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THE 



No 62,395 


i 


TIMES 


TUESDAY MARCH 4 >986 


RUC acc us ed of standing by in facc„of violence and intimidation 

Mob rules as strike grips Ulster 


• Police in foil riot gear took to the streets of North- 
ern Ireland after mob violence and intimidation 
swept through the province. 

• Thousands of people stayed away from work and 
sho ps and schools closed as the 24-honr “loyalist’* 
strike against the Anglo-Irish agreement took boML 

• Mr Tom King, the Secretary' of State for Northern 
Ireland, condemned Unionist leaders for failing to 
control the “hoodlum element" in a “so-called 
peaceful protest". 

By Richard Ford 

Mob violence and wide- collar employees reported for 
spread intimidation erupted their duties. ' 
across Northern Ireland yes- Only a boot 10 per cent of 




•■vfc.'.- ' • * ' 


terday as ihc 24-hour cmplovces turned up at the 
"loyalist" strike against the Harland and Wolff Shipvard 
Anglo-Irish agreement cITcc- and the Shorts Aircraft Fac- 
Kivvly paralysed large areas of tore in East Belfast. Others 


the province. 

Last night after vicious 
rioting in working-class east 


attempting to go to work were 
vicious greeted with barricades and 
iss east pickets who attacked cars and 



z?.. - rx/y 

V • - 



V .* % YJM!.'' > . 


Belfast, police in full riot gear verbally abused drivers, 
broke through makeshift bar- Power cuts closed schools, 
ri cades and dispersed a crowd offices and shops, and Orange 
of about 5f)0 youths who had Halls were used to provide 
gone on the rampage. cmcrgcncv food supplies for 

As the strike headed into its the elderly and sick, 
final hours Mr Tom King. In Belfast city centre, the big 
Secretary of State for North- shops opened but streets were 
ern Ireland, defended the po- almost empty. Shops and bars 
lice against numerous in the suburbs were shut either 
allegations that they had stood out of support for the protest 
by as people were intimidated or fear of reprisals, 
by loyalist pickets. In loyalist rural aa\ts there 

Mr King angrily denounced was an almost complete 
the leaders of the Official and closedown of commercial life. 
Democratic Unionist Parties and bus and rail travel were 





Masked men hijacking a car in Belfast to add to a barricade in tbeSbankill area during yesterday's Protestant strike 


for doing little to control 
-hoodlum element" in what 
he described as a -so-called 
peaceful protest”. He said: "I 
find it incredible that people 
who claim to be kwalists and 


severely restricted. Buses run- 
ning in Belfast were attackcd a 
with stones and bricks. 

The harbour airport in Bel- 
fast closed whifeat Aldergrove 
the major airline carriers can- 


Police watch as pickets and 
barbed wire rule the roads 


supporters or the Crown actu- celled (lights because they 
ally put this _ appalling strain claimed their stall' were being 


on the police". 

The deputy leader of the 


intimidated. The harbour at 
Larne dosed and fenrv scr- 


SDLP. Mr Seamus Mallon. vices to the mainland* were 
accused the RUC of a blatant cancelled. 


abrogation oft Herr duty saying 
there were two sorts of law: 


Gangs of youths, many in 
paramilitary uniforms and 


one lor the loyal sons of Ulster with sinister black masks, 
and another for other people, gathered on street comers 
But Sir John Hcrmon. the while a senes of agriculture 
Chief Constable, appeared on cavalcades caused traffic dis- 
iclcvision to say there were ruption. 
bound to ha'c been shortcom- In one of the worst incidents 
ings but overall there had been of the day. women at a 
"sterling police work in the clothing factory in Lurgan. Co 
interests 'of the whole Armagh, were bcscigcd by a 
community". loyalist mob. Police fired plas- 

The degeneration into vio- vie baton rounds and took the 


interests 01 tne wnoic Armagn. were bcscigcd by a 
community". loyalist mob. Police fired plas- 

The degeneration into vio- vie baton rounds and took the 
ience of what Mr James women to safety in armoured 
Molyneauv leader of the OUP trucks before rioters set light 
and the Rev lan Paisley, to the building, 
leader of the DUP, had want- Last nijdu. both Mr. 

ed to be a "dignified and Molyncaux- and Mr Paisley 
peaceful protest" came as no condemned the intimidation, 
surprise to the Government, but insisted it had been over- 
However there was concern exaggerated and that most 
at how quickly the protests people had willingly stayed 
snowballed into trouble and away from work, 
moderate Unionists fear that 


away from wont. 

However there is renewed 


hardline elements will be en- questioning about how far the 
couraged to step up their men can control their 


campaign. 

Thousands of workers 
stayed away from factories, 
although in many areas white- 


hardliners. 

Loyalist intimidation, page 
■» 


By Paul Yallely 

The woman's mistake was 
to approach the barricade 
along the road which led from 
the Catholic part of 
Portadown. The first group of 
pickets directed her to a 
second and the second group to 
a third. Two policemen stood 
and watched. 

Each time she repeated her 
request that she be allowed 
through to take the woman 
beside her in the passenger 
seat to a doctor. Each time she 
was subjected to a stream of 
abuse. 

“I’m not going to work. I 
have to get her to the doctors." 
she said. They conrinoed to 
refuse. She lost her temper. 

“We're not letting you 
through because you didn’t 
ask nicely", said a large man 
with an ugly sneer. His friend, . 
a'smaff~byperactive character - 
wearing a BP cap. picked np a 
roll of barbed wire from the 
barricade and draped it across 
the pavement in front of the 
cars wheels. “Drive across 
that", he said. 

Tears of rage filled the 
woman’s eyes. She reversed 
out to the cheers of the crowd 
of about 50 “loyalists", who 
lined the road at the approach 
to the barricade which was 


littered with boxful Is of bro- 
ken glass. 

She revved the car aggres- 
sively and the man in the BP 
cap ran at her screaming abuse 
and kicked a large dent in the 
side of the front wing. The 
crowd cheered. “Get J>ack 
where yon came from", he 
screeched. The two policemen 
stood and watched. 

One of the most disturbing 
elements of yesterday’s scenes 
of harassment and bnllying on 
the streets of Northern Ireland 
was the passive role played by 


mi 

M 




Tomorrow Cold spell 
True or shows sign 

fake? nf pnHina 



Cold spell Hopes grow for 
shows sign teachers pay deal 

vllulllg By Lucy Hodges, Education Correspondent 



The Times, with the 
help ofleading art 
historians, solves 
the $6 million 
mystery of the 
Getty museum’s 
Annunciation 


The tragedy 
of Jessica 

One parent’s 
story of a 
cot-death 


There is £6.000 to be won in 
today's Times Portfolio com- 
petition because there have 
been no winners for the past 
two days. Portfolio list, page 
20; how to play, information 
service, page 32. 


Swedish hope 

Sweden’s new leader. Mr 
Ingvar Carisson. promised to 
continue the policies of his 
assassinated predecessor. Mr 
Olof Palme. He will be sworn 
in next Wednesday Page 7 

Riot arrests 

Cairo authorities have arrest- 
ed seven people, including a 
lawyer, accused of leading 
police riols in which 37 people 
are known to have died Page 5 


Letters >3 
Parturamt 4 
Sale Room 14 
Srience 14 
Snow Reports 32 
Sport 25-27 
Taeatm. etc 31 


By a Staff Reporter 

Britain began to warm up 
yesterday after the second 
coldest February of the centu- 
ry - but forecasters said that 
spring, officially due at the end 
of the month, is still a long 
way olfi 

Yesterday's temperature 
was the warmest since the end 
of January when it rose to 
45 F. but ii was still well below 
the seasonal average for 
Mareh of 4S'F. 

From today the weather will 
continue to approach the sea- 
sonal norm though conditions 
will be changeable with spells 
of rain. 

Despite the improvement in 
the weather, emergency cold 
weather sun ival kits were 
being sent to old people 

packed by volunteers from 
.Age Concern. 

The kits, worth about £20 
each, include thermal under- 
wear. fuel stumps, a powdered 
drink, chocolate, soup, advice 
on keeping warm and on 
allowances they may be able to 
claim. 

• The I5fith running of the 
Waterloo Cup has been aban- 
doned because of the freeze. 
The running grounds at 
Allvar. Southport, were still 
deeply frozen when inspected 
at noon yesterday. 

Forecast, page 32 


By Lucy Hodges, Education Correspondent 

The two sides in the leach- to undertake “voluntary" du- 
ers pay dispute were inching ties such as covering for 
towards a settlement last night absent colleagues. Instead, it 
after the second biggest union agreed to talks at local level 
apparently conceded a crucial about ihe letters. 

sjs” , r k ,o ' h s - 

KT nCW j^LIWT member, off .he 

The National Association of L ' 
Schuolmastcrs/Union of “The parties will advise 
Women Teachers agreed that their constituents that for the 
industrial action should not purpose of the Acas talks and 


continue for the duration of 40 long as those talks arc in 
talks which arc expected to progress, no action should be 


the Royal Ulster Constabu- 
lary. 

At the side of the roads 
policemen sat in their sqnad 
cars and did nothing as con- 
voys made up of dozens of 
tractors drove three and four 
abreast along principal high- 
ways while queues of traffic 
piled np behind them. 

Other officers stood with 
the pickets at the roadblocks 
of telegraph poles, chains and 
scattered nails on the edges of 
small farming towns and larg- 
er market towns alike, as if 
giving official sanction to the 
activity. 

They watched as groups of 
loyalist workers harangued 
the handful of individuals who 
braved the strike and ap- 
peared on the largely deserted 
streets of the province. Around 
them windows were newly 
broken andrubbisfrskipr had 
been set on fire. 

One police inspector told me 
that he sat in a police minibus 
hemmed in on both sides by a 
blockade of farm vehicles: 
“Our job is to prevent disor- 
der. So Ear there seems to have 
been none that I have seen. 
But if I were to try to remove 
the barricades that could cause 
more problems than it would 

Continued on page 2, col 6 

10p rise in 
medicine 
charges 

By Our Social Services 
Correspondent 

Prescription charges are ex- 
pected to rise by lOp from next 
month with a similar 5 per cent 
increase in charges for Nation- 
al Health Service dental treat- 
ment. 

The increase, to be an- 
nounced in the next fortnight, 
will take the prescription 
charge to £2.10 after it has 
already risen ten-fold, well 
ahead of the rate of inflation 

Dental charges, where pa- 


Land Rover bids 
to beat deadline 

By Edward Townsend, Industrial Correspondent 

A management team led by land Vehicles and Land Rover 
Mr David Andrews. BL direc- operations but not lo buses, 
tor. was the sole bidder to has wilh al ^ , , namcd and 
emerged last night for the anonymous groups reported 
state-owned groups Land in ±c ^ t * 0 wccks t0 be 


Rover operations. 


interested in Land Rover, the 


But General Motors of jcwe | in lhc LRL crown.' the 


America, which has been department is todav expecting 
drawing up .is proposals, for a | as ,. minulc t0 beat the 
more than nine months, said it deadline 
would meet the Government s a spokesman said a total of 

deadline of midnight tonight s j x panics wen; interested in 
and formally lodge its propos- Rovcr General Motors. 

al . .. _ . . Lonrho. Avcling Barford. BL’s 

The Laird Group the engi- former hcavy construction 
icnng company whtch owns equipment company, the 
ic Metro C a m m cl I management consortium and 


nccring company which owns 
the Metro Cammed 


Wcymann coach business. lwo undisclosed companies. 

ujj Up r° 4 s1 2i^U Thc only GM has shown micrcsi in the 
bidder for the BL bus opera- trucks side of.thc business and 

ll0 f 11 f _ there is one other potcniigL 

A confident Mr Andteu* unnamed, foreign bidder. 

SW ■H&?V S3 

?. 0 : CT .™ ld c™ .dcS af thc^^ 


two year, of £ successful ™ “P™; 

management buyout ‘ “LTdccSn UuW 

Mr Andrewdirector re- be taken before the end of the 
onsibie for BL commercial month 
hides, said the existing m r Paul Spicer, a director of 


sponsible for BL commercial 
vehicles, said the existing 


management the financial in- Lonrho. said yesterday it was 
solutions and banks backing continuing to prepare its sub- 
them and stockbrokers were mission which would be deliv- 
agreed that a stock exchange cred today “although there has 
listing and dotation were pos- no i been enough time to do a 
siblc and would provide capt- ■ propcr study”, 
tal for the continued Laird will have to compete 
development of the Land fo r the bus business with 
Rover. Range Rover and the Volvo of Sweden, which 
Shcrpa van model range. makes coaches at its Irvine. 

"This would give us a solid Ayrshire, factory, and a mam 
equity base and set us on agemem buy-out team led by 
course for a Jaguar-style take the managing director. Mr Ian 


over." Mr Andrews said. 

The Department of Trade 


McKinnon. 

Meanwhile. 500 workers bc- 


and Industry made clear last gan a two-day strike at the BL 
night that the much-criticized Unipan spares depot at 
dcadlineapplicd to the Ley- Horspath near Oxford 


Grants 
by GLC 
lawful 
ruling 

By Hugh Clayton 
Environment Correspondent 

A High Court judge yester- 
day cleared cleared the way for 
a £105 milli on “spending 
spree” by the Greater London 
Covad! aad two other Labour- 
controlled metropolitan coun- 
cils. 

Mr Justice Macpherson 
ruled that spending plans by 
the GLC, Greater Manchester 
Council and West Midlands 
County Council, all of whom 
will be abolished at the end of 
this mouth, were tawfaL 
Conservatives immediately 
appealed against the judge- 
ment, which cuts across the 
efforts of ministers to deny the 
GLC what they call “a Life 
after death". 

The judgement allows the 
GLC to fund for a year after its 
abolition huodreds of volun- 
tary groups that it . has. fi- 
nanced in the years of Labour 
control since 1981. It also 
allows it to hand over £40 
milli on crucial to Inner Lon- 
don Education Authoritv 
Mr Jastice Macpherson 
accepted that some GLC deci- 
sions ought have “political or 
social overtones which may 
please some and dismay 
others". Ratepayers would gel 
the derisions they deserved 
from councillors they had 
elected “in this case as in 
many others”. 

It was not for the court to 
nrie on the popularity of such 
derisions. None of the seven 
councils to be abolished was 
bound to hand over surplus 
revenue to councils that would 
take over afterwards. There 
was no impropriety or irratio- 
nality in the spending consid- 
ered yesterday to justify court 
intervention. 

The total at stake in 
yesterday's case exceeded 
£180 raOtion. Westminster 
conceded that about £20 mO- 
tion 'should be allowed because 
it had been cleared by minis- 
ters. Greater Manchester 
Council was allowed to spend 
almost £9 mill ion and West 
Midlamb almost £1 million. 

The.' Westminster appeal w* 
witi begin on Monday. *** 
Law report, page 27 

Greek tanker 
explodes in 
Bay of Biscay 

Brest (AP) — A 70,000-ton 
Greek tanker, the Gaiini. ex- 
ploded and caught fire in the 
Bay of Biscay yesterday, kill- 
ing and seriously injuring 
crewmen, the French Allantic 
rescue centre announced. 

Falmouth coastguards said 
two crewmen were killed, 
three injured and 28 were 
missing. 

The lanker was about 200 
miles off the French coast 
when there were “many explo- 
sions followed by fire". Heli- 
copters evacuated the injured 
to Spain. 


start soon on major reforms to 
the profession. Thc> arc to be 
under the auspices of the Acas 
conciliation service. 

The NAS/UWT did not 
insist that local authority em- 
ployers withdraw letters sent 
to teachers in 70 areas threat- 
ening to dock pay for refusal 


taken which is likely to make 
the existence of the letters the 
basis of a dispute." the crucial 
new paragraph said. 

The other said the two sides 
would take such steps as they 
could to make sure calm was 
restored to the schools. 


petted to rise by lOp from next tw yf • J* 

E±£BSIS£ More face 

sack bv 

The increase, to be an- w 

Dounced in the next fortnight, u waim 1 m 
witi take the prescription JV.l. Vlilllli 

already * riSt^tenSSd!* wU From Christopher Walker 
ahead of the rate of inflation Moscow 

Dental charges, where pa- More heads are expected to 
treats pay the first £17 and 40 roll in the top echelons of 
per cent of the cost thereafter, Soviet industry following a 
are expected to rise by 5 per damning indictment of recent ! 
cent economic mismanagement in 

The increases will come as the USSR delivered yesterday 
the British Medical Associa- in a keynote address to the 
tion is pressing ministers to 27th Communist Party Con- 
review prescription riwr get, gross by Mr Nikolai Ryzhkov, 
claiming that the present sys- the new Soviet Prime Minis- 
tem is “flawed, anomalous, ter. 




Uranium plant scare 


inequitable". 


Launching an ambitions 


Dr Michael Wilson, chair- 1 blueprint to revive the flag- 


If within 3 months of accepting Prime-Loan you 
obtain an offer of a comparable loan from another 
Finance House on better terms, send us the offer 
-and we unconditionally promise you:- 
* the right to dear your Prime-Loan account 
without notice, AND 

# an immediate FULL REFUND of the difference in 
charges incurred. 


An employee of the 
CapcnhursL Cheshire, factory 
of British Nuclear Fuels Lim- 
ited was contaminated with 
uranium during routine main- 
tenance work. 

The company said that less 
than a thousandth of a gram of 
virtually inactive metal was 
involved, and there was no 
question of a leak during the 
incident on Sunday. 


The plant was built in the 
early 1950s. 

The purpose was to increase 
the proportion of uranium 235 
in material needed for weap- 
ons. Natural uranium ore is 
mainly in the form of uranium 
238, and only 0.7 per cent is in 
lhc fissile form of U325 that 
can be used to create a nuclear 
chain reaction. 


man of tbe association’s gener- 
al medical services committee. 


economy by the year 
and double national 


said some patients were de- income, Mr Ryzhkov laid 
t erred from seeking treatment most of tbe blame for present 
because of the prescription difficulties on mistakes made 
charge, which in certain cases during ihe era -of Mr Leonid 
is more than the cost of tire Brezhnev, 
medicines. ; _ _ The Prime Minister — who 

The association criticizes has day-t<Hiay responsibility 
the blanket exemption from for running tne economy — 
dwges of the elderly and singled out many individual 


children, which takes no ae- Soviet ministries and other 
count of patients' ability to state bodies for biuer criti- 


Anglican split threatened over moves to Rome 


By Clifford Longley plans were well advanced, and 
A formal split in the Church tbe decisive moment was not 
of England is being threatened far away. This could come if 
by one of tbe senior evangeli- the General Synod of the 
cal groups in opposition to Church of England decided to 

a n «i; mn 1.- r-tkni*. ,» - - - ■ . 


bodies are currently being held 
all over the country to discuss 


for away. This could come if what response the Church of 
tbe General Synod of the England should give. 


Angli c an-Roman Catholic uni- give its official endorsement 


ty moves. 

Church Society, which is 
leading a vigorous campaign 
against unity between the 


later this year, or next, to the 
two statements from the An- 
glkan-Roman Catholic Inter- 
national Commission. One 


Lid 
L eaden 


Sport 21 
Theatm. rtr 
TV & Radio 
Weather 
Wfl h 


Church of England and the concerns the doctrine of priest- 
Roman Catholic Church, says hood and the other the Holy 
H is preparing to set np a Comnumion gn >i the Eucha- 
“codtinuing Church of rist 
England", parallel to the ex- Those two statements have 
isting Anglican church. This received provisional approval 
would maintain -the rites, from tire General Synod, and 


ceremonies, and doctrines of have been passed for further 
the Protestant Reformed Reti- debate to tbe Church of 


gkm, as by law established". 
A society spokesman said 


England's diocesan and dean- 
ery synods. Meetings of these 


Church Society claims to 
have evidence that in a few 
cases proper debate is being 
denied, and that the two 
statements are being forced 
through by tbe diocesan bish- 
op. Tie council of the society 
discussed these reports last 
week, and decided to issue its 
threat of a split 
The threat will nevertheless 
cause no great surprise in the 
Church of England, for 
Church Society has been hos- 
tile to Anglkan-Catholic unity 
from tire start and its public 
statements have been taking 


an increasingly strong tone. Its and demand for them has been 
director is Dr David Samuel, heavy, according to the sod- 
former secretary' of tire Protes- ety. 
taut Reformation Sodety, who A spokesman estimated that 
organized a small protest more than a thousand clergy 


against the Pope’s visit 


might wont to be members of 



The sodety is the senior tbe “continuing Church of 
evangelical body in the Church England", and they were pro- 
of England, but has seen its pared to see a national net- 
leadership taken over hi recent work of dioceses and pa rish es 
years by such bodies as tire The threat is an ironic echo 
Anglican Evangelical Assent- Of a warning given by the 
My. which is less opposed to Bishop of London, Dr Graham 
muty with the Roman Catholic Leonard, last year, that Anglo- 
Church. Catholics might start a “oon- 

As part of its campaign, tinning Church of England" if 
90,000 leaflets attacking tire tire General Synod persisted 
work of the Anglican-Roman with the ordination of women. 
CatLoIic International Com- Dr Leonard and Church Sod- 
mission have been published ety are at opposate ends of tbe 
and distributed to parishes, church spectrum. " 


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HOME NEWS 


Customs starts 
new controls 
to counter gold 
bullion fraud 


By Stewart Tendler, Crime Reporter 


Customs officials will today 
announce new regulations for 
the bullion market in a fresh 
attempt to prevent main deal- 
ers such as Johnson Matxhey 
Bankers being abused by val- 
ue-added tax gold fraudsters 
to net millions. 

According to Customs 
sources, JMB and other deal- 
ers have only accepted current 
voluntary controls when it has 
suited them. 

On other occasions it is 
suspected that firms have 
opted out because of fears 
their share of gold trading 
might be reduced. 

JMB has continued to opt in 
and out of controls, according 
to Customs and City sources, 
since the Bank of England 
took control of its affairs after 
its collapse with losses of 
£240 million in 1984. 

The controls amount to 
paying VAT direct to Customs 
rather than to the third party 
selling the gold. Today Cus- 
toms will announce that from 
April all the 100 dealers 
accepting the control system 
will have to stick rigidly to 
paying the VAT direct to the 
Government. 

The change has been agreed 
with the main figures in the 
gold market and Customs is 
confident VAT frauds will be 
eroded. Since 1981 over £60 
million has been lost in VAT 
frauds involving £400 million 
in gold sales. 

Customs and the Treasury 
first began to take measures 


But the system was discre- 
tionary for the dealers and 
some dealers paid the VAT to 
Customs on some occasions 
and not on others. 


Civil Servants seek 
17% pay increase 


Pay rises averaging 17 per 
cent were sought yesterday for 
350.000 Civil Servants, in a 
claim submitted by four 
unions. 


The Civil and Public Ser- 
vices Association, the Society 
of Civil and Public Servants, 
the Inland Revenue Staff Fed- 
eration and the Civil Service 
Union agreed the common 
claim for £10 a week plus 10 
percent from April 1. 

They also want “tangible 
regress’* towards the intro- 


C7EST HARRODS 
AVEC L’ACCENT 
FRAN^AIS 


A breath of fresh French air 
is blowing through Harrods. 
Until April 12th we shall be 
celebrating the chic and 
savoir-faire of life across 
the Channel — so near 
and yet so different 
Fabulous fashion, avant- 
garde furniture, beautiful 
porcelain and classic crystal, 
and, naturellement, 
delectable food and wine 
from the great regions of 
Fiance. At the heart of it alL 
our Central Hall has been 
transformed into a 
Provencal village, complete 
with market square, fountain 
and small shops. So for a 
tantalising taste of living 
a la framjaise, visit Hanods 
for the most exciting 
promotion we have ever staged 






London SW1X 7XLOW30 1234 


A* -M -C*-* ) SXd 




THE TIMES TUESDAY MARCH 4 1986 


‘Loyalist’ intimidation locks off Catholic areas of Ulster 


By Richard Ford 


when the gold frauds started to 
emerge early this decade. 

In November 1984 Cus- 
toms started a system whereby 
gold dealers could pay VAT 
on gold purchases direct rath- 
er than to the vendors who 
were supposed to pay the 15 
per cent to Customs collectors 
under the regulations. 

The attraction of the system 
for Customs officials was that 
it should have prevented situ- 
ations where vendors smug- 
gled gold into Britain, created 
false companies and sold their 
gold into the legitimate mar- 
ket. 

The smugglers or their go- 
betweens were paid the mar- 
ket price for their gold plus the 
VAT. By the time Customs 
officials moved in to claim 
payment the smugglers and 
the VAT had vanished. 


Investigators suspect this 
might have been done by 
some dealers because gold on 
occasion was being offered at a 
good price and dealers were 
keen to retain their share of 
gold sources although it meant i 
paying the VAT to the vendor. I 
In defence of the dealers i< is 
said that they would pass the 
VAT to the traders because 
they might be well-known 
firms against whom there 
could be no suspicion of fraud. 


“Loyalist" pickets used 
mad block* and human barri- 
cades to effectively seal Off 
large unionist arms of North- 
ern Ireland vesterday. 
Throughout the province, the 
24- hoar loyalist strike was 
accompanied by intimidation 
and violence. In many areas 
(he protest against (he Anglo- 
Irish agreement quickly 
slumped into sporadic violence 
and attacks on the Royal 
Ulster Constabulary and men 
and women wishing to work. 

Gangs of loyalists, many in 
paramilitary-style uniforms, 
some wearing masks and 
black balaclavas, congregated 
in city streets and roamed 
country towns to enforce the 
message. “Ulster says stop". 

In loyalist areas public 
houses dosed, shops shut and 
roads in many areas were 
scorched wit b the blackened 
marks of burring cars. Glass 
was strewn across streets and 
wrecked vehicles were dumped 
in side streets. In Belfast the 
pad of black smoke was a 
frequent sight in working- 
class loyalist strongholds to 
the north and east of the city. 

Some of the worst violence 
occurred in the city centre 
when hundreds of youths went 
on a rampage at the end of a 
lunchtime rally, attacking a 
modern public boose, and 
overturning cars and setting 
them alight. 

Outside a bar bnilt and run 
by Roman Catholics, demon- 
strators screamed. “We know 
you", while others threw 
bricks and sticks through 
plate glass windows as they 
fied along two streets in a 
commercial area. The attacks 


Specialist 

supports 

Savage 


By Nicholas Timmins 
Social Services 
Correspondent 


duction of a minimum wage 
and a government commit- 
ment to allow Civil Servants 
to catch up with other work- 
ers. 


The unions say they have 
fallen behind by 30 per cent 
The First Division Associa- 
tion. for senior Civil Servants, 
is lodging its own claim, and 
the Institution of Professional 
Civil Servants has decided to 
negotiate with the Govern- 
ment on pay proposals turned 
down by the other unions. 1 


The decision by Tower, 
Hamlets Health Authority in 
east London to suspend Mrs 
Wendy Savage over allega- 
tions 'of incompetence was 
totally unjustified, a specialist 
in obstetrics said yesterday. 


The inquiry into her future 
as an obstetrician was told 
that Professor Jurgis 
Grudzinskas. her head of de- , 
partment, was saying even 1 
before he took up his appoint- , 
ment in 1983 that “his first 
task was to change his senior 
lecturer,” the post Mrs Savage 1 
held. 


Professor Ronald Taylor, 
professor of obstetrics at the 
medical school of St Thomas's 
and Guy’s, told the inquiry 
that he considered Mrs Savage 
competent “I would be per- 
fectly happy to work with 
her”, he said 


In the five cases over which 
she is charged with incompe- 
tence there were “quite a 
number of instances where 
things occurred which one 
would have preferred not to 
have occurred”. But they did 
not warrant the charge of 
incompetence. I 


There were many small 
issues such as a mother going 
into labour anaemic, and one 
or two other circumstances 
“where 1 think 1 would have 
taken different views”. 


He told the inquiry of a 
conversation he had with 
Professor Grudzinskas at the 
Athenaeum Gub in London 
after Professor Grudzinskas 
had been appointed but be- 
fore he took up his appoint- 
ment. 


“I was trying to be helpful 
and asked him how things 
were going and among other 
things he told me that his first 
task was to change his senior 
i lecturer.” 


Although Professor 
Grudzinskas did not name 
Mrs Savage, Professor Taylor 
said he found the comment “a 
little bit disturbing”. 


He said- “I was a bit 
worried” and passed on ad- 
vice that he had been given 
when appointed a professor 
himself, that it could lake 10 
years to get a department 
working the way you wanted it 
to. Mrs Savage was suspended 
in 1985. 


Professor Taylor told the 
inquiry that Mrs Savage was at 
the opposite end of the spec- 
trum of obstetric care but that 
he thought she stood "fairly 
close to me”. Her practice fell 
within the ambit of “what is 
medically acceptable”. 

The inquiry comines today. 


Lloyd’s call 
on Hailsham 


The Prime Minister has 
been asked to instruct Lord 
Hailsham. of St 
Marylebone.the Lord Chan- 
cellor. to gel rid of his interests 
in the Lloyd's insurance mar- 
ket. 


Mr Brian Sedgemore. La- 
bour MP for Hackney South 
and Shoreditch, Iasi night 
tabled a Commons written 
question asking for Lord 
Hailsham to act before the 
Financial Services Bill 
reached the House of Lords. 



Violence 


deplored 
by MPs 


By Philip Webster 
Political Reporter 




Binning raw and o3 drums on a barricade in the Shankifl road yesterday. 


were indiscriminate and were 
met with laughter and cheers 
by young and old alike. 

Later, in the Newtownards 
Road, east Belfast 500 youths 
attacked RUC officers with 
railings and paving stones 
after overturning a lorry and 
fanning a makeshift barricade 
of beer barrels. 

About 100 masked youths 
threw petrol bombs at the 


police on the Bally fil Ian estate 
in the north jf the city where 
cars were I .jacked and burnt 
in the middle of the road. 

At the entrance to Stormont 
and government buildings, 
gangs of 40 pickets accompa- 
nied by leading Democratic 
Unionist politicians waving 
anion jacks stopped all vehi- 
cles and handed out leaflets 
while the police sat and 


watched from a parked car. 

At Ballynahiucb. the 
charred remains of a burnt-out 
Chinese take-away food stive 
were dragged across the road 
to form a barricade. An agri- 
cultural convoy caused traffic 
delays by moving slowly 
through (he town as young 
men in paramilitary uniforms 
and masks stood ainilessly 

The Ml motorway was 


blocked for several hours after 
off and nails were strewn 
across the carriageway, while 
unionist pickets operated at 
many of the main roundabouts 
and slip roads leading on to it 
Trees were felled to block 
many minor roads as loyalists 
effectively sealed off tbe towns 
of Newtownards. Comber, 
Moira. Ballymena. Larne and 
Omagh for most of the day. 


Mr Tom King. Secretary of 
State for Northern Ireland, 
was joined by Labour Party 
spokesmen yesterday in con- 
demning the violence - and 
intimidation marking the one- 
day strike in 'the province. 

Mr King said that the action 
was intended to show the fuB- 
-bearted attitude of Northern 
Ireland people. If that was tbe 
why was it necessary to 
miimidate people to the ex- 
tent that had been going on? . 

Mr Merlyn Rees, a ' former 
Labour Secretary of State for 
Northern Ireland, called on 
the- Government to make 
contingency plans to deal with 
tbe outbreak of violence that 
would occur between the com- 
munities if the union between 
Britain and Northern Ireland 
was broken. 

People who proclaimed 
their Britishness wee telling 
the Government and Parlia- 
ment that they did not accept 
their decisions. “Tbe union of 
Northern Ireland with Great 
Britain is at risk when the 
unionists cock a snook at the 
Government.'” 

Mr King said that he hoped 
the union was not in danger. * 

Mr Peter Archer. Labour 
spokesman on Northern Ire- 
land said that it was time the ' 
unionist leaders “ceased to be 
dictated to by the so- called 
hard men”. 


New terminal will Pickets and wire rule roads 


not cut congestion 


Continued from page 1 


By Michael Baily 
Transport Editor 


Heathrow's £200 million 
Terminal Four will not mean 
any extra flights at the hard- 
pressed airport this year, it 
was confirmed yesterday. 

Unlike the existing termi- 
nals, it is outside Heathrow's 
main runway system, so air- 
craft using it will have to cross 
a runway used for take-off or 
landing 

Air traffic controllers say 
that Heathrow's south runway 
adjoining the terminal, due to 
be opened by the Prince and 
Princess of Wales next month, 
will have to be blocked off to 
aircraft up to six miles out for 
up to 40 seconds each time a 
plane has to taxi across it The 


terminal is expected to handle 
100 to (50 flights a day. 

That means that an expect- 
ed improvement from 34.5 to 
35 movements an hour on the 
runway this year will not take 
place, and congestion may 
occur between 1 0am and noon 
and between 5pm and 7pm. 


solve. It is best just to let the 
people have tbeir bead.” 

The roads between Belfast 
and the border were almost 
totally deserted. The Customs 
men at Newry reported that 
traffic from Belfast was practi- 
cally non-existent. The busy 
arterial routes yesterday con- 
tained only a few- private cars 
and a little local traffic. 


allowing doctors and nurses 
through. Others were not. 


“Every time we express our 
will in a Vote tbe balhit papers 


North Rummy 


Possible 
site ■ 


In staunchly loyalist areas 
even garages which stayed 
open on Christmas Day closed 
yesterday. Shops, banks and 
even the bars and pubs were 
locked and bolted. 


Th e mood was angry and 
sour. “We would eat grass 
rather than go into a united 
Ireland which is what this 
agreement would lead to.” said 
a quarry man at the bead of the 
roadblock outside the little 
town of Tanderagee. His fel- 
lows crowded around and in- 
jected their own comments in 
bitter bursts. 


are torn np by Westminster 
and thrown in our faces.” 


“Thatcher is in the pay of 
Reagan and the BBC is the 
voice of the IRA.” 


“They want to sell ns into 
the hands of the Pope”. 


South Runway 


Planes using terminal four 
win have to cross a runway 


Even the smallest towns had 
barricades of vehicles or de- 
bris blocking the main exit 
routes. They were manned 
often by youths hiding then- 
faces with scarves bearing the 
colours of local Protestant 
football teams. Some were 


“Tom King is a robot like all 
the rest before him. They have 
all been programmed with the 
same tape.” 


“We have been bombed and 
shot at for 16 years and the 
result is this agreement. The 
question we now- ask. ourselves 
is: does violence pay?” 


Reports were coming 
through on the radio of intimi- 
dation in Belfast. They were 
furious. In areas like this there 
has been none. “There is no 
need. Here everyone is solid in 
saying no to the agreement.” 

In areas like Portadown, a 
staunchly Protestant town 
with a 'significant Catholic 
minority near whose homes 
the shops were yesterday trad- 
ing as normally, and where 
support for the strike was not 
unanimous, the alternative, as 
the men at the barricades were 
so ready to demonstrate, was 
clear. * 


Fudging to the edge of Armageddon Aids unit 


By Richard Dowden 

Soon after Mr Robert Max- 
well took over the Mirror 
Group Newspapers in July 
1984 he said: “People in MGN 
know that 1 do not bluff.” 

He was threatening to close 
down the four titles if the 
unions interfered with pro- 
duction. It is a threat he has 
repeated publicly at least six 
times. 

Mr Maxwell's style has been 
to threaten Armageddon in 
public and then negotiate, 
with dire threats hanging over 
the union negotiators. But his 
success in achieving the one- 
third cut in staff at MGN has 
come less from his public 
posturing than his division of 
the company, so that he could 
have recourse to the 1982 Act 
concerning secondary picket- 
ing in the event of a strike. 

The first confrontation 
ca me o » er the Sporting Life. It 
was losing £3 million a year 


and he wanted to move publi- 
cation from Fleet Street to 
south London. 

In mid-August last year 
printers registered their 
objection to this move by 
disrupting production of the 
other titles. Mr Maxwell halt- 
ed their publication, drew up 
dismissal notices for the jour- 
nalists. and said that the 
primers had dismissed them- 
selves by breaking their con- 
tracts. 

The S/H>rting Life was to be 
sold. “Historic”. Mr Maxwell 
said. “Nothing remarkable in 
the changes in working 
practice”. Mr Tony Dubbins, 
general secretary of the Na- 
tional Graphical Association, 
said. 

Mr Maxwell said later “If 
production at Holbom Circus 
is interrupted once more . the 
decision to abandon the print- 
ing of all MGN titles at 
Holbom Circus will be irre- 


versible and further negotia- 
tions will be useless.” 

It was in November that his 
biggest battle started. Almost 
out of the blue he announced 
that he would dose the papers 
unless the unions would agree 
to lose 2.000 jobs by the end of 
the year. He was “not 
bluffing”, he said. 

He issued dismissal notices 
to all 6.000 employees and 
said he wanted a genuine fresh 
start. A few days later he 
offered to withdraw the dis- 
missal notices if the unions 
would negotiate the redundan- 
cies. The unions, having leami 
their lesson, refused to negoti- 
ate until the threat of dismiss- 
al was lifted. Sogat voted to 
strike. 

Mr Maxwell's first reaction 
was to stop production but 
within 24 hours .he reversed 
his strategy and decided in- 
stead to bring out The papers in 
spite of the strike.. So he 


threatened to dismiss any 
NGA members who did not | 
help to bring out the paper and 
threatened to enter a single , 
union agreement with the I 
electricians. 

Talks ensued and a day later ! 
normal publication was re- 1 
sumed. Mr Maxwell agreed to j 
withdraw dismissal notices. 
The union agreed actively to 
seek “a deal over the MGN 
survival plan". 

At the end of the year, some 
time after the deadline for 
agreement had passed. Mr 
Maxwell announced a mir- 
acle. “That’s not too exagger- 
ated a word.” he said. The 
union had agreed to 2,100 
redundancies, all but 300 of 
them voluntary. 

• A bid to buy the two 
Scottish papers, the Daily 
Record and the Sunday MaU, 
owned by Mr Maxwell, was 
launched in Glasgow yester- 
day. 


set up 


in prison 


By Richard Evans 
Lobby Reporter 


An Aids isolation unit is 
being set up in Brixton prison 
to treat the growing number of 
inmates in Britain's jails suf- 
fering from tbe fetal disease, 
the Government confirmed 
last night 


Mr David Mellor. Minister 
of State at the Home Office, 
said in a Commons answer 
last night that part of Brixton 
prison's hospital complex will 
be converted into an isolation . 
unit for treating patients suf- 
fering from infectious dis- 
eases, including Aids. So far at 
least one prisoner has died 
from tbe disease. 


Today presses start to roll 


By Robin Young 
New technology willing 
there are some 1.5 million 
copies of a new newspaper on 
sale today. Mr Eddy Shah's 
colour tabloid Today started to 
roll off the presses at Poyle, 
near Slough. Birmingham and 
Manchester shortly after 6pm 
last night, editorial deadlines 
bating been brought forward 
in tbe interests of printing as 
many copies as possible, 

Mr Snah's new- project revo- 
lutionized Fleet Street before a 
single copy was printed. The 
prospect of a low-cost competi- 
tor using tbe full capabilities 
of new print technology includ- 
ing full page make-up by- 
computer has galvanized es- 
tablished Fleet Street manage- 
ments into modernization 
programmes of their own. 

The announcement of Mr 
Shah's plans signalled the 
start of a race to the London 
docklands in which first place 
has been settled by Mr Rnpert 
Murdoch's success in transfer- 
ring the four News Interna- 
tional titles, including The 
Times, to his Tower Hamlets 
plant in Wap ping, 

Mr Sbab predicted yester- 
day that the launch of his 
paper spelt tbe end of Fleet 
Street. “I do not tfaink ( can be 
blamed for that. Fleet Street 
was a mess e»en before I was 
born and change has hmg been 
overdue”, he said. 

Mr Brian MacArthnr. the 
Today' editor, said: “There are 
lots of people out (here who 
would love to see us fail, but we 
are over our teething prob- 
lems'. The last dummy issue 
which we prepared for Sunday 
was the best we had done, and 
we fee) that we have got 
everything together at once. 
We are tremendously 
excited”. 



Hea drive 
to ban 
The Times 


The 12-bed unit will be 
staffed by prison hospital 
officers, and take Aids victims 
from any prison in Bri tain.. 


By Alan Hamilton 


Mr Shah (left) consulting Mr MacArthnr, the editor, during 
production of Today last night. 


Dummy issues of the news- 
paper have been produced 
regularly since February 25. 
although none was prepared 
on rbe e<e of tbe launch .so that 
production staff had full op- 
portunity to ensure there 
would be no last-minute hitch- 
es with their machinery as the 
launch issue was being prim- 
ed. 

“It is frightening and abso- 
lutely shattering to your confi- 
dence w hen a computer system 
fails because you never know- 
how long it is going to last”. 
Mr Jeremy Deedes. the man- 
aging editor, said. 

One computer failure in the 
newsroom last week lasted two 
hours, but Mr Deedes said 
that was a risk with all 
computer systems. 

Mr .Shahs company. News 
(L’Kl. is involved in litigation 
with tbe company which origi- 


nally wired its electrical sys- 
tems. which are said to suffer 
from electrical interference. 
The editors were confident 
yesterday that tbe problem 
had been completely remedied. 

Mr MacArthur expected to 
attempt no more than two 
edition changes last night, but 
Mr Sbab claims that when (be 
newspaper's technology is 
fully tested It will be possible 
to have a reporter's account of 
an event on the printed page 
h if hie 15 minutes, and colour 
pictures within two hours. 

The staff were pleased with 
tbe reception for Today's first 
television commercial, in 
which they were seen donning 
dark glasses and shouting, 
“We're ready. Eddy”. 

Today is distributed bv a 
network of franchisees, includ- 
ing W.H, Smith. 

Leading article, page 13. 


The controlling Labour 
group on the Inner London 
Education Authority has 
launched a campaign to have 
The Times and other News 
International publications 
banned from the capital's 
schools and colleges. 

Miss Lesley Hammond, 
chief whip of the authority’s 
Labour group, has written 
to every Labour-nominated 
school and college governor, 
urging them to pass a resolu- 
tion cancelling orders for: 
News Internationa] papers. 

The letter says: “Labour’ 
governors may wish to draw I 
attention to the plight faced by 1 
print workers and their fam- i 
dies by tabling a resolution to 
the next meeting of their 
governing bodies which would 
call on the school or college to 
cancel orders of newspapers 
owned by News Intemat- 
lonaL” 

Similar action at a Stafford- 
shire public library has led Mr 
John Riley, a banister, to 
threaten to apply to the courts 

Leaders of tbe 'print onion, ' 
Sogat '82, announced yester- 
day that they intended to step 
up their campaign of address- 
ing Labour Party and trade 
union groups in the hope of, 
persuading further councils 
and other, bodies- not to buy 
News International papers. 

The company's manage- 
ment expects to meet Mr 
Norman Willis, TUC general 
secretary, this week for explor- 
atory talks on the dispute over 
the company's Wapping plant , 


A spokesman for the Prison 
Officers Association said yes- 
terday there had been growing 
concern among members 
about the Aids. “Prisons have 
a much higher proportion, 
compared to the outside 
world, of homosexuals and 
drug addicts who are the main 
groups at risk. 


. “Prison officers are more at 
nsk than- most people because 
there is always the risk they 
may be bitten by a prisoner, or 
be infected by a scratch.” 


• Winchester prison, was 
closed to the outside world 
yesterday after an inmate died 
from meningitis on Saturday 
(Peter Evans writes). 

A second prisoner was in an 
outage hospital, and others 
had influenza-like symptoms, 

. which could be meningitis but 
had not been diagnosed. 


Increase in 
election cash 


Mr Douglas Hurd, Home 
SOTtaiy. yesterday raised 
tne limit for candidates* ex- 
penses at parliamentary and 
local elections. 

Parliamentary candidates in 
county constituencies' will be 
*P“ d “P » £3^40 
with 3.7p .for every elector, 
compared with £2.700 and 
J-ip per elector at present. In 
Doroagh constituencies, the 
same increase applies with the 
amount. per elector going up 
from 2.3p to Z8p. 




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THE TIMES TUESDAY MARCH 4 1986 


HOME NEWS 




‘suspicious’ of 
man to get 



' * 5: ;■ 





roas,, 


The Bishop of Chichester 

said yesterday he had been 
told that Mr Derry Main- 
waring Knight, the self-con- 
fessed Satan ist. was 
“baptized" in blood. 

He bad also heard that Mr 
Knight was dedicated to Sa- 
tanism by his grandmother 
before be Jaad been bom, the 
Rt Rev Eric Kemp lokl Maid- 
stone Crown Coun. 

Dr Kemp was giving evi- 
dence on the IJih day of the 
trial of Mr Kriightaged 46, of 
Dormans Land. Surrey, who' 
denies obtaining more than 
£200,000 by deception. 

Dr Kemp, aged 7 1, said that 
the Rev John Baker, the rector 
of Newick. who. was raising 
money for Mr Knight from 
committed Christians, had 
told him that more Satanic 
regalia had to be bought after 
he had already purchased a~ 
chalice, sceptre, ringand other 
regalia for about £70,000. 

He said that he first beard of 
Mr Baker's fund-raising ef- 
forts for Mr Knight at the end 
of June 1984 and had become 
increasingly concerned and 
eventually reported the matter, 
to the police in November 
1984. 

Dr Kemp said that Mr 
Knight would wear the Satan- 
ic regalia while he sat within a 
pc made in the Satanic Tem- 
ple. an underground air-rafd 
shelter in. Hockley : Woods. 
Essex. 

“There was a gold piece 
fined over his toes and fas- 
tened around his ankle. There 
was also a gold headpiece 
which covered the place where 
be had had a trepanning 
operation on his forehead, 
which had involved the inser- 
tion of two discs connected 
with communication with the 
Devil", Dr Kemp said. 

“There was also : a disc, 
which 1 was not dear about at 
the time, and talk of an 
inverted cross. Mr Baker told 
me that when Mr Knight wore 
these items standing in the 
temple he went into a trace 
and the Devil spoke through 
him, giving commands to 
other leaders of the order 

Mr Baker had tokf him hter 
that the items were being kept 
by a jeweller in Eastbourne. 


East Sussex, then that they 
were with a jeweller in 
. Grinstead, West Sussex. 

Dr. Kemp said -he insisted 
there should be verification 
..that the items, had, in feet, 
been bought after mbney had 
been paid over, ami suggested 
to Mr Baker and the Rt Rev 
Lloyd Morrell, then Bishop of 
■Lewes, that they should see 
them., or have photographs 
taken of them. 

But Mr Baker told him that 
. Mr Knight had refused, claim- 
ing the Satanists would be- 
come suspicious, and 
jeopardize the operation. / - 
r Mr Knight daimedhe need- 
ed money to buy the regalia 
and destroy it to extricate 
himself front Satanism. It is 
alleged be used the cash 
obtained from wealthy Chris- 
tians on high living, fost cars 
and girls. 

Dr Kemp said that he first, 
heard of Mr Bakers, fund- 
raising efforts at the end of 
June 1984 and had immedi- 
ately phoned the rector to ask 
what was happening. 

Mr Baker told him that Mr 
Knight was a grand archdea- 
con in a Satanic order in 
Essex.- who owed £7,500 to 
other members of. the order, 
but who wanted to leave to 
live as a Christian. 

By the -end of July, Dr 
Kemp had decided he wanted 
more investigations and ap- 
pointed two people to look 
into the matter further. 

Dr Kemp said he became 
increasingly concerned and 
reported the matter to the 
police on November 30, 1984. 

He. had met Mr Baker on 



The Bishop hf Chichester 
leaving court yesterday 


'September 25 to discuss the 
problem and had been intro- 
duced briefly to Mr Knight 

Thenextday Mr Baker told 
him that Mr Knight had just 
announced further items of 
regalia would have to be 
. bought including a gold col- 
lar, a set of gold keys and a 
; throne, thought to be in a 
house in the East End of 
London. - 

- - On February 20 last year he 
met Mr Baker and was told 
that the throne, was in a flat, 
off Pall Mali central London, 
belonging to the head of the 
; order. . - 

“I was told it was in a 
particular room in which it 
was surrounded by water and 
that Mr Knight would have to 
pay about £10,000 to enter the 
room 1 ”. Dr Kemp said. 

He said he became strongly 
suspicious that Mr Knight was 
playing a confidence trick 
when more and more money 
was being demanded to buy 
more items of regalia. 

“1 said I thought it was a 
very strange thing that Mr 
Knight should regard himself 
as so totally dominated by the 
Satanic objects”, he added. 

. “And I thought that if he 
really wished to become a 
Christian there was a fairly 
simple way of penitence and 
committing himself to Christ 
and receiving absolution”. 

Under cross-examination 
by Mr Michael West, QC, for 
the defence, the Bishop insist- 
ed that he did not discuss the 
situation with Mr Knight 
because he had been told that 
-Mr Knight did not wish to 
meet him. 

Mr Michael Warren, a form- 
er and former High Sheriff of 
East Sussex, told the court that 
he handed over a total of 
£55.500 to Mr Baker between 
October 1983 and February 
1985. 

Mr Warren said he shared 
the opinion of many of the 
donors that no prosecution 
should have been brought 
against Mr Knight. 

He described Satanism as 
“very much a potent source of 
evil in this country, and every 
step should- be taken to stamp 
it out and free people from it- 

Tbe case continues today. 


t; 


\ 


ids 

set 


nn 


in pnv 


Violence 
check on 
children 

By DavM Hewsoo ... 
Arts Correspondent 
The Independent Broad- 
casting Authority wfll uy to 
gauge the effect of television 
violence by “deprogramming’' 
50 normal schoolchildren who 
might be effected by viewing 
violent incidents nightly. 

The experiment comes 
amid increasing- concern that 
television violence desensi- 
tizes young people's tolerance 
of aggression in society. ■ 
The IBA research team win 
attempt to “resensitize” the 
schoolchildren by talking 
about aspects of television in 
schools and then measuring 
whether they become lea 
aggressive. 

The study will also attempt 
to measure whether unem- 
ployment affects the 
children's attitude to violence. 

Mr Robert Towter, the 
IBA’s head of research, em- 
phasized that the experiment 
would be based on the 
"hypothetical” notion that 
television had a desensitizing 
effect. 

But he said that courses m 
television literacy in schools 
were likely to become com- 
monplace m the future, 

“The amount of unregulat- 
ed material that will come into 
the home is going to grow. 
People will, over the next few 
years, come to realize that you 
can't block things at source, 
but you have got ti> fece the 
kids themselves and eduefr 
lion is going to be important. 


Abuse Bill 
for young 
at risk 

. By Frances GifcK Legal 
Affairs Correspondent 
A compromise oa a Conser- 
vative MF*s proposals for 
more safeguards for child 
abuse victims « being dis- 
cussed in an effort to win 
government support 
The Government has made 
dear it intends to oppose the 
private member's Bill put 
forward by Mr Dennis Wal- 
ters, MP for Westbmy, which 

would require the approval of a 
magistrates’ court before a 
child, placed in local authority 
cane because of ill treatment, 
was returned to its home. 

The Department of Health 
and Social Security wants Mr 
Walters to drop that proposal 
from Ires Children and Young 
Persons (Amendment ) BilL 
which has received a second 
reading in the Commons, 
OffidaZs are concerned that 
foe proposal, launched in the 
wake of the Jasmine Beckford 
case, will cause delays and 
. introduce inflexibility into sit- 
nations where responsiveness 
and sensitivity are needed. 
Officials are also ag a inst 
piecemeal legislation, when an 
overhaul of child care law is 
underway which is likely to 
lead to a coherent body of law. 

But Mr Walters and rite 
BflTs sponsors, who come 
from all parties, would prefer 

to pat forward a modified 
formula, so that at least some 
limited measure of control is 
introduced into current proce- 
dnre in cases of child abuse. 


£1,700 for sheep loss 

• . . , . — <* iImw nihirh hi 


-<.‘f £.Y* V * 


A woman whose dogs were 
seen closing sheep was or- 
dered to pay £1,700 compen- 
sation yesterday to a farmer 
who lost 29 sheep after they 
had been sagged- 
-Miss Kelly St John, aged 24, 
formerly of Bradford, West 
Yorkshire, but now of 
Rotherbitbe, east London, de- 
rrietf thal her two Mack chows 
were responsible. 

She was convicted by mag- 
istrates at Bradford of being 


the owner of dogs which had 
worried livestock. She admit- 
ted That neither dog had a 
collar, and was fined a total of 
£60 in addition. . 

Tbe court was told that 
witnesses saw two black chows 
chasing tbe sbeep. . 

Tbe former, Mr Peter 
Healey, of Wiisden, near 
Bradford, said that' several 
incidents had led to losses of 
£4,000. 


Gowrie to 
head 

Sotheby’s 

By Geraldine Norman 
Sale Room Correspondent 

Lord Gowrie, the former 
Arts Minister, is to take over 
the chairmanship of Sotheby’s 
m Britain towards the end of 
this year. Mr Julian Thomp- 
son, the present chairman of 
Sotheby’s, will step down and 
take over the chairmanship of 
Sotheby’s InternationaL the 
post taken up by Lord Gowrie 
when he joined Sotheby's Iasi 
autumn. 

The chain of command 
within the Sotheby’s empire 
will now run from the propri- 
etor. Mr A-Alfred Taubman, 
chairman of the board, to the 
chief executive, Mr Michael 
Ainsley, to the two regional 
chairmen, Mr John Marion, 
for tbe Americas, and Lord 
Gowrie for the rest of the 
world. 

Mr Thompson pointed out 
yesterday that it had been 
considered incorrect to put 
Lord Gowrie in charge of the 
British company directly after 
his resignation as Arts Minis- 
ter, as there might have been 
dashes of interest. After he 
has spent his first year learn- 
ing about the firm on the 
international side, he will be 
brought back to Britain. 

The United Kingdom oper- 
ations, and the world east of 
the Atlantic, will be run by 
Lord Gowrie. Mr Thompson, 
who will also be United 
Kingdom vice-chairman, and 
Mr Tim Llewellyn, managing 
director of Sotheby’s in the 
United Kingdom. .* 

Sole room, page 14 


Heart girl is 
improving 

Kiray Vowles, aged three, 
of Ridley’s Court, Pound HilL 
Crawley, Sussex, the world’s 
youngest heart and lung trans- 
plant patient, was improving 
steadily yesterday in Harefield 
HospitaL Middlesex, where 
she underwent a five-hour 
operation on Friday. 


French birds pay price 

By Tim Jones 


Five French cockerels, 
which were reteased dDnuga 
rugby match, have had a stay 
of execution. - 

French fiw® rcte * sed i55 

birds after their team beat 
Wales at the international 
stadium is Cardiff on Samr- 

^Fans laughed and 
as Inspector Ralph Evans, °j 
the RSFCA. »d * fXS 
steward raced on » 
and tried to capture one of 01 * 

.Ss-.isratt 

ceete bad ribbons in «ie 


French national colours tied 
around its neck. • 

Last night* the birds, all 

snfi wrts* 

Merthyr Tydfil home of a 
society inspector. . 

The birds, which had been 
snuggled across the Channel, 
hv fonsxould introduce fowl 
ust w other diseases mto 
Britain. Because of this they 
may be be killed. 

Mr Bert _• Thomas, an 
ncpCA superintendent, ssw 
-I think people whodo this are 
heartless. It is terrible to 
subject these birds to whar is 
probably a frightening expoi- 
latcfi. of stuffing them under 


for victory 


jackets or into holdalls and 
rt fracin g them in front of tens 
of thousands of people.” 

MrRay Wflfiams, secretory 
iff the Welsh Rugby Union, 
said they, were totally oppos 
to the practice bat as 60,0 
people attended the match it 
was unrealistic to body search 
each fan. 

A spokesman for the Minis- 
try of Agriculture said the 
birds wonld be held in quaran- 
tine for 35 days to see whether 
they carried any disease. 

“If they are healthy they 
wm be all right, so long as 
good homes can be found for 
them. If not..." 





The Omnlbot 2000 robot 
shows a touch of high tech- 
no logical efficiency as it 
panders to one of mankind’s 
little weaknesses. 


The robot, making an ap- 
pearance at the Future 
House 2000 display at the 
Ideal Home ExhibftioiL is 
made by tbe Japanese linn 


Thorny and is due to go on 
sale shortly for £400 


(Photograph: 


Peter 

Tiievnor) 


Making art feel at home 


The Arts Council is trying to 
coax the flying ducks and 
bine-faced Chinese girls down 
from the walls of the British 
living room and put “real art” 
in their place. 

With die department store, 
liberty. It has erected a 
Hollywood-style Greek tem- 
ple, which it calls a “living art 
pavilion'’, in the middle of the 
Ideal Home Exhibition. Inside 
are 60 paintings, sculptures, 
drawings and photographs, by 
modern British artists, which 
have been chosen to demon- 
strate how good modern art 


By Patricia Clongh 
can look in a domestic setting. 

If a David Hockney colour 
lithograph, “View of Hotel 
Well 2”. is a bit steep for most 
at £3,000, a pen and ink 
drawing of a sheep by Henry 
Moore costs £800, less than 
haring one's bathtub convert- 
ed into a whirlpool. 

Photographs seem to be the 
best bargain, however. A strik- 
ing black and white shot by 
former Life photographer 
George Rodger of a zebra, 
doing what is fashionably 
called a Maori insult, can be 
had for £100. 


The Arts Council says it 
wants to encourage private 
support for tbe arts, alongside 
the burden it bears itself. 

With a vast backdrop of the 
National Gallery overlooking 
tbe scene at one end, and King 
George Vs declaration that 
“foe foundations of national 
glory are set in the homes of 
the people” writ large at the 
other, conscientious visitors to 
tbe exhibition should not foil 
to get the message. 

The Daily Mail Ideal Home 
Exhibition is open at Earls 
Court from March 4 to 31. 


Damages claimed 
from late father 
for loss of mother 


A brother and sister who 
saw their parents die in a car 
crash claimed damages yester- 
day in the High Court from 
their father's estate for the loss 
of their mother. 

Mr George Smith, aged 57, 
a clerk, was largely to blame 
for the crash in which he and 
his wife Mary, aged 47, a hotel 
secretary, died in 1 979. 

Deborah, their daughter, 
who was aged 16 at the lime, 
was knocked unconscious and 
suffered serious injuries. She 
was in hospital for six weeks 
undergoing extensive surgery 
and has lost the sight of her 
right eye. 

She is aged 23 now, married 
and living in East Looe, 
Cornwall. She has already 
received almost £41.000 for 
her own injuries. 

David, her brother, who 
was aged 1 1 and is now IS. has 
been paid £2.500 for his 
injuries after suffering pain, 
shock, bruising and cuts. 

The children also shared in 
the £7.250 paid to their 
father’s estate for the accident 
His car was in a head-on 
collision with a bus at Sutton 
Green, near Woking. Surrey. 


Mr Roy McAulay, QC. for 
the mother’s estate, told Mr 
Justice Caulfield that the acci- 
dent was “a catastrophe for 
what had been a happy 
family". 

The children had nowhere 
to go before being taken in by 
a distant relative in Highfield 
Road, Northwood. south-east 
London, where David, who is 
unemployed and still affected 
by the deaths, continues to 
live. 

Mr Smith's estate, the 
Thames Valley and Aldershot 
Omnibus Company and the 
driver ail admit liability for 
the accident but are contesting 
the amount of damages they 
should pay for the mother’s 
death. 

The brother and sister had 
to make a claim against their 
late father’s estate for the 
damages for their own injuries 
and for the loss of their 
mother, as it had been agreed 
that he was largely responsible 
for the accident. 

In effect it is the father's 
insurers and the insurers of 
the bus company and their 
driver who would pay, 

The case continues today. 


Police ‘lie 
in 30% 
of trials’ 

By Frances Gibb 
Legal Affairs Correspondent 

Perjury by police officers is 
believed by barristers to occur 
on average in three out of 
every 10 trials in both the 
magistraies'and crown courts, 
according to an article in this 
week’s New Law Journal 

A straw poll of 55 barristers 
conducted by Mr David 
Wolchover, a member of the 
criminal Bar for 14 years, 
showed that 75 per cent said 
that in their experience that 
was a reasonable estimate. 

Eight barristers sampled (1 5 
per cent) thought it occurred 
in only one or two trials in 10. 

“Obviously these figures do 
not mean that 27per cent of 
London police officers habit- 
ually commit perjury. The 
statistic relates to trials, not 
individuals.” 


Derelict 
land still 
increasing 

- By Hugh Clayton 
Government spending of 
more than £350 million on 
reclamation has failed to stop 
tire growth of derelict land, 
experts appointed by ministers 
reported yesterday. 

Professor Anthony 
Bradshaw, professor of botany 
at Liverpool University, who 
led the stndy, said that the 
only available figures for tbe 
whole of England showed that 
almost 17,000 hectares of land 
had been reclaimed from dere- 
liction between 1974 and 1982. 
That is equal to about half of 
the area of the Isle of Wight. 

In the same period the 
amount of land classed as 
derelict had risen from 43,273 
hectares to 45.683 hectares. 

Transforming Oar tf 'aste Land 
(Stationery Office£9.95>. 

Letters, page 13 



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4 


THE TIMES TUESDAY MARCH 4 1986 


PARLIAMENT MARCH 3 1986 


Welsh affairs 


Leyland row 


Arts funding 


Plan to improve Welsh valleys 


ENVIRONMENT 

Details of a new mutative to 
improve the environment of the 
South Wales valleys were given 
in the Commons by Mr Nicho- 
las Edwards. Secretary of State 
for Wales, when he opened a 
debate on Welsh affairs. The 
abjective, he explained- was to 
msure that the valleys shared in 
Lhe regeneration of the rest of 
South wales. 

Besides road and rail commu- 
nications on which they were- 
doing much, he said there was a 
great deal which could be done 
to improve the valley environ- 
ment. This was especially true of 
lhe town centres and the areas 
leading to them, where poorly 
maintained buildings and a 
damaged environment sold 
short the enormous attractions 
which the valleys had to offer 

The Welsh Office would seek 
to trigger a series of coordinated 
initiatives by local authorities 
and private and voluntary 
organizations to improve these 
areas. He was not proposing 
Welsh Office solutions. 

Where communities had 
sound ideas and the willingness 
to back them, the Welsh Office 
would focus the many existing 
mechanisms of assistance and 
would also make available addi- 
tional resources to reinforce 
them, and to promote the 
contributions which was nec- 
essary from the private sector. 

Mr Edwards said he was 
making available in 1 986-87 for 
this valley initiative, on top of 
other Government funding. £2 
million of special capital alloca- 
tions for housing-related initia- 
tives and £1 million from urban 
programme resources quite 


a pan from special capital alloca- 
tion of £3 million for housing 
pnomy estates projects, much 
of which would go to the valley’s. 

Inevitably the bulk of 
developments under this initia- 
tive would fall in later years and 
those planning these projects 
could work on the assumption 
that the Government would 
want to reinforce successful 
schemes in the vears ahead. 

South Cardiff and Swansea 
had shown what could be 
achieved: the opportunity was 
there for the valleys as welL He 
did not always agree with the 
Bishop of Durham but he felt 
that for once they perhaps 
shared a common approach 
u hen the Bishop spoke recently 
about the need for financial 
pump priming for community 
self-help. That is exactly what 
lhe said) 1 am seeking to 
achieve 

Health authontes were having 
to face up to difficult decisions 
about priorities. That would 
always be the situation because 
funds could not be infinite while 
demand was virtually un- 
limited. They were dealing with 
the problems of an expanding 
service and changing needs and 
the allegations of widespread 
cuts were false. 

There was considerable con- 
cern about waiting lists which 
had risen under this Govern- 
ment just as they had under the 
last. There was one difference 
between the situation then and 
now and that was that already 
by 1984 they were treating 
63.000 or 18 per cent more in- 
patients than in 1 979 and 3 1 ,000 
or 12 per cent more out- 
patients. 

These figures had continued 
to rise since. The acceleration in 


the number of patients treated 
and in the range of services had 
been for greater than under 
Labour It was a remarkable 
achievement. Health authorities 
had been checking on their 
wamng lists and reported that in 
many cases the numbers in- 
cluded double counting. But 
that was no consolation to the 
patients who were having to 
wait and he was now undertak- 
ing a major exercise with health 
authorities to try to get on top of 
this long-standing problem 
In the last year the coal 



Westland shares 

yet been identified, he said, but 
the company was pursuing its 
inquiries. 

In answer to later questioning 
by Lord Brace oT Donington 
(Lab) he said the Government 
had not held its own inquiry 
because that would have run 
parallel to the one being con- 
ducted by Westland. The sus- 
picion that the Government had 
anything to hide lay only in the 
mind of Lord Bruce of 
Donington 


Investigations by the Westland 
helicopter company have re- 
vealed that one of the slx 
shareholders said to have a 20 
per cent shareholding in the 
company is TNT Ltd. an 
Australian company. Lord Lu- 
cas of Cbihrorth. Under Sec- 
retary of State for Trade and 
Industry, said during question 
time in the House of Lords 

The beneficial owners of the 
other five shareholdings bad not 


Jones: Do something 
for the elderly 

industry in South Wales bad 
undergone a major change, has- 
tened and made more severe by 
the miners' strike. The 
workforce had responded very 
positively to good management 
and the result had been a 
dramatic increase in perfor- 
mance. Productivity bad in- 
creased by 46 per cent in eight 
months and the coalfield, which 
had been losing £100 million or 
more a year, expected to break 
even in the March quarter. That 
was a remarkable achievement 
It had enabled the NCB to 
announce since the beginning of 
the financial year investment of 
£80 million, the largest capital 
development programme in so 
short a time in the history of the 
coalfield. 

There were good grounds for 
thinking they bad now reached 
the end of a period of decline 
that had lasted for many de- 
cades m South Wales and 
caused much hardship. 

After detailing some of the 
wide range of projects started in 
Wales in the past year. Mr 
Edwards said the Welsh Office. 


the Welsh Development Agency 
and Mid-Wales Development 
were working up further pro- 
grammes to help job creating 
business activity in rural areas. 
He hoped to announce details 
within the next few weeks. 

The growth of the long-term 
unemployed was a particularly 
disturbing aspect. During the 
past year they had more than 
doubled the number of available 
places on the community pro- 
gramme and the Manpower 
Services Commission was well 
on the way to meeting the June 
target of 20.500 filled places. 

Under the urban programme 
they had increased resources 
from £7.1 million in 1979^80 to 
£29 million in 1 986-37. It had 
proved possible to approve 200 
new schemes at a total cost of 
£14.4 million for 1986-87, 
which represented a 53 per cent 
increase in the value of new 
schemes approved over 1985- 
86 . 

By for the most significant 
urban development grant 
project approved was lhe £42 
million redevelopment of the 
Bute East Dock area in Cardiff 
by Tarmac which was now weO 
underway. They were now look- 
ing at what development 
opportunities might be created 
in the wider South Cardiff area 
if they were to construct a 
barrage across the harbour 
mouth. They were awaiting the 
results of the feasibility studies. 

In tackling housing derelic- 
tion. they were launching a 
further phase with new projects 
in Merthyr Tydfil, PontypooL 
the Rhymney Valley and Biany 
In total, special capital alloca- 
tions of £3 million would be 
made for projects in 1986-87 
and they were providing extra 
revenue support. 

Mr Barry Jones, chief Oppo- 
sition spokesman on Wales, said 
the Secretary of State should 
raise in Cabinet the need for 
extra help for old people in 
Wales during the present freez- 
ing weather. The Principality's 
housing problems were arguably 
the worst in Britain. It was these 
leaking, draughty homes, 
particularly in south Wales, that 
contained the elderly people 
who were very much at risk. 

All Opposition MPs* mailbags 
strongly featured the issue of 
Sunday trading. The Govern- 
ment would be well advised to 
exclude Wales from the pro- 


visions of an unpopular Bin. 
M misters had under-estimated 
the disquiet and opposition to it 

The Secretary of Slate wrig- 
gled somewhat on the issue of 
rates. It had been estimated that 
since 1980-81 something like 
£45 ( million cash had been lost 
to Welsh local authorities m 
terms of rate support grant and 
penalucs. Mr Edwards must 
work mtb the local authorities 
and not attack them. It was his 
failure to adopt that approach 
that led him to one lof the most 
incredible U-iums in the history 
of Welsh Office ministers. 

The concept of funding the 
valleys was welcome. Any help 
for these beleaguered commu- 
nities was most desirable. If the 
scheme could be enhanced with 
much greater cash backing it 
would be better siilL What was 
being offered initially in terms 
of the coalfield and valley 
communities was not enough. 
Sir Raymond Gower (Vale of 
Glamorgan. Q said there were 
obvious advantages in dealing 
with unemployment by increas- 
ing the activity in ibe building 
and construction industries. 
These were industries which 
were on the whole fairly labour- 
intensive. did not use a great 
number of imported products 
and which brought advantages 
to other industries too. 

There was a strong case for 
increasing the production of the 
building and construction in- 
dustries more than anything 
that had yet been contemplaxed. 
He hoped this would be done 
and not least in Wales. He 
hoped the Government would 
give this serious consideration. 
Mr Geraint Howells 
(Ceredigion and Pembroke 
North. L) said that each year, 
the cause for celebration of St 
David's Day was less and less. 
An ailing economy and mount- 
ing unemployment made any 
optimism fade away. Could Mr 
Edwards deny that one of the 
Wales University colleges was 
to be dosed? 

Mr Edwards said he had not 
heard the vaguest suggestion 
about such a closure. Mr How- 
ells really should not come to 
the House and invent things like 
tbaL 

Mr Howells said Mr Edwards 
should not get excited. These 
rumours bad been circulating in 
Wales. 


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If your capital 
is earning lessytt^in 
the wrong place. 


Tebbit’s 
time on 
ministerial 
duties 


QUESTIONS 


Have you checked what your money is earnim; 
recently? UyouVe got a ^ hundred, ca- a few thousand, 
tucked away somewhere youH probabty find it a 
profitable exercise to move it to die Woofwich. 

To be more specific, to aW3rtwich Capital Aco3unL 
\bu see, we 1 Ve now put up the interest rale. So now 
fib among the hghest in the high street The rate has 
gone up to 9J52% net p^whkii is worth 9.75% p.a if you 
leave the interest in to earn more interest For base rate 
taxpayers thaft equivalent to 1352% ^oss. 

Those are truly exceptional figures for a no risk 
Divestment espedafly when you consider how simple 
our terms are. 

The minimum investment is just S500 and there’s 
no upper fimfi to the amount you can invest 

Interest is normally paid every six months but you 
can take it monthly if you prefec 

When you want to make a withdrawal it’s best to 
give us 90 days’ notice. Then interest is paid right up to 
the last day. However; you can always have instant access 
if you need it You just give up 90 days’ interest 

TTierek one exception. If you leave over £10,000 


in your account, you can make instant withdrawals 
without penalty subject to normal branch Emits. 

So call in at your local ^ Vfodwich Branch, or fill in 
the coupon and said ft to: Wxjlwich Equitable Building 
Society, Investment Department, FREEPOST, Bejdeyheath, 
KentDA76BP 

r- The Capital AccoimL-n 

| l/Weendose a cheque tor £ * to be invested m a J 

I VVbohvKh Cap^ toaxni. Witfimaefest added half yearly O O Rp eidas I 


| Monthly Income □ i/We understand ibe rates may vary. *WaJ 
| Bease send me mfo nnaSon o n lhe Vtoobvich Capifol Account □ | 

g Wodwich Investor |Ves|No[ No ssaxrip Inquired Tick box ilreqiaied. | 


Namefs) 


A<Wn?s*i 


Pn^lcod? 


Stgianngi si 


m 


8 

L, 


I 

_ I 

WOOLWICH ! 

EOUrtABLE BUtDtNGSOcenr j 


HwTe bettor off with theUbolwicb. 


Mr Mormon TebWt was chal- 
lenged m the Commons about 
ibe -amount of time be spent on 
his duties as Chancellor of the 
Duchy of Lancaster. 

' He said ho devoted as much 
time as necessary to carry out 
those duties "Fully and 
effectively Mr Tebbft. who is 
chairman of the Conservative 
Party, said be estimated that last 
week three hours was required 
for them. 

Mr David Winaick (Walsall 
North, Lab) said some of Mr 
Tebbit’s own Cabinet colleagues 
such as Mr Douglas Hurd, the 
Home Secretary, and Mr John 
Biffen. Leader of the 
Commons, would prefer Mr 
Tebbit to spend more time 
looking after the affairs of the 
Duchy of Lancaster 

Is it altogether a coincidence 
(he asked) that since Mr Tebbit 
became party chairman the 
Tory Party has gone even 
further down m the polls? Does 
he not connect that in any way 
with his taking over tbe job? 

Mr Teh hit I do not answer in 
this House for my responsibil- 
ities as chairman of the Conser- 
vative Party. I would not abuse 
my post as Chancellor of the 
Duchy to do so here. I was very 
glad to note that tbe Home 
Secretary on Saturday was in 
vigorous and raucous form, 
busy scragging the Opposition. 

Mr Dennis Skinner 
(Botsover, Lab): Does he recall 
that bis predecessor (tbe Eari of 
Gowrie. who was also Minister 
for tbe Arts) could not manage 
on £33,000 a year in the job be 
had. and that be went to other 
fields to feather his nest? 

Mr Tebbit has just said he 
does about three bouts of work 
for this £33,000 and it is not a 
bad number. Last week one of 
his playmates (Mr Norman 
Fowler. -Secretary of State for 
Social Services) said the Gov- 
ernment would give angle 
pensioners an extra 40 pence, 
just enough to buy a mustard 
plaster. 

Mr Tebbit If Mr Skinner was 
right about my salary he might 
conceivably have some sort of 
point. But I am not paid as 
Chancellor of the Duchy of 
Lancaster through public funds. 

I do not receive a salary as a 
Cabinet minister from public 
funds. I do receive a nominal 
salary as Chancellor of the 
Duchy from the Duchy itself 


Best wishes 
for Lord 
Chancellor 

Congratulations and best 
wishes to Lord Halisham of St 
Marytebone, the Lord Chan- 
cellor, following bis marriage 
Saturday, came from aD sides of 
the House of Lords, when he 
took the Woolsack at the start of 
business. 

Lord Etwyn-Jooes, a former 
Lord Chancellor, said everyone 
had been delighted at the news, 
both In tbe Hoase of Lords and 
outside. 

The photograph* of the smil- 
ing Lord Chancellor at the 
weekend and of Spot the terrier 
in the arms of his bride really 
brought ns afl good cheer. We all 
wish the Lord Chancellor and 
Lady HaSsham of St Maiyte- 
booe every possible happiness to 
Che future. 

Viscount WhJtelaw, Lord 
President of the Council and 
Leader of the Hesse of Lords, 
sard that all those on the 
Government benches would wish 
to be associated with those good 
wishes. He had been delighted to 
read that the Lord Chanoeflor 
bad looked dapper at tbe cere- 
mony. Whether that was a 
description that could normally 
be applied to him was not for 
him to say. 

Lord Halisham of St Maryle- 
bone, rising from tbe Woolsack 
to speak from the aisle, said be 
was deeply gratefal to all for 
their good wishes. 


Nuclear waste 
protest 

Mr Douglas Hogg (Grantham. 
O unsuccessfully applied for an 
emergency debate on what be 
described as the anxieties, 
potential financial loss and 
planning blight caused by the 
announcement that Fulbeek 
Airfield in bis constituency was 
a possible sight for the disposal 
of nuclear waste. 


Minister hopeful 
despite many 



COALMINING 

There was no truth whatever in 
ibe allegation of conspiracy by 
tbe Prime Minister and Mr Ian 
MacGregor in ensuring the coal 
strike took place and the 
allegation was nonsense. Mr 
Nicholas Edwards, lhe 
Secretary of Stale for Wales, 
said during Commons 
questions. 

Wales was probably reaching 
the end of the long historic 
process of decline m the coal 
mining industry. 

Following tbe dosure of 
several consistently 

uneconomic collieries, tbe NCB 
had no current plans for further 
closures in South Wales and 
the industry could look forward 
to much greater stability and 
renewed development. 

Efforts to provide other 
employment opportunities 
were continuing using the 
instruments of regional 
industrial policy, the urban 



compassion and concern, of the 
effect of the Government's * 
policies on the South Wales 9 
vaDeys? 

A report published today by 
the Department of Trade and 
Industry suggests that regional 
policy is effeenve- and _has 
created more than 600,000 jobs 
in Britain m the last 20 years. 

If he accepts the findings of 
this report, sponsored by the 
department, why does lie not 
ensure m Wales die logical 
conclusion of that report s 
accepted whereby we get much 
of the proper. . regional 
investment policy to provide 
the jobs and infrastructure we 
seed to replace jobs we are 
losing? 

Mr Edwards: Regional policy 
has an important pan to play 
NCB (Enterprise) has got off to M 
a very good start, supporting * 
products to Wales at a cost of - 
investment of more than £{j 
million and providing 
something like 1.400 jobs. That 
is a good start. I am also taking 
other mifauves.' • • ' ■ 

Mr Robert Harvey (South West 
Clwyd. O: Can he give any 
estimate of the number of jobs 
lost as a result of tbe miners' 
strike last year? 

Mr Edwards: No. I cannot. 
There have been more than 
6.000 jobs lost m pits (hat bate 
been closed down. The total 
effect of the strike we cannot 
tell. Clearly it affected, a lot of 
other industries as well and a 
lot of smaller firms. 

Mr Gareth Warden (Gower, 
Lab): Has be got any plans at all . 
to increase the j 


Edwards: Coal decline 
•earmg its aid 

programme, and the Welsh 
Development Agency and 
drawing on the support of NCB 
(Enterprise). 

The NCB was now 
undertaking a major 
investment programme m the 
Welsh coalfield. There was 
substantial investment in the 
South Wales coalfield, 
including new equipment on 
the feces, which held out much 
better prospects for the future. 
Mr Ronald Davies (Caerphilly. 
Lab), who had asked whether 
Mr Edwards intended to take 
steps to provide further 
employment opportunities in 
the light of continuing colliery 
closures, said: It is not 
surprising we have heard 
nothing 7 new yet agaut from the 
secretary of state. When is he 
going to show some sign of 
understanding, let alone 


working population living in 
pans of Wales eligible fix- re- 
gional development grant? . 

Mr Edwards: We have carried 
out a major review of regional 
policy and I do not think n 
would be sensible, so soon after 
the last review, to recast the 
present disuibitcm of coverage. 
Sir Raymond Gower (Vale of 
Glamorgan. C): Wlnle there 
have been closures of pits in 
South Wales in recent years, the 
most marked decline m the coal 
industry m Wales occurred un- 
der a Labour government 
Mr Edwards: That is true and it 
is true that the decline earned 
on for many decades. 1 think we 
can be thankful that we are 
probably reaching the end of the 
long histone process. 

Mr Raymond Ptnreil (Ogmore. 
Labh Since the end of die 
miners' strike, which the Prime 
Minister and Mr Ian MacGregor 
and others conspired to ensure 
took place, every colheiy in my 
constituency has now closed. 


Timescale for 
Leyland bids 
‘laughable’ 

The timescale fix bids for 
Leyland vehicles — to counter 
the principal contender. General 
Motors of tbe United States — 
was laughable and made a 
mockery of the Government's 
claim to be serious about alter- 
native bids. Mr Jack Straw 
(Blackburn. Lab) said when 
unsuccessfully seeking an emer- 
gency debate in order to force an 
extension of the March 4 dead- 
line 

He said the Government's 
refusal to extend the deadline 
was coupled with a refusal to 
provide ap pro priate informa- 
tion to enable Lanchashue 
Enterprises Ltd to come up with 
property costed bids for Leyland 
vehicles. Requests for mforma- 
tjon had met with a point blank 
refusal. Hill Samuel would not 
provide information unless a 
series of onerous conditions was 
met They had put those behind 
the buy-out in a Catch 22 trap, 
because those conditions could 
be met only with information by 
HiTI Samuel. Tbe Government 
was creating conditions that 
made it impossible for anyone 
other than General Motors to 
get to the starting line. It bad 
taken GM nine months — and 
he understood they had not yet 
formally entered a bid. The 
National Carriers buy-out, 
winch Conservative MPs lauded 
so much, had taken nme months 
to reach fruition. Mr Edward 
Heath had said that Leyland was 
to be sacrificed and sold to GM 
as part of a private deal between 
the White House and Downing 
Street From tbe way things 
looked, there was every possibil- 
ity he was right The deadline 
could not be extended unless 
there was an emergency debate 
that day. or on Tuesday 


Opposition 
picture of arts 
funding false 

Mr Richard Luce. Minister for 
the Arts, countered Opposition 
criticism of Government fund- 
ing of the arts by saying that a 
totally false picture had been 
painted. Mr Norman Buchan. 
Opposition spokesman on the 
arts, had said that the country 
was in the classic situation of 
asking “Why. if things are so 
good, they are so bloody awfuT" 
Mr Christopher Murphy (Wel- 
wyn HarfieJdX) had said that 
the feet that there was a 7 per 
cent increase in teal terms, with 
a 10 per cent increase overall m 
arts funding, with £20 ntdhon 
business sponsorship, meant 
that there were excellent im- 
plications for the arts. 

Mr Loce: I agree entirely The 
picture painted by some of 
gloom, doom and despondency, 
is wrong and the Government 
has increased funding. 

Mr Tony Banks (Newham 
Nonb-West Lab): Since 1982 
83. if we exclude abolition 
money, which we must because 
it is an inadequate subsutute for 
money previously put in by the 
metropolitan counties and tbe 
GLC. the real increase from the 
Government is less, than 1 per 
cenL 

Mr Luce said that diversity 
and plurality in funding were 
the strength of the arts. 

He added later that central 
Government had switched 
spending from local authorities 
to the extent of £43 million of 
taxpayers' money Tbe Govern- 
ment was relieving local 
authorities of an overall burden 
Mr Norman Buchan: Theatres, 
music balls and concert halls are 
desperately anxious about the 
fall in momey they are reeeiv 
mg. 

Mr Lace. He is paimmga totally 
false picture 


Edwards denies arm twisting 

ferament would font at . L . ■ O 


The Government would look at 
the capital structure of the 
Welsh Water Authority when it 
came to privatize and consider 
what was necessary in order to 
have a sensible structure, Mr 
Nicholas Edwards. Secretary of 
State for Wales, said during 
question ume exchanges in tbe 
Commons. 

Mr Raymond Powell (Ogmore. 
Lab) bad asked bow for he bad 
screwed the arms of tbe 
authority's chairman behind his 
back to get him to agree to 
privatization of the water in- 
dustry. For months before (he 
went on) and in all probability 
during (he whole of 1985 John 
Elfed Jones bad pubfady de- 
clared. together with his board, 
that he was against any sort of 
privatization. I would like an 
inquiry into what happened 
with the secretary of state and 
what pressure be put on the 
chairman of the Welsh Water 
Authority to get his agreement? 
Mr Edwards. Tbe idea iff me 
twisting someone's arm over the 
phone is interesting. If anyone 
imagines that John Elfed Jones 
is the sort of man to have his 
arm twisted in any case: he 
clearly does not know the man. 
He is well able to suck up for 
himself and express his own 
views. He and the board will be 
considering proposals put for- 
ward in detail and bringing their , 


fully considered view to tbe 
Government in due course. 

Mr Gwilym Jones (Cardiff 
North. Ck Has be been asked to 
convey any apology to the chief 
executive of the Welsh Water 
Authority for what must have 
been at best a sincere misunder- 
standing by Mis Ann Clwyd 
(Cynon Valley Labp 

Mr Edwards: I have no desire 
ever io act os a son of postbox 
between Mrs Clwyd and the 
chief executive of the water 
au thorny. They are quite able to 
conduct their exchanges directly 
.and on their own. 

Mr Edward Rowlands (Merthyr 
Tydfil and Rhymney, Lab): The 
Only way privatization of the 
water authority can progress is if 
the Government wipes off the 
vast mmonty of the authority's 

debts. . If it can be done for the 
benefit or future shareholders, 
why not now for the vast 
majority of Welsh water con- 
sumers 7 

Mr Edwards: We wiflbe looking 
at the financial structure of the 
authority before privatization 
occurs. He cannot otgeci to any 
reconstruction of the debt po- 
sition. It is something for which 
Welsh MPs have long pressed, 
particularly if it helps the 
authority to raise its capital 
more easily and cany out its 
programme more satisfactorily 


-1 




Much is directly for the benefit 
of consumers 

MrDafydd W&ey (Caernarfon. 
n kj To make privatization 
£able it is necessary to write off 
£450 million of debt Why not 
do rt now and give even more 
ocnent to consumers'’ 

Mr Edwards: We will look at the 
capital structure when we come 
to privatize and consider whai ts 
ncce *5ary m order to have a 
sensible structure. It is not the 
capnai structure at present 
which controls the borrowing of 
the water authority 

J*Hd down by thc T T5asury 
S**™® ° r the need to control 
*®tafcjhty of Government 
SEP*""®- ^h 31 *s the pno- 
constraint on the capita! 
programme at the present nme 

~Ci y poauon of 

Mr Bony Joses, chief Gppo- 

S23 on wSE 

25*®“ * f even. at this late stage 

exfim^? Wa w S » w0u W strive io 
««mpt Wale* from water 

pnvatizafion prop osals . 
Pn v atizauon can go ahead and " 

Sd U ’^ OVemedt “ lfae 

=?™es and diargmg structure 
for the users of the Welsh Water 
Authority s services 








Jn %' 


THE TIMES TUESDAY MARCH 4 1986 


t0 Pe| 

®»ain' 

sur^' 

1 '. 


rx . ,, ■ . i ; 

? « ■ : »v * 

* **■■*•■ 




Medicine 


IS*®. 




epileptic 

By Nicholas Thnirnn^ 
SodalSerrices 
Correspondent 

The Government is to fece 
legal action over the blacklist 
ofdrugs for which the Nation- 
al Health'Scrvice will not pay. 

Mrs Belinda Chandler,, aged- 
24,. an. epileptic patient, is to 
sue Mr Norman Fowler, Sec- 
retary of State for Social 
Services; after being denied 
treatment that her doctors 
believe is necessary. . 

Lawyers see it as a test raw 
that could lead to an appeal 
system being introduced to 
allow individual patients to 
receive blacklisted drugs if 
they have a clinical need. 

The move comes after a 
local family practitioner com- 
mittee refused to discipline a 
doctor for breaking Lbe roles 
and prescribing a blacklisted 
drug for Mrs Chandler. 

It is n ow joining her GP, Dr 
Paul Mi Haiti, in. pressing, min , 
isters to introduce an appeal 
system for individual patterns. 

Dr Millard, a family doctor 
in Newbury, Berkshire, said ' 
yesterday that Mrs Chandler, 
who has been an epileptic 
since the age of . six, suffered 
from epilepsy and a benign 
brain tumour which made 
control of her epilepsy more 
complex. 

The one drug which ap- 
peared to help her, after she 
was seen by specialists in 
neurology at Oxford, was 
Anxon, which went on to the 
blacklist of drugs when it was 
introduced last April. 

“It is basically a 
tranquilliser and is not usually 
used to treat epilepsy," Dr 
Millard said yesterday. “But 
in her case it dearly works. 

“When the limited list came 




Wf 


m 






^#*22 

L- 


*•&** a -e ■ 

i-Ml 


iV; 




Members of fee threatened Liverpool 
PwUiamiouic Orchestra outside the 
town haJU yesterfay where tbeyhand- 
ed over a 100,000-agBatare petition of 
support. Later they paraded around 
the city in an open-top bus playing 
popular favourites 

The orchestra wants continued finan- 


cial backing after Merseyside County 
Council is scrapped at the end of this 
month. Liverpool City Council is the 
largest of the five authorities which 
wiu then assume responsibility. 

Mr Ian Wright, a representative of 
the orchestra, said; “The city council 
have always said they want to support 


ns, hot rate capping has made it 
difficult for than. As they have not yet 
sol a rate for the coming year we do 
not know where we are.*^ 

The Arts ConnoB wiD supply half the 
money needed, but the 80-piece 
orchestra will still have to rely on 
local authorities. 


-Protect bankers who notify 
police about drug money’ 


Private Eye 
to pay MP 
libel damages 


given the protection of the law 
to tell the police about diems 
who they suspect are connect- 
ed with traffi cking in drags 
such as heroin and cocaine, a 
parliamentary report will rec- 
ommend next week. 

The Commons home affairs 


By Richard .Enos, Lobby Reporter 

Britain s bankers should be fully with the authorities. The select committee gave a substantial libel damages in 
ven the protection of the law provided the law protects warning in a much-publicized the High Court yesterday after 
tell the police about clients them from any legal action for interim report last May that “highly offensive" allegations 


in her case it deariy works. sele^comxnrttee has just com- 

~ When the limited list came P 1 ™ a 12-month inquiry 

in we tried alternative permit- 

Hr-nnc w £it~. ' and » concerned about the 


ted drugs and her epilepsy 
returned with a vengance. She 
could hardly go out to put the 
milk bottles on the doorstep ip 
case she bad a fit, much less go 
to work.” 


apparent ease that drug barons 
use British and international 
b anks to circulate and di sguise 
the true origin of drugmoney, 
which is known as 


The West Berkshire Family 

Practitioner Committee has Jf- shared ty bankers, the MPs 
written to Mr Fowler calling ... 

for an individual appeals^ . , e s ^ isfied ^ the 

tern to KtfnStaSS^ banks are ready to cooperate 

Mrs Chandler, who works f •. 

as a buyer's assistant in deco- I'l £*& /'i 

rating materials, is being kept '.«*«. vl 

stable because Beecham, the id* 

drug's manufacturer, is sup- rtfiAll 
plying Dr Miilaid with free j |l v*f JLUf I 

samples; 

Dr -Millard said: “Mrs - - By PeterEvans, Horn 
Chandler deariy has a clinical All 30 members of the West 

need for this drug arfTit is Midlands Police Committee 
ludicrous that she cannot gel it are to be brought before the 
on the NHS. but has either to High Court on Friday and run 
pay for it or rely on freehand^ the risk of being sent to prison 
outs from a drug company.” for contempt. 

Buying the drug would cost They are being put before 
about £1 50 a year and Mrs the court by the Police Federa- 
Chandler could, if she had to, tion, which claims they have 
afford that. But for patients defied court orders to negoti- 
who could not, he said, the ate rises in rent allowances to 
rules meant “you can only officers living in police 
have the treatment that is best houses, 
for you if you pay for it". Mr Edwin Shore, chairman 

Mrs Chandler said yester- of the committee, confirmed 
day the issue was one of yesterday that the committee 
principle rather than money, members have had writs seek- 

“Thts case is not just about ing to commit them to prison 
me but about other patients in ana. which are returnable at 
a similar position". the Victoria Law Courts, Bir- 


disclosure of information 
which they believe to relate to 
drugmoney. 

“We recommend, therefore, 
that the present law on the 
disclosure of confidential in- 
formation by banks should be 
amended." 

The Drug Trafficking Of- 
fences Bill protects bankers 
when responding to police 
inquiries. 

But the MPS want the 
Government to go a step 
further and give statutory 
protection to bankers who 
volunteer information to po- 
lice about -clients'’ finances, 
“when these seem to be con- 
nected with drug trafficking". 


Britain faced die most serious were published in the satirical 
peacetime threat to its nation- magazine. Private Eye. 
al well-being from hard drugs. Mr Michael Tugendhai, 
In their final report, to be counsel for Sir Frederic, aged 

published on Wednesday next ^7? a 
week, the MPs conclude: said his chent had been ac- 
“Drug dealers still make aised of defending genocide in 
princely profits and threaten- Ba*** 1 " lroduan B Sibling 
us all, including our children, 10 Islands in 

with a nightmare of drug assoctanon with the mafia and 


addiction which has now be- ^shonest expenses 

come a reality for America." lh< ; Co A m ™°- n_ 

wealth Parliamentary Associa- 

The MPs call on the Gov- tion. among other allegations, 
emment to make sure that it is Mr Richard Rampion, 
giving the highest priority to counsel for the magazine edi- 
provming customs with the tor, Mr Richard Ingrams, and 
necessary manpower and the publishers, Pressdram Ltd, 
equipment in its fight against said they now acknowledged 


Police committee 


- s'- By PeterEvwis; Home Affairs Correspondent 
AR 30 members of the West mingham. “The committee 
Midlands Police Committee have, always, acted in accor- 
are to be brought before the dance with legal advice and 
High Court on Friday and run have and would do nothing 
the risk of being sent to prison other than abide by the law of 
for contempt. the land.” 

They are being put before The federation claims that a 
the court by the Police Fedora- national agreement links rent 
tion, which claims they have allowances to a scale worked 
defied court orders to negoti- out by comparison with pri- 
ate rises in rent allowances to vate households, but the West 


police Midlands committee has ar- 
gued for parity with council 
irtnan house rents, 
xrined Last month the High Court, 


yesterday that the committee sitting in Birmingham, or- 
members have had writs seek- derea the committee to nego- 
ing to commit them to prison tiate under the national 
ana which are returnable at agreement The committee is 
the Victoria Law Courts, Bir- Labour controlled. 


drug trafficking. 

Waite a 
bad 

listener 

By A Staff Reporter 

Mr Terry Waite, the Arch- 
bishop of Canterbury's envoy, 
has confessed that he is a 
short-tempered, bad listener. 

The man whose powers of 
persuasion have secured the 
release of hostages in several 
of dw world's troubled areas 
said: “Tm extremely impa- 
tient. I have to discipline 
myself. When I’ve had to wait 
for days for the next step in 
negotiations and there’s no 
one to consult I know I could 
easily blow it by being stupid. 
But I know deep down I can't 
afford to." 


there was no truth in the 
deeply offensive allegations, 
and publicly apologized to Sir 
Frederic. 

Mr Justice Turner was told 
the magazine agreed to pay 
undisclosed damages and all 
legal costs. 

Cell siege at 
prison ends 

A 19-hour cell siege at 
Strangeways prison. Manches- 
ter, ended peacefully yester- 
day morning. A hostage held 
prisoner overnight by 10 in- 
mates was released unhurt. 
Three men left the cell volun- 
tarily at 8.15 a.m. followed by 
the other seven an hour later. 
No demands were made, the 
Home Office said, but prison- 
ers at Strangeways have com- 
plained in the past about 
overcrowding. 


RSPCA appeal on badger baiting 


By Tim Jones trict inspector in South Gla- 

The Royal Society for the morgen, said that early March- 
Prevention of Cruelly to Ani- 

mals has called for ramblers in iJjKf 

Wales to bdp track down ravage and often slow death of 
badeer bailers who are using lheanimaL . 

increasingly advanced meth- 


terriers so that they enow 
More than 30 men were w here to dig when a badger is 
convicted in the principality confronted in his set. . 
last year, and so far this year ^ usuany desperate fight 
eight other suspects are feeing often leaves the dogs badly 
charges. Posters in shop win- wounded, and because ihe- 
dows and talks are being sport is illegal many die from 
organized to make the pobhc injuries as owners will 
aware of the increasing scare of qqi risk consulting vets. 


and some baiters lake pride in 
boasting of the scars their 
animals have received. 

Mr Gee appealed for ram- 
blers to report any suspicious 
activity they may come across. 
They should note cars parked 
at suspicious times, or at 
unusual locations, and men, 


BotjMciiow deep down i cMt £8m mortgage 
4 fraud alleged 

job of Secretary for Anglican Vaiipv nntin> an 

Comm union Affairs, is one of 
the Church of England’s most 


popular assets, he is not afraid 
to criticize it 

In an interview in toe maga- 
zine, Woman, published to- 
day, he says: “I think we have 
devastated much of church life 
in recent years and that sad- 
dens me. 

“Too often the church 


crossing open fields carrying comes across as a censorious, 
powerful lamps and spades, be moralistic body, forever telling 


Thames Valley police are 
investigating allegations of a 
mortgage racket on at least 
one building society using 
non-existent properties to ex- 
tract funds. Figures of up to £8 
million have been mentioned. 

Police said five people, 
including a solicitor, an estate 
agent and businessmen, have 
been interviewed and released 
mi police bail to return in May 
and June. 


the illegal sport. 

Mr Roy Gee. RSPCA dis- 


Police to keep 
‘observation 
posts' secret 

People who allow the pofice 
to use their homes or business- 
es to monitor criminal activity 
are entitied lo anonymity in 
the courts, the Court of Ap- 
peal ruled yesterday. _ . . 

Mr Justice Mann, sitting « 
London with Lord Lane, me 
Lord Chief Justice, and Sr 
Roger Ormrod. said such do- 
zens were in the same class as 
police informers and were 
entitled not to have their 
identities disclosed. 

Mr Justice Mann said there 
was an obvious fear of repnsai 
if those who assisted toe police 
bv providing “observation 
posts” had their ldentines 
disclosed in court . 

The judges dismissed _ an 
appeal bv Elliston Rankme. 
aged 41, unemployed, ot 
Roxboume Road. South 


Well trained 
change hands for 


often 

prices. 


said. 

“We want to make it as 
difficult as possible for badger- 
baiters to cany out their so- 
called sport. It is a 
horrendously cruel activity 
and we treed all the help we 
can get," Mr Gee added. 


morausne oouy, iorcver ceuiug » 

others what to do, and people lUTkeV tilTeat 

have become afraid of the _i 

church because of it. You end case remand 


Mother forfeits bail 
in £3m cannabis case 

A mother of two children Tveer, aged 30, a Dutch 
has been forced to seU. her 


home because her boy friend 
absconded while on bail, a 
court was told yesterday. 


