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3 




rate cut 


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• Tlie high street banks cnt base rates 
from 115 to lli per cent The bis 
iwuHmg societies reduced mortgage 
rates to l2 per cent •• 





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• The Chancellor, Mir Nigel Lawson, 
criticized oil companies for raising 
pump prices after the 7*5p increase in 
petrol duty in the Budget 

The Government is to recnrit 2,000 
^employment advisers” for Jobcentres 
in a £500 million campaig n aimmi at 
comhatmg long-term tmemplojment 
By David Smith and Lawrence Lever ■ 
optimism swept index rose by 0.5 points to 


• S hare pro s and government stocks 
rose stoog gly m response to the Budget 
andfaterest rate cuts, with the project 

of father rate cuts soon 


* 


'■ through financial marketsyes- 
terday ip a strong declarati on 
of approval for Mr Nigel 

Lawson's Budget. The high 
street banks cut base rates by 1 
percentage point to 11.5 per 
cent, after a: signal fioin the 
Bank of England. 

Britain's two biggest build- 
ing societies, the Halifax and 
Abbey National, immediately 
reduced their mortgage rates 
by 0.75 percentage points to 
12 per cent And the prospects 
ftp* further fells in interest 
rates were good,tbe Chancel- 
lor said yesterday. While em- 
phasizing the Government's 
cautious approach, Mr 
Lawson said: “I think that 
there is a prospect of lower 
interest rates.” 

Mr Lawson was talking to 
journalists at a briefing at No 
11 Downing Street shortly 
after the round of base rate 
reductions, led by Barclays, 
had begun. Barclays cut its 
rates from 123 to 11.5 per 
cent after the Bank ofEqgJand 
cut its money market rates by 
a point in an early dealing 
round. 

The Bank of England, in 
reducing its dealing rates, 
indicated that the move was in 
response to the Budget, the 
pound's firmness and recent 
good figures for the money 
supply and pubhc boitowing. 

Jhe pound rose m spite of 
toe reduction m base sues.. It 
gamed 10 points against the 
dollar to $1.4782, aadposteda' 
more . impressive two-pfiamig 
gain to: DM33442 against tbe 
German mark. The staling 


Tomorrow 


Breaking 
the mould 



five years after the 
formation of the 
Social Democratic 
Party, has the face of 
politics really 
changed? 

Wedded to 
their jobs 

How couples cope 
whentheir professions 
are the same 


The- Times Portfolio daily 
competition prize of £2,fD0 
was shared yesterday between 
Mr N Roberts of Wigan and 

Miss JLesfe Chapman of Wat- 
ford. Portfolio fist, page 24; 
how to play, information ser- 
vice, pageiO. 





Pitmen’s vote 

The pit deputies' union 
Nacods has voted by 6,413 to 
4,219 against industrial action 
over the closure of Bates 
colliery in Northumberland. 


Han* News 2-5 
Owwwb 54 
Apjrts 26 
\rS^ 1*1 
HrOs^katbs, 
mnfaps I* 
Bart* 11 

Ba rinm 21-26 
C#wt IS 
Crocr*nri*I(U0 

Dbry .12 

F turn 1642 


Law Report 
Leaden 
Letters 
Ofaitwry 
fedbment 
Sakkoon 
Sdeac e 
Saoir 
Sport 
TbotRS 
TV'ARaSo 
Weather 


74.8. 

However, most of the action 
was in the domestic - financial 
markets. The Financial Tunes 
30-share index rose by 14.9 
points: to a new. high of 
1,389.5. Government stocks 
were strong in response to the 
Budget and the prospect of 
farther base hue cuts. Long- 
dated stocks rose fay around 
£230. 

The new 12 percent mort- 


£30,000 endowment mort- 
gage, there will be a monthly 
saving of £1838, while- for -a 
£20,000 endowment mortgage 
covering the same period 
there will be a saving of £1239 
a month. 

In the case of repayment 


Parliament 

article 
Fleet 


4 

13 

21 


gage rates at the Abbey Na- 
tional and Halifax take 
immediate effect for new bor- 
rowers. For existing borrow- 
ers, the new rates apply from 
April 1. . 

The Nationwide building 
society, the ihixtl largest in the 
country, & widtiyexpectedto 
follow suit wfth an identical 
reduction tomorrow. 

Investors, however, will be 
hrt by a 1 per centreduction in 
savings rates which the Hali- 
fax and Abbey -National an- 
nounced yesterday at the same 
time as the mortgage rate cut 

- Tbenew 12 per cent rate,lbr 
both endowment and repay- 
ment mortgages with thesod- 
eties, follows the scrapping of 
endowment differential by the 
societies two weeks ago. ft wifi 
mean considerable savings for 
foe ,12- miffin n imldejs 1 -®^ 


mortgages, this latest cut will 
mean a saving of £8-28 a 
month for the £30,000 loan 
and £533 a month in the case 
of the £20,000 loan. 

The actual savings from the 
cat have been slightly redneed 
by the l per cent cut in basic 
rate tityc announced in the 
Budget. This is because the tax 
relief on the interest dement 
of home loans is reduced by a 
corresponding amount 

The Budget was well re- 
ceived in the Gty, because it 
was regarded as a cautious and 
prudent package. 

Mr Roger Nightingale, eco- 
nomics director at tie stock- 
broking firm of HoareG ovett, 
said the Budget was “well 
balanced and politically 
canny” and he predicted a 
long upward sweep for share 
prices. 

The Chancellor, in his brief- 
ing, stressed the importance of 
lower pay settlements if the 
economy is to benefit fully 
from lower oil prices. 

He said interest rates m 
Britain would be lower if the 
growth in unit labour costs 
were reduced and industry 
would receive twin benefits of 
lower borrowing ajjd lower 
wage costs. Sir Terence Beck- 


er * fr* * 


Chancellor 
criticizes 
rise 


existing endowment mart- ett,the CBTs director-general, 
wjfofoe sodety. - welcomed yesterday’s reduc- 
in' existing 25-year turn in base rates. 

£500m for 
new jobs 
revolution 

Edward Townsend 
iwtrfal Correspondent 

.. The Government, is to re- 
cruit 2,000 new “employment 
advisers” to spearhead what 
Lord Young of Grafiham, 
Secretary of State for Employ- 
ment, raid yesterday was a 
“revolution*’ in methods to 
combat long-term 

unemployment 
The new staff will be in- 
stalled at Jobcentres by mid- 
summer. 

Up to £500 million is to be 
spent in the next two years on 
foe new range of employment 
measures outlined in 
Tuesday’s Budget speed] by 
the Chancellor, - Mr Nigel 
Lawson. 

Yesterday Lord Young and 
Mr Kennefo'Ciarke, foe Pay- 
master General, filled in foe 
details of what the Govern- 
ment clearly hopes is a series 
of initiatives that will make a 
severe dent in foe ranks of foe 
long-term unemployed before 
the next election. 

As well as expanding exist- 
ing schemes to encourage 
people to rat up their own 
businesses, increased empha- 
sis is being placed on the 
young and those who have 
been out of work for more 
than a year. 

The new two-year Youth 
Training Scheme, now to be 
followed by the New Workers 
Scheme for those aged 18 to 
20, is designed to ensure that 
school-leavers have foe pros- 
pect of three years of guaran- 
teed training and work. “We 
air doing as much as any 

Continued on page 2, col 8 


By Teresa Poole 
Mr Nigel Lawson fuelled n 
row over petrol price increases 
yesterday by deserflang ml 
companies as “foolish” and 
“star* for passing on to 
motorists foe 7-5p increase in 
petrol duty announced in foe 
Budget. 

“1 tomk ft is pretty dear, 
afterwbai has happened m foe 
o3 market and tire degree of 
competition at the pomps, that 
iffoey are to put up prices they 

come down later. There- 
fore ft seems to be rather 
foolish to put tiie price up in 
tire first place,** he said. 

BP yesterday followed 
Shelf's lead and said that 
prices at foe pump would be 
increased by 7-5p from Satur- 
day, taking foe average price 
of a four star BP gallon to 
I81p. Esse is stifi renewing 
the situation. 

The Chancellor’s insistence 
that the o3 companies were 
mairmg tooogk money not to 
raise prices at all was high- 
lighted by Shell UK’s an- 
nouncement last week of 
profits for last year almost 
doubled at £667 million. 

A spokesman for BP sard: 
*fWe are net in the business of 
discounting duty increases. 
IPS the Chancellor’s increase, 
it’s not ours.” But be added 
that competition on the 
forecourts would mean _that 


again fairly quickly- 

In his Budget statement foe 


V IfffV"— — r — ~ 

had not passed on to the 
^ummEr tiie foil benefit 
cheaper ofi and that petrol 

. ■ g_n f—tk a. 


Prince plans a summer wedding 



Couple 
tell of 
secret 
love 

By Paul Vafiefy 
Tbe romance between 
Prince Andrew and Miss Sa- 
rah Ferguson might appear to 
foe public as a whirlwind 
affair, but it developed in 
secret over the past Bine 
months, tbe couple said 


Prince Andrew and Miss Sarah Ferguson at Buckingham Palace after their engagement announcement yesterday. 

Touch of comedy as engagement is confirmed 

Royal family shelters the bride 


By Alan Hamilton 

A mounting frenzy of specu- 
lation .was at once confirmed 
and defused yesterday morn- 
ing when Buckingham Palace 
finally made tbe official an- 
nouncement that Prince An- 
drew has become engaged to 
Miss Sarah Ferguson. 

Although no further details 
have yet been made known, it 
is expected that the 26-year- 
old Prince and his fiancee will 
many in Westminster Abbey, 
probably in July. 

The release of a statement 
much of whose news value 
was drained by weeks of press 
guesswork and an absence of 
any official denial, was not 
without its moments of 
comedy. 

The announcement had 
been planned for 11 am, but 
shortly after ten o'clock Miss 
Sarah Brennan, a Palace press 
officer, walked across the 
courtyard bearing a sheaf of 
papers and distributed them 
to those of the waiting crowd 
of reporters and cameramen 
who shouted loudest. One 


copy was seized by Peggy, an 
Old English sheepdog. 

Typed on' Palace beaded 
notepaper, the announcement 
said simply: “It is with the 
greatest pleasure that The 
Queen and The Duke of 
Edinburgh announce the be- 
trothal of their beloved son 
The Prince Andrew to Miss 
Sarah Ferguson, daughter of 
Major Ronald Ferguson and 
Mrs Hector Barrantes.” 

It was dated February 19, 
1986, which far from being 
yesterday's date is actually 
Prince Andrew's birthday. 

At midday, the couple went 
on television in a joint inter- 
view with BBC and 1TN. 
Sitting at opposite ends of an 
ample Palace sola, they ap- 
peared delighted but slightly 
awkward, the Prince laughing 
and joking heartily while Miss 
Ferguson smiled and looked 
entirely possessed of herself 
She showed off her engage- 
ment ring with its centrepiece 
of a large red ruby to match 
her mane of auburn hair, 
while Prince Andrew revealed 
that he had made his formal 



Prince Andrew was closely 
involved in the design of the 
engagement ring, a fine oval 
ruby with IQ drop femwiJg 
set duster-style mounted in 18 
carat white and yellow gold. 

Garrard, tbe jewellers who 
made the ring, said: “The 


Prince was very involved to the 
design. He made various sug- 
gestions and special refine- 
ments were made.” 

The price will remain a 
secret, but experts who saw 
pictures of the ring say it 
probably cost about £25^)00. 


proposal of marriage at Floors 
Castle, the majestic home of 
the Duke and Duchess of 
Roxburgh. 

Miss Ferguson, who is the 
Prince’s senior by eight 
months, explained that after 
her marriage she would be 
known officially as Princess 
Andrew. 

The Queen, according to her 
son. was “overjoyed, very 
happy, very pleased - a de- 
lighted parent”. The an- 

Fadng the spotlight 3 
Grand old dukes of York3 
Profile JO 

Enoch Powell 12 

Leading article 13 

nouncement was also 
welcomed by the Prime Min- 
ister, who sent a letter of 
congratulation from herself 
and Cabinet colleagues to the 
Prince; by foe Archbishop of 
Canterbury, who is attending 
a church conference in Toron- 
to; and by Miss Ferguson’s 
father, who left for Australia 
shortly after the announce- 
ment to visit his elder daugh- 
ter, Jane, and to referee polo 
matches. 

Major Ronald Ferguson, a 
retired Life Guards officer and 
now vice-chairman of foe 
Guards Polo Gub at Windsor 
and Prince Charles' polo man- 
ager, said of his prospective 
son-in-law: “1 think he is a 
very fine person. We all know 
he is a very professional 
helicopter pilot I admire any- 
body who is professional at 
their job.” 

Yesterday’s announcement 
made an immediate, dramatic 
and practical difference to 
Miss Ferguson’s life. For secu- 
rity reasons she will not return 
to her modest shared flat in 
Battersea, but will be instantly 
gathered into the bosom of foe 
Royal Family and be given 
safe accomodation, probably 
at Kensington Palace 

From yesterday she has also 
had assigned to her perma- 
nently an armed officer from 
foe royalty and diplomatic 
protection squad. 


The longer-term question of 
where foe couple will set up 
home remains unresolved In 
foe short-term^ a grace -end- 
favour apartment in Kensing- 
ton Palace is indicated, but in 
foe longer term they may 
inherit Clarence House, at 
present occupied by foe 
Queen Mother and her 
household 

_ Prince Andrew currently 
lies fourth in line of succession 
to the throne, and any chil- 
dren of his forthcoming mar- 
riage will take their place in 
line immediately after him. . 

Miss Ferguson, according to 
foe rules of succession, as a 
mere consort lakes no place in 
the line of succession. But she 
is not without royal connec- 
tion, being descended through 
her paternal grandmother 
from foe Dukes of Buccleuch, 
the Duke of Monmouth, and 
ultimately King Charles O and 
bis mistress Lucy Walters. 


with his fiancee on a 
deep sofo in his Buckingham 
Palace study, Prince Andrew 
said: “It may seem like a 
whirlwind because the media 
only discovered about it in 
December-January. Quite a 
lot went on before.” 

In a joint interview wfth 
BBC and ETN, Prince Andrew 
said their friendship began to 
torn to love last summer when 
they sat next to each other at a 
race meeting. “It was at Ascot 
that the whole thing took off.” 

The couple have been ac- 
quainted since they were chfl- 
dreu. “We have known each 
other since we were four or 
five, but we only really noticed 
each other fairly recently.” 

Miss Fergraon added: “We 
met up again in 1983 at a 
house party and became very 
good friends. Then in June, 
1985, when I was a guest of the 
Queen at Royal Ascot we 
became better friends.” 

Miss Fergnson said she was 
attracted by Prince Andrew’s 
“wit, charm and good looks”, 
and the Prince raid he liked 
her red hair. 

The Royal proposal hap- 
pened “some weeks ago”, 
privately, in Scotland. 

Asked if she remembered 
what Prince Andrew said to 
her she replied: “Yes, bat I am 
not going to tell you.” 

The prince added that he 
had made the proposal not in 
the traditional manner on one 
knee, but on both. 

He said he was surprised 
that she accepted his proposal 
apd she had told him: “If you 
wake up tomorrow morning, 
you can tell me it is all a huge 
joke”. 

The Queen was “overjoyed, 
very happy and very pleased - 
a delighted parent” when foe 
Prince somghi her formal ap- 
proval at Windsor Castle on 
her return from her tour of 
Australia. He then ap- 
proached Miss Ferguson's fa- 
ther to ask for his daughter’s 
hand last weekend. 

Prince Andrew is on record 
as saying that he would know 
at once when be met foe girl he 
wanted to many because ft 
would hit him like a 
thunderbolt. 

But yesterday be told a 
Press Association 

interviewen“It was not as 
modi a thunderbolt as I 
expected. It was a gradual 
realization.” 

Continued on page 3, col 2 


Record film rise for secret services 


By Anthony Bevins 
and Stewart Tendfcr 

A record 133% rae has 
been earmarked for foe official 
budgets of Britain's inteffi- 
- and security services in 
r,acc<nd- 


day hi Treasury Sandy 
e stimat es. 

• The £11 mllfioa increase 
itwqins the budgets of the 
services wifi rise to £92 mil- 
lion. But this figure may only 
r e p resent tiie cost of sal aries 
and other staff expenwitnre 
rather than tbe global figure 
for Britain's espionage, 
coanter-espkmnge and secun- 


. The increase could be mean 
pay rises within MI5 and MM 
ate extra staff through reor- 
ganization prompted by Secu- 


rity Gommisflon reports on 
the services. The budget Is 
described as “for Her Maj- 
esty's foreign and other secret 
services. The Cabinet office 
will account for this rote,” in 
toe estimates. - 
Tbe scale of tire coming 
yearVBadget increase can be 
gauged by reference to previ- 
ous rises. Expenditure in . 
1983/4 was £70 mutton which 
increased by 63 per. cat to 
£75 million in 1984-5. This 
year's outturn expenditure to 
the end of this mouth Is put at 
£81 milli on which means an 
mcease of 7-8 per cent 
The main rise for next year 
comes at the end id a. period 
which has brought MIS con- 
siderable' psbttc hmnififlrtoB 
and criticism which feegas 
with the conviction of Midsael 
Betfaney, a middle ranking 


MI5 officer, for att empting to 
spy for Russia. A Channel 
Four film on the 20/20 Vision 
programme included blunt 
critidsa from a former MI5 
officer. Miss Cathy Massfter. 

The Bettnney affair raised 
considerable discussion about 
the internal faffings of MI5. It 
prompted toe appointment of a 
new director general dose to 
Downing Street and foe need 
for change ■ in foe MIS 
bnreacracy and internal sec- 
urity. 

Tbe Prime Minister last 
year extended ministerial pow- 
ers to weed- out potential 
security risks within the dvfi 
and public services by widen- 
ing foe risk definition to 
bid ode “subversiv e s”. Until 
then the problem areas were 
considered to be cither Com- 


munists or Fascist assoc- 
iations. 

The figures revealed in foe 
estimates give only a partial 
picture of Britain’s secret ser- 
vices. They take little account 
for example of the GCHQ 
operation which employs 
about 11,000 staff and costs 
somewhere between £300 and 
£600mayear. 

There is also the military 
commitment to GCHQ 
through posts abroad and foe 
Army intelligence operation in 
Ulster. 

Much of Britain’s espionage 
effort is maintained through 
foe electronic eavesdropping 
of GCHQ rather than the old- 
fashioned spy network. 

Parliament, paged 
Leading article, page 13 


Reagan could 
compromise 
on Contra aid 

Washington —On the eve of 
the crucial vote in Congress of 
President Reagan’s request for 
$100 million for the Nicara- 
guan rebels, the White House 
yesterday indicated that it 
might consider compromised 
proposals to delay putting the 
plan into effect 
But Mr Reagan was still 
insisting he wanted a full $70 
million in military aid, as well 
as a further $30 million in 
humanitarian assistance. 

The vote, which Mr Reagan 
has made a crucial test of his 
Central America policy, is 
likely to be extremely close. 
The White House was esti- 
mating before foe debate be- 
gan that it needed oniy-about 
ten votes to win in the'House. 


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US told to end ‘unfair’ 
competition on 
Atlantic air routes 


THF TTMFS THTmSDAY MARCH 20 1986 


mm 




By PhiHp Webster, Political Reporter 


The Government is ready to 
aonsider tearing up an air 
services agreement with the 
United States over the Atlan- 
tic air routes unless it accepts a 
Emit on flights by US carriers. 

In the strongest warning yet 
about uhfair competition be- 
tween US and British airlines, 
Mr Michael Spicer, Minister 
for Aviation, spoke last night 
of the "very serious” conse- 
quences if a new agreement 
was not reached by ihe end of 
July to control capacity on the 
Atlantic, where die US holds 
60 per cent of the market. 

The capacity “annex” of the 
Bermuda 2 agreement runs 
out in July and the dear 
implication behind Mr 
Spicer's words, given as Brit- 
ish negotiators flew to Wash- 
ington. was that if a 
satisfactory arrangement is 
not reached consideration 
would be given to terminating 
the agreement. 

The Government would 
have to give 12 months notice 
. after which there would be no 
formal basis for aircraft to fly 
across the Atlantic The Gov- 
ernment hopes that US real- 
ization that they would have 
most to Jose from a free-for-all 
will be an added inducement 
to come to terms. 

“We are not playing games. 
We mean business. Without 
the capacity annex the agree- 
ment is not acceptable, ” a 
government source said. 


Mr Spicer, addressing the 
American Chamber of Com- 
merce in London, accused the 
US of breaking the roles of 
international aviation. “One 
of the fundamental roles of 
international aviation is that 
competition must be fair and 
equal. On the Atlantic it is 
not.” 

The US did not open its 
vast domestic market to for- 
eign carriers, even for access 
to international services: nor 
did it allow foreign carriers to 
invest in its market. 

But the European market 
was open to a for greater 
extent US airlines could com- 
bine London and European 
traffic and in some cases they 
carried passengers to and fro 
between London and Europe; 
British airlines did not have 
comparable advantages in the 
US. 

Mr Spicer said that efforts 
to press the US authorities for 
greater access to their home 
market were not making much 
progress. “The only practical 
means we have to protect our 
airlines, which are perfectly 
competitive in terms of price, 
performance and product 
from being progressively 
forced off UK/US routes, is to 
exercise some restraint on the 
capacity of US airlines.” 

He said that most US 
airlines were first and fore- 
most domestic operators for 
whom international routes 


were an adjunct to their 
domestic networks; such air- 
lines could afford to engage in 
fere of capacity wars on 
international routes, to use 
them as toss leaders, to 
achieve domination of those 
routes and force off their 
competitors. 

Mr Spicer saitt“Our air- 
fines, whose business is essen- 
tially international, cannot 
afford to behave in this tiny. 
We simply cannot and will not 
expose our airlines to risks 
where the cards are stacked 
against them. True competi- 
tion can only exist where there 
is proper and adequate access 
to the market.” 

Mr Spicer reiterated the 
Government's position that it 
was not in a position to 
privatize British Airways until 
the negotiations had been 
settled, and that it could not 
allow any immediate prospect 
of privatization to influence 
its negotiating position on the 
Bermuda agreement. 

He also said that the man- 
agement led buy-out for Brit- 
ish Airways had not found 
favour with the Government 
because it wanted the widest 
possible holding of shares, and 
a sale at the best price 

“This itself no doubt pre- 
cludes selling British Airways 
to a single buyer, encouraging 
as it is that there is so much 
enthusiasm for privatization 
within the airline.” 




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Two former employees of. 
Private Patients ran who. 
re signed when accused : of 
defrauding the provident USSO- i 
cation bxye set m*as specrat- 
isi ^consultants advising 
companies cm pnvate health 


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Satanist’s ‘gifts to woman’ 


Ml 


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Self-confessed satanist Der- 
ry Mainwaring Knight had a 
special hotel room for after- 
dinner sexual intercourse, a 
court was told yesterday. 

Jeanette Clohosy. aged 27. 
of Basildon. Essex, said Mr 
Knight took her to many 
hotels for sexual intercourse 
and bought her a jeep, expen- 
sive clothes and jewellery. He 
was living with the Rev John 
Baker, the rector of Newick. 
East 9ussex- 

She told Maidstone Crown 
Court that they regularly visit- 
ed hotels including The Old 
House Hotel, Chesterfield, the 
Post House and the Old Moat 
House at Brentwood, the 
South Lodge. Chelmsford, and 
the Chequers Hotel, Forest 
Row. East Sussex. 

Miss Gohosy said: “Mr 


Knight had a room at the 
Chequers for his use after 
dinner where we would make 
love." 

Mr Knight took her to meet 
the rector and his wife three 
times. She and Mr Knight 
then went to the Chequers for 
the night, she said 

On another occasion she 
saw Mr Baker hand Mr Knight 
a brown envelope which he 
later opened taking out about 
£300. 

Mr Knight, aged 46. an 
unemployed painter and deco- 
rator. of Dormans Land Sur- 
rey, denies 19 charges of 
obtaining more than £200,000 
by deception from committed 
Christians. 

He claims that the money 
went towards buying satanic 
regalia to free himself from the 


devil but. it is alleged it was 
spent on fast cars, women and 
high living. 

Mr Knight gave Miss 
Gohosy a gold and diamond 
engagement ring. 

Miss Gohosy is the third 
woman that the court has been 
told Mr Knight wanted to 
many. 

“As I saw it we were 
supppsed to be engaged to be 
married” she said under 
cross-examination from Mr 
Michael West, QC, for the 
defence. 

Miss Gohosy said that she 
loved . him . from about ..a 
month after she met him. It 
was nothing to do with the 
expensive gifts he gave her. 

The trial was adjourned 
until today. 


Science report 


Drug addict child 
must stay in care 


A decision by magistrates to 
put a baby girl into council 
care after she was bom suffer- 
ing from drug withdrawal 
symptoms, because of her 
mother’s addiction, was up- 
held by the Court of Appeal in 
London yesterday. 

The judges over-ruled a 
finding by two High Court 
judges that the magistrates 
had no power to put the baby 
in care on evidence of addic- 
tion while she was in her 
mother’s womb. 


The girl was boro suffering 
from convulsions. Her moth- 
er had continued to take drugs 
orally and by injection 
throughout her preguancy. 

Opposition to the care order 
had come fron the child's 
parents and from her legal 
guardian, a welfare officer. 

Lord Justice Dflkm said: *T 
would stress that there is no 
question whatever in tins case 
of giving this child back to a 
mother who is a drag addict.” 


Lord Chief Justice 
to hear Bar case 

By Frances Gibb ‘ Legal Affairs Correspondent 






Russians claim to have found ‘first universal flu vaccine’ 


Lord lane, the Lord Chief 
Justice, is to hear the Bar’s 
challenge to the Lord Chancel- 
lor about legal aid fees, which 
opens in the High Court 
today. The decision of the 
Lend Chief Justice to hear foe 
case, the first to be brought by 
the legal profession, is- an 
indication of the importance 
of the proceedings. • - , - j . 

. -senior counsel Said: 

“There is a feeling that it 
needs to be the . Lord. Chief 
Justice if there is a question of 
ruling that the Lord Chancel- - 


The Bar wffl be re pr ese nt ed 
by Mr Sydney Rentrafec, QC, 
a South African-born barrister 
who r e p rese n ted die family of 
Steve Bilro. the black activist, 
at the inquest into his death m 
police custody. 

Lord HaUsham cf S$ Mary- 
kbone, will be represented by 
another banister in th^ same 
cham bers,' Mr Micholas Phil- 
lips, QC. >’ 

\ In the name of their efair- 
man, Mr -Robert Alexander. 
QC, the Bar oTFhgfemf ana; 
Wales will 'argue ffiat Lord : 



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iday that it 


bra 

afierbeiflg advise 
t he judge at the 
criminal case heai 

i to do so by 
end of the 
dng. 


An unambiguous, if somewhat 
surprising, claim to have pro- 
duced “the world's first uni- 
versal anti-fin vaccine of a new 
generation” has just been 
made by Soviet scientists. 

Dr Rbakim Khaitov, deputy 
directin' of the Soviet Institute 
of Immunology, who worked 
on the new compound, says it 
is effective became, knowing 
that other vaccines fight only 
against a specific fra virus 
strain, be and his colleagues 
adopted a oew approach. 

Instead of tracking down the 
entire flu virus range, they 
decided to identify its most 


toxic segment That would 
have been impossible had they 
used existing racemes, which 
are weakened viral cultures. 
They work by “showing” the 
fin enemy to the body’s de- 
fence system so that the white 
cells in the Mood will produce 
antibodies when attacked by 
the virus proper. 

But Dr Khaitov says, those 
vaccines are only effective 
when the real fin vims bears a 
strong resemblance to the 
original *8n picture” shown to 
the cells. Because the fin rims 
is very changeable, the anti- 
bodies fen to attack Us many 


disguises and t h ere fo re fin 
vaccines do not work 
satisfactorily. 

To solve that the Russians 
decided to concentrate on a 
minute section of the protein 
fraction of the fin vims (a mere 
20 amino acids m length) 
common to aO viral mem- 
branes. They believed it would 
still contain the fin pathogene 
even after several mutations. 

If, they argued, they could 
induce antibodies to attack 
that section, they would be 
well on the way towards an 
anti-fin compound effective 
against all strains of flu. But 


they hit a snag; the blood’s 
white cells ignored the protein, 
failing to produce antibodies 
against ft. Clearly, die protein 
was not an immunogene. 

Dr Khaftov’s group decided 
to tun ft into one. Their plan 
was to join a molecule of the 
compound which triggers the 
activity of the blood’s white 
ceUs with the protein in 
question. 

An associate member of the 
Soviet Academy of Sciences, 
Dr Viktor Kabanov, who 
heads the department of high 
molfiCHlar compounds of Mos- 


cow University, thought he 
could synthesize such com- 
pounds. 

The researchers then tinned 
to experiments with mire. 
They first inoculated them 
with the new compound and 
then with a fin vims. An the 
mice survived, although they 
normally die if they have flu. 
The vaccine worked immedi- 
ately; 

In farther experiments mice 
were sequentially infected with 
all the eight known strains of 
the flu vims. In every case they 
all recovered when the new 
vaccine was a dm i ni s t ered. 



Beatles await 
royalty ruling 

VTfcjremammg members of 
tlyBeatiesarirt John Lennon's 
widow,- Yofco Otnvniust.waii 
to hear ^whether their latest 
move in royalties claim 
against the recording compa- 
rer, EML has succeeded. 

A Hi£b Court judge re- 
served judgement after a five- 
day hearing . yesterday. Just 
over 14 months ago accounts 
were ordered to be drawn up 
showing, .how much the 
Beaties were owed in respect, 
of two recording agreements. 


Advert time 

British Telecom is to begin a 
trial of - the telephone fin 
advertising from . March 29. . 
when' the message oil its 
speaking dock wifi indude foe 
name of .the watch company, 
AccurisL 


ANIMAL EXPERIMENTS 
IN MEDICAL RESEARCH 


New town group’s expansionist plans £500m for 


By Hugh Dayton, 


YES 


OR 


NO 




Would you treat a child suffering from 
leukaemia? 


Would you retain Society's hard won 
control over polio, diphtheria, TB and 
small^jox? 


Would you agree we must have 
medicines and vaccines which have 
been tested for safety? 


Would you agree that we need to 
alleviate and control, for example, 
cancer, arthritis, multiple sclerosis and 
heart disease? 


Would you like to see a cure for AIDS 
and Legionnaire's disease? 


The consortium that wants 
to build a complete new town 
at Tillingbam Hail disclosed 
yesterday that it had further 
building plans for open land in 
south Essex. Written evidence 
from the consortium against 
the refusal of councils to let it 
build the new town showed 
that its interest in local land 
went far beyond the bound- 
aries planned for Tillingham 
HalL 

Lord Northfidd of Telford, 
chairman of the consortium of 
nine of the largest house- 
building companies in Britain, 
rejected the councils’ claim 
that adequate land was avail- 
able on disused industrial land 
outside the Green Belt at 
Ch afford Hundred near-by. 

He made it dear that the 


W r®"s hara 

1 KaB 


iisoura 

roCKENOON 


IBS 


consortium, called Consor- 
tium Developments, believed 
that housing need required 
both sites to be used. “With 
regard to the Cbafford Hun- 


dred site potential, the compa- 
ny notes the estimate of the 
county council that it could 
provide sites for some 4,00 
houses,” Lord Ivf Orth field said. 

“The consortium is aware 
of this potential and many of 
its member companies have 
registered an interest in ae- . 
qoiring land for development 
at Cnafford Hundred. The 
consortium's view is flat the 
development ofboth Cbafford 
Hundred and Tiflingharn Hall 
should be • vigorously 
pursued.” 

The evidence was submit- 
ted at the consortium’s appeal 
against the councils’ refusal to. 
let it build a town of 5,000 
homes with shops and schools 
at Tillingham HalL The couo- 


New life for grandmother 


Animal experimentation has made 
an essential contribution to the 
control and eradication of serious 
diseases. Much more requires to be 

done - this work must continue. 



A grandmother aged 56 who 
received the liver of Sieve 
Watt, the boxer, in a trans- 
plant operation, yesterday 
save a thumbs up sign from 
her hospital bed as her family 
said she could now plan a new 
life. 

Mrs Brenda Duffy, of Broad 
Green, UverpooL received the 
liver in a 10-hour operation at 
ihe Queen Elizabeth Hospital 
in Birmingham. 

Steve Watt, aged 29, the 
Scottish welterweight champi- 
on, died on Monday three 
days after having surgery to 
remove a blood clot from his 
brain. 

He had collapsed in the ring 
in the tenth round of a fight 
against Rockey Kelley in 
London. 

Mr Arthur Duffy, aged 62, a 
Liverpool magistrates' court 
official said yesterday that his 
wife, who had been ill with 
liver disease for three years, 
was recovering welL 


From Craig Seton, Birmingham 

”We are sorry that this i 
happened to Sieve Wan, but i 
without donors all the skill < 
and knowledge of the surgeons j 
would come to aoughL”he , 
said. ■ 

“There might be some con- < 
solation for his family tha t 
someone else bas been given ] 
the chance to live. It means a j 
better quality of life for us and j 
we can begin again to make < 
plans for the future.” 

Mr Bill Essex, transplant co- j 
ordinator at Queen Eliz- 
abeth's hospital said that Mxs 
Duffy was lucky that a fiver 
had been found for transplan- 
tation so soon. She now stood ■ . 
a good chance of recovery 
because she had received the 
fiver of a fit young man. 

The dead boxer’s kidneys 
were given for transplant op- 
erations at Glaring Goss and 
St Mary's hospitals in London 
and his heart to the Papwpnh 
hospital in Cambridge. 


• Dr John Burton, the Ham- 
mersmith coroner, said yester- 
day that he was not going to 
hold an inquiry into the ethics 
of boxing wfaenhe opened and 
adjourned an inquest into the 
death of Mr Watt. 

Mr Waa, of Jveagh dose, 
Northwood, Middlesex, was 
identified by Police Constable 
Peter McCormack, a coroner’s 
officer. 

The -inquest was adjourned" 
for six weeks. ‘ 

Rugby may go 
fully co-ed 

Rugby School, founded in 
1567, may become fully co- 
educational 

Although the £l,70C-a-term 
school has taken girls into- its 
sixth form for nearly 10 years, 
Mr Richard BuD, headmaster^ 
is to propose that girls be 
admitted from 13 years on- 
wards. 


rife; Essex county and Thur- 
rock borough, oppose the 
creation of a new town in the 
Green Belt dose to London 
arid have jpver* a warning of 
the risk ofereating a continu- 
ous belt of suburbs from 
Londonto Southend. 7 

Lord bforthfidd, who as Mr 
Donald Chapman spent ’al- 
most 20 years as Labour MP 
for Birmingham/ Ndrthfield, - 
said that the consortium had 
formed a subsidiary to' biiild 
the new town at a rate of 500 
homes a year 'for IO.years. It 
would , differ from the - new 
towns of past years; such as- 
Crawtey . and Mflxon Keynes, 
because it’ would be :bmli 
entirely by private companies, 
without any public sector role, 
and would be much smaller. 


Fireman who 
defied strike 
fights council 

A former fireman who de- 
fied a call to strike' in Novem- 
ber 1977 is claiming 
compensation for alleged cm- 
fair dismissal from arrafterna- 
tive job found-fbr him by. 
Qywd County Council . 

Mr Brian Hodson, of RhyL 
was employed fry die council 
as a countryside warden more 
than two years after tfcstrifct 
: At. ihe tribunal in G 
Bay yesterday; Mr Ri 
Stanley, Gwycfs estates dona- 
tor,, said Mr Hodson bad 
probtemsin relationships with 
. officials had rerai s ed Ins 
^employers of damaging Jus. 
health. Hehad done lushest to, 
help, but Mr Hodson waspso 
awkward that nothing .1 could' 
do fin him could satisfyftira”.L 
After tbe : - -Eire Brigades 
Union strike/ Mir! Hodson 
■ received skfrpiay for two years 
asa resuft of tire mental strain 

of the dispute. Vv i •• 

. The hearing continues; 


revolution V 


■Coatiawed from page ! /- 

country fa the world," Lend 
Young jsnd. iat a Press 
conference. ' . 

The pilot schemes running 
since January, including the 
JofrStart scheme under which 
those who. get - a job' paying 
under £80 a week can qualify' 
for a £20 top-up, had shown : 
ihat: many of .the ,long- 
term unemployed had ' given 
up, he said. 


many 

jnflfibn peopfc unemployed ^ 
for. more than, a year are in ~ 
dange r of becoming a kind of 
forgotten array in the ever-. 
changing ranks of the .people. . 
Who go to make up the 


-The . . “expansion. of 

Jobcentres would inean that . 
forther first time they wonld be 
,abte :to. offer individual- help- 
and' advice, which could lead 
tor a: job, -a 'training course, a 
placed the Comrmmity Pro- 
graroine or .hr the range of 
othCTalteraesirawon offer. 

. “There is a great deaf of 
laient avafrable among thjfr 
unemployed and ! hope.thar 
employers will play their 
part,”fresaidl 
The 1 aiiti was contart 
every .unemployed man and 
wotnaii and o&ranintcrvicw 
a a Jobceutrel The idea was 
nptto bea “B« Brotheri’.afid 
snoop on the: jobless. Lord 
Young sakL “Tire alternative 
would be to let people :ioi- in 














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THE TIMES THURSDAY MARCH 20 1986 


HOME NEWS 


Sarah Ferguson: from pouting toddler to Prince’s bride 


t - Sarah Feiguson, at 26, is a much more 
‘ mature and street-wise young woman 
than the Princess of Wales was when she 


became engaged at the age of 19. This has 
' been reflected in the greater aplomb and 
. confidence with which she has faced the 
attentions of the press during the testing 
. * time in which her royal romance was 
guessed at but not officially 
'-acknowledged. 

. ' Her exchanges with the reporters and 
■* paparrazi who have plagued and pes- 
7 tered her have been unfailingly good- 
*- humoured and unpro testing. At the same 
■* time, she has not hesitated to use her skill 
as a fast driver to give her pursuers the 
-_ slip in London traffic. The only time she 
was patently flustered was when her car 
* failed to start at Heathrow in February 
.1 after her return from her Swiss ski-ing 
holiday with the Prince and Princess of 
V. Wales. 

As the daughter of the Prince of 
“ Wales's polo manager she was within the 


Facing the spotlight with confidence 


royal circle, without ever having featured 
in the advisers’ lists of young ladies 
eligible for royal espousaL Had the plans 
of those who traditionally advise Buck- 
ingham Palace about the nuptial future 
of the royal family been heeded. Prince 
Andrew should now be to Lady 

Diana Spencer or anolhereUgible young 
lady of her age. 

Miss Fereuson is, in fact, nine months 
older than Prince Andrew, who at 26 has 
brought royal marriage into line with the 
average age fin- British males. Miss 
Ferguson though, after her long romance 
with the racing driver Paddy McNally (a 
man 22 years her senior), is marrying 
more than two years later than the 
national average for her sex. 

The affection between the Prince and 
the girl he first met as a pudgy schoolgirl 
on the polo field was first suspected last 


June when they appeared together in the 
royal box at Ascot Excitement swelled to 
a new pitch when she was invited for a 
week-long stay al Sandrin gham at file 
new year. 

The couple were seen walking arm-in- 
arm and or hand-is-hand about the royal 
estate and the photographers realized 
that this was the real thing. 

Later the couple held hands at the 
Royal Opera House, a public display of 
affection that Prince Andrew never 


permitted himself with his former giri- 
triend. Miss Koo Stark. 


friend. Miss Koo Stark. 

Those who watch the royal family 
closely noted the serious effect that Miss 
Ferguson was having upon the impres- 
sionable prince when be began to lose 
weight quite noticeably. A trim figure 
while serving in the Falklands, he had 
gained weight quite rapidly. Best esti- 


Prince and 
the grand 
old dukes 
of York 


mates are that be might have acquired an 
extra two stones after his return from 
active service and the end of his 
relationship with Miss Stark. Miss 
Ferguson, it appears, already has him 
back in fighting trim. 

There is a genuine friendship between 
the Princess of Wales and Miss Fergu- 
son. Both grew up with in royal tildes, 
went to boarding school, and suffered the 
dismay of having their parents’ marriage 
break-up whfletney were young. 

For the second time a royal prince's 
marriage entangles Buckingham Palace 
with the etiquette of dealing with bride's 
parents who are divorced. Last time the 
additional complication was that Lady 
Diana Spencer’s step-grandmother was 
the queenly romantic novelist, Barbara 
Cartfand. This time the special problem 
is that Sarah Ferguson's mother is now 


Conple tell how 
their love 


married to a wealthy Argentinian polo 
player, Hector Bazrentes. . 

Miss Ferguson is much more experi- 
enced than the Lady Diana, whose 
shyness could be seen in her habit of 
dipping her head and looking at people 
through awkwardly upcast eyes. Muss 
Ferguson is notably more self-possessed 
than the Princess could be at her 

Rng agpme nl. 

The Princess of Wales qnicldy gave op 
her job as a kindergarten teacher, but 
Miss Ferguson plans to stay working 
with the graphic arts company in the 
West End as long as posable. 

She has, however, already abandoned 
her shared flat in Qapham, and for the 
months before the wedding may be seen 
more often at her father's country home, 
at Dummer outside Basingstoke. She 
may also enjoy, as did the Princess of 


Wales, the hospitality of the Queen 
Mother in the pre-marriage period. 

- For the moment, the couple are talking 
of living in Prince Andrew’s apartments 
in Buckingham Palace, though it is 
possible that grace and favour accommo- 
dation could be found for them in the 
Clock Coin! at Kensington Palace, where 
Princess Margaret, the Gloucester's and 
the Waleses already have their London 
homes. 

In the long term their eventual 
residence is likely to be Clarence House, 
al present the home of the Queen 
Mother. Clarence House was for many 
years the London home of Alfred, Duke 
of Edinburgh, Queen Victoria's second 
son. 

The wedding date has yet to be fixed, 
but July or August would certainly 
commend themselves to police, politi- 
cians and the tourist industry as months 
in which the nation could well benefit 
from the extra pleasure of a royal 
wedding. 


BOULOGNE 


grew in secret 


By Paul VaDely 


• The announcement of 
Prince Andrew’s intention to 
■ " marry increases (he tikeiihood 
> that he win soon lie created 
" Duke of York. 


* The tide, traditionally asso- 
dated with the second sou of 
*■ the sovereign, was last held by 
the Queen's father, who later 
became King George VL 
It would be unusual for the 
Queen’s son to many without 
? first being created a duke, 
7 according to David Wfltiam- 

- son of Dibrett’s Peerage. “It is 
' possible that he will be given 

the tide on the eve of his 
marriage, though it is more 
likely that it will happen about 
a month before, so that the 
invitations can be printed in 

- that form”, he said. 


• Prince Andrew would be the 
. thirteenth holder of the tide 

■ which was created in 1385 by 
Richard II and conferred upon 
his unde Edmund of Langley. 

- In that first creation, die 
title passed down to two 
Anther generations, but since 
that it has always been creat- 
ed afresh for subsequent hold- 
ers. Dukes of York do not 
seem to have long lineages. 

Edward Phmtagenet, the 
second duke, was killed at 
Agmcoart by “much hete and 
thranggid* 1 . The fourth duke, 
the younger son of Edward IV, 

- was one of the ill-fated Princes 
in the Tower. While Richard, 
Duke of York, who claimed the 
crown in opposition to Henry 

7 VI, had his head cat off, 

■ adorned with a paper crown 
■"and stack upon the battle- 

- meats of his namesake city. 

In many other cases, the 
' dukes’ lineages disappeared 
back into the royal line. Five 
Dukes of York later became 
; King , including Henry VID 

• r who resigned the patent on the 
: death of his elder brother 

- . Arthur and became Prince of 
: Wales. 

•• The most famous Duke of 
York, whom nursery rhyme 
seems to credit with a fondness 

- for mili tary drill with his 
;! apparently aimless marching 

of the 10,000 up and and down 
? the tin, was Prince Frederick, 

■ the second son of George m. 
He was commander-in-chief of 

\ the English army and got into 
- . trouble when his mistress was 

* accused of selling oommis- 

- sioos. He was acquitted of 
7 personal corruption by 278 
* votes to 196 in the House of 

'■ Commons, bat had to resign 
“ from the post. 


Continued from page 1 - 

Miss Ferguson said she felt 
a strain at having to keep the 
engagement secret - “bat only 
because 1 wanted everyone 
rise to share my happiness". 

Asked how he felt now that 
the announcement had been 
made. Prince Andrew said: 
“Over the moon", and then 
after a quick glance from his 
fiancee, he added: ‘Correc- 
tion. We are both over the 
moon and will be even more 
so when this is over.” 

No date or place has been 
chosen for the wedding but the 
prince said he would like “a 
London wedding and a white 
wedding” some time in July or 
August. 

“We would like it to be in the 
summer, if possible.” Plans 
were already underway but 
“there are so many people to 
talk to and get decision from. 

“If schedules do not permit 
us to have a summer wedding, 
then it will have to be some- 
time in the autumn. 

“I cannot be more specific 
and it will be very nice if it can 
be in Westminster Abbey, like 
my parents’ wedding. 

“Sarah is already charging 
round looking for a dress or 
looking for ideas. The plans 
are still up in the air.” 

Prince Andrew said mar- 
riage was a major upheaval for 
most people and would be for 
thera. But, Miss Ferguson 
added.-“We are a good team. 
We are good friends. I am 
going to enjoy it immensely. 1 . 
think I will cope with the help 
of Andrew." 

Miss Ferguson said it would 


be a “great honour” to be a 
princess and she was looking 
forward to carrying out her 
royal duties. She said^that she 
also planned to^-iuxp on 
working at her job in the 

prin t ing and j mhiishing wwtf- 
“I enjoy my job enormously. I 
run this graphic. firm and I 
work by myself That means 
making cups of coffee and 
doing most of the hoovering. 
When Andrew is away I will 
work' harder than when he is 
here.” 


Prince Andrew added: “Sa- 
rah is her own boss and she 
can make her own schedule to 
suit herself” 


Of his own career, he said: 
“We have discussed it at some 
length and for the foreseeable 
future I wil] be maintainin g 
my Naval career as it is at the 
momenL It is up to her to put 
up with that and I think she 
will bea remarkable wife if she 
can." 


Prince Andrew, a lieutenant 
in the Royal Naw, will be 
starling an officers' coarse at 
the Royal Naval College, 
Greenwich, next month. 


He said: “I have absolutely 
no plans to change the course 
of my career because I am to 
be married. And in any case. 
Sarah has told me in no 
uncertain terms not to change 
ray plans at least for the 
forseeable future." 


Asked what they thought of 
the title “Her Royal Highness 
the Princess Andrew”, which 
she would bear after the 
wedding, the Prince grinned 
and said “That's fine by me”. 


Wtfflain Henry Walter 
60i Duke of BucdBUCti 


John Charles, 
7th Duke of 
Bucdeudi 

1 

ARCS Ctnistabol 


(Princess ABce. f MAf j RED 
Duchess | ! 

of Gloucester) | I 


Prince Henry, 
brother of 


brother of 
King George VI. 

Duke of 
Gloucester, 
3rd son of 
King George V 


Prince Richard, 
Duka of 
Gloucester 


Lord Herbert I 


C g^2r}MABR E D{«gS5^Sr 


Major Ronald Ferguson 


SARAH FERGUSON 


PRINCE 

ANDREW 


Miss Ferguson’s family tree, showing how she is distantly 
related to her fiance. 


Princess’s fashion influence 


■' Sarah Ferguson’s “very 
. good friend”, the stylish Prin- 
. cess of Wales has already had 
-a hand in dressing Prince 
Andrew’s bride. 

A sharply tailored navy- 
blue suit, with Princess 
-Diana's favourite wide shoal- 
.* jjgf | jnp | trimmed Sarah's full 
- figure fcff the engagement 
; nkrtaes. The double-breasted 
• • cinched in at the waist 
by a very deep belt above an 
!„ impressed ideal skirt was wora 
over the simplest round-neck 


By Stay Menkes, Fashion Editor 


silk blouse in hyacinth bine. 
Silver buttons added an appro- 
priately naval touch for the 
girl who says that she and her 
sailor prince are “a good 
team”. 

The cbic outfit is in contrast 
to the fussy check suit that 
Sarah wore to visit Prince 
Andrew aboard ship a month 
ago, and to the Sloane sepa- 
rates she wears to work in the 
West End. Like Lady Diana 
Spencer before her, her 
present wardrobe consists of 


casual clothes and evening 
dresses, rather than 
“occasion” outfits. She has 
already been spotted shopping 
with the Princess of Wales In 
Fulham Road designer 
boutiques.. 

If Sarah Ferguson follows 
the Princess’s advice, the wed- 
ding dress is likely to be nude 
by one of the young British 
couturiers such as Bruce 
Oldfield or Victor Edetetem. 
The future bride is not yet a 
cheat of either. 


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HOME NEWS 


THE TIMES THURSDAY MARCH 20 1986 


PARLIAMENT MARCH 19 1986 


Budget debate • Rate bills • Union membership 


Howe: Most 


GCHQ staff 
agreed terms 


SECURITY 


The Foreign Secretary bad. made 
elf alai 


himself a laughing stock by his 
'extraordinary conduct over the 
issue of trade union member- 
ship at' GCHQ, Mr> Denis 
Healey, chief Opposition 
spokesman on foreign and 
Commonwealth affairs, said in 
the Commons. 

Could he explain his dogged 
determination to continue 
shooting himself in the foot 
when his wounds from two 
years ago must still be causing 
him some discomfort? he asked 

Sir Geoffrey Howe rejected 

what he described as Mr 


Healey's vulgar abuse and main- 
tainrati 


1 that the Government had 
achieved its basic objective -in 
freeing GCHQ from the threat 
of future disruption while deal- 
ing sympathetically with in- 
dividual cases. 

Responding to a private no- 
tice question from Mr Healey, 
he said the overwhelming 
majority of GCHQ staff had 
accepted the revised terms of 
service. A few who had resigned 
from union membership but 
later rejoined would be asked to 
honour their original commit- 
ment or face disciplinary 
procedures. 

Mr Healey said that two years 
after failing to cany out the 
fearful threats he made to union 
members at GCHQ, Sir Geof- 
frey had suddenly revived the 
threat and had now withdrawn 
it five days later. 

Sir Geoffrey Howe said he had 
met representatives of the 
Council of Civil Service Unions 
yesterday (Tuesday) and ex- 
plained that the Government's 
decisions on GCHQ had been 
taken in the interests of national 
security. 

The small number of union 
members who had not accepted 
the revised terms from the 
outset had been offered alter- 
native jobs or premature retire- 
ment on redundancy terms. 

He had been asked whether 
those staff who had rejoined 
unions would be liable to dis- 
missal as a result of disciplinary 
proceedings. He had replied that 
disciplinary matters at GCHQ 
were the responsibility of the 
director of GCHQ. who had 
informed the head of the Civil 
Service that he did not regard 
dismissal as an appropriate 
penalty unless there were factors 
of which he' was unaware. 

Mr Charles Irvhqt (Chelten- 
ham, 'C): While having sup- 

E rted all those in GCHQ who 
ve suffered greatly over the 
past two years. I do not think.il 
is unreasonable to welcome the 
flexibility that has at a perhaps 
slightly late hour been in- 
troduced into the situation at 
GCHQ. 

I welcome the statement 
made by Sir Geoffrey Howe. 1 
think it is right that this matter 
now should remain on the table 
until after the European Court 
has come to some decision. 1 
hope then that the whole re- 


vision can take place in a more 
reasonable and sensible context 
The misery and the damage 
that has been done to family 
upon family in my constituency 
is an absolute disgrace and it 
should not have happened in the 
beginning, but it is not un- 
reasonable to pay some tribute 
to the Foreign Secretary for 
making a full and reasonable 
statement which is far more 
flexible than we have eve seen 
Sir Geoffrey Howe: I am grateful 
to him because 1 fully under- 
stand and have always under- 
stood the extent to which this 
matter of great importance to 
national security has also 
brought difficult considerations 
for individuals. 

Mr JDa rid Steel, Leader of the 
Liberal Party: The most 
constructive thing he could do 


now is to ^gjve a categorical 


assurance of no dismissals at 
GCHQ in order to bring total 
stability into the situation. 

Sir Anthony Back (Colchester 
North. Cy It has been some- 
thing of an unfortunate si 
Looking to the future, can 
assure the House that ibe new 
structure there is to be will 
provide properly for the 
safeguarding of their position 
and legitimate interests of 
employees of this headquarters? 
Sir Geoffrey Ho»e: The 
restructuring which has taken 
place at GCHQ is designed to 
improve the operation of the 
headquarters as is necessary and 
to improve the pay and con- 
ditions of the staff there as can 
be achieved by restructuring 
from about 100 grades to about 
IS grades. That restructuring is 
available for all those who are 
serving there on the new terms 
Mr James Callaghan (Cardiff 
South and Penarth. Labk The 
Foreign Secretary has paid trib- 
ute to the loyalty of the people at 
GCHQ. Does he not realize that 
this disgraceful episode and the 
Government's record will not be 
wiped out until every member 
of GCHQ who desires to join a 
Civil Service trade union shall 
be free to do so without fear of 
intimidation, disciplinary ac- 
tion or dismissal? 

Sir Geoffrey Howe: I recognize 
that the point of new asserted 
by him with characteristic clar- 
ity is a point of view strongly 
held, but it has to be set 
alongside the Government's 
dear conviction that it was 
necessary to make changes in 
the terms and conditions of 
GCHQ in order to ensure 
continuity of operation in the 
organization. 

Mr Merlyn Rees (Leeds. South 
and Moriey. Lab) asked whether 
they were to understand that 
despite the announcement two 
years ago that the polygraph was 
not to be introduced at Chelten- 
ham, it now was? 

Sr Geoffrey Howe: Following 
the recommendation of the 
Security Commission, following 
the Prime case, recommenda- 
tions were made for experi- 
mental Jests to be carried out 
There has been no final recom- 
mendation as a result of tests. 


Fulham 
leaflets on 
housing 
attacked 


BY-ELECTION 


Leaflets drcnhUmg in Fulham 
and elsewhere daiming the Gov- 
ernment was threatening the 
future of private rented accom- 
modation were without founda- 
tion Mr John Patten, Minister 
for Housing, Urban Affairs and 
Construction, said during ques- 
tion rime in the Commons. 

I can gl re an uuequiricnl 
assurance to the House (be said) 
that the Government has no 
intention, now or ia the future, of 
doing anything to affect the 
seenrity of present tenants in the 
.private rented sector. 

Any leaflets going round Fat- 
ham saying the opposite are 

completely and utterly w ithout 
any foundation. 

Mr David Heatfacoat-Amory 
(Wells, C) had opened the 
exchanges when he asked if the 
Go v e rnm ent would in troduc e 
kgwtarioo to free all new 
residential tenancies from the 
provisions of the Rent Act. 

Mr John Patten: The Govern- 
ment has no proposals for any 
major reform of the Rent Act in 
the lifetime of dita Parliament. 

However, it remains oar wish 
to encourage die supply of more 
homes to let hi the private rented 
sector. In order to provide 
greater scope for responsible 
landlords to invest in rented 
accommodation, I yesterday ta- 
bled *Htf«it"M»« a 10 die Hon- 
ing and Planning BID to 
the assured tenancy scheme to 
improved property. 

Mr David Winnkk (Walsall 
North, Lab): Whal Conservative 
MPs warn is another 1957 Rent 
Act which brought 
Rachmaaism. The Opposition 
have a doty to warn private 
tenants that ia the unlikely event 
of this Government being re- 
turned there will be some sort of 
Rent Act as in 1957. 

Mr Patten: He Is retiring nA- 
bish. He is going over argmaents 
which long ago died when what 
he should be doing is looking to 
the future and trying to find 
ways we can bring accommoda- 
tion back into use, to help the 
homeless, the young and those 
seeking jobs, which b now 
empty. 


Mr Jeffrey Rooker, an Oppo- 
sition spokesman on the 
environment: WiU he condemn 
the proposed meeting tonight in 
private of Conservative and 
Liberal councillors of the hous- 
ing committee hi Fulham? 

Mr Pattern . That is. the first ! 
have heard oft he meeting.'!*) 
condemn. . the tactics of the 
London La boor P a rty iri putting 
around scareraoagering leaflets 
in Fulham and elsewhere 


Parliament today 

Lords (3.0): Appropriation 
(Northern Ireland) Order. Ho- 
man Rights and Fundamental 
Freedoms Bill and Museums 
and Galleries (Prohibition of 
Admission Charges) Bill, 
committee stages; Industrial 
Training BilL second reading. 
Connnoos (2.30): Budget debate. 


Robbing poor to pay 



THE BUDGET 


The present Government was 

the firat one this centniy to cany 
out a policy of reKiistribution by 

taking from the poor to give to 

the nch, Mr Roy Hxttmley, 
chief Opposition spokesman on 
Treasury and economic affirirs, 
said when .the Commons re- 
sumed its debate on tbe Budget 
When the media froth had been 
blown away from the 
ChanceHor’s statement the Bud- 
get would be remembered foe its 

essential triviality and its 


devoted to halving stomp duty 
and the reduction in capital 
transfer tax. 

No wonder the job start pilot 
schemes in nine areas had only 
produced in total 70 jobs. In 
one area the pilot scheme had 

only created one job: the job of 


interviewing non-existent other 
s ror the pilot scheme. 


parti al ity, he said. 


applicants 

The Budget could have been a 
real jobs programme because of 
the opportunities given by the 
fall in world oil prices. This was 
the moment when industrial 
policy &ould be used to maxi- 
mum benefit 

interest rates were being held 


did be have such an obsession 
with people's capitalism and 
such little interest in people's 
jobs? 

Even the plan fin 1 changing 
the married man's tax allowance 
was calculated to keep married 
women off the labour market • 
There were times in the life of 

an economy, or a family or a 

company, when it was prudent 
to borrow money for investment 
and when not to borrow was the 
profligate alternative. 

It was intolerable that the poor 


were paying more tax while the 
richest 5 per cent were paying 


not by to tackle the 

three great cases toeing the 

country - unemployment, pov- 
erty and collapsed manufac- 
turing industry - and it was 
divisive. It was a Budget for 
men and women with £200 a 

month to spend on share ac- 

quisition, for families wishing to 
manipulate large estates to 
avokf death duty, and for stock- 
brokers seen on television going 
wild with delight when their 
stamp duty was cm by 50 per 
cent. 

Even the in the baric 
rate of income tax, described by 
the Chancellor as concentrating 

benefit not on the rich buz on 

the great majority of ordinary 
taxpayers, had quite the op- 
posite effect. 

The family earning £5,000 a 
year was 26p a week better off as 
a result of that change, the 
family on average earnings 
£1.22 a week better off and the 
family warning £50,000 a year 
was £3.30 a week better off The 

famil y Irving on unemployment 

benefit was 55p a week worse off 
as a result of yesterday’s Budget. 

The basic pattern of Tory 
taxation policy remained the 
same. The rich paid less and the 
rest paid more. For taxpayers on 

IO times the national average 

the tax bill is down by 22 per 
cent For taxpayers on average 

earnings the tax bin was up by 

something between 1 per cent 
and 3 per cent. . 

If the Chancellor had wanted 

to reverse that trend of taking 

from the poor and giving to the 
rich he would not have altered 
the iwrie rate at all. His best 
course would have been to use 
his billion pounds either to cut 
unemployment or to increase 
child benefit. 

He had chosen the option 
which least helped the low wage 
earner. The battle over taxation 
within the Tory Party was won 
by the 1922 Committee and lost 
by social justice. 

The net cost of the entire jobs 
package in yesterday's Budget 
was less than £100 million: not 
as much as the Chancellor 


far too high. 

Nicholas 


Badges 

west. 


Mr _ 

(Wolverhampton South , 

O asked what was the proper 
level of interest rates? 

Mr Hatterstey said they should 
be at a level at which exporters 

could maximize thei r sa fes. 
Even now interest rates were tor 
too high and penalized indus- 
trial investment and pauperized 
the owner-occupier. They were 
much higher than Britain’s 
competitors. 

Interest rates had been man- 



: Chancellor 

nation 


aged down this morning by the 
Rank of England to help the 
Chancellor. (Conservative 
laughter) They should have 
been managed down a month 
ago to help the economy. 

If the massive tax cuts come 
next year (he went on) they will 
be wholly dependent and wholly 
financed by the sale of British 
Gas, British Telecom and other 
national w wete The Chancellor 
talked about holding down - the 
total of Government 
By some slip of the memory he 
did not mention the £4.75 
billion be intends to obtain from 
asset sales. 

The assets were being sold at 
£3 billion below their true value 
to ensure a quick sale. That was 
a wilful waste of taxpayers' 
money. 

The Chancellor should have 
financed jobs, not tax cuts. Why 


richest 5 per cent were paying 
less. By cutting the taxes of the 
rich the Government had beat 
forced to hold back benefits 
from pensioners, families and 
the long-term unemployed. The 
Chancellor was wilfully ftiKiq; . 
th ose groups and so failing the 
nation and the nation -would 
make him pay the price. . 
Mr John MacGregor, Chief 
Secretory to the Treasury, said 
because of the Government's. 

prudent management interest' 

rates had come down by l per 

cent, bringing further benefits to 
and families . 

He hoped the oil co mp anies 
would note the comments, of 

MPs and he believed there 

would be considerable com- 
petition at the petrol pumps. ‘ 
The Budget marked a further 
step in reducing the burden of 

income tax. though it- was still 

too high and be hoped the' 

Opposition would s u pport the 

Government's efforts to get it 

down farther. Ministers warned 

Individ gals to keen more of 

what they earned to spend it as 
they wished. 

The red take-home pay of a 
married man on average earn-, 
ings with two children hid risen 
by 1 7 per cent since 1979. Under 

Labour it had grown by only 0i5 

percent. 

In choosing to make a lp 
reduction in the baric rate of tax 
this year, the Government was 
not saying that basic rate redac- 
tions were in some sense better 
than threshold increases. Both 
were needed as part- of the 
programme of reducing the 
burden of taxation. The real 
value of the married man’s tax 
allowance was the highest since 
1945. 

The Government’s long-term 
objective continued to be -to 
maifp farther substantial in- 
creases in allowances. This dem-^ 
onstrated the Government’s 
commitment to thresholds, but 
it had beeu time more was done 
on the basic rale. 

The base rate redaction 
would improve incentives and 


costs bad been rising toster than 
in competitor countries. . 

The Budget, through the tfi- 
rect tax changes, throu gh ns 
encouragement of lower nnta- 
tion, and through its aste s touc e- 
to. tower mortgage rates which 
happened today, bad grcafly 
helped that process. He hoped 
both employers and employees 
would take note - and act 
accordingly. 

■ Everyone warded the level of 

unemployment to come down. 

The bulk of the benefits from 

last year's Budget were only now 

he gmamg to work through. The . 

measures announced yesterday 

were on top of all else that was 

being done. Wbar mattered was 

best use of taxpayer^ money. 

- It was nonsense to suggest the 
only impact of tins Budget or* 
jobs would be by s pecific 
employment measures. The 
Opposition thought . only 
Government could create jobs 
by spending other , people's 
money. The Government dis- 
agreed. Lasting jobs were ere-, 
m ed by business success in AC 
market, business producing 
goods and services people 
wanted to buy and they would 
have more money to buy after 
this Budget . 

. The Conservatives and the 
country would be watc hing coa- 
stantly to sec that Mr Hatiersley 
now had control of Ins col- 
leagues and would be watching 
like hawks to see that they did 
not start ringing up promises on 
tire register again. They 
also waited to see which of the 
dements of the £24„ bffion 

programme of Labour promises 
were to be knocked ouL 
Ifhe had intended to finance 
the increases be had spoken of 
today from borrowing, be would 
have made today’s toS m in- 
terest rates impossible. He had 
not got off the nook because Ms 
programme " was still 


helps more small bu sin e ss es and 
seif a 


Mr Roy Jenkins (Glasgow, 
HiUfeead. SOT) said the Budget 
was a pudding with scone good; 
plums in it but it did not haw a 
theme. Nothing followed logi- 

cally or obviously from any- 
thing else. 

He bad doubts about aboli- 
tion. of capital transfer tax-The 
Chancellor had gone back to 
death duties ansuppbtted by a 
tax on gifts inter prior which 
made ft a vohnnary fcvy paid 
only by those who distrusted 
their ndra . more titan they 
disliked the intend Revenue, ft 
became a levy on the rich who 
died young and unexpectedly 
which was not satisfactory. 


COMMENTARY 



frojto.fer the noem- 


pteyed and the prospect of 
belter firings ttri 


employment. One of the 

greatest threats to jobs in tins 
country today was that labour 


This is aremarfcablyjtoa r - 


hearted Budget (be said) 
those who are the casualties. of 
Go vernme nt policies. 


Authorities provided with resources 


-GRANTS - - - - 


There were do grounds for 
Government 


believing the _ T 

would deliberately inflict seri- 
ous damage on voluntary 
organizations. Lord Gtenartfcnr. 
Under Secretary of State, Home 
Office, told the House of Lords 
in a debate on the needs of 
voluntary bodies following abo- 


lition of the GLC - and the 
metropolitan counties. 

He said many authorities had 
already taken their grant de- 
cisions and others would be 
taking them soon. The Govern- 
ment had provided local 
authorities with the means and 
re s o ur ces to fund voluntary 
bodies. 

There was no reason why an 
authorities should not take de- 
cisions by the end of the month 




the debate, said 
cessions for charities in. the 
Budget were welcome but they 
did not compensate for the 
reductions, and in many cases 
abolition, of grants previously 
given by the GLC and the 
metropolitan authorities. 

The Bishop of Southwark, the 
Rt Rev Ronald Bowlby, said it 
was a totally unsatisfactory 
situation for organizations to 


find derisions about their Saltire 
being left to the last' moment 


Morale was desperately low and { 
the timescale had berii appafl- 
iriglyshorL • . . 

'Some of the pants made by 
flic GLC involuntary organiza- 
tions invited criticism (he said) 
and the pnbBc has been given 
the overall’ impression of 
extravagance -and extremism, 
but the amount involved was 
not large. 


Hong councils mean higher rates bills 


SPENDING 


General rates in England in the 
next financial year were likely to 
rise by about 1 2 per cent, with a 
domestic rate rise of 13 to 14 per 
cent, because local authorilies in 
general were budgeting for in- 
creased expenditrure of about 9 
per cent, double the rate of 
inflation, Mr Kenneth Baker. 
Secretary of state for the 
Environment, said during ques- 
tion time in the Commons. 

He added later that "hung” 
councils, where Liberals called 
the shots, were incurring heavy 
expenditure. It was time that 
local authorities, particularly 
those in areas of high unemploy- 
ment. realised the damage done 
to business by high rate 
increases. 


High levels of expenditure led 
to high rales. 

Dr John Cunningham, chief 
Opposition spokesman on 
environment, said that for the 
Government to claim that by 
rate-capping it was protecting 
ratepayers was simply not hon- 
esL 


Mr Baker said that a number of 
authorities had yet to set their 
rates, but it seemed likely that 
English general rates would rise 
by about 12 per cent and 
domestic rates by 13 to 14 per 
cent. 

Mr David Harris (St Ives. C): 
Some district councils in Corn- 
wall have cut their rates. The 
lesson should be passed to every 
county council in particular to 
look at expenditure and see 
where sensible savings can be 
made. 

Mr Baker ] agree. Cornwall 
County Council rate has gone up 
for the simple reason that the 
Liberals are calling the shots and 
where they call the shots, the 
rales go up. 

Mr Simon Hushes (Southwark 
and Bermondsey, L): While 
there is consistency for us in 
rates going up to the extent 
needed for increased services, in 
councils inherited from the 
Tories there is inconsistency 
from the minister in that his 
commitment was to cut costs 
and hold services and he has 
failed fundamentally to achieve 
that 

Mr Baker The rates rises in 


bung counties are on average 20 
per cent time and time again, la 
Cumbria, Cornwall, Devon, 
Oxfordshire and Somerset, 
where there are hung councils, ft 
leads to higher spouting and 
higher rates. 

It is not doe to a cut in grants 
because this year the amount of 
central Government grant to 
local government will be £11.4 
billion and next year, with an 
increase of £400 minimi, ft will 
be £11.8 billion. 


Dr John Y imningbani said taxes 
were being reduced miserably, 
but burdens were being shifted 
consistently on to ratepayers. 

Is that not why (be went on) in 
the shire counties rates are 
averaging almost 20 per cent 
and in Tory-controBed shire 
counties the rates averages are 
higher than in Labour-con- 
trolled counties? 

The figure for Tory counties, 
and there are ten of them, is 1 7.6 
percent on average: The average 
for the nine Labour-controlled 
counties is 15.8 per cent. 

Mr Baker: Loral government 
expenditure most regrettably is 
going up this next year betoken 
9 and IO percent. 


• Later Mr Patrick Nkfaofls 
(Tdgnbridge, Q said Devon 
County Cotmcd was raising 
rates by 19.8 per cent, whereas 
when it was Conservative- con- 
trolled the increase had been 11 
per Cent. He asked Mr Baker to 
remind the ratepayers of Devon 
that this had been because it was 
now Alliance controlled with 
Labour support. 

Mr Baker He is correct. I was m 
Devon a fortnight ago when 
they fixed their rates. The 
council has become hung and 
therefore Labour and Alliance 
councillors are calling the shots. 
Spending goes up, staffing goes 
up and rates go up. 

Mr Dale Campbefl-Savonrs 
(Workington, Lab) said the 
majority of Cumbrians under- 
stood the rate rises were a direct, 
result of the cuts in Government 
grant which were greater than 
the reduction in taxes an- 
nounced in the Budget. What 
was the point of robbing Peter to 
pay Paul? 

Mr Baker replied that Cumbria 
had increased expenditure by 16 
per cent and as a result rates 
woe up by 36 per cent. 

Dr Join CrmuHTgham said if 


rales were being held down fora 
few authorities, this was only 
possible at a cost to ratepayers in 
all other authorities. _ 

Mr Baker replied that 
ratecappmg had been of consid- 
erable benefit to many authori- 
ties, eg Lewisham which would 


have had to increase rates by 67 
plans. 


per cent on its spending 
but now the increase would be 
only 7 percent. In Hackney a 25 
per cent increase had been cut to 

11 percent 

It was little wonder that many 
MPs rep re senting other authori- 
ties welcomed the sort of future 
that ratecapping gave to hard- 
pressed ratepayers. 


Housing 

starts 


Provisional estimates for hous- 
ing starts in England last year 
are 140,000 in the private sector 
and 28.000 in the public sector, 
Sir George Young, Under Sec- 
retary of State for Environment, 
said in the Commons. Figures 
for 1979 were 121,000 and 
69,000 respectively. 


Threat to papers 


on leaked reports 


PRIVILEGE 


Leaks of select committees’ 
reports could be stopped by 
bringing the proprietors and 
publishers of newspapers which 
published them before the 
House. Sir Peter Emery 
(Honiton.C) said in the 
Commons.- • - • 

If this was done the order 
would soon go out to reporters 
and editors not to breach par- 
liamentary privilege. 


aleak which caused substantial 
inte rferen ce with the . work of a 
select committee should be re- 
ferred direct to the Privileges 
Com mi ttee instead of bang 
brought straight to- foe Com- 
mons. One example given was 
the leaking to The Times in 
December 1985 of the environ- 
ment select committee's repent 
on nuclear waste, which was 
critical of the nuclear 


during consideration of a mo- 
tion to approve a Committee of 
Privileges’ report on the leaking 
of select committee proceedings. 

The motion was earned late 


Sir Peter Emery said he did not 
think. the Privileges 
Committee's report went tor 
enough in attempting to stamp 
out pre-publication of commit- 
tee reports. It ought to be widely 
understood that pre-publication 
was a breach of privileges of the 
House. 


on Tuesday nighi b^KW Votes 


majority,* 
had beat before the Comm o ns 
on March 10 but the vote was 
not accepted by the. Speaker 
because fewer than 40 MPs took 
part. . ’ 

The report of the Privileges 
Committee recommended that 


ft Skinner (Bdsover, 

Lab) said be did not understand 
what all the fuss on select 
committees was about. 


Mir JoharaSsa^ Lord Privy Seal 


— - — - »wiiuiac,aia ne 

.““deraood the zest for exacting 
Punishment on editorari? 

proprietors. * OT 


Provincial sale spotlight 


Rush chairs creep into the auction 


“The rush seats are still OK; 
otherwise they'd be for the 
bonfire". Mr Steven Bruce 
cast a disparaging look at the 
two lightly-built Edwardian 
oak chairs with rush seats that 
hung from two nails near the 
door ( Geraldine Norman 
writes). “Two pounds apiece, 1 
should think. I don't know 
how they crept into this sale.” 
The backs have two oak 
uprights and crossbars. 

It is a type of chair that was 
made in very large Quantities 
at the beginning of the century 
and huge quantities survive, 
in spite of the bonfire. Stand- 
ing on a table further down the 
room ate two more, matching 
this lime, and set to make 
about £7 the pair. 


country cottage cheaply, you 
do not have to make do with 
items that are ugly or poorly 
made. Look for goods that are 
too plentiful lo interest 
dealers. 


The rush-seated Edwardian 
chairs are usually small, of 
rather mean proportions; the 
oak legs and backs are 
skimped rather than generous. 
The design is plain and neat 
and the wood generally has a 
bit of patina by now. A good 
buy for kitchen or playroom, 
and amazingly cheap. 


Friday’s sale at Colliers. 
Bigwood and Bewlay in Strat- 
ford-upon-Avon is one of 
their monthly antiques sales, 
not one of the twice-monthly 
auctions devoted to common- 
er furnishings and effects. 
Thai is why the rush chairs 
should not have crept in. 


There are plenty of inexpen- 
sive chairs in Friday's sale. A 
set of three circle-back mahog- 
any chairs of about 1860 are 
expected to sell for about £90; 
the circle encloses a simple 
design of scrolls and knobs 
and the straight legs are fluted 
and turned. 


All the same, they illustrate 
an important feature of coun- 
try auctions, the very direct 
link between supply and price. 

If you want to furnish a about £300 to 


A set of four might make 
£20Q-£3GQ, but three is not a 
popular number And if you 
are prepared to make do with 
out-and-out reproduction, 
there is a set of six dining 
chairs, plus two marching 
armchairs, imitating rather 
inaccurately, a George III 


There are several attractive 
single chairs, all the worse for 
wear. 

A country-made Chippen- 
■ dale chair in oak and elm. with 
an attractively-carved splat 
arms with a nice curved 
movement and an uphol- 
stered seat is an eighteenth- 
century piece, but only 
estimated at about £50. At 
about £40 you might secure an 
eighteenth-century French 
provincial oak chair, which 
the auctioneers have already 
offered several times without 
finding a buyer. 

The upholstered seat is now 
no more than a detached strip 
of sacking and sprays of 
stuffing. 

French provincial furniture, 
however, has a special charm; 
simplicity of design is com- 
bined with good proportions 
and flowing curves. Straight 
lines are always avoided in 
favour of curves, to excellent 
effecL 


There is a well -propor- 
tioned and well- finished ex- 
ample of the 1860s in nicely- 
coloured deal or pine, the 
commode seat already done 
away with, which you might 
get for a tenner. 


Every sale tends lo contain a 
few out-of-the ordinary, and 
attractive items. 


Worth mentioning is the 
big. old elm settle, which 
opens out into a bed (estimate 
£200-000). a box of butter- 
flies pinned into a rich design 
against a red backround and 
enclosed in a gilt gesso frame, 
very decorative but fragile 
(estimate £80), and a ravishing 
1920s beaded dress, worked in 
gold and silver thread, with an 
imitation Japanese design (es- 
timate £100). 


style, which might be yours at 
£250. 


Then there is a little coun- 
try-made fiddle back of about 
1S00. the solid seat broken and 
patched, which could make' 
£40-£50. Bui the most unpop- 
ular period piece is the com- 
mode chair. 


Colliers. Bigwood and 
Bewlay is owned by Colliers, 
the international property 
consultants. Colliers. Bigwood 
and Bewlay, The Old School. 
Tiddinglon. Stratford-upon- 
Avon, Warwickshire (0789- 
69415). Viewing today 9am- 
6.30pm and tomorrow 9am- 
Ham. Sale llam.The results of 
this sale wilt he reported in The 
Times on Monday, March 24. 





Mrs Patricia Gnat (abfrve), 
who runs a thriving freezer 
business, in Loudon yesterday 
after winning first prize m the 
Veuve Clicquot Business 
Woman of the Year contest 
The marketing and joint man- 
aging director of Norfrost Ltd, 
Calmness, has bdtt die com- 
pany op over 14 years to 
production of 3,000 chest 
freezers a year. Chosen from 
five other finalists, she wilt 
receive 12 bottles of vintage 
champagne, champagne on ev- 
ery birthday and the privilege 
of having a vine named after 
her. “I am thrilled to receive 
the accolade," she said. Bat 
Mis Grant does not drink. 


Botham to 
face drugs 


inquiry 

Ian Botham, the England 
cricketer, is to be questioned 
by police about allegations 
that he took drugs daring his 
charity walk from John 
O’Groats to Land’s End last 
year. 

Mr Botham, aged 3Q wifi be 
interviewed by detectives 
from the Devon and Cornwall 
force on bis return from the 
Caribbean where he is playing 
in the Test series against the 
West Indies. 


A police spokesman said 
yestendayt'Tiifonnation has 
come to us from a press source 
which has resulted in an 
investigation bring started 
into certain allegations in 
connection with those who 
took part in the walk.” 


It is understood that.Mr 
Botham and the other princi- 
pal walkers, including John 
Border, brother of the Austra- 
lian Test cricketer Allan Bor- 
der, will be interviewed. 


The Director of Public Pros- 
ecutions has been consulted 
and the police inquiry was 
started earlier this week. 

Mr Botham and his fellow 
walkers raised £710,000 for 
leukaemia research. 


End of line 
for school 


cruiser 


By Michael Bafty 
Transport Editor 


The FaUdands veteran, P<fc 
O’s former school cruise ship 
Uganda, will probably be bro^ 
ken up after foiling to find a 

buyer. 

_ ^ 34-year-old ship, which 
for years took schoolchildren 
on cruises to north. Europe 
asd the Mediterranean, was 
commandeered as a hospital 
ship for the Falkland* conflict 
She returned to P & o for 
three months* causing after 
the ceasefire and was then 

Jgwwi Ascension and the 
Falkland^That ended last 
year and she has since been 
laid up on the Fal 

-,?40 says that because of 
nsrng costs it would be uneco- 
nomic to convert her back to 
school'cruising. • • 

Greek ship now operates 
school cruises and the^a^ 
is still there, but few parents 
and educational authorises 
to £400 for one 
dad’s holiday cruise. When P 
& O sorted the service. S a 
wa y :of making use of super- 

OT^troopships.ffieySSt 


Basic intentions 
imam unchanged 


. TlwmitMrespoure of Con- 
servative MPslustoai large- 
ly frmnUt Hod aeon to 
are a fur reactiaE Mr Lmvaoh 
has inserted the i cp uU tio u 
‘ of t jvricst Chanceflof. H* 
CP* **®wdi 

mbbzb. ne is pm nnin g re 
keep eanftf control aver the 
b mn n vtfg requirement But 

tike cat in the standard rate of 

mcome tu is both eye-artcb- 
iug and a ^pil tint Us^asK 

attentions remain nachangefL 

He afro had a Brother of 
measures of direct help for the 
unemployed. He was merdfol 
to file motorist, which wiU net 
have pleased Affiance candi- 

dates coveting the votes of 
disaBustoned Conservatives hi 
rural constituencies. H# 
showed imagination, especial* 
ly in the tax concessions to 
charities and In the schemes to 
encomage private share owK 
ership, putting flesh on the 
concept of popular capitalism. 

He has; at foe same time, 
left himself room, if his expect 
tations are fnifUkd, for greater 
generosity next year. That b 
important becanse this should 
not be judged as a pre-election 
Budget. 

The chances of a general 
election within the nex t 12 
months seem remote. What 
Mr Lawson has bom doing 
this year is to prepare the 
ground for a pre-decnm BmP 
get, and in political te rms he- 

has dose it with some skSL 


Doubts over help 
for unemployed 


Two doubts remain. The 
first is whether his direct 
assistance for the rmemployed 
win really amount to all flat 
much in practice T 


Mr Lawson, I amsme, sees 
ute real core for marity- 
“«rt in general economy 
growth. Ail interim measures 
are, I suspect, simply paIB£ 
fives in his eyes. Emit Is of 
some consequence wbethex 
they are effective palliatives. ■ 


h e ^T“ d ™ htiswtefl « 

ne has done more than nost> 
critical cinm/fc 
tax cats and blow 
spendin g on pnblie^re- 


tel 


still seems de- 
to concentrate oo 2x i 
cate* That could ainse troohkt 
next vear « 



MrNigelLaw«mbMdent- 
«gcji tried far tire firat time tittt 
-X (ndi Mklltlnl 


EmVi rtly .political 
Chancellor. Hfr inttWifty »a 
tax re f o r mer nan been re- 
veafod m Ids first Budget 0) 
1984, but too often stoce theu 
then has * nafitical 


8 be m not regard the teak of 
seeming acbbc con sent & 
teatiySin^ parted Msjflh. . 

This week’s Bndgrt was, hi 
sooty respects, the meat dtHI- 
caft of the three -he has 
presented. Having made it 
that last autumn that he 
intended this tobe am occasion 
for significant tax cats,'. Ms 
strategy «*s that destroyed by 
tbecotiapse in oB prices. From 
then on, be was faring the 
threat of an anti-dimax. 

Bet that w as p reci sely what 
be cmdd notaffcni for political 
reasons. He ne ed ed to coafinn 
confidence to Ms «m fetor- 
mance as Chaneritor, aud io 
prvrideihe political npHft flint 
the Goren a an ri .iripdres m 
tike aftermath of Westiand and 
m the ruo-up to the ftftin 
fry -edectian. 

Sb the challenge for Mr 
tenrims tndo «a fra kit 
ritifomuii liwite fie dare 
Mtsfmffly Ignore the effect of. 
he loos of flQ revenues and 
pms ahead with massive tax 
cuts. That worid .has* voder- 
raiaed pokdideace' lk fib long- 
term strategy. But he had to 
offer a sense of 


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§ warn Fowler 

’£■ ■•• 7 : Br Thomson Prentice, Science Correspondent 

cl< teriy patient* and for those 
‘ with severe behaviour disor- 

: •S? ? S^^S Stal8 S n ? Q “ ders. The plan for the new 
~ 22LI? W?"* 80 - mfer i or ™»ls would prevent the staff 
illness service for from providing sucha range of 
»*tpS m - . • - . services, it has daimed. 

. . r* psyouatnsls and The team has »ne ~~t that 
-doc tors m the department at the mental Alness services in 
Wlfom8»» Hospital, Man- its district have been planned 
jester, havecalled on Mr without any psychiatric 
. Norman Fowler, Secretary of advices. 

'•State for Social Sendees, to set Th^ri*** 

iwa’ffifaiCsE SSS 

’fedSf repla “ tl “ Bdflia8 

‘and lead to the destruction of “We seriously question 
“■a tradition of excellence, the whether it can be reasonable 
- team has told Mr Fowler. to have two in-patient units 
v “It is against foe interest of within four miles of one 
.patients^ of teaching ami of the another in a single district 
'.development of much-needed health authority, when an 


••department, unit,” the team has told Mr 

ifc : In a letter to Mr Fowler, he Fowler. 

■•and bis colleagues “We ask you to set up an 
added^Tndeed, since we are inquiry into how the South 
'The suppliers of trained mental Manchester DHA came to 
: illness manpower for the make this decision, and to ask 
■north-west of England, it is the inquiry to consider all the 
-not too much to say that it is foots and all the arguments, so 
'-against the interests of all the that a decision can be reached 


Drug may 
'halt loss 

4. 

of memory 


The development of a drug 
to prevent loss of memory in 
ageing is possible, after a 
jdiscovery at the National 
Institute for Medical Re- 
search, Mill Hill, north 
London. 

The finding, $y a team 
working with Dr. . Nigel 
BirdsajJ, came iiuan explora- 
tion ofnovel waysof desjgn- 


mentally £Q in our region.” which does not waste public 
-j The psychiatry department money unnecessarily and 
- at the hospital offers special- which fern the best interests of 
~ized wards for acute mental the citizens of south Manches- 
illness, for mothers and ba- ler and Trafford,” the depart- 
rbies. for alcohol problems, for ment has said. 

Drug may Complaint 
\ halt loss on police 

of memory by judge 

By Pearce Wright By Gavin Bell 

Sdence Editor . . A jndge who- won an appeal 

, The development of a drug against a conviction for kerb 
to prevent loss of memory in crawling lodged a formal oom- 
a gn ng is possible, after a plaint against three police 
jdiscovery at the National officers yesterday alleging that 
Institute for Medical Re- they had given false evidence 
.search. Mill HilL north agamst him in court - • 
London. Mr Cofo* Hart-Leverton, 

The finding, by a team QC a crown court recorder, 
working with Dr Nigel was cleared at Knightsbndge 
BirdalL came iman exploia- Crown Court on Tuesday after 
Uoin ofnovel ways, of design- his hamster daimed fiat po- 
fnp <frn« to avmdride effects. evidence against him had 

; ThectorfcOTmqundson been fofl of "mcoiaisleTOK, 
yritich the team lFWtking nMcan a nei md moedibfl- 
ipens adififerent approadifor ' . ' ■ ■ 

Jhe preparation 'of agents to T^e complaint lodged wrth 
treat disorders so* as gasttic theComm^ioiMrofthe^ 
ulcers, heart conditions, intes- ropoliran Pohra aDe^s that 
iinal disorders, as well as wnstables^ Stephen Fotow, 
memory loss in ageing. . .. Francts Mullan and Hugh 

There is a common fector. ^ Vans each ©"5- ev K 
AD of the conditions can be ^encc to Wells Street 
influenced, either blocked or Magistrates? Carat,- which 
stimulated, by the action of convicted Mr Hart-Ieverton 
molecules winch are referred ^st month,_andtofoe Court 
i io as muscarinic drugs. of AppeaL It is expected to be 

In a disorder such as an referred to the Police Com- 
aker. the aim is to reduce Authority, 

gastric secretions which aggra- 
vate the condition. In loss of SSSSL- 
memory, the purpose is to Hertford^re, aj d aflo; tas 
stimulatethe release ofaixrain a PP®“f -*** 
chemical known as would be pursuing his kmd 
acetvkhohne. career. He was not available 

- The name for this category Jj* 00011116111 ^ 

qf drugs comes from foe way ^ ■ -> ffc . T __i 

their highly-selective action -aSI 

occurs on nerve cells of die S^SJ^ s rtn ^^L t saj ? h ^? 
heart, stomach, brain dr what- - Hart-Leverton s last three- 

Sw partof the body is 
involved. The various prepa- ^ 

rations act oh the nerve cells if n S?5? n 2 

by attaching themselves to could be taken at thetiine 
moleSteSned muscarinic ^ecaraeof the case pending 
racepiora. a « amst hjm - 

‘ miSSriSk dLr^S 0I S Coach dWver 
tiom^ar^scopdamme 15 ?^ sent for trial 

sedatives), hasten limited by - a coadi driver involved in a 
themany adeeffects. _ . motorway crash, in which 13 

The people died, was committed 

tute have shown that there are fa ^ ^ magistrates at 
subtypes of .-the re^^ots presto yesterday, accused of 
which can be dahngmshca oy rancma thdr deaths by reek- 
several selectrve dn^s. One of leradrmng. ■ 
these, ca lled pirenzejnne, is in T nhn Bonheyman, aged 63, 

clinxal trials for treat moit o f ^ ^mer place, Edinburgh, 
peptic ulcers. Another prepa- ^dio was remanded on bad, is 
ration is about to be used tor alu»g<»H to have caused the 
heart conditions. deaths by driving a single- 

' - .. .. . deck coach redikssly on the 

IfllertUIty ID M6 at Forton, Lancashire, 

monkeys helped 0nOcUlb f 21 ' bL ' iL 

- A new treament that over- AddlCt iDllSt 

comes infertility in women is ^ • 

being tried to stonulaie breed- |-0i (QTII SOU 

zoo, has begun with marmoset wilt his moto 

idea for the ^ssan, » J ^om » 

future e to treat pandas and Jowwn to. ^^J^ 

S53&52 as SSE&J: 
sh^ gig-gimas; 

gsg sStBS 

immediately or face arresi. 

Chandler in chess lead 

By H«iT Gotauiek, Chess Comspomtert 

. t a. for a win; his defeat could 

roMd'i ^ CW ^. £ ^ ctances for “ 

sfttM Sasrasss' 

? E5S2S 

™ SS Sfive points. la.tbe 


Bones keep their secret in Lebanon’s hill of Sharabil 


From Robert Fisk 
Sidtm 

Oily Lebanon codd have 
produced such a .scene. Col- 
onel Mahmoud ri-Haj — chief 
of foe Sidon police, no less — 
his grey-uniformed deputy, a 
forensic scientist and the be- 
spectacled commander of the 
Sunni Muslim “popular 
police” all stood at foe mouth 
of the cave 

So did a dutch of Lebanese 
soldiers and rnffitbunea hold- 
ing Kalashnikov idles aid a 
number of young men with 
heavy, metallic bulges under 
Ihfiif pHflovers. 

Lebanese tderisaon camera 


crews jostled on the s mal l hiQ 
above the pathetic pile of 
bones and broken skulls. Had 
dime not been, after an, a 
mass grave here? 

It was tme of those blame- 
less spring mornings with the 
breeze nndgtng the wild flow- 
ers on the little hill of 
Sharabil, and it might have 
bees a picnic spot save for die 
group of armed men and the 
important-looking policemen. 

Everyone had a theory: the 
Palesthrians had murdered 
C hri stian families h hW e n 
them in the cave; the Israelis* 
Christian allies had tortured 
MasUms in a neighbouring 


cave and thrown the corpses in 
the tunnel next door, a crypt 
carved into the prehistoric 
rock way back in antiquity. 

The facts, sock as they were, 
were not difficult to come by. 
Everyone agreed that a Leba- 
nese soldier had accidentally 
discovered the remains early 
on Tuesday morning on the 
tnmalus above the A wall river. 

Everyone agreed that the 
Palestinians had maintained 
positions on the hill until the 
Israelis invaded and set tip a 
base there in 1982. 

No one could dispute the 
Utter of human bones and 
skufls scattered around the 
dost at the cave’s mouth. Some 


were of children, and there 
were also the broken remains 
of wooden boxes that just 
might have been primitive 
coffins. Up to 30 bodies were 
probably in three adjoining 
caves, Colonel el-Haj an- 
nounced, although only seven 
sknUs were visible. 

Certainly in me rock-hewn 
vault there was fresh earth and 
human finger bones and foe 
glistening remains of what 
might have been blood. In the 
dark interior there were also 
sandstone tombs carved from 
the sotid stone 1,500 years 
ago; the old tourist books even 


mention them. 
So who wer 


who were the deadTThe 


government police officers 
gently vouchsafed the belief 
that, since the bones must be 
at least seven years old, the 
dead were victims of Palestin- 
ian guerrillas. 

The young men with bulges 
underneath their pullovers, 
warriors of the so-called 
“People’s liberation Army”, 
preferred the theory that 
Israel's allies had butchered 
Muslims on die hill, then 
shored up the corpses in the 
ancient tombs, albeit that the 
Israelis arrived only in 1982 
and left last year and the bones 
appeared much older. 

Indeed, if they were the 


victims of a massacre, why did 
they appear to have keen 
buried in disintegrating cof- 
fins? And why were there no 
clothes — not even belt buck- 
les, rings or spectacles — lying 
amid the rocks? The Lebanese 
refugees living across the nar- 
row wadi to tire south said they 
had seen no sign of secret 
burials on the hill overlhe past 
five years. 

The Sidon coroner Is sup- 
posed to rule on the cause Of 
death. Given the condition of 
the bodies, he is unlikely to 
come to any firm conclusions. 
The hill of Sharabil is thus 
likely to maintain its prehis- 
toric secrets. 



Soviet media round on Thatcher 

Moscow delays on UK 
visit by Shevardnadze 


From Christopher Walker, Moscow 


An Israeli woman army recraft getting her first lesson in how to use a submachine-gun from 
a woman instructor at a firing range near Tel Aviv. 


Moscow praises Polish leadership 


Warsaw Pact foreign minis- 
ters arrived in Poland yester- 
day for a top-level Soviet bloc 
consultation in the wake of 
Moscow’s praise for the Polish 
administration of General 
Wojciech JaruzelskL 
Rarely has the praise of the 
Polish party leadership been 
so strong as in recent weeks. 
Mr Eduard Shevardnadze, the 
Soviet Foreign Minister who 
arrived here two days ahead of 
other ministers, declared that 
the rise of Solidarity and the < 
imposition of martial law — 
code words, “a;, difficult 


Curfew after 
two die in 
Malaysia riots 

Kota Kinabalu, Malaysia 
(Renter) — A 12-hour curfew 
was imposed on Kota Kinabu- 
lu yesterday after two people 
were killed in rioting by 
Muslims opposed to Sabah's 
mainly Christian government. 
Four bombs exploded, but 
caused no injuries. 

' The Sabah police chief said 
that a Rlipino died in the riot 
and a boy of 14 was killed by a 
car during the ensuing chaos. 
About 10 people were injured. 
Shops, dosed and parents 
w hiske d children home from 
school as 2,000 rioters burnt 
30 shop-houses and 29 
vehicles. 

' The police chief said 20 
people bad been detained and 
police were moving in to 
arrest between 400 and 500 
militan t Muslims holding out 
in the stale mosque. 


From Roger Boyes, Warsaw 

period” — bad brought Poland 
and the Soviet Union closer 
and strengthened the “alliance 
of hearts”. 

The Soviet warmth for the 
Jaruzelslri leadership was par- 
ticularly apparent during the 
Soviet Party Congress in Mos- 
cow when General Jaruzelsld, 
fluent in Russian, seemed to 
receive special treatment from 
Mr Gorbachov. 

■ ■ -Some- Western -diplomats 
are now describing the general 
. as “ fir st among equals”, an 
evident “number two”in the 
Soviet alliance. But such num- 


Anti-austerity 
violence in 
Panama City 

Panama Gty (AP) — Thou- 
sands of striking workers riot- 
ed here yesterday during 
protests against austerity mea- 
sures imposed by Panama's 
Government in an attempt to 
revive the economy. 

A peaceful march in the 

violence congress 

building. Rioter* shouting slo- 
gans against the International 
Monetary Fund stoned vehi- 
cles and set some on fire, then 
ransacked offices and shops in 
the area. 

Several people were injured 
and a number of rioters 
arrested A strike was railed 
nine days ago by the National 
Council of Organized Work- 
ers, one of the country’s 
biggest labour organizations, 
to protest at austerity mea- 
sures taken on the IMF's 
recommendation. 


ber two ranking has little 
foreign policy significance 
since the focus is on super- 
power conciliation rather than 
dialogue between East and 
West. 

Moscow’s approval, howev- 
er, is si gnifican t in internal 

politics. It makes it almost 
impossible for Polish Marxist 
hardlin er* to dislodge the 
general and his 
govemmentwhiefa no -longer 
need fear Soviet disapproval if 
it Tries to negotiate with the 
Catholic Church on a number 
ofissues. - 


As Mrs Margaret Thatcher’s 
Government became the tar- 
get of an escalating campaign 
of officially-inspired hostility 
in the Soviet media, British 
sources here said yesterday 
that no date had yet been 
agreed for the expected visit to 
London of Mr Eduard 
Shevardnadze, the Soviet For- 
eign Minister. 

There is disappointment in 
London over the Soviet reluc- 
tance to make concrete plans 
for the visit, which had initial- 
ly been expected to follow 
soon after the Communist 
Party Congress that ended on 
March 6. Some British Gov- 
ernment advisers had seen it 
as a possible precursor of a 
visit to Moscow by Mis 
Thatcher before the next gen- 
eral election. 

The angry tone of the Soviet 
attacks has bees prompted by 
Mrs Thatcher's rejection of 
sweeping Kremlin plans for 
nuclear disarmament, first un- 
veiled on January 15, and by 
the Prime Minister's recent 
well-publicized meeting with a 
Mujahedin leader fi ghting 
against Soviet troops in 
Afghanistan. 

Yesterday, Provda carried a 
bitter condemnation of Brit- 
ain under the sarcastic head- 
line “Han g in g on to Unde 
Sam's Coat-tails.” It d aimed 
that the Thatcher Govern- 
ment had abandoned any 
independent policy on midear 
disarmament and now slav- 
ishly followed Washington's 
lead. 


This lack of independence, 
the article went on. had been 
confirmed this week in a 
speech by Sir Geoffrey Howe, 
the Foreign Secretary. 

“Differences of opinion are 
only possible between those 
who have an independent 
view on one question or 
another,” Pravda declared. 
“But that independence, judg- 
ing by Howe’s speech, is not to 
be seen today in London's 
nuclear policy.” 

In his speech to foreign 
journalists based in Britain, 
Sir Geoffrey accused Moscow 
of trying to pressure Britain 
into giving up any credible 
nuclear deterrent and seeking 
unilateral advantage in its 
proposals. 

Yesterday, the Soviet Com- 
munist youth paper, 
Moskovsky Komsomolets. 
joined in the anti-British cam- 
paign, claiming that by its 
refusal to give a “positive 
reply” to the Soviet peace 
proposals “the Government 
of Great Britain once again 
demonstrated its obedience to 
Washington's will and its 
readiness to block any steps on 
the way to saving mankind 
from the nuclear threat.” 

Earlier, Izvestia, the Gov- 
ernment newspaper, ridiculed 
Conservative claims that Brit- 
ain needed an independent 
nuclear deterrent. “Here is 
another example of the fam- 
ous British hypocrisy,” the 
paper claimed. “It is particu- 
larly dearly seen in the word 
‘independence’. The nuclear 


weapons race launched by 
Britain makes it even more 
dependent on the US”. 

At a press conference on 
Tuesday, Mr Vladimir 
Lomeiko, the chief Foreign 
Ministry spokesman, accused 
Mrs Thatcher of “distortion, 
to put it mildly” in her reply to 
the Soviet leader, Mr Mikhail 
Gorbachov, delivered here by 
Sir Bryan Cartiedge, the Brit- 
ish Ambassador, last week. 

He claimed that the British 
Prime Minister had 
“artificaJJy" introduced ques- 
tions of the military balance in 
Asia into the question of 
eliminating Soviet and Ameri- 
can medium-range missiles 
from Europe. 

In addition to the central 
question of nuclear disarma- 
ment, a second factor which 
has angered the Kremlin and 
now threatens the recent 
marked improvement in An- 
glo-Soviet relations was the 
meeting which Mrs Thatcher 
held last week with Mr Abdul 
Haq, who requested her help 
in securing the withdrawal of 
Soviet troops from 
Afghanistan. 

Dismissing Mr Haq as 
“counter-revolutionary 
scum”, Tass claimed that the 
London meeting was another 
example of the British Gov- 
ernment “teaming up” with 
the Reagan Administration 
which, the agency claimed, 
was “waging an undeclared 
war against Afghanistan with 
the use of mercenary gangs". 





lie 1978 wrongly identified photograph of Mr^ Yassine (left) 
and this week's picture, taken in London. 

Abu Nidal photograph 
was of someone else 

By Nicholas Ashford, Diplomatic Correspondent 

A photograph claimed to be paper rader Mr Yassiae's 
that of Abu Nidal, head of one name. 
pffte aostao toriwsJalMtfrH This week Mr Yassine, who 

ian terrorist or g a niz a ti ons, lives in Sweden, visited AP’s 
which has beat published in bureau in London to dear his 
newspapers around the world, name. He explained riwt, al- 
bas turned out to be of a thoagh he is balds' now (above 
Palestinian author who sup- right) than In 1978. the picture 
ports the rival Fatah distributed by AP definitely 
organization. was of him. He said that Abu 

Mr AbdeJ-Qader Yassine, a Nidal, whom he met m 1976, 
40-year-old Palestinian travel- was very sttm and much 
Kng mi a Jordanian passport shorter than he is. 
says he had been ban^from After checking his passport 

afidotoa 1 Personal documents, 
TtSSSSSSSSSSL AP said ft accepted that the 

Pta*"* was of him and not of 
ed by Associated ftess m Abq jqHaL The agency said it 

had bought the photograph in 
Aba NidaL Tie good faith, on the understand- 

ft showed Abu Nidal, 
pess to puhhsh a. and thatas soon as doubts had 

It was fatal in Sweden m been raised about toe identity 
1978 when Mr Yarame was an advisory message had been 
attendnig an academic confer- sent oat asking AP sabsaib- 
esce there. It originally ap- os not to make further use of 
peered m a Swedish news- ft 


W hen you first handle a Patek Philippe, you 

become aware that this watch has the presence 
of an object of rare perfectioa 
We know the feeling well. We experience it every time 
a Patek Philippe leaves the hands of our craftsmea 
You can call it pride. For us it lasts a moment; for you, 
a lifetime. 

We made this watch for ; -■ £ 

you - to be part of your 
life - simply because this 
is the way we’ve always 
made watches. 

And if we may draw a con- 
clusion from five genera- 
tions of experience, it will 
be this: choose once but 
choose welL 
A Patek Philippe - 
because it’s for a lifetime. 




paper under Mr Yassine s 
name. 

This week Mr Yassine, who 
fives in Sweden, visited AP’s 
borean in London to dear his 
name. He explained that, al- 
though he is balder now (above 
right) than in 1978, the picture 
distributed by AP definitely 
was of him. He said that Abo 
Nidal, whom he met in 1976, 
was very stem and modi 
shorter than he is. 

