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^ J 


TIMES 


ByDa?H Smith, Economics GoneqKndetf 




lifted lij 

^PPorti 


i 

I 30 


’'flE 


-'4.T: 


Theraieof inflation fill to 
5 .1 jper cent Iasi month, its 
lowest for over, a waxy from 
5.5 per cent in. January. A 
sharp, fill in the inflation rate 
|#to3 percent is expected by the 
summer. 

The pound’s post-Budget 
rise, ’which viB help lo push 
down inflation, continued yes- 
icrday-Tt rose by l.55 cents to 
$1.5035, the first time it has 
dosed above $U0 in London 
since October 21, 1983. Later 
in Ifew ‘York, it climbed 
abbve$i.5L 

Tbe steriing index iose 0.6 
points to 759 t as the pound 
recorded gains against.all cur- 
rencies, nfehidmg'a two pfen- 
nig rise to Dm3J7 a gnfnct the 
West German mark. 

The Bank of England 
stepped in to head off a cut in 
base .rales as money market 
^interest rates fell to U per 
i cent The Bank, through its 
money market tactics, showed 
that it wanted rates to stay at 
the current 1 1.5 per cent level 
for the time being. 

However, City analysts be* 
Ifovelhat further rate cuts are 
inevitable if the’: pound's 
s. Shareprices 

, . breath ydrterday, 

life Financial Times 30-share 
index edging down 2.9 points 
to 1,41 £2 The index has' 
gained 103 points in the past 
fortnighL . 

Government stocks were 
very strong, rising by £2.as a . 
result of the pound’s^ rise and 
optimism abort the prospects 
for filling inflation and inter- 


est rates. Foreign buyers have 
moved heavily into the Lon- 
don markets m the past few 
days. 

The retail prices index rose 
by 0.4 per cent between Janu- 
ary and February, from 379.7 
(January 1974=100) to a new 
level of 38L1. There was a 3.5 
per cent increase in fresh 
vegetable prices during- the 
month. The price of milk was 
increased by a penny a pint 

.'-Some durable household 
goods increased in price after 
the. January sides, but petrol 
dropped by ah average of 5p a 


INFLATION 



gallon. The overall 0.4 per 
cent rise in the index com-, 
pared with a 0.8 per cent 
increase m February fist year, 
when mortgage rates went up 
from 1 1.75.10 1 3 per cent 

The 12-monlh rate of infla- 
tion, 5.1 per cent, is the lowest 
since January fist year, and 
further fills are expected in 
.the coming months: This 
month’s ate will be helped by 
another sharp fill in petrol 
prices — the March statistics 
were coficxtetf before the Bud- 


get. Next month, the 0.75 
point cut in mortgage rates by 
the leading societies will re- 
duce the retail prices index by 
0.3 per cent 

The rate of inflation will fill 
very sharply in April because 
mortgage rates were raised by 
one percentage - point last 
April. Calculations by econo- 
mists at the stockbroking firm 
W. Green well & Co suggest 
that the April inflation rate 
will be a little over 3 per cent, 
and that the rate could dip 
below 3 per cent in the 
summer. - 

The Chancellor forecast a 
rate of inflation of 3.5 per cent 
by the end of the year in Jxis 
Budget on Tnesday. If 
Britain's rate does drop to 3 
percent, it will be comfortably 
below the average rates in 
both the EEC and theindustri- 
alized countries as a whole; 
Inflation in the Irish Re- 
has been cut to its 
lowest level for 18 years. 
Prices rose 4.6 per cent over 
the past 12 months: last 
November tire rate was 4.9 per 
cent, a year ago it was 62 per 
cent and at the. beginning of 
the decade mote than 20 per 
cent. . 

A statement from tire Dub- 
lin Government said it was 
hoped the rate could be far- 
ther reduced to - around 2 per 
cent by the second half of the 
year and it looked forward to 
“dose to zero'" inflation early 
in 1987. 



public 

lowest 





ByjGfoocgeHID ' ' '• __ ■ 

Labour t^vernment roent to which Labour jyas 
would introatkej^aots to help c ommit te d , Mir Kaufman 
hotttehdkfaes 'fir s^ngrT de- said, Staffing txjnstramis on. 
fences against Lprglars, /Mr local government would be 
Gerald Kaufman. Labour relaxed to allow provision of 
spokesman -on home affairs, ' better street hghting and. more 




The modem 
civil servant 

AftotiteWesfland 
afiair and the Tisdafl 
and Ponting teaks, ’ 
Britain's civil 
servants are unsure • 
where the political - 

buck stopsand Civil 
Service responsibility 
takes over. In the 
first part of a series. 
The Times asks what 
kind of Whitehall 
revolution Mrs 
Thatcher has created 


\ 


TUESDAY 




for 

. J,i \4 


. **■» 


Like mother, 
like daughter 



Ihe generation 

gamble 



Yesterday’s £2JM» daily 
prize in The Times Portfolio 
competition was won by Mr N 
P Thackray, of FLafetow, 
London E13. 

Next week the weekly prize 
£28,000 will be awarded on 
widay, rather than Saturday. 
This is because the Stock 
Exchange wiB he closed on 
Friday raid these will be no 
dafly prize for that day. Ptart- 
page 22; bow to play, 
infongoatum service, page 20. 


*1 


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V 


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Sate or spend 

Aflerihe Budget: 10 pages of 

news and views 

JamfiyMooey, page* 2d **>35 


BwbcNmis 24 

Oversew ■ 4-6 

4PWs •.... 10 

BMhoi . 2 T- 3 S 
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gww»witU7-28 

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letters 

Ptriasteat 


9 
4 
10 

Safetowu 2 

Stmee* » 

Sdeace 

Soon - 36-38 

w5*m> m 

W esstm. 20 

Wffis ■» 


* i ft ft.'*?* ft 


said 

suppoit Mr Nick 
Latbour candidate in the Ful- 
ham by-election. «*-■" 

Mr Kaufinap said that 
councils -would be given tire 
right to-make discretionary 
grants for tenants and owner- 
occupiers to fit stronger locks 
and doors, vandal-proof glass 
and seethe fencing. 

Thegrantswoukibepartof 
a top priority crime preven- 
tion campaign tifit would 
include changes in the law to 
create a forum for local coun- 
cillors and police to discuss 
policing methods, and an 
independent ombudsman to 
favesti^te complaints against 
tire police. 

“Britain is afflicted by the 
worst crime wave we have 
ever -known, with dear-up 
rates at: rode bottom" Mr 
Kaufman said. "Labour will 
tackle this through a partner- 
ship between tire public, the 
police, local councils and the 
Govermneni”. 

Tire cost of the grants would 
be fact -within increased allo- 
cations for housing invest- 


caretakers, security patrols 
and park keepers. 

The proposed machinery 
for contacts between counril- 
- lore and the police would not 
involve any interference with 
the operational discretion of 
the police, Mr Kaufman 
stressed. It would merely cre- 
ate a “structured framework” 
designed to give the local 
population “a say in their 
policingand fa their own areas 
through their elected 
representatives**. 



A young man with a replica rifle during the murk stay-away in Uitenhage yesterday. 


•-vVsV . 

■■■if. 


Kaufman: bydedhn 
promises.; 


Hughes joins 
Barcelona 
in £2m deal 


. JEtya^nff Reporter - 
Mark Hughes, the Manches- 
ter United arid Welsh interna- 
tional footballer, is to join 
Barcelona, the Spanish cfaam- 

S 'ons, at the end of the season 
r a fee of more than £2 
million, a record transfer be- 
tween a British and foreign 
dub. 

Hughes, agri) 23, has signed a 
long-term contract Specula- 
tion that he would join the 
club, 'managed fry 'an English- 
man, Terry Venables, .had 
been rife for. several weeks. 

Meanwhile, Venables had 
wi fe* with Barcelona yesterday 
after it was annotmeed the day 
before that he wanted to leave. 
Ii is befog widely forecast that 
Venables will return to man- 
age Areenal next season. 

Report page 38 


Challenge on 
£8mGoya 
to go ahead 

The Spanish Government 
won approval In the High 
Court yesterday to challenge 
the legality of the export 
document of the Goya master- 
piece “La Marquesa de Santa 
Cruz”, valued at £8 million. 

Sir Nicholas Browne-Wil- 
kinson, the Vice-Chancdlor, 
gave leave to Spain to seek a 
declaration that tire export 
doenment was false. 

The painting is being pul up 
for sale at Christie's by Lord 
'Wiinborrie, who bought it in 
Switzerland in 1983 from Mr- 
Pedno Saorro Bosch, a Spanish 
businessman, who obtained 
the export licence which the 
Spanish authorities daim was 
invalid. 

The sale is due to take place 
next month, and last night 
Christie’s said it would be 
amskiering the Titling 


Esso deal 
cuts rise 
at pumps 

Teresa Poole 
Philip Webster 

The oil companies yesterday 
settled on a compromise when 
Esso announced that it would 
pass on the fell 7-5p Budget 
duty rise but increase its price 
support to dealers so that 
pump prices would rise by less 
Hmh 2p in some ureas. 

This means the maximum 
price of a gallon of Esso fern- 
star petrol wiQ rise from 
177j8p to I79£p from today. 
A spokesman said: “This is an 
increase in consumer tax and 
therefore it must be bom by 

the consumer” 

BP, which said on Wednes- 
day that ft would raise prices 
iri an average 1BI&; quickly 
imposed fire 'suae maximum 
^Ice.as-'Bwx: 1 ''-". . 

Mobil, wUch Imd been 
iridiug out fw Essays ded- 
sfoo, afio said k would pass.on 
the duty increase but would 
rei nri n “c omp etitive”. ' 

Areas wMdh We benefitted 
from low prices are Ekdy to 
get tire fen 7 JSf increase this 
weekend but competitive jwes- 
sores, as wriLas the downward 
trend ra ofl prices, should lead 
to cuts in tire coming weeks. 

By pasring on the fen doty 
increase, oil companies are 
making about 9p profit a 
gallon; leaving considerable 
scope for “price sapparf*. 

Both Mrs Thatcher and Mr 
Nigel Lawson, Chancellor of 
tire Exchequer, made it dear 
tbs week that the Government 
wanted ofl com p ani e s to ab- 
sorb the higher Arty. 

Ministers, whoare reluctant 
to consider imposing a wind- 
fall tax or to refer the 
co mpan ies* action to the Mo- 
nopoly and Mergers Commis- 
sion, befieve the crunch for the 
big ofl companies will come in 
tire busy Easter period. 

Cheaper fad, page 2 


Rallies across South Africa 

Blacks remember 
Sharpeville dead 

From Michael Hornsby, Johannesburg 


Thousands ofblacks attend- 
ed demonstrations and rallies 
across South Africa yesterday 
to honour those who died in 
two police shooting incidents 
that have assumed almost 
mythological proportions in 
the history of resistance to 
white rule. 

-* There were scenes of emo- 
tion, and anger, and some 
dashes with the police, but 
generally the protests, taking 
place after 18 months of 
continuous unrest in which 
more than 1,200 blacks have 
been (tilled, passed off more 
pe&sfofly .than anticipated. 

- ' March 21 has been an 
emotive date ever since the 
day jri 1960 when the police 
fired- op: a crowd of Hacks, 
many of them women, dem- 
onstrating against the "pass 
laws** in Sharpeville, a drab 
township 40 miles south of 
Johannesburg. Sixty-nine peo- 
ple were killed and 186 
wounded. 

Last year, on the 25th 
anniversary of the Sharpeville 
massacre, as it is known to all 
blacks, police fired on funeral 
marchers in Langa, a black 
township near Uitenhage; in 
the Eastern Cape, killing at 
least 20 and wounding 27. One 
of the wounded later died. 

Yesterday, in a dusty soccer 
stadium in Kwanobuhie, a few 
miles from Langa, some 
50,000 people attended a me- 
morial service, after which a 
monument to the Langa dead 
was unveiled in the local 
cemetery. 

Earlier the police used tear 
gas to disperse a crowd which 
gathered ar the spot where the 
shootings occurred. 

“There is no power in the 
world that can outstrip the 


power of the people. We are 
not saying the while people 
should run away into the sea. 
All we are saying is that they 
should remember the find 
belongs to us alL and we 
should share everything in it,” 
Dr Allan Boesak, a leading 
Coloured (mixed-race) church 
opponent of the Government, 
told the multitude. 

The crowd held aloft the 
green, yellow and black flag of 
the outlawed African National 
Congress and carried placards 
with pictures of its iailed 
leader, Mr Nelson Mandela. 

Some youths brandished 
wooden replicas of AK47 
rifles, a weapon used by ANC 
guerrillas. 

A message was read out 
from Mr Mandela's wife, Win- 
nie. in which she said blacks 
would not accept for ever that 
only their blood should be 
shed. 

In Sharpeville itself, many 
youths took part in a tradi- 
tional cleaning of the graves of 
the victims of the 1 960 shoot- 
ing. Police confiscated several 
T-shirts bearing the slogan 
“Remember Sharpeville”, but 
otherwise did not interfere. 

In central Johannesburg, 
200 blacks marched through 
the streets, singing freedom 
songs 

• Township toll: Thirteen 
blacks died in black-against- 
black violence in a 24-hour 
period, according to police 
yesterday (AFP reports). 

Seven men were apparently 
murdered by young radicals in 
New Crossroads township 
near Cape Town, three people 
were burnt to death near East 
London and three were killed 
in an ambush on a bus in the 
homeland of KwaZulu. 


Lord Lane halts Bar’s 
case until Monday 


... Yesterday's bearing of the 
High. Court action brought by 
the Bar against the Lord 
niimffi|lfl raTer criminal legal 
aid fees- aided unexpectedly 
early, after the intervention of 
Lord Lane, the Lord Chief 
Justice. 

At the lunchtime break he 
adjourned the case until Mon-: 
flay instead of continuing the 
hearing throughout the day as 
had been expected, 

Lrati Lane, who is hearing 
the case .with Mr Justice 
Boreham and Mr Justice Tay- 
lor, took the step after com- 
menting that he “would not 
-like to have to rifle' against: 
Lord Hailsham”, who is head-r 
of the judiciary. ' 

- The Lord Chief Justice al$o? 
said that some “i$ un- 
thinking” was needed. ' 

_ Lawyers said later ' 
interpreted . the; jta 
mar ks asasinvitati 
Lord Chancellor to sedijde tire-. 
matter. 

The Bar is _ 

dal review of } Lord 

HailshanTs ^tecision; last 




month to increase barrister’s 
criminal Legal Aid foes by 
only 5 percent. 

The Bdr bad put in a claim 
for rises of between 30 and 
40 per cent based on detailed 
research by management 
consultants. 

In the High Court case, Mr 
Robert Alexander, QC the 
chairman of the- Bar, is acting 
on behalf of all- 5,200 banis- 
ters in England and Wales. 

He accuses Lord Ha il s h a m 
of acting unlawfully by foiling 
to fififil theJ^s “legitimate 
ition**? of -negotiations 
f'.fee levels were 

t£e derision 
or-^ig 197$ Legal 
'j ■nJquirfcd the 
orjio f& “foir 
and reasonable” rates. 

* Mr Nfihofas Phillips, QC, 
for Lord Hailsham; has argued 
that he stas entitled to have 
regard together demands on 
'^he public purse” when- set- 
ting new Legal Aid rates. 

Law Report, page 35 



Pathologist analyses agony of the crucifixion 


Washington (AFP) - Jesus 
Christ died on the cross in 
extreme pain from to.;u 
blood because of the scourging 
be received beforehand and 
from respiratory failure, an 
American pathologist says in 
rat analysis of his death pub- 
lished yesterday'. ‘ 

The medical analysfak based 
on biblical and historical 
records, in (heJoamai of tbe 
America* Medical Assoaatw * . 
also attempts to ridnte-tbe r 
modem theory that Jesus, who 
Christians believe rose from 


the dead three' days after Ms 
cnMtiftxknf , may not have been 
dead when taken from the 
cross. That theory maintains 
that he may have only hunted 
and was later resuscitated. 

Dr Wjfflam Edwards, a 
pathologist at the Mayo 0uflc 
- hi Rochester, Mbmesota,sald_ 
tire study -r proved that Jesus 
was indeed dead when taken 
from the cross. He died after 
only three hours from blood 
loss and tiie shock brought on 

traded to 


survive between three to fins' 
horns and three to. lots days, 
so Jesus's death was relatively 
rapid. This suggested that he 
was Indeed severely scourged^ 
Dr-Edwards said. It could also 
explain why he was too weak 
to carry his crossbar. 


The 


virtually 


f of the body 
tite^ntrs utrale it 
impossible for a tie- 


1 *:>■ 


tim to ekhale felly. 

The Andy also attempts to 
explain j pe flow of blood 'and 
water irfyn a wound inflicted 

■ ■ L ■ 


on Jesus 1 by a Roman soldier, 
as described in the New 
Testament The spear proba- 
bly procured his right lung 
and heart, releasing blood and 
dear fluid that accumulates 
around the heart or lungs after 
heart fitflmre. 

The study was carried out by 
Dr Edwards,; a Methodist 
pastor and a medical illustra- 
tor, who are a 1 ) Christians. 

. “Itfs almost, impossible to be 
totally unbiased, bat we tried 
to do this in as unbiased a wa 
as possible,” Dr Edwards 


Panama 
rejects 
Marcos 

Panama City (Reuter) — 
Panama has rejected a request 
for asylum from the deposed 
Philippines President, Mr Fer- 
dinand Marcos, the presiden- 
tial press secretary, Sertor 
Guillermo Adames, said here 
yesterday. 

The decision was made late 
on Thursday, he added, after a 
private meeting between Pres- 
ident del Valle, Cabinet minis- 
ters and other senior officials. 

The Government “deter- 
mined that it was not 
favourable for Panama at this 
time to accept the temporary 
presence of Mr Marcos in our 
country,” Senor Adames said. 

In Washington, the White 
House Chief of Staff, Mr 
Donald Regan, said the Rea- 
gan Administration was still 
trying to persuade Panama to 
accept Mr Marcos as a perma- 
nent resident 

“We're still talking to Pana- 
ma about taking the Marcoses 
there,” he said “There is still a 
possibility” 

The ousted President has 
been offered asylum by the 
Reagan Administration, but is 
reported unhappy with his 
treatment in the US. 

The US Government has 
handed over to the new Ma- 
nila Government copies of 
documents brought to Hawaii 
by Mr Marcos detailing his 
vast wealth. 

• MANILA: Vice-President 
Salvador Laurel said yester- 
day that the Philippines would 
regard it as an unfriendly act if 
Panama granted asylumn to 
Mr Marcos . 

Murder evidence, page 4 


Ministers take 
tougher line 
over BL sale 

By Philip Webster, Political Reporter 
The Govemmem yesterday t i on s that had to be satisfied. 


toughened its line in the 
negotiations with General 
Motors over the sale of the BL 
truck division and Land 
Rover and warned the Ameri- 
cans that it was prepared to 
see the deal called off unless 
they agreed to acceptable 
terms. 

With the talks in their final, 
delicate stages, senior minis- 
ters who have been closely 
involved admitted that Gen- 
eral Motors had played a hard 
negotiating game and had still 
to reveal their final bargaining 
position. 

It was clear that General 
Motors have yet to agree to the 
compromise deal which 
would allow British interests 
to retain a 51 per cent stake in 
Land Rover, or given suffi- 
ciently solid guarantees on 
jobs. Indeed General Motors 
are understood to be still 
holding out for an agreement 
that would eventually lead to 
them getting full control. 

In what was obviously part 
of the negotiating process, 
senior ministers warned the 
American company that the 
Government could go no fur- 
ther without making the deaf 
impossible to sell to Conserva- 
tive backbenchers. 

The American company 
was also told that the Govern- 
ment was no longer working 
under the pressure of an 
Easter deadline, and that next 
week's promised statement to 
the Commons by Mr Paul 
Channon, the Secretary of 
State for Trade and Industry, 
need not necessarily be defini- 
tive and might be a holding 
operation. 

A senior member of the 
Cabinet committee consider- 
ing the sale said yesterday that 
the Government had made 
clear that there were condi- 


paniculariy over Land Rover. 
“If those circumstances can- 
not be met there is no deal.” 

The minister added: “No 
deal is a perfectly possible 
proposition as far as the 
Government is concerned.” 

It was pointed out by Gov- 
ernment sources that if there 
was no deal with General 
Motors, which the Govern- 
ment would dearly prefer, 
other bids would be reconsid- 
ered. But it was also said that 
if there was no deal with 
General Motors, there was no 
deal for the truck division 
since (here was no other 
bidder for it at present. 

Yesterday’s warnings to 
General Motors were being 
seen by Conservative MPs lasl 
night as something of an 
exercise in brinkmanship by 
the Govemmeni.lt still ap- 
pears likely that a deal will be 
sealed next week. Although no 
meeting of the Cabinet is 
scheduled until after Easter it 
was made dear yesterday that 
if an agreement is reached a 
special meeting of the Cabinet 
will be summoned to ratify it. 

Mr Norman Tebbit, the 
Conservative Party chairman, 
said yesterday that the Gov- 
ernment bad always taken 
account of both commercial 
and political considerations. 

Speaking on the Channel 4 
programme A Week in Poli- 
tics, Mr Tebbit referred to the 
arrangmenis made to prevent 
foreign ownership with the 
notations of Jaguar. British 
Telecom and British Aero- 
space and said:“So you can 
have a mixture of politics and 
commerce and good sense. 
They may go contrary to each 
other, they may run along the 
same lines.” 

Continued on page 2, co!3 


Vicar in child sexual 
abuse claims resigns 


By Peter Davenport 


The vicar at the centre of 
allegations of sexnal abase of 
young children has resigned 
his parish, it was disclosed last 
night. 

He wrote to the Archbishop 
of York, Dr John Habgood, to 
offer his resignation and has 
since left his church on 
Humberside. 

The decision of the vicar, a 
widower with three children, 
came after increasing pressure 
and the threat of a private 
prosecution 

Last night Mr Raymond 
Barker, the lay chaplain to the 
Archbishop, said that the 
letter of resignation had been 
delivered to the Archbishop's 
Palace in York on Thursday. 

The vicar had refused a 
request by the Archbishop 
that he should resign six 
months 

Earlier this week, Mr Geof- 


frey Dickens, Conservative 
IMP for Littleborough and 
Saddleworth, was prevented 
by the Speaker from naming 
the vicar in the Commons. 

A police file on the allega- 
tions against the vicar, which 
initially concerned complaints 
by the mother of a boy aged U, 
then widened to indude claims 
by the parents of other chil- 
dren, is now with the Director 
of Public Prosecution. 

The vicar still faces the 
possibility of a private prase- 
cation over the allegation initi- 
ated by a Merseyside 
headmaster, Mr Charles 
Oxley, chairman of the Law 
and Order campaign. 

The vicar's solicitor com- 
plained that he had been 
bounded by the media since 
the allegations became known. 
His client denied all the 
allegations, he said. 



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HOME NEWS 


THE TIMES SATURDAY MARCH 22 19 


Militants 
call for 
‘natural 
justice’ 


The Labour Party bid to 
purge itself of Militant Ten- 
dency laced a legal challenge 
in the High Court yesterday. 

Twelve members of the 
Liverpool Labour Party, in- 
cluding Derek Hatton, the 
deputv council leader, are 
faced’ with expulsion over 
charges of pursuing Militant 
policies, due to be heard by the 
National Executive next 
Wednesday. . 

They are asking Sir Nicho- 
las Browne-Wilkinson, the 
Vice Chancellor, for an in- 
junction to delay the disciplin- 
ary hearing on the grounds 
that they have been denied 
“natural justice". 

Mr Andrew Collins. QG for 
the 12, told the judge that the 
charges were brought follow- 
ing the majority finding of an 
investigation by ihe party that 
there had been ‘irregularities 
during Liverpool’s clash with 
the Government in recent 
months. 

They all deny the charges 
but fear they will not receive a 
fair hearing. They claim they 
have been refused the right to 
be represented, call witnesses 
or cross examine witnesses 
giving evidence against them, 
Mr Collins said. 

He added it would be 
“manifestly unfair” if the 
members of the inquiry team, 
who have already found 
against them, should, be al- 
lowed to sit on the disciplinary 
committee to decide the 
charges. 

They are also seeking full 
details of the charges and 
evidence against them which 
they sav is “so insubstantial 
and feeble there is a real fear 
that the party is going to rely 
on rumour, gossip andjnalice 
from political enemies". 

The Labour Party’s Nation- 
al Executive says it has com- 
plied with the rules and 
opposes the injunction. 

The case was adjourned 
until Monday when it will 
start again with a new counsel 
representing the 12, after Mr 
Collins told the court he 
would be unavailable because 
he was involved in the GLCs 
House of Lords appeal oyer 
the block on their £76 million 
spending spree. 


Cheaper power 
prospects 
as oil price 
beats coal 


By Teresa Poole 
Negotiations are under way of electricity is generated by 
.I... pifcctricitv indus- burning oil but, as during the 

SfSd'Ste nKSEi CoS strike, fl^cotdd-.be 

try and me rmau _ sharply increased, a feel which 

is likely to intensify pressure 


Board which could lead to 
cheaper electricity as a result 
of the sharp drop in oil pnees 
over the past three months. 

The Central Electricity 
Generating Board yesterday 
announced an average 5— per 
cent increase from April 1 in 
the price of electricity sup- 


on the coal board to come to 
agreement over lower prices. 

The Government clearly 
faces a dilemma, particularly 
the controversy over petr ol 
price increases. Electricity 
consumers have so for had 




England and Wales. . 

That is in line with the 
average 5 per cent increases 
recently announced by the 
boards for Britain’s 19 million 
domestic electricity 
consumers. . . 

But ihe increase is based on 


in the oil price but any price 
reduction would be at a cost to 
the coal board, either through 
reduced prices or lower orders 
from its main customer. 

The coal board raised its 
prices to the electricity indus- 
try by 4.5 per cent in Novem- 




MiH 

:n* 


how to get 
rid of it 


jJU» ! 
f !0 L 


BvftsceWrigU 
id Craig Seton 

Do yaobeoww wy »be» 
1.500 are kept 

wfeeo.thecha- 

totedwfen people make stogaS 
fit fatting 


- ■ aT 

. B , r 

VLym nmnA “often” er 
mil “always? 1 to foeje qwsttsw* 
«* cooM be ftds* serious 

a m 


or yoo may just need ta 
d&tppear tote a lift to scream. 

Bat if W answered 
•fadfc^er“oe«r"youinay 
be cam e afa and kwg-Ii«fc 
bat may also be totally 


price agreements reached with ber. the fifth suct^vc 
the coal board in November, increase lower than the rate of 


TteDnfa of Edlnbmgli sitting ot foe back row dm** iris school lesson. 


before oil prices halved to S15 
a barrel. ... 

At current pnees it would be 
cheaper for the generating 
board to switch some genera- 
tion from coal to oil-burning 


power stations. 


The cost of heavy fuel oil 
$140 a tonne 


inflation. 

The generating board said 
yesterday that only 3 per cent 
of hs price increase was to 
cover increased costs and that 
the remainder was to meet 
government financial targets. 

Plant to produce 


Classrooi 


off for the Duke 


to * -report; 

^ by Dr Anbey 

• Booth, director of the Stress 
those who show *- 
greater pattern of untotam 
and anftr ia their Ktcs may be 

mcdous worriers with an ta- 
crased Bhetihood of a disor- 
der, but they may father he 
ambitious people wfa can 
readily develop tectonqum fa 
the side-effect* at 


has fallen from 5140 a tonne . ‘ i 

to less than $90 a tonne since Oil IT0IH C0U1 
November and the generating Mr ^ MacGregor, the coal 
board wants this fall reflected chairman, yesterday 

in coal prices. launched a £35 million pilot 

Two months ago the gener- al Point of Ayr 

ating board won a “modest j^iiiery near Prestatyn in 
reduction in prices for some of norlh wales to produce oil 

its coal which costs an average from coaL 


The Duke of Edinburgh was given a 
ticking off yesterday during a lecture on 
Vhtonan values and was told to speak 

only when spoken to and to raise his hand 

if he wished to say anything. 

The Duke’s schoolroom lecture came 
during a visit to Wigan Pier ’ •ririchl has 
been transformed into a £3.5 million 
complex of museums and living memori- 
als to Lancashlres’s industrial heritage. 
As a “new pupiT he was attending a 

reconstruction of a primary school class 

in 1900 given by the centre’s actors. 


He was accompanymgAe 
the official opening of Wigan Pier which 
has been renovated over four years from 
derelict mill buildings and wharfsde 
warehouses. 


The Queen made a private visit to the 
reconstruction of a Victoria - comers 
cottage, where an actress, Karen H arri - 
son, gave a portrayal of a woman whose 
husband had just died m a pit acodenL 
Tbe schoolroom and cottage form partof 
“The Way We Were" scenes mside the 


renovated tariMiugs alongside the Leeds- 
Uverpool CanaL , - 
Tie Queen - and'-, the Duke travelled 

afong the canal ma flal-b ottott watrri iBs 

between the min.- and the Herbage 
Centre- The complex, ia r rpe rted to 
attract more than 250#®8 vfeiteis to the 
coating year.. 

Wigan Ete, aJfaree-feet Ion coBtoy 
gantry jutting into the Leeds-xlverpoti 
€am£. which was demoSshed to 1929, 
has been restored to its former ptoce by 
technical coffee students. 



those who always react 
badly toe ‘.'to a togatos 
l and exerasem com- 


£43 a tonne compared with 
world coal prices of £28 a 
tonne. 

Lord Marshall, chairman of 
the generating board, told the 
Commons Select Committee 
on Energy earlier this week 
that electricity consumers 
were providing a “hidden 
subsidy" for the coal board 
because of that differential 
Lower coal prices would be 
immediately passed on to 
industrial consumers and 
could lead to rebates for 
domestic users. But with the 
current uncertainty over the 
oil price the generating board 
would probably choose to use 
ihe benefits to limit next 
year’s price increase. 

At present about 4 per cent 


It will eventually mean 10 
million tonnes of coal being 
used for transport fuel by the 
start of the next century, he 

predicted. _ 

The new plant will initially 
convert, in a proving process, 
just 2.5 tonnes of coal a day 
into petrol diesel and jet fuel 
• Coal users are pay 
more than ever for their f 
one year after the miners’ 
strike, the Domestic Coal 
Consumers Council said in a 
repor published yesteray. 

Newcastle upon Tyne and 
Nottingham emerge from the 


Maxwell goes to conrt 


Sogat ‘censored’ paper 

_ r- j . c nf ctanathatitkfldiinal 


regional prices survey as cities 
’ ' i low fuel costs 


with relatively 


although some coal is now up 
to £8.50 a half tonne dearer in 


Nottingham than in 1984. ( 


GLC to urge rejection 
of green belt new town 


By Hugh Clayton, Environment Correspondent 

The Greater London Coun- given on Monday or Tuesday 

at a hearing near Tillingham 
Hall of an appeal by the 
consortium against the refusal 
of two local councils to allow 
building. 


cil, in one of its last public acts 
before its abolition, is lo call 
on ministers to reject plans to 
build a new town on open 
farmland at Tillingham Hall, 
Essex. 

The Labour-led council is to 
ask Mr Kenneth Baker. Secre- 
tary of State for the Environ- 
ment “not only to dismiss 
this case out ofhand, but to do 
so in such terms as todiscour- 
age similar proposals". 

The consortium that wants 
to build around Tillingham 
Hall also hopes to gain per- 
mission to build four further 
new towns near London. De- 
tailed plans for the second, 
near Hook in Hampshire, are 
to be disclosed on Monday. 

The GLC evidence is to be 


The GLC is one of six big 
Labour-held authorities which 
are to be abolished on Easter 
Monday. Mr Anthony Perry, 
head of the transport and 
development division of the 
GLC, says in evidence to be 
given to the appeal that pres- 
sure to build on green belt 
areas near London must be 
resisted. 


Building on such sites 
would make it harder to 
attract investment to meet the 
needs of London, Mr Perry 
says. 


Ministers 
get tough 
on BL sale 


Continued from page 1 
• Mr Michael Heseltine gave 
a warning yesterday against 
allowing General Motors even 
a minority stake in Land 
Rover and added that it was 
up lo the British Government 
to be as tough as General 
Motors in any negotiations 
(Stephen Goodwin writes). 

Citing earlier arrangements 
under which minority inter- 
ests in Britain’s motor indus- 
try had been conceded to 
American companies, he said 
that it was only a matter of 
time before a minority became 
a majority. 


Mr Robert Maxwell, the 
Mirror Group publisher, ac- 
cused the print union Sopat’82 
yesterday of censorship by 
stopping production of his 
Scottish Daily Record because 
it objected to an editorial 
“No person is entitled to 
stop a newspaper and set 
himself up as a Hitler and say 
that he and no one else has the 
right to decide what is accept- 
able in a newspaper. That 
would be contrary to the 
freedom of the Press”, he told 
the High Court in London. 

Mr Maxwell was giving 
evidence on the first day of 
contempt case in which he 
accuses the union of breaking 
a court injunctionrby refusing 
to work normally on the 

newspaper. 

The Scottish Jkmy Record 
and Sunday Mail Ltd are 
asking Mr Justice Drake to 
punish the union for 
contempt ' 

The union could race fines 
or a second sequestration 
order on top of the one 
imposed on its £17 million 


assets for defiance of an stand that it is a dimate that is 
injunction granted in the dis- 
pule over Mr Rupert 
Murdoch’s News Internation- 
al plant at Wapping, east 
London. 


sot easily changed.' 

Mr Maxwell said Mr Wat- 


On March 9, Sogat mem- 
bers at the Daily Record 
refused to set an editorial 
critical of ihe union, Mr 
Justice Drake was told. Mr 
Maxwell said the decision not 
to set the editorial had been 
taken by Mr Allan Watson, 
Sogat’s Scottish secretary. 

After compositors refused 
to set the article, managers 
sent the staff home and pro- 
duction was halted. 

Mr Maxwell told the judge; 
“Mr Watson is Sogat 82 in 
Scotland. Ifhe^ysno.it is no, 
and- nobody ;cah change his 
mind. We.tri&very tori that 
night, bur if .Mr Watsons 
instructions, to his members 
are that they are. not to handle 
ihe Daily Record, MM is how 
it is at Anderstons Quay. 

• “That is how it has been for 
20. years and you will under- 


IVfti ivioavwu. to . “ 

sod could h&ve bad the right of 
reply without stopping the 
newspaper. . . , 

By Aning so, they dismissed 
themselves he daimed. 

“I don’t believe the court 
has a role in industrial rela- 
tions except as a last resort”, 
Mr Maxwell said. “The trou- 
ble with Mr Watson is that he 
thinks he is above the law. 

Mr David Tumer-Samuels, 
QC, fbrSogat, suggested to Mr 
Maxwell “You sacked them 
because they were not pre- 
pared to agree to new and 
different;-, terms., of 
employment. • ■ - 

Mr Maxwell replied; “They 
sadeed themselves because 
they would not cany out 
lawfully ^v^instriictionS."' 

tThe hearing continues _ 
• Mr Ron Brown, Labour 
for Edinburgh Leith, has writ- 
ten to Mr Larry Whitty, the 
party’s general secretary, call- 
ing for the expulsion of Mr 
Maxwell 


Alliance 


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Good design of good gilcts 


• Mr David Andrews, lead- 
er of the Leyland executives 
bidding for the management 
buy-out of Land Rover, came 
out after a meeting yesterday 
afternoon with Mr Paul 
Channon, Secretary of State 
for Trade and Industry, and 
said: “The battle for Land 
Rover is not yet over. We are 
still in the running,” (Derek 
Harris writes). 

Mr Andrews disclosed that 
the financial backers for the 
buy-out were Inyestore in 
Industry (3i), Britain’s biggesi 
providers of venture capital, 
Electra Candover, the Nation- 
al Coal Board Pension Fund, 
and the venture capital arm of 
Schroders, the merchant 
bankers. 


Fulham by-election 


The Andrews group told Mr 
Channon that they were not 


a gai nst some involvement in 
Land Rover by General Mo- 
tors but arc against any ar- 
rangement that could give 
GM full management control 
of Land Rover. 


The Liberal-Social Demo- 
cratic Allian ce is to vote 
against Mr Nigel Lawson's Ip 
reduction in income tax when 
the Commons debate on the 
Budget is resumed next week. 

The decision was an- 
nounced by Mr David Steel 
and Dr David Owen, the 
Alliance leaders, in speeches 
yesterday, after indications 
that the Labour Party wfl] not 
vote against the Chancellor’s 
standard rate reduction on 
Monday. 

Mr Steel addressing the 
Scottish Liberal Party confer- 
ence on the Isle of Bute, said 
the Budget was the opening 
salvo in an election campaign 
which on the Conservative 
ride would be characterized by 
triviality and an appeal to 
short term greed. 

He said a short-term boom 
on the high street and in the 
City would not deceive the 
electorate. The Alliance would, 
vote against the lp reduction, 
“to demonstrate that our 
words are not empty ones". 

Dr Owen, speaking in Taun- 
ton, Somerset said the Alli- 
ance would demonstrate its 


Labour labelled 
as ‘anti- 



By George HiD - 

Candidates in the Fulham and National Union ofTeach- 

ers official policy. 


j WASHINGTON: A ______ 

spokesman for General Mo- Budget priorities by votmg 
tort in Detroit said yesterday against the Government’s de- 

ihat he could not comment on ~ * **" ™ 1_n ' 

the British Government’s po- 
sition at a time when negotia- 
tions were in such a delicate 
stage (Michael Binyon writes). 


cision lo nse the £i billion 
it the 


Budget giveaway to cut ___ 
standard rate of rax, rather 
than using it to create jobs and 
increase competitiveness. 


by-election, who faced out- 
bursts of egg-hurting this 
week, yesterday accused the 
Labour Party and forces with- 
in the labour movement of 
being anti-police. 

Mr Matthew Carrington, 
Conservative candidate, ac- 
cused the Labour Party of pot 
speaking out against political 
violence of the kind seen 
outride News Internationals 
plant at Wapping, east 
London. 

He claimed that Labour 
leaders had not spoken out 
quickly enough to help pre- 
vent violence, in spite of 
remarks by Mr Roy 
Hattersley, the deputy Labour 
leader. 

Mr Gerald Kaufinan, the 
Opposition spokesman on 
home affairs, said there were 


and 


Staff at Hnriingham 
Chelsea School had told him 


that the police had been 
excluded because it was 
claimed they used racist and 
sexist teaching material and 
that, “our teachers do not like 
to have police in the class- 
room because they had had so 
many had experiences 
themselves". 

Mr Nick Raynsford, L abou r 
candidate, expressed surprise 
at the charge. In an adroit 
reminder ot his own dose 
links with the. constituency, as 
well as the police, he said that 
officers were _ “exceedingly 
welcome visitors” at a 
neighbouring school attended 
by his own children. 

Mr Liddie accused the NUT 
of damaging the interests of 


case man 
attacked 


proving healthy 
The most Hkdy co**- 
aaemxs of the harmful effect 
from ceatiHnal irritation are 
high Mood pressure and heart 
disease. They arise to part 
because of ft surge m the level 

of- the biochemical 

iiondremlin. 

. ■: Many ways of releasing 
anger ait sugge rtrf by Dr 
Booth. They come to several 




b ' *•* 

! r o hem 


4 I’ 


By Stewart Teudler 

Crime Reporter 


Scotland Yard detectives 
yesterday hnmdied a special 
investigation into an attack on 


one of foe men charged with 
the west London burglary m 
why* a vicars daughter was 
raped. 

The man was yesterday in a 
critical condition after being 
from prison for an 
emergen^ bramoperathm.. 


24 


Andrew Stuart Byrne: _ 
of Canada Crescent 


. — first Is an instant 
safety- valve, and fachdes sag- 
ges&oss front leaving 

ft room, getting foto an empty 
Eft tod- yeffiog “I hate every- 

one^torefeasfogeoCTgybya 
brisk walk round foe block or 
by smirethtog constructive tike 
tkantog windows or the car. . 

More permanent strategies 
are needed - for combatting 
tegolar patterns of anger, and 
they off for modffkations of 
tifatjfe, .. .such . ns, going 
fan the garden on 
v home and digging « 
» for half an how before 
invetved in worries 


• , f _ . ■ i 

' M * * * i - i 



Acton j was^-foaod'ttnbqo-' 
sciolis m his ^u^fe cefi^ 
Wormwood '’'’Scrubs tin! 
Wednesday at 9 a m. ' 


He wasmqvodto Hamfnofc-: 
jntoffi Tloiq^laLtoid- then ihc^ 
National Hospital for N er- 
vous Diseases where surgeons 
operated to remove a blood 
dot. 


Prison and pofice sources 
deny Mr Byrne received foe 
dot -from my nyrafies or 
attack while -in. pofice or 
prison custody. It is. suggested | 
be may haveheen injured in a 
fight with a gang at his tonne 
the day before he was arrested 
lastwedc. 


. Mr Byrne «m unemployed 
labourer, is charged with ag- 
gravated. burglary during the 
rape ibddent on March a, He 
appeared ax Ealing magistrates 
court a week ago and was 
remanded in custody with, a 
number of other accused. He 
did not complain about my ill 
treatment 


Flear moving 
ahead in GLC 
chess contest 


Th»e was much lively . 
in .round eight of the G. 
London . Chess Challenge 
Grandmaster Tournamem al 


nnlv two nroblems at of damaging foe interests of 
duemg a paper of record from 

a forteess, and people batten- of the agreement between 


a luiuvaa, 

ingon to foe dispute wbo have 
nothing to do with it, profes- 
sional stirrers up of trouble". 

Mr Roger Liddie, SDP can- 
didate, daimed that a local 
comprehensive school was 
one of several in London 
which have banned police 
visits, in defiance of Inner 
London Education Authority 


employers and unions. 

‘ Many children in' Fulham 
and elsewhere were still being 
sent home or left to wander 
the streets unsupervised. Tru- 
ancy. bad gone up white stan- 
dards had gone down. 

General MEcOoa: 'M Uhww 
u 102 . cm matortiy. *.78*. 


the Great Eastern Hotel with 
Manny Chandler, British 
grandmaster, and- Glenn 
Flear, English international 
master, leading wiib 5% 
points (Harry : Gotombek 
writes);. . . 

Flear looks lflcdy id increase 
his . lead as be appears to he 
winning his adjmunment 
against Jon S^eehnanv British 

grandmaster, improved 


Bat many people c*cm* 
coBtrid. or.even reo^prise, the - 
fapraad fatofrn to foefr 

V , *>««» 

ramched inta causes of anger 
aad ways in which it cm be 
eMUtoOed befive it explodes 
intotSafaioe; 

-The Umtoine Trust, m 
educational charity, has 
awarded the mosey to Bfr- 
wn/hwMmm Unirersity where Dr 
Kevai HoweDs, senior lecturer 
in dtokal psychology, will try 
to find out how some people 
can control their anger by 
counting to 10 while others 
fait over into physical 
assaults, 

■He wants 150 vohurteere 
from the West Midlands to 
keep derailed diaries of their 
i outbursts ef anger before sub- 
jecting them to interviews and 
psychological tests to deter- 
mine what, triggered their tem- 
per, what puyical sensations 
were present and, importantly 
what devices they used to stop 
their temper worsening. 

. Dr Howells said yesterday: 
♦Tlie tong-term aim is to 
.devise tteatthent.-progranmies 
for. pe^de with temper control 
proMtans, peofde who have 
been .violent to foor wtom, 
their children or others. That 
sort of behariwr hs rftea the 
rofaK . of strong smger^ype 
feelings so we hare to find out 
more about -the- natur e of 


V L S ^ 


^‘v ’ ft ♦ 

* v - Us i 


There was eridence that 
violence to the modally IB, 
chHd abuse and other types of 
aggression were the product of 
denriendes m anger-control 
systems.: -He hoped that a 
detailed examination of anger 
in everyday life, among people 
who were not violent could give 
dues to explain what was 
wrong with those who were. 

He saM^Wewanrpebpteto 


jDelugy, of foe US, m IS 
moves and Bent Larsen. Dan- 
ish grandmaster, beat Lajos 
Poitisch, the Hungatian 
grandmaster. 


with Orc nnO W V > 
— Nona. 

5; _Larsn». Pocusctu 

Spuiky. -4 l. Sg€ei mii n_ - (Wft 
Pel ********* 

2s Dctucv. MMML 2tt. 


iysvuiwj _ 

gets anger, whethcr it 8 
duldreu, a dispute with their 
wife or husband or a dtopte 
mart at work. 

' The reseaw* iwoject whk* 
would, take aboiit two .yrapi 
would also examine the influ- 
ence of alcohol. 



Fight for hall 


£2m to keep Kedleston for nation 


By David Hewson, Arts Correspoudcnt , tv 


The Derbyshire historic 
home of Kedteston Hall, de- 
signed by Robert Adam as die 
famil y seat of the Curnm 
family, wBl become one of the 
National Trust’s most glitter- 
ing possessions if the trust can 
raise £2 million to secure its 
purchase. 

The trust is joining forces 
with the National Heritage 
Memorial Fund to head a 
public appeal for the remain- 
ing money to safeguard the 
house and its furnishings for 
the nation. It has promised £1 
minion towards foe purchase 
and the heritage fund Is prom- 
ising its largest grant of £133 
million, coupled with 
from the present owner. 


Scarsdale, worth £23 nJUion, 
designed to give the property 
totbe trust 

Bat the handover will be 
subject to foe trust being able 
to raise foe outstanding £2 
mini on for the purchase of foe 
property and foe agreement of 
the High Court, which has to 
agree to changes ia the firsts 
affecting two of Lord 
Scarsdale N s 
minors, for 
through. 

Mr Brian 
foe heritage 
day that foe ap: 
court was expet 
and foe trust had 
year to which 
necessary 


million from the fund wQI be 
the largest stogie Ham the body 
has ever given to one project 


Saleroom 



1 money ’ 
special £25 million govern- 
ment grant awarded last year 
to help foe purchase of three 
historic properties, Kedteston, 
Nostril Priory, and Weston 
Park. 



of 

yester- 
to foe 
in June, 
itself a 
raise the 
The £133 


Dr Richards 


Viv Richards, aged 33, who 
is leading foe West Indies in 
the Test series againsz . En- 
gland, is to be made a Doctor 
of Letters (D Lin) by Exeter 
University. 


Christie’s and Sotheby’s 
were hoping to attract, buyers 
from continental Europe as 
well as Britain ^ to London with 
sales of nineteenth and twenti- 
eth century paintings and 
furniture yesterday. ; 

But in each casethe.lHddefs, 
many of whom were private, 
proved choosy. The paintings 


at Christie’s produced a total" 
6,-wHl 


of £L0l 939^- whh 28 per cent 
unsold, while, the ...sale of. 
furniture at Sotheby’s made 
£478,478, with almost -22 per 
centbou^rtin. 

At Chnstte’s, a painting by 
Giovanni Fhttorini of a caval- 
ry troop halted . outride, a 
village, which was dated 1882, 
made £59,400 (estimate 
£3O.OOO-£5O,O0QV . ah<f 


By Hum Mftfiafiea . . 

“-Flirtation",., a study . of a 
• boating party on a river/ 
Minted in Paris in 1885 by 
Georges Croegaert, reached 
£41,040 

; Another printing to gbweH . 
■ above its ^estimate was . a 
realistic portrayal of a fashion-, 
abte Copenhagen cafoi dated 
1906, by. Frants Henhingsen, 

, which sold 'for £34,560 (esti^ 
mate £lO.O0O-£l5,OO0j: •: ; 

At Sotheby’s. - Private bid- . 
ders took four of foe five most. ; 
expairive tots. A pair of: 

. En^ish mid^eteeirtb cental 


made in England, reached 
£28,600 ”■ 

Tte Musfe d’Orsay. Paris, • 
which:.specialiKS m tte-mne- 
teenfo. century, paid £23,100 • 
(estimateiliOOO^lfiJXWfor 
ah daboratr-i885 marquetry ■ 
ceptre table by . Joseph Cro* \ 
mer, /diplomatic manmetevr ^ 
w ba iworiced. for Louis. Mii- '*• ._ 
.litfae, Napoleon JH, the' King 
of HoUartd, andihe Americah, 
•market;/ ■ : *•.’ 


marble ^ rat^yw^’pbly- 


irpme tops 7. made an. 
unexpected £31.900 (estimate ■ 
£ 1 0,000-£20,000). A set of two ; 
armdialrs. and'twp 'setteesr-ui 
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A fete of tirree who stole 
more than £3 million from his 
company to finance his book- 
maJang business and feed his 
uisatiaMe appetite for gam- 

bnng on a grand scale" was 
He had admitted 16 soecunen 


comts involving £11^000. 

Gloucester Crown Court 
was told that Terence Antho- 
“V . H*ass, . aged : j 40, of 
Netewood Gardens, Cbel- 
lenham, who earned £8,400 a 
year, staked up to £39,00Q a 
day gambling on racing with 
money stolen from the com- 
pany where he worked as a 
ma n ag ement accountant. 


thony Bu^cr saidTWe arc not 
dealing with the Great Train 
Robb ery but a simple theft 
from your, employers, but the 
amounts involved are amply 
miles, beyond any previous 
legal authority. You did this 
with your eyes wide open to 
feed yonr gunablfag habit" 
Higgs started stealing on a 
small scale in 1979 from 
Piestolite Electricals of Chel- 
tenham. But as be realized tbe 
weakness of the American- 
owned company’s - financial 
control his forging of cheques 
grew on a wide scale. 

MrNeU Butterfield, QC, for 
the prosecution* said: “The 
defendant was able to embark 
upon a systematic, massive; 

Warning 
on shops 
Bill defeat 

By George H01 
Defeat for the Sunday trad- 
ing BiD might be followed by a 
legal crackdown on shops' 
which -are able to open -on 
Sundays at present because 
the law is weakly enforced, Mr 
David Waddington, Home 
Office minister,' said: 
yesterday. 

He issuedawannngtbatif 
the Bill Was defeated local 
councils would feel compelled 
to. recruit' “anarihyof inspec- 
tors to snoop” on evwy corner 
shop. 

“Local authorities will not 
be ateto ignore illegal Sun- 
day trading. If foe wreckers 
have their way -foot* small 
shops who open SfeaHy oh 
Sunday * wfif ;-nd^*tediy “ 
suffer;” Mr Waddmgtpirad 
“If tius Bill foils the Ihw wiU ' 
have to fie ehforoed' aha; fois 
wifi oost money," the minister 
told a meetup in Qhherae, 
Lancashire. • - 
“I believe that most rate- 
payers believe that focal au- 
thorities have better things to 
do with the ratepayers’ 
money.” 

Stops which are already 
allowed to. trade on Sunday 
would no longer be able to 
open at times which suit the 
customer, Mr Waddington 
added. “Instead they will open 
at times to suit the state.” 


• By Tim Jones ■ “ 

wholesale plundering of has 
employers’ money which went 
on unche&ed over a period of 
five, years involving ’ever- 
increasing amounts. 

“His employers were 'rely- 
ing on bis integrity, bnt regret- 
fully that trust was 
systematically exploited.” 

. Higgs began bis life of crime 

in November 1979,* stealing 
£493 from die company. But 
as his confidence and obses- 
sh» grew his thefts became 
more daring until in £984 he 
defrauded the company of 
£2^72,000. His total wand 
involved £3,272^06^0. 

- Mr- Butterfield said: “The 
trickle became a stream and 
then a river and' finally by 
1984 a torrent.” 

Prestolite, which had been 
trading at a profit, hadby that 
time reported a loss of more 
than £2 milli on. 

The manager' employed by 
Higgs to run his business, 
T.N.S. Turf Accountants, esti- 
mated *ha* Higgs was gam- 
bling at the rate of £5,000 a 
day but that turned out to be a' 
gross underestimate. 

In 1984, Mr Butterfield 
said, he staked the “colossal 
sum” of £889,000 and during 
September of that year he was 
staking between £15,000 and 
mOW daily. 

After he had been caught, 
Higgs told accountants of the 

Four jailed 
for heroin 
smuggling 


parent company. “It was not a 
devious conspiracy thing. I M 
into a spiral trap. I used a 
■ flood of Prestolite funds to 
repair the . damage.” 

Higgs stole most of the 
; money Iw altering cheque 
which had been signed by Mr 
John- MiiHiman, the plant 
manager. 

Mr Butterfield said that Mr 
■ Mufliman, who had been 
compelled to resign, was inno- 
cent. Higgs was able to finance 
his ‘ obsession - because the 
parent company, the 7 
Prestolite Group of Toledo, 
Ohio,, was “lax" in exercising 
-accounting control. ' 

But in' October 1984 when 
theXJS financial director visit- 
ed foe plant suspicions were 
aroused- when Higgs said the 
accounts, were not available. 
When, the next month, he was 
told there was to be an internal 
inquiry, Higgs offered his 
resignation. 

In spite of his^theft, which 
amassed more than that stolen . 
by the Great Train Robbers, 
Higgs lived relatively modest- 
• Iy. The only tangible benefits 
of- his fraud were a detached 
home in a wealthy part of 
Cheltenham, a new car for his 
wife and public school educa- 
tion of £500 a term for his 
children. The house has since 
been sold. 

Satan man 
a rapist, 
court told 


Four men were jailed at 
Reading Crown Court for their 
parts in Mm gp n it j £3 mOfien 
of heroin into Britain, hidden 
w carvings of elephants. : 

A “highly - organized” in- 
ternational drags ringbrooght 
in 16 kflognuns of heroin ! 
throng Heathrow Airport, m 
hoP o w e d- ou t carwmffi of ele- 
phants, Mr Alan Sodding, 
QC prosecuting, said at R&td- 
iag Oown ConrL " 

Maifoar Dattani, aged 32, a 
taxi driver; of Lbyes, Middle- 
sex, was jriied for 14 years, 
and Kenneth Parker, aged 47, 
a greeagrocer, <rf Weddmgtsa, 
Warwickshire* for -16 years 
-after they both admitted smug- 


feon Gibraltar, was piled for 
e^ttyan after hr was coo- 
^cteddfkndyfngfy being con- 

1 A fonrt^mattl^^&att, 
aged 25, of Wembley, west. 
London, was also jailed for 
yens after being found 
guilty of a staaDar offence in a 
separate triaL . 

41 A man aged who swallowed 
184 packets of liquid cannabis 
worth £3«400 in an attempt.to 
smuggle them into Britain 
fimnudia, was jaBed for nine 
months at foe same court. 

Paid Hdfrfcroft, of Cam» 
Hill Road, Coventry, admitted 
snurngBnQ 567 grams of can- 
nabis oQ on Dtorafoer 12. ' ' 


Police seek robbery 
clues in firearms find 

By Stewart Tendter, Crime Reporter 
A hanl of firearms found on The pete forensic srience 


foe Thames riveihmk bdow laboratories at Lambeth, 
Southwark bridge, south Lon- soufo London, are studying 
don, is beiiig examined by . the arms for clues, 
police scientists for dues to A spokesman said the guns 
several aimed robberies ana nia y have, been thrown awiay. 
terrorist s nac ks. . ■ . by criminals expecting a po- 

Scotland Yard ; >as tept.. teiafoorsc^ortemay 
d e t ail s of the -haul secret after- -bave belonged to an armed 
six handguns and a mmmu - ^ang or criminal armourer. 


lion were found by a member 
of the public using a metal 
detector on March 2. 

The cache, including an 
automatic pistol and a revolv- 
er, cartridges and-buBets, was 
wrapped in. a plastic bag: It is 
onom the biggest to have been 
found in London. 


[ Senior : London detectives ' 
have become worried by the 
i increasing use of handguns in 
- robberies. The guns are often 
; smoggkxl m from Europe, 

; where they can be bo tight 
l cheaply and easily in countries 
such as Spain. 

Bad weather hazards 


A detective told committed 
Christians who funded Deny 
Mamwaring Knight, a setf- 
I styled satanist, that the man 
thfiy thought they were saying 
from the devil had a prison 
record, including five years for^ ■ 
raping two prostitutes, a court 
was told yesterday. 

Det Chief Inq> Terence 
Fallon said at . Maidstone 
Crown; Court that be also told 
thwn that Mr Knight ha*t had 
venereal disease, which he 
gave to two offais wives. 

The detective arranged foe 
meeting with the Christians at 
-London’s Cafe Royal a few 
days after Mr Knight was 
arrested in March 1985. 

- They included Lord tent- 
ford and Mrs Susan 
Sainsbury, wife of Mr-Timo- 
foy Sainsbury, . 

MP for Hoye, and others who 
had given thousands of 
pounds to Mr Kni^iL 

Mr Fallon, then head of 
Sussex police commercial 
branch and now with the 
police in Papua New Guinea, 
told the court he wanted to 
show Mr Knight’s previous 
bad character. Under cross- 
examination by Mr Michael 
West, QC, for foe defence, be 
denied Ire was “feeding them 
foe dirt". 

Mr Knight, aged 46, an 
unemployed painter and deco- 
rator, of Dormans Land, Sur- 
rey, denies 19 charges of 
obtaining more than £200,000 
by deception from Christians, 
claiming be needed foe money 
to- buy satanic regalia to free 
himself from foe control of foe 
devfl. : ' • . • 

Mr West suggested to Mr 
Fallon that be had told the 
donors that Mr Knight was a 
member of the satanic cub, 
the ; OTO. (Oder Temphs 
Orienti) : “which dealt with 
cenainsexual perversions". 

'Mr. Fafion said he could not 
recall any mention of 
perversions. : 

The court was also told of a 
tape recording made by Mr 
Knight and bis mother, which 
Mr Fallon said he played to 
Mrs Sainsbury, winch de- 
scribed Mr Ktiighf s grand- 
mother “holding him and 
pronouncing- and incantation 
arid laying a curse on him”. 

