 
EnripM Itat de tan prano 
Barite OtttfeR TtatUCjXRMr 
Rartmknr nraosodv on a Tirana at 
- .. . PaBa»LSMMM*S»mor«nrNo2 

temtori no ctnd teri Crfor y*x>\ a w ^ ^ c ^ 

nnnuniiy nanrao and ante. B 

Famxsy-Owrtura I 

Boat L 'Artesem Suite No l 
Moan PBno Cooceno No a. K4B8 
Often tm OvettDfO ■Orpoeos m Me 
umenmntT. J Swann Bbe Ovube 
ttewitt Ctpnmo Bates 
£$. £6. C75Q C&SQL £950 


NATICNiLYCL'TH CflCHESTRJ 

3 


CTY OF LONDON JiSrOSl* 


ROTA'. PHILHARMONIC Gr.SHfSTR* 



SoonaMO Dv Most Pengai 

£4. £&£&»£& £10 


E7HC'»E!l CONCERT 


fmarnApna7.4apn 




SaWtet 12 Apm a 800pm 
Jan LaMttaMa eomtacar 
HerasdSteflerpano 
Oria Oiennra Ihsslan end LurfnW 
Hnriel ttrfc Mr me Botol RreM>^ 
hctetei Pane Oweeno No 2 
B eutei i— Sympriony Bo 5 
ES. £6l C7. E05q E95fl 0033 


I even.-nc 


frt4a»n April u 745pm 
OotatealfteBraalBJM 


| LONOufi CnCHESTRA 


imrarflApdai7J0pm 
Sanaa Itetel B rt i u ii rtr eandocar 



Emm Iran 'Eugene 
Paoo Camera No 1 in B A* mew 
Mantis Start The »u»aii«r Suns, 0» 
T8 gun c a nnon ■ramorfprfMcB 
C5 l £8l £754 ES50L £950 



jusouMoaemr 


I THE 7C3 H?A T M EARS 


V.7.EN ORCHESTPA Or LCIluv" 


1 vE?.c; p=cu-:i” 


BatetepM April atBLOOpm 
—M U— W rit 
Lateoa Qmi Soctey 
JaM&anrconexK* 
Etetwna tern soprano 


22 April H 7 45pm 
htt* tteycq* awkMor 
JataWorano 

■etealtaate Overture -Tlra HcMte* 
team tan Concerto No 5 
Emperor' 

DeoBfc Symphony No 9 in E tenot 
Erasr me Hew Mnhr 
Somorad q> Cepnai RadmLM 
E4, £&5C, £550, 050. E&50 


TteodaytSMn at 7.45pm 
C550, £7. £& £950 


( JACK .'ONE 5 IN' CONCERT 


Essdra 27 May « 746pm 

wOhsicdalgDeatoBa aoeouncfri 
£7.ant 


1 THE iCP.NCTEl'l KSliVi'. 


:;t ;• op London s;nfok.‘a 


FrioeyS Aprils 7.Qpm 
HMriMte ate M • 
ends Erin & Atoneate tab peon 


Mceoey B Apia ■ iJJOpra 


Uni Iranu new 
JoytonflcanKt. 

Mnan tram Cancerm No 4. Omel 
Coweta sy m phon y No 1. tondotf 
Meats 13 


E5l E& £7. Q5Q £9S0l CIO50 



mriay S April at 7.4Spm 
Latent SymphMy Ostetea 



am MM |1teRratef-Stee 
E350.E4SLE6.C75a E&50 0091 





anft«w»yagu2»25iaa 


tenaeidiy S April at 7.*5pra 
RyMtSea MM contactor 

ptnlHeJteeei Uteri riote 

Bw ffl a 

fmitospOwrtDfalAoeaCancanDina I mwngthtB B)«pnl 

Symphony No 4 I OrfMAteaiPQ-tMa Aorf 

acTa.f&E7.£&50 ■■ I WBamvBiPSJSAofMitof 


BOOK TODAY! 01 638 8891/628 8795 


TELEPHONES OPEN 


I0AM-8PM DAILY 


J12S BARBICAN HALL 

Barbican Centre. Silk St. EC2Y8DS 
Wl> 01-638 8891/626 3795 / 

Telephone Bookings: lOam^Bpm 7 days a week 


G*» r e2. !und«; Jns nr, iqe<5b, ; |H» Cc:ociJ!"on or iCi'Ciry o' ioncon 


I , .- |l y , /,, 









LONDON SYMPHONY 
ORCHESTRA Barbican 


Tomorrow 2 March 7 JO pm 

MOZART - BEETHOVEN 


SATURDAY » MARCH K ■ po 

THE GLORY OF EASTER 


THE ROYAL FESTIVAL HALL 

—Sunday 30 MarcO M3. 15pm 
RAYMONO QU88AY prranoM 
A MM cOanc* id m Npd Shatidi and AIMnlr Bateanb 
Mtafou* adaptations or Gflbnft & SteSvMi 


7-w ra* Ar. nmd rtn-a V* M*. «w* 


ROYAL FESTIVAL HALL 


RAYMOND Cl BBAT | 


TONIGHT at 7.30 pm 

THE MAGIC OF VIENNA 


FKHMV NEXT T MARCH sd 7 AS pm 

LONDON BACH ORCHESTRA 

Conductor. NICHOLAS KRAEMER 


ROSSINI Overture ‘Serairamide’ 

MOZART Piano Conomo No 26 in D, K537 

BEETHOVEN Symphony No 6 ‘PasioraT 

JORGE RUBIO conductor IMOGEN COOPER piano 


R aw vi rani *i l|Mh»4rau» l ln . l> . iarall, 

• r _2"“T ao *«»TL wau ni lI Mt far Ar M Riranfa. 

LONDON CONCERT ORCHESTRA Ceteaor PtDUP SIMMS 
ANN JAMES Mfaao CSISPIAN STEBLfi^EitXtNS mapa 
A0.Ctw.Xua.0tra 


mmm 


THE RATEPAYERS’ 10LANTHE 

aawy^drMaMresourcetrfss'-Xfesenv . 

THEMETROPQUTAN MIKADO 

Tt* tones:, shcaesr stewrYe men m neats' -OjiXteds 

■flm Iron Mtedam, Rrad Kwt, Pooh Bsoh. dw Cauntante 
GteMhaai nod many mom — all ugMMr tar dm 

partoimanea oedy ol codiimed ecann tMtunng montwraaf 
ms original case, directed and mroduoBd by Ned SMnw. 


ffESl Snaon F«i S«w Madh tatanl Raw* I* ,l>»iw W. 1 ^ 

I B 'mMa ttULt AmaiRiaa.trm«w»»m'l 1 itfl>« D a M« daa. 
r< HTI — « I*— v»»n. If»iw nifa. ml T mu IV Ffalgwn. 

1ktynU.TkrLBlaM^wl P»MDnM> 


ar LONDON CONCERT ORCHESTRA 

UMtemr BARRY WORDSWORTH 
MARILTNHIU- SMITH RAMON REMEDIOS m 

£1.41. lira. 0 ra. ia ra. X 7 ra x» «. x« m om*» 
m iwui-w tiai civoi^c»pp«ii 


CORELLL Cauiu Gitwa m Bria. Op* So II 
BAl3fc Ut«* Cmm* F. Utrv lift J 
HANDEL: Oipa Coauno m A Op 7 SaJ 
BACH: umento a D non to« wo notoo. 1W. I Ml 
TBLEMAtek Sww a F thap am 


Saturday 8 March 7.45 pm 

BEETHOVEN - MOZART 


TICKETS: CXM to ttOD from tfte RFH Box Offle* 
CradicMdBOVtta 3002. taantetaM oirfasaiti 


S* M M w* 1 1* loite 



ROYAL PHILHARMONIC 
ORCHESTRA 


Music Director ANDRE PREVIN 

NEXT TUESDAY 4 MARCH at 7 JO pro 


Friday U Man* at 7A5 

ACADEMY OF LONDON 

Canduaot Richard Stamp 

“American Artists* Series’* 


BEETHOVEN Overture ‘Leonore No 3’ 

‘MOZART ..Piano Concerto No 21 in C, K467 ■ 

BEETHOVEN .Symphony No 5 . 

JOHN GEORGIADIS conductor 
SALLY ANN BOTTOMLEY piano 




Tuesday II March 7.45pm 

JOHN LELL 


2t-w 


OVERTURE THE FORCE OP DESTINT 
P1AAO CONCERTO MU 
SYMPHONY NOJ 


Undone ANDREW LITTON Ster BERNARD rf-ASCOU 


£1 0. £'.£» ra £» ra xwrax li» H41 4IA> 11H U- W4W MIU 

rriaMUoneEratnaM 
SwnMwX h, WoulMna Cm * SWiJi 


LYNN HARRELL cello, in a 

programme of TC HAIKO VSKY plus the 

Braxaii htiBor 

Donald Erb's CcDo Cooceno 


Programme indudes 

BRAHMS Piano Conceno No I • 

MUSSORGSKY Pictures ai an Exhibition 

EDUARDO MATA conductor JOHN L1LL piano 
Sponsored by Rank Xerox 


PHD BARBICAN 
VAr SERIES 


war series 

LONDON SYMPHONY ORCHESTRA 


ST. MARYIEBOMB PARISH CHURCH. Mw*hb*ac Rd, M.«X 

tewra wUiratalRya 


Seat Prices £10.50. £3 SO. £7.50. Lb. £4.50 
Box Office tel: 10-8 every dav inc Sun CH-638 8M| -62887D5 


THl RSDAY NEXT 6 MARCH m 7.»pw 

ROYAL CHORAL SOCIETY 

Cdnduaur LASZLO HEITAY 

Brahms REQUIEM 

Haydn OXFORD SYMPHONY 


4« ra te te Vte.4 r 7». 


SLNDAT 1* MARCH m 7.11 fm 


BACH: ST JOHN PASSION 


ier NjbBi Bna |u*l u> t^twr Jmt. 



HAROLD HOLT LIMITED presents 
BARBICAN. MONDAY NEXT ai 7.45 


MON DM M MARCH » T-W pm 
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MESSIAH 

THE HUDDERSFIELD CHORAL SOCIETY 

Royal Philharmonic Orchestra 


Oaten ArvcH Kn^hn — conductor 

Vt rfu pwd t» tww Wi 

Hnt b firm) H— Walli C—*** 


RAYMOND CL B BAT < 


SATURDAY 2* MARCH JfUOgni 


POPULAR CLASSICS 


■mOI 'Vmt rauhn tcf. Sow TV Ljtnn 3* 

J. Sur*w> H ri* Bac mo VJKr. Onta Noio ■ «ou S*n 

I .rtBor. LoW Ljiafe.; Xiocw I«toub now t jnrWjO 
EI|*(W rat Iboocubu tUS Sr I. B oin J ii Po r-i rje L*nr. 
»*i Htoflt I eor. Rrad Burro 


ROYAL PHILHAAMrlNIC ORCHESTRA 
Idndwnr BARRY WORDSWORTH HOWARD SHELLEY pant 
tiw.:' U Olir.l* Y. lu Hlll>l|.>> ll«l U'-WASfttr 


QUEEN ELIZABETH HALL 


VAN WALSLM WANACSMENT f 


BORODIN QUARTET 

THE SHOSTAKOVICH QUARTETS 

TOMORROW at 3 pm 

k Y Prog me. Pino Cfrmuei Oy.97 

with PETER DONOHOE 

Fwihtr Mo unt ia • c r ies: IS, IA, 29, 2i March 


Sec Wtfb Bail w** for isavtwr WV 


TOMORROW u 7.15 pra 

TkrlralH WwtWc Trw pmra i 


GALA CONCERT FOR WILDLIFE 


M add at lb* Brush WIMUb Appeal 

Introduced by SIR DAVID ATTENBOROUGH 
with die CHUJNGCIUAN QUARTET 



i MILWAUKEE SYMPHONY 
Lukas Foss / Nigel Kennedy 


CaptanA Fjnlnr tor ihr Coraanu Mb 
hraDimUDOn 
Brack Vwkt Uontcrro Sal 
BctxSoa » n s» i Vo 7 


Firw two oraccnu m i arm 
vcrw« 'ptiovirrd In CAP Group pic 

SIR NEVILLE MARRINER conductor 
PETER DONOHOE piano 

Thursday 27 March 7.45pm 

BEWETJT ........ — Music for Sitings 

5^Si 1ANIN0V Rhapsody on a Theme of Paganini 
HOLST The Planets 

ROYAL ACADEMY CHORUS 

Mth ButhdiT rrihuw to Ru hurt i R, uteri- Bennrti 


RAUL STEJNTTZ conducts 

BACH: St MATTHEW PASSION 

LONDON BACH SOCIETY & 
STEINITZ BACH PLAYERS 

ha FratmSp (Bunpail (Vmj- Sntds* iCkrand 


£2 rat' ra it ra £» £7 ra i*ra boi cbwt r*v cc ai «s ran 


Sunday 30 March 730pm 

MUSSORGSKY — . Introduction and tertian Maidens' 
_ Dance from ‘Khovanchina' 

RACHMANINOV ..... Piano Concerto No 2 in C minor 
BEETHOVEN Symphony No 3 'Eroica' 


ST. MARGARKTS nil RT1L » KSTMIXSTTR 
IIVw* M.viMigif U*nl 
Tonight r| 7 JO pjn. 

Ssicred and Svcwlar Music 
London Cantata Choir 

Director Peter Moors. Organist Paol Hale 

Fjiui Lu. the Imal vktiikv Sunlord Three Lano 

MohrivIhmAtnikr my unrLsV at^uo WilInmvLonl. thou hit 
Ivv-n our relume- and pjrLvMiav 

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OPER.V & BALLET 


Scat Prices £ HI. 5(1. £K.St. £7511. £6. £4.5H. £3.50 
Bck Office tfc (0-K every day inc. Sun Ul-fijfi «KS»l/b» 8795 


COUSEUM S UU16I 
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T on-I r no 7 30 RUa— te rt ra.R ] 


HHEZISESDAY NEXT 1 M WCH ra 7 XI fm 


ENGLISH CHAMBER ORCHESTRA 
Conducted by JEFFREY TATE 


^ Q St John's Smith Square | 



London SWir 3HA Dlrrctor: PjuI Davies 
Bo»Of.‘icr OI-iT ; 1061 Mon-Fri 
. and from 6pm at eirh tOiVcerl 


MARIA JO AO PIRES 


iMcndebwhia: Hebrides Otenure 
Schumann: rrarw Concerto in A minor 
HaytiK b?mphony No.lul in E Ibt ■ Drum-mU i 


fv«,. A »ra,,% t e«p t \i ira t .‘ 

Vl«-n «W| WJ HTM fCkSMrra Ml i 


DAVID HARPER, prano 

h«cisu£K dhJteJr. 

Si'l'iiS* 7 — Am«X»w..fcr.w ! r». 

PICUM -lUram. 


■nMr ra nr am ra raor. 

JIU HAJDVS Jo. 

£- yi I " 0. 1 1 ra l' ra w Hra dl-t> iwi 1_<.. ows-w.1 


ROYAL PHILHARMONIC 
ORCHESTRA 
Music Director ANDRE PREVIN 

Boriticao Friday Nm 7 Martel at 7.45 pm 
Prog. me. Benicia *» 


WEST SIDE STORY 




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bra Bra^eui ponel fi. i mjra ilctrab 

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R01 U ILB£RT HALL 



4WJTHL 850 7611. or 2«3 

J?*- 5 * U: M| oaoo H56 

T5SH 5T«* t>455 
€>» silr. «»jo ol?5 

» ’ HUUKRIO TO \M«H "So 

tl \ V 'l! h f ■"* J nta On 
i*) 7700 fa Hr 7 Ur. 

LAURENCE OLIVER 
.... VWNHER* 

MST MUSICAL OF THE YEAR 

i AN 

POI I-ARD 

ME \ND MY GIRL 

THi. I ,UU8( TO Vt'AI k 

-» TMtteHTOH 

Diret-IMI lit 'Miki. OrkJ^ru 
NtrEIN* HI 7 50 Mdk Wm rtl 3 50 
* 4 .V) A H on 

“THEOIVljyE WUHCAL 
rVE EVER ENJOYED” 
MarUMu 



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Ajjtemr o) K3o W7H «• Sm 
OSoS IX' 374 o4U 751 «»U 
Ur. SJlw, «»JO 6)75 B56 SOW 
I'l' 715 SKi 7 0 k 750 | 

ACTOR OF THE YEAR 

oi>i*t A Skimi.nl Lr.ajih- *H6 
ANIONS SKI R-S 

l AM s wi I ks m 

TORCH SONG TRILOGY 

Uupra I Hrdiuj 

I i ran .uid Sam |.ui 

Mirw™ h.irlrn 

"BRIUJAJiTLT FUNNY** LFW 


SateilMiteHtEpm 


MUSIC OF EIGHT DECADES 


l6ndon SINFONIETTA 

BBC SINGERS 

ESA-PEKKA SALONEN conductor 
PALL CROSSLEY piano 
TRISTAN MIKAS, ondcs nanenDt 
*L<d Itimrar.ikraim 
- ~*-| — i rr . » .|i i i.i. 

TAntH'iK IN i»irn|.»Ji Hn ijufe UJ.Al.ttiTCi 



GALA CONCERT 
ON MOTHERING SUNDAY 


In ihr praxTKC rf HUH THE HL CHESS OF CLOLCFSTCJl 
lt«ilriiYW))*U£RUWiSgutn FOR THh BLIND 


LUNCHTIME MUSIC IN THE CITY 

ira to EXXZ 


ASTORIA THEATRE Ha.\ OH ■■■In 
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LONDON PHILHARMONIC ORCHESTRA 

LORIS TJEKNAVOR3AN .Mcdunor PETER DO.NOHOC puco 

Tal ni .aiiiuirmm. 

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BEST MUSICAL i%5 

I hf I intpv 

LENNON 

\ i a-lrfi# ralann M llln lifr .mil mmol 

ni J>tein | 

“W0NOERFULL. f REALLY 
LOVED IT- uT Wy mm, -THEY 
COULXW 7 HAVE DONE IT 
Cyrtthla Lnm -1 
MP T ntW CrlCCIttMC 
WITH EYCRTOME ELM AT THE 
END” 

■liMila'nui) \lu sun j| tn 
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BOOMH«fr TO KTTEBBKR 


THEATRE PC 417t 
5 *5ra .VAM tw hi 7 rLn . 
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■t*l I'jll ?4fl Will 

PEJiCLOFE KDTH 
MARK MNCSTOH 


•T THE DRAGON'S TAIL :: 



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LAST FOUR WEEKS 

































































THE TIMES SATURDAY MARCH 1 1986 



THE WEEK AHEAD 


:* The Judds Rockin' with the 
5 Rhythm (RCA AHU-70420) 

• Rosarme Cash Rhythm and 

f ^Romance (CBS 2636$) 



, - . l rGeorae SteaftSomefting 

-^Special (MCA s 605) 


. * At best country music isoneof 

tftemost enduring and cndear- 

* ingforms of popular expres- 
'* saoh to have come out of white 

working-class America. Sadly, 
l it hasn’t enjoyetTa good image 

* in Britain, where it is associai- 
Zed with dreadful television 
- cabaret shows or the Wembley 
I Festival’s usual collection of 
M>^d and grossly sentimental 
, troupers. 

(fr The Country Music Assoc i- 
..'aiion. aims to change- 
-.image, thb year. Under the- 
. < slogin “Discover New Coun- 
-«ery— Leave the-wagon wheels 
behind”, it is planning to 
tempi the closet cowboys into 
the open. In particular three 
new records from the Judds, 
Rosanne Cash and George 
Suait give good, reasons why 
it’s safe to emerge. 

The Judds are something of 
a phenomenon in America at 
present. A mother-and-daugb- - 
ter team,' Naomi and 
Wynonna, they recall - the 
styles of Appalachian folk and 
bluegrass bat updates down- 
. . home sound with a deliberate- 
lily contemporary choice of 
tend and production. 

Abetted by tbe band leader 
Don Ponerind their producer 
Brent Maher^ the. Judds* pew 
album, Bodin' with the 
Rhythm, .unveils all their Vir- 
tues: mountain-fresh harmo- 


*Vb and . good material, 
lovingly presented ' 

.Apart from Maher’s original 
amhtiy songs, the Judds 
bravely tackle* Allen 
Toussainfs “Working In The 
Coal Mine", which though not 
:qnite as good as Lee Dorsey's 
version, provides a chance to 
hear vocal- colouration at its 
most , ornate.. In* a different 
mood is “Grandpa (Tell Me 
’Bout The Good Old Days)” 
which bubbles oyer with good 
humour. 

. Rosanne Cash, like Naomi 
and Wynonna, enjoys the 
adva nt a g es of having the mu- 
sic run -in the family — she is 
the daughter of Johnny Cash. 
Rosanne'5 twang, however, is 
. about the only dong she has in 
common with her pa. Rhythm 
and Romance has a -gritty 
fend nine quality andstyle that 
eschews the usual barrage of 
country pickers in favour of a 
Jean. punchy Californian pro- 
duction. Ms Cash ‘also has that 
knack for selecting the right 
song: she also writes hersd£ 
using none of the clich&i 
formulas. - 

Besides, anyone who has the 
good taste to cover John. 
Hiatt's “Pink Bedroom" — a 
razor-sharp insight into the 
boredom of the LA Valley Girl 
set — sets herself apart from 
the usual peroxided practitio- 
ners of the art. She is occasion- 
ally assisted by her husband 
Rodney Crowell, who is also a 
country artist, but her best 
song is the sefcpenned “Half- 
way House", -an intelligent 



Punchy production; Rosanne Cash eschews old formnlas 


and provocative account of 
owning iip to growing up that 
could become a new standard. 

George Strait, in some ways 
the most typical artist here, 
comes from San Marcos, Tex- 
as. He looks and sounds as if 
he has walked off a ranch — 
and he has. Strait is a stranger 
• in these parts but his debut 
album Does Farr ff'orrh Ever 
Cross Your Mind outsold the 
Outlaw rockers Waylon and 
Willie :in 1985, while his end- 
of-year Dallas Convention 
concert pulled in more people 
than the heavy-metal stadium 
brigade. . 

Strait's Something Special 
is a few shades more macho 
than the Judds and Cash, but 
*his vocal delivery is soulful' 


and never hidden under a 
bourbon-soaked croak. When 
he sings "You Sure Got This 
Or Redneck Feelin’ Blue" 
you know that he isn't living a 
sepia-tinted lie. 

If Strait has a natural peer 
then it's Merle Haggard or 
Hoyt Axton, with whom he 
shares a loving for a plaintive 
pedal steel, a haunting fiddle . 
and the lure of the open range. 

Strait is actually something 
of a revelation in the new 
country male stakes and a visit 
to Britain would break him 
out of the category altogether. 
Something Special is no idle 
boast George Strait is the 
genuine rawhide. 

Max Bell 



- - JT • l 

t 1 

* ;Ti* VM 


... , r-i W * 
* ’ * 


contest 

■' In 1980, 4982" and 1984 the 
GLC, in conjunction - with 
stockbrokers, Phillips ’& 
Drew, funded a Grandmaster 
tournament hr London of the 
very front tank This year the 
.tradition continues, though 
the GLC is now sote sponsor. 

. The star-studded • 1986 
GLC Chess Challenge will 
run from March 11-17, at 
The Great Eastern Hotel,' 
Liverpool Street. London. 

J ickcts are available from 
he British Chess Federation, 
% Grand Parade, St Leon-. 
ards-on-Sea, . East *. Sussex 
TN38 ODD. ‘ 

■&r The favourites for top 
honours this time include the 
great Boris Spassky. This . 
week’s game demonstrates 
the recent excellent form of 
ibe ex-world champion. 

White: Julian Hodgson; - 
Black: Boris Spassky 
- Four Knights' Game, Brus- 
sels 1985. . 

1 P-K4 MC* 2 MM IMB3 

3 M-M H4U 4 M5 

An .. old and reputedly 
harmless line, not least be- 
cause Black can lay immedi- 
ate claim- to equality with 
Rubinstein's N-Q5. 

4 ... B-» 5 ire M 

• P-Q3 am t m ms 

I B-4B Q-X2 9 " IHC1 M-Crt 

W IHM M-Wi 11 SWJB1 NM 

n nm 

This constitutes an inter- 
' esting. if temporary, attempt 
to keep the centre fluid for 
his Bishop-pair. 12 PxKP 
PxP. 13 NxP fails to 13.. . 
N-B2, but 12 P-Q5 N-B2, 13 


ACROSS 

1 Leaping firework 
I7.4J 

9 Foolishly tearful (7) 

10 JcstS.) 

i ri Moose 01 

* 13 trosightlyW 

16 By unknown per- 
son i&) 

17 Saindem/6) 

W Hull (4) 

20 NoMcman(4) 

21 Prophery (6) 

22 Bpr4rn(4) 

23 Diplomacy (4) 

2S Done* (31 • 

38 Hue? horned ffitn* 

mal(5» 

29 Pipe bubble (7) 

30 Winter soktice (BJ) 
down 

2 Customary (5) 

3 Heap (4) - 

4 Not one W 
.. S Rubbish (4) 

\ 4 Beat <7* 

7 Sielf-reiprct (5.6) 

8 Russian Rrvolo- 

bon leader (7.41 
12 Bequest (6) . . 
MSoCwfJl • 

15 Vulgm o) 

W Uncouth (7) 

20 House aninud(3) 

24 Axtnm matter: 

Pboetij 

25 tymfr (4) 

26 Futd took (41 




27 CoarBfyM4) Atgett"** 

SOLUTION TO NO 882 (UK ^ l3Uotto ; 

jntosi IStopsga^ “PS. & " 

Jttw |7 Dream* WLakr m aphr admac 

2SBcd aVjboo 7Samod 

BOfcX- 2 u OdT 15 Mealie 19 


BRIDGE 


i 




twos and threes 


: ' hfimBonsSpuskr 1 ' 

B^Q3 is quite respectable. 

■tt 'am- own .ihci 
44 ns -ihw. «m* um.. 

a* MW-' -W MMM. - 

To prevent the possibility 
of . P-QN4 or . . VB-R5. 
w..."; wao » ooa " h-kbi 
• Althoiugh White controls 
more qxace Black is actually 
dtciatii^g events since he dan 
play to. open the KB file. 

tf N-Q2 K-B2 X MU . MM 

» w .»•«• ewa 

HM RxB 3* IHM .OR-tCBI 
2S p-raa tm 

A bold move, striving to 
diminate White's best defen- 
sive piece; the Knigbl bn K4. 
But in i!w process White is 
given the chance lo introduce 
complications. 

3S IM* P-K5 

Not 26... QxN 27 QxR. 

27 NMO> MM 2IIW> 041 
29 M3? 

The decisive error. 29 Q- 
Q4 NxKBPch, 30 RxN RxR, 

31 N-K6 leaves White with 
two pawns, compensation for 
his loss of Rook for Knight, 
plus a powerful outpost for 
himself at K6. - 

» ... x tKH lbm 

White resigns. A brisk 
finish since 31 KxN R-R4ch, 

32 K-NI Q-R6 is immediate- 
ly decisive. 

Raymond Keene 


“Any fool can take tricks 
with aces and kings; it takes 
an artist to use the twos and 
threes: to good effect.” Like 
most sweeping statements, 
this is an exaggeration which 
contains a germ of: truth.. 

The first undramatic exam- 
ple unfailingly finds out the 
thoughtless, defender. This 
declarer was unlucky to have 
to cross- swords with Roman 
Smokld, 4>ne of the best 
players of the younger school. 

Rubber bridge. 

. Love all. 

Deafer East. 

-• ♦0)1096 - - 

. VK65 
• 0 J73 
. * AJ 


The next hand has proba- 
bly caused West several 
sleepless nights, so I will 
leave him in peaceful ano- 
nymity. 

Rubber Bridge. 

North-South game. 

Dealer South. 


♦ K 109662 
W K2 

0 9754 

♦ 3 


<7 AQ10653 
06 

4 K10676 


♦ J5 
<77 

0 AKJ108 

♦ AGS54 


4 KK* 
?*73 
0 96 
♦ 10873 


♦ A72 
<?42 
0KO842 

♦ K42 


♦ 3 . 

V AQJ109 
O A105 

♦ 0905 ’ 


Wed 

Nonti 

East 

South 



_ 

no 

24 

2NT 

3<3> 

<♦ 

NO 

40 

No 

50 

NO 

No 

No - _ 

Opening lead W 


wut 

North 

East 

Smotsfd 




10 

NO 

20 

. NO 

No . 

3F 

No 

No 

No 

No- 


CONCISE CROSSWORD (No 888) 

Prizes of the New Collins TberamiB wffl 

correct solutions opened on Thursday, March 6. I«». homes 
sSd teSkli «2dm The Ti^Com^ Oossw^Co^ 
peution. 1 Penmngtoo Sireei. 
sohnion will be announced on Satuitby. Maxctx s, ivoq. 


■ aiiiH 

■ ■ 

□■■a a ■ qibh 

■ aiHH ■ g 

A ■ „(■■■■■ ■ 

Mm mm ^mu 

■ ■ m IBS 3 1 i 


Declarer took Smolski's 
OQ with the 0A. To avoid a 
diamond ruff, declarer was 
forced to draw three rounds 
of mtmps, putting Smolski to 
a critical discard. 

No problems, you say, 
throw a diamond. If you do, 
the defence is lost! Declarer 
will play a spade, which West 
must win. otherwise East will 
be compelled to yield a vital 
second entry to dummy. 
West continues with a second 
diamond, . which East must 
refuse, or the OJ becomes an 
entry. Declarer wins with the 
010 and plays a third round. 

When East plays the fourth 
round of the suit, declarer 
discards a dub, leaving East 
hopelessly enmeshed, in his 
web. Too late will he perceive 
the value of the gem he cast 
away at trick four. 


North-South found their 
best contract despite a spirit- 
ed barrage from their non- 
vulneraUe opponents. South 
ruffled the heart continuation 
and drew four rounds of 
trumps. 

As is often the case, the 
defensive bidding had been 
most revealing. The West 
hand could be counted as 6- 
2-4-1, but even with both the 
club honours well placed, 
declarer appeared to be a 
trick short. He played the +J. 
covered by the King and Ace. 
When the 4J was covered by 
the King and Ace and West 
followed with the 43, the 
hand became an open book. 
Nonchalantly South played 
the 45 which West thought- 
lessly covered with the 46. 
South played dummy's three 
of spades. 

West’s pleasure of winning 
the unexpected trick was 
short lived. Perforce he 
played a spade which pro- 
duced the final painful turn 
of the vice on East, who 
could now no longer retain 
bis guard in hearts and clubs. 

Jeremy Flint 


r 


OUTINGS 


S0LLT10NT0N0887 . 

1 Versos 5 Asthma 8 rod 9 ven- 

ACRCw- llDdu 12 Couscous M 

?P e iOMfltefeS 22 Pest 24 

& SUSS JtiSSr^NewWa 2* 

l7Saisuma 18 Wore 20 

ggaAHga 23Simg 

D^d ^ 

ArjpMar 


SUPER STAMPEX: Britain's 
leading national stamp 
exhibition. This year 148 
dealers and Post Offices will 
be represented. British 
colonial countries, such as the 
Faittandsandthe ' 

Bahamas, wiH be represented 
by the Crown Agents. 
BoyalHortcutturaJSoctety 
Halls, Greycoat Street ana 
Vincent Square, London 
SW1. Furtner information from 
Stampex (01-930 6465). 

Toes IrSpm, Wed lO^Oam- 
8pm.Thursand Fri . 
10B0am-6pm. Adirtsston first 
day £2, thereafter adult £1 , 
child 50p or after 4pra, adCitt 


at the Tricycle Theatre. Kilbum, 
Tues 4.30pm. Tickets £1 , 
£1.50, pre-bookaUe. 

CADBURY'S NATIONAL 
EXHIBITION OF CHILDREN’S 
ART: Prize-winning exhibits 
of art, craft and poetry by 
children from primary and 
secondary schools. 


Derby City Museum and Art 
Gallery, the Strand, Derby 
(0332 31111). Today until 


Name . ._j r _ 

A*!**.. 


50p, chad 25p. 

CAMDEN YOUNG : 

FESTIVAL: Events and 
entertainments lot children 
include Alan Bennett reading 
WimtiB the Pooh, Floefla 
Benjamin and Mike Rosen 
entertaining at the Shaw 
7?ieabi6. “Kids Cfassics” 
concerts by Civertimanti 
and Zippo the Clown at 
Camden Lock. 

Young Festival Box office 
. (01-38B 1394). From today until 
March 2L Alan Bennett is 


4 r Tuei*Sat1 


RONALD SEARLE-TOTHE 
KWAI - AND BACK: An 
exhibition of Second World 
War drawings by one of 
Britain’s finest cartoonists. 
They constitute a chronicle of 
Searte’s war from “mud- 
bashing in Norfolk” through his 
voyage to Singapore and 
subsequent imprisonment fn 
Siam and Malaya. 

Imperial War Museum, 

Lambeth Road, London SE1 
(01 -735 8922).Thursnhj*y 6. 
Mon-Sat 1 0am-5^0pm. Sun 2-. 
5.50pm. Free. 

Judy Froshaog 


FILMS ON TV 


Though reared in television 
documentary, John Boorman 
has used the cinema as an 
escape from realism. Even 
apparently naturalistic films, 
like his dazzling American 
thriller. Point Blank, owe as 
much to metaphysics as the 
conventions of the gangster 
genre. 

In most of Boorman's fea- 
tures, including his latest. The 
Emerald Forest, there is one 
consistent theme and that is 
the quest. It is powerfully 
evident in pictures as superfi- 
cially different as Zardoz, 
Deliverance and Hell in the 
Pacific. 

Even more obviously it 
permeates his 1981 film. Ex- 
catibur. which has its British 
television premiere on Chan- 
nel 4 on Tuesday (9-1 1.30pm). 
It is based on the legend of 
King Arthur and ibe Holy 
Grail, a subject Boorman long 
cherished and was finally able 
to film very much on his own 
terms. 

In doing so he opened up a 
critical debate about his work, 
touching on the paradox of 
artistic freedom. Boorman is 
an uncompromising film- 
maker, whose unsbakeable in- 
tegrity has often brought him 
into conflict with an industry 
which tends to distrust men of 
ideas and prefers the quick 
buck. 

As his book about the 
making of The Emerald Forest 
showed. Boorman is not a 
director who finds the com- 
mercial imperatives of film- 
making easy to accommodate. - 
This explains why his output 
is comparatively small— his 
niue films have been spread 
over 20 years — and why his 
career is peppered with unre- 
alized projects. 

But the irony, to some 
critics at least, is that his best 
films - Point Blank, Deliver- 

The funny 
things 
about God 



RADIO 

Stand-up comic, actor, film 
director — Woody Allen has 
been all of these things, with 
the films latterly tendlig to 
dwarf everything rise. Less 
well known is bis career as a 
playwright, though two exam- 
ples of it are on radio this 

U CC lta 

The first is God (Radio 3, 
tomorrow, 7 30-8.1 Opm), writ- 
ten in the mid-1970s bat being 
broadcast in this country for 
the first time in a production 
by the National Radio Theatre 
of Chicago. Infused with 
Allen's characteristically off- 
beat humour, it is set in an 
Athens amphitheatre in 500 
BC and follows two distraught 
Greeks as they try to stage a 
d rama which has neither . a 
beginning nor an end. 

Ignoring the historical fact 
that Alexander Graham Bril 
has yet to be invented, they put 
in a telephone call to the 
author — who is, and is played 
by, Allen himself — and ask 
him to sort things onL The 
other riddle is that Blanche 
Dubois, of A Streetcar Named 
Desire, has somehow wan- 
dered into the action. 

On Wednesday (Radio 3, 
730-8.1 5pm) there is a repeat 
of Allen's acclaimed black 
comedy. Death, with the 
American television comedian, 
Kelly Monteith. Meanwhile, 
Alexander Walker recalls 
Alim's movie career in Film 
Star (Radio 4, Wed, 630- 
7pm). 

While two-thirds of the 
world's population Is starving, 
the rest of ns are giving 
ourselves heart disease, 
strokes, diabetes and high 
blood pressure through over- 
eating and malting the wrong 
choke of what to eat. Not 
Another Diet Programme 
(Radio 4, today. 4.15-4.45pm) 
is a six-part series dedicated to ! 
the proposition that healthy j 
eating does not have to mean ; 
lentils and not cutlets. Pre-j 
seated in jocular style by Dr: 
Alan Maryon-Daris, the pro- 
grammes usefully combine the 
scientific facts behind diet 
with suggestions for dishes 
that purport to be both tasty 
and good for ns. 

Today is St David's Day and 
the cn for a week of Welsh 
drama on Radio 4. First off is 
Mike DorrelTs play. Three of 
Swords (today, 83040pm), a 
story of infidelity and murder 
owing something to the Holly- 
wood film aozr and set in the 
contemporary Sooth Wales of 
motorways, docks and Ameri- 
can airbases. 

Taken Out (Mon, 8.15- 
930pm) deals with the victims 
of war, in this case the 
bombing of the Sir Galahad 
during the Falklands conflict. 

The third Welsh play is The 
Peiuyn Summer by Alison 
Leonard (Toes, 3~4pm), in 
which, a student tries to 
reconcile her youthful ideal- 
ism with the militant socialism 
still evoked by Britain's long- 
est industrial dispute, the slate 
quarry strike of 1900-1903. 

