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THE 


No 62,393 



MONDAY MARCH 3-1986 


Critics of Sunday 


opening may be 


given hours deal 




A compromise allowing 
shops to open for up to four 
hours on Sundays is under 
discussion at the Home Office 
as a means of appeasing critics 
of the Shops Bi(L 
The Government's official 
position remains that the Bill, 
which emerged relatively un- 
scathed from the Lords, is to 
be pushed through in its 
present form with no surren- 
der to the combined parlia- 
mentary. trade union and 
church opposition. 

Senior ministers have made 
dear that there is no reason for 
the Cabinet to consider any 
significant concessions at this 
stage. The Bill, which lifts 
restrictions on shopping hours 
and Sunday trading, has still 
to come up for its Commons 
-second reading and the scale 
of Conservative backbench 
opposition is not yet known, it 
is argued. 

But it is understood that 
there is considerable doubt 
within the Home Office over 
whether the Bill can go 
through the Commons with- 
out serious amendment 

Informed sources say that 
ministers and offidals have 
been stunned by the scale of 
opposition; by the beginning 


By Philip Webster, Political Reporter 

of last week, the Government would have the problem of 
had received about 34.000 policing shops 
letters against the BilL It is Ji is known, however, that 


understood that in the Home 
Office a proposal to allow 
shops to open for up to four 
hours is the leading candidate 
if the Government feels a big 
concession is necessary. 

Ministers, while accepting 
that the Bill's passage will be 
tough, said yesterday that it 
would be wrong to give the 
impression that the Govern- 
ment had decided upon a 
preferred concession if events 
dictated that one was neces- 


sary. 

In accepting the report of 
the Auld committee on shop- 
ping hours, the Government 
had accepted its conclusion 
that all the “halfway houses" 
which were being canvassed 
were unsatisfactory and had 
therefore gone for deregula- 
tion. 

It was pointed out that a 
four-hours only arrangement 
would have particular practi- 
cal difficulties. A two-tier 
system would have to be 
devised to cater for those 
shops which already open 
legally on Sundays ana would 
not want to have their hours 
reducedsnd local authorities 


among senior figures in the 
Home Office the four-hours 
proposal is considered to be 
superior to another possible 
concession — that of giving 
local authorities discretion 
over the extent of Sunday 
trading in their areas. 

They believe that although 
it is far less than what the 
“keep Sunday special" cam- 
paigners want, it would rake 
the sting out the opposition. 

The Government is not 
expected to attempt to reverse 
the defeat it suffered on an 
amendment in the Lords giv- 
ing shopworkers legal protec- 
tion against being forced to 
work on Sundays. 

The second reading debate 
could take place next week 
although pressure of business, 
including the Budget, may 
delay it until after Easter. 

MrlvorStanbrook, Conser- 
vative MP for Orpington, is 
collecting signatures for an 
amendment opposing the sec- 
ond reading for a Bill which 
“foils to preserve the tradi- 
tional character of Sunday”. A 
Commons motion is also to be 
tabled shortly. 


Tomorrow 



Soft sell at 
the cinema 


The soft drink, car 
or cigarette used by 
the star in the. latest- 
film is not there by 
accident Product 
placement has 
become big business 
for the admen . . . 


French 

dressing 

Suzy Menkes on 
why Paris is 
back in fashion 



Saturday's £20,000 weekly 
prize in The Times Portfolio 
competition was won by Mr W 
Underwood, of Stoke Poges, 
Bocks. Today's daily competi- 
tion prize is doubled to £4,000 
because there was no winner 
on Saturday. Portfolio list, 
page 18; how to play, informa- 
tion service, page 32. 


Small firm 
jobs boost 


Small businesses have created 
up to 1.1 million jobs in 
Britain since 1980, according 
to a survey by the Small 
Business Research Trust 
Without these jobs, unem- 
ployment could have been 25 
per cent higher, the trust says 
Page 17 


Heart check 


Lord Shinwell. the Labour 
peer, aged 101, was admitted 
to the Royal Free Hospital, 
; London, on Saturday to have 
his heart pacemaker checked. 


Miners march 


More than 5.000 miners and 
supporters marched through 
London yesterday to win rein- 
statement for 500 men sacked 
in the miners* suike and 
freedom for 10 still in prison 
Oil threat to coal, Page 2 


Liverpool win 


Liverpool maintained their 
challenge for the Football 
League championship when a 
last-minute goal by Ian Rush 
gave them a 2-1 win at 
‘ Tottenham Hotspur Page 26 


(SPECIAL REPORT) 


At the start of the Queen's tour 
of Australia, a special report 
reviews the country after three 
years of Labor government 
under Bob HawkePages 21-24 


Home Ne«s 2-4 
(hmeas 4-7 
Appte M 

Am 8 

Bridge M 
Bnsmns 17-20 
Cowl *4 

Crosswords 1IL32 

Dfauy l l 

Fames 10-12 


Law Report 
Leaders 
Letters 
Pro Bonds 
RetigMHi 
Science 
Sport 25-28 
Tbe*lK3,ccc 31 
TV & Radio 31 
Weather 32 


* * * it * * 


Ulster extremists 
wield strike power 


Leading article 


By Pan! Vallety 

Protestant extremists are Unionists' 
attempting to outmanouevre 
the taders of the two main 
Unionist parties in Northern 
Ireland with plans for further 
action on top of the strike 
which they hope will paralyse 
the province today. 

Preparations have been 
made for more disruptive 
protests than those officially 
sanctioned by the Rev lan 
Paisley. . of. the: Democratic 
Unionist Party, and Mr James 
Molyneaux of the larger Offi- 
cial Unionist Party. 

Widespread intimidation 
was being reported throughout 
the province yesterday and 
preparations for the blocking 
of all the main roads were 
being made. 

The move seemed designed 
to undermine further the au- 
thority of the two party leaders 
who last week met Mrs 
Thatcher for discussions on 
the Anglo-Irish agreement and 
then returned to the province 
to find their response to the 
meeting overturned by a joint 
commitieee of their two par- 
lies. 

The people organizing the 
action agreed on Saturday to 
extend the strike from 12 to 24 
hours without reference to Mr 
Paisley and Mr Molyneaux. 

The main weapon in the 


armoury is the 
control they hope to exercise 
over the province’s power 
stations, which they claim will 
cut supplies in all areas. 

Other plans include pickets 
in Belfast's main shopping 
precincts and bus stations, car 
and tractor processions 
through all the main towns, 
and picketing of banks in 
country towns. 


Four distinct levels of pow- 
er have emerged. At the top 
are the party leaders whose 
attempts to negotiate with the 
Government may weD have 
isolated them from their more 
hard-line followers. 

Immediately beneath them, 
the strike is bang organized by 
the “1986 Workers’ 
Committee", which includes 
the two Unionist deputy lead- 
ers, Mr Peter Robinson and 
Mr Harold McCusker. 

The next tier is the core of 
the committee: an inner-com- 
mittee whose only publidy- 
known member is the DUP 
Belfast city councillor, Mr 
Frank Leslie. 

But the strike is being 
implemented on the ground 

Continued on page 2, co!2 


Minister says protest 
will hit economy 


By Philip Webster, Political Reporter 


Mr Tom King, the Secretary 
of State for Northern Ireland. 


Iasi night described today's 
24-hour strike in the province 
as pointless, and again gave a 
warning that its only outcome 
would be to damage the 
economy. 

While Mr King travelled to 
Belfast last night the organiz- 
ers of today's action, called to 
protest against the Anglo-Irish 
agreement voiced confidence 
in their ability to bring Ulster 
to a halt with power cuts 
expected, particularly at peak 
times. 

Mr King and other minis- 
ters will be in the province to 
monitor the situation as it 
develops, although the Gov- 
ernment hopes to be able to 
take a low-key approach. 

It was emphasized last night 
that the responsibility for law 
and Older belonged to the 
Royal Ulster Constabulary. 


and that protection would be 
given as for as possible to 
people deciding to go to work. 

Mr King, who said be hoped 
that there would be no 
initimidation, told The Times 
that the strike would only 
have bad point if it was to try 
to break the deadlock. Bui Mr 
James Molyneaux, leader of 
the Official Unionist Party 
(OUP), bad said last Tuesday 
that the deadlock was broken, 
“and that is the truth of it*' 

He said: “We wish to sit 
down and talk about the 
position. 

“The strike will achieve 
nothing except damage to the 
economy. So for the troubles 
in Northern Ireland have been 
kept out of the factories. This 
strike, if it has a serious effect, 
immediately casts a question 
mark over the reliability of 
industry." 

Powell support, page 2 



Mr Ingvar Carlsson (right), the acting Swedish Prime Minister, raider police escort in Stockholm yesterday. 


MPs urge 
more 
winter aid 
for aged 


By Philip Webster and 
David Hewson 


Senior Conservative MPs 
-are urging the Government to 
make special provision to help 
old people cope with die 
freezing weather. 

They have joined opposition 
politicians in Hahn hag the 
Government's severe weather 
payments scheme is inade- 
quate. 

Last night Mr Robert 
McCrindie, the Conservative 
MP for Brentwood and Ongar, 
last night called mi the Gov- 
ernment to make a special 
payment, along the lines of the 
Christmas bonus, to all pen- 
sioners who receive supple- 
mentary benefit. 

He suggested there shook! 
be an extra stogie payment of 
£5. or £1Q to be included with 
the pension payment due on 
-Maicfr-24-.- =» srvr :v *■= 
' In a letter to Mir Noo na n 
Fowler, the Secretary of Stall 
for Sodal Services, Mr 
McCrindie said the present 
scheme was not providing 
adequate assistance to pen- 
sioners to keep their homes 
warm. 

One of the factors deterring 
old people from using then- 
beating was mrtaiaty over 
whether they were in an area 
cold enough to justify the 
additional payments. - 


Outlook: milder, 
forecast page 32 


He suggested that the 
scheme be scrapped for the 
rest of the winter and that, 
without prejudice to a better 
scheme being devised at lei- 
sure, pensioners on supple- 
mentary benefit be given a 
once-and-for-all payment In 
that way pensioners would at 
least know that some help was 
forthcoming. 

Bat the freezing weather 
which has gripped Britain for 
most of the past month is 
coming to an end. 

Weathermen said Oat the 
thaw was moving into the 
north of Scotland yesterday 
and would reach southern 
England by Wednesday. 

The death tell from the cold 
spell could top the 2,000 mark 
for the whole of the month. 

Death figures issued by tire 
Office of Population Censuses 
and Surveys showed an in- 
crease of 600 a week dming 
the first fortnight of February. 

The toll is thought to have 
been increased later in the 
month by the deaths of elderly 
people suffering from hypo- 
thermia. 

Last month was the second 
coldest February of this centu- 
ry. with snow falling some- 
where in the British Isles 
every day. The freeze was only 
beaten by the arctic conditions 
of 1947. 

Heavy frosts were still likely 


overnight, leaving motorists to 
v today. 


Palme’s murder ‘a jigsaw 
with very small pieces’ 


From Christopher Mosey, Stockholm 

The killer of the Swedish quarter length coat or anorak a Swede or an immigrant who 

and carrying a small bag. 

Hopes that Mrs Palme 
might have seen his face faded 
yesterday as she came out of 
sedation to reveal that she had 
caught only a fleeting glimpse 
of the man. 

A couple who saw the 


Oiof 

last 

b> 

and 


Prime Minister, Mr 
Palme, was still at 
night, with police 
the carefully planned 
executed assassination.. 

The Stockholm police chief, 
Mr Hans Holmer. described 
the case as “a jigsaw puzzle 
with very small pieces”. There 
is. however, one important 
clue: a 357 calibre bullet fired 
at Olof Palme's widow, Lisbet, 
which has been examined by 
forensic experts. . 

Mr Holmer said it was of a 
very unusual type. It bad a 
copper casing and a lead tip 
and had been fired from a 
revolver, probably a Smith 
and Wesson magnum. . 

He said it was possible the 
bullet had been hand-made by 
a firearms enthusiast A sec- 
ond bullet the one. which 
killed Mr Palme, has been 
extracted frqm fos hpdy. apd 

BhT^icg'stiU 

rudimentary descrufoon of 
the assastin: talLdar^-frhiied, 
aged 40 to 45, wearing a three- 


knew Stockholm well. The 
murder- spot was well chosen 
for a get-away on foot 


Police are. however, hot 
ruling out that the assassina- 
tion might have been the work 
of international terrorists. 


Bitter awakening 
Geoffrey Smith 
Obituary 


5 

12 

14 


assassin as he ran past had 
little to add. They were inter- 
viewed yesterday after Mr 
Holmer appealed for them to 
come forward. 

Mr Holmer said the murder 
appeared to have been careful- 
ly planned. The killer had kept 
watch on Mr Palme's flat in 


Stockholm City Council 
said a monument would be 
erected on the spot where Mr 
Palme was murdered. It con- 
tinued to attract hundreds of 
visitors who threw flowers, 
mostly red roses, the symbol 
for social democracy., over a 
large bloodstain on. the icy 
-pavement 

- The nation stffl appeared to 
be in a state of shock. Weeping 
men and women filed into 
government offices in Stock- 
holm to sign a book of 


Stockholm's Old Town for at Mr 

lew two wtefa and had condolence for Mr Palme. 

.followed 



move for 


Rover 


By Jeremy Warner 
Business Correspondent 


The managemen t of Land' 
Rover has subedited a firm bit* 
for the coanany which to 
ander threat of a takeover b£ 
General Matoss of foe Unite* 

Financial analysis had bee» 
widely sceptical , of ther 
management's ability to mas* 
ter a substantive bid proposal 
by tomorrow, the government* 
deadline for firm 


Murder in Nablus 
baits peace bid 


From Ian Murray, Jerusalem 

One of the rare Palestinian Nidal Fatah 
leaders prepared to talk to 
Israel was shot dead yesterday 
— and with him died any 
chance of negotiating an eariy 
peace settlement in the area. 

The murdered man was Mr 
Zafer aJ-Masri, a wealthy busi- 
nessman, who agreed only at 
the end oflast November to be 
appointed by Israel as Mayor 
of Nablus in the occupied 
West Bank in place of the 
military municipal adminis- 
tration that had run die town 
for three years. ' 

He was shot on his way to 
work in Nablus when he 
stopped to talk to a trader in 
the street near the municipal 
offices. A man in the crowded 
street fired several shots into 
him and fled. Israeli troops 
immediately imposed a cur- 
few on the city and set up 
roadblocks. 

Responsibility for the mur- 
der was claimed jointly by two 
of the Syrian-backed Palestin- 
ian groups which reject any 
negotiation and are dedicated 
to the destruction of Israel. 

The claim, made by the Abu 


Revolutionary 
Council and the Popular 
Front for the Liberation of 
Palestine, said the murder had 
been carried out by the 
Sbevara Gaza commando 
unit An anonymous caller to 
the Agence France-Presse of- 
fice in Paris, on behalf of the 
Abu Nidal group, said that a 
“death sentence cm a traitor” 
had been carried oul 
Mr al-Masri had said that he 
bad decided to accept his 


‘Hostage held’ 
by prisoners 


appointment because, as long 
as the area was under occupa- 
tion and the Arabs could not 
terminate it, he wanted to do 
all he could to help make the 
life of the people as bearable as 
possible. 



face icy roads 1 


Mr Z afar aLMasrfc shot on 
his way to work. 


man Mr Shimon Peres, the 
Israeli Prime Minister, has 
been seeking to take over the 
everyday administration in 
the occupied territories in a 
kind of devolution meant to 
give Palestinians some control 
over almost everything but 
security. 

Sources here say that MraJ- 
Masri, in the short time he bad 
been working as mayor, bad 
been so successful that other 
Palestinians were befog per- 
suaded to follow his example 
and to become mayors in 
other occupied cities. Prelimi- 
nary secret talks with the 
candidates were expected to 
start this week, but are now 
almost certain to be post- 
poned indefinitely. 

Mr Peres opened 
yesterday’s Cabinet meeting 
by denouncing the killing as 

Continued on page 5, col 1 



UNBEATABLE OFFER 

n 

™» 1 s SFREI 

AND NOTHING TO REPAY UNTIL 

E 


Missing girl’s 
father is 
questioned 


The father of a missing girl, 
aged six. was interviewed for 
the third time yesterday as 
hundreds of people turned up 
to conduct a search 

Colette Gallagher was last 
seen when she set out for Our 
Ladies Infants School. Corby, 
Northamptonshire, early on 
Friday morning. Mr Andrew 
Gallagher, aged 34. her father, 
was questioned yesterday as 
the police started a search of a 
nearby lake. 

Det Supt Tony Buckmaster. 
who is heading the inquiry 
into Colette’s disappearance, 
said: "Our principal worry is 
that she may have been ab- 
ducted but we must look at the 
ultimate possibility Jhat she 
has been taken away" 


Ban on alluring brochures 


By Cliff Feltham 


The use of colour photo- 
graphs to present companies 
in their most glamorous and 
seductive light when they are 
floated on the Stock Exch a n g e 
is to be entailed. 

The Stock Exchange is 
banning the photographs from 
new issue prospectuses except 
on the front page. Many recent 
new issues, particularly hi the 
advertising and publicity in- 
dustries, have been character- 
ized by do cum en ts that look 
more like promotional bro- 
chures than representations of 
the companies' financial posi- 
tion. 

The quotations department 
of the Stock Exchange has 
told Gty issuing houses to 
concentrate on the words and 
the figures. 


Some prospectuses, often in 
the leisure field, have looked 
more like holiday broc h ures. 

The authorities are worried 
that some investors may be 
tempted to invest on the 
strength of the photographs 
rather than the prospects of 
the company . 

The action appears to have 
been bron^ti about by a 
number of issues oa the Un- 
listed Securities Market and 
in the advertising and publici- 
ty industries. The quotations 
department believes that tire 
prospectus is a legal docu- 
ment It is prepared to allow 
illustrations on the front cover 
but not elsewhere. 

Simon and Grates, a broker 
closely associated with USM 
flotations, said : “The commit- 
tee are right in not wanting 
documents plastered with too 


modi artwork, bot hopefully 
they will be more relaxed 
about tbe front cover.” 


Some bankers, however, feel 
that tbe success of an offer 
often depends on how it is 
presented and tbe sort of 
public image it is able to 
achieve. 


A number of advertising 
agencies floated over tbe past 
year have used their 
prospectuses to promote their 
own- work. 

But gloss; photos are not a 
prerequisite of a successful 
float. One company which 
recently resisted the advice of 
its publicity awn and issued a 
prospectus without photo- 
graphs was the pharmaceuti- 
cals group, Wellcome. The 
issue was hugely successful. 


Oil price slide 
wipes out 
tax cut hopes 


A no-chanpe Budget without 
big cuts is income tax is 
expected after the latest fall in 
oil prices. 

North Sea oil prices dipped 
below ST4 a barrel at the end 
of fast week, wiping out the 
Chancellor’s remaining scope 
for substantial cuts in income 
tax in the Budget in two 
weeks’ time. 

The Chancellor has accept- 
ed foe need to support the 
pound by presenting a 
“neutral” Budget. However, 
several job measuresare likely 
to be brought together into a 
Budget-day "employment 
package" and income tax cuts 
are pencilled to for 1987.' 

Going for jobs, page 12 
Details, page 17 


Ten remanded prisoners at 
Strangeways Prison, Manches- 
ter were last night believed to 
be holding a fellow inmate 
hostage. 

■ The prison’s assistant gov- 
ernor, Mr Kertb Ritch. said 
the men, all aged between 17 
and 21, were barricaded inside 
a cell but were talking to staff 

“We believe, one of tbe 1 1 
may be a hostage but at this 
stage they are not making any 
demands," he said. 

Prisoners at the jail have 
complained in the past of 
oyenxowdmg. 



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Bat a package has new been 
~put together by Schroder Ven- 
tures and one other City 
institutions which Mr David 
Andrews, Land Rover’s chief 
executive, befieves to be a 
winning pvoposaL 

A management buy-out 
would make the company real- 
ly hum, Mr Andrews said 
yesterday. 

Speaking ou Channel Four V 
The Basham Programm e , Mr 
Andrews said aB the managing 
directors of the fare i 
companies were now 
foe scheme. 

“We are very confident, we 
can make the business really 
hum. We think it is to our very 
great advantage to retain con- ; 
trol in foe United Kingdom so; 
that foe dedmoo tasking pro- 
cesses are made here and not 
in Pontiac, Michigan,” Mr 
Andrews said. 

‘‘We think we will be able fe 
motivate people inside foe 
business modi better because 
part of our deal is to offer the 
opportunity to all em pl oy ees to 
share in the success of the 
business.” . - 

Among Other things, the 
package attempts to lay to rest 
fears that an independent 
Land Rover would be unable to 
raise srifirieat capital to en- 
sure lirture development - of 
new vehicles. 

Also promised is foe estab- 
lishment of a distribution net- 
work in foe United States and 
elsewhere to match that pro- 
posed. by freMril Motors, 
Is abo -plan ring Jo boy 

■*' -yfUanr-.C- » 

ixmcxrmmum. . 


Li 


K 



:=r 


v yeari 

to use Austin Sorer 
engines and certain of BL’s 
backup services, the proposal 
says. ' „ 

Themammemenfs abffity to 
come up with a comprehensive 
package within sack a short 
spaceuf time is an embarrass- 
ment to the Government, 
which may have difficulty a 
selling BL’s toss-making 
truths division to General 
Motors vrithoat tbe bonus of 
Land Rover. 


Figures doe to be published 
fob month show that Land 
Rover made an operating prof- 
it of £9 million last year 
against £2 mfllioa the year 
before, strengthening claims 
that tbe company conld have a 
viable independent future 
ahead of it 













HOME NEWS 


THE TIMES MONDAY MARCH 3 1986 


Baker rejects calls to 
close Sellafield 


plant after latest leak 



‘Vouchers 
could have 
kept peace 
in schools’ 


. 5 n 1 1. 1 


i* 




DO 




” ’> V 


■ *** •* ‘'Wf' 'QMft ‘ 


By Pearce Wright, Science Editor 


After the fourth leak in five 
' weeks at the Sellafield nuclear 
■ plant in Cumbria, the Govern- 
ment said yesterday there was 
no case for closing the site. 

It was the most serious of 
the accidental discharges in 
' the past five weeks. The 
material escaped through a 
. seal of synthetic compound. 

Mr Kenneth Baker. Secre- 
tary of Slate for the Envincm- 
. menu defended British Nue- 
Tear Fuels in the television 
programme This Week Next 
Week. 

“This is the most regulated 
industry in the country. Fif- 
teen Acts of Parliament relate 
to this industry.” he said 

“There are 150 inspectors, 
both inside the plants and 
outside. Very minor incidents 


have to be reported. They 
should not be exaggerated 


should not be exaggerated 
And you cannot build up a 
case for dosing the plant 
(Sellafield).” 

But Dr John Cunningham. 
-Labour spokesman tor the 
’environment whose constitu- 
ency includes Sellafield said 
discharges from the plant to 
the Irish Sea should be 
stopped. 

* He said there should be 
'better management in the 


industry. “No one can accept 
the sequence of accidents of 
the last few weeks in any 
industry.” he said 

He also clashed with Mr 
Baker over secrecy. Dr Cun- 
ningham suggested that the 
use of the Official Secrets Act 
to cover the dvil nudear 
energy industry was an obsta- 
cle to public understanding, 
and he suggested it should go. 

Pressure has increased .Tor 
the halt of the chemical repro- 
cessing of nudear fuel at 
Sellafield after the leak on 
Saturday. 

The Greenpeace organiza- 
tion and Friends of the Earth 
are proposing that the spent 
fuel rods, from atomic power 
stations, be kept intact. 

The material would be 
stored for a “cooling" period 
of 20 or more years, until the 
bulk of the radioactive by- 
products created in the opera- 
tion of a nudear reactor 
decayed. 

The opponents of reprocess- 
ing have been joined by other 
voices. The European Parlia- 
ment has called for Sellafield 
to be closed. And the influen- 
tial weekly magazine, New 
Scientist, in its latest issue, has 
called for a halt 


An immediate investigation 
of the incident this weekend 
has begun by scientists from 
the Nudear Installations In- 
spectorate. They were already 
on site. A team of 16 had 
begun an audit last Thursday 
of the management of 
Sdlafield because of the previ- 
ous teak. 

In the latest inddem 12 
workers were in the immedi- 
ate and adjacent areas. The 
company. British Nudear Fu- 
els, said five of them had been 
contaminated on the skin. 

All the workers are undergo- 
ing more detailed monitoring 
in case they have inhaled any 
material. It will take several 
days to obtain those results. „ 

The leak happened in a 
special cubicle of a building 
referred to as Will, where 
plutonium and uranium oxide 
powders are handled. Those 
substances are contained in a ‘ 
cabinet and separated from 
workers by a glass screen. 



By George HB! 

Education vouchers could 
have prevented the year-tong 
teachers’ strike by giving par- 
ents the power to move -their 
children away from disrupted 



schools, a book published by 
the Institute of Economic 


Affairs claims today-. 

The book, by Mr Arthur 
Seldon. the institute’s former 
editorial director, asks wheth- 
er the recent revi*^ of interest 
in vouchers among ministers, 
so soon after Sir Keith Joseph, 
Secretary of State for Educa- 
tion and Science, officially 
declared the idea dead in 
19S3. may be a result of the 
dispute. 

“If a device such as the 
voucher for enabling dissatis- 
fied patients to move their 
children had been Introduced, 
or even provisionally an- 
nounced. in 1983 or 1984, it 
would have strengthened the 
bargaining power of the minis- 
ter and improved the pros- 
pects of earlier settlement". 
Mr Seldon says. 

A number of ministerial 
hints have been made in 
recent months that the pro- 
posal is by no means dead, 
there was also clear indication 
from 10 Downing Street last 
week ih3t Mrs Margaret 
Thatcher would favour, its 
inclusion in the party’s pro- 
gramme at the next election. 


More than 1,000 Land Rovers and their owners from all over Britain gathered at Battersea Park, London, yesterday before j 
driving in convoy to Downing Street as part of the campaign to keep the company British. 


There are no natural sources 
of plutonium. The element is 
formed during the nuclear 
chain reaction in uranium fuel 
elements in power stations. 
The plutonium is extracted by 
reprocessing. 


Crops hit 
worst by 
cold winds 


Ban on The Times 
faces court test 


Ex-killer 
chosen as 


Strike gets 
backing 
of Powell 


Ulster extremists 


wield strike power 


By John Young 
Agriculture Correspondent 

Winter-sown crops in the 
main arable areas of eastern 
England have been badly dam- 
aged by the prolonged spell of 
bitter, desiccating winds and 
the absence of snow to protect 
them from frosts. 


By a Staff Reporter 


min ister 


Continued from page 1 


Mr Enoch Powell, the Ul- 
’ ster Unionist MP for South 
1 Down, has given his support to 
the 24- hour protest strike 
against the Anglo-Irish agree- 
ment as a Iambi and legiti- 
mate form of expression. 

At the same time he gave a 
warning that it carried with it 
the risk of violence. 

Mr Powell, interviewed on 
the Channel 4 programme, 
Face the Press, said that if he 
were employed in Northern 
Ireland be would not go to 
work today. Nor did he believe 
that people in any other part of 
the United Kingdom would 
behave differently if the same 
thing had been d.one to them. 

He said that .-he -1 did not 
justify or support .'anything 
which was in contravention of 
the law. Nothing, as far as he 
knew, which was being pro- 
posed today was unlawful. 

.Asked whether he feared 
violence today, Mr Powell 
replied:“There is a risk of it. 
There most be where there are 
large crowds, and where there 
is strong feeling and excite- 
ment. ” But no politician could 
say that certain manifesta- 
tions which were lawful, and 
which could be the occasion 
for violence, should not take 
place, be said. 


by bodies known as the Ulster 
Cubs, fanned last November 
specifically to combat the 
Anglo-Irish agreement It is at 
this level that the most hard- 
line stance is being adopted. 

The leader of the Ulster 
Clubsis Mr Alan WrighL a 31- 
year-old unemployed 
eleclrican whose policeman 
father was killed in a bombing 
seven years ago. Today. Mr 
Wright represents the most 
extreme articulation of the 
Unionist position. He openly 
admits to standing at the 
interface of the Unionist 
politicans and the gunmen of 
the Protestant paramilitary 


organ izauons. 


‘Politics'; has ' finished ' hi 
sfer. Politics has failed- the 


Ulster. Politics has failed- the 
loyalist community. There' is 
no middle ground here any 
more. People are either for or 
against the agreement Any- 
one who attempts to work is 
quite obviously declaring that 
they are for it”, he said 
yesterday. 

He admitted that members 
of the Ulster Cubs had been 
telling shopkeepers and fac- 
tory-owners that anyone who 
refused to close his premises 
today would be boycotted 
permanently. 

Belfast’s newspapers said 


they had been inundated with 
calls from newsagents asking 
that no copies be delivered 
this morning. Many of them 
explained that this was be- 
cause threats had been made. 
Even in comparatively “safe” 
parts of the city, shopkeepers 
. were reporting; that they had 
received intimidating visits. 

A massive security presence 
is expected on the streets of 
the province today, though it 
will consist mainly of police. 
The Army has been told to 
keep a low profile. 

Mr Wright yesterday 
claimed that today's action 
was only the start of a large- 
scale campaign of civil disobe- 
dience. Future action would 
include picketing the BBCs 
.headquarters; in Belfast. ,io s 
demonstrate- the Unionist be- 
lief that the BBC was merely 
“the propaganda mouthpiece 
of the Northern Ireland 
Office”. 

“What we are aiming for is a 
revival of the loyalist identity. 
People have to realize that we 
are proud to be Protestant. 
British men. We will fight 
fiercely to preserve that inde- 
pendent status. If necessary, 
we will fight the British Army 
on the streets. The Anglo-Irish 
agreement is an attempt to 
deliver us into the hands of 
Rome. 


Mr Edmund Brown, a crop 
husbandry specialist of 
Framlingham. Norfolk, de- 
scribes the position as criticaL 
Oilseed rape, which was plant- 
ed later than usual because of 
the wet summer and delayed 
harvest is in many places a 
write- off, he says. 

Although the full extent of 
the damage cannot be assessed 
until -the ground thaws, Mr 
Brown believes that many 
wheat and barley fields will 
have to be redriHed in the 
spring. The difficulties are 
likely to be compounded by a 
shortage of cereal seed. “In 
many ways it has been worse 
than in the other cold winters 
of 1947 and 1963. when there 
was much more snow around,” 
be says. 

The National Fanners* 
Union is playing down sugges- 
-irons oLd crisis. Leeks &bd 
root vegetables cannot be har- 
vested at present; and cauli- 
flowers and spring greens have 
suffered damage, but there are 
plenty of potatoes and other 
vegetables from store, and at 
this time of year imports 
normally take a large share of 
the market 

The freezing spell has, how- 
ever. brought extra work for 
livestock fanners, with the 
constant chore of supplying 
feed to animals left out to 
winter and breaking ice on 
drinking troughs. 


The refusal of certain public 
libraries to display copies of 
The Times and other News 
International publications 
may be challenged in the 
courts by a barrister who was 
denied access to the 
newspaper's law reports. 

Mr John Riley, who has 
chambers in Birmingham, was 
refused permission to see the 
newspaper in Lichfield public 
library because of a a ban by 
Staffordshire County Council. 
Although its libraries continue 
to take the newspaper it is not 
being displayed out of sympa- 
thy with the 5.000 print 
workers who have been 
dismissed in the dispute over 
the transfer of the four. News 
International titles to lhe new 
prim works at Wapping in east 
London. 

A number of other councils 
are operating similar bans 
which the Prime Minister last 
week condemned as tanta- 
mount to censorship. The 
prohibition also covers The - 
Sunday Times. The Sun. News 
of the World and The Times 
Educational, Higher Educa- 
tion ...and . Literary supple- 


Mr Riley, a former Labour 
councillor, described the ban . 
as petty censorship and said 
that if the council did not lift it 
he would consider an applica- 
tion to the courts to have the 
ban declared unlawful under 
section seven of the Public 
Libraries and Museums Act 
1964. 


• More than 2,000 protesters 
joined the pickets at the 
Wapping plant on Saturday 
night during the prioting of 
The Sunday Times and the 
Sens of the World. Three 
police officers were injured in 
the demonstration during 
which 32 arrests were made 
for public order offences. 

- Yesterday a management 
spokesman said that some 
lateness occurred because of 
heavy picketing, but that all 1 
deliveries had been made. The 
Sunday Times sent out 


The Rev James Nelson, a 
convicted murderer, was yes- 
terday chosen as minister for 
two churches. It is the first 
time that the Church of Scot- 
land has chosen a convicted 
killer as a minister. 

Mr Nelson was convicted in 
1 970. then aged 24, of murder- 
ing his mother by hitting her 
with a wooden baton and a 
brick. 

Yesterday morning be 
preached in both Chape Ih all 
and Caldeibank churches in 
Lanarkshire, and after the 
services the congregation vot- 
ed by 283 to 76 in his favour. 


Pay peace 
talks today 

Talks aimed a i solving the j| 
teachers' pay dispute are due 
to resume to Loudon today 
with little sign of an agreement 
between the teaching radons 
involved. 

At the weekend Sir Keftfa. 
Joseph called on teachers to 
end the “misery” of the dis- 
pute at today's talks. . 


\!i« *? 


" : H 

. t W 


Killer tests 


on four dogs 


Mr Seldon says that tong- 
andine hostility among offi- 


1,385,000 copies and the News 
of the World 5.317,000. com- 
plete print runs of both pa- 
pers. 

News International is wait- 
ing for the TUC to fix a time 
for a meeting between them. 
He said. 


meats. * > 


Tests were being carried out 
last night to identify a dog 
which killed David Clarke, 
aged seven, who was found on 
Friday in a field near his home 
in Hoton, Leicestershire. 

Four dogs which may have 
been on the loose at the time 
have been examined by a vet, 
and hair and tooth imprints 
have been sent to. forensic 
'scientists. " ‘ ‘ * 


standing hostility among offi- 
cials at the Department of 
Education has caused action 
to be shelved in the past when 
ministers have shown an. in- 
terest in it. 

“The obstacles appear not 


J** " 

.\T\l 

• * ;M 


d 


to be administrative impcacti 
cability but weakness of politi- 
cal conviction and wilL The 
difficulties seen by the Depan- 
ment of Education in 1981-82 
were based on defence erf* the 
status qua maintenance of 
. political and official control, 

' and misunderstanding of die 
economics of education: 

He adds that the voucher 
.system could . be a T^ghly 
flexible device to “emancipate 
the working classes locked 
into state education” Ircould 
be traded at a lower value in 
private than in state schools 
“to encourage contributions 
to their fees”, and its value 
could be varied according to 
age and scholastic record 
The Riddle of the toucher (TEA. 
2 Lord North Street SW1. 
£3.50) 


Head wins crossword eliminator 


„ . . „ I 3 ■»<%> 

By John Grant * 
Crossword Editor 


Mr Michael Ware ham. 
headmaster of New Park 
School. St Andrews, Fife, won 
ibe Scottish regional final of 
the Collins Dictionaries 
Times Crossword Champion- 
ship at the Grosvenor Hotel. 
Glasgow, yesterday for the 
third year in succession. 

. Mr Ware ham. aged 44, and 


a former national 1 finalist 
completed the’ four puzzles! 
without a mistake in an 
average of 14 minutes for 
each. 


BBC Mastermind competi- 
tion. ‘ 


Mr Michael Macdonald- 
Cooper. also aged 44, a free- 
lance writer from Inchture, 
Perthshire, came second, a 
minute and a half per puzzle 
slower than the winner. He is a 
semi-finalist in this year’s 


Mr Wareham and Mr Mac- ! 
donald-Cooper both go 
through to the national final m 
London in September. 

Mr J. Quick. «ged 51, ! 
classics master at Dollar Acad- 
emy, came third: and Mr R D 
LyalL who lectures in law at 
the College of Further Educa- 
tion. Dundee, was fourth. 


BBC chairman gives 
licence fee warning 


Oil price threatens coal a year after miners’ strike ended 


Mr Stuart Young, chairman 
of the BBC, vesierday de- 
fended the need for a licence 
fee, saying that abandoning it 
could lead to advertisers con- 
trolling all programme sched- 
ules. 

Mr Young told Cambridge 
University Conservative As- 
sociation that some people 
thought it would be possible to 
fund the BBC from advertis- 
ing without affecting the quali- 
ty of television and radio 
programmes. 

Putting advertising on the 
BBC would have grave conse- 
quences. he said. “We have to 
remember first of all that the 
licence fee is not just an 
impost on the audience for the 



right to watch, or listen ta 
radio programmes.” 

The licence fee. the “means 
by which the BBC has re- 
mained independent in the 
very core and spirit of its 
activity", had kept it free from 
the sectional interests of ad- 
vertisers. 

Mr Young continued: “It 
has been free from the promo- 
tional interests of sponsors 
and the political interest of 
governments. The licence fee 
underpins an entire broadcast- 
ing system, and it is a guaran- 
tee of range, quality and 
accountability throughout 
that system. 

“Thai might well not be the 
case if both halves of the 
national broadcasting struc- 
ture were commercial, and if 
an advertiser or sponsor were 
able to say to both of them: 
‘Unless you make changes to 
your schedules and trim your 
programmes to my liking, the 
advertising on which you 
depend could be placed with 
your competitors.*” 


By David Young 
Energy Correspondent 


Dutch Citizens! 


Having spent a year restor- 
ing morale and increasing 
output in the pits, the National 
Coal Board management now 
faces the threat of having 
much of its good work affected 
by disarray among the Organi- 
zation of Petroleum Exporting 
Countries (Opec). 

O pec’s failure to agree on 
new output quotas has sent 
world erode oil price down and 
with it the price of heavy fuel 
oil, coal’s main competitor in 
the power generation and in- 
dustrial markets. 

Ironically, the new atmo- 
sphere in the mines has meant 
output is running at more than 
three tonnes a manshift; the 
latest detailed statistics show 
that on Febrnary 15 this year 
it averaged 3.05 tonnes a 
manshift. 

The coal board is working 
towards breaking the four- 
tonne barrier and is avoiding 
setting output targecs.lt said: 
“We are a market-led industry 
and setting production targets 
is pointless. We now concen- 
trate on productivity to get our 
prices down to what the mar- 
ket will bear.” 

However, the price of heavy 
fuel oil od the Rotterdam 
markets has fallen to less than 
£90 a tonne; at anything below 




Honeymoon over for rebels 





ITSSm n. 


Miners from the Bold colliery at St Helens, Merseyside, marching back to work 


The refusal of the NUM 
executive last week to endorse 
a call for an overtime ban from 
Mr Arthur ScargiU was bad 
news for the leaders of the 
Union of Democratic 
Mineworkers (Craig Seton 
writes). 

The last thing the emerging 
moderate union wanted was 
for the NUM president to be 
silenced. He has been its best 
recruiting sergeant His con- 
duct of the disastrous miners’ 
strike made thousands of 
pitmen look for new leaders. 

Although the UDM now 
claims 40,000 members, chief- 
ly in Nottinghamshire, the 
(titter memories of the strike 
are now fading. 

It is imperative for the new 
union to remain one jmnp 


ahead of the NUM. That is 
why the UDM so quickly 
concluded a 5.9 per cent pay 
deal with the coal board kale 
last year, a deal still defied to 
the NUM 

The UDM also has to face 
the future without Mr Ian 
MacGregor, the coal hoard 
chairman, who retires in Sep- 
tember. He bent over back- 
wards to help its creation. 

But Mr David Prendergast 
the UDM’s financial -.secre- 
tary, remains confident. 

Since Nottinghamshire and 
sooth Derbyshire voted to 
form the UDM, only 2,008 
of 27,000 Nottinghamshire 
members bad rejoined the 
NUMLThe union also had a 
majority among the 2,000 
miners in Warwickshire. 


Fleet,. 

•A* \ ; } \ ' : 


V flK 


Yorkshire Midlands 


Wales 


Scotland 


By Peter Davenport 


You are now able to participate for 
the first time from abroad in the 
elections for the representatives of 
the Second Chamber of the States- 
General on 21st May 1986. 


£102 a tonne it again becomes 
competitive with NCB coaL 


Naturally you do wish to make use 
of your right to vote. 


competitive with NCB coaL 
The Central Electricity 
Generating Board (CEGB) is 
renegotiating its coal board 
contract and while remaining 
committed to using British 
coaL the amount used will 
drop if oil prices remain low 
and it again becomes economic 
to bring into use the large oil- 
fired power stations 


You can register as voter before 
24th March, that is to say that your 
registration forms need to be re- 
ceived by the Rijksinspectie in the 
Hague by that day. 


You can apply for a voters registra- 
tion form at the 

Netherlands Embassy 
38 Hyde Park Gate 
London SW7 5DP 


tel. 01-584 5040 


The CEGB is : reluctant to 
discuss its o3 buying or oD- 
burning policies, because the 
price would rise if traders 
knew when it was about to 
move into the oD spot market 
for large purchases. 

Meanwhile, coal b still 
being added to the power 
station stockpiles to meet the 
eventuality of another stop- 
page in the mines. 

In the last quarter of last 
year the use of coal for power 
generation rose to a total of 
30.5 million tonnes and the use 
of oil dropped by 85 per cent to 
the equivalent of two minion 
tonnes of coaL 


A year after the end of the miners' 
strike, the Yorkshire coalfield has 
fewer miners and fewer pits, but it is 
recording increased productivity w‘ 
some men doubling their wage pack- 
ets with bonuses. 

Yorkshire, the country’s biggest 
coalfield, is based on two area 
headquarters. North and South, in- 
stead of the four areas of management 
that existed before the dispute. 

More than 1 3.000 men have left the 
industry, most taking voluntary re- 
dundancy. and the workforce is now 
38.000. Eight pits have closed and 
others have merged leaving 39 oper- 
ating collieries. 

Coal board officials report a new 
mood of realism among the men who 
have remained in the industry. In the 
South Yorkshire area, the board says 
there has been a remarkable turn- 
around in the year since- the men went 
back to work. Financial forecasts that 
the area would lose £100 million, 
including capital charges, by the end 
of March, have been revised down 
with a predicted loss of about £30 

million. 

Before the strike there were 25 pits, 
but three have closed and others 
merged. Of the 19 collieries left only 
five are not makin| a profit. 

In North Yorkshire, where five pits 
have dosed in the past year and at 
least two others may go before the end 
of this year, there are 20 operating 
collieries and output is approaching 
the three tonnes a man shift barrier. 


By Craig Seton 


By Tim Jones 


Nottinghamshire coal kept the 
Trent VaDey power stations operating 
during the strike and denied the 
National Union of Mineworkers the 
power cuts ft desperately needed to 
achieve victory. 


The coalfield's 30,000 men were 
almost solidly behind moderate lead- 
ers who emerged to take over from 
pro-SeargiU officiate during the strike 
and when it ended getting back to 
normal was easier than in most 
places. 


Even so. one year on. the strike still 
claims new casualties. Last week 200 
NUM members at Berercotes colliery 
went on strike over the dismissal of 
Mr Paul Whefton. a union activist, far 
distributing leaflets urging miners to 
leave the rival Union of Democratic 
Mineworkers. 


In the south Midlands area. Leices- 
tershire and south Derbyshire, which 
worked throughout the strike, ^ and 
Warwickshire, which was divided, 
miners will this year produce one 
million more tonnes of coal than they 
did last year. 


In the western area, which covers 

Lancashire, Staffordshire. Cumbria 
and North Wales, three pits have 
closed since tbe end of the strike. But 
the area is pinning hopes on the £60 
million Silverdale new mine in North 
Staffordshire. 


Coal will never be king again in 
South Wales but one year afteTthe 
stnke the future for the 13,500 men 
still in the industry appears to be 
secure in the 17 pits remaining. 

Before the strike, the 20.000 mem- 
bers of the National Union of 
Mineworkers knew their resilience 
was part of the mythology of the 
valleys. Once they had joined the 
strike, after voting initially by 18 
lodges to 10 against, their behaviour 
ran true to character. They became 
without question, the most militant 
defenders of the dispute. 

Their picketing tactics were at 
limes frightening and no one was 
surprised when the single worst 
incident of the conflict, the killing ofa 
taxi driver, occurred in their area. 

* otic-year investment of 

£80 million in the coalfield has 
demonstrated the board's confidence 
m economic extraction from the most 
geologically difficult area of Britain 
The miners have responded with 
record productivity, 43 per cent 
higher than before the strike when 
there were 28 pits. 

In the past 1 1 months, coalfield 
losses have been reduced, with break- 
even expected next month. Before the 
area lost more than £90 
million a vear. 

If ^ v f c ™em p tacking is forthcom- 
ing. a further £80 million may be 
invested in a new superpit at Maraam 
to produce coking coal for steel rnills 
at Port Talbot and Llanwem. 


By Ronald Faux 

area of the National 
Loal Board employs nearly 8,000 

-s- Before the 

worited at 10 pits 
returned an operat- 
ing tossof £34 million a year. Now the 
fcmrd anus to break even by J 987-88- 
_ bcotiand lost one colliery during 

jut fell victim to the most bitter 
moments of the dispute between 
“uons and management and was 

Zr’«r Th f- p,t supplied 500,000 
tonnes of coking coal to Raveascraig 
storiworks m Lanarkshire. 

A question mack still hangs over 

2HJ. ■*** « future linked to the 

gsnusMM 

^rottisb coalfield include: 

* “f 1 ? *3 million face at Sobgirtb 
roffiery m tbeLongaunet compteq 

link-up to ensure 
“axtaunn exploitation of the Kffloch 

and Barony pus in Ayrehire; . 

mfllkm investment at 


'W... 

* ' v, 


near m 

bnr gh, to work a new area of coal; 

** fl ° minion 
scbM * 1 * Kb, « 

Jills ' 01 °* £ 1 “i”*™ «*' Cbrarie 

& judged to be a 
shortlife collieiy.by the NCB. 


3 


I 


3y Darid Hewson 

. Trad ? union members an; 
increasingly unhappy with the 
way their unions 'represent 

them, a. poll published yester- 
day claims. . 

.JSf survey, produced by 
MORI for Industry Year as 
the first in a number of topical 
reports by the Association of- 
Market Survey Organizations, 
shows that. 48 per cent of 
workers; and 43 per cent of 

trade union. members, believe 
their organizations are con- 
trolled “by a few extremists 
and mil; tents". - 

The percentage of shoj>- 
flopr workers who thought 
tneir interests were being weJJ 
looked after by their shop 
stewards had fallen from 70 . 
per cent 10 yeare ago to 57 per. 
cent today, and only 42 per 
cent believed their national 
executive cared about them. 

The survey showed that 
members tend jo, belong to a 
trade union hot for political 
power, but for job security. 

Among all workers, 52 per 
cent thought that the unions 
still had too much power m ■ 
Britain in spite of changes in 
the law, and 42 per cent of 
trade union members agreed. 

But 58 per cent of workers 
believed " that unions were 
essential to protect workers' 
interests. 

There was widespread op- 


H 


' ' • - ■ 1 k!L' t ' 

I* ^ 




Tradeunion to 
run TV advert 

0 A trade onion wfl] m*ir« » 

Bn&h broadcasting history 
today when it starts advertis- 
ing its services on television in 
*ven lb-second ■Tingles” 

costing £10,000. - 

Tbe advertisement by the 
Transport and General 
Workers Union, Britain’s 
rargest Bnion,*rill goonteach 

night until Sunday at .-peak', 
viewing fine to. Granada TV " 
wwers-m* the north- westof' 
England. 

position toibe principle of the 
dosed . shop. Only 17 per cent ■ 
of workers thought everyone 
who works should have to • 
belong to a union, and even 
among union members .only 
32-. per cent believed that 
union membership should be 
compulsory. 

• But most workers did not 
believe that trade unions were 
the main cause of the 
country’s economic difficul- 
ties. 

And the pod showed that 
workers fell that their imme- 
diate boss was almost as likely 
to look after their interests as 
much as their shop steward. 

A total of 57 per' cent 
believed their interests were 
being wed looked after by their 


local union representative, 56 
per cent by- tiwir .immediate 
• boss, 42 per cent by their 
union national executive. 34 
-per cent by top management. 
19 per cent by their local MP, 
and 9 per cent by the Govern- 
menL. 

There -was widespread sup- 
' port for secret ballots of union 
members concerning a range 
of issues. 

More than 80 per cent of 
) union members, and three* 
quarters of general workers; 
supported ballots before 


r y 


W*' -t •» ; i' 


■ a 4 


r 1 


' 



supported ballots before 
strikes, 78 per cent of . workers 
wanted them for the election 
of union. officials, and 69 per 
cent on closed shop agree- 
ments. 

The idea of accepting wage 
reductions to ensure, contin- ! 
ued employment was attrac- 
tive to only 4 per cent of shop- 
floor workers in 
man ula during and construc- 
tion. » 

. A total of 14 per cent rated 
their company as “one of the 
best”, 20 per cent “above 
average", 52 per cent 
“average”, 6 per cent “below 
average” and 5 per cent “one 
of the worst”. 

The survey was based upon 
1.019 manual workers and 
managers in the manufactur- 
ing. mining, and construction 
industries and in the service 
sector, including government. 


Move to save wild flowers 


More than 300 of Britain's 
wild flowers are threatened 
with extinction { Oar Hortfcal- 
ture Correspondent writes). 

To focus, attention on this 
and to campaign for better 
management' - Of wild-fiower 
. habitats such as ' roadside 
' verges, the Royal Society of 
Nature Conservation's British 
wild fife appeal is organizing* 
wild flower week on May 47- 

Office use 
ofVDUs 
‘soon 50%’ 

More than half Britain's 
workforce will J reguhuiy be 
using visual display units 
within four years, according to 
. the TUC today. , 

• It points out that US- 
million VDUsare In aw in 
Britain and that sales «f word 

. processors. JwrSOTMil fOBppnt- 
; ers and larger systems contin- 
ue at a rapid rate. . . . 

The TUC says that as a 
result of research confirming 
that some health problems are 
frequently encountered among 
VDU workers, it publishes 
today a handbook that sets out 
guidelines for the safe use of 
the equipment. 

The aim of the guidelines is 
to assist safety' representatives . 
and other union officials in 
their negotiations with em- 
ployers on the introduction 
and use of VDUs. 

The TUC is particularly 
keen to. avoid intensive VDU 
work and to limit the total time 
spent on sock work. 

• British industry is ^ depen- 
dent on computers that com- 
puter failure could ruin 
companies, an international 
insurance specialist expert 
says. 

According to Stewart 
Wrightson, the International 
insurance brokers, many com- 
panies depend on computers 
for the day-to-day running of 
their business to sorb an 
extent that a computer system 
interruption of more than a few 
hours could bring a company 
close to collapse. 


26. The week will begin with a 
sponsored celebrities . wQd 
flower walk, started by Mr 
David Bellamy, the bo tanis t. 

This will leave the Stoke 
Garden Festival on May 17 
and, passing through many 
wild flower reserves, will ar- 
rive during the opening of the 
Chelsea Flower Show on May 
20 . 

Other events around the 


reform this week 


By Frances Gibb, Legal Affairs Correspondent 

•' Far-reaching changes in the to range from complete aboli- 
criminal justice system to tton oT the peremptory chal- 
make it more effective in lenge, to reducing the present 
bringing criminals to hook right of three challenges to 
win be proposed by TheGov- one. 
eriimem in a White'Paperon " The White Riper wiirsop- 
Thursday. • 


T1h«sday. ■ - « . 'gestihat complete abolition be 

, The tnanr ingredients 01 the.- matched by an expansion- in 
mtxed pack^e^of tefoms are: dp right ,io challenge for 

• Changes m the extradition cause, of giving a reason- 

laws 10 stop the United King-; ■ • ; t _ . ■ . 

dom being used as a haven by ^' na il7, l ^ e ^£ lle ^2*5? ,s 
international criminals-. c *Pe«ed V> pu fo ™ d ' hrce 

• The abolition of trial by °P“ ons for S r Z r 

• Ipmwii a*ni«i(vs in ihe facp of 


w 1 ik auuuuuu ot . uicu uy , r : — — . ~ c 

jury for certain minor offences leo.ent senrences in ihe face of 
to rare crown court conges- coo “ n ’ b f s01De backbench- 


tioiu 

• Options 


curbing 


Last year the Government 


wr vpuviid . iv* vwm 1 " © “ Lrflol UiW vii/'Wiuiiivm 

defendant's right to challenge was forced to withdraw a 
jurors without reason: • . proposal that the Court of 

• Options for , tackling over-. Appeal should be able to 
lenient sentences by judges. . . review allegedly over-lenient 
The reforms to the extradi- sentences referred to it by the 
lion laws will include a relax- prosecution, and 10 make a 
ation of the present legal rule statement of opinion, because 
which makes it difficult for of parliamentary opposition. 

AxMinw rAiirlC A At aIIaoaH TUnf MmA wrAiwrol vl/ltl k\A 


foreign courts to get alleged 
offenders out of Britain. 

In return, it -is hoped that 
other countries will take steps 
to return British fugitives. 


That same proposal will be 
one of three options canvassed 
in the White Paper. A second 
option will be the same pro- 
posal but with “teeth”. The 


The White Paper will also Court of Appeal would be able 
outline changes in the present to increase the sentence if it 
system of trial by jury. It thought it was too lenient and 
‘ wants to abolish the right to not be confined just to a 
f jury trial in the case of some statement of opinion, 
minor offences, such as com- Third, the White Paper will 


-lltlAIUi UIIV.IIV.I.J, uuvu w IliiiXH Uiv 

mon assault and driving while suggest that sentencing by 
disqualified. judges be made more consis- 

Proposais to curb the con- tent. This would be done by 
troversial peremptory chat codifying the practice direc- 
lenge. or right 10 challenge lions of the Lord Chief Justice 
jurors, will also be put forward into a “guide book” forjudges, 
in the form of options. perhaps with statutory back- 

These options are expected ing. 


Plea to save merlins 


Merlin falcons are the only 
bird of prey whose numoers 
are tailing in the United 
Kingdom, according to the 
latest issue, of the Royal 
Society for the Protection of 
Birds’ magazine. Birds. 

The society is calling for 
action to ensure that the 
merlin’** upland habitat is not 
destroved by larming and 
foretry ft wants the Govern- 
ment to support the Agricul- 
ture Bill which would allow 
large areas of land to be 
designated environmentally 
sensitive areas. 

The Nature Conservancy: 
Council and the Countryside 
Commission have drawn up a 
list of 18 such areas, including 
the Cambrian mountains and 
Orkncv. The merlin popula- 
tion in Britain is about ouu 




The merlin felcon, whose 
numbers are falling. 

pairs; 350 pairs in Scotland 
200 in northern England and 
50 in Wales. 


Britons under 
24 keen to 
travel in space 

Six out of 10 young Britons 
.would travel in space if they 
had the chance and the idea is 
twice as popular with men. 
according to a holiday survey 
out today. 

What Britons do and spend 
on holiday are contained in 
the survey conducted by Gal- 
lup. for American Express. 

It shows that enthusiasm for 
space travel is affected by age; 
63 per cent of those aged 1 6 to 
24 would go. compared with 
16 per cent of the 65-plus 
group. 

More than 16-million Brit- 
ish adults are likely to take a 
foreign holiday this year, 2.6 
million more than last year. 


Weather hits cathedral charges 


Elv Cathedral took £313 
when it began imposing ad- 
mission charges at the week- 
end. 

But the authorities at the 
cathedral, one of the final *d 
E urope and dating hack 1.300 
ycarT said they »«* no1 
disappointed. 

Canon Dennis Green, vice- 
dean and treasurer. 2£l 
terday: “If a slow. stoj 
because of the weather. It w* 
slewing." 

More than 200 sightsmj- 
including Australians, oerj 

1J so jo go mto the bauar^ 
which the Cant- 


bndgeshire- Fen landscape. 
Children, students and pen- 
sioners were charged £L 
Until now the 200,000 visi- 
tors a year have given an 
average of 32p each. 

Canon Green said: “The 
response of everyone was very 
positive. They quue under- 

noodoursiniauoR. 

to raise an extra £100,000 a 
year to break even. 

••It is a case of the cathedral 
either remaining a Hying, 
building or becoming a ftrture 
Stonehenge. 

•■N'o one expressed alarm 
that thev had to pay. I was 
amazed. T expected lobaveto 


explain our situation in grcai 
detail. 

“We have notice boards 
explaining that we don't re- 
■ ceive slate aid." 

More than 1,000 free passes 
have been issued to local 
people and the Cathedral 
Friends, its supporters' dub. 

“No charges are made at the 
cathedral on Sundays. A side 
chapel for prayers is available 
free of charge throughout the 
week.” Canon Green said. 

More than £5 million has to 
be found fpr the upkeep and 
restoration of the cathedral 
during the next 10 years. An 
international fund-raising 
campaign is 10 be launched. 




Retirement at 70 
proposed for GPs 

By Nicholas Timmins., Social Services Corrspondent 



country will include exhibi- 
tions. 

A wiki life garden is being 
created at the Stoke Garden 
Festival (May J to October 26) 
and there will be a display 
called Wild Flowers Are Won- 
derful at the Chelsea sbow. 

The RSNC, in association 
with the Ford Motor Compa- 
ny, is producing a booklet, i 
Wild Flowers on the Verges. 


Proposals to make family 
doctoxs retire at the age of 70, 
to make if easier for paiiems 
to change doctors and to find 
out what services local doctors 
offer are to be put forward in 
the Government's Green Pa- 
per on the future of family 
practitioner services. 

Ministers are to propose 
that GPs should move to- 
wards a performance-related 
contract, where those who 
undertake preventive work 
and achieve high rates of 
vaccination; immunization 
and screening, would receive 
more pay. There wouklalso be 
incentives to encourage youn- 
ger doctors to move 10 inner- 
city areas. 

The Green Paper, first 
promised for October 1984, is 
expected to appear about 
Easter. But ministers are em- 
phasizing that it will be an 
“agenda for discussion" rather 
than a firm plan of action. 

Mr Norman Fowler, Secre- 
tary of Stale .for Social Ser- 


vices. and the other health 
ministers are likely to hold 
public meetings to encourage 
patients to say what they want. 

Ultimately, there are likely 
to be changes in family 
doctors* contracts, but minis- 
ters are anxious to avoid a 
confrontation with the medi- 
cal profession near a general 
election. They believe the 
threat of the Green Paper has 
already led to changes and 
want to take advantage of the 
mood in the medical profes- 
sion without uniting doctors 
against them. 

The Green Paper is likely, 
however, to pick up initiatives 
from the Royal College of 
General Practitioners which is 
keen to see a performance- 
related contract introduced to 
encourage GPs 10 provide 
better services. Ministers may 
press for GPs to be allowed, in 
effect, to advertise their ser- 
vices. 10 encourage competi- 
tion. 


Mrs Gay Biddlecombe, 
whose St George's English 
Wines have been chosen to 
launch the Domesday cele- 
brations this mouth, with her 
staff pruning the vines in 
sub-zero temperatures in the 
East Sussex vineyard. Spe- 
cially bottled for the celebra- 
tions. Domesday English 
Wine, being tasted (right) by 
Mrs Biddlecombe, has been 
selected by The National 
Domesday Committee and 
the Public Record Office for 
all the official functions, 
including the reception to be 
attended by the Queen. 

(Photograph: Tim Bishop) 



Budget tax cut plea 
as sherry sales drop 


By Derek Harris 


Sales of fortified wines, 
especially sherry, fell 18 per 
cent Iasi year, in spite of bigger 
Christmas sales to shops. At 
the same time, the sale of table 
wines stowed for the first time 
since 1982. 

The findings emerge from 
the latest analyses by the Wine 
and Spirit Association, based 
on customs and excise returns. 

The association blames 
over-taxation for the decline 


and is calling for taxes to be 
reduced in the Budget. 

The association has ap- 
pealed to Spain and Portugal 
to add to the pressure to 
reduce the taxes in Britain 
now that these key exporters 
of sherry and port are EEC 
members. 

Beer sales are also still in the 
doldrums, but lager accounts 
for 41 per cent of the beer 
market. 


Disruption 
threat in 
Bar pay 
deadlock 

By Our Legal Affairs 
Correspondent 
A deadlock between the Bar 
and the Attorney General over 
barristers’ fees for prosecution 
work threatens widespread 
disruption of the Crown pros- 
ecution service, due to start in 
parts of the country on April 1. 

Negotiations ceased abrupt- 
ly three weeks ago at the same 
time as the Lord Chancellor 
announced he was increasing 
defence fees under legal aid by 
only 5 per cent. 

The Bar is challenging the 
Lord Chancellor in the courts 
over that decision, but it has 
failed 10 make any progress 
with negotiations on prosecu- 
tion fees. 

When barristers decided 10 
take legal proceedings against 
the Lord Chancellor, they also 
agreed they should be free to 
refuse prosecutions unless a 
reasonable fee was agreed. 

This move, which comes 
close to industrial action, will 
directly affect the new service, 
unless Bar leaders and the 
Attorney General can agree on 
fees" within four weeks. 

Mr Robert Alexander. QC. 
chairman of the Bar. said: 
“We are pressing the Attorney 
Genera] for negotiations and 
there is great concern that he 
has not so far responded, 
bearing in mind he agreed 
these negotiations should take 
place within a timetable to be 
completed by the end of 
January.” 

■Three weeks ago. the Attor- 
ney General wrote to Mr 
Alexander, saying that the new 
prosecution service would 
need 10 engage private practi- 
tioners in the magistrates’ 
courts to supplement its own 
lawyers. 

But there has been no 
further move on crown court 
work, where the Bar is putting 
forward a system of “standard 
fees", which would remove 
the need for each brief to be 
assessed. 


HOWTO INVEST IN THE FUTURE 



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HOME/OVERSEAS NEWS 


THE TIMES MONDAY MARCH 3 1986 


;' : -r 


* * ☆ * * 


Government will not 


contribute to safety 
at football grounds 


Spray 

attack 


Australia independent at 


on 


police 


By Philip Webster, Political Reporter 

A government working par- But Mrs Thatcher argued ship for the FA Cup compcii- 
' up after the Bradford strongly at several Downing lion, a suggestion it regards 


ty. sei^ up after the Bradford 
City fire disaster to organize 
the financing of football 
ground improvements, has 
been quietly wound up with- 
out the Government having to 
contribute to the multi- 
million-pound cost. 

The decision, so far unan- 
nounced. marks a victory for 
the Government, and particu- 
larly the Prime Minister, over 
the football authorities. 

After the Valiev Parade 
disaster last May there were 
calls from the Football Associ- 
ation and the Football League, 
backed by opposition parties, 
for government help for fi- 
nancing the upgrading of stan- 
dards which was ordered for 
all Football League grounds. 


Street meetings that the game 
itself had the capacity to find 
more money. 

The working party, chaired 
by Mr Richard Tracey. Minis- 


tion. a suggestion it regards 
with horror, before asking for 
money from the Government 
that finally led it to admit 
defeat 

A decision before Christmas 


ter for Sport and involving to allow the clubs five years to 
several government depan- complete the improvements. 


mcnis and the football au- 
thorities. is considered by the 
Government to have a role no 
longer. 

The authorities pressed un- 
til the last the need for 


while keeping unsafe parts of 
their grounds closed, has en- 
abled the Government to say 
that the clubs should complete 
the programme with consider- 
able help from the Football 


government help but. accord- Grounds Improvement Trust. 


Thirty-six policemen suA 
fered irritation to the eyes, 
nose and throat when they 
were attacked by football sup- 
porters armed with canisters 
at Southampton. 

Hampshire Police said that 
it was not known what the 
policemen were sprayed with. 
None was seriously hurt. 

The incident happened 
when 750 Manchester United 
supporters broke down two 
gates as they surged out of 
Southampton’s stadium. The 
Dell, shortly before the end of 
Saturday's First Division 
I match. 


ing to a working party source, 
were in the end outmanoeu- 
vred by the Government. 

According to the source, it 
was a suggestion from Mr 
Tracey that the FA should 
consider organizing sponsor- 


Each year it gives £4 million 
from the spoi-the-bal! compe- 
titions for safety work. 

Its allied organization, the 
Football Trust, will soon an- 
nounce a £300.000 scheme to 
help the big non-League dubs. 


Girl murdered 
after disco 


Jobless build ‘own’ hall 


Community enterprise has a 
long tradition in Glasgow. The 
pioneering work in the 1970s 
by Mr Jim Johnson and his 
colleagues in the architectural 
co-operative. Assist on reha- 
bilitating tenement blocks 
with the help of tenants has 
been widely copied (Charles 
Knetitt writes). 

For the past four years Mr 
Andy Jack, an Assist archi- 
tect has been working with 


Spittal Tenants Community 
Association in the Glasgow 
suburb of Rutherglen. Their 
community hall, serving an 
estate of 850 houses, opens 
this summer with the help of a 
£50,000 grant from Glasgow 
District Council and labour 
provided through the Man- 
power Services Commission. 

The project is one of the 33 
entries short-listed In The 
Times Community En- 


terprise Scheme. It was visited 
by the assessors at the week- 
end. 

Mrs Margaret Deans, sec- 
retary of the association, said 
that positive discrimination 
had been used in selecting 
MSC labour from the sur- 
rounding area. 

Mr Kenny Waters, the site 
manager, said but he has bad 
considerable success in finding 
permanent jobs for them. 


The parents of a giri aged 16 1 
who was found strangled and 
sexually assaulted early yester- 
day morning in Colwyn Bay. 
North Wales, were travelling 
from their home in Liverpool 
last night to identify their 
daughter's body. 

The girt, who had been 
living in the resort, was on her 
way home from a discotheque 
when she was attacked, 


Militant fails 


Mr Ben Lucas, aged 23. a 
Liverpool Universitv student 
who supports the soft left was 
elected leader of the Labour 
Students Organizations on 
Saturday, defeating a Militant 



From Stephen Taylor, Canberra 


J 




The Oueen yesterday left jurisidktiop ia Austrafia, and 
traditionaJMaori insults and henceforth the High i Court » 
mS brouhaha io New 


pyilMVUi . — 

Zealand and amved in Can- 
berra fora 12-day visit which, 
for all Australia's reputation 
for belligerent egalitarianism, 
is unlikely to be touched by 
the same kind of controversy. 

Her first official duty was to 
grant Australians the full inde- 
pendence from Britain which 
many thought they had de- 
cades ago. 

In a simple ceremony at 
Government House here, at- 
tended bv Mr Bob Hawke, the 
Prime Minister, and his Cabi- 
net. the Queen signed a procla- 
mation activating from today 
the Australia Acts of 1986. 
recently passed by the British 
and Federal Parliaments. 

The Acts remove the residu- 
al — and by general agreement 
outdated — legislative, execu- 
tive and judicial fetters which 
could be imposed from Brit- 
ain. 

The unhanding by Australia 
of such control has been a 
process which started with the 


The Act alstf scraps powers 
which British governments 
have in theory retained bui j n 
effect not exercised few wears, 
as a link between stare govern- 
ments in Australia and the 
Crown. 


- 



& 




effective granting of self-gov- 
ernment in 1901 — when 


eminent in 1901 — when 
colonies like Victoria and 
New South Wales federated as 
a nation - and continued 
through the 1930s but which is 
only now complete. 

The final phase, which start- 
ed more than a decade ago, 
was delayed as much by a 
certain weariness in various 
state parliaments at the pros- 


The New Zealand tour 
incident-filled to the end. On 
Saturday three women m then- 
early twenties exposed their 
buttocks to the Queen as she 
was being driven to a garden 
party in Christchurch. 

The Whakapakane. as this 
traditional Maori gesture is 
known, was cieariy seen by the 
Queen, and was the. second 
time ou the tour that she and 
the Duke of Edinburgh had 
been confronted by protesters 
in this way. She was also hh by 
an egg thrown by a' yo ung 
woman and encountered a 
number of demonstrations. 

For all the attention these 
protests have attracted, it 
would be a mistake to imagine 
that New Zealand — arguably 
the most ardently royalist of - 
all Commonwealth countries 
- has undergone some dra- 
matic metamorphosis. The 
demonstrators were invari- 
ably in small groups and 
generally representative of 
fringe political groups. 


fji 


Mr David Lange, the Prime 
Minister, dearly testy at the 
coverage the incidents have 


A smiling Queen accepts bouquets from Australian children 
daring a walkabout on her arrival in Canberra. 


panoflosingftirOierauthori^ gg Sg fc 

f° Canberra as by rolaclance 
















M6 


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Ml 


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in Westminster to approve it. 

The most significant change 
in practical terms is abolition 
of the right of appeal to the 
Privy CoundL The view has 
been widely held in legal 
drcles for years here that it 
was intolerable for a foreign 
body to have overriding legal 


Saturday: “She is the Queen of 
New Zealand. I don't remem- 
ber complaining when a man 
got into her bedroom at 
Buckingham Palace, f wish 
you people would look after 
her as well as we do in New 
Zealand". 


Special Report, pages 21-24 


Dingo baby mother 
breaks down on TY 


Sydney (Renter) — The 
convicted baby-killer, Mrs 
Lindy Chamberlain, repeated- 
ly broke down yesterday as she 
insisted in ber first television 
interview since her release 
from jail that her nine-week- 
old daughter was snatched by 
a dingo. 

Mrs Chamberlain, aged 38, 
whose bizarre case has 
gripped Australia, was freed 
on February 9 after serving 
three years of a life sentence 
for killing her baby, Azaria, in 
1986. 

She said sbe would fight to 
dear her name and those of 
her family and witnesses who 
said Azaria was taken by a 
■dingo from a" camp site, at 
remote Ayers Rock. 

■ After new evidence was 
found relating to her baby's 
death, Mrs Chamberlain was 
freed, tat the anthorities said 
that her conviction would 
stand pending the outcome of a 
new inquiry. 

Mrs Chamberlain, who 
showed an apparent detach- 
ment during her marathon 
murder trial, spoke emotional- 
ly about what her conviction 
had done to her family. 

“To see my children's reac- 
tions, to watch my father go 
grey, nothing will pay for that, 
not ever, and that makes me 
extremely angry," she said. 

Mrs Chamberlain, who has ( 
three other children, said there i 
was no way she could have , 
killed her daughter, whose j 
body was never found. * 





Seven die 
in Tamil 
ambush 


Colombo (AFP. Reuter) - 
IS jptfftsnjs in S ri Lanka 
ktiled five soldiers and two 
Sinhalese farmers in an attack 
vesierday in the Vavuniva 

oChere a ^° ut miles north 

The soldiers were guarding 
he farmers as they move! 
Uteir harvest from a paddy 
53* wh ? 1 Tamils blew up 

^n l L^ ,C J es with a re mote 

control landmine. Seven other 

farmers were seriously injured 
A ban on fishing in Sn 
Lanka s northern territorial 
waters went into effect yesier- 
day after the Government 
accused Tamil separatists of 
terrymg arms and trained 
terrorists from southern India, 
intormed sources here said the 
Government was planning to 
spend 300 million rupees (£8 

St&ShF"** ,mlia 

Meanwhile. Sri Lanka 
launched a diplomatic cam- 
paign tn . . * 


| London to 
share 
chess fight 

Lucerne (Renter) — a w. 


Lucerne (Renter) A re- 
natch between the new world 
chess champion, Gary 
Kasparov, and the rhaiiwiggr 
and former world champion, 
his fellow Russian Anatoly 
Karpov, will be held in London 
and Leningrad from July 28, 
the International Chess Feder- 
ation announced here. 

played m Britain and the 

*2 in the Soviet 
union. th» ch>hM^< -j 


*• M*p*umaiic cam- 
paign to defend itself against 
Indian accuser inne 


Indian accusations of geno- 
f'^ e - Tte acting Foreign Min- 

M U yr ? nne Fernando 

announced that he wouS 
meet envoys from 10 coun- 

E5SF* l ° bn r eflhem on Sri 
Lanka s view of the dispute. 


xi.r T saw. 

i ne decision to hold the 
competition in two centres was 

^r^SL? e -r h i >,e ■“** to be 

*n London, it added. 

The federation’s president, 
Florenao Campomanes, 
J™? 8 *. reports ttaTto 
had beeu eu- 
SfS “■ power straggle with 
■h e So T K, C1.«, rStion. 
i*, M“ K,0n financing problem 

m ° aes wobU b* 

** near future, Mr 
t-entpomanes said. London 

lSSoS? 0 (£666,000) and 
Leningrad one mOllon. 

toS*®* of the long time 
to deckle on the venue 


We’re getting there ^ intercity 


£ rst banknii 


sssg&s safsss 

crcdiiors. Its cmni.? v !2 ^ off where H S|,,VC *01* «» China. 

employees would Sf is com- 

muted to fon employment- • 


% 


.-i 


iiU I 


Mrs Lindy Chamberlain: 

• vows to clear name. - 

Asked . why she did net 
pretend she killed her daugh- 
ter in a state of post-natal-' 
depression, she said: “Why 
should I pretend that l bad 
done something I didn't do?" 

The evidence which trig- 
gered her release was the 
discovery of a tattered jacket 
she identified as the one 
Azaria wore on the night she 
went missing. 

Her supporters say that the 
jacket, still under forensic 
study, proved that .Azaria was 
waring if on the night she 
disappeared, a fact body con- 
tested by the prosecution dur- 
ing Mrs Chamberlain's tiiaL 
The interview was shown on 
a channel controlled by the 
media ty coon Mr Kerry Pack- 
er, whose Consolidated Press 
Group is reported by local 
newspapers to have paid 
£125,000 for exclusive inter- 
views wi th the Chamberiaihs. 




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The assassination, of Olof Palme 



1 From OaistopberMosev 
Stockholm 

j The murder of the Swedish 

rnme Minister, Mr Olof 
ralme, may end a reniartiable 
openness m the upper eche- 
Io ^of Swedish politka 1 life. 

Foreign, correspondents 
“pre were always amazed at 
me ease with which one could 
contact leadingpoliticians and 
- frequently . encounter them 
about town withont . body- 
guards. . . ’ • . 

Only last year I was one of. 
three journalists who had an . 
impromptu interview with the 
forinei* Defence Minister, Mr 
. Andei&Thunhoi^ on a street • 

coraer.near the Foreign Minis.' 
fry. .There was no sign of 
security; 

Mr Palme, walking appar- 
ently- unguarded from his- 
home in the OW Town -round- 
the Houses of Parliament on-- 
Holy- Ghost bland, to his - 
offices in Rosen bad a few 
hundred yards away, was a 
familiar sight. -He would -T ake 
a band and call the traditional 
Swedish greeting “Hejr : 

When his ; successor, Mr 
Igvar Carlsson, went walking 
in Stockholm at the weekend 
he was .surrounded by talk 
thick-set security men wearing ■ 
overcoats which bulged omi- 
nously at the shoulders. .. 

With the death of its leader. ■ 
Sweden has been propelled 
into Ihe harsh reality of the 
modern world. All the “it 
couldn't happen here'’ talk is 
now a thing of the pastA 
leading article in yesterday’s 
Dagens. Nyheter, Sweden’s 



A Stockholm boy struggles 

main daily newspaper, said 
“The picture of Sweden as a 
protected corner of the world, 
safe in its . lack of social 
division, has several times 
previously ‘ been disturbed 
when political violence has 
touched our land 
“But what happened on the 

Hie successor 


mm 

to write his name in the condolence book for Mr Palme. 


nights of Friday and Saturday 
has no parallel and has sud- 
denly made our own existence 
feel more uncertain.” 

Among the general public 
there is shock and grave 
concern that Mr Palme was 
allowed to go out late at night 
unprotected The national po- 


lice chief, Mr Holger 
Romander, the man ultimate- 
ly responsible for the Prime 
Minister’s safety, said- “We 
can't plague ourselves with 
guilt and regret over what has 
happened We couldn't have 
acted in any other way. Olof 
Palme wanted to be left in 


peace in his private life, 
without bodyguards. 

“It was the Government 
and Mr Palme who decided on 
security concerning the Prime 
Minister and top civil ser- 
vants. We obey them and 
serve them.” he said “Mr 
Palme wanted great personal 
freedom but, of course, we 
explained to him the risks he 
was running." 

Mr Romander said that 
security had been increased 
for all ministers. “How com- 
prehensive this is we naturally 
cannot say, but it is 
considerable.'” 

Mr Sven-Ake Hjalmroth, 
chief of Sapo. the Swedish 
secret police, held anxious 
discussions with Mr Palme in 
1982 over what he saw as lax 
security. But it took several 
months, said Mr Hjalmroth, 
before Mr Palme would accept 
a regular bodyguard 

However, since 1983. when 
anonymous threats were made 
against Mr Palme’s life, two 
Sapo bodyguards have always 
been in attendance at public 
appearances by the Prime 
Minister. 

Mr Palme always agreed to 
keep Sapo informed of his 
movements. There was one 
tragic exception. “On Friday- 
evening he didn't do so,” said 
Mr Hjalmroth. “Mr Palme 
said he thought he would be 
home throughout the evening, 
so surveillance was 
withdrawn." 

Obituary, page 14 


Mystery man takes helm 


: From Christopher Mosey, Stockholm 


Mr lngvar Carlsson, the 
maiL who has stepped out of 
the giant shallow cast by Mr 
Olof Palme, Sweden's assassi- 
nated leader, to become: the 
comby's Prime Minister-des- 
ignate, Vis something ‘of a 
: mystery even to those who 

. knew him welL . - 

Putting flesh on the bare, 
bwies of a brief official Social 
Democratic Party biography is 
- 3- difficult task simply because 
MrCarbson has always cho- 
' sen to remain very much in the 
background. ; 

He was born into a working- 
- class £un3y. in die . Swedish 
textile town of Boras in 1931,- 
' attended a coniinercral high- , 
school and then .went on ta 
-take ah ' MA- Ini political ,sd- 
.eiice atthetJnixersify.pf Tupd,. 
• in 1958. .. 

From 1958 to I960 he ins, 
like Mr .Palme,, one of 
“Erland«’s boys", part of the . . 
group of bright young men . 
working with the then Prase 
Minister, Tage Ertander. . 

He spent a year studying in 


the United States and in 1961 
returned to Sweden to become 
chairman of the Social Demo- 
cratic Youth Movement. 

At the age of 31 be was 
elected MP, and three years 
later graduated to the post of 
Under-Secretary in the Cabi- 
net Office.. 

In 1969, the year Mr Palme 
took over die leadership, Mr 
Carlsson was appointed Min- 
ister of Education. In 1973 he 
was made Minister of Hous- 
ing. 

In 1976, when the Social 
Democrats lost power after 44 
years in offfce, Mr Palmegave 
MrCarbson the oforctaes- 
tratifl g.V4. ration power, 
coupled with tire ' task' ' of 
drawing npajmaster plan to 
POt^thgiflXH^any. on asopnd 
footing.. • . : 1 - •' 
i Wten.the party ratarned to 
power , in 4982, . Mr Carlsson 
received his reward. He be- 
came- Deputy Prime Minister, 
and as Mr Palme’s personal 
trooble-shooter occupied him- 
seff with a study of posable' 

World reaction 


future strategies for Swedish 
society. 

These were aimed at reliev- 
ing the Social Democrats from 
accusations of totalitarian 
trends. This won him the 
popular title of “Minister of 
tiie Fature". 

After a second election vic- 
tory last year, Mr Palme gave 
him the new, official title of 
Minister of the Environment 
in an attempt to woo Sweden’s 
“Green" movement 

Mr Carlsson is described by 
those who know him as a 
workaholic and a highly pro- 
fessional — although some- 
what colourless — politician. 

However, while his public 
appearances have done little to 
set the house on fire, Mr 
Carlsson has been knowu io 
give humorous speeches at 
party congresses. 

After March 12 when, if all 
goes well, he will be officially 
sworn in as Prime Minister, he 
may start to assert himself as 
he steps oat of Mr Palme’s 
shadow. 


Countdown to murder 

The killer who lurked 
in the shadows 

From Our Correspondent, Stockholm 


Tributes from East and West 


.By Oxnr Forefen Staff 

. Messages of sympathy 
poured into Sweden, underlin- 
ing Mr Palme's international 
role as an advocate of Third 
World causes and an oppo- 
nent of nuclear arms. 

In the United States. Presi- 
dent Reagan sakfc “My sorrow 
in the face of this senseless act 
of violence is profound. Olof 


Palme was one of the world's 
most respected leaders, a man 
-who made compassion . the 
hallmark of Swedish policy." 

In the Soviet Union, the 
head of the KGB, Mr Viktor 
Chebrikov. told the Commu- 
nist Party congress that Mr 
Palme was “a world-known 
fighter for peace" The con- 
gress observed , a minute of 
silence in his memory. 


The Pope told King Carl 
Gustaf that .after hearing 
about the assassination he 
prayed that mankind would 
“renounce all acts of hate". 

In Britain, Mrs Margaret 
Thatcher described Mr Palme 
as a great international figure 
who would he “grievously 
missed”. The Queen sent a 
message to the Swedish King 
expressing shock. 


The man who killed Mr 
Olof Palme waited in the 
shadows outside the block of 
luxury flats where the Swedish 
Prime Minister lived in 
Stockholm's Old Town, ac- 
cording to the police version 
of events. 

When Mr Palme and his 
.wife, Lisbet, left the house at 
8.40 pm (7.40pm GMT) on 
Friday, the assassin followed 
themThey walked for five 
minutes through cobbled 
streets, to the Old Town 
underground station, boarded 
a northbound train and got off 
three stops further on at 
Radmansgatan station. 

" They then walked a few 
hundred yards to the Grand 
Cinema, arriving just before 
9pm. The assassin watched 
through the glass doors as the 
Palmes met their 24-year-old 
son. Marten, and his girlfriend 
in the foyer, bought tickets 
and went into the cinema to 
see The Brothers Mozart, a 
new Swedish film. 

He wafted either inside or 
outside — the police are not 
sure — until the film ended at 
1 1.10 pm. Then he followed as 
the four people walked a block 
northwards along Sveavagen, 
the capital’s main thorough- 
fare. 

There Mr and Mrs Palme 
said goodbye to their son and 
his girlfriend and crossed to 
the other side of Sveavagen. 
the assassin close behind 
them. 

Mr Palme dropped a few 


paces behind his wife and, at 
1 1.20 pm at the junction with 
Tunnelgaian. a pedestrian 
street, ihe assassin seized his 
chance. 

He pulled a revolver from 
the pocket of his coat and fired 
a copper-plated, lead-tipped 
bullet into the Prime 
Minister's back. The bullet 
severed Mr Palme’s aorta. 

As Mrs Palme turned to ask 
her husband why someone 
was letting off fireworks, the 
assassin fired again. The sec- 
ond bullet passed through Mrs 
Palme's clothes, grazing her 
slightly, and ended up on the 
opposite side of Sveavagen. 

The assassin then turned 
and ran down Tunnelgatan. 
pursued by a man who was 
passing by. 

He scrambled up a dimly lit 
flight of 86 steps to 
Malmskiilnadsgatan, a street 
frequented by drug addicts, 
prostililues and their clients. 

Then he disappeared into a 
maze of small streets to reap- 
pear on Birger Jarisgatan. a 
main road running parallel 
with Sveavagen, near 
Alexandra's, Stockholm's 
trendy night spot. The man 
who had set off in pursuit lost 
the killer somewhere on route. 

Miss Anna Hage, a 17-year- 
old trainee nurse, who rushed 
from a car to give first aid to 
the Prime Minister, tried heart 
massage because she could feel 
no pulse. “His heart started 
beating again briefly but then 
stopped," she said. 


Bonn asks 
the Jews 
to forgive 

Duisbmg. West Germany 
AP) - President Richard von 
Weizsacker yesterday asked 
lews to forgive a recent spate 
jf an li -Semi tic remarks by 
West German officials. 

In a speech to about 4jQ00 
people, Herr von Weizsacker 
mid the remarkshad wounded 
lews in West Germany and 
iround the world. 

"I ask for forgiveness from 
hem. We cannot excuse these 
iiaicmcms. They are irrecon- 
rilable with our view of people 
md democratic humanism, 
vith history, and with the 
lonour of our people.". 

Herr von Weizsacker made 
ris speech to mark the annual 

•Brotherhood Week" begun 

n 1951 to underline the need 
or reconciliation with Jew's. 

The controversial state- 
ncnis have led to a debate on 
vhether anti-Semitism ts 
: merging again in Germany. 


Angry Brazilians loot shops 


Rio de Janeiro (AP) — 
Angry customers looted three 
supermarkets here and mobs 
tried to ransack three others in 
Sao Paulo after prices were 
raised despite a government- 
decreed price freeze. 

The freeze was ordered on 
Friday as part of a sweeping 
anti-inflation programme an- 
nounced by President Samey. 
Measures also included a wage 
freeze and a new currency, the 
cruzado, to replace the cruzei- 
ro. . . . 

Price increases m supermar- 
kets and snack bars were 
reported all over Brazil on 
Friday, and Rio de Janeiro 
police were reported to have 
arrested 27 store managers. 

Dozens of angry customers 
completely demolished the 
inside of a hamburger restau- 
rant in central Rio after prices 
were increased. Police armed 
with machine-guns broke up 
the mob by firing shots, in the 
air. , 

Senhor Samey said that the 
price freeze would last indefi- 


nitely and that violators could 
be thrown in jafl. It was not 
dear under what law they 
would be prosecuted or what 
the penalties would be. 

• Praise from bankers: The 
economic package has been 
greeted with hostility by 
unions, but has won approval 
from bankers and business- 
men. For many bankers and 
economists, the programme is 
probably the Government's 
last hope of defeating infla- 
tion, which is running at -more 
than 250 per cent, while still 
allowing the economy to grow 
(Reuter reports). 

“For the first time the 
Government has demonstrat- 
ed that it really intends u> 
defeat inflation, which is 
something we have beei 
pressing for," one foreign 
banker said. 

Unions criticized the deri- 
sion to adjust wages only 
annually, despite the granting 
of an immediate increase to all 


workers and a guarantee of 
further increases should prices 
rise by 20 per cent. Bank 
workers have called an indefi- 
nite protest strike from today. 

During the 1 1 months that 
President Samey's civilian 
Government has ruled in 
Brazil, the economy has 
boomed, with one of the 
highest growth rates in the 
world last year. Workers have 
enjoyed a sharp increase in 
purchasing power for the first 
time in years and unemploy- 
ment has fallen. But the price 
paid has been continuing high 
inflation. 

“To continue blindly to- 
wards an inflation rate of 500 
or 600 per cent would only 
lead U) recession, unemploy- 
ment and falling salaries," 
said the Finance Minister, 
Senhor Dilson Funaro. The 
Government says it expects 
monthly inflation to fell to 
zero this month, from 14.4 per 
cent in February, 


Murder of Palestinian halts bid for peace 


Continued from page I 

undermining eftorw to brmfi 
peace to the area. "This shows 
that anyone who is prepared 
to talk to us is likely to sign his 
own death sentence, a For- 
eign Ministry source said. 

Mr al-Masn was also the 
kind of Palestinian fjnfi 
Husain of Jordan has been 
asking to come forward in 
place of the P3lesrinf 
non Organization (PLOI. In 
an interview with the Kuwiu 
newspaper ® 

weekend, the Kiap 

Palestinians "wiU b££t° 

choose another l^“ersitip_ 
He promised Krstand by a 
Palestinian leadership tiuj 
the pcoPfe 


appreciates the cause 
responsibly”. 

Mr al-Masri. whose nephew 
is the present Jordanian For-’ 
cign Minister, has never been 
close to the PLO. although he 
made it dear that be would 
never negotiate with Israel 
without the organization’s 
blessing. Last month, after 
King Husain announced that 
he was ending political co- 
operation with the PLO, Mr 
al-Masri said: "It is impossible 
to achieve any settlement 
without the PLO and any 
attempt of this kind will not 
bring about a just ami durable 
peace to the region-." 

For all their present difficul- 
ties, the Jordanian Govern- 
ment and the PLO both issued : 


statements yesterday in Am- 
man condemning the assassi- 
nation. The Jordanian 
Government said that it was 
“an act which aids Israeli 
crimes". By preventing negoti- 
ation, the statement said, it 
helped the spread of Judaism 
in the occupied territories. 

Mr Hanna Siniora, editor of 
the East Jerusalem newspaper 
al-Fajr. is another Palestinian 
who does not believe m 
violence and has already been 
accepted by the United 5tates 
and Israel as a potential 
member of the delegation 
which could negotiate a settle- 
ment “This is not going to 
stop Palestinians from seeking 
a peaceful solution," he said 
yesterday. 


Mr al-Masn and Mr Siniora 
were among the leading Pales- 
tinians likely to have been 
asked to meet Mrs Margaret 
Thatcher when she pays her 
promised visit to the area later 
this year. Sir Geoffrey Howe, 
the Foreign Secretary, yester- 
day condemned the shooting. 

An attempt by three mem- 
bers of another rejection from 
group - the Democratic Front 
for the Liberation of Palestine 
- to infiltrate Israel through 
the Lebanese border was 
foiled early on Saturday when 
an Israeli army patrol discov- 
ered they had "cut through an 
electronic wire near the settle- 
ment of Zant. Two were 
[rapped in thick undergrowth 
and killed 


Pretoria 
defied 
by pastor 

Cape Town (.AFP. Reuter) 
— A West German Lutheran, 
Pastor Gottfried Kraatz, or- 
dered to leave South Africa by 
last Friday for “dubious ac- 
tions against the authorities", 
preached in Aihlone suburb 
here yesterday. 

Meanwhile, police reported 
shooting a man dead when he 
stoned their vehicle near Dur- 
ban. and said another man 
was killed by a burning tyre 
“necklace" in a township near 
Robertson in the Western 
Cape. 

Drugs seized 

Dubai (Reuter) - Two Bel- 
gians. the British wife of one 
of them, a Dutchman and a 
Pakistani were arrested when 
police here seized 2.5 tonnes 
of hashish in what they said 
was the biggest single drugs 
haul in the Gulf, 

Donkey quest 

Mrs Betty Svensen. founder 
of the donkey sanctuary near 
Sidmouth. Devon, will spend 
a fortnight treating 2,300 ail- 
ing donkeys against parasites 
and sleeping sickness on 
Lamu. off the Kenyan coast. 
They are the island's only 
form of transport. 

Fraud charge 

Mr Joseph Wilkins of 
Gloucestershire, who faces 
charges involving £250.000 in 
counterfeit Bank of England 
£50 notes, is to be extradited 
io Britain from Gibraltar 

Kennedy date 

New \ork ( AP) — Miss 
Caroline Kennedy, daugbier 
of the former US President, is 
to marry Mr Edwin 
Schlossberg] a designer 


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OVERSEAS NEWS 


THE TIMES MONDAY MARCH 3 1986 


After the Philippines upheaval 

Joyful millions cheer 
conquering Corazon 


la a highly theatrical ges- 
ture. the new President of the 
Philippines. Mrs Corazon 
Aquino, yesterday revoked her 
predecessor's suspension of 
habeas corpus and signed the 
presidential proclamation with 
a flourish before a vast mass 
meeting in the centre of the 
capital. Manila. 

The meeting, which was 
partly a religious service, part- 
ly a show business festival, 
and partly a political rally, 
look place on a sweltering!}' 
sultry afternoon, and bad Car- 
dinal Jaime Sin. while cele- 
brating Mass, bellowing **Cor- 
y. Cor-}**, giving the 
presidential "L" sign, and 
speaking of "the past days of 
grace" when people defied 
tanks and guns "when their 
only weapons were rosaries 
and words and jwayers and 
(lowers and faith". 

Even the President caught 
the biblical atmosphere, refer- 
ring to the assassination of her 
husband. Senator Benigno 
("Ninoy"! Aquino, as the 
country's Good Friday, and 
the installation of her Govern- 
ment as its Easter Sunday. 

"I am sure that Ninoy is 
smiling at ns now," she told 
the ecstatic crowd. “We have 
proved him correct that the 
Filipino is worth dying for." 

Mrs Aqnino urged her audi- 
ence. which a commentator 
estimated at six million strong 


From Michael Hamlyn, Manila 
and which even the police 
guessed as about three million, 
not to allow the “people 
power" that swept her into 
office to fade away. 

She said there were still 
vital tasks for the peop!e._and 
warned that, thoagh the situa- 
tion was now stable, “there are 
still hokf-oat pockets of civil- 
ian and military loyalists" who 
threaten the new set-up- 

She urged the people to act 
as vigilantes to “watchover 
our Government, from Presi- 
dent ami Vice-President to my 
ministers, all the way down to 
the lowest rungs of the 
bureaucracy." 

The crowd, dressed in every 
shade of yellow imaginable, 
from the palest jersey cream 
through jasmine and primrose 
and ochre to the richness of 
mango and apricot and gold, 
responded with huge applause 
when the President insisted 
that she meant every word 
when she promised to ootlaw 
the evils of Mr Marcos's 

Government, 

Mrs Aqnino announced 
that, of the 484 in detention, 
she bad ordered 480 released. 

The two principal ones re- 
maining in detention are the 
chairman of the Central Com- 
mittee of the banned Commu- 
nist Party, Mr Jose Maria 
Sison, and the Commander-in- 
chief of the Communist-led 


rebel New People's Army 
(NPA), Mr Bernabe 
Buscayno. 

The failure to release all the 
prisoners — though an 
orbiously sound move in the 
event - is not the only way 
the new Government is 
not quite living up to the 
immediately high expectations 
of its followers. 

The new Minister for Local 
Government. Mr Aquiline 
PementeL, is causing a consid- 
erable furore by giving orders 
to all incumbent mayors to 
resign their offices and face 
replacement by mayors of a 
more suitable political colour- 

ing- 

ln a number of municipal- 
ities the news is being greeted 
by further spontaneous dem- 
onstrations of “people power" , 
with objectors protesting that 
they want to keep the mayors 
they love. 

The Justice Minister is 
having a similar problem with 
some of the judges of the High 
and Supreme Courts, who are 
anxious not to resign in case 
they may not be reappointed. 

Some dissident figures are 
trying to challenge the 
Government's legal right to 
ask for all these resignations. 

Other officials, tike the 
Justice Minister himself!, have 
been saying that Mrs Aquino's 
Government is a revolutionary 



Still in the shadow of the military, a Filipino family picnics before President Aquino's rally. 


one basing its right on the 
power of the people. 

One set of sackings has not 
caused any disturbance, yet 
was also announced by Mrs 
Aqnino yesterday. She said 
she had pot an end to the 
service of 23 generals whose 
careers were extended past 


retirement age by Mr Marcos. 
• Ex-minister returns: Mr 
Bias Ople, Labour Minister 
under ousted President Mar- 
cos, returned yesterday from 
the US (AFP reports). 

Mr Ople said his plans were 
“to attend to private interests 
and devote myself at the 


Marcos claims he 
stepped down 
to avert bloodshed 

From Christopher Thomas, Washington 

His wife Imelda sat next to 
him, smiling occasionally. Mr 
Marcos, egad 68, said he had 
recovered from, "a touch of 
- flu" He said that after leaving 
MaJacanang Palace he bad 
wanted logo to Laoqg City in 
his home province of IQocos 
Norte, but had been told by 
“President Reagan's direct 
representative" to leave for 
Hawaii instead. . 

He said he was looking for 
accommodation to . rent or 
leasein Hawaii. 

New revelations, are emerg- 
ing about the trove of money, 
jewellery and documents that 
.were among personal p o ses- 
sions on the two American 
planes that took Mr Marcos 
and his entourage into exile. 

US Government sources in 
Honolulu were quoted yester- 
day as saying that Teal estate 
deeds, stocks and bonds and 
other documents detailing in- 
vestments potentially worth 
hundreds of millions of dol- 
lars were on board. The 
. money and documents, .to- 
gether with jewellery and oth- 
er valuables, were said to be 
under guard while US officials 
decided what to do with them. 

One report .said that Mr 
Marcos left behind a 1982 
contract to buy a 71-siorey 
office building on Wall Street, 
New York, tor $70 ^ million! 
However, his name is not in 
the contract. 


Batasang Pambaasa (Nation- 
al Assembly) as KBL leader," 
the Philippine News Agency 
said. 

The KBL is Mr Marcos's 
New Society Movement, 
which held a majority in the 
assembly before be was de- 
posed. 


Mr Ferdinand Marcos die 
ousted Philippines President, 
looking typically impassive 
but fitter than when he -first 
stepped shakily off an Ameri- 
can military plane in Hawaii 
on Wednesday, said at the 
weekend that be had stepped 
down rather than use his 
"superior military power”. 

Although he had several 
opportunities to use that pow- 
er. “the employment -of such 
an overwhelming force, no 
-matter how legitimate, would 
have resulted in the bloody 
carnageofinnocCTt-civilians." 
- He added: “1 have been called 
brave in my time, but brave as 
1 have been, against foreign 
invaders, I have no heart to 
shed Filipino blood."!. 

It was his first public state- 
ment since being taken on a 
stretcher into a US C14I 
Starfighter cargo plane at 
Clark air base outride Manila 
a week ago and flown into 
exile. He refused to answer 
questions, reportedly on-foe 
advice of friends- and those, 
who waatedito prevent possi- 
ble embarrassment to the US. 

Typewritten copies of. his 
statement were issued on pa- 
per headed: “Office of the 
President of the Philippines, 
Manila" He read it seated on 
the wind-swept stage of an 
open-air dance floor at the 
officers club overlooking Pear) 
Harbour. 




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Moscow offer to 

West on SS22s 


Moscow (Reuter) — The 
Soviet Union has promised to 
withdraw new short-range nu- 
clear missiles from Czechoslo- 
vakia and East Germany if the 
United States agrees to scrap 
its European-based rockets 
under an East-West arms con- 
trol deaL 

In a speech to the Commu- 
nist Party congress made pub- 
lic yesterday, the Foreign 
Minister, Mr . Eduard 
Shevardnadze, inserted a sen- 
tence apparently aimed at 
soothing concern about the 
missiles in Western Europe. 

“If American medium- 
range rockets in Western Eu- 
rope are completely liquidated 


/% pSmr¥t\ 

t£C0NGRESS^i 

there will be no further neces- 
sity for the stationing of Soviet 
operative-tactical weapons in 
those places where they have 
been deployed,^ he said. 

It was Moscow's first indi- 
cation of what would happen 
to the missiles if it reached 
agreement with Washington 
on abolishing medium-rang; 
weapons. 

The Soviet Union began 
deploying SS22 missiles in the 
two allied communist states in 
1 984 in response to the arrival 
of US cruise and Pershing 
missiles in the West. 

" Western European goyertF' 
ments, especially the . West. 
Germans, have voiced con- 
cern that the new rod&ts*' 
might be overlooked in ah . 
arms control package. 

The SS22s based in East 
Germany and Czechoslovakia 
can reach targets in West 
Germany, Britain and France. 

Karmal blames US for 
Afghan stalemate 


Low-key birthday 

Moscow /(Beater) ri^-.-.iJHr 
Mikhail Gorbachov's 55th 
birthday 'yesterday passed 
with barely juarentioaJn. the. 
Soriet press, in contrast witir 
the .pomp that . surrounded 
such occasions when Brezhnev 
was party leader, when there 
were special ceremonies and 
eulogies in newspapers. 


Moscow (Renter) — Presi- 
dent Babrak Karmal of Af- 
ghanistan has said that US 
pressure on Pakistan is Mock- 
ing a settlement of his 
country’s guerrilla war, and 
that an absolute majority of 
Afghans now supported his 
Government. 

He also said that Soviet 
troops would leave Afghani- 
stan immediately if foe US 
and other countries halted 
their sapport for Muslim guer- 
rillas there.. 

“If Pakistan was not raider 
the pressure of the United 
States and agreed to talk 
directly with our country, a 
political settlement could soon 
be found." 

Pakistan has refused to 
negotiate with the Soviet- 
backed Kabul Government. 
The two states are talking 
indirectly through United Na- 
tions officials. 

President Karmal, In Mos- 
cow for foe 27th Soviet Com- 


munist Party Congress^ 
repeatedly attacked Washing- 
ton as foe main cause of the 
six-year conflict He also 
blamed China and Iran. 

He said that important 
changes were taking place in 
Afghanistan as more people 
began sap porting bis adminis- 
tration. 





President Babrak Karmal: 
settlement could be found. 


Gonzalez in fighting 
mood for Nato poll 

From Kichani Wigg, Jaen, Andalusia 


Senor Felipe Gonzdlez. the 
Spanish Prime Minister, came 
to his native Andalusia yester- 
day to plunge personally into 
his Government's campaign 
for a “Yes" verdict in the Nato 
referendum 10 days from 
now. 

He adopted his old fierce 
combative style, reminiscent 
of the 1982 general election 
campaign, in which he won 
power, telling an enthusiastic 
audience: “l am proud as a 
politician to lead swimming 
against the current, not for the 
benefit of my party or myself, 
but in the interest of Spain." 

He added: “l am confident 
it will be 'Yes' because X trust 
in the common sense of the 
people who believe we are 
building peace with the rest of 
the democratic countries of 
Europe and who know we 
have broken down the barriers 
of two centuries of isolation. 
Wrc can be proud of a party 
which has evolved m order to 
sene the country " 

The audience repeatedly 
Chanted “Felipe, the people 
are with you " 

This initial meeting on one 
of the Prime Minister's rare 
appearances outside the capi- 
tol since taking office was 
chosen with great care Jaen 
has with 9 000 card-carrying 


members, the biggiest Socialist 
Party group in the country 
after Madrid, and buses of 
militants from rural areas 
easily filled the town's indoor 
sports stadium. . . 