After checking his passport 
ami otba- personal documents, 
AP said ft accepted that the 
picture was of him and not of 
Abu NidaL The agency said it 
had bought toe photograph in 

good faith, on the understand- 
ing that it showed Abu Nidal, 
and thatas soon as doubts had 
been raised about toe identity 
an advisory m e ssag e had been 
sent out asking AP subscrib- 
ers not to make further use of 

it 


PATEK PHILIPPE 

GENEVE 

•Vtk L^AeParek -.n * r ■ 

\rVu P* ncl Sfreet l »*■ J* » A \ i 
id » 









THE TIMES THURSDAY MARCH 20 1986 


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Thanks to the bpani 
we can enjoy 

the sweet smell of s 


nose. 


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m^9 


When the world thinks of sherry it nat- 

^ urally thinks of Jerez. 

11 Which is why we at Allied-Lyons have 

I j invested millions in that particular region over 

|1 the last few years. ' > \ v ^ 

Jl r rhe vineyards, bodegas and wineries we 

acquired have given us two main advantages. 
W\ Firstly, they make us 70 pier cent self- 

sufficient in sherry. 

Secondly, and probably more 
J important, with all those vineyards, 
W* X||# bodegas and wineries come the skill 
-X and expertise of the Spanish. 

Now we’ve the finest quality sherry 
,J|g^ W in the quantities we need. Without any 
worries about supplies we can attack with 
confidence the highly profitable world market 
Not that we’re doing badly. 

With Harveys we already have the 
world’s biggest selling sherry with 20 per cent 
of international sales. 

This financial year with an even greater 
variety of sherries (thanks to our Spanish ac- 
quisitions) we plan on worldwide sales of over 
LX. £90 million. Which - ll. J I 

is not to be sniffed at AlbSQ-liyCIlS 

GOING ON ^GROWING 


GOING ON GROWING 










THE TTMF.S THURSDAY MARCH 20 1986 


X>4 J 


OVERSEAS NEWS I. _ 










Pbs'cwn; 


:TetNa, 


Postcode- 


I • fc&iSa b&jmwwvn Ststems (150 Ltd.. inretnsriofxat House, Windmill Road, | 
i j' vS -.;7. Su^n-^-.Tha^^feiB^ 7HR. Td: 0932 785t*6. * 


PSPss 


■•■ .' nV; 


1 .„. 


to demand more 


More than 2^00 lawyers 

end a three-day strike tonight 

ini. Spain's Basque country 
intended to draw attention to 
the : ' “acute deterioration of 
justice” in the region. 

The strike Bilbao's 
courts of justice idle, with no 
lawyers to plead before the 
judges. Lawyers visiting their 
cheats , in jail were the only 
exception. 

- It was a strike with a 
difference. The lawyers, many 
of whom already earn fat fees 
in this big industrial city, had 
no thought of increasing their 
incomes. They wanted to put 
pressure on the Madrid Gov- 
ernment to create enough 
courts and appoint new magis- 
trates so that their clients do 
not despair of ever getting 
justice. 

The Basque country is fee- 
ing in the most acute form a 
problem successive democrat- 
ic governments have left unre- 
solved. There are fewer than 
1,000 judges and magistrates 
serving the »oonntty‘s 38 nmT 

of Spain’s prison p^^tidn - 
of around 20,000 is awaiting 
trial. 

There is a backlog of 54.000 
cases left from last year in the 
Basque country, and it is 
growing at the rate of 5,000 
cases a year. 

The worst case, an inheri- 
tance dispute in Guernica, has 
dragged on for 17 years with- 
out settlement. Two lawyers 


From Richard Wigg, Bilbao 

have already died during the 
case. ■' 

Lawyers in the . ..Basque 
country have been the first to 
take drastic.steps on behalf of 
their clients to try to force 
Sedor Fernando Ledesma, the 
Justice Minister in Madrid, to 
act 

In Catalonia last month,. 
1,000 lawyers started a public 
campaign against the 
“inefficiency” of justice in 
their region. 

. “If we joined the European 
Co mmuni ty, I suppose it is 
not just to pay VAT. we must 
have European levels of 
justice,” Sefior Juan Vidarte, 
dean of Bilbao's College of 
Barristers, observed. 

The problem is more acute 
in the Basque country because 
of the workload and the 
consequent high turnover of 
magistrates. . 

Sefior Juan Guevara, Coun- 
cillor of Justice in th c Basque 
auto mo nous government, 
said that there was one magis- 
trate for 24*000 i inhabitants in 

vtitiMMfeto^OOO in Unrest 
of Spain* and one for 4,500 in 
West Germany. 

Magistrates do not like serv- 

variety of reasoi^^Sudnig 
ETA, the Basque terrorist 
organization, and the “free- 
wheeling methods” of the 
Spanish . police combating 
terrorism. - 

“People in the Basque coun- 


try' are now going to court fir 
more than in the past, exercis- 
ing their rights,” Seflor Gue- 
vara told The Times. 

- This often means trouble 
for the investigating magis- 
trates. In San Sebastian, where 
than should be three magis- 
trates, there has been only one 
for several months. - 

Spain's magistrates earn 
about £1 ,000 a month wherev- 
er they serve, be it a peaceful 
country town or Bilbao. 

But when the Basque Parlia- 
ment debated the problem last 
week it emerged that justice 
was also impeded because the 
central government and the 
Basque authorities are locked 
in a dispute — now before 
Spain's Constitutional Court 

— over who finances the 
courts and who decides priori- 
ties in justice. 

Meanwhile, the Bilbao Pro- 
vincial Court ordered _ the 
intelligence chief of the Direc- 
torate of State Security, Seitor 
Francisco Alvarez Sanchez, to 
stand trial for allegedly hiding 
evidence of maltreatment of a 
prisoner by police, according 
to reports published here 
yesterday. 

The prosecution claims he 
ordered that the file be closed 
in a case in which there was 
medical evidence to back up 
Haimg that a suspected thief 
was beaten by police at the 
time of his arrest 


Gibraltar ‘only colony in Europe’ 


In his first visit here since 
Spain and Portugal joined the 
EEC in January, the Spanish 
Foreign Minister, Sefior Fran- 
cisco Orddnez, held two days 
of talks with Portuguese lead- 
ers on how the two countries 
can work -together in the 
Community mid Nato and 
resolve common problems, 
such as trade, drug tr affickin g 
and the 50,000 Portuguese 
working illegally in Spain. 

At a meeting with foreign 
journalists yesterday, Sefior 
Orddnez talked aboutbraader 
international questions. He 
believed the problem of Gi- 
braltar would - be- easier .to. 
solve “now that Spam and 
Great Britain are fide^dswithr 


From Martini dels Cal, Lisbon 

in the EEC and Nato and will 
be. sitting at the same, table 
discussing together”. 

Gibraltar remained “the 
only colony in Europe”, a 
situation , be classified as 
“anachro nistic” and “morally 
intolerable". 

He expected that the future 
of American military bases in 
Spain would be settled by the 
summer. “We believe the 
American presence would be 
reduced gradually through ne- 
gotiation in a friendly manner, 

- ratherthan by theexpulsion of 
the bases.” 


vote last week to remain in 
Nato would make asettlement 
easier “The United States can 
see that Spain is now an aDy in 
Nalo” He repeated that it 
would not permit nuclear 
arms on its sod. 

Spain's membership of 
Nato would not affect 
Portugal's position in the 
alliance.“Spain does not want 
to enter the Nato command 
system,” he said. 

On its policy in Africa and 
Latin America, - Sefior 
Orddnez said Spain was 
“against direct or indirect 
military intervention” .by tfye. 
US in Angola in support of 
Unite rebels, or in Nicaragua 
in su pport of tire Contras. 


A sixth 
inquiry 
into dingo 
baby case 

From Stephen Taylor 
Sydney 

A federal court judge was 
yesterday revested with wide- 
ranging powers to hokl a new 
inquiry into the death of the 
baby Azaria Chamberlain and 
the conviction for murder of 
her mother, Mrs Undy 
Chamberlain. 

It will be the sixth inquiry 
into one of the most celebrat- 
ed cases in Australian legal 
history — the “dingo baby 
case”. 

Supporters of Mrs Cham- 
berlain, who for more than 
five years has maintained that 
a dingo (wild dog) was respon- 
sible for the baby's death, 
welcomed the nature and 
scope of the inquiry an- 
nounced in the Northern Ter- 
ritory Legislative Assembly in 
Darwin. 

Senator Colin Mason, a 
federal parliamentarian and 
member of the Chamberlain 
Innocence Committee, said: 
“It would appear that the 
inquiry will be of a kind that 
the innocence committee has 
been seeking and I am confi- 
dent that it will establish Mrs 
Chamberlain's innocence.” 

Mrs Chamberlain, serving a 
life sentence for the murder of 
her daughter, was released 
from prison on February 7 
after the discovery near Ayers 
Rock of a baby's jacket which 
she identified as the one worn 
by Azaria on the night of her 
disappearance. 

The jacket win be among 
new evidence to be assessed by 
Mr Justice Trevor Morting, a 
respected federal court judge. 
Mrs Chamberlain was con- 
victed of cutting the baby's 
throat. 

She and her husband Mi- 
chael, a 1 former Seventh Day 
Adventist pastor found guilty 
of being an accessory, have 
already sat through two in- 
quests, a trial and two appeals. 

The Northern Territory ad- 
ministration, conscious of al- 
legations that _ .Mrs 
Cham berlain was a victim of 
prejudice in Darwin, has been 
at pains to ensure that there 
can be no comebacks from 
what must surely be the last 
inquiry. 

Whatever the outcome, Mrs 
Chamberlain will not be re- 
■ turned to .Darwin's Berritnali 
f JaiL-Tbe itenainder of her life 
sentence has been remitted. 

The hearing is expected to 
start in about six weds. ' 


Hotel tycoon opposed inherited wealth 


Ctwrod Hilton (above left) cave the bulk of his milliotis to charities ran by Catholic nutte. Francesca Hilton (centre), 
daughter of his second wife, Zsa Zsa Gabor (right), forfeited her $100,000 inheritance when she contested the will. 

Charity gifts contested in 
battle for Hilton fortune 


Mtdti-mnOomure hotel tycoon Con- 
rad Hilton strongly opposed inherited 
wealth. When he died in January 1979, 
aged 91, he left 99 per cent of his vast 
fortune running to hundreds of millions 
of dollars to charity. 

Each of his grandchildren inherited 
only $15,000 (about £10,000). Two of his 
sisters were given $50,000 and a third 
nothing. Franresca Hilton, the daughter 
of his second wife, die actress Zsa Zsa 
Gabor, received $100,000, but when she 
contested the amount in court and lost, 
she forfeited the bequest. 

He left Barron Hilton, one of bis three 

sons, $750,000 and half that amount to 
his other two sons, Eric and Conrad, jnr. 

Today Barron Hilton, aged 57, chair- 
man »nd chief executive of die $3 htDion 
hotel empire, accompanied by an army 
of lawyers, is doe in comt here to try to 
wrest control of his father's stockhold- 
ings in the company from the charitable 
foundation, which by edict of the will, 
now owns them. 

It is a complex and bitter case and the 
outcome couii eventually be worth as 
much as $905 million to Catholic orders 
of nuns ar onn d the world. _ 

Conrad H5hon, a devout Catholic, left 
a 15 -page will instructing die beneficia- 
ries to “promote world peace and sbetter 
tttde children under the nmbrellaof your 
charity” Tt also said that they were to 


From Ivor Davis, Los Angeles 

hand over the largest portion of the 
bequest to assist the work of Catholic 
ming among the poor. 

Barron Hilton's long-fooght suit 
raises the Ironic spectacle of Catholic 
sisters, who have taken a vow of poverty, 
embroiled in a struggle for control of 
milli ons of dollars. 

At the heart of the matter is Barron 
Hilton's contention that a 1969 tax law 
allows only 20 per cent of a corporation 
to be owned by a fonndatkm and other 
heirs together, and that the only way to 
eliminate problem is for Barron 
Hilton himself to buy the entire 27.4 per 
cent (6.8 million shares) of his father's 
ho ldings pass die cash on to the 
foundation. 

However, he wants to boy the stock at 
$24 a unit, the price it was on the New 
York Stock Exchange when his father 
died. Today the stock is worth three 
Hwioc that amount — $641 million more 
t*i«n Barron Hilton says he should pay. 

It non appears that there may be 
another way round the problem created 
by law. Some or all of the stock of 
Conrad Hilton could be placed in a 
“public support organization”, an en- 
dowment gjmilar to a foundation bat not 
subject to the 20 per cent limit. Its 
contributions, however, could go only to 
a specified list of charities. 

Ibis would effectively exclude Barron 


Hilton from acquiring any more of his 
father's stock, and the Hilton executive 
contends that his father (fid not want a 
public charity to receive his stock. 

The California Attorney General's 
office has, however, declared its support 
for the public organization, saying it 
would benefit everyone except Barron 
Hilton. 

The matter is further complicated by 
the fact that Donald Hobbs, president of 
the Hilton Foundation, served as per- 
sonal attorney to Barron Hilton for 30 
years and only resigned from that 
position three years ago after protests 
that his relationship with Barron Hilton 
posed a conflict of interests. 

Mr Hobbs has repeatedly advised the 

foundation to settle with Barron Hilton 
at below market price to allow the 
fonndatkm to get on with its charitable 
work. 

Meanwhile James Bates, the estate 
execHtor, and Myron Harpole, his 
lawyer, maintain that Conrad Hilton 
repeatedly told them of his concern not 
to leave too modi money to his son 
Barron and that in feet, during his 
lifetime, be wrote 35 wins, each one 
reducing the amount left to his offspring- 

Mr Bates, a dose friend and personal 
attorney of Conrad Hilton, told the court 
that his friend's intent was dearly to 
give his money to charity. 


He had been in consultation 


Shultz, the 


with Mr 


State. Stains 


USSecretary 




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OVERSEAS NEWS 


Media criticized as 


police release the 
main Palme suspect 


From Christopher Mosey, Stockholm 


Police hunting the assassin 
of Mr Olof Palme were last 
night forced to free their main 
suspect because of lack of 
evidence. 

Mr Hans Holmer. Stock- 
holm police chief said there 
wis no longer sufficient evi- 
dence on which to bold Mr 
Victor Gunnaisson, aged 32, 
who was to have appeared m 
court today charged with Mr 
Palme's murder. 

A grim-feced Mr Holmer 
yesterday inferred that apho- 
tograph of die suspect printed 
on Tuesday in the Mahno 
Socialist newspaper Arbetet, 
contrary to Swedish press 
re gula tions on the non-identi- 
fication of accused persons. 


destroyed the credibility of 
identific 


identification of the suspect by 
one witness. 

He said a second man. an 
acquaintance of Mr Gunnars- 
son arrested on Monday for 
suspected illegal possession of 
firearms, would now also be 
freed. 

The police chief had earlier 
read a prepared statement 
criticizing the media and the 


lawyers of Mr Gunnaisson. a 
former watchman and sup- 
porter of a right-wing political 
party which had conducted a 
political vendetta against the 
former Swedish Prime 
Minister. 

The statement said: “It is 
vital that an open democracy 
such as ours shows itself able 
to handle the particular diffi- 
culties feeing us m our 
endeavours to trace the 
assassin. 

“And what happens? 

“Well, the defence counsel 
of a suspect loses its head and 
makes statements in the mass 
media in a manner that makes 
the Swedish Bar Association 
react and a respected newspa- 
per starts a witch bunt by 
publishing the name and pic- 
ture of an arrested person and 
claiming that this is no ordi- 
nary case. 

“There is reason for one and 
all who participate in the hunt 
for the murderer of Olof 
Palme to act with consider- 
ation and restraint. The man- 
ner in which we deal with the 
of the man now in 


custody will be a test of how 
this society .of ours functions 
when under pressure.” 

Referring to the release of 
the suspect, Mr Holmer sakt 
“A candle has gone out.” 
Earlier in the week he had 
compared the progress of po- 
lice investigations to the light- 
ing of candles. 

He said no one rise was now 
being held and 200 police had 
started a new hunt in Stock- 
holm. “We are looking for 
technical evidence and wit- 
nesses. We are talking to 
people who might be able to 
help,” he said. 

“We are working on a broad 
front." 

Mr Gunnaisson had been a 
member, of the European 
Workers’ Party, and in 1976 
was photographed holding 
placards depicting Mr Palme 
as the Devil. 

Mr K.G. Svenssoo, Stock- 
holm chief prosecutor, said 
Mr Gunnaisson had said in a 
telephone conversation short- 
ly before Mr Palme was shot 
dead on February 28: “Pairoe 
is on tire death list ” 


EEC warns US on 
UN budget cuts 


From Mohsin All Washington 


The European Community 
has warned the United States 
that cuts in its share of the 
United Nations budget might 
violate its treaty obligations. 

Three EEC ambassadors 
also expressed regret that they 
had bom unable to see Mr 
George Shultz, the Secretary 
of State, to discuss the issue in 
the past three weeks. The State 
Department explained that he 
had had a very busy schedule, 
including the funeral of Mr 
Olof Palme in Stockholm. 

Mr Shultz had asked his 
deputy, Mr John Whitehead, 
to meet the ambassador of 
The Netherlands, which is 
current president of the Coun- 
cil of Ministers, and those, of 
Luxembourg and Britain. ■ ■ 

In a letter to Mr Shuitz; the 
ambassadors expressed con*- 
cern that recent budget-cutting 
legislation and a Senates 
amendment was .significantly 
affecting US ability to comply 
with the treaty obligations. . 

The legislation would cut its 
UN contribution by $70 mil- 
lion (£47 million) this year. 
The US share is now about 


$210 million, or 25 per cent of 
the budget. 

The ambassadors made it 
dear that EEC countries, 
which pay about 20 per cent of 
the budget, would not increase 
their shares to compensate for 
the expected American cuts. 

The State Department 
spokesman said: “We recog- 
nize that not paying our full 
assessed share of the United 
Nations budget raises substan- 
tial questions in terms of our 
obligations under the UN 
charter." 


• Brussels: New EEC proce- 
dures obliging member states 
to accept the will of the 
majority are already having an 
impact on Community deci- 
sion-making. though the re* 
form package has yet to be 
ratified by Westminster and 
other Parliaments (Richard 

Owen writes). • 

This has emerged from 
Council of Ministers meetings 
on an issue of symbolic signifi- 
cance for future European 
union: the creation of an 
internal market by 1992 


Grindlays Bank p.l.c 
Interest Rates 


Grindlays Bank p.l.c. 

announces 
that its base rate for 
lending will change 
from 12j% to 11 5% 
with effect from 
19th March 1986 


Grindlays 
Bank p.l.c. 


A member 01 the JUNE Croup of Compeotai 

Head Office: Grind hm Bank pic. 

Minerva House. Montague Close. London SEI 9DH. 


ye 

aft 


The Royal Bank 
of Scotland pic 


Base Rate 


The Royal Bank of Scotland 
announces that with effect 
from close of business 
on 19 March 1986 
its Base Rate for advances 
wfll be reduced from 12 Y 2 % 


to 11%% per annum. 


WSL A»frr» « i n .EMl* BKHA 

BrfiiMrWi <0 ■CnHlurf \ol MMI2. 


Uniform 
TV laws 
sought 


Brussels — Britain and its 
EEC partners should be pre- 
pared to accept satellite televi- 
sion broadcasts with up to 15 
per cent advertising content — 
more than is allowed by any 
government at present — ac- 
cording to proposals pub- 
lished by the European 
Commission yesterday (A 
Correspondent writes). 


The new proposals, put 
forward by Lord Cockfield. 
the Commissioner in charge of 
opening up free trade within 
the Community, would force 
the Twelve to adopt identical 
advertising standards to en- 
sure that viewers are not 
offended by foreign material. 


They are hot designed to 
force the BBC to take advertis- 
ing. but EEC governments 
would not be allowed to keep 
out commercial broadcasts 
from other countries. 


The Commission argues 
that there should be no restric- 
tion on imports of non-EEC 
programmes like Dallas, but 
European programmes must 
take up at least 30 per cent of 
programming time. Lord 
Cockfield said the minimum 
would rise to 60 per cent over 
several years. 


victory 



Kampala (Reuter) - 
Uganda’s victorious National 
Resistance Army (NRA) was 
poised yesterday to take con- 
trol of the whole country after 
capturing Kitgum. the lad 
important town in the north 
near the border with Sudan. 

Western diplomats said it 
was only a matter of time 
before NRA forces occupied 
Arua, where several thousand 
demoralized soldiers of the 
former Kampala government 
had fled. 

The diplomats said hun- 
dreds of troops in the West 
Nile region, of which Arua is 
capital and in the north 
around Kitgum had aban- 
doned their weapons and ei- 
ther disappeared into the bush 
or fled across the frontier to 
Sudan and Zaire. 

The NRA, which ousted the 
Kampala government in late 
January, took Kitgum without 
a fight. Kampala radio an 


nounced yesterday. Kitgum. 
from the Sudanese 


30 miles - 

border, was largely deserted as 
an NRA mobile column 
moved in, it said. 

In Khartoum, the Sudanese 
Government said it was dis- 
arming Ugandans wbo bad 
crossed the frontier as part of 
its promise to help Uganda's 
new President, Mr Yoweri 
Museveni the NRA leader, to 
unite the country and end the 
civil war. 

The leaders of six countries 
neighbouring Uganda are to 
meet in Kampala today for a 
one-day summit which Mr 
Museveni said was being held 
to consolidate their unity. 

They first met in Goma, 
east Zaire, on January 30. one 
day after Mr Museveni was 
sworn in as President of 
Uganda. 

Today’s meeting appears 
designed' to’ give the new 
Government the assurances it 
wants that its neighbours will 
not help the defeated regime 
and its armed followers, diplo- 
mats said. 

“The priority of the new 
Government is security,” one 
Western envoy said. 

The NRA has made a steady 
advance north from Kampala 
over the past two months, 
capturing key towns without 
having to fight a big battle as it 
pushed towards the frontiers 
with Zaire and Sudan. 



a tnnnel dug l^»d«s• the coOaiwed New Wodd Hotel in Si^apore to help possible survtwttS. 


Singapore search for 18th survivor 

— • - » .c x - ■■ - - - — - j — — f "- mormon the hotel coBa 


Singapore (AP) — Rescue 
workers began removing large, 
room-sized slabs of concrete 
from the rabble of the col- 
lapsed New World Hotel yes- 
terday after hearing sounds of 
a possible 18th survivor under 
the ruins. 


They had resumed clearing 
debris after succeeding late on 
Tuesday in resenrag a woman 
believed to be tire last survivor. 
Early yesterday they also 
recovered the body of an 
unidentified Indian man. 


brin g in g the confirmed death 
toll to 12. 

After cranes, bulldozers axed 

power shovels emptied more 
rabble into a long fine of 
lorries, all work was halted 
once again to listen for sounds 
of human movement. Sensitive 
microphones were lowered 
into three holes in die rubble 
and rescuers said they heard 
some tapping in the eerie 
silence. They quickly resumed 
work to fry to reach the 
possible survivor. 

But as dawn broke and work 


was stopped again to fistea for 
more sounds, there was no 
tappfog, even after a marker 
bellowed over a megaphone: 
“Take a stone and keep tap- 
ping, We are coming.” 

The bnfldnig, described by 
die Prime Minister, Mr Lee 
Kwan Yew, as a “c onventiona l 
reinforced concrete structure”, 
suddenly collapsed in a swwi 
of dost on Saturday. 

One of those rescued on 
Monday night. Miss Christina- 
Pbaa Churn Fang, a bank 
desk, said later that on die 


the hotel collapsed 
she and another rescued vic- 
tim, Mr Boh Gee Cheng, bad 
gane to the basement car pa rk 
and seen some men trying to 
prop np the floor with wood 
becaase of a Stage crack. 

Mr Liaium bai, director of 
operations at the Heme Af- 
fairs MWtstryJdertified Tues- 
day night's survivor as Mrs 
CtaaKha Choo, aged 45. He 
said she was m satisfactory 
conditio*. bet was treated far 
dehydration and. minor 
bruises. - 


Vital piece 
of shuttle 


recovered 


Washington — Ocean recov- 
ery crews have hauled up 
wreckage of a booster rocket of 
the shuttle Challenger which 
could provide valuable clues 
to the cause of the disaster in 
January (Mohsin Ali writes). 

A 5001b piece of debris 
measuring 5ft by 4ft recovered 
from 650ft of water may be 
from the right rocket booster.. 
Failure of the O-ring seal in 
the lower joint of the booster 
is widely believed to have, 
caused the explosion. 

Mr James Thompson, vice- 
chairman of Nasa’s Challeng- 
er task force, told reporters 
that the cause of the destruc- 
tion of the Shuttle would be 
found even if search crews 
were unable to salvage crucial 
parts of the suspect right 
booster rocket 

He said that his group 
would present a full report on 
its findings on April 18 


Libyan planes aid Sudan 


From Gill Lusk, Khartoum 


Military aircraft supplied by 
Libya are being used by 
Sudan's Air Force in the war 
against southern rebels, ac- 
cording to military sources in 
Khartoum. 

The planes, understood to 
be Tu22s. are being used in a 
campaign to recapture the 
garrison town of Rumbek — 
strategic capital of the Lakes 
province evacuated by the 
Army nearly two weeks ago 
after being besieged by the 
Sudanese People's Liberation 
Army. 

Though the ruling Transi- 
tional Military Council has 
consistently reiterated its de- 
termination to recapture the 
town, details of the actual 


offensive are shrouded in a 
secrecy unprecedented in Su- 
danese politics. 

A military source, who 
could not be named, said 
bombing raids had been going 
on for several days and the 
planes were being flown by 
Sudanese pilots currently 
serving in the Libyan Air 
Force. But he did not say what 
exactly was being bombed. 

Rumours persist in Khar- 
toum that Rumbek itself is the 
target. Another military 
source, however, said this 
would not occur until infantry 
support from Juba and Wau 
arrived. 

If this is so. current 
offensives could have mainly 


a political significance — army 
morale has been low as the 
war drags on; losses last year 
were given at more than 400 
men; and a shortage of ammu- 
nition. supplies .and equip- 
ment is understood to be the 
main reason for the recent 
evacuation of Rumbek. 


The civilians of Rumbek 
have already migrated south 
towards the equatorial town of 
Yambio, according to south- 
ern sources. 


Meanwhile, Dr ai-Gizuli 
DaffaJlah, the civilian Prime 
Minister, said Libya was act- 
ing as an intermediary be- 
tween the Khartoum and 
Addis Ababa governments. 


Women’s democracy day in Chile 


From Lake Sagans, Santiago 


A women's coalition sup- 
ported by all Chile’s main 
opposition parties, profession- 
al associations, unions and 
student groups has declared 
today a “day for democracy”. 

• The women have called on 
all Chileans to protest against 
the 1 3-year-old military re- 
gime by exercising their demo- 
cratic rights: by boycotting 
classes and shops; by filling 
the streets of central Santiago 


Black gold 
miner 


with marches for freedom, 
democracy and justice, and by 
hanging pots and pans to 
symbolize freedom of speech. 

In spite of differences, 
members of both the main 
opposition coalitions worked 
together to make this demon- 
stration a success. 

They are the Democratic 
Alliance, made up of conser- 
vative, moderate and mildly 
left-wing political parties, and 


Ahe . Popular Democratic 
- Movement, formed by the 
Communists, the Movement 
of the Revolutionary left 
(MIR) and the Abneyda sec- 
tion of The divided Socialist 
Party..’. 

Both . coalitions represent 
important sectors of Chilean 
society and have won signifi- 
cant electoral victories in the 
ar. bat they have been 
to form a united body. 


murdered 


From Michael Hornsby 
Johannesburg 





announces that on and after 

20th MARCH, 1986 

the following annual rate will apply 
Basic Rate...ll 1 /t% (Previously 12'/:%) 


The Hongkong and Shanghai Banking Corporation 
The British Bank of the Middle East 
HongkongBank Limited 


Another black miner has 
died in violence at the Vaal 
Reefs gold mine, sear Orkney 
on tire West Rand, bringing to 
21 the death toB there snee 
the middle of last month. 

A spokesman for the mine 
management said that the 
kilting occurred during fight- 
ing on Tuesday night among 
residents of foe Noj 4 shaft 
bosteL 

The distmbance was said to 
be a continuation of the tribal 
‘’Taction fighting*’ which 
claimed six lives on Monday, 
eight last weekend, and two on 
Tuesday of last week. In 
addition, four senior Mack 
miners were murdered on Feb- 
ruary 18. 

Vaal Reefs, which accounts 
for about 12 per cent of South 
Africa's gold output, employs 
a total or 4(1000 Macks, of 
whom some 1,750 are said to 
have resigned “voluntarily*' as 
a result of die recent unrest. 

Meanwhile, at least three 
people were killed, and two 
bouses and four cars were set 
alight, during Tuesday and the 
early hoars of yesterday m 
pitched battles between some 
3,000 school children and a 
criminal gang in Diepidool 

The fighting seems to have 
been related to the political 
unrest m the conotry. Two of 
those wbo died were burnt 
alive after the pupils raided a 
house. 

The modest reflects an 
increasing tendency by young 
blacky calling themselves 
“comrades”, to take die law 
Into their own hands. 

• WHITEEXODUS: Emi- 
gration from Sooth Africa 
went op from 8350 in 1984 to 
11,4)1 in 1985, au increase of 
333 per cent, while the num- 
ber of immigrants fell from 
28,793 to 17,284, a decline of 
48 per cent, according to 
figures released by the Central 
Statistical Services. 



Base Rate 

Reduces by 1% to 11.5% per annum with 
effect from 19th March 1986. 





ftHtiiand Sank 


Midland Bank pic, 27 Poultry, London EC2P 2BX 


When Grace Fisher fell, 
no one heard her cries. 
Please listen to our Appeal. 


fisher. Last year she was meggedni she had a stroke, And in November 
shefeU in her home. Unable to reach a phone she by alone in pain, catting 
tor help for 15 boun. She could lave died alone. 

Help couU have been a push button awxjt 

If Grace had lad a Lifehne unit she could have avoided her agonising 
vwafe. Connected roa24hotr«onndomtre.Ufdineoawo^way voice 
communication system that, hi a crisis. can summon hdp instantly 
Even from die garden; or from bed. help can mg be raised using a 

special radio pendant which activates the main alarm unit by remote 

control.. : .... 


Thousands are needed. 

• Thcee miflkxroW people in Britain Jive alone like Grace. Many afraid 

dot an accident, sudden Mnesx or violent mtrusion would leave them 

helpless. UfeBnecan preserve their independence and peace of mind- 
: even thear lives.- . ■ _ 

Grace now has a lifeline unit from Help the Aged but we need to 
insaO thousands more. We urgendyneed your help. 

Please give generously. Every pouna counts. 

Let cries for help jike Grace’s no longer go unheard. 



(Grace's story h true but the name has been 
changed to protect her prtvoqt) 


Help the Aged Lifeline Alarm 



r~~ - i ] 

.To: Hdp idle Aged, Project 66918, FREEPOST London 6CIB 1BD. i 
□ Ptejoc send me more hrformarion on Lrfefife* 3 > 


: Name (Mr/Mrs/Missflis). 
Address- 


WOOL LETTERS PIXA5E 


.Postcode. 




■IJfctattiixMartoWaarttf-GMM-htaanlaL 


T SB 


BANK 



With effect from the close of 
business on Wednesday, 19th 

further no 
Rate will decrease 
from 12%% p.a. to liy 2 % p.a. 


All facilities (including regulated consumer credit 
, asreements) with a rate ofinterest linked to 
TSB Base Rate wili be varied accordingly 

Trustee Savings Banks 
. Central Board 

PO Box 33, 25 Milk Street, 

-• London EC2V8LU. ’ ... 


- i s; » 


» >*' 


f-’l { 


.1 ’I-** 


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' * i* L, 

L*' 


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* .•» 


' 15*', 


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jJ j aXj6 J 




THE TIMES THURSDAY MARCH 20 1986 


OVERSEAS NEWS 


w. 




Ui s urvi Vor 




- i'< 

V . w 

1 i; -J 


• in Chi; 


Fisher fcl 
K-vifd Kerens 

v ••: O'srkflB 


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r~i r 


'■* - 

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UMi v 

1 


Congress examines documents brought from Manila 


Marcos ‘gave cash’ 
to campaigns of 
Carter and Reagan 


Ffcom Michael Binyon, Washington 
Documents brought to the - 

United States by Mr Ferdi- Manila (Beater) - Singapore n 
““d show that the hasieiected a request frura toe r 

tanner Philippines president ousted ndUrabes leader. Mr r 


former .Philippines president 
may have contributed $50,000 
(£30300) to both President 
Carter -and his challenger, Mr 
Ronald Reagaxy in the 1980 
election campaign, according 
to congressional sources. 

Mr Marcos also appears to 
have given a $ 10,000 cam- 
paign contribution to Senator 
Alan Qanston of California, 
and sums from $500 to 
$50,000 to between 10 and 20 
American candidate s in state 
and local elections, mainly on 
the west coast Senator Cran- 
ston said he knew of no 
Philippines contributions to 
his campaigo. 

The one-page record of 
contributions is among 2,300 
pages, copies of which were 
released on Tuesday to the 
House sub-committee investi- 
gating the Marcos holdings in 
the US. The record has now 
been referred to the Justice 
Department's criminal divi- 
sion for further investigation. 

Under American election 
law, federal campaign contri- 
butions by foreigners, includ- 
ing companies, are illegal 
Individual Americans are also 
prohibited from donating 
more than $1,000 to a presi- 
dential candidate. 

It is not clear how or 
whether the Marcos payments 
were made. Reagan campaign 
officials denied on Tuesday 
that he had ever received any 
such contributions. 


ousted Philippines leader, Mr 
Fwdmand Marcos, to allow 
him in for a visit, its embassy 
said yesterday. 

Mr Marcos wasted to spend 
two to three weeks there but 
his s accessor. President 
Aquino, fdt the visit woold not 
be helpful to her 
admialstTatioa. ~ ' 

A White House spokesman 
also said a 1982 document was 
untrue, and that the campaign 
and the Federal Election Com- 
mission hafl elaborate safe- 
guards which would have 
brought this to light. 

But members of the House 


mg sums totalling $400,000. 
These payments involved ship 
repair contracts in the Philip- 
pines and work on water 
pumping stations. 

“The documents' confirm 
what we have suspected all 
along," MrSalonga said. They 
showed a “raid of the Philip- 
pines public treasury**, includ- 
ing mili tary intelligence funds 
fertile private use of Mr and 
Mrs Marcos. There was an 
“AH cat relationship” between 
the Marcoses and banks, fi- 
nancial institutions and many 
corporations in the Philip- 
pines and abroad. 

Meanwhile, General Fabian 
Ver, the former military chief; 
appeared with a Philippines 
businessman in Alexandria, 


subcommittee suggested tile ? 

money may havebeen given Virginia, on Tuesday beforea 
to the pJUn and <§ner gra nd jury nyreagjU- 

campaigrisljy dividing it K* ‘“'EilSS “ ^ 


^ tag attend fiaud in US mili- 

sass autism 

more difficult to detect, this is PhiUppmes. 

also illegaL The two men, who fled to 

The documents, also re- H ?^!!^^ Marc ® s ' T we ^ 
leased to Mr Jovho Satonga, ?«bporaa ed last week. It a 
head, of the Philippines com- investigating contracts total- 
mission set up to recover ^ than SlOOmifoon 
illegally acquired Marcos partly fenced# 

wealth, shared that the for- ^ Pentagon's foreign nnb- 
mer president kept most ofhis **** sales and ^ cr^s pro- 
money in Swiss ac- g^umme. The investigations 
counts. There was a pattern of ^ >egan 


The two men, who fled to 
Hawaii with Mr Marcos, were 
subpoenaed last week. It is 
investigating contracts total- 
ling more than $100 million 
which were partly financed by 


commissions and kickbacks 
paid by US, Japanese and 
other companies to dose Mar- 
cos associates, according to 
investigators who have seen 
tire documents. 

Japanese companies paid 
the most in kickbacks, indud- 


Cyprus tops Howe’s 
agenda in Athens 

By Nicholas Ashford, Diplomatic Correspondent 


Sir Geoffrey Howe, the 
Foreign Secretory, begins a 
visit to Athens today as a fresh 
attempt to solve the dispate 
o ver Copras between Greece 
and Turkey is about to be 
launched. 

Within the next month, 
Seoor Perez de $a^Bar, the 
United Nations Secretory- 
General, is expected to com- 
plete work on a revised plan 
for solving the Cyprus prob- 
lem — the third since he began 
his initiative Ip remite the 
divided island in 1984. 

The Greek Government is 
concerned that the new UN 
plan will skirt around issues 
which Athens— and the Greek 
Cypriots —regards as being of 
paramount importance, nota- 
bly a timetable for the with- 
drawal of Greek troops from 
northern Cyprus. 

Greece fears that Sir Geof- 
frey and Mr George Shultz, 
the US Secretary of State, who 
is doe in Athens immediately 
after his British colleague, will 
try to persuade Greece that the 
UN jtian offers the best hope 
of resolving toe Cypres 
proWem-There is also concern 
that they will try to pressure 


Mr Andreas Fapandreoo, the 
Greek Prime Minister, into 
accepting what he recen t ly 
described as being “only a 
senti-agreement”. 

. British officials deny that 
Sir Geoffrey, who wio also 
risk Yugoslavia daring his 
fear-day Balkan tour, intends 
to do aHy arm-twisting white hi 
Athens. 

Nevertheless, Cypres will 
be high on the ageada of the 
talks Sir Geoffrey wffl have 
with Mr Papaadreoa, particu- 
larly as the subject was dig- 
ressed in some detail with Mr 
Turgot Orel, toe Tnrkisb , 
Prime Minister, when he was I 
in London last month. Britain 
still has residual responsibil- 
ities towards Cypres as a i 


General Ver would not 
.comment as he left the court- 
house. His appearance may be 
one of many in US courts by 
Marcos associates as Investi- 
gations get under way into 
alleged corruption during the 
Marcos fldmtni«ctrati< ?tl . 

Kabul pledge 
encourages 
UN mediator 

Mamahari — SefiOT DiegO 
Cordovez, the UN Secretary- 
General’s personal envoy for 
Afghanistan, said here yester- 
day that be had obtained from 
Kabo) a draft timetable for the 
withdrawal of Soviet troops 
(Hasan Akhtar writes). He was 
hopeful that it would help 
break the deadlock over re- 
sumption of Geneva talks cm 


Sir Geoffrey's visit, fee first 
to Athens by a Foreign Secre- 
tary since Sir Anthony Eden 
was there in 1944, conies at a 
time when relations between 
the two c uont ries are better 
than they have been for years 
despite ideological differences. 

Apart from Cypres he will 
also talk aboat the European 
Community, Nato and interna- 
tional terrorism. 


But Mr Cordovez made it 
dear that he still awaited a 
final decision by Pakistan and 
Afghanistan on the crucial 
issue of whether direct across- 
tho-tabte talks should replace, 
as Kabul demands, the four- 
year-old indirect talks format 
The UN official said he was 
quite confident the format 
problem would be overcome 
and the Geneva process 
resumed. 


Elections 
call by 
Aquino 
Cabinet 

Prim Keith Dalton 

Manila 

President Aqaino was yes- 
terday mged to rewrite the 
constitution of the Philippines 
and call legislative and local 
government elections for 
November. 

After a three-hoar Cabinet 
m ee ti n g — her second since 
taking power three weeks ago 
- she postponed until next 

week, awHng a final Horidnn 

on whether to proclaim a 
revolutionary govenunenL 

Mr Antonio Caeoco, Minis- 
ter for Politica] Affairs, said a 
five-man commission recom- 
mended that Mrs Aquino ob- 
tain emergency powers from 
toe National Assembly for six 
months while a new coas ti tn- 
tion is drawn up. 

The recommendation over- 
ruled an earlier proposal that a 
revolutionary government 
would be the quickest and 
earnest way to overhaul the 
last vestiges of toe 20-year-old 

t Jn i i a it l i »tinn nf f n ynM M Prea- 

ident Marcos, embodied in the 
1973 martial law co n s tit u ti on. 

Because Mrs Aquino took 
power on February 25 after a 
civilian-hacked military re- 
volt, toe validity of bar admin- 
istration is in question and its 
co n sti tution has to be c la rifi ed. 

More than 100 people have 
died in dashes between com- 
munist rebels and government 
troops since then. 

Meanwhile, the newly creat- 
ed Commission on Human 
Rights has said its first priori- 
ty b to in vestigate the disap- 
pearance of more than 300 

n wtnl . aMw ted by unldigra mr 

armed men daring the Marcos 
regime. The commission, 
beaded by Mr Jok Diokno, a 
former senator and human 
rights lawyer, will also investi- 
gate of summary 

wimi taw , massacres and 
cases of to rtm e and artitary 
arrest 

It has the power to subpoena 
witnesses red officials and 
grant inununfty from prosecu- 
tion. It has bees allowed 
reflate d access to dp” 1 ** 1 * 
documents 

Mr Diokno said it was likely 
another in v e s tigatio n would be 
made into the 1983 assassina- 
tion of the President's hus- 
band, Mr Benigno Aquino. In 
December 26 men, iactading 
General Fabian Ver, the far- 
mer military chief, were ac- 
quitted of involvesmt in his 
Binder. 

MeanwhOe, employees yes- 
terday screed control of 
Manila's Daily Express, 
owned by Mr Roberto 
Benedict*), n dose associate of 
Mr Marcos, and sacked key 
officials before printing the 
first “special liberation issue" 
of the newspaper. 


Negotiators fall out * 

Paris — A slanging match saw in Damascus last week, 
between the two semi-official But the Ministry of Foreign 
French negotiators in the Leb- Affairs recognizes only the 
anon hostages crisis, one of government emissaries who 
Lebanese origin and one of went last week to Beirut, 
Syrian, has broken out (Susan Baghdad and Damascus. 


MacDonald writes). 
Dr Rezah Raad, 


“They wanted to smear my 
whose name in the election 


r&mily comes from the BeJcaa campaign," Dr Raad said. He 
Valley, has said he is giving up stood in last Sunday's elec~ 
his attempts after accusations tions as a right-wing candidate 
by M Omrane Adham that his in L’Orne, but was beaten. 


negotiating tactics led to a 
January breakdown m talks. 


Responsibility for the ex- 
plosion on the Paris-Lyons 




M Adham, of Syrian extrac- TGV express on Monday has 
tion, says he is President been dauned by the Commit- 
Mitterrand's personal envoy tee of Solidarity with Arab 
to President Assad, whom he Political Prisoners. 





Mrs Aquino, escorted by a military aide, arrives at toe palace for toe Cabinet meeting. 


Acid rain 
admission 
by Britain 

By Hugh Clayton, 
Envkonmeflt Correspondent 

Britain yesterday accepted 
that sulphur emigrifttiR from 
its power stations had caused 
acid rain pollution in Norway. 
The admission was made by 
Mr William Waldegrave, Min- 
ister of State at the Depart- 
ment of the Environment 
responsible for pollution con- 
trol, at the end of a visit to 
Britain by Mrs Rake! Surlien, 
the Norwegian Minister of the 
Environment. 

“We have no divirion as to 
the scientific perception of the 
problem," Mr Waldegrave 
said in London. Two or three 
years ago there was some 
scepticism in the scientific 
establishment." But while 
there was now substantial 
agreement between Britain 
red Norway about the impact 
of acid rain on- lakes and 
waterways, the two govern- 
ments had not agreed about 
ways to reduce it 
Mis Surlien said that Nor- 
way wanted Britain to join the 
“30 per cent dub” of more 
than 20 countries which have 
agreed that in 1993 their add 
rain emissions should be 30 
per cent lower than in 1980. 

Mr Waldegrave said:* 1 We 
were not able to move nearly 
as fast as they would like in 
using additional investment 
to bnng emissions down faster 
than they would come 
anyway." He rejected Mrs 
Surlien’s statement that toe 
two governments had agreed 
that Britain must review its 
attitude to add rain, which she, 
called “the most touchy issue 
between our two nations." 

“I would have put it a little 
more tentatively than 
toat,"Mr Waldegrave said. 
But they agreed that there 
were still gaps in research 
about the impact of add 
rauMtspedally on trees. • 




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THE COLLISION 0FTHE CENTURY 


COLOUR PHOTOGRAPHS 
FROM THE 
GIOTTO/HALLEY’S 
COMET ENCOUNTER 


The European Space Agency's probe Giotto met 
Hailey's Comet, at midnight on 13 March 1986. 
Full report including unique colour photographs 
of what a comet really looks like! 

newscientis 


Today and Every Thursday 




Canada agrees to 
extend US 
air defence pact 

From Michael Bmyon, Washington 


At one of the most success- 
ful US-Cauadian summit 
meetings for years. President 
Reagan and Mr Brian 
Mulroney, the Canadian 
Prime Minister, agreed to 
extred a mutual air defence 
agreement for five years. 

The two men also proposed 
early talks on free trade ar- 
rangements. And in a signifi- 
cant chang e ofheart. President 
Reagan accepted toe impor- 
tance of reducing arid rain, 
broadly endorsing a report 
drawn up by US and Canadi- 
an envoys which calls for a 
large-scale pilot project to 
reduce US sidphur emissions. 

The two-day summit here 
did much to restore toe tradi- 
tionally dose relations, which 
have been strained by Canadi- 
an resentment recently at what 
they saw as US indifference on 
acid rain and worries that 
Canada was bring drawn un- 
willingly into President 
Reagan’s Strategic Defence 
Initiative (SDI). 

The two leaders signed the 
extension to the North Ameri- 
can Air Defence Agreement 
yesterday. The pact, which 
had integrated Canadian and 
US air defence systems since 
1958, was due to expire in 
May. Last month a parliamen- 
tary commission in Ottawa 
recommended its renewal. 

But many Canadians want- 
ed toe reinstatement of A 


clause, dropped in toe last 
extension, forbidding any 
steps that violated the 1972 
Soviet-American anti-ballistic 
missile treaty. 

Panada has strongly op- 
posed any broader interpreta- 
tion of this treaty, and 
announced in September that 
it would not take part in the 
SDI research programme. 

On arid rain, Mr Reagan 
has been made forcefully 
aware of the depth of Canadi- 
an feeling and damage being 
done to Canadian lakes and 
forests by wind-borne pollu- 
tion from toe coat-fired power 
plants and factories of the 
American Middle West The 
Administration has tempo- 
rized until now. insisting more 
research was needed to find 
the cause of acid rain. But the 
last summit in Quebec last 
year commissioned the special 
envoys' report which called 
for a $5 million US test project 
on new technologies to reduce 
arid rain. 

Mr Reagan also reaffirmed 
toe US desire to scrap all 
barriers to free trade between 
the two countries, saying such 
an agreement could put an end 
to many of the irritants that 
had bedevilled them. Mr 
Mulroney announced that 
Canada would accept the US 
invitation to help develop an , 
American manned space ! 
station. 


Ivan the 
Terrible 
Vas killed 
in 1943’ 

Jerusalem — Evidence 
yhi^h shows that Mr John 
Demjanjuk cannot be “ivaa 
toe Terrible", who ran toe 
ovens at Treblinka extermina- 
tion camp, has been produced 
by an institute in Jerusalem 
which studies toe Nazi Holo- 
caust (Ian Murray writes). 

According to evidence 20 
years ago by one of 
TrebUnka's few survivors, toe 
Ukrainian guard was 
killed during a rebellion by 
prisoners in 1943. The survi- 
vor has since died, but copies 
of his evidence have been 
forwarded to the court 

Plan for ferry 
link to Spain 

Madrid (AFP) - A ferry link 
between GijOn in northern 
Spain and Britain is to be 
established by Sea Link and 
could be operating by spring, 
1987, the Cinco Dias newspa- 
per said. 

Sea Link has two routes in 
mind, using either Ports- 
mouth or Fishguard. 

Fiat jobs deal 

Turin (AP) — Fiat has 
agreed with trade unions to re- 
employ 5,500 workers laid off 
in 1980. Seven hundred will 
be back by July, and others 
will be hired again, after re- 
training, by the end of 1987. 

Children die 

Orraandali, Turkey (AP) - 
Seven children were killed 
here yesterday when a mortar 
shell with which they were 
playing exploded. 

Mir back-up 

Moscow (Reuter) — The 
Soviet Union has launched an 
unmanned spaceship carrying 
supplies for two cosmonauts 
on toe Mir space station. 

Angola return 

Kinshasa (AP) — The 197 
foreigners freed on Zaire’s 
bonder by Angola’s Uniia 
rebels will be flown to Kinsha- 
sa under toe care of the 
Internationa] Red Cross and 
returned to Angola this week. 

Chad attack 

Ndjamena (AP) — Chad has 
claimed government forces 
inflicted heavy casualties in a 
surprise attack on a rebel 
outpost at Ghicha, near Faya- 
Largua. killing 235 soldiers, 
including “18 white Libyans”. 

Drug sentence 

Perpignan (AP) — Raymond 
Keller, aged 60, of Dunstable, 
has been jailed for five years, 
with two years suspended, for 
trying to smuggle cannabis 
across the Spanish-French 
frontier. 

Wine seized 

Milan (AP)— Police investi- 
gating toe death by poisoning 
of three people have seized 
14,000 bottles of wine from 
supermarkets in north Italy. 

Golden egg 

Rio de Janeiro (AP) — A 
Brazilian gold prospector on 
his way home stumbled on an 
egg-sized stone which was a 
165.5 carat diamond worth $1 
million (£684,000). 


by being there. 


25-27 MARCH 1986 


OLYMPIA 2 -LONDON 


OFFKE ENVIRONMENT EXHIBITION W 


How does office environment 
improve productivity? Why do new 
developments in office technology {dace 
fresh emphasis on the working environ- 
ment? The suitability of furniture and 
lighting the importance of noise and 
temperature control; the advantages of 
cable management, how can these con 
tribute to a company^ profit? 


You'll find the answers at the Office 
Environment Exhibition at Olympia 2. 
Itfe the only show this year dedicated 
to the office environment in all its 
forms. 

Your complimentary ticket is below 
- put it in your diary today! 

BETA Exhibitions Ltd, 
g Southampton Place. London. WClA 2EE 


PS 5 


Ss? § 

g! £ 

^ £ 


This voucher entities ooe pereon to free entry to the Office Environment Exhibition. 

^^cS:^Siv-iSt ShtSon jF 

25-27 MARCH 1986 ■ OLYMPIA 2 -LONDON 

Sauv-nsus Tliesd^ Thursday 9 30 am to j 30 pm Upm Thuruiay LIT Marrhl 


T 20/3*6 






P rince Andrew, visiting the 
Maritime Provinces of 
Canada last year at the 
end of his final tour of 
duty in the Falklands, found 
himself in the company of a party 
of local journalists covering his 
presence, and struck up a conver- 
sation with an attractive young 
woman reporter. Instead of dis- 
solving under his charms she 
adopted an argumentative, femi- 
nist and somewhat republican 
stance towards a member of 
British - and indeed Canadian - 
royalty. The Prince passed on. 

“That woman”, observed one of 
the seasoned Fleet Street royal 
hounds watching from the wings* 
“has just missed the opportunity 
of her life." 

At the other extreme, the 
Queen's second son has occasion- 
ally found that his reputation as a 
ladies’ man has left him prey to 
naked opportunism. Victoria 
Macdonald, a 21-year old starlet 
who had become co-owner of a 
West End night club, fuelled the 
rumour that she had been dated by 
the Prince and, when approached 
by the popular newspapers, played 
her cards perfectly. She nodded, 
blushed, and murmured: “I don't 
want to say any more.” 

But in the end Victoria had to 
admit it was all a hoax, a cheap 
stunt to win publicity for her club. 
Prince Andrew was furious, and 
made sure that her invitation to a 
film premiere which he was 
attending shortly afterwards was 
quietly withdrawn. 

He has complained more than 
once, and often with justification, 
that the press have labelled girls as 
his steady dates when he has 
barely shaken hands with them; it 
is the price he has had to pay for 
his reputation. Only once, howev- 
er, has his family felt a serious 
need to blow the whistle on his 
romantic attachments. Immedi- 
ately after the Falklands campaign 
he took the actress Koo Stark on 
holiday to his aunt’s Caribbean 
hideaway island of Mustique, and 
was summoned home because the 
lady concerned, who had appeared 
in films which did not require her 
to wear heavy period costume, 
was not felt to be enhancing the 
monarchy's good name. 

For Pnnce Andrew, it was a 
hard and sobering decision, for 
what does a young man fresh from 
war need but a severe bout of rest 
and relaxation? 

Romantic rumour has -pursued 
the Prince ever since his 
schooldays at Gordonstoun, that 
stem academy of leadership on the 
windy coast of Morayshire which 
in recent years has slightly soft- 
ened its cold-bath and hairy-chest 
regimen and now even admits 
girls to its sixth form. 

When Kurt Hahn, a brilliant 
German Jewish educationalist, 
was thrown out of his native land 
by Hitler and re-established his 
elite school for future leaders in 
Scotland, Prince Philip was 
among his first pupils. Prince An- 
drew, unlike his more sensitive 


brother Charles, took to the 
Gordonstoun life almost as much 
as his father had done. But, 
although sometimes portrayed as 


something of a dunderheaded 
Hooray Henry, Andrew achieved 
highly respectable a c ad emi c re- 
sults, with A levels in English, 
history and economics, and six O- 
levels. 

He is nothing if not his fathers 
son -he is named after hi s pate rnal 
grandfather Prince Andrew of 

Greece - and to follow bis father to 

the Royal Naval College at Dan- 
mouth was more or less inevita- 
ble, considering that he sh owed no 
consuming passion nor interest in 
any other career. Helicopt er pilot s 
are prone to take a self-deprecat- 
ing view of their job: they win tell 
you that ft takes little intellectual 
brainpower, only the intelligence 
to absorb a few simple rules, the 
discipline to stick to them, and the 
ability to stay awake at the wheel 
There is, perhaps, a little more to 
it than that 


v vV r; ' \ * . v 

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■'I' 

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tutors; 

School, 

GuaHflcatkw A- levels in ^ 

English, history, economics; 6 0- 

lounl* 

WIUD* . . 

Career: Royal Naval CoBega, - 
Dartmouth. Sailed as Beutenant 
and second pBot of Sea Kin g. „ 

heftcoptaronbomtf HMSJftririciMs 

as part erf Fsfldands task force, .. 


Supporter tt 

wedding of’ Prineeandijfnqaat 
of Wales, St PauTs. 1981 . 
Anniversary of cotorezatkin ot 
St Helena, 1984, Openssof Mount 
Pleasant airport. Faad a ngs. , 

1986. Tour of Maritime Provinces 
of Canada. 1985- 


jf , -AtW iW I- 

-r.-. m 
' ... MRW 


Ova List all owance: £20.000 a 


FaMancte campaign. Convert* 
to Lynx hetfcoptar course, and 


Counsellor of State, 




: - ■ ... viW 

■ v 

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T he Prince’s skill was put 
to the test in February last 
year when, flying a sortie 
in the Falklands many 
miles from his mother ship, a 
hydraulic pump on his Lynx failed 
and he chose to make what in the 
understatement of military par- 
lance is known as a precautionary 
landing in a boggy East Falkland 
field rather than risk trying to 
return to HMS Brazen. By all 
accounts, he handled the situation 
with calm and skill 
“He is one hell of a helicopter 


pilot”, said the Ministry of De- 
fence spokesman. “But this is only 


fence spokesman. “But this is only 
what we would expect from 
someone of his experience and 
seniority.” 

His fellow officers on Brazen, 
who referred to him simply as 
“H”, rated his skill as a pilot 
rather higher than his ability as an 
organizer, when he was given the 
additional duty of ship's entertain- 
ments officer, laying on films and 
bingo sessions for the crew, and 
even occasionally taking the mi- 
crophone as ship's disc jockey. - 

The Falkland Islanders, anxious 
for any contact or recognition 
from the mother country, took to 
him warmly, except these who did 
not recognize him. There are 
habitations in the islands for 
which remote is too mild a word. 

On a fishing trip to an isolated 
corner of West Falkland, he was 
approached by Claude 
Molkenburgh, a shepherd, and 
inquired kindly after his dogs. 
Claude in return asked if the off- 
duty serviceman had dogs at 
home. Yes, said the serviceman: 
corgis. “Useless for sheep work”, 
said Claude, who indicated a 
trailer full of peat and suggested 
that some help in unloading it 
might produce a cup of tea. 

The talk turned to how Claude’s 
house had been damaged by the 
Argentinians. “Do you have a 
house?” Claude asked his anony- 
mous visitor. “Er, yes, two 




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Babe and boy in the public eye: Prim* Andrew aged one 
month (photograph by Cecil Beaton); and aged eight 


s-*— • 

N 

■ *in 




Sharp shooter: The Prince at work behind one of his five Nikons 


actually” said the visftor.”One in 
London and one in Scotland.” 
Claude was more than a little 
surprised. “My God”, he ex- 
claimed, “You must have bloody 
rich parents.” 


same attitude spills over into 
Prince Andrew’s current passion 
for photography, an interest he 
developed while flying a newspa- 
per cameraman around his squad- 
ron on an assignment 


found a technical error in the 
small print His art, however, was 
not wdl received by the photo- 
graphic professionals of die press, 
who wondered what, if anything, 
he was trying to convey. 


Naval careers suit royalty, if 
only because a ship provides long 
periods of privacy away from the 
endless public gaze. Prince An- 
drew fits easily into the rather 
hermetic camaraderie of the ward- 
room, with its breezy masculine 
air, ceaseless shop talk and techni- 
cal doublespeak; Service life is 
curiously self-contained and in 
many ways remote from the real 
world. Military flying men love 
the minutiae of their work, and 
when on leave can take days to 
wind down and return to speaking 
comprehensible English. . The 


H e quickly acquired five 
cameras, including his 
mother’s magnificent 
Hasselbfad, presented 
to her at the factory on a state visit 
to Sweden. And when this corre- 
spondent interviewed him at 
Buckingham Palace Jast year on 
his recently-published book of 
photographs, he was a very whirl- 
wind of enthusiasm, of the kind 
that grips the newly converted, 
and boasted with some pride that, 
while reading the instruction book 
for a new Nikon camera, he had 


The photographer himself was 
easy, charming and quite self- 
effacing, making no great claims 
for his own abilities. He. freely 
conceded that, earlier that day he 
had been on his hands and knees 
cleaning his darkroom - converted 
from a palace bathroom - with' 
Harpic. When we moved to a 
window to examine a set of 
negatives, he cautioned: '“Better 
not- do that, or they’ll all start 
waving”, and dissolved into a 
giggle. There was the distinct 
impression that making faces 
from the window, or leaving a 


caixiboanlcutcmtcffhnnsdfpeep- 
ing from behind the curtains, was 
exactly what he would Eke to have 
done. He then threw open' his 
drinks cupboard, but announced 
that he never touched the stuff 
himself 

Outside photography, which 
may now take a back seat, his 
interests are only those due would, 
expect in a young man of his 
position- He shoots,' and has! 
inherited a fine pair of Pnxriey 
shotguns from Charles who has 
given up killing defenceless birds 
for pleasure. He is no great foyer qf 
competitive mbit, and has not 
jnhgritwd iris father's passion for. 
polo. He would prefer to partici- 
pate in an qxpedition to some, 
remote bonier of the globe; with 
perhaps a bit of canoeing thrown - 
in for the thrill of iL ffe is happier 
shaking his gangly Embs to the 
music of Eton John oh the disco 
floor than sweating on the playing 
field; more of a prankster than a 
competitor. - 

His official public life remains 
greatly restricted Ire the fact that 
tiaeNirey is a foil-time career, and - 
his major engagements remain 
few. He has undertaken only two 
major functions abroad, the 150th 
anniversary, celebrations of St 
Helena, and the opening of the - 


refrained at sea after his marriage 
toTfrincess Elizabeth in 1947 until 
the dedinfra’ health of ' King 
George: VI forced him, - much 
against his wEfl, to shoulder a full- 
time pub&c career in 'support of 
his wife, for the remainder, of his 
naval career the Prince can expea 
fmtber postings at sea,' . and the 
new Princess Andrew Will experi- 
ence foe occasionally lonely shore 
life of a naval officer’s wife 


B eyond the British Schools 
Exploring Society and the 

SS Great Britain appeal, 
foe Prince’s portfolio of 
patronage* foir^Zbe time being 
•rem ai ns: , ' 1 s6rel >r JEBr* mother has 


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shown nog t atanxic ty to promote 
bam into the first division of 


new Falkfands. airport, the. fast; 
public exhibition ofmsbrief naval 
beard. . -" f - 

By continuing his naval caxeer- 
be is signed up until at least l 992- 
he is emulating bis fiuher, who 


formal engagements. - ■ 

In time, he will have to be found 
a niche in pititiic Ufe The Duke of 
Kent, who bad no traimra beyond 
the Army, carved himself a worth- 
while career as vice-chairman of 
iheJBrilisb Overseas Trade Board. 
Prince Mkharirof Kent has taken 
on four City directorships, al- 
though Prince Andrew is unlikely 
ever to face the Michaels’ substan- 
tial shortage of cash- 
No such considerations need 
trouble Prince Andrew for foe 
time being. Compared with the 
pressures faced by his elder broth- 


er, the relatively simple life of a 
married naval officer is something 


married naval officer is something 
to be eqjoyed to the foil while it 
fasts. ‘ “ 


Alan Hamilton 


Make sure of your copy of 


TLS 


The Times Literary Supplement 


THETIMES 


Educational Supplement 


TheTimes Higher Education 

Supplement 


by taking out a subscription today. 
Simply complete and return the 
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postal order, made payable to 
The Times Supplements. 


Please send me a year's, 6 months subscription to: 


Plastic for the plumber 


CONCISE CROSSWORD NO 904 


It may just be the ultimate 
accolade to the nbiquitious 
credit card that there is now a 
town where even a humble pint 
of beer or fish and chips can be 
paid for with plastic. 


Not only that, but you can 
also have your eyes tested, 
teeth fixed and hair cut with- 
out parting with real money. 
And should you then arrive 
home to find the kitchen 
flooded or a window shattered 
by a stray football, even the 
local plumber will accept the 
latest addition to the family of 
credit 


The town with its very own 
credit card is weQ-heeled 
Wllmsfow in Cheshire and for 
more than 100 traders and 
some 6,000 of their customers 
the green and gold Wflmslow 

Card now does nicely, thank 
yon. 


more than two years ago by 
Paul Robinson and David 
Ixmgworth, president and 
vice-president' of the local 
Chamber of Trade, as a means 
of combating foe attractions of 
the shopping centres. 

It has proved so successful 
that now other towns through- 
out the country are amdocs to 
follow in WOmslow’s pioneer- 
ing tracks. A similar scheme is 
about to go into operation in 
Tonbridge Wells. The cards 
are already going to traders 
and will be available to the 
public in June with an expect- 
ed response in the first year of 

25,000. 


It was an idea dreamt up 


The credit company open- 
ing the scheme is Credit and 
Data Marketing Services in 
Liverpool — the financial arm 
of the littkwood stores, mail 
order and pools group. It has 
had nearly 40 approaches 
from towns and communities 


wanting to launch their own 
cards. 

Customers pay 28J per cent 
interest which, the company 
says, puts the card at the top 
end of the forger card company 
range but at the lower end rtf 
the major store charge cards. 

David Longworth, general 
manag er of FL -dgans Store in 
Wihnsiow, said the card en- 
abled easterners to nsejast one 
piece of plastic Instead of 
juggling with assorted cards at 
vanoas shops. 

“And after all if yon have to 
call the ptaanber oat on a 
Sunday yea don’t always have 
foe rash in yonr pocket to pay 


The main problem - in 
launching the setane, be says, 
was in getting financial hack- 
ing. “I am afraid the major 
banks and credit ce^apanfes 
didn’t see the imstMUty of 
other towns joking in”. 


The scheme went into oper- 
ation fast September . and it 
was expected that 5,000 cards 
would be issned in foe first 
year. However, nearly 6,000 
cards have already; .been sent 
out with an average credit Hmlt 
of fl.fMMLMr Longworth and 
his coneagues say ranch iff 
that spending is new' money; ~ 
not simply transactions trans- 
ferred from other cards 
There are other benefits. 
The credit company receives a 
3 per cent fee on each transac- 
tion on foecardbot it retnrns a 
portion of that figure to foe 
Chamber of Trades bank ac- 
count to be used in promoting- 
the card and foe general 
benefit of the town. Last 
Christmas it provided for the 
purchase of an J3MHM) fight 
display which next year is 
expected to be augmented by a 


ACROSS 
8 Sweets (13) 

. 9 Collide with (3) 

19 Formless (9) 

II Etptain(5) 

13 Written misuke(7) 
I« Rarife(7) 

.19 Power (5) 

22 Sworn sutemont (9) 
24 Okl French, coin (3) 
24 Fc^ttcafiycunoing. 

(13) 


ii a m m 



DOWN 

1 Oak fruits (6) 

2 Na0 po&sb<6). ' 

3 -DecEnint corruptly; 
(8) 

4 Brush lightly (6) 

5 Poultry cagt{4) . 

4 Rebellion (6) 

7 Plaster of Paris (6) 
12 Lubricate (3) 

14 Distantly (gf 


Ioann anonnon 
■ ■ n n 

lononnwa anon; 

in n n n n i_, 
annnannnn ann 



15 Disgust cry (3) 

16 Moist (6) 

17 ln£Uuaice(6) 

18 ResusaiM£{6) 


20 Hone lower thigfa (6) 

21 Unofficial absentee 
to) 

23 Low platform (4) 


Peter Davenport 


SOLUTION TO NO 903 . - 

DOWN: l Hurt 2 Midsummer 3 Ranch 4 Vibes SRni* < 
-Huke 10 Cores 11 Abhor - 12 Ennuil3 SwinwSL 6 

Soot 18 Abate 29 Agent 2 InS ZljJHfKte T ™ “ 


□ The TLS. 


f endose a cheque P0 for 

£40.00 &20.00 


□ The TES- 1 enclose a cheque ?0 for 

536.00 £ 18.00 


□ TheTHES- I endose a cheque. PO for 
£33.00 £16.50 






























THE TIMES THURSDAY MARCH 20 1986 



BOOKS 




• ...:: • ^ 


• t ; 

- y ' n 







“ r 

" c . 1.?; 2£*y 


....; 

:i;S 


i «***! 

S r 2 «* 




SeSJ Begins a journey in his head 


Raymond Carr. 

THE SPANISH CIVIL 
WAR 


HamishHantihon, £20 

This "new edition” adds nodi-’ 
^“darned ■“* reused 
1976 edition of Lord Thomas's 
1961 classic — a work tfee bate 
Dkk Crossman once told me 
he regarded as tf m t of a 
notem Thucydides. The new 
edition does not, as the blurb 
wWfe i, take into account 
“new information which has 
come to hand** s*n rr 1976. 

This is a pity. The rmh> 
tfon ia Spanish hfetorfegrapfay 
has taken place mainly since 
3976. No accout of the See- 
ond Republic can neglect new 
work on the proletarian and 
bourgeois parties,, on 
employers* organizations. On 
the war itself there are new 
. studies which describe in some 
: detail the local impact of the 
creations o 4 the “spontaneons 
revolution** that swept .'over 
Republican Spain in the sum- 
mer of 1936. A revised bibliog- 
raphy indading these new 
. stodks might have helped to 
fill the gap. 

' The new edftion does, how- 
ever, include a challenging 
short preface. Yet not aU 
Spaniards would agree with 
Hagh Thomas that It was 
“good fortune** dint converted 
imperial Spain into a amr 
secondairt after 1815; poverty, 
which kept Spain ettl of the 
great Enropeaa game, can 
scarcely be called good 
fortune. 

- Hugh Thomas's new edition 
remains what The Spanish 
Civil War always was: incom- 
parably the best narrative 
history of that tragic episode 
in any language. Though none 
of ns may relish the awftd task 
of overhauling a major work, 
Lord Thomas should be en- 
couraged to undertake a re- 
vised edition; it might reveal 
the shffta in his own political 
position over the years. 


THE TIMES 
JONATHAN CAPE 


G ermaine Greer < 

wrote her doctoral 
thesis on The Ethic : 
of low' and Mar- 
riage m Shakespeare's Early a 
Comedies (1967), The present I 
volume belongs to ihe “Past * 
Masters" series, and has the * 
intriguing task of summariz- c 
mg Shakespeare’s thought as * 
displayed through his art * 
Some people have thought t 
that Shakespeare was not real- \ 
ly capable of thought His i 
strong suit wa5intimkm-He < 
warbled. Other ' people have > 
tried to push matters in the 
opposite direction, leaving s 
fantastic brain-brines on Ins 1 
doorstep. But the Act remains 1 
that, whereas we can easily 1 
guess the kind of thing we > 
might find u the Fast Masten < 
volumes on Dante, Coleridge, 
or Goethe, in the case of- 
Shakespeare we just can’t be 
sure. It afl depends on what Dr 
Greer decides constitutes 
“thought". 

She begins with what is ; 
known about the poet's Hie, 
which she recounts in a stark - 
and largely unspeculative way. 
Shakespeare’s works, she says: 

have been- ransacked 
lime and again for evidence 
qf.his adherence to Catholi- 
cism. Puritanism. the Esr 
sex faction. Platonism, 
feminism, anti-feminism. 
and so forth, on the basis of 
different and incompatible 
assumptions of where he 
war at different times and 
on different occasions, and 
whom he knew. No such 
assumptions will be made 
in this slim volume... Given 
the fact that Shakespeare - 
seldom if ever spoke in his 
own person, -a scrupulous ' 
discussion of his thought 
. must jake his invisibility 
' into account as an aspect oj 
his intellect. 

So we are not to assume that 
any speech from the plays 
represents Shakespeare's' 
opinion en : a given: subject. - 
Shakespeare stands back man 
the dialectic of his drama in 
which ’Hdea is pitied against 
idea, and from their friction a 
deeper undeistendii^ of the 
issues emerges." This under- 
standing is not safoething 
exhibited in the transmitted 
•ext It is achieved by the .. 


James Fenton reviews an imaginative, teasing 
introduction to the philosophy of The Bard 


audience in the course of 
performance. 

And this makes Shakespeare’s 
thought more evanescent than 
ever, since there is not a single 
audience but a multitude of 
audiences. To S h a k es peare ’s 
contemporaries Iago would 
have appeared as the Devil 
incarnate, or his agent. But Dr 
Greer says that “we no longer 
feeL.the ubiquity of Satan"; 
“Iago is stiH serviceable to us, 
as an objective correlative of 
the mindless inventiveness of 
racist aggression. Iago is still 

alive ana kinking and filling 
migrants* letter-boxes with 
excrement." 

T his is a banal conclu- 
sion to the study of 
Othello, and it is . un- 
characteristic of Dr 
Greer to make a play 
“serviceable” in so narrow a 
cause. Do we really no longer 
fed the ubiquity of Satan? The 
success of many modernfilms 
depends upon our ability to 
fed precisely that. "We might 
fed it but not, intellectually, 
believe init; though ! should 


James Fenton 

SHAKESPEARE 

By Gerhraine Greer 

Oxford. £9.95. paperback £2.95 

think that we still believe in 
the quality called Satanic. 
What was the original audi- 
ence supposed to thmk, in the 
last momenus of Othello 7 The 
Moor, realizing what has hap- 
pened, says of Iago. “I look 
down towards his feet, but 
that's a fable." Meaning, I 
look to see whether he has 


cloven hooves, but I know 
that is just a story. The crucial 
proof comes in the next 
lrne:“If that thou be’ si a devil, 
I cannot kill thee." Othello 
stabs Iago, who then says;"l 
Weed sir, but not kill'd." 
Meaning, Yes, you see, I am a 
devil. Othello believes him. 
Bui as to what the audience 
believed, or what Shakespeare 
intended them to believe, we 
can really only guess. We 
know that Shakespeare delib- 
erately introduced the Satanic 
element into the story he 
adapted and that this element 
is easily in a modern 

performance. “The ethical 
notion," says Dr Greer, "of 
evil as defective, absurd and 
inconsistent is Aristotelian, 
but the embodiment of these 
characteristics in an agent, 
which makes possible the 
dynamic presentation of evil 
as an active force, is 
Christian.” But is Othello 
intended to show the struggle 
of good and evil, as Dr Greer 
says, or the unfolding of 
Satan’s designs in the world? 
To a certain degree. Dr Greer 
seems to want to enlist Shake- 
speare as our contemporary, 
and to forget what divides him 


A 



Young Writers 

COMPETITION 
There are ten days lefffi* 
entries to the J986 
Times/Jonathan Cape Young 
Writers’ Competition. Five of 
last year's winners are set for 
publication. This year’s com- 
petition puts the emphasis on 
non-fiction. Entries by unpub- 
lished writes under JO. to 
Jonathan Cape by 31st March. 


Mr Pouting is highly intelli- 
gent, and arguerlus case wed 
His book makes ope regret ltis 
foolish arrogance in deciding' - 
to leak information about the 
Betgrano in the hope of dam- - 
a g in g the Government he 
served He could have done 
important work as a reforming 
Civil Servant if he had not 
been so vain. 

It is no revelation that most 
politicians are ■ more . con- 
cerned with winning elections 
and their own positions than 
with honesty and the good of 
the country. The Crossman 
and Castle diaries are littered 
with examples freely quoted 
here. 

It is not generally in the 
nature of politicians to think 


An uncivil 
servant 
sounds off 

Woodrow Wyatt 

WHITEHALL 
Tragedy & Farce 


TERESA WAUGH 

WATERLOO 

M&T1RIL@<§ 

I 'Some gloriously funny moments’ - 

I Jeanette Winterson, SundayTimes 

I Teresa Waugh knows about the cruelty of 

I petty human wickedness and she made 

I me cry.’ 

I Jane Gardam, Books and Bookmen 

I ‘A beautifully observed tragi-comedy* 

I . Peter Grosvenor, Daily Express 

| III hamish hamilton £9,95 


By Clive Ponti ; 

Hamish Hamilton, £9.95 


beyond the next election; in 
this dereliction of duty they . 
are encouraged by the elector- 
ate. Universal suffrage mili- 
tates against good 
l government; but it remains 
preferable to dictatorship. 

Almost worse than the ve- 
nality of politicians is tire 
complacency of the Civil Ser- 
vice. Its senior members are 
chosen because they have the 
education and outlook of 
nin eteenth-century gentle- 
men. They despise commerce 
and m anufa cturing — until 
they retire and get highly paid 
jobs because of their knowl- 
edge of the workings of Wbite- 
tiail, which is valualblc-to firms 
with government contracts. 
Civil Servants have no con- 
ception of business efficiency, 
and are indifferent to tire 
husbanding of public money. 
They would have been capable 
ofbeing District Cfcwnmisskm- 
ers and Governors in India 
before the war, but are useless 
at cutting out waste in tire 
complexities of modern gov- 
ernment. Nor do they want to 
cut it out, hiding behind 
thickets of bureaucratic resis- 
tance to change. 

Lord Rayner made a few 
reforms, most of which have 
been successfully neutralized. 
“The Whitehall re- 

sponse follows a fairly predict- 
able sequence. The 
department win generally wel- 
come a report, argue that a 




detailed study. j$ required, and 
that set up a'oommittee to 
report on possible implemen- 
tation of the ' proposed 
changes. Those responsible for 
tire existing, criticized system 
will be well represented on tins 
committee and psychological- 
ly opposed to major changes. 
After a few months a report is 
produced saying that some, 
but not all, of the proposed 
changes should be workable 
but need further study." In the 
end the result is about zero. 

- All Civil Service reformers 
go the way ofLeslie Cha pman , 
author of Your Disobedient 
Servant, who unearthed ways 
in which almost countless 
millions could be saved by 
adopting methods common in 
business. But the powerful 
brains of the Qvil Service, 
good on paper but useless in 
practice, smother all attempts 
at modernization, and the 
most energetic of Prime Min- 
isters batters for it in vain. 
There are simply not enough 
hours in the week to cut 
through the thickets. 

We shall continue to be 
. served badly by our Civil 
Service until tire system of 
recruitment and training is 
radically altered. Arts degrees 
should disqualify. There 
should be an administrative 
and business staff college at 
winch prospective entrants 
should study for at least three 
years. We are not an empire 
any more, but a country that 
must live, on its commercial 
and industrial wits to survive. 

In the fashion of the day, 
and by indmaiion, Mr 
Pouting believes in the cura- 
tive properties of a Freedom 
of Information Act. Alas, 
those Civil Servants, aided by 
the politicians, would soon 
stultify that What is needed is 
not more information, of 
which there is a depressing 

S tity, but an entirely dif- 
t approach. 


IHE tunnels ofcu chi 


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From the author of The Bass Saxophone 
JOSEF SKVORECKY 

THE ENGINEER 
OF HUMAN SOULS 


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An entertainment on the 
old themes of life, 
women, fate, dreams, 
the working class, secret 
agents, love and death. 
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Paperback £3.95 
Arable now from bocksetlen 

mm 


from us. “As long as Shake- 
speare remains central to En- 
glish cultural life, it will retain 
the values that make it unique 
in the world, namely toler- 
ance, pluralism, a talent for 
viable compromise, and a 
commitment to that most 
wasteful form of social organi- 
zation, democracy." She 
might more accurately have 
written and a profound 
commitment to that most 
wasteful form of social organi- 
zation, the monarchy." 

F or indeed this is a 
sentimental view both 
of Shakespeare and of 
English cultural life. 
Had we been offered an 
extended treatment of what 
Shakespeare thought of the 
monarchy or of the role of the 
people in history, I suspect 
that the poet would have 
appeared very much less of a 
contemporary, and perhaps 
also less elusive in his thought. 
The difficulty is that, if you 
follow Dr Greer’s sound ad- 
vice in not confusing an 
opinion expressed by a charac- 
ter with a belief held by 
Shakespeare, you are in dan- 
ger, when trying to put togeth- 
er bis world view, of 
constructing no more than an ; 
Elizab e than Everyman. 

Still, it must be possible to ask 
of the plays whether their 
apparent ptiuosophy does not 
run against the current of 
contemporary belief, and sure- 
ly in the answers to such 
questions there is a way of 
deducing the existence of a 
thinking man. Does Hamlet 
subvert the literary form of 
revenge drama, or does it do 
more than that and attack the 
notion of revenge? Is the 
conception of kingship what 
one would expect from any 

conventionally-minded Eliza- 
bethan, or does it have its own 
originality and quirks? 

Dr Greer uses something of 
this approach in the section 
she Sociology, which 
Hicmiwc coutship, women 
and marriage, and which is 
presumably based on her doc- 
toral thesis. Her other catego- 
ries are Poetics, Ethics, 
Politics, and Teleology. The 
div i si o ns are strange and 
somelmes illuminating; but £ 
cannot help thinking that the 
methodology chosen has ham- 
pered the overall inquiry. 


Cracking the code 
of hidden shoals 


One of the many pleasures of 
the new le Carre is the depth 
and variety of the sub-text I 
particularly enjoyed poor Hal 
Tresider’s tie on page 442, the 
hotel where Jack Brotherhood 
Takes Tom for lunch on page 
166, and what 1 take to be the 
substitution of “Sugarloaf’ for 
“Plum Pudding" a page later. 
This is one particular code I 
can half crack, though I am 
not sure I read the message 
right. Or indeed whether there 
is a message or merely a 
diversionary tactic. 

I sense other threads and 
passages, not necessarily cen- 
tral to the theme, where 
special knowledge might 
heighten enjoyment if not 
improve one’s understanding. 
I’d like to know more about 
Grim-melhausen's 
Simplicissimus; and cricket on 
Cornu boarding houses in 
Bern; Dawlish. Perhaps if one 
had the key. they might all 
mean more than meets the 
eye. Perhaps: perhaps not. Le 
Carr* is brilliant at implying 
hidden depth and meanings. 
With some writers you know 
they mean only what they say, 
or even less. Le Carte manages 
to suggest the reverse. 

To call the book a thriller is 
misleading. Absorbing, al- 
ways; tlroiting , no. Magnus 
Pym, one of our men in 
Vienna, latterly Deputy Head 
of Station in Washington, goes 
home to bury his father, 
whom he loved and loathed, 
and then does a bunk. Pre- 
tends to catch the plane home, 
but goes instead to Miss 
Dubber’s Boarding House in a 
seedy South Devon seaside 
resort out of season. There he 
answers to the name of Mr 
Canterbury, and there he con- 
fronts his past the divided 
loyalties, the secrets, the be- 
trayals, the father, the son. the 
wife, the surrogate fathers on 
both sides of the curtain. 
From Miss Dubber’s upper 
room he can “look down the 
gardens to the beach where the 
best pals ever had kicked a 
football from one end of the 
world to the Oder, and ridden 
their Harrods bicycles across 
the sea.” 


Miniaturist with a 
broad canvas 


A middle-aged Englishman, 
writing a gride to Florence, is 
lured into conversation with a 
fellow guest at his pensions. 
Nothing wrong with that, yon 
say. Probably a welcome di- 
version, he being alone and 
t e n t a tive with women, she 
attractive yet disposed to flat- 
ter. His diffidence is no match 
for her unexplained and to him 
inexplicable desire for Ms- 
company; so the relationship 
graduates from impromptu 
drink in the hotel bar to 
dinner, after which he retne- 
tantiy accepts her suggestion 
of a meeting: co cktails at- 
Doney’s bar the next evening. 

He turns up, she does not. 
When he comes back a day 
later, thinking be may have 
misunderstood the arrange- 
ment, there b still no sign of 
her. He reports the matter to 
the hotel, who are mainly 
interested in seeing her bffl 
paid. Then he tells the local 
police, whose uncomplicated 
view of banian nature leads 
them to attribute her disap- 
pearance first to'Sex and then, 
with equal conviction, to vio- 
lence. ’ The man returns to 
Dooey’s every evening — to 
mourn her as a lover might, 
but only there because he b 
certain she b dead, and hence 
unable to return to make any 
further demands on him. 

The reader of “Cocktafls at 
Doney’s", one of the 12 short 
stories that comprise The 
News from Ireland, has no 
such confidence in the 
woman's fate. Indeed the story 
co Deludes with the observation 
just quoted. William Trevor b 
said to regard his late& collec- 
tion as relatively undemand- 
ing, even conventional, 
perhaps they are, hot the 
writer's admirers will recog- 
nize the force of the qualifier. 

It isn't easy to pin down Mr 
Trevor’s genius. To cafl him a 
miniaturist b to give a mis- 
leading impression of the ! 
Ireadm of his canvas. For 
example, although most of 
these stories are set in his 
native Ireland, the message of 
the whole coDection b that he 
is just as comfortable in a 
Tuscan setting - or even in the 
suburbs of London. Similarly, 
although he is clearly fascinat- 
ed by genteel poverty and has 
a weakness for rommerrial 
travellers, his dass base is 
actually quite broad for a 
writer of his type. He b a uosy 

as well as a knowing writer, 
and tiie care that goes into the 
construction of bis stories is 
matched by a prose style as 
easy as it b economical. It 
would be difficult to think of 
better qualifications for a writ- 
er of short stories. 

“Peter Dunaut" b a pseud- 
onym that hides the identity ol 
a newffeh) duo of political 
thriller writers. Osmond and 
Hurd they may not be, but 
they do have a nice line in die 


FICTION 


John Nicholson 

THE NEWS FROM 
IRELAND 
By William Trevor 

TheBodley Head. £9.95 

INTENSIVE CARE 

By Peter Dunant 

Anari Deutsch. £8. 95 

THE PERSONALITY 

SURGEON I 

By Colin Wilson J 

New English Library, £10.95 | 


kind of yarn in which a decent 
young English couple (he a 
personnel manager, _ she a 
semi-professional leftie) inad- 
vertently uncover the 
riUainoaa machinations of a 
sinister foreign intelligence 
service (here, topically, 
BOSS), and overcome initial 
mutual distaste white solving a 
riddle that has baffled the 
police of two continents, etc. 

The hero of CoKn Wilson's 
The Personality Surgeon b a 
less enga g in g figure - a GP 
turned psychologist after 
stumbling on a device that 
enables him to solve at a 
stroke (all high tech, no pain) 
the problems of depression 
and lack of self-confidence. 
Not surprisingly, be finds 
himself much in demand, espe- 
cially by a modisbly takeover- 
oriented entrepreneur who 
wants help, not only in assess- 
ing the personality of rival 
tycoons, but also in transform- 
ing his sou from juvenile 
delinquent into chess champi- 
on. Easy Peasy, says the 
obliging doc — and does it for a 
paltiy £30.000 a year, plus 
running costs. But the gbmo 
isn't up to much, and the whole 
thing’s really pretty dotty. 


That’s all very well; but the 
life he left behind is more than 
a memory to those who are left 
in it The Finn .are in Vienna 
before you can say “Double 
Agent”. Old Jack Brother-., 
hood, who took him on all 
those years bode when he first 
met Axel at Herr Ollmger’K 
Jack's in charge. Jack interro- 
gates the wife, goes to the prep 
school and does the same with 
the boy. All very civilized, but 
inexorable and ruthless under 
the bluff veneer. You can't 
.escape from the Firm — it’s a 
life nembership. Magnus 
knows he can’t, any more than 
he can escape from Rick, the 
conman father with his 
“Lovelies" and his 
“Neverwozzer” racehorses 
and his Bentleys and his spells 
in clink. Not even after the 
cremation. 

One forgets sometimes what 
a spare, terse writer le Carte 


Tim Heald g 

A PERFECT SPY * 
By John le Carte ~ 

H odder A Stoughton, £10-9% 

used to be. His first novit 
originally published as Callj\ 
the Dead, and later filmed w 
reissued as The Deadly Affai 
is a mere 156 pages in paps 
back. It was not an outstan 
ing success (“One of the mo 
promising of newcomers. 
Another Daily Newspap*?: 
and it was not until The' Si 
Who Came in from the CoC 
his third book, that the supe 
latives really started to ffov 
Graham Greene said that ’ 
was “the best spy story I ha’ 

' ever read." The Spy was 
an enormously long bod 
either. i 

One forgets also that Cc, 
for the Dead began and ends, 
with Smiley. “Short, fat, arr 
of a quiet disposition. 1 
appeared to spend a lot * 
money on really bad clothe 
which hung about his squi 
frame like a skin on a shrunJ 
en toad." He played a sma 
part in The Spy, but it wi 
almost 1 5 years before le Can 
gave him his own trilogy and 
second wind for both of then 
Just before doing that le Can 
wrote The Naive and Sent 
mental Lover, which wj 
widely regarded as a disa: 
irons attempt to shift genre 
and write somethin 
“serious”. The paradox w; 
that the Smiley trilogy, despil 
being dismissively pigeoi 
holed into this “thriller" slo 
ended up getting moi 
“serious" attention and eve 
“acclaim" (that's the modis 
blurb word) than The Lover. 

The success became, i 
course, a bit of a trap. Le Carti 
must have longed to pu 
Smiley into a barrel and ro 
him over the Reichenbach. H 
had created a character fa 
better known than himsel: 
and a style of book that peopl 
came to expect My hunch i 
that the somewhat lukewair 
reception for The Little Drum 
mer Girl had more io do witi 
the fact that it was not anotbe 
Smiley, than with any failure 
in the book itself. Readers am 
f reviewers are far more conser 
“• vative than the natural indi 
nations of most writers. The; 
like their writers to get in : 
groove and stay there. Wha 
they want is Smiley Gets You 
Gun. Our Man Smiley, Smile, 
in Manila, and so on, at 
infinitum. 

Le Carre is plainly much tot 
restless, inventive, and ambi 
tious to do that But his earlie: 
attempts to break away frorr 
the past had not been success 
fill. It is a problem — £ 
problem created by success 
but still a problem for all that 

More than anyone now 
■ writing le Carte transcends the 
idea of genre. This book meek 
many of the criteria you wil 
find on Booker shortlists. . 


Past Masters 
are the people whose 
ideas have made 
history. 


AUGUSTINE 

Henry Chadwick 


NEW! 

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Germaine Greer 


GOING HOME 

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Shakespeare. Augustine. Aristotle. Newman. 
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THE TIMES 
DIARY 


k different 


proposition 


.'olio Han-Levenon, the judge 


•ho successfully appealed against 
conviction for kerb-crawling. 


conviction for kerb-crawling, 
ras not always so critical of the 
olice. He told Knightsbridge 
'rown Court this week that police 
lad lied about his so-called propo- 
itioning of three girls in a hire car 
o Bays water and bis counsel 
sked if it was credible that a judge 
vould have made confessions 
jven his experience in criminal 
natters. He was awarded costs 
sri mated at £40,000. Four years 
go, addressing a Police Federa- 
ion seminar at Wad ham College, 
)xford. he said: “The acquittal 
ate in the crown court can be 60, 
'0. and in some cases 75 per cent 
7o the police really arrest 75 per 
ent of the wrong people?. . . 
Unfortunately, there is a tendency , 
hese day’s for juries no longer to 
onvict on the uncorroborated 
vidence of police officers. That is 
ad. Two police officers get an 
dmission out of the defendant It 
.oes into their notebook, but over 
.nd over again today juries will 
iol accept it Thai's a fact of life." 
4o doubt even judges sometimes 
iave cause :o change their minds. 


Stepping out 

"he Princess of Wales had another 
amily engagement to celebrate 
■esrenday besides that of Prince 
Andrew and ‘‘Fergie’’: pop im- 
rresario Patrick Anderson rang 
ne in a state of great excitement to 
ay he had just become engaged to 


Yincess Di’s step-cousin , Sally 
*lcK.el vie- Paine. Certainly her n- 


«4cK.el vie- Paine. Certainly her ti- 
mes seems a more, shall we say 
olourful, character than Prince 
Andrew. "I am a soldier of fortune 
md a self-made man. I have been 
lisinherited and reinherited." His 
-laims to fame include organizing 
he Rolling Stones* tour of Latin 
Vm erica and being involved in the 
iboritive kidnap in Brazil of great 
rain robber Ronald Biggs. 


Paper tiger? 


•f a Sunday Times or a Timer 
oumaiist figures in this year's 
British Press Awards in May (and 
»me may say dream on), the 
iccolade could meet with a deaf- 
ening silence: presenting the gongs 
it the televized beano will be the 
■nan who is still trying to impose 
lis ludicrous ban on the Labour 


?any talking to anyone on Rupert 
Murdoch’s titles: Neil Kionock. 


Cautionary 


Cleveland's police magazine re- 
sorts the tribulations of one eager 
►'dung constable giving evidence 
or the first time in a magistrates 
:ourL Stepping into the witness 
x>x he took the Bible in his right 
land and declaimed: “You are not 
obliged to say anything if you do 
ioi wish to do so, but whatever 
y ou do say will be taken down in 
writing and may be used in 
vidence ..." The chairman of 
the bench responded: "Now you 
iiave cautioned the entire court, 
v ould you like to take the oath?” 


Vanessa veto 


Vanessa Redgrave’s call for an 
actors’ boycott of Israel (Diary, 
yesterday) will not now be debated 
at Equity's annual meeting. Mem- 
bers have just voted in a referen- 
dum against getting involved in 
matters politicaL Marius Goring 
told me too much time had been 
wasted in the past getting bogged 
down in political issues. “She can 
submit her motion, but nobody 
will discuss it or vote on it," he 
said. Perhaps Miss R will now get 
bogged down in some acting. 


Wrong party 


Charles Irving, wet Tory MP for 
Cheltenham, has just found him- 
self starring in an advert in the 
local freesheet for the Alliance 
advice centre. Instead of a picture 
of Richard Holme, the local 
Liberal candidate and former 
party president, Irving's mug ap- 
peared . 


BARRY FANTONI 

bctin» §D-fl©P 




Terrible. I bet against 
a royal announcement and for 
a higher tax on spirits’ 


Prophet taking 


Small wonder David Steel did a 
double take during the 
Chancellor's speech. Denouncing 
the level of pay in relation to 
productivity and the rigidity of the 
pay system, Nigel Lawson sug- 
gested; “One way out of this might 
be to move to a system in which a 
significant proportion of an 
employee's renumeration depends 
directly on the company's profit- 
ability per person employed. 
Couldn’t have put it better myself, 
old boy, thought Steel. In his book. 
Partners in One Nation, published 
earlier this year, Steel wrote “A 
substantial part of the average 
person's take home pay should be 
expressed not as a regular wage but 
as a share of profit earned or value 
added in the company to which be 
or she has contributed. PHS 


not wholly distinct, in reality or in 
perception, from spouse, family 
and children. The family unit, not 
excluding the sovereign’s, is a 
human reality, applied to which 
constitutional dogma begins tb 
falter. 

Ministerial advice and respon- 
sibility is limited to the words and 
acts of the sovereign. It is to the 
sovereign only that responsible 


Paris 

Ten years ago Jacques Chirac, 
then aged 43, became the first 
prime minister under the Fifth 
Republic to resign voluntarily. If 
he could not “cohabit" with 
President Giscard d’Estaing, like 
himself a man of the right, how 
can he possibly do so — it is now 
being asked — with the Socialist 
Francois Mitterrand? 

In private, Chirac does not seek 
to hide his dislike of Mitterrand. 
“He is a man for whom I have 
absolutely no respect and 
sympathy," he insists. Not even 
for Mitterrand the political ani- 
mal. the Machiavellian Prince, the 
sphinx, ever able to catch his 
opponents by surprise? “No. He is 
a man who believes that the ends 
justify the means, and that I 
cannot tolerate." 

Mitterrand and Chirac in fact 
have several characteristics in 
common. Both rule their parties 
with an authoritarian, not to say 
monarchical, hand. Both expect, 
and attract complete loyalty and 
devotion from their immediate 
followers. Both are used to being 
obeyed without question, and 
intensely dislike being crossed or 
criticized. Both greatly enjoy the 
exercise of power. 

It would not seem that those are 
the best qualifications to ensure a 
peaceful cohabitation. But the two 
have a common interest at least in 
the short term, in making the 
experiment work. Neither wants 
to give Raymond Bane, chief rival 
to both for the presidency in 1988, 
the satisfaction of seeing his 
predictions of constitutional crisis 
under a government of cohabita- 
tion come true. 

Over the past few weeks both 
Mitterrand and Chirac have 
adopted a markedly moderate and 
conciliatory tone when speaking 
of the prospects of cohabitation. 
They point to the inherent flexibil- 
ity of the constitution and insist 
that all will be well if both sides 
scrupulously "respect the 
institutions" and “put the na- 
tional interest above ail else". 

“We shall not give our fellow 
citizens the spectacle of a France 
which has suddenly become un- 
governable; we shall not give our 
partners abroad the spectacle of a 
country which does not know how 
to accept a change of par- 
liamentary majority," Chirac said 
recently. However, both he and 
Mitterrand pass over in conve- 
nient silence the feet that the 
institutions of the Fifth Republic 
have never before been submitted 
to the strains and tensions caused 


by a president of one party trying 
to govern with a prime minister of 


to govern with a prime minister of 
an opposing party. The constitu- 
tion is ambiguous on many points. 
What exactly does “respecting the 
institutions" mean and who is to 
decide what constitutes the na- 
tional interest? 


Resignation over 
the same issue 


Long before the election Chirac 
made it clear that he expected the 
new right-wing prime minister to 
assume in full the considerable 
powers given to him under the 
constitution, but which the presi- 
dent had always exercised. “The 
day that the president is no longer 
head of the majority in par- 
liament, he loses his power." 

Mitterrand, for bis part, has 
made it equally clear that he does 
not mean to give up all his powers 
and become a mere "constitu- 
tional monarch", his duties con- 
fined to the cereroonfel. As he 
reiterated in his televized address 
to the nation on Monday night 
when the election results had 
become known, he intends “to 
defend everywhere, at home and 
abroad, our liberties and our 
independence, our involvement in 
Europe and our place in the 
world”. 

Chirac’s previous attempt to i 
work under an authoritarian presi- 
dent ended after two years because 
of a clash over the very issue that 
is likely to cause some of the 
greatest problems now - the di- 
vision of power between the 
president and his prime minister. 
In his resignation statement, 
Chirac explained: “I do not have 
all the means I believe necessary 
to fulfil effectively the functions of 
prime minister.” But that was 10 


years ago. 

Chirac was bom at the end of 


November 1932, the only son of a 
prosperous Paris businessman and 




THE TIMES THURSDAY MARCH 20 1985 


That the ultimate source of all 
lawful authority in the United 
Kingdom is accepted by its people 
(commonly called "the British") 
as vested in a human individual is 
part of their singular good fortune, 
it is an arrangement which imbues 
the exercise of government with 
characteristics - personality, 
symbolism and mystique - 
which, if not indispensable to the 
successful governance of a society, 
are highly valuable. 

We owe our continued pos- 
session of this advantage, unique 
in the world, to a contrivance 
which even the political genius of 
the English - yes. 1 did say “the 
English” - needed a couple of 
centuries and the help of a civil 
war and a revolution to perfect. 

Baldly- stated, the contrivance is 
simplicity itself. All political 
words and acts of the sovereign 
are — which means must be - 
covered by the sole advice of the 
sovereign’s chief minister; and the 
question which words and acts are 
for this purpose political and 
which are not, is itself resolved 
upon the same advice, express or 
tacit. 

The feet, however, that the 
sovereign is human and not 
abstract places the plain constitu- 
tional principle in a setting where 
its edges are blurred. The sov- 
ereign, like any other person, is 


As Britain celebrates Prince Andrew ? s 
engage ment, J: Enoch Powell reflects os the 
responsibilities of the monarch’s family 



i Hi i 





Mn§ 


H- 

U 


advice is tendered. This cannot 
mean, however, that the 
sovereign’s consort, for example, 
can wisely speak or act exactly like 
a private individual. I think 
sufficient time has elapsed for me 
to record without impropriety that 
in 1952 I remonstrated with 
Winston Churchill, the prime 
minister, against the consort 
attending a debate in the House ef 
Commons, upon the principle 
established a century earlier that 
there ought not to be even the 
appearance of the sentiment of her 
Commons being conveyed to the 
Queen through any channel other 
than her ministers. Despite a 
sharp exchange with the chief 
whip, the remonstrance was ac- 
cepted. 

It is a matter of the most 
delicate judgement. How far 
might the constitutional integrity 
of the monarch’s position appear 
to be diminished by words and 
acts, political or personal, of 


members of the monarch's femily 


through all the degrees of propin- 
quity tiom spouse and heir appar- 
ent to other children and yet ctirer 
relations further removed? 

Gf ministerial advice and 
responsibility there can be no 
question. Neither through the 
sovereign nor directly can respon- 
sible advice be tendered. The 
attempt to do so would be rightly 
and indignantly repudiated, 
though not all communications 
infce place in circumstances which 
raise the possibility of their being 
misunderstood as an illicit exten- 
sion of the constitutional right and 
duty to advise the sovereign. 

Beyond that exceedingly deli- 
cate and difficult exception, the 
nation has to depend upon the 
good sense and trained instinct of 
the persons concerned, both in- 
dividually and collectively. 

I add the words “and 
collectively" because in ail fam- 
ilies influence is exerted by the 


Diana Geddes profiles France’s new prime 
minister and looks at his prospects 
of Hiving harmonioissiy with Mitterrand 


win <umrac 
this time stay 
the course? 




puss 








mmm 




the grandson of a primary school 
teacher from the Correze. His 
childhood was divided between 
top high schools in the capiicl 
(Carnot and Louis Ie Grand) and 
carefree holidays at bis 
grandparents' home in (be heart of 
rural France, with which he has 
never lost his close connections. 
He still feels at home in the farms 
of the Correze, chatting with the 
peasant companions of his youth. 

At school he was not considered 
particularly brilliant, preferring to 
pass his lime playing with his 
fellow Scouts or flirting with girls 
in ihe Pare Monceau. He even 
secretly signed up for cordon bleu 
cookery classes outside school at 
the age of 15. learning to cook 
some of the dishes that still remain 
his favourite — reie de vean. tripe 
au safran, pigeon aux petits pais. 

His school reports of the time 
were not complimentary: 
“ Sympathise , but much too 
inattentive’’; “Could do better 
with a little reflection"; “Too 
talkative, too distracted, too excit- 
able to succeed’’. He nevertheless 
managed to get sufficiently good 
marks in his baccslaureat to get 
into the elite "Science-PO" ic read 
political science and economics. 

But before settling down to 
serious study he went m search of 
adventure, signing up for the 
summer holidays of 1 950 as a crew 
member on a cargo ship visiting 
the ports of North Africa. His 
feliow sailors were quick to in- 
troduce him to the pleasures of the 
Cos bah. 

At Science-PO Chirac suddenly 
showed a bent for hard work and 
application and began gening 
excellent marks. Although he bad 
enrolled on the spur of the 
moment for the GauJiist party at 
the age of 14, he had never shown 
any real interest in politics, and at 
Science-PO found most of his 
fellow students too conservative 


and conformist. The only poli- 
tician for whom he showed any 
admiration at the time was the 
left-wing Pierre .Wendes-France. 

In the summer of 1953 he took 
off again in search of adventure, 
this time to the United States, 
where he paid his way through 
Harvard summer school by work- 
ing as a waiter. After an unsuccess- 
ful engagement to the daughter of 
a rich American from South 
Carolina he became a chauffeur to 
the widow of a Texan oil magnate, 
with whom he drove all over the 
country. 

On his return to Paris he soon 
got engaged again, this time to a 
fellow Science-PO student, Berna- 
dette De Courcel. a member of an 
old French aristocratic family. 
They married two years Ja:er and 
have two daughters', Laurence. 2S. 
a doctor, and Claude, 23, who is 
studying economics. Both have 
been kept well out of the politics! 
spotlight. 

Chirac graduated third in his 
class from Scieftce-PO. He was 
automatically considered a likely 
candidate for £Na. the leading 
post-graduate institute in France 
and the sine qua non for any- 
aspiring civil servant. But before 
that he had to do his military 
service. After a year at ibe officers’ 
training school at Saumur he was 
apparently told he could not be 
made a major, although he had 
high enough marks. At the age of 
17 he had signed a peace mani- 
festo against nuclear arms which, 
unknown to him, had been or- 
ganized by the communists. 