Peter Waymark 


Headstrong hero: 

awe— have been made within 
the restrictions of the studio 
system, while the freedom to 
make personal projects of his 
own choosing has often 
produced less than satisfac- 
tory results. ExcaUbur is cen- 
tral to this argument. 

Those who dislike the film 
say it is the result of giving free 
rein to a director of bulging 
ideas but uncertain judge- 
ment. They point to the 
choppy narrative, the sudden 
shifts in tone and the idiosyn- 
cratic casting, particularly of 
Nicol Williamson as Merlin. 

Others have seen ExcaUbur 
as one of Boorman's finest 
achievements, a film of power 
and richness, both visually 
and on the level of myth and 
legend. 

About the scale and ambi- 
tion of the work there can be 
little argument. Nor about 
Alex Thomson's arresting 
photography. The main ques- 
tions are whether ExcaUbur 


Nigel Terry, impetuous and gullible, in ExcaJibor 

offers the same feast for the 
mind as it does the eyes, 
whether what lies behind the 
brilliant images is intellectual- The Knack (1965): Ann 
1y penetrating or merely pre* Jellicoe's stage play 
tenuous* 1 transformed into a dazzling 

Much depends on the credi- SL?a9 sby 

biiity of Arthur himself. As 

played by Nigel Terry (soon lo ffgwl 4* tomorrow ’ iai&- 
be seen as the painter Cara- 

vaggio in Derek Jarman’s new The QuBer Memorandum 
filS). he is not the conven- t® 6 ® Mutedbut watdrable 
tionally noble figure of movie. 

if not Arthurian legend, but a ^ 

young blood by turn gullible, m™. T^ iTsS) 
impetuous and headstrong. _ .. ' 

The performance that 

makes the strongest impres- 3S 

••on. however is that of Nicol ro HJ J, paLs do 

Williamson. It is an eccentric Danse in an unassuming 
portrayal which draws upon slice-of-life drama from Ealing 
the actor’s impressive range of (Channel 4, Thurs, 5- 
visual and vocal effects. 6.30pm). 

Whether or not it works is a eaiun*i«n ii., M 
matter for individual judge- (1925): Rare televisii 
mem and the same can be said for Josef von Stemi 
for the film itself. silent classic of rorr 


RECOMMENDED 


6.30pm). 

The Salvation Hunters 
(1925): Rare television outing 
for Josef von Sternberg's 
silent classic of romance on 
the mud flats (BBC2, Fri, 
11.45pm-12.55am). 


f. X lie UUXJIl ques- 11. f . L u u -l r UlBIflUO HdIS|DX> 

hether ExcaUbur Peter Waymark ii.45pm-l2.55an 

Comic communities 


There is a wealth of comedy in 
next week's new offerings, 
some intentional — most not. 
The funniest is Mr Pye (Chan- 
nel 4, tomorrow, 9.15- 
10. 15pm. repeated on Wed 10- 
II pm) with Derek Jacobi 
reaching angelic proportions 
in Mervyn Peake's comic 
fantasy novel, set 00 the small 
but perfectly proportioned 
feudal island of Sark. 

The straight-laced hippy ex- 
udes an aura of ethereal 
evangelism in his Withe en- 
counters with the brusque 
enclosed commumty.This in- 
cludes Judy Parfitt as his fieTy 
ginger-haired landlady with 
legs like pistons and emotions 
like piano wires, her snarling 
Albanian kitchen maid Ka-Ka 
(Patricia Hayes) and a gouty, 
doughty Miss George (Betty 
Marsden). built like a 
Michelin woman under her 
formidable overcoats. 

Peace of mind and wisdom 
of the soul are noticeably 


TELEVISION 

absent in Bobby-less 
Southfork and there is not a 
glycerine-free eye as the 
Ewings reassemble for family 
strife in a double length 
episode of Dallas (BBC1. 
Wed, 7.30-9pm). in which the 
ludicrous mourning antics of 
the high-cholesterol oil barons 
make it difficult to suppress 
mirth. Sue Ellen’s eyelashes 
spiral into overdrive as her 
shoulders square up to yet 
another quart of vodka. 

In The Real Life of a 
Hollywood Wife (BBC2, 
Thurs, 9.30 -10.10pm) Rich- 
ard Burton's fourth wife Sally 
guides us through the gilded 
land of accessorized lifestyles, 
to the accompaniment of the 
remorseless thwack of tennis 
balls and inane drivel at 


designer parlies. But her ap- 
proach to the interview is. 
alas, only about one notch up 
from Selina Scott's. 

Ibe Collectors (tSBCl. to- 
day. 8. 1 5-9.05pm). a ’ cross 
between Howard's War and a 
BL “Now we're motoring” 
commercial, is a 1 0-part dra- 
ma showing the human foibles 
of the rugged men and pert 
women of the Customs and 
Excise, people only slightly 
above the Inland Revenue and 
VAT men in popular appeal. 

There are precious few 
laughs in Dae to an Act of God 
(BBC2. tonight. Ilpm- 
1140am - with subtitles). It is 
a powerful and disturbing 
drama about a small, uninten- 
tional nuclear explosion in 
West Germany in 1990 which 
wreaks havoc with the placid 
and affluent lifestyles of the 
post-holocaust buighers. 

Bob Williams 


QUALITY PEWTER HIP FLASK 


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IVIihis fine pewter hip flask is the 
perfect accessory for sports 
enthusiasts and all those who love the 
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T he flask is made from fine British 
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on the front It measures approx. 
4” high, 3%* wide and has a capacity 
of approximately 6 fluid oz. 

rwnhis quality flask is invaluable 
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out clay pigeon shooting, horse 
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In fact, whenever you need a quick 
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provide a stylish solution. 

T^ach flask is struck with the 
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Ontas and enquiries sboold be seat to: 
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Bexley, Kent DA5 lBL.Tet Crayfoid 53316 


THE TIMES 


DIAL YOUR ORDER 

KAPtD ORDERING SERVICE 
| BY TELEPHONE ON 
ACCESS OR VISA 
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11 


SATURDAY 


THE TIMES SATURDAY MARCH 1 1986 


THE WEEK AHEAD 



FILMS 


STREEP WISE: Meryl Streep adds 
Danish to her repertoire of accents, 
Dlaying the writer Karen Blixen in 
Out of Africa (PG), a painstaking 
account of love and hard times on 
a farm in Kenya. Robert Redford co- 
stars. Empire (01-437 1234), from 
Wednesday. 





TELEVISION 



BOOKS 


THEATRE 


LAC LUSTRE: Denholm Elliott, an 
actor who can almost be guaranteed 
to turn in a screen-stealing 
performance, co-stars with Anna 
Massey in Hotel du Lac, from the 
Booker Prize- winning novel by Anita 
Brookner. BBC2, tomorrow. 

10.05-1 1.20pm. 


BUS STOP: Maeve Binchy, the 
best-selling author of Light A Penny 
Candle, puts eight of her short 
stories between hard covers for the 
first time in The Lilac Bus 
(Century, £8.95), a characteristic 
anthology of human joys 
and sadness. 


SOLO TURN: Rowan Atkinson, 
who made his name on television 
with the zany comedy of Not the 
Nine O ‘Clock News and The Black 
Adder, returns to the West End 
with a new one-man show, The New 
Revue. Shaftesbury (01-379 
5399), from Friday. 


OPERA 


CONCERTS 


WEILL BODY: Kate Flowers, who 
has sung several soubrette roles at 
Glyndeboume, moves on to 
sterner stuff as Jenny In Scottish 
Opera’s The Rise and Fall of the 
City of Mahagonny by Kurt Weill. 
Theatre Royal, Glasgow (041 331 
1234), from Wednesday. 


STRING TIME: Nigel Kennedy, 
the talented and unconventional 
young violinist and Aston VHIa 
supporter, plays die Bruch Concerto 
with the Milwaukee Symphony 
Orchestra under Lukas Foss. ._ 

Barbican (01-638 8891), * 

Monday, 7.30pm. 


-nr 


ARTS DIARY 


Maestro 


race 


A problem girl 
comes of age 


Surest* KarwJta 


Herbert von Karajan's mem- 
bership of the Nazi pony has 
been thrown back at him in 
the most ironic way. The 
maestro, a great yachting fa- 
natic. approached the Ameri- 
can writer Roger Vaughan to 
undertake his authorized biog- 
raphy because he admired 
Vaughan's work as editor ofj 
The Yacht. 

Unfortunately. Vaughan 
found it impossible to ignore 
this most unfortunate of epi- 
sodes in von Karajan's life. 
The conductor always said he 
joined the Nazis for career 
reasons. Vaughan, however, 
cites evidence that von Kara- 
jan did not join the Nazis in 
the politically expedient year 
of 1935, but two years earlier, 
suggesting a deeper enthusi- 
asm for the party. 

That von Karajan should be 
reminded of these wounding 
details 40 years on by the man 
whose writing he admired so 
much is bad enough. Just as 
bad fs that Weidenfeld. who 

G ublish the book this week, 
ave now been denied help 
with the publicity promised 
earlier by von Karajan's 
record label. Polygram. The 
company denies that this is 
anything to do with the book's 
contents. “We’re not book 
promoters", is their cun re- 


sponse. 


Razor sharp 


The man who liked the razor ! 
so much he bought the compa- 
ny. Victor Kiam. adopts the 
same breezy approach to pub- 
lishing. He has written Going 
Far It !, a manual on how to 
succeed as an entrepreneur. 
But far from allowing the 
usual market forces to rule its 
sale. Kiam is buying 90 televi- 
sion commercial slots on ITV. 
Naturally they will star Victor 
Kiam. Most people in publish- 
ing would argue that this is 
commercial nonsense. But 
does it matter as long as Kiam 
gets a mention? 

• The Lindsey quartet 
solved the problem of the ex- 
tra viola when they tackled 
two Mozart quintets at the 
Wigmore Hall on Wednes- 
day. Viola player Robin Ire- 
land called in his lather 
Patrick, an ex-member of the 
famous Alexi quartet. The 
last time the two played in 
public together was when 
the BBC was making a docu- 
mentary aboot the quartet, 
when Robin was six. They 
played “ Baa Baa Black 
Sheep". 



THE TIMES CHOICE 


DANCE 


SECOND STRIDE: This 
small but innovative and 
influential company 
presents Bosendorfer Waltzes, 
a new theatrical 
collaboration by Ian Spink, 
choreographer, Orlando • 
Gough, composer, and Antony 
McDonald, designer. 

Fokine's Firebird , surrealism 
and Dadaism are among its 
inspirations. Tues-Mar 8. 

The Place, 17 Duke Road, 
London WC1 (01-387 0031). 


performance work by artists of 
the 1980s. 

Kettle’s Yard Gallery, 

Castle Street Cambridge 
(0223 352124). From today. 

TUNNICUFFE: Four 
decades of drawings from the 
studio of the renowned 
wildlife artist Charles 
TunnicTiffe. 

Tryon and Moorland 
GaHery, 23-24 Cork Street 
London W1 (01-734 6961). 
From Wed. 


THEATRE 


IN PREVIEW 


MADE IN BANGKOK: New 
play by Anthony Minghella 
about package tourists on a 
stop-over in Bangkok. 
Afowych (01-836 u404). 
Previews from Thurs. Opens 
Mar 18. 


Hilda MurreM, a 78-year-okJ 
rose grower, whose murder 
in Shrewsbury in 1984 was the 
subject of intense public 
speculation. 

Crucible Studio (0742 
79922). Opens Thurs. 


ROCK AND JAZZ 


•; ) . C X V- 

r ' V i « > f 

, ; i V ^ ^ 


ROYAL BALLET: The 
company's week at the Palace 
Theatre. Manchester (061 


ABSTRACT ART: Work by 
three British artists who 
decline to return to the 
currently fashionable figurative 
style: John Gibbons, Frank 


ORPHANS: Albert Finney, 
with Gary Cole and Kevin 
Anderson, in Lyle Kessler's 
drama. 

Hampstead (01-722 9301). 
Previews from Thurs. Opens 
Marll. 


VIOLENT FEMMES: Arty i 
folk-punk-rockabw/ 


236 9922) ends today with two 
‘ m 


performances of La Rite 
malgardee, then back to base 
Tnurs with Bintiey's 

is, MacMillan's 


Bowling and Clyde Hopkins. 
Saffery, 


on 

Consort Lessons, 

Gloria and Wayne Eagling's 
Frankenstein. 

Royal Opera House, Covent 
Garden, London WC2 (01 -240 
1066). 


Serpentine Gad 
Kensington Gardens. London 
W2 (01-402 6075). From 
today. 


.TALK OF THE DEVIL: 

World premiere of new comedy 


American 
band whose idea of a good 
•time is to rebore T Rex's 
' Children of the 
Revolution”. 

Tonight, International , 
Manchester (061 224 5050); 
tomorrow. Warehouse, ; 
Leeds (0532 468287); Mon. 


by Mar^O'MaHey. Directed 


LONDON FESTIVAL 
BALLET: Varied casts perform 
CoppeHia this afternoon 
and evening at the Theatre 


CANVASS: First phase of 
two-tiered exhibition 
highlighting young talent 
including Pauline Allwright and 
Paul Stork. 

John Hansard Gallery, The 
Univeristy, Southampton (0703 
559122 ext 2158). From 
Mon. 


by Bill Alexander with Ian Dury 
as the Devil. 

Palace, Watford (0923 
25671 ). Previews from Thurs. 
Opens Mar 12. 


Town and Country Oub, 9- 
17 Highgate Road, London' 
NW5?0f-2673334). 


OPENINGS 


Royal. Norwich (0603 
28205) and Mon-Mar 8 at the 


SELECTED 


Theatre Royal, Nottingham 
42328). 


(0602- 


LONDON 

CONTEMPORARY: Works by 
Jerome Robbins. Siobhan 
Davies. Robert Cohan and 
Christopher Bannerman are 
grven in two programmes , 
Tues-Mar 8. 


ART AND TIME: HOW 
artists present movement in a 
multi-media exhibition of 
work from the late 19th century 
onwards, including Dali, 
Duchamp and Degas. 

Barbican Centre. London 
EC2 (01-638 5403). 


WHEN WE ARE MARRIED: 
New production by the Theatre 
of Comedy Company 
reopens this theatre with J. B. 
Priestley's comedy of 
middle -class values thrown 
into turmoil. Starring 
Prunella Scales. Timothy West 
Patricia Routtedge. 

Whitehall (01-930 7765). 
Previews today, Mon. Tues. 
Opens Wed. . 


GEORGE RUSSELL: One of 
jazz's great composers, he is 
making his British debut at 
the he&n of a multinational 
orchestra featuring Pafle 
Mikkelborg and Kenny Wheeler 
(trumpets) and Django 
Bates (keyboards), ftghiy -> 
recommended. 

Tonight. Triangle Arts 
Centre. Birmingham (021 359 
3979); tomorrow, 


Haymarket Theatre, Leicesfef 
(0533 539797); Mon. 


Warwick University Arts Centre 
(0203417417); Wed, 

Leadmai Arts Centre. Sheffield 
(0742 754500). . 


Theatre Royal, Plymouth 
669595). 


(07521 


FILMS 


OPENINGS 


SIR JOSHUA REYNOLDS: 

A chance to re-evaluate the 
English 18th-century artist 
who was revered in his lifetime 
but reviled by subsequent 
generations. 

Royal Academy, Piccadilly. 
London W1 (01-734 9052). 


JEANNE: Shirtie Roden’s 
rock opera version of the life of 
Joan of Arc. directed by Bill 
Kenwright with choreography 
by Anthony van Laastand 
musical arrangements by 
Anthony Bowles. Starring 


HEINOSUKE GOSHO 
SEASON: Europe's I 
retrospective of films i 
one or Japan's major directors; 
23 films, beginning with two 
classics - Woman of Mist and 
An Inn At Osaka. 

National Film Theatre (01* 

928 3232). From Tues. 


CONCERTS 


Grand idea 


I like this place a lot”, says 
Liza Minnelli, looking 
round llte “21” Club 
from a comer banquette 
in the most select area of the 
dining room. “I saw a movie 
about the Twenties, once, and 
during Prohibition the whole 
of (hat long bar swung round 
■when the cops came, and alt 
the bottles and glasses went 
down into the vaults. The cops 
could never get down into the 
vaults — they didn't have ihe 
right papers. 

“Then during the depres- 
sion this was one of the few 
places that would give credit, 
and when times got better 
peopje remembered that." 
Tradition and loyalty are two 
qualities that mean a great 
deal to her. 


Liza Minnelli is ™ * “Jf- Her daughter, as 


returning to 


she herself says, was “bom in a 
fishbowl" — from birth her life 


the London stage 


next week, after 


surviving a year 


of personal crisis 


With all the smart money in 
Hollywood being put into 
sequels — Rocky IV. Super- 
man III — the French have 
decided to make a sequel to 
that anthem to 1960s nostalgia, 
Vn Homme et Vnc Femme 



Trinrignani and Aimee 
Anouk Aimee and Jean Louis 
Trimignam will once again 
star, though given the time 
that has elapsed since the 
original iL might be wiser to 
title it Vn Grandpere et Une j 
Grand mere. 


Her enthusiasm is reminis- 
cent of the Liza Minnelli 
image of Cabaret and Sterile 
Cuckoo, but nowadays her 
almost childlike eagerness 
seems calmed: only occasion- 
ally does it break through a 
stronger, adult gusto and lev- 
el-headedness. which in turn 
gives way from lime to time to 
an almost maternal warmth. 

Her lack of pretence, her 
direct. on-lhe-Jevel approach 
seems like a matter of con- 
scious. very deliberate choice. 

Any Liza fen. looking for- 
ward to her next appearances 
at the London Palladium, 
must think of her legendary 
first appearance there, a guest 
on her mother's stage, when 
she first gave notice that she 
would be a performer to be 
reckoned with. 


with regularly since her first 
triumph in his Flora. The Red 
Menace. 

“It's thematic in a way. it's 
about different women in 
different situations at different 
times in their life, but each 
song is almost a little playlet — 
it's about women i knew or 
made up and how they react in 
different circumstances and 
situations. It offers you an 
opportunity to play different 
roles without changing cos- 
tumes. do it all with interior 
work, and that's my favourite 
thing to do. Then you're not 
just singing the song, there’s a 
history to it, it makes the 
performance of one song com- 
plete. 

-Az navour has always done 
that: so, apparently did Piaf — 

I never saw her, bin I've read 
that each song was a little 
vignette and it's always inter- 
ested me to do thaL So this is 
the first show where I've really 
followed it through as much as 
1 can." 


About-Tumer 


I can finally solve the mystery 
surrounding the sudden with- 
drawal of three watercolours, 
by the 18th-century artist Wil- 
liam Daniel from Christie's 
autumn sale last year. The 
paintings, almost certainly by 
Turner, are all Indian views 


and are unique in that they 
represent Turner's only work 


reflecting the sub-continent — 
he never actually went there. 
Had they, been by DanieL a 
top price of £5-7.000 might 
have been expected for the 
works. When they go on sale at 
Christie’s on March )8 they 
can be expected to raise a 
minimum of £10.000 each. 


“It was exciting, it was 
wonderful to do. but I remem- 
ber the Palladium even before 
thaL from when I was liulc. As 
a child I can remember going 
to the Palladium and seeing all 
kinds of things: it was wonder- 
ful. It's always a high point, 
because there's a feeling of 
consistency to if it's like the 
joke about the youngster ask- 
ing directions of an old New 
Yorker. He says *How do you 
get to Carnegie HallT and the 
old guy says 'Practise!' - it's 
the same thing." 

She has always, in preparing 
her songs, worked on them as 
if for an acting part, develop- 
ing backgrounds for the char- 
acter behind the song. For the 
forthcoming British concerts 
she has gone one step further, 
writing with Fred Ebb. the 
songwriter she has worked 


A ccording to reports 
in the American 
press, her voice is 
nowr better than it 
has ever been. **I know it has 
to do with health—Tve found 
that since I've slopped drink- 
ing completely my voice is 
much stronger. I just feel so 
well and much calmer. People 
come of age in their voice at 
different times, and I guess 
this is my time." 

How has she achieved this 
calmness'!* “The most helpful 
way I've found to do it is to 
stay current with your emo- 
tions every day. People have 
always said about me - and 
I'm very grateful — that I'm a 
good friend and 1 guess that 
I’ve finally made friends with 
myself for the first lime and 
I'm treating myself like a real 


has been documented in the 
international press. So last 
year her retreat to the Betty 
Ford Clinic to break her 
dependency on valium and 
alcohol was very well pubii 
cized indeed. She talks about 
it freely, not like a True 
Confessions magazine but 
more like a senior nurse 
lecturing junior nurses who 
are quite likely to encounter 
the same problems. 

“I was feeling so ill. I was 
really sick - the disease of 
chemical dependency is a 
terrible thing, it's insidious, 
it's cunning, it's baffling, and 
you can't play with it because 
it's going to kill you. You 
don't know what's happening, 
you feel fine most of the time, 
but you've crossed an invisi- 
ble line so you're really allergic 
to this stuff and it happens so 

slowly.” 

Because she was who she 
was. the whole world knew of 
her problems. But she doesn't 
resent that at all. she says. Her 
primary feeling is that of being 
lucky - lucky that she went 
through being famous so early 
that she never experienced the 
shock of being unknown one 
minute and then subject to 
public scrutiny as soon as 
success arrived. "Ifs never 
bothered me — I think it's 
because I'm not frightened at 
all. People have never fright- 
ened me.’’ 

Liza Minnelli is lucky, too. 
that she is secure enough to 
choose what she is going to do: 
"I can sit here and say ‘No' to 
things and know that they're 
not going to come and remove 
the lumiture. or take away the 
apartment: I'm not going to be 
out on the street — it's a very- 
privileged position to be in." 

She will be celebrating her 
fortieth birthday in England, 
but it doesn't hold any threat 
for her. “I should have cele- 
brated it two years ago. when 1 
tell 40. Anyway, it's very in to 
be 40! All the big sex symbols 
now are between -40 and 50 — 
your own Joan Collins!" And 
there’s plenty more to do. “I 
honestly feci I haven't 
scratched the surface yet!" 


_C«W friend as opposed to 
yseif 


tormenting myseit to keep 
going." 

Judy Garland sang autobio- 
graphically that she was "born 


Henry Fenwick 



Uza Minnelli s new show 
opens at the London Palladium 
(Ql-437 7373) on Friday. 


DETECTIVE (15): A 
densely-packed folderol from 
JearvLuc Godard, with a 
clutch of characters up to ■ 
obscure tricks in a Paris 
hotel. 

Camden Plaza (01-485 
2443). Metro (01-437 0757). 
From Fri. 


CONTINUED 
SHOSTAKOVICH: In their 
complete series of 
Shostakovich string quartets 
the Borodin Quartet has 
reached No 9, and they are 


joined by Peter Donohoe 
for the Ra 


lano Quintet 
Queen Elizabeth Hall, South 
Bank, London SE1 (01-928 
3191 , credit cards 01-928 
8800). Tomorrow, 3pm. 


RAN (15): Kurosawa's 
majestic variations on King 
Lear, awash with battle and 
apocalyptic sights; with 



RPO/UTTON: Andrew 
Litton conducts the Royal 
Philharmonic Orchestra in a 
varied programme with Verdi's 
Forza dei Destino Overture, 
Rachmaninov's Symphony No 
2, and Bernard d'Ascoll 
solos in Chopin’s Piano 
Concerto No 2. 

Royal Festival Hall. South 
Bank, London SE1 (01-928 
3191, credit cards 01-928 
8800). Tues, 7.30pm. 



ANTTA O'DAY: Remember 
Jazz on a Summer's Day, the 
cartwheel hat those 
gloves? A perfect definition of 
Fifties hipness. 

Tonight and Mon to Sat, 
Ronnie Scott's Club, 47 Frith 
Street, London W1 $1-439, 
0747). 


JOHN MARTYN: A 24-carat- 
romantic with a voice to calm 
the Devil. 

Tomorrow, Hammersmith 
Odeon, Queen Caroline Streek 
London W6 (01-748 4081). • 


OPERA 


ROYAL OPERA: Ubarbtere 
di Shnglia is back, with Danish 


baritone Mikael Melbye 
intheti 

Tues and Fri at 


ma 

role. 


Jang his debut i 
B- Performances 


i title 


i ■ 


Rebecca Storm (above), Peter 
Straker, Malcolm Roberts. 
Sadlers WeHs (01 -278 
8916). Previews today, Mon. 
Opens Tues. 


Mon. Wed and Mar 8 at 
7pm Rosalind Plowright is the 
Leonora in a revival of 
Visconti's production of II 
trovatore. 

Covent Garden. London ' 
WC2 (01-240 1066). 




SELECTED 


MAGIC HORN: Sheila 
Armstrong and John Shirley- 
Quirk sing Mahler's Des 
Knaben Wunderhom. 
Wigmore Hall. 36 Wigmore 
Street London W1 (O'! 

2141). Wed. 7.30pm. 


ECO/TATE: Jeffrey Tate 
conducts the English Chamber 
Orchestra in 




V 


Mendelssohn's Fingars Cave 
Overture. Haydn's “Drum 


RoH" Symphony and. making 
her concerto debut in this 


A TASTE OF ORTON: A fine 
double bill comprising a 
biographical miscellany, 

GorUta in the Roses and the 
original television play 
Funeral Games. 

King’s Head (01-226 1916) 

TORCH SONG TRILOGY: 
Harvey Fiersteln's Broadway 
hit provides a showcase for 
Antony Sher as the plucky drag 
queen and for Miriam Karlin 
and Ian Sears. 

Albery (01-836 3878). 

OUT OF TOWN 


ENGLISH NATIONAL 
OPERA: Another week of ' 
Puccini and Mozart, with 
three lively productions: . * 

tonight Tues and Fri at ■ # 
7.30pm Graham Vick's 
handsome and illuminating 
staging of Madam Butter fly. 
Jonathan Miller’s . 
enlightening production of The 
Magic Flute takes over on 
purs at 7pm. La BoMme, with 
Valerie Masterson and 
Arthur Davies a superb Miml 
and Rodolfo, should not be 
missed on Wed and Mar 8 at 
7.30pm. 

Coliseum, St Martins Lane. ' 
London WC2 (01-836 3163). ' 




Tatsuya Nakadai (above) as 


the old. fraught kina and' 

. . *. c 


excellent music by Torn 
Takemitsu. 

Curzon West End (01-439 


country, Maria Joao Pires 
solos in Schumann's Piano 
Concerto. 

Barbican Centre. Wed. 
7.45pm. 


4805). Screen on the Hill (0T- 
A3S 3366). Gate Notting Hi)) 
(01-221 0220). From Fri. 


SELECTED 


YEAR OF THE QUIET SUN 
(15): Krzysztof Zanussi's 
eloquent account of a 
thwarted love affair. 

ICA Cinema (01-930 3647). 

OUT OF ORDER (15): Carl 
Schenkei's crisp German 
thriller about four people 
trapped in a lift 
Cannon Tottenham Court 
Road (01-836 6148). 


NEW ENGLAND 
TRIPTYCH: American 
composer William 
Schuman’s piece opens this 
concert by the London 
College of Music Symphony 
Orchestra. It also includes 
a rare opportunity to hear 


BRIGHTON: A Taste of 
Honey: Miriam Karlin directs a 
new production of Shelagh 
Delaney's bitter-sweet study of 
life in me 1950s in the north 
of England. 

Theatre Royal (0273 
28488). Opens Mon. 

LANCASTER: The Clerical 


RARE ORFF: Rare 
chanceto see Carl Orffs opera 
based on Grimm, Die K3uge * 


feu,. . 

... ■*»■ j i £ 


(The Clever Girl), on Tues, W6<# 

enWn«.NM nt kl. _ A 


and Thurs at 8pm, by Opera 


Manning Had. University of 
London Ur 5 * - — 


Inion. Malet Street 

London WC1 (01-5809551). 


Outfitters: Wortdpremtere of 
new comedy by Bisabeth 
Bond. A town discovers the 


PHOTOGRAPHY I 


mi 


Delius's lovely Violin 
Concert o (soloist Jackie 


Hartley). 

St John's. Smith Square, 
London SW1 (01-222 1061). 
Thurs, 7.30pm. 


relics of its local patron 
saint in the vaults of the 
Muslim Community Centre. 
Duke's Playhouse (0524 
63645). Opens Wed 

SHEFFIELD: Who Idled 
Hilda MurreH?: Chris Martin's 
play examines toe death of 


STREETWISE (18): 

Powerful documentary about 
ufs. 


Seattle's teenage wai 


BOOKINGS 


THIS WIDE WORLD: Wide * 
format photographs by an " 
almost unknown 
Edwardian, A. H. Robinson. - 
Beach scenes and seaside 
resorts which capture the 
sokten age before the First 
World War, all of which have a 
certain idyllic charm. 
Impressions GaHery, 17 - 

CoWiergate, York (0904 54724)# 


Pro 




x *-.i 


Screen on the Green (01 - 
226 3520). 


FIRST CHANCE 


GALLERIES 


OPENINGS 


ROYAL OPERA: 
Telephone and personal 


booking from today for 
performances in March and 


LIVING ART: This year's 
Ideal Home Exhibition has 
contemporary art as its 
theme. The main pavilion will 
be controlled by toe Arts 
Council and Liberty. 

Ideal Home Exhibition. 

Earls Court (01-385 1200). 
From Tues. 


April of Arabella. 

Semiramide, II bartxere dt 
Srvig/ia, Fanfare for 
Elizabeth, and Royal Ballet 
programmes. 

Royai Opera House, 48 
Floral Street. Covent Garden, 
London WC2 (01-250 
1066/1911). 


29) opens new season; 
followed by TroHus and 
Cressida. Booking opens 
today. 

Barbican Centre. Silk 
Street London EC2 (01-628 
8795/01-6388891; 
information. 01-6384141). 


THE VALLEYS PROJECT: - 
Fourth exhibition from a 
project documenting (He in - 
the vaHeys of South Wales. ' 
Harsh reality and touches 
ot nostalgia. 


The ffoto Gallery. 31 
M.Q 


Chartes Street, Cardiff (0222 
41667). 


LAST CHANCE 


NEXT: TOMORROW: 
Visions of toe future with 
video, installation and 


BARBICAN THEATRE: 

Major new production of 
Mephisto by Ariane 
Mnouchklne (previews March 


ANNE FRANK IN THE 
WORLD: Hundreds of 
photographs of events 
surrounding the life ot Anne 
Frank. Finishes tomorrow. 
10-8. Mali GaUeries. The 
Mall. London SWi (01-930 
6844/. 


Dance John Peroral," ; 
Films: Geoff Brown; 
Galleries: Sarah Jane ■ 
Checkland; Concerts: 
Max Harrison; Theatre: I 
Tony Patrick and Martin 
Cropper: Rock & Jazz: 
Richard Williams; 
Opera: Hilary finch; 
Photography: Michael ! 
Young; Bookings: Anne • 
Wbitehouse. T 








r - *■- 





THE 




TIMES 


FINANCE AND INDUSTRY 




JTTOCK: MARKET 


1FI-SE100 
1543.9 (-5J5) 

USH 

415.56 (+0.19) 

THE POUND 


US dollar 


IMm-'mi “vmil 

^1^520(4)4)310) 


W German mark 

‘^2322 (4)4)601)- 


Trade-weighted 

732 (-1.5) 



°ck'a^ 


. tfV* 






f4QT0^: • 



up 20% as 



eases 


By Richard Thomson,Banking Correspondent 
UoydsBank^the smallest of Bank California is beiniz sold. 



oil sector 


N ~ 


Cs The Energy Mnrister, TMr 
Atick Buchanan-Smith, yes- 
.terday h rated that iheGovem- 
---meni would take into account 
-***-The British oil industry's diffi- 
culties with falling world oil 
prices when it comes to con- 
sider approval for future 
projects. 

Speaking in Aberdeen be 
. . said that the first round of 
' onshore licences for oH explo- 
ration — previous licences 
have -been awarded 'on an ad 
hoc baas — will be announced 
this month and -will provide 

- -work for the oil construction 
industry.. 

— He said: :*?Our fiscal regime. 
. is responsive to the new 

(^situation. ■ It. . is ' geared to 
provide incentives . for oil 
companies to get ahead with 
new developments. * . 

“In any case,' oil companies 
plan for the long term. A new 


the big four clearing banks, 
kicked off die bank reporting 
season yesterday with a 20 per 
cent increase in pretax profits 
-.for 1981 - - 

Last year, the bank's expo- 
sure to Latin American debt- 
ors- m and profits, on 
domestic operations surged. 
The overall provision for bad 
and : doubtful debt..— a factor 
which has dogged Lloyds for 
four years —was lower than in 
the previous year. ; 

~ Pretax profits . Increased 
from £468 million to £561 
million, in line with market 
expectations, while a low tax 
charge of 41 per cent, com- 
pared with 48 per centin 1984, 
caused a 43 per cent rise in 
earnings per share to 93p. 

The dividend is torisefrom. 
17.7 p to 21 p, and the bank 
intends to make a one-for-two 
scrip issue. • ' 

Sir Jeremy Morse, the chair- 
man, said that 1985 was the 
last year of the old structure of 
Lloyds. Since then the UK 
clearing bank: and. Lloyds In- 
ternational have been merged, 
Lloyds Merchant Bank has 
been launched and -Lloyds 


t is being sol 
Sir Jeremy said the chans 
made Lloyds more adaptable 
to future developments in 
rajndly changing world mar- 
kets. 

The bank's average total 
assets remained virtually un- 
changed at £43 billion in 
sterling terms because, of the 
weakness of the dollar which 
reduced the value of Lloyds* - 
large overseas loan portfolio. 

The sterling value of over- 
seas assets dropped 9 per cent 
to £24.3 billion from £26.8 
billion the year before. 

At the same time, bad debt 
provisions fell from £269 mil- 
lion to £257 million, wuth a 
slight increase on the interna- 
tional side offset by a 14 per 
cent drop in provisions on UK 
business. 

- Sir Jetemy said that high 
interest rates and high provi- 
sions' had persisted for four 
years. He welcomed the plan 
by Mr James Baker, the US 
Treasury Secretary , to in- 
crease lending to Third World 
debtor countries and reshape 
their economies, but he said 
the international hanks would 
reject any attempt by debtor 



Sir Jeremy Morse: 
keen com petiton 


countries to put ceilings on 
their interest repayments. 

He said Lloyds and other 
banks could not afford to 
allow interest payments on 
iheir loans to be cut down. 

The profitablilhy of Lloyds' 
domestic banking jumped by 
more than 40 per cent, howev- 
er. from £288 million to £410 
million compared with a 16 
per cent fall in international 
profitability by the b ank. 

Mr Brian Pitman, the chief 
executive, said the change was 
d ue to t he bank's policy of 


improving the quality of its 
earnings rather than expand- 
ing its assets. 

Sir Jeremy said that Lloyds 
would be competing more 
keenly in the UK, especially in 
persona] banking, by concen- 
trating more specifically on 
particular groups of custom- 
ers. But he added: “It will not 
be easy to keep up growth in 
the UK with the increasing 
competition". 

Lloyds lost around 20,000 
accounts last year to other 
banks because of free banking 
offers. Sir Jeremy said that he 
regretted the introduction of 
free banking because it meant 
that cross subsidization of 
banking services, which was 
unfair on some customers, 
would have to continue 

. “We hope to make up the 
lost revenue on free banking 
by selling more fee earning 
services," he said. 

Lloyds ended last year with 
increased primary capital of 
£2.3 billion, including issues 
of perpetual floating rate 
notes. When off-balance sheet 
items are taken into account, 
the risk asset ratio rose from 8 
per cent to 1 1 per cent. 

Tempos, page 25 


development planned today is 
ikdy to provide 60 until the 


until 

1990s. h is not today's price 
but the price expected in the, 
1990s that matters." , . f... 


P&O bank 
sale starts 
bid talk 


£lbn loan for 
Hanson Trust 


A£1 billion sterling-denom- 
inated loan facility has been 
ar ra n g e d for Hanson Trust, 
which will be pa/llyaled to 
finance the cash element of 
7 Hanson's £2;4 billion hid for. 
the Imperial Group. / 
t The loan comprises a shbrt- 
term line of credit, followed by 


" a seven-year term loan. It is 
Jiiily underwniten by a group 


of international banks. 

Reed sale 


Reed International is selling 
NVK Sphinx, of Holland, to 
Algemeene Bank Nederland 
prior to the flotation of Sphinx 
oo the Netherlands stock mar- 
ket later this year.. Sphinx 
manufactures ceramic sani- 
tary ware, floor and wall tiles 
and refractories. 


Forecast ban 


ft 


The Corporate Affairs 
- mission of Victoria said 
would not permit BHP t< 
release profit forecasts for its 
current year ending May 31, 
-or for 1986/87. ' 


Hunting deal 


Hunting Gate Group, the 
property company, has bought 
the Homemakers Group of 
housebuilding companies, of 
Sussex for £4.3 million. 


Share plan 


Imperial Metals intends to 
buy, through Canadian stock 
exchanges, some of its shares 
during the year beginning 
March 6. . 

Travel buy 

WSt Holdings has condi- 1 
tionally agreed to acquire 
Schools Abroad for between] 
,£5.9 million and £12.9, and 
the outstanding 25 per cent] 
minority interest in H & C'i 
Tra vela way for between 
£500.000 and £750.000. 