Britain she bad not believed 
him. Brooks bad stood surety 
of £40,000 to ensure that 


up askmg t Ts the church 
really touching the depth of 
the spiritual question? It's 
part of its responsibility to 
assist people in finding some 
deeper meaning. Yet that side 
of things is dealt with these 
days by psychotherapists. It's 
not -their job; it’s tire priests 
who shoaki be coring soul 
sickness." 

Everybody needs a sense of 
humour and even be and 
Colonel Gadaffi were able to 


SteHa BrootaT^ed 30, * ^ 

divorcee, wih have to seD her apni. would face tnal on 
StSTm Godstone, Surrey., obarges of conspinug with 
SrZ y a £23,000 forfeit, others to smuggle cannabis 
Chelmsford Gown Conn was resin worth £3 million. 


told. She was given four jj e had agreed to continue 
months to raise toe money or jiving with her in Surrey, but 


go to jail for a year, 


felled to appear at Chelmsford 


Brooks said that although Crown Court on Monday last 

her boy friend, Johannes Van week. 


the most tortuous of negotia- 
tions. 

Mr Waite, who maintains 
that there b good in everyone, 
says that when talking to 
murderous terrorists: “Yon do 
what you can. They recognize 
that my mission is fundamen- 
tally based on humanitarian 
grounds and yon hope that 
they will respond 
accordingly." 


A director of a security firm 
was remanded on bail for five 
weeks by Norwich magistrates 
yesterday accused of plotting 
to contaminate supermarket 
poultry with mercury unless 
£250,000 was paid. 

Mr Peter Steven O’Connor, 
aged 27. of Kensworth, 
Dunstable, in Bedfordshire, is 
charged with demanding the 
money with menaces from Mr 
Bernard Matthews, the turkey 
producer, who is based in 
Great Witchiogham, Norfolk. 

Theft charges 

Arnold Johnson, aged 38, of 
Cherry Avenue. Yapion, West 
Sussex, former assistant gov- 
ernor of Ford prison, appeared 
before Arundel magistrates 
yesterday on three charges of 
theft. The case was adjourned 
until April 2 and Mr Johnson 
was granted bail. 


Japanese video war may affect British market 

Technology Correspondent in Britain ing each other m foreign Copyright Theft said j este 

A video war is about to 
break out between two big 


Roxboume Roaa. Jamurese consumer etectron- 

Ockendon. Essex, groups, Sony and 

IS-monthjaUierroimpowdat ’ 

the Inner London Crown „ A . j — , — 


the Inner London Crown 
Court on July lO.lasi year for 
supplying canoabis- . 


it could halt toe develop- 
ment of a standard tor video 


dominates markets in Britain mg eaco sssner m 
and the rest of Europe, says it markets, 
inters to resist Sony’s efforts. Matsushita chums that 
Matsushita, maker of toe ' 

PanasonicT^ National and by marketing 8 mm machines 
Technics tamds, has a large ^ the next generatum of video 
stake in thehalMnch format tape itteoiderafw use at hraie 
, ‘ „ as well as outdoors, rather 

It says it wiU respond wsm than a specialty product 


supplying cannams. tane recorders, and affect mar- it says n wiu rapwiu wiu» than as a specialty product 

The court was told. tteT*e tap* "JS <UMI1 g them aggnssive marketiag ai med at whb sales potential. 

police used an image iflKWj 1 g-itfeh high street, which ensnrag Sony strew products Matsushita is expected to 

er to watch Rankme s ac&v> me oru»u . have onlv mmnntv aoneal. — ~t .k- 

ties in Railion Road, Brixion. 

During the trial counsel for 
the defence had wanted to 
question police aTicrrs on me 


exact location of their °bser- 
vauoti p«t. Howeynv the 
trial judge ruled that tiw 
need not disclose tL ^ 
pubiic interest”. 


is one of the largest ride© 
markets in the world. 

Sony, inventor of the 
Befamax video recording sys- 
tt m, tost year launched its 
« mm video camera and re- 
corder as the first step towards 
shaking ft a world standard. ; 

Matsushita, whose wbsfd- 


have only minority appeal. 

The impact of toe battle 
between the two Japanese 
companies wfll be wide^read* 
embracing British companies 
which manufacture Japanese 
products under licence. 

. It will embarrass toe Japa- 
nese government which has 


market its own version of the 
8 mm later this year, but only 
as a lightweight camera-re- 
corder, primarily designed for 
outdoor filming rather than 
home recording. 


• A new wave of video piracy 
is on its way to Britain from 


toe US, Middle East and Far 
East, toe Federation against 
Copyright Theft said yester- 
day. 

Successful box office films 
such as Ram bo. Rocky JV. 
Back to the Future and The 
Jewel of toe Nile were being 
pirated in Beirut, Bahrain, 
Bangkok, Singapore and' 
America. 

Mr Peter Duffy, the 
federation's director general I 
said: “Without worldwide 
copright legislation, there b 
little we can do." 

Much greater international 
co-operation was necessary to | 
combat the video pirates, Mr 
Duffy, a former bead of Scot - 1 
land' Yard's anti-terrorist 
squad, said. 


HOME/O VERSHAS NEWS s 

The post-Marcos Philippines 

Aquino may side-step 
Parliament in fight 
for a new constitution 


From Michael Hamlyn 
Manila 

A new constitution for the 
Philippines involving a single- 
term president is to be put to 
the people in a referendum 
within 90 days if a plan drawn 
up by toe new Vice-President, 
Mr Salvador Laurel, is accept- 
ed. 

The plan was sent to Presi- 
dent Corazon Aquino by Mr 
Laurel in his capacity as leader 
of Unido (United National 
Democratic Organization), 
the party under whose banner 
she fought toe election, to try 
to solve the complex constitu- 
tional and legal entanglements 
lacing her Government. 

At present the Government 
is by no means clear whether it 
is acting as a legal and 
property constituted adminis- 
tration or as a. revolutionary 
body empowered to act simply 
by virtue of the absence of any 
other government and the 
support of toe people. 

Yesterday Mr Laurel insist- 
ed that the Government was 
in existence both de facto and 
de jure since it was plainly in 
charge, and had been recog- 
nized as such by other govern- 
ments. 

Bui he also said that toe 
Government rejected the 1973 
constitution brought in by 
former President Marcos. 

“Thai constitution was 
invalid from toe very outset in 
1973," he said yesterday. “It 
was not validly approved by 
toe Philippine people. The 
Supreme Court said by six 
votes to four that it was not 
properly ratified." 

Not surprisingly, that view 
is not held by members of the 
Philippines Parliament be- 
longing to Mr Marcos's KLBL 
(New Society Movement) par- 

ty- 

The KBL parliamentary 
caucus met yesterday and 
offered its assistance to toe 
new President. “We shall not 
oppose her," toe leader of toe 
parliamentary party, Mr Jose 
Rono. said, “and if Mrs 
Aquino seeks constitutional 
approval from toe Batasang 
(Parliament) we shall give her 
that" 

He said, however, that toe 
KBL would act as a democrat- 
ic opposition and would keep 
up their surveillance of her 
Government “That is the best 


Move for assets 

Manila (AFP) — President 
Aquino has taken the first 
legal steps to recover govern- 
ment assets from Mr Marcos 
in (he Philippines and abroad 
by asking US federal and state 
courts to issue an injunction on 
a plane-load brought with him 
to Hawaii. 

service we can give toe 
President." he said. “It is vital 
if we are to call this democracy 
a real democracy, that we 
must maintain toe two-party 
system." 

Mr Rofto went on to point 
out that toe Batasang was 
empowered to act as a consti- 
tutional assembly, and would 
be able to draw up and 
approve a new constitution. 

But Mr Laurel plainly in- 
tends to side-step the Assem- 
bly. since it is still dominated 
by toe KBL and its supporters. 
The new constitution, which 
he suggests should be drawn 
up by a small panel of experts, 
will be put directly to the 
people. 

The Vice-President also 
suggested yesterday that im- 
mediately after the constitu- 
tion is approved there should 




.(W : 






A young street vendor of pro- 
Aquino badges doing a brisk 
- trade in Manna. 


Warsaw mood on trial 
with five nationalists 


From Roger Boyes, Warsaw 


The leaders of a group of 
■Itra-natioualist Polish dissi- 
dents who have publicly called 
for a break with toe Soviet 
Union were pot on trial yester- 
day, charged with anti-state 
activity and preparing to over- 
throw the communist system 
with force. 

The trial is the latest in a 
series of cases against dissi- 
dents that has been regarded 
as something of a barometer of 
the political climate in Poland. 

Slander charges against Mr 
Lech Walesa, the Solidarity 
chairman, were dropped last 
month and two Solidarity or- 
ganizers and advisers, Mr 
Adam Michnik and Mr 
Bogdan Us, had their sen- 
tences cot by six months. 

Bnt the trial of the five 
leaders of the Confederation of 
Independent Poland (KPN) is 
expected to have a different 
outcome. Preparations to over- 
throw the state system with 
force carries a possible jail 
term of between one and 10 
years. Led by the veteran 
dissident Leszek Mocznlski, 
KPN has been questioning 
Poland's role in the Soviet 
alliance, and its various writ- 
ings consistently depict Mos- 
cow as an enemy. 

The banned movement did 
not command a large following 
on the scale of Sobdarity. and 
is often at odds with toe 
leadership of the outlawed 
union. 

Tough treatment of the five 


KPN leaders - apart from Mr 
Mocznlski, they are Krzystof 
Krai, Adam Sfomka, Andrzej 
Szamanski and Dariusz 
Wojrik — would show Moscow 
that despite recent Polish 
court verdicts, the authorities 
will crack down hard on overt 
anti-Sovietism. AU but Mr 
Wojtik refused to testify yes- 
terday and the proceedings 
were dominated by the reading 
of the indictment. 

The trial coincides with the 
Communist Party congress in 1 
the Soviet Union, and the 
original charges against the 
group were drawn up only days 
after the accession of Mr 
Mikhail Gorbachov to the 
Soviet leadership. 

Security measures were 
tight outside the Warsaw 
courtroom yesterday — a po- 
lice search turned np a kitchen 
. knife, presumably meant to cut 
sandwiches during the lengthy 
proceedings, in the handbag of 
a woman relative — and toe 
press was barred. 

Despite KPN’s differences 
with Solidarity, the accused 
are represented by top human 
rights lawyers reflecting to 
some degree the respect for 
Mr MoczulskTs past record. 

After benefiting from an 
amnesty’ for political prisoners 
in July 1984. be irritated toe 
authorities by speaking in 
churches and in private discus- 
sion groups, outlining his pro- 
gramme for an independent 
Poland. 


be local elections for mayors 
and provincial governors. 
That would also get round the 
fracas building around Mr 
Aquilino Pimentel, Minister 
for Local Government, who 
asked for the resignation of toe 
mayors and is replacing them 
with Unido supporters. 

In an indication that Philip- 
pine politics are returning to 
normal, with politicians on 
toe same side stabbing each 
other in public, Mr Laurel 
accused Mr Pimentel of acting 
illegally “in some instances." 
He said that the matter had 
been discussed with toe Presi- 
dent. but he was not at liberty 
to disclose whal was said. 

A threat to the new Govern- 
ment which at one time was 
thought to be serious now 
appears to be diminishing. 

The idea of a military conspir- 
acy to hold out against the new 
regime seems to be vanishing 
with several hard-line Marcos 
loyalists reporting in recent 
days to the Defence Minister. 
Mr Juan Ponce Enrile. and to 
the Chief of Staff. General 
Fidel Ramos. 

Other indications of grow- 
ing confidence in the stability 
of the regime come from the 
increasing numbers of former 
political leaders reluming to 
the country from exile. 

Chief among them has been 
a former Foreign Minister. Mr 
Raul Manglapus. Another was 
Mr Heherson Alvarez, aged 
81. a senior figure in the last 
constitutional convention 
who went into exile when 
many members were arrested 
by Mr Marcos in 1973. Mr 
Justiniano Martnno and Mr 
Paul Daza. a former congress- 
man. have also relumed. 

• Reagan visit possible: Mr 
Laurel said yesterday that 
President Reagan might visit 
Manila on his way to Indone- 
sia for a South-East Asian 
foreign ministers’ meeting 
(Reuter reports). 

• 15 killed: Fourteen police- 
men and a paramilitary ser- 
geant were killed near LegaspL 
in the central province of 
Albay yesterday, in the first 
big clash with Communist 
guerrillas since toe fall of Mr 
Marcos (Reuter reports). 


Clamp on 
critics 
by Athens 

From Mario Modiano 
Athens 

A leading member of 
Greece's ruling Pasok party 
was expelled and a Commu- 
nist newspaper was heavily 
fined as toe Government 
moved to curb criiirism and 
discourage the flouting of its 
economic austerity drive. 

Mr Gerasimos Arsenis, who 
as National Economy Minis- 
ter until July had been dubbed 
toe Economic Tsar of Greece, 
was ousted from toe party on 
Sunday night for publicly 
criticizing drastic changes in 
government economic policy. 

At next weekend's meeting 
of the party general committee 
it was expected that he would 
rally support from toe left 
wing to oppose toe economic 
about-turn. 

Meanwhile, toe Athens dai- 
ly Rizospastis. organ of the 
pro-Soviet Communist party, 
was fined £75.000 for defying 
a government decree curbing 
wage rises until the end of next 
year. 

Rizospastis was published 
last Thursday when other 
Athens dailies were hit by a 
journalists' strike in protest 
against toe wage freeze. 

The paper is sharply critical 
of the Socialist government’s 
monetarist options for the 
debt-ridden economy. The 
fine was denounced by the 
Athens Union of Journalists. 


Astronauts reply to critics 


From Mohsin Ati 
Washington 

Nasa. which for decades has 
evidently run the US space 
programme with flawless effi- 
ciency, has emerged from 
presidential hearings on toe 
explosion of the Challenger 
shuttle with its image badly 
dented. 

After a month of official 
silence, four members of 
Nasa’s astronaut corps held a 
press conference yesterday at 
the Johnson Space Centre in 
Houston, to discuss the Chal- 
lenger disaster and to answer 
the allegation by Mr William 
Rogers, toe investigating 
commission's chairman, that 
the Nasa launch decision- 
making process is flawed. 

Mr Rogers, a former Secre- 
tory of Stole, made the state- 
ment after lhree days of public 
hearings last week, adding that 
toe decision-making process 
must be improved. 

Shortcomings in the system 
were brought to light by 
disclosures that engineers at 
Morton Thiokol. the company 
which built toe Challenger 







Mr William Rogers: critical 
of decision-makers, 
rocket Challenger, opposed 
the launch on January 28 in 
which the crew of seven were 
killed soon after take-off. 

They feared that toe abnor- 
mally cold weather on the day 
posed a safely risk, and were 
particularly worried lhat the 
freeze might make ring seals 
on the shuttle's solid rocket 
boosters become inflexible 
and let gases escape, which is 
considered a possible cause of 
the explosion. Their concerns 
were apparently never relayed 


above middle-level manage- 
ment at Nasa: senior officials 
testified lhat they were never 
told about them. 

As a result, the ill-fated 
launch went ahead and toe 
spacecraft exploded about 75 
seconds after take-off destroy- 
ing the shuttle. 

Mr Rogers told Nasa offi- 
cials that they had forgotten to 
use "good judgement". 

The four astronauts at the 
press conference were Charles 
Fullerton, a veteran of two 
shuule voyages, Vance Brand, 
Joe Engle and Hank Ham- 
field. AH but Mr Fullerton are 
due to go on space missions 
this year and are among toe 
investigative team of 24 astro- 
nauts led by a shuule pilot, 
Robert Crippen. 

The White House mean- 
while is searching for a full- 
time Nasa administrator io 
replace Mr James Besgs. who 
resigned last week to devote 
his full time to fighting an 
indictment on charges not 
related to his Nasa activities. 

A front runner appears to be 
Mr James Fletcher, head of 
the agency from 1971 to 1977. 


I 



HERE’S A LIST OF SOME OF THE MOST 
PROGRESSIVE AND FAR-SIGHTED COMPANIES IN BRITAIN. 



You don’t need to be a regular 
reader of the Financial Times to know 
that this is a list of very successful 
companies. 

But progressive and far-sighted? 
Certainly. 

They all recognise that they can 
only stay successful by training 
young people for the future. 

And that having properly-trained 
people working for you means higher 
productivity. 

And that a regular input of 
enthusiastic young people has a 
positive effect on everyone in a firm. 

Which is why they’re about to 
take on thousands of school-leavers 
on the new 2 year YTS. 

These tightly-run companies will, 
with the happy agreement of their 
finance directors, be devoting time 
and money to training totally green 
sixteen and seventeen year olds. 

An investment that will be pay- 
ing returns year in, year out, way 
into the next century. 

Up to now, over 100,000 com- 
panies have said they want to be part 
of the scheme. So your competitors 
are probably already amongst them. 




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MARKS AND SPENCERS PLC 
J. SAINSBURY PLC 
BRITISH PETROLEUM COMPANY PLC 
THE BURTON GROUP 
ALLIED-LYONS PLC 
THE BOOTS COMPANY PLC 

THE ASSOCIATION OF BRITISH TRAVEL AGENTS LIMITED 
WHITBREAD AND COMPANY PLC 
CADBURY SCHWEPPES PLC 
NORTHERN FOODS PLC 
BAKER PERKINS PLC 
PILKINGTON BROTHERS PLC 
INTERNATIONAL THOMSON ORGANISATION PLC 
BUILDERS’ MERCHANTS FEDERATION 
GRAND METROPOLITAN PLC 
TESCO STORES LTD. 

BRITISH ASSOCIATION OF 
PROFESSIONAL HAIRDRESSING EMPLOYERS 

GALLAHER TOBACCO (UK) LIMITED 

THE DISTILLERS COMPANY PLC 

ESSO UK PLC 

TARMAC PLC 

ASDA-MFI GROUP PLC 

THE POST OFFICE ' 

THE PLESSEY COMPANY PLC 

MOTOR AGENTS ASSOCIATION LIMITED 

ELECTRICITY COUNCIL 

IBM UK LIMITED 

GLAXO HOLDINGS 

GUEST KEEN & NETTLEFOLDS PLC 

IMPERIAL GROUP PLC 

COURTAULDS PLC 

THE BOC GROUP 

SCOTTISH AND NEWCASTLE BREWERIES 
BRITISH SHIPBUILDERS 


IMPERIAL CHEMICAL INDUSTRIES PLC 
TATE & LYLE PLC 
AUSTIN ROVER 
BASS PLC 

ROWNTREE MACKINTOSH PLC 
ARGYLL GROUP PLC 
LITTLEWOODS ORGANISATION 
RANK XEROX LIMITED 
GEORGE WIMPEY PLC 
THORN EMI 

JOHN LEWIS PARTNERSHIP PLC 
THE GENERAL ELECTRIC COMPANY PLC 
UNILEVER UK HOLDINGS LIMITED 
ROLLS-ROYCE LIMITED 
EAGLE STAR INSURANCE CO. LTD. 
BRITISH AEROSPACE 
SHELL UK 










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HERE’S HOW TO GET ON IT. 


I Apply for information to: Mr C Neale. Manpower Sen/ices Commission. FREEPOST. Sheffield S3 7ZZ 1 
| No stamp needed. Or phone for free Information Pack on Sheffield (0742) 755205. ti a# | 


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Address- 




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Sweden after Palme 


: V New leader pledges 


no change in policy 


' ^ Trom Christopher Mosey, Stockholm...' 

Sven’s new leader; Mr. views on security. He hoped bloodstained snow with a 

RVar LflllSSnn Ha ojamM m La a. ^11 ' ’ - . _ r . 


j ■ " v 3IUCT; Mr , 4CWS 011 seenmy. ne nopea wooastained snow with 
ingvar Larisson, pledged yes- he would in fiiture be able to small mountain of flowers. 

1 SSSSS?i^ aa ^L ang f r S d ^ t 5 n ? ugh ^ 

01 ms a ssaspnat ed predeces- streets of Stockholm. He 

<nr Mr MlftT D n l M ^ n ' 1 J is v. ** . 


sor, Mr Olof Palme. ■ 

He intended to be as active 


wished, like Mr Palme, to 
keep his private life bee from 


55 ml eroauona[ «£ne as supervision, bin as long as Mr 
Mr Palme, who was shot dead Palme's murder remained rat- 


io Stockholm on Friday by an solved there would have to be 
unknown killer. strict security and he was 

The Swedish Foreign Minis- prepared to accept that, 
try said that Mr Carlson was , Mp p , , - . 

expected to visit Mncmtu n/»*t _ raime s funeral 


expected to visit Moscow next xr u fonfflal on 

month or m May. Mr Palme Vf* 15 wul be a pnvate 
had intended this visit to be 5 ™’ ■““‘M onJ y ^ tor 
part of a process of II Y’ ciose 4 ,en ds and members 
ll, Tiftnnoli79i!^ii w Af mL of the Social Democratic elite. 


Meanwhile, a spokesman 
for the murder investigation 
team said yesterday that the 
leadfrpped, copper-cased bul- 
lets usedin the assassination 
could penetrate a bullet-proof 
vest Itwas also disclosed that 
on the night of the assassina- 
tion a diplomat at the Swedish 
Embassy in Bonn received a 


telephone call claiming that 
the killing was the work of the 
West German terrorist group. 
Red Army Faction. 


part of a process of 
“normalization" of relations, 
which have been strained in 


the Serial Democratic etite. 
However, a memorial ser- 


"invu nave tou sirainea m - , , 7 , 

recent years' mainly because of ■ S 0 *, ^ 2? . «* 

alleged violations of Swedish Halli which 

L A - . . K ^YTWVdfVl <A Iwh Immm 


uvrawwiu Ul OWGUIAU ■ , >’ % ~ - . . — 

waters by Soviet submarines. ,s ****$* *? *«ended by 
Mr Carlsson is also likely to many wori “ leaders. 

linira •a11 m J 4 L V a a. ■ « 


have talks with Mr Gorb- Arrangements have been 


achov, the Soviet leader, on made for outsiders to follow 
the possibility that Sweden the funeral sendee itself on 


may be proposed to monitor laxge television screens set up 
any nuclear test ban treaty at various places throughout 


agreed with President Reagan, the country. 

The new leader, who at 52 is A 
o-vpn ware w, A memorial fund for Mr 


seven years younger than Mr p^LtS ”, 

Palme, looked pale, tired and SSL, 
sadashpnwiihpuiftrfrf'crvn^ Sweden, the SodalDemocrat- 


sad as ho moi aweaen, tne aoaai uemo — . 

fo? ite fits, time i? Pi 7 ™T l ffi < 1 l 1 ;- 

assassination. 11 wil1 promote studies by 

He was elected unanimous- 

ly yesterday as chairmen of “"“mamidtng and peace, 
the iuling Social Democratic The spot where Mr Pi 


The spot where Mr Palme 


5^- 

r pf' t- 

' k '*• JW» 

JJSx 

•-fee?- 


Next Tuesday he will be to act as an un 
proposed formally to Pariia- yesterdeay. for 
ment as successor to Mr. Swedes, who ha' 
Palme. On the following day ' 
he will be sworn in. 

No opposition to Mr i 
Carlsson's election is expected 
either bom the Social Demo- 
crats or from any of the non- 
socialist Opposition parties. 

His main rival for the leader- 
ship. Mr Kjell-OIof Feldt, the 
ebullient Finance Minister, 
has evidently derided that it 
would be inopportune to 
make any bid for power. 

Mr Carissousaid he had co- 
operated closely with Mr 
Palme over almost three de- 
cades. “1 shall strive to follow 
the principles he has laid 
down” he said. 

Referring to the murder, be 
said: “Sweden should be a 
land with political democracy, 
with a great degree of 
openness”. Everyone must 
fight to preserve “the open ___ 
and free Sweden we have built ZTZsji 
up over the years” Mr bmvar Carl 

He shared Mr Palme's . attentions of on 


t as an unofficial shrine 
rdeay for thousands of 
les. who have covered the 


• COPENHAGEN: The 
murder of Mr Palme cast a 
shadow over the opening here 
yesterday of the 34th session 
of the Nordic Council, the 
consultative parliament of tire 
five Nordic countries (Chris- 
topher Foiled writes). 

The five-day n^eetmg, tak- 
ing place in the Danish Parlia- 
ment building and attended 
by 87 politicians and parlia- 
mentarians, observed a one- 
minute silence after a 50- 
minute memorial ceremony 
during which Mr Poul 
Schluter, Denmark's Conser- 
vative Prime Minister, paid 
tribute to the late Swedish 
premier. 

Ah festivities connected 
with the session, including the 
traditional Nordic state ban- 
quet, were cancelled. 

Leading article, page 13 


l •Nf ' •'!*>$ 

“* * if 

to- . i . $ 


•.> • > . * - - ~ 3 *. ,sSf 







, : v., 


Mr Inpvar Carlsson, tire new Swedish leader, receiving the 
attesOunts of press photographers in Stockholm yesteiday. . 


Tourism 
threat 
to reef 


Iran and Iraq claim 
successes near Fao 


Sydney (Renter) — Austra- 
lian conservationists branched 
a national campaign yesteiday 
to stop a £160 million tourist 
development which, they 
claimed, could threaten the 
Great Barrio’ Reef. • 

At least five conservation 
groups condemned moves by 
the right-wing Qneessjand 
state government to withdraw 
national park status from a 
small island near the reef 
One of Australia's domestic 
airlines, East-West, is seeking 
freehold title from the state : 
government over most of 
Lind emu island, for a tourist 
resort. . 

A large population on the 
island with resulting effineot 
and waste coold destroy a - 
section of the reeC the world's 
largest marine park, according 
to a spokesman for the 
Queensland Wildlife Preser- 
vation Society. 

But conservationists were : 
also worried by the precedent i 
created in selling off ; the ] 
national parkland in a World : 
Heritage Commission area to 
a tourist developer, toe 
society’s vice-president, Mr 
John Sinclair, said in an 
interview. . .. , 

East -West have declined 
comment on their {dans. 


Bahrain (Reuter) — Iran and 
• Iraq both claimed big success- 
es yesterday in overnight 


fighting in the Fao peninsula 
of southern Iraq, occupied by 
Iranian troops early in tire 
“Dawn 8 ” offensive across the 
Shatt ai-Arab waterway three 
weeks ago. 

A Baghdad communique 
said that two divisions of 
Iranian Revolutionary 
Guards were ‘ annihilated 
when they attacked the central 
column of a three-pronged 
Iraqi advance on Iranians 
. holding toe small port of Fao. 

sion is normally 10.000 men, 
but militaiy Tehran sources 
said that reserve divirions of 


war -volunteers might com- 
prise as few as 1,500 men.) 

Iran said it inflicted 500 
Iraqi casualties in what ap- 
peared to be the same fighting 
and said its air force bombed 
strategic areas behind toe Iraqi 
frontlines. 


Iran also reported another 
advance on the northern Kur- 
disran front. 


A war communique on 
Tehran Radio said that Irani- 


an troops were now only 1 1 
miles from toe Kurdistan 


provincial capital, Sulay- 
marnyah, some 170 miles 
north-east of B a gh dad. Iraq 
made ne mention of fighting 
in Kurdistan. 


Shias claim executions 


Beirut (Reuter) - A radical 
Shia Muslim militia said yes- 
terday that it bad “executed” 
nine men and two women 
accused of involvement in a 
lethal series of car bomb blasts 
in Lebanon dating back to 
1978. 

The pro-Iranian Hizbollah 
distri buted an 86 -page docu- 
ment, with photographs of the 
accused, on its investigation of 
an alleged bomb ring it said 
was backed by, Christian 
groups and Army intelligence. 

The document did not sav 


how, when or where toe death 
sentences were carried out 
Video-taped confessions 
would be shown on Lebanese 
television.-. 

Hizbollah said the 1 1 were 
part of a ring responsible for 
car bomb attacks, including 
one that killed at least 75 in 
the Shia suburb of Bir al-Abed 
in March_Tbe Masts killed 277 
people and wounded 1 , 1 1 1 . 

The document said toe 
ringleader, Mahmud Zayyat, 
had taken refuge in Christian 
East Beirut. 


Union leader’s blow to 
Gonzalez Nato hopes 


As toe campaign leading to 
Spain's referendum on Nato 
membership went into a sec- 
ond week yesterday, tire So- 
cialist Government, which 
desperately wants a “yes 
vote, took a severe blow from 
Senor Nicolas Redondo, the 
party’s leading union figuje. 

He told all members of the 
pro-Socialist General Union 
of Workers (UGT). the Span- 
ish equivalent of toe TUC, to 
vote “no" on March i-, 
thercbv obeying union policy. 

But Senor Redondo, wnciai 
secretary of the UGT, in- 
structed bis local leaders not 
to lake part with Communist 


From Richard Wigg, Madrid 

tign leading to unionists and other left-win^ 
ium on Nato ers in campaigning for a “no 

mt into a sec- verdict. _ . 

>rday, tire So- His position appears to be 
mem, which supported in bis. own Basque 
wits a “Us" region where, according to a 
ere blow & polL 49 per cent of Bajqws 
Redondo, the in tend to vote no - Only 13 
Sn figure- per cent said that they thought 

embers of toe Spain should remam in Nata 

^ntoesSn” •MlwostAccmdmgtotoe 

?nir^to latest puWic opinion pofl, to. 
,f M e J^ C p fe^ifiished in today’s issue 
1 of Epoch, a Madrid weekly of 

union pobey ? hp igncr cent who intend to 

jondo ^! J*£Eg l2 . 49 per cent 

k C ninmiinist “no - 


Muslims sack 
nine temples 
in Pakistan 


taxe pait - ■ — 

Libya’s foreign chief 

TVinnli 1 «FW- ThC to 198^^^ 


Tripoli. Ltoya (AFPVr ^ 

Lib van potoaracnt,theGene£ 
al People* Congress, ^ 

named Mr £ amal JSS 
Mansour. ihc former <W Mm 
jstcr. as toe country? n f? 
foreign minister, rc^rfacing N 

^'VlrTreiki. aged 48. «rvg 
twice as foreigj mmisrerin 
CoJonrf 


• ’ — o . 

10 !984Mr . Mansour, who 
recently changed Tiis name 
from Maqhour. has been 
Libva’s representative to the 
UN and ambassador to 
France and China. He ms oil 
from 1982. to . 1984 
and Opec chairman m l 984. 


Mr Tretoi. No immediate explanation 


Islamabad (AFP) — Hindus 
in toe south-eastern city of 
Jacbbsbad were in a state of 
shock yesterday after the sack- 
ing of nine temples by Muslim 
extremists •— the first such 
violence' against a non-Mus- 
lim minority in Pakistan since 
1948. 

The city; in the north of 
Sind province, remained 
tense. Jacobabad is home to 
some i 0,000 of toe more than 
one million Hindus iu Paki- 
stan, compared to 84. million 
Muslims. 

Demonstrators were called 
out on Sunday by the Muslim 
■fundamentalist Jamiat Ulema 
Islam , in protest at an Indian 
court's decision to authorize 
toe opening of a Hindu temple 
on toe site of a mosque in 
India’s Uuar Pradesh state. 

The Indian court's decision 
provoked inter-community 
'clashes in India, which left 15 
dead and aroused great emo- 
tion among Pakistanis. 

On Sunday demonstrators 
stoned and .sacked toe nine 
temples, according to local 
-police, who did not report any 
victims. They dispersed toe 
demonstrators but were un- 
able to protect toe temples. 



Charred 


corpse 
in Cairo 


hotel 


From Alice Brinton 
Cairo 




Rip-flop flying: A single-engine plane lies belly-up on top of a Cadillac after crash-landing in a residential area of Oakland, 
California. Three other cars were damaged but the pilot escaped with slight injuries. 


Ex-envoy 
held on 


gun charge 


Police escape ANC ambush 
by killing 7 in shootout 


From Mario Modiano 
Athens 


From Michael Hornsby, Johannesburg 


A retired British diplomatic 
employee whose Athens flat 
was searched in connection 
with a Soviet espionage case 
now under investigation in 
London and Athens, was re- 
manded in custody yesterday 
on a charge of illegal posses- 
sion of five pistols and 148 
rounds of ammunition. 

Mr Edgerton “Eddie” 
Duckworth, aged 63, who 
worked in the British 
Embassy's commercial de- 
partment until 1979, told toe 
investigating magistrate that 
he was a collector of firearms, 
and target practice was his 
hobby. 

He said he had failed to 
declare his collection after 
losing his diplomatic status on 
retirement 

Mr Thanasis Liakopoulos. 
the lawyer representing Mr 
Duckworth, detained since 
Friday, said toe prosecutor's 
derision to detain him on 
“suspicion that he might flee 
toe country”, was most unusu- 
aL 

He would appeal against it 
considering that the trial was 
likely to be delayed for several 
months. 


The South African police 
yesterday shot dead seven 
black men who they said were 
“terrorists” of toe outlawed 
African National Congress 
(.ANC) in a gun battle in 
Guguletu. a black township on 
the outskirts of Cape Town. 
One policeman was slightly 
injured 

The police said they had 
received a tip-off that the 
ANC planned to attack a 
vehicle carrying policemen to 
work at toe Guguletu police 
station and “certain precau- 
tionary measures were taken” 
In effect, the police appear to 
have laid an ambush for the 
would-be ambushers. 

“At 0720 hours, near the 
Guguletu police station, after 
toe police had stopped a 
vehicle with black occupants, 
a skirmish between the police 
and ANC terrorists ensued 
during which a hand grenade 
was hurled at toe police and 
they were fired on," the 
Commissioner of Police, Gen- 
eral Johan Coetzee. said. 

“In the dash seven ANC 
terrorists were killed and one 
policeman was . slightly 
wounded The police seized 
several AK47 rifles, a number 
of rounds of ammunition and 


several pistols and hand 
grenades.” 

it is understood that the 
police had been hidden near 
the scene of the expected 
ambush for several hours. The 
van taking the policemen to 
work passed by and a few 
minutes later another van 
drew up and seven armed men 
got OUL 

• ANC talks: The ANC has 
held talks with one of South 
.Africa's tribal homeland lead- 
ers in a new move aimed at 
broadening its range of poten- 
tial allies within toe republic 
and putting pressure on Pre- 
toria to lift toe ban on it. 

Meanwhile, six of the seven 
members of toe Common- 
wealth “Eminent Persons 
Group" (EPGl arrived in 
Cape Town on Sunday on toe 
second legofa visit to monitor 
the pace of reform and assess 
toe chances of negotiation 
between the Government and 
black leaders on sharing politi- 
cal power. 

The Chief Minister of 
Kangwane, Mr Enos Mabuza, 
accompanied by about 20 
membra of his homeland's 
legislative assembly, arrived 
in Lusaka, the capital of 
Zambia, on Friday for 


“consultative” talks with Mr 
Oliver Tambo, toe ANC presi- 
dent, and other ANC leaders. 
The talks were reported to be 
continuing yesterday. 

Mr Mabuza, whose small 
homeland is contiguous to the 
northern and western frontiers 
of Swaziland and is the territo- 
ry reserved for South Africa's 
800.000 Swazis, is due to fly 
back to South Africa today. 


The homeland leaders have 
been regarded with contempt 
by the ANC as “puppets” of 
Pretoria. The only exception is 
Chief Gatsha Bulhelezi, the 
Zulu leader, whom Mr Tambo 
met in London in 1979. Since 
then, however. Chief 
Butoelezi's relations with the 
ANC have deteriorated drasti- 
cally. 

In receni months, toe ANC 
has met white businesssmen, 
opposition MPS, churchmen 
and student leaders. At one 
point the Government be- 
came alarmed — in toe words 
of toe Deputy Foreign Minis- 
ter. Mr Ron Miller — at toe 
number of people "beating a 
path to the ANC s door”, and 
refused permission for some 
would-be visitors to Lusaka. 


Slabber! questioned, page 


Two Danish diplomats 
searching a hotel in the Giza 
area of Cairo have uncovered 
the remains of a charred body 
they believe to be that of a 
Danish tourist. Miss Anne 
Pedersen, who was in her 70s. 

Mr Claus Von Bamekow, 
counsellor at toe Danish Em- 
bassy in Cairo, said that Miss 
Pedersen had been reported 
missing on Wednesday last 
week, toe day alter security 
police conscripts went on toe 
rampage in Giza streets and 
set fire to a number of hotels, 
including the Holiday Pyra- 
mids Hotel, where she and her 
group had been staying. 

Mr Von Bamekow said that 
at toe lime they reported Miss 
Pederson missing they were 
assured by Egyptian authori- 
ties that all the rooms of 
damaged hotels had been 
searched and that no bodies 
had been found. 

The two diplomats conduct- 
ed their own search on Sunday 
and found an unidentifiable 
charred body in the bathroom 
of the room Miss Pedersen 
was listed as occupying. 

They are waiting for her 
dental charts from Denmark 
to make a positive identifica- 
tion. but if (he body does 
prove to be that of Miss 
Pedersen she will be the first 
known foreign victim of the 
rioters* violence. 

More than 2.500 security 
troops and 700 civilians have 
been arrested since an estimat- 
ed $. 000 - 10.000 members of 
the security forces took to the 
streets on Tuesday night last 
week because of a false ru- 
mour that tbeir tours of duty 
would be extended. 

The conscripts earn about 
£2.50 a month and live under 
generally appalling condi- 
tions. 

Meanwhile, a leading Cairo 
newspaper. al-Ahram , said 
yesterday that a woman had 
given riot investigators a vid- 
eo tape showing the rioting 
which had led to the arrest of 
seven people, including a law- 
yer 

Egypt's Minister of the Inte- 
rior. Mr Zaki Badr, was 
quoted yesterday in the offi- 
cial ruling party organ Mayo 
as saying that toe Government 
would not disband the securi- 
ty forces. 







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8 


OVERSEAS NEWS 


THE TIMES TUESDAY MARCH 4 1986 


Kremlin blueprint for 2000 

Premier flays planners 
and sets fresh course 

From Christopher Walker, Moscow 

The Kremlin blueprint for Areas of particular concern level. There was a fall in 


revitalizing the economy by 
the year 2000 was combined 
with a damning indictment of 
the Soviet Union's recent 
economic performance in the 
presentation to the 27th Com- 
munist Party congress yester- 
day of Mr Nikolai Ryzhkov, 
the Prime Minister. 

In a tough ly- worded speech 
that continued the predomi- 
nant theme of seif-criticism. 

Mr Ryzhkov chided numer- 
ous ministries and other top 
state bodies for inefficiency 
and irresponsibility which had 

cost the country billions of ^ ■ 
roubles. thanhere is still lack of any 

He also indicated “moral _ overall strategy by which this 
3nd material" punishment for might be achieve*! 


to the Kremlin are agriculture, 
construction and oil. where 
declining production is being 
aggravated by the slump in 
world oil prices. 

The new programme fore- 
sees the doubling of national 
income and industrial output 
by the turn of the century, but 
after yesterday's two-hour ad- 
dress, Western experts say 

/> -S&r 

Lg CONGRESS 


those enterprises which pro- 
duce sub-standard goods. 

Among examples highlight- 
ing past mistakes were fac- 
tories which were instructed to 
start up production of designs 
already 20 years out of date, 
delays’ of many years in com- 
pleting important building 
projects, and a massive waste 
in the Soviet Union’s natural 
resources. 

The singling-out by name of 
some industries for criticism 
left observers with no doubt 
that further heads in the 
administrative hierachy are 
soon to roll. 


As congress speakers before 
him had done. Mr Ryzhkov 
devoted considerable atten- 
tion to de-bunking the era of 
the laic President Brezhnev. 
He referred to “unfavourable 
tendencies" in the economy 
which had first appeared in 
the !970s and grown even 
stronger in the early 1980s. _ 

"Both in the centre and in 
the regions, many managers 
continued ro work wilh out- 
dated methods and proved 
unprepared for work in the 
new conditions", he said. 

“Discipline and order dete- 
riorated to an intolerable 


responsibility. The vicious 
practice of revising plan tar- 
gets downwards became wide- 
spread." 

His keynote address also 
outlined details of the first 
five-year plan of the 
Gorbachov era. which will run 
until J990. In June it was 
announced that Mr 
Gorbachov had ordered the 
original draft to be scrapped 
because it encouraged waste. 

But he also acknowledged 
publicly that “many ind- 
ustries" had failed to reach 
their targets in the 1981-1985 
period. 

Mr Ryzhkov emphasized 
ihal as regards the economy, 
the party was looking for 
“radical reform” rather than 
partial improvements. 

To the applause of the 
delegates. Mr Ryzhkov 
pledged that the Kremlin 
would never “fulfil the hopes 
of the bourgeois ideologues” 
by straying from "fundamen- 
tal principles” in economic 
management 

• Praise from Benn: Mr Tony 
Beon was quoted yesterday in 
the official Soviet media as 
saying that all mankind had 
drawn hope from Moscow's 
arms control initiatives (Reu- 
ter reports). 



Mr Ryzhkov, the Soviet Prime Minister, delivering his 
keynote speech to 5,000 congress delegates yesterday. 


Doubts nag US 
over sailor’s 
on-off ‘defection’ 

From Christopher Thomas. Washington 

Miroslav the Soviet Embassy m Wash- 


The saga of 
Medved, the Soviet “defector” 
who apparently changed his 
mind, contuses to raise nag- 
ging questions four months 
after the Reagan Administra- 
tion allowed him to sail home 
to certain punishment, aid 
possibly even death, four 
months ago. 

The central question is 
whether the Russians 
switched the real Mr Medved 
with an imposter before the 
State Department interviewed 
him In New Orleans. 

He M jumped into the 
Mississippi in a defection 
attempt, only to be ordered 
back to his cargo ship 

He, or somebody purporting 
to be him. later jumped into 
die river again ami was inter- 
viewed at length. He insisted 
that, after all he wanted to go 
home. 

Some Congressmen are con- 
vinced that mis man was not 
Mr Medved. They cite his 
belligerent manner, his vigor- 
ous defence of the Soviet 
system and his arrogance — 
traits that were apparently far 
from evident when Mr 
Medved first clambered 
ashore. 

The State Department says 
it is certain there was not a 
switch. And Mr Boris 
Malakhov, a spokesman for 


‘It’s 
was not 
who 


crazy to 
Miroslav 
inter- 


Shaw Carpets pic mill at Darton, near The cheapest source, ofeng gy 

Barnsley produces 400,000 square metres of British coal costs less than other fuels* And the 

carpeting every week. This means large quantities NCB intends to make sure coal prices remain competitive, 
of steam are necessary for the dyeing process and World-be^ fin p tpchnnln^ y 
for space heating* British coal leads the world in combustion 

Facing fuel costs of over £1 million a year, the technology and methods of coal and ash handling. To 
company commissioned a feasibility study that maintain coal supplies there is a nationwide network of 

showed this figure could be substantially reduced distributors who are strategically situated to give 
by switching from fuel oil to coal advice and provide an efficient service to industry. 

But one question remained to be answered: Real help with cpnversipn _ goste 

The govemmenrs confidence in the coal 
industry is demonstrated by the extension of die 
coal firing grant scheme until at least June 1987* 

The current limit of £75 million on 



the capital cost of the change-over. 

This problem was solved by installing boiler 
modules. These are a breakthrough in 
coal-fired boiler packages, providing total 
flexibility as they can be installed with a 
variety of boiler types, ratings and come singly 
or in multiples to meet 
individual requirements. 

They are delivered on-site 
in three sections, the boiler, the housing 
and the bunker. Construction and installation 
work is fast and easy and all the user has to 
provide are the necessary service connections. 

The supplier retains ownership of the module, 
freeing the customer from heavy capital investment 
Water and steam are simply bought on a metered 
basis. In the case of Shaw Carpets, four Associated 
Heat Services Energy Capsules, fitted with horizontal 
Shell boilers rated at 16,000 lb/hour of steam, will use 
about 14,000 tonnes of washed singles coal per year. 

Most vital of all was a significant cut in the 
company's annual fuel bilL Shaw Carpets have 
joined that growing sector of British Industry who 
have proved that converting to British Coal turns 
fuel costs into profits. 


total grants has been lifted. This scheme, 
with the backing of European loans, creates a 
really attractive financial package* 

A final word from Malcolm Edwards, 
Commercial Director of NCB: '"We intend to 
keep British coal competitive and by 
reducing our costs retain attractive 
differentials. This is good news for all our 
customers* Let us talk - we can do 
business together."’ 

1 mm m mmm m 

Fbr furiber mfijnnanon please fill m [he coupon aod send 
n id the Industrial Branch, Markeong Deparrmenr, r 
National Coal Board. Hobart House, Grosvcnor Place, London SWIX7AE. ill 




T 3/3 68 


THERE’S NEVER BEEN A 
L_BETTER Ji^iOfONyER^TQ BRITISH COAL^, 


install, said: 

think it 

Medved 
viewed." 

Those who suspect a switch 
aioi dte a number of photo- 
graphs taken surreptitiously 
during (he interview, which, 
they ™im, demonstrate that it 
was not the same man. The 
FBI, which compared the pic* 
tares with photographs taken 
of the seaman who first 
jumped ship, said that no firm 
conclusions conib be drawn. 

Mr tarry Speaker the 
White House spokesman, said 
yesterday that there was noth- 
ing to contradict the belief (hat 
the m wn inter v ie wed was Mr 
Medved. 




Miroslav Med ved: Some say 

Russians did a switch. 

Setback to 
Kohl in 
local poll 

From Frank Johnson 
Bonn 

Plenty of explanations were 
on offer here yesterday for the 
unexpectedly big Social Dem- 
ocrat and Green gains, at the 
expense of Christian Demo- 
crats and Free Democrats, in 
local government elections in 
northern Germany on Sun- 
day. But one question remains 
above all: were Chancellor 
Kohl's current legal difficul- 
ties anything to do with it? 

Bonn’s politicians face a 
general election in 10 months; 
and Herr Kohl is being inves- 
tigated for having allegedly 
given fiise testimony to a 
committee of the Land (prov- 
ince) Parliament of the Rhine- 
land-Palatinate which was 
investigating business contri- 
butions to his party foods. 

The public prosecutors in 
Bonn are expected to decide 
this week whether to investi- 
gate a similar accusation made 
about Herr Kohl’s testimony 
to a Bundestag committee. 

In Sunday’s elections, for H 
local councils in the Land of 
Schleswig-Holstein, Hen- 
Kohl's Christian Democrats 
(CDU) lost 5.9 per cent of 
their 1982 vote. It was the 
worst CD U result in the Land 
for 20 years. Most of the losses 
were to the Soria! Democrats 
(SPD). 

The Greens emerged as the 
third biggest party, replacing 
the liberal Free Democrats 
(FDP). This was particularly 
ominous for the national Gov- 
ernment, of which the FDP is 
junior member. 

The Christian Democrats 
rely on the FDP to produce an 
anti-SPD majority nationally. 
If a combination of SPD and 
Green support produced an 
anti-CDU majority, the SPD 
could form a Government 
sustained in the Bundestag by 
die Greens. 

The SDP candidate for 
Chancellor, Herr Johannes 
Rau, has always said that he 
would never form a coalition 
with the Greens. 

But there are various defini- 
tions of “coalition". If the 
SPD turned out as the biggest 
single party, it would be 
unlikely to spurn the Greens’ 
parliamentary support, if it 
was the only way the SPD 
could form a Government 


Gun found 

in tennis 

star’s 

luggage 

San Francisco (UPft — A 
pistol found in the lu ggage of 
tennis star Martina 
Navratilova was seized at San 
Francisco international air- 
port. ... 

The gun was discovered on 
Sunday during a rou tine m et- 
al -scannin g check of cany-on 
luggage- Miss Navratilova told 
officials that the gun was 
mistakenly put in the case by a 
friend who helped her pack. 
She said the weapon was 
normally stored in cargo-hold 




Reagan steps up aid 
efforts for Contras 

From Michael Binyon, Washington T 


President Reagan, step ping 
“*?„• to win $100 

million (£69 million) maid for 
me Contra rebels fighting the 
Nicaraguan Government, re- 
ceived their leaders at the 
white House yesterday, to- 
gether with their supporters in 
the American private sector. 

His symbolic meeting came 
as the White House waft rtrine 
to persuade a sceptical Con- 
gress that the situation in 
Nwaragua is more dangerous 
for the US than was that in the 
Pfohppines before Mr Mairos 


hostage by totaJitarians". 

In a speech to US veterans 
he said the Sandmkta Gov- 
had been threatening 
elected governments . in 
neighbouring countries with 
boviex weapons 
The Administration has 
oeen exasperated by the tack 
ot public support for its iwie h 
policies towards Nicaragua. In 
1984 Congress cut off all 
military aid to the Contras, 
authorizing onljrS27 mafion 
assistance 
*ue Administration has also 


fled. Mr George Shultz, Secret w «««. u u*» aw 

tary of State, gave a wartime . embarr assed by the plan- 
tor if the Contras ?** « has i«eiv^foSS 

elected foe Western henri- S^If T l/ or T l ts role ™ getting 
sphere could be “taken ?nd Mr^MaSj^^ 


Mayor blamed for raid 

and 61 houses were destroyed, adahs^^}*? 1 ***' MBa S ^ x 
has cn Dozed the city's Mavra? , awl - Cf * chfldren and 

m a draft report. ^ *“* 3 * fire whk* left 250 

The commission, aDDolmwi tiT homeIess - 

Mayor hinXlf, Mr **“* “** 

V'foson Goode, called him Move hoB “ 

grossly uegbgent in branching 


•J 


* 


was allowed to board 

her plane and can fik a court 
petition fbr the return of the 
pistol for which she has a 
Texas permit 

£4m oil depot 
blaze beaten 

Athens — A week-king blaze 
in a 12-tank oil depot near 
Sgin niTta was subdued early 
yesterday with the help of 
European experts and 80 Yu- 
goslav firemen. . (Mario 
Modiano writes). 

Athens officials said die 
flames were confined to oil 
spilt from tanks gutted in one 
of the worst oil fires in Europe, 
destroying £4 million of crude 
oiL 

Glass in food 

New York (UPI) — An 
investigation into the discov- 
ery of glass m a jar of Gerber 
baby tapioca was ordered after 
a mother found her son's 
tongue was bleeding. 

Guru auction 

Laguna Beach, California 
(UPI) — Belongings of guru 
Bhagwan Sbree Rajneesh. who 
is now in Crete, including a 
silver flute and luxury robe 
fabrics, were auctioned by 
followers to pay his legal bills. 

Choosy thief 

San Francisco (UPI) — A 
burglar with a taste for rare 
wines broke into the cellar of 
an elegant restaurant here and 
stole vintage Bordeaux worth 
£10.000, an 182$ French 
painting and a five-ton safe. 

Jail workers 

Kigali, Rwanda (AFP) — 
The 12,000 prisoners in 
Rwanda jails are being cold to 
grow food and make uniforms 
to put prisons. m profit and 
save money for tin state. 

Hoxha elected 

Vienna (AFP) — Mrs 
Nexhmije Hoxha, Widow of 
the late Albanian party chief 
and head of state, Enver 
Hoxha, who died in April, has 
been elected head of the 
Albanian Popular Front. 

Fatal flight 

Bern (AF) — A Swiss- 
registered Cessna private 
plane crashed three minutes 
after takeoff from Bern airport 
in snow, killing the pilot and 
seven passengers. 

Ershad snub 

bfaaka — The leading Ban- 
gladesh opposition parties 
have rejected President 
Ershad’s offer of elections on 
April 26 and said, they win 
continue to campaign against 
military rule. 

Ailing airport 

Paris (Reuter) —■ An indefi- 
nite strike by firemen at 
Diaries De Gaulle . airport 
over medical tests disrupted 
domestic and international 
traffic yesteniay. ■ 

Not so rocky 

New York (Reuter) — The 
film star Sylvester StaUooe 
earns as much from one film— 
$ 1 2 million (£8.57 million) — 
as President Reagan, on - an 
annual salary of 5200^00, 
would earn in 60 years, . ac- 
cording zo a People magaz in e 
report. 


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THE TIMES TUESDAY MARCH 4 1986 


OVERSEAS NEWS 


Seoul leader heads for 



m attempt 
to avoid Marcos’s fate 


-By Nicholas Ashford, Di piomatk Correspon dent 
President Chun Doo Hwan, 
tpc authoritarian leader of 
South Korea, is to 


ij-T. — r\ — 1 “ iw pay an 
official visit to Britain, early 
neat month as part of a four- 
nation lour of Western Eu- 
rope. He will also visit West 
Germany, France and Bel- 
gium. 

It will be the first visit to 
Western Europe by a Korean 
head of state. Although, there 
are growing economic ties 
between Korea and Europe, 
the authoritarian nature- of- 
successive Korean regimes has 
meant that their leaders were 
not welcome visitors in the 
West. The date of the visit has 
not yet been announced. 

Acutely aware of the fete of 
Mr Marcos, his near neigh- 
bour from the Philippines. 
President Chun is trying to 
give his administration a more 
democratic and moderate im- 
age - a process encouraged 
actively by the United States. 

After weeks of growing po- 
litical unrest President Chun 


last week suddenly made a ry of President Chun’s taking 
senes of political concessions office (AFP reports), 
in me hope .of avoiding a Witnesses said that about 
similarly ignominious exit 300 students at Seoul National 
from his presidential palace. University clashed with riot 
These included the release notice after a rally in support 
&om house arrest of the °* an opposition-run signature 


opposition leader, Mr Kim. 
Dae Jung, and a promise to* 
discuss changes in the consti- 
tution after the 1988 presiden- 
tial election. 


His visit to Europe formsi 
part of his plan to improve his 
image. He hopes that .televi- 
sion pictures of him chatting 
with Mrs Thatcher, Chancel- 
lor Kohl of West Germany 
and President Mitterrand of 
France will persuade the Ko- 
rean electorate that be enjoys 
the respect and confidence of 
these Western democratic 
leaders. 


• SEOUL: Riot police used 
teargas io break up. a student 
demonstration against the 
■ South - Korean Government 
yesterday, the fifth anniversa- 


collection campaign calling 
for direct presidential elec- 
. tions. 

The students fled when an 
estimated 1,000 police in plain 
clothes and riot police lobbed 
teargas canisters and moved 
in to arrest them, witnesses 
said. Similar demonstrations 
were held at three other 
campuses . in the capital 

Newspapers yesterday 
praised President Chun, an 
Army ge n eraJ-turaed-po liti- 
cian, for his success m the 
economic sector, his liberal- 
ization policies and his contri- 
bution to South Korea's 
international standing. 

But they say that there is 
still much to be done to 
eliminate a perceived threat of 
war from North Korea. 


Colombia 


extends 


rebel truce 


Bogota (Reuter) — The Rev- 
olutionary Armed Forces of 
Colombia (FARC), the 
country's biggest guerrilla 
group, yesterday signed an 
indefinite extension of a 21- 
monlh truce with the Govern- 
ment 

President Betancur. speak- 
ing at the presidential palace, 
said - the agreement showed 
peace was possible and that 
"discussion will always be 
better than confrontation”. . 

The extension had been 
widely expected after the pro- 
communist FARC agreed to 
take part m parliamentary 
elections on Sunday as a left- 
wing coalition front called 
Patriotic Union. 

The new pact was signed by 
members of the Government 
peace commission and leading 
FARC leaders in Uribe, a 
mountain zone south of Bogo- 
ta where the rebels have 
headquarters. 

President Betancur initiated 
the peace process in. 1982 with 
a wide-ranging amnesty, fol- 
lowed in 1984 by truces with 
the main rebel groups. 


Queen honours a 
Tittle bush hero 


From Stephen Taylor, Canberra 


The Queen pinned Aust- 
ralia's highest civilian bravery 
award yesterday on the chest 
of a little Anssie battler named 
Alfred Collins. 

"Little AH”, as he is known 
in his family to distinguish 
him from his father, who is 
also an Alfred, is a slim, shy, 
freckle-faced boy aged 11. He 
was in Canberra yesterday 
with other distinguished Aus- 
tralians, captains of industry 
and civilian servants, to be 
honoured by the Queen. 

The difference was that 
Little Alf, who was presented 
with the gold medal of The 
Royal Humane Society of 
Australasia, had travelled 
more than L200 miles by road, 
taking more than a week to get 
here. 

The Collins cattle farm is in 
one of Australia's remotest 
regions, in the heart of 
Qneessland 500 miles from a 
city and almost 100 miles from 
Rockhampton, the nearest 
town. Alf and his five sisters 
do not go to school but are 
tanght at home ' . 


Some 18 months ago Alf, 
then aged just nine, was out 
helping his father to load fence 
posts on a track. A wild boar 
suddenly charged oat of the 
bush. The animal was the 
species known locally as a 
"razorback”, a powerful, dan- 
gerous creature which sent Mr 
Collins sprawling and ripped 
into him with scything blows 
from its tusks. 


Still limping yesterday after 
three boots in hospital, Mr 
Collins said: a Whftn I saw the 
pig coming I thought, ‘Weft, I 
can manage this OK,* bnt then 
suddenly I was down and in 
big trouble. I was scrapping, 
but I knew 1 was losing. No 
doubt about it, my number was 
up. That's when X called for 
tittle AIL” 

The official record of the 
incident says that he called 
out: "Save me, A1& save me.” 
Neither father nor son can now 
-verify tiie actual words, but 
little AIL who had first fled in 
fear, picked np apiece of wood 
and raced back, beating the 
animal until ft fled. 



Mr Brian Mnlroney, the rnnadian Prime Minister, showing 
off his skills at the opening ceremonies of the 1986 Brier 
Carling Championships at Kitchener in Ontario. 


Indian budget fails to 
allay inflation fears 


From Knldip Nayar, Delhi 


Irked by a barrage of criti- 
cism tbat next year's budget is 
inflationary, the Indian Fi- 
nance Ministry asserts that 
“the budget will be price 
neutral”. But ibe statement 
has not allayed general mis- 
givings that the country is in 
for another round of price 
rises in the wake of increases 
three weeks ago on petroleum 
products, coal, wheat, rice, 
chemicals and fertilizers. 

The Finance Ministry has 
also tried to explain, without 
winning much support, the 
rise in deficit financing, which 
is expected to top £350 mil- 
lion, ten times more than the 
extra won in taxation. 


Defence expenditure has 
risen by nearly £58 million. 
The budget levies duty on 
such luxuries as cars, colour 
televisions, air conditioners 
and race and lottery winnings. 

Kerosene stoves, footware. 
blankets and some drugs will 
become cheaper because of the 
withdrawal of excise duties. 
Funds have have also been 
allocated to house-building, 
social security schemes for 
workers and subsidized loans 
for the urban poor. 

The budget tries to rational- 
ize the tax structure, introduc- 
ing a modified VAT system 
(Modvat). and excise conces- 
sions for industrial units. 


Turmoil in Quebec 


Liberals weigh 
up departure 


of a vote-getter 


From John Best, Ottawa 


The Liberal Party of Canada 
is anxiously trying to sort out 
the implications oflast week’s 
sudden departure of Mr Jean 
Chretien, a long-time party 
stalwart and one of the 
country's most popular politi- 
cians. 

The question the party faces 
is whether by resigning his 
House of Commons seat to 
take up a career in business, 
Mr Chretien, a valuable vote- 
getter, has handed the next 
federal election to the ruling 
Conservatives on a platter. 

Mr Chretien stepped aside 
on Thursday, as the culmina- 
tion of an increasingly bitter 
feud with Mr John Turner, the 
party leader and former Prime 
Minister. He said he wanted to 
devote more time to his 
family, and to pursue opportu- 
nities with an Ottawa law firm 
and a Montreal investment 
business. 


wheeling and plebeian ways 
endeared him both to English- 


But few political observers 
doubled that the real reason 
was that he found himself in 
an increasingly untenable po- 
sition in the House 
Rumblings over the Chre- 
tien affair occurred in a con- 
ference of the party's Quebec 
wing in Quebec City at the 
weekend. 


Some delegates criticized 
Mr Turner's handling of the 
affair and one delegate, Mrs 
Celine Hervieux-Payette, a 
former federal Cabinet minis- 
ter. claimed that Mr Chretien 
had been forced out rather 
than having left of his own 
accord. 

Mr Turner’s position 
should be clarified when the 
Liberals hold an automatic 
leadership review in Novem- 
ber. 

Mr Chretien, aged 52, an 
earthy politician whose free- 


speaking Canada and his na- 
tive. French-speaking Quebec, 
finished second to Mr Turner 
in the June, 1984. Liberal 
leadership race. He never 
appeared to become recon- 
ciled io his defeat. 

Relations between him and 
Mr Turner reached breaking 
point last month over control 
of the federal party's Quebec 
wing. Quebec with its 75 seats 
at Ottawa - more than a 
quarter of the 282 total - is 
considered vital to a restora- 
tion of Liberal power. Accord- 
ing io opinion polls, voters in 
the province have already 
started to return to the party of 
their traditional allegiance, 
which they deserted in droves 
in the September 1984 elec- 
tions. 

Mr Chretien, never a man 
to mince words, erupted in 
anger when Mr Turner 
blocked his choice for presi- 
dent of the federal party 
organization in Quebec and 
got his own candidate elected 
instead. 

He alleged that a “malaise” 
had taken root in the party's 
Quebec wing, and suggested 
that Turner supporters were 
trying to get rid of party 
veterans loyal to him. 

After that, with the issue 
triggering noisy recrimina- 
tions between pro-Turner and 
pro-Chretien factions, it was 
probably just a matter of time 
before the two men came to a 
formal parting of the ways. 

For the moment, Mr Turner 
has cause for relief since Mr 
Chretien's departure resolves 
a situation that was causing 
him acute embarrassment and 
raising questions about his 
hold on the leadership. 


Asian tour by Hayden 


Jakarta (Reuter) - Mr Bill 
Hayden, the Australian For- 
eign Minister, had wide-rang- 
ing discussions here yesterday 
with his Indonesian opposite 
number. Dr Mochtar Kusu- 
maatmadja. including devel- 
opments in the Philippines 
and Cambodia. 

Mr Hayden, starting an 
Asian tour which will also take 
him to Singapore. Kuala Lum- 
pur. Hong Kong and Manila. 


said that they had reviewed 
the situation in Manila and 
the challenges faced by Presi- 
dent Aquino. 

The two foreign ministers 
also discussed Dr Moch tar’s 
talks this month in Hanoi on 
Cambodia on behalf of the 
Association of South East 
Asian Nations (Asean). 

Mr Hayden said that Aus- 
tralia applauded Jakarta's ini- 
tiative for settling the conflict. 


gjfgpgip™ 


OF CONSCIENCE 


Soviet Union: 


Mikhail 

Kukobaka 


By Caroline Moorehead 


A former lorry driver in his 
late forties called Mikhail 
Kukobaka is serving his third 
consecutive sentence as a po- 
litical prisoner in the Soviet 
Union. 

The exact term is not 
known, bnt it may be as long as 
12 years' imprisonment and 
exile, the maximmn for the 
charge of "anti-Soviet agita- 
tion and propaganda” on 
which he is being held. He is in 
a strict regime labour camp in 
the Perm region. 

Mr Kukobaka first clashed 
with the authorities in 1970 
after he criticized the Soviet 
intervention in Czechoslova- 
kia. Charged with circulating 
anti-Soviet propaganda, he 
spent six years iu psychiatric 
hospitals. 

After his release he was 
rearrested and held for brief 
periods for haring on his wall 
the Universal Declaration of 
Homan Rights and a photo- 
graph of Dr Andrei Sakharov. 
Caught sending essays 
abroad, he spent three years in 
.a criminal labour camp at 
Novopolotsk in Belorussiya. 

He has not been free since. 
In 1981 be faced new charges 
of circulating anti-Soviet slan- 
der, and was jailed for three 
years. It was during this term, 
in October 1984, that be was 
given his current sentence. 

• The new attitude to dissi- 
dents may be tested when 
Professor Ynfi Kagarlitsky, a 
Soviet expert on English liter- 
ature, learns whether he is to 
be allowed to attend an 
H G Wells symposium in 
London in July. 

His son, Boris, was arrested 
trith a Young Socialist discus- 
sion group, and though he was 
later released, Dr Kagarlitsky 
has been dismissed from his 
professorship. 



Mikhail Kukobaka: 16 years 
• of clashes with authority 



Mention the words “interior design” 
to businessmen and their eyes roll. 

Visions of long haired adolescents 
and the spotted bow tie brigade spring 
to mind. 

You know the type. More effete 
than effective. 

And chandeliers which absolutely, 
positively have got to be imported from 
Venice to create the desired effect. 

And bills which inexplicably keep 
appearing from out of the woodwork. 

If you’ve ever been involved in 
refurbishment and restoration, you’ll 
know what we mean. 

If you haven’t yet but plan to soon, 
you’ll want to avoid the nightmares. 

Happily, we can help. 

A visit to the IDC Interior Design 
Management Group in Stratford-upon- 
Avon puts you in touch with a more 
practical and businesslike approach to 
interiordesign and its implementation. 

And whilst there’s no shortage of 
creative ingenuity and flair at I IDC, the 
way we do things will eliminate those 
sleepless nights. 

With IDC a budget is a budget, 
simple as that. 

And it’s down to us to create just 
what you want at the price you want 
to pay. 

With IDC your interior design 
project is on time, and it’s on budget, 
whatever business you’re in. 

For the full story, write to Clive 
Hicks, IDC Group Limited, Stratford- 
upon-Avon, Warwickshire CV37 9NJ. 

Or telephone 0789 204288. Or telex 
311201. 



« DESIGN • CONSTRUCT ■ ENGINEER 




Ydu don’t need anyone else. 








SPECTRUM 


From doughnuts to car oil and tyres, the hard sell in our cinemas we’re not supposed to notice 



of the 


screen 


Companies are prepared to pay dearly for 
stars like Sylvester Stallone to drink their 



brand of beer or drive their cars in a hit 
film. Product placement is big business 
in America, and now agencies are courting 
British producers with an eye to our 
television market. Bryan Appleyard reports 


“We gave Rambo his knife and 
Schwarzenegger his sunglasses”, 
says Russell Pickering. London 
manager of Associated Rim Pro- 
motions. AFP also put Panasonic 
hardware into the hands of the 
Ghosibusiers. Budweiser beer 
down the parched throat of Clint 
Eastwood and gave Gene Wilder a 
Cadillac for The Woman in Red. 

This is called “Product 
Placemen l” and the manufactur- 
ers paid handsomely for the 
privilege of appearing in the films. 
After all it comes cheaper than 
television advertising; during the 
life of a big budget movie it 
reaches more people and it creates 
a public image without the public 
realizing. AFP laughs all the way 
to the Bank and the film-makers 
find their budget pressures are 
cased. 

But just as the marketing men 
are considering product placing on 
British television, advertising ex- 
ecutives in this country have 
begun to express doubts about the 
ethics of such deals. .Any such 
move will bring them into direct 
conflict with the BBC and the IBA 
— product placing can break the 
rules. But suddenly a lot of people 
are trying to find ways of doing 
just that. Some say they have done 
it already. 

Using the movies to advertise 
goods is almost as old as cinema 
itself. U was common enough, 
even in the 1930s or 1940s. to 
thank airline or car companies in 
the credits for travel or free props. 
And unofficially, props managers, 
when dispatched to find a car. 
would lake backhanders from 
local dealers. 

But then along came Bob 
Kovoloff. He came out of the 
American advertising industry 


with the conviction that such 
placements were worth big bucks 
— the industry just needed a little 
organizing. He formed AFP and. 
from 1 977. created a new method 
of film financing. 

The first venture was the Jerry 
Lewis film Hardy Working in 
which Kovoloff placed Dunkin 
Donuts. Quaker Slate Motor Oil 
and Goodyear tyres. From then on 
he never looked back. The indus- 
try he invented has expanded to 
the point where virtually every big 
budgeL non X-rated film pro- 
duced by Hollywood will be 
littered with product placements. 
Back to the Future had no fewer 
than 37. including Toyota, JVC 
Camcorders and Pepsi -Co la. 


The coup that 
everybody talks 
about in hushed 
tones was ET 


But the greatest product place- 
ment coup of all. the one that 
everybody in the business talks 
about in bushed tones, was ET. 
When the small boy lured the 
cuddly alien from his hideout, he 
used a trail of sweets. These were 
Peeces Reeces; thanks to the film, 
sales instantly shot up by 85 per 
cent. Another sweet — said to be M 
*n Ms. the American equivalent of 
Smarties — had originally been 
specified in the script, but it was 
changed to accommodate the 
highest bidder. The placement was 
so successful that everybody in the 





Pass the product placement: Harold Ramis offers a Cheez-it to Dan Aykroyd In Ghostbusters 


business now claims credit, and 
nobody is now sure who closed the 
deal. 

That is an indication of how 
many competitors -AFP has 
spawned. One estimate suggests 
that there are 30 placement agen- 
cies working in the United States. 
Now the two biggest - AFP and 
International Film Promotions, 
its main rival — are in London 
fighting for the queue, of British 
and European manufacturers who 
dream of seeing Sylvester Stallone 
wearing, driving or smoking their 
products. 

Mark Gottlieb, managing direc- 
tor of IFP in London, is currently 
celebrating successes that include 
the Peugeot Glenn Gose drives in 
Jagged Edge . the Adidas shoes 
from Thai's Dancing and the 
Cheez-lts eaten in Ghost busters. 
He is also pleased with the Martini 
poster which Julie Walters walks 
past in Car Trouble — for, al- 
though it is an American-financed 
movie, everything else about it is 
British, a promising sign for the 
UK placement industry. 

Gottlieb says the suras of mon- 
ey involved in each placement 
vary enormously. The biggest 
known placement was the $5m put 
into Santa Claus by McDonald’s 
hamburgers. But Gottlieb stresses 
that the average placement in- 
volves relatively small sums. A 
simple ‘’pack shot” where, for 
example, a product just happens 
to be lying on a table may be the 
cheapest level of exposure, but 


every additional degree of empha- 
sis costs more. A line of dialogue 
such as “Gee these widgets are 
great!" is the ultimate. 

“We are talking about marginal 
money for the film makers — 
enough to allow them an extra 
day's shooting or something like 
that". Gottlieb says. 

Agencies like IFP receive scripts 
from the studios long before 
shooting starts. Gottlieb then vets 
them for “placement 
opportunities** and produces a 
newsletter outlining new produc- 
tions and the son of props that 
might be required. His clients pay 
a basic £50.000 a year and are 
guaranteed placements in six 
movies. The bigger the movie the 
greater the competition and the 
higher the bidding. For anything 
by Spielberg the companies tend 
to deal direct with the studio, 
cutting out the agencies. But there 
are now so many placements that 
there is something for everyone in 
every big movie. 

Both Gottlieb and Pickering 
insist that British demand for the 
service is immense. Primarily, of 
course, it comes from UK manu- 
facturers with distribution in the 
US. But as the market develops, 
the agencies are finding ways of 
placing in films likely to be 
successful in the UK. And 
Gottlieb says he is about to reveal 
a new way of using films for 
product promotion. 

Both companies are cagey about 
all their clients, but VauxJiall, 


Toshiba. Buchanan’s whisky and 
DHL are all in there. AFP are even 
opening a warehouse in Acton, 
west London, from which film 
makers can simply take their 
clients' products off the shelves 
(on condition that the products 
are not shown in a derogatory 
fight). 

Television is 
the next big 
challenge for 
the agencies 


Gottlieb, at least, is not follow- 
ing the American pattern; he is 
dealing with advertising agencies 
as well as directly with the 
companies, fn the US the advertis- 
ing people have effectively missed, 
the product placement boat* and, 
in this country, agencies are still 
smarting after the slow way they 
climbed on the sponsorship band- 
wagon. Many feel determined not 
to get caught out this time round. 

Leading the field is Doiiands 
where Nick Farley, a director, is 
trying to sell the idea to his clients, 
which include Rover,, whose, new 
car Doriands win be promoting. 
But he is determined not to go 
down the crude American route. 
He feds product placement there 
has been given a bad name by 
scatter-gun tactics which pay no 


attention to the predse placing of 
a product. 

“The real value of placement”, 
be says, “lies in product position- 
ing. With ordinary advertising you 
can only say so much. With 
placement you can bint at what 
kind of product it is .far more 
effectively. For example, you can 
always see cars, but placement 
says this is the kind of car driven 
by this kind of man.” 

Peter Finch, a director of Ayer 
Barker, has come out fiercely 
against the whole idea; Writing in 
Campaign, advertising's trade 
magazine, be said: “ft represents a 
fundamental blurring of the dis- 
tinction between advertising and 
editorial that compromises one of 
the basic strengths of our business. 
Advertising is founded on an 
essential honesty: we always ac- 
knowledge we’re making a sale.” 

Finch wants agencies to make 
dear that they “will not compro- 
mise the integrity of the product 
even if film-makers can be tempt- 
ed to compromise theirs”. The 
implication is that placement 
comes perilously dose to sublimi- 
nal advertising. 

The placement people .do not 
see it that way. Their readiness to 
discuss the industry as a serious, 
respectable* business reflects a 
certainty that the shadow of the 
back-lot backhander has long 
since gone. 

But on one aspect of the 
business they all suddenly button 
up. What about television? “No 


comment”, said -Gottlieb. “No 
comment", said Pickering. “No 
comment”, said Farley. 

The reason is that large-scale 
product placement on television is 
the ultimate coup. A well-placed 
product can appear weekly, seen 
by millions at a time; a film which 
contains substantial .product 
placement and then goes on to be * 
shown on tide vision has what is 
known in the business as “media 
roll-out". The attraction is that 
television producers cannot edit 
out products as they can sex and 
violence: equally, while television 
has dear guidelines over advertis- 
ing for its producers, as yet there 
are no- guidelines referring to 
feature films which are bought m. 
“Bought in programmes are not 
something we can control dosdy, 
but I don’t think we have a serious 
problem yet”, says Michael 
Bunce. head of BBC publicity. 

Kovoloff s famous coup in this 
area was to persuade the kids in 
Fame to dance around carrying 
packets of Tide. But m Britain it is u 
a sensitive subject both the rules w 
of the IBA and the BBC forbid 
undue prominence being given to 
commercial products. Both con- 
firmed that they would reject any 
attempt by manufacturers to pay 
for placements. 

But there are very grey areas. 
When Frank and Nesta Bough 
were sent on a driving tour round 
France for a BBC holiday pro- 
gramme, Ford were asked to. 
provide a car. They supplied an 
Escort cabriolet from their press 
fleet. There was no payment- Sales 
of cabriolets can hardly have been 
hindered by several weeks of 
exposure in a perfect promotional 
setting with the implied endorse- 
ment of such a famous figure. - 

The BBC says the car was - 
requested for logistical reasons. 
Bough and his wife were filming 
only at weekends so one car had to 
be kept in France all the time, it 
had to be sofl-iop, 3nd soon. A fee 
was offered to Ford but refused. 

Overall there is no question that 
agencies are angling to get on 
television and turn lucky opportu- 
nities like Ford’s into a systematic 
business. Yet they know they 
cannot talk about it, for the only 
way into the existing channels is 
through the back door — any 
admission that it happens will 
force the IBA and the BBC to act 

However, enforcement is a. big 
problem- With the proliferation of 
independent production compa- 
nies and television and video 
material in general, who is to 
know when a product has been £ 
placed or when it just happens to 
be there? The demands of realism 
can hardly be met if all commer- 
cial products are kept out of shot 

Judging by the placement 
industry’s expansion so far it 
seems dear that television is 
simply the next challenge. So 
watch for the odd product which 
just happens to get into shot. 
When the product placers arc at 
work, nothing is there by accident. 

© Tim— HWMpH tM6 


v • % . K«.7 ! ’£ ■: * ! '■'■■■ ''£'5? V 1 " •' * 



TOKYO 
NON-STO P 

'• -T - . ? 





of the East 


y. r T- 



On April 1st japan Air Lines will be 
bringtngTokyo closer to London. 

That's when we become theonly airline 
to operate non-stop flights from London 
to Tokyo, offering the fastest route to Japan 
from the U.K. 

The flights will leave Heathrow at 
19 20 every Tuesday, arriving in Tokyo, on 
Wednesday at 14 55 saving almost 6 hours 
on normal flight times. 


On all other days we will continue our 
one-stop flights from Heathrow to Tokyo 
via Anchorage, including two on Saturdays. 

And, of course, all our flights offer the 
Japanese hospitality and serene efficiency 
that have made us the world's number one 
international airline.’ 



UARAN AIR LINES 

Everything you expect and more. 


!\Ta i %i it ■ 




The eastern cult for 
junk food may be 
having a remarkable 
effect on the health 
and appearance of 
Japan’s youngsters 

R enowned as a nation of 
skilled imitators, Japan 
has now taken tire art of 
I the copycat to its ultimate: the 
Japanese face is becoming 
westernized. The transforma- 
tion from the relatively round, 
proportionately large, high- 
cheekboned fare to one that is 
smaller and more oval is 
occurring, according to epide- 
miologists in Tokyo, among 
younger Japanese as part of 
what most be one of the most 
rapid evolutionary- changes of 
all time. The cause, they 
believe, is the rapid American- 
| ization of the Japanese diet. 

The mending international 
debate about diet ami disease 
constantly focuses on Japan 
for proof or refutation of 
arguments, particularly aboal 
the link between dietary Eat 
and heart disease. Yon do not 
| need to stay long in Tokyo or 
! any other Japanese city to see 
I why. Dunkin Dooms, Basldn- 
Robbins ire-cream parlours, 
and other American East-food 
establishments are on every 
corner. 

The new food could hardly 
be more different from the 
j traditional Japanese diet of 
I rice, vegetables and fish, both 
raw and cooked. The young 
people who eat it do not need 
to chew nearly as much, andas 
la result their jaws are less 
(developed. The shape of the 
fare is changing accordingly, 
with the sort of associated 
dental problems and sin ns 
troubles that worry westeru- 
1 ers. There is even a discern- 
able trend towards short- 
sightedness. 

On the positive side, the 
yotmgare on average 4 in taller 
than their parents. And in 
terms of longevity, Japan 
leads the world with life 
expectancy 74 years for men 
and SO for women, three years 
longer than in Britain. Infant 
mortality is also the world's 
lowest 

But the nation that has shot 
from feudal backwardness to 
the world’s second most pow- 
erful economy in less than a 
century could still pay a price 
for its affluence. Some notri- 


Mariin Hanford 



tionists believe that a growing 
incidence of obesity means 
that Japan coabd enter the 
Guinness Book of Records on 
another count, as the first 
major nation to suffer a signifi- 
cant fail in key health indices 
such as longevity. 

Toshiko Stmada, an adviser 
to the food and agricoltme 
ministry, says: “The unwanted 
and unsightly problem of obe- 
sity is creeping on Japan. But 
how do yon stop a 
megatrend V 

Japan’s traditional- diet is 
often linked with the country's 
low incidence of heart disease, 
hat the experts are still at odds 
over this; they are not even 
sore whether heart disease is 
increasing. Meanwhile, there 
are other health problems. 

F or centuries, the main 
cause of natural death 
among Japanese was ce- 
rebrovascular stroke. It caused 
more deaths than cancer and 
heart disease combined. 
Strokes continue at a higher 
rate than in most conn tries, 
doe perhaps to traditionally 
highly salted fish and ferment- 
ed seasonings like soya sauce. 

The same causes are attrib- 
uted to the commonest malig- 
nancy, stomach cancer, 
possibly exacerbated by very 
hot drinks and squatting at 
meals, which impedes the flow 
of gastric juices. But western 
forms of cancer are taking over 
and clearly indict diet as a 
main cause. 

According to a report by (he 
Japan Dietetic Association all 
the main western “kUler” 
diseases are coming to the 
fore. Cancer of Che breast, liver 
and colon are appearing signif- 
icantly for the first time and 


their increasing incidence par- 
allels the rising consumption 
of meat and the growing use of 
animal rather than vegetable 
oils in cooking. Deaths from 
diabetes have trebled in 25 
years, 

L ong cancer has also 
doubled in a generation: 
the Japanese are heavy 
smokers and there are as yet 
no controls on rigaretteadver- 
tising or tar contest. 

A health ministry expert on 
obsesity. Professor Haroo 
Nakamura, said that because 
cholesterol levels among Japa- 
nese under 25 are now even 
higher than those of a similar 
age in the United States, he is 


fearful about the future. “1 am 
partfenlaitr concerned that 
heart disease wifi continue to 
increase”, he said. 

The authorities 'are trying 
hard to limit the trend. Where- 
as our own NHS employs only 
1.00(1 dieticians, Japan, with 
twice the population, employs 
50 times as many and has an 
additional 150,000 trained vol- 
unteers in the community. 

The problem is that it is 
very chic in Japan to follow 
western fashions. Women are 
wearing jeans, Mozart pro- 
vides background music in 
lifts and there is an extensive 
equivalent of Fronghh _ - 
Japglish? — which figures on 
shop _ fronts, posters and 
hoardings, magazines and, in- 
creasingly, in daily life. 

It .is more than 'a matter of 
fashion, however. Today’s 
Japanese are such workahol- 
ics, and society values hard 
work so highly, that conve- 
nience foods are a godsend, in 
particular for working women. 
Traditional cuisine with its 
varied ingredients — 30 or 40 
in a typical meal - is very 
tune-consuming. 

Until science establishes 
some cast-iron links between 
western diet and western dis- 
ease, it seems unlikely that 
Japan will revert to rice, 
seaweed and shellfish. 

David Loshak 


CONCISE CROSSWORD NO 890 


ACROSS ' . . 

1 Casual trousers <6 ) 

5 Binding strip (4) 

8 Respond 1 5) 

9 Revival (7) 

11 Brain membrane 
( 8 ) 

13 Joke (4) 

15 Procedure cbeck- 
upl6.7) 

17 Barred enclosure 
H> 

18 Not curved (81 

21 Barr (7) 

22 Eskimo coot (5) 

23 Group (4) 

24 Boil (6j 

DOWN 

2 find out 15) 

3 Gash (3) 

4 Stealthy (13) 

5 Underground (4) . 

6 Upstart(7) 

. 7 At first sight (5.5) 



18 Hired Assassin 
(7J) 

12 Comer (4) 

14 Operatic song (■}) 


W Readable (7) 

£SS”(3f ,a,c?(5, 

22 Pastry dish (3) 


SOLUTION TO NO 889 
Across: I-Moped 4 Cabaret 8 Leads tAmnmi. 

Flee 13 Disgruntled 17 Ripe 11 

ude 23 Leeward 24 Fred "Bonanza 22 Ex* 


* 


ude 23 Leeward . .. 

DOWN: 1 Malice 2 Psalm 3Dis&otne * .... 


24 Feet 
IPsahn 






_ r , 


^^1 


si*-* IsAjD ] 

THF TIMES TUESDAY MARCH 4 1986 


11 


FASHION by Suzy Menkes 


The present tense of French dress 


French fashion Is centre stage in London tiris spring. Harrods 
is bolding a six week long GalUc-promotioiL This morning, ' 
Princess Stephanie of Monaco unveils her swimsuit collection. 
French shop openings and designer launches both! suggest that 
Paris is fashion's leader again. Bat do we insular British 
understand the language of their dothes? For those who have 
left the pen of their aunt ip the schoolroom, here are some nsefal 
exercises — for intermediary and advanced fashion students as' 
wed as beginners. 


PREMIERE LEQON - FIRST LESSON 

PRESENT TENSE OF FRENCH FASHION 
n’riieoutinjull - . 

(!) London likes French fashion 

(2) Is Paris making, a come-back ? . 

(3) Yves does not rind Karl sympathetic 

(4) Princess Stephanie designs sexy swimsuits - 

deuxieme lecon- second lesson 

REGULAR AND IRREGULAR COMMENTS 
Decline 

(1) I (the Fashion Editor) admire French fashion 

(2) You (familiar) are too fat to wear it - 

(3) She (Princess Stephanie) is in the Pool Position 

(4) Are we (the British) dressing with French polish ? 

(5) You (plural) are going shopping 

(6) They (the French) are making millions of francs 

TROISlEME LECON - THIRD LESSON 

USEFUL FASHION PHRASES 

A. H'hat do you understand by the following terms ? 

Chic - entente cordiale - nouvelle vague - louche - 
enfant terrible 

B. Choosing one of the above, complete the sentences below 

(1) jean Paul Gaultier is the of French fashion 

(2) This YSL suit is the height of Parisian 

(3) Lolita Lempicka is a young French designer of the — 

(4) How deliciously ; is French lingerie! 

(5) ln-store French promotions cement the — 

QUA TRlEME LECON - FOURTH LESSON 
FRENCH FASHION: PAST, IMPERFECT, FUTURE 
Repeal with French accent 

(1) Skirts will be short, tight and sexy this spring 

(2) Givehchy'dressed Audrey Hepburn in Breakfast at 
Tiffanvs. 

(3) Was French fashion losing hs way in the swinging - 
Sixties? 

(4) Chanel opens a new shop in Sloane Street in April . 

(5) Have you lost your waistline ? 

(6) Harrods will hold French fashion shows all this week 

CINQI'IEME LECON - FIFTH LESSON 

A SUBJUNCTIVE _ " ~ .. 

( 1 ) Coco would love Kali's collection, as it is m her spirit 

(2) French fashion should score, now the body is back 

(3) If you want fit, AJaia is your man 
B. IMPERATIVE 

(1) Buv French! 

(2) Remember the Italians! - 

(3) We must not forget British Fashion Week in March ! 

SlXlEME LECON -SIXTH LESSON 

POSSESSIVES v r . ... 

(’sing the picture (below) as a guide, put mto French 

(1) Prince Rainier's younger daughter 

(2) The decline of the bra • ' • • 

(3) Stephanie's design partner, Alix de fa Combfe 

(4) A Princess of tire 1980s ’ - r • 










•SSSSS'S- 

BBSBBBBBaaBaSggjSSS 

a from Yves Saint Laurent collection at Harrods, Kmghtsbndge. SW1. 

Make-up: Ruth Sheldon using “ ,l8C,i °" 6V 

Photographs by NICK BRIGGS taken at The Criterion Brasserie. Piccadilly 



★THE NEW POWER OF FASHION 
Milan: all the elothes fit to print 
Charismatie Paris Ice-cool m London 

★STYLE CRISIS IN.THE STREETS 
Peter York on machine-made youth 

★WORLD cpMPIONSHff SHOCKER 

Horses with jet lag 

★CAROLINE BLACKWOOD 
INTERVIEWS IAN PAISLEY 

JENNIFER'S SOCIAL DATES FOR 1986 


Has Spitting Image got it 
right? Its vision of Mrs 
Thatcher as a dominating 
figure imprisoned in pin- 
stripes may be prescient rath- 
er than virions. For the image- 
makers still believe that it is a 
businessman's world. 

Last week Austin Reed un- 
veiled a programme to per- 
suade male and female 
executives to dress for success. 

“Looking the Part" is a 12- 
minute video emphasizing 
power dressing: the quality of 
the doth, the importance of fit 
and the way to pick a shirt to 
suit Women are allowed a 
little controlled fantasy with 
colour (her male colleague 
plays with his tie pattern). 


BUSINESS (MEN) 
AS USUAL 


The boardroom reality, ac- 
cording to Austin Reed's retail 
managing director, Peter 
Reed, is classic tailoring. 
Fashion as I understand it — 
the subtle changes of shape, 
cut and fit - simply passes the 
boss class by. 

Fashion has certainly failed 
to make its mark on Business. 
a new magazine launched last 
week jointly by Conde Nast, 
the Financial Times and Kevin 
Kelly of the World of Interi- 
ors. 

It is aimed at the pin-striped 
heart of the market, with 


picture spreads on football, 
Hong Kong high flyers, and 
the grounding of the glorious 
grouse. 

British publishers have of- 
ten flirted with a men's style 
magazine on the lines of the 
American GQ. In Easiness. 
not even a macho spread on 
watches interferes with the 
flow of company profiles. 

I expect that the ma ga zi ne 
will be a huge success. After 
alL real men probably care 
about making money, making 
women and making an impres- 
sion in that order. 

They certainly don't wear] 
skirts. Maybe it’s time that 
women execs aped that too. 


LAST WEEK OF 





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OFF 


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Clothkits design and 
produce original and colour- 
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and children: clothes which 
offer spectacular value and 
style. Their ream of eight 
talented designers create the 
shapes, colours and themes 
for two seasonal collections 
each year. 

These collections include 
not only smart and casual 
clothes but also offer special 
fun ideas for basics like 
socks, gloves and night-wear, 
children’s toys and games, and 
household items. There are 
plain are! patterned styles, the 
patterns being created round 
die shapes of the garments and 
printed onto the doth. The 
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Traditionally. Clothkits 
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12 


THE TIMES TUESDAY MARCH 4 1986 



THE TIMES 



A touch of 
Feydough 

Don't laugh, but former farceur 
Brian Rix has been asked to 
become chairman of the Arts 
Council's drama panel. The sec- 
retary-general of Men cap. famous 
for dropping his trousers on stage, 
could soon be in charge of 
£12 million of theatre grants - 
quite a jump from wowing, audi- 
ences with shows like Let Sleeping 
Wives Lie and Reluctant Heroes. 
Far from decrying the likely 
appointment as ‘‘suburbanite." 
panel members who resigned last 
year over grant cuts welcomed the 
news. One, playwright 01 wen 
Wymark. told me: "It would be 
tremendous. Brian is a vigorous 
campaigner — he has done a great 
job at Mencap — and I’m sure iie 
would be prepared lo fight for 
cash." Although no mention of 
Rix was made at last Wednesday's 
meeting of the Arts Council. 1 
understand that the approach to 
fill the vacancy, arising from the 
resignation in November of RSC 
actor Tony Church, has been 
made by the Arts Council sec- 
retary general. Luke Rittner. 

• Pinned on Coventry railway 
station is the sign: “Ladies* toilet 
out of order. Please use no I 
Platform." 

No Scruton 

Ray Honeyford may have re- 
signed but the bitterness contin- 
ues. Roger Scruton was due to 
speak ai Leeds Civic Hall tomor- 
row, as part of a liberal-minded 
gesture by the city council's peace 
and emergency planning commit- 
tee lo invite speakers both for and 
against its nuclear policies. The 
council has now withdrawn the 
invitation, however. Scruton edits 
The Salisbury Review, the journal 
in which Honeyford's controver- 
sial article about education and 
race appeared. Such is the legacy 
of bitterness over the Honeyford 
affair, the council could not 
guarantee his safety inside the 
public meeting. A Sheffield Tory 
councillor will instead make the 
case against peace studies in 
schools. 


BARRY FANT0N1 



Must long enough to find parking 
space at the supermarket’ 


High-level leaks 

Is there something about Ameri- 
can nuclear power stations that 
Washington doesn't know but 
British Airways does? A BA 
spokesman confirmed yesterday 
that solar radioactivity meters on 
Concorde flights had been trig- 
gered off while flying over the 
Eastern USA — apparently by 
leaks from power stations. He 
could not give details, he said, 
because no records were kepi. He 
emphasized, however, that pas- 
sengers and crew were in no 
danger. The British Air Lines 
Pilots' Association (Balpa) said 
meters were intended to measure 
radioactivity from the sun. which 
emitted “quite acceptable” levels 
of radiation at high altitude. A 
claim last month that aircraft 
meters had recorded emissions 
from Aldermaston weapons re- 
search institute was not confirmed 
by British Airways. 

No morals 

Talking of censorship, a reader 
refers me to the new biography of 
Robert Graves by Martin Sey- 
mour-Smilh. After being sent a 
copy of Count Beiisarius by 
Graves, Sir Winston Churchill 
wrote back, concluding: “I de- 
lighted also in the theological 
discussion which blend so amus- 
ingly with the easy morals.” 
Graves later wrote to Sir Winston 
asking if he could use the letter as 
the foreword to promote his book: 
Sir Winston replied he had no 
objection — provided Graves 
omitted the paragraph mentioning 
“easy morals". 

• A football match between MPs 
and House of Commons staff at 
the weekend had (o be cancelled. 
Lambeth council's all-weather 
pitch was unplayable — because of 
the weather. 


Dishing up 

Professor Alan Peacock, chairman 
of ihe inquiry into BBC financing, 
is taking his box-watching duties 
seriously. He is now tuning into 
Italian and German news pro- 
grammes and an occasional Dutch 
film, picked up by a 5 ft diameter 
satellite TV dish temporarily in- 
stalled in the garden of his 
Edinburgh home. 

PHS 


| Paris 

One of the more dramatic effects 
I of a right-wing victory in the 
I French genera! election on March 
! 16 would be a significant weaken- 
ing of the man who now enjoys 
more power than any other leader 
in the western world: President 
Francois Mitterrand. 

The French president's power, 
according to one senior western 
diplomat, “is out of all compari- 
son with that of the US president, 
let alone that of the British prime 
minister, and indeed is equal to 
that of the first secretary of the 
Soviet Communist Party. In so far 
as he has control of the majority in 
parliament, he can do virtually 
whatever he wishes. He has only 
to snap his fingers and his orders 
are carried out. The whole of 
France fives in awe of the 
president.'’ 

Ever since the founding of a 
truly presidential regime in France 
under the Fifth Republic in 1958. 
successive presidents, starting 
with General de Gaulle, have 
taken more and more power into 
their own hands. 

In opposition. Mitterrand se- 
verely criticized the ami-demo- 
cratic institutions of the Fifth 
Republic and condemned what he 
described as de Gaulle's coup 
d'aai permanent. But once in 
power, ihe first socialist president 
of France in 27 years donned the 
monarch's robe, adapting the in- 
stitutions to his own use and 
increasing still further the pres- 
ident’s powers. 

Under Article 20 of the 
constitution, the prime minister is 
supposed to “determine and carry 
out the policy of the nation". But 
nevermore than under Mitterrand 
have the government and par- 
liament become a mere rubber 
stamp. 

Mitterrand alone decided to put 
up the much-contested glass pyra- 
mid in front of the Louvre; to 
welcome General Jaruzelski to 
Paris: to bomb the Libyan-con- 
trolled airstrip in northern Chad; 
to abandon the bill to reform the 
private, predominantly Roman 
Catholic school system: to give the 
concession for France's first pri- 
vate television channel to the 
controversial Sejdoux- Berlusconi 
team. Sometimes he informed his 
prime minister in advance; some- 
times he did not bother. 

The degree to which the presi- 
dent controls the life of the nation 
is reflected in the extraordinary 
way every thing seems to come to a 
full stop when he goes on foreign 
trips. In a recent book. La Vie 
quotidienne a Maiignon. Thierry 
Pfrster, chief aide to Pierre. 
Mauroy when he was prime 
minister, gives a clear picture of 
the way Mitterrand acts as the 
central axis around which govern- 
ment revolves. 

Everything flows into, and out 
of. the Elysee Palace. If a minister 
wants to take some initiative he 
seeks an audience with the rele- 
vant presidential aide rather than 
with the prime minister. 

“Everyone goes in fear of 
Mitterrand. It is not a good thing 
for democracy." one dose friend 
said. Mitterrand is by nature a 
proud, autocratic man who hates 
to be crossed and who has always 
expected his followers to pay him 
court. Few are those who are 
permitted to use the familiar tu in 
conversation with him. 

Catherine Nay. in her best- 
selling biography of Mitterrand. 
Le Heir a le Rouge, quotes Andre 
Rousscfet, another intimate friend 
and now head of the Havas 
advertising agency, as saying that 
after Mitterrand’s election in 
1981. nothing changed for his 
immediate entourage. “For us. he 
had always been the president." 

All Mitterrand’s friends com- 
ment on his evident love of the 
exercise of power. “He is not a 
man to want to share power, nor a 
man to give it up without a hard 
fight.” one said. “So even if the 
Socialists suffered a really severe 
defeat on March 16. it is unlikely 
he would resign on the night of the 
elections. He's a fighter and will 
still try to ding to power.” The 
mainspring of that power, how- 
ever - his control of the majority 


Diana Geddes outlines the likely tensions 
between president and prime minister if 
the right wins the French general election 


Clinging on 
to power 
—if he can 



in parliament and therefore of the 
government — will have been re- 
moved. 

Commenting recently on the 
possibility of a right-wing victory, 
Mitterrand said: “Depending on 
the results, my role could change, 
but my function, duties and rights 
will remain the same, whatever 
happens." However, that function 
and those rights and duties are not 
clearly defined. 

The ambiguous terms in which 
the constitution sets out the 
president's powers have never 
been tested. It appears to allow 
two very different readings, one 
giving the upper hand to the 
president the other giving control 
of the nation's affairs to the prime 
minister and parliament. Until 
now. the presidential reading has 
held sway, but it is likely to be a 
different matter when he is faced 
by a hostile majority in par- 
liament 

As Charles Pasqua, leader of the 
Gaullist RPR Group in the senate; 
commented last week: “If Mitter- 
rand wants to stay, that’s his 
problem. We will accept it because 
we respect the constitution 
...but it is he who holds the 
purse-strings who governs. It is the 
government that prepares the 
budget not the president It is 
parliament that votes it not the 
president The only funds he has 
at his disposal are those required 
for running the Elysee. One cannot 
carry out a major political pro- 
gramme with that" 

Ministers will no longer run to 
the Elysee once they realize that 
the Maiignon, the prime min- 
ister’s office, controls the funds 
they need for their pet projects. 
Mitterrand will no longer be able 
to snap bis fingers to get the 
minister of the interior to lay on 
extra police for a Jaruzelski visit. 