So he set off as e humble sub- 
lieutenant in f 956 to fight in the 
Algerian civil war. He enjoyed it. 
“For me. Algeria was the mosi 
fascinating period of my life.’* he 
wrote later. He was tempted by the 
idea of a career in the army, but Fi- 
nally returned to Paris, albeit 


members upon one another, for 
good or ill. and in this respect the 
sovereign’s family cannot be dif- 
ferent . From what is visible to an 
outside observer those influences 
would appear to have operated, 
more beneficially during the 
present reign than history records 
under Former monarchs whose 
services to the nation in other 
respects v.ere pre-eminent 

Our monarchy and its unique 
constitutional position are the 
counterpart of certain equally 
unique qualities and characteris- 
tics of the people. There is a 
reciprocity between the two. To a 
much higher degree than for a 
political lender (whose function is 
always to some extent to be a 
faction fighter), the business of a 
British sovereign, and by exten- 
sion the business of the British 
Rovat Family, is to understand the 
British. 


They are a people, as you may 
observe any day in their most 
characteristic institution, the 
House cf Commons, capable of 
combining — you could say. need- 
ing to combine — robust egalitari- 
anism with devotion to estab- 
lished modes and manners. It is a 
combination which Bagehci at- 
tempted to pinpoint.by hisfemous 
and much misunderstood word 
“deference"; and deference de- 
pends or. difference. 


To appraise this baffling double 
character of their people wuh tea 
and accuracy is the only rule upon 
which tite sovereign and her 
family car. ultimately rely for 
living with the paradox that lies at 
the heart of a constitutional 
hereditary' monarchy. 


0 Times Newspapers, i9ca 


somewhat reluctantly to start his 
studies at ENA. 

On graduation in 1959 he 
returned for nine months to 


Algeria, then still in French hands, 
to w ork as the directeur du cabinet 


jgriculturc minister 


Algeria. Back in France he worked 
without enthusiasm for a time on 
the nation’s accounts at the Cour 
dcs Coir.ptes before getting the 
break in 1962 that was to change 
his tile — he was appointed charge 
de mission in the Cabinet of the 
new G&uilist prime minister, 
Georges Pompidou, where began 
the one totaiiy devoted and loyal 
political relationship of his life, to 
this day Pompidou remains his 
only political “hero". 

He is vividly remembered by 
colleagues in Pompidou's cabinet 
for hi s good looks, non-oon- 
formism. his indefatigable capac- 
ity for hard work and his 
formidable memory. He seemed 
larger than life, slamming doors, 
shaking hands, kissing secretaries. 
“He was iike a firework. He took 
off from all sides - his arms, his 
legs, his ideas," one former col- 
league said. 


‘He will go far 1 
said Giscard 


By the age of 34 Chirac bad-been 
elected Gaullisi deputy in the 
Socialist stronghold in the Correze 
and had been given his first 
government post as junior min- 
ister for employment. The follow- 
ing year, 1968, he was moved to 
finance, where he became junior 
minister to another rapidly rising 
young politician. Giscard 
d'Estaing. Chirac was. and still is, 
fascinated by Giscard’s intellec- 
tual powers. Giscard was im- 
pressed by Chirac’s dynamism 
and sense of discipline. “He’s a 
minister who will go far; he’ll 
replace me one day," he said path 
more prescience than he knew. 

On President Pompidou’s death 
' six years later, Chirac backed 
Giscard for the presidency against 
his former prime minister, Jac- 
ques Chahan-Delmas. He was 
rewarded by being made, at the 
age of 41, Giscard’s first prime 
minister. But it was to be a short- 
lived idyll. The two men soon 
started manoeuvring against each 
ether, distrust and bitterness grew 
up. and by the summer of 1976 
Chirac had quit. He soon set about 
creating his own power base, 
remodelling the GauUist DDR 
party into his own 
Rassemblement Pour la 
P.cpublique and getting himself 
elected mayor of Paris. 

In the 1981 presidential elec- 
tions Chirac ran against Giscard 
and was publicly denounced by his 
former boss for “premeditated 
betrayal". However . that has all 
been conveniently forgotten now. 
in the interests of forming an 
alliance against Raymond Barre in 
the two years to the presidential 
election. For Chirac, the prime 
minister’s office, which he insists 
he did not really want, is simply a 
stepping-stone to that ultimate 
goal. 

Chirac’s early life is interesting 
because all his present characteris- 
tics were already there — seduc- 
tive charm, dynamism, infectious 
zest for life, quick intelligence. He 
is often likened to a dashing 
ca'alry officer — impulsive, 
colourful but perhaps a bn of a 
lightweight, lacking in substance 
and sober reflection. His critics 
accuse him cf being without 
conviction or ideals and of chang- 
ing lack with every shift in the 
political wind. He has neverthe- 
less proved a first-class admin- 
istrator of Paris over the past nine 
years. 

After being in front of the othcT 
right-wing politicians in the opin- 
ion pells during the first three 
years of the Socialist government. 
Chirac’s popularity suddenly be- 
gan to slump and in raid-1984 he 
was overtaken by Barre. A new 
team of image makers were hur- 
riedly brought in lo try to bring 
out the "reaT Chirac ihe caring,' 
warm-hearted boss; the cultured 
lover of Chinese poetry and 
modem arc the moderate and 
responsible statesman. The se- 
vere, bfeck-rimmed spectacles 
were changed for softer tortoise- . 
shells: ihe three-piece suits were 
banished; Chirac was told to slow 
down, to relax, to snsile mere 
frequently on television, to be less 
aggressive and demagogic. 

it has been a partial success, but 
the other Chirac is still there. - 


Ronald Butt 


Capitalism with 


humane face 


Nigel Lawson is right to believe 
that capitalism canlje popular and 
to act on that assumption in a. 
Budget which has the hallmark; of 
a politician who has. total convic- 
tion ic what he is doing. The kind 
cf quasi-sDcialisre under, which 
the economy has for so long been 
managed and socialist state wel- 
fare administered has failed to 
deliver a. stable and acceptable 
society, and can now, provided the 
change has public support,.- be 
replaced by something better. ' 

The outstanding characteristic 
of the Budget is its combination of 
honesty and confidence. Its hon- 
esty is symbolized by the decision - 
to accept that the loss of oil 
revenue makes the intended tax 
cuts impracticable aud io hold to a 
public sector borrowing require- 
ment of only £7 billion, margin- 
ally tighter than last year's figure. 

the Budget is quite properly 
built on the understanding {to 
which the history of recent de- 
cades is a testimony) that the 
plight from which the nation is 
now being extricated, and -above 
all the present , level of unemploy- 
ment, is the direct consequence of 
inflation. It follows that it would 
be no service to the unemployed 
for the government to bid for 
popularity with , tax cuts which 
undermined confidence in the 
anti-inflation policy and therefore 
put industrial recovery at risk. 

It is on confidence in the anti- 
inflation policy that sustaining the 
fell in interest rates, which is so 
badly needed by industry and 
which began- yesterday, will de- 
pend. This is of greater im- 
portance to job prospects than 
Lawson’s direct assistance to 
employment through the 
improvements in the job-creation 
programme and the assistance to 
the growth of small businesses 
provided through the abolition of 
the lifetime capital transfer tax. 

The sustained anti-inflation 
policy and a lasting recovery in 
employment are, indeed, the pre- 
conditions for the success of 
“popular capitalism."' The idea 
that capitalism can be popular is 
enough to set the Labour Party 
jeering, but there is evidence 
enough of its potential popularity 
from Labour’s own pohey-wrig- 
giing, for instance, over workers’ 
ownership of denationalized 
shares, and council house safes. 

Vv'nai the public is beginning 10 
understand that it can have, and is 
therefore begin] ng to want is a ' 
proper share of ownership in the 
rapidly advancing prosperity of a 
new technology-based democracy; 
a partnership of shared interest . 
between management and work- 
ers; and the satisfaction of greater 
individual responsibility in place 
of subjugation to a so-called' 
collective wifi which is actially 
exercised either by bureaucrats or 
caucuses of over-mighty union 
officials. 

Lawson’s plan for discussions 
on a scheme for profit-sharing 
related to remuneration ' could 
make a radical contribution to this 
change if it can be brought to 
fruition. If a significant proportion 
of remuneration depended on: a 


company’s profitability ft would 
diminish the rigidity of wag? costs 
which now often militates agamsi 
jobs. It 'would inean that when 
business was slack, companies 

would be under less pressure to ay 

employees off. Equally. Rowing 
they had this safeguard Utey 
would be keener to take people on 

when prospects were better. 

But above all such a negotiated 
scheme would make employe® 
much more conscious cf the 
importance of their work for the 
prosperity of their company in 
which aB would automatically 
share. Meanwhile, ihe personal 
cqitity plan, enabling smaH savers 
to invest, free of income and 
capital gains lax, is a valuable 
' incentive to ownership, j 

The promotion of a society of 
responsible individuals is also 

helped by ' the important tax 

incentives, for donations by 

companies and individuals to 

charities; The dangers of depen- 
dency on the' vagaries of state 
funding, and the chilliness of 
bureauicratic provision become 
increasingly apparent. 

Bat one major dilemma re- 
mains after the Budget Reducing 
the tax burden to produce a 
responsible society of popular 
capitation must be right But the 
heavy hand of state monopoly in 
many ^arcas cannot be quickly 
lifted. Motions wiQ remain depen- 
dent on services financed by a 
Treasury wh ic h has other than 
their interests to consider. 

There is great and growing 
discontent with the quality of 
many of these services, notably 
the hospitals • and education. In 
programme after programme on 
television, these shortcomings are 
befog rammed home in a manner 
plainly intended to leave no doubt 
of the government's culpability, 
with little if any r e ferenc e to the 
needs of the economy. In his -next 
Budget Lawson has his sights set 
‘ on cutting /tbs standard rate of 
income tax to 25 per cent But the 
concept of popular capitalism 
could be endangered if (lie grow- 
ing outcry over she' state of these 
services goes unheeded and all 
preference goes to tax reduction. 

There is no problem in principle 
about winning' the public to 
popular and responsible capital- 
ism. The question is simply how 
to get there from where wenow are 
without disregarding the general 
sense of- responsibility for the 
quality of these services. 

In the long tuivffie answer must 
be to reshape spaa! spending so as 
toL concentrate resources on. the 
essent&l, and hitting . otic .the 
inessential, which the government 
bas so fer faded to do. But that 
takes time, and a year is not long 
for _ the Chancellor and his col- 
leagues to confront the problem. 
They must understand that the 
public may welcome the removal 
of functions from the state, but 
that the deterioration of vital 
functions in services of which the 
state cannot divest itself will not 
easily be tolerated. To be popular, 
capitalism has to be at least as 
humane as our dilapidated siat- 
ism, and preferable more so. 


moreover , . . Miles Kington 

Have group. 


I “And next bn Radio Roundup we 
have Matt Forelock, who is the 
representative of New Zealand 
Actors for Pressure Croups. I 
must say at the outset. Matt, that 
this is not a group I have ever 
heard of before." . 

“No. it was only . formed last 
week." : 

“And it’s not very clear from tire 
title what it actually does. Can you 
tell us something about the work 
of New Zealand Actors for ..Pres-' 
sure Groups?""'-' 

"Certainty. There are quite a few of 

us New Zealand actors over here in 
the UK. but unfortunately there 
aren 't many New Zealand parts in 
plays. What this means is that we 
don 7 work all the time . " 

“I’m with you so fer." 

“Ott the other hand, we’ve noticed 
that an enormous amount of air 
time is taken up by spokesmen for 
pressure groups, and frankly they 
don’t impress us very much as 


now. made those three points three 
times, and I’U make them again if 
you don’t stop me.” 

“WelV thank you Matt Forelock. 
And from exotic actors we. move 
on to exotic blooms, because it is 
said that if plans for the Channel 
Tunnel go ahead, construction 
work wifi destroy the last colony of 
cucumber orchids in Pnm 


— -wj Wivuwiwtuil) Ul 

cucumber orchids in Europe. To 
tell us more about this rare flower, 
we have in the studio a repre- 
sentative of Kent Flower Heritage. 
' and your name is . . ?” 

“Matt Forelock. " 

“Good heavens, it’s you again. 
What do you know about cucum- 
ber orchids. Matt?" 

Sit!*!! 1 They are extremely 
™[ e and valuable. Building ihe 
Channel Tunnel would kill them. 
It would be easier to move the 
than move the flowers. *• 
JSrSP' saying that the 

^ or ** 111111161 Should 
^nged just for a bunch of 

l L arrL V you' 4ont ask 
y , ou expect you’ll 
** Mything- But these 
1 %i ld rt, are priceless. 

ISLPV 1 . T unnel a overv 
b ^ asno1 priceless. H > 
nave to retain some sense of 
priorities. There. I’ve made 
three points again.” Me y 

M Do you honestly believe what 

yotfre saying?" 

4£a C ' T m an out-of-work New 

2£5J« «*• lam saying? y 
ffywtf noticed ” 

Pr °' 

res. Five tirHor. 


spokesmen for their cause. We 
think we could do it far better — 


think we could do it far better — 
and it would be good acting work 
for us." 

"Could you give us an example?" 
''Certainly; On Saturday l ap- 
peared on TV as spokesman for 
Hands Qff Oxfordshire, an ami- 
motorway group. / spoke pas- 
sionately against the t hreat of the 
motor car. On Sunday I appeared 
as spokesman for the road lobby 


and spoke eloquently in favour of 
criss-crossing Oxfordshire with 
roads. Both sides agreed their case 
had never been denier put. “ 
“Don’t, you feel there is some 
conflict of interest here?" 

"Not at all Both sides. have a good 
case. Why shouldn V they be put by 
the same person?".. 

“Couldn’t it be better put by an 
expert,- someone who has worked 
for the pressure- group for some 
time and knows the subjects 


"Not really. You often find that 
experts are oyer-informed and get 
bogged down in detail. They make 
unimpressive spokesmen, whereas 
a New Zealand actor,- starving but 


intelligent, will get the three essen- 
tial points. and repeat, them over- 
and over again.. For- instance. .1 
have mode three points: that, we are 
New. Zealand actors,' that we ars 
but cf work, andtfim.we should be 
employed ' as spokesmen?, I have . 




aciujfy™ 8r ?^P » 


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label woulf^ke 

Mguing and mi m ‘ 

pr °8rammes. And it more 


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THE TIMES THURSDAY MARCH 20 1986 



LETTERS TO THE EDITOR 



Pennington Street, London El 9XN Telephone: 01-481 4100 


PoMic pleasure at the engage- 
ment of Prince Andrew and 
Miss Sarah Ferguson has been 
widespread and unaffected. 

Royal eng agem ents naturally 
arouse warm emotions in the 
British public. But the rejoio 
mg on this occasion is largely 
free of constitutional consid- 
erations. The Prince is fourth 
in line , to the throne .and it' 
would not be surprising if he 
were further demoted by fu- 
ture royal births. 

It " is almost wholly 
prompted by sentiment, not 
least the enduring affection of. 
the British people for the 
whole. Royal Family. It is a 
paradoxical affection in cer- 
tain respects since we admire 
them both for performing their 
duties so well and for. present- 
ing an image of normality to 
the world. A young English- 
woman, who works in,a Lon- 
don office yet who can trace 
her ancestry both to the 4th 
Duke of Devonshire and to 
Mrs Fitzherbert, fits into this 
pattern of elevated normalcy 


rather, more comfortably than 
would the most presentable 
foreign princess. 

The feet that constitutional 
necessity played little or no 
part in the match farther 
assures that public that it is 
truly a love match. Our in- 
terest in this may be imperti- 
nent, but it is inescapable. 
Dynastic marriages, however 
useful in settling the conflicts 
of fourteenth century England 
and eighteenth century Eu- 
rope, have rarely enjoyed 
popular esteem, while it is a 
troth universally acknowl- 
edged that all the world loves a 
lover. The evident happiness 
of Miss Ferguson under 
harrassing public attention 
proves the point 

Prince Andrew has not al- 
ways been so fortunate in the 
publicity he has attracted. Nor 
would many young lives, sub- 
jected to such intrusive scru- 
tiny, escape embarrassment 
But the public has seen in him 
— in bu courage as a naval 
pilot during the Falklands War 
and in his work for charity — a 


young man of charm, bravery 
and not a little dash. 

It like most young men, he 
would benefit from the love 
and complementary virtues of 
a sensible young woman, he 
seems to have found an ideal 
partner in Miss Ferguson. She 
is a level-headed and attractive 
young woman. In the face of 
sudden feme and the camera, 
she has shown a sturdy good 
temper that would be praise- 
worthy in someone educated 
bom birth to undertake a 
public rale. 

Upon their marriage, the 
young couple will be called 
upon to perform the secondary 
duties of royalty. Those duties 
can be exacting and always 
require qualities of endurance, 
patience, kindliness and good 
humour. Strengthened by the 
partnership of a loving mar- 
riage, the Prince and his 
prospective bride are well- 
equipped to embark upon that 
royal treadmill. 

We wish them every happi- 
ness. 


FOR THE SAKE OF THE SIGNALS 


Less visible than military 
hardware, less dramatic than 
nuclear weapons, the 
safeguarding of the intell&ence 
gathered at the communica- 
tions headquarters at Chelten- 
ham has to be no less the 
Government’s imperative. On 
Cheltenham’s “sig-int” turns 
Britain’s defence, and aspects 
of the defence of the West 

Today the Government has 
a problem in presenting a 
coherent position towards 
GCHQ. But theimportance of 
securing the data that flows 
through it outranks admin-* 
istrative tidiness, even logic. It 
certainly is worth a mountain 
of political embarrassment I£ 
to maximize the effectiveness 
of GCHQ, ministers have to 
show show themselves guilty 
of further maladroitness, 
hesitation or hypocrisy, it may 
be a price that has to be paid. 

Evidence of most of those 
failings abounds. As recently 
as last Friday — two full years 
after the first deadline — 
dismissal was to be the official 
fete of staff who failed to give 
up their union membership. 
Now the sack is not considered 
appropriate. A haughty dis- 
regard of civil service union 
general secretaries has given 
way to (if Mr Alastair Graham 
is right) warm discussions. 

The feet of union member- 
ship at GCHQ, the one thing 
the Government intended to 
end, remains. The 
installation’s staff now divide 
into bewildering categories: 
people who refused to relin- 
quish their membership and 
never accepted the preferred 
£1,000; those who did and 
have since recanted, but have 
kept the money; those who 
did, have recanted, and have 
repaid the money. Then there 
is the majority who, with 
evident unhappiness, abjured 
the Civil and Public Services 
Association and the First Di- 
vision Association (a union 
whose members in the Cabinet 


Office regularly and without 
challenge handle the results of 
GCHQ’s data-gathering). 

It is not a recipe for good 
management, nor for that 
esprit de corps which has in the 
past given British crypto- 
graphic operations a certain - 
quality (and a protection 
against - enemy penetration). 
TTie Government has, in short, 
made a mess and virtually 
anything that Sir Geoffrey 
Howe can now do to cleanse it, 
however inconsistent, is wel- 
come. 

The GCHQ affair has been a 
sequence of half-measures. 
The initial identification of 
problems appeared to confuse 
security in the wake of the 
Geoffrey Prime case with con- 
tinuity in the flow of data, 
which was jeopardized in 1981 
by civil service union action. 
Brith had harmed GCHQ. 
They remained completely 
separate problems. For better 
or worse British cryptography 
had grown up under a different 
umbrella from the Armed 
Forces or the Security Ser- 
vices. The centre was civilian . 
and unionized. 

Yet after 1981 guarantees 
gainst disruption were vitaL 
The soundest guarantee was 
the militarization of the in- 
stallation (which given the 
diverse skills of GCHQ lan- 
guage experts cryptographers 
may never have been prac- 
tical). Another option was 
offered among others by Mr 
Len Murray of the TUG a 
promise by the civil service 
unions to exempt GCHQ from 
strikes. - 

The Government chose nei- 
ther. It banned unions without 
altering the centre’s civilian 
status. It is said that decision 
was taken against the advice of 
the centre’s own managers and 
through them the head of the 
civil service. Sir Robert Arm- 
strong. If so, the civil servants 
were right It is now dear that a 
considerable price has been 


paid for the method the gov- 
ernment chose. 

Another half measure: hav- 
ing staled its intention of 
removing unions, the Govern- 
ment has not followed 
through. Harsh though it was, 
the only remedy for recal- 
citrants was dismissal or trans- 
fer. Ditto the re-joiners. 

There are inevitably great 
gaps in outsiders’ understand- 
ing of the calculations made in 
this matter. We can only guess 
at the reasons. It might be the 
threat voiced by Mr Eric 
Hammond that members of 
the EEPTU would take indus- 
trial action as part of a national 
day of action. This of course 
would be illegal secondary 
action. To bow to such a threat 
the Government would be 
suspending every promise 
made on the labour front over 
the past seven years. 

Perhaps the government has 
been forced to listen this time 
to Sir Peter Marychurch, direc- 
tor of GCHQ. It could be that 
the centre’s managers have 
spelled out an uncomfortable 
equation between the ef- 
ficiency of their operations 
and the fete of the recalcitrant 
unionists. Perhaps Sir Peter 
has said that, contrary to 
ministerial expectations, the 
issue of union membership 
rankles stiD after two years. 

Sir Geoffrey’s best hope is 
that the attention of the wider 
trade union movement will be 
distracted by the removal of 
the dismissal threat, and that 
GCHQ becomes a more paro- 
chial issue. Evidently Mr Gra- 
ham and the civil service 
union suit in the European 
Court will not go away. The 
law might even come to the 
Government’s rescue. Con- 
cessions are justified up to the , 
point of and for the sake of 
restoring to Cheltenham con- 
ditions of peace and high staff 
morale in which the quiet and 
permanent task of intelligence- 
gathering will again prosper. 


THE WAY TO MORE JOBS 


re was any disposition 
l his own supporters to 
e the Chancellor of the 
juer after his Budget 
it was on the grounds 
: should have done more 
: directly against un- 
dent. What precisely 
ics wanted was less than 
Some, defying, experi- 
with hope, still have 
y in mind more govern- 
pending form ore public 
work. Others, with 
■ relevance to the real 
m, have feH that the 
ment should act more 
ely on programmes to 
iople for work, to 
age the creation of new 
t sector jobs by in- 
*s of one sort or another, 
i improve facilities for 
ng people with va- 
l The second is, of 
, the right approach and 
government has had a 
ress on unemploynieiit 
ly has itself to blame. 

often it to presented 
ernes in a half-hearted 
r. Mr Lawson in bis 
ise finely constructed 
: statement certainly did 
baps because the Budget 
tctually the logical place 
m. 

erdav Lord Young, the 
«nent Secretary, went 
way to restore con- 
k in the governments 
ch. By .fer the most 
ing part of the new 
rnient package is foe 
availed Restart pro- 
e which will radically 


change the way in which 
Jobcentres deal with the long- 
term unemployed. Hitherto, 
the Jobcentres have simply 
been concerned with referring 
would-be employees to noti- 
fied job vacancies. Their opera- 
tion was run on the 
assumption that the most 
successful Jobcentre was foe 
one which placed people in 
jobs most cheaply. There was 
virtually no counselling. 

Last January, however, a 
pilot scheme was started in 
nine highly varied areas 
throughout the country. Its 
essence was counselling the 
long-term unemployed, and as 
the results so far have been 
distinctly promising, it is being 
applied to the country as a 
whole. Ii can be claimed that, 
on the basis of this experi- 
ment, had the scheme been 
operable nationwide in Janu- 
ary foe national long-term 
unemployment figure would 
have fallen by 1.1 per cent 
instead of rising by .1 per cent 

Some of the fell may, of 
course, be attributed to the 
departure from foe register of 
those not seriously looking for 
work who mighi not relish 
such an interview. 

The essential feature of the 
programme (for which 2,000 
new Jobcentre recruits will be 
needed) will be letters to all 
long-term unemployed offer- 
ing a specific appointment at a 
stated time to discuss what 
sort of work the person is 
looking Tor, their interests, 
their suitability for different 


occupations and offers of 
training if appropriate. 

This revolution in the role of 
Jobcentres has real potential 
and foe principal wonder is 
why we have had to wait so 
long for it. Other particularly 
useful parts of the new jobs 
package, are the Jobstart 
allowance of £20 a week for 
six months to top up the 
income of those starting at less 
than £80 a week; the expan- 
sion of foe present Enterprise 
Allowance Scheme, which pro- 
vides £40 weekly payments to 
help the unemployed set up 
their own businesses, and es- 
pecially the New Workers 
Scheme, which gives a £15 
weekly allowance (for a year) 
to employers of 18 to 19 year 
olds earning up to £55 a week, 
or 20-year olds earning up to 
£65. This could help those who 
start work under the Youth 
Training Scheme to carry on 
permanent employment. 

This new phase in the 
government's approach shows 
more positive thinking and it 
would be sensible for the 
government to present its-new 
drive more energetically than 
hitherto. Unemployment now 
worries the nation more than 
any other current problem, 
and those who are worried are 
not simply those whom Mrs 
Thatcher regards as pro- 
fessional grumblers. Lord 
Young expects the long term 
unemployed and (reading be- 
tween the lines) foe un- 
employed as a whole to be 
fewer next year. That too is the 
nation’s hope: 


Compensating 
victims of crime 

From Mr John Knight 
Sir. Your article (March 5), “Help 
victims - and beat crime*' by John 
Spencer, as well as drawing long 
overdue attention to the plight of 
victims of crime, has come just in 
time to alert those who care about 
justice ro the worsening of the 
victim's position under the new 
Gown Prosecution Service. When 
this comes into force, the victim 
will become even more remote 
from those responsible for 
prosecutions. 

At present, the victims can, if 
they are not suffering too severely 
from shock, contact their local 
police, and in some cases, gain 
access to the prosecuting solicitor. 
Under this new system, “it is not 
envisaged that, the new service will 
have direct or personal contact 
with witnesses, and it will be 
under no duty to make contact 
with victims. _ 

The Campaign Against Drink- 
ing and Driving is now in touch 
with 250 victim famili es each of 
whom has suffered a death at the 
bands ofa drunken driver, and the 
overwhelming message received 
from these families is of absolute 
dissatisfaction with the processes 
of the law, and the manner in 
which the charges have been 
formulated and dealt with by 
those responsible: 

In cases coming before mag- 
istrates they have been pre-judged, 
in secret, by the prosecuting 
solicitor, and the criminal has 
escaped justice for a crime very 
akin to manslaughter. Where cases 
have gone to the crown court, a 
charge of manslaughter is often 
well justified, bat is reduced to one 
of causing death by reckless 
driving, and is nearly always 
disposed of by a trivial sentence, 
in spite of Lord Lane’s guidelines 
of two years’ custody as a 'mini- 
mum in serious cskck 

If victims are going to continue 
to be abused in this way by the 
legal system, it will inevitably 
become preferable for them to 
take the law into their own hands, 
and become criminals themselves. 
In this way, they will be ehgible for 
ail the privileges now being given 
to the criminal, and they will have 
the satisfaction of knowing that 
rough justice has been done if 
civilised justice is denied them. 
JOHN KNIGHT, 

Meads de. 

Shudy Camps, 

Cambridge. 

March 11. 


Queries for Reagan 

From Mr Graham Greene. 

OM. CH 

Sir, Isn’t it about time that a very 
big question mark was aimed at 
President Reagan? 

“Why do you persist in calling 
the Nicaraguan Government a 
communist government? 
Wouldn’t it be equally true, or 
equally false, to call it a Roman 
Catholic government? I can 
understand and even sympathise 
with the objections you might 
have to a Catholic government, 
but, of course, the support you 
give the terrorists would be less 
excusable in the eyes of your 
countrymen.” 

How can the Nicaraguan Gov- 
ernment be classified simply as 
communist? The key positions of 
foreign affairs, health and educa- 
tion and culture are all held by 
Catholic priests. The official in 
charge of economic research is a 
priest An English priest is 
organising rural libraries in the 
countryside. 

It is true that the Archbishop is 
opposed to the present Govern- 
ment bat the Church does not 
belong to the Archbishop, it 
belongs to the Catholic people, 
and I watched last December bow 
the population celebrated with a 
faith and a fervour which 7 wish I 
could have fully shared the Feast 
of the Immaculate Conception. 

There are Marxists in the Gov- 
ernment, yes. but Marxism is an 
economic theory not a heresy. 
President Ortega has visited Mos- 
cow, yes, and Mrs Thatcher, we 
are told, also hopes to visit 
Moscow. 

Yours truly, 

GRAHAM GREENE, 

Antibes, 

France. 

March II. 

Bilingual education 

From Mrs J. M. Goldsmith 
Sir, With reference to the report 
from your Education Correspon- 
dent in today’s paper (March 1 1) 
resis tanc e to bilingual education 
in this country is not, as Professor 
Biku Parekh asserts, “grounded in 
linguistic parochialism”. 

Job applications in this country 
are written in English; children are 
tested and obtain qualifications in 
English; internationally the lan- 
guage of science, mathematics, 
insurance; banking and com- 
merce, is English. 

Primary education in this coun- 
try enables a child to acquire the 
vocabulary necessary for the study 
of textbooks, and the preparation 
for exams, in secondary 
education.By advocating that chil- 
dren be taught “in their mother 
longues for the first two years” 
Professor Parekh is in fact denying 
children from ethnic minorities 
the opportunity to study on equal 
terms with their peers in second- 
ary school whose mother tongue is 
English. 

Of far more practical help to 
them, in the long term, would be 
to offer them more English les- 
sons. not fewer, with English as a 
second language predominating. 
Yours faithfully. 

JOAN M. GOLDSMITH, 

24 Windmill Cose, 

Kenilworth, Warwickshire. 


‘Chaotic’ introduction of GCSE 


From the President of the Second- 
ary Heads Association 
Sir, This week a delegation of 
officers of the Secondary Heads 
Association, representing the 
majority of the nation's secondary 
schools’ management, went to the 
Department of Education and 
Science to urge the Minister. Mr 
Chris Patten, to postpone the 
introduction of GCSE for one 
year. 

We went with no political axe to 
grind; our concern is the total 
unpreparedness of the education 
service for what should be the 
most invigorating and important 
change m approach, syllabus con- 
tent and manner of assessment ia 
secondary schools this century. 

The Minister gave the rebuff 
that he reiterated in his speech at 
Chester on March 11. when a 
Minister goes against the consid- 
ered advice of the heads of 
schools, the very people on whom 
be is relying to implement the 
desired changes, the nation should 
be made aware of this astonishing 
situation. 

GCSE will go ahead as planned, 
runs your report (March 12). If the 
chaotic shambles that we see 
building up for this autumn is 
planned, then heaven preserve us 
from the unplanned; syllabuses 
unavailable until too late, option 
choices for third-year pupils un- 
decided, the consequent inability 
of schools to make timetables or 

Moves to Rome 

From the Reverend Paul 
McPartlan 

Sir, One of the signs of our 
ecumenical times, a remarkable 
and momentous sign, is the 
convergence towards recognising 
the Eucharist as the “heart” of the 
Church. The following is a state- 
ment of no less representative a 
body than the Faith and Order 
Commission of the World Council 
of Churches in its Lima Report of 
1982: 

As the Eucharist celebrates the 
resurrection of Christ, it is appro- 
priate that it should take place at 
least every Sunday. As it is the new 
sacramental meal of the people of 
God. every Christian should be 
encouraged to receive communion 
frequently (Eucharist, n.30). 

In particular, there are now 
prominent Roman Catholic, 
Orthodox and Anglican theolo- 
gians who agree that a central part 
of our shared heritage is the belief 
that the Eucharist is not just “one 
of the things the Church does'* but 
rather is the celebration par 
excellence of our Christian iden- 
tity, of our life in Christ 

Those who teach and exercise 
authority in the Christian commu- 
nity, primarily the bishops, do so 
essentially to gather people in 
truth for this celebration and to 
ensure that its effect on the 
participants and its witness to the 
world are not marred by division. 

For this celebration is unique, 
because Christ is unique. He is the 
incarnate Word of God, through 
whom everything was made and 
in whom alone all humanity and 
indeed all creation is reconciled 
and all worldly divisions tran- 
scended. Every Eucharist cele- 
brates and proclaims this fact and 

Paying for gas 

From Mr J. Chahidi 
Sir, Like Mr Jones (March 6) I 
would like to know how the gas 
board justifies charging us — and 
presumably millions of other con- 
sumers — at least £50 more on our 
quarterly account than we have 
ever been charged in the winter 
months, based on its new practice 
of only reading meters every six 
months. This represents an in- 
terest-free loan of enviable mag- 
nitude. 

Yours faithfully. 

J. CHAHIDI, 

22 Lonsdale Road, Oxford. 

Sellafield safety 

From the Reverend Stephen Trott 
Sir, The select committee has 
articulated the growing public 
concern about Sellafield, as the 
scale of its pollution of the Irish 
Sea has become known, and the 

Dutch courage 

From Mr Anthony R- Fuell 
Sir, In today’s edition (March 5) I 
was pleased to note an advertise- 
ment placed by the Dutch Gov- 
ernment inviting citizens of The 
Netherlands resident in Britain 
who wish to vote in their country’s 
forthcoming elections to register 
wnh their embassy. 

How long will it be before the 
British Government places simi- 
lar advertisements in the Belgian 
Press? I find it completely 
inexplicable that Britons resident 
abroad — even in member states of 

Satanic drills 

From Mr P. A. Faulkner and 
others 

Sir. Few would doubt that Corfe 
Castle, the village and surround- 
ing landscape, form a unique part 
of our national heritage. Some 
200,000 visitors per year ate 
attracted to the castle alone and 
approximately 500,000 to the 
village. This small living village, 
with a population of under 2,000, 
is already in danger of becoming 
strangled as it ties in the centre erf 
an area increasingly dominated by 
oil interests. 

Currently the buildiog of a by- 
pass (for which the local authority 
has received little or no financial 
encouragement) and the replan- 
ning of the environs of the castle 
are both being considered. Both 
issues pose a threat to the very 
entity they seek to preserve. 

This is a key issue, both locally 
and nationally, and one that, we 
think, calls for the care and 
imagination that produced reports 


order the necessary bods and 
leaching materials, training 
courses 50 per cent unattended - 
the picture is alarming. 

The one crumb of comfort has 
been the news that more finance 
will be available to resource the 
change. So far enough finance to 
supply each pupil with a couple of 
modestly priced books has been 
provided. £100 million is the 
need, or £30,000 per average 
school — the cost of one Awacs 
radar plane. If this can be pro- 
vided, something may yet be 
pulled from the wreckage. 

Yours faithfully. 

ROWLAND P. BROWN, 
President, Secondary Heads 
Association, 

107 St Paurs Road, Nl. 

March 19. 

Guessing game 

From Dr Julian Verhov 
Sir, Mr Pettifor (March 13) is 
mistaken. Multiple choice 
examination is not new-fangled 
but a proven and well-recognised 
test of knowledge. A candidate 
who relies on guesswork will fail a 
well set and intelligently marked 
paper. 

The only pin I know mightier 
than the pen is a cask of AVz 
gallons. 

Yours faithfully, 

JULIAN VERBOV, 

38 Montclair Drive, Liverpool. 

furthers the unity of all in Christ, 
the very unity for which we were 
made. 

That is why, in the early Church 
there was only one Eucharist, 
presided over by the bishop, in a 
given town on a given feast. Can 
we permit ourselves to envisage a 
reunited Church in which, on 
Sundays. Christians would gather 
according to their former labels to 
celebrate the Eucharist? 

Do not the profound reasons 
why, as Father Edward Yarnold 
notes (article, March 8), "some 
ecumenists wish ‘one church in 
one place”’ deserve more consid- 
eration? He prefers to envisage “a 
unity of 'sister churches', 'united 
but not absorbed’”. Ought we not 
all to pray and work for absorp- 
tion into a Church in which the 
true sisters will be the local 
churches which gather for the 
Eucharist around brother bishops 
(or their presbyteral repre- 
sentatives), one in each place. 
Yours faithfully, 

PAUL McPARTLAN, 

Campion Hall, 

Oxford. 

Tea at the vicarage 

From Mr Jeffrey Archer 
Sir, Tea parties at the rectory of 
the Archdeacon of the Isle of 
Wight (March 1 4) may sadly be an 
occasion for violence but. Sir, the 
sly shades of our spectral curates, 
vicars and rural deans still dance 
down our lawn, nor was our house 
“pulled down many years ago” 

1 am. Sir, your obedient servant, 
JEFFREY ARCHER, 

The Old Vicarage, 

Granzcbester, 

Cambridge. 

March 17. 

necessity for its operations called 
into question. 

British Nuclear Fuels has made 
claims for the plant's safety which 
it now seems cannot be regarded 
as reliable in the absence of hard 
evidence as to the long-term 
effects of radioactive pollution of 
the environment 

For the sake of those who live in 
the area affected by 
Sellafield/Wjndscale. already dis- 
mayed at the apparent link with 
increased leukaemia statistics, the 
reprocessing must be stopped. 
Until there is satisfactory scien- 
tific evidence about the potential 
dangers, there can be no moral 
justification for continuing the 
risks. 

Yours faithfoly, 

STEPHEN TROTT, 

14 Southgate, 

Hessle, 

Hull, 

Humberside. 

the EEC — should be denied the 
opportunity to participate in the 
political process of their home 
country; and having been effec- 
tively disenfranchised for the last 
four years. I hope that the Govern- 
ment will make good its promise 
to rectify this situation in time for 
the thousands of British expatri- 
ates to vote in the next general 
election. 

Yours faithfully. 

ANTHONY R. FUELL, 

Rue d’Angoussan 18, 

B- 1301 Binges. 

Belgium. 

March 5. 

on Bath and York and the Roman 
WalL These reports studied all 
aspects of conservation and were 
in themselves a landmark. 

May we suggest that the Na- 
tional Trust pauses in its 
redevelopment of Corfe village 
while a similar independent study 
is commissioned by an appro- 
priate body with a remit to 
reconcile the rival claims of traffic 
management, visitor management 
and environmental conservation, 
at the same time preserving a 
living community within the con- 
text of a site of. perhaps, more 
than local or even national signifi- 
cance. 

Yours faithfully. 

PATRICK A FAULKNER, 
BERNARD FEILDEN, 

MICHAEL MIDDLETON, 

J. M. RICHARDS. 

Farrier's, 

Kingston, 

Corfe Castle, 

Dorset. 

March 13. 


MARCH 20 1912 
In February, 1911 an Mr 

Battalion the Royal Engineers 
toot formed. Later that year the - 
Committee of Imperial Defence led 
by lord Haldane, Secretary for 
War.ftuccveded in June 1912 by 
J3.Serly. later Lord Moltistone), 
recommended that the country 
should hare a unified Flying 
Service. In fact two services came 
into operation in 1912 — the Royal 


Air Service, the former booed at 
Famborwgh and Netheraoon and 
the latter at Bastchurch. Our 
Aeronautical Correspondent was 
Hubert WaUer. 


pie 

BP w 

tch ri 

ies * 

he J 

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BRITISH AVIATION. 
THE NEW FLYING CORPS. 

(BY OUR AERONAUTICAL 
CORRESPONDENT.) 

The announcements made in 
Parliament by Colonel Seely and 
Mr. Churchill on the subject of the 
new flying organization which is to 
Cake the place of Che ex ist in g Air 
Battalion deserve far more atten- 
tion chan they are likely to receive 
from a public whose mind is 
overshadowed by the coal strike. . . 

A NATIONAL AIR SERVICE. 

Its chief and most obvious merit 
is that it treats flying aa a thing in 
itself, and not a mere function of 
any existing arm. Flying is flying, 
whether it be done by a soldier, a 
Bailor, or a mere civilian, and the 
concentration under one adminis- 
tration of the training of all 
persons who are qualified and 
prepared to serve the country in 
time of war in any part of the world 
should ensure foe attainment of 
the highest standard alike of 
theoretical professional knowledge 
and of practical performance in foe 
air .Details of pay and pensions 
appear to be not yet fixed, but it ia 
to be assumed that they will be on a 
special scale and sufficient to. 
induce an adequate supply of 
officers to volunteer for foe corps. 
With the abolition of the Air 
Battalion, a transitional makeshift 
of the unimaginative British type, 
foe way is clear for the formation of 
a National Air Service to belong to 
which a man may well be proud. 
However meritorious may have 
been the personnel of the Air 
Battalion, part of the Government 
are to be congratulated on their 
recognition that an organization of 
that kind is altogether inadequate 
to the aerial requirements of the 
country. 

THE CENTRAL SCHOOL. 

Colonel Seely cleared up the 
meaning of a loose expression hi 
Lord Haldane’s Memorandum, 
which was published on February 
28. The latter stated that at the 
proposed joint Army and Navy 
School of Aviation officers of both 
service* “shall be taught to fly 
before proceeding to foe separate 
Army and Navy establishments at 
which they will be exercised in the 
more specialized requirements of 
their respective services.” But 
Colonel Seely in bis speech made it 
quite clear that it is nor proposed to 
use tiie central school for teaching 
officers to fly. “They would learn 
the elements of the art elsewhere 
and go to the flying school for the 
more advanced course." He ex- 
plained later that it had been 
settled that officers should learn to 
fly at private flying schools; first, 
because it was desirable to encour- 
age private effort, and, secondly, 
because it was thought that there 
was less risk of accident in the 
initial stages if this method was 
adopted. It appears, then, that all 
officers and civilians who present 
themselves at the school for their 
four months’ course will already be 
certificated airmen. 

The training of non-commis- 
sioned officers and men as well as 
officers is contemplated-and en- 
lightened and very important inno- 
vation— and it seems probable that 
these may actually be taught to fly 
at the 9chooL But otherwise the art 
of flying, pure and simple, will not 
be taught at the central school any 
more than company drill is taught 
at the Staff College. What will be . 
taught at the central school will be' 
the thing s which the differ- . 
ence between the mere airman and 
the military airman. Much more 
than the ability to fly is needed, 
before a man can be counted as a ’ 
useful asset to a military or naval : 
commander. It is the scientific, as 
opposed to the acrobatic, side of . 
foe business which has to be 
developed— “progressive” flying, ; 
observation and photography from 1 
the air, meteorology, flying by 
compass, signalling, and the like, as 
well as mechanics and the priori- ■ 
pies of construction— and in this 
the school will supply a training 
which will be invaluable when, 
after the course, the airman joins 1 
the military or naval wing of the ! 
Service at Nether-Avon or 
Eastchurch. . . 

REASONS FOR SLOW 
DEVELOPMENT. 

It is not clear from the published 

figures how much money is to be 
spent this year on actual aero- . 
planes. Colonel Seely stated that 
the purchase of 71 had been | 
sanctioned out of the 131 required * 
to complete the scheme. Whether 
as many as 71 suitable machines 
will be procurable this year seems 

doubtful- The obstacle is not 
expense. Both Colonel Seely and 
Mr. Churchill declared that the. 
Government were determined that 
money should not stand in the way 
of any necessary steps. It is the fro- 
greater difficulty of getting delivery ' 
of machines in which men can have 
confidence and which are really 
suitable for military purposes. ■ 

Top chunks 

From Dr M. P. Stewardson 
Sir. Perhaps Mrs Keenan (front . 
page. March 13) could re-label her 
marmalade •* Redbrick”? Al- 
though that might not go down too 
welt in Harrods and Fortnum and 
Mason. 

Yours sincerely. 

MICHAEL SfEWARDSON, ; 

Oddy's Piece, 

2 Chapel Reed. 

Pawletu 

Bridgwater. Somerset. 






THE TIMES THURSDAY MARCH.20.1986 

THE ARTS 



Television 


unlucky Passionate trial 

families i # ±* 

srfrj's ot lii6 s realities 


Divorce exists as an institution 
not because we are notably 
more fickle and inconstant 
than our forebears bnt because 
we live so much longer; de- 
prived of early widowerhood, 
the modem husband resorts to 
serial polygamy. 

Out of Court (BBC2) intro- 
duced its studio discussion of 
the subject with filmed reports 
of two victims: a woman who 
found herself haring to pay 
her own costs when attempting 
to enforce a maintenance or- 
der; and a man whose former 
wife 1ms successfully denied 
him his rights of access to 
their children — now, with 
heavy pathos, he is reduced to 
keeping in touch by dedicating 
sentimental records to them on 
local radio. 

In order to rationalize the 
provisions of divorce judge- 
ments, the Lord Chancellor's 
office has prepared a working 
paper which recommends set- 
ting np family courts along the 
lines of the Aastratian model 
where informal hearings seek 
to dispel the traditional notion 
of apportioning blame, im- 
mensely popular when first 
introduced on the back of a 
new law which provided a 
single requirement for divorce 
(12 months* separation), the 
system there has brought 
about an alarming backlash in 
that several family-court 
judges have been attacked 
with bombs, presumably by 
aggrieved former customers 
who ended by resenting the 
very liberalization which was 
designed to help them. 

Perhaps the heart of the 
problem is the modern, roman- 
tic idea of married love; we 
tend to regard happiness as a 
birthright rather than some- 
thing that requires application 
and a measure of good lock. 
The low-life characters of 
Channel 4*s late-night Brazil- 
ian curiosity The Double Death 
of Quinces Berro d'Agua had 
their own recipe: a bottle of 
hooch and a complaisant 
whore. 

In this sometimes heavy- 
handed black comedy, the 
degraded civil servant of the 
title managed to ootdo 
W.C.Fieids in actually dying 
after drinking a glass of water, 
and then favoured the rest of 
die proceedings with a beatific 
smile as his purloined corpse 
was borne through the streets 
of Bahia, on a last night out. 
before returning to his unnatu- 
ral element by falling into the 
heaving sea. At times the play 
resembled an alternative trav- 
elogue for the seedy side of 
Brazilian life, with character 
and development not getting 
much of a look in. Bnt the 
Portuguese for “shrewsT* 
sounds absolutely splendid. 

Martin Cropper 


i Made in Bangkok 

Aldwych 

The Bangkok of Anthony Mingh- 
ella's title combines simultaneously 
a place on the map and a place in the 
mind. It is the latest manifestation 
of the faraway country where Brit- 
ish dramatists have traditionally let 
loose their ugliest fantasies; the 
difference being that, instead of 
exhibiting a supposed pack of filthy 
foreigners (as with the Jaco beans), 
Mr Mingheila is out to pin the 
blame where it belongs. If Bangkok 
is a city where any forbidden dream 
can come true and where sweat- 
shops flourish with un diminished 
Victorian vigour, it is because the 
West has debauched its people into 
that condition. 

The play follows a group of five 
English tourists on a stopover in 
Bangkok en route to Hong Kong. 
We meet them hanging around an 
airport carousel, and revealing 
themselves through the frayed 
nerves of a punishing flight and a 
baggage-claim bold-up. 

There are a loud-mouthed fash- 
ion sah»<TTMn and his gentlemanly 
boss; a distracted electronics execu- 
tive and his composed wife; and 
Edward, a Lancashire dentist work- 
ing in Hong Kong refugee camps, 
who is keen to show off his respect 
for the Thai people and contempt 
for his insular fellow passengers. As 
things stand at the end of the this 
scene, the party breaks down into 
those who take a cultivated interest 
in an exotic spot, those who want 
human contact with its inhabitants 


and those whose loonies are hang- 
ing out for the Thai neshpots. 

The plot Mr Mingheila goes on to 
develop could just as easily have 
been reworked as fence. With the aid 
of one identical bedroom (an exer- 
cise in the Hilton Far Eastern 
manner by John Gunter) each of the 
three groups set about satisfying 
their own clandestine requirements, 
with mutually compromising meet- 
ings down in the lobby with the aid 
of obsequiously clanger-dropping 
hotel staff and an unreliable lift 
(always a sure-fire comic property). 
In feet there are virtually no laughs 
in the piece; and its atmosphere is 
set by the blown-up photographs of 
massage-parlour advertisements 
and the ominous drum interlude in 
Michael Bfekemore's productio n . 

What the action does accomplish 
is largely to demolish the precon- 
ceptions of the opening scene, so as 
to show that those who frankly 
admit their appetites are pretty 
harmless, while those who conceal 
fantasies under cover of indiffer- 
ence or moral superiority are the 
real bringers of pain and danger. It 
would have been better for them 
and for society, the play implies, if 
such places as Bangkok did not 
exist “Where does it belong, a 
fantasy?” the wife demands; “Be- 
cause out here in the open it's 
terrible. And it’s terrible bottled 
up.” 

That sounds as though Mr 
Mingheila were writing even- 
handedfy; but the overwhelming 
impression of Made in Bangkok is 
of a high moral didacticism which 
extends to extremely manipulative. 





Pharisee who finally submits to p 

characterization. The treatment of 
Gary, the salesman, as a coarse 
phallus-obsessed lout, incapable of 

seeing a model taking her dress off 
without springing to his feel, is so 
chained to stereotype and pushed to 
such unspeakabkle lengths by Chris- 
topher Fulford that it is hard to see 
how the rest of the company go 
through the motions of tolerating 
Mm. This, as it turns out, is Mr 
Minghella’s way of exposing the real 
ghoul — Stephen, the bashful execu- 
tive, who takes a night off from the 
wife to visit the massage parlour, 
and then engages a pair of bedroom 
girls whom he leaves tied up when 


Peter McEnery** memorable performance, with Fdkity Kendal 


the fire-alarm sounds. In him. we 
witness the birth of a s ad i st In 
Edward we witness a parallel and 
sadder case of the birth ofhomosex- 
nal love when, after establishing a 
firm friendship with a Thai pimp, 
he then ruins it by of ferin g him 
money fin an hour in bed. 

Peter McEnery’s performance in 
this role is the most memorable part 
of the show: a bony, sexless, gauche 
Pharisee finally submitting to the 
paconns he hag up to this moment 
escaped. Felicity Kendal and Paul 
Shelley as the married pair commu- 
nicate the sense of furtive non- 
communication and temporary 


Dance 

Entertaining eccentricities 


One Train Can 
Hide Another 
Northcott, Exeter 

The Dance Theatre of Rennes 
in Brittany, directed by Gigi 
Caciuleanu. has an eccentric, 
amiable, entertaining charac- 
ter all its own. This week it is 
back at the Northcott Theatre, 
Exeter, where it made its 
British debut three years ago, 
this time with a single long 
work called One Train Can 
Hide Another. 

A programme note explains 
the title with the analogy of 
leaning on a level-crossing 
gate to contemplate the trains 
of life. What Caciuleanu is 
after, as I understand it, is to 
use the diversity of his own or 
anyone else’s cultural experi- 
ence as the pretext for putting 
together many contrasted ele- 
ments and looking for some 


pattern within them. So the 
musical basis of the piece is a 
collage ranging from medieval 
songs to a comic blues, from 
Rossini's Figaro to the sounds 
made by whales, from spoken 
words to flamenco. 

The movement is equally 
diverse. One moment the 
whole cast is miming to 
Charles Ives’s song about 
“Waiting for the op’ry", the 
next minute they are crudely 
masked like commedia deu‘ 
arte characters in an enigmatic 
drama. Sometimes the con- 
trast comes within a single 
dance, as when Claudine 
Orvain first instructs her part- 
ner, with much lewd innuen- 
do. in what looks a comically 
awkward bit of partnering 
until repeated smoothly to 
part of that choreographically 
ubiquitious Albinoni Adagio, 
it is transformed into roman- 
tic innocence. 

There is much comedy in 


It wasn’t the Gestapo in 1942. 

It was the child’s mother in 1985. 


Thr child's 
foot 



the piece, but there are also 
moments of quiet, lonely still- 
ness. The dimax is purely 
choreographic, a marvellously 
gentle, fluent solo for Rux- 
andra Racovitza to a Chopin 
Barcarolle, imaginat ively re- 
sponsive to the music's shifts 
of mood and pattern, using 
her exceptionally precise skills 
with casual grace. 

Cariuleanu's own easy vir- 
tuosity and humour find ex- 
pression in several solos, and 
he puls the personalities as 
well as the skills of all his 
dancers on display. It occurs 
to me in retrospect that, in his 
entirely different way, Caciu- 
leanu comes nearer to Pina 
Bausch’s aim of presenting 
dancers primarily as people 
than any of her would-be 
imitators. Yet while watching 
his work one sees it only as 
something entirely individual 

John Perchal 


Jazz 

Camden Week 

Shaw Theatre 

Completely avoiding the lead- 
en routines beloved of both 
artisans and show-offs, a drum 
solo by Elvin Jones involves 


LPO/Tennstedt 

Festival Hall 

Klaus Tennstedt came back to 
London in triumph on Tues- 
day. Mahler's savagely pessi- 
mistic Sixth Symphony is not 
the obvious choice to cele- 
brate a conductor’s return to 
good health — quite the oppo- 
site. given its compositional 
circumstances. But a perfor- 
mance in. this heroic mould 
could only have a therapeutic 
effect on those who played it 
and those lucky enough to 
listen. The London Philhar- 
monic has welcomed back its 
principal conductor in mag- 
nificent fashion. 

There was not an ounce of 
indulgence anywhere. In the 
first movement Tennstedt 
maintained an almost brutal 
momentum from those first 
thudding bass notes onwards. 
Mahler’s contrapuntal tex- 
tures were crystallized; even 
the expansive second subject 
(usually a signal for relax- 
ation) was kept taut and lean. 


feet nourishment for his inno- 
vations; now Surman, on 
whose philosophy Coltrane 
made an early and indelible 
imprint, clearly relished the 
chance to feast from the 
source. 

As with so much jazz in the 
post-Coltrane style, there were 
passages in which nothing 


Concert 

with the fiddles tucking in 
their profuse grace-notes im- 
maculately. So all-embracing 
was the funereal atmosphere 
that when the oow-befls sig- 
nalled the sighting of that 
haunted landscape. — of shad- 
owy half-themes in the wood- 
wind and unnaturally sweet 
string tremofendos — it was as 
if waking from a nightmare to 
find a worse reality. 

Tennstedt opted to play the 
Scherzo next, and with 'good 
reason. The dark mood per- 
sisted; snarling brass passages 
gradually overwhelmed the 
trio's ritual ironies. Here there 
were some stunning pieces of 


Music-theatre 


such a perfect reconciliation of much happened except the 
the intellectual and the physi- expression of physical energy 


Because he had received a poor school 
report, a nine year old bqv had a toe nail 
ripped out by his mother. 

She did it with a pair of scissors. She 
did it in a town in England. And she did 
it recently. 

Forty years ago, this kind of barbar- 
ity went by the name of ‘war crime’ or 
‘atrocity 

Today it beggars description. 

The threat of similar mistreatment 
hangs over many children. They des- 
perately need someone to protect them. 

That's often the NSPCC. We have to 
work very hard. And we can’t do it for 
nothing. 

£15.48 can protect a child for 2 weeks. 

There are more than 57.0111) children 
being helped by the Society in a year. 


You can help them by sending what 
you can afford to the NSPCC using the 
coupon below. 

Remember, our struggle did not end 
forty years ago. We're fighting the battle 
against child abuse every day and it costs 
money. 

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cal that comparisons are more and the exe 
likely with dancers or athletes techniques 
than with other musicians, something 
His style, which became wide- gdsdorff w 
ly influential during his time of extra ore 
with the remarkable John tortions an< 
Coltrane Quartet of the eariy sible multi; 
1960s, marries the most so- adept), btr 
phisticated extensions of Afro- piece by I 
American rhythmic theory to rare pensi 
the speed, power and grace of surprising 
a great half-mil er or a champi- version of 
on middleweight lude to a 

On Tuesday, during the Surman ’s t 
second night of what promises a wonderfij 
to be, even by its own high ideas and p 
standards, an unusually sub- authority, 
stantial Camden Jazz Week, Luckily,' 
we heard him in the stimulat- phones wi 
ing context of an all-star capture a 1 
ensemble completed by two mit-meetin; 
Englishmen, the double bass- that they 
ist Dave Holland and the much with 
saxophonist John Surman, festival’s 0 
and a German, the trombonist riotous Lo 
Albert Mangelsdorff. This nerformanc 


and the exercising of extended 
techniques (the latter being 
something at which Man- 
gtisdorffi who has a repertoire 
of extraordinary timbral dis- 
tortions and seemingly impos- 
sible multiphonics, is notably 
adept), but an out-of-tempo 
piece by Holland distilled a 
rare pensive beauty, and a 
surprising medium-tempo 
version of Ellington's “Pre- 
lude to a Kiss” drew from 
Suroaan’s baritone saxophone 
a wonderful solo full of lively 
ideas and paced with a relaxed 
authority. 

Luckily, the Radio 3 micro- 
phones were on hand to 
capture a true musical sum- 
mit-meeting; h is doubtful 
that they could have done 
much with the stars of the 
festival’s opening night, the 
riotous Loose Tubes, whose 
performance was even more 


Phantastes/ 

Other Voices 

The Place • 

It was really a choice ofhaving 
your psychology Jung or 
Freud. Paul Barker’s Phan- 
tastes was an adaptation of the 
fantasy novels by George 
MacDonald to makes dream- 
play out of Maeterlinck or 
Strindberg, with a young man 
lost in a finest where . he 
encounters figures with names 
like The White Lady, The 
Shadow and The Maiden of 
the Spheres. Richard Haw- 
kins’s Other Voices was a 
setting of poems from Rilke’s 
DasBuchderBUdervomakeu 
sequence of scarifying mono- 
logues of alienation. 

Quite why the mere men- 
tion of music-theatre should 
produce these great washes of 
Angst is an interesting point: 
Obviously it has something to 
do with the long shadows 
thrown by Pierrot lunaire and 
The Soldier’s Tale, the latter 
an evident influence on Haw- 
kins. But perhaps more deeply 
it is the dislocation of the 
medium. Its estrangement 
from the conventional worlds 
of opera, chamber music or 
straight play, that is bound to 
produce a dislocated . ex- 
pression. 


i a harassed committee 

meeting today serves 
to highlight some °f 

GLCs abolition, as 
Nicholas Shakespeare 
reports 

Minute - 
stakes 

This is a talc of. c h a os , 
confusion and haste. U is 
caused by ihe abobtion of the 
QIC and it concerns the 
funding of voluntary arts ot^» 
nizafioris nx London — m 
particulars much-needed sum 
of £2 million-. According to 
repeated ministerial assur- 
ances, worthwhile voluntary 
projects will not be harmed as 
a result ofabdition. A variety 
of schemes have been set upto 
administer replacement fund- • 
ing. It is the largest of these/ 
the London Boroughs Grant 
Scheme - known as the 
Richmond Scheme — which 
concerns us here. 

Just to sketch out its history 
is to enter a plot sauted by 
Kafka, interpreted by Buggms 
and rewritten by Jeffrey Ar- 
cher. The refusal of Labour 
boroughs 10 take port at all set 
the scene early oft; it was not 
mnil mid-October that tire 33 
members of the committee, 
core from. each borough (com- 
prising 19 Tories, 13 Labour 
and one Liberal), met for the 
.first time. In November they 
met ag»nv to consider the 

budget. The Tories opted for a 

sum of £20 million. Labour 
£35 minion and the Tory 
member for Sutton, Council- 
lor Edward Trevor, for a sum 
of £2 million. 

The first agreed figure was 
£24.64 million for London- 
wide voluntary organizations 
previously fended by the 
GLC, of which aits organiza- 
tions formed a quarter. The 
figure was passed by 16 votes 
to 15. The figure turned out to 
be a non-starter anyway be- 
cause two-thirds of tire bor- 
oughs needed to ratify ft. 

At a spetiafly-convened 
meeting on January 13 a new 
figure of £27 nulfioa was 
proposed — despite a recom- 
mendation from Gerald Op- 
penbeim, director of the . 
Ghauts Unit, of £2&24 as a 
feme minimum. Not until 
! Imwty 30, when the budget 
'was -finally agreed, could the 
committee consider a single 


Ghriwnras, Oppen- 
heira bad sat in solitary splen- 
dour sifting through app- 
lications from 1,100 organ- 
izations. Of these, 700 were 
. . previously funded by the 

As a result, it is a form that GLC. Aided by two seconded 
is appropriate onfy under very clerical employees, he caku- 
special circumstances, which feted that, were each currently 
obtained 20 years ago but funded proj e c t to be consid- 


rdease that still leaves the nature of 
their pas t jwarriag e imexamined; 
they are not helped by Mr 
Mingbefla's discovery that, under 
emotional stress, tire speaker’s syn- 
tax is apt to break xq> — a trick winch 
he then works to excess. 

The production itself is a model 
of the «w»n significant moments in 
which this director excels; and, 
felling the return of Peter Nichols, 
the play offers a thoughtful, morally 
im p a ssio ned wram ina ti on of how 
we live now, of a kind too seldom 
seen recently in London. 

IniDgW 



baton virtuosity: one startling. 
ritenuto followed by a mo- 
mentary but idling pause was 
accomplished by a hundred 
musicians as if by one. 

In tins scheme the slow 
movement was a place of 
repose where limpid string 
lines and audacious portamen- 
ri caught the ear. BM its 
gloriously lyrical enforoed cB- 
max set the scene for an 
intensely passionate finale. 
Those . massive hammer-: 
strokes didfittafly 
human spirit utterly* as -they 
should; but whaz a revelation 
of spirit it had been. - 

Richard Morrison 


seem not to now. Maybe the 
Modern Music Theatre' 
Troupe will prove me wrong 
about that, but I have to doubt 
it when the intensify of these 
productions by them was so 
much more m the perfor- 
mance than in the material. .. 

Phantastes was cunningly 
staged on a tiny . budget by 
Christopher Newell to provide 
maximum magic, and boasted 
an excellent central perfor- 
mance by the young baritone 
John Oakiey-Tncker. One 
wished he bad been given 
something better than this 
grey arioso with feint echoes 
of Britten. The score . was 
feeble, though* '.one has to 
approve the association of the 
bagpipes with the devil 

Hankins’s music for a 
mixed nonet was a great deal 
more assured: if ft had not 
been, it could hardly have 
sounded so strikingly Stravin- 
skian at times. But again ft was 
tiie energy of the actor-singers 
that counted, with Sian 
Woodhng. John Upperton 
and James Meek tearing their 
hearts out over the Thing 
There are further ' perfor- 
mances tonight and on 
Saturday. 

Paul Griffiths 


ered by theend of tire financial 
year, the committee would 
have one minute per applioi- 4 
non. By the deadline of April 1 
tire committee will have only 
decided on some 180 of the 
-700 previously funded. A new 
candidate has no hope at all of 
bang considered by then. 

With about £2 million for 
the arts, the Richmond 
Scheme wiU not be adminis- 
tering the lion’s share of arts 
funding in London. Neverthe- 
less ft cannot even consider its 
applications until the Arts 
Council, hand in moist hand 
. with the Greater London Arts 
Association, have negotiated 
borough by borough. This has 
meant that at today’s commit- 
tee meeting Oppenheim will 
be empowered to give out 0 
three months of contingency 
fondiug to those currently 
funded who have not heard 
about their application by 
April 1. He promises to be 
sending out a lot of letters. 

Unable to cope with what 
already existed, the Richmond 
Scheme has not even looked at 
new initiatives. Far from 
maintaining the dynamism of 
the voluntary sector, it might 
be symptomatic of what is 
stifling it 


| Hfi >|iu.\.|S c IKrEf-l I — l-H M't 


turned out to be the land of lcaleidoscopically dazzling 
ma tchm a kin g that allows the than usual encompassing 


THE CASE. QUOTED HEPE IS A TRUE EXAMPLE. SOME DETAILS HAVE BEEN CHANGED TO PROTECT THE IDENTITY Of THE CHILD 


partners to be themselves 
while provoking fresh inspira- 
tion, and Jones in particular 
was encouraged to a marvel- 
lous display. 

His drumming achieves its 
wholly original effect through 
the tension between behind- 
tfte-bear time-keeping on the 
ride cymbal lagging triplets 
on the snare-drum and antici- 
patory explosions on the first 
beat of the bar. Instead of the 
conventional linear flow of a 
swinging pulse, he creates a 
static field of kinetic energy 
from which others can draw. 
Coltrane found there the per- 


hymns, reels, bebop muta- 
tions, electro-pop, mariachi 
brass and the sort ofjazz-fimk 
invented to provide a sound- 
track for theme pubs. 

Richard Williams 


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THE 



TIMES 


B ritain is in danger of 
felling from the second 
league of industrialized 
nations to the third. 
What has gone so drasti- 
cally wrong with the country that 
started the Industrial Revolution 
and that only 40 years ago was 
second to the United States in 
gross national product per head? 

We are famous for our inven- 
tors but infamous for not exploit- 
ing the market potential of our 
own inventions. Talented young 
people still take their ideas to the 
United States, Canada and Europe 
because no one here will invest in 
their products. 

Politicians and pundits talk 
glibly about Japanese commit- 
ment. American marketing and 
German work values but little 
attempt is made to emulate the 
conditions or attitudes which 
create success in those countries. 

More threatening still is that 
there now seems to be a debate 
about whether the country should 
concentrate on manufacturing or 
sen-ices — as if the UK could 
survive with one or the other but 
cannot afford both and as if the 
two are mutually exclusive. With 
25.8 per cent of the working 
population employed in manufac- 
turing and 65.5 per cent in 


services, the demise of either 
would be a catastrophe. 

Seven years ago those figures 
were closer — 32.1 per cent for 
manufacturing, 57.8 per cent for 
services. Why is our manufactur- 
ing base, supposedly leaner and 
finer from the recession, still 
diminishing while other countries 
surge ahead? 

It is not the technology. Compa- 
nies can buy the machines and the 
processes. One of the main differ- 
ences is in the people — their 
abilities in using the machines, 
producing quality products that 
the customer wants, then selling 
them. Slowly the idea is becoming 
accepted that the resources which 
matter most are human resources. 

With technologies and markets 
changing so quickly, companies 
need to recruit and develop young 
people who can adapt at the same 
pace, boys and girls who are used 
to learning rather than those who 
think that education stops when 
work begins. Education needs to 
go on throughout people's work- , 
ing lives: training to up-date 
techniques, functional training to 
understand colleagues' work and 1 
problems, and management train- ' 
ing to develop leadership and' 
team working. 

The Government has made a. 


With technologies 
' changing so fast, we 
need young people 
: who can adapt and 
' will go on learning, 
says Bill Friggens 



HT 


. start The Youth Training Scheme 
has been extended from one year 
' to two. with the aim of giving 
more vocational training that will 
lead to recognized qualifications. 
The technical and vocational edu- 
cation initiative is another hopeful 
sign. This is aimed at developing 
technical and vocational educa- 
tion inside secondary schools. 

The Manpower Services 
Commission's adult training strat- 
egy is also a step in the right 
direction. It is based on the old 
Training Opportunities Scheme 
course, and the MSC is campaign- 
ing to make more people aware of 
the need for adult framing as well 
as doing some of it itself 


It is not enough. The MSC 
spends £250 million a year on 
adult training as opposed to £1 
billion on youth. 

There is not enough liaison 
between the Government, the 
universities, polytechnics and 
course runners who decide on 
course content and numbers to be 
taken on in each discipline, and 
companies which fight over or 
reject the end product. 

Japan and West Germany have 
better liaison arrangements. Gov- 
ernment, industry and education- 
al establishments plan and 
negotiate according to industry’s 
needs and within financial con- 


straints imposed by central or 
regional government 
In the-Uniied States, if industry 
suddenly has a need for a new 
high-technology skill, half a .dozen 
courses will come into bong 
overnight to offer training, and 
potential employees will borrow 
the money to pay for it 
In Britain, a remuneration eco- 
nomics salary survey of engineer- 
ing functions showed recently that 
the proportion of companies hav- 
ing difficulty in recruiting engi- 
neers had grown from. 37 percent 
in 1981 to 61 per cent in 1985. / 
Yet the number of apprentices 
taken on every year foils to grow 
and predictions of skill shortages 
get worse. Sir Keith Joseph cited 
this evidence in this column; Irigh- 
perfbrming businesses have in- 
creased their training by 25 per 
cent during the past five years 
while low performers have re- 
duced theirs by 20 per cent, it has 
a spiralling effect; framing works. 

Many individual engineering 
firms know this already. One 
example from my industry is 
STELRAD, one oi Britain's lead- 
ing manufacturers of domestic 
and industrial boilers, which has 
increased production during the 
past four years by 20 per cent and 
saved about 37 per cent of its pay 
bill, mainly through a new training 


programme for managers, shop- 
floor workers and sales 
representatives. ... 

Training and retraining people 
again and again throughout their 
working lives is not a luxury to be 
indulged in when times are good 
and fwanagers have time to spare 
from nmoingtte company. 

M y organization, the 
Engineering Indus- 
try Training Board, 
will be promoting 
the need for action 
on developing human resources. 
gnd action on attitudes . in a 
number 'of ways during Industry 

’Year. ; ' . • 

On March 23-24 we are running 
a conference showing the impor- 
tance of developing talent for 
successful competition cal led The 
W innin g Margin. The conference 
will provide a forum, for discus- 
sion and is aimed at chief execu- 
tives and senior managers. . 

Topics will indude the relation- 
ship between people, performance 
and productivity, and between 
government and manufactu ring 
industry to ensure its future 
contribution to UK wealth cre- 
ation. and the trade union com- 
mitment to competence in British . 
industry. 

The conference is just a first 


March 20, 1986 


sep. !t ml! be vdeoaiKi ‘ 
edited versions will be used at 
Industry Year seminars. 

Engineering creates wealth and 

isJlSe Jar^f » W 

in Britain today. And the vast 
majority of the M 
industry is dependent on success- 
ful engineering acuviiy. 

Yet manufacturing has J U* 
status here compared 
professions and compared 
certain European countries wfocb 
value the people who JT?£ 
wealth. We need to encourage toe 
best of wr scfaool-teavera and 

graduates to compete for tnnnu 
String jobs, particularly as 
moeraohic changes mean there 
Sbnbefewer oflhOT. Having 
caught them, «e need jo keep 
diem bv encouraging self-de* etop- 
meat and advancement. 

The only way we can hope to 
cazeb our competitors is to use the 
best resources we have. And once 
we have caught up, if we can, will 
“they"; our competitors, have 
moved on again? If we go on 
talking, instead of acting, we shall 
fell . further behind. In the 1990s 
only the Teaming company will 
succeed. 

Bill Friggens is the director of . the 
Engineering Training Board 


Appointments Phone: 01-481 4481 


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your full potential. 

The London Executive Programme is for 
managers who have established themselves as future 
leaders within the organisation. During the challenging 
ten weeks they spend at the UK’s leading business 
school, they master new skills of analysis, negotiation, 
implementation. This experience benefits participants 
in one of the most productive and creative phases of 
their careers. 

It is a cosmopolitan programme. A third of the 
participants are based outside the UK. They are 
selected to achieve a balance across industries and 
sectors. Each course makes a working visit outside the 
UK and for the next course this is to Eastern Europe. 

The London Executive Programme. 

Applications are now being taken for the October 1<$B6 
programme and for the few remaining places on the 
April 1986 programme. 

Geraldine Jackson, London Business School, 
Sussex Race, Regent's Park, London NW1 4SA 
Telephone 01-262 5050. 


o FiQjVDON BUSINESS SCHOOL 


GENERAL 

SECRETARY 

A General Secretary is required by 
the National Federation of Post Of- 
fice and British Telecom Pensioners 
with a membership of 93,000 in 270 
branches. 

The successful applicant will need 
good powers of organisation and the 
ability to set up and run the New 
Federation office at Luton. A firm 
belief and interest in aJJ matters af- 
fecting pensioners is essentiaL 
Effective collaboration with other 
pensioner organisation, M.P.s etc will 
be necessary. 

Initial salary negotiable rising to 
£15,000 per 'annum. 

Further details from: 

Mr S.G. Murrell 
44 Cozens-Hardy Road 
Norwich NR7 8QF 


PART TIME FINANCIAL 
JOURNALISM & RESEARCH 

Publisher of financial review seeks persons with writ- 
ing ability to monitor and comment on UK. and 
international investment opportunities. Ideal open- 
ing for experienced people wining to accept a 
significant work load on a regular bat flexible basis. 
Successful applicants will have extensive knowledge 
of the pnvale investment field. Rwmmerarioo will be 
attractive to well qualified people. 

Please write giving details of qualifications and expe- 
rience la 
James Wooden. 

World Investor. 

7-1 1 Lexington Street. 

London W1R 3HQ. 


Electrical /Control 
Engineers 


together with at least five years experience 
working with etectrical/etecbonic control 
equipment used in foe process industry 
including microprocessor (PUG) based 
systems and Medium Vbftage distribution 
systems. A knowledge erf process industry 
■nstajmenteftipn would be useful. • 

In return, we are offering salaries in th*» 
range £12,300 to £18,000, including 
allowances and bonuses, together with 


At British Nuclear Fuels pic we supply^ 
complete nuclear fuels service for reactor 
operators worldwide. Our largest production 
unit is at SellafieJd in Cumbria, on the western- 
edge of the Lake District National Park. 
SellafieW is predominantly a large chemical 
processing operation presently undergoing a 
major expansion and refurbishment 
programme in excess of £2,000 million. 

To complement the growing needs of this 
site, we are now seeking a number of 
experienced professional engineers (male/ 
female) to be responsible, in plant support 
teams, for the commissioning and 1. 
maintenance of electrical distribution and 
plant process control equipment ... 

You will need a relevant honours degree 
and/or corporate membership ofthe fEE,* . 


■ Jnteresfed? Please write, or teteDhonpfrv 

an application form to: Miss C. BaJneT^ * 
British Nuclear Fuels pic, FREEPOST ’ 
Errtotayment Centre, Sellafieid Works ’ 
Seascale, Cumbria CA20 1 PG ortelenhon* 
27724 (24 hour answSpI^^ 



5SS 


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THE TIMES THURSDAY MARCH 20 1986 


17 


~»v." . « 

■ 

>• .» 



s ;i 5 ji’J-M 






-- 





OVERSEA S PRESS SEMES 

tra\slato-isb\\ish) 

London 

- f^'gn Languages Section translates, and ' 
Mmmssians from freelances and agencies the translation 
w, tne LU* s overseas Dress material m » nnn {»««. 


IangQi^as, particularly French, Spanish and Arabic. 



Knowledge or experience of industry; international institutions, 
andtbe mformafaon media would be an advantage. must be 

- a .British or Commonwealth citizen. 

m (^derrcview) as lai(mnation()f6cer£10^60- ■ 

M2^Q.atartnig salary according 1 tn q mKficaticMis ffn d 

- experience. Promotion prospects. 

details and an application form (to be 

rrtnmed by 23 April 1986) write to Civil Service Co mmission , 
Ateueon link, Basingstoke, Hants RG21 UB, or 
telephone Basmgstoke (0256) 4685a (answering q £ . 

service operates outside office hoars). . . . 

Please quote ref: Gf3A)634. jY W 

Tbe Civil Service is an equal * ( PAT } * 

opportunity employer 9 AaA/X/§ 

^ostl^ 


THE PHARMACEUTICAL SOCIETY OF 
GREAT BRITAIN 
HEAD, EDUCATION DIVISION 

The Pbarmeceutkal Society of Great Britain is the registration authority 
and professional body for 3S,000 pharmacists, and is located in a modern 
London building on the South Hnnlr next to Lambeth Paplace. 

. Applications are invited from graduates for the position of Head of the 
.Education Division within a major Department of the Pharmaceutical 
Society concerned with professional development. The Department also 
indpdes divisions dtafing with pharmacy practice and the organisation of 
foe Society’s activities. The Education division is concerned with the 
Socrety*S approval of U.K. pharmacy degrees, '.-liaison, with pharmacy 
schools and students, careers activities,- jnoregistraiion practice experi- 
ence, all aspects of continnihg education and the Society's support of 
postgraduate research. Significant development of the' pre-registration 
experience and contimting education activities is intended. The-Sodety is 
currently funding a project investigating conrinningylucarion activities is 
' inttnded. The Society is currently funding a project investigating continu- 
ing professional education by distance -learning methods. 

■ A pharmacy graduate will be preferred but, more i m port an tly, applicants 
should have had considerable' educational e xp e rie nce. preferably involv- 
ing cunwrt techniques and technology. A related qualification would be 
advantageous: It is expected that the successful applicant wffl be under 45 
years of age, with the ability to communicate effectively and tnanage 
efficiently. . . ' ’ ■' - ’ •.^ r - 

The salary tobeoffered wiD Be between £1<L31 14 and £20.124 per annum 
: -{iartodiiy Eaodoa* We ighting s A8«nwtnce> depending upcm-experienct 
, Kte oppommi^ also exists for earning UrewntnaflyiiKrease to £23,934, . 
- if per fo rmance is significantly above. average. Benefits indude free life - 
assurance and a contributory pension scheme. 

Application forms and a job desc ri ptio n are available from Hw Deputy 
Sn cr at nr y, The Pharmaceutical Society ef Great Britain, £ Lam- 
beth High Street, Leaden 5E1 7HL The last dale for receipt of 
applications wiD be April 18th 1986.- ' 


FINANCIAL SERVICES 

LONDON 

Salaries .to £28K plus car 

Touche Ross & Co. one of the world’s largest and most progressive 
firmsof Chartered Accountants, is experiencing significant growth in 
the demand for it's Audit and specialist Audit Services. 

Exciting career opportunities exist in:- 

— CORPORATE FINANCE 
— FORENSIC INVESTIGATIONS 
— BANKING AND FINANCIAL INSTITUTIONS 
— AUDIT MANAGEMENT 

Applicants should be Chartered Accountants, aged up to 35, with 
relevant experience in public practice, in financiaf 
'institutions or in the corporate finance department of a large 
corporation. 

Career prospects for ambitious candidates with partnership 
potential are excellent 

Write or phone now to Raymond Hurley for more information at- 

^louche Ross 

The Business Partners 

Touche Ross & Co„ . 

Hill House. 1 Little New Street London EC4A 3TR. 
Telephone: 01-353 801 1 


Assistant P rivate Secretary 
to the 

WH May or of London 

c.£ 18 , 000 pa. 

Thk k a senior position within the Lord Mayor's Household ^tbpri"^ 

•* «-*? dOT ” C ' “ d 

important duties, and deputising for him >n his absenus. 

v - tasks wfll involve deafing with Mayoral correspon- 

and efficient running of the Secretarial ’ 
dence. -L.. control and development of some 50 staff: the 

mnmmim^NVnwl estimates and long-wnn costino|ihe comrol or all 
“counts: liaison with Corporation Department, on the 
ina^HclwaM^ppairalKjrefufbahilient of tbe Mansion House. ■ 

will have the competence to fulfil these and other 
The cuccesJulapplcari, capob lliry to act for the Priraie Secretary 

good standard ofeducatioir must be complemented by 
penoo™. Cel*. rib experience of 

ceremonial- ’ , , . . 

W „ K „*J homo. wittas «c*»n»lly u »eeken<fc. g» be a».KiI«.«L 

Preferred age range: 45*55. ... , 

The po» «rri« o aim of emend SBIM P»- »" h "* "■"« 

of benefits. ■ . . 

■„ . Illdinc a fall curriculum vnae. should be made in writing, by 

sss^ssts.^ syr'” 5 ' “ '*'*'■ Hon - ^ ^ 

Mavor- MansKW House London EC4NSBH. 


NT 



NTS 


JOBHUNTERS 

For • b*r job huating Wonmion pack ud aecIN datNbm 
■he rKWtPMnt RMliH pkiM ioctudRlfi o«r 4S0ot«i Jobi 
■ ptawwMiK 101 1 200 DZOOar mritf u 
PER.(EP) KitzodUam Horn*-. 2-4 F1 u»Mm CMc.Sb«ficUSl AIR 

hr*pou*emlaam nMMr«A[ 


Plastics Industry 

Bcxsiorp Fereuson is a subsidiary of a major Swedish 
plastics and metrical group. 

Business Manager - 
Resins Division 

From £18,000 + car County Durham 

This key position, vacant due to internal promotion, offers 
profit responsibility for a complete business area within the 
companv. Current^ manufacturing thennoset phenolic 
and m pianrin e resins for captive use and external sale, the 
requirement is to develop both the production resources 
and commerciri impetus of the buaness. Applicants, aged 
30-45, with appropriate industry experience and proven 
commercial acumen, should contact the company for 
further details. U is envisaged that the succes&ii! candidate 
wiD have degree qualifications in a relevant science. 

Sales Engineer - 
Electronics Division 

Attractive salary+car Home Counties/South 
The cfivision,a leading supplier of copper-dad and undad 
industrial laminates to the electronics and peb cudUstries, 
wishes to recruit a Sales Engineer to take responsibility for 
the sale of our complete product range. Appucams over 25. 
whh appropriate further educational qualifications, 
preferably with experience of the peb or related industries, 
and interested in commencing or developing a sales career 
in a dynamic fest-movingen vnonmenL 
Apply with hitiev to: Mr T RBatrershv, Company 
Secretary, Pexstorp Ferguson Limited. A>cRffe industrial 
Estate, Newton AydiBe. Co Durham DL5 6EF. 

Perstorp Ferguson 


Joinery Industry 

BJJrinery Ltd. part of Sarefc Wbod AB. a consortium of 
major Swedish sawmills; is a leading UK joinery 
manufacturer. Continual sales growth and reorganisation 
has created the following opportunities: 

Production Managers (2 posts) 

Casde Hedingham 

One post is for our Special Window Division and the other 
for our Kitchen Unit Division. Must have proven 
management and technical ability in batch or flowfine 
environment Background in joineiy or furniture industry 
an advantage. 

, Sales Representatives (4 posts) 

Areas -various 

Three posts for jrineiysales team. Area 1 ) Manchester. 
Cheshire, Gwynedd, Clwyd; Area 2) Beds. Bucks and NW 
London; Area 3) Derbys,Notts, Lines. Loics. Warics, 
Sodbull & Coventry. Experience in selling to large 
developers, builders merchants and locaiauthomies. 
Joinery background preferred. The fourth post wfll cover 
the region of North England. Technical credibility reauired. 
WtDseflto architects, specifiers, local authorities and large 
developers. Attractive salaries and benefits. Sales posts 
indude car 4- commission. 

Write endosuKCv to: Mike Reed, Personnel Manager. 

BJ Joinery Ltd. Castle Hedingham, Essex C09 3EP. 


Sales Engineer 

Aerospace £ Defence * 

Very competitive salary + car Qos 

Moog Controls Ltd, is the autonomous UK division of 


aerospace and other high technology industries. We are 
design innovaiors in the field of servo vahts. sem> 
actuators and electronic control systems, and business is 
very good. We wish to recruit a high calibre individual to 
provide unpetus to (he drive for increased sales in this 
competitive sector throughout the UK and a broad. You wfll 
need to be a qualified engineer, aged 24-33 . Reasonable 


aerospace experience wuh specific knowledge of servo 
systems would be very desirable. Some previous sales 
experience whilst helpful is not essential Of prime 
importance is the ability to identify new business 
opportunities, to interpret customers' needs and to have 


benefits. Comprehensive relocation assistance will be given 

who re appro priate- 

Ptease write or telephone to Asciiss salary requirements 
and for an application form toe Mr M McLaren, or Mis C 
Harrisore Moog Controls Ltd, Ashchurch, Tewkesbury, 
Gloucestershire. 1<I:( 0684) 296600.- 

MOOG 


Electronic Design 
Engineer 

JSB Electrical limited have a vacancy for a Design 


degree. HND or equivalent Candidates must be self- 
mo rivaled and capable of working on their own with a 



TRAINEE RECRUITMENT 
CONSULTANTS 

LONDON AREA £NEGOHABLE 

Accountancy Personnel is the market 
leader in the specialist recruitment of 
Accountants and their staff at all lev- 
els In commerce, industry and public 
practice. Committed to sustained 
growth, we offer sound training lead- 
ing rapidly Into an exceptionally 
progressive career structure with all 
promotion from within, providing 
stimulating . and rewarding 
responsibilities. 

To join one of our successful profes- 
sional teams you should be 21-50, self 
motivated and well educated, ideally 
(but not essentially) with some ac- 
countancy knowledge. 

Contact The Personnel Manager on: 

01-823^004 

Accountancy Personnel, 

1 Glen House, Stag Place, 
London, SW1E SAD. 


PERSONNEL/TRAINING 

OFFICER 

Required for Fraternal Benefit Company in SE 

« , ■ , i in . u b- . 


aflQ.000 pa. 

Tel: Mr. Hayward 01-703 5575 


Production Superintendent Sales Opportunities 


Five figure negotiable salary Norfolk 

Travcnol is a successful Dnulti-million imcmaional 
company devoted to the design, development. manufacture 
and distribution of a range oflife-saving medical care 
products. A Production Superintendent is soueht for the 2- 
10pm shift. Responsible, through Production Supervisors, 
for controlling a large fast growing team of production 
operatives within a high-tech clean-room environment to 
tight manufacturing targets, you will need a soantf 


tfisdptihcand be seeking yourncxi career moM&Thc 
company offer good career prospects and wide ranging 
benefits including relocation assistance. Salary-will not be a 
titrating factor in appointing tbe right person. 

Phone: Diana Campbell, hobbt 

PER Norwich. \ 1 / 

on (0603) 617426, / 1 V 

for an application form. 

TRAVEMOL 


Assistant General Manager 

£12,000-£1S,000 + car Norib Cambs 

Huntingdon based adhesive tape compaiv. are looking to 
strengthen their management team with crcaticm of this 
new position. Initial responsibility will indude finance, 

E roduct management and office sv’StetnsdeveJoaracnL 
lawever it is anticipated that the post wiD qtrickK- develop 
into a key management rda Can oidaies aged 2S-32 
educated to at least ’A' level standard, should have financial 
and sales and marketing experience in a commercial 
environment. Essential qualities sought include Oeir, drive 
and determination, and a strong desvc for success 
Excellent career prospects. 

Please write with foil c* to: Mr K Mefior, Limpet 'tapes 
Limited. Bond House. 9AGeoree Street. Hpntinadon. 
Cambs PE186BD. 


Systems Analyst/Programmer 

£10,500-£13,000 + benefits Suffolk 

Recently transferred to private ownership wc ate a 
respected and successful compart)' in shipbufldingand 
en^neering. Applicants, ideally degree or HNC with 
experience in mechanical enrince ring and knouiedgoof 


Sika Ltd are proud of their excellent reputation as 
formulaiors and manufacturers of a wide range of products 
for the construction industry. To maintain our position, add 
increase our market share we wish to appoint me following 
candidates who should he self-motivated, professional 
sales persons with a proven track record. 

Technical Sales Representative 

Neg salary+car O xon/B ucks/Beds/Herts 

The successful applicant for this position will cover the 
above area, and a knowledge of sealants, epoxy products, 
polymer mortars or concrete admixtures is desirable. 

Please write (0 Ken Lea. Sales Manager. at (headdress 
below; 

Technical Sales Representative 
Joint Sealant Division 

Competitive salary + car Home Counties 

For the development of sales of polyurethane and joint 
sealants wc wish to appoint a professional salesperson to 
cover Surrey. Kent. Hampshire and Berkshire. A 
knowledge of joint sealants desirable. Please write with cv 
to Ted Croasdale. Sales Manager (Joint Sealants Division) 
at the address below. 

Candidates applying for the above positions should have ai 
least three years' sales experience in the construction 
industry, coupled with the ability io communicate with 
specifiers, contractors, on-site buyers and engineers. 
Successful applicants, aged 25-45. 
will receive an attractive A 

salary, company car and 4Hk 

other company benefits. /Jfo 

Sika Limited, muchmead. IBBl 


Welwyn Garden City. 
Hertfordshire AL 7 1BQ. 


analvsis, ; programrni ng using TME and Ranee COBOL on 
1 CL"MEj 9 equipment TPE an advantage. Supervising 
staff an d giving technical advice and guidance to 

management fs essential. 

Send cv to: Anne Daniels, 

Personnel Assistant 
Brooke Marine Limited, 

Heath Road, Lowestoft, 

Suffolk NR339LZ- : 


Graduate 

c£12^00 Corby 

Avon Cosmetics, one of the world's leading cosmetics 



Sales Manager 

c£12,000+comm+car England & Wales 

My client is a leading manufacturer of domestic electrical 
appliances. This new appointment has been created in 
order to develop new sales outlets. You will be responsible 
for identifying and contacting potential distributors, 
electrical wholesalers and home improvement stores and 
also for negotiation of sales contracts and subsequent 
servicing ol the new accounts. Applicants must be 
experienced in selling electrical goods and have established 
contacts. 

Send full cv to: Jane Parker. PER. Bankfield House, 

163 New Unton Street. Coventry CV! 2PE. Please list any 
company to whom you do not wish your application to be 
forwarded. 


f YfA r i >I¥<T i Itu 1 1 VTTi 'll i tY \ 


with'accounting experience to be responsible (or the day to 
day control of their credit administration and marketing co- 
ordination department. Responsibilities of the department 
are diverse with considerable involvement in the 
operational aspects of our business. Consequently, at least 
three years' experience within a fast moving, highly 
computerised environment is essential, together with 
excellent communication and inter-personal skills. You wd) 
be expected to achieve demandintyct realistic goals widtin 
an agreed budget and contribute effectively to the future erf 
ourousincss. the salary wfll depend on the level of 
experience and will not bean obstacle to the candidate who 
matches our requirements. A comprehensive benefits 
package including non-con tributary pension scheme, 
health insurance, and free life assurance is offered. 
Relocation assistance will be available. If this is the career 
move you are lookingfon 

Please seodecomprehenovecv to: Mr C Young, Personnel 
Officer, Avon Cosmetics Ltd, Eartetrees Road, Corby, 
Northerns NN 17 2AT. 


Sales Representative 

Corrugated Packaang 

South East 

Our company is part of a large international packaging 
group which continues to expand successfully despite the 
recession. We arc now seeking an experienced Sales 
Representative for a territory in Greater London and 
adjoining counties North of the Thames. Applicants should 
be able to demonstrate the ability to succeed in a highly 
competitive market, preferably in the packaging or allied 
industries, and he seeking opportunity for advancement on 
merit with a profitable group which sees commitment and 
determination as key factors in achieving high 
performance. Salary will reflect both the importance of the. 
position and the calibre of the individual, other benefits 
include a company car and pension scheme. 

Send cv to: Mr P Wilkinson, r^oi/K. [/■^j 

Lin PSac Corrugated Cases, J f J \l/ I Wkll 

RkfamerRoad, 

Erith, Kent DA8 2HN. 


Sales Executives - CIM 

Negotiable salary + car Nationwide 

A successful specialist company established in 1970, wc 
are actively involved in monitoring and computcr- 
imcgraicdi manufacturing. .As systems integrators. our 
activities include sensing, communications, applications/ 
integration software ana total CIM turnkey svstems. With 
worldwide systems installation bases and a wholly owned 
US subsidiary, wc are currently capitalised and positioned 
for further expansion in Europe and the UK. Several 
experienced sales professionals are now required, who can 
demonstrate a proven track record in sales and marketing 
in manufacturing automation, electronics or information 
technology- With opportunities nationwide, these positions 
offer realtong term career prospects and a very attractive 
salary package, together with good additional earnings 
potential, pension scheme and other frinee benefit 
Please reply in confidence to: The ChiefExecutive, 

Mr RTM Van Gestel. _l_ I 

Dextraloe Limited. Hillside. n fiX TlfllQfl 
Wfiiteberk Industrial t stale, ** ^ . D 

Bfackbum BB1 5SN. SCSHtBX 


Manager - Sales Department 


Technical Manager 

Wiltshire 

To recruit and lead a small team of professionals providing 
technical support to our microcomputer franchised stores. 
The position also involves product evaluation and 
assessment of market trends. The successful candidate will 
be fully conversant with the integration of micro/supcr 
micro systems and office communications and have a 
detailed knowledge of LAN/Multi User technology. 

Send fiitl cv to: Pauline Morgan, PER. 62-64 High Street, 1 
Southampton S092EC. 


successful sales aaminisiranon experience ideally m a 
consumer eoods industry involved in world-wide exports. 
A knowledge of computerised systems is hiehly desirable 
and fluency in a European language would be an 
advantage. The main duties wfll include the management of 
the department which acts as the liaison point for the sales 
team in the UK and overseas. It covers the monitoring of all 
orders through from sellina- production, warehousing, to 
despatch, the handling of all enquiries from established and 
potential customers and the comrol and production of 
accurate documentation and statistics within a strict time 
schedule A good salary and benefits will be negotiated. 
Write ( in confidence) mv ing details of experience and 
current salary UK The Personnel Director. 
AquascuturaUd, — 

100 Regent Street. A 

London WI A 2AQ. J^JjUOSCUtWn 


Software Engineers 

Birmin gham 

RETIS Realtime Software UK. located 31 the Aston 
Science Park, wishes to recruit further software personnel, 
for projects in the UK and Switzerland. Software Engineers 
are required at all levels for die management and 
implementation of industrial software projects, including 
control, management information, warehouse and 
communication systems. Using Pascal. C. or Modula II, 
you will be managing, designing and implementing 
software for VAX. PDP 11. Intel and Motorola hardware. 
You should be qualified to degree or HNC level and 
possess initiative and the ability to work well in teams. 
Based in the UK frequent, short visits to Switzerland ma 




be an advantage. Interested? 

Send lull evtre Doreen Woodward. PER, I SO Corporation 
Street, Birmingham B4 6T8. 


RADIALL 


Multinational Group in hi-tech electronics components 



FOR RADIALL U.K. SUBSIDIARY (Located in Farnborough-Hants) 


ADMINISTRATION AND FINANCIAL MANAGER 


Due fo the rapid growth over the last 3 years f-f 88%) our General Manager 
requires additional managerial support in the financial and administrative field. 

The Function : 

The manager shall be responsible for all aspects of finance (reporting, credit 
control, cash and stock management), administrative and staff procedures 
(including fully integrated computer system). This responsibility requires an 
ambitious and career orientated person capable of achieving the position of 
assistant to the Genera/ Manager. 

The candidate : 

Practical experience (minimum of 3 years) in administration, financial control 
and data-processing within a commercial environment is essential. 

The candidate must be able to offer considerable drive and enthusiasm to achieve 
the objectives of the function. 

To apply for this position, please write with full C. V. fo 
RADIALL MICROWAVE COMPONENTS Ltd 
Invencible Road - FARNBOROOGH (Hants) 


OFFICE MANAGER 
£14 v 00Qe 

Wdl established West End prope rt y devetoperc require an expo- 
ncnccd office manager (JIMS). Tbe t ne eesrf ii l appBeaM must he 
self motivated and pones u eye for detail. Th« win be die 
opp ort uni t y to become foil; involved in the oiguisaiion. a- 
rfodmg setting up pnnecK and tbe msmgEBEiR of staff Apply 
to Gaye Neville on 01-486 6717 Aifted Marts RccnscnaK 
Consultants. 


ADVERTISING 
CONTINUED ON 
PAGE 28. 






























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18 


THE TIMES THURSDAY MARCH 20 1986 


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COURT 

AND 

SOCIAL 


COURT 

CIRCULAR 

BUCKINGHAM PALACE 
March 19: It is with the greatest 
pleasure that The Queen and 
The Duke of Edinburgh an- 
nounce the betrothal of their 
beloved son The Prince Andrew 
to Miss Sarah Ferguson, daugh- 
ter of Major Ronald Ferguson 
and Mrs Hector Barrames. 

Mr M.L. Tart was received in 
audience by The Queen and 
kissed hands upon his appoint- 
ment as Hct Majesty's Ambas- 
sador Extraordinary and 
Plenipotentiary at Abu Dhabi. 

Mrs Tait bad the honour of 
being received by The Queen. 

The Duke of Edinburgh, Mas- 
ter of Trinity House and Honor- 
ary Fellow of the Nautical 
Institute, this morning Opened 
the Institute's Command Semi- 
nar at Trinity House, London, 
EC3. 

Brigadier Clive Robertson 
was in attendance. 

His Royal Highness, COlonel- 
in-Chief, this evening attended a 
Reception given by the Corps of 
Royal Electrical and Mechanical 
Engineers at St James’s Palace. 

The Duke of Edinburgh, 
President of the Royal Society of 
Arts, and The Prince and Prin- 
cess of Wales, attended a dinner 
at the Royal Society of Arts, 
John Adam Street. WC2. 

During the evening The Duke 
of Edinburgh presented the 
Albert Medal for 1985 to The 
Prince of Wales. 

Mr Brian McGrath, Mis 
George West and Mr David 
Roycroft were in attendance. 

CLARENCE HOUSE 
March 1 9: Queen Elizabeth The 
Queen Mother, this afternoon 
received the Presidents of 
Queen Mary's London Needle- 
work Guild at St James's Palace 
on the occasion of the Guild's 
Annual General Meeting. 

Ruth Lady Fennoy was in 
attendance. 

KENSINGTON PALACE 

March 19: The Prince of 


Wales. Duke of Cornwall, this 
morning presided at a meeting 
of The Prince’s Council at 10 
Buckingham Gate, SW1, and 
subsequently with The Princess 
of Wales, Diuchess of Cornwall, 
entertained members of .the 
Council to luncheon at Kensing- 
ton Palace. 

His Royal Highness this after- 
noon visited the 1986 Royal 
Institute of Painters in 
Watercolours Exhibition at the 
MaU Gallery, London. SW 1. 

Afterwards The Prince of 
Wales attended a Colloquium 
on "Research Validation of 
Complementary Therapies” at 
the Royal Society of Medicine. 2 
Wimpote Street London, Wl. 

Lieutenant-Colonel Brian 

Anderson was in attendance. 

KENSINGTON PALACE 
March 19: The Duchess of 
Gloucester, Patron of the Lon- 
don College of Music, was 
present this evening at a College 
Concert at the Library of the 
Central HalL Westminster. 

Mrs Howard Page was in 
attendance. 

YORK HOUSE 
ST JAMES'S PALACE 
March 19: The Duke of Kent, 
Vice-Chairman of the British 
Overseas Trade Board, today 
visited Elcometer Instruments 
Limited, Droylsden, Manches- 
ter, and ERF Limited. 
Sandhocfa, Cheshire. 

His Royal Highness, who 
travelled in an aircraft of The 
Queen's Flight, was attended by 
Sir Richard Buckley. 

The Duchess of Kent this 
morning opened the Glen field 
District Hospital and this after- 
noon opened the Fire and 
Rescue Service Headquarters 
and the Belgrave Children and 
Family Centre, Leicester. 

Her Royal Highness, who 
travelled in an aircraft of The 
Queen's Right, was attended by 
Mrs David Napier. 


A memorial service for Mr Olof 
Palme will be held in West- 
minster Abbey today at 
11.30am. 


Birthdays today 

The Very Rev William 
Baddeley, 72; Mr Anthony 
Blond. 38; Sir Arnold Burgen, 
64; Sir Richard Denby, 71; Sir 
Arthur Driver. 86: Dame Vera 
Lynn. 69; Mr A.M. M’Bow. 65; 
Sir Alec Merrison. 62; Professor 
Sir Ashley Miles, 82; Sir David 
Montgomery, 55; Dr John Rae, 
55; Mr Justice Saville, 50; Mr 
Steven Watson, 70. 


William and Mary 

Tercentenary 

Trust 

The Prince of Wales is to be 
Patron of the William and Mary 
Tercentenary Trust, established 
last year to organize celebrations] 
in 1988. Princess Maigriet of] 
The Netherlands is to be Patron 
of the Foundation 
Netherlands/England 
‘.688/1988. which, with the 
trust, will organize events in 
both countries. 


Reception 

Veuve Clicquot Champagne 
A reception was held yesterday 
at the Institute of Directors, Pall 
Mall, for the Veuve Clicquot 
Award Business Woman of the 
Year, which was awarded to Mrs 
Patricia Gram, Managing Direc- 
tor. Norfrost. Mr Malcolm 
Rifkind. MP, made the 
presentation. Sir John Hosfyns, 
Director General of the Institute 
of Directors, and Count Alain 
de Vogue, President. Veuve 
Clicquot-Pbnsardin, were hosts 
at a luncheon held afterwards. 


Buckingham 

Palace 

Luncheon 

The Queen and the Duke of 
Edinburgh held a luncheon 
party at Buckingham Palace 
yesterday. The guests were: 

M to Barbara Dickson utnoerL Bar- 
oness McFarlane or Uandafr (profes- 
sor and head of Uw department of 
nursing. Manchester University). 
Professor Bernard crossland (profes- 
sor emeritus. The Queen's Un i ver si ty. 
Belfast). Sir Owen Green l chairman. 
BTH pic i. Professor Frederick 
Holliday ivicr-chanceilor and warden. 
Durham University). Mr Brian Red- 
head (broadcaster). Mr Samuel 
Swinger (co-ordtnaior. Black Enter- 
prise unit. Business In the Commu- 
nity) and Mr DavRf wUUams Qxneiaf 
secretary. Confederation of Health 
Service Employees). 


Service dinner 

RAF Inusworth 
The Lord-Lieutenant of 
Gloucestershire was present at a 
civic guest night held at RAF 
Innsworth last night. Air Vice- 
Marshal R.A. Meson, Air Sec- 
retary. and Wing Commander 
P.C. Squire, Station Com- 
mander. recieved the guests. 
Wing Commander PAL Hall 
presided. Among those present 
were: 

The High Sheriff of Gloucestershire. 

UW Archdeacon of Cheltenham, the 

Chief Constable of Gloucestershire. 

the Mayors of Tewkesbury. Glouces- 

ter and Cheltenham, the CMcf Exec- 
utives of Gloucmer and Cheltenham 
Borough Council and the Borough 

Secretary of Tewkesbury. 


Latest wills 

Major the Hon Baron Thomas 
Edward Dimsdale. of 
Nuthampstead, Hertfordshire, 
formerly High Sheriff of 
Hertfordshire and one of the few 
British subjects allowed by 
Royal Warrant to bear a foreign 
(Russian) title, left estate valued 
ax £4 12,974. 


University news 

Bristol 

Grants 

nsugngus 

spectrometry and (Kranwtrv. 

aetiology of human malignant 

BBraaB'sgjSsyg 

to lej ear cti BWjmawt bf «dmg l» 

muias on an EB w w ua cxa ne- 

l^nrefhufiiw TiW £fi4-9C0» Prol»- 

sor WP Botrtnaon tawarjB^flP J«v 
vMtlgMhdrt 

achievement in secondary soum 

PUPlb. 