Optical move 

PresTwirh Holdings has 
conditionally agreed to sell 80 
‘ per cent of -HenJys Optical 
Group for £7.1 million to 
Codpcrvisioh, which is listed 
on the New York Stock Ex- 
change. Prestwjch paid £1.6 
million forHeiilys in 1983. 

Cash call 

* KLP . Group is raising £2.65 
million, after - expenses, 
through a two-for-nine rights 
issue selling at 255p each. 
Proceeds will be used to 
reduce borrowings. 


.... By Cliff Feltham 

- The Peninsular and Orien- 
tal Steam Navigation Compa- 
ny is selling its in-house 
banking business, TCB, to the 
First National Finance Corpo- 
ration for. £47,5 million in 
cash:'.." 

The deal has foelfed specu- 
lation that Sir Jeffrey Sterling, 
the shipping group’s chair-, 
man. is demmg the decks, to 
mount a big takeovdiud. 

He .owns 20 per cent of! 
European Ferries, the cross- 
Channel ferry operator, and 
has been strongly tipped to 
launch a foO-sciale offer..- But 
last night he refused ~to com- 
raenl.wjt.. . 

The sale of P&O’s tCB 
banking business has been on 
the cards for some time but 
offers-- have always been 
spumed. .• 

It was brought into the P&O 
fold when the shipping group 
acquired Bovis, the bunding 
firm, and was then known as 
Twentieth Century Banking 
Its safe to First National 
Finance . Corporation- will 
bring together two companies 
which were closely involved 
in the secondary banking col- 
lapse of the early 1970s. 

TCB has achieved .steady , 
reliable growth and last year 
made profits of £7.7 milhoxu 
np from £7.5. million, with a 
portfolio Of short to medium 
term, loans .with some. Hue 
chip commercial customers. 
.Its assets at the end of 1985 
stood at just under ’ £230 
million. 

- The deal also indicates that 
Sir Jeffrey has decided not to • 
move into the financial ser- 
vices sector Hit instead to 
remain with his mainstream 
shipping and transportation, 
businesses. ■ 

The acquisition provides 
further evidence that First 
National Finance Corporation 
has now made a complete 
recovery, after its rescue by 
the Bank of England more 
than a decade ago with debts 
of £350 million. - 

- The First National Finance 
Corporation, recently an- 
nounced its first dividend for 
12 years and reported profits 
tip "from £37.6 million to £22.6 
million. . 

As part if the deal P&O will 
take warrants in respect of 3.5 
million shares 
On tbe stock market, P&O 
eased 6p to 490p and FNFC 
feH 4p to 188p. 


Receivers called in 


at hovercraft fin 


By Jeremy Warner, Business Correspondent 

order petition had worsened 


One of Britain's two re- 
maining hovercraft manufac- 
turers is in danger of being 
dosed with the loss of more 
than 100 jobs. 

Receivers were yesterday 
called in at Vosper, the parent 
company of Hovermanne, of 
Southampton, which makes 
sidewafl hovercraft for use in 
sheltered waters. .' 

National Westminster, the 
group's main banker, called in 
Mr Anthony Houghton and 
Mr A G Atkinson, of Touche 
Ross, the accountancy firm, to 
handle the. lossmaking 
company’s affairs. 

Vosper, which owned the 
Vosper Thornycroft warship 
yards until- 1977, when they 
were natkjnaHzed,is reckoned 
to have gone down owing 
more than £8 million. It no 
longer has any connection 
with the warship yard. 

Mr Houghton said that 
Hoyermarine was building 
seven hovercraft, but there 
was no firm buyer for any of 
them. He would for the time 
bemgbe running the company 
as a going concern, and he 
“very much hoped" that a 
British buyer could be found 
Vosper said that its future 


considerably in recent weeks. 
An imminent order for three 
hovercraft from Indonesia 
had been reduced to two and 
delayed, while the British 
Government had stopped the 
National Bus Company from 
placing orders for two hover- 
craft. 

In these circumstances, and 
in view of Vosper's financial 
position, the board did not 
consider that the group could 
continue trading. 

Shareholders were given a 
warning that they were unlike- 
ly- to recover any money from 
the receivership unless there 
was a favourable outcome 
from the company's, impend- 
ing case with the European 
Court of Human Rights. 

Hie company has made a 
£60 million claim against the 
Government for increased 
compensation for the nation- 
alization of its yards. At the 
lime it received only £5.3 
million. 

Vosper Thornycroft, which 
was absorbed into British 
Shipbuilders on nationaliza- 
tion in 1 977, recently returned 
to the private sector in a 
management buyout. 


Hillsdown takes 5% 
stake in Berisford 


By Our Business Correspondent 
Holdings, the the commodity trading opera- 
tion, leaving the Italian com- 
pany in control of British 
Sugar, the monopoly refiner of 
sugar beet in Britain. 

Hillsdown has also been 
negotiating with Berisford 
over the sale of British Sugar 
but has so far failed to come 
up with a proposal that satis- 
fies the Berisford manage- 
ment. Hillsdown declined to 
comment on its intentions 
yesterday. 

On the stock market, 
Berisford shares climbed 9p to 

202p. 


Hillsdown 
fast-growing foods group, yes- 
terday emerged as a 5.95 per 
cent shareholder in S & W 
Berisford, die commodity 
trading and sugar refining 
group, prompting stock mar- 
ket speculation that it is about 
to launch a foil-scale bid. 


Berisford is already in dis- 
cussions with Femizzi, the 
Italian food and agricultural 
group, about a possible £340 
million offer. 


Such an offer would involve 
a later management buyout of 


Water costs warning 


The cost of water will be a 
major expense for British 
industry once the water supply 
industry is privatized, accord- 
ing, to National Utility Ser- 
vices. 

The energy monitoring 
group has forecast that with 
the possible exception of 


Thames Water, water authori- 
ties will be forced to increase 
charges. 

Mr Graham Ptisey, the 
managing director of NUS, 
said: “Those increased costs 
will force companies to pay 
dose attention to the price 
they pay for water." 


US trade 
deficit 
at record 


Washin^na 


(AP-Dow 
Jones) — The United States 
had a record merchandise 
trade defid t of $16.46 billion 
(£11.12 billion) in January, 
the Department of Commerce 
reported. 

It released revised figures 
showing that the December 
defidt was $14.91 billion, 
compared with a $12.81 billion 
defidt In November. 

Department officials point- 
ed out that the revised figures 
give a more accurate reflection 
of trade, as they eliminate 
most of the carryover, or the 
value of trade data received too 
late to be included in tbe initial 
report. 

They said that for January 
11.6 per cent of exports and 
354 per cent of imports oc- 
curred in earlier months, but 
the data was received late and 
tbe figures were induded in 
the latest month. 

Mr Malcolm Baldrige, Sec- 
retary for Commerce, said that 
the customs service was work- 
ing to improve its performance 
in reporting import data on 
time. 

Revised figures for all of 
1985 show a trade defidt of 
$144.6 billion, compared with 
a defidt of $127.64 billion for 
1984. 

4JS exports m January rose 
0.1 per cent to a seasonally- 
adjusted $17.01 billion after 
falling 4 per cent in the 


previous month to an adjusted 
$16.99 


billion. Imports in- 
creased by 4 per cent in 
January to an adjusted S33.47 
billion after rising 2 3 per cent 
in December to an adjusted 
$32.14 billion 

The value of imports of 
petroleum and related prod- 
ucts in January rose by 1JB per 
cent to an adjusted $5.25 
billion from $5.16 billion the 
preceding month. 

By volume oil imports in 
January rose by 3 A per cent to 
193.42 million barrels from 
1874)1 million barrels in De- 
cember. The average price of a 
barrel of imported ofl fell to 
$27.14 in January from $27-59 
in December. 

The American trade deficit 
with Canada narrowed to 
$1.71 billion in January, com- 
pared with $2.7 billion for 
December. The trade gap with 
Mexico narrowed to $498.9 
million from $794.6 million. 

The defidt with the Organi- 
zation of Petroleum Exporting 
Countries widened to $1.83 
billion from $138 


Prospects ‘improving’ in debt crisis 


By David Smith, Economics Correspondent 


Trust goes on 


. r The board of Rights * 
. Is sues Investment Trust has 
a decided to continue tbe trust 
* for a further five years. 


BASE 

LENDING 

RATES 


abn - 

Adam & Company.. 
BCC1 

Elite *- 1 -'"'.v * 


The fell in the dollar and the 
debt initiative .of "Mr James 
Baker, the US Treasuiy Secre- 
tary, lave improved prospects 
for the resolution of the world 
debt crisis, according to the 
Oxford Review of Economic 
Policy*, published yesterday. 
But serious problems remain. 

The Review says that lower 
world oil prices should en- 


And they add: “Even if the 
macroeconomic environment 
improves, some countries are 
likely to face acute financing 
difficulties-— the important 
thing is that the political will 
to find a solution to these 
difficulties should exist 
‘ “The tanking system can 
no doubt provide some fi- 
nance and if the climate is 


h^ce growth and reduce in- improving, it pays them to do 
flation but the short-term so. But the problem is bound 
Snact is to increase the to involve more public and 
_r ,u- a*u* official intervention m the 
supply of fonds." 


U-\- - 

*«> - 
Apiss* feu- - * ]• 




increase the 
overall scale of the debt 

nroblem. and to shm it to- ... A 

SSds oil exporting ^ btor - In . 2 
rations such as Mexico, Vene- Review, Profosor Jobs Wd- 
ScJa and Nigeria. ' t fiamson, of the Washmgton- 
More rapid world growth based Institute * for 
- _j real interest rates International -Economics, 
u-ouki make every aspect of looks at whether debtor couo- 
IL. debt crisis easier to solve, tries are likely to repudiate 
, authors, Mr Christopher their debt— declare that they 
- and Mr Yijay Joshi, do not recognize any responsi- 
ve crisis would, be Wity to service it - anti 
.'jied by\stow growth;'.' wboberthe banks are Hcriyio 
. crest rales and protec- offer debt relief to the heavily 
. <l5rn . indebted nations. 

1 he authors call for intenia: ' He argues that countries are 
tional action ro bring down * uchJcdy to repudiate their 
interest rates, in both real aud debt; because of the threat of 
nominal terras, .woridWfcjp: sanctions against them: be- 



James Baker Praised 
for his initiative 

cause of the damage it would 
do if they ever wauled to 
return to international capital 
markets; and because if the 
government is seen to be 
reneging on its international 
obligations, citizens of the 
country could renege on their 
domestic obligations and 
property rights could be at 
risk. 

Professor Williamson sug- 
gests that there is no need for 
countries to repudiate their 


debts. Those who cannot pay 
will have debts rescheduled 
anyway, those that can would 
find it difficult to put up a 
convincing case for repudia- 
tion. 

In the case of Peru, which 
set a limit for one year on debt 
service equal to 10 per cent of 
export earnings, no banker 
would have expected to re- 
ceive more than this anyway. 
Professor Williamson says. 

There is a case for the banks 
to offer the poor countries 
debt relief he says. This is 
because the banks were care- 
less in supervising loans to the 
poor countries and because 
restrictive macroeconomic 
policies in the industrialized 
countries contributed to the 
debt crisis. 

Debt servicing costs in Lat- 
in America, at 6 per cent of 
gross national product, are. in 
relation to national income, 
twice those of the heavy 
German reparations between 
the wars. 

The British economy is 
expected to grow by 2 per cent 
this year and 1.7 percent next 
vear. with inflation steady aL 
Ipper cent to 4 per cent. 


Executive Editor Kenneth Fleet 


Oil rediscovered in 
sporadic trading 


The oil markets began some seri- 
ous. if sporadic, trading in April and 
May contracts yesterday and the 
foreign exchanges rediscovered oiL 
The result was a cold sponge for the 
unfortunate pound and for some of 
the more immediate market hopes 
for lower base rates. 

Brent crude for April delivery 


dropped to $13.70 a barrel and May 

* 1 2.70. 


contracts to a new low of $1! 
There was a similar pattern in the US 
with West Texas intermediate crude 
for April down $1 to $13 a barreL 

In these circumstances, and even 
on the day of the announcement of a 
$ 1 6.46 billion January US trade 
deficit, the pound was up against it. 
The sterling index fell 1.5 points to 
73.2, there was a 3.1 cent drop to 
$1.4522 against the dollar and a new 
closing low of DM3.23 to tbe 
currently very strong German mark. 

The stock market caught a whiff of 
the panic, mainly on the base rate 
impact. But shares are still affected 
with enough euphoria for it to take 
much more than this to produce a 
major wave of selling. And the same, 
in current circumstances, goes for 
gilts. 


lost much of its bloom, 
underperforming the rest of the stock 
market by 2.3 per cent in the past 
three months. The bids for Allied- 
Lyons, Distillers and Davenports, a 
regional brewer, have failed to sup- 
port the sector in the way other bids 
have lifted the market as a whole. 

Recent underperformance can be 
partly explained by pre-Budget 
nerves, though the Chancellor is not 
expected to do more than increase 
duties in line with inflation, which 
would put lponlhe price of a pint of 
beer, 20p on a bottle of spirits and 5p 
on a bottle of wine. In case of nasty 
surprises however the market is 
unlikely to regain confidence until 
after the Budget on 18 March. 

Assuming the worst fears are 
allayed, and consumer spending 
continues buoyant, all that will be len 
holding dealers back will be the OFT. 
Sir Gordon will be under scrutiny. 


BES opportunity 


Brewers in spotlight 


Sir Gordon Borne, Director Gen- 
eral of Fair Trading, last year sent a 
warning shot over the brewing in- 
dustry about the tied houses system, 
even though the EEC had virtually 
given its blessing. Now he has sent off 


a volley of questionnaires to the big 
six national brewers and three small- 


er companies to grill them on 
everything from prices and profits to 
tenancy conditions. 

We have been here before. The last 
time the Monopolies and Mergers 
Commission had a look into brewing, 
in the 1960s, it decided that the tied 
house system was against the public 
interest but failed to come up with 
any practical suggestions on what to 
do about iL More recently at the 
behest of the EEC the brewers have 
been easing the tie so that tenants 
have a choice in buying in wines and 
spirits and some other peripheral 
supplies like soft drinks. 

The Brewers* Society argues that 
brewers have been steadily divesting 
themselves of tied pubs and off- 
licences. Twenty years ago they 
owned 78 per cent of pubs but still ac- 
count for 46,700, or 59 per cenL Even 
if dubs are included in the equation 
brewery control applies to 41 per cent 
of on-licences. In the far more 
competitive high street, brewers now 
own less than 10 per cent of off- 
licences compared with some 30 per 
cent a score of years ago. 

It is not only the nation's beer 
drinkers who will be interested in 
what Sir Gordon says. The stock 
market too will watch closely for 
impending change. Yesterday it 
showed no more than mild curiosity, 
knocking a few pennies from the 
leaders such as Grand Metropolitan 
and Bass. But the sector has already 


The Chancellor has an excellent 
opportunity in the Budget to carry 
out a broad reform of the Business 
Expansion Scheme instead of tinker- 
ing with iL as he did in the last two 
budgets. 

Blatant abuses, notably the fanning 
and property development ventures, 
were eliminated in the 1984 and 1985 
budgets respectively, but this has not 
prevented so-called sponsors invent- 
ing largely artificial asset-backed 
schemes which make a mockery of 
the BES ethos. Farming and property 
development have simply been re- 
placed by a plethora of BES schemes 
using hotels, pubs, retirement-nurs- 
ing homes, restaurants, antiques, fine 
wines and retail stores to raise 


money. 

Asset- backed schemes en masse 
ought to be removed from the ambit 
of the BES, which should be extended 
at the same time, in its reformed 
guise, beyond the April 1987 dead- 
line. There will dearly be problems in 
drafting the enabling legislation so as 
to introduce a satisfactory acid test of 
what constitutes an asset-backed 
venture, but this problem is not 
insuperable. Apart from the desirabil- 
ity of increasing shareholder 
participation in genuine unquoted 
vehicles, there is considerable politi- 
cal mileage for the Chancellor in an 
innovative reform of the BES. 

The Chancellor should publish the 
report on the BES. commissioned by 
Peat Marwick Mitchell and which 
was completed last autumn. There is 
little governmental information on 
the success or otherwise of the 
scheme, and this report — the only 
comprehensive review carried out — 
deserves public airing. 

It may well highlight the ways in 
which the scheme is being abused, 
but talcing these away should not dry 
up BES finance. Instead, the generous 
tax breaks available to investors 
should herald greater investment in 
more worthy causes. 


“Excellent 

overall 

performance!’ 


This was a recent description of 
Oppenheimers investment achieve- 
ments over 1985, a year when our Euro- 
pean Growth Trust out-performed all 
other authorised unit trusts in the UK. 


1986 has started very well with 
statistics for the 12 months to 1 February 
1986 showing 5 of our 10 funds in the 
top 100 of all 725 authorised unit 
trusts and, as importantly, none in the 
bottom 300? 



This excellent overall performance 
was achieved by active management 
as demonstrated by our 3 general trusts. 
International, European and Pacific, all 
of which were 2nd in their respective 
sectors over the last 12 months. 


*Scxxce Planned Savings: offer to bid. ncome reinvest eO. 12 months to 1-2-86. 

01-236 3885 (6i»n«s). 


* vt-tst 0 31 Im* 

M Mercannk House Group 

Iff MIERhATiOMM. CIMNOU SCRVCES 


| 

a 


[y 


in 









JJ 


FINANCE AND INDUSTRY 


THE TIMES SATURDAY MARCH I 1986 


WALLSTREET 


FOREIGN EXCHANGES 


COMMODITIES 


New York (4P-DJ) - X 
powerful rally In the bond 
market spread to (he stock 
market yesterday afternoon 
and helped send the Dow 
Jones industrial average to its 
first close a bote the 1.700 
mark. It was the second 
centennial mark to fall this 
month. 

The Rains were just as 
head) in the broader market 
as a number of market at er- 
ases surced to new highs. 


Trading was extremely heavy. 

The Dow Industrial index 
fought off the ill effects of a 
sharp drop in the bellwether 
share of International Busi- 
ness Machines and weakness 
in its oil components to close 
up 17.09 points at 1.713.99. 

The pretious record high of 
1 .698.-8 was set last Monday, 
The Dow industrials first 
dosed above 1.600 on Febru- 
ary 6. just 14 trading sessions 
ago. 


Feo FeO 

27 rs 





IRWBsttw i 




1 FMi 

Feo 

27 

26 



MONEY- MARKETS AND GOLD 


Base Hates % 

Cie&nng Banks 12 'r 
Finance House 12 

Discount Market Loam % 

Ovenugm Higtv 12 L< 7»9 
Week faced: 12 S 

Tieaiuy BUM (Discount "o) 

Buying Setiavj 

2 mntn 12 >., 2 mmfi 12 % 

3 mirth IP* 3 mntn 11 ".» 

Prime Bonk BAs (Discount °i) 

Tmntfi 12 "j.-T 2 V 2 mmti 
3 nwrth Ji'».*-nv 1 6 mirth I 1 S- 1 IS 
T rade Mb (DOcount %| 

1 mntn 2 m/ith 12 ".* 

3 mrrth 12 *"a 6 mntti 1 1 '•» 

JntartMnfc (*») 

Ovemrgtrt- open 12 ’i close 12 
1 week 12 %-l 2 -i„ 6 mnth it^.-tt’i.i 

1 mnth 12 H-I 2 'i 9 mntn t Hi-fi "■« 

3 mnth 12 %-i 2 ’„ i 2 mth TIS- 11 % 

Local Authority Deposits \%>) 

2 days 1 2V, 7 Days 12 % 

t mmh 12 S 3 mntn 12 

8 mnth 71 % 12 mttt 11 % 


EURO MONEY DEPOSITS % 


SUGAR 

(R«w) 

No .6 
March — 

1562-55 6 

- 159.5-592 


1 S 6 . 4 - 65.4 

1 B 9 .- 4 - 69.4 


zinc High God* 

T M . Mn , Cash 410 . 0 M 13.00 

HyJktj! Three Montes . A23.0CM2S 00 

127 5-770 
130 . 0-29 0 
1320-300 
1325400 




AkanMum 

Cash 770.00-771 00 

Three Months . 796.00-797 00 


Dollar 

7 aavs 7 h- 7 , 1 i« 

3 months 7 ''^- 7 ,J i« 
Deutschmark 
7 days 4 M- 4 S 
3 momfts 4 "i(- 4 'm 
French Franc 
7 days 14-13 
3 months 14 H- 14 X 
Swiss Franc 
7 days 2M-2 
3 months 44 '. . 

Yen 

7 days 6 % - 6 % 
3 momhs 6 ’i»- 5 rt >» 


can 8 V 7 S 
I month 7 1 */' 1 * 
6 months 7 , V ,3 >« 
call 5 -» 

I month 4%-4% 

6 mornne** 
cal 9 V 8 K 
1 month 15 - 14 % 

6 months 13 ^- 12 % 
cal 22 V 20 V, 
1 month 3 %- 3 % 

6 months 4-3 V. 
can 6-5 
1 month 6 '< 5 - 8 '>* 
6 months 5 ^- 5 % 


OTHER STERLING RATES 


MEAT AND LIVESTOCK 
COMMISSION 
Average fotstocfc prices et 
representative markets on 
February 27 

GEk Cattle. 9&20p per kg hr 
(+0.32) 

Gft Shaep 20 B. 01 pperkgest 

0 

cw (4 18.96) 

08 :^ 5 . 7756 p per kg tvr 


1 mnth I 3 X +13 
3 mnth 13 - 12 * 

9 mnth 12 VI 2 % 


Bond s (V) 

2 mnth 
6 mmh 
% I 2 mtn 


Gold. $336 25438 75 
Krugerrand* (per con? 

S SJ 7 0533850 (E 227 00 - 22833 ) 


^£ 5450 - 55 . 33 ) 


S 81 . 0042.00 
‘Excludes VA 



England and Wales: 

Came noe. down 11.1 V »e 


LONDON MEAT FUTURES ■ 


EXCHANGE 


Pigment 


p per kJo 

Month 

Open Cssw 


104 5 unotM 

May 

TOfi-O unq lea 


1026 jnaieo 

July 

1035 imp led 


1 OI .3 101.3 

Sep 

1075 irrtjted 


Vd 11 


LONDON 

POTATO FUTURES 


E per tonne 

Month 

Opt* Close 

Ado! 

56 CO 96 . *0 

Mav 

10 s 00 103 90 

NChr 

7850 78 50 

Feo 

87.00 38 50 

Aprd 

TOT .00 100 50 


Vet 625 

BALTIC FREIGHT INDEX 

G-NJ. Frerqtrt Futores Lid 

report 510 per Index paint 


Hwh!Lnvi Close 

Ap« 86 

8*5 0 - 0*0 0 8*40 

July 85 

755 0-747 0 7505 §■ 

Oa 86 

8520-650 0 0510 


Sour 737.0 
Vo) 132 tats 


Sterling COsfv) 
lmntni 2 Vl 2 % 3 mmh 
6 mnth i! , 1 i*-ir i <«l 2 mth 

DeOarCSstV) 
t mnth 7 . 70-765 3 mnth 

6 mnth 770 - 7.65 12 mm 


i 13 %- 13 % 
i I2V12% 
12 V 12 % 

11 '<- 11-4 
11 ) 5 - 11 * 

7 . 70-7 65 
7 . 857.80 


INVESTMENT TRUSTS 


Fixed Rate Sterlmg Export Finance 
Scheme IV Average reference rate tor 
interest period January 8 . 1966 10 
February 4 . 1988 Inclusive: 13-077 per 
cent. 


f - LONDON FINANCIAL FUTURES 


Three Month Sterling Open 

Mar 86 aaoo 

Jun 86 8aB5 

Sep 86 89.40 

Dec 86 09.71 

Previous day & iota* open interest 1 1 466 
Three Month Eurodollar 

Mar 86 92.16 

Jun 86 9229 

Sep 86 9222 

Dec 86 92.03 

US Treasury Bond 

Mar 86 ~ 93-08 

Jun 86 92-08 

Sep 86 NfT 

Short fait' 

Mar 88 _. 9520 

Jur>86 .. 98-40 

Sep 86 ....... N/T 


High Low Close EatVU 
88 05 87.95 87.94 771 

88.97 88 80 88.80 1792 

8942 8935 8929 483 

8675 89 65 8961 321 

Previous day's total open interest 19723 
92.18 92.12 9217 1019 

9233 922 S 92.33 3674 

9226 92.17 92.26 550 

92.09 9127 92.09 218 

Previous day's total ooen interest 2940 
94-04 93-00 93-24 5182 

93-09 92-04 92-31 4244 

0 

Previous day's total ooen interest 848 
9520 88-03 98 -OJ 144 

9540 9530 9534 16 


Jun 86 

Sep 86 

Dec 86 

FTSE 1 Q 0 

Mar 86 

Jun 66 - 


Previous day’s to tel open merest 8816 
11515 11515 11514 114-25 3333 

11513 11513 11510 11521 4780 

N/T 116-09 0 

N/T 116-09 0 

Previous day’s total open marestl 817 
15450 155.75 154,50 154 95 686 

15620 15620 15620 156.65 42 



111 

30689 


26-1 v 

1 3.7 332 

+1 

*3 

21 356 


86 

28 *67 


44 

27 616 


OR 

07 .. 


36i 

' 26 41.7 


18 

06 .. 

+'r 

27 

*7 324 


27 

22 436 


209r 

58 235 


11 

36 406 


33 r 

37 38.4 

+5 

»flr 

4 1 346 

+2 

05 

06 .. 


120 

104 127 


IO 

46 315 


16 

1.1 .. 

♦4 

14 

as .. 


162 

36 326 


77 

21 336 


09 

06 764 


46r 

24 461 


38r 

18 718 


50 

25*20 


1.9 

23 579 


36 

10 472 


20 

19 728 


35 

26 527 

+2 

1 Bt 

1 1 388 


H3r 

45 302 


10 

49 282 


67 

•2 

ft Si 


146 

4 8 29.1 


129 

45352 


18 

18956 


36 

21 456 

►*' 

5.7 

1.0 .. 


43 

13 429 

n 

39 

36 424 


33 

22 636 


71 1 

26 439 

i-i 

21 

27 528 

rl 

20» 

14 973 


29 

26 879 


15-»r 

05 254 


P 












FINANCIAL TRUSTS 


12 * 

98 

377 

736 

as 

211 

99 

73 

*48 

345 

774 

70 * 

•00 

35 *' 

60 B 

500 

■*8 

IM 


THE TIMES UNIT TRUST INFORMATION SERVICE 


Btf Ottor Chng YU 


ABBEY UNIT TRUST MANMBtS 
B0 HaWantuU Ho. Bamsaicutti BH8 SAL 
0345 717373 (Lnttnai 

G* 1 Food 1138 120.4c +05 997 

*hpn Inc Early *.4 gi DB +06 538 

WortJwueBona tn 7 t05B« +1 6 522 
AnwnCan Growth 146 0 156 4B +0.3 0 80 

Man Parte 40 6 436 -06 267 


GW 1 Fned 
Hgn Inc Early 
Workhwhi Bond 
American Growth 
Asian Paoic 
Aunts a Earn 
Captai Reserve 
Comm 5 Energy 
European Capital 
General 


Do Acorn 
US Emeravj Co's 
Equtas Prowess 
Masurtsltec 


ALUED DUNBAR UNIT TRUSTS 
ABM Du rod' Centre 5wnoon SNt 
0793 810386 4 0793 26291 
Fnl Trust 209.1 2226* 

Growth a Income 1268 1346 


92.1 985 +06 t GO 

61 8 61 9c +0 1 1 B3 
630 67 4c -10 152 
752 60.1 +67 167 

1301 139 IB +1J 106 
596 636 +10 ; 

M.O 903 4)1 1.71 

1202 1292 -02 I 19 

566 610 -05 0*3 

1872 1993 *17 357, 

551 585 +02 1.71 l 


Nat Mi K 
PM Stan 
Comnoaty 
Hnanoal Secs 
Grad a Gen 
Mi Inin 
Ptep Shares 
lAm Enwgv • 
Wodd Terri 
Amer Growth 
Anwr fncone 
Am* Snueer Co s 
Au« Growth 
Eire Smaller 
Far East 

Hong Kong Prf 
Ml Growm 
Japan Part 

Japan Serter 
E+erapr 

Exonpt Market 


Bu oner Ctng YU 


1866 201.4 +2.1 A 75 

18 6 196B 964 

1269 1354 -09 2.84 

406 433 +02 227 

194 209 -05 £93 

154 1«4 0.71 

S6 4 5014 +02 144 
40-5 432* -02 080 

431 460 +02 0 68 

956 1019B 127 

58.7 605 .. 593 

236 252 .169 

61 9 860 -06 054 

13.1 14 0 +02 041 

361 366 4)1 124 

226 2*3* -05 363 ! 
316 33.7 +0.1 269 

45 4 48.4B +08 .. 
134 143 +04 

754 799 +0.7 381 

64.7 67.7 .. 4 14 


UK Growth Acorn 137.7 1+8 4 
Do Income 121 1 1286 

Maner Inc Accun 217 4 2313 
Do Merxnt 1766 1863 

OAts/Fmo fl Accum 955 1005 
Do Incar* 829 671. 

N8t Amer Tst Acorn 1269 1346 
Far East Tat Acorn 108 6 M55 


+12 IB GU#UE88 MAHON U*T TRUST 
+1 I 360 MAMAOSIS 

tzjJSJ PO 442. 32 St IterjNit+M. London EC3P 


Do team 
Sim Ur COi ku 
Do tea*# 


1170 124.7 +19 136 

946 toi IB +06 2.79 
1002 IQB9B +03 2.79 


955 1005c +05 267 0^823 9333 

829 67 1e +0 .4 287 " T7, 

1269 1346 -0 4 023 ***• lncorao 

086 1155 +1.7 072 


Euro Tst Adam 
General Trust 


131.4 1397c +OS 0S7 
214.7 2204 +17 256 


Feu Trust 
Growth a Inflame 
Capua) Trust 
Bala need 
Acorn Tnrsi 


2216 2362 
3368 3608 
5159 5494 
291 31 0B 
Hkjti income Ta 231 7 2466c 

Early Income 124.0 132 IB 

HKF> YwU 1325 1415 

GPVJ Secs Trust 28.9 302 

mtemaacw" 6B5 7a9B 

Japan Fin 735 78 7 

PacBc Tru 1281 136 4 

Amer Sod 543 628 609 

Secs Of A « Tst 1928 2053 

AU Asset aue 206 2 2198 


+26 343 
+1 3 3.4! 
*20 278 
+4 0 326 
+51 309 
-01 *35 
+13 468 
+13 498 
♦21 586 
♦02 954 
+02 135 
+ t I 001 
♦06 131 
123 
+04 067 
+18 3.44 


BROWN SHIPLEY 

5-17. hmymwt FU. Haywarde Heath 
0444 4581+4 


Fl CUBIT MANA GEMEN T 

1. Laurence Ramey HB. Londcn EC4R ABA 

01-623 4680 

Amencm FirW 893 742 -04 03 

Caput Fund 1015 1090 +02 04 

mromeFima 736 786 +16 45 

Far Eastern Find 60 5 640 +94 a« 

Oversees Marne 629 66.7 +03 461 

fined Menwt 546 56.1 +04 941 

NauifB Res Find 455 45.7 -05 4 n 

Brotman Marne 625 686B +15 39 


500 537 B -Ol 569 

JJ Amer TiuB 11011171 -04 064 

1703 1812 +12 274 

GW Trust 37.6 385B .. 952 

St ttaesm Me 73 1 785B -01 596 

SMteeem US Gth 705 735B -03 DTK 


BS Firu Marne 
Do Accum 
FManas l 
Growth Acorn 
Do Mcome 
Ikgn Marne 


Technology 

German 


553 992B +05 426 
92 8 993b +06 . 

1116 1202b . 212 

1764 188.7 +17 

1117 1217 +1 1 201 

602 84 . 7 c +05 704 

T 12 765 *11 564 

55 B 609 +01 120 

603 64 8 * 1.1 020 

333 362 +05 331 

1308 1406 -0 7 080 

292 312 ..200 


AHBUTWn rSECUMTKS 
131. finsb y Pevemem. umoon EC2A iay 
01628 98 I 01-280 8540/1/2/3 
Caper Gruwtn Inc 54 8 563 +08 161 

Do Accum 61 0 652 +1.0 1 81 

Eastern a tml 1024 1095c +13 162 
Do 6% WthtrawT 56 4 603c +0.7 182 

finance a Property 562 80 1 . . £41 

G» a find non +67 *a6B +03 897 
Do Accum 760 BOOB +05 857 

Hgh Income Mune 888 71 4B +05 5 70 

, Do ACam 154.7 165 4B +12 570 

lean YieU income 970 7i 6e +04 630 

DO Actum 171.0 1828c +10 830 

hrt ACOTT1 665 71 1 -01 262 


BUCKMASTER MANAGEMENT 

The Stock Exchange London EC2P 2JT 

01-588 2868 


, oo ream 
mat* VieU income 
Do Accum 


1926 2027 
3033 3193 
93 1 981 
180.0 186 4 
1112 11628 
147 0 153 6B 
93781005 0 
990210812 


Da Accum 171.0 1828 

Hrt ream 865 71 1 

Da y. vntnanM 632 975 

Managed Fund 566 599 

Preteence Means 76 6 28.4 

Do Accum 83 0 887 

SnuBBT Go's Accum 1291 i38d 
Woru Pen*, Shim 92 98 

Porrtqko Th UK 725 75 1 
POrtfoAo Tn Japan 71.4 736 
POrttcte Tst US 70 4 729 

Pcvttofco Tsi Eirope 6S.0 922 
PDrtWc Tst HK 395 403 

BAJUJE GIFFORD 


General Me (4) 1! 

Do Accum (4j 31 

mcome Find p) ! 

Do Accun (3) II 

M Me |7| 11 

Do ream a u 

Stricter Inc 151 9! 

Do Accum |5j 9f 

CSFMB MANAGERS 
125. rtgn Hotoont. Lor 
01-243 1148 
CS Japan Fund 1 


CANNON FUND MANAGERS 
1 . Orotte*. Wanthev. HA 9 (MB 
tM- 9 ® 8876 


190 Was George SL Glasgow G2 SPA 
0*1-332 3132 

Bxtoncad G* Me 

34.44 36 6* 

.. 220 

DO Accun 

3* 75 X 97 


ncotrn Gto Me 

3*2 

364 

.. 760 

Do ACOOT 

J50 

372 


Serves Co s Me 

359 

382 

. 190 

Do Accum 

3 1*2 

385 


BOQJTT BtTEPNATXJHAi. 



Rrver Wbbi. Tcntxioga TW8 1DY 


0732 362222 




Amarcan 

X* 

899 

+0.1 080 

Amor Egialy Mean* 

306 

330* 

509 


*3 1 

512 

+03 044 


283 

302 

*0 7 390 

QFI 3 Food Mr 

293 

30 6 

+01 93* 


91 * 

978 

+13 *82 

Japan Spocad Ste 

X7 

327* 

+05 .. 


M2 

9*9 

+28 .. 