Senor Gonzilez: . stakes 
much on the referendum out- 
come. If be pulls it off he can 
sweep to victory in general 
elections this year with his 
own powers enhanced, but if 
he blunders, the magic of his 
personal style of governing 
will be seriously damaged. 

The last opinion poll before 
foe campaign began showed a 
majority of Spaniards oppos- 
ing Nato. but the gap was 
narrowing, and many were 
still undecided. 

The Socialists need a big 
vote from their strong- 
hold. Andalucia, to compen- 
sate for adverse areas like the 
Basque country 
Sefior Gonzalez said: “It is 
tnre l have changed m> posi- 
tion and l am explaining this 
now to the country Others 
triange but they do not have 
foe courage to explain " 

If the “no" vote triumphed. 
Senor 'Gonzalez said that after 
Mareh 13 he would have to 
break links with other EEC 

of governme ni and face 
tnc Americans alone on de- 
fence issues 






i nr. i iivira Iviuivju/a i xvimK^n j i 7ou 


\j v nv^rryj i>r w o 


7 


Si 



S^erament 
JEJP* • . yesterday tramped 

^dk 

west of the Pyramids in search 
ot the Jew mutinous security 
policemen who managed ‘to 
“cape from their besieged 
Ssf 1 *®" Friday, President 
Mubarak hastily replaced the 
otticers who commanded - 
wd did not control - the 
thousands of security men 
who noted throughout Cairo 
ast week. / . . 

Four - senior officials . have 
been _ transferred to humble 
positions in the government 

bureaucracy, the nature of 
wiuch grves some indication 
ot the ignominy into which Mr 
Mubarak has . thrown their - 
careers. ■ 

Newspapers here have giv- 
en considerable publicity to 
the dismissals, so that Egyp- 
tians should realize how sen-' 
ously the President regards ihe. 
rebdlion within his own secu- 
rity forces. 

Major-General Muhammad 
Tantani fell from grace rather- 
spectaculariy. From being 
head of the Egyptian State 
Security Services, he has been 
made Assistant Minister for 
the •■Central Delia Area" 
Major-General Hussein 
Kamel Zaki, who was First 
Assistant Minister for the 
Security Services, will now 


FromRbbertTislCCairo 

exercise his -talents -is’ -First 
Assistant Minister for “Eco- 
nomic Security”(sic7. while 
Major- General Lutft Abdul- 
Fatiah Ibrahim, the director 
for- the Central Security 
Forces, is to become director 
of “the Department of Data 
and Documentation" — in 
other words, state archives. 

Major-General Mukhtar 
Mabed, who was Assistant 
Minister for . -the : Security 
Forces, -his now been put in’ 
"charge of “financial and' ad- 
ministrative affairs." - 

Mr ' Mubarak has at least 
tried , to deal with the immedi- 
ate causes of the rioting by 
instructing his new Interior 
Minister, Major-General Zaki 
Badri, to look after the “social 
interests" of the black-uni- 
formed conscripts who are 
supposed to : control internal 
security in the capital 
-> Indeed; details of their con- 
ditions which are now emerg- 
ing in Gaiflo Say a "good 'deal 1 ' 
about the contempt in which 
the authorities held them over 
the past decade. 

It transpires; for example, 
that the average wage of a 
Cairo security policeman, was 
£4 a month — enough money 
to buy two soft drinks in the 
hotels which they burnt down 
in their riot last week. 

Many were enraged not so 


inucli. by false rjimotrs that 
their three-year term of con- 
scription was to be raised by 
12 months as by an instruc- 
tion that they were now to lose 
two days 1 pay a month “for 
austerity reasons”.. 

Furthermore, the police — 
-many -of whom come from 
villages hundreds of miles 
from Cairo — were told that. 
-.their free train fores home 
every six weeks were hence- 
forth to be given to them only 
ooce every three months.' 

J The policemen, with their 
outdated Soviet bayonet- 
topped breech-loading rifles, 
who stood guard outside for- 
eign embassies in the capital, 
were expected to buy or cadge 
bread while on duty, some- 
times accepting food as gifts 
from passers-by. Yesterday 
many of them were back on 
duty in the city — but without 
. their rifles. 

. There is little doubt in 
Egypt, however, that improve- 
ments in their conditions will 
be merely cosmetic if the 
Government does not swiftly 
come to grips with the more 
fundamental problem of pov- 
erty among the overcrowded, 
Dickensian slums of the city. 

Yet with falling oil and 
tourist revenues, it is difficult 
to see how the President can' 
even begin Jo cope. 





“• 

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Iraqi soldiers in action outside Fao, the sooth-eastern Iraqi port which has been occupied for two weeks by Iranian troops. 


Ershad offers to hold elections at end of April 


"From Ahmed Fazl 
Dhaka 

President Ershad of Bangla- 
desh announced here yester- 
day that he woold bold 
elections for a new Parliament 
in the Last week of April, in an 
attempt to return the country 
to democracy after four years 
of military rale. 

General Ershad asked the 
main opposition parties to 


withdraw their boycott threat 
and promised to take steps to 
ensure fair elections. 

But he emphasized that he 
would not end martial law 
before the poll, as demanded 
by the two main opposition 
alliances. 

At least three previous at- 
tempts to hold elections were 
abandoned after opposition 
boycott threats. 


There were no immediate 
reactions from the opposition, 
but both Mrs Sheikh Hastna 
Wazed, chief of the 15-party 
alliance, and Mrs Khaleda 
Zia, leader of the seven-party 
alliance, said in speeches on 
Saturday (hat they could not 
take part in polls under mili- 
tary rale. 


General Ershad, in an at- 


tempt to bring the opposition 
to the polls, said that he would 
wind up the military courts 
and abolish (he martial law 
administrators' offices. 

The two alliances have 
called a general strike for 
March 24, and have threat- 
ened to follow it up with a civil 
disobedience movement if 
martial law continues. 


Ship chief 
officer 
dies in 
Gulf raid 

Bahrain (Reuter) - Five 
warplanes, apparently from 
Iran, bombed a Turkish tank- 
er in the Gulf yesterday, 
killing the ship’s chief officer 
and injuring a crew member, 
shipping officials said. 

The attack on the Atlas 1. 
bound for the main Saudi' 
Arabian oil terminal of Ras 
Tannurah. appeared to be a; 
retaliation from Iran for four 
strikes in the past week by Iraq 
on tankers using Iranian ports. 

In Istanbul, the general' 
manager of a state-owned 
shipping company said that 
the ship “was hit by bombs 
from five still unidentified 

military aircraft 150 miles off 

Ras Tannurah”. 

Shipping sources in the Gulf 
said that the attack appeared ' 
to have been carried out by 
Iranian aircraft judging from 
the ship's position 85 miles 
east of Qatar and the use of', 
bombs. 

• NlCOSIArlranian troops 
have shelled the military garri- 
son at Sulcymaniyah in north- 
east Iraq, Iran's official. 
Islamic Republic News Agen- 
cy said yesterday (AP reports). 

It was thought to be the firsL 
time that the environs of the 
city, one of the twin capitals of 
Iraq's Kurdistan region, have 
come under artillery fire since 
the outbreak of the war 5Vi 
years ago. Dozens of Iraqi 
soldiers were reported killed 
or wounded. 




Ivan the Terrible’ trial : . 

Ukrainian denies 
he was a Nazi 

From Ian Murray, Jerusalem 

The man the Israelis call pointed out that the death 
“Ivan the TerriUe” made his sentence was passible mtder 
first appearance before a court Sections ! and 2 of the Nazi 
here yesterday and immediate- ; and Nazi Collaborators (Pnn- 
!y denied that he had ever been ishmerit) Lawj .bm that it was 
to the Nan death camp off ' not obligatory. ' - 
Treblinka, let alone. In the MrDemjanjti 
words of the charge sheet, hind his Aide, 

u i- • . I • ■ *1 _ „■ % f - 


“participated in the murder of 
hundreds of thousands offdril- 
bms — men, women aid 
children" 

. In the. canteen of the Rus- 
sian Compound police bar- 
racks, where the British once 


, -rimmed 

spectacles in the harsh light of 
the television camera spot- 
lights. was asked if he had 
thing to say. 

bvionsly frustrated at hav- 
ing the proceedings filtered 
through his inteipveter, be 


interrogated Jewish terrorists, , asked JL M .could, speak in 
a makeshift courtroom had English aid was-alhw^to dO 1 
been, set up 'so that Deputy-’ 'so. JUitbougb hejWjliwiAh 


Commander Aleat-’Ish^SteS®® 
could apply for V' If 
remand in custody, fa? ' 

at . present under arrest m 
Israel." 

Wearing tbe.brown suit and 
open-neck shirt in which he 
arrived in Israel on Friday, Mr 
Pemjanjak was brought hand- 
cuffed in the special armoured 
car which will be used to tide 
him to hearings from hisrhigh- 
seenrity ceU at Ramla, 30 
miles from Jerusalem. 

Tall and thick-set,' he has 
been described by prison ser- 
vice doctors as “very strong”. 

While Mr Denis GoaMjnan, 
bead of the Slate Attorney's 
international section, read out 
in Hebrew the charges, pun- 
ishable fry death, Mr 
Demjanjnk sat impassively, 
scratching bis face ami listen- 
ing to a whispered Ukrainian 
translation. 

Mr Aharon Sirncha, presi- 
dent of the magistrates' omit; 


the tfifited Stdtes'sfrfoe 1952; 
his Eigfohis heavflyaccented 

and- <Cry jmgrammaticah'r - 

: 1 *Wfcyi*imintare**ivemfc' 
beffcife;” he sahfc^i.was-wever- 
In the place* yoo . call 
Trebtialub T myself was in a 
prison camp of war." 

He told the court he had 
never served the Nazis. He 
had been a prisons and had 
been token to Graz in Austria 
and asked to serve in a 
Ukrainian division by the 
Germans.; “I am completely 
the wrong person yon talk 
about” he said* "i • \S ' 

But tiie court, having briefly 
studied three of the 'thick files 
of evidoice coll e cted against 
him over the past 10 years, 
granted the remand in custody 
and he was hurried back to his 
armoured car. 

-In prison- he has been 
refused permission to tele- 
phone his family in the United 
States and . told that he most 
comm unicate with them' by 
mall. 


France deploys radar 
north of Ndjamena 


Paris (Reuter) — France- has 
deployed a radar system, 
guarded by its troops, in 
northern Chad for the .first 
time since the latest fighting 
broke out 

The Defence Ministry said 
radar equipment began oper- 
ating yesterday m Moiissoro, 



anda puts 
-prisoner 
ts Cabinet 

tala (AP) - A long- 

ponent of former Pr«r 
[ilton Oboie who has 
gjii of die past 20 ywis 
oliucal prisoner has 

he new Cabinet 

appointment of Mr 
Kina as Minisier^of 


ic President's office 



ntmems. There are 
misters in the Cain- 
adeni Museveni, 
juiv ministers were 

j. including the firsi 

iven a minisierial 

resident Museveni, 
vjuba will be Dcpu- 
r of Rehabifitetion, 
a Kiauws Minister 
al Cooperation. Mr 
*ionse, ' Local 
' Me John 


about 120 miles north-west of 
Ndjamena. 

The radar was being used to 
provide better protection for 
Ndjamena airport in the event 
of air attacks. 

The vulnerability of the 
airport was highlighted on 
February 17 "when “it 'was 
attacked by a lone Soviet-built 
Tupolev 22 bomber. 

France said the attack left a 
crater in the runway and the 
airport was closed to civilian 
traffic for two days. 

The ministry would not say 
how many troops were being 
deployed to protea the radar, 
but sources numbered them at 
about 100. France sent troops 
and aircraft to Chad after a 
rebel offensive three weeks 
ago. - • - : ' r 

Income tax 
scrapped 
in Grenada 

St George’s. Grenada (Reu- 
ier) - Mr Herbert Baize, the 
Grenada Prime Minister, an- 
nounced that personal income 
tax would be abolished in his 
new budget which he. saia 

would convert Grenada into 
an island of opportunities. 

Mr Blaize has pizs.-ntJd to 
Parliament a budget of 236.4 
million East Caribbean dollars 
(about £58.3 milhonj.which 
scrapped 16 other forms, of 

laxaiion. including hold occu- 
pancy tax and . consumption 

and excise duties. - - 

He- also removed , a levy 
imposed by the former Marx- 
ist government on salaries- to 
help finance construction of 
the Point-Saliw^aifport- : 

. Mr Blaize replaced the abol- 
ished taxes with a value added 
tax. a land value, lax,, a 
company tax and a petrol tax. 




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THE TIMES MONDAY MARCH 3 1986 


THE ARTS 


Television 

Without 
heart 

Anita Brookner's Hotel du Lae 
won the Booker Prize in 1985 
and. completing its trium- 
phant progress, has mm- made 
It to the small screen in 
BBCTs faithful but uninspir- 
ing adaptation. 

The original work is a study 
of Edith Hope, writer of 
romantic fiction under a more 
"thrusting** (Brookner's word) 
name than her own. and 
woman in pain who bankers 
after a loving, domestic rela- 
tionship. Her story is told in a 
clear, simple language which 
resonates with feeling and is 
packed with many surprising 
and alarming images. 

A translation to the screen 
must be judged on two levels: 
not only how well it re-creates 
the characters and places de- 
picted in the original, but also 
how well it finds a way of 
expressing, in the language of 
film, what was originally said 
in words. 

In terms of the first criteri- 
on. this production cannot be 
faulted. The location is just as 
one imagines it from the book; 
Anna Massey in the role of 
Edith Hope is just the right 
balance of primness and dis- 
creet sexuality: Denholm El- 
liott as Mr Neville is sad and 
mephistophelean; and Patricia 
Hodge as Monica has brought 
to life a character who arouses 
feelings simultaneously of 
sympathy and contempt. 

" Unfortunately these excel- 
lent performances were yoked 
to poor technique and a tired 
style of film-making. This was 
dear from the start, when the 
credits were played over a 
close-up of a breakfast tray 
with a glass of orange juice 
prominent on it and a Swiss 
lake in the background. It was 
probably meant to say some- 
thing about Edith Hope's lone- 
liness: as an image, it belonged 
to a holiday brochure. 

We next saw Edith lying in 
bed with her lover jDavid 
Simmonds (played by Barry 
Foster). The camera tracked 
along crumpled sheets to a 
pair of slightly fuzzy heads. It 
would have been quite in order 
if a voice-over had started 
extolling the virtues of silk 
underwear or a male deodor- 
ant. It was a degraded image, 
indistinguishable from a thou- 
sand like it. 

The result was photo- 
graphed theatre and not cine- 
ma. It looked like the original: 
it had die characters from the 
original, speaking lines from 
tiie original: but it had not the 
essence of the original. It 
lacked the pain of the novel 
because it resorted to visual 
cliches rather than finding 
new expressions. 

Mr Pye (Channel 4), on the 
other band, was good, for it 
tried to find pictures for 
Mervyn Peake’s prose and 
succeeded. Derek Jacobi as 
Mr Pye captured the char- 
acter's quirky piety and Jndy 
Parfitt was splendidly uptight 
as Miss Dredger. Patricia 
Hayes as Kaka, the Albanian 
harridan, was unforgettable. 


In his new film, Clockwise, which appears in London 
next week, John Cleese (right) has risen above the 
confines of absurdity: interview by Paul Nathanson 

Struggling to escape from a 
familiarly Fawlty image 


"Ask me anything you like — the 
more insulting, the more interest- 
ing it'll probably be". John Cleese 
says gamely, stretching out his huge 
frame and’ resting his foot on a 
chair. Failing an insult. I toss him a 
quote — one of his own. "I want to 
go into character a lot deeper than 
I've ever been before in my acting. 
And that won't be difficult", he had 
declared in 1983. Reminded of this 
pious hope. Geese roars with 
laughter — a deep, wheezy laugh 
like an ancient jalopy starting up 
on a frosty morning. 

He is too modest to say so. but in 
his new role as Brian Stimpson. the 
doomed hero in the first film with a 
Michael Frayn script. Clockwise. 
Cleese has transcended the riotous 
but narrow confines of absurdity 
enclosing his Minister of Silly- 
Walks and friends and. later. Basil 
Fawlty. Stimpson is the proud, 
pragmatic headmaster of Thomas 
Tompion Comprehensive School, 
who is the first Comprehensive 
head ever to be Chairman of the 
Headmasters' Conference. Fanati- 
cally punctual, he still contrives to 
miss his train and battles desper- 
ately against the clock to reach the 
conference before his hour of glory 
passes him by. 

Did Basil Fawlty muscle in on 
the part? “Well. I'm aware of the 
public expectation and. whatever I 
do. people sec me as Basil''. Geese 


replies with the jaded air of an 
overworked cleric. “I mean in 
Sihcrado. where 1 play a sheri fl 
[the amoral and cowardly Sheriff 
Langston of Turley], one critic 
wrote about me turning up in 
Fawlty Prairies. So yes. I did make 
some conscious derisions not to do 
one or two things." 

According to the director. Chris- 
topher Monahan. Geese did not 
always succeed: “But John’s his 
own best critic and is very, very 
alert to overstatement, so on a 
number of occasions he asked us to 
do takes again where he felt he'd 
gone over the top”. Geese indeed 
does rush around manically in two 
scenes, vandalizes a phone box and 
kicks a car. but there all compari- 
sons with Basil stop. 

Unlike Fawlty. Brian Stimpson 
is ruthlessly efficient He has the 
timetable computerized and the 
school ninning like a dream rail- 
way system — with digital preci- 
sion. He docs not ram or bang his 
head on desks; neither does he 
assault staff. And, Cleese observes, 
under Stimpson's rather formida- 
ble authority-figure there is some- 
body quite roil: under Basil's 
carrot face he is not sure there is 
anyone at all. 

Stimpson fails and resigns him- 
self to defeat having given his aJL 
As Michael Frayn says, "Stimpson 


can stand despair, it's the hope he 
finds difficult". Geese liked the 
apotheosis in Stimpson from the 
all-dominant to the all-passive and 
conveys the transformation with £ 
quiet subtlety not associated with 
his acting untii now. 

After two years away from films 
he was drawn to Clockwise by the 
script and by Stimpson as well as 
the physical challenge of a full pan 
instead of the cameos in the Python 
films. Time Bandits, The Great 
Muppet Caper and Yellowbeard 
He had only played one other role 
through a whole film — Major Giles 
Flack in Privates on Parade in 
1 9S2. "I wanted to see if I could get 
through eight weeks' filming and 
finish in reasonably good form, 
feeling physically o.l£ and mentally 
together and not exhausted". 
Geese says, “and I managed it fine 
by the simple expedient of getting 
to bed very early and having my 
masseur work on me for 45 
minutes every night." 

The masseur was much needed. 
Within eight days Cleese had 
managed to smash his left knee on 
a staircase, get water on his other 
knee and then pull a hamstring 
chasing trains on Hull station. "It 
fell a bit like going out to war", he 
chuckles boyishly, “and I thought: 

I hope I come out of this alive." He 
did. and seemed remarkably re- 



laxed when we met early one 
morning at the Groucho Gub in 
Soho. Friends like Michael Palm 
confirm that he is altogether much 
more relaxed and settled nowadays 
than in the Python years during the 
Sixties and Seventies. The farceur 
pillorying all figures of authority is 
now the philosopher, immersed in 
books on religion, psychiatry and 
psychdgy. 

The filming process bores Geese 
and. as his intemationally-success- 
ful industrial training film compa- 
ny Video Arts pays the bills, he is 
under little pressure to act Surpris- 
ingly, he has never seen himself as ‘ 
an actor. He wants to write, and is 
planning a sequel to his best-selling 
book Families and How to Survive 


Them (1983), co-written with his 
therapist, Robin Skynneir. Under 
scrutiny will be change, death, 
divorce and the work ethic. 

If this sounds slightly turgid for 
the man once dubbed as Britain's 
very own comedy institution, fear 
noL Geese is also planning his own 
first screenplay — a comedy called 
either Corruption or A Goldfish 
Called Wonder. “One sounds thor- 
oughly silly", he says, “the other 
almost D. W.Griffith. I'm writing it 
with Charlie Chrichton [who di- 
rected The Lavender Hill Mob in 
1951] and it's about a barrister who 
gets called in to defend the head of 
a gang who's carried out a jewellery 
robbery and how the barrister gets 
involved with the members of the 


gang- We're just going to make a 
funny film, not least because one 
feels so good when one laughs. It 
somehow clears the blocks in the 
body and lets everything flow." 

As for doing more work for the 
SDP after his widely-acclaimed 
Party Political Broadcast last De- 
cember. Geese is reluctant to be 
wheeled on again for a while as tie 
argues there are many talented 
writers and actors who would give 
effective help. As for actually 
entering politics and standing for 
the SDP. Geese winces and ex- 
claims: “There’s not the slightest 
chance of that! Politicians have 
exactly the kind ofjob which would 
put me in a nursing home in six 
weeks." 


Opera 


Singers left to fight their own battles 


D trovatore 

Covent Garden 


Carlo Gebler 


The weekend's revival of 
Verdi's II trovatore. the second 
of the season, gave the impres- 
sion that the principals and 
the conductor had just flown 
in on the afternoon plane. 
Most of the dramatic eneigy 
has seeped from Luchino 
Visconti's once distinguished 

8 reduction, now staged by 
/ilfred Judd, and what re- 
mains has. become almost, 
invisible. With little guidance 
on stage or from the pit the 
singers, some new to the 
production and others noL 
were left to do their own thing. 

The most attractive singing 
came from the Azucena ana 
the di Luna. Stefania Tocz- 
yska looks outrageously young 
to have reared a brawny fellow 
like Franco Bonisolli's Man- 
rico. but perhaps gypsy girls 
weathered well in 15th-centu- 
ry Spain. The mezzo remains 
excellently based, although a 
little unremitting in volume: a 
few soft notes of gentle wan- 
dering as Azucena drifts into 
sleep in “Ai nostri monli" 
would have been welcome. 
Leo Nucci's forthright bari- 
tone has been accused of 
monotony, but he makes a 
bold figure ofdi Luna and. like 
Toczyska, never gives any 



The gypsy girl who weathered well: Stefania Toczyska with the brawny Franco Bonisolli 


Senta and Leonora within the 
space of a fortnight. It was not 
until the Act rv duets with 
Manrico and di Luna that she 
showed the Leonora she could 
be; by then she bad at last 
acquired a decent costume to 
show off her fine features. 

In the pit Giuseppe Patane 
chugged along like Ivor the 
Engine, allowing the orchestra 
the occasional hoot of interest 
but for the most part taking all 
the gradients in the score at 
the same pace. By the time the 
performance ended there were 
some empty seats in the stalls. 


cause for vocal concern. “U 
balen" was hit plumb on the 
note, and that was the pleasure 
in an evening when pleasures 
were rationed out with parsi- 
mony. 

Bonisolli's Manrico is inim- 
itable and. some would say. 
just as well. It is built around 
nis rendering of “Di quella 
pira". which remains a piece 
of bravura singing just as "Ah 
si. ben mio“. which preceded 
it. was a miserable experience. 
For much of the evening 
Bonisolli provided few of the 
tones of the true tenor, scoop- 
ing at notes but always insist- 
ing on literally having the last 


sing, even in the Act II finale. 

Rosalind Plowright has al- 
ready proved herself a fine 
Leonora on record in Giulini's 
set for DG, but her Covem 
Garden debut in the role was a 
disappointment. She sounded 
out of sorts from the start and 
found the coloratura of “Di 
tale amor” especially taxing — 
no help from the conductor 
there. Maybe the voice has 
darkened and deepened over 
the past two or three years; 
more likely the rehearsals for 
the forthcoming Fliegende 
Hollander have taken their 
loll. She seems ill-advised to 
tackle roles as different 


as John Higgins 


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When the last generation or 
iwo of indigenous or epony- 
mous publishers — the likes of 
Andre Den Lsc h. Ernest Hecht, 
Rupert Hart- Da vis. James 
MacGibbon & Robert Kee. 
John Lehmann. John Calder 
- set up their plates the object 
of the passionate exercise was 
to publish particular authors, 
particular books; literature, no 
less. The publisher obtained 
his kicks from priming his 
name at the base of a book’s 
spine and near the bottom of 
the title page, and in somehow- 
selling sufficient copies to 
remain in business for long 
enough to be able to bring out 
the next book by the same 
admired author, and others of 
his or her literary kind. Occa- 
sionally a publisher would go 
under, and thus be acquired 
by a more affluent, larger, 
long-established house, the 
imprint sooner or later dis- 
creetly submerged. Thus the 
Granada Group acquired Ru- 
pert Han-Davis and Mac- 
Gibbon & Kee. and in its turn 
not long ago Collins acquired 
Granada and changed its 
name to Grafton. 

Today the book-publishing 
industry employs immeasur- 
ably more people than ever 
before. Equally, mare arc out 
of work than ever before. They 
manage, mostly, to cobble 
together a living by freelance 
reading, sometimes for their 
old employers; editing; writing 
blurbs: even co-aulhoring 
with better known names: 
James Cochrane, late editorial 
director at Penguin then 
Hutchinson, has just signed 
up with Pavilion to do a book 
on songs with his former 
Hutchinson author Kingsley 
Amis. Nevertheless, most o’l 
the editorial people shaken 
loose, as the cliche of industri- 
al relations has it. will not find 
il easy to obtain another job 
an a similar level as. with 
increasing fervour and brutal- 
ity. publishing house buys 
publishing house in a game ol 
who can become the biggest. 

As a result of its latest 
restructuring. Collins has just 
lost Roger Schlesinger. its 
senior editorial man. who — 
ironically - once had his own 
distinguished children's im- 


Publishing 

What is 
a book? 


prim. Christopher Mac- 
Lchose. publisher of the 
Collins subsidiary Harviil (its 
sop to literary 1 values), also 
resigned but was persuaded 
back a few- days later. Schle- 
singer and MacLehosc. like 
Cochrane, are in publishing 
because they care about the 
editorial content of books. 
Even a few years ago to have 
had to make such a statement 
about book-trade people 
would have been absurd. To- 
day the attitude of the accoun- 
tants and bookkeepers who 
rule the industry is: turnover 
and profits come first and any 
young idiot can bring in the 
saleable authors and keep 
them. 

In the Iasi ten days or so 
Macmillan bought Sidgwick & 
Jackson from Trusthouse 
Forte: Cambridge University 
Press and W. & R, Chambers 
agreed to collaborate on refer- 
ence-books publishing; and 
three senior directors at Rob- 
ert Maxwell's Macdonald an- 
nounced their resignation to 
set up their own house. A Few 
years ago any of these occur- 
rences. including the flurry of 
temperaments being displayed 
at Collins, would have been 
the cause of endless specula- 
tion. and prophecies that the 
age of the book was over. Now 
they hardly cause a ripple, as 
changes of a similar kind are 
announced every week. 

Of course, the people they 
most affect, the authors, are 
told — if at all — as an 
afterthought. They do not 
come into the calculations, at 
least until every other piece in 
the jigsaw is in place. 

The City, for better or for 
worse, continues to believe 
there are substantial profits to 
be made from publishing. Tim 
Hcly-Hutchinson and his fel- 
low departed colleagues from 
Macdonald have already rai- 
sed a reasonable sum and will 


experience little difficulty in 
garnering the rest they need 
Will tomorrow's Shakespeare. 
Milton and Dickens have 
found their benefactor? This is 
unlikely as Hely-Hutchinson 
is quoted as saying that bis 
purpose is to establish a “full- 
blooded, diversified publish- 
ing house, publishing fiction, 
humour, popular biography, 
food and wine titles — the full 
range of popular subjects". He 
adds, as is de rigueur on such 
occasions, that he is anxious 
“to get back to being with 
boots". 

We shall see. The difficulty 
is that there are books and 
books, and what publishers 
increasingly mean by books is 
not what people who value 
reading and literature mean. 


This column nodded a few 
weeks ago in stating that the 
National Book League had 
celebrated its fiftieth birthday: 
it was its sixtieth. The current 
chairman. Frank Delaney, has 
an excellent attendance 
record, and the director. 
Martyn GofT. inducted Ian 
Norrie into the craft of book- 
selling, not vice versa. Apolo- 
i all round. 


Camden Festival 


Hillier/Stubbs 
Old St Pancras 
Church 

Over the years the Camden 
Festival has mounted some 
fairly esoteric entertainments, 
much to the dismay of the 
London borough's less cultur- 
ally-minded ratepayers, per- 
haps. But opening a major arts 
festival with- a recital of 800- 
year-old monodies, sung in a 
liny medieval church on a 
snowy mound behind King's 
Cross station, takes some 
beating for quirky inventive^ 
ness. 

For connoisseurs of twelth- 
and thirteenth-century music, 
it was a jewel of an .evening; 
JPauI Hillitsr. chose_weILfrom . 
among the large repetoire of 
Crusaders' songs -r songs in 
which the troubadour's peren- 
nial preoccupations with love, 
separation and death are often 


heightened by isolation in a 
strange land fighting for a 
cause in which many had lost 
interest 

He included, for instance. 
“Fortz chausa es" by Gaucelm 
Faidit, who was said to have 
“sung worse than any man in 
the world" but could certainly 
write a plaintive melody, as 
this elegy for Richard the 
Uonheart showed. Vet Rich- 
ard was perfectly capable of 
turning in a serviceable la- 
ment himself; his “Ja mis hons 
pris". which rather bitterly 
berates his allies for not 
hailing him out, is a truly regal 
tune. Per haps 'the finest of all 
these songs is Walthervon der 
Vogelweide’s .*tPaJastn^ed'\ 
encapsulating the whole -phi- 
losophy behind the Crusades 
in five elegant raedieval-Ger- 
man stanzas. Bid the song 
which inspired Paul Hfflier to 
his most impassioned delivery 
was Oswald von Wolken- 


stein's “Es fugt sich". an 
earthy, dark and fatalistic 
“last ’iesiamem” sort of ditty 
with a wonderfully expressive 
series of modal melts mas. 

In general, though, Hillier 
used his dark-timbred bari- 
tone with excellent control but 
some reserve. One hardly 
expected him to burst into 
falsetto when narrating the 
erotic adventures of a 1 3-year- 
old virgin, but a greater ex- 
pressive range would have 
helped differentiate between 
what were essentially similar 
items. 

Nevertheless he weaved bi- 
ography. songs, recitations 
and some harp-playing of a 
rather minimal variety into an 
attractive aural tapestry; and 
Stephen .Stubbs certainly var- 
ied the lute accompaniments, 
from some calchily rhythmic 
drones to many delicate ech- 
oes of the singer. 

Richard Morrison 


Rock 

Cherrelle and 
Alexander O’Neal 
Hammersmith 
Odeon 


Although the two artists per- 
formed separately, their recent 
hit as a duel. “Saturday 
Love", and other common 
features of their careers, made 
this a sensible double bill, and 
a must for aficionados of the 
latest generation of glossy 
disco-soul crooners. 

Both performers have 
achieved prominence through 
the auspices of Tabu Records, 
employing the production and 
song-writing skills of Jimmy 


orientated background, at one 
time performing covers of 
songs by such groups as Def 
Leppard, yet he has evolved 
into the smoother end of the 
soul markeL With a voice like 
brown treacle, he seduced, the 
audience with a carefully mea- 
sured delivery of sensuous* 
heavy-lidded lovesongs; “If 
You Were With Me Tonight" 
- "a song for all the ladies and 
lovers in the house" — was 
sung with much melodramatic 
grunting and sharp intakes of 
breath while his large, white- 
suited frame writhed in sym- 
pathy. 

Despite this rather dreary 
format. O'Neal nevertheless 
exuded a certain kitsch charis- 
ma. He had presence. Cher- 
relle, on the other hand, took a 
more upbeat direction, but 
seemed a slighter performer. 


Jam and Terry Lewis, former- 

i _ r T— ■ jvviliuv* u augitiVl l^tlVULUCl. 

With a sharp-dressed trio of 
flourished m the early Eighties male backing singers, who 

rrN«i lhe ? n . na :- danced almost as well as they 

““S’ She laufl Ched into a 
comes from the more rock- lively set. with a rapid turn- 


gies 


E.J.Craddock 


over of spriidy songs and 
gaudy costumes- As “Artificial 
Heart" segued into the pump- 
ing groove of “New Love", the 
dance steps accelerated and 
temperatures rose. 

Her backing band, some of 
whom also supported O’Neal, 
comprised for most of the 
lime three keyboard players 
and a drummer only, yet, 
despite the synthesized bass- 
line and horn parts, the sound 
was curiously conventional, 
even a little loose. 

The reappearance ofCNeal 
to sing “Saturday Love" was 
greeted with uproar, and, as 
the two embraced in simulat- 
ed lascivious passion, the 
performance drew to a timely 
conclusion; the kind of music, 
and ending, that are bound to 
please listeners to Tony 
Blackburn’s radio show, but 
may leave the rest of us 
looking forward to Sunday. 

David Sinclair 



The Royal Ballet 

Giselle 

the most theatrically 
satisfying and visually attractive 
version of the ballet I have 

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"R RICH AND LOVING PRODUCTION 

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Lyttelton: Tonight -fit Tomorat 7.45. .Wed ac 2 iS & ? 

Theatre » B Re«n™ to * e 







9 


TKF. TIMES MONDAY MARCH 3 1 986_ 


7 REASONS 



01icnioali;ml-lR'K;lcdy()n:m-.thcni(>rc)Oulllik<-<.niiJ 



1.SERPS is unfair 



for money 

•’ '• . Once, the State Earnings Related 
. Pension Scheme (better known as "SERPS ) 
was a gleam in BaibaraCasde's eye (remember her?) • 

; It was setup with theadmiiableobjective of providing adecent 
pension for every employee who wasn’t properly looked after by a- 

P nV3 to taSyscoW light of day, however; SERPS looks distinctly like 
bad news for everyone. . , w 

1 For not only are the pensions it promises to its members 

vougo’ basis (the way Governments pay for everything) could end 
up making theTrident programme looklike petty cash. 


2.The Government 



5.Vbur workforce 
will enjoy 
substantial benefits. 

And so will you. 


The management of any responsible company will rake pride 
in ensuring that its workforce is going to enjoy lull hnancial securin- 
in retirement. But there are also more direct business reasons for 

starting vour own company pension scheme. , . 

Employees who are financially secure are ikely to prove both 
more productive and more loyal. And you'll also find that .a i good 
pension scheme can be an important factor in persuading more 
good people to come and work for you. 



>W.f *3 'iWi 

fe£r» „-r^£T. .a* 






ml'. I" 

*** • ■ \ _ . 





6. Every day 
you waste means 
more money 



Well? What would you do? 

To its credit, the Government has 
decided to fece the reaUty of SERPS. rather than bequeathing its un- 
resolved problems to its successors in the 21st Century f „ 
fCSt Itis now introducing legislation to reduce the burden of SERPS 

°" “^KSSSe, means taher redudi| .he vate of future 

pensions many existing members can expea from SERPS. 



3. But it is prepared 



to_ 

6V4% of your wage 

bill if you set up 

your own company scheme. 

S^Sc^vaepaionschomofor*ecompa^. 



4. 



another 



iQ 


O 

And the Government’s generosity 
doesn’ t end there. , , F 

prOV; Srto»b^ on ™ t ^T t ^f raIOtaba5Stedby 

rSi? 2 % of pa>Ton costs as from early 198S. 


Even before the present Government began fe review of 

nensions legislation, manv companies had already elected to 
oontraa out of SERPS in order to provide better pension benehts for 

their employees at little cost to themselves. cudpc 

Now die government has made dear its intention to ran SERPS 

down it makes even more sense to contract oul . 

Throwing good money after bad Isn't a good idea, and since 

all contraaed out schemes started now will a^^^evew 
the extra 2% incentive when it becomes available, there is e\ er\ 

reason to a« immediately. 


7 Crown can 
set up a scheme for 

you without 

delay or problems. 


Crown Financial Management is a leading pensions company 
that already looks after die interests of more than one million people 
in theUK, and which provides company pension schemes for mam 

specifically to meet tire Government’s criteria for contracung out of 
Se State Scheme and thus qualifying in full for the Governments 

S ' ne S^S3on rakes cate of everything. from P^dt-g 

right 

look forward to hadyounothadtheforesight-andthehard-headed 

commercial sense - to redirect a large part ofvour National Insurance 
Contributions into your company's own pension schen e. 

Stop throwinggood money afterbad. Send usthecoupoivNow. 

™ w . a " ,s,, " Jn "’ f " |, " r " dl 
I'lL-j-r*." lei me U.itv ,l: U Jotail*’' 'il'airlXails hi t KL- nrunK-m 



crown 

FINANCIAL 

MANAGEMENT 


Name. 


I’nMiiiin. 


ta imp.ui> 
AdJref'_ 








^^llVUiVl 

As yvey conducted io 10 countries indicates that tta most disabling illness known to man has a biological basis 

• : ~~ — — ' ... - 







There are 1 7 million people 
in the world suffering from 
schizophre nia. A new study 

forgotten absolves families from most 
illness of the blame and suggests 

that it is an illness and not a soc ial 
condition. Marjorie Wallace reports 


: the root of the problem 



mm 


• 4 “r:’ - t 's '** 


Nwfy 3Q years ago American psychoanalysts people Co be hospitalized against their will ' 
™UMiged the traditional view that schizo- Those discharged should betoofcedafta-infhX 
pireitei was an illness which needed medical community. 

^ P retM ** aD concept that all These ideas spread through Europe dnzfno 
beharioor has rt<c in infoiM.- ><•... 1 >un~ * ■ min. l. : • t ™8 



"uiui nras«i meoKai counnmny. 

^ P reo< ** aD concept that all These ideas spread through Europe dnm? K 
“J* **5 root in urfaucy, they believed the 1960$ and 1970s, becoming entai*gledvii3h 
sttuz^hreaia was earned by early conflicts m flower-power, intellectual socialism, stuhst 
relationships, particularly with the mother, protests, left-wine resistatsce vrame 


A worldwide epidemiological that in all 10 countries ihe 
study of schizophrenia carried incidence of new cases of 
out bv the World . • ,« 


■ \z wmeu incidence 01 new cases of 

out by the World Health schizophrenia was virtual!*.* 
Organization over the last eight identical, about one per cent of 
vears Will throw new lierhf nn : 


~ -, ,* 1uk.-nm.u1. uok.iui one percent 01 

-^ are J . U1 ^ throw new light on whom half wen: serious cases, 
the disease and may help to Because social and economic 
reveal us cause. conditions vary so widely bc- 


1 1 i. cunumons varv so widclv be- 

It also has important impli- tween the different countries 
cations lor the way we cope the study showed that schizo- 
wnh \ . ictims and the role phrenia is not brought on bv 


.... ......... luit (JIIIUIU la noi PTOUgm On DV 

pla\cd by their families. panicular socio-economic con- 

Dr Assen Jablensky. a Bui- driions. 


5 , v W'.s-»: w v^ 1 


. ■ •'“wiviianj. a WUI- UIAIUIO. 

ganan epidemiologist and the Similarly, because familv re- 

vnifyr Mivfinol ■ ■ 


s“ . * , , u oimiiany. recause familv re- 

f !^ cd,cal OlTicer in lationships and culture varv so 

li , l. s . parlmem oi Mental greatly, it is vw uniikelv that 
Health last week told Tit.’ c-.rr.m.-c . 







l u 3 wny conuicts in 
relationship^ particularly with the mother. 
Vranns ..should -therefore be treated hr 
P^chommSysis ratter than dross. - 
Thp ItliM flBBttlfln L.IJ . 


AnwUfel* ?!$. “ *»a*ys*SHBiad As a result of these "referas”* thousands* df 

AfMrra ani m the 1960s Thomas Szasz took destitute mental patients are crowding -fa, 

fnnr.. » , eXtreme r. cfa ” n ™g tiwl ail mental streets of the major cities of Europe *aiM 
“Iness was a mvtii rm>f«ii v ~ a . .feT-i =_ . UM 


protests, left-wing resistance groups ifo ^ 
Baader-Meinhof gang and neo-Marxist rev®. - 
Intionaries. ' 

As a result of these *Tefernis T \ thewsands*ttf 

rlnctftirata manta 1 na tfontr am - . .. 


claimiDg that all mental streets of the major cities of Europe and 
my ^ l cr ^ atei br psychiatrists. America and their plight is b33L?£ 
^onothns were jumpingon the bandwagon, intematiofial scandaL Now the pendulum fa 
gcsffiWte Erring Goffinaa and Thomas begmuing to s — M 




^ aud Thomas beghuing to swing ■*».*. . «= a-u-psyeonaro 
nh r( .n peop,e became sduzo- movements contain the seed of theirowa 
UvSCtifaL 0 !!! *f cs ^® e ®f their parents or destnlctio^^ says Professor John Win® of^L 
WggPhlMutaiwthnH^ social pressures Institute irf Psychiatry in London. “A* far sfl 


«*• ■ •» 
mK* 


owrfTiflfriLTi of their parents or destruction^ says Professor JohiWin> ofn^ 

through social pressures Institute of Psychiatry in London. “?lot rt. 
° r rm * tw sufferer was not mad. but a what they say is based on fantasy T6ev »»4 
?Ktm of society and should nm ho 




u‘ ^ V , fe 1 * 1 ! 1 ;- *« » very uniikelv ihat 

Hcallh Iasi week told The lamilics cause ihcir children’s 
Tti/ny ihe results of this study, schizophrenia. “The studv 


v w ™ 3 ; uu >- «. n izopnren 1a. - i tie Studv 

due to be published in June, should relieve anv feelings of 
Tne surv ey, the first to quantify euilt**. Dr Jablenskv “savs. 
new cases. ws« Ainn.'H in iott -c. — : i.„ . - . 


wHwiiun gum. jaoiensKv savs. 

new cases, was started in 1977. “Families cannot be "blamed 
It was earned out mi: search and those who take comfort 


• r.z — . — *•" wire comion 

rHw!*w I? ^ unlnL ' 5 Irom the ev idence that schizo- 
Colombia. Lzechoslovakia. phrenia has a biological basis 



■ smerer was not mad, but a what they say is based on fantasy. Tfcev w«4 

in he locked awny to nuke all mentally ill people uormaL Boris 

- ' . some cases the patient is too ill and it becomes 

hospitals nSrSTri, m **** obv * oas in the eul that it is inhnmawtoS 

such pressure on him." -TT ff 

maiened for _ and cam- The Times checked how the picture was 

PSigned Or changes in the laws which allowed - changing in a nmnher of com rtrW. . 


UNITED states 


/tsaraww*..-. •• * ** 

. ^.%* .. 


■■ 


Reassurance: Dr Jablensky 

Denmark. India. Ireland. Ja- 
pan. Nigeria, the United King- 


Soviet Union. 

The researchers went to great 
lengths to idemilV all new 
schizophrenics in the different 
centres, not only through hospi- 
tals and doctors, out-patient 
and community centres, but 
also through the help of faith 
healers, shrines, sooth-savers 
and other non-tradiliona! 


should be fun her reassured". 
He believes the study demol- 
ishes the concept of the 
sehizophrenogenie mother, 
who causes schizophrenia bv a 
mixture of over-protection and 
expectations of independence. 

But while culture and family- 
do not affect the incidence of 
schizophrenia, they can dra- 
matically alter its progress. 
“Where the schizophrenic can 
be contained within a large 
lamily network where the at- 
mosphere is more supportive 
and less demanding, his 
chances of recovery arc much 
higher", says Jablensky. In 






has been most 
TOggsagi dramatical 
the United 

"There is now 
a universal realization 
mat the running down and 

closing of mental hospitals - - 

was a disaster’ V says Dr Fuller 
Torrey. consultant 
psychiatrist at St Elizabeth's ' 
Hospital, Washington. 

"Only last year a Texan mental 


idea that mental Dlness is due 
to sotial attritions is 
unacceptable. There has been 
no pplicy to dose the 
hospitals, although the major 
centres are developing 
community care through 
psychiatric dispensaries 

finrf e n. ^ 


regional structure of catchment 
areas, known as 
“sectorization". But this • 
scheme relies on a person . 
having an address and patients 
can easily fall through the - - 

net “There are amfes of 
discharged patients who . 


"Only last year a Texan mental 
hospital sent weekly 
busloads of patients to 


. hospitals. "Thdy are not 
part of the heaim service”, 
says Professor John Wing, 
wno has visited Moscow 
several times. "Very little is 
known about them . 


Mangensays. 

tfALY 

The anti- 


Houston discharging them 
at the terminus with either 
•Family’ or ’Salvation Army 1 
on their notes. Many had 

nowhere to go”. Half the 
"bag ladies’ and 37 per cent of 
homeless men are mentally 
in. It is now a hot political issue 

and there are powerful 
lobby groups In Congress. , 


SSi: ssfit&iffe- SSS 


pan. Nigeria, the Linited Kina- h i “u ' - L , ,,,u V n “ J ! n Jnaia ana Denmark. emoiinn an.Hhp UCI,W Y l ^oisease in diflerem 

dom. the United States and the rie^Hnnin^ 5 Ja . Wei ? sk >!- ,n In this and previous survevs. worse prognosis is counincs as happens in diabe- 

Sovfci Union. £ t P Z£ W ™J'^ ^uWp^prc^ (Spite widely differing,!. disease. The only 


WEST GERMANY 


In the 1960s 
the movement 
reached 

Vf West Germany 

v— ^ and became 
associated with various left- 
wing and libertarian causes. 
One of the most vehement was 

nrlMAKmn. U..L^. _x 


ria or India manv patients 
suffer a single schizophrenic 
episode followed by complete 
recovery. In Nigeria. 58 per 
cent ol those followed up were 
of this type. In India, it was 51 
ptfr .f en j J‘ In Denmark, with 
smaller families, only 6 percent 
recovered completely. 

This interpretation of the 


me pattern ol poorer prognosis Desoite widely «.i_ l nean disease. The only 

extended throughout the devel- other conditions which show 

oped countnes where up to half wo^ Srited ^efr lhe unifomt distribution 

the patients became chronic toms w^n «rie sLSrirS - " ^d mental 

schizophrenics. HTiliiSni retaidauon". Geariy, there is 

There are also geographic them in tiL 311 important genetic cotnpo- 

diffcrences in symptoS ln rommeminf on evm- nepl ujderiymg schizophrenia, 
poor counines ih^ nnc^t nf it.« j .. !“ °iL eve 0 action He believes that ihnm» ■>» 


UNITED KINGDOM 

In the UK, a 


Dr Wolfgang Huber, of 
Heidelberg Universltv. v 


S an was put 
rward in 


rr cou„“ m «,fc'c^rjf^e a C rra°W lt a S 

illness is sudden. ^,e patient has HouEh.s tad iS mteL ^ ^bly a variety q f causes SSSto 

ro m rr 7 , -;s h ,r^. 

E2J1JI-.W SSi^-LWS^ta.: 


s^ e iSz numbcr or ^ 

Usineacnmnntr'r thAU-wrv ,. u L'-n’ ?nd Dr Chnstme 


Using a computer, the WHO 

doctors employed standard 
methods of diagnosis. They 
took details of case histories 
and followed up each patient 
alter one year, two years and. in 
some cases, five years. 

The extraordinary result was 


uuu ur i_nnsune 
vaughan of the Maudsley Hos- 
pital. London, indicating that 
families which are critical and 
make demands on the sufferer 
(high expressed emotion fam- 
ilies) are three limes as likelv to 
trigger a relapse than calmer 
families-This was also eon- 


Heidelberg University, who 
attempteato put treatment 
into the hands of the patients. 
He became involved with the 
Baader-Meinhof gang and was 
*mprisoned for possessing 
ammunition. 

Another group of young 
Psychoanalysts, who called 
themselves the Mannheim 


s&^as-k-r saassaagB 

sron after the first episode are most the same wirds ** lhe «>psMuence.pf^ 1960s, Larry Gostin^in^ 

good. By contrast, in richer phrases This seems to noinflf {kyd^pmentaJ defect m lhe American lawyer, came to 
countnes. the patient is often a common biochemica/ranL* 10 firsl few years fojf oourttry and, working \ 

socially withdrawn and lives **i wSnXwE, P f We ^uld look into MIND (Natfonal AssoS 

ssSS -tes eariy Sosas' 

- A. i-i & SSraMSSTTSTBS: .^SSffKSSS 

1 I I A 


ATTENTION- 




tote country and, working with 
MIND (National Association 
tor Mental Health) lobbied for 

hospitals to be closed and 
championed the cause of 
patients detained 
compulsorily. The movement 

nac noon pi .1 u 


PARTLY-PAID SHARES 


EASTERN BLOC 



hv « uT™ , j (ws peen successful in 

.^eReX a.ri'S 

tote of Psychiatry, London, make it more difficult to treat a 
i wins suffer more birth trau- patient who is so ill he 
mas than single children, and refuses help. 

Dr Reveley has found they also ’ — - - 

commonly have enlarged brain c « ercnn 
ventricles (chambers WJed with tASTERN BLl 
cerebno-spinal fluid). Many . jJJIl tyu** * 

people with schizophrenia also WAn rnZohil 

have enlaiyed brides Vi |B|A K 

“If we could find out what is never re 

| going wrong in the maturation W the Sovi 
of the nervous system” Union or the Eastern Eui 
Jablensky says,“it would help countries, which remain 
us understand why in later rertoful to a rigid medical 
years a person develops model. Since the Soviet 
schizophrenia." rs 9 af ds its social 

sin IMi tra se aatpamI aw. 


; .* d.wATOi.,iiftuuyjt uttnr BITCXTS, 

psychatiy tftes redaflntitf to 
exclude rtamolo^sts. 

■ Sut nene of them was able 
to change the mentalheaith . 
: '-taws* or have a hospital : •’ 
cwsure policy adopted. 
"Gommunrty care is dfficuit 
to fund in Gemnany", says Dr 
Steen Mangen, of the 
f^xfon School of Economics. 
Untike Britain, German 

health services are funded bv 

insurance companies. 
Hospitals lose money when 
mere are empty beds". 


Vl-. ; A\\ psychiatry .-V 
■ Vi J r' , VTt\ movement 
vf Vl^hafasm^or*-* 
v\ ^ triumph in 
Italy. There was a - 
tremendous ideological ■ 
movement with student -z 

protests, worker protasis 
and then the government saw 
it as a lovely way of crating-, 
down on bills. As in otto* ■■» 

countries, it was a unique ^ 

fusion of left and right-wing 
motives”, says Prcrfessor 
Kathleen Jones of York . ' 

University, who has studied 
Italian mental health reform. Ih 4 • 
1978 communist-inspired 
legislation preventer: new 
patients from b^ng 
admitted. The asylums faced’ ■ 
eventual closure and many . ' J} 
of their patients were decanted 
Into the community. The - 
. result was crowds of - - 
abandon&tb, as they ' ' Y : ■ - 
became known, on rdarfefcfek'Y- 

and railway stations- '■ ^ 
Community care is .~j 
supposed to be avatebte, but *ri 
when Professor Jones • 
tra veiled through (taiym 1984- > ■. 
she found many areas ted 
none. 


SWEDEN 


FRANCE 


movement 

\\ Nim "ever reached 

" the Soviet 
Union or the Eastern European 

COlintriflce uihirih r 


Psycho- 
analysis has 
always 
been very 
popular In 


\\ — popular in 

France and anti-psychiatry 
ideas were eagerly taken 
:iallyby the 


structure ascorrect, trie 


up, especially By the 
intellectual left and 
Communist Party. As in 
Germany, the definition of 
psychiatry was changed to 
exclude the neurologists. 
Py” , h ^s a programme of 
hospital closures and a 


% pressures 

from civil -jk 

Ifoertes . - 

groups, tte Swedish- ■ *i«. 

government has adopted a -Y 

“ytefPProw*- "PoWcians 
are slowing down the ' 

closure of mental hospitals and 
a report lobbying for ” : 

^SLSf^S hla * re: - : . 

Wears learning the lessons . 
and rtaly. We do 


This is a notice to those holding partly-paid shares in 
Cable and Wireless pic. If you hold partly-paid shares in Cable 
and Wireless pic, whether acquired in the December 1985 
share sale or since, you are reminded that the second and final 

instalment of 287p per share is due shortly 

You should ensure that your cheque or bankers’ draft 
arrives not later than 3.00 pm (London time) on 7th March 
1986. If your payment is for £10,000 or more, it must arrive 
sufficiently early to be cleared by that time. 

, ^ cheques or bankers’ drafts should be made payable 

to National Westminster Bank" and should be crossed 
“C and W Offer." 

You should send your cheque or bankers’ draft and the 
lett er of acce ptance for your shares to the address shown on 

page 3 of your letter of acceptance. 

Please remember that Mure to pay the second and final 
instalment may result in the relevant shares being forfeited 

and the allocation being cancelled. 


A sal mon’s a lly in the skv 

oaching is a big and * 



break 


Poaching is a big and 
lucrative business in 
Scotland. But river 
bailiffs are fighting 
back — from the air 



David Smith. Inspector of Sea 
Fisheries for South East Scot- 
land. scans the bleak stretch of 
csiuarx 500ft below. It is not a 
good day for poachers, with 
drizzle driven on a bitter 
wind, and a heavy swell c , 

hammering the Berwickshire ^ sp - v: spotting poachers from Hie a»> 

coast. The Department of fine . . ** 

Agriculture and Fisheries for invi S'bIe somecas 

Scotland air patrol is cruising W7,J license W e have 

along at cliff-top height, so low S^°iL dealere “f 1 ten h °te- «ng into 
that salt water has to be hosed S.JJpfT accepting salmon confiscan 
offaftcr each sortie. through the back door. '•”&m52e 

Mr S J rpi ?. se tl 3, e essence”. f Pcwching used to be “one Tweed 
Mr Smith. The ...... for the nnt” nnH . . 


department’s helicopter which 
Jad spotted an .illegal net 
beneath a cliff; along the top of 

aiiSft raD i- g0 J f course. The 
aircraft radioed for grounA- 

EaSwSSsI 

S?«gSl ,,i,h «ESfc® 

asSa^^ast^ 

SSSoSSMSS 

wrar balacla va bdmets to hide ^ 

e ’ 


^unicatii 


tnc 


\x\ K 


irrw 


ucigim so low 

that salt water has to be hosed 
o IT after each sortie. 

“Surprise is the essence” 


fine mesh plastic and invisible some cas« , tiS? n5cord ^ Post- 

to salmon. It will also license w«» 51006 tfa rowing. iiSlS” 1 ?* 11316 and heading of 

salmon dealers andbanhote^ ^ ^ P°achera brea£ vessel and ?i 

. 3CC6 Pfi n g salmon confisSi^iS^J? !** rieve auto One 


m, c .l . i essence . f ■ u*u oc one 

l. the flying water " 5r ,he P 01 a °d regarded as 

bailiff, says. “Radio warnings 1,01 specially illegal but the 
travel faster than nin-rsA rewards became so hnw> >hn> 


travel faster than aircraft. 
Poachers use scrambler de- 
vices on the radio. Some give 
warnings in Gaelic. The way 
to catch them is to pounce 
over the cliff tops from the 
snore or sweep in from 20 
miles out.” 


^ uui me 

rewards became so huge that 
todays pgachere are armed 
W| «» ejanide and explosives, 
and the species is threatened. 

Bailiffs on the River Tweed 
arc reportedly angry about the 
£30 fine meted out to a man 
caught with 30 poisoned salm- 


to retrieve IZZ m coon. One 

wr have turned the tabS ^ Poachers now raSuf'LSi” 85 ’ 

The most bizarre retaliation 
*as reported by the 

y the Ronald Fanx 


_ 7 caugni wnn ju poisoned salm- 

tacn yrar the department ° n - fisheries officers calculate 
spends £10 million guarding “J, 3 * poachers could earn 
dcoitisii waters against all £'.000 in one good haul; even 

Kinds Of lllPo.il t*t_ . 9 smnll hn«i ■ ■ 


CONCISE CROSSW ORD (N„ 889 ) 



LinWc .r ta'P tc ? again« all 
kinds of illegal fishing. The 

cover extends from Rockail 
where the work is done by' 
kaf Nimrod maritime sur- 
ven lance aircraft, to the in- 
stiorc waters, where combined 
Uictics are used: the air patroL 
a helicopter with fishery ofti- 


a small boat could land 
£37.000 tax free in a season. 


With stiffer penalties and 
the risk of confiscation of 
vessel and tackle, the big boats 
shy away from poaching and 
leave it to small boats, often 
nameless, unmarked and of 


cers nri ' 7, - * iMUKioi. unmarxea ana of 


ACROSS 

1 Lighi motorbike (SJ 
■* Nightclub show (7) 

8 Guides (S) 

9 Memory loss (7) 

10 Music writer (S) 

11 Runawav(4) . 

13 Sulky ( n"| 

17 Mature (4> 

18 Sinking (8) 

21 Sudden weajih <7) 

22 Secp(S) 

23 Sheltered side (7) 

2d Drive out (5) 






a S"S"SmSm, 


JsuedbvJ HenryS chiodefvVaajacs Licu» 1 on j; .4 M Covenwieni and Kfcimwn. Baaar. Limned on tehall alCsS^ d v: . iej ^ pic 


inflatable launches. 

There arc also the ever- 
tightening laws. The Salmon 
Fisheries Bill, which has just 
received its third reading in 
the Lords, will make it illegal 
for a boat e\en to carry a 


!■■■ 


4« A II Ik. 

time ihe Tweed Commission- 
ers dealt with 1 18 cases in the 
estuary and upstream waters, 
ihe inshore patrol had onlv 
one case. 

But old loyalties die hand in 
fishing communities. “We 


—I *- 1 * J rommuntHes. We 

monofilament net - made of have had threats, abuse and 


DOWN 


1 E'il intern (6) 

2 Sacred song (5) 

3 Empty (8) 

■* Filki steak (13) 

5 Sbclf-Iike bed (4) 

6 Deiermine’f7) 

7 Journey (6) 

12 ChaippcS) 








BBSSOiiiS 


JJ Tiwpass(T) 

Jf V2 nnish 

10 A "”«wlcdec(6) 


20 fe r,repaa f5) 
(4) Amenc an Indian 


















A** 


1 


THE TIMES MONDAY MARCH 3 1986 


11 


MONDAY PAGE 


ft'r to 
S22s 


2 Tift 





U ikiii' 


T-: \ 


V = 


an Iron Maiden 


Pearson P^Wfoi!n™ 
the best known business 


Thteny Rannou/GAMMA 


^ woman in France as she 
temporarily trades her 
Porsche and furs for the 
. promise of political power 

The so-called "Iron Maiden of Ranee” is iust 
axentimeire over five feet tall, has green eyes. 
fashronaWy-streaked blonde hair and^a 
dan^rous habit of making controversial 
asides to journalists. • 

% There are other important ways in which 
Madame Fran cine Gomez differs from her 
alleged prototype. Britain's Margaret Thatch- 
er. She is 53, but looks about 40, and has just 
taken a third husband, an advertising man in 
his late thirties. (Her second husband was 
■Stain Gomez, now head of the nationalized 
Thomson Company, which among other 
tilings makes Exocet missiles.) - 

She also decided that it was up to her to do 

h$r duty to French architecture. Unlike our 
own "iron Maiden”, she decided to give carte 
blanche to a young ar c hi t ect to design her 
country house. The result looks like a large 
concrete abstract sculpture, squatting on a 
Proven caJ hillside; she is delighted with ft. 
-There is one other important difference: 
Mme Gomez has never yet won a poli ti cal 
election, though having watched her in the 
current national and local election campaig n 
in the southern French city of Nimes, I would 
say that is about to change. 

How, then, did she get her nickname? I saw 
her in a street market hand in g out leaflets 
which showed her arm-in-arm with right- 
wing prime ministerial hopeful Jacques 
Qxirac. Customers and market traders greet- ' 
•ed her with cries of “Ah . . . Waterman, 
Waterman ...” for she is best known as the 
woman who runs the company that malms 
this famous brand of fountain pen. 

She fired a third of her staffs 
and retired her mother 


She has run it, moreover, with the ruthless 
"Iron Maiden” qualities which French folk- 
lore (and pop songs) link with 
“Thatcherism”. Successful women bosses are 
rare in French industry. She has therefore 
regularly decorated Reach television as the 
statutory female managing director. . 

“In France,” die says, “the only way fora 
woman to get on has been to concentrate on 
fashion, perfume or the media. Either that or 
■'lie must have the power given by a majority 
tif shares in a family company ” 

' -That was her method. The French agency 
for the American. Waterman Fen Company ^ 
was previously beaded by - her formidable^ 
Scottish grandmother. Jler ^o^lKT tobk^ftr 
over but was. not successful. When Mine' 
Gomez joined the company, in 1969, her qgly- 
business' experience- h ad cone- from running 
her own art gahery and antique furniture ., 
shop. Fountain pens' were going out of 
fashion. Waterman was losing £400,000 a 
year and feeing bankruptcy- She was put 
under the wing ofthe joint managing director, 
a cousin, and told to get to know the 
company. 

Within two years she had “dusted the place : 
off*. She fired 10 of the top management, 
including her cousin (“His four secretaries 
i£osl too much”), sacked a third of the staff 
and eased her mother and the managing 
director into retirement. She appointed a new 
managing director, fired him after a few 
months (“Power had gone to his head”) and 
took over the whole business. The grand oak- 
panelled headquarters in the Boulevard de la 
Madeleine were exchanged for small offices in 
the 1 7th arTondisseroenL-She brought in a 
new team, including designees and marketing 
experts. 



Fnutdne Gomez: “It fa important never to commit yourself in politics to anything that fa utterly, indelibly factual” 


She saw a future for the fountain pen in a 
world dominated by the ballpoint. By the 
middle of the 1970s sales had doubled and 
profits were £1.8 million and rising. She 
bought the rights to the Waterman trade 
name from the American and British owners 
;: and Taundbed Waterman -SA as a: public 
* company.' oh .the French 1 ^ stock exchange in 
1975. Sne is now battling for world markets 
^^withher chief rival, toe, Parker Pen Company 
- qf America. j. . . v. 

- As part of the battle she arrives in London 
tomorrow for an appearance at a Harrods 
"French Week” gala with Princess Stephanie 
of Monaco and die French ambassador. But 
what about her election campaign? Voting is 
on March 16. Again she departs from the 
. Thatcher model. Politics is all very well, but 
she finds it a relief to escape from "that 
curious environment of egocentririty and 
narcissism which is involved in an election 
campaign”. 

As a candidate she feels like “a talking 
suitcase, taken from hotel to hotel, unpacked, 
packed up again and taken somewhere else.” 
She says about politics: "Truth does not exist. 
Everything is fluctuating, wavering. Whatev- 
er happens it is important never to commit 
yourself in politics to anything that is utterly, 
indelibly factual.” For her it is a relief to get 
back to “the eternal, solid truths of facts and 
figures which business provides.” 


She has been forced into some fluctuations 
herself She has abandoned her black Porsche 
temporarily and drives a more sober Saab for 
electoral appearances. "And I was in trouble 
because the only coals I owned to keep out 
this cold weather were furs. But they told me 1 
couldn’t make: politics in those. So I had to 
buy a doth coat for the campaign. Isn't it ri- 
diculous? Why can't people be the way they 

a xeT" - • - - 

Even the leaflets she' was handing out didn't 
show things quite the way they are. as she 
gleefully explained. “I look quite tall beside 
Monsieur Chirac, no? But as you see I am not 
tall. It is because I was standing on a plank.” 


She is being launched like one 
of her ex-hnsband’s Exocets 


With such apparent disdain for the political 
game, how did she get mixed up in it in the 
first place? “Well, the world of business ... I 
begin to know him. So I think it important to 
know this world of politics, where they make 
decisions which have so much effect on our 
lives and our businesses. I like to have some 
say in this.” 

During the 1984 European elections she 
organized a list of fellow industrialists and 


“men and women who had done something 
with their lives". She hoped French voters 
would turn to people of proven success in 
fields other than politics to "make the 
European ideal work”. On her list were such 
people as Marielle Goitschel, three times 
Olympic skiing 8° |d medal winner. The 
result? Voters virtually ignored them. 

She classifies her own performance during 
the campaign as. “between pathetic and 
pitiable". The experience cost her much 
money and grief, bul she wroie a funny, 
indiscreet book. On He Badine Pas Avec La 
Politique ( One Shouldn't Joke With Politics). 

She isn't joking now. She has been clever to 
get the organization and money of Chirac's 
RPR party behind her. although she is not 
herself a party member. She is apparently 
being launched, like one of her ex-husband's 
missiles, against one of the RPR’s main 
adversaries, the current Mayor of Nimes. “1 
don't dislike the smell of gunpowder”, she 
says. 

One of her concerns is that the Roman 
amphitheatre in Nimes is being used for bull 
fighting, a popular local spectacle. And is she 
going to come out publicly against it? “It is 
more practical to gel elected first - then do 
something about it.” 

Spoken, as she would say, like a politician. 

©Time* NmratmpwB Ltd, 1S88 


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A child’s right to justice 


The Government is 


Wendy HoBe 


planning to channe l 


domestic disputes 


into a single court — 


but where will this 


leave the children? 


The first step in a radical 
reform of .the- legal system to 
allow family issues, such as 
custody and divorce, to be 
taken into a new “family court" 
structure, is expected at Easter. 

Lord Haikham of St Maryle- 
bone. the Lord Chancellor, will 
set but the Government's de 
tailed plans and although the 
changes are not expected to 
become law until the next 
parliament, many experts be- 
lieve it marks an end to the 
confusing and protracted sys- 
tem of bearing cases in splint- 
ered areas of jurisdiction. 

At the moment family cases 
are heard before magistrates 
and judges who also deal with 
_ .mma! matters - juvenile 
courts, magistrates’ courts, foe 
county court and the High 
Court. Because of their similar- 
ity with foe adversarial proce- 
dures of criminal cases, 
hearings can actually widen foe 
differences between parents, 
perhaps most dantagin^y in 
questions of access in divorce 



Some campaigners. However 
believe the changes will not go 
far enoughMary Ryan, of foe 
Family Rights Group, believes 
foe Loid Chancellor's plans will 

not provide foe means to 
include children in care in foe 
family court structure: Child 
care is currently foe subject of a 
Department of Health and 
Social Security review - an 
interdepartmental working par- 
ty reported to ministers last 
September 

- “At the moment you can 
have a child in care being foe 
subject of proceedings in sever- 


al different courts at once” 
Mary Ryan says. “Her mother 
might be applying for access in 
foe juvenile court, her foster 
parents making application for 
her adoption in the county 
court and foe putative father 
applying for guardianship pro- 
ceedings for custody in foe 
High Court 

Family courts are a 
a big success abroad^ 

The child gets foe raw deal 
because everything is so con- 
fused and it rakes so long for the 
final decision to be reached 
Time works against parents . 
who want to get their children 
home.” 

It is more than 10 years since 
foe Finer Report advocated 
radical changes in foe way out 
judicial system handles family 
matters. Filler's emphasis was 
on dealing with family break- 
down in a humane way us 
conclusions reflecting the feci 
foat care proceedings are often 
a response to marital collapse 
Finer warned to create a unified 
system of matrimonial law in 
impartial, informal courts with 
an emphasis on conciliation 


In the intervening years, 
despite all-party agreement on 
the need for change, there have 
been more than five million 
domestic cases through the 
courts — more than three 
million divorces, two million 
applications to vary orders in 
magistrates' courts and two 
million more domestic pro- 
ceedings. 

But there are other countries 
where unified family courts are 
already regarded as a success. 
In New Zealand, out-ofcourt 
conciliation helps couples to 
resolve questions related to 
children before they become 
involved in adversarial conflict. 
If that fails, there is an in-court 
process called mediation in 
which it is reported that 41 per 
cent of parties reach full agree- 
ment and a further 13 per cem 
reach partial agreement 

New Zealand has a single 
non-fault ground for divorce 
based on two years of living 
apart. In Australia the system 
works on one year apart 

In Ontario. Canada, both 
divorcing parents fill in a 
questionnaire and return it to 
an independent person, foe 
official guardian. If the answers 
raise any matters of concern, a 
fuller investigation is carried 
out by a social worker attached 
to the official guardian's office 
and the results are rcooned to 
foe court. 

The Children * Legal Centre 
m London believes foal chil- 
dren should have a standing in 
law and a right to independent 
legal representation It advo- 
rates replacing foe present sys- 
tem with one in which foe 
resolution of family differences 
xniki be reached by discussion 
and agreement 'There should 
be dear recognition foat chil- 
dren are not peripheral to 
family determinations, but are 
important family members 
*-ho should hav e a right to full 
vmsuJiauon at all stages ’ 

\lison Miller 

clTiniM NMmeaoera Ltd rttf 


TALKBACK 


Porridge 

penitence 

From Mrs Wendy 
Hawkin. MiU Way. 
Rickmansworth, 
Hertfordshire. 

I found Christine Brown's 
comments on giving np for 
Lent (Wednesday Page, Feb- 
ruary 12k very interesting. 
One of the reasons that so 
many of ns need to go on a diet 
is omr perpetual self-indul- 
gence against which Lent is a 
necessary antidote. 

My solution is to give up all 
food except porridge for Lent. 
This cannot except bv an 
amaring stretch of the imagi- 
nation. be called a diet and 
performs the function of absti- 
nence (from flesh, fowl, bits, 
etc). It shows me thaLfor a 
short period at least I am able 
to refrain from the excesses of 
our modern society - the year 
when I cannot tackle or main- 
tain my Lenten regime will 
mean that the battle with self- 
control is completely lost. 

And. of coarse, porridge is 
good for you: it contains all 
sorts of essential vitamins and 
other nutrients, especially as I 
have it made with salt and 
served with a dash of sugar 
and milk. 

Mealtimes out can be pro- 
tided for by taking supplies in 
a wide-necked vacuum flask, 
or by nibbling at oatcakes 
(which I allow myself for such 
occasions). Yes. there is a 
small weight loss each year, 
but foe main benefit is to my 
character and. dare T sav it. mv 
soul. 

The conclusive reasmi why 
giving up anything for Lent 
cannot be a diet is that the 40 
days do not include Sundays, 
which are feast days (connt the 
days from Ash Wednesday to 
Easier and check). Thus one 
can eat normally on the Sab- 
bath a treat forbidden tn 
those nn n strict diet routine 


Just the lady 
for m’Lord 


I have decided what I want to 
be when I grow up. I want to 
be foe sort of woman adored 
by Lord Weidenfeid. Whai 
His Lordship really goes for, 
according to one observer, are 
“women who are beautiful 
and who look like they don't 
have a thought in their heads, 
but who turn out to be 
incredibly inielligenL" 

Imagine the lovely time one 
could have by looking so 
deceptive. Men would come 
swarming around, thinking 
that they were on to a good 
thing, and then you could bore 
them into a stupor by deliver- 
ing a thesis on some obscure 
Jacobean poeL Unless one of 
them happened to be Lord 
Weidenfeid, of course. He 
would be mesmerized by ev- 
ery pearl from one's scarlet 
lips. 

This is not an ambition 
likely to be fulfilled. My 
appearance gives every im- 
pression that I am more 
intelligent than I am. This is 
because I often forget to put 
on lipstick or to collect my 
best dress from foe cleaner. 
Everyone assumes my head is 
teeming with thoughts, and 
some people get rather upset 
when they discover it's full of 
cotton wool, something that 
only, peaches and cream 
blondes are allowed to get 
away with. 

What 1 feel I am about to 
turn into is something even 
more confusing than the 
Weidenfeid Woman, namely 
the Indomitable One. or as the 
film critic of Vanity Fair calls 
her, the Rambo-erte. 

Indomitable women get 
that way through circum- 
stances rather than choice — 
no one wants to go through life 
with rolled-up sleeves, push- 
ing straggling strands of hair 
behind your ears and wiping 
beads of moisture from your 
upper lip. But indomitable is 
the only way to go when, as in 
my case, you suddenly find 
yourself alone with the mort- 
gage repayments and a cur- 
tain-rack that needs fixing. 

It’s amazing how quickly 
the word gels around that you 
are no longer silly and help- 
less. Within minutes, men 
expect you to book the restau- 
rant table when they ask you 
oul to lunch, and colleagues 
are confident that you will 
never let them ' down by 
getting 'flu even when an 
epidemic is raging. 

Indomitable women don't 



• V" !<. * 4 


c 


PENNY 

PERRICK 


) 


have too bad a time ofit since, 
although they are not handed 
life on a plate, at least no one 
is going to stop them striding 
out and grabbing it They do 
make mistakes, though, 
expecially when they begin to 
miss all the sweet, feminine 
things in life, which leads 
them to fall hook, line and 
sinker for young men with 
blow-dried hair and pink cash- 
mere pullovers who make a 
great salad dressing 

They can also become pret- 
ty nasty towards more 
domitable women who have 
regular hairdressing appoint- 
ments and go all goofy when 
asked to fill in their own tax 
return. I am really quite 
ashamed of myself that, in- 
stead of taking a live and let 
live attitude towards women 
who lake to their bed when 
they have a slight headache, I 
narrow my eyes and mutter 
“wimpette”. 

Luckily, for some of us, the 
indomitable seems to be right 
in style at the momenL First of 
all there were all those films 
starring Sally Field where our 
heroine fought for trade union 
recognition or harvested a 
cotton crop practically single- 
handed. Now there is Out of 
.\1rica, which has led to a craze 
in indomitable dressing, 
namely jodhpurs and those 
no-nonsense jackets. 

With some trepidation. I 
bought a pair of jodhpurs, 
hoping that ihey didn't look as 
if my thighs were filling out 
the baggy bits. Bui they have 
been a big success. .As a man 
with impeccable taste said. 
"They really bring you out." 
And that is more than a 
sweetly pretty taffeta party 
frock has ever been able to do. 


Homing in to a pigeon hole 


Nicky Raynsford, the Labour 
candidate for Fulham. says 
that he is not “someone who 
espouses Labels” and does not 
tike to have a tag on him that 
reads “cuddly Left”. And then 
he rather spoils his argument 
by sticking the label “prag- 
matic radical” on himself. Mr 
Raynsford is not the first 
person to find that labelling is 
tuia voidable and that you 
might as well write oat ; mr 
own before somebody else does 
it for you. 

Coming from rather a starry 
family, I progressed from be- 
ing my mother's daughter. 


through being Introduced as 
my husband's wife and then 
my children's mother, which 
probably accounts for my rath- 
er negative personality. On the 
other hand, it gave people 
something to go on when 
forced into a situation where 
making conversation with me 
was imperative. 

And 1 have fared better than 
most: for example, the lady 
who wherever she goes knows 
that her hostess is hissing 
behind her band to foe assem- 
bled company that she is so- 
and-so's ex-mistress. It is the 
“ex” that must rankle so. 



Cheshire Homes 
are ail about caring 
...in so many ways. 

The residents in Leonard Cheshire Homos are veiy severely hand) 
.apped men. women and children suffering [ram a wide range of conditions 
Someumes unable to speak, or 10 move much more than i hand or foot 

A Cheshire Home offers them much more then jusr phisical care, 
it gives then the dignity and freedom that is their right os inaivtaiuus. ihe 
'spponunity of friendship, a sense of purpose and a chance lo participate 

There are j Cheshire Homes m the Umied Kingdom and a further 
<4 7 in 45 countries throughout ihe world All of lhem have been made 
possible by rhe efforts nf dedicated vnJumecrs and hv gencrou* charitable 
donations 

W? also reach oui io eldvrn ana disaplvu people living m their own homes 
ind 10 families with a handicapped member who mjy be straggling alone in 
solaiion and despair |R Family Support Services in England provide nul pan 
ime help at crucial times of ihe iti> - a lifeline indeed But many, many mors 
.vrvices are needed io plug the yawning gaps m state provision Onfy 2 3>- oi 
'ur income is spent on administering thi* large charily This mean* rhai almrw 
ill ihe mnner we receive goes m FJIR FPT help w ih.ss# u» need 


PLEASE HELP US TO GO ON C ARING AND EXPANDING 

1 To Hon Treasurer. Room 3. f he Leonard rhcshire Enundalinn””j 
Rv-N Maunsc! Street. London Sw ip IO* i 

i endow a donation I 

Please sond fit* some iniornuuon nn covenants/ legacies* 
^(Mvesvnii me noro lniVirmalus ' 1 ’lease delete" 

j vfldre>' 

I - 



I 











• .... . JJS . -,.-^ ajSCs. . 


12 


THt 1'AMfcS MONDAY MAKCri 3 19tfo 



THE TIMES 
DIARY 

Short arm 
of the law 

Members of the West Midlands 
constabulary may this week move 
towards jailing the county's police 
committee. The bizarre prospect 
arises from a long-running dispute 
over the force's rent allowances, 
which have not been increased by 
the committee since 1982. In the 
Birmingham High Court this Fri- 
day. I understand, the Police 
Federation will claim the commit- 
tee is in breach of court orders that 
demand a review of the allowance 
(now averaging £30 a week 1 on the 
basis of the rental value of a 
£35.000 semi-detached house. The 
committee believes a fairer basis is 
a council house. The federation's 
secretary, Arthur Quinn, would 
not be drawn yesterday on 
whether writs were being taken 
out alleging contempt of court 
against each committee member. 
“Let's wait till Friday before we 
start mentioning things, like 
contempt," he said. The police 
committee deputy chairman. 
George Law. is not amused by 
possible threat of the clink from 
bis own coppers. “The federation 
gets more greedy every time we 
talk." he told me. 


Off target 

Those really in the know this year? 
Members of the public workers' 
union, Nupe. Thanks to the 
union's information-packed of- 
ficial diary they know that the 
peasant and partridge shooting 
season has just ended and are no 
doubt counting the days to the 
“Glorious Twelfth", when grouse 
shooting starts. Nor need Nupe 
members, many of whom are at 
the bottom of the pay scale, ever 
be at a loss when in London. The 
diary comprehensively lists clubs 
to join — among them The Turf 
Brooks's and Whites. At least it is 
more useful than the NUR diary: 
the one union diary which has no 
map of the London Underground. 

• Is London Underground plan- 
ning to reintroduce horse power 
following technical hitches this 
winter? A notice at Baker Street 
station last week read: “Oats and 
water free.” 


Regulars 


Those who liken the House of 
Lords when the divisiofkbells ring 
to Brands Hatch - wheelchair 
lyres squealing as peers rush to 
vote - should not ..mock. . Lord 
Shinwcll. who is 102. in October, 
attended on 102 days of a possible 
151 during the 1984-85 session and 
the second oldest peer. 98-year-old 
Lord Brockway. 138. Indeed, the 
attendance record of many of the 
old stagers, including Lords Stock- 
ton. Long and Boothby. is more 
impressive than that of quite a few 
young shavers next door. 

Double trouble 

A politician friend couldn't be- 
lieve his eyes when he read Robert 
Barnard's new political thriller 
Political Suicide about the 
mysterious death of a Tory MP. 
The prime suspect is the Labour 
candidate in the ensuing by- 
election. He bears an uncanny 
resemblance to a real-life Labour 
MP. Tony Banks: trendy, left- 
wing. chairman of the GLCs arts 
committee and the son of a 
diplomat. Yet Barnard tells me the 
figure is entirely fictional. “I’d 
never even heard of Tony Banks 
until after I'd finished the novel 
and I started reading about him in 
the Times Diary” he said. 



Voice under 

I think I have found the man 
behind David Owen's odd speech 
in which he pleaded for more 
independent TV production com- 
panies and the cabling of Britain. 
SDP member Peter Moniagnon. 
founder member of Antelope 
Films, makers of the recent Chan- 
nel 4 series The Heart -of the 
Dragon, has Owen's car and has 
been helping to formulate SDP 
broadcasting policy. Even Mon- 
tagnon. however, admits he can- 
not agree with Owen's idea to sell 
ITV franchises to the highest 
bidder. He added that Owen's 
commen t tha t the broadcasting 
union ACTT was “as bad as the 
N'GA" was an “over-simplif- 
ication’. He was not the only one 
who thought so. When Owen 
made the comment ai a What the 
Papers Say dinner. Thames Tele- 
vision MD Richard Dunn, not 
known for his union sympathies, 
went to pains to dissociate himself 
from the remark. 

PHS 


How Lawson can go 

by Terence Beckett 



The task feeing Nigel Lawson in 
preparing his Budget - now only 
two weeks away — is not an 
enviable one. Although Treasury 
figures published last week suggest 
that government finances may be 
recovering, the fall in oil prices, 
and the consequent ial! in sterling, 
have probably^dcprived hirti of 
. some £6 billion of revenue.. ■ 

At the- time oflhe 1985. Budget. 
Lawson expected to have as much 
as £3<5 billion for a fiscal adjust- 
ment in March this year. It now 
looks as if the sharp fall in oil 
prices has made this impossible. 
The Prime Minister herself ap- 
peared to recognize this in her 
Panorama interview last week, 
when she suggested that the main 
thrusL of this year's Budget should, 
be towards cutting the .lax burden 
on the lower-paid. 

■ The Confederation of British 
Industry would be delighiecFto see 
this done. In our representations 
to the Chancellor, we called on 
him to raise all personal allow- 
ances by 10 per cent more than the 
increase in the rate of inflation. 
This would take a million people 
out of tax altogether, at a cost of 
£2.1 billion. 

It is interesting to contrast the 
effect of tax cuts and of raised 
thresholds. If I p is cut off the basic 
rate of income tax. only 37p a 
week is added to the. pay packet of 
a married man with two children 
earning half the national average. 
The cost of that Ip reduction is 
£1.1 billion. If the same sum were 
devoted to raising personal allow- 
ances, it would give the same 
person an extra £1.10 a week 


Our objective is to make work 
more attractive to the low-paid, 
and to ease the poverty and 
unemployment traps. An increase 
in personal allowances by more 
than inflation' would reduce' rel- 
ative poverty levels and provide 
help and incentives for the young 
unemployed, who would find the 
value of what they could earn 
increased in comparison with 
what they could draw in state 
benefits. 

But in spite of the widespread 
support given by CB1 members to 
this proposal, it was not our main 
priority. What we urged Lawson 
to do first was to devote £1 billion 
to job-creation measures, targeted 
at the young' and long-term un- 
employed and the regions of high 
unemployment, to provide jobs 
for up to a third of a million 
people within two years. 

On Panorama Mrs Thatcher 
made it dear that while she was 
concerned about unemployment 
she did not see direct action as a 
priority. The Chancellor's first 
task, she said, was to improve 
incentives and purchasing power 
for “the bottom half’ of the wage- 
earning population. 

There is no doubt that easing 
the tax burden oh these people 
would improve incentives and 
stimulate demand, thus creating 
new jobs. But the worst-off in this 
bottom half are the long-term 
unemployed, who have little pros- 
pect of improving their living 


standards. Our proposals would 
do a great deal to help them. 

Given the propensity of con- 
sumers to spend their money on 
imported rather than home-pro- 
duced goods, to' use the Badget 
. just for tax cuts could do more to 
provide jobs for workers overseas, 
rather than in Britain. Most 
Conservative backbenchers have 
recognized that the government's 
biggest problem is how to cope 
with the persistently high level of 
unemployment— at 3.4 million, 
nearly one in seven of those 
available for work. 

Reducing unemployment must 
be the priority. That was the 
message the CB1 council conveyed 
to the Chancellor two months agio. 
We called fora building improve-, 
meni programme to provide tem- 
porary work for the long-term 
unemployed in the worst-nit ar- 
eas: increased funding for urban 
development and derelict land 
clearance: training for the long- 
term unemployed under the 
Enterprise Allowance Scheme; 
lowering the early retirement age 
to 62 under die Job Release 
Scheme, and encouraging new and 
more flexible ways of working. 

The government's own policies 
have contributed loan impressive 
pace of job creation over the last 
few years. In Britain today, a 
higher proportion of the popula- 
tion is working than in any other 
European country except Den- 
mark. In the past two years. 


700.000 new jobs have been 
created. 

Critics argue that many of these 
are part-time, and of no real value. 
But for many people with, other 
commitments and interests, part- 
time jobs are exactly what drey 
want. Patterns., of . work, and 
leisure, are changing: more people 
will be taking pan-time jobs. 

. Businessmen, anxious, to 'help 
cut the dole queues, believe trade 
and industry are capable erf 1 doing 
more. Many of the schemes for 
which the CBI is pressing depend 
on a partnership between business 
and government — in both fi- 
nance and goodwill. Each scheme 
is based on existing government 
programmes. 

The CBI’s calculations are well 
supported, both in terms of cost 
per job and the number of jobs 
each proposal will produce, be- 
cause each project is based, on an 
extension or development of exist- 
ing government services. The 
introduction of tax cuts in the 
midst of the present surge in 
consumer spending would be a 
high-risk strategy more likely to 
boost imports than create jobs 
here at borne. 

Business, in the face of compet- 
itive pressures, is keeping a close 
watch on its labour costs. We must 
now biiild on -the positive benefits 
of lower oil prices, which will help 
increase world demand and re- 
duce inflation. It is vital that 
industry takes advantage of this 
tremendous opportunity in export 
markets. 

Sir Terence Beckett is Director 
General of the CBI. 


Olof Palme was an unlikely repre- 
sentative of the egalitarian Swe- 
den he sought to build. An upper- 
class intellectual. cosmopolitan in 
his attitudes and interests, he- 
could never have been mistaken 
for the average Swede. 

Perhaps this contrast between 
his political purposes and his 
personal background helps to 
explain why he provoked such 
extreme reactions. Palme was not 
a comfortable Social Democrat, 
working to achieve by centrist 
methods the goals for society that 
most people want. Yet he came 
from the comfortable section of 
society. That made him seem all 
the more daring or threatening, 
according to one's point of view. 

I first met .him 20 years ago. 

That was a time when Swedish big 
businessmen and bankers were 
happv enough with a Social Dem- 
ocratic government. Most did not 
vole for the party themselves, they 
explained to me, but they recog- 
nized it as a force for stability. It 
was run by solid practical men like 
the prime minister, Tage Eriander, 
a reassuring, rather crumpled 
figure:, and by the;, finance .minis- • • 
I ter,- Gunnar Straag. a plain-spoken- 
1 WagtiiadsE’ 

Their style of government was 
known as the “Haipsund ( Dem-.«ou><. 
ocracy", from thq practice of 
gathering the different interest 
groups together around the table 
at Harpsund. the prime minister's 
offical residence, to thrash out 
agreements. It was a government 
that provided prosperity without 
confrontation. 

Yet even then Palme was seen 
in a contrasting light He was at 
the lime Erlander’s protege and 
principal adviser, and was already 
seen as his probable successor. But. 
some regarded him as a'disiurbing ■■ - ■ 
force who might undermine the 
balance established by the older 
generation. 

So when 1 went to see this 
youthful ogre, on the threshold of 
high office before the age of 40, 1 
was not prepared for a slight 
friendly, eager, rather intense man 
who relished the interplay of 
ideas.Subsequently I met him 
frequently, whether he was in or 
out of office. He certainly did not 
make himself available because he 
always agreed with what I wrote. 

I believe lhai he -enjoyed what . 
he regarded as the intellect urai 
sport of meeting foreign journal- 
ists. Confident in his debating 
skills, he fell in no danger of being 
caught out This made him one of 
the best leading politicians to 
interview that 1 have ever met. He 
was neither vain nor excessively 
cautions. To have taken refuge in 
the prerogatives of his office or to 
have said “no comment” would 
have seemed to him a confession 
of weakness. 

This occasionally led him into 
indiscretion, but I think it made 


Geoffrey Smith pays tribute to Olof Palme, 
silver-spoon socialist who combined 
private courtesy with public abrasiveness 

The enigma 
always ready 
to do battle 



over the years. It certainly made 
him an engaging one. I recall an 
occasion in Karlsrad during a 
general election campaign some 
years ago when, leaving his hotel 
dining room, he was approached 
by a young worker who had one 
arm' around his girl and draped the 
other around the prime minister’s 
shoulder as he engaged him in 
conversation. Palme was neither 
embarrassed nor condescending. 

Yet while the manner in private 
conversation could hardly have 
been more pleasant, those who 
saw Palme as a threat to the 
existing order were not mistaken. 
When he became prime minister 
in 1969 his party had been in 
office for 37 years and he was 
convinced that it was time to 
move on to a further stage of 
Social Democracy, beyond, the 
provision of prosperity and basic 


equality. 

Perhaps Eriander would have 
formed the same judgement had 
he remained in office. He was 
certainly more radical than was 
generally ' appreciated, and left- 
wing governments that hold office 
for a long time do fecea dilemma., 
■ff they do not change more and 
more they disappoint their more 
ardent supporters. But if they 
change too much they upset the 
wider electorate who prefer prag- 
matic rule. 

Palme had no difficulty in 
resolving that dilemma to his 
satisfaction. He chose the radical 
course. He was eager for Sweden 
to move on from a society where 
there was equality of opportunity 
to one where there was equality of 
results as well. 

But in doing so 'he was insensi- 
tive to the pressures of high 


taxation, the frustrations of bu- 
reaucracy and the mounting evi- 
dence of middle-class protest By 
the mid-1970s these discontents 
had reached -serious proportions 
and were one of the' principal 
■causes of the Social .Democrats’ 
electoral defeat in 1976. 

The party's difficulties were 
compounded by Palme's abrasive 
style of public debate, which 
contrasted with his private con- 
venation and was discomforting 
to the stolid Swedes. But the 
problems were inherent in the 
development of Swedish Social 
Democracy. 

Sweden was never the model of 
a modern society that it was once 
supposed to be. Its level . of direct 
taxation has for. years been too. 
high and its regulations too restric- 
tive, even though one must recog- 
nize that the Swedes are a 
com form i st people and may well 
find acceptable a degree of regula- 
tion that we would consider 
intolerable. But no society run 
indefinitely in defiance of its 
middle class can be an example to 
. ..... others. : — • ;■■■ 1 

‘ ■ j The :r SociaI ' Democrats- -have' 

n •'•-Jieeh back in govei»menc$£ the^ 
past three and a half yearn laigely. 
i through the failure .pErJhe^qon-J 
socialist parties to offer asattsfec-. 
toiy alternative. Their superior' 
organization and managerial pow- 
ers make them Sweden's natural 
governing parly. But the tensions 
remain within the country and the 
government 

In his later years Palme ap- 
peared to mellow, or perhaps it 
would be more accurate to say that 
he appreciated the political neces- 
sity of compromising more as his 
party's strength became uncertain. 
But- within the government .there 
was still, the ideological wing led 
by Palme, and ihe pragmatic wing 
represemed especially by the able 
and hardheaded finance minister, 
KjeH-OlofFeldt. 

The immediate effect of the 
assassination should be to streng- 
then the pragmatists simply be- 
cause the first priority must be to 
establish calm and to show that 
business is being conducted with 
practical good sense. Bui in the 
longer run this tension seems to 
me endemic within a natural 
governing party ‘of 'the left. It is 
bound to be tom' over a period of 
lime between the idealsof its more 
zealous members and the re- 
straints of public opinion. That 
will continue to be the case in 
Sweden. Bui if the pragmatists 
lose their influence then the Social 
Democrats will cease to be the 
natural party of government. 

It is for his private courtesy, his 
personal assurance and his sense 
of public service at. home and 
abroad, rather than for his poli- 
cies. that I wiji value the memory 
of Olbf Palme. ' . 


Anne Sofer 



Schooling: 
London thinks 


Regular readers of. this column 
will recall the tale I told some 
weeks ago about the MORI opin- 
ion poll -which the Inner London 
Education Authority partly mis- 
represented and partly suppressed. 
Since then events have moved on. 

MORI has written to me 
explaining that any misrepresenta- 
tions of its findings should be 
attributed entirely to the ILEA. 
And now, six months after my 
original query, I have been given 
permission to publish the true 
facts. Readers may wonder what 
possible justification there can 
have been for trying so long and so 
assiduously to keep them from the 
public eye! .. „ ' 

The two opinion polls carried 
cut by MORI in September 1984 
and January 1985, paid for by the 
ratepayers and used by the ILEA 
in its publicity campaign, dearly 
showed a majority of Londoners 
were against government-imposed 
cuts in the education budget: 53 
per cent strongly disapproving, 21 
per cent “tending to disapprove” 
(not -strongly disapproving, as 
claimed by Frances Morrell, the 
ILEA leader, at the time). 

But other interesting parts of 
both polls have remained unpub- 
licized. Questions were asked in 
the first poll about Londoners' 
perception of the quality of educa- 
tion, and in the second about their 
perception of how ILEA spends its 
money. Here support for the ILEA 
becomes more equivocal. Here are 
the figures on quality, showing a 
comparison of Inner and Outer 
London. 

Question: " From what you know, 
how would you describe the quality 
of state education in this area?" 


between high social 

dissatisfaction. 


Class AB 

Cl 

C2 

DE 


status and 


good - poor 

■ 41- • - 36 

42 37 

43 35 • 

33 46 

- is this because the inner London 
education service, after more than 
100 years of trying, has still not 
convinced working-class London- 
ers that education is for them? Or 
because a larger than normal 
proportion of DEs areold people 
who tend to have a dim. view of 
modern education? Or because 
most DEs are concentrated in 
areas in a downward economic 
spiral which reflects itself in local 
institutions? Fascinating ques- 
tions. worthy of further research. 

The other uncomfortable find- 
ings for Labour are those on 
spending. Despite public resis- 
tance to the idea of cuts, thes^r^s 
evidence of unease about the way 
it fa spends its money. Although 
56 per cent agree that “ILEA does 
the best it.can with the money it 
has available", when a slightly 
different question is asked, the 
majority becomes less certain. 
Asked if they agreed with the 
statement “ILEA could make 
significant cuts in its spending 
without damaging the quality of 
education it provides," 37 per cent 
agreed and 39 per cent disagreed- 
The Hass analysis on this point 
is particularly interesting. ABs and 
DEs unite in being more inclined 
to agree than disagree, but are 
outweighed by the combined force 
of the CIs and C2s. 


Inner 

London 


Outer 

London 


Class AB 

Agree ' 
41 

Disagree; 

Cl 

38 

42 

C2 

35 

44 

DE 

37 

35 


Excellent 
Very Good 
Fairly Good 
Fairly Poor 
Very Poor 
Terrible 
Don't Know 


* 

2 

9 

16 

29 

35 

18 

14 

14 

10 

8 

8 

21 

16 


To the statement that “ILEA 
wastes a lot of money," 3 1 percent 
agreed and 41 per cent disagreed — 
again an uncomfortably dose 
result And again, on both these 
questions those with a child at an 
ILEA school are more likely to 
support the ILEA position — 50 
percent and 52 per cent on the two 
questions respectively. 

The picture that emerges from 
these figures is one that should be 
both an encouragement and a 
challenge to ail those who believe 
in relatively high public spending 
on education and that the public 
services in inner cities are a 
potential force for good. J 

^ FW . WMI , There is widespread support ftrf* 

thought they were “fairly poor 1 or, maintaining, or increasing. levels 
worse): A starting result for the - of, spending on education and a 
Labour. Party, . however* is-: that, . giS^.indniatioQ to trust ILEA's. 
their voters are more likely than ' ndher'-.than 'the government's. 


Perhaps that is what you would 
expect in an inner dty area. It is 
possible to point to the large 
number of “don't knows”as an 
explanation of the low positive 
response; and also to take comfort 
from the fed that a larger propor- 
tion of parents with a child at an 
ILEA school, than of the popula- 
tion at large, thought the quality of 
state education was at least “fairly 
good”, (though 38 per cent 


Conservative or Alliance voters to 
-be'disSati^fietF'with the quality of 
akfiseduCatfon.' " ' ' • 

% saying % saying 


good poor 


Con 

Lab 

Alliance 


44 

39 

38 


37 

42 

34 


An analysis by class also seems 
to show an inverse relationship 


judgements in financial and 
educational matters. On the other 
han4 there is undoubted concern 
about quality and the way the 
money is spent 

Inner Londoners are willing to 
shell out for education, but they 
are not sure that what they have 
now is what they want or worth 
the money. 

The author is SDP member of the 
G LX? /ILEA for St Pancras North. 


Budget-cutters eye the Nato sacred cow 


Washington 

President Reagan's televized win- 
ter offensive designed to win 
public support for his increasingly 
unpopular military build-up may 
signal hard rimes ahead for Euro- 
pean defence programmes. . 

The first hard feet 1 is that 
Reagan's ■ $320 billion military 
budget for the next financial year 
is in trouble. The second is that 
the European contribution to 
Nato is being criticized as inad- 
equate — not only by a group of 
senior US senators but also by the 
public al large. 

In this uneasy political year, 
already- dubbed “the year of the 
budget" by political pollsters. 
America feces hard choices be- 
tween guns and butter. Both 
arouse strong emotions. 

Reagan recognised this when he. 
appeared on television to say “I 
need your help" to continue a five- 
year military build-up that would 
produce high quality equipment, 
the MX missile, the Trident, the 
B-l and stealth bombers. 

Jim Wnght, the majority leader 
of the House of Representatives, 
also recognized it when he gave 
the Democratic response: "We 
have enough weapons, to kill 
ourselves ten times over." At 
home. Wright said. Washington is 
threatening the brainpower of US 
citizens by cutting investment in 
education" lo pay the cost of war. 

The hard choices over budget 


priorities are resulting in harsh 
scrutiny of the big items that have 
so far remained immune from the 
long arms of budget cutters. Of 
these. Nato is a prime target. 

One study after another in 
recent months has taken aim at 
Nato as a “huge sacred cow" that 
can no longer be fed by American 
taxpayers. The notion that Amer- 
ica is a “rich Uncle Sam" who has 
continued to pav an estimated 
$120 billion to $170 billion an- 
nually to defend Europe does not 
go down well with a middle class 
faced with unprecedented cuts in 
loans to pay for university educa- 
tion for its children. 

It is also clear that sentiment is 
building in both political parties 
against the continued, largely 
unquestioned build-up of Nato 
begun in tKe raid- 1 0 80s. 

Until recently; Nato has been a 
foreign concept, something out of 
reach to a US public whose 
memories of the Second World 
War and Cold War have receded 
into a vounger. contemporary 
maze of different problems. Over 
the past year, public attention has 
been galvanized by a series of 
studies pointing out the big 
proportion of US tax dollars 
targeted for European defence 
programmes. 

The non-partisan Government 
Accounting Office reported that 
56 per cent of l!S defence spend- 
ing has been allocated to Europe in 
recent years. Gar Alperovitz. au- 


thor of Atomic Diplomacy, es- 
timated that 6.6 per cent of total 
US income has been devoted to 
defence spending, compared with 
only 3.9 per cent among European 
Nato members. 

Last week, a study carried out 
by the New York Times reported 
that two-thirds of all US troops 
serving overseas are based in 
Europe and that Americans pay 
for 25 per cent of all Nato's tanks, 
compared to 20 per cent a few 
sears ago. The economic argu- 
ment is beginning to take hold. 

What does all this mean to a 
country that fears the Soviet 
military threat but does not see 
itself as a nation “under the 
Russian bear's nose"? It means, in 
the words of the Former T reasury 
Secretary. William Simon, that 
Americans increasingly find that 
“our Nato contributions are far 
out of proportion". 

Senator Sam Nunn of Georgia 
tried to make this point dramati- 
cally in 1984 when he attached an 
amendment to the 1985 defence 
authorization bill which required 
the withdrawal of 90.000 Ameri- 
can troops from Europe unless 
European nations increased their 
own defence spending. 

The amendment was defeated 
but the senator, a Democrat and a 
strong supporter of Nato. made 
his point. Since then, others have 
joined the chorus of senators, 
among them the former Secretary 
of Stale. Henry Kissinger, and 


former National Security Adviser, 
Zbigniew Brzezinski. who have 
urged new approaches in Europe. 

This does not mean that Con- 
gress is about - to demand a 
unilateral withdrawal of US 
troops from Europe .or that efforts 
to modernize Nato will begreatlv 
reduced. Irdoes mean that Ameri- 
cans are beginning to listen closely 
to a ground swell of proposals to 
alter the US relationship with 
Nato — a relationship begun in 
1950 when the Russian threat to 
western Europe was strong and the 
United States was a rich nation, 
not a nation strapped by a $200 
billion deficit. 

Alperovitz. for example, has 
proposed a budget-cutting pro- 
gramme to Congress to reduce the 
US contribution by up to $20 bil- 
lion a year. Even then, he main-* 
tains, the US would still be 
shouldering more of the cost than 
Britain and West Germany com- 
bined. Others have proposed the 
unilateral withdrawal of forces 
from Europe. 

The point is that in these times 
of hard choices, many Americans 
want Europeans to do more. 
Robert Komer. defence under- 
secretary for policy during the 
Carter administration, fears there 
is a danger oflosing control of this 
growing opinion, which could 
strengthen isolationist sentiment. 

Bailey Morris 


moreover . . . Miles Kington 

Get your free 
serf here 


1986 is the 900th anniversary of 
the publication of the Domesday 
Book. Yes, that's right - 900 
years ago the bookshops of Eng- 
land were stacked with copies of 
the Domesday Book, the fore- 
runner of the Gallup Poll, the first- 
ever nationwide survey. Buy a 
copy and see how many sheep 
your neighbour has. You can’t 
afford to be without Domesday 
Database — Expanding in the 
north? Gel Domesday and study 
your market] 

That was the idea. It didn't 
really work, of course. The world 
was riot ready for the prototype of 
the Yellow Pages, because people 
in Worples-Ie-Fold were not really 
interested in how many plumbers 
and builders’ merchants there 
were in Lower Pig’s Froth. The 
Domesday Book did not selL 
Three copies in 25 years. It isn't a 
lot. is it? 