The Inal continues 


Climbers defeat snow storm 


Nine climbers on a winter 
mountaineering course in the 
Scottish Highlands survived a 
storm with 150 mph winds on 
Cairn Gorm. They spent the 
night burrowed in snow boles 
during the worst recorded 
weather on the mountain. 

An RAF helicopter yester- 
day brougM foe six instructors 
and three students from foe 
Glemnore Lodge centre for 
outdoor trainings near 
Aviemore, from foe . moun- 
tain. One had an injured 
ankle, the others were no 
worse for foe ordeaL 

Mr Roger O’Donovan, act- 
ing principal of Glenmore 
Fivlgp which is the .leading 
centre for outdoor training in 
Scotland, said: “The system . 
seems to work.” He added 
that the three students, who . 
were already hardy and expe- 
rienced climbers, had all 
passed that pari of foe course. 

He said foe group had been 
fully equipped .to sur vive fo e 
worst conditions and w ere in 
radio contact with foe centre. 
“We knew where they were 
and that they W 

remain safe - ft 
been more dangerous to at- 
tempt toga them down aifoat .. 
time.* - ■ . . ■ 

More than 20 students and 


instructors from Glenmore 
Lodge were on foe mountain 
as- the weather deteriorated. 
Instructors os hill walking and 
mountain leader, training 
courses brought their students 
. down to foe valley when the 
severe "weather . was forecast. 

. The wind forecast at 100 
mph strengthened beyond that 
leveL One instructor leadin g 
his group of four students was 
blown over a shallow cliff but - 


.lan ded unhar med. 

“They linked foe snow 
holes with ropes and did 
everything according to foe 
book. Even so no one had 
experienced such extreme 
winds -before,” Mr 
O'Donovan said. “We have 
been -tangling with mountains 
fin- 20 years and none of us 
boo vernure fr> underestimate 
the potential violence of foe 
Cairo Grain". , 


Sixth crew member 
feared lost in storm 


Mystery yesterday sur- 
rounded foe frdl crew list of foe 

trawler Dawn Waters, which 
sank in hurricane cbwfifions 
off foe Isle of Man on Thurs- 
day* '• y B 

.. Five men, possfirfysuc, died 
in the smiting hi the Irish Sea 
in which foe crew list went 
down wifothe ship. 

The drowned mdoded the 
trawler’s skipper, Mr Uals 
Ozard, aged jfoont 40, a 
Gaensey man, of Newiyn, 
Cornwall, who was doe to be 
married at Easter.' - 

Others ntisring - are Mr 


Chris Dodds, aged 27, of 
Mouse-hide, foe rola^ which 
lost eight fifeboatmen in te 
1981 Ffeiriee disaster, Mr Gor- 
don Conan, aged in his 20s; iff 
Penzance, Jason Ward, aged 
16, of Plymouth, and Mr 
David Yomog, of fe^rini, 
pevtm, who lived ait Newiyn. 

Mir Ray Hafl, saperinteo- 
deot of the Royal National 
Missma to Deep Sea Ftsber- 
men, Newiyn, srid foe name oT . 
a sixth Bran, Mr Geoige 
Wfiiiams, .of Flynogfr, ap- 
peared-on one list fen ft had 
not been estahfished whether 
he was actnally on board. ; 


THE TIMES SATURDAY MARCH 22 1986 


Stricter 
rules for 
soccer air 
charters 

Britifo football fens, travel- 
ling on charter flights to 
matches abroad in fiabnc, wiB 
not be allowed on the aircraft 
unless they have a valid ticket 
for foe game. 

Mr Nicholas Ridfey, Secre- 
tary of State for Transport, is 
to introdu c e foe new controls 
as. part of foe campaign 
against football hooliganism. 

He wfll direct foe Gvil 
Aviation Authority to intro- 
duce snch a comtitkm m 

R fM^K in jiiy rail Hx» 

same cood kk m wfll be im- 
posed by his department on 
foreign ahinaes. 

There are not expected to be 
many charter flights for the 
World Cup in Mexico becasse 
of the dis tance. The action wffl 
affect this year’s European 
ch ampio n s h ip games. 

But Mr Richard Tracey, 
Minister for Sport, said zn 
1 London yesterday that con- 
victed football hooligans and 
afl those on a special Football 
Association blacklist are being 
advised not to travel to Mexico 
this summer. 

- Although they will not be 
prevented from leaving this 
country they may be barred 
from entering Mexico. 

Mr Ted Croker, the Foot- 
ball As socia tio n’s .Secretary, 
added: “We do have quite a 
catalogne of information of 
incidents that have happened 
m foe past and about people 
concerned in them. It is our 
intention to try to deter these 
people from going to foe 
WoridCnp." 

The FA are to issue a leaflet 
to afl pro sp e c tive travellers to 
Mexico and wiD also issue a 
letter of intend action, written 
both in English and Spanish, 
far bona fide support e rs. 

' Mr lfcacey warned all En- 
glish supporters that the Mex- 
ican police will be' very strict 
and that troops will be sta- 
tioned in afl stadimns. 


HOME NEWS 



‘Build-a-degree’ 
scheme to bridge 
gap in education 

By Lucy Hodges, Education Correspondent 


Dame Margaret Weston, retiring director of the Srience 
Museum, London, at the wheel of foe 1911 Rolls-Royce 
which she drov e in foe 1981 London to Brighton ran 
(Photograph: Tim Bishop). 


A tertiary degree scheme 
which could help bridge foe 
gap between universities and 
polytechnics was launched in 
London yesterday. 

The Credit Accumulation 
and Transfer Scheme (Cits) 
enables students to be credited 
for experience, as well as 
learning, and to obtain a 
certificate after completing 
courses at different 
institutions. 

Aimed mainly at adults who 
missed out on higher educa- 
tion, it could revolutionize the 
higher education system in 
Britain by breaking down the 
division between training and 
academic study. 

The scheme, announced by 
the Council for National Aca- 
demic Awards, allows stu- 
dents to build up a degree, or 
some other qualification, by 
compiling credits at universi- 
ties. polytechnics or other 
higher institutions. Company 
training schemes will also be 
included. 

Dr Edwin Kerr, the CNAA’s 
chief officer, described the 
scheme as “historic", with 

a potential to bring more 
ulity into Britain’s higher 
education system. 

Mr Peter Toyne, chairman 
of the Cats advisory board and 
deputy director or North East 
London Polytechnic, said the 
outside world still saw higher 
education as unwelcoming 
and traditional. 

“Through this scheme, that 


is about to change and in a big 
way. Part of this exercise is to 
open up higher education to a 
whole range of people who 
have hitfaeno been put off it, 
or have not known about it, or 
felt it wasn’t for them.” 

Mr George Walden, Parlia- 
mentary Under Secretary of 
State in charge of higher 
education, said: “The mood of 
the limes is for flexibility and 
mobility. I have a vision of 
men and women scurrying the 
sueeis with attache cases full 
of Nigel Lawson’s shares and 
these new CNAA modules”. 

Potential students will pay a 
£25 fee for a preliminary 
assessment, and will then be 
advised to register either with 
a particular institution or to 
enrol directly with CNAA to 
gather credits at more than 
one college. 

However, since there is no 
question of the grants system 
being changed, most students 
under the scheme will have to 
finance themselves. 

Ten polytechnics and four 
universities have so far shown 
interest in the scheme. They 
are the five inner London 
polytechnics, plus Hatfield, 
Manchester, Oxford and Bir- 
mingham, as well as the 
universities of London, Hull 
and Manchester and foe Open 
University. 

The Cats advisory service is 
at 344-354 Gray's Inn Road, 
London WClX 8BP, tele- 
phone 01-278-441L 


Academic wins test case on sex discrimination 


By Lucy Hodges 
An academic who was re- 
jected for a “new blood” 
lecturing post at Cambridge 
University on the grounds of 
her age has won a test case of 
sex discrimination at an in- 
dustrial tribunal in London. 

The University Grants 
Committee, which adminis- 


tered the “new blood” 
scheme, has been found to 
have breached the Sex Dis- 
crimination Act and is now 
being called upon to endorse 
the appointment of Dr Felicia 
Huppert to the post of lecturer 
in foe department of psychia- 
try at Cambridge University. 

Miss Diana Warwick, gen- 


eral secretary of the Associa- 
tion of University Teachers, 
which brought the case, said: 
“We hope that the UGC will 
now do the decent thing and 
endorse her appointment to 
this post. 

In 1984 Dr Huppert applied 
for a post under the 
Government’s “new blood” 


scheme which was designed to 
ensure that universities re- 
cruited new talent in the field 
of srience research. Cam- 
bridge University wanted to 
appoint her, but the UGC 
refused to provide funding on 
foe grounds that the scheme 
carried an age limit of 35. Dr 
Huppert was 39. 



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HOME/OVERSFAR news 


Child sex abuse cases 
doubled last year, 
NSPCC survey shows 


By Gavin BeD 
The number of known cases 
f of sexual abuse of children 
-almost doubled last year, ac- 
cording to a survey by the 
National Society for the Pre- 
; vention of Craelty to Chil- 
dren, published yesterday. 

It estimated that the num- 
ber of reported cases in En- 
gland and Wales rose by 
90 per cent last year to 2.850. 
The figures were based on 
local authority registers main- 
tained by the NSPCC s child 
protection units, covering . 
about 10 per cent of the child 
population under 1 7 years. 

The society also found that 
while 10 to 14-year-olds were 
at greatest risk, many more 
younger children were among 
the victims; from 4 per cent 
under five years in 1984 to 
14 per cent last year. The 
society concluded that at least 
one child in every 4,000 was 
being sexually abused at 
home. 

Dr Alan GiJmour. NSPCC 
director, said it was not possi- 
ble to determine whether child 
- sexual abuse was increasing, 
but the figures showed a 
greater public awareness of the 

Difficulty 
for family 
court plan 

Lord Hailsham of St Mary- 
iebonc, the Lord Chancellor, 
hinted at the difficulty of 
. setting up a family court, 
during a speech at the annual 
dinner of county court and 
district registrars in London 
last night It is to be the subject 
of a government discussion 
paper at Easter. 

“Though almost everyone is 
in favour of a family court 
few people have thought out 
what it is they mean, and how 
it can be brought about” he 
said. 

The idea has hitherto foun- 
dered on two main rocks. “In 
the first place it could not be 
done without abolishing the 
domestic jurisdiction of the 
magistrates' courts.” 

Secondly, he said, the fam- 
ily court would cost more. 

Lord Hailsham said he was 
criticized during the passage 
of the recent Matrimonial and 
Family Proceedings Act 1984 
for not introducing a family 
court . 

The Act would create great- 
er unity between the High 
Court and county court and 
retain in the High Court 
family division those cases 
which required the skills of a 
High Court judge, he said. 
Others would be transferred to 
the county court. 


Fatima Sulaiman, a AM 
wife, was flown out of Britain 
yesterday 24 hoars after it was 
disclosed that the 13-year-old 
was married to an Omani 
student aged 21. 

The girt ami her husband, 
Abdullah Shohi, had been 
living in Luton, Bedfordshire, 
for six months. The sudden 
departure came on the (orders 
of the Omani embassy, anx- 
ious to avoid a diplomatic 
dispute. 

evil and a resolve to combat it. 

However, he said: “We 
believe ihat many children 
continue to suffer the distress 
of sexual abuse in secret. A 
veil of secrecy is drawn across 
families where this is happen- 
ing. There is no way out for 
the child. - 

“We appeal to friends, 
neighbours and relatives to 
help us tearaway this veil. Our 
message is that the NSPCC 
and other caring professions 
can and will help.” 

Mrs Jenny Still, leader of 
one of the society's 29 special 
child protection teams, urged 
the public to report any suspi- 


Police ‘cover up in 
Hell’s Angel case’ 


The police were yesterday 
accused of a cover-up in the 
death of a Hell's Angel who 
died in police custody. 

The accusation came from 
counsel for the Hell's Angels, 
Mr Orlando Pownall. at the 
start of the fifth day of the 
inquest into John Mikkleson, 
aged 34. of Salters Road. 
North Kensington, west Lon- 
don. at Hammersmith 
Coroners' Court. 

Mr Pownall asked Police 
Constable George Renton 
when did be mate his notes 
after the incident. PC Renton 
replied that it was after 12 
noon on July 1 6. more than 1 2 
hours after Mikkleson's death 
in the West Middlesex 
Hospital 

Asked if it was not unusual' 
to make notes so long after an 
incident, PC Renton replied: 
“Yes, but it was on the orders 
of a senior police officer." 

Referring lo the feet that 
most of the officers involved 
in the incident preceding 
Mikkleson's death were kept 
together in a conference room 
at Hounslow police station. 
Mr Pownall asked him: “Did 
you not think it unusual that 
potential suspects in a murder 
or manslaughter inquiry were 
kept together in the same 
room?" PC Renton replied: 
“Yes sir.” 

Mr Pownall said that after 

Science report 


being together the officers had 
had a chance to talk. He asked 
PC Renton: “Did you talk to 
PC Peacock about this?" PC 
Renton said: “Yes sir”. 

Mr Pownall went on to 
allege a cover-up between PC 
Renton and PC Peacock. “I 
say there was a cover-up 
leading up to the making of 
the notes. You and fellow ' 
officers concocted a version of ! 
events that would reflect well 
on you and badly on those 
arrested, including the man 
who died." 

PC Renton denied this and 
was unable to explain why he 
did not have a single injury 
after having allegedly been 
involved in a violent struggle 
with Mikkleson. 

PC Glyn Gray helped other 
officers to handcuff 
Mikkleson as he lay on the 
ground. 

At the police station he said 
Mikkleson's breathing seemed 
normal and he could feel a 
pulse in his neck. 

Asked if he had inquired if 
Mikkleson was in pain, PC 
Gray said: “No". 

Mr Pownall said: “The truth 
is you could not have cared 
less, could you?" PC Gray 
replied: “I did not have time 
to ask him. I thought he was 
drunk. He had a stupid grin on 
his face and his eyes were 
glazed.” 


Fungus clue to Stradivarius tone 

By Bill Johnstone, Technology Correspondent 


The unique Stradivarius vi- 
olin sound might be due to a 
fungus spawned in water, stud- 
ies by a biophysicist at the 
Agricultural and Mechanical 
University in Texas have 
shown. 

The conclusion was reached 
from recent evidence, indicat- 
ing that the wood used by the 
Italian craftsmen had been 
soaked in water, not dry- 
seasoned as believed, accord- 
ing to Dr Joseph Nagyvaiy, 
professor of biophysics and 
biochemistry at the university 1 . 

“For the affioonado, it will 
be hard to accept that the 
secret ingredient behind the 
Stradivarius tone is not human 
ingenuity but merely a 


fungus”. Dr Nagyvary, who forces the cells to separate or 
years ago discovered a differ- loosen up, he said. 


euce in the woods used by 


studies 


Europe 


another seventeenth-century showed that logs had been sent 
violin maker, Gaiseppe Auto- downstream on die rivers lead- 


nio Gnameri. and by the 
modern violin makers, said. 

Four wood samples, two 
from Stradivarius violins and 
two from Gnarnerius violins, 
were examined over 10 years, 
the professor said. 

Microscopic examinations 
showed that traces of fungi 
had altered the shape of the 
wood cells. The fungi could 
have grown only through water 
immersion. 

Water fungi eat gummy 


ing from the Tyrolean Alps, 
where most of the wood was 
cut, to the Italian towns where 
the instruments w we made. 

Other researchers have In- 
sisted that die Italian violin 
makers went to the Alps and 
got their wood dry, just like the 
German makers who settled in 
the valley of MfttenwakL 

Dr Nagyvaiy said be also 
found traces of mineral depos- 
its in the wood that exactly 


material in the wood make matched the minerals found in 
it lighter and drier. It also A* waters of northern Italy. 






dons they may have to the 
police, the NSPCC or to local 
social sendees. 

Dr Gilmour also called for 
assistance by local and nation- 
al authorities to collate more 
comprehensive statistics. “In 
an area fraught with such 
misery and injury for children 
we need to know the size of the 
problem we are dealing with.” 

The survey noted that the 
sharp rise in known cases 
contrasted with a 30 per cent 
increase In reports of physical 
abuse between 1984 and 1985 
and a 42 per cent increase in 
child neglect Most of the 
victims of sexual abuse, 
84 percent, were girls and 
most of the suspects were 
fathers or “father-substitutes". 

The NSPCC said it was 
planning to increase the num- 
ber of child protection teams 
to 60 throughout the country 
by the end of 1988. This week 
jt issued detailed gridlines to 
its staff for investigating such 
cases, notably reminding them 
that sexual abuse was harmful 
to children even if it occurred 
without physical coercion -in 
an apparently “loving” 
atmosphere. 


THE TIMES SATURDAY MARCH 22 1986 


Suspended 
sentence 
for son of 
gun victim 

Mrs Cherry Groce, whose 
accidental shooting by the 
police led to the Bruton riots 
in south London last Septem- 
ber, was in Southwark Crown 
Court yesterday to hear her 
son being given a suspended 
prison sentence for two fire- 
arms offences. 

Mrs Groce, who was left 
paralysed by her injuries, was 
taken to the south London 
court in a wheelchair. 

After being told that Mi- 
chael Groce blamed himself 
for her injuries, and that 1 be 
had given himself up to the 
police. Judge Gerald Butler, 
QC, said: “By reason of the 
many powerful and in some 
respects unusual mitigating 
features, I shall take what I can 
only describe as a wholly 
exceptional course." 

He sentenced Groce, aged 
23, to two concurrent 12- 
month prison sentences, sus- 
pended for two years. 

Mrs Groce, aged 39, was 
accidentally sbot by a police 
officer who had gone to her 
home in search of her son. A 
medical document read to the 
court described her as a 
“paraplegic" whose prognosis 
for recovery was “almost non- 
existent". 

Groce, of Stamford Street, 
Waterloo, south London, had 
admitted charges of possessing 
a sawn-off shotgun and having 
the firearm having previously 
been convicted of i crime. 

Mr Timothy Davis, for the 
prosecution, said that police 
officers who went to the Groce 
home had heard an argument 
between the accused and his 
girl friend. Miss Valerie 
Lav i He. When the door was 
opened, there was a smell of 
cordite in the room as if a gun 
had been fired. 

Mr Davis said Groce was 
holding a gun and the officers 
left the fiat. When they re- 


Howe pressure 
to end rows 
with Ankara 

• i’ From Mario Modfano, Athens <£< 

. Greece yesterday, firmly re- areas, but he had invoked 
jetted British pressure for a Turkey’s “expansionism in 


jected British pressure fora 
Greek-Turkish ' dialogue 
aimed at eliminating disputes 


the Aegean" to declare that he 
saw no scope at the moment 


which disrupt Natoplans in for a bilateral dialogue. 


the region, and at facilitating a 
Cyprus settiemenL 
However, Mr Andreas 


The Foreign Secretary later 
had formal discussions with 
his Greek opposite number. 


Papandreou, the .Greek Prime Mr Karolos Paporiias- He had 
Minister, did. promise _ Sir begun his day with a call on 
Geoffrey Howe; tire British Mr Constantine Mrtsotakis, 
Foreign Secretary, when they the opposition leader. 

S2J22; Sir Geoffrey seized the occa- 

fere with the UN Secretary- S 0 f a luncheon offered m 
General’s current initiative on his honour by the British- 


Cyprus. 


Hellenic Chamber of Corn- 


Sir Geoffrey, who is here on men*, to urge Greece in no 
the first official vial to Greece uncertain terms to fees up to ^ 
by a British Foreign Secretary responsibilities in Nato, w 
in more than 40 years, said he nol on i y f or the sate of 
had had a “very constructive, collective security, but also for 
very friendly, and useful" talk ihe protection of Greece itself. 

* he Greek Pr,me This meant, be said. that 
Munster. those who enjoyed Nato’s 

It was, perhaps, significant protection from the Soviet 
that Mr Papandreou did not, . .threat should pay the price, 
as is his custom, accompany And the price was not only 
his visitor to the television . concessions for the sake of 
cameras waiting outside his consensus, but also “guiding 
Villa for the usual statements. our public to accept the hard 
Sources said he had been held decisions involved in this 
up by an important telephone partnership", ft was a dear 
calk allusion to the anti-Nato cam- 

An official of the British paign encouraged by the ruling 
delegation later said that al- Greek Socialists. 


though -Britain 


The British Foreign Secret 


Miss Carter charges connected with anti-apartbeid’protest. 

Amy Carter in court 

Providence, Rhode Island they entered the office to 
(Reuter) — Amy Carter, 18- protest at IBM's business op- 
year-old daughter of former nations in South Africa. * 


strongly in favour of the iary who is visiting Crete 
Socretary-Generars Cyprus privately with Lady Howe 
initiative, there had been no before flying to Belgrade for a 


arm-twisting. 


day of talks tomorrow, went to 



Providence, Rhode Island 
(Reuter) — Amy Carter, 18- 
year-old daughter of former 
President Jimmy Carter, ap- 
peared in court on a trespass 
charge arising from an anti- 
apartheid .protest at an IBM 
office. - 

Police said Miss Carter and 
13 other students from Brown 
University were arrested after 


Lawyers for IBM moved to 
drop charges against the stu- 
dents on Thursday but the 
judge said he would not decide 
until April 2. Miss Carter 
refused to comment after her 
court appearance. 


“Mr Papandreou told the the British Council building 
Foreign Secretary that it was yesterday and paid tribute to 
not for Greece to interfere in Kenneth Whitty, the council's 
the Cyprus question, but he deputy representative, and the 
did stress the importance that Greek librarian killed in a 
his Government attached to terrorist a tiack in Athens two 
the withdrawal ■ of' Turkish- years ago. 
troops from, the island," -he fa his lunchtime speech he 

added. expressed satisfaction that 

The same source indicated Greek-British co-operation on 
that the Greek Prime Minister counter-terrorism was groW- 
agreed that talks with Turkey mg. 


might be welcome in some 


Leading article, page 9. 


Small businesses beat the system 

Coping with a permanent crisis 


Michael Groce, outside - 
the court yesterday 

turned some time later they 
found' that he. had dunned 
down a drainpipe, but left the 
shotgun behind. A hole in a 
wardrobe mirror indicated the 
weapon had bees fired, “no 
doubt out of bravado”. 

He referred to “the tragic 
undertones” of the case when, 
as a result of the police looking 
for Groce, Mrs Groce was 
badly injured by a police 
bullet 

“There was no suggestion 
that he was planning a 
robbery," Mr Davis said. 
Groce had told the police that 
he was looking after the gun 
for someone else, and that h 
had accidentally gone off 
while he was arguing with 
Miss Laville. 

Mr Davis agreed with the 
judge that the use of firearms 
was “not his style”. 

Mr Kuldup Singh, for 
Groce, said the defendant had 
been under “virtual house 
arrest" as a condition of his 
bail. Referring to Mrs Groce's 
injuries, he said: “The impli- 
cations have gone far beyond 
the offence itself". 

The judge said that al- 
though Groce had a bad 
criminal record, he had never 
been involved in an offence of 
this kind. He was also taking 
account of the “tragic family 
circumstances”. 


PARLIAMENT MARCH 21 1986 


Defence YTS 

Calls for national service rejected 


TRAINING 

Recruitment overall to the 
regular Armed Forces remained 
generally satisfactory, with 
most recruiting targets being 
met Mr John Lee. Under 
Secretary or State for Defence 
Procurement, said in the 
Commons. He was replying to 
a debate on voluntary national 
service vouth training and 
reserve forces, and rejected 

suggestions for large-scale basic 
training for >oung people with 
the armed forces. , . 

Training is specialist in 
depth and expensive (he said) 
ana it is essential to secure an 
adequate return on our training 
in many years of service bv the 
soldiers. There would be bole 
prospect or funding for such a 
scheme from the defence or 
Manpower Services 

Commission budgets. 

The Armed Services Youth 
Training Scheme . already 
offered standard training which 
was to be extended to two 
years and lead to a trade 
qualification. 

Since the start of the scheme 
there had been 
applications for 6.000 places 
and 2.200 trainees Iwd already 
attended courses. Of those sou 
had converted to regular 
Service engagements. 

The Ministry or Defence also 
had a YTS scheme wtljj &SO 
youngsters enrolled- Half of 
them in the United Kingdom 
and the other half in Germany. 

fa opening the debate. Sir 
Philip Goodltart (Beckenham. 


O said Ihe fact that a young 
person voluntarily undertook an 
intensive period of training 
should do a lot to enhance his 
attractiveness in [he eyes of a 
great many employers. 

The Aimy should scrap its 
existing youth training scheme 
and replace it with a voluntary 
national service scheme in 
which some 15.000 young men 



Goodhart Hundred days 
of training 

and women would be offered 
|00 days of regular training with 
regular pay. 

When choosing those who 
might join the scheme priority 
should be given to those young 
people who had served ui the 
cadets or other voluntary 
organizations at school and also 
to those who indicated a readi- 
ness to do some future service in 
the Territorial Army. 

It would be expensive, but not 
excessively so. The money 
should come from the rapidly 
growing youth training budget 


rather than the shrinking de- 
fence budget. 

A hundred days' primary 
training would have an im- 
portant and beneficial effect 
upon Britain's own reserve 
forces. 

Dr David Owen, Leader of the 
SDP. said the armed forces 
YTS had been launched in 
1983 with the aim of providing 
5.000 places. So far only 1,500 
had been taken up. 

The inadequate effort being 
put into skill training was a 
scandal. It was of paramount 
importance to “upstair the 
youth of this country and seize 
the opportunities of a new 
Technological era. 

Few Government 

departments were better able to 
set an example and increase the 
training element for today's 
youth than the Ministry of 
Defence. 

The scheme had so far been 
badly conducted, poorly carried 
out ami lacked the necessary 
commitment The Secretary or 
State for Defence (Mr George 
Younger) had to tel! the chiefs 
of staff that the scheme should 
have priority. The extra 
funding should come from the 
Manpower Services 

Commission, not the MoD. 

Mr Barry Sbeerman, for the 
Opposition, said the Labour 
Party believed in having a fully 
professional armed services. It 
aid not believe there should be a 
compulsory national service. 
There was enormous capacity 
and capability for the aimed 
services to train people but the 
proposals could take money 
from other organisations. They 


could nol have skill training on 
the cheap. It was expensive. The 
Labour Party had opposed the 
YTS in the services when it was 
introduced and still opposed it. 
It had been a failure. The take- 
up had been smaJL He did not 
believe the cause was mis- 
chievous chiefs of staff but that 
young people were not enthused 
or attracted by the idea. 

Lurking behind the SDP argu- 
ments and implicit in their 
arguments was that the scheme 
would be made compulsory for 
underprivileged youngsters. 

Mr John Wilkinson (Ruislip- 
Northwood, O said that at this 
time of high unemployment 
they should reconsider 
carefully the potential merits of 
national service. 

Today the opportunity for 
operational service for national 
servicemen would probably he 
smaller than it was in “viigin 
soldier" post-war national 
service days, but the chance of 
overseas service would still 
exist. It would be valuable 
experience, in addition to the 
technical training which those 
concerned would receive. 

Mr Patrick Thompson 
(Norwich North. Q said the 
arguments for compulsory 
conscription were probably 
overwhelmed by the realities of 
the situation which was that it 
was probably not on at the 
present time. But at least they 
could move some way towards 
what MPs had been arguing 
for. 

Mr James Spicer (Dorset 
West) said those who decried 
the role of national services 
were making grave mistake or 
misleading people. 


The restaurant owner casu- 
ally plated two. bills on the 
table at the end of the meaL 
When asked about this he 
explained with a smile that the 
smaller one was the teal price 
and flur. bujger for claiming 
expenses. It is common prac- 
tice here, a courtesy to custom- 
ers, like an extra cup of coffee. 
It explains quite well why 
things are not always what 
they are supposed to be in 
Yugoslavia. 

The country is going 
through its sixth year of 
economic crisis. The external 
debt stands at $20 billion, 
(£13.16 billion) posting the 
country $1.7 billion in debt 
repayments hist year. Unem- - 
pfoymeat stands at 14 per 
cent, but nearly SO per cent in 
the southern province of 
Kosovo and less than 2 per 
cent in northern Slovenia. In 
some areas it is legal and 
common, to “bay** a job with 
hard currency. 

Inflation is rumung at 80 
per cent and few believe h will 
comedown in the short term. 
Living standards have 
dropped by 30 per cent hi the 
past three years and are now 
back to the 1967 JeveL Recent 
research conducted in Bel- 
grade estimated that a month's 
food basket for a family of four 
cost 39,000 dinar (£84). The 
average salary is about 40,000 

dinar. 

Coffee, Yugoslavia's nation- 
al drink, is now more expen- 
sive than anywhere else in 
Europe. There has been a big 
increase in the number of 
strikes. There were more than 
500 last yean short, sharp 
affairs over wages, which is 
odd in a country where the 
workers are supposed Co be in 

Sikhs shot 
by police 
in Punjab 

Chandigarh (AP) - Para- 
military police opened fire on 
rioting Sikh militants near the 
Punjab state assembly build- 
ing yesterday. At least three 
people were killed and 25 
wounded, according to hospi- 
tal sources. 

The United News of India 
quoted unconfirmed reports 
that at ■ least five- protesters 
were shot dead during the riot 
against the Sikh state 
government. 

Police opened fire -after . 
thousands of sword-wielding 
militants broke through 
barricades. 

The protesters were led by 
Mr Jogmder Singh, the ailing 
74-year-old father of Sant 
Jamail ' Singh Bhindranwaie, 
who was killed in the 1984 
army assault on the Sikh 
Golden Temple in Amritsar. 

• DELHI- The Congress (I) 
Party of Mr Rajiv Gandhi, the 
Prime Minister, .won only five 
of 19 seats in elections to the 
upper house, the Rajya Sab ha, 
yesterday. Congress (I) slipped 
to 152 members in the 244- 
seat chamber. 


In the second of two articles on Yugoslavia, Richard 
Dowden in Belgrade-examines the country’s economic 
crisis and the arguments being put forward to solve it. 


complete control of their fac- 
tories and offices. 

Yet a visitor would hardly 
notice. There are no food 
queues, no shortages. Shops, 
large and small, are reason- 
ably well stocked. There are 
no dollar shops for privileged 
party members, as there are in 
other communist countries. 

Some Yugoslavs get by with 
Hie help of relatives working in 
Western Europe; Yugoslavs 
are allowed individual foreign 
exchange bank accounts. Otn- 


YUGOSLAVIA 

Part 2 


er urban workers use family 
connections in rural areas lo 
provide the basic foodstuffs. 

Others do two jobs. A taxi 
driver, for example, drives 
regularly to Austria and Swit- 
zerland and brings back goods 
to trade. A lawyer cooks at 
other people’s dinner parties. 

.In disenssions about 
Yugoslavia's economy, • one 
bears little about Marx and a 
lot about the market Under 
Yugoslavia's unique system of 
serf-management, in which 
workers, are supposed to no 
their own enterprises under 
the guiding role of the party, 
businesses have been able to 
continue making losses almost 
indefinitely. 

. Xt was common for the local 
managers, party officials and. 
representatives forming the 
commiae to get together with 
the local bank manager, him- 


self jm executive of tire setf- 
. management system, and set 
up a factory- In many, in- 
stances their 'intention was to 
reduce, unemployment and 
they did not take expert advice 
about its viability. In some 
cases they ended up raising 
hard currency loans to pay the 
workers. The workers could 
rote theknsdves salary in- 
creases regardless of produc- 
tivity and profit 
There were some thousand 
loss-making enterprises in 
Yngsolavia last year; only 21 
were closed down. • 

When tire interest rate 
soared, tire problem was exac- 
erbated by the fact that each 
republic and province was 
viromUy.antonomons. and no 
one knew where all the debts 
lay. The IMF insisted that tire . 
Belgrade Government bore re- 
sponsibility fin- all the debts of 
the power ones, and it took a 
resignation threat by the 
Prime Mraister to get the 
legislation through. Now all 
hard currency transactions 
have to go through tire Central 
Bank. 

The crisis has cruelly re- 
vealed tire economic absurdi- 
ties of jealously guarded 
autonomy. Each republic and 
province has its own ofl refin- 
ery and there is no integrated . 
rafl system. While travelling 
across Yugsolavia - a train 
changes its engine every time 
it crosses a regional bonier. 

Mr Avooko Logar, econom- 
ics editor of Polinka, the daily 
.newspaper, said: “There has 
been a heated discussion be- 
tween centralism and federal- 


ism. 1 have advocated that the 
federal iGownuaent should be 
,-given qach more authority to 
the economy." 

Pro-market men tike Mr 
- Logar argue tint the crisis has 
also revealed fundamental 
weaknesses to the sefcmn- 
agement system, and demand 
an end to political 
interference. 


“In tbeeconoi 
has to become 


the market 
ie ultimate 


arbiter," said Mr Logar. “The 
majority of people here fed 
that no one wants to see vital 
economic branches * collapse 
but they must adapt to market 
demands. The banks should 
have more independence and 
be able to say no to projects or 
warn about the consequences. 
The enterprise must be made 
responsible for the risk and for 
the losses." 

The economic stabilization 
programme published to 1983 
pointed in this direction, but 
there are powerful interests 
hampering its effective imple- 
mentation.. Opponents of the 
market approach say all tint 
is needed is to set production 
agreements and for everyone 
to work harder. They aigpsi 
that the short-term effect*)} 
allowing market forces to did 
tate would beanewnurnsris} 
in unemployment as industries 
were dosed down. ’ 

In the long run the econoraJ 
debate hinges on the political 
one. A further (j beralirationd 
the economy would weaken tM 
bold of the party on till 
country. But Yugoslavs do nc# 
stand to awe of their Govenf 
meat or their politicians an| 
many, tike the restaurant 
er, are already taking their 
own ways round the system. 
Concluded 


Fresh evidence may lead to 
Aquino murder retrial 


The newly-formed Presi- 
dential Commission on Hu- 
man Rights has confidential 
new evidence -in the 1983 
assassination of the former 
senator and opposition leader 
Benigno Aquino. It will re- 
open inquiries into the mur- 
der which shook the nation 
and catapulted his widow, 
Corazon, into the presidency. 

The commission chairman, 
Mr Jose Diokno, would riot 
say whether the evidence was 
from a new witness or materi- 
al proof which could overturn 
the mass acquittal last Decem- 
ber of 25 military men and a 
civilian earlier linked to the 
August 21, 1983 killing. 

The investigation will also 
assess the “overall feimess" of 
the trial and investigate allega- 
tions of collusion between -, 
defendants and prosecutors. 

“If we can prove that there 
was collusion, and there’s - 
strong evidence already, then 
that would be aiough to 
declare a mistrial and begin - 
the case- all over again” Mr- 
Diokno said. 


From Keith Dalton, Manila 

Vice-President Salvador Lau- 
rel said yesterday that he and 
President Aquino were targets 
of assassination squads em- 
ployed by former President 
Marcos (UPI reports from 
Manila). “We are supposed to 
be etiminated," he sakL 
“Without Cory Aquino and 
myself, it woaM be very easy 
for .Marcos to a 

comeback." 


Mrs Aquino has accused Mr 
Marcos of ordering the mur- 
der of her . husband, Mr 
Marcos’s most bitter rival, 
and said “military henchman” 
of the deposed leader killed 
him at Manila airport minutes 
after be returned from self- 
exile in the United States. 

Mr Diokno. a former sena- 
tor detained for two years on 
tiie imposition of martial law 
in 1972. said his. committee 
was empowered to investigate 
human rights violations com- . 
nutted by the armed forces 
and para-military groups. 


“Under Marcos there- were 
more than 800 summary exe- 
cutions, at least 600 people 
™»ing “d there were 
possibly 5,000 cases of torture. 
Aoothff 70,000 people were 

detained during the eight years 

of mTtial law," Mr Dibkno 

• TOKYOr Japan is to review 
aid to the Philippines over the 
fest 15 years after allegations 
that Japanese companies paid 
commissions to former Presi- 
dent Marcos (David Watts 
writes) 

A four-man task force will 
next week, begin re-assessW 
1 3 loans worth 467 billion vm 

(£1,75 billion) that 

tie Philippine, 
since 1971. The group will also 
review Japan's aid policy. 

„ Documents takei to tfr 
United States by the Martf 
femtiy allegedly show £ 
mentS from five Janaf* 
companies totaf 
SL0H000 (£610,263) b 



Ji cj * \\Sjd 









THE TIMES SATURDAY MARCH 22 1986 


OVERSEAS NEWS 




Kremlin launches propaganda offensive 

Gorbachov determined to 
separate Europe from US 


v . 

' ■ T v 


*•> /•'V 


s * iL 1 

r 

- •,'fc 
“ r > 


> •: 




■4 - J . 

" At. 


The Kremlin is 'hunching a 
big propaganda offensive in 
Western Europe to persuade 
, bom governments and public 
opinion to adopt a more 
independent line from the 
'. United States on security poli- 
cy, especially the key-issue of 
Star Wars. 

- Well -placed ‘ diplomatic 
sources said here yesterday 
that the information drive 
would include visits by Mr 
Gorbachov; the Soviet leader, 
to strategic European capita ls; 
the appointment of a new 
. breed of- communications^ 
conscious Soviet ambassadore 
to senior European posts and 
the encouragement of more 
.visits to ' Moscow by leading 
West European statesmen. 

The European drive is un- 
derstood to be. one of the 
centrepieces of Soviet foreign 
policy for 1 986i It involves the 
imminent appointment of 
-new Soviet envoys to London, 
Bonn and Madrid, and visits 
by. Mr Gorbachov and . his 
elegara wife Raisa before tile- 
year’s end to Rome, Athens 
and possibly Bonn -r although' : 
this arrangement has yet to be 
finalized. - . 

According to both Soviet 
and Italian officials, there is a 
strong chance that the visit to 



From Christopher Walker, Moscow 

Drive to bridge computer gap 

As part off a drive to bridge the sion of computerization 
East-West technology gap^ the throughout the economy. As a 
-K remlin . a to set up a. state resalt of a decision by the 
conmnttee for computer fadfi-. .recent party; congress, prod ac- 
hes and information science lion of computers is to increase 
wMgh win oversee the expaar - by 80 per cart this year. 

European thinking on nuclear 
arms control - 
Two central figures in the 
. Kremlin campaign will be Mr 
Leonid Zamyatin, aged 64, the 
chief public spokesman for Mr 
Gorbachov, and Mr Yuli 
Kvitsinsky, aged 49, one ofthe 
Soviet Union’s three negotia- 
tors at the Geneva arms talks. 
They are soon to become 
Soviet ambassadors in Ion- 
don and Bonn, respectively. 

Mr Zamyatin, chief of the 
international information de- 
partment of the Communist 
Party's Central Committee,, 
was the master-mind of Mr 
Gorbachov's highly effective 
propaganda drive during Us 
trips last year to Paris and 
later to the Geneva summit* 
The - .appointment, which 
has ~ yet to be announced 
officially, is seen in diplomatic, 
circles as a considerable up- 
grading for the London em- 
bassy, and a pointer to the 
type of diplomatic exercise 


Rome Could include a historic 
meeting with the Pope. 

It was confirmed here .yes- 
’ terday that Mr Ruud Lubbers, 
the Dutch Prime Minister, has 
accepted an invitation to pay 
aii official visit to Moscow fit 
the second half of the year,' 
assuming that be wins the 
May general election. 

Although the Dutch Gov- 
ernment and Parliament have 
approved Nato plans to site 48 
nuclear . cruise missiles on 
Dutch soD in 1988, the Krem- 
lin is knows to regard The 
Netherlands as one of the 
strongest centres of public 
resistance in Europe to US 
nuclear strategy. 

. Other West European visi- 
tors to the Soviet capital are to 
include President Mitterrand 
of Trance, who accepted an 
invitation- during Mr 
Gorbachov’s successful trip to 
Paris last October. The Krem- 
lin sees France as playing a 
pivotal role in its plans to alter 


which Moscow plans to stage 
in Europe, making much 
greater use of local channels of 
communication. 

One of the great survivors 
of Kremlin politics, Mr 
. Zamyatin has served five 
Soviet leaders dating back to 
1961. He is noted for his 
abrupt style with Western 
questioners who annoy him, 
but has shown himself well 
able to adapt to the upbeat 
style of public relations which 
symbolizes the Gorbachov 
era. . 

The appointment of Mr 
Kvitsinsky to Bonn, where he 
will replace the ageing Mr 
Vladimir Semyonov, who has 
hekLtfae post since 1978. is 
described by Western sources 
as another vital element in the 
European diplomatic network 
being established by Mr 
Gorbachov. Both he and Mr 
Zamyatin are experts at field- 
ing questions about the intri- 
cacies of arms control 

It. is expected here that the 
propaganda offensive will also 
include efforts by Soviet rep- 
resentatives in Western Eu- 
rope to strike up closer 
relationships with “peace 
groups” and initiate closer co- 
operation with local commu- 
nist, socialist and social 
democratic parties. 



Fanny PoDax oto, a leader of Chile's Communist Party, gets a soaking from police water cannon as anti-Government 
demonstrators try to salvage mock ballot boxes used for a symbolic vote on “Democracy Day" in Santiago. 

Angry Pinochet confident he can retain control 


Santiago (Reuter) — Presi- 
dent Pinochet, angry about 
unprecedented US pressure 
on himand facing a new round 
of protest at home, has vowed 
not to alter his plan to stay in 
power until at least 1989. 

Diplomats say the President 
appears confident that be can 
control any unrest, even 
though his opponents have 
taken heart from increasingly 


outspoken criticism from 
Washington. 

Even the communist-led 
Popular Democratic Move- 
ment hailed the US decision 
to sponsor a United Nations 
resolution deploring President 
Pinochet's human rights 
record. 

“This switch by the United 
Slates (is) obviously the result 
of the State Department per- 
ceiving the extreme isolation 


and weakness of the dictatori- 
al regime which they helped to 
impose on the Chilean 
people." the movement's pres- 
ident, Senor German Correa, 
said. 

Explaining the US change of 
heart, the Assistant Secretary 
of State. Mr Richard Schifier, 
said “quiet diplomacy" had 
failed to end killings, torture 
and kidnappings. 

Chilean opposition leaders 


say the events in Haiti and the 
Philippines gave them a big 
psychological boost, and a 
former foreign minister, Seri or 
Gabriel Valdes, urged Chil- 
eans to follow the example of 
the social mobilization in 
those two countries. 

Diplomats said, however, 
that splits in the opposition 
and disenchantment with pro- 
test so far could make it hard 
to spark mass demonstrations. 


been poisoned 
to keep him quiet 


Emm Pieter Nipbofo, Rqme 


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ride that St mmhtlie dangerous 
to allow Sinoona to be tried 
again, beawse of die secrete 
which he might finally , have 
revealed. 

Sindong, who is 70, was at 
one time a dose associate of 
Roberto .Cafri» the Italian 
banker who was fond dead to 
London four years ago. 

Sindona, a Sicilian, had 
relations with fie Mafia, 
which helped him to fake his 
own Iddnappmg. His 
was on the fists pf the . burned 
secretmasoniclodgeknownas 
Propag anda Two, which was 
regarded : as »' sah msi re and 
wn the so bject of a parliamea- 
laiy inquiry. 

i vThe lodge was led by Lido 


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• -H i" 

r 

^ 

v’* t 

... 7. * 


• b ./? \J 

'• ” 


'V ' }W? 


Most official fliwnMng ffl 
'the collapse of Michele 
- Sindona Ks that he ;was. poi- 
soned to keep him quiet once 
and for all rather than that he 
. tried to IdH himselL His 
lawyer discounts suicide. 

Yet doubts remain. Signor 
Gian Franco MartinazzolCthe 
Minister of Jnstice, told the 
Chamber of Deputies yester- 
day that tiie account of the 
condemned. banker's collapse, 
given to him by prison guards 
in the higfeoeemity- whw at 
*'Voghere was . that 'Sindona 
->roke with Ms nonrndhakit'by 
^drinking his heAfiitt cdflfae - 
on Thursday ; nomfiqr sep*- - 
; rately from his food. - -rf • 

ThegHardssaidhe totAJbe 
;r «9 iiito lis-bathrooii, wiiere; Gel]i, another of Italy's most 
: .they coold not see him, and he . funims- mystery men. Gdli is 
sremerged saying “they have 
-.poisoned me", u this account 
is tree, some weight would 
H.have to be placed on it, 
because Shriona was an ex- 
ceptionally methodical .man. 

• An inquiry . fevotving the 
guards has been opened into 
‘ the whole, question of how. 
poison reached Sindona de- 
^ spite the elaborate precautions 
-token to protect him.. Ope 
"theory is that the breakfast 
and coffee were not poisoned 
bat the cap itself had been 
^treated with some pOBonous 
‘ substance. 

Not even the theory about 
7 the use of cyanide goes enm- 
- pletely unchallenged, because 
^pome experts say that even a 
'small trace of cyanide would 
Jhave meant Sindona’s almost 
finstantaneons death, whereas - 
“late yesterday he was still to a 
“ coma. ' 

; The former hanker was . 

^sentenced on Tuesday to fife 
''imprisonment for in s ti g atin g 
the murder of the liquidator of 
T one of his banks. After sen- 
‘ tearing be not only announced 
that be was appealing, but 
•‘'seemed to combative mood 
’Minting a television interview: 

: r It is tiroaght tins may have 
.'prompted some people to de- 


still on the ranafier eseppfag I 
from a Swiss ■ trigh-seemity 
prison. - - • 

; In the earlier stages of his 
career Sindona had- been the 
trusted financial adviser of the 
Vatican. 

He was already serving a 
25-year sentence, passed to 
the US to 1980; for frandnlent 
bankruptcy. The A m e ric a n s 
permitted his extradfimn to 
stand trial to Daly, but stipu- 
lated that ha be retaraed to | 
them after sentencing to finish 
his term. 

Stadona said frequently fliat j 
he was more humanely treated 
at Otisvilfe prison, to Newi 
York State, than he was to 
Italy. So he was presumably | 
teafciiag forward to going baric, 
especially as he was dne to be I 
released by tire .Americans on 
parole became of Ms good 
behaviour. 

. The Americans, nerertbe-l 
less, would not have given him 
baric to the Italians until he 
had served his 25 years, eithe r I 
to a cell or on parole. And that 
would mean he would have 
beat nearly 90 by the time be 
coahl have^ come back to Italy 
to start serving his fife 
sentence. 


leas 

‘IT 


1* 

V’ 


Strike bait 
; as Ershad 
backs poll 

> From Ahmed Fad 

• Dhaka. 

President Ershad of Bangla- 
desh yesterday banned all 
opposition protests against the 
April 26 parliamentary elec- 
tions, including a general 
strike called for today. 

■ General Ershad announced 

* the ban in an address bn radio 
?' and television as lorry loads of' 
*-■ soldiers moved into Dhaka, 

■ i ^*lf the opposition parties put 
‘-'’-off the boycott tonight there 
*j will be no restrictions.”. 

** He made a fresh appeal to 

• the opposition 15-party and. 
^.seven-party alliances to take. 
. part in the polls and promised 
-a to postpone them for a wedc to 
allow more campaigmng Jitne. 
Pa ramili tary forces and not 
- police patrolled the greets as 

* crowcb gathere d to hear the 
unscheduled address. 

Affiance leaders had called 
’-"the 12 -hour strike to tryto 

■ “paralyse the Government. The 
1 affiances and the fimdamen-. 

■ ' talisi jamaat-i-lslami refused 

' ■ to take part .in, the elertitms 

■ 'unless tMutial law .was lifted. 

• KARACHI- More thaaffO 
. . people were arrefled after 
' thousands demanding . J 0 * 5 * 
? Cand a crackdown on 

■ *■ 'drugs fought with not police, 
7 -“.’who used tear gas 

“ ‘charges to prevent them trem 
marching on govenuneitj 
\ buikfings (AP reports); 


Transport 
chaos 
in Spain 

From Harry Debqlhis 
Madrid 

Ground crews of Spain’s 
Iberia airlin e debated yester- 
day whether. to' call off a 
planned strike after receiving 
a new pay offer, while railway 
workers halted trains for four 
hours, and the Interior Minis- 
try disclosed plans to cope 
with record traffic during 
Holy Week: 

Iberia offered an 8 per cent 
pay rise, .1 per cent below that 
demanded' by unions. 

However, railway workers; 
showed no sign of giving up 
their strike plans, which are to 
do with bonus payments and 
hiring practices. A two-hour 
stoppage yesterday morning 
and another in the afternoon 
inconvenienced half a million 
people. • * 

The raflmen said they in- 
tended lo repeat the strike on 
Monday, and stage 24-hour 
stoppages on Wednesday, and 
on April 1- 

Spain’s biggest charter .air- 
line. Spantax, is feeing strikes 
■ on Monday. Tuesday and 
Wednesday, and on April-2, 3 
and 4.- Employees are protest- 
ing against arrearsin wages. 

Jhe Interior-Ministry’s Di- 
rectorate of Traffic published 
guidetinesformoionsts. Mdre 
peopk ^e expecied to travel 
by car during the holidays. 




This new range of Nissan Bluebirds offers 
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The Turbo ZX not only has 3-way adjust- 
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More MotoringEnjoyment. Test drive a 
Bluebird You’ll find more front leg room 


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OVERSEAS NEWS 


THF TIMES SATURDAY MARCH 22 1986 


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White Hoiise maps out Senate strategy 

Shaken Reagan continues 
his fight for Contra aid 

From Michael Binyon, Wash^Mn u the Cod 

on Tuesday, and ils expected take.weakem^the previoffi 


Shaken though undaunted 
by his defeat in the House of 
Representatives. President 
Reagan has moved swiftly to 
continue his fight for $100 
million (£65.8 million) in aid 
to the Nicaraguan rebels, 
whom he has told not to lose 

heart. _ . 

Within minutes of the 222- 
210 vote against his aid plan, 
die President summoned Seri- 
ate Republican leaders to the 
White House to map out a 
strategy for getting the Bill 
through the Republican-con- 
trolled Senate as quickly as 
possible. It will be introduced 


passage is likely to force the 
House to endorse at least 
some military aid for the 
Contras when it reconsiders 
the issue on April 15. 

Sombre White House offi- 
cials were yesterday investi- 
gating why their strategy over 
the past two weeks failed to 
persuade enough House Dem- 
ocrats and Republicans to 
back Mr Reagan. 

None the less, the 
Administration’s last-minute 
compromise, offering a90-day 
delav on supply of offensive 
weapons, was a tactical nus- 


* 

insistence on Contra need tor 
immediate help. Some Demo- 
crats also saw this as a ruse to 
get the full $100 million 
without any real concession. 


a message to the Corneas that 
they should keep up their 
hopes, as the American people 
were only beginning to awak- 
en to the danger on their 
doorstep- Many of 


without any real concession, uooiawH- 1 *** j u owev _> 
*£ "osionhe money could 

not have been spent unmedi- uncon- 

ate y m any case. . . ^ ^ «curitv threat 

Mr Reagan has suggested 

Sfor C S£S m° begin ^^d^ult issue to 
Should now be wnuen into the House KepuouLOi^ 


Senate Bill . 

Insisting “the vote must be 
reversed”, Mr Reagan said in 


jssible. it win oe rairuuw.cw — r 

Sceptical Ortega fears war 

From John Carlin, Managua 


Refusing to be heartened by 
the vote in the US Congress. 
President Ortega of Nicaragua 
said that President Reagans 
•terrorist” policy wonld con- 
tinue, obliging Nicaragua to 
still greater mobilization of its 
military forces against the risk 
of an eventual American 
invasion. 

The diplomatic community 
here sees the result of the vote 
as a victor}' for Nicaragua s 
Sandinista Government. But 
President Ortega predicted at 
a news conference after the 
vote on Thursday night that 


From John Carlin, Managua 

Far from expressing any 
gratitude to the Congressmen 
who voted against President 
Reagan, the Nicaraguan Pres- 
ident said it was “immoral" 
and against international law 
for the American Congress 
even to be debating means of 
making war against a country 
with which the US has diplo- 
matic relations. 

Senor Ortega anticipated 
what he called a 
-Vietnam ization" of the Nica- 
raguan conflict. He noted that 
reports from Washington said 
the US means to provide the 


-In Vietnam they began 
with military advisers and 
ended up with half a million 
soldiers," he said. 

While the US insisted on 
seeking military solutions in 
Central America, he went on, 
the threat existed of a direct 
US intervention, with the 
-great bloodshed" that would 
involve. 

Demanding American re- 
spect for Nicaragua, President 
Ortega said his policy of 
negotiation remained 


nOUK TOI/UTO— . 7 _ 

not on the front-burner of 
public consciousness. _ 

The Administration is now 
likely to redouble negotiating 
efforts, to reassure Congres- 
sional opponents that it is not 
choosing a militaiv option 
over diplomacy. Mr Philip 
Habib, the special envoy to 
Central America, is expected 
to return to the region shortly. 

Meanwhile, the presidents 
of the five Central American 
nations, including Nicaragua, 
have agreed to meet in Guate- 
mala on May 23 and 24 to 
discuss a negcrtiated settle- 
ment of the region's conflicts. 
Washington has noted that the 
Nicaraguan and Soviet reac- 
tions to the House votes have 
been relatively restrained, sug- 
gesting they realized further 
strident rhetoric may jropar- 
dize the negotiating efforts. 



& 

1 0 

M P- 

V. VJR. 

I 


Smah Fer^zsos* meeting the press i» 

Mrs Susan of the^gement to Prince Audrey 


vote on Thursday night that the us means “ 

President Reagan would find a currently demoralized Contras 
^ to ro!S£e support for - who seem further than ever 
“e^ forSP - tl* dow from the .Sontostos 
Sandinista term for the esti- overthrow - with military 
mated 15,000 Contras. advisers. 



would talk oniy with the 

-mercenaries’ chief, who is 
President Reagan". 


nave vuij — --^ ,7, , 

by the likelihood that Wash- 
ington will vote for military 
aid for the Contras. 


End of long 
march for 
UK hostages 

Lisbon - Four Britons were 
among the 194 hostages who 
arrived at Lisbon airport on a 
flight from Kinshasa, where 
they bad been freed by Unria 
rebels after a 300-mile march 
through Angola to Zaire (Mar- 
tha de la Cal writes). 

They are Mr John Suther- 
land of Perth, project manager 
for Intraco in the Angolan 
diamond mining down of 
Andrada, from which they 
were captured on March 1; Mr 
Keith Dyton, a foreman engi- 
neer. Mr Terrance Richards of 
Cornwall, a foreman: and Mr 
Simon Tingay, a mechanic. 


Shuttle debris examined for clue 


Nasa engineers are examin- 
ing pieces of wreckage proba- 
bly from Challenger's right 
solid rocket booster which 
mav explain why the shuttle 
exploded shortly after blast- 
off cm January 28. 

The engineers art particu- 
larly interested in a 5001b 
piece of wreckage recovered 
from the Atlantic. Nasa 
sources said this could contain 
parts of a fitting on the right 
booster that was within inches 
of the area where the rocket 
joint and its O-ring seal foiled 
moments after lift-offi trigger- 
ing the explosion that de- 
stroyed the spacecraft and 
killed the crew of seven. 


From Mohsin Ali, Washington 

^The nature of the debris. 


A major mortgage 
breakthrough from the Midland 


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It shows we’re in the 
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This year, we’re making one 
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Quite literally, it shows you mean 
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Yet the mortgage certificate is only 
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and you'll also have the following: 






mortgage, for example, or £133.20 on a Management Account which allows you 
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interest rate for endowment and capital 

repayment loans ^ 




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thought to be the most valu- 
able piece of wreckage recov- 
ered so for. may be announced 
at a public bearing of me 

presidential commission in- 
vestigating the disaster. • 
Meanwhile, Senator Ernest 
H (tilings (Democrat. South 


was originailv due to make his 
ttfeSS Sme of Uk Union 
address. 

Senator Holdings asked the 
White House for a log of 
telephone calls from January 
■*0 to noon January 28 be* 
tween the White House and 


Carolina) has asked the White senior Nasa officials. 


Nasa officials to launch the 
shuttle. ‘ . 

The White House has 
.strongly denied that there was 
any pressure to launch Chal- 
lenger on January 2S. a few 


nnaiK imn.M , 

final seconds on Wednesday, 
has been rescheduled for 
March 28, according to the 
director-general of 

Arianespace. M Charles Bigot 
(Reuter reports). 



campaign to 



Fron Dana Gedde*. Paris 

Enabling Bills to permit the the right’s rank* over the 
right to by-pass Parliament controversial issue of mainly 
and legisfote by decree in two voting. - . - 

key areas arc expected to bead It is no secret ihai- many 
the agenda at tire first meeting members of -tire centre-ngm 
of the new Cabinet to be held UDF. tire Gaullisi RPR 
at the Hysee Palace today. ^ party’s junior partner in »v- 
with President Mi tterraod m ernmem, feel that they might. 


tire chair. 

In a speech : immediately 
after being madePrnpeMmis- 
ter on Thursday, M Jacques 
: Chirac announced tb« ms 
government intended to. jsaafe 

. Ji V — LmaIt rMuiAf'ltV 


OUIUUIK * -J - 

therefore. h»e been tempted 
lo vorc against a Bill to bring 
baet majority voting. 

NoznatcftHy. the 37 minis- 
terial posts in the new govern- 
mehr have been shared out 


govenunem uhqhwu. iu. odw mcm iutvc vku 
decrees to bring back-majority -equally between tire UDF and 
voting and to -.introduce" a' theljtPR, but M Chirac's party 
programme of^ privatization as v has taken tire lion’s share of 
well as to bring in a series of the important portfolios, in- 
economic measures designed, dading all those retaring to the 
to set the economy rapidly, economy — finance, foreign 


back on tire road to recovery. 