Managed X T« 

1178 

1252c 

♦04 0*0 

uox Mcome £cuH» 

688 

74 Oe 

♦0.7 541 

ProtOTOnH am 

30/ 

32.7* 

+02 263 

Sourn Eam Ava Tfi 

251 

268 

-03 042 

sped# Sas 

1353 

1448 

+07 116 





2 Crostw Sq. London EC3A Ban 
01-638 5858 


American Exarnpl 

04*8 3522 

. . 137 

Japan Exempi E2795 2823c 

.. 125 

ym Prrpwry T» 

*10795 0 

7.75 

Property Trial 

E2DS70 

.. 310 


Tengde Bar 5m Co's 141.7 1465 .. 886 

NAMBROB BANK UMT TRUST MANAOM 
fiBiaer UT ATOM. 5. Raytagn Rd. Brentwood 
E»se» 

0277 217918 

HamOtu SnteCo-s 109 7 116 . 7 * *05 223 

Macros N Amer 833 675 -01 068 

Hamcros tep 8 F E 866 924 *o+ tug 

Handm Scand+n <66 TJ 2 ^ 0.4 1 05 

HBnPros Eiropaan 85.1 903 +06 102 

Haems Cawun 421 44 J -02 1.79 

Hanme Equey Me 765 Si .4 +08 464 

Hamero s rngtiVnc 536 570 c +04 588 

Hantm Res Asets 533 S& 7 * +OJ 3.13 

HENDERSON ADMMST1UT10N 

fietner UT AthneoraDdn 5 RayU 9 i Rd. Hum 


Efln Irtcon*# 
SmaOB Gcs Dry 
Pref a Got 
G* Trust 


Fat East 
Ncrti American 


2819 3786 
300 0 3192 
1423 1508 
1324 1406 


3. GMntnias St Eanotrcoi 
031 223 2581 (dealers 031. 
Mil Ei (231 3788 

Japan Ei 1 431 2759 

Uk Ei 1311 188 7 

Fiat Pens MB 3988 

"‘Ml Pens UK 1612 

BG America 1503 

BG Energy 1126 

BG Income Garth >78 1 

BG Japan 136 7 

BG Technology 1618 


EH3 6YY 
326 60661 
3947* -09 1 28 

287 9* +31 7 0 30 
2008 +119 124 

3882 

169 6 +>4 4 

1599 +08 099 

12112 +17 169 

187+e +71 522 

1349 +24 000 

1732 -t 9 1.35 


CAPEL (JAMES) MANAOEM0IT 
tOO. OH Broad St London EC2N ISO 
0*6!1 QQti 

CapfflU (31 33* 9 349 4 

Inccroe <31 263.0 2769 

North American (3) 253 0 2664 
CATER ALLEN 

1. Km Men St EC4N 7AU 
01-623 9314 


3. Lonocn Was BWgs. London Wat. London 
EC 34 5NO 
01-628 5181 

Amer i Gw be 2176 231 4 +02 057 

Oo Accum 2224 2384 +01 057 

Amer Timamd Me 705.6 2*66 


01-623 9314 
G* Trust 


986 105 5* +0611 51 


BALTIC TRUST MANAGERS 

25/26 Albemarle Street. London W1X 4A0 

Dt-491 0295 


Amoican 
Australian 
Japan a General 
Hrgh tarn 
InrerruDcnal Trust 
income Cm Tsi 

Gen & Fries Ml 
OotH Markets 
Special SauRons 


47 6 51.3# +02 0 86 
17 9 192 -02 3 03 

758 8i r +z i on 

43 1 4614 +09 778 

696 745 +01 116 

*3.7 46 8* +02 4.47 
652 68 7 C 6 <>l 

331 355 -01 211 

417 44.7 +02 150 


BARCLAYS UNICORN 

Urkcam Hesse. 252. Honuord Rtf E7 

01-534 5644 


Amenta 814 865 +02 241 

Auat Actum 1361 134 1 -20 1 99 

Do income 901 958 -*5 198 

Cwrul 64 7 683* +05 320 

Ersmpr Trust 399 S *25 0 *3 8 3 99 

Em Mcome 67 9 722 +07S64 

Fmamaa; 31*6 22B2 +1*325 

500 3393 254 4# +18 335 

General 1305 1388 +10 315 

GW B Fried Me 518 542# +0 11000 

Japan * Gen me 1190 1»5e +03 0 49 

Do Att 1301 1777c +03 0 49 

Growth Accun 167 4 1780c +*8 2 £3 

Mcome Trust 3064 3259# +15 J7B 

Letue Trust 745 79 2# -02 164 

Special Stuanont 129.8 1380 *i 0 358 

Rcccwy 1733 183 9 *03 3 73 

Trustee Find 1010 1074 +12 3 <2 

Urw Teen Accum 406 517 +02 DBS 

Do Mcome 46* 514 +02 0 83 

WDrtOmOe Trust <33 1 I4S0B +79 121 

B Tu tin Fund ASS 2890 31KQ *25 349 

Do Me 196.1 708.8 ■ 

8AMHO niHO MANAGERS 
PO Bci 15*. Beckenraun. Ken BH3 ‘ 
tH-658 9002 

Auseaie *7B 5*2 

Eastern 434 «&3c 

Europe 944 1009s • 

Grand' 6 Me W * 635a - 

Do Accum 992 95Sa ■ 

F»« Japan 60 9 G50 < 

Japan Special 756 602* ' < 

Jaaan Sunnse 7tS 76* < 

F«sr Smmer Coe 59 6 6*0e “ 

Fnsl Europe 94 8 90S 

Fnt N Amur 469 50.1 

BAAfWQTON MANAGEMENT 

59 Qiesnam Sl London EC2P 2DS 
01-606 4433 


CENTRAL BOARD OF FMANCE OF 
CHURCH OF ENQ 
77 London W# ECS 106 
01-588 IBIS 

Mv Fund 36605 .. 464 

FVied Mi *3255 .. 1079 

Daposn *000 . . 11 70 

CHMKTOVnCMt-MVESTMENT HIND 
77. Umoon vn«. Lonoon EG2N 1DB 
01 588 1815 

Moome 32666 e .5 38 

Accum 93* 77 . . . . 

CLERICAL MEDICAL UMT TRUST 
MANAGERS 

Narrow Pton. Brook BS2 QJH 
0272 377719 

General Eauny 353 37 6 +05 

Eawy 1*5(1 Mcnme 375 399c +04 .. 
GW 6 Fued *m GO* 773 29 1 +01 


COUNTY BAIBL UNtT TRUSTS 
i«. Cneessde. London EC2V S€U 
01-736 1999 


3120 2254 123 

Capital Tsi we 185.4 1972 +05 238 

DO Accum 221 4 335.4 +06 256 

COW S Gw Me BIB 870 +03 523 

Do Accum 107 0 1138 +03 6 23 

Eon Inc Tsi Me 142.4 151.4B +1 0 4 79 

Do Accum 1514 1610* +11 4 79 

Mcome Trust 1084 II 52 +12 4 44 

Do kcrum >126 1196 +14 4*4 

Mi Growth Fd Ire <49 6 159 0 -02 0 00 

DO Accum 1862 1768 -02 0 00 

Japan & Gen Inc 550 S90# +08 008 

[Jo Accum 65 8 89 6# +06 0 08 

Monday Mcome Fd 698 74 2# +08 505 


MU. SAMJEL UMT TRUST MANAGERS 
*5 Seven SL EC2P 2LX 
01639 8011 

Srnan Tiusl Urals 496 6 530 5 
Caoral Trust ums 91 3 97 a* 

Deter Toot twits 1787 1902 +1 


48. Gracecfuch SL EC3P 3MH 
01-628 4200 Ext 369 

l« UK 1663 200.4 +25 110 

DO Accum 3003 3202 +3 1 3.10 

NP 1 Overseas 5005 5325c +3* 1.10 

Do Acom 6085 6*74c +42 1.10 

FAT EM ACC 566 g4# +OJ 030 

Do DM S 66 614* +09 03 ) 

American aoc 533 566 -01 130 

DOOM 536 564 ..130 

NORWICH UNKM 

PO Bn 4. Norwich NR 1 3NG 

0803 877200 


Gram TrvM El 030 11 . 47 # +068 366 

•ml Trust 1116 1196 -08 1 £4 

OFFBIHBBm TRUST MANAGEHENT 
86 C— ion 8tra*L London EC4N 6AE 
dsungs 01-236 3B85/5/7/8/S/0 
Mtamdonai Growth 1224 131 0 . . 050 

Moan* 8 Oowth 532 566 +61 100 

■Speak Sds 7I.T 767 -03 440 

American GrtXntl 316 3i8e 070 

Japan GrowFi 424 454 +08 .. 

&rj»ear iGrravto 522 556* +02 120 

UK Growth 40.7 532 +02 080 

Parte Grow* 355 380 .010 

Hgn Mcome 23 B 318 +6.1 a 30 

Pmaicai Means 476 sas +02 230 

Dd Accran 655 91 0 +03 230 

PEARL TRUST 

252. H«i Mbom. WCTV 7a 
01-405 6441 


.. 0 10 
+0.1 630 
*62 230 
+03 230 


01-405 6*41 
Growth Fund Me 
Do Accun 
krone Fund 

M* Equity Me 

Da Accun 
IMI True: MC 
Oo tecum 


613 865 
1262 1273 
*069 1159 
1102 J172 
1102 1172 
1160 1214 
196S 2112 


+65 263 
+67 263 
+10 *J0 
+67 1 71 
♦07 1.71 
+1.1 636 
+16 338 


PERPETUAL UNTT TRUST 

48. Han Street Hwkey On Ttuxnes 

0*91 576868 


RtondMde Bee 
Amer Grower 
MC EmergGo'e 
Fat EmWi 
E uropean Gei 


238 7 2562 +18 130 

175.4 IB? B +19 614 
1351 1461* +16 194 
»0 69.8s -64 132 

71 7 77.0 +68 667 

583 6ZB +OB 1.10 

51 I 5*9 +64 290 


PROUFW UMT TRUSTS 


-^sr 1 


'^P Means 
Cutv 6 GW 
Far Eastern 


Racovury 122 2 1X0 

Do Accun 1320 1404 

Euuoeon me 480 51 0 

Ob tecum 48 0 51 0 

FRUNOa+HUTOENT MANAGERS 
Pnrnim Enc. Oorkwa. Surey 
0306 885055 

FP Eoury Ost 189.7 2009 

Op Accun 3132 331 7 

FP FUad W Dor 1076 1149 

Do Accun 1198 1280 

O BH BW B Dun 1H8 165 0 

Do Accun 1603 160 7 


1227 1X0* +1.1 197 
1320 1*04* +1 I >97 
48 0 510 +02 0 99 


_ 1787 1902 +19 310 

European Trust 104 6 III 3 +67 089 

Far East Trust 952 101 3 -1 1 234 

Fmancrnl Trusr 3324 353 7 . . 280 

Gw Fixed Im me 27 9 290* . 1009 

Oo G"M1ft 402 42 «* .. 326 

Hen y«« Trust 59 9 53 8 5A2 

Krone Tost 754 aoj 466 

KnemaBon# :Q5» 1177# -03 311 

Jason Tsoi Tst 79 5 31 4 0.47 

Natural Resotfoei 298 318 +0* 239 

Seeuey Taxi 17i 0 ibsjjc . 31* 

Smaler Cos 73 1 77# .. 1 68 

SPTOOI S*» 877 933* 267 

S9 FUND HANAGERS 

32 OmT+n Annas O aw. London SWIM SAB 
fli-222 1000 

IBi Bnf A 0 seas 1221 1299 +09 1 90 

® iroi ncra 547 575 9X 

» S*CU*y_Gw 55s 580 *02 200 

Mvsronem Tsr Fno 520 £53 +03 350 

XLEINWORT BENSON 

20 F errowte SL icncon EC3 

01423 8000 

Amer Growci Me 507 <aa* -01 1.12 

Oj Accun 81! 658* -01 

Fuw Aw Tst MC 17 6 16 0c .. 257 

Do Accum £1 as* 


caonai Accum 261 7 775 « . . 1 63 

Energy Trust 41 2 438a -01 562 

Ertra Mcune 1*89 1564 +17 SM 

■fironoa 1 134 6 1*3 3* +06 250 

GW Strategy 54 B 56* +01 159 

Growth ln»es a nent 7624 7791 +21 2 7C 

Mcome & Growth 978 *02* +0*4 74 

Japanese s Paafie 1103 117 3 +23 001 

NM Aim*. Grow* 956 >01 7 +03 1 7£ 

Ink Recoery 1016 'XT* +64 304 

Snrter Cos 1647 1964a +05 74E 

GkJtMl Inc Tst 51 7 54 Be -02 53* 

crown unit nwsrssmcEs 
Omni House, wotang GUZ1 IkW 
0*662 5033 

Hgh Mcome Rust 7165 2315 +30 653 

Grown Trust 207 7 222 I* +22 32* 

MWnsi Trust 1X8 1292 +61 0 77 

EAGLE STAR UNIT TRUST MANAGERS 
Bam Road. C n aaent ia m. Ooucenw G453 7LO 
0242 52131 1 

UA Balanced Me 628 670 +05 299 

Da Accun 629 670 +06 299 

UH Growth Accun 67 0 71 5 +02 1 75 

UK Hen Me Me 61 0 65 r +0 7 526 

1 tv tnenew Accun 606 6*6 +43 156 

I Far Eesvern Maim 80 7 64 7 +13077 

European Accum 655 B9S +0 7 1 25 

UK ON 6 FI Me 50 7 5*1 +0 3 92* 

Da Accun » 7 54 I -03 924 

EFM IRBr TRUST lUHAOERS 
4. UMvWe Crescent. EOnouign 
031-229 J*5C 


FUNDS IN COUNT 

PuCAC Trustee. Kmgewky. WCS 

01-405 4300 

Ceate 30*3 314 7 . . 3 0* 

Gross Me iX 0 137 0 . 0 *2 

High T*d 1901 1965* 653 

! GT UNTT MANAGERS 

am Moor. B. D e icn srvr e 9a LOnaxi EC2M 4YJ 
01-283 2575 Dxteng 01-828 943* 

UK cep Fnrt MC 91 3 97 7* +26 2 6C 

Do Accum 130 1 1X2* +3 8 2 60 

Mcome Fund 762 81 4c *12 660 

Pennon Exempt 148* 1554* +1.1 2*0 

Mtemanonal 1352 1«46e +0* 100 

USOOro* 535 576 +02 **0 

Teen a Grown 825 689 -09 HO 

Jaoan 4 General 1625 1738 +20 OX 

Far EBB! 6 Owl 728 779 +0 I 1 00 

European Fund 2114 226 2c +03 0 70 


! UK cap Pnd Me 91 3 97 7* +26 2 6C 

! Do Accum 1X1 1X2* +3 8 2 80 

Mcome Fund 762 81 4e *12 660 

Pension Exempt 1*8 4 1554* +1.1 2*0 

Mtemanonal 1352 1«46e +0* 1® 

I US 6 Gro* 535 576 +02 **0 

Tech 4 Growth 825 689 -09 1 DO 

Japan 4 General 1625 1738 +20 OX 

Far Earn A Ovn 728 779 +01 100 

European Fund 211 4 726 ?e +03 0 70 
Germany Field 802 6* * . 1 X 

GARTMORE FUND MANAGERS 
2 a Mary Am. London EC3A SEP 
01-623 1712 Oeamq 01-623 5760 OeaMU 01623 
5006 

Amene*' Trust 993 956 +03 OX 

Ausaakan Trust 186 197 -01 0*4 

Briton Tal Accun *98 536c -O « 2 S3 

Oo ftsi *37 *69* -0J 2 33 

CrxnmodlY Share 552 MB 1 X 

European Trust *37 46 6* -02 0 70 


B72 10*5 +0.7 146 

151 B 1716 +GB *32 

■7 4 92-7* +0 5 534 

1275 137.1 +15 029 

131.7 1418 +01 225 

1811 1926 +13 1.08 

1116 1X0 +0 8 076 

76 7 618 +96 6.10 


PRUDENTIAL UNIT TRUST t 
51-68. Hard HW. Hord ESP 
01-478 3377 

Hrtorn Equity 3795 

European 723 

Hpfeom Conans 505 

MoBoni KWh Me 61 1 

HcVCWTO ktX 627 

jwnaw eta 

N > M« n c an *1.1 

Hoeom Spec S4S 574 

HCTborn UK Growth 762 

HCtoom Gw Truss 1S54 


*637 +42 330 

789 +03 094 

S3 7 +03 309 

65 0c +0 3 687 
879* +05 0.79 
713* +1.0 005 
6*9 -0.1 1.74 

619 *03 399 

819# +07 102 
1721 +16 690 


*37 46 6* -02 0 70 


. ... 1068 1158 +10 211 

Euopean Me 763 802 +0 1 1 37 

Do Accum 935 98 1 +01 137 

General Me 1403 149 1 +02 3 76 

_ Dc Accum IM D 2019 +0 3 3 76 

Get VMO Me Ml B 1 iSJe +06 9 64 

DP Accum 1719 177 3 +09 9 64 

Hon herd Me 78 7 617 +0 1 6.17 

DO Accun 1*95 159 1 +01 817 

jaoan meomt iB07 1919 +52 026 

Du Accum 1614 1926 +52 026 

N Amer-can Me «43 472 -02 099 

Du Accum SI 3 54 b *03 099 

PBCihe mcome 1031 1065 +i*055 

Do Ooaim 1159 1218 -15 055 

Sm* COS Me 687 71 0 -012 17 

&U Accun 764 835 . . 217 

ORTTANIRA UNIT TRUST 
74-70 Fmuuy PBWiwm London EC2A IJD 
01580 2777 OuHrngOIOSB 0*7619 MoneyGuoe 
080C-01 0-333 

Gro+m G41 585 S74 069 

W Recovery 97 9 10*4 +1 J 215 

SmaHm Cot 1283 1369* *12 15* 

ua Qrowm x* 36a +03201 

Extra Me 58 9 607* *0 5 7 48 

5* 25 7 271 -0 1 770 

K 4 Grom 1B1 1 2038 +26 *31 



Anrencsn Fuid 65 6 706 -04 IC 

Cap** Fuu B0 1 65 7 +0 6 198 

Growth g Me Fund 1X7 1X1* +08**5 
ttgn Den Fund 960 KB 7 +05 657 

MmraBon# Fund 168 1 1809 -10 IM 

RaHUWS Fund 19 0 20 3 222 

Sm* Jap Co S Fnd 27 5 294 -OS 0 10 


EM9URAHCEFUC WNMEMHT LTD 
tvewn Monei 4i. Hemngion Garona. London 
SW7 *JU 
01-373 7261 

Endurance 9 82 1029 .12 3+0 

EQUIT4HLEUWTS40MWIHTRATTDN 
35 Fowira* SL MmOew 
061-236 5885 


Eaira Moome Tort 44 3 474 -04 S29 

Far Eastern Truss 535 1000 -13 0*2 

F^ee Inferos! fund 25 0 266 1022 . 

Gat Turn 25 6 78 6 1001 5 Hajw-gn 

GUObI Fund Accun 1*28 1S2J> +06 OJB 0277 23+SJ 

Oo Or* 1362 1*49 +0 7 026 Easy IVJr 

Com Share Tout 13 7 14 0 1 98 Qo Kxtrt 

Ingw Amoncsn 2 52 »1 -02 0 10 Drr U+ijrn 

Hrjn Mams Trust 1242 132.9# -09 550 European^ 
Hong Kong Trust 252 KM -0 4 093 r»E«rr 

Mtom* Fw>d 855 ns* -04 37r Go Tn,sl 

Ms+nnea *gmm US90 4606 -029 2 19 un iuuw 

Japan Trust 13+ 0 1107 -Ob 900 

Managed Esampi 2*64 2568 -13 IX 

Or 6 Energy Trust 323 3* 4* -0 4 5 04 

Sceoai Sa Traat 83 6 889 -0 9 I IQ 

|UK3n*CsRacTlt 832 672 -05 105 


507 84 4# -0 1 M2 

621 658* -01 
176 i& De .. 257 
0.1 23 9a 

_ *166 1239 +0 1 561 

Do Accun 1890 2003 -02 

Ml Recovery me 88 6 33S -04 192 

Do tecum 927 963 -04 .. 

Japan Growth MC 67 0 71 7 +i.e , 

Do Acoen 67 3 72 a -12 .. 

Smaner Co s Inc USJ 1472 .. 241 

Do Amen 1765 1X6 -01 .. 

UK Eg Growth Me 262 278a -01 156 

Do Accum 43 0 *5 6m +01 . 

Wortomoe Tech Me 402 430* -0* 

Do Accum 405 *13 +01 

L 4 C IP#T TRUST MANAGEMENT 

Pwrar House. CoproaP *•*. EC2R 7BE 
Oi 568 3800 

Mrom* Fwm 3771 364 6* 

Mlmnason* 4 Gan 2182 222 7* 


LEGAL 4 BEMSUL LOST TRUST 
MANAGERS 

g r 5 , gft.+" “ w - 


Nvwa Res 

N Am+npjr. Trust 
UK SpeoH Sts 


2564 

776 4 c 

•23 

221 

4000 

*27 ?e 

+45 

221 

569 

601* 

♦ 12 

499 

604 

6*8* 

+0* 

126 

6 22 

*65 

-22 

060 

734 

777 

-03 

60* 

665 

71 1 

+01 

IX 

456 

480 

-04 

381 

68 S 

73 3* 

-01 

377 

582 

502 

*07 

224 


EduKSOM Mean 


609 74* 
B8 9 708 
50 0 532 


govett (john) war management 

Mncnesrer Mse. 77. London nr*. Lonoon EC2N 
IDA 

01588 56X 

MB Growth 70S 75 7 -02 182 

Amencm Growm 593 63 +• 1 65 

Amenenn me 552 Hie 6 01 

European Gramm 166 0 180 7 -t 1 024 
GodAAtena el* 453 -08 is* 

Japan Grown 1199 C92a +24 D2i 

Peote Mcome 61 i 65 J* -02 133 

UK aceoal Opps 757 6i 3* +0 1 £23 


GiS 4 Food Mr 50 0 532 -08 B97 

Tsr Of ln» Trusts 59 7 63 6* -02 190 

Spec*) Sds Trust 70 4 74 9 +03 252 

nth Amer Tnrsi Si 8 552 . 202 

Far Emmi Trust 59 8 637 +07 OSS 

EOUtTY 4 LAW 

Sr Gecxge Me CoporaMm Sr Co*emrv Cvi 
190 

0203 wan 


GRTUMITMANAGeRa 
Rova* Evoungs. EC3P 30* 
81-888 8903 

CUt 5 fivod Ini 1139 1 
Cowm Egwly 194 t : 

GuankiA 31 6 i 

U AmgnCMi 131 1 1 

Paohc 157 9 1 

Property Snanr 216 e 1 


Srovner C c n — te a 1910 2032 
Europoan Trust 1958 ?38J 


1139 118** +03 970 
194 t 206 5 2 16 

XI 6 291 a* +20 305 
13i 1 IX 5 »0J 2 1* 

157 9 168 0 +2 1 0 80 

2168 2X.5* -13 1 Tg 


LLOYDS BANK UNIT TR U ST MANAGERS 
R^gorram Opt. Gormg-BrSe*. Womwig W 

Sum 
0444 +59'** 

Baurced 1719 1838 -16 310 

On Accun oar j 323 7 + 12 8 3 rO 

Energy MU 450 +84* +02 387 ; 

Os Acorn 433 530 +0 2 U7 

Emu iwwv 1446 *5*6 *18 549 

Oo Accum 255 5 3732 -30 S*9 

German G» Me 566 M’ -Oil 029 

Dc teoxn 568 <K 7 -03 029 

Income 3*60 752.0 -LS 463 

CO accum 475 3 508 J -* 9 4 42 

Mil T*ai IK 3 176 7 -08 060 

De Aeoan 1723 'M3 +07 660 

Jacan Grown 539 5-5 -1 4 go? 

Dd Acoan 53 9 5+8 *14 002 

N amer 4 Gm. K9 993* +02 1 09 

Dj Accum 1000 IBS -02 1» 

Parte Basm 9451011* -08 03? 

Do Acs*n 99 7 HR5* -06 DJI 

185 3 176 7 -1+ 1.95 

184 1 1968 -1 3 13* 

163* 1730 -09 121 

227 < 2*32 -1* I2i: 


QUOTES MANAGEMENT COMPANY 
3l-*5 Oregon SL London ECSV 7LH 
01-600 *177 



Smoker Cos & Rae 185 3 174 7 
Do Accum 184 1 196 8 

MTOMKGlMI 163* 173 6 
Go accum 237 i 2*32 











1 




I 






pijKj 


f‘ j f \ Yr . 































































THE TIMES SAT U RDAY MARCH 1 1986 


FINANCE .AND INDUSTRY 


TEMPOS 


ann 9unced by 
Lloyds Bank proved some- 
inmg of -a revelation and 
confirmed suspicions about 

>hc. way the stock market 
views the banking sector. The 
message from the' maiicel 
appeared to be that the banks 
Cannot win. \ 

As long as there are South 
American debtors with repay- 
ment Problems.. bank shares 
will suffer since investors- axe 
only too aware -.that the 
business of providing for bad 
debt is a bit like guessing the 
length of a piece of siring. 
This seems the best explana- 
tion forthe fall in -bank shares 
yesterday after Lloyds an- 
nounced a handsome 20 per 
emt increase in' pretax profits 
io£561m last year, hitting the - 
middle of the range of 
brokers's estimates. 

Lloyds shares rase 5p but 
then retreated to finish 2p 
down ' on the .day at 482p 
despite evidence that things 
are looking up for the sector. 
Not even a lower-than-ex- 
pecied lax charge which left 
post-tax profits np 40 per cent 
at £331 million iitiqrired the 
market. 

Yet the Lloyds figures were 
encouraging in a number .of 
ways. Assets shrank slightly 
thanks: mainly to a 20 per' 
cent drop in the value of the 
bank's dollar loans, but they 
showed that Lloyds, had re- 
sisted making substantial fur- 
ther loans to South America: 
The sidling vstfuebf Mexican" 
loans; for instance*. dropped 
'almost £200 million to £994 
million. V .. . 

At- the same time key. ratios 
improved and the bank has 
clearly made considerable ef- 
forts ’to . improve quality of 
earnings. Among other things 
this, has meant spreading its 
assets to.remove the. cyclical 
swings caused by the endow-., 
mem effect on noninterest ; 
■ bearing 1 current accounts .t? 
although that vdD not have, 
helped last yearns perfor- 
mance-. - • . - . 

The chitf causes for alarm in 
the results were the substan- 
tial losses in the Middle and 
Far East, and Africa. Lloyds 
pots this down to general 
recessionary 1 conditions in 
these areas, but it has some- 
what the air of inept lending 
and does not. help - take-, 
people's minds off thefoad- 
loss reserves. ■• M V- 
Tire ^ striking - feature of ; 
Lloyds' figures, though, was ; 


the surge in the profitability 
. of us domestic . operations. 

' confounding the convention-; 

• wisdom-that UK banking is 
becoming ever less profitable 
.with increasing competition. 
When the; British post-tax 
. return, is set against ' the 
-relatively paltry 0.33 per cent 
return from .-. international 
business it. is easy to see why 
Lloyds and its competitors 
are cutting away their sillier; 
less, logical overseas involve- 
ments and'arestarapeding 
back into Britam.- 

Saga Holidays 

■ Shipping the elderiy off on* 
holiday to:.Cosia Geriatrica 
should be a ample business. 
But Saga Holidays, which 
sells to the over 60s. does not 
see it that way. 

Its customers may be okl in 
body but many are young in 
spirit. Instead of taking them 
to Hove or Great Yarmouth, 
Saga offers holidays on the 
Trans-Siberian railway, walk- 
ing tours in Nepal and trips 
round America. For the less 
adventurous, there’s still that . 
week in Crewe, which hap^- 
pens to be the company's 
most popular- destination in 
Britain. • ; 

The profitability .of this 
: variety ls deariy much great- 
er than a week on the South 
Coast would be. Yesterday 
Saga announced pretax prof- 
its of £4.07 million, np from 
£2.55 million for 1985. Pre- 
interest margins rose from : 
1.7 per cent to 2.7 per cent 
Three quarters- of the profit-, 
was made in Brilain, tbe rest 
in America. 

.' Saga's profits from selling 
holidays were, almost 
equalled last year by interest 
received. At the year’s end, it 
'had £11.5 million cash of its 
own ' and £10.4 million in 
advance bookings. While 
most holiday companies re- . 
ceive bookings through travel - 
agents. Saga receives the 
- money direct and bolds it for 
longer. 

' It says it might use some of r 
the . pash pile to 'make an 
acquisition, but for the mo- . 
meal it plans to put' its 
mailing: list - of Z2 million 
customer to better commer- 
cial use — marketing other 
companies’ insurance prod- 
ucts. ■ - 

. hr addition to any contri- 
bufron frctoi these activities, ; 
2he cvmatyear should bene- 
fit fiomfoss riimiAtfoa fol- 
lowing the sale of the hold 


business, which lost £246,000 
last year, and a slight im- 
provement m holiday sales. 
-Next year. Saga will benefit 
. from lower oil prices which 
will .feed through in lower 
charter rates. 

. Given the size of the cash 
pDe, however, the outlook for 
;interest rates is almost as 
important as these trading 
factors. Financial complexity: 
i$ a far cry from Hove. 

Meanwhile, Saga is build- 
ings portfolio of holidays for 
different geographical mar- 
kets. It is bundling a pro- 
gramme m Australia, largely 
based on the range sola in 
America. 

Snter/UKO 

Mr David AbelTs reputation 
could soon be transformed. 
Until now he has probably 
been better known for his 
share dealing than for the way 
he has built up Suter, where 
ire is chairman, into an 

industrial conglomerate. - 

But yesterday, alongside a 
set of excellent results and the 
tains of an agreed bid for 
UKO international, the lead- 
ing manufacturer of specta-, 
des, he let it be known that 
Suter would no longer deal in 
. share stakes. Even the 26 per 
cent holding in F.H. Lloyd, 
the foundry group which 
Suter has been wooing for 
some months, is now up for 
sale. ‘ 

The timing of the bid for 
UKO is perfect A recovery in 
profits is already in prospect 
as new management, brought 
in last September, has taken 
tough r corrective action. This 
year’s result could be de- 
pressed but by the next 


back to £3.5 million or so. 

Sitter's bid values UKO at 
£283 million, or less than 10 
times prospective earnings, 
allowing for a negligible tax 
charge. The terms are 37 for 
42, which values each UKO 
share at 201p with Suter at 
228a 

IfSutercan keep up its own 
growth, earnings of the com- 
bined group should continue 
to rise in the c u r re nt year 
even though UKO’s result is 
. likely to be poor. 

Last year Suter’s profits 
rose from £4.1 million to an 
estimated. £9.4 million before 
tax, as ' a result of acquired 
and organicgixjwth, This year 
should 1 ' also see a good ad- 
vance. 


COMPANY NEWS 


• AUTHORITY INVEST- 
MENTS: Six months to Octo- 
ber 31, no dividend. Pretax profit 
£81,928 <£14,649), tax nil (oil). 
Earnings per share l.64p 
(0.29p). 

• BO WATER INC Quarterly 
dividend of 18 cents per share 
on common stock. 

• DWEK: Group is to buy, 
subject to shareholders' ap- 
proval, the share capital and 
undertaking of Q A Furniture 
for £4.25 million in cash (£2 
million on completion and 
£235 million over two years, 
dependent upon performance). 

• HOWDEN GROUP: 
Howden . Airdynamics has ac- 
quired tire whole of the share of 
Pneu Devices, of California. 
There will be an immediate cash 
payment of $2.5‘tnillion (£1.7m) 
with a further payment of up to 
S23 million in June, 1987, 
dependent on profits. Some 
wMirinnai amounts may be : 
payable, again dependent on 
certain proms. It is anticipated 
that the minimum price mil be 
$5 mini on. 

• JEBSENS DRILLING: Pre- 
tax loss £25,024 (£3,138). After 
tax loss £21341 (£2,833). Loss 
per share 101 -5p (33.2) 

• CHILD HEALTH RE- 
SEARCH INVESTMENT 
TRUST: No interim dividend 
for year to December 31. With 
figures in £000s, gross revenue 
was 235 (239), net revenue 
before tax 23 (15), net revenue 
aftertax 14, distributions to the 
Child Health Research Appeal 
Trust (gross) £152,704 
(£188,830), net asset value per 
ordinary share 340.1 p (3263), 
unaudited net asset value per 
ordinary share (February 
17.1986) 367p. 

• RENISON GOLDFIELDS 
(subsidiary of Consolidated 
Gold Fields): Interim dividend 
5 cents (nil) for half year to 
December 25. With figures in 
AusSOOO, turnover was 1 11,383 
(99,156), investment income 
5,156 (1,846). operating profit 
before tax 16387 (4092), tax 
6639 (469). minorities 439 (nil). 
Company says that volatility in 
economic circ umsta nces in 
Australia and. elsewhere illus- 
trates difficulty in predicting 
results. It is anticipated that the 
group will maintain current 
rates of performance for the 

remainder of thin financial year. 

• FIRST CASTLE 

ELECTRONICS: Company 
has written to shareholders who 
have not accepted the Morgan 
Crucible offer, recommending 
them to do so. 

• CHANNEL ISLANDS INC 
Total revenue £651,740 
(£569.487). consolidated net 
revenue before tax £577,936 
(£502,196), consolidated net 
revenue -after . tax £462349 
(£401,774). Earnings per share 
for 1985 was 46. 23p (40.18). 

• GREAT WESTERN RE- 
SOURCES: Of the 40,473,902 
participating pref shares offered 


STOCK MARKET REPORT 


up. Balance of 15.133.604 pref 
will be taken up by the under- 
writers at tbe subscription price , 
of£l per share. 

• J PERKIN MEATS: 
Grovebell In vestments -has sold 
its entire bolding of 2,429,700 
ordinary shares of Perkins 
(2531 per cent) for £752,000. . 


Blue chips slip from peak 
as investors take profits 


Gyrations in the oil and 
currency markets foiled to 
have much effect on share 
prices yesterday. Leading 
shares were dull at first on 
light profit taking ahead of the 
weekend, but American buy- 
ers returned towards the close 
to lift them above the worst. 

The FT 30-share index feU 
4.1 to 1277.4. Despite a drop 
of 5.6 to 1543.9 in the FT-SE 
index of 100 shares, secondary 
stocks enjoyed another buoy- 
ant session on renewed take- 
over speculation. 

Government securities had 
a quieter day moving up and 
down with sterling but the 
closing pattern was no worse 
than mixed. 

Leaders finished mainly 
with modest foils. ICI at 927p 
reversed an early lOp foil on 
further consideration of 
Thursday's results. Imperial 
Group rose 6p to 322p on the 
Hanson bid situation, but in 
dull oils BP lost 1 lp to 530p. 

Stores had several good 
features. Laura Ashley soared 
26p to 230p as dealers pre- 
pared for a rush of American 
buying orders expected next 
week. 

Heme Charm jumped 66p 
to 354p on news of discussions 
which may lead to a bid. Other 
DIY issues moved up in 
sympathy, with AG Stanley 
the Fads group 7p better at 

81 p. 

In contrast. Boots slipped 
4p to 230p on news of planned 
job cuts while Barton lost 
another lOp to 264p still 
awaiting Habitat's option de- 
cision. 

UKO International ad- 


Abbott Mead V (180p) 223 

Ashley (Laura) ^ (135j>j 


226 up 22 

Brookmount f160p) 180 

Cable & Wire (587p) 348 up 2 
Chart FL (86p) 90 

Chancery Secs (63p) 71 dn 1 
Cranswick M (95p) 109 

Davidson P (160p) 163 dn 3 

Dralene (I28p) 170 up 10 

Ferguson (J) (10p) 22 dn 1 

Granyte Surface (S6p) 71 


fnoco (55p) 

JS Pathology (I60p) 


United Scientific Holdings: 
Mr Peter Hickson has been 
appointed financial director. 

Swan Housewares: Mr 
Garth Wooldridge has been 
made sales and marketing 
director. 


vanced 14p to I96p following 
agreed terms from Suter, 2p 
better and 227p. Newman 
Tonks was lifted 13p to I30p 
as McKechn « shareholders 
approved the bid, thus giving 
the cold shoulder to the 
Williams approach. 
McKechnie dropped 43p to 
1 96p while Williams Holdings 
lost 14p to 506p. 

Pflkington improved 7p to 
435p on US acquisition plans, 
but profit taking cut 12p from 
Beatson Dark at I86p and 6p 
from Rockware at 48p. 

Martin Ford climbed 1 6p to 
12Ip. The company has re- 
ceived several approaches and 
it is understood the family 
slake has now changed hands 
and an offer of the remaining 
shares will be announced next 
week. 

In primers, McCorquodale 
gained 24p to 205p after a 
press suggestion of an immi- 
nent bid from Norton Opax. 
S&W Berisford, in receipt of 
an approach from Italian com- 
modity group Ferruzzi. added 
'9p to 202p on tbe disclosure 
that Hillsdown Holdings, Ip 
lower at 210p, bad acquired a 
5.95 per cent stake. 

A 78 per cent earnings 
expansion boosted Derek 
Crtroch 1 6p to 1 56p. Burnett & 
Hallamsbire, suspended at 
20p last July, returned at 15p. 

Molins improved lip to 
174p as BAT Industries sold 
its 29.9 per cent holding at 
170p. Recently a management 
buy-out at that price foiled by 
a small majority. 

Racal lost 2p to 198p in 
spite of the chairman's denial 
of money-raising intentions. 


RECENT ISSUES 


Klearfold (1 18p) 116 

Lexicon (11Sp) 2000 

Macro 4 (I05p) 143 dn 2 


Merivafe Moore (1 15p) 
Microsystems (127p) 135 

Norank Sys (90p) 100 

Really Usefun (330p) 368 

SAC Inti (IQOp) 130 up 1 

SPP (125p) 157 

(21 5p) — 218 up 2 

Sigmex (101p) 88 

Snowdon & B (97p) 112 up 2 
Spice (80p) 92 up 3 

Tech Comp (130p) 214 


71 

49 dn 2' 
263 


3) 125 

135 
100 
368 
130 up 1 
157 
218 up 2 
86 


ip (130p) 


92 up 3 
214 


APPOINTMENTS 


AMEV (UKV. Mr Peter 
Howell has joined tbe board. 

Bishopsgate Insurance: Mr 
Peter Howell, Mr Pim 
Nanninga and Mr Jan 
Scherphnis have joined the 
board. 


Telemetrix, which reports 
next week, rallied 8p to 98p. 
Among other electronics, VG 
Instruments at 378p and UEI 
276p advanced aroirod 9p. 
Profit taking clipped 8p from 
Amstrad at 362p and 6p from 
J Crowther at l2Sp. 

Motor distributors contin- 
ued to reflect the bumper 
profits from T Cowie, up 25p 
to I45p, whose shares were 
also helped by the planned 
flotation of its financial ser- 
vices division. 

Armstrong Equipment at 
1 1 Ip, Appleyard at 106p and 
Brumal! 260p were among 
those to advance 7p to 1 7p but 
Godfrey Davies gave up 8p to 
12Sp. 

In chemicals, revived bid 
rumours excited W Canning 
at lOOp up 7p. Holt Lloyd 
hardened 3p to 87p helped by 
press comment The IBA's 
strong stance against Rank's 
bid for Granada left Rank 8p 
lower at 514p. 

AC Cars, a shell situation, 
climbed lOp to I S3p. Have- 
lock Europa added 7p more to 
243p on the recent expansion 
moves. 