Under ihe constitution, the 

president has the right to appoint 
the prime minister but can get rid 


of him only by forcing him to offer 
his resignation and that of his 
government In the past when the 
prime minister depended on the 
president's patronage, that was a 
relatively simple matter. But it 
will not be so easy if the prime 
minister derives his authority 
from a parliamentary majority 
opposed to the president 

Some opposition leaders, in- 
cluding ex-president Giscard 
d'Estatng, maintain that in such 
circumstances the president would 
be deprived of all decision-making 
and executive power, save that oT 
dissolving parliament and press- 
ing the nuclear button. But since 1 
the elected president is tradition- 
ally seen as the embodiment of the 
will of the people, Mitterrand will 
retain a certain power and in- 
fluence. 

He will naturally play on the 
prestige of his office to the fullest 
possible extent. He has no inten- 
tion of turning himself into a 
constitutional monarch, passing 
his time in “inaugurating chrysan- 
themu m shows”, as de Gaulle said 
of the figurehead presidents of the 
Third and Fourth Republics. Nei- 
ther does he mean to retire to a 
chateau outside Paris to serve out 
the final two years of his mandate 
in stately solitude, as Giscard said 
he would when confronted by the 
possibility of a hostile par- 
liamentary majority before the 
1978 elections. “I will not remain 
inert," Mitterrand has said. 

However, the opposition parties 
have made it equally clear that 
they will not deprive themselves 
of one iota of the power which 
they insist will rightfully be theirs 
once they get their majority. 
Jacques Chirac, the Gaullist RPR 
leader and most likely to be the 
next prime minister, said last week 
that Mitterrand must give a dear 
undertaking that he will allow a 
new right-wmg government to 
introduce in full, “without com- 
promise or concession", the pro- 


Slabbert resignation: Michael Hornsby on 
the questions that remain unanswered 

Mediator or 
collaborator? 


Johannesburg 

Dr Frederik Van Zyl Slabbert the 
former leader of the official white 
opposition in South Africa, caused 
a furore in liberal circles here 
when he abruptly quit parliament 
on February 7. declaring that 
parliamentary politics had be- 
come “a grotesque ritual of 
irrelevance” incapable of bringing 
apartheid to an end. 

On leaving parliament, in which 
he had led the staunchly anti- 
apartheid Progressive Federal 
Party (PFP) since 1979. Slabbert 
declared that he intended hence- 
forth to pursue what he called “the 
politics of negotiation” outside, 
from where be believes the main 
pressures for change will now 
come. 

For many liberals, his decision 
was a cruel blow. In effect, their 
former leader was telling them 
that they bad been wasting their 
lime. PFP veterans such as Helen 
Suzman, who weathered 13 long 
years as the sole anti-apartheid 
voice on the opposition benches 
during the Verwoerd and Vorstcr 
periods, felt betrayed and told him 
so. He was widely accused of 
lacking staying power and of an 
act of gross self-indulgence. 

Stanley Uys, the noted liberal 
commentator and fellow Afri- 
kaner, described Siabberfs resig- 
nation as “incomprehensible". No 
one. he said, had been in a better 
position in opposition to break the 
mould of white politics. “Yet just 
when his labours over twelve years 
were beginning to bear fruit, he 
packed it in”. 

The opposite view is argued by 
Allister Sparks, former editor of 
the now defunct Rand Daily .Vail. 
who wrote recently that by resign- 
ing from parliament Slabbert had 
“placed himself in a unique 
position to be a potential future 
mediator as the seemingly un- 
avoidable confrontation between 
African and Afrikaner national- 
isms intensifies". 


What this view argues, in 
essence, is that Slabbert has 
■ accurately detected a fundamental 
shift in the balance of power from 
parliamentary to extra-parliam- 
entary politics, and has shrewdly 
invested in the future. It can only 
be a matter of time, it is suggested, 
before the government is forced to 
negotiate with such groups as the 
outlawed African National Con- 
gress 1ANC). and the former PFP 
leader, with his impeccable Afri- 
kaner and liberal credentials, will 
then be available as the obvious 
go-between. 

But is such a role feasible, or is it 
just another South African liberal 
pipe-dream? it is true that 
Siabberfs resignation has boosted 
his credibility among many 
blacks, but a mediating role would 
only have meaning if Pretoria was 
prepared to negotiate with the 
ANC on a transfer of political 
power, and that day is still a long 
way off. 

Siabberfs potential as a medi- 
ator has also been seriously com- 
promised by President P. W, 
Botha's decision to publish the 
transcript of a confidential 
conversation held between the two 
men on November 25 last year 
which, unknown to Slabbert, wa$ 
being tape-recorded. The presi- 
dent made the conversation public 
after Slabbert had claimed that the 
obduracy of Botha's views, as 


expressed during their meeting, 
had been a material factor in 
hardening his resolve to leave 
parliament He said their talk had 
left him deeply depressed and 
convinced that Botha would never 
abandon his view that legally 
defined racial groups, and the 
preservation of a large measure of 
white control, must remain the 
basis of the South African political 
system. 

The transcript of the conversa- 
tion largely confirms this assess- 
ment and makes salutary reading 
for anyone who still believes that 
the president has some “hidden 
agenda” of reform which he 
cannot disclose for fear of arous- 
ing ihe ire of white right-wingers. 
There is. in fact, no difference 
between the public and the private 
Botha. At the same time, however, 
Slabbert does not emerge at all 
well from the conversation. As 
one commentator put it “After 
several careful readings. I find it 
hand! to believe that this was an 
opposition leader talking to the 
head of government with anything 
other than the offer of dose co- 
operation in mind". Another 
wrote: “A black radical might be 
forgiven for saying, ‘Look how 
close those two Boers came to 
ganging up tpgedier’." 

At one point in their conversa- 
tion. Slabbert tells Botha that the 
ANC can be defeated and offers to 


gramme on which it was elected 
before any opposition, leader 
would agree to become prime 
minister. 

As for foreign policy issues, 
which have been regarded under 
the Fifth Republic as the 
president's special preserve, Chi- 
rac has said these would be a 
matter for the new right-wing 
prime minister to decide “because 
he will have both the means and 
the control". He saw no reason 
why both the prime minis ter and 
the president should not represent 
France at international summits. 
Mitterrand once said it would be 
the equivalent of a coup d'etat if 
the opposition sought to take 
foreign policy from him, though 
more recently he has accepted that 
*t is a divided responsibility. 

Given the apparently contradic- 
tory positions of Mitterrand and 
the opposition on a division of 
power, it is difficult to see how 
"cohabitation” could be peaceful. 

However, Mitterrand and Chi- 
rac— if be is the next prime 
minister — will both have a vested 
interest in making cohabitation at 
least appear to work. Mitterrand 
has no desire to go down iir history 
as the first Film Republic presi- 
dent to be forced to resign {de 
Gaulle went voluntarily) and 
Chirac wants to use the power and 
prestige of the prime minister’s 
office to enhance his own standing 
in the contest against Raymond 
Barre, his chief rival on the right, 
for the 1988 presidential election. 

Neither wants to give Barre the 
credit and satisfaction of having 
his own predictions of political 
chaos and paralysis under “cohab- 
itation" proved righL So there will 
have to be more give and take than 
either is now willing to admit. 

“We shall not give our fellow 
citizens the spectacle of a France 
which has suddenly become 
ungovernable," Chirac said in a 
little-noticed campaign speech in 
Bourg-en-Bresse a month ago. 
“We shall not give the nations 
abroad the spectacle of a country 
which does not know bow to 
accept a change of government." 

But bow could Mitterrand ever 
agree to sign some of the legisla- 
tion likely to be passed by a new 
right-wing majority in parliament, 
it is asked? Wed, what, precisely? 
There is little in the opposition’s 
remarkably moderate election 
manifesto that Mitterrand should 
have too much trouble swallow- 
ing. He has already said he does 
not regard nationalization as a 
panacea. He is unlikely to otrject 
too strongly to the right's promise 
to return to a majority-voting 
electoral system - he has always 
said he considers a regular change 
of voting system good for a 
country. Something like the 
reintroduction of the death pen- 
alty would be a sticking point, but 
that is unlikely because Chirac and 
a number of other opposition 
leaders are opposed to it 

So there does not need to be a 
head-on clash, provided neither 
side wants one. "Mitterrand does 
not want a cohabitation of | 
conflict,” a Gaullist friend said. I 
“He is flexible; be will be willing to I 
accept many things. But he must 
not be humiliated, otherwise he is 
liable to turn nasty." So Mitter- 
rand must be left with at least the 
semblance of power. 

In a television- interview on 
Sunday. Mitterrand hinted for the 
find time that he might resign if 
robbed of too much power "I 
would prefer to renounce my 
office than renounce the powers of 
my office . . . There is no question 
of my becoming a cut-price 
president.” But his comments 
may have been designed more to 
frighten traditionalist voters ra- 
ther than as a genuine threat 
Earlier in the interview be again 
declared that he intended to serve 
out his fiiU seven-year term and 
warned of a “certain disorder and 
difficulties" if the election resulted 
in a right-wing majority. 

If the right does win, most of 
Mitterrand's real powers are likely 
to seep away. But come 1988. the 
new president will probably re- 
sume control of the majority in 
parliament and become once 
again the most powerful man in 
the western world. 


advise him on how to “draw its 
teeth". He also suggests that the 
ANC is “a myth” and “a romantic 
picture” which exists hugely in the . 
minds of people overseas. One ; 
wonders how this will go down in 1 
Lusaka where only a week or two 
earlier the ANC had praised 
Slabbert's decision to quit par- ! 
liameni as “heroic". (Slabbert met 1 
ANC leaders while in London and 
reportedly apologized for his re- 
marks, saying they had to be 
understood "in context”.) 

Slabbert and Botha are also 
shown agreeing with each other 
that the ANC and Chief Gatsha 
Buthelezi, leader of the rival Zulu- 
dominated Inkatha movement, 
both want to be “the only bull in 
the kraal" Chief Buthdezi has 
since replied waspishly by saying 
that they sounded like two white 
bosses discussing their problems 
with “a difficult, uppity Kaffir". 
Elsewhere, Slabbert tells Botha 
that he found the ANC leaders he 
had met far more reasonable and 
less radical than the “swart etjies” 
(Afrikaans for "little blacks") at 
home, a reference to the militant 
youth in South Africa's black 
townships. This may be no more 
than a statement of the truth, but 
the choice of word has a distinctly 
patronizing ring. 

It may be that Slabbert was 
simply using language and con- 
cepts which Botha would be likely 
to understand in an attempt to 
establish areas of agreement that 
could later be exploited. A less 
charitable interpretation is that 
Slabbert's resignation was moti- 
vated mainly by pique that he was 
not taken into Botha's confidence 
more fully. 

Either way. the genera! feeling 
here is that Slabbert still has some 
explaining to do. both to his fellow 
white liberals whom he left in the 
lurch and to the extra-par- 
liamentary groups with whom he 
apparently hopes to co-operate in 
future: 


Digby Anderson 

Give the law a 
day off too 


Sunday shop-opening is a straight- 
forward matter for two groups. 
Illiberal Christians are against 
permitting consenting adults , to 
buy and sell what they wish on 
Sundays and want them punished 
with the full force of the law: Non- 
Christian liberals, who would 
minimize government regulation, 
wholeheartedly support the Shops 
BilL But what should Christians 
who are also of a liberal dis- 
position do? 

Their conclusions will turn on 
their view not so much of Sunday 
trading as of the law. But first they 
will listen carefully to the argu- 
ments of their church leaders. 
These are not (and I am concerned 
. throughout with the Church of 
England) in general derived from 
Sab batari anism . They are not 
about church attendance: few fear 
that committed Christians will be 
unable to attend a church. Nor is 
the main issue shopworkers' 
"rights”: the bishops were criti- 
cized by the Labour Party for not 
supporting such “rights”. 

Anyway, the well-informed lib- 
eral knows that the rights of those 
who wish not to work have to be 
weighed against the rights of those 
who do and consumers who pay 
both. He also knows that Sunday 
shops often employ a separate 
labour force, and that stores report 
a queue of applicants wanting to 
the “rights" which .the 
unrepresentative Union of Shop, 
Distributive and Allied Workers 
would have imposed. 

No, the church leaders have two 
points. The minor one is that, as 
the petitions show, activist church 
members are strongly against Sun- 
day shopping. The Christian lib- 
eral will balance that against the 
polls which persistently show the 
larger non-church population for 
it. The major point is that Sunday 
ought to remain “special". 

If “special” means “not like the 
other six days of the week” he will 
be reassured to learn that freer 
Sunday shopping elsewhere, in 
Scotland or Sweden, has not 
turned Sunday into “another 
Saturday”. But it is not dear what 
“special" means. The Bishop of 
Birmingham talks of the 
“rhythm” of work and rest, which 
sounds nice enough but contains 
the questionable notion that ail 
the population should be com- 
manded fry the state to have the 
same rhythm and, if offbeat 
enough to choose their own, be 
punished by fine or imprison- 
ment 

And is the present British 
Sunday a “day of rest”? “Rest" 
like rhythm, sounds nice. It has 
biblical associations and suggests 
deserved tranquillity, requiem. 
But might not “lounging in bed", 
“sleeping off last night's excesses", 
“dozing fitfully after too much 
beef and yellow sprouts both even 
more over-cooked than intended 
because of father's late return 
from the Red Lion", “watching 
pornographic videos" or "rowing 


with the children, who are bored" 
be more accurate descriptions of 
many Sundays? . . 

Another word used like “rest" 
rhetorically to sanctify a largely 
secular argument, -and this make 
it the- church's - concern, is 
“femily". Sunday is a family day. 
But it will not have escaped the 
liberal's Christian notice that buy- 
ing or even selling, for example , 
tinned baby food on Sunday is not 
the main threat to the family. 

For 25 years, it has been 
subverted by more permissive 
attitudes to and tax-funded sub- 
sidies for abortion, divorce, sex 
outside marriag e .and its con- 
sequences and perversion. Against 
none of these has the Church of 
England mounted the same unani- 
mous attack as it has on the 
comparatively trivial, issue of 
Sunday shopping. 

And what Sunday are the 
church leaders fort They admit the 
present legislation is muddled and 
then propose new muddfes for old. 
A bishop for whom I have had 
total respect actually proposed 
that while ordinary shops, be 
restricted, shops on religious 
premises be free to sell whatsoever 

Others propose this be sold and 
not that, this size shop open but 
not rhar, “small" shops with 
turnover below £x be open but not 
those above. How would officers 
enforce such Byzantine - regula- 
tions? Such unenforceable law is 
not only bad itself: it bring? the 
law generally into, disrepute and 
erodes law-abiding habits. 

For in the end the controversy is 
about the proper and discriminate 
use of law. Modern society relies 
too much on more and more laws 
to solve its problems: there are 
now 3,100 general public acts in 
force plus 13.000 general statutory 
instruments. 

Yet old, even archaic laws are 
rarely repealed, though many 
would never now be passed as new 
laws. Would any of those pleading 
for the retention of the Sunday 
laws be rash enough to advocate 
them as new laws? How many 
would support them if they did? 

We might learn here from the 
humble university librarian. Fac- 
‘ed with reduced budgets, he makes 
any order for a new journal 
conditional on the proposer in- 
dicating an existing journal for 
discontinuation. Had such a sys- 
tem operated for politicians 
proposing legislation, the laws 
prohibiting Sunday shopping 
would have gone long ago. 

Even if the Christian liberal 
prefers his Sunday to remain as it 
is. and other people's to remain as 
he wistfully imagines them to be, 
he win understand that in this case 
it is inappropriate, even harmful, 
to use the fun majesty of the law to 
impose his preference. But then, 
how many other Christian liberals 
are there today? 

The author is di rector of the Social 
Affairs Unit. 


moreover . . . Miles Kington 

No rest from 
the baize haze 


And welcome to tonight's snooker 
special, which comes from the 
Dylan Thomas Memorial Hall in 
Cardiff, or perhaps it's the Robin 
Hood Stadium in Nottingham, or 
it could be the Arthur Scatgjll 
Assembly Rooms in Doncaster — 
or maybe Newcastle— anyway 
it’s a very important snooker 
tournament, because whoever 
wins this contest will surely be in 
line to be favourite for the 
Washing Up Powder Champion- 
ship which begins next wed; in 
Sheffield, or do I mean the Frilly 
Bow-Tie Premier Title which 
starts early tomorrow morning in 
Hong Kong? Dick? 

Thank you. Brian, and you join 
us at a very crucial moment . 
because we are just moving to- 


D. H. Lawrence Centenary Snoo- 
ker Cup here at the Crucifix in 
Nottingham, with Willie Cook 
leading Steve Cook bv five frames 
to two. You have to remember that 
each round is the best of 57 frames, 
so either man can win. Brian? ' 

Thanks, Dick. To get to this 
round, WiUie Cook had to beat 
Eddie Cook, the enormous Ca- 
nadian. and Steve Cook had to 
edge out Alun ap Cook, the wily 
Welshman, and my goodness what 
a tussle that was, as you'll know if 
you stayed up until two o'clock 
this morning. It all went to the 
final black on the S7th frame, and 
I don't suppose we shall see a 
better game of snooker unless we 
stay up until two o'clock tonight, 
Dick? 

As you say. Brian, this is snooker 
at its very best, which is what we al- 
ways expect from the Plastic 
Flower Display Tournament here 
at Grantham, or Peterborough, at 
any rate it's somewhere on the A I, 
personally l find it vent hard to tell 
one snooker game from another 
these days, but one thing’s certain, 
you join us at a very crucial 
moment. Brian? 

What's that, Dick? . . . 

Crucial moment. Brian. 

Oh, that's right Dick, because 
as you join us here at the quarter- 
final stage of the Crucial Moment 
Cup, Willie Cook must get the 
pink lo stay in this frame; and ifhe 
doesn't Steve Cook will be right 
back in the game. Both men have 
shown| exceptional courage Iq 
stick with it this far, and the same 
goes for us, would you agree with 
that Dick? 


/ certainly would. Brian, be 
cause personally / haven't ih 
faintest idea what’s going on 
sometimes I wake up and think ft 
myself, wouldn't it be nice to hav> 
a day without snooker. / mean jo, 
instance I think this is the Stripe j 
Waistcoat World Champianshi) 
here at the Government Warning 
Hall in Leeds, and that's Terr j 
"Whirlwind” Cook trying to ge 
back on the blue with a dangerous 
cushion shot, but / could be totally 
mistaken. Dick? 

No, I'm Brian. 

RighL Brian? 

And Cook has to get this yellov 
down, because otherwise it wil 
mean snookers. Of course, thii 
isn't happening now, it’s happen 
ing much earlier in the evening 
and we already know which o 
these two men won, but we haw 
to keep it a secret otherwise yot 
wouldn't even switch on to watch 
Willie Cook, remember, is wear 
mg the tight waistcoat and Stevi 
Cook is wearing the full swathec 
ball-gown in tulle. Dick? 

- vou * Brian, and no * 
Willie is going for a very efiffidd 
double off the back cushioi 
v ■ Bure he goes! He hurtle 

down through the air, twisting a 
he goes, a jack-knife and a daubh 
somersault, then He hits the water 
Oh my goodness, an absolute fj 
stunning entry . . . or should / sa\ 
tnaz he cannoned off the pink am 
messed up the whole shot? Brian? 

"What I think we 'have u 
remember at this stage is that thi 
isthe 23rd major tournamen 
toese men have faced this week. s< 
j* * no ! surprising that they're ; 
little tired. Willie Cook is now 
“tp *tis pyjamas prior tt 
his next shot but let's remembe 
to p , tay an exhibitior 

W* Hon S Kong tonjghz anc 
°e rack for tomorrow's session. Ii 
must be a terrible strain, playini 
non-stop snooker - what's realh 
amazing is that anyone is srili 

watching it Dick? 

dnd the crowd has gone ab 
sohaeiy mad! 

Has it? 

**5 're st ill here. Anysam 

crowd would be home in bed h\ 
now. And so with the score at 15k 



J, 

too 


THE TIMES TUESDAY MARCH 4 1986 


13 






Uli: 


^ » 



2j^pgton Street, London E19DD Telephone : 01-481 4100 

EDUCATION’S CONSUMERS 


It is ten years since Mr James 
Callaghan inaugurated at Rus- 
\ kin College, Oxford a “great 
debate” about education. His 
point was simple, and damn- 
ing. Schools — and colleges — 
J \ had forgotten who paid the 
bills. Pupils and students were 
in-equipped for work. Their 
training, formal qualifications 
and attitudes were wrong.- Mrs 

Thatcher's rediscovery of 
education' policy when she 
spoke at the Conservatives’ 

«■ local government conference 
at the weekend was a restate- 
ment, in different terms, of Mr 
Callaghan’s thesis; that educa- . 
tion was too much the busi- 
; ness of producers, too little the 
concern of consumers. 

So ferso good. Any effort to 
direct the public's attention to 
the state of the schools and 
. colleges must be welcome. Yet 
in a decade a great deal has 
changed. Attitudes have 
shifted, not far enough per- 
, haps, but in higher education 
as wdl as in the schools there 

are glimmerings of a new spirit 
of positive approval of wealth 
generation: 

Surprising though it may 
seem to some, Mrs Thatcher’s 
government has presided over 
a massive expansion of State 
v involvement in the processes 
of gaining and renewing skills, 
especially the Youth Training 
Scheme of the Manpower Ser- 
vices Commission. The MSC 
may or may not be consistent 
with the Government's 
broader philosophy. It has 
undeniably been an effective 
instrument of public purpose. 

The MSCs growth has in 
fact been a primary response 
to the concerns expressed in 
Mr Callaghan’s speech, and it 
ought to figure centrally in the 
policy discussions that ought 


now to follow Mrs Thatcher’s 
concern. _ For the proper 
development of the MSC 
could represent an end to the 
anachronistic separation of 
education -and training, voca- 
tional skill and academic 
achievement 

The MSC has begun to 
redirect the attention of policy- 
makers, employers and par- 
ents to what is arguably the 
most' important sector of 
educational provision in this 
country - and that is neither 
the universities; nor the inner 
city comprehensives nor the 
public , schools. It is the sector 
that goes under the initials FE, . 
further education, a diverse 
array of colleges, providing an 
infinity of applied courses for 
pupils, young workers and . 
adults. 

These colleges have grown 
up higgledy piggledy. They 
have grown tip responsive, 
often linked in the most 
intimate -way with local 
employer’s and students’ 
aspirations. This is the sector; 
providing te chnical, voca- 
tional and intermediate 
qualifications, in which the 
West Germans and the Ameri- 
cans outproduce Great Brit- 
ain. This is the . sector 
providing their skilled 

workforces. 

FE lacks glamour. Technical 
colleges lack political sex- 
appeaL But they are the basis 
of any educational policy ad- 
dressed to the terms of that 
unconciudedgreat debate. 

Here ought to be the begin- 
ning of the review of policy , 
that is apparently now being, 
undertaken. Suggestions about 
marrying the administration 
of edncation and training are 
entirely apposite. The lines of 
fresh policy thought should 


encompass the future of the 
Technical and Vocational 
Education Initiative, courses 
for the 40 per cent of 16 year 
olds who still leave school 
without any qualification to 
their names. The think-tankers 
should examine the suggestion 
that children might leave for- 
mal schooling at the age of 14* 
provided they then followed a 
mixed sequence of education 
and training, work experience 
and college lasting for years - 
perhaps right into adulthood. 
These are fit concerns for such 
a review. 

Mrs Thatcher is evidently 
attracted to malting education 
a centre piece of social policy, 
and not before time. But she is 
equally attracted by shibbo- 
leths. Vouchers are one of 
these. Maximizing parental 
eneigy and enthusiasm in 
education is a fine aim. There 
should always have been much 
more room for practical, 
local experiment 

Bat advocates of vouchers 
assume that parents are the 
sole consumers of education, a 
full proxy for employers and 
all those who receive and live 
with the products of the 
schools. They are not The 
educational question is, as Mr 
Callaghan dimly perceived a 
decade ago, the better align- 
ment of classroom and work- 
place for the large number of 
lower and middle ability chil- 
dren now ill served by the 
schools. There is much to be 
done, and in the MSC the 
government has a powerful 
tooL Mrs Thatcher must not 
allow the debate to be dis- 
tracted by tiie important but at 
this stage peripheral issue of 
mechanisms of middle class 
parents' choice of schooL 


SWEDISH REALISM 


The assassination of Olof 
Palme and the manner in 
which he died, walking home 
from a night at the cinema, is 
bound to affect the political 
life of Sweden and the. sense of 
security which its people en- 
joy. But to pretend as many 
commentators have in recent, 
days, that it has brought the 
country face to face with 
reality after it has hidden for so 
long from the outside world, is 
to do an injustice, not least to 
the memory of its late prune 
minister. 

Sweden’s neutrality stems 
from an awareness of the 
outside world, not from 
ignorance.There is an anec- 
dotal joke in Stockholm about 
a general who is asked by a 
journalist where he thmks^the 
main threat to Sweden might 
arise. “From the East" he 
promptly replies. His inter- 
viewer, conscious of the 
country’s middle course, tries 
again. “Do you not think” he 
persisis “that it might also 
come from the West?” The 
general ponders this awhile, 
then says: “Well yes - I 
suppose if the Russians came 
around our flanks, it could 
come from the West as well” 


doubt where their ultimate 
sympathies lie. If they ever 
doubted k the series of incur- 
sions by Soviet submarines in 
tiie waters around Sweden's 
defence installations, should 
have now settled the aigument ; 
in most people's minds. Palme 
himself was under, criticism 
from the right for muting his 
protests to Moscow. In feet 
neither political wing has ever 
complained as vigorously as 
the Russians deserved. But to 
most Swedish people this re- 
flects a sense of reality, not an 
over-indulgent leaning to- 
wards Big Brother 

Nor are Swedish people 
isolated from the rest of the 
world as is commonly sup- 
posed. About one in eight 
passers by on any Stockholm 
thoroughfare is now likely to 
have been bom abroad - 
admittedly a high, proportion 
of them in Finland. A generous 
immigration policy operated 
by left and right has brought 
around 30 minority 
comunities to Sweden, 
ubcluding some 40,000 Yugo- 
slavs, more than 30,000 from 
Latin America, several thou- 
sand from Iran and as many as 
17,000 Turks. 


To this extent there is little This even-handed benevo- 


lence has brought its problems. 
Many of the 25,000 or so 
immigrants a year have im- 
ported. their politics with 
them. The murder of the Yug 
osiav ambassador seven years 
ago and acts of violence, 
interspersed with still more 
disturbing threats, by refugees 
from elsewhere, notably the 
Middle East, have made even 
the Swedes uneasy. Many of 
these now fear that the murder 
of Palme - the inspiration of 
these immigration policies - 
will lead to a backlash against 
them. 

Palme led his country into a 
position of strong disagree- 
ment with the United States 
over the Vietnam War and 
there have been other occa- 
sions on which tiie Stockholm 
government has seemed to 
wear its heart on its sleeve; It 
might be a temptation - but 
would certainly be a mistake - 
for Sweden to enshrine its 
international conscience as a 
kind of memorial to the man 
who has best represented it 
overseas. Equally it would be a 
mistake for Swedes to opt out 
of the international scene 
following the loss of their one 
political leader who was 
known to the world South of 
the Baltic. 


WELCOME TO TODAY 


Democracies flourish by the 
forthright and open discussion 
of policies and events which 
affect their citizens’ lives. In- 
formed discussion requires ac- 
curate information. Both have 
to be presented in a wide 
variety of styles and forms in 
order to communicate as 
widely as possible. This re- 
quires the maximum number 
of newspapers that readers are 

prepared to buy and sustain. 

The first issue of Today, to 
Eddie Shah’s colour tabloid 
newspaper, which is published 
this rooming, is therefore to be 

welcomed. It w *!l, ac ^ *J? 
readers’ choices; The maxi- 
mum genuine competition 
must be as good for: news- 
papers generally as ins for any 
other product. 

In this paructiar casej how- 
ever, there are other 
for what has traditionally 
called Fleet Street to acknowl- 
edge Mr Shah’s initiative. For 
in his long, difcult and 
ultimately successful tenle 


(both in the courts and facing 
massed pickets in Warrington) 
to defend his Stockport Mes- 
senger from trade union at- 
tacks, Mr Shah was one 
important catalyst in. helping 
to bring about the changes 
which are now beginning to 
take place in the structure and 
practices of British national 
newspapers. 

Despite the albatross of 
destructive union practices, 
which has for so long been 
hung round the neck of this 
industry* British readers are 
fortunate; compared with their 
counterparts overseas, in the 
choice of national newspapers 
they enjoy. But they could 
have been luckier siifl had the 
industry been free to develop 
as it could have done with 
evolving technology. 

Unfortunately the print 
unions have long given over- 
riding priority to what they' 
saw as the preservation or. 
existing jobs, even when these 
were non-jobs, or .only frac- 


tions of real jobs. The result 
has been to prevent the in- 
dustry from expanding on a 
modem basis. 

That unhappy picture is 
beginning to change. The tech- 
nological revolution on which 
The Times, fbr instance, has 
embarked should have taken 
place ten years ago, but at least 
it is happening now. As a 
result, much less now stands 
between the journalists and 
their readers, who will gen- 
erally have a greater opportu- 
nity to judge newspapers by 
the quality of their writers’ 
work. 

The promise of a greater 
choice from among more 
newspapers renews hope for 
the eventual creation of new 
jobs, founded on a genuine 
economic basis rather than on 
the Luddite methods which 
are always, in the end, bound 
to feil The industry and its 
readers should applaud the 
arrival of Mr Shah in London, 
and the lesson he learned the 
hid way in Warrington. 


LETTERS TO THE EDITOR 


‘Positive’ scoring 

From Dr C. D. F Rogers 

Sir, The recent discussion on i me 

disproportionate advantage 

resulting from the pena^m 
union inarches produced some 
interesting suggestions. 
among these were the unckn aid- 
ing of the classic 
because of At £ 

converting it, and foenraj g 
reward try scoring refeuw? zo 
penalty kicks. 


A proposal that conversions be. 
taken from .in front of the goal 
posts was, rightly, refuted as 
irivialising this part ofthe game to 
ihe extent that six points could be 
awarded for a try and the conver- 
sion be dispensed with. : 

I suggest that, for a try .scored 
between ihe touch line and the 15- 
tnetre tine.- the conversion be 
taken ' 15 metres in from touch. 
This would retain the incentive to 
score dose to the goal posts, would 
retain an important and tra- 
ditional facet of the game and 


would increase the likelihood of a 
goal being achieved. 

If, for example, 50 per cent of 
conversions an: currently made, a 
try is worth, on average, 5 . points; 
the above amendment might re- 
sult in a 75 per cent success rate 
and an average of 5.5 points per 
try. Hence a part restoration of 
balance. 

Yams faithfully. 

C D. F. ROGERS, 

1 1 Sinope. . 

A50. 

Leicestershire. 


Disposing of nuclear waste 


From Mr $.1 1 Tromans 
Sir, It must now be apparent that 
the disposal of nudear waste is 
likely to pose intractable problems 
fbr British governments for the 
rest of the century and beyond. 
After a resting place has been 
found for the relatively short-lived 
and low-level wastes, the time will 
come when attention to the 
longer-lived and beat-generating 
wastes now in storage will no 
longer be capable of postpone- 
ment. 

The derision to carry out in- 
vestigations into the physical 
characteristics of potential sites 
for disposal is therefore to be 
welcomed. What is needed at this 
stage is the maximum informa- 
tion, with which the various 
disposal options can be weighed 
and tested. However, simulta- 
neous hints of future rate rebates 
or the provision of social facilities 
for those living dose to the site 
eventually chosen can only give 
rise to suspicion that we are 
witnessing, not the impartial 
gathering of information but the 
digging of foundations for the 
implementation of pre-formed 

policy. 

Such, no doubt, is the stuff of 
politics. But the problem is that 
(he issues to be faced with nuclear 
waste are not simply political and 
technological but also concern 
ethics and equity. Conflicts occur 
not only between the interests of 
regions, but also generations. 
Many difficult moral choices have 
to be made: do we for example 
adopt the principle that each 
generation should deal with its 
own wastes permanently; or do we 
seek to preserve as much flexibil- 
ity of future action as possible for 
our descendants? 

It is right that those adversely 
affected for any eventual decision 
as to disposal should be com- 
pensated frilly by the rest of 
society. However, there is a danger 
that political expediency may lead 
to short-term regional gains being 
offered to make acceptable, or at 
least weaken opposition to, the 
easy solution. Given the some- 
times ill-informed attitudes of 
public antipathy to the nuclear 
industry, it is understandable that 
any government win want to reach 
the answer which is most expedi- 
ent in political terms. Unfortu- 
nately, such an answer is by no 
means likefy to be the right one. 

Happily, two opportunities fbr a 
hard and non-site-specific look at 
waste-disposal policy will arise 
rhift year, with tiie Government’s 
own study on the best practicable 
environmental option and the 
Commons Environment 
Committee’s report on 
readidactive waste. Is it too much 
to hope that advantage will be 
taken of these opportunities, 
while information is being mar- 
shalled on possible sites for land 
disposal? 

Yours faithfully. 

STEPHEN TROMANS, 

Selwyn College, 

Cambridge. 

February 27. 


From Dr J. C. Raybould 
Sir, In your second leader of 
February 26 you state: “Geology, 
transport, land ownership: all 
militate against the layman’s solu- 
tion of disposing of waste in 
unpopulated areas.” The first of 
these factors is by no means as 
militant as you suppose. 

It is true that N'irex (Nuclear 
Industry Radioactive Waste Exec- 
utive) has confined its search for 
low-level radioactive waste reposi- 
tories to the main day regions of 
Britain. From these regions areas 
of high population density or 
conservation interest have been 
eliminated and the search for 
individual siies concentrated on 
the remaining areas. In other 
words, a technical issue — geology 
- was adopted as the first criterion 
on the selection of sites. 

However, the disposal of low- 
level and short-lived intermedi- 
ate-level wastes is not so much a 
technical problem as one of public 
acceptability. An engineered bar- 
rier is capable of affording a 
substantially greater degree of 
containment than is absolutely 
necessary for the wastes in ques- 
tion. and although geology is 
important to the design and 
construction of a repository, its 
significance in site selection is 
much less. 

This is recognised by Nirex. Ata 
conference in June last year 
Maurice Ginniff the Director of 
Nirex, accepted that it was not 
necessary to rely on geology, but 
said, “We feel that because of the 
uncertainty, particularly of public 
perception, we would like to have 
a multi-barrier approach.” 

Since public perception is such 
an important factor, it would seem 
to be logical to give higher priority 
to those “barriers" which the 
public perceives as more crucial, 
sucb as shorter transport routes or 
remote disposal (although you are 
right in suggesting that these two 
conflict to some extent). 

If areas other than clay areas 
were considered, it is possible that 
repository rites closer to the 
sources of the waste, or in remote 
situations, could be selected. 

Personally, I have every con- 
fidence that low-level and some 
intermediate-level wastes could be 
deposited safely at any of the four 
sites now proposed. But if the 
public in general want remoteness, 
geology is certainly not one of the 
reasons why they shouldn't have 
it. 

There is an irony in all this. 
While geology is unnecessarily 
being made important in the 
selection of low-level waste sites, 
funding is available for only a 
fraction of the geological research 
which is now vital for the future 
disposal of high-level wastes. 
Yours faithfully, 

J. G. RAYBOULD, 

56 Lonsdale Road, 

Formby, 

Merseyside. 

February 27. 


Palestinian aims 

From Rabbi Frank Hellner 
Sir, Professor Mazzawi (feature, 
February 25) tells us that the 
partition resolution of 1947 “gave 
67 per cent of the land of Palestine 
to tbe Jews”. But surely he knows 
fun weD that, to the contrary. 
Great Britain had already given SO 
per cent of Mandatory Palestine 
(45,820 square miles) to the 
Hashemiies in 1 922 to establish an 
independent Arab State of Trans 
Jordan (subsequently Jordan) and 
Jews living there were expelled 
and forbidden to settle there — a 
few, incidentally, which still ob- 
tains. 

What the partition resolution of 
1947 gave to the Jews, in feet, was 
67 per cent ofthe remaining 20 per 
oent of Palestine (about 6.000 
square miles). Thus nearly 40,000 
square miles, or about seven eights 
of Palestine, was awarded to the 
Arabs. 

Mr Mazzawi's closing remark, 
however, that “IF some 


.Palesiinians...resort in self-defence 
and in pursuit of their rights to 
what some describe as terrorism" 
(my italics), roust give us pause to 
consider his moral position as a 
“moderate” Palestinian intellec- 
tual. 

If the killing of a crippled Jew 
on board a cruise liner, the slaying 
of three Jewish tourists in Cyprus, 
the slaughter of 18 Jewish school 
children in Maalot or the in- 
discriminate massacre of Chris- 
tian and Jewish passengers in an 
airport lounge in Rome are exam- 
ples of “self-defence” or “what 
some describe as terrorism” then, 
to my dismay, there seems to be 
no common moral ground be- 
tween us and I would have to agree 
with Professor Mazzawi's own 
perception that “something tragic 
and evil has happened to the 
Palestinians.” 

Yours faithfully, 

FRANK HELLNER, 

Finchley Progressive Synagogue, 
54 Hutton Grove, N12, 

February 26. 


New schools for old 

From Mr M. C. F. Pettit 
Sir, Tbe proposed legislation to 
increase parental representation 
on school governing bodies is 
entirely praiseworthy for all the 
reasons set out in your own leader 
today (February 2l ) but the reality 
remains that the effective powers 
of governors are extremely limited 
ana my experience over the past 
five years suggests that real power 
still resides in the hands of County 
HalL 

• As current vice-chairman of 
governors of Henlow Middle 
School (acknowledged as one of 
the best examples of this genre in 
the country) I have become 
increasingly frustrated by our 
inability to influence even such 
mundane events as: 

1. Effective disposal of rubbish. 

2. Planned maintenance of build- 
ings. 

3. Four years of discussion on 
catchment areas leading to yet 
further postponement for some 
years. 

4. Inability to obtain answers 


(other than meaningless plati- 
tudes) to a range of correspon- 
dence. 

5. The influencing of current 
selection procedures for a new- 
head teacher, where the “system" 
allows for a single day to cover 
visit by short-listed applicants and 
subsequent interview. And a 
board dominated by county coun- 
cillors pulled off a rota and 
potentially lacking in experience 
of either local affairs or education 
matters. 

6. The stupidity of a decision by 
county authorities to switch on 
heating during the past half-term 
despite the fact that similar action 
at Christmas resulted in burst 
pipes, flooded rooms, and damage 
to floors that are only 1 0 years old. 

The policy. Sir, should not 
merely be to stimulate appoint- 
ment of parent governors but to 
give them real, as distinct from 
apparent, power. 

Yours sincerely; 

MALCOLM PETTIT, 

Milverton, 

1 Rectory Road, 

Meppershall. 

Shefford, Bedfordshire. 


Regenerating 
urban areas 

From Dr Nicholas Falk 
Sir, The imminent demise of the 
metropolitan counties makes it 
imperative to look again at the 
funding of major urban regenera- 
tion projects, especially where 
EEC fends are potentially avail- 
able. Whatever their limitations, 
the metropolitan county councils 
did provide a mechanism for 
targeting investment on areas 
where the risks are greater than the 
private sector is prepared to bear. 

This particularly applies to the 
Victorian industrial areas, which 
have suffered most from the rapid 
decline of manufacturing over the 
last 10 to 20 years. In many cases 
the “solutions” of abandoning the 
areas or grassing them over are not 
feasible because the buildings are 
listed for preservation. 

Though it is possible to devise 
practical schemes for reviving the 
heart of these areas — and the 
recent opening of a canoe slalom 
course in Sowerby Bridge shows 
what can be done — the regula- 
tions over public finance threaten 
to deprive regeneration schemes 
of the very fends they need. 

For example. local authorities 
in West Yorkshire are being 
prevented from taking up most of 
the £9 million expected from the 
EEC under its textile closure areas 
schemes because of the restric- 
tions on capital allocations. 

Surely, now is the time to 
concentrate on securing better 
value for public spending and on 
creating real jobs. This means 
modifying the rules so that well 
conceived regeneration schemes 
that have real local support and 
the promise of EEC funds can go 
ahead. 

Yours faithfully. 

NICHOLAS FALK, Director, 
Urbed. 

99 Southwark Street, SE1. 
February 24. 

A suspect gloss 

From Mr Charles Beare 
Sir, I read with interest your 
saleroom corespondent's com- 
ment (Feburary 19) that “paint- 
ings that had been cleaned and 
restored were simply not selling, 
since this is a sure sign that they 
have been recently on the 
market" No doubt every branch 
of the art market has its bad 
pennies, but I wonder if there is 
not a more basic reason why the 
paintings were unpopular. 

It has for many years been a 
feature of the market for musical 
instruments, for instance, that an 
obviously restored object is much 
less appealing to the eye, and 
therefore less easily sold, than one 
in a pure state, even if damaged. A 
premium is often paid, not so 
much because something has not 
been “seen on the market" for 
many years, but because it has 
managed to escape the extrava- 
gant attentions of the average 
restorer. 

Surely the aim of the restorer 
should always be to do what is 
absolutely necessary and no more, 
to repair damage but to preserve 
the honest, unresiored appearance 
that gives an antique object so 
much of its charm. If clean 
paintings are difficult to sell, why 
are they made so dean? 

Yours faithfully, 

CHARLES BEARE, 

J. & A Beam Ltd-, 

7 Broadwick Street, Wl. 

February 20. 

Aid for charities 

From Mr Christopher Chataway 
Sir, The “bonanza" for charities, 
to which you refer in your lead 
article of February 19, will not 
necessarily be a bonanza for all 
charities. The proposed tax in- 
centive scheme could, in fact, lose 
some charities millions of pounds. 
The scheme would unfairly hit 
those charities which already take 
foU advantage of the .existing 
incentive scheme — the deed of 
covenant. 

Action Aid, for instance, which 
funds long-term development 
projects in the Third World, will 
receive nearly £3 million in tax 
relief on covenants in 1986. If the 
right to claim tax relief was 
switched in the Budget to the 
donor, we should have to spend a 
great deal of time and money in 
persuading our supporters to in- 
crease their standing orders; and 
many of them would probably 
never get round the complexities 
of reclaiming tax. There would 
almost certainly be a serious 
reduction in the charity's income 
this year. 

If a change is to be made - and 
of course I welcome any attempts 
by the Chancellor to help charities 
- it would be important to have a 
long transition period. Front the 
viewpoint of many charities it 
would also be desirable to allow 
the present system of covenanting 
to continue in parallel with any 
new incentives. 

Yours faithfully. 

CHRISTOPHER CHATAWAY, 
Honorary Treasurer, 

Action Aid. 

PO Box 69, 

208 Upper Street NL 
February 21. 


Sunday trading 

From Lord Campbell of Cray 
Sir. Shops in Scotland have for 
years b«n free to open on 
Sundays. In practice, only 16 per 
cent do. The present situation in 
Scotland is virtually what the 
Shops Bill proposes to bring about 
for England and Wales. 

Recently I observed alaige 
number of leaflets in a 
neighbouring church (nearly 300 
miles north of the border) beaded, 
“Your Sunday is about to be 
hijacked" and issued by a body 


called the “Pro-Sunday 
Coalition". The contents in- 
dicated that the authors did not 
know that fee Sunday jn question 
(the Scottish Sunday) has for years 
been as proposed (and therefore as 
“hijacked") by this Bill. The 
leaflet urged readers to write to 
their MPs. 

Scotland is not less religious or 
Sabbatarian than England or 
Wales. The freedom to open shops 
on Sunday is exercised with 
discretion. For example, very little 
opens in the north-west High- 
lands. The large multiple retail 


Shop in Inverness does not open, 
although it could. 

I recognise that the Scottish 
situation has evolved over a 
period and that the Bill poses 
problems of immediate changes 
elsewhere in Britain. To par- 
liamentarians from England and 
Wales, however. I suggest that the 
Scottish experience is worth some 
study. 

Yours faithfully. 

CAMPBELL of CROY, 

Holme Rose, 

Nairnshire. 

February 24. 


ON THIS DAY 


MARCH 4 1861 

In June, I860 Garibaldi captured 
Sicily and in September Naples, 
compelling Francis II, Bourbon 
King ofthe Two Sicilies to flee to 
Gaeta, where he made a final 
unsuccessful stand. The capture of 
the town was a decisive step 
towards the unification of Italy. 


THE SIEGE OF 
GAfeTA. 

(From Our Own Correspondent.) 
MOLA DI GAfiTA, Feb. 22. 

The Biege of GaSta is rapidly 
being unmadp...I do not believe any 
Eastern country ever presented 
more revolting scenes, more shock- 
ing sights than this last abandoned 
foul nest of Bourbon domination. 
Carcases of dead horses are still 
lying in the main streets, where 
they have evidently been suffered 
to rot for the last month or two. 
Tbe state of tbe casemates, even of 
those which the enemy’s fire could 
not reach, and not excepting even 
that which harboured the “Grande 
infortune noblemen t supports.' 
and the lovely “HeJo&e von 
GaBta." is such - such as no pen 
could or would describe; and it is 
difficult to conceive the danger the 
most arrant poltroon would not 
brave to escape from so horrible a 
hotbed of all corruption— 

Nothing could well be more 
remarkable than the behaviour of 
this poor, ignorant, and craven 
population throughout. Inside the 
town, no less than in tbe Boigo, the 
tenant of the lowest hut had in 
frequent instances to be driven 
from his home by main force. 
Nothing but the stick, or the 
menace of it, could conquer an 
apathy that seems grounded on the 
blindest fatalism. I have seen 
cottages along the sea, between the 
Piedmontese feuteries and the 
town, where the wretched families 
have lived for months actually 
between two fires; the loss of some 
of their members did not cure tbe 
rest of that unconquerable apathy 
which lays ail the burden even of 
self-preservation on Providence. 
At first Cialdini endeavoured to 
scare them away, for he appre- 
hended they harboured hostile 
intentions and stayed there as 
spies. But they were obviously too 
harmless and neutral a set fbr a 
second thought to be bestowed 
upon them— 

—Imagine, then, the homes of at 
least 10,000 families turned inside 
out, and all moving in one line and 
in one direction, loaded on carts, 
mules, asses, men’s and women’s 
backs. — wool and straw 
mattresses, chairs, boxes, band- 
boxes. pote and pans, household 
and kitchen furniture of every 
description swarming in one con- 
fused mass, along the road. I saw a 
man. an old man, dosing a 
procession of half-a-dozen lusty 
fellows, in all likelihood his sons or 
grandsons, all of them laden with 
the insides of their gutted cottage, 
all of them trusted with the 
conveyance of objects of the first 
necessity, the old man bringing up 
the rear with a huge crucifix, 
wrapped in white linen doth, and 
so heavy as almost to break the 
bearer’s bent hack under its bur- 
den. Tbe new Anchises had taken 
the household gods with him in his 
flight; he had no faith in their 
ability to protect themselves, let 
alone the dwelling which burnt 
incense or lit farthing lamps in 
their honour. Alas! for tbe shady 
side of war! These poor wretches 
had heard that the siege was at an 
end; they laid hold of what each of 
them held dearest, and are all eager 
for their return — home! But where 
is their home? A man stopped us 
on tiie road the day before yester- 
day, and addressed the staff officer 
in my company, with whom he had 
struck up something like a speak- 
ing acquaintance, with a doleful 
look that said as plainly as possible, 
“What shall I do?" “Well, how is it. 
Felice?" said my companion. “Did 
you find much damage done at 
home?" “Nothing!" was the pithy 
answer, “I found nothing!” “Ah 
well, you had better luck than 
many of your neighbours. I'll 
warrant." “Nothing, I said,” retort- 
ed the poor stricken hind, goaded 
out of his spiritless consternation 
by my friend’s misconception of his 
meaning; “I tell you I found 
nothing! my house and home are 
nowhere!"... 


Hard to grasp 

From (he Reverend Af. P. R- 
Linskill 

Sir, “Hard to grasp” packaging 
tries more than the old (Ms Peggy 
PilL February 21). Once I deemed 
the M**s Bar to be the man of 
action's last resource when 
simultaneously juggling with crisis 
and fighting off exhaustion; its 
great merit was consumability 
with one hand (the teeth. Sir, 
would dial with the wrapper). 

Are my recent failures telling 
me it's time to retire, or the 
manufacturers to review their 
duty to a great British institution? 
Perhaps less vigorously yours, 
MARTIN LINSKILL 
Librarian and Dean of Degrees, 

Si Stephen's House, 

16 Marsion Street. 

Oxford. 

Meaningful terms 

From Mr Leslie Morgan ‘ 

Sir. Some thirty years ago, as a 
member of a BBC audience re- 
search team in Bradford. I asked a 
well-dressed and well-spoken 
gentleman for his profession — he 
toid me he was a "glassologisr. 
When 1 asked him to elucidate he 
broke into the broadest Yorkshire: 
“During th’ week I’m a 
windercleaner, lad, at weekends 
I’m a glassologisH 
Yours faithfully. 

LESLIE MORGAN. 

Ravendale, 

2S Si John's Road, 

Heysham. 

Morecambe. 

Lancashire. 


t 



14 


THE TIMES TUESDAY MARCH 4 1986 



COURT 

AND 

SOCIAL 


COURT 

CIRCULAR 

BUCKINGHAM PALACE 

March 3: The Princess Anne. 
Mrs Mark Phillips visited 
Derbyshire today. 

Having been received by Her 
Majesty's Lord Lieutenant for 
Derbyshire (Colonel Peter Hil- 
ton! Her Royal Highness. Presi- 
dent of the ’Save the Children 
Fund, opened the Fund's Shop 
in Chesterfield. 

Afterwards The Princess 
Anne. Mrs Mark Phillips, vis- 
ited the Midland Railway Trust 
Station at Ripley escorted by the 
President and Chairman of the 
Trust (Mrs K. Mew). 

Her Royal Highness was later 
entertained to luncheon at 
Ukcsion Park. 

The Princess Anne. Mrs Mark 
Phillips, (his afternoon visited 
Chamos Factory. Ilkeston in 
celebration of their Golden Ju- 
bilee and was received on 
arriial by the Chairman of the 
Directors (Mr R. Noskwith). 

Her Royal Highness later 
opened the new Design Block at 
Trent College (Headmaster Mr 
A. Mallby) in Long Easton and 
unveiled two commemorative 
plaques. 

Afterwards The Princess 
Anne. Mrs Mark Phillips, vis- 
ited Birkins Lace Factory. 
Borrowash and was received on 
arrival by the Managing Direc- 
tor (Mr F. Attenborough). 

Her Roval Highness, attended 
by the Hon Mrs LeggoBourfce. 
travelled in an aircraft of The 
Queen's FlighL 

By command of The Queen, 
the Lord Brabazon of Tara 
(Lord in Waiting) called upon 
The President of the Republic of 
Sierra Leone at the Hyde Park 
Hotel this morning and. on 
behalf of Her Majesty, wel- 
comed His Excellency on his 
arrival in this Country. 
CLARENCE HOUSE 
March 3: Queen Elizabeth The 
Queen Mother this afternoon 
visited the Daily Mai I Ideal 
Home Exhibition at Earls Court. 

Lady Jean Rankin. Sir 
Alastair Aird and Captain 
James LowiherPinkerton were 
in attendance. 


KENSINGTON PALACE 
March 3: The Princess of Wales 
this morning visited the Adfcr 
Unit at Whitchurch HospitaL 
Park Road. Cardiff and after- 
wards attended a Reception to 
mark the launch of the Lifeline 
Wales Campaign of the Kidney- 
Research Unit of Wales 
Foundation, at the City HaU. 
Cardiff. South Glamorgan. 

Her Royal Highness, attended 
by Miss .Anne BedcwiihSmith 
and LicuienamCommander 
Richard Aylard. RN. travelled 
in an aircraft of the Queen's 
FlighL 

KENSINGTON PALACE 
March 3: The Duchess of 
Gloucester. President of The 
Roval London Society for the 
Blind and of The Incorporated 
Association for Promoting the 
General Welfare of the Blind, 
was present this evening at a 
Gala Dinner and Fashion Show 
given by Sightline in aid of 
London's Blind at the Inter- 
Continental HotcL London. 

Mrs Euan McCorquodale was 
in attendance. 

(The court circular above was 
published yesterday ,by mis- 
take). 


A service of thanksgiving for the 
life and work of Dr Constance 
Annie Poyser Wood will be held 
on Wednesday. March 5. 1986. 
at noon in the Chapel of the 
Middlesex HospitaL Mortimer 
Street. London. Wl. 

A service of thanksgiving for the 
life of Lord Aldenham will be 
hdd at St Michael's. Comhill. 
EC2. on Monday. March 10. at 
noon. 


Birthdays today 

Mr Basil Booth rovd, 76: Sir 
Arthur Bryan. 63; Sir John 
Carcw Pole. 84: Professor HJ. 
Eysenck. 70: Miss Joan Green- 
wood. 63: Mr Bernard Haitink. 
57; Mr John Hunt. 54: Sir 
Geoffrey Jackson. 71: Mr Fran- 
cis King. 63; Mr Ralph 
Kirshbaum. 40: Sir Ralph Mil- 
lais. 81: Mr Patrick Moore. 63; 
Mr Alan Sillitoe. 58: Professor 
H.N.V. Temperlcy. 71; Dame 
Albertine Winner. 79. 


Forthcoming 

marriages 

Mr F.R. Enock 
and Miss G.M. Crawford 
The engagement is announced 
between Roger, younger son of 
Mr and Mrs J.A.D. Enock, of 
Ex mouth. Devon, and Gillian, 
eider daughter of Mr and Mrs R. 
Crawford, of Chew Magna. 
Avon. 

Mr J.M. Franklin 
and Miss H.A. Hals ted 
The engagement is announced 
between Jacob, son of Colin and 
Charlotte Franklin, of Cuiham. 
Oxfordshire, and Hilary, daugh- 
ter of Dulcie Halsted and the 
late Victor Halsted. of London. 
NW11. 

Mr J.C. Smelt 
and Miss D..A. Galbraith 
The engagement is announced 
between John. youngest son of 
Mrs J.B. Smelt, of East 
Chionock. Somerset and Mr 

M. A.C. Smelt, of Castallack. 
Cornwall, and Deborah, youn- 
ger daughter of Mr and Mrs 

AD. Galbraith, of Borland Cot- 
tages. Ayrshire. 


Mr J.R. Gibson Fleming 
and Miss F.L Don 
The engagement is announced 
between James, son of the late 
Major W.H. Gibson Fleming 
and Mrs W.H. Gibson Fleming, 
of Ranslon. Dorset, and Fiona, 
daughter of Mr and Mrs R.S. 
Don. of Elmham House. Nor- 
folk. 

Mr B.W.F. Shepherd 
and Miss PA. Howell 
The engagement is announced 
between Benjamin, eldest son of 
Mr Roland Shepherd, of 
Boxaiands Farm. West Sussex, 
and Mrs Christina Fenwick- 
Smilh. of Ingrams Green. 
Mid hurst and Peia. second 
daughter of Mr Gerald Howell, 
of Belchambers Farm. West 
Sussex, and Mrs Joanna Howell, 
of London. SW6. 

Marriage 

Mr A.C. Frost 
and Dr M J. MacDoogall 
The marriage took place be- 
tween Mr Adrian Charles Frost 
and Dr Margaret Jane 
MacDougail on February 22 at 
Si James's. Piccadilly. 



Three heart transplant patients (from left), Mr Roy Freese, aged 42, of Shore baro-by-Sea, 
Mr Paddy Tizzard, aged 30, of Seaford, and Mr Ken Prior, aged 47, of Worthing, were 
among those who signed np yesterday in Covent Garden when registration opened for the 
eleventh London to Brighton Bike Ride on Jane 15 in aid of the British Heart Foundation 

(Photograph: John Voos). 


Appointments 



Mr Peter Ahrends 

Academic post for 
architect 

Mr Peter Ahrends, partner of 
Ahrends. Burton and Koralek. 
has been appointed professor of 
architecture at the Bartlett 
School of Architecture and 
Planning. University College 
London. He will take up the post 
in October. 

Mr Ahrends, aged 51 and his 
practice are responsible for a 
number or award-winning 
buildings and won the architect- 
developer competition for the 
extension to the National Gal- 
lery. Trafalgar Square, in 1981 
which was laier abandoned (our 
Architecture Correspondent 
writes). 


The post is an influential one 
and comes at a lime of widening 
public debate about architec- 
ture. Mr Ahrends will continue 
to play an active role within his 
practice, combining design with 
education. His appointment will 
be popular among architects and 
students. 

Among the practice's best- 
known buildings are the Berke- 
ley Library at Trinity College, 
Dublin, the residential building 
at Keblc College. Oxford, the 
Cummins Engine Factory in 
Scotland, and the new Sainsbury 
supermarket in Canterbury. 

Mr Ahrends succeeds Profes- 
sor Newton Watson who has 
headed the school since 1969. 
Other appointments include: 

Sir Jeffrey Stirling, aged 51, 
chairman of P & O. to be special 
adviser on industrial and finan- 
cial affairs to Mr Paul Channon, 
Secretary of State for Trade and 
Industry. 

Mr John Wfaittingdale. aged 26. 
former special adviser to Mr 
Leon Bnttan at the Department 
of Trade and Industry, has been 
appointed a special adviser at 
the department. 

The following to be members of 
the Royal Fine Art Commis- 
sion: 

Mr RD Cvnr, Mr MMnM J Hopk to*, 
Mn DMm NHTlnc, Mr Jon SoMr! 
bad, and Mr Mn Winter. 

The following to be members of 
the Council for Licensed 
Conveyancers: 

Mr LA Enm, Mrs K Foul M Ml C u Oni 
Hatton, MrP Kenny, MrR Kin*. Mr 6*1 
KtattxBdH, Mr L Owr, Mr R Saw, and 
Mr J Taylor. 


Latest wills of Brancaster. co-chairman of 

Couniess Pamela Moj, of Arthur Guinness. 1975-78, left 
Pulbo rough. West Sussex, left £249.803 net. 


estate valued at £179.672 neL 
Mrs Nora Angela Straiten 
Watters, of Spital. Merseyside, 
left £125,775 neL After personal 
bequests of £4.000 and effects 
she left the residue to the 
Salvation Army. 

Mrs Margot HirjL of Forest Hill. 
London, left £1 15.551 neL After 
personal bequests of £ 1 1 .000 she 
left the residue to the Cancer 
Research Campaign. 

Mr Robert Arbulhnoi McNeUe, 


Other estates include (net, be- 
fore tax paid): 

Clay. Mrs Margaret Lewis, of 

Pcrshore £41 1.736 

Hill. Mrs Eileen Smeeton. of 

Poole— £399,569 

Hooper. Mr Henry Norris, of 
West Lavington. Wilt- 
shire £442.755 

Horlick. Lady, of Pans, estate in 
England and Wales. — £404.994 
North. Mr Franklin St John, of 
Puriey £461,561 


Science report 


Analyser detects changes in bones 


By Pearce Wright. Science Editor 


New exercises are being 
developed by the National 
Aeronautics and Space Ad- 
ministration. Nasa. to help 
astronauts to retain the 
strength of their limbs in the 
weightlessness of space. 

Measurements of the effec- 
tiveness of the treadmills and 
bicycles used now show that 
crews still suffer bone loss 
during flights. 

Part of the research by Dr 
Donald Young, a physiologist 
at the Ames Research Centre 
in California, and Dr Charles 
Steele, an engineer at Stanford 
University Medical Centre, 
has produced an instrument 
for analysing changes in the 
bone structure. Measurements 
are made by pressing a small 
probe ou the surface of the 
Skin of an arm or leg. 

The device is also being 
tested in the orthopaedic de- 
partment at Stanford for moni- 
toring the rate of repair of 


fractures and for detecting 
diseases which result in the 
deterioration of the bone or in 
brittleness . 

Although by adolescence an 
individual's bones have 
stopped lengthening, the pro- 
cess of growing continues. 
Cells within bone tissue are 
constantly breaking down and 
reassembling the matrix of the 
skeleton. 

In conditions like osteoporo- 
sis. the loss of bone is greater 
than the replacement because 
of hormonal imbalances af- 
fecting metabolism of the ap- 
propriate minerals. 

Prolonged dialysis of pa- 
tients with kidney damage, 
and treatments with the type 
of drugs used to prevent 
rejection of transplanted or- 
gans are other circumstances 
in which a continuing watch is 
needed on the mechanism of 
bone replacement 

Daily exercise stimulates 
the rebuilding. But studies of 


activities in weightlessness 
show that rate of rebuilding is 
slower than on the ground. Dr 
Steele says each step while 
walking pots a load on the leg 
bone of five times the body 
weight But if a person is in 
weightlessness, or confined to 
bed, there is no load and, 
consequently, little regrowth. 

He said the bone analyser 
detected those changes earlier 
than other methods using X- 
rays or photon absorption, 
because it directly tested the 
strength of the bones. The 
primary measurement was of 
the change in the stiffness of 
the bone. 

Preliminary results with the 
instrument are able to measure 
5 per cent changes in bone 
structure, which should be 
adequate to judge the success 
of dietary changes, exercise or 
drugs. The fingertip probe 
which vibrates is pressed 
against the skin over a 


person's forearm or lower leg. 
The bone vibrates in response, 
but with a frequency that 
depends on its strength, or 
"how hard it Is to bend". 

Special microelectronic de- 
tectors attached to the probe 
include a force transducer and 
an accelerometer, which trans- 
mit data to a microprocessor 
that analyses the bone's resis- 
tance to being shaken by the 
probe. 

Measurement of each limb 
takes less than a minute. 
Trials have included 
asessmeuts of weakness of 
bones that have been immobi- 
lized in plaster casts. 

One woman had a shoulder 
injury that kept her from 
moving her shoulder for four 
years. She had a 68 per cent 
drop in that bone's stiffness, 
according to probe measure- 
ments. A programme of reme- 
dial therapy was planned on 
that assessment 


CHRISTIE’S WEEK IN VIEW’ 

A selection from oar 16 sales in London this week. 

Fine Japanese Works of Art: Tuesday 4 and 
Wednesday 5 March at 10 JO a.m. and 2.30 p.m.. King 
Street: Over two day's we are presenting over 800 lots 
covering most aspects oi Japanese applied art. The first sale 
comprises items made exclusively for Japanese themselves: 
prints, screens, swords and sword-fittings. The following 
day colourful kakiemon porcelain, enamels and ivories will 
be more familiar to western eyes. Lacquers include a fine 
series of chests and there is a good range of netsuke. 

Clocks and Watches: "Wednesday 5 March at 11 a.m., 
King Street: A ‘Floating Turtle' clock, a Chinese wooden 
dock, several skeleton clocks and a curious Art Nouveau 
item with a girl’s arms pointing to the time, are some of die 
stranger items here. Otherwise there is a serious range of 
chronometers, carriage, bracket and longcase clocks, with a 
good group of regulators to end the sale. 

Icons, Russian Paintings and Works of Art: 
Thursday 6 March at 10.39 a.m. and 2.30 p.m.. King 
Street: An all-day sale which evokes the anden regime of the 
Czars. In a new' combination for Christie’s, 100 lots of icons 
are followed by Russian paintings - with some most 


attractive landscapes, particularly the view of the rural 
surroundings of Old Moscow by V.D. Polenov. Later in the 
sale come enamels, silver, fine porcelain and bronzes 
induding a good bust of Tolstoy. 

British and Irish Traditionalist and Modernist 
Paintings and Sculpture: Thursday 6 March at 
2.30 p.m. and Friday 7 March at 10.30 a.m.. King 
Street: Interest in this field has increased so much that we 
have divided the sales mto two separate catalogues: the first 
offering paintings with the traditional feel continuing from 
the Victorian era — landscapes, flower-pieces and genre 
subjects: the second covering the subject-matter and 
techniques basically stemming fiom Europe, and including 
for the first rime a significant number fiom the 1950s and 
1960s. There are over 400 lots in all, and viewing is strongly 
recommended. 

Viewing: King Street: Weekdays 9 a.m.- 4.45 p.m. 
Enquiries (01) 8399060 

South Kensington: 

Mondays 9 a.m. — 7 p.m. 

Tuesdav to Friday 9 a.m. - 4.45 p.m. 

Enquiries: (01) 581 7611 



Meeting 

Royal Over-Seas League 
The Marquess of Douro. MEP, 
was tire guest speaker at a 
meeting of the discussion circle 
of the Royal Over-Seas League 
held at Over-Seas House last 
night. Captain William J. Law 
presided. 

Luncheon 

Coal Industry Society 
Mr J.A.V. Speigd. Chairman of* 
the Chamber of Coal Traders 
and President of the Coal 
Merchants' Federation of Great 
Britain, was the principal guest 
speaker at a luncheon or the 
Coal 1 ndustry Society held at the 
Park Lane Hotel yesterday . He 
was introduced by Lord Ezra, 
and Mr Andrew Horsier was in 
the chair. 


Wycombe Abbey 
School 

Scholarship awards for 1986: 

Wycotnb* Anbey Open Scltolarstap: 

Laura ZaOoukai tBwiKteart Park 
School. Mlnchinhaniptank. 

William Johnson Yapp Scholarship: 
Kathryn McNab (Wycombe Abbey 
and Cods owe School. High WVc- 
ocnbel 

CroMhwaiie Scholarship: Miranda 
Sevan iStoneflekJ House School. Un- 
co In i. 

Walpole Scholarship- Natasha Coke 
lOodstowe School. High Wycombe). 
Crosihwalte Scholarship: Maria 
Coombe iQpdMowa School. High 
Wycombe). 

WHKeiaw Scholarship (music): Tara 
Campbell Golding (Lady Eden's 
School) 

Exhibitions: Auriol Bishop (Wycombe 
Abbey and buncombe School, 
Bcngeo): Lynne Burgess (Wycombe 
Abbey and Mailman's Green. 
Gerrards Cross): Alice GasKen rWyc- 
orabr Abbey and MUlfleld Junior 
School (Edgarley Han)* Philippa Qoi 
(Wycombe Abbey and Queen Mary's 
School. Baidereby Party; Caroline 
Heaton (GodsJowe School. High Wye 
omber Fiona Walker (Godstowe. 
School. High- Wycombe). 

St George’s School, 
Ascot 

The main 1 1-plus scholarship 
for 1986 has been awarded to 
Catherine Alison Moulds 
(Flexlands School, Chobham) 
and the junior mathematics 
scholarship has been awarded to 
Victoria Rachel Oxtley 
(Flexlands School, Chobham). 


Institute of 
Physics 

The Council of the Institute of 
Physics has made the following 
awbds for 1986: 

Gulhrte medal and prize: Str Denys 
Wilkinson, of Sumo univ ersity: 
Ckazebrook medal and. prize: EX G 
Manning, of (he Rutherford Appleton 
Laboratory. OxfonUhlre: Bragg medal 
and prize: Mr W uowarcb formerly 
of the London Institute of Education: 
Ouddeil medal and nrtm: Dr BP 
Kibble, of the National Physical 
Laboratory. Teddmgton. ■ 

Patterson medal and prtza. Dr EP 
Raynes. of (be Royal Signals and 
Radar Establishment. Malvern: 
Rutherford medal and prae: Professor 
A Asibury. of Victoria University. 
Canada: Maxwell medal and prac: Dr 

JJ Binney. of Oxford University: and 

the Hot week medal and prvbf: Profes- 
sor GC Roberts, of the TTtorrt EMI 
Central Research Laboratories at 
Hayes. -London. 

Professor PW Anderson, of Pr ince- 
ton University. US. and Proiwor 
ADdus Saiam. of imper ial C oueye. 
London University, have been elected 
honorary feUow* of the institute. 


Saleroom 

Rare Fulda 
porcelain 

finds eager 
buyers 

By Geraldine Norman 
Sale Room Correspondent 

The collection of Fulda porce- 
lain formed by Daniel 
Meincrtzhagen and his wife 
was sold for £247,395 at 
Christie's yesterday with ev- 
ery lot finding a buyer. It was a 
one-off occasion, the best col- 
lection of Fulda outside West 
Germany. 

The little town of Fulda, 
north-west of CasseL boasted 
its own porcelain factory from 
1764 to 1789 under the patron- 
age of the local grandee. 
Prince Bishop Heinrich von 
Bibra. Celebrating die activi- 
ties of his court, h no doubt 
enlarged his consequence. 
Both workmen and designs 
were frequently borrowed from 
other German factories. . 

The collection contained a 
set of charming little figures of 
the Prince Bishop's court mu- 
sicians, which sold for a total 
of £33,696. The cheapest fig- 
ure was the “Flautist ” at 
£4,320 (estimate £2,000- 
£3,000) and the top price paid 
was £5,616 (estimate £2,000- 
£4,000) for both the 
“Dedelpfelffer” and the 
“Bagpiper". . 

The figures, which stand 
15cm high, wear hats gaily 
embellished with ribbons and 
flowers ami were adapted from 
a Frankenthal model of a fruit- 
seller. The creation of the 
series followed the dismissal 
of the Prince Bishop's orches- 
tra for reasons of economy and 
its subsequent reinstatement 
by order of the town counciL 
The top price in the sale was 
the £32,40 0 (estimate £10,000- 
£20,000) paid by Robbtg for a 
sporting group of huntsman 
and companion. Accompanied 
by their dog, they stand beside 
the blasted trunk of a tree on 
which they have hung two 
dead birds. The group was 
adapted from an engraving of 
“Autumn", by Johann Es&ias 
Nikon, at the request of the 
Prince Bishop. 

The National Musemn in 
Cassel commissioned 
Ameluag of Wdrzbarg to bay 
the very rare figure of Scan- 
mooche at £20,250 (estimate 
£10,000-£15,000) and the same 
dealer secured six ornithologi- 
cal cups and saucers on behalf 
of the little museum in Fulda 
at £8,856 (estimate £2300- 
£4,000). 

Christie's mixed property 
auction of Continental porce- 
lain, which' followed the 
Meiuertzhagen collection* 
proved popular with a total 
sale of £252,725 and 7 per cent 
left unsold. 

A Sevres Wen lapis jardi- 
niere, decorated with a vi- 
gnette of sailors loading 
barrels into their boat, provid- 
ed a striking illustration of the 
recent climb in prices. 
Christie's sold it from the Earl 
of Sefton's collection in 1973 
for £840 and again from an 
anonymous collection in 1982 
for £5.184. Yesterday the same 
piece secured £11380. 


Dinner 

Society of Conservative Lawyers 
Mr Kenneth Clarice, QC. MP. 
was the guest of honour at the 
annual dinner of the Society of 
Conservative Lawyers held at 
the Savoy Hotel last nighL Mr 
Nicholas Lyell, QC, MP, chair- 
man, presided and a vote' of 
thanks was given by the Hon 
Douglas Hogg. MP. Among 
those present were: 

Sir Patrick Mayhrw. QC. MP. Sir 
Edward Gardner. QC. MR Mr RlS- 
ard onaway. mp. Mr Leoiiii Price, 
oc. Mr John McDonnell. QC. Mtss 
Emma NkHolson. Mr Alexander Hlll- 
Smrai and Mr James Lemldn. 


Church news 

Appointments 

The Rev T R Botilwell. Chaplain. 
Trowbridge College, diocese of Salis- 
bury. to ne Vicar. SI Barnabas. Bath. 

mbe_ diocese of Bath 


buty. to be vica 
with EngUshcor 
and Wells. 


Other appointments 

Mrs G Dauow. head of reUgtous 
education. Cowon Girts Schoo. Bris- 
tol. to be religious education adviser, 
schools and parishes, diocese of Bath 
and welts- 

Resignations and retirements 


Christie's have 25 offices throughout the UK. If yon would like to know the name of your nearest representative please 
telephone Caroline Trefigame on (01) 588 4424. 


The Rev M T Coomoe. Chaplain at 
Belgrade with Zagreb, diocese of 
Europe, to be curate. St Peters. 
Maidenhead, diocese of Oxford. 

The Rev ADC Evans, vicar. 
Chadwrfi Heath, diocese of Chelms- 
ford. to be Vicar. Sq ui rr e ls Heath, 
same diocese 

The Rev R J Groves. Parish Priest. 
AD Saints. Clapham Park, diocese o f 
Southwark, to be Vicar, same parish. 

The Rev J H Langstaff. Priest- in- 
charge. S< Peter's. Famtoorough. 
diocese of Guildford- to be PrMst-ut- 
ctiarge. SI Matthew. Duddestoo and S» 
demerit. Nectietts. diocese of Bir- 
mingham. 

The Rev N T Mowan. vicar. St 
John's. Dormansland. diocese Of 
Southwark, to be . Team Rector. 

ad^ate. diocese of Liverpool. 

The Rev C Newton, resident 
diocese of winchester, lo be .Pitest-Uv 
charge. Dare with CuOione. diocese of 
Baih and wells. 

The Rev D Olive, formerly curate 
iNSMI. St CumberTs. Wells, diocese of 
Bath and Weils, lo be curate (stipen- 
diary i. Yanoo Moor, same diocese. 

The Rev D Wee. curate, Oirncesur 
with waiermoor. diocese of Glouces- 
ter. to be Rector. Theale wun 
Englefleid, diocese of Oxford. 

The Rev J S Richardson. Vicar, 
omst Church. Nausea, diocese of 
BaUt ana Wdb. to be also diocesan 
adviser on evangelism, same diocese. 

The Rev P J Rogers, parish Priest 
St James. Piumstead. 


to retire on Abril 30 

The Rev W Grim wood. Rector of 
Burbage With Aston Flamvflle. diocese 
of Leicester, retired on Jan 1. 

Canon V A Sheen, vicar. Si James, 
czapham Park, mocese of Southwark, 
lo retire on July 31. - 

Canon J Whllfiam. vicar. % Agnes, 
kenntngfon Park, diocese Of South- 
wark. to retire on May 8. 

Preb H F Warren. Rector. West 
Monkton. diocese of Bath and Weto, 
la retire 3t the imd of September. 

The Rev D G Gardner. Vicar. 
Kington Langley, and Rector. Drevctx 
Ceme (In ptwahtyi diocese of Bristol, 
to retire hi October. 

Church of Scotland 

The Rev J Forsyth, from conun- 
St rathe on on lo KUchrenan and 
Dalavtcn. 

The Rev I D Petrie, from East 
KUhrtde. Westwood to Dundee. St 
Andrew's. 

The Rev J B Anderson, from 
Falkirk. Balnsford to Edinburgh. 

Rev J T Lang, from glasgow. 
to Glasgow, st James's 

B Lawrte lo EttrKK With 




lo be vicar. 


St John with St 
diocese of Southwark, 
same parish 
The Rev R I Smith. Rector. Crook 
and vicar. Stanley (In pna-alltyL 
diocese of Durham, to be vicar, si 
Cuthben's. Btntrx*iam. sane diocese. 

The Rev B R Spence, vicar, st 
Mary's. East Gnnsteod. diocese of 

Chichester, to be vicar. SI John the 

Baptist. Crowtnome. diocese of Ox- 
ford. 

The Rev H B Tasker. Vicar. Lang 
Ash I on. diocese of Bath and Wells, to 
oe also Rural Dean of Porushead. 
same diocese. 

The Rev H V Taylor, secretary, 
ISPO . Tufton Street. Westminster, to 
be also an honor ar y canon of Bristol 

cathedral, diocese of Bristol. 

The Rev C T Tookey. Vicar. Si 
Thomas. Wells, diocese of Bath ad 
wells, to be also Rural Dean of 
Shepton Mallei, same diocese. 

The Rev I L wuis curate. 
Whitchurch, diocese of Bristol, lo be 
Prlesiui -charge. PucMecnurcti and 
Ataon. same diocese. 


The Rev H F wan to Glasgow. 
Lochwood. 

Retirements 

The Rev J M Laing from 
Buchlyvie with Ganmore. 

The Rev R R Brown from 
Perth. Kinnoull. 

The Rev A t Mackenzie from 
Glenelg with Glenshiel with 
Kintail. 

The Rev R J S Wallace from 
Foveran. 

Church in Wales 

_ The Rev Margaret Harvey, curate of 
Con nan's Quay, to be adviser to the 
Bbhop of SI Asaph on continuing 

clerical education and an honorary 

assistant In (he parish of Cbrwen and 
the deanery of Edeymkm. 

The Rev B Lesson, curaie. Flint, to 
be Vicar of Uanarmon IJyffntn 
Cetnog. uansanuiraM Gc. and 
Pontradog. diocese of St Asaph. 

The Rev j D Trlnder. Vicar of 
Dtngestow _ and_ Llartgovan wilh 


Liangoian with Penyciawdd and 
Tregaer. diocese of Monmouth. 


University news 

City 

Grams 

Science and Engineering Research 
Council £64 BBS to Dr JP Weight for 
studies of propegatlofi of short pulses 
of ultrasound In souds with applica- 
tions to NDT instrumentation. 
Economic and Social Research Coun- 
cil: £98.580 to Professor AJ Fox lor 
user support grow for national child 
development study: £ 102.000 to 
professor M Beehstock to study 
medium term macroeconomic model- 
Ium if the UK economy. 

Office Of Population Censuses and 
Survey*. EtiO.OOO to Profrssor Fox 
for salary of a senior lecturer. 
Institute of Actuaries and Memorial 


Education and Research Fund- 
£80.000 to Professor S Haherrnan to 
support a research (el low tor three 


Oxford 

Professor William Hayes, head 
of the Clarendon Laboratory at 
Oxford and Principal Bursar at 
Si John's College, has been 
chosen as president of St John's 
wiLh effect from July 31. 1987. 
and not this year as previously 
reported 


OBITUARY 

BLOKE MODISANE 

African writer and actor 


J. A. M. writes: 

Bloke Modisane. one of that 
team of African writers of the 
1 950s who created Drum mag- 
azine; has died in Dortmund 
at the age of 62. - 

William Modisane - bis 
nickname. Bloke, was in- 
spanned for his writings - 
lived in the Johannesburg 
suburb of Sophiatown. the 
“black spot" bulldozed flat by 
government order in. 1958 for 
being too close to white sub- 
urbs. When it went, Modisane 
left loo. to seek his fortune 

In his one . room in 
Sophiatown, as one of the first 
black urban intellectuals, he 
bad become host to innumera- 
ble searchers for the real. 
Africa. 

A highly social man, be took 
behind the scenes, into the 
shebeens and shanty towns, 
people fiom Europe and 
America such as Sybil 
Thomdyke and A dlai Steven- 
son as well as South African 
whites, themselves wanting to 
meet blacks on an equal 
footing, and writers such as 
Nadine Gordimer and Athol 
Fugard. 

Modisane became an actor 


and in the Fugard plays. So 
Good Friday and The Blood 
Knot, in Reductions -oa the 
Rand and in London, contin- 
ued to interpret for the outside 
world, the life of his African 
fellows.. 

Later he appeared m 
Genet’s The Blacks at the 
Royal Court, and in many a 
radio and stage play. 

When first discovered by 
Drum he was working in the. 
despatch department of Van- 
guard Bookshop, an imefiec- 
tuai centre of Johan neshuurg. 
He became a reporter, short 
story writer, boxing, corre- 
spondent and in Britain and 
later in Germany, he turned 
playwright. Many of his works 
were produced, by _ the.- BBC 
and bv German radio. 

But away from Africa it was 
always very milch exile. As he 
said in the opening of 'his 
autobiography. Blame Me On 
History . . published in _ J963. 
“Something in me died, a 
piece of me died, with the 
dying of Sophiatown”. __ 

He is survived by iris wid- 
ow, Inge bo rg. and a son. and 
also by a daughter from a first 
marriage in South Africa. 


MISS BEATRIX THOMSON 


Miss Beatrix Thomson who 
has died at the age of 85, was a 
leading actress on the West 
End stage in the 1920s and 
1930s. 

She was engaged by Basil 
Dean on leaving the Royal 
Academy of Dramatic Art to 
take over the role of Mabel 
Dancy in Loyalties at the St 
Martin's Theatre. 

Following this both the 
West End and Broadway saw 
her in starring roles among 
which The Three Sisters in 
which she played Irena (oppo- 
site a youthful John Gielgud); 
The Idior, The Rivals \ The 
Years Between and Lilies of 
the Field were perhaps the best 
known.' 

In 1926 she created the title 
role in The Constant Nymph 
on the New York stage and 
subsequently other leading 
roles. 

Back in London she was to 
be seen in The Bey at His 
Majesty's and in the stage 
version of G. B. Stern's The 
Matriarch at the Royalty (in 
which she co-starred with Mrs 
Patrick Campbell). Her out- 
standing performance in her 
own play. Wooden Shoes, 
earned her a film contract to 
play Madame Dreyfus in one 
of the first British talking 
pictures. 


Irt 1931 she entered a period 
of actress-management, in as- 
sociation with Helena Pickard 
at the Little Grafton Theatre. 
Her roles daring this p eriod 
were varied, ranging from 
Granville-Barker to Ibsen, as 
well as her own play Love for 
Sale. It was during the Second 
World War after volunteering 
for duty on aircraft production 
arid, later, touring to entertain 
troops in the Far East, that she 
contracted the tropical disease 
that was so tragically to upset 
her stage career. 

Home again, she concen- 
trated on her second love, 
writing, achieving produc- 
tions at several oi London's 
fringe theatres in the 1940s 
and 1950s. 

She was to return to the live 
stage in two productions of 
Peter Cotes, Arnold Bennett's 
llhar the Public Wants at 
Manchester in 1 948 and in the 
first West End revival of 
Rodney AcklancTs The Old 
Ladies' (Duchess) in 1969. . 

Beatrix Thomson's contri- 
bution to the pre-war move- 
ment to popularise thoughtful 
and unusual theatre, and the 
slrill and charm of a unique 
personality, will not easily be 
forgotten by those with mem- 
ories old enough to recall 
London's West End between 
the wars. 


MR PAUL BEWSHEA 


Mr Paul Bewshea. OBE,. 
MM, for many years the 
representative in New York of 
Imperial Airways, and later of 
BOAC. died there on Febru- 
ary 20, aged 88. 

Born in Beckenham. Kent, 
on January 12, 1898 he joined 
the Gordon Highlanders at the 
age of 17 in 1915, went to 
France, was wounded twice, 
seriously gassed, won the MM 
and was demobilized on his 
2 1st birthday. 

He then conducted tours of 
the battlefields before joining 
the Daimler Airway and then 
Imperial Airways. 

He worked in the traffic 
department of Imperial Air- 
ways at Croydon, before being 
posted to New York in 1929, 
at a time when plans for North 
Atlantic air services were still 
a gleam in the eye. 

Later, as the company's 
commercial manager, he orga- 
nized the American end of the 


experimental uans-Atiantic 
commercial flying-boat ser- 
vices. the first of which was 
flown in July, 1 937, in associa- 
tion with Pan-American Air- 
ways. 

During the war, as BOACs 
commercial manager, he was 
at one time closely concerned 
wilh the acquisition by the 
British government of the 
three Boeing flying boats 
which maintained trans-At- 
lantic air links throughout the 
war. 

Later he organized the New 
York end of BOACs North 
Atlantic commercial land 
plane services, operated from 
1946 with Lockheed Constel- 
lations. 

Throughout his 57 years in 
New York, he was highly 
regarded for his quiet and 
courteous wisdom, together 
with his readiness to smooth 
the way. for many visitors by 
air from Britain. 


MR F. J. NORTON 


Mr Frederick John Norton, 
who died on February 28 at 
the age of 81. presided for 
many years over the Foreigh 
Books department of the 
Cambridge University Li- 
brary and was an authority in 
the field of Spanish bibliogra- 
phy. 

Educated at Alleyn's School 
and Pembroke College, Cam- 
bridge, where he read modem . 
languages, in 1930 after liter- 
ary research in Spain and 
some school teaching, he 
joined the staff of Cambridge 
University Library, where he 
was to remain, with a break at 
the Foreign Office during the 
war. until his retirement in 
1971 

While his professional work 
was among mainly modem 
books his own interest turned 
to older material especially to 
books printed between 1501 
and 1520. And by wise buying 
at a time when such books 
were within the means of 
ordinary men he eventually 


built up a quite remarkable 
collection. 

His Italian Primers, 1501- 
1520 (1958) and his Printing 
in Spain. 1501-1520 (1966) 
brought him an aulhoriiaive 
reputation on which the publi- 
cation in 1978 of his Descrip- 
tive Catalogue of surviving 
Spanish . and Portuguese 
books, 1501-20 set the final 
seaL 

This achievement • was 
recongnised by Spam with die 
Grand Cross of the Order of 
Alfonso X. the Wise. 

He also published in col- 
laboration with Professor L. 
C. Harmer. a successful Man- 
ual of Modem Spanish. 

Norton was a bachelor, a 
silent man and ill at ease in 
company. He was however an 
ambitious traveller (though be 
never learned how to pack a 
suitcase) and he exibited on 
foreign' soil and in foreign 
tongues a confidence which he 
altogether lacked at home. 


MR HAROLD WILLIS, QC 

Mr H^ l d Wiuis. qc, died recruits to the Bench towa 
on February 1 2, aged 83. ... - 

The younger son of Sir 
Frederick Willis, a distin- 
guished civil servant, he went 
from Berkharosted School lo muai sureiy na Ve „ 

New College. Oxford, winning to becomes judee. 
an athletics blue for the long He married ml 943 Eil 

jump. 


those who in the main pr 
tised before the committees 
both Houses; otherwise a m 
of such exceptional qualit 
must surely have been invii 


He was called to the Bar by 
the Middle Temple in 1926, 
and from then until the out- 
break of war. practised as a 
specialist in the Parliamentary 
chambers of Maurice Fitzger- 
ald. K.C, rapidly- becoming the 
leading junior of the Parlia- 
mentary Bar. 

After service in the war with 
the RAFVR . he returned to 
his practice, took silk in 1952, 
and became Leader of the 
Parliamentary Bar. He be- 
came a Bencher of his Inn in 
1948 and Treasurer in 1969. 

In those days Lord Chancel- 
lors did not look for possible 


Murray, who predeceased h 
by two days. 


COLLECTORS GU IDE 


Pedestal Desks 
Chester Clocks 
Regency Porcelai 
Antiques Overses 


MARCH ISSUE OH' NOW 






- 'E - 

fft _ s 

4rj r . ; & 

v : * l 0r -..-a 






■THET1M-ES TUESDAY MARCH 4 198 fi 


THE ARTS 



Televisioii 


i‘j\\ 


* 0 \ 


\ 


- :% 





Afazindm (Channel 4) was a 
profile of - effectively u 
£ advertisement for — the Soh- 
v moa MahlangnTrtedom Col- 
. lege b Tanzania, to which 
young South African exiles go 
to be educated when police 
harassment drives them from 
the townships. . - 

It. started^ with a bland 
montage — if conld have been 
lifted straight from the pages 
of an in-flight magaano — 
shooing infants playing hap- 
pily together cm dimhing- 
frames and students beavering 
away b a chemistry class. At 
any moment one expected *Td 
like to teach the world tosing” 
to burst forth, for that was the 
sort of advertisement this was, 
^oft-centred and sentimental. 
s To disguise its partiality, we 
mn-gmara great-deal of so- 
called hard inf ormatfou aboet 
day-care facilities, creches and 
the achievement of carving a 
community oat of the East 
African wilderness. This need 
to itemize is a common failing 
of those fa a revoiationary 
situation, hot the tihn-tnakers 
(South Africans living m Brit- 
ain) should sorely have re- 
membered flat the western 
intelligence, sapped by long 
exposure to soaps, serials and 
commercials, has a low bore- 
dom threshold. . . 

Sandwiching the facts were 
interviews but these, rather 
^ than rescue the situation,. 
*■ worsened it Students describ- 
ing their harrowing experi- 
ences in Sooth Africa all spoke 
a sort of liberation newspeak 
which gave off i disturbingly 
strong whiff of indtoctrinathm, 
while the teachers spoke in* 
tone of eaharrassiiig setf- 
congratniation. 

TTus was bad advertising. 
Somebody, somewhere along 
the tine, seems to have forgot- 
ten that documentaries ought 
to probe and. question. For 
instance, bow seriously were 
we to take the claim that the 
school was producing a new 
Sooth African for a new Sooth 
Africa? And what Ad the Qm- 
makers think? Obvious ques- 
tions, and not -even partic- 
ularly radical, hot no one 
- asked them. . ' 

The trouble with a pnt-np 
fob like this is that one ends by 
throwing eat the baby with the 
bathwater mid dismissing ev- 
erything. Honest and trathfal 
content becomes $ttginatized 
by association ahd 'fbfe fifth 
fails in its purpose; which is 
conmumfcatioa wWr the on- 
converted. There is an arga- 
ment that organization? like 
the ANC should not be criti- 
dzedL Bnt.no matter how valid 
the cause, programme-makers 
should never forsake their 
intelCgence. 

Carlo Gebler 


Galleries 


England’s complexion 


The British Face 
Colnaghi \ 


Scottie Wilson 

Mayor/Giliian Jason/ 
Third Eye Centre, 
Glasgow 


The British Face?" Is there, or was 
there ever, such a thing? No doubt 
it is more likely that something 
distinguishable as such existed, 
during the period coveted by the 
show called The British Face, at 
Colnaghi until March 29. But even 
between 1 62S and 1850 the British 
werens motley and mongrel a crew 
as any in Europe; even though the 
successive waves - of new arrivals 
had for the moment calmed down. 
AH die same, the show as a whole is 
redotentof a quality which one can . 
ontycall ... . noteveh really British 
(despite the presence of a number 
of Scots and Irish - and quite 
possibly Welsh), but English. And 
it cannot even be entirely a result of 
the EngUshness of En^isfa ait, since 
so many of the painters represented 
— Lefy, Knellcr, Trevisani, Mer- 
rier, Soldi, Batoni, Kauffinaim, 
Rigaud. Danloux — were not in fact 
British at all but merely worked at 
some stage in Britain or specialized 
in painting the British abroad. 

No, ifthere is indeed a consisten- 
cy, it must be a consistency rn the 
thing painted. Maybe not all the 
portraits included are totally accu- 
rate renderings of their subjects, 
wart? and all. Bui standards of 
beauty change, and are in any event 
rather local The purposes of 
portraiture change too, and few 


before the nineteenth century seem 
to have cared too much whether 
they looked handsome or pretty, 
bin rather whether their rank and 
riches and general importance were 
. properly indicated. And certainly 
few of those commissioning por- 
traits appear to have demanded 
anything too fancy or fanciful: a 
straightforward, reasonably recog- 
nizable picture, with maybe a 
touch of the locality discreetly 
indicated in the background, would 
do very nicely. Thus we are able to 
feel unexpectedly dose to these 
people — even- while we are 
wondering whether ail the young 
women in the seventeenth century 
really bad almond-shaped faces 
and improbably widely-spaced, 
brown-button eyes. 

The other surprise is that our 
sense of closeness is constantly 
enhanced by the feeling that, for ail 
the waves of differing colour which 
have recently ' been lapping our 
shores, you could still go out on 
any street and see -people who 
looked just like this. The fresh, 
pink-arid-white colouring (heigbi- 
ened by convention to a drunkard’s 
rubicimdity. for children), the 
sometimes oddly lumpy features, 
with a heavy Hanoverian jaw, the 
sharp, questioning gaze (not a 
trustful race at all one would say), 
the mobile mouth which may turn 
upwards into a boyish grin or 
downwards in hanging-judge sever- 
ity — all of these can still be seen all 
round, and certainly on every 
British stage or screen. Actually, a 
number of National Theatre play- 
ers seem to be here already, 
wearing a light period disguise. 

Often the most striking individ- 
ual portraits are by the admittedly 
lesser painters: Nathaniel Dance’s 


Thomas Assheion-Smith Esq, for 
instance, with its humour and 
vulnerability, or Tilly Kettle's 
faintly effete Portrait of a Gentle- 
man , or Mason Chamberlain’s 
George, 2 1st Earl of Cranford with 
Two of his Sons , where the charac- 
ters of all three leap at you off the 
canvas. Nor are the big names 
lacking: there are a splendidly 
unflattering pair of Lawrences, of 
Sir Robert Wigrant and his wife, 
and enough Romneys to make one 
, wonder how he will stand up to the 
big retrospective which must now 
surely be inevitable. 

From mainline British an to 
almost as honoured British eccen- 
tricity. Scottie Wilson was a naive 
artist and sometimes, in his haunt- 
ed quality, close to being that other 
kind of revered outsider, the 
lunatic artist During his own 
lifetime he was much discovered — 
almost as enthusiastically as Alfred 
Wallis — and had at least one book 
devoted to him (Mervyn Levy's) 
which strongly emphasized the 
Surrealist connection and perhaps 
portrayed him as more knowing 
than he was. Or perhaps not; it is 
difficult to tell from the work. The 
appearance of a new book about 
him. It's AU Writ Out for You : The 
Life and Work of Scottie Wilson , by 
George Melly (Thames and Hud- 
son. £1150), has encouraged no 
fewer than three shows, the most 
comprehensive being that at the 
Third Eye Centre in Glasgow (until 
March 221 but those in London at 
the Mayor Gallery until March 14 
and at Gillian Jason until March 15 
will certainly be enough for any 
newcomer to Wilson’s work to get a 
fair idea. * 

For it is, when you come down to 
it, all much the same. George Melly 



Faces recognizably with us still? — the humour and vulnerability of Dance's Thomas Assheton-Smkh Esq, 
and Romney's Anne Verelst , making us wonder bow he will stand up to a major retrospective (details) 

gives us ample detail on Wilson's 
background, which was. to say the 
least of it, varied: born in White- 
chapel of Russian Jewish immi- 
grants. he was brought up in 
Glasgow, thrown into employment 
as a child with no conventional 
schooling, and was later in the 
army in India and South Africa and 
on the Western Front- Later still he 
lived for a while in Canada, 
running a general store in Toronto. 

And it seems to have been around 
this time that he started to draw. 

His qualification as a naive artist 
was double: he had never had any 
art training or gallery experience at 
alL and he had never learnt how to 
read and write. - The work is 
virtually unique in true naive art 


(as opposed to psychotic) in that it 
does not attempt to render, howev- 
er inadequately, external reality, 
but resolves itself entirely into 
decorative patterns, slightly sugges- 
tive of the decorations in gypsy 
caravans or on traditional canal 
barges. 

Mr Melly, expert as he is on the 
later generations of (often very 
commercial) naive artists, cannot 
throw very much light on the 
deeper sources of Wilson's inspira- 
tion. or indeed perhaps convince us 
that there is any deeper source, 
despite the admiration of Dubuffet 
and Andre Breton. A lot of the 
drawings and paintings — they are 
mainly in strongly drawn black 
outlines, filled in with colour (ike a 


children's colouring book — suggest 
genuine folk-art, from a wide 
variety of sources, including Amer- 
ican Indian totem beads he appar- 
ently saw while in Canada. Most of 
it is very bright and cheerful, but at 
times the demons evidently come 
and get him, and menace is always 
likely to peer out from behind the 
blandest decorations and poke a 
Satanic tongue at us. 

Taken one by one, the pieces are 
very interesting, quite often for 
essentially non-artistic reasons, 
and very easy to take. Collectively 
one may find that quite a little goes 
a long way. 

John Russell Taylor 


Theatre 


Champion disintegration 


The Boxer Benny 
Lynch 

Tron, Glasgow 


neered both his nse and his 
falL 

The picture of Lynch is 
drawn not so much psycholog- 
ically from inside, out from 
outside: each scene a new 


Benny Lynch's is a aorv dMC romMt shcw^S Mm fa cing 


to the heart of Glasgow m 
many ways. Most Glasgow 
people remember Lynch : the 
legend and many Lynch the 
man. It is the gap between the 
two (and its significance for 
him and his people) that 
emerges in Peter Ambtt’s play 
about the boxer who literally 
fought hi$. voy pm qi. tbe 
Gorbals to become flyweight 
champion of ibe world and the 
city’s hero in 1935 — only to 
die an alcoholic back on the' 
streets a few years later. : 

lo 12 short, tight sceties 
Arnott shifts us back and forth 
through Lynch’s hfe. outlining - 
the forces — social, political 
and psychological — that seem 
to have simuUaheously engi- 


one of the key issues or 
moments in his life. So, as 
Lynch emerges as an exploit- 
able commodity, adrift be- 
tween classes, Arnott inter- 
weaves more general themes, 
each from several angles — 
particularly alcoholism, and 
hero-worship as a sell-out, 
personally for the hero, politi- 
cally for the public ...... , _ T , 

In United ArtistsScotlancTs *. . hl ® real stature. LeonanJ 
production Lloyd Quman’s O’Malley takes him from the 


A terse, understated rela- 
tionship is worked up between 
Lynch and his trainer, Sammy 
Wilson (played by Jake d’Arty 
with resigned sternness), and, 
while sadly telling humour 
surrounds Lynch's first meet- 
ing with the cocktail set and 
his Gretna Green wedding 
(Robert Carr playing a won- 
derfully magmatic “preacher" 
amongst other parts), his 
wife’s account of leaving the 
lost, alcoholic Benny is unsen- 
timental, direct and moving. 

Here the tragedy of Lynch’s 
disintegration does not dimin- 


direction manages the episod- 
ic structure deftly, neatly link- 
ing the scenes but keeping 
them bright, taut and low-key 
to make the roost of Amort's 
ability swiftly to delineate 
characters and launch them 
into winy, crisp and entirely 
believable dialogue. 


witty, resilient chancer to a 
man trapped in the gap be- 
tween himself and his image! 
aware of somehow being 
conned — his final throwaway 
question drawing out the rele- 
vance of Amoit’s play. ■■ 

Sarah Hemming 


Opera 


I vespri sldliani 
Teatro Communale, 
Bologna 

No mature Verdi opera is in 
greater need of toe whole- 
hearted skill and confidence of 
its interpreters than / vespri 
Sicilian q and nowhere is its 
rehabilitation more desirable 
than in Italy itself The banal- 
ity of Scribe’s libretto, and 
Verdi’s less, than successful 
attempt to many his musical 
inspiration to French operatic 
conventions of the 1850s, 
have generally been held as 
insuperable obstacles. The 
new Bologna production, 
which marks the debut of 
Riccardo Chailly as music 
director of the Teatro Com- 
ntunale, challenges all that. 