It has been widely assumed 
that M Chirac must have got 
M Mitterrand’s acquiescence 
for such a move as part of tire 
“cohabitation” package 
thrashed out by the two men 
in lengthy conversations' earb- 
er this week. The President's 
signature is required on all 
decrees before they can come 
into forte. 

Whereas the Presiifcnt. is 
obliged under the constitution 
.. .11 o;n«r fMRH* Fnr 


trade. - the budget and 
privatization. 

The RPR wants to move 
foster than the more cautious 
UDFIn liberalizing the econo- 
my and in cutting taxes. 

Yesterday M Chirac said he 
had no intention of giving up 
his fimetions as Mayor of 
Paris, and that he would 
-continue to live in his private 
apartments in the Hotel de 
ViHe, though he would work 
during tire day from the Hotel 


to sign all Bills passed by Matignon. the Prime 
Parliament within a set peri-' Minister’s office, 
od, oaially- 15 days-, he is : He performed his first pub- 
under no such obligation in ij c . duties as Prime Minister 
the case ofdecrees. r - - when he received 

Mr’ George Shultz, the US 
Secretary of State, who is on a 
one-day serai-private visit to 
Paris. As a sign that 
. “cohabitation" had begun. Mr 
Shultz visited President 
Mitterrand Just before going 
to see M Chirac 
M Mitterrand has sent a 
glowing tribute to his former 
Prime Minister. M Laurent 
Fabiiis. thanking him for the 
work he achieved. 


M Chirac could, therefore, 
find himself running -into 
serious difficulties unless he 
has already got M 
Mitterrand's tacit approval. 

Legislating by decree entails 
two important advantages for 
■ M Chirac It enables him to 
avoid lengthy pariianiemary 
[ debate which could hold up 
his economic programme, and 
It allows him to prevent a 
dangerous public split within 


Arab link 
in Paris 
bombings 

From Diana Geddes 
Paris 

The Committee for the Sup- 
port <if Arab and Middle East 
Polftka].P j risonars claimed re- 
sponsibility yesterday for the 
bomb attack in a crowded 
shopping arcade on the 
Champs Elysfos on Thursday 
in which two people, woe 
killed and 2K injured, nine of 
them seriously. .. 

The same organization has 
claimed responsibility for the 
bomb attack against tiie high- 
speed TGV Paris-Lyoos train 
on Monday, in which 10 
people were injured, as well as 
three bomb attacks in Paris 
shopping centres in February 
in which a further 21 people 
were hurt. 

On each occasion* the orga- 
nization has. demanded tire 
release of three convicted ter- 
rorists imprisoned in . France. 

M Jacques Chirac, the new 
Prime Minister,/ who visited 
thestoppirig arcade soon after 
the bomb went off, said yester- 
day that such “bestial and 
Inhuman ads” demande d pm 
increase in the human, techni- 
cal and judicial forces de- 
ployed In the figjht 
terrorism. 

Much more systematic secu- 
rity checks were required in 
public places vulnerable to 
attac he said. 


» 




jubilant 
gays hail 
new law 

From Christopher Thomas 
NewYork 

After a 1 5-year bailie New 
York City has made it illegal 
to discriminate against homo- 
sexuals. Greenwich Village, 
the chic area of Manhattan 
where gays congregate, went 
wild with jubilation. 

The vote in the city council 
was a surprisingly decisive 21 
10 14. Mayor Edward Koch 
supported the measure, which 
empowers the city’s Human 
Right Commission to investi- 
gate complaints of discrimina- 
tion in housing, employment, 
public accommodation, own- 
ership of land and the leasing 
of commercial space. 

The commission can im- 
pose maximum penalties of a 
year in prison or a S500 (£330) 
fine, although in practice pun- 
ishments- are likely to be 
moderate. 

Passions ran high in a four- 
hour debate -iu the ornate 
council chamber, the ceiling of 
wbjch bears Thomas 
Jefferson's words: “Equal and 
exaci justice 10 all men of 
whaicverstate or persuasion.” 
Several, council . members 
erred as the vole was taken, 
saying the pressures bad been 
exhausting. 

About 50 towns, villages, 
municipalities and the state of 
Winsconsin . have* passed a 
similar law: . 


& 








morehard-hfeadedyou are,the more you’ll like ’em.) 



L SERPS is unfair 
and poor value 

# - 

; . k . .. ;... 

formoney 

if fqjgj 


Once, the StateEarnings Related 



5.^£>ur workforce 
will enjoy 
substantial benefits. 
And so will you. 


was a gleam in Barbara Castle’s eye (remember her?). 

It was set up with the admirable objective of providing a decent 
pension for every employee who wasn’t properly looked after by a 
private company scheme. 

In today’s cold lightof day, however SERPS looks distinctly like 
bad news for everyone. 

For not only are the pensions it promises to its members 
actually very poor value for money. 

But the eventual cost of providing those pensions on a ‘pay as 
you go’ basis (the way Governments pay for everything) could end 
up making the Trident programme look like petty cash. 


2.The Government 




Well? What would you do? 

To its credit, the Government has 
decided to face die reality of SERPS, rather than bequeathing its un- 
resolved problems to its successors in the 21st Century. 

It is now introducing legislation to reduce the burden of SERPS 
on future generations. 

Which, of course, means further reducing the Value of future 
pensions many existing members can expect from SERPS. 


The management of any responsible company will take pride 
in ensuring that its workforce is going to enjoy lull financial security 
in retirement. But there are also more direct business reasons for 
starting your own company pension scheme. 

Employees who are financially secure are likely to prove both 
more productive and more loyal. And you’ll also find that a good 
pension scheme can be an important factor in persuading more 
good people to come and work for you. 



6. Every day 
you waste means 
more money 
down the drain. 


Even before the present Government began its review of 
pensions legislation, many companies had already elected to 
contract out of SERPS in order to provide better pension benefits for 
their employees at little cost to themselves. 

Nowthe Government has madeclear its intention torunSERPS 
down, it makes even more sense to contract out. 

Throwing good money after bad isn't a good idea, and since 
all contracted out schemes started now will automatically qualify for 
the extra 2% incentive when it becomes available, there is every 
reason to act immediately. 



Many companies don’t realise that if they contractout of SERPS 
they qualify for a substantial saving on their National Insurance 
Contributions. * 

It amounts to a subsidy worth approximately 6VM of payroll 
costs. A subsidy so substantial in fact, that it will cover most of the cost 
of running an excellent private pension scheme for the company. 

4. It intends to offer 
another 
2 % subsidy soon. 

And the Government’s generosity 
doesn’t end there. 

So keen are they to encourage firms to cake over the role of 
prodding employees with pensions, that the newSocial Security Bill 
provides fertile subsidy on contracted out schemes to be boosted by 
a further 2% of payroll costs as from early 1988. 




7 Crown can 
set up a scheme for 
you without 
delay or problems. 

Crown Financial Management is a leading financial services 
group that already looks after the interests of more than one million 
people in the UK, and which provides company pension schemes 
for many thousands ofBrirish companies. 

Our “Fair Deals For Retirement" Plan has been designed 
specifically to meet the Government's criteria for contracting out of 
the State Scheme and thus qualifying in full for the Government's 
generous subsidies. 

Our organisation takes care of everything, from producing 
descriptive literature in your company’s name and explaining the 
benefits to your employees at specially arranged meetings, right 
through to paying their pensions when they retire. 

Well-deserved pensions that they would not have been able to 
" look forward to, had you nothad the ibresight-and the hard-headed 
commercial sense - to redirect a large partofvourNationallnsurance 
Contributions into your company’s own pension scheme. 

Stop throwing good money after bad . Send us the coupon . Now. 



To: Department FDR. Cn *wn Financial Management. Frccp* w.Wt iking. Surrey GL'21 1 BR. ( No stamp required) . 
Or rcJepht me: n-jHGi 5033. PIea.sc lei me have lull details ot Fair Deals For Retirement. 



CROWN 

FINANCIAL 

MANAGEMENT 


Name 

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Address. 




Tel:. 


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-:_i.>-vaasr liKT: 


THE TIMES SATURDAY MARCH 22 1986 


SPORTS 

DIARY 

Simon Barnes 

White to 
move 

As Our Boys face another black- 
wash in Barbados, so John God- 
dard, the last white captain of the 
West Indies, is asking what has 
become of the white West Indian 
Cricketer. He said: “Barclay Gas- 
kin. the West Indian manager, was 
intent on fielding a wholly black 
XI... in the 1950s, blacks gave a 
white captain 100 per cent sup- 
port Then things changed. Now 
white people in Barbados feel 
pushed to get into the Barbados 
side, let alone the West Indies 
side." It is more than .a decade 
since the last white man played for 
the West Indies ... a decade in 
which the West Indies have 
dominated world cricket, dem- 
onstrating a superiority that is 
nothing less than awesome. Per- 
haps the introduction of some 
while boys would redress the 
balance. 

Power play 

Is this the thin edge of the wedge? 
The floodlit Test match will soon 
be a feet of life. .The Australian 
Cricket Board has suggested to the 
International Cricket Conference 
that it be allowed to switch on the 
lights at Sydney and Melbourne 
when bad light strikes and God's 
own floodlights fail. 

Costa Spinna 

A cricket festival will be held in 
Spain in April. It will include four 
teams: two from Gibraltar, one 
from East Anglia, and an all- 
Indian side from Torremolinos. 
Now the British vice-consul in 
Malaga has suggested the forma- 
tion of a Spanish cricket associ- 
ation. Well, why not? 

Mismatched 

Fascinating facts: of the 14 sports 
events which received the most 
television coverage between Janu- 
ary and June last year, half were 
sponsored by tobacco companies. 
The Embassy Snooker Tour- 
nament provided 1 15 hours of 
television all by itself. In 1984. 
tobacco companies provided half 
of all sport sponsorship money. 

Mistimed 

This week's bad taste award must 
go to a Heath cartoon in the 
Spectator. It shows two men at a 
boxing ringside with a crate 
labelled Spare Parts Hospital 
“Kill W. they are shouting. To 
be charitable, perhaps the people 
who run the Spectator read only 
about political fisticuffs and 
passed over the death of Scottish 
welterweight champion Steve 
Wall on Monday. 

• Cue-makers Permian and Flet- 
cher have developed the nltimate 
accessory for the really cool 
snooker player personalized 
chalk. Available - naturally - by 
the gross. 

Reprieved 

Faithful readers of this column 
will recall the case of Bolton St 
Thomas, the North-West Coun- 
ties League side faced with evic- 
tion from their ground by the 
Church of England. I now learn 
that it has been allowed to stay for 
a further year —provided it drops 
the St Thomas from its name. 

Post haste 

An advertisement in The Sporting 
Life informs us that Lester Piggott 
and Dick Francis will.be signing 
copies of their book. Lester , at a 
Newbury hotel on Monday. The 
ad adds plaintively: “Lester, if you 
cannot be there, telephone or write 
to the White Horse Bookshop. 
High Street. Marlborough . . ." 

BARRY FANTONI 

u s s-^uirs 


„ invE 


•Great ... it shows more animation 
than the real thing* 

Exit, all round 

Sport has long been theatre, but 
theatre is increasingly becoming 
sport. A new sporting play has 
opened at ibe Tricycle Theatre in 
Kilbum. north London, and sets 
off soon on a national tour. It is 
called Blood, Sweat and Tears and 
is about judo. It was written and 
directed by John Godber. who was 
also responsible for Up n Lnaer. 
a plav that actually has a Rugby 
League match on stage and which 
is now at the Fortune Theatre in 
the West End. Godber has also 
done a play about weigbi-hfung 
called Cramp. The judo play was 
inspired bv Karen Bnggs. who not 
only helped in the production but 
also put a gloss on it by 'winning 
the women's world bantamweight 
title at Crvstal Palace last week- 
end. There is a great deal of 
combat on stage. “The British 
judo squad saw it. and they were 
convinced”, say the Tricycle The- 
atre people happily. 


A new battle of the Atlantic 


Edmund Dell, when Trade Sec- 
retary, emerged chastened but 
wiser from his 1977 talks with the 
Americans over the Anglo-US 
bilateral treaty on North Atlantic 
air services. He would never 
forget, as he wryly commented 
afterwards, "what it is like nego- 
tiating with a powerful friend". It 
was a bruising experience. 

The stalling of the British 
Airways privatization suggests 
that Nicholas Ridley could now be 
flying along the same learning 
! curve. As Transport Secretary, 
Ridley is faced with the most 
critical renegotiation of that same 
treaty, the so-called Bermuda II 
agreement, since 1977. To Rid- 
ley’s evident consternation in 
Washington last month, the 
Americans have suddenly turned 
very tough. The prospect looms of 
a complete sand-off - hence the 
postponement of the BA sale while 
Whitehall struggles to regain some 
control of the situation. 

The central issue under dis- 
cussion is simple enough. Annex 
Two to the treaty sets limits to the 
seat capacity which can be offered 
by British and US airlines operat- 
ing over the Atlantic. Hie annex is 
due to expire on July 23 and' 
Washington would like to bid it 
good riddance. The British gov- 
ernment wants to see another, 
preferably more permanent and 
comprehensive, ruling in its place. 

The possible consequences of 
the annex expiring with no agreed 
replacement are less straight- 
forward. The half dozen US 
airlines on the Atlantic routes 
might expand their capacity dras- 
tically. In theory, Bermuda II 
would allow the British govern- 
ment to restrict their operating 
permits and so remove the result- 
ing excess capacity. In practice, 
though, corrective measures 
would be slow and cumbersome — 
not least because the US govern- 
ment might easily exploit legal 

Washington 

Deep down every American seems 
to believe be (and she. too, after 
Geraldine Ferraro) can make it 
from the 1% cabin to the White 
House. Certainly the prospect is 
what fires the rhetoric and sus- 
tains the commitment of many 
congressmen and governors. They 
are inordinately preoccupied by 
the challenge of the great race, for 
ever constructing scenarios and 
political game-plans. 

Most are realistic enough to 
turn back when they see they do 
not have the essential pre- 
requisites: political achievement, 
money, publicity, organization, 
timing, daring and luck. The 
White House may be the Holy 
Grail that beckons them on, but 
the day-to-day demands of the 
state legislatures, the . House of 
Representatives or the Senate are 
generally sufficient challenge and 
reward. Running for president is a 
dangerous political risk and a 
thankless personal undertaking. 
Every statement made and po- 
sition taken for years past is 
subject to ruthless scrutiny, every 
facet of personality tossed around 
the television studios, every 
peccadillo blown up into a scan- 
daL The reward may be the chance 
to influence the history of the 
world, but the penalty for failure is 
often ridicule, humiliation and 
political extinction. 

Nevertheless, a surprisingly 
large number of people pursue the 
vision to the limit of what is 
possible: a declared candidacy and 
an appearance on the ballot in at 
least one state. In 1964 16 people 
presented themselves and their 
running mates to voters in one or 
more states. Only two — Ronald 
Reagan and Walter Mondale — 
had the remotest chance of taking 
office. What made the other 14 
run — those from such un-Ameri- 
can sounding parties as Citizens, 
Socialist Workers. Alliance. Pro- 
hibition. Big Deal, and United 
Sovereign Citizens? And who is 
waiting in the wings in an attempt 
to become president in 1988? 

Candidates fall into four cate- 
gories: the established politicians, 
the serious but non-conformist 
political activists, the perpetual 
losers and the crazies. The first 
group is the only one that matters 
in American politics: those who 
seek the Republican or Demo- 
cratic nomination, and whose 
hopes are generally dashed at the 
pre-election conventions. For 
1988 the field is still wide open, 
and speculation has already begun 
on even the darkest of dark horses. 
The three other groups cannot be 


Duncan Campbell-Smith looks at the 
wrangling with the US over airline rights 
as BA privatization remains gronnded 


ambiguities in Bermuda II to 
challenge the British action. 

The result, as Ridley has implic- 
itly acknowledged, could be an 
ugly series of rows, while BA and 
British Caledonian watched their 
vita! North Atlantic revenues 
spiralling ever krar. 

The Americans see their present 
position as an asse rtion of die 
desirable rigours of a free market, 
against the namby-pamby protec- 
tionism of the Old Wend. The 
British see the US stance as a 
bullying tactic which ignores the 
complex realities of foe inter- 
national market and renders 
impossible any tong-term plan- 
ning by the airlines which serve h. 

The passions beneath these 
conflicting views are only readily 
comprehensible when the capacity 
argument is set in the broader 
context of Bermuda H*s history. 

In the first place, it has had to 
govern Anglo-American com- 
petition during a period when 
their airline industries have been 
competing on increasingly un- 
equal terms. To see why, consider 
the 1944 Chicago Convention 
which is the basis of all airline 
agreements. Internal flights with 
embarking and disembarking pas- 
sengers within any country are 
confined (as “cabotage" in the 
industry jargon) to domestic carri- 
ers. At the same time, the right to 
By passengers from one country to 
another is protected by the third of 
five golden “freedoms" estab- 
lished as sacrosanct in 1944. 

Now apply this to the North 
Atlantic carriers. Only US airlines 
are allowed cabotage rights to 
build up networks within the US 
which can feed a huge volume of 
traffic to their transatlantic flights. 


On this side of the Atlantic, by 
contrast, the US airlines are just as 
free as British or continental 
carriers to develop “feeder" net- 
works across Europe. In the 
immediate post-war tfecades, the 
potential unfairness of these 
ground rules was little realized. 
Today, when the US market is still 
rigidly dosed to foreign antines 
but American 737s from Europe 
connect with American 747s leav- 
ing Heathrow for New York, the 
unfairness is blatant 

Undeniably, the problem de- 
serves wider public discussion. 
There is room to doubt whether 
the US government is promoting 
this by attacking as uncompetitive 
foe lines of Bermuda II- which 
hardly address the underlying 
problems - and W ashing ton's at- 
titude has caused bitterness. 

Again, there is the little matter 
of domestic US anti-trust legisla- 
tion. Until 1983, Whitehall be- 
lieved that Bermuda II effectively 
protected transatlantic carriers 
from anti-trust charges, which was 
just as well, since the authoriites 
here have always encouraged Brit- 
ish airlines to discuss some aspects 
of their operations together. The 
courtroom dramas over foe Laker 
Airways collapse have now rudely 
disabused British officials. Ber- 
muda II has emerged looking 
disas trously aiwftignrnis Jq this 

respect The present crisis may 
only concern capacity; but the 
Americans fully appreciate that 
the British government is really 
angling, as Ridley acknowledged 
last week, at a fundamental re- 
appraisal of the treaty to rule out 
future anti-trust actions. The com- 
plete deregulation of the US 
airline industry since 1977 has 


Michael Binyon lists the fringe candidates 
for the 1988 presidential election 

Dark horses 
dreaming of the 
White House 




Hall: ‘propaganda Stassem in every LaRoucbe: ‘Feed Jue 
and agitation contest since 1948 Fonda to the whales* 


taken seriously but, like -eccentric 
by-election candidates in Britain, 
some do represent strands in 
American thinking and have a 
marginal influence on the debate. 

Of these, the non-conformist 
activists are the most important. 
They seek to break the restricting 
mould of the two-party system, to 
offer voters an alternative to 
machine politicians. In the past 
they have played a vital rede, often 
as spoilers. Theodore Roosevelt’s 
independent Progressive party 
split the Republican vote in 1912, 
allowing in the Democrat Wood- 
row Wilson; Strom Thurmond 
made a considerable impact in the 
South in 1948 with his States' 
Rights candidacy; George Wallace 
in 1968 and John Anderson in 
1980 did well as independents, 
Anderson winning more than five 
million votes. 

Such candidates cannot expect 
to win the 270 votes needed to 
gain a majority in the electoral 
college: but they can dream of a 
deadlock, however unlikely, and 
the subsequent resolution of the 
issue in their favour in Congress. 

So far there are no serious 
contenders this time determined 
to remain outside the framework 
of Republican and Democra ti c 
politics. Even Jesse Jackson, if he 
runs again, will probably do so as a 
Democrat But in the third group, 
the perpetual losers, several famil- 
iar names are already being ban- 
died about The Libertarian Party, 
which stood in both 1980 and 


1984, is trying to establish itself as 
a serious mould-breaker, and will 
probably pul up a candidate again. 
It has a long way to ga in 1984 it 
received only 921 .000 votes. 

Another party with a longer, if 
chequered, history in the US is the 
Communist Party. Its veteran 
general secretory, Gus Hall, now 
75, is a turgid speaker who has 
already stood as a candidate four 
times, getting only 36,000 votes in 
1984. The party is to convene a 
special congress this summer to 
decide on its candidate, and may 
well pick Hall's running 

mate for the past two elections, 
Angela Davis, the radical black 
feminist 

“Of course we can’t get elected," 
he said in 1984. “The main 
purpose is to speak to all people so 
as to get our platform over. 
Basically it comes down to a 
propaganda-agitational cam- 
paign." His is a straightforward 
explanation of why these small 
party candidates run. They want 
the attention, however limited, 
that an election campaign gives 
them. They hope to influence the 
debate and remain a credible 
entity. Norman Thomas, head of 
the old Socialist Party, never got 
near the presidency, but pro- 
foundly influenced US polhics 
before the war. 

But if Hail’s platform is at least 
dear, this cannot be said for a 
more bizarre and, to many people, 
sinister candidate, Lyndon La- 


underscored the tension on this 
front. 

At least one other background 
factor is helping to ensure ac- 
rimony, now as in 1977. This 
concerns the nature of the nego- 
tiating teams. The American of- 
ficials, drawn from foe State, 
Justice and Transportation de- 
partments. look to the US private 
sector airlines as their constit- 
uency and know that the negotia- 
tions will be judged by then- 
political masters solely in terms of 
the domestic industry's seeds. 
British. civil servants — even se- 
nior Britirii politicians, Mrs 
Thatcher excepted — cut tittle' ice 
m this scheme of things, as Ridley 
has found. The American team 
has behaved brusquely towards 
Whitehall mandarins adopting the 
detached, intellectual approach 
which they believe the common 
sense merits of the British case 
deserve. 

It might be argued on this 
account that the best riposte to 
Washington might be a pan- 
European approach: after all, the 
major European carriers share 
much the same problems vis-a-vis 
the US, and have similar views 
about fog" 1 - But the airline in- 
dustry tradition of bilateral talks 
looks as robust as ever. Nor do the 
various British officials such as 
those who returned to Washington 
to resume the talks thfa week seem 
keen to surrender their jobs to the 
Eurocrats of the DG7 Directorate 
in Brussels. 

Whitehall has lost many of its 
more interesting international 
roles to Brussels over the years. 
Airline regulation battles are one 
of the few potentially dramatic 
challenges left and responsibility 
for them is jealously guarded — 
however unnerving the con- 
sequences — for Cabinet ministesr 
past and present 
Duncan Campbell-Smith is the 
author of Struggle for Take-Off: 
The British Airways Story ( Coro- 
net Books). 

Rouche. A shadowy figure, it is 
not dear whether he is a far-right 
conservative, a leftist, or a cult 
leader. In 1984 be advocated 
nationalizing US SteeL According 
to his prospect u s his favourite 
scapegoat, Henry Kissinger, is "an 
agent of influence for foe Soviet 
Union." His slogans then were, 
“nuclear power is safer than sex" 
and “feed Jane Fonda to the 
whales." 

LaRoucbe is connected to the 
far-right ■ Executive Intelligence 
Review, a publicity-minded group 
that has set op organizations in 
Europe as well as foe US. They 
seem to have access to consid- 
erable foods, and a cult-like 
loyalty to LaRouche. But whether 
LaRoucbe, who started his potiti- 
calcareerin 1948mtheTrotskyite 
Socialist Workers’ Party, actually 
speaks for anyone is unclean he 
claimed in 1984 that his National 
Democratic Policy Committee 
had 30,000 members; others said 
it had only 450. 

Also on the right, but far more 
influential, is America's leading 
television gospel preacher; Pat 
Robertson, who is 55. His daily 
message on the Christian Broad- 
casting Network is heard in 16 
million households and generates 
more than $230 million annual 
income. He therefore has an 
immediate advantage over p oorer 
and lesser-known faces in Con- 
gress. Robertson has not declared 
himself as a candidate but is 
dearly politically orientated 
If he runs it will be to focus 
greater attention on his Christian 
message. But he would also have 
another platform for his oppo- 
sition to welfare policies, foe evils 
be sees in abortion, homosexuality 
and school violence, and his 
virulent anti-communism. 

For some people running for 
president has become an ob- 
session. The dassic example is 
Harold Stassen, a former governor 
of Minnesota who was once a 
serious contender for the Repub- 
lican nomination. He refused to 
give up when the tide turned 
against him in 1948, and has 
entered the race with diminishing 
credibility ever since. 

Individual crackpots can per- 
haps run in one state. Btxzo foe 
clown or Pat Paulsen the co- 
median have gained some useful 
publicity for their frivolous can- 
didacies. But however formidable 
the obstacles, there are still enough 
dreamers and fanatics around to 
crowd the ballot sheet on election 
day. They will never be convinced 
the White House is a long way , 
down the road from ibe log cabin. 


The Cicero shadow we failed to honour 


Rome 

The intriguing story of Cicero, the 
German spy 'who worked at the 
British embassy in Ankara during 
the Second World War. and the 
interlocking story of Fritz Kolbe, 
the German Foreign Ministry 
official and Allied agent who 
tipped off the Allies about him. are 
told in a set of documents recently 
released by the CIA. 

The 750 pages are the hitherto 
secret files of Allen Dulles, chief of 
US Intelligence in Switzerland 
during the war and later head of 
CIA. who was Kolbe's contact 
They were released at the request 
of Father Robert Graham, foe 
Jesuit expert on diplomacy and 
espionage. Graham is now about 
to publish his conclusions. 

The broad outlines of the Cicero 
Story were already known. The 
man with the code-name Cicero 
was an Albanian called Elyesa 
Bazna who worked as valet to the 
British ambassador in Ankara. Sir 
Hugh Knatchbull-Hugessen. He 
photographed Sir Hugh's top se- 
cret papers and sold them at a high 
price to ihe Germans. They paid 
him in sterling notes which sub- 
sequently turned out to be 
counterfeit. 

The Dulles papers shed tantaliz- 
ing new’ light on the dainag p 
Cicero did to the Allied cause and 
the circumstances of his exposure. 


They also provide documentary 
evidence for the first time of the 
extern of Kolbe's activity and his 
motivation. 

Kolbe was the first to inform foe 
Allies of the leak of secrets from 
the British embassy in Ankara. 
Bui he was also responsible for 
providing the Americans, through 
Dulles, with hundreds of Germans 
diplomatic and military docu- 
ments. Even the careful Dulles 
described the information in his 
dispatches as the "the intelligence 
officer's dream". 

Fritz Kolbe was a modest man 
of deep convictions who has so far 
found no place in history because 
he fils no acceptable pattern. Born 
in 1900. he joined foe German 
diplomatic service in 1925 but 
never rose higher than the level of 
clerk. In 1939 he returned from 
service abroad and was sent to 
work in the Foreign Ministry 
department handling liaison with 
the German High Command. 

His duties, perfect for a spy. 
included routing incoming cables 
and dispatches, which he first 
copied and then photographed, 
taking them personally to Dulles 
in Berne. His code-name was 
George Wood: he never came 
under suspicion and there was no 
one to denounce what he was 
doing, as he later did to Cicero. 


It was luck that led Kolbe to 
work for Dulles and the Ameri- 
cans. Kolbe had gone first to the 
British with his oner to keep them 
informed, but he was not believed. 
One reason Dulles had no doubts 
about Kdbe's integrity was be- 
cause he never asked foe Ameri- 
cans for money. He was simply a 
convinced anti-Nazi wtid believed 
that only foe full military defeat of 
foe Reich would remove the Nazis 
from power. Anti-Nazi plotters 
working against the regime from 
within, he believed, could only 
fail; and in this he was righL 

On December 28 1943. Kolbe 
met Dulles in Berne. There he told 
him for the first time that Franz 
von Pape a. the German ambas- 
sador in Ankara, was regularly 
receiving startlingly confidential 
material from foe British embassy. 
He knew foe code-name Cicero 
but not foe identity of foe source. 
He brought with him four of von 
Papen's dispatches on the subject 
which contained what Father Gra- 
ham has described as “a mass of 
crucial military information’’. 

DuHes was good enough to pass 
all this to foe British, and he said 
in a cable to Washington that the 
dispatches dealt with “documents 
on which. Milii (which was von 
Papen's code-name) clearly placed 
great value and which, seemingly. 


were taken from the Zulu (mean- 
ing British) embassy through a 
source designated as Cicero'*. 

Kolbe came near to guessing foe 
identity of Cicero when he com- 
mented to DuHes that ah Albanian 
working as a private secretary for 
President Inonu of Turkey might 
be involved. But he got no closer 
than that 

At foe end of the war foe 
Americans persuaded Kolbe to go 
to foe United States. He accepted 
some money in order to start a 
new life but invested it badly and 
lost it. He then went back to 
Germany to live out his life in a 
strange nether world distinct both 
from foe past and the present He 
is thought to have died some 10 
years ago in Freiburg. 

Kolbe's work in trying to force a 
military defeat on foe Nazis and 
his amazing skill in living to the 
end above suspicion did not 
entitle him to a place in the 
resistance movement In consid- 
ering the new evidence about him.- 
Father Graham raises two ques- 
tions: can one distinguish between 
one kind of anti-Nazi resistance 
and another? Can one justify 
tyrannicide but not justify work- 
ing with the enemy to overthrow 
that tyranny? 


Norman Podhoretz 


On the death 
of a friend 


My closest friend died last week. 
At his home in London, sur- 
rounded by his wife and children. 
He died only a little short of the 
allotted biblical span of . three score 
and ten. He died full of honours 
and daily beloved of many. 
Nevertheless he did not die peace- 
fully. He died bard. 

“Do not go gentle into that good 
mght/Rage. rage, against the dying 
ofthe fight," wrote Dylan Thomas 
in a poem addressed to his father. 
Like Thomas, my friend was a 
Welshman, and that is how he 
died: not gently but full of rage. I 
know this not because I sawit with 
my own eyes, but from a mutual 
friend who quoted Dylan 
Thomas's lines in describing for 
me how the last hours had gone. 

By an eerie coincidence, another 
mutual friend. Senator Dante! 
Patrick Moymban, also fell back 
on those very same lines last week 
in his remarks at foe funeral of 
Senator Jacob Javits. In every 
other respect an altogether dif- 
ferent kind of person from Javits. 
my friend too had known for 
many months that he had a 
terminal illness; and he too re- 
sponded to the sentence of im- 
minent death with a ferocious 
determination to. live and live and 
live until the moment he died. 


Weaker and weaker, but stiff he' 
forced himself to- do tilings for 
which no one around him could 
believe he had the strength. He 
was in unendurable pain, but he 
would take only enough medica- 
tion to dull its edge because more 
than that insulated him from life. 

In riwrtHing to die in this way, 
my friend never, I think, doubted 
that he was making the right 
choice. Yet the last time I saw 
turn, about three months ago, I 
could see that he was in torment 
over his inability to resign himsd£. 
to make his peace with death. 

That much underrated philos- 
opher, George Santayana, once 
said: “There is no God and Mary 
is His mother." My friend would 
never have said flatiy “There is no 
God" — he would have thought it 
brazen and crass — but if he ever 
had, he would certainly have 
added, “and the Bible is His 
word." Raised in a devout Presby- 
terian family, but finally unable to 
sustain the literal faith of his 
fathers, still he never lost his belief 
in the spiritual truth of Christian- 
ity. Specifically he never lost his 
belief in the idea that the reason 
we are here on earth is to serve 
God and to praise Him. 

. Serving God as my friend came 
to understand it translated, into 
devoting oneself to the service of 
something greater than self— in 


his case it was a gre« national 
institution — and ipcaismg Goa 
translated into praising h fe- _ 
Although hymn* and n q * n™g 

were certainly necessary to gjonjy 

what deserved to be glorified, ope 

was not mainly supposed to praise 

life by verbal affirmation. Mainly 
one paused it through * readiness 
to enjoy what there was to be 
enjoyed, to savour what there was 
to be savoured, and most es- 
pecially to accept every invitation 

to a good laugh that the world had 


to oner. ... 

All this my friend did, and 
more. Like Rhttff, be was not 
only witty in hinadf but ^foe 
cause that wit was in other men" 
And even more than wit, he was 
the cause that iaiqfoter was in 
other men. His own la ugh was so 
loud and boisterous that — I do 
not exaggerate — it became fam- 
ous from one end of Britain to tbe 
other. His very entry into a room 
inva riabl y made everyone in it 
smile in anticipation of the laugh- 
ter be was sure to bring. 

That such a man should rage 

against death is not surprising. But 

why torment himself over dying in 

a state of rage? He hinted at the an- 
swer in telling me that (me day, 
when his physical pain was as its 
most unbearable, he turned in a 
desperate search for help toa Bach 
cantata about dying, Idt habe 
germg (“1 have had enough.") He 
asked himself: “If Bach can say it, 
why can’t IT* He meant that n 
Bach, in his eyes perhaps the 
greatest of all men. was permitted 
to yearn for death as an escape 
from foe awful miseries of this lire, 
why should he, an ordinary mor- 
tal be required to go on raging? 

But of course he knew why. 
Bach, who believed m an afterlife, 
was permitted to serve God and 
praise Him by welcoming death as 
a deliverance into the arms of his 
saviour. My friend could only 
serve God and praise Him by 
cherishing life to foe very end and 
by refusing to curse it. 

Even in the extremity of his 
suffering he did not curse life. 
Least of all did he curse- it as so 
many do nowadays when they 
declare that life is worth having 
only when it is good and, worse 
yet, when they act on that Satanic 
idea. 

My friend’s name was How 
Whddon. Though he would have 
accused me of blasphemy for 
raying to, he taught everyone who 
was given the great and blessed gift 
of knowing Urn how, in what he 
himself called these spiritually 
illiterate times, when it is so hard 
to die with the peaceful resigna- 
tion of a true befievec, it is still 
possible to liye a truly godly life. 


Philip Howard 

Just a back 
number now 


For all the people in the world 
with ricked backs, lumbago, 
slipped discs and unspecific pain 
in the back, there are exactly as 
many back experts, each with her 
or his panacea, or bade magic. 
Nothing is more boring than other 
people's back stories. Nothing is 
more interesting than one’s own. 

It's a broad bade that has no 
turning. I have never thought 
much about my bade useful for 
keeping the head from falling into 
tbe trousers; uncomfortable on a 
mattress that is too soft; necessary 
to keep straight while sticking 
bottom out when marching in kilt. 

Apart from that, I suppose I 
have given the old ramrod a hard 
time, scrummaging, poring over 
texts in the Bodleian, fast bowling 
as tbe original cfaucker before 
Charlie Griffiths, and carrying 
weights, including Unde Monty 
home from the Artiste Assoijffie 
after we Jhad celebrated the start of 
the summer hois too enthusias- 
tically. My back has never given 
me a twinge of trouble. 

Then we removed the word 
factory overnight from Gray’s Inn 
Road to Wapping; and 1 woke up 
in a literary editor’s office with 
smart bookshelves, a VDU, and 
do books. A literary editor without 
books is a cook without fire: or, as 
foe Belgians say, I'homme sans 
feu, e’estun homme sans queue. So 
1 raced back to Gray’s Inn Road, 
loaded up sacks and pallets of 
books, my poster of Arethusa, and 
tbe charts telling me the number 
of words per centimetre (the latter, 
thank God, quite obsolete in this 
brave new worid of high tech). 

Next morning I woke as usual to 
the first flight from Alicante 
homing in to Heathrow like a 
noisy pigeon, and could not 
move. Once J started limping 
around looking sorry for myselt I 
discovered Axiom 94 of life about 
back bores with their special 
remedies. Baghwashes, chiro- 
practors and chiromancers, and 
Professor Holloway’s patent Tipi- 
mem for pains mid strains. A 
Greek friend lent me a corset with 
four hot water bottles dependent 
from it you fill the bottles with 
boiling water, soak a towel in - 
boiling water, wrap ft round foe 
bottles, and Bob's your unde, 
which is back-slang for first degree 
burns, I tried nibbing in deep heat 
unguent; but ft got into quite the 
wrong place because I could not 
turn, and, apart from the burning 
sensation. 1 smelled . like a 
women's lacrosse (hanging room 
for a week. B. Levin hustled for his 
back quack in Harley Street, who 
sounded expensive. A French 
friend swore by a retired general in 
Wiltshire, who cures backs by 
laying hands on foe afflicted’s 
head: too like a fringe moral 

Peter Nichols I "'StaSS to the 


infallible Howard treatment of 
ignoring it and it wall go away. So 
groaning as self-pityingly as 
Hercules when he tried foe patent 
bad: rub of Nessus, I took myself 
to a physio. 

I assumed she would massage 
me with agreeably chilly hands, 
fiddle with a vertebra, . and hey 
presto, I could forget about my 
back and get on with life. But 

ChrbVtomM 



Anna is a heaftb-forough-suficmig 
fanatic who would have been a 
captain ofthe Wandervogel move- 
ment in lederhosenl She said: 
“Take your clothes off and touch 
your toes." With a great deal of 
protest and whimperitg, I coaid 
not even cover my parts. let alone 
touch my knees. Then she tried to 
make me touch my heels -by 
bending backwards. Then, with a 
gleam of religious enthusiasm m 
ber eyes, she explained about my 
back, using as visual aid the 
backbone of a patient who had 
died of anorexia. 

I do sot want to understand my 
back. I lust want it to stop hurting. 
Then she gave me a book entitled 
Treat Your Own Back. In foe line 
of duty as Lit Ed I have to read 
some terrible books that no other 
critic would touch with a ten-foot 
pointer. But this is' the moat 
repetitious work- I have ever 
waded through. Subbing ft down, 
all it says is: “It’s your own fault 
sit up straight." This is not a 
sympathetic doctrine for a 
whose occupation consists in 
slouching over a VDU. But the 
booked teach me a Hew word: 
lordosis, which is what we experts, 
call the curve that good guys have 
at the base of their spines. 

1 *? t*? 0 * aJo . D 8 nicely, thank 
you. I shall soon be able to touch 
my knees. And I do not want to ' 

hear about your miracle lack 
cures. As a journo f have always ■ 
replied to readers dotty or obsea- ' 
si vc enough to write to me. But if 
any of you lot write about vour 
backs, I SM break ' 

lifetime, and not reply. 



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THE TIMES SATURDAY MARCH 22 1986 





1 Pennington Street; London El 9XN Telephone: 01-481 4100 


WHEN BISHOP IS A WOMAN 


Thft Church of England has 
sometimes been accused of 
imnxing and acting as if the 
rest of the Anglican Commu- 
nion hardly existed. This in- 
sularity, or self-sufficiency, 
may yet prove a useful defence 
ff orwhen other parts of the 
Communion move to their 
next logical step in. the. eccle- 
siastical emancipation of 
women, the consecration of a 
woman bishop. The two North 
American . parts of the An- 
glican Communion, in Canada 
and. the. United -States, have 
had - women priests long 
enough for some of them to 
look for promising can- 
didates for higher office, and 
the American Episcopal 
church is apparently looking to 
promote them quite quickly,. 

The Bishop of Newark, New 
Jersey, has said as much. But 
with the Church of England 
not yet having ordained .its 
fust woman priest, and not yet 
quite sure it wants to even 
now, the American pace is 
proving much too fast for it. 
The supporters of the ordina- 
tion of women in this country 
have been content with a 
steady but gradual progress 
towards their goal, hoping to 
win over the undecided mid- 
dle ground without putting too 
much fear into the opposition: 
the opposition has fought a 
careful rearguard action, and 
by no means regards itself as 
beaten. Neither will welcome 
the raising of the temperature 
of debate at this stage through 
events beyond the. Church of 
England's control 
The consecration of the first 
Anglican woman bishop will 


inevitably face other bishops 
everywhere with an awkward 
choice. Pressure .will be on 
them to repudiate or endorse 
her appointment even if, in the 
normal course of English epis- 
copal life, they would hardly 
expect to to have much to do 
with her. If she is a -diocesan 
and noiasufiragan, she will.be 
invited to the Lambeth Con- 
ference in 1988, for her brother 
bishops from America would 
hardly be prepared to attend 
without her. If .no-one else 
does, the Bishop of London, 
Dr. Graham -Leonard, will 
make a major issue of this: he 
has already said he would not 
be there in such a case. That 
alone guarantees that the prob- 
lem will be imported to En- 
gland, for rest of the English 
bench will have to align them- 
selves with him, or with her. 

Their only other choice 
would be . to downgrade the 
Lambeth Conference to the 
status of something like the. 
Commonwealth Prime 
Ministers' Conference, an 
international consultation of 
friends (more or less), and so 
downgrade the Anglican 
Communion, whose symbol of 
unity the Conference is, to 
little more - than a loose associ- 
ation of Christians with com- 
mon origins. In the regard of 
many ordinary Anglican 
church-goers it may be no 
more than that already, but the 
church's leadership has in- 
vested a good deal of energy in. 
recent years in promoting a 
rather more visionary theory 
of world-wide Anglican unity. 
Unfortunately for them this 
theory does not seem to be 


shared by ihe American epis- 
copate. 

The international Commit- 
tee of Primates, which has just 
completed a meeting in To- 
ronto under the chairmanship 
of the Archbishop of Canter- 
bury, represents a step towards 
this more grandiose concep- 
tion of the Anglican Commu- 
nion. But the crisis in Anglican 
affairs arising from current 
American intentions has come 
too soon for it. There is 
beginning to emerge an An- 
glican doctrine of primacy, 
centred on the primates' 
committee. But it is not yet 
established, and cannot there- 
fore be used to deflect the 
Bishop of Newark, or others 
with the same impatience, for 
they owe the primates no 
obedience whatever in current 
Anglican thinking. In any case, 
the primates' considered state- 
ment is a long way short of an 
interdict 

The Church of England 
would naturally prefer to 
tackle women bishops, if it has 
to at all, after its mind is 
decided on women priests. But 
its participation in the An- 
glican Communion does not 
permit it the luxury of such a 
tidy and logical sequence. 
Instead it will be messy. The 
prospect would have been less 
so. had the Anglican Commu- 
nion been either a good deal 
weaker, so that each part could 
more or less ignore the rest, or 
a good deal stronger, so that 
each part could significantly 
influence the rest. Unable to 
do either, the Church of En- 
gland has a rough passage 
ahead. 


CHANGES IN THE BALKAN AIR 


Geographical proximity, may 
be the sole consideration be^. 
hind Sir Geoffrey Howe’s 
combined visit to Greece and 
Yugoslavia this week; But- 
linking the two countries is not : 
without symbolic value. One is 
at -the outer edge of the; 
Wpstem alliance, jnc, other : 
the Eastern edge of the com-' 
munist worfcLBoth aire at 
times uncertain in ihdt alle-' 
giances. 

Greece and Yugoslavia 
have, in recent years, embod- 
ied the hopes and the fears of 
foe West. The return of Greece 
to democracy after the rule of 
the colonels and its accession 
to the European Community 
five years ago appeared 10 
cement its loyalties to the West 
and. to free enterprise. At the 
same time, the election of a 
Socialist government, espous-. 
ing hostility towards American 
influence/ pledged to the- re- 
moval of the US bases and 
actively interested in im- 
proved relations with the So- 
viet Union, aroused fears that 
the . reliability of one of 
NATO’s most strategically im- 
portant outposts might be in 
doubt. 

Yugoslavia, for its part, has 
proved capable of straddling 
the East-West divide and 
maintaining itself as a national 
entity even without Tito’s 
leadership. It has pursued its 
past policy of active non- 
alignment and deflected, so far 
successfully, advances from 
Moscow for a closer relation- 
ship. Yet with Tito gone, 
Yugoslavia has lost its leading 
role in the imn-aligned move- ., 
ment and thus its high profile 


abroad. It has been unable to 
overcome its chronic eco- 
nomic-problems of inflation 
running at an annual rate of 
over 80 per cent, a massive 
foreign debt, and unprofitable 
industry. It has spumed the 
advice/ and assistance of the 
IMF; in favour of muddling 
through as best it can: 

• As . its economic problems 
have become more acute, so 
the centrifugal tendencies — 
never, far .from the surface in 
Yugoslavia — have intensified. 
They have ‘brought in their 
wake pleas from some quarters 
for stronger central govern- 
ment and concomitant restric- 
tions on free speech and free 
enterprise. The selection of 
Branko Mikulic to be the next 
Prime Minister, a Croat who is 
regarded as a political 
hardliner, is seen as an ex- 
pression of the centralizing 
tendency. This has raised 
doubts about whether or for 
how long Yugoslavia will be 
able to maintain its present 
equilibrium, either at home or 
abroad. 

Uncertainty about the fu- 
ture direction of Greece and 
Yugoslavia gives the British 
Foreign Secretary’s visit 
special importance. As a sym- 
bol, it is a gesture of good win 
towards the present direction 
being taken by each country 
and an expression of hope that 
their evident concern to main- 
tain existing ties to the West 
will be maintained. On a 
practical level. Sir Geoffrey’s 
visit may lead to an enhanced 
role for Britain in the eco- 
nomic and. financial arrange- 


ments of the two countries. 
Both Greece and Yugoslavia 
appreciate Britain's im- 
portance as a centre of inter- 
national finance and have 
benefited from banking and 
credit arrangements initiated 
by London. . 

Britain also has a diplomatic 
role to'play. Apart from; dis- 
cussion of particular bilateral 
problems, like the Cyprus 
issue with Greece, Britain is 
able to speak for the Western 
alliance, from a European 
rather than a superpower 
viewpoint Similarly, Britain 
can encourage both Greece 
and Yugoslavia to improve 
their record on combating 
Middle East terrorism without 
the partiality towards Israel 
which tends — however un- 
justifiably — to undermine 
America's anti-terrorist state- 
ments. 

Sir Geoffrey is in Greece and 
Yugoslavia at a time when 
change is in the air throughout 
the Balkans. The uncertainty 
in the political stance of 
Greece and Yugoslavia is 
inherent also in Turkey, whose 
democracy is still only fragile. 
In the Soviet bloc, both Bul- 
garia and Romania face crucial 
leadership changes before the 
decade is out. Albania has 
already embarked on its transi- 
tion, opening up albeit len- 
. tatively to the world outside. 
Later this year, it will be linked 
by rail for the first time to the 
rest of Europe. At such a time 
and in a region which has seen 
conflict so often in the past it is 
vital that forces for stability be 
encouraged. 


TOO MANY CHEMISTS 


. As a species of private 
enterprise local chemist shops 
pay badly. Yet their number is 
increasing and the supply of 
qualified pharmacists is rising. 
That is the paradox at the 
heart .of the report of die 
Nuffield Foundation’s inquiry 
into pharmacy published this 
week. 

This is not a market that can 
simply be left to correct itself. 
The major source of chemists’ 
incomes is dispensing 
prescriptions for the- National 
Health Service, The Govern- 
ment has in this instance to 
have some kind of 'industrial 
policy”, for if not, there is an 
unwelcome drain on public 
mosey and, as the Nuffield 
report lucidly points out, a 
failure to provide patients with . 
adequate pharmaceutical ser- 
vice. 

Pharmacists can do a lot 
more than stick labels on pre- 
packaged drugs provided by 
the pharmaceutical industry. 
This is a profession which is 
under-achieving- Consumer 
surveys indicate dial die pub- 
lic trusts pharmacists. It wants 
their advice. There would-be 


wide-spread acceptance of a 
broadened role for chemists 
that made them into a para- 
medical profession. 

Chemists could be a better 
filter for the public’s medical 
anxieties, ' signposting cus- 
tomers to medication and/or 
to consultation. A chemist 
who actually talked with and 
was trusted by a general prac- 
titioner could cut surgery 
queues, improve prescribing 
and, in principle, play, a much 
more active role in “health at 
home”.. .. 

Chemists are, for the most 
part, businessmen. The auio- 
. made provision up till now of 
an NHS dispensing contract to 
any chemist who choses to’ 
open any where has led to the 
proliferation of small chemists 
shops where smalKscale NHS 
dispensing underpins the sale 
of soap and cosmetics. The 
needs of the small shopkeeper 
to make a profit have tended 
to overtake the professional 
advice pharmacists -can in fact 
offer both the public and 
doctors. According to the 
present structure of their 
remunerations dispensing . 
brings in income, but the 


provision of advice is a free 
gift. 

Nuffield’s recommendation 
of closer integration of the 
pharmacist with the health 
services implies both more 
detailed supervision of phar- 
macy practice (for example the 
sensible suggestion that chem- 
ists shops provide some space 
for confidential talk between 
customer and pharmacist) and 
better control over location 
and number of dispensing 
pharmacists. The new contract 
already on the way deals with 
controls over location and 
numbers reasonably effec- 
tively. It does nothing, how- 
ever,- to reward chemists for 
providing advice to both the 
public and doctors, indeed 
rather the reverse. 

By abolishing the basic prac- 
tice allowance it pins even 
more of the pharmacist's 
remuneration to the number 
of prescriptions dispensed. 
Further revision is therefore 
needed to provide pharmacists 
with the incentive to use their 
professional skills and reverse 
the trend that has increasingly 
made them merely packagers 
of medicines and purveyors of 
soap. 


LETTERS TO THE EDITOR 


Equal rights on 
tax for wives 

From Mr J. R. Hawthorn 
Sir, According to your Economics 
Correspondent (March 15) the 
Institute of Fiscal Studies con- 
demns the Chancellor's income 
zax proposals on the ground that 
they take away the working mar- 
ried woman's tax allowance. They 
may have forgotten how that 
allowance came about. 

It was after the war, when 
labour was short in the factories, 
and the Chancellor (Stafford 
Cripps) derided to bribe married 
women to go to work. He thought 
of it as a purely economic matter, 
and did it in a Budget, so that no 
previous discussion of its social 
consequences was possible, 
though some of us were critical 
from the start. 

Now the situation is quite 
different: there is no need for the 
extra labour — quite the reverse — 
and we do know something of the 
social cost. Working mothers do 
not have a right to such preferen- 
tial treatment in perpetuity, and if 
Chancellors had been men of 
courage the bribe would have been 
withdrawn long ago. 

Only the Treasury would think 
that a mother in a factory was 
more deserving than a mother at 
home. 

I am, Sir, yours etc, 

J. R. HAWTHORN, 

Mayfield, 

Pem bridge. 

Leominster, 

Herefordshire. 

March 16. 


Value of Giotto 

From Mr R. W. Saunders 
Sir, While applauding your leader, 
“An historic rendezvous” (March 
1 3) on the Giotto cometry probe, I 
must take you to task over your 
description therein of armour- 
piercing projectiles as an example 
of the commercial application of 
scientific endeavour. Projectiles 
are military applications: they are 
of commercial value to those who 
gain contracts for them, but so is 
Giotto hsdfl 

I trust that even after the Stock 
Exchange’s “big bang” the City 
will not need to equip itself with 
armour-piercing shells. 

Yours faithfully, 

R. W. SAUNDERS, 

135 Lothian Crescent, 

Stirling. 

March 13. 


Law centres at risk 

From the General Secretary of the 
British Legal Association 
Sir, The prospect of ten million 
people wandering aimlessly 
throughout Britain in the year 
1986 seeking advice from non- 
existent law centres may well 
alarm Cardinal Hume and others. 

May I be permitted to tighten 
the gloom by pointing out that 
there are thousands of equally 
independent solicitors in private 
practice who are ready, willing and 
considerably more able to give 
proper and professional advice at 
no cost whatsoever to such of the 
bemused ten million as are unable 
to pay for it. . 

Presumably, the Government is 
aware of this, and that the 
overhead expenses are borne by 
the solicitors themselves and not 
by the general public. Lists of local 
solicitors willing to undertake this 
« of work are readily available 
im several local sources. 

Yours truly, 

GEOFFREY THOMAS, 

General Secretary, 

British Legal Association, 

116 London Road, 

South borough, 

Tunbridge Wells, 

Kent 
March 12. 


Danger to birds 

From Mrs Josephine de Goris 
Sir, Dr Margaret Weldhen (March 
17) warns of the danger of nylon 
mesh food holders for birds, 
suggesting string as an alternative. 
This winter, while visiting a 
friend, I saw through her kitchen 
window what I thought was a 
curiously acrobatic sparrow. 

Almost immediately 1 realised 
that it was trapped hanging with 
its foot caught in the string from 
which was suspended a metal 
mesh bird-feeder. It flew when I 
freed it Beware of string, even for 
tying up other types of container, 
it may fray when exposed to the 
weather. 

Yours faithfully, 

JOSEPHINE de GORIS, 

The Chantry, 

Park Lane, 

Appleton, 

Abingdon. 

Oxfordshire. 

March 18. 


‘Excellence’ at schools of music 


Gospel to cities 

From Mr R. M. Rowett 
Sir, The Reverend Timothy Ra- 
phael, as Archdeacon of Middle- 
sex, rejecting the appeal for funds 
for Si Cuthben's, Philbeach Gar- 
dens, asserts (March 5) “The test 
will be if we can really as a Church 
make the change from mainte-. 
nance to mission’*. 

His great namesake, Raphael, 
was more inspired; for in the 
Church of Sant' Qigio degli 
Orefici he put this inscription: 
Astra deus nos templa damus tu 
sidera pande. One might para- 
phrase this as “You, O God gave 
the stars: we have given the 
temples. Now open out the 
heavens”. 

Churches and their adornment 
built to the glory of God are Man's 
humble gift to Him and a witness 
of our fiuth; it can hardly be in 
accordance with our mission to 
neglect them. 

Yours fait hfully . 

R.M.ROWETT, 

4 Iklersly Grove, SE21. 


From Professor Raymond Fischer 
and others 

Sir. We are professors at four of 
the five publicly funded music 
colleges in England and are the 
chairmen of the respective 
branches of the National Associ- 
ation of Teachers in Further and 
Higher Education, whose total 
membership of professors in these 
four colleges is around 200. 

The fifth is the Royal Academy 
of Music, which has launched a 
scheme to promote itself as the 
“centre of excellence” in this 
country (report by Fiona 
Maddocks, March 6). 

If this scheme were to be 
financed privately, such financial 
arrangements would be the con- 
cern only of the RAM: but it 
would certainly be in the public 
interest for the superficiality of the 
concept to be widely known. 
There would however, be addi- 
tional cause for concern were there 
to be any element of public 
funding. 

It has been authoritatively re- 
ported that the Secretary of State 
at the Department of Education 
and Science. Sir Keith Joseph, has 
been considering the creation of a 
single “centre of excellence”; that 
he wishes to investigate 
“allegations” that some of 
Britain's best students train 
abroad rather than here; and that 
he wants to know why Britain 
does not produce more soloists of 
international stature. 

If a student seeks to go abroad it 
is naive to assume that this is 
because of dissatisfaction with 
leaching in British music colleges; 
it can be for the sensible reason of 
wishing to absorb different musi- 
cal atmospheres. On the other 
hand we receive students from all 
over the world including the 
United States, often at high post- 
graduate performing level. 

As for those rare cases, potential 
top soloists, who tend to go not to 
colleges as such but to specific 
teachers, they can spring up 
anywhere, but are most likely to 
emerge from a background of 
specialist teaching at an early age 
(of which there is insufficient here) 
and from a whole musical culture. 


This fact is often not understood 
by the public at large, attracted by 
the star status of big international 
names. 

Thus there is more than a touch 
of amateurish, ill-informed atti- 
tudes in this preoccupation with 
top soloists revealed by those who 
support the RAM proposals. The 
scheme does nothing for such 
future soloists which could not be 
done by the existing colleges. 

There are as many as three top- 
quality colleges in the eastern 
United States; we need to retain 
such healthy competition here. 
We cannot believe that prefer- 
ment for ihe RAM would not be at 
the expense of the others. To 
single out one college would be 
short-sighted, divisive and harm- 
ful to the profession. 

Yours sincerely, 

RAYMOND FISCHER, 

Royal College of Music, 

NEVILLE DUCKWORTH, 

Royal Northern College of Music, 
GEORGE KiNNEAR. 

Trinitv College of Music, 
CHRISTOPHER KITE, 

Guildhall School of Music & 
Drama, 

Royal College of Music, 

Prince Consort Road 
South Kensington, SW7. 

March 17. 

'Good’ composers 

From Mr R. Anthony Dams 
Sir, Your music critic mentioned 
in his review of the Huddersfield 
Choral Society's Messiah (March 
1 2) “dark Victorian days when we 
were incapable of nurturing one 
good composer”. 

May one presume to advance 
the claims of Arthur Seymour 
Sullivan, or even those of Edward 
Williams Elgar? Or does your 
critic consider them to be great as 
opposed to good composers? 
There are. of course, many who 
think them both great and good 
I remain. Sir, your obedient 
servant. 

R. ANTHONY DAMS, 

301 Park Lane, 

Selston, 

Nottinghamshire. 

March 12. 


Rent control 

From the Chairman of the Small 
Landlords .Association 
Sir, Mr Kenneth Braid wood 
(March 7) says that the private 
rented sector has now shrunk to 
less than 5 per cent of Britain’s 
housing stock, mostly occupied by 
long-established sitting tenants. In 
fact, the private rented sector 
actually accounts for some 9 per 
cent of Britain's dwellings. 

This divides roughly as between 
6 per cent of Britain’s dwellings 
occupied by sitting tenants, and 3 
per cent in the “available for rent” 
sector, which fills the vital func- 
tions of accommodating young 
people making their way in the 
world and providing a bridge to 
home ownership. 