First National Finance 
eased 4p to 188p following 
confirmation of the acquisi- 
tion of TCB from P&O for 
£47.5 million. 

Insurances presented a drab 
picture after Thursday’s rather 
disappointing results from 
Royal 8p down at 36Sp. 
General Accident at 823p and 
Commercial Union, 275 p. 
both reporting next Wednes- 
day dipped 8p . 

Revised takeover hopes ex- 
cited Aitken Hume at 1 69p up 


Underwoods (180p) 185 dn 2 

Wellcome <120p) 171 '2 

W York Hosp (90p) 80 

(140p) — 146 tin 1 

RIGHTS ISSUES 

Cray Elec F/P 290 dn 2 

Hartwells N/P 3 * 

Peel HWgs F/P 475 

Porter Chad F/P 3 

Safeway UK £43 up *4 

Stormguard F/P 20 up 2 

Wales N/P 25 up 1 

Westland N/P 13 up 8 


Morphy Richards: Mr Jim 
rqrfmnn has been appointed 
sales and marketing director. 

Charles Barker Lyons: Mr 
Laurie Ward is appointed 
director of sponsorship and 
television. 


4p but Exco slipped 5p to 
239p awaiting -the result of 
merger talks with Morgan 
Grenfell. 

A 45 per cenl profit increase 
prompted a 1 Op rise in' Wil- 
liam Bedford at HOp. In 
contrast Dewey Warren 
slumped 3Sp to 128p after at 
15 per cenl shortfall. Jebsens 
Drilling at 1 2p recouped-7p of 
Thursday's late fall that fol- 
lowed news of heavy losses. 

Rights issue news clipped 
4p from KLP Group at*300p 
and 2p from John Kent at 8 1 p. 
Berkeley Group was hoisted 
20p to 350p on press .com- 
ment Polytechnic Electric lost 
ISp to 220p although profits 
were well up to expectations. 

Good Relations picked up 
5p to 128p on recovery pros- 
pects. Dwek Group at* 57p 
gave back 6p after Thursday's 
acquisition news. Reed Inter- 
national put on 5p to 807p on 
the sale of a subsidiary.' to a 
Dutch Bank. 

Irish banks were buoyant 
with Allied Irish at 243p up 
18p. In supermarkets perenni- 
al takeover favourite -Nor- 
mans Group added 3Vip to 
82'/:p. Raine Industries eased 
3p to 38'/’p as Con-mech 
Engineering reduced its stake. 

• February has been a 
record month for the traded 
options market. With an -aver- 
age of around 1 9,000 contracts 
a day the total for the month is 
nearly 383,000. Gilts contracts 
totalled 14,599 during the 
month, the FT-SE 25,681 and 
currencies 62151. 

Most active in company 
contracts were Lonrho. and 
Imperial Group, dealers said. 

MAIN PRICE CHANGES 


RISES: 

UKO int 196p +14 

Newman Tonks I30p +13 

Pilkmgton 435p + 7 

D Crouch I56p +16 

MoTins 174p+11 

Gtynwed 313p + 6 

Telemetrix 98p + 8 

VG Instruments 37Bp + 8 

T Cowie 145p +25 

Appleyard I06p +13 

B ram all 260p +17 

S W Berisford 202 p + 9 

Laura Ashley 230p +26 

■Home Charm 354p +66 

AG Stanley 81p + 7 

Richards 63p + 7 

W Canning lOOp + 7 

Ho« Uoyo87p + 3 
ICI 927p +10 

FALLS: 

Raine Inds 38Kp - 3 

Beatson Clark 186p -12 

Boots 230p - 4 

Ward White 274p - 8p 



Throw away fewer widgets 


and make more 


ondulicks. 







Tor manufacturers, the equation is simple: fewer rejects 
equals more profits. Simple to understand, and probably simpler 
** to achieve than youthink. 

Fbr instance, using gas as a fuel in your production process 
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better end product altogether. 

That’s because gas is the dean, effident, high quality fuel. 
It’s also economical to use, giving significant savings in fuel costs. 
This can result in increased productivity, a lower unit cost 
and greater profitability. 

Butthat'snotthe end of the story. 

With the advances made by modem technology 
in the past few years, gas is more versatile and effid- 
s d| I ent than ever, and even simpler to maintain. 

J : ! = v ^ Converting to gas can be a matter of just chang- 

n '£ k ingthebumerinyourexistingsystem. 

B LUnf Or we can help you develop a whole new manu- 

Mj il facturing process, with the assurance of plentiful 

! I supplies of gas long into the future. 

Bpf % , j Even a major investment in gas can pay for itself 

ijj in no time at all with the day to day savings in miming 

jfj f f> 11 costs it will make. 

k ip s I And your competitors could end up paying too, 
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jJ I 





STRY 


Minimum subscription exceeded 

" over £ 3M ALREADY SUBSCRIBED 


: BUSINESS EXPANSION SCHEME 

; GLADDING SECURED CONTRACTORS PLC 

« . (Company Number 1926836) 

■ ' OFFER FOR SUBSCRIPTION 

’ _ Sponsored By 

CHANCERY SECURITIES PLC 

(Licensed Deaton " SeeunMS) 

' The Company has been described as being “possibly tha 

- pick of the bunch" and "head and shoulders above the 

■ rear by a specialist financial magazine. 

Business -A bidding contractor waking mainly for property 

* development cfients. offering deferred payment terms whereby 
, all or part of the contract price will tie paid after buftfing work 

t has been completed. Amounts due will be secured, normally 
. by a mortgage over land and buildings. Property 
: devetopmen! c&ents will benefit from an improved cash flow 
, and so building contracts win be at higher prices with higher 
’ gross margins. 

Over 20% p.a. pre lax return on sharehokJers’ fund is 

* anticipated m the medium term. 

The M an agement Team have many years of actual 

- experience in the property development and building 

; industries. Their main reward comes from maximising net 
asset growth to the benefit of shareholders. Maxwefl Creasey 
‘ (non-executive Chairman) recently retired from being Deputy 
Managing Director of MEPC pic. 

. Tax Relief -The Company began trading in September 
1385 and so Investors should receive their tea relief . 
certificates without delay. 

65% Loan Farilfty- Appropriate subscribers need only pay 
35% of their investment (pius documentation fee). 

NEXT ALLOTMENT DATE - BY TUESDAY 18th MARCH 
1986 -BUDGET DAY 

Offer extended to 30th April 1 986 (unless over subscrfijed), 
thus enabling investors lo decide in which tax year they wish to 
seek tax ratieL 


THE TIMES SATURDAY MARCH 1 1986 


FRIENDLY 

SOCIETIES 


s Financial journalists often recommend FrwndlySodetles as ideal 
| forsavers because BUILDING SOCIETYSAViNCS EARN m MORE 
» WHEN INVESTED THROUGH A FRIENDLY SOCIETY. Homeowners, 

I the largest, invests £100 million on behali of 170,000 savers. 

Thereare tax free monthly andannual savings plans and attractive 

I lump sum schemes (1500 or £1000) to choose from. 

Your savings could be earning I3.09°o pa. tax free f 17-27°t» gross 

I equivalent).’ Clip the ad and send for details TO DAY (w ithout 
obligation) to: Homeowners Friendly Society FREEPOST. 

B „ <We promise no salesman th:«mz 3 i sant t2< nm 

■ will call). mh Wwywifrrt TS0103P 


MR MRS UtXS 

IKLlKki amal-'l 


nwrcopE 

‘4fiW'niridiwn^ nttr^ r u Mrtrtr\tb‘*n nst* roi pawn 


l TAX FREE HIGH 
I RETURN SAVINGS 


|| RETURN SAVINGS | 


FIRST RETAIL STORES PLC 

UP TO £5.000.000 

THE COMPANY HAS BEEN FORMED TO CREATE 
A DIVERSIRED RETAIL GROUP 
TRADING UNDER FRANCHISE FROM 
PREMISES WHICH f T WILL OWN. 

• Trading risks reduced by the use of franchising 

• Asset Backed 

• Management investing £140,000 pari passu with 
investors 

• No Directors or promoters privileges - Directors 
rewards only performance related after shares 
have increased by 61% 

• Tax Relief available in both1985/86&1386/7 

• Loan Facilities available 


To obtain a prospectus please complete coupon and said la 


| Robert Fraser* Partners Limited 
| 29 Albemarle Street, London W1X 3FA 
■ orPhone. 01-200 0200 (24bre-Maysl 


Sponsored by 



I Licensed Dealer in Securities TT, ft 
Tins advertisement is not an tmniafton to purchase shares. 


L I I I l — »- ■ » l -L I I 1 


Robert Fraser 
& Partners 
Limited 


Edited by Lorna Bourke 


New is better — 
at least in 
UK unit trusts 

■ An old investment theory of many 
a unit-trust portfolio manager is that new 
funds, because they are small, can 
deal actively and can always out-perform 
the okJ-estabfished trusts. Kent 
Seager, an investment adviser, has been 
testing this theory and it seems borne 
out, at least in the UK. 

Mr Seager, from Whitachurch Securi- 
ties. said: “The results for tne UK were 
little short of amazing, with 90 per 
cent of the funds beating the average. 
The bulk of them were in the top 25 
per cent a good number were in the top 
10 per cent and the actual winner was 
often a new fund. 

“We confined our research to the 
new funds launched in 1984 and 1985 and 
looked at a8 new trusts investing in 
the UK, North America Japan and the 
international sectors. We monitored 
them over their first six and 12 months of 
Bfe. In the overseas sectors the re- 
sults were less spectacular but still very 
good. Among the US, Japan and 
General International funds, nearly two- 
thirds were above average oversee 
months write after 12 months, over 80 
per cent were above average." 

Using his research. Mr Seager has 
come up with the idea of a new funds 
portfolio, designed to take advantage 
ol this better performance. Details from 
Mr Seager at Whitachurch Securities, 
Freepost, Teddington TWU 8BR (Tel: 01 
977 8951). 

A 200% rise? 

, ■ Would you like to know how tb 
double the pension you could expect to 
receive at retirement age without any 
extra cost? The information can be found 
in a pensions survey which reviews 
the performance of all personal pension 
plans over the last five years, 
highlighting the fact that the difference 
between having the best-performing 
pension plan compared with the worst 
can be a 200 percent increase in the 
pension paid at retirement age. 

1 Copies of the pension survey are 


FAMILY MONEY/1 


jlMimCSOCGTY 

w \ cmcm> 



directors are pterifting toseekBiyxilB on 
the unlisted securities market tors 
year. 

Knowledge share 

M Shareholders who acqui red * *a sfa 

for investment by . 

Telecom, Laura As^andothww 
issues might want to impro w e ; » 
knowledge of share ownersh ip py 
ZZZESona of two short everang ses- 




write to the magazine at 8a West 
Smith field, London ECIA9JR. or 
phone 01 2484016. 

On a plate 

■ The idea of getting something - 
for nothing never loses its charm and 
shareholder perks - freebies or dis- 
counts given to those who hold a certain 
company's shares - are no excep- 
tion. 

Latest up-market offer comes from 
Limoges Porcelains Limited, the French- 
based fine china producer, which is 
offering Limoges Porcelains at factory 
prices tor those who have 1,000 or 
more shares. 

The shareholder simply selects the 
items required from the catalogue sup- 
plied, completes the order form and 
sends it with a cheque. For example, a 
45-piece dinner service costs the 
shareholder £340, compared with the re- 
tail price of £400. if your stockbroker 


aon 1 -uiyiov... — _ . 

Entitled Getting A Better ParforrnfflTce 
From Your investments, they fflti topro- 
vKje the necessary background to 
successful share ownership. 

Full details of the courses, which take 
place on April 22 and 24 canbe obtained 1 

a^^rasSSf-*. 

EC2M 6SCL The fee is E25a bead. 

Nest egg 

■ Income bonds paying a guar- 
anteed 9.5 per cent net of basic rate-fax 
are on offer from General Portfolio 
Life. You can invesr for one to four years 
and monthly income is available tor 
sums of £5,000 or more. 

Those who do not require income can 
go for guaranteed capital growth, in 
which case a £1,000 investment wffl 
grow to be worth £1.432 at the end of a 
four-year term. Full details from Gen- 
eral Portfolio Life. Vafley House. 
Crossbrook Street Cheshunt _ 

Hertfordshire EN8 8JH (tel: Waltham 
Cross 31971). 


Lloyds change 


iZMfl. If you would like a copy simply . 


has difficulty getting hold of shares for 
you, mention that they are quoted in 
Vancouver but dealings lake place under 
Stock Exchange Rule 535(4). The 


■ From March 10. free iJ-in -credit 
banking is introduced by Lloyds Bank 
while those customers who cannot 
keep in the black will have their bank 
charges calculated on a monthly 
rath er than quarterly basis. 

This means that if they are overdrawn 
for, say. just a week, they wifi incur bank " 
charges for only one month rather 
than three. Even if you do overdraw, it 
may still be possible to avoid bank 
charges. 

Customers who maintain an average 
credit balance lor the month of £500 wffl 
still not notch up bank charges. 


ONE STOP SHOPPING 
FROM SAVE & PROSPER 


Your restaurant dream may have to wait 





Owning a pah, small hold or newspaper shop 
is the retirement dream of many. The 
difficulty is often In finding the right business 
for sale, at the right price and m the right 
area. 

The sale price of newsagendes has gone np 
by almost 25 per cent in fire last 12 months, 
according to specialist valuers Christie & Co 
the leading firm of business agents. 

Christie's review says: “There has been a 
continued and increasing demand for 


newsagendes in all sectors of the market and 
prices have dramatically increased owing to 
the relative lack of supply a trend we fed wffl 
combine through 1986.” 

Anyone wanting to buy or sefi a hotel, res- 
taurant, retail shop or other small businesses 
can get a package service from Christie Sk Q» 
to cover everything from stock valuation to 
fixtures and fittings. Finance can also be 
arranged as part of the package. Christie St 
Co. is at 32 palter Street l4»draWlM2BU. . 


Savc& Prosper would like to open the doors on 
Masterfund. 

The newest type of investment for capital growth 
that's designed to give you the best of a whole range of 
different unit trusts. 

from just one investment. 


^ f lI - verVee 1 ^ 1 (OR THE ONLY UNIT TRUST 

YOU’LL EVER NEED.) 


Far from being just one more unit trust 
investing in one more area. Save & Prospers 
Masterfund is one of the first unit trusts to 
invest among other unit trusts. 

27 of them, in fact, making up one of the widest 
and most comprehensive investment ranges there is. 

1,400 different securities traded in 25 different 
countries - covering everything from investment trusts 
to Japanese smaller companies. And, (for those who 
like safety in numbers,) including some of the largest 
foods there are. 

NO SHOPPING AROUND. 

So, instead of you having to shop around 
deriding which of the hundreds of unit trusts to put 
your money in - and when to take it out again - you can 
leave it to our Masterfund experts to make (and take) 
the decisions. 

(The same experts, incidentally, who as part of 
one of Britain's largest unit trust group, handle 
millions every day.) 

From start to finish they 71 be switching your 
money into those of our trusts they think are on the 


way up. And safely out of any that look at risk. 

All without charging you one new penny in 
switching fees. 

BUILDING SOC1ET1 ES Z T^ 1 Z Z 

There’s a couple of other reasons for stopping off 
at Save & Prosper for your financial shopping too. 
(Points of interest you could say.) 

Investment in even the average Save & Prosper 
unit trust over the last five years* would have been 
worth 59% more than in a building society ordinary 
share account. 

And 74% more than in a seven day bank deposit 

account. 

So while you should leave short term savings 
lying quietly within reach, it's paid 
to date to put tong-term 
savings out to work. 


\ A PRICE TAG 

/ TO FIT THE BILL, 

You can Invest in Masterfund from as little as 
£250 or from £20 a month. 

You should remember, of course, that the price 
of units and any income from them can go down as 
well as up. 

Just complete the coupon or talk to your 
professional advisee. Or 'phone us for free on 
0800 282 101 for more information. 

And see why Masterfund 's got it all -in one. 


*«Hst January | 86 i ^ ^ 


Raising the wind 

Dearden Farrow is in the business of corporate finance and our experts 
have the experience and specialist knowledge to enable companies to 
raise additional capital. Of the right type, at the right level at the right • 
time. 

Each company is unique and its requirements liable to change, so 
that there will be no standard method We examine available alternatives 
- including the different forms of flotation, and brief clients as to the most 
suitable. Our financial advice is impartial therefore we work well 
alongside other professional advisers. 

Our corporate finance advisers can be contacted through any of our 
offices throughout the country 

Dearden Farrow, 1 Serjeants' Inn, London EC4Y 1JD. 

Telephone: 01-353 2000Telex: 8812282 DEFA G. j 


AV 


Deirden Farrow 

in the business of creating a future 'syFw&r 
/Or* <&/ 





rrsyyw if? 


mi cTi,* o • 






(Company No. 1886359) 


FURTHER DETAILS 


OBJECTIVE w p rar rt f ■ portfolio IhbM w telrty « Sm A Anpcr 
MbHuriwinn. 

PRICES JU*D YIELD TT»e* wrqmtcd daft, la leading nailml papm. 

IflM fchnu B w fc OHM attp a 2? Op 1*1 iJiJIeiwi ibc 

Cd nnBJ pawmniy>nM»«JII»Vp». 

DEALING IN UNITS Itata narmalh be hufki or nld oa an, mU^ dn 

CcmfKaiet wdt nmlh btfcnwM oukan W*m. WlmuuuiuUtack 

lo UK Maurm, pnMtf a am*% mmOm wtitun 7 dap s t M r mdriag 
.NET INCOME DOTRIHJTKM taw> awl JIm lot, ckA jtm [hn tut; 

jWa 

'CHARGES MU etafBe: phi * MmUnf adfrMMMI ** nnmffnt Ac 

lover dr*« J. per uut. otnd) n lacluJrd m Uw offer prtee M ourt. No 
BiUuletarpr of roondrap «djMjnn,i •* he iMrtaArd Mthr al itm* mhc, m 

.llw ■oOctH,«jI funds .Underfund pnnnain >■■■■■■ msn If ion 

!n«Uk sa rrdnml eia br pwd lo rwhmvf pfoTailOMl adrarn. Aiinl 
.chdtr I % of if* solar nf I hr Fuad phn v*T fwirti o penamrO ooaxma of I ' i% 
n» liner mvailti'HoiKCL Thu I* deducted Inalh (tuuj'i J&jrta to Mel 
.MUaugrrs 1 dpsnscs. lOvludmr Trotter ■> hr,. Thr rwr oi charpr m^Unfrifiiad 
wtUCMtsMnndini itrroed a — m lcharp; opptaaMe BIN uadC^WtfBWla 1 
Md al ibc dared iNc H^bff nasi jwiiuI <4u>sea oar cob ulMed. 

MEEUIWPOS The Fund h omJioriwd b* ihc Srorun of SUM far Trade ft 

.ImlnH's The Tntsrer t» Bank slScuUaod. 

MANflUERS Sow ft Prsnprr Seeunnet Lmund. I Funhay Aa iw. Umdoa 
ECiM JUT. tkph*Jnr SI-SM I7|T \ (OdtOu of ibr L na TrnU AnadatToa 


To: Save A Prosper Securities Lid. FREEPOST. Romford RM I !B(L 
Telephone: MoMyfriac0800 282 101 . Presiel *481 28*. 

Plesfte send me detaite of saving In i— “» 
Mruferfundfrom£20anonUi L I 


Sanunnel MtfMnMtu) 


( wish lo invest £. (maunttun £250 initially. £100 

subsequently) hi Save A Prosper Masterftmd at the offer price 
prevailing on (he day of receipt of my application. 

I enclose a cheque made payable to Saw & Prosper Securities 
Limited. I am over 18. 

I would like distributions of income to he reinvested in the 
purchase of further units. * 

**J«*r if yoavnaft Araocnw oa*rp*d duict (b%ob. 


Exiuion Account No ilfanvi 


213 FOR OFFICE USE ON LV 

6IPA6/BA |r.R. R.A. C.C./No. 

ThnottnasaoloMtaMrrarsNhaNofiftrffcpDWcarirgimd hca-iaSuxiood 
NO. 1*0 hf. Use- Offfet- ton J I.hjrm Siren. tCmtantP tMl 4N\ 


Britain^ newest investment idea. 


OFFER FOR SUBSCRIPTION 

Under the 

BUSINESS EXPANSION SCHEME 

Sponsored by 

CHANCERY SECURITIES PLC 

. (Licensed Dealers (n Securities) 

of op to 1,400,000 Ordinary Shares of 50p eadi at £l per Share 

fates tors rn the Comptmy ore offered: 

★ Ownership of a major West End theatre - an bnporantand suhcrmtiai - 

policy is ro fearure tn^or sora for limited runs prior tv> ^^- The production 

End. Suitable plan's wifl be filmed 6x TV and SS 

★ AndiwTreagus.QtiefBtecurrve, who has extensive exnerfenrwerf^-- , 

productions, including "A Chores Liner “Daisy Pulls End 

★ Investor benefits (foe those holding 2,500 slum or ^PfessT - 

bookings and the opportunity to arcend first night parties! mC ^ din ® fiiscziight 

★ Income ^ Tax relief of up to 60%. Provisional BES tax approralhashrw,,^.- j 

★ Pro(hs ofabout £425 ,000 before tax in the third year^^rdinr S * , ^i n0 ^ lainet ^ 

projections (which do nor constitute a profit forecast)'. ^ Mcoraing^ to dluatrative profit 

★ A substantial investment ofover£L4mar par by the Band and th«r 

INITIAL ALLOTMENTS 

BYTUEJUMY ; Toi Otamcrr Sccurtet. PLrt. ■> v— 1 

I8th MARCH 1986- 1 Te4ephe»e= 01.2 4 J iS61 S *****.^ ***** WON ZNw I 

SSSt* ' ' i 

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Vth Afml tmeven cm J ~ ■ — ■ 

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THE. 


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1 198< 


FINANCE AND INDUSTRY 


FAMILY MONEY/2 


Oil funds in 


, fflfls nvA 

Aff-MML'WJ' / , 

cm? IcAfiEs} 
■ ) 


C investment 

The oil price fell below SI4 a 
barrel this week taking oil 
shares down with it though by 
the end of ibe week it had 
recovered to $14.50. ' 

When energy costs quadru- 
pled after the Six-Day War. 
the West was aghasi. It was all 
definitely bad news. 

Now that oil is becoming 
progressively cheaper it seems 
ihe news is just as awfoJL 
Forget those Budget tax -cuts, 
we arc told, and if we have any 
lime left after worrying about 
the mortgage payments we 
might worry about the plight 
of sterling on the foreign 
exchanges. Protecting a weak 
pound would probably mean- 
higher i merest rales, and in 
time even bigger instalments 
on the house loan. 

But is cheaper oil bad news? 

Perhaps, there is money lo- 
be made. The best time to buy 
is often after the price has 
plummeted. What goes up 
often comes down.' and vice 
versa. The canel of oil-pro^ 
during countries. Opec. has 
effectively controlled world 
oil prices for the past 12 years. 
But failure on the part of the 
cartel to agree production 
quotas and a standard price 
per barrel has seen the oil price 
slide. 

Next in line were shares in 
oil companies, and that : in 
tum means unit trusts invest- 
ing in those companies have 
suffered. The table shows that 
the energy and commodity 
sector has seen some sad 
losses as well as startling gains.. 


mainly m gold share funds, 
during -die past month. The 
worst affected have Been oil 
unit trusts. -The .important 
question is where they will go 
from here. • 

Peter Holland of County 
Bank takes a gently optimistic 
view of the shbn-ienh pros- 
pects: “The Saudis may have 
had too great a psychological 
impact on the - market when 
they said they would increase 
production - until they had 
shaken everyone into line. We 
may therefore see a small, 
temporary correction in oil 
.share prices.” • ■ .. 

"Brian O’Neil of Gartmore is 

even more circumspect about 

Final extinction . 
is possible 

potential profits after the falls. 
'The background for oils is far 
from encouraging, and al- 
though a fair amount of bad 
news for the oil market has 
been discounted, and reflected 
in a lower price, there may be 
more to lake account of. It will 
be two or three months at least 
before things settle — if they 
settle.” 

The cause of all. ihe uncer- 
tainty is the demise of Opec. 
Despite the drastic losses su£ 
fered by oil unit trusts there is 
no guarantee that the funds 
will recover. “In the energy- 
sector h is now unsafe to read' 
the oil price as meaning 
anything at all until a new 
pricing mechanism is fixed,” 
says Mr Foster. 


COMMODITY AND ENERGY FUNDS 

- cTHE BEST 


Over One Month 

M&GGokJ 
& General 
. +34.6% . . 

Britannia Gold 
- & General 

+32.7% 

Schroder 

Gold 

+26A% 


Over One Month 
Britannia 
Universal Energy 
-5.4% 

Atlanta 

World Energy - 
-5.8% 

Gartmore Oil 
& Energy 
-6 J% 

Soum Ptarmd Sating* 


Over Qne Year 

.s&p 

-Exploration 
*14 .2% 
M1MGOW& 
Precious Metals 
+& 8 % 

MSG Gold 
& General 
-*5.1% 

THEWORST 

. Over One Year : 
Target 
Commodity 
-19.6% 

- Brit a n nia 
Universal Energy 
-27.2% 

Sentinel Energy 
.& Resources 
. _ -32.1% 


' Over Five Years 
Britannia Gold 
& General 
+48.0% 

Affied Dunbar 
Mineral & Commotfity 
+45.9% . 

Target 
Commodity 
+36.1% . 


Over Five Years 
Sentinel Energy 
A Resources 
-21.9% 

Target Universal 


Britannia 
Universal Energy 
-44.5% 


Martin Ruscoe of 
. Britannia’s Universal Energy 
fund agrees: “Because of the 
time lag between production 
and supply we're into lower, 
warm weather demand for 
oil, The fact is that at the 
moment there is more oil 
than there are buyers.” 

That fact is extremely 
unpalatable for energy fund 
managers, and their response 
has been clever. Many have 
expanded the meaning of the 
term “energy” to areas less 
dependent on the price of oiL 

You may be wondering, for 
example, why the lower oil 
price has not translated into 
significantly lower petrol 
prices. The short answer is 
that companies such as BP 
are making lots of money by 
selling cheap stock at high 
prices. So when the Oil price 
rails, the retailers, and their 
shareholders, benefit. 

Stocks such as BP are a 
refuge for oil and energy 
trusts, and have been for 
some time. A year ago Peter 
Ho lland moved a fifth of 
County Energy Trust’s 
money into companies which 
buy energy and retail petrol 
or electricity. Virtually all 
foods have been moving into 
retailing and utilities to 
protect themselves from a 
wild card oil price. 

The final extinction of 
these funds, launched to take 
advantage of the mid-1970s 
boom in commodities and oil 
is entirely possible. Dilan 
Evans of Target's Energy 
Fund says that at best the 
unit price will be “treading 
water rather than making 
money”. And the prognosis 
of the fund, which features at 
the wrong end of our table, is 
for from good. 

This may be the exception 
rather than the rule — the 
nosedive without the recov- 
ery. Yet there are arguments 
in fovour of keeping a 
holding in oils. World de- 
• mand is not going to dry up, 
and petrol consumption in 
the United States has been 
creeping steadily back np in 
recent years. In the long term 
it may not be a bad bet 

Martin Baker 


FRAMLBNGTON 

r uisrr trust-, 
I GUIDE I 

I For a five copy of out 
l 1986 Guide, with full 
I details of our top- j 

I perjbnning funds and I 
| both lump-sum and j 
] monthly investment, I 
j simply send this I 
j coupon. 1 

I lb- FRAMLXNGTONi 
| FREEPOST LONDON JEC2B 2DL. | 


30 DAY SHARE 

9 - 151 - ra&n-xriE 


90 DAY SHARE 


Ifinmum bveunaani £500 


Name ... 

Address 


....... , 


l - 


MB*= in-n 4 &= 14 - 34 *ld 

3 YEAR SHARE 

««-»«£ H 44 & 

fUom flquhahwi »w w» W T«»wii tofcwfrt h»«lina« T— 

/5?S\ BcadOBfac 178 loodon Ro«L Worth End, Po*t»nionthP62 BBS. 
|U| . JApfcoM {0705) f yoil 

{Rrtsmonth Bi Whig Society 








Yr»rtn Nos months 

ye*ir to 30 September 3 oJL» 30 ^ 7 nbB 


* Investment policy- ^ to 30 September 

changed to one of income 1987-L.p. 

growth through invest- • Introduction of quar- 


ment in sharesof British terlydi^dend payment, 

companies withanabove commencing June ly&b. 
averse yield. .Ivoo'&Sime. ^pointed. 

• forecast dividend for managers. 

. n tOR y & s fi 

V ?L'SLJC iiMJTEDCOMRVNY 


WK 

T.-N+'.V .. 

2 Sll 

+>*: V- 

• •jdr 


DIVIDEND PROJECTIONS 

•forujJ 



®ctvf\T MANAGEMENT WORLDWIDE. 

^1 A 5 r cn|\HI ’UGH F.H 2 +DZ TELEPHONE ifll-22S 135“ 

r* 7" ~~r~cZZ Ch^fott^Square, Edinburg EH2 4DZ1 Please send me a copy] 

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) s\xib 


THE TIMES SATURDAY MARCH 1 198 


Framlington personal Pensions are underwritten by Framlington Life Insnrance Limited, a member of Framlington Gronp pic. The policies have been appcowed by the Intend ^ 

Revenue under Sections 226 and 226A of the Income and Corporation Taxes 1970 (as amended), framlipgton Group pk is primarily an investment company specialising in unit 

trusts, with funds under management of over £360 million and over 65,000 investors. 

FRAMLINGTON PERSONAL PENSIONS 

A 100 per cent investment in Framlington unit trusts 


* , «.,f 


.*1 'l ■ 


■ 

,«* .t 

' 

• • •. A ' 

4d v 

: * - ■ - 


I F YOU HAVE A NON-PENSIONABLE JOB you can invest in 
the Framlington Pensions Managed Fund of Framlington unit 
trusts and have your investment fully allowed against tax. 

You can invest either through a single premium ( minimum £500 ) 
or through monthly premiums (minimum £50 per month). 

Either way, the whole of your investment goes to buy units. There 
are no additional charges. 

TOUR INVESTMENT 

The Pensions Managed Fund was formed in January 1985 to provide 
a balanced selection of Framlington unit trusts chosen and managed 
Si* with the aim of achieving maximum total return over the long 
term. The proportions in the different trusts are varied continuously, 
Jsat on 25th February 1986 were as follows: 


American & General Fund 

16-5 percent 

American Turnaround Fund 

7-3 per cent 

Capital Trust 

12-1 percent 

Convertible & Gilt Trust 

7-3 percent 

European Fund 

5-0 per cent 

Extra Income Trust 

6*4 per cent 

Income Trust 

7-2 percent 

International Growth Fund 

20-3 percent 

Japan & General Fund 

11-1 percent 

Recovery Trust 

6-8 per cent 


- The value of the Fund was £3-8 million and the price of units 
| was 61 -Op, up 22 percent from the initial offer price of 50p. 

£ The strong international diversification of the fund reflects 
^ Framlingtons belief that for secure growth a wide spread of invest- 
^ ments is essential. Within the underlying funds 41% is currently 
invested in Britain, 39% in North America, 5% in continental 
Europe and 15% in Japan. 

The quality of Framlington investment management is high: a 
f* recent Planned Savings survey of unit trust groups in the 1980’s 
shows that of the 22 groups with five funds or more at the start 
of the decade, Framlington has had the best average performance 
(+268-2% to 1st January 1986). 

You can also invest through Framlington Personal Pensions in the 
individual Framlington unit trusts. Details are available on request 
from Framlington Life. 


HOW YOUR POLIO' WORKS 

• The main features of Framlington 
! Ftrsonal Pensions are as follows: 

; I. If you take out a single 

premium Personal Pension, you do 
■ not commit yourself to more than 

; one payment. 

• 2. If you take out a monthly 

I premium plan, you can stop it at any 
’ time without penalty (after you 

t have invested at least £ 1 ,000 in total ) 

• and you can also increase or decrease 
your contribution at any rime. 

• 3- You can make investments at 
| any age under 75. Ybu can take up 

• your benefits at any time between 

• age 60 and age 75. 

i 4. You can take all your benefits 

\ as a pension or use part of your 

. accumulated fund to provide a 

tax-free cash sum on your 
j retirement , as you v ish. 
i 5. The value of your pension 

' ( including the optional cash sum) will 

i always be the full value of the units 

j allocated to your Framlington Fteisonal 

j Pension. 

6. Contributions to Framlington 
; Personal Pensions an? normally fully 

j allowable against tax. The w hole 

j of your investment builds up free of all 

j income and capita] gains taxes. 

, Simplicity, flexibility, tax efficiency 

; and investment ability are all hallmarks 

; of the Framlington scheme. In 

'» addition, the scheme is exceptionally 

! cost-effect ive. There are no charges 

J apart from the charges within the 

> funds. 

i 

FOLLOWING THE PROGRESS OF 
; YOUR PENSION INVESTMENT 
} - With single premium Framlington 

i ^ Personal Pensions, your contributions 

will be invested in accumulation units 
J \c*f Framlington Pensions Managed 

1 "Fund at the offer price ruling on the 

. i day your Application Form and 

J " -.cheque are received. For monthly 
i ' premium Ftersonal Pensions, your first 
j -. contribution will be invested on the 
j ‘“allocation day (the 8th of the month) 
...after your Application Form and 
■ * cheque are received; subsequent 

J _ contributions will be invested on the 

j l 8th day of each month. 

; The prices of the Pensions Managed 

i - „ r Fund are calculated each working day 
! L and are published in several leading 

1 daily newspapers. Two prices are 

; shown : the offer price (at which units 

; are allocated to your Framlington 

| Personal Pension) and the bid price 

» (which is used to determine the value 

! of the units accumulated on vour 

J behalf). 

J You will be sent a statement each 

* year showing the number and value of 

; units allocated to your Framlington 

Ftersonal Pension. Managers’ reports 
i on the Framlington {tensions Managed 
\ Fund are published each year. 

e 

l SWITCHING BETWEEN FUNDS 

I Over the years investment conditions 

: change and you may feel that you w ish 

; to change the investment links for 

\ your Framlington n Personal Pension. 

• In particular, when you are approaching 
^-/etirement. you might wish to switch 

jjj|| the Framlington Pensions Cash 


Fund which is invested in bank 
deposits and other totally secure 
investments. This would ensure that 
you would not suffer from any 
. short-term fluctuations in the value of 
your accumulated pension fund 
immediately before your retirement. 
If you do decide to switch your 
policy! ies) to the Pensions Cash Fund, 
your existing units will be valued (at 
bid price) and this value will be 
applied to secure units in the Pensions 
Cash Fund at the price ruling on the 
day your instructions are received. 

If you switch to a unit trust (from 
. the Pensions Managed Fund, another 
unit trust, or the Pensions Cash 
Fund), the existing units will be 
valued at bid price and the units of the 
new Trust will be allocated at the offer 
price ruling on the day vour 
instructions are received, less a 
discount of 3%- 

It should be noted that Framlington 
reserves the right to vary the discount 
at any time in the future or to impose a 
charge for switching to the Pensions * 
Cash Fund. 

INCREASING OR REDUCING 
YOUR CONTRIBUTIONS 
With single premium Framlington 
Personal Pensions, you do not commit 
yourself to more than the one 
payment. Your policy continues 
automatically until you decide to start 
drawing the benefits - any time 
between your 60rh and 75th birthdays 
- without further action from you. If 
you wish to pay further contributions, 
you can simply take out additional 
single premium Framlington Personal 
Pensions at any time. 

With monthly premium Fram- 
lington Personal Pensions, you can 
increase your regular monthly con- 
tribution to any amount, or decrease it 
(but not below the minimum of £50) 
at any time. You can also pay in 
additional single premiums (minimum 
currently £100) when you start your 
plan or at any time subsequently 
Additional premiums will be invested 
on the first allocation day (the 8th of 
the month) after your cheque has been 
received. 

You can miss a regular monthly 
premium - but if more than three are 
missed consecutively, Framlington 
will have the right to make your policy 
“paid-up" and to refuse any further 
premiums. You can decide at any time 
that you do not want to pay any further 
premiums and make your policy 
paid-up: the units allocated to your 
policy will continue to grow in value 
until you decide to draw the benefits. 

If you make vour policy paid-up. or 
more than three monthly premiums 
are missed, before premiums totalling 
£1.000 have been paid, Framlington 
will have the right to impose a charge 
against the units allocated to the 
policy. This charge will not exceed 5% 
of the difference between £1.000 and 
the rotal of premiums paid. 

ELIGIBILITY 

You can invest in a Framlington 
Personal Pension if you have any 
earnings from non-pensionable 


Good retums....8mipIicity.,..proveii long 
term record.... 100 per cent from day one. 

When single premium Framlington Personal Pensions 
were introduced early in 1985, there was widespread 
favourable comment. 