Chailly, with the help of the 
producer-designer team of 
Luca Runcorn and Pasquate. 
Grossi and a weH-chosen cast, 
brings Vespri to life as an 
example of Verdi’s -blood- 
thirsty Romanticism, less 
beautiful perhaps than us 
contemporaries in the Verm 
canon, but more sophisticated 


than the work of his early 
career. ■- 

Chailly has io recent years 
been quietly establishing his 
Verdi credentials around Eu- 
rope: he brings to Vespri , bis 
gin for fine-limbed musical 
drama, a sense of proportion 
and oar for lyrical deoil but 
above all the ability to pump 
the adrenalin of his orchestra 
and soJaisis. It was this air of 
excitement, of large-scale Ver- 
dian drama fleshed out with 
highly-exposed opportunities 
for vocal prowess, that gave 
Vespri such an unexpected air 
of distinction. 

Chaifiy’s incisive command 
. was evident from the start, the 
orchestral attack in the over- 
ture highlighting the contrasts 
of brio and bombast in Verdi’s 
melodies. In the arias, the 
vocal lines were linked with 
deft instrumental strokes; the 
shaping of the two great duets 
in Acts III and IV was a source 
of equal pleasure. 

Even the paltry musical 
ideas . of the grand ensembles, 
majestically dominated by the 
American . soprano Susan 
Duim. appeared transformed 
— though not even Chailly 



SasauuDmm, measuring up superbly to Elena on her Italian 
d£hut, with the solemn Bonaldo Giaotti as Procida 




U kunt nu voor het eerst vanuit het 
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Utteraard witt Ugraag 9fb ruik ™ten 
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aanvragen btj de Nederlands 

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Teh 01S84 5040 


could hide the occasional 
crudity of invention in Verdi’s 
staccato part-writing. Taken 
as a whole, however, the wells 
of Verdi's native Italian inspi- 
ration are — on this evidence 
— nearer the surface in Vespri 
than its reputation has some- 
times allowed. 

Miss Dunn was making her 
I talian debut at Chailly's invi- 
tation. Elena is one of the 
most difficult ofVerdi’s sopra- 
no parts to cast, requiring a 
true dramatic soprano d' 
agilitd. It is do exaggeration to 
say that the young American 
matched its demands superb- 
ly. The voice has a fresh, peari- 
Hke timbre, it is well 
supported and has an all- 



BUl Fraser 
James Grout 
Patricia Hayes 
Brian Murphy 
Patricia Routledge 
Patsy Rowlands 
Prunella Scales 
Elizabeth Spriggs 
Timothy West 



J. B. Priestley 
Directed by Ronald Eyre 


Opens Tomorrow at 7.00 


O Whitehall Theatre, SWi 
Box Office 81-930 7765 
CC 01-379 6565/6433 


round evenness; the articula- 
tion of the coloratura flights 
was immaculate. Miss Dunn 
holds the stage well in the 
stend-and "deliver tradition, 
moving her ample figure with 
grace and economy. 

After an unsteady start, 
Veriano Luchcni quickly im- 
proved and gave a properly 
burnished account of Arrigo's 
“Giomo di panto”. Leo Nucci 
looked equally appropriate as 
Monforte though the part 
needs a voice of greater natu- 
ral strength and individuality. 
Bonaldo Giaotti as Procida 
was no more than adequate: 
the bass wobble was all too 
evident and his solemn cloak 
and fez made him look more 
like a North African fiesco 
than an aged revolutionary. 

It was difficult to judge 
whether stage director or de- 
signer had the greater influ- 
ence on the production. 
Ronconi was at his stylish and 
supportive best, using the 
stage as a spacious platform 
for lyrical drama and resisting 
the temptation to dress Vespri 
in any other than the clothes 
Vgrdi intended. 

The setting was medieval 
and Mediterranean, with a 
warm outdoor atmosphere 
imparted to every scene 
through Grossi’s glowing 
backdrops and verdant Sicil- 
ian foliage. Initselfthiswasan 
example of a very Italian kind 
of stage artistry, but it was 
perfectly complemented by a 
set of sumptuous curtain- 
drapes, dimly decorated with 
medieval figures which al- 
lowed Ronconi to frame and 
partition the stage as he 
wanted: a very simple idea, 
but one that brought continu- 
ity. intimacy and a sense of 
theatre. 

Andrew Clark 


Concerts 


BBCSO/Davis 
Festival Hall/ 
Radio 3 


Just like Halley’s Comet, with 
which it seems lo feel a certain 
affinity, Tippett’s The Mask oj 
Time has come back. The 
return of his latest magnum 
opus, after its Boston premiere 
in April 1984 and its London 
Proms debut three months 
later, has. predictably, been lit 
by much celebration and 
many words. A full day of 
events — open rehearsal films, 
discussions, interview — pre- 
ceded its climactic third pre- 
sentation on Sunday. 

Words, from Shelley to 
Yeats, from Eliot to Akh- 
matova, are the generating 
system of this massive 10-part 
pageant for voices and instru- 
ments. They must, though, be 
eaten up by the music, insists 
Tippett; and, as they work 
their way deeper into perform- 
ers and listeners, the process 
of assimilation certainly in- 
creases. 

Sunday's performance re- 
vealed a new confidence, a 
new fluency and flexibility. 
Andrew Davis conducted the 
BBC Symphony Orchestra, 
Chorus and Singers as he did 
at the Proms: their responses 
were mercurial and passion- 
ate. Those of the soloists, Faye 
Robinson and John Cheek, 
already familiar with the 
work, and Sarah Walker and 
Robert Tear, were equally 
remarkable in meeting 
Tippett’s ecstatic vocal writ- 
ing with quick and deep 
understanding. 

The sureness of Tippett's 
masterstrokes was surer still: 
the burning brass mirage of 
sun-rays, the exquisite ritual 
dance of flutes, harp and 
pitched percussion in the 
“Paradise Garden”, the per- 
fect fusion of idea and imagi- 
native realization in “Hiro- 
shima” and the instrumental 
preludes of “Whitening 
Light”. But, even if the words 
were ever adequately digested 
(and of that I remain uncon- 
vinced), what nourishment is 
provided in the end? 

The fact that there is so little 
satisfying musical progress or 
development may not be en- 
tirely disconnected from the 
fact that this Mask makes little 
place in its cerebral scheme oi 
life for the regenerative power 
oflove, human or divine.This, 
as the poet Andrew Marvell 
knew in addressing his Coy 
Mistress, was the way of nol 
only toying and dallying with 
Time but playing ii at its own 
game. 

Hilary Finch 


Bruno Leonardo 

Gelber 

Wigmore Hall 


exuberance that the com- 
poser’s fertile fount of ideas 
demanded, his loudish, solid 
sound bringing out the cele- 
bratory resonances of the 
home key. His technique, too. 
served him well particularly 
in the tricky finale, while his 
sense of harmonic line - for 
example in the Trio section of 
the Scherzo - always re- 
mained strong. Only m the 
slow movement did one feel 
the need for something more 
intense than he was able to 
offer. 

Yet both here and in the C 
minor Sonata, Op 10 No 1. 
there was a certain improvisa- 
tory quality which aided the 
atmostphere of youthful vital- 
ity. At the same time in the 
later work Gelber played deep 
into the note, ensuring there 
was little hint of frivolity. 
Perhaps in the finale of the E 
flat Sonata, Op 31 No 3, the 
force of his playing was just a 
little too unrelenting, but he 
captured well the slightly elu- 
sive quality of the first move- 
ment There could be few 
qualms about his magisterial 
reading of the latest work in 
his programme, the definitive- 
ly middie-period E flat Sonata. 
Op 8 la, “Les Adieux”, howev- 
er. for its tempestuous moods 
of sadness, despair' and then 
unbridled joy were conveyed 
in a style whose very aggres- 
sion spoke of a man spiritually 
well acquainted with the com- 
poser. 

Stephen Pettitt 


Camden Festival 


Apartment House 

1776 

Diorama 

So there 1 was, staring down 
from the second floor of its 
grey circling corridors into the 
hollow octagon of the Diora- 
ma near Regent's Park, hear- 
ing the turbid mix of sounds 
sloshing about below, when all 
of a sudden a light goes on 
across the melting poti and a 
girl in vivid orange leans out 
from her window to sing, as 1 
am leaning out from mine to 
listen to the strong, clear 
outlines of the Dutch folksong 
she flings out It was a 
moment of musical communi- 
cation, a scrap of intense 
colour leaping out of the 
mangled musical Plasticine: 
the kind of thing that is 
inclined to happen when one 
goes along to one of these Cage 
jamborees. 

I had met a colleague leav- 
ing as I arrived, and asked him 
how the performance was 
going. “Oh, you know bow 
Cage is.” And ro I do: instant- 
ly there was the image of 
recordings burbling forth, of 
instrumentalists solemnly 
playing the music of no-mind, 
of a litter of cigarette ends, 
white plastic beakers and un- 
finished guacamole. of an 
audience beached on cushions 
and of babes in Osh Kosh 
dungarees and Peruvian knit- 
wear being dandled in the air 
of alternative culture. 


It does not matter very 
much whether the “work" is 
HPSCHD, as it was at the 
Proms a decade ago, or 
Roaratorio, as it was in Isling- 
ton three years back, or Apart- 
ment House 1776 . as it was on 
this occasion (though for the 
record I should note that 
Apartment House was com- 
missioned for the American 
Bicentennial and that it is a 
monument to immigration: 
indigenous American. African 
and European music is heard 
from tapes, supplied here by 
the British Sound Archive, 
while the playets - we had 
Circle conducted by Gregory 
Rose — offer strange disman- 
tled versions of hymns and 
marches from 1776). 

Why then does one keep 
going? It is for surprises like 
the one I described, and 
conversely for a comforting 
familiarity. One knows how 
Cage is. Dick Wins, responsi- 
ble for music at the Camden 
Festival, cheerfully excused a 
late change in the venue as 
“somehow appropriate” for 
Cage, which sufflests the awe- 
some scale of the man’s 
achievement 

A Beethovenian happening 
in one’s life would have to be 
something special: a Schu- 
mannesque circumstance is 
barely imaginable. But just by 
making a hash of things one 
enters into the spirit of Cage. 

Paul Griffiths 


It is still an ambitious pianist 
who elects to devote his entire 
redial to Beethoven sonatas. 
But Bruno Leonardo Gelber is 
a positive player, equipped 
with abundant intellect and 
the sensitivity to render with 
sometimes startling clarity the 
moods as well as the formal 
designs of this composer. He 
does it too with a personality 
that goes hand-in-hand with 
the music rather than over- 
whelms it. . 

His choice, perhaps wisely 
for a player still comparatively 
young even though enormous- 
ly experienced, veered to- 
wards the earlier sonatas, 
none more successful than the 
earliest the C major. Op 2 No 
3 . Gelber here showed all the 




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Name 

Position 

Organisation. 
Address 


.Postcode. 


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FT 30 Share: 

1267.4 (-10.0) 

FT-SE100 i 
1534.9 (-9.0) ■' 

USM (Datastream) 

115.25 (4131) - 

THE POUND 


US dollar 

1.4405 (4J.0115). 

W German mark 

3.1972 (-0.0350) -/. 

Trade-weighted 

72.5 (-0.7) . 

Bid goes 
to court 

The ; Rank Organisation is 
taking the Independent 
Broadcasting - Authority to 
court for Mocking hs £740 
million takeover bid for Gra- 
nada. 

Having asked, but receiving 
no “satisfactory response" as 
to why it was not being 
allowed to acquire the Grana- 
da television franchise. Rank 
said. it. would now seek a 


out its duties under the 1961 
Broadcasting Acl 
T he I BA had ruled that Rank 
could not exercise control of 
more than 5 per cent of the 
voting shines in . .Granada 
without its permission — 
which it refused to give. 

Profits rise 

British Vita yesterday re- 
ported a 17 per cent rise in 
pretax profits to £322 million 
and is lifting, the total divi- 
dend from 6.2p to 7p a share. 

Tempos, page 19 

Brewery sale 

Grand Metropolitan is sell- 
ing its 78 per cent stake in 
Stem, the German brewery, to 
a private consortium for £14 
million. 

Gold search 

Two Canadian companies 
are to begin drilling in the 
Loch Tay region. Highlands, 
in April, hoping to confirm at 
least one commercial gold 
zone. 

Talks end 

Home Chaim has ended 
discussions which it bad said 
might lead, to offers for hs 
enure issued share capital and 
con vertibfe loan stock. . 

St Ives offer 

St Ives, which has made its 
offer for the ordinary shares of 
Richard Clay unconditional 
has made a recommended 
offer of 85p per share plus 
accrued dividend for Clay’s 
4.2 per cent preference shares. 

Thorn sells 

Thom EMI has sold Teg 
Technischer Elektro 
GrosshandeL a West German 
electrical wholesaling busi- 
ness, for £6.1 million cash. 
Thorn EM! Television Rent- 
als has declared unconditional 
its offer for the 6 per cent 
preference shares in Radio 
Rentals (Holdings) after re- 
ceiving acceptances for 90.56 
per cent of the shares. 

$700m bid 

Electrolux has made a cash 
offer to acquire all the 
oustanding common stock of 
White Consolidated Indus- 
tries for $45 per share, which 

values the US company at just 

over $700 million (£488 mil- 
lion). 

Hotel plan 

British Land has formed a 
joint company with Friendly 
Holels to build two and three-, 
star hotels. British Land will 
provide 80 per cent of the 
finance for the £73 million 
required. 

18-year best 

■ In the 12 months to Febru- 
ary, the cost of living in West 
Germany rose less Ilian it had 
every year for the past 18. 
According to preliminary fig- 
ures released yesterday, me 
0.7 per cent inflation rate was 
due to a 02 per cent one- 
month fall in prices in Febru- 
ary. • 

Share deal 

London International mak- 
er of household and industri- 
al products, has bought all the 
issued share capiial of Hamil- 
ton Tail, the Scottish photo- 
graphic group, for arMwmum 
of £600.000 plus 1 57,895 of its 
new shares 

BASE 

lending 

RATES 


• By David Smith 
Economics Correspondent 

A vdy weak pound fell to a 
new alkimc low' against the 
mark yesterday.. Although 
sterling steadied in afternoon 
trading: share prices fell on 
fears, that the expected, base, 
rate curaround ihc lime of the 
Budget will not now take 
place: 

The FT 30-share index 
dropped by 10,3 points to 
1267.1. Government stocks, 
initially down, by more than 
half a -point, showed modest 
losses, of around ’A points at 
(he close; helped by the 
strength of the . US bond 
market. ; 

' Oil was .the. main factor 
hitting the pound. The price of 
Brent chide oil for' delivery 
next month fell .by 45 corns to 
$13.25 a barrel. The sterling 
index, down bv a point at one 
stage, closcd-0.7 down at 72.5. 
its lowest for a year. 

The pound* fell by 3.6 
, pfennigs to DM3.1968. below 
the important DM3.20 level. 
Technical analysts say the 
next important support level 
for the pound is. DM3.00. 
Against the dollar, the pound 
dosed 1.17. cents down at 
$1.4405. 


’s slide hits hopes 
lit in base rates 


THE POUND 
AND OIL 



Money' market i merest rates 
closed- up. to Hi points higher, 
in response to the pound's falL 
Mr Mark Bren, currency econ- 
omist at the stockbroking firm 
of dc Zoctc & Bcvan. said: 
“There is no good reason for 
justifying a cut in base rates in 

Current circumstances." 

. .The pound's faff was limited 
by market suggestions that a 
round of international interest 
rate cuts, ted by West Germa- 
ny and Japan, is on the way. 
This also helped to stabilize 
trie dollar yesterday. 


Braoroa 

price 


DEC 1 JAN 1 FEB ' MAR 


The council of the West 
German Bundesbank meets 
on Thursday for its fortnightly 
meeting and could sanction a 
reduction in official interest 
rates, dealers believe. 

Provisional cost of living 
figures for February, pub- 
lished yesterday, showed infla- 
tionary pressures at a very low 
level. 

The cost of living index fell 
by 0.2 per cent in Iasi month, 
to stand just 0.7 per cent up on 
a year earlier. Hopes ofa cut in 
German rates also pushed 


down money market rates in 
the Netherlands. 

Foreign exchange dealers 
are also wan, of new official 
action to steady the dollar. 4 
number ofintemaiional meet- 
ings are to take place in the 
next few weeks at which recent 
sharp exchange rate changes 
will be discussed. 

The Group of Ten industri- 
alized countries are to meet on 
March 13-14. The GI0 
“deputies" meet partly to 
prepare the ground for the 
meeting of the interim com- 
mittee of the International 
Monetary Fund eorlv in April. 

This will be followed b> the 
ministerial meeting of the 
Organization for Economic 
Co-operation and Develop- 
ment in Paris on April 17-18, 
at which Japan appears deter- 
mined to prepare the ground 
for a co-ordinated interest rate 
cutting strategy, to be rubber- 
stamped at the world econom- 
ic summit in Tokyo cariy in 
May. 

Dealers believe that any of 
these meetings could provide 
the forum at which a co- 
ordinated attempt to steady 
the present highly volatile 
currency markets could be 
unveiled. 


ITC stocks ‘could be sold I Consumer 
in a year 5 if tin price falls 

By Michael Prest^Fonncial Correspondent 


A sharp fall in tin prices 
coukl so restrict mine produc- 
tion as to allow TinCo. the 
company which, it is hoped. 
. will.take over the. Internation- 
al Tin. Council's obligations, 
to dispose of its stocks is a 
year, a leading metal broker 
has advised the ITCs bank 
creditors. 

Mr Rah* Kestenbaum, 
managing director of Gerald 
Metais and one of the authors 
of the TinCo . plan, told the 
banks that at a price of £5,500 
a tonne, more than 60 per cent 
of the Western world’s tin 
production of 174,000 tonnes 
a year would be uneconomic. 


BHP ‘set 
to make 
AusSlbn’ 

Broken Hill Proprietary has 
released figures showing it 1 
expects to earn Aus$1.03 bil- 
lion (£481 million} in foe year 
to May '31. The announce- 
ment is BHFs latest defensive 
effort against Mr Robert 
Holmes & Court’s partial take- 
overbid. 

The Australian Govern- 
ment has derided against 
launching an - investigation 
into the Ans$3.5 bflJion bid. 

An inquiry, advocated by 
some government officials 
and unions, ‘ would have 
smiled Mr Holmes a Court's 
ted indefinitely. 

BHP said it decided to 
release the profit forecast be- 
cause of uncertainty and mar- 
ket instability caused by both 
the Holmes a Court bid and 
slumping oil prices. 

BHP, which had a record 
profit of Aus$774 million in 
fiscal 1985 said the prediction 
of Au 5$1.03 billion for this 
year- is Aus$60 . million less 
. than earlier forecasts because 
of a government derision to 
cut controlled domestic crude 
prices 

For fiscal 1987, it said, the 


TinCo will acquire from the 
council more than- 82,000 
tonnes of obligations which, it 
is proposed, should be sold in 
three years. 

His memorandum went on: 
"Thus the Newco (now called 
TinCo) stockpile would theo- 
retically be required for con- 
sumption at the rate of 70,000 
tonnes per annum at a price of 
£6,000 a tonne and would thus 
be disposed of in IS months; 
at a price of £5,500 per tonne, 
the stock would be consumed 
in nine months." 

■ . Bur this ' view has been 
challenged as optimistic by 
other experts. They point out 


that supply and demand are 
barely balanced despite 55,000 
tonnes of annual production 
being kept off the market by 
ITC export controls, that re- 
moval of these controls will 
tempt mines to produce at 
maximum capacity, and that 
companies may decide to 
operate with lower stocks 
The pessimists argue that a 
great deal will depend on 
currency factors. If the South- 
east Asian currencies depreci- 
ate against the pound, the 
higher local currency prices in 
producing countries would in- 
duce mines to produce as 
much as possible, they say. 


oil ‘price 
drop soon’ 

The chairman of Texaco. 
Mr John McKinley, said yes- 
terday that fuel prices to the 
consumer will soon drop to 
reflect the low world crude oil 
prices, but gave warning that 
the fell wjl) not be as dramatic 
as that in the spot oil markets. 

Mr McKinley said that the 
gap between prices paid for oil 
at the refinery and prices now 
being quoted on the world 
spot markets meant that con- 
sumers are not receiving the 
price cuts they feel arc due. He 
said that prices for consumers 
will shortly “directionally re- 
flect real crude prices". 


April launch for 
Mercury Group 

By Richard Thomson, Banking Correspondent 


The date has at but been set 
for the formation of one of 
Britain’s largest financial coa- 
gtomarates. . 

It was annnounced yester- 
day tint Mercury Internation- 
al Group wffl . probably be 
formed on April 12 — although 
no foal derision has yet been 

; The group win be the result 
of -the merger of Mercury 
Securities, Akroyd & 
Soothers, Rowe & Pitman and 
Mullens sad Co. The new 
securities operation, headed 
by Mr Peter Wamot-Sitwefl 
and Mr Brian Peppiatt, wfll be 
known as Warburg; Securities. 

Although the different com- 
ponents of Warburg Securities 
are legally allowed to merge at 
this stage, Akroyd & 
Soothers, the Jobber, and 
Rowe &Tftman, the stockbro- 
ker, will not be allowed to 
trade as a single operation 
until big bang in October. 

Mercury International 


Group wfll also include the 
merchant bank, S G Warburg, 
which will continue to be 
chaired by Lord Roll and Mr 
David Scboley. The third arm 
of MIG, Mercury Asset Man- 
agement, wfll be the invest- 
ment management division. 

At the same time, Mercmy 
announced that it was baying a 
50 pm cent interest in Potter 
Partners & Co, an Australian 
stockbroking and equity un- 
derwriting firm. 

Mercury is paying Ans$8 
milli on initially for its Stake 
and np to a farther AnsSl2 
million after the first year, 
depending on results. 

The purchase will enable 
Mercury to distribute Austra- 
lian . equities domestically 
within Australia. The staff In 
Potter’s offices in London and 
New York will move into the 
offices of Rowak, to be formed 
from the merger of Rowe & 
Pitman and Ackroyd & 
S mi there. 



i Ttj M [ t ■»! Jit \ - 


profit decline to Aos$ 
million . ’ ' ‘ 

A government spokesman 
sai d a committee of ministers 

would discuss the future of the 

Australian sled industry 
Bell Resources, Nfr Holmes 
a Court’s company, is offering 
A us$7.70 a share for 50 per 
cent of each shareholder’s 
stake in BHP. It is also 
offering an alternative of one 
Bell Resources share plus 
Aus$ 2.50 for each BHP share. 

BHP shares dosed at 
Aus$ 6.50 each on foe Sydney 

Stock Exchange yesterday, up 

6- cents from 
Resources closed at AuS$4.4Q , 
down 5 cents from Friday. 


Broadside by Haslemere 

By Lawrence Lever 

The £179 million bid for had expected. Haslemere's 
Haslemere - from Rodamco, shares fell back slightly on the 
the Dutch property developer, announcement, from 628p to 
moved up a gear yesterday 62 Ip. The calculation of net 
with the issue of Haslemere’s assets reflects the inclusion of 
fonnaL defence document. In trading and development 
this, Mr David Pickford, properties at valuation rather 
Haslemere’s chairman, de- than book costs, 
scribed foe bid as “wholly Mr Pickford described as 
unrealistic "and claimed that “fallacious" Rodaraco’s argu- 
Rodamco’s analysis of meat that its 600p cash offer 
Haslemere and its arguments was generous in the light of the 
for accepting the bid were contingent tax liability that 
“misguided and ill-informed”, would be payable on disposal 
. The much-awaited revalua- of its portfolio. He said that 
tion of Haslemere’s property this had been taken into 
portfolio — effectively the account in the case of trading 
lynchpin of its defence — stock, but not for other prop* 
establishes a net asset value of erties within the company, 
728p per share, slightly below since tax would only arise on 
.foe value that market experts their disposal. 


John McKinley: ex- 
pects fall soon 

Last year Texaco supplied 6 
per cent of the world's oil and 
its output of natural gas in the 
United States equalled the 
total for the North Sea. The 
company is one of the biggest 
operating in the North Sea. Its 
petrol stations take more than 
10 per cent of the British 
petrol market, after Shell. Esso 
and BP. . 

Spot prices for North Sea 
crude are being quoted at 
about Si 3.40 for April deliv- 
ery. but yesterday barrels be- 
ing bought by refineries for 
immediate -delivery — what 
the industry calls “wet" bar- 
rels — were selling for more 
than $ 1 7. 

Mr McKinley said that price 
cuts to the consumer were 
never as dramatic as the falls 
seen in the spot markets, 
largely because oil passing 
through ihc refineries had 
been bought between 45 and 
60 days before. 

“The price is going down, 
but it is not going down at the 
same rate as is reflected by the 
futures prices." 

He believes that the world 
price will level off at about 
that being seen in the spot 
markets and has already 
trimmed Texaco's planned 
spending this year by 10 per 
cent from $2.8 billion (£1.9 
billion). 

• Abu Dhabi yesterday cut 
the price of its best-selling 
M urban crude to contract 
customers from $24.95 in 
Januarv to $16.65 in Fcbru- 


Distillers must pay Guinness £38m 


By Michael Prest, Financial Correspondent 


m — 

Adam i Company— 

BCCl. 

Citibank Sawngsf 
Consolidated CrCs.~ - 
Comments! fast—. 
Co- operative Bank—.. 

C Hoare & Co 

LLoydsBark 

Mat Westminsier .. ..... 

Rcvai Bs* ot Scotland - 

TSB ... 

Wiljaafc HA--. — 


..12*% 

,.l2h% 

^I2h% 
... I2w% 

...12*7% 

_124V 


t Moopp Bkc 


Distillcre is committed to 
pavingat least £38.7 million of 
the costs Guinness Incurs in 
making its friendly £2.3 bil- 
lion takeover bid for the 
Scotch whisky group, it 
emerged yesterday. • 

Details of foe controversial 
agreement which is the sub- 
ject of a legal challenge by 
Are'll Group, foe rival Disiili- 
enTbiddcr. were spelled out ifr 
Guinness's formal offer docu- 
ment. . . : . 

The costs wi» begin to rise 
again after March 21 ar the 
rare of £2.1 million a week. 

Distillers has agreed to pay 
ihc fi.es and expenses includ- 
ing certain advertising costs of* 
ihc Guinness mcrgcrproposaL 


But a clause which requires 
Distillers to indemnify 
Guinness against the son of 
legal challenge to the agree- 
ment that Argyll has launched 
has been dropped: 

Guinness's chief executive. 
Mr Ernest Saunders, defended 
tire agreement, saying it was 
absurd to characterize it as 'a 
poison pill" or “shark- 
repeflant". 

• “This agreement was put’in 
-place to attract an offer which 
was considerably better for the 
company and had the added 
ad' antage of being significant- 
ly higher than anything else on 
the tabic." he said. 

Meanwhile Guinness has 
reached, agreement with a 


number of banks allowing it to 
resume purchases of Distillers 
shares in foe stock market. A 
£11! million loan facility has 
been arranged with Allied 
Irish Bank. Australia New 
Zealand Banking Group and 
British Linen Bank, which will 
effectively allow the purchase 
of a further 5 per cent of 
Distillers shares on 
Guinness's behalf. 

Morgan Grenfell. Guin- 
ness's established merchant 
bank, has been told by the 
Bank of England to stop 
buying shares on Guinness's 
behalf. The new facility will 
allow resumed purchases. 

A judicial review of foe 


Government's decision to lax 
aside a Monopolies Commis- 
sion reference of Guinness's 
original bid for Distillers be- 
gan yesterdav. 

Guinness now has a new 
otter on the tahle under which 
ii proposes to sell off certain 
tthiskj brands to quell the 
Office of Fair Trading's fears 
ahoul the effects of the merger 
on competition in the drinks 
market. 

Mr Saunders said that there 
would be net's about the sale 
of the brands short lx. 

One interested purchaser is 1 
Grand Metropolitan, which 
a!rend\ owns J & B Rare | 
Whisk'. j 


Executive Editor Kenneth Fleet 


Traders’ hopes focus 
on the Bundesbank 


Crunch points arc beginning to 
loom for central banks all over the 
world in their dealings with respec- 
tive bond and money markets. Either 
bond markets have been overbought, 
or central banks will be forced to give 
way on the interest rate front to the 
markets' pressure for lower rales. The 
latest hope for the traders is the 
Bundesbank. which mayor may notbe 
planning to cut its Lombard rate. 

The two-way stretch shows up with 
vivid clarity in the US. Fed funds 
yesterday were firm, and showed no 
signs of casing from the most recent 
trading range of just under 8 percent. 
Vet the long bond continued to move 
ahead. By mid-session it was well 
over V’ point ahcad.and still steaming 
onwards. Lower oil prices may have 
helped. Brent crude prices slipped a 
further 30 cents. As extension pre- 
miums on the bonds.rclative to 
money costs.continue to shrink, the 
Fed is either going to find itself 
coping with an inverted yield 
curve.wiih all which that implies in 
political termsabout tight money 
policies.or it will graciously cut the 
discount rate. 

Doubtlessoihcr possible outturns 
exist in the vast scheme of things, but 
cheaper money sounds like the other 
central banks' preferred way out of 
the dilemma. The Japanese again 
yesterday put in a plea for concerted 
cuts in rales. 

The Bundesbank, by contrast, 
wheeled and dealed in market senti- 
ment as if dealers had taken a 
correspondence course from the 
Bank of England. On the one hand, 
the new Federal Government bond 
emerged with a 6 per cent coupon, 
rather than the 5 per cent plus figure 
which traders had hoped to see. as an 
augur of cheaper rales on the way. 
But the bond was priced above par. 
giving it a yield on issue of 5.95 per 
cent, or new big figure territory. At 
the same time.the Bundesbank ap- 
peared to stress its tolerance of 


cheaper money costs by setting a 
minimum bid’ rate on its 29-day 
repurchase agreement of 4.3 per 
ccm.the lowest level since the new 
money market regime started a year 
ago.Falls in the Lombard rate im- 
minent? 

Until late in the day. when gilts 
drew support from New 
York. London socnl most of the day 
moving in a contrary' direction to the 
rest of the world.S’ierJing weakness 
accounted in part for the V; point 
markdown at the off in gilts: at Dm. 
3.1925. sterling hit a record low 
against the German currency. Trad- 
ers also registered their dislike of 
some of the more inspirational 
pundilry around: long yields returned 
lo double figures. 

But it was also a desperately heavy 
day for the authorities in the money 
markets. A forecast shortage of £1.1 
billion proved hard to shifLand the 
Bank went into the market three 
limcs.as well as providing sale and 
repurchase facilities, to take the 
shortage out. Nonetheless, money 
rates rose. boosted as well perhaps by 
sterling weakness.Thrcc month inter- 
bank increased by '/« point. 

The problem with the current 
situation is the Bank of England"s old 
bogcy.lt has loo many markets to 
survey at this critical juncturc.and 
most of them are responding to 
different external stimuli. This confu- 
sion in turn renders policy 
incomprehcnsible.accounting ior the 
UK's inability to keep up with the 
rest of the world. 

' Market traders scoff at the idea of 
EMS membership, especially 
yesterday's rumour that the Chan- 
cellor will reveal imminent member- 
ship on Budget Day. But if the 
Chancellor were to take this stcp.it 
would undoubtedly ease the prob- 
lems in market management cur- 
rently encountered by the Bank of 
England.as well as putting the gilt 
market a score of points better 
ovcmight.Crunch points.indeed! 


Time to come clean 


The current proposals, formulated by 
the Marketing of Investments Board , 
for sales of life insurance and unit 
trusts, are patently in need of 
sharpening, particularly in the area of 
diclosure of commissions earned on 
life insurance products.Since MIBOC 
published its consultative paper last 
December on the subject the main 
focus of interest has been upon the 
purist view proposed by MIBOC, 
namely that salesmen should (all into 
one of only two camps, the company 
representative acting for one com- 
pany alone and the genuinely in- 
dependent intermediary with 
allegiance to no particular company's 
products.The public should know 
exactly whom it is dealing with, say 
MIBOC.In particular it must be 
protected from what the British 
Insurance Brokers Association, in its 
evidence to MIBOC this week, called 


** today's greatest evil in the 
market”- namely the tied agent 
masquerading as an independent 
advisor. 

But it is dear that there are limits 
on what the MIBOC element of the 
Securities and Investments Board 
want the public to be told.So-called 
company representatives will not 
have to disclose the level of commis- 
sion that they stand to gain from the 
sale of a particular product; they 
merely have to reveal their status and 
the fact that they were not able to of- 
fer independent advice. 

This rings admirably in the cosy 
corridors of life insurance head 
offices. In practice and in the front 
room of the unsuspecting and 
uniliated consumer it is pure 
fantasy.Life knsurance salesmen as a 
breed are not made in the MIBOC 
image. 




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v.; 

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Howto be 
your own boss 
without giving 
up your job. 

Yau awe an able, am hi tious company 
director wnh manj ideas OB bw your 
(xxopeny can do Ixiicr. 

Bui you’ve also gw a group board «dto 
commualI> rum down your ideas Tno 
resources avaHi&e 'and submerge 
you wiih paperwtnl iin accordance 
with group policy T. 

DodVdespaic Themisasoluticntbm 
can pjwesais&cwiy to d ecnccnedL 
liX called a managmietu buyout. 

Wtadi required? 

Fng.im an agapeg team with 4riw 
and contsdnnem wfao ware it to 
happen. 

Second.a^oop board willmg io tfivea 
a company ai the right pace. 

And ttred. the right advice a the right 
rime to bring it all (ogetbec 

Ttoftwherewe. Peat Marwick. can 
help. Wfi provide objective gmdan-^C 

no ewoy aspea cd a hreoui. fwm 
evaluating your initial proposals lo 
advismg on tbc oegouations and the 
m tmpBcarioor from mtroduemg. 
you to the rigtu financing mfltiuaons 
(you may be surprired how link money 
you haw to find yourself) to wrong op 
ibe new systems .vouD need toga your 
newly independent company ofl u a 
Hying nart 

Let ns rtew you bow wr helped rite 
managers of more (ban a thud o( tbe 
tager buyouts lodaie.Sian bv wnring 
iseoflSdeflftrfora toeoopr our 
new boakki "Management Buy-outs' 
or ring David Carter on Ol-i&i 6000 
for further intoretatton. 

TOi tot Marwick. I Puddle Dock. 
BbcLfnas. Loudon EC4V 3 PD. 

Pleare send me ‘Management Buy- 
outs' and keep me mfunned. 


Cnmpany 

Tel 

You bare a partner at Beat Marwick. 


nglPEAT 

I El MAR 


MARWICK 


t 





?:■ 






18 


FINANCE and industry 


THE TIMES TUESDAY MARCH 4 1986 


WALL STREET 


FOREIGN- EXCHANGES 


COMMODITIES 


New York (AP-DJ) — A weak 
blue chip sector prevented the 
Dow Jones industrial average 
from climbing to another peak 
as prices finished mixed in 
extremely heavy trading on 
Wall Street 

The average fell 4.93 to 
1,709.06, although towards 
the end of trading it had been 
10 points behind. 

Most of the broader market 
indices edged to record highs 
as 193.6 million shares were 


traded. This was up from 

181.7 million on Thmsday. 

It was the heaviest trading 
day this year and. based or 
preliminary volame figures, 
the fourth busiest session in 
the history of the exchange. 

The Do*' Jones Industrial 
average was weighed by a 
continuing weakness in Inter- 
national Business Machines, 
which slumped 4% to 151 on 
big board volume of 2.8 million 
shares. 


Fob 

29 


Fet> 

27 


AMR S3 

ASA 35\ 

Anted Signal 513 
AJkedStrs 74 
AHreCMmrs 
Alcoa 
Amu Inc 
Am'rdaHs 
Am Brands 
AmBrdcast 
Am Can 


3% 

44% 

m 

2s:> 

76% 


Am 
Am EJPw 


77 

I'd 66 

r 26% 

Am Express 6S*i 
Am Home 715 . 

Am Hospital 
Am Motors 
AmSt'nrd 
AmTetepn 

Amoco 


3% 

43 

221k 

58 


Armco Steel 10% 
Asarco 20X 
Ashland Oil 43% 
AtRKMuM 52% 
Avon Proas 3i 
BkrsTBINY 41% 
Bankamw 17'/ : 
BkofSston 71*, 
Bank ol NY 59% 
Beavce Pda 46% 
Beth Steel 
Boong 


20 

53% 


BseCascde 53 


57*. 

29'. 

17% 

32% 


Brden 
Bg Warner 
Bnst Myers 
BP 

Burner Ind 36 
BurTion Ntn 77% 
Burroughs 67% 
CmpbeuSp 52 
Can Pacific 12 1 
Carerpiller 
Celanese 


50% 

192% 

Central SW 31". 
Champion 27% 
Chase Man 43% 
Chm Bk NY 47% 
Chevron 36% 
Chrysler 56% 
Citicorp 5<% 
Clark Equip 23% 


51% 

38% 

51% 

74*, 

4% 

4S‘; 

13% 

23% 

73% 

74% 

65 

26 J a 

66M 

71% 

2 % 

42S 

22% 

59% 

11% 

2% 
43% 
53*8 
30 
39% 
17% 
70% 
59% 
46% 
19% 
53% 
53% 
56% 
28% 
69% 
33% 
36% 
78 ’i 
691. 
517. 
12 % 
50 

197% 

30V. 

27% 

42% 

47% 

36- 

57'.- 

53% 

23% 


Exxon Corp 
Fed Opr Sts 
Firestone 
F« Chicago 
Fst Int Bncp 
Fst Perm c 
Ford 

FT Wacftva 
GAF Corp 
GTE Corp 
Gen Corp 
GenOy mes 
Gan Beane 
Gen Inst 
Gen Mis 
Gen Motors 
GnPDUtny 
Genesee 
Georgia Pat 
GiKeie 
Gooonen 


Inc 

Grace 

Gt Arts Tac 

Grhno 

GnxnanCor 

Gulf & Weal 

HemzHJ. 

Hercules 

H'len-Phrd 

HoneyweS 

1C Inds 

Ingersd 

inland Steel 

IBM 

Int Hervtr 
INCO 
int Paper 
Int Tm Tel 
Irving Bank 
Jhnsn & Jhn 
Kaiser Alum 
Kerr McGee 
KmbfyCIrk 
K Mart 
Kroger 
LTV. Corp 
Ltlon 
Lockheed 
Lucky Sirs 
Man H'nver 


FaO 

Feb 


Fab 

Feb 

26 

27 


28 

27 

52% 

52% 

Pfizer 

55% 

52% 

74*1 

73% 

PhetpsDgo 

25 li 

26 

25% 

25% 

PIhHo Mrs 
Pfa^sPet 

104% 

106 

32% 

31 B 

in 

10% 

58% 

58% 

PoUrcwJ 

66% 

65% 

9% 

8ft 

PPG Ind 

61% 

58% 

71% 

72 

PrctrGmbl 

69 

66V, 

38% 

38% 

PbSEAG 

38 

37% 

675, 

50% 

68% 

49>i 

Raytheon 

RCA Corp 

59 

62 

59 

61 '• 

74 Vi 

75% 

Rynlds Mel 

38 

45% 

76% 

75 

Rock we8 Int 

40 

40% 

77% 

20% 

rr s 

Royal Dutch 
Safeways 

67% 

36% 

69 

36 

69*1 

R8Y. 

Sara Lee 

59% 

57% 

77% 

79% 

SFESopac 

38% 

38% 

19% 

19'i 

SCM 

73% 

73', 

3% 

3% 

ScWberger 

30% 

30% 

29% 

2f)*i 

Scoti Paper 

59% 

59% 

13% 

80% 

Seagram 

54 

53 

43% 

43% 

Sears Rack 

44% 

44% 

35% 

34* 

Shell Trans 

41% 

42 

23% 

48’- 

28% 

51'h 

Singer 
Smuikki Bk 

48% 

82% 

49% 

83% 

£2% 

27% 

Sony 

Sm Cal Ed 

19% 

19*1 

35 

34 » 

29% 

29% 

24% 

58*4 

Wt 

56** 

Sperry Corp 
Sid Oil Otno 

52 

49 

53% 

51V, 

35’/, 

45% 

34% 

45V, 

Sterling Dra 
Stevens JP 

39% 

33% 

40% 

33% 

43% 

43% 

Sun Camp 

48% 

47% 

76V. 

77>, 

Teledytie 

356% 

354 li 

44 A, 

44 

Teoneco 

37 

37% 

64% 

65% 

Texaco 

30 

30 

25:. 

26% 

Texas E Cor 

31% 

34 


151 155% 

14% 14S 

57% 57% 
44% 45 

50% 50% 
50 49% 

16% 16% 


28% 

61 


26% 

77% 


39% 39% 

46". 46 

7% 7% 

84% 64U 

55:. 54 

25% 25% 

48% 47% 



96% 

97% 

ManviHe Cp 

6% 

&>4 

Weyerti'ser 

36% 

36% 


35 

34", 

Mapco 

38% 

38 

Whirlpool 

64% 

64% 

CBS 

138% 

126'. 

Marine Mid 

48 

46 

Wentworth 

68V. 

68 

C'lmOta Gas 

39 

39": 

Mrt Marietta 

37”. 

38% 

Xerox Corp 

70% 

70V, 

Cmb'mEnq 

35% 

35 

Masco 

5?% 

50 

Zenith 

23% 

m 

ComwUhEo 

35 

34% 

McDonnell 

78% 

78% 




Cons Edrs 

41% 

41% 

Meed 

48% 

48% 




Gn Nat Gas 

47*-. 

47% 

Merck 

150% 

152% 

CANADIAN PRICES 

Cons Power 

12% 

12% 

Mmsta Mng 

98% 

97% 




CrmiData 

23% 

23% 

Mobil Oil 

29 

29S 

Atntu 

7 1/3 

23% 

Com rig Q 

69% 

69 

Monsanto 

59% 

58% 

Alai Alum 

n/a 

46% 

CPC Inti 

57% 

56 

Morgan J P. 

72 

71% 

AlgomaSU 

n/a 

17% 

Crane 

47 

48 

Motorola 

43% 

43% 

Ben Tele 



Cm ZeMr 

45% 

45% 

NCR Corp 

44% 

45% 

Can Pacific 

n/a 

17V. 

Dart 3 Kraft 

47 

47 

NL Indsirs 

13.% 

7-4 

Commco 

n/a 

71% 

Deere 

30 

31 1 * 

Nai Dtstlrs 

37% 

38 

Con Batnrst 

n/a 

24% 

Delia Ar 

41% 

41". 

Nar Med Era 

71% 

21 

GuliCN 

n/a 

15% 

Deiron Ed 

19 

18% 

NatSmcnot 

13% 

14!. 

Hkr/StdCan 

n/a 

23*'. 

Digital Eq 

168 

171% 

Norfolk Sift 

88% 

89 

HdsnBMm 

n/a 

24V, 

Disney 

139% 

135% 

■VW Saner p 

37% 

33% 

Imasco 

n/a 

25V. 

DowCnem 

48% 

49% 

OcodniPei 

76% 

26% 

Imperial Oil 

n/a 

45% 

Dresser bid 

18". 

18% 

Ogden 

31% 

30 'a 

In Pipe 

n/a 

38% 

Duke Power 

39% 

39% 

OknCorp 

m 

407. 

Masa-Ferg 

n/a 

283 

DuPont 

72 

71 % 

Owens-Ill 

64 V. 

63% 

RylTrusteo 

n/a 

28 ’A 

Eastern Air 

fl% 

8-» 

PacGasB 

77% 

22% 


n/a 

75 

Estm Kodak 

56 

56% 

Pan Am 

8% 

8% 

Sied Co 

n/a 

18% 

Eaton Corp 

75". 

76% 

Penney J C. 

64% 

63% 

Thmsn N A - 

n/a 

2714 

Emerson B 

88% 

88% 

Pennzoil 

55V. 

56% 

Wlkrhtoam 


28V. 

Evans Prod 



Pepoco 

77 

76V, 

WCT 

JUi 

14% 


aflnftiaJt a be k oatc iNfmSSWl t 


Texes Inst 
Te xas U tis 
Textron 
TratrirsCor 
TRW loc 
UAL Inc 
Unilever nv 

Un Carbide 
UnPacCor 
Utd Brands 
US Steel 
UidTectmoi 
Unocal 
Jim Walter 

wmerLmbt 
Wete Faroe 


127J, 

34% 

59% 

53% 

98K. 

58% 

139% 

96% 

50 

24>; 

23% 

53'S 

22 % 

51% 

49% 

60% 

49 


128 
34 Vi 
56 
53% 

98% 

58% 

140% 

97'. 

50* 

24*9 

23-8 

53>a 

23 

51* 

49'8 

80 

49'* 


She* RW I Traded yUnquMM 


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ABBEY UNITTHUST MANAGERS 

80. HOtOtmrn Ad Sou mtmxah BUS UAL 

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Capri o' Rewve 

600 

8014 

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158 

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Comm & Evg» 

610 

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ALLIED DUNBAR UNIT TRUSTS 
AMO Duntui Centra Swnwoii SNt 1EL 
9793 B 10366 S 0793 38281 
F*sl Trust 208 8 222 *4 *59 3*8 

Growth S income 126 3 13*5 +34 341 

CipiM Trust 22c 0 2364 +62 2- 78 

afirart 337 5 3S9 « +92 328 

Accun Trust 513 5 5*63 +113 311 

Amencan income 296 31 So *0 1 4.29 

Hen Hcam* Tsi 277 8 242fle +2.0 506 

Emm wcome 124 1 1322* +34*95 

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PlOhc Truer 12ft? 1376 +09 I JO 

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Secs Of Arne* Tw 197 9 ZiOB +27 0 88 

AM Asset Value 20S S 219.0 +38 3*5 

AtTBUTHNOT SECURITIES 
131 . FhSBury Pavement umoen £C2A 1A» 
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France 6 Property 
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Ken income r-Kome 
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tag" Yaw Income 


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Psal Pens inti 
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BG America 
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+ 13 169 
+5 B 5 22 
+21 000 
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BALTIC TRUST MANAGERS 

25/26 Afcetmane Sorter. London wix *AD 

01-491 0295 


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AuU accum 1269 194 9 

Do Income 987 964 

CaWX 6*5 666# 

£+eflUil Trust 3983 4227 

Eit+a income 87 8 721 

Financial 213 9 227 5 

500 2395 25*7# 

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Japan 4 Geo me 1201 1277* 

Do ACC 121.2 128 9c 

GrowM Accum 166 9 177 5c 

income Trust 308 ? 325 7# 

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Unw Teen Accum 49 6 52 7 

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WprWwne TruM I lei 142 8# 
Bl.m Fund ACC 397 7 3166 

Oc Inc 1952 21778 

BAFUKO FUND BUNAQERS 

PO Boa is6 eecenrum Keni OR3 

01-658 9002 


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Do Accum 
Fuct Japan 
japan 5oecu> 
japan Su/ims 
F in, Srnaaer Go 5 
F«V Eurrrpe 
Fear n Amar 


48 3 51 0 
424 45 3# 
944 1009s 
591 63 i. 


892 
61 6 
75 B 
218 
598 
B48 
469 


95! 

658 

BIO# 

76 7 

64Q* 

90.B 

501 


4XO 

-18 OBO 
-I 7 080 
+ 22 09U 
♦ 1 7 200 
+?5 230 
♦26 030 
+29 0 JO 
+04 030 
+06 270 
+21 0 90 
-12 3 40 


BARRMGTON MANAGEMENT 
59 Grevum Si London ECSP !D5 
Di-506 4433 
Planned ln» 

Eurotraan Inr. 

DO Accum 
General IK 
Do Accum 
Gin v«*a Inc 
Do Accum 
Hrch Vi*|fl Inc 
Of «cax" 

Japan inKxrm 
ret Acrum 

N American i« 

Do Accum 
PaCJic Income 
Do ACC'Xn 
6 m (» C/js mr 
Zn a«u-n 
BRIT 5NNIA UNIT TRUST 
74- ’8 FiusOuni Pawwr»jnr LdUun ECS* UP 
Ct 588 27".' Deaimg 01-838 0478 rY UonevGum 
DSOO-0 10-333 

Cwnwin C, n 56 S 5-7.5 Hb* D 64 

mil Rneuysry 981 10*6 +2.7 215 

SmaAjr Co' 1289 I379* +3! 153 

UK Gfowm 39* J 8 S +09 £.03 

Etna Inc 56/ 605# +08 7 51 

-Get 35 7 27 1 +0 5 7 70 

inc & lio+im 1904 203 S +57 4 32 


I0B8 

1158 

♦ 10 

Z 11 

78 5 

SO] 

+03 

137 

937 

98 3 

+ 12 

137 

141 4 

1505 

♦4J 

3.72 

i9r 5 

2037 

+57 

372 

111 9 

tis-se 

+3 6 

963 

172.1 

1778 

-4 7 

963 

V) 

823 

+ 2 * 

613 

1506 

1603 

♦ 4 7 

6.13 

i »8 

19 ? 0 

+3 2 

0?6 

1814 

19?' 

♦31 

0 J 6 

«5 3 

*83 

03 

0?7 

K4 

558 

03 

0 97 

10)1 

1086 

-10 

055 

1159 

r?l9 

-> 2 

055 

B’O 

71 3 

• 10 

216 

787 

838 

-1 J 

? 16 


EM Offer Cmg Vkf 


Nat Hgn Inc 
pw snares 
Commodny 
Faianca Secs 
Gold S Gen 
5n Leisure 
Proo Shares 

Hint Energy 
Worn T*«h 
Amer Growth 
Amer Income 
Amur Smaiwr Co* 

Auxi Growth 

E«*p Smoaar 
■-+ taa 
*+unn Kong Prt 

lm) Growth 
Japan R#t 
Japan Smaaer 

Erempi 

Eiemcn Market 

BROWN SHIPLEY 
9-17 Perrymoonr 
0444 458144 
BS Fund Income 
Do to# 
RnanoN 

GrowVi Accum 

Do income 
f* gft Wxxne 
Income 

Norm American 
Oramt 
Recovery 
Tecnnciggy 

German 


IB8 6 2014 
18.7 199* 
1275 1360 
406 43$ 
197 212 
156 166 
5* 7 58 3c 
*05 4J2# 
42 S 464 

B 0 102.4c 
7 615 
240 256 
S25 667 
132 Ml 
364 388 
SB 243# 
31.9 34 0 
473 505* 
13 7 14 6 
75J 789 
6*7 67 7 


+55 4 76 
*03 989 
-13 263 
+03 237 
+01 269 
0.71 
+03 1«5 
+07 09D 
-01 067 
♦02 335 
+08 584 
+03 IBS 
-34 053 
+02 0*1 
133 
-09 383 
+03 308 
+34 
+OS 
+21 3 82 
4.14 


Htt. H a yw a rta Hearn 


552 590# 
935 989# 
1117 120 1# 
1760 188.4 
1138 1213 
59 1 835c 

70 7 780 
57 7 62i 
614 660 
34 0 38 6 
1326 142 8 
S3 7 31.6 


+10 436 
+1 7 . 
+14 212 
+5 0 
+33 301 
70* 
+20 5B4 
+07 120 
♦17 030 
+21 331 
-13 0 60 
-04 £00 


BUCKHMIBH MAMMHWfT 
The Stock EMhange Londoi EC2P 2JT 
01-588 2866 
General Inc 14) ’928 2027 +49 336 

Do Accum (4| 3033 3193 +93 336 

income Fund 31 93.1 98 1 +3 * 481 

Do Accum (3) ifiO.O 1684 +58 48T 

inn me (2) 1113 U62# +11214 

Do Amim (21 147 0 153.8# +I3 3U 

5mjBwmcj5/ 967 9103?! +088 Jl4 

Do Accum (51 £1022 1086 +030 3 14 

CS FUND MANAGERS 
125. H*jn Ho®om. London WCiv 6PY 
01-212 1148 
CS Japan Fund 638 868 +35 032 

CAWKM FUND MANAGBIS 
1. Ohnnorc wav. Wemctey. HA9 Owe 
01-9* 887/ 


1 8876 
GhTwih 
Income 

F« East 

Norm Ametcan 


2644 2813 *91 3l3 

30? I 321 4 +102 4 63 

144 0 152.6 +33 068 

1348 1433 .. 083 


CAPEL (JAMES) MANAGEMENT 
100. Ota Broad SL London EC3N 1BO 
01-821 0011 
Cawtal 13) 331.9 3494 +113 1 B8 

income 13) 263 0 2759 +135*61 

Norm American (3) 2538 2664 -48 1*9 

CATER ALLBI 

i. hen Hlawr Sr. EC*N FAO 
0I-B3 6 


6JM 
G* Try# 


887 105.4# +1 7118! 


COntUU. BOARD OF FINANCE OF 
CHURCH OF EHQ 
77 London Waa EC2 IDS 
01-588 1815 

kii Fund 366 05 

FuM tat 13255 

Depose 1000 


. . 464 
. 10.79 
..1170 


CHAH/TTES OFFICIAL INVESTMENT PU» 

77 London Wri. London EC2N 1DB 
0I-5BB IBIS 
Income 32986 c .. 538 

Accum 931 77 

CLERICAL MEDICAL UNIT TRUST 
MANAGERS 

Nan *, Plan. BnaW BS2 OJH 
0272 277719 

General Eomy 35 3 376 +1 1 

Eouny Hen income 378 399# +12 

Gdl 8 Fhed lm Qh 273 29 1 +07 

moe, seavmvs 237 25J +02 

COUHTY BANK UNtT TRUSTS 
161 CheapMfe. London EC3V ecu 
01-726 (9*» 


261 0 377 8 
*08 *34# 
1498 1585 
13S5 I44.I# 

4R1& 

37 7 4Q1# 
1114 1185 
973 HRS 
1023 108.B# 
1849 1966# 
51.8 55 0c 


*50 16* 
-0 5 5B7 
+42 550 
+16 £57 
+07 I 59 
+59 £71 
+1.T 4.75 
+49 081 
+09 1 73 
+12 103 
+25 £46 
+02 633 


CAP4M Accum 

Energy Trust 
E»tra income 
Fmanoai 
G# Strategy 
Groerth bwasnnem 
Income 6 Growth 
Japanese S Paohc 
Nlh Alrwr Cvowm 
InO Ryc orw v 
SmaPer Co s 
GUOai me Tit 

CROWN UNIT TRUST SERVICES 
Cmwn House. Wotang QU3I 1XW 
0*86? 5033 

H<gn income Tiun 2185 2315 + 6 B S53 

GrjwBi Tnisr 20.T82SI# +68 32* 

Ameocan Trua 1208 1292 -13 0.7? 

EAGLE STAR UNIT TRUST MANAGERS 
Bam Ilona cnenemum. Gkiuiie jh P OLS3 7 lo 
02*2 521311 

634 £68 +20 100 

92.4 666 *20 300 

66 9 71 4 +1 7 1 75 

605 650 +23 538 

623 663 *12 I SI 

813 664 +35 076 

655 669 +06 125 

507 54 1 +13 92* 

507 541 +13 924 


STERLING SPOT AND FORWARD RATES 


Mmke* rates 
day's mw# 
FoOruarySU 
N York 1.4470+14710 
Montreal £0677-2 1007 
ARQ dam3.6Z76-3.6902 
Brussels 65.76-fie.92 
Cprtgon II .8658- >2 03® 
DuOkti 1.0696-1 0787 
FranKfun3322+-336B3 
LisDon 21047-215® 
Madrid 20* 1 5-206-39 
MdanM 3184.90-222630 
O30 10.1736-103672 

Pads 9.886&-1 0.0460 

St'khtm 103927-103234 
Tokyo 260.45-26537 
Vienna 22.65-2233 
Zurich 2.7247-2.7595 


Uarkel rates 

don 

February 28 
1.4515-1.4530 
£0677-2.0742 
36520-3.6587 
® .91-6®. 13 
7 1.9749. 11.9987 
1.069S- 1.0705 

33296-33358 

210.47-212 14 

20*15-204^1 

219612-2202.75 

10.1736-1031 3T 

9.92B3-93530 

10-3927-10.4180 

261-53-28234 

22.65-22.69 

2.7381-2.7433 


0 60-0.57prBm 
0.08-0. 19ms 

2 h- 2 pnm 

i6-8prem 

SJt-Tfejram 

46-93drs 

2 J k-2%pr#m 

235-61 Otis 

35pram-l5cts 

9-17*5 

%+1(fiS 

1%-3%dq 

I'/.-'AprBm 

1Y,-1Wprem 

iaJk-uKp«m 

214-1 apram 


airxmOn 

I S4-1-58 

032-0.04 

6-5 Y. 

46-34 

1J14-lin 

128-223 

6*4-6 

555+1500 

25-105 

31-40 

2)4-3% 

5+7% 

3VS-1S4 

416-4 

3314-29% 

5%-5% 


Tb« pound had a had day on 
currency markets, dropping 
more than 3 cents on its 
previous dose to end at 
SI. **522 (S 1.4832). Sterling's 
value against the mark also 
fell sharply to 3.2327 (3.2990), 
dropping more than 10 pfen- 
nigs in two days. 


DOLLAR SPOT RATES 


Ireland 


Sterling Index compared with 1975 was down at 733 (day's range 733-74.1). 
Rates supplied by Barclays Bank HOFEX end ExttriL 


M; 

Australia ..... 
Canada . 
Sweden 
Norway 


13870+13700 

2.1525-2.1545 

249 ID-2.4830 

... 0.6990-0.7000 

1^210+1.4280 

7.1550-7 .1550 

— ... 6-9850-63950 

81700-6.1800 

23190+23210 


MONEY MARKETS 


GOLD 


Bose Rates* 

Clear mg Banks 12’, 

Finance House 12 
Discount Market Loons % 

Overrun hi High: 12'.? Low 10 

week Aied: f2>« 

Treasury BBs (Dscounl 
Buymg SeBmg 

2 mnth 12'j- 2mnlfi 12s.« 

3m W! it **,« 3rrnm it 

Prime Bank BAs | Discount %,) 

1 ninth 12 , .a- 12 , i? 2mnBi }2']M2 ] (d 
3mrwi ll»'i.’+ll-’»j.'6 mmh ir/.-lli^ 

Trade BBs (Discount %; 
irwim 12‘'t( 2 ninth 12 j, j, 

3mntti 12 ’»k emrrtti 11% 

lntertwnk(%) 

Ovenught open 12^. dose 8 
1 week iM-12% 6mnth 12%-12 

i mran 12"«-12»4 9mnth ll’P.t+ll'iM 

3mntti 12%-12% l2mrh 11%-IIK 

Local Authority Depostts (V) 

20875 12% 7 days 12% 

1 mnth 12% 3mrah 12»^ 

6mmn 11% >2mth 11» 


Local Authority Bonds (%) 

1 mnth 13'4-13 2 mnth 13)4-1314 

3 mnth 13+I2ii 6 mnth 12%-12% 

9 mnth 12V12V. 12 nth 12*4-12% 


EURO MONEY DEPOSITS % 


7 days 7*'— 7% 

3 months 7 ,, '*«7 ,, i» 
Deutxchnwk 
7 days 4*4-4% 

3 months4»w+«»is 
French Franc 
7 days 9%-9K 
3 months 14%-14 
Swiss Franc 
7 days 2K-2 
3 months 4-3% 

Yen 

7 days 6%-6% 

3 months B'w-5 1 ®* 


can 854+7% 

1 month t'V’ie 
5months7 , 7/”u 
caH 5-4 
1 month 4%-4K 
6 months 4 , ic-4'w 
cell SYi-BVk 
I month I5K+14V 
6 months 1311 -12% 
cai 2%-1% 

1 month 354-354 
6 months 4-3% 
cal 6-5 
1 month 6 7 *c+&«c 
8 months 5%-5% 


GOLD 


GoktS336.75-3373S 
Kr 

Si LOO- 23435) 

i. 75-56. 50) 



ECGD 


I mnth I254-TS 
fimnth 1 1 ,, ie-1 1 ' 

Dollar CDs r>) 

1 mnth 7.70-7.65 
6 ninth 7.70+7.65 


3mntfl 12% -12% 
.«l2mtti ir/,-11% 


3 mnth 7.70-7.65 
12mth 735-7.80 


Fixed Rate Starling Export Finance 
Scheme IV Average reference rate lor 
interest period January 8. 1886 to 
February 4. 1986 mehisive: 13.077 per 
cant 

Quotations on this page relate 
to Friday's trading. 


Denmark 

West Germany .. _ 

Swtttertand 18750-1.8770 

Netherlands, 2^050-2^060 

France S.B2B0-83300 

._. 179.80-179.90 


1508^-15113 

, | Comm) 45.40-4550 

Hong Kong 7.8020+73040 

Portugal 14&50-147J50 

Spam 14050+141 SO 

Austria 15.68-15.68 

*Uqyds Bank bnimaflonal 


UNXM COMMODITY ■ 
EXCHANS 
Rubber inp par Mo: 
Soyabean meat, coffee and 
cocoa tn t per tonne: 
Oaa-eft end sugar la USS 
per tonne. 

G W Joynson and Co report 
RUBBER 

Unq'tsd 


_ 2715-10 
- 27»« 
2820-2735 


VoL 

SUGAR 


M 


March 

May- 1602-60.0 

Aug 1B7. 0-66.4 

Oct 170. 4-70 J) 


OTHER STERLING RATES 


ArgefrhnaausrraT — 1.1672+1.1703 

Australia doBar 20871-20923 

Bahrain dinar 055304X5570 

Brazil cnizwro* — N/A 

pound 0.7460-0.7560 

marfca 7.4050-7.4450 


Greece drachma - 
HongKongdolv . 

India rupea 

IraqMnar 

Kuwait dinar KO _ 

Malaysia deflar 

Mexico peso 


202-50-204.50 
. 11.398-11.414 

— 1780-18^0 

N/A 

0.4130-0.4170 
353930.6461 
640-690 


New Zeeland doAar 2.78S5i799i 

Saudi Aratxartyai 5^530-50930 

Singapore dollar 314482.1510 

South Africa rand 2JB02+29047 

U A EcWtam 5.3840-5.4240 


Vot 

SUGAR 

fWfXBl 

All months unquoted 


.644 


Vot 

COCOA 
March „ 
May — 

JUy 

Sept — 
Dee 


March 

S= 


— 1562-45 

— 1548-45 

— 1578-77 

— 1605-04 

— 1627-26 

— 1553-52 

— 186885 
5800 


COFFEE 

March — 

.May 


2575-68 

264838 


July 
Sept 

Nov 

Jan 2880-50 

March 289080 

vot 8129 

SOYABEAN 

Aprt 1342-34.0 

Ajob 131 JJ -302 

Aug 728/4-280 

Oct 1297-293 

DOC 131.831 J 

Feb 133.0-32-3 

April 134831.1 

Vot 82 7 

GASOIL 

March 173J82S 

April 14725-00 

him -i — : 14l.0(M050 

Ju« t38M04TJ0 

July 137 J0-00 

Aug 142.00-38.75 

Sepl 1*3-50-4250 

Oct 147.00-45.00 

Nov : 752.MM3.00 

Vot 7717 


LONDON METAL EXCHANGE 
Unofficial prtc#* 
Official Turnover figures 

Price bi C par metric tome 
SBvar in pamper tray ounce 

Rudolf WW * Co. LbL report 

COPPER HIGH GAADE 

Cash 998892 

Three months .. 1Q07JXM008 

Vol 15500 

Tone Finn 

STANDARD CATHODES 

Cash 975.00-980.00 

Three Months — 1000-1005 

VW M 

Tone — Idle 


TM 

Cash Suspended 

Three Months 

vol 

Tone 


LEAD 

Cash 257 .00-258-00 

Three Months. 266-08266^0 
Vol 5300 


Tone Steady but quM 

Zinc-StBhdBld 

^i”!!_-. 410.0842000 

Three Months — - — 

Vot "■ 

Tone . ... — — — 


Zncffioh Grade' 

M3.__ 423.OM24.00 
Three Months . 436JXM36JO 

Vrt 

Twie 

Three Months — 396^-397.5 

Vol — 

Tone «ao 


saver Smafi ’ 

Cash 3845G8S4 

Three Mdntfa...- 296^397? 

Vd 

Tone 


Cash 7905879150 

Three Months . 515.086 15.50 

Vol 6700 

Ton# Firmer 

reck* 

Cash 2825-2835 

Three Months- — 28982895 

Vol 384 

Tone Steady 

MEAT AND LIVESTOCK 
COMMISSION 
Avarage fatatoch prtoes at 
representative markm on 
February 27 

GB: Cattle. 93-20p per kg fw 

(+0.52) 

GB: Sheep 2J»XI1 p por kg est 
d 

Cw (+16.96) 

GB: Pjps, 77-56p per kg hr 

England and Wales: 

Canta nos- down ll.i %. am. 
price. 98.63p(+0.51| 

Sheep nos. down 0.8 %. eve. 
price. 206.71 p(+14 95) 

Pig ixb. down. 112 VW. 
pnee. 77.61pt+1.69) 

Soodancb 

Cattle nos. down 72 %>. ave. 



H+015 

LOffflON GRJUWfUnms 

EpanooM. 


Month 
March . 
May 
JMy - 
Sept 
Nov 
Jon 
Wum* 


Baripy 


Ctaa# Om 

t*sss_ .moo 
. ruuo iitas 
11080 —Z 

9965 5790 

1KJ85 HUSO 
tOMQ- 10525 


-481 

-72 


Month 

March 

iS 

June 

JUy 

Aug 


^S"®. * 

UMLIKI HEELS 
1043 1049 

Unq>d 1035 
nos mcjo 
1toJ> 102.0 
19141 1015 

. VW 14 


CONDOM ‘ 
POTATO FUTURES 
£ penance . 

Month Open Ooae 
Anri . »00 . 9630 

hfey 10350 10350 

Nov . 7850 7B.3Q 
Feb • 6040 8600 

Apr* 9850 8830 

. - Vot 709 

BALTIC FRGGHTMDGC 
8XL MOM FRbmw ltd 
report *10 per Mac paint 


April 86 6840-8580 853.0 

jSjSO 7550-7609 7000 . 

CXt 86 851 MOSS BSSRw 
Jan 97 — — 885JJ* 

Aprsar . 9425 

Jury 67 8075 

Oct 87 . S830 

Jan 68 - 9«U) 


Spot 737. 
VotlBBli 


O 

188 lots 


INVESTMENT TRUSTS 


1985 

Low COrapwiy 


Orow 
a* yu 

Pro Oi gv pvnoa V P/E 


LONDON -FINANCIAL FUTURES '. 


Three Month Sterling 

MarB 6 — 

Jun 86 

Sep 86 — - 

Dec 86 

Previous day s total open m 
Three Month Eurodollar 

Mar 66 

Jun 86 

Seo 66 

Dec 86 

US Treasury Bond 

Mar 86 - 

Jun 86 ..... 

Sep 86 - 

Short Gift 

Mar 86 - 

Jun 86 

Sep 86 


Gift 

Marlfi 

Jun 86 

Sep 86- 


Open 

87 94 

££ 

Law 

87.78 

Ctoae 

87.76 

Eat vol 
317 

8877 

8825 

88.64 

88.66 

1350 

8930 

89.33 

89.28 

89.15 

154 

8968 

89 AS 

89.60 

89.49 

121 

irast 11753 






Previous day's total open interest 19958 

9221 

92.36 

9219 

9225 

1032 

9229 

92.56 

9237 

9239 

4841 

9233 

92.52 

9232 

9233 

894 

9215 

9235 

9215 

9218 

240 

94-30 

Previous day's total open interest 3715 
96-17 94-08 94-27 1222 

94-10 

95-31 

93-10 

94-00 

7809 | 

N/T 




0 1 


Dec 86 — 
FT-SEKJO 
Mar 86. 


Jun 86 


98-04 

96-31 

N/T 


114- 18 

115- 18 
HfT 

N rr 

15550 
156 55 


Previous day's total open interest 827 
98-08 98-00 97-62 414 

98-36 88-28 SB-22 ISO 

0 

Previous day's total open intorest 9496 

115- 18 114-18 114-28 924 

116- 22 115-15 115-24 3901 

116-12 0 
116-12 0 

Previous d^s total open Interna 1604 


155.60 

150.55 


153.1 

155.40 


15350 

15560 


430 

36 


104 87 

700 500 
155 111 
321 2*5 
163 123 
120 BS 
Ml 03 

M % 

3M‘a“ 
to 6* 
00 72 

130 525 
17B 119 
MS 97 
127 95 
330 26* 
(S3 HZ 
515 348 
S28 363 
199 1E0 
llfl 89 
138 103 
3M 25* 
144 |I4 

S3 05 
l» 91 

131 85 

97 79 

168 T2Z 
253 IBB 
295 2 *2 
185 BO 
590 415 
316 235 
302 233 
1CH 76 
MB 100 
564 405 
<33 105 

S IDO 
120 
358 26B 
79 59 

'Si S' 

<85 M5 
1*6 97 
295 230 


Atol 
Manor 
Amar t rws 
Ano Amer Sac 
Asndoiin 
AVanae Assets 
BMm 

nu. 

Br EnifWB See 
Bncsh Inr 
Bnamer 

star* 

Ciescem Japan 
Dwo» Inc 
Do Cap 
Dniywn Cons 
Oaynn Far East 
Drayton Japan 
Drayton Prana# 
Dunne Lon 
Edm AM# Asser 
EMMff 
BacmcGan 
En*in Int 
EngMi Scot 

Enagn 

f rt i 


F * (_ _ __ __ 

F S C Picric 
Fill# 

fina Scot Are 
PVr 1)0 Don 


138 

320 

144 

B3 

121 

131 

« 

UK 

253 

2» 

120 


Benvng Clavaf 318 
Ranvng Entarpra* 302 
Ftonig Far EMI 97 
Ftamng BadflEsM TIB 
Hanwg Juan 504 
Ranvng MetcsnUa 133 
Remng OvatMas 129 
Renxnfl Tadi 

GBC Caput 
OT japan 
Gan#al Funds 
Gtmaiai Cons 


103 


21 r 33303 

888 


20 In 17 3X3 


+1 

A3 

XI 353 

821 

+3 

as 

20 492 

163 


4.4 

27 610 

10B 


08 

07 . 

110 

-t 

33r 33 *1.4 

180 

+T 

18 

03 .. 

50 


£7 

4 7 324 

32 


X? 

22 430 

395 

+12 

200 r 53 2*2 

to 

• +1 

XI 

3.6 405. 

no 

4-+T 

33 r 17 3X8 

730 

+6 

30 Qi 

41 340 

164 


XS 

03 . 

<16 

115 

321 

4 . . 

12.0 

104 1X7 

♦1 

143 

43310 

[PA 


18 


515 

4+3 

1.4 

03 . 

510 


18J* 

30 3X8 

IW 

+2 


40 3*2 

109 


09 

00 78.4 


IS2 

357 

79 

TOO 

144 

142 

295 


-I 

+4 

+2 

+2 

1+1 


+3 

*1 

• *3 

• +14 

• +<4 
+1 

• +l 
+2 
+t 

• +1 
♦2 


e+2 
m .. 

• +5 


56, 

5.0 
2JQ 

38 

2.0 
25 

llfr 

145 

a? 

B5 

145 

125 

15 

35 

57 

45 

39 
35 
7.1 r 
Z1 


X* 410 
19 727 
35 426 

24 40.7 
30*7 6 
15 725 

25 542 
T.T 37.0 
45X5 
45 203 
73 10.1 
18 81.1 
4.0 304 
45 359 
15 HO 
XI 4S4 
19 . . 
35 432 
39 427 
22 64.7 
29 436 
27 523 


29 r I * 90.6 
29 29 079 
159t 54 2X9 


1985 

HflW L gar Company 


0# vu 

CtTge pane! % P|E 


Prashanr House 


125 H8’j Gtssgow Saar* 
330 251 GUm 

Oovan Adamic 
Goven Ontrnai 
Goven Stratgy 


14B 110 
181 VI 87 
209 152 
278 202 
273 220 

573 *40 
SA 208 
62 41 

202 162 
BS » 
a? 66 
110 X 
181 133 
137 106 
1S3 112 
251 153 
338 288 
4« 354 
77 X 
!7B 163 
54 


IP) 

tafesHn Success 
few Cap 
Japan Asms 
U arDBMmuv 

Lon Marei u int Sac 
Lon Trua 


Monks 
Mxrev mcom 
Mxray HI 
Munay Smsl 
Murrey Manure 
Mew Court 
New Damn 04 
928 

Inc 83 



4+> 

33 

Z7SD3 

32B 


145 

4.4 318 

138 

+1 

40 

£9 *2* 


-1 

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21 696 

sm 

+2 

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24 59* 

276 

4+0 

24 

09 . 



S3 

26 302 


+1 

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33*27 


+2 

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+3 

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14 95 * 

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32 

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67 


XI n 91 227 

110 


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181 

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137 

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7.1 

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751 

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338 

+2 

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100 70 

IDS 75 
178 137 
256 197-, 
lit 79 
i4S'.-m 
160 129 
107 79 

158 12* 
147 lit 
270 211 
333 2*8 
172 137 
125 103 
63V 72V 
242 IX 
82 52 

X 61 
110 8 * 
105 139 
303 259 


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TB AusreU O 

m Cny Of Lon MB MS 
TP Ind A Gen 17B 
TO Na amt Rev toj 
TO Nonn Anreica 96 
TO Pacific S*m> l» 
TO Property iW 

TO Teen 106 

to Truman 15 » 
tanyna Bar 14* 

Ttwogmorton 270 

Throg Sacued Cap 3J2 
Trens Ocame 172 

Trome 

lytpWi** lr« 

U5 Daoantmv 2« 

v+ng Rasoureas 53V 
wasrpoal 6* 

Wunatbotna Energy 08 
Wtom IX 

reoman 303 


LTr UQ} 
61 U . 
31 37792 
Ur 57 303 
54r XI 467 
IV 4(06 
Ml 274X7 


+1 

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U 33390 

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T18 44 320 

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33 11 358 

+1 

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22 T 41 *U 

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£2 24 400 

X3 30374*0 
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396 

57 

174 

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204 52 275 
05 OS .. 
67 39 317 

4J r S3 1X0 


243 

324 

157 

248 

Nmr Traqn 

Nti Monte Sac 

219 

313 

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1.1 

40 

05 

16 872 

173 

m 


70 


07 

10 814 

310 

777 




7.7 

£9 5X7 

157 

128 

Ouwlch 

167 


44 

20 AS 

11)1 


Pacdrc Atsats 

72 




43 

30 

DO Wma 

38 




48 



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03 

00 . 

375 

297 

flHOUtl 

375 

*5 

150 

*0 380 

IS6 

125 

River 8 Marc 

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4 .. 

XG 

287 

?44 

inn 

pm 

2*1 

+2 

121 

50 3X5 

233 

168 


228 



198 

ISO 

Robnco 

19* 

+1 



296 

13 

229 

10 


299 

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• +5 

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71 

2.4 4X2 

30 42.0 

174 

96 

SI AixaaM 

174 

• .. 

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377 

235 

SCpMsIt 

327 

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80 

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211 

Scot Aniancan 

286 

4 . 

97r 

X* 402 


99 73 

446 345 
27* 204 
420 35*'. 
506 500 
IV 10X 


Scar Om ni 
Scat Mh 
S cat N« 

Sac* Merc A' 
Second ANSncv 
Sac a Scotland 


X 

446 

273 

420 


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29 29 4X7 
W.7r 24 550 
69 25 511 
2S9 60 21.1 
3* Bn 4)31.1 
69, 47 349 



The prices on this page refer to 
Friday** tndfng. 


THE TIMES UNIT TRUST INFORMATION SERVICE 


UK BauncM me 
Do Accum 
LUt Gnmih Acorn 
UK inc me 

N Anwcan Accum 
Fa, Eastern Accum 
Euiopaan Accum 
IXfitllRInc 


PM UNIT TOUST MANAGERS 
4 uetawe Ononi Edntwrah 
031 226 3*92 


Americ an Fmf 
Caoaai Funu 
Grawvi B kie Funtr 
High Dm Fund 
biMmatonal Fund 
Reumrcas Fund 
Set# jao Coe Fnd 
TcK-yo Fund 


ess me 

50.1 US 7 

1207 129 la 
HO 102.7 
1691 1W« 
190 203 
275 294 
1148 122B 


♦01 2*2 
+2 1 190 
+2J 4*6 
+28 657 
+09 134 
-01 222 
*ot a io 
-12 020 


EMDUMNCC FUND MANAGEMENT LTD 
MMi house. 41. Herrmgtcm Gordans. Lornkxi 
SW7 4JU 

01J73 7281 

Entwmnce 962 1029 3*0 


EOUTTABU UNITS ADMIHBTOATIOH 
35 Famiun Si Uarcneaw 
MI-538 5685 
Ewjow PNcan 
►kgh Inetsme Tnsi 
ijJi 6 Fned mr 


Tm (H kw Tresa 
Specui Sits TruM 
war Amjr rim 
Fat Easiam Tim 


89.4 739 

66 3 70S 
SM SIS 
599 63 B# 
70 J 74 8 
SO* 569 
61 1 650 


♦12 3*6 
+ 13 i53 
♦ 18 890 
+10 189 
+1.1 153 
+06 196 
+10 0 83 


EQUITY & LAW 

Si. Gaoroe me C u po raw n Si Covens? CVi 
190 

0303 SS3231 


Bid Oder Omg yid 


UK Growth Accum 
Oo Income 
Hflhw inc Accun 
Do manna 
GUs/Fued Accum 
□a income 
Nth Amar Tsr Accum 
Far East Tat Accum 
Bra M Accun 
General Tnot 


1372 1*59 
1207 1303 
2174 2312 
1780 1B93 
95 5 IBLSc 
817 K9c 
129 9 mo 

109 7 1166 
131 3 139 6 c 
21X1 2368 


+X1 362 
+27 262 
+85 498 
+M 488 
+21 268 
+0.8 108 
-20 023 
+26 077 
+08 OX 
+X8 286 


FO C UNIT MKNAQEWEKT 

1. Laurence Poutnay MB. London EG*R DBA 

01-623*660 


Amencan Fund 
Capnai Find 
kreoma Fuw 
Far Eastern Fund 
Omreevs msoma 
Fixed merast 
Nwrei Has Fimd 
Eurapaan mcoma 


709 752 
1031 1103 
733 786 
610 663 
638 SftJ 
558 589 
460 493 
631 67 5# 


-13 027 
+06 044 
+24 5.00 
+01 043 
+07 X99 
+19 934 
+08 401 
+24 384 


120 

700 

ISO 


FSMVESTWBfT MANAGBIS 
tOO. West George St Glasgow 02 l 
041-332 3133 

Balanced am Inc 34.4* 3654 

DO Accum 3*75 3697 

Income an Inc 342 Rt 

Do Accum 350 372 

Samoa Go's me 359 M2 

DO Accum 362 385 

FIDELITY INTERNATIONAL 
River waft. Tonondga. TW9 1DV 
0733 382222 

Amencan 958 1025 +10 0 77 

Amei Ediety kreome 313 355# +12 501 
Amer Sfmoal S«s 492 S2« +i 7 a*3 

Far East he ?85 304 -02 405 

ON 8 Rued M S3 306 +09 934 

Growth S moora* 912 975 +3 3 4 52 

JM>*1 Special Sas 30 7 317# +07 
Japan Trusi 900 958 +32 

Managed lm TB 1186 l£89c +14 039 

Max fncrxne Eaury 689 740c +19 541 
ProtaBtxul OVi 30 7 31 7# *0 7 293 

Sauer East As* 7a 252 289 -10 047 

SpacMl S« 1X1 1456 +39 1.15 

FLBNNGimSEim 

8. Crertv So. London EC3A BAN 

01-633 5858 

Amencan Exempt 0*4 6 3512 -4 90 13? 

Japan Enrol £7795 28B3N -929 1 35 
Am Property Th $107950 7 75 

Propaiy Trust £2087 0 . . 6.10 

FTUUKMGTPN UMT HAMAOEMENT 
3. London Wal Bugs. Lonotai was London 
EC2M SNO 
01-628 5181 
Amer » Gen me 
Do Accum 
Amer TumamO fete 
Do Accum 


7V99 2362 
226 8 2412 
2102 2235 
2168 2X6 
1854 1572 
2214 2354 
830 882 
108* 1152 
1429 1516# 
1516 1612# 
1080 1158 
1130 1202 
1518 1614 
1HS 1792 
650 590* 
650 TOO# 
702 74 6# 
123 4 131 2* 
133 4 1416# 
48 4 514 
48* 51* 


Cantal TM me 
Da Accum 
Core 5 G*r me 
Do Accum 
Ertra me Tit me 
Do Accum 
income Truel 
Do Accum 
int Growth Fd me 
Da Accum 
Japan 8 Can me 
Do Accun 
uomre me Fd 
Recreaty 
Do Accum 
European Inc 
Do Acas» 

FHENDS PROVIDENT MANAGERS 
Parum End. Dodmg. Surrey 
0306 885055 

FP EalFty Dm 188 7 2009 

Do Accun 3132 33n 7 

FP Fixed lm Da 107 8 M«S 

Do Accun 1198 1280 

Stav+unKixo Da 1559 1650 

Do Accum 1603 1697 


FUTtOS IN COURT 

PuMC Tnaaa. Knpway. wc? 

01-405 4300 

GMMN 32X8 336 9 +21 8 284 

Grow me 1X3 1*1 D +4 J 023 

H«jn riem reaoMOO* +32 6*1 

GT UNIT MANAGBIS 

Btn FPor. X Ommlxni Sa London EC2M 4VJ 
01-283 2575 Oralmg Qi-626 3431 


-13 OX 
-16 OM 
+ 1 1 ’20 
♦1.3 120 
+29 198 
+35 298 
+23 623 
+29 623 
+43 478 
-4 4 4 78 
+41 4*2 
+4.0 4 42 

+02 on 
+0* 000 
+09 0 06 
+ii ana 
+20 502 
+4 1 >05 
+40 106 
.. 038 
.. 0» 


+*6 280 
+76 290 
+24 625 
+27 625 
+46 223 
+49 123 


+40 260 
+70 260 
+80 660 
+3 8 240 
♦04 100 
140 
-31 MM 
+40 OM 
-07 100 
-04 070 
-2 1 100 


l Daatarg 01-623 5766 Dealing Oi 423 


UK GAO Fnd Inc 010 97 4* 

Do Accum 1290 1X9# 

Income Fund 7*2 79 «• 

Pension Exempt i486 1557# 

itutenjhunai 135 7 145 2# 

US « Ganeni 551 590 

Tech 5 Growth 63 6 Hi 

Japan 8 General 164 3 175 6 
Far Easl S Gen 734 786 

European Fund 2100 224 7# 

Germany Fund 59 r 63 3 

GAATMORE FIM MANAGERS 
. ? Si Mary Ax Ldnacn FC1» sap 
^ 01^121?- 

American Trust 90 9 97 3 -16 000 

Ausuaun Trust 10 7 19 B -07 04+ 

Bnrran Tst Accum *9 B 5J 6 # -12 2 3? 

DO >SI *37 ««0* -r i 2.32 

Cornmoony Snare S59 565 »' 2 120 

European Trust *35 +05# -03 071 

Ere* mcame Trusi *** 475 +11520 

Far Eastern Trust 9*6 1012 +2* 0*2 

F..aa interest Fima 25 0 28 7 +OSiO<8 

G* Tn«l 25 8 26 6 +o*iaoi 

GiOtHI Fund Accum 1430 153 1 +18 025 

_ Do Dim 1371 1*5 9 -26 OX 

OMO store Tnisr 13B 148 +0 4 1.95 

Hedged Amenam ?8 5 30* -01 010 

H^h mcoma Tnw 12 * 2 1320# +?B 5M 
Hong Kong Trua 2S2 26 9# -1 t 0 93 

mcrew Fund 66 1 708# +1 5 369 

•nauranoe Agencm E4?85 462J +0712 19 

Japan Trocr i«r In 4 +30 jOu 

Maraqed Ewhuct 2*8*2586 -4S328 

W i Energy Trust 32* 3*5# +18104 

Speaar 5ns Tnnu 83 6 8S5 -38 110 

M Sent C a Rec Tsr 602 677 -14 to* 

GOMf77 , (4DNN7UWTMANAGEAKNT 
Wmcnrswr MM 77. Lcnaan Won 
10 + 


ummi EC2N 


01-588 5633 





hd Growm 

7i ? 

761 

+(JT 

1 Bi 

Amencan Growth 

BOB 

65 0# 

*1 1 

' BO 

American he 

65* 

6994 

-03 

589 

Lu'ooean ijrowtn 

1696 

181 J 

♦ ?? 

D?l 

Goa & Mew oil 

■LJ 6 

46 5 

-09 

107 

Japan Growm 

120.7 

129 04 

•27 

02- 

Paote loecvne 

61 6 

65 7# 

-OB 

J 73 

UK Spaa* opm 

753 

81 6# 

+24 

22? 


tMEtPUr MANAGERS 
Royal Exchange EC3P 3DN 
01-688 9903 
Cm S Fixed lm 
Growl* Emery 
GuUrdhd 
N AmancSd 
Paol-: 

ProOFly Share 
Shim# cemtamas 
fimw** Trua 


1119 1184* 
1955 2000 
281.6 291 M 
131 1 139 5 
157 9 168 0 
2166 2305* 
191 3 M3 8 
I9i8 2083 


-Si 970 
+53 2?* 
At 305 
-32 214 
-Ol 060 
+1 1 179 
+38 102 
+46 Q.SS 


M Orfar cmg nd 


GUINNESS MANON UNTC TRUST 
MANAGERS 
PO Box 441 32 Si Mary-at-ME, London EC3P9AJ 
01-623 9333 

SOD 537* 

110.1 1171 
1703 1812 
370 389* 


H*)h mcoma 
N Amar Truel 
Raccwery 
Gdl Trust 
Si Vmceni me 78. 

a Vraml US Oar 70J 

Tanpw Bar Sm CO'S Ml.: 


7356 

1495 


+06 589 
-20 084 
+43 17* 
+1.1 982 
+09 506 
-22 000 
305 


HAMBROS BANK UMTTOUST MANAGERS 
ttomNi UT AdnwL X RaylMgh HO, O ra m w uuu 
Essex _ 

0277 217918 


HBIrdRH Sm# Co's 110.7 1170* 
Kmsros at Amar 8 SO 89.1 

Hameros Jap J F E 
Hemoros Sc»n<J*n 
hmmvos Brepaan 
Hnmorot 1 


Hameros Egudy arc 
Hamorps HgriW 
Hammos Res Ass# 


870 9XA 
6X2 7 U 
80 897 
412 440 
7*0 81.7 
53 6 570c 
530 57.0# 


♦32 220 
-08 058 
+13 048 
-03 106 
-12 1.03 
-00 178 
+12 4.02 
+00 089 
+1 0 XII 


HENDERSON ADMDOntATlON 
Prewar UT AOiwii iiia a u n 6. fta| >e tfi Rd. Huhca 
B ramwood Essex 
0277-217238 
Soecui Saa Ik 
D o Accun 
Recovery Trust 
Coosa) Onrefi hie 
Do Accun 
mcoma Asian 
Fmanoal Tru* 


1176 1250# 
1652 17804 
905 9804 
53 7 575 
0*3 65.8 
100.7 10X3# 
1210 1303 


income 6 Grom# me 1314 1413 
Da Accun 2514 Z71 4 
H«>h mcoma Treat 1803 1710# 
Extra Meant M84 IS74e 
SnuMr Cos ON 010 974# 
Prof A G* 440 47.9c 

CM Trust 419 4X54 

Ftoa mtamst Thai S33 56.7c 
Gwoai H nu m ca ra 91 4 85 1 
Okoh Tear NM0 >109 

Gold 410 4384 

Hemaaoncl 1500 1622 

GfcCtti ftosaacaa «2 H7e 
wondvnda (5) 3327 3502 

Ausmikan GO* 652 

Baooacn 2075 Jf84 

Eure Smaier Cos 75 0 760 
Japan Trusi 1112 11704 

Jobs' Soeoal ton 11*0 121 • 
Fac*c Smaaer Cot 568 802 
Smgapore * Malay 2*0 2574 

Norm Amencan (380 >474# 
Am# Smaaer Cos 502 542 
Amer Ftew«V Tw 1184 1270 
Itgn mcorae Esemol 1112 11704 
Smaaer COS Exempt 100.7 1144 
Eure Exempj (5j 998 1050c 


Jaotn Exempt 
N Amer 
Gtoon Tear Ex 
pbcac Exempt 


1043 f 09.74 
8*3 Bar 
660 905 
1360 14X7 


+28 1.03 
+3,7 103 
+4 0 251 
+28 223 
+3 1 223 
+17 4.13 
*19 239 
+38 307 
+73 307 
+67 4.79 
♦30 4 S3 
+20 503 
-031041 
+13 936 
+02 988 
♦12 001 
-10 023 
-10 10* 
+08 037 
-10 IBS 

+106 144 
-1 B 088 
**2 079 
+16 035 
+55 046 
+60 am 
-16 asi 
-00 133 
+M a*5 

♦as aai 

+07 138 
+2* 542 
+2.7 298 
+2 A 159 
+20 007 
-03 1.17 
-1 7 0.15 
-90 135 


MLL SAMIEL UNIT TRUST MANAGERS 

*S amen 5L EC27 2 LX 
01-628 8011 


Bntren Trust Urea 
COIMV Trust Umjs 
Dc«ar Trust Urea 
European Trust 
Far East Trust 
Fmancuii Trust 
G* Brea IM Me 
Da Growm 
Hgh M Trust 
neon* Trust 
Mtumanonal 
Japan Teen TM 

Normal Resources 
Secuoty Trust 
Smaiar Cos 
Small Sts . 


5020 5349 
93* 9944 
178 7 1902 
ick- 6 nrj 
952 1013 
3342 3530 
200 2514 
40 4 4184 
604 64 3 
76* 8(3 
1050 11274 
MS 314 
290 910 
1712 1B32C 
7X8 78 E 
902 9604 


+130 316 
♦28 293 
♦09 HO 
+T4 003 
-10 134 
♦34 259 
■ 1006 
+00 326 
*42 5J8 
+53 400 
-18 311 
-08 047 
+05 139 
+48 312 
+18 167 
+30 25* 


IBI H1N3 MANAGERS 

32 Oumri Annas Gate. London SW1H 9AB 
01-22? 1COQ 


IB) Bra A 0 seas 
(Br f+gn (ncune 
I8> Secumy CM 
Mvesonenr Tst Fnd 


1221 130.1 
54 7 578 
56 1 581 
620 653 


+02 100 
+03 930 
+03 200 
+06 350 



KLHNWOWT B&tSON 

20 Fencfturen Si. London 1 
01023 0000 
Amor Grower Ik 
D o accum 
Fund inv Tst #c 
Do Accum 

Hen Viera me 
Do Accum 
im Recovery he 
Do Accum 
Japan Grawm Me 
Oj Accum 
Sriaaor Coj Me 
Do Accum 
UK Be Growm bk 
D o Accum 
wortowoe Tech aw 
th Accum 

LA C UNIT TRUST MANAGE14ENT 
Pvercv House cectrc# Aro EC 2 R 7 BE 
01-589 2900 

Mtnme Fund 377 1 3M04 5 70 

■ntumononal A Gen JIB2 222 74 083 

UGAL A GENERAL WTT TRUST 
MANAGERS 

os^oSm 0 * 1 ****** ^ 

E-Nxry Deramcn 254 5 7722c +4 0 22* 

Do Accun 397 3 *S*9c +10.7 224 

_ Do income 56 1 60 04 +10 501 

European 602 6444 *06 109 

Fa: Eainrm 6* 2 68.7 +42 058 

GCI Trua 73 5 77 B *?0 6.Q3 

Ml Manml 87 8 725 +12 128 

NanrerNK *60 *92 +0 7 350 

N Amencan Trest 707 7564 +13 365 

UK 5paool Sos 562 601 *1.9 225 

LLOTOS BANK |0OT TRUST MANAOERS 
Regsyars Om. Gonng^ly-Sefl. woritm, yy 

JUS Ml" 

04*4 459144 

Balanced 

Dc Accum 
Ene+gv MS 


JT1 1 182.9 +3 7 3 1? 

30'J 3222 +65 J 12 

- . *53 49 44 *01 301 

_ Do accum 500 524 +02 331 

Exi+a meome iij.3 1543 +35 549 

Oo «-:cum 2551 272.8 +63 5*9 

Gwman Gm he 568 607 -0.7 029 

Du At-eum 56 8 80 7 -07 029 

hart* J448 MIB *95 48* 

D-> tairn *7-15 507 4 ->24 46* 

me 7«" 167 3 1+8 B -1 1 OM 

Do Accum 17*5 166 6 -12 009 

Japan iifcwn 559 59 7 .*59 002 

Bu Accun 559 Mr +30 002 

N Amar C Gen *3 102.94 -04 IDS 

_Dj Accum I0S6 fTflfl -oj 10s 

Pool* Bosm B5J 101 94 +08 037 

DO Accum 99 5 10844 +06 037 

Smaaer Cos 4 floe 1655 1769 +3.7 193 

Dd Accun 18*2 197 0 +4 1 1 83 

Woncwid* Giowm 16* i 175s +15 120 

Oe *aum 2297 745 a +110 120 


tod cam Cfirg YW 


LLOTOS LIFE UNIT TRUST 
20. man Sl London BC2A8*4X 
01-920 0311 
Eawty Dot 10*9 1110 +X7 108 

Do Accun 1402 155.6 +52 108 

Get Trust 50.4 5X1 +1.7 XU 

Do Accun 530 58.7 +1.7 fill 

Mali harm Dot 8X0 880 +X2 401 

Do Actum 952 1010 +30 401 

US Grow*! 54.1 8704 +09 1.14 

Do Accun 5*0 5X04 +09 1 14 


LONDON 0 MANCHESTER 
wmnde Park. Exatar Ett IBS 
0392 52155 

Ganerat Trust *02 430 +10 300 

Income Trust 330 354# +00 650 

hMt na aonaf Trust 202 302 . . IM 

MaasECURtnes 
Three Quire. Tower Mi EC3R 68Q 
01-026*5* 

Amar 0 Gan Ik 21X2 22604 +0.1 103 

Do Accum 247.1 26104 .. 1.83 

Amar Recovery 2*00 254.4 -01 155 

Do Accum 2601 2757 -00 105 

Am Stnawr Cos 570 6004 -0.4 007 

Do Accun 580 6104 -a* 0.97 

Ausi a Gan IK 660 7104 -00 1.10 

Do Accun 720 77.74 -20 1 10 

Comm 8 Gan he 1537 18404 +1.7 XiD 

DO Accum 2000 21404 +20 X10 

Compound Growth 3770 4030 +120 328 

Qrewson Growth 3009 3223m +5.6 168 
Do he 1700 18004 +70 604 

DrwdeM Fund arc 37*9 397.4 +150 408 

Do Accun El 002 11.47 +044 406 

Euraoeur 8 Goner* 1674 177 4 +17 1.12 

Do Accum 
Eire You ims 
DO Accum 
For Eastern he 
Dd Accum 
Find Of Inv Ik 
Do to 

Central meant* 

Do Accum 
041 6 Fared hi 
Do Accun 
Gatd bicama 
Do Accum 
tow he 
Accum 

M Growm me 
Do Accun 
hd Ik Ik 
J uan a Gen Ik 
D o Accun 
Japan Smaowr to 
Mxaand 8 Gen me 
Do Accum 
Recovery Ftmo IK 
Da Accum 
Second Gan Me 
Do Accum 
Sots*# Cos Ik 
D o Accun 
Trustee Fund he 
Do Accun 
Ounoond me (3) 

Do Accun i 
Cremfund inc 
Do Accum 


"ft! 