When Mr Braidwood argues 
that decontrol will add precious 
little to the “available for rent” 
sector, he makes the fundamental 
mistake of treating the private 
rented sector as one homogeneous 
mass. Nothing could be further 
from the truth. The “available for 
rent” part of the private rented 
sector is highly volatile, not only 
in terms of supply but also in 
demand. 


Much of this part of the private 
rented sector is in the hands of 
smaller private landlords, who 
when they get a vacancy are totally 
deterred from reletting by the 
impossibly onerous terms im- 
posed by the Rent Act 

The smaller private landlord 
simply is not going to let his 
property with three generation 
security of tenure at an un- 
economic rent to someone who is 
a total stranger and who can yet 
require the landlord to maintain 
the property in good repair regard- 
less of the cost. 

There is an overwhelming case, 
in the national interest and in the 
interests of justice, for reforming 
the Rent Acts in relation to new 
lets. It is a pity that the Labour 
Party and the Alliance refuse to 
see the facts and take such a 
jaundiced view of the average 
private landlord in the re-letting 
market who wants to do a decent 
job on reasonable terms. 

Yours truly, 

GEOFFREY CUTTING, 
Chairman, 

Small Landlords Association, 

7 Rosedene Avenue, SW16. 

March 7. 


Clearer Rugby 

From Mr R. A. B. Crowe 
Sir, Mr Colin Maclvor, who asks 
(March 14) for a set of simple aim 
signals for the referee in Rugby 
Union matches, is just 10 years 
behind the times. In March, 1976, 
the International Rugby Football 
Board agreed a system of signals 
for referees, and a handsome 
illustrated booklet with a green 
cover befitting its Irish origin was 
produced at the board's request 

The reluctance of some of the 
more conservative referees at the 
time to adopt the postures and to 
perform the bodily gyrations re- 
quired for giving the signals was 
overcome when it was pointed out 
to them that uniformity of signal- 
ling would prove advantageous 
not only to players and spectators 
but also to commentators, includ- 
ing any whose knowledge of the 
laws of the game might, alas, be 
slightly less than perfect. 

The approved signals are now 
widely used by referees, particu- 
larly by referees senior enough to 
be appointed to games seen on 
television. Indeed, in their enthu- 
siasm to make their decisions clear 
to all, some referees, not least in 
the Principality, occasionally tend 
to resemble human windmills. 


If. as Mr Maclvor suggests, 
commentators have trouble 
determining the cause of a stop- 
page despite the current profusion 
of signals, it is unfair of him to 
imply blame to referees and 
administrators. 

Yours sincerely, 

R. A B. CROWE 
68 Leighton Avenue, 
Leigb-on-Sea, Essex. 


Under false colours? 

From Mrs Ad&le A. Kitrick 
Sir, My father used to tell us of the 
occasion when, as an undergrad- 
uate at Cambridge before the First 
World War, he was included in the 
team to play a chess match against 
Oxford. As a mediocre player, he 
was surprised but gratified at this 
honour. 

When the teams came together, 
it was found that Oxford were two 
players short and my father was 
“lent” to Oxford, in order to 
balance the numbers on both 
sides. He duly lost all his games, 
thus contributing handsomely to 
Cambridge’s victory. 

Yours faithfully, 

A. A. KITRICK, 

31 Bam Way. 

Wembley, Middlesex. 


Spain and Nato 

From Mr Madron Sehgman, MEP 
for Sussex West ( European Demo- 
crat (Conservative}) 

Sir. Your leader on the Nato 
referendum in Spain (Marcb 14) 
refers unfairty to the "dubious 
political tactics” of the right-wing 
opposition leaders, who (ailed on 
their supporters to abstain. 

Clearly Manuel Fraga had a 
difficult decision to make. He 
decided to recommend abstention 
because a “Yes” vote would have 
committed his Alliance Popular 
for ever to the policies implied in 
the three complex referendum 
questions — Le., non-military 
participation in Nato, a non- 
nuclear Spain and a reduction in 
US forces. In no way could 
Manuel Fraga give approval to 
these three leftist policies. There- 
fore the only honest alternative 
was abstention. 

It is not surprising that such a 
serpentine set of questions has 
enabled all the main political 
parties, including the three com- 
munist groups, to claim comfort 
from the result. But since no other 


party called for abstention. Fraga 
can fairly claim that a major part 
of the 11,558,000 (40 per cent) 
voters who abstained and the 
1,121,000 (4 per cent) who spoilt 
their papers, were following his 
lead. Abstention in the 1976 
referendum, which the Socialists 
called for, was only 22 per cent 
This casts doubt on your 
contention that Felipe Gonzales 
“has emerged much stronger than 
before, with the prospect of win- 
ning a further four years in 
power”. He was only able to 
marshall the support of 31.6 per 
cent of the electorate for his "Yes” 
vote. 1 do not deny however that 
the result of the referendum has 
been a welcome boost for peace 
and security. Felipe Gonzales 
deserves great credit for revising 
his former distaste for Nato and 
for submitting his change of mind 
to a national referendum. 

Yours faithfully, 

MADRON SEUGMAN, 
Micklepage House, 

Nuthurst, 

Near Horsham, 

West Sussex, 

March 15. 



MARCH 22 1919 

In March 19IB Russia and 
Germany signed the Treaty of 
Brest ■ Litousk, which Britain and 
her allies refused to recognise. By 
August, British, French, American 
and Japanese troops were at 
Murmansk and Archangel A 
contingent of the British was 
supporting and training the 
armtes of Admiral Koltchak who. 

at Omsk had set up a counter- 
revolutionary government He was 
captured by the Bolshevists and 
executed at Irkusck in February 
1920. Our Special Correspondent 
Robert Wilton. 


was . 


THE RULER OF 
SIBERIA 

NEW HOPE OF RUSSIA 
(From Our Special 
Correspondent) 
KHARBIN, March 10 

At Omsk 1 met not a few people 
whom I last saw in Petrograd 17 
months ago, but the leading lights 
of old and new Russia remain west 
of the Urals. Omsk, after all, is only 
a huge overgrown village, and the 
Russian Government perforce is 
composed of local celebrities, who 
are doing their best to grapple with 
a colossal task. It seems a thousand 
pities that the most competent 
brains of Russia should not be 
available at Omsk. The same may 
be said of the military talent under 
General Denikin's banners. These 
are undoubted handicaps to Admi- 
ral Koltchak, and the wonder is 
that be manages so well 

As the train sped me westward I 
had become more impressed with 
the indications of the growing 
confidence and authority of Admi- 
ral Kohchak's Government. Also it 
had been borne in upon me that 
Admiral Koltchak was the centre 
of things and that people look to 
him alone 

POPULAR BRITISH 
SOLDIERS 

The Ural front is held exclusive- 
ly by Russians. The new regiments 
forming are required to break the 
Bolshevist line and sweep into 
Russia. Admiral Koltchak cannot 
do without the support of the Allies 
on the lines of communications. He 
owes much to the presence of 
Allied troops’ in the cities of 
Siberia. The men of the Hampshire 
and Middlesex battalions gaily 
promenade the streets of Omsk in 
the fiercest frost without over- 
coats. This does much to strength- 
en the confidence so essential to 
the successs of the new Govern- 
ment. All Omsk is Socking to its 
Cathedral for the Sunday service, 
with Anglican rites, to the accom- 
paniment of the Hampshires' 
band. The Hampshires and Mid 
dlesex men also are in great 
demand for the exchange of Rus- 
sian and English lessons. 

The same may be said of other 
cities where the British soldiers 
have taken up their abode. Tommy 
has made himself immensely popu- 
lar. The “sing-songs” and weekly 
dances given by the British battal- 
ions are in great request The 
conduct of our men reflects the 
highest credit upon them and their 
commanding officers. They are 
doing a great work for their 
country and Russia. I say it 
without reservation, could the 
hasty critics of intervention judge 
for themselves on the spot as I 
have been able to do so. they would 
encourage a substantial increase of| 
our contingents. 

To withdraw them at the present 
juncture would be tantamount to a 
direct incitement to Bolshevism. 
The nascent confidence in the wise 
and prudent role of Admiral 
Koltchak would be seriously, per- 
haps irrevocably, compromised. 

The morning of Admiral 
Koltchak's return from the front 
the main street of Omsk was lined 
with soldiers. I had my first look at 
the young army in which lies the 
hope of Russia. They are fine lads, 
healthy and typical peasants. They 
stood without arms, evidently on 
the best of terms with themselves 
and the world. As material they are 
of the best, and comparatively easy 
to get into shape. A combination of 
this rustic element and the better 
educated town youth will make up 
a splendid army. . - - 


Meaningful terms 

From Mr T. W. Miller-Jones 
Sir, It is by no means essential to 
have two estate agents for curious 
parallelisms to be drawn. When 
we bought this house some years 
ago the garden (then, as now, in a 
state of deferred maintenance) was 
described in a single phrase as “A 
naturalist's paradise, excellent 
shooting”. 

Yours truly. 

T. W. MILLER-JONES, 

Cob House, 

Saxmundham Road, 

Aldeburgh, Suffolk. 


Seen along the line 

From Mr S. H. Freedman 
Sir. Mr Jackson's letter (February 
26) about the inflatable scarecrow 
reminded me of Mr Beresford. an 
old gardener who once worked for 
me. He knew a thing or two about 
scarecrows! 

One, which he put under an 
apple tree, nearly made me jump 
out of my skin when I walked 
around the comer of the bouse 
and saw it for the first time. It was 
in the shape of an imposing and 
buxom woman, somewhat resem- 
bling Mrs B. 

But his most successful bird 
scarer was a large piece of card- 
board cut out in the shape of a cat, 
which cast its shadow over the 
raspberry bushes, Perhaps Mr 
Jackson should be investing in 
inflatable cats rather than inflat a* 
able men. 

Yours faithfully, 

SIDNEY FREEDMAN 28 

Place Guy D' Arezzo 7, 

1060 Brussels, 

Belgium. 





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COURT 

CIRCULAR 


Afterwards Her Majesty anc 
His Royal Highness travelled in 
the Royal Train to Victoria 
Station. Manchester and were 
received by the Lord Mayor of 
Manchester (Councillor K_ 
Strathj. 

The Queen and The Duke of 
Edinburgh drove to the Midland 
Hotel Conference Centre 
Development and. having been 
received by the Leader of the 
Greater Manchester Council 
(County Councillor Bernard 
Clarke), Her Majesty unveiled a 
commemorative plaque in- 
augurating the Reconstruction 

of the Midland Hotel Con- 
ference Centre: 

The Queen and the Duke of 


Edinburgh then walked to the 
Greater Manchester Exhibition 
and Event Centre. 

Her Majesty opened the Cen- 
tre. unveiled a commemorative 
plaque, and with His Royal 
Highness toured the building. 

Afterwards the Queen, with 
The Duke of . Edinburgh, 
honoured the Chairman of the 
Greater Manchester Council 


Forthcoming 


marriages 

Dr R.C. Fraser 
and Miss CM. Doneli 
The engagement is announced 
from Cape Town between Rich- 
ard. only son of Mr and Mrs 
W.D. Fraser. ofGfpeTown. and 
Caroline, elder daughter of Mr 
and Mrs R_A. DonelJ, of 
Kilmingum, Wiltshire, and 
Kensington. London. 

Dr R~A- Holman 
and Miss RJVI. Tinker 
The engagement is announced 
between Richard, only son of 
Mr and Mrs Hugh Holman, of 
Cuddesdon, Oxford, and Ra- 


cheL, only daughter of Preb- 
endary Eric and Dr Anthea 
Tinker, of London, WC1. • 

Mr M.N. Lambirth 
and Miss A-C. Wood 
The engagement is announced 
between Mark, only son of Mr 
and Mrs P.M. Lambirth. of St 
Albans, and Anne, elder daugh- 
ter of Captain and Mrs G.B. 
Wood, of Stoke Poges. 
Buckinghamshire. 

Mr R-L MMforth 
and Miss J-S- Littlejohn 
The engagement is announced 
between Richard, son of Mr and 
Mrs J.K. Midforth, of Prestbury, 
Cheshire, and Jane, younger 


daughter of Dr and Mrs A.C. 
Littlejohn, of Cossington. 


Littlejohn, of Cossington. 
Leicestershire. 

Dr AJH. Watson 
and Dr MJ. Platt 
The engagement is announced 
between Alastair. elder son of 
Mr and Mrs Donald Watson, of 
Edinburgh, and Mary Jane, 
eldest daughter of Mr and Mrs 
Basil Platt, of Timsbury, Bath. 


Harrow School 

The Duchess of Aberrant has 
been appointed a governor of 
Harrow SchooL 

Hafleybury and 
Imperial Service 
College 

Mr David John Jewell Head- 
master of Repton School, has 
been appointed to succeed Mr 
D.M. Summerscale as Master of 
Haileybury and Imperial Ser- 
vice College. Mr Jewell will take 
up his new appointment in April 
1987. 

St Mary’s School, 
Wantage 

Music scholarships for 1986 
have not been awarded. 


BIRTHS, MARRIAGES. 

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; .Hosanna: Blessed n tv (hat comeUi 
in the name of the Lord. 

SL Mark II: 9 


BIRTHS 


GUmmo-WALSH Christian Patrick 
Julian on 18th March 1936 at North 
Middlesex Hospital. Son to Brendan 
and Alleen. and brother to Stobhan. 
Damien and Melanie- Deo Gradas. 




THE TIMES SATURDAY MARCH 22 1986 


COURT 

AND 

SOCIAL 


Forgotten vision of the city 


(County Councillor G. Colin) 


and the Deputy Chairman. 
Commereia) Union Assurance 
Company (Mr Nicholas Baring) 
with her presence at luncheon in 
the Main Restaurant. 

In the afternoon Her Majesty 
and His Royal Highness drove 
to the Headquarters of the 
Greater Manchester Police and 
were received by the Mayor of 
Trafford (Councillor R. Mee), 
the Chairwoman of the Greater 
Manchester Police Committee 
(County Councillor Mrs G.l. 
Cox) and the Chief Constable of 
Greater Manchester (Mr C J. 
Anderton). 

The Queen opened the new 
Greater Manchester Police 
Communications and Com- 
puter Centre, unveiled a 


BUCKINGHAM PALACE 
March 21: The Queen and The 
Duke of Edinburgh arrived at 
Wigan North-West Station in 
the Royal Train this morning 
and were received by Her 
Majesty's Lord-Lieutenant for 
Greater Manchester (Sir Wil- 
liam Downward) and the Mayor 
of Wigan (Councillor G.A. 
Lockett). 


Her Majesty and His Royal 
Highness drove to Trencberfieid 
Mill, were received by the 
Chairman of Wigan Pier Co- 
ordinating Committee and lead- 
er of Wigan Metropolitan 
Borough Council (Councillor B. 

Coyle), and then travelled by 
Waterbus to the Heritage 
Centre. 

The Queen opened the Wigan 
Pier Development, unveiled a 
commemorative plaque and. 
with The Duke of Edinburgh, 
toured the Heritage Centre. 

Afterwards Her Majesty and 


commemorative plaque and. 
with The Duke of Edinburgh, 
toured the Centre. 


Her Majesty and His Royal 
Highness later left Manchester 
International Airport in an air- 


craft of The Queen's Flight. 

The Duchess of Grafton. Mr 
Robert Fellowes and Lieuten- 
ant-Colonel Blair Stewart-Wil- 
son were in attendance. 
KENSINGTON PALACE 
March 21: The Prince of Wales. 
Duke of Cornwall, this after- 
noon attended a Seminar on 
Farm Structure, organized by 
Responsible Use of Resources 
in Agriculture and on the Land, 
at the Royal Agricultural Col- 
lege, Cirencester. 

March 21: Princess .Alice. Duch- 
ess of Gloucester, as President, 
this afternoon visited the HRH 
Princess Christian’s Hospital, 
and was later present at a 
Reception given by the Trustees 
of the Hospital at the Guildhall, 
Windsor. 

Miss Jane Egerton-War- 
burton was in attendance. 


Christian’s journey m 
Pilgrim's Progress ends in a 
city which “shone like the 
sun” and where “the streets, 
also, were paved with gold”. 
Those whose journeys nowa- 
days finish either in London 
or any other of our great cities 
find little sun shining, and the 
myth of the golden streets a 
sick joke. 

The long history of 
Bun van’s city imagery passes 
us by. We inhabit the ruins of 
Athens, Jerusalem, Florence 
and Rome. 

Traditionally, all journeys 
should end in the dty, a place 
of freedom, civilizing influ- 
ence and sufficient wealth to 
enable the citizen to make real 
choices. Life in the country- 
side was nasty, brutish and 
short. City life offered safety, 
fulfilment, harmonious social 
intercourse: all willingly pur- 
chased by mutual cooperation 
and respecL . 

Order and law would nd the 
streets of tear, curb licence and 
greed, and prohibit the inev- 
itable corruption of power. Set 
against such a vision it is not 
hard to see why there is so 
little faith in the city: either as 
a concept or a reality. The 
experience of decay in city life, 
though, is much more than a 
contemporary problem. Dick- 


ens and Dostoievsky cata- 
logued the dark side of ihe 
vision in the last century. 

“For lack of vision the 
people perish”; perhaps the 
desirability of city life is not 
being argued and presented 
with enough cogency to make 
people work for it energetical- 
ly. On the whole, loo many 
prefer retreat to the country 
cottage and second home 

On Palm Sunday, Jesus 
entered the city and his minis- 
try reached its climax. Delib- 
erately he set his face to go to 
Jerusalem; not necessarily to 
take on the establishment, to 
provoke the government, or to 
challenge his opponents to a 
final showdown. He went 


Jesus's prayers and heart, at tested and vindicated, sugggstj 
any rate, as his tears over the ing that Christians can and 


dtv reveaL 

The donkey ride is usually 
taken as a piece of propaganda 
for peace, especially by those 
who want to recruit Jesus as a 


hero and leader to their cause- may be possible It emerges 
They see the choice before the that most of the deigy who 


people of the city (then and 
now) between militarism and 
pacifism. 

Jesus’s entry, however, is a 
manifesto of a different kind. 


work in the inner ones do not 
wish to leave. There is more 
job satisfaction there than; 
elsewhere. 

The other is that Christian 


inwi mww VI U lAuawwu* ■ I !■■■■■ _ j[Ut UUIWI W UUU V** * ** 1 " 1 " 

It has specific messianic over- commitment, what it docs 
tones which role out a simplis- develop, is stronger in inner- 


Jerusalem: not necessarily to tic interpretation. The animal, city parishes than in comfort- 
take on the establishment, to carefully selected by Jesus, able Britain. Numbers at 
provoke the government, or to was a new mount, pointing up Fairer communion are not 
challenge bis opponents to a the newness of Jesus’s preach- much greater than for on any 
final showdown. He went ing. “My kingdom is not of other Sunday. There are fewer 
there because for any Jew this world”, ■ be raid; not fhngers, which is a source of 
“Zion is a fair place and the meaning it has nothing to do strength, 
joy of the whole earth”. It was .with this world, but that once ^ citizens of Chartres 
a long-established expectation it is rooted in the here and 0 *^ their gloriom cathedral 
m the city Gotfs prom- now if costs m ore of self and at muc fa pereonSrast afler a 
ises would find fulfilment and has more implications for tire AieaKtrons senes of fixw while 
his kingdom come. future and eternity than is w was beine built. It was the 

Joijsaiera’s story has been usually realized. 

as mixed as the history of any The other detail (mentioned SSS SeriS 

dty. Before Jesus, it had been only in St John's Gospel) is 

sacked, broken, restored; the palms. They were used 

woire still, it had betrayed its when Simon Maccabaeus en- 

vocation. Timeafler tune the tered Jenisalem m mumph S^oubfcs tS^tion. 

prophets pleaded, Jerusalem, and was made king because of 

Jerusalem, return unto the a victory already won. When f''annn Paul TTm 


jot of the whole earth”. It was 
a long-established expectation 
that in the city, God’s prom- 
ises would find fulfilment and 
his kingdom come. 

Jerusalem’s story has been 
as mixed as the history of any 
dty. Before Jesus, it had been 
sacked, broken, restored; 
worse still, it had betrayed its 
vocation. Time after time the 
prophets pleaded. "Jerusalem, 
Jerusalem, return unto the 


The dozens of Chartres 
rebuilt their glorious cathedral 
at much personal cost after a 
disastrous series of fires while 
h was being built It was the 
heart of their dty. Those who 
recover Jesus's faith in the city 


after the collapse which now 
so troubles the nation. 


Lord thy God”, but in spite of Jesus entered the dty his 
disaster and failure, the an- victory had not yet been won. 


dent vision was still alive; in He found his feitb in the dty 


A memorial service for the 
Right Rev Victor Pike will be 
held in Salisbury Cathedral at 
noon today. 

A memorial service for Sir 
Ronald Wates will be held at St 
Lawrence Jewry-next-GuildhalL 
London. EC2. on Tuesday, 
March 25, 1986. at noon. 


Mr N.C. Meadmore 
and Miss D.D. Sannderson 
The engagement is announced 
between Nicholas, third son of 
Mrs Patricia Meadmore and the 
late Norman Meadmore, of 
Henbam. Essex, and Daphne, 
younger daughter of Mrs Joanna 
Sannderson and the late Mr 
Robert Saunderson, of Guilden 
Morden. Cambridgeshire. 


Birthdays 

TODAY: Lord Alport 74; Mr 
R.A. Belhell. 64; Air Marshal Sir 
Denis Crowley-Milling, 67; the 
Right Rev Dr EB. Henderson, 
76; the Very Rev Lawrence 
Jackson. 60: Dr Harry Kay, 67; 
Sir W illiam Lindsay, 79; Mr 
Andrew Lloyd Webber. 38; M 
Marcel Marceau, 63; Lavinia 
Duchess of Norfolk, 70; Lady 
(Frederick) Ogilvie, 86: Sir 
Lvnden Pindling, 56; Sir Bryan 
Roberts. 63: Mr Paul Rogers. 69; 
Mr Stephen Sondheim, 56; Lord 
Stokes. 72: Mr Leslie Thomas, 
55. Miss Fanny Waterman, 66. 
TOMORROW: Professor H.C 
Allen, 69; Mr Norman Bailey, 
53; Sir Roger Bannister. 57; Mr 
Barry Cryer, 51; Mr Jimmy 
Edwards. * 66; Marshal of the 
RAF Lord Elworthy. 75; Mr 
Peter Godfrey. 62; Mr Douglas 
Jay, 79: Sir David McNee. 61; 
Mr Michael Manser, 57; Mr 
Edward Middleditch, 63; Mr 
Alfred Morris, MP, 58; Sir 
Ralph Perring. 81; Sir Edward 


Appointments 

Latest appointments include: 
Professor David Williams, 
president of Wolison College. 
Cambridge, and Rouse Ball 
Professor of English Law. to be 
chairman of the Advisory 
Committee on Animal Experi- 
ments with immediate effect in 
succession to Lady Warnock. 


Vice-Admiral Sir Thomas Baird 
to be chairman of ErsJdne 
Hospital for disabled ex-service- 
men and women at Bishoptoo, 
Glasgow, in succession to Sir 
Eric Yarrow. 


Luncheon 

Ins titute of Directors 
The City branch of the Institute 
of Directors hdd a luncheon 
meeting on Thursday, March 
20. at the Elizabeth Suite. 
Barrington House, 59-67 
Gresham Street, London, EC2. 
Mr Donald Chilvers was in the 
chair. The guest speaker was Sir 
Kenneth Cork. 


ner and Mr R.V. 
Headmaster of Livt 
lege, also spoke. 


Service dinners 


Dinners 


Mr R.C. Pool ton, aged 48, 
former Head Master of Wydiffe 
College, Stonehouse, to be Head 
Master of Christ's College. 
Horsham, from January 1, 1987, 
in succession to Mr J.T. 
Hansford. 


Warner, 75; the Right Rev G.O. 
Williams. 73: Sir Denis Wright, 


Mr John Macrae, aged S3, 
Ambassador to Senegal, to be 
additionally Ambassador (non- 
resident) to Guinea-Bissau in 
succession to Mr PX-CKeefie, 
who has taken up an appoint- 
ment in London. 


Company of Chartered Sec- 
retaries and Administrators 
The Lord Mayor and Lady 
Mayoress, accompanied by the 
Sheriffs, were present at a livery 
dinner given by the Company of 
Chartered Secretaries and 
Administrators at the Mansion 
House last fright- They were 
received by Mr Leslie Croydon. 


Master. Su- Lindsay Ring, Se- 
nior Warden, and Mr Ronald 


Latest wills 


Mr H.M. Morrison 
and Miss EJ, Whelan 
The engagement is announced 
between Hugh Mac Arthur, only 
son of the l3te Mr and Mrs 
Alexander Morrison, of Coat- 
bridge. Scotland, and Elizabeth 
Janet, only daughter of the late 
Professor R.F. Whelan and of 
Mrs Whelan, of Devonshire 
Place, London. WI. 


Marriages 


Mr Arthur Stanley Hammon, of 
Wappenbury. Warwickshire, 
left estate valued at £1,734,495 
neL 

Baroness Braybrooke, of War- 
dens Ambo. Essex. Hereditary 
Visitor. Magdalene College, 
Cambridge. left £210.879 net 
Miss Enid Mabel Luis 
Fernandes, of Hyde Park. Loo- 
, don. winner of the Open Ski 
Championship of India m 1933, 
left £192.084 net. 



Bounds. Junior Warden. The 
speakers were the Lord Mayor, 
the Master, the Senior Warden 
and the Common Serjeant. The 
guests included: 

Ttj* Mexican Ambassador. Sir 
Kenneoi and Lady Cork, me Masters 
or Uie PkHuhT. SoUcttora*. Makers 
of Playing Cards’ and 'Tobacco Pipe 


The Queen's Regiment 
Brigadier FLC. MHIman, Colo- 
nel of The Queen’s Regiment, 
presided at the annual Officers’ 
Qob dinner held last night in 
the Drike of York’s Head- 
quarters, Chelsea. Major-Gen-^ 
era! M.F. Reynolds was among 
those present. 

4th Parachute Brigade 
General Sir John Hadoett and 
other officers of 4th Parachute 
Brigade (1943/44) held a dinner 
at the Army and Navy Club last 
night. . 

Anny Catering Corps . 

The Army Catering Corps 
Officers* past and present dinner 
was held bst night in the HQ 
Mess Aldershot. General Sir 
Geoffrey Hewlett, Repre- 
sentative Colonel Com- 
mandant, presided and General 
Sir Roland Guy, Adjutant Gen- 
eral, also spoke. • 

HQ RAF Support Coamand 
Air Marshal Sr John Sutton, 


Makers’ and Tobacco Blenders’ 
Companies: Die President and Sec- 
retary of Hie institute of Chartered 
Secret a ries and AOranmnun ana 
tbatr ladies. 


Lincoln’s Inn 


Lord Colville of Cuirass, QC 
has been elected a Bencher of 
Lincoln’s Inn. 


Mr R-J- Milleo 
and Miss N.W. Ho 
The marriage took place on 
March 20 in Sydney of Mr 
Richard Milieu, son of the late 
Mr James Millen and of Mrs 
James Millen. of Wickham. 
Hampshire, and Miss Woon 
Ho. daughter of Mr and Mrs 
Kant Koon Ho. of Kuala 
Lumpur. 

Mr S- Pearson 
and Miss G. Thrower 
The marriage took place on 
Friday. March 14, 1986. at All 
Saints Church, Fulham, Lon- 
don, between Mr Simon Pear- 
son. son of the late Mr L.N. 
Pearson and Mrs Elsa Pearson, 
of Kirtlington, Oxfordshire, and 
Miss Gillian Thrower, daughter 
of Dr A.L. Thrower and the late 
Mrs Joyce Thrower, of Stonely, 
Cambridgeshire. 


Sir John Lyefl Langman. of 
Cirencester, who was found 
dead in his car last October, left 
£139.391 net. 


Hugo; Mr Gerald Philip, of 
Midhurst, West Sussex£33 1,412 


Swaziland visit 

Prince Micheal of Kent wfll visit 
Swaziland from April 24 to 27 to 
re pr ese nt the Queen ax the 
coronation of Crown Prince 
Makhosetive. He will be 
accompanied by Princess Mi- 
chael. 


Institute of’ Chartered 
Sbipbrokers 

Mr J. Good, President of the 
Institute of Chartered 
Shipbroken, presided at tire 
seventy-fifth anniversarydhmer 
held last night at the Hilton 
1 boteL The guests of honour were 
the Earl of Caithness, Mr Axle 
Jebsen, and Mr David Bee. 

Old LerpooUan Society 
I Mr S.P. Watson, President of 
the London branch of the Old 
Lerpoolian Society, presided at 
I the annual dinner held last night 
ar the East India and Public 
1 Schools Club. Sir Anthony Gar- 


Hospitals patron 

The Princess of Wale s has 
agreed to become patron ‘of the 
National Hospitals for Nervous 
Diseases in London, it was 
announced today. The hospitals 
are at Queen .Square; Maida 
Vale and at Finchley. The 
special health authority 
consuming the hos pit a ls also 
manages the College of Speech 
Sciences in Portland Place and 
Hampstead, and the Special 
Centre for Epilepsy at Chateau 
St Peter, Bu ckinghamshi re. • 


Music bursaries have been 
awarded to Charlotte Wake, of 
Homefield School and Rebecca 
High ton, of St Swithun's Junior 
School. Winchester, and St 
Mary’s, Wantage. 


King’s School, 
Bruton 


The following scholarships for 
1986 are announced: 

Mator MhoUnhlp: G8 Shlotpcr 

1 King's Softool . Brniw Junior School. 

Hazfeqrove House). 

Minor scholarships: JA Gamut (SI 
Michael's- Tawstodo. AJ Hitchcock 
'Kira's School. Bruton Junior School. 
Kaztevos'C House). 

EsMbTuom: sm .Cook (Banda SchooL 
Nairobi 1. B Box (King's SchooL Bruton 


Junior SchooL Hazlegrove House), SJ 

Mackenzie Crooks t£dgeborouBhi. P 
Brasted iFoires). 

Music scholarships: major. AC Starter 
jSj^leJWanoc). minor. JA Stiwens 

An exhibition: AJ Hitchcock (King's 
School. Bruton Junior School. 
Kazleurove House). 


Births, Marriages, Deaths and In Memoriam 


COFFIN On March 15Ui at The Rosie 
Maternity Hospital. Cambridge. Jo 
Chris amt Sue (n*e Colwell) a son. 
Michael Richmond. 


CONIJET On March 14 th at Wexfiam 
Park Hospital, to Melanie |n£e 
Hughes) and DavM a daughter (Ktm- 
twley Frances). 


Munster. » Alton Otoe Braraweo 
an d DavM. a daughter EBzabeth. 

RUSSELL - On 4th March, in Nairobi. 
Kenya, to GUI and ausuut. a son Al- 
exander Robert Cameron, a brother 
for Bonnie. 


EHTHOVEH- On March I9lh. to Eliza- 
beth and Justin, a daughter. Martha 
Alice. 


STERN -On 19th March, to Aprtl (nee 
Samoson) and Philip, a son. Edward, 
a brother tor George. 


EVANS To Anne and Andrew, a hr 
atnstomer Robert, a brother for 
Simon. Jonathan and Daniel. 


WAMWM6HT - On March 4Ui. to 
Maggie (nte RMoeweU) and Peter, a 
son. William, a ban Or other to 
Alexandra. 


GOULD On March 20th at South mead 
Bristol, to Carol and Ramie, a beauti- 
ful daughter Vanessa. 


WEALTHALL To John and Julie (trie 
Adams), on 19th March, a daughter 
Katy Alison. 


m-LIAftb • On 3rd March 1986 to 
Teresa (nee Smith t and Trevor, a 
daughter. Carolyn Ann. a sister for 
Martin. 


«tnUJs On March 17th to Jill CMwtep 
and Lionel, a aaugther Thea Lewie, 
a sister for Chloe. 


DEATHS 


■WWJstqne - on xiot March at 
Cucvma Hospital, to Jayne EBza- 
tmh uric wtiicock) and Michael 
C< m i there, a daughter. Sarah Helen 
Carruthere. 


WNC On March 17th to Sally (nee 
Stevens) and Tom. a daughter 
Dorothea Kate. 


Kj HHW Oflp - to Nicole uric de 
Fresnes) and Ttm. on Saturday 
March 8th 1986. a daughter. Matilda 
AUW. a aster for Harriet Mary. 


KIWU- On March 2Qlh t986. to 
StnKHi and Mary, a daughter Luo 


UEBEHMAN - On March 20th to 
Stuart and Sybil, Abigail Rebecca 
Bose- to Genuna and 

Melanie, gramlchiid to Joe and Dons 
Heath. Jerry ana Libby Ueberman. 


POWELL on the nth March, to- 
Rosemarie brie Chaui) and Grant, a 
beautiful no Qwnes John 
Machatne. 


(OVERS On llth March at B.M.H. 


ALDRIDGE - On March 17th 1986. in 
Edinburg*. John Derek. M-B-E- 
Royal Tank Regiment, wved hus- 
band of Ada. Balado House. Kinross. 
Funeral Service at Perth Crematori- 
um on Monday 24th March « 
3.16pm. Family flowers only and no 
lettere please. 

BACKHOUSE On Man* 19th 1986 
peacefully after a anon illness in 
ivyhall Nursing Home. 
Crowtwreagh. Sussex. Captain Ivan 
Oldham Backhouse R.N.. retired 
aged 82 years. Beloved husband of 
Die late Margaret, father of Loveday. 
Charles and Judy andaramffatherof 
Roger. Peter and Oliver and Jona- 
than. Andrew. Salty and Claire. 
Funeral Service at Holy Trinity 
Church. Gookham. Berks cm 
Wednesday. 26th March at 12 noon 
followed by private cremation. Fam- 
ily flowers only. Donations to R-N. 
Benevolent Society. 1 Fleet SL Lon- 
don EC4. 

BENTAU. - On March 20th peacefully 
at home In Broughton Hampshire. 
AdeUa Elizabeth in her 7001 year, be- 
loved wife of Rows), dearly beloved 
mother of Edward. Alastafr. Mere, 
Rowena. AurtoL and grandmother of 
17 kwlno ' orandctiUdren. Funeral 


Service St Marys Church 

Broughton, near Slockbridpe Hamp- 
shire. Tuesday 2Sth March 11 son. 
Flowers may be sent to A H Cheater. 
122 The Hundred. Ramsey 

Hampshire. 

■BDULPHOn March 200). Robin, son 
of the lale LH. Col Harold 
MavromtohaeU Blddtdph. Rifle Bri- 
gade. and Mis BkfatuhJh brie 
Edwards), hoband of Dm late Mrs E. 
R. (May) Biddulph orie Gregory) of 
Btwdford Forum. Funeral at Si Sav- 
iors Church. Mortimer West Cod. on 
Wednesday March 26th at 3.00pm. 
Family flowers only. Donations to 
me Church of England Children's 
Society. 

■tUMSTON - On Marth 19th. peace- 
fully. aiSL LmnartTa Hcaptee. ysric 
Toro BOingtoa. Priest Funeral Ser- 
vice at PockUngtod Pansh Church, 
on Tuesday March 25m. at 5 J**. 
followed by c r an a BOP at York Cre- 
matorium- No flowcM. donattons to 
St. Leonard's HoNNCe. York. 

COLLINS -On Wednesday IMiMkIi 
E lisabeth Mary of 7a Queens Road. 
ftfcftfnaiKl. Surrey. Much lowed 
mother, grandmother. fricuL and 
coaeague. Service on Tuesday 2Sth 
March at 3.16 pm at St Matthias 
Church. Church Read. RkhnwmL 
AH friends welcome. No memorial 
service. Fanaty flowers only. 

BARKER ELISABETH - see Oothia. 

CROW I HU on March 19Ui peaceful- 
ly at home. Andrew Guy. dear 
husband of Bspem. a devoted father 
at WDUam. Eva. Lindsay. Elizabeth 
and a much loved and respected 
grandfather. Service lakes place at 
Statthwatle Parish Oiurch. Hudders- 
field. on Tuesday March 26th at 
lpm. to be followed try a private cre- 
mation. No flowers by to* request, 
but donattons in lieu to HuddereSdd 
Hospice Appeal Fund, e/o Mr A. 
Galvin. 74 Greenfield Avenue. 
Oakes. HuddereHeM 

DAUBENY - On March 19tb 1966. 
Ann OetJbeny, M.B.ET- XP- beloved 
wife of Ronald and devoted mother 
of Philip and Giles. Funeral Service 
at$L Nicholas Church. Union. MaM- 
stone. KbiL at 2.30pm. on 
Wednesday 26m March. Enq ui r ie s to 
Thomas Miller. 43 Metvffle Road. 
Maidstone. Teh Maidstone 64834. 


DAVBtSON On 19th March at Guy* 
Hospital pe a cefully after a topp and 
courageous battle agamst cancer. Jo 
aepftu* Carol of Sdcup, Kent aged 
47 years. The adored wtfe or Christo- 
pher. dearly loved mother of Jan t 
and Katherine and much loved step- 
mother of Richard and PsuL Funeral 
Service at St John’s Qiurth. SJdcup. 
on 27th March at 2X)0pm followed 
by private cremation. Family fldwess 
only, but donaooas please to Bexley 
Macmillw Nurse APpeaL c/o Na- 
tKutal Westminster Bank. 289 
Broadway. Bexley Head) . Kens. 

00(0* 20th March, at Edpemoor 
Houae. Btthop Thonden..Nr Harro- 
gate. id hts- 78th year. WUttam 
Dtxou- OAE. Dearly loved husband 
of Margaret dear father of Margaret. 
Elizabeth and Nigel and beloved 
grandad of Sarah and James. Crema- 
tion Service for family only. 
Memorial Service at AD Satnrs 
Owrch. Storburn In Oner on 
Wednesday 26th March as 1 1 -00 am. 
Donattons to Ms memory maybe gtv- 

' eh to All Saint's Qnrch. c/e of the 
Vicarage. Sherbura In EBa*L 

EVE - an March 20th. peacefully at 
home. J. Doutdas Tristram 
P-P.RJ.CS- at the age of 88. rmxJx 
loved husband of Shells and father of 
jotm and BilL former serdoc partner 
of J.R. Eve & San. Funeral service at 
Parish Oiurch West watering at 12 
o’clock Tuesday March 2Sih. Flew- ■ 
era and enatdriea to Edward Whfle&. 
Son. Chkhotar 782196. Memorial 
sendee War. • 

HfCNTf I - Roland Jeffery at the 
(keen. ANeriou. Bristol on 19m 
March aged 73. Beloved husband or 
Beth and dear (Mho- of Aw and 
William. Sendee at St Marak 
Church. Thornbury on Wednesday 
26th March at 1 p.m- foBowed by 
private cremation, Ftonfly flowers 
only. D o aa t to cs If desired to The 
Parkinson Disease Society. 96 Pori- 
land Place. London WIN 3DG- 

UKAS - Arthur j oho of FriafleW 
Oven gaacafUy March jgm. fu- 
nerol ax St Peters. FrwdWd Green, 
at 3 pm on Tuesday 2Sth March. 

MARKOV Rate VuUmova., beloved 
and admired by lamuy said friends la 
East and West In Sofia 19th Mareb 
aged 90. Rest tn Peace. “ 


RNINt - Peacefully at iTelmrtnarrii on 
20th March 1986. Air Commodore 
Adam Muir CJJ~ (RAF! Retired) 
MA.BSc.NAaLADnrbBKraf 
Angria and John. Service at IT w«m 
King Street IlsiSM hu ro ii on Toes- 
day 2sih Mirth -at ZOOgni. Faueral 
thereaner to Fasiane Cemetery. 


PRRKM. On March 19th. peacefufly 
at home. Traveller’s Rest ton. 
HotnWMfield. wtth ho- OmOy. Nora. 
Service and cre staUu n at Brtmington 
Crematorium on Tuesday Match 
28th M 12 noon. FUmlty flowers only 
please but dona ttons tor Cancer Be-. 
Kef at Weston Park Hospital way be 
sent to A. Dunham and San Ltd. Pu- 
-Jturol Direc to rs. 66-Snan* HU Lane. 
Dronflrid SIS 8LO. 


PITMAN Oh March t9th 1996. 
suddenly Sr Hubert Pitman. OB£. 
of Da n m m re Paric-Bpetono r si. tont 
Funeral Private. 


SMALL On 20th March peacefully at 
Lymewood Ntashig Home. Margaret 
togas OMsy) widow of Dr FVSmaH. 
COlaniaf Medical Service, dear stoeer 
of Bertye and the late Jean. Qwna- 
ttan at YeovR-on wedneedv 26 
Mam at 2^0 pm. bxndries id A J 
• wakriy & Scbb. Bridpcrt 03t» 
25726. • 


TRAVIS On March 16 th 1986 . Whig 
Oadr.AATravto.BJU RJLF.-sud- 
deify as leave in Caty. Betowed 
- husband of CU and much loved ra- 
ths 1 or Ntaoto. Amanda and PauL 
.TtmerU Bevira at a Udeek Chmch. 
: Southport, on Tuesday 2 SCi Mam 
1986 . at 2 . 46 pm. toaewed bycrema- 
. tton. Ehquhtos to Ccddonr. of 
Southport Tel. 0704 36383 . . 


'IN MEMORIAM - WAS ' 


CR AP W ICK - Major" Harry Piers. 
M»ed in Malaya while serving wtth 
The Green Howards. Never forgot- 
ten- R ememb erin g all Green 
Howards. Ema lAtnaL • Patrida. 
Adrian. Jason. Bmtmra. 


IN MEMOBIAM 
. - PRIVATE 


0 + 


must do the same. 

There are two moving testi- 
monies in the Archbishop of 
Canterbury’s .recently pub- 
lished report which show it 


OBITUARY 

VISCOUNT KNUTSFORD 
Pioneering work on services 
for the disabled 


Canon Paul Hes 

Precenior of Hertford 
Cathedral 


ViscoiHit Knuisford, CK, 
who died on Mandi 7 at ^ we 
age of 65, was teponsibie for 
major improvements m- ser- 
vices for fte 
C hair man from 1948 to 1®I 
of the National Association 
for die Paralysed, which hr ay 
founded, and tough his 
membership of the Ntonal 
Advisory Council on Employ- 
ment of the IXsaWecL 

In his very ffl bfe* 

ignored the lumtafions which 

Ss own paralysis, caused by 
wounds received in Nora 
Africa, imposed on tom. nis 

passion for fox-hunting* inner- 

it^ftosxi his fether, continued 
as a matter of course. 

Even with the viable evi- 
dence of his wheeJchair, it was 
often hard to remember that 

by Julian 

Honand-Hibbert as fie then 
was, and Mr P. F. Stewart, 
was inspired by a bteod of. 
idealism and comreos-sense: _ 

Based on the concept of . 
"availafaality. . not disability”, 
NAP luonoered m the early 
1950s many of the attitudes to 
and services for the disabled 
which axe today common-' 
place; holidays for --the dis- 
abled, assessment and 
rehabilitation of -the. severiy 
handicapped, the cbflec&on 
and collation of information 
about “aids to daily living” 
and; access 0 places of. 
entertainmenL - 

Throughout his period as 
chairman Joftas Hoflahd- 
Hibbert was deeply involved 
with Queen Elizabeth’s Train- 



When N AP decided that fe 
Dtooeerin* weak v« done, it 


should in large p»t amngam- 
ate with that, organisation to 
form Queen Elizabeth's Faun- 
da i ion for the Drsabted. 

Bot it was in those earty 
years that his course was set 
ax»l that he evolved a peraooal 
philosophy which . he 
epitomised .in Zbs own fife - 
that the disabled have a 
contribution id mate to MMti> 
cry as iinpmttm as the boo- 
fits they expert from iL 

He made a significant and 
balanced contribution to cur- 
rent thinking oh an important, 
if n of raaj<ir r problem of our 
time. 

Julian Hollasd-Hibfeert. 
who was created CBE for his 
setvfocsta ^1957, succeeded his 
his fether as 5th Viscount 
Kinitsforti in 197& 


PANDELB PREVELAKK 

Pasdehs PreveWris, one of creative book^ Sara tfotto (Sol- 
Greece’s most distingnsbed ffieis, I928X wtr a lyrical epic 


novefots, critics and men of >aind eftective.dmHL Soda as 
letters, has died at foe age of To fphcUsuiq {Ite Vokano, 


AOC-in-C RAF Support Com- 
mand. and Lady Sutton' at- 


tnand, and Lady Sutton' at- 
tended a ladies guest night held 
last night at RAF Brampton. 
Group Captain M.G. Coggins 


Also a highly respected art . But it m for 1 
critic he is best taaowir for his he a besx kixia 
fiction, ffoiefly. for To story of a low 
Ckroniko mins Poiiteias finest achicvem 
(J938L nanti^ed as The Tak sad romance 
qfa Town in 1977, a portrait bcaatifid towti 
of his native town, of siieat decay, f 
Rtthymnon,oo Crete. (WrOCWOo 

Prevdakis was . bora on vivid cfaniucl 
February 18, 1909, foe desoea- Crette ttpn$tn& 
dam ofCretan nKRik^ priests, --.The tnktqy 
icon-paimers, warriors and U948-5G r revw 


J962)l - 

. Bat it ia for hi* fiction that 
be iabenkaoteiL Oftfeda, the 
stay of ) tea ftfoto Jris 
finest achievement, ttfitifc but 
Sad : iMUtuvii w a 

beautiful feowp iatiKKC* of 
silent decay. Pun tutm i Krai 
<Wrttcted Qwe» 1945), is a 
tind iMcie of foe first 
Cretan tipnsfo^of 1866. . 

- The tzftqsy - Zte Cretan 
( !948-5a^M«n965) tracts 


scholars.- He was educated in foe fortaairts and mgfortuoes 
RethymnoTT and then at the of TCb^ atttine Mgcantanis 


univeraities of Athens and xfaring foe cvmfol years be* 
Faris. : Mfo 1866 dad I9ta O Urn 


He was Director of Rne An 

in foe (kak.hfo^stnr (&-&a*TkeSttnqfpeathml%* 

Edocation - and , anolber mriy fo foe 

thereafter taught fob 

art in the Natkm^ Acadany ' gfe a Qrwan discovers 
nfthe Arts in Athens. ' . b» vOdaDon asa wnier. 


of the Artsin Athens.' .... 

rw. ; P«velakjs*s ratentxou was 

Prm^&slchieve^t by' *.ggS 


older contempai 
tan writer Nikos 


KrtiieCpp!' 


an ms ncDon has an epic 
cpiafity. He was very mnefa the 


u in wiua niww JimJ* .r p-.. u... 

In 1958 he woteaka^ critical 

book on Kazautzak^ nxxk - JR“S5^ developed a 




oered - Jove . John. 














TIMES 


SATURDAY 


week the fi lm world gives its favourites their prizes. Douglas Thompson reveals the unwritten rules behind the tinsel 

Oscar’s billion-dollar baby 





A weekly guide 
to leisure, entertainment 
and the arts 



V J •» 


1928 • 

DI STI NCTJYE^XCW^yEMENT 

C^iltJaraitR^s 

/iifj 

S^ST'iwa R.-& 

y#*- . in 

7/*y 'ffr/if jhJhtiOtn //w/V 

ftn/yntjn/ Ay«^ trju/r/n/ , ttvf/i n/rrrnn /.• 
•J^ P A/IC( -"yiaS &r/nAf. t/ in 
f/ir~/ro • j/ijfrirf t/itritiy // tt 

*««■ rnt/tn/f tfu/tf ‘J/M 


(Above left): the first award certificate. (Above right): Cnraat Acadmy president Robot Wise 




Almost ready: The life-size Oscars which will decorate the au dit or ium get their annual spring Haan 


Oscar winners (from left): Norma Shearer (1930), Walt Disney (1941), Barbra Streisand (1969) and Warren Beatty (1981) 



•\. i:\K-0 


n Monday after- 
noon atabout4pm 
die idling of a cou- 
ple of hundred 
stretctf 1 Timonarie 
engines, aku^ '^ aptly-" 
named Grand Avenue in 
downtown. Los Angeles, will 
be raising the city’s smog level 
and the anxiety of their pas- 
sengers. Inside the velour, 
velvet and red-carpeted an- 
nexe of the Music Centre in 
the Dorothy Chandler Pavil- 
ion, a crazy mix of hysteria 
and professionalism will be 
working to make sure it's all 
right on the night. 

Monday is Hollywood's big 
night — the annual cavalcade 
of self-acclaim, officially 
known as the 58th Academy 
Awards, but better known to 
the audience and the 600 
million who will watch on 
television as the Oscars. 

The main question this year 
is whether Meryl Streep and 
Out of Africa beat Whoopi 
Goldberg and The Colour 


Purple, or whether, as some 
believe, both lose to Prizzi’s 
Honour, directed by the rising 
80-year-old, John Huston. 
The. commercial stakes are 
'high. The roiigh rule is that a 
Best Picture Oscar can add 
more than $20 million -to the 
domestic. (USybox office of a 
fibn and a Bat Actress or Best 
Actor award puts the asking 
price for their next movie at 
5 1. 8m. 

To hundreds behind the 
scenes the ceremony can mean 
glamour and profit. To the 
Academy of Motion Pictures 
and Sciences and its president 
Robert Wise, the 72-year-old 
director who won Oscars him- 
self for West Side Story and 
The Sound qf Music, it is the 
showcase:: for. the film indus- 
try, Hollywood’s evening in - 
somebody else's spotlight. 

“The Oscars and the Oscar 
show are our greatest promo- 
tion and advertisement An 
award-winning film is going to 
do better, whether it is seen in 



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the cinema, on video or os 
television. When West Side 
Story wps the Royal Film in 
London and I was to meet the 
Queen, they told me it would 
the big moment in my life. 
- With great respect'it was not — 
winning the Oscar was".- 
The Oscar nominations — 
five in each category — are 
arrived at by actor voting fot 
actor, writer for writer, direc- 
tor for director and so on. All 
members of the Academy are 
eligible to vote for best pic- 
ture. Once the nominations 
are determined, there is a 
second vote - this time of the 
entire membership — to pick 
the winners. 

Membership currently 
stands at 4,772, of whom 
4,244 are entitled to vote. To 
become a member a candidate 
must have a “substantial body 
of work" in a particular field 
and be endorsed by two 
existing members. 

V oting is by secret 
ballot and to guard 
against fraud, the 
process is super- 
vised by Price 
Waterhouse, the accountants. 
Since surprise became a prime 
ingredient of the ceremony 
more than 50 years ago, the 
names of the winners have 
never been leaked. Frank 
Johnson, a partner in Price 
Waterhouse, plans to keep it 
that way, locking the sealed 
envelopes with the names of 
the winners in a vault until 
they are taken to the ceremony 
on Monday. 

Robert Wise says the system 
is as fair as they can make ft. 
“Yes, there is advertising by 
the studios to try to influence 
voters, but I believe there is a 
backlash effect if the studios 
push too hard. I cannot deny 
that there are emotional 
choices. If an admired star is 
nominated and has never won 
but is ailing, that can affect 
voting. But you cannot legis- 
late against emotion." 

The two certainties on 
Monday are that Steven 
Spielberg won’t get an Oscar 
and Paul Newman will. 
Though Spielberg’s The Col- 
our Purple (yet to be seen in 
Britain) has gained 11 nomi- 
nations, they do not — contro- 
versially — indude one for 
him as director. Newman, six 
times a nominee but never a 
winner, is to $et a special 
award for his “lifetime 
achievements’*. 

When the first . 10 Oscars 
were handed out at a self- 
congratulatory party in 1929 
there was no suspense. The 
winners had been announced 
three months earlier and the 
evening was ignored by news- 
papers and radio: Janet 
Gaynor, the first Best Actress, 
recalled- “Had I known what 
it was to become. Tin sure I 
would have been over- 
whelmed. At the time I was 
more thrilled over meeting 
Doug Fairbanks”. 

On Monday the details of 
the winners - and losers - 
will be lasered around the 
world by 874 accredited press 
representatives, and television 
will give the cinema its biggest 
worldwide audience ' of the 
year. Tie small screen, which 


is so often blamed for maim- 
ing the cinema, is the ironic 
lifeblood of the - Oscar 
ceremony. 

It took just under five 
minutes to hand out . the 
Oscars in 1929. Two years ago 
it took a record three hours 
and 40 minutes to present the 
-Awards. Then a typical winner 
took one minute and 39 
seconds to thank 7.8 friends, 
relatives, colleagues and sup- 
porters. 

This year Robert Wise has 
decreed a new policy — the 30- 
second acceptance speech. “A 
red light will start flashing at 
around the 30-second mark 
Soft music will follow — it’s 
the same ploy used to cut off 
talkshow guests before com- 
mercial breaks. The light will 
flash a little fester at 38 
seconds, at 40 still fester and 
when it gets to 45 ft will stay 
on." What if they keep talk- 
ing? All Wise can do is shrug 
and add:“We can’t really have 
a trapdoor”. Then he asks 
ly:“Can we?" 


The statuette — depicting a 
naked man plunging a sword 
into a reel of film - was 
designed by a famous MGM 
aft director, Cedric Gibbons, 
lr is 13'* inches high, weighs 
6lb 12oz, and is made of- 
brodze coated with 14-carat 
gold. There are many claims 
about how the golden gentle- 
man got his name but the 
generally accepted story is that 
an Academy librarian. Marga- 
ret Herrick, when seeing the 
figure for the first time, said ft 
reminded her of her Uncle 
Oscar. 

The Oscars roll off the 
production line at the Dodge 
Trophy Company in Carson, 
California, about 80 miles to 
the south of Los Angeles, at a 
cost of 5190 a time. Winners 
must agree not to sell their 
trophies except to the 
Academy. 

On Monday, the statuettes 
will arrive at the Dorothy 
Chandler Pavilion a little 
before noon when the hordes 
of fens, who have been lining 


1986 CONTENDERS 



Meryl Streep: adding to the coflaetion? 

BEST FILM 

The Colour Purple 
(tfrector Steven Spielberg) 

Kiss of the Spider Woman 
(director Hector Babenco) 

Out of Africa 
(tfrector Sydney Pollack) 

Prizzi’s Honour 
(director John Huston) 

Witness (Peter Weir) 


Anne Bancroft, Agnes of 
God 

Whoopi Gokfoeng, 77W 
Colour Purple 
Jessica Lange. Sweef 
Dreams 

Geraldine Page, The Trip to 
Bountiful 

Meryl Streep, Out of Africa 



John Huston: honours for a Hollywood hero? 

BEST ACTOR BEST DIRECTOR 


Harrison Font, Witness 
James Gamer, Murphy's 
Romance 

William Hun, Kiss of the 

Spider Woman 

Jack Nicholson, Prize's 
Honour 

Jon VtXgftt, Runaway Tram 


Hector Babenco, Kiss of 
. the Spider Woman 
Sidney Pollack. Out of 

John Huston, Prizzi's 
Honour 

Akira Kurosawa. Ran 
Peter Weir, Witness 


up for seats since last night, 
will just be gening to their 
places. 

It is doubtful whether they 
will notice Herb Citrin, who 
for the past dozen years has 
ensured that the crowds of 
stars arrive and leave safely. 
He runs VaJet Parking Ser- 
vices Incorporated whose 140 
red-jacketed drivers park the 
cars of the great 

There will be 2.900 people 
in the audience on Monday 
evening and nearly half of 
them will have arrived by 
limousine. Citrin’s red brigade 
will park, he guesses, about 
1,200 cars. Citrin diplomati- 
cally forgets the name of a 
famous actress who was the 
victim of a limo door closing 
too soon: “The star moved 
towards the entrance but pan 
of her gown was gone. It was 
still in the door of the limo. 
She was a trouper. She just 
grabbed what was left of her 
skirt and kept going”. 

At least she wasn't paying - 
no one does for parking on 
Oscar night. The parking pass 
arrives with your admission 
ticket. The tickets cost 5100 
for Orchestra or Founders 
Circle, the best 1,119 seats, 
560 for Loge (the first balcony) 
and 540 for Balcony (really the 
second balcony) but that is 
simply face value. A resold 
ticket will sell for upwards of 
51,000. 

T here are rules for 
being seen at the 
Oscars. Diane 
Keaton turned up in 
1978 — the Oscars’ 
50th anniversary and the year 
of her, and Woody Allen’s, 
Annie Hall — but hasn’t been 
seen since. Robert Redford 
was there five years ago for 
Ordinary People , his debut as 
a director, but an absentee 
thereafter. The unwritten Hol- 
lywood rules say you attend if 
you are nominated, or if you 
have a film in release and 
doing well, but you don’t go to 
sit in the audience. Those who 
do are the aspiring and the 
older stars who want or maybe 
need the exposure; stars of the 
moment don't like to attend 
because ft seems as if they 
have nothing better to do. 
Nevertheless, there are Oscar 
stalwarts like Frank Sinatra, 
Charlton Heston, Liz Taylor 
and Jack Lemmon. 

Included in that list should 
be Army Archend, who will be 
greeting, for the 24th time, the 
celebrities as they trot along 
the red carpet. Archend, col- 
umnist of Hollywood’s trade 
newspaper Daily Variety, be- 
lieves the glamour of the 
Oscars has become a little 
tainted, even if his enthusiasm 
is unblemished. 

“What’s changed? 1 think 
the superstar power has 
changed. There’s not as much 
of it as there used to be. You 
know, the Oscars can be very 
emotional. I remember being 
backstage when Elizabeth 
Tavlor finally won. She came 
off and just collapsed. 