But now, 900 years later, things 
are different. Now we have mass 
marketing, and a fesci mile copy of 
the Domesday Book will go 'like 
hot cakes, won't it? 

Well, no. it won't It was boring 
then and it is boring now. We are 
already, two months mio 1986, 
and not a single reprint of the 
Domesday Book has hit the 
bookstalls, not so that you would 
notice. There must be good' rea- 
sons for this. 

One reason is that the original 
compilers of the Domesday Book 
did not ask the right questions. 
There they were, with access to all 
the households of England, and 
they could have asked all the 
burning questions that pollsters 
now like to ask. such as: . 

Do you think William I is doing 
a good/bad job? 

If there was an election now, 
would you vote Progressive Nor- 
man. Conservative Saxon, Brine 
back the Vikings? ^ 

Do you think that Norman 
architecture is good/bad/a car- 
buncle on society/too mod- 
em/quitc good, but rather cold in 
winter? 

Do you think that chastity belts 
should be made compulsory? 

But lhey didn't. They asked 
questions like: 

How many sheep have you got? 

• How many cows? 

Well, what have you got, then? 


No wonder the Domesday Book 
is a boring read. And no wonder 
that publishers, faced with tire last 
. anniversary before 2086, have 
shrunk before the prospect of 
investing thousands of pounds in 
a reprint which might again sell no 
more than three copies. What thr ' 
have been waiting for is a pui> 
iisher who would take the daring 
risk of bringing the Domesday 
Book up to date. 

That publisher is Moreover 
Books Ltd. We have put all! the 
racts from the Domesday Book on 
the computer, and we are now 
preparing a new edition which will 
incorporate all the old-fects. 'plus 
your address. That’s right If-you 
subscribe to our Domesday Book, 
.your address and details will 
automatically be included Say, 
tor instance, that you live at 127 
Kelvedon Road, Colchester, then 
your edition of the Domesday 
Book will read as follows: 

• Kelvedon Manor; 10' sheep, iJ 
5P WS ’ a S oa L on 17 acres with 
three serfs thereto appertaining. 

• 127 Kelvedon Road, 1 dog, 2 

cats ,<Mimsy and. Geldof), 1 gold- 

ttsn, dahlias and. chrysanthe- 
mums, also leeks 'and spinach 
weather permitting, on 1/3 acre, 
no retainers except Mrs ThrelfelL 
the cleaning lady (Tuesdays and 
Thursdays), also a black cat 
pennies from next door. 

. yoarcopy of the Domes- 
Jj-X ?ooh will have these details. It 
wm be a book you can leave with 
J™_ H on * e li.vingroom table, 
opened at the right page. LooJ- . 

ift XaiJse o ^ y cbmput- 
SttJSar* Domesday Book 
wilUnclude everyone -who buys a 

But you must hurry to aet 
J2SJS- 1 ? C,uded - W? .aim *5 
all -■ ,u P e ' ^ must have 

SiltSSf? by end of March. 

y « SeiM L your domestic details 
£\ 00b U S her a cheque for 

S^ 0 ^v£ cannal50f£n « iisl «' 

,„5 )rry ’ ^ ‘his offer does not 
Irefend* JEW? ,ivin ® * n Scotland, 
any mb **** of Wales or 

SE ° lher region which remained 
“"conquered by 1086. 

You vUif he Yellow Pa S es for 1086! 

• ou will never gel another chance. 


t 



*f;V ' 






THE TIMES MONDAY MARCH 3 1986 


straet > Uodon El- Tataphont 01 401 4100 



Grand gestures of 
great generators 


great generators ofmytl? do “ inaled ,- b y is a solid grass-roots militancy 

"XS? readytopress an aU-out strike. 


1 • to be propagated about today's 
stoppage in Northern Ireland 
. , ‘ is that it somehow settles the 
; question of the Anglo-Irish 
. agreement. It can do no such 
thing. 

There win no doubt be 
- argument over exactly how 
• much was stopped' for how 
; long and whether bv intimida- 
tion or by free choice. The 
government will point to its 
patchiness and to the strategic 


apologists. British public 
opinion sees, again, the spec- 
tacle of unionism setting out to 

destroy what British govern- 
ments have tentatively buih. It 
is not. a sight calculated to win 
support for the unionist case 
among the m ainlan d elec- 
torate.' 

It- must be open to'qiiestion 


and tactical confusion among n f“»bers of people to tala risks 
unionist politicians. The strike 5^ theirliveiihood to destroy 


t! { • 




An 

i i 

s,r- • .•* 


i ‘Ct 

TV 


"'rii. 




% 


organizers will point to the 
depth and breadth of their. 
-' support and hint , that an 
indefinite stoppage would 
; force the’ government to meet 
their demand for the complete' 
.‘abandonment of • the' 
' Hillsborough treaty. 

■ A single day strike, although 
attracting a great deal of 
- attention, cannot answer the 
key question: how far or how 
. many members of the Prot- 
, estant majority are ready to go 
'■on testing the government’s 
• will power?. Today, many of 
them can stay at home, shut 
..iheir.shop, take their tractor to 
a roadblock without fear of 
...serious consequences. What 
'proportion of them would be 
ready to do the same indefi- 
nitely? Since the conditions of 
1986 are not the^santoas those 
of 1 974. when a strike brought 
down the power-sharing exec- 
utive, there can be no precise 
answer in advance. 

But the hesitant attitude of 
some unionist politicians, and 
. of the Reverend Ian Paisley of 
the Democratic Unionists in . 
particular; may provide a clue. 
Dr Paisley, for all his im- 
•placable bluster, has seemed . 
curiously reluctant to force the 
issue as early as this — until he, 

; and the Official Unionists’ Mr 
James Molynerux. were pushed 
into it last week,. 

In 1 986, the unionists axe set 
to confront a Conservative . 
Party, secine jn. government- 
which . feels less sympathy for ; 
unionism than it did a dozen'..' 
years ago. That, sympathy is- . 
further diminished.- /the more . 


then the government will face 
thestiffest test immediately. 

But the Official Unionists* 
insistence on trying to leave 
the door to talks open shows 
that they know they may have 
.rejected too much too soon. 
They are vulnerable to the 
argument — which ministers 

. should impress upon them — 

whether ' the Hillsborough _* that they are trying to end an 
agreement has become enough ‘ agreement that holds benefits 
of a target to persuade large and opportunities which they 

had not even tested, let alone 
enjoyed. 

Unionism is more heteroge- 
neous than sometimes ap- 
pears. It is divided by class, 
between two mutually 
mistrustful political parties, by 
differences of Protestant doc- 
trine and over the ultimate 
aim of its political negotiations 
with governments in London. 
Moderate unionists continue 
to be nervous about finding 
themselves manoeuvred into 
the cul-de-sac of UDI. Ex- 
tremist politicians can create 
an atmosphere in which it is 
impossible for moderates to be 
heard But that is not necessar- 
ily the same as a climate in 
which hundreds of thousands 
of people will be prepared to 
paralyse the life of the Prov- 
ince for weeks on end. 

But if that is what it does 
come to, the government’s 
stance will need to switch from 
explanation to assertion of its 
control of essential services. It 
would be guilty of gross ir- 
responsibility if it had em- 
barked on tbe activities of the 
last few months without tbe 
capacity to defend itself 
against the* ultimate unionist 
sanction. This more aggressive 
pose would be represented as 
the oppression of a democratic 
majority for unworthy ends; it 
would be the execution of 
Parliament’s decision in the 
face of opposition from a 
minority within the United 
Kingdom. There is no better 


iL # In 1974 there was a new 
local government, administer- 
ing services alongside plans for 
a “Council of Ireland”. This 
time there is a- treaty, a barely 
visible secretariat and occa- 
sional communiques. Only, 
certain causes wifi mobilize 
unionist reaction. 

In 1977 Dr Paisley’s boom- 
ing strike call in favour of 
tougher security was humiliat- 
ingly ignored by bis own 
community. Twelve years ago 
the level of terrorist violence, 
and the accompanying fear 
and insecurity was far higher 
than now. More troops are 
today available to tbe govern- 
ment for strike-breaking. 
Last2y,tbere are the personal- 
ities at Downing Street In 
1974, unionists dealt with Mr 
Heath, distracted and then 
defeated by the miners, fol- 
lowed by Mr Harold Wilson 
(as he then was). They now 
face Mrs Thatcher. 

None of these changes, by 
itself - guarantees that . the 
Hillsborough agreement will 
survive, but taken together 
they offer a hope, that the 
government will feel secure 
enough to call the unionists' 
bluff. The volatile flux of 
personalities and tactical 
disagreements which charac- 
terizes the various umbrella 
organizations promoting the 
strike is evidence enough that 
the. real strength of opposition 


to the agreement cannot yet be ... . recruiting sergeant for. terrorist 
measured.- If the signs^ and the % - organizations than ? . a ; British 


rise of Dr Paisley’s deputy, Mr 
Rpbmson, at the front of 
the hardlinersrshow that there 


-government that cannot make 
its; own -political initiatives 
work. “ T * * * *' . 


BACK TO BASICS 


r* # * 


V / : ' * ; £ 






Vi: 


As the teachers' dispute has 
dragged on, some people have 
been tempted to depict Mr 
• Fred Jarvis, General Secretary 
of the main combatant union, 
the National Union of Teach- 
ers. in demoniacal .terms. 
Some, even more fancifully, 
have made comparisons with 
Mr Scargill. Events over the 
past few days might seem to 
have endorsed that view. 

At a very late stage in 
negotiations, long after the 
other teacher unions had sig- 
nalled their acceptance of a 
formula worked out in ACAS 
. and secured their members’ 
. adherence to it, Mr Jarvis has 
threatened to bring the entire 
temple of a negotiated settle- 
ment down around their ears, 
i The NUT has gone to lawyers 
.v and now claims that the very 
institution on which any settle- 
ment has to be based, the 
statutory Burnham negotiating 
committee, cannot legally refer 
1 to or even mention the essence 
; of the agreement on assess- 
ment of teachers and therr 

• - terms of work. Burnham meets 

. later today in a mood of 
confusion and rancour. 

• ; The view of Mr Jarvis as a 

■ wrecker is wrong. He is merely 
a union official like others, 

: worried about ambitious fel- 
. low officials aid about pofiii- 
: cal balance among his lay 
members. Like other public 
> sector unionists he rarely has 
lime to worry about the public. 
But this weekend, Mr Jarvis 

■ has done a service. His inter- 
‘ vention and threat of lawyers 
.. is apathy. There is a gross flaw 

.in the very# constitution of 
Burnham, something that has 
been obvious for years and 
something about which the 
government and Sir Keith 
;■ Joseph have been entirely 

Peace in Cyprus 

From the London Representative 
‘ * of the Turkish Republic of North- 
ern Cyprus ■ * ■ 

" Sir; Contrary w wftai your leader 
(February 1*) suggests, ii was nor 
Mr Dentals who c a use d the 

• breakdown of ifeeL r N initiative or 
January. 1 985. nor has it been the 
Turkish Cypriot leader who has 
.discouraged the. right kind o* 

: climate for progress, 
i • in a leader on March 2. t9S> 
CA Greek error). The Tunes 
. commented that Mr Kypnanou 
expressed “reservations 

• qualifications about every potm 

- m the January document which 
“Mr Denktas was ready* to sign . 

• and* that “For his blunder, the 
‘President (Mr Kyprianpn) was 


complacent. By law, Burnham 
is about salaries. For genera- 
tions teachers’ conditions of 
service have hardly been 
talked about, let alone talked 
about within the coniines of 
the committee where pay is 
considered. A legal verdict in 
the NUTs favour will, at long 
last, force the government to 
revise the Remuneration of 
Teachers Act 

Mr Jarvis has done more. 
Throughout the dispute he has 
displayed consistency. He 
wants more money for teach- 
ers and he wants it without 
strings. His union, represent- 
ing a large number, does not 
want assessment, grading, or 
lightened contracts- They 
want, in short, the old ir- 
responsibility with new levels 
of pay. 

There is tbe major issue of 
the dispute. Not the only issue: 
it parallels the question of the 
relative adequacy of teachers’ 
remuneration and the implied 
low value put on their work by 
their pay levels. But it is the 
issue that has to be settled, 
sooner or later. 

According to the ACAS 
formula, it may be later. An 
agreement in Burnham will 
only lead to talks in another 
committee, the Council of 
Local Education 

Authorities/School Teachers 
Committee. So Mr Jarvis's 
intransigence dramatises ono? 
again the reason why this , 
dispute has lingered, at such. 
cost 7 to the day-to-day conve- 
nience of parents and with 
such harmful consequences to 
the reputation of publicly- 
maintained schools, individ- 
ually and collectively. 

There are those, parents and 
policy-makers, who at this 


stage simply wish the dispute 
could be ended. What progress 
can be made on the new 
examinations at 16-plus. What 
. progress on that vexed im- 
balance in teaching numbers 
in physics and mathematics, 
or craft, design and technol- 
ogy, what movement in the 
schools to parallel the 
reorganisation of education 
and training for 16-18 year 
olds being accomplished by 
the Manpower Services 
Commission ... all depend on a 
new and better definition of 
the teacher’s job and perfor- 
mance. 

Educational progress does 
not just require an end to 
disruption of classes, lunch- 
times and parents’ evenings. It 
hinges on reform of the con- 
tent of teachers' work. That 
reform may take time, give 
and take in negotiation in 
CLEA and other forums. But it 
is the precondition of forward 
movement in education pol- 
icy. Mr Jarvis's opposition 
crystalises the point 

Burnham today feces sundry 
obstacles. The local education 
authorities naturally want re- 
assurance that before new 
money is paid over, tbe teach- 
ers will perform their jobs as 
agreed. The National Associ- 
ation of Schoolmasters/Union 
of Women Teachers wants to 
know tbe status of disciplinary 
measures the local authorities 
are (rather late in the day) 
taking in some districts. But 
these are minor. Thanks to Mr 
Jarvis, the dispute has been re- 
focused. The essential issue is 
the intimacy of extra money 
and reform of conditions of 
service. Until these are linked 
there should be no basis for 
settlement 


LETTERS TO THE EDITOR 


Backward look at better English 


From Mr David Gadsby 

Sir, Professor EH. Brown and 
oiheis (Febraary 25) “are con- 
cerned at the near collapse in our 
schools’ teaching of syntax of 
English”. They repeat many of the 
assertions which were made to die 
Bullock Committee of Inquiry 
into tbe Use of English, whose 
report was published in 1975. May 
I, however, refer them to the 
opening of that report? 

In any anxiety over a contemporary 
situation there is likely to be a 
wistful look back to the past, with a 
conviction, ofien illusory, that times 
were better then than now. And the 
times people claim to have been 
better are generally within the span 
of their own lives. 

The report went on to quote 
evidence given to the Newbolt 
committee in 1921, where VickeTS 
reported “great difficulty in 
obtaining junior clerks who can 
speak and write English dearly 
and correctly”; Lever Bros said 

it is a great surprise and disappoint- 
ment to us to find that our young 
employees are so hopelessly de- 
ficient in their command of 
English'"; and Boots Pure Drug Co. 
remarked that the "leaching of 
English in the present day schools 
produces a very limited command of 
the English language. 

Have Professor Brown and his 
colleagues any objective evidence 
for their assertion that tbe present- 
day school-leaver has a worse 
command of English than those 
school-leavers who were so criti- 
cized by Vickers. Lever Bros and 
Bools? The Bullock committee 
found no such evidence. It did, 
however, say that “standards of 
reading and writing need to be 
raised to fulfil the increasingly 
exacting demands made on them 


is 


by modem society" — which 
quite another matter. 

Yours faithfullv. 

DAVID GADSBY (Member, 
Bullock committee), 

Joint Managing Director, 

A & C Black (Publishers) Limited. 
35 Bedford Row. WC1. 

From Professor John Honey 
Sir, The biggest obstacle to the 
leaching of a more serviceable 
form of English (as recommended 
by the engineering professors. 
Febraary 25) is the limitations of 
knowledge among the teachers 
themselves. 

Reforms in the syllabus of 
teacher education courses in re- 
cent years have helped matters. 
But it is all too common to find 
class teachers who are not able to 
explain to pupils how language 
works, or even how to handle 
basic grammatical terminology. 

They are mostly products of 
that long era when the myth 
prevailed that the teaching of 
formal grammar produced no 
demonstrable improvements in 
pupils’ writing. Research is expos- 
ing that myth, but its ill effects 
have been compounded by the 
virtual disappearance of Latin 
from most schools and the present 
decline in the teaching of French 
and other modern languages, 
which at least gave pupils a general 
understanding of how language 
works. 

Any realistic campaign to im- 
prove English language teaching in 
schools and in higher education 
would require extensive retraining 
of teachers which, to be effective, 
would have to be both compulsory 
and tested. 

Yours faithfully. 

JOHN HONEY. 

5 Woods Close, 

Oadby, Leicester. 


Thinking big* 


From Lord Balfour of Burleigh 
Sir, Sir John Hoskyns is right in 
saying (February 20) that anyone 
interested in the Government’s 
policy towards BL should read 
David Watt’s article of February 
14, which deals with all foreign 
industrial investment into this 
country. 

Having picked my way through 
various targets vigorously at- 
tacked by Sir John, I hope I 
understand him correctly in 
advocating a free-marketing econ- 
omy. 

David Watt, in reporting his 
discussions with bankers and 
industrialists, moves- forward 
from acceptance* of a free market' 
in practice to the very important 
conclusion that Britain's .interests 
in the case of inward investment 
are best safeguarded if those who 
make the corporate decisions live 
in this country. Those who have 
run companies overseas in this 
way will know how important this 
is both to the company itself and 
to the host country. 


Even with this safeguard there 
can,, of course, be no guarantee 
that unpopular decisions may not 
be taken, but a healthy economy 
needs the cross-fertilisation pro- 
vided by investment in new 
methods and technology both 
inward into this country and 
outward from it 

Instead of suggesting that the 
bankers and industrialists whose 
interests he is charged with 
representing are con/used. Sir 
John should awake from his 
dreams of unfettered frce-marfcez 
ideology, and use the influence of 
his institute with Government to 
secure one of the most important 
controls they might reasonably 
insist upon in tbe case of major 
acquisitions, namely the residence 
in.- this country of the derision-, 
makers. .* ' ' 

Yours faithfully, 

BALFOUR OF BURLEIGH, 

The Turing Institute. 

George House, 

36 North Hanover Street 
Glasgow. 

February 22. 


Obscenity and law 

From the President of the National 
Viewers' and Listeners’ Associ- 
ation 

Sir, In view of the personalised 
nature of your leader writer’s 
attack (February 24), may I make 
it clear that the so-called “laundry 
list” of perverted sexual practices 
was no part of the Bill we offered 
to Mr CburchilL Our Bill was 
concerned, first, to make a reality 
of the unfulfilled intention of 
Parliament “to strengthen the law 
on pornography” with the Ob- 
scene Publications Act (1959). 

We proposed, first, that the 
clause “a tendency to deprave and 
corrupt” be replaced by one which 
provided for the judgement of “a 
reasonable aduh at the time that 
person first reads, hears or sees the 
matter concerned”. And secondly, 
our Bill would have removed the 
exemption within the present Act 
which excludes broadcasting from 
any charge under its provisions. 

It may also be of interest to your 
readers to know that we asked the 
Director of Public Prosecutions to 
institute proceedings, under tbe 
Broadcasting Act, against the 1BA 
for -allowing the transmission of 
the two films Jubilee and 
Sebastiane. 

In his reply (February 17) the 
Director states that in view of “the 
exemption provided by the Ob- 
scene Publications Act,” and the 
feet that the breach of the duty 


imposed by the Broadcasting Act 
1981 “does not create a criminal 
offence” be is of the view that “the 
criminal law cannot be invoked” 
in this matter. 

Yours faithfullv, 

MARY WHITEHOUSE, 
President, National Viewers* and 
Listeners’ Association, 

Ardleigh, 

Colchester, 

Essex. 

February 24. 

From the Controller of BBC I 
Sir, Mr Winston Churchill’s letter 
(February 27), in which he quotes 
from a private conversation, mis- 
represents my position on his 
proposed amendments to the Ob- 
scene Publications (1959) Act 

He bas ignored the context of 
my remarks. 1 told him that if 
Parliament was determined to 
enact the legislation in this area, 
broadcasters could, in the last 
resort, live with the original 1959 
test of obscenity slightly more 
comfortably than with his damag- 
ing “Laundry list”. 

Mr Churchill’s subtle implica- 
tion is that 1 support broadcasting 
being brought under the 1959 
Obscene Publications Acl I do 
not 

Yours faithfully. 

MICHAEL GRADE 
Controller, BBC1. 

BBC Television Centre. 

Wood Lane. WI2. 

February 28. 


justly censured by an admittedly 
heterogeneous majority in the 
Greek Cypriot parliament, com-, 
posed of his pro-Nato rival, .Mr. 
Glafcos Klerides on tbe one band. 
and on the other of Communists • 
Similar points were made at the 
time . by other leading inter- 
national papers, mdudrng The 
Economist and the Wall Street 
Journal. 

Moreover, the pditiral Irader- 
ship in Athens and the Greek 
Cvpriot leaders in Cyprus have 
hailed the-wisdom and acceptabil- 
ity of the recent “Soviet 
proposals” on Cyprus.^ This .is 
Tan tam ount to a total rejection of 
all basic accords previously 
reached at various summit meet- 
ings between’ Turkish and Greek 


Cvpriot leaders since 1974. ft also 
constitutes a fundamental diver- 
gence from the UN Secretary 
General's basic framework to 
settle the Cyprus problem. 

The Greek Prime Minister, Mr 
Phpandreou, who has his own axe 
to grind over the Aegean dispute 
between Turkey and Greece, ap- 
pears to encourage Mr Kypnanou 
to keep the dispute alive in the 
hope that this will continue to be a 
source of international pressure 
on Turkey. And that is a big 
obstacle to durable peace in 
Cyprus. 

Yours faithfully, 

TANSEL FIKRL 
London Representative. 

Turkish Republic of Northern 
Cyprus. 

28 CockspurStnsez, SWL 


Oil price question 

From Professor Emeritus John 
Fremlin 

1 find David Hall's assumption 
(February 21) that the present 
drop in oil prices should deter- 
mine CEGB policy on Sizewell 
almost incredibly shortsighted. 
Tbe world's oil is very limited and 
when the present glut has been 
used the finding and exploitation 
of new supplies, with the in- 
evitable increase in world popula- 
tion and consequently of demand, 
must inevitably be more expen- 
sive than ever before. Any North 
Sea oil that we can save now will 
be worth several times as much in 
a decade or so’s time. 

If the Sizewell power station is 
built it will be working for two or 
three decades into next century. 
when any oil that we can save now 
an be an export of enormous 
value; and the coal that is then 
saved will be available for the 
production of the liquid or gas- 
eous feel that we shall vitally need 
when the oil runs out 

Yours faithfully. 

JOHN FREMUN. 

46 Vernon Road, 

Edgbaston. 

Birmingham. 

February 22. 


Traitors in 1940 

From Sir John Winnifrith 
Sir, My former colleague, Hugh 
Gardner, recalls in his letter 
(February 22) his successful trans- 
port of the sheep on Romney 
Marsh in the invasion scare of 
1940. For this operation he de- 
serves great credit, (though what 
happened to all the cattle left 
behind to be slaughtered by the 
Germans?) 

The War Office, however, get no 
credit if what they told the 
Ministry of Agriculture describes 
their plan to deal with a German 
invasion of South-east England by 
breaching the embankments and 
flooding Romney Marsh. 

This had indeed been the plan 
favoured by George ill in 1794. 
The list or 22 farmers here in 
Appfedore, their wagons and their 
orders for the route they were to 
follow into the Weald still survive. 
The same plan was dusted and 
handed to the GOG General Sir 
David Dun das, when, in 1804, 
Napoleon was mustering his 
Arm£e d’ Angleterre and prepar- 
ing his landing craft in all the 
adjoining creeks and harbours. 

The general sent his staff officer 
for field works. Lt Col John 
Brown, to “recce” ihe marsh. He 
speedily discerned that it was 
impossible to flood the marsh by 


letting in the sea. It needed three 
or four high tides to flood even 
pan of it and most of the water 
that came in on the flood returned 
to the sea on the ebb. 

The general scrapped the plan 
and adopted Col Brown's alter- 
native of building the Royal 
Military Canal, with Col Twiss's 
Martello towers defending the 
coast The canal, though also a 
useful defence line, was primarily 
to provide rapid transport of men 
and munitions to whatever point 
was threatened by invading 
troops. 

If my col league's report of what 
the War Office told him in 1940 is 
a true reflection of their defence 
plan, they had failed to study Col 
Brown’s conclusions or to gel 
proper advice about the possibility 
of flooding the marsh. The Ger- 
mans did better. Their invasion 
pfan (in the Imperial War Mu- 
seuml provided for a parachute 
drop behind Hythe and a number 
of landings along the coasL Even a 
flooded marsh would have been 
no problem. Access to a harbour 
would have been much more 
difficult. 


Success story of 
the vicuna 

From the Hon President of the 
Peruvian Zoological Society 
Sir. 1 would like to pay tribute to 
the World Wildlife Fund for its 
help in saving the vicufta from 
extinction. This gentle member of 
the cameioid family lives in the 
Andes of .Argentina. Bolivia. Chile 
and Peru. It produces the finest 
wool in the world, but unfortu- 
nately its golden fleece makes it an 
attrartive prey to the poacher. 

In 1962 lan MacPhail, Inter- 
national Campaigns Director of 
' the fund, arranged for the Ministry 
of Overseas Development to send 
the distinguished conservationist. 
Major lan Grirawood. on a two- 
year study, which resulted in a 
blueprint on which all Peruvian 
conservation laws and national 
parks arc based. He suggested that 
there were about 5,000 vicuna left 
in Peru and 5.000 to be found in 
the other three Andean countries. 

Acting on his advice, reserves 
were established, guard-posts were 
constructed and what followed is 
one of the greatest conservation 
success stories in the last 50 years. 
The Peruvian population was 
increased to J 00.000 and total 
population within the habitat 
range is now something like 
140.000. 

Two years ago it was found 
possible to capture and shear the 
vicuna (as the Incas did) and 
translocate them over long dis- 
tances to other suitable areas on 
the basis of not having all the 
golden eggs in one basket. 

ft is hoped in the not too distant 
future that cloth woven from 
sheared Jive vicuna bearing proper 
identification marks will be on 
legal sale on the luxury markets of 
Europe, thus benefiting both the 
viduna and the local peasant. 

Last year the President con- 
ferred the highest honour in Peru 
- the Orden del Sol del Peru — on 
Ian MacPhail for his services to 
conservation in Peru over the past 
23 years. He is the fust naturalist 
ever to receive iL 

In a recent letterto me the Duke 
of Edinbuigh said, “ft is encourag- 
ing to know that the Peruvian 
Government is willing to reward 
those who work for conservation”. 

I would also like to express our 
heartfelt thanks to Great Britain 
for its help and support in the past. 
Yours faithfully. 

FELIPE BENAVIDES, 

Hon President. 

Peruvian Zoological Society, 

335 Avenida El Golf Los ftikas. 
Moniemco, 

Lima, 

Peru. . . 

February 21. 


Tax anomaly 

From Mr John F. Avery Jones 
Sir. Mr Tester (February 26) is a 
little unfair in suggesting that 
whether more than one acre of 
garden is exempt from capital 
gains tax depends on the whim of 
a particular district valuer. In feet, 
the additional area is the amount 
the special or general commis- 
sioners (independent appeal bod- 
ies) are satisfied, having regard to 
the size and character of the house, 
is required for the reasonable 
enjoyment of the residence. 

Since the criteria are laid down, 
a taxpayer wil be able to obtain 
advice on the likely result if he 
took an appeal to the commis- 
sioners. 

Yours faithfully. 

J. F. AVERY JONES, 

Bouverie House. 

1 54 Fleet Street, EC4. 

February 26. 

All-rounder 

From Mr A. .4. Mon 
Sir. Can anyone better my total of 
18 jobs, all with different employ- 
ers — page boy, errand boy, lift 
attendant, waiter, bar-ceilarman. 
dining-car attendant, dairy 
worker, gas-board fitter, 
electrician’s mate, stage artiste, 
farm-hand, clerk, rent collector. 
Regular soldier, handyman, 
painter, fomaceman, laundry 
hand? 

No. I never owned a bike! 

Yours faithfully, 

A A. MORT. 

4 Denison Road. 

Leeds. West Yorkshire. 



ON THIS DAY 


MARCH 3 1958 

In traversing the Antarctic the 
British team led by Dr Vivian 
Fuchs had the support of a New 
Zealand one led by Sir Edmund 
Hilltuy. A waiting Dr Fuchs ’s 
arrival was a telegram from 
Downing Street announcing the 
conferment of a knighthood upon 
him. The expedition's triumph 
was one which had been denied 
another great explorer. Sir Ernest 
Shackkton, whose imperial 
expedition of 1914 met disaster 
when his ship the Endurance teas 
crushed in pack ice. 


TRANS- 
ANTARCTIC 
EXPEDITION 

From Our Special 
Correspondent 

SCOTT BASE, March 2 

Dr. Vivien Fuchs, leader of the 
Trans-Antarctic Expedition, and 
his party reached Scott Base to- 
day, completing their journey 
across the continent — the first to 
be accomplished — in 99 days. 
They left Shackleton base. 2J200 
miles away, on November 24. 

Anns (hiked. Dr. Fuchs and Sir 
Edmund Hillary stepped from the 
ice of Antarctica on to the snowy 
shore of Ross Island at 1.47pm. Dr. 
Fuchs and his men brought their 
vehicles to the final halt within 
sight of a memorial to another 
Englishman whose name will al- 
ways be part of Antarctica. Above 
the party, on the top of Observa- 
tion Hill, stands the cross to the 
memory of Robert Falcon Scott 
and his four companions. . Its 
inscription reads: “To strive, to 
seek, to find, and not to yield.” 
AIMING POINT 
When he left his last camp this 
morning. Dr. Fuchs had the blunt 
pinnacle of Castle Rock on Ross 
Island sharply on his horizon, more 
than 20 miles away. He steered for 
this until tbe jagged black shadows 
and gleaming white faces of an 
icefall on the Scott Base side of 
Castle Rock gave him an aiming 
point more directly in the line of 
the mark which stood at the head 
of the final route home: an aircraft 
windsock, with its pole thrust into 
an empty petrol drum, billowing 
out 10ft. above the snowv ground... 
FLUTTERING FLAGS 
Churning out of this little area of 
ski-resort loveliness, tbe. Sno-cats 
ran along the partly prepared light 
aircraft landing strip now bull- 
dozed by the Americans here, and 
came at last within sight of Scott 
Base itself. Up on tbe hill above the 
parked aircraft and the lines of 
base stores and Ibe huge mound of 
freshly cut seal meat. Dr. Fuchs 
and his men saw the first of the 
lemon and red Scott Base build 
ings. And high on the hill flew the 
Union -Tack. 

All their flags fluttering, the four 
Sno-cats were hemmed in at once 
by the camera-clicking men from 
Scott Base and from the American 
base at Hut Point. Very pistols 
shot up coloured charges in noisy 
welcome. Looking almost dazed in 
the face of the excitement around 
him. Dr. Fuchs, wearing his black 
helmet, his white polo-necked 
sweater, his blue windbreaker trou- 
sers. and red-thonged soft leather 
footwear, climbed out of the cabin 
of the leading vehicle with Sir 
Edmund Hillary. “A piece of cake.” 
was their comment. The American 
band played as the explorers 
mounted the hill... 

Dr. Fuchs was handed a sheaf of 
congratulatory telegrams which 
had already begun to come in. and 
he disappeared into the radio room 
to send his own messages out. A 
few minutes later he began a news 
conference with the representa- 
tives here from newspapers and 
broadcasting services in all parts of 
the world. 

Dr. Fuchs and Sir Edmund 
Hillary arrived at Scott Base in a 
completely amicable relationship. 
They are now — as they have been 
all along — two men able to discuss 
opposing views without losing 
their balance or their respect for 
each other. The former controver- 
sy (which was not of their making) 
gives added point to their linking 
of arms when the job they set out to 
do was finished. 

Each man had the courage of his 
convictions. After Sir Edmund 
Hillary had made his recommenda- 
tion that the journey should be 
abandoned at the Pole, and Dr. 
Fuchs bad declined to accept this 
recommendation, their partner- 
ship went ahead in all respects as 
before. In spite of his own doubts 
about being on the plateau so late 
in tbe season, and accepting the 
possibility that he might be caught 
for the winter. Sir Edmund Hillary 
joined Dr. Fuchs at Depot 700 to 
give the party the benefit of his 
local knowledge. Without this help 
tbe vehicles could well have been a 
fortnight later reaching Scott 
Base-. 


Yours faithfullv. 

JOHN WINNIFRITH. 
Hallhouse Farm. 
Appledore. 

Ashford. KeriL * 


Smooth operator 

Front Mrs Catherine Craig 
Sir, Deep snow in west Cornwall is 
a rare and wonderful sight but not 
quite so rare and wonderful as the 
subsequent sight of a young man 
sliding effortlessly down the hill 
outside my house standing upright 
on his surfboard. 

Yours failhfofjy. 

CATHERINE CRAIG, 

Treslothan House. 

Treslothan, 

Camborne, 

Cornwall. 

February 25. 

Enter, a bear 

From Mr Ivan Stringer 

Sir. How does March go out when 

it comes in like a polar bear? 

Yours faithfullv. 

IVAN STRINGER. 

4 Langdons. 

Sherborne. 

Dorset. 

February Jo. 


I 


ti? 9 -U ( j XL4 


THE TIMES MONDAY MARCH 3 1986 



Clifford Longley 


OBITUARY 


Enduring lesson of martyrdom 


MR OLOF PALME 
Swedish role on the world stage 


COURT 

CIRCULAR 


KENSINGTON PALACE 
March 3: The Duchess of 
Gloucester. President of The 
Royal London Society for the 
Blind and of The Incorporated 
Association for Promoting, the 
General Welfare of the Blind, 
was present this evening at a 
Gala Dinner and Fashion Show 
given by Sightlinc in aid of 
London's Blind at the Inter- 
Continental Hotel. London. 

Mrs Euan McCorquodale was 
in attendance. 


Another 85 English Reforma- 
tion martyrs of the Roman 
Catholic Church are soon to 
be beatified and raised to the 
status of “Blessed”, one step 
short of sainthood. The event 


lations of inner-church, or 

inter-church, politics. 

Of the 85. whose "cause” 
was formally promoted to 
Rome in 1978 by Cardinal 
Basil Hume of Westminster. 


may raise apprehensions, if eight were laymen and the rest 
not hackles, in the Church of priests. They were executed. 


of English history has rather 
written them off as unfortu- 
nate victims of the religjous- 
poliiical ferment of their time. 
English history has made 
more of the fires oFSraiihfieid 
and the martyrdoms of Maty 


the inheritors or both sides of 
the Reformation divide can i 
look back dispassionately at I 
what went on. It is no longer 
taboo on one side, for in- 
stance. to point out that die 
religion which the martyr?. 


Princess Anne. Senior Warden 
of the Company of Carmen, will 
attend a livery dinner on March 
1 1 at the Mansion House. 
Princess Anne. President of the 
Save the Children Fund, wilt 
attend a reception for the Stop 
Polio board members at 2 
Belgravc Square. W l, on March 
12 . 

Prince Andrew will attend the 
British premiere of Young Sher- 
lock Holmes at the Plaza Cin- 
ema. Lower Regent Street, on 
March 12. in aid of the Royal 
Star and Garter Home. 


England: and probably a good 
deal of mystification in En- 
glish society generally. 

Pope Paul VI canonized 40 
English martyrs in 1970. an 
event anticipated as likely to 
reopen wounds on both sides 
but in the event saved by some 
exceedingly generous and 
warm words from him to- 
wards the Church of England. 
He referred to it in the 
canonization ceremony as 
"our beloved sister” whose 
patrimony of tradition and 
identity was not to be threat- 
ened by church unity. His 
words have since been cher- 
ished in Anglican circles as 
proof (hat ecumenical negotia- 


most by hanging, drawing and 
quartering and the rest by' 
hanging, under the penal stat- 
utes of Elizabeth I. particular- 
ly the Act of 1585 which made 
it a capital offence for a 
Catholic priest to enter En- 
gland. 

The walls of the English 
College in Rome carry har- 
rowi ng pai n lings record i ng 
their martyrdoms. In all. there 
are said to be some 360 known 
executions of Catholics under 
Henry. Elizabeth, and James I 
in England and Wales. The 
original 40. now officially 
saints, were the best attested 
and easiest to deal with: and 
the subsequent 85. now being 


Tudor's reign’.- but. history is priests of the Elizabethan 
always written by the winners, period died for was probably 
It comes as a crear surmise to still the majority faith of the 


It comes as a great surprise to still the majority faith of the 
most Englishmen to learn that English people. 

Elizabeth executed more It is no longer taboo on the 
Catholics than Mary did Prot- other to ask whether Pius V's 
estants. handling of his English prob- 

Nevertheless. Elizabeth had 

been excommunicated by 5^^52252^5 St 
Pope Pius V. along with all 
who obeyed her, and he 
declared her subjects to be 

released from their oath of Certainl y no modern Pope 


It is no longer taboo on the 
other to ask whether Pius V's 
handling of his English prob- 
lem was calamitously incom- 
petent and arroganL He made 
claims for die authority of the 
papacy over temporal rulers 
which now seem incredible. 


tions are not a betrayal of promoted one step higher. 
.Anglican integrity. represent a selection of the 


.Anglican integrity. 
The cause of 


Birthdays today 

Mr Ernest Bradbury. 67: Miss 
Joan HassalL 80; Air Vice- 
Marshal C.G. Maughan. 63: 
Lord Mclhsh. 73: Mr Peter 
O'Sullcvan. 68; Mr M.P. Phil- 
-lips. 50: Mr Hugh RadlcitTe. 75: 
the Right Rev Dr J.R_ Richards. I 
'85: Dame Enid Russell-Smith. I 
-83: Mr Ronald Searie. 66: Lord 
Templeman. 66: Sir John Ward. 
77. 


The cause of the "Forty 
Martyrs", as they were known, 
had become an immensely 
popular focus of devotion in 
the Roman Catholic commu- 
nity. and they have since given 
their names to many new 
churches. 

There is no equivalent pop- 
ular following for the "Eighty- 
Five Martyrs" now. but 
Vatican canonization process- 
es have a momentum of their 
own. The results of those 
processes do not always bear 
any relation to nuanced calcu- 


represent a selection of the 
rest. 

The Catholic Church has 
always held that they died for 
the faith: certainly being a 
Catholic, and acting in fur- 
therance of the Catholic reli- 
gion, was what they were 
charged with. Outside that 
community, however, this 
host of heroic figures is very 


allegiance. So those priests 
who were smuggled into En- 
gland. who passed in disguise 
round the countryside pur- 
sued by priest-hunters, and for 
whom ingenious hiding holes 
were created in the homes of 
their protectors, were engaged 
necessarily in a dangerous and 
subversive political mission as 
well as a religious one. 

Their activities were indeed 
treasonable according to the 
law of the land, whatever their 
intentions, for merely by pro- 
moting Catholicism and . at- 
tending secretly to the 
religious needs of Catholics 
they were automatically un- 


large ly forgotten. They were of dermining the Crown. 


a generation with Raleigh and 
Drake, and in their own way 
showed the same swashbuck- 
ling courage and enterprise. 

_ But the “received" version. 


Some 16 years after the 
canonization of the Forty 
Martyrs the climate has 


would dream of thinking that 
he could release the citizens of 
a state from their loyalty to iL 
Bui they were far different 
limes. 

The lesson of the martyr- 
doms to which Rome is 
shortly to draw attention by 
the beatifications is that nei- 
ther states nor popes nor i 
parlies have the right to coerce 
religious belief, and those who ; 
pay the penalty of their deft- 1 
ance when this is tried must be 
honoured, whatever their par- 
ticular cause. ' 

The lesson to be rejected is , 
that the religious quarrels ! 
which took good men to a 
horrible death need further 
stirring to add to that honour. 
If they are truly saints in 
heaven, they must surely re- 
joice at the pacification of 


Mr Olof Palme, who was 
assassinated in Stockholm on 
February 28 at the age of 59, 
was both the most controver- 
sial and the most internation- 
ally famous of Swedish Prime 
Ministers jn modem times. 
He held the office for 10 years 
out of the past 16. and had 
been reelected for another 
term only last September. 

That he should be contro- 
versial was perhaps inevitable 
for a left-wing Social Demo- 
crat from an upper-class back- 
ground. Circumstances made 
it all the more likely. He 
succeeded his mentor, Tagc 
Eriander. in 1969 after the 
party had been in office for 37 
years. The less contested ob- 
jectives of Social Democracy 
had been achieved, with the 
development of a prosperous 
economy, full employment 
and welfare services. 

So it fell to Palme to 
demonstrate to the electorate 
and to younger radicals within 
the party that the Social 



cian line of senior civflrer- ^ 

vants. bankers and lawyers. ^ 197& 3n(1 l980s wu g 

Bom on January 30, 1927. be hv errmmnie 


marched to the American 
Embassy- in Stockholm at the 
head of a demonstration, be- 
ing photographed next to 
North Vietnam's ambassador 
to Moscow. The Americans 
recalled their- ambassador 
from Sweden. 

■However. Palme was equal- 
ly outspoken about the Rus- 
sian tanks which rolled imo^ 1 
Prague that same year and 
publicly condemned the 
"henchmen of dictatorship” 
who ousted Alexander 

Dubcek. 

In 1969 Eriander retired and 
Palme was elected Chairman 
of the Social Democratic Party 
and became Prime Minister. 
Unlike the preceding two 
golden decades of expansion. 


SS 'SSriV -the a « Of Characterised by economic 
lost his father at the age .of nmbtems and increasing eco 
seven. went to an exclusive i* 


Democrats had not run out of abiding admiration for the 
ideas. He did this by pressing American radical tradition. 


ahead with programmes for 
greater economic and social 
equality, which naturally 
aroused opposition. 

His approach to foreign 
affairs, also fed controversy. 


isiic product of his milieu- As 
an officer of the Student’s 
Union's International Com- 
mittee, be began to gravitate 
towards the left. He was 


He was not sympathetic to outspokenly critical of the 
Communism, but. especially Communist take-over in 


Lommiinism, nut. especially Communist take-over in 
during .his earlier years in Prague in 1948 (he married a 


public life, be appeared to take Czech gift there secretly in 
particular relish in criticising 1949 soidy in order to help 


changed considerably, and the England's religious history in 
point has been reached when the centuries ance they died. 


the United States. He was not 
reluctant to offer his advice to 


other Western governments, wards). In 1950 he attended 


Forthcoming marriages 


Mr D.A. Hanson 
and Miss H.L- Robson 
The engagement is announced 
between Daniel, elder son (he 
Right Rev R.P.C. and Mrs 
Hanson, of Wilmslow. Chesh- 
ire. and Helen, younger daugh- 


ter of Mr and Mrs C. Robson, of and 


Mr N.R.P. Debenham 
and Miss S.B. Manger 
The engagement is announced 
between Nicholas, son of Mr 
and Mrs F. Debenham. of 
Lcdweli. Oxfordshire, and 
Samantha, elder daughter of Mr 


Entries rise for 
bridge league 

Entries at the British E 


Entries at the British Bridge 
League's congress held at the 
Palace HoteL Buxton, over the 
weekend were up on last year's 
with 122 tables in play. 


Swtss pairs: 1 R J Rowlands. V J 
Martin: 2 Mrs C M BooUiroyd. J 
Staler. 

Mixed pairs: 1 Mrs L C Wood. Dr A 
P So w ter: 2 Mrs R GoMenfleM. a 
Ewart. 


Stone. Staffordshire. 

Mr ,A.H. Collins 
and Miss PJL Bailey 
Thc engagement is announced 
between Anthony Howard, son 


Manger. 


Cru who rough, Sussex. 

Mr AJ. Little 

and Miss DJ. Curtis 

The engagement is announced 

between Adrian, younger son of 



sometimes to their irritation. tj, e jus Congress in Prague 


But he was a man of broad an( | was booed in company 
international perspective. As with other Western delegates. 


the years passed, he occasion- men, While at the Ministry of 
ally appeared to draw greater Defence in Stockholm, he was 


stimulation from the dial- asked in J953 to become 
lenge of international than of personal assistant to the Prime 
national problems. His inter- Minister Tage Eriander, in 

Act umrlW oflotre hmi/Avpr ■ • i. . . ■'f _ _ * ■ _ j 


est in world affairs, however. which opacity he continued 
was never a mere search for f 0 rten vears. 


Mixed teams, t Mrs T Lana. Mrs M 
Castaqlloia. M RoMnson. M Hum- 
phrey: 2 Mtas M Brunner. Mrs R 
CoMenOeU. B Ewart. W J Holland. 


B Ewart. W J Holland. 


of Mr Michael Collins, of Mr and Mre J.A. Utile, of 
Chiddingfold. Surrey and of Loose, Maidstone. Kent, and 


Mrs Ann Collins, of Chevening. Diana, younger daughter of Mr 
KenL and Patricia Rosemary. an d Mrs T. Curtis, of Reigate. 


daughter of Sir Derrick Bailey. 
Bt. or Blue Slones. Alderney. 
Channel Islands, and of Nancy 
Lady Bailey, of LyonshalL 
Kington. Herefordshire. 


Mr PJ. Conroy 
and Miss PA. Fuller 
The engagement is announced 
between Paul John, younger son 
of Mr and Mrs P.D. Conroy, of 
Claremont Road. RedhilL Sur- 
rey. and Paula Anne, second 
daughter of Mr and Mrs P.M. 
Fuller, of The Glade. 
Kingswood. Surrey. 

Mr EJ.G. Geddes 
and Miss L-A. Milner 
The engagement is announced 
between Edward Jonathan 
Grange, son ofMrand Mrs EG. 
Geddes. of Si John's. Worcester, 
and Lesley- Anne, youngest 
daughter of Mr and Mrs R. 
Milner, of Stakeford. Northum- 
berland. 

Mr J.E.C. Gibbs 
and Miss J.M. Bourne 
The engagement is announced 
between Jeffrey Edward 
Carlton, elder son of Mr and 
Mrs Derek C. Gibbs, of 


Liphook. Hampshire, and Jen- 
nifer Mary, youngest daughter 


nifer Mary, youngest daughter 
of Mr John S. Bourne and the 


Flight Lieutenant LA. LumsdeoT 
RAF. 

and Miss RJi. Swinley 
The engagement is announced 
between lan. son ofMrand Mrs 
J. Lumsden. of Bishopbriggs. 
Glasgow, and Rachel, daughter 
of Commander and Mrs J. 
Swinlcy. of Reydon Grove. 
Sou ih wold, Suffolk. 

Mr J.S. PDweU 
and Miss C.F. Conroy 
The engagement is announced 
between James Storer. younger 
son of Mr and Mrs TS.E. 
Powell, of High Trees ' Road: 
Reigate. Surrey, and Claire j 
Frances, eldest daughter of Mr ! 
and Mrs P. D. Conroy, of Clare- 
mont Road. Redhill. Surrey. 

lieutenant Commander M. Sto- 
rey, RN. 

and Mrs R.W. Banfieid 
The engagement is announced 
between Michael, son of Mrs 
P.L Storey and of the laic Major 
R.A. Storey, of Fivehead. 
Somerset and Sally, widow of 
Lieutenant Commander Rich- 
ard Banfieid. RN. and elder 
daughter of Mr and Mrs AD. 
Walker, of Reigate, Surrey. 

Mr N.C. Tomalin 
and Miss D.A Van 


Westminster Cathedral 
Choir School 
As a result of the recent voice ! 
trials, choral scholarships have 
been awarded to the following: ] 


Rotten Lewis 'Cranmorp School. 
Leolhertiead. Surrey r. Pinup Kay 
iThomas London Day School. Lon- 


don. SWJi, Darnel Lynch i Beam plan 
Infants School. London. Efei, Stephen 
O'Brien <St Mary's RC primary 
School. London. SE9i. Andrew Sea- 
man iCuardlan Ansels Primary 
School. London. E3L 


Princess Anne will present the 
Ritz Club Charity Trophy at the 
Cheltenham National Hunt 
Racing Festival on March 13. . 




diversion. He took bis respon- 
sibilities seriously as a vice- 
president of the Brandt 
Commission on the gap be- 
tween the rich and poor 
countries, as chairman of his 
own commission on disarms- 


:ven. went w « bgical and social anxiety. In 

boarding school m Sigtuna, . Wial Democrats 

and read law at Stockholm 

oEo 11 in firet ^ me for 40 - vears Sweden 
W7A* a£ rtfre fSZd Z had a non-socialist govern-. . 

tiding admiration for the mcnL . 

merican radical tradition. It was during his six years as 

Thus far he was a character- -leader of the opposition that 
tic product of his milieu- As Palme was most active on the 
i officer of the Student’s world scene. The Brandi Com- 
mon's international Com- mission , was set up fry the 
ittee, be began to gravitate Socialist International in 
wards the left. He was 1976. and under its aegis 
itspokenly critical of the Palme led a delegation to 
jmmunist take-over ' in southern Africa in the follow- 
ague in 1948 (he married a ing year. He founded the 
:ech girl there secretly in commission on disar mam ent 
49 soldy in order to help and security problems _in 
r out of the country and 1 980, with the aim of working 
■y divorced soon after- for general disarmament, to be 
irds). In 1950 he attended achieved stage by stage, siart- 
i IUS Congress in Prague ing with a nuclear-free zone in 
d was booed in company Central Europe, 
th other Western delegates. When the Social Democrats 
len, while at the Ministry of won the 1 982 election, two : 

: fence in Stockholm, he was issues dominated the early 
ted in 1953 to become years of his new government, 
rsonal assistant to the Prime One was the government's 
inister Tage Eriander, in statutory implementation of 
lich capacity he continued Wage Earners' Investment 
‘ten years. Funds, whereby a percentage 

. - ^ of profits from all enterprises 

It was dunng his decade as ^ collected and re-invested in 
lander s right-hand man industry by trustee boards 
at the Swedish public sector hreelv ' made up of trades 
d social services expanded un f on * representatives. The 


1949 soicty tn order to neip 
her out or the country and 
they divorced soon afier- 


It was dunng his decade as 
Erlander's right-hand man 
that the Swedish public sector 
and social services expanded 


greatly in v a general spirit of n on-Socialist opposition re- 


opumism. 


mem and as an assiduous if in 1965 he was appointed 


unsuccessful mediator on be-' Communications Minister, 


half of the United .Nations' and in 1962 he became Educa- 
Secretary-General in the war tion Minister and faced hostile 


Mrs Jane Marsh bringing in from the cold a newly-born 
Iamb born in freezing temperatures at Old Barn Farm, 
Cowbeech, near Hails ham. East Sussex, at the weekend 
(Photograph: Tim Bishop). , . 


Marriages Mis-jocdyne Aiwrey, of F^y^Appointments iit; 

^rd HaUsbam of St Maryje- ,m£ the FOrCCS 

. Flora ‘Bui^is.onfydatfgfitcl - ^^ Royal !\jvv- 

and Miss D. Shannon General Sir Edward and. Lady caMMANDos- j 

The marnage took p^ce on Burgess; of Chateau St Pierre. .ragR jS? I 
Saturday .March 1 , 1 986. at the shape. Belgium. The Rev Denys VgS.SZP'iJFS. I 1 
Church of Our Lady. St Johns Banleti officiated. id niustridus. aim ri 

The w , h0 T 5 » ven in r? 

Haiisham oi 5t Marylepone, marriage by her father, was Ju] y J n mo 
CH. and Miss Deirdre Shannon, ancn ded by Jamie Burgess, 


between Iran and Iraq. 

A small, alert, articulate 
man of great personal charm, 
his manner was totally unpre- 
tentious. He loved an argu- 
ment. which he could conduct 
with complete ease in a variety 
of languages, but he never 
pulled rank. - - 
. He leaves the memory of* 


criticism from rebellious stu- 
dents of the 1968 protest 
movement, angry’ over re- 
forms inaugurated by his pre- 
decessors. 

Palme's passionate advoca- 
cy of the cause of underprivi- 


garded them as leading to state 
control of industry. 

The other issue was the 
repeated violation of Swedish 
waters by Soviet submarines 
and there was criticism that 
Palme might have taken a 
tougher stance towards Mos- 
cow. 

In foreign affairs Palme 
cherished the ideals of Ameri- j 
can democracy, as he saw v 
them, but showed no inhibi- 


bone. CH.- - • 
and Miss D; Shannon 
The marriage took place on 
Saturday. March I, 1986. at the 
Church of Our Lady. St John’s 
Wood. London, of Lord 
Haiisham of St Marylebone, 
CH. and Miss Deirdre Shannon, 


COMMANDERS. J_P Clark* to 
CINCf LEET. June- 20: c J Ctar to 


aNCFLEET. July 8: T C Emm lo 
MOD (Battii. June IT; A P E Une to 
Centurion. June 3; P J Lin^tead-Smltji 


lo Illustrious- Aim 15: R F Lovett lo 
MOD iLoadonL Ju ne 6: A 1 Sonwr- 
illie-McAletfcr lo CFCSC Toronto. 
July 31: J N McGrath lo MOD 
iLoodon). April 25: J J Price lo 
H ermes. In Cma. March *: R J 
Tempest lo MOD i London V Sew 5. 
SURGEON COMMANDERS (OI: S 
Lambert- Humble to Neptune. Sept 2: 
G H A Rudge to RNH Plymouth. Oct 
15 

ROYAL MARINES 

BRIGADIERS- H V La R Beverley lo 
be Major-General Royal Marines 
Training. Reserve and Special- Forces. 
July 8. 

MAJOR- c G H - Dun loo to MOD 
(London!. April 8. . 


elder daughter of Mrs Margaret Sophie Hodges and Miss Lucia 
Briscoe and ihe late Captain AJIfrey. Mr Charles Allfrey was 


late Mrs 


Weymouth. Dorset 


Bourne, of The engagement is announced 


Mr C.E.M. Gilbertson 
and Miss N.LB. Uojd- Philipps 
The engagement is announced 
between Edward, son of Mr and 
Mrs Mark Gilbertson, of 
Yoxford, Suffolk, and Nicola 
Lloyd-Philipps. of Llangwarren, 
Letterston. Pembrokeshire, 
younger daughter of the late 
Major and Mrs John Lloyd- 
Philipps. 


Mr G. Pottie 

and Miss C-A. Sharkey 

The engagement is announced 


Dctween Neil, younger son ol Mr 
and Mrs Roland Tomalin. of 
Bearsted. Kent, and Deborah, 
elder daughter of Dr and Mrs 
Hugh Vaux. of Otham. Maid- 
stone. KenL 
Dr S.R. Walters 
and Miss J.M A. Murphy 
The engagement is announced 
between Sean, youngest son of 
Dr and Mrs P.T. Watters, of 
RadleiL Hertfordshire, and Jen- 
nifer. daughter of Dr and Mrs 
P.W.E. Murphy, of Hoton, 
Leicestershire. 

Mr D.I. Wilson 


Peter Shannon. Father Charles 
McGowan officiated. 

Mr D.M-I. Warren 
and Miss M.S, Debenham 
The marriage took place on 
Saturday at Si George’s. Hano- 
ver Square, of Mr David War- 
ren. eldest son of Dr and Mrs J. 
Warren. ofSoutbminster. Essex, 
to Miss Marye Debenham. 
younger daughter of Mr and the 


between Neil, youngerson of Mr i, “‘‘tf'.T a is r>tenhim of ^ 1 ™" r, i* h 

and Mn Roland Tomalin of Hon Mrs A. I.3- Debenham. ol H am Huddart. son ofMrand 


best man. 

A reception was held at the 
Cadogan Hall. -Duke of York's 
Barracks. Chelsea, and the 
honeymoon wiD be spent in 
Mauritius. 

Mr H. Huddart 
and Miss A. Wauchope 
The marriage took place on 
Friday. February 28. at St 
Margaret’s. Westminster, of Mr 


of languages, but he never leged peoples and countries . them, but showed no inhibi- 
pulled rank. ■ and his belief in the..n^orat,- r uousabOLJt criticising when he 

He leaves the .memory of^ guih colonial 'powers had • bought America foiled to livc 
one of ihemost^bram figures: :’beeftaicoi»laifr feature, of his up to them. In the case of the 
in Nordic political history, political life since his student Soviet ^-U’nion, on the- other 
and of a -man who made a da^ but ^. Vietnam war 1^^ he.hqd.no wish to align 
remarkable im^ct on the focured U^-issun sharply - himtelf ^vith militant anil- 
world for ihe leader of a small for him. While Education Communism and a long- 

C0 D n , lry - Mini , sle r in , I 968 *1? fierce, y standing Swedish tradition of 

Palme came from a patn- attacked US policy and Russopbobia. 


standing Swedish tradition of 
Russopbobia. 


Lingfield. Surrey. The Rev 
W.M. Atkins officiated. 

The bride was given in mar- 


Mis William Huddart. and Miss 
Arabella Wauchope. daughter of 
Mr John Wauchope and Mrs 


riage by her father, and Mr John Hannam. Canon Trevor 
Hendrik Bossman was best Beeson officiated. 


man. _ The brii 

A reception was held at marriage 
Claridge’s hotel and the honey- attended 
moon will be spent abroad. Wauchope 
Mr R.N. Browne . Wauchope 

and Mrs C.E. Balls Emma ( 

The marriage took place on Wauchope 


The bride, who was given in 
marriage by her father, was 
attended by Miss Lucy 
Wauchope. Miss Alexandra 
Wauchope. Georgians Bristol. 
Emma Gibb and Andrew 
Wauchope. Mr John- NectJefold 


MAJOR-GENERAL: J H A ThompvOn. 
CXI 25 -• 

C H MansfMd. April 5: C E K 
Robinson. APrU 26 

The Army 

MAJOR GENERALS: 8 M Bowen lo 
be P In OAi MOD. Marrb 3: A B 
Crowfoot to be DGAMR MOO. Marcti 
8 

COLONELS: J N S B Drake to MOO. 
March 17. J N □ Urns to le<AI. 
March 5: D S William* to Shape. 
March 3. C f V Cowell lo RAOC M A 
RO. March 7. D J T Dowry to Shape. 
March 7. d M O Miller lo R Stonab M 
A RO. March 7 

LTE L TEN A NT COLONELS. A Mllh. 
RAPC lo RAPC Trs Centre. March & 
AJ M Rice. RRF. lo be CO 5 RRF. 
March 3. 

Brigadier (acting Mator- General) 
Charley Ronald Uewryn CuUine. late 
Welsh Guards. Is appointed Colonel 
Commandant Ime! Horace Corps. 


between Graham, cider son of and Miss M.H. Cheetham 
Mr and Mrs A.D. Pottie. of The engagement is announced 


March I. 1986. at St Giles' was best man. 

Church. Badger. Shropshire, be- A reception was given ai the 
tween Mr Nicholas Browne. House of Commons. The 
elder son of Sir Humphrey honeymoon will be spent in ihe 
Browne and the late Lady Caribbean. 

Browne, of Beckbury Hall. Mr M.H. McCormack 
Shifnal. Shropshire, and Mrs and Miss H.E. Nagdseo 
Carla Balls, only daughter of The marriage took place at 


Paisley. Scotland, and Carole- 
Anne. only daughter of Mr C.J. 
Sharkey. CMG. MBE. and Mrs 
CJ. Sharkey, of Cockfosicrs. 
Hertfordshire, and Buenos 
Aires. Argentina. 


between David, only son of Mr 
and Mrs 8.K. Wilson, of 
Cheltenham, and Madeleine, 
younger daughter ofMrand Mrs 
J. Cheetham. also of Chelten- 
ham. 


Commandant imetUgracc Corps. 
Marcti 1. in sucenuon to General Sir 
Mlcnael Cow. lemur expired. 

Royal Air Force 

AIR VICE MAR SHAL- _M J DBww" 
lo be Dtrwior General of SlraiPW 
Electronic Systems in succession to P 


Tommy Farr, who died on 
March 1 at the age of 7 1. was a 
boxer, who though be reigned 
briefly as British and Empire 
Heavyweight champion be- 
fore the war. will be best, 
remembered for his brave and 
resourceful challenge for the 
world heavyweight crown of 
Joe Louis in 1937. 

Though losing the decision 
on points over 15 rounds Farr 
did what so many of the 
Brown Bomber’s champion- 
ship opponents fruled to do: he 
stayed ihe distance, took the 
fight to Louis, absorbed some 
of the champion's best punch- 
es and - the greater tribute to 
his skill - evaded a great many 
more. 

Farr was born in 
Tonypandy in the South 
Wales coalfield and began 


TOMMY FARR 



To Americans he was just , 
another ‘bum from Europe', 
but he surprised them, as well 
as Louis, in a skilful display.^ 
backed up by aggression and 
stamina. Uncowed by Louis's^' 
.fearsome reputation, Farr* 
forced the pace from the>‘ 
dutset and then weathered; 
some heavy counter attacks. 

In the event he look six' 
rounds off the champion in! 
spite of a cut eye. and finished ■ 
strongly in a way which won! 
the affection of the Madison 
Square Garden crowd. At’ 
home he became a national- 
hero. 


it by beating an American; Joe 


This was the apogee of his, 
career. He stayed on in Ameri-? 
ca until 1939 taking on lhe3 


M Hoiroyd. March 7. 

GROUP CAPTAINS: P O Nn 10 
MOD. March i M N Evan*to RAF 
Germany. March 6 : T G Thom lo 

FTS Cranwrtl ag OC- March 7: J F 
Hoar? to MOO FAR PMC March T 
WING COMMANDERS: K G 
CruraMn- lo RAF BcLiTC. March % J E 
Bracket lo HORATS C. Ma rch _ 3: M 
Sulbvan to MOO Harro*uc March 
to-. K Edwards to Sr ait Coil. 
■ Br ackne ll. March 3: H e Purser 10 
HQSTC. March 3. 


Zeeman, in six rounds in Wnf theAmeri^o onnred 


Mrs Phyliss Hoseltine. of Chel- 
sea. London, and Mr Marshall 


AshviUe. North Carolina. 
United States, on Saturday. 


fighting at 16 to escape a life af Foord, of his British’ and 
the coalface which seemed at Empire heavyweight titles 


Hascllinc. of Montoire. Sur-Le- March 1. 1986. of Mr Mark 


—CHRISTIE’S—— 

LONDON 

Now is the time to sell at Christie’s 


Loir. France. 


Captain H.D. Allfrey 
and Miss FJ.H. Burgess Baron Waldernar von 1 

The marriage took place on Hohenstein 
Saturday in ihe Chapel of the and Mrs L'. Malloch Brown 
Royal Hospital Chelsea, of Baron Waldcmar von T 
Captain David Allfrey. Royal Hohenstein and Mrs Un 


McCormack and Miss Betsy 
Nagdscn. 

Baron Waldernar von Teck. - 


Baron Waldcmar von Teck 
Hohenstein and Mrs Ursula 


Luncheon 

HnytoaCoBege Old Girls’ Gnfld 
The Huyion College Old Girts* 
Guild luncheon was held at the 
Strand Palace Hotel on Sat- 
urday. Among those present 


that age to be his ineluctable 
destiny. After a few six round- 
ers he joined a fair-ground 
boxing booth wherein it was 
possible to earn the sum of £l 
for staying three rounds with 
him. 

Later he left Wales and 


when he outpointed him over 
15 rounds. This was not a 
spectacular victory and is 
reckoned to have given Max 
Baer, the former world heavy- 
weight champion, and the 
German, Walter NeuseL who 
watched it from ringside, the 


settled for a mrte in Slough, _ feeling that noumucb was to 


Scots Dragoon Guards, elder Malloch Brown were married 
son of Major HJ. Allfrey. of 25b quietly in Colgate, Sussex, on 



Wilton Row. London. SW | . and February 22. 1986. 

Science report 


were: 

MW Wendy Edwards. tmdmWmi. 
Mr* Joan Banw Jono. Mbs SWrtov 
Hannan. Mrs win Gaskin. Mbs Sue 
Shaw. Mrs Jennifer Grundy and Mbs 
Margot Drecnaler 


Curing deafness with new blood 

By Barry Shurlock . 


Better treatment could soon be 
available for those who suffer 


Support for an aotehmaime 
basis for Meniere's Disease is 


from recurrent boots of deaf- growing. The latest evidence l»s 
ness, giddiness and head muzzi- just come from a study carried 


ness. Doctors in London have out by the ear, nose and throat 
recently discovered that making s ur geon. Mr Andrew Morrison. 


changes to die Mood of some and bis colleagues at the London 


people with those afflictions 
may improve their condition. 

In a separate exercise. 


HosphaL They characterized 
die sites on the cell surface to 
which antibodies brad and foand 


researchers in the United States that three q Barters of patients 
have used a Mood purification with Meniere's Dise as e exhib- 


Historical Royal Presentation ormolu mounted ebony grande 
soimeric spring clock by Thomas Tompion, London, no. 278. 

Sold at Christie’s for ,£248,400. 

Christie’s next sale of clocks and watches 
will be on 14 May. 

Closing date for entries is 12 March. 

Those wishing to include their property in this sale 
should contact Richard Gamier or Sam Camera- Cuss. 

8 King Street, St. James's, London swiy 6 QT 
Tel: (01) 839 9060 Telex: 916429 


technique to relieve temporarily 
some symptoms of a severe 
nerve disease. 

The new British treatment 
follows a growing realization 
that certain types of ear disorder 
are due to the body's immune 
system attacking Ns own tissues, 
a process which is called auto- 
immunity. Similar mechanisms 
are already firmly implicated in 


ited tiie same specific type of 
site. 

The sites are .called human 
lymphocyte antigens, HLL and 
are Hie cellular features which 
have to be matched between 
donor and recipient before orga n 
transplantation is likely to be 
snccessfuL 


The sqpificance of the new 
findings is that they suggest 


rheumatoid arthritis and a band- several novel approaches to the 


ful of other diseases. 

The new thinking has particu- 
larly focused on Meniere's Dis- 
ease. which is suff ered by about 
25.000 people m Britain and. is 
foand most frequently in those 
with an obsessive personality. 
For this reason, it was ooce 
thought to be a psychiatric 
disorder, a view which has now 
been generally discarded. 


treatment of Meniere's Disease 
and related conditions. Recently, 
for example. Mr Gerald 
Brookes, of the National Hos- 
pital for Nervous Diseases. Lon- 
don. and Dr Adrian New land, of 
the London Hospital, r e p orted 
the results of exchanging 
patients* plasma - that part Of 
the blood which, among other 
things, contains imnume com- 


plexes - with fresh material. 

Some positive benefits in 
bearing and other signs were 
noted in about half of the 
patients. The deafness, giddi- 
ness and muzzi ness suffered 
intermittently over seven years 
by a man aged 55. for example, 
were unproved for two months 
after six plasma changes spread 
over a fortnight. 

In the United States, doctors 
at the Mayo Clink in Minnesota 
bare gradually replaced the 
liquid portion of the blood of 
patients suffering from a seme 
ne r ve disease with donated 
plasma, and loraid that some of 
(be patients temporarily had 
healthier nerves and stronger 
mnscles. 

The patients were suffering 
from chronic inflammatory 
dcmyicnating 

potyredicnloaearopathy, caused 

when the body's immune system 
begins stripping away the Pate- 
ra I insolation that surrounds 
nerve cells. 


which then had a substantial 
emigrant Welsh population. 
As he recalled in later years he 
banked his total assets to that 
date with the local branch of 
Lloyds Bank, assuming it to be 
a native institution. 

Until 1933 his career - 
managed by the ex-miner 
"Joby" Churchill, who was to 
be his life long mentor - had 
been largely in Wales, but 
from 1 934 he fought a number 
of fights in London. In this 
year. too. he won the Welsh 
light heavyweight title from 
Charlie Bundy in Trealawand 


be apprehended from a labori- 
ous journeyman like Farr. 

In the event they were to be 
his next victims in quick 
succession. Farr’s victory over 
Baer at Haningay in April was 
certainly not expected by box- 
ing opinion. But it was an 
emphatic one as be outboxed 
and outpointed the former 
world champion over 12 
rounds. 

Next, in June, he turned to 
NeuseT- then the scourge of 
British heavyweights - and- 
knocked him out in three 
rounds. This emphatic victory 


ing fights against • . James* 
Braddock. Lou Nova, Red, ./ 
Butman and Max Baer who* ' 
avenged himself for bis! 
Harringay defeat by handing' 
out severe punishment over! 

15 rounds, flooring .Farr three- 
times during the contest. ’ . 

In what remained of his* 
career before the war effective^ 
ly ended iu Farr avenged* 
himself- jggainst Bunnan on» 
points at- Harringay and beat; 
the Canadian Larry Gains' in- 
fi ve rounds at Cardiff - i 

When war broke out Farr] 
joined the RAF but was; 
discharged with defective eye- ! 
sight. 


informed opinion began to over the conqueror of- Jack 
notice him. Petersen combined with his 

In 1936 wins over two victorv over Ran- In maU hi» 


experienced Americans, for- 
mer world light heavyweight 
champions. Tommy 
Lough van and Bob Olin. fur- 
ther enhanced his reputation 
and in September 1936 he 
knocked out Jimmy Wilde in 
Swansea, taking the Welsh 
heavy-weight title. 

The next year was to be the 
zenith of his career. He began 


victory over Baer to make him 
in a few months not merely a 
promising British heavy- 
weight. but a contender for 
world honours. 

Accordingly he sailed for 
America for a tilt at Louis's 
title on August 30. 1937. an 
event which was to keep 
thousands of Briions glued to 
their wirelesses in the small 
hours of the morning. 


In 1950 at the age of 36 he 
made an astonishing come- 
back after 10 years out of the; 
png and actually got as for as a; 
final eliminator for the British^ 
tide within three years. But' 
further progress was halted by- 
Don Cockell in seven rounds 
ai . Nottingham aiid he retired 
with his wife to the house: 
which he had bought on the 
Sussex coast. 


He had been a boxer of 
dignity and continued to live 
like a man of dignity. He was a 
likeable character and on. his. 
rare appearances on television: 

«e brought to his remiiiis- £ 
cen . ces a- fluency and passion- 
which took a younger, audr- 
ence - accustomed tot somfe-’ 
thing less articulate jfhHp- ;the" 
average ex-pug - by surprise! ; 


Sohtccs: Journal of Laryngol- 
ogy and Octokfgy, 1986. Vo] 100 


HIS HON JUDGE SIR THOMAS WILLIAMS - 

Sir Thomas Williams. QC. a .He was called to the Bar at ■ ,, n _ IX.. 

former Labour MP and. since Lincolns Inn in 1 95 1 ^ He H° n ? J ”0-5 1 ). Minister of ' 
1981. a Circuit Judge, died on was Recorder of Birkenhead {2 eal,h ,< !9 5l) and Attorneys, 
February 28 ai the age of 70. from 1969 to 1971 General (1965-67).- V 

Boro in Aberdare. the son of In his Parliamentary career n from Paritamenl ( £ 

a miner, he was educated at he had held three seats for on ® ecom iffg a fidl-time.judge> j 
University College. Cardiff Si Labour Hammersmith South nJ?- < V w 2* chainnafr- of .-ihe* 
Catherine's College. Oxford, (1949-55) Baron’s Sn g™ 511 Group of^ the InteiS.J 
and the University of London. (1955-59) and Warrinmon t“ r,iam emaryUnioxw-l9t4-^ 

He became a Baptist Minis- (1961-81). * n .and a 

terin 1941 and was Bursarand 


nriiamentacy. UiuosL-I 

76. and a member^pf^ 


lt : Kk Net* England Jounai of I tutor at Manchester College. 

■ r.i in mn/ I a a ■ 


Medicine, February 19, 1986. 


Oxford. 


He had been Parliamentary !!Sl ,s ? ry cotraefl onVpublic-'* 
Private Secretary ,o S "^(1965-71) and of -thtl 
ministers.- Minister of pe n _ vf V, ?SIK Coun ol off Staiuie^ 
a Law (i 974-81). ; 


f|t'\ Bi i 


»’ a V: . 




snip 










THE TIMES MONDAY MARCH 3 1986 



LA CREME DE LA CREME 



PRIVATE SECRETARY £8,000+ 

J? n . vale se ^ ret ?> l ° work for ihe Group Surveyor. The 
a m i f p 3 n t n \ u 51 flexible and enjoy working under pressure. 

and audw typing skills needed. Arranging appoint- 
1 ! r 5 ve ! :and be aW e io liaise with people at all levels, 

ere 5* weeks Mday^ 1 ^' trai ^ ng 9-5.30 pm. Luncheon vouch- 

PART TIME ACCOUNTS CLERK 

Accounts Clerk to assist the Financial Accountant. Elementary 
book keeping., writing cheques and generally helping out where necessary 
witnin the department. Hours and salary to be negotiated. 

Apply, in confidence to: 

Mr D B Parkes, Chairman, 

Westminster & Country. Properties PLC 
,8 Quccii' Streqt ' 

London W1X 7PH -" 4 • ■ 


PA to EXECUTIVE DIRECTOR 

Salary; c.£12,000 + with comprehensive benefit package 
is required by . . 

EPSON EUROPEAN OPERATIONS CENTRE LTD 

the 

NEW EUROPEAN HEADQUARTERS of SEIKO EPSON CORPORATION 
v; to be. based in North London 

SEIKO EPSONCORP are a world major m the computer: and computer peripherals 
field with m arreting arid manufacturing branches worldwide. Working alongside the 
Director responsible for developing new European subsidiaries-and planning strate- 
gy tor trie existing network, the successful candidate win have: 

• Impeccable secretarial stalls 

• A top Quality (preferably graduate) educational background. 

• Excellent personal presentation- and conwitmtcatton skills both oral & written. 

• A very high level of integrity, commitment and the willingness to become 
immersed in a very cha&engmg position involving frequent business travel in Europe. 

ideally, candidates should be aged c:25-30. and a knowledge of European lan- 
guages. particularly French. Spanish and Italian, would be a considerable advantage, 
involvement in high-level contractual negotiations wifi also be a key element m this 
position, and some, familiarity with (pr the ability and motivation to team about) 
Commarcia I La>v Is desirable. 

• For further details, please, caB: — - 
. Andrew AveneU on 01-236 . 8192 - 
JAC Recruitment & Employment- 
's Ctotiege HilL Loncton EC4. 


PA to EXECUTIVE DIRECTOR 

Salary: c XI 2,000 + with comprehensive benefit package 
is required by 

EPSON EUROPEAN OPERATIONS CENTRE LTD 
the 

NEW EUROPEAN HEADQUARTERS of SEIKO EPSON CORPORATION 
to be based in North London 

SEIKO EPSON COUP are a world major In the computer and computer peripherals 
field with marketing and manufacturing branches worldwide. Working alongside the 
Director responsible for developing new European subsidiaries and planning strate- 
gy for the existing network, the successful candidate wifi nave: 

• Impeccable sec r etarial skills 

• A top quality (preferably graduate) educational background. 

• Excellent persona* presentation and communication skills both oral & written. 

• A very high level of integrity, commitment and the willingness to become 
immersed in a very ch a ll en ging position involving frequent business travel in Europe- 

Ideally, candidates should be aged c .25-30, and a knowledge of European lan- 
guages, particularly French, Spanish and Italian, would be a considerable advantage. 
Involvement to high-level contractual negotiations will also be a key element to this 
position, and some familiarity with (or the ability and motivation to leam about) 
Commercial Law is desirable. 

For further details, please caU- 

Andrew AveneU on 01-236 6192 

JAC Recruitment & Employment 
23 College Hill, London EC4. 


«1AC 




QUEEN BEE 


West End 

in Personnel Assistant 


Our diem, a Icadi 
firm, needs a eonfi 

extraordinary.' '• .. 

The job is diverse. eocompassrMi^teiwcniil- 
ment. and welfare of non-professiOBat staff, in 
the London offices, counselling, uaiorng on all 
office equipment salaries advice, .die booking 
of temporary staff, holiday rotas and also play- 
ing an important liaison role. •’ 

The successful candidate will have a secretarial 
background, be self motivated, energetic, -high- 
ly numerate, and possess the soda! skills, 
background and maturity which are essential 
to work in this gentlemanly environ menu 

Age: 30-40. ;■ n '.‘ 'J; 

Salar\-. £52.500 highly negotiabtejUuS exceDqitt . 
hcneliK. - ••• 

WEST END OHF1CE 
• 629 9&S6 * ' 

• — o\ 


COUNOL 
OF EUROPE 


‘ * + * 

- • + 

* * 
★ • * 
* * * •• 


:C0NSB- 

DELBRJPE 


Europe of 6* 21 Strasbowg. Fnwp nab 

MALE/FEMME SECRETARIAL STAFF 

wiff wort m on intergovwnmMtal organization iMch ferAers • 
[vropeon unity and o«n» Ol mipowiig ihe lw« W Euraptore 
fvough potted od'ion m varied adds and m the protection of 
^jinon right. , 

fair storting sabry wH be aporo u rdrir 8500 French nones nte 
get rnorih (single emoirdensie!. Tea: hta. S« weeks' owwa raw. 
pua home leo» every ivm rears, 
tee- 20-34 ;ertendeaupto4flir certao cosesj. „ _ 
Eaicd'On. 5GCE'0'le*els«loefingEngl»sMGnjdBABwCposs) . 

pr?fi“ahlf cr teca 1, A’ levd, or Sto»isbequ~ole«rv- 
Stoihend and i^wg speeds d ITQ.’ SO wpw dw ady «rt fed °r . 
pud't eiommowm [eg r?SA. F ~ 


(speak mg wdrecxfng). 

M>ol period in typing pod. dler when 


ripecente french 1 


Pitmans, SCQTBEG, Wort processor' 
passile traBfar to a 


cmnnina 


*FEATtlRE IN; FASHION* ; 

. As PA to the fashion. director of this famous Compa- 
ny you win help organise fashion shows and liaise 
with models and designers. Excellent presentation 
and a calm personality. Skffls 100/60. Age 25+. 
£9300. 


Join one . of Britain* fashion success stories as 
secretary to their concessions (firector and detf with 
buyers and suppliers etc. Excellent prospects and 
rous dotting discounts. Typing 55+ wpm. 




Tba European cSneofoKof this expanding French 

eridj^Yoif^wlU look^a^^.tiS^^Mutifd" fashion 
cSBecfons and me^t_top boyers. SKiis 80*45. 


r T-: 



phase Mepteu; 01-499 8070 
46 Old Bond Street London W.1 
cuipumimiSEaErmiLuwimMans 


J 


tiAC 


(■■■DRAKE 

DARE: TO BE- - PERSONNEL 

ALL THAT YOU CAN BE 


Introducing the MacBlain 
Nash Privilege Club Card. 

An exclusive card offering temporarix a very special 
package of benefits, loin our temporary team and gel 

• An opportunity to cam tun weeks' paid holiday. 

• Generous rfisawnfs of t a wide range of products and services. 

• A riscounf aw holidays or travel. ' 

o A building society that can help with a mortgage. 

• A bank that offers an advisory service ok 
financial matters for temporaries, together 
with free banking. ' 

• A private health scheme for temporaries. 

If you would like a MacBlain Nash 
Prh'ilegCCard give us ti ring today and 
join our temporary team. 

Coniocf Victoria MortiH 
on 01 439 0601. 

MacBlain 

— NASH— 

Temporary 
Secretaries 



MARKETING 

Join this International company 
based in the West End with offices 
in Canada and Holland. Assisting 
the Marketing Manager, you will be 
dealing with new enquiries and fol- 
lowing them up. becoming involved 
in the design of brochures. Also 
keeping labs on seven engineers in 
Europe. If you have any marketing 
experience, your involvement would 
be immediate. So. if you have good ‘ 
typing and rusty shorthand skills 
and In is sounds like you, please caD 
GINA N ADLER 


SALES ADMIN 
WITH A DIFFERENCE 
£9,000 

This really go-ahead sales team need 
someone to help keep them in the 
right place at the right time. This is 
where your good organisational abil- 
ity will come to the forefront. You 
will be constantly li» icing with their 
clients, organising PR- functions, 
thus becoming an integral part of 
the team. So, if you want involve-' 

. merit, to use your initiative and have. 

[ roll 


Top of the TemporarytTreei 


INA N ADLER 

CALL DRAKE PERSONNEL on 734-0911 


THE DRAKE DSHTERNAIIOISIAL GROUP 

■THE 


Manpower temporaries are people on their way up! 

Tough, but rewarding, assignments. Jobs where you use your 
skills - and widen them. Free training (W Ps and PCs) to 
make you a machine all-rounder. Pay and benefits 
to match. 

• Management Secretaries, automated office skills 

• Senior Secretaries • - - 

Near the top and still ambitious? 

Grab one of our branches... 

O MANPOWER Tel: 225 0505 


Temporary Suit Specialise 


r.Ou.-anjvni/.-ng J<?rV09 



lasteful lemping... 

.No bassles. No let-downt Just plain, .simple, high grade 
temping. 

A tasteful package of lop jobs, elite rates and thoroughly 
professional service. 

If vou have sound skills and experience, you should be 
talking to “The TXbrk Shop". 

Telephone Sue Cooke on 01-409 1232. 


Recruitment Consultants 


EXECUTIVE - .BANKING . • 

. . .. SECRETARY 4«AMMEftSMTH - 

o«»iirlurAly has arisen wiui ln\hfc major 
International bank for a well educated, professional 
secretary to join the exclusive systems area.;DeaLing * 
with cikrils adaPstalf^'t Tlcry sertar pvetS.. candt^al^, 
: shoukL : pos9es»'.a' fle5tinie' nature.- prAven^smetaiiaf 

P '. skins of at least .iqo/60 anti most important- 
ly a goon sense of humour. Ageti 26+. For 
0 further details please call: Portman 
Recrullmeni Services 01-236-1113 
■ 1 24li ours) 


DRESSED TO KILL 
to £9,500 

A ; world famous ladies fashion . 
-house seeks a PA/secretary to 
their fashion director. You will be- 
based m the design studio and wtif 
enpy a last moving creative- atmo- 
sphere. You should be calm, 
sophis ti c at ed, wen educated with 
90/60 skills and ideally some 
French or itaflaa 


ON HOLIDAY 
£9,000 

Our diem, an international compa- 
ny closely involved to leisure and 
-tourism seeks a bright, young sec- 
: retary. to their .head .’of 
administration. Excellent benefits 
include discounts on holidays. 60 
wpm Audio aMity needed. Training 
given on the latest WP. 


Cfly 
0-2403551 


Elizabeth Hunt 


West End 
0W40 353! 




Recn^mentCbnsultcinlSi 


i- 

? 


m. "" 

ccnbeobtoMd 


MKJf 'f^^ffO! 

(TKVIEWS ji Loniiwfdinb^TZWjCflin. . 
ppliC3hO",forre (to be retvmed.tw?? march l 
wtre» wniK ftrmer mformo^onl troet _ 

' Heod of Etiatfs^BnBreDwsw-Cou'eiloftBJope 

- B.P. 431 Rfi. 67006 Smsbouigcedn. Fronrt 



A Touch of Qass! 


superb opportunity Jbr a lively secretary; within ode of 
Londuria most presrigkms estate agencies. 

FjM-moiing land hectic, the department handles a rich 
*mfhho of W*t End pjoperry A* a vital part ™ the Iran, 
nm will provide' full hark-up 


r up and dwnt liaiHn for two 

»ung partners. 

[■uod tvping. nistv. shorthand and social confidence 
rsnuitoL Salary £9.0011 Please caD 01-HW 1232. 

Rpcruitrwm CnMilunt> 


YOUR GERMAN 
WU± HRP TO 
LAUNCH A 
NEW PRODUCT 
c£iD.D00 

Dsectm srttng up a new 
voi st rots mtanaMnil. 
naw e NW1. nestis m* 
man swakntg ahMi# tn- 
■fi shwifwnd wnuM be 
Id and good typing B «n- 
ian| They are housed *i 
e!i offices and wfl nwstty 
involved taunctmg a new 
dud li you are aged 23+. 
hr wnetv and gel on 
b people tins wB sut you. 


ulu, iMvbil M «W» **• rai 

* .Hh-i • IihiI, vi IrtrtUVDW to 

Mwn MUts tou wpm 

174 Nine Bond St W1 


That's when we. 
took on our 
wonderful temp. 




01-6291204 
fo» *x** p J;£2 v 

TEMP’ORARISS 


§□ 


PL'BLIC- RELATIONS 


£8500 neg 


Nev er a dull moment when you assist, pn Account 
Director In his many varied activities. Develop 
your own areas of responsibmty. put your good 
organisational ability to full use and keep every 
one happy with your cheerful personality. Good 
audio skills with some shorthand. 

TEMPORARY SECRETARIES 

We urgently need all types of temporary 
secretaries to fill Uie many varied bookings both 
long and short term. 

Please caD 01-434 2402 Immediately. 


cfiROJflE rota 

PRIVATE SECRETARYE9,000 

The dynamic and entrepreneurial owner of some of 
London's most exclusive restaurants seeks an ©te- 
nant PA/secretary. He needs a well organised per- 
son who is able to solve problems as they arise 
and ensure that his day runs smoothly. Yew U enjoy 
a busy and involving day with plenty or variety. 
Skills 100/50. 

01-4998070 

(CAROUKEiaKSSKRETAmAMWMBITSi 


LEISURE GROUP PA 
£9,000 AT 24+ 

Join the busy environment of a. prestigious 
leisure/ restaurant group and benefit from 
our standing company perks. A varied day 
will mean lots of envolvemenL working for 
a General Manager who enjoys delegating. 
You will need s/h and audio skills (90/55). 
with some knowledge of French. Contact 
Melanie Laing. 

OI 6311541'ltec Cons' 

Price -^cimiesoKi 

riftSTMEVSlB. 


CAREER PROSPECTS 
SALES PA 
.110.000+ 

Young araf tmqhl amt VBtang to 
me lutiue 7 Xte etoanurq high 
lech comowrr * seeking mote 
non fust * seaman Good ryWrt 
combined vrtfi arnto siuUs and 
sane snormand woidd be deaL 
as would WP stalls More bihjw- 
uniiy you musi «w mratoemem 
and ihe abhv to taw on more 
responwOtilv Weal age 21 30 





SECRETARY TO 
. CHIEF EXEC 
KNIGHTSBRIOGE 
£ 11 , 000 . 

Posed art capable sectetm wnh 

eacelleffl shwmart art wig 

would enm dpvetoomg this sec 

ipunai rote mto more at a PA 

Lois oi telephone wort art chert 

emenammeni are also mpmum 

in tbn Tzp«Py e*oandmg Propetiv 

Devei opmert Comoanv Ideal age 

?7 35 liee lundi 5 weets MW- 

day bonus and BtlPA 

- 

CITY 

MERCHANT BANK 
NO SHORTHAND 
<£10,000+ Mortgage 
Seowai npeisnce la Dieda 
lew! coopted with an A level 
ecxmti art a wUmgness u 
hrio od art share ipswifitowes 
Ml be itwwqntf apOKoaue and 
wed rewaided. Valuable beneins 
and you vril ouaMy lor a 
subsidised mortgage atto t year 
flirt® ivtmg ai TO «om b needed 

%s# 


CONSULTING 
COMPANY 
- MAYFAIR- 
210,000 

You fjno> level secieunH dwen- 

ence n site wW be perflea .lor 

Avwmq mo ow ehaUemmo ue- 

iwji suceuwi nut «rwig In a 

mrunvc anew AnEsueemuWv 

a nnenrd I w ■ worn Mettqtm 

vwuoo PA iWonBW Annie nan 

wqi ADWv Hi «Q*W* «efnal«inil 

i ravel wianotmeias and a comoem. 

wflipiiq penuuwv eswatui Age ?0* 

Bernadette 
of Bond St. 


Ask. Alfred Marks. 


ADMIN SECRETARY TO 
FASHION DIRECTOR 

£9,500 + 40% CLOTHES DISCOUNT 

This internationally renowned fashion 
company are looking for a smart elegant 
person with a charming personality to 
liaise with designers, help at fashion 
shows and occasionally model a dress! 
You will need excellent secretarial skills 
(90/60) combined with a flair for admin- 
istration. Age 25-40. For further details, 
please phone Kate Wood, Carolyn Wes- 

- ton nr Jane Shirley on: - • 

- &;■ 01-734^157' ' r 

- Alfred Marks Recruitment ..Consultant^. 

-1 151 Regent Street^ : . 

London -Wl. -. 



BEWARE THE IDES OF MARCH 

and don't rely on the Budget! Get happy 
and secure working with our famous 
team of Guiness temps who delight top 
Employers with their Secretarial and WP 
skills. Incidently, you also get paid - 
superbly! 


01 -583 8807- 





FINE ART 
AUCTIONEERS - 
MAYFAIR 

howd eiDoi wowor rawres 
«i piuokhoi sfDewv win eud 
bn vnrtund wi iy»«q iwwig 
wnWi » rortvvn 
km »qrtnp «w*> piieif*! 
mMv in a-**e 

mo aim (KovnnenK 4 pan 
mown you irnurt aso i» a 
imrjew onsanuj and a art wnuM 

Tin sawv rsoou fasa 

Bernadette 
of Bond St. 

RocfuilnivnT CanfulUnK 
lb 55 mu AarHhvMde) 




UK 

CONFERENCE 
ORGANISERS 
Nr OXFORD CIRCUS 

A fcvriv voung jiwWnd sea«ar» 
ww id* Mruig lor a umsu 
Run » im snmuahng emwonrani 
Fimfli n toman iKfiul wgana 
win a cooftoert ttfconow manna 
«rt good onpavsa'onai sails 
&oi trs® 

Bernadette ' 
of Bond St. 

fiaerDiimeni ConsmunK 
«o Si. (iwtt mm w f wmii fa l 
^ 01-623 1204 



TO £11.000 
CROYDON 

WP coordraiDi rtremstiatoi ?5- 
A5 teuaue to A.m« to nw 
nagwg cowses Olive in FT 225 
plus general aflimusiranon and. 
bason. 

£9,500+ EXCELLENT 
BENEFITS. 

PA Sec mrt 20 e 100/50. to* 2 
Vice Presrtems lm Meiouw 
Bank, Div Coirtme einoKicv 
wiin a remed working 
atrrwjjlwre 

£90)00+ GOOD 
BENEFITS 

PA Sec mrt 20 s no anonhand 
l*cenm rwung adimn WP au- 
dio plus good educational 
standaid Inr e.eculive ol mi CO 
Wl Dieertul canartaie apprei> 
and io wort win young iwety 
»0W 

E8JM10+ GOOD- 
BENEFITS 

Sk 30 48. 100 '50 lm 2 Seoioi 
Legal Assstams ol piomneiii UK 
co Woik n pteasart sunound- 
mgs (i Hawwt Sotnie 

£8,000+ GOOD 
BENEFITS 

PA sec eath 20s wreUfirt W 
rq WP autbo sh an advantage 
Presti^ous olv to wort In 
young qq- ahead dnetiois hvely 
ouigoing oeisonaliry needed 

' Tel 01-734 3768 
or 437 8476. 
133-135 Oxford SL 
MILLER 
MCNISH 

Rec.Cons. . 


4Ky firm never looted beck 
uice w Started to get 
our temporaries f. "r 

from... 9 ^ 

lem r 


CITY oi-OOfiKfll'weH 0001*99 0098 ^ j 

The firsi numbers to ling ’ v •• • rr " 


PR IN 
C0VENT GARDEN 
To £10,000 neg. 

>lave yno ihe cool head art su- 
per suns io ehwermv anamse 
lira hm y Chaimar oi this highly 
sJccatsiuiPfi ccunpanv J Jliev re . 
ndi tnown lor itwv ptesligrtus 
acconnis in hv wild ol laslhor 
and sivle inerelore you musi 
ha.y artd rueMmanor ane»cei- 
lent leknmtme manner art ihe 
aruhiy in slay cairn under ail rn 
S>-. Pl»niy ti ICflM lof a krtW 
cirfnnull.ri '.rfietify anlh skills 
Pi IPO bO Aoe 25-r- 
m PH AflwfliSBig or Fashion an 
advantage 


-jO 



BANKING OPPORTUNITIES 

Sc\ oral of our Clients, maior Banks in the City of 
London, reauire Ihe following secretarial 
personnel. 

All these vacancies have excellent benefits in- 
cluding mortgage subsidy and personal ■ loans. 
M.D. Secretary £10.500 
Bilmeual (Eiir French) Secretary £2,500 
Shorthand Secretary £3,750 

PIpav iciophoin- lor lurihnr iniormalian. 

PAMELA DiCKENS 
Recruitment Consultants 

(BANKING SECTION) 


Pamela SSiekens 


01-491 7195 



L. inline for dfitvul.' Then looL no funhec Tins 

lop-rankina younu ud aeenoy has n aJL 
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. MONDAY MARCH 1 1 9§6 ' 



TIMES 



9 9 ^ 


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17 


FINANCE AND INDUSTRY 


os notebook 

Consensus 
wrong on 


f 



From Maxwell Newton 
New Ywk 


The pred»cOon by 25 of the 
most _ prestigious names in 
American economic forecast- 
ing that the yield on 30-year 
US treasury bonds would rise 
from 9 per cent at the end of 
December to 9.45 per emit on 
Jane 30, 1986, and to 9.76 per 
cent on December 31, 1986, 
had only one si gnifican t dis- 
senter — Mr Gary S chillin g, a 
long-time bear on the . US 
economy. 

He predicted that the yield 
on the long bond would be 8 
per cent on both dates. 
t By last Friday the 

* era ao mists’ forecast — nude 

just two months ago — lay in 
rains. The 30-year bond yield 
had already fallen to 816 per 
cent t 

There were several. reasons 
for this almost unprecedented 
disaster in American forecast- 
ing (one in which I. did not 
participate, having been a boll 
on bonds since the second 
quarter of 1984). 

The first and most egregjhms 
error of the economists was 
their continuing bfind belief in 
the workability of the 
“monetarist” model. They 
looked at the growth of Ml — 
II per cent over the last 12 

* months — and convinced them- 
selves that this most produce a 
strong “surge of growth” in 
American economic activity, 

They were undeterred by the 
fact that, since 1982, the 
velocity of money, the key- 
stone of monetarist foreeast-, 
ing, had behaved most 
erratically 1 , rendering inopera- 
ble and irrelevant the mone- 
tarist model which they barf all: 
learned at college — seemingly 
all they had learned. - 
In 1985, after a huge 
tary input by the Fed 
uing in October, 1984, 
economy turned in its lowest 
growth performance — 2J2 per 
cent — since the recession of 
1982. Economic data for Janu- 
ary indicates continuing eco- 
nomic weakness. 

Retail sales,' industrial pro- 
duction, durable goods orders 
and a record trade deficit in 
January combine to suggest 
that the economy in the first 
quarter of 1986 will be iuckj to; 
equal the X-2 per cent rate of 
increase in the fourth quarter 
of 1985 — a figure which 
provided a further humfliatiiig 
defeat for the “consensus”. 

Another reason for the 
economists' error was the 
failure to recognize the force of 
disinflation in America today. 
Commodity futures prices are 
at their lowest since early in 
1978 and are 48 per cent lower 
than at that tune in real terms. 

Average hourly earnings, 
which rose by 7 per cent a year 
between 1976 and 1984, rose 
by only 23 per cent in the 12 
months ended December, 
1985. In real 1977 terms, 
average hourly earnings are 
about 6 per cent lower than in 
1976. The Federal Reserve 
has cut the rate of money; 
growth. Ml, by 40 per cent 
since September. 

.Another reason for the ap- 
palling mistakes in the 
“consensus” was the fitflure to 
believe a tiny group of fore- 
casters who correctly predict- 
ed a massive drop in the spot 
price of crude ofl. 

So severe has been the 
devastation that it is possible 
the American price level will 
fall in 1986. This, with a 
financial crisis in the oil states 
to match the crisis hr the 
farming states. 

Since February, 198S, when 
the devaluation of the dollar 
began, commodify formes 
prices, measured in dollars, 
have fallen by 15 per cent, not 
w hat would be expected from a 
3b per cent devaluation of the 
dollar. 

Gradually, the truth of tire 
situation — that disinflation or 
even deflation remains domi- 
nant — has been absorbed by 
tbe Americas financial mar- 
kets. Since the third week of 
Jan nary. March T-bonds have 
bolted from 82 to 94, an 
increase of 15 per cent, which 
has bees more or less matched 
is the cash bond . market, 
where the yield on the 30-year 
bond is 8Vi per cenL 
Now that the financial mar- 
kets have perceived the truth 
of America's situation, it is 
likely that the yield on the long 
bond’ will continue to drop over 
rime, reaching about 7 per cent 
in early 1987, 



Sea oil price 

ensures neutral Budget 


By David Smith, Economics Correspondent 


' 'The latest foil in oil prices, 
with Noith Sea crude dipping 
well below $14 a barrel at the 
end of last week, .has guaran- 
teed- that the forthcoming 
Budget will be broadly based 
and neutral. 

The Chancellor, Mr Nigel 
Lawson, has rejected the argu- 
ment that the oil price collapse 
means he should raise -overall 
taxation to keep within his 
financial targets. 

Treasury economists calcu- 
late that more buoyant non-oil 
revenues will partly offset the 
£S billion to £6 billion short- 
fall in oil revenues in 1 986-87. 
But they say the £3.5 billion 
originally estimated for tax 
cuts has already gone. 

With the pound once more 
under pressure, the Chancellor 
has to present aJBqdget accept- 
able to the financial markets." 
This beans adhering to his 
existing target of £73 billion 
for public sector borrowing in ' 
the next financial year. 

Mr Lawson could, still an- 
nounce income tax cuts in- a 
neutral Budget by putting up 


indirect -taxes, notably excise 
duties on petrol and cigarettes. 
But . with real . incomes and 
consumer spending set to 
grow strongly, and with the 
prospect of a sizeable cut in 
the basic rate of income tax 
having disappeared with the 
oil price fall, he is likely to 
leave well alone. 

The City has pushed hard 
for the abolition of stamp duty 
on share purchases, in ad- 
vance of the Stock Exchange 
big bang move to negotiated 
commissions in October. In- 
stead of abolition, the Chan- 
cellor is more likely to opt for 
a halving of the rate from 1 to 
0.5 per cent which, with higher 
turnover, could cost the Ex- 
chequer las than £100 mil- 
lion.'' * - ‘ - 

A pulling together of the 
various government job mea- 
sures, to make up an unem- 
ployment package to be 
announced on Budget day, fan 
be expected. This may include 
an extension of the present 
Job Start scheme, operating in 
nine, pilot areas since the 



Nigel Lawson: rejects 
raising taxes overall 


beginning of the year. 

Job Stan provides counsel- 
ling and job offers on state 
schemes for the long-term 
unemployed as well as £20 a 
week for those who take on 
jobs for less than £80 a week. 

One difficulty with a big 
extension of the scheme fa- 
voured by Lord Young, the 
Secretary of State for Employ- 
ment, is that it is too early to 
assess its success. 


The Government will also 
announce a big publicity pack- 
age designed to increase public 
awareness of various job mea- 
sures. One reason for the rise 
in adult unemployment in the 
past three months has been 
that the take-up of vacancies 
on the expanded Community 
Programme has bran slow. 

The Chancellor is expected 
to argue in his Budget speech 
that the benefits of lower oil 
prices on growth and inflation, 
and the improved world eco- 
nomic outlook, more than 
outweigh the short-term loss 
of tax cuts. In addition, he is 
likely to hold out the prospect 
of cheaper money when oil 
and the foreign exchanges 
settle. 

Independent forecasters, in- 
cluding the Institute for Fiscal 
Studies and several City econ- 
omists. have calculated that 
although the oil price drop has 
fait this year's tax cut hopes, 
the prospects for big reduc- 


tions next year are good. From 
'of view. 


a political point of view, tax 
cuts in March 1 987 will appeal 
to the majority of the Cabinet 


Builders 


on tax 
dodgers 


By Edward Townsend 
Industrial Correspondent 
- . Proposals to combat the 
growth of Britain's black econ- 
4Mny, said today to be respon- 
sible for a big increase in 
ly building and toihreat- 
of boua.fide 
ha,ve been put 
■-’Chancellor of ' the 
by the Building 
Employers’ Confederation. . 

" In a report sent to Mr Nigel 
Lawson and Mr John Patten. 
Minister for Housing, Urban 
Affairs and Construction, the 
confederation urges the Gov- 
ernment to introduce a low 
threshold of £10,000 for value 
\pnmjtoe 



Small firms ‘may have kept 
jobless down by a quarter’ 


By Derek Harris, Industrial Editor 

Britain's unemployment positive on new job creation 
figures might have been a and those which are not. 
quarter higher but for the The biggest increases last 

year were in financial services, 
where a quarter of the busi- 
nesses added to their 
workforces, and manufactur- 
ing where 21 per cent did. 
Another 12 per cent in finan- 
. rial services were expecting in 


creation of Jobs by small 
firms, according to the latest 
quarterly survey by the Small 
Business Research Trust- 
Calculations suggest that 
smaH. businesses have provid- 
ed between 800,000 and 1.1 


milfioQ' jobs since I980, r in- ; the first quarter to add 
dudiflgselfetnploymenL - The black spoL was the 
- Ih the past year, 12 per cent transportation sector where 14 


of businesses surveyed had 
expanded their' workforces 
and 5 per cent expected in- 
creases in this quarter. The 
survey strikes a balance be- 
tween businesses which are 


percent expected to shed staff 
in the current quarter. 