1990 2113 +30 1.12 

2010 213 le +3S 508 
42X6 4*90 +180 508 
1038 11004 -8.1 209 

12X9 134.7 -67 109 

21X1 229.1 +38 181 

3350 3550 +55 181 

6624 596.14 +214 306 
tot. 77 12474 +048 396 
580 8104 +10 901 

S7.Q 913 +10 901 

410 4404 +00 207 
43 1 466 *00 267 

2892 3065 +718 509 

78X7 8117 +3X6 509 

6854 733*4 +140 119 
El 093 11894 +022 119 
540 5X1 +0.4 X13 


5618 5894 

6017 6410 

740 790 
498 0 527.9 
E1Z02 1295 
3090 3275 

3960 4198 

8270 665 1 
to 204 1297 
5880 83X14 


+134 008 
+140 aos 
+»4 a oo 
♦180 405 
+0.44 405 
+11.7 X26 
♦140 308 
+TX1 305 
+005 365 
+93 173 



9150 sea?# +14 4 173 
4147 4417 +120 408 

£11.71 1253 +004 4 39 
1083 4 +201146 

3294 4 +801148 

3461 34964 +11.6 598 
8922 9D104 +299 598 
(91 41X6 4320 +70 402 

357 4 +09 607 

*17.8 4 +105 807 


MOI UWT TRUST MANAGERS 

1i. Dewmuvre So. London EC2M «TO 

01-623 *273 

Eouty Enrol 388 8 3830 

Da *3Mn 4593 *79-7 

UK Minret Features 620 663 
Do Accun 


Accum 

US SoaoBl Futures 
Do Accun 
Gold 8 Precious Mar 
Da Accun 
US Siwaoi me 
Do Accum 
European Pin me 
Do Accum 


635 677 
97.9 IM* 

983 IM 7 
639 6X1 
8*4 6X7 
30.3 427c 
404 44 le 

5*3 6704 
57 7 815# 
091 7X54 

890 7X84 


+85 204 
+105 06* 
+10 110 
+11 110 
+4.6 X14 
+4 6 XI* 
+1.8 OB? 
♦1.8 032 
-13 101 
-10 201 
-04 S 39 
-04 500 
+10 093 
♦J.l 095 


WJk UNIT TRUST MAMAGEMEXT 

99-100 Samsung AS. MMtfone. Kara MEi* iwt 

0622 674751 

ULA General 310 330 +07 128 

*4 LA MmConil 4S9 *97 *06 1.06 

ULA Grit UK 231 24.04 +0010.55 

MLA Income 364 3854 +10 5.19 

MLA Eudpaan 260 270 +00 001 

UANUUFE MANAGEMENT 
Sr Qacrgn Way. a wee n e g s Marts 


0*38 358101 
Growm UnllS 
Cut a Fired hr 
Hon mcoma Unas 
■■ A YM GM urn 
GnMfr (MBS 
N Amencan Urns 
For East Unnm 
Smaaer Cos Fuid 


690 7*0 
IM7 108*4 

1041 ms 

528 S4 74 
1«f f 106 
6*1 681 
730 778 

61.7 656 


+33 301 
+24 855 
+37 502 
+0810.1* 
-07 035 
-15 059 
-03 052 
+10 198 


MBHCAP UWT TRUST . „ 

room Hsa 252 Rareterd ReL E7 
>1-23* 55** 

Mencap Ito 1 1353 +* * *31 

MERCURY FUND MANAGERS LTD 
33 ^ 604,1 ^ 


Ot-TBO 
Amer Growth 
Dcr Accun 
Amer Mcoma 
DC Accum 
Euopean Growth 
Do Accun 
General 
On Accum 
Gar 8 Fried 
Do Accum 
ineune 
Oo xccum 
hnemasonai 
Oo Accum 

Japan 
Dc Accun 
Recovery 
Da *eeum 
Exempt Dan 
tremor Accum 


913 971 
9*6 1005 
*87 480 
*79 SOB 
108.4 11X1 
1093 1161 
2309 24564 
371.9 3956# 
83 7 645 
91,7 626 
74 I 7884 
802 6534 
1573 me 
2*3 * 2589 
liot 117.14 
112 2 11934 
173 4 *84.4 
183 a iflSf 
2136 22024 
3263 33684 


-1.7 160 
-17 ICO 
-00 501 
-09 501 
*12 1.48 
+12 1*8 
+4* 123 
*7 1 123 
+10 00* 
+12 BO* 
+10 458 
+1* *58 
-14 129 
-30 126 
+31 002 
+X1 002 
+50 208 
+5C 289 

+5 7 167 

*80 267 


NMHANt) BANK QROtP UWT TRUST 
Managers 

CpurwouiHse. s*w6t Hrad-SheflMdSI 3RD 
01*2 796*2 


Carnal Income 
Do Axxurn 
GommcxHv A Gen 
DC A-eum 
Erfhj x+grr arc 
Do Accum 
G*l 5 Frxad Inc 

[tn *ia:um 
•n< 

Accum 
ineoma 
Do Aaun 

Japan S Pacrtc 
Do Accum 

N American arc 

Do Accun 
Euro Gan me 


•* 6 : 


»4# 70S 
1006 1071 
1100 117.3 
151* 162 8 
5*8 584 
81 9 £60 
52? 5*54 
83/ 117 <4 
1*03 1*98 
2328 348J 
f»3 lfi7S4 
258 * 27X 74 
195* 20X4C 
3U8 218 4c 
1011 1080 
1215 1296 
sas tnsi 


+1 7 1*5 
+12 1*5 
+00 3to 
+1.3 3.07 
+11 817 
♦ 10 8.17 
+04 865' 
+15 965 
+39 583 
♦86 5.83 
+38 381 
+7 9 301 
+*S 022 
+5 3 002 
+15 101 
+M 121 
*27 125 


Od oh# Qmg Yid 


Do Accun 
Smaaer cm km 
Do Accun 


11X0 1250 +32 12S 

857 10104 +35 178 
10)2 10704 +37 17B 


MURRAY JOHNSTONE UWT TRUST 
MANAGEMENT 

16X Hope Sweet. Gtogow C2 2un 
041 ??l 8252 
Anwrtan 1050 11X14 +00 352 

Europerm I860 20X7 

Smaller Cos 176.4 1883 


Bid 00# cmg Yid 


Japan Sn#iar Cm 

Uumkm 

New Tactmicny 
SE AS* Growth 
Scoots 
ScotNms 
Scuryrohk 


♦v* a 

♦45 107 
+20 1 


100 


NATKMMLtoKRMXNrMVESTMENT 

MANAGBIS 

43 GraceduchSL EC3P 3NH 
01-823 *200 Ext an 


NPI UK 
Do Accun 
NROwlM 
Do Accun 
hr Ear Acc 

DO DM 
American Ace 
Do Dm 


1880 2000 
3018 321 . 1 
5076 5*004 
61X0 65X54 
580 6334 
595 8304 
6X0 580 
54.7 5X2 


+84 X10 
+1X2 310 
-06 1.10 
+13 1.10 
+0.6 030 
+00 030 
♦05 100 
+05 130 


NORWICH UMON 

PO B ox «. N ravach NR1 3NG 

0603 822200 


Grow Treat 
ma Treat 


to 005 11*24 +035 3 89 
m* 12X5 -0.1 100 


OFFBfHEWEH TRUST MANAGB4ENT 
06. Carrem SraaL London EG«N 6AE 
daaangs 01-236 3885/6/7/8/9/0 
fcam nt a iN Growth 121.7 1301 
heuna 8 Grow* 53* 560 

SpadNStt 712 783 

American Grow* 312 345c 

japan Grow* *35 *6-7 

Eurapaan Grow* 519 65.6# 

UK&mrtt *X7 502 

PxdAc Growth 36.4 300 

H^i Mcoma 299 310 

Praedcal tneema *7.6 50.6 

Do Accun 8X8 01.1 

PEARL TRUST 

251 HHP HcArom. WCIV 7BB 
' »B«41 


-23 000 
+20 XOO 
+00 *00 
-03 0.70 
+10 .. 
-00 120 
+13 000 
+08 0.10 
+00 830 
+08 130 
+10 130 


Sander Go's Ik 
EmcM SauaaraB 
UK EqiMf 
US Growth 
U»m#n* Growth 


970 104.7 
253 270 
9X5 1000 
883 9*4 
1138 121.7# 
14X9 1803 
1*77 1579c 
9X5 7T.I 
1381 1455 
8X0 910 
1870 17954 
710 7X7e 
7*3 7X7 


+15 . 
♦02 300 
-20 

-37 192 

+00 lag 
438 
117 
+02 138 
+12 508 
+12 2 . 1 * 
+40 221 
+0.1 IX* 
.. J08 


3f 


SCH RODE R U N IT T R U ST 
E nt er pri se Ho use. Portsmouth 
D70S 827733 


Amencan he 
Do Accun 
Auarefean he 
Do Acqira 
European he 
Oo Accum 
G4A Fbtad he 
Do Accun 
Goto Find he 
Do Aoami 


D o Accu m 
ho tncome 
Do Accun 
jap So* Co s Ac 

Smaaer Cos he 
Dp Accun 
Spaa* Sits he 
Da Accun 
Tokyo Fund he 
Do Accum 
US Satoar Co's Ac 
W Eouty he 
Do Accun 
Recovery 
Soecul Exrrot 
FW»nj 0 Chanty 


1201 1294 
1214 1309 
576 6194 
618 8844 

33.0 994 
953 1019 
527 5X54 
7X5 IB04 
330 3X9 

35.0 374 
15X3 1693 
347.7 3710 

9X1 101.7 
1313 1*0.4 
1045 1117# 
*4.7 470 
*56 <87 
1170 125J 
1221 1303 
950 1022 
989 105.7 
15X8 167.4 
1583 18X2 
542 579 
M4 1031 
1*75 157.7 
87X0 72X1# 
19X5 1130a 
51X1 5*80# 


01-405 
Grow* Fvhd he 
Do Accun 
Income Fuid 
hd Eqwy he 
Do Accun 
UK Trusi he 
DO 


814 080 
1203 12X0 
10X9 11X9 
111.1 1182 
111.1 11X2 
1157 123.1 
19X0 2108 


+20 283 
+20 163 
+17 430 
+30 
+10 109 
+1* 338 
+40 309 


PTOPETUAL UNIT TRUST 
4X Han Scent KorUey On Thames 
0491 575888 


hd Grow* 


nrauwua Rac 
Amar Grow* 
h« Emern Co * 
Far Em erwtn 
European Gdl 


2*23 2800 
1750 1874 
1372 >4734 
665 7154 
710 7X2 
S67 63.0 
513 5X1 


PROlinC UWT TRUSTS 

99 5 10X0 
181 7 1715 
690 9*44 
12X4 13X1 
1343 *44 3 
1810 T9I0 
114 1 121.4 
770 B1.7 


Wan hcoma 
Cure G*r 
Far Easton 
Nor* Americmi 
Spaeal Sas 

Terdhotogy 

Exsa hcoma 


+40 130 
*4.7 XI* 
+20 10 * 
-0.1 ID? 
+1 3 0.67 
+04 110 
.. 200 


+17 
+35 432 
+34 X30 
+30 090 
+10 207 
+45 1 19 
+18 049 
+17 X07 


ST 


FRUOBmAL UMT TRUST MANAGERS 
5MB. Mm MX Herd Esmx. W 1 20L 
01-478 3377 

--- _<y 3789 *020 +9.7 331 

Euopaan 715 77 A +i.s ojh 

" " “ 508 540 -01 307 

he 811 650a +15X87 

839 0924 +1.0 0.78 

97* 71.74 +10 005 

629 669 +09 15B 

574 610 +13 3.03 

Ukttow* 759 SL7# +1.7 303 

Hcroom GB Treat 1 EG 0 1725 +35 807 

QULTBUWANAOEMFNT COMPANY 
31-45 Grosnam Sl London eczv tlh 
01-000 4177 

Oureram General 38i B 4062 . . 323 

Qua**n hasme HO A 2239 SBC 

OuadOMiKIFd 3*73 3658 -Xl 121 

2292 2439 . . 305 

HMROTH0CMLD ASSET MANAMSIENT 
Stjhamnsxan*. Union EC*P 4Du 

NCAmaneahe 2403 2796 +59 10B 

. DP ACCun 2818 300 a +03 108 

NC Em»97 Res 1403 1482 +03 201 

NC hcoma 83 i> 890 +15 391 

NG Japan 1*05 14X5# +4 8X03 

STONto Cos 124 0 131 9c +1.7 133 

NCSmBrEuthCos 1407 1560 +X7 0*0 

NC Exempt G« £1180 1110 .. 708 

NC Amor Prsp S1157 1118 .. .. 

NC Property 1839 19X3 .. . 

ROWAN UNIT TRUST 

to-BsrwJB 8 ” S * reet u *“ Qn ^ 


m 

«8h Ytod^ 
Menu (3) 


2085 2185 -05 270 

8890 6*40# -60 175 

14X5 1*90 500 

3535 36i5# +35 2 OS 
1590 1600 +05 287 

_ _ _ 1210 +301150 

Far EM (2) 1570 1605 -40 001 

ROYAL UTK FUND MANAGEMENT 
new «B Puce. Liverpool 109 3MS 
051-227 4*22 

Enure Tru# 580 61 7 

he TruM 831 to i# 

« Treat 2X8 27 1 

US Trust 290 31.7 

TM 3X6 314 


+17 172 
+09 126 
+05 86? 
*02 152 
+05 005 

ROYAL LONDON UMT TRUST MANAGERS 
1 London House. Comstar cai IRA 
578116 

American Qraw* 790 850# +13 092 

1669 17X6 +3B 227 

517 5X5 +13 907 

HGtHneemt 8X2 7374 +25 552 

mcoma 6 Growm 076 9334 *38 480 

Japan Crow* B39 87* +10 008 

9*0 1020 +X1 152 

SAVES PROSPER 
J Woton JKL Rorartm flaw 3L0 
68-73. Queen Sl Eanburan EH? **K 
luntod) 078846966 Or (Esin) D3I-226 7351 
Amer ine 0 Grow* BSD 895 7.67 

Una 93.1 59 6 -05 2*9 

488 «9Bc -a? re 

«f *7 14 +00 33B 

96 1 DIO +02 091 

750 78°* +32 3 8? 

577 W3 -04 202 

362 3X74 +04 108 

04.5 503 +0.7 228 

630 558 +0411.12 

1636 17*04 +4 4 509 
1549 1656 +47 470 

690 9X14 +23 611 

7X2 83.8 +10 171 

1072 114 0 +22 308 

Japan Grow* SZO 8X3 +12 .. 


Energy ha* 
Eurocean Grown 
Ertmothc Bnd 
Do hd t*3f 


CM 8 FT he 
r«ch Rahim uno 
rtgh Yield UK* 
hccna urats 
hvannant Treat 


SCOTTISH Eoumuxc 
2X St Andrews 5% Eonaetfi 
mi-658 9101 


bat mcoma lims 
Do AOCum 


1380 1498 
2014 2140 


+02 157 
+02 157 
-1.1 109 
-1.1 109 
♦02 122 
+02 121 
+12 9.73 
+10 9.73 
+0.1 *0* 
+01 AIM 
+46 *96 
+102 496 
-0.1 0-78 
-OI 0?8 
+24 010 
-20 1A6 
-27 1*8 
+25 157 
+25 137 
+31 108 
+32 108 
+20 026 
+35 026 
+01 02* 
+18 113 
+41 X13 
-- 228 
+00 1.68 


+14 137 
+3* 307 


+4 1 107 

tSJio? 

+02 071 


+30 24* 
+20 849 

+00 1.49 
+35 104 


SCOTTISH LIFE INVESTMENTS 
19. SI ATKHws Sa EdPOurgh 
031 225 2211 

UK EduCy 1663 177 9 

Amwirao 1414 1523 

P»C*C 1273 1362 

Euopaan 1902 2035 

SCOT TISH M UTUAL WVtatTMBtr 
MANAGERS 

109. Vhcm SL Glasgow G2 SHN 
041-248 6) DO 

UK Equity IS76 137.7 

GM X FFred 1105 1178 

UK Smar Co’s Eq 131.4 ir&B 

Euppaon 1591 1690 

N Amencan 1M0 in.5 

PaoAc 1206 1280 

SCOTTISH UWT TRUST 

S+^ rt S, a *' Eow »«9 B 

031-228 4072 

PM*e 420 *50 +14 040 

TOrM Growth 310 335 411 080 

M Ame ncan 331 355 -Ol 003 

hcoma Fund 413 4*2# +1.1 X19 

SCOTTISH WIDOWS 

s}^ga a,rt,wB,,GH,B5Bu 

2153 229 7 
2*85 2824 

BtofTMEL FUND BUUMOEmr 
London EC1Y My 

01-638 6011 
Amar Taeh 8 Gan 
Paste 

See hcoma Fnd 


ftd onr 


am vu £ 


EeM hcoma 
Franca* 

G* reora 
Grad hcoma 

Do Accum 
hcoma 
JUW 

L toi^ xSnaaporo 

Do Ramvost — — 
Pro* Shore Fd 
UR Capital 
SpeeutSiS 
TeennMooY 
Wort) hrxroe 
woKreoa CnkU 
Eoudy Ea CO 

Do Accun n 


1940 11274 
2*1 0 25704 
1007 IM fiW 
S91 630 
107.7 1142 
755. 8084 
0X3 TUB 
190 3Q0 
717 7X2 
879 934 
1X0 1704 
60S 8X2# 
017 87.44 
4X3 «44 
502 530 
1290 13X04 
595 740 
mi ma 


+40 613 
+X8 195 
*14 0*8 
-Ol 198 
-81 196 
+04 *77 
+X4 010 
-04 108 
+07 009 
+09 009 
+0.4 99? 
+27 104 
+05 O BJ 
-00 0 1C 
*10 706 
+30 101 
*1.7 107 
*29 207 


PndCto Oocjl London GCn 


3MRVT TRUST MANAGERS 
1 S^Mar^Ato. London EC3A 8BP 

SnKto Co« COO 704 -0X019 

TOUCHE REMNANT 
Menmad Houml 2 
SAT 

01-248 1250 
Amencan Growth 
General Grow* 

GhbN Tacn 
income Grow* 
income Mommy 
Japan Grow* 

CTsm* Grow* 

Smator Cos 
Spaoat Oppa 


3X5 3704 +08 OM 
494 5024 +10 177 
3X4 41.1 *00 010 

555 5824 +13 502 
44-1 *3 3m +TJ715 

301 32.1 ' 

3X3 432 
540 581 
5X8 6164 


> 


TRANSATLANTIC A 
SECURITIES 
91-99. Mow Londbn 
03*5 Si 66 i 


Crawnco he f5| 


Oo Accun i 


FMPIng Fund t*i 

DP Accum (4) 

FMng Am 8 Gan (4) 
Do Accun I*) 
RMdng he Fund (41 
saWAourra 
saw sma sacs 


+12 xia 
♦05 139 
+19 13* 
•14 200 


AX OMtnatond 

436 9 44S5c +138 3*9 
ES 6 J 7200 +305 309 

2254 2373 +55 327 

3460 2598 +81327 


20X0 21804 -OB 007 
1 2*774 -V ~~ 


154 087 
1802 1887 +S4 XOO 

1*45 1519 -6 A 105 

11X4 I2U +16 037 


TVNDAU. MANAGERS 

C avyngi i Rd. Brrsol 
0273 7X341 
Australian 
Do Acc 
Copt* 

Do Accun 
E+ampt 
_ Ch Accum 
Far Emm 
_Dd Accum 
Fin 0 prop 
_Da Accum 
ORCtoMf 
Do Accum 
Get Income 
Do Accun 


"ito 


+65 106 
♦7 B 208 


__ 

Amanom Motors 
Sma* CP's 
Jap an Tech a Gan 
Msmxkkto tana 


toi i 1082 
13*5 1*3 9 
158 7 19X84 
1914.3045 
2*0 2X8 
680 737 
34 5 3804 
705 7X0 
5*4 5X2# 
4985 5310 
291 jr.l 


+09 010 
+25 O.JO 
+60 400 
*90 1*5 
.. XEO 
•15 004 

*2.4 IBB 


MMON X COATES 
1. London WH F 
01-588 384* EM 
Special Sits (5) 4X2 


togL London EC2M BPT 


510 +1.1 1,49 


STANDARD LIFE 

3. Grama Sr. Er£MW{/i BT2 2X2 


031 22f25SZ 
kicame Unas 
Do Accun Unto 


ZM5 2538 
259* 27X1 


+97 111 
•100 3.ll 


gEWWgWORY UNITTHUST 
*5. Cttnone Sa Edhbugn 


031-229 3271 
Amoncrai Fund 
Da Accum 
Do Wtearaw M 


Aiomarei Fund 
DO ACaim 
Brtasn Fund 
Da Accun 
beptoSB Puna 
Do Acam 
-Moan Find 
_ Do Accum 
Suras PPP 
SUN ALLIANCE 

~ Haa. warah a m. Suasm 


2090 2234 
235 6 250 0 
151. 0 181 T 
1088 11X5 
1100 1172 
5212 5561c 
7022 7479c 
2*12 2573 
2540 2709 
2399 2555c 
3+0.6 2560c 
I486 15*4 


-01 217 
■00 217 
-01 2.17 
-40 1.00 
-40 i So 
+1.0 402 
+89 402. 
+51 a S3 
+53 093 
+17 0/40 
+18 OMQ 


HW Yma 
Do Accun 
Income 
D o Acca m 
hd Eamerga 
Do Accun 
hd Growm 
. Do Accam 
Jtoan Growth acc 
N wnu Rasourcas 
lAj Accum 
n Amer Grower 

Do Accun 
SoMtoCaiOvinc 
_ Da Accum 
SmaUer Cos 
_ Do Aconr 
Stooai sas 
Do Accun 

Grawvi 


57 D SID 
569 610 
30*2 32254 
5375 5700# 
2821 27904 
58X2 6Z754 
1301 13904 
1402 15004 
469 500# 
73.0 770# 

ms i 2 * 0 c 

13*0 1398c 
10*0 1063c 
1668 1711c 
503 53.8 

1070 1140 
2100 22B9c 
8487 68X0C 

155 5 185.7 
22*7 2393 
88 0 710 
714 7X1 
900 856 
159.1 18X5 
2280 241.6 
11X7 1240# 
1353 14*0# 
11X6 1178 
274.9 2920 
490 524# 
5&5 592# 
1700 18114 
2260 2 * 11 # 
9*4 « 0 B 

980 1844 
8X0 930# 


-20 IK 
-14 102 
+X2 178 
+110 378 
+X4 13* 
+140 63* 
-11 101 
-18 191 
+03 191 
+00 391 
+22 004 
+24 804 
+011009 
♦001009 
•I* 682 
+28 6R 
+7.1 X72 
+210 X72 
+18 203 
#*.1 283 
-0-7 09* 
-00 00 * 
•10 020 
-17 150 
-13 258 
-06 101 
-a? -im 
+181108 
+*11168 
*1.1 833 
+13 633 
+33 188 
•40 188 
+30 Z25 
+X1 125 
+08 135 


WlPROhEOCTUTMAHAOBoj 

ra fi B tf ** 81 ****1 S'* 1 331 

1159 <229 +19 

P«ate Basm 11Q8 TI70 +13 

N Amu 1167 123.7 +10 

vwwuun TRUST 
“^omUaoucL ecia zeu 


*- 



1710 18204 
ISli 2042# 

tax iS5* 

serf 

AOmgaon Rah As# JOO0 *07.1 


0^8*1532^ Tm 0enKm ^ mM Sn 1 


+40 213 
+7 7 113 
+07 4.45 
+00 271 
+00 306 
+05 168 
+0.1 IBS 
•019 326 
•10 4JB 


London EC? 


SUI 
0403 

Equay Tnoi Acc 38*0 SS7 A 
Th* Ate 64* 

Far East Trust Acc 598 wir 


+80 2 44 
-03 103 
-04 100 


7»WWr TRUSTS 

Anoover. Huts. SPta iPq 
026* 62188 Deaieyg H KC* 

Amencan he 
Da Accun 

Etoa hnma me 
Do Bosun 
CeMral UK he 
Do Accum 
G*t 4 Ft** Ik • 

Do Accum 

income 
Accum 
PW3te Inc 
Da Aiscum 

il he 

DO Apcun 
SMcted Om he 
. Op-Aceum 
Natural R» 

Do Aocum .. 

TARGET TRUST MANAGBIS 
TWfyjw* <S“?Wu*e RO- Aywsouy Bum 

Amu Eagh 74.1 . 79.1 tna rc* 

Au crawp . .«* 207# -08 nK 

Comnotfcry 71 9 773 S 

Mar» 32J 3*5# +03 IS 

EQUty 118 7 128* *29 a3J 

EurapaH Spec £49 830 BBS +2.| gfy 



Airemcan Thre 

EfJfii* GUI 
hn Growth 
hoom* Trust 
repwi Growm 




Wk.nusi 
gurophon Qrowtn 
Hong Kong 


-XI 190 
+18 140 
+10 1.40 
+12 560 
♦28 0?O 
ZOO 
-05 X20 
+01 150 
+35 250 
+10 130 
-11 100 


■05 015 

-07 020 
. 300 
-07 850 


6*0 09 7 
as 73 3 

S3 633 

739 795 
77.1 BiS 

’S'8 ’Si" 

4*3 472 

ia9 2i.»e 

Mi-^S'i 50 ' EQn6W » a 

52 ]IST 

<M«0 Mu Fnd siorf 1U04 — 

ton tko G« Find 609 619 +1L4 tj7 

? tejjjsen dtvWend. k 

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irw “I muiUL (P8' 

month, (0d/i«ai 
of nienui. gm sm 
>* am 

r xiuiied 
of. Stock 


Stock 

-nonG? .4S1 






MARCH 4 198 


FINANCE AND INDUSTRY 



Beecham, which has one of 
the worst reputations around 
the City, may have unknow- 
ingly capitalized on its sorry 
image, its weekend press 
release, highlighting flat prof- 
its, may have unwittingly 
attracted investors' interests 
and caused yesterday’s share 
price rise. 

Analysts do „ not expea 
good results from Beecham in 
mid-June when the 1985/86 
figures are released. The com- 
pany expects liule change on 
last year's profits and forecast 
a profit this year of between 
£295 and £305 fruition. Ana- 
lysts predict a' figure around 
£300 million. This gloomy 
prediction is reflected in the 
share price action — at 350p, 
the share price has under- 
performed by a street. 

So there was no ■ point in . 
trying to hide the had news: 
nuggets of ill-tidings were 
what .the city expected. 

This may have been the 
rationale behind the' 
weekend’s reaffirmation of 
the year-end figures^ which 
accompanied news of the' 
purchase of Norcliff Thayer, 
the ' US over-the-counter 
medicines and health prod- 
ucts business. The City had 
already swallowed the bad 
news that the results would be 
adversely affected by the 
weak dollar versus sterling 
but would be partly mitigated 
by the . strength of. some 
European currencies and . the 
yen;. 

But regardless of the bad 
news, there is little doubt that 
the underlying direction of 
the business improved in the • 
latter half of the year. Phar- 
maceuticals were likely to be 
flat as the drug Augmentin 
has been replacing Amoxyl; 
soft drinks in Germany have 
been on an improving trend 
and the cosmetics and OIY 
businesses . have been on a 
rising trend. 

Despite looking vulnerable 
to takeover, reports of its 
imminent demise appear to 
be exaggerated. 

British Vita 

British Vita yesterday 
claimed a third successive 
year of profit growth saying, 
it Jiad„shed its image of a 
domestic manufacturer shel- 
tering behind protected colo- 
nial markets. 

In feet, it may.be an 
appropriate time to consider 


changing ris name to Europa 
Vita because it was mainland 
Europe that provided the 
. thrust of the latest profit 
suree. 

: The Manchester-based 

company is now clo cking op 
world-wide sales of more 
than. £300 million in. what 
could be termed “invisibles" 
-the unseen fillings, such as 
foam and fibres, that go in to 
products such as car seats, 
mattresses, furniture and an 
increasing range of household 
textiles. 

Pretax profits last year rose 
by 17 per cent to £12.2 million, 
but most significantly, for the 
first time the contribution 
from Europe edged sbgbtly 
ahead of Britain's contribu- 
tion of £4.7 million. Com- 
bined, the • ' two markets 
..accounted for 75. per cent of 
all profits. 

The profit included the 
results of a full year’s opera- 
tion in France. and the results 
of the foam interests of the 
Sol vay Group from last July, 
the date of its acquisition.. 

British Vita believes its 
future prosperity lies in 
strengthening its bases in ibe 
key French and German mar- 
kets.- 

The Sol vay acquisition has 
allowed British Vita to tap its 
advanced technological 
know-how and it has already 
cashed in on a system of 
producing cheaper mid better 
headliners in cans. Instead of 
manufacturing the products 
itself, it ts extending its 
increasingly important li- 
censing arrangements and 
has entered an agreement to 
allow the system to be manu- 
factured under licence in. 
North America, which should 
result in a growing royalty 
income in future years. 

Yesterday, British Vita's 
shares jumped 9p. But in the 
past six months they have 
risen from 15 5p to 240p. This 
was probably influenced by 
the group’s decison, con- 
firmed yesterday, to tackle its 
problem of blocked funds in 
Zambia, which represent the 
bulk of the £3.3 million 
extraordinary chaiges. 

Outside Britain and Eu- 
rope, the international side of 
the business — in the old 
colonies of Canada and Aus- ; 
tralia — came in with a £3 
million contribution. 

British Vrta, through an 
aggressive move across the 


Channel, 'has significantly al- 
tered its profile with a broad 
enough spread across most 
markets to offer the prospect 
of sustained growth even 
without acquisitions, which 
do hot appear all that likely at 
the moment. 

Gold Greenlees 
Trott 

Gold Greenlees Trott is the 
first advertising agency to be 
hit by tiie new Stoat Ex- 
change rules on the contents 
of prospectuses. Although it 
has done its best to liven up 
the document, it has had to 
restrict the pictures to the 
outside cover. It has, howev- 
er, shown a video to journal- 
ists. and anyone wanting to 
see stills can ask for a 
corporate brochure. 

The figures show impres- 
sive growth. In just five years 
profits have risen from a 
negligible level to a forecast 
£1 3 million before tax for the 
year to April 30. The pretax 
-profit margin is 4.4 per cent. 
Although East growth is likely 
to continue, it is difficult to. 
say how fast, as GGT is too 
young to have established a 
proper record- ' 

Youth however is no obsta- 
cle to riches. At 163p the 
shares are offered at 18 times 
prospective earnings, which 
represents a slight discount to 
the rating accorded to better 
established rivals such as 
Abbott Mead Vickers. James 
CapeL the broker, expects 
GGT to trade on a par with 
Abbott once dealings begin. 

One of the disadvantages 
under which GGT labours, 
however, is that most of the 
£4.95 million being raised is 
going to the founding direc- 
tors rather than to the compa- 
ny. GGT itself is raising only 
£539,000 after expenses. An- 
other point to bear in mind is 
that margins will fall next 
year because the company is j 
moving into new and more 
expensive offices in May. 

Despite these qualifica- 
tions, the issue is likely to be a 
success, given the agency’s 
reputation and the market's 
continuing fondness for the 
industry. GGT may com- 
plain that its prospectus looks 
no different from that of an 
engineering company, but it 
still has the advantage on 


By Derek Harris, Indnstrial Editor 


The recent spate of takeover 
bids, which has put a premi- 
um on management abilities 

■ to market products successful- 
ly, has underlined the need for 
improved top marketing man- 
agement in companies, ac- 
cording to Mr Tony 
McBumic. director-general of 

■ the Institute of Marketing. 

He called on the Govern- 
ment to clarify its competition 
policy on the issue of market 
share. This was a crucial factor 
in the recent references to the 

. Monopolies and Mergers 
Commissision of the initial 
United Biscuits and Guinness 
bids. 


Companies which were suc- 
cessful in world markets 
would inevitably tend to have 
strong domestic market 
shares. Mr McBurhie main- 
tained The crucial market 
share was segment share 
where sales broke down into 
product and brand categories 
such as premium and own 
label. That was the issue the 
Government needed to be 
clearer about in competition 
policy. 

Mr McBurnie said: “We 
need improved top-level mar- 
keting management and we 
need more chief executives to 
accept and develop a company 


culture and style that puts 
marketing second to nothing, 
if they do not I have a feeling 
that predators, shareholders 
and non-executive directors 
soon will ” 

-Fewer than 40 per cent of 
chief executives of British 
companies had marketing and 
sales experience, with finan- 
cial. legal and technical back- 
grounds much more common. 

A recent University of 
Bradford management centre 
study had reported that two- 
thirds of British companies 
surveyed had said they were 
not good at marketing. They 
still believed that profit came 


Onshore 
search still 
promising 


The onshore oil industry’s 
main problem this year mil not 
be falling o3 prices, but environ- 
mental pressures. Wood Mac- 
kenzie, the broker, suggests. 

Despite this, the hue of 
profitable developments should 
proride sufficient incentive for 
continued enthusfesra fin on- 
shore exploration, the broker 
says. 

Mr Alkk Buchanan-Snridi, 
Minister fir Energy, wfll an- 
nomce the first formal round of 
onshore oD exploration licences 
tins month- 

wood Mackenzie, m a report 1 
to diems, says “Although the 
onshore scene continues to offer 


even at current o3 prices, the 
industry is faced with a variety of 


STOCK MARKET REPORT 


Oil price worries trigger 
bout of profit-taking 


In many cases, it notes, 
companies few difficulties in 
n tdgfamg p lanning permission 
“The revised ficeace system 
should ahon ofl companies great- 
er flexibility of operations," tike 
report adds-“However, la n down- 
ers, local authm ilies and environ- 
mentalists may all delay o3 
companies' plans. 

'in addition, growing aware- 
ness of the profitability hi 
onshore oQ activities has resulted 
in landowners seeking higher 
compensation payments." 


Saatchi Bros 
to take 30% 
stake in NMC 

Mr Charles and Mr Maurice 
Saatchi. directors of the public 
relations firm, are to take a 1 5 
per cent stake each in the 
NMC fibreboard manufactur- 
er in a proposed 8.63 million 
share issue that will see 50. 1 
per cent of the company in 
new hands. 

Ibe deal also includes the 
issue of 1.71 million warrants 
to existing shareholders and to 
the new investors. 

The Saatchi brothers will 
hold nearly 2.59 million 
shares each and a third inves- 
tor. Mr N Newton, will have 
3.45 million shares, or 20.04 
per cent. He will join the 
board. 

This issue will raise about 
£1.32 million, after expenses. 
It will halve the 48.8 per cent I 
stake in NMC currently held i 
by East Rand Consolidated to 
24.4 per cent. 

The issue is subject to 
shareholders’ approval, but 
principal shareholders holding 
57.61 per cent will vote in 
favour. 


from rationalizing and cost- 
cutting. while at Japanese 
subsidiaries in Britain there 
were detailed marketing plans 
against which performance 
was monitored. 

Mr McBurnie said that the 
study demonstrated that 
whereas the Japanese had 
marketing strategies, the Brit- 
ish had budgets. 

In the latest annual rankings 
for international competitive- 
ness emphasizing the role of 
marketing and carried out by 
the European Management 
Forum. Britain was rated at 
16, he pointed out 


TJKsacfmtaernenecofnpr^s withm nquirsmwts of the Cburuaol The Stock Exchange 



M 

E 

P 

C 



MEPC pic 

(incorporated as a company with Smiled liability in England under the Companies Act 1929) 

£50,000,000 

11V 4 per cent. Bonds due 1993 

The Issue Price of the Bonds is 100 per cent, of their principal amount. 


Morgan GrenfeH & Co. Limited 


Hill Samuel & Co. Limited 


Barclays Merchant Bank Limited Baring Brothers & Co, Limited 

Berfiner Handels- und Frankfurter Bank County Bank Limited 

OresdnerBank Girozentrale und Bankder^erre.chischen Sparkassen 

AktwjffBsen»ehaft 

Lloyds Merchant Bank Limited Manufacturer Hanover Limited 

npufionoi ^HTiitfid Orion Royal Bank Limited 

^^CtoSlerchant Bank Union Bank of Switzerland (Securities) limited 

Westdeutsche Landesbank Girozentrale 


, w -.artotn ihe Council of The Stock Exchange of the United Kingdom and the Republic of Ireland 

" 10 ^ . 

a*; from 15 March 1986 a! the rate of 11 V« per cent per annum, payable annudly in arrear on 15 

afcll * * o-adeor, 15 March 1987. 

yepn nlc are available in the statistical services of Extel Statistical Servfces Limited. 
Particulars of the Bonds aro ^L^ained during usual business hours up to and including 6 March 1986 from the 

Listing PartictllarS r ^J r ^^ ce of The Stock Exchange and up to and including 18 March 1986 from: 

Cazendve& Ca . Orion Royal Bank Limited 

MEPCp® 12 ToKenhouse Vbrd 1 London Waff 

Brook House London EC2R7AN London EC2Y5JX 

Tt3Pwktane 

London ttf1Y4AY 4 March 1886 


Share prices recorded wide- 
spread falls as investors took 
fright from falling oil prices 
and a weakening pound. The 
FT 30-share index lost 10 
points to close at f 267.4 and 
the FT-SE fell 9 points to 
1534.9. 

Hopes that interest rates 
will be allowed to ease in the 
Budget have largely evaporat- 
ed as (he spot price of oil 
slipped below $14 a barrel 
following the latest price cut- 
ting move by Abu Dhabi. 

Hints that the arctic weather 
is now over was another 
sobering factor. So there was 
little fresh incentive for inves- 
tors who were content to take 
profits after the recent strong 
advance. Selling was light and 
turnover was generally a much 
lower. 

Government securities gave 
back half a point as cheaper 
money hopes waned- Losses 
among leading industrials 
were contained to a band of 
between 2p and !0p. but one 
or two internationals were 
supported by currency consid- 
erations. 

BOC Group, for instance, 
rose 6p to 334p and Cadbury 
Schweppes, with results due 
next Thursday, hardened 2p 
to 166p. Elsewhere, Hawker 
Siddeley slipped 8p to 517p 
and Lucas IOp to 6J3p while 
Beecham Group, a recent take- 
over favourite, declined 6p to 
350p in spile of talk of 
“imminent developments”. 

Consumer stocks made a 
drab showing on the prospect 
of a nutral Budget. Marks and 
Spencer, worried by fashion 


EQUITIES 

Abbott Mead V (1 80p) 230 up 7 
Ashley (L) (135p) 230 up 4 

Brook mount (160p) 180 

Cable & Wire (587p) 348 

Chart FL (86p) 90 

Chancery Secs (63p) 71 

Cranswick M (95p) 109 

Davidson P (160p) 165 up 2 
Dialene (128p) 170 

Ferguson (J) (lOp) 23 up 1 
Granyte Surface (56p) 71 

51 up 2 


Granyte Surface 
Inoco (55p) 

JS Pathology f16 
KlearfoW {11 Bp) 


competition from other stores 
like Burton eased 4p to !87p. 
Storehouse, the subject of 
several brokers' 

downgradings, dipped iOp to 
303p but Laura Ashley con- 
tinued to reflect hopes of US 
buying orders at 23 ip. up 5p. 

Home Charm tumbled to 
283p on news that discussions 
about a possible bid, an- 
nounced last Friday, had been 
terminated. The shares later 
rallied to 51 Sp a net fall of 
52p. 

Other DIY companies were 
also upset with A.G. Stanley 
down 4p to 75p and Hampden 
Home Care 7p lower at 61p. 

Martin Ford was marked up 
I2fc|> to 133fep oa talk of an 
imminent 145p offer. The 
commodity dealers S.& w. 
Berisford gained 9p to 21 Ipas 
Hillsdown Holdings increased 
'its stake to 9.09 per cent by 
way of market purchases. 

McKechnie. whose share- 
holders gave the go-ahead to 
bid for Newman Tonks (up 3p 
to 13lp) lost another 6p to 
I90p. Williams Holdings, 
whose bid for McKechnie has 
now been aborted, rallied 1 2p 
to 5ISp. 

Sitter climbed 13p to 240p 
after favourable comment on 
its proposed acquisition of 
UK.0 International. Hep- 
vrorth Ceramic put on 9p to 
i 67p speculative demand. But 
Pilkington gave up lOp to 
428p on further consideration 
of its US expansion plans. 

Rridon gained IOp to 135p 
on the sale of its Mexican 
interests. Acquisition news 
supported B. Elliott at 57p up 


. RECENT ISSUES 


Lexicon (1l5p) 2115 

Macro 4 (105p) 140 dn 3 

Merivale Moore (11 5p) 125 

Microsystems (I27p) 135 

Norank Sys {90p) 1 00 

Really Useful (330p) 365 dn 3 
SAC Inti (lOOp) 130 

SPP (125p) 158 up 1 

Templeton (21 5p) 218 

Sigmex (I0lp) 86 

Snowdon & B (97p) 112 

Spice (80p) 93 up 1 

Tech Comp (130p) 214 

Underwoods (1 80p) 184 dn 1 


4p and Amari 7p better at 
I48p. 

AMS Industries reported 
profits up by 58 per cent, but a 
warning with the figures that 
the order intake for audio 
processing equipment had de- 
clined lopped 20p from the 
shares at !Q4p. Electricals 
generally were down with 
Racai 6p down at 1 94p in spile 
of fast weeks denial of rights 
issue intentions. 

LEC Refrigeration met de- 
mand at 280p up I7p and 
Automated Security, another 
speculative favourite im- 
proved Sp to I68p. 

Reports that the influx of 
American visitors is well 
down on last year unsettled 
hotel shares where falls of 2p 
to 5p were frequent. 

McCorquodale at 20 8p up 
5p continued to anticipate a 
rumoured bid from Norton 
Opax. British Vita celebrated 
a bener-than-expected 17 per 
cent earnings expansion with a 
9p rise to 240p- 

Abbott Mead, reporting on 
Thursday, was marked up 7p 
to 230p but a 40 per cent 
setback knocked I7p from 
Michael Peters at 173p. 
Powerline also disappointed 
down 24p to 13 Ip while a 57 
per cent reduction in profits 
dipped 3p from Microvitec at 
35p. 

Weekend press comment 
prompted the usual Monday 
crop of firm features. Helical 
Bar at 104p J S D Computer 
M5p. Minty 34Gp, Havelock 
Enropa 253p, Schroders 
I263p. Aurora 52p, Strong 
and Fisher 136p were among 


Wickes (140p) 148 up 2 

RIGHTS ISSUES 


those to advance between 6p 
and 65p. Futnra Holdings was 
wanted at 320p up 20p. 

In a thin market, James 
Crean was hoisted 4Qp to 
355p. NMC Investments re- 
turned from suspension 67p 
higher at 90p on news that the 
Saatchi Brothers had acquired 
a substantial stake. Dealers 
immediately suspected a shell 
situation such as Wire and 
Pas tic Prod nets where the 
Saatchi Brothers interest has 
transformed the share price. 

C H Industrial jumped 6p 
to 56p on the sale of its stake 
in Banro. Banks remained 
perky after last Friday’s good 
profits from Lloyds. National 
Westminster, reporting today, 
added 5p to 707p. Analysis are 
looking for profits of between 
£750 million and £770 mil- 
lion. 

Life companies made a 
bright showing with Pruden- 
tial up 10p to 942p after a 
press report suggesting a possi- 
ble merger with Midland 
Bank. 7p firmer at 479p. 
Composite insurers were still 
concerned with last 
Thursday’s disappointing 
profits from Royal another 5p 
easier at 863p. 

Mixed properties had 
MEPC at 350p. down 8p, but 
the shares later rallied to 566p 
awaiting takeover develop- 
ments. 

MAIN PRICE CHANGES 


Cray Sec F/P 
Hartwells N/P 
Peel Hktos F/P 
Porter (mad F/P 
Safeway UK 
Stormguard F/P 
Wales N/P 
Westland N/P 


296 dn 2 

475 

3 

£42 'a dn 3 < 
20 
25 
13 


Tech Comp (130p) 214 

Underwoods (180p) 184 dn 1 
Wellcome (120p) 174 up 2'z 

W York Kosp (90p) 60 


Westland N/P 
(Issue price in brackets). 


RISES: 

BOC Grp 

Cadbury 

Nalwest 

Suter 

Newman Tonks 
Hepworth Ceramic 
G Dew 
Bndon 
Williams 
Aurora 
B Elliott 
FALLS: 

Marks 

Lucas 

McKechnie 

Storehouse 

MEPC 

Michael Peters 
Powerline 
AMS Ind 
T Cowie 
A G Stanley 
Home Charm 


334 + 6 
166p + 2 

707p + 5 
240p +13 
131 p + 3 

'W?I 

135p +10 
51 8p +12 
52p + 5 
57p + 4 

187p-4 
613P-10 
190p - 6 
303O-10 
350p -8 
173p -17 
131P-24 
104p -20 
13Bp-7 
7Sp-4 
31 8p -52 


[ r ' COMPANY NEWS \ ' v I f 




• Fll GROUP:Wiih figures in 
£000. sales were up to 8.735 
(7,583) and pretax profit to 
1,060 (810L Profit after tax was 
816 1510). 

• LEISURE INVEST- 
MENTS; Results for the six 
months to December 31 (figures 
m £000) show turnover at 1 300 
(1338) and operating profit 
before depreciation 436 (352). 
Pretax profit was 244 (189) and 
earnings per share were 0.93p 
(0.98p). 

• J.I. JACOBS: Salenia has 
acquired an additional 700,000 
ordinary shares .representing 
3.04 per cent of the company's 
outstanding capital. This takes 
Salenia's total holding in Jacobs 
to 5.765.000 ordinary shares 
(25.02 per cent). 

• NEW AUSTRALIA 
INVESTMENTS; Keywest Fi- 
nance has purchased 214,999 
ordinary shares (4.3 per 
crnD.taking the parent Keywest 
group's holding to 1.489.899 
ordinary sha res (2 9.8 per cent). 

• MEDMINSTER: An interim 
dividend of 21.5 per cent 
(19.5percem) is included in the 
results for the six months to 
December 31 last year. With 
figures in (£000). turnover was 
6.325 (6,412). pretax profit 296 
(241) and profit after tax 192 
(161). Earnings per share are 
9.60p (8.05p). 

• COPE ALLMAN INTER- 
NATIONAL: An interim divi- 
dend of 3.4p (17p) is included 
in the results for the half year to 
December 28 last year. With 
figures in £000. turnover was 
92,520 (86.604). pretax profit 
7,5 1 9 (6.339) and profit after tax 
4776 (3567). Earnings per share 
are 12p(8.97pj. 

• GOOD RELATIONS 
GROUP: A dividend of 4.9p 
(4.9) is included in the results 
for the year to December 31. 
With figures in £000. turnover 
totalled 11.765 (8.826). pretax 
profit 1023 (1345) and 
attributable profit 547 (997). 
Earnings per share are 6.4 p 
(9.9p). The chairman said the 
group had been through a 
difficult period and had 
emerged stronger as a result of 
the decisive and forward-look- 
ing actions by the board. 

• T. COWIE: A final dividend 
of 2.25p (l.75p) is payable for 
the year to December 31. 1985 
(15 mth5io December31, 1984), 
making 3.5p l2.75p) for the 
whole year. With figures in 
£000. turnover amounted to 
217.708 (200.847). pretax profit 
4.055 (2JS5) and atributable 
profit 3.956 (909). Earnings per 
share on a net basis are 22-72p 
(I0.36p), 

• WOODHOUSE & RDCSON 
HOLDINGS: A final dividend 
of 1.5p (0.75ph making 2.5p 
(Ip) for the year, is payable for 
1985. With figures in £000. 
turnover was 10.537 (8,985) and 
profit before tax 1.13? (262). 
tamings per share were 7.8p 
(lip). Dividend is payable on 
April 28. 

• ROTHMANS INTER- 
NATIONAL: An interim divi- 
dend of 15 cents (15 cents) is 
included in the results of the 
company's Singapore associates 
for the six months to December 
31 last year. With figures in 
SSOO0. turnover was 77.743 
(8.466) and pretax-profit 17.779 
(18,052/. Earnings per share are 
9.5c (9.4c). Barring unforeseen 
circumstances, profit for the 
second half year is expecicd to 
be maintained at a sauslactorv 
level. 

• RATCLIFFS (GREAT 
BRIDGE): A final dividend of 
1.5p (I5p) is payable for the 
vear to December 31. 1985. 
making a total of 2-5p (3.5p). 
With figures in £000. the group 
loss after all charges was 343 


(1,337 profit). Loss per share 
amounts to 8.26p (27.67p earn- 
ing). The parent company’s loss 
is after allowing for a provision 
for doubtful debts of £176.000 
and an abnormally high under- 
valuation of stock against orders 
on hand of £337.000. Dividend 
is payable on May I. 

• RIVER PLATE AND GEN- 
ERAL INVESTMENT 
TRUST: A dividend of 6.5p is 
payable, making 8.5p (7.2p) for 
1985. With figures in £000. 
franked investment income was 
1.687(1.500). unfranked invest- 
ment income 334 (389), profit 
on dealing by subsidiaries 21 
(23) and other income 74 (61). 

• WADKIN: The offer docu- 
ment and listing particulars 
have been posted to the 
shareholders of Wadkin and 
Thomas Robinson. Robinson's 
pretax profits for the year ended 
Decemeber 31 are estimated at 
£410,000. Wadkin is estimated 
to have made a losss of £380,000 
over the same period- The offer, 
which is unanimously recom- 
mended by the board of 
Wadkin. is due to close on 
March 19. 


Romney sharpens its investment objective 

To emphasise its international nature Romney will 
henceforth be measured against the Morgan Stanley 
Capital International Index whilst retaining a sterling 
base. 

If is probable that with the increasing emphasis in 
foreign markets, earnings will fall. However, a 
minimum total dividend of 5.0p will be recommended 
for the year to 31.12.86 using revenue reserves if 
necessaiy. 

Mr. S. G. Brooksbank FCA, Chairman 


Results:— 31.12.85 31.12.84 


Gross revenue £3. 86m £3.17m 

Earnings per stock unit 6.53p 4.49p 

Proposed dividend for year 
perstockunir 5.00p 4.60p 

Net asset value per stock unit 341. 8p 316. 9p 

Total resources £101 .9m £95. 5m 

Ci'pia of iht Report uni Awh/iu aw amiable from The Secretaries: 

Lazard Brothers & Co., limited 

j-'w'i 21 Moorfields. London EC2P 2HT | 

V W ^ A MLMBEC Of THE ASSOCIATION OF INVESTMENT TRUST COMPANIES. / 

v *•’ y 


5.00p 
341. 8p 
£101 .9m 


4.60p 
316. 9p 
£95.5m 



Alexanders 
Laing & Cruickshank 
Holdings Ltd 


The British Investment Bank 
purpose built for the mid 80 ’s 
and bevond . . . 


* PART Of 1 HI MvtSTu EMI ban. UK DluI&C 1 ’, Of 

Mercantile House Group 

mTEfM'KAuu SfftwtMS 













jwt 'U- 5 ' ) XIjA 


FINANCE AND INDUSTRY 


THE TIMES TUESDAY MARCH 4 1986 


STOCK EXCHANGE PRICES 


THEwteTIMES 


From >our portfolio card check your 
eight share price movements. Add them 
up to give you your overall total Check 
this against the daily dividend figure 
published on this page. If it matches you 
nave won outright or a share of the total 
daily prize money stated. If you axe a 
winner follow the daira procedure on the 
back of vour card. You must always have 
your card available when claiming. 


Equities drop 


ACCOUNT DAYS: Dealings began Feb 24. Dealings end March 10. §Contango day March 10. Settlement day, March 17. 

§ Forward bargains are permitted on two previous days. 


© TlnaNCTSWattaM 

daily dividend 

£ 6,000 

Claims required for 
+47 points 



TO 33 SRMI SI Auoya 
M3 410 Sand Cron 
7*8 G03 lAon 
152 56 Wagon 
55'. 3 Bto Wife Fargo 
260 220 Wkwrast 


Betaavon 48 

BatSassaons 00 

Brown (Matthew) 415 
Burner (HP) 1ST 
Bunonwood Brew <05 

C*sm ffibtfMWt 470 

Dawttl (J A) 830 

Dtanaers 827 

Groan** WMay 1TO 

Own King 205 

GuttnoM 2Kb 

Hum a umi <57 

HflMand DAI 74 

Marmnk» Dad i60 

kwh &a) 358 

Marmn Thompson 91 

Monana 237 

SA BrawVM 244 

Sm6 N Mr 197 

i S eag ram £37 

Vaui 375 

Wtnteeed 'A' 285 

Do B" 289 

w um w A l in» 2i3 

Wohrfnmom & D 451 

Young -A' 205 


35 


,0 

24 

12 


♦2 






324 

70 1 

S74 



14 

04 

185 


+lto 




250 

• -6 

71 

00 

163 


118 40 172 

21.0 3.1 146 
11 Z4 2S4 
42 42 143 

200 43 153 

7.0 43 135 

143 23 HA 
>0.7 23 193 

166 23 240 

J23n 37 123 

70 r 46 121 
72 35 143 

103 33 103 

24.1 63 113 

23 39 143 

61 33 11.7 

60 23 .. 
23 32 157 

9.1 33 13.1 

i'ojOr 51 134 
41 i 1.1 . . 
153 42 143 
102 33 133 

T02 33 116 
93 4 6 31.4 

122 27 163 
9.4 45 164 


BUILDINGS AND ROADS 


tam , 

lEOKfl 



<C runes Nrnspapm Ltd. Daily Total 


Weekly Dividend 


Please moke a note of your daily totals 
for the weekly dividend of £20.000 in 
Saturday's newspaper. 


1 145 


) 50 

Ctm 

J 42 

Con a 

I 336 

1 194 

Com 

i 84 

Cram 

) 60 

Dew 

> *5 

Dug 

< so 

Enin 

1 81 

Fw 

! 5* 

i 83 

1 6* 1 

Do 

Rnra 

Genh 

i 103 

G*XK 

1 204 ■ 
1 88 

GtaM 

HAT 

» 

33 

Heea 

Hawn 



BRITISH FUNDS 


SHI 

99V 92'* 

98 S? 

1 00 

101 > 34*. 
90to 92 >. 
96 97', 

105'* 96 
IMS 95 * 

BR 

T »• 

99'« 92'. 
93 ’. o>* 
102'. 94 
95 .- 89V 

100 91 * 
98'* SO'. 
BSto 79'; 
971. ffll, 

102'. 93V. 

99 > 90'- 
98V 90'; 
lOOb 94'* 

77'. 76'* 
101 V 90'* 
B6- re 

101** 94', 

97'* aa 

85 79 

108'* 100 
106 , 99’* 
BT* 75V 
S3’* 86 s . 

101 91', 


+2 

105 

43 114 


117 

67 93 


01 n 

1 02 89 



34 115 


118 

08 115 

+5 

99 

24 103 

-4 

104 

78 .. 


0.4 

1.7 4 9 



85 17.4 


54 

74 383 



66 189 



37 109 

-5 

MR 

44 8.1 


116 

57 314 


49 

84 154 


16 

54 150 



.. 154 



64 72 

♦ 1 

*7 

44 10* 

+2 

5.7 

313 00 



09 280 

+4 

*0 

17 .. 


2 1 

11 2a 1 

-2 

331 

*8102 

■ .. 

6 2 

05 90 


05 

5.4 34.1 

• +6 

06 

B4 135 


£br 

24 15.1 


44 

11 115 


42 

45 124 

.. 

42 

SO IS 


54 

83 264 


61 

7.7 133 1 


23 

22354 


72 

06 182 ' 

■ -2 

54 

59 10.1 

+15 


.. 287 


21 

43 107 

i -1 

85 

5.1 103 

1 +3 

,83 

18114 

-2 

11 

id test 


250 

88 94 


00 

05 112 

-1 

flu 

18 ,89 

r .. 

57 r 

55 70 


S3 

84 110 


100 

09 103 

• +2 

67 

49 143 

*3 

109 

13 104 


7.1 

18117 


5*n 

12 .. 

-2 

179 

49 109 


7.7 

89 109 


0.7 

30 .. 

♦1 

91 

73 171 


196 

52 252 


15? 

19 162 


93 

48 1*8 


18 

49 184 


43 

42 39 


184 

44 84 


180 

16 114 


155 

39 180 


86 

88100 


17 1 

45 122 


119 

55119 

• +2 

,87 

4.1 102 

-1 

12 

15 144 


83 

45 155 

-4 

1,7 

00 172 


214 

*0 145 

-1 


*7 ,29 

+3 

1,3 

31 130 

• .. 

14 

00 69 


100 

83 295 

• .. 

114 

54 189 

• +5 

,0* 

40 119 

-1 

5/n 

85 79 

-2 

10 

39 ,61 

:l 

1.4n 

19 180 

. . 1) 
AS 

iaii’s 

-* 

44 

29 153 


CHEMICALS, PLASTICS 



44V Z3’« AKZO NJV Baser 

E43to 

+'i 

400 

9.1 .. 

058 

121 

Ataad CofcKb 

170 

-3 

13 

19 I7J 

383 

273 


353 

+3 

89 

05 172 

260 

180 


030 

-6 

61 

07 15 


re 

HTP 

129 


87 


99', 

; 5ito Bayer DM50 

£99', 

+3 

no 

70 .. 

12* 

100 

ESBjJdlSS 

124 

+2 

103 

83 93 

134 

104 


127 

+2 

S.l 

*0 169 

79'; 

■ 9', Br B«m* 

7SV 

-1 


.. 839 

107 

79 


101 

+1 

ill 

SO 1*9 

rra 

108 

224 

131 

Cum Bras 

268 

145 

+1 

95 

16 

15 140 
49 89 


112 


115 


66 

5.7 19 

26 

151 

14 

118 

gxyJHoraco) 

15V 

141 

-?V 

87 

100 

45 82 
71 149 


62 

Dp DU 

110 




227 

158 


,96 

• .. 

64 

44 172 

2S8 

175 


256 


119 


14* 

HU 

Matetesfi (James) 

,34 

-1 

87 

*3 104 

468 

316 


380 


214 

16 88 

95*, 51 

Hoecns, DM50 

£S5V 

♦Tv 


5.1 10> 

949 

630 

•no Chen bid 

92* 

-5 

47., 

3/3 

12, 

276 

8* 

1 35" 

383 

lira 

-2 

105 

*7 

09 184 

4 3 172 


Ml 


162 

+2 

13 



53 


61 

30 

17 186 

182 

126 

Reraoki 

156 

-1 

12 

01 2,2 

30* 

64 

SNLA BPO 

304 



55 94 

328 

182 

WOUBenhra™ Htak 203 

+3 

111, 

112 

66 

YortfMSre Cham 

,10 

-0 

43 

19 105 


CINEMAS AND TV 


203 120 Anglia TV 'A' 
64 26 Ckimoan 

185 118 HTVN/V 
301 218 LWT tfdgs 

sea in scat tv>- 

186 110 TVS N/V 

38 23 TSW 


203 .. 123 64 143 

36 24 67 61- 

1B0 113 61 82 

290 ..206 7.1 118 

see 12? 43 ice 

175 • *2 114 65 84 

38 .. 24 63 10.4 


DRAPERY AND STORES 


UNDA 

4r« 36' 
37', 33'- 

47S 41 
31** 26*. 
26'. 23V 
26 23', 

INDEX 

118'j IDS', 
102'. 91 
raviae 
103'; 9S'« 
IDS', 93', 
106*. 96- 
103*. 92V 

108'. 97 

. gr. 79'. 
99'. 87*. 
98*. 


'4 

96 


*8 

98 


*4 

74 


'■ 

9.7 


hi 

97 


■* 

92 


, 

01 


<i 

02 


■a 

05 



11 


*ra 

11 



07 



31 


■l 

32 



12 


* m 

12 


* 

32 



BANKS DISCOUNT HP 


2*6 90 

88 46 

32, 194'- 

18'. r- 

445 225 

15': 8'.- 
OO SIS 
-444 351'.- 
482 332 
460 380 
5<6 433 
46'. 23'.- 
30'. 17. 
42 '. 27 . 
72 32 

70 if 

107; 4J*. 
264 104'* 
197 7*', 

372 3*8 
82 55 
246 131 
31 12'.- 

300 Sp 

69 81V 

393 233 
189 138 
735 375 
51* 346 
42 22 
819 396 
SW 3S 
270 ire 
724 567 
105 

360 >M 

60 & 
120 82 
Si to 13* 

29* S« 

t7a728 


90 

37 .. 



150 

56 .. 

170 

35 n 


67 „2 

iBOr 

*7 92 

8*0 

50 90 




6, 105 


51 ,55 

384 

120 .. 

208 

54 .. 



34 

<9 106 

60 

01 .. 

an 

si 




58 ,69 

2.7 

34 108 

96 

40 002 

95.7 

31 259 

170 

45 ,80 

1T4 

44 205 

118 

71 20.0 

2,4 r 

09 139 

286 

54 76 

01 

62 130 

2 23 

08 12 7 

364 

78 79 

37.6 

93 80 

550 

52 226 

15 7 

44 152 

19 

£5 017 

65 

55 142 

117 

*04 

284 

01 179 


10* 50', Aquascutum A 
100 5r, bmm (James) a 
163 60 B«r«8»5 

52 9 Stocks LM 

66 48 Brenner 
S85 220 Brown (N) 

317 2W Buttons 
120 83 Canajrs 'A' 

54 36 CkSfctK (S) 

355 22* Church 

186 67 Cornom) Endoh 

138 95 Cowls (FwnTA- 

93 67'.- DewNrst flJ) 

30* 131 Onms Grp 
423 271 Duns 
81 56’, Efts A GcSdstBb, 

665 380 B*8 (VWmbWdon) 
176 92 Essvpsa Suras 

230 130 Ban 
98 27 Eaecutw Ctodiet 

139 72 Fine An Dev 

133', 255 Fen) (kiartn) 

186 1*3 Formnstor 
392 162 Ftesmans 
110 79', Gaffer (AJ) 

IM 60 Gam SR 
105 43 G0WWg(AJ 

237 ,S3 GcMWiAnGp 
394 152 Graoan 

13', 864 BUS 
937 674 Do A' 

288 168 Hants Oueenmoy 
29', 22 Helena 0, LAMM 
36 21 HOMS 

307 2*0 Hone Cham, 

12B 93 House Of Loose 
90 71', Jones lemest) 

38 21 Lathes Pnce 

1M 93 LCP 

228 100 Lee Cooper 

6*5 370 ueerty 

190 142 imcrofi agar 

IBS 111 MBrirs A Staaxr 

338 2,8 MwaweiJonn) 

195 116 MtoettS LWSurt 
615 306 Moss Bras 

ISO 94 NSS Newsagents 
244 154 NM 
385 313 Okrar tOJ 
6*0 33, Our Pile* 

71 38 Penns 

97 56 Ram Sons 

tie » Praeoy tAtfrert 
131 46 Ramra (Mini 

40'.- 23', RavMcfc 
315 155 Reed lAusnm 

IBS 96 Do -a 

38 16 & 6 U Store* 

IBS 116 Samuel (H) 

92 72 Do 'K 

127': 78 Sows 

335 200 Saopscai (S) 'A 
320 180 Snath (WH) 'A 

6* 31 DO o 

61 42 Stanley (AG) 

115 56 SMUMrg 

336 273 swantxae 

85 26 Sam Clothrt 

50i 373 Suaerarug Sms 
St 40 TenvCorattM 
83'- 27', Time Prorkxaa 

196 '80 Unaerwoods 
462 267 vantme Viyeta 
235 140 WW Gram 
328 203 Wert wwa 
1*8 98 (vgtoas 

6,0 277', WuMrti 


33 35 355 
10 3-3 1*9 

31 21 308 


.. 139 

-4 &a 

• +Z 32 

.. 3.1 

■6 20.7 

• .. 7.7 

• .. 6.7 

1 A 

■ -6 23 

61 

... 33 

+10 129 
-4 36 

4.6 

..a 

4.7 

+1Z'i .. 

■ aa 

-4 S3 

• . . 76 

-« 29 

• +1 31 

-2 10.7 

-4 57 

• .. 269 

•-13 369 

-4 69 

33 

• -1 30 

-62 43 

114 

• .. 59 

+1 1.1 
.. 80 
-5 53 

.. TOO 

• +7 ion 

-4 5 f 

-2 5.1 

29 

+5 74 

-6 ii 

11.7 

• -10 79 

0b 

-2 T4 
-2 65 

• .. 3.7 


+7 60 35 439 

*1 60 77 200 

-1 44 3S 163 

8 2 25 128 

• -6 79 26 20.1 

• 15 25 199 

-4 35 49 209 

. . 35 33 155 

-13 1IO 27 785 

+4 84 14 221 

29n 52 104 
♦1 Zi 5I«2 
24 13 329 

-2 17 1 r 38 186 

+10 113 *9 89 

-2 86 31 159 

18n 37 . 

.. 128 26 200 


ELECTRICALS 


637 ire 
386 63 
385 <9 
90 28 
303 185 
80 25 
200 138 
308 IBS 
185 *3 
*8* 308 
208 104V 


AB Baa 315 

Aram! 366 

Apnea C0CJMVS 82 

Wen 86 

Manse Camp 280 

Autvo FfleMy Si 

Auto Sic 188 

BJCC SCO 

Bfi-fi » 

Bowiheipe „ <71 

Br Tetesam Mo P 204 


11.4 35 235 

15 8* Z7.7 
2.1 2.6 85 

24 09 145 
. . 165 
19 1 1 13, 
15.1 10 IM 

24 25 63 

82 1 7 229 
89 49 134 




i mo 



81 

14 

t 25 

08 

5 

1 250 

S7 

15 

SB 

ao 

e 

24 

as 

19 

75 

07 ; 

M 

15 

13 

,3 

59 

01 

5 

11 

*9 

13 

07 

07: 

30 

I 11.4 

*5 

10 

1 19 

85 

18 

02 

04 

13 

18 

4.1 ' 

10 


FINANCE AND LAND 


3S4 210 
193 128 
346 200 
151 70 

28', 17-e 
218 158 
36 10 

20*4 ,6'. 
2S3 120 
183 91 
173 IM 
47 37 

48*. 38 


AlMUMwin 238 

AAten HunM 172 

AnuMresu 340 

fi^kley Tech ,23 

Conan E24 

Conoam 188 

Ce wraw y 25 

EqJty 6 Gen 1(P< 

HamtoO 241 

hoty A Sow 188 

•to«H 172 

Nu Home Leans 40 

Don £42 


19 09 .. 

I TO 84 72 
200 89 55 

167 0.7 II 

29 15 589 

13° 89 84 
104 45 345 

81 -35 285 
89 59 249 


425 275 Gram Mel 
282 186 Kemeny Br 
381 241 Uathdw 


100 77 Mount Chnrtane 
112 87 Pnnce Of W Han 

72', 48', Queens Man 


78 SB SaMe 


4,0 

• -fl 

1*3 

15 

105 

250 

-2 

01 

08 

125 

357 

-4 

150 

*2 

219 

*50 


1*3r 

32 

,95 

87 

-V 

00 

24 

118 

TO 

♦1 

01 

30 

106 

67V 

-2 

02 r 

34 

188 

383 


39 

09 

HL3 

70 

• -2 

1.7 

24 

,79 

156 

• -2 

79 

*9 

187 


INDUSTRIALS 

A-D 


221 118 
267 182 
128 93 

301 218 
112 71 

222 1*8 
200 136 
M5 85 
385 86 
42 24 

30 15', 


52 15', 

3*5 21 B 
81 25 

211 52 

415 278 
87 59 

335 348 


AAH 

AGS Reseero, 


Alunki Wwesr 

Amosr M 

Apatattace 

Arenson 

Armour 

Ash A Loco* 

AsMev 

Ass Br Bn 8% 


Ajronire Men* 

BET DM 


197 118 BlDcodk 184 

®S', 13', Baser (CHI 21*. 

560 325 (WfWmf 500 

276 ISO Baker Reams 2S7 

175 54 Bsnra mu 168 

185 112 BatMO) 1S9 

495 180 Barton Band 387 

49', 38 B*TW Keppwn 481 

210 130 BMP Transport iao 

81 » Sernas fCnanesJ 27 

1W iw S*Mon Ctortui 190 

116 66 BewtenJ 115 

391 275 Baecnem 350 

.. . BeRek Caemabcs 

45 18 BeMon 28 

211 IS Senotord (SAW, 207 

1,6 73 Bartsforns 115 

327 100 Baspah 1,9 


33 <5 Bsvan (OF) 

305 220 B mil) 

205 135 BkkA 
103 51 fW*m yj 

US 80 Bmd uualcast 
1*3 102', Brmnauni IM 
174 75 BOckAtrow 

243 1B0 Biaa (Pew) 

44'; 22 Btocfcnood Hedge 
230 79 Bodpana 

Si 223 Boater MeConme 
274 180 Boots 
10'.- 5*. Bowen (Wm) 

3GB 21* Bomtar 
24 ,5 Buwaier Me 

138 75 BMhM, Grp 

•12 277 Brenner 
72 38 Brabmr 


54 28 
150 97 

185 W; 
155 MS 
16* 114 
148 77 ' 

244 153 


; Bnqpotttkjnay ire 

Br^AEngApplg 

'Br Svpfter, 122 

Qr Vet 244 

r Broken Ha 313 

BtntmM Inds SO 

r Bronx Eng 20 

Breoke Tool 38 

. Brawn A T<ma 170 

Brawn ulOhnl 20 

BrunwtS (Mus) 55 

Soksugn 27i 

Buraess IB* 

Bwns-Andamn 64 

CjmWrt Eng M 

Caoaro mo 32 ', 

Cepe m 65 

Circ*o Eng 303 

CeOMgs 87 

CewnK» 38 

central A Shew 7 

CWIWW hid T9'r 

CM Ina 56 

OWUrtMl Ph 7V, 

Cnemtoertm A HU 83 

CwwCm 253 

Chaavg 570 

Chnjses Ini 328 

Const, Hum 37 

cwke (Ctomert) 187 

Ctoynn Son 118 

Conen lAI 400 

CaknB Go 188 

Contxned Tech 14', 

Concenmc 83 

Cam Ssfi&srary 27 

CotKlWmt 95 


14 79 149 

257 149 59 
22 81 .. 
9.4 40 80 
88 50 104 

181 49 1*9 

.. t .. 

19 82 144 
ISO 70 8.7 
78 85 119 

6.1 5.1 69 

. . « . . 149 
80 r 19 588 
20r 99 79 
95 11 189 
149 72 99 

4 0 43 M 

54 49 94 

88 60 ,47 

64 40 130 

29 1.1 198 

. . . . ,78 

86 17 118 
164 5.1 135 

99 4.1 158 


IIDbIOS .. 
17.9 40 185 
32 4 8 UMI 
£1 14 129 

8.1 48 100 

7.1 4 0 130 

09 0 7 859 

99 53 129 

39 3 I 322 
99 39 100 

19 32 li.0 

87 35 . 

19 47 77 

96 56 119 

43 78 124 

it 7 43 >29 

23 19 175 
39 91 139 
25 37 B 1 

24 74 133 

. . n . 45 

179r S3 73 
19 87 85 
14 17 192 
.. ■ .. 144 
.. a .. 375 
11 55 101 
55 77 92 

50 80 Bfl 

15.7 64 902 

193 3* 124 

73 £4 17 0 

.. 185 
69 35 283 
107 91 W 
154 19 7.9 

63 .. .. 


466 






286 

135 

Cope A*man 

283 

-6 


39 111 

re 

22 


48 


01 



COB® 





»1 

31 

Coinoey Rope 
Cowan Da Own 

367 

66 

mJS 

,0B 

34114 


80 

Crest MefaoNon 

,38 

m .. 










287'; 1*8' 

Cuma>*3*% 




43 

22 

DSC 





*83 

350 

OPCE 

*70 






Oakanr 

268 


179 

17 104 


15V Dn 



a 

33 

Owes A Met 'A' 

S3 






Oakes • Neatnrai 





940 

81 

7,5 

8ft, Ru. 

SB 

820 

■ .. 
+5 

69 

55 13 

231 

105V Ma 

219 

-3 



206 


Dantend Soaping 

201 

• ♦1 





□eeoumr 

z*a 

-6 




10V Dorta Heal 

18V 




333 


Optoma 

333 

+2 




Damon Perk 

66V 

• -V 





rVyn 

106 

• -2 


86 114 



Danankm tot 

113 





26 

□upon 

69'i 


06 


G5 



fO 

-T 


9, 

87 

58 

84 

W 1 * 

SO 

77 

• .. 

• .. 

3.7 

87 

89 014 

74 117 


231 1S6 - Tmrecommemel 
162 103', Transport Dot 
19*, TV Tranwood 
80 38 Trteftie 
93 29', Triplex 

158 - 01 Turner A N not 

203 9* (JKO 

134 aa 

14'jfiS® (Merer . 

63S 44V Unlever (NV) 

2» 184 «*r 

413 210 Ifldmra 

140 78 VWor Products 

206 101 vmun 
m; 92V vaemagen 
as so w5T 
17* no wade Ronenes 
216 98 lUttki 

18, 125 Wagon M - 
125 34b watartort Otoss 

185 14S WBtshm 
288 81 Watson fH Kehrtrq 
274 180’r Wedgwood 


112 84 Wheasoe 

221 138 WHMcraft 
224 128 1Mk8S(Iaae« 



395 

263 

Eastern Prod 

301 


1*3 


183 

106 

Eitaro 

183 

+2 



253 

148 

BS 

253 


89 

15114 


Z7V Be d 

3*V 




120 

65 



-2 


is 104 

31to 12** EtaCMlun (AQ 

£23 V 



87 

St 


68 

+3 

2.9 

12 188 

29 

* 18V EffhWT 

£28 V 

♦ V 

139 

13 .. 

329 

216 

Erntash China On 325 

• +3 

187 

*8120 

» 

l«V Ericsson IUU) & 

224V 

+*» 

90 

a* .. 




,58 


*0 

24 2,0 


European Femes 

189 




163 

101 

Do 5% ftt 

,16 

-1 

7.1 

61 .. 

270 

139 

Enema 

POO 

-4 

46 

02112 



Evade 

12* 

• +* 


17 114 

154 

90 

Expranet W 

150 

+2 

7.6 

5.1 1B0 


2/2 

Extol 





42 

22 

Petal 

24 

+T 


18 62 

37 

26 

XZSX" 1 

29 


1.4 

44 51 6 

150 

IDS 

120 



89 180 

IBS 

60 

Ftfe Inauer 

65 


50 

73 07 

523 


Ftaons 

501 

+8 


13 274 


32 

Fttnadmn 

38 

+1 



112 

flB 

Ftaxefc COW 





*9 

20 

Fatal 

48V 


08 

13 16 

122 65 Fogarty 

30V Bfi Fbi« GKwp N/V 

122 

26 


87 

10 

4.7 480 

80 82 

110 

KB 

FmmraN 6 Mw 158 

-4 

116 

7.4 143 

89 

43 

French (Thomas) 

66 

• +2 


82 .. 

112 

64 

QB M 

102 

+1 

64 

12 15.1 

3*4 

188 

GXN 

336 

-5 

,57 

4.7 113 

780 

200 

GR 

280 


100 

18 7.7 

M 

55 


84 


*3 

11 9.1 

T38 

99 

Geatetner 

132 

• .. 

01 

14 114 

>45 

64 

Saws 

U6 


*3r 0S 70.1 

10V 533V Gina 

960 

-6 


14 283 

323 

,6* 


310 

-a 

110 

44 17.8 

88 

30 

Gamma 

A6 

+2 

29 

3.4 70 

0*a 

433 

Goring Kan 

460 

• +5 

180 

33 174 

201 

85 

GOBTprSn MdDS 

186 

-2 

70 

*2 240 

3,2 

146 


270 

• +2 

101 

37 213 

W, 

TV UmUwB 

0V 


07 

72 13 


39 

man Pnamaa 

71 

•-a 

3S 

34 U9 



HU Eng 

Hal M 

156 

-2 

110 

12 181 

IBS 

138 

155 

-1 

68n *4 114 1 

230 

1*3 

HaKn 

190 

• .. 

179 

64 115 [ 

W5 

IKi 

Hsana 

743 

-0 

02 

00318 1 

3* 

19*4 HimpBon M 

30V 


Ur 53 114 

62 

35 


42 

+1 



191 

133V Hanson 

162 


57 

141*4 

190V 135 

Do B% Cr» 

fIBIV 

BOO 

10 .. 

111 

96V 

Do 5V% 

11, 

-i' 

87 

74 .. 

156 

92 

Hangaawm 

149 

70 

4.7174 



Hawker GUdkay 





541 

359 

517 

-8 

174 

34 113 

,14 

121 

66 

73 

Hawley 

Hay INonsan) 

112 

105 

*2 

*9 

07 

SA 

24 18 

11 1*4 

,72 

,20 


167 

99 

19114 

128 

55 


121 

-2 

5.1 

*2 51.1 

92 

.5* 

Hewitt (J) 

83 


34 

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251 IBS 
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787 255 Bbvooni 

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392 238 CHA 

100 52 GsrBOfd 

5M 397 Cone GoW*«i 
508 257 OaBaaa 
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18V 5V D u om lont ea, 

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310 10 E Damn 
780 27S Bsik&sm 
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20 80 EMxeg 

488 233 E Ram Gold 

730 2’« e Fund prp 
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213 8* FB Dev 
20 0 G eevo r Tm 
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12 ’« 4V Gan Mawig 
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178 53 Gopang 
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218 US', Hampton Anrae 
13* 4V Harmony 
525 190 HmHS 
67 * 0 Joh nn ies 
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278 87 Le*B 
20V Vi Ubanon 

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188 lie MM 

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175 70 llaMl 

38 U 1 , Manta Exptradon 

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10V wfckfs u«» 

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166 99 Nth Bndwi Hi 

64', 28V Nth Ktataut 
375 195 Norttgata 
22V 20 Orangs Free 
280 1l» PoWmg Tin 
318 205 PtaoMud 
33V 14 Reno hues Lid 
800 275 Rand Wnea Prey, 
95 16 R a ndtonwn 

303 231 Rentaon 
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279 78 SA Land 

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865 335 UMI 

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844 315 VanwnpoM 
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737 3*0 We&om 
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182 104 WMi Creek 
31 SV Mnbab 
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88 32 Zandpen 


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MOTORS AND AIRCRAFT 


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textiles 


NEWSPAPERS AND 
PUBUSHERS 


20 186 Anoc Book 
283 122 assoc tin iBpapto' 
350 SW Black (AAcT^ 
600 388 BrtaW 
*85 333 Coons (Wm) 

338 283 DOW 
189 95 Snap 'A' 

380 2B0 Hamas PutOthina 

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6.7 r 82.84. 
93 14 114 



TOBACCOS 


5® 255 BAT 

S 1® S**" - 

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-7. ,67 «4 73 

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and halve their UK whisky market volume share 

Argyll We can revive Distillers’ spirits. 


THE TIMES TUESDAY MARCH 4 1986 


. ; tsf«aisrtne> SMsuti WWVajiCOLiD ncsniMnnu japktt Pi' f.r v-r*t CfiXAtHf trctmKNeiF c-i iam: g?(*> < f . _ 

fORTVff RtfWBATiON'-COHIJUHEDTiT Trt5 AOTEHTtSOflOfl TO THE BEST Of THEM.WWUKE AND B£UP |H*I.* U*I* *U REA30«&i UK IrtT 3£H IS «* CASH •« rtC »*«• S3rtiMtt * T^AMSTGWWT £ iN ACCORDANCE «RH THE UC»D »* MKC UK* «W W « 401 


Guinness’ first 
stroke of marketing genius 
for Distillers. 








• r 


COMMODITIES REVIEW 


Orwellian ring to SIB’s 
futures business rules 


Damper on 
building 
industry 


hopes 


One does not need to dwell 
long on the studied legalese of 
last week's weighty ofTerings 
from the Securities and in- 
vestments Board to reach an 
arresting conclusion: anjbody 
in the futures business who 
fondlv believed that London 
was not about to receive a 
Securities and Exchange Com- 
mission should think again. 

Indeed, the "Conduct of 
Business Rules" issued by the 
SIB for consultation have 
quite un intern tonally an al- 
most Orwellian ring: "de- 
regulation" means exactly the 
opposite. 

Under the guise of “self- 
regulation". futures trading in 
London will in fact be careful- 
ly regulated by someone else. 
Thisis certainly true of pri- 
vate investor business, and is 
more true of trade business 
than many people so far have 
cared to admit. 

Take capital adequacy’, a 
mailer which arguably a fleets 
firms with mainly trade busi- 
ness more closely than those 
dealing with private investors. 
The SIB. headed by Sir 
Kenneth Be trill, has not yet 
shared its thoughts on this 
central question with us. but 
when it docs, the squeals wilt 
be audible all o\ cr the Square 
Mile. 


lures contracts or contracts for 
differences or effect or arrange 
for the effecting of such a 
transaction with or for a 
customer who is not reason- 
ably believed by the firm to be 
a business investor in relation 
to that in\ esimeni or a profes- 
sional investor in relation to 
that transaction unless the 
firm has a reasonable basis for 
believing that the customer 
has such knowledge and expe- 
rience in financial matters that 
he may be expected to be 
capable of evaluating the risks 
of the transaction and that he 
can afford to take those risks.” 

After reading that, one is 
grateful to the SIB draughts- 
men for not including a 
"clarifying" Practice Note. 
But the message is [slain. A lot 
of customers of firms who 
shall remain nameless but 
which do pop up in the 
newspapers every now and 
again could be rejected be- 
cause either they did not have 
the relevant knowledge and 
experience, or because they 
could not evaluate the risk, or 
because they could not afford 
it. 




Sir Kenneth BerriU: 
more rules to come 


The detail counts because 
these rules wilt be the basis of 
“equivalence”, the SIB doc- 
trine that the Self- Regulatory 
Organizations which are sup- 
posed to run the show must 
have rules equivalent in the 
scope and effect to those of the 
board. In practice, the SIB is 
depriving SRGs of much of 
their cherished initiative, and 
it is not outside its powers in 
so doing. 


In offering these distinc- 
tions. the board is try ing- quite 
rightly, to quell long-standing 
fears among futures traders 
(that is. professional inves- 
tors) that they will be subject 
to the same onerous rules 
when dealing with each other 
as when dealing with private 
investors. 

But the list of rules (devo- 
lves note again, numbers 
3.3.01 to 3.3.07) for dealing 
with private investors does 
not leave SROs much scope. 
Customer agreements, discre- 
tionary portfolio management 
and frequency with which 
information is given to the 
customer are all covered. 

What the SIB has avoided, 
interestingly, is a definition of 
what the SEC calls a “sophisti- 
cated investor’’ 


By Judith Huntley 
Commercial Property 
Correspondent 


The construction industry 
can look forward to only a 
modest improvement in its 
fortunes this year, according to 
the latest Investment in Con- 
struction report by Greene A 
Co, the firm of stockbrokers. 

The recent excitement in the 
sector caused by a bull market 
and the prospect of the Chan- 
nel tunnel contracts has died 
away in the face of falling off 
prices and the spectre of rising 
interest rates, the firm says. 

Greene & Co gnes warning 
against pinning feopes for the 
sector on increasing public 
expenditure. Mach has been 
said about the state of Britain's 
declining i nfr a s tructure hot it 
has little impact on government 
policy or spending plans. 


The number of sophisticat- 
ed private investors in futures 
and options in this country 
seems Fairly small. Such peo- 
ple are reduced instead to a 
kind of residual category with- 
in the rules, the people who do 
not fall under any other 
definition. 


Estimates put the construc- 
tion industry's share of public 
spending as low as 7.5 per cent 
in 1986-87, a fall from the 1(U 
per cent in 1979-80. 

Real growth b likely to come 
only through the private sector 
bid the broker raises doebts 
about that if interest rates rise. 


The notion of what is 
eligible rather than the size of 
the capital adequacy require- 
ment will bear an" uncanny 
rcsemblence to SEC rules. 

Or to return to thoughts 
which the SIB has vouchsafed, 
take the "Know Your Cus- 
tomer" rule (number 3.4.01 
for devotees of last week's 
"General Note”): 

"No firm shall recommend 
a transaction in options, fu- 


The last is a sound and 
rather fundamental point 
which occurs several times in 
the General Note. The draft 
rules go on to define best 
execution (the principle that 
the client is entitled to the 
cheapest price), firm's remu- 
neration. and the tricky little 
matter of investments which 
are not marketed. 

That embraces a wide range, 
from what one SIB luminary 
described as the typical Van- 
couver stock to certain kinds 
of Business Enterprise 
Schemes. 

And so the rules proceed. 


Let us take another item, 
almost at random. The rules 
try to distinguish between on 
the one hand what I have here 
called a private investor and 
what on the other hand the 
SIB calls a “business investor" 
and a “professional investor". 
The former is someone for 
whom buying and selling in- 
vestments is normal in the 
course of carrying on a busi- 
ness whose main purpose is 
not investment; the latter is 
someone who carries on an 
investment business and re- 
ceives and gives services for 
that purpose. 


But the two crucial points 
remain. The SIB rules are 
comprehensive, and we arc 
promised many more: and 
they arc rules, not mere guide- 
lines. Futures and options 
trading in London, for so long 
a world of its own. is moving 
into an uncomfortable era of 
direct and stringent controls. 


The office market in London 
and the South-east of England 
is comparatively buoyant, as b 
the retail sector, the report 
says. Private house-building 
provides a solid backbone tor 
the industry bat the land 
shortages in the South-east 
could present problems. 


By constructing the elabo- 
rate apparatus of SROs. the 
Government has skilfully dis- 
guised the true extent of the 
central direction. Orwell 
would have understood. 

Michael Prest 


Greene & Co believes the M 
J Gleeson Group and Bryant 
Holdings, both lowly-geared 
companies, and Wilson 
(Connolly) Holdings, with its 
large residential land bank, 
will be good investments in 
1986. 


imp 





EUROPEAN 


FUND 


A New Unit Trust Aiming for All-Out Capital Growth 


F 


ramlington European Fund aims for 
maximum capital growth through invest- 
ment in shares quoted on the principal 
European stock markets. 


Europe is now one of the most populjr areas 
for investment. But it is a diverse and complex 
market: for investment success strong links with 
the continent arc highly desirable. Our own were 
completed on 19 December with a subscription 
by Credit Commercial de France into Framlington 
Group pic. enabling us to combine CCFs 
expertise and knowledge of the European market 
with our own eminently effective jppronch to 
long term capital growth. 


France 30 per cent 

Germany 30 per cent 

Holland 1 5 per cent 

Italy lOpercenr 

Switzerland 8 per cent 

Austria. Belgium, 

Scandinavia. Spain 7 per cent 

The fund has powers to invest in Britain 
but will not do so initiallv. 


Investors should regard all unit trust invest- 
ment as long term. They are reminded that the 
price of units and the income from them can go 
down as well as up. 

On 1st March the price of both income and 
accumulation units was 51.4p. The estimated 
gross yield was 2.00 per cent. 


THE FRAMLINGTON APPROACH 
Our special style is to concentrate on smaller 
companies and try to identify those with really 
good growth prospects before the rest of the 
marker recognises their promise, aiming for 
exceptional capital growth performance. 

The resulrs of this have been good, especially 
over the long term. 


LUMP SUM INVESTMENT 
\bu can make a lump sum investment simply 
by completing rbe form below and sending it 
to us with your cheque. Units are allocated at 
the price ruling when we receive your order. 
The minimum investment for a lump sum is 
£500. There is a discount of 1 per cent for 
investments of £10.000 or more. 


OUR RECORD 

The two previous Framlington funds which have 
most closely followed this approach have been 
Capital Trust, investing in U.K. shares: and 
American and General Fund, investing in the 
US. A. Both have done well. 

Over the ren years to 1st January Framlington 
Capital Trusr was rbe besr performing of all the 
271 unit trusts monitored by Planned Springs 
over the period. It turned an original investment 
of £1.000 into £1 1.462. 

Over seven years, our American & General 
Fund ( started 1978) was the second best perform- 
ing unit trusr out of the 26 investing in North 
American shares, it turned £1.000 into £4.339. 


MONTHLY 
SAVINGS PLAN 

S tarting a monthly savings plan is 
equally easy. The minimum is £20 
per month, with a discount of 1 per 
cent for contributions of £100 or 
more. Accumulation units are used and are 
allocated at the price ruling on the 5th of 
each month. 1b start your plan, complete the 
application and send it with your cheque for 
the first contribution. Subsequent contribu- 
tions are by the direct debit mandate which 
we shall send to you for vour signature. 


GENERAL INFORMATION 
Applications will be acknowledged; certificates for 
lump-sum investments will be sent by the registrars, 
Lloyds Bank Pic. normally within 42 days. 

The minimum initial investment is £50 0. Units may 
be boaghr and sold daily Prices and yields will be 
pub I is ted daily in leading newspapers. When units are 
sold back to the managers payment is normally made 
within 7 days of receipt of the renounced certificate. 
Savings plans can be cashed in at any time. 

Income net of basic rate tax is distributed to holders of 
income units annually on 15 July. The first distribution 
willbeoo 15 July, 1987. 

The annual charge is 1% ( +VAT) of the value of the 
fund. The initial charge, which is included in the offer 
price, is 5%. 

Commission is paid to qualified intermediaries at the 
rate of lVt% (plus VAT). Commission is not paid on 
savings plans. 

The trust is an authorised unit trusr constituted by 
Trust Deed. It ranks as a wider range security under the 
Trustee Investments Act, 1961. The Trustee is Lloyds 
Bank Pic. The managers are Framlington Unit 
Management Limited, 1 3 London Wall Buildings, 
London EC2M 5NQ. Telephone 01-628 5J8L 
Telex 88L2599. Registered in England No 895241. 
Member of the Unit Trust Association. 

This offer is not open to residents of the Republic of 
Ireland. 


TO: FRAMLINGTON UNIT MANAGEMENT LIMITED, 3 LONDON WALL BUILDINGS, 

LONDON EC2M 5NQ 


I wish to invest 


LUMPSUM 


MONTHLY SAVINGS 
I wish to start a Monthly Savings Plan for 


in Framlington European Fund 
(minimum £500i 


in Framlington European Fund 
(minimum’ £20) 


OUR EUROPEAN LINK 
The manager of Framlington European Fund 
is Philippe Herault. who has been seconded 
from CCF for the purpose. He is our link 
into CCFs research, while working in London 
with the other Framlington fund managers. 

The fund will have an emphasis on smaller 
companies: it is. for example, authorised to 
invest in rhe French Second Alnrcbd. We are 
currently investing in the following proportions: 


I enclose my cheque payable to Framlington Unit 
Management Limited. I am over 18. For accumulation 
units in which income is reinvested, tick here □ 


I enclose my cheque lor £ for my first 

contribution (this can be for a larger amount than 
your monthly payment ). 1 am cner 18. 


Surname (Mr/Mn/Miss/TitleL 


Full first name(s)_ 


Address. 


Signature - .... 

I Joint jpplicar. should jU sign tind if necccssiin 
gitc Jcuih tcf-iwteh > 


— 


T 


National surgery to soothe 
the victims of ‘technofear’ 


British management has long 
been in crisis, ft has been 
shackled with a negative atti- 
tude towards anything techni- 
cal— an attitude that has been 
tempered by an educational 
system which dissuaded the 
test brains from entering tech- 
nically related professions. 

The situation has been fur- 
ther aggravated try an abun- 
dance of brilliant engineers 
whose design talents are the 
envy of the world but whose 
understanding of corporate 
management is basic, again a 
poor testimony to the British 
educational system. The mid- 
dle managers who are trying to 
keep np with their secretaries' 
knowledge of word processors 
are as vulnerable as the entre- 
preneurs who want to invest 

.computerized/aulomated 

equipment with minimum in- 
dustrial conflict. They are all 
in need of help. 

All is not gloom. A team of 
volunteers at the British Insti- 
tute of Management intend to 
change the profile of those 
technically deprived managers 
and attempt to encourage . 
them to shed their 
“lechnofears”. and learn to 
appreciate technology. 

‘ Last week the team began a 
campaign to raise £500.000 to 
transform the 100 or so BIM 
centres around the UK into 


that without such a scheme 
UK management will remain 
second-rate and under-skilled. 
By September six surgeries 
will be in operation, depend- 
ing on the funding available. 

That funding is a yearly 
budget of about £5,000 for 
each centre. The price is 
cheap, since most 'of the 
overheads in teaching and 
achninstration are carried out 
by unpaid volunteers. 

Briiain will pay an even 
higher price in the internation- 
al business market if its corpo- 


K THE WEEK j 


By Bill Johnstone 

Technology Correspondent 


surgeries where ailing manag- 
ers can have theranv in con Ti- 


ers can have therapy in confi- 
dence. 

The national surgery net- 
work is an extension of two 
pilot schemes which have 
been created within the Iasi 18 
months at Warrington and 
Kingston. In these centres 
managers of different ranks 
and backgrounds have dis- 
cussed their problems with 
experts and with each other in 
their search for solutions. 

The network is to be extend- 
ed in modest stages, assuming 
that the BLM can get industry 
to fund the project and realize 


rate decision-makers are 
outclassed. Undoubtedly rhe 
long term approach must be to 
give a more comprehensive 
education to those studying 
technical subjects. 

Undoubtedly the long term 
approach must be to give a 
more comprehensive educa- 
tion to those studying techni- 
cal subjects. 

Dr Bert Damefl. one of the 
principal energies behind, the 
BIM surgery project, was on 
the Finniston Committee 
which looked at the calibre of 
British engineers. The 
Rnniston report was to rec- 


ommend many sweeping 
changes. In the wake of its 


changes. In the wake of its 
publication the Engineering 
Council was ultimately 
formed to influence the educa- 
tion and training of engineers. 

Testimonies gathered by 
committee members from Eu- 
ropeans and Americans were 
in praise of the technical skills 
of British engineers but highly 
critical of their arrogance, 
inflexibility, and ignorance of 
corporate management. 
Bluntly, they were not quali- 


fied to be . considered for 
management and invariably 
they were not. 

Waiting for the new batches 
of engineers to acquire such 
skills will guarantee that Brit- + 
ish management will be so far 
behind its major industrial 
competitors that catching up 
may prove to be almost 
impossible. Thai is what 
makes the BIM project vital 

The surgeries, however, are 
not enough. The patients must 
realise that they are ailing. To 
help that diagnostic process 
the BIM is encouraging its 
members to give their skills an 
objective audit. 

Tbc result of such andits is 
to ensure' that the manager 
can: 

• Take advantage of new 
systems; 

• Relate market requirements, 
and opportunities to technical*', 
projects; 

• Understand the best meth- 
ods of working - with the 
relevant technology and how 
to make the best use of 
people’s skills; . 

• Marry corporate strategy to 
the exploitation of those skills 
and technologies. ;■ 

The technology, albeit com- 
puters or electronics, is but a 
means to an end. The manager 
must be able to relate that 
change to the business in 
which he is competing. 

They must examine wheth- 
er markets are being lost for 
technical reasons, what is the 


performance of the competi-ik 
lion and what strains wifi be 


imposed when new technol- 
ogy is introduced. 

Information Technology 
Year three years ago raised the 
awareness of British business 
significantly we were tokL If it 
overdid then British manage- 
ment has failed to respond to 
the challenge. 

For that reason the BIM 
project must be supported. 


Gentlemen cracksmen of the 80s 


By Richard Sarson 
Hacking is the dangerous 
sport of breaking electronical- 
ly and often illegally into other 
people's computer networks 
and then browsing around, 
preferably in die most heavily 


protected parts of the system. 
The hackers see themselves as 


judice comment on a court 
case next month. 

The pseudonymous Hugo 
Cornwall takes a new look at 
the ethics of hacking. He is 
insistent that hackers, are not 
fraudsters, transferring vast 
aims between bank accounts. 


the system, but because he 
genuinely admires the net- 


works he is exploring. 

He disapproves of electron- 
ic vandals and even deplores 
the spitefiilness of a group of .§ 
American hackers who, dis- 
pleased with a Newsweek re- 
porter. Richard Sandaza, for 
betraying confidences, hacked 
into his credit rating and 
displayed it on bufletin boards 
from coast to coast as revenge. 

Truthfulness is seldom 
present in tales of hacking 
exploits. The hacker embroi- 
ders his achievements, but 
covers up his methods. The 
victim does not like to appear 
a fool and covers up the fact 
that he has been backed. 

The book may introduce 
new backers into this twilit 
world of semi-legality, half- 
truths and hoaxes. But it will £ 
warn others of the conse- 
quences, and may even deter 
litem. 

For the non-hacker it is a 
clear and entertaining intro- 
duction to data communica- 
tions 


The hackers see themselves as 
the gentlemen cracksmen of 
the high-technology 1980s. 

When The Hacker’s Hand- 
book by Hugo Cornwall was 
published last year it uncov- 
ered an interest in hacking 
■much wider than the author 
expected. So now the book has 
been revised to keep up with 
, 1985's technical jumps: new 
videotex targets to hack and 
new radio and packet-switch- 
ing services to use to reach 
those targets. 

It also brings the reader up 
to date with the effects of the 
Data Protection Act and the 
possible extension of the 
crime of forgery to cover 
certain types of hacking. 
Omitted are references to the 
Great Prince Philip Pres tel 
Mailbox Hack to avoid sub 


or moles, burrowing away in 
the most secret of MI5 files. 


the most secret of MI5 files. 
The hacker is seldom interest- 
ed in what he finds. The fun 
lies in the intellectual process 
of gening in. 

One of the pioneers, Susan 
Headley, a 1 7-year-old Cali- 
fornian, who ran all over the 
local telephone system in 
1977, confessed that what 
attracted her was the sense of 
power. She had beaten today's 
elite, the computer designers. 

Mr Cornwall is fascinated 
by peeping into the inner 
workings of fashionable 
multitasking operating sys- 
tems. running on large main- 
frames, through the porthole 
of his battered old Apple U+. 
He does not regard this as 
trespassing because he is not 
doing it for gain, or to damage 





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THE TIMES TUESDAY MARCH 4 1986 


23 



in the 



room 

By Richard Pawson - 

In the beginning there was 
Pong, the brainchild of Silicon 
Valley entrepreneur Nolan 
Bushndr. This simple com- 
puterized video game that 
involved two bats and a ball 
was to sparlc offa multi- 
million dollar revolution in 
home entertainment. . That 
was in 1972 and every suc- 
ceeding. year has seen an 
increase in the sophistication 
of the video effects. Yet k has 
taken 14 years for the next 
major innovation to arrive 
and it comes from the same 

inventor. 