London 
King’s College 
Grams 

Wriimme Trust £51 .861 to Dr CW 
Coen to support research Irt the neujjl 
anatomical sy-rtoW ^ 

release of ruteltUztaa hormone rrtee*- 
htg hormones- 

Ministry of Defence: £54.637 .to 
Kxrfessor RE Burge to jjudyjjramrfrgi 
front suo-wavelengtft sized structures. 

raptiy sources, masks. roasts and 
transferred images. 

Heriot-Watt 

Conoco UK, the oil company, 
has given £320,000 to the 
university to esiablish a new. 
engineering and research 6cQ- 
hy. The grant will provide more 
half the funds for the 
centre, the remainder coming 
from the university and Univer- 
sity Grants Committee. 


United Wards’ 
Club 

The following have been elected 
officers of the United Wards* 
Oub of the City of London for 
the ensuing year. _ , _ 
President, Mr Peter Northan- 
Laurie: Vice-Presidents, Mr A. 
John James and Mr Sheriff Jack 
Neary. Honorary Treasurer, Mr 
Stanley Rust; Secretary, Mr 
Frank Wooldridge. 


Forthcoming 

marriages 


Mr J. Watson 
and Miss S. Waugh 
The engagement is announced 
between Julian, only son of 
Vice-Admiral Sir Philip Wat- 
son, KBE, MVO. and Lady 
Watson, of The Hermitage, 
Bodicoie, Oxfordshire, and So- 
phia, rider daughter of Mr 
Auberon and Lady Teresa 
Waugh, of Combe Florey 
House, Somerset. 

Mr RA, SteetJman 

and Miss N J. Evensou 
The engagement is announced 

between Roderick Alasdair, 
only son of Air Chief Marshal 
Sir Alasdair Sieedman and the 
late Lady Sieedman. of 
Gatehouse of Fleet, and Nancy 
Irene, daughter of Mr and Mrs 
Ronald Even son, of Colorado 
Springs, United States. 


Mr RjY. Giacf 

and Miss S-M. Richards 

The engagement is announced 

between Roger Arthur, elder son 
of the late Dr Irving Gifeef and 
Mrs GraeL of New York City, 
and Susan Mary, only daughter 
of Sir Brooks and Lady Rich- 
ards, of the Ranger's House, 
Faixiham, Surrey. 

Mr J.C. Bodansky 
and Mrs A-H. Coflman 
The engagement is announced! 
between Jonathan, son of Mr 
and Mrs Ernst Bodansky. of 
Horsham, Sussex, and Anne, 
daughter of Mr and Mrs Rich* 
aid Silley. of Epping, Essex. 

Mr D-L- McGibbon 
and Miss Utd. Chudtey 
The engagement is announced 
between David, eldest son of Mr 
and Mrs Lewis McGibbon, of 
Golf Chapel Brampton, 

Northamptonshire, and Lucy, 
youngest daughter of Mr and 
Mrs Michael Chudley, of 
Highgate House, Creaton, 
Northamptonshire. 


Mr M.G Moore 
and Miss J.B. WHtetts 
The engagement is announced 
between Matthew, son of Mr 
and Mrs G.E. Moore, of Sutton 
Coldfield, West Midlands, and 
Jayne, daughter of Mr and Mrs 
J.K. Willetts, ofSeecbem Eques- 
trian Centre, Alvechurch, 
Worcestershire. 

MrJLF.Mortoa 
and Miss A. Lotassigh 
The engagement is announced 
between James Freeland, youn- 
gest son of Mr and Mrs K-VJF. 
Morton, of. Great Wflbraham, 
Cambridge; and Ame, daughter 
of Mr and Mrs Ni Loingrigh, of 
Ralhiainham, Dublin. 

Mr G. Passey 
and MissAJP. George 
The engagement is announced 
between George, only son of- 
Mrs J.B. Passey, or Clifton, 
Bristol, and Amanda, daughter- 
of Mr and Mrs J. George, of 
Marlborough, Wiltshire. 

Mr N.A. RnsseB 
and Miss HJBJL Barren 
The engagement is announced 
between Nicholas, youngest son 
of Mr and Mis Cynl Russell, of 
Holland Park, London, and 
Heather, daughter of Cbtonel 
and Mrs John BurreiL, of Grange 
Court, Bishop's Siortford, 
Hertfordshire. 

Dr A. Verg£aeOi 
and Mbs XA. Mitchell 
The engagement is announced 
between Antonio, elder son of 
Mr and Mrs V. Vergmeffi, 
Zagarolo, Route, and Julie, 
second daugh ter of Mr and Mrs 
P-G. MitchelL of 32 Village 
Way, Beckenham, Kent. 

Mr N.W. Weyman 
and Miss D.G. Saunders 
The engagement is announced 
between Nigel Westcar, younger 
son of tire late Mis D.M. 
Weyman and of Mr A.W. 
Weyman, of Parley, Surrey, and 
Diane Glen, younger daughter 
of Mr and Mrs R-G. Sa u nders,- 
of Purley, Surrey. 


Luncheons 


HM Government 
Baroness Young, Minister of 
Stale for Foreign and Common- 
wealth Affairs, was host yes- 
terday at a luncheon at 
Lancaster House given in hon- 
our of Mrs Rake! Suricin, 
Norwegian Minister of 
Environment. 

HM Government 
Mr Timothy Raison, Minister 
for Overseas Development, was 
host at a luncheon given yes- 
terday by Her Majesty’s Gov- 
ernment at Duke’s Hotel in 
honour of Mr Charles Wagner. 
Minister of Works of Belize. 

Board of Deputies of British 
Jews 

Dr Lionel Kopek) witz, Presi- 
dent of the Board of Deputies of 
British Jews, and Mrs 
Kopelowitz, assisted by the 
honorary officers, were hosts at 
a luncheon ia honour of Dr 
David Owen, MP. and Mrs 
Owen held ai Woburn House, 
Tavistock Square yesterday. 
Among the guests were: 

Tlw Israeli Ambassador. Viscount 
Hantvurth. Lard FKmco. Lord Hunt, 
Loril Hutchinson of LuUngnn. QC. 
Lord Perry of Walton. Lord Raglan. 
Lord Satnsbury. Lord Taylor or 
Cryfc Lord Whadckm. Lord Wdb- 
Pesten. Lord Wcttenfrld. Baroness 
Stedman. Sir Basil Feldman. Sir John 
Walton. Sir Alfred Sherman. Mr Alan 
Belth. MP. Mr Rotten Mactennan. MP. 
and Mr A H Grattham. 

Dinners 

Royal Society of Arts 
The Duke of Edinburgh, Presi- 
dent of the Royal Society of 
Arts, and the Pnnce and Prin- 
cess of Wales were entertained 
at a private dinner party by Sir 
Peter Baldwin, chairman, and 
the council of the society in the 
society's house in the Adelphi 
last night 

The Duke of Edinburgh pre- 
sented the society's Albert 
Medal for ] 986 to the Prince of 
Wales. The other guests: 

Mr Kenneth Adams. Mr and Mrs 
Demetrius Comtno. Professor and Mrs 
Harry Hansen. Dr and Mrs Martin 
Haidgate. Mr and Mrs HyweU Jo ne s. 
Mr and Mrs Bryan Nlctioison and Mr 
and Mrs Stephen O’Brien. 


Coachmakers’ and Coach Har- 
ness Makers' Company 
Prince Michael of Kent dined 
with the Coachmakers’ and 
Coach Harness Makers’ Com- 
pany on the occasion of the 
motor industry dinner at Mer- 
chant Taylors’ Hall last night 
Mr Richard Dallimore, Master, 
presided. Sir Barrie Heath, Mr 
Philip Ashfield and Mr Ray 
Horrocks also spoke. 

HM Government 
Lord Gray of Comm. Minister 
of Stale ai the Scottish Office, 
was host at a dinner held last 
night at Edinburgh Castle on the 
occasion of the visit to Scotland 
by the Agriculture and Fisheries 
Commission of Denmark. 

Army Board 

Mr Norman Lamont, Minister 
of State for Defence Procure- 
ment presided at a dinner given 
yesterday at the Royal Hospital. 
Chelsea, by the Army Board of 
the Defence Council in honour 
of Lieutenant-General Jozsef 
Pacsek, Chief of Staff Hungar- 
ian Army. Among those present 
were: 

General Sir Nigel BagnafL General 
Btr Roland Gay. Genera) Sir Rfcbard 
TranL Lieutenant-General Sir Richard 
Vincent. Mr John Btenodu Mr Oolln 
FtehUne: Die Hungarian Ambassador. 
Lord Moran, the Hon NKhoUs 
Soames. MP. Mr Justice Stuart -Smith. 
Sir GUve W hitm ore. General Sir 
Robert Ford. Sir Alan TraUL Admiral 
Sir David HaUtfax. Sir David Plastov*. 
Mr Donald Andenon. MP. Mr Dwelt 
Thomas. Mr Ouislopher Long. 
Professor John Cadogan. Me- George 
SehopfllA Mr Mlcha5Webb«Owen. 
Mr Albert Wheway and Cotone! 
GyOrgy Demeter. 

Conzngsby Club 
The Coningsby Qub enter- 
tained Mr Tom King, MP, at 
dinner last night at the Carlton 
Club. Mr Jonathan Baker 
presided. 

Highland Society of London 
The Duke of Argyll was yes- 
terday elected President of the 
Highland Society of London 
and was in the chair at the 
society’s annual members* din- 
ner held at the Caledonian Qub. 
Lord Campbell of Croy was the 
guest of honour. Among others 
present were: 


The Duke of AXhod. Viscount 
Thurso. Lord Margadato. Lord 
Drurotfbyn. Lord Rosy. Mr Justice 
Macufterson Of Cluny. Dm- Very Rev 
Dr j Fraser McUafcey and Ootaarf R 
A A S Macrae. 

Westminster Darfag Chfo 
Mrs Angela Rum bold, MP, and 
Mrs Elizabeth Peacock, MP, 
Joint Chairmen of the West- 
minster Dining Club, were hosts 
at a dinner held by the dob at 
the House of Commons last 
night The Hon Alidc Bu- 
chanan -Smith. MP, also spoke. 
Among those present were: 


Mm Sandra Chabnera. Mrs Jane 


Angela Cnffln. Mias JnrneB 
Elizabeth Macd onald-Brown 
Elena SatvonL ■ 


Drake. .Mis Janto" Fleedur. IJto 
Mias Jayne hi^uMra 


FacalQ' of Anaesthetists 
Dr Ailieen K. Adams; Dean of 
the Faculty of Anaesthetists, 
presided at a dinner held last 
night at the Royal College of 
Surgeons. The principal speak- 
ers were Mr Maurice Shock and 
Professor J. Terblanche. 

Qpopeaa Association of Fro- 
fesskwal Secretaries: . 

The animal dinner for the 
European Association ct Pro- 
fessional Secretaries UK mem- 
ben and their guests was held 
last night at the Berkeley hotcL 
The guest of honour was Mr 
Philip Wilkinson, Director and 
Group Chief Executive of Na- 
tional Westminster Bank pte. 
The other speakers were the 
Hon David Montagu, Deputy 
Chairman of J. Rothschild 
Holdings pic, and EAPS mem- 
bers. Mrs Penny James and 
Miss Anne Hamilton. 

Royal Society 
of Medicine 

The Prince of Wales attended a 
colloquium on "Research 
validation of complementary 
therapies” at the Royal Society 
of Medicine yesterday.' He was 
received by Sir John Walton, 
president, and Sir James Watt, 
chair man of the colloquium. 


OBITUARY 



BIRTHS. MARRIAGES 

DEATHS and IN MEMOR1AM 
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Births, Marriages, Deaths and In Memoriam 


Be ye therefore followers of God. as 
dear children: and walk in love, as 
Chnsl abo hath loved us 
F.BhesUin-i fit? 


BIRTHS 

BEfiC On March 15Qi to Susan (nee 
Cox) and Nigel, a son. James Ed- 
mund Houston, a brother for Alice. 

BIDDER lo Bill and Jane (nee Thomas) 
on 17th March, a daughter Lucy 
Cefaslina Margaret, c sister for 
wuha/n. 

CARTER. On March I5lh toSara tn*e 
Co xi and Ben. a daughter. Elizabeth 
Mary, a sister for Rachel. 

CLARKE- to unda mee Barden) and 
Makolm a daughter. Angela Christi- 
na Linda, on March the 6th at 
Broinsgrove Genera) HospllaL 
Bromsgrove. Worcestershire. 

COLE Orr March 1 7th ai home in Hol- 
land Park, to Nicola and Adam, a son 
Toby Oliver- 

DAWS On March 16Ui. at Queen 
Charkme’s Hospital, to Andrew and 
Phoebe, a son. Harry Arthur Vidor 
Bennett, a brother to Constance. 

ELUS- On March tern at the Rosie 
Maternity Hospital, Cambridge, to 
Marie (nee McLeod) and Peter, a 
daughter Jennifer, a sister for 
Richard. 

HANULT0H On March uth- at Si 
Mary's Hospital, Paddington, to 
France, wile of Gordon Hamilton- a 
daughter Georgina Elizabeth Cole. 


HOWE ■ On 17 March to Margaret mee 
Causer) and Chris a daughter JuUa 
Elizabeth, a sister (tor Richard. 

KARPMSKITo Jan and Melanie on 13 
March, a son Piers Stanbfcaw, a 
brother for Alice and Lucian. 

IUSZELV - On March 17th. to 
Arabella, wife of John Kiszety. a son. 

LEWIS on March t7Ui at Queen Char- 
lottes to Karin (nee AinJey-Smfdi) 
and Graham, a sister for Edmund. 
Caroline Tabatha Florence. 

LEWIS on March 12th a! The 
Gorsetnofi HospUaL Swansea, to 
James and Kim uiee Sulah) a beauti- 
ful daughter Emma-Marte. Sister for 
Christian. 

LORMER on 18th March at Queen 
Charlotte's Hospital, to Miranda (nee 
James) and lan. a son. Thomas Ian. a 
br other fo r Alastalr. 

McCflEME On March X6th to Pip and 
cnsplan. a daughter Juliet Clare, a 
sister for Oliver. 

PRICE On Itith March 1966 at Prin- 
cess Margaret Hospital. Swindon, to 
Louise into Coghlan) and Martin, a 
son Sebastian Gerard Francis 
Barraud. a brother for Alexander 
and M arle-nwese. 

SCOTT on 1 5th March ro Caroline and 
Michael, a daughter Elizabeth Main, 
a sister for Katharine. 

SIMPSON on March nth. at Royal 
Lancaster Infirmary, to Nicky, twin 
sons. Thomas William and Charles 
Alexander, small and beautiful. 

WELCH To Andrew and Mary on 7th 
March In Plymouth, a son. Hugh 
Frederick, brother for Beniamin. 

YUJLL on 12th March In Sydney to 
EUsabeth uwe SWbWngv and Brian, 
a son Richard Alexander a brother 
for Katle- 

DEATHS 

ANDERSON on March lllh at St 
George's Hospital SW17 to Pauline 
and BUI SuUocJt-AndereoR. a second 
son David William. 

BAR.WARD On 17th March, peaceful- 
ly m SI- George s Hospital. Milliard - 
On-Sea. Eileen, aged 88 yearn, 
dearly loved mother, grandmother 
and great-grandmother. Private Cre- 
mation. Service of Thanksgiving lo 
be announced laier. 

BARRY- On March the 18th Lilian Ja- 
net of 26 rifflon Court Westminster, 
widow of Frank Russell Barry 
D S.O.. D.D-. tote Btshop of 

South welL dearly loved mother of 
Rosemary and grandmetther of Rub- 
sell. Nicholas, and Frances. Funeral 
Service at Westminster Abbey on 
Tuesday March 25th at 5.45pnt 

HAZELL- On March 18lh In AppoUo 
Bay. Victoria. Australia. Anthony, 
dear husband of J am and father of 
Uza jane and Andy. 

BEAUMONT On Saturday Ma rch l S th 
peacefully at Healh Road HospuaL 
Ipswich. Suffolk. F-AJE-fTonViaged 
69 years. Private cremation l2To 
pm March 2ist at Ipswich crematori- 
um. preceded by 5* 

Remembrance at 1 1.30am at si 
Mary's Cnurch. Woodbndg*- s*"' 
folk Flowers io E B Button and sow, 
woodbndge. Donaltoos H prefered to 
Mencap c.o £. B Button and Sons.. 
Wooabridge. 

BROOKER On March 1EU) 1986. sud- 
denly. John Godfrey, dear brother of 


Joan and Leila- and Unde of Vhden 
and Bobby. Service al Golden Green 
Crematorium, at 1 l.OOam on Friday. 
March 2 1st. 

BUTLER On ITUi March 1986 after a 
long IDness steadfastly borne. Ernes! 
James, beloved husband of Erica Na- 
nette. Funeral service at Richmond 
Hill United Reformed Church. 
Bournemouth on Monday zatn 
March at 2.00pm followed by private 
cremation. Flowers or donations If 
preferred for the Orion Rfgg Holiday 
Centre for Arthritis Care may be sent 
to Tapper Funeral Service. 32 64 
Parks? one Road. Poole. 

CANTUE Lady AM.l. on March t7Dt. 
aged 86. Mome widow of U. Gen. Sir 
Nell Canute H A.M.C.. mother of- 
Conn. Service. Bournemouth 
Oeoutorlum on Monday March 
24Ui al 12.30pm. Enquiries and 
flowers to Miller Brothers ana F P 
Butler Ltd. Funeral Directors. 1 19 
Bargaie. Christchurch. Tel Christ- 
church 48&039. 

CARROLL cm the 14th March at the 
Fraseruy Nunang home. Tunbridge 
Weils. Maud SafTery <n£e Warner) 
widow of Major HEY Carroll 8th 
K.RJ. Hussars and late of Canter- 
bury. A very dearly loved mother, 
grandmother ana great 
grandmother. 

COLTART on March 181b J986 peace- 
fully in the devoied care of Waistead 
Place. Frances dearly loved mother, 
grandmother and grral grandmoth- 
er. Funeral service al the Surrey and 
Sussex Crematorium, worth, on 
Wednesday March 26th at l.«5pm. 
Family flowers only please. 

MJBNY Norah ■ Loyal support of Wal- 
ter for 63 years, peacefully In 
Hasiltal of SL John. Scorton. Rich- 
mond after nearly two years of kind 
and cheerful nursing by Sister Fisher 
and staff. Interment March IB at 
Hawn by. nutetly at No rail's long 
standing request. 

EYKYN On 17th March 1986. sudden- 
!y at home, Duncan Arthur 
Davidson. Colonel uetd) D.S.O.. 
O.L.. late Royal Scots (Royal Reel- 
menu aged 79. Greatly loved 
fusband. father and grandfather. 
Cremation at MortonhalJ Crematori- 
um. Edinburgh at ll.OOam on 
Thursday 20th March. Family now- 
ers only. Donations IT desired to the 
Royal Scots Benevolent Fund. RHQ 
Royal Scots. Edinburgh Castle. No 
fetters Please. 

FOGES On 17th March 1986 suddenly 
but peacefully at none, wougang. 
husband of the late icarhrm Foges 
and beloved father and grandfather. 
Funeral at CoMera Green Crematori- 
um on Tuesday 25 March al 12 
noon . 

GRESHAM on March 17. Manorie 
tHoidCroft i peacefully al Broome End 
Xursutg Home. Beto«e« sister of JHL 
Betty and Mild and much loved step 
mother of Sue and Sam. Cremation 
ai Parndon Wood Crematorium. 
Harlow. Monday. Mar 24 at io am. 

HALE on March 18th after a long m- 
n*»$, borne with fortitude and faith. 
Margery Hate formerly Prtnlcpal Tta- 
lor al the Norfolk and Norwich 
Hosptla). Funeral at LUtte Piumstead 
Church, on Tuesday March 26th at 
2 00pm No flowers Mease. Dona- 
tions to Churcn ' of England 
Children's Society. 

HARRISON John, husband of the (ate 
Vera- Peacefully to his steep on 18th 


March, to Ms 93rd Year. Of Ingle- 
wood Bank. Penrith. Funeral Great 
SaUtetd Church. 5pm. Friday. 2lst 
March. 

LIGHT William Frederick, on 24Ut 
' February aged 83 In Altea. AUcante. 
Spain. 

LUSHRtGTOM on lSth March Briga- 
dier Geoffrey Franftlyn LusMngtou- 
C.B-E.. Late R-A- tretired). Dearly 
loved husband of Betty, much toyed 
father of JuUet and stepfather of Sue. 
Service Mortlake Crematorium. 
Wednesday 26th March at 2.30pm. 
FamOy flowers only, but donadOBs IT 
desired to St Mary Abbott Hospital. 
C/- Dr Peter Rohde. Marines Rd. 
Kensington. W8. 

MAGNUS . On March 18th. aged 83. 
Miriam, beloved Mother of Josepbiiie 
and Alfred and Grandmother. Funer k 
at taken plan - no prayers or Oowas 
by requesL 

MOSS ob 1 5th March 1986 in an ar- 
cran accidciiL Phuip Linton Moss. 
Funeral Wednesday 26th March 
1986 at 2pm East Hampstead Park 
Crematorium. BraeknetL rangy 
dowers only, donations for charity u 
desired. Enquiries to F.G. Pymra * 
Sons. Funeral Directors. T«L Maid* 
enhead a-voa 

OWEN - on Friday March 14th. sud- 
denly Ctyn. beloved husband of 
SMney and dearly loved father of 
Jane. Sarah and John. Funeral at 
Breafcsoear Cremaiortum. RUtsilB. 
Monday 24tn March al n ara.Tlow- 
era and enquiries to T A EBrtnent^ 
21 Bndge Street Pmner. Tek 01 866 
0324. 

FAKFITT, Ttevor. al ParttsWe Hotpb 
taL wu u btedow. on Monday t7fl> 
March 1986 Much loved brotherof 
David, mast dear rotation of HicasL 
Sara. Justin and Karen, and beloved 
husband of Ina uteceusedL Service at 
Putney vale Crematorium on Thare- 
day 27Xh March at i-SOpm. FmUy 
flowers only. Please. Donations, if SO 
desired, to Career Research. All eo- 
atones to F W Paine Ol 946 1974. 


PLEASANCE - On March Idth 
suddenly to the United Stales. John 
Anthony dearly loved husband of 
Margaret and much loved and loving 
father of Judith & Michael (died 
1974). Funeral Service at SL 
Augustine's Church. Thorpe Bay. 
Friday March 2isa at UJD am. Fto- 
lowed by burial at St. Margaret's 
Church. Downturn. Essex. Flowers 
to W. Thom A Sous. 78-83 Ldgh 
H111. Letgn on Sea. Essex or too* 
■ions to the British Heart foundation. 
Enquires please lo J.H. Kenyon 01- 
935-3728. 

PQWNALL. On Mara 17th peaotftAf 
al name. Yvonne, beloved w ue of 
Hugh (Podge), and dearty >? tfed 
mother of David and Belinda. Funer- 
al service at St M my* Dedham at 
2.30 pm on Friday gist Mar ch. 

PROSSOR On Febotaiy 2Tth 1986. 
MWiael Kemp. Wring bu^nd mil 
father, sou of Eileen Of NorthnelL 
Bosham. ewetwser. and brother of 
Betty, suddenly In hospital in Kath- 
mandu. Nepal, formerly of the 
Gurkas and Founder and Director of 
Community Progess Nepal. 

ROBE R TS On March 16th 1986 at 
home to Kfiey. Oxford. General Sir 
Ouvry Lindltetd Roberts^ G-CB.. 
KJ3.E.. DJLO- beloved husband of 
the tote Eileen and of Joya. devoted 
father of John and the me Michael 


and of Hugh. Pelham and Omtrite- 
Goardian of Jean and Demds. a 
grandftlher and giwrt grandfather. A 
private service has u*en place ar the 

Chapel to HlghcJete Parte tMaw 
modal sendee w« later be 
announced- 

fWfffyu - On 18th. March 1986. at 
Sandfletd Farm, never. Alan Ber- 
naiTl RasseflOBX-. TJ>- la Ms 89th 
year. Cremation private. Than logty - 
ing Service at St Peters Church. 
Hever. at noon on Saturday. 22nd 
March. 

RUSH) Mrs Tony tote SMtanprari 
mother of Mkhad : and Christoph* 
Campben-Jtowston. at her h ome in 
Spain Monday 17th Much. RIP. 
SAVILLE Fred, on im March pteHe- 
finty m hospital dearly hared 
Husband Of Motet, betowed rather Of 
Lynn. Gareth and Martin and much, 
loved grandfather of Lee. Lisa. 
Damn and Dean. Oresnanon on 
Monday .24th March al 3 30pm. 
fjwiih Essex Cremator turn. 
Ockendoi Road. Corbetts Tey. 
Upftonster. P l ea se no flowers. Dona- 
tions to imperial Cancer Research 
Fund. 26 Victoria Road. SaHttn. 
Swrey. 

SCARFS On March 13th isSdagedTo 

years suddenly but peacefully In Ox- 

tord. professor Francis HaroW 
Starfe. CAE.. Che^lw 

des Arts et des Lectres. Chevalier de 
la Legion d* Hormeur. former 
tor of the British tnstunte far Paria. 
Devoted Husband of Greta, dsar ra- 
ther of Bnmo.and ffwtontt ter Of 
Patriot, babel and Dominic. Funeral 

- service SS Gregory and AidA^i^- 
i wmi cathode Church. Woodstock 
Road. Oxford. 12 noon Mrmday 24tb 
March foBowed by lidcnnenL Oxre- 
spoBdence to 433 Banbury Road. 
Oxford. . 

UBUM Mis Dorothy G P ■ On 
March 1 8th 1986 peacefully » Os- 
borne Cottage. East Coww. Aged 95 
Years. Beloved Aura of George and 
loving Great Aunt and Great Great 
Aunt Service at me We Of WhU* 
Crema to rium on Monday. March the 
24tb al &30 pm. Family flowers 
only. Donations if desired to the 
RSPCA. AD enotortes to F l uo y d 
Funeral Directors. Cowes. Tel 0983 
293716. 

SPUROLE. On March 12Hi 1986 Towy 
aged 27 while to the care of Qoevn 
Mary Hospital for children. Dearly 
loved son to Jackie and Arthur and 
brother lo Ian and fttgcL 
TURNER - on March 17th. 1986. 
peacefully after a short Uftesa to Sol- 
ton Hospital. Frances Kathleen, to 
her 89th year. Recently of WeUeoley 
Lodge. Sutton, wife ofthetotoAr- 
Utur Henry Tomer and much foved 
mother of Brian and David, funeral 
at North East Surrey Crematorium 
on Thursday March 27th. at 10 am. 
Family Oowere only, but donattoM 
desired to Mr George A Ban. Rotary 
Club of Wimbledon Memorial Troa. 
Halifax Budding Society. 47’Wlmbte- 
don HUI Road. London SW19 7BH. 
WILEY. On March 18th peacefully. 
Sylvia Marian Stonier, aged 83. wid- 
ow of Brigadier H.O. WBey M.C. 
Funeral at Soke4w-N*ytand Church 
on Tuesday March 26th at 12 noon. 
Family flowers only to WJ4 She p* 
herd. High Street. Coiehestor. but 
donations If desired to Stofcoby- 
Nayland CbtoCh. 

WILLIAMS A service of thaaHWtvtng 
for Bridget OUvia William* wffl be 
iMid at St John's Church. New 
Atresford. Hampshire on Wednesday, 

Apru sac d at 2 -wpjn. 


Compassionate observer oi 


Bernard Mabms&.ose of 
America^, leading novelists 
and short story writers, died 
on March- 18 at the of 71. 

As a Jewish novelist it was 
his perpetual misfortune to be 
overshadowed by his contem- 
porary, Saul Bellow, whose 
greater range of experience 
and powers of invention en- 
abled him to produce a succes- 
sion of kvishly-coaadved 
novels with a fluency denied 
loMalamud. . 

Nevertheless Majamnd re- 
mains inimitable inhis explo- 
ration of a predicament which 
in his .work, can be semi as not 
merely Jewish, but as die fete - 
of fffl individuals who are ' 
compelled to struggle - ofttia 
through no feult of thetr own - 
throu^t lives devoid ;! of 
richness. • 

And it was his adtievemeat' 
to describe poverty of experi- 
ence with a compassion which 
exalts the sufferings of his 


human experience tI0lf 

dTpoor Jew wmzgly 

KSd of ™*l “ unta “ 

Tsarist Russ* 2 - roa ^ e <r a /{JjT 
ccssM movie, 

1: a* 50 



some air of 

vented aH but a small 

ity from citing « ^ JJJJ 

Irasterpiece it was evukotly 

intended to be- 
Neverthefess Malamudwas 

now established® Aycng* » 
second Jewish novelist {Mmj- 
CT was in titenoy Wjnsa^JCTt 
force: Salinger bad long re- 
Sd into sflenoe HuBp 

Kilim, ~~ «.w» j- Roth had proved noamm** 

staff of Oregon State Umvena- after a meieonc Sart] jut ■ J* 
‘ where he staved until 1961. ^vas plainly outranked try me 


taught in various -New York 
schools, and then joined UK 


he taught at Ben- 
nington State College, 


protagonists and - especially 'Vermont. . 

in the short stories - ttansfig- His first novd. The Natural 


ures their longings to matters 
of eternal value.; ■ 

At times the world of Mah- 
mud seems to exchange real- : 
ism for emblem; to hold-xts 
inhabitants in -an - aura of 
Gh^all-like innocence. 


Bernard Malamudwas bom 

on April 26, 1914inBrob3dyn, 
ofRussian immigrant parenfe. 

His fether was a gjocer; in 
whose store - necessarily itin- 
erant from neighbourhood to . — o-~-v 

neighbourhood in pursuit of. during the DepressimL. Out of 
b^mess - Mahm ud arid bis. sn at first, unwilling 


0952), published when he was 
nearly forty, bad no Jewish 
'dmracters. And it fe in other 
: respects - it rosaSs the life of a 
great basebaJl player in the 
.form of a verson of the Grail 
myth- DDchazacteristic: .: 

With The Assklmt (1957) 
Malamrid received interna- 
tional acclaim. Thenovei tdls 
the story of a young gentile 
drifter who rote a .Job-like, 
Jewish grocer in Brooklyn 


brother worked as cfafthen. 
This worid, barely so^jended 
above the maxgfc of poverty, 
was to provide the badedom 
for perhaps his finest novel. 
The Assistant. 

At nights tire sieve's back 
room provided - the .. study 
where Bernard first tried his 
hand at fiction, in tbe dark 
hours after Malanaud senior 

hadgryeaitptbefiiritestirisBfc 

with his accounts. 

Mabraod was educated at 
Erasmus Hril, New York, 
where his creative desires took 
more purposeful shape; and at 
New York City College. Later 
he went to Columbia Univer- 
sity. Ftom 1940 to 1949 he 


remorse,the thief takes on the 
groctr’sm^sorrows.gocsto 
work for him and, a&r his 
death elects to ‘become’ him 
by having himself dicmn -. 
cased. As a treatment of tire 
rttwite 1 , *aH max are Jews' it 
was a work of rarerhari xy and 
fife affirmation. ■. 

A New life (i960 a feugely 
satirical novel -about an ex- 
afonhriBc Jew who gOCS to 
tcarii at a fearfiti- ‘cow crfkge’ 
in the PaaficNrirthwest, bad 
richly comic passages, but was 
not, oathe whote, accounted a 
success; • 

The fixer <1966) was, and 
remains, MaiamurTs most 
ambmoos noveJL ButTt is not 


^SieBdlowamldus 
is said to have womeu tom 
even to foe point of making 
writing more difficult. 

Pictures of Fideiman (1969), 
a picaresque frolic in Italy, 
certainly represented lire nadir 
to that point. But The Tenant 
(1971) and Dubin’s Lives 
(1979) indicated a welcome 
return (1979) of form and 
confidence. In these novels, 
whose protagonists were both 
writers, Malaraud intelligently 
examined foe question of 
whether art confers freedom 
and whether the search for 
truth actually makes m 
realisati on more likely. 

But it is MalamutTs short 
stories which will probably 
give more enduring pleasure 
than any of foe novels he 
wrote after The Fixer, al- 
though all his work was of foe 
highest integrity. 

In a collection like 
Rembrandt's Hat (1973) he is 
capable, in a few, spare, pages, 
of distilling foe sublimity ia 
suffering of protagonists beat- 
en down by poverty, lodced in 
the loneliness of their own 
inarticulacy or utterly de- 
ceived in their opinion of foe 
world’s kindness. 

It is m this that his supreme 
gtftiies^ 


MR STEPHEN DOWLING 


Stephen Dowling, the strip 
cartoonist who created foe 
super-hero. Garth, -in the Dai- 
ly Mirror, died yesterday at 
the age of 82. 

Bora in Liverpool ou Man* 
19, 1904, he was educated at 
Liverpool CoHegiateand Liv- 
erpool School of Art, templet- 
ing'. Im. studies , al foe 
Westminster School of Art 

He then fredanoed Bhstia- 
rions for the Charles Hobson 
Agency, and by 1928 had 
become assistant an director 
at DorlancTs Agency, working 
alongside his brother, frank. 
With Steve sketching and 
Prank scripting, the brothers 
teamed up to make an assault 
on- the world of newspaper 
snips, which was just begin- 
ning to burgeon. . 

Their first attempt, under - 
foe pen-name of Dart, was 
Tich, who made his debut in 
foe Daily Minor in 1931: A ; 
speechless urchin in a word- . 
less wodd, Ttch proved too 
tricky to sustain, but in his 
outsized doth cap might be 
seen the shadow of Andy 
Capp- 

The brothers had more 
success with their second at- 
tempt, a femDy strip called 
The Ruggles, for which they 
devized a new pen-name Blik. 
John Ruggles, cheerful, but . 
chinless was dearly inspired 


by rife American strip charac- 
ter, Andy Gump, but soon 
reflected with some accuracy 
the work and home life of the 
average Mirror reader. 

. The Rua^esfiarfiodoi 2935, 
and (juid^devdc^edacoQZi- 
- nuity that made it the first 
strip cartoon soap-opera. 
Rnggfes, iirhis bowter hataml 
ramcoat, suffered embarrass- 
ing. entangjcanenis with the 
gfemoriMis Greta; daughter 
Maisie manried handsome Ju- 
fian Balham and bore foe 
Ruggles* grandson; young 
Herbert outgrew his spots and 
studied anforiecture. 

In a startling post-war twist, 
the Ruggles entered the real 
wodd and readers of foe 
Mirror found themselves fea- 
tured in the strip. But fact 
proved less fascinating than 
-fiction and the strip faded 
away in 1957. 

; In 1936 Steve Dowling took 
over Belinda Blue-Eyes, but 
was forced, to retain the origi- 
nal artist’s pen-name of Glo- 
ria. The serial, begun foe 
previous year was inspired by 
little Orphan Annie. 

The wanderings of the wide- 
eyed moppet were scripted by 
William Connor" as comic 
relief from his daily Cassandra 
column. 

. Garth,; as wbh Dowling’s 
other strips, drew its inspira- 


tion from America. Designed 
as Britain’s answer to Super- 
man, Garth foe Man of Mys- 
tery, drifted into foe Mirror on 
-foe morning of July 14, 1943. 
washed ashore on a raft. 
-Hailed as the Son of Mor by 
Gala, the first ofjnany lovely 
maidens to feK for this hand- 
some Wood hero. Garth dealt 
with an evil high priest before 
$a3in&offoa a barrage balloon 
in search of his destiny. 

Despite foe scientific genius 
of Professor Lumiene, his 
mentor, 43 years on Garth is 
still searching. 

Between strips Dowling 
continued his advertising art 
work, notably the Roses’ Lime a . 
Juice cartoons featuring foe ' 
Jeeves-like Hawkins. 

During the war he served as 
a captain in foe Horae Guard, 
and afterwards joined the 
Mirror staff to work on a new 
daily strip, Keeping Up with 
foe Joneses, an advice to 
readers strip which replaced 
Ruggles. 

He retired in 1969 and 
became a full-time country- 
man running a farm and a 
riding scftooL 

He returned briefly to foe 
strip world when he was 
presented with the Ally Slopcr 
Award at the first British 
Comic Convention in 1976. 


HERR HEINZ NIXDORF 


Herr Heinz Nradcaff the 
West German entrepreneur 
mid founder* Chairman -of 
Nixdorf Computer AG, -died 
on Mardi 17, agedL 60, after 
collapsing at a reception, in 
Hanover. 

He symbolized the dynamic 
businessman who created out 
of the mins and desolation of 
the Second World War foe. 
thriving national economy of 
West Germany that exists 
‘today. 

The company that be start- 
ed in his basement lodgings in 
Essen ip- '.1.952, blossomed, 
under his leadership,.: into a 
business with a~ revenue last 
year of DM4 billion and --a ' 
w o rk for ce worldwide totalling 
23,000. . - 

His great breakthrough asa 
young man was the idea : to ■ 


develop a small and cheap 
computer. .He fought what 
-amounted to a crusade in foe 
: 1960a against the concept 
promoted by American manu- 
facturers of hugely expensive 
centralized computers. - 
Nixdorf opted instead for 
smalfer systems with termi- 
nals United •* to mainframe 
computers mid he now ranks 
as a pioneer of what is known 
as decentralized - data 
processing. . 

• The company he. set-up, 
-based in Tns home- town of 
Paderborn, Westohalia, is the 
market leader in West Germa^ 
-ay .'of small business comput- 
ers. Indeeff Heinz Nixdorf is 
credited with inventing the 
first dectrbme^ calculator in 
Germany more than 30 years 


The firm .went public in 


1984, although about 70 pi 
cent of the shares remain i 
the family’s control 

As the third largest comp; 
ny mils field in Europe, it ah 
has factories in the Republ 
of Ireland, foe United State 
Singapore, Brazil and Spain. 

Throughout foe past I 
years Nixdorf Computers hi 
brief flirtations with some i 
foe world’s largest computi 
companies, knowing fall w« 
that ii needed vast financi 
resources to compete with tl 
such as IBN 
^ forged a lie 
J Telefunken, If 

West German electrical grou 

Nwdotf, the son of 
railwayman, was a keen tenn 
gayer and successful sailo 
He leaves a widow and tors 


HUBERT FIGHTE 


Hubert Rchte, the German 
novelist, has died in Hamburg 
at toe age of 50. He had been 
undergoing surgery for a brain 
tumour. 

His books, noted for .then- 
informal t echniq ues and raw 
realism, made a considerable 
impact on critics in Germany 
when they first appeared! in 
toe 1960$ and Rchte- was' 
hailed as the J- D. Salinger Gf 
his country fry; literary- 
journalists.- ■ • 

He was bora in 1935. at 
Periebetg m Brandenberg and 
earned ms early bring as ah, 
agricultural apprentice to Swe- 
den, actor in Gennany .and = 
shepherd in Provence befote 
embarking cm a career .as a - 
freelance writer. 

His first book; a collection . 
of short stories entitled Der .. 
Aujbruch nodi Turku OExif to 
Turku), won hun. a - Julius-,: 


his second, Das tFaisenhaus 
fllie Orphanage),; which 


of 1965 and brought him 


Die Palette (1965) contin- 
ued the gory of the orphan 
protagonist of . Das 
fVaisenhattsiPow seen against 
foe backdrop of the Hamburg 
hippte.jomt of ihe title. A 
-Kerouaaan sprawl. Die Pal- 
ette .attracted attention 
through its multinational 

slabs of ovo5^^oonversar- 
-tion, and of interviews which 
in foe view of some German 
critic# Fichte established as a 
literary form. -. 

■ in the J970s he turned to 
anforopplagy and several 
wars.of research led to foe 
book Kongo, Bahia,' Haiti. 
Trinidad - The Afro-American 
Retigtoriz. : 


Major-( 
Lockwood 
CBE, who c 
foe age ol 
regular 
crosswords 
toe last 20 

Apre-wj 

wartime ii 
and a oos 


had 
stocki 
wiL 

. Havini 

foe Arm 1 
in toe Vi 
David' 
books. G 
Story nf 

fir 

mends: i 




THE TIMES THURSDAY MARCH 20 1986 


k 


k 


l 


K THE OPPORTUNITY TO 
S/WE £L000 BY TAKING 


FORDCREDI 



1 



In February rising interest rates meant that we had to revise this scheme. However the 
new rate of finance was a low 5.9% p.a. (11.4% APR) over three years, or 4.9% p.a. (9.5% APR) 
over two years. It proved extremely popular 

So much SO that weVe now extending Just take a look at these typical examples of Ford Credit Finance deals. 

it to cover any Capri or Sierra registered MODEL lIlaser zolasb? 

between March 1st and March 31st 1986. apr r n. 4 % u. 4 % 

Don't foi^jet that the examples we <$ve in ^ ^ ' 725338 732844 

the table are based on the maximum retail price initial Payment (minimum 20 %) 1450.68 1465.69 

of the car. Amount of Credit 5802.70 5862.75 


MODEL 











APR 

Cash Price* 

Initial Payment (minimum 20%) 
Amount of Credit 
36 Monthly Instalments of 
Charge for Credit 

Total Credit Price 


SIERRA 

L8 LASER 

CAPRI 
2.0 LASER 

1L4% 

114% 

79CIQ *38 

1 QQQ A A 

/ 400.00 

1450.68 

/ 040. t rf 

1465.69 

5802.70 

5862.75 

189.72 

19168 

1027.22 

8280.60 

1037.73 

8366.17 






*Maximum retail price as at March 1st 1986 
excluding delivery, number plates &nd road fund licence 


If you talk toyour Ford . 
dealer you could get an even better deal and still 
use the attractive interest rates quoted above 


The above finance plan is subject to credit approval and applies to 
Sierra and Capri vehddes registered between March 1st and March 31st in England, 
Scotiand and Vfeies and which are subject to Conditional Sale Agreements arranged 
by participating Ford dealers and underwritten by Ford Motor Credit Company Ltd, 
Regent House, 1 Hubert Road, Brentwood, Essex CM14 4QL Appficants must be over 
18 years of age and credit worthy. Please note: various factory fitted options are available for 
eligible vehicles at extra cost figures are correct at time of going to press. 




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20 


THF TIMES THURSDAY MARCH 20 1986 


Mitterrand in 
joking mood as 


France waits 


From Diana Geddes, Paris 


In contrast to the constant 
coinings and goings around 
the Hotel de Ville, where M 
Chirac has his offices as 
Mayor of Paris, all was quiet 
at the Elysee Palace yesterday. 

At lunch-time, a relaxed 
and smiling President 
Mitterrand made an unexpect- 
ed sally to chat with journal- 
ists camped out in the “Cour 
d’Honneur" of the palace. 


of the centre-right UDF, 
which has formed an alliance 
to govern with the RPR. 

M Jean Lecanuel president 
of the UDF, said that M 
Chirac had asked him “to be 
part of bis government", but 
declined to say what ministry 
he was offered. M Jean-Claude 
Gaudin. leader of the UDF 
group in Parliament, said that 
the discussions on the forma- 


“Lucky I've come, other- ^oiTof the new government 
wise nothing would be going ^ “going well", and that be 
on " he quipped. “It's long to lhou gi lt a fair balance was 
wait. You've got a rotten .job - ^ between the two 

me too. So, you’re going to 0 ^^ 
stay here all afternoon? I ve , . 1 . 

come to see that you aren t too fliirac CQOlCe, DUt 

you ’ re ” ot Mitterrand veto 


“Would you like some cof- 
fee? You haven’t even had 
lunch either, have you? HI see 
that someone brings you that 
in a moment'’ 

Journalists interpreted this 
uncharacteristic bonhommie 
as part of M Mitterrand’s 
attempt to show that every- 
thing was taking place calmly 
and serenely. It is understood 
that he and M Chirac have 
reached a broad understand- 
ing on their respective future 
roles. 

No real problems 
at long meeting 

M Jacques Chirac, the 
Gaul list RPR leader and may- 
or of Paris, was expected to 
accept President Mitterrand’s 


M Mitterrand apparently 
told M Chirac that he would 
not be appointed until after 
he, M Mitterrand, had seen M 
Chirac's proposed list of gov- 
ernment ministers. 

Le Monde reported that M 
Mitterrand told M Chirac that 
he would refuse to appoint 
anyone whom he considered 
had insulted his person or 
function. 

Under the constitution, it is 
the Prime Minister who pro- 
poses the ministers, but the 


President who appoints them 
‘ erefo 


fore has the 


and who ibei 
power of veto. 

Shortly before the elections 
last Sunday, M Chirac an- 
nounced that the Right al- 
ready had some 30 bills and 


accept tTesineni Miumanus icauj iuu 
offer of the Prime Minister’s ordinances drawn up ready for 
office by lunchtime today at presentation to Pmiiamrat 


the latest after spending yes- 
terday drawing up his 
government 

Certainty that M Chirac 
would accept the offer grew 
after he told journalists that 
contrary to what some com- 
mentators thought no real 
problems had arisen between 
himself and the President 
during their lengthy conversa- 
tion on Monday evening. 

“I will give my response to 
the Head of State this evening 
or tomorrow morning at the 
latest" he said. 

After having met the lead- 
ing figures and new deputies 
of his own party on Monday. 
M Chirac yesterday called in 
for consultation all the leaders 


Priority is to be given to 
measures to help youth unem- 
ployment; the repeal of the 
Socialist law on proportional 
representation; the lifting of 
the last price controls; the 
abolition of the need to obtain 
prior government approval 
before laying off redundant 
workers; an amendment of the 
1986 Budget; and enabling 
legislation for a large privati- 
zation programme. 

The Bourse, the French 
stock exchange, leapt to a 
record high yesterday in an- 
ticipation of the nomination 
of a new right-wing Prime 
Minister and a relatively 
peaceful cohabitation at least 
in the short term. 


Today’s events 


Royal engagements 
The Queen opens the new 
head office of the Standard 
Chartered Group, Bishopsgate, 
EC3, 2.45: and later, accompa- 


nied by the Duke of Edinburgh, 
' — perfor- 


attends the royal film , 
mance of While Nights. Odeon 
Theatre, Leicester Square. . 

The Duke of Edinburgh chairs 
a meeting of the Royal Mini 
Advisory Committee, Bucking- 
ham Palace. 10: and then, as 
President, the World Wildlife 
Fund-International, launches 
the 25th anniversary campaign 
of World Wildlife Fund-United 
Kingdom. Institution of Civil 
Engineers. Great George St, 
SW1, 11.30. _ 

Queen Elizabeth The Queen 
Mother opens the Princess Alice 
Hospice. Esher. 3.30. 

Princess Anne, President, 
Save the Children Fund, visits 
the Hammersmith Gypsy 


Project, Latimer Rd, .WIG, 
10.10; and then visits the South- 
ern Regional Office/ African 
Family Advisory Service, 
Goldhawk Road, W 12, 11.20; 
later, as Patron, the Riding for 
the Disabled Association, she 
attends a lunch. The Saddlers 
HalL EC2, 1; and then attends 
the London Hospital Medical 
College's bicentenary dinner, 
Guildhall. London. 7.10. 

Princess Margaret, as Presi- 
dent. the Girl Guides Associ- 
ation, attends a supper given by 
the World Committee, Olave 
Centre, Hampstead, 7.30. 

The Duke of Gloucester 
opens the Rothwell Community 
Centre. Wellingborough, 11-45; 
and later opens the Texas Home 
Care warehouse and offices in 
Wellingborough, 2.15. 

The Duchess of Kent, as 
Patron, the National Society for 
Cancer Relief, opens the Mag- 
netic Resonance Scanner Cen- 
tre, Mount Vernon Hospital 
North wood. 11.30; and later 


The Times Crossword Puzzle No 16,998 


myw ■ • v* iCA 



Tarter from Managua 




on Sandfofe® foS 

specter Oouwao ..and Jan» TH* 


Bond pack . tiwm in « the 
barrio cinemas. ‘ 

Cadbm/s “Fnnt and 
does a roaring trade at th? 

1 . U. ..n n M l t Jtir- 


lifce a Nonflan castle. The 
gojbasszdor has - sn tally- 
's and dfolonials may u 
the capital only to go to / 




..at' 1 

.try 


Uo T- ■ j / his- 11131 most common: and 

ss^SaSssa sssns 

ST-* 

insists a 

^en the Sandznistas and tot. co tat home to &a s&. : Ai _a 


y 

' 


. ry* 1 





All smiles: M Chirac, left, delighted at his snccess, 


am \ President Mitterrand j oldpg yesterday with tittynssu 


Nightmare 

haunts 

dissident 


From Ian M array 
Jerusalem 

Mr Anatoly Shcharansky is 
still having nightmares about 
being in a Soviet punishment 
cell and is having difficulty in 
sleeping, his wife, Avital said 
yesterday. 

He had cancelled a dinner 
being held in his honour this 
week by the Group of 35, 
which worked for Soviet Jew- 
ry, because he was feeling 
unwell. Mrs Shcharansky said: 
“It is very difficult for him to 
face many, many people after 
being shut away on his own for 
nine years - but it is going 
away." 


Valley Parade to 



The Valley Parade football 
ground in Bradford, where a 
fire in the main stand killed 56 
spectators and injured more 
Item 200 others last year, is to 
be completely rebnOL 

A “farewell* grant of £1-46 
mini on from the West York- 
shire Metropolitan County 
Council which is to be abol- 
ished at the end of this month, 
win let a new stadium be 

developed. 

The cost will be more than 
£236 million. Officials of the 
dob, which is in the second 
division of the league, hope it 
will be possible to begin 
playing football at the pound 
again by the start of the next 
season. 

The council leader, Mr 
John Gunnell, said yesterday: 


By Peter Davenport 

“The fire was the greatest 
spectator disaster in 100 years 
of league footbalL ItetaMrag 
this stadium was a national 
responsibility but the Govern- 
ment has only given permis- 
sion to spend, not the actual 
money. 

The cheque from the council 
was handed over by Mr 
Gunnell to Mr Stafford 
Heginbotbam, the chairman of . 
Bradford, at a ceremony . in the 
dub’s boardroom. 

Negotiations to raise the 
finance have been going on 
since the disaster in May. The. 
dab had secured £900,000 
towards the cost, made up 
from insurance money and 
funds from the Football 
Grounds Improvement Trust. 
Then the Government agreed 


to give Bradford City Council 
permission to borrow the extra 
£1.46 ntillion required. 

The permission was trans- 
ferred to the comity council 
which took a unanimous- deri- 
sion to borrow the money and 
give it to the dnb as a gift The 
loan and i nter est , charges will 
have to be repaid event ually by 
the irate payera in the district 
council in the area. * 

The newstadiran is intended 
to be not only a memorial to 
those who died but also a mark 
of thanksgiving for those that 
survived. 

It will be theffrst stodmm to 
be purpose built since the 
disaster and win incorporate 
the latest safety recommenda- 
tions produced by Mr Justice 
PoppiewdTs inquiry 


SnSS 

Wonder still* rotes the aw fete-floored mansions, Italian 
waves*™* the b® yeflow “M" Red bngadtstt sipped 

unraoMcingjy ^ mmh 
dusista troops ina ne fro m and ca kcs» thgr. -SjfffJgyS. * 
expeditions to the mountains spreading, thor talk more ot 
tofSht the rebd Contras. women than of revolution, 
Thisisnotfosay Sandmista todays done. 
Nicaragua has become a Latin These ^erronsis can be 
American' Disneyland; After fooad any night of the week 
watching Benny Hin drances rubbing, shoulders at 
S vfewras wfll have to sit 

ariexcracntmglystil- with their journalist mends, 
emn Soviet documentary. .. ' Saadi nista offidals and mem-. 

On^ the radio,, i» between bers of the wary, wealthy 
Michad Jadtsaaamf.Wtaa^, , t| v 

as likelv as not, there w21 be Those among the upper 

an IntenorMiiiBtry broadcast ttessrawtodSedrt^to^ 

haranguing ■ . “Yankee to Mtanu have been 
imperifoism* Tbe troopsar- fortiremost partita teep th«r 
riviSfiom the front wiB be v:g 
scoffing cheese quarter- and their gardeners. Bui, as 

pounders but riding on E® 51 

German lorries. they are a faghteaafc bgwil- \ 

Yet there isL certainly, dered lot. defenave and s*u%, 
enough of. the flavour of jatifijifly out . of pto m the 
capitalist oemsumerism m .rasfr, muscular worW of w 
Nicaragua, six years after the Sandhnstas —idealists befl- 
{cvoiSot^ for bemoo^ngifduty tonamh 

visitor to wonder seriously if tt for .tfaen- notion of patno- 

President Reagan is bdpg tismaml freMOin. • 

entirely accurate when fre says : But wtule thaTs is a frenzy m 
the country is a '■Comnraiiist Sanffintea conwctipris, reyo- 
toiaHtamn dungBoa" - a lutionmy^MawBte “f rate 
fevourite phrase used inf the unwudicd bv-the Ccmtra war 
enrient White House push for -isataBgiiid,law4bi<foMa5f 
increased aid to the COBtras- where pwpln drove carefony. 
■^Coriondy, the American red fights are rardy jumped 
Embassy in Msaagnjs the md, the poba -jmb 
leaa protected . in Central absurdly ycwthfiil- areprob- 
America and American diplo- abty the feast corrupt a«d 
mats the most retaboed. The most courteous m aU of L«m 
US amb assador has only qot .America. ; . 

bodyguard country — ; John Carlin 


% 




; 


THE TIMES INFORMATION SERVICE 



across 

I Social dimber at university 
has advantage, initially (7). 

5 Kitty's white bowl and mug 

(7). 

9 Resolution to order captive 
before monarch (4-5). 

10 Unfinished home for rabbit 
or donkey (5). 

II More bash fill and quiet! 
That’s right 15). 

12 Holding back court action 
after let (9). 

14 Perhaps changing to rare 
church music . . . (9.5). 

17 ... or divine verses rewrit- 
ten (7,7). 

21 Collecting activity for chap 
in cathedral city (9). 

23 Reach with blow in early 
round (5) 

24 Successfully influence elec- 
toral change (5). 

25 Italian cheese for start of 
large publication (9). 

26 Vessel sitting higher in the 
water (7). 

27 Capital part for sweetheart 
as nurse (4,3). 

DOWN 

1 Imprudent as R os turn's 
child Sohrab. proverbially 
( 6 ). 

2 One serving as defender of 
colony, perhaps (7). 

3 Source of tips in restaurant 

(9). 

4 Dominate game between 
Loudon banks (5,6). 


5 Lack of harmony in vessel 
(3). 

6 Be in vehide Scot tries to 
overturn (5). 

7 Pirated version of part of 
Shakespearian play (7). 

8 Ought to replace one in this 
mental activity (8). 

13 A seal in the House after 
August (7.4). 

15 Green vegetables, say, not 
for consumption (4.5). 

16 It offers support and love to 
gjri (8). 

18 One learner inside given ter- 
rible hiding (7). 

19 Beaten, exhausted and fin- 
ished (7). 

20 In disorder, is held to pro- 
vide protection (6). 

22 Gangsters contributing to 
anxiety? On the contrary 
(51 

25 Learner driver's unlikely to 
achieve this standard (3). 


visits Michad Sobdl House, 
Norlbwood, 2L25. 

Prince Michael of Kent at- 
tends a Livery dinner, 
Leatbersellers' HalL 6 JO. 

New exhibitions 

Paintings by David Nevin; 
Diorama Art Gallery, 14 Peto 
Place. NWli Mon to Sal 12to6 
(ends April 30). 

In Albion's Light;. Frost & 
Reed, 41 New Bond Si Wl; 
Mon to Fri 9 to 5.30, Sat 9.30 to 
12.30 (ends April 25). 

Works by Garry Gilchrist; 
Charm ichael Fine An 156 
lfield Rd, SWI0; Mon to Sat 10 
to 8 (ends March 29). 

Modern British paintings; Mi- 
chael Parkin Gallery, 1 i 
Motcomb Si SW1; Mon to Fri 
10 to 6, Sat 10 to 1 (ends April 
18» ... 

Twenty-twenty vision: paint- 
ings by Frank Colckmgh and 
James Orn MacLaurin Art Gal- 
lery. Rozetle Park. Ayr, Mon to 
Sat 11 to 5, Sun 2 to 5 (ends 
April 9). 

Music 

Recital by James Dower 
(flute). Christopher O’Neil 
(oboe) and John Lenehan (pi- 
ano). 1.15: Bach’s St John 
Passion by the Holst Singers and 
City of London Sinfonia; St 
John's. Smith Sq, SW1, 730. 

Recital by Mark Underwood 
(flute) and Carol Wells (piano); 
Lauderdale House, Wateriow 
park, Highgate Hffi, NW6; 8pm. 

Concert by the BBC Club 
Choir. St James’s, Sussex Gar- 
dens, W2, 7.30. 

Recital by the Bartok String 
Quartet; County First School 
Minebead. 8. 

Organ redial by Wuliam 
Whitehead; Taunton School 8. 

Concert by the Bournemouth 
Symphony Orchestra; Colston 
HalL Bristol 7.30. 

Concert by York Concert 
Orchestra: St Sampson's. 
Church Si York. 7.30. 

Concert by the Northern 
Sinfonia Ensemble; Hatton Gal- 
lery, Newcastle University. 1. 

Recital by Michael Collins 
(clarinet) and Kathryn Stott 
(piano); The Royal Exchange 
Theatre, Manchester, 1. 

Piano recital by Leslie How- 
ard; St George's. Brandon Hill 
Bristol 1. 

Recital by Christine Bunning 
(soprano) and David Mason 
(piano): Pump Room, Bath. 
7.30. 

Concert by the Manchester 
Cam era ta; Lancaster Univer- 
sity. 7.30. 

Talks, lectures 
Myths and Legends: Bacchus, 
Colin Wiggins; The National 


Solution to puzzle No 14997 




Concise Crossword page 10 


& 


allery. Trafalgar Sq, WC2. 1. 
irds’ nests and eggs, by Joyce 


Bird 


Pope; Natural History Museum, 
Cromwell Rd. SW7, 3. 

Kant on the Self, by Sir Peter 
Strawson; Queen's Building, 
Exeter University, 4.30. 

Domesday Book in History, 
by Dr Elizabeth Hal lam; Sixth 
Form Centre, King's School 
Rochester. S. 

General 

Auction of Printed Books; 
Bloomsbury Book Auctions, 
Hardwick Si WC1. 10.30 and 
2.30. 

1986 Camden Festival; for 
details telephone; 01-388 1394. 

Facets of glass: royal glass- 
makers and glass- three films on 
the history and techniques of 
glass; The Whitworth Art Gal 
iery, Manchester University, 
Whitworth Park. 7. 

Daily Mail Ideal Home Ex- 
hibition: Earls Court Exhibition 
Centre. Warwick Rd SW5. Mon 
to Sun 10 to 8 (urnil March 31). 


Books — paperback 


The Literary Editor's selection of i nte rest in g books published this week: 
FICTION : 

Snail by Richard MBtar (Abacus, £3£5) _ 

Kill, J 1 DUTimtan ICU.rlr CuHHI 90 - 



Edmund 


Gosse (Alan Sutton. £235) 

NON-FICTION 

Colacted PoeBW. by LoubMacNeica (Fabar. £6^ _ 

Education of die Santas. The Bourgeois Experience: Victoria to Ftoud, by 

rA»W#l ca c/n 


in the History of Labour, by EJ. Habsbawm 
& Nicotson, £8.95) 


„ Critfdem. by Roger Fowler (Oxfprd, E4^ , f ^, 

The History of Ancient Israel by Michael Grant (WeidenfeW 


& Nicotson. 


The Romantic RebeSon, Romantic Versus Classic Art, by Kenneth Clark 
(John Murray, E12£0) 


The pound 


Bank 


AustraHaS 

Austria Scii 
Bala a m ft 
CanariaS 
DenmwkKr 
FHandMde 

ftaneaft 

GannaaytkB 
Grant* Dr 
KongKoogS 
Ireland Pt 
My Lira 
Japan Van 
NatbariandaGM 
Norway Kr 
Portugal Eac 
SmAAMcaM 
Spate Pta 
SwndenKr 
Swtaoiteodft 
USAS 

Yugoaiavta Dor 
RataS Plica Index: 37SJ. 
London: rtw FT Index closed 
1389-5. 


2.185 

2+2D 

71.80 

2-125 

12A2 

7JH 

1085 

US 

Z22J&3 

1U0 

I. 15 

2350-00 

272-00 

X89 

1093 

224-00 

3-20 

215-00 

II. 07 

sax 

1JS4 

515JB 


Bank 

Soto 

2-045 

23-00 

B8-00 

2-025 

12-12 

7.48 

10.10 

SJfl 

202-00 

HJffl 

ins 

223000 

2sa«' 

X70 

1038 

214JOO 

230 

20SU0 

1332 

2J8 

147 

46530 


up 143 at 


Roads 


London and Sou Oi a aat A 4 08 0- 0etays 

to northbound traffic on Forty Avenue at 

the junction wBh Die Paddocks. AI: Long 

term roadworks at Hatfield wD delays 

aoudiboiind usffic. A25* Roadworks on 

Sandgate Esplands; four sets of tem- 

porary traffic Itams- 

DwNHdtenac MS: ContiaRow removed 

betwaen junction 2 (Dudey) and 3 

(Hafoaowart: etil lane closures to both 
dkactiORS. MS: Contraflow between Junc- 

tion 4 (Bramsraove) and 5 (Drodwtdi) with 
mandatory 50 mph speed restrictions. 
A41: Temporary traffic Ighte et Hatton. N 
of Warick. 

Wafes and Watt A3Q: Temporary 
traffic lights (24 hours) between 
Camtjoume and Bodmin. A3SB: Rasuriao- 

Ing between Taunton and Norton FHz 

warren. A3& Roadworks between 
ShaftttwyandlMton: utrtflereotriatosss- 
The North; Mb Contraflow between 
junction 16 (Kldsarove) and 17 
Ai (Mk Only one carriage- 


KStocraiddo; 
delays between 1230 and 2. M7* 
Roadworks between Hamtton and 
BoOiwM two way traffic southbound, 
tefaraafton auppfi a d by AA 


Anniversaries 


Births: Ovid (Suhnona, Italy). 
43 BC; Jean-Anioine Houdoo, 
sculptor, Versailles, 1741; 
Henrik Ibsen, Skien. Norway, 
1828. . , 
Deaths: Henry IV, reigned 
1399-1413, London. 1413; Sir 
)pwr Newton, London. 1727; 
Lajos Kossnth. Hunearian 
nationalist, Turin, 1894; George 
Nathaniel Crazoa, 1st Mar- 
quess Cnrzon rf Kedleston, 
Viceroy of India, 1898-1905, 
London, 1925; Ferdinand Foch, 
Marshall of France, Paris, 1929; 
Ethel Florence Richardson 
(Henry Handel Richardson) 
novelrsi Fairlighi Sussex. 1946; 
Brendan Behan, writer, Dublin, 
1964. 


Artists in industry 


Scotland’s first Artist in In- 
dustry Fellowship scheme is 
being launched by the Scottish 
Arts Council as part of Industry 
Year 1986. Any company in- 
terested in taking part in the 
scheme should contact the Art 
Departmeni The Scottish Arts 
Council 19 Charlotte Square, 
Edinburgh, EH2 4DF. Tel : 031- 
226 6051. 


Parliament today 


Commons <2.30): Budget 
debate. 

Lords (3.00): Appropriate 
(Northern Ireland) Order. Hu- 
man Rights and Fundamental 
Freedoms Bill and Museums 
and Galleries (Prohibition of 
Admission Charges) BUI, 
committee stages; Industrial 
Training Bill second reading. 


Snow Reports 


Depth 

(cm) 

L U Piste 


ComStions 


Weather 


ANDORRA 

SoUeu 100 200 good 

New snow on firm ban 
AUSTRIA _ , , 

Kltzbuhei 40 90 fair 

Good skiing upper slopes 

FRANCE 

Bane 95 285 good 

New snow on hard base 
Les Arcs 120 180 good 

Slush on lower slopes 
ValThorens 100 150 good 

New snow on hard base 

SWITZERLAND 

C Montana 110 180 good 


Good skiing upper slopes 
Gstaad 10 SO good 

Slush on tower slopes 
Verbier 40 210 good 

Worn patches on lower slopes 
Wengen 30 . 100 worn 

worn patches on an slopes 
Zermatt 80 t85 good 

Light snow falling 


Off 

Piste 

Runs to 
resort 

(5pm) 

■c 

varied 

good 

an 

-a 

crust 

poor 

doud 

2 

varied 

fair 

snow 

-i 

varied 

fair 

snow 

■3 

varied 

far 

snow 

1 

heavy 

fair 

sun 

8 

heavy 

poor 

doud 

10 

heavy 

good 

rain 

4 

varied 

good 

snow 

5 

heavy 

poor 

rain 

4 

varied 

fair 

snow 

3 


Britain, L refers to tower slopes 


of the Ski Club of Great 
U to upper, and art to artificial. 


Weather 


t NOON tOpAT fr— k 


• • *. \ 


A vig oro us depression wffl 
more NOE sicrow Scotibrad. 
Associated frontal 


6 amte midnight 


W imdarato teton mm 


sfrOfta * wring 
temp eC (4SF)- 


Cwrtral^E, 
MUMdKRato, bM»y n 
front W, bright or 


NE Engfml 

tog; wmd Sfraori or sfrooglwOTi^gfSf 
moderate; mix temp 10CJ5DFV 


Ottte ^W B n d r 'Oot^attrwte of 


rain, cteanng trtxa W; wto d S trash _or 
strong bacoamg NW fratt; m» temp 9C • 


a&Bui. & Watag Rton soon 
dsuing inxn W, sunny totennto derate; 
ton: wind S fresh or strong baoatnng NW- 


Argyfi: 


tog; winds trash er 

Ms of Mate R4to soon clearing from W, 
n sunny totsnsis and scattered show 
. j: wind S wortw NW trash or sbung; 
max temp 8C148FI 

tuffwng showory from 
busts: wind SE waring NW 
tresii to strong locafly gate fan* max 

JSsSfWmnr Hrth. IE ScoOsmI. 
Ortowy, Shsitand: Bscoming 4uS and wet 
ehovrary later wind SE fresh or strong 
tacaBy gate fan* max temp 7C (48F). 

Norifisre Wand: Showers, soma 
heavy, perhaps prolonged at frst bright 
intervals: wmd W veering NW fresh or 
strong locafiy g tee Ion*: max temp 7C 
(46 f). 

Onttook for l o momrar mad Sotawtey: 
Showers or longsr psriods at tain, bid 
also brighter spate. Near normal tem- 
peratures. 





SunRtess: 
B.Mam , 


SonSatK 
6 -13 pm . 


n 

n M teooasate: MoonffcwK 
4.05 am 10-57 am 
Full Moon: March 2S. 


liMuf'sky: boWtoc tty a nd .ctog* y - 
doudy: oevtrent. HO* 4WMK . 

hau: miM-mBC h®. tnn*rvf. m- 

thuraterstorm: i-tnri -• 

.ce B Pgiafle- '• - 


Hdsii 


HT .... 

53 836 
3.1 932 
89 1-28 
2A. 734 
\ 1.11 
’ 1235 
.43 . 858 
'*»• 

. 81 .737 

82 836 
43 819 
S3 1.W 

• 1236 

431023 

83 850 
13 4j44. 
33 7.13 
43 1.13 

1213 
2-7 223 
87 

123* 

84 7.11 
42 6.47 

85 6/40 
87-1.18 
89 11.46 
32 832 


Aroond Britain 




lighting-lip time 


London 843 pm to 632 am : 
Bristol 853 pm to 842 am . 
BMwrsto 8fi6pm to 5^3 am . 

* *r 852 pm to 840 am 

735 pm to 5-5* am 


SonRato Max 
brain C F 

EAST COAST . , „ 


SonRato M» 
hrs . te C' F ■ 

. .14 11 52 Tten 

Tatty ; 0J 32 7 *5 raj; 
OofwynOay 0.6 .15 8 -tt «bj 
.- ..14 0. 48 .rain 

13 36 8 46 ram 


Yesterday 


ite* 


Temparatutfos at midday. yastentey: c. . 

- ,cf 

S 948 Guonway Is 848 
B'luioluon s 948 k w a iti aa a . s 948 

Btackpool b 745 Janay 8 846 

Bristol 3 948 London c 846 

CattiOr 6 745 MMefcstar s 948 

s 948 Waweaaea a .948 
f 848 fTnfdnray s 745 



PiaUafib - how ‘to pfe‘# _■ 

Monday-Satardap record your daily 
Poruona tout 

Add thwe lObriher .to deranvaae 
your weekly Portlouo total 
H your total maichea the ptlUMMd 
mvtoaul figure you have won 
j| or a share of .Ute trite money 
for that week, and must ctaim 
your mae as tnstrucred betaw. 

u 


T . luhmu Ita TkWX r|M lIStK) tMH 

hoiiK34-5im a ju ra — nuttjoi and 
Wa m a n aaa ba aisBif w a ft tfcaea 


You most have your card wtm you 
when you I d awne . . . . . 

U you ate unable to taieptkme 
aomeona toae can ctotm on your bebaff 

but Biay. must fywypnr card, an d eau 

The Times Porttobo - damn 
betwe en the satnifHlea tones 
No respansimrar can be i . 

for failure to contact the CbtM 

for any reason . wtttun me stand 
hours _ 

The above, muwtkxn -are ajh 
ptfcabfd to Doth natty and weekty- 
divMtond clams . . 

•Some- Times Portfolio cards Incline 
minor oitspnnH In the inatrutbon* on 
u» reverie sale These cants are. not 
Invalidated 

•The worcunp of Rides 2 and s has 


been expanded from earHcr versfoos 
claitocation 


for ciarmratian purposes Tho Game 
itself is not affected and wu COtttuWte 
to be Mayen m exactly toe samp-way 
as before ' 





s 41. ISO 
8 46 rate 
0 48 ram 
S 48 ttowera 
9 r 48 wigw • 
7 *5 te 
T AS rate" - 
s 48 nw 
7 4S fate ... 



01 8 46 rite 


RtifmtBWRBJUtD^ • 

: 87 .08 .10 50 woof 


Ttnar ravTundBys tigtiraa 


Abroad 


W»AYs*i 9 o«ft^^ raki«, site, wl ftetteritiwxiar 

.c' F C F • • .. c 

a 14 57 Milorra 6 13 55 Room 1 « 
.3 .- 6 .43.«Ma9M - fi 21 70-Sahbsg * 13 
^ 13 55 «alte - f 17 03 S Fated 

* -9 48 NMbte a 23 73 SPriaao 

• 41^82 MnanC 
f 17 83 

H5 59 

_c 17 63 Matter 


A tec cfa 

dhaU 

AtaxW* 

Atfere 


C F -.VI. 

f 14 Sr Cotogne 
a 19 asentete 
f 17. 68 CatAtv. : 
c 15 58 OaMte 
• 13 ; 56Attnttr 
s 14.57 - 

s 22 72 nw m w 


V v * 

.'l • 




S .9 48 


Sootd 


C 

t ZB 

s 7 
* 14 

.t 37 
C.XT- 
f:T7 
f « 

r 8 


2 36 


• 8 46 SmabTg 
» 7 46 ~ 
t 27 81 
f 16 61 TM 

5 23 73 Tanwtta 
- Tokyo 

6 13 59 Toronto - 
s 2 36 Tm 
c 10 50 Vteaada 

&S7 Walter 
a 19 66 Vttto* 

s 8 46 Vtom - 

o 1 30 Waraaw 
a 16 « Waatattw 

. , , * 25 78 WttRg&T 1 20 

8 21.70 maH J-J3 S .30 (tsaoUk. . « 8 

. TdtnotetlbattayaflgtearelaMgi va llttl c -- 




fr 17 
f 14 




I 9 

: l 


48 





iCf.'i , 

■ouV?% 


THURSDAY MARCH 20 1986 


THE 



TIMES 


21 


FINANCE AND INDUSTRY 


-t 

’fll 

■ 

.. • r> - 
r 

■ . 'V 

T-. •: 

V 


- i, 

• ! 




V- 


- . ■ } 


STOCK MARKET 


FT 30 Share 

1389.5 (+14.9) 

FT-SE 100 

1659.8 (+15j4) 

USMi 

119.42 (+1.37) 

THE POUND 


US dollar 

1.4782 (+0.0010) 

W German mark 

.33442 (+0.0171) 

Trade-weighted 

74.8X+0.5) . 



expects lower pay 
settlements after tax cut 


•<V 




- • ife*. 


1 •• c 





_ -a 


mb 




...nr 


. — a**’ 


~ J 

SC 


- y* 

’1/ 




/ . 


Beecham 
in sales 

Beecham, the pharraaceDti- 
cals and consumer products 
group which underwent a 
. boardroom upheaval last au- 
tumn, is selling off two of its. 
business as part of a strategic 
group review. 

v . Reheis Chemical Company 
: is being sold in a management 
buyout for $23.5 and 

the retail milk business of 
Hodicks Farms and Dairies is 
going to Unigate for £5.8 
million. - The sale does not 
affect the Horlicks Tange of 
malted and chocolate 
products. 

Beecham said it had initiat- 
ed a number of strategic 
reviews in the past three 
months to improve efficiency, 
profitability, and the utiliza- 
tion- of the group’s manufac- 
turing resources and was now 
rcveiwing the future with par- 
ticular.- attention to its phar- 
maceuticals and over-the- 
counter medicines. 

Broker ahead 

Willis Faber, the Lloyd’s 
insurance broker, increased 
pretax profits to £50.7 million 
in 1985, a rise of 29 per cent 
The dividend was increased to 
' &75p, a' 35 per cent risel 

Tempos, page 23 

DRG soars 

DRG, the stationery, pack- 
aging, office supplies and engi- 
. nee ring . company, . made 
taxable profits in 1985 of 
£31.2 million, a rise of 20 per 
cent. The total dividend was 
raised 10 per cent to 8J5p. 

Tempos, page 23 


T-* 

• 

7 

. - /■* 

>*,• 


*> * 


=: Cost of bid 



Sea Containers has written 
off flO million, partly as a 
rank of tbe-e^ftiise of its 

' itntmwtcfiil ffaniMl fif. 

pressway hid. The writeoff 
also covered losses arising 
from defaults of two lessees 

UCAT sold 

The Park Place offer lor 
United Computer and Tech- 
nology has been declared nn- 
coixfioonaL Acceptances have 
been received for 53.4 percent 
of shares, giving Park Place 
5£2 per cent of UCAT. 

Spong buy 

* Holdings has ex- 
_ J conditional contracts 
for the acquisition of 80 per 
cent of. die share capital of 
Hutchinson Design Consul- 
tants through the issue of 
666,666 Spong shares, valuing 
Hutchinson at £120,000. 

Aberdeen £7m 

The City of Aberdeen has 
placed £7 milli on 10.80 per 
cent redeemable stock 2011 
with institutions. The stock is 
being issued at £100 per emit 
and the first interest payment 
of £4.76384 per cent will be 
made on September 1- Deal- 
ings are expected to start 
tomorrow. 

Tonks success 

. Newman Tonks, the Bir- 
mingham hardware and pi- 
ties company fighting a £67 
minion bid from McKecfcnic 
Brothers, yesterday forecast a 
25 ‘ : " 



j year to October 31 

company also said the divi- 
dend would be increased by 
- more , than 30 per cent in the 
current year to 7.2p. 


By David Smith 
Economics Correspondent 

The ChanceDor of the Ex- 
chequer, Mr Nigel Lawson, 
said yesterday that he expect- 
ed the cut in the baric rate of 
income-tax, announced on 
Tuesday, to be reflected in 
tower pay settlements. 

. Rapid growth in unit labour 
costs is keeping Britain’s inter- 
est rates higher than they 
should be, he added. 

Mr. Lawson's comments 
came as Department of Em- 
ployment figures were re- 
leased showing a rise in 
average earnings of 8-3 per 
cent id the .12 months to 
January, compared with a 5.5 
per cent increase in retail 
prices. . 

The underiying rate of 
growth of average earnings, 
after allowing for distortions, 
was 7-5 per cent, the same as 
in December and, apart from 
an upward blip last Septem- 
ber, an underlying rate that 
has remained the same ^ 
July 1984. •••'. 


10- 

[Per cent change * 

- 

- 9- 

g_ 

;fV . AVERAGE A^J a 

w \ ^ EARNINGS / fl 

b 

7- 

V\ A j i 


' 6 - 

\ | 


5- 

4- 

A MokLmM 

p 

3- 




1983 ’* 1984 ™ 1985 1 

1986 


. Department of Employ- 
ment officials said that there 
were no signs of an easing io 
the pace of earnings growth, 
with figures from the Confed- 
eration of British Industry 
showing settlements in the 
present pay ;round unchanged 
on last year. 

The Chancellor, in a press 
briefing, said that one reason 
for the relatively high level of 
British interest rates, even 


after yesterday’s reductions, is 
pay. 

“Unit labour cfcsts are rising 
at a faster rate than compet- 
itors' and this makes the 
markets take a slightly scepti- 
cal view of sterling,” he said. 

In January, unit wages and 
salaries were 5.3 per cent up 
on a year earlier. In the three 
months to January, they were 
5 per cent up on the corre- 
sponding period a year earlier. 


The Treasury's Budget fore- 
cast is for a 4.5 per cent rise in 
unit labour costs iu 1986. Mr 
Lawson said yesterday that he 
hoped this figure would turn 
out to be too high. 

The cut in the baric rate of 
income lax should lead to a 
lower level of pay settlements, 
the Chancellor said. He urged 
employers to stress the ! per 
cent real income increase 
brought about by the tax cut in 
wage negotiations. 

*Tt is an extra argument that 
management can use. They 
would be very foolish indeed 
if they did not” he said. 

Manufacturing employ- 
ment continues to decline, 
according to Department of 
Employment figures also re- 
leased yesterday. 

There was a 7,000 fell, to 
5.34 million, in January. Dur- 
ing last year, manufacturing 
employment fell by 64,000. 

There was also a 10,000 
decline in employment in the 
energy and water supply in- 
dustries, mainly coal mining, 
in January. 


Rank withdraws its bid for 
Granada but may try again 


The Rank Organisation has 
withdrawn its £741 million 
bid fix’ Granada Group, but 
has obtained permission from 
the Takeover - Fund to refold 
within 21 days, if the objec- 
tions of the Independent 
Broadcasting Authority are 
overcome. - ' 

The IBA blocked the bid 
because. Granada owned the 
fiandtise for Granada Televi- 
sion whit* is not allowed to 
change hands without IBA 
permission. Rank’s attempt to 
overturn the IB A’s decision in 
court failed, but the appeal is 
due to be heard this week or 
next ■■ 


By Alison Eadie 

If theappeal fails. Rank win 
have to tty to persuade the 
IBA to come to an arrange- 
ment Mr Michael Gifford, 
chief executive of Rank, said 
yesterday: “We have a num- 
ber of ideas we are pursuing”. 
The IBA has so fer declined to‘ 
talk to Rank. It is thought 
Rank may offer to bid for 
Granada without the televi- 
sion franchise. 

Rank has built up an 8 per 
cent state in Granada at a cost 
of around £58 mAlion. The 
shares of Granada fell 16p in 
after-hours trading from 280p 
to 264p. Rank snares gained 


28p on the day to 537p. 

The Takeover Panel has 
allowed the Rank bid to be 
treated in the same way as a 
reference by the Office of Fair 
Trading to the Monopolies 
Commission. A clearance by 
the Commission permits a 
company to rebid within 21 
days. In other circumstances, 
if a bid fails or is withdrawn, 
the bidder has to wait a year 
before trying again. 

Mr Alex Bernstein, the 
rfiairman of Granada, he 
was very pleased. “We always 
felt it was an ill-considered 
bkL Now we can get on with 

running our businesses.” 


Opec up 
against 
UK stand 

.Em . 

Genera 

Tte ofl miaistere of tire Orga- 
nization 6f Petroleum Expect-, 
ins Countries yesterday were 
forced to accept that Britain is 
unlikely to offer any coopera- 
tion to help ease the soppfy- 
demand imbalance in the 
world oil market which has 
sent prices spiralling down- 
wards this year 

As talks continued with five 
nohrOpec producers, Mexico, 
Egypt, Malaysia, Oman and 
Angola, on how they could 
help limit the amount of oil 
entering the free market, Opec 
members were digesting Mr 
Nigel Lawson’s latest state- 
ment that the British Govern- 
ment win not change its policy 
of allowing the oil companies 
to set their own production 
targets in the North Sea. 

Several Opec ministers in 
Geneva still harbour an out- 
side hope that extended main- 
tenance programmes in the 
North Sea may be 
“encouraged” by the Govern- 
ment this summer while 
pices are low. 

However, Dr Arturo 
Grisanti, the Opec president, 
said .yesterday: “Other non- 
Opec producers must be pre- 
pared to cooperate, but we 
have little hope now of any 
agreement.” 

A majority of members 
favour a return to the quotas 
set in London in 1983 pre- 
scribing an overall ceiling of 
16 million barrels a day while 

others have suggested that that 

figure is too high and that a 

more realistic ceiling would be 
14 milli on barrels. ' * 


MARKET SUMMARY 


STOCK MARKETS 


tlmr York 

Dow Jones ~ 1791 43 (+1-56) 

Tiihuo 

rmS Dow . — 14476^4 <-162.78) 

RSIs 3?-: 155934 

Amsterdam: Gen 237, 

Sydneys AO 11233 

Commerzbank „ — 20953 (+22.0) 

Bnasds: 

General 417.09 

Paris: CAC 325. 

Zurich: 

SKA General . 509.40 (same) 


GOLD 


London Fixing: 

AM $34025 
ctosa $347 
235.75) 

WewYoric . 

Come* $348.60-343.10 


.75 


MAIN PRICE CHANGES 


RISES: 

Tarmac 

Bass 

Sate T» 

Maca&n 

Dixons _ 

B e echa m 

Shell 

Lloyds 


472p+20p 

— 7S3p +2®P 
_„2a0p+22p 
355p +25P 

348p +28p 

_13&5p +10p 
„ 768p +1t)p 
_634p+34p 

gS G i^=fl:i 

ASda _ — ~*.445p+25p 


Wlmpey 

Kenning Mir 
TozerK 


Tazerl 
LWTHdgs 
DeeCorp — 

DRG 

Duport _ — 

Logtaa 

Barrett 


1 83p+16p 

188p+12p 

116p+12p 

330p +10p 
285p +10p 
27Bp +15p 
92p +8>4p 
- «1p +7p 
„152p +8C 


FALLS: 


Legal and Genera) 
Sun Life — 


453p -12p 
221p -12p 
7840 -28p 

9T9p-35p 


CURRENCIES 


London: 

B $1.4782 
EDM33442 
£: SwFrZJMXB ; 
C FFr105472 . 
£ Yen2B1.76 
£r&jdex.74fl 
New Yoric 
E: 51.4782 
ODM2^615 
$: Index: 1172 
ECU £0 547666 
SDH £0.788372 


INTEREST RATES 


London: 

Bank Base: lift _ . 

3 -monO* Wert»nlt7»!ff-7»M 
3-month efigi Me Wtei1 3 w-11> 
buying rate ‘ ' 

Prime Rate 9 
federal Funds 7*4 
S Treasury BfflS 
gO-year txmds IWm-IM** 


Guinness censured 
by Takeover Panel 


Conespondeiit 

GtimrKSS was yesterday rep- 
rimanded by the Takeover 
Band fix* comments h made to 
the Press about its £14 billion 
bid for Distillers and told to 
produce a frill-blooded profit 
forecast at the earliest 
opportunity. 

At a Press conference on 
Febuary 20, Guinness, whose 
chief executive is Mr Ernest 
Saimdos, said it had raised the 
terms of its bad fix’ Distillers 
and that the meiger would not 
involve any earnings dilution 
fix- existing Guinness share- 
holder. This has been inter- 
preted by the Takeover Panel 
as tantamount to a profit 
forecast 

Rule 28 of die Takeover 
Code requires that afl profit 
forecasts are reported on by the 
relevant auditors or consultant 
accountants and fin a n c i al 
adviseis. 

The Panel said: “If a public 
statement is made which in- 
cludes a profit forecast, the 
existence of this forecast should 
be. acknowledged and the fore- 
cast reported oo unless it is 
immediately and publicly 
withdrawn”. 

“The period of uncertainty 
between Febuary 20 and today 
relating to the Guinness fine- 
cast was unfair ip the otter 
parties involved in the 
takeover”. 

A senior Guinness executive 
stated at the Press conference, 
which was attended by repre- 
sentatives of Guinness’s finan- 
cial adviser, Morgan Gre nfe D : 
“Although we are not making a 
forecast, we anticipate on the 
basis of public information, 
that the earnins per shae of 
the merged entity m 1986 will 
be at least as great as the 



Ernest Saanders: told to 
produce profit forecast 
earnings per share of Guinness 
on its own and that there wfll be 
do dilution”. 

Mr James Gulliver's Argyll 
Group, the rival bidder Tor 
Dtstfflas, has chimed that on 
the bias of published informa- 
tion, Mmi np dilution in the 
Guinness bid will be a least 16 
per cent 

The Takeover Code states- 
that advisers should ensure that 
directors and o ffi c ials of com- 
panies know the code implica- 
tions of what they say to 
journalists. 

“h is very difficult after 
puhficatioa to alter an impres- 
sion given or a view or remark 
attributed to a particular 
person,” the code states. 

“Particular areas of sensitiv- 
ity on which comment should 
be avoided include future prof- 
its and prospects, asset values 
and the likelihood of the 
revision of an offer.” 

Meanwhile, Lonrho, Mr Ro- 
land. Tiny” Rowland's inter- 
national trading group, Iras 
expresse d an interest in buying 
the five whisky brands which 
Guinness and Distillers pro- 
tean about the effect of the 
meigsr on competition. 


New rules 
kill£ 800 m 
market 

By Lawrence Lever 
The £800 million market in 
packaged capital transfer tax 
mitigation schemes, known as 
“inheritance trusts,” has 
folded after the introduction 
of special provisions in the 
Budget 

Holders of these plans win 
not, however, be affected by 
the new provisions governing 
donors who retain an interest 
in gifted assets, usually under 
a trust or insu rance arrange- 
ment 

The new rules will hit 
insurance companies such as 
legal & Genera l, wh o had 
heavily marketed CTT mitiga- 
tion schemes. Legal & General 
has taken between £350 mil- 
lion and £400 million in the 
four years it provided the 
schemes. Yesterday the com- 
pany withdrew its Capital 
Preservation Plan from the 
market 

Mr Christopher Marshall, 
Legal & General's legal ser- 
vices manager, said about 
10,000 of these plans had been 
sold. 

“It is sad this should have 
had to happen. The capital 
preservation plan was a handy 
way for people to pass capital 
on to their children, and retain 
an income from it, "he said. 

“Every single company 
marketing these types of plan 
will have to withdraw them. 

The dear suggestion last 
night was that it was the 
aggre ssive marketing of the 
CTT mitigation schemes by 
insurance companies and lire 
offices which led to their 
downfall. 

Schemes, marketed by Al- 
bany and Abbey Life, known 
as “deathbed schemes” had 
already been disallowed by the 
Inland Revenue. 

The new provisions, similar 
in effect to old anti-avoidance 
estate duty measures, took the 
industry by surprise. 

The effect of the provisions 
is to levy the new inheritance 
tax on a gift made under 
reservation, when that reser- 
vation ceases, which, in the 
case of mitigation schemes, 
would usually be the death of 
the donor. 

Credit would be given for 
any tax paid at the time of the 
original gift, but the tax rates 
on death, under the inheri- 
tance tax re gime are twice the 
old lifetime CTT rates. 

The new provisions wfll 
apply to gifts made after 
midnight last Monday. In the 
case of gifts involving an 
insurance policy, the Inland 
Revenue takes the day the 
policy was effected, but gener- 
ally the date of the gift will 
depend on the circumstances. 


Rodamco wins 
bid for 
Haslemere 

■ Rodamco, the Dutch com- 
pany, haswon its £250 million 
takeover bid for Haslemere 
Estates, the property firm. 

Haslemere has bowed to the 
inevitable and told its remain- 
ing; shareholders to accept 
Rodamco’s 640p per share 
offer. Rodamco, acting in 
concert with Rodamco Prop- 


oftbe company 
Haskmere's chafrman, Mr 
David Pickfon} is to remain at 
Haslemere for. the time being 
but Rodamco is drawing up 
new plans for the company 
and these will determine 
whether he remains. 

Stockley leap 

Stockley, the fast-growing 
property company which ho- 
lds an unwelcome 26.5 per 
cent stake in Stock Conver- 
sion, one of Britain's hugest 
property companies, yester- 
day announced pretax- profits 
up 427 per cent to £3.76 
million for the year ended 
November 30. 


Barclays buys Visa 
cheque business 

By Richard Thomson, Banking Correspondent 


Barclays Bank announced 
yesterday that it had acquired 
the Visa Travellers Cheque 
basin ess of Chase Manhattan, 

the New York bank, making it 
one of the world's largest 
travellers cheque operators. 

The price of the deal was oot 
disclosed. 

Barclays is already the 
world's biggest issuer of Visa 
travellers cheques with about 9 
per cent of the world market 
for travellers cheques. Bat the 
purchase win lift its market 
share to about 14 per cent with 
total turnover rising from £24 
trillion in 1985 to more than £4 
b3Bon. 

Mr Peter Eli wood, chief 
executive of Bardaycard, said 
that the addition of the Chase 
travellers cheque operation to 
Barclays’ existing operations 
demonstrated the bank's be fief 
that travellers cheques would 
continue to play an important 
role with business travellers 
and holidaymakers. 


He said that travellers 
cheques and credit cards were 
usually Hsed for different rea- 
sons. “Onr travellers cheque 
business will complement, not 
compete with, onr credit card 

business,” 

American Express remains 
the largest operator of travel- 
lers cheques with more than 40 
per cent of the market Thom- 
as Cook is slightly largo- than 
the enlarged Barclays opera- 
tion, with more than 15 per 
emit of the market 

Mr Ell wood said that the 
new acquisition would 
strengthen Barclays* position 
in North America. 

Mr Edward James, presi- 
dent of Chase Travellers 
Cheque Service Corporation, 
said that the company’s plans 
for growth were in areas of 
financial services other than 
travellers cheques, so it had 
decided to sell that side of the 
b usiness. 


Executive Editor Kenneth Fleet 


Morgan and ICI open 
a new loan market 


Yesterday we saw a prime example 
of the City of London at its best With 
extraordinary speed, skill and not a 
little foresight on the part of Morgan 
Grenfell, allied with ICTs high pro- 
fessionalism and capacity for rapid 
decision making, a new market for 
UK long term corporate loans was 
opened. Between them, Morgans and 
ICI may have uncovered a signicant 
demand in Europe for long term 
sterling loan instruments. 

The bank raised £100 million for 
ICI in the Euro-sterling market. The 
bond carries a 1 0 per cent coupon, the 
issue price was £99V^» per cent and the 
life 17 years. Hitherto this market has 
been tapped only for five to 10 year 
loans. But the length of the loan is 
only the beginning of the story. The 
issue was made without covenants - 
something which UK investing in- 
stitutions had hitherto refused to 
countenance. But they have no seen 
the light in the Chancellor of the 
Exchequer's eyes. His decision , 
revealed in Tuesday's budget speech 
to put a half per cent (not one per cent 
as too bastisly reported here yes- 
terday) stamp duty on transfers of 
loan stock was destined to have two 
immediate consequences: it would 
dry up the liquidity of the domestic 
loan market and it would drive new 
loan issues offshore. The notable 
exception to the new stamp duty rule 
are Euro-sterling bonds (to have 
denied UK companies alone access to 
this market would have been an 
absurdity not even the most doc- 
trinaire official would contemplate). 

Faced with this entirely new situa- 
tion the institutions promptly cast 
aside their cartelised insistence on 
covenants and went scrambling after 
the new ICI stock, whgich promptly 
went half a point above the issue 
price dand was being traded on a 
level with European Investment 
Bank paper. To be fair, price was also 
a factor. Yesterday's one point cut in 
bank base rates, with the half promise 
of still lower rates to come, could not 
have been better timed, either for ICI 
or its merchant tankers. But the 
breaking of the covenant wall is the 
really significant development And 
where ICI has had the perceptiveness, 
and the courage, to go other major 
UK companies will surely follow. In 
addition to have abolished a tax on 
Tuesday, Nigel Lawson, albeit in- 
advertently, also created a new 
market 

Glittering approval 

The young men who write the 
brokers' circulars have given the 
Budget a virtual clean sweep of 
favourable reviews. Perhaps they 
were partly influenced by the fact that 
the Budget contained nothing to hit 
them in the wallet despite the talk 
beforehand. 

The murmurs of approval added 
fuel to already roaring markets. Gilts 


rose by 2 Vs points at the long end, 
with dealers citing the Budget rather 
than the expected one-point base rate 
cul Equities accelerated towards 
1,400 on the FT 30-share index. 

Roger Nightingale at Hoare Govett 
found the Budget “well balanced and 
politically canny” and particularly 
good for the City. Laing & 
Cruickshank’s verdict is that the 
PSBR forecast is “achievable and 
cautious.” 

Mark ClifTe at Capel-Cure Myers 
thinks that the Chancellor has deliv- 
ered a prudent and cautious package, 
which is probably a little too cautious 
in its predictions for non-oil tax 
revenues and the likely scope for tax 
cuts this lime next year. 

There may have been doubts about 
the medium term financial strategy 
before the BudgeuTherc are fewer 
now. “The sound money philosophy 
embodied in the PSBR and the 
reintroduction of the sterling M3 
target.. .will allow UK interest rates to 
decline significantly over the coming 
year,” Laurie Milbank says. 

Rowe & Pitman believes that the 
Budget’s fiscal and monetary fore- 
casts are credible and, in the case of 
the PSBR, “unusually realistic.” De 
Zoete & Bevan thinks that the 
Chancellor succeeded in improving 
the Government's standing, pursuing 
a reforming strategy, and dealing in 
the right way with the consequences 
of a falling oil price, all at one go. 

The bright young men will have a 
chance to test their new found 
admiration for Mr Lawson quite 
soon. A detailed speech on monetary 
policy is promised in the middle of 
next month. 

Ending old account 

The days must surely now be 
numbered for the Stock Exchange's 
two-week account trading system. 
The Budget announcement that deal- 
ings within the account are to become 
liable to the new 0.5 per cent rate of 
stamp duty will certainly hasten the 
end of a settlement system which is 
already under review because of the 
far reaching changes due to come into 
effect on October 27. 

For institutions, the effect of the 
Budget changes will be to double the 
cost of account trading, while for 
small traders dealing in bargains 
worth about £2,000 a time costs will 
rise by about a third. Thus there is 
bound to be some consequent fell-off 
in account trading and in the 
market's overall liquidity. 

Most markets around the world 
have a 48-hour rolling settlement 
system. In New York liquidity is 
provided by the brokers who allow 
their clients to deal on margin in 
return for a charge over the securities. 
This must surely be the way forward 
for London. 




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BfllTANMAUMT TRUST 

74-78 RnsBury Pavement London EC2A 1JD 

01 -5M 2777 tmlMgOI -638 0478/9 MonayGuKM 

0800-010333 

Grown OH 988 575 ..043 

MHKOioy 1043 1113 *07 292 

SmaaarCos 1330 1419* -02 149 

UK Growth 378 401 -03 197 

Extra Inc 58 G 625 -.727 

G* 368 280 -0.1 7.45 

Inc A Growth 1980 2123 -04 4 19 

Nat Woh me 193 7 2088a -05 4.72 
Pro* Snaros IBS 1999 >0.1 9.94 

CO"-*'o-My 1304 1391 .. 2.76 

R-m.-mi Seat 42.7 455 -02 228 

<3*0 4 Oat 192 20.7 . . 224 

Mt Unsure 167 179 045 

Prog Shams 588 604# *0.1 i.*i 

Unw Energy 405 432 *0.4 090 

WOrtO Tar* 429 458 -04 008 

Amar Grown 979 104 4* -OB 211 

Am* Income 58.0 01 M -03 580 

Am* Smaaar Go's 25 7 Z74 .. 174 


58 5 625 -.727 

260 230 -01 7.45 

1990 2123 -04 419 

1937 2088* -05 4.72 
IBS 1998 -0.1 994 
1304 1391 -. 276 


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WnJiaS* 77. Uaidon WON. London EC3N 
IDA 

01-5M 5820 

M Growth 74-4 795 -82 1.73 

Amanean Growth 828 67.1 -85 1.58 

American Inc 872 723* -0.7 556 

EixcpMn Qrowth 1955 1984 *05 832 

Go* A Mhwais 415 469 *01 191 

Japan Growth 1283 1372 -19 020 

PSStc toon* 833 876 *04 4-32 i 

UK Special Opps 783 84.1 • -83 213 ! 


-87 558 
*85 832 
481 191 
-19 030 
*04 432 


783 84.1 • -83 215 


GREUNTTMAMAOCRS 
Royal EwJump*. EC3P3DN 
014889903 


982 727* *84 049 

MO US .. 099 

37.6 40 1 *02 1 12 

209 222 -03 * 20 

33 5 357 -02 198 

539 57 1 -81 . . 

14.0 MB -02 .. 

7B2 819 -02 394 

64.7 67.7 .. 4.14 


R8 Haywards Heath 


EQUITY A LAW 

Si Gecrae Haa Ctnpwaftn St Cowmtry CV1 
190 _ 

0203 553231 

UK Growth Accom 1444 1538 -02 342 

Do Income 127.1 1352 -0.1 342 

- ■ - *0,1 4.7D 

*02 4.70 


Ngner Me Atxum 2379 2468 
DC income 1099 3015 


01-898 9903 
GW A Arad Mt 
Growth Ewaty 
GtrantiN 
N American 

Paofic 

Property Snare 


1181 1228* *0.1 995 
304.7 2179 -0.1 296 

290.4 3049* -32 253 
1389 147.9 -IS 202 
1719 1929 -83 055 

2287 30.4 *81 ISO 


1171 1259* 
1866 2088 
12Q3 1253 

60.0 652* 
73 1 79 8 
BOB 645 

1029 109 7 

59.0 635 
8*1 685 
372 4Q.0 
1342 1443 
311 352 


-81 1.79 
-84 82S 
♦03 524 
-0.1 426 
*07 .. 
-19 120 
*1.7 020 
-81 321 
-20 080 
*81 290 


DO income 1899 2015 +02 4.70 

GrasJFerad Aecun 988 ID*.'* -0.1 277 

00 harm 049 89.0# . . 2.77 

Nth Am* Tn Acann 1354 144.0 -19 030 

F* EM Tit ACOhn 1165 1237 -86 056 

Euro TM Actum 1395 1484* -88 058 

Genoa) Trial 2244 ZM.7# -1.0 299 

FA CUMff M AWA OEMFW r 

1. Laurence Pouney HO. London EC4R DBA 

01923 4680 

American Fund 735 787 -05 023 

CapM Find 10*4 111.78 -08 044 

Mcome Fund 789 812* -1.7 472 

Far Eastern Pund 618 88.1 -36 039 

Overseas Income 88* 71.1 -05 384 

Foad Interest 589 612 .. 856 

Naom Rea Fratf 455 469 . . 493 

European Income 875 72.7 *04 358 


5ma6er CompUM 200.0 2i£8 -08 1J8 

European Tmm 2130 2289 +19 OBI 

gM^MANONU*!^ 

PO Boa 442. 32 St MvxtML London EC3P 


Do Accrn 1959 2094 -81 299 

EaenvrOvt 2309 2371* *7.0 231 

Exempt Actum 3515 3827* +189 251 
MULANO BANK GROUP IMTTHUST 
MANAGOtS 

CWPiwnofl Haa.SN«r8L HaatLSwOfeldSl WD 
0742 79842 


Cn*N income -779 825 

Do Atxum 1042 1115 

Commodicy A Gan - 1032 1179 

Do Accun 1522 1623 


Earn High he 
_ Do Accom' 

Gw A Arad tie 

Do Atom 
HrtlYWd 
Do Aecun 
Income 
Do Accwo 
4mn A POcKc 
Do Accum 
N Amanean Me 
Do Atnm 
Euro GBi too 
Oo Action 
Snwtor Coe toe 
Do Aocun 


57.3 61.1 
. 649 99.1 
.541 »** 
187 905# 
147 A 1974 
2442 2812 
1683 1772 


-09 336 
-a* 228 
-05 307 
-1.1 397 
78 
.. .791 
-02 821 
■S3 BlX 
*09 548 
*04 348 
-84 354 
-07 354 


1862 1772 -84 35* 

2707 2837 -87 394 

21*7 2299# -19 0.19 
225.1 240.1# -12 319 
1079 1147 _ -05 1.14 
1279 1804 - -1J 1.14 
1034 1734 -07 J.17 

1272 1359 -05 127 

1010 1077 -O.T nsr 
1085 1149 -0.1 257 


01-628 5333 

tfl? Mcoma 534 589 -04 581 

N Am* 1>un 1179 1345# -1.0 080 

"MOW 1776 189.0 +14 203 

aw TTOn 889 407# .. 354 

awneontw 737 812# .. 677 

s> VMcar* US Qh 735 73M -19 078 

TaitotoBn&aiGoA 1525 1615 .. 390 

WlWRO a BANK UNT TRUST MANAOBW 
Prana* UT Attoan. 3 Raytoigh Rd. Brentwood 


aw That 
St Vtoomt wc 


-05 025 
-05 384 
.. 856 
.. *03 
*04 398 


131. Finwray Pavement, London EC2A 1AY 
01538 9876 01280 8540/1/2/3 
Capital Qrowth he 579 509 .. 174 

Do Atxum 837 BUI .174 

Eaatarn 8 MU 1177 4 114 8# +15 173 
Do 0*> IWnuawfll 575 614# -09 173 
Branc* A Properly 57 5 61.4 -03 JL3S 

Gw A Foad Income 406 51 1 +0 1 853 

Dd Accum SOD 842 *01 858 

High income income 7ii 760 *0 8 515 


BUCXMASTOt MANAGBMamT 

The Sex* Exchange London EC2P 2JT 

01488 2888 


General He Ml 
Do Aocwn (41 
Mnna Fund PI 
Do Accum (3i 
Hi# Me (21 
Do Accum (21 
Smaler me tdf 

Do Aceian (31 


207 4 2131 
326.7 343.5 
982 1013 
1688 177 3 
1177 1225# 
155 7 1825# 
0025 1094 
0032 1155 


H-gn rwtd Incoma 
Dq Accum 


1646 1780 +13 515 

69 9 7«7* +ij 8.18 
1815 1B41* *10 818 
899 74 7 *08 248 


Dq Accum 1815 1B41* * 

M6 Accum 99 9 74 7 * 

Dq WShtJrwt 06.4 71 0 4 

Managed Fund 572 BOJ 

PraMronce Mcoma 27 6 29 5 * 

Do Accun 860 9i9 4 

smarter Coa Accum i3T9 1469 
world Rjnrv Sharo 84 100 

Portdho T* UK 751 778 + 

PortloHo T* japan 78 7 025 + 

PomtWO T* US 723 749 
Pcnloho T* Europe 97 4 1069 + 

PomWoruNK 36 8 379 

BAILUEGtFFORD 

2 Gmnfeaac Si. Edmhqrgh EH3 8YY 
031-225 3SS1 IOMhrtOai3S6 BOBU 


031-225 3S81 | 
M Ex B2J 
Jamn Ea l<3) 

\ UK Ex HU 
Pmi Pans ma 
ma* pens UK 
BG Amanca 
BG Energy 


2916 3043# 
1952 207 6 
3888 3882 
1619 169 8 
162.0 172 4 
130 6 1209 


BO Hcoma Grwth 190 T 194.4* *0.1 552 


BG JWpan 
BG Technology 


1982 1450 
1876 1784 


BALTIC TRUST MANAGERS 

25/26 Atoermane Strew. London mix 4A0 

01-491 BOSS 


Ausnatan 

Japan A General 
Hgh Hcoma 
Intomatamai Trust 
tocoma On Ta 
Gtts 6 Fried Ml 
GWmj Markets 


49 4 529 -03 0B2 

1A7 20 1 *02 258 

025 833 *04 020 

436 466* *01 7.68 

72 7 777 +04 1 10 

46 9 502 -43 416 

67 7 723* -0 7 5 58 

35 3 37fle -0.7 198 
445 *7 7 -04 1.41 


BARCLAYS UWCORN 

Unicorn House. 252. Ftomtara Rd E7 

01 534 5844- 

Atranea 889 924 

A151 Accum 139 2 1*80 

Dotocom# 994 1057 

Cnwal 68 3 726# 

Fiamcr Tnai 4215 4484 

Extra Income 70 8 7i3 

Fjkmcml 355 6 2309 

EM 350 7 266.7* 

Genenu 1374 146 I c 

Cfl 4 fi«*d He 535 56.0* 

Japan A Gan He 1282 1363* 

0°*gc 129 7 1J7.9* 

Growth Accum 17SA 187g* 

m coral Trust 3T1 5 3*20 

Leoute Tru* 773 »; 

Speow SriuaMns 1339 1414 

Peaxor iBoj 191B 

TneveFun# roee 1133 

Tech Aecun SO* S3 5 

Do meonra 502 533 

Wortthrae Trust >41 7 1507 

B To M» Fun Ace 314 8 3348 

Do n* 2084 219 i . 