The most successful job 
creators appear to be business- 
es employing beteeen 15 and 
49 people. Some 23 per cent 


had taken on new staff with a 
further 1 1 per cent expecting 
increases this quarto-. 

Optimism about employ- 
ment mirrors that on in- 
creased sales, although at 26.2 
per cent, fewer expected sales 
improvements in the current 
quarter compared with the last 
survey. 

There is another cautionary 
note in the. survey which 
reports that small businesses 
comtinue to be worried about 
high interest rates — a quarter 
complained about them — 
with the second greatest cause 
for concern being the total tax 
burden. 



.Meanwhile, say-foe build- 
ers, a more vigorous, and 
effective enforcement of the 
existing VaT registration lev- 
el of £1 9,500. should be made 
to recoup massive losses 
through non-payment. 
by“cowboy” builders. • 

The confederation says that 
foe dodging of VAT has 
seriously undermined the abil- 
ity of honest builders to offer 
job. and training opportuni- 
ties. 

“Encouragement of the 
black economy will eventually 
result in the major part of the 
domestic market' being served 
by semi-skilled or self-trained 


amateurs — an appalling pros- 
blic and u 


pect few the public and for the 
maintenance of proper stan- 
dards in the industry." 

Tbe report highlights an 
Inland Revenue estimate that 
the overall size of the black 
economy is 7.5 per cent of 
gross domestic product, repre- 
senting about £25 billion of 
undeclared income or £4 bil- 
lion in tost revalue. This, say 
the builders, would amount to. 
3p off the basic rate of income 
tax. 

But Mr Jack Newby, direc- 
tor-general of the confedera- 
tion. said that the overall 
figures masked a much greater 
problem 

“We are concerned that the 
Government has not so for 
taken a for more critical stance 
on this position. It sometimes 
seems to be regarded as an 
acceptable way of easing some 
of the worst effects of unem- 
ployment when; in fact, it is 
destroying jobs and training 
opportunities.” 

Recent estimates from pro-, 
ducers of building maienals 
are that . black economy 
“cowboys” buy about £135 
billion of VAT-paid materials 
while the labour element of 
the subsequent work amounts 
to £235 billion. 


Brock turns down 
Id 



From Bailey Morris, Washington 


Mr William Brock, the US 
Labour Secretary, Iras decided 
not to accept the job as head of 
the World Bank, when the 
term of Mr A W "Tom” 
Clausen expires in June. • 

His decision, taken largely 
for personal reasons, puts 
renewed pressure on the Rea- 
gan Administration to find a 
candidate acceptable' -to Eu- 
rope and Japan to assume the 
bank presidency. 

Mr Brock is the third high- 
leveL official to reject the US 
Administration's overtures. 
Earlier,. Mr Paul Volcker, 
chairman of the US Federal 
Reserve Board, and Mr John 
Whitehead, Lender-Secretary 
of State, expressed lack of 
interest in the job. 

Mr Brock's derision appears 
to have revived the candidacy 
of Mr William Middendorf. 
US ambassador to the EEC 
who has continued a relentless 
campaign for the job. In 
addition, Mr William Simon, 
a former US Treasury Secre- 



W illiam Brock: third top US 
official to refuse post 
tary who is a high-level Wall 
Street official is also under 
consideration. 

Mr Middendorf who is 
supported by Mr Donald 
Regan, the White House Chief 
of Staff, earlier mounted a 
vigorous campaign for the job 
but his candidacy drew oppo- 
sition from Europe and Japan 
Now, he is being supported 
by a group of US Senators 


$31bn Brazil debt pact 


New York ( Reuter ) — Brazil ’ 
and its leading commercial 
bank creditors have agreed on 
a S31 billion (£21.3 billion) 
financial package that in- 
cludes a substantial reduction 
in interest rates on part of the 
country's $103 billion debt. 
Citibank said yesterday. 

The agreement calls for the 
interest rate on $ 1 6.5 billion of 
debt foiling due in 1985 and 
1986 to be lowered to 1 per 
cent over the London Euro- 
dollar rate from an average of 
about 2 per cent, a cut that will 
save Brazil about $150 mil- 
lion. Brazil's 700 creditor 
banks worldwide are also be- 
ing asked to keep in place 
$15.5 billion in trade and 


The proposed terms will be 
sent out to all the banks in the 
next few days, and contracts 
should be ready for signing by 
early June, Citibank said. 

Brazil, the developing 
world's largest debtor, chalked 
up trade surpluses of $13.1 
billion ih 1984 and $12.45 
billion in 1985. It has also 
built up its foreign reserves to 
about $9 billion after ending 
1983 in the red. 

Under the accord, which 
was reached late on Saturday 
after three weeks of intensive 
talks, the repayment of $6 
billion of debt that matured 
last year will.be stretched over 
seven years, with payments 


interbank credit lines for one ■ beginning in 1 99 J and running 


year. 


until March 15. 1993. 


BASE 

LENDING 

RATES 


ABN 

Adam & Company 

BCC1. 

Otiban* Sawngst 

CwisoMAied CrCS- 12V" 

OdltoWWiat Trust 12V- 1 

Co- opeiaire Bank — 

C Hnme & Co 

Lloyds Bank -*?V- 

Nat titetmiiBftr ■ «*» v 

ftny.il Bank of SutfUnd . 

TSE 

CNftkML-. - 


f Maiipf* Baw 


‘Little bang’ heralds first 
phase of City revolution 


By Richard Thomson, Banking Correspondent 


The stock market opens this Other _ non-member 
morning with the first stage of institutions which are apply- 
ihe City revolution now in ing for membership without 


□regress. The so-called “little 
bang” began over foe weekend 
when non-member 

institiutions became free to go 
above the 29.9 per cent limit 
so for imposed on the- owner- 
ship of Stock Exchange mem- 

Union Bank ofSwitzeriand. 
which is raising its i stake i m tire 
brokerage fin* 1 of .Phillips « 
Drew, and Dow Scandia. 


which is taking full control of 
»r brow 


another broker. Sayoury- 
Miinc. are so far the only two 
outside institutions to take 
advantage of the new rules. • 


owning an existing member 
firm may now be given per- 
mission to trade on ihe Exr 
change. The exchange's 
membership council is consid- 
ering a handful of applications 
next week and several more 
applications the week after 
that . 

Nomura Ltd. which will 
become a broker, and Merrill 
Lynch, which is launching a 
broking and jobbing opera- 
tion. wiir.be considered by the 
cdimmuee'ibmorrow. 

Despiie the easing of mem- 
bership rules, however, the 


system of dual capacity in the 
market will remain until the 
big bang in October. 

This first stage was designed 
to reduce the disruption in the 
market which might have 
been caused by too many 
changes at once. It also allows 
new firms to practise at trad- 
ing in foe exchange and en- 
ables parent companies to 
inject more capital into them 

Phillips & Drew has also 
announced that it has taken 
100 per cent control of 
Moulsdale & Co, the gill- 
edged jobber, to form Phillips 
& Drew Moulsdale with a 
capitalization of £25 million. 


Rodime 
comes to 
London 


By Clare Dobie 

Trading in the shares of 
Rodime, a computer compo- 
nent manufacturer, starts to- 
day on the London Stock 
Exchange. The shares are ex- 
pected to open at £8.45. 

Rodime, which has fac- 
tories in Glenrothes, Fife, and 
Boca Raton, Florida, is com- 
ing to foe stock market via an 
introduction. 

The London 

quotation will be in addition 
to an existing listing in Ameri- 
ca . where its shares have been 
traded over the counter for 
nearly four years. On Friday 
the share price was 
$12.25(£8.45). 

The company makes Win- 
chester disc drives for small 
business, personal and porta- 
ble computers. It is develop- 
ing disc drives for 
minicomputers and main- 
frames. 

Sales have quadrupled in 
the Iasi two years from £19.0 
million to £75.9 million in foe 
year to September 30 1985. But 
like other companies in the 
industry. Rodime has suffered 
from competition on price 
and the rising costs of devel- 
oping new products. Profits 
have nevertheless risen from 
£5.1 million two years ago to 
£14.8 million last year. There 
is no forecast for this year. 

The company has cash of 
£24.0 million, raised in share 
issues in America in 1983 and 
1984. The money is earmarked 
for further product develop- 
ment 


Reporting of 
fraud to police 
‘unnecessary’ 


Requiring auditors to report 
any fraud or financial irregu- 
larity they’ discover in foeir 
client companies to foe police 
or other third party would 
constitute unnecessary inter- 
ference by foe state in business 
affairs, according to a survey 
of senior businessmen. 

Two out of three directors 
and top executives surveyed 
by the Chartered Association 
of Certified Accountants 
thought that auditors should 
be required to report fraud 
only to their client companies 
who would then undertake 
any necessary' action on their 
own account 

Opposition to the idea of 
auditors reporting irregular- 
ities to the police was partially 
reduced on the suggestion that 
this should be done after the 
diem had been informed, but 
even this was acceptable to 
only 32 per cenL 

Many businessmen thought 
that imposing a duty to report 
to a third party such as the 
police would destroy trust 
between audiior and client 


Executive Editor Kenneth Fleet 


A painful pregnancy 
for the Baker plan 


Whatever happened to the Baker 
plan? The US Treasury Secretary’s 
col leagues- in -arms, the finance min- 
isters of the other large industrial 
countries, have been asking him since 
the turn of the year. 

Latin American governments, 
meeting in Uruguay over the week- 
end. are again threatening the kind of 
alternatives the Baker initiative was 
designed to pre-empt. Mexico, 
nearest and dearest to the heart of 
America, is providing a painful test of 
American strategy. A deadline is 
approaching fast: the April meetings 
of the committees of finance min- 
isters from “North" and “South" 
who run the International Monetary 
Fund and the World Bank. 

The Baker plan called for co- 
operative action by the international 
financial institutions and the 
commercial banks to provide “new 
money" for a shortlist of 1 5 debtor 
nations which were unlikely to be 
able to go unaided to market. The 
code words of debts peak changed. 
There was less talk of “adjustment" 
(which means cutting imports) in 
developing countries; more of 
“growth" (which means expanding 
production and exports). The world 
was to be hitched out of debt by its . 
braces, not strapped into solvency by 
belt-tightening. The IMF, purveyors 
to the world economy of nice tough 
belts, was in eclipse; the World Bank, 
suppliers of hard-wearing braces, was 
to lead the new approach. 

Banking self-interest naturally, 
was at the heart of the change. The 
first element was a fear among 
bankers that tbe prevailing con- 
ditions of slow growth and high 
interest rates locked them into the 
permanent provision of large loans to 
Third-World governments. Virtually 
all amortization payments due from 
Latin America last year were re- 
scheduled. . 

The second element was an unease 
among bankers that belt-tightening 
was actually increasing the risk of 
debt repudiation. John Williamson's 
“calculus of repudiation" in the just- 
published Oxford Review of Eco- 
nomic Policy demonstrates that 
governments are most tempted not 
when their reserves have run out but, 
on the contrary, after a period of 
deflation has built reserves up to the 
point at which they will pay for a few 
months' essential imports, so that 
governments can live without a drip- 
feed of trade credits. By last year, the 
world's seven biggest debtors had 
built up reserves with the aid of a $40 
billion trade surplus. 


sources, notably the World Bank; and 
the first significant feature of the 
Baker plan is that the Americans 
plainly accepted this. But, secondly, it 
introduced a new tension into World 
Bank finance. This was traditionally 
if not exclusively for specific projects 
in developing countries; but is under 
the Baker plan to be broadened into 
loans made conditional on changes in 
management of debt-ridden econo- 
mies as a whole. 

What's more, the World bank 
would carry’ the clout of the commer- 
cial banks, whose loans would follow 
World Bank agreements: with this 
clout would come the obligation on 
the World Bank not to puli its 
punches. 

To show this new approach could 
work to the satisfaction of all three 
parties - commercial banks, inter- 
national institutions and govern- 
ments - something recognizable as a 
“Baker loan" had to be in place or in 
prospect before the April meetings of 
the IMF and the World Bank. In the 
meantime, however, the earth moved; 
and with it the fortunes of the Baker 
15. 

The falling oil price hurt Indonesia, 
Venezuela and Nigeria; helped Bra- 
zil; and left Argentina's prospects 
little changed. Most important of all. 
it thrust Mexico's tentative 
rescheduling plans into chaos. 

The most critical case for treat- 
ment is therefore a country suffering 
not merely from excessive borrow- 
ings yielding poor returns, but also 
from the need to adjust to a sudden 
fall in the price of an important 
export commodity. According to the 
Mexican finance minister, the fall in 
oil prices will lose Mexico $6 billion 
of expected export earnings in 1986. 

There are hopeful signs. Falling oil 
prices, on balance, will stimulate 
world growth. The clearest winner - 
Brazil - is succeeding in renegotiating 
its commercial bank debt at quite 
markedly easier interest rates, while 
taking advantage of cheaper energy to 
reinforce its attack on inflation.Even 
in Mexico, falling oil prices do not 
excuse all economic failure. 

Whatever deal is patched together 


for. Mexico will be a compromise 

loan" 


between a new-style “Baker loan" or 
an % old-style first-aid job. It will 
thereby illustrate one of the fun- 
damental difficulties in the plan. This 
sets targets for an increase in lending, 
while at the same time arguing that 
loans should not be granted except on 
condition that governments in- 
troduce “structural” reforms 


Skilfully presented, the Baker plan 
purported to offer “new money" in 
roughly equal proportions from both 
commercial banks and the inter- 
national financial institutions. It also 
appeared to offer debtor govern- 
ments “softer". longer-term help. 
Only as the plan left the American 
drawing board did its true character, 
and consequent difficulties, become 
apparent. 

More of the genuine “new money" 
would in fact come from official 


Juggling with these conflicting 
objectives will not be easy, and it is 
being made more difficult by the 
Americans' seeming inability to agree 
on a candidate for the presidency of 
the World Bank of sufficient calibre. 
Even at its conception, the plan 
depended heavily on presentation: a 
live birth now depends on the 
appointment of a midwife of inter- 
national reputation. 


Sarah Hogg 


Economics Editor 




INCOME TAX RELIEF F»J985/86 


Guinness Mahon & Co. 


is sponsoring 

Offers for Subscription under the 
Business Expansion Scheme by 


LOCKTON INNS pic 

up to £7,500,000 
The acquisition and management of a chain of public 
houses, FREEHOLD and LONG LEASEHOLD, principally 
'Tree houses” 


LOCKTON RETAIL STORES pic 

up to £7,500,000 

Retail trading under franchise agreements from 
premises in good locations owned by the company 
principally FREEHOLD 


* Experienced management 
* Asset backed 


* Conservatively financed 
* 100% loan facilities available 


* No ‘golden 5 shares for promoters 

The Directors of each company will pursue a conservative 
financing policy designed to provide a high degree of stability to each 
company. 

Individual subscribers should, depending on their circumstances, 
be able to obtain income tax relief at their highest rates of tax in respect 
of the year ending 5th April, 1986. 

Closing date 15th March, 1986, unless extended. 

Tel: 01-623 9333 (24 hour service) for copies of either or both of 
the prospectuses or complete the coupon below. 

This advertisement does not constitute an invitation to subscribe for shares 


To: Guinness Mahon & Co Limited 
32 St Mary at HUL LONDON EC3P 3AJ. 

Please send me a copy of the prospectus for Lockton Inns pic □ 

Lockton Retail Stores pic D 


Name- 


Address. 


Up to 3.5% commission will be pad to professional intermediaries through whom successful 
applications are submitted 



J 


S’. 






£ A-ii 





18 


ei 

tl 

c 

d. 

VL 

lx 

>< 

THE ttt&TIMES 

SbtUfolio 

From your ponfolio card check your 
Sht Share price movements. Add them 
c» 10 gike \ou your a\crall total. Check 
is againsi the daily dividend figure 
j Wished on this page. If ii matches you 
,ve won outnghi or a share of the total 
illy pnre money stated. If you arc a 
finer tallow the cljim procedure on the 
ck or your card. You must always have 
jut card available when claiming. 

No. 

rranpaD) 

Yoer 

K»ro or 

leas 


BUILDING AND ROADS 


( 

RMC 


2 

Yibrupiani 


3 

1 Rnlland 


4 

Tar-nac 


5 

Noutoehatn Bnck 


h 

Costain 


7 

Lilky tFJCl 


S 

EVw (Geomri 


V 

Marshalls iHalrtu) 


10 

Beil Bros 



DRAPERY AND STORES 


11 

Cnuru (fumi 'A' 


ir 

Empire Slorrs 


13 

Tern ConsuLue 


,4 

Pevero 5 iot» 


15 

Seais 


lb 

Rainers (Jewellenl 


17 

Simpson (SI ‘A 1 


18 

Freemans 


19 

House of Lctdsc 


:n 

Penir.H 



ELECnilCALS 


21 

PrrtSJC 



AB Ektl 


23 

Mull none Elect 


24 

Dale Elen 


2S 

Eknioatmponenif 


2h 

Elea ionic Mach 


^7 

Ones Auiomjlion 


28 

Duhtlwr 


2V 

(Trosvenur 


30 

Sysiem Designera 



INDUSTRIALS A-D 


>1 

Bronusioke Inds 


32 

Be Syphon 


3? 

Cook (Wmi 


.34 

Br Viu 


35 

Castings 


3n 

Crown House 


3 7 

Dobson Park 


3S 

Biaiihwaiie Grp 


3V 

Dyson UJJ) 


40 

Clayton Son 


| & Timo Newspapers Lid. DxS; Total | 



FINANCE AND INDUSTRY 


THE TIMES MONDAY MARCH 3 1986 


Wccklv Dividend 


Please make a note of jour daily totals 
for the weekly dividend of £201000 in 
Saturday's newspaper. 


tnu 


SAT 


BRITISH FUNDS 


Stocv our- 

sundma 

e sipcv 


Pnct Ch ge M. Dress 
Iasi on ertv Had. 
FrvJay WM* y«% VtfS 


SHORTS [Under Five Years) 


996m Traae C HP. 1986 

99”. 


iao 

704m Tr«as 

3*. 1986 

98 


xi 

109am Ejc" 

10 N 1906 

ff; 


105 

1,40m Tre» 

13% 1966 


1£0 

592m Tims 

S % 1964-66 

3&. 

♦ ‘i 

06 

621m £xcn 

:■.% law 

95 % 

-> 

26 

1013m E>cb 

,4% 1986 

101 S 


138 

I2f7m E«b 

13 % 1987 

101 ■ 

+•« 

131 

902m Truitt CIO .% 1067 

69'. 


,03 

052m E«cb 

2' % 1907 

94 '.•♦'• 

£6 

15J8ra E.en 

,0 *. 1907 

99. 

*% 

106 

535m Fund 

6 % 1905-87 

95 1 . 

*% 

60 

1500m Tnus 

10% 1907 

98't 

*% 

10.1 

084m Trims 

3** 1907 

93- 

♦j. 

32 

1976m Tre» 

>2*. 1987 

,01% 


116 

478m TrMS 

7 V*. 1905-60 

95'- 

*», 

01 

1441m E»cf 

10 *. i960 

99 - 

*'. 

106 

,171m Treas C9 ,966 

or- 

*•- 

100 

1153m Tnatt 

3% 1978-08 

W. 

*j. 

£4 

1983m TrMS 

9‘ % ,988 

96-'- 


90 

2299m TrMS 

11 % ,968 

101'* 


113 

1390m T teas 

10 % 1988 

»■- 

* *4 

106 

2353m Dcf 

10*. ,989 


*i 

102 

1096m E»cr 

,0 1999 

99'- 

*1Vi 

103 

309m Ericn 

2 % 1990 

77 . 

+'■ 

£2 

1767m E-cn 

H% 1909 

101 •♦! 

109 

521m Trius 

5*. 1906-68 

06-'. 

*'• 

60 

12i4re Eicn 

11% 1990 

101 • 

+, 

,09 

1059m TroasCS .% I9B9 

96'. 

♦% 

95 

*24m Trrras 

3% 1989 

04- 

♦»- 

J 5 

10(9m Trees 

I r. 1990 

107'. 

♦ 1*4 

12.1 

1326m E>cb 

12'.-% ,990 

3*. 1990 

106'- 


1,6 

446m Tims 

61'. 

♦% 

37 

SSSm Treas 

0 .% >907-90 

92’. 

*•>'- 

09 

1406m Treas 

,0*. 1990 

97 s - 

♦ IV 

102 


FIVE TO FIFTEEN YEARS 

22* im Incas tr«% 1991 iW. 
349m Fund 5’ *. 1987-91 
1129m E«cn II”. 1991 
935m Trejs 12'.*. 1992 
i083m Tims 1D% 1992 
947m Tims CIO i992 
1158m Even 12". % 1992 
1998m E«eb 13 % 1992 
1177m Troas 10% 1993 
1210m Treak 12 1993 

490m Fund 8% 1993 
H5Jm Ti*j* 13".% 1993 
727* Troas 1« •• 1991 
1289m ELicn U % 1991 
17i6m &ai 13.% 1991 
101 Sm Treas 9% 1991 
2189m Tims 12% 1995 
153m G» 3% 1990-95 
2021m E»B1 10 1 % 1985 
1133m Tim* 12"-% 1995 
10B3m Tnea* H% 1996 
6S3m Trw* 9% 1992 96 
173*m Tim* 15 .% 1996 
938m E*en 13 w 1996 
1766m TieeS ,J'.% 1997 
Z562a Even 10' % 1997 
901m Trees B‘i% 1997 
i282m E .101 15% ’997 

777rn Tims 6’.% 199S-9B 
2403m E/tfi 9 .% >968 
1468m Tims is .% 1996 
2776m E>di 12% '998 
10CU m Tims 9 % 1999 
3287m ILrth 12 .% 1999 
1273m Tims ID % 1999 
1396m Cor. 10’.% 1999 
2ii4m Treas 13*- 2000 


♦ 1 % 
87'. *1 
,02'* -.1% 
no *,% 
96. *1\- 
100'. +1'.- 
108 *1’. 
M3 . *+ln 
98. *1". 
110 ♦ ,'. 
B3.*+1 
116'. +1*. 
121 .*.1 • 
IIS'- 


*1’. 


110'. 

92". 

108'. 

90% 

11J- 

120>. 

92'. »-,S 
126 .- *1 >. 
U7'. *r« 
117'. *1% 
100'.- *r« 
M'-«+1 
128 - *1*. 
77*. ♦, 
96". ♦,'* 
133 «.l . 
111 '. * 1 % 
95 . ♦ . 
IW-te-iv 
101". *l 
99-- *1 
119 .- +,'/ 


OVER FIFTEEN YEARS 

797m T-w* ,0% 200 » 99*. 

blBm Con. 9 >% 2001 98 

1442m Tmas 14% 1998-01 123'- 
714m Conv 10". MC2 99'. 
17Wm EjuSi 12”. I9W-02 111. 
082m Vu 9 % 2002 98 

1006m Thus 1IJ°* 2003 I0<r- 

2241m Tims 13 .% 200003 124'.- 
2101 m Tr-si 11 % 2001-01 110 ” 1 
0?ten Tims iff*. 2004 99 * 

236m Fund 3 % 1999-04 53 . 

fl72m Con. -9 % 2004 96 

Con. 9 2005 B =20 20'. 

385m Con. 9 % 2COS 96". 
1097m EuSi 10 % 2005 104 | 

2620m Tims 12 % 2WO-OS 119- 
406m Tims 8% 2002-06 84 • 

35'Om T.^as H'.** 2003-07 llJ'. 
1592m Tieas 13 % 200J-08 177-1 
627m T-eas 4 *. 2006-12 62M 
498m Tims 7 .% 2012-15 8? . 

1201m E*cn <2% 2013-17 120' 


11 3 
66 
10 8 
116 
102 

105 
113 

119 
102 
11 4 

7 2 
118 

120 
11 7 
H3 
97 

II I 
42 
104 
112 
116 
9.7 
119 

11.3 
1T3 

<04 
97 
11 7 
87 
101 
116 

106 
TOD 
10 6 
10J 

10.3 
109 


100 

99 

113 

100 
TO 7 

99 

99 

no 

104 
10 0 
66 
99 
469 
99 
10.0 
IDS 
95 
104 
106 
68 
94 
>0 0 


UNDATED 


,46m ConsdH 4% 


98 


69Sra v»*r L/i 3 °» 






73 



3i - ♦'. 

96 


7ia Comers 2 % 


90 


113m Tims 7 % 

25 -•♦ '. 

9.7 


INDEX-LINKED 





510m T.ms IL 2 s . 1990 

102- *•- 

a? 


1131m Tims H. 2% '9% 

■ 

35 


744m Treas IL2 % 3001 




569m Treat: IL2 % 3003 

98. * . 

31 


tOtlm Tr«as ft. 3% 3006 




7T5m Troas IL3 ■- TCWl 




1015m Tinas 1L2 % 2011 




S13m T. eJ , IL2 % 2013 




lOlten Tinas >L2 % 2016 


32 


90fim Treas >L2 % 2020 

*7- *« 

£2 


BANKS DISCOUNT HP 

_ 


STOCK EXCHANGE PRICES 


Capitalization and week’s change 

(Current market price multiplied by the number of shares in issue for the stock quoted) 

ACCOUNT DAYS: Dealings began Feb 24. Dealings end March 10. §Contango day March 10.. Settlement day. March 17. 

§Forward bargains are permitted on two previous days. 


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525m 
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a*n* Leumi ivae, 
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Ban* Cit Scenario 
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29 13 5 
55 7 5 
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29 125 
7 7 75 

14 59 
52 22 6 
44 15 I 

25 21 7 

54 Ml 

48 6* 

22 169 


BREWERIES 


2.042 im AM-Lyone 
2279 7m Bass 
ii Sre BMuwn 
89 6m Boddnjcns 
939m Brow" iMaWwwl 
86 6m BuMMf iH Pi 
252m Burawwooa Bw 
40 8m Cm (Mannmm 
30 6m P—e m sn U A| 

2J77 0m O u wl c n 
1932m umanal WTMMy 
84 Sm beam xmg 
893 im Oumness 
man MaiOTi 6 Hansom 
91 2 m Hrtmmc Don 
30 Bm hnrn«mxm Doll 
581m ktsn tkm 
78 9m Marsico TTiomosoi 
189m Morland 
83? Om 5* Bm nan os 
585 4m Scot 8 Mm 
3 no* am Saagram 
1432m Vau> 

1.001 7m wnaoraad 'A' 

45 Jm Do B 
1356m wnmraao inv 
145 6m WoMTOmm S D 451 
5957 000 noting A 205 




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205 

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10.4 


BUILDINGS AND ROADS 


isi 4m Amec 
2900000 AmcM* 

525m All woods 
7912m BPB musmes 
<33m Baggerage Bne» 
2559m Baran Dbvs 
1.254.000 BaMviamv Cdnstr 
26 0m BaMny 
153m Banlura Cancrew 
100m Balt Bros 
154m SJoOdaY? 

7605a BM Cade 


II 5m Br OrwMng 
4 600.000 Blown S AcKson 
100m Bu ima m 
77 6m BnW 
31 7m Burnell 6 Halam 


5.503.000 Condor Grp 
3363m CoSta** 

300m CoumrWJe 
19 Am bouen (DneM 
7 200.000 Dew fuoroat 
3»6 l«M| 


344 

+6 

105 

43 152 

235 

♦6 

157 

£7 £3 

58 


Oil 

02 &B 

148 

■j 

5.7 

39 ,36 

415 

>14 

11.R 

£8 165 

334 

+7 

98 

25 1£1 

144 

♦ 10 

109 

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0.4 

1 7 40 

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105 

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nnn 


325 

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40 82 

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5231* 

91 

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21 

31 261 

404 

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25 90 

156 

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5.1 34.1 


12.8m Dougue 

13 9m Eran n 

1J76000 Feo 9T 

3S7J .OO0 Do -A" 70 

6.302.000 FfflUn Go 65 

22 8m GaKtanl 62 

iaujoo a«ps A Dm* ora 106 
294a Qedon (I4JJ 294 
759m HAT 99 

2^10.000 hehctf Bar 07 

46 Bm HanAfan^Stuait 53 
37 Om Haywood wauaro 177 
57 im MM 6 Hul 510 

105 7m IbKOCfe Johnson 17 0 
2684 000 Jarats (Jl S Sons 285 
9?7m Lw*g U) 

90 6m DO A 
IB 3m Lawrence (Warn 
62 4a LArflFJC] 

968m L0VO4 (YJ) 

2*6 4m Magnet & 5eufli 

29 7m Manna's 

71 Im MarStMs (HaMax) 185 
9.574 XXW May 8 Hasse* 102 

1305m McMpne l«red) 

1809m Meyer >m 
U8T.OOO M«ir (Stantoy) 

130m Mon* |Aj 
1090m MowWm (Jam) 

66 9a NewsnnA 
21 0m NanmTram Bncft 
170m Peisimran 
3 055.000 Pncwrax TuMMr 
2952.000 POCWTJ 
5042m PMC 
0764m Beaiand 
7J44.000 Booens AOard 
33 la RuDerora 


• +2 
• -3 


4fi 

m-i 

*7 


+3 

+9 

414 


86 98 64 

25 r 29 1&I 
44 61 11J 

43 46 124 

42 BO 95 
54 83 254 
63 7.7 133 
2-3 22359 

7.7 28 102 
54 55 103 

.. n .. 17.7 
23 4310.7 
09 SO 10.4 
IB3 35 138 
61 30 130 


353 

343 

95 

78 

348 

136 

202 


378 

196 

23 

126 

374 


!?S£§r 

lB4«ii Sharps 6 Fisher 
7360000 Smart (J) 

1387 Jm Tarmac 
3665m Tavtor W o o dro w 
2 Jm THDuy Group 
53 la Traws 6 Amok) 

5 638900 Tiers 
7046.000 Tom* 

14 6m vnsrapMM 
33 6m Ward 

201*000 Wamngton (T> 
402m Waits EMte 
1 3*4.000 wetiam Bros 
S31&00O Wnima 

153 2m IMqort (ComoByt 
404 6m Wmraoy tOeorgel 


f95 

1*2 

102 

380 

530 

408 

153 

ZB 

181 

262 

93 

73 

41S 

638 

151 

362 

82 

160 

248 

250 

67 

202 

m 

53 

% 


4-10 250 8.B 98 

44 85 25 113 

+* 89 26 109 

r-1 52r 55 70 

+3 53 08 II 8 

• 410 100 20 123 

• -2 67 49 14.1 

*5 109 3.4 127 

• 44 71 35 13.7 

.. 5 An 53 . 

442 179 47 109 

t-l 7 7 39 105 

.. 07 30 . 

*2 93 74 170 

*10 190 5 2 252 
15.7 15 162 

S3 43 14 8 
BJ 48 104 
43 42 28 
.. 184 4.B 84 

*2 189 36 11.9 

*3 155 38 ISO 

OO 58129 
-5 11 1 45 12 2 

•3 85 55 11 B 

107 4.1 102 

-2 12 14MS 

-1 02 05 155 

44 11.7 28 173 

412 214 4 0 146 

410 111 

i£i 


42 

42 


•-3 
-5 
• 43 

•■’n 5 

42 


45 130 

3.1 129 

M 2U 


03 

134 54 109 
104 4.1 130 
5.7n 05 7 7 
0.0 30 163 
-T4* 10 180 


410 4 5 U172 
-I 4.6 20 155 


CHEMICALS. PLASTICS 


i.7i04m 
2i79m 
175 3m 
9510000 

51 im 

53266m 

35 7m 

52 3m 
171m 
169m 

2296m 
24 7m 
26.6m 
3.126.000 
1630m 
110m 
32.0m 
2065m 
133m 
73 4a 
4.7S05a 
5.0292m 
*90 6m 
IB 9m 
430m 
5925 000 
301 Sm 
4162m 
124a 
150m 


AK20 N/v Bearer 
am Cofexda 
Amentiam 
Ancnor cnatmcaJ 
BTP 

Bawr DM50 
Btogoan 
Brea am 
Br Berm 

SSS 91 " 1 

comes Bios 
DO "A" 

IHoraca) 


Cory O' 
Croda 


do ora 

Eks 6 Ewrard 
Foaeco-Mmsap 
HMsMan (Jamesi 
H*cMon 
Hoedw 0M50 
ftnp Cham lad 
Laaone 

LftQJl 

Ptyii 

FWabrooK nogs 
RentdU 
5Hia 0PO 
WobMn nolma Rvh 
TOrhSrere Cnem 


C43>y 

+,». 

400 

92 . 

,73 

• .. 

13 

1.9 ,01 

350 

+12 

05 

£5 170 

235 

•« 

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£5 07 

129 


57 

4.4 107 

£96 'r 

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700 

75 . 

122 

+2 

,03 

04 92 

,25 

-1 

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70't 



.. 050 

100 

+13 

51 

5, 14 0 

267 

+ 14 

95 

16 1X9 

145 


06 

48 05 

115 

■ 1 

65 

S.7 65 

17 

+1 

07 

4, 5.7 

141 

*0 

100 

7.1 ,4 6 

110 

+4 


.. 1,4 

196 

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45 172 

252 

+9 

119 

47 95 

135 

♦3 

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300 

-20 

21.4 

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£94 

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929 

+25 

471 

51 92 

3S5 

+2 

105 

£9105 

109 

+4 

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43 172 

102 


13 

15 105 

79 

+11 

30 

18 162 

157 

-8 

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£0 214 

304 

*28 



200 

-0 

111 

56 93 

H2 

+20 

*5 

35 ia7 


CINEMAS AND TV 


27 3m AngM tv A" 
4 566 000 Grenian 
360m MTV N/V 
495m LOT Hags 
2? 2m Sea TV A" 
420m TVS N/V 
8309500 TSW 


203 

*3 

128 

6.4 

14 3 

J8 

+1 

£4 

67 

01 

100 


1,0 

51 

02 

290 


206 

7, 

11.6 

262 

+12 

1Z7 

*5 

106 

173 

• -5 

1,4 

66 

BX 

30 

*,'i 

£4 

63 

104 


DRAPERY AND STORES 


14 

139 
S3 

• *17 32 

-1 31 

-5 207 

• -1 7 7 

■ 44 67 

45 14 

a 4.25V ?3 
81 
13 

♦ 15 129 


4.7 


*5 
-1 
*25 
• . 86 
44 6 3 

• -4 76 

-a £9 

• . 2.1 

42 10 7 
♦2 5 7 

• -1« 268 
• ♦18 28 8 
*18 59 

*2 23 

ao 

43 


157a AouaSCUUn A" 94 -2 

42 7m Bn me IJsmesi A 95 *6 

62 3m BenuWs 150 -6 

7790 000 BUCKS Leo 14 

5343.000 aemner 58 

687m Brawn INI 550 *10 

724 0 m Bawn 26* +2 

6 851 000 Canto'S A" 118 »*17 

*.804 000 CasMl (St 45 -1 

36 Om 011 X 01 345 .5 

97 6 m Cononed Engksn 181 •-! 

23 7m Courts IFum| A 126 >44 

562m Qe-MH 4UI 92 

1.107 7 m D>*ons Cro 302 

173*0, DuMI 413 

21 7m Qm 5 OatKtan 75 

7960.000 Ef,s <Wfen*l 8 don) 655 
635m Empre Stares 170 

1167m Earn 226 

1.661 000 Eibcmm dames 70 

B4 fte Pme Art Dev 120 

189m Fpro iMareni 121 

6 279 000 Fonmuta 105 

2709m Freemans 37B 

6.125 000 GeHST I AJJ 98 

245m Gem sn 68 

17 5m GtMDrra |AJ 103 

IB Im Gousmms Gp 590 

1770m Granan 390 

62.5m GUS Ell .- 

23597m Do A B22 

355 6 m hams Qi wo n w y 2*0 

6504.000 Helene a London 28 

9.787 ooo HgSas 30 _ 

161 0m Home Cnanri 370 .as 
6540-000 House O' Lerose <22 *5 

8 * 00.000 Jones lEmesn 04 m -2 

2039300 Lames Pnde 2 * -4 

iOi Ira LCP >23 -8 

30 Em Lae Cooper 1 S 8 *6 

370m Lawny 830 

LLCW3 000 uncron Ugour I7G 

5 0520m Mams 5 Spencer 191 

1730m Memos uonnl 313 

9520 000 UdeltS LftSwe 165 

17 7m Mass Bros SBS 

*3 Bm MSS Newsagents 138 51 

3396m Ne«1 343 *10 54 

8519000 Dltwef (Gl 338 117 

340m Our Pm 530 B-15 79 

jaora Penns 7r .3 05 

2585000 Peters Stores 84 -4 1 4 

10 0m Poetry (Ailiedl 110 . . 55 

41 4m Raeneis McwaBars) I2G ■ »-4 37 

14 4m RayDocK 36’.- 44V 1 I 

8275D00 ReH lAustn) 315 *10 71 

35 On Do "A 144 -1 71 

£610.000 S 5 l' Srorus 32 ... 

11 Im Samuel ihl I6J SO 

63Jm Do A 77 .2 eo 

1.853 mi Scats i£S *a 44 

i7 J® Senpson /Si "A 325 45 82 

4412* Smei (WHl A 300 • «I2 7 6 

807m DO B 50 »*3 15 

ZOOdl Stanley (AGl 79 *5 36 

21 im SuMtoerg >00 3 5 

1 3092m Srmenouie 313 -5 110 

950000 surrme domes 38 -2 

156 An Supensug Stores 440 40 

i 100 000 Tern-comma 47 40 

JO 9m Tane Proouns 82'. 4, ; 

M 3m Lmmrwaortsi 185 -3 

, 464 0m vamona Viyela 448 »I6 

5 550 000 WW bdup £25 *10 

3492m Ward VWWe 27a .14 

5 100 000 w-otafe 96 

8 G 60 a Woalwoon *68 


33 35 355 

30 32 154 

31 £1305 


♦ 10 100 
1-4 100 

♦2 51 

♦ IS 51 
-5 £9 

*5 


24 433 

25 280 
£4 182 
£7 303 
59 8 7 
SO MG 

4 3 25.3 
53 104 
15 21 7 

05 33 7 

15 209 

44 102 
£0 329 
21 291 
£0 245 

1 14 4 

3.7 225 

46 95 
£2 22.1 
7 8 95 

45 4,0 
25 769 

56 13* 
15250 
£3 156 
2.9 IS I 

25 222 
0-2 91 
79 158 
1 1 270 
93 114 

69 10.1 

46 ,70 

49 21 0 
£7 93 

12 367 

57 12.1 
£7 27 4 
10 193 

16 49 6 

13 4£0 
37 144 
£2 280 
35 255 
15 33 5 
0 7 205 

1.7 402 

50 196 
£5 390 

26 

£3 360 
r? 165 
2G4 
3 7 410 

70 19J 
35 16* 
£5 t£8 

2 5 205 
£6 199 
46221 
32 15 8 
35 194 


64 ,4219 

£9» 62 10 4 
25 40 >30 
24 1 J 330 

171* 38 10 7 
11J 50 84 

85 31 '59 
Sun 3 7 . 
129 25 209 


ELECTRICALS 


Pnce Cn ge Grass Dm 
lam on a* TM 

Fnax* we* pence % P/E 


Capeateanon 

E Company 



57 5m GMonda 
330m Do 7'.% CPF 
61 6m 1 
952m C»*y 1 
465m 1"’ 
i03m 1 
*3 7m oataserv 
1.180.000 Daucum "A" 
459m Domno 
20 4m DOwdng 0 Mas 


19 14 1 314 
1.9 16100 

138 2 1 21 I 

102 3J 14 4 

16 

. . 104 


2.1 


• «4 64n 63 255 


63 7m DUMr 


1593400 Beororec Maoi 
137 dm Electronic Rentals 
419m Emeu Damns 
94 6m Eaoma i ni 
2797m Fame* Bee* 

595 6m Farm 
524m FpTSI Castle Eke 
5.623/100 Forward Ted, 

54850m G£C 
6 170400 Gronenor 
94,5000 Htosana Elect 
1169m i3l 
461.1m Inf Signal 6 Control 330 
104m Janes Stroud — 
5457 000 KdCk 

154m Lee Remgerauon 703 
01.1m Loan 
117 0a UK Beet 
107 5m AMIWC 
254m MCTO BS 
21 4m MKTO Focus 
7400400 MiAtona Bee 
10 0m Mtaray Beet 

370m Newman 

Bjmaoo HewmatK Oouts 
2248m NEI 
132m Oownics 
2105m Oxrara a wo unief 
6430000 Ptntww 

144m PtKom 26 

194« Pn*ps Fin 5V% £147 

3.5727m PnAps Lamps N/V E16 3 . 
4.142000 FWO ,90 

3467.000 DO "A" LH VoUng 145 
i.S244m Basse* 210 

15445 Im Do ADR 25 E20 1 . 

122m Pres sac 153 

4.‘W.080 Quest Aukximoon 30 

1.141 4m Ram Beet 200 

207m Potato* 188 

3£3m SdXMS IGH) 503 
18.7m SnorrocL 76 

57 Om Sound Dirfusxjn a, 

122 
102 

131 la System Designers nfl 
I 700.0m TDK LT4', 

164 Om Tettohone Henws 200 


170 

+5 

10 

33 

• *l 

,5 

350 

• *40 

£5 

43 


20 

19* 

+4 

40 

428 

+5 

75 

65 

• +4 

1.0 

48 

■ -1 

46 

277 

+25 

7.9 

350 

• +5 

68 

223 

+10 

28 

130 


£3 

202 

+14 

30 

33 

-1 

.. t. 

202 

• -2 

58 

66 

+5 

B2 

103 

-2 

36 

160 

+10 

1.7 

N330 

-3 

1.0 

183 

• + T 

107 

105 

+ 10 

71 

2R3 

+13 

179 

164 

+15 

,.*■ 

310 

-2 

14 6 

469 

+10 

36 

73 

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£5 

,75 

-6 

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50 

+2 

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GO 

-2 

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30 

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+2'a 

75 

43 


1 1 

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♦ '• 


18 82 74 
575 £9 

75 34 104 
70 52 79 

86 3.1 188 


GG60m STC 
83.0m Stone tad 


196m Tekmetnx 
9615a Thom BM 
5.580400 Thorpe IFW1 
46 im TaaiaS Tetaeom 
1463m UP 
119. Ba Unaach 
365m IM Leekng 
I Soannc 


916m Ufd 

1660m va Htflnmams 
3?5n VcMx 
SJSS1.000 Western SakcMn 56 
3564.000 wwmnrt Bee go 
33. Sa Whaesak Rrang 2*0 


98 

447 

186 

290 

27G 

260 

253 

17D 

378 

246 


+5 3.1 

♦2 

» .. A3 

5.7 

♦ 13 260 

♦1 £1 
-4 0.8 

4-10 . a 

• 48 85 

*4 06 

♦14 100 
-14 £5 

>4* II 

♦ 15 £4 

+8 75 

>42 85 

43 13 

1410 81 

410 £7 

» .. 11 * 
♦I 39 
45 22 

• 42 92 


£0 223 
.. 144 
£2 129 
35 112 
57 113 
£7162 
12 7.9 
. 62 
38 11.4 
05 422 

30 MS 
£6 50 
52 1B0 

3.0 99 
02 30.0 
£7 24.7 
35 139 
£1 SO 
48 MO 
07 3£7 
46103 

7.0 131 
34 l£B 
41 1£3 


FINANCE AND LAND 


40 fim AOmgwonti 

240 

+7 

15 

08 . 

77 Sm token Huna 

172 

+5 

1,0 

8 * 72 

21 An Antofagasta 

340 


200 

U 55 

Berttoy Tacb 

00 ten CaiMM 

120 

E 2 * 

• .. 

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17 " 

14 On Canaorer 

196 

♦2 

£0 

,5 502 

927 000 Camrawny 

25 

+ 7 



4 X 70.000 Eaut* 8 Om 

HP. 


tx 

69 04 

31 . 7 m Hwrwro 

741 


,04 

43 345 

a, lm ivory A Sana 

163 


ftl 

30 29 X 

4 * Bm Mflieore 

170 

+4 

05 

5.2 24.4 

26 6 m Nai Home Lon 

40 




210 m (to 0% 

E 42 

•-T 

000 

190 . . 


FOODS 


1.7152*1 AS0A-MFI 
2263.000 Mpan Me 

8706m Argyll 
1.164 0m Ad Food 

21 4m A&soc Fatiarle s 
203.9m Avana 

5159200 Hanks [S«n Q 
33 Sm BarMr 6 Dooson 
196m Barr |AQ 
24 7a Brntsaa Foods 
M0m Banovs 
220.5m SeiXm . 

3.127000 Biuetwfl COM 
7.460200 Br 


152 

22 

338 


At £7 194 
£8 1,2 . 
11 in 32184 


282 • *24 00 £7 142 


122 

564 

248 

13>r 

311 

181 

98 

177 

as 


J4-I 46 32 363 

• -I0 168 £9 179 

• .. 149 59 73 

♦ 1 '. 

• 48 

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.460000 Br VCrttM (BM! -70 
655 7ka Cadbury-SciMiaapai 164 
100m Cans MAaig 
3225.000 CMtords Dunn 
18 0m Do "A" 

3a 2m Cuaem 
12689m Ow 

9i 8m FuBna (Alort) 

2294m Fden liwcA 
33 3m Glass Clover 
1743m Kirtewtxxl Foods 
950m Hoards 
4192m Hksdowit Hugs 
3 734.000 home Farm 
80 6m Iceland Rozen 
3954m KwW Sana 
£ioa ooo Lees (Jgwi J) 

755000 UwP' IGF) 

78>n Low Wn) 

94 9m Monfunn (Bernard) 595 
£702.000 Mew Trade Supp un 
1669m Mtaraon (W) 100 

442a Wendts UNI (WTT1D1 240 
30 la Nonrtns 02'i 

6iS0m Nm Fooas 290 
121 An Nunm 6 Peacock 162 


+9 

*3 

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173 

tan 

183 

285 

270 

166 


913 

193 

206 

80 

564 

262 

105 

00 

600 


134m Rant Foods 
5429a RUM 
737 6a Rowrmee ike 
£732 9a Sam-rony (J) 
3895a Semesen iChsoi) 
4.072900 Sonswnex 
420 4a Taw 6 Lyle 
1.41 1 On Tescd 
556 Bm Ui>9Me 
906fia l/u Bacues 
142m Watson 6 Pimp 


131 

192 

435 

390 

141 

174 

610 

3«3 

252 

223 

149 


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♦5 

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98 

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• ♦20 

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11.4 

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53 

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+32 

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09 

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£1 

+15 

43 

+35 

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+20 

1, 1 

• 410 

75 

+16 

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-5 

79 

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£6 

+6 

105 

+« 

52 

• +3 

54 

+0 

76 

-18 

103 

+12 

65 

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4.1 

+2 


♦27 

3, '4 

♦10 

74 

• .. 

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-2 

109 

♦9 

83 


.. IBS 

f£l 39 09 
9> 54 105 

30 31 116 
5.4 31 ?,.i 
74 96 244 
20 -29 12G - 


49 239 
£3 180 


32290m 
39 la 
743 BW 
17 la 
1895a 
0547900 
114 3m 
108 Bm 
16* Sa 
12435m 


Grand Ua 

Kennedy Brookes 


Lon Pare reams 
Mount Chenotta 
Prwiea Of w reams 
Queens mow 
S avoy Hows A" 
sabs 

TiusMoiae Forw 


418 • 420 142 3 4 T£7 

ZS2 -4 £1 08 130 

361 *19 150 42 2,0 
450 . . ,*3f 32 195 


89 


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£0 £3 I* 0 

£1 3 0 124 


393 

72 • .. 

150 «-1 


*1V 23 r 32 193 


36 09 192 
1.7 14 179 

7.0 49 159 


INDUSTRIALS 

A-D 


106 Bm 4AH 

9i 7m AGS Researon 
,aOm MM 
91 2m AFV 
32 im Ajtrornon 
6* im Adwesi 

28 7rn Awncre Wwaer 
3563000 Amoer "0 

ii4a Aoceedoro 
107a Aronson 
5. *35.080 ArmtW 
163m Asn S Lacn 
3718 ooo Asrtey _ 

4 662 000 Ah ft- Eng 8% 

29 4m assoc Hew 

43 6m Aurora 
392m Avon Fh4XJer 

3950000 Arstvre Mmm 
1705m BBA 
10529m SET D<d 
5500.000 BETEC 
14177m BOC 

4 733 0m BTR 
22T 4m Bjd-W* 

M9m Bailey fCH) 

99 7m Band iWmi 

107 3m Baker Pvriuns 
109m Bareo mo 

39 0m Bareefn 
6* 6m Bmw Rend 
IS 6m Barrow Heeduro 
900 000 Barter* Tranjpral 

5 42* 000 Baynes (dunes! 

M Bm BeotsC" Clarke 

3 873.000 BsojlIVd 
£683 0m Baecnam 

. Baoaa Cesmtacs 

4 070X00 Bemcx 

586 7m Bensnad (SAW) 
6-300000 Benumds 
154m BesoxF 

44 9m Besnoae 
2, 0m Bawwood 

£435000 Sevan (OF) 

3*5 im B*By (Jl 
7400000 Bode 
,395000 Bream 1 Jl 
75 6m Arena Quwcast 
8.966 000 BreungMin Mmt 
109m BUCK Arrow 
07 5m Black (Fared 
34 8m Btachwood Hodge 
22 Sm Bndvcpm 
4,1 7m Boovar McConnell 
iG063m asms 
4 025 000 BOunar' (Wmi 
2976m Bowamr 
50a im Boweter kx 
33»X0O BraWwrane Gro 
150 2m Bramreer 

6 -KCjJOO B'aowov 

25 4m Brengre*" 

1082 000 BnOgend Op 
fiSOm Brtion _ 

15 6m Brcoon-Gunty 
I 513000 Br BUG A Eng Ape 
20 Jm Br Sown 
224m Br 5*0*10" 

69 7m A VXa 
J 730 Jm Broken HP 
£M4M0 Brantsgra** Wts 
’625 000 0-ret. fcng 
3635 000 Brooke Turn 
268m Brown 6 Tews* 

27 5m Brown (Jo"". 

4 400000 frurious (Musi 
98 *m Bufcwon 

12 Tru Bui-juss 
10 5m BurnvAivJirsa-i 
f?5m Cjrnford Eng 
12 6m Canaro ind 
19 Sm Cat* I id 
15 Cm Carrie Eng 
4. ’89 000 Teiwier. 

8 950 000 OmsotJ" _ 

4 10' OW Crereal A Vwre 
? IOO 000 Ceinvn*' W 


£17 

214 

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288 

89 

206 

260 

140 

383 

34 

77 

365 

74 

305 

368 

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29S 

79 

194 

410 

71 

328 

433 

187 

21 '. 

530 

249 

ITS 

159 

388 

40 r 
100 
20 

188 
113 


25 

202 

115 

119 

7T9 

440 

31 

305 

105 

93 

115 

143 

188 

211 

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230 
323 

231 
9-'. 

310 


*5 97 

1-7 95 

» . 92 

*10 161 


4 5 17 2 
4J 230 
65 108 

5 6 330 

57 9* 
5* 131 
27 ZD0 
69 102 
£2 21 1 
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1 1 r £3 13 4 
01 £7 100 

£1 £7 21 2 

£90 15 243 
210 53 187 

£0 92 
4 1 1£5 
£4 249 
64 165 
.231 
*09 Z6.0f *9 l£4 
102 30 M4 


-2 


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11 1 
71 
97 
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114 

167 


£■ 

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45 20 2 
£9 1 8 241 

34 70 149 

25 7 143 55 
22 79 . 
94 51 88 
60 00102 
101 45 14S 


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♦ 12 86 

*15 184 
-4 93 


16 04 138 

150 74 94 

7 5 65 11 0 

61 51 55 

n 14 6 
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£0r 65 76 
95 31 186 
7 7 92 
43 59 
47 95 
86 60 147 
64 39140 

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45 189 

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125 

104 

120 

231 

301 

40 

21 


55 

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162 

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66 

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09 

96 

30 

93 


AB EteO 

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J6 235 

saonoon ch i»i 

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304 


• 6 

C 4 27 6 

2S Jm Cnantswr ®" 


•fmcor Computan 

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S7 62 

2939.000 CtorHwr*" 4 Mai 

63 


88 






Anarrec Crenp 

260 



09 >45 



Au«i Fidnrfy 

51 



103 


XB 

»UKl V>C 

ISO 



12 l£5 


37 


303 

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1ST 

*0 1£7 

14 tel Dared rOemenn 

HP 







1 !H 

BiMIMHkr 

474 


62 

1 7 +29 



Br Tekjb.'T' 90s P 

TIM 



49 134 



Brown Boron Kem 

86 


5.6 

42 118 

1 1 2m CcmoroW Teen 

la 


-2 I 

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3 1 

•f 55 

•: so 

-33 15 7 

-10 19 J 
•2 7 9 

•IS 65 
•5 10 r 
1-10 154 
•5 65 


arose 

52 12 7 

32 3CD 
4 0 95 

J J 100 

33 

55 67 
55 110 

7 8 l£4 
43 13 0 
16 17 J 
61 139 
35 79 
72 1J7 
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59 rj 

61 93 
3 7 19 2 

14 0 

315 

62 90 
77 92 
50 88 

63 498 

34 124 
£4 17 2 

105 
3 5 263 
9 I 92 
39 ?6 

35 169 


pnce Choe Grou Dm 
WW qn Ot* TU 
Fnaey war* pence % P/E 


Pnce Cnoe Grow br 
lest on <6* vu 
Friday woe* pence % P/E 



1143m 
1 738000 

7301.000 
18 4m 

9.721 000 
653m 
492m 

1299.000 
1225300 

64 7m 
53a Aa 
1327 8m 
954 000 
14.7m 
69 7a 
3483m 
3189m 
105m 
315m 
1.739 300 
168 An 
75 0m 
0250000 
49 7m 
306m 
5386300 
1A65AU 
9222000 


House 
Gunman J>A 
DSC 
0PCE 
«9««y 
Dm* 

Davos 6 Met A" 
Dawn 0 Newman 


STL Rue 

Doha 

Osmond Stamping 
Ddsoimm 
OaM HeW 
Dtptanre 
□omon Perk 
DOra 

DOnxnMn H 

OupotT 

Owe* 

(J&JJ 


Lkgon 


A' 


470 

• .. 

45 

208 

+12 

17.9 

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+'1 


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32 

210 

♦17 

134 

95 

•-2 

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915 

*J0 

429 

222 

+14 

72 

200 

• -3 

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253 

+23 

97 

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+': 

08 

331 

+0 

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90 

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74 

110 

• .. 

71 

113 

♦ 11 

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25 

64 

+15 


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• +2 

57 

77 

• -1 

£7 


53 63 112 

£5 93 69 

49 52 15 

9 3 £0 124 

110 30 133 
£1 44 270 

3 9 54 11 

1£9 36 114 

32 4531 

5.9 43 105 
11.1 01 105 

375 1 7 

0.7b 18 


330 


E-K 


31 Sm Eastern Rod 
151m Etna 
47.7W ES 
*364.080 DC»t 
193m Elect) 

1322 Im Bearolux (AE) -a - £23 'r 
9.150000 BWi (BJ 53 «-1 

7794m Emtart £25', 

653.CW1 Engksh Om Ctay 322 **2 

7920m Ena non (LM) & £23'. *r, 

230m Erskaw Hotne 156 -2 

3763m European Femes 
779m Do 5% Rf 
852m Evered 
212m Evodn 
33.7m Ekpemet kit 
1743m Ej(M 
6318000 Fjfcon 
3.72* ODD Feeder Acme Wfl 
36 Aa Farmer (Jfl) 

£824.000 File bKknar 
1339«m Rem 
&1B4AU FKWdran 
3.440D0G RexMlQ CAW 
6333JKU FoOW 


301 4-1 14 3 4 6 31 

isi +3 taa 55 77 

233 +13 69 33 154 

3* 1 ? • . £5 72 14 0 

lie 40 &0 52 l£6 


156 

109'i 

117 

£12 

120 

140 

411 

23 

23 

120 


^EE?G 


513 

37 

104 

49 

122 


>4-1 


+3 


+2 


6610200 Fates Group N/V 
204a Fottwrai & Harvey 163 
7200.000 French (Thomas) 64 


36 la GQ W 
8100m GKN 
9.I8£000 m 
£095000 Grata, Eng 
64 7m Gesremer 
l£6tn Groves 
7290 7 in GHW 
302 la Oynwed 
108m Gonxna 
273m Gormg Kerr 
26401 CMmpan Hags 
666 5m Grenada 
&73OQ00 GrdvaOeB 
7.416200 HaM Precision 
22.4m Hal Gng 
1203m Hal m 
sas atB Hate 
89.5m HWoa 
7J5£000 Hairanon hd 
to am Hareowx 
£086 Ora Henson 


101 
341 
280 
64 
132 
1*6 
905 
373 
64 
455 
15® 

288 S-26 

9*. +’i 

74 •*9 

15A 44 

155 *0 

190 • .. 

245 *4 

30>. «+1'. 


41 


£9 55 15* 
139 54 .. 

15.7 49 126 

ao a* . . 

* 0 £521 6 

6.1 35115 

7.1 61 

46 £2 185 
4 6 36 130 
7.8 5.1 194 
M £3 24 
1A 6.1 59 

14 4 8 516 

71 59 18.9 

60r 7 7 8.7 

69 13 27.4 

10 £7 

5.4 52 78 

a6 12 55 

57 47 469 

15 88 02 

11.8 7 2 14.6 

4.1 6* . 

8.4 03 ISO 

*11 15.7- 46 135 
+5 1Q0 3JS 77 

40 4 3 5.1 9.1 

•-4 £1 1.6 119 

*6 43r £9 201 

-19% 143 15 204 

428 13.9 44 179 
£9 35 65 
-10 ISO 33 178 
-6 79 02 243 

101 39213 

07 72 53 

£5 34 155 
119 71 102 

68n 44 118 

l£9 58 135 
£2 03 37.1 
1.7 r 55 112 


410 


43 

• + 4 . 




Wfa Da &>•% 

545a Hsraraevee 
6240000 Hams (PMpi 
1.0345m Hawtew STOtMey 
2135m Hawkty 

4300.000 Hay (Noraom 
2466m Hopwonn Cerame 

305m Hesiar 
£801.000 HawM (J) 

1357.000 reghgzte 6 Job 
S50B! nwto Aro 


182 
n62'i««8' 


III 

ISO 

195 

525 

110 

105 

156 

123 

03 

140 

70 

87 

180 


47V 

-5 


57 3514.4 
600 4 9 .. 

52 74 . 
70 4.7 17.1 

51 U 187 
410 174 33 11 5 

*0 £7 25 99 

54 5.1 1*5 

05 83 U5 


. Bros 

393m Ho« Uoyd 
357m reyfcmsons 

Howard Machinery . . 

568m Hoyden 97 V 

332 7m Hudson Bay Eim 
31An Hunting Assoc 255 
20 7m Hunting Group 93 
1205 7m reechsn Whanuoe 232 
395 4m nfl 147 

3£2m Isotron 270 

&22SAM Jacksons Bourne 293 
3S32m Jertlni Math 109 
54 3m Johnson Clmneni 502 
234 7m JolSWon Mxnhny 176 
31 Ba Johnson 6 FB 30 
275a Jonrmon 275 

lO.&ro Jones 6 Snpnnai 86 
iQOm jowdxn. (Thomas)- JfiG 


-7 
-3 
*2 
*5 
♦5 
• 45 


51 4 1 51 9 
3A 4.1 II 0 


Z71 

392 


62 127 


49 iib 


-3 

2 . 

-1 

-20 


4.807900 KWeraaioo 
37*m Kam 
7973.000 Kekey tnd 
7.7)0900 Ktamedy 8nW* 
97 Jm Kershaw (A) 
8993900 IQlChan 
4971900 Kieen-E 


25 

32 

3*0 

128 

30 


■$ T «wom 


*V, 45 49 95 
-1 500 £1 .. 

107 42 92 

89 52 205 

07 45 133 

15 07 50.1 

55 29 164 

-7'i . . . . 

419 250 56 149 

40 0.7 04 225 

-I .. .. 150 

♦5 104 35 175 

*5 4.1 47 114 

. .tli'.dfe 57 ,£7 
.. 29 115 BA 

•-', 1.7 53££9 

• 449 ,1.4 48 118 

*3 £9* 16 225 

• 45 2T.4 7 6 234 

.. 157 75 92 

45 7.T 49 315 


L-R 


£901900 LDH 
1082a top 
2£T 7ll Lead 
309m Lament 

2.400.000 Urwtex 
155m Lee (Arthur) 

5933AM Ldecare 
1539900 Ue shal 
4450000 unread 
14 o« f 
7500AM I _ 

479m Lon I 
£406900 DO DM 
773m Lon a Wn 
232 An Lon Ml 
■a«a Longion Ml 
86.5 ti Low 6 Boner 
204m ML Hdgs 
19 im NS BH 

7.191.000 MY Dari 

467m Mecanhys Rami 
433a MecUrttne 
4.019 000 MacMm (PSW) 
iiB.im McKecnrea 


2294m Martuy 
120m Mareng 
1.116.000 Maanao iLoxiey) 
3 779.000 Do A' 

I29m Marstnas Un>v 
53 Gm MartOraw 
5123m Meal Box 
293a Met* erasures 
230a Mean, 

T*An Uttid CcOS 
128m M«cne4 Somers 
51 An Mains 
245 5m Morgen CruaUe 
20.2a MOSS 1 Booed) 
3J97CKM Neeassna 
51 7m Ned (Jl 
40 im Newman Ttxw 
II Im Notion 
Z73 7a Naroroe 


32 


303 

+5 

280 

+5 

157 

-1 

62 

+4 

54'j 

*3'.- 

2B 


70 

-a 

63 

-1 

58V 

+2'j 

25 


TOT 

+0 

100 


69 


104 

•-,0 

168 

•+3 

371 

-6 

368 

• +12 

B0 

• -4 

37'.- 

-is 

355 

• +37 

140 

♦ 12 

45 


,96 

-32 

00 


620 


56 


HJ9': 

+’i'i 

80 

+2 

93 


07 


69 

-2 

410 

♦17 

866 

-10 

139 

♦ 7 

73 


77': 


60 

-4 

174 

+9 

275 

+21 

,04 


25 


TBS 

*4 


128 
SB 
220 

i£<n Orece Beet Mach 210 


i92Jn Parker total A 

31 2m Pare Pace 
5 386 000 Pam*n JT 

9479m Peer** 

1.716000 Peek 
12.3m Peeneeu 
120 8m PaWer-Hatwrelay 
1790m Pwreem Ind 

75 «a PntnHWe 
9334m Mindton 
£709 AM Plaste Constr 
129 0m Pmato 
10 fm Porter OredB um 
177<m Rowed DiMyn 

32 7m Pnestmcti MMgs 
798m maun, Sere 
Te 8m RFD 
984m RHP 

1.741AM RacHA MatW 
19445m Rank Org 
44 3m Rxnsume 9ms 
5582000 HskMK (Gl BreJgej 115 
10GS9mRMk4t aCtWram 719 
6*97 000 BedVrare GUSS 
23 im Read EsecuM 
967 3m Reed W 
I66m Raryon 
47im Ranald 
10 la Resanor 


D3 

436 

67 

710 

215 

280 

148 

GS 

ID9 

1G9 

128 

517 

180 


140 

2£® 

011 

143 

73 


42 

*8 

*5 
♦90 
♦ 18 
+3'. 


05 1 $ 195 

65 £2 27.9 
8.0 29 12.6 
51 £2 135 
£1 3* 55 
30 55 77 
.. .220 
£9 41 115 
£9r 35 . . 
£8 62 170 
15 76 85 
M2 7 5 125 

7.4 10 8 52 
59 £2 194 

45 £8 21.7 

1£Br 35 124 

11 1r £0 207 

0.7 09 114 

12 32*16 
I35n 35 174 
32 23 232 
£5 55 100 

1£9r 6 5 138 
32 45 1£3 
’ , * 21.0 
77 86 
4 9 17 4 
£9 97 
*6 145 
*9 136 
42 171 
3B 1*9 
£7 100 
69 87 
£4r 4J 111 
61 79 78 
63 149 
65 109 
4.4 101 
«2 116 
0* 130 

34 75 
62 99 
24 652 
67 ii 1 
54 II 7 
*2 iai 

35 19.7 


85 

43 

54 

£3 

42 

43 

29 

15.7 

2*9 

96 


£789.000 Rumen 27 

2,8m fbaroo Eng 1S2 

1260 000 Richard (Lacs) 80 

£571.000 Rmenlson Wan 28 

20 Ba Rosensan Res 125 

9000000 Racarann (Thonmai 226 

,1 9m Raduxarn *9 

9.060 900 Bupncr 139 

210 m Do A 136 

960 oca noapm - 4' 

36 Gm Hoon 136 

29 im Russel (A) 130 


♦d 
♦2'. 
• 42 


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-8 

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*22 

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♦12 


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30 
115 
12-1 

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100 
79 
14 
1£6 
114 
136 
65 

135 29 I6S 

. 455 

9 On 95 128 
214 54 117 

04 360 
06 337 
4 1 1QO 
60 11 7 
, £9 1*5 

I.Sn OJ . 
21.7 78 150 


IS 
75 
17 9 
40 
779 


00 
8.4 
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51 
36 
21.4 
6.1 
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£9 
50 
275 
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75 00 
50 13* 
1G 125 
28 . 

4 1 163 

£5 I £8 
£1 *2 
23 168 
21 8* 
£3 18J 
34 14 5 
45 no 

14 IDG 

58 151 
_ 1 1 312 
1 47 s 2 106 
41 £7 185 

14 21 56 

tl . 127 

3.1 £5 194 

. H .. 231 
.. . *5 

92 G7 62 
95 65 79 
.. £2 
50 115 

15 703 


69 

£0 


0212AM 
J7 2» 
16 1 nt 
13 Jm 
178 3m 
23.4m 
30 Jm 
7447 000 
5573000 
94 9m 
1460m 
IS 6m 
2 744JJ00 

29 3a 
792 Bm 
20 2m 
1269m 
49 0m 
98 An 
274 2m 
9178m 
1320000 
597 7m 
8 GOT 000 
163m 

6 925000 

H4 4m 

6804 MX) 

7 333CKM 
60)6.000 
« 120 AM 


9 

SWe Three 
Sentwurei 
Ss>«e Gordon (Jl 
5capa 

Scott Graennam 
Soon MentaWe 
■Scott 3 Reeertsan 
Seems* 

Do A 

issxsr 

Simon 


34 

247 

78 

55 


Srefte 
Lw knrnyr 
Surron Eng 
Srx Hundred 
Sketcfvey 
SAF B 

SnuTO A Ncpnm. 
Sbmh vwinwa i h 
Snvtrc. ind 
Spm> tJWi 
Spur A Jecksan 
Scencer Clark 

Smx-Sarco 
Staffs PMieries 
Shq Fi/mtiae 


ea<.— 

251 4m 

22 0m 

* 571.000 

*502.000 

*. >9' no 

405m 

4 506 000 

HE 6m 


2 876 AM 
608*000 
258 ’m 
302 Jm 
22 7m 
33 Jm 


Star Como 

Srj«*V*y 

Skwoev 

SWrtWg ind 

SravUike 

SroremP 

Siotneri 5 Put 

Suvrjfli 'Serv 
SuKtflc Speahhon 

'Litre 

Swan Patahc A 

Srumoie 

Syhoru 

Tl 

T NT 

TSL Thermal 
Tacn 


436 

+ 13 

117 

+9 

136 

♦2 

104 

-2 

147 

• -2 

,37 

• -2 

149 

• ♦5 

36 

+ 1 

90 

♦5 

14, 

• +1 

755 

• -24 

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+14 

109 


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£27 v 

-2'. 

225 

-8 

33 

+2 

279 

+ 10 

2,1 

280 

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,72 

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• -,0 

,19 

♦4 

9b 

*9 

107 

♦J 

63 

+5 

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-7 

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♦9 

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• + 7 

206 

-3 

B2 

• *4 

163 

.7 

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_ | 

30 

+2 

227 

♦ 13 

291 

-4 

34 

200 

*6 

435 

♦4 

<» 

♦3 

243 

• ♦3 

ATS 

• ♦IQ 


08 72 
31 15 7 
£2 225 

64 129 
£7 100 
3 7 163 
£9 13.8 
35 139 
12 735 
12 21 9 
23 2SJ 
6* 140 

aa 86 

91 87 
23 19.0 
8 7 14? 

65 77 
72 99 
53 176 


68 26226 
O* 12273 
6* £3216 

57 £7 193 

66 3, 123 

43 25 93 
6 7 4.1 13. f 
43 35 12.0 


23" 
78 
1 7 
35 
161 
43 
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35 
1 7 
16 
34 
£3 
32 
f£9 
175 
asn 

II 4 


39 

55 


236 


51 BJ 
203 
57,15 

170 44 132 

aa ao 36 1 

171 83 44 

56 10.5 0 5 

48 

129 08 9.’ 

362 

66 £5 215 


14 3 72 B 0 

1* J 33 203 


4 3 IB 124 
95 2.0 23L7 


Company 


5.199AM Taken Chon 
£760 000 Taa»x 
100m reran 
3512AM T«. reoos 
2304.®® Thad M* 

£605 000 Thomson Tuts 

25 7m Tronoon 
67 5m T<3B*iR3 (FM 
1 1523m Tralatgar House 
GbOm Transcongnarnai 
2328m Transom Dev 
4723AM Traimood 
7360000 Tnefus 
7667 000 TnpWx 

16S Im Turner 5 Nvwua 
28 3m UhO 
ll Gm IhwjrouD 
£292 On Untoior 
3612.0m Undever (NV) 
01.5m Vaor 
361 7m VMk» 

9.481 000 VdOr Products 
40 4m Vnun 
£80* 0m V craswegan 


91 

155 

96 

161 

174 

221 

333 

£16 

161 

16 

SO 

93 

152 

202 

114 

E14'; 

£55* 

219 


*5 

♦I 

*38 

-2 

44x 

-1% 

-3 


71 35 94 

IE 1 4 254 

509 35 136 


150m wad* Pmenas 
iaL2m weuim 
J5 As WOnOn hd 
257 4ot Waterford Gbst 
478m wamama 
7390.00] Watson (R Kahmq 2S6 
123 la Wedgwood 
37.4a Max 
£894000 W** mm 
S3 2m weedano 
9£13AB Wests 

534m VdKttmen Reave 
104m Whessoe 
498m MxMaoH 
7642 000 W* ea blames) 

HMkSnr VMtona Ttogj 
ll atn W»S GM 
373 Bm WtdteWy Hugtws 
1 400 000 WMd (Artfkal 
1.623000 WOOd |SW) 

8.149.000 tMwdhOUN 6 Ht 
1606000 Wyndham Eng 

22An Yarrow 

7.473.000 Young (H) 


413 


IBS 

45 1,4 

12* 

-2 

65 

55 131 

193 


45i 

2X3X5 

£150- 

+2'.- 

". 1 


,50 

-2 

.. 1 

43 

251X2 

213 


21 

10 

179 

• +3 

11.1 

62 1X6 

121 

+18 

IB 

16 . 

175 

• *2 

51 

25 255 

266 


£3 

09 300 

27, 

♦2 

10.7 

35125 

86 


4.1 r 

45 75 

21 




73 

+5 

43 

£9 25.3 

117*: 


75 

07 tax 

245 

+5 

31 

13 22.1 

102 

♦HI 

79 

7 7 85 

221 


1(3 

5, TIB 

IBS 


9* 

55 1X0 

506 

-22 

IDO 

20 aa 

150 


1, 4 

75 453 

5T1 

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1£6 

£5152 

TO 

+2 

ao 

71 64 

2fl 

. +1 

1.4 

55 95 

79 


36 

*6 iai 

07 

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£1 

£4 175 

556 

-5 

20 Or 

36 121 

166 

+10 

33 

25 165 


INSURANCE 


5796a Abbey Life 
614 .1m Aiex A Alex 
£507 9m Am Gen 
31 Im BnONOCH 

1731m Bais 
1 135 Ta Cam won 
299 Im EaWy & Lew 

15042a Gen Accrtra 
I £54 7a GRE 
#37 7m Haafh C E 


1023m Horn 

1.1723m Legal 6 Set 

3829m Ub Lite SA RT 
191 2m London 8 Man 
46 9m Ldn Utd to* 
24334a Marsh 6 McLen 
1964m Mm 
188m PWS 
4781m Peart 
£402 6m PrudemM 
1990m Retone 
£048 8m RayeT 
1 160 7m Sedqwx* Gp 
171 5a Stewen wr son 
ii 26m Shane Hugs 
1677 9m Sun AJkance 
5184a Sw Lite 
260m Trade h dt n aw y 
7007m WHS Faber 


207 

+4 

£4 

£23': 

• -2'* 

too 

£27'. 

• -1 

890 

280 

•+7 

79 

B39 

♦ 10 

379 

275 

+2 

,65 

268 

+13 

00 

260 

-1, 


823 

+42 

286 

788 

-22 

379 

656 

•45 

314 

312 

• -4 

13.4 

782 

+30 

32.1 

£26 

+, 


83* 

+15 

315 

333 


106 

£6P. 

-2'e 

220 

255 

-10 

99 

268 

-5 

125 

E13* 

♦’.- 

56.4 

832 

♦30 

3*3 

415 

♦ 17 

108 

0G8 

+20 

360 

391 

-2 

146 

387 

-15 

144 

420 

• 

80 

648 

♦37 

221 

082 

*18 

305 

360 


,?0 

*19 


ia* 


<5 
43 
£3 
£0 166 
45 
61 
£0 

. £5 20.7 
48 226 
4 6 mi 
43 146. 
42 

£8 330. 
5.6 126 
£3 .. 

39 169 
493X5 
42 . 

41 5*9 

40 .. 
42207 
£7 17.6 
37 21.0 
£0 286 
£4 583 
X5 .. 
36 1X1 
25 287 


LEISURE 


ai&OOODBVT 8 WA -A 
5811.000 Boosey & I 
27 5n Brant ' . 

4 090000 CampM 
56 5m Cteyseks 
1093m Fnt Lrairo 
24 0» CRA 


67ia kit Leam 
14 0a Julians s Mdgs 
£100.000 Meonnsur 
2368m Reasiaama 
40 4m Healy Useful 
9.196AM Fttey Leoin 
41dm Sega HokOrs 
BXlm Semuetson Gp 
£050.000 Tottenham hatst 
9636.000 ZMers 


T2T 

" -? 

105 

03 89 

1«3 


IV 

. 214 

,06 

+2 

79 

75 90 

57 

+2 

14 

25 1S£ 

213 

+3 

00 

XB 1X0 

4£T 

+0 

107 

£5 161 

57 

-1 


. 695 

81 

+ 13 


. 325 

,22 

+15 

65 

52 237 

130 

*4 

69 

S3 as 

B5 

-S 

30 

£5 133 

155 

+5 

79 

5T 103 

331 

qua 

+5 

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n 


THE TIMES MONDAY MARCH 3 1986 


FINANCE AND INDUSTRY 




New York. Friday, -February 
28. 8.59 am. Semi-shadow in 
the dealing room and the.i 
desks glow green from the 
consoles. The bond market 
opens in one minute; the 
atmosphere is tense. Sixty - 

traders sit waiting for the off, 

watching the -dockjike ma- 
rines about to go in. ■ ■ ■ . 

On Thursday, the market 
moved as if shoved by a giant 
hand, and the. commuter - 
trains back to Connecticut 
were - fuU of carousing' bond 
dealers. Lust for bonds, whis- . 
pers a trader; this market is 
devouring its your®. In Lon- 
don, the long bona future is 
already one point ahead. 

One minute past nine — 
pandemonium. The shorts 
are ahead by .16 point' The 
futures contract is- up by 229 
basis points. 

“The twos are hit the twos' 
are bit,” screams a trader. 
The selling siaitsJBack comes 
the market The long bond, 
faithful bellwether of. the 
flock; swings through about 
200 points in an hour as $80 
billion starts to hit the market 
with ferocity and iil-diliicted 
intensity. 

Lunch here is taken on a 
tray in front of the screen. 
Ketchup, not Scotch, pre- 
vails. . . None. com plain; as 
they join in what by com- 
mon consent seems like the 
greatest bond bull market of 
all time. 

But over at New York 
Plaza, high above the East 
River in. a bright, sun-tilted 
study, a slight almost frafl, 
figure is preparing to light a 
fire beneath the entire mar- 
ket Dr Henry Kaufman of 
Salomon Brothers is starting 
to raise, some thirty funda- 
mental questions about the - 
yield base in the market 

“The markets," ; say? Dr 
Kaufman firmly, “are going 
to have to demonstrate at 
some pointin time that they 
are viable or can be stable in; 
the face of economic expan- 
sion. They have not yet been, 
tested on that" • • 

Long yields 6f about 83^ 
per cent look reasonable, 
according to Dr Kaufman. 
These have been achieved 
against a background of very 
favourable factors. Since 
mid-1984. he estimates that 
the US has; enjoyed' a sub-, 
normal path of economic 
growth. Inflationary fears 
have beep dampened by low: 
cr oir prices. The federal 


Reserve hasbeen exceedingly 
acoonunodative. - ' 

And marketarebullish, Dr 
Kaufman goes on. In this 
setting.' even the bearish de- 
ments are transmuted. .. 

- But inflation;- he warns, is . 
bottoming out Some time in 
the second half of this year, a 
weaker ' dollar should start ■' 
impacting on the US price 
structure. Oil price trends* 
166, are very hard to track. 
Will another sharp crack in 
prices, for example, induce 
fears of a countervailing 
bounce back? - 

Oil price uncertainty is 
paralleled- by dollar fears. So 
far, notes Dr Kaufman, the 
decline in the dollar has been 
orderly^ Hence, there has 
been no shiftin the pattern of 
international investment 
away from the US. 

“I don ? t believe the Japa- -' 
nese are going to stop buying 
American securities. The un- 
certainty is whether other 
foreign buyers of US securi- 
ties mil pull, away in favour 

- of investment in - other 
economies," he suggests. 

Germany ana Japan 
should benefit fer more than 
the US from felling oil prices., 
The value of their cuijency is 
up, . and oil is priced in 
dollars. Their- inflation rates 
shortly could be close to zero,' 
just as US inflation begins to 
rise. Not by much, . Dr Kauf- 
man says, but by enough to 
tilt the balance of emphasis. 

Market sentimenet is also 
threatened by a twin attack, 
on both the supply and 
demand sides of the US 
credit picture. 

“I think that American 
monetary policy will remain 
expansionary for virtually all 
of this year; says Dr Kauf- 
man. “The Fed will not 
change policy. It has been 
very expansionary, and very 
accommodating. The infu- 
sion of bank reserves has 
: been very.- very large." 

America is beading for a 
good , year. Perhaps ' 1987 
could be even better.. But feter_ 
: m the year, this means that 
: some of the money numbers - 
will be less than attractive -tb 
the market. Credit demand 
by US corporates ought to be 
exuberant 

“In the last Vh years, with 
subnormal economic growth, 
business community demand 
for credit has been moderate. 
The. rise in inventories has 
decelerated. Last year, in the 
...fourth quarter, it was a minus 


cjirlitflkvi 


figure: But this - on-going 
pressing down of US business 
inventories cannot be pressed 
down much further with 
-Hiiproveraem-m the pace of 
economic expansion." 

'•-Dr- Kauftnan’s analysis 
may or may not be correct; 
time will tell. But there exists 
-a visible correlation between 
his well-laid hints that the US 
markets may be approaching 
a tinning point and the 
current -composition of US 
yields. A Kaufman prediction 
would stand a reasonable 
chance of self-fulfilment be- 
cause of the volatility now 
built into -the US yield curve.. 

A fortnight ago, the spread 
between two-year notes and 
30-year bonds was broadly 90 
points. Mid-week,!ast week, 
it was nearer 70 points. 
Following the market's huge 
surge, it was closer to 55 
points. The flattening of the 
US yield curve means that 
extension premiums have 
well-nigh disappeared. 

But if the market is now to 
make further progress, and 
the push , continues to . come 
from the longs, then the yield 
curve will start to invert fairly 
shortly. This would be a silly 
curve, since, pro forma, it 
would define US monetary 
policy as tight, even though 
the Fed would resist the 
definition, mid the market 
does not expect it. 

Easier short-term rates? 
Dollar weakness seems to 
rule , this oat, and central 
hanking ' activity round the 
world last week, offered no 
.change on the official- hard- 
line ‘ attitude. 'The 
Bundesbank was particularly 
intransigent. . 

Yield curves, however, are 
moving Heraclitean things, 
especially in the highly 
charged New York aimo- 
■ sphere. And if the market has 
nowhere to go on the bull 
tack, then it must be an even 
money bet thal'the bears will 
move in. The long end has 
' plenty of scope for an upward 
. flip, afterthe toboggan ride of 
the last few weeks. -Yields 
now look overbought 
" The message for the gilts 
market from Dr Kaufman’s 
■comments is clear. Do not be 
surprised, chagrined or even 
just disappointed, if markets 
come back. Quid enim salvis 
infamia rtummis? r* take the 
money and run? 

Christopher Dunn 

Onon\Royal Bank 


building 
venture in 
liquidation 

By Teresa Poole 

Laing Wimpey Alireza - 
the Saudi Arabian joint ven- 
ture company owned by the 
British "construction- compa- 
nies, John Laing and George 
Wimpey, and a Saudi partner 
— has been put into liquida- 
tion after non-payment of 
more than £16 million for 
work on major projects. 

The move follows the sud- 
den withdrawal by Laing and 
Wimpey of all expatriate staff 
from Saudi Arabia in Novem- 
ber and the subsequent failure 
of their efforts to resolve the 
company’s financial position. 

• Before the decision to pull 
out the' two British companies 
'had funded the company’s 
shortfall without any contri- 
bution from their local part- 
ner. the Alireza family. A 
Saudi lawyer. Dr Abdullah al- 
Munifi, has been appointed 
liquidator, and Laing and 
Wimpey are to submit a claim 
for these sums by the March 
10 deadline. 

It is understood that, at the 
lime of the withdrawal, all 
construction work bad been 
completed, but., substantial 
sums were owed to LWA. 

Ttaev included 25 million 
riyals (£4.6 million) from the 
Ministry of Health in relation 
to Jubatl Hospital; 33 million 
riyals (£6. 1 million) from Ara- 
bian Hotels and Catering for 
the Holiday Inn, Jeddah; 30 
million riyals (£5.5 million) 
from the Ministry of Health 
for the hospitals at A1 
Midhnab.ahd Al Bukavriyah; 
and certified sums outstand- 
ing bn other contracts for 
several years. 

* LWA is equally owned by 
the three partners. 

Mr Angus Phaure, of Field- 
ing Newson-Smith, the stock- 
broker. estimated write-offs at 
up to £10 million by each 
company to cover unpaid 
sums and the cost of with- 
drawing from Saudi Arabia. 

Under Saudi law the liqui- 
dator must provide a state- 
ment of affeirs within three 
.months. Dr al-Muhifi has 
-asked for :the. assistance of 
former LWA staff and^ has 
assured their safe entry- and 
exit from the Kingdom. 

The Health Ministry 
projects director, Mr Moham- 
med al-Guwaihes. said last 
month that Saudi Arabia 
would call a performance 
bond of more than 20 million 
riyals (£3.7 ; millionjfor. failing 

• to properiyifompleie.the three 


ORDINARY SHARES 


rz. m a t'\ 


BT pays a high price for 
Isle of Man contract 


The Isle of Man Parliament is 
to keep British Telecom as its 
public telecommunications 
provider. - 

If BT had lost the competi- . 
lion to Cable & Wireless for 
these 25,000 telephone sub- 
scribers. the direct financial 
consequence would have been 
minuscule. In 1984/85, the 
island bought BT just £5.4 
million in revenue and £1.4 
million in profits, just under 
0.1 per cent of its total 
turnover. 

So why all the fuss? And 
why did BT agree to pay £73 
million to the Manx Govern- 
ment and £250,000 each year: 
for the next 20 to have its' 
licence renewed? 

The new privatized BT is 
keen to prove itself commer- 
cially and wants to form and 
acquire new businesses, espe- 
cially overseas. To have lost 
the Isle of Man would not only 
have been a blow to its pride 
but may have damaged its 
chances to gel contracts else- 
where. like' Sri Lanka, where 
again it is tendering against 
Cable & Wireless. 

But the price to pay for the 
island could be a lot more than 
the £7.5 million plus £250.000 
vearly for the next 20 years. 
BT is to form a new company, 
Manx Telecom, and the Manx 
Government may take a stake 
in iL 

The profit and loss account 
of Manx Telecom will make 
.interesting reading, especially, 
for BT watchdog Ofiet, be- 
cause it will be BTs . first- 
breakout business. Indeed: it 
could help Oftel to review and 
perhaps amend BTs whole 
pricing structure in Britain. 


Manx subscribers may also be 
pleasantly surprise as BT has 
agreed to cut ijs charges to 
them, by about. 15 per cent 
when the new Rcencc becomes 
.effective in January* 1987. 

The Isle of Man. being a 
fairly wealthy place, is not 
exactly representative of Brit- 
ain but we must place iL 
alongside Kingston-upon- 
Hull. which is the other little 
bit of Britain where telephone 
charges could be substantially 
cuL 

Hull Corporation is the only 
independent local telephone - 
serv ice provider in the coun- 
try. Its long-distance calls go 
via BT and currently BT takes 
all the revenue from those 
calls, but still. Hull made a 
profit of £4.1 million on local 
revenues of £17.4 million 
from its 150.000 subscribers 
Iasi year. 

If negotiations to share the 
long-distance revenue more 
equally with BT are success- 
jul. Hull could also be cutting 
charges next. year. Its local 
rervice (rental of telephone 
and local calls) is already 
cheaper than BT s. 

Even if Oftel did not exist, 
these price cuts would com- 
mand some public attention. 
Public pressure has already 
forced BT to cut telephone 
charges in some of the Scottish 
Island groups, such as Orkney 
and the Hebrides. Why should 
BT give in to such pressure 
when it has a monopoly? The 
.simple answer is, it no longer 
has a monopoly and thus the 
big guns are trained on a 
rather ponderous target 

Mercury Communications, 
now wholly owned by Cable & 


Wireless, has a licence to 
compete with BT and is 
already providing private tele-, 
phone circuits. mainly to large 
companies for their internal 
networks. By the early sum- 
mer, it will have some of its 
own all-digiiaf telephone ex- 
changes and could be offering 
a lower priced service to one 
third of Britain’s telephone 
users next year. But Mercury 
will be almost wholly a long- 
distance telecom supplier with 
only limited local networks - 
it would be too expensive to 
re-lay all- its cables -even 
though it is doing so in areas • 
like the City of London. 

So Mercury will be looking 
for cost-effective ways to ac- 
cess other local networks. The 
biggest of these will be BT 
itself. Last October. Oftel 
granted Mercury the right of 
access to BTs network at rates 
equivalent to a 60 per cent 
discount on BTs public tar- 
iffs. In lime, this will allow 
Mercurv to win new subscrib- 
ers from BT because" anybne 
with, a telephone will be able to 
use Mercury by dialling a 
code. Indeed. Mercury will 
soon start selling its own 
telephones which will dial the 
extra digits automatically. 

We expect that by 1988, 
Mercury will be serving one 
million of BTs, by then. 215 
million subscribers from Exter 
to Aberdeen. By 1990. most 
business and many domestic 
customers will be using Mer- 
cury for at least some -long- 
distance cafls because they will 
be cheaper than BT by 10 to 30 
per cent. 

Mercury’s revenues could 
nearfl billion by 1990 with a 


profit contribution to Cable & 
Wireless in the £100 million to 
£200 million range. 

The combination of direct 
loss of revenue and lower 
prices due to competition 
could deprive BT of some- 
thing like £1.5 billion of 
revenue by the end of this 
decade. 

Of course, the*market for 
telecommunications will con- 
tinue to grow from just over 
£4 billion in 1985 to perhaps 
£6.5 billion by 1990, but BT 
will find it difficult to show 
any growth at all in telephone 
call revenue during the period 
of Mercurv’s fastest growth, 
probably 1988 or 1989. This 
will be a completely new 
situation for BT; whereas 
privatizing the company gave 
it the short-term opportunity 
to exploit a monopoly, the 
longer-term process of compe- 
tition will make life much 
more difficult. BT could easily 
be reporting profit reductions 
before the decade is ouL 
•• • The speed with- which all 
This could come about- de- 
pends on market dynamics 
and the growth of public 
awareness. Most BT subscrib- 
ers have no idea what Mercury 
offers. But once the service 
begins to catch on, things 
could happen quickly. A really 
neat way to gel the tell rolling 
would have been to win the 
Isle of Man franchise. 

_No doubt BT. will go to 
extraordinary lengths to de- 
. fend JHulL too. 

Bill Dixon 

The author is leiecommunica- 
tions analyst at the broker 
Scott. Goff, Layton 


C 


BOARD MEETINGS 


3 


TODAY — Interims; Industri- 
al Finance and Investment 
Corporation, Michael Peters 
Croup, Ramar Textiles.' 
Finals: T F and J H flratme; 
'Holdings, British.. Vital' 
Mifcrovitec. 

TOMORROW - Interims: 
Telemetrix. Finals: Blagden 
Industries, BSR International, 
Fisons. The Fleming Mercan- 
tile Investment Trust, 
Johnstone’s Paints. National 
Westminster Bank. The Nine- 
teen Twentv-Eight Investment 
-Trust,- Provident Financial . 
rQiotrp. StatjPlus Group. ' • ■■ ; 6 - 
^i^EspAt - imm* 


Attwoods. Galliford, Midland 
Bank. William Sinclair Hold- 
ings. Finals; Anglo American 
.Gold Investment. Co lexpect- 
ed March hJ.Auhand Wibore 
"{amended). Commercial 
' Union Assurance Co. General 
Accident Fire and Life Assur- 
ance, Hey wood Williams 
Group. Tavener Rutledge. 
THLIRSDAY — Interims: 
Barclays Bank (2nd). Johnson 
Matihey, Kleinwort Benson 
Eurobond Fund. Mitchell 
Cotts, Shires Investment 
...Finals: Biomechanics, 

'/Cadbury Schweppes... . Corah, 
Vfefe Indraar^IrtStcro.- Stock 


holders Far East Investments, 
TI Group. James Wilkes. 
FRIDAY — Interims: Consoli- 
dated Plantations Berhad. 
Finals: Alliance Trust Anglo- 


American Industrial Corpora- 
tion. Standard Telephones 
and Cables. 

SATURDAY - Interims: 
Sihie Darby Berhad. 


Kleinwort Benson 

With effect from 1st March 1986 
the Kleinwort. Benson Limited mortgage rate 
will be 13.5% per annum, and the 
personal loan base rate will be 12.5% per annum. 


( C<s us ad 


1 - c.*« OW1 (SASX KVat t 

'• a*--- -rw.--.- •• 


t'.r ;n«>4 ou <> 
ire I I'vs-itC 



The main features of 1985 were: 

□ Higher profit, earnings per share and 
dividend; and a 1 for 2 scrip issue. 

□ A significant strengthening of our 
capital base. 

□ Strong performance in UK; Latin 
American exposure reduced in sterling 

terms. 

□ Continuing prudent approach to 
provisions for bad and doubtful debts, 
but write-offs down. 

□ The creation of Lloyds Merchant 
Bank, the sale of our investment in the 

Royal Bank 6f Scotland, and the merger 

of the clearing bank and Lloyds Bank 
International (1 January 1986). 


“1985 was a year- -in which we 
significandy strengthened our capital 
base and reduced our relative exposure 
to international debt problems. The 
excellent results allow us to increase the 
dividend and. we propose a furtherlfor 
2 scrip issue. We shall continue to push 
forward in 1986!’ 

Sir Jeremy Morse, Chairman of Lloyds Bank Pic 


LLOYDS BANK Pic 



• 19&5- 

j. 19S4 • 

Increase 

Profit Before Tax 

£561 m 

£46Sm 

' - 20% 

Profit AiterTax 

£331m 

£237m 

40?c 

Pose-Tax Return on 
Average Total Assets 

0.77% 

0.55% 


Post-Tax Return on 
Average Equity ' ' 

15.1% 

12.1# 

. • > 

• 

Earnings Per Share 

93 p 

65p 


Dividends Fter Share 

21.0p 

17.7p 

mo 

Dividend Cover 

4.4 times 

3.7 times 



Dividend 

The Directors of Lloyds Bank Pic 
have declared a final dividend for the 
year ended 31 December 1985 of 13.5p 
per share (1984: 11.4p adjusted for the 
One for two capitalisation issue in 1985), 
making a total for the year of 21.0p per 
share (1984: 17.7p). With the related tax 
credit this is equivalent to 30.0p per 
share (1984: 25.2p). The final dividend 
is payable on 4 April 1986 to 
shareholders registered on 12 March 
1986. 

Proposed one for two scrip issue 

The Directors will recommend to 
. shareholders at the Annual General 
Meeting the issue of one new fully paid 
ordinary £1 share for every two shares 
held. Subject to shareholders’ approval, 
the new shares will be issued to holders 
on the register on 30 May 1986. 

Further information 

Further details of Lloyds Bank’s 
1985 results may be obtained from: 
Corporate Communications Division, 
Princess House, 152/156 Upper 
Thames Street, London EG4R3UJ. 
Telephone: 01-929 2777. 




A THOROUGHBRED AMONGST BANKS. 


Llovds Bank Pic, 71 Lombard Street. London EC3P 3BS 





20 


FINANCE AND INDUSTRY/LAW 


is j JJj 

THE TIMES MONDAY MARCH 3 1986 




USM REVIEW 


Study materials publisher 
seeks £1 .2m for expansion 


Law Report March 3 1986 House of Lords 


Guidelines unsafe and 



The spring season in Unlist- 
ed Securities Market new is- 
sues gets under wa> this week 
with the arrival of BPP t a 
specialist publisher. 

. Named after its founding 
directors. Brierley. Price and 
Prior, the company was 
formed 10 years ago to pro- 
vide tuition for accountancy 
examinations. 

The study text and related 
tuition material led the com- 
pany into publishing from the 
outset and the demand for 
publications from external 
students not connected with 
the tuition courses led to rapid 
expansion of this side of the 
business. 

The range of publication 
has been expanded signifi- 
cantly to cover materials for 
other financial examinations 
so that the turnover from this 
side of the business contrib- 
utes 60 per cent of sales. The 
tuition courses still contribute 
to overall growth. 

This type of publishing 
offers scope for impressive 
returns as the study materials 
have to be updated regularly 
to keep abreast Of tax and legal 
changes. This kills any market 
for second-hand texts and 
ensures regular reprinting. 

The number of students 


training in accountancy con- 
tinues to grow, and there is 
still a much larger market to 
be developed in related areas 
of business and in educational 
publishing where the same 
formula can be applied. 

The company is raising 
about £1.2 million to provide 
additional working capital. 
Profits before tax for 1985 
were £405.000 with earnings 
per share J2.25p. It is expected 
that the historic price-earnings 
ratio will be about 13. 

The broker to the issue is 
Grieveson Grant, and deal- 
ings are expected to begin next 
week. 

Interim figures are due to- 
day from Michael Peters, the 
design consultancy. This com- 
pany. originally floated in 
November, 1983, has im- 
pressed the market with its 
elegant and stylish work. 

Since flotation Peters has 
begun to broaden the base of 
its business into areas in need 
of a strong design base. The 
fastest growing subsidiary is 
its retail division, which re- 
cently announced a contract 
to design motorway service 
stations for BP and is now 
working closely with other 
high street retailers. 

Peters, in profit terms, is in 


a consolidation phase, and But it was Friday's ao- 
this year is likely to reflectihe nouncement from Home 


costs of investing in people 
and buildings, slowing the 
impressive rale of growth seen 
in the last two years. The 
market is looking for an 
increase in profits of about 2S 
per cent. 

The do-i t-yourself sector 
was causing a flurry late last 
week. Pessimistic noisesabout 
the competitive conditions in 
this area of retailing damp- 
ened enthusiasm for two re- 
cent USM issues. Hampden 
Home Care and Wickes. 

The latter company was 
offered for sale in January, but 
50 per cent was left in the 
hands of the underwriters. 
Despite the attempt by the 
management to demonstrate 
its careful market positioning 
and aggressive promotion and 
pricing policies, the City felt 
unclear whether this was a 
builders' merchant or a retail- 
er. 

Bargain hunters, however, 
have been disappointed as the 
company's broker supported 
the issue and kept the shares at 
a small premium to the issue, 
price. 

Overhanging the sector is 
Marlev's sale of its subsidiary. 
Payless DIY. 


Charm that it had received a 
bid approach that brought 
speculators out, leaving 
Hampden Home Care 6p bet- 
ter at 6Sp. 

In a week when nuclear 
waste was topical. Stainless 
Metaicraft, a manufacturer of 
high quality stainless 
aluminium and exotic metals 
in the nuclear, medical and 
aerospace industries, an- 
nounced the small acquisition 
of the pipework division of the 
Supafto Group for about asset 
value. 

Stainless has been a 
favourite among USM follow- 
ers in recent months — the 
shares have moved from 80p 
to 153p since December. The 
group's efforts to upgrade its 
quality control in the past two 
years leaves it strongly placed 
to tender for work in the 
nuclear, oil and bio-processing 
industries. The acquisition 
will complement the group's 
activities well, and Grieveson 
Grant, the company's broker, 
is looking for pretax profits of 
£950.000 this year. Much of 
this is discounted in the share 
price. 

Isobel Unsworth 


UNLISTED SECURITIES 


CMlW'ZJtWn 

C Cwv 


Pnce Cage Crass £** 

lasr on Av Via 
Fnajy <*eek pence °* 


CawatoBo n 

£ Company 


price CngaGnas Or. 

last on tS» Vto 

Friday mm penes % P/E 


Company 


Prea CnMGrOM Orv 
last an *> Yip 
Fnflay ponce N 


P/E 


< ITU 000 M M Go 
4 J0*WO MA SHectiCFi 
UUan Aarorafe 
6 000 ABWycteS 

Atx-raeec Srv Kve 
16 lot Acres Swawe 

67 401 Acorn Comp 
■918 000 Acs* 

4 »0 000 Adam LnUii* 

09 7m AoMon Page 
139m Au CU 
210m Ahu 

18 0m Ajpnamenp 
7.813 000 A«*rtre* 

25 aa Apo Hormru p m cs 
- — • Do Wmts 
15 3m Aspen Conns 
K 0n Aspinaa 
66 -3m Asprey 
2354 000 Assoc Energy 

1 36m Assoc Sred 
4 200 000 Auiomaac 
J 55 1 000 STS Gip 
5225 000 BaOltoO iWanO 

10 4m Berman 5 rgmaa 
2.064 OCO Bensons Cmw 

9&3.000 Berkeley £ Hay 

iBJm Be»day £<□ 

42 rm Beraetey GO 
2 176 000 Bo tenures 

2338 000 B'cmactmcs 

6550 000 BUnawas 

33 401 Obe Arnow 

1 1 5m P-ueMd Toys 
_475m Boor Shop 


1000 B> 

3922000 BraarniMer 
106m HriMI 

7 556 000 Bnm 
3S55 0<)0 B'lUnna See 

7 SO 000 fi> BkXCSINh 

5850000 

78001)00 Brown |CHJ>'tet 
7 182000 Bn** 10*1*1 

BuU ‘fcrtOnrM 3 

1 525000 Busmess Comp 

3255 000 CCA Galenas 

153m CML Moo 
6 916000 CPS Comp 
5998 000 CPU Comp 

19 am CUD 156 

Canooman OH 27J) 

13 5m Cannon seed In. 88 
2.602.000 Cjnvwmoor U 

54 8m Cera* IV 22 8 

11 5m cnancary SaCS 71 
3579.01)0 cnan Foiuks L/tren « 
4 000 000 Owe* pom Europe iM> 


12 . 
48 
62 
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Regina v Hancock and 
Sbanklaiid 

Before Lord Scarman. Lord 
Keith of Kinkel Lord RoskilL 
Lord Brighunan and Lord Grif- 
filh$ 

[Speeches sold February 27] 

In a murder case where it was 
necessary to direct a jury on the 
issue of intern by reference to 
foresight of consequences, the 
probability of death or serious 
injury resulting from the act 
done might be critically im- 
portant. depending on the de- 
gree of probability. 

Failure .to explain the rele- 
vance of probability might 
therefore mislead a jury into 
thinking that it was of hole or no 
importance and into concentrat- 
ing exclusively on the causal 
link between the an and its 
consequence. 

The House df Lords so held, 
giving reasons for dismissing an 
appeal by the Crown from a 
derision dated October?!. 1985 
(77ie Times November 1, 1985; 
H98S1 J WLR 1014) of the 
Court of Appeal (Lord Lane. 
Lord Chief Justice, Mr Justice 
Leonard and Mr Justice Rose) 
allowing appeals by the defen- 
dants. Reginald Dean Hancock 
and Russell Shankland who 
were convicted of murder on 
May 16, 1985 at CardifTCrown 
Court before Mr Justice Mann 
and a jury. 