Mr BushnelPs new concept 
can best be described as three- 
dimensional video games. To 
‘ put it another way. Space 
Invaders have acquired a 
physical form: they no longer 
attack down a video screen, 
but across the living room 
carpet. 

TechForce was revealed at 
the New York Toy Fair earlier 
this month, which means that 
it will be .in US toy shops by 
Christmas, but probably hot 

■ in Britain until 1987. Amerir 

* can prices will start from $200 
(£137) for two consoles and 
two vehicles. 

Designed for two players. 
TechForce gives each player 
control of up to eight mobile 

- units via a radio-control link 
with a range of 50 feet. Thise 
units have interchangeable 

. bodies to give a range of 
different games from space 
monsters to World War II 
tank engagements. 

Each mobile unit can move 
forward sand backwards, turn, 
or fire an infra-red beam at an 
opposing unit. If the beam hits 
the receptor on another unit 
then the latter is immobilized 
for 10 seconds. Conventional 
LEDs give a visual indication 
that a unit is firing. 

The tricky part of the de- 
sign. according to Mr 
Bushnell, was finding a way to 
encode messages for eight 
different units on to one radio 
channel. The computer, chip 
iaside each unit was designed 
' within his own company, 
Axtoh. and has an expansion 
unit for additional functions — 
including a planned link to 
existing home computers. - 

In the initial version, how- 
ever. each' player needs a 
TechForce command consul. 
Any individual tank of combi- 
nation of tanks can be selected 
from the keyboard and their 

Some entrepreneurs 
foresee a major 
market in 

off-the-shelf software 

- movements and guns con- 
trolled live from a joystick. 
The consuls also permit play- 
ers to pre-program a simple 
sequence of moves for each 
lank and then activate them 
simultaneously. When the ef- 
fects of the moves have been 
observed, players can specify 
their next attack. 

However. Mr Bushnell fbre- 
_ sees a major market in off-the- 

* shelf software, familiar ground 
‘ 10 . the. . man who founded 
j Atari, and to this end he has 

devised an ingenious method 
of dubbing control signals on 
to the audio track ofa cassette 
or video tape. Conventional 
voice, or music recordings do 
; no: interfere with these con- 

■ trol signals (which are picked 
Up by a microphone attached 

■ to control consul) thus 
1 enabling verbal instructions 

for the game, background 
music and sound effects to be 
on the same tape. 

In an impressive demon- 
stration of TechForce, a video 
recording of Mr Bushnell in- 
teracts with space vehicles on 
the floor in front of the screen 
- each one seemingly re- 
sponding to the voice of its 
creator. He goes on to initiate 
a game of three-dimensional 
space invaders. The eight 
aliens receive their orders 
from the TV sec your solitary 
defender must immobilize 
. them before they roach you - 

■ ducking behind cover when 
they are about to fire. 

My own efforts to oppose 
this onslaught lasted just 30 
seconds and seemed about as 
ineffectual as my attempts on 
the video versions in the late 
1970s. Bui there is no denjjng 
the addictive quality of video 
games in physical form. 

If it works on video tape 
there is no reason why control 
signals should not broadcast 
on live television — a licensing 
opportunity that Bushnell has 
not been slow to exploit- In me 
case of TechForce. a Hve 1 * 
programme coukt b nn S inc 
lovs-ihemsdves to lire. 



COMPUTER HORIZQNS/2 


in the shade 


Edited by Matthew May 


By David Guest 
Shakespeare’s vocabulary is 
estimated at about 5,000 
words. The- thrifty Racine, by 
contrast, made do with fewer 
than 1 ,000. But both are put in 
the shade by r modem woid 
^processing programs. 

During the past month 
three word processing pack- 
ages have been launched with 
extensive lexicons that auto- 
matically check -the typist's 
spelling. Volkswriter 3 has .a 
lexicon of 170,000 words, 
IBM’s Displaywrne 3 ' has 
"JOOiOOO and; Innovative 
Software's Smart program has 
80,000 plus a thesaur us. 

Spelling checkers; have been, 
available as adjuncts to word 
processing programs for sever- 
al- years, but their size and 
growing scope is beginning to 
put them into a new category. 
They belong in the class of 
software that the computer 
industry’s marketing men find 
so hard to ill uminat e r~ expert 
systems. ■ 

■ This type of software com- 
monly deals with more ab- 
struse subjects such as medical 
diagnoses • or •' mineral 
prospecting. The common fea- 
ture is their ability to give 
answers that spare, their users 
a journey to the reference 
library. Spelling checkers are a 
simple example; so simple 
that they have so -far escaped, 
attention. 

They offer expertise at two 
levels. First, there are the 
labours of the lexicographers 
whose works have been re- 


Stephen Johnson 



HP backs 
radical 
computer 
design 

From Matthew May, 

- San Francisco 

The American computer firm 
Hewlett-Packard is. to base 
most of its future computer 
products on a novel form of 
computer design that the in- 
dustry is only beginning to 
accept 

So &r this form of computer 
architecture, known as re- 
duced instruction set comput- 
ers (Rise), has been seen as 
largely relevant to specialist 
markets, such as engineering 
and science; where complex 
d esig n and research programs, 
need , intensive computation 
The technology, developed 
over ten years ago by scientists 
at IBM, is based on research, 
which showed that the major- 
ity of a computer's time is 
spent processing a relatively 
small number of simple in- 
structions, twenty per cent of a 
computer’s set of instructions 
would be used 80. per cent of 
the time. . , 

It led to a design of comput- 
er architecture which builds 
simple instructions into the 
hardware of a machine and 
puts seldom-used instructions 
into software, thereby, say its 
advocates, making computers 
more powerful, reliable and 
cheaper. 

Hewlett-Packard is to begin 
its switch to Rise technology 
with the launch of two high 
performance minicomputers 
for business applications and 
two others for engineering and 
factory automation. The first 
will not, however, be available 
until the middle of this year 
and the last in the middle of 
1987. 

Their early announcement 
will give the company time to 
reassure potential customers 
— particularly those for the 
business machines — who may 
feel they will end up as guinea' 
pigs for the new technology -in 
an industry, deeply cautious 
about changing such funda- 
raentals as computer 
architechture. 

John Young, president and 
chief executive of the compa- 
ny, firmly denies the sugges- 
tion that the complete switch 
to Rise is a major gamble. "At 
HP we are innovators, not 
gam biers,” he said, pointing 
out that two-thirds of the 
developments in the new com- 
puters are not to do with the 
Rise technology. And, he 
pointed out, all the software 
for its current range of busi- 
ness computers can easily be 
convened for use on the two 
new business machines. 

Other computer, manufac- 
turers will be watching HFs 
fortunes with great interest as 
the new machines are cheaper 
to build and maintain and 
should provide a sharp bowl 
to Hewlett-Packard’s profit 
margin. Being the first compa- 
ny to base an entire product 
range on R>« **. a 

gamble, but if mushrooming 
growth rales are to return to an 
industry that badly needs 
innovation, the rewards it 
reaps could be great. 


: yt/FD 10mb, £22^ 


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AutTcrsed 
peai er 


corded on a floppy disc. Then 
there is the processing soft- 
ware that applies the spelling 
checker to the document being 
typed at the word processor. 

IBM was unable to disclose 
the source of Displaywriie 3*s 
words at the product's launch. 
It specified only that it was 
based on a 100,000 word UK 
dictionary. The Smart package 
is assembled from Merriam- 
Webster’s Ninth New Colle- 
giate. Lifetree Software's 
Volkswriter has the most in- 
teresting pedigree of the trio. 

Lifetree’s founder, Carmilo 
Wilson, says the lexicon has 
been compiled by . ex-EEC 
linguists from 10 dictionaries, 
technical and general. This 
makes the product truly inter- 
national — Wilson is Chilean, 


his company is American, and 
the dictionary is European by 
adoption. It should embody 
substantial expertise. 

Modern spelling checkers 
are not restricted to spelling 
The Smart product is sensitive 
to punctuation and abbrevia- 
tion and Volkswriter 3 will 
detect missing spaces. Both 
can spot lower case letters that 
should be capitals, words that 
have been repeated acciden- 
tally and incorrectly used 
prefixes and suffixes. 

Volkswriter is also said to 
look at phonetics and mis- 
placed letters in its checking 
process. In doing so it intro- 
duces an educational element: 
when it detects a mistake it 
delves into the dictionary to 
produce a list of the closest 


alternatives for the user's con- 
sideration. and there can be 
incongruous suggestions. 

For example, typing the 
word 'rang’ will yield a string 
of obvious alternatives — 
wrong, wrang. wrung, ring etc 
- and one or two that are less 
closely related. 

Improving your word-pow- 
er is probably old hat as a 
slogan for a word processor, 
but the new breed of program 
seems genuinely to offer the 
possibility. Alongside accept- 
ed standards of literacy, 
170.000 words sounds like a 
major contribution to adult 
education. 

Beside Racine's miserly tal- 
ly it sounds like overkill. But 
Racine did not seek fame 
writing business letters: 


Amiga set 
for launch 
in Europe 

■ Commodore is due to 
announce a European version 
of its Amiga micro in Frank- 
furt tomorrow. The success of 
this technically advanced 
computer is vital to the com- 
pany which earlier this 
month reported a $53 million 
loss tor its second quarter 
compared to 8 S3 .2 million 
prow a year earlier. 

With an expected price for 
the European Amiga of more 
than £1.000, Commodore is 
expected to emphasize its use 
as a business micro - un- 
like America, Europeans wilt 
not pay that sort of amount 
for anything perceived as 
purely a home computer. 

■ More than half of me- 
dium-sized businesses are de- 
terred from using electronic 
mail because of the in- 
compatibility between dif- 
ferent services says the 
electronic mail company 
One-to-One. It is suggesting 
that such services band to- 
gether to set up direct links be- 
tween different systems 
under a new organisation — the 
European Electronic Mail 
Association. 

Companies which joined 
would be expected to promptly 
pass on messages received 
from other services and charge 
only the usual rate to 
subscribers. "Given the will," 
says Roger Dean of One- 
to-One. "our industry could 
achieve complete message 
interchange in months. All the 
technical problems were 


l } 


expandable to 100 


r 


■ 




21 

^ . r 

To borrowing it for the 
weekend to help me do my 
son’s homework’ 

solved years ago when the 
various services linked up 
to the telex network". 

■ British firms must "auto- 
mate or liquidate'', says the 
British Robot Association 
after it released figures show- 
ing that the sales of indus- 
tnai robots in the UK fell for the 
first time fast year. Despite 
expansion in West Germany, 
the US and Japan, only 585 
robots were sold here in 1985 
compared to 679 in 1984. 

West Germany has 8,000 
industrial robots compared 

to Bntains 3,200. 

■ Birmingham-based Apri- 
cot Computers dipped its cor- 
porate tee into tee waters 

of the market for computers 



' COMPUTER 
BRIEFING ^ 


1 




that can handle several 
users last week as it an- 
nounced the development 
of a multiple station computer 
based a round its Xen busi- 
ness micro. 

The system looks similar to 
the standard Xen computer but 
comes with two megabytes 
of computer memory, a mini- 
mum of 20 megabytes of 
hard disc computer storage. 


each terminal £1 ,000 with a 
monchrome screen and one 
megabyte of memory built 
m 

The company claims that 
this will move it into tee super 
micro and low end mini 
computer market — offering a 
System which has high 
speed performance . 

■ In a major blow to IBM, 
tee US central ax agency, the 
Internal Revenue Service, 
has given a £20 million con- 
tract for 1 5.000 laptop por- 
table computers to Zenith Data 
Systems. Industry experts 
and computer journals on bote 
sides of the Atlantic had 
predicted IBM would win the 
contract - the first order for 
its new laptop that has yet to 
be announced publicly. 

UK Events 

Dexpo Europe 86, Olympia 
2, London, today until Thurs- 
day. 

Atari Computer Show. 

Novotel. Hammersmith. Lon- 
don. W6, March 7-9 (061- 
456 8835) 

Amstrad Computer Show. 

New Century Hail, Manchester. 
March 22-23 ( 

8835) 

Info 85, Olympia. London. 
March 24-27.(01 647 1001) 
Computer Aided Design 
and Manufacturing Exhibition, 
National Exhibition Centre, 
Birmingham. April 8-10. 
Scottish Computer Show, 
Scottish Exhibition Centre, 
Glasgow, April 15-17 (01- 
891 5051) 

Overseas Events 

Cebrt 86, Hanover Fair 
Complex. West Germany, 
March 12-19. 


; (061-456 



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THE TIMES TUESDAY MARCH 4.1986 



learn UNIX 




put the 
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By Richard Sarson 


If you’re going to learn UNIX’isn’t it sensible to be taught 
by the people who brought it to you in the first place? 

Olivetti/AT&T experts have prepared a range of UNIX 
and "C" programming courses suitable for both technical and 
non -technical staff alike. 

Aimed at all levels of experience, from complete novices 
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They take place at our well equipped International 
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technical and recreational facility you could possibly want. 

So clip the coupon below before someone else does. 


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For course information contact Lesley Bishop at the address below. 


More and more managers and 
clerks are getting screens on 
their desks which give them 
facts and figures about their 
job. Members of a company's 
board are ususally not so 
lucky. 

They still go into board 
meetings with sheaves of pa- 
per full of rows and columns 
and indigestible numbers. Per- 
haps they would prefer the 
facts to be served up in charts 
and graphs to show key ratios 
and trends, not just raw 
numbers. 

Financial directors can be 
guilty of either giving board 
members too much paper to 
find important figures hidden 
in a mass of details or they get 
so little they cannot pinpoint a 
trouble spot. 

Geoffrey Kent chairman of 
the Imperial Group, was one 
of ifiose who felt he and his 
board needed better Lhan this 
and since 1981 has built up a 
boadroom computer system 
to give a view of the company 



On screen 
faster 


then ever 
before 


HRech business: ICL's computer-controlled meeting room 


that can be as broad or as pin- 
pointed as it warns. 

To do this a team converted 
budgets, five-year plans, 
monthly accounting returns 
and economic trends into a 
computer library of 2,000 
graphs and tables. The board 
members can select any of 
these and browse through 
them at their desks. Recently 
the system was extended to 
the boadroom so that charts 
can be brought up on a 
projection screen — in full 
colour of course. 


Imperial's boadroom sys- 
tem was put in by Metapraxis 
of Kingston with prices start- 
ing at about £25,000. 1CL also 
believes there is a market for 
intelligent computerized 
boadrooms and' sells “ a 
unique octagonal shaped 
meeting room complete with 
hi-tech equipment called the 
Pod. But with a staggering 
price tag of more than 
£100,000 it has so far onlv 
managed to sell one. 

Intelligent boadrooms are a 
development of the ideas of 


Winston Churchill’s cabinet 
war room, although the tech- 
nology is no longer obtrusive, 
say the developers. 

■ An intelligent boardroom, it 
is argued , can give frets in a 
painless way, hopefully lead- 
ing them to better decisions. It 
could even help them to argue 
their case better to merchant 
bankers in the crises of com- 
mercial life such as takeover 
bids — perhaps this was why 
Geoffrey Kent decided to 
extend bis company’s system 
to the boardroom last autumn. 


By Frank Brown 
| An optical processor capable 
of operating 1,000 times foster 
than present processors wffl be 
one of the highlights of this 
year’s Hanover Fan 1 CeBIT 
(Office and Information Tech- 
nology} Exhibition. The treat, 
which opens on March 12 for 
eight days, will be the largest 
information technology exhi- 
bition in the world with mere 
fhgn 2,000 exhibitors front 26 
countries, including more than 
100 from the L'lL 

Exhibits will cover virtually 
every aspect of office, informa- 
tion a n d communications tech- 
nologies, including RAD, 
products, systems, and net- 
works and spc dal se c tions ea r 
fain king ami security, comput- 
er integrated manufacturing, 
software and personal conrput- 
ing- 

Tfae new optical processor 


will be one of many prototype 
exhibits in the Exhibition s 
Rfln section where academic 
and research establishments ; 
from many parts of the worW, 
inc l udin g two from the LK, 
will be demonstrating the re- 
sults of their work. 

The device has been devel- 
oped by the European Joint 
Optical BistabiHty (EJOB) 
project, one of a number at 
EEC-funded research pro- 
grammes that rill be featured 
on the European Com- 
mission's stand 

EJOB was established last, 
year to co-ordinate the efforts 
of eight European Laborato- 
ries and Research Teams in 
developing a digital optical 
parallel computer that vail 
revolutionize present process- 
ing technology, partkobKiy in 
artificial intelligence, optical 
image processing, and optical 
networking. 

The EJOB project has green 
Europe a strong lead ha optical 
promsing over its competitors 
in the l T S and Japan. It is due 
to end later this year and the 
availability of further fluids' 
will depend on the.wftfinjpiess 
of the industry to provide 
support for a follow-up project. 


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By David Guest 
A slow fuse is bumi og down to 
the deregulation of financial 
services in the City in October 
and suppliers of computer 
systems are laying plans for a 
controlled explosion. 

.As any veteran of shop tills 
at the time of decimalization 
will confirm, change spells 
opportunity for the nimble 
system manufacturer. Bui it 
can also mean high risk. 

A peculiarity of the deregu- 
lation of the Slock Exchange is 
the degree of uncertainty that 
applies to the size and type oi 
computer systems that will be 
needed. New types of dealer, 
new business and new elec- 
tronic services are on the cards 
but estimating the scale and 
scope of the systems to cope 
with them is fraught with 
difficulty. 

One supplier said archly: 


“Come October we’re going to 
have to take a speculative 
position on the delivery of 
systems.” 


Two companies at opposite 
ends of the spectrum represent 
the computer industry’s re- 
sponse. Tandem, the multina- 
tional which has become 
popular among computer us- 
ers in the financial sector with 
fault-tolerant systems and spe- 
cialization in transaction pro- 
cessing. has allied itself with 
two other specialists in a 
venture called Consultants to 
the City. 


came together late last year on 
the understanding that three 
heads are better lhan one. 
Between them they claim to be 
able to offer everything from 
desk design to advanced com- 
puter hardware, and the con- 
sultancy to apply it at the right 
point. 


FDS Microsystems, a much 
smaller operation but with a 
background in computer ser- 
vices to the City, has launched 
a system that can be extended 
in scope and size on demand. 

Tandem, Admiral Comput- 
ing, and C&P Technology — 
Consultants to the City — 



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system units act as the turn- 
stiles through which the infor- 
mation services enter the 
network 


FDS Microsystems’ 
Multiview is aimed at a 
particular sector of the market 
— small and medium-sized 
brokers, and fund managers in 
large organizations. It uses the 
IBM PC as a building block 
and its purpose is to enable 
brokers to make the best use of 
the technology and services 
available. 


The- software organizes in- 
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allows him or her to build up a 
view of an immediate area oi 
concern. It will also monitor 
the market automatically 
while the PC is used on 
another task, triggering an 
alert if for example, a user’s 
stop-loss condition is reached. 


A Multiview system is a 
network of PCs into which 
information services like Top- 
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Each user has a keyboard, a 
PC and one or two screens. 


The network can accommo- 
date between 30 and 200 
terminals and FDS also offers 
consultancy services and net- 
work maintenance. It prom- 
ises to protea its users from 
having to tangle with the 
information vendors and with 
British Telecom. 


Another push to a 
hi-tech frontier 


By Peter Pinion 
The computer has worked its 
way through a number of 
technologies in its relatively 
short life. It now seems set to 
see yet another one off and the 
change may prove to be the 
most spectacular offering the 
potential for building comput- 
ers a million times more 
powerful than those available. 

The (me thing common to 
all of the current technologies 
on which computers are based 
is that they all rely on the 
transfer of electrical charge for 
their signals. Scientists in 
Edinburgh, however, are now 
working on a crude computing 
subsystem which dispenses 
with electricity as a signal 
medium and uses light in its 
place — the optica] computer. 

Silicon chips have enabled 
the design of machines capa- 
ble of processing three or four 
million instructions a second. 
Optical switching components 
have been demonstrated 
which can switch at speeds 
approaching tenths of bil- 
lionths of a second and re- 
searchers believe this speed 
can be increased a hundred- 
fold. 

But the most exciting pros- 
pect which optical computer 
technology holds is based on 
the non -interfering nature of 
light. Individual optical com- 
ponents may be able to cope 
with thousands or even mil- 
lions of parallel information 
paths at the same time. 

If the paths of two or more 
electrical signals become dose 
they will interfere with each 
other. With light, a huge 
□umber of signals may travel 
in closest proximity, even 
crossing each other's paths 
wiihout causing interference. 
The eye, for instance, may 
detea all of the light rays 
reflected from an object, de- 
spite whatever other light 
sources may be present, and 
use the information to recon- 
struct a perfect image of the 
object. 

The basic building block of 
the optical computer is the 
transphasor — an optical 
equivalent of the transistor. 

The operation of the 
transphasor is based on the 
properties of certain crystals. 
In there crystals, of which 23 
have been found to dale, the 
refractive index, which deter- 
mines the rate by which light 
is slowed as it passes through a 
material, can be altered bv 
ebanges in the intensity of 
light. 

But before transphasore can 
be used to build optical com- 
puters a number of problems 
must be overcome. Some have 


already been tackled. The first 
transphasors built at 
Edinburgh’s Heriot-Watt Uni- 
versity, for example, needed 
to be operated at temperatures 
a few hundreds of degrees 
below the freezing point of 
water in order that the active 
material, indium anumonide, 
displayed the right character- 
istics. 

[ Now the Heriot-Watt team, 
under the leadership ofProfes- 
sor Desmond Smith, has 
found other materials such as 
zinc selenide which will oper- 
ate at more convenient tem- 
peratures. The team has also 
been able to show that simple, 
digital circuits can be built by 
connecting individual . de- 
vices. 

As young as it is. the field of' 
optical computer- develop- 
ment is not without contro- 
versy. ‘There is a gang of 
people centred around Befl 
Laboratories in the US who. 
try to pretend that gallium 
arsenide is the answer, 1 * says 
Professor Smith. “There is no 
scientific evidence to pretend 
that gallium arsenide will be 
any better than our own 
materials. No one has’ yet 
made a gallium arsenide de- 
vice which exhibits gain* is of 
steady state and. is 
cascadable,” he claims. 

One critic of Professor 
Smith’s work is John Midwin- 
ter, Professor of opto-efectron- 
ics at University College: 
London. He believes that the 
technology being applied by 
the Heriot-Watt team may 
lead to devices capable of 
switching in. times dose to 
hundredths of billionths of a 
second but that they would 
have to wait for as long as a 
millionth of a second before 
being able to be switched 
again, a period similar to that 
which can be expected from 
the cheapest silicon chips. 

Professor Smith, however, 
claims that his -team Iras 
demonstrated recovery times 
in the region of a thousandth, 
of a millionth of a second. 

Professor Midwinter is not 
yet convinced that a general 
purpose computer based on 
optica! technology may be 
possible but he does see 
applications for-- optical 
switching devices in commu- 
nications applications. But 
rrolessor Smith remains firm- 
iv_ convinced of the potential 
of his transphasor as the 
of a universal processor. “The 
first universal processor is a 
few yeara away," be admits, . 
out working components for 
the nKcarch worker will be 
available from us by the end of 
fins year.*’ 




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1 



THE TIMES TUESDAY MARCH 4 1986 


SPORT 


25 


FOOTBALL: ATTENTION CENTRES ON EUROPE'S MIDFIELD MEN 


By Brian GianriQe 


TJe lOBg-postpooed 
confrontation <r|tb Ben* 
Sckaster and kia wife conJd not 

have come tta worse time for the 

Barcelona manager, Terrv 

first leg of the mighty European 
Cup quarter-fiaalwith J m emos 
in the Nob Camp stadlmn, and 
the general informed view is that 
only with Schuster in the team, 
folly fit and folly committed 
hare Barcelona much chance 
over the two legs. 

- Venables, who has shown a 
Job-like patience nil 
made * symbolic gesture 
relieving Schoster of the cap- 
teificy. The bitter irony is that 
the West German has no greater 
admirer or defender than his 
English nanager.who has n- 
snred me that last season he was 
the finest midfield player hi 
Europe (all the more reason, 
then, to see him In direct 
opposition jfo Platini). Ens last 
October, when Schuster had 
declared himself fully fit to play 
in Bilbao (“It's easier to come 
back aHve from Vietnam rtM» n 
Bilbao," he has said) Venables 
cootfnned to defend the player. 

But enough is «w>"gi. The 
Barcelona directors recently 
censured their controversial 
President, Nunes, for f«n g too 
passive an attitude towards 
Schuster. But it is difficult to 
know what to do with so 
stubborn a player, with so 
visibly dominant a wife, The 
general view is that Gaby 
Schuster calls (be shots and that 
Schuster, a dazzling presence op 
the field, is immeasurably less 
mature off it 



The first of three Sanchez pats Real Madrid on the way to a 3-0 win over Hercules. 


Souness impressed by England 


Schuster has been having 
laser beam treatment If he is fit, 
he will sorely play tomorrow; bat 
who knows in what physical, not 
to mention psychological, con- 
dition lie would be. 

Juventus's easy win two San- 
dal's ago in Bari was outfunous 
news for Barcelona; it was the 
Turin dab's first away victory 
for foar months and they played 
superbly in the second tuff. 
When I mentioned to Gordon 
Cowans, Barfs midfield or- 
rhestralor, in Td Aviv last week 
that Paul- Rideout had hit the 
Jnventus .bar in the first few 
minutes, when the goalkeeper 
touched his drive, Cowans an- 
swered resignedly that Juventns 
looked good enough to have 
raised their game when they 
wanted. Platini, he said, was 
superb; hut then, he had so much 
help. 


Graeme Souness. the captain 
of Scotland, yesterday briefly 
changed national al|fE«wf and 
joined the growing band of those 
who are optimistic about 
England's fete m the World Cup 
finals. He believes that the 
squad that Bobby Robson will 
lake to. Mexico this summer win 
teach at least the semi-finals and 
could perhaps even win it. 

“I know some people don’t 
seem to agree,” he said, “hot 
there are a lot of quality players 
in the current England ^ The 
last two results, in strange places 
where they were on a hiding to 
nothing, were impressive and I 
would pm them in with France 
and Denmark as the strongest of 
the finalists among the Euro- 
pean contingent. 

"Bryan Robson's individual 
contribution is obvious but 
perhaps even more important is 


By Smart Jones, Football Correspondent 


In Shilton. England have 
the best goalkeeper in the world 
Hoddle has more ability than 
anyone else in the game today 
and, if the bafl rolls in the right 
direction. I'm convinced they 
will do very nefl.” 

Souness recently competed 
against all of those who will be 
included in the England party 
and now, for Sampdoria, he 
plays every week against those 
who will in less than three 
months be defending the world 
title. "If they met each other 
tomorrow” be stated, “I would 
take England to win. 

“Italy are sure to do well 
because of the way they play,” 
he added. “Almost every side in 
the World Cap win tine-up with 
a sweeper and they do that the 
whole time in the domestic 
league. The I talian public ac- 
cepts that defending is as. if not 


tsoret iropqrtaM than attacking 


“They trill putt up with _ 
win. a sneaked result, but the 
English first division is unique 
bemuse it is so fast, so aggres- 
sive and so competitive. The 
step up from there to inter- 
national level, where everything 
is conducted at a much slower 
and more deliberate pace, is a 
problem. 

“But the Italians in general 
have a tremendous respect for 
the English game and the 
coaches study the game here to 
examine why the chr’is have 
been so successful in Europe 
over the last decade. The only 
other setback is going to be the 
lack of time to prepare property. 

“The Italian i season, 
for example, will end on April 
26 and. although the Cup will be 
only at the quarter-final stage, 
none of the internationals will 


be involved in domestic fixtures 
from then on.” In other words, 
Italy’s World Cup build-up will 
last a fortnight longer than 


England’s. 

Souness. 


mness, who has a year left, 
on his contract at Sampdoria. 
thinks that Hoddle. Robson, 
Lineker and Stevens would 
flourish in his adopted home- 
land. “The two midfield players 
would enjoy the space they 
would be given but Lineker 
might find it harder. To be a 
forward in Italy is a young 
man's game.” 

He was more pessimistic 
about his own nation's World 
Cup fortunes. “On paper we are 
the weakest in our^roup” he 
admitted. “Our tint game 
against Denmark is so im- 
portant and we win have done 
well just lo get through to the 
second round.” 


Cardiff City to be Oxford in mood 
put up for sale for good result 


The striker, Briasdu, whom 
Liverpool found so difficult to 
handle on the Turin ice in the 
Soper Cop a year ago, has 
returned after long absence 
through injury to give a farther 
alternative -up ftoqt^ where -the 
new acquisitions Serena, he of 
the dangerous head, and the 
Dane, Laudrop look so effective. 

Mauro, the “deep" right 
winger bought from Udhiese 
seems also to have settled well 
while Manfredoma, with aO 
memories rf his : two-year 
suspension for the fixed odds 
betting scandal behind hhn, has 
strong claims to a place in Italy's 
World Cup midfldd. The former 
Lazio sweeper was another to 
join the drastically renewed 
Juventns team this season. 

Then there is Cabrini, whose 
atta cking forays from full-back 
are as productive as Sdrea. the 
sweeper, has lost some of his 
pace, bat Archibald and the 
Barcelona attack , will not find 
much given away. 


Cardiff City’s owners, 
Kenton Utilities, have indi- 
cated that this win be the last 
season in which they will 
support the dub, which is 
losing around £5,000 a week. 

The general manager, Ron 
Jones, confirmed yesterday 
that be is having talks with a 
number of businessmen who 
might be interested in forming 
a consortium to take oyer the 
struggling third division dub. 

“Kenton are prepared to 
listen to any reasonable offer 
preferably, from . South 
WalesTJones said. Keaton 
have written off more than £l 
million which they are owed 
forground improvements, but 
the buyer would have to pay 
off a bank overdraft of 
£250,000 and purchase the 
Jarrow-based. company’s 
share&A posable starting 
price for negotiations is be- 
lieved to be in the region of 
£500,000. . 

• A£l-2nrilfioh sports centre 
was opened at Middlesbrough 
Football Club yesterday after 
a six-year delay. The work to 


table tennis and aerobics. The 
weight training and fitness 
room has been described as 
one of the best in tire NoiiIlA 
second phase planned for the 
Centre will indude a snooker 
room, a sauna and a solarium. 

Two listed 


. West Bromwich have trans- 
fer-listed Garth Crooks and 
Mickey Thomas, because they 
have refused to move in order to 
live near . the Hawthorns. 
Crooks, signed from Spun, lives 
m London while Thomas, a 
Welsh international midfield 
player . who signed from Chel- 
sea, has his borne in North 
Wales. 

The Albion manager. Ron 
Saundeis, sank “I have spoken 
to both players and asked them 
to move into this area. They 
have both declined.“l regard it 
as unprofessional for players to 
live so far away from the club 
and gave them the opportunity 
to move nearer. For this reason 


they have been placed on the 
transfer list." . 


meet fire and' safety regula- 
nid tor by the 


Aaderlechl play Bayern Mo* 
juch is another fascinating 
European Cup tie. Both te a m s 
are in hot contention to retain 
their League tides, though Bay- 
ern have ground to make op on 
Werder Bremen, whose week, 
Anderlechf were beaten 3-2 by 
South Korea in a friendly in 
Brussels, but four of their regu- 
lar players. Including the Bel- 
gian internationals 

Vandesbergh and 

Vandereycken, did not partici- 
pate. 


lions has been paid . _ 

second division dub, the 
Sports Council, the Football 
Grounds Improvement Trust, 
and Middlesbrough Borough 
Council. • 

The sports haB will be used 
for five a side football, basket- 
ball, volleyball, badminton. 


• Andy Strong, the Middles- 
brough ftdl bade, is to get away 
from' the English winter. 
Strong, who is on the transfer 
list, has had his contract 
cancelled by mutual consent 
so he can join his fianofce, who 
is working in the West Indies. 

• Jeff Hopkins, Fulham’s 
Welsh international central 
defender, goes into hospital 
for a knee operation on 
Wednesday. 


Oxford United, who are 
attempting to reach Wembley 
for the first time in their 
history, are taking a positive 
approach to Villa Park for 
tonight’s Milk Cup semi-final 
first leg.“We are not going 
there to defend," Maurice 
Evans, the Oxford manager, 
said. 

“Without being over-confi- 
dent we must be in with a 
shout after away wins at 
Chelsea and Manchester City 
in our last two matches. Villa 
are not going too weB at the 
moment and we are in the 
mood to get a good result,” he 
added. 

John Trewick. the Oxford 
full back, who was carried off 
at Maine Road on Saturday 
with stud marks and bruising 
on his right knee, has made an 
unexpectedly fast recovery. 
"It surprised me how qu : ckly 
John has got over the injury, 
and although he wall have a 
late test, I expect him to play," 
Evans said. 

Oxford have a slight doubt 
about the forward Jeremy 
Charles, who was sent home 
from training yesterday with a 
throat infection, but hope to 
be unchanged for the long- 
delayed semi-final. 

The match now seems cer- 
tain to go ahead at the fourth 
attempt, with Villa likely to 
draft in Gary Williams,their 
foil back, who is on the 


transfer list. 

Williams, who asked for a 
move after being dropped 
after Villa’s FA Cup defeat at 
Mill-wall in January, is stand- 
ing by because Tony Dorigo 
has a hamstring strain. 

Villa are still without the 
suspended Andy Gray, but 
expect Sieve Hodge, the En- 
gland under-21 captain, to 
recover from a “dead leg.” 

Peter Sh reeve, the Totten- 
ham manager, waits for a 
fitness test on the versatile 
Gary Mabbutt before finaliz- 
ing his line-up for the Fa Cup 
fifth-round tie against Everton 
at White Hart Lane. 

Mabbutt, currenly playing 
in the centre of the defence, 
has a knee injury and Shreeve 
said; “He has been a kingpin 
for us recently. Whatever 
team I select depends on his 
fitness.” Graham Roberts is 
available again after suspen- 
sion and Clive Allen, Tony 
Galvin and Ovaido Ardiles 
have also been added to the 
Spurs squad. 

Everton will be boosted by 
the return of Paul 
BraceweiLthe England mid- 
field player, who has been 
passed fit after having plaster 
removed from a damaged 
shin.The league leaders have a 
slight doubt about the full 
back Gary Stevens, who has a 
knee injury. Alan Harper will 
take over if necessary. 


Under-21 
squad face 
Cup calls 


Aberdeen rescued 


An interesting feature of the 
AnderJechi midfield Is t hat ft 
includes two players of foreign 
extraction, who made thexr 
oaims in Italy; Scifo, whose 
parents are Sicilian, but who 
now plays for Belgium, .and 
Lozano, born in Spain, but back 
in Belgium after an unhappy 
season with Real Madrid. 


England's attempt to win the 
European Under-21 champion- 
ship for the third time could be 
wrecked by the fixtures backlog. 
The holders’ squad for the first 
leg of the quarter-final in Den- 
mark on March 12 is in danger 
of being halved by club commit- 
ments. and nine of tbe 18 
selected could miss the trip 
because of Cup games. 


Aberdeen yesterday recruited 
tbe assistance of their old rivals. 
Dundee United, to bring them 
to peak fitness for tomorrow's 
European Cup quarter-final 
against Gothenburg. 

Alex Feiguson,thr Aberdeen 
manager, asked United for tbe 
use of their heated pitch to beat 


the freeze which has gripped 
1’s direc- 


Asion Villa's Steve Hodge, 
Paul Elliott and Mark Walters 
are due to face Oxford in the 
semi-final of tbe Milk Cup — the 
same night as the Denmark 


match and another six payers 


■ {Brian GlanviUe is Football 
Correspondent of the Sunday 
Tima ) 


are with dubs still in the FA Cup 
and who could have replays or 
delayed sixth-round ties next 
week. 


Aberdeen and United’s 
tors immediately granted ap- 
proval for Tanoadice Park to be 
turned over to Aberdeen. Fer- 
guson transported his entire 
first-team squad 70 miles down 
die roast to Dundee for a work- 
out on the frost-free surface. 

After training Ferguson said, 
“Coming down to Dundee has 
been a valuable exercise and 
might make all the difference on 
Wednesday night." Ferguson 
had been forced to train his 
squad on Aberdeen’s vast sandy 


beach close to Pittodrie but felt 
that the players had begun to 
look sluggish on the soft surface. 

He said: "I didn’t consider the 
beach as an ideal place to 
sharpen them up for such an 
important European match. 
They needed a work-out on 
grass and will be the better for 
it-” 

Meanwhile. Pittodrie is ex- 
pected to be fit for the quarter- 
finals of the champions cup. The 
frost which caused the 
postponement of Saturday's 
League game against United 
showed signs of easing yes- 
terday leaving Ferguson hope- 
ful that the pitch will be fit for 
tomorrow. Failing that, Aber- 
deen and Gothenburg could try 
again on Thursday night 

It is in Aberdeen's best in- 
terests to ensure that the match 
goes ahead 


Price of room 
in Mexico 
‘reasonable’ 


Mexico City (AP) — The 
Tourism Department here has 
insisted that hotel rates will not 
be rising to unacceptable levels 
duriog the World Cup finals, to 
be staged in May and June. 


The top price for a four-star 
hotel would be 38.000 pesos and 
for a three-star hotel 18,000 
pesos. The article quoted 
Alejandro Morones Ochoa, the 
under-secretary of tourism for 
operations, as saying that the 
rales were reasonable and ade- 
quate. 


A statement in the govern- 
ment newspaper El Nacional 
said that a maximum price of 
48.000 pesos (about £69) would 
be enforced for five-star hotels. 


OVERSEAS FOOTBALL RESULTS 


MOEMTMAte * to g n flJ5?2?SLi' 
Ctutana JWwra n! 

Riwr Plata 1; 1 

independents 0; fonm aaa E-M 1 ™ /n 
tog5*wajum*2: 
l. San LQtan aj ft 
Estudww* La Rra T: 

1 . umoo ft Ptawnsa 3, Hwwan 

JUSSIS' m£SSS iw-j* 

assgnsgf ^ 

Spartak V*ma 1; 

More ft Sfcwa 9, Ljhfliuotw tovCw w 
petti. S&w 1 - , . 9 . 

PorwaXTOfoia T: MUortanco3.Bua^ 


PORTUGUESE: HMM $ 

Porto 5. Bewaraw* ft Bpavtaa Z, 
Snorting t: BartSca Z P qnaflgt ft 


SOVOTDynarfio'hAsi I.P yiamoM w 1: 
Dynamo Moscow 


SaSwnspor ti 

km erispor 0: Ortuspw 0. BanelBrt5Wk3i 
irftzespor 1, 

1 . Kocutepor 


Maiatytapor Cfc 
ftTrabronst 




nsporO, Atey ft 


0; Monaco ft 
Baste v Bor- 


WE5T maw Fortune DBMfl fgorf ft 

° g g * . '£5SZ2T&&i' mK 


rnmvu ■ 

Lite ft Toulon 1. 

sasggfiap«Ti 



2. H»w*wr * *s 00 "BP* *■ V1H 
YUGOSLAV: Hajdufc SpR 3. _Smpsk a 


Jwsw**°. 

ssssAisS-as Rai 

£££&£&§ 

I BwttPW* 

_ . — “ 23; 


Sad 1: omarao 


tafcihanva ft &*** 0 

rMSSBE»W« 

vtteoien za M1XVM2? 

ZAffBMS SMMgK - >.*«“£ 1: PoflOl 


_ ft 
Howl 

Cad V unm rif— V CBtft Zanfcaft 

2. Dinamo Vmfcovci ft L —fo g 
JSSLS pKt£n27; ftedSwrJ*; Vataz 
SSfftaSj* 2 ft Dinamo VWmwc* 2ft 

gJSSwpiftPfotoalft 


Leading scorers 

wsnwsSKr 

SgS^NfSyc^Sa: 
Hio I? 

eSSttin teanal Tft Swm 0MM*. 

Sf§T hI 


TODAY’S FIXTURES 


POOLS FORECAST by Paul Newman 


FOOTBALL 

7 J30 inteas stattd 

FACUPsFnhramfcTottMhamvEvsrtofl 

Skit CtJR: SaaMlnat Hrst leg; Aston 
VRIav Oxford. 

RRST DIVtSHN: PO«p«wt Lstocaftr v 

^OT^WVtaOH: Bradford w OUhan 
to Leadsl: fUfwn <t Ctorttoj Hutt v 
ShrewaixHy. MWdleaiirougb v Grimsby. 
7WHP wfaiOte Bctett v Yortc B oome- 
moutt <r Lmcofct Brentford v OarflTOton 
(7.4a Brtstoi City v Newport (MS); 
C»«f v Ranartem (7.4^; CTttStoftte v 
Reading; Poncasto v Btackpoot GKng- 
hs /11 v Plymouth <8.0}; Notts County v 
Brtstoi RororyWafa rti* Wiga n 
rtHHRB DWSJOte w Herefcrd; 

v Burnley; Qnw v Scun- 
thorpe: Enter v Swindon: HaBtax v 
Tormoy: Man&flekf v Cheson HoeMale v 
Orient: Wrexham* Northampton. 
^XrmStiCt^FMthSotfKtSthfrren 

sStttwh S^OND owstete A/tnaoh 
v Won Benmdc v Stranraer; StHm 
mao v snnhousemue. PMtpcout 
Queen otihe Soiah * Chaw* Park. 

FA TROPHY: TUW rawd rapier Leek 


FOURTH DIVISION 


FA CUP SDCVH ROUND 
Not an coupon* Derby or 


Sheffield Wednesday v 
Wew Ham or Manchester 
UWtofc PetBrtjonxjgh or 
BrigMon v Southampton 
or (tews* LtofpooJ » 
Watford or Bury: Luton or 
Arsenal * Tottenham or 
Everea 

FASTPMSION 

1 CtteteMV MtoC 
XIpswiaiyNotmiF 
XLaioesterv Coventry 
SECOND DMSWN 


X Bradford « Blackburn 
tC Palace vMtttesOW 
IQnrTBbyvOwnnn 
2Lse(tey HudderaM 
1 Portsmth v Barrotey 
1 Shrewsbry v Futiani 
1 Stoke v Hun 
X Sunflartnd v Chartton 
aWmdtodonwNorartcft 


1 AJderefKX v HaSfax 
a Burnley v Chester 
1 Exster v Coichester 
X Hereford vMharotofi 
1 MansfiefovCambU 

1 Preston v Create 

2 RochrJale v Swindon 
X Scunthorpe vOmnt 
X Wrexham w Port Vale 
Not on coupons Stock- 
port v Torquay fFnttay}; 
Trwimerev Southend (Fn- 

COLA LEAGUE 
1 Barnet v Dagenham 
XDartfordy Scartxno 
1 EnfieW v Nurrsawi 
IFnckleyw Wycombe 
X Kr&ervTQ v Weyrmti 
1 KrtJmnar w Stafford 

1 Tetad v Maidstone 

1 Widstone v Chaftenhm 


vGoote 


1 Worksop v Woridnpjon 
SCOTTISH FA CUP 
RFTH ROUND 


2 rtbemian v Celtic 
Net an coupons ABoa or 
MoftiarwaU v Dundee 
United: HamOtsn or Hearts 
v St Mtrren or Fabdrtc 
Dundee v Aberdeen. 


SJOTTtSHHeT 


X Ayr v Ctyde 
X East Fife v Forfar . 

1 Montrose v Motion 
X Para* V Dumbarton 
Not on coupante Airtete v 
Breath; aam v Fatem 


(provtsional): Hamition v 
K P n a nuck (prpytepnflft 


SCOTTISH SECOND 


MULtiPART LEAGUE 


T °* B ' V LE^!fc^Janfoid v EnfiekL Bob 


THIRD ENVISION 


SOLA - 

Lord TVoptiy: Serntfeteb Runoom v Staf- 
tord Fourth nnaxfc Barnet u Matetone. 


2 Bolton « Reading 
2 Bownemlh v Cardiff 


2 Bangor v Morecambe 
IBtKfenv Caernarfon 
1 Gateshead v Stitport 
1 Hontrttii v Mattock 


1 Berw*w Atten 
1 Dunformtlno v On's Pk 
IE Swing yStwfwmr 
1 Meadowtt* v Sttrfhg 
1 0ofSthvCowdenbih 

1 St Johnstone V Ralth 

2 Stranraer v Arbroath 


MULTd^BT LEAMfc Goole yS otrtr^CTt. 


1 Bristol R v Ptymth 
1 ChesterfM v Bristol I 


SOUTHERN LEAGUE: BO Detour 


TUW round: AyfesPW ^fo aeyjaT rhg; 


SemH tnat 
Chetmalord. * 

VAUXHAU. ora. LEA3U& premier «S- 
vtsifla; Windsor & Eton* Harrow Borough. 
FhetdNMiR SasAfon Unirad v SorWiam 


1 GAngftam v Btocfcpoof 
1 Newport v Lincoln 
1 Walsall v Doncsster 
Not on coupanc Dariteg- 
jon * York “ 
Swansea v 
Wotvas y Rotherham. 


TREBLE CHAWE thoma taansL Ipswich. 
Leicester. Bradford. Sunderland. Wimbte- 


Vtooct Leyton Wmgara V St Afoans Ctty. 

' W v hariw Town; Men) 


Msoenhcad utd 


City v Bromley: TBbury v Lewes. Second 
■Melon norite Ci«* 


Cfoptpn v Cheshunt 

Hwefleld tinted V CnaBoni Sr P«er; 
HeytttdgaSwdtsv Hertford Town; Ware* 
Lettworth GG Second <Msk» south: 
BrackneS Town * WfWtateSfo p. 45}; 
Cembenay Town v Atewbury Ten 


Famoorpugh Town. OorteMbaf re- 


pfeyr Hampton v Leathertwed: Uxbridge 
» Epsom & — J - 


v Epsom S EwdL Fourth roond replays 
UX&noge v Epsom A Eweft Hampton y 
Laathfiftwad. 


don. Hereford. Wrexham. Dartford. Ket- 
tering. Ayr. East Rfs. Parack. 

BEST DRAWS: Latcasw. Wrexham. Ket- 
termo. East Fife. ParMc 
AWAVS: Reacfang. Chw», Want, Morw- 
cambe. Arbroath. 

HOMES: GAngnam. Aiderehat. Mans- 
fieM. Enfold. FnCfcfey. Kjddemtns». 
Weaktoone. Oswestry. Rhyl. Dirferm- 
*na, Ouaen o#tha South. St Johnstons. 
FIXED ODDS: Home: Chelsea. Crystal 
Palace, Gtengham. Aldershot Mansfield. 
A ways: HuSierefiefo. Cardin. Cernc. 
Draws Leicester. East Fife. Parte*- 


Town; 


H un oeriord Town v Egnam town; 
SouBwne* v“ 


; Madden ( 


:Da«<sonf 


31 _.,. - n ^ T , y Wotefly. 

CENTRAL LEAGUE; Emn v Liverpool 
&TDELCO CUP: Q yd rter- fl wt Hayes v 


ESSEX SEMOR LEAGUE WfthamTownv 
CoppsshaS Tenwi. 

REpkesemtaTjvf MATCH: Cambridge 
Uravewty * Territorial Army (Grange 
Road-ifel. 


RUGBY UNION 

HOSPITALS CUP: SemMlnats: Si Mary's v 
Guy’s (el Rewnondl 

CLUB MATCHES: NterthvPontypoal (7.0): 
Tredegar y PcntypnOd (7.0). 


RUGBY UNION: ENGLAND STILL HAVE PROBLEMS 


Simms looks unlikely for 
vital game with France 


By David Hands, Rugby Correspondent 


The hamstring injury to 


Kevin Simms. England's centre, 
sustained during the game 
against Ireland on Saturday, not 
only prevents him from appear- 
ing for the Barbarians against 
the East Midlands tomorrow at 
Northampton but casts doubt 
over bis availability for England 
in their final five nations' 
championship match against 
France on March 1 5. 

Looking further ahead it may 
also affect the England squad 
which takes part in tbe inter- 
national sevens tournament in 
Sydney on March 22 to 23. 
Simms is a member of the 1 1- 
strong party named to travel to 
Australia under the manage- 
ment of Martin Green, the 
England coach. 

It is doubt over tbe centres 
which delays the announcement 
of England's team to play 
France, probably until tomor- 
row. Fran Clough, a colleague of 
Simms at Cambridge Univer- 
sity, hurt a thumb but otherwise 
came through his first inter- 
national intact. Under normal 
circumstances, however, a ham- 
string injury would need rest for 
at least three weeks, leaving 
England seeking a replacement 
for Simms. 

His place was filled on Sat- 
urday by John Palmer, the Bath 
captain, who thus won his third 
cap having played twice against 
South Africa in 1984. Bath were 
not pleased to find Palmer still 
on the bench when England 
dropped both centres. Jamie 
Salmon and Simon HaUiday, 
after the heavy defeat against 
Scotland and it is ironic now 
that if Simms proves unfit, one 
of those two may be recalled. 


has unfolded the North has 
received a &ir share of recog- 
nition. Eight Of England's team 
on Saturday were from the 
Northern division and their 
players dominate the sevens 
squad for Sydney. That, though, 
is largely due to the failure of 
their dubs in the John Player 
Special Cup. Tbe selectors can 
not tell which dubs wifi still be 
involved in the Cup on March 
22 and have gone out of their 
way not to pick players from, 
say, Bath. Leicester or Wasps 
with the exception of Melville 
who will captain the seven. 

There are only two non- 


Nonheners in th squad. Marie 
Jermyn and the ageless Andy 
Ripley from Rosslyn Park. 
Jermyn has proved nis sevens 
value during the Middlesex 
event and it was Ripley who led 
the Barbarians to success in the 
Cathay Pacific-Hong Kong 
Bank sevens in 1981. 



wmterna (OnaBJ. A 

SudoonfOrrAH). A , 
A Simpson (Sate). 
{HaaAngtey). 


Art of the touch judge 


By David Hands 


The art of refereeing has long 
been recognized; increasingly, 
however, the art of touch-judg- 
ing is acknowteded as requiring 
different qualities. Tbe extent of 
the team work between Clive 
Norling. the Welsh match of- 
ficial during England's game 
with Ireland at Twickenham 00 


Saturday, and bis touch judges 
Sevan and Ken Row- 


Franldy. what England will 
1 do 


have to do if they are to beat the 
French is tackle and make sure 
ofbringing their men down. The 
French hacks have proved lime 
after time this season that they 
are strong enough to stay on 
their feet in the now-fashionable 
smother tackle, and I would not 
mind seeing Salmon restored to 
the fold as much for his defen- 
sive qualities as for his eye for 
the main scoring chance. 

As this international season 


Derek 

lands, was quite obvious and 
never more so than in the second 
minute when Mr Norling had to 
disallow a try which had already 
been awarded to Mike Harrison. 

At the rack which preceded 
the “score" Mr Be van, who will 
officiate at England's game with 
France in Paris on March 15 
(his first Five Nation champion- 
ship appointment), flagged for 
fool play against Steve Brain, 
England's hooker. He was quite 
right to do so. It is a matter for 
debate whether Mr Norling was 
right to disallow the try - the 
incident had no effect on tbe 
subsequent ran of play - and 
whether he should have allowed 
it bnt restarted the game with a 
penalty to Ireland. 

However, there was no doubt- 
ing the moral effect of die 
decision - there could be nothing 
more salutary for a player than 
directly to deprive bis own side 
of fonr, possibly six, points. 

When the Welsh referees hold 


their conference in June, tooeb- 
judging will be introduced as 
pan of the conference. Indeed, 
Mr Be van himself gave a lecture 
on the subject to some 140 
Welsh referees six days before 
the game at Twickenham. And 
before tbe third round of the 
Schweppes Welsh Cop in Janu- 
ary'. all 24 match officials met at 
Bridgend lo discuss touch-judg- 
ing. 

“The natural thing to do is to 
follow the ban, whereas the 
touch judge must watch the 
scrums ami line-outs as they 
break up," Mr Bevan said. “It 
was something I didn't really 
enjoy when 1 started doing it bnt 
I don't find it difficult. 
Concentration is the hardest 
part." 

Unfortunately tbe teamwork 
which leading officials from 
each national panel build-up will 
be dissipated if only two from 
each of the seven International 
Board conn tries involved in the 
world tournament next year go 
to New Zealand and Australia. 
It appears all too likely that 
match officials there may not 
know their touch judges and 1 
would have thought that, for the 
sake of a few more ponnds, h 
would be worth taking the 
leading three referees from each 
country so they can continne to 
work as a trait. 


Irish bemoan loss of an art 


By George Ace 


While Old Bushmill may 
have been in short supply late 
on Saturday night and early 
Sunday morning at the Irish 
headquarters in London, advice 
to solve tbe problems that beset 
Irish rugby was plentiful both 
from past internationals and 
from those who not so many 
years ago bore responsibility for 
team selection. As night gave 
way to dawn confusion became 
more evident but there re- 
mained an almost complete 


unanimity that the ability^ to 


scrummage, so tar as the 
are concerned, is a lost art. 

The after-match comment of 
Mick Doyle, the coach, that he 
“wouldn’t accept that England 
were totally dominant in the 
scrums” provoked almost total 
disbelief and only succeeded in 
adding to a steadily growing well 
of opinion that the Irish plight 
today is tn no small measure due 
to the almost complete dis- 
regard by the Irish coach for this 
facet of play. 

The scrum has played liule 


pan in Ireland's preparation for 
five nations' championship 

g mes and Mike Burton, the 
rmer England and British 
Lions prop forward, was ab- 
solutely right when he com- 
mented in an Irish Sunday 
newspaper “It seems to me that 
the basic preparation wasn't 
done in terms of scrummaging 
and it is probably a bit late in the 
day to do anything about it.” 

A former Irish and lions 
front row forward called for at 
least three intensive scrummag- 
ing sessions before the game 
against Scotland in Dublin on 
Saturday week, and a linJe light 
relief was brought to the 
proceedings when the question 
was posed: “Do you not think it 
might be better it Doyle look the 
pack to Lourdes for the weekend 
rather titan hold extra training 
stints?” 

The team to meet Scotland 
will be selected tonight in Dub- 
lin and announced tomorrow. 

The middle of the front row. 
scrum half and the back row will 


occupy the greater part of the 
selectors' lime. There is a grow- 
ing lobby of opinion for the 
removal of Fitzgerald, the cap- 
tain. but a successor is not easily 
discernable unless John 
O’Driscoll, of London Irish, is 
recalled to the back row. And 
that would pose a problem of 
who 10 leave out between Mor- 
row who wore the No 6 jersey on 
Saturday with distinction and 
plays his nigby for Ulster at No 
8. and Spillane who. like 
Lenihan. his Munster colleague, 
has been playing in fits and 
starts this season. 


Bradley had, admittedly, a 

_ . . - - ,r 1 “ 


difficult task at the base of ifee 
Irish scrum, but in truth he has 
made liule or no progress since 
he won his first cap against 
Australia in 1984 and has 
enjoyed an unbroken run since. 
The time may be opportune to 
put LUsicr's Brady under the 
international microscope. He is 
faster in thought and deed and 
his unpredictability may be no 
bad thing against the Scots. 


IN BRIEF 


Capes aids 
hunt for 
‘Goliaths’ 


The recent 12-metre world 
championship in Fremantle 
showed up a possible weakness 
in many of the syndicates which 
have challenged for the 
America’s Cup. Rougher con- 
ditions indicated a need for at 
least two strong men on each 
boat to operate the “coffee 
grinder" winches controlling the 
foresails (John Nichols writes). 

Such men were not included 
in the nucleus of tbe crew that 
has been formed for tbe two 
boats of the Royal Thames 
Yacht Club's challenge, so a 
competition has been organized 
to find them. Chris Law, one of 
the British Challenge's nomi- 
nated helmsmen, has been put 
in charge of the search. He has 
enlisted tbe shot putter. Geoff 
Capes, to help him find some 20 
“gorillas”. 

The competition will be or- 
ganized at Cougar Marine's yard 
near Southampton. 


CYCLING 


Kelly still 
out in 
the lead 


From John Wflcodkson 
Li mel-B re vannes 


Sean Kelly comfortably re- 
tained bis leadership of the 
Paris-Nice race yesterday, Mon- 
day, when he came fourth in a 
mass sprint finish at tbe end of 
the 92-mile first stage. “1 was a 
long way back coining into the 
finish straight,” Kelly said after- 
wards. 

“There was too orach ground 
for There were two right-angled 
brads in the final kilometre 
which enabled Brnno Wojtinek 
from Lille and Francis C astaing 
from Bordeaux to fight out an 
all-French duel for first place. 
FIRST STAGE {92 ABM* 1, B Wottnek 
{Fit. 4hr 5mte Imc; 2. F Castaing (Frt 3, 
F Host* (Bet); A S Kete fee); 5 E 
PJerafcmxt (Bdtal same am. 
OVERALL: 1. Kwy,4hr12min20Mc;2.B 


OostwtMach (Noth), Saec behind; 3, A 
Bondue (Fr), 7 mc: A 


5, J Vandecbreuckn (Bel), 
LmUond (USU 12*ec; 7, Woj 


T Itene^te 


. 8. G 

. ..... . Woptnek, 14aac 

S, G Doctoe-Lessale (Ft), 14*ac 


GOLF 

Knox gains 
unusual 
triumph 


From John Ballantine 
Cora! Springs, Florida 


Kenny Knox's unexpected 
win in the Honda Classic on 
Sunday was one of the more 
interesting stories in tbe history 
of the US tour. “Kenny who?” 
one might well ask. Until the 
professional from Tallahassee 
held off Andy Bean. John 
Mahafiey. Jodie Mudd and 
Clarence Rose lo win the 
$90,000 first prize by one stroke, 
his six-year professional career 
had been distinguished only by 
occasional wins on the “mini 
tour”, a circuit for unsuccessful 
players. 

Knox, who was born in 
Georgia, stands 5ft Min. weighs 
I2st 

LEADING FINAL SCORES: 287: K Knm. 
66. 71. 80. 70. 288: A Bean. 69. 69. 77. 73; 
J Mahaffey. 74. 70, 76. 68; C Rosa. 70. 73, 
72. 73. 289: B Jaeckat 76. 70. 74. 69: 290: 
T Purtzer 71. 71. 80. 68. British sco re *: 
298: K Brawn. 78, 70. 7ft 72. 299: S Lyle 
78. 07. 79. 75. 


FOR THE RECORD 


FOOTBALL 


STi 


FA CUP: Fifth round: Postponed: Watford v 
v. pW) round » ptrp P oote m ed r Stmt- 

Wedmaday « Defo»: MMwal * Soute- 
amtxon 

SCOTTISH CUP: FiBUrft round: POKpOMct St 
lUinen v FOkirk; Alos v MotrwrwA. 
MULTIPART LEAGUE: PooteMW* HofWtcn V 


Cenwi Dfcrisbn W L Pci OB 
tfewaukto Bucfct 42 19 .609 - 

Atlanta Hawks 35 25 .583 6% 

Detroit Pistons 36 26 381 6% 

Ctovebmd CavaBera 23 36 390 IB 
Chicago Bute 21 40 .344 21 

Indiana Pacers 21 40 .344 21 


Campbell Con 

NomsDraision 


ference 


Mosstejr. Hype v Moroea'P&e. 
OOLA LEAGUE: I 


; Pwtpooadr Ktedarmtostar v 

Wycomos. 

BANGKOK: tenf* Cup: Rrrt rotmfc Soutn 
Korea Z Denmark Z Thafend 6 0. North 
Kora# 2 


BADMINTON 


RHEINHAUSEN: Wwt Gorman 


Woman's ateteto flute r J Kim |S Korea! bi H 
niTTfl 


WESTERN CONFERENCE 
NMyrest Dtviaion W L Pet GB 

Houston Rockets 38 22 £33 - 

Denver Noggots 36 25 J99Q 2'h 

Utah Jan 31 30 .508 7» 

Dates MavertcJcs 30 23 £08 7H 

San Antorw spurs 30 32 .484 9 

Saoanforte Kmgs 27 33 A50 11 


W L TPts F A 
Chicago Hawte 33 24 B 74291275 
St Lous Biues 2926 8 66245 237 
Minnesota North 2827 9 65261 25i 
Toronto Maple 1938 6 44252 308 
□effort Rad Wings 1345 5 31209 329 
Smythe DMsioa 

W L TPtS F A 
Edmonton Mere 44 14 6 94336 2S3 
Calgary Furnas 32 25 7 71 280 244 

mnvpegjsts is 35 9 45217257 

Vancouver Can 19 40 6 44 231 308 
Los Angeles Kmgs 20 3B 6 46230 314 


Trctef&^l 
Dewand ~ 

utrecort 


l. 8-11. 12-10. Mtaed dotefes 


fete: D C lee ana M H Clang (5 Korao) U M 
G Gifts JEng) 10-15. 18-17. lS-9. 


basketball 


Padfic Dhfeiofl W L Pa GB 
Los Angeles Lakers 43 16 .729 - 

Perttand Trait Blazers 30 34 .469 15* 
PfKWmx StttS 24 35 .407 19 

Los Angeles Ctppers 22 30 .367 21ft 
SWhteSuperSortcs 21 33 .356 22 
Golden State Wamors 19 43 .306 25Y, 


RUGBY UNION 


VSZEFRANCE-SW-SAONE: France 8 10. 
Scor&ndB 12 

CLUB MATCH: Caocefed: Newport v Ebow 
Vtea 


SPEEDSKATING 


GARLSBERa NATIONAL CHAMPIOHSMfc 

Quartarfin te p Uy oH ft lfctelaff B l rn fe a m m 

Bufotx 66 (Sfrotidare 31. Han 20. french 
17L Pdrtsmwtt 92 |Sttugt*er33. Duae 2ft 
Mh i«fc Bnrai Dude uawjoa and Camden 
67 (Roberts 26. Katoyorewlfl, Potto 171. 
Team Pptycab Kngston 10S [Bontrmgar ip. 


ICE HOCKEY 


CUn Si. Lloyd DyMtf Pteaee 91 
“ “ " 19. J Bremen igj. 


NORTH AMERICA: Nsferal Lea gue < 
EanKrtonOttesftPhttOetpnBRyertil . 
Wash ngton Caotos 4 , n*w rock Rangers Z 
Hartford Wnaters 4. Boston Bnteis r.< 


CALGARY. Ateerta: World tuteorchmnpott- 
SMpK W inn ers: Men: IJOfec B SrtWttw 
(USSR), 2mm IJSsec. 5J00m: B Swore* 
(USSR). 7 15 89 3.000 k S Swtkav (USSR). 
<: 14 34 soon A zmne (USSR). 4fl.ff7. 
Women: 3A00nr M Gartrecftt (EGL 4.5331 
1 JOOne L yteteOzD* (USSR). 1.27.65. 


(Jenranae 33, Seaman 
MancAwtsrr 


■ GitoB 84 (Kennedy 35. Brookes 
26. Scott 10t Waters Crape Leicester % 


Back Hawks 6. Si Uxcs &u03 4; NOW Jersey 
■mess. 


Devss 61 Wnmueg jen 4. Caigvy Hamas ! 
Los Angeles twigs 1. 


TENNIS 


lUmiNij jyi - ® ■? nBfp 


Unrac SS fT Blown 33. W frown 
18. Joras 161 NaOonte Trophy Sere-foot 
Cakardab 116. Bnxton 89 (Ctederdale vs* 
Pl ymout h in final March 9). 

UOTED STATES NMmtel wwettdon 
(NBA): Boston CeWtt 129. Dteroa frgora 
109; Waahttgwr Bufeta 125. MteBiAm 
Butte 104; rfflana Facers 12B. Los Ammu 
C appers 112. 


Wales Conference 

Patrick Dnfeion 


EASTERN CONFERENCE 
ABarOcOnabn W L Pet GB 

Boston CeOcs 47 11 .81Q - 

PnuaoefoMa 76era 39 21 .650 9 

Near Jersey Nets 32 30.519 17 

Washington BuDets « 32 .475 19ft 

New Tori Kracta IS 40 .322 28ft 


RteedefolaaR 
WasIwqtcnC&p 
New York is 
Pittsburgh Per 
New York Ran 
New Jersey own 
Adam League 


W L 
41 19 
2919 

30 23 

31 26 
30 29 
20 39 


T Ptt F A 

4 86 267 195 

5 83243 213 
10 70236 231 
7 69260 228 
4 64 223 216 
3 43233 283 


PRINCETON, Nam Jersey: US wdffien't 
mdaon Feu round (US unless stated)- M L 
PmteWNSoduwM. B-i.BRewtwmP 
Cassia 6-3. 6-1. T Pneips <ust w M v 
Nosrana 3 *. 6-2 7-6; A Httikow IC2I bl C 
jotsaamt (S«4zl 4-6 6-1. 6-2 


CRICKET 


Momreet Can 
Qute*eNo»d 
Boston Brums 
BunetoSaoras 
Hanford Wrtaiere 


W L 
35 23 
34 71 
31 27 
30 28 
29 33 


TPts F A 
8 76 274 214 
4 72 266 23S 
7 69 259 238 
6 66344 231 

2 60251 253 


SHEFFIELD SHIELD: Sfttwy; Queensland. 
339 ano 983. draw «n New South Wales. 
440{M O Neif J 1 7. M Tartar PBf. Pdt9t South 
Australia. 432 ana 181-8 dec (G frsnoo SOL 
(hen wan western Aus&sha. «33-6 ow (M 
Vents 107. R GartreU 92. W Andrews 82 no) 
and i2fl tor 9lGWpoaS4no.GSmaH AA7.J 
Pybea-in 


tLJ' 






■>y 


26 


SPORT 


. * 


BOXING: BRITAIN’S CONTENDER INTO THE LAST STRETCH ON THE WORLD CHAMPIONSHIP ROAD 


Bruno’s mettle 
will be put 
to test against 
Coetzee 

By Srikumar Sen, Boxing Correspondent 


Everybody's money is on 
Frank Bruno. Fans and ex- 
perts alike say he just cannot 
lose to Genie Coetzee. of 
South Africa, in the World 
Boxing Association heavy- 
weight final eliminator at 
Wembley tonight. 

The ironmonger down the 
road from my place (he used 
to be an Ivor “The Engine” 
Jones supporter) said: “Yes, 
I've got a couple of pounds on 
Bruno because he cannot lose. 
Because Terry Lawless and 
Mickey Duff are too clever. 
They would not have taken 
this’ fight if Bruno could be 
beaten. I have seen this 
Coetzee on the telly fighting 
Page and that other fellow and 
this Coetzee is no good at alL 
Too slow. I think Bruno will 
be too last for him. And that is 
saying something.” 

Coetzee's American trainer, 
the highly experienced Jack 
McCoy, laughs at this kind of 
talk which almost makes the 
former world champion into a 
no-hoper. '“Sure, Mickey Duff 
knows his fighters and makes 
very few mistakes. But it does 
go wrong sometimes. He went 
wrong with Palomino when he 
beat Stracey; and he was 
wrong about Bruno and 
Bonecrusher.” 

McCoy maintains that 
Bruno's connections are going 
by Coetzee's last two contests. 
“Yes, he wasn’t good.” Mc- 
Coy says. “He wasn’t right for 
those fights. Against Page his 
right hand, that had those IS 
operations, was giving trouble 
and they put five different 
shots into him to kill the pain. 
He was so sedated that he said 
before the fight ‘I don't feel 
nervous at all'. When he 
fought Quick Tillis he was not 
himself. He had had 'flu and 
his mother had died a little 
before. Tillis is not a bad 
fighter to beat. Tillis had Page 
and Truth Williams on the 
floor.'* 

McCoy says that there is 
nothing wrong with Coetzee 
this time and that the South 
African will knock out Bruno 
early. “You know when he 
fought Dokes he was the 
underdog but he said to me 
•sometime I am going to catch 
him and when I do ... '. He did 


in the tenth and turned Dokes 
over onto his face to win the 
WBA title.” 

Another observer. Doug 
Bidwell. whose heavyweight 
Glen McCrary has been spar- 
ring with Coetzee. concurs. “I 
can't see Bruno beating 
Coetzee except on cuts and he 
does cut,” he said. Bidwell, 
who as Alan Minter’s manager 
worked closely with McCoy 
has been in attendance on the 
South African for the past 
eight days. He has watched 
Coetzee closely as he sparred 
with MacCrory. Bidwell main- 
tains that the South African is 
more than capable of taking 
care of himself against Bruno. 
“Coetzee is very well and fit 
He is heavy but I was sur- 
prised to see how light he is on 
his feet- He has got a very good 
left hook and a very fast right 
hand and good body moves. 
He had no trouble catching 
McCrary. I know McCrary is 
no Bruno but Coetzee wasn't 
even trying. If Bruno beats 
Coetzee it will tell us some- 
thing else about Bruno. I want 
Bruno to win because it will 
do British boxing good and fill 
the small holes, but really 
Coetzee looks too good I 
cannot understand the book- 
makers making Bruno the 
favourite. I think Coetzee will 
surprise everybody and could 
stop Bruno early.” 

Bidwell picked up some 
interesting snippets of conver- 
sation that shows that Coetzee 
is determined to win. “When 
McCoy says Coetzee is going 
to win you know that he is 
going to.” Bidwell said. 
“Once, just as I was leaving 
the South African's hotel and 
was walking away, I heard 
Coetzee saying to McCoy ‘I 
really want to beat this Bruno*. 
McCoy said “you will. no 
trouble'.” 

On boxing ability it is 
difficult to disagree with Mc- 
Coy and Bidwell that the 
South African is a class above 
Bruno. Coetzee has been in 
with tough men in the world: 
he knocked out Leon Spinks 
in one: he lost to John Tate 
when they met for the vacant 
WBA title in 1979: he was 
knocked out by Mike Weaver 
in 13 rounds but not before 



having the American almost 
out on his feet in the eighth; he 
lost to Renaldo Snipes on a 
split decision after flooring the 
American twice; he drew with 
the present WBC champion. 
Pinkion Thomas, in 1983; 
then came the Dokes knock- 
out which gave him the title, 
which he lost to Page in 1984 
in the controversial eighth 
round that lasted 3min SOsec. 

With all this experience 


Riding high: Bruno is the people's favourite against Coetzee 
erican almost Coetzee must be able to land can will have 


Coetzee must be able to land 
at least two solid shots on 
Bruno's chin, the kind that 
took BidwelTs breath away 
when sparring with McCrory 
in London recently. How Bru- 
no copes with that situation 
will tell us whether he is 
capable of going further down 
the championship road. If our 
man becomes paralysed, as 
against Cumraiogs and 
Bonecrusher, the South Afri- 


Ring records 


GERRIE COETZEE 
Bom: 4 August, 1955 
Height 6ft Bin 

10 LATEST BOUTS 

1981 

Mar. 14 George Chaplin WptslO 
Aug. 9 Renaldo Snipes L pts 10 
Oct 31 Leroy Caldwell _ W KO 5 

1982 

Feb. 13 Fbssie Schmidt .WK04 
May 5 Scott Le Doux ... W KO 8 
Sept 11 Stan Ward WK02 

1983 

Jan. 22 Ptnkton Thomas L dec 10 
Sept 23 Michael Dokes WKO10 
(Won WBA , 

1! 

Dec. 1 Greg Page L KO 8 

(Lost WBA he^Ywerght titte) 

Sept 7 James TflSs W pts 10 

Careen Won 30, Drew 1, Lost 4 


FRANK BRUNO 
Bom: 16 November, 1961 
Height 6ft 3in 

10 LATEST BOUTS 
1983 


Nov. 11 
Dec. 6 


Floyd Cummings Wrsf7 
Waft Santemore WK04 


Mar. 13 
May 13 


1984 

Juan Figueroa 
James Strath . 

Sept 25 Ken Lakusta _ 

Nov. 6 Jeff Jordan Wrsf3 

Nov. 27 Phil Brown W pts 10 

1985 

Mar. 26 
Nov. 1 

European heavyweight title) 
Dec. 4 Larry Frazier — W KO 2 
Career Won 27, Lost 1 


W KO 1 
L KO 10 
W KO 2 


Luden Rodriguez W rsf 1 
Anders Eklund .. W KO 4 


can will have little trouble in 
finishing him off. 

if there is in fact nothing the 
matter with Coetzee and he is 

fit to go the distance and is 
keen to win as McCoy says: 
“because he wants to live in 
America and wants to be a 
part of the big tournament 
coming up to find the undis- 
puted world champion” and 
can recapture some of his old 
fire. Bidwell and McCoy may 
well be right that he will win. 

However it is equally hard 
to see how, with £5 million 
resting on Bruno's next con- 
test with the world champion. 
Tim Witherspoon, Bruno's 
backers, who are the 
shrewdest in the game, could 
have made a mistake by 
putting him in too early with 
someone who could set his 
career back severely. Either 
they know something about 
Coetzee’s form that others do 
not or they have made a bad 
mistake in trying to take a 
short cut to a world tide bout 
by taking on the world num- 
ber one in this heavyweight 
final eliminator. 


Multi-racialism does not mean equality for black boxers in South Africa 

Body blows from reformers still not enough 


Johannesburg 

With an appetite for inter- 
national sporting achievement 
made all the keener by their 
country's growing isolation, mil- 
lions of South Africans will 
tonight be glued to their tele- 
vision sets for the Coetzee- 
Bruno encounter. 

“Gerrie Camp Hits Back At 
Critics" was the headline 
splashed across the Johannes- 
burg Citizen newspaper yes- 
terday - and that was on the 
front page. 

This patriotic fervour is con- 
fined, it must be added, to white 
South Africans. As for the far 
bigger legion of black boxing 
followers they will be rooting 
almost to a nun for Bruno. Or 
else they will not even be aware 
that the bout is taking place. 

For while apartheid in boxing 
is reeling from a barrage of body 
blows, it stubbornly refuses to 
throw in the towel. Significant 
progress has been made in 


uniting professional boxing, but 
the year and a half of turbulence 
in the black townships has 
reversed some of the advances 
already under way. 

The continued support by the 
World Boxing Association 
(WBA) for South African box- 
ing - they even has a South 
African on their executive - 
stems from their leader's regular 
visits here, convincing them that 
boxing is indeed mnlti-raciaL It 
is. But it is not equal, even for 
the professionals. 

“Getting more fights is the 
vital ingredient to reach the 
top.” Marcos Nkosi. a blade 
boxing promoter, points out 
“And black boxers simply don't 
gel enough action.” They de- 
pend largely on black promoters 
like himself who in torn face an 
uphill battle to attract predomi- 
nantly white-owned companies 
as sponsors. The result is that 
white promoters, who predomi- 
nate. can arrange far more 


fights, far more profitably. 

Black boxing promoters be- 
lieve white businessmen are now 
smiting to realize that burgeon- 
ing black buying power win 
make sponsorship of black boots 
and boxers a lucrative prospect. 
Nevertheless, blade boxing 
observers all claim that white 
talent is being nurtured gently 
towards the cop while blacks 
have to rely on pure boxing skill 
and luck. 

Take the rise of Arthur "The 
Black Prince” Mayisela. who 
was contemptuously Ignored by 
the boxing establishment as n 
lavished its attention on the 
white hopeful, Brian Baronet. 

The two boxers eventually met 
late last year in Sun City ."I 
don't think I've ever been to a 
multi-racial boxing tournament 
In this country where racist 
remarks have been absent.” 
wrote the boxing correspondent 
of the anti-government Weekly 
Mail newspaper. “But the racial 


element was never more evident 
than in this fight” 

The anreted black boxer won 
easfly, leaving the white man. 
No 4 on the WBA rankings, 
miconsdons on the canvas for 
more ifco* a wtinuip. 

The boat bad gone on despite 
the tragic outcome to the pre- 
vious contes t fas which Jacob 
“Dancing Shoes” Morake had 
been , battered into a coma by a 
yooas white boxer, Brian MJldh 
elL As attendants vainly gave 
Morake an oxygen mask, the 
crowd was asked by the ring 
anno uncer to give a big band For 
the loser, and be then asked 
them to cheer the Anstralian 
cricket rebels In the crowd. 
“Dancing Shoes' was carted out 
Eke a fallen gladiator on his 
shield, and in no time two more 
gladiators e n tered as if nothing 
extraordinary bad happened,” 
the Weekly Mail wrote. 

It would be unfair to pillory 
South African boxing on one 


exhibition of appalling taste. 
But many black boxing experts 
and the boxing public believe the 
events of that night typified 
official insensitivity towards 
black boxers 

They point out that, mlike 
every other sport, the controlling 
body of professional boxing is 
not fully independent from gov- 
ernment interference. A govern- 
ment minister selects each 
member of the boards from two 
names submitted by the boards 
themselves. 

All in all, the claim by Sooth 
Africa's WBA executive mem- 
ber Mike Mortimer that 
tonight's Coetzee-Bruno boot 
continuing despite anti-apart- 
heid protest, is “a victory for 
fairness and for all our boxers 
black and white,” may ring 
somewhat hollowly in the empty 
boxing balls of the black town- 
ships. 

Paul Martin 


CRICKET: ITINERARY OFFERS NO LETjjP 

England’s players must 
not look for excuses 

From John Woodcock, Cricket Correspondent, PQrt-of-Spsrfn 


J 




Believing, or at least hoping, 'Ticket being as they are, there 
that their form and fortunes can will be less short-pitched bowl- 
only get better, England meet ing today than in the Test 
West Indies for another one-day matches: if nothing else, this 
international here today. This should make it a less hazardous 
will be followed on Friday by game for England's batsmen. It 
■the second Test match, spon- is a great rdieC too, to have got 
sored by Cable and Wireless, away from Sabina Park where 
From now until the end of the the only side to have reached a 
tour the only relief from playing total of250 this season was west 
against the full force of the West indies in the first Test match. 
Indian attack will come against The pitch for today will be better 
Barbados' in 10 days* time, and than that It has had the grass 
even they can put into the field, taken off it unlike the one for 
when they choose to. a team of the Trinidad match or. more 
Test strength. ominously, for Friday’s Test _ 

To say how acutely dis- if the weather is overcast as it 

appointing the tour has been so usually is for a part of the day 
hr, from En g l an d's point of here at this time of year, 
view, is hardly necessary. In my EmiandV method of bowling, 
experience there has not been especially Elliso n's, could be 
another quite like it particularly effective, provided they pitch 
as hopes were so high at the ball up. There is also a 
start That dangerous stage has theory in the English camp that 
now been reached when the ^ ball may turn, though I 
players will be tempted to fall doubt whether that would count 
back on excuses rather than f Qr a lot What the ground 
work on improvements. authorities are aiming for is a 

It would be a help if Gower, as pilch which is the same for both 
captain, were not so con- ydre and good for batting 
foundedly casual in the way be throughout the day. 
comes in and gets out Having What should almost certainly 
had no time yet to catch this be England's game is the loss to 
mood. Slack looked in a class of West Indies of Dujon. who has 
his own against Trinidad' on dipped the top joint of the little 
Sunday. He is obviously not finger of his left band. Although 
that or anything Eke it but to be mav yet play on Friday, he is 
say that it appeared that way unlikely to risk the injury today, 
may give an idea of how urgent accomplished innings of 34 
the need isfora really concerted finally shut England out of the 
effort, not to look for a brighter Test match, and although 
side. The rules for one-day not q u he in the top flight as a 

wicketkeeper he misses very 
little standing back to the fos 
bowlers. 

No more than 1,000 people, 
all told, can have watched the 
match against Trinidad. That 
the attendance was affected by 
the clamour for a boycott is not 
in doubt though we shall get a 
better idea today of the full 
extent to which the public are 
staying away. Trinidad's present 
economic difficulties may also 
partly have accounted for then- 
being so few at last weekend’s 
game. 


ENGLAND XL- First Innings 229 (R T 
Robinson 78; AH Gray 
5 (or 50) and 101 tar 4 dec 
TRINIDAD: First timings 1 09 (N A Foster 6 
tor S> J 

Second innings 

PV Simmons c Gooch b Foster 6 

M Reftardson c Gooch b Taytor 1 

N Gomez c Slack b Etfrnonds 39 

A Ranh notout 55 

D I Mohammed c Foster bWOey 5 

M Bodoe notout 0 

Extras(b1,«j6.w1 p nb2) 10 

Total (4 wkts) 116 

FALL OF WICKETS: MO. 2-10, 3-90, 4- 
11Z 

BOWLING: Foster 7-3-16-1: Tartar 9-1- 


Probably the best that can be 
hoped for today » a crowd of 
10.000 (in favourable circum- 
stances it might be double that) 
and perhaps a half-foil ground 
for the first two days of me Test 
match. There were, in fort, fewer 
for the first Test match here on « 
England's last tour, when there “■ 
was also a small boycott, can- 
vassed because of Deryck 
Murray's omission from the 
West Indian side. What the 
undecided may find irresistible 
this time is the hkdihood- of a 
couple of West Indian victories. 
Off the field, as weft as on it, 
there is this bade of wills.' 

At yesterday’s practice Gower 
had a session with “Fred" the 
bowling machine, operated by - 
Bob Willis, the assistant man- 
ager. who is gening rather good 
at it The purpose was to get 
Gower working on what or 
what not to play at outside his 
off stump. The fact that-Robm- 
son was missing from the prac- 
tise with an upset stomach 
improved Slack’s chances, as it 
were, of being thrown to the P 
lions today. 

Day of rain 

Christchurch (AP> — Only 94 
minutes of play, either side of 
lunch, was possible on the 
fourth day of the second Test 
between New Zealand and 
Austral ia here yesterday and the 
game is now likely to end id a 
draw. Light rain ihroi$houl the 
morning delayed the start - 


AUSTRALIA: Firs! 
Border ! 
tor > 16 } 


liwmjs 364 (A R 

Border 140. S R Waugt? 74. R J HvIm 7 

Second tnnogs 
D C Boon c Coney b Troup 6 

G R Marsh ttw b Bracewea 15 

fW B Philips not out — — tt 

■A R Border not out — t5 

Extras |W> Zt 2 

Total 12 wtctst 49 

FALL OF VWCKETS 1-15 2-32 V 

BOWLING: Hadlee 11-3-134). Troup 2-0- 
13-1. Cnarheto &3-7-0: Bueewtf &3-14. 


3l-1;Emburey 
l.tMRey 5-1-10-1. 


Star 7-3-16-1: Taytor 9*1- 
9-1-23-0; Edmonds 9-1-29- 


NEW ZEALAND: First 
Cm >37. JV Coney 98; S 
56. BA Rad 4 tor 91 


..88B(MO 

Waugnafor 


Blowing whistle on England 


To spend one's first day in any 
new cum try is to shatter a 
duster of preconceptions; hot to 
arrive in Trinidad was like 
missing a step in the dark. Fora 
start England were whipping a 
West Indian side: when play 
ended on Saturday, Trinidad 
were 92 for eight and Foster had 
five wickets. 

However, the shock went 
beyond even this. I had always 
believed that the West Indians 
were cricket fenatics. So they 
are; bat when Foster was bowl- 
ing his ever-so-Engiish seamers, 
he was bowling to an empty 
ground. One might have been 
back watching the clandestine 
rituals of the county champion- 
ship. 

What is more, I had always 
believed that West Indian 


cricket matches take place 
against a terrifying background 
of noise. I have watched the 
West Indies play at The Oval: I 
knew what to expect, I thought 
What I did not expect was 
silence. Foster may have si- 
lenced the few who boned op to 
watch; hot it was gnflt that 
sflenced the rest 
There were crowd noises, bat 
these came from ontside the 
pound: a cacophony of booting 
and whistling. Along the street 
they blew their .whistles, 
s booted, and implored passing 
motorists from placards: hoot if 
joo hate apartheid! -And poop- 
poop they replied. And; though 
they may listen to the cricket on 
their transistors, the Trinidadi- 
ans wfll not go to the cricket to 
watch England. 


This may well have changed 
when the international matches 
start, bat many feel it would be 
an act of betrayal. 

The Trinidadians believe that 
watching any cricket side fnfl of 
Sooth African rebels is support- 
ing apartheid. This is not mere 
mischief-making. Tree, the 
political implications f or late r- 
national cricket do not tarn on 
such basic gut instincts and 
those have, so far, kept the 
Trinidadians from the cricket. 
Bat the people staying away ate 
not staying away because they 
are tronble-tnakers. They are 
staying away because they bate 
apartheid. To the last at least, 
there is but one response. Ftoop- 
poop! A 

Simon Barnes 


ATHLETICS 


Sprinters are a world apart 


By Plat Batcher, Athletics Correspondent 


Allan Wells and Mike 
AfcFarfane were inseparable 
when they finished the last 
Commonwealth Games, win- 
ning a gold medal each after 
they had dead-heated in the 200 
metres final But they will be 
separated by thousands of miles 
when the festivities for this 
year’s Commonwealth Games 
in Edinbuigh start next month. 

For Wells is running the first 
leg of a relay, sponsored by the 
Distillers company, which will 
lake a scroll — signed in Edin- 
burgh yesterday — throughout 
the 58 countries of the 
Commonwealth. and 
McFarlane is doing the last leg. 

The two sprinters, along with 
Lmsey Macdonald, who like 
them has bad a long saga of 
injuries si nee her emergence as a 
16-year-okI in the 1980 Olym- 
pics. were in Edinbuigh yes- 


terday for the official 
announcement of the Distillers 
Commonwealth Friendship 
Journey. The first leg will start 
on April 24 from Edinburgh's 
Meadowbank Stadium, the 
venue for the athletics in this 
year's Games. Wells will run, 
“or possibly walk” what for him 
is die marathon distance of two 
miles to Edinburgh Qsrift 

The scroll will be flown to 
Australia, New Zealand and Fiji 
but the final pan of the journey 
will take place in the United 
Kingdom with Mary Peters 
from Northern Ireland handing 
the scroll to Lynn Davies for 
Wales, who will then pass it on 
to McFarlane, who is expected 
to return it to Edinburgh on July 
10. two weeks before the Games 
begin. 

Ken Borthwick, chairman of 
the Commonwealth Gaines 


TENNIS 


Chance to move 
out of an orbit 

By Rex Bellamy. Tennis Correspondent 
During the five weeks from their dreams in greater clarity. 


April 14 to May 1 8 the glamour 
of the international tour will be 
concentrated in Amelia Island 
(Florida). Indianapolis. Forest 
Hills. Monte Carlo. Berlin and 
Rome. These will be faraway 
places, somewhere in dream- 
land. for die eager young men 
and women competing at the 
same lime on an English circuit 
co-ordinated by the Lawn Ten- 
nis Association. 

Everyone has to start some- 
where. This LTA series comes 
into the lowest international 
categories for men and women, 
but competitors will at least 
have precarious footholds on 
the bottom of the ladder. They 
will be playing for meagre 
rewards in terms of money and 
ranking points and the com- 
petition will be tough. Most of by qualifying rounds, but also by 


will fire the endeavours of the 
young - plus some older players 
anxious to arrest a slide to 
obscurity - during this English 
spring. 

There will be no celebrities on 
the LTA circuit The quality of 
the tennis will be modcsL But 
the competition will be red- 
blooded because every match 
won will be a small step towards 
Forest Hills, Berlin and the rest 

The venues for the mini-wars 
will be Hampstead (the annual 
British Home Stores Tour- 
nament April 15 to 19). Queen's 
Club (April 22 to 26). Sutton 
(April 29 to May 3). Bourne- 
mouth (May 6 to 10) and Lee- 
on-Solem (May 13 to 1 7). These 
events will be preceded not only 


the players will find it hard to 
make ends meet But they will 
learn much in this gruelling 
training school and a tew will 
graduate to the big league — 
either by winning consistently 
and thus improving their 
rankings, or by _ doing just 
enough to earn a wild card place 
in some tournament offering 
more money and more ranking 
points. 

That chance to break out of ... 
the satellite orbtL to visualize aching rigour of the climb. 


pre-quafifying tournaments at 
Bristol (the BMW Tournament. 
April 5 to 12). Norwich (April 
14-19). Telford (April 21 to 26). 
West Worthing (April 28 to May 
3) and Peterborough (May 5 to 
10 ). 

In tennis, as in mountaineer- 
ing. the upper slopes of Everest 
are an awfully long way from 
Kathmandu. Bui high places, 
for those who can reach them, 
always repay the sweat and 


Nystrom 
too good 
for Noah 

La Quinta. California. (Reu- 
ter) — Joakim Nystrom, of 
Sweden, the fifth seed, out- 
classed a listless Yannick Noah, 
of France, 6-1. 6-3. 6-2. on 
Sunday to win the $405,000 
(£270.000) La Quinta Classic 
tournament in 1 hr 41 min. 

After breaking the service of 
Noah, ranked seventh in the 
world, in the second and fourth 
game of the first set. Nystrom 
raced to a 5-0 lead, dominating 
with brilliant passing shots 
while the Frenchman lunged 
helplessly, and took the set in 
only 30 minutes. 

Nystrom. ranked ninth in the 
world, did not lose a point on 
hisserve in the second set, while 
Noah straggled with his usually- 
fierce first serve and came in on 
weak approach shots which 
made him an easy target for 
passing shots. Nystrom. who 
was rarely made to display his 
excellent return of serve, won 
the set 6-3 with a brilliant 
forehand crosscourt passing 
shoi at full stretch. 

Noah discovered only as be 
walked on court that the match 
was the best of five sets and it 
seemed to deflate both his 
physical and menial resolve. All 
iheprevious rounds had been 
the best of three. 


ROWING 


Trembling in the 
role of favourites 


By Jim Rail ton 


One giant too many for Jordan 


Oakland (API — Chris Lloyd 
ended Kathy Jordan's giant- 
killmg spree with a 6-2. 6-4 
victor)’ m the final of the 
SI50.U00 Virginia Slims of 
California tournament on Sun- 
day. Jordan, who was unseeded. 
had beaten Martina 
Navratilova, the top seed, and 
Hana Mandlikova, seeded third, 
in earlier rounds. 


Lloyd's key weapons on the 
medium-fast carpel in the Oak- 
land Coliseum Arena were pin- 
point lobs and crisp crosscourt 
passing shots that often forced 
Jordan to lunge awkwardly, just 
out of reach, as she rushed to the 
net. 

Lloyd, who has now won 
three tournaments this year, 
broke Jordan's service after two 


deuces in the third game of the 
first scl Lloyd's second break of 
the sci came in the sixth game 
with a fine forehand passing 

ShOL 

Breaks of service were ex- 
changed in the third and fourth 

games of the second scl but 
Jordan foiled to hold service in 
the seventh. 


Ever since the Boat Race 
sponsors. Ladbrokes, made 
Cambridge favourites for this 
year's race, the pressure has 
been telling on the Light Blues, 
who have hardly found the cold 
snap to their liking either. 

The latest among their walk- 
ing wounded is John Pritchard, 
their Olympic and world silver 
medal winner, who has a viral 
infection. Over the weekend at 
Kingston. Cambridge borrowed 
Goldie's Downing oarsman. 
Charlie Green and Cambridge's 
non-rowing president. Quintus 
Travis was even pressed into 
service. 

Cambridge can ill-afford 
many more mishaps with less 
than a month to the Boat Race 
on March 29 (3.15). While 
Oxford undergo a meta- 
morphosis this weekend and 
defend the Reading Head of the 
River race, rowing as Isis. 
Cambridge face an important 
trial on the Tideway against the 
ambitious British Lightweight 
eight designate, who roughed up 
Oxford not so long ago. 

Oxford arrived on the Tide- 
way on Saturday just in time to 
glimpse Cambridge running oil 
to Kingston to seek kinder 
water. Daniel Topolski was 
somewhat amused. “All they 
have to do is row round a bend 
or two. The water is as flat as a 
pancake." the Oxford coach 
said. The point was. however, 
that the Tideway during the 
week had driven Cambridge 
round the bend. 

Topolski initially had his own 
problems on Saturday. Oxford 
being defeated by a good half- 
length by a respectable Thames 
Rowing Club eight in a race 
between Hammersmith and 
Putney Bridges before shaking 
off their complacency in a series 


of seven -minute rows during 
which they were able to notch 
up three lengths and more to 
their crediL 

Neil CampbelL Cambridge's 
Canadian coach, who flew tack 
yesterday to even colder climes 
in Ontario, will be back to assist 
his crew's final week on the 
Tideway before the Boat Race. 
Oxford, in the meantime, can be 
found on the picturesque 
reaches of the Thames and 
Pange bourn under their coach. 
Steve Royle. 

OXFORD: M R Dnnstan (Si Wave's. 
Ommgtofl and Worcester), bow; G R 
Scream (Magdalen CoBege School and 
Merton): A D ward (King s. Chester and 
Q/«W). D H M MaeOooefcJ (Momson's 
Academy and Mansfield). *B M PMp 
(Bryanston. Downing and Worcester); C H 
Clatfc (CairforTva University and Urevimty 
Cotecej, G Livingston |CaMo»nia Univer- 
sity and OnetfA U S Thomas (Win- 
ctewer and Pembroke}, stroke; A S 
Green (HaDer dashers' Ashe s and Christ 
Church). COX 

CAMBRIDGE: 1 R Cfcnfca IStourpan HS 
and Fitzwilham). bow: M WBson {Pr ince to n 
University and Trany): M D Hughes 
(Bedford Modern and Downing i, *J M 
Pntcturd (Si Clement Dane s and Ro»n- 
soni: J p L Ziedter (Hadeybury and 


l/mversity. Onfano and Chureftin): J 5 Rear 
(Sientoid University and Trinity). Stroks; C 
A Burton lAhce OtUey ana FrtzwUkam). 
CO* 

■ A Blue 


Caribbean leave 

Andrew Strung, iliv iraii'ilcr- 
liMcd ^litldlcNhriuisli foil hack, 
has li.uf his cut it rail mnivik-tJ 
b> muuulomscnt st» ili.it hcuin 
|i»in Ins fiancee. «hn is uurking 
hi the West Indies 


Ballesteros out 

Susannah. Georgia (AP) - 
Severiano Ballesteros has with- 
drawn from the TPA Atlantic 
Coast golf toumamenL which 
suns today. 


RUGBY LEAGUE 

Salford lay 
on carpet 
exhibition 

By Keith Macklin 

Salford, who are planning to 
lay an artificial pitch at the end 
of the season, will play Widoes 
on such a surface in an ex- 
hibition match at the Lutoa 
Town football ground. 

Salford, who were promoted 
to the first division ibis season, 
have ambitious plans for a 
multi-sports stadium with a 
centrepiece of artificial turf like 
the Kenilworth Road carpet. 

Widnes have already an- 
nounced a similar scheme, and 
the two dubs have joined forces 
to play each other in' an ex- 
hibition match in April or May. 

John Wilkinson, the Salford 
chairman, said yesterday: “If we 
can lay the ideal surface, we can 
open up our ground at The 
Willows to a host of other sports 
like football, crickei and bowl- 
ing. We will develop our dress- 
ing room, grandstand and other 
sporting facilities at the same 
time, and we envisage a scheme 
whose total cost will be around 
£750.000. 

“We have promises of private 
finance and have a good 
relationship with the local 
authority, with the possibility of 
financial support from them, 
particularly if the stadium is 
made available for community 
use.” 

Mr Wilkinson and the Salford 
commercial manager. David 
Tarry, will visit Kenilworth 
Road on Thursday to talk to 
Luton officials and examine the 
artificial turf. 

• Widnes have placed iheir 
hooker Ian Go cm ley. grandson 
of the former miners' leader. 
Lord Gormley. on the transfer 
lisL 


ICE HOCKEY 

Brawling players 
get just deserts 

By a Correspondent 

-rsftsriffssa 

League, and Peterborough, who w . ,I ? nin E Promotion from di- 

division, set a record for 
ineptitude on Sunday. 

Nottingham has become .a 
battleground this season. In 

January their match with Nottingham PamharsT'iwr Sum* > 
Murrayfidd was abandoned af- Pwww $ Wwtey wanton 

ter a scries of on-ice battles. i i ._Pawticroggh 

Salunday-s fid,, nigb. ara* 

from one incident m the third SpuBwnptonvaarisa: CrowtreeChtoS 
period. As the Ayr goalkeeper. 19 *LL?®Y afl *r lJo '’ s 

John McCrone. fell on the puck, Z Lotv^ 8Sfi3i222Z9S&!f 
a Nottingham forward, Jim ‘ RlcJvnom3 0- 

Keyes, skated in to try to gain Tigvs 9. 

possession, but all he received JoronmEa ^tCab}3. 
was a stick across the back. That — 

was the opening bell for both 

^,cis;‘i, lhe,rtoct,es “ d Gold on ice 


MgLffg sg 3 Mu naytoM R«c m 7; 

■Wragtam P afflhBfB 4. Ayr Bruns Z 


=as,sas: Bs£?£ , s?M'TaB 
gttMSKSa K2£J?-lsgK 

. monopoly in the 

Notungham s share added up nraWmrer Asian CWes. Wang 
to 1 00m in and Ayr's was ^“^ofdunawon the womeo^f 
_!28mm^a total of 3hr 48mi n in in_ which Seiko 


in a 60-minute game. 

All was calm when the final 13 
minutes got under way, There 
was no more fighting, no more 
penalties and no more scoring, 
and the Panthers won 4-2. . 

Peterborough would be grate- 
ful fora win. because tbe Pirates 
have J *■ 


2XSdT ,oofJ =^"*i iS«B 

second turn. 