“And when Ingrid Bergman 
came back and won after she’d 
practically been driven out of 
town she got a tremendous 
standing ovation. And there 
was Jimmy Stewart accepting 
for his friend Gary Cooper 


who everybody knew was at 
home dying. Some funny 
things too. I remember Joan 
Crawford backstage with a 
cooler marked Pepsi-Coia - 
one that was filled with 
vodka." 

President Robert Wise says 
the Oscars should be the 
Greatest Show on Earth. Ray- 
mond Chandler, who knew all 
about Grand Avenue and the 
other “mean streets" of Los 
Angeles, aw ft somewhat 
differently. “If you can gel 
past those awful, idiotic feces 
outside the theatre without a 


sense of collapse of human 
intelligence...", he wrote, “...if 
you can go out into the night 
and see half the police force of 
Los Angeles gathered to pro- 
tect the golden ones from the 
mob...if you can do those 
things and still feel the next 
morning that the picture busi- 
ness is worth the attention of 
one single intelligent artistic, 
mind.-.then in the picture 
business you certainly 
belong." 

Highlights of the 1 986 
ceremony are on BBC1 on 
Tuesday, 9.30pm. 


^SATURDAY 


Tragedy queen 
Eileen Atkins: 
hopes, regrets 
and a red-hot 
temper — page 18 


Arts Dfauy 

18 

Gardening 

14 

Auctions 

17 

Opera 

18 

Bridge 

17 

Photography 

18 

Chess 

17 

Radio 

17 

Concerts 

18 

Reriew 

17 

Crossword 

17 

Rock A Jazz 

18 

Dance 

18 

Shopping 

13 

Drink 

14 

T ele risk* 

17 

Films 

18 

Travel 

12 

Galleries 

18 

TV films 

17 



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THE TIMES SATURDAY MARCH 77 1986 


TRAVEL 



Mixed blessings in a tropical melting pot 


Sheltered by his broad-brimmed hat, 


Paul Roatledge sets out to decode the 


complexities of Malacca’s rich history 


M alacca, said John 
Turnbull Thom- 
son, was ‘The 
Brighton of the 
Singaporean Chinese. To this 
place they come to spend their 
holidays, to eat the luscious 
fruit so abundant in the [dace, 
to indulge in recreation and 
repose from the mercantile 
anxieties of the great 
emporium.” 

Admittedly, he was writing 
in 1864, and then of a visit 
paid to the historic Malayan 


city a quarter of a century 
earlier. But the principle still 

holds good ISO years later. 
Singaporeans and westerners 
alike cheerfully endure a six- 
hour tropical bus ride, experi- 
ence a cultural diversity 
unique in this comer of South 
East Asia. 

There is, of course, no 
Royal Pavilion. And, good as 
they are, the antique shops of 
Japan Hang Jehat (the Jokers' 
Street of Dutch colonial times) 
axe not exactly the Lanes of 
Brighton. For one thing, the 
prices are lower and for anoth- 
er the satay - local kebabs - is 
better, though the less said 
about the traffic, the better. 

But where else will you find 
a gorgeous Islamic mosque 
(with British tiles) in the same 
street with Hindu and Chinese 
temples? Or the Eurasian de- • 
scendants of Portuguese con- 
quistadores serving sweet and 
sour fish in a Mediterranean- 
style square overlooking the 
Straits of Malacca? 

Wefl. there you go. It is not 
surprising that weekend refu- 
gees from “the great 
emporium” (which is even 
more of an emporium now 
than it was in Thomson's day) 
are ready to invest the best 
part of £3 to take the mislead- 
ingly-titled Malacca Express 


from a grubby terminal in 
downtown Singapore. 

And not a tew Westerners 
join them. On the one I took 
were other Britons and a 
portly perspiring German cou- 
ple, though the ubiquitous 
Australians were missing. But 
Malacca i$ not remote, or 
mysterious: just a civilized 
experience not to be hurried. 
It takes time to peel away the 
layers of Malay, Chinese, 
Portugese. Dutch and British 
history. They have all contrib- 
uted to the Malaccan way of 
life, and they all left then- 
architectural mark. Most of 
them came to conquer, and 
most of them left 


O ld Malacca dusters 
round the river of 
the same name. The 
big ships that made 
it the foremost trading entre- 
pot of the East have gone, but 
the river is still active with 
high-powered native fishing 
boats pui-put-putting ' up- 
stream to land their catches at 
the city market 
Malacca has distinct charms 
of its own. The narrow streets 
gravitate naturally to the tiny 
square that houses the 17th- 
century Stadthuys. borne of 
the governors and their reti- 
nue and now a museum: and 
the burgers' Protestant church 
of 1753 with its glazed-tile 
frieze of the Last Supper. 

These and other salmon- 
pink buildings form a pleasing 
ensemble around a rather 
incongruous Fn d«h marble 
fountain erected in 1901 to 
celebrate Queen Victoria's Di- 
amond Jubilee of 1897. Some 
of the trishaw drivers who loaf 
around it waiting for custom- 
ers look as if theymight have 
been there at the time. 

Other traces of British rule 



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TRAVEL NOTES 


Malacca (Melaka In 
Malay) is about 100 mites 
south of the Malaysian 
capital Kuala Lumpur, 150 
mites north from Singapore; 
there are flights from both. 
Buses run several times 
<teHy from Singapore. Long- 

has been put in hand. On the 
day I toiled to the summit — 
which affords magnificent 
views of the city and hinter- 
land — h was confined to a 
handful of men engaged in a 
spot of leisurely bush- 


Path to peace: a temple set apart from tire dty bustle 


are not so obvious. The old 
Malacca Gub, built in 1912 
on Japan Parameswara feeing 
the straits, once the haunt of 
the expatriate stengah brigade, 
is now a memorial to 
Malaysia's struggle for inde- 
pendence from the British. 

A chain-link fence topped 
with barbed wire separates the 
dub from a once-hallowed 
field at the back. The score- 
board stiD stands, but the grass 
on the cricket pitch is waist- 
high; and the crack of leather 
on willow is unlikely to be 
heard there 

It is not the only neglected 
monument to the past The 
powerful Chinese community 


has just realized that a price- 
less piece of its heritage is also 
under threat. The state go v- 
ernment wants to develop 
Bukit China (China Kilty a low 
sandstone eminence on the 
fringe of the old dty that has 
been the Chinese graveyard 
for centuries. 

Though the Chinese wor- 
ship their ancestors, they are 
pretty casual about their 
graves, and the 100-acre hill 
has become o vergro wn by 
tropical vegetation. It does not 
take long — hereabouts, a 
billiard cue stride in the earth 
would bloom ovemight- 

Rather late in the day, a 
“beautification programme” 


• The world economic reces- 
sion, which has finally anived 
in South East Asia along with 
the disease AIDS, has forced 
the government to shelve its 
plans to run up a few skyscrap- 
ers over the bones of the 
Babas. The h3L gifted to 
Chinese princess Hang Li Poh . 
and her 500 handmaidens by 
the reigning Sultan Mansur 
Shah in 1459, can dumber on 
in peace. 

I t is hard to refrain from 
such metaphors of relax- 
ation when writing of 
Malacca. Bruce Lockhart 
in his Return to Malaya, 1936, 
wrote of the dty as “a sleepy 
hollow” with ”a sleepy old 
world atmosphere.” Certainly, 
there is a sensation that the 
noisy march of modem life is 
going on somewhere else. 


distance taxis are very 
good value; nearest ran station 

ts atTampin, about 25 miles 
from Malacca with frequent 
trams to Kuala Lumpur and 
Singapore. 

Ramada Renaissance. 

751 00 Malacca; from £30 a 
night single, £40 double. 

Cool doming essential; take 
an umbrella. 

There are now three spank- 
ing, brand-new hotels located 
hard by the okL Probably the 
best of these is the Ramada 
Renaissance, opened a year 
ago and originally constructed 
with an eye on the lucrative 
trade expected from an oil 
refinery project nearby. Like 
the Bukit China skyscrapers 
that, too, has been shelved, 
leaving the Ramada a quiet 
and eminently comfortable 
base from which to explore 
Malacca and the surrounding 
area. 

The hotel has even collared 
the services of Mr Robert Tarir 
the best local guide, whose 
short book The Cultural Melt- 
ing Pm is required reading. It 
is perfectly possible to study . 
the volume, glass in hand, in 
poolside ease on the ninth 
floor, contemplating from 
time to time the street-plan of 
old Malacca overlooked by 
the pooL You are then ready 
to explore on foot— and don't 
forget your broad-brimmed 
hat The breeze off the Malac- 
ca Straits disguises the power 
of the tropical sun. 


U ?• • . 

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The krwest cost at^Ha 

Dwrlnrfc Travel 
01-542 4613 
01:543 4227 

Estab 1970 


HoMdays « 
tnwr bro- 


SELF-CATERING 

FRANCE 


HoBden. TH oi-asoaSBG, . 
■or nanr. 12 noncrmi 
motor yacht mm £ 1.000 ».w. 
Wytnc Htnli bwch hoM tr 
CSOnvCwnb. lac -AO. Pm 
. wMcnvmtt witb boai.' 01-826 
-1005. Aim. 2091 
una >wmn> Law cm 
nw« «a. Rto CMS Lhna 
£*75 rtn. AIM teaO Group 
HotMay Joanm JLAOX-747- 







KhetuKDgpnakrUSom- 
m. 01-584 7371 ABTA. 



SELF-CATERING ITALY 


SOLEMAR. 

ITALIAN VILfcA 
. .HOLIDAYS 

Solemar for the finest 
Castles, Villas, Farmhouses 
and Apartments in Tuscany. 

Renting a house for your 

holiday is easy: Simply 
choose one from Solemar. 

Solemar 



For tftnurmalbrockurrpfrw wtHeorrmp 
.ChapmTronUjd. 

102 Si Johns HWTmwr. London. NWS 
Trl.OIMo’NSI 





2S7 Green Lanes. 
Umim NU 4XT 
Td tl 8S2 3925 (ZOos) 
Ud 1248 AMa 


SELF-CATERING 

PORTUGAL 




M4UMVC Flar UBCDfV vrnat With 
POOK Sr mod jcrvwe M 
PortuBal'l OKfcMva Cftrvoctm 
cum. caB Pacnaa wndMoM 
LM 0249 817023 or 01 688 
«1» ABTA ATOL 1276. 
NIMHVE. Mucb loved MlgM 
noww vMaae. amcm do Oa«. 

VltaroOTO. Chanranv privately 
. owned vua. stars 4/6, mdo. 
poo*, tana. go*. AacM 25906. 


YtBa»/BrttWi Airways PHM. 
Tet AOdns 0352 85704. 




■MHaiA Plava ReaL ft ro Ch 
front prrvate luxury' apart- 
«*«. stem 4-6. Putty mad 
uaomi, Use of two pools 4 
Jacuzzi 40734) 411061 or 
412628. 


SELF-CATERING 


THE BOX VILLAS m U «a 
W iw c * nu her btue dock. 
AvaOaMe lo Al9arve. MvoOB. 
Souai or Franc*. USA. & wmi 
M ies, mm havener, an nave 
prtvwe poou ft none are cMan. 
Broct a ae a t049 481) 6ai> 


EASTER 
FUGHTS 
FROM £109 

UMM4 27/3 E12S 3/4 TOS 
NJUN1E 27/3 E126 4/4 £TW 
!V3 £118 

BUT 19/3 £179 3/4 £179 
TO. MW 

ia2U83i/3 rrrg 

S4 la i/n 

SPEED WING 

01-486 9356 

AGENTS ATOL 1824 




Donawuure 01 957 1649. 
ABTA ATOL 8798. 


USA Irani £99. Major travrL 01 
486 9257. IATA 





■raanr-Maa 

Oocjio^u^f^ Sevtt^ 

aManaawE*" 


CORNWALL & 


HOTEL 

mtHOOTO. SOUTH COMMNX 
IB.-UUKtHUBEI]«7| 
SPRING BREAKS 

Sprtig oomaa oody to Corona. 
«Pdaafl>r fct our nmgndoant 
0 ««a teMg to private 

co«6. ayjy superb cruMu & ot- 

tano.6 nsrytpe. Racoronendtw 

by mo best gudas. 

Wnh e shoe k» bodMe. 

Tea teane t 




MAMHLLA new luxury effia, 5 
bans. 3 Dana, own pool Mbo- 
Mftcent Sen views. AvaaaMe 
mw. Qntr £200 pw. Tdi 01 
6QZ 4583 (Home*: OI 248 1234 
X 4369 (World. 


S*ORTS 


Wl «HM/JWHNIMM 
or Mir-caanng am. Coach or 
fly from £79. phone now for 
. «r broe ma e; Dedters Tnvd 
01-5735391 


SELF-CATERING 
CANARY k MADEIRA 




June min July. 070? 


Mpd by phonln Frawtao 
Manmti «oi. Boanmao are D*-| - country 


























































THE TIMES SATURDAY MARCH 22 1986 




VS? 

* ; 





rS-, ‘ 


up for 
summer 


TRAVEL NEWS 


* TbeJ^fenl Travel iroup has 
‘ rappee Bp more than 75,000 
package holidays from leading 
tour’, operators in an attempt 
to overcome likely availability 
problems in the summer peak 
season. ... - - . 

Neil Thompson; >• FHckford's 
marketing director,, says it is 
becoming increasingly diffi- 
cult for customers to book The -' 
better-known hotels in the 
more popular resorts; particu- 
larly between mid-July and 
the end of August “By-obtain-" 
mg a selection of -holidays, 
from .a number of openuors- 
we .are. in effect,, acting as a 
High Siren retailer, stocking 
goods before , the customers 
*>. come m to ‘buy’?* he explains: ' 

The company is promoting - 
holidays m . an . eight-page 
“good buys” brochure which 
covers neatly 400 hotels ul 
more than 1 30 Mediterranean, 
resorts, with prices starting at 
£95. for one week's fid} boarcT : 
on the Costa Brava. : : 

' Staiined ap "> 

i ) The Royal Scotsman, the ex-;_ 
dusrve Irani wrtli elegantly 
restored coaches from . the: 
• Viptorian and Edwardian eras; 

„ : will operate an extended series 

of lours of the Scottish Hjigh- 
£ lands this year, from April 1 5 
to October 24. The pain , 
^ carries a - maximum of 26 

■ ":.m passengers and starts .from 

^ j Edin burgh's Waverley station 

on. two ■ separate.- three^day 
itiheries which can be com- 
.:*■ • bmed to make a six-day trip. 1 

' Prices, .which include ad- . 
commodatioh and all meals, 
onthe vain, start, at £950 fora 
‘ "c three-day tour or £1,800 for 
■ r - six days. Bookings are handled 
by Abercrombie and Kent (01 , . 
730 9600)1- •• . • - i - , - 

Rich Swiss role - V* 

Holiday-makers heading for' 
the ski slopes over Easter will 
find tint Swiss resorts are the 
most expensive in Europe, 
according to a new survey by 
Thomas Cook. One week's 
typical incidental expenditure 


'vikinar 






' QE 2 , 
CONCORDE ATSD 
NEWYORK’S 
WALDORE 
ASTOraAf; ’ 
From «w^y £1^75 


to experience this fantastic. 
New YdHc holiday - bnightson 
OF? one-way. 3^ hours on 
Concorde the other and up to 
4 nights in the Waldorf Astoria 
are included in the 
Space fesd] 

at 
The 

r !6 4 

1 2 

JUDl 3 

Jun6 3. 

Jun 15 1 

Jun IS , 3 
* For full delate caD Cunard 
on <01-491 3930) or 
see your travel agent 


on: 

From 

£1,296 

£1.295 

£1345 

£1345 

£1.275 

£1385 



Switzerland: the most e xp c u a l re 
skiing fa Europe. 

in Switzerland will cost almost 
1 £249; according to the compa- 
ny* cpmpared with only £159 
m‘ Spain or £177 in the UK’s 
leading skiing outre, Avie- 
more. - Howeyer, - Thomas 
Cook says bookings to Swiss 
winter resorts' are ru nning 40 
per cent ahead of last year as. 
hotel rates- had been held at 
1985 levels. ‘ - ' 

Algarve incentive 

Discounts of up to £100 a 
person on late March and 
April departures are being 
offered by Meon Villa Holi- 
day?; a. leading self-catering 
operator. Typical price for a 
holiday- in a. villa with swim* 
ming ppoj jn Portugal's Algar- 
ve - region "during April, 
.including hire of a car, is £249 
■ per - person for- two weeks. 
Price reductions are also avail- 
able on -holidays to Minorca, 
the Dordogne, Malta, Crete 
and Rhodes. Information: 
0730 68411. 

• Tennis holidays are ' 
being organised fey British 
Airways' Enterprise 
Holidays subsidiary in Spain 
and Portugal this year. 

, The programme includes 
tracing weeks at centres 
-in mainland Spain and 
Majorca, with instruction 
by coaches registered with the 
Lawn Tenuis Association. * 
Prices start at £282 for seven 
nightsat the La Manga. ... 
Club, Costa Cabda. 

.Hobbyhorses 

A new guide, published by the 
English Tourist Board, lists 
activity and hobby holidays 
operated by more than 500 
organisations throughout the 
country. Among the off-beat 
holiday ideas covered by the 
guide' We' courses on foe 
appreciation of single mait; 
whisky, bee-keeping or train- 
ing gun-dogs. Sporting activi- 
ties hKlude basketball, sailing 
and pofoolmg and there is a 
special. section covering-holi-., 
days for children. Activity and 
Hobby Holidays 1986 is avail- 
able from bookshops at £1.99. 
or ty' post a («!d 40p) from' 
Depaatment D, English Tour- 
ist Board,. 4 Street, 

London SW4 OBJ. 

.Philip Ray 


SHOPPING 


A revolution with no strings attached 


Telephones are not what they used to 
bel Beryl Downing reveals why 
thousands are now ringing the changes 


A' telephone which is small 
enough to slip into your shirt 
pocket or handbag — that is . 
the shape of tomorrow's com- 
munications. By the end of the 
century we may all be wearing 
Telephone-wrist watches show- 
ing television pictures of our. 
caUere./-- 

' Science ;fictioii? ‘Certainly 
noi. : Demand for transport- 
able telephones, to fit into cars 
has easily outstripped expecta- 
tions since the cellular system 
was introduced in January last 
year. Then foe two rival 
networks,. Cellnet and 
Vodafone, anticipated 25,000 
subscribers between them. To- 
day Cellnet has 31,000 users 
and Vodafone has 25,000. 

The market is expected to 
grow to 100,000 by foe end of 
this year and to 500,000 by 
199a, 1 

•Who' .are these travelling 
telephiles? The first subsribers 
were at either end of the 
business scale-/— blue-chip 
company chairmen or one- 
man .ehtwpmieurs to whom 
availabaity means money. 

Now foe sales drive is 
aimed at the middle market - 
foe sales forces, site engineers 
and -medium-sized .compa- 
nies. It will be a long tune 
before large numbers of do- 
mestic users think it worth 
being - able to char on the 
move: - 

■ But (hose who want to can 
plug in tomorrow. The diffi- 
culty: is not the link-up but 
how to- choose which service 
and which machines will best 
suit your purpose: 

: You cannot go to a high 
street telephone shop and say . 
‘Tell me the pros and cons of . 
each network*'. The distribu- 
tors- are committed either to 
Cellnet (owned by British 
Telecom) or Vodafone (owned 
by Racal). Both are legally 
obliged recover 90 per cent of 
the population by 1990, and at 
the moment both have con- 
centrated on the major popu- 
lation centres and trunk 


routes. On the fringes Cellnet 
is stronger' in foe Newcastle 
; area ana .Vodafone in the 
South West. 

' The main decision is wheth- 
er you need a mobile phone, 
which is fixed to' your car, or a 
portable, which you can take 
■ anywhere in your briefcase or 
handbag. AH cellular phones 
have- memories, so that you 
can programme them with foe 
numbers you use most. Some 
have a “call barring" facility 
which means that you can 
control the types of calls made 
on it — Jong distance' can be 
incoming only, for instance, 
so that . employees are not 
tempted to call their long-lost 
- aunts in Australia. 

The most exciting develop- 
ment in foe past year has been 
foe truly portable telephone, 
with no cords or wires to 
restrict your movements. The 
newest and best-looking is the 
Pearl, to be introduced ip May 
by ST. A similar model is the . 
Roaxner for Vodafone Bofov 
wil! -cost' more than £2,000. 

This is a very hew industry 
and prices for equipment are 
coming down all foe time. The 
lowest price for a BT or 
Vodafone mobile car tele- 
phone is now £899 but as in 
any new industry there are 
cowboys about and cellular 
telephones are being offered 
for £750 including installa- 
tion. But be careful, this will 
not include any after-sales 
service. 

The only British-made por- 
table cellular telephone is the 
ExceU. It had some initial 
problems of interference, but 
. it is foe smallest and neatest of 
all phones — slim and light 
enough to fit into a pocket It - 
costs £2^08.9a 

The emphasis on portability’ 
is affecting telephones in the 
home. too. The first cordless 
phones costing under £100 
appeared last year and now 
.the chain stores are selling the 
Uniden at £99.95, the CSI 
2200 at £84.99 at all branches 



Far afield: three portable cellular phones. From left, British Telecom's Peari, about 
£2/200, available in May; Ex cell, the smallest portable, £1,990; and Vodafone's 
Roamer £2,285 from Martin Dawes, also available as Answercall's own brand. 


of Dixons and foe Betacom 
Cl 000 at £89.95 from most 
branches of ComeL 

Other companies are hang- 
ing fire until the new specifica- 
tions for cordless telephones 
are approved later this year. 
These will affect foe frequen- 
cies used; owners of current 
models will still be able to use 
them, but the change has 
made some companies draw 
back from competing on 
cordless. 

There is a third type of 
portable communicator — foe 
telephone pager or bleeper. 
About 800,000 people in Brit- 


ain carry one — mostly doc- 
tors. district nurses, salesmen 
and domestic users who want 
to keep in touch with elderly 
parents or baby-sitters. 

Again British Telecom has a 
large slice of the market, but 
small companies also offer 
useful models. ' Novapbone, 
for example, is a cross between 
a cellular phone and a bleeper. 
It offers direct voice commu- 
nication, pager, call referral 
and answer service. 

With foe Novapbone you 
can be contacted from any- 
where in foe world and you 
can also have a limited num- 


ber of pre-programmed num- 
bers that you can contact. - 

The phone is attached to the 
car and foe user also has a 
mini-pager no bigger than a 
small cigarette lighter which 
will bleep when someone calls 
and you are not in the car. At 
the press of a button you can 
hold the call until you return 
to the phone, or the call can be 
transferred to a pre-designated 
number which you can call 
later. 

This, like most other hard- 
ware. can be bought (it costs 
£1,325} or taken on a one to 
five year lease. The average 


Amsterdam Poster 
For a free copy of in 


eon individual 
i nduf iuc frofafayi m dw 
b ea utifu l dry. write to- 

TimeOffLuL, 

. .2a Chester Clove. 
London SWlXTBQ. 



TOTTING UP THE BILLS 


Uniden 300E, excellent value at 
. £9450 from all branches of John - 
Lewis. This and the Esprit, right 
work’oo the domestic plug-in jack 
system available through the normal 
domestic telephone network and can 
he mounted on the wall. 


— ■ . 

Cellnet 

Vodafone 

Contraction charge 

£60- 

■ £50 

Subscription charge 
per jiuMitti. . 

£25 

£25 

CaR charges 

peak rata 

25p> for first minute 
than 13p per 
30 secs. 8am to 8pm 

25p for first minute 
then 5p per 

12 secs, 7.30am to 7.30pm . 

off peak,. 

15p for 1st minute 
8pper 30 
secs. 6am to 8am 
and 6pm to 10pm 

not applicable 

cheap rate 

8p for 1st minute 
4p per 30 secs 
all other times 

IQp for first minute 
5p for 48 secs 
afl other times 

Minimum caff charge 
per month 

none 

£15 

There are no call charges for incoming calls so and charging per 12 seconds on peak rate 
if tills would be your main use -to be contacted could prove a considerable saving on a large 
onthe move -Vodafone's minimum call charge number of calls. Cellnet charges are to be 
per month might be a disadvantage, although increased from April 1 and Vodafone are likely 
they are slightly less expensive on cheap rates to make a similar announcement 



The Esprit 1042 by 
GEC, £139.95. 
Available from Brit 
isfa Telecom shops. 
It has a good range . 
and is neat light 
and easy to handle. 


PHONE BOOK 


Answercall,Kangjey Bridge 
Road, London SE26 (01-659 
1133). 

Cedent Centre, 142-148. 
Goswell Road. London EC1 
(01-251 5155). Send fora 
list of their dealers. 

Excell Communications, 
Freepost, Excell House. Cecil 
Road, Hale. Cheshire (061 
941 7006). 

Martin Dawes 

Communicfl tarns, 47 Museum 
Street Warrington. 

Cheshire (0925 52525). 
Novamast, Trafalgar 

House, Grenville Place, 

London NW7 (01-959 3611). 
Vodafone, The Courtyard, 
London Road. Newbury, 
Berkshire (0635 33251). 

Send for a list of dealers. 

rates are about £24.25 per 
£1.000 per month over five 
years. 

Unlike foe Cellnet and 
Vodafone dealers. Jack Good- 
man. director of Novamast is 
an independent specialist and 
is prepared to give free advice 
on the type of communica- 
tions that will be most suitable 

A salesman on foe road, he 
suggests, or someone with a 
delivery van* would be ade- 
quately served by foe less 
expensive type of cellular 
phone which is fixed in foe 
vehicle, so that head office can 
keep in touch, re-schedule 
deliveries or give time-saving 
instructions en route. 

The more expensive, entire- 
ly portable phones would be 
useful to a group medical 
practice, for instance, so that 
whichever doctor was on duty 
could be contacted through 
one number, wherever he was 

“Shopping around for what 
appears to be the best financial 
deal is not always a good 
idea", says Jack Goodman. 
“People must be assured of 
after-sales service, too. But I 
believe that having a tele- 
phone attached to foe wall 
with a piece of wire is an 
absolute nonsense — a thing of 
the past. For anyone for whom 
lime means money there is no 
doubt that being in contact all 
the time — eventually with any 
part of foe world — is foe 
shape of things to come..." 


CELL SYSTEMS 


Tbe network operator 
(Cellnet or Vodafone) in- 
stalls the system. Theterri- 
tory is splIHnto -small areas 
or cells measuring anything 
from four to 30 kilometres. 
Each cell is served by its own 
radio transmitter which is 
linked through regional elec- 
tronic exchanges to the pub- 
lic telephone network. 

The network operators are 
not allowed to sell the service 
direct to the public, so they 
each appoint a number of 
independent accredited re- 
tailers or distributors. Dis- 
tributors sell the equipment, 
install and maintain it and 
send you the itemized month- 
ly bil'ls.Many also have sub- 
contracted dealers who sell 
equipment only and install it. 
but the billing still comes 
from the distributor. Confu- 
sion arises because foe dis- 
tributors are sometimes 
referred to as "air time 
retailers" and the dealers as 
“retailers". 


-=r=- f 






_ \ 



■ : 





. IV/t • 

_ors, walkers, 
le ear travellers 


Thev say in Limousin that every by-way leads 
to a new ^discovery. Hundreds of lakes hidden in green 
valleys, chestnut forests, the Plaieau de Millevaches 
widy its thousand springs or thedeep, wooded 


gorges of tbe Dorcfogn e river . There are Romanesque 
dmrehes, time-worn GaBd-Roman bridges, riverside -. 


villa ge s and towns like Limoges, 
thousand ^rs of hisrorv. ... . 

It's perfect counnysioe to explore on twh on 
horseback, bv boat or by cap- - ' 

. ^ /The b^ way ro book > , oiffho^y mljrn^iSin 

is throudi tiie SennaL^^ ' 

- a locah direct booking service.Just 
clip the coupon and we will send 
you full details and Booking forms. 






Toiisseschemhismenentah decouvem 


1 CDVITk KhQQN-U Dt TOLJiyviv . 1 

1/ \ Irince * 

I " : . b yLtJ Mrnd mt llw IpDowins pifonnaWn: -- ‘-I 

3 1 m*«jJTvbi.vhurr. .. D Ciilii’cl.iuiik . . 

1 ; u Hod L>» - l*h"SGwk- . ' ' - | 

| «•' ; . ; — I 

I' *' 


FRANCE 


L-L 


•V '"■l i-''*'*' • 


New. 7-day cruises in 
the Med, the fjords 
or to Leningrad. 
From only £595. 


/> 



A BRAND NEW 
IDEA IN 
CRUISING. 

In one magical 
week, you'll take in (P 
more memories 
than in a month of 
ofoer holidays. 

• Memories of haunting 
Venice, medieval Dubrovnik. 

Portofmo^ Strom boli and the 
isles of Capri and Corfu.- 

Oryoull sail lo the majestic To celebrate this season's 
Fjords, standing in awe as your inaugural sailings in the -. 
ship navigates theif waters! Mediterranean, we’re offering 
Or full steam' ahead for the a princely £200 off a cabin lor 
fabled city of Leningrad . seeing two. But hurry . space is limited^ 

and it's fiisl come: first served. 


You'll choose 
from inter- 
national menus; 
dance to live 
bands: play at 
the Casino; enjoy 
a cabaret. Most 
of all. you'll slip 
into ports denied^to bigger 
ships. But not to yachts. 

MAY SAILINGS ONLY: 

- SAVE £200. . 


Copenhagen. Stockholm and 
Helsinki en route. 

In .all there are three 
leisurely 7-day sailaways. with 
weekly.dcpartures May 3 to 
October 25- 


FLY FROM LONDON OR 
MANCHESTER. 
You’ll fly to your ship from 
London or. on Scandinavian 
cruises only, from Manchester, 


RATHER MORE PRIVATE and the price includes your air 


YACHT THAN OCEAN 
LINER. 

You'll sail on board Ocean 
Islander or Ocean Princess, in a 
style which owes rather more to 
a private yacht than a liner. And 
since we're British managed, 
foe service is excellent. 


ticket. (Prices from £595 up to 
£1350). 

RESERVE NOW. 

Our new- colour brochure is just 
in. For your copy , contact your 
travel aeent. call us direct on 
nj-ti37 4b32 or ni-724 7555. Or 
clip the coupon now. 



joSggg* OCEAN CRUISE LINES 


j Send nw ^our new. tree njluur.bfui.hufv new ’ 



hm 


\ Vt 


TfLftllui 


Send SO. OciJrt Cntiyt Lnv>.tO Fn-fL-ru-t c lo.e. Sunhopt; Phit-i London W 2 2 Hl> j 


THE TIMES GUERNSEY CARDIGAN 


S pecially selected for 
Times readers, this 
versatile Guernsey cardigan 
is both hard wearing and 
attractive. Made in 100% 
pure new wool, the cardi- 
incorporates those 


Features of the “guernsey” 


feati 

design that make it imme- 
diately identifiable — 
ribbed sleeve insets and 
two small slit openings in 
the hem. To add to the 
continuity of the design, 
the turtle neck and patch 
pockets also have the same 
ribbed pattern. 

rphe strength and quality 
X of the wool ensure that 
the wearer is warm whilst 
looking stylish. The cardi- 
gan is made in Guernsey 
For Times readers and 
comes in a choice of oat- 
meal or grey. Suitable for 
both men and women. We 
advise ordering one size 
larger than normal if a" 
loose fit is required. 

Sizes: 36% 38% 40% 42* 

% £39.95 each. 44' @ £42.95. 



AU price on mJuaif p( pun Jnd puck inf float oU\>w tip to? I Jcysfor 

delivery If yvu art rttf untied The Timet mil refund your money 
Mlhout ifiiftrUM 77iU offer (on I ml} be linpauhtd \o addresses m the 
L : K TV Tmey Gurmw Caidtpa Offer. Bourne Road. Sedey Kent 
Dt\ 5 IBL 7W- Oavlun/ ?.W# hir tnquinn will. 


THE TIMES 


DIAL YOUR ORDER 

RAPID QRDLRliQ SLR l Kb 
BV TELEPHONE ON 
ACCESS OR VISA 
tm need u> iwn&fce unpani 

(Crayford) 0322-58011 

24 hours a day - ? day* a vseek 



Please send me Guernsey Cardigan^) as 

indicated 4 £39.95 each for sizes j 6'-42‘ and send 
£4195 for the 44". 


COLOUR 


kThpiSL' Bust «aze [enter quantity required) 


GREY 


OATMEAL) 




38“ 


40* 


42' 


44* 


I enclose Cheque - PO fur £ made payable to 

The Times Guernsey Cardigan Offer. 

Or debit my Access Vim No - 

Expriry Date 

Signature 

Send to: The Time'- Gueniwv C anligan Offer, 
Bourne Road . Besk v. Kent DA5 I BL 

MR/MRS/ MISS 

ADDRESS 


WLlh 4 f. 


M 

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74 

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64 

64 

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148 

100 

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>88 

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148 

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148 

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132 
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166 
166 
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M0 
020 
184 
IS* 
089 
089 

D97 

087 

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413 

248 

329 

123 

1(5 

297 

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l.» 

140 

iao 

580 

020 

200 

(120 

180 

230 

M0 

200 


0.15 

020 

100 

540 


IC2B 


784 

SJS 

240 













I 


THE TIMES SATURDAY MARCH 22 1986 


502) 


1986 

. *zmrm m w t j 



TEMRA — the own of Btrew- 
bornes; no other variety can 
equal ha flavour. Taste It and 
see. 

£3.75 for 10 plants, £530 for 20. 
£&40 for 30. £1230 for 50. 



* TAVBBUBES « SUN8ERHES 

Two Wadchenv / raspberry hy- 
brids for tratnang against a fence 
or wall like a blackberry. The 
Tay berry resembles a m am mo th 
sized loganberry. The Sun berry la 
vmitar tn size to ■ loganberry end 
(Sightly taler ripening. Bath hy- 
brids crop heavily end ham a 
delicious flavour. 

• SoM undvr dm Medana 
trademark indicating variety was 
raised ataU.K. Research Institute. 

Tayfaetifas: £150 for 1 plant. 

£530 for 2. Srniberrtoa: £335 fori 
plant. £730 ter 2. 

FflENCH ASPARAGUS ILOREUA A JACOMA) 

Borti these excettam asparagus 

varieties are imported from An* 

France and 50 a owns when 

planted in 3 row flat beds at 1 ft. 

spaong each way, should pro- 

duce plenty of superb asparagus At V -y** 

spears tor die fsmitv. with Bmpia 

surplus for the freezer for many years. Loretta produces 
huge milk-white purple-upped spears: whilst Jsoq-ma is a 
delicious green variety . 

Offered In packs of 25 crowns ter £7.40. 50 ter £1045. 75 tor 
£13.05 or 100 for £15.70 




GOOSEBERRIES 
{MVKTA — green & LEVH1ER 
— yetfow) 

hrvtcta is a new cuhnary variety, 
resistant to mildew, cropping 
twice as heavily as any other 
variety, with a good flavour. 
Leveller is considered the best 
ever flavoured dessert variety 
with berries that can be os big 
os pullets' eggs. 

£5.45 for any 2 plants, £ 8 .55 for 
3, £10.10 fOT 4, £14.15 ter 6L 


Once believed to be a crass between 
a gooseberry and a blackcurrant; 
now known to be a similar but des- 
tine] species (Ribes drvaricatum). 
The delicious berries which resem- 
ble large blackcurrants, ham the 
flavour of a sweet desert 
gooseberry, ripening in AugJSepL 
In greet profusion. 

£2.75 fori plant, £545 tor 2- 


KHM FRUIT |w. HAYWARD) 

This delicious fruit eon be 
grown outdoors m southern 
districts of England agsmst a 
south facing wad for under 
glass elsewhere In (he U.K.) h is 
a true climber and will survive 
our cold winters, indeed, 
wherever grapes grow, so wad 
the Kiwi. Ottered m pairs (male 
& I ornate) — only the female 
bears fruit. 

£935 tar 2 plants (M ft F), £1330 for 3. 




for further information, pleats sand Wo sta mp (lor oar 
complete brochures. 

Phase add £135 towards post & packing — 
orders over £50.00 post free. 

KEN MUIR (Dept. TT 12 ) Honuypot Farm, 
Rectory Road, Weeksy Heath, Clacton on 
Sea, Essex C0169BJ 

Or telephone your order using ACCESS/ 
VISA Tel: (0255)830181. 

PBtSONAl CHUBS WELCOM 


DRINK 

Bordeaux 

bargains 

Nicholas Danes has a pen- 
chant for mufti-coloured bow- 
ties, striped blazers and loud 
shirts. What’s My Line? com- 
petitors would never guess he 
is a wine merchant. Yet behind 
the bizarre apparel lies an 
astute business brain, a good 
palate and an enterprising 
approach to the trade. 

His greatest coup so far was 
to dense a cut-price prior 
commitment scheme for en 
primotr claret Thus in 1982 
and 1983 his firm. The 
Hungerford Wine Company, 
had many of the cheapest en 
primeur darets in the country. 

(En primeur claret is the 

young, still-maturing wine of- 
fered before it is bottled.) All 
Hengerford's customers had 
to do was to commit them- 
selves in advance to however 
many cases they required and 
pay before a certain date. 
Alined in advance with their 
cash and exact requirements, 
Davies then wait to Bordeaux 
and bought the wines. " 

His 'SS claret offer is al- 
ready out and he is in France 
now selecting the best ’85s at 
the most advantageous prices. 
Those who want to take 
advantage of tfaePrior Cem- 
nutmeat Scheme should write 
to the company immediately at 
128 High Street, Hu ngerfo rd, 
Berkshire. The dosing date is 
next Friday. 

The 1985 Bordeaux vintage 
is dearly a good and, at some 
chateaux, even a great year. 
The Cabernet Saurignoa of 
the M6doc and the Cabernet 
Franc have apparently fared 
less well. 

Thankfully the first of the 
ex-chateaux prices look infi- 
nitely more appealing than the 
rumours flying around in 
January At this stage, before 
the major comparative trade 
nuttings take place, it is hard 
to know exactly what to buy. 
But Davies strongly recom- 
mends Cos d’Estonrnel, 
Grand-Pny-Lacoate, Lynch- 
Bages, Docru-Beancafllou, La 
Lagune and Hant-BaiUy. To 
this list I would add Ltovflle- 
Las-Cases, Palmer and 
Marganx, whose performance 
in *83 was magnificent 

Jane MacQmtty 


THE TIMES COOK 


A tradition of lamb 


Collecting.' in the sense of 
accumulating many different 
versions of the same thing, is a 
pretty universal urge. Culi- 
nary antiques, a modest line of 
bygones of the table rather 
than of the kitchen are my 
weakness. 

And while tt is not too 
difficult to decline a second set 
of Edwardian asparagus-eat- 
ing tongs, manches h gigot (or 
is it manche it gigottf) seem to 
have accumulated in more, 
than useful numbers. 

Since 1 have no occasion to 
roast more than one leg of 
lamb at a time it is pointless to 
own several of these adjust- 
able handles for gripping the 
bone when carving. In France, 
where they are still made, new 
examples fashioned from the 
feet of mountain goals and the 
like are utterly resistible. It is 
the older, plainer, silver ones 
that give me a little trouble. 

A manche h gigot is a far 
better tool than a carving fork 
for coping with legs of roast 
pork, or hams, as well as the 
lamb for which h was de- 
signed, so it is well worth 
keeping an eye open for one in 
antique shops and stalls. 

Lamb is a traditional Easter 
roast and there is no better 
time of year for small, sweet, 
tender joints. Instead of spik- 
ing the meat with pieces of raw 
garlic, insert a layer of freshly- 
flavoured stuffing between 
skin and meat 

Stuffed leg of lamb 

Serves four to six 

1 leg new season's lamb 

2 tablespoons olive oil 

For the stuffing 
1 10a (4oz) fat belly 
of pork 

225g (8oz) mild onion, finely 
chopped 

4 tablespoons, or more, 
chopped fresh parsley 

A little thyme, fresh or 
dried 

Finely grated rind of 

half a lemon 

Salt and freshly ground 
black pepper 

Work loose the skin or mem- 
brane covering the leg from 
the underlying flesh by easing 
them apart with your fingers 
and a sharp, pointed knife. 



Shopa Crawford Foote serves up two 

suggestions for the Easter feast 

Start at the meaty, end of the jambon de Paques. Hard- 
joint, leaving the skin attached boiled eggs are added to the 


to the boneatlbe shank. 

To make the stuffing, finely 
chop or mince the fetpork and 
mix it with the chopped 
onion,, parsley, thyme and 
lemon zest Season the mix- 
ture well with- salt and reshly 
gound black pepper. 

' Insert it in a thin, even layer 
under the skin of the It®, then 
reshape the joint and sew or 
skewer the skin in place with 
one or two stitches or cocktail 
sticks. Rub the joint aU over 
with dive oil and season it. 

Tq seal the meat, toast the 
lambfbr 10 minutes in a pre- 
heated hot oven 
(230°C/450°F, gas mark 8) 
then reduce the heat to moder- 
ate ( 180°C/350°F, gas mark 4) 
and continue roasting it for a 
total of 10 minutes' per 450g 
(lib) if you like the meat pink; 
12 to IS minutes per 45Qg 
(lib) for medium-cooked 
lamb; and 20 minutes per 45Qg 
(lib) if preferred well-done. 

Using a meat thermometer 
to indicate “ doneness”, insert 
the probe into the centre of the 
thickest part of the meat 
without allowing it to touch 1 
the bone. It ' will register 
60°C/140°F when the lamb is 
pink, and 80°C/175°F when it 
is well done. 

No matter how lightly or 
thoroughly-cooked the iamb, 
it should be rested after roast- 
ing for 10 to 15 minutes in a 
warm place. This allows the 
meat to relax, and will release 
fewer juices when it is carved. 

Another traditional Easter 
dish is the seasonable version 
of jambon persille called 


juicy chunks of ham set m a 
rich, parsley-crammed jelly. 
The dish comes from Burgun- 
dy where.lt is served on Easter 
Monday. 

Jambon de Piques 
Serves six to eight 

1 pig's trotter, spirt ■ 


900g (2fb) piece lean 
gammon 

1 medium onion, chopped 

1 leek, chopped 

■ 1 carrot, chopped 

1 stick celery, chopped 

150ml (1/4pinQ white 
wine. ■ • 
Sprigtifthyme 

2 bay leaves. 

Four hard-boiled eggs 
Six tablespoons finely 

chopped parsley 

2 doves garlic, very 

finely chopped 

Salt and freshly ground 
black pepper ' 


Gammon, lean green bacon or . 
un smoked raw ham are 
nearest equivalents W we 
French ham used for this dish. 
If you cannot buy a ■} 
trotter to set the jelly, ecu 
unflavoured gelatine to the 
stock after the ham has been 
cooked. * 

Put uotter and gammon m 
heavy pan and cover with raid 
water. Bring to the boil, then 
immediately drain off the 
liquicLReturn trotter and gam- 
mon to pan and add me 
onion, leek, carrot, celery 1 , 
white wine, thyme and bay 

leaves with- enough cold water 
to cover. Bring slowly to the 
boil, skim carefully, cover and 
simmer for three hours. 

Strain the stock through a 
sieve lined with muslin (or a 
dean cloth) and set it aside to 
cool. When it is cool it should 
have set to a jelly, and the fat 
can be scraped off. 

Shell the hard-boiled eggs^ 
leaving them whole. Cut ih# 
gammon into large dice, at 
least 1 cm (1/2 inch) cubes, 
and toss them with the 
chopped parsley, garlic, and 
plenty of freshly ground black 
pepper. 

Pack about a third of the 
ham into a bowl or terrine. 
Arrange the eggs on top . pack 
the remaining ham round and 
on top. Heat the stock until it 
liquifies, check the seasoning, 
and pour in just sufficient to 
cover the ham. Cool set, keep 
chilled until needed. 

Serve jambon de Paques ai 
room temperature. It may be 
eaten as a first course with 
bread, or served with salads as 
picnic dish. £ 




ECOLEDUYIN 


IN THE GARDEN 


Splendour in the shrubbery 


Summer Courses 1986 

Uth-Ufthfcnc 30th lone -S«fa. Toly 3th -f 3th September 

Not only is the Ecoie du Vin a unique wine course. It tsako a gastronomic 
experience forever remembered.- Come and enjoy a luxurious live nfghts stay m a 
Bordeaux ddieau that ts renowned world-wide tor us ansme. mm inn and verv 
duunenve homely welcome 

Afl enquiries to Ecok do Vin. Vtatner House. Riv er Way. Harkw.Esser CM202EA 




Camellias are probably the 
finest of the flowering ever- 
green shrubs. They regularly 
produce masses of large attrac- 
tive blooms and they nearly all 
have foliage which is worthy 
of inclusion in the garden in 
its own right 

Siting is veiy important 
The first essential is the soil 
and the most important ele- 
ment is humus. This can be of 
any type, so long as it has been 
well rotted. Peat bark or 
garden compost are all suit- 
able and ideally should be 
added to the soil before plant- 
ing. The second thing to 
consider is the pH of the soil 
and of the humus being added. 
The soil should be slightly on 
the acidic side of neutral. 

Camellias do best in light 
overhead shade and should be 
protected from hot son and 
from cold east or north winds. 
Reflected heat can also cause 
problems. 

Autumn is the best time to 
plant but it is also possible to 
plant in April and May when 









probably as growth begins* in 
about April. 

There is a wealth of variet- 
ies in all shapes and sizes. 
Donation comes into flower in 
late February and by mid- 
April is covered with semi- 
double, dear pink blooms. 
Brigadoon is quite hardy and 
has double flowers of deep 
pink, an attractive habit ana 
glossy foliage. Cornish Snow is 
a hybrid with white flowers. It 
has a long flowering period 
but its foliage is not as good as 
many of the others. 

Else- Jury has rich pink, 
anenome-type flowers that 
can be at least Sin across. 
Inspiration has abundant deep 
pink flowers up to 4in across. 


Pink " an; CundEa Donation 

the ground begins to warm up. 

Camellias as a rule require 
little in the way of training. 
There will be times when a 
shoot or branch will spoil their 
normal compact habit, and 
these should be removed. The 
best time to use the knife is 


First-class compost 


As the days begin to lengthen 
and grow wanner, h is time to 
prepare for summer. 

If the compost is not right, 
the plants wifl not get a good 
start and will never be at their 
best 

There is no need these days 
to mix your own compost hot 
should yon wish to do so, yon 
have to have the right ingredi- 
ents, starting with the sofl. 
The main reason sofl-less 
composts are popular is that 
this most important material 
remains a variable. A good 
quality top soil can be used for 
compost base and will give 
good results. 

There are a wealth of soil- 
less composts on the market 
Some to look at are Lerington 
Composts, Arthur Bowers 
compost, Id Verdley compost 
and PBI composts. 

Soil-based composts are 
usually made to the John 
limes formula and as such. 


once mixed with fertilizers, 
most be used within eight 
weeks. Plants can be damaged 
by soil containing decomposed 
fertilizers and as it is not 
possible to know how long a 
compost has been made op, I 
hesitate to recommend it 
Many of the makers of own- 
post using the John tones 
formula are now using slow- 
release fertilizers. 

Ashley Stephenson 


Camellia japonica Elegans 
has anenome-type {rink flow- 
ers and is a more open plant 
than most of the genus. 

I recommend the catalogue 
of James Trehane and Sons, 
Camellia Nursery, Stapehill 
Road, Hampreston, 
Wimbome, Dorset, BH12 
7NE They are specialist grow- 
ers with good quality plants. 


c^Agri frames 

FRUIT CAOFS 


aqua Vitae on 
The rocks 

What gives indi- 
vidual malt whiskies 
their distinctive 
character is often the 
subject of debate. 
One thing, however, 
is indisputable: the 
quality of the water is 
vital. 

Lagavulin, the 

single malt whisky that charaaerises the 
White Horse blend is al ways made with pure, 
soft Isle of Islay water. 

This water has passed over more than 
100 rocky falls and travelled over miles of 
moss and peat to reach the distillery at 
Lagavulin. 

How that water helps create the malt that 
gives White Horae its distinctive flavour is 
one of natures secrets. But die secret is 
out every time you open the bottle and fill 
your glass. 

Blended to let the malt shine through. 






£200 For Your Old 
Mower- At Least! 


The New ESSEX opening cloche 

A GREAT MONEY SAVER . . , 


You don't have to be a keen gardener to appreciate the 
benefits of this unique doche, ir you warn early vegetable 
ft yii, and safari crops you vriB find the Essex Cloche the most 
effective, earicsltonacdoclie yon have r»ar tried. Our 
illustration shows how it works and ihe whole thine can be , assembled 
and operational in a few minutes. Unlike conventional cloches dial 
must be lifted for wxess die unique design of the Essex Cloche allows 
instant access to either side by sliding up One Of the crystal dear 


pliable PVC side ponds forming its protective cover. 

The Essex Cloche is I2‘ wide, 9' high, saked toa depth of 6' ami is mailable 


in 2 Cloche Packs 6' Jong or 3 Ctoche Packs*' tong complete with PNC. end 
panels and coma with easy assembly instructors. Our price includes all post, 
racking, and handling charges We despatch within 14 days from receipt of order, 
jfjoii are not ddiriued with your purchase return for a full and courteous refund. 

6' Cloche — £7.95; 9* Cloche — £10.95} 2x6' Cloches — £l&«fc 
2x9' Oodles — £19.50 


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i 






THE TIMES SATURDAY MARCH 22 1986 


FESTIVALS 


A celebration of the best of British 


To com plete our two-part guide to the 
jestivals, Anne Whitehoose covers the 
ground from the wilds of St Magnus to 
Brighton pier; from the folk musician*; 

and steel bands o f Ayrshire to the 
international celebrities of Edinburgh 


MARCH 


IRISH FESTIVAL 

<?<?asey^ Sy/ctoSSS 1 
thee Dr Fell, and Herbie 
AnrisfronQ gives a concert • 
n^dingWsnawsst release. A 
St Patriots Night combines 
music, cabaretand dance, 
featuring Ronnutece 
(traditional group from Dublin), 
and Mullagn dancers and 
musicians; with Eurovision 
song contest winner Johnny 





"U 


■ ■ cabaret, and Slobhan O’Nefl 
.. . runs an Irish language 
workshop. 

. March 17-23. Battersea Arts 
Centre, Old Town HaH, 
Uvender HH1. London SW11 
(01-2238413). 

HARROGATE 

international youth 

MUSIC FESTIVAL 
- The Scholar es Minoras Pro 

MusicaAntfqua, a children s 

group from Poland, Is one of 

14th festival, who win perform 
. songs and dances in costume, 
' L accompanied by old ~ 

& instruments. Choirs, bands and 
_ - baroque dance groups from 
Sweden, America and UK, plus 
. premiera of Guy Wootfenden's 
. Deo Gracias, and a parade and 
' •**. . choral event fn Ripon 
; .Cathedral to mark Rfpon 1 1 00 

. .•» .Festival. •’ 

■r March 26-April 2. Details: 
Concertworid, 180 High Street 
Beckenham, Kent BR31EW 
{01-658 0121). ■ . .. 

LANCASTER LITERATURE 
FESTIVAL 

Ninth festival indudes lectures, 
readings and workshops with 
Laurie Taylor, Glyn Hughes, 
Stanley Middleton, Douglas 
. Dunn; and performances by 
. Urdus Dance Company "and. 

Northern Black Light Theatre, 

.. using mime and puppets. 
Playwrights Louise Page and 
.,* * Stephen Lowe talk about thefr. 
\ , work, and Red Rose Theatre 
Company perform Louise 
- Page’s Real Estate. 

April 20-27. Booking (from 
March 31): Duke's Playhouse, - 
Moor Lane, Lancaster. Season - 
tickets available; 


ST ENDELUON EASTER 
FESTIVAL 

This festival of music covers 
choral, orchestral and chamber 
works, and takes place at St 
EndeUion Church, near Port 
Isaac, under conductor 
Richard Hickox. The major 
choral work will be the Mozart 
Mass in C minor. The summer . 
festival includes music and 
drama, also under direction of 
Hickox. 

April and August Details: Mrs 
J R Holden. Rock House, 
Delabote, North Cornwall PL33 
9BS (0840 213242). 

LEITH HILL MUSIC FESTIVAL 
Highlights of 1986 festival are 


Rig Band, and Preservation 
Hall Jazz Band. Exhibitions on 
30 years of rock music; 
man and the elements; and 
artists fn tits theatre: 
Workshops, parades, films, 
literary lunches, tea dances, 
horsedrivi ngtrials, bo nfires, 

firew^c^Sa^ 0 ”' ^ 

May 2-25. Dome Box 
Office, 21 New Rced.-Brighton 
BN11UG (0273 674357). . 

NEWBURY FESTIVAL 
A David Munrow 
anniversary concert is one of 
.the highlights In a . 
programme which includes the 
City of Birmingham 




Hymn toStCedfia. and John 
Rutter's Gloria will also be 
performed. Dorking Halls. 
ApriL Box Office, Leith Hill 
festival, 24 Raglan Road, 
Rebate. Surrey RH2 0DP 
(0306887720). 

8ROMSGROVE FESTIVAL 
Ffrogramme includes West 
Mkrands* premiere of Andrew 
Lloyd Webber's Requiem with 
Sarah Brightrnan and Arthur 
Davies as soloists, and 
celebrity recM by Brazilian 
pianist Cristina Ortiz. Richard 
Baker is guest artist in The 
Menagene, and there wiU be 
performances by Syd 
Lawrence and orchestra, the 


Bournemouth Sinfonietta, 
the English Concert, London 
Baroque. Allegri Quartet 
Paul Tortelier, Fou Ts'ona, 
Walter Klein. Sir Peter 
Pears, Emma Klrkby, and 
Heather Harper. 

Programme combines 
concerts in churches and 
country houses, exhibitions, 
jazz, children's events, and 
visual arts. 

May 7-17. Details: Newbury 
Spring Festival. Suite 3, Town 
Half, Newbury, Berkshire 
(063532421). 

GREAT .WniEY MUSIC 
FESTIVAL 

The second festival opens 
with two concerts of baroque 
music and Includes choral 
and instrumental works by 
Mozart and Haydn 
presented by Philomusica of 
Worcestershire and 
[ Gloucestershire and other 
groups. Works include 
Messiah, Mozart's Requiem 
Mass, Haydn's Creation 
and TeDeum, piano recitals 
and string quartets. Organ 
recftals take place in June and 
July, with performances of 
works by Verdi and Rossini 
with Stourport Choral 
Operatic Society in September. 
May 10-Sept 27, with eight- 
day Mozart programme May 
-24-31. Details: Great Witiey 
Church Festival. The Cottage, 
Great Witfey, Worcester 
WR66HR. - 

AYRSHIRE ARTS 

festival: ... 


BBC Scottish Symphony 
Orchestra, Sheba Sound, 
Borderline Theatre Company, 
and Toronto Dance 
Company. Also brass and folk 
concerts, Caribbean steel 
bands, films, exhibitions, and 
busking competitions. 

May 17-24. Festival Office, 
Wallace Tower, 176 High 
Street Ayr (0292 262821). 

MALVERN FESTIVAL 

This.year's festival, in 
. celebration of Benjamin 
Britten, features the City of 
London Shfonia playing works 
by Britteo and Fmzl. BBC • 
Welsh Symphony Orchestra 
with soloist Mark Kaplan, 


mm 






Manchester Camerata 
conducted by James Lockhart, 
and the Medid Quartet with 
John Bingham and Michael 
Brittain as soloists. Just 
Friends is an emertaininemt 
wifo Marion Montgomery and 
Richard Rodney Bennett 
April 27-May 10. Details c/o - 





... V t" 


^BRIGHTON FESTIVAL 
Zr The 1986 theme Is the four 
elements, fo reflect thfr United 
Natfohs declaration of 
International Peace Year, and 
j£. the m^or peace event wiB ( 
bea performance of Britten's 
ZCWarRequfemti ythe 
• -t Dresden Philharmonic 
: j - Orchestra and Brighton 
. Festival Chorus. Opera 
highlights include Aida 
staged in the Dome by New 
Sussex Opera; and Kent 
’ / r Opera's new productions of 
Rameau's Pygmalion and . 
PurcaS's Dido and Aeneas. 

Conceits inducte Schubert 
recitals in the recently restored 
; music room of tbe Royal 

Pavilion; and David Munrow 
; , _ anniversary concert at 

r GlyrKfebouma Opera House. 

j ■ Pramiaresof BeterMaxweB 
• Davies's An Matey Wadding 
- wtm Sunrise, and new 
•; ' works by Erika Fox, Janet 

.■ Graham, Barry Seaman and 

Barry Mills. Theatre includes 
. . TheRaH by Carbone 14 
from Toronto,, who wffi taka tne 
. audience by special train to . 

; Piston Park, with the action 


.! tradL Other higfiBghts include: 
» Dance and mime from the ; - 

Paa Lfljr A0meH»atre and 
Northern Btftat Theatre. 


Soderstrom sings songs by 
Britten and Schubert with 
Geoffrey Parsons (piano), 
an cf festival drama includes 
PeterTereon’s Moby Dick 
by the Orchard Theatre 
Company. Also programme 
of films for which Britten wrote 
the music, and art . 
exhibitions include Homage to 
Britten. Spencers on Spas, 
jand Auden in CcJwaiL Fringe 
festival of lunchtime 
concerts, boat trips and solo 
performances in circus big 
topt'. 

May 18-31. Box Office, 

Malvern Festival Theatre, 
Grange Road, Malvern, 
Worcestershire (08845 33 77). 