Mr Martin Thomas, QC and 
Mr Philip Rees for the Crown; 
Mr Gareth -Williams, ■ QC and 
Mr Christopher Pitch ford for 
Mr Hancock; Mr John Prosser, 
QC and Lord Elystan-Morgan 
for Mr Shankland. 

LORD SCARMAN said that 
the appeal was brought to secure 
a ruling on the guidance given 
by the House of Lords in R v 
Moloney {[1985] AC 905) as to 
the direction appropriate to be 
gyvwi to the jury on the issue of 
intent by reference to foresight 
of consequences in a murder 
trial. 

Lord Bridge of Harwich said 
in that case, at p929: 

“In rare cases in which it is 


necessary to direct a juiy by jects were either- thrown from 
reference to foresight of con- the bridge or pushed over its 
sequences, l do not believe it is parapet in the path of the taxi at 
necessary for the judge to do a time when the uuci.could not 
more than invite the jury to avoid being struck, 
consider two questions. - AS the Inal judge told the jury, 

“First .was death or really the prosecution case could be 
serious injury in a murder case . compressed into one question: 
. . a natural consequence of the “What else could a person who 
defendant's voluntary act? Sec- pushed or threw such objects 
ondJy. did the defendant foresee have intended bat to rang 
that consequence as being a really serious bodily harm to the 
natural consequence of bis act? occupants of the car?"* 

“The jury should then be told The defence case was that 
that if they answer ‘yes' to both they intended to block the road, 
questions it isa proper inference to stop the miner going to work, 
for them to draw, that he but not to kill or to do serious 
intended that consequence." . bodily harm to anybody. The 
The trial judge based his - defendants were - prepared to 
direction to the jury on that plead guilty to manslaughter but 
guidance and the two defen- the Crown decided to pursue the 
dants were convicted. The charge of murder. 

Court of Appeal quashed the The issue was ultimately one 
convictions on the ground that of intention. Did they (or either 
the judge's guidance may well, of them) intend to kill or to 
hive mts/ed-thejury. The Court cause anyone serious'--- bodily 
of Appeal refused leave to’ harm? - 

appeal but certified the follow- ; The case called for a; careful 
ing point of law; . direction by the judge to die jury 

“Do the questions to be as to the state of mind required, 
considered by a jury set out in by law to be proved to their 
the speech of Lord Bridge of satisfaction before they could 
Harwich in R v Moloney ([ 1 985] return a verdict of murder. 

929) as a model 


. Lord Bridge omitted any ref- 
erence in the guidelines to 
probability because he included 
“probability" jn the meaning 
which he. attributed to 

“natural**. 

It was very doubtful whethera 
jury without further explanation 
-would think that “probable" 
added nothing to “natural". 
Probability of a consequence 
was a factor 'of sufficient im- 
portance to be drawn specifi- 
cally to the jury's attention and 
to be explained. 

The Moloney, guidelines as 
they stood' were, unsafe and 
misleading. They also required 
an explanation that the greater 
the probability of a consequence 
.the more likely it was dial (be 
consequence was foreseen and 
that if it was foreseen the greater 
the probability was that it was 
also intended Jones also re- 
quired to be reminded- that the 
decision wasiheirs to be reached 
upon a consideration of all the 
evidence. 

. Guidelines of general applica- 
tion, albeit within a limited class 
of case, were neither wise nor 


0 


AC 905. 

direction require 

amplification?" 

In the dark hours of the early 


desirable. It was therefore not 
The judge's direction as to the - advisable to use the guidelines 
intention required by law was formulated by the Lord Chief 
impeccable. When he 


help them on the facts, he 


came to •' Justice in the present case. 


e injury a 
of what 


morning of November 30, 1984 offered guidance along the 
Mr David Wilkie was driving Moloney tines and. stated that 
his taxi along the Heads of the they might find ft helpful to 
Valley Road, South Wales. As “Was death or serious 
he approached the bridge over, 
the road at Rhymney he was 
killed when two lumps of con- 
crete dropped from the bridge 
hit his car. 

Mr Wilkie's passenger was a 
rk.TTte 


natural consequence 
was done? Did a defendant 
foresee that consequence as -a 
natural consequence?". 

The jury were out for five 
. hours and . returned asking .for 

miner going to work. The defen- further directions. Their prob- 
dants were miners on strike and lem was how to relate foresight 
strongly objected to Mr Wilkie's to intention and they could not 
Passenger going to work. solve ft by answering the two 

That morning they had col- questions 
lected the concrete lumps from The Court of Appeal found 
nearby, had brought them to the itself driven to the conclusion 
bridge and bad placed them on that the use by the judge of the 
the parapet They then awaited Moloney guidelines might have 
the arrival oftbe convoy escort- misled the jury. The question 
ingthe miner to work. for the House therefore was 

The case for the prosecution whether those guidelines were 
•was_that.the .two concrete ob-„sound. 


The baying down of guidelines * T 
by the Court of Appeal should u 
be done roaringly. and limited 
to cases of real difficulty. 

If it was done, the guidelines 
should avoid generalization so 
far as " was possible and 
encourage- the jury to exercise 
their common sense: in reaching 
what was (heir decision On the 
facts. 

Guidelines were not rules of 
law. Judges should not think 
that they must use diem. A 
judge's duty was to direct .and 
help, the jury upon the particular 
facts of the case. 

Lord Keith. Lord RoskilL 
Lord Brighiman and Lord Grif- 
fiths agreed. 

Solicitors: Director of Public 
Prosecutions; Cartwrights. Car- 
diff, Mr Gareth J. Davies. 
Bargoed. 




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’MS (Sit 


INVESTMENT TRUSTS 



Trave Schiffahrtsgesellschaft 
mbH A Co KG « Ninerala 
Maritime Corporation 
Before Sir John Donaldson. 
Master of the Rolls, Lord Justice 
Stephen Brown and Lord Justice 
Woolf 

[Judgment given February 21 J 
The Coun of Appeal consid- 
ered the proper exercise of the 
courts' powers, under' section 
1(5) of the Arbitration Act 1979, 
to direct arbitrators to give 
reasons or further and belter 
reasons for awards, in the course 
of giving its reasons for dismiss- 
ing an appeal by the sellers of the 
vessel Niedersachsen, renamed 
Ninemia. from Mr Justice 
Staughum who on June 26, 1985. 
refused to order the arbitrators 
of their dispute with the respon- 
dents to give further reasons for 
an award. dated April 2, 1985. . . 

Mr Timothy Young for the 
appellants: Mr Bernard. Eder for 
the respondents. 

THE MASTER OF THE. 
ROLES said thaf rfje' Arbftfa-' 
lion Act 1979 nowhere defined 
what was meant by a “reasoned 
award", but it was clear from 
, section l(5l that what was 
meant was one which slated the 
reasons for the award in suf- 
ficient detail for the court to 
consider any question of law 
arising therefrom, if it were to 
give leave to appeal 
Thai was what a party “was 
asking for if he gave notice 
under section l(6)(a) that a 
reasoned award was required or 
if. notwithstanding the absence 
of such a notice, either the 
relevant arbitral rules requited 
the giving of a reasoned award 
or the arbitrator himself in- 


Staughton in Vermala Shipping 
Enterprises Lid v Minerals and 
Metals Trading Corporation of 
India Ud ((19821 l Lloyd's Rep 
468) and H orde v Feedex Inter- 
national Inc ([1984] 1 Lloyd's 
Rep 310) and disagreed with Mir 
Justice Robert Goff in 
Schiffahnsagemur Hamburg 
Middle East Line GmbH v . 
Virtue Shipping Corporation 
([1981] 2 All ER ‘887) that in 
exercising the court’s discretion 
■whether or not to grant leave to 
appeal, it could take account of 
whether the parties asked for a 


dicated that it was his intention 
to make a reasoned award. 

Where, in response to a 
request, the arbitrator purported 
to make a reasoned award, but 
failed to do so because the 
reasons were insufficient, the 
court had jurisdiction under 
section 1(5) to order him to do 
so. 

The purpose of section 1|6) 
was clear. It would be a consid-' 
erable burden if an arbitrator, 
having given an award without 
any reasons, and not having 
been asked to do otherwise by 
any of the parties, were sub- 
sequently to be ordered by the 
court to give such reasons. 

Accordingly, the court had no 
jurisdiction to make such an 
order, in the absence ofspecial 
reasons why no such request was 
made. 

There remained a situation" 
with which the An did not deal 
expressly. That - WSS "Where - the "'arid fecordingifie ‘reason 
arbitrator gave some reason for to accentuate its rationali: 
- his award, notsrithstandirig.that 
he was .not asked to make a 
reasoned award and that there 
was no special reason why a 
party should not have given 
notice requiring such an award. 

What happened then? 

If the reasons were suf- 
ficiently full to constitute a 
“reasoned award", no question 
of further reasons would arise. 

The coun would have full 
jurisdiction to consider whether 
or not to give leave to appeal. 

(unless' there was an exlusion 
agreement within the meaning 


Act did not apply and the coun 
bad jurisdiction to order further 
and JJener reasons under section 
1(5). 

Nevertheless, it retained a 
discretion. And a very ira- 

S rtant. and often decisive. 

lor in exercising that- dis- 
cretion had to be the policy 
under the Act. which was that an 
arbitrator was generally under 
no obligation to give a reasoned 
award, unless asked to do so. 
and that, in the absence of such 
a request, arbitrators should not 
be expected to give reasons for 


reasoned award or, for special/; an award after the award had 
reasons, were excused from so ; been published. 


doing. 

The giving of reasoned 
awards was to be encouraged 
for. as was said in the Commer- 
cial Court Report on Arbitration 
(1978MCmnd 7284). “The mak- 
ing or an award is, or should be. 
a rational process. 


tty. 

White -tire 'parties touIo ‘exe- 
cute an exclusion agreement and 
so prevent any appeaL it would 
be unfortunate if arbitrators 
were to come to regard the 
making of a reasoned award, in 
the absence of a request to do so. 
as giving hostages to fortune. 

The importance of that factor 
would vary in differing circum- 
stances, as was always the case 
with matters going to the ex- 
ercise of a discretion. 

[f. notwithstanding the ab- 
sence of a request for a reasoned: 
_ award or a special reason wily 
of section 3). ' , such a request should notfiave 

In that context, his Lordship been made, some reasons for the 
respectfully agreed with the award were given but they are 
approach of Mr Justice insufficient, section 1(6) of the 


Parliament could not have 
intended that a right to be given 
reasons sufficient to mount an 
appeal should depend upon 
whether or not the ingenuity of 
counsel could detect something 
which could be characterized as 
,..a_ reason Jnjui award which, 
from the point of view of a 
commercial man. could never 
be reganJetf as being, or being 
intended to be, a reasoned 
award. 

An equally important (actor 
was the degree of likelihood that 
if further reasons were given, the 
court would grant leave to 
appeal. - 

The giving of further reasons 
after the award had been pub- 
lished was burdensome and 
arbitrators should not be asked 
to undertake it unless it was 
likely to be necessary for the 
purposes of an appear 

Lord Justice Stephen Brown 
and Lord Justice Woolf agreed. 

Solicitois: Holman Fenwick 
& Wilian: Ince & Co. 


.3 




Debt not discharged by delivery of cheque 


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CONTRfBUTES EFFECTIVELY TO CORPORATE PERFORMANCE 


Official Solicitor to the Su- 
preme Court v Thomas 
Before Lord Justice Slade and 
Lord Justice Nicholls 
[Judgment given February 21] 
The mere delivery of a cheque 
to a creditor did not discharge a 
debt, even where the creditor 
had agreed that payment could 
be made by cheque instead ofin 
cash: the debt was only dis- 
charged when the creditor ac- 
cepted payment. 

The Court of Appeal so held 
in a reserved judgment, dismiss- 
ing an appeal by a tenant. Mr 
John Derek Thomas, and allow- 
ing a cross-appeal by his land- 
lord. the Official Solicitor to the 
Supreme Court, from a decision 
of Truro County Court (Judge 
Chopek which on April 3. 19S5 
had declared, in answer to a 
question of taw posed in a case 
stated by an arbitrator, that a 
notice to quit issued by the 
landlord was good and suf- 
ficient. since the tenant had 
failed to comply with a valid 
notice to pay issued under case 
Dial in section 2(3) of the 
Agricultural Holdings (Notices 
to Quit) Act 1977. but that a 
notice to remedy issued under 
case D(b) in section 2(3) was not 
in proper form. 

Mr M. D. W. Barnes. QC and 
Mr John Male for the tenant: Mr 
Derek Wood QC and Miss 
, Joanne -Moss for the landlord - 
LORD JUSTICE 

NICHOLLS said that the tenant 
had been tenant of a farm i= 
Cornwall since 1975 at an 
annual rent of £3.800 payable at 
Lady Day and Michaelmas. 

In 1979 two sets of improve- 
ments had been executed by the 
landlord and the tenant had 
agreed to pay additional interest 
payments at the same time as 
the rent. The tenant had paid by 
cheque two or three weeks after 
each half-yearly rent demand 
In 19S0 the landlord had 
issued a notice to quit and in 
order noi to prejudice it. had not 
demanded the Michaelmas rent. 
In October 1980 the tenant had 
sent the landlord a cheque for 
that remand interest (which was 
1 £59 short) which the landlord 
had not cashed. 

An arbitrator having upheld 
the notice to quit, the landlord 
had again demanded rent in July 
1981. The cheque had by then 
! expired and the tenant mode no 
payment. 

In December 1981 the county 
court had restrained the land- 
lord from levying distress, on 
the condition that the tenant 
pay into coun “the sum of 


0,800 on account of any mon- 
eys due" to the landlord. The 
tenant had complied and the 
moneys had been paid out to the. 
landlord. 

In January 1982 the landlord 
had served a notice to pay, 
requiring the tenant “to pay 
within two months . . . the rent 
due ... as set out below:- Half 
year's rent due on September 29, 
1981. £1.900". and a notice to 
remedy requiring the tenant 
within to months to remedy 
breaches of “supplemental 
agreements for the payment of 
interest on landlord's repairs" 
alleging failure “to pay the 
interest due" for the previous 
three half-years. 

No payment having been 
made pursuant to either notice, 
a further notice to quit had been 
served, on the .basis of ‘the 
tenant's failures to comply with 
the notices. Subsequently the 
county court had set aside the 
first notice to quit 

The tenant's case was that 
when the notice to pay had been 
served, he had already dis- 
charged the obligation to pay- 
rent because the Michaelmas 
1980 rent had been paid by the 
cheque of October 1 980 and the 
.subsequent instalments met by 
the payment out of court, and 
that even if the cheque had not 
discharged the 1980 instalment, 
the payment out of court had 
been apportioned to the instal- 
ments due in I9SI. 

The landlord had argued that 
“due" in the notice to pay meant 
“owing" and that he had there 
set out the rent position as at 
Michaelmas 1981. namely, the 
total amount of rent unpaid at 
that date. 

His Lordship could not accept 
that submission. The natural 
reading of the notice was that 
the landlord was requiring pay- 
ment of the half-year's rent 
which had first become due at 
Michaelmas 198L 

The tenant said that once the 
cheoue had been delivered to 
the landlord by posL subject to 
its not being dishonoured on 
presentation, the tenant had 
paid the rent and there was no 
longer any due in respect of the 
half-year ending Michaelmas 
1980. since in getting the cheque 
into the landlord's possession 
the tenant had done all that he 
was obliged to do and could do. 

His Lordship said that to 
make possession, rather than 
acceptance of payment, the 
touchstone tor distinguishing 
tender from payment was noth- 
ing short of absurd. If it were, a 


TS 


debtor having tendered 
merit and been refused cou 
enforce payment by putting die 
money through the creditor's 
letterbox dr posting ft to him. 

The law needed to protect 
debtors against creditors seeking 
to take advantage of their crwn. 
self-induced non-payment, bat 
that was not the principle on 
which it did sa 

No such protection was in any 
event required here, since the 
tenant had had several months 
to provide another cheque after 
the landlord had again become 
willing to accept rent. 

The tenant had relied on 
Avrerr v Mason ((1978) 37 P & 
C R 452). Tankexpress A/S v 
Compagnie Finaneiere Beige 
dcs Petro/es S4 ([1945] AC 76. 
103) and The Brimnes ([19751 
QB 929). None of those cases 
established or supported his 
proposition; there was no ques- 
tion in them of refusal to accept 
payment and the issue was ibe 
limeousness of payment. 

The receipt and retention by 
the landlord of the October 1 980 
cheque might have afforded a 
defence of tender and precluded 
the landlord issuing a notice to 


by reference to the amount of 
•rent for which distress could 
then be levied (the 1981 instal- 
ments), in payiug the money the 
tenant had merely been fulfilling 
the condition imposed by the 
judge^ which had been expressed 
as. “on account, of any- moneys 
due" No a ppropriation was to 
be inferred from the dreum- 
stances or from the agreement 
between the parties regarding 
payment out. 

The tenant had. sought to 
draw an analogy with a debtor 
owing several suras, somcstai- 
ine-barred. who had .made a 
payment: the presumption be- 
ing that ft was to be appro- 
priated to the non-barred . 


bts: 

- , Nash v Hodgson {{1855X6 de 

ra/er -S4_([l 943] AC 76, G M & G -474). Although the 

^ n * position on distresses an 

important matter to .be taken 
into account, the terms agreed 
between the parties showed 
appropriation to have been a 
matter of indifference 
The judge had been right to 
hold that the notice to pay was 
valid. 

The judge had upheld the 
tenant s contention that the 
notice to remedy, had not given 


pay unless and until he had ' sufficient or wholly accurate 
asked for a further cheque and particulars of the term or con- 


given the tenant a reasonable 
opportunity to send one. 

It had not however discharged 
the obligation to pay rent, which 
had remained unpaid and due 
when the notice to pay bad been 
issued. That conclusion ac- 
corded wiih common sense, 
since no money m respect of the 
Michaelmas 1980 rem had ever 
left the tenant’s bank account 
and passed to the landlord 
before the notice to pay 
been given. 

As to appropriation, the ap- 
plicable (aw was summarised in 
C or}’ Brothers & Co Ltd v 
Owners of the Turkish Steam- 
ship Mecca ([18971 AC 286. 

It was conceded that the 
tenant had not expressly appro- 
priated the moneys paid out of 
court to the l98t rent, but he 
had argued that an appropri- 
ation was to be implied. A mere 
_un communicated intention to 
make such an appropriation was 
insufficient: see Leeson v Leeson 
<[19361 2 KB 156. 161. 162C 

Applying the approach 
adopted there, it was clear that 
the payment into court did not 
constitute an appropriation to 
any particular rem instalments. 

Although it was a reasonable 
inference that the sum to be paid 
into court had been determined 


dition alleged .-to :have been 

broken. —r' 

• fo Pickard v Bishop\( I gi75) 3 1 
P & C R 108) and Dickinson r 
Boucher ((1983) 269 EG 1159. 
1164) strict compliance with 
statu tory requirements had been 
emphasised with regard to no- 
tw» under the Agricultural 
Holdings Act 1948 or the- 1977 
Act, and the tenant had submit- 
ted that the notice to remedy did 
not pass the stria test applied in 
those cases. 

His Lordship could not 
acccept that submission. The 
adequacy of the description of 
•the obligation and. its alleged 
breach was a question of degree 
to be answered ini the tight ofthe 
circumstances, and il was not 
tne case that any inaccuracy, 
however trivial or immaterial or 
obviously a slip and regardless 
or whether the tenant might be 
misled, by it was necessarily 
ratal. > 

idSffite?S CUlar * * ven 
loenuned the source and essen- 
tial subject-matter of the oblifta- 

}n°£i t J O OWed *■“*' «*»e noE 

to remedy was valid. :• ' ■ 

Lord J ustice Slade agreed. 

Co , for Foot A Bowden. Plym- 
outh; Robbins Olivey & Blake 

Sr fer Bur*. -Mm™. 




























TIMES 


March 3, 1986 


t FOCUS )) 


itrato! 


The Queen’s vfeiftd Australia,' 
which will take her lo Canber- 
ra, Sydney, . Melbourne and 
Adelaide over the next "10 
days, reminds us once again of 

the deep historical and per- 
sonal links between our two 
countries. And yet, as Austra- 
bans prepare to celebrate the 
200th anniversary of British 
settlement in 1988, their day-, 
to-day concerns, are . over- 
whelmingly with' the Asia- 
Pacific region of which 
geographically they are a pan. 

Two facts, illustrate this 
orientation. First, the alliance., 
with the United States, which 
has guaranteed the country’s 
security since, the Second 
World War, and, second, trade 
with Japan, which for two 
decades has been the largest 
export market 

in recent years Australia has 
played a more independent 
role in ..the region.- Cough 
Whitlam, who came to power 
with Labor in 1972, withdrew 
Australian troops from South ‘ 
Vietnam, recognized China, 
opened relations with North 
Vietnam and North Korea, 
and chose Papua New Guinea - 
and Indonesia for his first 
overseas trip as Prime Minis- 
ter. Although his Liberal (con- 
servative) successor, Malcolm 
Fraser, had different priori- 
ties. he did not substantially 
reverse this trend. The Labor " 
government which has held . 
office since 1983 under Bob , 
Hawke has sought to strength- 
en tia with South-East Asiarin 
a more p ra g ma t i c way than 
Mr Whitlam, with the empha- 
sis on economic cooperation. 

BiD Hayden, the foreign 
minister, has tried, so far 
without success, to act as 
honest broker between Viet- 


nam and the Asean countries 
over Cambodia. However, he 
does seem to. have succeeded 
in burying the hatchet with 
Indonesia over: East Timor. 
The. visit of Mocbtar Kusu- 
maatmadja, tire foreign minis- 
ter, in December was 
remarkable for the absence of 
beat on Hus issue and there is 
how talk of President Suharto 
coming to Canberra. 

" In foreign policy matters Mr 
Hawke has concentrated on 
the ANZUS crisis and trade 
with China. .The quarrel be- 
tween Neiw Zealand and the 
United Stales over the visits of 
American nuclear powered or 
armed vessels has cemented 
therelarionship between Can- 
berra and Washington. Aus- 
tralians seem to have decided 
that their country, with its 
proximity to the .great: Asian 
land mass, cannot : . afford a 
gesture such as Nfew Zea- 
land’s, and support for the 
alliance is at an all-tune high. 

The Americans have been 
irritated by Mr Hawke’s dith- 
ering over whether or not to 
cooperate in MX missile tests 
in the South Pacific (he even- 
tually decided against) and by 
Mr Hayden’s push in the 
United Nations for a compre- 
hensive nuclear test ban trea- 
ty. However, these differences 
appear to have been worn 
comfortably in the light ol 
Canberra's firm commitment ; 
to the allian ce. 

lire two countries operate 
three joint facilities in Austra- 
lia, including an early warning 
satellite ground station and a 
communications • centre- used 
mainly for keeping in touch 
with submerged nuclear sub- 
marines. 

Relations with China have 


A SPECIAL REPORT ON 

AUSTRALIA/1 

An uphill fight 
for Honest John 


been a particular concern of 
the last three Prime Ministers, 
although Mr Fraser used them 
as an pnti-Soyiet card. The 
value of Australian exports, 
mainly wheat, wool and iron 
ore, rose by over 70 per cent in 
fiscal 1984/85 to nearly 
SA 1,056 million (about £528 
million) and negotiations are 
underway for China to invest 
in an iron ore mine, a blast 
furnace and an aluminium 

Australia has a 
trade surplus 
with Japan 

. smelter in Australia. Howev-,. 
er, two-way trade whh Taiwan 
is still worth more than that 
with China. 

Australia is one of the few 
countries to have a trade 
surplus with Japan (SAI, 247 
million in 1984/85). However, 
the Japanese share of total . 


exports reached a peak 10 
years ago while its portion of 
imports has steadily in- 
creased. overtaking that of the 
United States for the first time 
in 1983/84. 

As a former administrative 
power, Australia maintains 
dose relations with Papua 
New Guinea, to which it 
supplies about SA200 million 
in aid a year, $A140 million 
towards the budget and the 
rest as project and defence 
grants. The vulnerability of 
the Papua New Guinean econ- 
omy and the tension with 
Indonesia over . Melanesian 
guerrillas in Irian Jaya who 
seek refuge in PNG are causes 
: of concern to Canberra; 
Australia's nearest neighbour 
remains a potential flashpoint. 

In the South-West Pacific, 
Canberra has taken the initia- 
tive in getting the South 
Pacific Forum, which groups 
Australia, New Zealand and 
Pacific Islands, to endorse a 


SoBth Pacific nuclear free 
zone treaty. The area is of 
great strategic interest to Aus- 
tralia and Mr Hayden is due to 
tour it later this year. The 
future of New Caledonia, 
French nuclear testing, the 
fisheries agreement between 
Kiribati and the Soviet Union, 
and the danger of Libyan 
involvement will be high on 
his agenda. 

Although the Hawke gov- 
ernment is making its mark in 
the Asia/Pacific region it 
could be argued tht it is 
following a series of ad hoc 
initiatives rather than a coher- 
ent external strategy. 

Perhaps that will emerge 
only after a review commis- 
sioned by Kim Beazley. the 
defence minister, is published 
later this year. Paul Dibb of 
the Australian National Uni- 


versity in Can- 
berra has been 
asked to look at 
the structure of 
the armed forces 
in the light of 
peculiarly Aus- 
tralian, as op- 
posed to allied, requirements. 

While leaving the alliance 
with the United States intact, 
Australia will in future place 
more emphasis on defending 
its own vast territory. This is 
likely to be done by a combi- 
nation of maritime strike ca- 
pability and lightly armed 
ground forces which can be 
deployed rapidly. Such a con- 
cept is a retreat from wider 
responsibilities within the 
Western alliance but it does 
correspond more closely to the 
pronounced regional bent of 
Australian foreign policy. 

Simon Scott Plummer 


John Winston Howard took 
over as leader of the liberal 
Party in extraordinary drtmn- 
stances on September 5, 1985. 
His predecessor, Andrew Pea- 
cock, bad set out to remove 
him as bis deputy after Mr 
Howard had refused to declare 
be would not seek election to 
the leadership before the next 
.federal poll. 

The move backfired disas- 
trously for Mr Peacock. Mr 
Howard defeated the challeng- 
er for the deputy’s post by 38 
votes to 31. Mr Peacock then 
resigned and Mr Howard was 
elected leader of the party by 
57 votes to six with seven 
abstentions. 

■ His accession has brought a 
new look to the leadership of 
the Opposition, which has 
traditionally been dominated 
by the Victorian Establish- 
ment. Mr Howard is from a 
small business background — 
his father ran a garage — in 
New South Wales. Both he 
and his deputy, NeQ Brown, 
went to state schools and the 
Liberals’ leader and deputy 
leader in the Senate are both 
Roman Catholics. 

It also marks a swing to the 
right in the party, which 
distinguishes it more sharply 
from a conservative Labor 
government than under Mr 
Peacock. Mr Howard support- 
ed Labor's deregulation of the 
financial market but would 
like to extend tins to the 
labour market. This is anathe- 
ma to the muons and a 
government whose political 
platform is based on their 
support. He also favours sell- 
ing off parts of the public 
sector. 

Mr Howard, who is 46, is a 
small bespectacled man with 
a ruddy complexion and thin- 
ning grey hair. He has a 
reputation for honesty, a quali- 
ty evident in an interview with 
The Times in his office in 
Parliament House, Canberra, 
daring which he answered 
questions simply and directly. 

He said he had been inter- 
ested in politics for as long as 
he could remember and re- 
called the 1949 election, when 
Robert Menzies returned to 
power and when petrol ration- 


ing was a big issue. Menzies. 
Churchill and Mrs Gandhi are 
people whose strength be ad- 
mires and he also respects 
Mis Thatcher and President 
Reagan for the way they have 
captured the public mood. 

Alter graduating in law from 
Sydney University in 1961 Mr 
Howard joined a firm of 
solicitors. In 1974 he was 
elected to the federal parlia- 
ment as member for the Syd- 
ney suburb of Bennelong, 
which he still represents. He 
and his wife, Janette, and their 
three children, a girl and two 
boys, live in Wollstonecraft, 
another Sydney suburb. 

Mr Howard was appointed 
Opposition spokesman on 
consumer affair s and com- 
merce in March 1975 and, 
after the Libera l-Na tional 
Party coalition returned to 
power later that year, became 
successively Minister for 
Business and Consumer Af- 
fairs. Minister of State for 
Special Trade Negotiations, 


Johu Howard: A new look to 
Opposition leadership 

Minister for Finance, and 
Treasurer. The last portfolio 
he held from 1977 to 1983. He 
became deputy leader of the 
Liberals in 1982. 

In the six months since he 
. assumed the leadership of the 
Opposition Mr Howard has 
hurt an uphill struggle to 
convince the country that he 
could beat Bob Hawke in a 
general election. Whatever the 
problems of the present gov- 
ernment — and they are many 
— Mr Hawke has retained his 
popularity as a good bloke who 
Continued on page 2 




■j J ut z , iri»p ■■■•: jfii •- 


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irtllK SYHTVPl.SU 






J 




THE TIMES MONDAY MARCH 3 198( 


AUSTRALIA/2 


FOCUS 



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The Trade Development Zone offers no 
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TYPE OF BUSINESS 


HORTHEMTHWTWT 





IBBOEDEVQ0PMEHI2XME 



MM Bm ifootaa CMn. Ommm. SOW 


'Animal 

General Meeting 


National Australia Bank Limited 

Highlights of the 
Chairman’s Address 


Group operating profit after tax 
in 1984/85 amounted to almost 
$302 million, an increase of 30.1%. 
This Tesult must be placed into 
perspective with the major 
changes that have taken place with- 
in Australian financial markets' 

It was inevitable that Australian 
banks would gain something from 
the initial round of deregulation. 
Indeed, it would have been an 
unhealthy sign if they had not. 

The second round of changes 
within the financial industry 
involves establishment of the new 
ban); entrants. There always has 
been strong competition within 
the banking industry; but the next 
five years is going to be something 
of a watershed, as the new 
entrants make their bids for a 
viable share. The success of 
1984/85 has provided National 
Australia Bank with an excellent 
start and it is revamping its 
strategies to meet these new 
competitive challenges. 

The Bank was first to offer 
payment systems to the new 
banks and non-banks seeking 
agency access. Innovations in 
deposit and lending products are 
taking place, some of which are 
well ahead of those being offered 
by overseas banks in their 
domestic markets. A new zone 
concept will place specialist 
service and advice closer to 
people in branches to maintain 
and enhance customer 
relationships. 

At the same time, the Ban): is 
taking advantage of the increased 
opportunity foreign bank entry is 
providing to extend and upgrade 
its presence overseas. It has also 
established National Australia 
Life Limited to enter the Life 
Insurance market. 


Economic Outlook 

The broader economic outlook 
suggests a difficult operating 
environment in the near term. 
High real rates of interest strike at 
the very heart of economic growth 
and development. Real rates of 
interest of well over D% per 
annum, stifle investment and our 
ability to achieve productivity 
gains. New investment in 
productive economic ventures 
cannot be forced and markets 
must be allowed to operate 
unfettered. A healthy stable 
environment, devoid of the 
uncertainties associated with high 
real Interest rates, is an essential 
prerequisite. 

Of great concern is the 
resurgence of inflation and the 
perceived lack of confidence in 
the Australian dollar. 

Undoubtedly a tight monetary 
stance is a necessary strategy in 
these circumstances. However, 
it should not be allowed to bear 
the full brunt of deflationary 
policy It will also be necessary 
to reduce or postpone govern- 
ment expenditure and restrain 
wages growth, lb maintain 
pressure on interest rates for too 
long may well prove highly detri- 
mental to the nation's medium 
term prospects. 


Rising domestic costs and low 
returns are severely impacting on 
farm incomes and depressing 
property values. The agricultural 
policies erf the European 
Economic Community and the 
United States of America are 
distorting markets and resulting 
in a poor outlook for commodity 
prices. The Bank strongly 
encourages the Federal Govern- 
ment to maintain its protest on 
these issues and for its part the 
Bank, as -a major lender to the 
rural sector, will continue to 
sympathetically treat ’viable 
farmers in difficulty 

Ultimately the success of National 
Australia Bank is going to be 
closely bound to the future pros- 
perity of our own country As a 
financial intermediary we have 
an important role to play but we 
canonly play that rde if the 
economic climate is supportive. 
Many more hard decisions have 
yet to be made before we can look 
forward to this country reaching 
the very considerable potential it 
undoubtedly possesses. 

Sir Robert Law-Smith, 

Chairman of Directors, 
Melbourne. 

January 23, 1986. 


SUMMARY OF RESULTS (Year ended September) 


Tbtal Group assets 
Group operating profit 
(aftertax) 

Earnings per share 
Dividend per stock unit 


1983 

1984 

1985 

($m) 

(3m) 

(Sm) 

23,283 

27,505 

35,329 

161 

228 

302 

62c 

70c 

88c 

23c 

25c 

27.5c 


Growth, but no safety margin 


Ihe Labor government has 
succeeded beyond all expecta- 
tions with its "dash for 
growth” and “jobs now” eco- 
nomic strategy in the pas 1 
three years, achieving this in 
the face of both a commodity 
price slump and subdued 
growth among Australia’s 
trade partners. 

Growth has been running at 
more than four per cent a year, 
faster than in virtually all the 
industrial economies, and 
Australia's best performance 
in a quarter of a century. 

Unemployment has fallen a 
couple of points to eight per 
cent, the country is having its 
fourth year of industrial stabil- 
ity. corporate profit share is 
returning to late 1960s levels, 
and labour costs arc now 
below the late 1 960s level. For 
all that, there is a penalty for 
governments that ignore the 
orthodoxies, especially when 
inflation rales are out of step 
with those of trading partners. 

Australia’s 8.2 per cent 
including a couple of points 
for last year's devaluation, 
compares with about 5.5 per 
cent for Britain. 3.6 per cent 
for the United States, 1.9 per 
cent for Japan and 1.8 percent 
for West Germany. 

Paul Keating, the Treasurer, 
argues that the real index of 
competitiveness is labour 
costs, where Australia's real 
unit costs rose half a point less 
than the key trading partners’ 
over 1984/85. With a 6.1 per 
cent rise expected over 
1985/86. it would be only a 
point above the average over- 
seas. 

However, international 
scepticism is reinforced when 
AukraJia’s economic growth 
is fuelled by big budget deficits 
and when the growth is depen- 
dent on heavy borrowing off- 
shore to fund an exceptionally 
weak balance of payments (an 
expected current account defi- 
cit for 1985/86 of about SA12 
billion). 

The result has been a deval- 
uation of the Australian dollar 
by currency markets last year 
of about 20 per cent. To keep 
the dollar at its present level of 
around 68-71 US cents, the 
government is having to run 






economy heavily ,.m hock to 
overseas fenders , and sow. 

subject jo sharply dete riora t- 
ing world prices oa. its major 



A bird's eye view of Sydney’s business district 


short-term interest rates 
(nominal and real) at levels 
well above the OECD norm. 
The bank prime rate, for 
example, is around 20 per 
cent 

The success to date has been 
a function of the “accord" 
with the trade onion move- 
ment. based on confining 
wage gains to the rate of 
inflation. Pan of the accord 
iheory was that the unions 
were to be brought into the 
policy-setting framework. The 
hot pace of economic growth 
has enabled the Australian 
Council of Trade Unions to go 
along with the profit restora- 
tion. financial deregulation, 
and less than full wage 
indexation. 

The ACTU has kept its side 
of the bargain. Wages drift and 
industrial disputes have been 
minimal, and the government 
and ACTU have acted sharply 
against renegade unions trying 
to bust out of the accord 
restraints. 

Hence this recovery has not 
run into the normal wages- 
cxplosion brick wall. The 
expansion has run instead into 
the balance of payments con- 
straint. It is now difficult to 
satisfy both unions and the 
foreign exchange markeL 


There are further conse- 
quences of the government 
running an economic policy 
on a nil safety margin. For 
instance, the latest sag in oil 
prices . cannot be passed on 
• fully into local petrol prices 
because the government is 
dependent on oil taxes to 
finance major income tax cuts 
promised in 1986 and 1987. 

On the other hand, to keep 
up oil prices will further 
worsen Australia's inflation 
rale relative to those of its 
trading partners, and the cur- 
rency and hence the accord 

Business community 
is apprehensive 

will again come under pres- 
sure (devaluations require a 
discounting of wage index- 
ation). 

Fiscal policy has also been 
hampered by the unions' re- 
fusal in last year’s tax summit 
to wear Mr Keating's pro- 
posed broad-based consump- - 
lion tax. These developments 
merely indicate that the basic 
premise .of the accord — 
maintenance and improver 
mem of real workforce living 
standards - is suspect in an 


Two-airline policy under review 


.Vc.r-.ii ‘,1 .iB • 1 r it-: 

*(■ ’ J . •.ci 'ii Aw-.- •. j 


In a country the size of Australia, air 
travel is the most convenient way of 
moving between cities. However, the 
airline system is quite different from 
that of the United States. 

Whereas the US market has been 
deregulated since 1978, the Australian is 
strictly controlled by a policy which 
provides for two carriers. An sett and 
Trans Australia Airiines(TAA). to fly. 

’ trunk routes within the country and a 
f third, Qantas, to be the sole imeraation- 
^ al earner. 

This domestic duopoly, in which the 
two airlines have similar capacity, 
charge the same fores and. in the main, 
fly the same routes at approximately the 
same time, is under review. 

Ansett, a private company owned 
jointly by Sir Peter Abeles’ TNT and 
Rupert Murdoch's News Corporation, 
wants to leave things largely as they arc, 
arguing that there has not yet been lime 
to evaluate fully changes in the policy 
introduced in 1981 to foster competi- 
tion. 

Honest John's 
uphill fight 

Continued from page 1 

understands Ihe feelings of the 
ordinary Australian. 

In an opinion poll published 
in the weekly magazine The 
Bulletin last month, half of 
those questioned supported 
Labor, compared to 42 per 
cent for the Liberal-National 
coalition. However, when it 
came to wbo would make the 
better Prime Minister, Mr 
Howard scored only 19 per 
cent against Mr Hawke's 66 
per cent 

As well as taking on Labor, 

Mr Howard has had to con- 
solidate his position within the 
Liberal Party after his surpris- 
ing victory last September. 

This be appears to have 
achieved to a large extent and 
it will be interesting to see 
whether he and his party will 
now be able to take advantage 
of the government's weak 
points. 

These include one of the 
most serious crises ever to 
affect Australian formers, 
stagnation in mining (apart 
from gold), high interest rates, 
a huge current account deficit 
soaring debt a retreat over tax 
reform in the face of onion 
opposition, and a failure, for 
revenue reasons, to pass on 
fully to consumers the benefits 
of the drop in world oil prices. 

The Liberals will have no 
lack of targets to attack be- 
tween now and the next federal 
election, and in the current 
session of parliament which 
began last month, they are 
adopting more aggressive tac- 
tics towards their opponents 
than they did before Christ- 
mas. 

The question is whether 
“Honest John” Howard can afiip 

capitalize on Labor's difficul- Wp 

ties and emerge as a popular fT 

leader. ^ 

Evidently he intends to try a Ml 

more hard-hitting approach. gro# 

“The Opposition is for black 
and » hite,” he told The Times. H 

“Shades of grey are fur the Wm 

government" «jp 

SSP " 


TAA. which is state-owned, wishes, 
like Ansett to retain the two-airline 
system. Bui it advocates greater free- 
dom to set fares and to decide on trow its ■ 
fleet should be used. It would also, like 
access to intrastate and to some 
international routes, r .• > . ■ 

East-West Airlines is: out to- break 
their duopoly. Owned by' Ric Stowe, a 
West Australian millionaire, it sees the 
present system as stifling innovation 
and making air travel unnecessarily 
expensive, and is calling for gradual 
deregulation. 

In an attempt to force the pace of 
change. East-West has challenged the 
two airlines policy in the High Court on 
the grounds that it contravenes Section 
92 of the constitution, which guarantees 
free trade and commerce between the 
states. 

- . Though it is Australia's overseas 
earner. Qantas, which, like TAA, is 
government-owned, has made a sub- 
mission to the review body because it 
wants restoration of the right to carry on 
the domestic sectors of its international 


services (eg. Sydney-Perth) passengers 
brought to Australia by foreign airlines. 

The government is expected to intro- 
duce changes but. because it is the 
owner of one of the two main domestic 
earners, these are unlikely to be drastic. . 

• 'However; things could look very differ- 
ent- ff the two-airline policy is ruled 
unconstitutional by the High Court.- 

• Turning" to the international scene, 
Qantas’s current worry is the advent of 
United Airlines in the Pacific. The 
largest American carrier, United has 
bought Pan American's assets in the 
region and began flights to Australia last 
month. Qantas fears that with its strong 
domestic base and lower labour costs. 
United will be able to offer big discounts 
on its overseas flights. 

On the “kangaroo" route between 
Australia and Britain, Qantas and 
British Airways estimate they have, 
between 40 and 50 per cent of the 
markeL BA increased its flights to 10 a' 
week last December and Qantas will 
follow suit next month. 

SSP 


“■ capital and experience wbo wffl mate Australia 
their home and coniribute to its development as a ' 
business centre for the Asia-Pacific region. 

You may be eligible it in addition to meeting foe 
normal migration requirements, you have a business 
proposal which is Htely to benefit Australia — far - - 
example, by: 

• creating employment opportunities; - 

• introducing new or Improved technology: 

• expanding business or economic activity; or 

• stimulating exports or international trading. 

apply for migration through the program's 
awesnwmt category if you have a minimum of SA500 nrn 
to invest in a business venture and to establish your 

which lakes particular account of personal siring 
teChni r}^ pr p^ ucte * technologies or joint ventures 
„ • Fu riher totomoatian on the Business Migration 

Program is avedabie at the nearest Austi^to^Sseas : 

any Regional Office of the Departmental 005 
Immigration and Ethnic Attains In AustrafcL^ 


BMP 




.>'»■ 7. 
Law. - 



The accord mark It- for .the 
: two years.fipm October 1985 
. has underwritten , real wages; 
with the bonus « improved 
workforce superannuation 
aikl ashcvrtexworking weeki' ' 

What worries life market' s 
- that, given a choice -between; 
averting a rise in unemploy- 
ment and keeping the Austra- 
lian dollar high.- the .Labor 
government would use mone- 
tary and fiscal' policy .to sup- 
port employment- This would ■ 
unply acceptance of* weaker.- 
dollar Jailer this; yea?" and. a 
~ sudden aid -lo/the^:bi!dpsh.- 
mood of foreign investors. 

Labor's new “tritogy".POb- 
cy promises arefor no rise in • 
federal tax as a proportion of 
gdp over the life of the current 
pa rliam ent, a similar no-rise 

policy for spending and a cut 
in the defirit-gdp ratio in the 
same period; 

The buret of economic 
growth in the -wake of the 
devaluation early last year has 
enabled Mr Keating to meet 
the “trilogy" targets in 
1985/86. If growth now slows, 
heavy spending cuts are going 
to be needed 

While the country has en- 
joyed its binge of growth, the 
business community has re- 
mained apprehensive, and 
capita] investment has run 
down to surprisingly low lev- 
els. A further problem is the 
slow pace at which industrial 
restructuring is being achieved 
through cuts m protection of 
Australia’s least efficient ,inr L 
dustries. 

Generally, the manufactur- 
ing sector is uncompetitive oh 
world markets and acts as a 
drag on both rural and tertiary 
sector efficiency. The problem 
is compounded because high- 
value-added manufactured 
goods are the major area of 
growth in world trade pat- 
terns. 

Tony Thomas 

Accountancy Editor 
Business Review Weekly, ' 
Melbourne. 


? , 'vie-: jki- 


V 




m 


■ft 


U; ‘ iA * f ; :;V;P 



THE TIMES MONDAY MARCH 3 1986 


23 


AUSTRALIA/3 



A Merino flock: Tbe picture looks muck better for Australia's sheep formers 

The anxious farmers 


As the National Agricultural 
Outlook - conferijnce. in Janu- 
ary made plain, -the rural 
saiordoes. not ' fit. into the - 
broadly optimistic economic 
canvas viewed from 'Canberra. ! 
Agriculture, which still con- 
tributes something of the or- 
der of 40 per cent to export 
earnings, is in trouble, and an 
the prognoses suggest 1986 is 
going to make matters sub- 
stantially worse. 

It would probably, be mis- 
taken th read too much at this 
stage into the emergence of a. 
new militancy among produc- 
ers, ' which has 1 given rise to. 


rice production is up m most 
Asian consumer nations and 
pnees are; at, their lowest 
relative level since the war 
strong' potential for fruit, and 
vegetable producers has not 
yet been realized . because of 
poor, marketing: against tbe 
trend, the fishing outlook is 
for a continued improvement. 
. The chief area of concern 
for 1 986 is the wheat industry. 
The. value of the 1985/86 crop 
has been revised upwards to 
$A2.920m as a result of new 
indicators, but is still 12 per 
cent down on. 1984-85. Ac- 
cording - to the Bureau ol 


tional Fanners' Federation 
says that centralized wage 
fixing has to be made more 
flexible. 

Another area in which the 
NFF and producers are de- 
manding government action is 
on high interest rates, which 
are adding to the rural burden 
in the form of increased debt- 
servicing costs. 

ST 


King Coal is 



Senator Gareth Evans, Minis- 
ter for Resources and Energy, 
spoke at an international min- 
ing conference last August of 
an emotional resistance in 
Australia to being typecast as 
“a quarry and a farm for the 
rest- of the world". 

Btii the feci is that the 
dominance of minerals and 
oil, which account for 49 per 
cent of. Australia's exports 
(compared with agriculture's 
39 per cent) is. if anything. 
Only likely to increase. 

Recent Sydney Stock Ex- 
change surveys forecast that 
coal, already Australia's lead- 
ing export, will account within 
the next two years for more 
foreign revenue than the com- 
bined total of the number two 
and three earners, wheat and 
wool. 

Coal and oil together bring 
in 55 per cent of mineral 
earnings, compared with nine 
per cent for aluminium, eight 
per cent for iron ore and four 
per cent for bauxite. All 
precious metals and gems 
account for only four per cent 
The industry is based around 
bulky, low-value commodities 
for which transport is a major 
determinant of costs. 

The common belief is that 
last year's sharp foil in the 
value of the Australian dollar 
has enabled raining compa- 
nies to sustain a slow and 
patchy recovery from the 


1981-82 recession. But the 
influential annual survey by 
the Australian Mining Indus- 
try Council (Amic). conducted 
by Coopers and Lybrand and 
released in December, 
sounded a cautionary note. 

Despite a substantial in- 
crease in 1984-85 in sales 
volume and increased profit- 
ability, the survey says, the 
industry did not receive an 
adequate return on its invest- 
ments. 

Total revenues increased by 
26 per cent to SA 13.859 
million (about £6.929 million] 
while industry profits rose 
from SA462 million in 
1983/84 to SA64G million. 
Projections for the 1985-86 
year say profits could rise to 
SA 1,000 million. 

The Amic survey says, how- 
ever. that last year's returns 
were “well below acceptable 
levels'*. The effective after-tax 
return on funds employed was 

5.5 per cent, and net profit 
return on total revenue was 

4.6 per cent. These . figures 
compared with pretax returns 
on government bonds of 13.5 
percent. 

Sydney Stock Exchange 
members are predicting a 
continuation of low demand 
and over-supply in mineral 
commodities, with a generally 
fiat outlook for the next few 
years. 

For coal, which in 1984 
earned SA6.210 million or 29 


per cent of the value of all 
mineral production, there are 
two pans of the picture. The 
outlook for coking coal is 
weak, with Japanese sleet 
production likeh to be re- 
duced from 150 million 
tonnes last year to between 96 
and 102 million tonnes in 
I9S5/86. 

For steaming coal, on the 






Under the Prime Minister 
Bob Hawke, Investment in 
mining is stagnant 

other hand, the outlook » 
promising. According ic 
Mearcs and Philips of the 
Sydney Stock Exchange 
Australia's steaming coal ca- 
pacity will have increased 
from 35 million to 40 million 
tonnes by mid-year, and this 
will be fully used against a 


background of impending in- 
ternational shortages. 

Coal is one of the areas 
where the industry can point 
to a broad pattern of cost- 
c lining, increased productivi- 
ty and technological 
innovation. According to sta- 
tistics produced by the joint 
coal board, average output per 
man shift increased by 10.9 
per cent to 20.33 tonnes in the 
last financial year. 

Iron ore producers are hap- 
pier these days, having got 
over a bad patch a year ago 
caused by a substantial price 
reduction, increased efficien- 
cy and an improvement in 
indusiiai relations arc partly 
responsible for the buoyant 
mood but the industry re- 
mains vulnerable to trends in 
Japan, far and away its main 
customer. 

Aluminium is expected to 
be badly affected by overpro- 
duction in I486. The glut will 
only get deeper with the 
scheduled opening of a new 
smelter project in Portland. 
Victoria, with a capacity fo 
1 80.000 tonnes a year. 

Other base metals are not 
thought likely to show any 
significant change. Predic- 
tions arc for a slight upswing 
in demand for copper and a 
cutback in nickel production. 

The Amic survey says a 
point of great concern "is a 
decline of 14 per cent in 


exploration investment to 
S A2 1 8 million. The long-term 
viability of the industry, it 
adds, depends on the discov- 
ery of new reserves which can 
be developed at low cost. 

The past five years of low 
profits have also slowed up 
new investment programmes. 
No large-scale new projects 
were begun in the 19S4-85 
year, and most new invest- 
ment was on gold, of which 
Australia is only the fifth 
largest western producer and 
which accounts for 2.1 per 
cent of total mineral produc- 
tion. 

The survey also points to 
what it describes as a signifi- 
cant trend cmeiging in recent 
years. In 1979-80. when prof- 
its were running at acceptable 
levels, income tax represented 
about 64 per cent of total 
company taxes. A range of 
new levies or increases in 
statutory charges has since 
been introduced, however, 
and while tax is sensitive to 
fluctuations in profitability, 
these government charges are 
not. By 1984-S5 income tax 
accounted for only 45 per cent 
of company taxes. 

Another long-term concert: 
of the mining companies is 
possible legislation limiting 
their access to resources, in 
particular the question of 
Aboriginal land rights. 

Stephen Taylor 


ers, wmen nas; given nse to cording - to the Bureau oi 
angty~ demonstrations in ite -Agricultural Economics, . the 
capital and threats to, blockade most likely value, of the crop 


agricultural': exports. But the 
mood among , Australia's 
1 76.000 formers is bitter at the 
continuing erosion of rural 
living standards and in marry 
cases despairing ' of afry 
forseeable improvement : . 

Two statistics give some 
indication of the extentef .the 
problem. The first is that the 
real net value of rural produc- 
tion. which is the profit-.naped 


being sowed this year will 
show an even greater drop, to 
$A2,530m, a -decline of nearly 
20 per cent in real terms. 

The picture is brighter for 
both wool arid meat which arc 
expected to increase in terms 
of gross production value by 
four, per cent, and seven per 
cent respectively, while in 
export terms they are expected 
to increase in value by. 10 per 


by producers after, ail; costs cent and 1.1 percent 
and inflation have been fokdf ‘For, most .of these broadly 
into account is expected to' ^gloomy figures therein so fei 
fair by a quarter in 1985/86. " as the agricultural eslablisb- 


The second is that the average 
return for each world ng mem- 
ber oh family, forms, which 
produce about eight per cent 
of agricultural output, is now 
projected at AS3.700 (£1.850). 
or half the level of the dole. •- 
the:, latest • ' • ' ‘ 8 

qu&rtedy- re- 

viq^of the rfc* ;Daiiy pneesthave 

rat. economy, 


published Ini., -.a... a .tr?:: 

die Bureau .of! >• • 

Agricultural Economics., con- 
tains another grim figure. 
Return on invested capital in 
1985/86 is expected to be 
minus six per cent, compared 
with 1.5 per cent last year and 
4.8 per cent the year before. 

It is estimated that the 


meat is concerned, one funda- 
mental cause — subsidies on 
produce from the European 
contmimityand now the Unit- 
ed States. The real villain of 
the piece is seen to be the 
EEC's Common Agricultural 
■ ■ Policy;:-- which 
srta-estzmated.fry 
the BAE to be 
•fosting Austra- 
c Ua^'.ifoifghty : 

■ £5G0m in lost 
exports’ per annum. . ; - 

The proposed US Farm Bill 
provoked some heavy broad- 
skfcs to start with' but it is seen 
as a partly justifiable response 
to the CAP. . And since John 
Dawkins, the trade minister, 
was assured on a visit to 


average family firm income:- Washington- last month that 


this year will be about 
SA7.0OO, while 35 percent wflL 
have a negative income, 
Australia- is - among the 
world's leading producers and 
exporters of wheat, wool; and 
meat. It also has substantial 
dairy, sugar, coarse grain, rice, 
fruit and fishery industries. 

To deal with the lesser first: 
world dairy prices have been 
foiling since J 982 and the 


the administration was out to 
nobble the Europeans and 
■would' take :steps *to avoid 
huffing Australia in itslegiti- 
raate markets, foe foil atten- 
tion of Canberra’s resentment 
has turned back to Brussels 
While foe government is. 
not unnaturally, keen to see 
the CAP take foe blame for foe 
rural crisis, producers believe 
Canberra could be doing a 


expectation is that local pro- great deal more to help them 
ducerc will continue to face through their difficulties, 
strong competition on, a de- Inflation is roughly double 
pressed international .market that of A ustralia’s com peii tors 
for the wii few years. ... . - aodmeans rtsu&cbsts to rim 
: Few Australian so&r pro- /with -declining: prices. While 
ducers are likely to-be in a : f fast year’s decline in ’the value 
position to benefit from' a - of the dollar was of some 
limited ’wbrid 'pricc increase - benefit, the effect was also to 
because of a bad growing increase fertilizer . and fuel 
season in Queensland which ' prices. The prices and wages 
was tbppfed ofTeariier this year accord is proving harmful to 
by a crop-ravaging cyclone: the rural sector and foe Na- 



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MOH031 


AUSTRALIA/4 


Fast new life in the Cinderella state 


South Australia has tended to 
be seen as a Cinderella among 
Australian states, lacking the 

Confidence of New South 
Wales and Victoria with their 
large populations and politico- 


1 960s and 1 970s it led the way 
in social reform, legalizing 
homosexuality and abolishing 
censorship and capital punish- 
ment and. more recently, it 
has been to the fore in granting 


around the world watched it vention centre with seating for 


economic influence, or of Aboriginal land rights. 


Western Australia and In ms book. The Australian 
Queensland, with their huge Dilemma. Brace C 
new mineral wealth. However, that South Austrr 
as it approaches the 150th social rhythm tha 
anniversary of its foundation. a tely steady and a 
it has plenty to celebrate. tries to see 'life as « 

South Australia differs from These qualities 
the other states in that it was prevented South 
founded not as a penal settle- from feeling — 
ment but as territory which something of a 
was settled freely and devel- backwater, 
oped initially by a private however, and 
company. Proclaimed a colo- ,' n recent vears 
ny by Captain John it has tried un- “ 


on television. 

It was voted the best run 
race of the season by the 
competing teams and is esti- 
mated to have brought be- 
tween $A40 million and $A50 
million (£20 million and £25 


Dilemma. Bruce Grant writes million) into the local econo- 
that South Australia has “ a my. 


social rhythm that is deliber- 
ately steady and a vision that 
tries to see life as a whole". 

These qualities have not 
prevented South Australia 


in recent years 
it has tried un- 


Hind marsh, the newly-arrived der its Labor premier, John 
governor, on December 28. Bannon. to project a more 


became a Crown dynamic image in order to 


Colony in 1841 and was given attract investment and tour- 
its own Constitution and self- jsm. Its greatest coup was to 


government in 1856. 


acquire the final race in the 


This year’s race, on October 
26. will be one of the main 
events of the sesquicen tenary 
celebrations. Among the oth- 
ers are a four-day visit by the 
Queen and 

Dynamic image to 2S£ 

attract investment on Saturday. 

and the World 
Three Day 
Event Championships from' 
May 22-25 at Gawler. north of 
Adelaide, the first time they 
have been held in the South- 
ern Hemisphere. 

As well as hosting the 


it has a reputation for being World Formula One Champi- Grand Prix, Adelaide has 


progressive and stable. In on ship last vear. 

1894 it extended the vote to On November 3 more than 
women and in 1896 intro- 100.000 people. 40.000 of 
duccd the referendum as a them from outside the state, 
means of obtaining a verdict attended the Adelaide Grand 


acquired a casino. This is 
housed in the magnificent old 


100.000 people. 4G.0Q0 of railway station in the middle 
them from outside the state, of the city and is the first stage 


on important issues. In the -Prix 


millions 


irand of a SA220 million develop- 
more ment which includes a con-. 


4.000 and a 400-room hotel. 

Racing cars and gambling 
are in danger of eclipsing the 
biennial Festival of Arts 
which, since it started in 1960, 
has been perhaps the single 
most important factor in 
putting Adelaide on the map. 
“The festival injected life Into 
a place which had a boring 
reputation as a city of 
churches", one of the organiz- 
ers said. “Now Adelaide has 
two fabulous new mistresses 
in the Grand Prix and the 
casino and perhaps it is the 
festival which is becoming 
boring" 

Among the highlights of the 
1986 festival which opened 
last Saturday, is the world 
premiere of Foss, an opera by 
the Australian composer 
Richard Meale based on the 
novel by Patrick White. In 
1988. when Australia cele- 
brates its bicentenary. Lord 
Hare wood will direct the festi- 
val. 

The quality of life is some- 
thing which the government 
hopes will attract outside in- 
vestment. particularly in high 



technology. Just north of the 
capita] it has opened a tech- 
nology park offering office 
space to hi-tech companies 
which are starting up. Among 
its tenants are Austek, which 
was formed in 1984 and 
makes high-end VLSI custom 
chips, and Vision Systems, 
which has evolved a comput- 
erized surveillance technique 
involving the digital process- 
ing of television images at a 
very high speed 

Disposable Products Aus- 
tralia. one of the country’s 
largest makers of biotechnolo- 
gy and medical products, is to 
set up an R&D complex at the 
park and British Aerospace 
Australia is building a new , 
headquarters there. 

South Australia sees hs 
strengths as being in micro- 
electronics. biotechnology, 
mining technology and de- 
fence work. More than half of 
the federal government’s de- 
fence research is carried out at 
Salisbury, north of Adelaide. 
The atom bomb tests which 
have been the subject of a 
recent Royal Commission 
took place in the interior of 
the state at Maralinga and 
Emu in the 1950s and there is 
the famous rocket range at 
Woomera. 


This 

beautiful 

empty 

country 


Everyone knows that the 
AustraBans have been making 
a bit of noise lately. 

And doing quite weR, thank 
you too. 

But not everyone knows 


tasisi 


that white some Australians are 
strutting around Eke peacocks, 
there are some prime 
opportunities back in Australia. 

Australia is a dynamic 
marketplace right now and no- 


smtefirif 


one knows it better than Aust- 
ralia’s most successful 
corporate /institutional broket 
McIntosh Hamson Hoars 
Govern Ltd. 

So K you'd Eke to give 


the Aussies a bit of bother for a 
change, hop to it. 


M c Intosh Hamson 

HoareGovettLteL 


>•*** %-vjnaausAM.niJMUsn racm.siiM B .tcivuuu* 


With this experience the 
state is hoping that h will win 
a SA2.600 million contract to 
build replacements for the 
Australian navy’s Oberon- 
class^su bmarines. The project 
would provide thousands of 
jobs and revitalize the state's 
engineering sector. 

in the primary sector South 
Australia has enormous re- 
serves of oil and gas in the 
Cooper Basin in the north 
east, which are expected to 
earn about SA900 million a 
year when in full production. 
Mining of uranium, copper 
and gold is due to begin at 
Roxby Downs in the second 
half of 1988. having been 
delayed because of political 
controversy over the uranium, i 
Annual output is expected 
to be 1,900-2,000 tonnes of 
yellow cake (uranium concen- 
trate), 30,000-50,000 tonnes of 
copper and 90,000 fine oz of 
gold. Tony Palmer of Western 
Mining, which is exploiting 
the site with BP, said Roxby 
was probably the largest urani- 
um deposit in the world and 
would do for the South Aus- 
tralian economy what Broken 
Hill had for New South Wales 
or Mount Isa for Queensland. 


In the land of Lord-knaws- 
where. 

Right up and furthest out. 
You'll find a new Australia 
there. 

That we know nought about 1 . 

Forty years ago I lay in aty 
swag one night on the treeless 
JBarkly Tableland in the 
Northern Territory, listening 
to the beOs ami the hobble 
chains on out horses. I could 
hear the Aboriginal stockmen, 
riding around the cattle we had 
mastered that day. Hie Ab- 
origines were singing softly, 
qmeteningthe cattle. 

Z looked np into the im- 
mense black sky, which came 
right down to the horizon, all 
around me, and I remembered 
the words of the old bosh 
poem. They were true in those 
days. 

Australians knew very little 
about their vast Northern 
Territory, which is five times 
the size of Great Britain; They 
were uneasy about it, dose to 
Asia, empty, undefended. Bat 
they couldn't afford to develop 
and populate such remote 
frontier country. 

Now It is liferent, becanse 
Australia is richer. Hoewever, 
Northern Territory is still 
empty, with fewer than 
150,000 residents (one-quarter 
of them Aboriginal). It is as if 
the population of Brighton 
were scattered throughout five . 
Bri tains. Since 1978 the Terri- 
tory has had a form of self- 
government and, if it gets a 
good financial settlement from 
the Commonwealth govern- 
ment, it would like to become a 
state in the 1988 bicentenary 
year. 

Much will depend on negoti- 
ations between Darwin and 
Canberra, which now gives toe 
Territory 80 per cent of its 
budget revenue. So toe Chief 
Minister. Ian Tnxworth, ap- 
pointed last year a special 
Minister for Constitntional 
Development, Jim Robertson. 

The drive for statehood 
explains toe Conntry Liberal 
Party government’s heavy 
spending to prepare the 
Terri toy's economy for its 
new, independent status. Mr 
Tuxworto has boldly under- 
written much of toe private 
capital investment in an ambi- 
tions tourist industry. The 
Sheraton group runs luxury 







faim 


The face of an Aborigine: Waiting for change 


hotels in Alice Springs and 
near Ayers Rock, and in 
Angnst it will open a hotel in 
Darwin. Each town also has a 
casino. 

The result is more than 
500,000 tourists a year and 

revenue worth SA250 million 
(about £125 million). Howev- 
er, most tourists are Austra- 
lian, finding their “new 
Australia”, and they don’t stay 
in toe half-empty Sheratons. 
Bat toe Territory Tourist 
Commission has opened of- 
fices in London, Los Angeles, 
Singapore, Frankfurt and To- 
kyo, and foreigners are finding 
their way. 

A Territory Development 
Corporation offers incentives 
to industry, and Mr Tnxworth 


More than 500,000 
tourists a year 


hopes to establish a free trade 
zone becanse, he says, *we live 


mil mink jg lovely Kakadn 
National Park, on the edge of 
Arnhem Land. He is also 
frustrated by the power of 
Aborigines to control aQ min- yf 
mg on their land, which com- 
prises about 30 par cent of the 
Northern Territory. . 

Because toe Territory Gov- 
ernment is hr a fanny and the 
Aborigines are not xn a harry 
(after so many years of domi- 
nating pressure from white 
Australians), there is ffl-feel- 
ing between Mr Tmcworth and 
Aboriginal leaders. The chair- 
man of toe Northern Land 
Connell, Mr Galamvny 
Ymmpiagu, ami the manage r 
of the Central Land Cornual, 

Mr Fat Dodson, also Aborigi- 
nal and a former priest, are 
determined to keep their statn- 
tory powers to negotiate with 7 
mining companies. ▼ 

Becanse these Abori ginal 
councils need mining royalties 
to give their people capital and 


-on the brink of toe South-East they do eventually 

Asian/Western Pacific region, a « r eemeats. But they 


toe fastest growing economic 
bloc in toe world". 

In toe meantime, it most 
rely on manfifactnring worth 
SA350 nulli ng a year, primary 


don't get deals signed as 
quickly (and cheaply) as the 
milters and Mr Tnxworth 
would like. 


There are two ways to see 


production worth SA10O mil- the Territory's strange, beauti- 
hon and minerals worth m and tnnoh 


ca^c/i -i,- "rc? 1 M and tough countryside. 

SA750 milh«L Mr-Thxwmto, Expensively, as an ak-condi- 
son of a miiiiii£ engineer, has timed tourist, sight-seeing 
his eye on mmng. and buffalo-shooting on salarL 

However, toe Common- 0r cheaply, with a sense of 
wealth (federal) government is adventure, enjoying the 
still responsible for most of the straight, rough-and-readiness 
areas which affect mining , of white Territorians and the 
such as national parks, Ab- friendship of Aborigines, 
origmes, uranium production Talk to Aborigines in pubs, . 

and royalties. This frustrates yourself a swag and ask them a 
the Chief Minister, as be to take yon to their land, 
contemplates the huge uran! Stewart Harris 


[ant? century 
t bounces ba 


O- •- 


:V-7 jc 




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. THE TIMES MONDAY MARCH 3 1986 


V4. 


■fsK 






;V^ J ^ro^John Woodcock, Cricket Correspondent, Trinidad 

lad of 120-cuftfae last day's nvofiwntSfR^SS; 5 cop 5?“ But England’s batting was 
their match against Trinidad, y EnriaSd* 1 ^» re S Ilderw ^ y * no ^ ner wten they went in 
Wand began their second weirlK.K^ again than it has been ail the 

- - 5econa tour In the fifth over of their 

dad off for 10? in. their first • second innm« r 




timings by losing wickets with 
a regularity that is banning 
to seem inevitable. However, 
Sack baited promisingly. 
Smith made a few and when 
Gower declared Trin idad were 
left with three. boure in Which 
to make 222 to .win. At tea 
lhej[ were 30 fortwo. 


innings yesterday. It was an- 
other deteriorating pitch. - 
when are we ever going to find 
a good one? - and with Gomes 
and Logie missing, Trinidad 
were not much of a Trailing 
side; but Taylor and Foster 


mgs (jooch wa 

before to a ball from Gray that 
cut back at him. In the sixth 
Robinson forced Gilman to 
mid-wicket and in the eighth 
Gower was caught at second 
slip, playing a very poor stroke 
to Gilman. Since resuming 


J •- * 


If the last three "days are. tbeir fin* innings at 145 for 3 

anything to go by, Trinidad’s had 011 Saturday morning, En- 

effective. 


^ -'j .-»•/ 


% • , 


is well-founded. By . staying 
away from the cricket the 
public have identified them- 
selves with the ■ honourable 
cause being voiced by any- 
thing from 50 to 150 people 
outside the ground, according 
to the weather and the time of 

to 

If tomorrow’s one-day in- 
ternational is also played be- 
fore an empty house 
Trinidadians will have made 
thCir point emphatically and 
impressively. The cost-to the 
West Indian Cricket Board of 
Control goes without saying, 
although the losses they incur 
through reduced attendances 
wilL be offset to some extent by 
the sponsorship of Cable and 
Wireless. 

It has been as though a pack 
of protestors, marshalled by 
police, was occupying the 
pavement on The opposite side 
of the road from the Grace 
Gates, at Lord’s, constantly 
singing “How many more,” 
bearing slogans such as “We 
love cricket but hate apartheid 
more", and inviting passers- 
by to “Toot your horns if you 
support us", which many do. 

At the entrance to the 
ground have been no more 
mounted police than might be 
found outside the Oval for a 
Test match between England 
and West Indies; inside have 
lounged the units of the riot 
squad, a familiar sight these 
days at ihe world’s sporting 
venues. The game .with Trini- 
dad has been played in a 


HWLAMO — Rnatmtags 

GA Gooch c Mohammad bGray 23 

R T Robinson few b Gray — _ 76 

. w N Stack c BqbOB b Nanan _____ 0 

T) I OoMerb Nation .43 

tB N French b Grey o 

D M South o Rajahb Grey 7 

PWSm st WMBTOb Mahal* 27 

J E Emborev b Mahabir ; 32 


not out 


PH 

NA Foster c Bodoe bNanan __ 
L B Taylor e and b Gray 
Extras (b5, winblf . 

. 1 Tatal -l._ 


5 

1 

8 

_7 

229 


FAIL OF WtCKETBLI-SG, 2-55, 3-145. 

S' 156 - 7 - 206 - S’ 215 - 9^8- 

' WWWJMa. Gray 243-9-505: GBman 8- 
1-»ft SmwwfB 8-2-1 B-ft Nanan 28-S- 
54-3: Mahabir 21 -6-48-2; Bodoa 5-0-194. 
■ - Second tarings 

G A Gooch few b Gray 12 


RTRpUnoncMohanwwdb GOman . 6 

DM Smith not out 23 

*0 1 Gower c Shu mens b Gilman 7 

a 

. Extras (143. w3) - 6 


Total (4wfda dec) 


— 101 

.FALL OF WICKETS: 1-21. 261. 36ft 4- 

BJMUNG: Gray 114494; Gflman 124- 
444; Nanan4 0 12 0: Mahabir 2-144 
TMMtMD — First innings 

PV Simmons bEmbum ^ 24 

M Rchardsoo few b Foster 0 

N Gomez c Ftanch b Taylor 2 

A Rajah c WWey b Taylor 12 

D I Mohammad few h Footer _ 6 

MBodoe tow b Foster 9 

tt> WHSams b Foster 17 

"R Nanan not out 11 

A H Gray c Smith b Foster 2 

G Mahabir c EmOurey b Taylor 2 

G Qftnan not nut 0 

Extras (bl. Mfi. w&nbl) g 

Total 109 

FALL OF WICKETS: 1-1,2-9.3-42,4-45, 
5-50. 641. 7-84. 848. 996. 

BOWLING: Taylor 144-274; Emburey 8- 
4-15-1: Foster 1BA4444; Edmonds 16- 
2.4: Gooch 5454. 

Second innings 

PVSimmonsc Gooch b Foster 
M Ridwdson c Gooch b Taylor 
N Gomez not out 


A Rajah notout . 
Extras. . 

Total C2wkts) 


1 6 
- 1 
_ 7 
12 
__3 
30 


FALL OF WICKETS: 1-1ft 2-1ft 


gfcmd, 'either side of bowling 
Trinidad out, had lost 10 
wickets for 1 14 runs, Gower’s 
twice in 12 balls. - 
... Gflman, bowling left arm 
oyer the wicket at a briskish 

pace, was r unning ihe ball 
away from Gower, who had 
already edged him just wide of 
second slip for four. Now, 
doing little more than put his 
bat in the way of the ball, 
without any, significant move- 
ment of the feet, he was caught 
there. In nine first-class in- 
nings his average for the tour 
is 12. 

By lunch Willey was also 
out, playing no better a stroke 
than Gower’s. Gray bowled 
him something short and wide 
on the off side, which he 
slashed at and edged to the 
wicketkeeper. 

But he played as though 
unaffected by this, adding 60 
for the fifth wicket with Smith. 
Slack looked at ease against 
Gray and played the spinners 
welt and he and Smith ran 
better between the wickets 
than the senior players have 
been doing. When the innings 
started, and he had been 
relegated from number 3, 
where he batted on Friday, to 
number 6, Slack’s chances of 
much more cricket here 
seemed slender. By the time 
gower declared they had obvi- 
ously improved. Even a score 
of 37 not out, a . duck in the 
first innings notwithstanding, 
will have brought him into the 
reckoning for this weeks sec- 
ond Test match, so desperate 
are England for batsmen 


• j 


Crowe century as Mohsin is 
he bounces back .p?®* 

of victory 


§!■&. ? 



wicketkeeper, off Reid without 

irering. • < — ' 

New 7«ibivi went to lunch Kandy (Reuter) *■ Mohsin 
Still poorly placed at 133 for five Khan tut a fluent 59 to pilot the 
but took command . in the touring Pakistanis to an eight- 
afternoon as 102. runs were wicket win over Sri Lanka in 
added for the loss of just the their first one-day international 
wicket of Smith (22). Crowe here yesterday, 
returned at l9Lwith.thc fall of A wet pitch and light rain 
Smith and he and Coney re- reduced the 45-overs game to 25 
sinned their stylish attack on overs a ride. Pakistan, replying 
some fi gging Australian bowl- to Sri Lanka’s 124 for six in 23 
rag. . overs, scored 125 fortwo in 21.3 

After tea Coney was dis- overs to take . the lead in the 
missed for 98, puffing the me- four-match series, 
dium-pace Waugh .to Reid at Mudassar and Mohsin, the 
backward square leg,, shortly opening batsmen, .gave their 
after Oowe reached his century, side a solid start, putting on 66 
stitches inserted in his right raw , put Crowe, well supported bjrin 12 .overs before Mudassar was 
but was declared fit to resume the tail-aiders, Bracewell (20) caught by the wicketkeeper, 

and Troup (10). continued his Ashley dp Sdva. 
magnificent assault until holing Mohsin and laved Mi a nd a d 
out to mid-off off Reid just comfortably added 58 for the 
before stumps. second wicket to take Pakistan 

AUSTRALIA: Hret tentage 364 to the brink of victory, but 

NEW ZEALAND: First Innings Mohsm was caught behind off 

JG Wngfit c Zoeftrerb Gilbert 10 Rranesb Ratnayake with the 

level, leaving Javed 10 


Christchurch (AP) — New 
Zealand,' led by an ixyured 
Martin Crowe, staged a fine 
recovery to reach near parity 
with Australia on the third day 
of the second Test yesterday. 
Replying to Australia's first 
innings total of 364. New Zea- 
land were dismissed, for 339 
shortly before stumps, with 
Crowe the last man .out for a 
courageous 137. 

Crowe was forced to leave the 
field after an. boor yesterday 
with his score at 51 when he was 
struck in the face by a bouncer 
from the medium-pace bowler,. 
Bruce Reid; He had, eight 


I m / 

* r>. 


after an X-ray examznauon 
revealed no fracture; 

Crowe was 14 not out when 
New Zealand resumed the day 
at 48 for three. The need for a 
big rescue operation became the 
more obvious when Rutherford 
lost his wicket, leg-before to 
Gilbert, without addition to the 
score. 

Jeremy Coney, the New Zea- 
land captain, who joined Crowe, 
immediately went on to the 
attack but the partnership was 
split when Crowe was aided 
from the field after being hit by 
Reid. His departure was fol- 
lowed quickly by that of the new 
batsman, Hadlee, who was 
caught by Zoehrer, the 


BA 

JF 


few b Retd 


e Zoehrer b Wwgfi 

M D Crowe c Waugh b Rad 

K Rutherford few b QNMR 

M V Coney c Reid b Waugh 

RJHadtoec Zoehrer bFteid 

flD Smith bWutii — 

J G BracsweB cMwsh b Reid — 

GB Troup tow b waugh 

EJChamftnotout — 


scores 


T 37 score the winning single off the 
-.0 third ball of the 22nd over. 
Mohsin. who was named manof 
the match, hit one six and seven 
fours off 56 balls. 


Extras (nb12, 148, b2) . 
Total . 


98 
_ 0 
22 
20 
10 
2 


■-S V 

m - 


SHI LANKA 
A M da Sara b zaidr . 


339 


FALL OF WICKETS: 1-17. 249. 349, 4- 
<8. 5-124,6^191. 7463, 8411, 9431- 
BOWLING: Stoert 26-4-1064: Reid 34 3- 
840-4; W hud] 23-8-56-4: Bright 18441- 
0; Matthews 6-1424. 


Kapil Dev retained 


Ranasinghe c QacSr b Tausaef . 

P A da Siva b Imran Khan 

ARsnatungacRamaezbCtedir - 
X R D Mends c Akram b QatSr _ 

R L Dias c Mlandad b Qadtr 

R S Matianama not out ■ 

ALFde MM notout. 

Extras (to 3, nb 1> 


Total 0 wkts. 23 overs). 


New Delhi (Reuter) — India's 
cricket selectors decided yes- 
terday to retain Kapil Dev as 
captain for one-day tour- 
naments in Sri Lanka and 
Sharjah next month and for the 
tour of England starting in May, 
despite criticism over ms leader- 
ship. The rest of the party’ will be 
announced in a week’s ume. 

Kapil, who has led India in 20 
ics is without a win. was blamed 
by Indian newspapers for what 
they called his failure to press 
home clear advantages during 
the recent series in Australia. 


The three tests were all drawn. 
India face Pakistan and Sn 
Lanka from March 30 to April 6 
in the Asia Cup and then 
compete in the Australasia Cup 
from April JO. to 18. The tour of 
England starts on May 1. 

The Indian Express news- 
paper said yesterday: "-his 
anxiety to do well at times did 
not allow him the menial bal- 
ance and coolness to think and 
act." The Statesman newspaper 
said Kapil would retain his 
captaincy because there were no 
serious rivals 


41 

21 

- 2 

- 5 
12 
15 
18 

_ 4 
124 

R J Ratnayake. S 0 Anuraakl and K G 
Perera did not bat 

FALL OF WICKETS: 14ft 268. 3-71, 4- 
78, 56ft 6-101. 

BOWUNG: Imran 4-0-1 5-1: Wastm 4-044- 
0: EaMr 5-0-22-1; Tsuamf 5647-1 ; CMDr 
56434. 

PAKISTAN 

Mudassar Nazar c A M ds Store b 
Ranaaaighe- 41 
Mohsin Khan c A M ds Storeb Ramayahe 59 

-Javed Mlandad not out — 18 

RameezRteanotou. 0 

Extras fo ft no 1) 7 


Total (2 wkts, 214 ousts) 


Seim MoNc, Imran Khan. Abdul Qadr, 
tZukjamaln. Tausaef Ahmad. 2Me Khar 
and Wastei Akram dd not bat 
FALL OF WICKETS: 166, 2-124. 
BOWtiNG: ds Mel 4^-1450; Rakwyaks 4- 
0-17-1; Rarasbighe 5641-1 : Ranatunga 2- 
0-42-0; Anuraslr46-190; Perara 26-156. 


FOR THE RECORD 


ICE HOCKEY 


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CYCLING 

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HOCKEY 


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Blow to the eye 

Geoff Cook. the . North- 
amptonshire captain and former 
England opening batsman, is in 
hospital after being injured play- 
ing squash. 


CYCLING: VICTORY FOR IRISHMAN IN PARIS 



RUGBY LEAGUE 


French resistance 
is ground down 
on debutants’ day 


By Keith Macklin 


Sean Kelly on his way to winning the prologne of the Paris-Nice race yesterday. Kelly 
docked 7nun 19.22sec for the 5.9-kilomei 


5.9-kilometre course. Report, page 26. 


SNOOKER 


Davis well on course for 
another world title 


Steve Davis has set himself up 
as the favourite for the world 
title after winning the Dulux 
British Open championship at 
Derby yesterday. In a scheduled 
23-frame final, which he domi- 
nated almost from the start, he 
defeated Willie Thome 12-7. 

The first prize of £55,000 took 
Davis's earnings for the season 
to a total of £202,750, which is a 


No player I 
exceeded the £200,000 mark In 
one season. His cumulative 
powers were demonstrated at 
the table. 

By early evening on Saturday. 
Davis had prospered to a lead of 
8-1 . ending the ninth frame with 
a classic break of 127. As his 
confidence had grown, that of 
Thome diminished amid long 


By Sydney Friskin 

periods of enforced retirement 
to his chair. 

Thome, who had obviously 
been wondering what he could 
do to stem the ude. achieved his 
purpose by winning four of the 
next five frames but only in the 
last two was he in foil flow. A 
fluke red by Davis left him with 
no feeling of remorse -or com- 
passionate shrinking. Instead, 
he accepted an open invitation 
to pot the pink and went on to 
make a break of 74 for a 9-3 
lead. 

But in the 13th frame Davis 
struck at the pink with a careless 
shot — he does not play many of 
those — and Thome himself 
flourished after a fluke red, a 
valuable one which evoked the 
crowd's approval. Soon, the 


score was 9-4 and Thome after 
capitalizing on an in-off by 
Davis, made 60 to depart from 
the Arena looking a much 
happier man. 

This success was Davis's third 
of the season. He said that he 
had won the Rothmans Grand 
Prix and the Coral UK title after 
playing badly, but he has cor- 
rected the technical faults in his 
play and anyone who watched 
him at Derby can say that he 
won the Dulux Open title 
playing exceptionally well. 

Thome, who began the day 5- 
9 behind, won an extraordinary 
frame on the black ball. 

FINAL: S Daws bt W Thome 12-7. 
Frame scores (Davis first): 6166. 80-18. 
72-37. 84-27. 84-13. 63-27. 71-46, 854. 
127-1. 3065. 2665. 74-15. 4366. 1-102. 
66-78. 70-16. 25-106. 1136. 8549. 


GOLF 


Storms haunt Americans 


The second round of the 
British Open at Royal St 
George's last year has become a 
current term of reference from 
the US tour. “It was bad out 
there," said Tom Watson after a 
stormy day at Pebble Beach, 
“but it wasn’t as bad as the 
Friday at Sandwich". 

Other Americans refer back 10 : 
even wilder -days in our 
championship, to wrecker 
weather at Turn berry or St 
Andrews, but the Saturday at 
Eagle Trace on the third day of 
the S 5 (XX 000 Honda Classic will 
undoubtedly be remembered 
not only for the 40mpb gale but 
for the high scores it produced. 

Andy Bean, who at 6 ft 4 
inches and nearly 16 stone has 
enough weight to anchor himself 
down, scored 77 and yet still 
became the joint leader with 
Clarence Rose, the rapidly, 
improving 27-year-old North 
Carolinian who has not yet won 
a title. 

The rough weather last July at 
Sandwich produced scores of 78 
from Mark James and 76 from 
Lee Trevino and Fuzzy Zoeller. 
Of the 73 entered 37 failed to 
break 80. Among those were 
some very fine players, Tom 
WeiskopC 86. Andy North, 


By John BaUantine 

Mark McCumber and Chi Chi 
Rodriguez on 84 and Tim 
Simpson and Bill Glasson on 82. 

Can Knox the 29-year-old 
Florida professional who had 
gallantly cheated the worsening 
weather to bold the lead for the 
first two days finally succombed 
with an 80 although he stayed 
quite dose to the lead while the 
78 of Ken Brown and the 79 of 
Sandy Lyle, ridiculously, looked 
quite reasonable in the after- 
math of the debade. 

The best way to describe the 
conditions is to ask readers to 
imagine a very windy day at, 
say, lum berry with competitors 
having to hit the majority of 
their shots along the cliffs with 
the sea threatening on three 
sides. Here Lhe problems in the 
gale seemed to the unfortunate 
players to be all like the 18th at 


Pebble Beach for the short 16th 
at Cypress poinL Unlike those 
links’ however, where nature at 
least occasionally relents, this 
course has been engineered by 
man apparently for the sole 
purpose of the destruction of Ihe 
golfer. Lakes are sculpted into 
the sides of fairways which slope 
down towards diem and greens 
are built beside the blue water. 

Inevitably long delays built 
up as players hit drives or irons 
into the hazards and 5'/> hour 
rounds were common place. It 
was certainly not as cold as it 
has been 300 miles north where 
the tournament players, 
championship is due in another 
month and where snow was 
falling this weekend, but even 
Lhe dour Scots Lyle and Brown 
began to look a bit punch drunk 
by the end. 


Spectacular win for Kanai 


Hong Kong (Reuter) — Seichi 
Kanai, of Japan, sank a 20-foot 
putt for a birdie on the final hole 
10 snatch a dramatic victory in 
the Hong Kong Open 
championship yesterday. 

Kanai. 45. who won by one 
stroke from Ian Baker-Finch, of 


Australia, achieved a hole-in- 
one at the 198-yard fifth hole 
when he faded a four-iron shoL 
RESULTS: 285: Seichi Kara (Japan): 286: 
I Bakei-Ftncn (Auat 287: (teen Yu-Stm 
(Taiwan): 289: G Turner (N2), B Jones 
(AusLJ Ruitadge (Can); 290: Liao Kuo- 
CWi (Taiwan). M Pmero (Spl; British 
platings: 294: S Torrance. R Rafferty. 


Great Britain 24 

France .......... 10 

Two international debuts of 
rich promise were the outstand- 
ing features of a comfortable 
win by Great Britain in the 
second of two internationals 
sponsored by Whitbread Tro- 
phy. Neil James, the fast and 
strong-running Halifax second 
row forward, and Tony 
Marehant the nippy Castieford 
centre, scored excellent tries 
alter being drafted late into the 
injury-hit Great Britain squad. 
Two other debutants, the Leeds 
second row forward Kevin 
Rayne and David Laws, also 
made useful contributions to a 
team victory against the French 
side, who again showed their 
inability to travel as well as their 
country's wines. 

A fortnight ago the French 
showed great tenacity, skill and 
spirit in holding Great Britain to 
a 10-10 draw at Avignon. After 
that game the Great Britain 
coach, Maurice Bam ford, con- 
ceded that Britain had been 
lucky to scrape a draw. On 
Saturday, on the centrally 
heated pitch at Wigan, there was 
no doubting Great Britain's 
superiority alter they had bro- 
ken down some early hard- 
tackling resistance from the 
French. 


With a biting wind at their 
backs. Great Britain were given 
several early penalty kick 
chances by the Australian ref- 
eree. Kevin Roberts, but Crooks 
missed a couple and landed one. 
France flattered to deceive by 
scoring a fine try in their first 
attack. Quick handling saw the 
stand-off half, Espugna. tackled 
□ear the posts, and when (he ball 
was fanned right Couston dived 
over in the comer despite a 
heavy double tackle. 

Great Britain came back 
swiftly to take a lead they never 
lost thereafter. Smart passing 
inside the French 22saw Crooks 
delay his pass long enough to 
send Schofield under the posts 

and Crooks himself kicked the 
goal. Shortly before half-time 
further quick transfers from a 
scrum gave Drummond a try at 
the comer. 

In the second half the power- 
ful James sliced through the 
French defence to gain a try and 
the man of the match award. 
Marehant. showing intelligence 
as well as speed, handled twice 
in a movement before going 
outside Schofield to score in the 
left-hand corner. Schofield 
kicked two goals and France got 
a good consolation try as the 
flying Couston came up along- 
side the big forward Palanque to 
gallop 50 yards. Dumas kicking 
the goal. 


St Helens too fast 
for league leaders 


By K?ith Macklin 


Halifax. the League leaders, 
came up against a St Helens side 
in brilliant attacking form at 
Knowsley Road. St Helens, 
superbly ' led by ihe lightning 
breaks of Holding and Haggerty, 
won 22-10. In the first half they 
tore big holes in the Halifax 
defence and rattled up a 16-0 
lead with tries from Haggerty. 
Elia and Holding and two goals 
from Day. 

Halifax, who have just spent 
five days on a Spanish holiday 
break, took a long time to settle 
down again to the English 
winter, but a try by Robinson 
and a goal by Whitfield game 
them heart. However, careless 
handling cost them both trys 
and possession, and Veivcrs 
went in for a fourth try. Al- 
though Halifax finished strongly 
they continued to drop and 
throw away the ball and man- 
aged only a consolation try by 
Stephens. 

Widnes went to the top of the 


Kingston Rovers, the cham- 
pions. who were 16-0 down at 
half-time at Oldham, but domi- 
nated the second half to snatch 
the points 20-16. Wigan moved 
into third place in the table, 
routing the troubled Hull side 
44-6. 

In the second division Barrow 
and Leigh continued their in- 
evitable romp towards promo- 
tion. Barrow trounced Runcorn 
Highfiek! 44-10.- and Leigh 
came from 2-6 down at half- 
time to score three second half 
tries and beat Wakefield Trinity 
22-6. Bramley dented the 
promotion hopes of Whitehaven 
with a comfortable and un- 
expected success in Cumbria. 
Fulham beat Blackpool Borough 
22-12. and Doncaster main- 
tained their improvement by 
winning IS- 1 2 at Keighley. 

SLALOM LAGER CHAMPIONSHIP: CHd- 
tiam 16. Hull K R 20: Si Helens 22. Halifax 
10: Widnes 20. Leeds 18. Wigan 44. Hull 6. 
Postponed: Bradford Northern v Wamng- 
ton; Featherstone-Casdolord: Swimon v 


League with a narrow 20-18 win pewsoury 
over Leeds, their championship SECOND division: Borrow f8, Runcorn 
challencerv The most remark- H Blackpool 12. Fulham 22: Keigniev 
nn!l „iM«nTnf 1Z D0flC8S '® f 1* ^ ^ Wakflfitid 6; 
able comeback and victory Oi Whitehaven 14. Bramley 38. Postponed: 
the day was provided by Hull Sheffield Eagles v Wotiungion. 


HOCKEY 


Former cup holders are 
eliminated by Welt on 


By Sydney Friskin 


East Grinstead. winners of 
the Hockey Association Cup 
two seasons ago. were elimi- 
nated yesterday when they were 
beaten 2-1 in the third round by 
Weltou, the only Northern 
survivors in the competition. 
Kevin Stamp and David Bailey 
scored for Welton and Brum 
van Assclt for East Grinstead. 

Isca. who retained the Sun 
Life West League title on Sat- 
urday. also qualified for the 
fourth round with a 3-1 victory 
over Leicester Westlelgh. Mar- 
tin. Rodgers and Julian Laxon 
scored for Isca: Suki Obi for 
Leicester Westleigh from a pen- 
alty stroke. 

Taunton Vale moved into the 
fourth round wiih a 2-1 victory 
over Olton and West Warwick- 
shire and their next opponents 
will be Pickwick. Berry and 
Masters scored for Taunton 
Vale and Wilkinson for Olton 


HOCKEY ASSOCIATION CUP: Second 
round: Doncaster 4. Warrington 3 
(ael) -Postponed Lewes v Gore Court 
Long Suffon v Wimhteflon. Third round: 
PckwicK 7, Ford i; BoumevAe 3. Trojans 
2 Isca 3. Leicester Westfagh 1; Taunton 
Vole ft Often and West Warwickshire 1: 
Bowden 5. West Herts 0: Welton ft East 
Gnnsiead 1. Postponed Oxl ord Hawks v 
Beckenham: Boanor v Richmond: Plym- 
outh v Aktertey Edge; RAPC v Bishop's 
Stanford 

• Richard Clarke, who had 
been dropped by England for the 
home countries indoor 
championship, led Tulse Hill to 
victory in the Royal Bank 
indoor club championship at 
the Michael Sob ell sports centre 
on Friday nighL He scored two 
goals in their 3-1 victory over 
Firebrands in the final and 4 
against Tulse Hill in the semi- 
finals. 

RESULTS: Quarter-floats: Tulsa Hill 3 
Stourpon 2; East Qrmstairt B St AJOans 3; 
HreQrands 5 Wefton 2: Boumevfle 3 
Southgate 5. Semi-finals: Tube hfcfl 7 East 
Gnrtaead 3; Firetxands 7 Southgate a 
Final: Tulse HA 3 Firebrands 1. 


TENNIS 


Connors eliminated 


La Quinta. California (Reu- 
ter) — Joakim Nystrom ousted 
second-seeded Jimmy Connors 
and Yannick Noah beat his 
Davis Cup teammate Thierry 
Tulasne to advance to the finals 
of the 5405,000 La Quinta 
Classic tournament. 

Nystrom. the fifth seed, had a 
surprisingly easy time as he 
eliminated Connocs 6-4. 6-2. 
The fburrh-seeded Noah won 
the aD-French match against 
Tulasne, seeded lOlh. 6-2, 6-7, 
7 - 5 - 

Noah, who won this tour- 
nament in 1982 and was 
ninnerup to Connors in 1984, 
will be playing Nystrom for only 
the second time. He lost to a the 
Swede in their only previous 
meeting, last year at an indoor 
tournament in Stockholm. 

Connors looked sluggish 
against Nystrom and showed 
neither, the groundstroke power 
□or the spirited return of service 
that usually mark his game. 

Nystrom wore a black 
armband during the match, a 
sign of mourning for the assas- 
sinated Swedish Prime Min- 
ister. Olof Palme. The 23-year- 
old player said he and the others 
were shocked by the murder. 

Ranked No. 9 in the world, 
Nystrom combined a steady 
baseline game and heavy 
topspin to frustrate Connors 
during the 84-minute match. 

“1 tried to play to his 
forehand." said Nystrom, who 
has not lost a set in beating three 
players — including Boris Becker 
m Friday's quarterfinals. “He 
made a lot of mistakes out there, 
especially on the forehand." 


The first set was tied 4-4 as 
each registered two service 
breaks. Nystrom held to go 
ahead 5-4 and. with Connors 
serving, held a set-point at 30- 
40. The Swede won when he 
blocked a forehand volley at the 
neL 

Connors, who has won the 
tournament three times, faded 
in the second set. losing his 
service in the sixth and eighth 
game. 

“I had my chances, but squan- 
dered them.** said Connors. 
“The balls were flying with his 
heavy topspin. It kept me back 
on the baseline. We were trying 
to do the same thing. He was 
trying to get deep balls and gel 
into the net It worked for him 
and not for me." 

Noah, who now lives in New 
York, opened quickly against 
Tulasne. breaking him in the 
sixth and eighth games of the 
first set. Tulasne. who has now 
lost four in a row to Noah, 
evened the match by pulling out 
the second -set tiebreaker. 

The two battled to 5-5 by 
holding serve in the third sei. In 
the 11th game. Noah made a 
spectacular leaping over-the- 
shoulder backhand winner and 
took the next two points to 
break Tulasne for a 6-5 lead. 
Noah held serve to claim the 
match. 

Tulasne said 10 years of 
practice against Noah has not 
made Noah's game easier to 
handle. “It's tough for me to 
piav him. I don't like to play 
him." Tulasne said. “He plays 
strangely. We practice often 
together, but he plays different 
in practice.” 



Victory drive; Joakim Nystrom on his way 
Connors 


YACHTING 

Lighter winds 
delay yachts 
at Cape Horn 

By Barry Pickthall 

Lighter winds over the week- 
end have delayed the Whitbread 
round the world yacht race fleet 
as they approach Cape Horn 
and the leaders were not ex- 
pected to round this notorious 
rocky outcrop dividing the Pa- 
cific and Atlantic oceans until 
tonighL 

The leading maxi. UBS 
Switzerland, skippered by Pierre 
Fehlmann, still had 347 jniles to 
run yesterday morning 

LEADING POSITIONS (1QJ20GMT yes- 
terday): 1. UBS (Switzerland): ft Cota d Or 
(Belgun): 3. Adamic Privateer (USt 4. 
□mm lllT " ' " “ ' 


(UK); 5. 

Leaden an 
U Eqmpe (France): 


Uon 


(New Zealand). 
1. L’Espnt 
ucanw Tnstar 


(Belgium); 3. Equity and Law (Nether- 
lands): 4. Philips Innovator (Netnarlands): 
5, Phazer (Finland). 


RUGBY RESULTS 


INTERNATIONAL HATCHES: England 25. 
Ireland 20: Wales iS France 23 
JOHN SMITH'S MERIT TABLE A: 
Heatingley 9. woranonam 28. 

MERIT TABLE B: Postponed: Ores v 
Bedford. 

CLUB MATCHES: Blrfcenhead Part: 13, 
Oney 6: FyWe 25, Boroufflimuir 38. 
HamepotH i3. MtOfflesCrougn 3: Liverpool 
25. West HerttefsMl 17. New BngMon 9. 
Hull & E Ft ift Postponed: London 
Scottish * Richmond: Harrogats * Shef- 
field. Met PoAce v Esner: Oxford Llniver- 
sty v Rugby. 


Soman challenger 

Osaka (Reuter) — Jiro 
Watanabe. of Japan, will defend 
his World Boxing Council 
(WBCl super-flyweight title 
against Gilbcno Roman, of 
Mexico, the no. I ranked chal- 
lenger. in ltami. western Japan, 
on March 30. 






LE i 


- . 1*? V 


«Mr- 


26 


SPORT 


THE TIMES MONDAY MARCH 3 1986 


FOOTBALL- CONTRASTING TALE OF THE HERO AND THE VILLAIN AT WHITE HART LANE 


Last-minute Rush surprises Clemence 


Bj Stuart Jones 
Football Correspondent 


Tottenham Hotspur 1 

Liverpool ........ 2 


The tale of two goalkeepers 
unfolded ai While Hart Lane 
and in front of the BBCs 
cameras yesterday afternoon. 
One. Clemence. was a hero. 
Before conceding the decisive 
goal in the final minute, he 
frustrated his former employ- 
ers. Liverpool, with a succes- 
sion of remarkable saves in 
the second half. 

One of them, from John- 
ston. was particularly memo- 
rable and the suggestion was 
that if he had not declined the 
invitation to join the England 
squad during the forthcoming 
World Cup finals. Bobby Rot>- 
son might have been templed 
to prolong his international 
career. 

The other. Grobbelaar. was 
potentially the villain. It has 
been estimated that his errors 
have already cost his club 
some 15 Canon League points 
this season and. if 
Tottenham's contribution had 
not fallen away, his critics 
might have been presented 
with another one or two points 
to add to their argument and 
after he had committed anoth- 
er awful blunder. 

Grobbelaar cannot use the 
conditions as an excuse. The 
goalkeeper, who delights in his 
new soubriquet of 
“Dropalot". hopelessly mis- 
judged the flight of Hoddle's 
comer in the second minute. 
He was under no particular 
pressure at the time and 
looked resigned to his own 
embarrassing fate as he turned 
to watch Waddle win the race 
for the loose ball on the line. 


been two down five minutes 
later, although Grobbelaar. 
the victim of many a cruel 
taunt, was not to blame. 
Hoddle. with a typically pene- 
trating through ball, and 
Chiedozie. accelerating down 
the right, were responsible for 
providing Waddle with an 
equally open opportunity. 
Blinded perhaps by the daz- 
zling sun. he headed over. 

Tottenham. lifted by their 
first League victory as well as 
ihcir first League goals of the 
year at Sheffield Wednesday 
fast Saturday, continued to be 
the more lively and the more 
determined side on a surface 
which became increasingly 
more difficult. 


The from two were suppon- 


Kenny Dalglish, again re- 
luctant to pick himself lost his 
managerial gamble last week- 
end when Grobbelaar, suffer- 
ing from a damaged elbow, 
conceded the first and ludi- 
crously soft goal against 
Everton. Dalglish drafted an- 
other goalkeeper into his 
squad for yesterday's match 
and must now be asking yet 
again how long he can afford 
to carry such a costly liability. 
Liverpool might ’well have 


ed by Molby a man for all 
positions, but Liverpool were 
forced to concentrate so heavi- 
ly on protecting their wildly 
eccentric goal keeper that it 
was not until early in the 
second half that they pro- 
duced attacking ideas of their 
own. McMahon, the first to 
strike, was denied spectularly 
by Clemence. 

Molby. the second to step 
into the firing line, was thwart- 
ed by the woodwork. But the 
pressure they applied was 
growing almost by the minute 
and alter sixty-six. with Tot- 
tenham in considerable dis- 
tress. they equalised. The ball 
ricocheted from one side to 
the other of their area in from 
of Clemence before he was 
beaten cleanly by Molby. 

The transformation was 
soon complete. Tottenham's 
midfield was obliterated 
throughout the closing stages 
as Liverpool's dominance be- 
came more and more unmis- 
takably clear. McMahon, with 
a thunderous shot, ail but 
lifted the bar off its hinges and 
Rush, from the rebound and 
on two other occasions, was 
blocked by Clemence before 
claiming the dramatic winner. 




Paine 
the 

celebrated repeat 


By Clive White 


Southampton 


Manchester United 0 


was happily 


aftermath oflbe assassination of 
the Prime Murisxer.-Ofof f&ftjje, 

. it was ibe only emenawmait to. ■ 
be shown on Swedish tdeidsieB'r-'- 
on Saturday. MrPaJnir wasaw*’- '■ 
avid football Mower: -- - 


, • «/. ■ 
-• 


Another memory ’ 
packed away by Terry nunis, 
who collected a few in bis 81 7 


United had Robson lack after 
his Roker Park vi8ahiy_aad Tel/ ' 
Aviv heroics but he never got 


appearances acrossl7 himself into a position wherehe >- 

could<tefa.So uSMB n P » ? « be i 


Low-level attack: Chiedozie about to make a landing after being sent flying by Molby (Photograph: Ian Stewart) 

Luton on course for club record 


iiunic lu juum J 7 o' 

What better way to round off a 
week in whit* he and other 
former Saints bad come together 
for the dub's centenary dinner 
Than ta enjoy a repeat of 
Southampton’s most tamous 
victory achieved lOyearsagoat 
Wembley and. coincidentally, 
by the same score. - 

In such an atmosphere of 
celebration its achievement was 
far less shocking to Manchester 
United than it was in that FA 
Cup Final- yet it may prove to 
be that United will have as 
much reason to shudder at the 
memorv of Cockenli's impres- 
sive left-foot goal as that of 
Stokes all those years ago. It is a 
defeat which leaves them six 
points, if a game in hand, behind 
Everton. who are maintaining 
the best Merseyside tradition of 
excellence coupled with consis- 
tency. 