BAMNQ MO MANAGBS 

PO Bo» 156. Beckenham. K*m BR3 • 
D1-6SA9D02 


-09 2J8 
+21 1 79 
*15 178 
-01 303 
-20 3 78 
-0 1 541 
-07 309 
-03 320 

-02 aoo 

.. 9.68 
-06 045 
-05 045 
-03 a» 

. 160 
-02 158 
-05 250 
-06 262 
295 
-87 080 
-07 060 
-08 1 13 
-88 331 
-0 7 331 


CS FUND MANAGERS 

1». High Moaxxn. London WCiV BPY 

01-242 1149 

CS Japan FUid 603 737 -fll 029 

CANNON FUND MANAGERS 
^Ognpcway. Weratfay. has onb 

Growt h 275.4 2935 402 293 

Mcoma 3163 3365 +05 4.18 

Far Ej mi I5U 1693 +25 051 

North Amanean 1415 1888 -15 071 

CAPS. (JAMES) MANAGEMENT 
•00. Old Broad St London EC2N 1BQ 
01521 0011 

C«M*iai 341 1 3591 .. 183 

mcoma CT 270 6 2845 .. 468 

Norn Amanean (31 2680 3BZ2 .. 150 

■Cater allen 

1. KMq MWam St SCAN 7AU 
01-823 6314 

G4t Trust 1039 1095 *0.411.05 

CENTRAL BOANO W FMANCG OF 
CHURCH Or ENG 
77 London waa EC2 IDS 
01-568 1815 

H» Fix'd 389 15 -. 40 

Quad mi 1386 .. 1824 

Oeooaa 1000 .. 12x0 

gtA MT^ aW9CWLWYESTMEHTPUWB 

M S * WU,W " BaN, “ 


OTO«XUflT111W 

Hano w Pitm. Bratol BS2 CUN 
0272 277719 

Q#rara)^u«y 373 397 

Eaura Mg|> Mcoma 401 42 7* 

GW i Feted Ira DM 788 207 
todM SacuntoM 235 250 
Am* Grown 235 .'‘SO 

worn Qrowtn 335 an 

tvropa*’ Grow* 23£ aO 

GWARrodJnc 235 250 

COUNTY BANK UNIT TRUSTS 
161 ChMoMJi. London EC2V 6HJ 
01-726 1989 


PS MVESTM8HT NMNMMB 

180. West Gauge St Gbegow G2 2 Pa 

041 332 3132 

BNonced Gth Me 3882 407.7 .. 820 

Od Accum 3865 4113 .. 

Mcoma Gth me 372 396 . . 650 

Oo Accum 391 405 . . . . 

5oraKa Cos Me 385 «i3 .. 150 

DO Atxum 38.1 41 8 . . . . 

FBEUTY 8VTERNA7WNAL 
Rn* walk. Tonenna. tws tor 
0732 362222 

AmeflCMi 992 108.1 -15 0.64 

Amar Equuv Mcoma 322 345 -02 +81 

Am* Soeowl Sill 509 545 -OB 042 

F* E3S1 He 29.7 31.7 +02 4.40 

O# 8 Faed M 305 315 .. 89G 

Growth 8 income 97.1 1039 -02 <23 

Japan Special Su 335 35 B *05 .. 

Japan Trusi 995 1083 *05 . . 

Managed W TIB 127.0 1352* -0 1 030 

Max Hcoma EtXjBy 688 723* -05 542 

PrarouunN Gth 333 355* *02 232 
Saudi East Am T« zsb 252 -02 050 

SpecnP Sts 1445 156.7 -07 097 

HJBMMQ IROKRT) 
O^SLUMdonECaAeAN 

Amanean Ex*rpi £3595 3675# *457 150 

Japan Exempt *3105 3205**17.14 1.18 

Am Properly TM SI 0793 .0 . . 7.78 

Properly Trusi 120339 e . . 8-10 


I to mto ue SmOr Ctfs 1198 1249 -04 299 

Hatom N Am* 679 72.1 -05 092 

Jap OF E 903 98.1 -04 0.46 

Hamtooi Seandvn 713 759 *09 191 

"■"*** &xt»e an 02.6 885 *92 033 

Hentaua CanwSan 45.6 *05 -04 196 

Haaaros EtBXly kx 793 64.4 -02 497 

HgSg iSglW 548 S8.1R -0.1892 

HwnBroa "at Aastt 365 324# -03 294, 


a London wjb Bugs. London was. London 
EC2M SNO 
01-628 5161 

Am* 6 Gan Inc 2285 3432 -15 054 

DO ACCum 23M 3484 -1 7 054 

Am* Tumamd Mo 218 2 2329 


DP Accum 225 0 2392 -211.17 

Capua* "1M Me woo Z042* -04 286 

Do Accun 231 0 243 .8* -05 258 
Con* & GW me MO 91 4 

Do Accum 1125 1195 

Enra ine 7* Me 147.4 1505 -0 1 4 84 

Da Acaxn 1M6 166.4 -02 4 64 

mcoma Trial 1148 1218 -02 421 

DoACtun 1190 126.4 -02 <21 

Ml Growm Fd he 1562 1660 -1 1 000 

CM Aecun 1736 1648 -IO 000 

Japan L Gan Inc 888 739* *02 OOB 

Do Aecun 09.4 735# 

MtrtWy Magma Fto 732 775* 


Rwcowy 
Do Accun 
EuYMeon Inc 
DO Accum 


1274 13S.4 
1376 1462 
502 514 
502 514 


Caps# Atxum 
Oner 9 7 Tnm 
Extra income 

FtnarvxX 

G* Snmgy 


Z85A 2KJ 
41.7 44J* 
1551 18<9 
1*26 iSr.B 
547 S85 


CnraiMKmn 27B0 2938 
Mc oma 6 Growth 395 420* 
JWMwe 8 Paahc I2S6 1335 
Nl» Am* Growth >04 6 I M 2 
W Recovary 1045 111.4 
SmoMr Coa 1925 204 7# 
GtoO# ine Tst 53.7 S7.1* 

omwn owrmusr services 

Grown HpuatL wokmg Gugl IXW 


FR®*CSPROVTD0fT MANAGERS 
Pamm End. Dontno. Surroy 
0308 685056 

FP Eoury tat 7583 2i07 

Da Accun 3275 347.9 

FP PUO Ml Del 112.8 1202 

Do Acaim 1256 1316 

Stwrarauifc tat 161.7 171.6 

Do Aecun 1682 7784 

FUNDS IN COURT 

nraw Trustee. KMnwy. WC2 

01-405 4300 

Capa 3453 3S20 

G«J« H: 141.7 1465 

HtfrVmid 2038 2112# 

CTUMrTUAMAOCItS 
Ml FM*. (L PwotBtwa So. Lgndcsi 
01-283 3S7S Oaaang 01-626 9431 
UK Cep fiid Me 981 1825# 


MURRAY JOWNCTME fTTWUT 
MAfuaeoaENT 

1B3. Hope Streel CT ee g o w 03 2UH 
Ml 221 9252 

Amencro 1129 TT95#’ -12 389 

Granpaon - . tw 2289 -05 193 

Smetor Goa 1909 2017 *12 012 

NATIONAL PROVIDENT INVESTMENT 
MANAGERS 

49, aaoachtxO# ft. CC3P5W 
01-823 4200 Gn 969 - 

NR UK 2001 2129 *07 3.10 

DO Aocun 3193 3402 +1.0 110 

NPI owlaa* 531.7 566-7* -02 1-10 

DO Accum MX 9805# -85 1.10 

Far East Ace 618 875# +91 030 

Do DM 53.7 57.8# .. 030 

Amanean ACC ■ 879 507 -06 130 

OO DM 5&6 era -04 130 

NORWICH UMON 
PO Bok A. Nawttfi Iff!) 3NG 1 . 

n*X> WWW ‘ 

Gnu) That ETT56 1297# *092 184 

wTw .1195 1265 -2.1 197 

OPPCNHCMSt TRUST MANAGEMENT 
85. Camtm Straw London EC4N 5AE 
*-» 01-296 muimtnS 
i n Mmaaoi M l Grown 1315 14)9 *05 090 

Mediae 6 Qrowth 60.4 64.7 >95 390 

SpBCdS Ska 783 835 -03 4 *0 

Ameflcan GrowBi 332 355# -DJ 0.7V 

Japan Growth *34 si.B *oa 

Eurowwi Qrowth 573 813 -19 290 

WtOrwAh 52.6 583 -04 050 

PacSc Growth 407 *3.8 *03 0.10 

MghHcomif 305 339 403 040 

Pnwkjl Mcoma aas 527# -0.1 230 

Do Accun 895 BOA# .>11 230 

PURL TRUST 

aa^HoBwiLWCIVT® 


-19 290 
~0* 050 
*03 0.10 
403 MO 



-M+i- 



Pr 



.'i'iF 




Growth f*M Inc 
Do Accum 
Mc o ma Rind 
MU Equity Me 
Do Accum 
IM Trust ine 
Do Accum 


865 92.1 
1279 1311 
11K5 1239 
1189 1265 
1189 1285 
1239 1309 
2107 221.1 


-02 290 
-03 240 
+OI -MffiJ 
-19 155 
-1.9 155 
-02 3.17 
-03 117 


PfWETUAL WOT TRUST 
AlKg^aaKItatoyC 

MU Growth 237. 


WorfeMa Roc IO 

Am* Growth 88 

MU BneraCff* ' 77 
Fw £aar am ei 

Europaan Gth 5* 

PRtXjnC iMT TRUSTS 


2579 3748 -OS 1J0 
1849 1980 -08 497 

1433 154 Q* -04 157 
689 74.1# -08 0 04 

TJA M.1 -0.7 050 

51 * 65.9 -03 106 

543 585 *01 290 


Hgn Income 
Cow t Gil 
Ftr Eastern 


iai ' -a* us 

1719 182-3 -08 397 

.917 99 A# -OI 899 
Mtt8 1512# +49 OOB 

I25S -l- 1 1ST 

W£5 2M2 -0.4 153 

’523 1 S-! ■-“** 

786 84A# -02 691 


0lS»»7 W1 ' ,BrtEtW * 1 * 1 ZDL 


E qUty 3999 4254 

Bxop&Hi 77.I - 829 

Hotoom Comm* 328 SOI 


+05 113 
-06 098 
-03 3 S3 


Auonrta 
Ex stare 
Euraoe 
Sic** S Inc 
Do Accum 
First Japan 
Japan SiMerar 
Japan Sumw 
F** Small* Co e 
F**i Europe 
Fir* N Am* 


52.0 588 
41 5 44 M 
1025 1091 
623 689# 
84 1 101 I# 
65 9 70.x 
939 89 7 
735 786# 
623 66,9 
915 979 
H>0 93.4 


MflRNGTQN MANAGEMENT 
5B Gresham Sl London EC2P 208 
01900 4433 


ragn Mcome Trust m*t aw e 

Growth Tibet 2170 3921 

American Trust 1287 1315 

■<* 

EFM UNIT TRUST MANAGERS 
4 MNwaa Crescent Eanbut* 

031236 3492 

American Fund 705 76.7 

CaoRMFund 975 938 

arowto 6 Me Fund 1278 138.7 
Hgh Oca Fund 1015 108.9 

t m e ma nonar Ftmd 1787 1912 

Hesdusus Fund 202 2i.6« 


Do Accum 
Mcame Fund 

PTOoe Exampt 

Mtarr a hur uj 
US 8 General 
Teen > Growth 
Japan a General 
F* East 4 Sen 
Europeu FtM4 
G#nt#iy Ftahd 


1370 [486# 
78.1 836# 
1583 1637# 
1412 1512# 
575 818 
65 0 696 
1778 1902 
785 815 
81M 2362# 
87 4 7Z1 


*81 290 
*02 230 
*02 858 
-03 240 
+15 150 
-05 1A0 
-07 10Q 
-1A 020 
-0.1 190 
+1.1 070 
*08 190 


! HE? »" ■« «-8 879# *ft1 630 

t tc * MfT1 w » B7 fl 833 -05 075 

SStoM «■ 

SE&JK -m 

mxnrn oar That 1747 igzs _ _ 

guaj a mama nr M P WTC o ai P a nt 

a. London EC2V 7LH 

01-000 4177 

ttraarora General 41434405 257 

QuMjnun hcome 2»6 2392 sss 

gmawA iwiFd 3597 otj :: i.« 

OMdrant Heeoyery 246L9 2829# ... 

•ancnracwjiAsacTaiANAQWBtT 

dJ-aSsSs*** 1 *"*" K4P 40 ° 7 



NCAmettoi Me 
Do Accun 

NCtoSaL"" 

1*6 nwnt 

NC Japan 
NC Sana* Cos 


29*9 
»79 3105 
1382 1489 
•» 930 ' 
1604 oao 
1285 138.1# 


-27 193 
-U 1.03 
-15 254 
-02 178 
-14 091 
' in 

-07 037. 

+59 842 


Hnoumn Fund Hi 21.6# 
Sm# Jap Ob'* Fna 7SJ 302 
TdkYO Fund 121.1 1295 


Flamed m* 
European He 
_ Do Accum 
Cen*ai me 
„Do Accun 
P# Yieaaine 
,.Do Accum 
"Gh Yn«j hc 
, Do Accun 
■Lroa" Meaow 
„Do Oeeani 
N American He 
-,0a Accum 
Fbotk Hcoma 
_Do Aetarm 

Ou Ace** 


114.7 122.1 
62 6 887 

1012 1060 

1417 1580 
2014 2138 

1)3.1 1189# 
177 7 1*32 
818 87 lc 
1595 1697 
192.5 2044 
ISM 2052 
47 3 50.4 
54 8 582 
107 4 113) 

120.7 1279 
1*2 «8 
017 891 


.. 2-13 
*1 2 127 
*12 127 
33* 
• 33* 

-9.1 *38 
-01 938 
^95 579 
*09 579 
-08 02* 
-0.7 024 
-05 09) 
-08 031 
-08 0 78 
-11 078 
+■02 201 
*02 291 


Tefcvc Fund 
(Exl Anrar (R 
(&/ Japan (s 
fExj Piakc /*) 


121.1 1293 
|430 M7.7 
818 B«3 
21B0 236 1# 


(E«1 Sma«* jap (it 1678 1733 ' 0 10 

Eurofuml 242 259 -02 888 

EAOLE STAR WOT TRUST MANAGERS 
Swn flac Orwram, Olwnw OLD 7UJ 
02*2 5213T1 

UK BaMncad Me 67 T 71 6 +02 £79 

DaAaun PI 716 +02 279 

UK Grown Accum 712 719 -02 I.Efi 

UKHpiMeMe 61 9 680 >03530 

n Amanean Accum 648 88 1 >00 1 45 

For Eaaiarn Accum 688 712 *0 1 070 

Eurooaen Accun 09* 7*0 -oc its 

UK G# 4 R A* 534 570 . 877 

Do Accum 534 570 .. 177 


GARTMDRE FUND MANAGERS 
2 atoptea. London EG3A BBP 
Ot+BS 1212 Dealng 014S3 5788 Daahng 01 -823 

Amancwi Trust ' 019 975 -08 000 

AusWMr Trust 195 21 1 *01 0*1 

fttan Tjr Aeon 549 587 -ftr 248 

, Dotal 411 SIS -11 238 

Commwy Sit*# 570 607 128 

European Trust 408 495# -05 057 

Extra Mccna Trial 479 503 . . 533 

Par Eaaeern Trual 103 0 1112 -0.8 O.11 

Farad mterec Fund 268 274 . . 10m 

041 Trust 26+ 27.6# 833 

Ctoh# Fund Accum 153.4 1532 gig 

, ,<a l 1666 -04 033 

Odd 5h*e Trust i£9 137 .. 2.18 

Hedged American 29.7 31 8 -02 020 

l*gh kyome Trust 13B U8S -43 535 

Himg K qng Tru* 331 347* ^>.1 1.15 

Mcoma Find 892 74.1# 4U 3Si 

Msurama Agenam £4498 4841 -06* 198 

Japan Trutl lias 1219 J3 onn 

»gn*«C Exsira 2613 2722 *09 301 

04 8E wwgy Truw 3£6 3+7 +Q3 VP 

Sonet* Sits Tn» 887 949 -ft? a S3 

IMSohCeRecTa 859 704 Jat 


NC Srr* Eu ropCOT)156.1 1B89 loJ t 

gswjjM Y&0 1 

Jin* Prop . . D1J7 n,n 
»Cftt»arty 1883 1*53 

ROWAN UNIT TRUST ■ 

«"*■ lon «F' EC4FI BAS 


ml Hi# +.,85 Bb 

me 0 1679# -09 255 
1209 1219# - -291294 
18*9 1«10 +45 aafll 


awr" 

Fir Em (£) 



43A) .L*st +«fldw] oay 












































M 


jj 


m 


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*«■ it* 

> . S * 

^ v * 

■ *5* . _ ’ 

• '** 


■'M '*1 



THE TIMES THURSDAY MARCH 20 1986 


STOCK MARKET REPORT 


iase rate cuts send share 
prices surging to record 


. The City gave an enth nd^ 
.tic' welcome to the 
Chancellors tax-cutting Bud- 
get andthe widely anticipated 
base rates and mortgage cots. 
Dealers were at “their desks 
.from 8am coping with a flood 
of buying orders for consumer 
shares, builders, breweries and 
banks. ' 

•By the tune the market 
officially opened at 9.30 the 
-FT. Index was already showing 
. .arise of more than II. points. 
The one point base rate cut 
from the clearing banks, swift- 
ly followed by 12 per cent 
. mortgage rates from the two 
biggest building societies, pro- 
vided the icing on the cake 
and the index surged to close 
4.9 points at a record 

Demand for government 
securities was such that last 
week’s new convertible tap 
issue was exhausted at £26fA 
as trading began. Quotations 
i. recorded gains to 1 V 2 points. 

The. main beneficiaries of 
the tax and mortgage cuts were 
stores and builders. Double 
figure gains were frequent in 
' both sectors. Tanaac scored 
. another 20p rise to 472p while 
Barratt Developments •' un- 
proved 8p to 152p ahead of 
today's half-time results. 
Wirapey, helped by press com- 
ment, climbed 16pto I83p. 

In stores, Dixons illustrated 
the buoyant mood up 18p to 
348p. Combined English 
Stores, reporting socm, gained 

g to 205p while Burton 
oop was marked up 16p to 
■ 336p. r 

Breweries celebrated the ab- 
sence of duty increases. Bass : 
soared 28p to 783p and Grand . 


Metropolitan gained I8p. to 
403p. In distilleries Macallan 
Glenlivet was hoisted 25p to 
359p in spite of lower proms. 

.Banks attracted strong de- 
mand as the wmdfaD profits 
tax foiled to appear. Lloyds led 
the way at 634p, up 34p, with 
National Westminster a dose 
second, at 884p, up 29p, 

Life assurance companies 
fell sharply on fears of compe- 
tition from the Personal Equi- 
ty Plan which trains next 
January. Son Life fell 35p to 
979p and Legal and General 
with results, due today tum- 
bled 28p to 784p. 

International fa vo antes 
were also dull on worries that 
the surprise S per cent tax on 
American Depositary Re- 
ceipts will frighten away po- 
tential overseas investors. 
Jaguar at 453p, Reuters 458p 
and Glaxo 1 02 7p were among 
those to slip. Wellcome at 
22J p dropped 12p, additional- 
ly upset by rumours that one 
of its drugs had side effect 
problems in America. 

Electricals 1 were another 
drab sector as one broker 
suggested that the recent rally 
had gone too far and that 
clients should switch into 
other sectors. DubBier was 
particularly weak at 192p, 
down 18p, as the stockbroker 
DeZoetc Be van downgraded 
its profit forecasts. 

Others to decline included 
GEC at 198p, Racal 196pand 
Ferranti L44p, between 6pand 
1 Op lower. 

Company statements pro- 
vided many good features. 
DRG reported profits well up 
to expectations, the shares 
advancing 15p to 278p. 


GEORGE H.SCH0LES PLC 

WYLEX WORKS. WYTHENSFWWE. MANCHESTER M224RA 

Manuf^rasoIWylexEle^calProdu^ - " Mwlft 

INTERIM REPORT MJIIk 
Unautfitetf results forthe half year tDJIstDecember, 1985 • 


Favourable news also support- 
ed George Scholes at SSSp, 
Logica 19 Ip. Armstrong 
Eqaipment 128p and Alida 
Holdings 445p, up 4p to 25p. 

Disappointing profits 
knocked 7p from Rentokil at 
165pand lOp from Strong and 
Fisher at 136p. 

Oils were stimulated by 
reports from Geneva that 
Opec ministers had agreed 
production cuts in principle. 
BP at 573p and SheQ 768p 
both put on lOp while Sun 03 
was similarly higher at 1 14p 
on rumours of a North Sea 
find. Britoil, with fell year 
results due today, hardened 3p 
to 188p. Dealers are looking 
for net profits of around £190 
million. 

St Ives Group continued to 
reflea satisfaction with the 
expansion moves, up 25p to 
8l5p. Parkfield made further 
progress at 405p, up 19p, on 
growth prospects while Sale 
Tilney was hoisted 22p to 
280p in anticipation of today's 
results. 

Access Satellite rallied I7p 
to 8Sp. Revived takeover 
speculation excited Britannia 
Arrow at 153p, up lOp. Sharp- 
ly higher profits helped 
Stockley to a 3p improvement 
at 80p. 

Buoyant merchant banks 
featured Schrodera at 1488p, 
up 30p. ahead of today's 
results. Good profits on Tues- 
day boosted Expamet a fur- 
ther 6p to 174p, but a 
disappointing 5 per cent set- 
back clipped a penny from 
Hepworth Ceramic at 183p. 

Newman Tanks rose Sp to 
140p on the higher dividend 
and profits forecast Bid hopes 
lifted Raine Industries 4&p to 
49p and Burgess Group, an- 


other speculative favourite, 
advanced 14p to 218p. 

Jones Shipman ended un- 
changed at 1 22p after touching 
130p, the doubled profits al- 
ready discounted. Kenning 
Motor, in receipt of an unwel- 
come offer from Tozer 
Kemsley, jumped 12pto 188p 
matching the rise in Tozer. 

THF at 203p, up 7p. looked 
forward to an influx of foreign 
visitors arriving to see the 
royal wedding Ratoers the 
jeweller attracted sympathetic 
interest at 134p. up 6p. 

Tobacco shares were unde- 
terred by the swingeing price 
increase in cigarettes. 

Smith and Nephew, report- 
ing today, added 6p to 243p. 
Analysts expect pretax profits 
of around £70 million, up 
from £55 .5 million. Gestetner 
lost 7p to I25p after the 
cautious statement at the an- 
nual meeting In narrowly 
mixed mines, RTZ was in 
demand again on bid hopes, 
up 18p to 682p. In Late trading 
Granada fell Sp to 264p as 
Rank Organisation withdrew 
its present offer. 


COMPANY NEWS 


• CHAMBERS & F ARGUS; 
Half-year to Dec. 28, 1985. No 
interim dividend (same), but the 
board expects to make a pay- 
ment for the foil year. No 
dividend was paid for the 
previous year. Turnover £8.45 
million (£9.93 million). Pretax 
profit £51,000 (loss £70,000). 
Earnings per share 0.9p (loss 
Up). 

• ALFA-LAVAL: Dividend for 
1985 raised from 9 to 10, 
Swedish krona. Net sales 10,046 
million krona (£948 million), 
against 8,848 million krona. 
Pretax income 824 million 
krona (235 million krona). The 
company expects income to 
continue rising in 1986. 



1985 

-1984 


£*000 

rooo 

h Turnover ’ 

14 #7 

12,109 

l Trading profit 

2,114 

1,865 

1 Income from shares in raided companies 

86 . 

124 

Other interest receivable and similar income. . 

246,- 

228 

- Profit 00 ordinary activities before taxation 

2446 

• 2,217-; 

: .'fax onjjrpfit on ordinary activities.- • 

: t: 968 ' 

- 953 

Profit afteriaxaaon lorthepenod 

v w V 

■ 1,264 

’’ Proposed interim rfvktentt '■* 



I Ralepershare 

- 8p 

6 p 

• Amount 

514 

386 

Retained profit for the period ‘ 

- 964 - 

878 

Earnings per shae based 00 profit on . 

\ 1 — 1-— 


ordinary activities after taxation 

23J0p 

19.7p 


The unaudited results tor the half year to 31st December 1985 are shown 
above 

■The company has had asuccessful first half year with a satisfactory upturn 
in sates and profit. The start dour seoorid half has been encouraging and 
we lookfohward to continuing al our present level of activity 
Vbusee a significant increase irithe interim dividend. This increase is 
being paid to tmpro /e ine relationship between the interim and the final. It 
should not be taken as an indication of an increase in the total dividend. 
The directors have today declared an interim dividend of 8p per share 
payable on wih May 1986 to shareholders on the register at 10th April 
1986. 

GL R. C. McDowell, Chairman 
• ; 19th March 1986 


Bank of Scotland 
Base Rate 

Bank of Scot/and 
announces that* 
with effect from 
19th March, 1986 
its Base Rate will be 
decreased from 
12.50% per annum 
to 11.50% per annum 

tisBAireOF SCOTLAND 

A FRIEND FOR LIFE 



# 




it 


/ 

.it- — — 

In Peterborough, there s no shortage of experienced 
office staff. You'll also find an outstanding range of office 
and factory space, excellent houses and good schools. And a 

S rV ’ j superb range of recreational and leisure opportunities. 

% I For .our free guide to relocation, post the coupon to: 

I John Bouldin, Peterborough DeveJopmerir Corporation, 

I PO Box 3, Peterborough PEI 1UJ’ Telephone 10733) 68931. 


Position _ 
Company. 
Address 


Bell’s fancy 
footwork 
thwarts 
BHP move 

From Stephen Taylor 
Sydney 

Mr Robert Holmes a Court's 
campaign to gam control of the 
Broken HOI Proprietary Com- 
pany (BHP) has been nudged 
forward In two ways over the 
past 48 hours. But although 
market analysts say the odds oa 
his success are shortening aD 
the time, he will now have to 
wait until the middle of next 
month for his way to be cleared 
f nr Qu ^ r 

The Hawke Cabinet yester- 
day endorsed an amended bill 
which will remove the only 
legislative obstacle to the take- 
over of Australia's corporate 
giant by Mr Holmes a Coart's 
Bell Group. 

The liberal opposition is in 
disarray over its attitude to the 
BeD bid, but there seems ample 
support to ensure the bill's 
passage alter parliament re- 
opens on April 9. 

Meanwhile, BHP has been 
left embarrassed by the latest 
display of fancy footwork by the 
Bell riiafnnMi 

In a counter attack which 
started last week, brokers act- 
ing for BHP had been baying 
Bril shares with the intention of 
pining for “the Wg Australian" 
the power to block a Bell share 
placement which was a condi- 
tion of Mr Hoboes a Court's 
takeover bid. 

Under the terms of the bid, 
Bril Resources must issue np to 
120 mOGon shares to its parent 
company, the Bril Group “To 
provide additional working cap- 
ital and enable Bril Group to 
manrtnhi its equity in the 
, company in the event of the 
aflotment of shares as consider- 
ation for shares in BHP”. 

SHF's AS125 million (£60 
million) share acquisition was 
apparently rendered nsdess 
when Mr Holmes i Court 
dropped a bombshell at a 
special BeO meeting in Pfirtfr. 

In a performance which 
detigttedhis supporters, the 
BeH chairman disclosed that 
the vendor of abont a million of 
the BHP shares had been the 
Bell Groop itself. That, be said, 
could mean that BHP was a 
Bell Group associate and as 
snch would not be entitled, like 
himself, to vote on the place- 
ment resolution. 

Mr Holmes i Court said he 
ted consulted the national 
companies and securities com- 
mittee, which had said it needed 

more time to deliver an opmion 
whether BHP had indeed been 
made a BeH associate. 


FINANCE ANDINDUSTRY 


TEMPUS 


Willis Faber results 
underwrite rating 


WiJJis Faber appears 10 have 
no trouble consistently pro- 
ducing results that justify its 
long-held premium rating. 

Pretax profits for last year 
were 29 per cent higher at 
£60.7 million. They included 
15 months or an extra 
£815.000 contribution from 
Carter, Wilkes & Fane. 

Income (brokerage, under- 
writing commission and in- 
terest) rose 23 per cent, 
comfortably ahead of ex- 
penses, which were an under- 
lying 15 per cent higher. 
Overall revenue, including 
associates but not Morgan 
Grenfell, was also up by 
exactly 15 percent 

Morgan Grenfell, in which 
Willis has a 23 per cent stake, 
chipped in £12.2 million, a 
handsome 42 per cent in- 
crease on the previous year. 
Willis is taking a relaxed view 
of Morgan's current search 
for capital It supported the 
attempted link-up with Exco 
and would be quite prepared 
to see the bank go public. 

The blot on 1985 results 
was the £3.6 million loss from 
Willis's company underwrit- 
ing. The non-marine busi- 
ness, which caused the 
problems, has now been dis- 
continued and it is hoped that 
reserving is sufficient to deal 
with claims as they come in. 

This year promises to be 
another good one with pretax 
profits of £75 million on the 
horizon. Although the dollar 
has moved the wrong way, 
Willis has covered forward a 
large part of its 1 986 exposure 
and some of its 1987 expo- 
sure. Last year there was a 
£4.5 million currency benefit. 

Rate hardening continues 
patchily, with aviation up 
sharply after the spate of 
disasters last year. The con- 
straints on capacity, however, 
are not easing and certain 
classes of business, particu- 
larly product liability, are 
impossible to place. Some 
automotive and drug compa- 
nies are having to risk their 
balance sheets and go without 
cover. The brokers mean- 
while lose the brokerage. 

Willis's shares rose I Op to 
457p before easing back to 
449p. They are trading on a 
historic p/e ratio of 22.4 and a 
prospective p/e of 16.5. 

Although the high rating 
does not offer great opportu- 
nities for further gains, the 
shares are a sound hold. 


Willis employees, who are 
now being offered shares 
worth £300 a head in a 
company profit-sharing 
scheme, should do well, par- 
ticularly if they put their 
shares into the Chancellor's 
new Personal Equity Plan. 

Clyde Petroleum 

While not many oil industry 
watchers are prepared to 
hazard a guess on what the oil 
price will be for the rest of 
this year, or even next week, 
most believe that the balance 
of supply and demand will 
tighten up in the 1990s, 
giving firm support to prices. 

Reserves outside Opec will 
then be at a premium, and the 
oil companies which own 
these reserves win once more 
find favour in the stock 
market. If they survive that 
long. 

Without question, survival 
is uppermost in the minds of 
the chief executives of the 
independent oil companies. 
Unless the oil price revives, 
many of them will not be 
around to enjoy the buoyant 
outlook for the 1990s. 

Malcolm Gourlay, chief 
executive of Gyde Petro- 
leum, intends that his compa- 
ny will be around, although 
he admits that unless North 
Sea prices recover to $ 1 8 per 
barrel or more Clyde will be 
struggling to survive beyond 
the next three years. 

With its spread of assets. 
Gyde is better positioned 
than many to withstand low 
oil prices. At current prices, 
its I9S6 cash flow is likely to 
be halved from £14.1 million 
last year to nearer £7 million, 
but Gyde is well placed to 
cope with this by slashing the 
discretionary parts of its ex- 
ploration budget. 

Gyde's North Sea produc- 
ing fields are well balanced, 
while the Wytch Farm 
oilfield development will en- 
sure continuing production 
beyond the year 2000. The 
company has approximately 
£14 million of cash, some of 
which will be run down this 
year, and about £18.5 million 
of debt As Wytch Farm is 
developed, debt will increase 
and Gyde will draw heavily 
on its $125 million medium- 
term corporate credit facility. 

Herein lies the rub. Interest 
payments form an item of 
fixed spending which will eat 


into cash flow at ever increas- 
ing rates until Wytch Farm 
production reaches its peak 
in I9S9. 

Survival strategy is simple 
— cut overheads, persuade BP 
to cut the cost of Wyich 
Farm, sell the US properties 
and halt exploration. The 
management has identified 
the problem and is imple- 
menting the solutions. If it 
fails, it will be because the oil 
price has remained too low 
tor loo long. If it succeeds, it 
is likely to be a long haul 

DRG 

DRG has been enjoying a 
quiet rerating in recent 
months and yesterday's an- 
nouncement of 1985 pretax 
profits 20 per cent ahead 
fuelled another surge in its 
share price to a record 278p. 

The benefits of the reorga- 
nization of the last five years 
are continuing to come 
through particularly in the 
United Kingdom stationery 
division, where operating 
profits were 70 per cent 
higher at £13.9 million mak- 
ing up half the total 

Carbonless copy paper 
made great strides and 
Sellotape and commerdaien- 
velopes increased their mar- 
ket share. The quest for cost 
cutting and margin improve- 
ments continues with spend- 
ing on new and improved 
plant rising to £35 million 
this year against £18 million 
last year. 

The quest for acquisitions 
also continues. In recent 
months DRG has spent £7.5 
million on four acquisitions 
and buying out the minority 
in its New Zealand subsid- 
iary. The latest purchase of a 
French medical packaging 
company was announced yes- 
terday. 

DRG has the finances to 
land a much bigger acquisi- 
tion. The £33.4 million rights 
issue last September wiped 
out gearing, giving scope for 
spending up to £60 million 
before reaching a ceiling of 30 
percent gearing. 

The company is looking to 
add to its existing range of 
businesses in Britain, Europe 
or the Unites States. This 
year DRG looks capable of 
making £38 million pretax 
giving a prospective p/e ratio 
of 10.4. assuming tax stays at 
a modest 26 per cent. 


InWpteqdUiNrbi^HtgiaJti »< iteira»4ra<lr>»MMtkrjte»iinwuv|iMi,iiii»thr<jM i iHir»i liT » to y ni i^im h d mh* «|i T i< wm i.»jimimn.|>irmteL»ii* ftirlnwi«r. I 4Hn»np rnMil' 



At last some help for the hard pressed Imperial shareholder. 

Mindlul that share prices can vary daily, we are publishing a bullelin showing the value 
of each of the offers for your company. 

In order to be perfectly fair, the values we've quoted are based on the best possible offers. 
Hanson's offer closes at 5 pm on March 24th. 




Pipin'* bast'd uu Ihe market price* al 5.50|ini un V\«*diir*da>. 


H ANSON TRUST 


CONTINUING GROWTH FROM BASIC B l SIN ESSES 

TbriJ^rflte'4rT6N'«AM|l MHrf HniM« e|Irr. rtopowl •*» Ih^ir «hjf* pm** Tb* ibnlr lArialni"* .v* *"*■ iLmuli Trim'* jhi-I 1 KUt«nih!<- hln L • lnlu.ii hum 1.1-4 Hte-mU itfit 

Thrall if ulu^ Ijlt- jrraunr YrdmaH tn Hcan-fimriiMd i 4 lhMiliip*!iJ Ihr r »h tju-rimn ftturrpnirxnllhr HfMimivnibHHUi -tint I Unviriii i-'nriuM* jrfi r r m .'Jijn «>■! I nii<rd!ii*iir- 


Telephone — 

The Peterborough ^ ^ 


“ ‘ \ 










........... J 


1 

FTNANrF. AND INDUSTRY THE TIMES THURSDAY MARCH 20 1986 




daily prize mooev staled. If you are a 
winner follow the claim procedure on ibe 
back of your card. You must always have 
your card available when claiming. 


Budget euphoria 

ACCOUNT DAYS: Dealings began Manila Dealings end March 27. §ContMgDday Ag3 1. Settlement day, April 7. 

§Forward bargains are penuitifid on two previous business days. 



t & Tig. l 7f i wapj pm liMBM 

DAILY DIVIDEND 

- £ 2,000 

Claim s required for 
+33 points 

Claimants sboold ring 6254-53272 


BRITISH FUNDS 



BANKS DISCOUNT HP 


70 33 Strath Si Atfflyn 
584 419 Sant Out 
7« B03 

163 56 Wagon 
Sfi 38H mb Fan 
310 00 Mom* 


39 *1 It UU 

557 +B 42.1 7.8 8.7 

733 • +» 5Z9 7-2 718 

1G3 *11 14 06 ISO 

E544. 

306 «+S 7.1 23 193 


BREWERIES 


AMfrLpm 321 

Bos 783 

Bsfcawr* 44 

Bodrirjjtons 109 

Brawn jMifftwin) 475 

BiPnar (HP) 177 

Bawroad Bran 545 

cun iuiqm 47S 

Derenan u Al SI5 

Drtsera S33 

final wraaey >98 

Grama km 228 

Aranara J5S 

Hardy* & Harmons 4® 

msruane Osd 87 

iiraatBpr aon am itb 

man ten 2Ba 

Minton Thompson 93 
MOTUM 249 

SA Sre+enea 231 

Scat INM 218 

Seagram 07+ 

vau* aoo 

Wl altMM O -A- 301 

Do D‘ 3C3 

WMBrasd bn 245 

Morartmom & Q <93 

roung -A- 260 


1060 46 146 
41.1 If . . 
156 46 15.4 

102 3.4 156 

102 34 154 

9 9 46 30.1 

122 25 180 

94 3 6 206 


CHEMICALS, PLASTICS 


46 

33 V 

AKZON/v Bearer 

E4S + 


400 

89 .. 

256 

*21 

Abed crams 

ISO 

+5 

13 

1J 198 

393 

273 

Aimrstato 

376 

♦5 

89 

24 183 

260 

160 

Anchor Chemical 

232 


01 

26 10 

130 

78 

BTP 

130 

+1 

17 

44 118 

US'. 51S Bayer DM50 

£103 

-a+ 

700 

66 .. 

128 

100 

Bbgden 

106 

• .. 

103 

9.7 iat 

145 

104 

Bran Chains 

Iti 

+2 

5.1 

38118 

85-. 

: 9 V 

Sr Benzol 

76 



..887 . 

138 

79 

Craning (W) 

130 

+2 

11 

39196 

£83 

234 

Coma 

282 

♦1 

95 

14 14.7 


131 

Cones &os 

153 

+3 

16 

43 92 

iea 

112 

Do A' 

133 

+1 

66 

50 8.0 

26 

14 

Cory (Hcraesj 

16 

-+ 

07 

44 M 

152 

116 

Cnsca 

140 

+3 

10.0 

17 154 

124 

82 

Do Old 

120 



.. 12* 

227 

158 

EVs a Everard 

204 

*4 

86 

43 179 

285 

175 

FoMco-Mnsed 

272 

*1 

119 

44 100 

160 

66 

HNstaad games) 

143 

♦1 

57 

37 119 

488 

318 

Hickson 

425 

+5 

214 

59 97 

10V, 

■ 51 

HoeefB! 0US0 

£96+ 

-1 



10 

630 

imp Cnam bid 

987 

•-6 

47.1 

48 11.4 

41Q 

278 

Lapons 

405 


105 

20 2DS 

121 

84 

Lwgn 

109 

+1 

4.7 

43 173 

223 

141 

Plyiu 

223 


13 

15230 

82 

53 

Raauraok nogs 

77 

*1 

30 

19158 

l« 

126 

RantoM 

161 

-11 

12 

29 219 

314 

94 

SWA BPD 

313 




32® 

162 

WoWenhootie tbr* 203 


11 1 

55 94 

112 

56 

Yorfcshee Cham 

*09 

•-1 

43 

39 99 


CINEMAS AND TV 


2<8 120 Argki TV 'A' 

64 26 Grartaaan 

215 110 HIV N/V 

330 218 LOT mgs 
269 128 Scot TV A' 
200 HO TVS N/V 
IV. 23 7SW 


21B • . 129 59 153 

41 24 59 93 

215 *7 HO 51 96 

330 +10 206 62 132 

267 .127 46 106 

200 • +15 114 57 06 

41 + +2+ 24 58 114 


DRAPERY AND STORES 










_ 







60 

3.6 . 

. I 

1 369 

150 

55 .. 

179 

17 .] 

160 

67 113 


26.Q 

4 7 8.1 

iao 

26 205 

41.1 

73 137 

2S 

4.9 15.7 

384 

121 

200 

52 

1J 

2.7 19 


92 102 

bO 

01 . 

•00 

47 .. 

4 0 

7.1 ITS 

•M 

5.1 21:4 


33 *31 

39 

42 159 

•A.7 

34 234 

170 

40 11.1 

174 

4022B 

11* 

68 225 

a? 

11 119 


4 7 68 

21 

54 **9 

229 

25 13 7 

354 

72 278 

<03 

43 72 

5M 

53 229 


47 11 6 


25 21.1 

65 

SO 156 

13 7 


264 

16 2*0 




95 


30 

35 350 

100 

51+ Borote Llamas) 'A 

94 

♦1 

30 

32 150 

172 

60 

Benoits 




IS 333 

52 

9 

BUcha Leo 



. 1 


GG 

48 

fiWKW 

54 

-4 


2£ 403 

505 



B0 

-15 

119 

24 301 

330 

204 


338 

+18 

13 

1.9 230 

130 


Cwaors 'A' 

US 

• -* 

32 

26 321 

S« 

38 

Casual r&i 

44 

*1 

31 

7.0 85 

ass 


C*wth 

335 

-5 

20.7 

12 110 


67 

Gona»wd Engaan 

212 

+14 

77 

36295 


95 

Courts (Fixn) A 

149 

• +4 

8J 

45 120 

3SO 

zoo 

CLAK Srfncaon A 

330 


, , 

.* 

83 

67+ Dewrtrst <U) 


+1 


18 210 

352 

131 

Doon Q/p 


s -18 


0.7 388 











SO 

♦ 'j 

33 

4.1 109 

665 

380 

Bys mbewaon) 

685 


129 

19334 

178 

92 

Empna Stores 

178 

+2' 

30 

20 301 

238 

130 

Elam 

238 

•6 

4 6 

10 25.7 








J39 

77 

Fne An Dor 

127 

♦3 

4,7 

17227 

*33' 

25' 

Ford (Marin) 

114 

-1 




1-0 


in 

• 

B.6 


422 

162 

Reemans 

420 

+ 14 

13 

20 240 

no 

78' 

Caller (aji 

105 

• .. 

77 

70 103 

1 M 

U 

Gam SR 

62 

-2 

14 

20 370 

lie 

43 

Goldberg (A) 

116 

0-2 

ii 

18 88.6 

237 

IW 

Gausmme Gp 



iar 

56 13* 


IW 

Grattan 

<42 

+a 

57 

13 283 

13+884 

GUS 

m+ 

•-+ 

966 

20 160 

' 937 

674 

DO A' 

919 


?*>H 

28 150 

MS 

*M 

Hama OueenswaY 

268 

+ 14 

59 

22 240 


72 


27+ 




39 

2* 

Hotas 

35 




387 240 

Home Charm 

148 

+14 

4.6 

10 220 

*28 

93 

House Of urose 

119 


IM 

90 112 

90 

7*' 


1U 

• +2 

58 


38 

21 

U*ea Pr<te 

27 


1 J 

41 SOD 

134 

93 

LCP 

125 

•1 

10 

4.8 210 

as 

100 


MO 




6*5 

370 

Lberty 

810 


100 

*2 370 



LiAcrott KWuf 

IB! 


100 

55 124 

213 

111 

Maras & 

210 

-2 

SI 

24302 

345 

2*6 


341 


51 

10 200 

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Mierfs Lasura 

1B0 


79 

16480 

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305 

Moss Bras 

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74 


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134 

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335 


11 7 

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10 

14 49.7 

97 

56 


70 


1 A 

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115 

99 

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134 

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155 

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330 


71 

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4.4 

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5(8 357 

Vanana viye<4 

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17.f 

30 (29 

J70 

140 

WW Grot® 

340 


11 Jn 

33 103 

MB 

3LU 

Wjo vymta 

280 

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93n 

30 1+9 

1*6 

90 

WgfBUs 

100 


16# 38 

0*8 

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liuuwpfViUi 

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129 

21 211 


ELECTRICALS 



230 

TO Ti 

400 

88 T< 

494 

SOI TT 

190 

140 Th 

3S 

188 Tu 

278 

158 UE 

308 

173 Ur 

390 

236 Ut 

270 

ISO Ut 

394 

244 VC 

• 270 

123 VC 

82 

40 Wl 

103 

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325 

220 IM 


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45 144 


18 

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19 119 370 

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1380 20 221 


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334 2r0 Atangmrtfi 
193 128 A»m Hurra 
420 200 Antongma 
1® 70 Barkley Tech 

26’.- 17', CamSa 
243 159 Candonr 
36 10 Cerrtiwwv 

25 16 . Equity 4 Gon 

253 120 Hambro 
T93 81 hrory A sura 
188 114 Ma|acM 
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4W. 96 008% 


243 *2 16 07 .. 

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174 

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403 

250 

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a +18 

130 

32 M5 

270 

186 

Kennedy Btoekaa 

268 

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241 

LwtooAo 

3S2 

♦11 

181 

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470 

348 

Lon Park HQMs 

170 

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163 

30 20.4 

100 

77 

Marat Chariots 

98+ 

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112 

67 

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22 190 

BO 

29 

StoldB 

77 

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1.7 

204 

119 

TraStMuM Forts 

203 

• +7 

78 

38 201 


INDUSTRIALS 

A-D 



24 

09 159 



160 

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1.9 

10 f<4 

10 

15 1 

44 14.4 

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93 

1 7 220 


221 ns 

257 182 
128 S3 
323 216 
112 71 

222 148 

280 136 
150 85 

403 86 

« 24 

30 15 + 

425 32S 

87 14 
305 165 
406 303 

60+ 15+ 
345 218 
89 25 

233 52 

450 278 
*7 59 

386 248 
496 296 
213 1TB 
30+ 13+ 
580 325 
290 160 
175 54 

174 112 

493 100 
50 98 

210 130 
61 23 

19fl 130 
1»0 66 
391 275 

45 19 
229 132 

lie 73 

327 100 
3*5 204 
450 129 
33 15 
335 220 
2B5 135 
103 61 
133 00 
168 101+ 
174 75 
343 190 
59+ 22 
338 109 
247 79 

348 723 
282 IW 
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388 214 
24 15 

138 75 
412 277 
68 36 
57 30 

54 28 

156 97 
1S2 99: 
155 115 
19* 114 
146 77 
285 153 
383 2ZT'; 

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49 25 

182 121 
38 19 

78 60 
233 184 
218 110 
71 38 

77 28 

38 55+ 

88 33 
400 IBS 

64 39 

38+ 20 
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27 10 

66 40 

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84 48 

255 166 

92 88 

see 401 
343 208 
43 31 

215 7? 
145 62 

590 380 
191 KB 
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AaftlLxar 

AssEr Eng B* 
Assoc Ham 
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Aran Rubber 
Agsraauam 

BET DM 

SCTEC 

BOC 
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Babcock 
Bale* I CHI 

Baivo Ind 
Barram 
Baton Bra# 

Sraraw Heobrat 
Baton Transport 
Baynes (Cnraesi 
Bsraon On 

&9duforti 


Barword |S5W) 227 

BenskXO* a 102 

Bsspik 4 130 

Basraoei at* 

Bearwood 44* 

Sevan <Df] 30: 

isa 14 s 

BiifflOl Ft 

e«mwJ Qt aUM 120+ 

Ba wui w ram Man 168 

Sort Arrow i5l 

buck (PoUfl 211 

BUdwooa Koooe 55+ 

Hue Arrow 326 

BadraoM 247 

Botnar McComa 346 

Boots 2*0 

Bouton (Wte) 9 

Bowara 330 

Bowaur Inc SO'* 

Bwmwan a Grp H5 

Brawner 376 

&44+BY 88 

Brenyaan 41 

Bncfiand Gp 42 

Bndcn 1S4 

BnaoortGradry 191 

& BKJS * Eng App 125 
Br Sarai 194 

B» Svonon 129 

Br Wa 265 

Brafcm H4I 303 

Bramsarova Cnft H 

Sroru tog 20 

Bracks Tool 44 

Brawn I Tewsa 180 

Brown (Joriil 25 

awns (I*d) 61 

Budougn 2*5 

21B 

Bures- Anderson 83 

Camtora Era 73 

Cwarama 33 

Cw* Ind 06 

Cards Eng 390 

Casangi 64 

Ceriltoi 38. 

Central 6 Shw 6 

Caraway rd 19'. 

Oma 66 

CramMftaat Pti 78 

awmserim am 83 

drartor Cora 241 

Qian R»*t Lynch 92 
Cnemnng 560 

OinsMa int 37i 

CnnSTy Horn 39 

CU*a tCUwff 202 

Clayton Son 123 

Coran lA) 440 

CWH Of 182 

Conoraa Tboi IS / 


+1 34 8 8 153 

25 7 132 50 

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■6 10.7 5 3 14« 

08 60 103 

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9J 29 198 

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-1 74 33 149 

03 07 65.8 

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38 21344 

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.. 07 15 .. 

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39 62135 

a *8 25 14 124 

24 76 13 1 

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50 63 06 

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79 25 167 

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-3 85 33 313 

. 107 57 95 

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47 16 

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65 <3 

503 3W 

f i7 as 

138 60 

ns 69 

164 109'} 
154 110 
185 116's 

38 19 
108 30 
1C 183 
BT0 479 
47 28 
280 180 
113 83+ 
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243 164 
44 28 

300 161 
225 93 
285 130 

1B4 122 

12B 58 
103 50 

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83 28 
451 36? 
486 285 
115 SB 
323 130 
120 75 
210 113 
20 ITB 

as 24 

272 112 
313 207+ 

39 6 
240 160 
531 266 
178 91 
320 94 
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91 44 
185 CO 
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S a nJn ra t 
S«aa Gordon (J) 

Sa^ Oamraw 

Seed S RotwiMn 
Eacuncor 
Do A' 

Sacunty stn 
Sww 6ng 
Won 
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So Kutoad 113 

Ekeiowy 440 

WF -B- E2B+ 

SmBh 8 Nephew 343 

Sirasi WMtaonn 33 

Snmislnd 299 

Sp «ar WHO 215 

Spear & Jactwn 285 

Sarw^ared 174 

Staffs n oBara s ns 

Stag Fvrma# 04 

stantara nrawots 109 
Bar Comp S3 

S m aUy 451 

Staaray 401 

Staffing Ind 113 

SBXUaka 220 

EtonanB « 

swran »w 168 

Supgm Sara 205 

SutriSte Sauluran 38 
Suw 270 

Swsa Plate A' 286 

Sycanara 29 

Sytora 198 

ft 531 

TNT 172. 

TSL TTwrcal 248 

Tact 485 

Tdteda Oran E«9'< 

TBDU 6‘ 

THIH 88 

Tf» HBOS ISO 

TMd iS 98 


13s 70 79 
7.6 27 178 
17 21237 

15 M 152 

101 13 119 

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49 23 1*0 

16 14 1*3 

17 1.T3B4 

16 1.1386 
34 24 279 
23 8.1 114 
32 13 72 
123 87 9.1 
175 22203 

36a 85150 
114 46 66 
73 79 102 
214 5.1 166 

56 24 244 
tt4 13 326 
84 2.1 234 

17 17 185 
66 S0 12.4 
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45 17 117 
39 4.1 .. 
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236 52 125 
179 39 146 
13 23370 
171 78 4.7 

86 103 64 
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60 22 194 


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Mi 1 

IS 78 

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OVERSEAS TRADERS 


PAPER. PRINTING, ADVERTS 


146 

06 

W 

128 

130 

98 

58 

22 

235 

170 

443 

231 

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FI 

35 

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78 

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386 

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368 

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335 

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315 

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315 


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306 

140 

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308 

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Mantel (Untoy) 

90 


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43 

40 130 

77 

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Mershaas Urn* 

73 


20 

AO 111 

650 

2B5 

Mawar 

630 


15.7 

20 220 

700 

378 

Meal Box 

696 

+5 

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30104 

172 

10b 

UeU Ctosures 

146 

♦2 

18 

60 82 

82 

50 

Merakn 

82 

+1 

30 

43 125 

85 

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MkdMJ Cons 

81 


11 

100 12 

96 

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98 


50 

52170 

188 

126 


188 

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113 

60110 

275 

187 

Morgen Clwflte 

270 

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45 150 . 

130 

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Moss (Robert) 

99 



44 110 

30 

218 

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119 

NMOMM 

NeiCJ) 

29+ 

208 

+3 

0.1# 03 153 

100 46 08 

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WO 

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7.9 

60 120 

65 

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67 


10 

25 640 

280 

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256 

+7 

126 

40 120 

253 


Often Sect Mich 
Parker Knoa 'A' 

218 


110 

82T22 

375 

16b 

370 


150 

4.1 135 

288 

123 

Pari rises 

Z*S 

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80 

30 207 

833 

285 

Pamsh JT 

833 

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500 

286 

Peenon 

463 

130 

20167 

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105 

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406 

258 

Pegter-Hstterstoy 

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5.4 11.7 

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Pwtond mo 

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Photo-Ma 

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07 272 

470 

2«a 

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453 

+8 

17 9 

19 103 

12 

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89 


40 

1812.1 

780 

490 

Portals 

775 

+5 

270 

30118 

300 

103 

Porter Chariton 

223 

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314 

184 

236 

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Ppwal Duttryn 
Praataach *Jgs 

262 

142 

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7.7 15.1 

1.1 317 

90 

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Pmcnara Sam 

69 



78 80 

111 

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RFO 

111 

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80 117 

172 


RHP 

171 

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18 127 

133 

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127 


30 

28 

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Rank Org 

537 

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210 

40 190 

190 

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145 

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Ranoto 

71 


10 

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R*smor 

102 


5.7 

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270 

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160 


Rcardo Era 

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190 

176 

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158 

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153 



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130 

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11+570 AngAffl 
79 28*a Ad OPkl 

55 28* J AMT 

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787 255 Bywure 
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318 143 E Daggaa 
780 Z75 BnSSaut 
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248 80 Bstog 

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12+ 4N Gan MMng 
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808 348 GM Klkjoort 
175 43 ■ Gopang 

850 230 OrooMB 
218 113+ Manraton Areas 
13% 4% Hammy 
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1B% 6 « Bnraas . . 
1+ Vt woof 
278 87 LaMa • ■ 

20+ 7+ Utanotl 
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198 110 MM 
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5+ 2V AUwrMMi 
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34+ 28+ Nth Wgul 
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280 S3 PnSaTa 
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33+ 14 Hand Boat Lid 
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96 18 Rato orrarn 
306 231 Ramson 
887 507 RTZ 
B*a 4+ Ruatanatrg 
25+ 6*a St I li l ana 
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731V 15+ Soutrxaal 
B+3T9 Sfitomam 
2*0 80 Stoja. Basi 

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14+ 8 Tara 
310 IBS . Tramn 
B85 335 UnM 
67 32+ vaai RaMa 
844 315 vaw a r i poM 
170 55 vttriomam 
115 50 Vogels 

15 10+ Wait Coftary 

737 340 weetom . 

420 143 Yxatem Areas 
39 16+ Western Deep 
248 142 WBstam MSig 
470 140 wan Rand Cons 
132 104 Winn Creak 

3i as wa*ns 
107 30 tmtNmi 
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TOBACCOS 













































































THE TIMES THURSDAY MARCH 20 1986 


FINANCE AND INDUSTRY 


25 


( COMMERCIAL PROPERTY ) 



By Judith Hanfley 


Abac® Investments, the fest 
growujg propaty and finan- 
cial services company billed as 

tomonx>w*s Exco, has come 
up with a new investment 
vehicle which offers an Alter- 
native to selling unit* in 
commerical property. 
Speciality Shops is a £14.5 

million institutionally backed 
i nvest ment company for in- 
vesting in management-inten- 
sive — but potentially highly 
rewarding— town-centre retail 
developments. 

These will be a far qy from 
the traditional, large-scale, 
multiple retailer, dominated 
schemes in the centre offeree 
cities. 

Abaci's new vehicle win. 
invest in developing small- 
scale (35,000 sq ft to 75,000 so 
ft) schemes with a value of 
between £2 mfllion and £7 
million. ' 

The Rouse Corporation’s 
work in America has been 
taken as the model for Special- 
ity Shops* developments 
which will cater for high- 
maigm retailers with a strong, 
emphasis on tourist spendi n g. 
Small market or university 
towns will be the target areas. 

While the debate about 
selling units in individual 
properties continues, Abaco is 
using a well established vehi- 
cle to allow institutional in- 


vestors to participate in a 
sector of the market normally 
considered too management- 
intensive to be worthwhile. It 
is _the type of vehicle which 
brings the liquidity not seen in 
direct property investment. - 

Mr Peter Goldie, chief exec- 
utive of Abaco, remains scep- 
tical about unitization. 

He said “Companies have 
been around for a long time. 
They are excellent things for 
raising more money and com- 
pany law has been built up 
over 1 SO years to cope with 'ail 
the problems that ought arise. 
There are still a lot of unan- 
swered questions about unit- 
ization, including . that of . 
insider trading.” 

Speciality Shops has been 
set up as a corporate struc tu re 
with a mix of equity and loan 
stock. The coupon on the loan 
stock is tax-deductible and the 
income generated is gross 
which allows gross funds to 
collect the tax payable. - 

The investors in Speciality 
.Shops — Abaco, the British Sc 
Commonwealth Shipping 
Company, Canada life Assur- 
ance Company, London and 
Manchester Assurance and 
Sun Life Assurance of Canada 
all invest directly in proper ty 
already but the new company 
allows them to enter a differ- 
ent field. 

“Managing a speciality cen- 
tre is more like running an 
hotel. You can’t just sendin a . 
chartered surveyor once a 


small for big gains 










Town & City Properties (Developments) with Norwich 
Union, the Insurance company, has started work on 
the new 47,000 sq fit office scheme, Morley House, at 
26/30 Holborn Viaduct in the City of London. There 
will be shops front in g the viaduct and basement 
parking. The letting agent is Hiliier Parker. 


year," Mr Goldie said. 

Mount Provincial Develop- 
ments, the renamed property 
side of Abaco, which is headed 
by Mr David Houghton and 
Mr Stephen Jaffe, both char- 
tered surveyors from Canada 
Life, will the schemes. 

The first two developments 
being injected into Speciality 
Shops at cost are the Berkeley 
Shopping Centre at Clifton, 


Bristol, and The Courtyard in 
Montpelier, Chel tenham, fD- 
tailing £4.8 million. 

Both schemes have been 
developed by Canada Life, the 
Clifton scheme in conjunction 
with Mount Provincial. They 
have been pul into the new 
vehicle as seed com to help 
Speciality Shops off the 
ground. 

Mount Provincial sees its 


role as manager as more akin 
to a retailer than a mere rent 
collector. It even has its own 
design company. Equations. 
Some of the lop fashion names 
are keen to establish in the 
kind of target locations fa- 
voured by Speciality Shops. 

This means the company 
can break away from the 
shackles of the Landlord and 
Tenant Act by giving retailers 
short leases or putting them 
on turnover rents. As the 
American experience shows, 
this is the most effective way 
to manage shopping centres 
intensively and maintain their 
value in a highly competitive 
sector. 

This latest venture by Aba- 
co follows hard on the heels of 
its £6.2 million acquisition of 
Bridgets, the estate agent. 

Speculation about its future 
has been fuelled by the pur- 
chase of 16 per cent of the 
company by The British & 
Commonwealth Shipping 
Company and Garunore. 
That acquisition brought Mr 
John Gunn, the former chief 
executive of Exco and now the 
executive director of British & 
Commonwealth on to the 
Abaco board. Mr Gunn and 
Abaco's chief executive Mr 
Goldie are old acquaintances. 
They worked together on fi- 

sradeem Tdorate^jughlf 1 ^ 
Exco and other financial insti- 
tutions in 1981. 


Do-it-yourself superstores 
face stiffer competition 


By Derek Harris, Industrial Editor 


The approadi to Easter 
ushers in the high season for 
Britain's £3 billion do-it-your- 
self market, which is facing its 
biggest shake-up for years. 

Two of the three leading 
DIY companies have been 
taken over in the past fort- 
night and the future of the 
other is in question. 

The pace of competition 
will intensify this year if shop 
hour regulations are eased, 
with widespread Sunday 
opening of DIY stores, which 
are expected to gain most 

A warning has also come in 
a report* on the industry by 
Jordans Surveys, the business 
analyst, suggesting that the big 
groups could face stiffer com- 
petition. 

The industry’s short-term 
future looks bright, the report 
says, but the burgeoning num- 
ber of DIY superstores will 
soon ran out of small indepen- 
dents from which to capture 
market share. 

The six biggest retailers, 
with a combined turnover of 
more £700 million, al- 
ready account for about a fifth 
of the DIY market in home 
repairs, maintenance and dec- 
oration. This sector accounts 
for about 40 per cent of the 
overall home improvement 


market, which on the widest 
definition is estimated by the 
National Home Improvement 
Council to have been worth 
£8.2 billion last year. 

B&Q, a subsidiary of Wool- 
worth, with more than 170 
stores, is clear market 
leader. Woolworth is seen as a 
takeover target. 

The second largest chain. 
Home Charm, which sells 
under both the Texas and, 
more recently, the Bulk ban- 
ners. was sold last week to 
Ladbroke, the betting and 
hotels group, for £201 million. 

Home Charm, as well as 
having a range of smaller 
outlets, has more than 100 
superstores, most of them 
Texas outlets. 

Bulk is aimed at those 
buying heavier items includ- 
ing bricks, timber, sand and 
cement. 

The heavy end of the trade 


is a growth area, such stores 
being used by many in the 
builing trade tor their 
supplies. 

Wiekes, an offshoot of a 
United States operation, is 
attacking the same market as 
well as the more traditional 
market. It has about 20 outlets 
in Britain 

Payless, third largest of the 
DrY chains, was bought a 
fortnight ago from Mariey for 
£94 million by Ward White, 

Payless now has nearly 70 
{Millets, increasingly adding 
the larger superstores on the 
pattern found among the other 
big DIY groups. 

Dry is now a more mature 
market but there are still big 
growth sectors, notably in 
security products. 

*The British DIY Industry. 
Jordans Surveys. Jordan 
House. 47 Brunswick Place, 
London N16EE £125. 


Conoco may move offices to Victoria Plaza 


• Conoco, the oH compa- 
ny, is befined to be in talks 
with Greycoat Group, the 
developer of the Victoria Pla- 
za office development 
above Victoria Station in Lon- 
don, about taking space in 
phase two of the scheme. 
Greycoat is retoctant to 
comment on the possibility of 
presetting the 350,000 sq 
ft second phase after its po- 
tential tenant. Dean 
Witter, the finance boose, . 
pulled ont of phase one af- . . 
ter protracted talks. Salomon 
Brothers is the biggest oo- - 
capier there now. 

Conoco has offices scat- 
tered around foe West End of 
London and is thought to 
want to bring them muter one 


roof. It is advised by Rich- 
ard JE21is. Greycoat is also 
talking to some of the US 
investment banka about mov- 
ing to Victoria, something 
which has become “respect- 
able’’ since Salomon 
Brothers’ move there. 

Victoria Plaza is jointly 
developed by Greycoat, Sir 
Robert McAlpine, foe con- 
struction company, and toe 
, British RaO Property 
Board. All have equal shares 
hi foe scheme. Greycoat, 
which is potting 250 ndflion 
into phase two of the 
project, is not yet dose to 
signings letting. 

• Radical changes in foe 
structure aftoeRoyal Institu- 
tion of Chartered Sorvey- 


ore, are te&sg urged by Mr 
William Wells, Urn senior 
partner of Chestertous. Mr 
Weds, told the RIGS an- 
nual conference in Cardiff this 
week, that existing divi- 
sions witom foe institution 
- should be abolished and 
two new ones created. 

He wanted to see foe en- 
largement of foe general prac- 
tice division to encompass 
foe present divisions whose 
members make np only a 
small proportion of foe mem- 
bership. And he called for 
quantity surve y ors and bald- 
ing surveyors to be put into 
a new division for chartered 
construction surveyors . 

“It simply cannot be 
right that foe planning and 


fromKnight 
Frank & Kiitley' 




If you would like to know more abbot the 
services of Knight Frank & Rutley and their 
profe ssio n a l view of particular markets the publications below are 
available free. Just complete the coupon or ring KF&R Publications on 01-629 817L 

Please send me a free copy of the following: 

The KF&R Annual Review □‘Rent Reviews’: a KF&R study □ 

•Milk Quotas: Freedom or Serfdom’ by DHL Harvey (CAS Study I) □ 

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I 
I 

L^MII 


COMPANY. 

ADDRESS. 


Knight Frank I 
K &Rutky| 

MOMS 071 ■ 


20 Haiiovcr Sqon. 
London Wlil 0AH TtfcOMMSm 


The Fitiroy Robinson Partnership 


CONGRATULATE THE CHAIRMAN AND DIRECTORS OF 


Standard ^Chartered 


ON THE OCCASION OF THE OPENING OF THEIR NEW 
HEADQUARTERS IN BISHOPSGATE LONDON 


20TH MARCH 1986 


The Fitzroy Robinson Partnership 

Architects 77 Portland Place. London WIN 4EP 


development, land agents, 
mineral, land and marine divi- 
sions have exactly the 
same prominence within foe 
RICSas general practice, 
quantity surveyors and build- 
ing surveyors who between 
than represent 90 per cent af 
the membership,” Mr 
Wefts said. 

Mr Write also wanted to 
sweep away toe rules and reg- 
ulations surrounding ad- 
vertising, marketing, 
soliciting for Instructions, 
fee tendering and foe provison 
of other financial services. 

Mr Wells said the prop- 
erty market was changing 
rapidly. “The market is at 
best static, at worst reducing 
in size — but with more 


players from outside the pro- 
fession trying to ounpete. 

• Project Development 
Europe is building a £60 mil- 
lion commercial complex 
on the waterfront in foe Isle of 
Dogs, the only enterprise 
zone in London. The Brad 
Centre, as the scheme Is 
known, Is faded by the Lon- 
don Leasing Company. 


Southwark Corporation 6 3/4% 
Ited rentable Slock 1983/6. 
Barclays Bank PLC. Registration 
Dep ar t m ent. Radbroke HalL 
KnutafORL Cheshire WAX6 9EU 
hereby give notice Dial tn order to 
prepare the Merest on the 90s 
May 1986 the balances on the sev- 
eral accounts in the above Stock 
wiH be struck at Die dose of busi- 
ness on 9m April 1966. 


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In the Budget, a revolutionary new plan was announced 
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You will be entitled to invest in a piani- 
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Fidelity International, one of the world's largest invest- 
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T5> make sore YOU are one of the first to benefit from 
these new opportunities, complete the coupon below or 'phone 
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Fidelity 

INTERNATIONAL*' 


TURN THE 
‘BIG BANG’ 
INTO A 
SUBSTANTIAL 
BOOM. 

As a financial service institution, what’s your position on the 
‘Big Bang’? 

T he wayyou do business will change. More institutions than 
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will become increasingly importanL 

The question, ‘Why should a client come to 
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‘Positioning to Makea Piofit' is a new report 
which examines the need to identify a point 
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ARC/Everett’s 

ARC INTERNATIONAL ADVERTISING LIMITED 



BASE 

LENDING 

RATES 


,12VA 
,12H% 
.12M% 
. 12 *% 
12H% 
,1114% 
12H% 
12 »% 
11W% 
,11H% 

Baft at Seated— .11H% 
,iiw% 

Gttenfc HA lltft 


AM 

Aten 8 Company - 

BCC1 

Ctfrisnfc Sawncst- 

C onsolid ated Cras- 
Contmential Tnst_ 

Co-operative Bank- 

a Hoars & Co 

LLoyds Bank 

Nat W est m i ns ter. 


K. 


t Honpx* Bare Race. 



ENTERTAINMENT 
& HOSPITALITY 

Opportune 


M ALLMAJOI SPOnWB EVBfTS 

•> h.m. 1 «l 6. c 

mu.lHHMf.ai Ik, m: likih6Mat.Hna> 
t h|i I »«il# Hu HwIit 
KnyJ A».am la** 
WuMc.U.tld MA l«r»inrfcj. 
I.i.hI Hm .mJm.un’Miol 

SWIMS}] 263 263.. «*■.. 
EVENTS, I .dcv*M(4. ■ lodi.il I Wl m 


Lloyds Ba nk 

If J 



Lloyds Bank Pic has reduced 
its Base Race from 12.5 per cent to 
11.5 per cent p.a. with effect from 
Wednesday, 19 March 1986. 

All facilities (including regulated consumer credit 
agreements) with a race of interest linked to Lloyds 
Bank Base Rate will be varied accordingly. 

The change in Base Rate will also be applied from 
the same dace by the United Kingdom branch of: 
The National Bank of New Zealand Limited. 

With effect from 27 March 1986 the standard rate of 
interest charged for overdrafts without prior arrange- 
ment will be, on a daily basis, 2 per cent per month - 
this is equivalent to an effective annual cate of 26.8 per 
cent on accounts charged monthly; 26.2 per cent on 
accounts charged quarterly. 



Lloyds 

Bank 


A THOROUGH BRED AMONGST BANKS. 


Llovds Bank Pic. 71 Lombard Server. London EOP 5BS. 


1985 Results 




Premium Income 

EH3 General □ Life 


Profit before taxation 


£23. 7m 


£27. 0m \ 


£175J9m( 


t&XZ 




temomi 






£13.Sm 




1983 


1984 


1985 


1983 


1984 


1985 


Premium Income 
General business 
Life business 


Profits 

Underwriting result 

Investment income attributable to general insurance funds 

General insurance profit 

Shareholders' investment and other income 

General business profit 

Life business profit. 

Share of associated company result 


Comhill 

Insurance Group 


1985 

1984 

£m 

£m 

230.0 

200.5 

27.0 

23.7 

257.0 

224.2 

(20.81 

(14.31 

21.5 

19.8 

0.7 

5.5 

7.1 

7.3 

7.8 

12.8 

3.2 

1.4 

— 

10.1) 

Till 

14.1 

C 1 I.tUihtt 

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FINANCE AND INDUSTRY 


THE TIMES THURSDAYMAR 


wm . es 


APPOINTMENTS 


Anambra State 
Water Corporation 


3 Consliiuiion Road, P.M.B. 01296, Enugu. 

5(h March, 1986 


INVITATION TO TENDER FOR THE SUPPLY OF SPARES 
FOR MECHANICAL AND ELECTRICAL EQUIPMENT 


1. The Anambra State Water Corporation proposes to rehabilitate some of the mechanical 
and electrical equipment installed at the pumping stations, for which project a 
number of spares will be needed. The foreign component of the cost of spares will 
be funded out of a loan provided by the World Bank for the Anambra Slate Water 
Supply and Sanitation Project. 

2. Details of spares requirements arc as follows: 

Spares for 1) Sumo Submersible Pumps 

2) Pleuger Submersible Pumps 

3) Rolls Roycc Diesel Engine Model CSTFL 

4) Rolls Royce Diesel Engine Model SF6ST 

5) Rolls Roycc Diesel Engine Model C6200 and C8T.CA 
(>) Pclbour generators 

7) Elco generator 

8) Electrical Switchgear 

9) Perkins Diesel Engine Model 4.236 and 6.354 

10) Elco Water Treatment Plant 

11) JCB Excavator 

12) Pont - A - Mousson Water Meters 

13) Fittings for Asbestos Cement Pipes to 150 Standards 

3. Tenders are now invited for supply of spares for any or all of the above items. 

4. Tenders will be received only from persons or firms from the territories of member 
countries of the International Bank for Rcconstrudion and Development, Switzerland 
and Taiwan. Expenditures for goods produced in or services provided from the territories of 
any country (other than Switzerland and Taiwan) which is not a member of IBRD will 
not be permitted and tenders contemplating such expenditures will be rejected. 

5. Tender documents shall be collected from the Secretary to the Corporation. 

C. Completed Tenders should be marked “Confidential Tender for the Supply of Spares 
for Mechanical and Electrical Equipment” addressed to: 

The Secretary, 

Anambra State Water Corporation, 

3, Constitution Road, 

P.M.B. 01296, 

Enugu. 

7. Tenders must be received on or before 3.30 p.m. on 2nd May. 


Ampercor d Communica- 
tions: Mrs Diane Clarke and 
Mr Alastair Bancroft have 
joined the board. 

Combustion Engineering 
Europe: Mr Derek Bargh has 
been made vice-president, 
business development. 

UniBond-Copydex: Mr 
Richard Aston has become 
mana g in g director and chief 
executive officer. 

James Ferguson Holdings: 
Mr Peter Ckmes and Dr Peter 
Naylor have been named non- 
executive directors and Mr 
Christopher Newman has 
been appointed finance 
director. 

Britannia Okasan Interna- 
tional Investment Manage- 
ment: Mr D S S Fbuting has 
been appointed managing 
director. 



Mr Alan Sneddon, above, has 
been made chief general maa- 
*ger-4esignate of Co-operative 
Insurance Society and wiD 
succeed Mr Arthur Dural on 
his retirement next year. 


COMPANY NEWS 


• ST IVES GBOUR The com- 


pany is lo mope with C h ase 
Printers (Holdings). a colour 
magazine p rin ter based in she 
Wot Country. & Ives will pay 
£22 motion for Chase, wfaicb a a 
pri v a te company controlled by 
Mr Max Harvey and his flmtthr. 

• COMBINED TECHNOL- 
OGY CORPORATION: Three 
months to Dec. 31. 1983. Loss 
attributable £07 million (loss 
£2.02 mHBoqL Nine months to 
Dec. 31. 1983. Loss attributable 
£3.52 million (loss £2.5 milhon). 

• INVESTMENT AB 
BEUER: Dividend 8 Swedish 
krona (3.85 krona) for 1985. 
Sales 1.520 million krona (1,120 
million krona). Income before 
tax 428 million krona (£40 
million), compared with 233 
million krona. 

• PRESTWICH HOLDINGS: 
Half-year to Dec. 31, 1985. 
Interim dividend 0.35p on en- 
larged capital (0j5p). Turnover 


against $7.02 million. No tax 
(nflX The loss is tower because 
of staff reductions and cost 

tont roi , 

• GUERNSEY ATLANTIC 
SECURITIES: Pretax revenue 
for 1985. £30.655 (£24,298). 
Dividend 3.5 per cent (3 per 


cent), payable on May 5. 

• WATMOUGHS (HOLD- 
INGS): Final dividend 4£p 
(4.55p) on increased capital, 
payable on April 25. making 
6.5p (6.25p) for 1985. Turnover 
£308 million (£27 minion). 
Pretax profit £2-31 million (£2-3 
million). Adjusted earnings per 
share (net basis) 18.25p 
(2l30p). The board looks for- , 
ward to substantial improve- : 




ment in profits in 1986. 
• AUTOMOTIVE i 


• AUTOMOTIVE PROD- 
UCTS: No final dividend for 
1985 in view of the merger with 
BBA(0-5p) r making a total of Ip 
(l.Sp). Turnover £260.2 million 


£11.49 million (£4.34 million). 
Pretax profit £813.000 


Pretax profit £813.000 
(£424.000). 

• TECHNOFAN: Half-year to 
Dec. 31. 1985. No interim 
dividend (nil). Turnover 24.53 
million francs (16.59 million 
francs). Pretax profit 4.16 mil- 
lion francs (about £400,000), 
against 2.48 million francs. 

• BM GROUP: Half-year to 
Dec 31, 1985. Interim dividend 
0.66p (0.66pX payable on May 
6. Turnover £16.29 million 


(235.6 million). Pretax profit 
£7.5 mil hem, as forecast at the 
time of BBA’s offer (against £3.9 
million): 

• NORANK SYSTEMS: No 
dividend for 1985, as forecast. 
Turnover 1.2 million 
(£699,000). - Pretax profit 
£404£00 (£191,000). Earnings 
per share 7.8p (13p]L 

• EXPAMET INTER- 
NATIONAL: Final dividend 
3.55p (3p), making 5.9p (5p) for 
1985. Turnover £52.45 nunkm 
(£41.93 million). Pretax profit 
£437 million (£3.19 million). 
Earnings per share 123 8p 
(9.49p). 

• PENNINE RESOURCES: 
Half-year to Sept 30, 2985. 
Turnover £4.13 million 
(£1 14,000). Pretax profit 
£90,000 (loss £25,000). Earnings 
per share 0.6p(Ios &2p). 

• MERCHANTS* 
WAREHOUSING: Interim 


(£13.08 million). Pretax profit 
£1.03 million (£480,000). Earn- 
ings per share 3.64p (I.Slp). The 
board looks forward to the 
current year’s outcome with 
optimism. 

• E W TARRY: Mr M 
Sirochowiiz, the chairman, fore- 
casts in his annual statement 
that the company’s earnings in 
1986 will atleast equal IMS’s 
and that the company will pay 
dividends on a three times 
covered basis. 

• TRILION: The companyjtias 
agreed to buy from Mr R 
. Balyney and others, Movitd 
Services, Caribbean Programme 
Services and Eurotd Pro- 
gramme Distributors. The 
agreement is conditional on 
cmfou’s shareholders approval. 

• MNEMOSt Nine months to 

Dec. 31, 198S. Turnover 

5150,000 ($197,000). Pretax loss 
$4.7 million (about £3 million), 


S. The Corpora Lion is not bound to accept the lowest or any tender. 


(J. C. Udeagbala) 

• Secretary 

ANAMBRA STATE WATER CORPORATION 


dividend &9p (0.9p), payable 
April 4. Revenue for the 24 
weeks to Dec. 14, 1985, £1.67 
million (£1.64 million). Pretax 
profit £137,000 (£225,000). 
Earnings per share 2.07p 
(2.76pX 

• CLONDALKTN GROUP: 
Total dividend for 1985, 8.1Sp 
(7p). Turnover Irish £47.22 
million (Irish. £42.07 minion). 
Pretax profit Irish £3.54 minion 
(Irish £3.13 million). Earnings 
per share 27.48p (23.45p). 


Fox Television Stations, Inc. 


a subsidiary of 


The News Corporation Limited 


has purchased 


WNEW-TV 

KTTV 

WFLD-TV 

WTTG 

KRLD-TV 

KRIV-TV 


New York, New York 
Los Angeles, California 
Chicago, Illinois 
Washington, D.C. 
Dallas/Fort Worth, Texas 
Houston, Texas 


from 


Metromedia Broadcasting Corporation 


The undersigned acted as financial advisor 
to The News Corporation Limited. 


qAllen & Company 


INCORPORATED 


March 19S6 


i 


National 

rv a Westminster 




Bank PLC 


NatWest announces that 
with effect from 
Wednesday, 19th March, 1986, 
its Base Rate 
is decreased from 
12.50% to 11.50% per annum. 


All fa cilities (including legislated consumer credit 
agreements) with a rate of interest linked to 
NatWest Base Rate will be varied accordingly 


41 Lothbuzy London EC2P 2BP 



Cbutts & Co. announce that their 
Base Rate is reduced from 
12.50% to 31.50% per annum with effect 
from the 19th March, 1986 
until further notice. 


AO fittest including itjrabKda<utimer credit agreenwnol 
with a ole finked roGcwrri Base Rate *n2 be varied atforduiah 


The Deposit Rates on monies subject, 
to seven days, notice of withdrawal 
are as follows:- . 


7.75% per annum Gross* 

5.625% per annum Net (the Gross Equivalent 
of which is 8.03% per annum to 
a basic rate tax payer). 


Rates are subject to variation and 
interest is paid half-yearly in 
.. . . June and December. . 

•Nmordattnlr a*»!*bie wjndmduals u*ho L 1 X rtndenn 

440 Strand. Lonc?on.WCZR 0QS 


r\ 

i |r 

.4 iJ * 



On and after 19th March, 1986 
Standard Chartered Bank’s Base Rate 
for lending is bemg decreased from 
12.50% to 11.50%, 


Deposit Rates are Gross Interest Net interest 


'notice : 8.00% 5.98% 


21 days’ notice ; 9.00% 6.73%. 


Interest paid half-yearly 


Standard Chartered Bank 

Head Office 38 Bishopsgate, London EC2N 4DE 
TeL 01-280 7500 Telex 885951 


•I;; 



Clydesdale Bank PLC 


BASE 

RATE 


Clydesdale Bank PLC 
announces that with 
effect from 20th March 
1986 its Base Rate for 
lending is being 
reduced 

from 1214% to 1.1-%% 
per annum. 





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41 4 


THE TIMES THURSDAY MARCH 20 1986 


This announcement is neither an offer to sell nor a solicitation of an offer to buy these securities. 

The offer is made only by the Prospectus. 


1,148,000 Shares 


FOX • 

1 ELI. VISION 
STM iO\S ' 


Increasing Rate Exchangeable Guaranteed Preferred Stock 

Guaranteed by The News Corporation Limited and News America Holdings Incorporated 


Price $1,000 a Share 


Copies of the Prospectus are obtainable in any State from the undersigned 
and such other dealers as may lawfully offer these securities m such State. 


Lambert 


INCORPORATED 


oAllen & Company 

INCORPORATED 


.. - February 


Metromedia Broadcasting Corporation 


has sold 


WNEW-TV 

KTTV 

WFLD-TV 

WTTG 

KRLD-TV 

KRIV-TV 


New York, New York 
Los Angeles, California 
Chicago, Illinois 
Washington, D.C. 
Dallas/Fort Worth, Texas 
Houston, Texas 


to 


Fox Television Stations, Inc. 

a subsidiary of 

The News Corporation Limited 


Theundeisi^edinitiat^JhisJranBc^iopoildocjedas^nanoialadyisc^to 


end The News Corporal 


Drexel Burnham Lambert 


INCORPORATED 


March 1986 


This announcement appears as a matter of record only. 


Cash and/or shares of 


Fox Television Stations, Inc. 

Incasing Rate Exchangeable Guaranteed Preferred Stock 

by The News Corporafion Limited and News America Holdings Incorporated 
exchanged for 


Metromedia Broadcasting Corporation 

$960,000,000 


Series 1 Zero 
Series 2 Zero 
Series 3 Zero 
Series 4 Zero 
Series 5 Zero 
Series 6 Zero 


Coupon Senior Notes due December 1, 1988 
Coupon Senior Notes due December 1, 1989 
Coupon Senior Notes due December 1, 1990 
Coupon Senior Notes due December 1, 1991 
Coupon Senior Notes due December 1, 1992 
Coupon Senior Notes due December 1, 1993 

$954,276,000 Tendered 
99% of the Class 


$335,000,000 

Senior Exchangeable Variable Rate Debentures 
due December 1, 1996 

$332,992,000 Tendered 
99% of the Class 


$225,000,000 


15%% Senior Subordinated Debentures 
due December 1, 1999 
$198,260,000 Tendered 
88% of the Class 


$400,000,000 

Adjustable Rate Participating Subordinated Debentures 
due December 1, 2002 
$370,917,000 Tendered 
93% of the Class 


The undefined acted as Dealer Managers for this Exchange Offer. 


Drexel Burnham Lambert 

incorporated 


qAllen & Company 

incorporated 


March 1986 


4 


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5 
1 
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1 2 

t «* 

t IT 

« <3 

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jh^-U -W' ,\^j6 


THE TIMES THURSDAY MARCH 20 1986 




Have excellent 
opportunities in their 
London Office 
for qualified Chartered 
Accountants in Audit, 
Investigation/Corporate 
Finance, Tax, Insolvency 
and Management 
Consultancy 


Fbr further details please contact Anita Tovell or 
Iiz Richards at Grant Thornton, Fairfax House,FuIwood Place, 
London WC1V 6DW Telephone 01-405 8422. 


GrantThomton 

CHARTERED ACCOUNTANTS 


Nobody gets 
closer to clients 


Newly Qualified 
Accountants 


ACA’s and ACMA’S _ ' 

YOUR KEY TO THE FUTURE LIES IN 


a\ M M 


niroimffl!©! 


Initial Earnings 
£18,000+ 


London 


As a newly qualified Accountant you 
want to guide the business planning 
and related in formation systems 
decisions of major organisations. 
You want the prospect of total 
involvement from strategic business 
and information planning studies to 
systems design and installation. 

Management information 
Consultancy is the one area that 
really can offer you the variety, 
breadth of experience and 
. immediate rewards. 
We want to meet top graduate 
Accountants - young professionals 
who are eager to learn how to 


information processing and industry 
skills coupled with interpersonal and 
management ability. The very skills 

which we now will develop in you. 
CAREER DEVELOPMENT 


Our commitment to your 
development will be second to none 
and involves integrating formal 
tramingwith practical experience, hi 
fact, during the next five years you 
will receive over 800 hours of formal 
training and education, mostly 
conducted at our centres in Chicago 
and Geneva. There you will meet 

your counterparts from 7 20 offices in 
40 countries, and participate in a 


problem solving and using their 
creative and logical abilities to the 


mssssssm 


full, if you feel the need to develop 


information systemsconsultancy. 
Arthur Andersen & Co„ Management 
Consultants have always specialised 
in the information technology 
business to provide our clients with 
a comped tiveadvantage. 
We have concentrated on providing a 
high quality professional service that 
requires the study of financial, 
marketing, operations, personnel 
and other key functions with critical 
objectivity coupled with the application 
of advanced information technology. 
As a result, our list of clients has 


framework of a professional 
. organisation which has over 7,000 
consul tantswortd-wide. 

Have no illusions, this wifi bea 
physically and intellectually 
demanding challenge. From it, 
though, you will gain anew, wider 
perspective on professional life. 


grown impressively. Today, it spans : 
abroad ranseof blue-chip companies 


abroad rangeof blue-chip companies 
in every major industry sector; as well 
as most government departments 
and manynealth & local authorities- 
Our work requires a unicpie 
- combination of business, technical 


cross section of industries and the 
publicsector. . 

Promotionprospects are excellent 
and based entirely on merit; career 
and salary progression are rapid 
with the genuineprospect of 
partnership. 

WfeYegrowing and successful and 
we need you to be the same. 

Please writeiri the strictest confidence 
to: Jdhn Maxted, Arthur Andersen & Qx, 
Management Consultants, ■■ 

1 Surrey Street. . 

London WC2R2PS. 



Management Consultants 


EnglishtlHeritage 




Historic Buildings & Monuments 
Commission fbr England 



PUBLICATIONS 

OFFICER 



■ 

■ 


■ 

I 


I 

I 


English Heritage (the popular name fbr the Historic Buildings and Monuments 
Commission for England) was established under the National Heritage Act 1983 to 
help secure the preservation of historic bufldings, conservation areas and ancient 
monuments throughout England. Although funded by Government we are 
independent of it 

We ouxentiy have a vacancy fora Publications Officer (graded Curator D) in the 
Academic and Specialist Publications branch of our Inspectorate Division. The 
branch publishes a series of major archaeological excavation reports, advisory and 
technical papers in archaeology, conservation and environmental studies and records 
of historical and archaeological investigations at monuments and buildings in 
English Heritage’s care. 

You will be resp on s ib le for arranging the refereeing, editing and production of each 
volume. You will also be expected to assist in the programme fbr completion of 
reports and archives of pre-1973 excavations. Academic and copy-editing is carried 
out by Publications branch staff or staff under short-term contr a ct s while layout, 
design, printing and marketing are arranged with technical staff in our Marketing 
Division. 

You should normally have a relevant degree, preferably with 1st or upper 2nd class 
honours (where divided). A wide academic knowledge of British archaeology and 
architectural history is essential, and preference will lie given to those with special 
knowledge of the medieval period. You most have experience of academic editorial 
work, and experience in a publishing house or knowledge of the technical aspects of 
publication would be an advantage. You should also be able to demonstrate your 
capacity fen* effective and accurate work by reference to publications which you have 
prepared 

Salary; (under review) as Curator Grade D £lL68Q-£ 15,165. Starting salary according to 
qualifications and expe ri ence. 

For further details and an application form (to be returned by 9 April 1966) write to 
Civil Service Commission, Alencon Link Basingstoke, Hants RGZ1 1JB. or telephone 
Basingstoke (0256) 468551 (answering service operates outside office hours). 

Please quote re£ 0(14)382. 

English Heritage is an equal opportunity employer 


PROGRESSIVE 

COMMODITY 


TRADING 

COMPANY 


Requires the services 
of a young and Hh 
thusfastic commodity 
trader. The appli- 
cants must have a 
world wide knowl- 
edge and back 
ground in the pulses 
trade and all neces- 
sary related buslnes. 


Salary, terms and 
conditions of em- 
ployment win Ire 
commensurate with 
experience. 


Please reply in writ- 
ing to the Managing 
Director. 


AGMIN LIMITED 
THE LODGE 


16 SHUTE END 


BERKS RG11 1BJ 



n £14,000 

Dtro fl om career opportunflfn 
w«h ms tosdtog American 
Company. Requirements are 
tor g raduswe in marketing 1 
with mWrmxn 1 year tssdaaf 
flDMom Mwrenee n emcA 

FtooDto mm Age ZB+. 


Pleas* phono or write tos- 
DEREK UST 


London W1 

01-734 assn 



1 ?•> «4 r 




IfKWt. 





P i<j ^^8 

TW? 


‘-i -) > 

i > rr? 




rrm 



3 r»j I ) 

1 

IW iTh kUc 



PA/Ji w 5 * » »7 




client offers a 


RA 




YOUR GATEWAY TO HISTORIC ENGLAND 


AN OUTSTANDING 
OPPORTUNITY 


For a well-educated individual (preferably 
graduate) to train as a Financial Pluming Ad- 
viser with a leading city-based brokerage. The 
successful applicant will be (1) aged 21-30, (2) 
self-motivated and hard-working, (3) a good 
communicator, (4) looking for an exciting ca- 
reer. In return, the position offers (1) full 
training and support. (2i an exciting working 
environment, (3) a stable career with a profes- 
sional organisation, (4) an attractive 
remuneration package, (5) a wide range of 
joiig-tenn opportunities with one of the most 
innovative and dynamic companies in the Fi- 
nancial Services sector. 

Teh Peter Cole on 01-404-5766 
or write to him at 
Chase de Vere (Investments Ltd) 

63 Lincoln's t«i Reids 
London WC2A 3JX 


WHITEHEAD MANN 


RESEARCH CONSULTANT/ 
TRAINEE HEADHUNTER 

Circa £15,000 


Whitehead Mann is a leading British-owned in- 
ternational executive search consultancy. 
Continuing growth demands the appointment of 
a lively. imeUigctu, commercially aware research 
consultant/trainee headhunter. He/she must be 
a scif-staner, willing to take early responsibly 
and able to enjoy the pressures of a fast-moving, 
demanding work environment Preferred age 
23/23: graduate. 


Please write with full details to: 
Richard Slater, Whitehead Mann Limited, 
44 Weibeck Street, London W1M 7HF, 
telephone 01-935 3978. 


OPPORTUNITY 


An oxcJtmg career & open to 
individuals (22+) wtw are 
single m&tdad and interested 
in trier own tutura. if you 
would Ore tno opportunity to 
Bare over £20,000 per 

annum and aam shares Si a 
nsttonwidfl group. 


Please calk* 

Miss Former on 
01-439 8431 


PROFESSIONAL SALES PEOPLE 


Required to promote revolutionary computer 
systems designed specifically for the Insurance 
or Mortgage Broker Market. The ideal candi- 
dates will be familiar with the Insurance 
Business and have experience of demonstrating 
and spedality-sdling. As this position is an 
Agency basis, sales people already employed axe 
also welcome. 


CaR Peter Fisher now on 
Worcester (0905) 58585. 


“ lor » Person wUIr sjlos or 
nj***W22!! eowneiK*. Tee- 
Phone 0303 28*40 

raaomeo. omen nr***. 

wy a gradual r or a leva 
standard *v«h ipm. A highly 
gmon with expert. 
W* of rreruttmvpt «n4 
reswwi aura In for Mayfair of 
re* (20CH- iiato UZ.OQO. can 

oi-»» «SiaB 

Farquharan Umm m» 
Coom. 47 Now Bond street. 


HIGH INCOMES 


For highly motivated enthusiastic 
people with hie will to succeed. 

If you think you are, and you are aged be- 
tween 23 and 45 then can us for a position at 
our newly opened offices In the London 
Bridge area. Cafl Mr Taylor Cavendish oru 

01-928 4599 


RECRUITMENT 
SPECIALIST 
WEST END 


A young graduate, to age 
24. with a year or two s 
eemmerOal MpahmoB la 
sought to join an- estab- 
lished team of highly 
successful professionals 
engaged h the reenft- 


. demonstrate dear, and i 



MAJOR NATIONAL 
ACCOUNT EXECUTIVES 


MMf computer manufacturer 

O/T/E £35K - £45K + Quality Car 

The Company. 




















ji ) x\- c& 




THE TTMES THURSDAY MARCH 20 1986 


FINANCIAL CONSULTANCY 

A GROWTH AREA OF THE MOMENT 
AND OF THE FUTURE- DON’T MISS OUT! 

2 JSS? 811 * 11 *) »> leading firm of financial consultants and because of phenomenal expansion in 1 986 is 

oomng jot outst andin g individuals to. compliment its London based of professionals. 

. , "B* 11 individuals (aged 23+ and based in London) will be energetic and intelligent, highly motivated, 
hardworking and able to absorb new ideas quickly. ' 

Full training will be provided. 

Remuneration expected to be in excess of £15,000, and lead to management in the first year. 

Tins is a superb opportunity to develop your own business and career path in a growing company and in an 
exciting industry. 

For further details phone the Recruitment Manager on 01-836 7333. 


MANAGER £19,000 + Car 

Midlands 

AntrlaTBh^DfactCTTnp^^^t^8h^Bim>^c^at>flmpn<^tt* rt l0 wr^ 
has an unonuNy tor me yoyo ACa n MM a saw ransuoncv mb »«an cawa oascfl 
pnwmnunb As wot me "ftHT. me to* tannw inomneutfominaertUBCUiane 
aowEtb at en to these whose Oteros conpmm sues rospoanwy 

Coventry Office 

CHIEF ACCOUNTANT £16,000 
+ Company Car Midlands 

A mature named Drtessmai e reowrofl Or a iag0y rowtactwing/eDWwinii 

annum Ine vccksu cawm® •* w attfe o oenwswe a wan a mmcncni sm 

*Jwice»ert wprtwceo mhwi mg ronjjrutnoo rcps*r li* ctnei »cr 9 irt»™ «*» ocbwwtw «d 

two and nuwent the MtKanys curwn apansw pans, wren ate d amt ntmwce. 
&ucas5 *w amg c own roans n me rajm nsaam. 

Erdington Office 


ELECTRONIC 
£14,000 + Car 


ENGINEER 

Lincolnshire 


CJ103 


qAl 


r - 



Ad DCDWhJKy n ton the uonahon Oman d Os kxU fcxknq rawtod u M The past 
enenmows# roe oesan a ana smewr. to- aaenar nanOrng swwns M It* assaaeohjC 
software ajgema wdi mr aowwson mawmoana awn# a sis suo-cMtae&nq m comas- 
snwg A mmum q u a mu o n a hM) s rotund cooped waft mimtd com# Syswns 
Pptwace 


Nottingham Office 


ACCOUNTS MANAGER£16,000 
+ Car Midlands 

Emenenoe ol sudl and basnets mwftflmoon lor metbani sued d#nt conocne onthwH 
■mm a map padcs. s *s mcmmuw mm #•« tns ptesajais tom now s«*s to ww*l a 
quarto) aCA yen ommu mo wnowaRW anwy rust cowmen! oooratf and nraie- 
rarosMfe. (Vie mads nil ben#! am* prospects hi Mnaonmitt touts QnenfiUMdNI 
apd. 

Coventry Office 

PROJECT ENGINEER 

£15,000 North Midlands 

Unufecturag amney ol MemMnal ien# sorts dwi w* enowo in w*i is mrtjd 
ansv ma toihk (tokcs » •> siaqes bon conxtiim lu awqKMn Atan in Enqreemg <Mfc 
mt DCS aco gngm gme g nness ncflwv oeormes suca as wq mi and art woo* 
a#npe<cnsun a tmancai ana jihkwm maws. 

Nottingham Office 

COST ACCOUNTANT 

£15,000 Staffordshire 

The roW fenSnq nandachanM eonnany sect a your#] cwaWcd ACMA wdh noencncs ol the 
nwwadnwq aidusitv Remnsm to he CM ArawiBW ana wwg as pan « aowamc 
acauwig bool me cosmn demands baRi sound asm ppw ma ntt and a fcqn Degree ol 
conouR sysems unMgr Ra» proaressai u sraranea mar nal anaranero a OK 
cans onermEd nomiML EueAenl noting ernmnnix m an awaowe no! ucaum 

Erdington Office 


COST 

£15,000 


The above positions have outstanding career prospects and carry excellent benefits. For Further 
information applicants M/F should telephone or send a comprehensive c.v. to the repsective regional 
office. 

tmmm .nm umMui _kiii£ r- i — uilo Uiu <■ m r 

■”***• ■**““ ““ roMaraa »mm RECRUITMENT iV». 


It's not worth lookh 


Belna unemployed when you're over 35 is 
no joke. You have always considered 
yourself hard wortdna. successful and 
ambitious but after alT the 'phone calls and 
unsuccessful Interviews, iri fairly eaay to . 
start thinking that you really are 
unemployable. 

At Chusfd Lander we understand how you 
feel but more importantly, we know how to 
help you. We’ve been helping thousands of 
people like you for many years. 


Chusid Lander are a group of specialist 
career consultants wno, for many years, 
have helped people lika you realise their true 
career potential and find their real vocation. 
We give you the advice and guidance you 
need to get the right job for yourself. 

So fust when you might be thinking that 
nothing can help you, remember that wa 
may be the only ones who can. 

Telephone us now to arrange a confidential 
personal assessment without obligation, or 
write to: The Administrator, 

35/37 Rtzroy Street, London W1P5AF, 
enclosing a brief career summary. 


UMDW 01-6808771 MWOCSIDI 0S142SO0B8 

aw— i OH W oamaasiiw notimohmi dmsitvu 

ansraL 027322307 ausoow ou-muia 

BOAST 0232S2XB3M 


0 CHUSID LANDER 


MARKET INTELLIGENCE 
ANALYST 

Ajriculaie, energetic person sought, educated 
to degree standard, to assist in the collection 
and diSseminaDon of market intelligence in 
large volume industrial commodities. The 
individual must be prepared to contact pro- 
ducers. traders, and other industrial sources by 
telephone and telex on a daily basis, to obtain 
ana follow up information for a News 
Magazine and for Regnlar Information 
Services on price movements and market 
developments. Quick wined intelligence, a de- 
sire to learn rapidly, and an abiliTy to produce 
interesting written material are indispensibte. 
Apply with cumculum vttae to: 

Mia C Langton. The British Sulphur Corpora- 
tion UdL Parnell House. 25 H ilton Road. 
London. 'IV INH. 