The Financial Times said: “The plan is for the self- 
employed and employees in non-pensionable employment. 
It offers prospects of good returns , , because of its 
investment expertise and its low charging structure. ” 

i 

The Sunday Telegraph said: “Out have gone all 
those confusing sub-clauses and pointless extras which 
clutter up personal pensions. Out, too, have gone those 
nasty charges you need a magnifying glass to notice. ” 

The Observer said: “The chief selling-point of 
Framlingtons no-nonsense pension arrangements is that 
contributors will be investing for their retirement in 
unit trusts, most of which have a proven long-term track 
record of impeccable pedigree. " 

When we launched our monthly premium plan this 
year. The Times added: ‘ Fierce competition in the 
personal pensions market is good news for consumers - 
charges are coming down. The market leader in this field 
is fund managers Framlington .... whereas most pension 
plans allocate less than 100 per cent of premiums to 
investment , the Framlington plan gives you 100 per cent 
from day one." 


employment. You can therefore take 
out a Personal Pension if:- 

1 . You are self-employed. 

2. Ybur employer does not have a 
pension scheme. 

3. Ybur employer has a pension 
scheme but you are not a member of it. 

4. You are a partner in a partnership. 

5. You are the sole proprietor of a 
business. 

6. You have consultancy or other 
earnings (apart from your main 
income from employment) which are 
non-pensionable. 


HOW MUCH ARE YOU ALLOWED 
TO INVEST? 

The minimum investment is £500 for 
single premium framlington Ftersonal 
Pensions and £50 per month for 
monthly premium plans. The maxi- 
mum amount you can invest is laid 
down by Government legislation and 
is based on your "net relevant 
earnings”. These are your gross 
earnings (other than any earnings 
from emplcymem which carries pension 
rights), less expenses connected with 
running your own business -including 
stock relief and capital allowances. 

If you were born in 1934 or later 
you can contribute 1714% of your net 
relevant earnings to a personal 
pension plan. If you were born in 1933 
or earlier, you can make larger 
contributions as shown below 


Year of Birth 

1916-1933 
l9l4or 1915 
1912or 1913 
1911 


Age 

Under 25 
25-35 
35-45 
Over 45 


5% 

10 % 

15% 

I7fc% 


(If you were bom in 1933 or earlier 
you should invest the .maximum 
allowed.) 

TAX ADVANTAGES 
Investing in a personal pension plan 
has significant tax advantages over 
every other method of saving and 
investing. 

tax relief on contributions 

Provided your contributions fall 
within the rules you can obtain full 
income tax relief on them at the 
highest rate you currently pay Thus if 
you are a basic rate taxpayer, a 
contribution of £1,000 will in effect 
cost you only £700. If your top rate of 
rax is 60%, a contribution of £1,000 
should cost you only £400. 

Tax-free Investment growth 

Your contributions are invested by 
Framlington Life in units of Framlington 
unit trusts, through the Framlington 
Itensions Managed Fund. Unit trusts 
and pension funds are both exempt 
from capital gains tax. Pension funds 
are also exempt from income tax; 
Framlingron Life is therefore able to 
claim back and reinvest on your behalf 
the income tax charged on the income 
distributed by the unit trusts. 


Relevant Earnings 

20 % 

21 % 

24% 

26V&% 


Thx-free cash sum on retirement 
Under current legislation you are 
entitled to cake a cash sum, which is 
completely free of tax, as part of your 
pension. 

THE BENEFnSON RETIREMENT 

No Pored Retirement Date 
Ybu can take the benefits from your 
Framlington ftersonal Pension at any 
time between the ages of 60 and 75; 
the latest date on which you are 
allowed by law to start drawing your 
pension is your 75th birthday. You do 
not have to decide on your retirement 
dare now. 

If you are in an occupation where 
the normal retirement age is below 
60, you can usually take your pension 
at this lower age, subject to Inland 
Revenue approval. 

You can also take the benefits 
earlier than age 60 if you have to retire 
early because of 31-health. 

• At whatever age you take the 
benefits, the full value of your 
accumulated fund will be made 
available to you. No deductions of any 
sort are made on early retirement. 

Pension and Cash Sum at 
' Retirement 

At retirement you can choose between 
using the whole value of yotir 
accumulated fund to provide a 
pension and taking part of the benefits 
as a tax-free cash sum, with the 
balance providing a pension. If you 
decide to take part of your benefits in 
cash, the amount must not be more 
than three times the annual pension 
provided by the remainder. 

Ybu may choose a pension of a fixed 
amount or one which starts at a lower 
level but escalates by a fixed 
percentage ( up to 10%) each yean Ybu 
can also choose between a pension for 
your lifetime alone, one guaranteed 
for 5 years and one which would 
continue to be paid to your widow (or 
widower) if you were to die first. 

The pension can be paid monthly, 
quarterly, halfyearfy or annually as 
you prefer Ybu also have a choice of 
who will actually provide the benefits: 

■ 1. Through the “Open Market 
Option". At retirement you can use 
the fund built up through your 
Framlington Personal Pension to 
purchase a pension at the best 
rates obtainable from any company 
in the market, 
or 

2. From Framlington Life. The 
rates available will depend upon 
conditions at the time and may not be 
as good as you would be able to obtain 
through the "Open Market Option". 

BENEFIT S ON D EATH BEFORE 
RETIREMENT 

The amount payable on death will be 
the full value (at bid price) of the units 
allocated to your policy. If you are 
under 55 it is possible to take out a 
single premium Framlington Personal 
Pension which provides guaranteed 
life assurance benefits - but with a 
3% deduction from the units allocated. 
Details are available from Framlington 
life. 


MANAGEMENT CHARGES 
100% of your contributions are 
invested on your behalf. There are no 
extra charges over and above the 
normal annual and initial charges for 

APPLICATION FORM 


the unit trusts, in which the Pensions 
Managed Fund is invested. 

The Trust Deed of each unit trust 
allows an annual charge of up to 1% 
(+ VAT ) of the value of the fund to be 
deducted from its income, although 
on funds invested wholly in the UK. 
the charge is currently only The 
in trig I charge, which is included in the 
offer price of the units, is 5%. 

There are at present no direct 
annual charges for the Framlington 
Pensions Managed Fund - although 
the normal annual charges are 
deducted for the unit trusts (or the 
Framlington Pensions Cash Fund - 
Vz%). The initial charge for the 
Itensions Managed Fund, which is 
included in the offer price of the units, 
is 5%; the prices of the Fund take 
account of the initial charges of the 
unit crusts * so there is no 
"double-charging". 

Commission of 1&% is paid to 
agents for single premium Framlington 
ftersonal {tensions. No commission is 
payable for monthly premium plans. 

LOAN FACILITIES 
Loan facilities can be provided by 
Courts Finance Co. Details are 
available on request. 

NOTES 

1 . This advertisement is based on 
framlington Life's understanding of 
legislation and Inland Revenue practice 
as at 1st February 1986. 

2. Framlington Life can take no 
responsibility for determining whether 
or not contributions to Framlington 
Etersonal Itensions fall within the eligi- 
bility limits for the individuals con- 
cerned. If you are in any doubt whether 
your contributions will attract tax 
relief, you should consult a professional 
advisee 

3. All allocations to units under 
the Framlington Personal Pension are 
notional ana merely for the purposes 
of determining the value of your policy: 
references to “investment" and 
“invested" should not be construed as 
conferring any right to the underlying 
units. • 

4. This advertisement is intended 
to provide information about Frara- 
lington Personal {tensions. Rights as 
between investors and Framlington 
Life will be governed solely by the 
terms of the policies. Specimen 
policy documents for Framlington 
Itersonal Itensions can be obtained 
from. Framlington Life Insurance 
Limited, 3 London Wall Buildings, 
London Wall, EC2M 5NQ. 

Ural trusts invest in securities with 
prices that fluctuate and you. should he 
aware that the price of units linked to 
Framlington Personal Pensions and 
the income from them reinvested on 
your behalf may go down as well as up. 

HOW TO APPLY 
Simply complete the Application 
Form and send it with your cheque for 
the single premium or your first 
contribution to a monthly premium 
plan to: 

fiamlington Life Insurance Limited, 

3 London Wall Buildings, London V&1L 

01*628 M8?M ^ e p! Jone No. 

The minimum investment is £500 
for single premium Personal Itensions • 
and £50 per month for monthly 
premium plans. 


Please send the completed form to Framlington Life Insurance Limited, 3 London Wall Buildings, London EC2M 5NQ. 


PROPOSER ( Please use Mock capiub) 
Sumaoie< Mr/Mrs/Miss/Tide) 


There are provisions for carrying 
back contributions to the preceding 
tax year and for carrying forward 
unused relief from up to six previous 
years to the current year. 


HOW MUCH SHOULD YOU 
INVEST? 

■ Because of the outstanding tax 
advantages, it can be argued that you 
should invest the maximum permitted 
every year. On the other hand, even 
with tax relief you may not be able to 
afford the maximum. 

If it were possible to make realistic 
projections it would be easier to 
suggest the amount you should invest. 
Many insurance companies do quote 
projections. In our view, however, 
these can be dangerously misleading. 
They are normally only" arithmetical 
projections of rates of growth and 
annuity rates chosen arbitrarily. They 
cannot cater for changes in inflation 
rates or variations in investment 
performance. Vfe believe it is more 
realistic to choose as efficient as 
possible a scheme and then to put as 
much as you can into it. 

As a guide, and accepting that your 
own persona] circumstances may 
dictate a different proportion, we urge 
you to invest at least the following 
proportions of your net relevant 
earnings in personal pension plans: 


Date of Birth 


SINGLE PREMIUM 

I enclose my cheque (payable to “ Framlington Life Insurance 

Limited") for C (minimum £500) for a single 

premium Framlington Person *1 Ftensfon Plan (1986). 

1 wish the premium to be applied for investment m the 
Framlingron Pensions Managed Fund. 


DECLARATION 


ELIGIBILITY Wane tick appropriate box 

1 Axe you engaged on your owo account 

or as a piaruier personally acting in some 

trade, profession or occupation? Nn fT 

2 (a) Ate you an employed person (or the 

holder of an office or employment)? Yes □ NoQ 

SS ZZaZSKT 1 ** 226(91 "*«*** 

2 (b)lf YES. isoneormoreofyour 
occupation-, non-pensionable? YesQ NoQ 

Note: An occupation is pco*®nabfc if m cramectfoo rK tfwvilh 
are a member a» a sponsor* 

» any scheme or arrangement fnw, Which - 

rewanem benefit, whether to tump *,«» r-- nf ”P^ t . toIiec ' ei l ge f 
will not have been wholly pouted ow of *££?£££?* 


MONTHLY PREMIUM PLAN 

to st^n a monthly prenuum ^Ifogtoo Pferxmai IVmiott 
(1986) for (minimum £50} per month. 

S' S^for^tnount 

premium) made payable to “framlington Life Insurance LvmcedT 

*■ mvesimem - * 


1 declare that the statements contained in this Application are true and complete and that I have nei 

I agree that this Appbcauoo shall be the basis of the proposed contract between me and FramLnecon TflT eartunsa ta * ed «n tbe UK 
benefits approvable under Section 226 of the Income and Corporation Taxes Act 19^0 ) funhe^ ondere tasurance Limited to provide 

comma shall be capable of bong surrendered nor any pension assigned or commuted W «raan d that no benefit under this 

Income and Corporation Thxes Act 1970 ™ permitted bv Section 226 of the 

Signed_ - 

Registered Office as above Registered m England No 1689 1"* 6 " — 






■'ri € 


' , A v _ 


I ! 

I - l 


¥ 

t 

% ' : 

- * l 




THF TTMES SATURDAY MARCH I 1986 


FINANCE AND INDUSTRY. 


29 


FAMILY MONEY/3 


Low-cost endowment tome loans' stay out of favour 

Straight 
buying 
is still 
the best 

( mortgages ) 


“For the first time in. living 
memory we are advertising 
mortgages." says David Blake 
of the Woolwich Building 
Society. And this week in an 
attempt to woo buyas, three 
of the four high sum banks 
removed the differential 
charged to borrowers who opt 
for an endowment-linked 
mortgage. 

The banks now all charge a 
flat 13 per cent for all borne ' 
loans. Buyers could be forgiv- 
en for. thinking they have 
never had it so good. But is 
this really so? Why do not the 
societies bring down their 
rates — rather than advertise 
home loans? 

“They don't think like that 
but 1 would expect to see a 
general freeing-up of the mar- 
ket quite quickly now with 
more and more societies doing 
away with differentials for 



endowment loans," explained 
Adrian Coles of the Building 
Societies Association. 

A. 0.5 per cent cut . for 
endowment borrowers now 
has the same effect as 0J!5 per- 
cent off the mortgage rate, for 
all borrowers as around-50 per 
; cent of all outstanding home 
loans, are arranged on an 
endowment basts. ... 

"With the introduction of 
MIRAS (Mortgage -Interest 
Relief at Source) a huge 
amount of building society 
business was done on an 
endowment basis," explains 
Mr Cedes. 

Even today, with the re- 
moval of lAPRflife Assur- 
ance Premium Relief), most of 
the major societies are signing 
up around 50 per cent of their. 
borrowers on an endowment 
basis. The absence of tax relief 
on the endowment policy has 


WHAT YOUR HOME LOAN WILL COST 


Bank/Buftfing 

Society 


interest 
Rate % 


APR 

%■ 


Halifax . . • .12.75 .. 13.9: 

Abbey National 12.75 13.7 

Nationwide 12.75 - 13.9 

Leeds Permanent 12.75 13.7 

Woolwich 12.75 . 13.9 

Alliance & Leicester 12.75 . 13.8 

(over £20.000) 13.00 — 

National & Provincial - 12.75 13£ 

Anglia 12.75 13.9- 

Bradford & Btngtey .... 12.75 13.8 

(£20,000 to £50.000} 13.00 — 

(over E50.00Q) : 13-25 — 

Britannia 12.75 13^ 

Cheltenham CGfoucesfcr ~ 12.65 13.8 

Bristol & West ... 1275 . .. 13£ 

NatWest •: 13.00 14.1 

Barclays- • " -’--i, • - ,-.'•-13.00 133 

uSvds^ • ? ' 13.00 13.9 

Midand ". ... . .13.00 .13.7 

TSB .... 13.25 .14.3 

Royal Bank of Scotland • 12.75 13.5 


Source: Vtoohticti Btddmg Society 


INCOME TAX RELIEF 1985/86 





• . /. 


soumDOWNS & ?v v 

HOTTlSSJ^SIAtKANTS ^ ^ 



Offer for Subscripdcm 
of 1,000,000 Ordinary Shares 
of &l each at £L1Q per share. . 

★ Existing freehold hold has increased in 
vahie by 94 p€ir cent in years. 

★ Company Is trading. BES relief for 1985/86 
should be quickly available. 

★ Experienced professional management 

★ Founder directors have an investment 
of £233,614 

★ Strong net asset cover. . 

Copies of the Prospectus availa ble from 

POINTON YORK LIMITED 

- (a member of NASDIM) 

7, Cavendish Square, Loudon W1M 9 HA 

’ Telephone 01-631 3015 

This adveitoiwiB is not an inviiaiion to Invest ft shares. _ 


not deterred. societies from 
promoting this type of loan as 
they earn huge commissions 
on endowment policies. 

Although this week’s reduc- 
tion 10 bank-bontwere taking 
out an endowment loan is an 
improvement, the repayment 
loan is still the cheapest 
Norwich Union,, which has 
one of the most competitive 
low-cost endowment schemes, 
quotes the following rates for a 
32-year-old, wanting a 
£30,000 loan over 25 years. 
Total after-tax monthly repay- 
ments for a straight repayment 
loan with a mortgage protec- 
tion policy are £258.47, while 
the low-cost endowment 
works out at £26L63. The 
cheapest of all, if you are 
eligible for- a selfemployed 
pension plan, is a pension- 
linked loan where the after-tax 
monthly cost is £257 JL 
" ' “I don’t understand why the 
societies continue to push 
endowment-linked loans be- 
cause it certainly is not the 
cheapest way: of buying a 
home,"' said Craig Boxmar, of 
financial advisers Fairchilds. 

He quotes the example of a 
40-year-old wanting a 25-year 
£40,000 loan. The net month- 1 
ly cost after tax relief of a 
repayment loan is £375.81 
while the low-cost endowment 
costs £387.98 after tax relief 
Undoubtedly the most se- 
ductive of the banks? offers is 
the Midland’s scheme. For the 
next .three months new Mid- 
land home-biiyers get a 0.5 per 
cent reduction for one yeiar in 
their mortgage: interest charge 

— but more important, cus- 
tomers who move their mort- - 
.gage to the Midland from 
Other lenders wiD have valua- 

; tion and legal fees paid by 
Midland. 

’ If for example, you are one 
of- the unfortunate borrowers 
still paying' over the odds for 
your money — say 13.5 per cent 

— you can transfer to the 
Midland and pay only 13 per | 
cent without inclining any 
expenses at alL 

NatWesf r improvements 
iriaude 95 per cent home 
loans for first-time buyers — 
90 per Cent for all others — 
ncompar&Twith a previous SO 
per cent , maximum. The mul- 
tiple of income which you can 
borrow has also been im- 
proved - three times earnings 
for single people, or three 
times the mam income plus 
the second income for a 
couple. t . 

Choosing the cheapest loan 
is still tricky since, as our table 
shows, societies and banks 
may quote the same mortgage 
rate bin because of the varying 

The same rates 
that can vary 

ways in which they calculate 
interest, the APR can vary. 

According to the latest edi- 
tion of JBlay’s Mortgage Guide, 
“it is currently possible to pay 
between 12.5 per cent and 14.5 
per cent for a £30,000 repay- 
ment mortgage, which can 
mean a difference of more 
than £30 a month on a 25-year 
form loan”. - " 

i Relatively unknown lenders 
such as Allied Arab Bank, 
United Bank of Kuwait, Buck- 
inghamshire, Chesham , Han- 
ley Economic, Herne Bay and 
I Loughborough Permanent 

! building societies, all of which 
charge only 12.5 for then 
I .loans, are the ones to go for. 

Lorna Bourne 


CTT? 


1C a s near as one can get to a bomb- 
proof way of minimizing capital 

transfer tax )) 

ii Making the least of CTT . . . a new 

type of scheme to mitigate the amount 
ofCTTpayableondeath 5 ) f.t.mifaw 


For the definitive answers on( .a pit . 9 
Transfer Tax. whether from (.npilal • 

Income, return the coupon non. or 

telephone 01-R39 31^-- 




GUARANTEED 1 YEAR 
BUILDING SOCIETY 
RETURN 


tow* in w highly popular 
Triple Sonus Bond 
- (3rd issue) wlh your 
investment divided to 
secure a guaranteed orvj 
year return of 13% net on 
your account '•4th one of 
. the biggest Societies and ■ ' 
rtw Wonce invested in a 
£400 nuKon Managed 
Fund that has averaged 
■ lfflfc'iwt-nefsneeit 
: started in tf77f. 


I Tch-phoo eKo- 
1 MyagPte 


THIS OFFER CLOSES 
AT£2MILU0N 
Coll ih now to obtain your 
Building Society 
Reservation Number. 

0272-276954 

■AT 3Q*HAM!2Ja77 -mss 

MINIMUM WOTSlMfiNT C2.P M 

. U/tiwnsmr Medical General 
j FMEPOST. Bristol 551 5BR. J 
, NAME-- 1 


Mvhiabafld/t^fcaggte 


ADDRESS, 



tairchj 


-TEL 


The CTT Specialists 


: AGEIS1- 
j T1/Sr 
1 AMOUNT 


-TAX. KATE 


1 

| AVAIIASUE LZ 1 J 


Offer for Subscription under the terms of the 

BUSINESS EXPANSION SCHEME 

Sponsored by 

ELECTRA 

MANAGEMENT SERVICES UMTTED 

.and 

GUIDEH0USE LIMITED 

of up to 1,477,120 
Ordinary Shares of lOp each 
at I45p per share payable in full on application 


PLEASUREWORLD PLC 


Pteasu reworld PLC has two subsidiaries which operate the 
Gunton Hall Holiday Centre and the adjoining Pleasure- 
wood Hills American Theme Park, situated in Lowestoft, 
"Suffolk. The Company owns in total 136 acres of freehold 
and long leasehold land on which these businesses 
operate and pro-forma net tangible assets per share at 31 st 
December 1985 amounted to approximately 191 p- The 

Directors intend to recommend the payment of dividends, 
which on the basis of the projected profit for the year to 

31st March 1987, should give a dividend yield c# around 

SA% furthat year. The proceeds of this Offer wiH be used to 
reduce borrowings and to expand the businesses. 

Prior to the issue, certain institutional and . private investors 
have subscribed approximately £431,000 for shares. 

The minimum subscription has been underwritten by Eleo- 
tra Investment Trust P J_C. and by Guidehbuse Limited. As 
the Company has been trading for over 4 months, certifi- 
cates for claiming BES tax relief should be available shortly ■ 
after allotment. 


The Offer dose bo soon » the Offer Is fully subscribed^ al O' 1 

Mth April. 1888 unless ojasnOad prior to that Owe. Them will be an initial aHot- 
meriton 17rh March 1986. 

Copies of the Prospectus, on the terms of which eione a p pfc ettons tor shares 
’nwry be made; may be obtained from aithor of the toHowing addresses: 

GiddsheuseLhiritad. Bactre Management Sendees United. 

VMrrHousai.(keyMm Passage, 

■ Newgate Street London GC1A78A London WC2R3HP 

Tel: 01-6067001 Tel: 01,2408565 


Please send me a copy of the Prospectus far Pleesuraworid PLC. 


NAME. 


T 1/3 


ADDRESS. 


YEagle Star Gnwp 

DO YOU WANT TO 
KNOW MORE ABOUT 
SAVING C.T.T.? 

If so Eagle Star’s new Rainbow 
Capital Protection Plan offers a 
simple way to do just that. 

You can retain an absolute right to some or all of your capita! 
with the comfort of an income to use as you wish plus a 
substantial potential CTT saving. 

Send for details todayi 


^ To: Eagle Star Croup ^ ^ 

+ FREEPOST, Bath Road, 

j Cheltenham, GL53 3 BR 

^ I understand that your Rainbow Capital 

* Protection Plan can:- 
f * Build a CTT-free fund for my family/other beneficiaries 

/ 4c Pay me “tax-free income" 

rfe Allow me to receive back up to the total sum I hav e 

jf invested — leaving the growth for my family, free from CTT. 

g Please send me full details. 

■ Name. 

: Address. 


Name and address of Financial Aduiser (if any). 


YEagleStarGrotte 


announcing an important new unit trust 

EUROPE KEEPS ON 
GROWING 



INVEST NOW 
IN BRITANNIA’S NEW 
EUROPEAN GROWTH TRUST 


I urope was a great success 
story for unit mist investors in 
1985. Share prices rose rapidly 
cm the major European stock- 
markets. Prices of European unit 
trusts rose with them. And all the 

economic indicators suggest that this 

trend will continue. 

Investing in stability plus ■ • • 

dynamism! 

The new Britannia European 
Growth Trust aims for 


of European shares, giving you ft 1 
ideal opportunity to take a stake in 
this booming investment sector. 
Britannia’s investment managers are 
CTH'^rrating on the countries that 
combine politkai stability and a 
iff ymri currency with a record of 


dynamic stockmarket growth: 
Germany, up 71% in 1985, 
Switzerland up 52%, France up 
45%, Holland up 40%. These 
stockmarkets offer a wide scope for 
profitable investment in both blue- 
chip and selected smaller companies. 

Don’t mists the boat. Don’t r emain 
under-invested 

The leading European economies 

are characterised by strong economic 

growth, low inflation and the 
prospect of falling interest rates. 
Although last year saw ■ excellenr 
returns from European unit trusts, 
there is virtual unanimity amongst 
financial commentators and invest- 
ment advisers alike that Europe re- 
mains an area of outstanding growth 
potential for 1986 and beyond. 


Surprisingly, however, only a small 
number of unit trust holders have any 
investments in Europe. Make sure 
you achieve tout stake in Europe by 
investing today in the new Britannia 
European Growth Trust. 

Invest now for up to 2% discount 
Simplv complete the application 
form below, or call our Unit Trust 
Dealers on 01 -638 0478. 

The estimated gross starting yield on 
the launch price of 50p per unit is 
1.5% p-a. . 

Remember, the price of units and the 
income from them can go down as 
well as up. 

Take advantage of our launch offer 
and discount (see below) and of 
Europe’s continuing prospects for 
growth. 


General Information for Invesora. 




m 

ir 


run 




\ 

- :'*$ 

TCrj 

l->v 

kr 


3 

% 


\cHi 

rp 

is. 1 


a) 

a 




tirt 

W 

9 

V 


»Tthia ?fi davs l« price *od '"kW ate pobfehed ' 
tb8v in ledmg naaonai t-™* 630 

sold bacitaihe Miafpaui not less than the aznent , 
bkl pax calnibTed to a frnmub approved bj- die ■ 
E^ qjimuttc rofTodeand Industry. ‘ 

.Vi tnirial nt nti c ^ n m t efrarpe of 5-5° a on ihcatfg . 

(eqiiivafcfflto5.grfttaB^pocnjBindDdBimdic . 

prKE of emits and i^xedmpcai an annual nnroi • 

VATIofdievtiuealBieTnHtsdediitajd ; 
trom the Trost's gros income. akSough tbe Trost . 
Deal alkws i im xgnmn amid dsngc of 2"» 

i+vatj. . . _ . r 

TtaTtietD ualpcn ncirKisnicaincndMOpaotg . 
md in second martco within the Madelines bid . 
dombthcDqannTOxafTn^ * 

The Trust's maxnt disrribution date is 1st April in ; 
nspot ot" the period nvfrnn; Is Fetfum 1 . The nta _ 
dtstrftwkn bsthctfakd ior la .^xi, 

R fl i mn g a non is pavabb ro quamed itBegnediages • 
wvl irnesaitavaimteon ttcptst TnMee Midland | 
Bonk Trust Cormr Litnitod, iW Old Broad . 
Sum, London ECM !AQ. Msmgps Briamua ■ 
I'nii Ttust Mamgas Lm«d Telephone- 01-588 - 
2777. Regiarrcd O&r: 80G;4eOT*o Screa. London . 
EC2R 5AD. MendxrrfThe LfliiTtva Aacentea . 


The N i w Britannia European Growth Trust 


'I 

To: BRITANNIA UNIT TRUST MANAGERS LIMITED 74,78 Finsbury Pavement, London EGA 1 j D | 

rr 1/3 * 


I,^e wish to invest 


i Unttcd- 

{ #l%EHBcaantfixinwsnnfaBDf£500tiplo£4^W. 

[ rWemTaamrrl8and understand thartny;our3pplmntnus 
I jarobrikjsing date Em itetA*,Fndar 21st 


■ Kegular Moouiiy aavmg® 

| Pka?« lick box for informaLkra i— i 

1 yj25 minim om investment per month J. I — l 
Toss ofe is 00? available to rtadansol EtfC 

I 

t 


Surname 

(Mr Mb Mb .'Si 

iKjUCK C\?it \LS PLt' VSE* 

Firtt Names 

J 



Address 

I 

} 

Pncjonde 

Sicaanire 

Date 




















30 


FINANCE AND INDUSTRY 


THE TIMES SATURDAY MARCH 1 1986, 


INSTANT ACCESS 

ft AND 

I NO PENALTIES 


'i 


EARN 
UP TO 


9 . 75 % 
13 . 93 % 


~ Wftfi J Chesbuntcash Instant Access Account you can pay in 
* or withdmx* as much and as often as you ftke without nouce or 
penalty The greater the sum roested the higher the return (see 
table below) 



’Amount 

Nf t Annual 

-Grcji* 




Eauivjlent' 


i : ,000--:4.999 

9.23% ; 

' 1 3 2 i J 


£ 5. CC0-£ 250,000 

9. 75 % ! 

I393 > j 


Monthly income 6 also available and you can earn — 

8.90% net- (12.71% grass*) on balances of L 1.000 to £4.999 
935% net-. (1336% gross’) on £5.000 or more 

Open a CheshunCcash Instant Accea Account at any of our 
branches or agencies or by usng our free postal service 

+ Ajln vuj ijr* "urtni Wie v ienf «**im bttc 'Jit (J> P-**d 

Fun details fronr 

Chnhunt Buiklmg Society. FREEPOST Dept L P 
Waltham Cross. Herrs EN8 7BR 



A non o' iiy 0.wrWcf^4nociiivinll.irtfOi P. Vh^»v 

Aii«i»iirf ioi e»rs<iw »• innirrs *«(' C 1 40 000 000 


= S'S’q b*E 
rt 3*5 3 5 5 



o ~ s £■ * o a* m. 
c g — < cr := -* ■'* 
n g^3*SZ 

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To'. The Sconish Mutual Assurance Society 

1U9 Sl Vincent Street Glasgow G2 5HN. Tel: 041-248 6321 

Please send me. uithnut obligation, full details of your 
TAX FREE HALIFAX PESS10S FLSD. 


Name. 


Address. 


Daytime telephone nn 

Age now Planned Retirement Age. 


Scottish Mutual 

Dependable Money Managers 


SS03O3WM 



FAMILY MONEY/4 


GrannltMhcBKlA 

1% 


IO.2milJ.OI 

oabatom CKX0OO oa QUUXM 

10.00% = 10*25% = 14*64% 

WMUIWI gCQtpCpCSQJOO 


• hnrat fc y*— ado. - mu tor nortec p «rt r«l • Early Why wMtMtf** 

toBofknrvsc. « ltoiq w i Wi «di*bi to ii ii d<» * l M* i d8 iBft 

• RandnnwMn *to— gapaMMfyearfr . 


TEL: 01-928 1331 

AWFOHOflCBvn 2SMI 

Bouncmvm nwu 


MDCTON M-737292S STKIUMN *M77Jffl 
CROYDON « -406 4621 TOSWROCE 3W7Z3 
ORP I N GTO N MM UPHM5TER 2ttJ0f 
RBGXTE «ZU Rome 735*2 


How the public lost thousands 

through insurance offices 


Self-Employed ? 

Retire early with 
some pension 
plans and you’ll 
be penalised. 


Unlike some pension plans, if you retire 
early, The Equitable pays you just the same as if 
you’d chosen that age to start with. 

Not that you pay any more for this flexi- 
bility. 

In fact over the last nine years we’ve 
produced the highest results from 10 and 20 year 
regular premium with profit pension policies 
more often than any ocher company. * 

Of course the past cannot guarantee the 
future, but why have we been so consistently 
successful? 

Wfeli certainly one reason is that we never 
pay commission to middlemen - which helps to 
gjve our policyholders a better return on their 
investment. 

If you’d like a pension plan that doesn’t 
penalise you should you retire early; cut out the 
coupon or speak directly to The Equitable on 
01-6066611. 

•Nmnnbcr US 5 Plumed Sj.mp jtuimnt ooitvariHraotuniuliinltjJi hmdi. 

"for The Equitable Lite. FREEPOST. 4 Coleman Street. U mdon EC2B 2JT 
I'd welcome further details on tour SeH-EmploieJ ftmirm Plans with: 

□ Annua L'Va na Mr Comnhut ion>; DMonthh Contributions; 

□ Unit-linked based j hematites. 

(I’Kieskiemsoohi 

Name i Mr'Mrc-.Misd 


.iu 


Tel: iOIIkci 




fcjtg* Tel: -Houiel 
FiwiklaJ rVI 


BRTBB 


The Equitable Life 

m You gain because we're differenL— _ J 


C SAVINGS ) 

This week new regnlatiuis 
concerning the way m which 
life-assnraflce prodwas are 
sold were published. These 
place heavy emphasis oa the 
role of the nsaraace company 
to monitor properly those who 
sen their products. A com- 
plaint to The Times reveals 
jost how far the industry has to 
go to come anywhere near 
these new high standards 

Members of the public have 
lost hundreds of thmusmH* of 
pounds through an insurance 
intermediary and Bfe offices 
involved in die loss are reus- 
ing to help them. 

Details are still emerging, 
but at the moment companies 
such as Scottish Provident, 
Clerical Medical, Equity and 
Law, Friends Provident and 
Scottish Equitable are refusing 
to acknowledge any liability — 
legal or moral — towards the 
victims, some of whom have 
lost their life savings or pen- 
sion provisions. 

Clerical Medical is being 
sued in the High Court by the 
trustees of a company pension 
scheme who claim to have lost 
£186,000. Friends Provident 
is being sued for. £25,000. 

It is open to question bow 
assiduous the mutual life of-* 
fice, Scottish Provident, was 
in checking the credentials of 
the insurance intermediary 
concerned. 

The Scottish Provident 
branch manager told The 
Times this week: “You can 
guard the public only so far.” 
The facts of the case reveal 
how apparently slipshod life 
offices can be when it comes to 
checking the credentials of 
intermediaries or brokers to 
whom they grant 
rangements. They 
how life offices such as Scot- 
tish Provident will allow their 
name to be touted by interme- 
diaries in such a way as to 


ar- 


suggest that they endorse that 
intermediary, while their legal 
arrangement, behind the 
scenes, purport to deny that 
the intermediary is their agent 
in law. 

In essence, hundreds of 
thousands of pounds of insur- 
ance premiums and pension 
contributions paid to the par- 
ticular intermediary by mem- 
bers of the public or trustees of 
pension schemes have gone 
missing. The life offices to. 
whom the payments were to 
be -forwarded say that they 
never received them. The 
broker intermediary has been 
compulsorily wound up. For 
legal reasons we can not name 

Nevertheless There 
amples of the disgraceful be- 
haviour aflife offices over this 
matter that we can highlight 
Take the case of a garage 
owner, who in 1981 made two 
separate payments of £2.000 
and £3,000 to the intermedi- 
ary — whom we shah call Joe 
Bloggs Ltd — to fond an “E" 
type pension policy be wanted 
to start up with the Scottish 
Provident The garage owner 
at the time already had a 
similar Scottish Provident 
policy through another com- 
pany he ran. 

Scottish Provident says it 
never received a proposal 
form, let alone the premiums. 
But Scottish Provident did 
have what is known in the 
trade as an agency agreement 
with Joe Bloggs Ltd, as did a 
number of other life offices. . 

According to the agreement 
terms, Joe Bloggs Ltd was 
allowed to display Scottish 
Provident literature, posters 
and other promotional mate- 
rial The Scottish Provident 
branch manager says: “A leaf- 
let stand is allowed. You can 
also put up posters Grom 
Sconish Provident.” 

The net effect, for members 
of the public, is at least to 
imply an endorsement of Joe 



Lloyd’s 
Syndicate 
Results-1982 


IF YOU JOIN THE ALM 

ThK56-[Mgr analysis, mvrrtog iil4l9syridir«rs nprratlngln ibrUsirluvd 
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MnnhnsmM. 

Fur ihr standard 1.50 subscription (aBcnKthk- lor l<t* rrfipf) you abo gri; 

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MfW 0 Ri^ular HuhIww on Uoyft agatrs. 

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W ■ Cuuipf illhrfi qoouiiiios fc»r Slop-L** Insoranrr. 

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9 (Tel: 01-623 7 (00. Eat 4058) 


Income Tax Relief For 1985/86 

British Americas Cup Challenges Plc 

m \ 

• . • # • • § / 

Offer For Subscription 
Under The Business Expansion Scheme 

Of 3,000,000 ORDINARY SHARES AT £l PER SHARE 

Arranged By 

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British America's Cup Challenges PLC will be 
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Expansion portfolio. 

BACC will exploit commercial opportunities 
arising from British participation in the America's 
Cup and other yachting events, revenues from 
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in the growing field of sports promotion. 

The Company is providing the British entry 
for the 1987 America's Cup. It will have two yachts 
in Australia from which to select a challenging 
yacht for the 1987 America's Cup Both British 
yachts have been extensively tested at scale 
against models similar to Australia II. the last 
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Copies of the prospectus offering shares for 
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r~ : 

| Please send me 

Name 


This advertisement does not constitute an invitation to subscribe for shares. 

To: Guinness Mahon & Co. Limited, 32 SL Mary at HilirEondon EC3P3AJ 1 

— copies of the prospectus for British America's Cup Challenges PLC. | 


Address. 


= r ^ U 


Bloggs Ltd by Scottish Provi- 
dent- But behind the scenes, in 
tile small print of the agency 
agreement, Scottish Provident 
had stipulated that the pay- 
ment of premiums to Joe 
Bloggs Ltd was not payment to 
Scottish Provident Ltd- 
In other words, Joe Bloggs 
Ltd though free to tout the 
Sconish Provident name to 
get business, was not an agent 
for Scottish Provident 
So what checks did Scottish 
Provident run to establish the 
credentials of Joe Blog^ Ltd? 
The branch manager said this 
week: ”It was a member of the 
British Insurance Brokers As- 
sociation. We had the mem- 
bership number ” 

In feet, The Times has 
discovered that Joe Bloggs Ltd 
was never a member of BIBA. 
And the number given as a 
BIBA membership number 
was in fact nothing more than 
the regist ration number of Joe 
Bloggs Ltd. 

Every limited company, re- 
gardless of the nature of its 
business has a registration 
number. 

Peter Bullough, mi assistant 
general manager of the Scot- 
tish Provident, claimed that 
Joe Bloggs Ltd was registered 
with the Insurance Brokers 
Registration CoundL Why 
then should Scottish Provi- 
dent even doubt the broker’s 
bona fides? He even quoted 
the D3RC number. 