DUMFRIES AND 
GALLOWAY ARTS FESTIVAL 
The 7th festival includes 
performances by BBC 
Symphony Orchestra, 

. Borderline Theatre Company, 
and Toronto Dance 
Theatre, with appearances by 
Prunella Scales and Ralph 
McTeH. Also major arts 
exh&xtions. • 

May 23-June 1. Festival 
Office, Gracefietd Arts Centre. 
Edinburgh Road, Dumfries 
DG1 1JQ (0387 63822). 

BATH FESTIVAL 
1986 programme 
celebrates the arts of France, 
featuring Pierre Boulez, 

Paul Tortefier,.Shura • 

Cherkassky, Monteverdi 
Choir, Polish Chamber 
Orchestra, and Elly 
Ameling. Events indude opera, 
choral concerts, orchestral 
and chamber music, jazz, 
contemporary art fair, 
exhibition, children's events, 
marionettes, and festival 
fringe. 

May 23-Jime 8. Details: 

Bath International Festival, 
Liniey House, 1 Pferrepon* 
Place. Bath BA1 1 JY (0225 
63362/66411). 

EXETER FESTIVAL 
Cornmunhy-basedfestival 

with professional events 
including appearances m 
the catiiedral by Polish 

Chambw Orchestra under 
conductor Jerzy Maksymiuk; 
Orchestra of Welsh-, 

National Opera with Helen 
Field (soprano) and Jeffery 
Lawton (tenor); and Academy 
of St Martin in the Rekls. 

Other artiste include James 
Galway, PhiHp Mdl.and 
jitiian Bream.Trestte Theatre . 






Erei-of-the-piershowbyttie 
Bright Red Theatre 
Company on the revttalizad 
- palace pier. Three-week 
jazz season, with Charlie Watte 



m 




(046061900). 

SPITALFIELOS FESTIVAL 
Highlights of tenth festival 
Include Britten TOth 
anniversary concert, David 
Munrow 10th anniversary 
concert, and appearances 
by Endymion Ensemble, Janet 
Baker, and New College 
Choir, Oxford. Gustav 
Leonhardt gives 
- harpsichord recital, and „ 
Schubert song cycles will 
be performed by David Wilson- 
Johnson and David Owen- 
Norris. 

May 27-June 5. Paul Gray, 

29 Marmlon Road, London 
SW1 1(01-2239594). 

GLYNDE BOURNE 
FESTIVAL OPB1A 
The two new productions 
this season are Verdi's Simon 
Boccanegra and 
Gershwin’s Porgy and Bess; ■ 
with, three Peter Hall 
revivals eit Albert Herring, 
L'lncoronazkme di Poppea. 
and Don Giovanni. Casts 
include Willard White, 

Cynthia Haymon and Maria 
Ewing, with Bernard 
Haitink, Simon Rattle, Andrew . 
Davis, Richard Bradshaw 
and Jane Glover as 
conductors. The London 
Philharmonic Orchestra 
performs with the 
Gynde bourne Festival Chorus. 
May 27-Aua 15. Booking ' 

g nom April 2): Box Office, 
lynde bourne Festival 
Opera, Lewes. East Sussex, 
BN8 5UU. PersonaJ/phone 
booking from April 28/29 (0273 
812411). 

DICKENS FESTIVAL 
Highlights of 8th festival 
include Grand Dickensian 
procession fed by 
Commodore stage coach, 
evening Edwardian river 
cruise by paddle steamer, and 
London Festival Orchestra 
concert Also Dickens readings 
and talks, Victorian soiree, 
tea dances and Victorian 
cricket match. Dickensian 
. costume win be worn, and 
there win be a grand festival 
ban and firework display. 

May 29-June 1. Tourist 
Information Centre, Eastgate 
Cottage, High Street 
Rochester, Kent ME1 1 EW. 

GREENWICH FESTIVAL 

Handers oratorio Solomon 
performed by the Thomas 
Taflis Society choir, and a 
recital of Schubert songs by 
Sly Ameling are highlights 
of classical music programme; 
also appearances by James • 
Galway, the Chieftains, Helen 


Lyttieton. Alan Bates and 
Derek Jacobi read Philip 
Laritin's-and Lord Byron's 
poetry, and there will be 
performances by mime artist 
Note Rae and the Theatre 
de Complicite. Plus street ' 
entertainments, buskers, 
magicians, jazz, reggae, and 
open air concert with 
fireworks in Cutty Sark 
Gardens. 

May 30-June 15. Festival 
Office, 25 Woolwich New 
Road, London SE18 6EU 
(01-317 8687/855 5900 (credit 
cards). 

PORTSMOUTH FESTIVAL: 
France will be the theme; and 
programme includes first • 
complete performance of 
Berlioz* Les Troyens, with . 
Bournemouth Symphony . 

Orchestra and 

Bournemouth Sinfonietta,. . . 
Portsmouth Festival Choir 
and Bournemouth Choir, under 
Roger Norrington.- Music 
programme features works by 
Dukas. Messiaen, Poulenc " 






m 






: Hitch at the Northcott Theatre, 
and festival winds up with 
fireworks display. 

May 24-June 7. Bookings, 
from mid-May, to Exeter Arts 
Booking and Information 
Centre, Princesshay, Exeter 
(0392 211080). 

CHILWORTHY FESTIVAL 
South West of England 
Shakespeare Trust present 
Hamlet As You Uta h, 

Julius Caesar and The Taming 
of the Shrew , plus 
Renaissance and Medieval 
music concerts with ■ 
.renderings of. songs of 
Shakespeare's time. 
Performances are in Woodland 
Glade Amphitheatre, 
accompanied by roast boar or 
venison and mulled wine. 
Elizabethan pageant and fayre 
includes duefllsts, long-bow 
archers, jugglers, craft stalls, 
fortune tellers and jesters. 


and Ravel, and there will be a 
day school on The Trojans 
Experience. Film programme 
includes screenings, talks 
and exhibitions, and there will 
be an exhibition of work by 
contemporary French 
environmental artist 
Bernard Lassus. Dance, 
drama, community arts and 
street events will turn the city 
into a bustling French town 
for two weeks. 

May 31 -June 15- Festival 
Office, Guildhall, Portsmouth 
POI 2AD (0705 
834182/834185). 


1 RIPON 1100 
Year-lora festival to mark 
city's 1100th anniversary with 
June 1 designated Charter 
Day, when a service in Ripon 
Cathedral followed by 
revels at Fountains Abbey in 
the presence of the Queen 
Mother marks the granting of 
the charter to the city in AD 
886 by King Alfred. City and 
religious celebrations are 
combined to mark also the 
150th anniversary of the . 
diocese of Ripon. Highlights 
include piano recital by 
RosaMnd Runcfe, the London 
Festival Orchestra with 
Janet Baker, and St Wilfrid 
pageant and procession. 
Exhibitions of the 70th 
anniversary of the Somme, 
and the history of Ripon's 
liberty court; plus medieval 
fairs and banquets, jousting, 
ox roastiro, town crters 
contests, Edwardian tea party, 
re-enactments of battles 
and granting of charter, and a 
King Alfred Charter 
anniversary ball with burnt 
cakes. Festival concludes 
with torchlight procession and 
cathedral service on New 
Year's Eve. 

June 1, and al year. Barrie 
Price, Beckete House, 34 
Market Place, Ripon, North 
Yorkshire HG4 1BZ (0765 
700681). 

ALDEBURGH FESTIVAL 
The 39th festival includes 

EytheBritten-Pears f ^ Brr ’ r ^ 
School, conducted by Steuart 
Bedford, and Parsdai Act III 
with the English National 
Opera under Sir Reginald 
Goodall. Festival commissions 
indude works by 25-year- 
old British composer Rupert 
Bawden, and John Lambert 
to mark his 60th birthday, and 
there will be performances 
by English Chamber Orchestra 
with Murray Perahia. Other 
artistes will include Dame 
Janet Baker, Paul Cross ley, 

Sir Peter Pears, and John 
Shlrtey-Qulrk, plus the 
Medici and Amadeus Quartets. 
The Aldeburgh Festival 
Singers and Yorkshire 
Baroque Soloists will 
perform the Monteverdi 
Vespers In Hadleigh 
Church, and there win be a 
Richard Tod nay Bennett jaz 
programme in Jubilee HalL 
Poetry readings by Stephen 
Spender, lecture by George 
Steiner, and exhibitions by 
Sidney Nolan. Jeffrey Camp 
and Paxton Chadwick. 

June 6-22. Aldeburgh 
Foundation, High Street, 
Aldeburgh, Suffolk (P15 
5AX (072 885 3543): 

THREE SPIRES FESTIVAL ' 
Highlights include Verdi's 
Requiem by Bournemouth 
Symphony Orchestra, with 
Alison Hargan, Sally Burgess. 
Arthur Davies and David 
Wiison-dohnson. Appearances 
also by Northern SInfonia of 
England, with Cerile Ousset 
(piano) and Cofin Carr 
foallo); Heather Harper sings 
Strauss's Four Last Songs; 
John Bingham gives Liszt 
centenary concert and 

Jennifer Bate gives organ 
recital in the chapel, St 
Michael's Mount Plus 
exhibition of contemporary 
Cornish arts at the county 
museum. 

June 16-28. The Secretary, 
Bryher, Norway Lane. 
Perranarworthal, Truro TR3 
7NU (s.a^L please) (0872 
863346). 

ST MAGNUS FESTIVAL 
Royal Philharmonic 
Orchestra will premiere viofin 
concerto by Peter Maxwell 
Davies, with Isaac Stem, and 
the Fires of London will 
perform opera The Lighthouse. 
Other features of 1 0th 
festival include Albany Brass 
Ensemple, Kings Singers, 

St Magnus Cathedral Choir, 
and Festival Drama Group 
In DrFaustus. Recitals also by 
Richard Hughes, Sven 








Weber, John Gray, and 
Norwegian Wind Band and 
Choir. 

June 18-24. Details: 

Eleanor Laird, Festival 
Secretary, 22 St 
Catherine's Place, Kirkwall. 
Orkney KW151HX {0856 
2433). Booking from May. 

LUDLOW FESTIVAL 
The Norman castle, which 
this year celebrates its 900th 
anniversary, will 
accommodate a major open air 


production of 
Shakespeare's Romeo and 
JuBet and a series of 
concerts of orchestral, 
chamber and light musk: 
will take place in the 1 5th- 
century parish church. 
Programme Includes theatre. 


exhibitions, jazz, children's - 
events, guided historical tours 
June 21 -July 6. Festival 
Office, Castle Square, Ludlow, 
Shropshire SYB 1 AX (0584 
2448). 

ALMEIDA 

INTERNATIONAL FESTIVAL 
OF CONTEMPORARY 
MUSIC 

Two main themes of the 
sixth festival are the music of 
Spain and Japan, featuring 
leading composers and 
performers including Toru 
Takemrtsu, and Luis de Pablo. 
Plus major retrospectives 
of the work of Arvo Part, and of 
Steve Reich in celebration 
of his 50th birthday. Also 
British premiere of 
Bussotti's opera Le Racine, a 
short series featuring the 
music of James Wood, and two 
events programmed by 
Oliver Knussen and Hans 
Weme Henze, with works 
by Harrison Birtwistle, Richard 
Feliciano, and Peter 
MaxweU Davies. 

June-July. Almeida 
Theatre, Almeida Street 
Islington, London N1 1TA 
(01-3594404). 


THE LIVERPOOL 
FESTIVAL OF COMEDY 
A fortnight of comedy 
shows and stums, including a 
: film festival, an exhibition of 
cartoons and Spirting Image 
puppets, street theatre and 
circus. Tom O'Connor, George 
Meily, Alan Bleasdaie. the 
Liverpool Poets and Faith 
Brown are among those 
involved. 

July 12-27. Festival office: 
Atlantic Tower Hotel, Liverpool 
L39RE (051 2275734). 

HENLEY FESTIVAL 
Concerts include the 
Scottish Chamber Orchestra in 
fully staged version of 
Shakespeare’s A Midsummer 
Night's Dream with original 
incidental music, the Orty of 
London SInfonia conducted 
by Richard Hickox and the 
Royal Liverpool 
Philharmonic Orchestra with 
Nigel Kennedy (violin). Also 
grand firework and fountain 
spectacular with Handel's 
Music for the Royal Fireworks, 
£lus performances by^the^ 

the^ad^a^Sl^ws, and 
the Movingstage Marionette 
Company. Other events 
include cabaret shows, 
satirical revues, shows 
from the 1930s and '40s and 
exhibitions of work by 
Patrick Proctor and Ricardo 
Crnalli. 

July 9-12. Festival Box 
Office. 27 Hart Street Henley- 
on-Thames. Oxon RG9 2AR 
(0491 575751/575834). 

HASLEMERE FESTIVAL 

62nd festival presents 8 
major concerts of Cl 6th-C1 8th 
English and European 
music and verse, plus earty 
court dances in costume. 

July 18-26. Programmes 
from Festival Office, Jeses, 
Grayswood Road, 

Haaemere, Surrey, GU27 2BS, 

CHESTER FESTIVAL 
Concerts, jazz and fringe 
events, with music from aB 
periods in the cathedral and 
small centres throughout the 
city. Programme published: 
ApriL 

July 18-26. c/o Gateway 
Theatre, Chester. CHI 2BH 
(024440393). 

PROMS 86 

Mahler's Symphony of a 
Thousand launches the 92nd 
season of 59 concerts in 
which 43 orchestras, 
ensembles and choirs will 
take part The Toronto 
Symphony under Andrew 
Davis marks the first visit to the 
season by a Canadian 
orchestra, and the Bavarian 



Radio Symphony Orchestra 
make their Proms debut. Other 
highlights include 
Glyndeboume Festival Opera's 
new production of Verdi's 
Simon Boccanegra conducted 
by Bernard Haitink, 

Messiaen's TurangaDa 
Symphony performed by 
the National Youth Orchestra 
of Great Britain and Mark 
Elder, and a visit by the 
Chamber Orchestra of 
Europe with Claudio Abbado. 
Early music wilt include 
performances of Monteverdi's 
Orfeo by Early Opera ■ 

Project and Roger Norrington. 
Handel's Solomon by 
Trevor Pm nock and the English 
Concert, and Mozart choral 
works presented by John Eliot 
Gardiner, the English 
Baroque Soloists and 
Monteverdi Choir. 
Contemporary repertoire 
includes two works specially 
commissioned for the 
season: a trumpet concerto 
from Gordon Crosse, and a 
new work for orchestra and 
live electronics from 
Jonathon Harvey. 

Appearances also of 
Murray Perahia, Anne- Sophie 
Mutter, Jessye Norman, 
and Lontano. 

July 18-Sept 13. ' 

Prospectus available mid-May, 
with booking from June 2. 
Royal Albert Hall Box Office, 
London SW7 2AU (01-589 
8212; Credit cards: 01-589 
9465). 

CAMBRIDGE FESTIVAL 
Under its new artistic 
director, Guy Wooftenden, this 
year s festival adopts a 
Hungarian theme, fo mark the 
centenary of the death of 
Liszt. A performance of his 
rarely performed work, St 
Elizabeth, win take place with 
the Royal Philharmonic 
Orchestra, and there will be a 
repeat of the 1985 series of 
modem living composers 
choosing the programme. 
Events take place in the 
college chapels, Ely 
Cathedral, the Fitzwilliam 
Museum, and parks, with 
opera, concerts, theatre, 
exhibitions, films, literary 
events, jazz, children's events, 
and festival fringe. 

Jidy 19-August 3. Festival 
Administrator, Kelt House, 
Station Road, Cambridge, 

CB1 2JX (0223 358977). 

FISHGUARD FESTIVAL 
Highfights of 17th festival 
include the John Davies 
Singers and City of London 
Simonia In Haydn's Creation; 
and Stravinsky's The 
Soldier's Tale and Walton's 
Facade with Timothy West 
and PruneHa Scales. Also 
Ctiikngirian String Quartet; 

BBC Welsh Symphony 
Orchestra with Howard 
Shelley (piano); and an evening 
with Georgie Fame and 
Hoagy Carmichael. Exhibition 
of work of Pembrokeshire 
artists. Also exhibitions and 
films. 

July 19-26. Programme 
published: April. Festival 
Office, Fishguard, 
Pembrokeshire, SAS5 9BJ 
(0348 873612). 

BUXTON FESTIVAL 
1986 will focus on 
Cervantes, ihe Spanish author 
of Don Quixote, and will 
include the first British staging 
this century of Donizetti's ii 

Furioso aU lsola di San 

Domingo. Programme of 
opera, concerts, theatre, 
exhibitions, films, jazz, 
children's and fringe events. 
July 19-August 3. Buxton 
Festival, 1 Crescent View, Hall 
Bank. Buxton, Derbyshire 
(0298 71 657 or 71 859). 

SOUTHERN CATHEDRALS 
FESTIVAL 

The three cathedral choirs 
of Chichester. Winchester and 
Salisbury meet this year for 
their annual festival of 
cathedral music at 
Chichester. A concert with the 
Michael Laird Brass 
Ensemble includes Parry's 
Blest Pair of Sirens and 
Stamford's Bible Songs; and 
John Birch gives an organ 
recital, with a commissioned 
work by Czech composer 
Petr Eben. Also festival 
eucharist and evensong. 

July 24-27. Festival Office, . 
The Cloisters, Chichester 
Cathedral, West Sussex, 

POI 9 IPX (0243 782595). 

HARROGATE 

INTERNATIONAL FESTIVAL 

21 st festival includes 
appearances by Derek Jacobi, 
Richard Stflgoe, Edward 
Woodward, and performances 
from the English Chamber 


Orchestra with Thomas Allen 
and Jeffrey Tate, the 
Moscow virtuosi, and 
Academy of St Martin -m- 
the-Fields under Sir Neville 
Marriner. Also the 
Pasadena Roof Orchestra, 
Phoenix Dance Company, 
literary events, lata night 
shows, and firework 
display. Programme published 
in April, and booking from 
June. 

July 31 -Aug 13. Festival 
Office. Royal Beths, Harrogate, 
North Yorkshire. HG1 2RR 
(0423 65757 from June 30). 


AUGUST 


NATIONAL EISTEDDFOD 
This year's folk festival 
takes place at Abergwaun AT 
Fro, Dyfed. with highlights 
including concert with BBC 
Welsh Symphony Orchestra 
(soloist John Lill). the National 
Youth Orchestra of Wales, 
and National Youth Brass of 
Wales; plus mixed choirs, 
madrigals, and vocal 
competitions. Also science 
and arts and crafts exhibitions, 
and pop sessions. 

Aug 2-9. J.ldris Evans, 
Eisteddfod Office. 3 Main 
Street, Fishguard, Dyfed 
SA65 9HG (0348 874599). 


EDINBURGH FESTIVAL 
The 40th international 
festival opens with a world 
premiere of a production of 
Weber's Oberon in Pfanche's 
English original, with other 
opera including a visit by the 
Maly Company of 
Leningrad. Music programme 
mcludes visits by the 
Moscow Virtuosi, the Toronto 
Symphony Orchestra, and 
the City of Birmingham 
Symphony Orchestra; with 
Emanuel Ax, Janet Baker. Yo 
Yo Ma and Victoria MuKova 
among the soloists. There will 
be a weekend of C20th 
music, and a season of 
Tchaikovsky operas. A 
world theatre season includes 
the Royal Dramatic Theatre 
of Stockholm, with Ingmar 
Bergman's new production 
of Strindberg's Miss Julie; and 
the Toho Company of 
Japan perform the Euripides 
tragedy, Medea. 

Aug 10-30. Edinburgh 
International Festival, 21 
Market Street, Edinburgh 
EH1 1BW (031 226 4001). 

THREE CHOIRS 
This year's festival takes 
place at Gloucester and 
includes performances by 
the London Bach Orchestra 
and London Mozart 
Players; the Amaryllis Consort 
Munrow Anniversary 
Ensemble play in Painswick 
Parish Church. 

Performances also of 
Beethoven's Missa 
Sotemnis, Andrew Lloyd- 
Webber's Requiem, and 
works by Britten. Williamson, 
and Paul Patterson. 

Aug 16-23. Festival Office, 
Community House, Co) lege 
Green, Gloucester GL1 2LZ 
(0452 29819). 

MOZART FESTIVAL 

Murray Perahia is artistic 
director in four performances 
of Cosi fan tutte at 
Aldeburgh. and is soloist in 
Mozart's Piano Concerto 
with Brttterv Pears Orchestra: 
plus chamber music 
concerts. 

Aug 30-Sep 6. Box Office, 
Aldeburgh Foundation, High 
Street, Aldeburgh, Suffolk 
IP15 5AX (072 685 3543). 


SEPTEMBER 


SALISBURY FESTIVAL 

Highlights Include concerts 
in Bie cathedral with the 
London Mozart Players 
under Jane Glover, and the 
Royal Philharmonic 
Orchestra under Andrg Previn. 
A Young Musicians Series 
takes place at St Thomas's 
Church, and concerts in the 
City Hall will feature Ann 
Mackay and the English 
Chamber Orchestra, Vladimir 
Ashkenazy and Lynn 
Harrell in a programme of 
Beethoven cello sonatas, 
George Meily, the Cambridge 
Buskers, and Richard 
Stilgoe. Major theatrical 
productions at Safibury Arts 
Centre and Playhouse, plus 
dance, exhibitions, 
community art and films. 

Sep 8-20. Salisbury Festival 
Box Office, Salisbury 
Playhouse, Maithouse 
Lane, Salisbury SP2 7RA. 


ST LEONARDS FESTIVAL 
The third festival includes a 
Uszt centenary recital by 
Australian pianists 
Rhondda Gillespie and Robert 
Weatherbum. Other 
soloists include Russian 
violinist Yuri Baginki, Zena 
Baker, and Derek Hammond- 
Stroud. 

Sept 13-28. Details from 1 
The Uplands. Maze Hill, St 
Leonards on Sea. East 
Sussex TN38 DHL. 

TEWKESBURY FESTIVAL 
OF ARTS 

The festival, in its second 
year, includes a concert by 
Bournemouth Sinfonietta In 
Tewkesbury Abbey with Jane 
Glover conducting, piano 
recital by Rosalind Runcie in 
Winchcombe Parish 
Church, and Highnam National 
Opera perform 77 ki 
Marriage of Figaro at the 
Roses Theatre. Also organ 


recitals in the abbey, celebrity 
evening, and street theatre, 
including Dickens Day. when 
local traders will be dressed 
in Victorian costume. 

Sep 19-28. Festival 
administrator, Eboracum, 

Bred on. Tewkesbury, Glos 
GL207EJ. 

NORTH WALES MUSIC 
FESTIVAL 
Programme includes 
London Mozart Players 
conducted by Jane Glover, 
BBC Symphony Orchestra 
under Sir Charles Groves, 
and Marian Montgomery and 
musicians in cabaret at 
Bodelwyddan Castle. 

Sep 21-27. Festival Office, 

High Street. St Asaph, Cfwyd, 
(0745 584508). 

WINDSOR FESTIVAL 
Performances of Faure's 
Requiem, and Britten's Curlew 
River by Nexus Opera are 
among festival highlights; plus 
Britten's Let s Make an 
Opera by the National Youth 
Music Theatre at the 
Theatre Royal. Concerts in the 
state rooms of the castle 
with-English Chamber 
Orchestra, Windsor Festival 
Chorus, and King's College 
Cambridge Chapel Choir. St 
George 's Chapel Choir 
perform Haydn's Nelson 
Mass. 

Sep 21-Oet 5. Windsor 
Festival Society, Dial House, 
Englefield Green, Surrey. 

SWANSEA FESTIVAL 
39th festival includes 
commission of a cello concerto 
from Welsh composer 
Daniel Jones; plus concerts by 
the Philharmonia, Moscow 
Philharmonic. Stockholm 
Sinfonietta, and Welsh 
National Opera. Plus recitals, 
chamber music, jazz, 
literary events, dance, films, 
children's events and art 
exhibitions on surrealism. Full 
festival fringe. Programme 
published in May. 
Sep2?-Oct18. Civic 
Information Centre, PO Box 
59. Singleton Street, 

Swansea (0792 468321). 

CANTERBURY FESTIVAL 

Third festival focuses on 
France, with highlights 
including a performance of 
Duruffe Requiem in the 
cathedral by Canterbury 
Choral Society, and organ 
recitals by Allan Wicks. 
Appearances also by Pasquier 
Trio from France. English 
Chamber Orchestra, plus 
drama programme at the 
Marlowe Theatre. Talks and 
exhibition of Bayeux 
Tapestry. 

Sep 28- Oct 18. Festival 
office, 59 Ivy Lane, Canterbury 


!, 59 ivy u 
452853). 


OCTOBER 


NEWCASTLE LITERARY 
FESTIVAL 

Festival includes fiction, 
poetry, drama and non-fiction, 
with authors of many 
nationalities. 

Oct 26- Nov 2. Festival 
Office, 10 Osborne Terrace. 
Jesmond, Newcastle upon 
Tyne, NE2 1NE (091 281 7701). 


NOVEMBER 


BELFAST FESTIVAL 
Opera, concerts, theatre, 
dance, cinema, exhibitions, 
jazz, literary events, folk 
music, architectural tours, 
children's and fringe 
events, in and around campus 
of Queen's University and 
Grand Opera House. 
Programme published: 
September. 

Nov 12-29. Festival House, 

8 Malone Road, Belfast BT9 
5BN (0232 667687). 

Audoersfield 

CONTEMPORARY MUSIC 
FESTIVAL 

Eastern European music is 
one of main themes, featuring 
Witold Lutoslaw^ki from 
Poland and Gyorgy Kurtag 
from Hungary. Trie Junge 
Deutsche Philharmonic from 
West Germany makes its 
British debut, and Heinz 
Holliger conducts three 
concerts, while his Scardanelli 
Cycle receives its UK 
premiere. Exhibitions include 
musically related paintings 
by Golm Rose. 

Nov 17-26. Festival Office, 
Department of Music, The 
Polytechnic, Queensgate, 
Huddersfield HD1 3DH (0484 
22288 ext 21 03). 

CARDIFF FESTIVAL 
The 20th festival, which 
focuses especially on choral 
music, will include concerts 
by the London Symphony 
Orchestra (orchestra in 
residence), the Danish Radio 
Symphony Orchestra, the 
BBC Welsh Symphony 
Orchestra, and the 
Ensemble Varia of Salzburg. 
Most of the major concerts 
take place in St David's Hail, 
and programme includes 
choral works Dy young people. 
Nov 22-Dec 6. Festival 
administrator. Fox Hollows. 
Maendy, nr Cowbridge, 

South Glamorgan (04463 
3474). 






THE TIMES SATURDAY MARCH 22 1986 


ENTERTAINMENTS 


H22 BARBICAN HALL 


•CB Barb^aD Centre, Silk St, EC2Y 8DS 


01-638 8891 ■'628 8795 
Telephone Bookings: 10am-8pm 7 days a week 



Good Fndav 28 March 7 00pm Barbican Hail 

BACH: 

SX JOHN PASSION 

-VApinGernun 

ACADEMY OF ANCIENT MUSIC AND CHOIR' 
CHRISTOPHER HOG WOOD Cnmluctor 
EMMAKIRKBY CAROLYN WATKINSON 
MARTYN HILL DAVID THOM AS . 
NIGEL ROGERS Evangelic 
GREGORY REINHART Chrisius 


Sen Price* E8. £7. £5 nnly 

Box Office lei. 10-8 every dax net Sun 01 -638 8891.628 8795 


LONDON SYMPHONY 
ORCHESTRA Barbican 


STEPHEN 

BISHOP-KOVACEVICH 

plays the 

BRAHMS PIANO CONCERTOS 


Thursday 3 April 7.45pm 

DVORAK Symphony No 8 in G 

BRAHMS Piano Concerto No 1 in D minor 


Saturday 5 April 7.4Spm 

BRAHMS Piano tonceito No 2 in B flat 

DVORAK Symphony No 7 in D minor 

Spunsonrdln; the Pe/iTSiurtesam Foundation 

MYUNG WHUN CHUNG conductor 


UA) an Of LONDON CHOIR iMmgmMMhO CMnm 

23 M* imna) p. Wafcutoy CLeX* faopi A. Gu«Mn invnjpi X Corners Ittn) 

7<S pre L WiilnBttn (Orel John Hrcft rcra) Moral Wats « C nw'O' K 437 
Haydn Nctwfi Moh. £0. CJ.l^so tl tb Cay at London On 


Seal Pnces£10 50. £8.50. £7 50. £6. £4.50. £3.50 
Box Office Tel: 10-8 every thy incl. Son 01-638 8891 *28 8795 


BERNSTEIN 

FESTIVAL 

at the Barbican 


Mesic Director: Jobs Maced 


ROYAL FESTIVAL HALL 

PHILHARMONIA 

ORCHESTRA 


(ilwC/' LONDON SYMPHONY 

/ ^ ORCHESTRA ■ 

Tuesday 24 Aptfl 7.45 pw 
COPLAND r«ci£ire far roe Common M*tt 
BERNSTEIN Prelude, Fugue and Riff* 

GERSHWIN Rhapsody in Blue 
BERNSTEIN On tbewaierfkmi Suite; Halil 
STRAVINSKY Tbc Firebird Suiie 
luck BrymerCfanwl Jobs Ogdon Putt 
Kjman Wilson Flute Lukas FroxCcotdacm- 
£1050 18.50 £7.50 £6.00 £450 £350 


Friday 2 May 7.45pm 
BERNSTEIN Symphony No I iJctenusJil 
MAHLER Symphony No 1 
Heather Harper Soprano JrflrevTane Condi 
£1050 £8.50 £7.50 £6.00 £450 £3.50 


prana Jeffrey T»e Conductor 


Principal Conduaon Giuseppe Sinopoli 

BRITTEN/ELGAR SERIES 
ANDREW DAVIS 

conducts 

Monday Next 24 March at 7 JO 
ISOBEL BUCHANAN ALFREDA HODGSON 
MALDWYN DAVIES JONATHAN SUMMERS 
STEPHEN ROBERTS STAFFORD DEAN 
PHILHARMONIA CHORUS 
THE ROYAL COLLEGE OF MUSIC 
JUNIOR DEPARTMENT CHORUS 
ELGAR: THE APOSTLES 
* *. * * 

Thursday Next 27 March at 7 JO 

ROBERT TEAR 

Britten: The Young Person’s Guide to the Orchestra 
Britten: Nocturne 
Elgan Symphony NoJ 
* + * * 

Sunday 30 March 7.30 

OSCAR SHUMSKY 

Elgar: Overture, Froissart 
Elgar: Sospin 
Elgar: Chanson dc Matin 
Elgar: Wand of Youth — Suite No_2 
Elgan Violin Concerto 

SPONSORED BY NISSAN UK LIMITED 


Su day 4 May 7.30 pm 
STRAVINSKY SurSpan 





rr playing on original nutrLrrwan 
SMng OUWMII n C rTMior Op 1 7 Mo 4. Momrt Sbmg OuarMl m 
3D. BaoVceere Sbwig Quartet m B tun Op i&Nt>6 
’ (4.Q.E2 fens & tiftetl Ltd. 


Programmes include 
Thursday 27 March 7.45pm 

RACHMANINOV. Rhapsody on a 

. Theme of Paganini 

HOLST .The Planets 


STRA VINSK Y SiarSpimafed Banner 

BLITZ STEIN Airborne Symphony 

BERNSTEIN Candxlc Suite 

Narrator fo beamomerd 

Joyce Code, Nan Christie, David Eisler, 5mgrr» 

Further singcrt mb* ataemaud 

John Mauceri Conductor 

£10.50 £8.50 £7.50 £6.00 £450 13.50 


ROYAL ACADEMY CHORUS 

Sunday 30 March 7.30pm 

RACHMANINOV.. ..Piano Concerto No 2 
BEETHOVEN... .Symphony No3 ‘Eroica’ 


Torsday 6 May 7.45pm 

In the presence of HM The Qe eea and 

HRHTbc Dnfceof Edinberah 

BERNSTEIN Chichester Palms Serenade: Age oTAmdety. 

Krywian Zitnrrntan Puma Gtdon Kremer Violin 

Med j on a Boy Soprano London Symphony Chorus 

Leonard Bernstein Condmter 

G ida Concert mind of ike LSO Tnu 

£100.00 £50.00 £25.00 £15.00 £10.00 

Pntet admit txJcttpnct, VAT and demotion 


SIR NEVILLE MARRINER conductor 
PETER DONOHOE piano 


Thursday 8 May 7.45 pm 

BERNSTEIN A Musical Tout 

IV ES Th e Unanswered Question 

BRI t I fcN F our Sea Interludes from Peter Grimq 

BERNSTEIN Symphonic Dances htqnYRst Side Story 

SHOSTAKOVICH SymphuayNoS . . . - 

John Manoeri Conductor 

£10.50 £8.50 £7 50 £6 DO £450 £350 


see Barbican panels Jor full programme' details 


Seal Prices £8 50. £7.50. £6. £4.50. £3. SO only 
Box Ofike Tel: 10-8 every day incl Sun 01-638 8X9162H 8795 


Friday 9 May 7.4« jm 

BERNSTEIN ChhursierPnlnM Serenade; Age of Anxiety. 

KrysrianZuncrmnr' "leaeGidon Kremer Viofoi 

Akd J ones Bey Sup mu London Symphony Chorus 

Leonard Bernstein Conductor 

£15.00 £13.00 0 1. 00 £9.00 £7.00 £5.00 




two -rec q uHtov Hartay I 
CareRm OenMw puno Dmiale Piano Tito n B fiai 
TJBpw ICran* TlnMP«<l.lMtaaEPMTM«BM 
lE45aaS0 C50.E2 


Thursday a April at 7.30 

RICCARDO MUTI 

Honegger: Symphony No J for Strings and 
Trumpet Obligate 
Mahler: Symphony No.l 

Yfciei* £". 1 5 In j[4 75. /.ft. £7 2*. i* /,■» reX 1 1 1 
Audible I mm Hull i)l-45i 11*1 1 Ci '. -Ol-Ot (MMi a jprm 


J [j St John's Smith Square 


London SiViP jHA Dircclor: Paul Davies _ 
U u ui Bo* Office '01-222 1061 Mon-Fri 11 im-O-.ii , 
LlTiP! - - and from upm at each concert- 



Barbican 
HaD 

A m 3 gie. 1 l world of music 
and sioriet, for children 

ANN RACHLIN 

and ihtf 

LONDON SYMPHONY ORCHESTRA 

EZRA RACHLIN conductor 


Leonard Bcrastemh appearance at the London concert 
on the <th May if made possible by Ebd, The Architects 
o(Time,ia celebration oftbcir7Stb aanivemiy 


Saturday 29 March 3pm 

Symphony in Sea -The Ghost Ship 
and cnher salty tales 
For children aged 7-1 J 


Boa Office Tel: 1 0-* erery day incl Sun 01 -638 889 1 - 628 8795 


Tonight 22 March 7.45pm v BarbicanHall 

GRIEG - 
TCHAIKOVSKY 


ISO 


u r - a d 


Royal Philharmonic Society 

Pi iron: Her Majesty the Queen A 


k* 5 ^ ran£ ^ s Maitrcs Fran^ais ^w - 

IhUnffncMDons 

Wednesday Next 26 March at 7 JO pm 

■^ pa ’ MESSIAEN 





Sunda>’ 6 April 3.15 pm 

When the pie was opened.. .P 
A collection of musical birds 

For children aged 6- 1 ! 

Prices: Adults £5.50. children £3-50 
Box Office Tel: WJ-R cxerx das inc. Sun QI-6 W 889 1-628 8795 


VtCTORHOCHHAUSER preaaitt u the R0EAL FESTTVAJL aAU. 

AH MONDAY 31st MARCH at 7 


Three Tableaux from 

ST. FRANCIS OF ASSISI 

Bruch Premiere 

BBC Symphony Orchestra, Singers & Chorus 
Seiji Ozawa Dietrich Fischer-Dieskau 
Maria Fausta Gaflamini Kenneth Rieqel 
Phillipe RouUlon 


r-:: ::i 

'iV 








,^ii j >i^;;viK-e^iiKJ., „b; 


if UNFINISHED 
SYMPHONY 

OF AN ERA AT THE SOUTH BANK 


St. Margaret’s Church, Westminster 
Wednesday Next 26 March at 6 pm 


English Bach Festival 

Dbkw Um Lnlondi OBE 


BACH 

ST. MATTHEW PASSION 


BANDEL Zadok the Pnen; HANDEL Kirer .Vlouc SuUe ALBINONI 
AdJgm, Saba Mver STRAUSS Font L» Soogs ELGAR Or. Codoi^ne; 
VEJtDlPie ia. rnpena, aawti.Macbcthfc MUSSORGSKY Song of the Flea; 
GERSHWIN I Got Pleotyo' SotblnL GRAINGER Haodrl in iheStrzodi 


HANDEL XCon by ii ibe Limb, Amen (Mcmtthfc 
CLARKE Trumpet Wjl unary. 


Sponsored by ELF AQUTTAINE UK 

There Hill he no mtenj) dunaf ihi> perfonainre 
See KFH Panel iur fuO itenh 


TTTI. Mv' J~T ' ’ * * » »'f- 1 * ! t .m 


RAYMOND GL’BBAY present* 

SATURDAY NEXT 29 MARCH at 7.30 pm 

POPULAR CLASSICS 

Rovdol I hno it. Vdbam TsIL Soon 111: Uteftt BelL 
J-Stnumll The Blue ruouhett^Lr.lirietsPreH'i^iurnp. 
Ip’flk MrpfK i.'hemec. Lipn xjsiln: MwagiU lntmncim croni 
B J HTI l^niOcro PiNkJiu fJ&iT Pnrap joJ utamroacr .VWLh 
a RvWj \u I. Boradlo PuIiHsud U4HT> mm Prince l*»r. 

Whf R«d Bitrm 

ROVAL I’HILH.XRMO'TC ORCHfcisTRX 
«n*luo.e B.VRRI WUKllMKIKTl' HOWARD SHELLEY pm 
li V, I* v, (X t T. L 3 SO. i-tu. l IiI.tO Hill III-VJ1 W4 Cl . UI4W (W 


CLARKE Thnnptt Vblmuary. 

PbUhannonui Orchestra and Chorus 
OWAIN AKWEL HUGHES cond. RALPH DOWNES organ 
ROSALIND PLOWRIGHT soprano SIMON ESTES banmne 

SPECTACULAR FIREWORKS 
PLUS A UNIQUE FAREWELL ENCORE 

£5 50. £5, £7 50, DO from HLatJ a 28 J191W2* 8800 asm I ctracrwums 


tuPinridp — Evartfjdm bn Caddy— Oumwi 
L ouisa Kennedy. Pen ckipc WhBrer. NeS Jeafcbs, Henr y Hcrf ord 
ENGLISH BACH FESTIVAL BAROQUE ORCHESTRA 
AND SINGERS 

Choirboys of St. MapmX Cburcb 

Conductor -SIGISWALD KUIJKEN 


T>*»r. £16, iTtt. C5Uwn TubtUMn »W-SWt4\x, & 

rnnor crehi arJs. In penoo Item mt V K South Treiel ttcuk-h. 
xrhrttuDTWSei vxtnre. « m die itw 


mu f-m* ! y AW 


ORT 


1 LESD 4 V I APRIL at 7 .J 0 pm 

TCHAIKOVSKY Ox. Romeo & Juliet 
RACHMANINOV Piano Concerto No.2 
MICHAEL ROLL piano 
DVORAK New World Symphony 


Royal Philharmonic Orchestra 

Conductor: Sir Alexander Gibson 


i '• v. i \ t -. i in iroo Hd I'l-'fis Mil 

■jeJr UrJ- <■] -«* x>4»i J. .tpenr in *1 nt' BRITISH OST 


RAYMOND GLTOAT pre*em» SATURDAY 5 APRIL at 7 J 0 pm 

OPERA GALA NIGHT 


paw mt- Venlt AMa Good Mjrctt BUce The Feort 
FUn Duec V*rdfc RJBattno Cumet Nabaxo CWm of 
tb Hebcc Shm, Mbkspe CnaDcxia RoMkos Eater 
Hvauimd IdirfnKUft. JtW *«i ud dBtTi from L. Bofacme, 
MdJam BanerQy, Carmen, oc. 


VICTOR HOOfHAUSER pmcotssf Che ROYAL ALBERT 

TOMORROW at 7^0 

DIRECT FROM THE USA 

AMERICAN 
GRENADIER BAND 

tcub i be 

BAND OF THE COLDSTREAM GUARDS 

OVER 300 ARTISTS 

A DAZZLING & SPECTACULAR DISPLAY 

£J.W. £5. lb. £7. £8 flora Hlil 5f»62l2.'5fl9 “Mi 
Tkbcromrr c» idnffy be Sami 3791433 * oarel braschn MIL Smith 


VICTOR KOCHHAUSER pemramra the BAJUmCAM 

fJMM WEDNESDAY 2nd APRIL at 7.45 

■Ml POPULAR CLASSICS 

ROSSINI Orernirc, Thleviof MjspJc, 

GRIEG fret Gvn t burs 

BRUCH V xlin Concerns BEETHOVEN S ym pb om No 7 
LONDON SYMPHONY ORCHESTRA 
Cond. HOWARD SHELLEY 
Soloist: ERICH GRUENBERG 

(.S, £f>. £7 it.i8.W.£9 50rraraHjIlfii8M*M.'628g7^54*ilyiiic bundiyt 


ROYAL ALBERT HALL GOOD FRIDAY 28 MARCH ra 2JD pm 

ROYAL CHORAL SOCIETY 

Conductor LASZLO HELTAY 

Handel . . . MESSIAH 


ISOBEL BUCHANAN MICHAEL CHANCE 
ROSIN LEGGATE MATTHEW BEST 
Tra repel: PAUL ARCHIBALD Hiirpsdhxil JOHN BIRCH 

WREN ORCHESTRA OF LONDON 


T«*m- £lJV*>£S(XJm»eH«U0I.WA2l2CX.01JW)«s 
PARTY UISCOUXTS 01-444 2051 
SPONSORED BY L'NIPART INTERNATIONAL 


FAIRFIELD HALL Croydon 

BOX OFFICE 01-688 9»l CREDUPHONE 01-680 f9K 


Wednesday Next 26 March at 8 pm 

ROYAL PHILHARMONIC 
ORCHESTRA 


ARTHUR DAVISON 
WHUAM STEPHENSON Pam 


TCHAIKOVSKY EVENING 


RBC CONCERT ORCHESTRA CenJnrer JAMES LOCKHART 
h mRF TH VAL'GHAN io|<in ANN HOWARD mam-upnao 
ARTHIH DA'TS na MALL JtUWAY tatOK 
LMBRONLUN OPER-Y CHORL^S LoimliAcd h BRIAN KMT 
Fantirr- TrumpcteM from the Bilirf of ihe S.-OU Giunli 

l } W. £4.W. £-5 V. £7. IS ^ ^ 

la jaBflfjinnn wilti oBL 


ZS5SgS55SB5 




• DtRHTaFROWantr nl-SStta 

-A SPECTACULAR 
MUSICAL EVENT 




THE nr>IJ,m * > — 
Ppgr.titsrsTAiw^^: Fn it April 7 JO pm 

Wed 9 April 7.46pm FAIRFIELD HALLS, 

BARBICAN HALL, CROYDON 

LONDON Box Off.ee 01-6W9»> 


Lunuui* 

Bn. Ollier 0 1 -638 889 < I63B 6»B5 Grrdn Ca-min • SW 



Faaiay Oremne, Romeo nd Juba': Pane Concern No.! tn B Oh t 
Mncfae Shir; S htpiog Beam} tfaltr. Over ire '1812' 


lA-P.ISfr-C Sfcwthnl prme, £LM. £450, <>. t* 

TtJMk ndok (be (opram 


Brighton festival 

2-25 May 1986 


ENGLAND'S MOST COMPREHENSIVE 
FESTIVAL 

CONCERTS A RECITALS 

Sffi =KSS« , » 0,,, " Ea ™ 


Knnt Op n m — Prio and AaiB8aff , yoma>on 
Net* Sue* ex Opera —Aida 


DANCEAMUE 


IbrMite Once TheptrafCaMbn RamenooIExlsmporary 

Dancn and Wk« WHaRwKmarthara BaMatlDMOi 


K^RRYDOWN JAZZ FESTIVAL 


Ctarti Wuy Ml SttrsTCharM WMk Bln BwOLmm 

Thbee/Beb WTIbtir Bfp Bnl 


W w id b Mt t ft a ifri, Ai lUi i MJW d 
CaBAraULMarahnMhBiMnfe WM AMO MUCHMORE 

trom: B-. a remi FtwW. WariborouQh House. Chd Swwie. 
BrigWon BN1 1EO. W. (027^29801 


GOOD FRIDAY, 28 March at 5.00pm 

LONDON CHORALSOCIETY 

Sponsored b\ Capital Radio 

BACH: ST. MATTHEW PASSION 



QUEEN ELIZABETH HALL 

Goofl Hta y a M arch a 8pm; Sarunlay, Sunday 2* 30 March 
a 5pm A 8pm; Eaasr Monday 31 March at 5prn 8950pm 
nckMK 060 £7A0 teao £&50 EU0 
T 6 fciyt-W 8 Jt07 Credo oerde 01 -W 8 0800 


Anthonj RolfcWinKin-EvanpcliM \Wllard White -ChriMu:. 
Fclieitj Loti -Soprano PjuI E&swood - Counler-lenor ' 
Laurence Oak -Tenor Dex id WiImmi Johnson - Basx 


ART GALLERIES 


ENGLISH CHAMBER ORCHESTRA 
Conductor; JANE GLOVER 


ALMS CALLDtT. 74 South 
Audrey BL WJ. CNOUSH 
WRTCTCOLOUWS 1780-1960 In- 
ctaUng Works by BW MUM 
17-22 Mnch lOdt l<yz Set 


MKM8MUIIY430UIM 

Street. Wl C29&I7GH0DDBI 


TK-lwft-lin. tn. a sn. ft. t4 ». £ » SO Ax JilaMe rmm Rmjt Festnd Kail 
Ho.nffkoiin^tiHiccn^sHtnji u>U ji 




O* ljSf> 


RAYMOND GUBBAY presents 

at Che BARBICAN 

WEDNESDAY NEXT 26 MARCH ai 7.45 pm 

MUSIC FROM THE BALLET 

ORCHESTRA OF SADLERS WELLS ROYAL BALLET 

BRAMVfELLTOYEYtJUKiuaa 
Kreunre iikm liutn the naiotaur ot UrM#' I nnrw 
JfeTU BrllrT Rie* Tetoiortks Skerme BnUt' Vue. 

■ |AUj I'atne. RtmrigUcanalun ^bchrtwafc ■» * *’“ v • 

U23r RawtBL'RaMxULa Boului* ■ 

. Dcfibc. I -afjxij XUrttftai; SennmOty IV? ratine 


SATURDAY XE3CT 29 MARCH M 8 pm 

THE GLORY OF EASTER 

lta«W Vm J d rt* ^ 

. re t O String, Sleep AUr VJh'h uaa-. Handel LopJ 

A I 'fll CUrbe Iramjwr Votanur,-. PorccU 'l'nnn|\i 1«1* oat .1* 
■ r«K1 Hudd VTUre a Y.m Y* W«r 'hi*i- S^- 

HMl AlWnwd B«Eb/Geunpd XU~. Hk.iW 1 Ln 


Ibc Bneht Scfttfam Bath !»■ o* 

HbM I Km Ito mv Rfikttaa Lack HamM Mini. 
wr litr Koial HreuraAv 

LONDON CONCERT ORCHESTRA Lnadusrar PHILIP SIMMS 
ANN JAMES v^pwaa CtUSmN STEELE-PERWV. trurapn 


SUNDAY, MONDAY JA 31 MARCH at I pm 

TEDDY BEARS 
EASTER CONCERT 


Bring your Tcddtet for some Springtime Fun: 

IW ni Tnhh beir IVner. >**». Hreiqm . TbureJer 

^U^m»t«c..»3wn ilbp lUrigB^ XXunuagmd 

IraA Hill tl da- xvxnum Km iwro Pecs um J 
Pi RflT Dl IknCfll ^ UUuH 


jwluciiui.r rt I’odhimpon Hear m CoumtI m UMud 
■ IaUI UinJ *kI Hrrhcr l JufreO »hKfl tlh tl >- a 

rjUaKtin (Lar n areih inJ imro. Sfwal afl***’ 1 *' *7 

MicL»wTBc»rvWiii-k^BuroT-r»bl«i3w»B<uielJ 
OUn tail IfbOUYC^ 

LONDON CONCERT ORCHESTRA i«vh»w FRASER GOLTJHNG 
idlbifoalprl rre n ni Lr ITJLIN BAKER .BBC TV, Dr «bo- 
TiO>rl> ii ’ll tan <jnh it. -XI d 4ux>np<ranl t*> J loU, Be* 

Crenr eerie and reeet thebewv- 


MONDAY 9 MARCH at 7.45 pm 

SCHUBERT-MOZART- 

MENDELSSOHN 


Schaben SY MPHONY NO^ icVFDOSHEDt 
|UYA| Moran EINE KLELNE NACHTML StK 

I *4 VI Moran PIANO CONCERTO NOJI.ILttT 

I k\Wl . . OVERTURE TO 

vMSW ’A MIDSUMMER MG HT*S DRE A M' 

Mean SYMPHONY NO.« 

ROYAL PHILHARMONIC ORCHESTRA 
Cooduau- ENRIQUE BATK VOVKA ASHKENAZY preoo 

iVi.K.1'.. iH-Xj ti NX i lU’U 


^ TUESDAY I APRIL m 3 pm 

Extra repeat: performance bv orenrbeti&iiig public tl nn a ml 

t%k THE SNOWMAN 

X\H1 Featuring tbc hn single VaUung m the An jisi 
Ho«erJ BLAs-'s Suren Rheme Overture ami 
The RemsKMc Ro dm 

SIN FOMA OF LONDON draluare- HOWARD BLAKE 
hpccul Guest Nerrator BERNARD CRIBBINS 
Bv> Sap-dno JAMES RAINSQU1 
1 iln. AJuin it. 41 Chikbea mJe lb id 4(1 


TUESDAY i APRIL ar 7.4S pm 


BACH-MOZART-VTVALDI 


Bach BRANDENBURG CONCERTO NOT 
ImTVX Moran CLARINET CONCERTO 

I ViM Xlveldi THE FOUR SEASONS 

CITY OF UHvTKTN SINFOMA 
NIGEL KENNEDY vuha-'vbmrar 
JACK BRY.MER Gannet DUKE DOBING llutr 
JULIAN COWARD Dure UN WATSON bd^tdKmbdimwr 
(.'./AiTsO-lb^XibW 


FRIDAY 4 APRIL ax US pm 


SPRING LOVE CLASSICS 


e^^ TdraQsmJtv ROMEO AND JIAJET FANTASY OV. 

Bbrt LXHLtSIENNtSLfTENO.I 

I W Staton PLVNO CONCERTO MUJKJB8 

l\a| OtMndi ORPHEUS IN THE UNDERWORLD 

LNS/ J. Strauss II BLUE DANUBE WALTZ 

WtF leinlketukv CAPRKDCW Tl ALIEN 

LONDON CONCERT ORCHESTRA 
ConJuanr FRASER GOLL0ING PAUL COKER puna 
And a Spring Rmcfor every lady member of the emUrnee 


SATURDAY 12 .APRIL MS pm . . 

GLINKA-HANDEL- 

RACHMANINOV-BEETHOVEN 

ydflph. OBnha RUSSIAN AND LUDMILLA OX 


■h UDska RUSSIAN AND LUDMILLA OV. 

fTZtea Handel MUSK FOR TME ROYAL FIREWORKS 

in Raritmenmav PIANO CONCERTO NOJ 

AJy Btrtberen SVMTHONVNOA 

WpP LONDON PHILH ARMONIC ORCHESTRA 
Cotxlaarr JAN LATHAM-KOEMG HOWARD SHELLEY gm 
IN l*- f!. t -i NX i liXT» 


SATURDAY 19 APRIL at 8 pm 

VERDI REQUIEM 



ROYAL PHILHARMONIC ORCHESTRA 
Conductor JANE GLOVER TLKESA CAHBJ. Hipren 
PENELOPE WALKER mezm-voprann 
PETER BRO.NDER tenor PETER ROSE bay, 
LONDON CHORAL SOCIETY 

tUiA£7.ib.9i.£*.bUiJ0W 



RIMSK V-KORSA KOV Capriccio Espagnole 

GRICG PiannConceno in minor. Op 16 

TCHAIKOVSKY Symphony No 5 in E minor. Op 64 

LONDON SYMPHONY ORCHESTRA 
OVVAIN AJtWEL HUGHES conducior 
MARC UERITE WOLFF piano 
Seat Prices £7.50. £6. £3.50. onl> - all other, sold 
Bo-xOfTicefel: 10-8e«ery day incl. 

Sundays 01 -638 8891*28 8795 


ST. GEORGES DAY CONCERT 
WEDNESDAY 21 APRIL at 8 pm 


ELGAR- VAUGHAN WILUAMS- 
A BRITTEN-HOLST 


Wj mp% Elgar OVERTURE. COCKAIGNE 

i Vaughan WRErem . THE LARK ASCENDING 
Brinoi YOUNG PERSONS GUIDE TO THE 

ORCHESTRA 

Habl THE PLANETS 

LONDON SlMPHONT ORCHESTRA 
OwdiKBr MAURICE H.V.NDFORD ELISABETH PERRY nofen 
LAZHES OF THE LONDON CHORAL SOCIETY 
(A I.*, i 7 . A H«. it V./. 10.40 


Buv OUkc OldJiSTW uedn Lanl' >61-00 Wl> 


JOIN OUR FREE MAILING LIST. VTmr w Raxmoud OuWvas Ltd, 
Ui Tonmtam Gmnt WmL LondlM Yri or phone 01-M7 2*382 


LONDON HANDEL 
FESTIVAL 

St Geode's Hanover Square London Wl 


Saturday 8 April 

HANDEL: La Ra sui te xk me " 

Naray Areeota. r.aiwn Fisher. Catherine Deniey. Andrew Hint 
Michael iieurge. London Handel Orchestra 


rimdirua: Fur (ntidmaa 


Miinday 7 April 
HANDEL: 


HANDEL: 

HANDEL: Snoata a cinque 

HANDEL: The Cterice of Hercules 

Nancy Amenta, ratheriw Denbr. Michael Chant 
Andrew Kina- London Handel Choir & Orchestra 


Cuocertn Grtnro Op. 1 
No. S in d minor 
Donna the in cM 


Andrew Kinp. London Hi 
(leader Kny (iiudman) 
IVndurhtr: /Wn fhirhn r 


Saturday 12 Apnl 70fln 

HANDEL; Jeptha V 

tlillinn Fi-her. Lima Andemofl. Marjam Cable 
Mirhne] Chance, ion Partridpe. Marlin Johnsmi 
Lrndnji Handel Cfc.tr & Orrhestra (Leader Rnv Goodm»nl 
1 ondnrtor AtriW * 


TICKETS*. 410-90 £7.50 £5.50 £4.00 TeL- 01-828 6913 



LwMo " 8-w.i mi a» s^ij; 































l ^ 


THE TIMES SATURDAY MARCH 22 1986 



Paperbacks 


REVIEW 



up a 




in corpses 


by Julian 
Symons (Penguin. £3is) 

- Julian Symons has set himself 
a_ monumental task to assess 
foeJilerary worth of a genre 
that accounts for a Quarter of 
-all ww titles published here 
ana m America. 

It’s a sticky wicket. Pace 
• bowlers for the opposition 
indude -Edmund Wilson 
“with so many fine books to 
be read... there is no need to 
bore ourselves with this 
rubbish”; and WJiAuden, 
•m detective stories have noth- 
ing to do with art”. 

Furthermore, ' some of 
Symons’s somewhat sinister 
team are more hindrance than 
help. Among others skulking 
in the pavilion: Abraham 
Lincoln and . Joseph Stalin 
(both Poe fanatics); J.F.K. 
(Ian Fleming); and Freud 
(crazy for, of all things, Doro- 
thy Sayers). 

■ In a brief and lonely five- 
story flash of genius, E<i g»T- 
Allah Poe invented not only 
the mystery story - a plot to 
which dues offer a rational 
solution - but also the omni- 
scient amateur sleuth and his 
thick sidekick. Early writers in 
the field (Godwin, Lytton, 
^ Balzac) made heroes of the 
criminal outsider, not seen 
again until the late 1930s. 

But then, the voracious (no 
television) Victorian middle 
classes had their cosy way with 
crime, aided and abetted by 


Dickens. “It is a satisfaction to 
me to see a determined thief, 
sweating; profusely at the 
treadmill and knowing font be 
*s undergoing nothing bat 
punishment.” Hence the de- 
tective as saviour of a bour- 
geoisie terrified by. such 
popular 19th-century bogey- 
men as The Bomb-Toting 
Anarchist or The Master 
CnminaL 

Mr Symons points out that 
although we may perceive the 
Victorian era as relatively 
stable, its occupants did not. 
The same goes for the Twen- 
ties and Thirties, the so-called 
“Golden Age”. Sayers and 
Christie are read today by a 
public yearning nostalgically 
for house parties, the gentle 
sounds of a distant game of 
tennis, and butlers. For a 
decade between the wars there 
were three million unem- 
ployed, and a nascent trade 
union movement under 
pressure. 

Christie, ' and 'in particular 
Sayers, are criticized for set- 
ting stories in an already non- 
existent Arcadia, and . sticking 
to a set of self-imposed, 
arbitrary and snobbish rules: 
no sex or character develop- 
ment that might distract from, 
the plot; servants never the 
culprit, because this was “a 
‘ too easy solution”. Lord Peter 
Wimsey (motto:“As my 
Whimsy takes Me”) is an 
appalling creation. A sort of 
Bertie Wooster clone without 
the humour. 