Turner cash flow 

Mike Turner, the secretarv- 
manager^ of LeicesreSSe 


■a win. because tne Pirates oi Leicestershire 

managed to Pickup just ggft C ™ket Club, received 
one point in 27 games. Their I f- f”?* 300 his testimonial 

3 loss at Streatham was their Turner, who Him 

21st defeat in succession, ^? ,ded . lhe side since 1%Q 
surpassing, the mark set by JJgSPJfjir most successful 
Southampton last season. bS?fe^ " The 

Peterborough's latest high the four wS 1 ^r,^ S t deqD8 xbat 
spot was their promotion last had oreai^^7 !Wl,a ^ matches 1 
season, but they look destined to oul” 0 ^ 3 ^^ werc washed 


i 


organizing committee said that 
sponsorship was well on the way 
to the £12.8 mfllion necessary 
for the Games to break even. 
Unfortunately the 1.000 seat 
reduction imposed on 
Meadowbank Stadium, under 
the safety measures proposed in 
the Popplewell Report, means 
nor only a Joss of XS&OOO 
revenue but embarrassment be- 
cause of the huge demand for 
tickets which will have to go 
unfolfilled. 

Winning team 

Miami (AJ 5 ?- Bob Woflek, of 
France, and Paoia Barilla, of 
Italy, won the Grand Prix of 
Miami, completing 128 laps on 
a 1 .87-mile street course in a 
Porsche 962 and finishing 
28.974sec ahead of Danny Suln- 
van and Drake Olson, of tbe 
United States. 


i? *■ 

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1$ 





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i‘HH TiMfcS TUESDAY MARCH 4 1986 


SPORT/LAW 


27 


SNOOKER 

Davis sees 

White 
as biggest 
threat 

By Sydney ftfckin 

„ Steve Da«s considers Jimmy 
"Bite to be bis mam rival far 
the world title which Doris is 
aiming to regain. White has 
beaten him twice this __ 

in the Mercantile Credit Cleric 
and the Benson and Hedges 
Masters tournament — and they 
conld meet again in the quarter- 
finals of the world champion- 
ship. starting in Sheffield on 
April 29. 

"This will be a tough game, & 

real warand whoever wins could 

take the world title." Daris said 
after defeating Willie Thorae 
12-7. in the Data* British Open 
final at Derby on Sunday. White 
is taking part in the Benson and 
Hedges Irish Masters tour- 
nament at Cods, Co. Kildare, 
from April 8 to 13. whereas 
Davis is not He will, however, 
be at Bournemouth to captain 
England in the World Team 
Championship from March 20 
to 23. 

Davis left London by an- 
yesterday rooming for a four of 
Muscat and Hong Kong along 
with three other members of the 
Romford Match room team — 
Dennis Taylor, Terry Griffiths 
and Tony Meo. The fifth mem- 
ber, Willie Thorne, stayed at 
borne because of business 
commitments. 

The four men will (day a few 
exhibition matches in Muscat, 
where the game is rapidly 
gaining popularity, gad go on to 
Hong Kong for more exhibition 
matches and a promotion 
paigH- 


RACING; AMBITIOUS PLAN FOR ELSWORTH’S CRACK NOVICE 


Law Report March 4 1986 


BASKETBALL 

Leicester’s 
delight 
and dread 

By Nicholas Harling 

A Wembley place later this 
month beckons for Walkers 
Crisps Leicester, a club which 
will go out of existence unless it 
finds itself a new sponsor for 
next season.. 

The curious state of affairs 
was confirmed at the weekend 
by the club's chairman, Chris 
Worcester, after Leicester had 
surprised the new first division 
champions. Sharp Manchester 
United, by winning the first leg 
of their quarter-final play-off 96- 
92. 

Walkers are not renewing 
their two-year £70.000 annual 
sponsorship, which had been 
preceded by two years' support 
from Planters, a subsidiary com- 
pany in the "Nabisco group. “If 
we don’t attract a new sponsor 
we won’t be in the National 
League next season. It's as 
simple as that," Worcester said. 

Sponsorship is needed to 
purchase and pay American 
players without whom Leicester 
would have no intention of 
carrying on, even though they 
have three England inter- 
nationals in their squad. “We 
won’t play with just an England 
team. Thai is not fair to the 
public, the players or anyone," 
Worcester explained. 

Leicester are one of many 
clubs envying the kind of 
sponsorship financing the two 
top dubs. United and Team 
Polycell Kingston, not to men- 
tion that recently renewed by 
HomeSpare for struggling 1 Bol- 
ton. 

“It's a relatively expensive 
sport to compete in. especially 
the first division, and obviously 
there is money about," Worces- 
ter said. “Bui we feel we should 
be attractive to sponsors who 
want to get in nationally." 

That is certainly true since 
Leicester, who reached ibe na- 
tional championship play-off 
finals at Wembley last year, are 
poised to do so again. Yet, since 
Ind Coope have just announced 
that they will not succeed Walk- 
ers as Leicester's sponsor, 
Worcester is left ruing the feci 
that a club whose nucleus ts 
based around local players, may 
follow Doncaster out of the 
league. 

Leicester go into tonight’s 
second leg against United at 
Stretford with the advantage, 
chiefly because United, them- 
selves comeback specialists, 
squandered a 1 3- point lead after 
five minutes of the second halt. 
Wiih the scores level at 9--9_ 
the champions might still have 
won had Gardner not missed 
two shots in Ihe Iasi half minute. 

Each time. Leicester grabbed 
the rebounds with first Vaughan 
and then James sinking the ntal 
baskets. Il was Uniteus first 
defeat in 21 domestic fixtures. 

Bir mingham Bullets were an- 
other team to waste a lead, in 
their case one of 52-42 at half- 
time against Portsmouth, who 
won 92*86 with Slaughter (33 
points! sinking two baskets m 
the final IP seconds. Colin 
Wood. Birmingham's assistant 
coach, has taken over on a 
temporary basis since Art Ross 
is recovering from bronchia 1 
pneumonia back home m Gear- 
watcr, Florida. Ross collapsed 
after last week’s game with 
Brand Ducks Uxbndge and 
Camden. 

Uxbridge found the power of 
Kingston 'too great and capitu- 
lated I02-S7 at home with 
8ontragcr (401 and Clark (3U 
maintaining their irrestible foim 
for the visitors, who stage me 
return leg on Thursday. 

The olher game that night » 
between Manchester Giants and 
Crystal Palace, who ^ won 
Saturday's first leg 91-84 with 
Ji-nmngs (331 excelling himse« 
again. 

CaMerdaJe. who have been 
promoted to the first division 

wwb Derbv. xiand on the thresh- 
old of a double. They bw| 
Brhum 1 1 5-*9 ip the semi-final 
of the National Trophy on 
Saturday and visit Plymouth in 
the final next Sunday ■ 



GLC can give grants 
lasting beyond 
its own abolition 


Desert Orchid shows the jumping prowess that has made him one of the season's leading novices 

Champion chance for Desert Orchid 


By Phfl McLennan 

David EJswonh may run his 
crack novice. Desert Orchid, 
in the Queen Mother Champi- 
on Chase at the Cheltenham 
Festival. The Whitsbury 
trainer's exciting grey is also in 
the Arkie Challenge Trophy, 
but at present Eisworth slight- 
ly favours taking on 
Badsworth Boy, Bobsline and 
Very Promising in the two- 
mile championship. 

“It depends on the number 
of runners but the Champion 
Chase often cuts, up,” 
Eisworth said. “He's not at his 
best on a left-hand trade, but 
there's nothing else for him at 
this time of the season." 

The stable's Gold Cup hope. 
Combs Ditch, will have been 
inconvenienced less than 
most by the freeze and his 
enforced seven-week lay-off 
could work in his favour. 
“He's at his best when fresh : 
and has won first time out for 
the last two seasons,”. 
Eisworth said. 

Robin Wonder, the 100-1 
runner-up in last year's Cham- . 
pi on Hurdle, may miss the 
blue riband event this time 
and go instead for either the 
Wiareford Crystal Stayers’ 
Conn 


Other stable probables include 
Fandango Light (Waterford 
Crystal Supreme Novices' 
Hurdle), The Footman (Tri- 
umph Hurdle) and Easter 
Festival, who would run in the 
Sun Alliance Hurdle if surviv- 
ing the ballot 

Josh Gifford, still chasing 


ping Cheltenham for the 
Grand National, You’re Wel- 
come will represent Gifford in 
the Gold Cup and other 
definite runners are Our Fun 
(Champion Chase). Captain 
Dawn (Grand Annual), Simon 
Legree (Mildmay ofFIete) and 
Greenwood Lad (Kira Muir). 


Restart unlikely before Friday 


Despite the promised thaw, 
racing In *t»i* country is unlikely 
to resume before Friday. 
Bangor's meeting scheduled for 
tomorrow kas been abandoned 
because of frost. This brings the 
total n ember of meetings lost 
this season to 110. Tomorrow's 
other meeting, at Catterick, is 
also in doubt. Stewards wifl 
inspect the track at 930 this 
morning. A coarse spokesman 
said: “Although a thaw is fore- 
cast, ft will bare to he a rapid one 
for ns to have a chance." 

There will be a 2.0 Inspection 
at Wmcanton tomorrow after- 
noon to see if Thursday's meet- 
ing can go ahead. The clerk of 


the coarse, Michael Meredith, 
said: “The course is frozen solid 
at the moment and it's long odds 
against racing.’’ 

Stratford, where Thursday’s 
other meeting is dee to talc* 
place, have called for a 12.0 
inspection tomorrow. Prospects 
there are also described as 
remote. 

Yesterday's meeting at 
Leopsundstowa was abandoned 
after an inspection because of 
frost but the card will be run 
today. The p burned meeting at 
Tipperary has been abandoned 
becaase Ihe coarse is 
frostboand. 


Hurdle or the County Hurdle. 


that elusive first Festival suc- 
cess as a trainer, will have a 
numerically strong hand with 
Jim Joel's highly-promising 
Midnight Count leading the 
Ftndon challenge in the Sun 
Alliance Hurdle. 

With Door Latch sidestep- 


Among Midnight Count's 
principal rivals in the Sun 
Alliance Hurdle will be Ibn 
Mqjed, who has looked one of 
the season's leading juveniles 
in winningat Urtoxeter. Don- 
caster and Ascot Chuck 
Spares's stayer has not run. 


since early January, but I 
should lack nothing in fitness ! 
after working on Yarmouth 
sands. 

Another Jess fashionable 
trainer with a realistic chance 
of success is Don Lee whose 
progressive chaser. Misty 
Spirit looks auractively- 
weighied on lOst 91b in the 
Ritz Club Chase. The winner 
of four races this season, 
including the Cheltenham 
event in which Dawn Run fell. 
Misty Spirit has not been idle 
during the cold spell as Lee 
has had sufficient quantities of | 
snow on top of the frozen 
ground to keep his stable star 
on the move. 

Other northern trainer 
mounting one-horse raids in- 
clude Donald McCain, who 
saddles Honeygrove Banker in 
the Supreme Novices' Hurdle, 
and Sally Hall, who runs her 
talented novice chaser. Cool 
Decision, in the Arkie Trophy. 

The Queen Mother's Insu- 
lar could be among 
Honeygrove Banker's oppo- 
nents, but if the weather 
relents in time. Ian Balding is 
more likely to send the versa- 
tile six-year-old to Sandown 
Park on Saturday for the 
Imperial Cup. 


Regina v Greater London 
Council, Ex parte Westmin- 
ster City Council and Others 
Before Mr Justice Macpherson 
[Judgment given March 3] 

Until il was abolished the 
Greater London Council re- 
tained its wide powers and there 
was nothing to prevent il from 
using its revenue for lawful 
purposes even if the expenditure 
would benefit the recipient for a 
period which ex [ended beyond 
the date of abolition. 

The choice of recipients of 
grams was a political function oi 
elected representatives. It was 
not the function of the court to 
review such decisions unless, in 
an extreme case. B 'ednesbury 
principles of reasonableness 
([I94S] l KB 223) could be 
invoked. 

Mr Justice Macpherson so 
held in the Queen's Bench 
Division dismissing an applica- 
tion by the Westminster City 
Council and seven other coun- 
cils in Greater London for 
judicial review of decisions of 
the GLC to provide for pay- 
ments to a number of voluntary 
and community organizations 
which would hot be funded 
under post -abolition arrange- 
ments. 

Mr Roger Henderson. QC. Mr 
Charles George and Mr Andrew 
Arden for the GLC: Mr Andrew 
Collins. QC and Mr Mark Lowe 
for the applicants. 

MR JUSTICE MAC- 
PHERSON said that there was 
no allegation, or ccnainly no 
sustainable argument, based 
upon l Vednesbury principles. 
Whatever might be the political 
views upon the decisions im- 
pugned in this case, there was no 
doubt that the overall financial 
effect of them had been most 
carefully scrutinized at every 
stage by those involved in the 
management of the GLCs 
financial affairs. 

h might well be that there 
were block grant consequences 
which could be identified as 
(lowing from those decisions. 
But Mr Collins realistically ac- 
cepted that there were no 
grounds upon which he could 
suggest that those implications 
could vitiate the decisions 
which were attacked in this case. 

In any event it was vital to 
remember that provided the 
payments or allocations made 
were legal and within the law 
that regulated the decision- 
making power, no decision 
cound be reviewed unless, in 
Lord Di plock.'s often quoted 
words in Council of Civil Service 
Unions r .Minister for the Civil 
Senice ([1985] AC 374. 410). it 
was tainted by procedural im- 
propriety. or was “so outrageous 
in us defiance of logic or of 
accepted moral standards that 
no sensible person who had 
applied his mind to the question 
to be 


decided could have arrived 
at it". 

Correctly in this case no 

O’Neill to test Dawn Run in racecourse school I 


From Oor Irish Raring Correspondent, Dublin 


one 

O’NeiD win be the partner of 
Dawn Ron in the Gold Cup, but 
according to Faddy Mullins, her 
trainer, the Cheltenham book- 
ing will only be confirmed after 
be bas ridden her in a school in 
Ireland this week. 

There is just a possibility that 
this gallop will be held after 
racing at Leopardstown. this 
afternoon, but Mullins said' 
yesterday: "I would only bring 
her up to Dublin if there was 
substantial rain overnight. The 
reported going at the moment is 
good to firm and 1 would not 
like to risk her on that surface so 
near to the big race”. ' . 

If there is no break in the 
weather overnight it is Mullins* 
intention to seek the permission 
of the Leopardstown executives 
to bring her there later in the 
week. 

Those who discard Dawn 
Run as a potential Gold Cup 
winner on the score that she is 
"just a four race novice” are 
flying in the face of an historical 


precedent. Thirty four years ago 
another novice belonging to a 
distinguished lady owner. Doro- 
thy Paget’s Mont Tremblant, 
came to the Gold Cup with 
precisely the same amount of 
experience. He, too, had been 
beaten in one of his four 
previous races over fences but 
notwithstanding this limitation, 
he was still good enough to win 
handsomely. 

Greasepaint, who managed a 
. last-gasp qualifying win for this 
year's. Grand National, re- 
appears at Leopardstown this 
afternoon — where yesterday’s 
card has been carried over to 
today — in the Foxrock Cup, a 
two and a half mile handicap 
chase. 

■ With Dermot Weld planning 
to have Greasepaint at his peak 
in a month's time, he is likely to 
be short of a gallop and the same 
remark may apply to the top 
weight and fellow Aintree hope- 
ful, Kilkilowen. 

In this . event a year ago 
Larry's Latest and Dudie were 


placed behind Bobsline and at 
the revised weights Dudie is 
now l lib better off with Lany's 
Latest for a beating of eight 
lengths. At Gowran Park in the 
middle of February, DUDIE 
stayed on well to finish fourth to 
Another Brownie and could 
turn up here at a nice price. 

As a starter to an afternoon 
when he is strongly represented 
through the programme Mullins 
and his son. Tony, could win the 
Cabinteely Five-Year-Old 
Maiden Hurdle with NOIR 
SHOON, whom is competing 
overjumps for the first time, but 
who has some useful Flat race 
form. 

The stewards at the last 
meeting here held a protracted 
enquiry into the riding of Willie 
Mullins on KJSSANE. This 
well-backed runner had come 
from an impossible position to 
finish third to Larchmont and 
Mullins in his defence offered 
the explanation that he had been 
told to ride the horse in a very 


different manner than pre- 
viously. holding him up fo 
late effort. The stewards 
“noted" die excuse and if | 
Mullins can lime his effort a bit 
better he could touch off The 
West Awake in the Rockbrook 
Amateur Riders' Maiden Flat 
Race. 

Several of today’s probables 
hold Cheltenham engagements, 
including Galmoy and Banker's 
Benefit, who head the weights in 
the Firmount Handicap Hurdle. 
BANKER'S BENEFIT has 
proved a prolific race winner for 
John Fowler and over this 
distance could prove too good 
for Galmoy at a difference of: 
71b. 

Galmoy's siablemate. 
DROMOLAND'S LAD, has 
been given lOst 11b in the 
County Hurdle and if that is a 
realistic assessment he could 
step up on his effort of 12 
months ago when he lost the 
Hillcrest Hurdle by a short head 
to the odds-on favourite. Hearns 
Hotel. 


matter was left open but there 
was no material upon which the 
suggestion could succeed. 

iis Lordship referred to the 
care and clarity of the reports 
made by the GLC officials 
which prepared the ground for 
the decisions. Where such de- 
railed material and full informa- 
tion was laid before a committee 
or the council it was difficult to 
suggest that anything had been 
left unconsidered or had been 
considered when it should not 
have been. 

In each case the question was 
one for the committee or coun- 
cil, and the court would never 
substitute its own view for that 
of the decision making body. 


Seduction to such an exercise 
might often be attempted. But 
the coun had to be deaf to siren 
voices aimed to achieve that 
end. Far too many cases came in 
these days which sought to 
circumnavigate the form and 
substance or Lord Diplock's 
speech or the many other firm 
repetitions of those principles. 

The present applications were 
made in the context of the two 
Acts [the Local Government 
(Interim Provisions) Act 1984 
and the Local Government Act 
1985] which deah with the 
abolition of the metropolitan 
county councils and or the 
Greater London Council. 

As Mr Collins said, it had 
always to be remembered that 
on April I. 1986 the GLCs 
functions would cease ab- 
solutely. The GLC was then 
abolished. 

The court had to be alert to 
the detailed provisions of both 
Acts, and never allow the GLC 
to perpetuate itself in ghostly 
form or in any way 10 ensure its 
continued existence by some 
illegal device. 

Furthermore. Mr Collins said 
that the GLC had no power to 
make a will, and in so far as it 
had moneys available at aboli- 
tion. the intention of Parliament 
was i hat the district councils 
should inherit those funds. 

In that context phrases of that 
kind could be dangerous since 
while it was true that the GLC 
must not try to live on. or to 
make a will as such, there was no 
restriction placed upon it before 
it died to prevent it using its 
budgeued revenue so long as the 
use to which the moneys were 
put were lawful. 

While the GLC might not 
make its own will, it could, if it 
did so legally, spend its money 
to defeat its statutory will and 
thus disappoint its successors, 
provided Ihe expenditure was 
lawful. 

Nowhere in cither of the two 
relevant Acts was there anything 
to defeat the GLCs extant 
powers, save for those specific 
clauses which did control spe- 
cific aspects of its activities. 

That was. of course, a prime 
point in Mr Henderson's argu- 
ment. and it was a true and 
powerful point. If Parliament 
had intended to provide ex- 
pressly for the passtng-on of 
budget surplus moneys it could 
have done so. It did not Thus 
the GLCs powers remained. 

Two points of construction 
had been raised. Fireu section II 
of the 1984 “paving Act" im- 
posed a duty upon the GLC to 
consult its constituent councils. 

Subsections (2) and (3Ha) 
taken together could have oaly 
one proper construction. Sub- 
section (3Ha) required the GLC 
to “comply with the duty im- 
posed by subsection |2l" at a 
clearly defined lime, namely 
before it determined its total 
estimated expenditure for the 
financial year beginning on 
April 1. 1985. 

“The duly“ was set out in 
subsection (2). It covered two 
matters, since it referred ex- 
pressly to expenditure and 
financing within the relevant 
financial year and any other 
proposal that would involve 
expenditure in a subsequent 
financial year. 

But on analysis there was only 
one duty, namely a single duty 
to consult as to those two 
matters and at that time. His 
Lordship could not accept Mr 
Collin's argument that section II 
gave any extended right to 
consultation. 

Turning to section 97 of the 
Local Government Act 1985. 
lhat provided for the GLC to be 
obliged to cooperate with both 


the London borough councils 
and any other authority to 
which the GLCs functions were 
to be transferred. 

Much of the argument fo- 
cussed upon the GLC s proposal 
to fund the new ILIEA which 
would in due course perform the 
relevant inner London educa- 
tion functions. 

In his Lordship's judgment 
“cooperation" and “facilitate 
the implementation" were wide 
expressions contemplating pay- 
ments to be made of a much 
wider kind, provided always 
tliar (hose who decided to make 
such payments carefully consid- 
ered in derail whether or not 
they fitted ihe statutoiy mould 
or did indeed "facilitate the 
implementation" of the Act 
rather than simply try to take 
over in advance the new ILEA's 
funding. 

Provided a balanced decision 
was made upon that matter that 
decision could not be upset 
except upon M ednesbury prin- 
ciples. 

Turning to the decisions, in 
order to succeed in his argu- 
ments Mr Collins had to distin- 
guish Manchester Ctiy Council y 
Greater Manchester Metropoli- 
tan Count v Council ([1980] 78 
LGR7U. ' 

In h is Lordship's judgmem it 
could not be said that what was 
termed •■forward-funding" 
achieved by payments made 
now in order ib ensure the 
transition of specific recipients 
into the new era were illegal in 
form or in substance. 

If payment now ensured the 
life and viability of an organiza- 
tion for the coming months or 
even beyond such a period there 
was no illegality, provided each 
case was considered on its 
merits. 

The abolition in the present 
case could not be distinguished 
from the change of control in the 
Manchester case. 

Public reaction to the pro- 
posals had singled out individ- 
ual proposals for criticism and 
adverse comment But it was 
right to stress that it was no 
possible pan of the court's duty 
or power to look at such aspects 
of the proposals. 

In some cases the choices of 
recipients of grams had political 
or social overtones which might 
please some or dismay others. 
These were solely matters for 
political or GLC decision by 
elected representatives. 

Provided the payments were 
justified in accordance with the 
principles carefully spelled out 
by the GLC officials they could 
not be impugned at law. unless 
perhaps in some most extreme 
case il might be said lhat the 
H 'ednesbury principle could be 
invoked. Such was not the case 
here. 

In his Lordship's judgment 
(here was no basis for saying in 
fact or at law that there was a 
reasonable basis of consultation 
such as to help the applicants in 
their case. There was foil statu- 
tory consultation before April 1. 
1985. 

But since Parliament did not 

e rovide for later consultation 
ui did expressly provide for 
“cooperation” and access to 
information the court should be 
guarded in imposing by in- 
ference or implication a duty 
which Parliament did not pre- 
scribe. If the applicants were 
right it would be difficult to 
know where (o draw the fine. 

There was no “legitimate 
expectation" in this case. 

Solicitors: Mr R. A. Lanham: 
MrG. Matthew Ives. 


Police need not disclose 
observation post 
secrets in court 


LEOPARDSTOWN 


Going: good to firm 

2.30 CABINTEELY 5-Y-O MAIDEN HURDLE (£1035: 2m) (16 
runners) 

PMeComataO) 

P P Kmane (7) 

J Shorn 

T Kmane 

. A MuUms 


6 

7 

8 
9 

10 

11 

12 

13 


004 DUOTEPMtHtfisB 102 

204 SHAMPOO A Moor® 9 10 2 - 

P-0 MOTOR ON M Brew 8 9 11 


, RO Donovan 
T J Taa«e 


214 WINNING NORA M Houngan 7 9 8 
IPf NATURE TRAIL B P O Sum 


Mr O T Conroy (71 

RFO Brian 

itvan to 9 7 H Rogers 


1 

2 

3 

4 

5 

6 

7 

8 
9 

10 

11 

12 

13 

14 

15 

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400 80L0W0PD McCreary 11 12 

003 RNESLAVETW Nicholson It 12 — 

000 FOURTRtX J R Cow 11 12 

10 FRIENDLY SAINT C Kmane 11 12 — 

014 NOW SHOON P Muttra 11 12 

000 POWER LOONN Meade 11 12 . — ... 
000 TUBBERBUN4NY DMcDonoflft 11 12 
000 AMBER JACK Mrs POuggan 11 4 — 
0 DIAMOND SEA Ms J Morgan 11 4 — 
003 GOLDEN WINGS Ruby Walsh 11 4 
000 WLLCA5TLE D Day 11 4 — 


P03 RANDOM SELECT W Rock 8 9 7 KB Watsn i7) 

Z4F THAT'S SHOW BIZ J R Co* 8 9 7 .. — J P Bvme 

0P1 THE BAR RULES M Cunnmgnam 9 9 7 P Leecn 

5-2 Kilkilowen. 7-2 Dark Ivy. 5-1 Greasepwn. 6-1 SnannxL 8-1 Wirmmg Nora. 10-1 The 
Bar Rides. 12-1 Chow Meet. Larry s latest 14-1 others. 


*30 FIRMOUNT HANDICAP HURDLE (£1,242: 2m 6f) (17) 


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3 

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10 

11 

12 

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000 ROYAL RECORD 0 T Hugnes 11 4 -T Morgan 

OOP STtttClLROYALEJMacaiitey 114 P J Gttesotfi (7) 

04 THINKING CAP A MoOrfl 11 4 T JTaafte 

00 RATHLWE T O'Neal 11 1 T O Nett (3) 

5-2 Fourth*. 3-1 NoffShOOfl. 9-2 Friend* Saw. M flanking Cap. 8-1 Fine Slave, 10-1 
Bottmo. Gaiflen Wings. 14-1 others. 

Leopardstown selections 

-» 30 Noir Shoon. 3.0 Larry's Bottle. 3.30 Dromoland Lad. 4.0 
Dudie. 4.30 Banker's Benefit. 5.0 Dawn Even. 5.30 Kissane. 

3 jq HARCOURT NOVICE CHASE (£1 ,31 1: 2m) (15) 

712 BON CHEVAL Ruby Wa&n 0 12 0 -I. 

000 CARWCXAV0LET J R Qok6120 — 

COOL GAMBLER J F0W*0f 6 12-0 — 

g&WJfciaoW 

MO INDIAN SHOT M Houngan 6 120- — K uSJ*E, 

% tSSSS^S^fSSt’r’aT — mFp»SR 

£5 S wwroS J p Hms 120 TGMSjojj 

0PP POLL TOPPS*BJCo«wjM20. R0I *T™£ 

am UNCLE SCOBtE John CrtwHey 8 12 0_— ^ 

■ WEST WICKLOW F Oakes 9 120 Cp Dwyer 

WHATE'rtRWilJ. BE P 8120 AM pM 

4113 WILD ARGOSY C J POwer J12 0 — p Gfl 

33U PRINCESS RAPWffEL W T Boirte 7 1 1 11 - — 

a^Ranrinmal 3-1 Wny s Borne. 5-1 Wee. 6-1 Wjjd Argos y 8-H nflanSnOL 

12-1 Ommiwi Bcnonxm. Whatever w« 8e. is-i others. 

3J0 HILLCREST HURDLE (£1.173'. Sra 2f) (10) 

« 7 170 - 785 

£5 D&JSSnD LMJE !■» 7 120 .. ■■ TCmjl 

1 a-4£S 

5? tSqRSEaSONIR wmVi o n . - . T McQ"Wr 

HANSARD 11 FSerr 

, ."ita-Wd urn 41 Another Sunset. 11-2 Kara. 6-1 TuOor Season. 8-1 Otfycnxr. 

4.0 FOXROCK CUP EXTENDED HANDICAP CHASE (£2.070: 2m 

, 232 iCILKAOWEN J 10120 .. K Morgan 

, 3PI GREASEPAINT D.'KIMld It 114 TCamody 

\ dark wy Fan to to to - jSnoni 

j tup LARRY’S LATEST Mas A Cohen 9 _ MCumtrans 

5 IBP CHOW MfiW 07 fcujpn Bid*' . ... T Morgan 


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12 

13 

14 

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102 QALMOV J E MJtiam 7 11 9 

102 BANKERS BENEFIT J Fowler 6112. 


000 THE CHANCEV I 


243 ALKEPA J P Cavanagh 6 10 11 

TEV MAlfT Caroerry I 
011 STRUT'S BROTHER O H Ctvoe 8 1 


1 8 10 7 . 

110 3 

004 CATSROCK FMO Bnen 7 9 12 
403 COOOtE HILL Jofm Craxdav 7 911 
214 SAILING BIRO F M O Bnen 8 9 8 - — 

000 AUU) JAKE R J Cotter 69 7 

400 BRACKA PIGEON L Woods 597 — 

240 LITTLE CHIRPINGS A Murpny 79 7 
33U PRINCESS RAPIMZEL W T Bourxe i 

414 REGULAR TIME S A Krt 59 7 . 

004 REVEREND RASHERS Mrs P Duggan 99 7 
an 109 7 


(797 


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. . Maria Cuhen i3i 

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023 StLVERBULLETJGeogheganl09 7 DPFagan<3> 

030 SOMERSET ROSE D McSrawey 7 97 

01/3 THETOTM P A McCansn 99 7 

11-4 Bankers Bene«. 4-1 Galmoy. 5-1 Si An s Bromer, 7-1 Aikepa. 8-1 Regjar Time. 
Coaaie MU. io-i Sattng Biro. l4-i oners. 

5.0 KILGOBBIN OPPORTUNITY USD HANDICAP CHASE (£1,311: 
3m) (11) 


1 

2 

3 

4 

5 

6 

7 

8 
9 

10 

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1U4 HOWAfTT HIGHWAY A MeLoughfcn 10114 K BWalsh(4t 

F41 EAOESTOWN 0 Day 7113 — J W Cu»en 

200 AMBER WINE I R Ferguson 9 11 2 

003 FINANCIAL CRISIS M Curmmyam 7 it 0 - N Bvme 

.323 DAWN EVEN M Gieeson ? lOll — .PFODcmell 

OOF ANOTHER HONOUR P E McCreery 7. 10 3.. P McCormack 

FD4 QUEEN'S SERVANT P Rooney 710 7 • 

0 PAPADRIM J R CO* 9 10 I .... .. .. .. G McGivern 

002 QlXANCKtnq 109 12 . . RAFahey|7| 

H/2 IMY MEJU&ANE TO Nett 6 9 12 T0Nfl« 

303 BURMAH ROAD A McLougmm 109 B . J C Barter (4) 


5-2 Dawn Evan. 4-1 Lady Meartar*. 9-2 Howart Hignway, 6-1 EadeStOem. 7-1 ti*an. 10- 
1 Financial Crisis. 12-1 otneis. 

5.30 ROCKBROOK FLAT RACE (Coils and geldings: £966: 2m) 
( 15 ) 


1 0 BALLY8MCKEN BOY R Coonan 5 11 1? 

2 BLACKLAKE BEAUTY D T rtuqne* 5 n 12 

3 0 DAMIENS FELLOW E J Keams 5 1 1 12 

4 000 HAMILTON JAMES P Muflms 5 It 12 » . 

5 403 KISSANE P MurthS 5 ft 12 . . 

8 33 NEW GOLD DREAM W Rm\ 5 >1 12 . 

7 0 ROBILAR (Bi R J WIxTtord 5 11 12 

S 004 SHARP JEWEL W Patterns H 12- - . 

9 000 SlMSlR HILL P Rooney 5 1112. . .. 

10 4 SLyGUFFT5ijrgm5in2. 

11 082 THE WEST AWAKE A Moore 5 It 12 

12 0 CRASH FORT B Maione 4 II 4 

13 0 DROWSY Hiibv vwsn 4 it 4 

14 GENERALS BOY ? FIOOC 4 11 4 . 

15 MON LEA D Murphy 4 114 . — 

9-4 Kissane a l The WtSI Awaks. 9 2 DTO*sy 6-1 Ne» Goa Dream. 8-1 Shgutt. KM 
Sharp Jewel 14-1 total S 


Mr A J Mamn 
Mr j R Bananan (7l 
.. Mr D M 0 Sr«n (31 
. Mr T ivtam i3i 

Mr WP Muttrifr 

Mr M McNuiiviSi 
M r R J WnittorO l?l 
Mr D H O Connor |3l 
Ur PJ Rooney 1 7) 
Mr T j Beggan 

.. . -Mr j P Dempsey (3i 
MilM Wd'tn 
Mr J A Bany 


Reel 

Before Lord Lane. Lord Chief 
Justice. Mr Justice Mann and 
Sir Roger Ormrod 
[Judgment given March J] 

The long-established rule that 
police or other investigating ' 
officers could not be required to 
disclose the sources of their 
information applied to protect 
the identity of a person who had 
allowed his premises to be used 
for surveillance, and ihe loca- 
tion of those premises. 

The Court of Appeal so held 
when dismissing the appeal of 
EUiston RanJone against his 
conviction on July IO. 1985 at 
Inner London Crown Court 
( J udge Crowthcr. QC and a jury) 
of unlawful supply of a con- 
trolled drug, contrary to section 
4{3)(3) of the Misuse of Drugs 
Act 1971, for which he was 
sentenced to 18 months' 
imprisonment 

Mr Roger Offenbach, as- 
signed by the Registrar of Crim- 
inal Appeals, for ihe appellant; 
Mr Paul Purnell. QC and Mr 
Hugh Torrance for the Crown. 

MR JUSTICE MANN, giving 
the judgment of the court, said 
that the prosecution case was 
that on March 14, 1485. on 10 
occasions m an hour the appel- 
lant was seen selling cannabis 
outside a shop in Raihon Road. 
Brixton. 

The case was based on the 
observations and identification 
of two police officers who were 
in an observation post watching 
the shop and who had passed to 
other officers a radio message of 
what they had seen. 

The appellant was arrested 
and 107 grammes of cannabis 
and £274 in cash were found 
upon him. 

Ai the beginning of Ihe trial 
and in the absence of the jury, 
counsel for the prosecution 
applied for a ruling that the 
officers who conducted the 
surveillance operation should 
not be asked lo identify the 
location of the observation post. 

The reason for the application 
was given as being the public 
inieresl in that an observation 
post lost its ultliiy when its 
location was known, and in that 


the persons who provided the 
post would or could be placed in 
jeopardy from persons who 
disapproved of cooperation 
with the police. 

After argument the applica- 
’ tion was granted on the basis 
lhat any questions might be 
asked, but the officers would not 
be compelled to answer any 
questions to which they ob- 
jected on the ground that il 
would embarrass their sources 
of cooperation. 

In the event some questions 
about the observation were both 
asked and answered, but the 
location of the observation post 
remained unknown to the jury. 

For the appellant a single 
ground of appeal was raised: 
whether the mal judge was 
wrong in law in permitting the 
prosecution not to disclose the 
observation point from where 
the identification was made. 

That raised a point of general 
importance. Their Lordships 
were told that surveillance was a 
vital form of criminal intelli- 
gence and that much of it was 
carried out from static positions 
in business premises or private 
houses. 

Such positions could not be 
occupied without the coopera- 
tion of members of the public. 
Their Lordships readily under- 
stood that members of the 
public would be unwilling to 
cooperate if the identity of iheir 
premises was disclosable in 
court. 

For many years it had been 
well recognised that the detec- 
tion of crime was assisted by the 
use of information given to the 
police by members of the public. 

Those members might be 
either professional informers 
who gave information regularly 
in the expectation of financial or 
olher reward, or public spirited 
citizens who wished to see the 
guilty punished for their of- 
fences. 

It was in the public interest 
that nothing should be done 
which was likely to discourage 
persons of either class from 
coming forward. One thing 
which above all others would be 
likely to prevent personscoming 


forward with information would 
be the knowledge that their 
identity might be disclosed in 
court. 

Accordingly, for many years it 
had been the rule that police or 
olher investigating officers 
could not be required io disclose 
the sources of their information: 
see trrnmev-Gencral r Brianl 
((1846) 15 M & w 164 1 -. Marks v 
Stylus ((1890) 25 QBD 494): R v 
Hcnncssy (Timothy) (11979) 68 
Cr App R 419). 

It was to be observed that the 
rule was a rule of exclusion 
subject to a discretion to admit 
in order to avoid a miscarriage 
of justice. Thus even if the 
prosecution did not invoke the 
rule the judge was none the less 
obliged to apply it. 

The question was whether the 
rule protected the identity os a 
person who had allowed his 
premises to be used for surveil- 
lance and the identity of the 
premises themselves. 

In their Lordships' judgmem 
the reasons which gave rise to 
the rule lhat an informer was 
not to be identified applied with 
equal force to the identification 
of the owner or occupier of 
premises used for surveillance 
and to the identification of the 
premises themselves. The cases 
were indistinguishable and the 
same rule had to apply to each. 

That being so the only ques- 
tion was whether the mal judge 
was correct in not exercising the 
discretion exceptionally to ad- 
mit such evidence in order to 
avoid a miscarriage of justice. 

For the appellant it was 
accepted that if the rule in 
regard to informers applied, the 
exercise of the discretion culd 
not be criticised. Their Lord- 
ships agreed. 

Solicitors: Solicitor. Metro- 
politan Police. 

Correction 

In Gordon and .-ti-v/fa* i- 
Si'it\.i 1 C ■ * LiJ and -t i; t >incr ( The 
Times February 2M. the solic- 
itors for the plaint ills were 
Sebastian Coleman JL Co. and 
not Gcoflret L curie £ Co. The 
second plaintiff was Mrs Anya 
Teixcira. 




28 


THE TIMES TUESDAY MARCH 4 1986 



APPOINTMENTS 


Executive Search and Selection Consultants 

M MfWUM. CAKDtfF. GLASGOW UEOS. tOVDOH. WyCHCSTEK- W»X«lie.aWWKU»J«H*WOSO» 

Commercial Lawyer 

North East, £25,000, Profit Sharing, Car 

This new position with a very substantial international 
group, created to support the contractual needs of 
several rapidly expanding, technically based 
businesses. Prime responsibility' is to ensure 
technology and commercial protection related to a 
series of major commercial projects in both the UK and 
overseas. You will be influential in the drafting of 
detailed technical and commercial agreements and 
extensively involved in contract negotiations. 

The preferred candidate will be aged 32 to 40 and have 
obtained a first degree in a scientific discipline prior to 
obtaining legal qualifications. Widely experienced in 
international contract drafting and negotiation, the 
individual will possess the presence and personality to 
represent professionally a major organisation in 
negotiations at senior executive level and will ideally 
have a working knowledge of patent law. 

Male or female candidates should submit in confidence 
a comprehensive e.v. or telephone for a personal 
historv form to A.D. Kellv. Hoggett Bowers pic, 

4 Mosley Street. NEWCASTLE UPONTYNE. .VE1 IDE. 
0632 327455, quoting Ref. 4427 7 iT. 



COMPANY 1 

COMMERCIAL 

£15 -£20,000 + benefits 

Fast-growing public company with retail and property development 
operanons m the UK. Belgium and the Netherlands requires a young solicitor 
or banister, 26-30 years, tor a senior position in the legal department at their 
Head Office in central London. The work will include corporate law, 
company secretarial work, commercial contracts and general advice to senior 
management. Experience in public company work an advantage. 
f V»o> whi jvt -ymal rkaufa to Chambers a Partners. 74Longhxrv, London ECI 
or telephone us on 01-606 9571- 

CHAMBERS & PARTNERS 

PROFESSIONAL RECRUITMENT 


Company 

Secretary 

c. £40,000+ Car 

Thi« rapidly growim; UK public 
company with revenues of £5* in million 
generated through worldwide .icavitiis is 
acknoxvkxlgcd as a leader hi the provision of 
specialised services to govemnwuts and the 
public and private sectors. 

The cnuipjny now seek.- an experienced 
Company Secretary, preferably wicn a legal 
fcvick ground. who will be based in London 
and report to the Chief Executive Officer as 
part ot a lean Head Office ream. The 
MK.xvss(iil candidate will be supponed by an 
Assistant jnd in addirion to statutory duties 
will manage the full spectrum of secretarial 
rvsponsibilmes. The Company Secretary 
wiD be required to handle special projects 
assigned by che Chief Executive Officer 
from time to time and could play a role in 
management development. 

Aged 35 to 45. the preferred candidate 
will be j graduate soheitor. barrister or 
chartered accountant with a minimum of 
5 wars’ experience in the secretarial function 
of a sizeable public company. Professional 
competence will be supplemented by good - 
communications skills, energy and 
enthusiasm. 

Please* replv with fiifl curriculum sitae 
and salary details tee 

St James's Corporaic Consjlnng. 

Box TT-'"ih5. St James’s House. 

4,7 Red Lion Court. Hen Street, 

London EC4A3EB. 


LITIGATION/COMMERCIAL 

Cull in- & To. a -uhsianiLil practice in ihe 
Slnu^h 'Maiilf-nhead Hieh Wycombe area with a 
standard eomm+tiul work normally associated 
with City firms, ls hih> again seeking to expand its 
Litigation .<nd Commercial Departroeni. 

Sulicilors ;it»plying In either Department fur the 
np|M lint moot s currenilv available will need to be 
vnm]ieient and confident, with minds sufficiently 
agile m deal with the c>n«iderahle variety nf work, 
much of it demanding and urgent. In this respect, 
ability to learn ie as mipnrum as experience. 

One the Li(igali<m f«*-i« will involve some matri- 
mnnial work tor estalilL-hed clients ul the practice. 

These .ij'l»tini merits offer ■■pp.-nunnies of tremen- 
dous job saii-laciion and a substantial remuneration 
IKickape. ineluding help with brnsing il needed. 
Initially, plejse contact David -Inne* iLiugaiinni or 
David Stunning tComnierriah on 06286 62644 nr 
write r »• t'dlins Hoa c e. fiS-72. High Street. 
Burnham. Bucks SI. I 7LE. 


shepway 
DISTRICT 
COUNCIL 
SECRETARY AND 
SOLICITORS 
DEPARTMENT 
ASSISTANT 
SOLICITOR 
SALARY: GRADE P04 
t 11168 - £13.508) 

IWllMlimr. .nr mi tl-tl |nr 
llw ,i»ai> ikM »l«fli Im- h* 
|»||IIC hrrn iimIM W .»***-4 
I nr li-u.il Ml lien an mut hIiipi.I 
u»1r Tjnm- m I. -n.il mImii- In 
nllp-r iIi-(mi>iih-iiN Inil wilt, 
p.u- 1 irnUn ,1 riii'll, ■* lo hoON 
uni ami .'in noimn-iiHI hr aim 
in.ai.-l-. lli.-'im.'Sl* aM* 
rani Mill hr <sd.-,i.i| 10 Ural 
mill *nli IiIkmIi-'h .r- air--c 
ill Hu- ■ riiili-il .MCI |n annul al 
I Jintnnli.-r Mrrnnw- -**• 
rmuirni 

\|<plira|ion lomu ■■.in hr «*» 
l.iilirri lion, IIK- Pr»*<miirl 
IJIliin. r,i ir «/«llr l.ialr 
Hill .\\rniir fftlkrclour. 
■OJ05. 575*8 txl ?10 in hr 
ni> in mu hi I hr ZJIh Xlarrti 
l«an 


Litigation 

Solicitor 

We ore o small. rapidly developing Ctty- 
based company handling insurance 
doims. manly in Professional Indemnity, 
on behalf of Lloyd’s Underwriters ond 
Insurance Companies. 

We are seeking o young, energeric 
Soliaror. with one to three yeots' posr 
admission linaonon experience, 
preferably m Professional Indemnity, to 
join o small ond dynamic managemenr 
ream. 

This is a challenging opponunny to 
pomapare m an exdnna commercial 
enrerpnse in a fosdnaring and highly 
professional marketplace. The role offers 
immediate daims handling responsibility 
and diem contact. 

The successful candidate will hove 
personal 1 ry. emhusiosm. rhecapodryfor 
hard work ond above oil will be highly . 
capable professionally. 

5alory will be negorioble according to 
oge and experience. There is in addition 
a generous benefits pochoge. 

Apply with dented C V. to Philip Thomas, 
Oayden Claims Services lid.. 

21 Wtdegate Street. London El 7 HP, 
refephoneOI-377 1166. 


COMPUTER APPOINTMENTS 


Analysts and Programmers 

HELP US TO TURN METAL 



INTO PAPER 



You win expand your mind, 
your experience, your income 
and your lifestyle with Mdim. 
We are now consolidating our 
DP activities at our 
Management Services 
Department in Sannderton. 

The opportunity to learn or 
increase yonr knowledge of 
systems in a manufacturing 
environment and the security 
that only a world market 
leader can provide. 

Location, salaries, benefits and 
working conditions are all 
excellent. Interested? Read more. 

World leader, 
leading exporter. 

Molina is an international 
precision engineering company 
and one of the world's leading 
manufacturers of tobacco 
machinery- We are a major UK 
exporter, with over 75*5: of our 
output going overseas. 

Long commitment, 
latest equipment. 

At Molins, you will work in a 
sympathetic environment with 
people who know what they're 
about- Since the early sixties, we 
have been up front developing 

computer technology for 

manufacturing applications. 

Today, our equipment is an 
interesting mix of IBM and 
Digital. In addition to our 
Peterborough based IBM 4341 
engaged in supporting our spares 
activities. Saunderton has an 
IBM 4381 and 4341. utilising 
custom written programmes and 
standard packages such as 


Unipay, Unipersonnel, 
Informatics and of key 
importance - AMAPS. 

The two PDP 11/7 0s run other 
custom written systems covering 
purchasing and documentation 
for manufacturing, thus 
completing our overall business 
systems. Both the IBM and 
Digital machines make extensive 
useofaCodasyl Database, ©MS 
and DBMS-11. 

Where you come in. 

Manufacturing applications 
provide some of the most 
absorbing systems work you can 
find. If you have already worked 
in a manufacturing environment 
you will know what we mean, and 
you can rapidly broaden your 
experience and value at Molins. 
We are reeking individuals with 
well developed analytical skills 
and particular experience of 
packages such as Unipay, 

Uni personnel. Informatics and 
AMAPS. 

The continued development of 
the Management Services 
Function is a key objective of our 
business and is fundamental to 
our progress. 

Where we are. 

We are located in the 
Buckinghamshire Chil terns, in a 
modern plant set in beautiful 
country close to the M40 and the 
Thames Valley. Varied housing at 
all prices is available, as are 
excellent educational facilities 
including grammar schools. 


Salaries and 
Benefits. 

Salaries range from £10,000- 
£17,000. Benefits include 
contributory pension, free life 
assurance, BUPA, assisted travel 
and subsidised meals. Generous 
relocation expenses will be paid 
where applicable. 

Your best move. 

If you have relevant Systems 
Analyst or Programmer skills 
and experience, a move to Molins 
can secure a satisfying present 
and an expanding future. 

Ring Pat Mitchell, Senior 
Personnel Officer on Princes 
Risborough 3211. 

Or write or post coupon to 
the above at Molins Tobacco 
Machinery, Haw Lane. 
Saunderton, High Wycombe, 
Bucks. HP14 4JE. 


r» 


Please send for an Application 
Form and Company Brochure. 
I am interested in the Analyst/ 
Programmer vacancies 
i underline as appropriate). 


Name. 


Address. 


Tel. No 


MOLINS 


SLAUGHTER AND MAY 
are looking for 
YOUNG LAWYERS 

Slaughter and May invite applications from young solicitors who want a career 
with a major City firm, working in the Company/Commercial Department. 

The firm’s practice, in the U-K. and overseas, continues to expand and offers a vride 
r ang e of financial and commercial work which is both challenging and intellect- 
ually stimulating; it often involves considerable responsibility and young lawyers 
are encouraged to accept this challenge. 

If you have some experience (not necessarily extensive), and want to join a first 
clas s team working in a friendly atmosphere* based in London or one of the over-, 
seas offices, then you should apply. . 

Salary and benefits are attractive «~nd the working conditions are good. Write now, 
with a detailed curriculum vitae, to: — 

. Peter Morley-Jacob, 

. Slaughter and May, 

35 Basinghall Street, London EC2V 5DB. 


Conveyancing 

n i- 

r« uwr 

Wc art for i young pro- 
growxc tneduira sized CUy 
practice who s*c4 a for- 
ward lookin'). vigorous 
sokHor lo steer pirtr com- 
mercial conveyancing 
deoartmenl No supervi- 
sion. Partnership status 
imminent. Salary c. 
C2S.OOO plus benefits. 

Company 

Commercial Partner 

u> are instructed by a dy- 
namic medium sized CUy 
practice to introduce a 
skilled and experienced 
rompnay commercial so- 
licitor capable of heading 
an cnerpede department. 
Salary in excess of 
£24.000 


Soil swaalats lo the ffB 

tetRlpnteJioniioittmde 
35 UUmtcli. London WC2B 4JF. 
Id. 01-2*21261 


LONDON 
Corporate Tax 

WMl rmprrtnf medium urea 
Cilv di«ik« imuim ann- 
um newly UHIIIM up lo a 
vnars poU oualillcauon. 
A T 1 1 prrtirryd. Salary r. 
08.000 

Company 

Commercial 

lard prixMr jad BUM*- 

company wort. wttMo 

nv-fliion large. Crty prartKi* 

Hk-a lor sowrnor a years pod 
o ujln imi ion umaniir all- 
Cl' and arltmU- pros pertL 

Comiw erd al 

Conveyancing 

Csnuirtnii soUriior of al least 
3 years roll sougM Uy medi- 
um st zed CUy praruce for 
limn quality drsctopmeni 
limdirm worlt. Salary c. 
tia.ooo. 

M nlwin Nr Hw atom pwi- 
Up— am H i il j pg l NM! 

^wTersormel 

Start spetitfststtjBw 
legal pmtewoniurtWile 
95 Mdwych. London WC2R4JF. 
Tel- 01-2*2 1261 


wamteo oiMUnco sonruor 

pi rin.M) al lead 2 years r\pe 
rienre Fluem Cennan 
essential. Required lo wort, m 
out expanding Hong Kong ot 
/ice Alliat-lise lerms and 
oMonuniiies Apply lo Priim- 
aid EmiletleM A w.-inq ct*rf 
HHMi 2S Gie.il Caslh- Street. 
London WIN UNO- Telephone 
Ol P2P BSCS 

YOUNG recently qualified sTHKi 
tar required for tOO*n mminjl 
uk mamre. Presiwis niminal 
expeneuce unnecessary 

Toss-,,11 A Oo 2*0 Br ix ton HiB. 
Londen SW2. 

COMMERCIAL CONVEY ANCZR 

immq mqh caiiiwe person for 
Thames iallex Itrm CIO OCX? 
Wessex Consultant* O t US 
.'SIM 

COMMERCUU. CONVEYANCING 

Clli TOP Pracjice reounrs So 
Ueiiors pief 1 BiisadnHlied 
1u UO.IVO Court Assotulcs 
■Jl SK5 0155 

CONVCYANCMG SOUCITOR 

gualns- work, domed Ir and 
rninnuscial Sucres- town (win 
L12 500 Wrsfx Consullalris 
OU5S 251R5 

LEGAL EXECUTIVE for KMUiiq 
Nmi firm snenabsmg in 
lilMailic-n maiiiTs LIOOOO 
hews consultants OS>3& 
3&KU 

LITIGATION Sucre, Hams nor 
lie, Sole met I 3 srs 
annulled C1SOOO aae a- 
p'shin prospeeis Court Asu> 
riales Ol 683 0066 

MIPPLESEX YOUNG artmmed 
yitKikx Genet el m-ieme 
Simii limi. in.y presppcts 
Cl 2.500 Weseex Consul! onls 
CM >6 25183 

NEWLY QUAlinCS Vacancies 
London rsationu-sde lor 

Sepl Clrt Qualim-rs in Pn.ale 
PiariHe C neu Churl Asso 
exiles Ol 58 J 0055 

NORTH WALES .tdnulled sole 
IOI 83 84 GmnJl PI.kikc 
unrk UrWt .at adsanlage TO 
1 10 000 Wessex Consnllonls 
0OJ6 25183. 

SOLICITOR C2EA0»r 

r. Q arrepiaWr Compuiv K 
rmnniernal Partnership Piosl 
25- Pol iners Cits Ol 278 < 5*8 7 
London Lena! Bmrsui 


\Afe are looking for able and experienced 
lawyers to handle the increased workload in 
our Tax Department. 

Applicants should have a first class academic 
record and a sound knowledge of the prin- 
ciples of corporate taxation. Consideration 
will also be given to applicants who are 
Chartered Accountants and now wish to 
pursue a legal career. 

The department engages in all aspects of 
corporate and individual tax and associated 
planning work, especially in the context of 
international business, and some experience 
of international tax planning would be useful. 
The rewards, professionally and financially, 
are very attractive. 

if you would like to find- out more, please 
write sending a complete CV to Michael 
Charteris-Black, 14 Dominion Street, London 
EC2M 2RJ. 


SIMMONS & SIMMONS 


Commercially-awarc 

Legal Officer 


J.P. Morgan Investment Management 
tnc. specialises in investment management 
for major corporations and sovereign and 
international institutions. The London office 
of J.P.M.I.M., with more than $7billion under 
management, is responsible for 
international investment in all the major 
stock markets throughout the world. 

The continuing growth of the London 
office has created a first-class career 
opportunity fora Lawyer whose experience 
within a commercial environment, together 
with a high-level legal expertise, could 
provide tiie ideal combination for this 
demanding role. 

While the position win involve routine 
legal duties such as the supervision of 


contract arrangements and tiie provision of 
legal advice involving UK, European and US 
law, an important and highly-attractive 
aspect of this position is that the successful 
candidate will play an important role in the , 
manage merit group. As a member of the 
Client Services and Marketing Group, he or 
she will make a positive contribution to tiie 
design of new investment products and 

marketing effort gene rally. 

The salary and benefits package win . 
reflect the importance with which we regard - 
this new position. 

Please write with a complete c.v. to 
Mary Thom, Personnel Manager, 

J.P. Morgan investment Management Inc^. 
83 Pail Mail, London SW1 Y 5ES. 


i J.E Morgan 
Investment! 


I RAYNER DE WOLFE 

require two recently qualified 
assistant solicitors 

1. Commercial litigation solidtor at our Hd- 
bom office. Varied work - mainly High Court 
Would suit somebody with experience in Cen- 
tral London firm but others are certainly not 
ruled out 

2. Conveyancing solicitor at our offices in Bar- 
net (near to New Barnet B.R. Station). Mixture 
of commercial and domestic work. The work 
is both of a Central London and local nature. 

Please write to us at 

Kbigsboume House, 

1/231 High Holbom, 
on WCl 


229. 
London 


V 7DA. 


Please provide a dayt im e 
if possible. For 1, quote 
quote ref. MY. 


number 
ROS. For 2, 


COMPUTER 

APPOINTMENTS 


COMPUTER PERSONNEL 

£18,560 

< ilj s flipping mmpflm arv non rixfiiiimg t-om- 

inner jxnvinrK-1 uiih ;ii k-asi IS mnnlhs wpcricncc of 
i In Liny S\Mcms and Slrvciurcd Techniques. Success-- 
I ul cjndidine will h.- currently working in an IBM 
Clttirunmcm. Escdlcni career deseiiKimcnL Ring 
Jackie Lx tins .*n tM- 4 .W 4 WH. 

OFFICE SYSTEMS RECRUTTMENT SERVICES. 


INTELLECTUAL 

PROPERTY 

LITIGATION 

Durrant Piesse is a wel^stabiished Qw law film with an ewerreiw 

practioe centred mainly in the finartoal and 

f °, r a to assist ^ our 
Intellectual ftopoly iitigatraa Department 

Ondidain newly qualified ori^ to three yeas' call; 
they may be solicitors, hamsters or patent agents tumei^lawTO 


^ ^3?°^ C 2?° n aS0und scientific background. The work 

draft licences. Above all, we look For 
en«gyto rake on the responsibilities 

7 1 Cheapside, London EC2V 6ER/* 

DURRANT PIESSE 


iwyet 











29 




-TURNER 


RS 


ers 


\\fe require able lawyers, both newly qualified or bailed, and those 
With more experience, who wish to develop their careers in the . 

corporate part of our practice. 

In particular we have opportunities in all aspects of the financial 
services industry and corporate finance including the expanding area of 
leveraged management buy-outs. 

Tiding will be provided for those without the relevant experience. The 
salary and benefits will be commensurate with the abilities of the 
successful applicants. 

Please apply, with a curriculum vitae to: 

■ B.E:K Hawkes, : 

Clifiord-Tumer; 

: Blackfriars House, 

19 New Bridge Street, 

London EC4V6BY 

or alternatively if you wish to discuss the. matter in more detail, please 
- ringB.E.N. Hawteson: 

. 01-353 0211 


CLIFFORD-TURNER 
London, Paris, Brussels, Amsterdam, 
Singapore, Riyadh, Tokyo and Madrid 


— NORTH EASTTHAMES — 

Regional Health Authority 



Salary up to approx. £25,000 


IONS 



an* 


vr 


Theltegional Legal Adviser to theNorth 
East Thames RHA is a key appointment on 
the Anthoritysstaff. charged with leading 
the m-house legal services for the RHA, and 
tor its 16 consiimem District Healtti 
Authorities. . 

Because of the extensive remit of thepost .. 
wrthinthe Region, thework coveisawtde 
range of intereSs. Including advice on 
common law. general irrigation, 
conveyancing, town planning, and 
contract tew. and more particularly, advice 
on all aspects of the National Health ■ 
Service- including medical negligence . 
cases. There is also an opportunity for 


advocacy, particularly inthe Coroner's 
Court 

what we are looking for is an Admitted 
Solidtorwith experience in personal Injury 
titigatitniand an interest in medico/lega! 
work, and the enthusiasm and drive to lead 
a team of dedicated support staff. 

Thebroad nature and responsibility of the 
post could perhaps best be described 
through an informal discussion with the 
current post holder, ‘ferry Dibley. who 
retires in thesummer. and prospective 
applicants are invited to contact him on 
01-2533020, 


A candidates’ package, with application form, fs available from, 
and applications should be returned to, 

Tbe Director of Conmnimcations, 

North East Thames Regional Health Authority, 

40 EastbourneTerrace, London W23QR. 

Closing date; Tuesday, teL April,' *986. 




and 

Property Lawyers 


Simpson Curtis is a substantial commercial law firm serving a full 
range of business clients, including numerous PLCs. We are growing 
rapidly and have a particular requirement for company/ commercial 

and property lawyers. 

Ideally you will have had appropriate experience, but if you are a 
recently Qualified lawyer and would like to specialise in one of these 
areas we would still like to hear from you. 

Salaries and prospects are excellent We think we will be able to 
satisfy your career ambitions. 

Interviews will be held in London or Leeds. 

Please telephone or write to Richard Lee or Nigel McClea 

Simpson Curtis ^ 

SOLICTORS AS 

41 Park Square - Leeds LSI 2NS- Telephone (0532) 433433 


LITIGATION SOLICITOR - HONG KONG 

We ok fooling lbr a solicitor 

ofiuo yea* p«v.i qualification join our iarge 

litigation deparum-m. TTii-awlicanl sh . 
NHlfik'mlN espenemvd to be able 10 
» lift a mininrmim *il supcn>s*on. 

■\n abuu- average «lary »ili be o 
reflect ability and expeneoce. 

U * amu-hMUtl dwi * con " 

ducted tn London m Ma«* lvao. 

^pplicaunns >»>li o.x l0 - 
John M R«im.' 

Deartmv 

3rd - 7th Fluor 

Alexandra House 

Hong. Kong _ 


THE COLLEGE OF LAW 

LECTURESHIP IN LAW 

Applications are invited from solicitors for a 
post of lecturer. 

The salary will be. within the scale of £12.148 - 
£18.3S4 pJ. (which includes a' London allow- 
ance of £L365) with (he entry poinl depending 
on qualifications and experience. Normal annu- 
al. increments arc £6NJ. ■ 

.Apply with full personal, professional and aca- 
demic detail and the names of two referees to 
the Principal. The College i»r Law. 2 Bream's 
Buildings. Chanecr> Lane. London. EC4A. iDP. 
Irani wham further, particulars may be obtained. 


The People’s Republic Of China 

Do you speak Mandarin or another major Chinesedialect? 

Are you a solicitor or barrister with company, commercial or corporate rax law experience? 
W ould you like to practise law in China with a major international law firm? 
if so, we would be interested in hearing from you, as \vc arc urgently looking for a young 
lawyer to work with our firm in Beijing, Shanghai and Hong Kong as part of a team which 
advises clients on investment in. and trading with, China. 

The intention is that the successful candidate will return to our London office after a stay in 
China and Hong Kong of approximately one year and will continue to be involved 
extensively, but not exclusively, in China work which represents a significant parr of our 


Asian practice. 

Career prospects in the Firm are excellent. 


Please write with C.V. to Blair Wallace, Partnership Secretary, Baker & McKenzie, 
AJdwych House, Aldwych, London WC2B 4JP. 

Baker & McKenzie 

Offices in Europe, North America, South America, The Middle East, Asia/Parific. 


Wc arc one of the largest and most aciive 
District Councils in the South East outside 
London. With a revenue budget of £72m and 
2.100 employees we provide a wide range of 
services to (his national and international 
conference and tourist resort which is also a 
major centre for shopping, commerce, educa- 
tion and light industry. 

Assistant 

Borough 


This senior management opportunity will re- 
quire you to advise several major committees 
of the Council (including Housing) and to 
ensure implementation of their decisions. 
You wilt be thrid-tier in a diverse department 
of 90 and will be expected to contribute to the 
corporate management of the authority. 

You will be a Solicitor with at least three 
years' post qualification experience in the 
public sector, particularly in advising and ad- 
ministering committees. Management skills 
arc essential, together with the ability to work, 
within a team m a very busy environment 

Generous relocation scheme includes grants 
of up to £1.750. plus full reimbursement of 
removal costs, lodging and travel allowances. 

Please telephone Brighton (0273) 29801 
Ext- 667 for far the r details and an appli- 
cation form to be retained to the 
Personnel Officer, Town Halt, Brighton 
BN1 1JA, by 21 March. 


Borough of - 

Dromon 




Out ef London 


Kent 

Wo have taken Instructions 
from orarum tn all areas 
of KmiI seeking soirilors to 
undertake noth conlen* 
ttous Mid non-conienlious 
workloads 

£xrM»nt Salaries, condi- 
tions and prospects are 
offered lor trccnUy quaU- 
fied or experienced 

candidates. 

Windsor Area 

Small, expanding practice 
requires recently admitted 
solicitor lo deal with all as- 
pects of illiqaiion Some 
adiorary imoitcment and 
t vtnntnMo prospects- Sal- 
ary Mqhty compel !U\e. 

AM wdrif* fcr Mm ate** peal* 


jjnv'Perspiwl 

SMipfeiUastoine A 
Inal profession wHtfwifle . 
95 XMwycfi. LomfOrt WC2fidJF. 
Td (h -242 IiBI-wm 


Town Sc Country 
Planning Solicitor 

Our clienl B a highly re- 
garded large Cily pracllce 
which requires a senior 
sonrltor Who has specialist 
experience in all aspecls of 
planning law The ideal ap- 
Phranl must not only be 
able 10 demonstrate consul 
erawe experience w a 
r elated fletd out must also 
possess a working known- 
edge of compulsory 
purchase procedures and 
sue appraisal work. The 
applicant must haxe an 
outgoing personality 
which ran continue 10 Pro- 
mote the exrtting learn 
spirit within the relevant 
department Considerable 
clienl exposure R involved. 

Salary up io c. tis.ooo 

pa. 

Safi speca Ibis to the CV 
Itgsi profession atriiMite 
$5 WDwwfi. Iow»n WC2B Uf 
Tal . Di -242 12 Bl . a— . « •»« 



LONDON 
West End 

Rrspertm medium small 
prunirr requires ronuner- 
rtal romeyanrer for 
unsuperv hied aualiiy 
workload. Coed prospects, 
rompctime salary 

Central London 

Well resoeclPO medium 
si/pa prueur e Seeks Intel- 
Icclual uiKiaior wirn up lo 
a years aoul auallllcsUlon 
experience. ExrrUenl 
salary. 

CHy 

-well .csiaNwhed 

medium small praciice 
veekinq rommortial HUffa- 
lor with up lo 2 yean posi 
dittltlirnlUM? pwfrience 
♦or quality workload vnin- 
hi expanding deparimenl. 
Salary c Cl 5X00 
M valak* he Hm stow «aal> 


saftspecaflsBiDifw By 
MdilpisiasonHnlilwWe 
. S5Aahwh.lonijonM2B*ff 
Tel:01-2S2 1281 uim ■, wwd 


Corporate 

Finance 

Lawyers 

Wo are instructed by a 
malor prestigious City 
practice lo introduce 
oulslanding lawyers 
with experience In all 
corporate finance 
related mailers. The 
workload emphasis 
will be upon Venture 
Capital and large 
Management Buy-outs. 

Significant 
remuneration and 
career prospects are 
offered- 


tjwTersntmel 

Ststfspedswugme SB 
ta8lpc«!(UiQllVafl<»Mlfl 
ttAMMydi.londaiwCZfidJF. 
TbL 01-ZI212B1 ihweiira 


Legal Executive 

Join Britain’s Leading Oil Company 


Esso needs another Legal Executive for its small, friendly team of 
lawyers in Kingston upon Thames. The group gives a full legal service 
to the Retail Business Line which is responsible for Esso's service 
station network throughout the UK. This is a last moving business 
with interesting and challenging work for the lawyers. 

We are looking for an Associate or Fellow of the Institute of Legal 
Executives who has — 

• a good knowledge of property law but is willing to take on awide 
variety of work 

• previous experience in private practice, industxy or local 
government 

• agood sense afhumonrand gets on well with people 

There will be some opportunity for travel within the UK. There is no 
particular age requirement 

A highly competitive salary win be offered to the right applicant. Other 
benefits include an a ttr ac ti ve pension scheme. 

Although initially based in Kingston, the Legal Department will be 
moving to Esso’s new purpose-built head office in an a ttr a ctiv e 
location at Leatherhead, Surrey in 1988. 

Please apply no later than 15 March 1986 with details of experience 
and present salary to the 
Regional Legal Adviser; 

Esso Petroleum Company Limited, 

Esso House. 106-114 London Road. 

Kingston upon Thames, m ■ 

Surrey KT26QX. 1 CMU M 


Esso is an Equal Opportunity Employer and posOfoety 
welcomes apptLcanansJi-om men and women and 
members cf atmic minority groups. 



For Commercial Litigation 


We are looking for 
people with: 

• up to 2 years' experience 
(preferably litigation) 

• enthusiasm, initiative, 
dedication and good humour 

• an interest in: product liability, 
insurance matters, media law, 
professional negligence, 
construction, fraud, and a wide 
range of commercial and 
corporate disputes. 

• good academic qualifications. 

• ability to work well under 
pressure 

• a willingness to travel (and 
preferably a foreign language) 

Are you looking for 

• challenging, interesting and 
varied work for an international 
clientele? 


• greater responsibifity? 

• the friendly atmosphere 
and team spirit of one of 
our compact working 
groups? 

• the facilities and working 
conditions of a large firm in the 
City of London? 

• opportunities to work and 
possibly live abroad? 

• excellent salary and 
career prospects? 

ff you are the person we are looking 
for and like what we have to otter, 
please apply, with a curriculum 
vitae to 

P.R Phillipps, 

Lovell. White & King, 

21 Holbom Viaduct 
London EC 1A2DY. 


Lovell, White & King HONG^ONG^BRUSSELS 


Pensions Lawyer 

J- Birmingham c£ 20,000 + Benefits ^ 


Our client is a major and long established 
legal practice offering a comprehensive range of 
services to commercial and industrial clients in 
the west Midlands. 

As a progressive firm, with a consistent 
record of expansion, their commitment to further 
growth and development has created the need 
for an additional Pensions Lawyer to join their 
established and expanding Pensions f^actice. 

This is a new appointment and a key area of 
responsibility will involve the provision of profes- 
sional and legal advice to a range of small, 
medium and large business clients on all matters 
relating to pension fund establishment and 
management This will include the assessment 
of client companies' existing pension schemes 
as well as recommendations to companies con- 
sidering the implementation of pension 
schemes for the first time. 

The requirement is fora fufiy qualified lawyer 
with a good knowledge of pensions and associ- 
ated legislation. The successful candidate will 
need to demonstrate first class drafting skills. 


have the ability to communicate at all levels, and 
form a part of an energetic, hardworking team. 
The opportunity will be available to achieve 
Pensioneer Trustee Status. 

The salary offered will reflect both the 
qualities and experience of the applicant and 
the importance attached to the position. Assis- 
tance with relocation will be given if appropriate 
and provision of a car will be considered. 

The position is challengingin opportunity, and 
offers career progression to the right applicant. 
If you think you have the professional skills, are 
enthusiastic and innovative, and have the ability 
to recognise foe needs of new and existing 
clients, we’d like to hear from you. 

Please write enclosing full career details, 
quoting reference MCS/8619 to Philip Gardiner; 
Executive Selection Division 
Price Waterhouse 
Management Consultants 
Livery House 
169 Edmund Street 
Birmingham B3 2JB - . . 


l wood uiQiuiigqnma. iiiiumigiiaiii uo r > 

Price Waterhouse 


EXPANDING HAMPSTEAD PRACTICE 
URGENTLY SEEKS, 

Capable solicitor (age no harrier) for varied 
d/imosiic/ctminim-ial lojj tin anting work in our 
friendly office, v-iih wide scope lor oilier work. ' 
xnracme salary and henefiis package iosui lable 
person negotiable. Tel: Mr Lcvcnc Ul 431 12.14 


LITIGATION 

ASSISTANT 

1 1. I I..I | ./hint HidJI l 

Ini* Maimih m.ili ainini'ril 
■Hilt CKI 1 unit. I * 

1 IU I , 111.1 |M .r f» " I- I I 
llllll al|l|,l„ .nil * I «.|i\ul.-i i-ll 

ret 01-579 0933. 


WYNTER, DAVIES 
& LEE 

**nl»sf.lJ'Jl.>J JH.ftllJ#- J|J lJj ‘11 
|i«Vi| illifillU in vlK Mint 
i ■nil if 1 1 m ms •ts-M.ilil il)t 
*»'M In * Mill |V;iln.rv)i)|> 
Sibil 1 U .ifl.inurflVVll 
1'1‘Mm' «1M I \ In 
M' if t i t ■— I *.n Ik.iiM ni 

^.ii-.i- I lil V» i.|.l. lli-Hs 

*•4.1.1 II 1 













Rl KTIIN. MVRRiLGKS. 
UKM1LS «nd IN MFMlV 
RUM £4 a line 4 ip,\ AT. 

{minimum .1 lines} 
Annountviih'nis auilicnu- 
i-alcJ r*> ihc name and 
jvunanem address nf IIh.- 
wiulcr. mat k‘ vail in 
Till' TIMR* 

PO BOV 484 
Virsiobi Stnci 

IxKKtSlI H 

or uiiDlwmcd (hi tckTtmir 
iuh-* - n(Vi\ only) in M-tSI 
.RIM. 

SnnininivnK-Tiis ran lx- rr- 
ui^iiJ hi kirptnHir IvuKvai 
9 M tint and S Vipm MniHlay 
|n FnUay. nn Sjluulai lx-- 
luivn “iftiBi and l2no>in 
(481 -SOW Only), h.-r puhll- 
rannn ihi- ruUuwmg day 
nhimr h> I Vipm 
KlRtiiroMlMi M\R- 
RlVCt-S. Mt'nnlNCS. etc 
nn < nun and Smial Page. £6 
■ liar * J*°* V AT. 

I nun and Snual ragr ao- 
mnjiMinmls ran nui tv 
•hiyi-usJ hv irlcptninr En- 
quiiks M 01-481 4100. 
Mini iHhn clauilkd advrr- 
inrmrms can hr ara'piril hy 
IL-Irptinnr Thr dradlmr u 
Sinpm 2 days pnnr in puhli- 
rannn lie SCdptii Monday 
li>r WTdnrsilayl Shnuld you 
wish lo send an odicrtiw*- 
im-ni in writing (Hi-asr 
mcludr ymu day lime phone 
number 

ri'Sin.'YSKR SKR VICKS 
IWPARIMKNT. If you 
hate any queries or proWems 
rt-Lnmg lu ynur advertise- 
ment iinre n has appeared 
pleasr cnntaei our f usiumrr 
StTucvs Oepanmem hy iclc- 
phnne on 0I-4SI 3006. 


Bn m iransl-Mia-rxl n» ih» r<- 
iirvtinu ta sour minP Ihal »-c 
m.iv mote vshal ■"» fhaX good. 

I .irrrtiUibJo and tarlerl. 

will or Col 

Honuns 1J.2 


MORGAN Cm 28 February t 
Penny and Dai e. a son dfln 
orert m home. 4 broUier lo 
Mailheu. 


OLLERHCAD id Gillian nice 
Dully and Keim on laui 
February I486, a son. Rich 
arc! John Thanhs lo Moll at 
iiwsop Hospital. Shell ield 
SOSHIN on February 38lh ac 
O uern CharJolie's HosphaJ 
lo Marie and Nikolas a son 
Paul Mkolas 


DEATHS 


MAIffNCC - Pcarrtiiiry an 
March 2 1986 m Bearhani. 
Norintk Gabrielis M«* **? 
si-,11* lain of Belize Park 
Leiutoii. □ devoted mother A 
qi jnttmolhei Private rrPnvi- 
non in Norfolk on Fnxwy 
M.irrh T al 3 30pm Tlou ers 
pb-a— la Enr »• Whilton. 
riinerai Director 26 Sl.ilion 
Rond He.Kham NwloH * 
Memorial Smite al Colderc 
Ci ecu « lo be ai mourn •'0 oi d 
Ijli't dale 


MORRIS on Marrn the 2nd 
I486 Charles William- Bmy 
Morris TD u Caster Got 
lane. The Mud Rl’* East 
iu**ex Dearly loved 

huviMhd and companion of 
Njiwv -hpc Cote* PnidK* 
CTemalioii Donations ir do- 
vircd lo Che H A C. 
BenevoliHI Fund. Armours 
Hoi i—. cny Rd . Loixion 
ECl’i 2BQ Was Billy — vi rsh. 

Gnria. ih>I I hoi h» lw oonr. 

nil her rcKiyco llul ho was 

MOftRISON Of Frfcruon I he 

£7lh. Nanci iWnler N 
Bh«in Momsoui ol 13 
Hamilton Clow. NWB. dearly 
loved witer of John and Tom 
Mormon Funeral at GaMers 
Green Crematorium. Hist 
Chapel al 2 OO pm . Wedncs 
da\. March 5th Memorial 
Sen ire to tie Hniiounred lal 
er Family flowers only, hut 
donations if desired lo Mid- 
dk-sos Hospital. Wl 

MOULE Peacefully al Ihe Old 
Virarsy-ye MOuMOrd on tsl 
Marrh aued 92 Henry 
Charles Caul lev Moule. vi id 
ovver o( MarHine Lilian iiier 
Pnnihrn-.il,- Funeral al Ox- 
lord Crematorium. Friday 
Tin March ai 2 15pm No 
Flowers, please, bv his 
rwiuesi 

HtviLtt on amn reoiuary 
l9Se prdi'efullv al home 
ilabrielle beloved wife Ol Ed 
ward Neville ol The Abbey 
Charlton Adam. So merlon 
Suiu-rsel Funeral sen ire a 
Chariton Artam Church ot 
Thursday 6 March 1986 a 
11 3dam No uitecs please 
(lowers or il desired, dona 
lions (or Charlton Adair 
Church c a W A. Forsev d 
Son Lid. Budntqh. GUslon 
bury. Somerset. Tel CM5f 
50654 

O'CONNOR On March Isl 
Sisli-r Man - PjiiI. Covenl ol 
ine Holly Child Jesus. May 

held. Sussex 


BALDWIN - On Saturday 
Mairn Isl. al Ue«J Lomloii 
Hcispii.il . lo Marietta nice 
Hood • and Rninev a hoy. 
S.iniiir-1 Baliha.-ar 
BLACKETT-ORO To Carol and 
Mark, a daiKihlcr Elinor, on 
Fenruary 2olh 

BREESE On Fraruan 2am to 
Charfotir uiee Od9ersi and 
Pi'ler. a dauphier. Josephine 
U ilia Eloisr. a sister for 
Ohi ia and Cecilv 
BROOK-FOX on 22ud Fehru- 

.irv lo Caroline nnxi 

Shorni.il i > and Julian a 
daiiohler. N'aiheriiH- Emma. 
BROWN cm 25lh February 
1986. at RAF Vvioulhtou. I 
LeKih • nee Kennedy-' and 
Chrrs. a son Edward Charles 
Alexander 

CLARK On 2nd March lo 
Gnu-s ra and Huoh a von. 
.lames Frederick Alexander 
DAVIE On 28ih February 
1986 al Nmeuells Hospital. 
Dundee. io Sue and Ian a 
daiiuhler Kate v irinrra Rose 
■ Xirionai a sister lor 
Alexander and Thomas 
EVANS. On 2oih February 
I486, lo Nirky mee Palmer' 
amt CJiaries. a son. Peter. 
HOUGH on 2nd March lo Eli/ 
ahein .nor Slanyeri and 
Audi ew a dauohlrr Frances 
Tei esa 

JENNINGS On 2Tlb February 
1986. lo Annabe l mee Gore 
Audri-wsi and Roheri 
liaunhhT Emiix Snpma 
KERSHAW On Fi-hrvmrt jgin 
in Sarah mee Goodharu and 
Georoe a son. a brolher I 
.Samuel 

MAKIM to Vandra 
lumiernin and Harold, oi 
(ehruary 281 *i. SI ManjarcV 
Huspilal. DarllliqhUTSt. syd 
twv. a son. D««iby Angus 
MOFFATT m» February 251 
I486 to Sv Ilia •tie** Bauer 
and Paul, a son Peler James 
a Inolhur (or kaiharine 


BUWETT Freda beloved wife 
« Raymond Birkell. mother 
ol Alison. Diana. Julian and 
Camilla, peacefully ai Trimly 
Hospice. Ciapham on 28ih 
February. Requiem Mass al 
Holv Redeemer Cheync 
Row. li am Thursday March 
olh 


BULL George Arthur on Feb 
rnarx 27m peacefully in 
hospital Husband of Irene 
and lainer oi \ixonira and 
Si )na Funeral al Reading 
Crematorium 2pm March 
olh Family Mowers only, do 
nations if rtrsired IO MIND 
< o A B Walkei Funeral Di 
rertors 36 Eldon Road. 
Readmit 

CAPEL CURE on March 2nd 
|98t- in hospital Caroline, 
helovect wile of Ronnie Fu 
ueral Friday Match 7th 3 pm 
M Ci-rniams. Bobbing world. 
Immediate family only and 
larnilv Mowers. Memorial 
—rxire m London to be an 
nounred later 

CASTLE on Marrh 2nd al 
Allon General Hospital, 
peacefully afler a long illness 
hra> efy bom. Rirnard 
William iDirM aged 83 ol 
Liphook Belov ed husband ol 
Mary . dear father of Rodney. | 
Jennifer and Son-m-Law- I 
Richard, lomm Poppa ol ' 
Antonia and Claudia Funer- 
al. 5l Mary's Church 
Bramshoti on Friday March 
7ihal 12 00 noon Cui flow 
ers mai- he sen I to Gould and | 
Chapman Lid. GrevshoU. , 
Hmdhead. Surrey 

FA1RUE On February 27lh 
suddeuiv Harry husband ol 
Eve Funeral al Oakley 
Wood Crematorium Learn 
in-linn Spa. al l 30pm on 
Thursday t4h March No 
flowers or toilers please nul ' 
donations if desired lo 
Multiple Sclerose Soeiely 

HA ROT . l_Hl I* JH IM .Kr-UUI- 
Sii kinw— [inuul-iv H-inlv 
r is I ■■■— nirii mNu<Mi tH 

Hifmu '.ilhi'r W Bir/XMil .v An , 
llinm liniri.il —line ,i| hlen ' 
niui'li rrm.iv xiaur. T .il 
I- I’Ouui r.n noun' pica— Du 
u.iiuin% a d---i 1---I In I* Ire 
i nun li. Hu- su.M-1 

HENDRY On Marrh Isi peace- 
1 1 illy al home. Alexander 
Mile hell. dearlv toved 
huslidnd of Dnrrcn. falher ol 1 
Jiiditn Denlrr and Alaslair 
■liirt Ioviiki grandfalher Ser 
vice ai Si Mary's Parish 
Churen. Wimbledon on Fn- 
d.iv Marrh 7ih ui 2.15pm. 
lollmveti bv Fhlialc Crcma 
Iron Tamili flowers an ! I 

JAMES Bridget Aim . peaceful 
Il on 281 h February aged 77. 
al St Calherine's Nursing 
H-mie Both Funeral verv ire 
.■I Ihe Churrh SI Mary and Si 
Edward Barrow- Gurney. Nr 
Bristol, al 2 15pm Tuv-sday 
lllh Maivh Flowers or do 
naiioiis lo Ihe Church, il 
devil ed. C o Arinur E Dave> 
and sons. 82 Silver SI. 
N.nlsna. BrMol 

JONES - Oil 28 February- 1986 
pearefulli al W«’sl Sussex 
Hospital lre»ra Hone, in her 
75in y col much lev ed bv her 
many menus Funeral ai 
Crolon Churrh Suffolk on 
Thursday March 6 al 
? OOpin No llow-ers please 
mil oouallons if desired to 
Gi oinn Cnurrn r o Brown & 
Fi-nn Arfon Suuare. 
sudUuix. SuHoik 

MAKtN 3id March al Mews 
CViltoo- Slrav Towers. Har- 
l-KMle Cieolfrev Makm loved 
and Ioxiiiq molher « Lucv. oi 
Dolphins Tolli-ndOP Green 
London N20 BPE. Svrrwce at 
Harroaaie Creoiaionum on 
Thursday olh March al 
IO JO-nn Family flowers 
onlv please 


MEMORIAL SERVICES 


IN .VEMORI.A.M 
- PRIVATE 


JIRTHDAVS 




\xU 




PEARN Norman, husband -ji 
J ay .uid father of Rodney 
Carol and Anihonv peace 
fully on February 28th 
Pro 4lo rrenialion. no flow 
ers or toilers ptcav 
D-iiMlions u desired Ic 
Shipwreck Manners l North 
Paliani Chichester. 

aUILLER-COUCH On Feb 25ih 
I -=-86 in n->spilal. Foy FeliciA 
Quitter Couch M B E . aged 
86 only daughter of Ihe talc 
S-r Arthur atid Lady Quitter 
Courh and much loved 
consul of Guy and Kate 
Svmondson Funeral service 
al Fowey Parish Church or 
Wednesday March 5m ai 
llOOam Flowers io Ihc 
Church please 

ROBERTS Douglas Henry 
peacefully at his home, on 
March lsi 1986 Grrallv 
tax ed and missed bv his w He 
Belly, his children Susan. Si 
mon. Christian and Pa I no a 
and hn ek'ven grandrhil 
aren. Funeral service at 
2 »pm on Friday “th 
Alarm. a( Aft Saints Church 

I xbridge Road. Han worth. 
Middx Private cremation al 
Randalls Park. Leal her head 
Family flowers only please 
Donations welcome lo 
Leukaemia Research Fund. 
J3 Great Ormond St. London 
WCl 

ROGERS On Sunday. March 
2nd peacefully at home Old 
T i an ip Modburv. Margaret 
Evelyn aqpd 91 years be 
loved wife of William 
Lanqworlhi Andrews »de 
ceased' dearest molher ol 
Marv Rose. John and Eliza 
t>nh. darling grand molher « 
kale. Dam- and Rachel, and 
dear mol tier -in -law- of Susan 
and Alexander Funeral Ser 
ure a) SI George’s rhun h. 
Modhurv on Friday. March 
7ih al 4pm Family (lowers 
nnlv. donations if desired lo 
Co Workers of Molher Tere 
sa. c ■ Lloyds Bank. 58 
Queens Road. Ctlflon. Brtslol 
B58 IRQ 

ROSS On 1st March 1986 al 
Tinhay Nursing Home. Lyme 
Rrgis Barbara Daphne aged 
B7 years, tale of L’Elacq 
Jersey Funeral service at 
Weymouth Crematorium on 
Monday 10th Marrh al 

I I QQam No flowers by re 
auest Donations if desired 
lor British Heart Foundation 
r o A J Wakefy A Sons 91 
Easi SI reel. Bndport. Dorset. 

5ARGANT. SEE MAKIN. 

SI MM ON DS - On February 
27lh 1986. Wing Command 
er Arthur Henry iSimmyi 
DF.C. PAF rellred. Dearly 
to- ed husband of Enid and 
lather of Susie Enquiries lo 
Twj mans. Freshwater, ble 
of Wight. 0903 752169. 

SMITH Brigadier Etienne 
Lionel Hertz C.BE.. MC 
Peacefully ai home on isl 
Marrh 1986. dearly loved 
husband of Eleanor, devoted 
falher of Douglas and 
Prunella and grandfather of 
Rupert. Beniamin. Rebecca. 
Hugo. Toby. Camilla and 
Louisa Funeral service lo be 
hrio ai 9 45am on Friday 7lh 
March at ilu* Church of SI 
Mary Ihe Xirgm. Berkeley. 
inllQwed hv private crema- 
lion Family flowers oulv 
Donations if desired lo ihe 
Seven Wild Fowl Trust 
Shmhndqr. Gtos 

SYKES William Joseph Arnold 
QBE. F.IEE. 

M I MECH.E . A M.I.R.S E 
Suddenly al ihe Kent and 
Sussex Hospital. Tunbridge 
Weils, on 1st March 1986 
C.remaiion 300pm on 

Monday March 10th al Tun 
bridge Wells Cremalonum 
No Flowers please but dona 
franc la (he Bninh Sartors 
Sanelx 

TAYLOR on March id sudden 
lv in CuckfleM Hospital after 
a short illness. John Ewing 
Tax-far -Cnbi aged 81 xrc-ars. 
ex Bank of England, beloved 
husband of Peggy devofed 
falher of Julia and Louise, 
and grandfather of Chrtslo- 
pher. Miranda and Tom 
Family flowers only but do 
nations if desired lo 
NSPCC 67 Saffron Hill. 
ECl M8RS Serxice al Sur 
rev and Sussex Cremalonum 
Balcombe Road. Worth. 
Thursday March 6th al a pm. 
enquiries 10 J & R. Mallhewrs 
Haywards Heath 0444 
413055. 

THOMAS On Friday 28lh Feb- 
ruarx . suddenly at home. 
David Mervyn E Thomas 
MD.URCP. beloved bus 
hand of Ivy Private funeral 
sen ice Fridav 7ih March No 
flowers please 

WALKER On 27lh February 
1986. pearefulli at home 
Edith Walker O B E Stsler lo 
Ada and Sera Service 
Putney Vale Crematorium. 
Fridav 7th March at 2.00pm. 

WHITEHEAD on Wednesday 
26th February, peacefully in 
SI Helier. George White- 
head. M C C.raix de Cuerrc. 
Sun Ldr RAF A SOE. Much 
taxed anrl rfJmired by hts re- 
lations and many Irmnds in 
Poland. Great Brtlain and 
F i.inre. Serxice in Jersey 
Crematorium al midd.iv cm 
Friday 7m M.irrh So flow 
ers please, but donailois if 
wished to RAF Benevolent 
Fund 


SERVICES 


obtuse as nuvn. 


MOTHERS DAT BALLOONS- A 

■hill.m m I-*-' mill rnor-il.Mr. 
■:iiu- -klh— UV l-l-l I* !-.“-•! 

-H 111 in Oitlr.il Lmidnii 
T i-boUOUe Tfna«01 OLV 7id6 
Balmuir. Over U»m» 

C l t-alll I Jill OC-WII-v " r4rn.ll.- 

•KMCtHtA-nNOT -U.ll.-a r.iMliu 
>.»ik on piil.-1ili.iUi- Imol lilt ill 

IMe- P-'lil OI *W 3»» «*■ 

.‘Mil I rl*. 

CV SPECIALISTS, is! .|— -r v h 
v. nuni bv gu.iiilir*l a o—ul 
unis .sat iS4 sews 
FiaeKSSMIP, Leu- or M.imae 
XII -n— mens Daleltin*. Dept 
-do- AiHinel'Hi R-M.1 Lon 
■l.-n- WB T--I Ol *sa ‘Ol I 


TRAILRNDERS 


XvoilalWKI-- taw ins! IIIUIII- 

V r.- ito— .1 ......... p. ... ■> *1 

I '/■ OOO « li..|ll~ viih |. 1970 
vnua NU 1 ill 14 OKI II 
I MOM V7o5 


SYDNEY 

PERTH 

AUCKLAND 

BANGKOK 

SINGAPORE 


oi<m rtn 
E392 £641 
E380 £582 
£409 £770 
£1W £383 
£225 £462 


WANTED 


ANYONE with memories of Ihe 
laie Edward FitzGerald. 7!h 
Duke ol Leinster tus wives, 
family or friends, please 
write with details lo BOX 
CS1. The Tin*-*s. P.O Box 
aHJ. x'irgiiiia Street. Loudon 
E I 

LARGE WARDROBES A Minots. 

Lh-.ks Book. JM- --tr .x Pre 1 940 

In ill*, r.-l cu 5US OI->8 or 

Ol v.'H ^710 

MARCAMTE A alt mrei nling 
«k.-i rovlnnio lewnlew 
Ol 0^2 8079 


MUkM/FLOfUQA £189 E292 
HONG KONG £337 £474 
DELH1/BOMBAY £250 £388 

COLOMBO £241 £42(1 

CAIRO £160 £270 

NAIROBI £231 £391 

JO'BURG £288 £473 

LIMA £253 £484 

LOS ANGELES El 8 7 £325 

NEW YORK £120 £240 
GENEVA E 75 E 89 

EMUS C01IAT MM 
UJMOM WHJ 

Empe.'USA FUgnu 01-977 6*00 
Lang Haul Fb^-B 01-603 ISIS 
IskBusinms Phi 01-838 3444 
Ga w nnwt Licensed 'Boirttfl 
A8TA IATA ATQL KSB 


FOR SALE 


RESIST A CARPETS 

SALE NOW ON 


M.WXI- e stCK kN of wool 
blind'd Bei Ders rrom 11 °5 
. \ XT Plus nuvnv twircuiiK 
m room has In all oualtnes. 


548 Fulham Road 
Parsons Green SW6 
Tel: 01-730 7551 


I rrc isumalr expert tillin'! 


★ ★SAVE fCfN** 

♦ ★FIRST ( ‘LASS^ ♦ 

♦ ♦CLl.'B ( LASS^R 

♦ ♦TOl’RIST CUSS*^ 

♦ ROOK NOW FOR Kt.ir 

I > TJ- * • l.-rl^Oii^j i 

r i -is * * a 



'►?. * a .-/.ISI a * 

l Oi * * '«.» * 

-. i- .- a a ■ w. .4-1 a 

a • a a ■;!- a *v .4 * 


S STONE DtAMOMb MNC Bran 
ID in S.HHMU W vjluanon 
to-3P>x Trl C-l 7t>7 5BS3 


si NIX DPI 1 1 Ik Wit 

(f .id l<*9 

— xylll si I P-H-I s*ni*- 

|.i l - _*-| '*.!» Jwill ;‘lir* 

in* 

i.vx ;jh.' 


THE TIMES .1 Ml 4 198SI Give 
-n-imi' .in enoiiijl is«ue. ml 
rniiirvnv .l.it I hr. wrirbom 
vir yj or a im c ??(». pu*s 
II rr IltoO'- Times K orrx-lmos 
I.xin Trl Ol 4-M> 6305 or 
0492 i>145 

OESICNER GUILD Collirr 

C.illiplH-ll «pl*OI-4ri «1 Xirtn* kill 
.1 IWve vuije and armchairs 3 
PHs-r uoni t*C Prit.ilr s.iio 
r.ill T.-l C-l 674 1447 

FINE BRITISH SUITINGS 5b u 
•liHl-nir. Srnd law SVE lo* 
Urc iMlterns wnh urn-1 «K-«-|IP 
lull *01-411 rlr Rrub lo BOX 
OXT 

TICKETS lor anv event Cals, 
si . ii liuhl C\P Chrsx Les Mis 
All ItnsUir ana spot tv H7I 
twilr- H28 0495 

A l.s Xtsj. Dtnrts 

TICKETS FOR ANY EVENT, Cats 
SiailKtal r>P Chess Lrs Mis 
XII Ihr.ilir .nut sports 
Trl H2I 0016 828 049& 

I Ls V iso Of— -is 

TICKETS lut an r- nil Cals. 
Mil-l-uhl Lsp Cnrss L— Mis 
■XII inr.ilu- and sports »21 
he 16 nia 0495 

A Ls x isp Pinei' 

OLD YORK FLAGSTONES cob 
l<|- mi. KalKMiwirtr 

'Wiirfa-. T.-I 113380) 850039 

■ Wills. 

SCATF1NOERS Anv event me 
i.-.il* iVn- ul Gxlii. SMrhqhl £'P 
Ol 1678 Mam rrraUI 

i-anl-. 

OLD YORK nav ma as drin rent lo 

..<sllrs .ll.it Old 'OUlllrX OMTH-s 

OS4S 35521 l 


MELBOURNE REACH FLORIDA. 

luxurious nrr.-ut tioul town 
limit-- Pi iv atatv os. msl 5twl 
i . hatts Uillv IiiiiiisIksI. wviaqr. 
rrnuis. pool, all lUiliiies iialm] 
,-it \> .lit Mas iniouqti Augirsx. 
uiniilh Id iiNVnti* SI JO.t pm 
.vmrrii a 813 062774.? 


AfRF-ARC SnetAUSrt M dm-, 
o w C..X95 in, Le4S Anrkl.iiul 
n w 1.420 rlu L774 JoTunq 

0 .. IlfM nn 1.470 Lrw Ainxr 

lrs.v .» C171 rlu L335 Lem. Ion 

1 I itlUl Cenlie Ol 370 6337 


COSTCUTTEKS ON flights non 
I.- f »■<«•-. I S.x a most xb-sluia 
(Mins Oii»l.*ii mi Ti.**'-l 01 730 
2J*31 VUT X I V I V ATCJL 


AUSTRALIA. NZ r.v Last In I.M I 
Win lit wi.fr Ion -0-4 IlhltUs 
i nidi her* Ol 5J-T. J727 


USA AFRICA EUROPE Genuine 
ilwreunl lan-s OTC Ol 602 
3736 


CHEAP FLIGHTS Wnrldi. KJr 

Ha.na.ukrl Oi &?o I 366 


USA irnm C99 mjioi li.wel 01 
JB5 «?37 I XT X 


RESIST A 
CARPETS 


SALE NOW ON 


M.emxe storks of wool 
hlrnilnl Berbers from t3 95 
* v.vl Plus many bargains ui 
room n?r* In dll giulllies. 


207 Haversiock Hill 
Hampstead NW3. 
Ol-7 Q 4 0139 


Free estimate Expert filling. 


ANTIQUES & 
COLLECTABLES 



Potkuil oak soilr rocnprunraiMf 
Ulinr rrrtammiUr traibee Mpprd 
lahlr liner aimmairsano hone 
vbce .u ran-omml ch uvqmg and 
v. nuim lables Onsma data foe 
Innins lllh Apnl 1986 On 
viri. at Wrslon-Supei Maar 
T.-inlo loam and bcuctiiur 

lioni 


SWTTZEf&AHD Sr hrrtuh-rl lltqhts 

Ol 724 2388 XHT/X -VTUI 

WUftUNG STEAMS. Forma aita 
I .111 V tale ra.il.-v anl imhics 
I rom osimidr III Ihr nrUaiUm 
Xi iti-amrs Die pumir»li|.-s .ur 
rtuliisw awiMaihot.irlivilrs.up 
rrrl<-i*xJ lor Ihe ..nok- Untile 
Holiday s Horn t TO prr pirson 

pm -sn-k III loiLme.. lai ms. .a 
muon villages m helrls Find 
nul mme ash mr Bi-KxjJ Inn 
rnuir Irani B-Hquim Rnnai 

Sri in- ITS SiH-den Park 

Roaxl S Croyth-n Cx2 8IJ 
Trlrpnonr Ol e5l 5109 Or 
L rn n-tifr Ondl.ifr Bureau. 
Dm me. ion. Miiillan. .Xlirrileen 
-rule scolldiui Trl 077 982 
249 Alda 24151 or Conlurl 
>our ta-al A i-i. i liavn Annu 
AUSTRALIA! NEW ZEALAND! 
xiaiun ti tends ami rrioiiotw? 
Tina* roll l.vct in for LOW Bl D 
UT T fairs. Fin- hr or I m res 
until Barrie Travel Sell ice 42 
Ha-ill sure! Kliaqv LamTrs. 
Heals Phone I09277I 61266 
Open 7 dAVs AMT A mmim-i 
ALGARVE, NKNORCA, T-xiertfe. 
Greek Islands Xill.w. Apis Pen 
sions. Taverna*. Hxriulays & 
nmlils si iimner winter Bin 
■ mires book mu. onlv diretl 
irom Ihe spramlr9> Xeniuaa 
Hotiilavs Tel 061 8345033 
GREEK ISLANDS. ALGARVE. 
Menorca. Train lie. Xillos aws. 
pensions. Tavarius Hcdidav. A 
flmbts siunnirT u-nilri Bio 
chiues nookimis eailx dneci 
irom Ihe saerfafasls Xenlura 
Hnfirt.ns Tel 01 250 1355 


Tin Vaknr 
Town Had 
Writun fiaipdi Mn« 
BS23 1UI. TafcOM4 31701 


MUSICAL 

INSTRUMENTS 


SALE. Piano World, snondfiand 
new ipciHHIiliOiieii L'nnoaldlile 
inns Ol 485 155S 


FOR HIM 


OWIKR suns 


WertriuHt Meninxa suits 
C* rmiHl tail .uil. 