Again this showed how little 
attention Scottish Provident 


pay to checking agents it 
allows to use its name: Joe 
Bloggs Ltd is not, nor ever has 
been registered with the 1BRC. 
and thus lacks the consuner- 
■ protection benefits that regis- 
tration implies. The number 
that Mr Bullough so readily 
quoted was that of Joe Bloggs 
(Insurance Brokers) -Ltd, -an 
entirely separate company 
which has never traded. Mr 
Bullougb told The Times on 
Thursday morning: “The 

problem was that the garage 
owner made out a cheque 
payable to an intermediary.’’ 
In feet, both cheques were 
made pays We to Sco ttish 
Provident 

The truth of the matter is 
that Scottish Provident's orig- 
inal agency agreement had 
been with a different compa- 
ny, which over the years 
changed its name and owner- 
ship, ending up as Joe Bloggs 
Ltd. Scottish Provident paid 
link attention to the changes. 

The branch manager said 
this week: “Yon have only to 
send in notice of change of 
title and directors. We do not 
necessarily make inquiries 
with the new directors.” 

Lawrence Lever 


Book now 

■ To obtain the free booklets 
on pensions published by* the 
Company Pensions Informa- 
tion Centre, send a large SAE 
with 40p postage to CPIC,7 
OU Park Lane, London W1Y 
3LJ. 


TAX RELIEF FOR 1985/6 

(does not onstitirte an invitafioa tosabscribe tortfaaret 


Tbs 



OflerforSubscriptRn under ttet^ - 

Scheraeofqi to 5001)00 Orfinaiy shares ofSl each at S2 per shat 


^ Tfamiciiiiiurosid>so^pt>on.S300J)001rasabeadybeex] ratsedfroma ■ 
private placnaj. 

|T The Comparyis engaged in the Estate Agency bnaoess m Vkst Sussex 
and irtends to expand its opsations to other re^ons. nduflog Snney 
and Oxfordshire. The Company provides a fuD range of icadeoU and 
commercial property services and idated services, suck as mortage 


Asset-backing to die shares from the Company's ownership of its 
freehold premises. 


'F” Prospechs con tains the following projectkjQs:- 


14 months to3l March 1987 
fertoft March 1968 
tear to 31 March 1969 


PRE-TAX PROFIT{LOSS) 
£000 
( 20 ) 

312 
628 


TfesobscriptiOTlistmTJt^atl01)()amonThuisd^27Fi*riiaiyBffi 
and maybedosedataty fine thereafieqshares wffl be allotted ona Inst 
come, first senwT basis. A copy of the prospectus may be obtained by 
writing to or telephoning AeSponsore:- 


lANCASHBE&YOnBHIRE 
INVESTMElffMANAGiEICIff LIMITED 


73 Wimpole Sheet, London W1M 7DD. 1<d:(n-93S 5566 (24 hoar service) 


Best terms 
for 

mortgages 

If you need finance for a new home, a second 
borne, school fees, or for home improvements, 
there’s no reason for you to think that our 
excellent reputation means high costs. 

On the contrary. You’ll find our terms 
extremely competitive with anything on offer 
in the High Street And well consider advances 
from £40,000 upwards, for primary mortgages 
and £5.000 upwards for secondary mortgages. 
Our service is countrywide. If you’d like to 

know more, call us on 01 - 486 8305 any dav of 

the week? 




MORTGAGE SERVICES 

Well do the homework. 

Residential and Commercial Murtgaees 

H^hEstaeOffioes. FREEPOST. LoodonSWaVv? 

Tr» Hamids Estate Offices. FREEPOST. H 

Plea*? send me details of jour Mortgages Srrires" 3 ^ 2 


f Name . 


Address , 


JWcude Tel Nt» 


‘I 

I 


} °9am-9pm weekdays. 10 30am '^s'srtoZ cl: - -T:!: ' 

1 J^reSahn^ , and 5^ ,^ | 













THE TIMES SATURDAY MARCH 1 1986 


FINANCE AND INDUSTRY 




FAMILY MONEY/5 


* 


1 - 




A new referee in the field 


C OMBUDSMEN *) 

The Government has nov 
accepted the need for a 
Building Societies Ombuds- 
man. It intends to table an 
ameiidment to the Building 
Societies Bill either at report 
aagc in the -House of 
Commons or in the bflTs 
passage through the Lords. . 

The call for such' an 
appointment was first made 
in February last year by ; the 
National Consumer Council 
as, according to its charrman, 
Michael Montagu, the 
present system of redress is 
ramsbackJfe - • . 

The bill is the first entirely 
new frameworic for the budd- 
ing society movement since 
1874. The' 1962 Act was. a 
consolidating measure. The 
demand for an independent 
adjudicator follows other 
. protection measures. 

' The Insurance Ombudsman 
was established in March 1981 
by three major insurance com- 
posites — General. Accident. 
Guardian Royal. Exchange 
and the ' RoyaL Today 160 
insurers belong. And in Janu- 
ary this year the - Banking 
Ombudsman started work. 

The fear among many con- 
sumer organisations was that 
a. voluntary ombudsman 
would, be established, by the 
Building Societies Associa- 
tion. but that it would not be 
comprehensive. One of the 
problems with the Insurance 
Ombudsman is that he cannot 
invesligatecoin plaints involv- 
ing .non -member companies 
though most of the major 
insurers arc now members. 

Most other insurance firms 
belong to the Personal Insur- 
ance Arbitration Service, 
which does nor prodoce annu- 
al reports and has a different 
status from the . Insurance - 
Ombudsman. A two-tier sys- 


5 Amreo mTtiemibtNc 

sotierromvmwm 

^WitoMGAmpet.-. 


TJ 


teht where giants in the build- 
ing-society movement did not 
.belong was not in the interests 
of either consumers or- the 

movement. ' 

This is why lan Stewart, the 
Government's Economic Sec- 
' retaiy. is devising a scheme to 
be administered by the BSA 
but with statutory . backing. 
There are- European prece- 
dents.. Switzerland -has an 
insurance ombudsman, while 
France and some Scandina- 
vian states operate similar 
schemes. 

Scope for errors 
is now greater 1 

The high street banks set up 
a Banking Ombudsman, who 
has the power to make an 
award binding on a bank with 
an upper limit of £50.000. If a 
customer decides not to accept 
the decision, he retains the full 
right to take legal action. 
Seventeen banks participate. 
Ian Edwards-Jones. QC- was 
appointed Banking Ombuds- 
man on January 1 and will 
investigate grievances that 
came to light on and after that' 
date. 

Working parties aimed at 
formulating rules under which 


life assurance and unit trust 
salesmen would operate were 
set up earlier this year with the 
likely prospect of an ombuds- 
man in that field. 

.Tbe need to regulate the 
'industry and to have 
investors’ complaints investi- 
gated independently has been 
recognized by the Unit Trust 
Association, the Association 
of British Insurers, the 
Linked- Life Assurance Group 
and the Life Assurance Com- 
mission. 

Only last May Mr Stewart 
told the BSA’s conference: “As 
building societies expand their 
activities, the scope for mis- 
takes, misjudgments and mis- 
understandings clearly 
becomes greater.’' 

The type of cases that the 
proposed Building Societies 
Ombudsman would cover are: 

• A dispute as to whether 
money was paid into or 
withdrawn from an account. 
The Chief Registrar of Friend- 
ly Societies has dealt with 
similar disputes in the past. 

• An inordinate delay in 
dealing with a loan applica- 
tion resulting in the mongage 
applicant losing the house. 

• Money being invested in a 
long-term savings account on 
the basis of inaccurate or 
incomplete' information re- 


sulting in a lower return than 
was reasonable to expect 

• Insistence on house insur- 
ance being for an excessive 
sum. 

• Failure to carry out instruc- 
tions to transfer funds from a 
lower interest account to a 
higher interest account 

• Failure to carry out instruc- 
tions from the borrower to 
insure the property. 

The ombudsman would 
also be asked to adjudicate on 
such matters as charging re- 
demption interest -and the 
practice of some societies 
having different rates of inter- 
est for new and existing bor- 
rowers. 

As many of these areas are 
Ute matter of a code of good 
practice governing all lenders, 
the ombudsman's comments 
in such cases should lead 
societies to reconsider their 
policies. He would therefore 
have a significant effect in this 
indirect way. as well as the 
more direct effect of making 
awards. 

It is envisaged that an 
inde|)endent council would 
appoint the Building Societies 
Ombudsman and decide to 
whom he would be account- 
able. Under an independent 
chairman, the council would 
comprise consumer interests 
and not more than one-third 
building society representa- 
tives. Like the Banking Om- 
budsman. an upper ceiling for 
any award would be fixed, 
subject to inflationary review. 

Tbe acceptance of indepen- 
dent ombudsmen by those 
providing financial services is 
to be welcomed. In time, 
because of the overlapping 
interests, perhaps there will be 
one single ombudsman to 
cover all investors, net unlike 
the Parliamentary Commis- 


Conal Gregory 



Allied Arab Bank's High 
Interest Cheque Account offers you 
an interest rate other British bank 
cheque accounts will find difficult 
to beat. 

Our interest rate is an 
opportunity- to obtain rates related 
to the London Money Market, and 
is quoted daily in the Financial 
Times. 

Current Interest Rates 

Cross interest (pretax) lint 

Net of Compi isilc Kate Tax 4.42°.. 

Crt*ss Equivalent Rotv 13.4h‘ , ,» 

Net Compound Annual Rak- y .K4‘\. 

Gross Equivalent , , , 

Compound Annual Rale 11 

These rates art* suh|ivt to change or 
amendment according to market conditions 

Interest is calculated daily and 
credited to your High Interest 
Account monthly to give 
compounded growth. 

To open your High Interest 




Cheque Account, you need a 
minimum deposit of £5,000. 

Your chequebook gives 
immediate access to your money 
uitfi no loss of interest because we 
don't need advance notice. If you 
want us to, we can even arrange to 
make regular payments by 
standing order or direct debit. 

No bank charges 

For all this, vve won't charge you 
a penny. We just insist that your 
High Interest Cheque Account can 
not be overdrawn. 

To open your account, you don't 
even need a postage stamp. Simply 
complete the coupon and post it. 
with a minimum deposit of £5,UtUl 
payable to Allied Arab Bank 
Limited, to: High Interest Cheque 
Account. Allied Arab Bank Limited, 
FREEPOST. London EC4B4HS. 

(Allied Arab Bank is registered 
in England, with its headquarters in 
the City of London, and is a fully 
recognised bank under the Banidng 
Act, 1979.) 


Terms and Conditions ; 

I i .} N 11 -. aciiuinl i-. jvailahk- In pri\ alv indix idual-T 
Itilhfr n-siilvni iir nun rt-Miii-nt in thi* L'K). chih*. ~ 
•)s-4Yii>lKin* i ha rilm and prnlrtsiimal firms. buL 

i-xcluiiinj-nirpiirali-ini-t-.iiir?. 1 A minimum «■ 
difxisit i*l LxiHfci la ixquimJ U* upcn Ihi-accijuni * 
.ind I hr maximum fialaniv lhai may bo hr Id pn lh£ 
ditiiuni i- iiliV.tMi. 13 )Thi' raiv oh nlt-rual will hi 
di-.pl.iy rd in nur hrani hr-- and will hr pjidnn r 

Katana* in orrs- nf L2 mil. It ihr Katana’ ut thi* K 
jununl Mil- In L2.iti»Uir lex*, thr funds will ottrnrt 
an inU-ri-j.1 ralr til V'ii hriuw ihr di^plavrd ratr a 
Anv variation dur In linancial marU-i ri>ndiln<ns - 
mil Km inir i-Iti\l iw i mnu-dia U-l v and in\ rst# >r~ - 
n ill IvadviM-d by pi-. I N ) Kir L k ivwdrnK ilu- ' 
intrn-.l will br iTi-dilixl allrr Ihr drdiK-l u in (it r 

Ci imp '-Hi- Kair lax tCKTi l*rimdtni;a divljratnin 
til niin-roidrncv i-. rvu-ixi-d. Ihnnlrrrsi tor non * 
IK rv»ii1i-nlx w ill tx- cn-dil.-d in lull I' I lnirr>->t “ 
b ill hr rak ufalixlun a d.nli ha-i- on i Irarrd raxiiU 
tutann.--.anit paid uionthlv |u ihr arn mill nr 
-ubjii'l U* ihr JiVnunl holdi-r *. instruction*., can b* 
crrdKrd li»din«llu-r aciouni a I any Kink in lln- IK* 
Molr. Should a Katana- tall hr lob j12.ihhi Ihr Han£ 
ix-MTu-* ilu- rijiihr 1.1 1 ml it I hi- inti-rc-M U< tin- 1 IIC jk 
ac, mint ralh«-r than to rrnnl inlrnM - 

ii> ) Siatrmrnl- will lx* -*iil quarU-rh l~ I Accounf 
hi ildt-rs an- n»i| fvrmilli-ii lorn i-rdr aw lu-nt*. _ 
(iri-M-nliii l«ir pay nii-nl whrn lhi-r t - arc infill Inii-nJ. 
mud-, bill tx- rrturmxf unpaid and a c har^c will lx- 
U-i iril |i ) flu Hank tin- tight l«i n-tux-a* 

ilrpi-.il nr Itidixlnx- to op-n an ,hi i Hint or l,»r 
rri|iiirr a drpi-iinr In rli -x- an .11 couni » illioul 
i;i\ a rva-nn tor anv -mil Jivi-hui I 1 * i In ihr 
c a-i- nl a inini aci ■ mni in i hr nanu-- ni in i Mir mner 
p-iiplr. Ilu- Kink li.i-aiillinrily Indi-hit t hi- ai count 
u till ihixjm— Mgiird hv anv nnr nr tin- -xitx iri -r M. 
tlv ai 1 1 -ii nt holder-. tYlirn- an oindialt i-iTi-.iird- 
tlii-acciiiiul hi Oder- a ri- |ointh and -n-vi-r.it I v liahli 1 ' 
tor the di-hl l Id 1 Tlu- Bank rr-n-r\i- Hit- riy^Tit In " 
\ ary anirnd nr add to t hisr U-rm-and u nidi I mn-1 
>ub|tx l to ri-a-oii jblr not in- 


HIGH INTEREST CHEQUE ACCOUNT A PPUCAflON FORM: Pltttse complete and post, with a minimum deposit of 7 
£5,000, to High Interest Cheque Account, Allied Arab Bank Limited. FREEPOST, London EC4B 4HS. ‘ 


Full Namefs) Mr/Mrs, ‘Mi w 

(1) 

(2) : 

If more than two please complete details on separate sheet. 
Permanent Address 


Telephone No. (Home) . 

(Business) , 
Date of Birth (1) 

Resident | | 


Post Code 


_ Ocaipation(l) 

(2) 

or Non Resident [ j 


Please open a I iigh Interns) Cheque Account in nivouir namefst - 

with Ihe enclosed remittance of L (minimum * 

L!>,IKX)) made pavable to the Allied Arab Bank. (/'We a\;rcc to abide 
by the terms and conditions as above applicable to I ho t figh * 

interest Cheque Account and acknovx ledge having read them. _ 
Signed (1) 


Title of Account (forchtx]uebiHiksl ' 

Nule: 1 1) All panic-, should siyyi Ihr appliculxin lurm 1 2) hv accounts in - 
Ihr names of dutb and jmxx utii ms •: 


TT/A/1/3 


please forward a enpv of the rules l[p : ^T'l 

(31 Additional formalilies may he . l ,! ".. 

nrcessarv. (4>If interest is u*k- ;jj[l •liinil'L 

credited to another UK hanking l!~V d!l 

account, advise us of hank '■ : 

Allied Arab Bank 


' If you had visited twoorniree 
Continental stock exchanges over 
the last few weeks, you couldVe 
seen with your own eyes fee so 
sense of investing in Europe 
Europe has got a lot going 
for it In recent years. European 
governments have become 
more concerned' wife boosting 
industry and encouraging Ihe 
development of newen more 
efficient plants. And as a result; 
European company profits have 
begun to rise substantially 
But it stands to reason 
that, from now on. the prospects 
for substantial capital growth - 
from whatever size of company 
- are more Ekely to lie wife those 
European shares which haven't 
yet been discovered and traded 
up by fee average institutional 
buyer 

That’s where HesKkrson’s 
European Trusts, and in particular 
fee Henderson European Smaller 
Companies Trust, comes in. 

SMALLER COMPANIES 
ARE NOW CATCHING UP 
Jn any bull market, larger 
companies move first and smaller 
companies catch up later Hus has 
begun to happen in Europe. If other 
markets arc a guide, it could con- 
tinue for quite some time 

Howeveg it takes an invest- 
ment manager with depth of experi- 
ence and a wide range of contacts 
across Europe to be able to pinpoint 
genuine European growth stocks 
ahead of the fidd 

Those are exactly the kind of 
shares which you will find in 
fee Henderson European Smaller 
Companies Trust’s por tfolio. 

LONG EXPERIENCE 
IXFITMIPE 

Henderson has been manag- 
ing investments internationally _for 
over 50 yean*. We have over £35 
billion under management. We have 
been investing in Europe for over 
15 years and now manage well over 

£400 million across aB European 

stockmarkets. 



Henderson l 






This unusually long experi- 
ence brings wife it fee benefit of an 
unusually wide spread Henderson 
European Smaller Companies 
Trust’s portfolio is currently spread 
between no less than 12 European 
countries - a wider spread thah^ 
other European smaller companies 
trusts. 

ALREADY UP 44% 

OVER 12 MONTHS 

"Since its launch "oh 28th 
January 1985, the Henderson Euro- 
pean Smaller Companies Trust 
has shown an increase of 44% on 
an offer to bid basis inducting net 
reinvested income. 

In our opinion, there is stiQ 
substantia] further growth in fee 
pipeline, which is why we 
recommend this trust as fee one to 
invest in today 

howtoinvest 

You can take advantage of 
Henderson's extensive European 
expertise either through direct 
investment in fee Henderson 
European Smaller Companies 


Trust or alternatively in fee 
Henderson European Trust (which 
invests in larger companies); or 
in both trusts through a unit 
linked bond (Full details of 
. feeselasttwocanbeobtainedby 
telephoning Pauline Carroll on 
01-638 5757.) 

To invest now in the 
Henderson European Smaller 
Companies Thist at the fixed 
offer price of 78.9p. simply 
complete fee application form 
bdowandreturnittogetherwith 
your cheque, either direct or 
through your professional 
adviser to arrive not later than 
Tuesday March life ,1986. 

The minim urn investment 
you can make is £500. 

You should remember 
that the price of units and the 
income from them can go down as 
well as up, and you should regard 
any investment as long term. 


ADDITIONAL INFORMATION 


•Should the unit offer price move by 
more than 2 Va<H» during Ihe fixed price period 
the offer win be dosed and unite will be 
allocated ax the price ruling ou receipt of 
application. 

An initial charwNa{ ji’ rth of the assets 
(equivalent of 5% of ihe issue price) is made by 
the managers when units are issued. Out of the 
initial charge, managers pay remuneration to 
qualified intermediaries: rates available on 
request. 

Ad annual charge of 1' i'v {plus VAT) on 
the value of the Trust will be deducted from the 
gross income to cover administration costs whh 
a provision in the ThjST Deed to increase this to 
a maximum of e°» on giving 3 months written 
notice to unit holders. 

Distributions of income will be paid on 
10th December. The current estimated gross 
annual yield is 0.35% (2&2i<6). 

Contract noted will be issued and unit 
certificates will be provided within eight weeks 
of payment To setl units endorse your certificate 
and send itto themartagers: payment based on the 
ruling bid price will normally be made within 
7 working days. 

Uni I Trusts are not subject to capital gains, 
tax: moreover; annit holder will not pay this teuton 
a disposal of unite unless his total realised gains 
from all source, in the lax year amount to more 
than £5.900 (1985/6). Prices and yields can be 
found dally in the Financial Tinusk 

Trustees: Midland Bank Trust Ltd. 

1J9 Old Broad Street London EC2N 1AQ. 

Managers: Henderson Unit Trust 
Management Ltd. 26 Finsbury Square, London 
EC2A IDA (Registered Office). Registration 
Number: 856263 England. 

A member of the Unit Trust Association. 


Joint applicants must sign and attach fall 
names and addresses separately 


Henderson European Smaller Companies Trust 


I To: Henderson L'nilTriistMan^iHffLld. 

I " Dealj rtv DepL. 5. RMd Hunoti. 

Brentwood. Essex CMB 1AA Telephone: 

I UMW6757. . - 

• l rtVo wish m invest £ — 

£560) Ift the Htuderwm European &rafler 


| 


rf tfiuSv. uaitt win be available at the 
tMyqartedpw 1 


If yon would like further information about 
the Share Exchange Sendee, pleasetick □ 

Mr/Mra/Miss/Titte_ — — 

porenamefs) fin fall). — y 1 " 

Surname ■ . — — - — — 


Signatures) — 

My professional adviser is 


,Postcode_ 
Date — 



i | j * | \ j ; 


1 i i : 5 


! » ! i 





U i- » 71 » 


i 1 • L-l ! 



"T'ii J 


: ~ 


ill 

I I I * 



-Lj_L L f . 2 
'VitT'H 



i j r : i I* 








^ I-.,— .j.. 






| j I ^Val ne 6fP «isloii Food kwe rjlQ years to 1st Npvgiitiber 1985J ; T ■ _L_ L_i; 

As^inies-10 tinitus il pbe riuurn sj ofSLO OQ j "Afodunt Irivek ed £AJto wmgfor t^relief at j : _y 

! i i I I I i ! i i i : i , } i : ' 1 : S.^jtw.Mi«xik->Saga4nv.FHiiTwr> iwtic 


••Prize for the most outstanding performance 
orthe decade must still go io^ T arget Managed.** 

Uat> Mlffzlir - FWman 

••T^ugei soars head and shoulders above all 
rivals in the pensions field coming, once again, 
lop of the performance league table.** 

Tta.Tio-1 .MiontJi j«itilBBuao I** 1 -"' 

••Indeed the best performing comraci in the 
survey was linked to Target’s Managed Fimri.v9 

Thr Haiti 'Mrf’nffe - ?uiiutU> tbd tVo-oifar I1»'l 


••One Company. Target Life, can actually boa.-9l 
an invesimem record that is so superior that it 
can afford to pay twice ihe pension or some of 
the others. Target stole a march on iLs rivals, 
because the Managed Fund holds investments 
directly rather than putting money into other 
unit-linked funds within the gnoup.w 

Tb* r U!l> TrkWJyfi - Mmnta} rTip VLurli IW-4 

••Thrget Manag>.-d is unquestionably the Steve 
Cram iff investment performan ve.«* 

'kwi Manafrtnnu - Ki-ihri l—-” 


••The nip cash fond for redrement at age 65]_ 
comes from Target Life’s Managed Fluid with a 
speciacularly gi«>d figure. This Lx clearly rm 
fluke result since the same fond swppi the* 

hunuurs board in ourtA'icber 198- survey .•• i* 

M-Kv- Vbna o -iwni - Jon- lion. ■' 

••There k no doubt that investors who had the-' 
fiirp-.xighr nr luck m put money in the Target ■’ 
Managed F\md deserve a large dose of self- . 
congratulation.** txraimrlvwu.m.iu>«4 

IPcMptwdb,. ihr FibukioI T aim). * 


If you’re self-employed or the director of a 
private company, you’ll know all about the tax 
advantages of investing in a pension plan. 

Your biggest problem will be selecting the best 
from the rest 

Obviously, the most important factor will be 
the size of your pension fiind when you retire. 

All too often, this decision is taken as a result 
of comparing proj ected growth figures, whereas 
the only realistic basis for comparison is achieved 
growth. 

The table above compares the actual results 
of an investment in the Target Personal Pension 
Plan - linked to the Target Managed Pension Fund - 
with three leading with profits policies and two 
other unit linked plans invested in managed hinds. 

What it doesn't show, however, is that the 
Target plan has out-performed all other personal 
pension plans over the last ten years. 

. Whats more, only the Target plan provides 
you with a g uaranteed loan back facility ‘enabling 
you to draw on your investment whenever you like, 
with no additional management charges. 

■JiutSix't l*i hxi-I uf {in-tnluniond aix*t*lubli'Nix-urli>. 


And, with Thrget you’re not committed 'to 
keeping up a regular payment. You may vary t.he ; 
level of your investment to suit your personal, 
circumstances. •• 

Except, of course, with a growth record like-; 
ours, we think you'll want to invest more rather ' 
than less. 

To find out more, fill out and return the 
Freepost coupon below, 

rr*!. tiM’U-i mo!m\f-fiulltiTuifiinn.itniiiiuiilu-T.iwi h'ii>mi»Pluiv I 

j N.iitif ... ... . . | 

I Ayr Unutiaitim — I- 


I I'hsKihIi- i l, 

j Btisirorfr It'l.nu. — |. 

I Srnil in: n**pt ME T.irgi'i Ltli- •\*»-»iir;uiiv t.'n. Ui! Frivjx.M. j 
I Avh-sl ii in. BtU'kh I IH' t -tYA. Ti-I: A> li^burx uUMiii'iiMl. 

i TARGET 0 

TARGET GROUP PLC ]&==\ „ 

L'MT TRUSTS LIFE A5SL ! R.XNCE PENSION'S- FIN A\CT xL M xNaGEMENT 





STOCK EXCHANGE PRICES 


From vour portfolio card check vour 
cight share price moventaui. Add them 
4 up 10 give 'ou vour overall raiaL Check 
ihis agamsi the daily dividend figure 
published on this page. If il matches you 
hjvc.won outright or a share of the total 
daily prize money stated. If you arc a 
winner follow the claim procedure on the 
back of vour card. You must always have 
your card available when claiming. 


Unsettled trading 

ACCOUNT DAYS: Dealings began Feb 24. Dealings end March 10. §Coniango day March 10. Settlement day, March 17. 

§Forward bargains are permitted on two previous days. 


DAILY 

DIVIDEND 


Claims required I Claims required 
for I f for 

+36 points I +198 po ints 

Claimants should ring 0254-53272 



70 33 Snren a Amah 

5 a 4is sanopwn^ 
74iS 603 ijnan 
IS 2 H Wagon 
SSV 36H Web Fargo 
23 0 220 wimud 


33 

tft 

2ft 92 

482 -2 

421 

88 70 

873 a .. 

529 

7.9 670 

IS? 

14 

Oft 18ft 

253 a .. 

7I1 

20 182 


97 70 Brown Bomt Kent K 36 42 110 

31 10 Brian UF| A' 13V . . 1JI 14.1 31 4 

309 95 5S 119 -3 IS 1.8 100 

053 440 CaBW A Wbetoes 035 a-6 198 31 21.1 

378 1SS CMMgiBac 311 +1 102 33144 

220 i3a cap op 2m .. at uo .. 

S3 as Cf*j>ioe 45 +1 .. .. 10s 

22B 129 Oa 7 .-5, CPF I S3 -2 

270 193 Cm» 270 1.7 08 21 0 

305 200 ■ Cray Etna 298 a-2 48 1-5338 

240 95 CrvaatoM 200 +2 81 It 12.1 

B Si DM Ewer 77 #42 64n 83 255 

ISO 97 WesreV 178 lO 08 . 

37 T4 Dentate* 'A' 33 # .. 13 45 74 

350 246 Dureno 350 a +35 25 0.7 236 

4b 31 DoM0ng ft ut) 43 20 *7 137 

706 134 OuMV 194 40 21 142 

430 255 SKtraanniMl 428 *2 70 10 218 

65 36 BacaortcMacti 85 # .. 13 1.5 BS 8 

55 3@ Beannc R*tab 48 #-2 43 98 183 

Z77 I SB Emets Wng 277 *8 79 29 292 

366 256 Enromerm 350 8-6 88 13 1&8 

228 138 FameOEM 223 23 13 298 

184 104 farm 138 -4 23 1.7 19.1 

202 88 First CM* Sac 20? +5 33 13 178 

40 20 FotwaW Tech 33 . R . 167 

270 JSO QEC 202 m-2 36 23 138 

184 94 Gramm* 99 82 83 83 

§ 78 tbentand Bed 103 33 33 133 

130 ®C 163 1.7 13 204 

243 M Sana! ft C m 4114338 -2 1.0 03 . . 

130 Jams Stroud 183 #48 mi 5ft 83 

215 as Komi 105 +a 7.1 88 93 

341 218 Lac RetaWrnnSoo 783 +0 T79 68 72 

368‘: 96 Lome* 164 -6 14 03 177 

335 SM KlfOocI 318 .. 148 42 104 

405 235 Memec 400 -6 38 09 374 

23S 34 UcroBS 73 -.25 14 110 

570 100 MOO Focus 179 -5 . . m . 

98 33 M4WWBN 50 AOn 8 0 37.8 

84 99 Mtarray Eba 60 01 02 .. 

45 18 Nawmsn 30 -I 1.1 97 87 


BREWERIES 


BPS Industries 


Monlrm iJnhnl 


INDUSTRIALS A 


Barlou. Rand 


CtorVe lOcmcno 


Dominion Ini 


C«aJi 


306 153 
703 471 
61 36 

100 6 a 

573 258 
169 119 
5J0 405 
485 225 
825 417 
638 270 

198 159 
25* 146 
32S 225 
457 324 

85 59 
177 124 
253 120 
93 57 

239 179 
3H 106 

199 126 
40V 27 V 

410 758 
280 184 
278 165 

236 163 

453 270 
245 169 


AArtAyons 298 

£h* 898 

StAWMMl *6 

Boddngmnj 99 

BriMn iMaSnowf 415 

Botnar (H PI 187 

Brenmood Brew «85 

OM iMasnewj 470 

Devarasnu A) 825 

P u rlers 627 

Greeneo VtattUy 17? 

Gram «*u 203 

Guimu 283 

Hardys 8 Hum 457 

Holland EM 74 

turn B u nion CM 160 

brstiDW 253 

Marston Thompson 91 

Manana 237 

5A Dre w a n na Hi 

Scot A New 199 

Searram 136 

Vbw 378 

Whelmed 'A' 288 

Do B 273 

Whetmad bn 215 

Wotanmoi 8 0 451 

Young X" 205 


a-3 11A 

-2 214 

-1 1.1 
♦3 4 ft 

.. 200 
a .. to 

■*5 143 

• . . 10.7 

188 
*4 220n 

-3 7.9 r 

72 

• +5 103 

• HI 

28 

81 

+5 60 

•2 39 . 

+3 9.1 1 

-2 

*2 10O I 

+1V 41.1 

-3 158 . 

-3 702 : 

+3 702 : 

98 . 
-I 122 i 

9 4 • 


Cook (Wmi 


Cirjwn House 


Bo«oier 


Cook son 


INDUSTRIALS L 


Laird 


Mftdoiuir 


jUl TTiTTil 

"■■EffiTSia 




li "/ Times NencpaiKn Ltd. Dafl* Total 


Weekly Dividend 


j Pica)*,' make a note of your daily totals 
for the weekly dividend of £ 20!000 in 
today's newspaper. 


BRITISH FUNDS 


IMS 

H«n Lew Sia* 


SHORTS [Under Five 


ini Gross 
onty n.« 
Price C" ge vbT. ytd* 


93 ■ 

9? 

• Tro-is 

CIC*. 

1996 

ft-* 


*W 

9£ 


r. 

i960 

M 


MW 

97 

• E«£h 

10 

1366 

99'. 


10* • 

94 

-T.eas 

i.r» 

1965 

99 - 

-V 

*m- 


T>ejs 



58'. 


% 


EjCH 


1998 

95'- 


PJ3 • 


E-dr 

I4*« 

1WS 

10* 

m re 

IW - 


E.ai 

13 .*n 


101 . 

-• a 


1-^ 

T«asCiO'.- 

1S87 

99. 


9* - 

JjJ 


£ .S 

153? 

94'. 


180', 

J4 

Ejcn 

10' ", 


99’. 



M 

Fuad 

6.*r 

1935-87 

95'- 


■W 

V 


10*. 

1997 

9Bm 


*>5. 

<U 


j*. 

1?fl7 

93- 

- v 

W* 

P* 

1-43S 

u*. 

1967 

101 ■ 


w> 


Treat 

7 

79650! 

«S 

w'e 

100 

U1 

E’Ch 

10'*. 

1988 

9V- 

- a 

90'. 

yo 

Treat 

n».% 

1988 

9T. 

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BB - 79 . Trent ft. 197888 


S' - 08 ■ Trees 

8'.*. 1938 

96. 

102 ■ 93 - Treat 

1909 

101’. 

95 ■ 90 • Treat 

10' *. l?M 

«, 

98 '- 90 E>cn 

10*. ise? 

98 

lOO- « E«ct> 

10 1989 

99. 

7? . 7o-E.cn 

2'S 1990 


181 , SO-. E.C4 
86. 79 Treat 

1l“, 19® 

101 • 

5”. 1986-89 

88'. 

IDr- w.E.cfl 

lit, 1990 

101 - 

3- - 69 Tims CS' •* 1989 

96 . 

» .9 Tr«t 

3*. 1905 
U+, 1990 

8< - 

108 100 Treat 


sue - 9“ E.cn 

12 •*, 1990 


9l'. 7a Treat 

1*. 1990 

01 • 

X) - 86 - Trmn 

3 ■-> 1967-30 

92 . 

151 ST- Treat 

lip, 1990 

?r- 



468 230V Gaohson 
288 135 Cope Aftoaa 
3, £ gopeon (FJ 
75V 55 COM 
385 210 CnninPqa 
81 31 Om« Da Qroar 

142 80 Oat NtahaUan 

182 128 Oman House 

787'j 148 V Qmni 8VJ. 


S +3 SL3 20 124 
*17 11.0 18 133 

J 21 4.4 270 

*1 10 54 11.1 

128 18 114 
71 8 .. 32 43 31.7 

138 a-2 S3 43 108 

182 *3 11 1 6.1 103 

£218*; *23 375 1.7 .. 


a-2 


15 338 

43 

22 

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350 

DPCE 

470 

0-2 

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275 



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Oil . 

28V 

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45 74 

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55 95 


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21 142 

9*0 

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913 

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47 12 0 

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231 

105V Data 

222 

+2 

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32 12.1 

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15 890 

208 

106 

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200 

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4.7 lift 

a-2 

46 

98 16ft 

2S3 

132 

Dooouttar 

253 

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9.7 

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+8 

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29 292 

19V 

1DV Onus Hast 

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43175 

a -« 

88 

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331 

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331 

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75 

22 205 


28 

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1.7 121 

115 

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45 

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118 

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63 Bft 

01 

88 


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0 .. 

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87 

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488 308 Ttafakpr HDMl 
3ST. 196 limMnnd 
182 105V Trsnspcn Daw 
r?'t Ta Transood 
80 . 38 itaafua 

93 a*i Tunac 

TSB . 81 -Turner ft Newtf 
207 94 UXO 

l» 20 Umnsro 
14] .-998 UlSeM 
83V 44*. UWBWrfftVI 
235 184 VU0> 

413 210 MOM 
140 7B vscajr Products 
■sm 101 vuMn 
mb 527. Vottwaam 


«4 *2 

£14 V 

EBB 1 - 

219 

413 *S 

124 

193 a .. 
2168*7 * 6*7 


-ft 184 43 9.1 

93 44 163 
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-3 «1 27 7.0 

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*2 18 14 2S< 

.. 603 33138 


163 1.7 10 204 

1338 -2 1.0 03 .. 

183 a*a mi sa so 

105 *a 7.1 as 93 

283 *8 T79 68 72 

164 -6 14 09 177 

318 148 43 104 

400 -6 38 03 374 

73 25 34 113 

179 -5 . . m . 

50 ..*On 6 0 37.6 

60 .. 01 02 .. 

30 -I 1.1 17 87 


395 283 return Pad 

f iDfl EAro 
148 BS 
27V BM 


301 *1 143 48 3.1 

181 *1 WO 53 77 


:: 

174 110 Mada Pnttadea 150 

218 96 WAdtan 213 -3 

ITS 125 wagon M 179 a .. 

121 34') wSatad mm 3 121 *fl 

i8S 145 wurams ITS #42 

288 81 WUwnOnWan] 288 

27* 100*1 WaOBioad 271 

87 40 (Sr 88 

S3 8 W UH re n 21 — *7 

118 45 Wltsasnd 73 *5 

in 86 wean ii7*» 

285 185 Whom* Rem .245 -ft 

112 B4 Whasaoe ■ 102 

221 136 VIMMatt 221 *6 

224 128 mm (James) 168 

530 563 l»*vrT.v. l7Uf»- 536 -14 

168 128 VWU OP 158 


6 > 11 11.0 
IBB 43 114 
68 93 111 

4Sr 21335 

" I .'I II 

43 23 132 

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18 1.6 . . 
51 29 250 

23 03 300 

107 33 128 

4.1 n 48 12 


*5 43 S3 253 

73 07 162 
-ft 3.1 13 22.1 

78 77 83 
*fi 113 ft.1 118 
84 5013.0 

-14 1O0 20 2OH 

.. 1)4 72 453 



OVERSEAS TRADERS 


_ 83 33 154 

V ZTi BM 34*f a . . 25 72 148 

1 20 a Been 11B 83 S3 128 

3rv 12*. Badrekn (AS V EQ*> *l*a 

Jff 51 Efton (8t 53 a -1 23 83 148 

28'* Wi Mat E25V 139 5* .. 

129 216 EngWi CHna Oa* 322 S-1 19.7 43 128 

30 18V Encaaon (Uq -B C23V +1V 90 04 .. 