THE WEEK AHEAD 


Quiet progress of a nice guy 


FILMS ON TV 


Sleuth and sidekick: Sherlock Holmes (right), an omniscient 
amateur, with his buthfhl friend Dr Watson 


Chandler said Hammett 
“gave murder back to the kind 
of people who commit it for 
reasons, not just to provide a 
corpse”; (someone else said 
that his drinking was explica- 
ble only by assuming that he 
had no expectation of being 
alive much beyond 
Thursday). 

While agreeing with Sy- 
mons that Hammett’s subtle, 
telepathically brittle prose is 
the equal of anything written 
since, I’m not certain that the 
advent of the corrupt police- 
man reflected some general 
social malaise. Perhaps the 
officers in Question were 
themselves folly capable of 
attracting this odium without 
assistance from others. 

A strength of this entertain- 
ing and encyclopaedic book, 
brought tight up to date in this 



priest of hi-tech 


Richard 
A 




This is an 

one to he read by all families 
and all architects. Bryan 
AppIeyarcTs account of. Rich- 
ard Rogers is absorbing, inti- 
mate, and immediate. 

Hie middle-class, Anglo- 
Italian boy, with strong Vene- 
tian family . connections, 
hopeless at school an undiag- 
nosed dyslexic, who, after- an 
unhappy start, turned to archi- 
tecture; and fohowing, more 
or less, the mamstfeam of the 
modern movement, with his 
large family in close atten- 
dance, finally made the grade. 
Ax S3 he is one of the world's 
most distinguished architects 
and a public figure. 

Women are- an .essential 
adjunct to Rogers’s life. He 
has an ability to stay bn 
excellent, even intimate, 
terms with former girlfriends. 
He parted from his first wife 
because he detected some- 
thing in his second which 
“answered his every need", 
but be continued .in profes- 
sional partnership with .his 
first. 

At the Architectural Associ- 
ation School of Architecture 
the authorities found' him 
feckless. “He has a genuine 
interest and feeling for archi- 
tecture, but sorely lacks the 
intellectual - equipment to 
translate these feelings into 
sound building.” In spite of ' 
this, be was later hailed in one 
office as the finest junionhey 
had ever employed. He was, 
however, bad at drawing and 
useless at making tea. 

Early on, he married an 
architecturally-minded stu- 
dent of sociology. They visited 



Magnetic Richard Rogers 


the States, and this produced a 
partnership with Norman 
Foster, another hi-tech archi- 
tect of great promise, but with 
a totally different approach 
and background. They pro- 
duced some distinguished and 
prize-winning bufl dings. But 
the partnership broke up from 
lack of work. 

Renzo Piano,, son of- a 
builder, . with ah - immense ' 
knowledge of the techniques 
of building, had an architec- 
tural practice in Genoa and a 
longingTor England. He much 
admired Rogers's work. They 
met and became partners. 
Short of work, and after much 
heart-searching, the firm nar- 
rowly voted to enter for the 
cultural Centre Pompidou 
competition in Paris, winning 
the commission from an inter- 
national field of 681. 

Rogers has the quality of a 
queen bee in attracting all the 
best skills to work with him: 
engineers who know the an- 
swers, businessmen who have 


BRIDGE 


the money, and men who 
draw like angels and who are 
expert, in the presentation of 
their cases. They seem to 
come and go when it suits 
Rogers, without fuss. 

The Centre Pompidou 
brought them all together. 
They produced 25,000 
drawings, and between them 
built the most successful mod- 
ern building in the world, with 
an attendance of six million in 
its first year. 

Once the Centre Pompidou 
.was -finished, and endlessly * 
commented upon, it seemed 
to hang around Rogers’s neck 
-like a dead albatross. There - 
was no more work. They had t 
nibbles, and a few giant bites, 
but all came to nothing. Theni 
suddenly, a- new building for 
Lloyds in the City of London 
seemed a possibility. Piano 
had left by now, but Rogers's 
team of experts was quickly 
re-assembled, and the bite was 
eventually hooked. 

Responsibility for the ex- 
pertise was now Rogers's, and 
it was not just a question of 
having ideas. When this vast, 
complicated building is fin- 
ished it will ieD its own story. 

Rogers's only real disap- 
pointment has been the Na- 
tional Gallery Extension, 
which could have been bis 
greatest triumph. He has won 
the Royal-Gokl Medal, been 
offered more than one impor- 
tant Chair of Architecture, 
and is universally known as 
the smiling public man. 
Round him, and all impor- 
tant he has his wife and 
children. . 

His record, in a way, seems 
too good to be true. One is 
tempted to ask:“What next?". 

Gontran Gonlden 


Discard to waken the dead 


Everyone agrees that the in- 
competence of the British high 
command was responsible for 
the heavy losses suffered in 
■ the Crimean War. It is only in 
ascribing the measure of indi- 
vidual blame that there is any 
dispute. Rather like the defen- 
sive disaster which befell East- 
West oa this hand. 

Rubber Bridge: Game all. 
North-South + 3a 


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4 A 102 


E S 


10 

No INTO 

No NO 

Ns NO 

|1J A iKHttnnts trap piM. . ■ ■ 
tH Nonr*Seumm 1*9”? « 
no trump, so flw moo pranwss 
". pom at most. . 

(3) Lffltmo out a fitfla morn me. 

(41 Fssmq lor a common ruO bv bri dge 
Mm p ua on to convert a paiMcort 
oo sMtor wets*. 

15j 774 am has oorw to arnke. - 

The defence; or should I 
say misdeftnee, oomains a 
number of instructive points. 
The first occurred at trick 
one. West (playing the Ace. 
from the Ace King) led. the 
OA.. Had he wished his 
..partner .to tinWbcfc'h?. would 


have led the King. East 
played the 02, the correct 
card in the modem style. 
Most authorities agree that 
the count is all important on 
the first trick in the defence 
to a no trump contract- The 
urge to encourage with the 
seven must be suppressed. 

West, unaware of declarer's 
fragile diamond holding, 
switched to the #3 which 
declarer allowed to ran to 
East’s ten and his Ace. 
Bravely concealing his dis- 
comfort, declarer advanced 
the ^Q, and when that held, 
continued with the ^10. But 
West, having noted . East’s 
<72, took his vA and contin- 
ued with a. third round of the 
suit- 

Frustrated in his attempt to 
get to the dummy with the 
VJ, declarer tried a small 
spade. West, sensing 
declarer’s discomfort, took 
the King while East followed 
with the 42. West may 'have 
teen -ill advised, bin East’s 
contribution of the 42 is a 
mistake. When following to 
the second round of a suit, a 
defender should play the- 
card; pro vided it has no trick- 
taking power, that he - would 
have played had. be -fed thc 7 
suit -himself! By adopting this 
method, a defender can Show 
whether be . holds three- or 
four cards in the suit. Thus 
the 42 should promise two or ■ 
four, clearly not the former, ■ 
as &uth. ; would have raised 
one spade ;to. two 'Spades. . 

■But if Easi>.play on trick 


was important his discard 
when West cashed the ^ on 
the next trick, became vital. 
East knows what he wants 
West to do. The bidding and 
the play so for have made it 
dear that West has excellent 
diamonds. How can he be 
persuaded to lead a small 
diamond? And bow at all 
costs can he be deflected 
-from switching to a dub? 

The art of good defence is 
to put . . yourself in your 
partner’s shoes. Study the 
position through his eyes. 
West has seen that declarer 
held the 4A, and the ‘TKQ; 
therefore if declarer has the 
OQ, there, is no room for the 
4 a...- 

. 'Without East's help, West 
could easily do the wrong 
thing. Flaying with a weak 
tar, if East discarded the 
1 that would at . least ensure 
one down. But with a good 
player it goes against the 
gram to commute an 800 
penalty to a miserable flesh 
wound. The 43 should work, 
the 4J would make West 
scent danger but the . discard 
that would even wake the 
dead is the King of Clubs. 

Is- that what happened? No, 
Tm afraid our latter-day Lord 
Cardigan discarded the '48. 
and when West switched to a 
club, covered the 4Q with 
the 4K, presenting South 
with an overtrick and a swing 
of/i-,690. . . " 

Jeremy Flint 


edition, is that Mr Symons's 
judgement is generally to be 
trusted. Of post-war writers, 
“in a world where Tolstoys 
and even George Eliots are in 
short supply, or no supply at 
all”, the best (Rendell. 
Deighton, et.oL) deserve seri- 
ous consideration as literature 
— and he’s very funny about 
those who don’t make the cut. 
The book solves the crime 
addict's perennial problem: 
whom to read next. 

There is. in any case, a clear 
educational need for this 
book. I once bad the pleasure 
of bearing Mr A.N. Wilson 
holding forth on American 
crime writers. Although con- 
versant with Chandler, he did 
not appear to have heard of 
Hammett. 

Adam Carr 


NON FICTION 


Imperial 

duties 


Alfred OOrart by Richard 
Dormant (Yale, £9.95) 

A century ago Gilbert, sculp- 
tor of Eros, pilcr of romantic 
heaps of bronze and marble 
into churches and museums, 
was one of the most famous 
artists in the United 
Kingdom. 

Most carefully upon its 
hour, to coincide with the 
Gilbert exhibition at the Roy- 
al Academy, and foe return of 
Eros cleaned to Piccadilly 
Circus, this lively biography is 
published in paperback. It 
deals entertainingly not mere- 
ly with foe sculpture but also 
with the social history, and 
Gilbert’s private life, which 
fell like Icarus (1884, National 
Museum of Wales). 

The Private Office by 
Nicholas Henderson 
(Weidenfeld & Nfcoteon, 

£4.95) 

Nidco Henderson was Private 
Secretary to five Foreign Sec- 
retaries: Anthony Eden. Er- 
nest Bevin, FLA. Butler, 
Patrick Gordon Walker and 
Michael Stewart His brief 
memoirs of his five masters 
exemplify foe virtues of the 
Foreign Office, undervalued 
by our present regime; urbani- 
ty, style, good temper, wit, 
effortless superiority, and 
discretion. 

Yon can read many agree- 
able and ill uminatin g anec- 
dotes, of the kind that you 
might hear at a select diplo- 
matic dinner. You will not 
learn the arcanum imperii at 
the Foreign Office. 

Philip Howard 


AUCTIONS 


Gregory Peck has always been 
a star without ever being a 
great actor. He has given a 
number of excellent perfor- 
mances, but few memorable 
ones, and his huge popularity 
was never quite matched by 
acting brilliance. 

Peck will be 70 on April 5, 
and the BBC is showing seven 
of his films over the next few 
weeks. Together, they demon- 
strate both his strengths and 
his limitations. 

Peck was clearly a serious, 
conscientious actor, often es- 
chewing easy, glamorous and 
flashy roles and choosing in- 
stead more difficult, subtle 
parts that offered a greater 
challenge. Most of his perfor- 
mances were dignified and 
sincere. But he was also 
narrow in range, and could be 
ponderous. 

He was the first of the 
Hollywood superstars to 
emerge at the end of the 
Second -World War. After 
being rejected by the Army on 
health grounds, he spent two 
years in the theatre on Broad- 
way before going to Holly- 
wood in 1944. 

With so many of the pre- 
war stars either engaged in 
hostilities or entertaining the 
troops. Peck was just what the 
studios needed — a new face 
for the post-war era, tall, 
broodmgly handsome and 
with acting experience. 

His first film. Days of Glory, 
a propaganda piece about 
Russian peasants fighting foe 
Nazis, brought him lucrative 
offers immediately, and for 
about 20 years he remained 
among Hollywood's most 

Legends 
brought 
to life 



Serious star. Gregory Peck hitting the Western trail in Wil liam Wyler’s The 
Big Country (1958) as a Baltimore gentleman who gets caught in a feud be- 
tween landowners 
sprawling Western about 


bankable (and financially as- 
tute) stars. 

His only Academy Award 
(he was nominated on four 
other occasions) was for his 
performance as the un bigoted 
Southern lawyer in To Kill A 
Mockingbird, in 1962 (not in 
the BBC season), and his films 
over the last 20 years have 
been generally disappointing. 

“He is the nicest man in 
Hollywood, and the dullest”, 
one colleague said of him. By 
other accounts, he was a 
difficult and prickly man to 
work with, stubborn, serious 
and quick to take offence. 

What was never in doubt 
was his professionalism, am- 
ply demonstrated by the films 
chosen for his season, which 
starts with The Big Country 
(BBC I, Fri. 220-5pm). direct- 
ed by Wi lliam Wyler, a long 


RADIO 


Almost incredibly, it is nearly 
a quarter of a century now 
since Michael Frayn was writ- 
ing the witty columns in the 
Guardian and foe Observer 
which were to multe his name. 
These early writings now have 
a quasi-legendary status, and 
ft will be more than ordinarily 
interesting to bear Jarvis's 
Frayn (Radio 4, Mon, 12^7- 
12.55pm). 

Hus is a series of five 
programmes based on those 
columns, with Martin Jarvis 
playing not only Frayn himself 
but everybody else. In die first 
programme, for example, he 
gives a virtuoso performance 
of a discussion about a football 
match and foe commentary in 
the background. Altogether he 
will be playing 99 different 
characters in foe series — quite 
a feat, even for this most 
versatile of actors. 

Tales from Paradise (Radio 
4, Wed, 10.15-1 lpm) is a six- 
part series in which British 
residents of the South Pacific 
recall their years abroad. 
Their memories of life among 
the Polynesians and Melane- 
sians span foe period form foe 
1920s to post-war 
independence. 

Missionaries, planters, co- 
lonial administrators and oth- 
ers recall colourful, often less 
than idyllic lives. If this series 
lives np to the earlier Tales 
From The South China Seas it 



Split personality: Martin Jarvis 

wQl be compulsive listening. 

Tomorrow morning, Mi- 
chael Parkinson's castaway on 
Desert Island Discs (Radio 4, 
12. 15-1 2.55pm) is Shirley 
Williams. Dialogue of a more 
elevated nature is provided 
that evening by The Last Days 
of Socrates (Radio 3, 7J5- 
K25pm). This is a two-part 
adaptation in which Leo 
McKern plays Socrates, in the 
first programme defending 
himself at his trial, in the 
second (next Sunday) in pris- 
on, talking things over, then 
knocking back foe hemlock. 

Music by Elgar marks Holy 
Week, with performances of 
two oratorios on Radio 3. The 
Apostles (Mon, 7-30-9-45pm) 
comes from, the Royal Festival 
Hall, with foe Philharmonic 
Chorus, the Royal College of 
Music Girls' Chores and the 
Phflharmonia Orchestra con- 
ducted by Andrew Davis. The 
Dresun of Gerontius (Thors, 
2-4pm) has Sir Adrian Boult 
conducting foe London Phfl- 
harmonic Choir, the John 
AUdls Choir and foe New 
Pbtiharmonia Orchestra. El- 
gar is also This Week's Com- 
poser (Radio 3, Mon-Fri 9.05- 
10am), with a selection of 
orchestral works from 1899 to 
1912. 

Nigel Andrew 


SCIENTIFIC BONANZA: 

The Arthur Frank coflection of 
scientific instruments, 
watches and chronometers 
includes 97 mioroscopes, 

79 telescopes, 76 navigational 
and surveying instruments, 

23 sundials and four pocket 
globes. 

Sotheby's, 34-35 New Bond 
Street, London W1 (01*493 
8080). Viewing Mon 9am- 
430pm. Sale Tues Ham and 
2.30pm. 

DR LIVINGSTONE, I 
PRESUME Stanley went down 
in history tor greeting the 
lost explorer in darkest Africa 
with these words. His own 
medals and memorabilia are 
being sold in 26 separate 
lots ranging to estimated value 
from £200 to £20,000 for 
the jewel-encrusted snuff box 
he received from Queen 
Victoria for finding Lfvinc 
Christie's, 8 King 
London SW1 (01- 
Vlewing Mon 9am-4pm. 

Sale Tues Ham. 

WEIGHT IN GOLD: UWfl 
brass weights, shaped as 
animals, men or any conceit 
that came into the maker's 
head, were used for 


Ghana in the 19th century. 
They have now become 
collectors' items. The sale 
includes eight lots collected by 
Richard Ha thorn Greaves 
when he was jprospecting in 
Ghana in 1903 and 30 lots 
from Sir Cecil Armftage, 
collected between 1895 and 
1920. 

Christie’s South 
Kensington. 85 Old Brampton 
Road, London SW7 (01-581 
761 1). Viewing Mon 9.30am- 
7pm. Sale Tues 1 0.30am 
and2J0pm. 

Geraldine Norman 


CHESS 


London’s pride 


This is London chess year. 
The GLC Challenge continues 
at the Great Eastern Hotel 
until Thursday and further 
events will be the UK-USA 
Match of Champions in May 
and the Kasparov-Karpov 
World Championship itself, 
starting on July 28. 

What might be termed the 
official guidebook to all this 
activity is David Spaniels 
Total Chess (Abacus, £3.95), 
itself a slogan for 1986. Spanier 
investigates everything of im- 
portance on the chess scene. 

In the GLC Challenge the 
British Grandmasters made 
an excellent start; Mestel de- 
molished Ponisch, while 
Chandler soared into an early 
lead with three straight wins 
against Vagan ian, Short and 
Larsen. 

While: Chandler; Black 
Vaganian;French Defence 

1 P-IW P-KS 2 TMH P-04 
3 M-OB3 B-M 4 P-KS P-OB4 
S P-OR3 B-fti 

A discredited variation which 
Vagaoian tries 10 revive from 
lime to time. 

6P-ON4 PxQP 7 N-N5 ME 
■ P-KB4 B-Q2 9 N-KB3 BxN 
10 BiSdi N-83 T1 0-0 KM-K2 
IS B-Q3 P-QH3 U K*R1 P-K3 
14 C-K3 

Vaganian had done well from 
an almost identical position 
against Nigel Short in their 
game from the Biel Interzonal 
in 1985. Short’s plan had been 
to place his Queen on Q2 and 
then advance with P-QR4. 
True to his. aggressive style 
Chandler throws everything 
into an all-out assault against 
the Black King. 


14 _ 0-02 15 B-N2 B-N3 

16 Ofi-Ki R-aei 

A move which commits 
Black's King to an unsafe 
residence in the centre of the 
board. 16 0-0-0 would 

have been preferable. 

17 P-M4 P-ta IB M-JU P-KR4 
19 P-65 

The intention is to sacrifice a 
piece in order to come to 
grips with the Black King. 

Tg „ P *Ht> 50 PiNP Sn 

21 PxPch K-B1 22 B-611 

A deep move with the hidden 
threat of sacrificing the Queen 
to give mate by means of a 
subsequent Q-Q2 followed by 
0-R6ch. 

22 _ N-B4 23 BxN 1*06 

If 23 ... PxB. 24 P-K6 Q-Q3, 
25 B-B4 Q-K2. 26 Q-Q2 wins. 

24 BxOP P-48 25 04*29 

Etc — “-«* r 


mm b 
mmwmm 

mmm a 
riii i 

IS M E SI 

s mm ii 
nail mm 
m m mm& 


A brilliant Queen sacrifice 
which enables the remainder 
of White's forces to close the 
ring around Black's hapless 
king. 

26 - BxPch x on P*Q 

27 B-ffiCfl K-K2 2ft Mtictl K-B1 
29 B-M01 K-K2 M 8-46 B-B2 
31 B-N5di K-Bi 32 B-fMcd K-K2 
33 P- 

BfcOcft RxQ 34 Biflcb K-OI 

as B-ar q-ki 3& Mr n*p 
sr a-esefs a** 


family feud over water rights, 
containing some superior fisti- 
cuffs. 

The season also includes 
John Huston's 1956 version of 
Moby Dick, in which Peck 
puts up a quiet, thoughifol 
performance as foe whale- 
obsessed Captain Ahab. doing 
all his own stunt-work 
strapped to foe gigantic rubber 
mammal in foe climactic 
scene; Roman Holiday ( 1 953). 
a delightful comedy romance 
with Peck and director Wyler 
in lighter mood than usual, 
helped by Audrey Hepburn at 
her most beguiling; and The 
Yearling (1946), a rural 
weepie about the relationship 
between a homesteader and a 
stray deer. 


RECOMMENDED 


Marcel Berlins 


Miracles 
worked in 
wasteland 


TELEVISION 


The special Good Friday of- 
fering from BBCl is The Holy 
Gty (9.45-1 lpm). a film dra- 
ma by Bill Bryden which re- 
tells the story of the Passion in 
terms of unemployment and 
desolation in contemporary 
Glasgow. 

The latter-day Chrisi is 
played by David Hayman as a 
pasty-fared scruff in a shabby 
overcoat trying to work his 
miracles in a wasteland of 
unmined coal, empty factories 
and derelict shipyards. The 12 
disciples are former shipyard 
workers, reflecting bitterly 
that the Queen Mary they 
helped to build is now a bingo 
ball in Florida. 

The concept had its genesis 
in Bryden's long stint as 
director of The Mysteries at 
the National Theatre. As a 
modem equivalent The Holy 
City is a cogent piece of 
television, but whether it suc- 
ceeds as a Christ metaphor 
will be something to argue 
over. 

On the same theme, the 
Arena programme Home 
Front (BBC2, Tues, 9.55- 
10.55pm) is a tour by the 
veteran war photographer, 
Don McCullin, through what 
he calls Third World Britain. 
Glasgow, as it happens, is not 
on the itinerary but 
McCullin's lens still finds 
plenty of images to shock — 
from a dripping bedroom in 


My Little Chickadee (1 940): 

W. C. Reids, Mae West ana 
some splendidly absurd 
one-liners (Channel 4. 
tommorow, 2 .25-3 .55pm). 
Inadmissible Evidence 
(1968): Virtuoso performance 
by Nicol Williamson as 
anguished solicitor (Channel 4, 
tomorrow, 10.15pm- 
mldnight). 

* Dead Men Don’t Wear 
Plaid (1981): Very funny private 
eye spoof; Steve Martin 
meets a host of stars from 
1 940s crime films (Channel 
4. Tues, 9-10.40pm). 

It’s a Wonderful Life 
(1947): Sentimental but 
captivating fantasy-comedy 
with James Stewart (BBC2, 
Thurs, 2.30-4.35pm). 

‘ First British television 
showing. 

Bradford to people toiterinf 
through the rubbish ai 
SpitaJfield MarkeL 
After the mainly hostik 
contributions of Alan Parkei 
and Lindsay Anderson, Brit- 
ish Cinema: Personal Vie* 
(1TV, Wed. 9-lOpra) places it! 
final instalment in foe mon 
optimistic hands of Sir Rich 
and Attenborough. His subjec 
is the relationship between tin 
actor and director, on whicl 
he can speak authoriiativeh 
from both sides of foe camera 
One of the laudable tiling^ 
about The Sooth Rank Show 
(ITV. tomorrow, 1 0-30> 

1 1.30pm) is that it does no} 
always go for the obviout 
names. This week's editioi, 
features Arthur Boyd who, a- 
not many schoolboys know, ij 
a leading Australian paintej 
with a unique vision of fo| 
outback. In the programme' 
filmed at Boyd's home in New 
South Wales, foe artist ruraii 
nates on his life and with fo | 
camera looking over his shoufr 
der paints two pictures on tha 
theme of man and nature. £ 
The heroine of Mysteries og 
Peru (Channel 4, Mon, 10f 
I lpm) is a wizened 82-yeara 
old called Maria Reiche, whr 
despite being partially larm 
and almost totally blind stil 
pursues a lifetime's obsession 
wiih one of the oddest ancien 
monuments known to man w 
foe Nazca Lines, nvysteriou 
animal and geometric figure^ 
etched into foe desert betweew 
the Andes and foe Pacific, io 
Largely ignored by archae* 
ologists and foe Peruvians 
Government, Maria Reichso 
has spent half a century no 
only formulating her owi 
theories about foe figures bu 
trying to preserve them fron M 
ravages of modern civilization 
like the Pan- Americas 
Highway. m 

Peter WaymarlS 


Raymond Keene 


CONCISE CROSSWORD NO 906 

84 

Prizes of the New Collins Thesaurus will be given for the first tw-JJ 
correct solutions opened on Thursday. March 27.1986. Entriew 
should be addressed to The Times Concise Crossword Corr“ 
petition. I Pennington Street. London. El 9XN.The winners an'S6 
solution will be announced on Saturday. March 29. 1986. IS 

ACROSS 

I SIa - borne soldier 
(l» 

9 Smelly ( 7) 

10 Momc (5) 

11 Fooidigil(3) 

13 NearjA) 

16 Cash register (41 

17 Slanting writing (6) 

18 Receding tides (4) 

20 Bullet (4) 

21 Least amounts 1 6) 

22 Renown i4) . 

23 Maw (41 
25 Droop (3) 

28 Expression (5) 

29 Desert |7| 

30 Pronounce pomp- 
oush (II) 

DOWN 

2 In Midst of (5) 

3 State f4) 

4 Reddish-brown (4) 

5 On an occasion (4) 

6 Of rock erosion (7)- 

7 Forged (111 

8 Aggressive 1 1 i) 

12 Derivation (6) 

14 Of him (5) 

15 Spittle (6) 

19 Italian child (7) 

20 Plant fluid (3) 

24 Accounts inspection 
(5) 

25 Soot speck (4) 

26 Fish spear 14) 

27 Body powder (4t 



ifti 

i*i 

SOLUTION TO NO 905 

ACROSS: I Upkeep 5 Bisque 8 Ova 9 Pa- 3*9 
tina 10 Noodle II Skit !2Hausfrau 14Spi’g 
dcr 17 Addend 19 Cavalier 22 Rite 24 Pen IS 
up 25 Daimv 26 Lag 27 Dourly 28 Eskimc 


DOWN: 2 Prank 3 Emitted 4 Poacher 5 
Bantu 6 Scoff 7 Unlearn 13 Sad 15 Pla- 
cebo 16 Eel 17. Abridge 18 Derrick 20 Al- 
tar 21 Imp!} 23 Totem 


The n uincn id Prize concise So WO arc: Mrs 
C.C.Siminnnds. Xnnh Chur. Mihcmm. Taumoi 
Siwwrwi: anil C. Jm.ni} Dorics, South HtU Ave- 
nue. Harrow, XUJdinvv. 


EU 

LTD 
1.40 
130 
580 
020 
ZOO 
nan 
1 .» 
2-50 
1 HJ 
WO 


0.1S 


SOLITION TO NO 900 (Iasi Saiurdav's Prjzc Concise) 

CROSS: l Crash helmet 9 .Archtvc 10 Lapel U Lay 13 Oops 16 §2 
Graf 17 Ocelot 18 Sash 20 Solo 21 Vacate 22 Evil 23 Amos 25 i«o 
God 28 Ratan 29 Amentia 30 Scotch broth 

DOWN; 2 Reap 3 Skid 4 Heel 5 Lily 6 Esparto 7. Aaron's 
Beard 8 All Fool's Day 12 Avowal 14 Soft 15 Legato 19 Sciatic 2( 

Sea 24 Motet 25 Gnat 26 Dash 27 Weir 


Name 

Address 


Ito 

STS 







m 31 

a * 

u 

ti >r 


THE TIMES SATURDAY MARCH 22 1986 


THE WEEK AHEAD 


»X 



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v 


\ 


TELEVISION 


HOOP PRINT: Shergar was the 
champion racehorse abducted from 
a stud in southern Ireland and 
never subsequently found. Bill 
Morrison's telefilm is a 
reconstruction of the case which 
stars Stephen Rea. B8C2, 
tomorrow, 1 0.1 5-1 1 .30pm. 


THEATRE 

HEARTFELT: Martin Sheen, 
Hollywood star of Apocalypse Now, 
makes his British stage debut in Tne 


OPERA 


I IA*. #:Tl *. - 1 1 


about public reaction to the disease 
AIDS. Royal Court Theatre (01-730 
1745), opens Tuesday after 
previews. 


POPP SONG: Lucia Popp, the 
Czech soprano who was last heard 
here three years ago, sings her 
first London Arabella under the baton 
of Bernard Haitink, who is 
conducting his first Strauss opera at 
Covent Garden. Royal Opera 
House (01-240 1066), from Thursday. 


* 


THE TIMES CHOICE 


THEATRE 

IN PREVIEW 


ALL THE FUN OF THE 
FAIR: The 7:84 Theatre 
Company in a new show for 
which the theatre becomes a 
funfair. 

Half Moon. 213 Mile End 
Road. London El (01-790 
4000). Previews from Wed. 
Press night Apr 1. 

IL CANDELA Kh Satire on 
16 th-century Neapolitan life by 
Giordano Bruno (burnt as a 
heretic in Rome. 1600). 

The Pit (01 -628 8795/638 
8891). Previews from Thurs. 
Opens Apr 2. 


MANCHESTER: The 
Cheeky Chappie: The life of 
comedian Max Miller, 
through the eyes of his 
girlfriend. 

Ubrary Theatre (061 236 
71 1 0). Previews today. Opens 
Tubs. 


FILMS 


OPENINGS 


D.A.R.Y.L.(PG): Which 

stands for Data Analysing 
Robot Youth Liteform. 


OPENINGS 


MOON ON A RAINBOW 
SHAWL: Post-war Trinidad 
back-street life. 

Theatre Royal. Stratford 
East Gerry Raffles Square. 
London El 5 (01 -534 0310). 
Previews today, opens Mon. 

ROAO:Surreal study of a 
small Lancashire town. 
Royal Court Theatre 
Upstairs (01-730 2554). 
Previews today. Mon. Tues. 
Opens Wed. 



SELECTED 


GLENGARRY GLEN ROSS: 
David Mamet's hard-edged, 
acerbic vision of duplicitous 
Chicago estate agents at work 
and play. . 

Mermaid (01-236 5568). 

THE APPLE CART: Peter 
O'Toole and Susannah York 
star in Val May's spirited 
revival of Shaw's political 
comedy. 

Haymarket (01 -930 9832). 


Barrett Oliver (above) plays the 
young computer brain at 
large in middle America. 
Cannon Panton Street (01- 
9300631); Cannon Tottenham 
Court Road (01-636 6148). 
From Fri. 

THE GIRL IN THE PICTURE 


(15): Romantic entanglements 
at the Smile Please photo- 
graphic studio 
Cannon Haymarket (01 -839 
15 27): Cannon Tottenham 
Court Road (01-636 6148). 
From Fri. 


SELECTED 


OUT OF TOWN 


ECHO PARK (15): Delight- 
fully bitter-sweet comedy 
about a body-builder. 
Cannon Tottenham Court 
Road (01-636 6148). 


BRISTOL: The Rivals/Mon 
Flanders: Main theatre has 
Sheridan's satirical 
comedy, the smaller house has 
Daniel Defoe's heroine, 
ad Vic Theatre Royal (0272 
24388) The Rivals opens Wed. 
New Vic (same telephone) 

Mon Handers opens Tues. 


PHOTOGRAPHY 


EDINBURGH: Mr 
Government A tale of a war 
veteran returning to his 
native Ayrshire. 

Royal Lyceum (031 229 
9697). 


THE GUARDIAN 


FUNNY 


FINANCIAL TIMES 


“THE MOST 
INVENTIVE 
ORIGINAL 
FARCE IN 
LONG TIME 


PUNCH 


‘IT REALLY IS 

VERY FUNNY 


SUNDAY TIMES 


.GLOBE 
THEATRE 

Sunesbuiy Wi 

Box Office; 
01-4371592 



CONCERTS 


WILD LISZT: Earl Wild 
continues his remarkable 
series of Liszt recitals with 
a programme of 
transcriptions, and pieces 
by Chopin. Wagner. 
Schumann. Verdi. 


Miranda, composer. Fusion 
(Wed, Thurs) is a multi- 
racial youth company in a 
performance (Erected by 
Beyhan Fowkes with music by 
Barrington Phefoung. 

The Place. Dukes Road. 
London WC1 (01-387 0031). 


Wigmore Hall. 36 Wigmore 
Street, London WI (Q 1-935 
2141). Today, 7.30pm. 

SHOSTAKOVICH: 
Continuing its series, the 
Borodin Quartet reaches 
Nos 14 and 1 5 Opp 142 and 
144. 

Queen Elizabeth Hall. South 
Bank, London SE1 (01-928 
3191). Tomorrow. 3pm. 

THE APOSTLES: The 
Philharmonia Chorus and 
Orchestra with soloists 


ON TOUR: London 
Contemporary Dance Theatre 


gives works by Robert 
Cohan and others tonight at 


the Gaumont, Doncaster 
(0302 62523) and Tues -Thurs 
at the Liverpool Empire 
(051 709 1555). London City 
Ballet gives Cornelia today 
at the Ashcroft, Croydon (01- 
6889291). 


ROCK AND JAZZ 


offer Elgar's The Apostles. 
Royal Festival Hall. Mon, 
7.30pm. 


CAMDEN JAZZ FESTIVAL: 
Art Blakey leads his fiery Jazz 
Messengers in the 


AFRICAN APPEAL: The 

Amadeus Trio plays Mozart's 
great Divertimento K 563 
and Schubert's ‘Trout" 
Quintet.in aid of the 
Musicians' Appeal for African 
Famine Relief. 

Barbican Centre, SUk 
Street, London EC2 (01-628 
8795). Tues. 7.45pm. 

BENNETT AT SO: To mark 
Richard Rodney Bennett's 
5Qth birthday, the LSO 


Festival's closing night 
Tonight. Shaw Theatre. 1 00 


Euston Road, London NW1 
(01-3881394). 

JAMES BLOOO 
ULMER/GEORGE ADAMS: 
Two ultra-modem jazz 
musicians, both with roots In 
the most basic r&b. 

Tomorrow, 1 00 Club, 100 
Oxford Street London WI (pi- 
636 0933). 


perform his Music for Strings. 
Barbican Centre. Thurs, 


Barbican Centre. Thurs, 
7.45pm. 


ROOMFUL OF BLUES: Big- 
band r&b by an American outfit 
now half-way through its 
second decade. 

Tues, Mean Fiddler, 28a 


ELGAR /BRITTEN: Elgar's 
Symphony No 2 and Britten's 


Hartesden High Street London 
NW10 (01-961 5490). 


Symphony No 2 and Britte 
Ybung Person ‘s Guide to 
the Orchestra with the . 
Philharmonia Orchestra. 
Royal Festival Hall. Thurs, 
7.30pm. 


JOAN BAEZ: Topping the 
bill of an "international 
women's evening". 

Wed. Albert Hall, 


Kensington Gore, London SW7 
(01-5898212). 


OPERA 


LONDON PHOTOGRAPHY 
FAIR: Contemporary and old 
topographical prints with 
even the occasional Emerson 
and Cameron. Also books 
and some fine documentary 
photographs of the 1950s 
by Roger Mayne. A must for 
serious collectors. 

The Photographer's 
Gallery, 5 and 8 Great Newport 
Street London WC2 (01- 
240 1969).From tomorrow. 


ROYAL OPERA: Two 
performances of the Royal 
Opera's new production of 
Oer Fliegende Hollander on 
Wed and Mar 29 at 7.30pm. 
Gerd Albrecht music-diractor- 
efectofthe Hamburg 
Opera, makes his Covent 
Garden debut in the pit 
Covent Garden. London 
WC2 (01 -240 1066). 

ENGLISH NATIONAL 
OPERA: Wagner s Easter 


JAMES TAYLOR: Has he 
any more to offer than 
nostalgic retreads of "Fire 
and Ram"? 

Fri and Mar 29. 

Hammersmith Odeon. Queen 
Caroline Street London WB 
(01-67484081). 


GALLERIES 


OPENINGS 


opera. Parsifal, plays this 
week on Tues and Mar 29 at 
5pm in its new production 
by Joachim Herz. Tonight and 
j Thurs at 7.30pm two more 
I chances to see Madam 
Butterfly. On Wed at 
7.30pm The Merry Widow. 
Coliseum, St Martin's Lane, 
London WC2 (01-836 3161). 


IN TANDEM: Master 
painters tum their hands to 
sculpture. Includes work by 
Picasso, Matisse. Giacometti 
and SchnabeL 
Whitechapel Art Gallery, 


Whitechapel High Street 
London El (01-377 0107). 


From Thurs. 


DAVID HOCKNEY: Vividly- 
coloured lithographs from a 
year’s work in New York. 


KENT OPERA: A Prom 
performance of their new 
production of Monteverdi's 
The Coronation of Poppea on 
Tues, a further 
performance of the opera on 
Wed. and two 

presentations of the Jonathan 
Miller La traviata on Thurs 
and Mar 29. All start at 7.30pm. 


year s work in New Yo 
Tate Gallery, MiRbank, 
London SW1 (01-821 1 


From Wed. 


(01-821 1313). 


Theatre Royal, Norwich 
(0603-628205). 


SELECTED 


ROYAL BALLET: Just three 
performances of Giselle this 
week, with Marla Almeida 
(tonight and Tues) and Lesley 
Collier (Mon) in the title role. 
Coverrt Garden, London 
WC2 (01-240 1066). 

NEW DANCES: The Place 


presents two companies. Strip 
Search (Mon) is a new 


GEORGE BELCHER- First 
retrospective of the comic 
artist since his death in 
1947. 


Search (Mon) is a new 
venture direcged by Nelson 
Fernandez with Carlos 


Langton Gallery, 3 Langton 
Street London SW1 0 (01 -352 
9150). 






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mil 


GIRTIN TO COLLIER: Early 
1 8th -century watercolours by 
Girtin, Cox, de Whit and 
Collier. 

Fhzwilliam Museum, 
Cambridge (0223 69501). From 
Tues. 


NEW CONTEMPORARIES: 
Grand masters of the future, in 
a show of work by recent 
art school graduates. 

ICA, The Mall, London SW1 
(01-930 3647). 


BOOKINGS 


FIRST CHANCE 


BERNSTEIN FESTIVAL: 
Booking opens today for 
concerts to celebrate the 
career of American composer 
Leonard Bernstein. They 
include the first British staging 
of The Mess, films and 
foyer performances, and 


The Life of Galileo at the 
Theatre Royal, and 
Salonika at the New Vic, with 
general public bookings 
from Apr 1. 

Box Office, Bristol OW Vic, 


Box Office, Bristol OW Vic, 
King Street Bristol (0272 
24CS8) 


LAST CHANCE 


and manuscripts. 

Apr 29-May 11. 

Barbican Centra, Silk 
Street London EC2. (01-638 
8891 or 01-628 8795). 


BRISTOL OLD VIC: 
Bookings open this week for 
season ticket holders for 


CHURCH1LUANA: Two 
hundred items from the private 
coflection of Ronald Smith, 
including toby jugs, postcards, 
and cigarette cards. 

Finishes tomorrow. 

Cabinet War Rooms. Clive 
Steps, King Charles Street 
London SW1 (01-930 6961). 


For ticket availability, performance and opening 
' times, telephone the numbers listed. Theatre: Tony 
Patrick and Martin Cropper; Films: Geoff Brown; 
Photography: Michael Young; Conceits: Max 
Harrison; Opera: Hilary Finch; Dance: John Perchal; 
Sock & Jazz: Richard Williams; Galleries: Sarah ' 
Jane Cbeckland; Bookings Anne Whltehonse 


i 


Artsdiary 


IS 


TP 


X. 






Acts Dhry can reveal this 
morning inat tbc neat official 
portrait of the Queen — her 
96th since she came to the 
throne — contains for the first 




•A'. t . 




time that symbol of royal 
eccentricity: tint c oqp. The 
portrait tnM be unveiled ai the 
National Portrait Cattery next 
Wednesday ad a remarkable 

in several respects. 

The Queen did not sit m the 
tmfitioiut manner for. artist 
1 Michael Leeward. hot allowed 
him to tafcc pfeotographs of 
her tom wbicfcbe painted the 
canvas. The cdcnliisaiofl, to 
coincide with the ^Queen’s 
sxtiefo birthday, came from a 
surprising quarter — Header's 


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Leonard whose pKiuresare 
principally of the male form in 
various stages undress, 
asked lbeQtteeaifshc would 
sit with hef corp. Spark. The 
result, say the NPG. is “a 
agmficaat addition" to their 
ooJfectiori. The. portrait is 
hkeiy. » be .- included in 
Leonard's, next volume. His 
two pubtkations so for are 
Oxvtgingsnd Paintings, both 
pubfehed by Tbe Gay Men's 


Tutu tough? 




W hen Eileen Atkins 
first embarked on 
an acting career, 
agents discour- 
aged her because she lacked 
the conventionally pretty 
looks deemed an essential 
requisite of every aspiring 
actress. 

In her early twenties the 
acting world was brimming 
over with Rank starlets and 
Shirley Eaton look-alikes.“Ii 
was another race of women”, 
Ms Atkins recalls with wide- 
eyed wonder. “Then they 
started using funny, more 
interesting races ...” Rita 
Tushingham and Lynne 
Redgrave began to flourish. 
Plain girls were in. Ms Atkins, 
30-plus by then, was reas- 
sured. Since then she has 
emerged as one of Britain’s 
most accomplished and enig- 
matic actresses. 

“We met in a small cluttered 
dressing room at the Young 
Vic where she opens on 
Wednesday in Euripides's Me- 
dea . directed by Toby Robert- 
son. It has already, played — to 
much critical acclaim — in 
North Wales. “Toby was the 
only person who would take it 
on", admits Ms Atkins. “He’s 
very enthusiastic and -will take 
a chance on things. ' 

“Jeremy Brooks has done a 
wonderful translation . that's 
brought it into modem lan- 
guage without losing the pow- 
er of poetry. It's a marvellous 
part. There are so few parts for 
women that really draw out 
everything from you.” 

Ms Atkins is 5i.and speaks 
in bursts and gusts of restless 
energy, using wild, sweeping 
gestures, sometimes leaving 
sentences unfinished as her 
mercurial -mind leaps on to 
some fresh tack. 

She has a] ways been deliber- 
ately choosy about parts, “I’ve 
only done two things that I 
was deeply ashamed of, that I 
did for foe money at foe time. 
One was a horror movie. I 
can’t remember foe other 
but I have very strong feelings 
- totally different from Mrs 
Whitehouse’s - about what I 
should or shouldn't do. 

“But 1 guess integrity is a 
luxury, isn't it? If I bad four 
ehildren and no husband, 
probably my integrity would 
go by the beard" 

She shares her West London 


1 


Weary of playing 
drab housewives/ 
Eileen Atkins has 
now turned 
to Greek tragedy 


laughterf* The contrast was 
fHwldJyexdlii^ 1 - •• 1 

One reason foe was keen to 
do Medea was because there 
had been a longisb lull since 
any major stage role: She 
started to have stage fright 


ironic that the massive securi- 
ty being mounted for the 
Bolshoi Ballet's first trip to 
Britain in 12 years should all 
be aimed at keeping the 
audiences at bay. Live mice 
and nails were hurled on Jo foe 
stage in London last time they 
were here, and foe theatres 
where they danced were pick- 
eted by noisy opponents of foe 
Soviet regime, Bui foe expen- 
sive security arrangements ap- 
parently do not extend to the 
dancers. Obviously the names 
of Nureyev and Baryshnikov, 
and other curtain-hoppers, 
lave faded into foe mists of 
Time. 


duringn-television production 
of Titus Andrvnicus earlier 
this yean “Having got used to 
filming for TV, it was sudden- 
ly video again, and the direc- 
tor quite rightly wanted to do 
whole sweeps of the play - 20- 
minute takes. I did seven false 
starts. -..A.- - •...-■■■ 

“You must see by the 


riverside home -with her sec- 
ond husband, B32 Shepherd, 
who makes television com- 
mercials, and three cars. 

Assessing a script's worth is 
“terribly instinctive ... I did 


• Verity Lambert, the 
veteran television and fHm 
producer at Easton Films 
and EMI films, recently left 
to set op on her own. What 
other title could she choose 
for her company bat 
Cinema Ferity? 


New pennies 


Mary Barnes, a true story of a 
schizophrenic. 1 played that in 


shape", she says, pointing to 
her angular figure clad in 
voluminous black, “I am nat- 
urally for too nervous". Her 
husband and foe cats have 
been a calming influence, bat 
it is still a battle: 

• “When I . was young I 
thought I was terrific. Td go to 
foe theatre and think: */ could 
do that’—Tbe older you get. 
the more people cxpcctfrom 
you.* ‘ 

People — including one 
friend from drama school who 
now runs the National The- 
atre of Northern Greece - 
have said she should play foe 
Greeks: “1 think it’s because I 
am a rather violernt-tempered 
person and I do very much 

understand revenge. 1 don't 
admire it, but I understand it, 
and I think we British aren’t 
open about revenge. We cover 
if up with a lot of nice words. 

“Of course; I don’t believe 
anybody should go as for as 
Medea does But the play, 
she thinks, may open people’s 
eyes enough to realize “this is 
whatcan happen if you let that 
feeling go too for. Although 
Tin horribly quick-tempered, 
things don't fester — it's out 
. “A few years ago I didn't 

■ work- for a while, probably 
-from choice, f found 1 was 
going to Harrods and having 
scenes with people there, and a 
friendsakk/ You'd better start 
working again soon, Eileen*. 

“fm always surprised when 
actors need analysis, because 1 
think you get rid of as awful 
lot through acting. We’re terri- 
bly lucky: vie canika out all 

■ kinds -ofthlngsT* f 


America. You- have to go on 
stage stark naked covered in 
your own excrement in one 
scene. 1 thought it. was an 
excellent play and very , good 
for people to see, -so to me, 
there was absolutely no feeling 
iharfoat was wrong.” 

Her selectivity has meant, 
with hindsight, a few- regrets. 
“I did regret turning down 


Ted Whitehead’s play. Alpha 
Beta. At the time! fekas it Td 


Beta. At the timeTfekas if Td 
played so many drab house- 
wives I couldn’t bear foe 
thought of another one. It Js 
rather my stock-rn-trade!” 
Despite having'the sort of 
face that provokes cries of 
“Cheer up, darfingT from 
workmen. -she would love to 
do more comedy. “Bui as a 
middle-aged actress you're in- 
undated with scripts /or gutsy 
women trying to break out of 
being housebound, and you 
gel a lot of cute one-) in ere. 
Thau to me, is not comedy.” 


S he has just had an idea 
for a televirion sitcom 
(a production compa- 
ny has taken h up) and 
would love Beryl Reid lo be in’ 
it. Beryl has been a chum shoe 
they worked Together in The 
Killing of Sister George, .a 
professional watershed for Ms 
Atkins who played Beryl’s 
lesbian partner, Childie. 

She recalls three months of 
playing lo hostile audiences in 
the provinces -before moving 
to London, where “we played 
two previewsio dead silence — 
one to policemen, one to 
nurses. Then we opened on 
the first night to a wonderful, 
camp, West End audience and ' 
they started shrieking with:. 


The long-awaited sequel to 
Dennis Potter’s Pennies From 
Heaven is finally under way. 
Called The Singing Detective 
and starring Janet Suzman, 
the six-pan serial for the BBC 
is about a failed detective 
writer who, lying in hospital 
suffering from psoriasis, hallu- 
cinates about his past. As in 
Pennies, there are period 
songs, this time from the 
1940s, and Potter accepts the 
autobiographical element. 



Suzman and Potter 


inis is toe piece of work fd 
** ^embered for”, he 


f hZ^ZTe 8065 leagues 

torward^ frqnx anything I’ve 

wntten. Potter fans will have 
U nu! November to 
decide for themselves. 


“S not unknown for 


r- T*- , » tune era < 

awhoi^ P F y bills 


The 

Philharmonic is about 
out on foe road toperf 


kteide Country cf 

fo? mn hrnem 


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‘"dudes Ken 
Lord Sutd 


Veronica Harvey 


Medea 

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THE TIMES SATURDAY MARCH 22 1986 


THE ARTS 


Television 

Glamour 
for girls 

, The stay of the town moose 
and the cnzntiy moose was 
dolled up with. lipgloss 
Carmen . rollers io 
Deceptions(liBCl ), an Ameri- 
can mini-series Which trans- 
lated the fable into terms 1 
which (uftfoubredH roand 90 j 
per cent of the female pejrate- 
don of the Western world 

exactly' where they lived. 

The story concerned a New j 
Jersey professor's wife who 
had everything a woman is 
supposed , to want — two 
healthy children, and a land- 
some, high-status husband 
who tolerated her job at the 
campus library. 

Sadly, the children were 
little pigs, the husband was 
an willing to make much emo- 
tional investment in his family 
and the job did not pay enou gh 
to purchase any of the material 
goodies which are traditional- 
ly supposed to compensate a 
woman for these deficiencies. 
Instead bar heroine took 
tranquilizers. 

Into this drah, frustrating 
Bfe, on a .split screen and an 
ormolu tele ip hone, came oar 
heroine's twin sister, calling 
from her glamorous fife with 
the international jetset Those 
well- versed in soap opera con- 
struction .will need to read no 
further. Before yon could say 
“life-swap”, the frumpy 
professor's wife was whisked 
away to Venice, lavished with 
new clothes and attention, and 
persuaded Co change places 
with her twin. 

At this point the scenario 
moved into sentimental hyper- 
space. The jetset glamour- 
puss toned down her act and 
flew into New Jersey, where 
she charmed the children, 
motivated the husband and 
■ zapped the. predatory Lolita 
who sat in the front row of his 
tutorials crossing her legs in a 
meaningf ul manner. 

Meanwhile in a Georgian 
pile in England, the domestic 
drudge sank blissfully into her 
sister's oval whirlpool bath 
and started lapping np the 
Latin lovers who appeared 
from every btuttrln cupboard. 

Deceptions was, by the stan- 
dards of most of the American 
mini-series screened in this 
country, a superior piece of 
candyfloss, it was - shot .on 
location and designed with, a 
modicum of taste. There was a 
sterling cast of British; actors 
including Jeremy Brett,- Jody 
Parfitt and Joap Simms. Gina 
LoHobrighia turned up- in se-r - 
qums, doing for the Italian 
accent what Maarice Cbeva- 
lier used to do for the French 
accent Part II of this confec- : 
tion is to be screened tonight, 
and we may expect the plot to 
thicken to die point of no . 
return. 


The reclusive Jeff Beck is back with a new single, released on Monday. Interview by David Sinclair 

, ^ Ambitious in his artistry 


John RusseU Taylor hails the return of the 
sculptor of Eros , Sir Alfred Gilbert, back 
to his alma mater, the Royal Academy 


On July 13- last year, when Eric 
Clapton and Jimmy Page were both 
. performing in Philadelphia at Live 
Aid in front of the largest television 
audience ever known, Jeff Beck was 
at work underneath one of his many 
vintage hot-rod racing cars in the 
garage of his estate at Tunbridge 
Wells. -He followed ev ents on a 
televirion set in the corner, “I didn't 
want to go, because 1 hate large 
crowds”, he says. “I don’t mind • 
playing to them, as long as you can get 
away quickly afterwards; - bat I 
-wouldn’t have ‘fitted * in there 
anyway:” 

While Clapton, and to a lesser 
extent Page of Led Zeppelin, are now . 
household names, the retiring Beck is 
still considered, with them, to be one 
of a handful of the most revered and 
influential rock guitarists. Unlike ' 
them, however, be ha?? never peaked. - 
as an artist, has never played the 
“feme game” and has long adopted a 
“take it or leave it” attitude to the 
business of being a rock star. His 
erratic recorded output, his rare five 
appearances and his extreme reluc- 
tance .to give interviews have resulted 
in a near-invisible British profile, but 
in America be still flourishes. Only 
last month he won the Best Rode 
Instrumental Grammy award for - 
“Escape” from his recent album 
Flash. 

“For what little amount of wort I 
do, I don't deserve anything”, he says 
laconically. “Of all the guitar-playing 
on that album, 'Escape* was probably 
the most controlled and, I think, - 
mediocre." He shrugs. “But then 
that’s just my view.” 

Of all the British rode guitarists 
Beck has been the most consistently 
adventurous and innovative. With 
the Yardbirds ip the Sixties, he was in 
tire forefront of the movement to 
extend the instrument's tonal vocab- 
ulary, using feedback effects, strange 
tunings and the sounds of destruction 
even before the arrival of Jimi 
Hendrix. He formed his own Jeff 
Beck* Group, featuring Rod Stewart 
on vocals, and with his 1968 album 
■Truth laid the rough ground-plan 
built on by many ensuing heavy rock 
acts. • In the Seventies, having de- 
dined a tacit offertojoin the Rolling 
Stones when Mick Taylor left, he -. 
made the courageous move of rede- 
ploying the electric guitar in a purely 


RobartKn&Tt 




ks&:%rs : 



instrumental setting with the albums 
Blow by Blow and Wired, revealing a 
range of unrivalled technical and 
interpretative playing skills. It was 
also an iconoclastic attempt to apply 
his experience in rock to a jazz 
framework, something that has been 
attempted more recently by Sting. 

‘'Sting. Simon [Phillips] and 1 had a 
play together about three years ago, 
and be [Sting] reportedly said on the 
way home They're incredible, but 
they're too jazzy for me; they’re both 
of them too wild and busy'.” 

As a personality, he has often been 
characterized as wayward, moody 
and unpredictable, epitomizing the 
restless, constantly frustrated artist, 
always taking intense care and pride 
in his work yet frequently dissatisfied 
with the results. 

Tve never been back and capital- 


ized on what I've laid out”, be says 
with a mixture of pride and regret. 
“It’s irresponsible, not at all profes- 
sional, but I'm still here, and as long 
as I can keep playing better than last 
week I'll keep going I'm sure I could 
get people hopping up and down by 
doing wild; simple rock 'n' rolL It 
may be just what they want but it’s 
not what I want.” 

Whatever else, his work-pattern 
has left him in remarkably good 
shape and he hardly looks his 4i 
years. Perhaps more shy than moody, 
he ascribes his well-being to the hard 
physical work entailed in his car 
rebuilding hobby, and to the fact that 
he has never given his life over to his 
career in music. “When Led Zeppelin 
made it so big. I was jealous, 
absolutely jealous as heH”. he says. 
“But I'm glad 1 carried on as I was. 1 


personally couldn't have pul up with 
that mass adulation.” 

He does not write or sing to the 
standard of his playing. His most 
enduring problem is to find suitable 
material, and to reconcile his aspira- 
tions as a player of serious intent with 
the commercial considerations of 
holding his ground in the shifting 
values of the rock market-place. 
“Recording should be a pure process 
of thought to tape, with the guitar as 
the way of doing it. without any 
outside interferences from record 
moguls or trends. But i can't look my 
record company in the face if I'm not 
playing some commercial role.” 

Accordingly, he has retreated from 
the instrumental standpoint contin- 
ued until 1980's There- and Back, 
whose opening track. “Star Cyde”. 
was reworked to become the theme 
music for Channel 4's The Tube. The 
newly released single “Ambitious” 
was written by the album’s producer 
Nile Rodgers, and features the bold 
singing of Jimmy HalL 

Beck freely admits that Flash was 
recorded in response to record com- 
pany pleas for “something we can 
sell''. Nile Rodgers was recruited as 
someone with a commercial ear who 
had nevertheless been around since 
the Truth days but the resulting 
album, according to Beck, does not 
contain enough of his own artistic 
essence, nor is it the kind of frilly 
blown “absolutely for the throat” 
commercial success for which he had 
hoped. But this is a typical reaction. 
Asked if he has ever achieved that 
balance. Beck mumbles “A couple of 
tracks on There and Back came 
close.” 

He is at last preparing - “training”, 
he calls it — for his first solo live 
performances in five years, though 
not in Britain. He is planning a brief 
Japanese tour in June. “I always feel 
that Japanese fans are loyal and 
respectful”, he says, betraying both 
vanity and vulnerability. “Every time 
when you come back after a break it's 
like starting over again. If you're a 
true performer it'll never leave you. 
but it's also the thing 1 fear the most 
It's a very great challenge." 

“Ambitious” may stilJ be a fair 
word to describe Beck, though it 
applies more readily to the standard 
of his work than to his occasional 
search for chan success. 



Icarus (detail) 


Alfred Gilbert 

Royal Academy 

At a glance, one could hardly 
imagine a more improbable 
comparison than between Al- 
fred Gilbert, sculptor of Eros, 
and Pablo Picasso. What 
could the favourite sculptor of 
lurn-of-ihe-ceniury British 
royalty have in common wiih 
the great revolutionary, ana 


destructive streak at the heart 
of his social success. 

He seems to have been 
wilful in his pursuit of disgrace 
and when finally, after the 
major scandals of his 
misbehaviour over his great- 
est commission, the Garence 
Memorial for Windsor, he was 
bankrupted, stripped of his 
membership of the Royal 
Academy and virtually forced 
into exile (all of which hap- 


ultimately the great master, of pened in the 1900s) one may 
20th-century art? And yet this almost sense a species of relief 


Radio 


Sympathetic studies of the pains of prejudice 


By far the most notable contri- 
bution to this week’s small 
season of Irish Drama was' only son has been shot down her man in particular and 
Graham Reid's Remembrance by the Prods; his younger boy, Protestants in general, while 
(Radio 4, Monday; director a member of the UDR, has Joan, less ferociously anti- 
Susan tfdggJ.'The season reso- tieen murdered on his father's ‘Prtxtzis destroyed with secret 
lutely tried to escape from doorstep by the IRA. When guilr that she may have been. 
Northern Irelands long-run- the Catholic grave is vandal- an part, to blame for her 
ning obsession with the trou- ized he helps her to tidy it up. brother's death. 