United will shudder, too. at 
die memory of the Dell pitch 


had Israel- ■ alntow *r,-. 
singlehandedly. United's anat* ; - 
was found sadly .'and 

necessarily wanting . j 
Atkinson kaows.why he chose to j'- 1 '. 
leave the: slippery siaSspfTeny^ 
Gibson in coWstwaae iihtil the 
83rd minnifc -while Staqfcfdn ' 
displayed the moMity' of T a- 
snowman. Within seconds- ofi'C 
coming oil Gibson's first touch.- - 
forced Shilton into his.ooly 
save, a desperate one at that. 


which, despite a thick cat^et of 


By Vince Wright embarrassed at looking down oa 

_ more fllnstrioss dabs sock as 

Liitnn Town 1 Arsenal, Tottenham Hotspur, 

Luion I own » NewcasUe Uoited ^ Man _ 


Sheffield Wednesday... 0 


TOTTENHAM HOTSPUR: R 
Clemence; P Allen, 0 Thomas, G 
Mabbutt. P Miller. S Perryman. G 
Stevens, N Fatco. J Chiedozie, G 
Hoddle. C Waddle. 


LIVERPOOL: B Grobbelaar; S Lee, J 
Begtin. M Lawrenson. R Whelan, A 
Hansen. G Gillespie. C Johnston, I 
Rush. J Molby. S McMahon. 
Referee: A Robinson (Hampshire). 


The result was predictable, for 
if any team were going to 
flounder on Luton Town's arti- 
ficial pitch it was Sheffield 
Wednesday. Wednesday's long 
ball game is unstated to syn- 
thetic surfaces, which demand 
that passes are played directly to 
feet, and by the time they varied 
their approach it was too hue. 
Luton were in no mood to 
surrender their slender advan- 
tage and were deserving win-, 
ners. 

Luton are well on coarse to 
achieve their highest ever 
League placing, their best being 
eighth in the first division in 
season 1957-58. Luton, who lie 
sixth, do not seem in the least 


Chester Chy. Nor shoald they, 
for they have many fine players 
and no obvious weaknesses. 


Wednesday, in ninth position, 
have many fine players too, 
although that was not so obvious 
on Saturday. SterfauL who was 
switched to midfield in the 
absence of Blair, looked what he 
is — a defender being played oat 
of position; Marwood was 
strangely ineffective and 
Thompson, once regarded by 
many as the answer to England's 
problems in attack, did not land 
a shot on target. Wednesday's 
defence was not blameless either 
as Hart and ShirtlifT often 
resorted to unfair means when 
trying to stop Harford and 
Newell. 


There was nothing they coaid 
do to prevent Harford from 
scoring the winning goal after 16 
inmates. A nicely flighted right 
wing corner by Preece cleared 
Wednesday's tall defenders and 
Luton's man of the moment 
hung in the air like a latter-day 
Tommy Lawton before fcHi w. 
powerfully past Hodge. 


Soodfn, who tested Sealey with a 
couple of raking drives. 


For a while Wednesday were 
rattled and Hart and Shirtliff 
were booked for crude fouls on 
Harford and Thomas respec- 
tively. Then die visitors com- 
posed themselves bat came ap 
against a brick wall in Foster 
and Donagby, who most be 
second only to Lawrenson and 
Hansen as a defensive partner- 
ship in this country. With 
Thompson and Marwood kepi at 
arm's length, the rally threat to 
Luton came from the former 
Doncaster Rovers player. 


A trig pins for Luton is die 
form of Newell, their inexpen- 
sive signing from Wigan Ath- 
letic. If he continues to perform 
as be did against Wednesday 
then the injured Stein, Harford's 
regular partner up frost, will not 
be missed. Luton's manager, 
David Pleat, takes the credit 
fame for a shrewd signing. The 
purchase of Nicholas also comes 
into that category. Pleat has 
made him more confident and 
positive than be was at 
High bray, where his career went 
backwards. 


snow, was pronounced 
Roger Milford, the referee. 
United's supporters may feel 
entitled to ask: "But fit for 
what?”. Certainly not football as 
intricate artists like Strachan 
and Olsen know it. The con- 
ditions favoured the more direct 
style of no-nonsense types like 
Case and Lawrence. But the ball 
did roll and the density of the 
snow made it safe for the 
players. Even a glum Ron 
Atkinson, vigorously chewing 
his Wrigleys presumably to 
prevent him saying too much, 
had to admit: “The pitch al- 
lowed for a bit of life and 
excitement.” 


For the most pan Wright tom: z ' 
a disciplined check on Hughes. -i) 
though the Welshmaodidset up - ' • 
Colin Gibson with, three 
mes remaining. Bui'.he . was” > 
either dazzled . by the opportu- v.? 
nity or the fluorescence at the 41 : 
orange ball which he hoisted <7- 
over the bar from 
probably already knew it- waal.t. 
not his day. U was from feistdaia i*. 
that Wallace's comer bounced:,/ 
obligingly for Cockerin' to dis--,/ 
pah* past Turner in the _8lst J* 
minute. If his spirit by the end . 
was not fractured enough: Gib-’-*:, 
son was later found nursing V' 
suspected broken nose. 

United, with one win in their 
last five League games (like’*. - 
Southampton), have some'V 
patching up to do to mind and 
muscle (which reminds one than-i. 
Whiteside is avaitabfe aK»«-f; 
after suspension) -before^ * 


Wednesday when they take od^ 


West Ham at Upton Baric m'a? 
delaved FA Cup fifth-rouixftie.'i'- 
Otherwise they may be left pttii ■*' 
more painful memories;, •.?„ 

SOUTHAMPTON: PSMton; G Rarest 
Holmes. J Case. U Wright K Shod, &JL 
Lawrenca G Cocker*, s Moran. iy,.' 
Armstrong. D Wallace- • - •j 


luton tome l setter. » 

Thornes, P Mchotos, S 


SHEFFIELD WEDNESDAY; M Hodoe; M 
P Sh*rtS<, 


Bone-hard pitches provide a 
serious threat for players 


Stntand C Monw, P Hwt I 
Smith. B Marwood, 
mo. 0 Stwrtoa (t fa Cl 
Referee: DAxcea Ml 


Runcorn reach third 
semi-final of season 


That was as much as we could 

hope for — or could Sweden. 
The £30.000 Southampton were 
due- to collect from advertising 
in transmitting the game to 
Sweden was one reason for 
ensuring that it went ahead. A 
better one was that , in the 


MANCHESTER UWTBfc C Tnreac M r , 
Duxbury. A Afinston. c G3aan. PV-’ 
McGrath. K Moran. B Robson. G *- . 
Strachan.kl Hughes. F Stepton. dOte»\| 
(sub: T GtbsorU. . . 

Referee: RMdfonJ (Bristol ' ‘ - *5. 


GOIA !£AGUE:CtMttantran2.ttoaairiL ; -4 ' 

SOUTHERN LEAGUE: Sotfhan SSore 
Woodford Town 2. (hitopa . 



By Paul Harrison 


By Paul Newman 


in three-goal McCoist 


* f • P v+ 

- * t IF f ^ 


1 


As football continues to be 
trapped in winters freezer box. 
the dangers, of playing on bone- 
hard pitches become more 
apparrnL Last Saturday. Andy 
Rogers, of Reading, was close to 
death after hitting the ground at 
the Vetch Field. Swansea. He 
had stopped breathing before 
the dub physiotherapist revived 
him. On Wednesday evening, 
against Derby County. Martin 
Hodge, the Sheffield Wednes- 


day goalkeeper crashed on to his 
id suffering cuts and con- 


hea- 

cussion. 

On Saturday, two more goal- 
keepers were injured. Keith 
W'augh. of Bristol Citv. was 
carried off against Blackpool, 
and so was Phil Harrington.of 
Preston North End. at Hereford. 
Roeder's late goal for Newcastle 
United beat an Arsenal side 
reduced to 10 men. the visitors 
having lost Woodcock in the 


first half and O'Leary in the 
second. For Newcastle Beards- 
ley also had to go off. 

Clearly the vigorous form the 
English game takes heightens 
the risk of injury in the prevail- 
ing conditions. So physiothera- 
pists join meteorologists as 
those harder at work than usual 
on football's behalf. Clubs with 
least to worry about are those 
who can either ignore or control 
the effects of the weather the 
clubs with plastic pitches or 
under-soil heating. 

Everton, Manchester City and 
Oldham Athletic are members 
of the latter fraternity and all 
played on Saturday, although 
with mixed fortunes. Everton 
had Sharp and Lineker to thank 
for the goals that put them six 
points clear at the top of the first 
division. Manchester City 
slumped 3-0 to Oxford United, 
who were inspired by Rhoades- 


Brownat Maine Road: Oldham 
could only share the points with 
Millwall. 

Portsmouth's ambitions are 
also currently being stunted. 
They lost to a goal from 
Gamer.of Blackburn Rovers, at 
Ewood Park, and the weekend 
before Oldham had won at 
Frauon Park.Alan Ball. the 
Portsmouth manager, must be 
beginning to believe that his 
fellow Lancastrians have got 
something against him. 

There were notable happen- 
ings elsewhere: Birmingham 
City scored their first home win 
since September against 
Queen’s Park Rangers, with 
goals from Clarke and Hopkins. 
Wigan Athletic 32 games un- 
beaten at home, duly saw off 
Chesterfield, and Orient were 
the only team to play in Lon- 
don. Unfortunately, to spoil the 
scripL they lost 3-1 to Wrexham. 


Although four of the eight FA 
Trophy third round ties have 
still to be completed. Runcorn 
are through to the semi-finals of 
the competition for the fourth 
time in II seasons. The 
Merseyside club won'i-l away 
to Kidderminster Harriers on 
Saturday in front of a crowd of 
more than 2.000 to move a step 
closer to their first Wembley 
final. 


lies were highlighted by the 
> of South F 


By Hugh Taylor 




experiences or South Bank ou 
Saturday. The Drybroughs 
Northern . League . club were 
nearly half way to Wealdstooe . 
when they discovered that their 
third round tie had been post- 
poned yet again. • 


Tuohy gave Kidderminster 
the lead after 10 minutes but 
Runcorn equalized through a 
penalty by Lee seven minutes 
after the interval. An own goal 
by Richards midway through 
the second half put Runcorn 
into their third semi-final of the 
season; they also have hopes of 
winning the Cheshire Senior 
Cup and Bob Lord Trophy. 


The difficulties faced by other 
clubs trying to complete Trophy 


Helping hands 

Four hundred Brighton support- 
ers helped dear toe Goldstone 
ground of snow yesterday in an 
attempt to save today’s FA Cup 
replay with Peterborough. The 
referee. AJan Gunn, will make 
an inspection at 9.15 this morn- 
ing. 

Pat Beasley 

Pat Beasley, who played for 
the successful Arsenal team of 
the 1930s. has died at the age of 
72. 

He played for England against 
Scotland in 1939 


A convincing 3-1 victory over 
Hibernian at Ibrox brightened 
Rangers 's hopes of. ending one 
' of their .most disappointing 
seasons withtf tott$blatioP 
prize. A place in' European' 
competition seems certain if 
they continue to play with the 
commitment and deadly finish- 
ing shown on Saturday. It was 
their first victory in toe premier 
division in six weeks and so for 
ahead were they of opponents 
lacking in drive that they could 
have won by an even more 
comfortable margin. 


their cause noth a 4-0 win over national league, that Scotland's ^ 
Clydebank at Dens Park. They World Cup plans could be ’) 
. were -so for ahead of their ' toreatened did nothmgti) please^ c 


All three goals were scored by 
McCoist. whose sparkling dis- 
play added evidence to his claim 
that he is the sharpshooter to 
solve Scotland's attack prob- 
lems in the World Cup team. 

’ Dundee. Rangers's rivals for a 
place in the UEFA Cup, helped 


.-opponents- ihaL only .inspired 
goalkeeping 'by Tjallacher pre-' 
vented their reaching - double 
figures. Again the outstanding 
player was a centre forward in 
peak form. The Clydebank 
defenders were bewildered by 
the dash and shooting power of 
Stephen, who scored three goals 
to bring his total for the season 
to 16. Harvey scored the other 
goal. 

There is still no hint of 
reconciliation between the dis- 
sident nine dubs who want to 
break away from the Scottish 
League and the verbal war. 
between them became fiercer at 
the weekend. A veiled threat by 
Wallace Mercer, toe chairman 
of Heart of Midlothian, who is a 
spokesman for the rebel new 


a football pbbfic bccommjfdaily J i . 
more: .retimed with thfcipns|-ii 
longed battle for power.; f V: : »L*e" 


Mercer indicated that -if the v..-' 
nine were not supported by the-.- 
Scottish Football Association "* 
when their constitution ciame tq) 
for delate many of toeiriKHhe<- ’? 
based players in toe World Cup y '" 
squad could be withdrawn. He , 
explained:- “We all want to 
provide players for Scotland's 
international team but if we are ' 
not supported by the minor 
associations and toe SFA cpun- 
cil we could be in a .dangerous.! 
civil war situation by ifae middle 
of the month. So why should we 
subsidize players and then give 
them to the SFA for their World 
Cup team for nothing?” 


^3-Vj, '' ; • v .. ^ *• 



rii bold 

bard i i h 


WEEKEND FOOTBALL RESULTS AND TABLES 


F irst div ision 

Birmingham 

Chelsea 

Everton 

Ipswich 

Luton 

Man City 

NewcasUe 

Nottingham F« 

Southampton 

West team 


OPR 

Watford 

A Vina 

Leicester 

Short Wed 

Oxford Utd 

Arsenal 

WHamUtd 

ManUtd 

Coventry 


Second division 


Barnsley 

Btackfaien 

Bradford 


Third division 


Cl 

HoddenMd 

HuH 

OMham 
Sheffield Utd 
Shrewsbury Tn 


P 

1 P o rt sm outh 0 

0 Grimsby Town 1 

P Futharn P 

P Stoke P 

2 Smtertond 0 

p Norwich P 

0 IMwak 0 

P Leeds United P 

0 Carfste 0 


2 Bristol 
0 


Derby O 
Lincoln 
Plymouth 


2 Notts County 
Bo u rne mou th 


Everton 

Manchester Utd 
Liverpool 
Cheteaa 
West Ham Utd 
Lufon Town 
Nott i ng ham For 
Arsenal 
Sheffield Wed 

Newcastle Utd 
Manchester City 
Watford 
Tottennam 
Southampton 

Coventry C4y 

QPfl 

Oxford United 
Leicester City 
Ipswich Twn 
Aston Villa 
Birmingham 
West 


PW □ 
3120 5 
3018 5 
3116 9 
2716 6 
26 IS 6 
3114 9 
2914 411 
2713 7 7 
2913 7 9 
2912 9 B 
3111 612 
2711 610 
3011 514 
3010 713 
31 9 814 
3010 4 16 
30 7 815 
28 6 913 

28 7 516 

29 51014 
7 419 

30 3 7 20 


F APIS 
71 35 65 
52 24 59 
59 34 57 

45 29 54 
42 24 51 
48 33 51 
52 42 46 
32 30 46 

44 45 46 
42 43 45 

36 4J 41 

46 43 39 

42 38 38 
38 41 37 

43 54 35 
31 45 34 

45 57 29 

37 51 27 
22 40 26 
31 45 25 
21 42 25 
25 68 16 


Norwich City 
Porismoutn 
Chariton 
Wimbledon 
Sheffield Utd 
Brighton 
Crystal Pal 
Hull City 
Stake City 
Grimsby Town 
Barnsley 
Oklhem 4th 
Blackburn Rvrs 

Hudoersfudd Tn 

Shrewsbury Tn 
Leeds Umted 
MriwaM 
Sunderland 

Bradford City 
Mtadfosbrough 
Fulham 
Carlisle Utd 


P W D L F 
2916 7 4 60 
3017 4 9 SO 
2714 6 7 50 
2813 7 8 37 
2812 7 9 47 
2912 710 49 
2912 710 36 
2911 9 9 49 
301012 B 38 
3011 ail 45 
2911 010 31 
3011 613 45 
2910 910 34 

29 91010 41 
3010 614 36 
3010 515 38 
2610 412 39 

30 9 714 32 
2610 312 28 
28 7 714 25 
25 8 314 2S 
28 5 617 26 


A Pts 
26 61 
26 55 
30 48 
28 46 
40 43 

44 43 
34 43 

42 42 
39 42 

43 41 
30 41 
49 39 
39 39 
48 37 

45 36 
52 35 
42 34 
47 34 
36 33 
36 28 
33 27 
55 21 


sr 


0 

2 Cardiff 
P Wolves 
P Bofton 
P Doncaster 

1 Brentford 

2 Chesterfield 
2 GtKngham 


Fourth tovfsfon 


Chester 

Hereford 


Orient 
Port Vale 
Scunthorpe 
Torquay 


1 Stockport 

1 Preston 
1 Rochdale 
1 
T 

1 Aldershot 
0 Crewe 


Bearpno 
Wigan Ath 


PW D L F A Pts 
2921 4 4 47 31 67 
Wigan Ath 3218 9 7 59 32 57 

G*>gham 3216 9 7 58 36 57 

_ . 2715 8 4 53 22 53 

31 16 5 10 W 43 53 

3114 9 8 52 41 51 
3213 811 51 35 47 
Doncaster Rvrs 321211 9 34 39 47 
Plymouth Argyle 29 13 7 9 48 40 46 


Deitry County 
Walsall 
Notts County 
Blackpool 


Braid City 
Brentford 


York City 
tel Rovers 


Bnsfolf 


Scottish premier division 
Aberdeen P Dundee Wri p 
4 Clydebank 0 

P St Mirren P 

P Celtic P 

3 Hibernian 1 


Duidee 
Hearts 
Motherwef 
Rangers 


Scottish first division 
BrachtaCRy P Alton 


Hearts 

Dundee Utd 

Aberdeen 

Celtic 

Rangers 

Dundee 

St Mateo 

Hfoerruan 

Clydebank 

Motherwell 


P W D L 
2814 9 5 
2613 8 4 
2713 8 6 
2612 8 6 
29 12 7 10 
2811 611 
25 9 412 

27 7 614 

28 5 617 
24 4 SIS 


F A Pts 
44 28 37 
43 21 35 
49 24 34 

41 31 32 

42 31 31 

36 44 28 
32 39 22 

37 SI 20 
24 57 16 
22 44 13 


Clyde 
Dumbarton 
Falkirk 
Forfar 
Kilmarnock 


P Airdrie 

2 EFtfe 
P Patrick 
P Hamilton 

3 Montrose 
0 Ayr 


FA TROPHY; OuartBn-finafc Kiddernmster 
1. Runcorn 2. 

GOLA LEAGUE: Altrincham 2. Barnet 0: 
Boston 2. Maidstone 2. Stafford 1. 
NorthwMh 2 FrickJcy 2. Bath 1. 
SOUTHERN LEAGUE: Premier dhriston: 

Worcester 3. Basingstoke 0: Bedwonh 1: 


Hamilton 

Mmamock 

Dumbarton 

FaBark 

Forfar Ata 

Morton 

Brechin City 

East Rfa 

Montrose 

Ayr United 

Avdnearwns 

Clyde 

Pamck 

Afloa Athfeoc 


P W D 

24 14 7 
2813 7 
2511 7 
2511 6 

25 tQ 8 
29 9 8 
2310 4 

26 G 11 
26 BID 
26 7 8 
23 7 7 

23 6 9 

24 6 9 
23 5 7 


L F 
3 51 
8 45 

7 42 

8 34 

7 33 
12 «0 

9 38 
9 31 

10 29 

11 27 
9 32 

8 23 

9 30 
11 31 


A Pts 
24 35 
38 33 
34 29 
22 28 
22 28 
49 26 
36 24 
36 23 
38 22 
43 22 
20 21 
31 2t 

41 21 

42 17 


32121010 48 46 46 

3113 711 36 41 46 

31 13 612 51 42 45 

2812 511 38 43 41 

Rotherham Utd 3010 911 41 37 39 

Chesterfield 31 9im 36 39 38 

Bournemouth 32 10 6 16 44 48 36 

Newport County 31 71410 31 40 35 
Bolton Wanars 3210 517 35 46 35 
34 9 619 40 61 33 
31 8 815 43 49 32 
28 8 713 42 54 31 
34 8 6 20 29 63 30 

29 51014 33 56 25 

Woherhan^mxi 30 6 618 37 69 24 

Scottish second division 

Abion P EStrtrra P 

Cowdenbeath P Berwick P 

Meadowbank p Arbroath P 

Que en ’s Park 2 SlJohnstone 0 
Raith Rovers p Stiaua ei P 

Stenhomulr p Ba tten n i n e P 
SMtogAfe p Queen of Sih p 


Carnal City 
Bury 

Darlington 
Swansea City 
Lincoln City 


Swindon Town 
Chester 
Mansfield Town 
Hartlepool Uto 

Port Vale 
Stockport 
Own 

Northampton 
Colchester Ufa 
Southend Utd 

Bumtey 
Rochdale 
Tranmere Rvrs 
Hereford Utd 
Wrexnam 
Aldershot 
Exeter C4y 
Scunthorpe Utd 
Peterborough 
HabfavTovw 
Camondoe Utd 


Camondgel 
Crewe Ata« 
Preston N-End 
Torquay Utd 


P W D 
3021 1 
331711 
3018 5 
3017 5 
31 14 10 
3114 8 
3113 9 _ 
2913 610 
3012 711 
2912 710 
3012 612 
3011 910 
3112 415 
3111 713 
31 11 7 13 
2910 613 

31 9 913 
30 8 913 

28 712 9 

30 8 913 

32 9 419 

31 7 915 

33 6 819 

29 6 617 


F A Pts 
44 29 6* 
66 36 62 
55 33 59 

49 34 56 

50 27 52 
47 43 50 

51 39 48 
58 36 45 
53 45 43 

43 45 43 

44 44 42 
41 45 42 
57 60 40 
49 51 40 
46 58 40 

37 42 36 
27 36 38 

30 36 33 
36 43 33 

38 49 33 
46 70 31 

31 49 30 
35 62 26 
24 57 24 


Vauxhall Opel League 

Caien c e y P Tooting 

Bognar P M 

Famhorougb P C: 

Yeovt 3 


Ayissfaury 2^ Dudley 1_: Gosport 0 Mldtaml 


B*ston 2. Le am i n gton 0: 

Bridgnorth 0. OWbury 3; Bromsracwa 1. 
Sutnn Cowfieta 1: Gloucester o. Mite Oak 

Ch Reddttch 1. Moor Green 1. So u thern 

dhrtsfom All matches postponed. 
VAUXHALL OPEL LEAGUE; First di- 

vision: Staines 1. Finchley 2: Uxbndge 1 
Tilbury 0. Second rfivtsian north: 
HarafwW Umted 3, Heybrldge Swifts 3. 
Second cMsion sotdh: Marlow 1. 
Moiesev3. 


GREAT MILLS WESTERN LEAGUE; Pra- 

tpier rfcrtstoie Bristol City 1. Weston 

Super Mare 1: Bnstool Manor Farm 1. 

TOrtmgton ft Cteppennam a Sftepvn 

MaBef ft Mangoofletd Umted 0. 
Barnstaple 0. Firat ifivtston: BackwvM 

United ft Bath Cay 1: Elmore t. LamiMii 

Athletic 5. Heawtree Unitea 1. Wellington 


Queen at Sth 
Ounfermhne 
Queen s Perk 

Meadowbank 

Arbroath 
St Johnstone 
Sorting Alb 
Cowdenbeath 
Rum Rovers 
Sfenhsmur 
East Stirling 
Berwick 
Stranraer 
ABKm Rovers 


P W D 
2di6 e 
2114 5 
2714 

2510 

2511 
2312 
2410 
23 9 
23 7 


4 

9 

6 

2 

5 

6 _ 
. 511 
8 211 
7 313 
4 812 
6 315 
4 4 15 


F A Pts 
47 16 38 
54 30 33 
43 31 32 
42 31 29 
38 32 28 
42 31 26 

33 28 25 

34 31 24 
38 42 19 
36 45 18 
X 38 17 
29 49 16 
25 46 15 
23 58 12 


OXFORDSHIRE SENIOR CUP: Third 
round: Moms Motor S 1. Oxford United 
10 . 


SKOL FIRST DIVISION: Cup: Phot raund: 
Aif matches postponed. 


SOUTHERN AMATEUR LEAGUE: AI 
matches postooned. 


SOUTH MIDLANDS LEAGUE: AI matches 
postponed. 


SUSSEX COUNTY LEAGUE: PorlfieU 3. 

Peacenaven Ana Tetscomtie 1. Second 

division: Cup: Ai matches postponed. 

Second division: FranHands VlBage 1. 

Seisev 3. Pagham 1. Hassocks ft 


HERTS SENIOR CENTENARY TROPHY: 


ab matches postponed. 

ESEX SENIOR CUP: Steit-ffcat 


Athletic L. — . a— 

3: Keynsham 0. Weymouth i: Odd Down 
0. Warmi n ster 0 (abandoned after 
2ftnmsH Poriway Bristol 1. Yeovtfl 1; 

Westtiwy U rated 0. Radstock 5: Walton 

Rovers f. Devizes 2. 


fiUDOl 

Harrow Borough 2. Hendon 3 


FOOTBALL COMBINATION: Swansea 1. 
Tottenham 1. 


HALLS BREWERY HELLENIC LEAGUE: 

(Wearier dwiaion: Afanondstwy Greenway 


BUILDING SCENE EASTERN LEAGUE: 

Thettord 1 . Braintree 2. Great Yarmouth 2. 

March 0. 


BULLDOG PETROLEUM CUP: Second 

reund: Sudbury 1. Colchester Umted 2. 


t. Sharpness 5; Faeford Town 1. Walling- 

ford Town 0: Shortwood United 2. 
Maidenhead Town ft Supermame 1. 

Pegasus Jurtors ft Ya» Town 1. Houns- 

low 0 First d wwn: AS matches posi- 
tioned. 


NENE GROUP UWTED COUNTIES 
LEAGUE: St Neat's 0. S and L Corby ft 
Buckmgham 3. Newport Papne* 0. 

NORTHERN COUNTIES EAST LEAGUE: 

Premier dMsknc Apntnoriw warfare 0. 

Em lay 2: ftadfingfon Tnrvty 1. Heanor 1; 

Long Eaton Umted ft Bradley Rangers 2. 

AS other matches i — " 


IRISH LEAGUE: Bangor 1. Gtenavon 1: 

O’lfronvrBe i. Doaltery t. Coleraine t. 

Glemoran 5. Lames. Crusaders 1: Lnfleta 

5. Baffymena 1. Newry ft Game* 1. 
Ponadpwn 2. Aros 0. 


fV" icwHEY: Wwmn HiwuptonitMl. H 

Second Wgr Mcnrnuey 2. Tammca Maoero 0 

iMomarrey «nn 3-2 on agg) 


COMBIN ED COUNTIES LEAGUE: All 

matches postponed. 


DEVON CHALLENGE CUP: Second 
round: Ilfracombe 1. Tiverton 0. 


MULTIPART LEAGUE: Burton 0. 
Oseestrv 3. Caernarfon 2. Hyde 1 : Marine 

3. Gans borough ft Morecambe 2. Gates- 

MOd 0: Witten 1 . Buxton 1 ; Wortongton 0. 

Rhyl 2. Bangor Crtv 2. Southport 3. 


NORTHERN LEAGUE: Hist tfivistorc 

Bishop Auckland 1 . Spermymoor Untied 1 . 

Gretna 1 . Brandon Umted ft Wfintiy Town 


Yesterday’s resalts 


First division 

TOTTENHT* ,1) 1 LIVERPOOL t Dl 2 
Mofoy. Rush 

16.436 


Waaaie 


NORTH WEST COUNTIES LEAGUE: Ftat 

rev is ion: Bootle 1. Fcrmby I. Burscoah 0. 

Penrth ft Easiwooc Hantey 2. Netfterheid 

1 1. IrtSm f 


1. Raociiffe Boro ■ 


Fourth division 

SWINDON ( } HARTVPOOL ( ) P 






a 

n 

r 

03 

S 


JUDO 


Surprise 
defeat for 
Gordon 


From Philip Nicksan 
Budapest 


Budapest sprang a surprise in 
the shape of toe Hungarian 
heavy weight Isivan Dubovsky. 
on Britain's European bronze 
medal winner. Elvis Gordon. 


yesterday. Fighting in the open 
sory of ihe Hungary 


weight category 
Cup. having missed out on toe 
medal positon in his weight 
category the day before. Gordon 
was laced with what looked, on 
paper, a good draw, starting 
with Dubovsky. 

But as he attacked the 
Hungarian confidently in toe 
opening seconds he was stopped 
in mid-stride and swept on to 
bis side for a five-point score. 
Undaunted, however, he re- 
turned strongly to toe fray only 
to face a series of attacks that 
took him backwards, forwards, 
on to his side, and finally up in 
toe air and flat on his back. 

”li has been a long time since 
that has happened to me." a 
bewildered Gordon said. “1 just 
didn't know whai he was going 
to hit me with nexl." 

It was a reversal of his first 
fight on Saturday in toe heavy- 
weight category against another 
Hungarian. Atilla Sarang. This 
ume ii was Gordon who did the 
throwing, collecting minor 
scorn on his way to Ippon (10 
points) which he was awarded 
for a perfect shoulder throw. 

* Gordon's further progress to- 
wards toe semi-finals was 
checked by Vladimir 
Zabchenko. of the Soviet 
Union, who gymnastically 
evaded all Gordon's attacks and 
knocked the Briton down for 
Koka. the smallest score. 

The best British performance 
of the tournament, one of toe 
strongest of the European 
events, came from the light- 
weight. Paul Shea Is. of Man- 
chester. He produced some good 
wins against the Hungarian. 
Laslo Gal. and. particularly, 
against Ihe Belgian. Bernard 
Didier. However, a momentary- 
loss of concentration allowed 
the Italian Mariano Sulli. to slip 
in past Sheals's defences to 
effect the most basic of judo 
throws, a double leg grab. The 
three-point score was enough to 
put the Italian through to the 
medal position. 


CYCLING 


Kelly rewrites 
his prologue 


From John Wilcockson. Paris 


Sean Kelly was toe un- 
expected winner yesterday ol 
ihe short, prologue time-trial to 
the 36to Paris to Nice race, even 
though toe Irishman is favoured 
to wm toe 750-mile event for a 
fifth successive year. The sur- 
prise is that Kelly has rarely 
done well in similar prologues, 
mainly because of his reluctance 
to use lightweight technology. 

Yesterday, however, Kelly 
raced at more than 30m ph 
through toe snow-speckled Bois 
de Vincennes on toe latest disc- 
wheeled. low profile, carbon 
fibre bicycle. He even wore the 
streamlined helmet 

When Kelly arrived at toe eod 
of his 3.7 mile effort the fastest 
rider had been toe Dutch 
specialist Ben Oosterbosch. 
whose 7min 24sec looked un- 
beatable. but Kelly sliced almost 
five seconds off this time. 

The cold weather deterred 
Kelly's great rival. Stephen 
Roche, from starting toe pro- 
logue yesterday. Knee ligaments 
that he injured in a crash during 
the Paris six-day race Iasi 
November are still causing him 

problems, and his donor said he 

needs warmer weather to help 

them heal. 

In Roche's absence, the main 

danger to Kelly during the next 

six days should come from 
LcMond and bis multi-national 


La Vj Claire team, which in- 
cludes Jean Francois Bernard 
and Bauer, both of whom 
finished in toe lop 12 yesterday. 

Srmss as 

(F0.737; TO. D Cecnxq (Fir), 7:41 


Voorn wins 


iwerp _ , 

Voorn. of the Netherlands, won 
the World Cup event in the 
Antwerp international show 
jumping competition on Sat- 
urday beating Frank Sloatoaak, 
of West Germany, and Eric 
Wautras. of Belgium. 

WORLDOLff latter six e*enfo):1. J 
WhitafcBrtgB), 5tjrts3. p Dwand (fry. 54; 
3-N Sk BWon ( GBp5l 4. T Fuchs (Swttzj. 
445, M Pyrah (Gb>. 43£. G McVean (Aust 
36:7. E Macken (Ire). 38:8. P CtarW (G bC 
35SL jywautBis (B«), 33: TO, M WfotNwr 


New sponsor 

The Glasgow Marathon is u> 
be sponsored by Scottish City 
Lin ^ poaches, who are putting 
u P^ 5 -^-Jh‘ s year’s race, for 
which 20.000 entries will be 
accepted, is on September 21. 
Scotts Forage Oats, toe main 
oackcrs For the first four years* 
ended their association after last 
year s race. 


TODAY’S FIXTURES 


7 unless stared 

FOOTBALL 


FA Cup 
Fifth round 

Watford v Bury 
West Ham v Man United 

Fifth round replays 

Arsenal v Luton 
Brighton v Peterborough 
MiDwall v Sout hamp t o n 
Sheff Wed v Derby 

Fourth division 

Stockport v Southend 

Scottish Cup 
Fourth round 

AUoa v Motherwell 

Hamilton v Hearts 

St Mirren v Falkirk 


^GOLA LEAGUE: KMdeRMnster * Wyo- 
tEAOUE: Horwich „ 




CENTRAL LEAGUE: Second 


RUGBY union 

cuw MATCHES: Newbridge ^Ataman. 

OTHER SPORT 

HOCKEY: Men. tnter^areioos dMinim. 

SQUASH nACKET&*YWm 
London open (m Stripes SC). 


OXFORD TORPIDS fell t() Y CStlV 


DIVISION fcCtrnstCtnirtiibpdPWTforoka: 
Exeter bpd Brasanose: New College Dpd. . 
Queen's. ^ t ■ . 

DIVISION It Wadham bpd Jesuo, wt» IMt i ■. 
|J» bank; Henfore bpd ifotverefty. vi- 

Kaie&RSd 


O TOti bpd Linc oln H: Lady Uargunt 

bpd l Worcester R; Merton bpd tforcaster.-ip 

U: Brasenosa II bpd Univeretty a .SL 'Y; 

BSPffPSSSr.-iiS- 


bpdai'^S^r 

HI. _ ITS" 


Wotfsonli bpd Woreester W. v., 

MWSIpN IfcWoteon » bpd St JeteY* 

F«k IRI Exeter OrW V bpd^ . 


Pb ter- allb g ^ 


r^j- nwwad to tee bottooi of tha.'L. 
oMskm; New Cotieoe m bod Sf 05 
forties W; MtetonB bpd Br££ttOB&7*.. 

• •’ — f ■“•fiOfi* 


Women \" m .~ 

p gjnr House bpd St HujAfS ■ 
WfocBwijjpd Uteveretiy; Brasenosetpd^ 

Draswxae bpd Pembroke:’,: ^ 

sss# 

SsgtfBattagiass-- 

^fojshMig order •* - n 2 !. 

q*;.; !«xa. -ertt:-*? 

S&-MKS; 

• II. St 


U^_ “MAH H. Lao 

OueSr?S Hortfoid B. •»> 




Regem’. * n - t WNton 1V.~ ,w 

unwsw ^St H aro’s. Wadham. 'J iV. 

hroke. sf 225? % a PBm-"U,.r- 
VW0H «fo. N 1ITL 11 K*fo. --r: 

Christ Somennfia-n. 

Ba^gasssma^ 

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‘ r 














































i£irA 


1 


THE TIMES MONDAY MARCH 3 1986 


SPORT 



RUGBV UNfON: MELVILLE’S MEN MUST BEWARE INDISCIPLINE AS THEY MAKE THEIR LAST CHALLENGE FOR TITLE 


pit as the pendulum 
firmly to Paris 



. • , By David Hands . 
Rugby Correspondent 


— 25- 

— 20 






^ “It will "be mce going into 
the Iasi game with something 
to play for," Martin Green, 
England's coach, mujsed after 
watchiughis mam beat Ireland 
by three, goals, a try and a 

penalty goal to a goal, two tries 

and two penalties in the Save 
and Prosper international at- 
Twickenham On Saturday. • 
Green & under no.illusions- 
. about- the. welcome waiting-in 

Pans but It is four gears' since . 
England won two matches in a - 
five nations championship 
season, putting themselves in 
a position to challenge for the 
title- . • 

Even if it takes a remarkable 
r&gree of optimism to imagine 
England beating Fiance on 
March;' IS. they did at least 
extricate themselves from the 
pit 4m©" which .they fell- at 
MurrayfiekL It was-a pit -with 
slippery sides, too, sines they 
worked Harrison over- the 
Irish fine in - the second 
minute, only to be recalled for 
an Irish penalty, and then 
found themselves a try down 
seven minutes later. 

Those are the buffets of 
fortune England can do with- 
out: more particularly, there 
were buffets struck by players 
who should know better. 
Brain’s punch at McCall was 
spotted by Derek Bevan, the" 
‘rsich judge; and was responsi- 
ble for the cancellation . of 
Harrison's try. It was followed 
by Coldough kneeing an off- 
side Bradley and, later in the 
game, another punch connect- 
ed with Ciaran Fitzgerald 
which went unobserved. In- 
discipline is not a characteris- 
tic of this England side and 
Melville must make sure it 
does not become one. 

There may be those who 
will carp that this was an 
indifferent game between two 
indifferent sides; that:: of 
England's four cries three were 
the direct consequence of 
pushovers and that yet again 
they failed to make the most 
of some excellent set-piece 
domination. 

A Let us, just for once, look at 
s£e positive side of the coin. 
England made the most of the 
area where they enjoyed an 
outstanding advantage; Ire- 
land did equally wep.i 0 .mc 
two.firsthalf tries from linaftr-- 
ed possession and Dean-Ricfei. 
ards made his semordebut ia 
a way which ought to bring 
tears of joy to England's sorely 
tried supporters. .. 

If Richards had not scored 
two tries it would still, have 
been a remarkably confident 




. first game. His support -work 
: and ball handling,' on a bitterly 
cold dayrwere of the' highest . 
'order and; his intdligehrread-" 
tng of the gatriemade oneache 
: that he had not been chosen 
earlier. ' 

He benefited from, the bafl- 
playing presence of Rees 
alongside him. The Notting- 
ham flanker reached many 
breakdowns first, ensuring- ■ 
that England had a vast ad- 
vantage at ruck and maul. But 
that "England, did not take 
greater ^advantage of. their., 
reshaped- back, row reflects 
credit, on Carr., and Spillane ' 
who, playing • behind; well- . 
beaten light forwards, made 
an immense defensive contri- 

button to the game. 

One of the curiosities was ■ 
that England did not maintain - 
their -first-half lineout pres- 
ence. This may have been 
because Chilcott, with a pain- 
ful shoulder, could hot main- 
tain his support work and . 
Wimerbottom. playing in- an . 
accustomed position, did not 
keep concentration^ TJoth may 
be forgiyen: Chilcott' s -pres- 1 
ence ensured that England 
could use the scrum as ah 
attacking weapon (in exactly 
the same way as France did 
against Ireland) and Winter- 
bottom responded well to the 
change in his role. 

Andrew was obviously net- 
tled by criticism of his play 
this season and took much 
more upon himself. It was his 
. check and delightful “grubber 
kidc -which -paved" the way for 
Harrison’s disallowed -score -. 
And twice he was held just., 
short of the Irish line after 
blind-side breaks. An unwant- 
ed propensity to have drop 
kicks charged down (three 
times) at least led to scoring 
positions, as did the other 
limited dabbles of the English 
backs.. 

. Ireland led by one point -at 
the interval Ringland twisted t 
out of twa iackles to score on ; 
the blind side of a five-metre 
'scrum, i then England were v 
awarded a -penalty try when ~ 
Carr kicked the ball out of the 
English bade row as they went 


for a pushover. Lenihan's 
lineout charge established; the 
position, for MuJlin’s try be^ 
tore Andrew’s- only successful 
penalty - made the half-time 
score 10-9 

England’s best football 
came after Richards’s first try 
when they fed 15-13. Melville 
sneaked off down the blind 
side, die back row and Dooley 
came pouring in and the backs 
had a two-man overlap but. 
contrived to misuse it In. the 
same 'way, in" the first half, 
Simms and Underwood foiled 
to make the most of a yawning 
field; .Simms pulling, a: ham- 
string which- led to the first • 
championship appearance of 
Palmer, the Bath centre. " 

There must be praise for the 
outstanding refereeing of 
Clive Noriing, who -defused 
two potentially explosive situ- 
ations and left no one in any 
doubt- over how the laws were 
to be applied. The Twicken- 
ham ground staff, too, worked 
magnificently, tp offer a play- 
ing, surface hard in parts — 
notably where Ireland scrab- 
bled for a foothold on their 
own line at the southern end 
and "foiled to find one — but 
otherwise in exceptional con- 
dition. 

Scorers: England: Tries: Richards 
(2). Davies, penalty try. Conver- 
sions: Andrew (3). Penally: Andrew. 
Ireland: Tries: Ringland. Muflan, 
McCall. Conversion: Kteman. Pen- 
attws: Kleman (21. 

ENGLAND: O H Davies (Wasps); M 
E Harrison (Wakefield), K G Simms 
(rep: J A PShner, Bath), 
fi (Orrefl), R Underwood 
. . j: B R Andrew (Notting- 
n), n D MeMtte (Wasps, captain); 



A loose forward cuts loose; Richards, the England No 8 and double try scorer, gets the ball away. (Photograph: Ian Stewart) 

Welsh unable to tip the balance 


By Gerald Davies 


Wales 

15 

Franrp 

.23 



G i ChScott 
(Coventry GS 


i). S E Brail 
rce ( Northern p- 
Winterbottom 


(Headtnaley). W A Dooley (Preston 
Grasshoppers). M J. Cofctougti 
(Swansea), G W Reece (Notting- 
ham). D Richards (Leicester). 
IRELAND: H P MacNeffi (London 
Irish): T M Ringland (Ballymena), B J 
Muffin (Dublin University). M J 
Kleman (Dolphin), K D Crossan 
(instontans); R A Keyes (Code 
Constitution), M T Bradley (Cork 
Constitution); A P Kennedy (London 
Irish), C F Fitzgerald (St Mary's 
Colege. captain). D C Fitzgerald 
(Larisdowne), D Morrow (Bangor), B 
W McCatf (London Irish), D G 
Lenihan (Cork Constitution), N J 
Carr (Ards), B J Spittane (Bohe- 


Referee: C Norflng (Wales). 


Nottingham get run-out 


You would have had to go a - . u A Ih( , 

SSS l oSS?S e ih?fr^ n S3Md5bi5Sd.h£S 

Saturday. Once again the freer- NoltJ - n&hara in second 

place behind Gloucester in the 
table. 

Nnvstn/At - - The conditions were remark- 
ihoscsdnpnvpTvwl. ahry ^od- yohn Dnipkin the 

^^Mtingteun^creiary said, and 
-Noiunghant; wjho were without 
‘. Andrew Rees and Cook,. Scored 


ing weather reduced the dub 
^programme to almost nothing 
< -and caused more .head scratch- 
ing ipi *** 

Jn lhc.lofin 



play . •Wakefield in the 
round of the rcup ai> College 
Grove next Saturday, and put in 
some much needed preparation 
(they have hot played since 
February 1 ) with a 28-9 win over 
Hcadingley in a John Smith’s 


six tries and afterwards reported 
no injuries. Their scorers were 
Moore, Glenn, Steve Holdsiock, 
Stokes. Northard, and Moon. 
Hodgkinson kicked two conver- 
sions. Worrall kicked three pen- 
alties for HeadibgJcy. 


With 10 minutes to go at the 
National Stadium on Saturday, 
and Wales trailing by two points 
at 15-17. memories of 
Murrayfield earlier in the season 
must have come flooding 
disturbingly back to the French. 
They already had three tries in 
the bag, yet they were far from 
safe. 

If only Wales, in this critical 
instant, had been able to boast a 
pack of forwards who could 
scrummage more authori- 
tatively or glean some regular 
lineout possession, so as to turn 
the French; but if Wales had 
such power things might have 
been different, anyway. 

What is certain is that had 
such an event arisen here, and 
Wales had assumed such con- 
trol. it would have been grossly 
un;usL They had kept in touch 
.by the simple virtue of 
Thorb urn’s incredible boot 
which, with another five pen- 
alties on Saturday, has given 
him the Welsh record of 52 
points for the championship. He 
really can thump them: his 
third here was from a distance of 
almost 60 metres. 

Yet for all France’s superior- 
ity, the game was in such a 
balance, and it did not need to 
stretch credibility too for to see 
that it just might fall disas- 
trously away from their grasp in 
the final minutes. Wales-wereon . 
the move, a. sense -.of greater, 
urgency havnfe jetnrried "after 
being noticeably absent for most 
of the match (sponsored by 
Toshiba), and they were ram- 
bling on towards the French 
line. 

France, so closely knit, were 
beginning to unravel at the 
edges. Phil Davies charged, was 
held and the ball went astray to 


Berbizier who. on his heels and 
desperate, kicked high but 
badly. The wind held it. Tilley, 
who had come in for Phil Lewis 
and had his best match for 
Wales, misjudged the flight and 
Bonneval latched on to it. He 
gave a spontaneously quick pass 
to Blanco, who ran half the 
length of the field, avoiding 
Jonathan Davies's despairing 
tackle on the way. to score the 
try. 

This was superbly convened 
from the touchline by La pone us 
give France the victory which 
they so much deserved by two 
goals, two tries and a drop goal 
to the more mundane, and. in 
this season, inglorious five pen- 
alties. 

As has been recognized hith- 
erto. Wales, with very little 
authoritative possession, have 
had to make maximum use of 
what has been available; pared 
to the slimmest capacity, the 
Welsh team could not afford to 
waste anything. On . Saturday 
they did and were that much 
looser or. perhaps, made to look 
looser. 

The first tackle, so crucial 
against the French, of all people, 
to stop iheir rolling momentum, 
was missed: gaps were looked 
for and never appeared in a rigid 
defence: and often after winning 
the initial possession, which 
goodness me was hard enough 
to come by in the first place, 
some of the forwards — James 
was particularly prone to this — 
turned bock on themselves, only 
to be enveloped by the consum- 
ing French forwards. • 

Epitomizing this, looseness 
was the manner the Welsh, in 
forcing, the French back in 
defence in the first half, when 
the strong wind favoured the 
whole team, allowed the visitors 
to take advantage and make 
ground at the first seven drop- 
outs on the 22-metre line. There 
was no Welsh player to take the 


ball cleanly, or it dropped on 
empty ground, was juggled b> 
Waters or else the tall French 
forwards. Joincl or Condom. goL 
there first to intercept the ball in 
flight. All such examples relaxed 
the pressure on the French line. 

The French themselves, how- 
ever. despite Hagei’s confusion 
as to which side he should be on 
— he did not always appreciate 
the offside line — were a team 
which had everything under 
control apart from their late 
lapse. 

Thorbum got his first penajty 
in the second minute, with 
Laporte dropping a goal a liule 
while later after a long sweeping 
movement set up by Blanco. 
Joinel and Erbani. The Welsh 
defence, which because of de- 
ficiencies elsewhere, has been so 
tight in past games, was ev- 
idently loose in the first French 
try. Lafond. in close quarters on 
the right wing, managed to ride 
three tacklers to squeeze in the 
corner. 

The other try came a minute 
into injury lime in the first half 
when the Toulouse pair. 
Chat-vet and Bonneval. com- 
bined to set Sella up for the 
score. Thorbum kicked a pen- 
alty either side of this try but 
Wales were still adrift 
three minutes ofthe restart, with 
the referee missing an obvious 


A second try by Lafond. 
converted by Lapone. after 
knock-on by Sella, seemed to 
threaten an overpowering disas- 
ter. BUt France committed er- 
rors — the penalty count went 
17-8 against them 
The game, which was never 
consistently moving because of 
the many stoppages as much os 
because of the cold conditions, 
did produce excitement in 
patches. After Blanco's try 
Wales had their most sustained 
period of attack in the game 
when Bowen and Hadley- 
crossed the line, only to be 
recalled, but it was an urgency 
which had been lacking earlier 
and which came too late. 
SCORERS: WalM: Penalties: Tliortxirn 
(5). France: Tries: Latond (21. SeHa. 
Blanco. Conversions: Laporta (2J. Drop 
goafc Lapone. 

WALES: P H Thorbtsn (Neath): M TtHey 
(Swansea). J A Denereux I South Glamor- 
gan institute). B Bowen (South Wales 
Pokes). A M Hadley (CartStf); J names 
(Neath). R N Jones iSivansea). J 
Whllnfoot (Cardifll. W J James 
lADeravonL I H EMman (Cardiff). W P 
Mon arty (Swansea). S J Perkins (Porter 
000(1. D R Waters (Newport). 0 F 
Pickering (LUneli. captain). P T Davies 
(Uaneuo. 

FRANCE: S Bianco (Borne): J B Latent 
(Racmg Club). P Seta (AgenJ. D Charvet 
(Toulouse), E Bomevar (Toulouse): G 
Laporta (Grauihet). P Berbizier (Agan): P 
Morocco (MomterrandJ. D Dubroca 
(Agen. captain). J-P Garnet (Lourdes). D 
9. F Haget (Bamtzl. J 


Emani f 
Condomll 
Joan el (Bnvei. 

Referee: J B Anderson (ScottandL 


). E Champ ^Toulon). J-L 


Another Gala occasion 


Gab's efforts in clearing snow 
framthe surface of Netbcrdalc 
were rewarded as they beat' Jed- 
Forest 25 points to 4 in a 
Scottish league first division 
match on Saturday (Ian 
McLauchlan writes). Jed-Forcst 
went into the lead after only 10 
minutes when Millar scored a 
try. 

After 25 minutes Dods slotted 
a penalty for Gala and a minute 
later Gary Millar added a try 


which Dods convened. Five 
minutes into the second hall 
Derek 'White drove off the 
scrum to said Millar in for his 
second try . Dods and Macaulay- 
added further tries which Dods 
converted. 

South of Scotbnd.dcspite nu- 
merous late changes, beat ihe 
Rest of Scotland by 2] points to 
19 at Murrayfield in a thrilling 
match which saw eight tries 
scored. . 


RACING:GEOFF LEWIS TAKES FANCIED LINCOLN HOPE RANA PRATAP TO GALLOP ON BARRY HILLS’ ALL-WEATHER STRIP 

Dudie can spring surprise in Cup 



From Our Irish Racing Correspondent, Dublin 


relish to Festival 


ByMidbadPUIGps 


If the promised thaw arrives in 
time to allow the three-day 
National Hunt Festival to take 
place as normal at . Cheltenham 
next week, the large, contingent 
of runners "trained in or around 
Lambourn will noi fail for .lack 
of fitness. All the trainers 1 have 
spoken to have been unanimous 
that they have been able. to do 
repre than just keep their horses 
St king over, even though frost 
has prevented any . work on 
grass. 

What is more, most are of the 
view> ihat their horses may even 
have bcncfitied from the break. 
They will be much fresher than 
they might normally have been 
come Cheltenham. Daily ra- 
ereise has taken place on the 
roads, around covered rides or 
indoor schools, at the Seaside or 
up the various all : weather 
gallops which have remained m 
remarkably good condition 
thanks to the ureless roumMhe- 



say“ remarkably" because in cer- 
ft:n circumstances even all 
weather gallops become vulner- 
able to the dements. _ 

A surprise visitor to 
Lambourn on Saturday was 
Geoff Lewis, ihe Epsom oainer. 
who brought four of .his own 
horses, including.- his.- Lincoln 
Handicap candidate. Ran* 
Pratap. and one of Phiup 
Mitchell V We’ve come to do a 
little piece of work on Barry 
Hills’s shavings.” Lewis 
said.“We cant do anything at 
home and I cant just sit wound 
and do nothing because J have 
had a few quid on him (Ran a 

Pratap)" 

* Lewis showed as much dash 
t his horses as he scuttled here 
and there supervising wings. 
Rang Pratap looked excep- 
tionally" well and the workout 
must have brought him on 
because be bad a good . Wow 
afterwards. Lewis will takw hnn 
io Sandown Park for another 
gallop on Saturday- Clearly be is 
Having nothing 10 chance m 
order to get a good run for 

money 

■Hills’s all-weather gallop, 
which stretches nine furlongs up 
$hc famous Faringdon 
training ground, was in pc™* 1 
condition on Friday when 
Walwyn and Rod Simpson 
barked their Cheltenham] 
hoises. But by Saturday 
elected logo and see fojjnv*" 
the snow had got brand 
hall and freeze. As a result both 


Nicky Henderson and Nick 
Caselee had a change of heart 
mid decided only to earner their 
horses instead of letting them 
“stride-on-a-biL” All the. saihe.. 
neither was downhejirted. 

Hendeisons’s See You Them 
the hot favourite for the Cham- 
pion Hurdle, looked in great 
heart as be was led by Classified 
to the lop of the hilL 

Ideally Henderson would 
have liked to have given See 
You Then another race before 
Cheltenham, but be contents 
himsclt nevertheless, with the 
knowledge that the champion 
hurdler ran and won just before 
ihe freeze-up. “So he should be 
alright, he concludes." . 

A rival who is “very definitely 
alright" in the opinion of his 
trainer. "Nicky Vigors is Kesslin. 
ihe unlucky looser,' on a . dis- 
qualification* of the wesset 
Cable Champion Hurdle at 
Leopardstown in Ireland last 

month. . . " . 

Vigors had a particularly gooa 
view of Kesslin on Satunfay 
because he rode bis galloping 
companion, Cumrew. in a work- 
out over a mile on the upper 
Lambourn all-weather strip. 
Kesslin was ridden for the first 
time by his new trigjrace J 0 ™^- 
Hywd Davies, and afierwaros 
both he and Vigors were de- 

- B8 cKries. inckieTTtaJry.was^also 
delighted with the feel lhai jus 
Triumph Hurdle Tide. 
TaneooaL had given .him only 
24boure before w heo hehada 
good blowout up the Fanngdon 
Road all-weather gallop, which 
Fulke Walwvn also took 
advantage of on Friday 

Twenty three years ago, 
Walwvn was the 
at Cheltenham after that 
tong cold spell which relented it s. 

S only five days before the 

Festival was due to begin. 

Yesterday toe message fro 1 " 
J Saxon House ^ 

that “Ours are fit- 
S£ v.iih Ten Pins nm - 

nina high- . . 

All the while Jenny Pitman s 
string were justtrtm^o" toe 
roads. The leading lady .of 
Upper Lambourn had done her 

hundred per cent raung. 


Greasepaint, who managed a 
last-gasp qualifying win for this 
year's Grand National, re- 
appears at Leopardstown this 
afternoon in the Foxrock Cap, a 
two and a half mile han di cap 
chase. Prospects of raring after 
a 12-day break in the Republic 
appear brightfthere will be a 
precautionary inspection at 9 JO 
am) ami as a precaution live 
bones were “schooled'' here on 
Saturday on ground that the 
jockeys .described - ' as “pretty 
firm". 

With Dennot Weld planning 
to have Greasepaint at his peak 
in a mouth's time, he is likely to 
be short of a gallop and the same 


remark may apply to the top 
weight and fellow AJutree hope- 
ful. Kil kilo wen. 

In this event a year ago 
Larry's Latest and Dudie were 
placed behind Bobs line and at 
foe revised weights Dudie is now 
lllb better off with Larry's 
Latest for a beating of eight 
lengths. At Gowran Park in the 
middle of February, DUDIE 
stayed on well to finish fourth to 
Another Brownie and could turn 
up here at a.aice price.- . 

Several of today’s probables 
bold Cheltenham engagements, 
including Galmoy and Banker's 
Benefit, who head the weights in 
the Firmonnt Handicap Hurdle. 


BANKER'S BENEFIT has 
proved a prolific race winner for 
John Fowler and over this 
distance conld prove too good for 
Galmoy at a difference of 71b. 

Galmoy's stablemate, 
DROM O LAND'S LAD, has 
been given lOst lib in foe 
Connty Hurdle and if foal is a 
realistic assessment be could 
step up on his effort of 12 
months ago when be lost the 
Hiilcrest Hurdle by a short head 
to the odds-on favourite, Hearns 
Hotel. 

Larry’s Bottle and Eddie Wee 
boast the best novice chase form 
of those declared in the Har- 
conrt Novices' Chase. Eddie 


Wee was beaten by the sub- 
sequent Ulster Harp National 
winner. Androy, while Larry’s 
Bottle finished within six 
lengths of Passage Creeper over 
two and a quarter miles at the 
Christmas meeting here. The 
extra quarter mile should favour 
LARRY’S BOTTLE 
As a starter to an afternoon 
when he is strongly represented 
tb rough the programme Paddy 
Mullins and bis son. Tony, could 
win the Cabimeely Five- Year- 
Old Maiden Hurdle with NOIR 
SHOON, whom is competing 
overjumps for foe first time, but 
who has some useful Flat race 
form. 


LEOPARDSTOWN 


Go^^oo^^nMpre^itonary 9.30am inspection) 

Z30 CABiNTEELY 5-Y-O MAIDEN HURDLE (£1035: 2m) (16 
runners) 


1 

2 

3 

4 

5 

6 

7 

8 
9 

10 

11 

12 

13 

14 

15 
15 


400 BOLDMO P D McCreary 11 12 ~- 
003 FWESLAVETW Nichoison 11 12 
000 FOUR TR1X JR Cox 11 12 
ID FHIEMJLV SAW C Kinane It 12 . 
014 HOOT SHOON P Muttrai 11 12 . 


P McCormaefc (3) 
_ PP Kinane (7) 
J Shorn 


on POWER LOON N Meade 11 12 

000 TUB8EHBUNJNY D McDonoqh 11 12 

000 AMBER JACK Mrs P Duggan 11 4 


0 DIAMONDSEAMeJMwsm 11 4 . 


003 GOLDEN WINGS 
000 MLLCASTLE DM 


11 4 


OPO PAULA'S EMPRESS T Carberry 114 
000 ROYAL RECORD DT Hughes 11 4 _ 
OOP STRUEIL ROY ALE J Macaitay 11 4 . 

04 THINKING CAP A Moore 11 4 

00 RATHLJNE T O'Neill 11 1 


T Kinane 

A Mulkns 

P Leech 

H Rogers 

— Mr P Duggan (7) 

T McGrvwn 

B Shendan 

Mr R Day (7) 

F Berry 

T Morgan 


PJ 


T J Taaffe 
TO-PtaUP) 


5-2 four Tree. 3-1 NdrSnoon. 9-2 Fnandly Sabn. 6-1 Thwtarig Cap.B-1 fins Stave, 10-1 
Boldmo. Golden wings. 14-1 others. 


Leopardstown selections 


2.30 Norr" Shoon- 3-0 Larry’s Bottle. 3.30 Drotnoland Lad. 4.0 
Duc&e. 430 Banker's Benefit 5.( 


i.O Dawn Even. 5.30 Kissane. 


3.0 HARCOURT NOVICE CHASE (£1,31 1: 2m) (IS) 


1 

2 
3 
.4 

5 

6 
7 
B 
9 

to 

11 

12 

13 

14 

15 


212 BON CHEVAL RuDy Wajsh 8 12 0 
On CARWCKAVOUi* J B t h»6 12 0 
COOLGAMBLQt J Fowler 6 120 
0F2 EDDIE WEE W Rock 10 120 


no SSmbSeenTb p mKF 12 o 

300 INDIAN SHOT MH0WXOT6 120 

002 LARRY’S BOTTl£ E PMwiy 9 12 0 - 

320 MSSTet BUTLER MttfEPurcaS 7 120 

DM OMMUMBOMOROUMJPH any6120 

0Pf> POLL TOPPER RJCc^er 912 0 - 

OOO UNCLE scoee Jojvj Crovrfey 8 T2 0 
WEST WICKLOW FOMies 9 120 - 

■ > iam I UE D UiAao B 


B Sheridan 

J Shoot 

Mr P Larkin (31 

A Powell 

,„D0 Wad (7) 
... K F O Bnen 
N Madden 


Mr P A Deegan (71 
TGMcCOurt 

R ODonovan 

PLflOCfl 


BMWtLUW r - Ita W nr- 

WHATEVER WtL BE PMiAnsB 120 

4US WILD ARGOSY C J Power 7120 

SU p3S^MPUNZELWTBourte711 H 


. CO'DwW 
_.. A Muffins 
PGiH 


j 39U — 

Son ctmaL 3-1 lanv'a Bottle, 5-1 Wd* Wae. 8-1 ArocoyB-1 MdianShoL 
10-1 MirttaBotJar. 12-1 Omnium BononJum, Whatowr Win Be. 1&-1 others. 

ZJ30 HILLCREST HURDLE (£1.173: 2m 2f) (10) 


1 

2 

3 

4 
9 
6 

7 

8 
9 

10 


JS 

M3 DROMOLAND LAD J E MuU»m 7120 . 

on SSSfls SffS pwton fiTf'.IL..- 


T Morgan 

APowrtt 

TCarmody 

N Madden 

Mr R jPanonf?) 


6 004 DUDS P MuBns 8 10 2 — R ° D ^g" 

7 204 SHANRCffl A Moore 9 102 u"nr 

B P-0 MOTOR ON M Brew 8 9 11 Mr □ T Cpnroym 

g 214 WINNING NORA M Hpungan 7 9 0 K “J"? 

10 1PF NATURE TRAM. B P OSlSnwn 10 9 -■■■■ 

11 P03 RANDOM SELECT W Rodk 8 9 7 * B 

12 2*F THATS SHOW EUZ J R Ccw 8 9 7 -.^. J p 

13 0P1 THE BAR RULES M Cunningham 9 97 P leech 

5-2 Klfcflowen. 7-2 Dark hiy. 5-1 Greasepaint 6-1 Shanrodi. 8-1 Winning Nora. 10-1 The 
Bar Rules. 12-1 Chow Man. Larry s Latest. T4-T cun ere. 

4^0 FIR MOUNT HANDICAP HURDLE (£1,242; 2m 6f) (17) 

1 102 GALMOY J E Mutaem T 119 ..... ... 

2 102 BANKERS BENEFIT J ftewter 6112 

3 243 ALKEPA J P Cavanagri 6 1 01 1 — Mart KFon)iS! 

4 000 THE CHANCEY MA»TT CartJerry 810 7 .. . K FOB'en 

5 011 STOTTS BROTHER D H Ctyda , 8 103 

6 004 CATSROCK F M O Br«n 7 k 12 - A 

7 403 COOOIE HILL John Cw*ey 7 9 11 

8 214 SAILING BIRO fMO BnenB 9 8 fnXSSX Ti 

q on AULD JAKE R J Co aer 6 9 7 P F O IMN 

10 400 BRACXA PIGEON L Woods S 97...— - K B Wafen ttt 

11 " 240 UTTLE CWPPINGSA KfcTOhy 7 9 7 . -COD MR 

12 33U PRINCESS RAPUNZEL W T BoufXe 7 9 7 - J W Cu(terl(3) 

13 414 REGULAR TIME S A Kir* S 9 7 .... .. <3 McaiJJ^WY 

?4 004 REVEREND RASHCTS Mrs P DugMn 99 7 n " P 

15 023 S8.VER BULLET JGeoghegan 10 9 7 D P Fagan i3| 

16 0M SOMERSET ROSE 0 McBrainey 7 9 7 — — — 

17 01/3 THE TOTM P A McCartan 9 9 7 — — 

• tt-4 Bankers Benefit 4.1 Galmov. S-i SUM'S Brother. 7-1 Akepa. 8-1 Begdar Time. 
CodGe Hit. 10-1 Sailing Bird. 14-1 oshers. 

5.0 K1LG0SBIN OPPORTUNITY USD HANDICAP CHASE (£1 .31 1: 
3 m) (11) 

1 1U4 HOW ART HIGHWAY A McLaughUn 10 1 1 4 K B Walsh (4) 

2 F41 EAOESTOWN D Day 7113- JWCuHen 

3 200 AMBER WINE I R Ferguson 9 11 2... b — ■ 

4 003 RNANCUU. CRISIS MCunrinrtiam 7 110 -NBvme 

5 323 DAWN EVEN M Gweson 7 109 ....... 

6 OOF ANOVGR HONOUR P E McCreen/ 7 ID 3 PMeCarmX* 

7 F04 QUEEN'S SERVANT P Rooney 710 7 ■ — 

Q 0 PAPADRiM J R Co* 9 10 1 .. G McC.vem 

9 002 DIXAN C Klflfl 109 12— RAF T?fl! 1 f; 3 

10 R/2 LADY MEARCANE T OKOdl 6 9 12, --J0 N«8 

11 3B& BURMAH ROAD A McLougfMi 10 9 8 JCBarKer(4» 

5-2 Dawn Even. 4- 1 Lady Meartane. 9-2 Howart Highway. 6-1 EadeStOWh. 7-1 Dwan. 10- 
1 Fin snort Crisis. 12-1 were. 

5.30 ROCKBROOK FLAT RACE (Colts and geldings: £966: 2m) 

05) 


TUDOR &LAWJW m ^ " 

HANSARD P Hughes 4 iD 11 f 

3-1 Dremotand Lad. 4-1 Another SufraeL 11-2 Wore. 6-1 Tuoor Season. 8-1 Baltycmm. 

4.0 FOXROCK CUP EXTENDED HANDICAP CHASE (£2.070: 2m 
4f)(13) 

.1 232 KMJOLOWEN J Dreaper 10 12 0 - — K Mdrgan 

.-.2 3P1 GREASEPAINT OKWeta 11 114 TCarmody 

3 . 430 DARK IVY J R FOx 10 10 10 Short 

4 ■ 04P LARRY'S LATEST Miss A Cohen 910 9 — M Cummins 

3 «)P CHOW MEIN DT Hughes 9 104 ..._ TMorean 


1 

2 

3 

4 

5 

6 

7 

8 

9 

10 
11 
12 

13 

14 

15 


0 BALLYBRICKEN BOY R OOOnan 6 11 12 ..... 

BLACKLAKE BEAUTY 0T Hughes 5 11 12 
0 DAMIENS FELLOW E J Keania 5 11 13 — - 
BOB HAMILTON JAMES P*M«W 5 11 12 
403 (OSSANE P MuJLns 5 11 12 .............. - - 

33 NEW GOLD DREAM W Rock 511 12.. 

0 ROBHAR IB) R J WMttonl 5 tl 12 • — - 

004 SHARP JEWEL W Patton 5 11 12 - 

000 S1MBUT HILL P Rocroy 5 11 12 
4 SLYGMFF T Birgn & H i? .. 


Mr A J Martin 

.. Mr JRBanananfT) 
_ Mr 0 M O Bnen (31 

MrTMulImfl) 

Mr WP Mullins 

.... Mr M McNulty |£>) 
.. Mr R J wnthorcj (T) 

Mr D H 0 Connor (3) 
.... to-PJ Rooney (7) 
Mr T J Beggar* 


M2 THE WEST AW«E A Moore 5 H *2 

0 CRASH B3RT 8 Malone 4 11 4 .. . Mr J P Demosev U' 

0 DROWSY RuEv wa«n 4 114 - Mr T M Waisn 

GENERALS SOY F Flood 4 tl 4 Mr JABerry 

MON LEA 0 Mlppny < 11 4 .. — 

9-4 Kiseane. 3-1 The Wes A*ake. 9-2 Orowsy. New Gob Dream. 8-1 Slyguti. i0-i 
Sharp Jewel. 14-1 others. 


Cecil’s plea 
on behalf 
of Cauthen 

Sieve Cauthen. the champion 
jockey, will return to Britain 
within the next few days after 
spending three weeks of the 
winter being treated for an 
alleged alcohol problem at a 
Cincinnati clinic. And Henry 
Cecil, the champion trainer by 
whom Cauthen in retained, has 
appealed for the young Ameri- 
can to be allowed to get on with 
his riding career. 

“We are looking forward to 
seeing him back. He will not be 
available for comment and I 
would be most grateful if I was 
contacted regarding anything to 
do with him so that Steve can 
settle down.” Cecil said. 

Cecil believes that too much 
was made of Cauthen's vol- 
untary admission to the clinic. 
“He sought medical advice 
cause of problems with weight 
and liquid retention, and ! feel 
that doctors advised him to give 
up drink as part of his very strict 
diet. 

“A lot of people suggested he 
turned to drink because of the 
pain of a broken romance, but 
that's rubbish. His problem was 
that he was drinking as much as 
anybody else does, but he was 
doing so without eating. 

“I've spoken to him recently 
and he"s very well and fit He’s 
been playing a lot of tennis. - 

Cauthen. who was champion 
jockey for the second successi ve 
season last year with 195 win- 
ners. the highest total since 
1952. is returning to Britain for 
Ihe start of the Flat in 12 days' 
time. His first big ride is 
expected to be on Christian 
Schud in the Lincoln Handicap 



No chance of 
quick return 

Alihough milder weather isj 
forecast for later in the week, 
there is no chance of racing| 
making an immediate return. 
Todays cards at Leicester and 
Windsor were called off on 
Saturday and tomorrow's three 
meeungs at Folkestone. 
Sedgefleld and Warwick were all 
abandoned yesterday. 

Wednesday's racing is at 
Catterick and Bangor with 
Wincamon and Straiford-on- 
Avon the venues for Thursday 
Meanwhile prospects are 
much brighter in Ireland wuh 
Tipperary (rearranged from Iasi 
Thursday) tomorrow, Clonmel 
on Wednesday and Wexford on 
Thursday the scheduled meet- 
ings. 

• Vincent O'Brien's Taw Gal- 
lery has been laid to lose £64.000 
with Corals for the 2.U00 Guin- 
eas and is now &-l favourite 
from 1 2-1. 


CROSS-COUNTR 

Neuchatel 
perfect 
setting for 
English 

By Pat Butcher 
Athletics Correspondent 

Tim Hutchings, ihe runaway 
winner of the national cross- 
country championship at New- 
castle on Saturday, and Dave 
Lewis will spearhead an En- 
gland team capable of wresting 
the world title back from the 
Ethiopians in the Swiss town of 
Neuchatel on March 23. 

There is some doubt about 
Mike McLeod, who finished 
fourth in the national 
championship. McLeod initially 
said he would not run in 
Neuchatel, buL as early as 
Saturday evening he was consid- 
ering ii." say ing he would like to 
find out what the Swiss course 
was like before giving a final 

answer. 

if McLeod docs run. not only 
will that greatly enhance 
England's chances of success, it 
will also mean that four winners 
of the English National in the 
last seven' years will be in the 
team. Dave" Clarke. N82 winner 
(and second four limes in the 
last six years), and Eamonn 
Martin, the 1984 winner, fol- 
lowed Hutchings home to the 
silver and bronze medals on 
Saturday, in front of McLeod, 
the 1979 winner. 

They ail gained automatic 
selection to the world 
championship team, as did 
Tony Milovsorov in fifth place, 
his best ever, and Steve Binns in 
sixth. Lewis chose to miss the 
race, but his victories at Gates- 
head and Alexandra Palace were 
always going, to make him a 
certainty for one of the other 
three optional places and with 
no other quality runners absent, 
the scleciers chose Andy Wilton 
and Bob Treadwell, seventh and 
eighth in Newcastle, to make up 
the nine for Neuchatel. 

Reports from Switzerland in- 
dicate that the Ethiopians have 
more to fear from the course 
than McLeod. There is no great 
tradition for cross-country in 
Switzerland, as elsewhere on the 
Continent: buL unlike their 
neighbours, the Swiss have not 
chosen a hippodrome or similar 
flat course, which has lately 
been the norm for these 
championships. They haie 
opted for a hilly, potentially 
muddy and nigged course: 
much "beloved of British cross- 
country specialists. 

England last won the world 
team title in Pans in 1980. but 
the altitude-trained Ethiopians. . 
who entered the following year 
in Madrid, have won every lime 
since then. However, their ini- 
tial domination has faded in the 
last two years to close victories, 
albeit over the Kenyans, who 
benefit similarly from being 
born and nurtured at altitude, 
which is such a help to long- 
distance runners. 

In contrast. England's for- 
tunes have declined in the last 
five years through a- mixture of • 
absence: injuries and selection 
blunders. The eighth place in 
Lisbon last year was the worst 
e\er for the country which 
invented and then dominated 
the sport throughout the pre- 
vious century. 

McLeod, an infrequent front- 
runner. surprised everyone by 
doing just that right from the 
start on the snowy Newcastle 
Town Moor on Saturday. His 
initiative split up the 3.000- 
strong field earlier than ex- 
pected but when Hutchings got 
into contention in the second 
mile of nine, his breakaway at 
the end of the first lap became 
more and more distant, such 
that he was over 30 seconds 
ahead of Clarke by ihe finish. 

Chris Sweeney wen the junior 
title in the absence of Paul 
Taylor, last year's winner, but 
Darren Mead retained his 
youths' title so convincingly 
that he was chosen for England's 
junior team for Lhe world 
championships. Teny Thorn- 
ton. the South African junior 
champion, who was bom in 
Britain, arrived in England too 
laic to be an official entranu The 
rules no longer permit guest 
runners, but his two victories in 
the Iasi fortnight persuaded the 
England seleciers to pick him as 
o ne of the reserves 

BOBSLEIGHING 

Scharer 
bows out 
in style 

From Chris Moore 
Kooigssee 

Erich Scharer yesterday 
brought to an end the most 
successful career in bobsleighing 
by capturing his fifth world title 
iti his final race before retiring. 
The 39-> ear-old Swiss cruised to 
victory "in the world four-man 
championship here, finishing 
0.49sec ahead of Peter ICienast 
(Austria), with the other Sw>iss 
driver. Ralph Pichler. pipping 
Wolfgang Hoppe, of East Ger- 
many. for the bronze by 100th of 
a second. 

It proved the most fitting of 
finales for Scharer. who bows 
out with a record toral of 54 
medals in major championships 
from a career spanning 1 8 years. 
He had been 0.03 sec down on 
Kicnatf after Saturday's laui on 
which lhe Austrian brokethe 
track record by 0.95sec in setting 
the championship best time of 
48.77sec. 

But Scharer's new of Kurt 
Meier. Erwin Fassbind and 
Andre fOser docked a record 
stan time of 5-OSsec on the 
second leuf 

When he extended it to 
CUSscc on yesterday's third font. 
it was ail over. Nick Phipps, of 
Britain, could not improve on 
his overnight position and re- 
mained in tenth place without 
having hit quite the peaks he 
had hoped for in the Sw iss sled 
borrowed from Ekkehard 
Fasscr. Britain's other driver. 
Tom De La Hunty, finished 
seumiivnih. 

More sport, page 28 






oi W1V 1 


TENNIS 


Jordan manages a 
victory over 
Navratilova at last 


Oakland (Reuter} - The un- 
heeded Kathy Jordan, sent 
Manma Navratilov a. the world 
No 1. 10 her first defeat since the 
US Open last September to 
reach the final of the SI 50.000 
Virginia Slims Classic on Sat- 
urday. 

Jordan's 5-7. 6-3. 7-6 victory 
took 2hr 16 min and was the 
first time in 13 meetings she had 
beaten Navratilova. 

Lloyd, the second seed, strug- 
gled before overcoming Helena 
Sukovxt of Czechoslovakia. 7-5. 
6-4 in a match lasting Ihr 
45min. 

After her match with 
Navratilova. Jordan said: "I feel 
pretty good. ! feel unbelievable. 
It is hard to describe." Jordan, 
who earlier in the tournament 
had knocked out Hana 
Mandlikova. of Czechoslovakia, 
the third seed, admitted to betnc 
a liulc apprehensive going into 
the match. 

"I was nervous, but not real 
bad because I had everything to 


gain and I had to look on it as an 
opportunity to beat the 
number one player in the world. 
I came to (he realization that 
what was the worst that could 
happen? I could lose, but it is no 
disgrace to lose to somebody 
like Martina." 

Jordan and Lloyd were due to 
meet in the final yesterday. 

RESULTS: Semf-flnateC Lloyd (US) Dt H 
Suhova iCz) 7-5. 6-1. fk Jordan (US) (X M 
Mavra wova (US) 5-7. 64. 7-6; M Washer 
(Netn) ot C Reynolds (US) 6-3.64; L 
McNeill (US) bf B Herr fUSI 6-3.6- 7 


Doubles: Semi-finals: S Gadusek (USJ 


and H Sukova (Cz) bt T Burgm (US) and I 
Fjirbank (SA) 6-0. 6-1. 


• OKLAHOMA CITY (AP) - 
Marcella Mcskcr. of the 
Nethcrlands.the fifth seed, de- 
feated Cand.v Reynolds. 6-3. 6-4. 
in the scm-finals of a Virginia 
Slims tournament on Saturday. 
Lori McNeilL of the United 
States, beat her compatriot Beth 
Herr 60.6-7. 


RESULTS: S e f ni-flna U. M Mesher I Neds 
M C Reynolds (US) 6-3. 64; L McNeri (US) 
bf B Herr (US) 6-3. 7-6. 


SKIING 



Liisa Savijarvi. of Canada, speeding to her first World Cup 
win in the super-giant slalom 


Savijarvi’s Petrovic 
first out on 


Cup win his own 


Furano (API - Canada's Liisa 
Savijarvi of Canada claimed her 
first World Cup victory %es- 
terdjv when she won ‘the 
women’s super-giant slalnm in 
this northern Japanese ski re- 
sort. Savijarvi. who started 
34th. covered the I .S.’W-metre 
Furano course with 37 gates and 
a drop of 445 metres in a lime of 
one minute 20.43 seconds. 

Sicglinde Winkler, of Austria, 
came in second in 1:21.04. 
.About 23.500 spectators 
watched the competition, in 
central Hokkaido. Japan's 
northernmost main island. Pam 
Ann Fletcher, of the United 
States, who started 42nd. fin- 
ished a surprising third, in 
1:21.04. only 0.05 seconds be- 
hind Winkler. 

After the competition. 
Savijarvi said. "The hill was in 
good shape. I’ve been training 
very hard, aiming at winning 
today's race I was a later starter 
and the track was fast but it was 
good for me." 

Fletcher said. "1 just could not 
believe it. It was my best time in 
my career. The snow- condition 
was fast and rough for the later 
starters but l skied well. I'm so 
happy.” 


Ceilo. Norway (API - Gun- 
ther Mader. of Austria, pro- 
duced a surprise by winning a 
■World Cup slalom here ves- 
terday. while Rok Petrovic of 
Yugoslavia, clinched the 
season's' slalom .'pile [when 'his 
only remaining rival. Ingem’ar 
Stcnmarfc. fell in the first run. 


Mader recorded the fastest 
times in both runs down the 
Gcilo track and beat Paul 
Frommelt of Liechtenstein, by 
0.8 1 sec. a large margin in sla- 
lom. Hiswinningtime was Imin 
40.66sec over his two runs. 


It was the first World Cup 
victory for Mader. who had won 
a combined event in last 
weekend's meeting at Are. 
Sweden. Frommelt had runs of 
44.JJ Jsec and 5l.64sec for a 
combined lime of Imin 
41 .47scc. He w as only sixth after 
the morning run. 


SUPER-CUANT SLALOM: 1. L Saviiarv, 
(Cam limn 2t).^3sec Z S Wmnler (Aus- 


Fetrovic. who finished third, 
went into yesterday's race with 
four wins and 120 points and 
had already secured at least a 
share in the slalom title. 
Stcnmark. who had 45 points, 
could have tied with Petrovic 
had he won the last three 
slaloms of the season. 


trial 2 21 04.3_ PA Fletcher (U5)l'2t 09: 
4. D Haight (Can) 1 -21.35. 5. 0 Chan/atova 
tCzi 1:21.40. 6. M Kiehl(WG| 1 21.69: 7. S 


Wot) (Austria) 1.21.81: 8. M Figm (Swnr) 
l 21.87: 9 E Hess (Swnz) 1.21 99. 10. M 


Marzola ill) 1:2200. 11. M Gerg IWG) 
2.16:13. H 


i 22.12: 12. K DetHer (WGl 1 22. 

Wiesler (WG) 1.2219. 14. a Wachter 
(Austral 12229; 15. E (Ausmal 122.34. 
OVERALL: 1. K»M SOpis. 2. Marzola 47-. 
3. Savoarvi 41: 4. T Haecher (WGl 40; 5. A- 
5. A-F Rey (Fr) 30. 

WORLD CUP: i. M Watkser (Switz) 
231 PK. 2. e Hess (Switzl 21 7; 3. M Figmi 
(Swflzi 1 77. 4. v SctmenJer 170; 5. Q Oertli 
(Switz) 160. 6. M Kiehl (WGl 134: 7. M 
Gerg )WG> 132: 8. 0 Charvatowa iCz) 131; 
9. K Gutengohn (Austria) 129. 10. M Sver 
(fug) 125. 

• Mana Walliser. of Switzer- 
land. won Saturday's downhill 
race to consolidate her position 
at the top of ihe overall World 
Cup standings, finishing in 
I mm I9.62sec. Brigitte Qcnh of 
Switzerland was second 0.19scc 
behind her. 

DOWNHILL: 1. M Wartsar fSvwtzl f 19.92; 
2. B Oerdi (Switz) 120.11. 3. L Graham 


Stcnmarii. with 83 World Cup 
wins in his career, an all-time 
record in slalom and giant 
slalom, straddled a gate about 
18 seconds into the first run and 
was disqualified. 









THE TIMES MONDAY MARCH 3 1986 


it was a black day for Sweden, 
who have one of the world's 
Icadingslalom teams. Jonas 
Nilsson, the world slalom cham- 
pion. missed a gate in the second 
run and was also disqualified. 
He was fourth after the opening 


RESULTS: 1. G Mader (Austral, imin 
40 66 mc. 2. P Frommeh (Leich). 1:41.47; 
3. R Petrove (Yugi. 1.4J 55; 4. P 
Zurtxiggwi (Swnz). 1;«1.80: 5. D Bouvet j 
«Frj. 1 41 98; 6. R Promotion «». 1:42.02. 
7. j Wanner [Smj. t 42.27; equal 8. J 
Sundcjvtst (Swe) and D KoMotctxer (Aus- 
tria). 1.43 41: 10. R Z crier (Austria). 
V4265. 11. 0 Totsdi (R). t;4273; 12 M 
Juten (Switzl. 1:42.96. 12 M Barthold 


(Ausmal. 1.43.43: 14. F-C Jaqoe 

'1.1.426a 


(NorV.1-.43 49. 15. OMouget (Fr). 


JCan) ^ 20.32 4. L Savijarvi l_Can) 1.2037; 


Gutensotm (Austnaj 1-20.48; 6. M 
Figini (Switz) 1 -20.74: 7. P A Fletcher (US) 
1 5t Tl.B.OCharvatovBiCzn 2126:9.H 
Wiesler (WG) 1 21 28 10. F Percy (Can) 
121.44: 11. S Winkler (Austria I 1-21.77; 
)2 H Flanders (USl 1 21.84: 13. H Zefer 
(Switzl 1-21 90. 14. V WaUinger (Austria i 
1 22 14. 15. K Snmvrte (Caul 1:28.21 
OVERALL: 1 equal. Gutensohn ard 
WaNise* >0500. 3. Graham 100: 4. OenS 
82 5. Fagmi 53. 


WORLD CUM. M Guar dels (Lux) 
279pts2. P Zurtwggen (Switz). 218; 3. P 
Mueflet (Swtai. 199. 4. M Wasmawi (WG). 
105 5. I swmmar* fs«e>. 162. 6. R 
Petrovic (Vug). 160: 7. L Srocfc (Ausmal. 
158. 8. P Wimsbarger (Austria). 143; 9. H 
Strati (Austria I, 142; 10. G Mader (Aus- 
tria i 123. 

OVERALL: 1. R Patronc. 120pts. 2 i 
Slermwric. 95. 3. P Frommeh (LiechL 91: 


equal 4. j Nilsson (Swei and B Kroaj 
( Cogj. 87: 6. D Bouvet. 72: 7. G Mader. 66 


LACROSSE 


Boost for the Welsh 


By Peter Tatlow 


After three weeks without 
match practice ihe women’s 
home international lacrosse sea- 
son began unimpeded at the 
weekend with England beating 
England Resen.es 7-1 on arti- 
ficial turf at Crystal Palace and 
Scotland defeating Wales 6-3 on 
grass at Cardiff. 

Wales did not start favourites 
but they were well satisfied with 
their performance against a 
Strong Scottish side. The Welsh 
captain. Vivien Jones. said: "We 
transformed a 13-0 defeat 
againsi Scotland last year to 6-3 
this season. This is a great 
confidence booster lo us. as we 
prepare for the World Cup in 
Philadelphia this June." 

Scotland’s defence settled 
down to ns work early on in a 
game in which good goal keeping 
by Annie Hooper (Scotland) and 
Nicola Amcry (Wales) played an 
important part. 

Defence was rcailv the kev to 
this game as Scotland made 


many wild passes and Wales 
missed chances in front of the 
goal. 


SCORERS: Scotland L Fitzroy (2). H 
Dulgaon. S Me Clean. M Pobock. N Retd. 
Wales: P Gamons-Wittams. V Jones. M 
McKroohi 

The England * England Reserves march 
was test moving In a bitmg cold easi wcncL 
It was no surprise thaitfte Resenes never 


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SCORER&EngtafM: S GuKen (2). P Mitch- 
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Hall England Reserves: A Townsend ,2) F 
Crag. L Preston. 


OTHER MATCHES: Wales B 4. Scotland B 
it. Welsh Schoofgiris )2 Scottish School- 
gfrts 7. 


University game off 


The University women's 
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.Illl. IIM'liill’ —'ll . an, MllJII 
aim -fMikan pa -a -nil Infil III .n Illl 
■4'i.ill la'.iiu nl illl IN Iim Ipii'I -1 
ta'liil las ——llul . Ilia) llrpa'IHillKi 
•an .«• .anal ■'Mh-rit^h .• Mlr.i-a- 
"'Mali' III Sll/I Ihllir.iu u- 
Il'HII'' A t lllla- I'M JO 

1 1'nipa-i lii im. I.HHlmi totolJ 
HOI '.Nil Ina-IHhsa 

DALLAS DEALINGS! r>s lhn 
I '•■ini -Ilia aaiHiil. Ill llh- M.ak 
I.UI ■■lira. H III*— numi o.ill.r- 

rvl . lamiMll. \‘ At 

la. -a a \iNiiu\as ..ni a, all hr iii 
.all. .-I III tun ilMilla , ali'.iK .liar, 
■la Illl .|IH-I If., mi, -ul lia'tiK 
I ul- ■<■ l,+.| a—4 Mini n IRII'. H> am 

■'.rnrn-n iKa.ismi ■n.iifii “ 
IIU'iil iHtal -haMIILIIK) |1|MIII| 
as-Mull.il IV .Tat *slLl| . 
vaacor.- kU.M-.' In, Ol JTita 
I.'*.' Ilia toallk S4l|l|l 
BANKING OPPORTUNITY 

r % 4 t - ->.a — nihl Ilhi'H- -aim |—1 k- 

I •.Miii'ii t ill nu'i< Ii.iiiI luuk i- 
a'tl'*1 lll'l ■■■■ a ,|l l—N .1 In i>il ,1 ii|i 
llhllkat mi aa 111, uhad -kill- .lllil 
llh- Mlullli |fa iMabilllw rm- 
llalllk s I.H >■>■ I iUllhj ,a'f 1 
!■ I* IhTll A ail, as- a If lHa-fBM K 
-f- .--'ll ,1- —lip fll Ifll- \u>> 

.■4'- I .all KmI,' fll 405 ahi| | |iu 
ill'll- .li.ali- n'lni.l'-'- 

k'lni-l mat lira - I'l'll- 

NEGOTlATCHtS SECRET ART. 

.'Nl .alala- In ,1 pa' Ulllik,, 
'O* - — .f.lli > aal.il.>' Iianiaa, -laula- am 
.■■•il- .I.n .iinI ki-a.|.f,ai,ii mn.|i 
Illl' luasMIlf- Illl riHsa- I'll' 

\ allalMf Ih aMfl.ll' i, - to h'l .11#' IHirl 
•', .1 at. II kiNi.a II to i-i I IN, iaa.ua 

• III fiaMa uran ■! IBM mill IN I -.an 
■•alia .a ua-Nl f'lruMuiH lll.llliia I 
III h'lii llla-aai ?— I Laa \ at .■(■» I - 
,h fh 111- fa |f, MM MU Cm 

la a, ■•! \llpl- i afl Ol 4W HOTO 
HO SHORTHAND cU.SOO lhr-r. 

.in ■ \* •■|*|h.i innih |i. m i 

min Iiw 1*«|.<I |ii nfashdDi mf> s*-# 
*'■*•»■» I' 1 hm SlIlfllMl* *«i .1 

I^IU*' « ••IM.IIIH lK-11 —19 II I I |Mp 
m-* Ifirej I ••■liia.tni \ 

• i rn ii-isf .iU]ii,LHh »-. i it t- rtidi 

••iimiiNnia IIm'M h«i>i 

•f.ii I ,mi iri.»l* .aiulfii Ixiiiim 

'* win' 1 1 .iiimni n vi n|i 
top la h pinna, I -a. .Ill,, kuiff 
k|a,-l- <■: J'M Ht-Tr. 

PARTNER'S SECRETARY 

C.1Q.SQ0 \ rn.sli.nnil- P\ ih/ 

-iiii'ii I...'.' is ia mill ,| i.,|. 


Courses Coathtaed from pay* 29 


Army sponsorship 
for undergraduates. 



Applications for the September 1986 intake 
close on April 30th 1986. 

The Army runs two forms of sponsorship 
for first degree students at university 
polytechnic or college of higher education. 

. The schemes are called Cadetship and 
Bursaries. Successful applicants for a 
Cadetship get a probationary commission and 
their tuition, plus atleast£5,059pa- ABursary 
amounts to £900 a yean is tax free and 
additional to any education authority grant. 

Write to Major John Floyd, Army Officer 
Entry; Department 6F03, Empress State 
Building, Lillie Road, Londoa SW6 LTR. 

TeU hira your date of birth, school and 
academic qualifications and we will clarify and 
expand on what we have to offer 


Brochure: 

St Joseph's HaU. 
Junction Road. 
Oxford 0X4 2UJ. 
Tel 0865 71 1629 


I # 1 


ST JOSEPH'S HALL, OXFORD 
ftacagnteed by BAC 


Spend Summer in Stratford-upon-Avon 

MUSIC IN THE AGE 
OF ELEGANCE 

Summer School 


The Shakespeare Centre 

August IS - 23, 1986 


Descriptive Brochure available (5AE 
please) from Stratford Tours, 8 John Street 
Stratford-upon-Avon CV37 6BU 


CHIROPODY AS A PROFESSION 


Tf*r cMiufx: ic irv DAneo man <v nomn mrcmsooi <n me naMr sec k* 
Ucsi tn [tie wim; avce-.sdrrH.' (BiWv to* * OOtonu ancniroc&d, 
n-ti If liken ji nv «fv soeuinea, corretpoiajRice lessons >0‘ l ^*»et: 
rv 'tfi BfocUol hoNNNQ v.jo me mt/eo it, v^ve lor itee cooMe, ’ion. 


The Sacntaiy of the School of Ohu p odr . 

THE SNAE WSTITUTE lesnWiMMd 1919) 

Ih* New >M (DepMnenl Tn) 
aM Rood. RUkdenlnM. BwhRMe SU3 «LA 
Tef HKMnbead (0029) 2 m 00 |»M)ml (09281 JW 


nrrio\ 


ENGLISH FOR Call a hdl -llula III- 
Iikli4iilii.il linlu*n K| iKkalflHtJ 
I* .11 Ini i « .|hir*,diIi l.il*- IH 

HI '+•■‘1 f “.71 *■! «»l ur|? 
MATHEMATICS A m (-firti.111 
I'rn^li' ImliaiK Vm li%«l A 

-tJl.ilnrl'1 lrf im.ni nirfllM iii.oti 
• i.iii r*l 7s? 


PRF.P & PI BI.JC 
sniooi.s 


COLLEGE LEAVER SECS tjprn 

mil- III Jit IIH* ba— « | ia -IH- C ill ,'||| 
(^l, ill II Hill ,'.111. I IO I lltH -a, . 
)Sk Ta»Of> 


WOMI'.N 
HU h 1U* 
HI M^l-ss 


A lull Unil. 12 toatok IHill ll*. 

Illf-llll.il a Cl to* L?5 pH 
Paint: 'Ll (: Iim. h-t' Lumpiil 

uuj Aiimuii.uHt . I .in 

Mail- lath \p,,i 1 on\ 
s.11,1 lUei - 1 ki\ H-N. Rif hitimul 
Ail nil Cjiiimv. riiirtiii I'M. 
Ttoirl-a'lllMill rv, 1 JL r 
TLL Ol HO) 5707 


ADMIH PA SEC 31-i.h ia ill 
lluflja liaalkina, alll'l lUaipiailirv 
liana lastsa-- in I.WNH-a IU nil-li 

uii'ii- shi in roii-iiin.iiMi. 

iii> mi miia-ni » Hh ■ iir.il- a, HI 
■h mi .Il ailiiiin. Airui.il.' -h.al 
liana!, -ipi- ,|iHlio J 1 diluuu. on . 
to I* anal I'lira-Lili , i.H TOO ILL 

& ..rfk- Iml- IrjUto*' llroa-flls . 

toasaaa < an II.-.- Ol" 

OOIO aR.n l'nii-i • ' 

SENIOR ADMIN tCC iP5-h.li 

i.llll aiiHNI -iNnllltUlil Upniq 

S' 11 ill Iklll'lain-Hlll 

-a,|H- -(Ulavt ,l^|intla..|a||lto v.,ll> 

Ml I eainai | M l mu I- ah hwh 

l\ -urirWiii n|\ r« rk-i -nil-,1 

I •■— P',11— |fHll|| I.N w^lH' Mall 
to iiinii Ilii- Pni-miiH'l tUnuil 
■“••lal Ti.nt-i in 1 'nIiiIhIiiiiis. 
■■malm in ■ CIO 050 p.i 
• Inina' UMiaalll- fliN- paikllHk 
■"!••• Iannis- oi 
HH07 OniO-Ha* f-aait-a 
TO THE RCSCUC Are \ni> .i fieri 
.'itoiln— i'l dainmipJi.ilnr rf nd 
“frUU ' Vpalr hm. .1 .tine.. 
••“Ill Ih-l-nauilll. . ahililt In llnilk 
.ilii'.vl .Hut n i irk ii in im ini'— urr 
al linn- -t. ill In- lillihll anoia-i 
.•!•', !■»' this a, i'll klKn. ii a lui K\ 

•• ilia ■ iitirnitnai nun e* 1- \i ,-i 
LUtoiiH-f-r inn Kill luikf- Pm- m 

■am .anil .iiiiiHinim .in.iiiieuu 
llalHl I.IIMIHl »M Jit ,!■•—. Kill. ,1 
in.ll.al Ihl, I la-<lii<n -Inn. jiu| . 

- I' li, imiriiiinienl- MHHnma.il -I 
.llh, fnitlHlf iil ail,il m.h h~ Uaaufl 
-kHK *<>* &s -O'- .hM 7 
«niiiii to, n.|> Ijt.son s 

annto ININ pii-.i-,- ,,J| 437 
JIM7 MSI IIIHaMCMH-. Oef (nth 

BANQUETING SECRETARY 

I.UOOO IHMi mm Ihl- tan PII-, 
iiuiaaai— hmm ,i> fsiHai. ia 

Ilia'll Hiiiiaith'linu man. »•', Van/ 

-Ihaiit.l Iv • ffl' Mll.ll IU 
I" ■—■.Hal'-, 1 ,1— 1 nil toil! IN' 
-ll'.la llh| . II, Mils ailMIIKl l,H' hn 
II 1 ' -HIP f*\l*I,lla, lll'l ihr- main 
l.h llllh*- all .nLIIiI,- l -UlllKf-i' 
kaani null I'M r.'-iK'iiih'iua' auri 

• llhal ., lull PA , uln <*0 £S 
Skill- iirMMhM, PlratM' H-h-iHmiH' 

, I.B| OJO .WOI fl.Hi 1 ni Of .->10 
• I'll ‘5)1 I li.'/rth Hum Hi' 

. •imlmriil Iaip-hNmiK >* 

; 1*' Wail ffa, 1 aaiiiii.-nl 409 
»*«« ’ 


INSTITUTE FRAWCAIS 


Ob-di fvn'" G>to'lMV4 

F Sla/M- j:aa,M'i 

p «dllvC fia?nc*I l.'x Ulrs Haijh 
•IhiaM. COIPM.' 


. A-0 Li- vLt r G-E-n i 
courts i\ raf-r.'M 


iFL 


MCnwa wtBPbct ls**» SW7 Ufi 
let St Of 62il in *2 
tt-SSl 2701 tit 21 


Gf'RM \.\ l\ IflVSIVF 
COIKSK 


RimriiIm (iHlaif*- | ITUrifNI 

UlMHItlH'l-. (J ,111.1.% Lltol't 

1 5 Atllil tjo 
‘ Al , run IlhHf ,1(1011 .il.llLllllo 


\nthi- \ss,riaa Sehti 
4* (>KM-n VnHr’- (die 
I.OMJON MUII 9\l 
Ir): Ul-723 OlhU 


THE QUEEN-5 Nat Ml fart 

l"H»- ?? .nj <Jn.ma.lB.nl \ 1‘La.r 
I ••lulu, 1 sto 7 .'IS I 'li-.n— • null- 

la, Ihfa'lalhllli laa* IHaa-pan III- Ilf 

HM) a ■! a.'l ■)““ HL‘l 


DUFF HILLER COLLEGE 
ASSISTED PLACES 
*0’ LEVEL COURSES 


,ui 


lllla'l Hfa'aa— a,Kl la"-l- 
■ Ufhlllilrrt III »l.ll,n SulaMilia 
flail Illl. Ufa Mil Ifh-IM.IIN a- lllla'l ail 
lair m ailtllhBllf, -IlHta-lil- (Jahliuf 
■Lila* 21M SLllI H. 1 ‘tHr, 

I h'l, llh. HiNU Ihr fhlllllflall 
I 111,1 Mllla-f SA LPIHM'll- LLUl' 

1 1 IK Hall SW7 MU IrL DI 
?T5 Ot.77 

Ma-mbrl iH € ill- 


WHICH SCHOOL? <>n, * 

Jlflll I— II I— .il-al ,4,M ,1. •' , *111*' 

,|ihl -Ml' la- I 1 uaia-an A 
Kill- Ihl ■• > • Ih' NuIIiihi flifl 

(ball, tol.a fal 01 7.a? i.<U 


FEl.l.OVS SHIPS 


WORKSOP COLLEGE Wn- (Mi- 
ls |H In MpLiiK aMhai|.ia-fil|i- 
f'lf ■ I fa .Mlllhtoli'l . WaukvH, f 11J 

fair' toiirk-m ihaaiis >c»Oaa 
47^J«H 


BONHAMS eiftL liifllJimf- | ■-'‘Till 

V Mhlf \lK I'lllilM' >*UllS a'Mll 
\ Ul ri \ppll J'llllfllkll «il ~jH-l 


SHORT INTENSIVE I % |k-% | IIIIHJ 
IIHirt IfllMl ItlllHHI Sllrail ■!.* 
w-|.i|!l1k ||| I life rial <*|rfe lli'llli 

J « lllll HUM- ri.U Uii«|lllrl'i 

llill '■ tpill? !■! Mlk IMllKllH 

i''| tv' u ; l <*n4 ritf I .uiqJimiii 
< run** Ik I Rung n-ii si. 

I 

LANCHAM Mni-f.iil.il f.'ll-H' 

lHIHllll.il f/lSIl.-a'I I’.nkl .all.' 
I fihiiHi toll .Ml Il'M-f ..in. 
■ N I*il*|'l|ia|H‘ HIT !■>** 

IM CL ^4 ,?a<-U 


l 


SCHOL\RSH!PS 


ASSISTED PLACES 


_ .in-Jinan ,iaa ruimr- r. ailla-l iim 
JO ItoMnl.KIwa- toaalfll Up 
If l.'?l«Or 1 Vh IMI rt‘- 1 1 a lU 

■mi, 2 \.'..a -A" ln.fl .wii'r- 
1 miiiln-iH mu ISIh a-aiUa-fiiun . 
I OH* 

a ^aiulut.ilm. «. rrtlinu In lir 11. 11 
Mab-I am MMinM upul\ Ito if 11, 
lkt.ua Ii ,11 rt»- Ptiiuiii.il 
I uu-l-naih- 1 iil'ia—, 7 to I'.ll 
fj-llr. I aUhlaail WH 51*. 
m 6H1 AStfT 
MrtnlHT Of fTlr 


THE BRITISH 
.ACADEMY 
•Tliiink-Oftcring 
’ iu Kriiuiu' 
Research Fellowships 
ApCtaMWm are Itimteci for 
Feiioasraps at posi-aodorai 
level )or speafic reseaicr- 
pfDgramrries mvesngarw-g a 
(Oi*c of an economic incus- 
uiat social, pouticai we, a' v 
or hisioncai character relat- 
ing io me Brnisn lyes 
Preference will &e onfen ua 
p,o»eas m itie moanni peri- 
od. Awards will be ud to a 
value ol £5.000 a year Ap- 
pointment will narma&v be ice 
one veer, bur m certain or- 
aims tances. app^canon lot 
renewal uo to two vearo may 
beconsae>ed Possession O 
a formal postgraduate quaWi- 
cabon is nor a requirement 
but me FeUowsftips are no! 
a>aHat»e io suDpori courses 
leading iq a profession or ac- 
ademic quaiit^aiion or 
oeoree Appucauons stion) 
be submitted on ihe p*e- 
scirtxd tofcn by 31 (Karen 
Snort imed canpKiares may 
be pruned Id attend (or inter- 
view m London (hereafter 
Further details and aoplrca- 
iion forms may be obtained 
from' 

The Secretarv 
The Bndsn Acaaemv 
20-21 Cornwall Terrace 
London NW) 4QP 
Tel Ot-487 5966 


IMYERSia 

APPOiMVrfAl.V. 