Black hKkexs 
6lriprd liwnm 


FOR SALE tran £30. 
UPMANS MIRC DEPT. 

ZZ CMARHtC CROSS ROAD 
WC2 INr Lficutar Sg Total 
•1-240 2310. 


CITY CLUB Meiiuiervnip Luwld 
pr we CITO 034 287 3352 
ea einiig. 


SHI BOfBfE HUGE. Catered 
rnalrts ill Mental A Courche.pl 
Ir Cl^O h A twk i nr iravxi. 
Grcol loon, unlid v.nn- A exien 
-41 e BUKlinq Ol TSS 2333-737 
3861 anvanhone i 
TURKEY. Small pem-taus A ho 
iris Duro mom lo Izmir, 
□a la man. Analalya Departure* 
imni 4 Mav Tel -09231 
778344 Tims way Holidays 
APT A ATOL 1107 
LATIN AMERICAN TRAVEL. 
COniarl me experts io Latin 
amerJra Club A Isl Ctaxv. Ca 
rilMwau ISA A Mexico 
Stuiair Ol 629 1 130 
LOW FARES WORLDWIDE 
L SA s America Mid au-1 Far 
Eosl. 6 Alnca Trav.aie. 48 
Mar gal el Stire* Wl Ol 980 
2928 -Visa AcrepfeOi 
DISCOUNTS isl Eronomv lick 
els Trv us 

Iasi FL1GHTBCXJKERS Ol 387 
9100 

LOW COST FLIGHTS. Mow 
European di-yjualians 

Valesander Ol 402 

4262 0052 ABTA 

61004 ATOl l“eO 
LOW COST FLIGHTS Most Eur-s 
pean dmlliiaiions Valesander 
Ol 402 4262 0052 ABTA 
6l-X»a ATOL 19oO 
MIAMI. JAMAICA. N.TORK. 
Worldwide rhrapesl lares 
Rirnmoaixt Travel. I Duke S! 
Rft hmond ABTA Ol 940 4073 
TUNISIA For mat prrlrrt noUdav 
wdh sunny dav-s A carefree 
nrafib Ideal lor Marrh April 
Tunisian Travel. OI 573 441 1 


ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS 


WWUIWK 
amm Bonta» 

T-sfon DrC- 

Lrqn mock 


LYWtE IRELAND wouM like 
lo rspress hey thanks to ev . 
cTvone (or Ihcir floral 
irlhules and messages of 
svmpalhv on her sad 
itairaxpnieiK 


announcements 


Cam kUnxio 

uni 

Dam Sad tab 

tsaau few fort 

Qim*a» Seta 

geaoro wwa ltd 
2 QIMUn SWEII lOAfWU Wl 
nc OT 09 £2l'K0T 

ww Botcni 


JOHN REWALE) ikie/anne me 
•stints .iihi I heir Cxirli- Ihis 

s-.ll's xsail-d Netu.lfh Memoii 
al l.niini- loiinxusl In Trsune. 
.mil ll-ul.ni. Tu.^.lav lllh 
xi. ii . h .a o pm. Liineasii. ol 
I nnli.ll hethlle House Xl.ital 
-slieea Lon-tan WX_1 Xdnris 
skiii Ii *-e 

CXPANDMG PUBLISHERS 

WLH LU Llk’l TO HI. IR 
I HUM Al TTUjRS « .nu lu-r 
Ninini a n,«ik lh.il il's-m. 
f-*0-X|. .tlHin Wnu- ill Deni THE 
HUOK Gt ILU I m 25 H*oh 
sikvI Li-.*-- siiw.\ BM m 




EASTER AVAAAUUTY 

onglp Gieak tonty ohn BcauSbi pn- 
x»e nttaiSWMs «™ »<« book 
W e offer very dbwuI sowce al 
ctrsorwive ran We nave ar nduiuM 
l u tac og t of On so pteasa mg lor 
w mat ta<h kMue 

01-9*4 44*2/9226 ATOL 1022 


Cancer 


HEE50M Dudley |QOd I486, 
a Mini or ial Service will be 
held m Oundfe School Chanel 
oil Saturday 5lh July al 

1 1 30am. 

IRELAND GORDON GRANT 

Memorial service lo ho held 
al ihe Church of SI Magnui 
Ihi- Marivr Lovsrr Thames 
31 EC3 al 12 00 noon. On 
Monday 24ih of March All 
welcome 

WOOD Dr C A P wood A 
sea. ire of lh.inL.sgiv tug for 

Jhe life and work of Dr 
Wood v. in no held on 
WeitnesdAv 5lh March al 

12 CO man Ihe Chapel of 

Ihe Middlesex Hxr.pi lal. 
ML-rtiniei si. Lonaon wi. 


Together we can beat II' 

LSl- lund iwv-r on* third -d 
jit r--srjr<. h lino ihx* prrvt-n- 
II..-H and sme ol .xili trr in 
the Uk 

Help us h> si-nding jd>:<na- 
lli.-il-ir uiakea IrgJS) In 

ir&i 


Cancer 1 
Research ! 
Campaign 


TLJS (04201 88724 or 87423 

1 RA/EUA 3 


2 i jrll.*l H-.iiw Terrai'- 
ifs-jit TT/1/3 i I - .inlt.iiS'A II 5-sK 


HARRIS Eupheini.i Doiolhx • 
In ev er tov mu iikhioi y of our 
darlltm Multi Vs p thank you 

>w.sgrK-.ii i foi all tour love 
and devotion tkxdwad and 

CKsisy. Billy BuninunH. 
Jiicky ■ Peter .iihi Dirkunw. 


FORTY imifuK of love Les 

uu.ihe poiiOfttos 



PARTAIR 


N rofh E19B J-ouro i486 
Los AiqlAZi rAtfrob* LJM 
Sydney L639 BuMJCW 

Aurk £730 Toronto £z» 

130 Jemqin Street, 

- SW1 

Phone 01-839 7144 


PERTH return from £629 
SYD/MEL/BHiS ' £555 
AUCKLAND ' £745 

, SwwJanwBffiffSiDOn' 
t SPEOAUST can offer! 
01-242 5555 
R£HO TRAVEL (IATA} 

B.H7 Net* tWotoSt. Lowon WO 

L ftatoto— aaltaa 4 Urtaw* A 


SHORT LETS 


USA. Mil C.159 Miami UW 
! A L2V9 rtn Iho Cheape*i 
Mhedul- fu on inaioa LS corn 
ers oi 584 7371 ABTA. 
ALICANTE. Faro. Malaga rlc 
DmaoiKl Tiavrt ATOL 17B3 
Ol 581 4641. Hoc-mom 68541 
AUSSi*. xz.. Sin -Vraca. L S 4 
H9I-S kuw Br4l F.sies: 0149J 

7775 ABTA 

SYO/MEL C618 PTITIl C545 AH 
niaioi t.tmi-rs lo AU* NZ OI 
Ml 7371 ABTA 
AUSTRALIA. MW TE A ! AIB1. 
Genuine nwrounl fares 
OTC: Ol 602 3236 
H KONG £488 Bangkok Uxwym 
C426 other Fai CaM (Ksuim 
nan Ol 584 7371 ABTA 
LOUTH AFRICA JoTniig fr C465 
Ol 584 7371 ABTA 


SERVKCD ATARI MEtt 1 3 in 

K.-*isnHaio.i Colls -aom win 
lls Ctal-ngtxaai APfs. Ol STS 
6306 

LUXURY SER VI CE D PLATS. 

mitral London Irom £52£- |fw. 
Ring Town t»e AnW S73 3433 
ST JAMES'S PLACE yv*l Im- 
sman 2 tied . r PPL next io 
Pai k. Mart wa woo » h 



FLA.TSHARE 


SELF-CATERING 

FRANCE 


KST OF BRITTANY .Seawdesil 
L*> mreri irom Bri-xon owners 
InrludllKi fernes AAA 5S(ar 
ins tkomure Cnr Tun -SI 
Travel Bomaon on W.ater 

GIO.CL54 2A2T <04S1( 20927 
or 22074 ABTA 


SELF-CATERING 

GREECE 


Anoto Creek family oiler 
beautiful private villas 
■audios, many wnh poets, for 


Ental Dap. 28/3 - 1/4 
Sate Daw ZZf« ■ 28 4 
Tata 01-994 4462 . 8228 


iPRMC IN CORFU. A0TU/M4V 
xpe>iol pnres in our axlrorlise 
\ ill.is from Heoihi ow- Ring Pan 
world Holidays 01 734 2562 


SELF-CATERING ITALY 


TUCCAMY Rest oriel farmhouse in 
neart of Chianti Available from 
C taler in Oct From C200 pw 
sips 6 0494 60375 for details. 


WGHGATC ARCHWAY prail f 

0 . roe rmh room u. lux 
sa-ae-t flax Chrsr lo (i4h* 
Cl 75prm exrl Phone ail 
6 OOpm 01-272 2767 

LJUWROKE GROVE PrtM mate 

01 female 20 30 Beam, lid rot 
l.eje wnh oaiden Own loom 
uv- ot I.triUlies CBO to inrl 
meg- Tel SHI 8644 e.TO 

WANTED ware well oppomterl 
ILU house crnxm LoxULnn 
near liansport S mum Amen 
ran stair Mr Cav -.tsod 
Trteuhone davs « a l 1720 
ISLINGTON Pretty 3 bcs j i uum ed 
G-s. rmuw- lo tel Gas CH G-ln 
C250 an. inri Suit 4 guniN 
Tel Ol 3o9 2754 
TEMP. FLATSHAM 3A months, 
girt 22- secure and rotnloil 
able lial CouillmM Gann-ns 
(45 IS, nu 370 7065 pus 
BATTERSEA own bed ttaih. in 
fanulv twe use of Ml. C2SOp,m 
UK XII 4 OOom 01 2S3 7651 
CLAPHAM Prof r. 22* O R 
■small, share CH flat Cl 45 urn 
inrt Tet 01 622 68 TO 
FULHAM Prof M r Lux Flat 
IM or (45 00 pw esc! 
Tctohone 01 -731 7589 6 10pm 
WOtKAMtlt RD. 401 orrjou 25 
- (168 prm Inrt. Tef. 01 5B4 
8195 Alter 6 pm 
SWI1 Prof F. 27*. O R. snare 
lux CH tea- odn. nr shops (200 
prm (net Tel: 01-622 6870 
SW1 a really magnllXrtnH llal 
share Cl J 3 per week ,W mlh 
and rteanrr included 589 0910 
SWt naisnore -hcenrei o r. c h. 
v. m. I v C49pw. uar Suit 
ni S PHI. m l Ol 834 7956 
SW16 own dtae mi tar lux not 
bv c h (47pw Ret ess Pf> Ol 
3S2 4261 afler 7 00 pm. 

SWA 2 T lo star toe dbt m mi Ine 
(35 n w rxrt Tot day 0737B4 
2359 or eve 01 731 2375 
SWlLN-a or r. dbt in rn flat. 2 
nun BR C40 B w - rr* diu Ol- 
350 0061 eves 

WEST HAPSTEAD. Jubilee Pi cur 
girl 28* lo share warm rheas ful 
Mue a i (48 01 A35 4141 


AROUND TOWN 


ISO l lotted PtaV lit W1I 


liOIJ.VND Plftk 


Deiiqhirut new 2nd (Ir flat In 
small D b Work Mori xuiuu 

irrm wtm bdtoDnr will 

UM kil 1 dhto bed Isqirtard 
Bain. Esrptmu tocoum*. Co 
bn e mmse (185 pw 


The rhoare ot two mamaru- 
late flats an qnid or flr. 
Dtge bright rerp dmiiw rm. 
bout have 2 bdrim. Filled 
kll Bain vviih shsur Smart 
furnMHiigs Cleaner - once 
wpeUv Avail now. 6 oaths 
*. Co M. LI 80 200 pw 


Hi fata Park D'-UqhlluJ hse 

r IMmn Sinov bed. um.. 
sen -ail mi. pieitv 
raxi-p din. lux tutly (M lot. 
hak qge C240 
WJ taa a lten . v*rtt fiun & 

Her .am 2 bedims. I on <fut 

kil luuv (150 

rauurti 6uprm a lews 2 

dm bds. baight irreu with 
bob kil wash dry Bain 

W C gqr Good saJne (120 

•14MSXM 


OLD CHUCK STREET SW3 

Elegant Use with gan. 2 tqe 
i prep, good kil. 4 dtde beds. 2 
baths study ptavrni Avan l 
yr + Co lei CMOpw 
CHELSEA .-FULHAM BOROSRS 
Interior designed fUl.smort 
btrk I in sorter gdiis. Dricg. 
s ootA. s.'uuva. •nrn Reci>p. 
dbfr bedrm. kit A bath Co 
ki I VI t (190 pw. 

MAJENDIE & CO 
Ol 225 0433 


Quraishi 

Constantine 


FINE FLATS 
& HOUSES 
NEEDED HOW! 


In KBustnBton. Cholsoo. 
Fuiham. Putney. 
Wimbledon and 
Ri ch m o nd. 

Full management 

service pvodafala. 


i Ot- 244 73 S3 1 


PARK WESt, W2 

in um rnodeni 
MorkLOvvrtooktng garaem- _ 
2 beds- 1 reeep»- 1 1 '**5* 
nux-d uicbpo. inwnor 

OSO*5 : tori. CHAC HMT 




WEST BEN F, F Bifid 4 Itad 
I. ns nhuuse Oiu Ok- I.SSSpw 

■IK •( -■ k-li Ol 675 1B96 
mrue PARK-lmeuo* aesruiaed 2 

' bnlic-niie- large dos*»ie *er*T* 

Iwii sdti rill ill iu imH. Anaenrao 
kilrtu-n marblr halhfoom Plus 
u-p w- I lot wnh WilroiiV an 
presbqe work Avgilaht e wow 
palace PiapT’lfS 486 8926 


ItWIMC. M inhe v-71 web 
lnuwlmt 3 IKHl house. Uir66 
tointo-- kil-hp»i will* 41 
inarhni's. aaimooiB. k" W 

gat deal -XvaaoUlr ita-s lor CO 
lei Liy* TO Barnard Mar rov 
627 0393 


UttFURlOMED Fetarhed laruiK 
house mi kmushUtv Kta-9lsi>w 
Iv dee and nneried * 
dive ren-p 2 *>-dhitus. tataiwt 

MT*! frtHV rump fcfcl CM. 

KwiCo Kl. (300 pw 244 7353 
CHELSEA SW3- Grand 3 min* 
h-e™V4 lbs WUhllH. Dll- 1114 
■an *41. .-turn, dtae xhamng 
\Z 7 baths, gdn Ciosr s^ma.-- 
wuuuic \3tlO pw Property 
jox s -res 995 4176 
ISLINGTON S ml ns tone. Uew*^ 
lial rsiHV dta ml i«-Ti “me 
.atea ME CTL W5 "** 

i.ib<4*sM*n Avalioute imm 
ISlh Mdirh "fr* 'Trt. 

£83 2500x141 *» 607 rses 

KCNSMGTON *WS I ux isl fir 
out ' Lge lecrt* iWw; li-wh 



HAMPSTEAD. Hupeib mod I4B1 
its hse in hcsai I Ol Village 3 
rants -2 lge rots 2 tvdfe.. All. uld 
ran * to k up ggp H«Nv rer 
(425 pw NOIIUD vxTNon a Co 
794 1 lei 


CHELSEA SW. Attract fve 1 bed 
I cal air kurus Rd wain guolltv 
iuiidsmugs Rerep. f lining U4D. 
bed with l-n srnie haOa. Kll 
(I95pw Otars 878 S2B1 


VtltTVK LOIBMMr* .Xlten Bairs 
A r« has •- a tar tie selection of 
flats and luMfves av.wlable ia 1 
uid. * from ClSOpss «« 


RENTALS 


NR.VEMC4E, flat ui rounlrv 
house, 'lbs 4 6 July I4ih . Au 
gits! 17th Tel 0865 511840 


SELF-CATERING 

PORTUGAL 


ROLAND GARDENS *W7 Kevslv 
i .doe 1 bedroom 1101 (I25dw 
H al la k A CO 584*863 
SW 2 bed floL rrretil rhilrl ok 
(75 dm others loo 627 26U 
HomrtoraKMX 


luOe.ClAO pw others. • 627 
2610 Homrlnralors 
rilliwil I bedrm flat, trend 
Dhoita near tube (75 pw. oxh 
ers 627 2610 Hontekiralorx 
HMiMte Double ueoroodi hoi. 
TV washer no hill s C92 pw. 
627 2610 Hon re tor a tors 
H l.nxaDnn ■ CH 2 Bed ItaL near 
tithe, rerrpt Jihone. C87 pw 
627 2614 Hometor.uors 
NW 1 bed rial rere.pt jahoue. (85 
pw. olherv all areas 627 2610 
Hwnetoralors. 


EALING tux Rxsjrncs- < uta. .ill fa 
cam-.. 3 1—1 . neuli Cter toe 
artit Close an amendies. (250 
p m Tel Ol 579 4642 


tamtaars’p B l il l ft i to renting 
uualdv lunilshnd horiuw 

Hunters BJ 7365 


windows to auuxouv oirl f-wk 
■rift clfYURl al rti'n Ml 

Co LrT t vi iim> w * > a57 
NEAR RICHMOND BRUOE I rt xrr 
bulled Xartociaii ' < 
not double 4k wogle >— *ooiti . 
rereutwnx K iBCH Ikon shiok 

e* Company »ef S2t Z2 S£ 

Cl3Soer week Tef Ol B92 2775 
Hr VHMHELPON PARK WFiTh 
H-a- 2 dhle bedim. 2 r-pl 
B-ktast ran. Mod Ml. l 'tx 
Lw Gdq A Patio Fid Cpis A 

CH Ctau* all amen Co oi LraUi 

Lo| Cl 40 pw Ol 870 4USS 
OLD MONfTWl *D- 2 

hedioonteal nu*** 1 IW MfF 
temdipu. diiniag lia h. m oxbxn 
oolhraom A Uilrnx-ii P W 

CuLei Tel Ol 748 9772 ofl*-i H 
pm 

AMERICAN SPgCtAUSTS art- 
raaienllv seekUMj good quotas 
finul jrrnhmHxunon »• 
tenilal London tor w.idum 
roxnpank inuiirtxOl 957 96trt 
Chart a « Period ho.-*-'- " iooHimi 
T h-tmes 3 tv-Umnms. j. .uk-fOr 

now comxunv lei (23C- per 
week Devonshire German ltd 
286-4944 

Had and! 2 f— lr«ai ma*s««-llr- 
near lube LlOOpw. IRhep-lxai 
627 2610 Hbnaetoralors. 


aw- ii.niuii.irF .ISI 7767 
HOLLAND PARK *iMaranwt -.-ir 
liau Miliia XML (tar 1— Nn, 
lor leaepi. ‘ * •> X FR iaua i W. 
'.ICO iiw Tel P I 127. «wn - 
lUqOHTSMDM. ClMUaung j 
iwl ful Rem. ha B In tag 
lrs. (7801 m. -Wei, Bates a 
499 1665 

HMJCO. vyd Hixju , IM. 1 m 
hnl 11. pt. lih (135 p Iv f rr 
lea pita C1J «.B 0991 I Dos. 
■T77.2 932378 -evesr . 











PRAIA da LUZ Neagnoomima val 
lav both wnh pool, lor a A SO. 
Julv Aug Patirirr A Parker Ol 
493 5726 


SELF-CATERING SPAIN 


W2. L Usuis- 2 bed loom. 7 batli 
i nor- Hal hr lube Co Let PH-f 
1.160 pw 01 370 0230 
W14 Saions Cl Lnumr superti 
nets iiand 1 dhtr lirrl aol CISC 
pu up 01 675 1 89a 
WL Cosv 1 find not Cos rh. rot 
K.bd value al (120 pi> WTF 
935 0512 


(WL Musi be seen Luxury spfff 
level llal Oatunum po9bon on 
o.uden sauare. Large rerpl. 
krirhrn. 2 douhie bods. bath. 
Ion. slutly arra All weather len 
rus rt Min I year (235 p w 
Trt 01-736 2637 
CHBMCK 1 tied aarrrt tlM 
Would will pita male CH. 
pnanr (60 pw Tel 994 33<M. 
CLAPHAM, or tab*. Lux newlv 
deiSCannnai I tor rm. took 
A b (SB pw 874 1146 


MEWS FLAT - REGENTS PARK 

Prisoners* lull v I uid polking 
com (275 pw Tel. 4026390 


AMERICAN EXECUTIVES Seek 
lux iuis nxxitex up lo (300 
D w. L xual ten reg Plulbps 
Kav A Lewiv south « ihe Part. 
Chetseu nXflce. Ol 36 2 811 I or 
North al Ihe Park Rooeni s 
Park oilier. Ol 722 5135 


CONTACT US V xou -.ml Ihe 
veix best wlerboti ol -topenor 
flats and twua-v in Lmidou- 

Quijaym Constantine Tel- Ol 
244 7353 Telex 918984 
tenth Ke ns i ng ton Retail superh 
uiitumhhnrt Mews house. 4 
beds .3 bat b&- 44 us xamva .mat 
lef race Long ro let C5CO |iw. 
But htaians 351 7767. 
AMERICAN Bank unaenllv fe- 
atures luxury flat- anxf noiias 
Irom (200 Cl OOO pw Rmu 
BtnuesS E-Saxe Aqibits 581 5t 3o 
Al HawkHibn Renrat Arrnmm 
pbbltshers we Iiaie 5 olticex 
and 25 skull to help VOO 627 
2610. 7 davx. 




COSTA BLANCA L ialque a Ula in 
2 does o/ looking sea 4 bed 
rooms isteeps 8 10-. 3 bdlfrv. 
pi lv ate pool, maid servirr 
(340 (670 pw Orta Its 4. col 
our photo! 025566517 
MAZARRON Lnsxtall resort m S 
Spain Xmas Apis Sal Fit Gal 
kturrla iNr La Manga’ Beach 
Bat Hols 0432 270185 ATOL 
ACT 1517 


SPECIAL INTEREST 


SPEAK FRENCH in a friendly 
Treau-h family Good food, m 

spec (id homes Families & 
waps ait owes Also Study & 
Houieoarly Cm I m. Seaside 
TeciuitF* Croups S A E En Fa 
mtllr Agency Queens Lone. 
Arundel i0903l 883582 
VflCMKA. Spanish Rktnag Srfiool 
5 personally rondueied tours uv 
r tilde full drew performance 4 
private vtsil lo Lipizzaner Stud 
Ot pllier Full details PhiDlp 51 
moil Travel Trl. 0404 44191 
ABTA 


WINTER SPORTS 


SKI* SKI* SKI* SKI 


FLY FROM MANCHESTER 
• 8ATWICK 

FOR DUTY-FREE SKBHC 
FROM ONLY C 99 
M THE AMA2WC 
I B B I CH A LTTY OF AMK1RRA. 


HOTELS A APARTMENTS 
FREEDOM HOLIDAYS 
Ol 741 4686 061-236 0019 
ATOL 432 IATA AtTO 


SKI WHIZZ 



Catered Chatel Parties 
— FUN OH THE SLOPESS 
Picnics. Borbegue* 
and Parties 


Fnrfuilir Flight!. 
Food and Wine 

»C (148 

Rina Ol 370 0999 
AM 1820 


CHIEF EXECUTIVES 
DEPARTMENT 


Assistant Solicitor 

PO 3-* £122.543 - £13,578 p-a. inclusive 


Newham is located east of the City or London. 
As a London Borough it is has a wide range of 
inner city problems and the provision of hous- 
ing. education, social and otehr services. This 
is reflected in the demands made on the 
Councils legal stafff who are expected to make 
a full contributoon to the Council's work. 
There is now a vacancy tor a Solicitor who has 
the ability and the experience to represent the 
Council in the Magistrates' and the County 
Courts and at tribunals and public inquiries, to 
attend and give advice to one or more of the 
Councils Committees and to deal with a wide 
range of legal matters. 

The work is varied and interesting and should 
suit someone who has some admitted expoi- 
ence (preferably but not necessarily in. local 
government), and is keen to develop a career 
m local government law and administration. 


Wo will Hvlcomc applications from people who 
wish to joh share. 


MARCH, PEARSON AND SKELTON 
MANCHESTER 

We are a well established practice which provides a 
comprehensive legal service for a broadly based 
commercial clientele. We need Solicitors with good pre 
and/or post qualifications experience in the fields. of : 
company/commercial law and commercial conveyancing. 

Our prestigious offices provide a conducive working 
envoironment. Salary will be commensurate with 
experience and ability. We have vacancies for both newly 
qualified and Solicitors with substantial experience. 

Please telephone or write with c.v., quoting present 
salary, to:- - 

P.P. Haines, Esq., 

March, Pearson & Skelton, 

41 Spring Gardens, 

MANCHESTER M2 2BB 
061-8327290 


For fii fiber nfamtien and ippliatm forms 
write to tbe Chief Enatin, Town HaH, East 
Ham London E6 2RP or telephone 01-472 
1430. 

Exl 3045 n—tHin wfante CE 424. 


We can see you for an interview either in London .or 
Manchester. 


Closing date 21 Monk 1986. 


. bl-JimdfffsmunyA 


LONDON mm 
'BOROUGH Qf 

NEWHAM 


SKI VAL DY5CRE A HONES. 15 

klar.-lt 7 cay-, ski tug from (215 
B D inrtiauva ralrrrtl 
dim Chain holiday. Call Ski 
Xal on 01 903 4444 or 01 200 
6CRO-24hrsi ABTA 56431 
ATOL 1 162 


MARCH AVAILABILITY Andor 
ra Lux raKTixl and S rathmd 
noix hi*- -cl id tills Fblvair bar 
6 poof Ski valuta liu fit* 4 
uxl tramlrr Ir (179 Ski Joan 
iw 01 221 7913 
APRIL SHBNG Lair sxurw moans 
areal snow Fully ramrrd etta 
Wls Irom (199 A part mens 
irom C09 Bv Air Ski kiorCOi 
351 5466 ATOL 
SKI ANDORRA /AUSTRULHnlrh 
oi «.-n , ab-ring apis Coarh or 
(lv irom (79 Phour now for 
our ororhiirc Drtlnv Travrt 
Ol 373 3391 

SPECIAL. ZELL AM SEE ALS- 
TR1 X 15 3 fly. pvvkx C269 all 
inriiixxvi- Also oxrw-r taiarx Ski 
Total 10932* 231113 
PUY ST. VINCENT -Fronrh Alps) 
F I am (59 nart .vrom Cihik 
S nowxpcrls -06221 677071 
SKI LES ALPES for luxury ttai 
davx m \i-tbwr Pk-xv id lot 
dr tails 01 602 3086 
SKI M O K C i K great Obrount* 
a- tatabk- for Max 4 April Ring 
Oe>91 713620 

SHI PUY ST VINCENT Irom (69 

■nr Hots 01- 309 7070. Cxllir 
ATOl ITT2 


ROWLEY'S & BLEWITTS 
SOLICITORS 

MANCHESTER CITY CENTRE 


Require a Solicitor or Legal Executive 
experienced in personal injury litigation. 
Good salary plus car. 


Telephone Mr Fitzpatrick. 061-834 4215. for 
further details. 


YOUNG LITIGATION solicitor lo ADVOCATE /LITIGATOR with 
p(.ii inimrUM rofr in qrxmfng mod pxoxprt-ts III Herts io»n 
iwo oiffre Sorany-l prarTKr lirm. (15.000 Wrtsrv Consul 
(II 000 xywysrx conxullaiils lauls 0936-25183. 

0935-25183 

YOUNG SOUCnUR lor gnwral COMPANY COMMERCIAL admit 


THE LAW SOCIETY 
LAW GRADUATE 

The Law Socicix ihc professional association of solicitors 
in England and Wales is seeking a law graduate, who will 
ideally have studied tor The Law Society's Final exami- 
nation. io work in ihc Professional Purposes Department. 
Dunes will include the handling of enquiries from ihc . 
public, advising ihc profession on professional conduct 
and ethics, and in due course responsibility for the inter- 
pretation and enforcement of the Practice Rules, 
preparation of committee agenda notes, and servicing the 
Sub i ommittecs. 

Applicants will preferably have a knowledge of the prac- 
tice of the profession obtained through employment in a 
solicitors office. Full training will be given to the success- 
ful applicant who must have the ability io produce 
concise reports, communicate effectively at all levels and 
efficiently handle a large v olume of administrative work. 
Commencing salary c£JUt>3 per annum (July review), in 
a range with a current maximum of £ 1 1.079. Good condi- 
tions or employment include 23 days annual leave, staff 
restaurant, and pension and season ticket loan schemes. 
Interested applicants should sent CV’s to the Personnel 
Officer. The Law Society's Hall. 113 Chanccrv Lane. 
London WC2A I PL 


CONCERTS 


.* . . M. . 


BARBICAN HAUL 62B HTu q 6» 

H«9i t-io 7 «s PAvaRotn 

MASTERCLASS -OTl Luruoo 
PnaMii SOLD OUT. Paul. 
Vv VIUM- (aanin x Pi. imi 
ROYAL FESTIVAL MILL 01 1« 

3191 

cc mac Tontqnt I 


^ 'tor. 


i *• : - 


CAKaa. Vit* OvntMr. 1 IH- 
Furrr ta DrM-m Ctetatoe (toma 
Cm urn In N..2 B a il— h w v - 
Sv x ii pn onr An 2 


ROYAL FESTIVAL HALL Ol 92B 

M 9J cx: **ew flwno tomnim* 
7 30pm 

LONDON MOZART FLAYERS 




EtasnNr Sarba. Hyfte Fnmptan 

11% Nf- AH. 

M mtf i T aia lm: xmuv Cawtaa 

in ( Mnuq 

♦■■■ Ini ! Ovrrnnp. Taairfrtll 
MOZMll Svnqiinaaiv aoJO 
iLin/i 




OPER A & BALLET 


'V- 


it 


CO LISEU M 5 B36 3101 - 
„ rt 240 62S8 
ENGLISH NATIONAL OKRA 
Tout 7 36 Madm BaHcrft. 

Tnniof 7 50 La Bahama. . . . 


prartKT work with di-vrxomna 
allirr- or Varxi Country xtaul 
toix (13.000 totw 
ComulUnb 0935-25183 


Uxl 8384 (or Soujn Wakv linn 
Cl 1.040 Wrwv ComuHoiiK 
0935 26183 


INO AGENOES). 




THEATRES 


WINWARD FEARON & CO 


SELF-CATERING 


MALAGA, TUKKin 

Travrtweo- Ol 441 Lin 


MALDIVES, LAMZAROTE 

IsfcinUx Ol 836 4383 


We aj*e a seven partner firm with a substantial commercial 
practice together with high quality private client work and 
require as a consequence of our expanding client base and 
workload the following:- 

BUILDING CONTRACT 


OOMF ' COMME RCIAL tWL Sun 

nrslv mmUy odmilim Cxiv 
lypn work Cl 5 OOO .1 ,i e 

Co urt Awtauin Ol 583 0056 
COWVtr kHf i tH fox Nortlwntp 
too -tatu-itoax working wiihxm] 
xuprrvTugu C 10.000 Wrxxox 
OOnxgiionlx 0935 251B3 


TREE LIST of rounlrv i«raiv«x 
al xaiarirx Irnm (7.000 to 

(25.000 Ovomlim A Parturix 
Ol 606 9371. 


MATKtoMMAL SPECIALIST lui 

■trr 35 lor Curntal huh 
VIJ.OOO Wnm Conxulianlx 
0935 25183 


FOR HER 


A 1-3 year qualified solicitor. 


RESIDENTIAL CONVEYANCER 
i >S|Uirm KM 1 1 7 Pro'll- 1-' 
(15.000 4,1 e Court -VvaoiMlrs^ 
Ol 683 0056.. 


SENS MOTHER BuWMv. drxxtal 

■mix o* rtwcx. Dtux flxnvrt DOW 

in xiripry Qrtl box. Cl 1 SO ptux 
d-d To ordn Cocdtn 0727 
657-34. 


GENERAL LITIGATION 
A 1-3 year qualified solicitor. 


TRUST AND TAX work wiin Sir 
nuiMOum xolKilors urcItt 35 
(9000 Virwv Con-iiDlantx 
0935 25183 


ADCLRM 83b -611 Ol 240 
7913 4 er. 741 0999 836 

7358 J7o 6433 ’ 

Cna Solrt. 930 6123 
CC BOOKING TO VM.\S Rb 
tscrx-sjvri v wtih rarxiroHOn 
240 7200 24 lir » ftnx 

LAURENCE OUVtXR. 

AWAKD MWMERS 
KST MUSICAL OF THE “YEAR 
CNN Si 

REirzL PLML3RD 

ME AND MY GIRL- 

THE L VkW TH W ALK 
ML-Jfxi. - 

■» -s?jJ(S“ ,k 

EkriYlM ftv Mikp (if BtH-flK 
NktoUX al 7 SO MMa Writ M 2 SO 
4 N.I1 a Jo & 8 OO - 

THE ONLY UVE MUSICAL 

rvc EVER ENJOVED" 

tWnMn. 


ENT 




TVmON 


CONVEYANCING 


YOUNG LITIGATOR wnt, main 
raxmial bias lu nini 6tn i n 
nrm dl.CKiO kPwvCOiMil 
Unix 0935 25183. 


ENGLISH FOR rornan xlun-mlx 
ImJivinuat lialioti bv qivrfiltrd 

l.'arva irj^mMblr rairv Trl 
Ol <*94 1374 or 01 624 9717 


A newly qualified solicitor to assist 
in both domestic and commercial conveyancing. 


DOMESTIC 4 CATERING 
Sm/ATIONS 


For all the above posts a high level of academic ability is 
essential. 


YOUNG PROBATE «pr, M | w 
xonir roi ill-van.- mg tor hull 
BtaUara lom tioooo vvtom<x 
C tmxotwnls 09.36 25 ihj 
'T tMkT WVkTED Drxorx 
CHAMBERS. S' ST ANDREW 
VTRrrT. PL VMO( TH - 


HUBERT 0I-H36 VI78 CC TT9 
6565 CC 379 o4ix 741 rjtton 
G>b sak-x 930 6123 BJ6' i°o2 
Lu-. 7 15 Sals 20 A IV 

t ACTOR OF THE YEAR 

Utii t-*i A •ixaiNlaiat YnaiOs '85 
ANTONV SHI J*7i 
L VST X kUkkM 

T2S™. TRILOGY 

BRILLIANTLY FUNNY" OO- 


“** v-.. ~ ■^r-..--* 


H . 

- ... - 


CHAUFFEUR MA/9TMAN to 

ui-irm ioi I ial art* in Parai-r.iWi 
iik-riHvi -.On wiir ■» i It iiki lo jx 

4.1 l. fill IMIU-i-tKO.1 tllllH— . 

1 iHni nr-on-ii ■<• - miiniiM2.il --n 

.k.iiIji*. Mini ban- Rolls r\in- 
u-ip-. ..nit I.*-*..!- rw*ili.if 
1. k-plKMir 047 41C Pyaa all. -I 
-pin i-iommi ■ llamas 
OVERSEAS AU PAIR AGENCY 
87 R-u-111 Slim I n*un Wl 
7-1 4 V- 6534 I h OinviA 

,\hn -i. imp. OIII1-. 1—.IP 1-1.11 


Please reply together with curriculum vitae to: 


LEGAL LA CREME 


ROGER DOULTON 
WINWARD FEARON & CO. 
35 BOW STREET, 
LONDON WC2E 7AU. 


PI BLIC NOTICES 


I vp ix.cv«.c Pt at (sur ps 
WUI LD Ltkl TL- 111. AR 

r RL.-X1 V( TltUPS 

II l oil lull- •-imrai a h-«l IISM 
■k— -r* pnoiR ali.-o Wi no to 
TMr B*>JK Cl 11 Cl LTD 20 H«Hi 
SX-.-l L.-»r- Xuw. BS7 2LI 


PREP & PL BLIC 
SCHOOLS 


Legal La Creme 


CONWCYAHCiNG PA tin son 

5S Lvf "Umi oono, in 

MKi xo aoui nt<-4*sia.K (xvt 
prsK hra- ox Pni lurr. p.. 
xnrruiixxmi in all oximyi* at 
urcntati M»k .Xu " 

•ml out an IBM D-ta-li.I.lr, 
. I'tami* -ill nr pro 

1 t-ktt l-lk-Ili van OiijtlM tsn r 
•5™' to9al rxtmnnr jrtin i| V 
R,, “* toarr 
Ol w 5277 Mai crans a 
•'■ no-MI-x -Rrr cans- 


ALDWYCM Ol 8 36 6404 (Ml 
CC 379 62U rnvl (kiu 24 to CC 

oi 240 7200 n*-« 7 so 

Catun Uii 4 o A WO 

”®V1£W3 FROM THURSDAY 

°N( THIRD OFT Al 1 Wlb 
Wty- MARCII 18 ,11 7 pill 
rojor r KENDAL 
PETER McENEHY - 
ROUAMNX wkttrow a 
PAUL SHELLEY hi 
MADE IN BANGKOK 
A nn. pf.n m tnlhrm 

Minqln-Ha -.villi Inraxtophn 

• uUxhiJ A n.i»Ml V m 
Dll rural bl MirlidH aAianW- 
T lt*x 11(01 xlr tax With tal 
AxorrUoi toiu aw ui Bonakokoaul 
tool not nr -oakiMi- ID. inuiM 
iwim 


H:.. - 




to .‘X.* 


WtOCH SCHOOL? Out refill— W 

liiKM^rin'tilKluhiiviPp * onv 
•iimI M9 IP* rmiiViii A 

ktituhlhi. To «TSi Noiliim Hill 
Otaili- Ul 2 Trl- Ol 7=T7 12J2 


URGENT TEMPS 


LCCAJL SCCIVTAIttQ 

rNl^Irttshrfl tong rnq Pr.triatF- 

MliP* slMKlIvmri riiulio re# cqo 
ui*ftIL .PlronT Trj ni 370 
ISCJ M„nror ZytrT ° 


LEGAL NOTICES 


We have a demand for Legal Secretaries to work for 
our prestigious clients throughout Central London. 
Excellent rates plus ho) id ay and Bank Hobday pay. 


CHANCERY LANE LEGAL SEC. 

«*«*«*. TCAuSurSaTVr 

P«.Rk4ANLIxTh ux. to LI 0^00 

Z9. Vlfilitm M . Lo-vdon w . 

(-1493 0045 Wl 


HOTVJN no RXJ TV n 

1 1 Uht ,V.l ih Vioulinrr< 
Cwl.-w Vv.*am.-r«. Umi 

H.-U-un tvniinlrivliiM- rtml 
S*-l is* 1 ' --m*r-r l°85 o,irli.-ilaix 
in IWvv s 1 Lari A Wilfioi 
(toll- itcas e-l kmhita 6lml, Bit 
miiKin.im (u-arvr 30th AIM 11 
Itoto 

1 s VIS\ MVrri RSL Otalmxi 
txix’i L.ifllUm 486 ON 1 3 


GENERAL 

APPOINTMENTS 


COLRSES 


BONHAMS o uk f tail liiun 

v ixai.il Arts r jimsr xklilx PH II- 
vimi Aptui Piiinuta Ol 584 
OoajT 


WC ARC A Pirm— a-i- lam o* I 
1 ~l.il'- l-p-nlx ui (rini.il I mi 
.-■tn M-.aul-.nai in ■ rl-nlxil I 
piuprall -tars Iha-lr Ol- lull. | 
linn* nxH-liilius lut Jmii.it N-nin I 
llrllilx «n-< mil *»■ J.pr-1 
luitirrfi |M JO in.m |uir a 
■li |. um In .in r .iiki ■< -■ nu hi mill 

.•■IHH1 IIP to V t-H.I sl.llMkll (I 

I Ilfs is .hi idi-iil Oran ii I 'il i it’ 114 
ep .inunlmr* |ri sun Jn iwu inn" , 
■q I niuinns most siki rssiul I * 
kil,- lir-uts .'IHI tr* '-.it mnu .u« . 
■ -xi.-nlHH1.il xlaUiri .Illn 'll in tu 
Ikii irjrx ntl-itsi--- li.illtiiiu 
(tal Ol ??l 35J4 Km I VII I 


1. Legal WP Secs Shorthand and Audio . up to 

£6.80 p.h. 

2. Legal Audio/Shorttiand Secs, up to £6.00 p.h. 

For more information about these and other interest- 
ing positions, please can Carmel on 01-242 0785. 


«»teSBADOR* Warn, si Wl? 

f V ia _ 6111 (WH W*l 
1171 741 9089. (4 amp Stars Ot 
9 Jq 6123 Mau Ttnns m tqwn. I il 

YKC 1 Tw^ns *or .cwon 

^^CDMPANY ^ 

landcn ooddard 

CAWOf l ° MW QUAY U _ 

n*** ™ -U atmSB 

. snd RATMONO FRANCIS 






TCrsoimei 

I Appointments Wf 


95 Aktwycn. Lonom WC2B4^ Tel. Oi -2*30785 
iMtnsans serrat 


UTIBATION SECRETARY HU, 

H'ta ol aria Itai-aul-nn Dnun 

'taxrun in tom hr. torn . i. K 
'«* tons! hail, 
mt'rtl-ta xlaorthuiHi t,p»nv 
•Wills .Uhl (all'll hms ttnuMM- 
I n rtr.anii,n,u 

“tWiri . pi rtriruv w .,| h 
tocta lilKitaiati »Mrk«ircnmtJ 

n In 14 .-. lain mi oit m 

Wf talrf .1 raniDi'liinr k.Uj,« 
..■hi in.-ii.Ui waZll 

toH-taiiirt M.uitan ai tih-o 

*■' *Jrniwl. London trt V 41 j 

to^lrtannr bn 


BEGINS AT FORTY 

a drinitoim rnannti • 

““•’kiln Ihranaiti -J.dh- 1986 

tofrtrttaioiii tnruxrta M4M« 


1S^ 1 ; 0 .,7 | fCAT*E rr act 

AM 4 4«4 ss 69 9 21M TNI- 

'' w+mqs 

ruxlttal 240 7200 • 

SS Oft KEITH 
**A"K KIMG51DN ' 


'O ' ’“ J L - ' - 

/ ^ -’L,. . - 

- " 'rtta-.a. ..' - 


the DRAGONS tail 

Fimni a Ctartromino' 

1 »„ . '- 1 * 1 Umfi • • 

li! - <>««**■ V-.iJF^* 

Li. s 'rirturt Rtstnun 
Liar.9tonrn7.-I0 Trauxs tvioi 3.0 

Stax 5.0 * H 15- ( 

moiip toiri uv 0123 

Last three weeks 


* ' - - -?T. * 























































i-.r i 




. 

-V-.. V •• 


- ;*«. 


r\TT- 




vwstonjandarevtewof ■ 

ISS^eEr"™ 

Titchmareh's gardening 
advice. 

&20 Ceefax 1030 Play 
School- IQJiO CafBL 

1JL30 News After Noon with - 
Richard Wfirtmora and 
Frances Cbverdcrie 
includes news headlines 

wite subtitles 1255 

Regional news and 

weather. 

1-00 Pebble H» at One with 
Paul Cola, Marian Foster 

A nw3^ratme!^r SSOn " 
multiple sclerosis is 
investigated with a 
contribution from a 
sufferer who dalms it has 

given him relief from his 
symptons; Heather 
Couper begins a monthly 
series on heavenly bodes; 
and Ashley Jackson 
presents tee-first of a 
series In which he talks to 
celebrities about their 
Interest in painting. Pius, a 
song from Roseanne, 
daughter of Johnny Cash. 

1 .45 Chock-a- BtockJ rl 

2.00 The Goode Kitchen. 

Shirley Goode prepares an 
inexpensive sea-food 
pasta and explains how to 
make curd cheese 2.15 
The Parent Progr amm e. 
Francis Wilson and Miriam 
O'Rddy with advice on 
surviving with under-fives 
240 Ceeta £52 Regional 
news 

3JS PosOnan Pat (r) 4.10 
Laurel and Hardy. 

Cartoon version (r) 4.15 
Jacfcenory. Joanna Monro 
with part two of £red 
Biytpn's, The Circus of 
Adventure 4J25 
B a titnam an 440The 
RaaByWOd Show. The 
fast progr amm e of the 
series in which Terry 
Nutidns arid his team 
answer viewers' questions 
on natural history matters. 

540 Neweratmd, presented by 
Roger Finn fL10 Orange 
HfiLEpisode 17 and 
Zammo is In more trouble. 
(Ceefax) 

545 Fax! BilOdde, Wendy 
Laavesiey and BWy Butler 
sattte another selection off 
arguments. 

640 News wffo Sue Lawtey and 
Nicholas WitcheW. 

Weather. 

845 Lon d on Plus. 

740 ffofidey, introduced fay 
CWf Mtchetmore. Tom 
Savage reports on a Hong 
Kong holiday; Anne Gregg 
takes a Norwegian fjords 
cruise; and BflfBucktey 
tacfdes a photographic 
holiday course m a Welsh 
manorhouse. 

740 E a st E n d ers.Denfnakesa 
dramatic discovery. - 

840 Sw by One. Wfth the 
Northern Zoo aboutto 
dose, MrChaHon,a 
stocktaker. is appointed to 
find new homes tor the - 
animalsJilfCeefax) ' 

8.50 Points of View. 

940 News with Julia Sqmervffie 
and Andrew Harvey. 
Weather. ... 

940 Hideaway. Cob), in a 
desperate attempt to 
diffuse his threatened 
situation, pays off the two 
Dutchmen; has a 

conversation with Amie; 
and tries to mofltfy 
Detetctive Adams. 
(Ceefax) 

1040 Film 85- Bany Norman 
reviews Out of Africa and . 
interviews one of the 
stars, Meryi Streep. 

1040 Nothing But the Best The 
final part of tee series for 
parents on secondary . 
education. 

11.15 SportartghlStreciaL 
Highlights from one of 
tonight's football matches 
and the latest news on foe 
Bruno/Coetzee bout 

12.05Weather. 


THE TIMES TUESDAY MARCH 4 1986 


Today’s television and radio programmes 


Edited by Peter Dear 
and Peter Davalle 


640 Ceefax AM. 

640 Breakfast 11m vriteFfenk 

Weather at 655, 745, 

745, 845 and 8^; 

regional news, weather 

traffic at 647, 747, 
747 and 847; national and 

sport at 740 and 84th 
Junta Advice line at Yjsl 
loBowed approximately an 


6-15 Gkiod 


Morning Britain,. 
ntedbyAnne 


ramond arid Nk* Owen. 
&WdSesat640;news 
with Gordon Honeycombe 

840 and 940; sport at 
' 645 and 744; regional 
report at 7.15; Popeye ■ 
rarewm 744; pop video 
at74^fflm review at 844? 

reunions at 8*45; a 
personal view from 
Geoffrey Cannon on what 

e wrong with the British 


945 Themes news haadfinas. 

940 For Schools; How to talk, 
aboutthe future. For tee 
, hearing impaired 940 
Flora and fauna that 
survives on rocks 1049 
Ways in which hands are 
wedtdpass messages 
1046 German - 
conversation far beginners 
IMS Parliamentary 
lobbyists and pressure 
groups 11.10 The role of 
‘ computers 1147 

Schoolchildren inves tiga te 
bullying 11.44 Ralph 

Steadman examines 
various aspects of 'maktog 
faces' 

1240 Button Moon. Puppet 
adventures of the Spoon 
family 12.10 Rainbow 
Learning made fun wfth 
puppets (rt 1240 The 


140 News at One with Leonard 
Parkin 140 Themin news 
presented by Robin 
Houston 140 Shim On 
Harvey Moon. The final 
part of the comedy drama 
serial about an ex- 
serviceman coming to 
terms wfth chrWan life In 
London after the Second 
World War. (0 

240 Daytime. Sarah Kennedy 
chairs a studio discussion 
on a topical matter 8.00 
Moutmrap. A new quiz 
game show, presented by 
Don Maclean. 345 

Thames news heacffines; 
340 The Young Doctors. 
Medical drama series from 
Australia 

440 Button Moon. A repeat of 
’ the programme shown at 
noon 4.10 fin the Minder. 
Cartoon series 440 The 
Wind in the WiSows. Toad 
tires of croquet and takes 
up golf (Oracle) 445 
Splash. The children's 
series in which the viewers 
decide the content 

5.15 Conmclions. Quiz game 
for teenagers, presented 
by Sue Robbie. 

5.45 News 640 Thames news. 

645 Reporting London. The 
findings of a report 
prepared by international 
experts exaniiting what 
would happen If London 
was the target of a nucie&r 
strike. .. 

7.00 Era m en Me Farm. Jack 
Sugden is determined that 
Ermnerdatewtil be tee 
successful bidder for - 
- Mowfenf stand. ■ * 

740 Busma n's Ho Odey.Jufan 
Pettifar presents another 

- . roundo* toe quiz game for 
teams.(Orade) ..' . 

840 HagmnL CaroL a deputy 
. , dfaflc t attorney, cons 
r Magnum and Higgins Into 
■ helping bar arrange an' 


• -- elaborate ‘sting* • 
operation. 

940 Boan.Thb weak the 
. freelance trouble shooter 
is reluctant to take a job ' 
moving antiques for a 
dealer. (Oracle) . 

1040 Newest Ten and weather 
foflowed by Thames news 
neacutnes* 

1040 First Tuesday. Len 

Harding, Borne Number, 
examines how former 
Rampton patient, Len 
Harding, is coping with the 
outside world. Kent Coal: 
Staying on Top, 
investigates the mood of 
the miners of Kent, one 
year after the endof the 
coal dispute, {see Choice) 

1145 FBrb Attempt to KRP 

(1961) starring Derek Farr 
and Tony Wright PoBce ' 
inspector Mtoter 
. investigates murder 
attempts on a 
businessman. Directed by 

Royston Moriey. 

1245 Night Thoughts 


• LEN HARDING: BORN A 
NUMBER (TTV, 10.30pm) brings 
up to date John Wife's 1979 
exposure of the BRreHtment of 
psychiatric patients at 
Rampton hospital.The impact of 
toatfim, Rampton: The 
Secret Hospital was immedate 
and dra m atic: a wide-ranging 
pofk» inquiry .prosecutions 

on appeal, 
one man sent to prison, and a 
Government Inqiwy.One of tee 
faces one remembers most 
from teat campaigning film was 
that of Len Harding, 
diagnosed as a psycopath. and 
Incarcerated in institutions for 
34 of his 35 years. When last we 
saw Mm, he was out of 
Rampton. and beginning a new 
and solitary Tile in a beo-sitter 


> Harding Born a Number. On after rehabHHation in a half-way 
ITV, 1030pm house-small an d confined Ms 


645 Open University: Sdence- 
rocks and magnets. Ends 

at 740. ^ 

9. 00 rnnfnnr 

940 Daytime on TWa. For the 
moderately mentally 
handicapped young adult 
945 Spanish conversation 
942 Maths: turning a 
mathematical rule Into a 
graph 18.15 A chapter 
from the Boy From Space, 
by Richard Carpenter 
1048 The future tor coal 
. 1140 Continuing the 
series exploring what He 
was Ike at the mm of the 
century 11.17 A forest 
walk and a stroif along a 
Strand 1149 Ways of 
producing alternative 
energy 1240 A portrait of 
a family run hotel in La 
Rochefe 1240 German 
conversation 1245 
Ceefax 140 French 
conversation 148 The 
sea-birds that have made 
the diffs of St Abbs and 
the Bass Rock their home 
240 For four- and five- 
year olds 2.15 The history 
of a local park 240 Sub- 
aqua societies. 

340 Ceefax. 

525 News summary with 
subtitles. Weather. 

540 The Grain Run. The first of 
aseriesof five 
programmes in which Pete 
Morgan navigates the 
Roman waterways of 
Britain by barge and 
boatffirst shown on BBC • 
Norte) . 

640 No Limits. Jenny Powefl 
and Tony Baker take theor 
dreadful accents to 
Norwich; on a boat trip cm 
the Broads; and a ride on 
stage coach that used to 
take the mail between 
London and East Angfia. 
Plus, pop music and 
videos. 

640 Joni Jones. Part two of 
the serial and Joni to 
introduced to chewring 
gum by visiting GIs. 

740 Cartoon Two. line ame a 
vote. From Canada, (r) 

740 ThO Money Makers. A 
profile of Akfo Morita, 

■ chief executive of the 
Japanese company, Sony. 

840 South East Reports. 
Reporter Fran Morrison 
investigates- the chaos and 
uncert a toty th r ea te ni ng 
London’s arts bodes once 
the GLC is abolished. 

840 Food and Drink. This final 
programme of the series 
indudes reports on the E 
numbers that me 
supposed to teH us what is 
to the food we eat on the 
best low fat spreads; and 
tee exotic vegetables that 
are becoming 
commonplace to the local 
greengrocers. 

940 L CIn d hn , Spfaode eight 
and Caligula becomes 
Emperor after the murder 
offiberius. The promising 
start to the ratal is soon 

• eclipsed by CaBgufa's 
delusion that hels the god 
Zeus, and by marrying hto 
sister after proclaiming her 
a goddess. Starring Derek 
Jacobi, John Hurt and 
Margaret Tyzack.(r) 

956 Arana. A profile of tee 
Japanese film director, 
Akira Kurosawa 
coinciding with the 
opening m London's West 
Bid of nis latest fi&n, Ran. 

1140 Newengbt 11.45 
Weather! • 


240 FOm: Mr Robinson 
Crusoe* (1932) starring 
Douglas Fairbanks and 
Mana Alba. Comedy about 
a playboy who accepts a 
bet to five in isolation on a 
South Pacific Island. 
Directed by Edward 


345 Yoars Ahead. Robert 
Dougs# presents another 
ecStion of the magazine 
programme for the older 
viewer. The contentious 
subject of British 
Telecom’s standing 
charges is examined; 
Zana Skinner takes up 
artist Tony Wafer's claim 
that he can teach anyone 
to paint in 30 minutes; 
Paul Lewis Investigates 
benefits far those with 
disabilities; and Frances 
Perry has seasonal 
gardening advice. 

440 countdown. Yesterday's 
winner is challenged tv 
Nigel Ingham from Cfifton 


540 Bewitched. The 20te 
century witch, Samantha 
Stephens, is sent back to 
the witch-hunting days of 
the 17th century by the 
dotty Aunt Clara. 

540 More Thm Meets the Eye. 
This second programme in 
the series on flower 
ar r an g in g finds presenter 
Sue Fte»ps to the 
Netherlands, to tee studio 
Michael Saunders 
demonstrates the various 
styles of European flower 
arrangement 

640 Pop the Queotion. Pop 
nostalgia qita. The team 
captains, Chris Tarrant 
and David Hamilton, are 
jotoed by Salty James, 
Anneka Rice, Duggie 
Brown and Adrian Juste. 

640 Danger Mi* British 
Intelligence agent John 
Drake is sent to Scotland 
to investigate the 
reappearance of a master 
spy thought to have died 
ten years earitor. 

7.00 Channel Four news with 
Peter Stosons and Afasttor 
Stewart Includes a report 
from Anne Peridns to 
G ri methorpe, a community 
deeply affected by tee 
miners' strflee. 

740 Comment With his views 
on a matter of topical 
Importance to Frank 
Cousfris, a writer and 

lecturer on tee history of 
science. Weather. 

840 Braotalda.Bifly fa 
. receiving a roasting In 
court andDoraen is 
wonted that the 
experience nW lead to hto 
losing tm job and hto 
house. • 

640 4 Whet Ifs Worth. Anew 
series of the c o n s umer 
maga zine begins with 
JohnStoneborough 


which, it to claimed, 
expkXtstee unemployed; 
BB Bracken and tee Kent 
pofica uncover the 
dangersof body identified 
chemical kxrtoe; and 
David Stafford has the 
best buys in compact disc 


940 nhn: Cxcslbur (1981) 
starring Nigel Teny and 
Helen Mirren. John 
Boorman's lavish version 
of the old Arthurian 

0Q8OQ- 

1140 The Tom. A repeat of the 
Heavy Metal spedai 
shown last Friday. Bids at 
1245 


CHOICE 


new world was, but at least it 
was a place where he could 

shed tears in peace. Mow Mr 

Willis has turned the camera 
on Len Harcfing once more, and 
we see that tee man who was 
born a number is now a Mr.He 
has a wife, home and job and 
ha has written a book which is an 
dtoquem plea for better 
treatment of the mentally 
iD.Completing tonight's 
edition of First Tuesday is 
another up-dating, Kent Coat 
Staying on Top .These were the 
last miners to drag their heels 
back to work at the end of the 
tong and violent coalfield 
strike, and the mood of both the 

men and their families one 
year later is exactly what you 
would expect it to oe.: bleak 
and bitter. 


( Radio 4 j 

545 Shipping 640 New*. 6.10 
Farming 645 Prayer (bL 

640 Today, md 640, 740, 

840 News 645 Business 
News 645, 745 Weather 
740, 840 News 740 
Letters 745, 845 Sport 745 
Thought for the Day. 845 
Yesterday In Parliament. 

847 weather Travel. 

9.00 News 

9.05 Tuesday CaB: 01-580 
4411 

1040 News; From our own 
correspondent Life and 
poWcs abroad, reported by 
BBC foreign 

c ur m soo ndBOts. 

1040 ktomSgStovThe 
Dance of the Little 
Swans by Jenny Hursett. 
Read by Valerie Windsor. 
1045 Daily Service (New Every 
Morning, page S3) (s). 

1140 News; Travel: Thirty- 
Minute Theatre: Mrs 
Donaldson at 60 by 
Constance Cox. with 
Duhae Gray as the poor 
widow (s). 

1143 The Unrig World: News 

ofwfldUfe. 

1240 News; You and Yours. 

With Pattie Cotowefi. 

, 1247 My Word! Panel game 
with Dilys Powell and 
Frank Muir challenging 
Antotea Fraser and 
Denis Norden is). 1245 
WratherJravsiL 

140 The World at One: News. 

140 The Archers. 145 

tassnurt Hour, 
includes a feature on 
Nanoose Peace Camp on 
Vancouver island. 

340 News; WNsh Drama: The 
Penrhyn Summer by 
Alison Leonard. With 
Alexandra Mathis (s). 

440 News. 

446 Communities in Crisis. 

How communities have 
coped with efifferent types of 
crisis (1) Shutdown. 

440 Kaleidoscope. Last 
night’s edition ( 1 % 

540 PM: News magazfne- 
540 Shipping 555 
Weather. 

840 News; Rnanctal Report 

640 Oh, Yes it tsl History of 
pantomine, narrated by 
Richard Briers (6). 

7 00 News 

74S The Archers 

740 Re on 4. With Stuart 
Simon. 

840 Medicine Now. (Geoff 
Watts). 

840 The Tuesday Feature: 

Culture Shock. MoOy 
Price-Owen reports on 
people who take up 

rrH Writ; 5 Tipm-SJO Wales 
ppv> 1 Today SJJS-7 JX) The Chrta SU- 
art Cha Cha Chet ShmrUO-lUO 
Week in Week OuL 1040-1040 AM 
Jones tZ05-t2.10MNewSjpd_ 
vwwttJBr-ScoJlBnd iCL20am-1840 
Dotamen 645-740 ReportngSco*- 
(and 1040-10*0 The iSoftofTorMue 
1040-1140 Ran 86 1140-1140 Ute 
Nkyit in Concert 114B-T1.5S weather 
.Northern ketend S4Sjx?£«0 
Today’s &on 5.0000 Insxje Ulster 
eSfjOtSte One l^wn-IZIO 

News en d w Mtw r^nptandlZeo- 

1240pm Esst on Two. East . . 

only2a6-740 Regiornf news nwgMnes. 

_ii S5SSU 

shoot Horwa Don’t VSto_? MMende: 

Body TrfcNortheni Ughts. NorthEast 
Vm >UWnw«ShowJ&1hW«t Mss- 
Mnotthe Mwine4outfE E^oringQar- 
dens. S uHW i ui AnaqueeetHome. 
WesfcOenoa with me Henry. 

CHANNEL asSTfffSSU. 

1 140 Channel News end wertter 140 
I A Country Practice 340 Ouertone 5.12 
PufBi’s PtoGjce SIS Sons and 
Deugtare 640 Chmel Report 045 
Crossroads 1145 The ChenpioM 
1245am WaaOier.Ctosa 




• John Boorman's film 
EXCAUBUR(ChanneI 
4,9.00pm)ls a version of 
Maltory'sMorted’Arthurteatis , 
as remote in style from the 
musical Cametat as My Fair Lady ! 
was from Pygmalion. This Is 

not to say that the Arthurian 
legend has been 
imeuectuaiized out of all 
recognition. It is simply to 
recognize teat Boorman has 
given the legend a 
philosophical edge teat satisfies 
the mind while allowing the 
eye to be astonished at Anthony 
Pratt's sets. 

• Radio chofceStephen 
Hough playing Rachmaninov's 
Piano Concerto No 1 with the 
City of Birminghan SO (Radio 
3.740pm). 

Peter Davalle 


340 In Touch. For people with 

a visual handicap. 


C minor, wrtti Hoikger. 
soloist): Haydn 
(Symphony No 22) 

10.45 BBC Singers: works by 
Ireland (me Hills: A 
Garland for the Queen). 
Delius (with David Roy. 
tenor). Britten and Stanford 
(from Eight Part Songs. 

Op 119). 

11.15 Nash Ensemble: Mozart 


(Octet. Op 3) 

12.10 Midday Concert BBC 
Scottish SO. with Syivt 


940 Persona Grata. Nigel 
Rees taBcs about inree of 
his favourite characters from 
fiction. 

345 Kaleidoscope. With 
Christopher Cook. 

10.15 A Book At Bedtime: 


TTv:- 


1040 

11.15 

Tonight 

1140 Today in Parliament 
1240 News; Weather. 1243 
Shipping. 

^ S^WaJfrjfonlvfas a£x>ve 
except 545-640 am 
Weather Travel. 1140- 

12.00 For Schools: 11.00 
Time and Tune (s) 1140 
Time to Move 11.40 
Musicianship: Fatty 

Stages (s). 145-340 pm For 
Schools: 1^ Listening 
Comer 2.05 History: Not So 
Long Ago 245 Contact 
2. 40 Pictures in your Mind 
(Stories). 540-545 PM 
(continued) 1148-12.10 am 
Open University 1140 
Open Forum. 1140 Poetry. 
1240-1.10 Schools Night- 
Tlme Broadcasting: 

Rehersing for Work. 1240 
The First Few Days. 1240 
Folding your F6et 

( Radio 3 ) 

645 Weather. 740 News 
745 Morning Concert 
Chabner (Gwendoline 
overture); Sauguett (CeHo 
Concerto: with 
Rostropovich as soloist 
Satie(La diva de 
I'Empire.wtth 
Ameimg soprano); 

Debussy (Images oubliees: 
Kocsis.piano).. 640 
News. 

845 Con cert part two. Suk 

S intastic Scherzo. Op 
); Bizet (Recitative and 
aria: Lorage s'est 
cal me... O Natfir. tendreaml 
(Souzay .baritone); 

Beethoven (Sonata m A, Op 
2 No 2: Gfels-piano). 940 
News 

945 This Week's Composer 
Poulenc. The cantata Le 
bai masque; Cinq poemes de 
Max Jacob(Elly 
Amekng^aprano): Quatre 
poemes d‘Apo!trnaire( 

Souzay, baritone); Concerto 
in D mmor for two pianos . I 
and orchestra: the composer ; 
is the soloist). 

1040 Bertfn and Esterhaza: 

Graun (Oboe Concerto in 



Nigel Terry ia. Ex caliber. 
Channel 4^.00pra 


REGIONAL TELEVISION VARIATIONS 


Wonanl 12.10 Ckm. 

, TVQ As London ncett94S 1VS 
iiS Outlook 140TVSMM 14QZ30 
A CounttyPracScB 349 Questions 
347340 TVS News 5.12 TVS News 
Hewanes (Mowed py Sons and 
Daughters 545640 Coast id Coaa 645 
Pofece 645-740 Croseroads 1145 
The Champions 1245wa 
Company .close. 

HTV WE ST 

KTV Newt 140140 mV News 34S- 
■ 340 HTV News 040640 Mwder4he 
Wrote 1145 Men to a Suitcase 
,1245am Weather .dose. 


HTV WALES J gg*” 

Six. GrariffliartAs London 
e*ceptS4SS40 First Thing 1240pm-140 
Gentenlng Tone 140 ttorth News 
1345340 North Haedtoma 5.1S45 
I Emmerdala Farm 640 North Tonight 
and weather 645 Crossroads 740740 
! RfKAndrew's Kkrodom 1145 The 
New Avengers 1245am News hsaianes 
and weather 1Z40 Ctosa. 


News 340440 Sons and Deimtmm 
■ 645740 crossroads 640940 Quincy 
11451 245 am Tales tram the _ 

‘Daikskte 1 Z 45 amNewsSwnmary 1240 
i Ctosa. 

j ' YORKSHIRE 

,W»ath 0 f 12 J 0140 Calenflaf Lunch- 
. time Live 140140 Cakndar News 345 
Calendar News 340440 A Coumnr 
Practice 5 . 155*5 The Prottctora 640 
; Calendar 646740 Crossroads 1145 
; V 1245 am Close 

SCOi hSH^^khjqgb. 

aotashNews 
Oners 5 . 165*5 
eoaishNews 
■ Crossroads 



uid Say That 
b Cas il*o w 


exceptrt24(n 40 Gar- 
dening Time 1401 40 Certial News 
34R40 Central News 640 Crossroads 
'645740 Central News 1146 ln»- 
' side (Raymond Burr) 1 1245am Close. 


AMrti | A 1240140 Gardens tor 
Afl 140140 Anglia News 
and Weather 340 Three UWe words 
345340 Angle News 6.155*5 
Emmemale Fann 640 About Andte 
645 Crossoads 740740 Mind Your 
Language 1145 Legmen 1245 Tues- 
dayTopfe^kise. 

ULSTER As London 
Ftby. 1 £SmcapcB4S6JDTheDay 
Ahead 140140 LuncMme 340 In- 
door Garoenmg 3*5 Showcase 358440 
’ Utster News 640 Good Everang Ui- 


Marcovia (violin).. Pam . 

David Bedford (the 
VaMey-Sieeper, the 
ChtkJren.me Snakes and 
the Giant): Bruch (Viohn 
Concerto No 1). 1.00 
News I 

145 Concert part two. 

Mozan (Symphony No 
33); Dvorak (Othello 
overture) 

1.45 Guitar Encores: Sven 
Lundestad plays works 
by Granados. Jon Mostad 
and Castelnuovo- 
Tedesco (TonatUla on tee 
name of Segovia) 

2.15 LesSlicGroupedesSix 
perform works by Auric 
(Trio, for oboe.darinet, and 
bassoon), TaiUetarre 
(Pastorale tor flute. piano). 

Milhaud (Sonata tor 
flute. oboe xtanrvetptano). 
Durey (Nicolios et la 
flute). Honegger (Danse et ia 
chevre)and Poulenc (Tno 
tor oboe, bassoon, psano). 

335 Chamber Symphony by 
Shostakovich: Lucerne 
Festival Strings. Barshai 
arrangement of String 
Quartet No 8 

4.00 Anne Howells and Roger 
Vignoles: the mezzo and 
her accompanist in works by 
Duparc, Debussy 

S winding Trois chansons de 
ibtis). Rodrigo and 
Obradors (Including Del 
cabello mas suth). 4.55 
News 

540 Mainly for 

Pleasure: recorded 
music^resented by Geoffrey 
Norris 

640 Cancwnero Musical: 

New London Consort. 

Music from Renaissance 
Spain 

7.00 Bartok: Victoria Mullova 
plays Sonata for solo 
wolm 

740 City of Birmingham 1 

SO, with Stephen 
Hough(ptano}.Part 1. Copland 
(Symphony No 2), J 

Rachmaninov (Piano ; 

Concerto No 1). 

8-20 Wordhoar d : Ian Hog g , 


reads poetry of the 
Anglo-Saxon victors in the 
wars against the Welsh, 
.introauced by Pro! Thomas 
Shippey 

8.40 Conceitpart 2. Dvorak 
(Symphony No 5) 

940 Thom Gurm's Castle: 
poetry feature -presented 
by Graham Fawcett 
1000 Magnum Opus: Charles 
Fox presents John 
Warren's Six Tributes tor 13 
players.played by John 
Warren Band 
1055 Beethoven and 

Schubert Parikian- 
Miine-Ftemmg Trio. 
Beethoven (variations m 
E fiat, Op 44). Schubert (B 
flat Tno. D 898) 

11.57 News. 12.00 Closedown. 
VHFonly: Open University, 

6.35am to 6.55. images of 

Prostitution . 

( Radio 2 ) 

News on the hour. Headlines 
530 am, 630 pm. 730 and 830. 
Cricket West Indies v England. 

1.05 pm, ZJB, 34)2. 4.02, 5.05, 

6.02, 6.45 (mt only). 842. 9.02 
(VHF), 935 (VHFT 114)2. 44)0am 


Young fmd medtau questions 
answered by Dr Mike Smith) 14)5 
pm David Jacobs (S) 2.00 Gloria 


pm David Jacobs (s) 2.00 Gloria 
Hurmiford (s) 330 Music All The 
Way 4.00 David Hemtiton (s) 

6J» John Dunn is) 840 Boxing and 
soccer specials (Frank Bruno 
faces Game Coetzse). 104)0 The 
Law game. Shaw Taylor. Barry 
Took, Patricia Hodge. Steve Jones, 
Gordon Reid, Melinda Wafer 
and Trevor Nichols. 1040 Dealing 
with Danieis.114)0 Brian 
Matthew. 14)0 am Peter Dickson (s) 
3 4)0-44)0 A Bitie night music (s). 

( Radio 1 . ) 

News on the half-hour from 
S40 am until 940 pm and at 124)0 
mktnjght 64M am Adrian John. 

740 Mike Read 940 Simon Bates 
1240 pm Newsbeat (Frank 
Partridge) 12*5 Gary Davies (This 
week's Top 40). 34)0 Steve 
Wright 540 Newsbeat (Frank 
Partridge). 5*5 Bruno Brookes 
(Ind new Top 40 stogies) 740 
Janice Long ' 104)0-12.00 John 
Peel (S). VHF RADIOS 1 & 2 44X1 
am As Radio 2. 84X) Old 
Stagers: Bobby Howes (s). 840 
The Golden Years (Alan Keith) 

(sj, 94X) BBC Radio Orchestra (s). 
935 Sports Desk. 104)0 As 
Radio 1 12Q4XHL00 am As Radto 
2. 

WORLD SERVICE 

6*0 Newsoesh. 7*0 News. 74)9 Twenty- 
Four Hours. 7 JO My Couitnrin Mind. 7*5 
Network UK. 6 i )0 News. 84 n Reflections. 
8.15 I Wish I d Met BJ 0 Taking About 
Music. 94 X 1 News. 94)9 Review of the 
British Prass. 8.15 The World Today. 940 
Financial News. 9*0 Look Ahead 9*5 
Whet's New. 1000 News, loot Orscover. 
1040 Pride and Prejudice. 114 X) News. 
114)9 News About Brtban. 11.15 Wave- 
owda. ii^ Letter from Scotland. 12.00 
fe 5 o NewsreeL 12-15 Faces. 1245 
Sports Roundup. 14 X) News. 14)9 Twen- 
ty-Four Hours. 140 Network UK. 140 
Recording ol me Week. 200 Outlook. 2*5 


Engksh Song. 34 X 1 Radto Newsreel. 215 
AMy Good Show. 44 X) News. 44 » 
Commentary. 4.15 Omnibus. 4.45 The 
World Today. 54 X 1 News. 54)9 A Latter 
From Scotland- 5.15 fc item m onal RaataJ. 
104)0 News. 104)9 The World Today. 
1045 A Letter From Scotiana 1040 
Rnanaal News. 10*0 Reflections. 10*6 
Sports Roundup. H 4 » News. 114 » 
Commentary. 11.15 The Classic Atoums. 
1140 Faces. 1200 News. 1209 News 
About Britar. 1215 R» 2 o Newsreels. 
1240 Omnibus. 14 X) News. IjOI Outlook. 
140 Report on Reigton. 1*6 Country 
.Style. 200 News. 209 Review of the 
Swish Press. 215 The Music Business. 
240 Pnde end Prejudice. 34)0 News. 209 
News About Britain. 215 The World 
Today. 230 Discovery. 44 W Newsdesk. 
440 Waveguda. 4 A 0 Book Ctwice. AD 


ster 645 Diary Dens 64574 X 1 cross- 
roads 200 On Sage Tonight 840 - 
94 M) The Cosby Show 11 -35 The 
Swesnev 1240 am News. 

CAP 14 X 1 Countdown 140 Aface 
200 Hwnt Ac Yms 240 
FfsiabMBm 245 Hyn O Fyd 2 SS in- 
terval 225 Sea War 255 Shakespeare 
Lives 445 Bewitched 445 Hamer 
Awr Fawr 540 Unlorgettable 64 X) Wto- 
sron Churchifl 640 Crwydro'r 
Oedrau 6*5 Sue Stared 74)0 Newyddion 
■ Saitn 740 Cetn Gwiad 200 Treasure 
mow. News headlines AOO Deryn 104 X 1 
, lesu Ddoe A Heddhr 1040 How to 
Survive the Nine to Five 1140 FlhniThe 
CM Dark Houea( 193 Zl Sons KertoM 
1240 am Close 

GRANADA 

naoa Reports 340 That s Hoeywood 
345 Granada Reports 340440 Sons and 
Daughters 200 Granada Reports 
840 This Is Your Right 6457.00 Cross- 
roads 1145 Man In A Suitcase 
1245 am Close. 


. excepcl -28140 Border TWster News 64 » Good Evarang UL 


TCUf As London 
lgw exwjnflZZOpmlJJO Newharr 
140140 TSW News 345 Sons and 
Daughters 2574 JX) tsw News 215 Gus 
Koneybun's Magic Bklhdays 540 - 
5*5 Crossroads B 4 » Today South West 
646 Televiews 640 Effunerdaie 
Farm 74 XF 94 » F 9 m:Buone SeraAIrs 
Can»beS( 196 B)(anaLotobrtaida 
1 1 .35 Postscript 1 1*0 Show Express 
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775S EVMdnes 7.46 mal Sal 
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A Play adapied from Jane 
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see Cnirnoii TI"Ndie 
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in 

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fn ROBIN R-Xx 
Hired ail Ifie Ine A iuini «4 

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ALU o 2? 1 1 !“■ 7 45 <Mal 10 .11 ; 
7. M-uiiu Laiilu |nr-*-iils ' 
O eet fa c'e FAUST part l 


CINEMAS 


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32 TUESDAY MARCH 4 1986 .. THE TIMES 


MPs to Defiant Palestinians bury a new saint 
examine 

petrol 

prices 


* * * + * * 


First published 1785 



& & J 


By David Young 
■ Energy Correspondent 

The link between world! 
crude oil prices and what the ! 
motorist pays for petrol is to 
be examined by the all-party 
Commons Energy Commit- 
tee. 

. The motoring organizations 
say that petrol prices are not 
falling fast enough. Forecourt 
prices average 1 75p a gallon. 

On the Rotterdam spot 
market North Sea crude for 
April delivery was being 
quoted last night at $13.25 a 
barrel, almost a third of the 
price charged to refineries in 
December. 

However, since December 
prices at the pumps have 
fallen by less than 20p and the 
oil companies have been criti- 
cized for not cutting them 
further. 

One city analyst has calcu- 
lated that profits are now 
running at more than 20p a 
gallon for the refiner, with the 
filling station owner doubling 
the 7p a gallon he was making 
at Christmas. But the oU 
companies say that falling 
prices can take up to 60 days 
to work through to the con- 
sumer. 

The Energy Select Commit- 
tee will ask for written evi- 
dence from the big oO 
companies— Esso. Shell and 
BP— asking for detailed infor- 
mation on the relationship 
between crude and petrol 
prices over the past 20 years. 

The information will show 
the effect of the link between 
the dollar and the pound; all 
oil prices, even those in the 
North Sea are quoted in 
dollars. 

The Committee will also 
review the effect of tax on 
petrol prices. The oil compa- 
nies have indicated that pan 
of their reluctance to cut 
prices is that to do so would 
give the Chancellor further 
scope for excise duty and 
consequent value-added lax 
increases in the Budget. 

The committee will also ask 
for techinical information on 
how the companies have up- 
graded their refineries to pro- 
duce more petrol' 

Price hope, page 17. 



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The body of the assassinated Mayor of Nablus, Zafer al-Masri, covered in the outlawed Palestinian flag, being taken to the tomb. 


Letter from Northern Philippines 


Crying for a lost 
political father 


When news of the downfall 
of Pres dent Marcos was 
heard in the northern capital 
of Laoag, people wept in the 
streets. For of all the cities in 
the Philippines, Laoag had 
been the most favoured with 
presidential patronage: 

The city proudly an- 
nounces to the world on a 
hoarding that it is a** disci- 
plined and orderly city", but 
when Mr Marcos flew out of 
.the country die fear in the. 
south was that the 




From Ian Murray 
Nablus 

They held a Palestinian 
state funeral for their mur- 
dered mayor here yesterday. 
Chanting, dapping and whis- 
tling, they laid Zafer al-Masri 
to rest to the tears and cheers 
of 20,000 and more in the 
streets of this dty. 

As if in symbolic sacrifice 
. before the ceremonies began, n 
young refugee in the town's 
camp of Bata died from an 
Israeli ballet as he grappled 
with a soldier in an incident 
sparked by the tension of the 
moment. 

Symbolically, too. the day 
ended with police firing into 
the air to disperse a group of 
youngsters who had flung a 
huge stone at the windscreen 
of a police bos. 

From just after sunrise 
mourners from afi over the 


Today’s events 

Royal engagements 

Queen Elizabeth. The Queen 
Mother, attends an Industrial 
Soiree at the Royal Society, 
London. 8.30pm. 

The Prince and Princess of 
Wales attend the premiere of the 
film Old of Africa at The 
Empire, Leicester Square, 
6.30pm. 

Princess Anne opens an ex- 
hibition of aaftwork at St 
Mary's Tradescant Church, 
London. 12; and later attends a 
reception at the Mansion 
House, London. 6.30pm. 

The Duke of Gloucester 
presents the 1985 award for the 
Pollution Abatement Technol- 
ogy Award Scheme at the Royal 
Society of Arts. London. 2.15; 
and later opens The Royal 
Collide of Physician’s Ex- 
hibition at the Stock Exchange, 
London, 6.15pm. 

Prince Michael of Kent at- 
tends the gala performance of 


the panto mine Danish Blues at 
Westminster Theatre, London, 
8pm. 

New exhibitions 
Architecture, People and 
Places, photographs by Mortey 
von Sternberg; RIBA, 66 Port- 
land PL Wl; Mon to Fri 9.30 to 
6 (ends March 24). 

Chinese Decorated Porcelain 
from Jingdezhen; Eric North 
Rm. Asbmolean Museum. Ox- 
ford; Tues to Sat. 10 to 4, Sun 2 
to 4 (ends March 1986). 

British Trees, photos by Alan 
Fairhursi and Eric Soothill; 
Towneley Hall An GalL Burn- 
ley; Mon to Fri 10 to 5.30, Sun 
12 lo 5 (ends April 3). 

French and English 13 Cen- 
tury Manuscripts; British li- 
brary. Gl Russell St, London; 
Mon to Sat 10 to 5, Sun 2.30 to 
6 . 

Last chance to see 
Work by Michael Phiilipson; 
Woodlands Art Gall. 90 My- 
cenae Rd. Blackhcath, London, 
Mon to Fri 10 to 7.30 (closed 


The Times Crossword Puzzle No 16,984 



ACROSS 

1 lx’s instrumental in broach- 
ing wine (8). 

6 Vessels circulating for in- 
stance in pubs (6). 

' 9 Disclose 19 pictures (6). 

10 Heard from river, a satisfied 

■ lark (8). 

11 Bank beside American rail- 
way lines (8). 

£ Super spelter (6). 

13 By the sound of it. want to 
work (5). 

14 fat round the middle, thin 
to port (5.4). 

17 Smartened scruffy shop- 
keepers (9). 

19 Was about to be a ghost (5). 

22 Walk with unsteady gait to 
get hamper (6). 

23 Forceful chap I met in 
Tours (8). 

24 It’s well-known outside if 1 
gave information (8). 

75 Islander provides some se- 
cret anchorages (61 

26 Fish swallowing 18 get thin- 
ner (6). 

27 Very large dog mums with- 
out prizes (S). 

DOWN 

2 Light (if vou've nothing on) 
a squib (7). 

3 Taii-cnders put up to defend 
W 

. 4 Character loved by Landor 

m 


5 Stuart repented and told her 
a different version (3,3.9). 

6 Slow footballer — give him 
room (8). 

7 Colour ran. spilt inside the 
store (7). 

8 Veronica joins expedition to 
source (9). 

13 Field Marshal Christopher 
North in good spirits (9). 

15 He tattles. Mowing up 
what’s new (3,6). 

16 What harshness, imprison- 
ing fairy in a filthy hole (8X 

18 Referee arrives, without in- 
cisiveness (7). 

20 Sincerely flatter the article 
penned by one friend (7). 

21 Summits of Alpine peaks 
including, curiously enough. 
Snowdon. 


Solution to No 16583 


aoaisaHia astaaiiB^l 

B H a 0 H ffl ^ 
SSSRS EJG3[S!3HHr30S 
IP E B IS n 71 ff E 

iJlGSBOESHE aansa 
l r g b n r 
fflena iisraBBamm 
— s ft : b e hi a - 
rJEJfeH [71 Dul □ E mPJSSHl 

b e- n 
Biisran 
Q 5 er B 

‘^iP 0 ! 1 — —i 


West Bank had been arriving. 
The bells of the Christian 
churches rang out discordant- 
ly as the chants from the 
megaphones in the many min- 
arets ceaselessly called across 
the shattered dty. 

At the family home the 
Muslim ritual of mourning 
was being closely observed. 
The older men sat silently in 
plash chairs round the tiring- 
rooms, staring vacantly. 

Outside on the steep stone 
steps and among the tenon 
trees in the garden, all was 
noise. Chants of “There is no 
God bat Allah and Aba 
Hisham is his most beloved” 
rang ont as the young mourn- 
ers remembered the mayor's 
family miw- 

They poshed their way into 
the courtyard, waring wreaths 
of palm leaves, hong with the 
flag ofMnstim mourning and 


with a Mack-edged poster 
showing the dapper business- 
man who has become the 
unlikely new saint of the 
Palestinian movement. 

Jnst before the Amend pro- 
cession moved off, the diplo- 
mats arrived from Jerusalem 
to pay their last respects in a 
cortege at cars flying national 
flags — the Union flag, the 
Tricolour, the Stars and 
Stripes and, last and most 
poignantly, the blue and yel- 
low flag of Sweden. 

Mr Wahed al-Masri had 
been struck by the similarity 
of the killing of Mr Okrf 
Palme and of his own cousin. 
“Why do they kill the men of 
peace; they are mad," he said. 
“Those who announced my 
consul's murder with pride 
should really feel ashamed. 
They are criminals and 
trahots.” 

The procession was more 


like a happy football crowd 
than a funeral march, mostly 
young people surging forward 
shooting out first for the dead 
mayor arid then for the Pales- 
tine Liberation Organization. 

As tiie procession continued 
the outlawed Palestinian flag 
appeared among the banners 
of the bmuttcks, held aloft by 
yotmgsters carried shoulder- 
high and with their faces 
in their kqfiymh 
headscarves. 

Round them other yoong 
men, giving the victory sign, 
chanted for the PLO. 

There was a brief stop at tiie 
town hafl, where a pile of sand 
surrounded by buOdiag Mocks 
and covered in flowers marked 
tiie spot nearest the place m 
the roadway where the mayur 
was shot on Sunday. 

After the service at the main 
mosque the crowd bore the 
coffin back to the Masri 


mosqne. By now the (dam, 
erode coffin was draped in the 
Palestinian flag, and the 
crowd round it pressed .dose. 

The coffin disappeared be- 1 
Death the hearing crowd. Sud- 
denly, with bo ceremony, out 
came the body, wrapped in 
white sheeting, like a mammy. 
Blood from the fatal bullet 
wound had made a stain near 
the bead. For moments it 
stiffly bobbed along the top of 
the crowd, then disappeared 
suddenly into its breeze-Hocfc 
tomb. 

Throughout, the Israeli oc- 
cupying army kept a very low 
profile on one or two strategic 
rooftops. The soldiers brought 
in the body of the young man 
from the refugee camp in a UN 
amtelanre when most of tiie 
crowd was at the mosqne. 
They did nothing to stop the 
waving of the outlawed Pales-* 

tfan— flag 


■would conspire somehow to. 
Ming him back. 

When the acting Governor 
of Bocos Norte called togeth- 
er the mayors of tiie province 
to give them bis views on 
what to do next the southern 
newspapers were quick to see 
a plot, despite the fact that the. 
outcome of the meeting was a 
telegram pledgiiu loyalty to 
the regime of President 
Aquino. 

When the Mayor of Laoag, 
Mr Rodolfo Faridas, was 
found approaching the bead- 
‘-quarters of the revolution at 
Camp Crame on the outskirts 
of Manila, and was found to 
have a band of armed men 
with him. he was immediate- 
ly suspected of a suicide 
attempt to assassinate the 
rebel teadera.“They had been 
in touch with me to see if I 
would defect and join them," 
Mr Farinas said, “and al- 
though I refused I wanted to 
see them to try to get a safe- 
conduct pass for myself and 
my men." 

Mr Faridas, of course, like 
‘many other Philippine 
polititicians, would not 
dream of travelling anywhere 
without a number of body- 
guards armed to the teeth. 
“The guns were all licensed 
and legal” 

The reason for this fear of 
the far north is that this is Mr 
Marcos's own country. He 
was born just down the road 
from here, and a museum 
enshrines the spot The 
boundary of the northern 
area is marked by the Ferdi- . 
nand Marcos Highway, over- 
looked by a bust of Mr 
Marcos standing 105ft, smil- 
ing indulgently from the top 
ofahilL 


There is a five-star hold 
with 126 bedrooms and more 
arebeing built, a few miles 
from town. The only guests 
last weekend were a handful 
of foreign journalists. 

There was, perhaps surpris- 
ingly, a victory procession to 
celebrate the accession of Mrs 
Aquino. A stream of cars 
bedecked in yellow ribbons 
ran through the streets 
“I was called for in the 
middle of the night by three 




the United Nationalist Dem- 
ocratic Organization, Unido, 
under whose yellow banner 
Mrs Aquino fought the elec- 
tion. 

“Mayor Faridas wanted to 
talk to me. They took me to a 
transport repair shop, and the 
Mayor was there and talked 
to me like 1 was his kid 
brother, saying that we 
should all help the President 
instead. 

“It was not that he threat- 
ened me. . .but there were 50 
people there, and I left feeling 
humiliated and depressed. 
He certainly neutralized me 
on election day. The feeling 
was one of hopelessness." 

Immediately after the elec- 
tion the local leader of Unido. 
Mr Rosidio Tipin, left the 
town and headed for Manila 
and safety. 

When Mayor Fan has re- 
turned from the south, trail- 
ing newspaper reports that he 
had been imprisoned for his 
“suicide assassination 
attempt" be was given a 
warm round of applause as he 
appeared in a public meeting. 

Speaking for most people 
in the room, be said: “I feel 
that I have lost my political 
father. 1 am a neophyte 
mayor, and I owe everything 
I am to President Marcos." 

The feelings of the north, 
however, are not restraining 
the men of the Ibaloi tribe 
who were dispossessed of 
their lands to make way for 
the park around the huge bust 
of Mr Marcos on the hillside 
farther south. They have 
announced that they plan to 
destroy the monument on 
March 9. 

■* * ■ , % 

Michael Hamlyn 


THE TIMES INFORMATION SERVICE 


Concise Crossword, page 10 


Wed) Sat 10 to 6. Sun 2 to 6 
(ends March 4). 

Music 

Royal Philharmonic Or- 
chestra; Royal Festival HaD, 
South Bank. 7.30. 

Recital including music by 
Brahms, Debussy and Martin u; 
Royal Festival Hall South 
Bank, London; 12.30 to 2. 

Organ recital by Andrew. 
Lumsden; St Lawrence Jewry, 
Guildhall Yard, London; 1pm. 

Piano duet by Dmitri and 
Tanya Alexeev; Bishopsgate 
HalL London: 1.05. 

Recital by Ursula Snow (vi- 
olin) and Peter O'Hagan (pi- 
ano); Southlands College, 65 
Parkside. Wimbledon, 7.30. 

London Ripieno Society, 
works by Schubert and Haydn; 
St Mark's Church. St Mark’s Sq, 
Regents Park. 8. 

A Concert of Song by Lynn 
Davies (baritone) and Richard 
Simm (piano); St David's Hall, 
Cardiff; 1.05. 

National Festival of Music for 
Youth, launch day. Nigel Ken- 
nedy (classical and jazz violin- 
ist); Queen Elizabeth Hall, 
South Bank. 7.30. 

Pianoforte Recital, by 
Thomas McIntosh; De La Warr 
Pavilion. Bexhitl-oo Sea: 3. 

Kent Youth Jazz Orchestra 
and Brian Wales Quartette: 
Sfttiagboorae and Milton Ro- 
tary Club, 8. 

Concert by the Richmond 
Trio; St Martin-io-the-Fiekls, 
Trafalgar Sq, 1.05. 

Recital of music composed by 
Copland. Rachmaninov and 
Dvorak, James Conion 
(conductor). Stephen Hough 
(soloist): ' Birmingham Town 
Hall Birmingham; 7 JO. 

Exhibitions in progress 

Translations from life and 
nature: stone carvings by 
George Kennethson; Peter- 
borough Museum and Art Gal- 
lery, Priestgate: Tues to Sat 1 2 to 
5 (ends March 22). 

Paintings by Mark le Clair, 
Niccol Centre. Brewery Court 
Cirencester. Glos: Mon to Fri 10 
to 4, Sat lOto 1 230 (ends March 

5\ 

Talks and lectures 

Revolutions in Understand- 
ing Muscle, lecture by Sir An- 
drew Huxley; Bennett Lecture 
Tfa 1. Trinity Coll Cambridge 
5. 

Orpheus or Clio? Reflections 
on the use of History, lecture by 
Mr Martin Davies; American 
Studies Seminar Rm, College 
House, University of Leicester, 
5.30 

Myths and Legends; Botticelli 
and Piero di Cosimo, lecture by 
Felicity Woolf 1 . Rm 5, National 
Gallery. 1. 

Reynolds and Gainsborough, 
lecture by Michael Rosenthal: 
Goldsmiths’ Th. London School 
of Hygiene and Tropical Medi- 
cine, Keppel St, WCl; 6.15. 

Leonardo: Master of Inven- 
tion by Clare Ford-Wille; 
Highgatc Literary and Scientific 
Instil. 1 1 South Grove. 
Highgatc. London: 8.15. 

On To The Revolution by 
Andrew Kirk; St Peter’s Church, 
VereStWl; 1.10 

General 

Registration opens for Lon- 
don to Brighton Bike Ride; The 
London Bicycle Co. 41 Floral St, 
WC2: 9.30 to 5.30 (ends mid 

May). 

Daily Mail Ideal Home Ex- 
hibition; Earls Court Exhibition 
Centre. Warwick Road. London; 
Sun to Sat 10 to 8 (ends 31 
March). 


10 Wbgan(R| 


1 Coron at ion Stmt (Mon) Grand* 
iaesm 

2 Wtefi You Wore Horn (Mon/Wad) 
Thames 1035m 

3 Coro n ation Street (Wed) Qranads 
17-55m 

4 SwpriefcSwprtoe, LWT 1530m 

5 A uf WUderaehen Pet CvnM 
1&40m 

6 Duty Free. Yurkshn 1405m 

7 Oul Of TT» Darkness, rTV 1335m 

8 =7 Crazy Uke A Ftox, ITV 1335m 

9 This Is Yow Lite. Thames 1330ra 

10 M At No 20. Themes 1830m 


B8C2 

1 Yes Prime Minster &30m 

2 MASH 5.66m 

3 Star Trek 4.60m 

4 Food and Drink 440m 

5 =4 Sid Suvfey 4.40m 

6 International Athletics (Sun 1700) 
430m 

7 Boo Monkhouae Show 425m 

8 Sands of Hmc Jma 4.05m 

9 =8 Hospital WetCh 4.05m 

10 Qarenca The Cross Eyed Uon 


Roads 


Loudon and S outh - eest iAJ3 
Lodge Lane flyover between 
Barking and Dagenham dosed, 
diversion. A217 southbound de-' 
lays b e tw ee n St Hdior round- 
about and Reigate; A10 Lights 
at Colliers End, nr Ware, Herts 

Midlands: MS Works be- 
tween junctions 4 and 5, 50mpb 
restrictions; A34 Lights, single 
line traffic on High St at Henley- 
in-Arden, Warwicks A435 
Lights, lane restrictions at 
Cough ton north of Alcester. 

Wales and West: A38 North- 
bound lane dosed between Ash- 
burton and Plymouth; MS 
Northbound lane and hard 
shoulder closures at junction 25 
(Taunton) A472 Delays between 
Hengoed and Nelson. 

North: M61 Lane closures at 
Walton summit near Blacow 
Bridge at M6 interchange; A49 
delays north and south of 
Tarporley, Cheshire, A64 
Contraflow along Malion by- 


Weather 

forecast 

Troughs of low pressure 
will moye from the W 
across all parts. 


10 Countdown (Wed) 320m 

BnOW MnMoK The average 
weekly figures tor audancee at peak 
times 

BBCl: BruMtuf Time: Mon to Pit 
1.7m (82m) 

TV -am: Good Uarnktg Britain Mon id Frt 
2.0m (I0.8m) Sat 29m (62m) 

Sun 12m (128m) 

Broadca s wra' Audience fl es e arUt Board. 


Scotland: A73 Diversion from 
Stewart St at Carluke and 
Kirkton Sl A74 Lane closures at 
Poniel Bridge north of A70; A71 
delays along Cakfcr Road at 
junction with Cutlins Rood. 

Infoanarioa supplied by AA 


Parliament today 


Commons (2.30): Housing 
(Scotland) Bill, remaining 
stages. Salmon Bill second 
reading. 

Lords (130); Drug Traffick- 
ing Offences Bin. second read- 
ing- 


The pound 




Snow Reports 


Depth 


Conditions 

Weather 

(cm) „ 


Off 

Runs to 

(5pm) 

L U 

Piste 

Piste 

resort 

-1 

AUSTRIA 




■ 

Kitzbuhei 55 150 

fair 

heavy 

fair 

snow 

Skuh on lower slopes. 



good 


Seefetd 100 130 

good 

varied 

snow 

\fefofirtybad. 



FRANCE 





name 115 355 

New snow on crust 
LbsAics 140 100 

good 

good 

crust 

varied 

fair 

fata- 

daud 

fine j 

Slush on Jmver slopes 

SWITZERLAND 

Crans-Mont 120 170 

good 

varied 

good 

fine - 

Good sfcfing on d pistes. 



Gstaad 45 135 

Light las of fresh snow. 

St Moritz 75 150 

good 

varied 

good 

fab- ; 

good 

varied 

good 

cloud 1 

Worn patches but snow raSna 



vernier 40 240 

good 

varied 

fair 

snow 

Good siding above 2,000m 


In the above reports, suppled by representatives of the Ski Club of Great 
Britain. L refers m lower slopes anaU to upper, and art to artificial. 


Sun Rain 

Max 

In ta 

C 

F 

27 - 

4 

39 

0.7 - 

3 

37 

65 - 

3 

37 

as - 

3 

37 

72 - 

2 

38 

T 

A3 - 

2 

36 

as - 

3 

37 

A1 

3 

37 

M - 

2 

36 

64 - 

9 

V 

6-9 - 

4 

39 

7.5 - 

3 

37 

7.1 

S 

41 

62 - 

3 

37 

7.8 - 

4 

38 

7J - 

s 

41 

A0 Oil 

3 

37 

6.7 - 

5 

41 

7A - 

6 

43 

60 - 

5 

<1 

5J - 

5 

41 

as - 

4 

» 

5.6 002 

4 

39 

43 - 

4 

39 

03 - 

4 

39 


In 

bi 

c 

F 

- 

- 

5 

41 

93 

- 

5 

41 

RL0 

_ 

5 

41 

OO 

- 

4 

39 

D WALES 



82 

■ 

4 

39 

KL0 

m 

4 

39 

83 

m 

6 

43 

93 

- 

6 

43 

93 

- 

4 

39 

9.7 

* 

6 

43 

83 

- 

4 

39 

73 

- 

3 

37 

43 

- 

4 

39 

M 

- 

5 

41 

93 


3 

37 

MU 

m 

3 

37 

9.7 

m 

5 

4t 

83 

- 

6 

43 

13 0.02 

7 

45 

3.6 QJ6 

7 

45 

LB 

■ 

7 

45 

03 

m 

6 

43 

42 

- 

e 43 


Abroad