Salary bxIkalSo* * 8.000 - * 10.000 pj. 


n DIVISIONAL MANAGER 

g Circa £20,000 plus executive car 
A NORTH-EAST- RELOCATION AVAILABLE 

S3 Our client is the major force in the electronic security systems market Continued 
rvn expansion and acquisition has created a need for an individual who can match their 

. impressive track record. 

^ Ybuc objective well be tocantinue the profitable expansion of a recently acquired 

CBS . . .Division. Initially ieadinglt to a position of group pre-eminence and,_givsn its vast 
I ll potential, eventually on to stock market flotation. A role that will require skills in a 

gQ variety of fields including .Sales, Pfanning-Marketing and Business Management 

SS 0 The infrastructure is in place and the career opportunities for the successful individual 
S 3 areexcellent 

B ® You are likely to be in your 30's and have the strength of character and leadership 

S ES qualities necessary to control and motivate a dedicated management team, four own 
m ™ personal drive and commitment should match your negotiating and business skills, 

sgra ultimately ensuring that turnover and profitability taigets are achieved within this 

|| HI highly competitive industry. 

If ® For further discussion please contact our advising consultant Mike Connolly on 

g gj 021-233 2777 (daytime) 0789 69322 (evenings) or forward your Curriculum Vitae to:- 

ng| Expedite Professional Recruftment. Britannia House. 50 Great Charles Street, 

|M Birmingham B3 2LP. Tbk 021 -233 2777. 


JOIN THE 
MARKET LEADER 

Unichema Chemicals Limbed is an industrial 
chemical company based in Bebmgton on 
the Wirral. his tne UJL Market Leader m me 
manufacture of oteochemteals and forms 
part ot the chemical interests of Unftever. 

ASSISTANT SALES 
MANA6ER 

cXIfik plus car 

We expect our Assistant Sates Manager to 
be aged between 25 and 30, hokJing a good 
deqree in Cherrustry or Chemteai Engineer- 
ing and to already have 2-3 years sates 
experience. . 

• Whilst working out of the U.K- headquarters 
on the Wirral, the Assistant Sates Manager 
will be expected to travel extensively and 

and the wffl to win: 

Major activities will be 
and the investigation and development ot 
hitherto unexplored markets. . ■ . 

It is perceived that the job holder will out- 
er ow this position wrthin three years andto 

mis and career ‘ 

and could include positions abroad. 

The employment package 

expect from a «|W iSSSSJfi- 


m 

tjf 


Assistant 

Information 

Officer 


membership. Relocation a^ramnee wm « 

given where appropriate. 

7b receive an form, write or 

Ctois Warile, Personae! OBtar. 

■tkuebema Ctenteal* utwow, 
BE8INGT0N. WkraL MowOS®*- 
7et 051-645 2028 Ext 417 



A CHANGE OF 

CAREER 

A firm conunitmtBT to 
i develop your can# 
ton's uhat Allied Dun- 
bar is currently onenng 
io men and *o® en wtt° 
are equally commitwo to 
! success. 

I Lastsear alone we spent 

oter L> nufltou oo trau»- 
mg programmes fw 
Sabs Associates aon 

reap the r^-ards. / 

For an inKP-tcw or tur- 
thcr deads faN'%S 
Pharos on OLJJ/ ™ 

. London a«l Home. 
Counties. - ■ 


WHICH CAREER 
SUITS BEST? 

(VofeuionatGUiKlancc and . 

Assnsmamforollagn. 

15-24 yn Cwiitt CaWS 

2 §^« yrs- PnisHw. Clwa 1 * 
3S34m Bwint2*lC*«w> 

fW dawi# in me brBdmfc- 

•••■ssass? 

• •• 01 
••o — 

Mr r franorowr •Mo««r 
iwtrm im i***' 

wiums t*-sev«w-«o« town 
imv «nn®wus bmm mUoto 
nw to mn um em/v#*mui 

London aftd Sou® CAM Eo- 
OUEOfl. GMaMHM Cu«"W». 
SSlvju* o rtwro ftgfiaropnon. 
rwiiea saury . m™ 


The Central Office of 
Information - the British 
Government's publicity oigurisstiou - has a vacancy 
for an Assistant Information Officer. 

The successful candidate will join a division 
responsible for arranging official visits for about 1 
1,500 senior people from over 100 countries each 
year. The successful candidate will be responsible for 
a variety of functions in connection with 1 
arrangements for these visits: assisting in programme 
planning, arranging functions for visitors, escorting 
visitors. Ka wring with -British Bmbawaefl and High 1 
Commissions and assisting senior pla nn i n g officers 
across the range of his/her activities. 

Experience in an area of activity Similar to this work , 
is essential, together with a good knowledge of 
current affaire and of the governmental, industrial, , 
economic and social structure of modern Britain. The | 
successful candidate will have good org an i sing ability 
and be able to mix at all levels and work under , 
pressure. Experience in publicity or public relations 
work will be an advantage. Some irregular hours and 
weekend working is likely. i 

The post is graded Assistant Information Officer and ! 
starting salary will be within £6,318 to £10,282 per 
annum (inclusive of Inner London Weighting | 
according to experience and qualifications. The post 
carries 22 days annual leave plus 10% days public and ' 
privilege holidays. Please send a post card for an i 
application form to F; G. Hoiohan, Central Office of I 
Information. Room 827, Hercules Road. London SEl 
7DU, quoting ocmpetrtkra number 30I/MC/86. The I 
dosing (foie for returned forms is 18 April, 1986. j 
The Civil Service is an Equal Opportunities ■ 
Employer. ! 


ASSISTANT DIRECTOR 

JFUNDRAjBTNC AND MARKETING 

. Age Concern England Es creating a new Assistant Dtrec- 
ior position to form an important part of a central team 
responsible for the direction and administration of its 
work. 

The post-holder will be supported by three heads of 
Departments responsible for fundraising, publishing 
and marining and in addition will be responsible for a 
• small team selling insurance policies. The gross turn- 
over of Age Concern England now ex c eeds £4 million. 

The perron appointed must be able to demonstrate a 
successful career in marketing, advertising, fundraising 
smdAvpublic relations at a senior level within the vol- 
untary sector or 2 commercial organisation. Candida les 
form a commercial background need to have a genuine 
commitment ot undemanding the voluntary move- 
ment and The needs of Age Concern. 

Salary £17.288 - £20548 pz. inclusive of London 
Weighting. Contributory pension scheme. 4 weeks an- 
nual leave plus S recess days. 

Forapplkation form Md dnailS please contact Person- 
nel Depart morn. 

m AGE CONCERN ENGLAND 

'Lj GO Pitcairn Reed 

sSSTmG 3LL 

/ Clacuig date Uth Ajrt, 

1986 



TO £25K+ BENEFITS 


IMdmiral ban mfcpendem privately owned 
uunsuuanis (JJsywems and software company with proven 

CONSULTANTS expertise Vi the management and design of 

software systems. With the emphasis on quafiry 
ANALYSTS and growth we provide an environment chat a both 

PROGRAMMERS stinuAdng 4nd demantl ng. 

The company has a prestigious tis of d rents m 

the financial, defence and energy sectors. 

mmpp Admiral is now expanding its activities in che 

financial sector, based from its City office in the 
& St I ILEMENT heart of the square mfle. The company is seeking 

INTERNATIONAL 03 recruit vmB qualified personnel m ptiy an active 
BANKING pan in its growth plans, for afl levels a degree and 

experience in real- rime, on-line systems wd be 
MONEY TRANSFER required and for more senior positions, a 
SYSTEMS knowledge of the Securities Industry or 


I CONSULTANTS 
I ANALYSTS 
(PROGRAMMERS 


& SETTLEMENT 

I INTERNATIONAL 
BANKING 

I MONEY TRANSFER 
SYSTEMS 


FOREIGN EXCHANGE Banking systems wN be 


DEALING 


I LOCATIONS: 
LONDON 
CAMBERLEY 
BRISTOL 


K you are interested in a career with a dynamic 
company where your contribution and 
commitment wffl be rapKRy recognised, then 
contact Terry Jones at: 

Admiral Computing Limited. 15 Victoria 
Avenue. Camberiey. Surrey GUIS 3JH. 

Tel Camberiey (0276) 61167 & 68 26 SI 


doaDGl nOEf tan 8 S-U 


admiral 

COMPUTING LIMITED 


Home Economist 


The Testing Laboratory of Which? magazine at Harpenden. Herts 
requires a young, qualified Home Economist to assist in foe testing of 
domestic apptianoes and food. 

We are looking for someone with a scientific approach and the abfflty to 
think critically, combined with practical skills. Some experience working 
In a Laboratory and with computers is a definite advantage, as is 'A' 
level Mathematics or Physics. 

Salary wM be around £7.500 according to age and experience, if you 
have a degree or a diploma in Home Economics, and are interested In 
starling a career with Consumers' Association, please write for an 
application form to: 

Personnel Services Manager CA Testing & Research, 
Harpenden Rise Laboratory, Harpenden, Herts. 


COUNTERTRADE 

ASSISTANT 

We are a company involved in countertrade transactions throughout the 
world. Due to expansion of our business, we wish to recruit another 
person to join our countertrade team. 

As a result of the global nature of our business, the successful applicant 
will be required to have fluency in Arabic, French and Spanish as well as 
En glish, Excellent prospects. 

Please reply to: 

SCANDINAVIAN TRADING 
INTERNATIONAL LTD 

(Attention; Rolf Carison/Janet Sabey) 

3 Qneen Street 

Matyfair 

London W1X 7PH 


Linguists 

The Linguist Officer Class is responsible for written translation 
(mainly into English), foreign document research, and conference 
interpreting. There are now about 6 vacancies for candidates 
qualified as described below. 

Royal Military Academy, Sandhurst ( 1 post) 

You must be proficient in Russian, with German as a second 
foreign language, and have a wide know, ledge of military afLm 
in general and of che Soviet military system m particular 
Appointment as Higher Linguist Officer: 

Central London (1 post ) 

You must be proficient in French and English to mother - 
tongue or equivalent standard, with ability do undertake conference 
interpreting {consecutive and simultaneous) in both directions. 
Appointment as Higher Linguist Officer: 

Central London (i post) 

Ybu must be proficient in Russian, wich German or any major 
Slavonic language as a second foreign language. Appointment 
as Linguist Offtcec. 

Central London and West Germany (2 pose) 

You must be proficient in German, with French as a second 
foreign language. Appointment as Linguist Officer. 

Central London (at least 1 post) 

You must have Hungarian or Romanian as a first foreign 
language, in combination with rhi or her of these, or with 
German, or with any major Sbv-oi u <. language. Appointment 
as Linguist Officet 


For all posts, you roust have an appropriate degree with at 
leasr second class honours, or ao equivalent qualification, or have 
equivalent experience. You must be a British or Commonwealth 
aozen and be proficient in English to mother -tongue or bilingual 
standard. . 

SALARY : ( under-review) as Higher Linguist Officer L8895- 
I1L265; as Linguist Officer L6J00-L8915. In addition, posts in 
London and West Germany attract an Inner London Weighting 
of £1365 per annum, and Higher Linguist Officers employed as 
conference interpreters receive an additional allowance {maximum 
0518 per annum). Promotion prospects. 

For further details and an application form ( to be returned by 
22 April 1986) write to Gvil Service Commission, Alencon Link, 
Basingstoke, Hants RG21 1JB, or telephone Basingstoke (0256) 
468551 (answering service operates outside office hours). 

Please quote ref: G/683L 

The Civil Service is an equal opportunity employer 


Ministry of Defence 


JOIN THE LEADERS! 
IN ADVANCED 
BATTERY SYSTEMS 

SAP T (UK) Ltd - a subsidiary of SAP T Prance and 
Member of the multinational CCE Croup - currently 
poised to increase its leadership in the UK for 
Advanced flattery Systems for military and industrial 
markets - are now seeking the right person for a 
newly -crea ted position . . . 

SALES AND 

MARKETING 

PROFESSIONAL 

Technically qualified with considerable personal flair 
and drive ...capable of working closely with European 
consortia. MoD Project Officers and prime contractor 
Technical Managers ...able to identify customer trends 
<n power source applications ...with an in-depth 
understanding of the relevant power sources ...and a 
business vision for defining our next generation of 
products. 

You should have an Electrical Engineering qualification 
with a minimum of three years' expeiience in industry 
or related military environment - and the flair to meet 
the challenge of this newly-created position at the sharp 
end of our marketing initiative. 

We are offering an excellent salary with fringe benefits 
that include a company car, bonus, 8UPA, relocation 
assistance and the prospect of Divisional Director status. 

Please apply in the first instance for an application form to: 

Mrs. M.A. KRIingback, Personnel Manager, 

SAFT (UK) Ltd, Station Road, Hampton, 

Middlesex, TW1 2 2BY, 

Telephone: 01-979 7755. 



Ei/urd 







^ -U-' \ &Ji 


THE TIMES THURSDAY MAROI20W86 




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CRAWLEY WARREN & 
COMPANY LTD 


an international specialist firm of Lloyd’s brokers, 
with subsidiaries throughout North America, require 



FINANCIAL DIRECTOR / COMPANY 
SECRETARY 


Applicants must have an intimate knowledge of the 
working of the Lloyd’s industry and be of senior 
standing, having warmth and strength of character, 
complementary to the Company’s business style and 
philosophy. 

In addition to generous salary and benefits, it is 
intended that the appointment will lead to a director- 
ship with the holding company. 

Please apply with full curriculum vitae to: 

Mr B J Warren - Chairman 
Crawley Warren (Holdings) Ltd 
8 Lloyds Avenue 
London EC3N 3HD 

ALL APPLICATIONS WILL BE TREATED IN STRICT CONFIDENCE 



Outstanding Systems Professionals 
for IT Strategy Work 

AT. Kearney is one of the leading international management consulting firms 
and is judged by many people to be THE strategic IT consultants. Our work in 
this area is essentially business based and we aim to help our clients to secure a 
competitive advantage by bang ahead of the field in their use of information 
technology. 

We are looking for exceptional young managers or consultants to join our IT 
Strategy Group. They must have a successful record of developing and 
implementing management systems in complex and challenging environments. 

Successful applicants will have most of the following attributes. 

• Experience in IT management 

• Demonstrable track record in IT development/implementation. 

• Good academic record and a numerate degree. 

• Understanding of business. 

• Willingness to contribute to the growth of the Firm. 

• Aged between 28 and 35. 

If you meet our exacting requirements, the remuneration package should not be 
a problem. If you want to Enk your success with ours, please contact 

Glye Hodson, Director, AT. Kearney Limited, 

134 Piccadilly, London W1V 9FJ. Telephone 01-499 71 81. 






TAXATION ACCOUNTANT 


CENTRAL LONDON (£15,000 pa 


Cableand Wireless, world leaders in 
international telecommunications, 
require a young taxation accountant in 
their London headquarters to work 
directly to the taxation manager. He/she 
will form partof a small team working at 


appeal to an enthusiastic and ambitious 
applicant who should preferably have 
spent two years in commerce or a 
professional office obtaining sound 
experience of CJK corporate tax matters. 
Some understanding of foreign tax would 


be a definite benefit Ft is expected that 
the candidate would be of graduate 
status with an accounting or taxation 
qualification. 

This is an excellent opportunity to 
gain further know ledge and could lead to 
significant career prospects in due course. 

Please send full CV, quoting ref: 
538/T to: Recruitment Manager, 

Cable and Wireless pic, Mercury House, 
Theobalds Road, London WC1X8RX 



tephone for an applicat 
1-405 4980 (24 hours). 


r77T7 


Jcationform 


Helps the world communicate 


LONDON FEDERATION OF BOYS’ CLUBS 

DIRECTOR OF 
FINANCE & APPEALS 



(LONDON! 


The London Federation of Boys' Clubs 
which celebrates its centenary in 1987 
seeks to appoint a senior director with 
experience in financial management and 
administration. The successful candidate 
would probably have completed his first 
career in the City or industry, and is now 
looking for a really worthwhile and person- 
ally rewarding occupation. A flair for fund 
raising and appeals would be a distinct 
advantage. He or she would be joining a 


lively team committed to Helping boys to 
help themselves; A willingness to work 
some unsocial hours is desirable. 

Salary and benefits package to be 
negotiated. 

Write now, in confidence for details of this 
challenging opportunity to: R. E. Edwards, 
General Secretary, L.F.B.C.. 121 Kennington 
Park Road, London SE11 4JN. 


' ' There are many companies in the office 58 

only one undisputed leader. Our 

ENVIRONMENrmi ! .^& 

^y r y^ T""! I Asa sales consultant 

m _ andfheVVferf^f^ndbn-jtoU ivilJ'represenl oiir client to 

SALES The worid’s .SSESSSae 3 ' 

leader is expanding ... 


TON 


& Kj3®Y un 

EXECUTIVE SEARCH & SELECTION 


SENIOR 
MANAGER 


London 


c.£20k 


Our client, a leading career 
management organisation, offering 
unique services, wishes to appoint an 
additional member to their senior 
consultancy team who will be totally 
accountable for successfully managing a 
portfolio of senior executive clients. 

You will already possess proven 
communication skills, be 

administratively able with a flair for 
organisation and will- preferably be 
currently working in me personnel/ 
training function, although mis is not an 
essential requirement. You will probably 
be aged 40-52 and hold a professional or 
graduate qualification. ■ * • 

The role demands strong personal 
qualities and candidates mould be 
authoritative, persuasive, independent 
and able to apply analytical skills to 
problem solving. 

A highly competitive salary is offered 
and applications are invited for this 
excellent career opportunity for suitably 
qualified candidates. 

Please apply in confidence with C. V. to: 
Stephen Mawditr, 

Managing Director, 


Senior Management 

EMecntmrSeanJiCopwhaiKH 


Landseer House, 

19, Charing Cross Road, LONDON WC2H 0ES. 


A leading American textile company is 
looking for a 

EUROPEAN SALES 
AND 

MARKETING 

MANAGER 

We sell Spring and Fall lines of garments 
for young men to better sporting goods 
stores, trend-setting young mens shops and 
major department stores throughout Eu- 
rope, via sales agents or distributors. 

We would like to find a dynamic European 
who is an experienced sales manager on a 
multinational basis, who knows textiles, 
and textile merchandising, who under- 
stands our particular life-style orientation 
and who speaks several languages, includ- 
ing En glish well. This is a very senior and 
important executive position in our young 
group, with a major responsibility for 
achieving our very aggressive sales 
objectives. 

The post is located at European Headquar- 
ters West of London, but extensive travel 
is required. Salary, incentive boons and car 
will be attractive. Please send detailed CV, 
with salary history to BOX E01 . 


MANAGING DIRECTOR 

A National building group based in 
the North West requires a Managing 
Director for its construction division. 
Construction turnover £20 million 
per annum. Group turnover £30 
million per annum. Preferred 
applicant will have experience in 
construction at this level and will be 
aged preferably 35 plus. 

Apply; The Chairman, Townson 
Group of Companies Limited, 
Higher Swan Lane, Bolton, BL3 


yyour 


own ambi tion, driveand abllity.lhis adds up to an offer that s totally 
compatible with our clients preeminent position in the industry. _ 
Experience in the office funtishingfield would obviously be a distinct plus 
but a solid record ofsates achievement is the key criteria, if you have this 
caZIusnow T . . - i 


We want to teD you more about our client's success story and the part 
in it for you so telephone Keith Sunderland during normal office hours. 

If you prefersend us your CV and we'll mail you a fact pack by return- 
Moxon Dolphin & Kerbv Ltd., 178-202 Groat Portland Street, 

London WIN 5TB. Tel: OL631 441L 



London 

We are one of the leading international 
m anageme nt consultancies; we are now 
looking for timber first class consultants 
and analysts for our financial 
management practice mtfae UK and 
overseas. 

For consultant postions, successful 
candidates will be qualified accountants 
aged 28 to 35, with an honours degree* 
who can demonstrate proven 
achievement in industry or commerce. 
Experience must indude respoosSniity 
forsystemsdevdopmentas well as fine ' 
man agement in the finance function. 
Personal qualities will include the ability 
tocommuuicatedemfybotooraQyand - 

in writing. - 

Rjr analyst positions we are interested in 
hearing from less e xp erienced people 
over 26 who ochenrise meet tire profile 
indicated above. 

We offer outstanefing opportunitiesto . 
broaden yonr experience in a wide 


cy 

Salary fcb £25,000 + .car 

variety of industries and to work with 
stismbting colleagues from a number of „ 
disciplines. There are excellent 


Marwickior those who wish to pursue a 
career in consultancy. Of particular 
interest to ns at the moment are people 
with experience of the manufacturing, 
retag, (tetrftmtkm and ofl industries, or 
of treasury management. 

If you ereimerested injoining our 
London offketmdworkingwuh. us in 
the UK or overseas, pieasewite m 
confidence, enclosing a brief summary 
of your qualifications and experience, 
and quoting inference Af MAJ 86, to Mike 
CuneyarPaa^Marwidc, Mitchell & Co~, 

I Puddle Clock; Bktdkfdan, London 
EC4V3PD. 


PEAT 

MARWICK 



OPPORTUNITIES IN GOVERNMENT 
SERVICE {CENTRAL LONDON) 

... to Join professional teams responsible for the translation into English, mainly 
from West European languages, of a wide variety of texts, including agricultural and 
allied subjects, commercial, economic, scientific and technical materiaL 

You must have Engli^i as your mother-tongue or language of education and good 
qualifications in both French and German. One of these must be to at least second-class 
honours degree standard or its equivalent, and the other to a standard approaching 
this. You will be required to show a high standard of proficiency in translation from, 
these languages into English.. Knowledge of, and a qualification in, one of more addi- 
tional foreign languages, especially Dutch, would be an advantage as would a relevant 
post-gradu ate di ploma Or cither qualification, professional translation experience, and 
some familiarity with the organisation and concepts of the European Community. 

, You •** eligible to apply if you are now in a relevant pcst-graduate course of study 
but you arenot eligible if you are a final-year student in an undergraduate course. 

SALARY : (under review) £7665 -E1CU80. Starting salary may be above the 
minimum. Promotion prospects. ; 

. ^ or , f ^ rtiier d ^ afls ** application form (to be returned by 23 April 1986) write 

to CrolServjce Ataneon ^ Basingstoke, Hants RG21 1JB, or telephone 

nSir^StL MLf CTm. 51 ^ answering senrice operates outside office hours). . 

The Qvil Service is an equal opportunity ‘employer 


















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... ? XT". 


. „ . ll 
... 1 


THE TIMES THURSDAY MARCH 20 1986 



We have recenfly farmed ai 


Salary up to £25,0Q0+Car 


.an 


BtPfffenced team of tax partners 
and consultants, which pmuM^ 


oral accountancy or legal 
quaification. Successful candidates 


the fields d WKT. Customs & Boose 
Dirties, and ntemational and IB 
Expatriate taxation. This exciting 
develo pment within a large 
international accountancy practice 
has created further challenging 
career opportunities for senior 
VAT specialists. 

You should have either HM 
Customs & Excise trailing and . 
experience, at HEO orSEO grade. 


VAT experienc e , wide practical 


and must have tteabiBty to commu- 
nicate with senior management 

Ybu win be responsible for 
cons u lt a ncy assignments for clients 
ranging f rom large international 
comp a res to small businesses. - 
Vbu vrill be ejected to liaise 
.extensively, with other parts of the 
PW practice and to demonstrate 
nitiafive and a keen sense of 
business awareness. 


Candidates, iikeiy to be aged about 
30, will be offered an attractive 
salary, a ca - and other benefits. 
Prospects tor further promotion are 
excdfenL The positions are based 
in London and, where appropriate, 
relocation expenses will be paid. 

Please write, in confidence, with 
detailed CV to: 

John RTownend, 

Price Waterhouse, 

Southwark lowers, 

32 London Bridge Street, 

London SEl 9SY 

CAREERS IN VAT 


Price Waterhouse 


m 


Director of Mapping 
& Charting Establishment 

£2L,505-£26,075 

Feltham, Middlesex 

Tile Mapping and f^har ting PmUkhtHwir , a Mi n twiy wfT V&nf f 


dxam and other geographical equipment far Ac armed farces. As one of 
the most important agmeks in die UK, tbcMCEis a majormnovatoc in 


ADi n ^ , mrkTirqnfrp<^Kf<m>A»T talfi.ri^ nMt ^^ if«. i r3naaaTTiim«rrafirm 
of MCE: forthcoming projects inr|i«te theimpkmcniatkm of digital 
c ar tog n pfric and ADP e q u ip m en t and the introduction of new 
management accounting and production control systems. 

As 'wdl as an np-to-daoe working knowledge qf modem cartographic 
practice and methods — particularly for mffitary applications — you most 

pnHuii iiiwQfiiwi Ailh mi! a wgftrflMapptfttcIi rev 
rhk my [ gQij nn ni gw iii l «nl«t 

Salary (under review) within the range quoted. 

For farther details and an applkarianfinn (to be returned by 15 April 
1986} write to Civil Service Cbnanissian, Alenoon Link. Basingstoke, 

» Hants RG21 1JB, or telephone Basingstoke (QS6) 468551 (answering 
service opeons outside office hoots]. 

Please quote re£G/68f9. 

Use Cm! Service is an equal upy ott uui ty employer • 


Ministry of Defence 



This is the top executive post in an institution which 
has long been recognised as a seedbed for pioneering 
work reflecting contemporary social needs. Among the 
current extensive range of activities, there is emphasis 
on training for employment and on education. 

The Warden' retires at the end of the year, and a 
successor is now sought to spearhead the future 
programme. The role requires imaginative leadership, 
all-round management skills and the ability to mix atall 
levels in a multi-racial environment and with national 
and local authorities. 

Salary is for discussion atover£18,000. In addition a 
femUy flatis provided. Please write in confidence with 
career details to Geoffrey Elms at Charity 
Appointments. Further information can be provided on 
request 


Charity. 

Appointments 


Victoria Houser Southampton Row, London WC1B 4DH 


- v 



The Royal Town Planning Institute 

Promoting Planning 
from £ 9,000 

ADMINISTRATIVE 
ASSISTANT 

The promotion of planning is tile Institute’s top 
priority. This post in the Public Affairs Depart- 
ment will play a key role m servicing 
committees dealing with public relations, the 
rapidly expanding private consultancy sector 

and the development of planning aid. An in ter- 

est in promotional activities will be encouraged. 

Experience of government, professional services 
or town mid country planning and die posses- 
sion of a relevant degree or Qualification would 
be an advantage. Competent administrative 
ability with sefcsufficient typing sldfl is 
essential. 

Further details and application forms from The 
Renal Town Planning Institute, 26 Portland 
Place. London WIN 4BE (01-636 9107). Closing 
dale 11 April- Interviews 28 April 


id' 


EUROPEAN SALES 
EXECUTIVE 

£25,000 + Bonus + Travel 

Our Chant a major US- f^Wcetjon needs a 



JgSSSScO pm .YOU need 

Crane Corkill 

Raoubncnt Consultants 

99 R©8««* S* 8 ** W1 


THE CHELSEA 
DESIGN CO 

Seek experienced and 
presentable staff Ur 
melr May Cbdwa rftop. U 
Appreciation or oood 
dollies essential. Salary 
aocwHos to age and 


01-352 4026. 


Advertising Agency requires 

experienced person wun knowt- 

(dge of Traffic Department 

procedures. Conan with pnhu- 

cXtona nd aoenaes m HoUand 

and Bomb Africa, means fluent 

DiMti /Afrikaans twtntM- 
Work! np knowledge of U& 

procedure* also an afea ntao e. 

Salary wgM If b h. Reply to 
BOX Ear. . 


THE CHELSEA DGWHComk 
experienced and pr wwnla tue 
atatr for melr busy Cbeteea 
■nop. ai-sss 46S6. 


Library 

Clerk 


The Library of Consumers' Association, 
publishers of Which? magazine, provides an 
information and documentation service for a 
team of researchers. The main duties of the 
library clerk are the receipt and circulation of 
appitudmateVTOOperiodicai tides: filing; and - 
the distribution of the library's internal mail. In 
addition there win be an opportunity to gain 
experience in other routines such as classifi- 
cation, cataloguing, microfilming and com- 
puterised information retrieval. 

The post wpuld be suitable for anyone 
contemplating a career in librarianship or 
in fo rm a tion stienoe. ft offers one or two years 
experience before taking a degree or post 
graduate qualification and applicants should 
have at least two A level passes. 

Starting salary around £6000. Benefits 
include 28 days’ annual holiday, LVs, 
pension and free life assurance schemes, 
interest-free season ticket loan. 

Please apply In writing to: The Personnel 
Officer, Consumers' Association, 14 
Buckingham Street London, WC2N6DS. 


Regional Secretary 

The Country Landowners’ Association 

• Gloucester • Worcester • Hereford 

TTw CLA is a wag e sta to fa ted organisation which 
represents the owners of rural tend hi England and 
Wales. A has 80 staff based h Ns London HQ and 
In the rvgions, serving some 43JXJ0 members. 

R e porting through the Regional Director, the 
successful candidate wS be responsfela to the 
Dkactar-General for the o treral management of 
the Association within these areas. 

CancSdates, ideally in their mid to late forties, must 
be experienced administrators withan enthusiastic 
and flexfole approach. An appreciation of taming 
and country fife and a wide interest In pubic affairs 
are essential. CancSdates must reride within one 
of the three counties. 

This ts a hil-time salaried appointment Benefits 
include car, pension schemeand 24 days holiday. 

Please mite- in oonMence-to Lesley Gifford ref. 
AJ2Q200. 

This wpoMmnrft otm to wen and woman. 

HAY-MSL Selection and Advertising Limited, 
52 Grosvenor Gardena, London SW1W0AW. 

Oflero *» Bm*. toe Americas, Aamtato wXiAtk Petite. 


MAHJumarTSixzcnoM 


ROYAL OPERA 
CHORUS 

1st & 2nd Tenors 
1st Basses 

Auditions win shortly be betef for toe above 
vacancies. Candidates of previous professional 
experience pre fer red. Please apply in writing 
with foil CV and phone number to: 

Auditions Secretary 
Royal Opera House 
Cerent Garden WO 
CWe tee Car ■ppfcitfaai Much 26*. 


If you are a Chartered Accountant 
or intend to qualify soon andyouare 
really determined to establish your 
career, here are the reasons why 
other equally ambitious and talented 
people have joined PW: 

•Practical experience based on 

an organisation structure designed 
to give you assignments with a wide 
variety of leading businesses in aS 
sectors of the economy. 

•Training in management aid 
business skife as an integral part of 
our comprehensive CPE 
programme. 


•Career development 
outstanding opportunities, 
generated by continuing growth, in 

general practice, tax, insolvency, 
computer audit, the public sector 
and consultancy. 

• International efient work within 
the UK, with unsurpassed 
opportunities to work abroad. 

If you share our determination 
to succeed by meeting the highest 


standards of professional excellence you 
can find out more by reading our 
booklet "Career Development to PW". 

Please contact your nearest PW office 
or mail the sfip below to: 

Mike Jennings, 

Price Waterhouse, 

Southwark Towers, ' 

32 London Bridge Street, 

London, SE19SY. 

Tel: 01-4078989. 


Price Waterhouse 


Offices In: London. Aberdeen, Birmingham, Bristol, Cardiff, Dudley, Et&obunjh, Glasgow, Leeds, Lei cester , 
Liverpool. Manchester, Middlesbrough, Newcastle, Nottingham, Southampton, Windsor and Jersey: 


Please said me a copy of your booklet “ Career Development in PW". 
Man* 1 

Address 


To: Mike Jennings, 

Price Waterhouse, 
SouthwarkTowers, 

32 London Bndge Street, 
London, SEl 9SY. 


I 

AC 16 10 I 



INNOVATIVE 

ELECTRONICS ENGINEERS 
AND SCIENTISTS 

THORN EMI, the largest consumer electrical company in the UK is expanding its Central Research 
Laboratories to meet the demand for tomorrow's products. We are seeking Engineers and Scientists 
to work in our new laboratory complex which houses one of the world's most innovative research 
establishments and is situated in the high technology centre of South-East England 


Solid State 
Physicists 

Device 

Physics 


Solid State Physicists are required for micro engineering and fundamental 
studies into Thin Film Dielectrics. We have several vacancies, all of which 
are dosely associated with our unique sensors research team. The 
appointments, subject to age, qualifications and experience, are for 
positions up to Senior Research/Project Leader level. 

Our rapidly expanding displays activities need staff at all levels with 
electronic systems design abilities and knowledge of surface mounting 
and inter-connection techniques. 


MRGnPtics/ We are a world force in digital, audio, video and data recording systems, 

i laLji ICULO/ We need staff at all levels to work on novel systems and media for 

StOIBQC recording, especially magnetic, but optical is of increasing importance. 


Video& 

Signal 

Processing 

Specialists 


Our work in TV Signal Processing leading towards true High Definition TV 
studies, improved standards and performance on TV display Systems is 
already well advanced To maintain and indeed to increase this 
momentum, we are seeking a number of well qualified electronics 
engineers to make a significant contribution to our research programme. 
We would expect applicants to have at least four years relevant experience. 
The research expertise to be enhanced includes the investigation of 
new/improved display systems and associated signal processing; the 
study of video recording techniques, analogue and digital video 
techniques. The minimum qualification for these vacancies is a BSc in a 
relevant discipline. 


Very attractive salaries and conditions of employment with excellent prospects for career development 
are offered to applicants who can make a significant contribution to the research in these fields. 

For further details and an application form please contact our personnel department on FREEFONE 
“Central Research" extension 6648 quoting reference TT/1 32. 

THORN EMI 

Central Research Laboratories 

FREEPOST, DAWLEY ROAD, HAYES, MIDDX. CIB3 1 BR. TEL 0 1 -848 6648. 



TOP LONDON 
BROKERAGE 


Unhauw wtth 


e ?he 




during training- Graduates 


Mark McLean on: 

01*629 1509 


AMff/Uir R PgJ t U for 
FoUMim pfemrr irantag gal- 
lery. interest M an ind decor 
essentlW.CS.OHf1 SA 5 worldnv 
days tot SM. Tel: 01-736 1956. 

CVI Brofcarianalbi written. 
Choice or style. vm/Aceaw. 
■W ms on 02*06 JJ3 67. 

CITY WME HflW P a want 
trainee 18-22 Tec oi 4 ar 0268 


TELEPHONE SALES 

The Conde Nast Publications Limited, 
Publishers of VOGUE, HOUSE & 
GARDEN, TATLER and BRIDES AND 
SETTING UP HOMES, are looking for a 
young, bright and enthusiastic person to 
join their Classified Sales team. Experience 
preferred. 

If you are interested please write (enclosing 
full Cumculmn Vitae) to; 

Mies Barbara Tims, 

Personnel Director, 

Vogue Home, 

Hanover Square, 

London W1R OAD. 


MINI COMPUTER /i 

; ,V n 'f 


5 Ficpue Basic -T OTE £ 2 8K^Cafr^ 


A major European manufacturer of hardware and 
systems software, with over 2,000 UK users in 
commercial and vertical markets, we have career 
opportunities for currently successful sales execs in 
London.- Home Counties, Birmingham and Manchester. 
'Phone, or write ten- Phil Markham, 

i MANNESMAN N 

SfORMAnONSYSIM (075U333&. 




ffyouareanewfyctoal^^arter^Accounteit, 

Price Waterhouse offers you the opportunity to develop 


JOIN ONE OF OUR 
TEAMS OVERSEAS 


We have openings in Australia, Bahamas, Belgium, 
Bermuda, Brad, Canada, France. Germany, Holland, 
Hong Kong, Italy, Jamaica, Kenya, Luxembourg, 
Malawi, Middle East, New Zealand, Papua New Gutoea, 
Portugal, South Africa, United States of America, 
Venezuela and Zambia. 


The challenges and rewards are great 
Please contact 

John Thompson, 

Price Waterhouse, * 

Southwark Towers, 

32 London Bridge Street, 

London, 

SEl 9SV: 

Tel: 01-407 8989. 


Price miterhou.se 



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THE TIMES THURSDAY MARCH 20 i?S6 




HEALS 


COMPANY DISPLAY 


MANAGER 


salary c. £15,000 + Car 


HeaJ’s, part of the Habitat/Mothercare Group, is expanding 
nationally following the successful reorganisation of our Stores and 
the transformation of the product range. 

We now have an exciting position for a Company Display Manager, 
possessing the creative talent to further extend and develop our 
new image. He or she will be responsible for all aspects of the 
Company's display, store layout and window promotions. All 
locations must meet our exacting visual standards. 

Solid Managerial skills will be needed to help plan and implement 
promotional activities, to control and develop staff and plan 
and manage budgets. 

4 weeks holiday. Generous Group discounts. Applicants should, 
preferably have previous furniture experience and be aged 
between 27 and 35. 


Please send your C.V. or write for an application form to 
Anne Cook 


...... _ 5k, Personnel & Training Manager. 

196. Tottenham Court Road, London W1 P 9LD. 


SPXBW&sa 




Chief Executive 


Torridge District Council 
c.£21 ,500 


The Council wish to appoint a Chief Executive to lead the 
Council’s professional service, with 290 staff and a gross 
annual expenditure of over £9m. 

The successful applicant, who may be from local 
government elsewhere in the public sector, or the 
private sector, must show evidence of substantial 
management achievement in an exposed environment 
The Chief Executive will co-ordinate and ensure the 
effective conduct of all the Council's business and 
advise the Council on priorities and the best use of 
resources. 

In addition to salary, car and telephone allowances are 
payable. A relocation allowance is also payable. 

For further information please contact John Smith ref. 
A.57003. HAY-MSL Selection and Advertising 
Limited, 52 Grosvenor Gardens, London SW1W OAU. 



*« 


3= 


2 




* 


1 




PUBLIC APPOINTMENTS 


DIRECTOR 


Up lo F27.623 p.a. inc LWA (Salary under review) 

Cenlnil Council for 
I xluculion ft 'tanning in Scxinl Work 


The Council is seeking a successor lo Priscilla Young who is retiring. 
The successful applicant will be London based and will be able to oiler: 

Leadership in the development of social work education 
nwd tr aining 


Ability to manage and lead a complex U.BL organisation 
involved in motor change 


Lively knowledge and interest in social work practice 
and theory. 


Applications are invited from men and women who have experience of 
social work, social work education and senior management responsi- 
bility, and who have relevant academic and professional qualifications. 
The Council is an equal opportunities employer. Application forms and 
further information from Personnel Section, CCETSW, Dor by shirr* 
House, St. Chad's Street, London WC1H 8AD. Tel: 01 278 2455 Ext. 
236. Closing dale lor completed applications: Friday, 18lh April, 1986. 

QUEID 


ENGINEERING 

MANAGER 


Barclays Bank PLC require a Chartered 
Engineer to take up the post of Engineering 
Manager in its Property Services Depart- 
ment-South Regional Office, based in 
Twyford. 

The successful applicant will be a 
corporate-member of one of the major 
engineering institutions. Ideally, they will 
have served an engineering apprenticeship 
followed by design experience, operation 
and maintenance of building engineering 
services coupled with Managerial expertise. 

The duties will include conceptual 
design of the engineering content of major 
protects and detail design of smaller ones, 
the vetting of engineering designs and 
drawings prepared by others, briefing of 
consultants, engineering project manage- 
ment and control of subordinate staff 
engaged in the operation and maintenance 
of engineering services in a group of build- 
ings for which the job holder will hold 
overall responsibility. 

Salary will commence at £16,052 per 
annum and is subject to annual review. 
Additionally, an annual bonus is payable 


and there is a wide range of benefits 
including non-contributory pension 
scheme, profit sharing and a special 
housing loan facilities scheme, after a 
qualifying period. 

Application, giving details of qualifi- 
cations and experience, should be made to: 


Mr P \Y Cooper 
Head of Personnel and 
Administration 
Property Services Department 
Barclays Bank PLC 
Britannia House 
16/17 Old Bailev 
LONDON EC4M 7DN 



^ 'v*.-'-;'* " " I - ; 

v: STi V . ?jW'- »;-S^.r-gfaifca-fcaaad 


We arc one of the woricTs leading 
Companies in the defence field, having 
developed highly specialised radar equipment 
for weapon systems. This equipment is in - 
service with many countries around the world. 

A vacancy hss arisen for a Chref Software 
Engineer to lead a design team of 
approximately ten Staff. Reporting to the 
Technical Manager you will be responsible for 
the preparation of operational software for 
military radar «.ysten& with associated lest 
software, computer models end emulators. _ 

Equipment available indudes both HP 
and VAX. Applicants should ideally be 
familiar with such machines and languages *C\ 
FORTRAN, and ASSEMBLER. BASIC. 
CORAL. MASCOT and ADA. would also be 
advantageous. 

ideaiJy applicants for this senior position 
wifi be «u the aee range 30-45 yeas old, 
educated to Degree level and be able to 
demonwmte proven management ability. 



Jf' ****** 
T-i 


If you would Eke to make the career move 
to a dynamic Company looking very much to 
is future, we will offer a good benefits package 
mchnftng relocation expenses, where 
appropriate- ... 

Please write with ftiH career details ta- 
-Mr PN Willis. Personnel Manager. 

Racul Defence Radar & Displays Ud. 

Davis Road. Cbessmgton. Surrey* or telephone 
01-397 5281 ext. 242ft. 


Racals people are Raeals success 


• l 


qH 




■■ 

V* ' •. -".vS • - • • ' 





C0VENT 

GARDEN 

Very responsible, 
hard-werkmg and 
self motivated person 
(25-30). To manage 
chain of 12 market 
stalls in Central Lon- 
don (based Covent 
Garden). Gean driv- 
ing Ecsrtse and 
phone essential 
Good package, 
immediate stert 
402 5CC0. 


MARKETING/ 

ADVERTISING 

SALES 


Are you earning over £20K and seeking a 

new job? 

The Connaught Services have helped 
more executives to find new appoint- 
ments than any other organisation — 
mainly in the unadvertised vacancyarea. 

Contact us for a free confidential 
meeting. If you are currently abroad, 
enquire about our EXPAT EXECUTIVE 
SERVICE. 


32 Sa vile Row[ 
London, W1 


3£§ "T**" 

I2t hours! 


r The Executive Job Search Professionals 


ALEC BROOK 


A highly successful company 
involved in the field of 
Marketing/Promotional products. 
Due to rapid expansion, several 
new positions are available from 
JUNIOR through to 

SECRETARY SH/TYPIST. 

If you are a person with intelli- 
gence and initiative and prefer 
interesting and responsible work, 
telephone without delay. 


ALEC BROOK, 

ADB (LONDON ) LTD., 
49-53 HARROW ROAD, 
LONDON. W2 1JH 


TELsOl 402 5671 


An 1 you wed educated and 
articulate? Do you watu to 
Jrarn Ete essentials M mar- 
U^Unq? U sou can team io 
sell video aoverCT-nq end 
tar pO marketing s**r\u« 
al Director level. conUuX 

Da rid James si 
INTEB VISUAL 
ADVERTISING LTD 

on G 1-6 29 6696 


Basic salary agreement 
a nd commission 


YOUNG 

GRADUATE 


Required for spadahst fcn jj 
of Hoyts Broken. 




An oppcnteHty Has arisen igr ■ 
graxata (or ■ very 

ato ooukj so j 

d jaei a W> I 
va m tsam b a pragnmme « 
arm of Uo/Os E rztun TTw \ 
MC MSt l ul wtta rt «a te jj 


r O« W «t a |C& oocra sor- 5 
ccrouty m wtetvo are 
■nportaX kobKoi Ryouare 
prepared to M n=xd trxi 
tend* br a caiw wO esuek 
Mrs orovwct* plcaso area 
with CV 10 Stewi Rhthkw n . 
BOX C63. The Ttmoa. PO Sxw 1 
4M. WgWa Si. London £1. 



SOUTHEND TRANSPORT LIHITBO 

Managing director 

c£25,000+car 


For a new public transport company shortly to take over operation of foe 
existing bus undertaking from the Borough Council The company t$ expected 
to have a turnover of around ESm in its first full firiandatyrar. Apartiaiter 

feabjreofthe businessisthemnovatlvee^jressservicetoLpridbnand 

Heathrow Airport started some years ago and mMCMkht represert a 
substantia? etement of the business. The company wSI infttatty provkfo 
engineering semces for the Ck)unaTs g«nei^ v^vde Be^. ■ * 


Reporting to the Board you imB manage the company on a dfty to day basis 
while having responsibility to the development and kupteawntalksn of allure 


travelling pubtia 

You should ideally have a transport backgiouodand wifi already have been 
profit responsible in a general management capacity possibly in a dMsjori of 
a large organisation ora smaller Independent company. ’ ' 

Candidates must toe skilled in leading foams and jnoIMfng peopte. with a 
consultative mariageraent style. A backgroundwhich focfudesrnwHebng . ; 
experience would be ^ a distinct advantage. 

Applications are also being invited (br.the post of Financial Director/Company 
Secretary. 


Resumes including a daytime telephone number toTorrance Smith, Executive 
Selection Division, Ref. ST 486.. ‘ 


Coopers 

&Lybrand 

associates 


Goopers S Lyprand Associates Lid 
management consultants 


10 Bouvene* Street 
■London EC4Y8AX 


ir. 




ALCCUCUSSl fJQ 83VG 

AMCTBil 

COL’^ELLC^S 

rwutrwl M tracing BT b«3 

Treaonanl Opi'j, »»! in 

bwultlul urrauMiiigi 
Training b ^vrn la nuiurr. 
w«tl mucatcO and rtnashrf 

U poraons A C ufimnirj vti to 

a '12 iW Drxjararmn^ ~wim 

Or an advama^r 
AccofnodatKai can O. pnmQ. 
ed APH> Ui tenting kn 

Wrwtaar 


to * Hmmrt*. 
Wasfelra SP3 CSC 


. mi 
Mra-Mi 
■ iiurt 


SALES 


Naunn.il (iallerv Puhluminno i> ih«r mnimciinl <iprnti'>n 
rc-.pnn>iblc f> irihe l :.i]k'r> / s«\panitincpuUinliMm pr* -jnmoiv 
i>< nnv-art 1x^4%^ .uid rv-pr- ■ilucu- -n'. 

A aak> cVtiU'i'c i» urawniJ.i required lu pnstuse aak-n 
ihrnuuh L'k trade and dim-i markcio. 


If »«] hnvu a pnuun sale, rvcnrd aiu] cm drtiinfi-imU- :i 
itcniunc inienj-t in nur nril«nK'r> and pr><ductx then >*ki 
sjii mid wTiie ti.iht- kuhl>:atii ms Mina *;r eixt "Mny lull c i and 
af.wncprcr*™ saton. 

A renium-ntinn pin'k-rjc ominivnMirnii: with thi-. impun.im 
TlcvifMutHin utli In. 1 irf'kTrtJ. 

The 1‘uhln.iitiiin.-. Manager. NaTinTCiMi.ilL-rv E'uhlii.iiiinnn.Thu 
Nai» >nal < iallerv. Trai.il jir Sguarv. Laid. «i tt L 1 !N .il »N. 


THE ROYAL ASSOCIATION 
FOR DISABILITY AND 
REHABILITATION 
(RADAR) 


is looking for a FUND RAISER to derise and 
develop marketing and promotional fund 
opportunities. The person will have had 


years experience in marketing and/or public re- 
* — * 3-5 (£7,551-£10,014) 


lations. Salary NJC scale 
Job description and application form available 


from The Offjpe Manager. RADAR. 25 Morti- 
mer Street London WiM 


8AB. 


RADAR is an equal opportunities employer. 


OVERSEAS DEVELOPER AND 
MARKETING GROUP 

Now interviewing off site brokers and property 
agents to represent and sell Mednananean 
lime shares. Meet us at the lime share exhibi- 
tion Cumberland Hotel. London, March 2 1st 
at 5.30-S.00pm in the “Time Share Marketing’ 
hospitality suite or write to: Overseas 
Timeshare, 5 Hanover Street London W 1, at- 
tention Marketing Director. 



Are you a young ambitious reporter with at least 
three year's journalistic experience? If so, Radio 
Shropshire has a vacancy that may interest you. 
The work is primarily reporting, interviewing, 
bulletin writing and newsreading. Good 
microphone voice and current driving licence 
essen.tial. 

Salary £8.528— £10.581 plus allowance of 
£569 p.a. Based Shrewsbury. 

Contact us immediately for application form 
(quote ref. 9410/T and enclose s.ae.) 

BSC Appointments, London W1 A 1AA. 

Tel: 01-927 5799. 






Technical Publishing 



Managing Director iaesiqna:ei retwi'ea few smaH 
(Mi'rorgi succa«4u: comtMiry DuOianmg i.ji tno 
correfnictMrtm.jijSir, Ool»jiirclu«wai'Miii«iiiial 
reiinoo»C ?1inc3raftwmvo:ouii'3mg«i"i:a£Jani3 
ajstoawijorj'iKHs swicun 

Puoiiraiions irwuaing rnjr.v :i. are 
UM Oy iruM-oraer and via our coo* »>: p 


A ppH ca rw o*»*Ooaggtf JS-90 lansni'ifl 
OOirwiKieraiiuocmpoi njnaceneoTe>p<irvnr^oni] 
-3 &iblsrj vjo^.-.crouid nn.-<Awageo! 
me Bui King mduarry wouKDu an aa<.lnl^;e 


The apmlntae w*n *tx* cmseiv •rtn ihe prevni MD 
Kr,viigroocr.ano<rvHippfHJCl Sdia»»rw.qnli«®re 
ic 1 20 000 1 carpfovMKO.convcuUXfPuruion 
schama 


Wnio ui the- r B w in*a nee lor application Iq rm and 
pnocscnoiior.io 

Lesser ConrwnvSecKHarv 
HIBAPu3licatiaR3Ud Finsc inv Mn'.on. 

worst ana Street LjnoonECtvuvB 
ApCK-iwru «• m aa ucawa m i^e sj r ctes: ^nlnle nee 


ADMIN MANAGER 
To £20,000 


Rapidly expanding EC4 Company requires an 
experienced Manager who is conscientious, 
flexible and capable of handling a great deal of 
responsibility. \ou will preferably be familiar 
with computerised systems and aged 30 - 40. 


Cafl JoSe 01-283 6091 
Selective Appointments 


BUILD A REPUTATION 
£15,000+ 


A woo established firm of Crty w&ciiors needs a dynamic 
Ptacnce Development Qtiicer to handle all asoeers of 
th&r P P This e a new posihon and you will Oe respona- 
We for staiimq a monihfv in-hoasc magazine proOucmg 
co'cotaie wochuiec and com^ung a ffst c*J an partners 
clients, and entering it on a W P You will ales be TSQuifd 
to fate mmuies for. ami cwrnbufe to. ccmrmiee meg;- 
mgs. as weU as organise an seminars and social events 
(or fhe (urn v ci4i must have "A" level education, and 
preteraDl? a degree Age 25-30. A F R. b.ickground m a 
ptoiesstonal organsaunn is essential Please call- 



OPPORTUNITIES 
IN FOOD PROCESS 
ENGINEERING/TECHNOLOGY 


As part of out general expansion we have created a 
number of opportunities at various levels of responsibil- 
ity for new people to join us and provide the technical 


support to improve manufacturing processes currently used in the food industry and take rhe 
Industry mro the 1 990’s. We therefore have an immediate requirement for well qualified or 
highly skilled professionals who have formal training as: 


Physldsls. 
Mathematicians. 
Computer specialists. 
Chemical Engineers. 
Control Engineers 
Food Technologists 


Current activities Include the development of sensors, expert systems, mathematical model- 
ling. modern control systems, technology transfer arid novel processing techniques. 


Applicants for these challenging posts will need to, show they have the expertise initiative 
and innovative skiiis to influence successfully the work of this international food research 
laboratory, in return we can offer first class working conditions and' resources (a new 
processing wing is currently being built and is due for completion in November 1 986) and an 
outstanding future for the right candidates. Starting salaries will be related to abtiibv and 
experience, up to£i2k tor Scientist grade. £i5k tor Senior Scientists and £2CJk for Principal 
Scien tis t s . 


Written applications with CVs and current salaries please to: 

Alaslair Henry. Personnel Manager. Leatherhead Food Research Association 
Randalls Road. Leatherhead. Surrey KT22 7HY. ' 






CITY 

RESEARCHER 
EADHUNTING 




5SS 3535 

Crone Ccrkiil 


Recruitment ConsAants 

18 EidonStreet EC2 


NORTH YORKSHIRE COUNTY COUNCIL 

APPOINTMENT Of PART-TIME 
CORONER - YORK DISTRICT 


Anihaipixis an forito tan uifrtty uaWW — xnt tat the pod ol jtrt-fime 
•;ro s V 


wi. c.£12,000-£1 5,000 


avti is it* Cranrs I>;na « Vo in d North Ytrishre. A 

tavm nus v 4 Bangs a Sons, a is^Sy qusftd Mcflra PnxJtotti, ol 
al ns M saituig 

Sa»n TH vjniME n v*in> *i> te in jraituv* udih the iSC to Coravr: 
aio sm in fie mv *£.»« np mac s' jw jC? anrini tae iwo i» m? 
[WO m MS r M-c a Pi u a fcji^nss ana a Ijup:» 

'j a' «m tint A me am r* «* « taum aoeEnr. iq ms aar> 

Res c s-io-uimaai 

aprtealrn^ a i(C rimuiuir tfiiJP ami ** name; rf rt-JEf y nj g >n 

«Ani> usance fc *um) * av fir- *s*di. tssf. i, irm 

unodigftdl. am to Man any was* i. sxjJ 3 oe mot 

U bn 

CW CiKBTb* tel d Btek 
■f Bte r » rarS 

ChH, W3 
iiteta i 


As market leaders in International Search and Selection we have 
the’'c% e and n its° in^tS SnCed researchner - w ^ C kn«g h e a o1 

assignments, and developing our expandingc&te tose 
The successful candidate will, have a minimi im nf A ‘ 
relevant research e^erience and ideal!? wTh 
similar environment at present. If vou am hricSX ’J orK,n 9 in a 
capable of working to tight deadlines as ® nd 

team in a progressive company, then pick K pho P nSS 





Andrew Hiils on 01-408 1670 

... ■ ... a t — 

Ucyd Chapman Associates 
160 New Bond Street 
London WlY Ciffl. 





















THE TIMES THURSDAY MARCH 20 1986 


GENERAL APPOINTMENTS 


CITY 

RESEARCHER 

HEADHUNTING 

LONDON, Wl. c.eT2,000-£1 5,000 

As market leaders in International Search and Selection, we have 

!L re 9Jd! remer| t for an experienced researcher with knowledge of 
the City and its institutions. - 

We need a person capable of identifying and locating relevant 
target candidates, ensuring the successful completion of specific 
assignments, and developing our expanding data base. 

The successful candidate will have a minimum of one year’s 
relevant research experience and ideally will be working in a 
s,mi ™ environment at present. If you are bright, dynamic and 
capable of working to tight deadlines as part of a professional 
team in a progressive company, then pick up the phone and call: 

Andrew Hills on 01-408 1670 

at: 

Lloyd Chapman Associates, 

160 New Bond Street, 

London W1Y 0HR. 


£5 

kK 


'ttttm rr’ TrrjT 



A 

1 

a 

m 

ta 

net 

r 

Packaging/Technica 

i 


BAR STAFF 

Foil rime bar staff re- 
quired for West End 
wine bar. Age preferred 
20-35 years. Most be of 
smart appearance. Mon- 
Fri lunchtimes and 
evenings “til 10pm. 
Approx 40 horns pw. 
£2.75ph. Phone Lindsay 
on 01-629 1643. 


\ ' i '-jp 1 v * 1 T i - -i i 








PUBLIC 




THE SECRETARY 
OE THE 

ROYAL SCOTTISH CORPORATION 
(Established 1611) 

wiB retire in the summer 15*86. 

THE CORPORATION. 

THE ANCIENT LONDON SCOTTISH CHARITY 
WISH TO APPONT NOW A 

SECRETARY 

THE WORK 

of the Corporation is concerned with Scots in 
need or distress particularly elderly Scots in 
London and the Home Counties. 

DUTIES 

The Secretary will act as GriefExecutrve to the 
Committee of Management The successful - 
applicant win have proven administrative 
ability, will take a keen and symp a th etic inter- 
est in developing the Corporation’s work and 
will act as the Corporation’s representative in 
Its contacts with other bodies. 

REMUNERATION 

The salary will be in the order of £15,000 
subject to negotiation. There isa non-contribu- 
tory pension scheme and assistance with, 
housing accommodation may be made avail- 
able n necessary. 

The Corporation’s Bye-Laws require that the 
Secretary be a Scot 

Application forms are obtainable from; 

The Secretary. Royal Scottish Corporation (TSL 37 
King Street, Const Garden, London WG2E MS. 


GENERAL 

APPOINTMENTS 

EVERY THURSDAY 


CHIEF EXECUTIVES ■ MANAGING DIRECTORS 

■ DIRECTORS ■ SALES & MARKETING EXECUTIVES 

■ OVERSEAS APPOINTMENTS 
R FINANCIAL & ACCOUNTANCY 

A wide range of management appointments appears 
every Thursday. 

THURSDAY 
MAKE SURE YOU GET 
YOUR COPY OF 

THE«S$MMES 


r % : » j i i it 


Burton-on-Tront 

Bass Public Limited Company. Europe's largest 
brewer, seeks to appoint an experienced, 
innovative Manager to join the Packaging and 
Technical Development team. 

The duties of this interesting and responsible' 
job will include the initiation and management 
of a wide and varied range of projects, with 
close involvement from origination to 
completion. A constant awareness and 
understanding of the technological 
developments in the carbonated beverage and 
associated fields is essential. 

Ideally, applicants will be 23-35 years of age, 
with an honours degree in engineering or - 
another relevant discipline. The personal 
attributes that will be required are creativity, . 
seif motivation, enthusiasm and a willingness 
to adopt a ‘shirt sleeves' approach whenever 
necessary. 

The excellent remuneration package includes a 
highly competitive salary and first class - 
benefits. Including contributory pension and 
free life assurance, share ownership and 
products allowances, and BUPA. 

This appointment offers a long term career 
opport unity within a progressive, expanding- 
and' stable environment where Individual effort 
and contribution is recognized. 

If interested, please write, enclosing a detailed 

career history, to:- 

The Senior Personnel Officer, 

Bass Public Limited Company, 

137 High Street, Burton-on-Trent, 

Staffs. DE141JZ. 





Public Um itedGompa ny 


PERSONAL COLUMNS 


DOMESTIC & CATERING 
SITUATIONS 


CHMmrant MBOMMC r3S-4R 
for Highly w w mntwW situa- 
tion iwtnti. RcwansibuiMs 
fnctuor muirrMumrc of Root 
Royc* and MMr can and some 
farm /gardening MnMMMnL At- 
tractive. Wtnie. sen- 
contained flat. Mn Bam. 
IUMWI Agency J OO Baker 
Stmt London W1 Tel 01-935 
6681 


CHAUrrantMECHAMC 05-451 
For highly recomm e nded rttua- 
noo (wutai. Responsibilities 
include maintenance of Rolls 
Royce and outer cars and soma 
(Arm /gardening eg moment. At- 
tractive. separate- setf- 
conBUnrd flat Mr* Bales. 
Masseys Agency ipo Batcer 
Street London Wl Tei 01-936 
«681 


WAITRESS (silver service) re- 
aidrcd (or partners dining room 
and atao to am wttn general 
kitchen dimes. Mon lo Fri It 
an to 3 pm. Would sUi some- 
one to ndd-SOs. Salary £6.000 
phn perks. Please lino Mrs. Su- 
rname Spring an 01-836 8400 
to arrange an Interview. 


FINANCIAL & ACCOUNTANCY 



Accountants 
for Banking 

£15,000- £35,000 

Several of our clients, all top 
mternationaJ Banks, are looking for 
qualified accountants with varying 
levels of experience. The types of 
positions available all offer good 
opportunities to develop your career 
within the City. ; 

To discuss these vacancies, call 
Tom Kerrigan on 01 -588 4308 or 
write with full curriculum vitae to 
TOm Kerrigan Associates Limited, 

20 Wormwood Street, Bishopsgate, 
London EC2M IRQ- 



TOIVlkERRIGAN 

— — * 


■ASSOCIATES LTD 
TTZSTTriT* TffiprrTSTFf 


SALES & MARKETING 


BWEPEim W Cp WMATMO AWP 
management company 

25 . 45 - Strong personality? 
good general knowledge? 
aiming high - suong will? 
start your new career - join us to become 
delegate consultant 
of our sales department, dealing with 
the small and meidum 
Comprehensive training - high salary 

fast promotion. ■ ■ 

Call todav Thurs 20th Mar between ?am -5pm 
BrianGmnon on 01-541 5171 for immediate 
interview. 


Applications are 
invited from men and 
women for the fuB- 
tirne post of- Bursar, 
to taka office on or 
before 1 October 
1986. 

The Bursar Is 
responsible for the 
management of the 
College’s jxoperty 
and income in accor- 
dance with the 
directions of the 
Cottage Councft. The 
person appointed wffl 
have experience of 
financial planning 
and administration 
and be expected to 
take an active inter- 
est in fundraising. 

The CoBege Statutes 
provide that if a 
woman Is appointed 
she shall be elected a 
FeUow off the College. 

Rather particulars 
may be obtained 
from: 

The Principal, 

Newnham Cottage, 


to whom applications 

with a C.v. and the 
names of three 
referees should be 


sent by 
19 April 




ACCOUNTANT 

£12,000 

01 impawn to wed- 

mes «nd some want turns 

Qmtaps <CC ft/KM* fa wl 1) h 

numbon and anMoalta mRw 



OUDOim. 88/86 CCT2HOL 
Train as CtwMrcd tanoMM 
Wim London atOcrei progres- 
stveNattonM Dm. FimtnMng 
ml cmDu arrtr par. Good 
academic record ««Ual.Mog 
Karen Faseot Bt Harrison A WB> 
H* on 01 009 4463 <W) 


192 KENSINGTON PARK ROAD W11 
Assistant Chef 

After AJastair little and Adam Robinson comes Angela 
Dwyer soon to become head chel at 192, the success- 
ful and weU known wine bar/restaurant So 192 are 
looking for an assistant chef to join the hard working 
and imaginative team which have created and main- 
tained ISPs unique style. 

Applicants should have at least 2 years experience. 
Please ring 01-221 6472 between 4 and 6 pm. 

Commis de Cuisine 

192 requires a Commis de Cuisine with at least 1 
years experience. Applicants to ring 01-221 8472 
between 4 and 6 pm. 


FAMILY Tonoridg, VKUgt N20 
organdy rcouln person H Bn 
in toasslsl with 3 Children, iwtn 
girts agtd 10 and bay aged 8. 
No Household chores (rendrnt 
cook, butler. denning start etc). 
Would De ukdy lo MU former 
school teacher who can assist 
with homework etc and win be 
expected io axwipaw family 
on holiday abroad wm A 
ttmes Per annum. Excellent sal- 
ary. free meroBership lo BUPA. 
Own room. Pnm teleotione 
Chairmans Memory on Ol 486 
7100 <dav) 

ARE YOU charming, efficient and 
hardworking? Then Mg busy 
wine bar/ restaurant need s you- 
Ring Beiimta or $udr an Ol- 
623 2565 before 11.00 am or 
alter 3.00 pm. 

OVERSEAS AO FAHZ ABENCV 

87 Regent sneetXondon Wl. 
TaH 439 6634 .uk -Oversea!. 
Also mJsetw/donw temp/perm 

Looxma RNT a waitress and a 
chef. For details contact Mr 
WosMhara Ot-722 3864 


FINANCIAL NOTICES 


JOHN LEWES PARTNERSHIP 
PK 

NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that 
the Transfer Books of mis 
Company's 5»e and Cumu- 
lative Preference stocks WILL BE 
CLOSED on 17 April 1 986 Tor the 
preparation of the warrants for 
the current hall year's dividends. 

B E DtOCtNSON 
Secretary. 

4 Old Cavendish Street. 

London W1A l EX- 


WINTER SPORTS 


SKI WHIZZ 

» • • 

CATERED CHALET PMTKS 
... FUN ON THE SLOPES 
Pokes. Babe-wes. aw mmas. 
22th MARCH £229 
29th MARCH £279 
Mi APRIL £209 
I net ttgaa. bod. 8 wire 
THE TOP RESORTS 

01-370 0999 

ATOL 1820 


EASTER 5MMMC. S tk 12 April, 
val dTsere. Ttgoes 6 Us Ares. 
Ud Avau. catered chalet /Cfub 
Holidays, some * -c. Call Skr 
val on 01-903 4444 or Ot soo 
60B£k?4hrsl ART A S6431. 
ATOL 1162. 


SELF-CATERING 

PORTUGAL 


VALE DO UWO, The Algarve. 
Luxury 3 bed momea. 2 
baihroomed villa lo rent. Close 
to an amenities April - Septem- 
ber. E 1.000 per manui. 0572- 
66406 

ALCARVE ALTERNATIVE. Villa 
Holidays of distinction tor Die 
very few Tel: 01-491 0802. 73 
S James's Siren, swi. 

VILLAS lo rent In Vale Do Ldbo 
and Quinta Do Logo. Algarve 
Portugal also Menorca. Pn 
0572 66466. 


SELF-CATERING SPAIN 


MAZARROH Unspotfl resort In S. 
Spain vuias Ants Sal FlI Cal 
Murcia (Nr La Manual Beach 
Bay Hots 0432 270185 ATOL 
ACT 1517. 



13 March 1986. 



SUPER SECRETARIES 



CORVEVAMCRM SECRETARY 
JE8J50O confidant young legal 
audio secretary wtto good con- 
veyandno experieoce to work 
In this busy young legal prac- 
tice. Excellent opportunity ta 
grow with ads newly created 
bosHliw uFfertng cxtefleM prat. 
Dec*® (salary rwkw pending). 
Can Joe Thomason. ASB Re- 
eruUmeot Ol-acB-1444 . 





coma LEAVER no Hunt- 
hand- Oppoftanlty to wm CM 
Chief Executive*- office ot mis 
preshgtous City sfoch broken. 
Excellent telephone manner ea- 
■enniiL as to good typing and top 
presentation- Sobers prospects. 
C6JSO0 neg + bonus and free 
lunch- Siena Fbher reeruKinenl 
01-836 6644. 

lir lM * EAST CONSULTANTS 

reotUresaPA/Serler small Wl 
ofllrr. must be well educated 
and weg woken. Mainly audio, 
telex and some wp. Coon tele- 
phone manner. booMMgng an 
advantage. £9DOO neg. TW. 01- 
439 5567. 

PART TIME FA Shorthand secre- 
tary tor Director involved m 
lund-ratstng/etMrtiAbie events 
for lending SWi organttanon. 
Age Me - ;.O r„ 3 nay werfc 

Saury £6000 pa. Please 
contact Rouge Presken oi-49t 
1868 L6 Creme Rec Cons. 
TELEVISION CO In Wl. 
Dfredom' secretary. Busy. In- 

l erea m tg work In young 

friendly ra Skill, 80 60 + con- 
ftdent w k ahooe maimer when 
EpeaUng lo actors agents etc. 
Age SO+. £8-000. Joan Tree 
Recmumew ot sw sbis. 
CHARITY REQUIRES adaptable 
cheerful secretary Betoravia lo- 
cation. Sun coupe leaver or 
mature person. Salary £6.400 
plus lvb. Telephone 01-235 
0991- 

PART-TIME Secretary,’ PA re- 
gutred for tespawfflle mb 
tnvoMng cams- imagination, 
and uautlir for Interior de- 
signer. 01 736 9016. 
S ECRETA RIES rOR A ROB- 
TECTS AMD DCStOORS. 
Ptnrunenl A temporary pea- 
lions. AMSA SbceaiR Dec. 
Cons. Ot 734 0832 
DANISH /ENGLISH cpk PA. Typ- 
ing Wl l. £8000. Language 
Staff Agy. 01 456 8922 
mCNCH/ENBUM epk w 
trMMaMr.edttor. £10.000- 
LaaguaBe Staff Agy 455 8922 


PUBLIC NOTICES 


THE COMP AMES A CT 198 5 
UPDATE CROUP LIMITED 
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN dial 
the creditor, of (he ■now-named 
COMPANY are required on or be- 
fore 25th day o t March 1986 lo 
send their name, and addresses 
and the parucniara of their debts 
or claims, and the names and ad- 
dresses of their Solicitors u any. 
IO COLW ORA HAM BIRD FCA Of 
SOUTHWARK TOWERS. 32 
LONDON BRIDGE STREET. 
LONDON. SE1 9SY the Liquida- 
tor Of the said Company- and. H 
no required by notice m writing 
from the raid UottMator. are by 
melr Sobciiors. or personally, to 
come In and prove their raid debts 
or at such tune and Mace 

as shall be specified In such no- 
nce. or In default thereof they win 
be excluded from the benefit of 
any cusuibotum made before 
ouen debts are proved. 

Dated this 10th day of March 
1986. 

CG Bird FCA Liquidator. 
TM notice l» purely formal. All 
known creditors have been or 
win be mm m loll FoOowtng IB 
sale the company’s business Is 
now being carried on by a leUow 
subsidiary as UpdatoStaberi 
PubUcaUons. 



TT*. 

V*? -r - 


DI A R\ OF TH E TI A I ES 




CORNWALL & DEVON 


BOVrY-TRACEY nr Dartmoor. 
Period ootiaor Ups 4 all amert 
bn. 28-31 Mar md £360. 28 
Mar-3 Anr HA £400. Rina Ol- 
T36 3296 after 6 pjn. 


LEGAL NOTICES 


IN THE MATTER Of BASIL 
GRAHAM iLONOONl LfMfTEO 
AND 

IN THE MATTER of THE 
COMPANIES ACT 1985 
Notice Is hereby given that me 
creditor® of the above-named 
Company, which Is betnq volun- 
tarily wound up. are required on 
or before the 16U, day of April. 
19B6. lo send their lull Christian 
and surnames, their addreuef. 
and descriptions. foD particulars 
Of their debts or dam*, and Uw 
names and addresses of their So- 
ueftors m aiurt. to _ the 
underttpird Keith David Good- 
man. FCA. or SO East bourne 
Terrace. London, wa 6LF. Ihe 
Uoutdaior of the said Company, 
and. H so required by nauce m 
writing from the smd Liquidat o r, 
are. personalty or by thrlr Solid- 
tors. to come In and prove their 
debts or dams at such tone and 
placo as shall be specified In such 
notice, or In default thereof uwy 
will be excluded from the benefu 
of any distribution made before 
such dents are Moved. 

Dated Bus 12th day of March 
1986. 

K D Goodman, 
uoiddaior- 


01 THE MATTER Of TREWS 

OFFICE EQUIP MENT 

(CROYDON) LIMITED 
AND 

VO THE MATTER Of THE 
COMPANKS ACT 1985 
Notice ts hereby given that Ihe 
creditors of ihe above-named 
Company, which Is being volun- 
tarily wound up. are required, on 
or before me 22nd day or April. 
1986. to lend In melr full Chns 
ban aad surnames. their 
addrann and derri micas. fuH 
particular of iheir debts or 
claims, and the names and M- 
dresaea of ihefr Sen ators iir any). 
Io ihe undersigned KQTH DAVID 
GOODMAN. PGA. of SO East 
bourne Terrace. London W2 6LF. 
Ihe liquidalor of the saM compa- 
ny. am. if » required ay nonce 
In writing mm the said liquida- 
tor. are personally or by their 
Senators. M come In and prove 
met debts or dal ms si such tone 
and place as shall be speeuiea in 
such notin', or to detoull they wit! 
be excluded from the benefit of 
any dtotribuUcn made before 
*ich Sects are proved. 

Dated UU9 lltn day Of March 
1966. 
k D Goodman. 

UquidatOT. 


FOR HIM 


Wedding Morning Suits. 


Evenmg Tail Suds. 
Black Jackets ft 
Stnpeo Trousers. 
Surplus to 
hire depL 
FOR SALE 
from £30 
LIPMANSKJRE 
DEFT. 

22 CHARING 
CROSS R 0 
LONDON WC2 
(Nr Lotemter Sq 
Tube) 

01-240 2310. 


SITUATIONS WANTED 


STOCKBROKER^ Analyst 41. 

seeks fornmrrclaf posittao Lon- 
don 0903 501763 




To Paid James lair of 23 Brook 
Sheet. Mayfair. London. Wl. 

TAKE NOTICE mat an action 
has teen commenced agaum you 
in the High Court of Justice. 
Chancery dubma Bournemouth 
District Rrgtsh). 1986B No. JSO 
by Sarah Elizabeth Randall and 
others care o! TO Richmond HflL 
Baurnemoum. Dorset, in wtuen 
Uie Putnuics' claim B (or the ap- 
point rn ml of a Receiver and 
Manager of ihe properly known 
as Glengarry. 75 SI. Michaels 
Road. Bournemouth 

AND THAT li has been ordered 
by tor High Goun of Justice that 
service of toe Wm In Uie said ac- 
tion on you be effected by this 
adverUsemenL 

AND FURTHER TAKE NO- 
TICE mat you must within 14 
days from the pubHution of tfda 
advertisement inclusive of the 
day Of such publication, acknowl- 
edge service of the saw writ of 
Summons by comptftmg a pre- 
scribed form of 

Arttoowtedgenienl of Service 

Which nay be obtained on re- 
quest from the Soliniors whose 
name and address appear below, 
otherwise Judgement may be ob- 
tained agantst you. 

WARD BOWIE 
70 Richmond Hit! 

Bournemouth 
Dorset 
fref. JHB) 
FHamUffs' Soucuan 
Dated the 20Ui day of March 
1986. 


IN THE MATTER OF 
MONOTONE LIMITED 

By Order of the HIGH COURT OF 
JUSTICE baled the 23rd day ot 
November. I9S4. Mr IO B Bond 
of 128 Queen Victoria Street. 

London EG4 has been aotMuntrd 
uouwator rk tne above named 
company with a Committee of 
inspection. 

Daren mis 17th day Of March. 

1986. 
LD B. Bono. 

Uemdator. 

RtGKATSON. SIDNEY BO AC 
R1CKATSON laieof Nabum Has- 
pual. e utford. York, died there on 
20th March 1985. tEUiie about 
Ct 4.000 i 

The mol her of the above-named 
is requested to apply to the Trea- 
sury Solicitor iB.V.l. Queen 
Annevj Chambers. 28 Broad- 
way. London SW1H 9J& [alUng 
wnten me Treasury Souchot may 

take steps to auimnisleT the estate. 


MONDAY^ Education: Univer- WEDNESDAY Lb Creme deb 
srty Appointments, Prep. & Public Crime: Scartari2l/R\ appo/nenen n 
School Appoinirtetns.Educaijonal over £7500. General secretanal. 
Cow»^chotei^ips&iyk)W5hips. Propeityj Restdential, Commercial. 



byrekvantedfiorialRTlkies. 

Use the coupon (right), 
smd frni orthow easy, fast 
sn4eo»ODHad.itiSitoailm v - 
rise in The Tones Classified. 


fj Crime deb Creme; Town* Country. Overseas, Rentals. 

TUESDAY CoiBprter Horinns 

a comprehensive guide io ihe THURSDAY GwerriApjwiax- 

computermattei. meats: ChieTExeajtives, Managing 

Legs! AppobdBWfllE Solicitors. Duecwra.Direciois, Sales and 

Commercial Lawyers, Legal Mark eting Eji ecu lives and Overseas 

Officen.PrivatcA Public practice. Appointments. Including a new 

Lepd Im Crime, a new dasaifica- classification enlided FbnztcU woi 


tion for top legal secretaries. 


AccoanUBcy Anwratmau. 


THE WORLD FAMOUS PERSONAL COLUMN APPEARS EVERY DAY. 
ANNOUNCEMENTS CAN APPEAR WITHIN 24 HOURS. 


FRIDAY Motors: A complete car 

buyers' guide featuring established 
dealers and private sales. 

Business Id Business: 

Selling property, franchises, 
equipment etc. io small and large 
companies or businesses. 

SATURDAY Overseas Havel: 
Holidays abroad. Low cost flights. 
Cruises, Car him. UJL'ftavd: 
Hotels, Collages, Holiday lets. 
EnrertiHnnfflfrc 

Pen Frieadsra new classification Tor 
young readers to conttcipeople with 
sanflarinign^athome an ti over se as. 


Fill in ihe coupon and attach it to your advertisement. Prior to it appearing, 
we will contact you with a quotation and c 'infirm the date of insertion. 

Rates arc Lineage £4 per line imin 3 lines). Boxed Display £23 per single 
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PAY NO POSTAGE. Send to: The Times. Shirley Munotts. Group 

CbssffKd Advertisement Murage c. Times Newspapers Ltd. Advertisement Depan* 
mert, RO, Box 484, Vhginia Sneer. Londmi El 9DD. 

NAME 

ADDRESS 


TELfiPHON E ( Daytime > - 

ACCESSOR VISA AiCNo 


. DATL OF INSERTION 

i Pt<jy.- atlfw. link! lot iwlthf jnJt'fO.jyyinpi 


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34 


THE TIMES THURSDAY MARCH 20 1986 


(( HORIZONS D 


A guide to 
career development 


Changing face of diplomacy 


Queen Victoria’s representative in Boliv- 
ia once declined to attend a local 
celebration. In revenge he was tied faring 
backwards on a donkey and paraded 
around the main square in La Paz. 
Diplomatic relations were severed and 
remained so for several generations. 

Foreign Office diplomacy is still 
concerned with political relations with 
the rest of the world but it covers all oth- 
er aspects of modern government busi- 
ness. This ranges from export promotion 
and technical cooperation to the supply 
of food, energy and raw materials, to the 
environment, telecommunications and 
space. 

The Foreign Office continues to 
•represent the interest of individual 
British dozens. Ultimately it is responsi- 
ble for seeing that British and the British 
Government are properly represented 
abroad on every topic that affects the 
British people — a very wide-ranging 
brief indeed. 

There are about 200 missions (embas- 
sies, high commissions and smaller 
posts) covering 164 countries. In all there 
are 6,718 UK-based staff (as opposed to 
staff recruited locally overseas). About 
4,700 are posted abroad at any one time, 
only 1,600 of whom are entitled to 
diplomatic status. There has been a 17.4 
per cent decrease m staff since 1968 with 
a decrease of S per cent forecast up until 
1988. 

Ann Gram is bead of the recruitment 
section. She is positive about the kind of 


There is no one kind 


of person that is 


recruited by the 


Diplomatic Service. 


Corinne Julius examines 


the skills needed 


to represent Britain 


community. By getting to know, for 
example, the views of students at the 
university which were somewhat differ- 
ent from those of the government. It 
meant being able to round up *The right 
kind" of people to meet a “Tony Bom 
or a “Norman Tebbft” 

“You have access, but there are 
constraints”, she says. “You must be 
aware of the damage you can da For 
example, your need to get to know a wide 
spread of people outside the diplomatic 
community can mean that you risk being 


thought a spy. 
After 


abroad today 


Entry into the fast stream 
is by written examination 


people the Diplomatic Service is hoping 

and of 


to recruit “There is do one kind 
person. We need people who can do a 
range of work. The ability to do is very 
important. We don't care where people 
are from or wh 2 t they have studied.” 

Applicants must be British citizens 
with at least one parent a citizen of the 
Commonwealth or the Irish Republic, 
continuously from the date 30 years or 
more prior to appointment An assess- 
ment is made of UK connections, with a 
positive security vetting not only for 
communist or fascist associations but for 
characteristics which may be a security 
risk, such as homosexuality. 

Entry into the fast sir earn and the 
administrative entry of 20 places is by 
written examination. These are held each 
autumn or winter followed by a series of 
interviews. Applicants must have at least 
a second dab honours degree and be 
under 32. Administrative entrants con- 
centrate on “intellectual policy” cover- 
ing, for example, energy and defence as 
well as political relations. 

Executive entry of 20 places annually 
is by open competition. The pace at 
administrative level is slower and more 
varied.usually involving commercial 
and information work. 


All executive officers must be pre- 
pared to do some routine jobs, with the 
expectation of ultimately reaching Con- 
sular level An executive officer would 
expect to become First Secretary around 
the age of 39 and an administrative 
officer at 29. 

There are now competitions to enable 
executive officers to transfer to adminis- 
trative grades. As a small service, 
working in small units, bright candidates 
are rarely left to moulder. Last year 
competition was fiercest at executive 
level This was due at least in part to the 
advice to women by careers' advisors to 
apply at this level 

There are good opportunities for 
women who should aim high. They can 
today work effectively in the Diplomatic 
Service in almost any country. There is 
no discrimination, nor is there special 
assistance, although there is good mater- 
nity leave provision and an option to 
take special unpaid leave. 

There is no one typical career pattern, 
but Ann Grant's career gives a flavour of 
life in the Diplomatic Service. She joined 
the first stream in 1971 having studied 
international relations at Sussex 
University. 

Her first job was as the desk officer for 
the Philippines. For two years she was 
responsible for co-ordinating informa- 
tion on the country, dealing with 
visitors, correspondence and the press. 

Unlike the French and the Americans 
who have diplomatic colleges, in Britain 
it is a matter of on the job training. This 
is supplemented by three month core 
training. For example, on drafting and 
economics and three months on inten- 
sive French. German or Spanish. 

At this point officers are assessed for 
hard language training. Fifty per cent of 
the intake is siphoned off for between 
nine and 24 months training, for 
example, in Japanese or Russian. Ann 
Grant did six months Bengali before 
becoming a Third Secretary political in 
Calcutta. The most junior of 12 diplo- 
mats. 

Her job was to monitor the political 
situation in North-East India. But she 
ended up doing a little of everything, and 
set about maximizing her contacts in the 


two-and-a-half years, she re- 
turned to the UK and somewhat 
unusually spent four years on 
secondment at the Department of Ener- 
gy. This was followed by two yea rs in t he 
news department as a “spokesman" 
responsible for East European and then 
Middle Eastern affoirs. 

At 32, Ann Grant found herself as 
First Secretary and Head of Chancery in 
Mozambique. In the absence of her 
ambassador, she was responsible for 
reporting on the political situation. She 


found her background in international 
relations and Amc 


ican studies helpful in 
establishing good relations with govern- 
ment officials who viewed Britain as a 
colonial power. 

In 1984, she returned to the UK as 
head of recruitment section. She expects 
to remain for here another year and 
aspires to promotion to councillor, in the 
□ext few years. 


The need is for diplomats to 
achieve aims by negotiation 


Between the ages of 30 to 40, 
administrative officers spend a consider- 
able time in the UK. After that they 
would expect the majority of their 
postings to be abroad, with a move every 
three to four years. In all, two- thirds of 
diplomatic service is likely to be 
overseas. 


This mobility, while offering consider- 
fo 


able variety and opportunity for promo- 
tion, can cause problems for families. 
It is unusual for spouses to be able to fol- 
low a career abroad, particularly fo Third 
World countries. 

As Britain’s status changes her will can 
no longer be imposed, and increasingly 
the need is for diplomats able to achieve 
aims by negotiation and co-operation 


■If yon n»ink yon have the talent and 
stamina yon can obtain farther informa- 
tion from the Recruitment Section Per- 
sonnel Policy Department, Foreign and 
Commonwealth Office, 3 Central Build- 
ings; Matthew Parker Street, London 
SW1H 9NL, tebO 1-233 5244. Informa- 
tion on recruitment schemes may be 
obtained from the Civil Service Commis- 
sion Alencon link, Basingstoke, Hamp- 
shire RG 21 UB. 



Newly Qualified A.C.A.’s | 

Merchant Banking & Investment Banking I 


Merchant Banking — Corporate Finance 

c £17,500 + benefits 

Many of the U.K-'s leading Accepting Houses require recently 
qualified Chartered Accountants to join their established and 
highly profitable corporate finance departments. The successful 
applicants will work in highly demanding environments being 
involved, at an early stage, with acquisition and merger studies, 
share flotations, corporate advice etc. The benefits and pro- 
motional prospects offered, combine to present a highly 
attractive opportunity for the selected applicants. 

Investment Bank — International 
Corporate Finance c£l8,000 + benefits 

Our client, a major force in British Banking, seeks a recently 
qualified accountant to work in the corporate finance depart- 
ment working on cross border mergers and acquisitions. The 
successful applicant should be prepared to travel extensively 
throughout the world particularly in the U.S.A. and Europe. 


International Capital Markets 

to £25,000 + benefits 

We are acting for a major U.S. investment bank currently 
expanding its capital markets activities. Opportunities exist for 
newly qualified A-CJV-’s. to join highly specialised reams 
marketing, negotiating and structuring swaps and other capital 
markets transactions. Candidates, aged 24-28, will have strong 
interpersonal drills and be highly self-motivated. 


International Project Finance 

to £20,000 + benefits 

A prime U.K. merchant bank seeks a recently qualified 
chartered accountant for its International Division. The suc- 
cessful applicant will be involved in identifying, structuring and 
advising on methods of funding for major worldwide projects. 
Excellent opportunity for chose with die commitment and 
ability to succeed. 


Interested applicants should contact Victoria Ward 
Krickic on 01-404 5751 at Michael Page City, 
39-41 Parker Street, London WC2B 5LH. 




Interested applicants should contact Andrew 
Stewart on 01-404 5751 at Michael Page City, 
39-41 Parker Street, London WC2B 5LH- 


Michael Rage City 

International Recruitment Consultants— London Brussels Newlbrk Sydney 
A member ofthe Addison Ihge FLC group 



01-623 1266 


Jonathan\^7i 


ren 


Banking Appointments 


Wo ate seeking ambitious, sob motivated graduate ACA's, aged 25-33 years for 
vacancies within merchant and international city based banks (or the following areas. 

Senior Accounting/ 

Financial Control 

(Banking experience essential). 


£20437,000 


£30-£35,000 


DK& International 
Corporate Tax 

(Creative financial skills a pre-requisite}. 

Audit 

(Major bank experience essential). 

For the above 3 vacancies contact Bryan Sales or Brian Gooch. 

Operations Managers £2Q-£35,000 


v.neg£20-£35,000 


Jonathan Wren is currently handling ajiumber of senior operational postions on 


behalf of its major clients. We would like to hear from candidates with extensive 
relevant experience, preferably gained with London based international bonks, 
ideally covering foreign exchange, accounts, loans, etc. 

Contact David Williams or Anne Griggs. 

Senior Credit Analyst £18-£25,000 

Successful international bank requires a highly experienced banker with a 
comprehensive knowledge of credit appraisal. Age range 28*35 years. The appointee 
will be required to reorganise an active department of six analysts. 

Junior Credit Analyst £10-£15,000 

A large european bank seeks an experienced Credit Analyst with experience gained 
within a banking environment Ideally aged between 21*25 years, the successful 
applicant wifi assist marketing officers in business assessment 

For the above 2 vacancies contact Richard Heredift or Trevor Williams. 

All applications w9l be treated in strict confidence. 



Institutional 

Sales 


Capital Markets 

Our client, a leading Scandinavian bank- TK: “ /,c 
has a need for experienced Euronote sales 
people with a proven track record in a major 
house. Candidates should have a minimum 
of one year's experience. 


This US international bank seeks * sales- 
peisonfomaricetmute-cunency securities to 

UK institutional efiente. Jdeafiy candidates 
should be economics graduates wtth two 
years' experience wjfofo £ corporate treasury 
department . 


Financial Futures 


A substantial CIS Broking house, requires a 
high calibre salesperson to join its existing 
team. Candidates should be femffiarwfth all 
major US and UK financial futures contracts. 


A major US Sank is seeking a young 
dynamic marketing professional to develop 
its institutional business. The successful 
applicant must have extensive knowledge of 
financial futures and options. . 


Stockbroking / 

This highly prestigious UK firm wishes to A leading US brokerage has a requirement 
appointan executive to market US equities to for specialists in tradedopbons. Applications • 
UK institutions. With two years* experience, are invited from those with at least one years 
candidates should ideally be NYSE Series 7 exposure wtoareputebte house, 
registered. 

For further information please telephone 01-481 3188 in complete confidence. 

CHARTERHOUSE 
APPOINTMENTS 

»Rc>reuoosE-twono'auiicCEinie-uanDCMEi9M*o>-«si3fM ' > 



Banking 


Our fast-growing and profitable North American Banking Department seeks 
executives to work on and help develop our North American business. 

The ideal candidate will be:- , ■ - - • 

• Mid to late twenties '■< " 

• Academicall y well qualified 

• Innovative 

• Selfreliant 


Candidates should have a good grounding in credit and a knowledge of 
general banking services. In addition experience in specialised banking 
products, such as Asset Based Lending, Leveraged Biqt Outs, Real Estate 
Finance, Bond Enhancement Programmes and Interest Rate Swaps would 
be of value. 


Successful candidates will work in an environment which encourages - 
flexibility and an individual approach. There .will be opportunities for travel 
and the possibility of a posting to one of our four U.S. offices. 

Candidates should apply with full Curriculum Vitae to:- . 

Hanover Partners limited, Bor D57, The Times, EO. Box 484, 

Virginia Street, London El 9BL. 



Benson 



Hie broad base of our Tecnritmqnt operations enables us to offer the 
widesr possible range of opportunities to tax specialists- 

Our clients include firms of accoun t a n ts and solicitors, financial 
institutions and public and private companies, both in London and in 
the provinces. 

We are experiencing an increase in demand at all levds for high calibre 
solicitors, ACAs, and Inland Revenue Inspectors wishing to optimise 
their career potentiaL Prospects exist to partnership level 

If you would like to find out more about the positions we can offer 

please call Laurence Simons (Legal Profession^ dr Mark Brewer 

(Accountancy Profession) on 01-831 2000 (01-485 1345 evenings/ 
weekends) or write to them at Michael Page Partnership (UK), 
39-41 Parker Streep London WC2B 5LH. Strictest confiden- 
tiality assured. 





Michael Bage Partnership 

Iraemxional Recnricmert Consultants .... 

London Windsor Bristol Krnringhani Manchester Leeds Gfastawr BnmebNMribk Sidney 
Amemberc^theAdcBsonf^cHJZgmup 



Our c&ent is a successful and expanding small practice in North London. 
They are currently seeking to SI the following key positions:- 

Tax Consultant 
Full Time/Part Time 
c£20,000 -f car 

ACCA/ACA/ATl! quaffed. Experience of solving complex corporate 
taxation problems is essential. The applicant should preferably have been 
trained in a large Taxation Department and possibly boW a key position in 
that department You will establish Taxation Department within practice. 
Consideration will be given to an applicant working 2-3 daysAveek on a 
consultancy basis. Partnership prospects exist 

Audit Managers (x2) 

c£20,000 + car 

Ambitious ACCA/ACA trained individuals preferably wfth a large Company 
background. Partnership prospects within 3 years. Reporting direct to . 
Partners. 

Audit Seniors (x2) 

c£1 2,000 

Qualified, time-barred or part qualified - 3*4 years audit experience js 
essential. Promotion prospects excellent 


•The art 0 / taxation isso to pluck thegoose that the 
maximum number 6//eGthereai^ohtQinec/ ir/th the 
minimum amount of hissing"; 

. . JeanColberU665 


Help wanted to fe ather nests 

upto £30,000 Tax Specialists 



_ _ren 

Recruitment Consultants 
170 Bishopsgate. London EC2M 4 LX. Jeit OI-623 1266 



HONG KONG 



Please telephone Jonathan Grantham 
quoting reference JG0142. 


EXECUTIVE RECRUITMENT 


166 Btshopsgate, London EC2H 4LX. 01-27*5531 (lONnes) 


Candidates varc in thpirsUUs.objeaii'esand persanaiiiies,Qur nh 'I nh 

recruilinem specialisb is In view every candidate asan indlvidiiS iSHXi* 


advice. 


unbiased career 

■ 

commerce and are mainly in 
An tafbrnalrareff discussion can&e 


01-242 6633 or send us brief details of your carperfodjtfeat 



_ F3NANGE & ACCOUNTANCY ' 


V 









ali 


f-4 

\ z 


Marketing Department 
West London 

Wang (UK) Untiled is a leading supplier of office 


Communications Department where \vc now have rvvo 
vacancire for Secretaries. 

Secretary to Marketing : 
Communications Manager— c£9k 

To provide top-level secretarial support and Daise with 
external suppliers in areas of advertising, media and wide- 

and press releases and ensure stocks of puSidiy material 
are adequately maintained 


Departmental Secretary - 
Marketing Communications — c£8k 

To provide secretarial support for the department and 
assume responsibility for the maintenance of 
departmental systems including Project Authorisation 
Requests and Purchase Orders. Additional duties include 
assisting at conferences, media events and similar. 

* Both positions require excellent secretarial and 
communication skills combined with a professional and 
enthusiastic approach to work. Operating knowledge of 
WP is desirable although full training wiu be provided. 

Competitive salaries are offered together with excellent 
large company benefits. Please write with full career 
details to Pam SesaL Wang (UK) Limited. WangHouse. 
661 London Read Isleworth. Middlesex TW7 4EH. or 

S ' hone 01-S47 1954 (24-hour service) for an 
cation form. 


WANG 


British 
Technology 
Croup ^ 


THE LAW SOCIETY 

PERSONAL ASSISTANT 

c£8,000 pa (July Review) 

The Law Society, the professional 
association of solicitors in EngUmd and 
Wales, requires an experienced audio 
secretary to work for the senior solicitor 
dealing with the Remuneration Committee 
and other matters. 

Doties include audio typing, of general 
correspondence and reports, organising 
committee papers, arranging meetings, and 
full secretarial support in a range of other 
tasks. 

Applicants should have SO wpm typing and 
80 wpm shorthand, possess English *0* 
level or equivalent and either, be 
experienced on a Wang Word Processor or 
be wining to be trained. 

Typed applications should be addressed to 
the Personnel Officer, The Law Society, 
113 Chancery Lane, LONDON WC2A 
IPL 

(NO AGENCIES) 


MARVIC TEXTILES LTD. 
Consultants . 

We are looking for a bright young person to 
promote our luxury famishing materials- on a 
full time baas within the Furnishing Fabrics 
Department at Harrod*, Knightsbridge. 

A good knowledge of famishing textiles and pre- 
vious experience of selling is preferable though 
not essential. 

This job enjoys die benefits of employment by a 
small successful and progressive company yet 
within our finest retail department store mid 
maybe looked upon as an excellent early career 
opportunity. 

Competitive salary and bonuses available. 
Please apply in. writing with fell CV to: 
Suzanne Parry, 

Marvic Textiles Ltd. 

3 West Point Trading Estate, 

AlHence Rood, 

London W3 ORA. 


£ 12,000 

An exceptional Nghcatflwv 
ocnoui BsaHAm with pood 
skills and a etvttsb manner 
a needed 10 work alongside 
a pace-selling Director of a 
leading taterDMtonal group 
with muDUarioos wmrid* 
wide outlets- A forward 
winker with execuHveTe-v** ' 
experience wffl ftnd this an 
Ideal chauengc for a brand 
new career. 

01-629 9323 

SHEILA CHILDS 

Rtr-BI MW'T 


Young. c&Mrttf and en- 
ded! ~TerTidir C20-24) 
experienced In word pro- 
oeadne. urgently tcodrad 
by pubUshtog company m 
worts in oar Special Offera 
Department FaBtboawte 
typing. Pleasant Meptmie 
manner and urtningnese to 
hem out generally In tw 
office. 


Private Secretary / 
Personal Assistant 

WATFORD 
Salary around £9,325 
(negotiable) 

required to work with Chief Executive of 
public water supply Company. Must 
demonstrate ability for fast and accurate 
shorthand/ typing and extensive experience 
of personal secretarial assistance at high 
level. Familiarity with modem office 
technology highly desirable. 

Reliability, together with capobSty of 
working under pressure when required is 
essential, as is ability to work competently 
on own initiative.. 

Full details of experience, qualifications, age 
and present salary should be sent by 27th 
March 1986 in confidence to the Personnel 
Officer, 

The Colne Valley Water Company 

BWm'xoiw te*tn»i»i«talf« Wrioni 


PRESTIGIOUS 
ANTIQUES SHOP, 
MMLICO ROAD 

Urgently raw** 

SK/Awtmnt Expe rien ce 
M tie n MI Knowledge Of 
Art- Worta 
ry negottette. 

Teh 01*73® 9959 


North Herts 


SENIOR 

LECTURER 

SECRETARIAL 

STUDIES 

£11,958 - £14,046 

0462 32351 


RUNG ML 9SMCCS 
CKMBOftf 

PA/Secntony wanted m 
SWl to assist young Execu- 
tive in Adnrintmattoa and 


RECEPTIONIST 

£9,000 

Exclusive fern of Executive 
Semen Consultants wflr praa- 
fcgmus oftaasmWI needs a 
•hMAn (ccoptiomst Vanad 
dutes nefufle greetng wa- 
ton. Sowar arrangetoema. 
orderetg taxis and couriers 
and swftehboaitJ reM. Ago 
24-30. Smart appearance, ax- 
cahnt educational 

background and relevant ex- 
perience essential. Planse 

434 4512 

Crone Corkill 

B— g fa p ted Conraftenfa 

99 Regent S&MtWI 


DESIGN 

c£9,500 

Young end dynamic ex- 
ecutive needs a fust 
class PA looking for a 
challenge. Successful 
international team. Su- 
per offices. Gd sec 
skills. 


Prestos* sates background 
would be preferable. Quan- 
ta* rewiired are that person 
hM a tort mind- -Age Z3- 40. 

Tab Mr Brook* M 732 W 


m* 


SECRETARY 

35+ 

£9,000 Package + Perks 

I mc n m io aa l Qxnpimy rwx nr ex a wen org mi fe d , dc dit a M d *o- 
retary to keep their Directors and general office in order. Yon 
wffl teresjiOMftte for afl office adnuoanwion, wffl he dealing 
with top m»marinn»i diems and will be nxprinsd to become 
totally invoiced ut the bosmeas development. In ictsni you are 
offered a bqchly iuottinj and snmttfatmt career with excefleni 
fa tore pros p ects, an tarty salary increase plus inuntdaxe perks. 
Please apply to Gayc Nevine on 4S6 £717 Alfred Marks 

Py ^ j ' p vnl rt piniltiim 


COMPETENT, EFFICIENT 
SECRETARY REQUIRED 

for - busy Chelsea rentals agency. Must be 
numerate - good accurate shorthand. Good 
salary. Please contact Catherine; 

01-351 23S3 


MAGAZINE PUBLISHERS 
c.£10,000 + Bonus 

^^^M^(22-3^with excellent Engbsh/andio typ- 
ing and enjoy variety in a fast moving, friendly 
atmosphere. Write with CV to Mis Linford, BML 9 
Kmgsway, London WC2B fiXF. 


RECCONS)! 


PA/SECRETARY ! 

Ags M - 38 I 

To MA. 01 MMMfeoal | 
Sports Mana g emant Ron 

e. ESjDOO 1 

j Wo are The country's tearing 
er ga t paara cl company anm- 
tiunment (acAtioa at tire 
mflon's laadsig aports events 
such w Wntotedon. Royal As- 
cot and Henley Prewxre 
wpanenoe oi PAjSeueanai 
work far sorer m ana geme n t 
it raqurad. 


SALLY WBTOfflRCH. 
KSSXUm PROMOTIONS 

m. 

m muFTsswr waw. 

LONDON WC2. 


D ESIGN/ 

MABKETWG 

Rapidly expanding agear 
cv, nice part of Holboni. 
needs sopor secretaries in 
bey areas (Saks promo- 
tion*, direct marketing, 
video productions and 
busy design department) 
all reporting to Board Di- 
rectors. Lively 

atmosphere. Ring Lesley 
Vipond on 01 242 0343. 


SEARCH 
FOR SUCCESS . 
to £10,000 j 

ThcDirmorofa higfaty proft*- 1 
1 woe I Ewniuwe Scorch pomp 
■n lbc Wc-a End needs i bnehl. 
micUiyrni Kcmaiy mUi a flex- 
ible approach and a sense of 
hunxxrr. Ac pan of ihe basv. 
friend!) team, you attend 
progress meetings, liaise with 
clients and candkbtcs. and ax- 
sol wiilr the general _ office 
admimsUaWMi b> addition to 
your secretarial duties. If you 
arc commercially aware, very 
bum it IA IrwteJ and have 
skills of lOQfaa some audio 
and WP please telephone u*. 
Age 2MS^ 

434 4512 


SECOND MBHCAL 
SECRETARY/ 
RECEPTIONIST 

For 2 GPs in new 
mania cs SW7. Private 
and NHS. 


essential. 3$ boms per 

week. Salary negotiable. 

tady JtxU between tan - 
Spa 

B1-373 6557. 


Medical 


Secretary 

Near Waterloo 

Would you like to work in an interesting 
and different environment, where your ex- 
cellent medical secretarial skins wifi be put 
to rewarding use? The British Technology 
Group (BTG) encourages worthwhile in- 
ventions in the UK. and provides practical 
financial help for their future development. . 

We need someone to work for 2 executives 
involved in the medical and dnigsfidd. It is 
a fast moving environment ana you wifi 
need exellent shorthand and typing skills 
and the ability to cope under pressure. You 
must also have word processing experience. 

The offices are modern, air conditioned and 
convenient for London Br and Waterloo 
Stations. The salary will be very competi- 
tive and there is a subsidised restaurant. 

Interested? If you are, please forward your 
curriculum vitae for my attention or. alter- 
natively. telephone me on 01-403 6666 to 
discuss' the position further. 