I N/VERSITY f)F 
NOTTINCiHAM 
Ki-vcurL'h 
Studentship 

llatfefto rff- rrv Uni 1^' 

IIm 1- Ill-H/.ITH r fMUa-h 

e L.ilra*|r HllHli'k<Nff(i (ifraWe y| 

CE» I |Hla|s||| nl VilllfrMlft.alu 


artf.^ 


I lir us* ,01 h nl 

iiwialllrfl If# iS'lt HI tt»T n 4| 

ruriMUi m III* JUrf&tiirfj 

i.H#il »n feiHii-t r«uip: 

illiPto m Hm- Vfefair* I rf%! lev 

•e.M.li loll »m«*iill.ilr 
Il4/.||d* -sn# il -tto. AVBlTlKlUlCfS. . 
IbH-hlPLIlRl 

nh*v qminidu^'i 


I iii< 4 * kito*. rinitif tn (fUMy., 
I«|iv _ »* 

» 1.* II . ..'ilMa-llX. J «m kUr s-to 

t\ i ■Aitaf If' rff)S»"Mklh' 


l Im -dtalv-itl mil Ir 

Ii.hK ilrifl ""•Ii Ua |ln. 

M-iJiR* I 4*1 


1 a.mUri.ilf- Uw. 

tol||#la IH ~dll|l *-h-irfiU4 ‘iuff |a#Jti 

I i f kraal nla a ||ift|. I» tki«rn«Aw| 

• H UiJDalfdil V f*l|i*toUi e| 

M.|| n*llM'll I P.a* si Hill |#,illk 
Vr'.'kll H1t|.k 
iiMj .a mil « of 1 #• •■mm *ii aN 


-H»*f Ir 


C Lifeiiri 


1 4»Ha** ##-| M 


iLilr 


"I \Ui* 


IMVFRSITY 
< DLLECiE OF 
SWANSEA 
Scniur Ki-vanh 
AssLstam 


’3- 


kl-|al>a alla'lh- ul ■" 


I'- 


ll. 


-a .1,1 la V'-I-Llill laa IWH riM, 

aa> A ia,l.aM4j,i* 1 niwhMaiwh 

•a, '•- Hl> ,1 In r aafl'lruin la) 

•••■ak- ."ill iKlMidfuVu 
|,',a-NiNi am fan fa .tiff laa uq 

.1.1.1' a, I HIU«.I. a, ItM'un 

■ f al- , III a ,"al a. Ill In- .,| 

La l<"*l li> liar IMlMIliiaaft a< 

\l"llia IlftaflM — .N-' I aHiai'.rf, | 

to 1. ata ,- kntrtia liuto altohi 

Ihl'* ■' .1 f "■» ••• ahaMl -haaNtol 

lha— llan'iaall- ih *Ha a- UB aailll 

Ih lll'l -tun. a lb. fill .li 
iWa'f «,,•*>. a a, ,aiti-«-li I'-U 

■al allMlj-al'a- hNHtlarn. "HI. 

.'I llaia.- . a- fl- Ihkllni 

|h— IUI.iJlll.lla' a-\|lr,hna»' 


!«•••. aPIKai", ,1» fll tofia, L. •• aft 

I,- I.', 111. ha I I'll f La'iH a la |D 

• *,l .1 - -all' |||l I,' ••I'll, 

> .aanaVna fl* 1 feh 1 ,«rtll'to 
,N,aal.l. 

I l.fllH-l PaMllI llkal - .anal j|ffc 

1 .ilia'll >'N •«< a a a, Hr-.' IMI Ito 

■ U.,1—1 "inu Ufa- Wl— a-h 1 

( 11,11 a t HI, at -If ■ ( afll«- a j 

«• ••■law., toiinii I'H ' i'jiI 

S'lVIaNN to %.• aaf *1 • ha 11 III, n 

■•HH • lilt-. Mtanib, llh I'tua IbV) 

M to, 1 to. I SII V> tfffU .■ 


CREME DE LA CREME 


PART-TIME TEMP. 

- PHILIPS 5020 - WC2 

£6^0 p.h. 


We are looking for a part-time temporary secretary to 
work for a servor executive of an international compa- 


ny. either every morning or afternoon. You shookl 
100/80,2 


have speeds o( 100/60, 2 years' Director level secre- 
tarial experience In central London, and be proficient 
onaPfiilfos S020 WP. This is a long-term booking with 
an immediate start. Please telephone: 


01-434 4512 

Crane Corkill 


Reauttnwit Consultants 


PRESS AHEAD 
IN PERSONNEL 

A unique opportunity to 
grow into and expand a 
personnel rote with a 
large publishing group in 
Ed4. Working with the 
new, absolutely charm- 
ing Group Personnel Ex- 
ecutive you win help her 
find her feet arid develop 


her job, eventually tak- 
1 of the ad- 


rng over many 
mm. duties yourself. 2 
years sound sec. exp. 
ess. + warm, outgoing 
personality, dipotomacy 
and discretion. IPM en- 
couraged. 0's. 80sh/ 
60tvp. Age 20-30. 
£9.000. Please caJi> 


437 4187/89 

HobctoneS 


VARIETY! 

Tried O wwiurg tn tte sane 
place damg the sane Hums 
Aar and day MiP Try 
Temper) 


We can oiler a rape selection 
oi realty mwesnng (emoorav 
•swmmerts m me West End 
m<J City to newte ue vol «ho 
taw meUem secretariat skiss 
,100 50 wpm). WP. AKbo or 
copy typing + about a yea, s 


otr« wpewrea 
Tenwo* Rmg ka-bi Snetman 
o, Cone Gray. 


LEGAL eZIO.OOO 


OPPONTUNTTY i 


l" ,' 


*. PR. PR. — . i 


•‘H I.ll ■■•nil 

• -UNI IHM 

l*'l* I l .DM iiiui'l llilult 

('■■lit ■■ I “.II k l D>l 7>-+yrj 

PA TO PARTNER £10.000 mmm 

Vbii.ill ftillhnr pi.4f'*Mii|| tl | 
mm -to s y»\ i„ -im,. p.miM-i 
IIW, qikalih l*4f Iim.I riHi ,if|. v 
!■■*« Inwr la a I* .irnl J'.m 

■ llarHi lilt .alia .*nr| |«— l.l»l|,uil 

iNh.frfVr 1 i-iU MtAlAU ,«t 

fn— Na-I.ia.ifel WHiliif 

• M* 111 ■ rfaaiil --I ill*- 


Wl PROPERTY CO 
PA TO MD 
TO £10,000 

Life far Ova busy Managing Dv- 
,«wr mvohws traveling, gwmg 
■eutures ana entenainng cfe 
ems m the oH<ce and many 
other ffenga mar w# keep ms 
PA mvoived end occupna It 
you have the conMance to 
h«d ihe ion and nm.it> kry to 
cope with travel cookings am 
ihe other Pa responsibktass 


and can type wetL it doesn 
matter ii me shorthand n rusty 
Lovrty Offices m Wl and usetj 
UHWW9 chscouna. Age 2B+. 


■tew -32S aas 


KNJGHTSBftJDGE 
c£13JIOO 


hnanauonal 
oaify see* io mow senor' 
-senewy wti hrrn but , 
inendly manner, good I 
Wady wrt, record amt a l 
petwee superb s.'h rypmgl 
and WP staXs lot hnance/ 
Manager Wvfey to fleienae 

wwkessentol German very 

ufetul Age 30 35 1 


MEDfA - ET2.000 


Superb opportunity with an internationally re- 
nowned publication for an intelligent energetic 
and articulate person. Working for a Senior Execu- 
tive you must be able to think on your feet, hanefle 
several jobs at once and be interested in pofitfos, 
arts and economics. Education at least to W lev- 
els. skills of 80 / 60 . good presentation and related 
expenence essential. Age 26-32. Please ring> 

434 4512 


Crone Corkill 

necnnuuwil Consultants 


a £ 


i j c -ii at fit . 


PROFESSIONAL 
PA/SECRETARY 
MUSIC ROUND 
THE WORLD 
70 E10.0B0 mg 

TaK* itw onportuniy m dswrop 
aM gro* witti a nnWv (vpamed 
Pf^MS and 7a* Controller pi xi 
writing and progressive compa- 
ny lha) amws frequently n im 
ww* As well as noma) PA 
“*£* '« you anil haw (he ehame 
Io becora mvofuet) m research- 
«J ihw feasiMity troreas and 
seeing mem io lruu)n Essential 
iml numeracy 80, 60 an) a 
wghr. pmresstxa anw Je Gav- 
iraw) 

ncb omas ei uentrai London 


PERSONNEL 
c£1 2,500 
For top Mayfair Property! 
company, enormous re- 
sponstoibty for staff 
recruitment wertare & so-' 
rial functions. Personnel 
expenence preferred. 80 
shorthand & excellent 
Late 20 s ea)y 
is. 




Call M Roberts 





OKMaSOOTto 

(wccorotT: 


3 9^H teo,T co ** s:1L ' ri irfaft 
STREET 
0I-3783SJ5 


DIRECTORS 

PA 

£10,808+ 


mort 

lidematnnaf Merchant Sant, 
ofler an attractive opening 
who the hgMy compeb- 
hve MOflD ol aoxismons. 
Team sum, vnthn this 
young c/iMd mH ensure an 
•wg an) siHniamg 
day Arranging senior level 
meetings and exiensnre 
tnos abroad, a fientue atfr- 
hxfe nl sound swrewal 
sWs are essential (100/55) 


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M 783 1555 


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dont mtss tins opportunity. 


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CHAIRMANS PA SEC 


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THE TIMES MONDAY MARCH 3 1986 




(( HORIZONS^ 


A guide to- 
career choice 


Better outlook for graduates 


u- 


,ate. this is the time of year that brings 
■toe climax *he annual safari conduct- 
;ed around the campuses by recruiting 
-employm on the look-out for this year’s 
V- intake. 

The Weak years of 1980 and 1981, 
..when graduate unemployment peaked 
? at 15 per cent of the total output, seem 
4 J form the distance. The annual survey of 
^graduate demand produced by the 
, Association of Graduate Careers Advi- 
sory Services (Agcas) and the Standing 
* Conference of Employers of Graduates 
^Scoeg) reveals that for the fourth year 
.in succession, employment prospects 
’ for graduates have improved, with an 
.estimated four per cent increase in the 
j number of vacancies. 

The survey indicates that though 


An increase in vacancies 


means improved 


employment prospects. 


writes Michel Syrett 


As the shortage of technically-quali- 
fied graduates and theapparent shortage 
of students with “high-flier” manage- 
ment potential, continues to grow, 
graduate employers are becoming much 
more competitive in their recruitment 
methods. The most noticeable indica- 
tion of this has been the extension of on 
and off-campus recruitment activities 
well before and well after the traditional 


■ jui * ^ v uiu k LilyU fi 1 * . . 

demand from manufacturing industry is — r 1 .. 1 ?? 7 ?. 1 *! 1 *, ^°[ Und : 


_ expected to be about nine per cent lower 
" than last year, there are still unfilled 
vacancies from last year and, signifi- 


cantly. some traditional heavy engineer- 
ing firms 


is are back in the market after 
several years' absence. Demand from 
;the non-manufacturing sector, especial- 
ly finance, is about 1 5 percent up on last 
r year. 

- The shortage of electronic engineers 
.continues, now coupled with a more 
recent shortage of chemical engineers. 
However, the supply of mechanical and 
production engineers, more nearly 
.matches the demand, with signs of some 
increase. Elsewhere in the market, a 
growing number of graduates in 


'shortage' disciplines are being attracted 
the fin 


to the financial sector, where pay and 
rapid promotion prospects can be very 
good. High salaries in the financial 
sector, a result of the forthcoming “big 
bang” in the City later this year, are also 
tending to distort the market 
. A number of significant factors 
affecting this year’s market are worth 


Courses daring the 
summer break 


noting. There is a marked and alarming 
foil in interest by graduates in the 
teaching profession. Teachers continue 
to leave the profession in large numbers, 
while applications for postgraduate 
certificate in education places in En- 
gland and Wales for 1 986 were down by 
28 per cent at the end of November 
1985, compared with the same date in 
the previous year. This trend bodes very 
ill for the future supply of school leavers- 
qualified to take up science, engineering 
and the newer information-technology- 
relaied computer courses. 

As Richard Pearson, associate direc- 
tor of the Institute of Manpower 
Studies, commented in an article: “One 
of the causes of the a beady-low sian- 
, dards of maths and physics in schools is 
^ the shortage of suitable teachers. This 
' -will get worse over the next decade if sci- 
ence. and particularly maths and phys- 
ics graduates, continue to turn away 
‘from teacher training courses and 
teaching as a profession.*’* ‘ 


Employers are becoming more keen 
to take part in the series of careers 
information fairs, presentations and 
seminars organised by the Careers 
Research Advisory Centre (CRAC), 
student branches of the Industrial 
Society and larger employers them- 
selves. 

These are held well before the main 
graduate-recruitment season, during the 
second academic year or in the autumn 
term of the final year. There, some 
organizations are using the opportunity 
to pinpoint high-calibre students ana 
prompt direct applications that can be 
processed during the later half of the 
autumn and lead to a second interview 
during the Christmas vacation. This 
process is being mirrored by the 
imaginative use of vacation training 
and courses during the summer break 
(see Horizons, January 20). 

Last year there was growing concern 
by both Agcas and Scocg at the number 
of employers who were attempting to 
pressure students into accepting offers 
of employment well before the Lent 
term, often by the use of cash induce- 
ments (termed “settling-in" allow- 
ances). 

This was aggravated by a long- 
standing controversy over the official 
sanction given to chartered-accountan- 
cy firms to interview graduates on- 
campus during the autumn-term 
interviews seems to have become less 
heated, but pressure on graduate recruit- 
ers by line management to steal a march 
on their competitors is still very 
evident 

Another sign that the market is 
increasingly favouring applicants rather 
than recruiters is the growth in impor- 
tance of the Summer Recruitment Fairs, 
held after graduation in Selected cam- 
puses during June and July. More 
confident of their ability to find work, 
many “key" students who would have 
previously taken part in the Lent Milk 
Round are now positioning the whole 


degree-holders, are now using ffie fairs 
as a primary rather than a secondary 
selection forum. Last year, the most 
important of the fairs, organized by the 
University of London, was three- 
quarters as large as their entire' Lem 
term milk round. 

More significantly, 30 per cent of the 
employers participating had not them- 
selves taken part in the main recruit- 
ment exercise. 

Hanging over ail these short-term 
shifts in demand is the spectre of a long- 
term reduction in the supply of school 
leavers entering higher education, and 
the further shortages in technological 
skills it will bring with it. 

The government Green Paper on 
Higher Education published last year 
predicts that student entrants will foil 
gradually over the period in 1989, and 
then much faster over the next six-years. 
A response to the paper recently 
published by Scoeg calculates that with 
a steady increase in demand from 
employers of four per cent a year, there 
will be a shortfall of between six and 
nine thousand graduates entering em- 
ployment by 1999. 

Already, there are early signs of the 
decline. This year, for the first time, the 
total pool in which recruiters are fishing 
is no bigger than the previous year. The 
number of graduates leaving university 
will be down, and while output from the 
polytechnics is still rising, it isat a much 
slower rate. 

Several measures have been put 
forward to alleviate the potential short- 
age. An Agcas report published last 
October stressed that post-graduate 
education needs more central planning 
and control to ensure a greater emphasis 
on a vocational rather than an academic 
need. Central control was also necessary 
for post-graduate education to ream 
more quickly to market demand and to 


Already early signs 
of the decline 


sordid business of fob hunting until 
' — often with the active 


after they qualify - 
encouragement of their academic de- 
partment. 

As a result, traditional graduate 
employers, as well . as the - growing 


ensure a more equitable funding of 
courses. 

There is a widespread feeling that if 
industry is to meet its future manpower 
requirements, it will have to become 
much more closely involved in collabo- 
rative arrangements such as sponsor- 
ship to' attract its own share of an 
inadequate supply. 

It will also have to help encourage 
more students to study science at school 
and to enter vocationally relevant 
courses, as well as encouraging a wider 
cross-section of the population to take 
up higher education. 

Consider women, for example. A 
report published by Toucbe Ross last 
month — What Do Graduates Do? - 
showed that despite the efforts of the 
WISE campaign and a rise in the output 
of women engineers, fewer than one in 
10 university engineering and technol- 
ogy graduates is female. 


The author -is- editor of the Manpower 1 I 


-*■ 


number of smaller recniiiersjopking for , Policy and Practice — The IMS Review. 

. -1 m 






EDUCATION 


TEACHING POSTS 

are available in the 


IRAQI UNIVERSITIES AND 
HIG 


IGHER INSTITUTES 
for the academic year 1986/7. 


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CONDITIONS AND BENEFITS 

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Vs ale I Hi-anli«t- 


QUEEN ETHELBURGA’S 
SCHOOL 

HARROCJ.ATE 
NORTH YORKSHIRE 

l*i ■•rtanMiMnllt ll--.il diiMi til anK . J« ihiimv. «7 (Ml 


HOME ECONOMICS 

III til <11 IHPlUltBM tt All 9 • • 

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lb ii in— Id i.rui 1-s dnmhl iivun Hits mine ht Hlh Mari h 


RELKtlOl IS STUDIES 

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— — i-i* ml— i l**m t 1 1‘H.h eineni r- nrerb-ii lu ■ un irlnmous slnUies 
in Hie- srmdl imhib iHb nl luuii iluuj S< hont I In- pnm| iru umtn-iM 

r- In l-ifcr- main ilu ii i i-Kenheie yum I ltnlbuiu.iS is a 

ttmni.il ii saiuud Mini aiH-ln.mls sinmlri In- tindnan diirt rm-Ddiaf 
isii In iibili- .n in i-it in llii' i -lain -ns |ur nl Ifu-N hna Vt illininn— 
I- .is.uim j.-sininsiinliit a» a 1 bnisennsli m amnl tsenili hi a 
t.t-MiuLtii s liiiww iwi is n»»i at aimiio, ifpiMitarM lain a 
all -lu almi idle Ihr ibMiu-s nl I» furl n— and «. t lo iivnh this 
inn- lit Mill M.uali 


DRAMA 

s in- mini I'tHn -viJ.m i inaedbilUi’ rlt-onHkiiir an PMn-rrmrr |M 
.undu .mi tt r ar- radaru n* sonmne in ulr wn . immi mm 

I . ss| Id Hi anM Il-nar Imrnl 111 Ibis Milan >ai K Nmi iIhhi si tnnl Tire 
• ■u.iat li.islnr|,rir.ili,l in I he piunwrim, a lln- pnsriH nnijnl 
in nl I- .i -s, .ib- .1 pnsi .-n. ii I un- I In- mm ■ i-ssinl .ipidu.inl vi ill lie 
■•in i-n lu aim taisiniibilii i* ami phsssrl a UirmiuH and rrHIHra 
.ran i a* in Ifn iiii|niii.iini- a itianw and aHnil ai lit ilirs in a 
1 -isii -I n ■■■ *a had i .imlnLil— imiMIrrl lo a- rrsulnil n ill In- .il an 
a-l- miiI.um- I In* in— I nmdil siul MUiwmr in Ihr -at II si, Kb- a a 
i.iii-i lull llnra inae »\|H.iniiieil siMnilil lull In- iklnlol hail 
.Ud-ln.an-n 1 1 ll-i Id amdnaliai ( t and Ihr names in 1 
|| II iia.siHuihl in- si-nl In un I li-.nlnusli rss m hlh Maliti 


HOI 'SEMI STRESS 

I In IlnlaMirv. |. ii,|iini,l In lube luri.dl rlbnqr id Un- nuts 
«unl .i.iii in In, In-tra- I i.ulthnriallt the Uommlir-ns a y I 
Ibr- ■ in- n a. nil mu. -iln- hah u irtliunl hmrunie and (.null 
■l.ili > ,iii|r |.i ■ dil l Itiiianiis IrlwdlKHi Hunk- liammKs anil 
hui". -, -iuil Ir ul uli ,ul' .ml. nr- Nw a-.ulr-mu >auilid.ilrs ulrn 

i" iinibi- sane ahri soiuih.iiiI nHUiilMUmu hi (he Mir a 

Iln M lend Inn* eta ut—. un tliil hiapplt I In- ■lu.iHlRsnral' 

la-tiiiu ra an- idrMdiri naraih ami npirmr \ man hot 
■ imdnaa mill ihiiiliin ismiihi inlaiiilt tn-aaraili-ipil Mdlinilt 
.h-iiiii- il eillni hi -i-ie -u r\|n- 4 i*-ini- rs an is-enli.il r isrumdtn-nr as 

Ill I in usihrme alnl InmiiHU sain neadbiMr I runs 

■■1 .iih>iu uin.ii imt- i t .iu-I Iln nanus, a .' ini-iris sinadil tea h 
II h* I Ii .uIiiiiMiiss . aim in Hlh Mum h IWn 


MICROELECTRONICS 
SUPPORT UNIT 
appointment of 

DIRECTOR 


The Chairman of the Management Board of 

The Unit, Mr M G Ntchoi. invites applications 
lor ihe post of Director, who will be required 
to take up duties as soon as possible after 1 
April 1986. 


The Unit will support the local education au- 
thorities and teacher training establishments 
of England. Wales and Northern Ireland in the 
task of integral ing and developing new tech- 
nology in schools. It will provide trainers, 
develop curriculum materials and support 
work on new technology in special educa- 
tion The Unit will build upon the work of the 
Microelectronics Education Programme 
which is to terminate on 31 March 1986. 


The Director will be required to set up and 
run the activities of the Unit under the super- 
vision of the Management Board. Applicants 
should be able lo demosirate a sound knowl- 
edge of new technology m schools and of 
the education system as a whole. Proven 
administrative capability will . also be 
required. 


It is likely that the post will be m the Birmir 

ham area. Salary will be on the sc 

C 22. 222 - £27.065 The post is pensionable 
under the (contributory) Local Government 
Superannuation Scheme 


Applications to Mr M G Nichol (MSU), 
Director of Education , Wirrol Borough 
Council, Municipal Offices, Cleveland 
Street Birkenhead, Wirral L41 6NH . 


Closing dote 21 March 1986. 


UNIVERSITY OF 
MANCHESTER 


CHAIR IN 
GERMAN 


Tlw V nr. mMV M Manrtn"»r» 
ituim ^RpirMiom tar J 
Own in Gemun' Irani ranili 
Mnn«i ifu * «n imr i rM in 

«nv- firta 04 Grrmin OnmVW 
M a IHrrolur* UjJjtv 
wiltan Ihr ranor tar Protav 


AMOMm tour nev «wl 
awe lor Mho J ocoawmJ oninn 
Ilia MM> a QuaMfmnom. 
nrmrwTHr ihr hmmi 
«M aiHT i-ar, a inrrr trfrr 
ra vlmM Mr wil lo Ihr 
Rrmuii. Thr iBhnnly. 
AUiK-hrsirr MIS OPL by Fn 
■An- April JNi 1QII6 
PalKiitArs at th« mMAl 
nvrm mn nr nauinm H an 

Iho Rronlrnr auohna iotrr 
oar 40 Ho T 


KING SAUD UNIVERSITY 

RIYADH, SAUDI ARABIA 


Applications are invited for Faculty and English Language Instructor posts on one year 
renewable contracts, tenable from 19 July 1986. 


Applicants for Faculty posts ; 

Professors, Associate Professors, Assistant Professors 

should hold a PhD and/or academic titles from accredited UqfoecdtfeS. 

Appllcantsfor - - ■ ' h : • 

English Language Instructed 

'posts should have at least a Bachelor's degree in English arid threfryears post- 
' qualification experience.- _ 

The language of instruction throughout the university is Arabic except In.the Colleges of 
Engineering, Science, Medicine (In Riyadh and Abha). Pharmacy. Dentistry. Allied 
Medical Sciences. Computer and Information Sciences, Architecture A Planning, and for 
the MSc programme in Hospital Administration (in the College of Administrative 
Sciences) where the language of instruction is English. 


Colleges 

Departments 

Arts 

Arabic - English - Geography -MassCommunftations - Social 
Studies - History - Archaeology AMitssology - libraries & 
Information Sciences - v i .‘" 

^ f-lattnn 

dCtfOCS 

Chemistry - Biochemistry - Physics - Astra nomy-- Botany - 
Zoology - Geology- Mathematics— Statistics - computer - 
Science- . 

Adminlatrattve 

Sciences 

Law - Business Administration - Public Administration - 
Economics - Accounting - Quantitative Methods - Political 
Science - Hospital Administration 

Pharmacy 

Pharmaceutical Chemistry - Pharmacology - Pharmaceutics - 
Pharmacognosy -Clinical Pharmacy 

Agrictitture 

Animal Production - Soil Sciences - Plant Protection - Food 
Sciences - Agricultural Engineering - Plant Production - 
Agricultural Economics & Rural Sbctojbgy r-.tyitffiidn AHorrie 
Economics (women only) ; ’• . ' . 1 ; 

EngiMaping 

Civil Engineering - Mechanical Engineering - Electrical 
Engineering - Chemical Engineering -7 Petroleum Engineering 
- Computer Engineering - Nuclear Engineering -Industrial 
Engineering 

Madicme (Riyadh) 

Anatomy - Physiology - Pharmacology - Pathology - Parasi- 
tology - Gynaecology & Obstetrics - ENT - Forensic Medicine 
- Community Medicine - Ophthalmology & Eye Surgery - 
Surgery -Medicine -Paediatrics 

Educatkan (Riyadh) 

Education - Psychology - Curriculum & Instruction - Islamic 
Studies - Art Education - Physical Education - Instructional 
Media & Educational Technology - Special Education (for the 
handicapped) 

Dentistry 

Operative Dentistry -Oral Dlagqosis/Medictne - Oral Surgery 
Oral Pathology - Oral Radiology - Oral Biology - Removable 
Prosttvodontics - Fixed ProsthodonUcs- Endodontics - 
Periodontics - Periodontics - Orthodontics - Community 
Dentistry - Dental Public Health 


Allied Medical 
Sciences (Riyadh) 

Clinical Laboratory Sciences - Radiological Sciences - 
Rehabilitation Sciences - Community Health Sciences - 
Biomedical Technology - Dental Health - Nursing - Surgical 
Technology - Medical Assisting - Anaesthesiology - 
Emergency Medical Technology - Ophthalmology Programme 
-Audiology & Speech Pathology 

Computer and 
Information Sciences 

Computer Engineering - Computer Science - Computer 
Technology -information Science 

Architecture and 
Planning 

Architecture and Building Sciences - Planning - Regional • 
Design - interior Design 

Education (Abha) 

Education - Curriculum 8 Instruction - Psychology - - 
instructional Media & Educational Technology - Art Education - 
Physical Education - Biology - Chemistry - Physics - 
Mathematics - Geography - History - English 

Metfidne and Medioal 
Sciences (Abha) 

Anatomy - Physiology - Family & Community Medicine - 
Biochemistry - Pathology - Microbiology & Parasitology - 
Pharmacy - Medicine - Paediatrics - Surgery - Medical - 
Education 

Agriculture and 
Veterinary MecBdne . 

(OsBioem) j * • 

Animal.Production & Breeding - Crops and Range Management 
- Crop Protection -Nfeterinacy Medicine —Horticulture & 

Forestry - W«er*SoiHftgfi^1iiratEDflfneeriria:- AgjtaulturaL , 

. Ef tension & Economics.. ^ ;( J _V,,. , ' ' .',”1 ; ; 

BnsHtessariU 
Economics • 
(Qassaem) - 

jggiBilHa 

Benefits for these 
posts include 

* Tax free salaries (based on qualifications and experience) 

* Free furnished accommodation or housing and furniture 


allowance 

* Monthly transport allowance 

* Relocation allowance 

* Free yearly return air tickets for incumbent and family 

* Children's educational allowance (non-Arabic speakers only) 

* Free medical/dental care for appointee and accompanying 
family 

¥ 60 days annual pre-pald leave 

* End of service gratuity (after two years) 

Applicants from Europe can obtain an application form from the following address. Applicants 
from further afield should write to their nearest Saudi Arabian Educational/ Cultural Office. 

Ms Carmel A Donnachle. KingSaud University Office. 29 Belgrave Square, London SWIX8QB. 
Please state clearly the College and department for which application is being made. 
CLOSING DATE: 19 MAY 7986 


FOR \ I HJHI! (HI 

wn hi Hull Milh ■ fHklr ill III 
UlIrliilllHI IhsiI.Iiiiu — 1 Hurt 
lf*>w la iMA.nK hi vamail 
I Imii-h-iii.iIi ai h ivpj mi si r in ib 
l-tphrl biltrt I rf. I1H -n 111 
•IWK- l“TH V1| . 


HARROW SCHOOL 


In accordance with directions contained 
in their Statutes the Governors 
invite applications for the post of 

HEADMASTER 


of The -John Lyon School 
which l)ecomes vacant in 
September 1986 


Any applicant must be a graduate of a 
University in the United Kingdom or pro- 
duce other evidence of his fitness.' 


Applications should be addressed to 
the Bursar of Harrow School, 5 
High Street, Harrow-on-the-Hill, 
Middlesex, HAI 3HP , and received 
by 3 1st March 1986. 


HEREFORD CATHEDRAL 
SCHOOL 
seek to appoint a 
BURSAR 


and Clerk to ihc Coi emors allhis 1 118 co-cd dav 

and l^oatdliKj school of 560 pupih for September 
1986 . 

Siniilat experience an advantage bul applications 
from younger uualiliml arcounianls wriromed. 
Evpenmwe of mortem management techniques 
and rompniri- appiiraiiom helpful. Saiarv not less 
than C 16.000 
Detail* from: 

Puicr .f. Pri<»r CBE. FC’A 
Chairman nf Iho (iuvemors. 

The Caihodral SchnoL 
Horerurd HR1 2NN. 

Closing dale 4lh April 11KA. 


UNIVERSITY 
OF WARWIC K 
LECTURESHIP 
IN LAW 

\|K 1 |I< irtHHT* ill »* no iliil l»H •» 
I IVH ■ I 111 II* 

H I le-llitillr* MiHII 1*1 f*hi 

l-i l«N## I In MlnH r* 
riWMlIt hi llitbM- 

fun i mre •HUifii I* hi lire- iriK'i 
•ll oillUlkli grel Lil% -in-* 

'lia lilrliirei |,ivilli«i itml a iilii 

|MI«« loii ■ Inil i»mi|a| Mi-hntiK 
rflMlIlt ^lMiir- II mH J- 

III* K •- liu-i 

■ • i |i . i *uium 

|H«nt *U |rerere|i«B| *m ,|*h- .iiui 

fMrHrre*' 


l m true itaHlre lil.H- ^INI .h«i i <i 

1 rifirm iram- i<»tni 
Im*it*Ii.ii I mi i'ImIi «4 Vi.h 
n«|. 4 mi a | ill % |\.| 7 \l 

H*i S*i •} \ I 
m.ukllr»ilh mi rill* 
fc'l- .'WNW'li 


UNIVERSITY 
OF READING 
Lcciurvship 
in Inorganic 
Chcmisirv 


.iihiH. aii- 1111 Hoi la .1 

jiim- UbiiJ inni .injHinii 
»n-nl *r« I ii limn 111 liHHiHiim 

Clb-niiMll IN.'I.I.-li,, hiB lir 
till I II III HIMIIMailb mill Mil in 

H'l-bl ni tl«" -lllllH-lb 

4I1H1HI1* Mfbl .l|»T>lli .llli^r* 1*1 
lu-ii iiHiiiLinK ina-Nil- kmI 
•III b. ,d. IJ -.11 Ul 1 l-l 
P 4 ■ihhH ’1 l-llr’i • |HUs 
I bb IVINS Urlulrf. I III 
III. I IMI 1 lllll.il> .H*l 

■itfJHn lluih linin' -.- 1 ufiu— ■ 
-» 1 . .it .ail.il . 1 . II ulM Ilu IV1-.1 

IU-I 1 Minn I liiii-lbiti 111 
Hb.ulim, \% liiirl. roil ik l-fi 

iba.-ir im .mum mu.:- ui. 

U UDlHHU- -I ITS*. H 711 I .-1 <-\l 

IHr.IV ,|IIU|-" 

Mil M H11J I hib.liri 1L1I1 1 1 
t|BII IKK- 


UNIVERSITY OF 


W? SOUTHAMPTON 


CHAIRS IN COMPUTB) SCIENCE . 
AND INFORMATION ENGINEERING 

Maior tfevtoptnerts tn the areas of Computer Scianca and 
fnfortnaDon Eng reefing are taking piaca imWiin the UiWarsfly 
*wth very sjntanoal support from the UGC and bom the 
oeawifl and Technology Programme To tacMata these 
deoenpewnts to acbumaa of die abating Dapartment of Com- 
puting Studies and of to Oeparvnam o( Sectromcs and 
Intonrauion Etoneaitna art bemq brought together na nevy 
Department wiimt to Faculty ot EngneaUng and So- 
enoa. TTss Oeparrment *1 adonan to exmtng courses. weN 
oiler mo new degrees: e 3 year S.Sc tn Computer Science and 
a - year B.Sc m integrated M a mmo n Engineering. 

Some 20 new acadenac and suppordno posts wHI be oeeted. 
and oppkcaions are now mWtad tar TWO CHARTS. The per- 
sons appointed wl 

help to detemwie 
w* be tuOy mvoivsd 1 
b expecred thei tne Protassma.wtf hare complenwn ta iy tnmr. 
ests withm to broad held coaered by to neiy Departmant wttb 
one Chao bwng*i an area ol computer science and Motor 
beng m an ara% related to h ar dw a re or architecture. 

F (utter dstsBs toy be ob ta i n ed fyom to Secracny and to- 
Isvar, The Urmereby cA Soettwamto, ttighlMd, 
Southampton, SOS SNH, to whom a pp fca i i owt peoples 


tram persons tn to IN abouM be sent be! ora 2 
Plaa-r quote ref no AJS/06/10. 


EDUCATION ADVISERS 


CHRISTIAN AID requires three senior edu- 
cational advisers with experience Jn adult 
education to- join its three Regional 
Groups: Africa /Middle East, . Asia/ Pacific 
and Latin America/Cartbbean. He/sbe will, 
devise initiatives for educational work re- 
lated to the region, prepare and develop 
resources and share In educational pro- 
grammes related to church and secular 
networks. A Christian commitment, under- 
standing in world development and 
overseas experience are important For 
the Africa/Middle East Group post knowl- 
edge of French or Arabic is an advantage, 
for the Latin America/Caribbean Group 
Spanish is necessary. Apply in writing only 
please sending 24p stamped addressed 
envelope for a job description and applica- 
tion form to; personnel Officer, Christian 
Aid, PO Box 1,. London,. $W9 8BH. 
Closing date 2* March. 


MANDER PORTMAN WOODWARD 


TUTORIAL COLLEGE 1 
5mi S widen 1* in Umdun 


DIRECTOR OF STUDIES 


Kaiilimi 1.1 vw.Nili -1 I In- m>bi iIHuhr. -bi-iiio, n ,ir, |,„. 
1*1 IIH Ilkri Hal l“- '■ >.l I Min la a ■"Indui Hi Ilk- mu ■■ s, l|i>H 

h.«ll|hlliH Hu , — ,,i a .**1 +uhwlb I 111 - HMII-WHHI .limM 

■ .no uni m«MH. il 1* ■■ r.ui-HH 1 imnibiii a n HI ... 
■luhi^ml- n| h I-- | it . .-tu-ir *uh.u\ MKim i ■■■ iu-uhihIhhi. in 
-b a in..- 1 1 1,. ,n 

The Waul. 

Z* ChMen Mas. 

• • SWT. 


Ihr I 


UNIVERSITY OF 
DURHAM 
Lcciurvship in 
Marketing in the 
Business Schtxil 


MnHu.ituiir. a-- mulitl la 
Ir\.il M-iin ■ "i Imibliii- m 
XUuM-linn Hum bOiLdili «|iwii 
•luil ■aulnlHlrb tin- 

axHwMinrni will br «■ «»>■■<■ 
iuH|b hv t|u- |N <4 nM-ini I- mi 

IIU- I nillBlin 

III I.IIVII pa JHIIUIII III. 
ih-j " ‘ " irimn ’ * din- 

bi««n,i>HiikiJHm- a«W«hiHi i“ 

•u*> iliMUlHiCVHib himI 
i^iui n-iu r 


I Iitlha Mill III uLiib Ilia bu 
iiblHUial lion Ufa Ui.Rbli.n 
.intlSan-tUx 01(1 Shin- II hH 
IMIuni Old Will lu uIuhii 
amlH an-rib - 1 ic-iu- > inrliiil 
inn Ihr Hiinr. ,nnl #Wlnwx 
■H 1 }ll Hi liHaib-. blumkl i>- 
-.iii mil IjM i iii.ni VaulHi 
ir* I Milllll Itol 


UNIVERS1T>’ OF 
EDINBURGH 


Department of . 

Chemist rv 


LECTURER IN 
inorganic 

CHEMISTRY 


\imlH .HK«| 1 . .hu mi Hat IK 
lliib PHbl lauihiu Iiihu Ibi IM 
toto !'-**> lanirrMii- 
4 miUM fa/li. lalillll «MW,I 
in .mi man ii nf 
llliHiuinr .lunubllx Ih.i 
-Ilium luw- a inn i-iiH nl .uni 
-.HiHiMI I- pirPiU-n ioWiim- 
llnii bhmi .inrl ImiliiilR ■- 
--xiif h -Km ni i~ 

Hi* -iIhii iirtl l »‘ ihi Uv la 
1111— 1 M.iH- il 17 It- - I IM'* 
i luiiiiin.uiKl-l ipii™-. "rtli- 
.aHHHiHia- pf.ifiui I oiiiui 
rkHIHHWib -•vlinlb urn III 
i iuil— .i ifrb/nHiai -ii iHi—ui 
laikhi-b aid luniili mfn : • 
■K. in Ilu -l-ibuluwirl- ai-. 
■it uil.il ill' Iran Ilk- l'i*i»aii»'l 

• or lu i" , loinbH K'lilw 
iMIiiui 1.1 -wuun ftrionr 
1 ■Iriimiiaill 111 111 HI! W 
LHflll IHIIIHM 1 Ml 
».W ■ 


l&AJi 

r>* / 

Ts 

0 









1 


inoir 


UntowyalWto 


BUSDIESS AND 
ECONOMICS 
2 RESEARCH 

ASSISTANTS 
(Bred hire - w me 
CwdttMrend) . 
(Ini tone - tor an 
UMdou-hXMd) 


To woik into Dr M Podt on a 
protect spoDSnred hn Me Oewrt- 
mstt td Enotoyment on proto 

tom) me Stan tomb* 

srtwniM 


Stoy: Wthn 


m 


uutb 

San £6£00 - 
per awi ante n«) 
RaquBsts (quoting Hef. WSJ lor 
dBBK to jpduamn tma to 
Snhmg Otto UWISL PO Box 
58 . CanMfCH 3 XA 
Cweg DM 14 Mree T 9 Bt 


AIGLOtT COLLEGE 


IfXK ITHhlu-nU-TH . 
.■mnaKIWur 
HlMl lid Ml 
faUMi -14 UIIMU 


lib- r Hilo- * 

A BURSAR 


flu-uuiia uan.ni .ihiuimiI 
ni Hill twi. - HMk- 
•alininibliKlnr Out IkmihuiI 
tmiui.i- —iiii a iiifaii H-- 
a i -r rit , i-b^riar-liHkil lit 
kn-rtMl I n-mii Mini 1 nuHJi i- 

u IlnUNlI nllin Linaibl-p- 
uli -rad flu- imbf ,au- 

i. irail'ni \Uuus( l*Mn >«i1i 
ii ur liv- leurta -H '.-“iu.i 
|h-I - 'aiiuiui. bUlHrl I hi 

j. imli.iauii 


liiiilkn nifa.nbWu ur.di 

u>*- Ij um Ilu- < luanwi a 
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hw «' n I hxuinurHu, X. 

mini- I ril*. ’ 1 KfaT-' 
< annuiim Hiuil I .Mam. -Hi 
I ll-l 1V\ . . 


CLIFTON COLLEGE 
Second Chaplain 


Ilu- in -Ml MU > hr, .niu-b laaK 
Hi -uMi-lHIfai !■*«*■ lidkniiiM 
Ilu (irtiun ui )h<' Haul m 
■ luutu-m hi U«r iuini 
firinibii fa Jfla iihin HHti a 
Iln luhl 


1|i|iiu riTVK -luaiM fa*- aurtli 

uk-b htd nl n an- w-aimm 
r\l>-|N-IMi- ib »H rbM-nli-rt 
Ilu- ani-MiilnH-ru imKub 
bii-di-irtl Mini k-alium didu-b 
mill Mini- -41 — mii* i-ibw-i 
lull (■<-. a SixihuI > 

HU hnbnu ipi utuOfl ' 1 u IVt-li. 

I -ll -ii.-i-uHil «l -Ilu- 
I’lrvauhHi SilHHd Ham 
-Ilnlilirb hi ilu- l M»i Had 
i.iii iu-ib*ulmjii iim- utua a 
inilini-ika. rtwl rifri.ni r 


In anuu.lamn Ml 'r l«« 

l.h*l I|M- h. I|U> t idluifa- 


Iniii u-ni kibtiiit r ihi u ulum 
i run- aai ilu- mu- a iim 
lif-1 a-bi it, un- IlibkiniM-la 

I III 1 - 1.1 « .rtk-lp- HMbllll IkbM 

nil nan HhuiH nirilu-i «i- • 
i.iiN ina In- au ri'iaj » - ■ - 


UNIVERSITY' OF 
BATH 

SCHOOL OF 
ELECTRICAL 
ENGINEERING 
Lectureship 


l nrM mtbi ihr. brm muM 
tn Hu- I In ttaim- <h*n«i tn 
llu-l (»- -Slim |„ |n linhlafi" 

mifbrtiir 


■ hr kli-.il lanbd-dr lid Ihib 
■MH nol PM> ai rquat.dnd 
bi.KHluiil. mitH.hh iinlh 
bow rxnairnur, mtn- 


1 ' jts 

I pn ywwi 


UNIVERSITY' OF 
NOTTINGHAM 
Department of ■ 
Linguist its 
TEMPOR.\R^' 
LECTURER IN 
ENGLISH' AS A 
FOREKiN 
LANGUACiE 

\notM rfluHib .Hr iHUlrtl un 

riHb mu- inn Hi lin rb*H|i in 
Uk* I hm man .h I ma.ibti. s 
Ihr pa-MKi untniiinl mil br 
lafaulml*- tin Iln- pi in rain 
and i.-umMinn irt I ruihsii 
LM-quau- l*sk limn. Illl IlKlllHI 
rt Id-- bl-M1|Vrtl IlHrtbT. In 
!*-,-. -, 1 b -rtiMk-iiN IninibrlnNJl 
nmi bill 


Ihrbrtlrtii Mid lu- wiIIiiii -I lk- 
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inw • 

1 IH 11 Ml 11.11 |N llkllb -UKl rtlipll 

'■iIhhi la nr. .ii.hIuIHi- nan 
* 4 .ill X ppm tin nan— IHmn 
l.min-rtii . a Nirilii'-iiM>n. 
■ nnirtbp, itrttk. tx.hiuimIuum 
MIT -*RI l |n Ik- liWilllird IHd 
MbH Hull S? -tpnf I°no Mrt 
n«i i(vr 


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IPIKMTV 4 W. wtrqirtll-<l liKUthb 


irtlra.m-d .in iirib 
KlrtMUdr lari 


■ XnplK .Ulinib Until f irffrtifJuti-v 
Milh la 


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nl lltr iiHIiiimiki -in-rtb MaiHd 
rtNn br Hrtninlr 
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u HiHM.il < amnurm rtltun 
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THE UNIVERSITY' 
OF LEEDS. 
IXTartmcnt of 
-.Cbintac Studies 


CHAIR OF 
CHINESE STUDIES 


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UNIVERSITY 
OF HONG KONG 


CHtoB or- COKSERVATIVC 
OLMSTRV PutiKSw CE 
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IH'ii HH 1 --J .iim- nKri luilmii.J 

■uflip lillh -ilu-tl (I 1 -ll 1 l|l«.|l III 
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30 


BBS* M*RWua«. 

mrvJS: 

« • Bfc + !5% v sp 

JS5TTB?- ■?» 

ynwn ewt addn^Ttf 
"ft hTS, £ ,he 
Sjnnws 

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aaMSESss 

«Sft£nSi: 

32 

ftRMflB M «. 

RIMiKK, WEDDINGS. «c 
ob fowl and Social Page. » 
> few + 15% VAT. 
t owi awl Social pw an- 
nouncements can mi bt 
acccKcd bj Wtephone Ejv- 
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Mom ocher cbuifiaJ adver- 
incmniB can be aennted by 
hicphfflw. Tho ctenibne n 
3 nHpm 2 dni pmr to pohit- 
otiun Ur. 100pm Monday 

Cor Wednesday l. Should you 

*oh hi scad an advcrlno 

mc« in wriimg plow 
indudr your dayumc phone 
number. 

^WtttMER SEJrtKTS 
DEPARTMENT. If you 
base any queries or problems 

nruiing u your advcntsc- 

roctu oner it has appe a red 

please contact our (’unomcr 
Scnrcn Department by idc- 
pbooc on tMH 30 06. 


.. WhmUWwWdM ihc prophet 
Mu» tow lo nm, Own mu 
Ura prcapnrt hr known. Due Ihe 
LORD mu liuty Vnl mm. 

■Mremuih 9 


BIRTHS 


BALDWYN on February 25Ui 
at Royal Sussex Counts- Hos- 
piuil. Brtqhion lo Kathryn 
utec Andrews) and Tom-, a 
son. James Ant bom . 

BARNES on 26lli Frtjruarv In 
Chester to Jill inrc.Boothbvi 
and Dai id. a baby, i Profiler 

BUXTON to Melinda and 
James, on 25tli February. a 
dauqtlwv. OUlta Louise 

CAfZNEG Y- ARBUTHN OTT. On 
FrtiruarY 281b 1986 in Dub 
bn. lo \Kiona aCarhlrandi 
and Hugh, a son. Frederick 
Thomas. 

CARPENTER On Feb. 2SUt. (O 
Deborah cnee Wilson i and 
Philip, a son iTmiolhv Pint 
tp>. a brother tor Samuel. 

CHANDLER on Wednesday 
26th Feiinury lo Alter inee 
Badrorkl and David. a 
daughter. Daisy. 

DONALDSON on February 
281 h at Queen Charloiirs 
Hospital- London lo Jan and 
Drew, a son. Alexander 
C harles T ocher 

FECCETTER an 23rd Febru- 
arv at Huiuingdon lo 
Margaret and Graeme, a 
daughter. Emma Helen 
Siewarl. 

GARNETT on 22nd February 
1986 al Princess Alexandra 
hospital Harlow lo Hilary 
cnee Nesbtin and Richard, a 
dauqhter Emma Rachel. 

GUTHRIE on Frbruarv 2Sih to 
Deborah tnce Gaiesi and 
□and. a son William. 

LYNE to Sally i rtee Vanei and 
Peler. adamjMcr. Jennifer, a 
sister for Tom, Alice and 
Robert, at Lincoln on 28 
February. 

MALTBY on February 21M Uib 
Genes a. lo Vicky >nre Elloni 
and Colin, a daughter. Kaih 
erine Eleanor. 

WEREKO-BHOBBY an Febru- 
ary 24Ui at St. Mary's 
Hospital Paddington. lo Dido 
inee Povvrtlj and Charles. 
Nil daughters. Olympia 
Aiaa and Nana Adwoa 


DEATHS 


BAILEY - on 2Sth February. 

'Suddenly at . SL 

Bartholomews: TunflUjy 

. Bailey, of The Deutsche 
Dank. Funeral al SI' Man ’s. 
The Bolton's. 1..30 -pnCTn 
day 7th March, (allowed by 
private cremation. 

B EL S HAM, on 26th February. 
1986. al Hereford. Helen 
Margaret widow of S. J. 
Bc-hham. a much laved and 
losing mother, grandmother 
and greatgrandmother, 
peacefully In her sleep, aped 
94 PmateemnaiumatHcr 
eford sih March at 2 30 pm. 
serslre of Thanksgiving In 
the spring Flowers to Dawe 
Bros. 115 West Fating Sheet. 
Hereford iTef. 0432 
274066 b Enoutnes lo Rouo 
Belgium. CotswoM c045i» 
30899 or 30232. ' 

BLACK. On February l»b. 
suddenly and prarefuDv in 
her stern at home. Miss Edith 
Maud Black. iBmdvi. aoed 85 
years, third dauqhler of Uie 
lain Sir Fredcrirk W Block. 
hCB. and of Lady Black 
Funeral sirs ice al Isle of 
Wtghl Crema lor Iuiii on 
Wednesday March Slh al 
2 30 p m. Flowers lo H \ 
Tavlor and Son Lid.. 45 
Green SlreeL Ride, fair of 
Wighi. 

BLAKER On 23rd February 
toso in Durtuw Hospilal. 
Helen Jane Uamei aged 69. 
sounger daughter of Uie lale 
Col. W. F. Blakrr DS.O 

0 B E . and Helen L Blaker 
Crenialion has been hew 
Com mil la I on Monday lOlh 
March al 3 n.m al SI. Mars’s 
Churrh. EwriL 

BLOOR on 27th February 
1986. Kenneth Bfoor. Con 
xullanl Surgeon. Manrhesler 
Rosal Infirmary, aged 59 
years of 140. Fog Lane. 
DHlfbnrv. Manrhesler 20 
Much kneel husband ol Val 
and serv dear lalher of Sara. 
Lm. Kale A Hod He will lie 
gt rails messed bs all his (am 
ifv fnenefa and lufients 
Servin' al Manrhesler Cn- 
maim turn on Thursday uh 
March al 12 noon All floss - 
res and ennuine* lo Chailes 
Robb A sons Lid. 22 
Errwood Road. Manrhesler 
19. Tel: 061 224 1200 or 
061 224 4996. 

CRAWFORD On February 
2Blh. peorcfwiy of Grmie- 
nor Studios. SW 1 . Finns dl 
Sets ire. Goldets Green Of 
matomim Thursday Morrh 
6lh at 1pm- F lowers lo J H 
kenvoci LU1. 49 Manors 
Road. Loudon W8. Tel Ol 
937 0757. 

FLANAGAN - On Frbruarv 
2Slh. pearefnlh al his home. 
Erir.dearh loird husband of 
Edith, deseled father of Ian 
and Elut and a mum tosixi 
ar.niilpa Form ah' cu M.srtuis 
Rank. ’ Prisale irematlon 
Inllosved t»V wTSKe Of 
ilidiiksqn mg al FareJerslead 
Lulled Reformed Churrh. 
South Croydon at 3 OOjam. 
oil Wednesday Marrh Slh. 
Family flowers, bid dona- 
tions if desired lo Parkinson's 
Disease Sonny. 36 Portland 
pure. London WIN 3 DC 
Enquiries lo B.c Baker and 
Son. Caiertuin 43219. 

HADLEY • on 27th Frtauarv 
1086. Isabel, daughter of Ihr 
late Laurmrc and Nora Had- 
lev. Msler of Hie UN- Di 
GevugeHadles and *waonl 
of Maggie. Nirouand Ahson 
Funeral an Thursday Wh 
March at 2 pm. al 61 
Joseph's Chutrh. Bourne- 
moiuh Road. Brankxotw. 
Poole Dorset FamUv fins* 
eis onlv, but donalmns if 
desired In Invalid Children's 
Ant -VnonOhon. 12b Burk 
inqh am Pawre Road. London 
SHI. 

LATHAM On February 21sl 
pearrlulli ol Rorhfoiil Hus 
prt.il. Marv Mriana aged 88 
seals, brtfwed ivMau of 
Her lirri Latham. whIIi 
mnsed bS her seaer. nnres 
■Hid iKlVesvs Reqioem Moss 
on Wixliwuv Marrh an at 
SI Ediliis UxiK'dl «d 
9 SOjra Flowers lo W 
Tfunp A Sons 79-H3 Leigh 
Hill Llillhuil Sea. Esses 

LIST Pe.n Hulls cm mb Feb 
man \ i Iren Maiiiuerile al 
Gjlbrrt. aKieil 92 litleli liung 
ui Prieixfirld WHlon ol J.N 

List of CutliUntil. niolfiH- of 
tun. Initilh ,uwt Rm fvitd 
ai.iiiiliuumrr .uul qreat 
■u.u»iiiK4ner Fiuinul 
Umlilimd Cremalai unn 

1 nestlai . 4lh Marc h al 3 30 
gin 


1 


THE TIMES MONDAY MARCH 3 1986 


DEATHS 


HUGFHAU. - On 27lh Frbru 
an 1986. in hb B71h yr,v. 
JO Slew-art MA fOxoro Of 
Haddington < Sudan Political 
Smite and SrOUMt Offlcei 
hektsrd husband Of nano, 
dear f.dher of Marv and Row 
and losing gr.indl.il her of 
Quentin and Ferenm. Srr 
sue in St. Mary’s Pdrfcti 
Churrh. Haddington, on 
Tuesday 4lh Marrh. at 12.30 
and thneafier at Penlland 
Chapel. Mortontvall Cremaw 
rmm Cdmburugb at 1.46pm. 

McGUIRE - 26lh February al 
Rosewood Nursing Home. 
Mutton. John Charles, aged 
96 years, former London 
Head Tenrher Funeral srr 
sue 2 n.m. Friday at YOrt 
Orenutonum. 

MODUNGER Stella peacefully 
nn February 28lh afler a 
long illnew. she will be deep 
tv missed bs- her two 
da ugh lets. Jackie and Made- 
leine. Sorts-in-law- Beil and 
Andrew, and grande hlktrm 
Jushn. bean and Sally. 

MOORE - Frances Joan QBE. 
proecfuuv alter a long Illness 
on February 28th. 1986- 
Cremauon Orders Green 
Friday Marrh 7tn. 4pm. 
Family flowers only Memo 
rkrt serv ice in Horpendrn lo 
be orrangnL 

POTTER, on 28 lh February. 
1986. oeareiulty at St 
Calhenne's Hospice. 

Crawley. Chrtsttne Mary 
inee Bootvi. All enquiries 
please lo Sherlork A So ns. 
Tel Dorking 103061 882266. 

PRESCOTT, Rosamund Ray- 
mond. on 2716 Frltnurv. 
1986. wife ol the lale Regi- 
nald Alison Prc-sro! l . much 
los ed mother of Nirftolas and 
Reqinald and grand mother of 

EJi/obeih. Lucv and Mary. 

Funeral prtsate. 

QUIRK - on 27th February 
pi-arefullv. Joan, loved w-Ue 
of (he J.tfe RonaM and moth- 
er of Marlin. Soret and Sue. 
A darling mum. friend and 
Carve. Very much loved by 
all. Funeral sen ire al 
Poclrhrsln- Crematorium on 
Fridas- 7ih March at 12 
noon No flowers please al 
her miuesl. Donations if 
wished lo Age Conrcrn. 

REYNOLDS on February 2aui. 
peacefully al Amnshom 
Hospital. Harry, aged 92 
years. A murh loved man. 
Prisale crematorium service, 
Idinilv flowers only. A roe 
mnnal service lo be held al 
SI Johns Methodist Cluirrh. 
Amentum al a dale lo be an 
naunred. Donations tf 
wished lo the Amentum 
AMK'yfK'fd Sortefy. r o 
Mamal House. Hers met, 
Road, -\menlum. 

ROBERTS THOMAS. On 27 Ui 
February at home afler long 
illness. D. Alun itsoUrflork 
Funeral Thornhill Crenuio- 
Hum. Cardiff 11.30 am 
Thursday 6Hi Marrh. FamJiy 
llovsers only. 

ROSS - Dr Donald Murray 
FR6C. ex Dean of the Sci- 
ence Faculty al The 
Lniserstly of Alberla. Ed 
nionlon. Canada Died on I he 
!3lh of February, aged 71 
years. Leases a wife Ruth, 
son Andrew, daughier Mary 
i Be hr i and Iheir grandctukl 
Toya. 

STANDRMG. On February 
27th peacefully at home. In 
her 91st year. Jessie, wife of 
the lale -PK.‘. dear mother 
of Barbara and Peter, grand- 
mother and gtealgrand- 
n eol her. Cremation at 
Crovdon Crematorium on 
Friday. March 7 at 12.15 pm 

TURNER Nicholas i Klaus) on 
February 27lh al home aged 
BO years Funeral Secvlrc at 
SI Mary's Churrh Compion. 
al 12 noon on Monday 10th 
March, followed by prisale 
cremation al Chichester. 
Family flowers only. 

WEBSTER the Res (tend 

C<*i >on Douglas DD. former 
Conan of S< Paul's Cathe- 
dral. On 27lh February 1986 
peacefully ol fee Sue Ryder 
Home-. Lerkhamplon'-Coun.- 
Chellenham. alter a - taiSfl- 

.-IWm, endured -wtiti- -quite - 

. courage, aged 65. iflurh _ 

. loved and respected Priest 
Funeral at SI Janies Church-: 
Chipping campden Thurs- 
day March 6lh al 1.30pm. 
ioUow-ed by cr email An. No 
fknveis ol IMS requesL dona- 
uom if desired lo Church 
Missionary Sortely or Can 
err Research Campaign. 
Memorial Service in si 
Paul 's Cathedral taler, enqut 
ties 0386 840695 or 01 730 
4019. 

WELLS- John Theodore. Mas 
Irr Manner. On Febraury 28 
at winchesier Jack dearly 
brloscd husband of Cal her 
me tamer of Army A Welly 
and qranrtfalher of Charioile. 
Daniel & Caspar. Funeral, 
sersirp al SI MaijA Chapel 
Chesil House. Wincesirr on 
Wednesday Marrh 5 al 
12 45pm Flowers lo John 
Sleet A Son. Funeral Direr- 
lots. W'lnrhesler. 

WOOD - On February 27th. 
1986 pearrfully in haswiol 
aged 85 vrars. Pern- George 
Wood MBE. Freeman ol Uie 
Borough and Honours' Al 
dermon Funeral sen ire ol 
Christ Churrh. Eastbourne. 
Sussex on Monday March 
loth al 11 15om followed i»- 
rremalion Family I towers 
only Donations lo Leukemia 
Heseorrh Fund, r a Adela 
Funeral Homes. 45 South 
si reel. Eastbourne. 0323 
643999 

WRIGHT - On February 28 
Frank Coram Wriqhl CflE. 
FCGI -Vied 81 murh loved 
luisnond of June and father 
ai Anlhons pearefudv after a 
short illness Cremalion al 
Sun es A Sussex rreraatan- 
um Claviles oil Wednesday 
kkirrh 5 11 OQam. Flowers 
mas lie sent lo King a 
H oopei 09 \irlona Road. 
Hor lev. Surrey 


ANNCH'.VCF.MKNTS 


TWO MIT15H bi-Hi k> 

kMin I lie 1 ipih n languaiii' iHi 
runs -sw-k ffiimm .nWy'SH 
huh. in IUH hisn.iui 
innoilis le-e-HV.Bi 
I.Hlll NeWaP. !« lUllllKUiekel 
Wi-4 ilanmshsBl. I imnon Min 
1,4 HI 4UU90HI1 .-si .mi l 
TO CIKU7ME. rnna ihuli 
rieniiuis In ifa-werf luur-Mi 

art 'rt Iblr- tim are lia> b.nun .1 

kin 

"SO. YOURE brilium wind 
eke h ness? I love jnu. 

Mrs J “ 

TREASURE lime reu UttlW IIP 
Ml- |I- , Feepah ms line 

damn 


MEMORIAL SERVICES 


CRAHAJM-DtXON a serv ire of 
Thanksgiving for the life of 
Charles Graham Dixon. OC. 
will be lietd in Ihe MpiIkoI 
School and HaspUal Chanel 
Charing Cross HospH.il. Firf 
hain Palace Road. Wo. on 
Thursday 27 March at 
12 30pm. 

I Corrod e d noUeot- 
ROBERT FRASER - A senire 
will be held at 12 noon this 
Ueriuesdav March 5lh ai SI. 
kkirs's - On Paddinqion 
Green 12 noon All fronds 
will be vers- welcome. 


I.\ MEMORUM 
- PRIA ATE 


INSTONE in knuw mernon- of 
Sii Siunurl and U»dv 
Inslone. on the aroiiserxars 
M Iheirssedding das and re 
mm (boring otso wilh lose, 
nur rirar shirrs Anna and 
Tlsrn 

SUflONS HAROLD 2nd Main 

liemi Hlh Sasiteaabet 1U7Q 
kMelulll.- (ilMliS l<*IT lOIH 

rile Ilia m llv *ifi*rllll<nv .4 
MlSIlMiS XlMluei 

SWOROCR Erica Ann S.R N. 
bCM MTD died 3rd 
Moirli 1974 in Bans Air Dt 
saMet- Missed bv us all. 


MARRIVGES 


PLATT-DOWUNG John 
fiends Platt .uul Jennifer 
Dowling were null led on 
22 nd Irbrudiy in NoriuU. 


BIRT1IDA\S 


BLUE EYES Hanoi Rmhdji 
lose sou at wavs, sieve. 
KELLY lo.)i uia Chai tone rmi 
■■ •iiutiUmns on \niH 2 1st 
Rulhilai. Sul Mairh. 


SERA ICES 


REBECORATMC? *4. ill.il i.iihhi 
■ imV tin |Nili'iiliiim In iHIIiIUI 

|iVm- ISM m -frt.* X.-'kS Ur 
• •ill Ml. 

HEART (a HEART. Tmkiis n.n 

■■I lUM-iiim i , niuiri.li.il mli" 
rim ImUi-. Illlnlllllmi Ik lm 
« ■ mii.ii(Urti-Jiip 1 1 H-mMlIli. 
St.iiK.re- Ihsal ki Ib-atl. S.' 
I artuliMi till I vi if hf lllbMl 

xt.rt.is a**: 1 .x.-.i 

FRIENDSHIP, l.ae .A Xkifii.N.- 
sii. b*« .■■■us Ikii. In* Hull 
•f.llr ■ *■ U.V..I I «Hi 

■Ini. WM III *>t 1* •! I 


Cancer 


Ibgether we can beat It. 

■ Wr fund over one third of 
oil research into ihe presen- 
i ton and euro of cancer in 
Ihe UK. 

Help us by sending a dona- 
tion or nuke t legocj lo: 

Cancer 
Research 
Campaign 

21'jih.in HtgiseTerrAeT 

lIVpi TTfl/3 LifindiKi SWlY 5AR.I 



WANTED 


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klle I rtw.rt d I ilAlrl Jkt. 7th 

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lilinlv 11 li m.k pleax- v»nle 
si nil riel. UK in IKIX. f?l Ihe 
limn. p U rtnx diU. Vnuinki 
Slusrt. I nntiai I 1. 

LARCE WARDROBES A Mima-. 
Ihviv llanki eerfi A Pn- 1*90 
nimiliiir Tel. 01 SHS 0148 rt 
ni pm Trio 

MAHCASTTE A an Inleti-JUN 

Him <inliime Kweriers 
Ol US3 «079. 


FOR SALE 


RESISTA 

CARPETS 

SALE NOW ON 

Mawise storks of wool 
hfroded Bntlrtv from C3.96 
+ v at Plus many bargains m 
loom slrt-v In all gualllirs. 

207 Havcntock Hill 
Hampstead NW3. 
01-794 0139 

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*200 PIANOS* 

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UR 

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wriM op non to m rth vsi 

MARKSON PIANOS. 

.VAniiV SUerf. IXWI. 

lei. 01 935 HOW 
Alllllers PkMP. Si 1H. 
lei. Ol M&4 4S17. 


mux It. IV dale. IHrt. dumonl 
itkJ ts.ooa Rnlex dale ue4. 

I Hit ihamDOd rii.il 15.000. Tel 
Ol 779 OHIO 


S STONE DIAMOND RMS Hiwu 
In ui -en.no New v.ilibilian 
kexxn rn: oi 7o7 sbaa. 


THE TUNES >ld|4 V9A6V <hve 
mmw-qim- .in mmin.il iwlr dal 
art IIk- wl\ ikn Hies umebnln 
k 17.50. m 2 Kx £22 OO, plus 
tree IrtOO'- Tune- A greefiugs 
i ai rt let Ol 4HO oSOG nr 
0497 53145 

CATS, STAHUMT EXPRESS 

wenavrlnkefsioi mesramlail 
IlHsdie and -purls. Tel. 631 
3719. 657 1716. AP niam 
until raids 


_ miles 

(ampbrll uplmislerea Ve lie sir 
3 Perr -hup and aine hairs. 3 
n«i> irnrh C990 Private -ale. 
Call rel: Ol 674 1447. 

TICKETS lor any rvcrtk G*s 
suuliuni Lap. Oie-V. In. Mi- 
Mi ihisilrr amt -parts. 1 M2I 
OOI6/U2H i <0*». 

• -\.f s/Vt-a/DoWr- 
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ip 4IM>* dirilurNi . 3 -lie ns liepr-T 


p-i'Aibqi 

, Olfers Ring Mle haetlB cn n mOl-, 

1321 298b / Ol |»Tt0»^5gW’ 

tbco-YORK - PHVMC STONES aMI; 

. iis-k'inuvMar Be.iuliiul *imei« 
unn Clmipnr in bus now. let-. 
0675 533771. 

SCATTIHDERS Am- event UK 
C-ols. rm ml Grin. SldrlNba I sp 
01 H2H I67H Mamr credit 
(aids 

EXCELLENT HEALS Study lum 
lute: gnokshrtse-. d«^k and 
rtU.IT 1300 01455 0974. 

OLD TOHNifcivmga-di-livrc.it to 
■ .i-llr- and old imimrv bnmi— 
0745 355211. 

TYPEWRITER, Olivetti Praxis 50 
pin lion ■>. a- new. IIKl ire 
LI75UNO. Irt 533 5S72 eves- 


ANTIQI'ES * 
COLLECTABLES 


WANTED! AnllquP Walking 
raws rig Ol sna hoph i-jcU 

■mniung- m eves 


MISICAL 

INSTRUMENTS 


FOR SALE Camempmaiv hand 
i lallril -nliri f iKpi-n nak rtuuiw 
laMr rtianem 511 uilli mqhl 
■ funs OffPis <n et WO Ruki 
O l 1*54 5579 Jtlei bpin. 


HAMMOND C3 naan wen I — «~ 
spa-akn \ (> cniMhleei. urtl 
pn UI Iwturt Ollets lo 0535 
clTW7Q alln oem. 


SALE. PunnknrM. -eionrth.mil. 
n—v. in nmUlHined I ntesaal* - 
IHHIW. Ol 41*5 1555. 


FOR HER 


SEND HOTHCR blMIl. deswrl 
mil- an i In - Nit- ltov -11 pn-v 
u, -li ipev ceil bns HI 60 plus 
p-n In niilei Unnrtie- 0777 
oOTfM 


SHORT LETS 


FULHAM mie bed Ikd. C II c-ol 
IS * Wa-ti Mach • Clem**, 
ISrw i m pet- Svail 3-1 mil*. 
I n Irt HOOfiw. Tel . 01 -31*3 

Sami 

SERVICED APARTMENTS in 

ha-imiininfi 1 .a I v 74iir -v, lad 
1I\ I'latuea-un Spls. Ol .STS 
evy. 

U.V PROP. COUPLE am tan 
ing -a esc irt seek rtnmed IfcHi-e 
wl -tlla let 5 6 Imnltls Irt Ol 
37 S TOtfi nn 6 A H6 
DCUOHTFUL FLAT eveitaefcina 
Slnnlowr -n|u.ui- Wl 1 nrd. 1 
le.|* I. IKS pw 01 935 WJ 
LUXURY SERVICED FLATS. 

■ nilial lanrtnn linen I'STS |itv 
Rum l.awn llw Spl- .375 MU 

ST JAMS’* PLACE SI* 1 Seas 
-■■Mil 7 laed. s I iKd nesl !>■ 

■ <aik ikaad uwl 573 oSOa ■ f 


FUTSHARE 


1 -mi w« nus prtum. 7“ 
Mier >1 himeaul Ik -. -rrte 
Inau-a 1 m ILil la-tMIe pal ciaun 
iis imaiinii v,iihan isi*» hsup 
ail I iqnini IU7H 7M 37 dill lime 
a-k l,n If*- XlaiKnm. evi'lldil 

l.llli-IK e— 

ftORUIRY Pi4Uid» lldl Ibui 
m i. .’5* !n -Ifcm- < mnl'U krlate 
leiai-e anti naiilell Hwe -ill 
inni-rrtew tjn PH a lulls HUS 
i— -nlMl Irt m 7t*1 nl50 >.d 
lei vapma 

KENSmCTOJL theme- nr.ri 
l».|— m w.iatleil I" -hi his Hal. 
WHII 111-11 ilhf In-dim hallum 
LI IS in- exi I Ol 937 mVM 
■MU 13 Pin 

LADBROKE CHOVE p« nv.de 
in irtn.de .m VI msndilul it* 
lain MHli uaidrti llvm inmn. 
use >11 l.iilUaes 'J1 ril* JIM I 
I»ga lei 771 5c4J isis 

YMJNO I Sendee ha -lame 
■ •■nil* finnpleiefi taa-enwid Hal 
in 1 .KMcakr Mini- L4y> in 
l*6i- -ti.il i- >•( h-ti-IUwme efa RalKa 
ni .’.11 Ml 77 .rilie 7 V> p In 

axAimruL salham. stuir 

lai'P Mill ’•lib ■einrt UW 
pun i’Si 1 I9NUP- Kfliall fn' 

c’.l,* 

CLAPHMI I « Inwn. m -Kaiia 
l*l Mil null hulls*- Willi idar 
idlin I xi'-tleial la. ihliaw a> a 
I'aliiw esal 7.»l W7H 
FLATMATES wain lave sia.HHMa 
ssa II i-*k«i inlirtl'* In* v —isaii- 
I5-- laf lid -nipl «•> 5H-* ’>4-*l 
.31 3 ill i WHIM ml H»ad. -W 3 
ISUHBtOH l*»i>tl 3 larilai-nn.l 
la— I*hh- hi la-1 ike. < II (alia 

• .’’di p>* mat wiiii 4 -lhuupi 

Til *'l S3’* WU 

IDEAL FOR CITY VmiHiilS.il hi 

dll Ills Ira- A Will In 1 III XI 

11 1 i.i-ai i*iii It* 1 hi 1*1 

,-aii .-*ai ■■ llni ,i-i4 . 

SW17 W COMMON l’T-1 I 
n if H. ■ •*■■■ c ii n- 

• 1 Hi pi na • si 1 |i| -am :i.:ii 

I sf -■'•I 3 ’ H.- 1" artl • |aiia 

WANTED #■'•11 liNtHll IN 4 nr I ■! - 
lii if 1 wild >M I rif.ia f ill If|r«t. a ~i 
i--. 1 Mli ->U> /»| 'MO >iRi 


COLUMNS 


FLATSHARE 


WCt LAiraE FLAT. M.Ue pirtrs 
Hlinal ■■ - Ui —lual.- w till 1 Ilk- 
I nm pa ill • lull- I Juan Ol W 
IW sat llvin .'pen 


in led twill <11 
UHlHlk law- 11 -e ui kil l.7M>1k 

ilia \ii 4 unian (>1 A' 1 3 7tOl 


hi slaate -llll.li livr 

■aiMin Hal Ni tiake k s t.|jo 
pna 1 11 nT» x Ton ■ ik is 1 
LAPHAM Ibcil 1 . 7J»* rt H 
eawdla-IMirf'llllal. i.|J5p*in 
■ml f rt. ni u.3> oH70 
FULHAM IX eh V I HO Ikd 
«H. u I. 1.45 00 PW es.1 

l.-tphoiH- fit 731 75ROO ligmi 
(ON . FNL .Viatwr .nail ni 
W 11 lea gUKiril ml IS * 3 W 

p v. it* M7KS 
PUTNEY (laf ni lube. i«u*h-Ii 
v.ut. hi 1 . w.i-ii iifci-u • n uno 
n 1 .m. nn Ol R74 1076 
RICH MONO. 1 -h hr li* O t 
4 nuns sin l.lMlpm. uw Hi 
99H 11345 

SW11 Prcu I. 77-1 OR. srtal>- 
lux cun- 1 - min m -iinp- t.cw 
mm iml li-l OIKtfWW 

SWS PROF F In sbain Mr rm in 
new Ikd llem Ildar Rent L3P 50 
pw ret 7.31 1H77 alln 7 pm 
SWt a lealls mem* I* eiri llal 
-I lair. 1.1 1.3 pn wrrfi VI hdts 
and rframg mrlmieif SWWIO 
m llal-avide ilnenfra n ». c h- 
u A- li. L46p n Inc Xiul 
m s ndi m r 01 H54 7956 
SWlS.lkd Old - 1. n v 75,50. 
LllOpi Hr - MU- OTH74 
■Si m ca SO. 

BWS Lame bastwllliag rm in Ins 
Ibil ni.clIVa,? mmsf iril-f'il 
Ildar LSOO pm let 744 o&'-e. 
Wl i .ids in share iHMiilifulls dn 
mated knue Imiise CTO tra- 
in. | Trt. Ol 4de aHt. 

IH4 M.F o i Well f urn. I hit. 

<: II i:57 pw- I Hepburn- Ol 

nSo-SOMH i -sin 730 
W4. 2nd pnsnn -33+. O R huge 
hrairiilul nnulrti ilal. CTOO t* an 
■ml. 90S 4MTO 

WS Prof uul n s. PI fc In -hi hie 
to. Ills mmt lee. inn- l.iDe 
6 oh uaTH .HI opm LlORpini 
WANTED BOCHLANDB alisi bs 
(dill nr rial (We -Taare l>frsrsr 
raw K77 9409 inf lire hou-l 


* TEMPTING TIMES 


22 *. 

min ed>* wiam lor ouc livi'lv 
wsreUiiial . unscdkinrs in Wl 
IIimhs 12 30 5 30 rail Isn 

C'ecrt Seria-tarn— Plus on Ol 

377 KoOO 

YOUNS GNADUATES wilh unncl 
Is ping in leoipiHaiv wak in 

uui erwlies. chan lie- jnl idtiei 
non nmnan. lal nrcaanealinns 
Pk'.ase ring Piospeil 1 rtnp- 
ejlall .wenrx-l 679 1331 
EXPERRCNCED S.'H. -\udto. W'P 
SisrrtalK— j* --ft. - ,! . ,\i-o 

I s nrUs 1 r k -prannea- Can i-rU 
Gulden Rui.-.iu. llOllerl hi. 
IC4 353 7696. 

SH SEC WANTED InrL T.wstan 
mi-ill in Oil ca W I nd Kin*. 
K7R 5797. KP Cans 


TEMPING 

WfTH 

A DIFFERENCE 

Why take |ust any tempo- 
rary secretarial |0b when 
you ooukl work Ft TELE- 
VISION. RLMS. 

ADVERTISING. PUBLIC 
RELATIONS OR PUB- 
LISHING’ We haw lota 
of vacancies and ottac ex- 
oMent rates - *and whaTa 
mors nd pay you in the 
sane week!*. 

Why not cal at loctey an 
'- 01-489 6568 

' ".Or 01-483 8388. 


laSosvi 


a* : 


iEtMOKj 


NON-SECRETARIAL 


ANTIQUE DEALERS In mrhasi 
-Can kltraiKi in III*- lMh .nad 
rails loincrmuis Lnolisti inr 
mince reauenw o-snslaiil -ales 
manaopt lo inn shop -\ge 25* 
Ring. 552 U509. 




SALES SERVICE Co OtrUiuilor 
. L9 500 ' + iroiew The. well 
v:-km»*n hdemaunn.il (JusmelK, 
-! rjntlse leouire minimum nf 41 
estpenence m sites sd 

-ir.dhm. 3 on -Muki be 

:brtwrn> 2o SO Ifase -A* 
«NO gualnHaUOR. Of a< li 
".TRA-i-unienie wills compulrts 

* and ..m .exit overt pnwoiulils 

1 srrttefH.pPTVrt mriuding mwi 
leilv cfWIlieUf .lUowanre Ins- 
WPS .slid 7SB IXX Please 
. 'Milan r-mrtmn King .Spots. 01 
409 HO 70 

PUBLIC AFFAIRS company re 
duties VOUMi per -on wilh .1 
wnckniq knowledge id Xa.uidi 
Union Pufdif Vlldicx Musi 
-polk hssedi-h^uM oi horwe 
giah This |sa new appmiuniffil 
.uul ihe su ressl UI .ipplK .ml will 
beiesporoa M elOi itesrlopiiUjH 

muse c.imp.ngiw ui 
hundlnashi bui w III be Lcimhan 
Wised Trt. Ol 722 2953 


STEPPING STONES 


RECCFTtCMtST- COPER P K Ca 

in (avintCldiih-n Cimxl pfn-.f1 
lalinn c L7.000 Wind 
.Veaanales 377 0435 ■ Vov i 


PART TIME VACANCIES 


FART TUBE SUN rrqum-d inf 
iik-IHiil pi ■« In in IkMh-i 

Mr eel. Tele ppm k- Ol «36 T. So." 


P T ACCEPT .SECRETARY loc 

v i-l v Mm. small oflare Hr 

nnd esira help for rTtrisiine 

who runs out swibniioaud. 
rtwlmu wilh all appaMmem- 
.imi i aimpondenf r Gnon iso 
■ u*i and —ilf imo.ud esoemae 
iMebwnicr and a c Itrrnul nn 
WHiaiifs rno-l imporLinl Cidl 

01.493 HKM Judv 

t.ilqulurson I Id 47 New- I kind 
- -Mi eel Lowon Wl 
PART-TRUE BOOKKEEPER aMr 
m dn general difoturis 3 Uie 
Iibiw. P.3YI . ledum, elf as 
nuiiHInl las Wl rtitphisnienl 
aumrv . -Vue kmnhiln uil They 
nur-4 he mature Will roti-iiihs 
-.MiM-nne reined Xalars iwg 
I’euUtl Mrs, Lirmk Ol 631 
0707 

PART TOM! AUDIO SEC insrtse 
men! is a-Miird vsiih Wl 
i hauls. Inr UUrtb-aem acid ini 
. -aonble se< 24 liotirs pet wiu-k 
1.4 ICO htelkll isHpi K36 6044. 


DOMESTIC & CATERING 
SITIATIONS 


isanm-. m«m 
mum 4 sis us lenienema.. 
IntalHHi Sun es sdr.lulir 3 
■ hckllrn. 5. X . 14 mile- Salary 
1.150 L200 ifeee per week, 
hull imnhei . cal ihiver .Sppii 
Mm 4ms MuUn. Jeeves .Sae-n 
< v .iMencev 3b RromMon Rd. 
Klilum-lM adge limdnn hW3 
TrtrtMmne 01 EM4 4047 


ASSISTANT COON RXOUiHKD Ir. 
wmk in hu-v Xnrsh ln*Un 
nul-KI.- rolmiM cnmp.ins 
IHe.ee- img MalHMae IduanK 
Irt Ol n07 1555 


cncr coon * Slemard e«. >2 
M-i minded Inr 7511 helih 
cinwinu Chert. Nanais Soul lo 

CHHMa-1 Ixcelkud ICHldrtHlIK 

■ 1*4 rail imN he m Iremti 
Ikiidr Curat*- -lawLilri. 
hum* ledge 01 Sjllinu pfrter.iWe 
H| 221 0749 H 1*0 answer, 
rturtl 75377. 

MEAD CHIEF ami heanml <7nrt 

■ rg uni-il lor JatMiH-se icxtau 
load ui Kfribilliluni I sp 
cm. -final Phxwe -end ilrtaih In 
Mi K loniisaiiid. shogun tana 
m— Re-Jaui am 05 laluol wl 
Xi if III* Ilia m NG1 5CJN. 

OVERSEAS AU PAIR AGENCY 

MT Hrtirnl Htm-t.I omlnn Wl 

let JiU 6534 I h Oiei-.se. 

lae m hrtos nncre. lentil petin 
PART THE COOK irgidied <3ris 
link w Uie bal 7 !«rsp« 
Irtiawwie Jills- nn W4 7327 


DOMESTIC & 
CATERING 

SITI ATIONS WANTED 


UI PARI anil Toting tall. 
17 s avals. r> hanking m a l.waalt 
k. inipmve hot f lUflr-h and lake 
■ mn -a- Iwuea wart in>Httag In 
fae— Ihe I ll-lC .amhiadg.- 1 -sain 

V*' Will nu av.ulalrie Hum 
hmuuuna H -liMir* Ho ■* .an 
I*- OnumhI -Ini -as inmllllNi 
Ideaie arm la. I Mr igeirn 
S iiamn-, Hie ate Kamrali L-bi 
C II .‘5*1? Hunan. 1 S». ri/rt knul 


PROPERTY TO LET 
LONDON 


NEARfOGHBUrTPHUK I f*cf 

|.*.||| ltd nisi ml llal In trt 
klh lfc-n Huia-i lal.*' re. i-pfuai 
r*‘ u*d ualihNi. ahea- In lid*' 
la.iikaik Imaiininu Xhn.li. 
I II i vTipi nuuilli fh-oav hi 
Ht'.w-i-. Ml I urJaaiiv 1 3uk 
lt.se! I iMIdtm XI 


BLACKNEATM SE IX lmm.ii 
- a IUIII Ikd IM lml I mhhii, 
kil A — Imwa-i C II luuas -4.1 
leu* a. -Jal pun IIK gas rti-a 
1.1 *lta -liiOCi an. 

Wl ,. v iiun • li in.* n lus nn 

a 11 - 1*11 Ikil • H.'3 I.amc gnu ill 

ia*r MM. ni :«’i .utt 


0^*ERSE.\S TR.VVF.L 


Fantasy Iceland 

Inland, n fantasy Wand where nature, hand 
in hand with ihe legends, has created a 
landscape of breatht^ang beauty volcanoes, 
bubbling hot springs that burst into 180 foot 

senses, spectacular wnterfel Is and wim 

sunvTMEdaysthatlastfor 24 hours. i 

You can stqiif^D anther wodd Cor as 

Dttfea 

®OI-Z^7Z7d IWOOBiiAM 



HEVRT OF ENGLAND 


HEAR LUDLOW Turibeied iMtn 
- a run el leal rain 4 he.iul.lul Imla 
•Lis- < *1 lanes H I \ Wsafd ad 
IM-tma laon Ofl« 472 511 


WALK 


Krin 

OnliMV mn riurtllimidl COm 

foils. Hi m Ilia rn IhelUfP OH 

ffadlllal. Hia-jeume.. Bfliss 
•054 4211600 


- BISFNESS ■ . 

OPPOI^^J^.- 


ivicumi 


I CE L A n 


TWICKENHAM TRAVEL LIMITED • 33 NOTTIHS HILL BATE 
LONDON *11 3J0 - TELEPHONE D1-ZZ1 7Z7B ■ TELES 9Z2IBS 

b ae a Glasgow telephone 04i-2B4 oz4Z-abta/atol 1337 


AUSTRALIA 


BJBcmgiamMrTOuAbu 

- addrfmbFIW— 

fBmjooOJAtfi :.py nraga 


■nwaiBBTOirina 

TRA/I : 

Qg pcr IZHg U tW — k AH uu . 
R*mpR*g,CUM1BN 


PARTAIR 


N York Cl _ 

Los Ang £32V HMM £339' 

SMkKS> £629 Banefcok J339, 

Anck C7SO Toronto £259 

130 Jenny* Straet, 

SW1 

PbMM 01-839 7M4 



PERTH rQum from 
SYD/MEL/BRB ' £655 
AUCKLAND * £745 
See what the IHIEPBtDBIT 
SPECiAUST can offer! 

01-2425555 
REHO TRAVEL {IATA} 

15TT7 New OxfocdSL London WD 

BwMcwSftor&lhnxm . 


TRA1LFINDERS 

vv'orWw uk- row ro-i immis 

TheheM and we ran laov eu 

1 70X100 < ItMtt- -UXl- 1 97JJ 

' .vrcx'kd thl tigno 

IfXNSI C766 

aim nn 
SYDNEY - £382 £841 
PERTH £380 CS82 

AUCKLAND £409 £770 
BANGKOK £188 £383 
SINGAPORE £225 £482 
M AMI/FLORIDA £189 £292 
HONG KONG £237 £474 
□EUfl/BOMBAY £250 £386 

COLOMBO £241 £420 

CAIRO £160 £270 

NAIROBI £231 E3B1 

JO’BURG E286 £473 
UMA £253 £484 

LOS ANGELES £187 £325 
NEW YORK £120 £240 
GENEVA . £75 £89 

■ 42-41 EARLS COURT tUJAO 
fOMDOB M.U: 

ekropofUBA FggbB- 01-937 5400 
Long Hml Fkjym 01-403 ISIS 
Ixt/Buotnon Oan 01-03 3444 

GomnaMM LjHnmVBandad 

ABTA IATA ATOL MSB 


★★SAVE £ffS** 
★★FIRST CLASS* ★ 
★★CLUB CLASS** 
★★TOURIST CLASS** 

★BOOK NOW FOR 86* 

* ww * * • MBeauw * 

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* Hflpjnr « • *auta * 

A-iOBAG - - * #. ■ : StffiO.* 

* HOUta - * HGLMiiQN * 

yrnews "rtini*- C-Liimja * 

* UEAkA "-Wr^f.'rAjlWWtf * 
* wwir® .* cr .. vmKai«a jr 

* IMrtlUS *" * MMlMk 

* a*»ru * • * % Rwosaj * 

* 115* * us* * USA 9 USA * 

SI MAURI n TR.UTI. 

ilvi'J iwg 

J9 South St F|*nnr . Sums 

oirri i’xw.jsHn^uRr 

• Jinra.-igii:'^uu7. 

Tries ilM.7 . 

AUtmtAllAI MEW 2EAUUHM 
\ rating Irtonds and irlilmnl 
Then con tart ua fn LOW BLD 
GET tarn. .Frau* Iwochucrs 
Irom Barrie. Travel JUmxIce, 42 
Hugh Jiiren. king* lamdev. 
Herha -Pfione <092771-61366 
Canon 7 day* ART A. member. 
TAKE TIME OPT to t»artv Am 
"derdam. BnrwK Bruges. 
Geneva- Brine. Lausanne. The 
H.KHK-. Dublin. Rouen. Ban 
Wane * thepue Time CHI 2a. 
cne-ler caone. London 6W1X 
7WJ Ol 236 8070 
SKI BONNE NEKE. GAemd 
rhalrfs in Mmtjrf a Oaurrhawef 
l» 1-190 h 6 1 Wfk tor. travel. 
Cbavu laon. unlld wtneKexlni 
siv e aitad mg 01 733 23331737 
3HOI ansaofione i 
LATIN AMERICAN' TRAVEL, 
fentdif the Mifrrf. lo Latin 
Amenta. Onb A 1st Claw. O 
litilKSin. 13 4. A MeSICO. 
MiUMir 01 629 1130. 
ALICANTE. Faro. Malana rtr 
Ununaul Travel -XTOL I7M3 
OI 581 4641. Hor-Uam 6BS4I 
AUSSBC. 1XV . kui XI nr*, v .« -V 
Hong h'onq. Ik-J Farm: Ol 493 
7776 -\BT.V, 


AUSTRALIA 
FAR EAST 
WORLDWIDE 

TTw fovvosf cost flights 

Erec h ec h Travel 
. 01*542 4613 ‘ 
e 4>l?543 4227 : 

’ 'Eslab 1970 


UP UP & AWAY 

Nairobi. JoHuro- Cairo. Du 
lul. Manbul. Mtngapaee. K.L 
Delhi. Bangkok. Hong Kong. 
Hvdnrv. Lww. a The 

•\mnrk-Ofc. Flarauago Travrt. 
3 New Umber SI klarttlr 
Arrti London WIH TOO. 

01-402 9217/18/19 

Open Saturday 10.00 13.00 


VENTiniA HjDUDAYS: 

L.XSF MINV. IT. ADVA NCt: 
BOOK1NO WINTER Sk N 
BAIiaviNS Algarve lwh 
from W: 2 WM from ClOO 
Tetter Me lwk iron) C1B9: 
2wk* Irom C224. Deharlum 
7. 9. 14. 16. 20 Marrh. AMO 
Departures April & Ihrough 
out ihe year mriuding 
Apaclmenh or Hold a FlMbl-v 
irom cmwirk A Manrhmter 
luuba la vtnr. A avail. Imlant 
booUng* A brawn ure only ah 
ran from The. SpertaiML 

V enlura Holldayv Tel Lon 
dotl Ol 250 1366: 

Manrhmler 061 834 6033: 
SbrtfMd 0»S 591 10©. 
ATOL 2034 


.linimwi ocean 'Irani town 

horn* MviMv oaveetf. s. bed 

monkrluto 1 lunmheaL gneane. 

tennis, prof, all imllUrs nartod 

ed A\8d Mas- LhrOunh Augaavl. 

momh m PHMUh- SI -300 pm. 

America 813 962T743. 


AIRFARE S PEC M U m i Sydney 
a w C395 rln C60G Aairklaivd 
O tv £420 rln C774. JoTiurg 
0 w (264 rhi (470. Lon Ange 
Lett w (.171 1 in CS36 London 
FbqM Centre 01 370 6332. 


COST CU1 TENS ON OHdll* MW 
to Luroue. L SA 3 maxu rteulina 
Itocn. Omfomaf Traaef OI 730 
2201 ABTA IATA ATOL- 


CWAT PUDHTS Worldwide. 

; Hav-nmr kef. 01-9S) 1366. 


USA from C99. Motor (ravel. OL 

485 9237. IAtA 


v».'. ’’- 1 ; 

nlrfi lifdapr »•. 

Mtan n .ivg-Lanl faa one mtririhx 

protni in radii mil irteuCauw 

,-urvrt m indinlla.ll fomoonle- 

\ ary neari handwritliia n*en 

Iwi. Aptirfhanh wlH be walking 

uom home (rang I bra own Me 

phone lexpenaw retunoed). 
ThefT N pta-dlvetv- no -idling lit 

vmvnl but vau must be atMe to 

ladh uUrfligenux amt to aotprev., 

voucxeff (burn- High luminq 

prrienual ndutnt to Mrlual 

lucmaiiinf gaci*-d .Irom 
lefephone ulvlolN of nmtlu 
me- -upMird appiv ui 
luadwnling to MunMAMi twee 

Mr. Nrwdada lid . htorlev 

Haxne. -314 522 Remit HUert. 

lOfidoa WlR 3,\D 


T 


: PUBLIC N&nCES - 


IN THE MATTER OF in RNITT 

A HiVLL.VMSHIRt HOUHNOS 

nsuc umiti n companv 

and 

Rv: THE MATTf.B.OF TH£ 
COMP AMIS .\<ri" 1988. 
NOTICE Pi HLREBX GIN L*N 

I had Ihe Order of Ihe Hlgfl Uoairl 

ol Ju-Uce Oum*n DtvMonu 

dated I7ih rebruan- ?986 ran 

1 riming the loamrUoe of the 

casual of the ahnve named Com I 

pony Iron* CTO.B48.69a lo) 

C10566XM3 60 and Uie Mmole 

approved by me Umrl «tmwtna| 

with erased to Ihe Caudal of Ihe 

Ooniseia- « allrt<xl the vxrrd 

pan mdon rnndred bv Ihe above 

menuooeo Art were mriMered bo 

the RepWrat- at oomnonle- M 

Sflnd Fobruucv . 1986 .. r- . I 
Doled UiN 26»h day of FroruarTf 
1986. 

CtoHrftarx lor Ihe aboxe tugned 
Oumoony 

Anhunl Monk Criaa k Ca 
Broadoate Haaane 

7 Ddon Hrert 
LONDON EC2M 7HP 


In Ihe mailer of r J. Mlloer a 

Sofia Una nrd by order of Ihe High 

Court « Jim Ire dated inr tain, 

oav of Nov ember 198B Mr. PAT 

RICK WALTER JOHN 
HARTIGAN Of BOOTH. WHITE 

A CO . 1. Wardrobe Rlarr. cartel 

Lone. SI Panda.. London EC4V 

OAJ lux been aopoinird LJoulala 

lor of Ihrabme named Comwv 

wilh a Commlllee of bnocclaos 

Dated Ihtx 7Ui (tor of February 

1986. 

P.W. HARTIGAN 
Ltouklaldr 


IN THE MATTER OF" WL 

COMPANIES ACT- kS8S>- 

AND 

BM THE MATTER JOtr 
-- AlATRSOea. UKTED 
B»‘ order of Uie High Court oi 

J in nd doled Ihe 17Ui day of Or 

Mber 1986. Brian MlRx of 2 

Norton Street. Southend an Sen 

Ewx SSI IEF. lux been ad 

sol fried U<tu Motor <d Ihe atone 

naamiM Componv. 

Dated ihta 19lh Day of Fa*ni 
ary. 1986 


The BRITISH RAILWAYS 
BOARD hecebv dv* ah am no 

Ure. m punuanreol semon 54 

■he Tranaoorl i\ci. 1962. null 

Ibey plan to wUlulrin* Urtghl u 

nimex from the looowing uatton) 

in me month of April. 1986 : 

□ARLINGTON 
pnruruurv of ihe dole on wtach 

ihe t arm ly win be art Ihdrawti and; 

.41 Ihe aUemalhe (onuih-t wUI 

announred toraOv. - 
222 Mbrylebone HoaL 
London. ' ' 


LEGAL NOTICES 


SELF-CATERING ‘ 

MALAGA, TUBIMI 

Tiavrtnraeoi 441 nil 

MALDIVES. LANZAROTE 

Mands Ol 836 4383 

SELF-CATERING 
CANARY & MADEIRA 

PEiaiTIO DEL CARMEN 1 usury 
oparlnranN uilh pool 4 oar 

Uixi IOH2SH4I75S <Uv KH2S. 

70241 ei exj 

SELF-CATERING 

FRANCE 

CAP FERMAT villa nUh ptml tot 

14 lo lldv 4 vxkx. SI. 720 
uix-klv Panina A Parker >049 

4H1 1 S4I.V 

BEST OF BRITTANY StSMdevlV 
la- dirert irom Breton oxirtv. 
Iiuludnig leiTKM A AA 6 Mar 
ills. IX offline Lrir TiHirtl 
T.axrt Baurlon M ixaltx 

UtosULS4 2\S 104511 20927 
ul 27074 VIII A 

SELF-CATERING ■ 
GREECE 

GREECE. (W rilamri) V IBav a»rt 
fc pen-aim- nnfculiirra. Irani 2S 
M,g.li tun jntra irom mk 
I.1&9. 2 Uk« L1H9 <09231 

7JKVW Tmisuav llotidili- 

viirv vroi 1107 

SPRING M CORFU. .xpnDMav 
sdrtul prnrti m IN it atllarlive 
vilkrtlitgn HisaUiTov* Ring Pan 
HfuM HlKMdVS Ol 734 2662. 

SELF-CATERJNC ITALY 

TUSCANY Ream axi larmtaatrie m 
In-all at (TliaiMl VvatlaMe Irom 

1 asks lo thl. Irom C20O pn 

Sip- o 0494 66175 lal (rikuK 

NR. VENICE, ual in ronniri 
riufta dp- 4 o Mil I4M1 lu 
iHlsl t71h. Irt 0H66 61 1600. 

SELF-CATERING SPAIN 

COSTA BLANCA 1 mgur villa in 

7 arrtra « IhdIuih -ea 4 bed 

1 IKH Irt i -riep- HXOa. 3 balhx. 

Pill Ole IM. IIUHd srtVHt- 
1.540 L6TO PM Ilrtaih A (IH 
•xa pltolo- 02556 0&I7. 

WINTER SPORTS 


PUT ST. VINCENT il irnah Alto* 
I Ilian k&9 mil oertun (ettu 
Snoax-Npari ta-iOh27a 677071 

APRIL UUMO l -lie xnm» meale. 
ip rid -naav- I idl* ladrt.M ah-i 
Irt- Hum Linn Aojnimm* 
i in a 1.96 m Ui NfeMnOOl 
Ml Hoe IKS 

SKI ANDORRA AUSYMAJ totrt- 
•« -Hi a Jin hh art- t ah It ai 
III llum L79 PtVH»r maw im 
nut luauliiiie- IP- trt- luirl 
*11 -T75 3391 

SKI LO AI.PEB laat uaxuav hub 
•Ml- an \rr Iwv Uk-H-a. Irt luf 
rtrtaii- ni orp soaao 

SKI MOftfiMS riraaiuni- 

oa rfikahk- I ih Ma A Vail Ring 
nwal 71 Soi-j 

SKI PUT ST VINCENT iron. I 09 
am 11-4- ni 6)0 7076 (rtlll 
\ICM 177.1 


SWITZERLAND SrtardUk-d ntoht* 

Ol 724 2388 ABTA A TO! 

WINDBK STEAMS, Forrext and 

FatrvUUe raclJex. uni tao.ni 

frnm on male. In UM> Ortglum 

Ardennex Ihe pomtoltlex are 

mdli-B. a mullhgl ami lie- tare 

ottered for the whole fomilv. ■ 

H0MI4VX ftom C20 net person 

per week m rolkKrix. fame. \a 

raltou vUlagex or Itolrrt. Final 

nut mote ask Uie BiHwd bro 

rtiufe Uom Brtotum Rental 

Service- ■ 176 Sierttlen Portu 
Rond. 'S CHfyden. 'era .BJJ. 
Trtentatoi^-ONatBl -IslBSi QT C 

• *lmrlr 

| ----- 

. ITtfditC C6l'»'Twnh C6d6‘ .Ufl 

a faMoe- ca rrferx to Ai>6 N/.-ftt- 
684 7371. ABTA 
AUSTRALIA. NEW Z EALAND . 
Genuine dnrouni forex 
OTC OX 602 3236 
HKON6 G4S8 Bangkok C369*fta 
W!S Ofber Far Lon aiexihu 
mm*. 01 684 7371 ABTA. 
SOUTH AFRICA Joihwg 1, £468. 
01 684 7371 ABTA. 

LOW FARES wanuwiDC . 

L SA. s America. Mid and Tar , 
Cask S Ain™ Trayvofe. «fl J 
Mot octet SlreeL Wl. 01 680 
2928 iVH Arnrriedi 
DKCCUNIS ixl Economy Irik 
es Try ux 

tagLFUGtiTBOOKERS OX 387 
' 9100. ... 

low cost pudirs.* mm 

European dr-uiuaaanx 

VolexandR-. 01 402" 

4762 0062. ABTA. 

61004 ATOI 1900. 

LOW COST PUCHTS. hXM Euro- 
pean irixluwllanx Varixandrt 
Ol 402 4262 0062 ABTA 
61004 ATOL 1960 

HUM. JAMAICA, HLYORK. 

Worldwide meopexl larex 
Rarhmond Travel. I Duke Si 
Richmond ABTA 01 940 4073 

TUHOU rot that peri eel iwMjv 

a»iUl -amnv ftliv A cocef.ee 

nudiix ideal lor Marrh >\imi. 

Tunraon Ttairt 01373 4411. 

USA. N York C169 Miami C19« 

L V C299 rtn Aha ClKUpe-l 
-died utr III <Hi motor l S cat ri 
nrv Ol S84 7371 ABTA. 


L.S. VISA MATTERSE Gadeonl 

lb twyt. London 486 0813. 


GENERAL 

APPOINTMENTS 


HE CHELSEA HESWN Cn xeek 

■-xpenrnred and prr-rnlaMe 

-loll lor Ihrtr busy theKea 

■Jiop . AppirtiaiKHi to. oond 
rial he*. ewrObal. 01 362 4626. 


WE AHE IMlMWtoKggm 

Hh'toffllllgpSjj! 

ikitot) who -win to- toiedf 1 Iat 

brtween 18 20 = vert-, huv.su 
drn inn Ik enfe and a -ound eUu 
f.dton up lo .» level xlunriaid 
rhi-w an ideal upporlunlli lor 
an amtolKHIx pci -on m told one 
ad I onakur* mo-l vuntolul I v 
une AurnK and be ninlmu .m 
ev. rpuonul -kflarv allrt one la 
I kvci max mien-ave uaanUaq 
I’rtll Ol 221.3534 Kef .IMH. 

Irani Itoiu i*f Je Ti.adit* turn 
liana or- engage i remedial rtiu-ni 
pmu itaie- rtutoenK en 
li.uluclron MX Imauue .xlagrx 
renumixe-i In* at OU laXe 
planner. Soorte 4T 6. Ilk* ale 
I'Uirtl 92100 Ihwloapie Irt 
4H2S7T75. ■ 

I ra-nrti TroiixlahMi fonnfcim 
■nliriee- nnmerikillv. .IrthtuuaT 
lion-lullnia touafenr- lot Iramang 
pn tod- ipofd xloito.a -ml a.x -all 
phone: s»*-*r 4|‘ e. Rue lie 
rOuexI 92100 RmiMiaine Irt: d* 

25 77 73 

EAUCHAMF PLACE Re-Mlem lal 
I rtling rumjfcuiv rixiuins a 
. hagh pemvied <anniliw«Mni ini 
cnUlkXl Brcvui pirtraoMv 
opninnl. 26* 881 5130. 