83 78 Erekbw Horn 158 - 48 23 21.8 


283 170 Newman. (Lou#) 270 a.. 183 71 123 


103'j 7B'i NE1 I02'j 

172 K Oceontc* 43 

478 238 Odom aaau nuMi 473 a-2 

38 43 Pnbow 48 

44 » Plncon 28 -1 

184** 95V Rams Bn SW £147 
17*.- to Philps Lamp* N/V tisv 
205 115 poco ISO 

1B0 111V Do A- UO Uoeng 145 
214 114 Pieway 2(0 -2 

20v 13V Do ADR 25 E20>< *1 

168 65 PtKUUte 153 

60 22 Quern Automation 30 

at» iso nm Baa 200 a . . 
196 142 Hotaflei IBS 


73 73 173 
1.1 23 87 

20 04 S3 


73 33 104 
75 52 78 
66 31 188 

i'i 2.0 223 

.. 144 
43 22128 

87 36 119 


OS 137 w anna* H agan 511 -e 128 85 152 

91 48 wooa 70 .. 50 7.1 54 

40 16 WoodKM) 28 .. 14 50 93 


503 

38? 

Schotts (OHO 

503 


388 

5.7 113 

88 



78 


21 

2.7 168 

>40 

21 

Sound DetiraMr 

41 

-2 

06 

1ft 7 9 

289 

72 

Sic 

127 

■2 

. . A 

.. 82 

197 

137 

Son* Ina 

18? 

a .. 

65 

3.8 114 

119 74 

21V O'. 

Stream Designers 

118 

E14V 

+*i 

05 

05 428 

230 

168 

TMapnone Rentals 

TOO 

ft 

too 

5.0 14ft 

400 

88 

Taamerri* 

08 

+6 

25 

28 56 

484 

301 

Thom EM 

447 


250 


185 

149 

Than* IFW) 

185 


56 

30 02 

3M> 

168 

TinsW Tplacooi 

200 


2ft 

00 20ft 

276 

158 

UE1 

276 

410 

7.5 

27 2*7 

306 

173 

Umrch 

7H0 

a-3 

65 

ft3 13ft 

350 

770 

296 

150 

UH Lsasna 
Utd Scamefic 

253 

170 

*2 

5ft 

21 8 0 

378 

244 

VG batnwwn» 

378 

+8 

27 

07 327 

758 

133 

WcMsx 

2*8 

a-2 


46 10ft 

83 

40 

wwmn setecaon 

56 

41 

39 

7ft 131 

103 

56 

Whnwortn Bee 

50 


2? 


325 

SIO 

wfunw nang 

240 

a .. 

9ft 

41 12ft 


FINANCE AND LAND 


I 334 

210 

ABngwonfi 

240 

44 

IB 

00 .. 

193 

l£B 

Mean Huron 

172 

47 

110 

84 72 

345 

200 

ArMagasD 

340 


200 

5ft Sft 

1S1 

70 

BerUnv Teen 

130 

• .. 



26'; 

17V Camsfa 

£24 


157 

87 .. 

21B 

159 


196 

+7 

25 

1ft 562 

38 

SO'. 

10 

L 16*. 

Centreway 

25 

187. 

. . D 

13 

6ft 64 

253 

120 

Hamno 

241 

a-2 

104 

4ft 34ft 

193 


Ivory 6 Sum 

168 


61 

38 29ft 

173 

11* 

Majedw 

170 

+2 

89 

52 2*4 

47 

37 

Nai Home Loans 

40 




46*. 

36 

Do 

C42 

a .. 

800 

19ft .. 


FOODS . 


FIVE TO FIFTEEN YEARS 


160 95 Trees 

1IVS 1991 

10i‘. 

79 FunO 

V**. 1967-91 

87 . 

US'. 95 -E.t.T 

1i»» 1991 

102' ■ -v 

11] . 100 Treat 

12 199£ 

UO 

MW . 87' Treat 

10* , 1992 

98; 

104- 9* Tr*jt CIO* -* 1592 

109 . -*« 

ill 95-E.ch 

12 A. I S! 

108 -V 

11?. 10? EjuTi 

13.*. 1992 

113 .a- V 

9* ’-Treat 

10*. 1993 

S8, 

11) - *® Treat «' *, 1993 

Tio -V 

«• 7* -Fund 

6-. 1993 

83 

r?i - 108 '. Tims 

13-"- 1993 

H6. -- 

Hb . 195 Treat 

1* •. 1991 

121 a-v 

ri9- 107-Eren 

12- -V 1994 

115- 

ii) or. End> 

I3’."« 199* 

110'. 

4* . 83 - Treat 

9% IW* 

92'- 

111 97 -Treat 

12*. 1995 

108 . 

"1 . 1 Gas 

y. I9M.95 

?1 . 

1*71 B8'- E'ch 

10 .% 1995 

98. 

1 19 10* • Treat 

!£'.*. 1995 

IU’. 

1£4 109 Treat 

l**.. 1996 

120*- -v 

91 - 8j - Treat 

?*, 1992-96 

«■•#-•- 

1W . i.VJ Treat 

IS'.*. 1996 

U6 - - 

IIV? • E*cn 

i3'.*k 1995 

117*. -•» 

TCI '>1 - Treat 

r3'.*. 199' 

11?’. -re 

:*j.' SL- - t.ai 

IQ':'- 1997 

100 . 

5i ■ "V - Treat 

8.*. 1997 

90 . a . 

1JT-M* E"W 

IS". 1??7 

128 -a 

TJ S5 Troat 

6 1 975-33 


j*. K e.C" 

9-V 1988 

96 • - - 

li' • Tr.sis 

15.*» tM8 

1X3 .9- „ 

11 j 19? E uji 

12*. |9S8 

in-. 

V 65 T-e« 

9 *- |9» 


11? 10 -Eicn 

l£'.‘. 1W9 

113 4F- • 

l.._ 5] Treat 

10 .re 1999 

10T*. - „ 

193 91 Con, 

10' .V 1439 

69 -. - - 

t£2 rid • Treas 

1.4, a»o 

TI9. -•* 


44 

23* AAZO N/V Bearer 

E43V 

+V 

400 

92 .. 

256 

121 

AIM CoKMS 

173 

#45 

33 

1ft 161 

383 

£73 

Amarthsm 

350 

♦4 

8ft 

2ft 17ft 

£60 

160 

Anchor Ctanlcal 

235 


01 

2.8 8 7 

130 

78 

BTP 

129 


57 

44 167 

99 

SV» aaver DM50 

fSSV 

+4 

?so 

73 . 

12! 

100 

BUgaai 

122 

*2 

103 

04 92 

13* 

10* 

Biem Cherts 

Iffi 


81 

41 16ft 

79' 

gu 

Hr Bencoi 

7BV 



.. 85ft 

107 

79 

Canmg(W) 

100 

♦7 

51 

5 1 1*ft 

£75 

a * 

Cooke 

267 


Sft 

35 139 

189 

13T 

Cones tan 

14S 


56 

46 Bft 

166 

117 

Do A' 

115 

, . 

6ft 

57 6ft 

25 

14 

Cory (Horace) 

17 


0.7 

AI 5.7 

151 

116 

Croda 

141 

+2 

iao 

7.1 14 6 

no 

82 

Do DM 

110 

+2 


.. 114 

227 

150 

E*S & Eeatard 

198 

a .. 

88 

«ft 172 

258 

179 

Foseco-Mmw*) 

252 

+0 

rift 

4.7 99 

Ua 

66 

Halstead (James) 

135 

-3 

57 

42 104 

*88 

315 

Hickson 

380 

-5 

£1 4 

Sft 86 

9* 

51 

Hoechsi DMS0 

BM 

43 



5*9 

630 

taro Churn taC 

920 

412 

471 

5.1 02 

373 

278 

Laporn 

385 

-2 

10ft 

29 185 

121 

84 


109 

+1 

47 

*J 172 

168 

141 

JfSU 

182 


3ft 

18 16ft 

82 

53 

Reaorook Hugs 

79 

♦V 

30 

35 182 

162 

126 

Renuui 

157 

-1 

12 

2ft £14 

304 

94 

SNIA BPD 

304 




328 

162 

Wotatentrotme Re* 

TOO 

-8 

11 i 

5 5 93 

112 

56 

Yorfcsnee Chem 

112 

*4 

4J 

38 107 


168 

r» 

ASOA-MFI 

152 


41 

23 19.4 

27 

15 

Alpne Dre*s 

22 


26 

118 . 


7S3 

i^ood 

338 

m y 


£34 

194 

292 

a-2 

Bft 

27 14.0 

128 

flfl 

Assoc FMKnm 

122 

a-2 

48 

38 38ft 

879 

wa 

Avans 

584 


iSS 

2917ft 

260 

13* 

195 

6 

Barks {SUney C) 
Barker 6 Dobson 

246 

13V 

a .. 

59 7J 

937 

311 

UO 

Barr (AQ 
Bassett Foods 

311 


121 

39 Oft 

206 

133 

181 

-4 

07 

&4 105 

128 

65- 

tteaeys 

08 


30 

21 116 

185 

140 

Efepm 

177 

-3 

b* 

31 21.1 

86 

50 

Bkjebrra Carl 

88 

+5 

74 

Bft 2*4 

75 

37V Br Vardan tBVI) 

70 

-1 

2.0 

29128 

177 

131 



+3 

6.4 

51 UO 

180 

IM 


173 


66 

5 0 Bft 

190 

130 

Cbttcrds Dawes 

150 


Sft 

51 M2 

183 

lib 

Do 'A' 

183 


96 

Sft 117 

315 

US 

Q*sm 

i 

a-5 

97 


285 

US 


36 Z7ft 

171 

W 

Fotier (AtaefQ 

188 

a +3 

3ft 

1 9 227 

318 

193 

Fncti Love* 

318 

1*5 

4 8 239 

313 

xo 


24fl 


bfi 

23 iao 

8*8 

548 


813 

lift 

14 2&3 

236 

IW 

HVams 

193 

a-5 

44 

23 170 

218 

143 

Hfcdown HWgS 

208 

-3 

53 

25 2*0 

«. 

5£ 

ttoma Farm 

W 


48 

5ft Bft 

612 

389 


SM 


an 

1 5 252 

264 

170 

Kn<h Save 

262 

a-V 

6H 

2ft 193 

108 

47' 


105 

21 

20 153 

80 

4/ 

LOW* (GFJ 
Low (Wmi 

80 

+10 

43 

5.4 589 

638 

498 

BOO 

+5 

17.1 

29 109 

595 

25* 

Matthews (Bernard) 595 

a +5 

11.1 

19 28.1 

113 

78'. 

uett Trada 5upp 

103 

Ih 

7ft 15ft 

180 

94 

Mormon IW) 

180 


1.7 

09 271 

270 

197 

IMdJ UN) fVOM)2aO 

+5 

13 

33190 

83 

07V ftamsa-a 

82V 

a+ft'j 

2ft 

3ft IBft 

30* 

20* 


290 

-2 

104 

3ft 15ft 

170 

1311 

Nredn & Pnacock 

162 


52 

3ft 153 

T37 

10b 


131 

a+i 

b 4 

*1 13ft 

190 

122 

FtHM 

192 

+1 

76 

40 111 

*65 

3*0 

Ftowntreo Mec 

435 


18ft 

17 123 

3M 

1*5 

25b 

117 


300 

1*1 

-t 

-2 

bft 

A.1 

17 256 
29186 

ISO 

20 


17* 

-2 



610 

418 

Tate a Lyle 

610 

♦5 

314 

5.1 124 

348 

210 

Tmco 

343 

-5 

7ft 

2ft 3*J> 

252 

233 

140 

164 

Ungae 
Utd Bocuts 

252 

223 

a+7 

*2 

124 

109 

4ft 18ft 
49 12ft 

158 

SO 

Watson S PWp 

1*9 

*1 

S3 

SftlSft 


183 78 Erstdis House 

iTiViiS Euupesn F*m«s 
183 101 Do 5% Prf 
2J0 138 EwreO 
140 KM EMXH . 

154- SO Eqmat M 
415 272 Baal 
42 22 Falun 
37 26 Fmdax Anrlc M 

150 108 Farewr (3q 
iB5 90 Rle Mmar 
920 260 Flitons 
47 32 FttmAon 

112 06 newtocaw 
49 20 Fooer 


112 84 GQ tat 
344 188 GKN 
aw 20a an 
84 5b Canon Eng 
138 99 GaSMW 

u6 64 Gmi 
KH. 533\ Gtau 
323 164 Oyiiwotl 
95 30 Gomna 

6*0 433 Goring Kan- 
201 05 Grampian HUga 

312 148 Granada 
16V 7V CkoretMtl 
74 38 hatat Prvoaan 
182 114 HM Eng 
188 138 Hal (Ml 
2 -ms 143 tone 
2*5 155 Hama 
34 18V Hampson M 
62 35 Ha ma 
191 133') Harem 
190'- 135 Do tub Cn* 
Ml SB'r Do 5*4k 
156 92 H a wre awn 
195 127 Hama tPnap) 


128 55 Hetalr 

92 54 Havntr (J) 

140 58 Higagaia 8 Job 
83 62 Hods Bros 

94 87 Non Uoyd 
182 too Hopknaods 
IS 7 Howard Uacntnu 
TIM 87 Howden 
14V Vt Hudson Bay 
288 IBS HuntrnAMDC 
106 80 Huatav GKM4> 


315 190 bovon 270 

310 205 Jackscna Bniana 293 
i33v 93 Jarabw Man in 


3a'i li*.- Joretxm • FB 30 
275 180 JObnaaai 275 

95 41 JOnaa 8 SMpman 80 

171 114 Jowaan (Ttaanas) 186 
38 22 KaMaam 25 

32V 22V KSfeai 32 

2«o i6S Katoey Ml 
128 78 Kanoady 8mMa 19 

385 230 Kershaw (A) 280 

2DB 155 Kitchen (ran TaytortZU 
148 80 NMKftZo 148 


32 13 UW 32 

303 185 Lop -803 

286 1*0 Lart 280 *2 

174 68 Uaaont 157 -3 

82 25'.- Uwm 82 

58 24V tea (Amu) S4*j *2 

44 25 Ulocara 28 +1 

83 82 LOashaa tb 

88 27 Urea 83 

72 32 Uoyd (FH] 58*7 *1 

31 20V Loow* m 25-1 

232 175 Lon VbitB 190 

13a 83 Doom ioo 

85 56 Lon 6 Ntan 89'; *V 

199 99 Lon tad 184 a-2 

i«8 88 Longkni tad 108 a .. 

390 157 Low 8 Bonar 37T 

368 22t ML Hdgs 388 #*5 

M 35 MS te 00 a *2 

41V 22V MV Dari 37*1 

350 144 Atacama Buna 358 a-3 

130 87*.- uaefatane i*o 

47 34 MacMtan (P8W| 46 .. 

239 112 MeXMnt 196 -43 

88 45 WgnA 88 

630 2CS Uancnener eao a.. 


S3 

a-i 

E25V 


322 

•-T 

E23V 

♦i* 

156 

- 

1EBV 

-1 

117 


212 

-* 

120 

a+a 

146 

-1 

411 

-2 

23 


29 


120 

*■1" 

86 


513 


37 


104 

+2 

49 

+4 

122 

+6 

20 

-V 

163 


64 

0 .. 

101 


341 

-ft 

£80 

+2 

8* 

T3£ 

a .. 

1*6 

+10 

BBS 

+7 

313 

+6 

84 

+1 

*66 

a .. 

190 


256 

a II 

9V 

— *4 

74 

a +2 

158 


156 

+2 

ISO 

a .. 

2*5 


30% 

a+v 

41 


182 

-V 

2162 v a +1 

111 

. +1 

150 

_| 

195 


526 

-6 

110 

♦1 

105 


168 


123 

-V 

83 

mm 

140 


78 

♦V 

87 

a+a 

150 


B7*i 

+v 

E11S 


255 

.. 

S3 


232 

+'i 

147 

-1 

270 

s 

293 


109 

■2 

532 

4ft 

(78 

-ft 

30 

-V 

275 

+6 


ag is NotoiMtl Ra 


9C3 370 Yarrow 
188 88 Yom (H) 


3ft 4ft 10.1 
2.1 2A 173 
200 r 3 ft 12.1 
3ft 2J 189 


40 2ft 21ft 

&r sftiift 

7.1 61 .. 

4B 2218ft 
4ft 3J 13ft 
76 ft.1 194 
Bft 23 24.1 
14 8.1 5ft 
14 4ft 51ft 

7.1 5ft 19ft 

5flr 7.7 67 
6ft 13 274 
1ft 2.7 .. 
54 52 7ft 
Oft 12 5ft 
5.7 47 499 

1 ft Cft 82 

lift 72 14ft 

4.1 64 .. 

84 83 16.6 

15.7 49 13ft 

aau 3& 7.7 
43 51 9.1 

21 16 11ft 


2ft 3ft 6ft 

15.0 33 17ft 

7.9 42 24ft 

mi 33 212 
07 72 53 

25 34 15ft 
112 7.1 102 
89n 4.4 11.9 
12ft 99 13ft 
22 OS 37.1 
Ur 5ft 112 

57 3ft 144 
ms 49 .. 
82 74 .. 

70 47 17.1 

12.1 82 18.7 
17.4 33 lift 

27 25 9ft 
54 51 14ft 

9 ft 03 112 
5.1 4.1 51ft 

34 4-1 lift 
.. a - 271 
.. D .. 392 


INSURANCE 


251 185 
26V W. 

ssnys. 

207 

E23V 

-3 

a+V 

Sft 

too- 

4ft .. 
4ft .. 

2BV 19v Am flan 

tZTi 


mo 

Sft .. 

380 

tatfeSCK* 

250 


7.9 

3J3 183 

844 593 


839 

*3 

37.9 

Aft .. 

290 174 

Com UMon 

275 

-8 

Tfi» 

61 .. 

299 308 
350 ' TO* 
820 503 

ar # +?- 

268 

SB* 

-ft 

ao 

10 .. 

Gen Acorn* 

823 

-7 

2HB 

1520.7 

815 61B 

GRE 

788 

-6 

37 ft 

40 22ft 

723 5*8 

Hamh-C E 

658 

-23 

31.4 

4ft 10.1 

SI 217 

Hogg Bubmaon 
Ul^a Oen 



134 

A3 14ft 

777.5*5 

7R 


32-1 

4ft .. 

34 19 

uSHm sa ri 

£26 





872 642 London b Man m *2 319 38 330 

338 24Z Ldn Ud M« 333 S 1&9 58 129 

70 401, MWI 8 McLert S05V *1S 220 33 . . 


«6 218 PWS 

14 977 tarl £13'« 

832 403 ftutarasi 832 

435 27B Retina 416 

883 515 noraT 858 -8 

413 332 SndgwKKQp 381 -4 

194 295 EtaSulWi'acn 367 -2 

450 320 fturga HUga 420 # 

653 391 Sun Mtova 848 

80* 709 Sui Ua 802 -2 

365 220 Trade tadamnty 360 

460 289 MMa Fauar . 419 -a 


148 88 Bar* B WA W 121 

188 133 Boost* 5 Hawke* U3 

130 90 tare WMrer tos 

58 22 Cerepah 57 

235 170 Onsafca 213 

433 231 Rrsl Laaure 421 

6BV 51V GRA 57 

81 35 Hanbugar Brook* 78 

146 78 HortzDO Tr»wt 122 

1*0 93 tat Lnsura 130 

231 66 JMano-a HUga 05 

205 12a Mremnatar^ 155 

1M PtauaM 331 

366 366 nattyUseUI 368 

64 32 fCy Uaaura 56 


9 ft XBWft 
12ft 40 39ft 
564 42 .. 
34ft 4.1 54ft 
169 4ft .. 
360 4 2 207 
US 67 176 
144 97 210 

80 2.0 280 
221 34083 

305 3ft .. 
12ft 3ft 13.1 
164 20 207 


100 6ft 8ft 
214 

79 7ft 90 
14 2ft 162 
89 3ft 130 
107 2ft 16.1 
.. .. Bft 

. . . . 49.7 

6ft 57 237 
69 53 9ft 
30 35 133 
7ft 5.1 103 
8ft 27 20ft 


PAPER. PRINTING, 
ADVERTG 


PROPERTY 


59.0 51 
107 4ft 63 
99 6220ft 

87 4ft lift 
1ft 07 50.1 
Bft 29 184 


0.7 04 22ft 
.. .. 150 

104 3ft 17ft 

4.1 4.7 1M 

65 67 127 
23 lift #4 
1.7 53 22ft 

114 4ft 11.8 
20r 1ft 225 
214 78214 

15.7 7ft 92 

7.1 49 3U 


05 1919ft 
99 22 270 
M 28 129 
5.1 3ft T3J 
21 34 6ft 

90 55 77 

.. .. 22a 

20 4.) lift 
29* 3ft .. 
39 62 17ft 

1ft 7ft 93 
142 73 126 

7.4 105 62 
99 32194 
43 29 21.7 
120r 35 124 


228 147 Saga HoMan 220 *1 

304 213V Smarm dp 295 m*S 

SO 61 Tottenham Hrespre 55 

153 92 Zaari 150 #-3 


.. n .. 91 

6.1 27 347 

24 1J2 . 

37010.4 109 
91 41 126 


MINING 


22 9>t Ang Amor CoM 

111. 570 And AM 
79 28V 5n Go kt 
46 29V AMT 
39V 21 AmioreM 
41 21 ifo-A- 

s zsr 

187 71 Bredwi 

100 52 Can DM 

504 307 Cons QoH&Md* 
499 257 Da Basra 
280 as DeatvaM 
18V 5V Doondorertn 
23V IP. Drtehwea. 

12V Vi Dnrtxn 


«J» fta.O Si .. 

» V 446 ao .. 
271 59 . . 
142 3ft .. 
.. 142 3ft .. 

.. 475 267 .. 

♦1 79 0 20ft .. 

*2 260 160 .. 
+V 252 143 .. 


+34 160 3 6 


780 275 emfiftnd 
« «38 BOro 
2*0 ss Babun 
488 233 E Rand GoU 
730 2"t E RanafYp 

9 TV FSCons 
213 04 F5 Oa* 

246 48 Grew tin 
It 4*j GaM 
12V ft Gan Mbang 
.14V 51* GFSA 
606 848 GM KMgooM 
175 S3 Gnxra 
050 230 GTOOb** 

216 i>3v Haapaai Aiwa 
OV ft Harabny 
525 tffl ttartw 
87 40 JtoSMfes 
18V «V Kbwoa* 

0‘t 3V woo* 

278 m Lasta 
70S 7V Ubanon 

423 193 Lorene 
196 110 MM 
56 21 MMayrtan Uftng 
its 10 (ianatMa 

38 14V Ueuk Ezpbaaan 

17 7 Mangura 

10V 4V MdM Mh 
7B2 460 Mlnorco 
6*. 2'r Now WU* 
ws 39 mi Broken MB 
54V 28V Not Kata*! 

280 100 Funding Tbi 
310 206 PSdWafceod 
33 . 14 Hud Mines Ud 
000 275 Ram mhos Prop 
95 16 Randkxwi 
308 231 Rumen 
087 507 HU 
8't 4V Rnaanouro 
» (VS Helena 

279 78 SA land 
731V 16V SoutfeioM 

8 *319 SHMoHai 

280 123 SengwBaal 
275 100 Tanjong 

MV B Tare 
3i0 too Trow* 

005 335 urea# 

87 3zv vast tads 
844 313 VMarapoar 
170 55 Wrta u aa i 
115 50 Wogais 
15 10V Wanker Coaler* 

737 340 waarom 
<20 143 Wasara Anna 

39 18V Westam Daap 
2*8 142 wenamMnm 
<70 r*o Wsst Rand Cane 

182 TO* Wiwn Oeefc 

31 Oh mnhMs 
107 30 «W »®S 

19 ID ZenKM Capper 
86 32 2ar<pw)^ 


HOTELS AND CATERERS 


CINEMAS AND TV 


42 

275 

Grand MM 

418 

a-ft 

M3 

3ft 12.7 

362 

196 

Kennedy Btoomh 

2SZ 

-3 

2 1 

Oft 130 

361 

£41 

Laobroke 

381 

*4 

15 0 

4ft 21ft 

<85 

3*0 

Lon part, Hotels 

450 


MJr 3ft 195 

100 

77 

Mauri Chvtoda 

88 

-i' 

20 

2ft 14 0 

112 

67 

Pence 01 W Hotel* 

69 


21 

30 124 

72*, 

> 46 V 

Queens Moat 

09 V 

-V 

22 r 

3ft 19ft 

415 

353 

Sew>r Hotels 'A' 

393 


16 

09 10ft 

76 

S 

SUMS 

72 

a II 

1 7 

24 175 j 

1B9 

119 

Tiusihouse Fore 

160 

a-t 

7ft 

49 119 | 


88 51 Manganese tanza 56 

122 TO'; Haifa 109V 

107 61 V Marbng M 

87 37 Do A 87 

77 53 Marshall Ua* 89 

410 285 Muipnar 410 

700 am Mead tt® ass 

172 100 Meat Ctoswea J38 

75 50 Mautm 73 

85 55 Wmsfl C DOF 77*; 

65 58 mum Samara m 

in 128 Moan 174 

275 197 Mbtym CrocMa 275 

130 59 Mon (Robert) 104 


an 

120 

AnQha TV K 

203 

.. 129 

a* 

lift 

6* 

£6 

Grampian 

36 

.. 24 

67 

01 

IBS 

110 

HIV N/V 

180 

110 

61 

Bft 

301 

215 

LWT HWgs 

290 

.. 306 

71 

116 

£68 

120 

Scot TVA' 

262 

., 127 

40 

106 

18G 

MO 

TVS N/V 

173 a 

11.4 

66 

83 

30 

£3 

TW 

30 

.. £4 

53 

10* 


INDUSTRIALS 

A-D 


25V 9 Haepsena 

20? 119 p£ru) 


II 


DRAPERY AND STORES 


OVER FIFTEEN YEARS 

1C* 51 • T*i*uv 1JS 2001 S»- 

9 ■SMOI 98 

lit. - n« Treea u*. vjWfti i?J - 
' <; • •"re*. ItT. 2002 9? - 

•w.l'Yr Eim I? - 1999-C2 111. 
«■ VC T*„M 9 2CtC M 

1 C: 57 10 *'. 2003 100 - 

1?' 1>2 • T-0J3 T3'.*. 200M? 12* 

il; .I'M her, II .*-,2001.04 1 IQ- i 
"'I *4 l».-45 ICh, 200* 

57 ** Fund 3,". 19990* 53. 

-r Tire, 5*. 200* 98 

:0- 20 CW9 ", 2005 3=20 20*. 
*»’ '*» S' •. 2005 96 - 

■Si 5* £■;■» 10 2005 10* . ( 

:.r :m t? -« ajos-os no- 
e> to T-aai e*. 2on:-« e* >. 

1.6 T-»is li'.", 2W1-07 11J. 

ITT. :*> Trn,w 1J ’.2004-08 127-1 

bj lf»a b *-.2009.12 eS'.l 

9? -J T--n 7 2012-15 82 . 

Hi E.cn I2<, 20IJ-17 120. 

UNDATED 

il 36 .VOWS 4*. 40’. 

?' 33 War L" 1 36-. 

■!.' il Con. 3 47-4 

M • 25 Ti?ac 3-. 31- 

29 23- COnjcJi ? ’ , 25 

2t . 23 Trcai 2.<V .' - 1 


INDEX- UNKED 

1 19 105' Treat IL 2*- 
•t2 . 51 Tr*ii il r. 

I IJ - irn Ti?a^ IL 

IV? fs ■ Ti«-at IL2 -> 
:c? 57 . Trrol lift S. 

I--.6 vf . T't*'. IL 2*. 
IU J* 52--TrJ,slL2 '■» 
106 5? Trem il?' *. 
*: 75 '. T.--4 IL2 

5 1 ■ V ■ T-.'^c IL2 ■*. 
96 . 06 Tre.u iL2 V. 


1908 U 8 . 

IWU ICC . 


2016 9T - 

2 'JM W. 


BANKS DISCOUNT HP 


90 

37 

150 

60 

17.0 

38 

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2*0 

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50 



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40 

2 1 

10 0 

57 

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96 

4D 

957 

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9* 


33 

15 355 

100 

61 






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11 


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Backs L66 

14 







58 


14 


565 

220 

Brown IN) 

550 

+5 

119 

25 280 

317 

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Bretons 

£6* 

-10 

63 

24 182 

120 

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Canort A' 

118 


32 


54 

3b 


45 


11 


355 

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3*5 


207 


T86 

87 

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Count rFrem A' 

181 


77 


130 

95 

126 

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67 

53 104 

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92 


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15 211 

30* 

1.1 T 


302 


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371 

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61 


81 

56' 

E*i 8 Goatiwr 

75 


3ft 

4* 102 

660 

380 

Fry-) iWmCtedan) 

655 


129 

20 32ft 

176 

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Emp«e Stems 

17D 

-2 

36 

21 29.1 

230 

130 

Earn 

228 


46 

20 246 

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£7 

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78 

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144 

139 

72 

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126 


47 

17 22 S 

i£l 

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Fora iManmi 

121 

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Fomwiswr 





392 

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378 

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22 221 

110 

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90 


7.6 


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66 

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105 

43 

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103 


21 

20 769 

237 

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190 


107 

5.6 134 



Graiun 



57 



QLK 

til's 

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937 

F7* 

Do A 

922 

a-2 

258 


2M 

■68 

Hams Oaerawor 

£40 


5ft 

25 222 

as 







39 

£1 

HMes 

38 

8-1 

30 

79 158 

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M7 






128 

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House 01 Lew 

122 


11 * 

93 11 4 

90 

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Jones iEmosn 

84 

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69 181 

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123 

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60 

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198 

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370 

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830 


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1ft 38.7 


142 

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178 

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100 

57 121 


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£10 

(John) 

313 


SI 



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185 


£9 



JIM 




7* 


150 

94 

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136 


51 

37 144 




2*3 

+3 

54 

22 260 








6*0 

331 

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7! 




97 

58 

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84 


1 4 









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tanore mewtaeri) 

120 




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156 

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315 


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32 




185 

118 

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92 

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135 


44 


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200 

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79 

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510 

877'. 

Womwonh 






144 74 Newman Tonka 120 *»*ii 

« 26 Notaai 56 -2 

224 147 NaratS 220 -4 

253 140 OMcs Beet Mach 210 

290 105 Rafter Knoe ft' 276 -1 

238 IZJ Pam Mice 233 +2 

748 28S Parrem JT 748 *30 

433 280 Poanoo 478 -7 

31 11 Peak IS *2*. 

97 73 naartas 96 a .. 

<06 250 PrfttoMHMer 384 -3 

400 » Penoand *XJ 383 

m 4*. pnoKFMe ri3 a . . 

445 248 PBkaigion 438 *-10 

73 48 FUsecConar 07 a .. 

715 490 (Varan 710 -f, 

300 J03 Porter Onadbum 215 a-lB 

314 238 Powee Puffren 200 -2 

140 39 Pneanreh HUga 146 

» 58-; taehard Sarv » -V 

109 79V RFD 100 # . . 

172 77 BMP 169 J 

133 72 Radare Slew 128 

56i 288 Bare. Og 517 a-S 

|08 85 Rantome Sans MM -2 

1« 100 HBKHIB (Gt Bnag^ 115 -1 

722 475 R0OM 9 Otaan 719 

iso 66 taSaam Cmaa 140 

220 120 Read ereomsa 220 

814 528 Raad m 811 49 

100 83 Ratyen 143 

73 46 Reran 73 *1 

120 BB Rosanor 98 #-2 

*50 £70 Rauura 438 *3 

29 18 Ranore 27 

152 87 neaMO Eng 152 a*3 

B8 35 Retag ti me# 88 *5 

29 18 Nc tatttnn Waft 28 *5V 

159 105 Rooartaon Rea 125 *2 

225 37 Roonaon (Thomaoj 225 


388 # *5 11,17 30 WJ 

80 #*2 9.7 09 114 

37V .. 1ft 92 416 

358 #-3 13ftn 3ft 174 

140 .. 3ft 23 23ft 

45 26 5ft mo 

198 -43 128 r 9ft 18ft 

95 29 4ft 123 

620 a . . 98 1ft 210 

56 U 7.7 M 

109V +IV 54 Aft 174 

m 42 23 23 97 

93 4ft 4 6 145 

£ 4ft 49 13ft 

99 2S 42171 

410 *2 157 3ft 14 8 

865 +5 246 37 *L0 

138 M y 17 

73 -1 34r 47 191 

77V 91 7 ft 7ft 

m -2 58 0.3 1*3 

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775 *6 121 44 191 

■04 44 42 116 

25 4f Din 04 120 

>06 .. 100 54 7ft 


128 a*11 7ft 9 2 Sft 
58 -2 14 24 653 



11 * 

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58 Xt Rrocware 
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190 126 60 A' 

9 3 Raupnre 

138 105 (Uom 

130 sa Hum (At 


517 a-s 214 4.1-183 

tag -2 91 3ft 129 

115 -1 U 11 42 

719 21.1 2ft 199 

140 29 21 84 

720 .. Ml 23 122 

811 4ft 275 94 145 

143 ..84 45 110 

73 41 1 0 14 106 

98 a-2 5.7 50 191 

<38 +3 4ft VI 392 

27 1.4r 92 IOlB 

152 # *3 4.1 27 18ft 

68 45 14 21 9ft 

2S +5V . . n . . 127 
125 *2 21 25 194 

2» . . - b .. 23.1 


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SCO 

126 

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£8'.- 

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120 

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155 


60 

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180 


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380 

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60.0 

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460 

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383 

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+5 

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345 II 

350 

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154 .. 

125 

8+2 

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CSV 

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70 .. 

300 

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170 

5.7 .. 

278 

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890 

80 .. 

ES'r 

■ +V 

400 

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KO 

-6 

290 

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212V 

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115 

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365 

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121 ■ 25339 
121 26332 


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610 +20 10.0 19 ..' 

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in 4 t .... 

42V a ; .1 

210 -2 

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113 

247 *9 

£22 

440, .. 120 27 120 

»v +1V 551 Bft .. 

817 -fi' 293 4J 97 

OJ +V 280 34 684 

£10V 4*. 125 123 .. 

150 47 180 120 .. 

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123 415 .. I 

8fi 414 480 84 . 

GMV 4IV 558 98 

5« +9 540 100 .. 

1JM .. 150 150 . 

» a .. 4ft si 11.1 

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270 .. 230 85 .. 

E2BV ♦*» 171 60 . 

«* +4 3.0 10 I. 

.. 120 92 .. 

£i 4 v +>, ire lift ;; 

tSv " •• 

58 42 3> 6ft 


SHIPPING 


MOTORS AND AIRCRAFT 


48 -5 

139 *2 

135 41 


93 87 8ft 
9ft Bft 7ft 

89 SO ivf 
20 15 703 


ELECTRICALS 


M7 
6 let 

175 

S3 

a 3,5 

*9 

J 90 

£9 

-6 303 

185 

1 50 

25 

7 £00 

138 

* SM 

■85 

165 

*3 

* *8* 

9 209 

336 

>0* 


114 

36 235 

1 6 

0 A £70 

21 

27 52 

24 

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3* 


£ftn Bft 7ft 


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78 





2ft 225 


a-3 

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38 

15130 


a .. 




0 .. 

1ft 



a . . 

14 

2ft 25ft 



23 

84 reft 


« # 


3ft 8ft 

141 



IJ 87 

750 

8 + 17 

17ft 







11* 


109 


79 


425 

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225 


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1ft22J 


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280 


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31 12ft 

172 

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95 

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3ft 

30 351 

206 

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82 

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105 65 





ibi 

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120 

19 9ft 





227 

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80 

20 21ft 

291 

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200 


M3 

72 80 

*35 

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3320ft 

■50 

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2*3 


43 

I 9 ISA 

475 

140V 

8+5 

49 

20 2 22 

BV 



91 


39r 


155 

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39 154 

66 

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£9 

30 MO 

161 




|7* 


53 

30236 


a .. 


10 370 


188 III AE 
wa 39 Aptm 
111 » Area 

» tan 


1 ? 3 

ifio KB Canons 

si-B^ 

M 32 EPF 

381 242 FR Group - - 

£49 1*8 Fora Motor 
92 58 GMulFiank Q 


f f !SS M0W 

| i 3 ^ 

323 159 Ute 


189 • +3 7.1 3ft igfl 

J* *13 4ft 4.1 gj 

1» *7 16 TO 147 

M® 21 n 1.1 igft 

36V 4 V 15 42 154 

2 B 0 *17 9ft ftft 13ft 

543 *5 203 3 7 m2 

*2 4 ft 2ft 131 


360 *1 

543 *5 

M 9 
58 
176 

145 42 

12s -ft 

190 a .. 
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2*8 a *9 

78 -2 


94 3ft I ' 
+23 3.0 34 202 

- * W Jl 150 

73 33 lift 

+14 4 8 'TftS2 

*9 70 28 

-» <ft 57 92 


272 a*iQ 260 82 
,|2 128 

1 5 ? IS'K 

a» «5 1ST 42 

104 . 7 Q 37 s_g 


SHOES AND LEATHER 


IQ Qarrw tan 3 S? 93 28 140 

31 t SISL fg“?. >5 -* wi 75 52 

133 u£SSS?iS 5 Ltw am ai 7.7 

l’« ’» *? 107 82 52 

143 Slyto 193 410 64 3 ft 238 


TEXTILES 


'£ £ SSKwe, 'M 

11 » a^(Ki 89 

50 29 Supra 50 

48 2T mwMM (Jones) 40 



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