Miss E Pills 

BRITISH TECHNOLOGY GROUP 


CITY WISE PA 

to £12,000++ 

Our efient a small group at verdure capital sgedaEsts based in 
EC4. is currently involved in an exettmg variety ol projects. 
Wortring primarily for the Chanman and using to the full your 
(maned experience (pref- in Corp. Finance) and your sec. swfls 
(90/60 + WP). your mb win encompass running the rtfee, 
involving yourself on the broking side and dealtno with cbents. 
You should be a first-class administrator with a flair for team- 
ing fast and working with complete accuracy. Languages 
useful, particularly French. Hours can be 9-30 - 6130. Age 25+ . 
Please call: 

588 3535 

Crone Corkill 

HocnittiTwnt Consonants 
18 Ekfon Street ECS 


RECEPTIONIST 
£9,000 + Bonus 

A tattno hrm ol socktitolws now UwxpKe mq»ms a w« presorted, 
twsea and expenancM leceoacna You Mftgred tensors. bsmspon- 
gtiw loi me nooning ol maamg and dang rooms, and oral win nns 
and counts Good u*o tyomg (SOmpmi a essential as you wW also 
nefa with lira wtun nece^^Pt ^j* 

Crone Corkill 

RocroltmentConsultsntB 

18 Eldon Street EC2 


Mayfair Sleuth 

£10.000 + Benefits 

This intemaiional 
executive search 
company based in 
Mayfair needs a ■ 
PA /secretary of ‘A* 
level calibre with an 
agile and retentive 
memory to assist an 
associate 

Social confidence and 
charm in dealing with 
captains of industry 
and ltieh quality candi- 
dates lace to face and 
on the telephone are 
prerequisites or the job 
and essential also to fit 
in with the existing 
stafT of this robust ana 
professional company. 

Age 25 - 32 
Speeds 100/60 + audio 

Telephone 629 9686 
West End Office 

A&SAJU2S2&R 


FLAIR FOR 
FRENCH 
£ 12,000 

A top-flight bi-lingua! 
P A who is used to WO ris- 
ing on their own 
initiative is needed by 
an American executive 
who runs the l/K. office 
of a Geneva based com- 
pany. Working in Ihe 
field of investment with 
mostly private clients he 
wants someone who is 
interested in becoming 
folly involved and can 
hdp develop the mar- 
keting side of the 
business. You should be 
wdkeducated. socially 
confident and have ev 
ccffcnt secretarial skills 
1 100/60). 

Age 25-35. 

629 9686 
West End Offic« 

AK&LMSEOMfR 


-#/ AUSTIN StliQ 

$ / of Megenl 

EXPERIENCED 

SECRETARY 


The Group Managing Director Is seeking a 
secretary who is interested in a career. The 
successful applicant will have a pleasant 
personality and appropriate experience. 
Good typing and shorthand speeds are 
essential. In return, we offer an excel tent 
starting salary and company benefits. 

Write immediately, including c_v. to: 

DJ. Gale; Personnel Director 
AUSTIN HEED UNITED. 

■Oaf- ) 103/113 Regent St., 

■< London. WlA 2AJ to-o**-*™ 


IMPERIAL COLLEGE OF 
SCIENCE AND TECHNOLOGY 

The DEPARTMENT OF MANAGEMENT SCIENCE 
has a vacancy for an experienced Secretary to deal with 
applications (in excess of 6000 for ad mi ssion to the 
Department's postgraduate courses and to act as secre- 
tary to the Director of the one year MSc course. The 
post win also include responsibility for keeping confi- 
dential student records and dealing with telephone and 
personal enquiries from prospective students. Good 
shorthand and typing required. Must, be witting |q use 
word processor for which training will be given if re- 
quired. Pleasant working conditions, spoms facilities 
available and generous holidays. Salary in range £6993 - 
£8092 including London Weighting according to age 
and experience. 

Applications in writing to the Assistant Director (from 
whom further details can be obtained) Miss A E Benja- 
min. Department of Management Science. Imperial 
c. Exhibition Road. London SW7 2BX. 


min. i> 
College, 


LEGAL AUDIO SECRETARIES 

We are a small and friendly firm of commer- 
cial lawyers situated near Fencburch Street 
We need 3 legal secretaries urgently and are 
wilting to pay a five figure sum for the right 
people. 

Applicants should have good speeds and be 
willing lo work hard. Wang WP is used exclu- 
sively but full training will be given to 
applicants who are otherwise well suited. 

If you are interested please phone Linda on 
481 1000. 

No agencies please. 


PA/ADMINISTRATOR 

Requited for small independent wine mer- 
chant French, sales and admin skills needed 
as well as an interest in wine and food, the 
owner and his dog! A challenging job for a 
practical, positive self-motivated person. 

Please write with C.V. to: Peter Pugson, 82 
Wandsworth Bridge Road, London SW6 
2TF. 


design/marketlmg ; 


nice part of Holbom. 
needs super secretaries in 
key areas (sales promo- 
tions, direct marketing, 
video productions and 
busy design department) 
all repomng to Board 
Directors. Lively 

atmosphere. 

Ring Lesley Vipood 

01 242 0343. 


MAGAZINE WORLD 
£HMX» NEC 

Unusually intercning 00- j 
ponunilv for PA/Sw 
who n looi-mg for rtte- 
tenge. scope and 
moonabiliiy asnlins 
newly appioiMcd MD of 
laigr magazine group 
with new promts. Good 
slh typing and positive 
flexible personality. 


RENTALS 

TUNBRIDGE 

WELLS: 

Fine residential bufld- 
tng land. & acres. 
Planning Consent for 
-46 houses plus 34 Oats. 
For sale tor Tender 
(dosfng date 15th. 
May. 1986). Parsons. 
H&i Street. 

Sevenoaks. Td 
Sevenoaks 45121 1. 


POSTS 


iL Mii i " j r y 


wettunte 


CHELSEA* 

KENSIN GTON 

MUST SOI E«n Ow*. BWlO. 
siwdur. large 3 usd IhL 4th 

pSSriTift. afjycg. si teg- 

wc, m Mt> wc CeimM at 
£120 XlOO <W» 881 0X36 (HJ 
SB2 7181. 

EMU courr M WWbiMJ 

srd oatx- oat oea locaeJdLa 

CH.'S© , SML . .. gfl4 - g0ft ' 
HOLMANS SBE) «J». 
Mm«i0T0*i urat ywvuste 
floor Itil wtgi good B Nrti 
rrerp. 2 totM. 2 Wtm. 


d4&oen. Lmnxs 602 SOS*. 


DUL WICH 

HR OWWiat VKWrtsni 
trMUM Ue* o bednn iheW «> 
Rng He- f/QM y 40.000 - Es- 
worataa i/d 4/B Wnn "ft 

r.nto eozooo. voomt * 

VoUut 761 62ZS. 

SOUTH OF THE 
THAMES 


ounan rate i BfaJ’S: 

t mtm UtKtf *4 Hr.®* 

mSSrpoiKyrZwanv. M „ 

BSSbotS sev «» v™ : 

<M IUM- BSUOUV — ■■ ■■H in a ««1 OOAd I 

tmawftte 

sssrSis ~ . -r-i 

MW. £1*0.000. UWOSi 

01 602 MW . ; 

TUITION 

KR wtt wicwraypouMwn- _ ; 

vsrssd «■»« WJJSLS 1 22*5 
wMfe ycuen Iremeti P«w 

■ggaaaacrae 

g^sj-iS?s , sT^n7^ 




ST M0m& WOOD 
NWS 




from ESS to £2000 par week, 
tor sfoisi/lMjr Isb. Phone is 
now fa r fast aid tffcoft 

" h Bmw b rtpn & 

CLARK 
01 588 5999 


MONTMARTRE 
PARIS . 

BrttM. utyme. comfor^Otr 
fwMtMd nu nur Sxn 
CMeor. 2 raw*. UVMn. 

mmv s suuyoo*-. 

tenatus -preferred. ClOO 
BCT WMlL 

POLm A 
COMPANY 
01 499 9876 


patto RaL 2 bade. CH. PUOjr m- 


FULHAM. DaHghtM. Sttafl (mb. 
systMte cud cottage. CMas 
HuuntetoBi CM ana Tuba. 2 
Beds. Ram WUV <wr. AD 
nuebs. sunny ssdmMgdn. On 
tel. SU6S pw. TM: UaO 736 
1076 or 361 8056- 


BBIH UUI’S *USM WS 3 tuna 
in mwv mMcwaMd ana re- 
fundsoed 9 ba dr ooweu 
wwtmwil. LBL polar. Rent »■ 
dudes cn ana Clrw. £J50 p~. 
Q wiw ny or hottday let taUv. 
OuTuaM 0I4412B5S. 


I Quratshi 
Constantine 

ummsM 



01-244 

7353 


0UEBTS GATE SW7 

Batman Hyda Park and 
Horrods. BaautHidiy totari- 
ar dasJgnatf funny 2 
badrm (tot Nawfa refur- 
bfahwt Mdi sUmg rm. 

dtang im. W. bsthnn, 

cterm, potto gdn E295pw. 


Utility £ Co. M <226 03S8- 

%So£tt a ESS&’™- 
mckton eoorr * 

uram. 244 8377 


ALL BOX 
NUMBER 
REPLIES 
SHOULD BE 

addressed 

TO: 

'c,' , o T(m« . 
Ne W SMPW>. 
P.6; Box 4W- 

viratnxt Siiw* • 

- ixxNOon 
cv woo 


roam, kttriwn. ran pwi 
So vwwtp. Ttt Day oi Mi 
22 i«. Eve ot sn 0110 . 


CWOMEA awuting y ewahe ura 

CWM 3914290. 

- nod ml Hr.Ttt ii/r btdrttta. 
t merajpe Bfc. tonMe enj- 
KawMV «Kto QaaCH. 
SXactoc Od B ■ ra a tl' P.wAl 
60713*0. 


c u rrentl y arttong good ouatey 
rental accenanMWHK « - 
mural London for «j«B0 
coanany fauants Ql-937 MBi. 
OM VKIA6C ariWi BwiUWwl 
new town ns* wwh sunk. *• 
ivcvpL I. til kit 1 Mttma. Lae 
a«u * pnvaw paiwno. £i9B 
PW. CO Ml OOOr. 431-1341 0. 
IUUN1IM. OXioc trenquU 
Heotn aoiuitp. Chartrter eoij- 
«mm*l 2 bed. recap, rood kn & 
tam. guo. £190 pw. Creerte & 
Co 01 «29 961 1. 

MMBIHTtM J PotoM Cadm 
terraco. flret ttaor taiemy IM. 
larpr uvbw roan. ***» b«- 
racm. wertv tumannfl - CH- 
ciaa gw tcl- 0753 ssaasa. 

WnOHT—W OB C . Lovely 8th Or 
fM a pm moc*. Owe to anpie 
- Mdtm-iaerec.fsf ULMflwmto 
. dkmt laOMCo ML £300 pw. 6. 
R. P. S81S3SS. 


RENTALS 





■timLtrceuutncaaaw. 
eney on 01-704 6706. Uawy 
apt* Ct00£2000eer weed. 
miu«Mnt lets, north, norm 
wh ce nt r a . aram Mag far p 
wtnpu t rat d IrtUBO ul 


•WW DH 9t«r, attractive, newts 
de c or a ted home «ntn new car- 
I peto throuotiouL 3 beds. 2 b&ttt 
(I ed ndtei. WM recepum. 
mny nned kucorn. pal cn. par- 
den. £290 gw. Tat SSS 6692. 


gsffKSX-at-eS? 


nmm. a w* ™ oewbr dec. 
preuv bath, ul tea la* tanmy 
hoe. Star cuuwe. Sep tef tme. 
£100 pw Inc OL nee. Tet 01 
78S 7741, 

5 KEMNMTONi Spacmi* Bar- 
Hen I bad flBL urge rer and 
UKlmi hrrnMen room, com- 
pany cr vratnor w. CltO pw. 
Ol 373 6642 

MM. Btactnn* sad nr nat wtu> 
Ul to porter. 2 beds. 2 red. 2 
baths. LnekltCoktfiiTVwns* 
£395 pw. wsam wmea 730 
3495. 

tCLtSAVU CMELSIA 

KNIOKT6BRIDK flats rhouara 
avadaUe now. £ 100 - 1.000 pw 
Bui Best OI-6B1 6136. 

CUUniMl a targe fnrntehed flar- 
den IM. 6 toms lube. «ie 
dottoia bed. cn. Eioopw. Yd 
01-622 0223. 


ffiUMSniM owners soactow pe- 
riod nee. Nr TumJ/ 4 bedrms. 
9 room Jo* WU dwrt»i.jae«l- 
dw with Hweiy views. Ota CM. 
S-Fnario CSdD.XaWLp.wXH- 
607 1349. 

KMT YOUR nUUBlUME. wtth-- 
our cawtal outlay For 
Unmetbaie kimc* to tobeeUve 
price*, ru vt Mr Micftsd 
Nortnay. Jonn Straw Coiv 
tram Ltd. Tel 01-485 6615. 


write N» *W7, superb 2/3 
bed oats- Details, w. T. r. mb 
9812- 


KCMHW>TOMI i/e duM. ww. 
TV. phone- mu aw. Oawn.627 
2610 Hotndocuora. 


AVJULABX mnUTCLY 
faye hororv mm nai wi. a 
beds. 9 mm latchn and 2 
btobs'l en tuttel ossCH. CBw. 
AM appUanras. Lone let Peri. 
CSflOpw. Tel Q 1-629 6102. (U 



GODFREY STREET SW3 

Enchanting imerior designed 
Chelsea house. 3 double, t 
single bedmu/siudy, 2 reception 
rms.. 1 balhrm-, I shwr^ 1 
dkrm.. modem kit. Roof 
terrace. £600 Per week. 


I CHELSEA OFFICE: 81-589 5211. 


Wide range of quality lurmsneo 
and untu rms tied properly 
• Full Management Service 


Chestertons 


• Legal Tax Advice 
Personalised Service mrougn 
7 computer linked oflices 




ST. GEORGE’S SQUARE 

An attractive two bedroom 
penthouse flat situated on the 
top fir., (lift). Reception, french 
windows onto 20ft. Roof 
terrace., kiL, 2 bedrmJL, bathrm. 
Available now on long 
Company let. £215 per week. 

PIMUCO OFFICE: 01-834 99SB. 


KXjONDOMI 2 omnMMiwd qardcii 
dm nr nine. £87 pw. omen too I 
627 2610 Komdocatara. 

MW BUb pafd. 2 wd fUf wari 
tube, cao pw. Other* too 627 ■ 
2610 HonutMUiffS- 1 

SC 2 bedroooHd nto. cMldren. 
era ok. *amr. £70 pw- Oa- , 
era 67T-2610 Hometoctoon. 

ira vtcp tfMmtnrri ml 
KensinpiMi. Col TV Sen. «wbd. 
Ux, CotUnSbtoU ABB 3736306. 

•T JAMES SWl. Luxury 2 bed 
rmtv (umuM KhicRl BM nr 1 
park. Ol 373 6306 CD. 

ST in MTS* lux mod tarn studio 
flat, k to b. im. avail burned. I 
£120 pw all rod. 4-57 7819. I 

SW Double twdrooRMM ntotet nr 
rube, pnooe. co2 uw. Others 
too 627 2610 HomeucMora. I 

Wl Rooftop mod Mlreny fi*. 2 
dtu# oedrms. £226 pw rod CH. 
CHW, TV. B34-S788. , 

m. Attractive period mew, her. 
i Dm, i red. Urb. eh. 1 gr Co 
Jet £1S0 pw. 936 95I2JTJ. 

«ni Dethtotfol shtolo “« «« ! 
HWie pereon. EiOOow. S G Bo- 
land Lid. 01-221 2615. 

m. BrWht hue rum llat. I fatoti 1 
am mol TV. w.-nuen. cm o 
pw. 01-727 9919 

WESTEMM W douw wdroamed 
tea wnn m £W pw. Otiun 
6Z7 2610 Homewctoon. 


CKUEA fax rent flat. EMgwi 
«xn yam enwrance. Suuaow 
senior tmbatsy. Largo Wupe. 
dmtng rm. 2 bkb. Dam. tin. 
£300 wcetOy. Buis Jane Cole 
01-662 9940 OL 

DULWICH SC21 Very well, fur- 
mHIM m doco rw d 3 bed 
pm hoow, Ql g«w. Rudy, 
an roactunes. EiUew, AA- 
drews Lemns * MtoM9««eoi 
01-6BS Dili. 

FLATtoHOUSCS, Mrunrolm! 
emtrai Motion oi 2a4 75*5 
Londo n, Aparunenit 

UHcrnatfctnto 


UW UMDOIED rnittmette lo let. 
Claptiani 1 Bmton Bordety. 2 
bedrms. 2 rececn. IdL batn/wc. 
£26 pw atd. Suit mourw per- 
son. Price to Co: Ql 673 3346 

UrtWATDt. Lux vt gwks 
Re( in atari Nwra- Lotaaoe. 
Ul, diner, dbl eedrm. cn. T.v. 
C|30 o w. 221 0591- 

HMt to DvmCHQF for Uirurv 
properties m S> Jonut wood. Re 
Oenis Piwv. Maria vale. Owns 
Con to Hamooeod 01 seo 766i 

GT-RUSULfraECr, wci pied- 
Metre. QineL oomfortaote bed- 
su. all cool, own pnooe. £216 
Bern. 242 2362. 

UOna/«H6RT IXT6 Srieetton of 
lux properties in central areas 
tram 1300 pw. Betiwtey Eawe* 

01 935 8959. 

NOmw MLL GATE. PetoMu* 

duplex with uuiuung views 2 
dbte oednra. Furn u very man 
SBMard. £360 pw.937 9681. 

PUTNEY HBX. LUX wild fir flat. 

2 OOlt bra rms. dbl# ret l.-f tilt, 
hath to eik. Pte nkna Long Co 
tH.EiSOpWS R. P. 681 3556- 

rr JONHS WOOD, l bed (Ur- 
■ttsMd npL Luc Block. 
P OlU B M Pe. Laundry tenner. 
£140 PW. Tet 01 8800 

537 5681 Tne nunoor lo nme*. 
her when fencing Deft rental 
prooerne, in rmtrto and prime 
London mm OSOiCLOOODW. 

MtODffLV WANYBM quality 
(iris 6 hiriH In neutral LOo- 
don. Loop 4 fftort lets. Selected 
Plata. 486 8878. 

1V2, UOUWT 2 bedroom 2 barn- 
room flat, company let 
preferred. £180 per week. TO 
01-570 0230. 

COmtAL! Dele bed oanifn flat 
near tin* wamcr. TV. ci^o 
pw. 627-2610 homerccofara. 

awYDOW Double Betfapomed 
(im. receptXM. pnono. £83 pw. 
others 627 2610 ttomrioetifam- 
Ctu ComtortBbie. 2 bedroomed 
flat. Avail Mr 5 Mont w i« 
Jldy. £175 pw. Tot 788 7779. 

HAtoLEY rr W». 2 Moraome. fit- I 
Wig room, C, H- £i80 pw. Tto 
Ol 936 7776. 


qiuumr nJWBShED nan and 
houses lo Kill in ad areas 
Hunters Ol 857.7365. 


mCHMONO. Central position on 
HUI. Lus owe bed mar IM. pkfl- 
CHS pw. Prtory Ol 940 46SS. 


TOOTtNO SWl 7, MOd Z bed to* 

close tune, fitto 2 prof *nan»re. 
Cl lO pw. Priory 01 900 46SS 


HUMCTON. 6 mins HiWIDUTV 

Corner odn nuaeorwtfe m Ceor. 
Brin terrace. Beautifully Off & 
turn Dote bed rm. second tied 
rui.dito*. loe recto, kil. tuner, 
bam rm. Ad mod cons, me cot 
it. w rnacn- dryer, eti Mto 
phone rtC. Parking. U20pw. 
Tef 01607 8590. 

CAUNB WE, BEST 9 ATT, 5 mins 
ruse and moos new conver- 
sion swer mooern warious 4 r 
Mud id 2 DM penmouse. t dm 
■PL AH am cn. new lurmfn- 
inas From (itew-tiSOBW. 
Company Lea oruv. C C S Es- 
tate! 01-431 3556. 

W J NO T OW Artracbvrfe sMuMM 
town house. 10 mns 
aty wtftend. laror reception, 
<~elt equipped kitchen tuner. 9 
doubio bedroom* to 
audio, study, small garden- off 
street parhinft. £175 pw. T« 
HaJCVOD 100381 67891. 

AamncAM EXECUTIVES Seen 
lux flats 'houses up lo £500 
pw. Usual tea red. pmubs 
K ay to Lews, sou mat me Pam. 
Chrises gintn. 01-363 8»«» or 
North Qi in* pars. Regent-* 
Park otuce. 01-122 ai 56. 

FULHAM. DettgMAd. «maB hon- 
Murttte cm eotBge. Close 
Kurbpghani ctnb ana Tube. 2 
Bette, Rncft, KK/Otner. All 
inachti. Sunny Hetuaw odn. Co 
tet. £165 pw. Tel; ilsu 736 

: 1076 or 381 B8S6. 


WESTON, non * . 4 bed dri hoe 
m pretty viltage Oniy 46 mn • 
Kings Cross Well lumisnea. 
CH. mature orflra- CBOO arm. 
Co or family let nuy. Pnone 
0462 79468 eves. 


r.lV-OAPr iManaorrrint Serrirmi 
1 in regime properties in central 
soutn and wm Lretdan areas 
lor waning applicants Ol 2Si ■ 
8838. 


PAMKSfK WMBLJEDON. Luxu- 
ry Brock. 2 Beam (idly 
lurnnned 1 nr Itoi Garage. 
Cnmfnom Cage 170000 pm 
Trt 01 879 1062 or Ol 786 
6840. 


MVERSIDE FUST Attrarttir 2 
bed apt at this smart muwrn 
hiocti. oveiiootiing the Thames 
•CloO pw Cancan Luxury 
Using- 01 889 992S 


•LOAN AVK sun Wl floor . Died tn-eelnpl.tCTgriter. «P rri(X-3 


a letre. with super Iiwe cludio 
flat with Pain and tiny uKiten I 
LiQopw uki cn -aim Cooks 
01 BPS 8261. I 


SUPfQBO* FLAT* to KOUSCS 
avm. to rend Mr dmoouia. 1 
evertdn.es. Lana to snon icq in 
an areas up- re-no t, Co. 4fl. 
AteenMrieStwi.Ot eBUM. 


VtsnRNC LONDON? Alum Bates 
to CO M> e a la roe sawruon 04 
flats and noum a* miaow lor 1 
week ♦ from EiSOpw- 499 
l+dto. 


HNTtHNATtON*L Executive & 
Vtsnori Looping tor augki* 
QMtS to Muses, please Ting 
R 1 4 B. 6i7 0821 


MAVTA8I ML UR t t W. Z 
bearro. large recep. Puny 
| eg tapped. CWV« Sheri lot. 
| 01 629 2546 iTl 


EAST SHED* SWrtd. 3 Bed wrtl 
presen led tar Sun 3 *«- 

erv £i» pw. Pnoev 940 4SM. 


HOUDAT FLAT SdtVKCS Boa- 
get or luxury apis snon ML 
Central London. 01 935-24 IS. 


OtW neos penthouse in secure 

block. 60fi iounae. ? Path rm. 
baKonm CH mCL £376pw. 01- 
631 2692J1X 


HOLLAND FARK Ml W an ai 

Iranfte tnuet od-ae s»r a luUy 
tunusned newtP Duiii mats Lge 
ul with batconv lot. diner 2 3 
bet» ammo room. S nains. 
Sutaunhal ooniararCo Let 1 - 
? yes prrt £JTSpw w 01-409 
2299 H Ol 603 Mel 


CLAMMCARDC OAftOOK, WSL 
Lmm mod 1 bra flat in ntuer 
uiwt won double recep fined 
ku wm d 4- ft. bath tthoweri 
Co tet. £138 pw Conun su 
zanne Conway Saunders of 
1 Kenspifaon on 50) 3623. 


HYDE PAMUntertor OMfaned 2 
bedrooms, (an* oouate rereo- 
uon wnn dtnuio ha8. American 
kilchen, marine bathroom gius 
sep wr nai with oatcony 10 
prestige twoex Amaw now. 
ftauce Properibs 486 8936 


faAWJVt RtBOCTKtett rrwn 
£360 tier wmt 10 £300 per 
wees*? KmfaiMmdge. Hion 
canter 1 bed lenwefl flat fad 
cn. cn wane rv oner for utuim 
P riiod. Ayledbrd & Co. 361 
3SW. 


Vsti ^rr- i-: 733-— vrr'.z. 


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36 


SPORT/LAW 


PERSONAL COLUMNS 



SERVICES 


COMFORTABLE PRIVATE 

Maid* . £xorim coafcmg. Lon- 
don V »5 CMfriy pmon nwMH i g 
rarr witcomr. Tet Ot W 
2410 

CALIBRE CVS prefeartmuny 
Miam and producM 
mrnculwn nur documents. 
Details 01 -S 8 Q 2960 . 

SELECT FRIENDS exclusive in 
trotfufttOiK for the unattached 
aa Maddox Street. Umooa Wl. 
Telephone J 93 - 9 W 7 
CAPITAL CV» prepare M 9 h quan- 
ta fumcujum man. 01-007 
7905 . 

onewu. cHI paintings from 
your lavounie pnotograptv 
ComprtJBve priced ■ UtaUke re- 
production Free (Math ■ tend 
S a.e. Tenay tune an. Dew- 
Tl. 14 Denham preen. PaDUhf 
Park. MtaamwouBb. Wi(- 
land. TS 3 SLN 

PERSIAN AND OMENTAL Rugs 

repaired. ail work guaranteed- 
Tet anytime oi vr 9978 . 
nt lfflHW P, Love or Marine. 
All aon- areas. DaMtne. Dept 
«Q 16 i 23 AMngdon Road. Lon- 
don wa. Tet 01938 lOll. 


LEGAL SERVICES 


US VISA MATTERS. E-S Gudeon. 
US lawyer. I? BuUtrooe St- 
London Wl 01 486 0813 


WANTED 


16 Miners. 

Desks. Bookcase etc 6 Pre 1940 
fumlrurr TeL 01-665 0148 or 
01-228 2 Tlfi. 


FOR SALE 


RESJSTA CARPETS 
SPECIAL OFFERS 


Wtcanders Corkopiast 
Tiles, design natural only 
£ 8.95 per sq yd + VAT. 
Wool mix Bertter carpets 
4 m wide Hessian bached 
£ 4.35 per sq yd + VAT. 
While stocks last 


255 New Kmgs Road. 
Parsons Green, SW& 

Tet 0 1-73 1-2588 


Free estimate ■ Expert rutin* 


GOLD ROLES 

18 carat oyster quartz, 
day date, diamond nu- 
merals. stipe rU 

condition. 

OFFERS 

INVITED. 

0685-70129 


Spink 

Ruv A\Var Mprlals 


Buy * War Medals 

toctwfcg Orders 5 Ooe u t sa om 
Spink t Son Limned 
5-7 kin; Sard. Sr liTOrtY 
London SK|YMJ£ 

. Trf- 01 -o.m 7 ?** 1 -.M houm y 


ST R I NG FEVER at Top* Latest 
GEC programme video £ 319 . 
] 41 f 1 COl £ 149 . I 6 tn £189 Z 3 n 
stereo and video package £ 799 . 
91 Lower Sloanc Street. SWI. 
730-0935 


SLOAIK smart S rooms de- 

signed witn early Engttsh and 
American lunuture and palm- 

ing*. quilt*. weallMrvanes. etc. 
winch make a Home really dtf- 

ferenl and onrtn.il Crane Folk 
Art. 1714 SkMne Street (up- 
sUttrsl London. SWI 01 238 
2464 Mon-Frt 1 06 . sat 104 
BRtQHTS OF NETTLEBCD. Four 
Hosier beds and Georgian style 
bedroom furniture Ip Yew and 
Mahogany veneers. Large 

showroom now open The Butts 

Centre. Readme. TeL 10734 ) 

8876 M. 

CENTS 18 CARAT COLD Auto- 
matic Vacheran Constantin. 
Serviced In Jan *86 Mmi condi- 
tion. Valued at £8000 WW 
accept otter* around £ 2.460 or 
will consider err car. Tel: 
Blackpool ( 02 S 3 I 891 148 
DISCONTINUED HEAVY DUTY 
12 It wide Wilton carpets re- 
duced from £22 per m yd to 
£ 9.50 *4 yd. Chancery Carpets. 
97 99 Clerkenwell Rd. London 
CC 1 . Ol 408 0483 . 

FINEST quality wool carnets. AI 
trade prkes and under, atm 
available lOOV extra. Large 
room sue remnants under half 
normal price. Chancery Carpets 
Ol 40 8 0463 . 

FINEST quality wow carpels. AI 
trade puces and under, also 
available 100 ‘s extra Large 
room size remnants under half 
normal Pitre Chancery Carpets 
01 408 0463 . 

SWIMMING FOOL COVER- Large 
mltaUMe dome type wllh full 
range of accessories. Eseefleni 
condition. Only 3 years old. 
£300 one. For full details ptease 
tel (06821 873432 . 

CATS. STARLIGHT EXPRESS 
We have tickets lor tneseandall 
theatre and sports. Tel 631 
3719 . 687 1718 . All major 
credit cards 

OLD YORK PAVDM STONE. All 

rectangular Excellent condi- 
tion. Winter Slump Sale Save 
£££*» and order now. 0626 - 
855721 . 

TICKETS lor any event. Cals. 
SafllQhl Exp. Chess. Las Mb. 
All theatre and spans. 821 
6616/828 0498 

A. EX /visa /Diners 
TICKETS FOR ANY EVENT. Cats. 
Starlight Exa. Chess. Lea Mu. 
All mum and soon*. 

Tot 821 - 6616 . 8260498 . 

AJjc / Visa / Diners 
DEBENTURES FOR SALE re Car- 
dm Arms Park. Two pairs and 
four singles in Mocfcs F 6 G. Of- 
fers to BOX D 98 . 

OLD YORK FLAGSTONE*, rou- 
ble setts etc. Nationwide 
detivenea Tel: i 03 SOi 860039 
mum. 

SCATFMDERS Any event Inc 
Cats. Coveni Cdn. StariMii Exp 
01-828 1678 . Major eredn 

cards 

THE TONES ft 814 - 19881 . Give 
someone an ongma) issue dated 
the very nay they were born. 
Tel. 01-486 6308 . 

PIANO. Medium- stood upright. 
1 st class rood £ 386 . Can ar- 
range delivery. 01-463 0148 . 


CO! 


NTIQUl 

LLECT* 


ABLES 


LADY MOVING wishes to dtspose 
of a fine pair of Import am 
ClBtn Giltwood Consul lames. 
Eiguisntij- carved, matching 
pair at mirrors. Sacnflre V: val- 
uation. Several oriental rugs, 
reasonably priced. Ol -tso 5657 
URERTY MHIGS: I need one rscti 
lor 1974 . 197 S and 1983 (Pns- 
tine rondiuon only]. Tel. 881 
1268 exL 41 office hour* 


ANTIQUES & 
COLLECT.* 


'ABLES 


paid fur Royal 

Ooulion Figures- DouiMn Aid- 
mafoaKo wanted. 01-291 3508 . 

WANTED Jap Swords, daggers, 
runnos. Private collector. TeL 
0227 458600 p.hl 


ART 6111X5 GUIDE 


ARTIST JOHN ANTHONY hat 

various pointing* for sale, hv 
cfudlng h» muoue collection of 


if Rovai Pori rain. Cnurchgl 


etc, emcikxi wvesihieni. 
London studio. Tet Ot 2 M 
7877 


MUSICAL 

INSTRUMENTS 


THE PIANO WORKSHOP 

London's leading spedaUsI tn 
new and restored planes, lor 
the largest genuine selection 
avatUMe. 30 a HighpMC Rd. 
NW 3 01 267 767 £ Freer 

catalogue. ■ 

HUM BMP MRS ■ Protect musical 

mstranamts from *y air dam- 


age caused by crtrtmiJBMtug 


Air Imssrovement Centre. __ 
DroMOh SL. SWI. 01 B 34 
2834 . 

THE PIANO WORKSHOP 

London’s leading wedatist vw 
new Mid restored pianos for the 
urges! genuine sefeottn *raU- 

aUr. 30a Wghgat* Rd. NW6. 
01-267 7671 . Free catalogue. 


CLUBS 


YOUNG CHELSEA BRIDGE Hub 
and school na-ao age group' 
Tel: 01-373 1666 . 


SHORT LETS 


COUN TRY COTTAGE. In Oxford- 
shire Avail tit Mid AnrH. by the 
week or long wk . end. Tei 0236 
87223 after six. 

. Large 2 bed hut ftaL 


Os. AvaU 


Weekly pww after 

01 937 4403. 

LUXURY SERVICED Apartments 
near Soane Square Aah ion- 
worth Lid 01-681 eooe rn 
LUXURY SERVICED flats, 
central London From £328 pw 
Ring Town Hse AMs 373 3433 
5 . KEN. Cdn So: 2 Bedrn\Mlco- 
nv rtfll.l . 4 - 20 6 or Part. 
CltiOOOpw. T et Ol 373 0667 . 
SE R V ICE D APARTMENTS In 
kemtngMn Col TV 2 Ahr n*hd. 
ox. Coiungham Apts 373 6306 . 
ST JAMES SWI. Luxury 2 bed 
fully furnished serviced apt nr 
park. 01 373 6306 IT). 


FLATSHARE 1 


SHEPHERDS BUSH WU. Share 
wllh 2 prof females Ige newly 
decorated hse. C h. Own bed 
and bath Close lubes. £60 p-w. 
Inch F 28 Plus. Tel Lama, work 
9 - 8 . 6 - 10 . Ot 7-10 8040 . 


SUIT CAR OWNER. W 2 Ige CM 
BrdMI tn private house. Own 
garage. Bain and wc. use of 

kitchen. £ 7 Spw me. 01262 
9691 . 

SW 5 2 people 18-23 In share 
room -urge flat Near tube. 
£133 pern. Shared bids. Trt 
373 0109 9 attain- lO.OOam or 
after 6 . 00 p m. 

CHELSEA Ige sunny dtu 
bed silting rm. share KtB. sun 
t or 2 sharing £37 SO pw unc 
Trt 382 8353 . 

FLATMATES Selective Sharing. 
Well esiab introductory service, 
ptte Irt tor a pot 01-589 8491 . 
313 Bromtrton Road. SW 3 
SW 11 Pro*. M/F wanted lo share 
huge V nice flat In Pr of Wales 
Dr. £280 prm. Trt. 584 5033 
on 622 7674 home. 

WANTED. Proffedonai . female 
Uie 2 <Tv leeks house 'fiatshare. 
central London. 01-236 0879 
office hours 

CHELSEA. F. lo snare small stu- 
dio 1141 £160 pm Inc. Tet 361 
3126 alter 6 pm. 
FWD-A-FLAT (Flat Sharing 
Agency) home-owners no fee. 
36 Kings Rd. SW 3 OI-S 84 8012 
HIGHBURY FltLDS-AvaU 

bmmed Spac flat Joe room. All 
mod rons.D 66 pw 354 1760 . 
PUTNEY. 1 Prof r. Shr lovely fit 
Nr Heath. £220 pm end. Ot 
-403 3303 (Wl B 98 6773 |H 1 
PUTNEY. LUX flat Prof 25 *. 
O/R. nref mon-frt. Share 1 cov- 
er. £48 pw tncl. Ot 789 4399 
fUltOK studio flan** in targe 
house for quirt person. £200 
p* m. 01-218 4689 (work). 
RICHMOND P. 24 *. Share ra. 
o-r. 2 min* stn. £180 pem rod. 
Day 437 0434 . Eve 940 768 a 
SWI 401 person age 30 *. Own 
smaU room. £140 pem ad- 
Trt: 336 3922 I after 69 <n). 
SW 7 . Own room spacious luxury 
ftaL £48 p.w. tuny exd. Tele- 
phone 01-370 2393 . 

SWia Female O.'Rnt In shrd 
hse. a ow tube iSautiifiekU DU. 
£40 pw. Tel 247 9098 (Day). 
W. NENSMOTON Prof m/I. Su- 
per o r m flat nr lube. £46 pw 
excL Tel. 01 - 381-8398 
HARLEY ST. Wl large room for 
prof per Maid. Linen. £266 pm 
uie. Ol 938 0292 
WEST HAMPSTEAD. F. gradL 
N S. 0 ». CM 5 mins lube 
£178 pm Inc. Eves. 436 1223 
WBHSLEDON PK Uvky prof 
25 *. O-R dbL Lovely hse nr 
lube £160 pem. 9460667 an 7 


IRELAND 


DUBUN 


Cosy teoaced hau» 3 nruRs 
tram city centre, set m a qua 
avenue. Living mm. kitchen. 1 
bedroom, bathroom, CH Off 
street partong. Ideal hy coupta. 


Freehold £20,000 ono 
Phone 0001 740013 


WILTSHIRE 


MARLBOROUGH DOWNS. Re- 
mote luxury nous*. 6 beds. 3 
baths i 2 en suuec fully lilted 
oak kitchen. 3 WW. 20 acres, 
staining and ouimuMings. heal- 
ed swimming pool, tennis court 
Could easily be divided. Fishing 
available !**: hours west End. 
12 miles Swindon Offers 
around £ 200 . 000 . 067286 

232 . 


V.W. AND AUDI 


GOLF cm 1800 . 1983 . Lhasa 
preen, lull spoilers. S ■ R tints. 
£ 4 . 900 . Dr Reed 0438 813272 


MERCEDES WANTED 


MERCEDES 2 SD BE 78 79 . 

Phone Dublin 0001688558 


ANNOUNCEMENTS 


UIBnBBSEUfll 


Arthritis: 

Seriously affects 
over 6 million 
peopleinttieUK 


Phot, a dMUuw»Ar 9 u$iHK 
A iqurv to Mp uf m Otr /ilH n. 


THEAmSUnSAmKHSMAnSMi 

COUHCRFOfi RESEARCH 

41 EaideStreet. LondoalAClR4AR 


Come and see 
Cliff Richard 
in the musical 
J, Time"and 
help our cause. 


On April "ih 19M HfiH The 
Puchessol Kent will allend a 
< haniy cala ptrriuntwnci.' ol the 
new nnaiiiol'TinK-'maidol 
Oncer Reliei ai ihe Dominion 
Thmirc You can help the vk- 
nmsol cancer b> coming along 
Ticket details are available 
from Cancer Rviicf.30 P«se« 
Square. London NW1 eQLTel 
Ol-i420i:&. 


Macmillan fond 


30,000 

DEAF CHILDREN 
NEED YOUR HELP 


These cWHren haw lo be taught how 
rospe* HieyneedsiMcialwchefS. 
sg«nl awmon ana swan 


equwronL Ptea»gneusmemejns 
that 


m help and lo «e ifotthey m twt 
HxggWn by Govern mem, py 

Etuanon. tryLacal Aimomies 

DMKUatfUgadwcanBflDii 


NATIONAL DEAF 
CHILDREN'S SOCIETY 
45 Hatfanl RoaL Londoa WZ SAH 

'ran •eMemace’fasan.'vteiitfnr' 
9 pam> 0 Ba»ki .TM" 



The more 
you help us, 
the more 
reilfind oi 



OVERSEAS TRAVEL 


TRAILFINDERS 

VWiJbWb km eo« « 9 M» T*» 
besi-end « can pmw «■ 
170DOO chads gm* 1570. 

AHOUND THE WOULD 
FROM £765 


mmer 

PERTH EW ^ 
MJCXUWO M 3 Og 
B 4 MK 0 X £« 55 

SINGAPORE CHS CM 
MAW _ ^ 

Fiawo* rw 5 “ 
HOMO KONG *397 tt7t 

nwAY C 2 M na 

COLOMBO 041 E« 
Cajon 080 EZ 79 

mmh m; 
jomum 

LIMA 053 E«M 

LOS 

AM GEIS tlSf CSS 
NCWYCMK MB 
GEfCVA C 75 CIS 
^ 4 B EARLS COURT ROAD 
liHOCW W 8 KJ 
Eunw/USA FV«S 

aisytt 


SWITZERLAND 
FROM ONLY 
£99 RETURN 


Save with Swissair^s 
Super Apex. 

London io Zurich or 
Geneva daily on con- 
venient afternoon 
flights. 

And daily morning 
flights London to Basle 
(except Sundays). 
Book and pay 14 days 
before departure. 

Slay in Switzerland at 
least until the Sunday 
after arrival. 

Similar savings also 
from Manchester and 
Birmingham direct lo 
Switzerland. 

Bookings and full con- 
ditions from travel 
agents or 01-4379583. 


issdr^l 


♦FLIGHTS FLIGHTS FLIGHTS* 
**Hl/GE DISCOUNTS** 
★★TOURIST CLASS** 
★★CLUB CLASS** 
★★1ST CLASS** 

* svnev * * MELBOURNE + 

* PERTH * * OTSBANt * 

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tu * *PT UOttfSBV 6 

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* SNGAPOfE * * MANLA * 

* DUBAI * * MHIW» Sr 

* MO EAST * * MHOBI • 

* LUSAKA * * HARARE * 
•■TORONTO * * VANCOUVER * 

* L ANGELES * * MUM * 

* CARMKAN * *SFtWIDSCO St 
* USA * USA * USA s-USA * 

SUNWORLD TRAVEL 
lEst'd IWl 

JO Sooth SL Epsom . Surrey 
103727 ) 27 SW/ 23 ) JO/ 77 104 / 

4 I 104 / 24 BJ 2/24047 
Tckx 24 M 7 


EASTER 
FUGHTS 
FROM £109 


MALAGA Vn E1Z9 3/4 ETO9 

AuCANTE 27/3 E124 4/4 CI14 

PALMA 26/3 fW 

fKAT 19/3 £179 Z/4 £179 

TB. AVIV 

192426J1/3 £179 


Sobj. Id i/Bx 

SPEEDWING 
01-486 9356 

AGENTS ATOL 1824 


GATWICK 

• NICE • 


■-. EVERY THURSDAY 
SATURDAYS SUNDAY 
1 . • From May 17 • 
FLIGHTS* HOTELS 
•FLYDRIVE* 



€oa‘r;h 


N York '£229 I't-L-rq .£405 
to> A ng £3 1 9 • Ncirooi- £339 


S/dner £ 639 ' ' Boncoi £339 
Auek £750 Toronto - £239 


130 Jarmyo Sfraaf. 5 W) 
SchadulaiFUghls *79 7144 
iodart f ligSra S 39 714 & 


LOWEST FARES 
WORLDWIDE 
Paris £69 Cairo £205 
Milan £88 JTburg £345 
Alncns £109 HKonq £496 
G«TI Zur £79 LA SF £345 
Faro £89 N York £275 
VmiiU £129 SydMPl £699 
Drthi £345 TAvlv £169 

SUN '& SAND 

21 SWALLOW ST 
LONDON W.l. 

01-437 0537/734 9503 
Nvucn e/CAf»s accepted 


AUSTRALIA 
FAR EAST 


WORLDWIDE 

The lowest cost Rltfita 

Eorocfiedk Travel 
01-942 4613 
01-543 4227 

Hsiab 1970 


MSGOUKTEU FAKES 

angle return 
Jo-burg. Har £300 £ 46 a 

Nairobi £220 £325 

Cairo £130 £200 

Laqos £238 £338 

Drt Bom £280 £340 

Bangkok • £195 £350 

Douaia £420 

Afro Asian Travel Ltd 


162 . 168 Regent St w l 
TEL: 01-07 8255 / 8 / 71 * 
AMEX/ VISA/ DINERS 


LOWEST FARES 
WORLDWIDE 
Parts £69 Cairo £205 
Milan £68 JTHKfl £345 
Athens £109 HKong £495 
On Zur £79 LA SF £343 
Faro £89 N York £275 
Vienna £129 SydMrt£699 
Delhi £346 TAviv £l69 

SUN & SAND 

21 SWALLOW ST 
LONDON W.l. 

01-437 0537/734 9503 
MAJOR CJCAR 05 ACCEPTED 


NEW LOW FAKES WORLDWIDE 

Anatun M» oun TON} 

Frssnn r«0 toanod £170 

Lagos E3TO JMMh jW 

Unwa S m hand* £280 

Amman £235 KuUSn £420 

Btinm £460 K SW tm 

Baigto* E3» N To* 

sx” m eu as 

2 DEfMW Sinai LONDON Wl 
Tei 01-438 3 K 5 !"*“" 

aruw 


TRAVEL SAVERS 


carrlbean 

New York 

Toromo 

LA/Frtsco 

Sydney 

JWurg 

Florida 

Auhund 

Hongkong 

5 Am mea 
**ta FfatfCM 

01 402 


O/W BUI 
£3 IS 
Cl 39 £235 
£150 £230 
£216 £325 
£410 £640 
£265 £419 
£489 £299 
£389 £ 7«9 
£273 £469 
£ 26 S £430 
BH* Fire*** 

3301 


UP UP & away 


Nairobi. JoHurg. Cairo. Du- 
bai. Istanbul Slngayore. K.L. 
Drttil. Bangkok. Hong Kong. 
Sydney. Europe- 4 The 
Amertras. Flamingo Travel 
3 New Quebec St Marble 
ATCh London W 1 H TDD. 

01402 9217/18/19 

Open Saturday io. 00 - 13.00 


COSTCUI 1118 ON Itights-hob 
W Europe. USA A most damna- 
tions. Dtrtocnai Travel: 01-730 
2201 AST A LATA ATOL. 


TravetwtM 01 Ml lttt. 
ABTA 


MALDTVSS. LANZAROTE 

Islands Ol 836 4883 . ATOL 
2061 . 


DM AFRICA EUROPE Australia 
New Zealand. Geiudne dlsrouM 
fares. OTC. 01-602 9236 . 


CHEAP FUGHTS Worldwide, 
ftayraarket 01-930 1366 . 


USA from C 99 Malar travel. Ol 
485 9237 . IATA 


SWITOERLAND Scheduled fUghta 
01-724 2388 ABTA ATOI 


mORCA. TEHUOFE. Greek B- 
tamts. Algarve . vHtaa Apts 
PeraiMO Tavern*). Hoiidaw A 

FUgnts. Summer / Winter Bro- 

chures. oookmos only direct 
from. The speoalMs. venrurei 

Holidays. Tel 0742 31 ICO 
WORLD WIDE Flights. 
Spe cia l ta mp m First h Chib 

Class 6 Economy to Australia. 

Far East. 5 - Africa. USA. Lis- 

bon. Faro 6 Geneva. Phone 
Travel Centre 01-666 7028 

ABTA 

ABfFAJtZ SPECIALISTS Sydney 

O/W £396 rtn £648. Auckland 

o/w £420 rtn £ 774 . Jo-burg 

O/W £264 rtn £470 Los Ange- 

les O/w £177 rtn £ 338 . London 
FHght Centro 01-370 6332 . 
MOT TURKEY. 12 berth crowd 

motor yacht from £ 1.000 p w. 

UMUc private beach hotel (r 

£ 330 pg i 2 weeks. Inc IHJ Free 

walersports with both. 01-326 

1005 . ATOL 2091 
CASTER Malta. Coro. Algarve. 
22 . 24 . 2 & 27 . 2 B 30 Mar 1*2 
wks. Flan, pensions, hotels. 

Bonavenlure Ol 937 1649 . 

ABTA ATOL 879 B. 

LAWN AMERICA. Low cost 
flights eg rm> £ 495 . Unu 

£475 rtn. Abo SmaU Group 

Holiday Journeys. JLA Ol - 747 - 

3108 

LOW FARES WORLDWIDE - 

USA. & America. Mid and Far 

East G Africa. Trayvaie. 48 

Margaret Street, wi. Oi 880 

2928 <vb* Accented} 

ROUND WORLD £746 econ. CSuh 

17 £ 1899 . flrsi fr £ 2035 . Syd- 

ney ir £889 rtn. CrtumbuSt 
Cutters Gardens. IO Devonshire 

Square. EC2. 01 929 42SI 
SPAM. PORTUGAL. GREECE. 

FligMs from most UK airports. 

Many ialr special oeero. FPMor 

Ot 471 0047 ATOL 1640 
Ac /Visa. 


USA.Canaaa.CartbbeanJUTiGa. 
Far EasL Australia. Globecrost 
01-787 2182/2212 ABTA. 

DISCOUNTS 1 * 1 / Economy tick- 
ers. Try us 

taxLFLICHTBOOKERS 01-387 
9100 . 

LOW COSY FUGHTS. Most Euro- 
pean destinations, vaiexander 
01 402 4282-0062 ABTA 

61004 ATOL I 960 

MUM, M MA IC A. N.VORK. 
Worldwide cheapest fares, 

mciuaaad Travel. I Duke st 
Richmond ABTA 01-940 4073 . 

TUNISIA For dial perfect holiday 
with sunny days * c a ref re e 
nlghis. Ideal for March/APfll. 
Tunisian Travel. Ol 573 4411 . 

IBL N/Yot* £169 Mtand £198 
LA £299 rm Abo Cheapest 
schedule IB ou major US cant- 
ers. 01 684 7371 ABTA. 

ALICANTE. Faro. Malaga etc. 
Ofaiumd Ttravel ATOL 1785 . 
01-581 4641 . Horsham 68841 

AUSSIE, mz. sth Africa, us. a. 


Hong Kong Best Fare* 01-493 
7778 ABTA. 


STD/MEL £618 Perm £846 All 
malar carriers so AUS/NZ. Ol- 
884 7371 . ABTA 
SOUTH AFRICA Jotmrg 17 £ 468 . 
01 -884 7371 ABTA. 


GENERAL 


TAKE TWt OFT lo Parts. Am- 
swdam. Brusaeh. Bruges. 
Geneva. Berne. Lausanne. The 
Hague. DuMtn. Rouen. Bou- 
logne & Dieppe. Time Off. 2 a. 
Chester dose. Lennon, fiwix 
7 BQ. 01-236 8070 . 

STEMS IN CYPRUS. Special 
prices 1 « 2 weeks hotels * 
apans Pan World HotidaysOI- 
734 2562 . 


SELF-CATERING 


TUNISIA For a p a rtme n t* or the 

Dtar D Andatous Hotel al Port 

El Kamaoul. the holiday fewrt 

bi Tunisia's crown, call Patricia 

WUdblOOd Ltd 0249 817D2S OT 

01-688 6722 . ABTA ATOL 
1276 . 


SELF-CATERING 

FRANCE 


SOUTH OF FRANCE 12 miles 
caiutes farmhouse sips ft. large 
garden. Tel Ol 736 0151 . 

SW FRANCE & Brittany. Seaside 
rural cottages. Some with pools. 
0228 337477 / 33 S 761 . 


SELF-CATERING 

GREECE 


ISLANDS m THE SUN 


srann breaks 

Crete. Certulonia. Corfu. 
Zanir. Skiathos 

1 Wk irom £ 19 APP. 

2 Wk, from C 225 p p 
Some FREE child places 

Ap-rH 1 . 8 . 1622^9 

May 5.9.12. 

wnv no* treat yourself lo a 
mile hal ot Summer. DrhgM- 
lirl family villas 6 rtuillm 
clove lo okmous beaches. 

For details 
Trt 



SPRING SALE 


WBa/Tararog llsMajs 
at da Mu prices 


SpetMS ft Poro* 

M41/S.744J3/4 - CUT 

Crete 

25 / 3 , 1 , 8 . 15 , 21/4 - OH 

Rhodes 

23,1603/4 - £145 
Till 01-828 7482 »* torn) 


9 WBm 


IWhtaj* 
m Rssd. 


ewi 
ATOL lies 


SPRING SALE 

WIVTdbth NOMUT 
M jve mv pms 

Spetees & Poros 

7, 14^1/4 - £139 

Crete 

8.T&22/4 - £155 

Rhodes 

-L9.1&23/4 - £165 
TIL 01-829 7882 (24 bra) 
Artnk Hofefna 
SWAN Hoad. 

London EWI 

ABTA ATOL 1 188 


GREECE - SnKMfc OFFER 9 / 4 . 
Km 1 wk £149. 2 wk* £169. 
Rhodes l wk £169. 2 wks £179 
■09231 77B344. 104221 76999- 
Knnway HoiUtays ABTA/ 
ATOL 1107 

HON m CORFU. Aprfl/May 
special puces ip our Attractive 
villas. Ring Pan World Hotidays 
Ol 734 2 B 62 

KHOKS EASIER Self Csderlnv 
ssurtmenb it HOHtt from 
£ 1 7 TP.P Inc. Trt: 0705 862814 . 


On trial 


among 

world’s 


elite 


From Jobs BaSantme 
NttvOrieass 

Severiano Balksteros starts 
Ihe defence of his New Orleans 
Open title today on the par-72 
Lakewood course. Although he 
has been warmly welcomed 
back by his peers, ihe Spaniard 

is very much aware ibai be is on 

trial among the world's elite. 

Jack Nicklaus, Toro Watson, 
Bernhard Longer, Greg Nor- 
man, Hal Sutton and Calvin 
Pcete compete in what will be 
Ballesteros's sole tournament 
appearance in 1980 on this tour. 
He was banned last year for not 
fulfilling a commitment to play 
in 15 events. 

Having promis ed to play, why 
did Ballesteros renege? It seems 
that be just could not bring 
himself to travel constantly 
across the Atlantic to a country 
be has never enjoyed being in 
for longer than two or three 
weeks,- so he took a calculated 
chance that the American drarii 
needed him more than he 
needed it. 

Ballesteros answered in some 
detail the “evidence" just issued 
by the commissioner, Deane 
Peman, to prove dial the golfer 
was. technically, in the wrong. 
“I think maybe be is mad at me 
because they changed rules be- 
cause of me,” he said yesterday. 
“Before I won at Greensboro in 
1978 you had to go the qualify- 
ing school to get your card. 

Ballesteros said be saw noth- 
ing wrong with giving any 
winner of a big championship a 
five-year exemption, allowing 
him to play whenever he 
pleased. 

“In 1984 I played in 15 
tournaments and found it was 
just too much for me to come 
over here and spend so much 
time," be said. “There were too 
many trips across the Atlantic. 1 * 

“People like Arnold Palmer 
made the tour, not Beman. 
Some of the players are afraid of 
him. I am not one of them," be 
said firmly. “Beman has afl the 
power and the players just work 
for him. It really should be the 
opposite. Beman should work 
for the players." 


In a flash: Steamark races down the 


rente to a win in the grant slalom 


Stenmark leaves his mark 


Lake Placid (Reuter) — 
fngemar Stenmark. of Sweden,' 

beat Hubert Strotz, of Ausaoia, 

on Tuesday to win a Work! Chp 

men's gjh»nt slalom event at 

WJutefece Mountain, the ate of 

his two Olympic victories in 

1980. Stenmark’s time of 
2:40.90 for two runs wasjgood 
enough to hold off a challenge 
by Strolz, who bad the third best 

time of the second run and 

finished with a combined time 
of 2:40.94. Robert Erlacher, of 
Italy, came third in 2:4132. 


■*BtKh 8 rML 5 j;tR 

l^wnctSooffl.S 2 ;r.BPM«ortc{V^. 4 tt 
a M Too*mjw. 33: 9. C tSNdMl^gS 

phnihiI 


a. e hb 




.192; A LJ 


RESULTS: (Bant aMom: 1. t Stamm* 


2:41.73; & 

7. G Matter 

OT). 2*2.48. 9. M 
KoeWxcaHr 


, OTotsch 
1:10.0 
. Ill; 11. A 
_ H Etw (AisssteS. 
24331; ft. FPiccatdffrt. 2:4035; 14, M 
Was«»r(WG^ 243.45. iSB PtmoUop^ 


2:43.49. Gtatit aMom alK S a a at 


170: 7. B ^oSrtcreurt. 185; L HSj rtte 

Mu' {W. 129; «. F Hwmar (8nittL12l: 
13. K ropioar (SvatzL lift 14. A SMmr 
ytastff^TO: 15. AWeittBlflJKtA ««- 
m Waieryille Valley, New 
Hampshire, -(Reuter) — 
Roswitha Steiner, of Austria, 
won the final World Cop 
women’s slalom ofthe- season 
on Tuesday. - Malgoraaia 
Magore, of France, finished 
second, and Erika of 

Switzerland came third. 

1.B Stator lAMOiaa. 

;ZMM 09 ora<F«lt 30 l; 


* 1J4.B8; A C 
acmwwr p-q.W: 5 - P PMto 

11. A Gp, (Auatita^. 13SJ0-. ft. P 
Magoai^SnN fflL 1J8.78: tX A 
En Scftar (PusaW. 135^1; 14. H 
Butwr (F4 liOWM. 

1^8 10. 8Um ataHdtog K 1. Rotwttta 
r Ounsm; 110 pis; 2. Ertta Haa* 
\ fi^iltarTtoa Mm «1 77: 4. 
inpvhaivBfcHB (CndiMlDraM-Sft £ 

S^orOwa(SMti^_ 5ft Mb LacMMtt* 
« «qSrr. Vtaoi Schmktaf 
SoSwidM St: MtHf 9. M 

SmMkA anUtaSctanidMour (Ssrtiz). 
48; istall. B Badtont fSwttz) and A 
JdcntadtarMrttoa}. 44; iCHBortStii (»)l 
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Iran 34.17a 



Salmon lairds surface again with a feudal smile 


By Conrad Voss Bark 


D was landlord-hashing day in 
the Boose of Commons when the 
Salmon Bill came up for ihe 
second reading debate; and what 
a splendid time was had by aU. 
The Bill aims at stopping the 
black market in salmon by 
licensing salmon dealers and 
makes some minor reforms in 
the Scottish district fishery 
boards. That was enough for the 
Scottish left-wingers. .They 
waded k So, too, did- the 
Scottish Nationalist MP, Don- 
ald Stewart, aa admlmble man 



to deal with tint, Latov's 
Norman Buchan said, h-tfl 
may qoote — “to take the water* 


from the Western Isles, who 
complained that though the Bin 
did certain things it did not deal 
with the fundamental issues of 
the feudal system. 

That system, Mr Stewart 
explained to tiiose unacquainted 
with ft, was one that 
private landlords fee. dak the 
ownership of wfld fish- The way 


community direction in tee n- 
terests of the commonly'*. , 

Another Labour member, 
John Home Robertson, who is a 
farmer on til* banks of lb* 
Tweed, explained that, the 
^ommuiiity indadcd. gUllioi 
representatives of all the people, 
including local comdHws. 

A motion was tabled to refine 
to accept a Biff which snfifenrd 
from the fetal flaw that it was a 
Scottish landlords’ Bill, and 


therefore extended th ei r powers 
-mid privileges and mute no 
a dtuuit e proriahm for anglers. 

Cnrtoesiy enoaglwif was left 
to Labour mem b ers who were 
afau salmon fishermen, such as 
Sdy Nteoa, to point out that It 
wus f&raagfera themselves who 
had been campaigning for the 
B3L 

' Wife the Labour party hap- 
jSj ftBL the left-wingor tailed 
tn a m end the BiO by 43 wtes 
jiggfnst. LZS.and the Commons 
went home Jawcring Chat far the 
time being at least the Scottish 
landlords axe safe- 


Law Report March 20 1 986 


Changing mode of juvenile’s trial 


Regina ▼ Newham Juvenile 
Court, Ex parte F 
Before Lora Justice Stephen 
Brown and Mr Justice 
McCullough 

[Judgment given March 131 ' 

Where a juvenile court had, 
after due consideration, deter- 
mined the mode of trial of an 
alleged juvenile offender pursu- 
ant to section 24(1 Xa) of the 
Magistrates' Courts Act 1 980. a 
differently constituted juvenile 
court, on an adjourned hearing 
before a plea had been taken and 
summary trial or committal 
proceedings embarked upon, 
had no power to review and 
reverse the previous decision in 
the absence of a change of 
circumstances. 

The Queen's Bench Di- 
visional Court accordingly 
granted an application for ju- 
dicial review by a juvenile 
defendant and quashed the de- 
cision of the Newham Juvenile 
Court on November 6, 1985, 
whereby they reversed the pre- 
vious decision of a differently 
constituted court on September 
20, declined to try the juvenile 
summarily on charges of rob- 
bery and having wrth him a 
firearm or imitation firearm and 
committed him to Snaresbrook 
Crown Conn on those charges. 

Mr Richard P. Sutton for the 


court. 


Philpon 


juvenile 


LORD JUSTICE STEPHEN 
BROWN said that the juvenile 
came before the juvenile court 
on September 20,. 1985, when 
justices considered the mode of 
trial pursuant to section 24{IXa> 
of the 1980 Art. . 

Section 24(IXa) provided: 
“Where a person under the age. 
of 17 appears or is brought 
before a magistrates' court on ah 
information charging him with 
an indictable offence other than 
homicid^ he. shall be tried 
summarily unless — (a) he has 
attained the age of 14 and the 
offence is such as is mentioned 
in subfecuon (2) of section 53 of . 
the Children and Young persons 
Act 1933 (under which jyotmg 
persons convicted on indict- 
ment of . certain grave crimes, 
may be sentenced lobe detained 
for long periods} and the court 
considers that if be is found 
guilty of the offence it ought to 
be possible lo sentence bun in 
pursuance of that sub- 
section;. 

After bearing representations 
from both sides, the justices 
acceded to the prosecution re- 
quest that the matter should 
proceed by way of summary 
trial No plea was taken and the 
matter was adjourned- - 

On the adjourned- hearing 
date of October 21. the juvenile 
failed to answer his bail. He was- 
arrested and brought before a 


In addition to the robbery and 
firearms, charges, the juvenile 
was charged with failing to 
surrender to his bail, with road 
traffic offences in May and 
September 1985, and with han- 
dling stolen goods in. October 
while on haiL- 

The case , was further ad- 
journed to 'November 6 before 


the same justices as had sat on 
October 30. The 


differently constituted juvenile 
court on October “ 


30. 


The justices pur- 
ported to reverse the decision 
taken on September 20 without 
-considering -the new circum- 
stances which had since arisen. 

• They refused to try the rob- 
bery and firearms offences sum* 
manly and committed the 
juvenile to the crown court on 
those charges. 

Counsel for the Juvenile 
submitted that a decision hav- 
ing once been taken after due 
ana proper consideration to 
implement summary _ trial. . it 
was not open to review sub- 
sequently by different justices; 
certainly not-in the absence of 
different circumstances. . 

Were the justices on Novem- 
ber. 6 at liberty to review and 
reverse the decision formally 
taken and : announced by the 
justices on September 20? 

If the justices had no such 
power there was an apparent 
anomaly in that justices who 
had begun to try an offence 
summarily under -section 
24{lXa), 'coiikl proceed as 
examining justices if they took 


the view ihat the defendant 
should not after all be tried 
Summarily: see section 25(5} 
and (6)' of the 1980 Act 

Once a decision had been 
taken after proper inquiry and 
the consideration of all relevant 
matters, it could not simply be 
reversed without further addi- 
tional factors which put a dif- 
ferent complexion on the case. 

That was not the present case. 
The justices on November b, 
would have had the opportunity 
for taking a different view from 
that taken on September 20 in 
the light of new factors which 
had emerged since that date. 

The justices knew that other 
offences were alleged to have 
been committed and it was 
arguable that that would have 
offered them the opportunity to 
review the previous decision as 
to the proper mode of trial. 

But the justices had reviewed 
the previous decision on the 
same facts without taking into 
account the additional material. 
In so acting they had exceeded 
their powers. It was. inevitable 
although unfortunate that the 
order committing the juvenile 
on the two charges should be 
quashed. 


Mr Justice McCullough deliv- 
ered a concurring judgment. 

Solicitors: Duthie. Han & 
: Metropolitan 
P^«« Solrator, Sharpe Pritcb- 


Surety not discharged by minor breach 


National Westminster Bank 
pic v Riley 

Before Lord Justice May and Sir 
George Walla* 

[Judgment given March 14] ' 
A non-repud La lory breach of a 

principal contract between 
debtor and creditor would not 
discharge a surety who bad 
guaranteed it unless it could be 
shown to amount to a departure 
from a term of the principal 
contract which had been 
embodied in the contract of 


guarantee. 

The Court of Appeal so held 


in a reserved judgment, allowing 
an appeal by the plaintiff. 


National Westminster Bank pic. 
from an order of Sir Nefl 
Lawson who. sitting as a judge 
of the High Court on October 
10, 1984, had dismissed its 
appeal from a decision of Mas- 
ter Crei^htmore to set aside a 


default judgment against . the 


Riley, and to give him uncondi- 
tional leave to defend the 
plaintiffs action under a con- 
tract of guarantee whereby he 
had guaranteed the debts of hi* 
company, , which had gone into 
liquidation. 

Mr Mark Potter. QC and Mr 
John B. Briggs for the plain tiff: 
Mr Gerald Godfrey. QC and Mr . 
James Bonney for' the 
defendant 

LORD JUSTICE MAY said 
that the judge, having been 
referred to The Vjtvassew That 
Co Ltd v Ashmore (unreported. 
April 2, 1976), had concluded, 
that il was arguable that the non- 
repudiaiory breach by the hank 
of its agreement with the com- . 
parry (failing to pay a direct 
debit on its overdrawn account) 
had discharged the defendant’s.' 
liability as guarantor. 

Although part of Lord Justice 


way, read as a whole and with 
the other judgments in that case; 
it decided, so the plaintiff had 
argued, only that a repudiatory 
breach, accepted by the debtor, 
would, provide a basis -for an 
amiable defence. 

That,, it had submitted, was 
wholly in accord with the gen- 
eral principles of surety law and 
with Royal Bank of Canada v 


Salvaeori « 1 928) 3 'WWR -50f, 
l and CeUuloi 


•Uulose Products Pty 

l v Truda ((1970) 92 WN 561, 
565). . 

It had 'accepted, however that 


defendant. 


John Wilton 


Browne's - judgment - in 
ravassew could be read in that. 


Similar offence evidence 


v Rasim 

i ere the only issue in tire 
trial ofa defendant charged with 
handling stolen goods was 
whether he had guilty knowl- 
edge, evidence of previous simi- 
lar offences should only be 
adduced under section 27t3Xb) 
of the Theft Act 1968 where the 
interests of justice so demanded. 

The Court of Appeal (Crim- 
inal Division) (Lord Justice 
Watkins. Mr Justice McCowau 
and Mr Justice Otton) so stated 
on March 13 when dismissing 
an appeal by Peter Rasim 
against a total sentence of. 


twenty-one. months’ imprison- 
ment passed on him on Feb- 
ruary 12, 1985- at the Central 
Criminal Court (Judge. Aigyle, 
QC and a jury) for two offences 
of handling stolen goods. 

LORD JUSTICE WATKINS 
said that it was right to say that 
evidence of previous convic- 
tions should not be adduced 
under section 27(3Xb) in cases 
of handling stolen goods as a 
matter of course: the intention 
of Parliament was to gye the 
court a discretion .readmit such 
evidence when the demands of 
justice warranted it. 


_ the creditor departed either 
front the express terms of the 
guarantee or from terms of the 
principal contract' which had' 
been embodied in the guarantee, 
but had said that there had been 
no such departure herie. . 

. His Lonasfaip entirely -agreed 
with the plaintiffs analysis- of 
the ratio of Vavasseur. A non- 
- repudiatory breach of a -prin- 
cipal contract would not, 
without more, discharge the 
■guarantor, although : a 
repudiatory breach, if accepted. 

--would certainly do so. • 

On ly . if ‘ a . _non-repndiatory 
breach amounted to a departure 
from a term of the creditor's 
contract vnih foe debtor which 
.. had* been embodied in foe 
; guarantee would it discharge the 


Rtemtiffs breach of hs obi 
Don to foe company bad dis- 

asi h ™ f? °- «■ 

Sir george waller, 
g5 c ^K. sai f that yavasscur 
had applied foe existing law. 
aajnejy, that a guarantor could 
only be discharged by a “not 

alteration- lo o? 
breach of the relationship be- 
tw ^ foe panies^^ 

^ 2? F^ntiffin 
case was, in relation to the 
®9“ trac L about as ia- 
gfostantial as it was possible to 

ft 1 ? adorc Goldman 

C cS5w5£rV. J ?y & Co for Ian 

t ~Corbndge&Ga, Blackpool. 


surety . see Blest y Brown ((1 8621 
-4 de-GF & J 367) and Holme v 
BnatskJim 1878). 3 QBO 455L 

' .TlwJiKlge betow had read too 

mqch _mio.FaiftasscKr.In view of 
the terms of the guarantee 
contract' it was impossible for 
the defendant re argue that foe 


Corrections 

smS£sm 

ment, the sentence 
w 3s, unclear whether «* 

J^mg fo e jSjrtf-g. 

continue committal ^ 

and an order of»™2? WJ,n 8 s 
reopen » 


reopen summary^™^ 

antfnQi eatSSS a fES” 8 * 


Tinies^ February 261 itw 

|Ppefoint^name ^ *** 

Eileen BufiarSr” * 85 Vaten * 


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i j| 


THE TIMES THURSDAY MARCH 20 1986 


SPORT 


37 



I can 


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au*s 


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Si# t 




Twelve months ago. Pal 
Eddery began the new Flat 
season id . brilliant style by. 
winning, the first three races at 
Doncaster. Today, I expectthe 
-feiafcmed. former champion 
jockey, who has no equal on 
his day, to make another good 
start by landing a double at 
Town Moor on Honeydew 
Wonder (3.15) and TremMant 

Tremblant is napped to win 
the Racing Post MUe in spite 
of the fact, that Bold Arrange- 
ment, one of last season's top 
two-year-olds, is opposing 
him. Placed in the Prtx de la 
Salamandre, the Grand 
Criierium and the William 
Hill Futurity after winning at 
Goodwood, Nottingham and 
Leicester, Bold Arrangement 
deservedly took high rank in 
the European Free Handicap. 
£■ As he was rated only 31b 
below the best of last year's 
juveniles, many will be look- 
ing at him today to give an 
indication of the ability of his 
generation. There are two 
schools of thought; some say 
that it was moderate; others 
up to par. 

Whichever is the case, I still 
feel that Bold Arrangement 
will find the redoubtable 
Tremblant a very lough nut. to 
crack so early in the season, 
especially as his own sights are 
already set on a crack at the 
Kentucky Derby. 


RACING: BR AND NATIONAL FAVOURITE CHANGES HANDS AS FLAT SEASON GETS UNDERWAY 

MrSnugfit 
sold to 
Ramsden 

MrSnugfit, the 1 0-1 favourite 
for next month's Grand Na- 
tional, sponsored by Seagram, 
has been sold by Adrian Green- 
wood to Terry Ramsden for an 
undisclosed sum. The nine- 


and Tremblant 

start 



By Mandarin (Michael PhiUtps) 


Bearing that in wmd, Bold 
Arrangement is unlitady to be 
near his peak this afternoon 
and,. while the same obviously 
applies to his three rivals, I 
still have the assurance from 
Epsom, where Tremblant is 
trained by Ron Smyth, that be 
is fit and well and ready to 
give of something- approach- ■ 
•mg bis best. 

. The wind from Newmarket 
. ts- that both Sulaa&h and ■ 
Mac's Reef have doae plenty 
- of last work but, at the 
weights, I prefer Tremblant It ■ 
would be hard to xmagme 
easier winner of the Cam- 
bridgeshire and, earlier in the 
season, Tremblant won the 
Victoria Cup at Ascot arid the 
Bunbnry Cup at Newmarket 
besides a valuable handicap at 
Doncaster during the Si Legcr 
meeting. 

All those races were tough .. 
assignments as usual and the- 
versatility that be showed in-, 
winning from seven furlongs:, 
to nine furlongs makes him' 
precisely the sort of horse that 
I like. As such, he looks a real 
thorn in the side of a three- 
year-old this early in the year, 
even a colt as good as Bold 
Arrangement 

Honeydew Wonder, my 
idea of Eddery's first winner of 
the season in die Bertie 
Bassett Handicap, has been 
hurdling and will be as hard as 
nails. He showed improved 


form to win at Beverley, 
Salisbury, Windsor and Ep- 
som last season and does not 
look harshly treated with 9si 
lib, 

- From Newmarket I hear 
that Bold Connection has 
done plenty of work and will 
go well, even with 10 stone. 
He too has been hurdling but, 
whereas Honeydew Wonder's 
graph was on the incline last 
season. Bold Connection's 
seemed to be going downhffl. 

Job's Girl, a stable compan- 
ion of Bold Connection, is also 
said to be fit and well and 
ready for the Spring Appren- 
tice Handicap. However, she 
has a lot of weight and I prefer 
Paris Trader from Mick 
Easterly's in-form stable, Par- 
is Trader is fit from hurdling 
and his Flat form last year was 
adequate. 

Castle Warden, who' ran 
well at Sandown to split the 
stable companions, You’re 
Welcome and Door Latch, 
should go well in the Louise 
Stockdafe Challenge Cup at 
Towcester. BargOl, from Fired 
Winter's stable, which is run- 
ning into form again after a 
mid-season hiccup, looks the 
obvious danger. 

Rugy, wit£ successive vic- 
tories at Southwell and War- 
wick to his credit; can 
complete a treble by winning 
the Piper Champagne Hunters 
Chase. 



Bold Arrangement (right), seen here finishing second in the 
William Hill Futurity Stakes, faces a tough task against old- 
er rivals in today's feature race at Doncaster. Pat Eddery, in 
the saddle here, now rides TremManf 


year-old win stay in training 
with Mick Easterby at Sheriff 
Hutton and Phil Tuck will keep 
the Aintree ride. 

Ramsden, who achieved a 
personal ambition when Moti- 
vator provided him with his 
first Cheltenham festival win- 
ner last week, 'cates Hallo 
Dandy, Cortnere, Last Suspect 
and Door Latch as the quartet 
most likely to deprive him of 
another big-race success. 

Ramsden will be hoping that 
Mr Snugfit proves at least as 
successful as his last purchase 
from Easterby- Chapel Cottage, 
who won the group three Duke 
of York Stakes last season 

Mr Snugfit's price has been 
reduced a point to 9-1 by 
Ladbrokes who also report 
heavy support for West Tip, laid 
to lose £40,000 at 14-1. includ- 
ing one bet of £1.000 each-way, 
and now a 12-1 chance. 

At yesterday's second accep- 
tance stage, 84 horses were left 
in. There were no surprise 
withdrawals. 

• Any Business, one of 37 four- 
day declarations for Saturday's 
William Hill Lincoln Handicap 
at Doncaster, will not run. The 
five-year-old was bought back 
by his trainer, Willie Musson. 
for 3,400 guineas at Doncaster 
sales yesterday. Any Business 
was sold to dissolve a partner- 
ship of three and will now lie 
racing for two owners. Musson 
said: “He won’t run on Saturday 
— he's not ready yet.” 


DONCASTER 


Televised: 245. 3.15. 345. 4.15 
Draw advantagedow numbers best on soft ground 
Going: good 



k TtanNQ R tasflhshaad 9-7 
I M Leach 8-13 , 



- 'r« 


‘ 1- • . 


■V 


-i 

“• Mj 







2.45 PHILIP CORNES BROCKLESBY STAKES (2-Y-O: C & G 
:£3,002£f) (9 rumors) 

1 AUTHENTIC Ml Ckcie Thorourtreds B LKJJ N Tinkler B-11 TNw2 

2 " BUJElKDep Anratrong)M Britain 8-11 , 1 — K Daisy 9 

3 

5 

6 

7 

8 
10 
11 

15-8 Laertes Warrior. 3-t Deinopus. 4-1 Boy Sngar, 6-1 Loosdso; 8-1 ane ro eda. 12-1 
Authentic, 14-1 often. 


Doncaster selections 

By Mandarin 

2.45 Lauries Warrior. 3J5 Honeydew Wonder. 3.45 
TREMBLANT (sap). 4.15 Rove. 4.45 fens Trader. 5 .15 
Alphabetical Order. 

By Onr Newmarket Correspondent 
2.45 Lauries Warrior. 3.15 Bold Connection. 345 Sulaafah. 4.15 
My Derya. 4.45 Jolfs GirL 5.15 Coral Harbour. 

By Michael Seely 

2.43 Lauries Warrior. 3.15 Pagan San. 445 BACHAGHA (nap). 


4.15 BAT7HYANY HANDICAP (3-Y-0£%51S3f) (13) 

1 120004- RUNAWAY 

2 342110- MAYOR | 

3 3000*4- THE I 

4 01041- SEWMOHl 

5 224233- OLE FLO CM fC Armstrong) K Brassey 7-12 . 

B tOtit- BOVEfD) (P WetZBl) S Norton 7-1l\_ 

J M003Z- «ENSOWUi«pitWraarton LrtJK Stone 7-10. 

8 BOO- BRA0auiiYH&l(MVIMtBraonLld)KSianti7-7. 

9 108300- PEHanoiW Pnneraon) K Non 7-7 

.12 

13 030000- RUMWNGRiUNBbW{MBritMi)M Brittain 7-7. 

16 004033- PLANTERS? 1C BarbefiUxnax) T Ftortwrat 7-7 . 

17 010000- MY DBtYAiu) (Mra H Akyuz) M Tom*m7.7 . 


S Paries 9- 


J Lowe 2. 

-LCtmmockS 
.G Carter (5) 10' 

N Adams 4 

NCMriftS 
.AMurvomii 
SPatitiw12 
.R Man* (7)3 

144 Ote no, 3-1 Rom 4-1 TM KkoM(3i4i,«-1 Ktin Stttai.8-1 SewMgk 10-1 Mayor. 12- 
1 Rtrany.141 others. 

5 ran. Radcar 51 tom Dot 
nn. Oonontar5f ft'eap 

good Nw a' sorter {B-Nft won W from KBI SQUALL (?8) 20 ran. Warwick 5fh'cap, 
good te torn Ort 14. rtEHftCOTE CLUB (B-3t 4th beaten 2HI to Catherines WeB (7-7)17 
!«LDoncasawSth , eapoDOdN(w8.BeWH&(^iMonwm5IOomC(>DperRadng(8- 
8)16 ran. Hswdocfc 6! 9draamitOct17. OLEHjO |»GI 3rd MBMn Sto 
~ — ^--from Sonnenete 

Now 6. MY __ 
3rsdboatan31.lt ran. 

a urjW ’o^^od Oct 20.' 

445 SPRING APPRENTICE HANDICAP {£1^7aiin 50 yd) (18) 



TOWCESTER 


Going: good to soft 

2J0 GREENS NORTON NOVICE HURDLE (Div 1: £736; 2m) (18 
runners) 

D Hood [7] 
. BPowel 

_ _ _ _ R Strange 

6 422440 TROUBLE IWs £&odaM0)F Winter 6-1 1-4 O de Man 


3.15 BERTIE BASSETT HANDICAP (£3^2«:1in 4f) (14) 


006206 OOLDCOWemON pj {E AAfeon) MJ Bwn 6160 
IfflO- GAY CAI^AW(JGaJ»an^J Bathe* 4^-W_~_- 
12006 VINTAGE TOLLtVntaoi Loan Urti S (tattoo 868. 


140420- JQ UPB OW L QAiM Ryan) M Ryan 4-610. 
400000- MOGWaD ffi Ttan) D Thom 66 5 — 
340102- PAMS TBADHMBI U faiartBrt M WMM 



r Raraadre )RSkntaon663 


GStarteyT 28 200042- 


‘t t 


i ‘ ! 1 


■HP KENiuctcrl 

RttS. honeybewIIB* 

smsf-NOLY SPA8K (JLealtjWPiBWW 

10 340040- PAGAN SUH (T RamKlani A Briny S-6flB 

11 E5£* RQSTHBOCliaBNMottaRKSWWjLM 


W Canon 13 
jLna* 


■4840f BACHAGHA j 

SS !£!bo^Sb»5HS^ 

1410000- ABSONANT (Mra A St— llwgGflavBiey 48-1 GCnjSS 

NORTH STAR SAB (MraL.Wab8tat) Mrs J Ram adan 5*0 — DP Areyj 

n ■ ■ M 

| J Rarosdw) Mrs J Ramsden 7-7-10 — DWWams] 

YP.McGee) M Brittain 5-74»_ Al|ur*0(l 

GBantweli 
SPWtfttn* 


floooosr ■ 

mtn oo- mbshocleyi 
0400 v CODBtUWEfl 
00W? TAKEA CAM C 
00000- LOV&YHH 

■34000-^HH 


tCTVVfMrs M Smartaart M Chapman 
BALflOWlffilR Vtedfl JMu«rafl6-7-r. 



™ B n»rij} M Pipe ^ WWd 11 

Whiv ion) D EJswtiflti 5-B-1 Pa Eddery 2 

-^68-13- .AlfcOlonelB 

BThOOWOn & 
AkAmay M 


>1 DueOng, ll-aPadeTYadar, B-^Bag h^ha^ ^aOr^lO-t Dick's FUy.RkJgetMd. 


12-1 Ibsa Moriey, Skytxxti. 14-1 Atsonot, I 
5.15 HALL GATE MAIDEN STAKES (£959rlm 2f 50yd) (30) 


' ; * 11 oowbo- 

‘ ? i 1 V **]' 18 M2201-' GOLDEN FANCY p5(NnrtlaamraW*n8 tOO I Vk*wx 

i * L. n mnt,. cniD eren-niiallRr imnUhc.l TlmMdR WhiMur4-64 K Brad£Ssa®9 


AnBCAN MAGIC WrePMonWJ Hants 68-0 
AL-AtAM jRMas^ J razGerakJ 
8LMCKwSAHD'Tl«w)D Thom 4-9-0 


, Tines 13 
, A Moray 7 
. P Waldron 23 


. . v ' mrou IMUR^ IV ^ imouommiii 


& 


M-11ACMhane(7)5 

SS SaSSB?|ffiiSSflS 


ORDBI(T Ramsden) Mrs NSo>4h 488 BCroastoy 11 

K Stone 488 C Dwyer 4 

SHMomrl 17 
P Robinson 28 

t-nafeP) 1 ® 

480 — &DtdMd2 


iGUMonatRlH 
(Lord CadoffonfGl 


3-1 Honeydew Mender. 7-2 Penan Sun, 41 Bold Comedkm. 5-1 Vkitajp .TdL M Four 
bmTH-I Bamdora. 14-1 GoSo Fanqr, »-1 othera 


SttrTTinflt 


FORM: BOLD CONNECnON (85) 8th beatm owr IS toPtaugh Slones WJ 19 ran. 
Doncaster 1m Sf elk* good NO» & VNTME TOLL SflOli twa nin ow r tit to Master 
lSl9r«i! YoA troll h'cap QOOd Oct 12. ROMEYDEW W ONDER (jW JOTbwmn 

(68) 13 ran. PonlBfcact 1m 2fh , eap good to Jim 24. 

SotocPon: TIV1AN 


3.45 RACING POST HUE (£1051 6:1m) (sir) (4) 


aurtvE mi k Hopps) las n Macwtey 48i 

IM2AArt(B)(M COMMA M ChMroan 680 

2^mSo^SSwMu!^ 

21 00- OCEAN LIFE (uid 

23 PRWCERHItoia 


Par* Eddery 26 
480. SPGrtHBfWgj 16 
JWtibns22 
. MRimnarS 

AWNaon680 SWabstarB 

488 S Paries 27 


IW EesMrhjr 4-9-0- 


M HtndNy(3)21 


nmcoumEo 


R J WMams 4-B-O R Cochrane 30 

Moorhead 4-80 RGue«5 

BemsTOki) Mrs JPNron 4-80 10 


IMBriBata488. 


1 010108 SULAAFAH 

2 032202- MACSKffi 

5 1M111- TRaBLANr 

6 421324- BOLD ' 



VfV.we.t-Y f % V 

AmaMnjrnJN Thomson Jon«4-87 - AMway 2 

. _nsder^ M Rjen 4-83 -.S.S22? 

(XAbdds)RSn^lh5-80 — WEdeleiy 1 


ate oeskm (j ■ 

DEMIT MnadCapt J Maon48-1J U 
FWBH3WER {6 Hardy) R Holder 48-11. 
JlAEVErMreBf i* ■ I 


_ KDarteyi 
. Pal Eddery IB 

MAHar29 

JiAs Bowkar (7) 24 


i «TK«4 BU»jjri«iw*u*3i«3i' (A Reftards)d Brittain 380 

64 TmraUart, 7-4 Bold AnangenienL 62 Sutea&h.W-l Mac's Rear. 

} 3rd beaten 6Vlto Stow The 
^13) 6lh beaten 2541 to EftsJo 

rs R£ff«-ia ajdbMiBo a to 

w a TTOdflSLANT f88) »wr WBI from 



Nawnrartcetllh if nrcap goodtaCrmbcaS. Bdl n A WWl^M Bff^O) 


i. 9 ran. Doncaster Iro sties good Ort ! 


.PRnhUnson4 


Unit 
71 ettes 
11) 18 ran. Don- 
na (9-4) 31 ran: 
ZndbeahmlUl 



25 

26 VESUW 

27 . WELSH 

28 M0- APPEALMG 

30 034 DHJCATC 

32 KERB 

33 KVNS- UDY 

35 NKOOUEVE 

37 236 AESP0NDC 

38 000320- RUSTLING 

39 000/08 STONBBK 

7-2 RuiNnft, 41 Me«can IHL 82 Veswe, 61 CoraJ Hartxw. 81 Ocean Ufe.«A»am, 12- 

1 Delcate Design. 161 others. 

• Richard Whitaker, the Wefberby trainer, starts the Flat season 
with two new jockeys — Dean McKeown and Kevin Bradshaw. 

• With 93 four-day acceptors for the Spring National Hunt Flat 
Race. at Newbury on Saturday, the Jockey Chib stewards have 
modified the rules to allow the race to be divided if necessary. Prin- 
cess Anne could ride her own horse. Well Wisher, in one of the 
divisions. 


Piggott advises 
pin approach 
to open Derby 

Lesier Piggott,. winner of the 
Epsom Deroy nine nines as a 
jockey, yesterday described this 
year’s premier classic as the 
most open for years, when 
asked at the Ever Ready lunch 
which Derby entry he wenddl Uke 
to train, Piggott replied: “Give 
us a pin." . _ , 

Piggott did mention Tniely 
Nurevev, but his trainer, Mi- 
chael’ Sioute, stressed thai 

Sheikh Mohammed's colt was 

being trained for the 2,000 
Guineas. 

Clive Brittain confirmed that 
Pebbles would be aimed at the 
Prix Ganay before the Eclipse 
Sir Gordon White, chairman 
of Hanson Trust, said Ever 
Ready had taken up their muon 
to sponsor the petty .for a 
further year which meant that 

their commitment to ElKOtn 
would reach the £2ta million 
mark. 

Aintree acceptors 


SEAGRAM GRAND MATKyA LHAW; 


iMJU , .uaraw. nw "jj. 




miPgN 

ftSSS”. Bid Brewi 

SS^SSSStS-g? 1 ?^ 


BUnkered first fin 1 ® 

ooNCAsm 4.ts ***** 

Mount. 


Results from yesterday’s meetings 


Worcester 

°2355?4f Mft) 1, ST ANDREW'S RAY 

%t^fS^ssesosi& 

juttior Trustae. Plundiera Wffl Sth. L__. 
Star (pui®. Toms Uttto Tam. Qwnraino 
( nn). “ijirfi Drums, Spbnh Ol ReJL 
Saporstawi. Lawlay. Around Town. 25 
Kar toS r at Warn Tote 
E2.B0; El -SO. £2 lB0. OM DP. 
EJ2.O0.GSF: Elf I S. Mar a Stewa rts 

inqitey. tf*« nasu« remained tratored . ■ 

asig ii 

PririS ffittth^lActi^OiyjpTf 

Faat * — 



dS ££ s £. *"• £Z9a 

ix.iv i rainiriimnan pator Haw._i.ir 
|^^RAJt6^JiiW|wT«ralW4 

Mmft I ?S33^r! 8 10-l" 1 M» BurnWa. 141 

sewgaSTSflS. 

So. DPOBWa- CSR 

£17178. DouflWm far BODjOft. ' 


3. TktM SMrtW fC Prlca. 80-1 ^ ALSO 
HAN; 62faw SimnySteva. 41 Criatt fay 
EM, 61 Titian Plina*. 61 FSnk Panther, 
U-1 Another Norfc* (pad.161 town 
Saga, SugarviUaLea <4th), 33-1 
Comtridga. ’Svi Otitic Wry, 1«M 
Goktonraaw (604. Haddnton. Help 




at Upper Lamboum. 

Es23Tei2a0L or 


SMnv FWM (Mi). Taw 
JU, let Ms J Pnmni 

Tote £1090:080. 

£32M- CSF; C9CL62- 
530 (2m M hdaUCaTC SAGA A 
Powaf 12-1X 2. Wiim The Hu afc (R 

WMggE 

161 

sfUflSMrsr 


261 GoodfWow's Foty. Cheviot Manor, 
Susanna. 100-1 Sir Soil, Reelebout 0*4 
14 tan. 1 U 41. a. 1 a. %L Miss M Benson 
at Hexham. Tote £5.00; £2^0. 2230. 

090- DFb 22048 CSF. £3149. Tricasfc 

£34789. 

4.15 (2m hdM) X L CASTAONO (T G 

' '*WS 

182 East 

*" 1R Si 


Out. ll-atmif.S, 


(5. 



RAN: 61 Prince Oberon 
Down. Tartan Torchtidtt $ 

Action S 141 Defibiea 
Candy Cone. Favotr-By-Foctme nxfl. 33- 
1 ArpW Dash. WWars Ptoasurs. 50-1 
Pamparinn, 100-1 Kanriuklas Boy, Giro 
Streak, fwer Song. Dubovsky (pul. 
Dindyvm (StiiL Lunar Roro a nca. 19 ran. 

NR: Sraiiiconon. a. 2L is. hd, nk. D 

Hodgson at Cartate Tote £230: £1-60. 
ttSTMOa Dft EBBaCBR £1703. 

4j 4S (3m dU r CHEBIIE CHIEF (Mr K 

Andarapf 100^ f Hytitg Am (Miss D 


jr Michael 

1 Sound ( 

Lady Doonn 

bia. 8tuid, 3t LKamara at mrton. Tote 
£5.70; tlJSO. E13J10. HA Dft &50 
winner or second wfth any Otter boras. 
CSF 235071. 

W acapofc E8 43L1S. 


Kelso 

1.WUYS 

Meagher. 1 i-iotav); 2. Roy 


1. DAD'S GA0BUI 

Revel Crecher] 

Lndar(KT«Nan,fl 
■■■General Chandos. 

(SBi). Tartvi TtvNght 141 


eh Lover. 60-1 Bum [ Apotio, Own 
mm. Gay Canard, OWlGng Cote. 


Tote ttfO-EIJO. Et.lft- 
%EIQ41. 


£2&A).DF:S4JaCSR 

MM) 



ana 

.ssmff Oftre rt«a(ur), 141 Poker Ctaaaie few), 
161S®femM jpul20-7B(Mobm^&- 
t Ice 181 (red). 8 ran. KL 2JU. 30L ifist N 
Bvdarat Lockarbie. Tote mMt £230. 

£1 jsa sasa df: saaa csf nzzi. 

6.15 can flat) 1, LAST GRAM Mr D 
UacTaggart, 6lfc 2, Wtirdront pr T 
Thomson Jones, *-ifc 3, Bnooiera Taiag 
fl. 81). ALSO ftM* 7-2 (av 
-- - “ ■ ,61 HanategRa, 
Tecaco. 15-1 Juot 
cfc, 25-1 Worthy 
IlfeM Tbny. Ifafcoun, 
GoW. Woodlands Wish. 
Speckle. Brer Rascal 18 ran. 
1KI.U 12L 1BL1XL J WBsonatter.Tote 
£020: £130, £24& £430. DF: £42J0. 
CSF: 22736 

54S (2m 1M 1, ETERNAL OaUNT (K 
61k*. Royal Grate (J D Dawes,4 
m BrUft Mr PPennM, 161). 
7-2 fav HI Baagtejtth). 4-1 
M s MUH (0-f PBAte »f fWl). 12-1 
Trial Pnod. 161 RoMftft Son, 261 
KeAy 1 * fan. Tycoon Moon 
Mc(33-lMtaiaytarxLto- 
1 BUngton BeeTChMa DMg. Lucky 
Course, Forth and Tay. PNaouST 18 ran. 



Onsmam Girt 



SffiSSrSftaMJ* CSF 
®ST:E1541JB. A ■ 

1 RAJ* 41 

>1 Jugadori 
CNtam 7 It _ .. 
NLNewKaybar 
6 25-1 Retool 

-1 Min AJwah 

13'Sn. NFh J 

RMWSfflM# 

« MM 1..0 9°L jWW.ff 

Z rnYi a ntirK JWhBa. 141): 



Adtin toofo. Grass Board (W. M i»- 
ML3LS1 M. i2LGRUianteMGMmqjte 
Tote £530: £140. El JO. ElJt). DR 
S&OD. CSF: S2SL24. 

3.15 0m CM 1, SMOALOHS BA3t(G 
amnyJ-IMy 2, JWaa Matjo(M tones. 

KSSfftaxSR 

SedgeMd Tote £4.70: £1J6 S1JQ. 
SJKISr £5026 CSR E48J3. 

345pm If 120yd hrW VCALMA(MrT 

RAM 6Tbegw ar nart gh ip. Tteaama Lord 
(Mil 81 Whets What jB»» 81 TOatawe 
guj.161 Hmy GMn (Stii). 20-1 Gtemad. 


Course specialists 


DONCASTER 

TRA1WR& W Horn. 22 wfefum from 74 
nronara. 29.7V P MltcheS. 5 from 33. 
15.1%: R Boss. 8 from 40. ISjOV 
JOCKEYS; N Day. 8 m*W 8 from OT 
rides. 167%; W Cemon, 36 from 226 
1B4VG Starkey. 20 from 122,154% 

TOWCESTER 

TRAINERS: F Wa^»yn,13 vrinnwa from 40 
runners. 305%; F Whir, 16 from 76 
228V T Ftasnr, 32 from 155. 206%. 
jockeyS: J White 8 wirawni tom 21 
rides. 38.iv K Mooney. 8 tomSft 267: P 
DotaJl*. 7 from 38, 184%. 

OFFICIAL 8CHATCMNGS: Ladbroke 
Eraopnan Free Handicap. Newmarket: 
prince ReearNte 


11 

12 

13 

15 

18 

19 

20 
22 
26 
28 
3D 

32 

33 

34 


■ o usatTYMHBPH 

UjO LUCKY BLOW (C House) 

■ 0 MV SON MY SON (W Her 


(Mrs R Crompabn) i 
louse) J OM 611-4 


OShanmod 611-4. 


.C Cox (41 


P NEWEnASST 
002 SHOTMGOpR 


Harmon) SMetior 611-4 . 


Murrin) M ScuNnom 81 1 -4. 
R Jaws 611-4. 


■TALACRE (Lord MosMtN hen deraon 611-4. 
CP W3SHOONSOftr(G Johnson) !—■■■ 


. MHanington 
GWnems(7) 

C Evans 

CMam 


_ ) N Henderson 611-4 S Smitti Ecdas 

4030 WKARRY BWW (Mrs G Mcferranl I 5-11-4 K Mooney 

0020 ATTH (Thrioactt hwesnenls Li4 N Henderson 41610 JWVWte 

DIAMOND IMGCSI (Mrs VTory)DMdioison 41610 PScudamore 

OP SHBWDODI 


FL0WBI0FTWTB1H 
00 FORMEUBLE LADY 
200 REST {R 


iACtwtien)Dt 
;RNowtan)l 
UMWtiwr41 


4f 610 C Brown 

4165 SMcNeR 

4165- RDunwoody 

-— -- G Marnagn 


61 AWd. 7-2 Deep Trouble. 82 CteartyBusL 61 Hast 7-1 Otenond Digger. 161 CMtic 
Crackle. 141 My Sai My Son, 161 ethers. 


Towcester selections 

By Mandarin 

ZOOeariy Bust 2.30 Castle Warden. 3.0 Infinity Rules. 3.30 Rugy. 
4.0 Fun Plortner. 4.30 Agra Knight. 5.0 fdleighs Run. 


2L30 LOUISE STQCKDALE CHALLENGE CUP HANDICAP CHASE 
(£1^81: 3m 190yd) (11) 

TMOFF^GMSIlfOOQlAD(Mre A Grantham) JGtffonJ 81 J-10 PCM 


1 

2 000102 CASTLE WABDEN 
6 HI HP FLAXEN TWA 

8 4PU400 VELESO 

9 D/PU030 LATE 
10 #6221 

11 1631 

12 021003 SXEGHYfOBri 

13 3F16P0 SPWOWOOU^ 

18 33-PP00 SONNY NAY W HubbS 
21 F33F36 PLAYFELDS (Andrew 


LADfMrs AGrarth 
DENIM Stale) JEr 
(C-D) (Mrs S Gee) . 
a Forte) J King 6 


Edwerts 811-8- 


J Wsbber 8184 . 

King 6162 

“ EPMWKBaleY 16161. 


P Barton 

— GMamagh 
PScudamore 

— BPowafl 

— J Duggan 


KSSt 


G Harllgan 6160 
GMjbtnrt 16UHJ. 


Bud Tontis Courts Udl P 




_ MBrennen 
— SMcNoW 
RBaNourp) 


8160 G Landau (7) 


WBatgO. 81 Caafla Wtedwy 41 Gfr wood tat 61 ftW^^lSfcegt^Wf 

3AARKLE OFFICE SUPPLIES HANDICAP HURDLE (£2^42: 2m) (21) 


IJenks)NGaaolw6160 


Hrfchs (Henow) Lttfl S T Harris 611-tl . 

ttnSSXBK!!!^ 


1 611-6 . 


2 44/1B16 ’KECORD DANC91 (D)l 

3 141020 IJFE GUARD UteteJ 

4 308000 ROYAL 

6 16P ARDEWr (D) (SPS lifl 

6 TfO-OOU MAUSTRAlfo (p)(J !«■■■■■■■■■■ 

7 226320 T AMINO fdijrtifrfMrs M ValenSnd F VWrter611-5 

8 M2PW aETTYKNOWES (C8)fJ Bw^RAlmtast 811-4 h 
B 004010 YWtARTffl) [Mm V Taylor) R Hodges 6118HMH| 

10 01220 INFINITY WILES ®) (Meu^Woods L#i) S Matter 5-1 1-3 J 

11 200/FUP AHSBL BANK (P-W &ta JUanad ertJ^ Edwarts 81t-2| 
1Z 080010 aiGffipnf Kea>neyjJSaMra6fMBHWHH 
14 oocs» EAMDieowBMPlwA'ntratm* 


5GEJones8l 


S Joinson 
R Guest (7) 
. JHDadas 
. E Buckley 
.BdeKaan 
- H Davies 
. S Earle 
G Landau (7) 
PSanon 
PDouMs 

Ite SOIver 61613 RHyetl 

CCox(4) 


_ JSfflhem 
. R Dennis (4) 



17 341030 SUHSHRfc GAL frPerians)PBo»iden 6169-—. 

19 OW0«1 ORBITAL MANOBA/ERS (D) (G Chipman) B MtaMion 

20 001262 D0UVSTROVE 

22 000200 SSYOUAROUNDi 

23 F80000 HEBB(D)(MraP 

24 PJP133-P KARS(D)UCesi*^)J 

25 012000 WOOOCAND VEwfa D Hamme reo n) P J Jonas 7-W-2 _ SWoodand 

61 Tamlno, 61 ta&nity Rules. 7-1 Kara. 81 OrttiW Manouewra, 10-lBtaty Knonns. Ufa 

Guard. 181 WbarL 141 Out WNta Hen. Blgaa, 161 DtewTB Trow, M a titr an o and Royal 
Brigadtar. 261 otta*. 

130 PIPER CHAMPAGNE HUNTER CHASE (Amateur*: £1,256: 3m 
190yti)(17) 

HONOURABLE MAM (Mm P RuwaB lira P Russel T612«_ DMnsatiB' 


B12/PPB6 

B 00600 



9 261 GALA 

10 IP-32 GOUIEN CASINO (M . . 

11 00U228 JACXQ (P Mchctison) D MchoNon M-y-L. 

— -pMSngton 1611-12. 

IVMn4e9-11-12 

KNOCXAMULLEN (Mrs J Cursoul Mrs JCuson 1611-12 

MOOMJGKT EXPRESS ^jyHanWTwnJJ Htttidmon frn-12. . 

PENNYWA5TE (C Lumsoen) G Roe 1611-1 CLwr^enm 

RUSHBURYnX&CSugiMcKICSidgwIck 11-11-12- S Cowley (7) 



JUeweflyn(7) 
- GMundtefl 


)C Sidgwlck 11-11-12- 

SWAMLYJMrsR Maftwon) Mrs R MAeson 11-11-12 

IffPER TEN J0)U Hewitt) R PWMna 12-11-12 

23 0HMW6 WOOLLY JW#B1 (C Green) CGrsen)8-11-1 2 

4£ WOOD BURCOTENGMCE CHASE (E1.Z75: 2m SHttyd) (IE) 

— G Marnagh 
_ MfUcharos 
. ROuwroody 

_ BPowel 


)J Wtibber 7-11-7 - 
1611-7. 


1 611044 

2 B3P13P BRASS — 

3 333810 RJNPARTNBI 

5 61FP38 TYTO EAGLES 

7 F ABBEYBRANE 

If 068FFP BARNET /Mrs G) 

17 mum JUB6 S Lights 

18 F JUSTAWMOUR 

ffi W400 Sri -ii— — — — « „ 

24 460000 OAKLEY HOUSE ffl) OLady Aithen) F Wafwyn 7-118. 

27 48F333 PORTIA'S LAST (A Wafton) J LKarrtS l6118 
33 0P-2F4B SHBIALAM (M leal P Bowden 7-118 _ 

36 P/302FP TIGS! THJ (Mrs JCteTtiPBafley 6118. 

38 1232-3F TURKANA (J Upson) T Casey 6118 


l G PhBpe) TFtaSW 7-1 1-7 
j R Armytage 7-1 1-7 
iEBfe)PCuniaa7-11-0. 
»CTfMtine6114. 

ITompk*w6ll-0 
Kldns9-118. 



40 Q6P2P0 BALAS (Mrs M Horten) P Horton 11-168 


R Dennis (4) 


£ Buckley (7) 
, G Jones 


81 Avte Hero, 41 BrassCharw.81 FurtPaTOW, 1327KlEagfes. 81 0*Ny Hoese, 81 
Porta's lisL 12-1 Torlora. 141 Sieralam. 181 others. 