WINTER SPORTS 


SKIiriG HOLIDAYS 

To Aiiama 16/3 for one 
ixixri. MiivrMMaxi Cl 37 hall 
baaid “rialx only. 

Goiw-Kk. Munich C7B 

Bimmtuham/ Munir h CMS 
ManrhrxUx i Munrih CH9 
Galwuk c Turin C86 

HARDS WfNTERSPORTH 
Trt 021 704 6222 
ATOL 16? ABTA 33771 


SKIING HOLIDAYS 


£174 


lor one week to Ncui/e 
rtOulX Jouvencraux hall 
board via CNwirh Turin. 

n&j an 704 ns 

ATOL 162 ABTA 33771 


SKI* SKI* SKI* SKI 

FLY FROM MANCHESTER 
A CATVMCH 


FROM ONLY AM 
M THE AMAZRM 
Pf U N U F A lTTY OF ANOORRA. 

HOTELS A APARTMENTS 
FREEDOM HOUD-1VS 
Ol 741 4586 051 736 0019 
ATOL 432 IATA AITO 


SKI WHIZZ 


earned Quin Ponte- 
* FUN ON THE SL0PE5R 

Ptrmrx. Bartoxinex 
and Pairiir* 


inriuxne nudiix. 

I nod aind Wine 
8 C f.148 
Ruw Ol 370 0999 
.Vlad 1820 


Maiih7daixaiki mquani UIB 

pp am heave i.iitxfxl 

(Tub fliatrt halutavv roll Ski 
l ill an Ol 903 4444 « 01 200 
6W*0.24hr-i. AHT\ 56431 
•irui nn? 


, Scanfrtlaiumxki nuK 
Il-p 8 and 15 Xlaith Suprtb 
(hotel IN- Ol 9Ne 7294 


IS ■ 22 MAR. Shi (to id l .mnexe 
in 1 wk Tun*.--. (Uuuihrxal. 

Val Thomx. la PLagne. eu 
Canal -ham. nnlv I hi pox-. HH. 
quubltg uul C 200 let 0272 
7.SH317 

MARCH AVABJUHUTY Vmtoc 

I J 1 IIX a Jleie .1 onq s i.drtixl 

hart Next to llllx. Pmale lui 
S puoL Ski -rhnol hu ill- 6 
laxilianxlei u 1.179 ski .lean 
mi- Ol 72l 7«l3 

SPECIAL SI 1 1 AXI Ml US 
IKH IS S III 2>ikx L26U.IU 
In. lii-iie VkonllM tof.x- -ak| 

l.aUil <0937. 231113 

SMI FLATS. V rt nimixn. 
I iam>- H 16 Un U« In 

UjCI pp pu Irt Ol imm 2X7ti 


r TRY TEMPING 

W you Ye temury to 
l ween (cor or M mm 
guirt taare wtrirh dtoprlioB 
to lake. We win find you 
mierrMiria wort and die 
von thorough nrtoflnp. 
rirar UNiunhm- OMml 
ralex. and a M of appreci- 
olaon. AN. • permsuccn . 
lob lain If you WtM 

01-408 0424 




CABBAN A 
GASELCE 

K2 Swarti picm IW vre 

■ et. in 'laaim wiHBW. 

icrii WO. 9 «rtl *1 h+xb it 
v .'. 1 ; . 

SW1 BrtWiS* ihMaPe"' 1 
Ui.e» .•rtB 2 iw 2 umn 
inn* KOT 

W11 hum ode mpwi w 
I.rtx t -fllCBM PTO 1 INC ? 
IrtlV 1 * 21 ) PM 6 tool Gl!" 
tJSD 

SW7 DPuneOe ficr u bar 
' wnUl! ? 0* ! toiT 
kewFMMR). 2 ll WIPE* £*80 
--SfftfRtr'frwx) IH 3 w ? 

Vli 8K0 ■ 

01 $89 5481 


GEORGE KNIGHT 

The Limits Agent 

KEHswmi nn 

Hi atoaitMaii -adrirtp nmh 

lemnahxl Mninuuae rial wtun 

of art- 3. dutMex and 1 xmuh- 

btoirom. a lutlhra betbiMim « 

-ludv. 7 leiepunu ronmxniu-a 

lame migmon aaro m III- rt#. 

Nohri netvrt lined kdttona 

MNkltot l non*. ? rtrimount-. 

•epCrtade foxn lanm. chart 

mum ad Irani a War Idol 

Irf lore li)toM unluuuvlled 

to* sure: fee' jwahnL. giwUv 

.UtojMf LMprfv aHegool dlripes 


LIPFRIEND 

E FWCHLET maper del hxe 

Imrtv quiel rtea. riwlrm- all 

lieaullluUl nlled. 7 balhx. 7 

-pa. anus i«ep-. lougr hofl. 

hix hal dm oH nuchmex. w 

ton QTB 

KENSOKTON DefloMIul Men- 

llxe Nuprt lerolanai 3 laediiia-. 

olliai Ihe rax am thud xlu Hahn. 

hAR l nlidn L2SO 

UU Men. dec old goart 

Mk 6 IHH1X lube 7 hrebna-. 

twn maam rex ep. KAB. RI i: 

omxh mm n cios. 

FUTREV G4 hour art 

toxb na. raxrp. alaa-e I idle. V.9R 

014995334 


PALACE 

PROPERTIES 

We haw ■ superb s top e n on Ol 
parsons)* oepacMd Utobmo 
and unturrHhaa piopertias <n 


SS?pw. 

Tel: 01-486 8926 


'■ -StOANE STREET. Wl 

2-brtl hrt Ih good bWrk. V 

bath with -hamx ,-rerep. U 

lilt' and panrt. .aanmiina], 
<Ffh-. ‘oAuuA- uoapic' 1 
CSRLSEA MANOR Vt SW3 

Aina, uve 3 bell mots. ' III 

good order, both, xhwr rm. 2 

recepx. mod Ml U76 pw 

ORR-EWING 
ASSOCIATES 
01 581 802S 


SHI 

HNHUVullx Iric- hxe xaUMled 

in rwrxaHT ai KtogMsbridoe- • 

Mh.3IMivilnrt.iWm 

am, 2 rerx. n ha. Bardco. 

L7D0 pw. Trt. 223 1972 


8ANPSTEAD, HH3 . 

hnmacidoie modern family 

house <m xerliatled ex i le. 

Art X Wnaae. Ttolrful rerixa 

irhHNung oanfeos. During 

rm 3 taedant* 2 hrthrme. rt 

kH. fkar. C435 pw TH; 
722 7101. . 


HYDE PARK. W2 

super* em floor rod. views 

over par* in noarl p b b + 

poriet Ml. Dbto hedrm. 
rerep. (f ML MUirm. 
CH HW lari. 090 pw. Trt- 
,727 7227. 

kx 1 si 


Anscombte 

; • J* ' : & Ring kind 



SpertArvitor m« 

toi eucrialnlng rt senior m 

ixxrtxe level a RrtxmUaa 

Kdrtton. BmaMH Room. 

Bedroom*. 3 Batoroomt 
Ctoatooani^ CIJOOpw. 

Piwty gardra floor ILd wRh| 

ro orthnaUng derar. Recep- 

Uon. Kirihen. 1 DMel 
BMrooni. 2 SUiato Bedrooms. 
2 tamnmm. czeopw! 
negotiable. 


BBSS 


t Ml biwfv 2* boon dsc « 
1 'laore aeUm syte m* irap. 
dnog im. f I ki 3 bods. tab. 
efts. E32Sfiw. 

SKI ABnylna M c o mfe m bte 
mas. Recep wUh firefton + p- 
300 . tge W/DUKrm, 3 Ms. 2 
badiL rucl Bruce £300pw. 
SW1 PMy jprtoi bk a ( art* 
douse BMft oec i aft tad, 
nap Mtfrinpboe. goad ka & 
ben. EISDpn. 



chabijb laic mn 

BrautMU large Mrws Hm*| 

off SI Johns Wood High 

Street. * -beets. dMe mm. 

kil. 2 baths, elk. garage, po- 

lio. CbSO pw neo. 

FMDUUEL emo MW 

Inferior destgned grtl flr flail 
with 2 beds. 2 ream. ML 2| 
balhi. OK £360 pw. 

772 506 - *WW OF IH fW 
333 im - MU* W TW MW 


PHUPSHCAY& LEWIS 


F.W. GAPP 


Heal tocamn pood ben dble bad 

Oat wft ctwactor. recapu Mt. 

bah. £150 p« 

We requre property in camnl. 
south ami west London ms tor 
wanna apptants. 


THE VERY BEST 

Landlord- a lenanlx 
cumr In II- Irt 

■FLORA VIA, MAMPSTCAH. 
KOBBKTON, WIMMJDMM 

and similar ai nax. 

- BIRCK & Cd 
; 01-734 7432 


Ewrulxle 5| 
baxli named 3 rtalhtaom anail 
mrnl. luinnlwxl .u*a egmpped 
hi Uie lUqhral xUod4KLCS7S. 
pet vxaxrt Jerome David A l'a> 
431 0246. 


T uilv turn 
x c xu pet 1 bedim Ikd 
Inge dm. k A h. rh. camin 
•tox Oriel CHS ok- Al-a in 
m rr-l.'l siimliat IM .avail 
C95 pw. Tel 01 720 621? 





HELHZE PARK. Hiunmnu luxury 

top III llal. Many onq lea line-. 
2 IriXK 2 raxNI-. 2 bdlhs >1 axi 
xuMel C27S pv». Net*. Nathan 
UH-cri A CO 794 1161. 


LAWSON • HOMAN DnrieciuK 
A lAixulivex uroentlv wk 
giuUH paupaxltox In .di crnUui 
It r-i t amaa oravix Tot alien 
bap prion- ring 01 938 3426- 

ST JO H NS WOOD TMX-triivn 
-el v ueil apt-, fully lurm-tied 
anal fxjawuuxl Ntaorl A long rie- 
C2SO HOpvi- HarNngdain lid 
TM. Ol 734 1128. - - 


VKITMC LONDON? .Urn Bales 
A f'n have a lame xrhxuan of 
llal-.ind iHHI-rx a> aUaWe fan I 
v-eek * l.om Cl SOp a- 409 
1066. 


EALING litx Reqenrx vifav all la 
calm.-. 3 bed . iravriv ihx . lira 
Will <J.,-e aB ameiuliex. C26Q 
PM Tel Cl S70 4642. 


M*)rn| Ik La m ina? 

I*e w- ufra in rritilnnr gueW* 
lutlii-hed hnmex In Ik. 
limit rxs K57 7365. 


FURNISHED QUALITY flat- and 
1 rtHiMM In afl jaeas 
llainhx A On 857 T3e5 


MEWS FLAT - BB BEN TS PARK 

PrtMelmh- liiOv lum Poiknui 
<»alN. c?7Bptfc. Irt. 4026590 


SITUATIONS WANTED 


AMERICAN EXECUTIVES -wk 

lux 1141- house- up to UKW 
PM I stiol lea-" leg- PluUip- 
S.av A I ewe- Notllh to the Pol k. 
narriu ollae. 01 363 Hill m 
hwlh ul Uie Pork Rerixil - 
Pari, mine Ol 72 2 613 6. 

LET YOUR PROPERTY wllti 
mriolax Irixriulilv UtaUriu V ri— 
lurniluetiw -haul an long term 
Irt- a an out unMue Rife -axi are 
Riibi XU Mai Ikiel rxorhuv 
MuiSlaaiKI Conuart- INI. IN 
01 486 8016 

FN II * IIIIBr I am .parr nak* 
dM bed. m. rax era- nmole p-dua 
pocking. . Fadlv I u l na-he el 

«.k or.. .0401) 50200. - 


, V90. 


ROLLAND SHEET, Ht 

AHrachve rurntslNd Mat 
gonrtte dose to W* 
Sired. 5 Bednra.. receb- 
‘ Ubn rm.. baUirm-. shower 
rm.. AxaUMt- now. Long 

c S^2TSL^Sfer- 

REfBEHTS PARK NWL Nanierh 
neiv lv ■ dax 3 lax* ikri in e-art 
bkriV \ -HOI aBOri lixagi. IviUl. 

-ep \x(k lal aU nxw h. vra I a-v 
a. • e— W I nd. t-?6Xim am fh 
A HW Ideal CM I mb Irt. 01 
486 5741 

SW1. Mud hr wci I uxiuv -pbl 
level ii.li OMniimu paralluu on 
•kuctaxi Mitaoce Loltra re. pi. 
kilthixi. 2'douMe bed-, hath. 
km, -liifli ,nm Hi uealiief ien 
nr. ll- Min- 1 v<xw L235 P w 
lel Ol 736 2637 
nUMOlON S man- lube, luxury 
Ikd vxilh did bed. reerp. dura 
orra. KAH. (31. L05 Pm mrl 
roles im A Nas . AvoalaMe Irom 
!6lh aalolrtv lei Mix ton-vd 
2M3 26.XI flay cn b07 7802 r\ r- 
KEMSNfCTOfl SWS hux Ixl Ur 

add. \. lira laxa-p ifmaakliemh 

vviualows lo tfcUa nnv merlaiok 
ing agaKMUi a*di alen -a 2 rtide 
beds. 2 CkUh-Jqr kll.k'SOOpu 
('■n 1 el t vt nun »7H 6467 
WEAR M CNMONP IUBDGE rrtm 
nt-hixa Vnionan x r fmm-iwxl 
Ikd trouble A xnqH< traclroum 2 
nxeMtate. KAH CH TNam xmnL 
n I'anvaam Irt ptrtrnrd 
LlSSprr Meek Trt Ol H9? 2775 
Mr W1WEUNNI PARK superb 
Ihe. 2 ubfc- tw-lim. 2 trapl. 
BUo-l rm. Mad Kil. 1 ux FkUh. 
i<r ufn a Puna CM h « 
(' II came all amen Clin I mb 
Irt £140 PM Ol H 70 4833 

. 2 

■mni-aon (lot kuafe,' 
Mining had. fiwkch 
A J3trhen l»Sp*i 
97^2, ecH 


fla- rtriwi Mted 
rafeniinh: M 
ikballMitotoA. 


r- 

Srei-hi- Orr If* with 
turn in MR nuung 
in nn. a dwr Iran-, a 
baths, xvc. Nauju rnari frit (to 
W 1 VI 4 11600 px-" VfciUf.un 
VkiiMI 730 343B: 

AMERICAN SPECIALISTS ore 

tunrnlli seeking a*md ciimMv 
imi.il aKcmunKKkilion in 
lent rot Lonatoai lor vt.nimg 
iraiuum- lervud- Ol 9J7 9oa*i 
SHOOK GREEN W14, MANX lux 
net'll ii-det 3 bed Ikil 7 
teaepx If kil .81 hkaf N. baUl. xrp 
WC. gain OSP Ki lube xln. Co 
rif C200 pm. Trt 992 6643 
Pra ia — Period tuNP-e o looking 
1 Ihimrs, 3 hiXliocims, av.ulabie 
wim. fOmp.un‘ leL C230 pm 
Meek. Devnaixhne Cemioaa lid 
.386 4944. ■ 

CHELSEA. .NnOv nraaricnraxl 
rilfd llrn— Ini 1 bed Hat Raxrp. 
lined . kiL siKH-vr - mi. mol 
■ im (jdri In + USOpM. fur 
/nn. 1 xlaK-> 01 361 6121 
CONTACT US II vou «anl lira 
veil fraxl xeriilugi Of -aaBefuri 
It-il- arid IHneas in l omtur 
Oucaa-tu Can-binUue. liX Ol 
244 7383 Telex Oirt-UM 
SoaMr Karulllb , Really supeeb 
iinliirni-trafl Mey.x Iwiu-e. 4 
beats .3 ruths phi- -anna .mol 
lax a ate. I mag co IN. >-600 pm 
H an honans 361 7767 


(Julrt. MM. rave. ? lard 
mom. 2 reception aruar-uiaa Ikd 
lit h . enli \ phone, naa shams 
(.166 p w 468 4293 
CHELSEA SWS CTuarming 2 trad 
■ mm llal 6 motrihs <nmp.un 
la 1200 p m incluave, Irt 01 
361 4KI& 

Clara — Ftrtlv- .and -par mar- 2 
Bax! Iiiorsofieale -*ul 3 xltaraxs 
xvllli tin Irt ol MO pm ixell Hu 
rtvanun- 361 7767 
Dam Ml ,' Mhm FW, 

rix-imt .ri ntMting C73 pm 
I flhaxs. 627 2elO 

IkurMxufdlnrv 

EdBuB \ -martuar. 6 lml 3 
i dirt Ionian house m rih lot are 
—til long fn hi. IJ50 

pvi HurlMiian- 361 7767 
IDEAL FOR VISITORS- xiub 
hen-inglua. Set v i. e rial lira 2 
I rteulHJiar TV . (ai Mi 684 
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ALL BOX 
NUMBER 
REPLIES 
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ADDRESSED 
TO: 


Sox No.—. 

C# o Times 
Newspapers. 
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THEATRES 


CHESS 

♦ 

OPENS 14 MAY 1986 


CALL TODAY 



OL -836 3464 

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PRINCE EDWARD THEATRE 


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THE TIMES MONDAY MARCH 3 1986 



' i. 


BBG t 


$.00 Ceeftx AM.- News 

headlines; weather, travel 
andsport 

6 .50 Breakfast Time with Frank 





Mi. 







' • r - . . 


Jr at 6.55. 7.25. 

7.55, 8J25 ana 8£5; 
regional news, weather 
and travel at 6^7, 7.27, 
757 and 8J27; national and 
.. international news at 7J». 
\ 7-30, &DD I &30ahd 9.00; 

" sport at 7^0 and 8^0; and 

a review of the morning 

newspapers at a.37. Plus 
Lynn Faukfc Wood's 
consumer report; 
horoscopes; and pop 
music. 

9.30 Ceefax 10J0 Play Bchooi 
1050 Ceefax 

12-30 News After Noon with 
Richard Whitmore and 
Frances Coverdaie, ■ 
Indudes news headlines 
wrtn suotfties izss 
Regional news and 
weather. 

1.00 Pebble MBI at One 
presented by Magnus 
Magnusson, Marian 
Foster and Josephine ' 
Buchan. Singer Barbara 

CourtneWOng presents a 

musical insight into her 
hometown, Brighton; and 
Errol TrzebinsJe, the 
author of the book on 
which the film, Out of 
Africa, starring Meryl 
Streep, was based, talks 
about We and Jove m 
colonial African times. 1.45 
Little Misses and the 
Mister Men. Jr) 

2.00 The Parent Programme 
examines some of the 
changes that have 
occured to the average 
family over the past two 
decades 2.15 Play it SbM 
Jimmy Savile with accident 
prevention advice for 
children (r) 255 Ceefax 

3.15 Songs of Praise from 
CapelMawr, Denbigh. 
{Ceefax) (r) 3.52 regional 
news. 

3.55 Paddington Is in the Hot 
Seat (r) 4.Q0 Heads and 
Tails 4.15 Laurel and 
Hardy. Cartoon version 
4£Q Jackanory. Joanna 
Monro reads part one of ■ 
Enid Blyton'sThe Circus 
o! Adventure 4.30 
Thunderbirds 2086. Space 
age cartoon series. 

4.55 Newsroimd, presented 1^ 
Roger Finn &D5 Blue 
Peter. Blue- with -cold 
Peter Duncan goes ice- 
skating on the Fens. 
(Ceefax) 5.35 Charles in 
Charge. American comedy 
series about a mate, 
teenage nanny. 

6.00 News with Nicholas 
Wrtchell and Andrew 
Harvey. Weather. 

6.35 London Pius presented by 
Jeremy Paxman. 
Wogan-The guests 
include Jute Andrews 
(shooting schedule 
permitting) and Jane 
RusseU with her number 
one fan, himself a leading 
Filmstar. 

7.35 It's Your Move. American 
domestic comedy series. 

2LO0 ScbftFree. Selina Scott . . , 
meets Dr. Watson, a. : 
research scientist whose 
laboratories are the 
Cairngorms. (Ceefax) 

8.30 Dear John_Ralph isin 
even deeper despair after 
the death of his dose 
friend. Teny, but the 1-2-1 
dub members rally round 
to help hfmoutofnis 
slough of despond. 

(Ceefax) 

9.00 News with Jufia Somerville 
and John Humphrys. 
Weather. 

9.30 P a no ra m a: Defectors. 

Tom Magold investigates 
the cases who five 
Russian defectors to the 
United States who claim 
they were treated In 
cavalier fashion by the CIA 
after they had been 
thoroughly de-briefed. 

10.10 FibixThe Quitter 

Memorandum (1966) 
starring George Segal. 

Alec Guinness and Senta 
Berqer. Spy thriller about 
a British agent to 
investigate the death of. . 
two colleagues - killed by 
members of a neo-Nazi - 
organisation. His task is to 
locate the base of the 
underground movement 
Directed by Michael 
Anderson. 

11.50 Weather. 


7.00 


TV-AM 


6.15 Good 


nond and Nick Owen, 
Exercises at Screws 
with Gordon Honeycomb® 


Jameson at 7.i5tcartoon 
at 7.25; pop video at 7.55; 
Jimmy Greaves’s 
television highlights at 
.8-35; Animal Watch at 
8.45; and a discussion on 
the deteriorating British 
diet with food aflergy 
•Xpert, Or Gtenys 
ScaddingatSJM 


ITV/LONDON 


9J25 Thames new* headlines. 

9-30 Bor Schools: the story of 
: Claudius, Bm' of Ancient 
Rome 9.47 Tne nature and 
qualities of leather &5» 
Learning toread with Bfll 
Odctle 10.11 Computers 
and their uses 1&28 
Physics: the Rutherford 


partidesT IMS German 
conversation for beginners 
11-06 Maths: countmg and 
balancing 11.22 Junior 
maths: plans and mazes 
11.39 Part three of Jean 
Anouilh’s, La Bede Vie. 

1200 Tidde on the Turn. Village 
tales for the young 
fr>1210 Let’s Pretend to 
the story of The-Bufldozer 
with Toothache. 

1230 Someone To Talk To. The 
[is who 
a decade of 
caring for her increasingly 
sente husband with the 
help of SEMI - Support for 
the Elderly and Mentally 
in firm. - 

1.00 News at One with Leonard 
Parkin 1.20 Thames news. 

1-30 F8m: Man in the Moon* 
(1961) starring Kenneth 
More and Shirley Ann 
Field. Comedy about a 
man who makes his Hving 
-by being Mr Average ana a 
human giriheapig, who is 
chosen to be Britain’s first 
astronaut Directed by 
Barf Dearden 225 
Thames news headfines 
230 The Young Doctor*. 

4.00 Tickle on the lum. A 

repeat of the p rogr amm e 
shown at noon 4.10 BO 
.. the Minder 4£0 He-Man 
. and Masters of the 
Universe. Animated 
science fiction adventures 
445 Dodger, Bonzo and 
the Rest Serial sat feta 
chBdren’s home. 

5JJ0 Connections. The first of a 
new quiz game series - 

545 News 200 Thames news. 

6.00 Hetpt John Murray 
explains how to qualify for 
an exceptionally severe 
weather payment 

&3S Crossroads. Miranda 

decides to leave the motel. 

TM Wish You Were Here-? 
Judith Chalmers meets 

holidaymakers who were 
.in the first BulS ns, 50 

years ago in Skegness, at 
. their latest camp at 

. Minehead; Arineka Rice 

• continues her trafntoumey 
^ around Europe; and-Shaw - 
■ : Taylor and Ws wife report 
-one Merfiterranean cruise. 


7J30 Coronation Street Rita Is 
.... -put on the spot(Orade) 
200 AH at No 22 Comedy 
series about a widow with 
a mortgage and a house- 
full of lodgers. 

230 World in Action: British . 
Telecom - tea Sate of the 
Century. A documentary 
that raises serious doubts 
about the Government's 
method of sefflng of 
nationalised industries. 
200 Taggart Episode two and 
the Glasgow detective is 
puzzled by the discovery 
of another severed leg, 
i of a woman's, 
s) 

10.00 News at Ten and weatiier 
followed by Thames news 
headlines. 

1230 FUm: Caravan to 
Vaccares 
Charlotte 

MacLaan adventure about 
a nan who is contracted 
to escort a mysterious 
Hungarian from southern 
France to New York. 
Directed by Geoffrey 
Reeve. 

1220 Night Thoughts 



’s television and radio programmes 


Edited by Peter Dear 
and Peter Davalle 



• EVERY WINDOW TELLS A 
STORY (Channel 4,6.30pm) is 
one' of those bright awe gems 
that adorn Channel 4 wttn 
Increasing regularity. As it is 
about the art of the stained glass 
window, there is no potet In 
pretending that has been made 
with one eye bn the Top Ten. 
Butif there was any Justice in this 
world. It would finish up in the 
Top Twenty Anything I can do 
towards that end wlfl be a 
labour of love. There wffl six films 
in the series. Tonight’s, which 
is rnamty about Rheims 
Cathedral, introduced me to 
Malcolm Miller. official guide to 
Its famed windows. He 


speaks in 
understand. 


. _ . everyone can 
ik of the 


cathedral as the binding of a 
book,he says, and tttnk of 
the windows as the text Chapter 
one: Adam and Eve. Final 


CHOfCE 


chapter the Last Judgment Mr 
Miller needs no artificial aids 
to help us come to grips with the 
text, but when it comes to 
explaining the binding, he does 
what I have never seen a 
guide do before. He grabs six 

bystanders, puts them into 

two lines ("hands out of your 
pockets reorders them to 
act Bke cathedral 
columns .keystones and 
transverse arches, and then he 
corrals six young ladies 
whom he transforms into Rytng 
buttresses. “Push as hard as 

S can !" he demands. “Let's 
r their ribs crack 1“ A 
rough-and-ready lesson In 
cathedra) building. perhaps, 

but a most effective way to learn 


why stained glass windows 
were not just an ornamental 
after-thought. 

• THE NEW FACE OF 
LEPROSY (BBC 2,8.10pm) has a 
new name to no with it, too, 
microbacteriaT 
neurodermatosis .The 
euphemism helps the ghastfy 
disease of btolical times to 
live more happily In a century that 
has made tejwsy curable and 
far less infectious than the 
common cold. 

•Two strong radio dramas 
from Wales on Radio 4 
todayrMike Oomelf's THREE 
OF SWORDS (3.00pm) which 
views the Principality in the 
distorting mirror of corruption: 
and TAKEN OUT (8.15pm), a 
Falkland® War post-mortem 

Peter Davalle 


BBC 2 


255 


Trigonomel 
Ends at 7.2 


Maths-, 
aa. 


at 7.20. 

200 Ceefax 

215 Daytime on Two: the vital 
months of childhood 
Course options for 

the over-1 3a 1200 For 
four- and five-year olds 
1215 Music: 
Tchaikovsky's Sleeping 
Beauty 1238 History: 
Arkwright and the first 
factories 1140 The 

conquest of cholera 11-22 
Thinkabout 1140 Looking 
for evidence ofitias In 
television news 1205 Part 
one of a three-programme 
dramatized series on the 
I a man in 


740 


is first managerial post 
1235 A history of the 
cotton industry 1JJ5 
Lesson three of a better 
tennis course 1.38 The 
leisure activities boom In 
- Scotland 200 Words and 
pictures 240 Religious 
studies. 

100 Ceefax. 

225 News summary with 
. subtitles. Weather. 

530 Micro Live. A report on 
. Ray KurzweU's project to 
produce a voice-activated 
typewriter; and how to 
become a newspaper 
magnate with the help of a 
microcomputer-^ 

6.00 Ftem Presenting Lfly 

Mars* (1 943) starring Judy 
Garland ana Van Heflin. 
Musical comedy with a 
sprinkle of romance about 
. a stage-struck country girl 
* who fs wffltng to do 

anything for the chance of 
appearing on the boards. 
With the Tommy Dorsey 
and Bob Crosby bands: 
Directed by Norman 
Taurog. 

Open SpacttBeMnd with 
the Mortgage. A 
documentary illustrating 
- how, for a variety of 
reasons, some 
houseowners are finding it 
(fifficott to keep up their 
mortgage repayments. It is 
estimated that the 
numbers of properties 
taken into possession has 
. ..increased from about „ . 
- . 2£00 to 124)00 in the last 
■fiveryears. 

210 Horizon: The New Face of 
Leprosy, (see Choice) 

94)0 Now -Something Else. 

The first of a new series 
showcasing the talents of 
the comedy impressionist, 
Rory Bremner. The 
programmes wiK fake the 
form oftopteal sketches in 
which the aurSence wifi be 
a vital part of the ad 
9 JO The Bob Monkhouse 
Show. The entertainer's 
this week are 
m comedienne 
PhylBs DUter; French 
comedy magician, 
MacRonay; and British 
entertainer, Derek 
Griffiths. 

1210 Maestro. A profile of 
former Irish and British 
Lion rugby union star, 

Mike Gawoa Barry Davies 
talks to him at his Belfast 
home. 

1QJ55 Newsnight indudes the 
first of a series of reports 
by David Sells in Paris for 
the French elections. 

■1140 Weather. 

11.45 Tete-JoumaL Tonight's 
news as seen by television 
viewers In Madrid. 

1210 Open Untveratty: 

Evolution - Conquest of 
the Air. Ends at 1240 


CHANNEL 4 


235 Wbnton Church# - The 
Vafiant Yews’. Part 1 6 of 
' the history of the Second 
World War based on the 
memoirs of Winston 
ChurchM begins at the 
start of 1943 when the 
Allies were in a precarious 
position. 

200 The Late Late Show. The 
Bvety and long-running 
chat show which is seen in 
the Irish Republic on 
Friday nights, hosted by 
Gay By me. 

4JU A Phis 4. A Portrait of 
. Shfldort in Co Durham, 
once a thriving railway 
town but now suffering 
with up to 50 per cent of 
the male working 
population unemployed. 
How has this affected 
individuals and the 
community? 

&30 Countdown. The reigning 
champion, Roy Jackson of 
Hartlepool, is challenged 
by Frank Mairey, a teacher 
from Southampton. 

5.00 ABce. Jolene’s plausible 
brother arrives at the diner 
and persuades Mel to 
invest in a worm ranch. 

5JM) Food for Thought This 
final programme of the 
series includes an 
examination of the 
industrial and commercial 
structure of the food 


215 


industry (r) 

World of Animation. 


ns 


nted by Richard 


230 Every Window teRs a 
Story. A new series on 
stained glass windows. 

7 DO fchaimel Four news with 
Peter Sissons and 
Nicholas Owen. Ian Ross 
talks to miners, the union, 
and the Coal Board, on the 
state of the mining 
industry, one year after the 
coal strike. 

7-50 Comment With his views 
on a matter of topical 
importance is writer John 
Ralston Saul. Weather. 

8.00 Brookside. Heather 
reluctantly agrees to 
accompany her boss on a 
business trip: and Harry 
. and Ralph draw up a . 
shortlist of jjepptewho’.^ 
rfeptied to tneir advert 

'8 JO Lou Gnuit Rossi meets a 
mother who is obssessed 
with finding the driverwho 
knocked down and killed 
her son; and BHileis 
assigned to find out if 
there is a story in the use 
of cars as weapons. 

9.25 Kate and ABe. Comedy 
series from the United 
States about two old 
friends who merge their 
households in order to 
face single parenthood 
together. Starring Susan 
Saint James and Jane 
Curtin. 

9.55 Conversation Pieces. The 
first of a repeated series 
of animated films based 
on actual conversations in 
real- life situations. 

104)0 Survive. The fifth 

programme in the series 
on tne Emits of human 
endurance examines the 
the horrors of Nazi 

concentration camps (r) 

114)0 The Eleventh Hour: 

Mazimbu. A documentary 
mat goes behind the fines 
of South Africa’s main 
liberation movement, the 
African National 
- Congress, at its large 
college complex in 
Tanzania. Ends at 11-55 


( Radio 4 ) 

255 Shipping Forecast 200 
News Briefing; Weather. 

210 Farming VYBek. 225 

Prayer for the Day. 

230 Today. Ind 232 7.32 
230 News. 245 
Business News. 255, 7.55 
Weather. 74)0, 200 
News. 7.25, 225 Sport 745 

235 ThtT^/eek on 4 
Marshall Corwin. 

243 Giyn Worship continues 
his exploration of the 
BBC Sound Archives. 257 
Weather; Travel. 

9.00 News. 

94)5 Start the week with 

Richard Baker and stucfio 
guests (s). 

1200 News; Money Box: 

Financial advice 


1040 Morning Story: ‘A 

Contract and the Smafl 
Print', by Andy Smith. Read 
by the author. 

1045 Daily Service (New Every 
Morning, page 13) (s). 

114)0 News; Travel; Down 
Your Way. Brian 
Johnston visits Penzance 
and Newtyn in ComwaB 

1148 Poetry please! Poetry 
requested by listeners. 

Read by June Barrie and 
Patrick Honor. Presented 
by D J EnnghL 

1200 News; You and Yours. 
Consumer advice with 
Pattie CoktweiL 

1227 Oh, Yes it isl A seven- 
part history of 
pantom ms narrated by 
Richard Briers (6) with a 
Wst, Wst, Wst (s). 124*5 
Weather. 

1.00 The World At One: News. 
140 The Archers. 145 
Shipping Forecast 
200 News: woman's Hour. 
Includes a feature about 
the emotional repercussions 
of a second marriage on 
cMdrenAnd Bizabeth 
_ i reeds the third 
3 mantel Blue 
Remembered Hills, by 
Rosemary SutCtitt 
34K) News; Welsh drama. 

'Three of Swords' I 
Mike DonelL With I 
Hayward. The story of a 
murder, and the police 
officer who is a suspect 


430 Kaleidoscope Another 
chance to hear tast 
Friday's edition of the arts 
magazine 
200 PM: News i 
250 Shipping 1 
255 Weather. 

200 The Six o’clock News; 


Financial Report 

6.30 Just a Minute. The last in 
the present series. With 
Kenneth Writ tarns. Clement 
Freud, d Peter Jones and 
Derek Nimmo (0 is). 

74M News. 

74)5 The Archers 

7.20 On your farm. 

745 Science Now. Peter 
Evans reviews 
discoveries and 
developments. 

215 Welsh Drama Taken 
Out' by Greg Cullen. 

Drama about a family 
pilgrimage to tne - 
Falklands after the recent 
conflict With . 

Wooster, Louise 
(sL 

9.30 My father, Lloyd George. 
June Knox-Mawer talks 

to Lady Otwen Carey Evans 
who, at ninety three, is 
the last surviving offspring of 
the great British 
statesman LJoyd George. 

9.45 Kaleidoscope. Presented 
by Paul 

Vaughan.Tonjght's items 
include the new film Out 
of Africa, with Meryl Streep; 
Black Experience Arts 
Festival, and the book 
Making Cocoa, by Wendy 
Cope 

10.15 A Book at Bedtime. 

Bengal Lancer the 
autobiography ol Francis 
Yeats Brown (1) The 
reader is Tim Pigott- Smith. 
1049 Weather. 

10.30 The World Tonight. 

11.15 The Financial World 
Tonight 

11.30 Today in PatiiamenL 

12.00 News: Weather. 

1233 Shipping Forecast 

VHF (available in England and 

S Wales only) as above 
except S£5200am Weather 
TraveL 114)0-1200 For 
Schools. 114)0 Music Makers. 
11.20 Let's Move. 11.40 
Johnny Bail's Maths Games 
(sL 1140 Poetry Comer. 
145^ 00pm For Schools. 
145 Listening Comer. 

205 Playtime. 220 
Introducing Science. 2.40 
Topic Songbook (s). 245 
Radio au&250-545 PM 
(Continued). 11 .30-1 2 10am 
Open University. 1140 
History. Handling Primary 
Sources. 11-50 Irony and 
Tom Jones'. 1230-1.10 
Schools Night-time 
broadcasting: Rehearsing tor 
Work. 1230 What use is 
work experience? 1250 
Choosing and Preparing. 


( Radio 3 ) 

255 Weather. 7.00 News. 

74)5 Morning ConcertRosSini 
(II Turco in Italia 
overture); Haydn (Sonata in 
E minor. H 

XVl34:Brendel); Purcefl 
(Remember not Lord, 
our ottences); Liszt 
(symphonic poem Tasso, 
(gmento e tnon/oJA 
performance by the 
Berlin PO under Herbert von 
Keraian. 84)0 News. 

2005 Con cert comd. Barber 
(Symphony No 1); 

Brahms (Der Tod, das ist 
die kuNe Nacht 

Norman. soprano); Mozart 

(String Quartet in G. K 
387). 200 News. 

9.05 This Week's Composer. 
Poulenc. Includes the 
Suite tes Blches: Le 
bestialre: Rapsodie 
negre; Chansons gaUlardes : 
Bernac, baritone) and 
Cocarttes: Senechal. tenor). 
104)0 In the Village Square: 

Haydn (Symphony No 
82), Panutldc (Sinfonla 

RuStica). 

1050 Bernard Roberts: piano 
recital. Beethoven 

in G. Op 51 No 2): 

_ jhms (Variations and 
Fugue on Handel theme, Qp 
24). 

1135 BBC Welsh SO: with 
Cheng Chai Man, and 
Wong On Yen 
(instrumentalists). John 
Mandueli (Concerto tor di-zi. 
er-hu and orchestra); 
Shostakovich (Symphony No 
10). 1-Od News 
14)5 BBC Lunchtime 
ConcartVarsovia 
Quartet Szymanowski 
(Quartet No l. Op 37, 

1917). Schubert (Death and 
the Maiden quartet) 

200 Music Weekly: includes a 
conversation with Esa- 
Pekka Salonen, and Peter 
Palmer talking about the 
Mozart born concertos. 
There Is also a tafc by 
Roger Savage on the subject 
Masques and Masks. 
Introduced by Michael Oliver 
(r) (s) 

245 New Records: Dvorak 
(Scherzo 

capncdosa performed by 
the Cleveland Orchestra, 
under Christoph von 
Dohnanyi), Michael 
Haydn (Symphony in A. P6: 
played by the Franz Liszt 
Chamber Orchestra); Liszt 
(La lugubre gondola; 

Cam pa nefla, piano); Holst 
(Hymn to Dtonysus 
-.Royal College of Music 
Chamber Cfioir); Britten 
(Lachrymae: reflections on a 
song of Dowiand.Wrth 
Roger Best (viola), and the 
English String Orchestra, 
under WMkam Boughton. 

455 News 

200 Mainly for Pleasure: 
recorded music 

selection .presented by 

Natalie Wheen 

530 Music for the Iron Voice: 
Frederick 

Rimmer .organ .plays lain 

Hamilton ' s Paraphrase: 
Epitaph tor this WOrid and 
Time).artd works by 
Hugh WOod, Frederick 
Rimmer and Sebastian 
Forbes The performances 
are given on the organ ol 
Bute Had. University of 
Glasgow 

7.00 Twilight is my Hour 
* Richard Cork m 

conversation with the painter 
Josef Herman (r| 

730 U Vkaggio a Reims: 

Rossim one*act comic 
opera. Sung in Italian. 


Chamber Orcrteslra of 
Europe/Prague Pnilharmonio 
Chorus/solorsts including 
Raquel Pierotti. Katia 
Rtcoarelli. Ruggero 
Raimondi, Lucia Valentin! 
Terrani. and Francisco 
Aral za The conductors 
Claudio Abbado 

10.00 British Music: Penelope 
Walmsley- 
Clark(soprano).with 
Ampluon String Quartet. 

Rn2i (interlude for oboe and 
stnng quartet); Jane 

Wells (Composition for 
clannet and string 
quartet); Jennifer Fowler 
(Voice of the shades.for 
soprano, oboe and violin); 
Howetls IRbapsodic 
Quintet, tor clarinet and 
String quartet). 

114)0 Edith Vogel piays 

Beethoven; Sonata In F 
major. Op 54; Sonata m F 
minor. Op 57. 

11.40 Nexus: Bruce Mather's 
Cios de Vougeot- 
1157 News. 1200 Closedown. 

VHF only: From 6.35am to 6.55. 
Open University. 

( Radio 2 ) 

News on the hour. Headlines 
5.30am, 230. 730 and 8.30. Sports 
Desks 1.05pm, 202 3.02 4.02 
5.02 6.02 245 (ml only). 955. 
4.00am Colin Berry (s). 6.00 
Ray Moore (s). 205 Ken Bruce Is). 
1030 Jimmy Young (s). 1.05pm 
David Jacobs (s). 200 Gloria 
Hunniford (s) 3-30 Music All the 
Way (5). 439 David Hamilton (s). 

6.00 John Dunn IS). 84)0 Alan 
Dell with Dance Band Days and at 
230 Big Band Era (s). 94)0 
Humphrey Lyttelton with iazz on 
record (s). 9.55 Sports Desk. 

10.00 The Monday Movie Quiz (Ray 
Moore). 1230 Star Sound. Nick 
Jackson with soundtrack requests. 
114 XI Round Midnignt (stereo 
from midnight). 104)0 am Peter 
Dickson (s|. 200-4.00 A Little 
Night Music (s). 


c 


Radio 1 


3 


News on the half hour from 6.30 
am until 930 pm and at 1200 
midnight. 6.00 am Adrian John. 

730 Mike Read. 930 Simon Bates. 
1230pm Newsbeat (Frank 
Partridge). 1245 Gary Davies. 3.00 
Steve Wright. 530 Newsbeat 
(Frank Partridge). 5.45 Bruno 
Brookes. 730 Janice Long (5). 
104)0-1200 John Peel (s). VHF 
RADIOS 1 & 2 4.00am As 
Radio 2. 10 00pm As Radio 1 . 
120Q-4.00am As Radio 2 

WORLD SERVICE 

6-00 Newsdesk. 74)0 Mews. 7M Twenty- 
Four Hours. 7 JO Sarah and Comsuny. 

8.00 News 209 Reuecoons 215 Foteign 
Affairs. B JO Anything Coes. 200 News. 
209 Review ol the British Press. 215 
Good Books. 230 Financial Mews. 240 
Look Ahead. 9.45 Peebie's Choice. 104)0 
News 104)1 The Mnd in Focus. 1230 
HitswUe USA. 11JJ0 News. 114)9 News 
About Bnoan. 11.15 1 Wish I d Met. 12.00 
Radio NewsreeL 12.15 Transatlantic Quc 
12.45 Sports Roundup. 14)0 News. 14)9 
Twenty-Four Hours. 130 King tM Swing. 
200 Outlook. 245 Breakfast at Trtiamr s. 

3.00 Radio NewsreeL 215 The Mmd in 
Focus. 345 Whai's New. 400 News 4.09 
Commentary. 4.15 My Country m Mmd. 
430 The Musk: Busmass. 445 ™ World 
Today. 200 News. S4» Book Choice 215 
My Word! 209 Twenty^our Hours 9.15 
The Music Business. 230 Rock Salad 
1200 News 104)9 The World Today. 
1035 Book Choice. 1030 Fmancial News. 
1040 Reflections. 1045 Sports Roundup. 
1 14U News. 1 1 4)9 Commentary. 11.15 My 
Country at Mmd 1130 Transatlantic Quu. 
124)0 News. 1239 News Aoout Britan 
12.15 Radio Newsreel. 1230 Sarah and 
Company 1.00 News. 14)1 Outlook. 130 
Short Story. 145 My Countrym Mind. 2.00 
News 239 Review oi tne British Press. 
2-15 Network UK 230 Sports internation- 
al. 200 News 209 News About Bmam. 
215 The World Today. 230 John Peed. 
400 Newsdesk. 430 Engbsh Song. 245 
The World Today. A« time* m GMT. 


DDhl WALES S3Spm-&30 
p Yy' Wales Today. 235-74)0 Time 
and Place. 11 50-1 250am tntama- 
ftonal Rugby Special- 1230-1255lniar. 
national Rugby Special 1230-1235 
News and weather. SCOTLAND 
I210am-1230 Bzzz. 53Spn4U» 
Catchword 635-7.0Q RoportiTifl Scot- 
land NORTHERN IRELAND 53Spm~ 
540 Today's Sport 240-230 InsxJa 
UMar. 235-7.00 Channel One. 
1130-1135 News and weather. Bl- 
QLAND 23Spm-730 Rational news 
magazmee. 

CHANNEL 

Openers. 130 Channel News and 
weather. 130 Home Cookery Club. 135 
Fane Windbag the Sa*or. 210 Indoor 
Gardening. 212 Putin's PiafDce. 215- 
545 Sons and Daimhtars. 200 
Channel Report toBowed by Report 
Sport 230-730 Life with a Capital 
Sea. 1030 Questions. 1130 The Ai 
era. 1230am Weemer. dose. 

TYNE TEE S ,^^30 

North East News. 130 North East 
News and Lookaround 130 Flm: The 
Corsican Brothers. 225-230 North 
East New*. 200 Nortnam Life. 230-730 
Mr & Mrs. 1032 Briefing. 1130 
Manrtx. 1230am Just Uka a Woman. 
1235 Close. 

TV <5 As London except 225- 
JjLfi 230 TVS Outlook. 130pm TVS 
New*. 130 Home Cookery CMd 
135 F9m: Whndbeg the SOaT 11938). 
210 Indoor GarawHna 337-330 
TVS News. 5.12-645TVS News head- 


s Aveng- 


REGIONAL TELEVISION VARIATIONS, 


Sons and Dauah- 
130-730 


gnes followed 

tern. 200 Coasf to CoasL 230-74)0 
Orff rent Strokes. 1030 Questions. 

1130 The New Avengers 1230am Com- 
pany, dose. 

HTVWEST *9 London e*- 
1 V 1 oept 935-230 MTV 

Nows. 130 HTV News. 130 rdne 
Cheaper by the Dozen (Clifton Webb). 
200Three UWo Words. 335-330 
HTV News. 200-730 HTV News. 1030 
Along the CoGwok) Way. 11410 V. 

124)0 The Moviemakers. 1230 Weather, 
dose. 

HTV WALES 

200pm-74)0 Wales at Sot. 1030- 
114)0 About Face. 

GRAMPIAN ^^g^ 

Thing. 130 North News. 130 Film: 

Jason and the Argonauts (1963). 335- 
330 North Haadtfws. 215-245 
EmmerdslB Farm. 230-730 North To- 
night and weather. 1030 The Jimmy 
Raid Show. 11.15 Rhy/Fony 12.15am 
, weather, dose. 

As London ex- 

: cept 130 Central 

News. 130 Film: The Man Who FhaJ- 


News neadtkies, 1 

CENTRAL. 


ly Died* (1952). 335-330 Central News. 
200 Central News. 245-74)0 Central 
Post 10L35 Cemrar Week. 1t4B The 
Master 124t5eai Contact 1235 
Close. 


BORDER As London except 
w Gy tri 130 Border News. 130 
Run: Judith (1965). 330-400 Sons 
and Daughters. 200 Lookaround Man- 
day 630-730 Mr & Mrs. 1030 Fal- 
con Crest 1130 Mam & Luca. 1230am 
News summary. 1233 Oose. 

YORKSHIRE 

Weather 130 Calendar News. 135 
Help YoureaH. 130 Rtm.- The Young Lov- 
ers 1 (David Knrgnt). 335 Calendar 
News. 333-44W A Country Practice. 
215-245 Benson. 200 Calendar 

j;s People. 12M Calendar 

1230am 


630-74)0 Ctagg's People. 1030 C 
Commentary. 1130 Prisoner CeB 
Block H. 1200 Comedy Toregnt 1 


Close 

SCOTTISH 


As London ex- 
cept 130 Scottish 


News. 130 Action Lne. 135 Film: 

And Baoy Makes Six (107B). 230-430 
About Gaefic. 215-245 Emmerdale 
Farm. 630 What's Your Problem? 1030 
Crime Desk. 1035 V. 1230am Late 
Can. dose. 

ANGLIA As London except 
O.r'aHff 130 Film: Artists and Mod- 
els (1955) 335330 Anglia News. 
215-245 Emmerdale Farm. 200 About 
Anglia. 230-730 Survival. 1030 Art- 
aka R worts. 114)0 V. 124M Ahmed 
Jamal Tno m Concert. 1235 Why 
Suffering?, dose. 

IILSTFR As London except 
HtSLLEIi 935-930 The Day Ahead. 


130 Lunchtime. 130 Fim; Breakfast 
at Tiffany's. 330 Snort Story Theatre. 
252-400 Ulster News. 212245 
News. 200 Good Evening Ulster. 230- 

7.00 Ldestyie. 1030 Lakeland 
Games. 11.00 'V'. 11.55 Ten Green Bot- 
tles 1220am News. dose. 

CMrf 14)0 Countdown. 130 Face 
The Press. 230 Flenestn. 230 
Moeiwyn. 235 Hwnl Ac Yma. 2.55 lr>- 
jerval. iflO The Lair. Late Show. 430 A 
Plus 4. 430 The Maron ot Time: The 
American Century. 200 Ysqotoriaeih. 

530 Pop The Question. 20b Danger 
Man*. 630 Gwanh Creu. 74)0 Newydttion 
Saith. 7.30 14 un Uytrau. 200 Lou 
Grant loflowed by News headlines 200 Y 
Bvd Ar Bedwar 1200 Cheers. 1030 
Mr Pye. 1130 Shadow on Die Cross. 
1235 Close. 

RR&NAHA As London ex- 
UHHWAUA capt 120 Granada 
Reports. 130 Scrample! 200 Firm 
The Intruder uack Hawkins). 335 Grana- 
da Reports. 330-400 Sons and 
Daughters. 5.15-245 Scramble! 630 Gra- 
nada Reports. 230-74)0 Drtl'rent 
Strokes. 1030 Double Vision. 1130 Ham- 
mer House ol Mystery and Sus- 
pense: Black Camon. 1235am Close. 
TCU/ As London except 130 
J -’ i S TSW News. 130 Film Scared 
Sblf (Martin and Lewis) 335 The 
Young Docutra. 157-430 TSW News. 
212 Gus Honeytiun's Magic Birth- 
days. 115-545 Blockbusters. 64)0 Today 
Southwest 630-7.00 Gardens lor 
AH. 10.32 Quroy 114» Breakthrough. 
1200 Postscript. 1205 Weather, 
dose. 


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- DIMENSION— D tup 

STARLIGHT EXPRESS 

Music by 

ANDREW LLOYD WEBBER 

ItlH-bi RH'JI \RP KITIIXN 
Hum I'll In rm \OR NI NN 
APPLY DAILY TO BOX OFFICE 
FOR RETURNS 
Cnoimn,r H« O \ P' « «MU 
.twit ul I Ur— tlJh 
ROOMNOS TO SEPTEMBER 


ASTORIA THEATRE Rnv OH imo 

<1 a (.mum II 7H 4JH7 Ol 
■1L7 KT7^ 

BEST Ml'SICAL Jf85 

1 hP 1 1HVS. 

LENNON 

\ i Mris .ilinn m Ihr tilr .irnt Iml'tr 
i U fcifwi I iuJ»in 

-WOWCRFULL. I REALLY 
LOVES IT" MB Wyauw “THEY 
COULWTT HAVE DOM IT 
BETTER” CyutkU Linn— I 1 
WAS UP THERE CMEEMNB 
WITH EVERYONE ELSE. AT THE 
END" 

U14rlHi4i.il M-4 Hull * n 
| t niiiHm I UN In N.M R ri 
Wil- •— rtniiLft A m iiMLn hi j O 

BOOKINGS TO SEPTEMBER 


BARBICAN Ol «f« oJW 

htfui I ■ .\lnii Lull HXmr HBM' 

ROYAL SHAKESPEARE 

COMPANY ... 

BARBICAN THEATRE 

Km II IKhl kiwi 

\wiki i \nr l-utrtn s « %kn« h 

VUIN w.iN I 4 c*l Him N VTJIU 

on inr Ait • V-n'l 7 VI I Ml 
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■in iAHfcl Um I • Vl 1 
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.MO M.U .l»ll 


COMEDY THEATRE H,i> iMlm 
,M 'IVI :*S”N I ll vl ( .dl ,»4 lull II 1 
■Lit Ii rilip III .'W T.’rttl 

• GLENDA MCEL 
JACKSON HAWTHORNE 

Hr 

\l ROSS FROM THE 
(.\Rf)EN OF ALLAH 

nt CHARLES WOOD 
lull nil nt RON DANIELS 
I ■ \hu iiiHn-^iomAMV 


COTTESLOE -S' '*;•*< « « 

--.lU.ltil llp,lll». '-Ill-Ill 

■imuim HHii- I "ii l l ,«ih» 7 *■ 
»■ ,. NUMPt-r-A ^f.THEROAO 
TO MECCA Ik lllml I mulil 
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CRTTEIHONL S W 3?lu tT STV 
ST® iy»Vt 741 
Ckmnv-HJO.VHJS Iti/tMOO. niu 
nul ?3H S.il Sin* B» 

-BRITISH FARCE AT ITS BEST" 

n itidii 

I In- I IK'.ili p ni rmnniv 0>mp.mt 

cmc SYKES TERRY SCOTT 
BERNARD BRES&LAW 
IAN HURT HELEN MJ 

.mil 

GARETH HUNT 

Rl'N FOR TOUR WIFE! 

uriiim. diHl rt,r«« wd In 
R\S IUUM S 

Ot.'i 1 ^»V| iHp i NINhc i«lni 

in — -SHOULD RUN FOR 

LIFE.” - I iu •'■■■Hi L6 OO I 
i io yi I hf jiio iiiiui'T trim mi, 
IU.kmih- — l.us m l ink- LlTSfi 


DOMINION THEATRE I IMI * 
MU 1 1 INI Ol 5M0 HHA5 llni 
mil. r hi shO a Be3 s >u 
Ol oVi KE-W H 1 II 'I t.ill SMUi 
T I Vl, f.r r+jo .’OPH 
Idn rvih- AJO ol54 
DAVE CLARK'* 

T/ME 

THE MUSICAL 

CLIFF RICHARD 

\- -nii Btk-k *.r \w 
■ I III non ITT IT AI Ol \hYUr 
i»> 

LAURENCE OLIVIER 

Itiil Pink Prrtv inun Mim ?J 
Mdrtli Ijw-in Wnl V \biil dl 7 
MtHi I il 7 50 
I Iui M.,1 r .» S.,1 5 A K 


DONMAR WAREHOUSE sun 

NJtOtT ^70 d&Od nflSa I nlil 
M.m l > IS Im 7 Mi DRUID 
THEATRE CO trim, li.-Luvl 
I Hum null lib'll I.iMi— I ilnii 
ihiui vhi i— BAILEGANGAHtE 
lit Tom Mnph). M.m imi 
MOBHAN McHENNA. I „|.i -hi 

.** min .Him niiii ,<i m’nt.d 


DUCHESS WC2 Mto MT4.t .»4<1 
■brirt. I in* C.M If - ."«4rt 7Jm 
■ :M 111— 7 lt.il vi 

I ii— H knl \Lilv 1 — -Il 5,v n V) 

GEORCiE COLE 

>li ••slllltfi ^Iniif iHil.rt Ol I4IIIIH 

liniin«r '.mIii 

A MONTH OF SI ’NO A VS 

M > n t qr 'i urn play 

(a lilt— lit 1 1 II Ml MtH K WII 
vmi nnipiviiov n M.m 

■A TREMENDOUS SUCCESS'hib . 


DUKE OF YORKS Ht, B|.i^ t-f 
nt., mt>T 7,ii urn tv i, s.ik— 

"V, 1-1.'^ I II -J I .ill MU 7 l*,» 
I'l MU 7.Mn | % .— H rt 
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2nd YEAR OF THE AWARD 
WINNING COMEDY MT 

STEPPING 017 

“TRIUMPN ON TAP” I i ,. «d,| 
lib- 1 1,1 tauiailt 
I't Nkh.ini I Ion- 
lll'i Uil lit lllli.i Mik.-n/v- 

(flMEDN.OF THF 'i EAR 

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l.ilt lln* I',', n (hi - vutt ii 1.4 

"1 .imnui .if Inn. |i - , 
mni-i I- 1 .J. t,n. |.„. , , , , 


DORY LAME THEATRE ROYAL 

Ol HJo HlOH Ol 240 uOro 7 
I u—1 I -III 3J IKHH 7 rt.,, ,1 nVa 

?40 7,-vjn 

DavM Merrick ’* 

42ND STREET 

A SHOW FOR ALL THE FAMILY 
WINNER OF ALL THE BEST 
MUSICAL AWARDS FOR 1BS4 

tuHfl 

BEST Ml'SICAL 

STANDARD DRAMA AWARDS 

\n4>W 

BEST Ml’SIC AL 

LAURENCE OLIVIER AWARD 

\ nUil 

BEST Ml'SICAL 

PLAYS A PLAYERS 
LONDON THEATRE CRITICS 
AWARD 

I iii- ho. M.,i* iti-rt tn 
Ml 50 Ml id 
Id. um — db- Tl| <5.10 tjl JL 

NOW BOOKING GNTIL 
JAS 14s? 

I'.ll It B.lli— \t dll.lMi- 


FORTUNE S 1 1 Kle 22iH 225*1 

7J| I t r ri I 11 SdloArUO 

COMEDY OF THE YEAR 

(dm rill,' UIII1PI l -.Ild |0»u 

UP AND UNDER 

Pt lift in (Waa-r 

“A WONDERFUL COMEDY" S 

I U1H— “—P| I 111111“ It ll-l 
1 Hr II IlH- l„l,|IH— I ,||M| H'.ld IH ■' 

■'■iHpnr. M.it - a •• <*» « M""“i 

in — *■ TOTALLY HYSTERICAL" 

tii— • i m lU-nM-m dal i, iid, tit 

lt’Mi,rilir« lln- .iiHlfii. <• hi i U*u 
.nm • Ii.n ' — 1 i-l ■■ A JOT - - 1 \|l 


OAR RICK. S ni RV> -IbHI ( |- 
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7.>nn tii|»*Hin— ^VioI.'T lir-n 
imi U i-1 nul ? P *-,i 5 n .,ml H O 

NO SEX. PLEASE. 
WERE BRITISH 


CLOSE 4H7 IW Ini t.m 
n in 7 ir.it ii ^40 

ran -sjn cirs 

(mill', I la., ,1 Iti-N.l 
l.u I Ih- Hfarilt I - lid ll»'.il'« • - 
I".— i'L 

DENIB LAWSON. JAN FRANCIS 
RONALD HOLCATE 
JOHN BARRON 

LEND ME A TEXOR 

\ ( IinH'llt In Kill I IHl-X'l 

llii, 1 hit in tl.it ni t tilriii ■!•■ 

1 ii- H M«l- W-il 5 n a^|i j n 
lUlk I'l'IMIHIVi 
I 111 NhiM Mill* II i> dl 7 «« i 


GREENWICH THEATRE r.i »ja 

‘*^ , „'i | i •■iiimr ? JIi llml *^-»l 

OMt OF V% ii« TOSfM 
CHAPMAN ■••lli ANTHONY 
ANDREWS, DAVID 

HOROVITCM. IAN OCILVY .nnl 
JENNY QUA VL£ ■■ l , ..nil.il 


HAMPSTEAD 7, ,' -t--j !■»•■.« 

II 'in 1 1"" - Krrw AnNrtM, 

J*H FdArv £ AUmtI Flwtry III 

ORPHANS m 1 1 1- f.'--l*'i 


HAYMARKET THEATRE ROYAL 

Bat mlf«* It ri oi - Vr iwjj rm 
CdU 2* hi 7 <«dt . I hl.tr. 24C< 7JQQ 

PETER O’TOOLE 

-ilh 

BERNARD BRADEN 
DORA BRYAN 
MICHAEL DENISON 
MARIUS CORING 

GEOFFREY KEEN 

MOIRA LISTER 
BREWSTER MASON 
PAUL ROGERS 
DINAH SHERIDAN 

DAVID WALLER 

rtlHl 

SUSANNAH YORK 

THE APPLE CART 

HI- BERNARD SHAW 

|iq» 7 V) M.,1 — -ll 2 Vr 


HER MAJESTY’S 

-JO dDOO ii 1 1, 'll*™- 7A1 emoa 

I ni k — ill i'J na.nl 7 ll.lt 
■ t hu.-1-iiHr. 74T. T^on 

••A W unBertiA TheptriuOtT hM- 

t* UIinJ to our UWlI tor 

■amNn" n M.ni 
DONALD SINDEN in 

THE SCARLET 
PIMPERNEL 

■■A Manta* adoptotton— — r-r 

nint *1 ThNln made U hi 

“Saprrti Cmk i»«rtoraMa«*»" 
i I “TW ipwiHaUrir. men- 
ioArjnu" M.nl "it lun 
if. 7 30 V.iN kill A ’-ll -I IO 


IOMIUN I'M 1 VI HI M 

THE HIT MUSICAL COMEDY 
DIRECT FROM BROADWAY 

LA CAGE Al \ FOLLHS 

Pmii'U, ihiui Vpi'l 22 
I ill Nuflil M.i* 7 

I I'li-plli'ld* ■ mill rumt liar. in". 
.11 1 •'lUilt “A «J7 737 3 J 37 -T>5 d 
7 to Mlf I I HI I .,11 .'■! lli 7 la.,t- 

I I 731111 ll"\ i'IIh i- 
man. d|U H nil |>1 -am.ll i dill- 1- ik p 

ujl I cl ^ V 

LYRIC THEATRE 

\f Vtl ri] J57 -hHi, 7 fil Jto 
iiva» n ni j -i ISM' o: 7 to 
dice. 7 I lid I'.lll ■—! l—nll 7 Ik.l 

,, i..i||.. r n | - Jil 7pnn 

BERYL JCAM-PICRRE 
REID AUMONT 

SIAN GEOFFREY 

PHILB*S BURR1DGE 
£ AMANDA WARING in 
LERHCR £ LOWE'S MUSICAL 

(.If II 


I Hr i 




■ffl- I, ,1 a, fill hill! Hill'll. 

., p| 1 1.1 ll t I M»«— 

1 i ii- !.!H -.,1* in* l>r, 
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LYRIC HAMMERSMITH ■•] 7JJ 
.•'l 1 I •■— 7 dh tta-I >1,11- .• -Jl 
S.,|. J II A 7 45 
DOUC LUCIE'S 

PROGRESS 

Inin i, n i*\ David Haynun 
■*— "i"-’ 1 '•• Cva« R**« 
-Slhtortaely Funay' O. TM 
5*TCNDB0 UNTIL U march 
LYRIC STUDIO Ew* Bam prompt! 
SATK DAY-MIGHT by Adrian 
Mitt be «. Directed by Richard WH- 
liamL DaMgnyd by Tom Philbpc. 


KINGS HEAD ''I 7.-*o |R1o 

TASTE OF ORTON' • H.-' II"' 
PI" — Tl't-t « PI" 


LYTTDLLTON -S' ».'» 71V ■ i 

.r-.lIHill.ll JlHMlI... I".— a. 

d.l" 1 lam'l Imi,",, 7 1& hnl 
2 -I".* IH." HI.HI * 7J5 

ll"-" —l.u. ll .-I I- .’?• BRIGH- 
TON BEACH MEMOIRS. 


I II -dl 0 Jl' A N 10 

RICHARD TODD 

ERIC LANDER ANNETTE ANDRE 

THE Bl SI NESS OF 

Ml RDER 

Ini' iui Kin ill* i rn |fj> li.«iu ll.wn- 

| it«- h--4 ll" ■ <*" .ii- ' - Mti 
" \n im-ilkrlliit ^ irni>‘i I \|» 

“\ llkllllll II. -ll all IlH \ |l .111 
■N'DwjIiuji,)) ■ I J|W- Jill JVI-B4 
IlNp'IIMUK niv -ll I I III ll.M ■' ,|J1 

|M illivl III .1 lll'i .nil ' | ■ M.lll 

Sdb GREAT TEAR 
OVER 2.000 PERFORMANCES 


MERMAID ( I >|pi I-uiIiimj li-n 

• «i 741 f«f*| 

I III 7 Il.it 2 1**1 (h II 

s.,|.-.:u «m«17' l • i» H '1 I II A 
sj r Ci a ho 

srs AW ARIVWIWIV; 

PRODUCTION 

GLENGARRY GLEN RiYN 

nt ILH HI M.llll.-I 
lain l.il In 11,11 In, .1, i, 

I In- |N.i i , t'Jl..i,i,. 

ytraaK Uapa.igv 

c ill.. « - I -lu»% - o r 'Vniiiii.,1 I Ii 


MERMAID THEATRE SHAKE- 
SPEARE WORKSHOPS 1 i.l.l 
M.ii, li I 1 toil, I ii „l 11 .,111 

MriiH.iul .’'in f . r tf-H ii.| iifi.iiK 


NATIONAL THEATRE -ii. I'.M.t 

national theatre 
compam 

— ■ SEPARATE ENTRIES 

OLIVIER LYTTELTON 

COTTESLOE | >■ ,.11. „i . "-..i' 

*■ •ll' ■l.l* - Mf JW** I— .ill Mil .ilia - - 

•«"T1 I-l. in, RESTAURANT 

CHEAP, EASY CAR PAR. 
TOURS OF TNI BUILDING 

111. 1 -I lip ' '. ■ I"-., r ’ • ■ 

NT ALSO AT THE MERMAID 


MEW LONDON I a rail I .rraa Hr.' 

Ill !•'•> I*.?.- ll ■ r«-. • ■ I -. .- 

"I" i* * si ’-"ik TI- 
THE ANDREW LLOYD WEBBER 
T.S. ELIOT MUSICAL 

CATS 


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mi". "■ 
..in .i" .iii. ii' 
■llilll Via|l,< 


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OLD VIC “7" Ten. O' ."*?! m." 

La II -.ala- Si.T ql.'t M.llrll 1 1 ". 
Viuil I Cl 

I AM MCNARD 

CMARLESON GRIFFITHS 
CEMNIA JONES 
DAVID MALCOLM 
LVON STORRY 

AFTER AIDA 

ll,Ti, Imi lit II.,— .ii* I I'l." h- 
A in-., yl. i, la. Jp H«n MKchrd 

l-l— I "ll in.' Ilia- A 'H 

ClaMppe Verdi -nl, .a ..i-l ■" 


OLD VtC. Q.— <*ni r, ii .i & i ih.'i 

ti.|. -.il.- a* r.17*. 

t» ...i M..I- ? V' — ..I- j o a t j:. 

PRIDE S, PRLH'DK'E 

\ i>l,l> .hI.ii.I.% 1 tl-l" I-"*" 
dhl.li-. Inn i-l m II." aaJ ill 

PETER PAULINE 

S ALLIS YATES 

JAMES TESSA 

WARWICK PE Alt E- JONES 
IAN IRENE 

GELDER SUTCLIFFE 

lln.Hl.-l lit H'll Iht.K 

■TINS IS THE MOST 

ENJOYABLE NOVEL 

ADAPTATION I HAVE SEEN 
SINCE NICHOLAS NICKLEBY" 
in,.. “I LOVED IT" in- 
LAST WEEK 


OUVIER 

Ii. 'li.il 


I" i 


sru?n 

In-dll." 
.• in - 


’i,’ i i '"-i 
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7 1 i A I 1 1 I" 

M.l|. I, I 1 dl 7 | I'|.,|. I. 

1 4 A l*. A V.'I'II ."’1 I.' I-J THE 
THREEPENNY OPERA HI 

III. -."I -alii Mii-ji In Him 
It ■ all 


PALACE THEATRE J 

{'." 4 t? «d.-7 .., '.7 tl «J".1 
< d|> —.Hi- t-Ul a- 1 ’■ 

THC MUSICAL SENSATION 

LtS MISER AKLES 
"IF YOU ( JiN T GET \ 
TK KET - ^TEaLGXF* Sid 


7 ‘.1 M.i" 

■ ■■iiii'i- ""T .tiinii"' 


-.il 
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BEAT THE TOUTS BT ENQUIR- 
ING FOR RETURNS AT THE BOX 
OFFICE NEW BOOKINGS 
PERIOD TO OCT 4 MOW OPCM 


PHOENIX - . 'C-l 


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•1 t ..|| 


111 - I Ml -|, \I <>| l"„:. 

-1 "i'l ml I " .fii.l t'-.H.I-. 

ARE YOU LONESOME TONIGHT? 

«l - . M Ill I i-l' tl l 

ll - ’I tr |i|M ote 

W.'l |H.d I I. ..I'l. -I, , 

■'I' l '|..||.|.ll I • •' ..id. 

Piccadilly theatre dj7 
ASM. 7J4 SS1S i i . .I" - ".l 
19", "la— 37# BSCS, 741 

- B3C ML2 SJO 6121. 

"A BrUkant nr* IMuuul" BBC 

i)i.\m rif\xk 
tssEX TIXIW 
Ml TIW 

TREMENDOUS SPECTACLE' 
Gdn 

Oyw 100 SlanduiR Oniron, 
Cm S3 Matt WM 3 & Sat 5 


OF WALES "i-aH 
a 1 1 1'. III". r.| Uttl 

■ ". Id'.",. —.I". Ol -.V 

V 711 

r -ill ’a 1.1 ' .r.M .. ixi.kin.- 

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GrtiKiMl IMiiucili" 
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kiiii.mi l* ■■■•■I 1% nifiiiiiA 

UTS Jl DOLLS 

-i LULU 

NORMAN JANET 

RPSSJNCTON DIBLET 

ANDREW C WADSWORTH 
THICK WILSON 

-WBndrrtal EBIrrtaaimmt" —l.l 
-A CUnK ■>, II- la l.l 

*'Oynaai4l«" I' M.,,l 

I.ail ,|H) illilil \l*l«l * 


OUEEN'S 7 to ll—. -to 

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| ,.— af|.|*l Vt.,1 A >-,l M..I- : .|nll 

M UiGiE ED\\ \R|) 

smith pri\ 

■■FIVE BRAVURA PERFOR- 
MANCES IN THIS SHARP 
SARDONIC. ELEGANT 

COMEDY.” - Inr- 

IXTFRPRETERS 


n.i. 


I'l.n ii 
HanvaoSiL 
•I "a Pater Yalas. 


Ronald 


ROYAL COURT - " ~ V ; 
WOMEN BEWARE WOMAN in 

I ■>■■■■'.•• Nliilill. In" .mil 1 1*. • ."-I 
ILlll'l I *•!.- I--I It .111."" 

C.i.1 'll I \ ... M " *-ll M.i" in 


ROYAL COURT THEATRE 
UPSTAIRS 01-730 £554 r » • ■ 
I—.' I'l... Ii. .— 

SHORT CHANCE "< )"■" 

■ l..il"ii I -.'I :>• >i 


SADLER'S WELLS 278 8916 

I ,..i i .al in Inn ii . 

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JEAXXr 


Tha Mini cal 

London PrrmkTP March 4. 

tote. | 1 1.141 --.ll- .kl -1I'\ t'il| 

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AMCAIPAN DAMCE &EA&OM 


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First published 1785 


Thatcher 
attacked 
hy Heath 
over BL 

By Philip Webster 

Political Correspondent 

The Prime Minister yester- 
day faced renewed criticism 
-from within her own party as 
Mr Edward Heath attacked 
her attitude to the British 
Leyland sale and Mr Michael 
Heseltine fired another salvo 
at the Government's approach 
to industry. 

Mr Heath, the former Prime 
Minister, pointedly refused in 
a television interview to en- 
dorse Mrs Thatcher to lead the 
Conservatives into the next 
election. 

Asked if he hoped she 
would be at the head of the 
Conservative's election battle, 
he said: “We must allow 
things to be decided by the 
party." 

He said that many people 
believed that the Government 
had already lied up the deal 
with General Motors and that 
the March 4 deadline was “a 
deadline being imposed 
against British would-be 
purchasers”. The talks with 
General Motors had been 
going on for a year, yet British 
firms' were bong given only 
three weeks. 

He said on TV-am that the 
British people would be 
"horrified” if the deal went 
ahead. 

Meanwhile Mr Heseltine, 
the former Secretary of State 
for Defence, called for a new 
enhanced industry depart 
mem with power and influ- 
ence to rival that of the 
Treasury. 

“For . loo long, and for 
historical reasons, the Trea- 
sury has dominated the indus- 
trial policies of this country," 
he said on the London Week- 
end television programme 
Weekend World. Calling fora 
strengthened partnership be- 
tween government and indus- 
try. Mr Heseltine said that all 
capitalist economies and gov- 
ernments were totally im- 
mersed in helping their 
industry^ *i have a feeling we 
try to; pretend that it' is other 
than ii is,r he said. 

!' Mr Heseltine admitted that 
his proposals would be unpop- 
ular with Mr Nigel Lawson, 
the Chancellor of the Exche- 
quer. He called for a new 
Cabinet committee, chaired 
by a senior government mem- 
ber. to co-ordinate the 
Government’s broad industri- 
al policies. 


Business as usual for Moscow 



•* ,K 

v- 


While Soviet rulers deliberated in the Palace of Congresses in the Kremlin (report page 5), it was business as usual for the 
citizens of Moscow, queueing for vodka (above) and going to the Bolshoi Theatre, below. Photographs, Dod Miller. 



Today's events 




Elizabeth the Queen 
Mother visits the Daily Mail 
Ideal Home Exhibition at Earls 
Court. 3. 

The Princess of Wales visits 
the Adfer Unit at Whitchurch 
Hospital. Park Road. Cardiff. 
II. 10: later anends a reception 
at Cardiff City Hall to marie the 
launch of the Lifeline Wales 
Campaign of the Kidney Re- 
search Unit of the Wales 
Foundation, i-. 10. 

■ Princess Anne opens the Save 
the Children Fund Shop at 
Chesterfield. Derbyshire. 1 1.05: 
visits the Midland Railway 


S^r.'VV.V ■ 

f*V‘ •, ... Vs ’ 

:C ! sJ1S 

r *r >Y.“V Nf V 


Trust Statioh at Ripley. Derby; 
-shire.-! 1.55; lunches at Ilkeston 
Fsfk Derbyshire, 1X45: visits 1 
the Ctaamos factory in celebra- 
tion of their Golden Jubilee. 
X25; later opens the new Design 
Block at Trent College, Long 
Eaton. Derbyshire. 3.15; and 
visits Birkins Lace Factory in 
Borrowash, 4.10. 

The Duchess of Gloucester 
attends a Gala Dinner and 
Fashion Show in aid of 
London's blind at the Inter- 
Continental Hotel, London, 
7.45. ■ . 

Music 

Recital by Helen Rees (re- 
corder) and Annette Richards 
(harpsichord): works by Bach. 


Frauds ‘involved 
£400m in bullion 9 

By Stewart Tendler, Crime Reporter 


Gold bullion handled by ma- 
jor City dealers, including 
Johnson Matihey Bankers, 
and wpnh a total of more.iban 
£400 million has been in- 
volved in serious VAT frauds 
detected by investigators over 
the past five years. 

Since 1981 Customs inves- 
tigators have brought a series 
of frauds to court and revealed 
total VAT loses of more than 
£60 million, a spokesman for 
Customs said yesterday. 

This represents gold trans- 
actions worth more than £400 
million but the full picture of 
VAT gold frauds is likely to be 
much larger. 

The Customs spokesman 
was unable to comment on a 
report suggesting the foil loss 
to the Exchequer could be as 
high as £500 million repre- 
senting transactions involving 
gold worth £3 billion. 

The report in The Observer 
suggested that JMB had been 
the largest dealer in gold 
transactions. 

JMB and other dealers have 


often been caught in the 
middle of frauds, paying VAT 
to vendors who have then 
failed to pay the tax to the 
Customs and have tried to 
vanish: — *" *" 

On. Saturday the latest Cus- 
toms investigation into allega- 
tions of VAT gold fraud 
resulted in nine men appear- 
ing in court charged with 
conspiracy to fraudulently 
evade VAT between July 1983 
and the end of February. 

The men were arrested after 
Customs investigators had ex- 
amined records of gold trans- 
actions at JMB offices, in 
London. 

.Eight of the mem' from 
London and the Midlands, 
were remanded on bail and 
one was remanded in custody. 
None of the accused is an 
employee of JMBl 

The Customs investigation 
is separate from a police 
inquirv into the affairs of JMB 
by 30 detectives from the City 
and Scotland Yard fraud 
teams 


■ Village Voice 

Postmaster shown the 
error of his ways 

This week Victor Zorza tells bow the people of a Himalayan village took rite 
: law into their own bands when a youngster embezzled money and delivered 
their own judgement, perhaps more just andL certainly more effective than 
: ' = - - . ? V A vf . the sentences. of dty courts. • 


. Only qne village family did not' hav^to 
■ depend for its fboif on its own crops and on 
the vagaries of the weather. If the raius.came 
; at foe wrong time the other househokfs 
might suffer, but the postmaster's family 
could always rely on his salary — or so it 
thought. 

When his illness proved more senous 
than had at first appeared, his wife tried to 
. cope with die . paperwork- but she had " 
neither education nor aptitude for figures. 
/Yet .when he died the, village^ expected 
"'officials to let her keep foe job. They 'did, al- 
though it meant that the;. post office could 
•-.barely function.'. -No one. wan led ilo deprive 
the widow ofherliving. The.viilage looks af- 
ter its own. ; . ... 

The primitive post office, distinguished 
from other huts only by a box containing 
stamps a nd account books, had made the 
village unique in the neighbourhood- The 
postmaster had served all the other villages 
in the area, managed foe mail, and handled 
the remittances sent by the few villagers who 

bad gone to the plains in search of work. 

The.sujjervisor from town agreed terrain 
the widow’s teenage son- Chuni. The- 
cheerfol; obliging boy, always readyro'leud- 
; a- hand to anyone who needed help, proved 
an apt pupiL When the official visited the- 
v diage, they worked late into the night, 
helping themselves io home-brewed liquor. 

By foe time they finished they were 
usual ly splendidly drunk and singing, ready 

He proved a very 
apt pupil 

Tor the extravagant feast - chicken, no less ' 
-« -prepared 'by', the" ■ widow. Everybody; 
wem d erect /v/frfe re - foe 'money came /frpm. - 
They assumed ihdt Quint. was giving foe 
supervisor a monthly bribe — a -frequent ~ 
arrangement between a. subordinate and his 
superior. 

: After each visit Chuni looked increasingly' 
worried. He was now drinking heavily. 
Some villagers who expected remittances 
never received them. They had not arrived, 
Chuni said. Tire villagers knew that such 
things happened- One does not send money 
by post if one can help it. 

When -the supervisor came again they 
complained. and he promised to investigate. 
On-his next visit be announced; that sdme'bf- 
\ihe "money had. “turned up". Chuni made. 

. the long-delayM paymeiUs. but there 'was-. 

' enough onTyTor those who had threatened 
to denounce both of them to the authorities. 
The stealing had gone on for. years; 

. Chuni took to smoking opium because, 
some said, the burden of responsibility had 
proved too heavy for him. Or, said those 
who had not been repaid, because be had 
easy access to other people's money. 


— The supervisor offered them sympathy, 
but- no repanUion-~Setile it "among 
yourselves,” he insist^ not. the 

boy would go to prison, the post office 
would be transferred., and the comm unity 
would lose face. 

They suspected that his advice was 
designed to hush up. the theft. He must be 
trying to protect himself and his superiors 
with whom he would have shared the bribes, 
they said " • . 

But they acknowledged that Chuni was 
the village's responsibility. He. was. only a 
boy. They didn't- warn to see his life ruined 

— provided he paid it all back. The 
supervisor urged Chuni to sell the- family 
land and pay up, but no one ever disposes of 
his fields unless be is pushed to the wail. He 
refused 

One day Chuni was summoned to town. 
Nobody knew, what transpired. Some 
villagers believed that officials anxious to 
conceal their own compli city had convinced 

Treated Chuni again as 
one of themselves - 

him that he alone would be held responsible 
and might spend the rest of his life in jafl. He 
begged the village's forgiveness, sold some 
land and began to make payments. . . 

- The village wiped the slate dean. Chuni 
was accepted back into foe community 
without recrimination, almost with a sense 
of relief. “Aren’t you taking a risk?" I asked 
the villagers. Could they really trust Chuni 
after what happened? 

There was no risk, they assured me. They 
had demonstrated to him the error of bis 

• ways and be had shown his contrition. Soon 
■ the. Villagers were again treating Chuni as 
"oriefof themselves, as if nothing had ever 
-happened 

I could not understand it. Someone 
' capable of plundering the community so 
systematically, for so long, I thought, did 

• not become a reformed character overnight. 
A village elder tried to enlighten me. He had 
heard of the law and order problem in the 
cities, of the grim penalties imposed on 
lawbreakers. He didn't think much of the 
way the cities coped 

“If Chuni were your son.” he said 
“wouldn't you have forgiven?" The village 
was a family; Chuni was irschikt In the city, 
"the boy might have gone astray again. In the 
.village, never. 

“■ -flow,- T asked could they be sure? 
“Because.” he explained with a disarming 
smile, “we'll be watching every step he 
makes, for ever — and he knows iu" The vil- 
lage, he said didn't trust the law and must 
look after its own. 

In more wavs than one. 

Copyright ©Victor Zorza ©86 


to 


ii L • 



THE TIMES INFORMATION SERVICE 


The Times Crossword Puzzle No 16,983 

V 



ACROSS 

1 The brave man confined to 
bed will get a cigar (7). 

S Give a lalking-to. being di- 
rect (7). 

9 Trains foe first mate, note 
(5). 

10 A tip Robin Hood put to 
good use (9X 

1 1 Prepared to play (9). 

12 Bel or back like a king (5). 

13 Invigorating drink (5). 

15 Not even a partisan (9). 

18 They raise no objection 
when a fool comes in (9). 

19 Building quarters within a 
high rock (S). 

21 Lie about strength of 
character (5X 

23 Waving an account due to 
be paid? (9). 

25 A restaurant with musicians 
beside a lake (9). 

26 A word of consolation of- 
fered hy foe serving men (5). 

27 Make much of general dis- 
order (7). 

28 Locks where a boat may be 
seen in wooded surround- 
ings (7). 

DOWN 

1 Show an animal outside 
without cover (7). 

2 Hannibal's trumpeters f9). 

3 A letter carried by some 
gaol-bird (5). 

4 A primer's error that’s come 
to light (9). 

5 Help to k eep in credit — 
sbatpjfj). 


6 Blum expression of anti- 
Conservatism? (9). 

7 He opposes people in foe 
old-lash ioned retrogressive 
way (5). 

8 Depressed apprentice ac- 
cepted by the German 
leather-worker (7). 

14. Scientific device becomes 
more impenetrable under 
study (9). 

16 Lies inert — not normally 
bouncy (9). 

17 **' — is young ambition's 
ladder." Q. Caesar) (9). 

18 Obliging with a strongly 
musical story (7k 

20 Go back for foe right issue 
(7k 

22 Battle cry grips foe regiment 
(5). 

23 Move clumsily and obstruct 
turning for .example (5). 

24 Bizarre route— quite- bizarre 
(51. 


The Solution 
of Saturday’s 
Prize Puzzle 
No 16,982 
will appear 
next Saturday 


Telemann! Castello and 
Lechnerrthe University Church, 
.of- St Mary, foe" Vfrgin, High 
Street. Oxford; 1.15. 

Orchestra Da Cameraj Men- 
delssohn and Beethoven); 
University Chapel Universiw 
of Keele. Keele. Staffordshire; a. 

Patterson Wind Quintet: St 
Anne and St Agnes. Gresham 
Street. London; 1. 10. 

Organ recital by Maija 
Lehionen. St. Michael's. 
ComhilL London : I pm. 

Piano recital (Paul 
Berkowitz): St Lawrence Jewry. 
Guildhall Yard, London: (pm. 

The Purcell Quartet; Ottery St 
Mary Concerts Society, King's 
School. Ottery St Mary; 7.30. 

The Western Orchestral Soci- 
ety present the Joaquin Rodrigo 
Festival; Royal Festival HalL 
London: 7.30 (3. 6, 10, ends 
March 15). 

Talks, lectures, 

“ Hope and Faith”, by Bishop 
Peter Selby, Sion College. Vic- 
toria Embankment, London: 
5.30. 

The limits, of the law in 
regulating medicine, by Lord 
Scarman; King's College, Lon- 
don: 1.05 to 2.15. 

Medieval Gospel Books, by 
Penelope Wallis. The British 
Library. Great Russell Street. 
WCI. 2. 

English Romanesque 
m an u scrips by Penelope Wallis: 
The British Library. Great Rus- 
sell Street. WCI. 12.30. 

Manuscripts, and their place 
in medieval art. by Penelope 
Wallis, foe British . Library, 
Great Russell Street, WCI. 1 1. 

“If Christ is not raised," by 
Rev Edward Burns. Liverpool 
Parish Church. Pier Head. 


The week’s walks 


Today; Inside Dickon s London. Grays 
inn io DtcHen s House, meet Hotborn 
Underground, 2. Qzabethan London: 
Rower of Ottos AL meet Museum oJ 
London, 2.30. The famous Sherlock 
Holmes detective traa. meet Baker Street 
Underground. 7 30. 

Tomorrow: Inns of Court - England's 
legal heritage, meet Chancery Lane 
Underground (OcfeM office). 11. inade the 
London of Shakespeare and f^pys. meet 
Temple Undeground, 2. Ghosts ot the 
West End (anas m a pub), meet Cm b an h- 
BNMt Underground. 1 30. 

Wednesday: Treasures and trtwa of 
Royal Westminster, meat Green Park 
Underground. 11. A pumay through 
nefcera' London, meat Embankment 
Underground, 11. Legal London. Inside 
me Law Courts, meet Hotbom Under- 
ground. 2. 

Thursday: Best of British pubs ngfns. 
meet Bond Street Underground ffiburt 
office). 730. 

Friday: Wfflam Shakespeare's rtwmtda 
scene, meet Btacktrtan Underground 
(ticket office), n Legal and iBagal London 
■ Inns ot Courts, meet Hotbom Under- 
ground, 11 Shakespeare m London, meet 
Museum of London. 2 '% 

Saturday: London's finest ow shops 
around Mayfafr. moot Green Park Under- 
(BOuncL ii. Pspys. the. Plague and the 
Great Tbs. meet Muaaurii of London, 
230. 

Sunday: m the footsteps ot Sherlock 
Holmes, meet Emb a nk men t 


grotmd, it Picturesque Hampstead Vil- 
lage and the Meath, meet HinpdMd 
Underground. IL U nd erw o rld London: 
Fagei's Friends, meet Museum of Lon- 
don, 2.30.. 


Anniversaries 


The Concise Crossword is on page 10 


Births: Edmond ’Waller, poet. 
Cole&hili. Warwickshire. 1606; 
Alexander Graham BelL in- 
ventor. Edinburgh. IW7; Sir 
Henri Wood* London. IS69; 
Edward Thomas, poet. London. 
1878. 

Robert Adam, architect, died 
in London. 1791 


Nature B&teS 


V Many starving , -Redwings/ 
have flown "in to foe West 
country and died there in gar- 
dens. To help foe survivors, 
apples and dried fruit, like 
sultanas, are the best food to put 
out. Small birds, like wrens, 
have also suffered badly, and 
grey herons have had a difficult 
search for fish, with ponds and 
lakes frozen:, many herons and 
kingfishers have moved down to 
the sea. There has been an influx 
of wax wings from Scandinavia. 
These are chestnut-coloured 
birds, about as big as a starling, 
with a pointed crest, a yellow- 
tipped taiL and a patch, like red 
sealing-wax, on their wings: they 
feed by preference on rose-hips 
and hawihome berries. All gar- 
den birds are helped in frost by 
putting out water for bathing; if 
their feathers get sticky, they 
cannot puff them up for insula- 
tion. 

In spite of the weather, 
lengthening days have brought 
birds further on into breeding 
condition. The first snatches of 
blackbird song can be beard in 
afternoon sunlight. 

Woodpigeons are displaying 
over their territories - soaring up 
in foe air, clapping their wings, 
and gliding down again: some 
even started nest-building in foe 
bare boughs with the tem- 
perature below freezing. DJM. 


Parliament today 


Commons(2.30): Debates on 
Welsh affairs and EEC social 
questions. 

Lords( 3.30): Museum of 
London Bill, committee stage; 
debate on television in Euro- 
pean Community. 


Rtftds 




:• yr,"i i 

M k B wkfa'MS : ; Contraflow* between 
Junction 3A4123 Dwftjyand Brm IN) and 
junction 3(A456 Halesowen and Brm WV 
Mi: Temporary tarns N of AS at Gorsey 
BanteShropchua- AM; Roadworks on N 
bound carriageway. Hanford: (Mays. 

Norm: A1 {Mk Contraflow Immediate) 

N ot luncbon A6G(N), S of Darlington. Mfc 
Contraflow between junction 16 and 17 ( 
Stoke and SonbocM- Ml: Btacow Bridge 
junction wttt M61/M& both carriageways 
haw nearside lane closures. 

Wales nd West MS: Lanes one and 
two of N-bound camageway at Taunton 
ctosedASft Lane restrictions on VMton- 
Street road. Somerset A54& Temporary 
agnate at Gorman's Quay, on Prestatyn 
road- . . 

Scotland: All 40: Portabeto road 
dosed at jurenon wNh Safleyfieid road 
(A6 1 06k dnerstona signed. M7« N-bound 
carriageway ctoeed N Ol access K> 
Blackwood : contraflow on S-bounOp 

Information aoppBed by AA 


Bond winners 


Winners in the weekly draw 
for Premium Bond prizes 
a re :£ 100,000 (6CK907593); 
winner lives in Lan c ashire. 
£50.000 ( 5EZ504663): London 
borough of Hounslow .£25,000 ( 
2YT000292);(SurreyX. 


New music 


Composers are invited io 
submit works for the 19S7 
World Music Days, to be held in 
Cologne from October 23 to 
November 1 next year. Works, 
which must have been written 
within the past five years, and be 
accompanied by a curriculum 
vitae of the composer, should be 
submitted to foe British Read- 
ing Panel by foe 14fo- af next 
month, at foe British Section of 
-the - International -Society for 
Contemporary Music. 1.05. 
Piccadilly. London W1VOAU ( 
tel. 01 - 629 - 9495). 



Times Portfolio rules are as follows: 

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tions on Itw reverse side.. These cards 
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. • Tiro warding of Rules S and 3 has 
been expanded from carder versions, 
for clarification purposes, me Game 

UseH » not affected and Will continue 

to be played in exactly the same way 
os before. 



Aii anticyclone will per- 
sist as a frontal trough 
approaches N Scotland. 


6 axn to midnight 


London, SE, central 5/ ,8*. 

■ — ■ - - E, W-UkSands* S- 
frost and. Ia»; .dry.-sainy - 
periods: wnd.oasteityji^itjnw tttrpJZ- 
riC’OB-SSFJ.-^" 1 •' / .. 

Cham*! Irt w rtir WaWy dry; jiunny 
fatarvakk jtihd aastarty, moderate, max 
temp 3C (37F). 

E, NW, control N, W EogfaoiLN Wales, 
Lake Diotrict, We al ttac Dry. tunny 
periods wrnd mamty westeriy fight max 
temp 2-4C (36-39F). ' 

Bwdon. EdMugb, Dundee, Atow- 
dwtii, SW Scodand, Glasgow, central 
Kgh tfa kt s. AigyB: isoland Ircwzng log 
patches Ctearmg. Mostly ■ dry. sunny 
•nervals. Wind southwesterly moder ate 
or fresh. Rather cokf max &5c (37-419. 

Moray FMi, HE, HW Seated, Oritney. 
Shetland: Rather cloudy. Ram in places 
perhaps snow on note. Wind souttv 
weetedy fresh or sfiong. Near nomw. 
max.5-7c (41-459. 

Morttw ra Ireland: FVosty-start. mam 

dry; cloudy laanwnd spuBhrastorty tight 
or moderate; max temp jiC (41FL. ... - 
^Outtoakfortouxwtroaad WedritMfey: 

Be«iming^T^8cbin^^^WMe Pan, ‘ ' 

Sui Rtsea: Sun Seta: 
6.42 am 5-44 pm 


Moon sofa 
625 am 



Moon rises 
135 am 
Last quarter 12.17 pm 


lighting-up time 


High Tides 


London E.14 pm to 610 am 


MHue sky: bc-Mue sky and doud: c- 
rtouoy: orovcrcasU f-fog; (Mfruzte: p- 
litet mtet-mtst: r-ratn: s-enow: Ui- 
Uiundersform: p^howera. 

Arrows show wind direction, wind 
wwdunnh} circled. Temperature 
centigrade. - ■ 


.. . r B&21 «d 

ga ggw ejksi proto 6 - 80 «m- : 


TODAY 

AM 

MT 

PH 

HT 

London Bridge 

6.0 

h-6 

638 

65 

Afeerrioeri 

4-W 

3.6 

525 

37 

Awonraouth 

11.39 

11.3 



Beffaot 

3-29 

21 

47 

33 

Canflff 

T154 

105 

11.48 

95 

fefwmport 

9JjB 

48 

1026 

4.7 

Dowrr 

3.18 

6.1 

3.48 

S.7 

Faknomtr 

9J» 

4.6 

956 

45 

iSnOet r 

$2 

4.1. 

47 

38 

223 

458 

48 

33 


2.37 

1051 

49 

6.5 

24 

11.13 

4.9 

85 

fltracoEBfie 

1024 

75 

1052 

75 

LwSs 

7.16 

45 

744 

4.9 

Uvafpoof 

3J1 

8^ 

35S 

85 

Lowestoft 

1.37 

2.4 

253 

5.0 

Hargste 

4-03 

45 

4.48 

41 

MBiord Karen 

I0j47 

5.0 

11.16 

55 


944 

6.1 

10.14 

58 

Otan 

iam 

32 

1054 

3.0 

Penzance 

9.10 

45 

9.40 

45 

•rwfWWRl 

rt.ca 

1.6 

1150 

1.4 

Portamoutb 

352 

4 3 

420 

4.0 

Sboreham 

3.20 

5.7 

350 

55 

tninlraupiiiii 

3.16 

43 

245 

48 

Swansea 

10.48 

8.2 

[1.19 

7.8 

Tees 

823 

45 

850 

46 

WTtonroo-Nze 

359 

29 

454 

35 


Around Britain 


Temperatures at midday yaatanjay: c. 
douchf. tatr.r.rabiia.Bun. - 

CF C F. 

Befftnrt a 337 Q oeresey c 238 

,s 337 tmramo o a f 541 

s 4 39 Jersey f 238 

,s 337 London f 134 

CgdHf . a 337 Wnctwfar s 337 


.SunRoki 
- hrs n 
EAST COAST 

7.5 003 

4.6 004 


5 A 

^Cton 0.7 

SalfficOAST 


Max ' - 7 ■.'* 

C F 

3 37 surniy 

4 39 bright 

2 36 bright 
1 34 aoudy 


The pound 




AutMfaS 
Austria Sch 
Betj^mnEr.'- 


Bank Bank 
Buys . . .Sals 
-Zii -.Slot- 

S5. ’.a§ 

- 2.15— 9M 
42J5_-^ i-UMS , 
7J5 73& 

1038 -OS3 
X38 320 

2M 222 
1170 1120 

1.12 LOS 

2^0 2.170 

275 281 

3.70 as 

1065 1010 

221 210 

a ^ 

.1152;- 1j*S 
SIO ...^. 460 
far sma# danorrAiinion bank notes 
atf^OppfcirbyBBfcfaJS'Bartk Ptd' 
fitment , rates apply to travotlors' 
cherjue% and ether foreign _ currency . 


Worthing 


-003 

- 0.01 


Utttetungtp - 0.01 


Oe ewe rtflfei J- - 
FMandMIdt 
Prance F» w 
GennenyDm' :. 
Greece Dr . 

ESSK?" 

Italy Lire 
Japan Yen . 
Netherlands Gld 
Norway Kr " 
Portugal Esc 
SoMh Africa Rd 
Spain Pte . 
BdeiiXr - - 
ItzertandFr 
USi^S . .. . 
rogoafarteOrtr.. 


-0X31 


&W8fUQA 

Waymmdh 
Exmouth 
Tet yu n uu tf i 

k-wnsaam 
P ewj rn tt 22 
Jersey -024 

Gu ern sey - 007 

.WEST COAST 
Scflly fates 2JJ - 
Newquay Zl 


- 3 37 


Snow 

Snow 

snow 

snow 

snow- 

snow 

Snow 

Snow 

Snow 

snow 

snow 

snow 

enow - 

dui 

arrow 

snow 

snow 


Sun Ratal 
hrs m 


Tenby 68 - 

CotwynBay 04 

Morec a i riU e 08" - 

Douglas 7* - 

ENGLAND AND WALES 
London 0.9 

BTiaro Alrpt 9 2 - 

Bristol (Ctri) 0.9 - 

Cardiff (Cttafl 03 - 

Angte ae y 93 - 

B’poot Airpt B.O - 

M— crimter 9.1 

NeUhrgfuro P.6 - 

W-n-T« 6.5 

le 6.8 - 


Max 
C F 

4 38 duS 

5 41 duB 

4 39 sunny 
4 39 sunny 
4 39 bngtu 

2 36 ckwdy 
4 39 sunny 
4. 39 elouay 

4 39 cloudy 

5 41 sumy 

6 41 sumy 

3 37 sunny 
2 35 sunny 

4 39 snow 
4 39 sumy 


Glasgow 


2 36 bright 

0 32 arrow 

1 34 snow 

3 37 sunny 

2 38 duf 


SCOTLAND 

8.9 0.01 
02 - 

4.3 - 

4.4 - 

Stornoway 6.1 

Lanridi 7£ - 

Wick 92 - 

KHoas SLB - 

JtbenJem 1.4 

SL Andrews 1.9 DOT 

Edinburgh 1 J> 0.02 

NORTHERH RtELAND 

845 


2 38 
5 41 

3 37 

4 39 

5 41 
5 41 
3 37 
3 37 
1 34 
3 37 
3 37 


snow 

sumy 


sunny 

sunny 

sumy 

sunny 

sunny 

bright 

snow 

snow 


- 5 41 sunny 


Abroad 


MIDDAY: c. ckw* d, titan fair, t. tak-jg. fog; r, rakt; s, sum sm snow, t thunder 


Retail Price Men 3792 
London; The FT Index cfcsed down 3.1 
on RxJm af 1278.4. 

iw Yortc The Dow Jonas nduariai 
dosed 423 down on Friday at 




average 

17Q94& 


Our address 


Beirut 

sar* 


c 

■"c "14 
f 17. 
C IB 

& a. 

C 14 
f 24 
*a 28 

c 13 


. F, 

57Cologna 

63 (Tpbagn 

64 Corfu 
72 DuMd 
32 Ootxvnfc 
57 Faro . 

75 rtareiete 
82 Frankfort 
SS Fuoc fad 

- Geneva 


C F 
‘2 36 




C 14 57 __ 
a 4 38 MeVrae 

r 12 54 


sasRfa 

r&'fii&s&Tw**' sct - 


Btorria 


CJrjNHS NEWSPAPERS LIMITED. 
196* Pruned bv London Poa iPrtni- 
erv Limited.. PuofJstrod by Times 
Nowwaoers unrued. P.O. Box 7. 200 
Gray's tnn Rood. London: WCxX ■ 

EngUnd Monday. March 3. 19®*. 
Regtstercd as a newspaper at Uw Poet 


Budapet 

BAires2 

Cake 

Cape Tr* ' 

CTdanea 

'CMcago 

Ch'chrcto" 


s -3 
y- u 
c 12 

s 0 
r 10 
5 -1 

an -3 
1 27 
T21 
s 22 

■C 12 


C 10' 50 

c -t 30 Mont rea l 

-I 3 37 

e 16 6i 


C F 

i ie m 

- - Salzburg 

S 21 70 8 Paulo 
I 20 68 

- *f 17 63 

-.1 18 64 Seoul 


;IXS 


s 13 SS 

c 7 45 N York 
e 5 41 Nice - - 

8 29 84Qato 


27 HtisMd 
57 HongK 
57. bmxorck 
32 fatanbui. 

50 Jeddah 

80 JoTwro 

27 itartefa .$ 31.08 Peking 
61 L Palmas e 19 56 Perth 
70 Lfahen - - 

72 Locarno C 5 '4T 

- LuHmbg f 1 34 

36 LAnoafa *1 19 66 Rtyedh 
1 11 52 fflode J 


S-lj jSXSte 

t 29 

C .16 61 Tel Airiv 
S 23 73 Tenerife 
■s -3 27 Tokyo 
c 13 56 Toronto 
- - - Tunis 
s T 34 VafMda 
8 14 67 VancNer 
s 28 82 Venice 
an -5 23 Vienna : 
c 5 41 Warsaw2 
i 17 63 waantou 
f 20 68 Wcrngtn* 
*8 30 86 Zurtrf 


C F 
6c 14 57 
c 3 37 
1 31 08 
-8 13 55 
*9 26 79 
3 3 37 
f 25 77 
0-327 
3 0 32 
C 22 72 

fl 18 64 
r 16 61 
1 9 48 
*1-10 14 
3 24 75 
f 19 64 
•t 11 52 
c 7 45 
8h -4 2S 
S -6 Z3 


ft* 


“ U * 






■is 


% 


P; 


_ — ' *1 « row WU 3 ou go £] 
denote Saturday's spires are latest auaHabia 


s 0 32