4^0 GREENS NORTON NOVICE HURDLE (Dhf 2£752: 2ra) (18) 



D Ancti 6128 

SW1)J Old 4118. 


GMcOout 


iStoan)JB«ort8lW 

, Bald) J (Word 6114 r 

_ BUCK AND DOE KIN (Mis M VHenteu F WMer 6114 

04 COMPTON WWCfUWVesteylJ MM 6114 

00 COWAL SHORE ICPariwjsiWor 61 M 

HasONS DOOOfARD (ALaigsBR)R Anaytege 6114 


PCaus 

PeffirHobbs 
— J Duggan 
PScudamore 
M Herrington 
BPowel 


30 

31 

34 

35 

36 

37 

61 _ 

Compton Par*, 12-1 


HBSCWWSAL/R MR Puch 61613 
RUTHS HVOlMrs BQnri RClainplori 61613 
UNDER THE STABS 6 BuMlfR Atahurei 41610 . 

an 


B— W— 1 

P0 VAttB-TAITTimr aB 
40 WHmeiaOESTTHOUp 
0 LADY KI1XANE (R JWks) N 


DRAna^Epb-li-4™-^— B rOM 

v NHndKsan6114 SSroWtEcctei 

James 61 14 6 Jones 

0 KNIT Rotate 6114 — h Danes 

SDttOMgroni SD Ud)0 Sherwood 

5-114CCw(4) 

JSUftOT 

D Dutton 

R Dtrawdy 

— JWMs 
_ SMCNMI 
, VMcKenP 


41610 . 


M8aurM,7-2 SaapThtaW^f, 41 Buck And Doe tai.61 Agra Khight, 81 GtijeDorL 16 
too P»ti, 12-1 ottws. 


&0 GREENS NORTON NOVICE HURDU (Div 3; E794: 2m) (18) 

0004 DMGMaADWRAL«K3Nbtnas)KMdmn6114 SJohnson 

DERWBn^ LAD CETtara^B McMahon 61 14 TWeO 

00 D0YERHJG6BaPy&t8S Com 6114, 

FW B3LB3KS 


wetrs iA^ fi wi 


23 306000 W 


■00 ma owaIP PPH 
PP HOLYBOQRMfflM 
no SOUTHERN HSwr 
_ THATS FOR EURE M 
Ip WRONG fOGHTH) 


OStawo*J6»4 . 

_ra«r 61 1-4 

WG Turner 8114. 


SdeHean 

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- -,-4,16114 . 

fDMehDtson6ll4 _ 

»TFWStor61l4_ 

IJNeectom 61613 

Mam 41610. 


Cttwran(7) 
■BPtwefl 


. — W_ organ 

— PScudamore 

RDuntmoody 

J Ekyen 

SJ O’Neil 


■00 

030 ffiNERAUSEU Bnwme Construetton Co Ud)GThomer 4-16tft — 

Miininm m mirin in i hiimann r in in RBefourfT) 

1181 nf Nlini-I IT ■ - — * te Art ate Cee^hCutea 


28 mtHBODr 
P020 LOVER COVER 
OU SWPMATE ‘ 
URfOVOS 
WRRAL(A 


)N Henderson 41610 SSruth Eerie* 
) J King 41610 — » S MeNal 


DMchtffion 4ld-5 - 
)W Charles 410-5 


. GMcCourt 


PDerer 


7-4 rm somebody. 81 GmereisB. 61 idWgha Run, 61 The» For Sura. 61 Wrong 
Rigend. 16I DansneAdralraL 181 olhera. 


ICE SKATING 


Bestemianova and 
Bukin embattled 
by young Russians 

From Jobs Hennessy, Geneva 


Uneasy lies the bead that 
wears the crown discarded by 
Torvil and Dean two years ago. 
Their successors as world ice 
dance champions in 1985, 
Natafcya Bestemianova and 
Andrei Bukin, survived the first 
element of thi$ year's com* 
petition in Geneva yesterday, 
but by the narrowest margin. 

Font of the nine judges voted 
in favour of their Russian 
compatriots, Marina. Klimova 
and Sergei Ponomarenko, who 
have thus chipped away still 
further into the established po- 
sition of their seniors. Having 
been overwhelmed in the 
compvisories of the European 
championships in January, they 
then went on 10 win (he second 
element, the original set pattern. 
It is un likely that the champions 
will be dispossessed in the fine 
dance on Saturday, but there is 
dearly a rising graph in favour 
of the younger Russians. 

In two cases yesterday only a 
tenth of a point separated the 
two couples as Klimova and 
Ponomarenko recovered 
strongly from comparatively 
poor marks in the mmba to win 
over three judges in the paso 
doble and six in the West- 
minster waltz. The wonder is 
that three judges failed to rec- 
ognize abe superiority of the 
younger couple, in the waltz at 
least 

Perhaps they were offended 
by Miss Klimova's dress, which 
belonged more to Cafe Apache 
than to a sporting arena, off the 
shoulder, off the hip and off 
most intermediate points on one 
side. Happily, she is Mrs 
Ponomarenko when the skates 
are put to bed. 

The British champions, 
Sharon Jones and Paul Askham. 
are noticeably more relaxed here 
than they were in Copenhagen 
for the European champion- 
ships, and faeve taken thirteenth 


place, an advance of two places 
compared with last year. Eliza- 
beth Coates and Alan Abretli, of 
Streatham, tie three places 
behind. 

Brian Orser. of Canada, 
moved into a threatening po- 
sition in the men's champion- 
ship with a sparkling display in 
the short programme. He won 
that second dement narrowly 
from Alexander Fadeyev, the 
Russian holder of the utie, and 
so climbed two places into third 
Jozef Sabovcik, the 
controversial Czechoslovak: 
winner of the European 
championship in January, is 
sandwiched between the two. 

Having one title, the pairs, 
already in the bag and occupy- 
ing the lead in the three other 
events, the Soviet team is 
running rioL And since the 
female member of the pairs 
champions, the gifted Ekaterina 
Gordeyeva. is only 14, it seems 
likely that that crown at least has 
found a resting place for some 
years to come. 

COMPULSORY DANCES: 1. N 
EfcKttrrmnnovB and A Bukin (USSR). 

0.60tsr. 2, M KBmovaand 5 Ponomarenko 

(USSR). \Z: 3, N Annenko and G 
Sretensky (USSR), IB: 4. T W3son and R 

McCall (Cart. 2.4: 5. S Senuraek and S 

Gregory (us). 3.0; s. R Roca and D Adair 

(US), as. British ptaemgs: 13. S Jonas and 
p Askham, 7.8; 16, E Coates and A Abratti. 
96. 

MEN’S SHORT PROGRAMME: 1. B OfSer 


(USSR) 2.4. Aftar wo awards: 1, Fadeyev 

1.4UB; Z Sabovcik 28, X Oreer 3.4: 4. 

Boitano4.4;5. H Fischer (WG)4u6: 6 Kotin 

6.6> 

PAIRS FREE SKATING: 1. E 
and S Grinkov (USSR) 1.1 

and O VasHtev [USSR) 2.0. __ 

M Rowsom (Can) 38: 4. L Selezneva and 

OMakarow(USSR)4A5.J Watson and P 
r, 6. D Banning and L 
68. Bridsrt pfeohg.- 12. C 
Peaks arid A Naylor 12L0. Feat 1. 

Gordeyeva and Grinkov, 1.4; 2 Valova 

andVasfiev2J); 3, Cote and Rowsom 4.8; 

«, Selezneva and Marafow 82: S. Banning 

ion and 


and 


Johnston 84; a Watson 
66 British placing: 12, Peaks 

', 16l8l 


ROWING 


Oxford need to pull 
their act together 


By Jim ftulton 


Oxford are wondering why 
things are going wrong. In solo 
training they looked Tong and 
smooth. Their style is that of a 
compressed spring while they 
reach out and attack the 
beginning of each stroke. 

It is the took of the Oxford 
crews of the last decade, but 
up to now Oxford, unlike their 
famous predecessors, are not 
putting their act together. This 
was evident again on Tuesday 
night just before dusk on a 
neap tide against Vesta Row- 
ing Club- 

Vesta are a good dub crew 
who finished fifth out of 420 
crews in the Head of the River 
Race last year and now have 
“old timers” such as Len 
Robertson, the Olympic world 
silver-medal winner, on 
board. Daniel Topol ski, 
Oxford's coach, knew that 
Vesta “were no push-over” yet 


1 1 days before the Boat Race, 
Oxford were expected to win. 
It did not quite work out that 
way. 

They set out to do one, two. 
and six minute pieces on the 
flood near the top of the tide. 
The lint exercise ended 
abruptly with a stupid clash as 
both crews set suicide courses 
towards each other.- 

Vesta looked set for the 
slaughter over six minutes. 
The crew started well above 
Putney Bridge with Oxford on 
Surrey. Oxford started a can- 
vas down and had half a 
length deficit in half a minute 
on the outside of the Fulham 
bend Vesta attacked fero- 
ciously and within two min- 
utes were a length or more 
dear and went on to win by 
more than two lengths. 

TODAY'S OUTINGS: Ozfonfc 1030 and 
SSO Cambridge: 1030 and 5. All tom 
Putney. 


SQUASH RACKETS 

Fall of Ardleigh Hall 


Ardleigh Hall, ihc Essex dub 
m their first American Express 
league season, looked like win- 
ning the title after containing an 
international challenge from 
their nearest rivals. Cannons 
Club, of London (Colin 
McQuillan writes). A thrashing 
from an un fancied Nottingham 
has jolted them and thrown the 
race open over the last two 
fixtures. 

Nottingham ruled supreme in 
team competition before Ameri- 
can Express invented the na- 
tional league that attracts most 
of the world’s top professionals 
to domestic club squash. Led by 


Gawain Briars and Greg Pol- 
lard, they reiterated their 
capability by humiliating 
Ardleigh Hall 5-0. 

Briars's and Pollard's dismiss- 
als of Hiddy Jahan and Martin 
Bodimeade might have been 
expected. It was the straight- 
games victory of Andrew 
Danzey over the Egyptian inter- 
national, Ahmed Sanvat, which 
inspired his colleagues, Jason 
Nicolle and Paul Millington, to 
compete unflagging! y. 

Ameri can Expran Premier Squash 

La* 9 MK Nottingham 5. AnBaigh HaB ft 

ChapaJ Aiwtor 1 . Cannons 4; Manchester 

NoTOiem l. Dunrinqs MB 4; Redwood 

Lodge a Squash Lafiwaw Z 


FOR THE RECORD 


FOOTBALL 


TENNIS 


MTERNATWIIAL MATCH: Kuwait 1. Iceland 
0 

SEMI-PH0FE8SIONAL INTERNATIONAL: 
Viratas 3. Bidand 1. 

FRENCH CUP: IWrd maid, second tom 
Auxarre i, Brest 0 (agg 5-2* Bordeaux 5. 
CnauwM Dim s-pj; urns 4. unease l (6 
4t Toura a Strasbourg 0 [38k Rannea 2. 
Rouen 0(3-it Btonod t.itortto 1 p-4t RC 
Paha a. Lavsio o-ik Uuftwusa i . Pans Saint- 
GerraateZ-P- 


md: (US irtass seoad): G Ho*nns 

68, 6-4. J Anas nj Ross. 7-5. 6 

- | til J Lapteus. 67. 7-5. 6 

SI 



AtnB f’eoroa. S-7,7-S.6l;'R 

sfcnsn (Indtal. 6-2. 


tFfl-®: 


BOWLS 


HARTLEPOOL-. 


unships: TUptor. first mind: AJfrrton (L 

Brook) 25. Bowon (T BwnmdJ 9: CoCMkfc 

(A Mcock) 16 By IF RsxSng) 15c Newcastle 
(W Engls* 2D We f Vattoy, GwUfeoJ U 
McCaunonQ 12 Norton and NoraWt (§ 


PiMxSng) 

- VuSy. GtAHcrd 
At and Nonvlcn 

. . Beckenham (M H< 

13: Aston vrt^r fr Francis) 24. Handy I 

High Wpsnfte IB Suttttora) 1ft Angel 

TontoKiga (M Luker) 25, Sanbian (R Graham) 
10: Preston. (Britton, w Haywertn 19. 
Psddngion (5 >WMj| 17: Bdt (1 
UaMtmasO 2*, HMt IMf/fitu, ReotSng (U 
was) IStetad (W Frsnda) 22. Wart 

Comwal U Robana) 17. Second mnt 

Thamasdown Swanton 21. Neweartta upon 

Tree 0. Cotsueto. Sound 22 Bonown 

ULideHsftChBrtusit23.Hifli:Langmaad- 

ow cnrttuatofcli 18 Bedtord 11 Nor™ and 

Norvncn 18 Beth 11; Avon VaBey 17. Angel 


Hat rout J Cantor (US) MHLbo 

4. 64. S ZSvpfciome (Yug) U H 

(Smtz), 63. 2-663. 


BASKETBALL 

EUROPEAN CUP WWNBW CUP: ScsvoW 

^aa^ BmoetonalOl. 


rink 
Brown 13. 


England 153, tetond B7. 

s (Etaant stupa flrstt M Steel 1ft A 
; 1 Shim si* 32 U Dunlop 12 T 
Barton 24. K Toner 16 : Etogan 26. MMa«on 
1ft C Wtesier 28, N GtoonlS; N Shftw 28, E 
Bel 12 England (12 Matof 103 (Entand 
sldpe flrsftTBarton tort to S Otw E 

Logan lottto J Davies 1619: m sraato UMP 

Meroy 26ii;C Wassier bt E Thomas 1614 1 

Moiwwk h R Jones 2*41; N Star U J 

Aekfan<J248. 


Pmsmouth PC 101. Heme) and 

Wattord Hoyais 99 (PortsmouBi urin 2-Ot 
UNITED STATES; National AaaaeMkM 

(NBAt Boston Cetacs 12S. Ctewlaivs Cava- 

wrai Be New York Kncks 107, New Jersey 

Nats 103 : Daftas ktovencks 12D. San Antonio 

Spies lift Huston Rockets 112. Phoara 

Sure 109. MBwatAm Bucks 116. Washington 
BulMs 87: Sreranwnu Kings 117. Denver 

Nuggets 1 13. Goktofl Stata Wannra 128, Los 

AnaSn Ctpoers 122 Utah Jazz 107, Soane 
SuwrSoniQ 104; Los Angeles Lakers 128. 
Portland TraB Blazers iS2 

CYCLING ~~ 

ANDORRA LA VELLA: Catalan weak racr 

Second stage (207knft 1. F Yarez (Sp). av 

llndn I8sac: 2 I Gaston (SpL imto 4lsec 
behind: 1 PH CaBasnawlSm, 2nm Olsac 
behnd. Ovenfc 1 . Yanat ahrSmin 33sec: 2 
Gaston, linn 20sw 2 J^ Bagto (Fr). imm 
46$act*ftWL 


RUGBY UNION 

UAUCUP FINAL: Wf A (jougfeorough 2ft 


TODAY'S FIXTURES 


7.30 untas stated 

FOOTBALL 

FREIGHT ROVER TROPHYi 
section: Reptey. Notts County v Maitt- 
Oekl Town. 

VAUXHA1JL-OPEL LEAGUE: Ptemtor ft- 
yWob; Harrow v Bishop's storttottt 
Sutton United v Bognor Reds. Second 
division south: Rush v Cambnrtsy 
MULTIPART LEAGUE; Mame v Macdfls- 
twd. 

SOUTHERN LEAGUE Premier dMatem 
BeSngsBJkfl v Gosport. BHtend ctivtotoro 
Grantham v Sutton Coktfeld. 
NORTHERN PREMIER LEAGUE: 
Pfrid wtf a Com Semt-fmaL MR tog: 
ftoetegnxt Honstch v Woriaop. 
CBftRAL LEAGUE: FWdMWaDeift 
v BtecUmm (7.0): Everion v Barnsley (7 ift 
Hte V Leicester (7.0), Second dMatotc 
Roitwrtiam v Natm County (7.0): Wtavec v 
Bradford Cdy (7JJ): Yortc v Biintey (7X). 
Soutiiam Burnham and rwig* 


LONDON SENIOR CUP: TUnf Hound: 
CflttfaittnvFincteB r.Stein MvHendoa 
NENE GROUP WfTED COUNTIES 
LEAGUE: Ptraniar .division: 


COUNTIES 
LEAGUE: Exeter reserves v Torquay 
rMerves(7.iSi)- 

RUGBY UNION 

CLUB MATCH: Bath v Exeter University 
(7.16). 

OTHER SPORT 

BUHLS: Men: Prudential v — 

(at Hamspooi)- Woemt Bntsn 
ctwrponstops (an Darianten). 

GOtJft Wtanaie Avia teuraomas (a* 1 
a hireQg. 

SNOOKER: Cara Cars World Cup (at 
Iraamationai Centre, Bournemouth). 
SQUASH RACKETS! mttefefen Cup to 
WtraMadenSSBC). ^ 

TBjm^Tate ana Lyta uumamant (at 


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• 1* 




SPORT THE TIMES THURSDAY MARCH 20 19 86 

FOOTBALL; A SURPRISE AT HOME FOLLOWS A SURPRISE ABROAD 


Middlesbrough 
appoint 
Rioch as new 
manager 


Middlesbrough have ap- 
pointed the former Scottish 
international captain. Bruce 
Rioch. as their manager. The 
club's chairman, Alf Duffield, 
said that Rioch has made an 
outstanding impression since 
he took over as first team 
coach two months ago. after 
the departure of Willie 
Maddren. 

Duffield said be had never 
seen a Middlesbrough team 
play better than they did on 
Tuesday night even though 
they were defeated 2-1 at 
home by Sheffield United. 
The club won a standing 
ovation at the final whistle; 
however, they remain in the 
bottom three in the second 
division. 

Rioch played in all four 
divisions of the Football 
League with Luton Town, 
Aston Villa. Derby County 
and Everton and was later 
player-manager of Torquay 
United. Now 38. he joined 
Middlesbrough in January 
when he returned to England 
after coaching in Seattle. 

He said: “The offer was a 
total surprise and a fantastic 
gesture after last night's 2-1 
home defeat I have been 
given tremendous commit- 
ment by the players since I 
joined the club as first team 
coach. 

• Maicom .Allison's dismissal 
as manager of Kuwait — a 
position he had held for only 
nine months — follows a year 
of turmoil for the football 
authorities in the country. It 


was onlv last Thursday that 
FIFA lifted lifted the interna- 
tional ten on Kuwait which 
had been imposed when prob- 
lems occurred after allegations 
of the misuse of football 
revenues. 

In a confused situation, 
FIFA's decision to hen Ku- 
wait had been taken when the 
Kuwait Government's minis- 
try overseeing sport had de- 
cided to replace the board of 
the Kuwait Football Associa- 
tion after the allegations of 
misuse of funds had been 
made. 

After the replacement of the 
board, referees in Kuwait had 
called a five-week strike. Con- 
sequently. the new board were 
forced to enlist 15 foreign 
officials to take charge of their 
League matches. 

FIFA objected to not being 
kept informed of these moves, 
and also to the appointment 
rather than election of a new 
board. The lifting of the ban 
will enable Kuwait to take part 
in the Gulf championship in 
Bahrain later this month. 

. Allison took charge last 
June, ending a 13-year reign 
by Brazilian coaches that led 
to Kuwait being dubbed “Lit- 
tle Brazil" for the extrovert 
style of play which carried 
them to the 1982 World Cup 
finals. But, in a season crip- 
pled by political infighting 
among Kuwait's sports ad- 
ministrators. Allison has man- 
aged to field his team just 
twice: in matches against 
Mexico and Egypt. 


Shreeve asks board to 
deny Roberts a move 


Peter Shreeve win recom- 
mend that the Tottenham 
Hotspur board reject the un- 
. expected transfer request 
submitted by Graham Roberts, 
their England defender. Robetis 
handed Shreeve a letter on 
Tuesday demanding a move 
because he is reported to want a 
return to the south coast. 

Shreeve said: “My advice to 
the board will be to turn down 
the request and help Graham 
with any problems be might 
have." Asked if he was surprised 
at Roberts’s plea. Shreeve said: 
“You are always disappointed 
when you receive a transfer 
request from someone you think 
a weal deal of." 

Roberts was signed from 
Weymouth, a non-League club, 
for £30.000 in 1980 and has 
developed into the mainstay of 
the Tottenham defence. He has 
■been capped six ■ times under 
Bobby Robson. 

• COPENHAGEN: Allan 
Simonsen and John Lauridsen 
have been called back to the 
Danish 16-man squad for the 
match against Northern Ireland 
in Belfast next Wednesday. The 
, match is the first of four for the 
Danes leading up to the World 


Cup finals in Mexico this sum- 
mer. Lauridsen has been out of 
the team since Denmark lost 3-0 
to Sweden last autumn and 
Simonsen has also been absent 
after serious 1% injury during a 
European Cup match in France. 

DAMSH SQUACb T Rasmussen, O Ovist, 
M Otaan. J Svebaak, I Nielsen, H 
Andersen. K Nielsen P Frtmann. J Moftjy. 
J Lauridsen. J Olsen. A Simonsen. K 
Beragreen, P EBqaar. M Lautoup. F 
Christensen. Reserves J Bartram. J HeO, 
MDonnwup. 

• Wales beat England 3-1 in a 
non-League international match 
at Merthyr Tydfil on Tuesday 
night. After soaking up pressure 
in the first half Wales sneaked a 
44ih minute lead when the 
unmarked Grypton netted from 
close range after good approach 
work from Sullivan and 
Morgan. 

Wales went further ahead five 
minutes into the second half 
when Morgan found the roof of 
the net from 25 yards. Their joy 
was short-lived when, three 
minutes later. Kidderminster's 
Davies scored after receiving the 
pass from Casey, his Midlands 
team colleague. With the En- 
glish defence at sixes and sev- 
ens, Smith scored Wales's third 
in the 68th minute. 


ki I ► J h vl 1 i- 1 

All dividends subject to rajcTUttoj 



AB matches to* March 15th. 


LITTLEWOODS 


POOLS, LIVER POOL 


€41022 




VERNONS POOLS LIVERPOOL 


WINNERS EVERYWHERE THIS WEEK 


Will 


FIVE GOES A PENNY 
TREBLE CHANCE 
3 Dividends only- 
Seu Rule 9(f) 

24 pts £67-95 

23 pts-.- £3-35 

22Vzpts £0fi5 

Treble Chance Dividends 10 Units of 
IlSp. 



10 HOMES .£122.10 

(Nothing Barred) 

5AWAYS „ £4-60 

(Nothing Barred) 

PIC6 £3-75 

Above Dividends to Units of IQp- 

Expenses and Commission for tar 

March 1986329% 


For coupons Phone 01-200 0200 





TREBLE 


if 

CHANCE 


’ 24 Pts £25.101-*" 


23 Pts £0.801 

. 2 DIVIDENDS ONLY AS PER RULE 

tofK H CCTimaw fry hi Strcfi 1306 - 3b?. 

£1501000 
bUGKY 


POOL |4 draws,... £3.60 
4 4 WAYS.... £1.50 

4 SUPER „ rtf . 

HOMES. £105.00 


m, 


Pad onJbv36?bfZ ooai rruiqm 

Above dividend * to lOpunna. 

If you have crossed out all E^ht Numbers 

1 12 15 21150.811551 

telemessage NOW' -zr rTftPQQL London ecip izs 





..i y 


The two faces of management: A woebegone Allison contemplates the end of a agar and of his hopes ra the Middle East 
after his tifemfaaai as national manager in Kuwait as an ebullient Rioch (right) looks forward to tfte-fatifc Jot second 

divison survival after an encouraging offer by ms dub. 



24 PTS £296-65 

23 PTS £13-65 

22V2PTS £2-15 

22 PTS £1-15 

21V2PTS £0-80 

5 Dividends onlv-5-re Rule 9' li 

Trrirte Ctonca dmdaeto 10 units Ysp. 

4 DRAWS £4-10 

10 HOMES £187-40 

4AWAYS £1-25 

Above dividends ta e*its sf1flp 

Expenses and Commission 

1st March 1986-28 9* 

[FOR COUPONS ‘ 



Blackpool 
face big 
obstacle 

Blackpool's “sell up and 
move" survival plan has run 
into an obstacle: Councillors at a 
town hall meeting yesterday 
voted unanimously to accept a 
five-year freeze on the building 
of any more seaside superstores. 
The resort's p lanning and 
development committee 
commissioned a 10,000-word 
study which concluded that the 
number of shopping facilities in 
Blackpool was adequate until at 
least 1991. 

The third divirion dub's lat- 
est plan was to sell its Bloom- 
field Road ground for 
redevelopment as a superstore 
and move to Blackpool Borough 
Rugby Club or to a new rite. 

• Preston North End, the fourth 
division dub, who plan to 
install a plastic pitch at the end 
of tbe season, will sell off the 
existing- Deepdale turf to senti- 
mental fans, many of whom 
remember the glory days of 
Tom Finney. Dave Bradshaw, 
commercial manager, said: “So 
many people want a piece for 
their gardens 

Armstrong 
goes third 

Gerry Armstrong, the North- 
ern Ireland international, said 
yesterday that he bad signed for 
Chesterfield. He said he pre- 
ferred first team football in the 
third division to reserve team 
football with West Bromwich 
Albion. 

Armstrong, aged 31, spent a 
month on loan with Chesterfield 
earlier this year. His signing did 
not go through in time for him 
to play again 5t Plymouth last 
night, but he will be eligible for 
tomorrow’s match a! Doncaster. 

• Tony Cascarino, the Gilling- 
ham forward, is likely to miss 
the Republic of Ireland's inter- 
national against Wales in Dub- 
lin next Wednesday. Cascarino 
saw a specialist yesterday after 
injuring a knee during 
Tuesday’s 2-1 home defeat by 
Brentford. 

“It could be ligament trouble 
but we won’t know how serious 
it is until he has seen tbe 
specialist." Keith Peacock, the 
Gillingham manager, had said. 


Random drug tests 
for World Cup 


Mexico City (AP) — Tbe 
Organizing Committee of the 
1986 World Cop has indicated 
that players wffl undergo ran- 
dom tests which will be able to 
detect evidence of drug use from 
as long as six months before the 

Dr Anrelio Perez Teuffer, who 
is in charge of medical services 
for tbe World Cup, said tbe 
system which will be operated 
will use a technical centre with 
laboratories and computers de- 
signed especially for the World 
Cop. “This laboratory is highly 
specialized, capable of detecting 
with certainty evidence of drugs 
taken six months before. Even, 
for example, if a person drank 
10 cups of coffee six months ago, 
the computer wiB detect the 
residuals of caffeine." 

Dr Teuffer is a member of the 
Organizing Committee as wcO 
as o f the medical committee of 
FIFA. He said the equipment for 
the World Cap resembles that 
which wiB be used in the 1988 
Summe r _ Olympics In Sonth 
Korea. “Our medical equipment 

TUESDAY’S 


b better titan that of the 1984 
Olympic Games in Los 
Angeles,” he said. 

According to- Dr Teuffer, be- 
fore each game the names of two 
players wfflbe will be jnr l adcd 
in separate packages. At the end 
of the first hatL the names of 
foo- players per team wffl be 
drawn. After tbe match, those 
four will be tested 

According to the doctoc, sanc- 
tions for players who fo3 the 
tests have not bees determined. 
“What we are trying to do with 
utidopag control is for soccer 
to continue be i ng healthy and 
clean. This expense was made 
knowing that all the tests wffl 
come out negative, the same 
thing that happened in the 1982 
World Gap in Spain," he said. 

A mon g substances prohibited 
by FIFA and the Org aniz i n g 
Committee are psychomotor 
stimulants soch as amphet- 
amines and cocaine, tranqnflfrr 
ers like iphtdrinc. ilfmnlaiift of 
the central nervous system Eke 
benzedrine and narcotics such as 
heroin. . 

RESULTS . 


Provisional 
sum is 
considered 


FUST DIVISION: ShefMd Wadnmday 1, 


SECOND DlttBON: Blackburn Rovers 1. 
Brighton and Hove aj&oi 4.- Cartefc 
Unfed Z HuddenlWd Town Ot Crystal 
Palace a Stota Cto 1; MkWesbrough t, 
ShBfMd United Z WBwto 1, Futam t. 

THBto OMSKJto Bownemauth 2. Baton 
Wanderers 1: CheserSekS T. Pljnouth 

Qtytt WoNerhwnpton Wanderers 1, Bury 

FOURTH DIVBHOIfc Crew Alexandra 2, 
Trarenata Rowers t; ttient 4, Torquay 
UnllBd 2; Port Vale 3. AkJershotl; Preston 
North End 1. Cambridge United Z 
R ochdale 1. Bur nley 0; Samthcrpe Untod 
1 , Northanvjton Town 0. 

SCOTTISH PREMIER OMSKM: Mottwr- 
wa fl Z Hb man a 

SCOTTISH HR5T ttVSOffc Brechin 4, 
Montrose 2. 

SCOTTISH SECOND DMSKJIt Cow- 
denbeefh 0, Albion Ravers 2; East Surfing 
0, Berwick Z Mcadowbank 2. tXmtermfine 
Z SanhousemUr 2. Aibroeth 1; St 
Johnstons a Suing AEtan Z 
UEFA CUP: Q u a rt er Th ie l , second lag: 
Cologne 2. Sporting Lisbon 0 (Cologne 
win£l on egg}. 

GOLA LEAGUE: Stafford 3. Dagenham 1. 
SOUTHERN LEAGUE: Prem i er dMafom 
Bedworm 2. FoBcastone 1; Witney I, 
Qmriav Z MdNnd tovWon: Banbury 3, 
Moor Green 0: Qttuy v Bromsgrova; 
Reddtch 0. Sutton Cokmald 0, Southern 
d Mtim Burnham and HaCngdon 2. 
Andover Z B*i and Belvedere 2, 
Canterbury 1: H e ati n gs 3. Dorchester 3; 
Thanet 3 Tonbridm 1; Wawtaovlle 0, 
Cambridge City ft Woodford 0. Asfrkxd a 


VAUXHALL-feB. LEAGUE Premier dh 
vtstonc Bishop's Stanford a Stoogh $ 
Barking 1, Kngskxuin Z Famboruugh 5, 
0; Harrow i, W okingham 1: 
I Z Epsom and Ewaia. ftst 


i V, Lewes Z Chesharn Z 
Bromley 4; fincHey 1, Homeh u rtb. 1; 
Gray* 4 St Afeans 4 H a m pto n 1. 
Wemttn 1; Hmtow.Z Oxford Qty 3r 
Le ith sr f i w s d 0, T*>ury 1 ; Layton-Wngrte 
1. Leytonstone/atord Z Stainae 0, 
Boreham Wood 4. Second 


CMfont St PBIer a Haytaridge SwWla 0; 
Cheshunt 1 , HarefleU 2f O^on 4, Were 
1; Hamel Hempate a d 1. Trfog 1; r 
0, Hertford £ Saffron WNden 1, 1 
Z Second itivUl o n aouBa Brae 
BanstBad 1; Dorking 1 , FWham t; I 
a Wlryutoafe A Fbckwel Hm 
Noting 4; Metropofen Pok 
PetermeldO. 

CENTRAL LEAGU& Fbat dMrtotc Man- 
0, Nawcaetta a 


3, Bradford CRy T; 
r. Crwatwy 8, Praeem 


BumteyvRothertimn : ( , 

0; Nona County 3, Stoke 1; OUaaa Z 
Doncaaeer 1; Sunderland 3, Grimsby Q. 
FOOTBALL COMBINATION: Fteiam 3. 
Reading Z Portsmouth 3, Chariton 0; 
Swindon t, Southampton XToUenftem 8, 
Oystal Pataca 7. - 
KSSH LEAGUE: Carrick 1, Bangor 1. 
EASTERN FLOGOUT CUP: frrt fog 
Braintree Town 1, Stevenage 


ATRt ET K WUO N. I 
iQ. 

tCUP:i_. 

Yeovl Town 4, Bristol Ctty 2. 

WEST GERMANY: Borussla 

ktenchengtedbach 1. WakM Mannheim 
1; Serials 3, Saartruckan^HanowrOl 


K amtxr g 2. 
INTERNAL 


KnONAL MATCH: Monaco 1, 
SoumKareaA. 


Bedfirafahhe Comity Council 
have agreed provistouaBy to 
•give Luton £2 million m 
compensatimt for taildifig 
road ihroo^r part of th 
groucd-The coBDOverait] A505 
Luton to D nnmh te relief road 
basbeendtscussedfiN-amnnber 
of years by the two sides. 

The council group-bas agreed 
to the cottHKBatnm subject to 
agreement by the full counriL 
• Bhntingham City have been 
forced to experiment wilh^ son- 
day football because of an FA 
Cap senti-finaL Birmingham 
were due to meetLolbn Town at 
St Andrews on April 5, bat 
because Sheffield .Wednesday 
are to meet Everton in the Villa 
Park semi-final that day nod 
West Bromwich Albion and 
Coventry City are also at home, 
Birmingham have ac cep ted po- 
lice advice to switch the game. 

The game wiB be played On 
April 6 with an 1 LJQ&m kick-off 
and the dob are hoping to make 
special arrange ments with the 
transport authorities to get 
supporter* to tbe game 

Sterland peps 
Wednesday 

Mel Sterlandi Sheffield 
Wednesday's full back, scored a 
wiuatng goaffbr the second tune 
in four days to give his team a l- 
0 victory over Leicester City on 
Tnesday and keep his side 
tucked in- among the leading 
dubs in the race for the League 
championship, i ■ ? . . 

Brighton rekindled their sec- 
ond division promotion hopes 
noth a 4-1 win at Bhdtin 
Uorers. Connor strode twice for 
Brighton, as .did EQiott and 
Hawker IbrWalsaU, whose tiO 
slamming of- Bristol Raven 
em ph asized their late charge in 
the third ; divisioa promotion 
tussle. 

• Maifsfieid Town want to sen 
their Held . Mill groniid' and 
build anew sports stadium. The- 
proposed new stadium, two 
miles mat of town, would cafer 
for a variety - of sports and 
include a football pitch. The 
fourth division dub have ap- 
plied to Mansfidd District 
Council for outline '.planning 
permission. • 


. RUGBY UNION 

Honours even in 

duel 



By Mkhad Stevenson 


West Park. 

Cowley— 


.9 

.9 


'Tito penultimate roeeang be- 
tween these saperfi ni$try 
schools before reoiganizapoa 
nansforms West Park into ffl 
esfaWirirroent for 1 l-lo16-year- 
^iifc , ended in a draw yesenfay 
with the hosts scoring a and 

a 'penalty to Cowley’s three 
penalties. ' 

West Fait, tackling wftb no- 

boaoded.^pirit. Hosted bgfr 
to otHtoier attacks often “Offl 
in ihdr own temwiy and 

regularly spearheaded by 

pniri ^ron, tbe fiU! back. j or 
Quinn, on the left wihg> Cowley, 
having played v»th me breeze 
on tbttrbask* led 6-3 at hai£ 
time, throm^ two penalties by 
Kdsafl to one for West Park, 
kicked byWfcingURi; 

Immediately cm the resump- 
tion KelsalTs third penalty,. 

awarded for handling m a rack; 
seemed to have earned Cowley 


viciorv. But a spark of mspinj- 
contention. Qumo mad* 

ground down ft**-- left l " cn 
Sped almost to the Cowley 
line. PilUngwn, 

prtdsch, caught the ball on the 
fofl n score the game S only uy, 

which he convened temsclt > 
An rqjwy W the Cowtoy fly 

half. Wilkinson.^ caused a re* 

shnfftg with Rtgnaii, tbor 
ou tstandi ng player. _ triov ing 
from centre to fly b^f. Several 
times he carved opetungs bui 
support was scarce and Wert 
iSk? defence fenaocaL Cowley 
could so easily have won on 
nraalttos alone bat justice was 
§5* and West Path's fine try 

Sdat least earned the draw. 

■ggaawEHSfi 

SSaas&MiwM 

FonLDLewr. 

G Danes (Uverpooi). . . 4 


New Boyle ban 


Steve Boyfe. Mosdey’s British 
lions lode;- who was suspended- 
fir a month after befog sent off 
against Nuneaton, has received 
an additional two- week ban 
from foe North Midlands disci- 
ptiiiyy 

He wiH not be able. to play 
until 1 April 17, by which time 
Moseley wffl have only three 
senior fixtures remaining. 
Bbyie's sendir%-off for butting 
an opponent was his first dor 
xnnsai in 15 yean nt taptos 


In addition to the mandatory 
rum2b4ong baa: imposed - 
Moseley, be has also been rid » 
stay away from the. ground for 
the duration .of bis suspension 
and to trim no part m any ctub 
activities:’ : 


• Nick Stringer, the former 
England player, will take over 
from the injured Huw Davies at 
foil back in tbe Wasps* team to 
visit Blackheatb in the fourth 
round of the John Player Cup on 
Saturday. 

• Rosslyn. Park make one 
Change for Saturday's away 
waxen . with Bristol. Tony 
Brooks, their No. S, is in 
Anrtza^a on business, so Rod 
Montgomery is recalled, to the 
bark row. Chris Mantel reverts 
to flanker alongside Montgom- 
ery, and Pttcr Dflington moves 
to No. ft Meanwhile. Park will 
field a side against ToroitfoJ 
Nomadxai Roebampton tomor- 
row <7.30). Nomads will be 
Park's hart dob for their short 
roar of Canada in May. 



and 


Game is advancing 
in universities 

. Last week Mtorice Bamfar* - - 

the Great Britain otoch, ffllCUBY 
awnetbne nt Oxford Ih u w si ty. W j. g y 
However, not en» the risk to 
che tfty of tantog nin by Ktoft MacWto 
the shrewd and w&y wnfaj . 
cstod ISt Oxford to vkvory over 
Cambrige in the tod inml played frith nest and 
Unhenity match. Bpnipd had orraifonalli aaAnva 
condaeted sewn! tnfootog sen- ‘ The- teams, aX abrays^ pro- 
sknKwMefte Oxftods 4 aad.hnt . tMed same Bariy taBdag pohns 
Cam bridge t riaiaphed 32-14 at 'and inaacsting converts to the ^ 
Headingley. . ' tW 

It was rnmtcfa which saw fte- Irwanstadenttntalce pin in a 
13-a-sade fixture aeeerded BBC - amenity match, with Mehdi 

Mntaaned phyfog at prop for- 
ward, ffhfie Oxford TSrfded the 
ftsa ptoper ton Zanhabwe to 
appe a r hr * toiwiiy gUM la 


teterisioo c o ve rag e tbe firrt 
tm re. He hjgUUrt* wffl he 
transmitted 'in. msdaagn& had 
cenqiany,. m toaptauiT on 
Boat Race day. The .match few 
abe gftaenfte boost of spmsor- 
shiphy Car Gave Plan. - 

These achurf ^gesf rift m ye 

farther eridegee tf t he coormoBS 
growth 1^8* J" 

uhmitis, cnUeges and m- 
dt i nw dLlfMier edi 
WhOelafteJu^iio 
teams Be Fdham, 

Bridgend, Soaftend and Kent 
Inricta toll by the wayside, and 
goUea dreams of professional 
expansioa wither, amateur 
teams and coDege sides grow 
fike-mBshimnns in London, the 
Sooth, West and Wales. 

Neatly 40 anhenities, pofy- 
technics and cofl^es piay the 
gam^ and there is a national 
merit league of.29 dubs, fodod- 
ag teams from Cardiff London, 
Newcastle, Blrnloghin and 
Lancaster-. 

Martya Sadler, rhnt: huh of 
the Untarsitks and CeD^es 
Amateur Ragby League Assod- 
atkn, says: “S tan d aids in the 
mdrersity rugby league are ris- 
ing aft the tune, and (Ms year’s 
march between Oxford and 
Cambridge produced some bril- 
tfant lugby.*’ There will- be - no 
*fDnent wfth Sadler ' from 
those spectators, aibot o tdy a. 
sparse number, who toned up at 
He a ding l ey . ' The match was 


America’s Cup will be focos of new yachting season 

The British try a new tack 


With the exception of a few 
hardy souls, mostly dinghy sail- 
ors and yac htsm en are stiD 
enjoying their dose season. 
Whatever the d edic at ed few say 
to the contrary, sail i n g is not 
much fun until there is some 
warmth in the sun and the water. 
This usually means from May 
onw a rds, though dab racing win 
begin in April or even March, as 
soon as British summertime 
makes tbe days more asable. 

Easter regattas are tbe in- 
centive for many dab sailors to 
brash the cobwebs off their 
boats and return them to the 
water. The new season then 
stretches ahead of them, with its 
customary mix of good and bad 
conditions, of excitement and 
disappointments, until the grad- 
ual winding down at the end of 
another year. 

By then the champfooships 
will have been won, tbe points 
series concluded and, for non- 
competitive sailors, new cruising 
grounds explored and old 
favourites revisited. 

Overshadowing all other events 
this year, even though the actual 
challenge races wfll not be held 
until 1987, will be the 26th 
attempt to win the America's 

Cap* 

Enough will be written about 
this evert in the coming months 
to require only the briefest 
mention here. There is a British 
challeng e by the Royal Thames 
Yacht Club and one of their two 
boats wfll be joined" by those of 
13 other syndicates in the first 
series of elimination races off 
Fremaatie on October 5. 

Another event whh British 
participation outside the regular 
yachting calendar Is the second 
BOC Challenge single-handed 
ronad the world race. This starts 
on August 30, only a few months 
after the expected finish of the 
Whitbread Round the World 
race for.fufly crewed yachts. One 
or two competitors, including 
Nora Zehender-Mnller, from 
Switzerland, one of two women 


entered, will be going from one 
race into tbe other and wfl] have 
clocked op about 6dflOQ miles 
by the end of their two yachting 
marathons. 

Four Britons are Ekdy start- 
ers, though only two of them, 
Desmond Hampton and J often 
Howland, have entries in dass 
one, the biggest boats and 
potential winners. The previous 
race fom- yeara uo was won by a 

Frenchman, Philippe Jeantot, 
who has entered again ia a new, 
maximum size Credit Agricole- 

Last time be mm easily with 
an elapsed time of 159 days, but 
in this year's race be wfll face 
stiff er competition firms about a 
dozen other boats capable of 
bettering his previous time. Tbe 
course comprises four legs, simi- 
lar to the Whitbread race but 
starting and finishing to New- 
port, Rhode Island. 


Another event for 
the adventurous 


Another event for the 
adventurous, rather than the day 
racer, is the Royal Western 
Yacht Ctob’s double-banded 
transatlantic race, sponsored by 
Carls berg. This will start from 
Plymouth on June 8 and finish 
in Newport about a fortnight 
later. Aronnd 100 boats will be 
taking part, ranging from the 
latest hi-tech multi-halls to 
stock production cruisers- 
Aaosg the favourites will be 
Tony Baltimore and his Ameri- 
can crew, Walter Green, in 
Baltimore's trimaran. Apricot 
which has a busy season 
ahead of her with a full pro- 
gramme to European watera and 
a second crossing of the Atlantic 
in tbe Route de Rhmn race from 
France to Guadeloupe in Decem- 
ber. After some inshore racing ta 
Martinique she wfll then leave 
for New York for an attempt on 


the transatlantic record trader 
safl. 

Mufti-hails like Apricot have 
been slow to gain acceptance 
among British yac htsm en, as 
indeed they have everywhere 
except in France, where there 
has been np to now a steady 
supply of companies wilting to 
sponsor these fairly expendable 
craft. However, there has to be a 
budget limit, even in France, and 
these were signs last season that 

was becoming scarcer. 

A new forma la 40 dass may 
go some way to redress the 
balance, in numbers if not size. 
Tbe prototype ' raced at La 
TrWtt last year and was cer- 
tainly fast, though toe would 
expect a modern design to be 
superior to the older boats that it 
was up against. The ,40ft dass 
has few and simple rules, which 
allow catamarans and trimarans 
to race together on equal terms, 
the object being to promote 
spectacular races between large 
fleets. 

Whether or not the idea 
attracts sponsors wfll be known 
by tbe end of the season, bet the 
notion of level racing may be 
counterproductive. Sponsors 
filer winning and up to now they 
have achieved this by buying tbe 
biggest and best for tbe latest 
sailing superstar to safl. If boat 
A is ao faster than boat B or C, 
how is she going to attract a 
sponsor? And if all the super- 
stars are safltag similar' boats, 
some oT them are going to be eOt 
down to size. . 

However, whatever’ tbe even- 
tual outcome, the class has 
initially attracted a following 
and a programme of races for the 
dozen or so expected new boats 
has been arranged. There wfll be 
a series of events - scattered 
around Europe, with two of them 
to England, at Plymouth ta May 
and at Cowes in Aognst- 

JohnNicholls 

L\ • 


too ’ played David 
Fuabam, to Australian for- 
ward, >ta-|aqtitjffii rugby 
league in the' junior league In 
Manly, the safcutU of. Sydney 
which has' one: of the finest 
senior profeasienaL teams in the 
worM . «ad thriving junior 
l eag u e s. 

Back |o Cambridge, and ta the 
centre was Andrew Montgom- 
ery, from Auckland, following in 
the footsteps - of flic# 
McCoaoefl, Ins c ou n tr y m a n, 
who founded the Cambridge ctab 
to 1986. . 

Perhaps the most remarkable 
achievement ' was by James 
Dtagemans, the Oxford prop 
forward, who must have made 
some .sort of history by playing 
in his third rugby league unrver- 
sky m at ch after his appearance 
at Twickenham in the ragby 
aba game. Mnrtyn Sadler 
comments: “Surely this in- 
dicates the good spirit that 
exists between the two codes at 
Oxford.” . . 

The. ragby league university 
match is established, and the 
game is attracting player* from 
all over die coentry to coaching 
sessumaat Britain's two greatest - 
halls of learning. . f 


CIN EMAS 


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THE TIMES THURSDAY MARCH 20 1986 


39 


Today’s television and radio programmes 


Edited by Peter Dear 
and Christopher Davalle 


V 




• * 

J i..' • 
-.•% %-*> 
v r - ~k 
M TV. 


11 

t C 

1 "-.4 






BBC 1 


«j)0 CoefuAM. 

&50 BroaktaatTbn# wSh Frank 
Bough and Dobbte 
Greenwood. Weather at 
&5S, 7J3S, 7.55, &25 and 
SJi; regional news, 
weather and traffic at &57, 
7.27, 7.57 and *27; 
nationat and international 
news at 7.00, 7.30, LOO, 
L30 and LOO; sport 7M 
and W»B; and * review of 

S^^Kil&eSown's 

teenage report; and 
Richard Smith's 'phone-in 
niecfical advice. 

&20 Caefaz m30 Ptay School 
1CLS0 Cooffnx. 

1230 Hew* After Noon with .- 

- Moira Stuart and David 
Davies Includes news . 
headfines with subtitles 
12J55 Regional news and 
weather. 

100 Pebble MBlat One. Hilary 
James returns with the 
first of a new Sew Easy 
series; and Dave and Al 
Se^sy of the muse hail 
group Cosmotheka, trace 

' their roots and end up in 
Paddington Green poMce 
station 1.45 Hokey 

. Cokey/r) 

ZM Intamiitional Snooker: the 
Worid Cup K. A. four day . 
event in which eight teams 
from around the world are 
competing. Hi fids 
afternoon s match Wales - 
play Scotland over a best- 

- oMWne-fcames format at 
the Bournemouth 

- Int ern a tio nal Centre, 
introduced by David leke. 
(cbntkiued on BBC 2) 3-00 
. Ceefax 3£2 Regional 
news. 

3£5 T.T.V. Tea-time Television 
for children 4.10 SuperTed 
(r)4.15 Jackenory. 
MdhaelPafln reads part 
four of Roald Dahl's 
Ctnrfie and Chocolate 
Ffactoty 440 Ulysses 31. 

445 John Craven's 

NewsroundSASBfua 
Peter. Bdbby Robson, the 
- England football team 

ger, puts two of his . 
! through their paces 
i a game of head 
tennis. (Ceefax). 

&3S the Ffiotstooes. Cartoon 






t-r?- 


-I' 


. V . 


L00 News with Sue Lawtey and 
Nicholas Witched, 
weather. 

L35 London Plus. 

740 Top of the Pops. 

740 Eas t En dere. The Queen 

Vic isal^ve of activity 
when the brewery 

announce a major 

promotion and visit 
Albert Square pub for a 
surprise stock takfog 

- exercise. (Ceefax) - 

LOO Tomorrow's Worid- Peter 
Macarm announces the 
resist of the week-long 
test of new devices 
ctafaned to improve fuel 
' economy; Judith Hfflin has 
news of a new technique 
that substantially cuts the 
cost of having a test-tube 
baby; Howard Stablefofd 
examines a shower which’ 
enables firemen who are 
conta min ated with 
dangerous chendcaJs to 
be hosed down ■ 

- immedtately; and Maggie 
Ptetotn demonstrates a 
‘ new chemical detector that 
is as sensitive as the 
human tongue. 

840 A Question alSDOft Ml 
Beaumont and 
Hughes art 

Martin Cm . 

Bates. Hugo MacNeffl, and. 
Tony Knowtea. (Ceefax) 

LOO News with JuflaSomervito 
and John Humphrys. 
Weather. . 

940 The Budget Roy Janttw 

comments on behalf of the 
SDP/UberalAWanoa 

L40 1 Woke Up One Mooting. 
Comedy drama series 
about a quartet of heavy 
drinkers who are trying to 

10.10 S«£mtKSIW RoWn 
Day's panel this weak Is 
RosaSnd GBmore. 
Baroness Seear and MPs 
Denis Healey and John 

11.10 wESfSirs S kating 

C ha ro ptonsM ps-The 

. Men's Free Programme 
from Geneva. 

1145 Can You Avoid Cancer?. 
The third nroaramma in Dr 
-Michael 



TV-AM 


3.15 Good Morning Britain, ' 
r presented by Anne 
raamond and Nick Owen.- 
Exercises at 640; news 
with Gordon Honeycombs 
at 640, 740,740, L00, 
840 and 840; sport at 
C45 and 744; regicinaf 

Z 

Jeni Barnett's i 
843; Moya I 
reunions at 845; i 
Raynor is given anew - 
image by fashion 
consultant Menfl Thomas 
at 944; and comments on 
the problems of dotbes . 
and confidence at 8 J 2 . . 


ITV LONDON 


945 Thame* news headlines. 
940 For Schools: How ~ 

electricity Is made and - 
used 942 Learning to read 
with BUI OddfaL» Safety 
at home and at play ILIv 
A profile of the American 
red-tailed hawk 1028 With 

a group of young people 
from Northampton 
spending a week atTaize 
10.45 Religion: Judaism 
1143 Thereto of 
computers 1140 An 
almost stent adventure - 
1147 How We Used to 
Uve: the 1926 General 
Strike. 

1240 TheGilddyGtemeShow. 
Gus, Gorma and Giddy go 
12.10 Puddle 

’ammo 


camping 12.10 Pudcfie 
Lane. Ffoppet programm 
presented by NeB nines 


1240 The StriBvans. 

140 News atOne with 
Leonard Parkin 140 
Thamss news 140 
Falcon Crest Final, 
episode of the carter 
about the vine-growing 
community ofCsiiftxroa. 
245 Home Cookery 
. Club. The recipe for 
Farmhouse Loaf. 

240 Daytime. Sarah Kennedy 
chairs a studio discussion 
on a matter of topical 
importance. 340 Gems. 
Drama serial 345 Thames 
hews headlines 340 Sons 
and Daughters 
440 The Giddy game Show. A 
repeat of the programme 
shown atnoon.4w10 
James the Cat Cartoon 
- series 4.15 Ragdoiy 
Anna. Adventures of a 
walking, talking dolL 440 
BaflamyfaBug». David 
Bellamy announces the 
. . winner of the wikfflfe 

sketching competition 445 
. - 8up«D**Mrt (0racle) 
5.15 Ice Skating. The Yforld 
Figure Char 
545 News with Ml 

Nicholson 640 Thames 


845 Help! The benefit of the 
month is Fuel Bifis. 

845 Crossroads: Joanna 
receives shattering 
formation from Ifeniel. 

7.00 Emmerdale Farm. Alan 
- Turner wants to settles 
score with Amos Brearfy. 

740 Knight Jtkfaf. Michael 
Knight and KITTcometo 
the aid of the focal - - • 
penitentiary when a gang 


series starring 


040 Farrington of 

Comedyseria 

Angela Thorne as the 
hardpresse^ British 
Consul-General in a 
Central American banana 
republic. " 

LOO in towinfl Memory- An 
accident at the funeral of a 
local coundHor leads Ivy to 
advertise for a new 
apprentice. " . .■ 

940 TV Eye: SeBafield and the 
- Bonn. An investigation 
into SeBafieU's role of 
- - plutonium producer for - 
military and comm er c ia l 
use. 

1040 News et Tan with Alastar 
Burnet and Martyn Lewis. 

1040 The Budget Roy Jenkins 
. replies on behalf of the 
SDP/Uberal Affiance. 

1040 The Royal FBm 

Performance. Peter 
Marshafi and Judith 
Chalmers set the scene at 
the Odeon, Leicester 
Square, where the Queen 
is attending a showing of 

Figure Champkmsivps 
from Geneva. 

1245 IBght Thought*. 



an 
BHIand 


Health move: 
Brass Tacks 


• FORTY MINUTES (BBC2. 
940pm) is sub-titled Come 
Home. Jute and returns to 
the case of the Ghanaian girt 
June Lanuy, who was the 
subject of a previous BBC 
documentary 10 years ago. 

Julie was fostered as a baby by 
eiderty Scottish couple. 

I and Evelyn Vose, only to be 
Suctedby her natural 
parents and taken to Africa, it 
was six years before the 
Vases heard from June, 
obviously unhappy and 
determined to return to her 
Scottish "home". Eventually, 
after several cries for hefo, the 
Voses paid for her air fare. 

BW, now 80 , and his wife, poorly 
after a series of heart attacks 
possibly brought on by the grief 
of June s abduction, wait at 
the airport hoping that the 
relationship can Be picked up 


CHOICE 


where it toft off . But Jufie is older 
and no longer has the same 
attitude towards the couple she 
has always known as 
“Mummy" and “Daddy", it is a 
story of sadness, wttft a 
surprise twist, told with revealing 
discretion by producer 
Angela Ho las worth and reporter 
John Pitman. 

• STRAWBERRY HELDS 
(Channel 4, 940pm) is a West 
German film version of the 
play by Steven Poliakoff which 
explores themes of modem 
youth and poi meal 
disenchantment within the 
format of a chase thriller. It 
follows two young activists as 
they travel through Germany, 
pick up a hitchhiker and. after 
a policeman is shot find 


themselves or, the run. 

Though overlaid with a setf- 
ccnsaous gloom, this Is a 
film of quality, deftly directed by 
Christian Kuhn and with a trio 
of excellent performances. 

• A PARADISE OUT OF A 
COMMON FIELD (Radio 3. 7pm) 
is the first of three talks by Dr 
Joan Morgan which look at that 
talented and versatile 
character, the Victorian head 
gardener. Taking examples 
as far flung as ArcherfieU in East 
Lothian. Linton Park in the 
Kentish Weald and Longleat, she 
draws on contemporary 
archives and journals to present 
a picture of men who were 
responsible not only designing 
gardens but providing 
anything from a pineapple to a 
dinner table decoration. 

Peter Waymark 


BBC 2 


645 Open University: 
Computers ano CoaL 
Ends at 740. . 

LOO Ceefax. 

945 Daytime on Two: 
mathematical 
. investigations- patterns 
and time graphs L58 
TWnkabout - eggs 10.15 
Science - animals of the 
soil 1048 Solving the 
140 

fa was like for a 


'200 vears aoo 
. 1t42 Course options for 
13-year-olds 1145 The 
rOe of trade unions 1245 
Lesson 20 of an Kalian for 
beginners course 1240 
Ceefax 140 Italy and the 
Italian language 148 
BirdwatettStgln Scotland 
240 FOr four- and five- 
year olds 2.15 Puppets 
perform Tchaikovsky's 
The Sleeping Beauty 240 
How the north of England 
coped with an outbreak of 
cholera in 1831. 

340 Inter na tion a l Snooker 
continued from BBC 1. 

545 News summary with 
subtitles. Weather. 

540 Path to the Sea. Slapton 
Ley, a freshwater lake in 
south west England, 
explored through the eyes 
of a grass snake. ( 1 ) 

640 Star Trek. Has IQric reaBy 
plighted his troth? (0 

640 Discovering Birds. The 

- • third of eight films 

preserved by Tony Soper. 

7.15 Best of Brass. The second 
round of the competition 
features the Ever Ready 
Band, the CWS (Glasgow) 
Band, and the Parc and 
Dare Band. 

LOO Inter na tional Snooker. 
Ireland A versus Ireland B. 

840 Brass Taeka; Health and 
Efficiency. A documentary 
about Tony Stapleton, a 
former director of 
Setfridges who has been 
made toe general manager 
, ofthe John Radcfiffo 
Hospital- He Is one of new 
wave of managers . 
recruited by the 
government to get better 
value for money from the 
National Health Service. 

Has he succeeded In 

making the hospital more 
efficient or have standards 
. of care faBen below. ■ 
accepted levels? 

940 Karan Kay.- The comedy 

" ' impresslonisfs guests this 
week include singer Jack 
Jones. • 

940 40 Minutes: Come Kama, 

JuSe. A documentary 
atxxrt EvelynandBwVdso 

faffaWas ageefelirit. had 
their foster child whom 
they had looked after 
since she was a few days 
old, snatched by her real 
parents and taken to 
Ghana. Now they hear that 
the girl wants to return to 
her raster home. Can the 

Vose's help? (see Choice) 
(Ceefax) 

10.10 International Snooker. 
Further coverage of the 
Ireland A versus Ireland B 
match. 

1045 The Budget Roy Jenkins 
replies on behalf of the 
SDP/Liberal Affiance. 

1046 NewsnigMl140 
Weather. 

1145 international Snooker 

12.10 Open University: 
Weekend Outlook 12.15 
Reading development 
Ends at 12.45. 


CHANNEL 4 


240 Channel 4 Racing from 
Doncaster. The opening 
meeting of the flat racing 
season. Coverage of the 
Phfflp Comes Brocklesby 
Stakes (245k the Bertie 
Bassett Handicap (3.15); 
the Racing Post MUe 
(3.45); ana the Batthyany 
Handicap (4.15). 

440 Countdown. The second 
quarterfinal of the 
anagrams and mental 
a ri thm etic contest The 
number two seed, Andy 
Keebie, meets Dorothy 
Bailey, seeded number 
seven. 

540 F*tn: Orders Are Orders* 

1 954) starring Brian 


Sidney James and, 

In his screen debut Tony 
Hancock. A farce about an 
army adjutant who, 
because he is smitten with 

a film starlet, allows an 
ArrtericanfHm-makerto 
make a science fiction 
adventure in the camp- 

Directed by David 


640 Union World includes 
Hems on union members 
at GCHQ Cheltenham; and 
on the efforts of trade 
unions to enrol new 
members. 

740 Channel Foot news with 
Alastair Stewart and 
Nicholas Owen. 

740 Comment With his views 

- on a topical matter, which 
might not be a million 
mites from the extra tax on 
tobacco, is Stephen Eyres, 
director of the Reedom 
Organisation for the Right 
to Enjoy Smoking 
Tobacco. Weather. 

840 The Art of Persuasion. 
Christopher FrayflnQ 
continues fas series on 
advertising with an 
investigation into where 
the good ideas come from; 
8nd mere is a report on 
foe making of Rodney 
Scoffs muton dollar 
romputer commercial (r) 

840 frenule Hunt The final 
pro gramme of the series 
finds Armska Rice, at the 
behest of Rosemary 
Griffin and her son 
Charles, skimming across 
the Cheshire countryside 
in search of clues to - 

- hidden treasure. (Oracle) 

940 Film an FOur- from 

Germany: St r a wberry 
Fields 11985) starring 
Beats Jensen, Rolf Zacher 
. and Thomas Schucke. A 
drama about Charlotte and 
: Karl, members of an 
• extremist groupwho are 
travelling through 
Germany cxjBettfng 
donations and delivering 
pamphlets about their 
organisation. On their 
travels they pick-up a 
hitchhiker. Nk*. who 
becomes fasdnatod by the 
couple. But with this third 
companion in tow, things 
start to go wrong for the 
political activists. Directed 
by Christian Kuhn. In 
German with English 
subtitles. 

1140 Voices. Michael Ignatteff 
chairs a rfiscussion 
between Ernest GMnar, 
Professor of Soda! 
Anthropology at 
Cambridge, and Charles 
Taylor oTMcGffl, Montreal, 
on Modernity and its 
Discontents -the Tough 
and the Tender. Ends at 
12.15. 


Radio 4 


545 Shipping 840 News; 
Weather 6.10 
Fanning 645 Prayer (s) 

640 Today. Ind 640, 740, 

840 News. 645 
Business News. B4S. 745 
Weather. 740, 840 
News. 745, 645 Sport 745 
Thought for the Day. 845 
Yesterday in Parliament. 

847 Weather; Travel 
LOO News 

LOS The Natural History 
Programme. How the 
abolition of the tortoise trade 
two years ago has 
affected the animals in the 
wHd. 

945 Fireside Tales. 

Storyteters around the 
country share some taBres 
with PnU Smith. 

1040 News; Medicine Now. 

Geoff Watts reports on 

the heaHh of the medical 
care. 

1040 Morning Story: The 
Ghost Cupboard, by 
Ronald Frame. 

1045 Daily Service (S) 

1140 News; Travel: Analysis. 

Mary GoWring looks at 
the future of local 
government after the 
demise of the seven 
metropolitan authorities. 
1148 Thought for Food. Bob 
Symes on traditional 
European dishes. 

1240 News; You and Yours. 
Consumer advice with 
John Howard 
1247 Fftn Star. Alexander 
Walker reeals screen 
careers ol famous stars: 
Peter SaHere. 1245 
Weather 

140 The WOrid At One: News 

140 The Archers 145 
Shipping Forecast 

240 News; Woman's Hour 
indudes a report on 
volunteers who mediate 
between criminals and 
their victims. 

340 News; Irish Drama: 

Autumn Love, by Stewart 
Love (8) 440 News 

445 Bookshelf with Hunter 
Davies. 

445 Kaleidoscope (r) 

540 PM: News Magazine 540 
Shipping 545 Weather 

6.00 News; Fmandal Report 

640 My World! Panel game 

with Dtiys Powell and 
Frank Muir challenging 
Victoria Glendirtning and 
Denis Norden (s) 

7.00 News 

745 The Archers 

740 Any Answers? Views on 
some of the subjects 
• ■ raised in last week's Any 
Questions? 

740 What On Earth Is The 

Church For? Rosemary 
Hartfil conducts an 


investigation with help 
from Bishop Keith Sutton. 
Bishop Patrick KaUombe 
and The Rev Myra BW (a) 
LOO Does he Teke Sugar? 

For disabled listeners 
and their families. 
flag Barry Fantoni's Chinese 
Horoscopes 
945 Kaleidoscope. 

Christopher Cook 
presents interviews, news 
and reviews of books, 
plays and films. 

10.15 A Book At Bedtime: A 
Perfect Spy written and 
read by John le Carre (4) 
1049 Weather 

1040 The World Tonight 
1040 The Budget A statement 
on behalf of the SDP- 
Li&eral Alliance by Roy 
Jenkins. MP 

1040 The World Tonight 
(continued) 

11.15 The Financial World 
Tonight 

1140 Today m Parliament 
1240 News: Weather. 1243 
Shipping 

VHF (available m England and 
S. wales onty) as above except 
545-6.00 etn Weather; Travel. 
945-10.45 For Schools. 1140- 
1240 For Schools. 145-3.00 
pm For Schools. 540-545 PM 
(continued). 1140-12.10 era 
Open University. 1240-1.10 
Schools night-time 
broadcasting (s). 

( Radio 3 ) 

645 Weather. 740 News 
745 Morning Concert Bax 
(Tone Poem: The Happy 
Forest), Mendelssohn 
(Fruhzeitiger Fruhiing. 

Op 59 No Z), Copland 
(Appatatian Spring), 
Beethoven (Neue Debe. 
noes Leben, Op75 No 2), 
Sibelius (Spring Song, Op 
16). 840 News 
845 Concert part two. 

George Butterworift (The 
Banks of Green WHIow). 
Beethoven (Sonata In F. 

Op 24, Spring), Bridge 
(Rhapsody: Enter 
Spring). L00 News. - 
945 This Week's Composer. 
Glazunov. Podm lyrique. 

Op 12: Moscow RSO, 
Rozhdestvensky. 

Symphony No B in E flat 
major. Op 83: Bavarian 
RSO. Neeme Jarvi. 

1040 Martina and Suk. Martinu 
(Field Mass, with Czech 
Phtttarmonic Orchestra and 
Chorus under 

Mackerras, and Vaclav Zttek, 
baritone). Suk (Fantasy 
in G minor. Op 24, for viofln 
and orchestra. Czech 
PO, Vadav Neumann). 

1040 Eichendorff Lieden Dn 
Nacht Nachtzauber: 
Verschwiegene Uebe; Die 
Zigeunerin Goethe 


Ueder. St Nepomukus 
Vorabentfc Die SprScte: 

Die Bekehrre; Anakreons 
Grab; Eptphanias. 

Amaral Gunson (mezzo- 
soprano) Paul 
Hamburger (piano). 

1140 BBC Walsh Symphony 
Orchestra- Part one: 

William Mathias conducts his 
Anniversary Dances. 

1140 Six Continents. Angus 
Me Derm id surveys 
recent foreign broadcasts 
monitored by the BBC. 

1245 Concert Part two: 

Brahms (Piano 
Concerto No 2 in B flat 
Op 83. with Christian 
Zacharias, conducted by 
Jacek Kasprzyk). 145 
News 

145 Birmingham Lunchtime 
Concsn. Recital Dy 
Birmingham Da Saram 
'• Clarinet Trio: Angela 
Maisbury (clarinet) Rohan da 
Saram (cello) David Pettit 
(plana). Tate (Sonata for 
clarinet and cello). 

• Franks) (Pezzi pianisskni), 

* Leighton (Fantasy on an 
. American hymn tune). 

2.00 The Country 
Philosopher. Opera in 
three acts by Galuppi. sung 
in EngHsh in a 

performance recorded at the 
1985 Buxton Festival, 
conducted by Anthony 
Hose Act one. 245 
Interval reading. 340 Opera 
-(continued) acts two and 
three. 

445 in Black and White. 

Stravinsky's Easy Pieces 
for piano duet and Rite of 
Spring for two pianos, 
played by the Norma- 
Keuschran Plano Duo. 

445 News 

540 Mainly for Pleasure. 
Presented by Natalie 
Whaen. 

640 Bandstand. Jesus Guridi 
(Three Basque 
melodies). Ida Gotkovsky 
(Sinforua for band). With 
the Academy of the Original 
Military Band of Liria. 

7.00 A Paradise out of a 
Common Field. Dr Joan 
Morgan describes how 
Victorian gardeners 
transformed the grounds of 
country mansions. One; 
Geometry and Geraniums. 

740 Dvorak. Stabat Mater, 
with the Haifa Orchestra 
under Zdenek Macal. Sheila 
Armstrong (soprano). 

Anne Coflins (contralto). 
Kenneth Bowen (tenor) 
and David Wilson- Johnson 


9.05 One Pair of Eyes. John 
Mfeom's critical look at 
the week's musk: 
broadcasting. 

940 CeUo and Piano. Timothy 
Hugh (ceUo) and Kathron 
Sturrock (piano) perform 
Nigel Osborne's 
Remembering Esenin and 
Poulenc's Sonata. 



Peter 


tr Ansi taRe: In Loving 
Memory (ITV, 9.00pm) 


1040 Music hi Our Time. 

Jonathan Harvey 
introduces a new work Of ms 
own (Song Offerings) 
and two other first 
performances. John 
Martow Rhys (Two Portrans) 
and BUott Schwartz 
1 Spirals: chamber concerto 
for piano and ensemble). 
Rosemary Hardy (soprano), 
EBiott Schwanz (piano). 
Spectrum, conductor Guy 
Protheroe. 

1045 American Piano MuSiC. 

Piano recital by PhRtp 
Martin. Goesdnaik (Union; 
Columbia). Wes (In the 
Sun). Lukas Foss (Solo, 

1 981). Barber (Four 
Excursions) Gershwin (Three 
Prertudes). 

1147 News. 1240 Closedown. 
VHF oiihR Open University. 

From 845am to 645. Studying 
Literature. 


C Radio 2 ) 


On medium wave. VHF at end 
of Radiol. 

News on the hour. Headlines 
540 am. 640. 740. 8401 Spate 

a « #t ** reel ro nre M m 


4.00 am Colin Benyjs) B 
Ray Moore (s) 845 Ken Bruce (s) 
1040 Jimmy Young ind food 
information from Tony De AngeU (9) 
145pm David Jacobs (8)240 
Gloria Hunnlford (s) 340 Music Afl 
The Way (s) 440 David 
Hamilton (s) 840 Bob Hotness (s) 
840 Country Club, featuring 
Wayton Jennings and Ricky Skaggs 
In concert (s) 945 Sports Desk 

10.00 The News HudcWnes, with 
Roy Hudd. 1040 Star Sound 
Extra news and interviews from the 
film work! 1140 Brian Matthew 
(stereo from midnight) 140 era 
Perer Dickson Nightride (s) 
340-440 A Little Night Music (s). 

( Radio 1 ) 

News on the half-hour from 
640am until 940pm and at 1240 
midnight. 

640 am Adrian John 740 Mike 
Read 940 Simon Bates 1240 pm 
Newsbeat (lan Parkinson) 1245 
Simon Mayo 340 Steve might 540 
Newsbeat (lan Parkinson) 545 
Bruno BrookBS 740 Janice Long 
with music on record and in 
session 1040-1240 Andy Kershaw 

WF Radios 1 8 2 440 am As 
Radio 2 1040 pm As Redo 1 
1240-440am As Radk) 2. 


WORLD SERVICE 


i 1001 King of Swing 
i jtmras « Hkne 6 
s 11-09 News About 
Maas 11.25 A Latter 
.^.RaOo Newsreel 12.15 
) Twenty 1245 Sports Roundup 140 
ws 149 Twenty Four Hours 1J» 
work UK 146 Bandera and Swann 


6.00 Newsdesk 740 News 749 Twenty 
Four Hours 7 JO The CtBBSic Altxms 745 
Network UK 840 News 640 Reflections 
815 International Soccer Special 840 
John Peel 840 News 949 Review ol the 
British Press 9.15 The World Today 82® 
Financial News 940 Look Ahead 945 
Mentor 1040 News 1001 " 

1040 The Random J 

Bracket 1140 News 

Britain 11.15 New Ideas 1i4S A Letter 
from England 1240 Radto Newsreel 1815 

TOP TV'*'**'' < * <> MIC QnimiLiiA 1 flfl 

News 

Network ... — 

240 News 241 Outlook 24S Jazz from 
Europe 340 Radio Newsreel 815 The 
Pleasure's Yours 440 News 409 Com. 
mintary 415 Assignment 445 The World 
Today 540 news 549 A Latter from 
England 5.15 Meridian 940 News 809 
Twenty Fox Hours 815 A JoBy Good 
Show 1040 News 1049 The World Today 
1825 A Letter from Entfand 1040 
financial News 1040 Reflections 1045 
Sports Rond-up 1140 News 1149 
Commentary 11.15 Merchant Navy Pro- 
gramme 1140 Nature Notebook 1140 
The Fernand World 1240 News 1249 
News About Brink! 12.15 Radio Newsreel 

1240 Music NOW 140 News 141 Outiook 
140 Flanders and Swarm 146 Book 
Choice 140 In the Meantfcne 240 News 
249 Review of the British Press 815 I 
-wish Id Met 240 The Musk: of Refund 
Rodney Bennett 340 News 349 News 
About Britain 3.15 The World Today 340 
Business Matters 440 Newsdesk 440 
Country Styte 545 The World Today (ell 
times fii GMT) 


FREQUENCIES: Radto 1:1053kHz7285m-.1088kHz^75tTi : Radio 7s 693KHz/433m; 909kH/433m;_Radto i * 1«5kH2g47ftc V HF^jO- 
925; Racfio 4: 200kHz 150 oScWf -®?-95;J-BGJ 1 S2kH^^t61 m ; VHF 97A Capital: 1548kHz/194m. VHF 95.8; BBC Radto London 


aiLo; raKuo m fljwni iouuih- **'r 

1458kHz/206m; VHF 94 S; Worid Service MF 648kHz/463m. 


DRri WALE S S45pt n -640 

^ 1 Wales Today. 835-740 Gar- 
dening Together. 12.l6am-12.15 
News end weather. 8COTLANO 
1820em-1(L30 Dotaman. 24M»- ■ 
342 Conference 88. 946-740 Reporting 
Scotland. 840-840 The Thursday 


mor. nrp runwiinw. w rev 

SpotUgnt liiOwlZlS Nows and 
weather. ENGLAND I800-t24tfam The 
Peat ki Focus ( n o rt h-west only). 645- 
740 Regional news magazines. 

RBC2 NOmfiW WELAND 
S5s= l48pm-240LRstsrln Focus. 

CHANNEL 

Crest M£2SjM0UtMrw8«WB4S 


Hornet 


l Report 1040-1040 Bam- 
ctomwis 1245 «n That’s Holywood 
1245 Closedown 

centra l agassu 

140 News 140-240 Man m a Su#- 
cese 640 crossroads 645-740 News 
740-840 Fskson Crest 1245 am 
Closedown. 


regional television variations 


Scotti sh 

140 Bodytine 145-240 Riptide 830- 
440 Whakers end Wet Noses 640-835 
News and Scotland Today 7.00 Take 
the High Rood 740-840 Falcon Crest 
1245 am Late Ca8 Closedown. 

HTVWESTg^"^ 

140-245 Country Practice 800845 
News 740-840 Falcon Crest 1245 am 
Closedown 

HTV WALES SSSB 1 — 

1809 Schools 10.11-1046 About 
Wales 640 pnv845 Wales at Six. 

ANflUA A> London except 

140 pm-140 News 640 
About Angka 740-740 Moutmrap 
12^ am Question of Lent Closedown. 

□nonpR As London except 
PWHUCW 1 _20p m NWS 140-240 
Man In a Suitcase 640-645 
Lookaround 1245 am News. Closedown. 


TYNE TEES 

140-240 Man In a Suitcase 640- 
545 Northern Ufe 740-840 Falcon Crest 
1042 The works 1140 k* Skating 
12^ am Crunch Questions, Closedown. 


Law 


TCW As London except: 140 pm 
J32Z. News 140-830 Carson's U 


5.15 Gus Honey txm 540-545 Cross- 
roads 640 Tortey South West 640 
Emmerdale Farm 7.00 Knight Rider 
B40-840 Busman's HoWay 1245 am 
PoetscnpL Closedown. 

GRANADA 

da Reports 140-245 Country _ 

Practice 340-440 Young Doctors 640 
Granada Reports 640-645 TTus is 
Your Righi7404L30 Fakxxi Crest 1246 
am Ctosaoown. 

GRAMPIAN News 

140-240 The Baron 740 Random 
Choice 740-840 Falcon Crest 1245 am 
News, Closedown. 


tMO Starts 140 pm Countdowft 
SZ3£ 140 Alee 240 F«n«ti1 240 


BwrFwySJ 

jeanrw 640 Brookaide 640 More Than 
meets The Eye 740 Nawyddkjr Satth 
740 w«e Gymru 835 Omw 805 
DinesyddylWyffad 945 H« Street 
Blues 1040 Prospects 1140 My BIMn 
1240 am Closedown 

TV <5 As London except 140pm 
-UL2 News 140 Home Cookery 145- 
240 Faksn Crest 340-440 
Mourhtrap 640-645 Coast to Coast 
1245m That's HoBywood 1246 
Company. Ctosedown. 

k London n 

— e140 

Calendar umchtlme Uve 1J 

Carson's Law 640-645 Caisndar 
1245am Closedown. 

Ill QTFR As London except 
M VP 1 c a 140 pm Lunchtime 1 JO 
Man me Suitcase 340440 Spice of 
Lite 640 Good Ewmlng tester 645-645 
Police Shi 740-840-Tuckars Witch 
1245 am News. Closedown. 



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WIFE BE CDt& AT FORTY 
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HOME OF TH E THEA TRE 
OP COMEDY COMPANY 
See separate entry. 


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TIMES 


THE TIMES THURSDAY MARCH 20 1986 


SPORT 



lesson 



the two Rs 


By John Woodcock, Cricket Correspondent, Barbados 


England had to score at 5.4 
runs an over 10 win the third 
of die one-day internationals 
here yesterday. In 46 overs 
West Indies, after being put in. 
made 249 for seven in a 
wonderfully entertaining in- 
nings. Their first six batsmen 
made runs, with Richards and 
Richardson again providing 


Scoreboard 


WESTMOE5 
c Dowraon d Foster _ 31 

_ _ . Foster 28 

R B Richardson D Botnam 62 


CG 
D L Haynes 


n V A Richards c Foster b Emburey - 62 

tP J Dujon c Lamb b Foster — 23 

R A Harper not out 24 


J Gamer 0 Emburey 

M 0 MarsnaH carat) Bottom 

M A Holding not out 

Extras (fi 4. w 2. nb 1) 7 


3 

9 

0 


Total [7 wfcts, 46 overs) . 


249 


HA Gomes and B P Patterson dkl not bat 
FALL OF WICKETS: 1-81. 2*4. 3-IBl. 4- 
195. 5-225. 8-239. 7-248. 

BOWLING: Botham 9-2-38-2: Thomas 7- 


1*0-0; Foster 9*39-3: Wj*ey>*-21-0: 


Gooch 6-1-41-0: Emburey 9-0-5 
ENGLAND: G A Gooch. R T Robinson. W 


the highlight. As they un- 
corked a succession of flashing 
strokes they slapped each 
others hands in mutual admi- 
ration. 

England took the field to 
enthusiastic applause from 
their host of supporters, who 
were treated to a splendid 
opening over from Botham, as 
good as anything he has 
bowled on the tour. In it he 
beat Gree nidge twice. Thomas 
also started with a maiden. 

Yet after four overs 
Gree nidge and Haynes had 
scored 20, including three 
fours in Thomas's second, two 
by Haynes with unstoppable 
straight hits. The outfield was 
parched and lightningly fast 
and the boundaries short. Of 
the wood's Test grounds this 
one and Headingley are per- 
haps the fastesL They are of 
much the same size, too. 


able English bowling. When 
drinks were taken after IS 
overs West Indies were 60 for 
no wicket. In the first over 
afterwards Haynes chopped 
Foster into his stumps and in 
Foster’s next over Greenidge 
was caught at the wicket. 

There looked to be more 
than enough lift in the pitch 
for England's batsmen to care 
for, but not Richards and 
Richardson, who were soon 
playing glorious strokes and 
running daringly between the 
wickets. Greenidge was out in 
the eighteenth over and in the 
next 17 Richards and Rich- 
ardson added 117. 


N Slack. "O l Go*w. P WHtey. A J Lamb. I 
on. JEE 


T Botham, fP R Dowraon. 

A Foster. J G Thomas. 

Umpires: D Archer and L Barker. 


Emburey, N 


So the match was soon on 
the move with high-class bat- 
ting against perfectly respect- 


Thomas came in for heavy 
front-foot punishment and 
when Gooch bowled (England 
were looking for 10 overs from 
him and Willey between 
them) it was more than he 
could do to contain two such 
dashing batsmen in this form. 

The show reached a thrilling 
climax and conclusion in the 


34th over, bowled by 
Emburey. From the first five 
balls Richards hit two fours 
and two sixes, both over extra 
cover. Off the last ball Foster 
at long off brilliantly held 
another high swinging drive 
that would also have carried 
for six. He pulled down the 
catch, two-handed, from away 
above his bead. 

In the fortieth over Rich- 
ards was bowled by Foster, 
trying to hook, whereupon 
Dujon and Harper played 
scarcely less vividly than the 
two Rs. Two cover drives by 
Dujon off Emburey were of 
the most exotic kind, a back- 
fool six by Harper off Foster 
on to the top of the new 
Garfield Sobers pavilion at 
long on a freakish stroke. 
Lamb took a nice running 
catch on the extra cover 
boundary and there were four 
overs still unbowled when 
half-time was reached. En- 
gland fielded well under pres- 
sure. 


NZ destroyer Special mission 


Dunedin (Reuter) - New 
Zealand defeated Australia by 
29 runs in the first of a series 
of four one-day internationals 
here yesterday. Replying to 
New Zealand's score of 186 
for six in SO overs, the tourists 
could muster only 1 57 before 
being dismissed in the 47th 
over. 

Hadlee was the chief de- 
stroyer for New Zealand, 
claiming four for 15. while 
Martin Crowe, the part-time 
medium pace bowler, re- 
lumed an economical two for 
23 off 10 overs. 

Faced with an accurate New 
Zealand attack and a slowish 
outfield, the Australians lost 
wickets regularly and were 
never on course to win. 

The fell of Matthews re- 
duced Australia to 124 for six 
in the 40th over, and almost 
immediately afterwards 
Hadlee bowled Marsh, the 
opener, who had scored a 
steady 35. A brief flourish 
from Waugh was the only 


other sign of resistance as 
Australia collapsed. 


NEW ZEALAND 
B A Edgar c Philips b Gilbert ._ 
KR Rutherford bGflbBH 


■j V Coney c Marsh b Waugh 
M D Crows b Rexf 


35 

23 

5 


J G Wright rw out _ 
1 Blair c 


47 

6 


B R Blair c Waugh b McDermott 12 

R J Hadtee not out 21 

tT E Btam not out 24 

Extras (te 10. *2, no 1) 13 


188 


Total (6 wkts, 50 overs) . 

J G Brecewefl. S R GOespto and E J 
Chatfieid dkl not bat 


FALL OF WICKETS: 1-8S. 2-72. 3*0. 4- 
87. 5-116, 8-146 

BOWLING: McDermott 104MO-1; Rett 
10-1*3-1; Davis 10-2-124 Gilbert 10-1- 
35-2. Waugh 10-0-38-0. 

AUSTRALIA 

DC Boone Rutherford b Chatfieid — 13 

GR Marsh b Hadlee 35 

tW B PhAps c 81am b GWespie 23 

*A R Border cBlainb Crowe 3 

G M Ritchie c end b Sracaweff 9 

G R J Matthews c Wright b BraceweS 25 
S J Waugh c Crowe b Hadtee 29 


Colombo (Reuter) — The 
Pakistan cricket board has 
sent a- special official to Sri 
Lanka to investigate the dis- 
pute between Pakistan's team 
and Sri Lankan players, um- 
pires and spectators. M. Ijaz 
Butt, a Pakistan cricket board 
member, said that he had been 
sent to Colombo after reports 
were received “about many 
things" in the past few days. 

On Monday, the Pakistan 
cricketers asked the manager 
to abandon the rest of the tour. 


the last Test series in 
Australia. 


New feces in the squad for 
England include Delhi's veter- 
an hard-hitting opening bats- 
man. Raman Lamba, and the 
24-year-old Bombay 
wicketkeeper, Chandrakant 
Pandit Sandeep Paul, an at- 
tacking middle-order bats- 
man, the left-arm spinner, 
Maninder Sin g h, and the seam 
bowler. Manoj Prabhakar, 
have been recalled. 


saying bad umpiring had led 


C J McDermott 8w b Madtee 
D R Gtoertb Crowe 


B A Reid c Crowe b Hadoe 
S P Davis notout . 


.. O 
2 


Extras (R> 12. w 3) 
Total (47 overs) 


— 2 
„ 0 
. 15 


156 


FALL OF WICKETS: 1-14 2-52. 3*5. 4- 
82. 5-121. 5-123. 7-125. 8-141. 9-156, ID- 
156. 

BOWLING: Hadlee 9-5-15-4; Chatfieid 8- 
2-19-1: GOtespn 10-2-39-1: Crowe 10-4- 
23-2: Brecewe* 7-0-30-2; Coney 3-0- 18-0. 


to a deterioration of relations 
between the teams, which had 
caused on-the-field incidents, 
threats and abuse. 

Pakistan, who won the first 
Test by an innings, lost the 
second on Tuesday by eight 
wickets. The third and final 
Test starts on Saturday. 

• DELHI (Reuter) — India's 
selectors have announced a 
party of 16 to lour England 
this summer, dropping five 
players from the side that lost 


The five replace the bats- 
man, Malbotra, the seam 
bowlers, Kulkarni and 
Rajinder Singh, the leg-spin- 
ner, Sivaramkirshnan, and the 
wicketkeeper, Kirmani, all 
dropped after the tour off 
Australia. 


SQUAD FOR ENGLAND TOUR: 


Kapfl Dev leapt). R J Shashi (vice- 
rapt), S M Gavaskar. I 


, K Srikkanth, R 
Lamba. M Amarnath, M 
Azharduddtn, D B Vengsarkar. S M 
PatH. K More, C Pandit C Shanna. R 


M H Bfemy, M Prabhakar, Martnder 
SlnqttSYi 


fadav. 



Martina Navratilova 

(above), displaying the full 
range of her talent in beating 
Terry Phelps 6-1, 6-2 in the 
first round of the Virginia 
Slims tonmameHt. Mbs 


Navratilova, who Is attempt- 
ing to win her third 
successive Virginia Slims 
title, took 51 minutes to 
dispose of Phelps, wmmng 
59 points to her opponent's 


The cuckoo clocks in 


By Pat Butcher, Athletics Correspondent 


The warmer weather is not 
the only early signal of spring, 
the first cuckoo being seen as 
well asheanJ yesterday, and in 
central London of all places. 

Zola Budd flew in from 
South Africa yesterday morn- 
ing on the way to the world 
cross-country championships, 
and a preliminary glance at 
the entries forSunday’s race in 
Neuchatel — home, inciden- 
tally. of one of Switzerland's 
famous cuckoo clock factories 
- suggests that Miss Budd will 
have liule difficulty in retain- 
ing the women's title she won 
in Lisbon last year. 


And she feels that the 
debate over her eligibility for 
the Commonwealth Games in 
Edinburgh this summer will 
be ended by the acceptance of 
the bouse that she bought in 
Guildford before Christmas as 
her domicile in England, al- 
though she has barely lived 
there. Her eligibility to com- 
pete in Edinburgh is in ques- 
tion because, as a former 
South African, she cannot 
satisfy the Commonwealth 
Games Federation stipulation 
that an athlete who changes 
countries, as she has done, 
must spend six of the 12 


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months before the Games in 
the “new" country. 

Tim Hutchings, who was at 
the British Athletics Writers’ 
Association lunch, which Miss 
Budd attended yesterday, said 
that the time had come for the 
England selectors to take a 
more serious attitude towards 
a world cross-country champi- 
onship. which has a record 
entry this year of 67 countries, 
one of the broadest represen- 
tations of any sporting event 
in the world. 

England's national champi- 
on said: “Our results have 
been achieved in spite of the 
national championship, which 
at nine miles is far too long as 
a selection race for the world 
championship, which is only 
seven and a half miles. Also 
the attitudes and decisions on 
selection are being taken by 
people with their heads firmly 
stuck in the 1950s. 

“The majority of English 
cross-country officials are not 
tuned in to modem cross- 
country. There is a case for 
having an elite race to select 
the world team, or even 
setting up a sponsored squad, 
which would make for a better 
team spirit. We've had appall- 
ing results in this race in the 
last few years." 

Hutchings was referring to a 
selection, policy which has 
involved leaving out some of 
England's best cross-country 
runners in recent years. 


Title holders stand 
their ground 



empty-handed 


By Mitchell Platts 


There is no substitute for 
experience, as Linda Bayman 
emphasized when she 
partnered Maureen Gamer to 
a one-under-par second round 
of 72 in the A via Watches 
women’s foursomes champi- 
onship on the Red Course at 
The Berkshire yesterday. 

Mrs Bayman, who is seek- 
ing a record seventh win in the 
Avia, and Mrs Gamer, im- 
proved their prospects, of re- 
taining the title by moving 
alongside Patricia Johnson 
and Lilian Behan (76) in the 
halfway lead with a two-over- 
par aggregate of 148. 

Mrs Bayman admitted that 
she and Mrs Gamer were 
overpowered off the tee by 
Miss Johnson, the English title 
holder, and Miss Behan, the 
British champion, but the 
defending champions refused 
to be intimidated by their 
younger rivals, with whom 
they were partnered. 

Mrs Bayman. however, cost 
her team the chance of leading 
with an indifferent four-iron 
tee shot at the 18th (161 
yards), which left Mrs Garner 
with virtually a full wedge shot 
to the green, although she had 


earlier holed from 10 feel at 
foe sixth for one of their three 
birdies. 

Miss Johnson and Miss 
Behan, foe favourites, were 
impressive off foe tee but their 
approach shots too often left 
them a worrying distance 
from the hole; they took three 
putts on no fewer than four 
occasions. 

Belle Robertson and Mary 
McKenna, who won foe Avia 
in 1984, stayed within striking 
distance with 75 for 151, 
which put them on foe same 
mark as Carol Caldwell and 
Lynda Simpson (74). But Hel- 
en Dobson and Alison Johns, 
foe two 15-year-olds from 
Lincolnshire who posted a 
first round of 74, fell back with 
an 82. 


45 FdRegtRA 


RAPC Worthy Down 0 


A goal by Ian Jolly from a 
penalty stroke in the first 
period of extra time decided 
the Army Cup (UK) final at 


Aldershot yesterday. It en- 
abled foe 45th Held 


SECOND ROUND 
148: P Johnson 
72,76; L Behan 
E Bayman 
Gamer 



scores): 

arid Kenfig), 


72.15I:C 
77. 74; L 
1C Robert- 
76, 75; M McKenna 
75. 154: S Moorcratt 
Park). 75. 79; T Ham- 
mond (Leamington and County), 75, 
79; B McIntosh (GudaneV, 80, 74; P 
Harvie (Walton Heath), «). 74. 


More golf, page 36 


Regi- 
ment, Royal Artillery, to 
break the monopoly of foe 
Royal Army Pay Corps, Wor- 
thy Dowu, who had wen foe 
trophy nine times in the past 
10, losing only in 1982. 

Besides Jolly, foe Artillery 
team had Strachan from foe 
combined Army side that 
recently won foe Services 
championship. They fash- 
ioned most of the attacks 
yesterday but little advantage 
was taken of Jolly’s creative 
ability. 

The RAPC survived as long 
as they did because of foe 
splendid goalkeeping of Ruth- 
erford and some stouthearted 
defence by.Mukiawney. Their 
resources in attack, however, 
were limited and in conse- 
quence the Artillery goalkeep- 
er had a fairly comfortable 
afternoon. 

Frequent infiingments led 


By Sydney FrisJdn 

toatotalof20shOrtcomere. 

. 13 of which were earned by the 
Artillery. The twelfth of these 
awards led to foe penalty 
stroke, when a defender’s foot 
on. .foe line stopped foe bit 
from foe. top of the circle by 
Makand Singh. Jolly made no 
mistake from the spot, but if 
he had not missed the target 
from a short corner in foe fifth 
minute of play this notch 
might have ended much 


" In the second period of 
extra time foe RAPC lost 
Duffy, who suffered a fecial 
injury at a short corner and 
wasled off life field. , As they 
hatTalready used twosubsti- 
tutes they could not bring off 
another man. but stiU'in/foe 
dying minutes foey came clbse 


45 FIELD REGIMENT RA: Bdr^G 
Warner; WOI K Dermis. Mai D 
Oubtey, . Sgt M retchings. Copt t 
Jolly, Sgt P Simpson, WOfl M 


Makand SangtvBdr. 
Howland, Gnr A 


. . Bdr S 
Green.. ' 

RAPC - WORTHY DOWTfcMaf 0 
Rutherford; Maj G Horsman, WOfl R 
. S/Sgt & 
gt; 0 Cassidy. CpT R 

S/5gtT Duffy. Capt'T foe 

UKWOUS 


SPORT \N BRIEF 


Distinctive 
out of 
world event 


Share issue 



a success 


By Jenny MacArthnr 


Captain Mark Phillips has 
had to pull out of The world 
three day event championships 
in Australia in May hwarwp his 
eight-year-old horse. Distinc- 
tive, owned by the Range Rover 
team, has developed a conta- 
gious skin infection and cannot 
go into quarantine for the event. 


The rest of the horses gang to 
Australia start their quarantine 
today at Wylye. Gapt Phillips’s 
place in the squad of seven is to 


The British America’s Cup 
Challenge share issue, 
launched at the beguming of 
last month, has raised £3 
million and was over-sub- 
scribed. according to the 
BACC director, David Ar- 
nold. The Challenge's first 
yacht. Crusader, arrived in 
Fremantle, Western Australia, 
last Friday; the second, being 
prepared at Cougar Marine on 
foe Hamble, will be shipped 
from Felixstowe on April 1 1. 

An advance party under the 
skipper, Harry Cudmore, will 
depart on Saturday to begin 
trials with foe Ian Howlett- 
designed 12-metre vessel 



Threat softens 


Walliser. overall champion 

Reducing costs 


Hie threat of a “super. league 
breakaway”. receded slightly at 
yesterday’s Rugby League man- 
agement committee meeting. 
Officials pointed out to the 10 
dubs in question that -foe. 
carching oommitee,^ led by the 
Great Britain manager, Les 
Bettinson. had for three, 
months been considering posri- 
bilities of taking the veay steps . 
demanded by the clubs. These 
include distribution of televi- 
sion and sponsorship income, 
and voting rights of first and 
second division dubs: 


gsmesfl 

uncertain 


. By" Stuart Jones 
Football Correspondent 


be taken by Anne-Marie Taylor, 
aged 21, and Jimney Cricket IIL 


CapL Phillips is not likely to 
be unduly upset. Although he 
was thrilled to have been jacked 
with foe horse, he always felt 
that the opportunity had cornea 
year too soon. 


Walliser wins 


Despite foe loss of CapL 
Phillips this week and Lucinda 
Green last week (her horse, 
Regal Realm, has tweaked a 
tendon), the British squad for 
Australia remains powerful, in- 
cluding three of last year's 
European team 


Waterville Valley, New 
Hampshire (AF) - Maria 
Walliser, of Switzerland, 
clinched the women’s World 
Cup overall title yesterday 
when officials cancelled a 
giant slalom because of severe 
rain. Miss Walliser, who has 
battled her compatriot, Erika 
Hess, for foe lead since early 
January, accumulated 275 
points. Miss Hess, a two-time 
champion, earned 238 points. 

More skiing, page 36 


The six national sports cen- 
tres. at Crystal Palace, Bisham 
Abbey, Lilldshall, Holme 
Pierrepont, Cowes and Ha& y 
Brenin, have been asked to 
reduce their oasts deficit from 
£3.4 million to £2 million for 
foe 1 987-88 financial year. 


Driving force 


The Football Association of 
Ireland have signed a sponsor- 
ship agreement worth ‘£400,000 
with Opel, the car manufactur- 
ers. Opcfs involvement will be 
spread over four years. They 
are the association's biggest 
sponsors. 


Kelly agrees 

Sean KeOy, of Ireland has. 
agreed to take pan in foe 
Nissan international classic for 
a second time starting from 
October l. Kelly is an obvious' 
favourite to retain the champi- 
onship in his native. land The 
prize list of the fiveday event 
has increased to almost 
£20,000. The ra* win start and’ 
finish in Dubtin and wfli pass 
through Kefl/s home, town, 
Camck-on-Suir,OTi thepenulti-: 
mate day.. 


COURSE; October lx Dubfa to 
Galway, 125 miles. October 2 Gat- 
wayto UmmertcK, 9Qmtes, October 
fo Tralee to KHamey. 60 ufles; 
KBamey to Cork: 60 mites. October- 
4c Cork to Ctonmel, -110 mles. 
October fcAridow to Dublin, 60 m»8S. ; 


The Football Association 
were still waiting last night to 
; hear whether England's inter- 
national against the Soviet 
Union mTbilisicangbahead 
as planned next Wednesday; 
The FA asked for penmsskui 
to fly directly to foe capital of 
Georgia rather than -via Mos- 
cow but no official response 
has been rircetyed “ 

If foe Soviet authorities 
insist that the England sqrad 
travel through Moscow both 
on foe way ou t and on. foe Way 
. back, foe match wjjl bc.can-r 
celled The F A who are to 
;make thefr deeision^lfiis 
. morning' wifi. ffica : aiaaHpjE to: 
arrange au an- 

: other 'Enropean. - natiDB+ mext; 
Wednesday- ; 

The list bf potential-caaH-- 
.dates who dtold either jBfet -as 
hosts or- be. invited, to pfeyat 
Weimbley include. Belgiinru 
The Neth«lands,Swed«i.ai«i 
Switzerland, none of ' whom 
are Involved in international, 
ratines next: “week. Nor 'are 
.Greece, Luxemburg and Mat 
ta. though foey would be less- 
saitabfe opponents. 

Mere foo(hadpage3& 


Grass is 



the big 




sctdfffer- 
*re bring pot 
down sr ft pABe ferihty in 
.Mefeine. After, sev e re test* 
oae war be chosen for the 
anti— id centre and, logically, 
wiB ate* be installed m other 

state capttate: The Wfaabtedoa 

cbdlrmad, • ; **B*aer" 
Hadtaghraa. arid yesterday 
"In ftrtare foe grand atea-wul 
be a very tfcoraogh test of a 
player, h fed wre he 



31 Nimfiodteklnn 
ter fittest, trranpk against 
her fiercest rind and rinse 
friend Chris. Lloyd teefat 
fitSSMe only oooe-,- V\' 


-ftw i^crait surfaces on 
play. Anybody who 
can .win aflftmtf *rf& be*, great 
cha mpio n. . .. 

AIT foe grand shndtnpf- 
oaships except the French 
-ftfrale) nred to be played on 
geess. Tte United. States 
cfewgaffiBsMga,- : : baring dis- 
carded grass after the 1974 
toiraaitenf, are played on 
hard ^snvto . After pae more 
domesfic season Australia wBI 
ateoriose foe book on pus. 

. .There is no Sanpedteto 
threat h WWWtoV Tradi- 
tional i character. The 
cSwtfe 1 * gencrans naforar wa- 
tniag prijpetin S«H grass 
courts, and WmtMhhm can 
afford tbe high cost of mate 
tafiring them in exemptery 
cmfiteB. Moreover, Wimbte 
don also has shale and. syn- 
foetic courts and consequently 
has no pressing need to rtpt- 
vert foe lawns to a surface font 
perntits y ear-ronsd use. . 

Thepassh^years, however, 
aarid- pose two awkward qaes- 
txons. How bmg wiOgrass be a 
practkaWe sm&ce for . the 
preparatory- tournament, and 
tew long will foe 
players continue to 
ch»a|H0itefaq)5 contested on 



QptiMstic about 
I. tie future ...... 


such an eccentric surface as 
tte -most; important -fit foe 
worid?Gebff Brown, president 
of foe. Lawn Tennis Associa-_ 
tion, renrinded me yesterday i;?’ 
the sayhig> ttere is nothing 
better than* good-grass cool, 
and aotiring worse than hbad 
one.Tfew as ^rtimtetfc;point- 
;mg out that. Eastbourne Cor- 
poration were enthusiastic 
abort foie firtnre of Devonshire 
JPark,-where grassoomt tennis 
«n»an attractive feature of foe 
hofiday programme. 


. ; Brown did, , tewever, strike 
two caut ionary- notes. The 
worrying feature f abort the 
costoT pre'Wimbtedon tonma- 
ww not so 


courtsas the 'maintenance of 

sponsorship. “The cost of 
m iming these tournaments 
can be hair-raising and foe 
LTA must make up .'any 
short&lL There Is no .way we 
otn back off. from sfcipfrtfiDg 
ttese' -teadte tournaments”. 
His second pom! was. that 
private dobs had to remain 

viable and, conseqaemlyvinast 

charge rational fees and pro* 
ride year-rotmd pfityrngforih- 
ties. “Players maypreCer grrts 
if they can get^te srtd, l *lrat 
yon also need a. my 
rtfentotire’’. . ? _ 


GrasscoOrtswiS sunrrrc as 
a pleasant -curiosity in the 
and - in" such 
scattered*- one-time /n taafat 
ortposts as Aistralia, New 
Zetforad; - Ask rtid Rhode 

Mamt. Rot flit num ber 
teportsmce oif such courts will 
continue to decime and, at the 
highest level competition. 


iip . wffl sqte Stand alone. 

Whettfoat happens, there may 
be more sadness than resent- 


amoug sbateirtirt specialists: 
“Grass is for cows and. sheep. 
Not temfo pteyer*" ‘ 


Rex Bellamy 

Tennis C6tfespqn4em 



* 4 


The Grand Stem cfaantyMm- 
shSps must be pntaded hy 
preparatory tournaments 
played on a smBar 'snr&ce. 
Omseqwfltty, ft is no smprhe 
io tertn foxtfoe tantewotb 
tSem' of New South Wales 
and Queensland; -- reluctantly 
•• toeing t: fine . drawn by foe 
Nationrt and Vktorinassocx- 
t&xti , afe accepting foe peed 
to rtg ^ tte grass cmats of 
Sydney and Brisboe before . 
the ■ 1987-88 Australian 
season ■' 

The lawn Tentte Associa- 
tion ; of Anstnrite — ‘Tawn" 
must be a mtenonter imw - 
hare decided font anas courts 
wS hot be frtstaued at their: 
Nafourt Tennis Centre in 
Me&nrnL Work on tie cen- 
tre began fort months late bat 
Tfloj mk, foe LTAA media 

mamgrt, frii 

tomnees were made for diffr- 
erties ceastrucfoa. 

The project manager assures 
ns that they are on schedule. 

! He » confident fort they wifi 
be firtsh ed. to time for the 
Ansfrafian tfem^^oahips 




A 



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