Wes. while Mr Reid’s play : was They meet more often, share The response of this charm- 
set fair and square in. the sandwiches and tea in die less trio to their parents’ 
middle of them. But its arrest- summer sun, and slowly the relationship includes mocking 
inequalities were undeniable, friendship ripens to affection disgust jealousy and implaca- 


and former soldier, strike up a with three unruly children and 
friendship in a cemetery. Her a blazing resentment against 


her man in particular and 
Protestants in general, while 


ning obsession with the trou- 
bles. while Mr Reid’s play was 
set fair and square in. the 
middle of them. But its arrest- 
ing qualities were undeniable. 


Two elderly people, There- 
sa, a Catholic widow, anti 


/I 1* m 1J I M, A V.4UIUIIL VYIUWW. 4I1U 

Cells Hraynela [ Ben, a Protestant Englishman 

Opera 


TLp Cnnw Mairlpn tempos, _and they responded 
me uuOW maiden ^ verve in such showpieces 

Logan Hall ■ 35 the frnwNn*’ dance from 

— £— — ; — • • . the thirdfact Of course the 

c - .. score needs fully succulent 

borne of the Chelsea. Opera playing, raptur- 

Group s recent penormances ous divided cellos and violins 
have drawn attention to works w ^ 0 ^ ^ securely brilliant 
that demanded reconsider- in the top register, but we were 
^on m the theatre workslflre ^ imaginative im- 

Oberon or The Lady Macbeth p^on 0 fihe work. 
of the Mtsensk District. Rrm- 

sky-Korsakov's The Snow There was also a strong and 

Maiden is a less likely addi- characterful team of soloists, 
tion to the repertory: there was Anne Dawson was quite prop- 
a delegation from the Cfclise- erly even-toned and emotion- , 
urn at Thursday evening's ally unsure of herself in the 
performance, but there must title role. Justin Lavender 
be a limit to the number of provided brimming lose, not 
times one can do a Rusalka. always fully, controlled as the 
In any event, the genre to prince, and Brian Bannatyne- 
wbich Rimsky's opera aspires Scott was a richly rounded, 
is not so much psychological solid presence in the two bass 
realism as puppet opera, parts. Fiona Kimra sang out 
Grounded in folksong, self- with dear creaminess as the 
consdous in its picturesque- shepherd boy: I cannot think 
ness and brightly scored, it has why such a sexy voice is so 
a casi of feiryLale characters to often heard in breeches parts, 
turn the pages of song, dance but the effort is piquant. 

and chorus. I cannot think _ . 

there is much deeper meaning °£ eTa 


and love. 

In any less crippled sodety 
Bert and Theresa would have 
r settled down contentedly to- 
! gether. But this is Northern 
Ireland and we have to reckon 
with the awful schism — here 
represented by the pah's sur- 
viving children. 

Bert’s son Victor is a mem- 
ber of the RUC, a man 
-corroded .by jealousy of his 
dead brother and by a broken 
marriage. Of Theresa's two 
daughters, Deirdre has a hus- 
band in Long Kesh and is left 


disgust jealousy and implaca- 
ble tribal rejection. 

Where Remembrance first 
of all succeeded was as an 
utterly persuasive, often heart- 
rending account of people's 
lives — even the helpless, 
savage children finally engage 
our pity. This was the solid. 


proach. Remembrance can be 
heard again tomorrow. 

Does He Take Sugar? (Ra- 
dio 4, Thursdays; producer 
Marlene Pease) was a wonder- 
ful choice of title for that 
excellent magazine which for 
so long now has taken up the 
cause of the disabled. In four 
words it summed up what 
these people have to fece. 
But the attitude has not gone 
away and in BBC Radio 
Merseyside’s Don’t Turn Off 
(Sunday) six active, coura- 
geous and seriously handi- 
capped teenagers spoke 
feelingly of this as one of the 
most distressing things they 
have to take. Many people 
appear to thi nk, being crippled 


gramme was complemented 
on Wednesday by For Better, 
for Worse (Radio 4; producer 
Fran Acheson). a short but 
well-filled documentary in 
which Gaire Frankel spoke to 
some of the partners in mixed 
Afro-Caribbean marriages. 


is precisely the comparison 
forced on one by the wonder- 
ful show devoted to Gilbert at 
the Royal Academy, until 
June 29. For clearly, just as 
Picasso was an artist through 
and through, and could never 
stop being one even for a 
moment, so Gilbert was a 
toialty obsessive sculptor, 
moulding the bread on the 
dinner-table if there was noth- 
ing else to hand. Also like 
Picasso. Gilbert was some- 
thing of a youthful prodigy. 
You have only to look at such 
amazingly proficient early 
work as the terracotta Mother 
and Child of 1877. when he 
was only 23. to wonder what 
more the young man had to 
learn in Older to be launched 
on a highly successful com- 
mercial career. The answer is: 
nothing. Except that his own 
restless, exploratory tempera- 
ment would not let him stick 
at mere academic compe- 
tence. Each work during the 
1880s. from The Kiss of 
Tiaorv to Perseus Arming to 
Icarus, marks a significant 
step onwards and upwards, 
towards ever greater ease and 
fluency of treatment an ever 


Here a very similar pattern of stronger visual imagination, 
preconception is operating, and above all a total at- 
The white mother of a col- homeness with the rippling, 
oured daughter recalled being curving, infinitely sensuous 
asked by a woman in a queue, surface of the material, almost 


“Are you going to educate her? 
They can be quite bright I 
believe”. 


like a living being beneath his 
hand. 

Rather surprisingly, public 


vital core of the play and so, in body, they must also be 
when the blows of hate rain’ crippled in mind. One girl 


down upon it they left the 
listener no option but to share 
the injury. Doreen Hepburn 
and Geoffrey Matthews as the 
star-crossed lovers excelled in 
a case that was beyond re- 


remembered when she was 
seven and in a wheelchair 
being spoken to by a passer-by 
in the “diddums” speech re- 
served for babes in arms. 

This extremely graphic pro- 


While a vestigial decency acclaim and success kept pace 
prevents their mates from with Gilbert's aesthetic devel- 
addressing the crippled as opment; before his mid-thir- 
anything much worse than ties he heard hardly a breath of 
“spassy”. there seems to be no adverse criticism and went 
such embargo on black bas- from triumph to triumph, 
tard. nigger or wog. By holding And did this all make him 
up this sort of mirror and happy and wealthy and wise? 
inviting us perhaps to see Seemingly not. The expres- 
ourselves I think radio does a sions of almost all his figures 


great service. 


David Wade 


are melancholy and downcast. 
And he certainly seems to 
have had a sort of self- 


in his attitude. 

By the time of his departure 
for Bruges. Gilbert had be- 
come an exceptional figure 
even among the exceptional 
figures of British art around 
1900. Almost completely for- 
eign in his professional forma- 
tion. he had become the only 
great British master of the full. 
Continental, curvilinear style 
of An Nouveau. The symbolic 
detail on his figures for the 
Clarence Memorial runs riot 
in a mesh of tendrils and 
plant-like excrescences, until 
the humans are trapped inside 
or are surrounded by 
claustrophobically intricate 
represen rations of their saintly 
attributes. 

Forms seem to become fluid 
and melt into one another — 
just look at the base of Eros 
itself, as you shortly will be 
able to when it is returned to 
Piccadilly Circus. There is no 
real parallel anywhere else in 
British art. Gilbert's end was, 
after all the vicissitudes of his 
middle years, relatively satis- 
factory- He was received back 
like the Prodigal Son. finally 
completed work on the Gar- 
cnee Memorial (in a radically 
simplified style which showed 
he was far from unconscious 
of what had been going on in 
art during the previous 20 
years), knighted and reinstat- 
ed in the Royal Academy, and 
given the chance to create one 
last masterpiece, the Alexan- 
dra Memorial. The Academy 
show has the advantage that it 
is not dealing with a complete- 
ly unknown quantity: indeed 
“the sculptor of Eros” is 
almost guaranteed to pull the 
crowds. But even the knowl- 
edgeable will be amazed at 
how much there is to discover. 
Gilbert was wholeheartedly 
and utterly a sculptor and we 
are never likely to produce a 
finer. 


Theatre 

Sloanes, rhinestones 
and perfect sense 


The story of the opera 


to be brought to light beneath to have been the story 

the story of the ice girt who of Rimsky s 10 

learns life and love, and melts. 

Nevertheless, the opera pro- and leaves behind its stretches 
▼ided an attractive concert of rather deadly recitauve. But 
occasion. Howard Williams, it remains a colourful period 
the conductor, made no con- P icce - 
cessions to his amateur or- p Qn t rriffitlic 

chestra in his choice of x 3HJ uniUlflS 


A Midsummer 
Night’s Dream 

Donmar Warehouse 

Shakespeare in modern dress 
does not necessarily make the 
ideas more accessible; all too 
often we find ourselves invit- 
ed to collude in a reading 
which detracts from the text’s 


Light of Silvery Moon” sug 
gests a reliance on gimmickry 
which does not in fact materi- 
alize; “Silvery Moon” alter- 
nates with “You Spotted 
Snakes” as a pair of off-the- 
cuff theme songs, neither of 
them obtruding. And, when 
Egeus illustrates his com- 
plaints about Lysandei's be- 
witchment of Hermia by 
producing from his brief-case 
a ragbag of evidence in which. 


inherent power. It depends, of for example, “verses of feign- 


ITALIAN IN VENICE 


MeuhiMyaJuise5(80ius)thiDugiH>i«^ircarHi^ 

levels. Course + sccamodHioa£43Q 
History of Art Onuses 


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course, on the play. This 
version of Dream from the 
Cheek by Jowl company has 
the great merit of presenting 
the action in a credible mod- 
em setting without attempting 
to “say” anything grand which 
was not there originally. 
Declan Donnellan’s produc- 
tion, in other words, contents 
itself with making the play 
jnake sense. 

There are* however, some 
uneasy moments, and our first 
sight of the 10-strong compa- 
ny lined up to sing “By the 



ing love” become a cassette 
tape, the laughs are easy 
without being cheap. 

The mechanicals have here 
been transmogrified into a 
suburban amateur dramatics 
sodety sitting on folding 
chairs to attend to their 
secretary’s plans. Stepb Bram- 
weiPs Miss Quince is a bespec- 
tacled librarian, while Colin 
Wakefield’s Bottom, appro- 
priately enough, is a complete 
ass, a pipe-smoking, bobble- 
hatted vicar whose theatrical 
ambitions make Pvramus and 
Thisbe an excellent piece of 
ferce. 



Mr Wakefield is given a fair 
run for his money by Martin ^ 
Turner, who doubles as a 
rhinestone-glittering . Oberon 


It may sound astonishing, but stmply feeding him the right foods 
at the right times can give him a healthy future in a very short time 
indeed. 

What ts even more astonishing is the horrifying number of child- 
ren still dying every day. 

Fortunately. Save the Children is involved in many positive, long 


r Save the Children 
I Mulago Nutrition Unit 


¥ 


and a Sloane Theseus, in term projects throughout the Tnird World 
which role he comes up with a OneurgentexampleistheMulagoNutrrtionUnitinUganda where 

nicely understated .cameo of ^ have been able to save many under-nourished children and give 
SjS'JK* .A them a happier future. 

cheek-scratching and all. Da- , « . _ * . x 


Name- 

Address. 


vid Gillespie’s Puck is a brisk Just £1 a week can do an extraordinary amount of good. And. if 

little wh3z who ties a girdle you, as a taxpayer, donate this amount through a four-year covenant, 
round the earth only after an Save the Children receives an extra 43 pence tax relief on every life- 
exaggerated pratfelL AH the ^ng pound. 

dSgn^^roduc- Save the Children has given its long-term commitment to the 
tion with polyphonic hum- Mutego Nutrition Unit and will keep you informed of the work and 


players join in decorating a 
minimally designed produc- 
tion with polyphonic hum- 


ming, and the boisterousness I results in return for your commitment 


is kept well under control. please join in and help. If we can put those children on a proper 

> -^ s pIay ,s prrferr “' diet we can put them on the road to a proper future. 

,■ Send to; Maureen Brian, The Covenants Manager, Dept 6211200, 

Martin Cropper Save the Children, 17 Grove Lane, London SE5 SRO. 


I TheChildren in Mulago Hospital desperately need your help A four- I 
year covenant of 152 p a. wJJ help er ^e fhe long !e:m success of this | 

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L Send to: Maureen Bnan. Dept 6211200. Save the Children Fund, ■ 
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j 






THE TIMES SATURDAY MARCH 22 1986 


Three Tories I 200 years of shoes and ships and 

to retire at 
next election 


, ; 

i I ! 


By Philip Webster, Political Reporter 
liuw Conservative MPs, Mr Rippon, aged 61, MPfor 
wo ol them former Cabinet Hexham, was once, during the 
ministers, announced last last Parliament, mooted as a 
mgnt that they were standing possible "stal king-horse” 


next general election in 1988. leadership. After completing 
Sir H umphrey Atkins, the the EEC negotiations under 
present chairman of the Select Mr Edward Heath, he was 
Committee on Defence who later appointed Secretary of 
resigned from the Cabinet in State for the Environment 
1982, and Mr Geoffrey . .. , , t . , 

Rippon, the minister who was _ _* n “ s statement tot mght 
in charge nf nfgntiatin n g Ip^ ri- Mr -RippOn said he fully 
ing to Br itain’ s entry into the supported the general policies 
European Community, made ®nd objectives which Mrs 
their announcements in state- Thatcher and die Govern- 
ments to their constituency were pursuing. He add- 

associations. «fc “Loyalty to a party or a 

Sir Humphrey, aged 63, MP government does not. howev- 
for Spelthorne, was made er, mvolve slavish acc^rtance 
Chief Whip when the Prime 201 of P ° h <7 

Minister became leader of the hStthtion- 
ttnserTOtiveJtorty in 1975. Mr David Crouch, aged 66. 
He was the Secretly of State Conservative MP for Gmter- 
1 Irelaild , bury since 1966 and chairman 
1979 to 1981. It was when he 0 f the British branch of the 
was Lord Privy Seal and the Intcr-Pariiamentary Union, 
Government s chief spokes- told his constituency party's 
man on foreign affairs m the executive council last night 
Commons that along with that the time had come to 
Lord Carrington, the Foreign make way for a younger 
Secretary, he resigned m Apnl nerson. 

1982 because the Foreign 

Office was being publicly At the last general election 
blamed for allowing the Ar- Mr Crouch retained the seat 
gen tine invasion to happen. with a 15,742 majority. 


Black Country aims to 
lure the day trippers 


By Craig Seton 

The tourist board that has opera to 
successfully sold Shake- once thi 
speare’s Stratford, Warwick to theii 
Castle and the Cotswokls to British! 
millions of visitors has a Hie 
tougher nut to crack this yean industri 
the Black Country. rich hei 

According to Mr Tony 
Salmon, chairman of the 
Heart of England Tourist 
Board, the Midlands conurfao- 
tion whose name became syn- Si 8 jJ 
onymous with smoke and ZiL/l: 
grime could now become “one JS 
of England's major tourist wjFn 
destinations.” 


The Black Country bor- 
oughs of Wolverhampton, 
Walsall, Dudley and Sandwdl 
have joined forces with the 
board and yesterday launched 
a campaign to persuade tour 


operators to add what was 
once the workshop of Britain 
to their itinerary for both 
British and foreign visitors. 

The board says that the 
industrial revolution has left a 
rich heritage of canals, glass 

factories and chain - making 

works to be enjoyed by via- 
tors. The area's other attrac- 
tions include the annual week- 
long Walsall Illuminations at 
the town's Arboretum, an 
event said to be second only to 
the lights at Blackpool 

Mr Richard Denman, the 
board's marketing manager 
and deputy director, said yes- 
terday: “We are really selling 
the industrial heritage of the 
area and it would be very silly 
of us to try to promote it as 
something else.” 



Solution Co pnzde No 16^94 Solatiea to puzzle No 16,999 


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A prize <?/The Times Atlas of World History will be given for the 
first three correct solutions opened next Thursday. Entries should 
be addressed to : The Times. Saturday Crossword Competition, 
Box 486. 1 Virginia Street, London El 9XN. The winners and 
solution will be published next Saturday. 

The winners of fast Saturday’s competition are: Pam MaUby. 311 
Summerwood Road. IsJeworth, Middlesex: Mrs L. M. Phi/poa. 3 
Church HiU. ShepherdsweU. Dover; Mr Keith Hall, 69 Regent 
Road. Great Yarmouth. 

Name 

Address 


The Times Crossword Puzzle No 17,000 



ACROSS 28 English 

1 Court card (6). 

5 Prior is dergyman ra re- 
ligious environment mwN 

9 Dfflin » oft * » fcvour , 

10 Entreaty from CopperfieJd? 3 Greek s 1 

4 Urgams 

11 Communicating on such W 

good terms (8). 5 Tile's 

12 Comptont of youth u mgrim 

springtime? (6). »i u,3 r 

13 Fish daily (4). 6 Corvine 

15 Brand dedining? Reduce f 

theprice (4,4). 7 Dnte. 

18 Racecourse of pleasantly b 

rounded style (8J. 8 Nc edw< 

19 Boundary for Esses, for rovered 

oampteW ,4 5^L“ 

21 fickle jade son m Pans - 
not for the first time, one 
feels (4,21 16 He thou 

“Serr' 1 ^ «tS% 

25 Army entertainer (4). S 

as Society ta. In essence, on- » 

changing (10). 22 ftf 0010 

27 Husband gets service en- 

gineers to Sannel (8). 24 Weight 

Concise Crossword page 17. 


English flower festival (6). 


DOWN 

Fit of pique? (5). 

Greek swearword? (9). 
Organised detectives' rank 
( 6 ). 

Tiller’s course set at the 
meridian, approximately 
(10,5). 

Corvine quotation nameless 
always (8). 

Drive, raking in fresh air. 
would be grand (5). 

Need wound hurt not being 
covered? {91- 

Rose in winter to provide 
remedy for the cuckoo 
flower (9). 

He thought he was a geome- 
trician (9). 

The language of wild cen- 
taurs (8). 

High court judge? (6). 

A cooler way to be on the go 
(5). 

Weight bom by another (5). 


By Trudi McIntosh 
The Prime Minister, Mis 
Margaret Thatcher, yesterday 
attended an hist or ic meeting of 
tiie Board of Trade in London, 
the first since 1851, to mark 
the board's b i cen t en ary. 

Since its formation in 1786, 
with a few clerks and “ one 
necessary woman” at £9) a 
year, to its incorporation into 
the Department of Trade and 
Industry 16 years ago, the 
board has had an influence on 
almost every aspect of 
Britain's social and working 
life. Its many inactions ranged 
from the care of the colonies ia 
the 18th and 19th centimes to 
administering clothes ration- 
ing daring the last war. 

Its presidents have been a 
mixed banch. William 
Hnskisson (1823-27) was 
killed when an early steam 
train ran him down — not the 
best of advertisements for 
British exports. Gladstone 
(1843-45) cat tariffs heavily — 
hot paid for this fay increasing 
income tax by sevenpence in 
the pound. 

Other presidents have b- 
d tided Sir Winston CHarehiU 
and Sidney Webb. Indeed, one 
of the few leading politicians 
of the past two centuries not to 
hold the post was George 
Canning — a pity since he was 
the author of tiie famous 
despatch which, sent in cipher 
to the British Minister ia The 
Hague, was decoded to read: 
*In matters of commerce the 
fault of the Dutch 

Is offering too little and 
asking too nmck. 

The French are with equal 
advantage content 
So we dap ou Dutch bottoms 
just twenty percent,*- 
Mrs Thatcher and other 
members of the board, indod- 
ing its president, Mr Paul 
Ckannen, the Secretary of 


soue iot iraae ana industry, 

yesterday signed a spedaOy- 
boand Illustrated h istory of 
the board. 

The volume. Shoes and 
Ships and Sealing Wax by 
Sasan Foreman, a freelance 
writer and researcher, win be 
presented to the Queen ia the 
summer as part of the bicente- 
nary celebrations. 

The history encompasses 
the abolition of slavery, tiie 
industrial revotutioa, both 
World Wars, the free trade 
debate, aviation and railways. 

Mr fhannnn, rifting in {be 

famous Pyx chair, an elabo- 
rately-carved chair used early 
last century by the Lord 
Chancellor presiding at tiie 


s 

WW 
■ /■■■■ 

* m 








ft 

I'.f 



Me*-' 

& 

M m 

iur ,.“’U 

». * f 

/ 

w. 


'i - r . 


li 

’ r. ..^V- 






meeting 


board s bicemennary book (pictured bdow) at yesterday’s board 
with Mr Nigel Lawson, Mr Norman Tebbit and Mr Chann on. 


Letter from Budapest 


Moonlighting to 
make ends meet 


annual trial of the Pyx 
todetennine whether corns is- 
sued from the Mint were 
accurate, said the board last 
awtinl851. 

“ Since then the Board of 
Trade has not met althoagh its 
continued existence and the 
possibility of its meeting ap- 
pears to have exercised a 
fascination which contimies op 
to this day,” he said. 

Such inactivity is of long 
standing. In 1780 Edmund 
Burke denounced the board as 
“a sort of temperate bed of 
influence; a sort of gently 


ripening faot-honse, where 
eight members of Parliament 
receive salaries of a thousand 
a year, for a certain given time. 
In order to mature at a proper 
season, a dam to two thou- 
sand, granted for doing less, 
and on the credit of having 
foiled so long in that inferior 
laborious department” 

Shoes and Ships and Sealing 
Wax: An Illustrated History of 
the Board of Trade 1786-1986. 
By Susan Foreman, published 
by HMSO, £535 avaflaWe 
from HMSO bookshops or 
booksellers. 


The discussion tinned to 
argument and the waitresses 
withdrew to the cash desk 
from where they could watch 
the noisy men at the centre 
table as they energetically 
removed spectacles, thrust 
nicotmed fingers towards 
heaven and dapped the party 
daily. Nenszabadsag. 

For RKkp^ Sie verbal 
heat was a rare occurrence: 
Nowadays, in the stay-at- 
home video, word processor 
age, central European intellec- 
tuals do not sit iiicafes batting 
around grand- concepts. 

The source of die row: not 
God, not beauty, not Kadar, 
but money. Making money 

rtat^aboveal^^ where to find 
plays a big part in the lives 
v . Hungarians. Elsewhere in 
the Soviet bloc there is of 
course a natural concern 
about comfort, about getting- 
by. about foreign travel but 
nowhere Is so much concen- 
trated intellectual energy 
poured into becoming richer. 

Two factors are at work. 
First, the intelligentsia is sad- 
dled with a low average wage. 
Secondly, Hungary's econom- 
ic reform offers a theoretical 
escape route, opening up ave- 
nues of private enterprise. - 

Blue-collar workers .seize 
tb ff SC . chances to tnairitain 
their standard of firing at a 
time of rising prices. More 
than 200,000 workers are or- 
ganized into perfectly legal 
moonli ghting brigades, known 
as VGMK They work in state 
factories, but after the day is 
over they rent die machinery 
and produce their own goods, 
sharing the profits. . .. 

Typically, workers at a Bu- 
dapest furniture factory will 
spend from 8am to 5pm 
torqing out standardized 
chests of drawers, and their 
evenings producing waU-to- 
wall cupboards made to the 
specification of the ' buyer, 
delivered and installed with 
an efficiency that the slate 
marhiiM! could never achieve. 

This is all very well for the 
workers, many of whom can 
double their incomes, but not 
for the middle class profes- 
sional Who wants a moon- 
lighting archaeologist? 

Sometimes the answer is to 
offer a manual service bin use 


one’s brains to outwit the flate 
competition- Thus a band oi 
mountain climbers — a popu- . 
lar sport among university 
teachers and writers •* haw 
set up a company to repair 
factory chimneys. They 
undercut the state because 
they do not have to erect 
scaffolding. 

Doctors and dentists do of 
course have transferable drills, 
and many have private prac- 
tices. Dentists living near the 
western borders have discov- 
ered a particularly lucrative 
business treating, ai a fraction 
of the Western price, the troth 
of Aust rians and West Ger- 
mans . _ e 

Foreign exduuige rates af- 
fect only a small proportion of 
the middle class moonlighters, 
but several other regulations 
keep truly free-spirited private 

initiative in its p l ace. 

When hardliners wanted to 
slow down economic reform 
in the 1 970s they introduced 
tough taxes on prosperous 
farmers; last year the corpo- 
rate tax on small companies 
was doubled to 6 per cent; and 
a 10 per cent sales tax was 
clamped on goods sold to state 
companies by private ven- 
tures. 

When an engineer, Zoitan 
Palmal opened the first pn- 
vaidy-owrted hotel in the 
Soviet bloc, a six-floor, three- 
star hostelry in Budapest, be 
found himself hemmed in by 
bureaucracy. He could employ 

no more than nine people and 

ft aA to pay a 65 per cent tax on 
turnover. Mr Palmai, who had 
once dreamed of establishing a 
hotel dynasty, recently sold 
U P- . 

A former police captain has 

also tried his hand at private 
business, setting up the first 
independent detective agency 
in Eastern Europe. 

Licensed to protect divorc- 
ing women from vengeful 
spouses and to escort payroll 
deliveries to shops and banks, < 
to investigate industrial theft 
and protect buildings. Captain 
Robert Bujdoso has also dis- 
covered some of the problems 
of private - enterprise in a 
socialist state. He has finally 
pulled down the shutters on 
bis business. 

Roger Boyes 



THE TIMES INFORMATION SERVICE 


Concert by Dulwich Choral 
Society; Southwark Cathedral 
SEI, 7.30. .. . 

Bach’s St Matthew Passion by 
the Si Matthew Singers; .Reid 
Concert HaD, Teviot Place, 
Edinburgh, 5. 

Bach’s St Matthew Passiom 
by the Lincoln Symphony Or- 
chestra; Lincoln Cathedral 7. 

Verdi’s Requiem by the 
Beauchamp Sinfbnietta; Bir- 
mingham Cathedral 7.30. 

Bach’s St John Passion by the 
Cathedral Choir, Singers and 


7ja 

Recital by the Choral Scholars 
of King's College; Parish 
Church, Hawkshead, Cumbria, 
630. 

Violin and piano recital by 
Bernard Lewis and David Price; 
Dauutsey's School, West 
Lavingtao, 8. 

Concert by Rytoo Chorale 
and Trinity College of Music 
Siring Orchestra; Worksop Pri- 
ory, Notts. 7 JO. 

Concert by Sheffield Oratorio 
Chorus; Sheffield Cathedral, 
7.30. 

Concert of French Baroque 
music. King's Hah, Newcastle 
University. 7.30. 

Bach's Sr Matthew Passion by 
Tonbridge Philharmonic Soci- 
ety, Tonbridge School Chapel 7. 

Concert by Wolverhampton 
G rammer School Choral Soci- 
ety and Chamber Orchestra; 
Civic Hall Wolverhampton, 
7.45. 

General 

62nd Chelsea Antiques Fair 
(last day); Chelsea Old Town 
Hall King's Rri, SW3, 1 1 to 6. 

Dave the Children Sale; Cafe 
Royal 68 Regent Sc, Wl, today 
and tomorrow 10 to 5. 

The East End- Festival: 
community arts festival staged 
in 45 venues from Bethnal 
Greco to the Isle of Dogs; for 
further details contact the Half 
Moon on 01-791 1141. 

Tomorrow 


Royal engagement 

Princess Anne visits Rio de 
Janeiro, Brazil, departs 
Heathrow, 9.3a 

Music 

Concert by the Jerusalem 
String Trio; Michael Sobel Cen- 
tre, Goldeis Green. Limes Ave, 
NW1 1, 7.30. 

Concert by the Non Nobis 
Choir and La Spiritata Chamber 
Orchestra; All Sahm Church, 
Tooting Graven ey. SW1 7, 7.30. 

Concert by the Renaissance 
Music Group; L iv erpool Cathe- 
dral $. 

Organ recital by Michael Har- 
ris: Leeds Parish Church, 
8.30|nn. 

Concert by the Co vent Gar- 
den Chamber Orchestra, Gerard 
Brooks (organ); Oxford Town 
Hall 8. 

Concert by Halle Orchestra; 
Manchester Free Trade Hall 
7.30. 

Bach's St Mdthew Passion by 
the Philomusica of Gloucester; 
Stroud Parish Church, 3.30 and 
6.3a 

General 

London Photographic Fair, 
Photographers's Gallery. 5 and 
8 Great Newport Street, WC2, 
1 1 to 5. 

Old Books Fain Bennington 
Hotel. WC1. 11 to 6. 

Antique Fair. Railway Hotel, 
Buxton, Derbyshire. 10 to S. 

Antique and Collectors Fair. 
Neeld Hall, Chippenham, 10 to 
Sa 

Book Fair; King’s Head Ho- 
tel. Monmouth. 10 to 5. 


Gardens open 


MtnchmtumfKon, 3m SE o< Stroud, from 
market square down Hkjh Street rigrt ax 
crossroads, left at West End; Daman 
House - shrubs, most garden, haroo- 
ceous: St. Francis, Lammei Pam - 
traced garden, trough gatians, bonsai: 
2 to 6. 

Kane Woodlands Manor. Mahan, 6m 
SE erf CamsrtJwy; otd wailed gardens, 
rocicary, woodland waks. shady garoena; 
2 to 5. also open March 30, 31 anoAprtlfi. 
OTHER DAYS 

C om w at GJandagan gardens. Nr Fat- 
mouth; a wltay garden, fine trees and 
shrubs ranranq down to Halford river 
Mon, Wsd andFri (not Good Friday) 1030 


Anniversaries 


TODAY 

Births: Sir Anthony Van 
Dyke, painter, Antwerp. 1599; 
Carl Rosa, impresario and 
founder of the opera company 
bearing his name, Hamburg. 
1842. 

Deaths: Jean-Baptiste Lady, 
composer, Paris, 1687; Johann 
Wolfgang ton Geotfae. Weimar, 
Germany. 1832. 

TOMORROW 

Births: William Smith, geolo- 
gist. Churchill Oxfordshire, 

1 769; Alfred. Vscoant Milner, 
statesman, Giessen. Germany, 
1854; Juan Gris, painter, pio- 
neer of Cubism, Madrid, 1 887. 

Deaths: Stendhal (pseud- 
onym of Marie-Henri Beyle), 
novelist, Paris, 1842; Raoul 
Dufy, painter, Forcaiquier. 
France. 1953. 


In the garden 


Those of us who have delayed 
pruning fruit trees and 
goodeberry .or current budbes 
should do so now. 

It is too early to assess the 
damage done -by the long cold 
weeks. Evergreens, particularly, 
have suffered because in many 
parts of the coon try the ground 
has been dry and frozen to a 
depth of eight inches or more. 
The drying winds have caused 
evergreen (eaves to look very 
sad as the roots were not able to 
replace the moisture lost from 
the leaves. Do not worry un- 
duly; if we do not have plenty o 
rain in the next two or three 
weeks, water them weU. Do not 
be in a hurry to cut back or pull 
out other plants that look very 
unhappy - 

Grass will begin to grow soon, 
so a dressing of a lawn fertilizer 


Weather 

forecast 


Frontal 

























SATURDAY MARCH 22 1986 


TJ [ TF 



TIMES 


21 


FINANCE AND INDUSTRY 


•‘■S .'■i 

' S»*V 
- .n,. : 
■i, t 


- - ; 


. - .'If 

V - a; 






STOCK MARKET 


FT 30 Star* 

14122 (-29) 

FT-SE100 

-168&3(-14) 

USM(Datastream) 

THE POUND 




Guinness 
‘final’ £ 2.46bn bid 


to 


- .< 


■ - ' ’■'V. 






*s* 





-fV U» 




a 


* 


US dollar 

1^110(+0.0230) 

WGenhan marie 

3J3S77 (+0.0337) 

Trade-weighted 
7 531+0.6) 

Holding 
raised 

HiU Samuel G^oop is 
trice op foe 70. 1 percent stake 
in Wood Mackenzie. ibeScot- 
tish stockbroker, whichit does 
not already own. 

-The net cost will be. £15.2 
million, one third of which 
wffl be met by an issne of Hill 
Samuel ordinary shares. The 
balance will be met by cash 
andloan stock. 

HiK Sam ad also announced 
that it was being forced to top 
up the capital of Hifl Samuel 
Merchant- Bank, Asia,- by £7 
million, 'because of d 
conditions on the Singapore 
.stock market 
The merchant bant 
frail and forward exposure 
relating to slock market trans- 
actions against which it may 
- have to mate provisions of up 
to £8 jnMtion. Any provision 
made wiU be charged directly 
to inner reserves. Hill Samuel 
said. 

Delta lift 

Delta Group, the electrical 
eq ui pme n t and industrial ser- 
vices group, made pretax prof 
ftsof£50.6 million in 1 985, to 
from £45.7 million- The divi- 
dend is raised by 44 per cent to 
atotaI6.5p. Tempos, page 24 

Spurs stake 

Mr Irving Brown, an Ameri- 
can property tycoon, has lifted 
his stake in Tottenham 
Hotspur, the only British foot- 
ball club with a stock market 
quotation, to 7 J4 per cent- ■ 

Bids cleared 7 

The proposed makers be- 
tween Woisd ey-Hugfies and 
» Grovewood, - and' between, 

Wadkin andT : Rotjmsra. w3T 

not be'referred 40 ^MoDOpKi 
dies Commisaon. ‘ ■<: 

Stake sold • 

Harvard Securities Group, 
which this week lost a take- 
over battle for United Com- 
puter and Technology, has 
sold a 3Z38 per cent state in 
the company. 

* Boots cut 

Boots is to reduce its holding 
_ in its Indian subsidiary. Boots 
' Co India, to 40 per cent from 
53 per cent 

Hambrosgain 

The High Court has ^reed 
to Hambros Bank talcing a 
controlling stake in Bairstow 
Eves, the quoted firm of 
estate agents. 

Grattan rights 

Grattan, the mad order 
group, announced a one-for- 
six rights -issue at 370p per 
ordinary share when if te- 
^ vealed annual pretax profits of 

* £16 million, up 66 per cent. 
The total dividend has been 

• doubled to 6p. Tempos, page 
24 

Bid extended 

The £173 million bid by 
Demerger Corporation^ for 
Extel, the busi- 
ness information group, has 
won acceptances on behalf of 
0.2 per cent of the ordinary 
shares and none of the prefer- 
ence shares. The offer, which 
is conditional on 90 per cent 

of the shareholders accepting 
has been extended until April 
1 1. ExteTs shares lost 3p to 
390p. 


^ B y Jeremy Warner 

witless Correspondent 

Mr Janies GulHver's Argyll 
supermarkets group yesterday 
raised its offer far Distillers 10 
£2.46 billion in a last ditch 
attempt to bring to an end the 
bitter, four-month-old battle 
for control of the Scotch 
whisky producer. 

The new and ‘‘final” assault 
came after Mr Geoffrey Pattie, 
the industry minister, con- 
firmed that he would not be 
referring a rival £2.46 trillion 
bid from Guinness to the 
Monopolies and Mergers 
Commission. 

Mr' Pattie said he was 
satisfied that Guinness’s 
present proposal did not raise 
foe stune concerns about com- 
petition in the drinks, market 
that had ted to the reference of 
the brewer’s original bid on 
'Febnary 14. 

’ An important factor in bis 
decision was the firm agree- 
ment _ to. sen seven . of the 
combined . group’s whisky 
brands, including Claymore 
and Haig, to Lonrho's Whyte 
& Mackay offshoot for £10.5 
million. This would have the 
effect of substantially reducing 
tile merged company’s share 
of the British whisky market, 
he said. 

Mr Ernest Saunders, chief 


HXh 


SO* 


4004 


3004 


120* 


HOW THE SHARES 
HAVE MOVED 



Mar Apr May Jun Jut Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec Jan Fab Mar 


executive of Guinness, hailed 
the decision as a “victory for 
common sense” saying that' 
bis offer for Distillers was 
good for shareholders and for 
Britain. 

There was dismay in die 
Argyll camp, whose bitterly 
opposed bid would have been 
given dear run had the 
decision gone the other way. 
Mr David Webster, the fi- 
nance director, said he was ax 
a loss .to understand the 
reasoning behind the decision 
Much he said made a mockery 
of the Government's competi- 
tion policy. 

Bat Mr Gulliver was quick 
to . swallow his 
disappointment, launching 


his new offer within an hour 
and a half of Mr Pa trie’s 
statement. The new bid, which 
was accompanied by an ambi- 
tious attempt to boy control of 
'Distillers through the stock 
market, would not be in- 
creased he said 

The attempt to buy control 
came when Argyll made it 
known in the stock market 
that it was prepared to pay 
659%2p a share for 113 mil- 
lion Distillers shares —enough 
to give it more than 50 per 
cent of the total. But the plan 
backfired when Distillers 
shares soared through the 
value of the new bid, rising 
37p to 678p. 

For every 100 Distillers 


shares Argyll is offering 125 of 
its shares, 1 00 new convertible 
preference shares and £16275 
m cash. Market souces said 
the company had considerable 
difficulty in sub-underwriting 
the offer among institutional 
investors, although Argyll 
claimed that the sub-under- 
writing had been completed 
by the end of the day. 

Argyll’s new offer is worth 
679p a share and the under- 
wri tteo cash alternative 660p a 
share. Guinness's shares bid is 
worth 680p and its cash 
alternative is valued at 630p. 

Guinness said its offer re- 
mained fundamentally superi- 
or since it was worth more and 
had the unanimous b ackin g of 
Distillers directors. 

But market sources said it 
would almost certainly have 
to provide a better cash alter- 
native to secure victory. Any 
general setback in share prices 
would give victory to the 
bidder with the highest cash 
offer, they said. 

.Argyll claimed that the net 
cost of fighting the battle 
would still be no higher than 
£30 million if h failed. Success 
would cost around £120 mil- 
lion. Debt gearing in the new 
group would be 122 per cent 
and there would be a 1 5 per 
cent boost in earnings per 
share. 


£97 million 
buyout at 
Cadbury 
division 


/ By Cttff-Feltham 

Cadbury Schweppes is sell- 
ing its food and beverage 
business to a management 
buyout team for £97 milli on — 
despite higher offers from 
some of the big names in the 
industry. . . 

The deal will, however, 
enable Cadbury Schweppes to 
take np an option to buy 10 
per cent in the new operation 
if it succeeds in its target of 
bemg floated- on the stock 
inarket by 1990. 

had^ de 

Cadbury Schweppes decided 
to' sell the division, which 
includes Smash instant pota- 
to, Typhoo tea; and the 
drivers and Hartley jams. 

This ported off oval bids, 
indudmgtine thought to be by 
Allied Lyons, the food and 
drinks grou 
£100 

But following a board meet- 
ing yesterday, Cadbury 
Schweppes decided to accept a 
revised offer from the man- 
agement team led by Mr Paul 
Judge, formerly m ana gin g di- 
rector of Cadbury Typboa 

Afterwards, Mr Hugh 
Gollum, Cadbury Schweppes 
finance (Erector, said “We felt 
there was for less uncertainty 
about the future of the brands 
by offering the business to the 
existing management. We 
were also attracted by the 
prospect of having a continu- 
ing stake in what we think is 
going to be a very successful 
business.” 

The board was almost cer- 
tainly influenced. by the 
knowledge that the sale of the 
division-to a company already 
in the sector could well have 
attracted the interest of the 
Office of Fair Trading and the 
possibility of a lengthy delay 

Last year, the division, 
winch employs around 4,000 
peoplein Britain, earned prof- 
its of £13.7 million 00 turnover 
of £377 million. 

The group has been the 
subject of stock market specu- 
lation after a severe setback in 
the US. Meanwhile, another 
company with a sweet tooth, 
Rowntree Mackintosh, saw its 
shares-efimb to a new peak of 
506p, up 31p, yesterday on 

takeo ver talk. 


Output figures show slower 
economic growth in 1985 


Ky David Smith 
Economics Correspondent 

Official evidence of a slow- 
down in economic growth — 
contrasting with the 
Chancellor’s optimism In 
Tuesday's Bndget speech — 
was released yestoday, in 
figures showing that gross 
domestic predict rase by just 
0.5 p«r emit between the third 
and fourth quarters of last 
year, • 

. Compared with a year earli- 
er, the average estimate of 
GDP in the fosrth quarter was 
up by 28 per cent Bat after • 
allowing for the effects of foe 
coal strike on GDP in the 
earfier period, foe 
ifoaa.l 


Q HQSS DOMESTIC PRODUCT 

Output 

exef 


1980 


Ave Output 
est est 
100 100 

ooat 

rasa 

&oi 

100 

1381 


984 

983 

97.7 

198? 


100.4 

100.1 

983 

1983 


103.7 

103.1 

1013 

1984 


106.4 

106.4 

1053 

1985 


109.9 

non 

108.6 

1984 

G1 

105.8 

103.6 

1043 


O? 

105.4 

103.8 

105.1 


Q3 

106.8 

104.9 

1063 


04 

107.7 

105.5 

1063 

1985 

Ql 

108.6 

106.6 

107.7 


Q? 

1103 

10&2 

108.4 


03 

110.1 

1083 

1083 


-St- 

110.7 

109.4 

109.4 


— less than .1.5 per cent 
For foe whole of 1985, foe 
economy grew by 33 per cent, 
on the avenge measure of 
GDP. After taking into ac- 
count foe strike, growth was 
reduced to around 25 percent 
However, this was split 
between strong, 35 per cent 
.year-on-year growth m foe 


first half of the year, declining 
to a weak, IS per cent rate in 
foe second hatt. — T 
Officials said that foe fig- 
ores wore affected by some 
special factors, notably foe 
bringmg forward into the first 
quarter of the year of invest- 
ment because of foe phasing 
out of capital allowances. Even 
so, foe figures support the view 
that there was a deceleration 


in growth in Britain last year. 

North Sea oO began to act as 
a drag on growth last year, 
after us important con tribe- 
tion in previous years. 03 and 
gas output rase by 2 per cent 
between 1984 and 1985, com- 
pared with a 3.8 per cent rise 
in non-oil GDP. 

In foe fourth quarter, GDP, 
excluding oQ, was np by 3.7 
per cent on the corresponding 
period of 1984. 

The most comprehensive 
measure of inflation in the 
economy, the GDP deflator, 
rose daring last year. The 
deflator, at factor cost, was up 
by 6^ per cent in foe fourth 
quarter compared with a year 
earfier, against rates of 6S pet 
cent in foe third quarter, 53 
per cent in the second ami 53 
per cent In the first. 

Treasury forecasts are for a 
rise of only 3.75 per cent m foe 
deflatin’ in 1986-87. The 
Treasury's forecast for growth 
this year is 3 per cent before 
allowing for foe coal strike. 


National Savings 
to maintain rates 

By Bkhaxd Thomson, Banking Correspondent 


MARKET SUMMARY 


STOCK MARKETS 

FThdOrd 


FT Ai Ware - 
FT Govt Secs 
FT-SE100 — 


Avana 

Rowntree- 
DesCocp 
Trinity kit _ 
Reedm*— ■ 
Woofworm, 
Foseco 


aaop+iep 

539p +12p 

51 Op +35p 

293p+10p 

320p +32p 

874p-t20p 
636p +15p 


Oatastrm. USM » 
ftowroffc 

Dow Jones 

Tokyo 

MkkeiDow 

HangKonff 

Hang Seng — 
A mste r dam: Gen 
k AO .. 


Commerzbank 

B nawte 

General 

Paris: CAD — 

Zorich: 


180851 (+4.57) 

(Market Closed) 

"1136-8 i 

- 20553 H&S) 

466.70 (+30.01) 
339.5 (-20) 


Pearson 

FALLS: 
Natwest — — 
Pteasuranw — 

BrtoB 


296p+24p 

,500p+l9p 


Norbain 


9li . 
875p.-1l . 
176p-12p 
170p-2Qp 


CURRENCIES 


SW&mwal 50&40<s*ne) 


GOLD 


London Fixing; 

235751 
NewYoric 

ConwcS3SMO*354-7D 


London: 
£6151 1 0 
£ DM33877 
£.Swff28301 
£ FR1 0.4183 
£Yen285.70 
£1odac753 
NewYoric 
£■ 315171? 

■$: 'DM22420 
$: Index: 1167 
ECU E0.641S20 
SDR £0-737912 


MAIN PRICE CHANGES; 


FUSCS." 

CABAS'S 

Gwnness 


6830 +42p 

_308p+l0p 

, 372p +8p 


CH Bearer — 


* 4 


TComo 


633p+1^ 

174P+8P 


INTEREST RATES 

London: - . 

Barm Base: 11%% 

3 -moren intwbank n/a „„„ 
ehfftte btBs:l0 ,5 »a-10 a w 
teg mg raw • 

pnmaRate 9% ■ 

Federal Funds.75t% . ■ . 

3-morah Treasury BBsfi38-6.36% 
Sfryear bonds 1J5J+-11 ^e 


The Department of Nation- 
al Savings said yesterday that 
it had no plans to cm the 
interest paid on its deposit 
accounts despite this week’s 
drop in bank and building 
society deposit rates. 

It said that for the first time 
in many years. the Govern- 
ment was setting it no annual 
funding target 

National Savings is almost 
certain to fefl fer short of this 
year's target of £3 billion by 
April. At thfe end of February 
funding had reached £205 
billion with tittle prospect of a 
stop upturn in deposits in the 
last month of the financial 
year. 

It says that the shortfall is 
not important since the Gov- 
ernment has made it up from 
other sources, such as the issne 
of gilt-edged stock and the 


proceeds of privatization. 

Much of the shortfall in 
National Savings was due to 
increasingly uncompetitive 
interest rates for much of the 
year in comparison to the 
rates offered by banks and 
briktiog societies. 

The decision not to lower its 
rates for the time bring despite 
the fell in the general level of 
interest rates leaves the de- 
partment more competitive 
than for many months. 

The thirty-first issue Na- 
tional Savings Certificate will 
continue to offer 7.85 per cent 
tax free after five years, while 
the Yearly Plan rate will stay 
at 8.19 per cent tax free . 

Deposit and income bonds 
will continue to pay 12 per 
cent gross and investment 
bonds, 1 15 per cent gross. 


Lloyd’s limits 
two agencies’ 
underwriting 

The committee of Lloyd's 
has told two Lloyd's managing 
agencies to limit their under- 
writing on certain syndicates 
to 85 per cent of the 
pennissable gross limit of 
bastness they can write. 

The syndicates are in danger 
of overwriting and the com- 
mittee has taken action after 
previous overwriting prob- 
lems at the two agencies. 

Bankside Syndicates must 
limit its business on syndi- 
cates 561 and 566 and Patrick 
Underwriting Agencies on 
syndicates 197 ana 726. 

Three weeks ago syndicate 
800 was told to stop under- 
writing altogether, because of 
the danger of overwriting. 

Syndicates are limited in the 
amount of insurance business 
they can write by the number 
of names who pledge their 
assets to the syndicate. 

Overwriting has caused seri- 
ous problems at Lloyd’s. 


Investment group offers $lbn 
for Washington airports 


From Bailey Morris, Washington 


' A British investment group 
has offered more than $1 
billion (£666 mUSon) to boy 
Washington's two main air- 
ports from the US Govern- 
ment if Congress will allow it. 

Mr John Redwood, who. has 
the MfKng nf NJVL Roth- 
schild & Sons, the merchant 
hanfc, has told US offi cials he 
will have no trouble raising 
money to take ever operations 
of Washington National and 
Duties International airports. 

Mr Redwood, a strong stqi- 
porter of priv ati zati on , heads 
foe international private own- 
ership division of Rothschild 
& Sons and has been active in 
foe British Government^ as- 
set sate efforts. 

He has beat ganging foe 
mood of Congress on privati- 
zation during meetings in 
Washington, which coincided 
with a Senate debate on 
whether to shift control of the 
two airports from foe federal 
government He said that if he 
were to receive a strong, 
affirmative signal, he woaid 
assemble almost immediately 
a group of private investors to 
hay foe busy airports. 

The Reagan Administration 
has proposed selling foe two 


airports and others. It wants to 
encourage private sector in- 
volvement in enterprises such 
as public transport 

But the proposal ran into 
strong ‘ opposition and was 
withdrawn after a special com- 
mission, beaded by Mr 
Unwood Holton, a former 
governor of Virginia, recom- 
mended they be transferred to 
control of a regional anthority 
. for $47 millioa. 

- Mr Gregory Wolfe, a US 
Department of Transportation 
official involved in airport 
management said: “There is a 
history of running airports as 
service centres in this country. 

To make that Lind of change is 
not politically feasible here". 

influential senators, noting 
that foe 547 million price tag 
is far too low, have opposed 
the transfer to the regional 

authority. 

The Rothschild-backed bid, 
which is many times higher 
than any other offer, may force 
foe federal government to. 
reconsider the transfer plans. 
At foe very least, it may force 
the Administration to recon- 
sider foe price, congressional 
officials said -yesterday, 

Mr Redwood said be won- 


dered whether foe US law 
makers would allow the mar- 
ket to be tested. 

Both Washington airports 
require big capital spending on 
improvements which the Ad- 
ministration has been nn will- 
ing to make for several years. 
Analysts said yesterday that a 
new owner, whether private or 
public, would have to inject as 
much as $500 million into the 
airports almost immediately. 

Mr Redwood said his group 
would consider imposing in- 
creased landing fees and insti- 
tuting other measures such as 
selling shares of the corpora- 
tion which would own the two 
airports to make them more 
profitable. 

But political opposition to 
private ownership remains 

S g, largely because of the 
s that public service 
operations should remain in 
government hands. 

Mr Holton said that he, for 
example, would be willing to 
bay foe airports himself for 
perhaps $300 million if the 
Government would allow him 
to nse and develop foe land 
around them. He talked about 
building condominiums along 
the Potomac River 


Executive Editor Kenneth Fleet 


OFT ruling tilts the 
Distillers scales 


The Office of Fair Trading’s de- 
cision not to recommend referral of 
the second Guinness bid for Distillers 
to the Monopolies and Mergers 
Commission, duly announced yes- 
terday, is undoubtedly correct. Not- 
withstanding Argyll’s instantly 
revised terms. Guinness is now 
firmly in the driving seat- Its offer is 
don a par with Argyll's revised terms 
as a result of a further weakening in 
the Argyll share price; it has the 
option of raising its own bid; 
Guinness's offer is agreed by the 
Distillers’s board — a factor of some 
importance to shareholders, both 
private and institutional; Guinness- 
Distillers as a group has more 
powerful logic, and more appeal; 

In the eyes of some observers the 
OFTs decision raises issues about 
competition policy. AJex Fletchdr, 
who was a junkpr minister at the 
Deaprtment of Trade and is now a 
consultant to James Gulliver, has put 
down a question to the minister, Paul 
Channon, for a written anser on 
Tuesday. Labour spokesmen may 
also take up the issue. Meanwhile the 
focus now moves to the other major 
takeover tussle where the OFT also 
has an important say . 

.United Biscuits has done quite 
respectably to win nearly 7 per cent 
acceptances by the first closing date 
in its £2.5 billion bid for Imperial 
Rival bidder Hanson Trust scooped 
12 per cent by its first dosing date. 


but it had the dual advantages of 
OFT clearance and a dosing date 
beyond the 42nd day. which gives 
shareholders who have accepted the 
chance to withdraw. 

United Biscuits now controls 
nearly 22 per cent of Imps, just a 
whisker in front of Hanson's 21 per 
cent. The delay in obtaining clear- 
ance has certainly not helped UB win 
early round acceptances, although it 
is very encouraged by some good 
institutional support in the 7 percent 

The OFTs advice finally went to 
the Department of Trade yesterday, 
the same day that clearance was given 
to Guinness to proceed with its bid 
for Distillers, even though UB’s bid 
predates that of Guinness. The OFT 
may have been waiting to see the 
reaction. 

There seems little doubt that the 
OFT has given UB the green light 
following the sale by Imperial of 
Golden Wonder. Confirmation of the 
clearance will remove the last hurdle 
in the bid drama, leaving sharehold- 
ers to choose between the rival bids. 
Some institutions have apparently 
been reluctant to meet UB to hear its 
case, before OFT clearance. UB 
clearly has plenty of work left to do as 
it enters the home straits. 

Hanson’s second closing date falls 
on Monday and a further extension 
looks certain. A final end to the bid 
battle looks in sight around mid- 
April. 


Deep division at the Bank 


In sticking rigidly to increasingly 
outmoded rules, the Bank of England 
is missing the chance of enabling 
financial conglomerates to emerge in 
the City which can rival the best that 
New York has to offer. Some of the 
Bank’s recent decisions are not only 
unhelpful they are inconsistent with 
its stated wish to see several big, UK 
owned players in the reshaped securi- 
ties market 

A look at the year end results of 
Exco International the money bro- 
ker, confirms that the blocking of its 
merger with Morgan Grenfell was a 
great oportunity missed. Driven 
mainly by its international money 
broking business, Exco turned in 
post-tax profits of £36.2 million, up 
46 per cent on the previous year’s 
restated result of £24.8 million. 
Earnings per share rose 40 per cent to 
I5.5p., and the dividend, also up 40 
per cent is well covered at 4.2p. Exco 
is still sitting on its £370 million cash 
pile, but despite the impression in 
many quarters that the company is 
lacking direction, there can be little 
doubt about its ability to make 
profits. 

The logic of a merger with Morgan 
Grenfell was unquestionable, flawed, 
in the political perception, only by 
the golden exits provided for 
Morgan's internal shareholders. It 
would have created an investment 
bouse larger than anything in New 
York, with world-class financial mus- 
cle, and solved Morgan's balance 
sheet problems at a stroke. At the 


moment there seems little likelihood 
that the banking community will 
agree to drop the O'Brien provisions 
which are preventing the deal going 
through. But that is not necessarily 
the end of the story: a satisfactory 
outcome is still possible. 

There is a deep division of opinion 
in the upper reaches of the Bank over 
whether a bolder line should have 
been taken in getting^ rid of the 
O'Brien provisions. 

Certainly .the recent bland state- 
ments from Morgan Grenfell about 
its future plans suggest that it has not 
completely given up hope that at 
some point perhaps later this year, 
the Bank of England's stance may 
change. A renewal of merger talks 
with Exco might then bear more fruit 

Exco also harbours such hopes but 
takes a realistic view. Earlier this 
week the Governor, Robin Leigh- 
Pemberton, made a speech reiterating 
the Bank’s position on the O’Brien 
provisions. Exco is also in no mood 
to wait It is still aiming to spend its 
cash pile on financial service compa- 
nies involved in fund management 
and corporate finance. It would have 
been convenient to get it all in one 
package, as ii would have with 
Morgan Grenfell, but Exco is willing 
to pick off more specialised compa- 
nies if necessary. It is also looking 
hard at the US fund management 
market in which it has already had 
some experience with the Californian 
subsidiary of Gartmore which it sold 
last year. 



Our fund 
management 

plus the best 
of the rest. 

The newly formed Oppenheimcr Unit Trust 
Portfolio Management Service will appeal to those 
investors with £10,000 or more who seek capital 
appreciation from a portfolio of unit trusts invested 
around the world. The advantages of this service for 
professional advisers include:- 

ACTll'E AND fNVOLVED MANAGEMENT by 
the .team which in 1985 produced u excellent overall 
performance" -including the No.l Unit Trust. 

M.4RKET INTELLIGENCE : it’s our business to 
know our competitors and we will use this knowledge 
to select funds from over 120 other groups to make 
up at least half of the portfolio. 

BETTER PROTECTION IN BEAR MARKETS 
w ith the ability to go totally into cash - currently not 
possible with a unit trust. 

ONE PQf.VT OF CONTACT providing simplified 
administration and regular valuations. 

To find out how the Oppenheimer Unit Trust 
Portfolio Management Service can benefit 
you and your clients call Graham Hunter) 
on 01-236 2558/2559/2550. Or write to 
him at 66 Cannon Street, London EC4. 

OppnibriBMr 

A U£M8ER COMPANY OF THE MERCANTILE HOUSE GROUP. INTERNATIONAL FINANCIAL SERVICES 





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FINANCE AND INDUSTRY 


THE TIMES SATTfRDAY MARCH 22 1986 


•*/**•*'«.*..# St 


STOCK EXCHANGE PRICES 


I 


From your portfolio card check your 
eight share price movements. Add them 
up to give you your overall total Check 
this against the daily dividend figure 
published on this page. If it matches you 
have won outright or a sham of the total 
daBy prize money stated. IF you are a. 
winner follow the claim procedure on the 
bock of your card. You must always have 
yonr card available when claiming. 



ELECTRICALS 


Timsall Telecom 




I *. . 



41 42 

10 

2* 37 

569 *19 SMQM 

5S7 -12 

421 

74 07 

796 S03 Un*n 

793 -5 


67 TO3 

56V 36V Woe* ftrOS 

ES6V 



320 220 rnnnm 

320 •♦» 


20 2M 



KUI 


EZO 


3H 

153 

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3M 

♦6 

116 

30 190 

825 

471 

BM» 

625 

•23 

210 

20 170 

61 

36 

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46 

+2 

1.1 

24 2&A 

IS 

573 

M 

256 

w 4- • 

UOWBPQWI* 

Brown iMMhaw) 

125 

480 

♦7 

45 

46 

200 

17 151 
40176 

169 

119 


177 

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7.0 

44 140 

560 

40S 

SdnrttHj^i 

560 

• 45 

143 

20 111 

.90 

225 

Own (Mannawj 

480 

• -10 

107 

20 19* 

8Z9 

417 

DMn*. (j A) 

825 

•5 

168 

20 240 

665 

770 

OOMW3 

900 

+33 

22Sn 

3* 119 

305 

159 

Qroanal WMsy 

284 

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7-9U 

1 30 146 

35* 

146 

Qiaane Kn 

226 

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70 

30160 

32S 

225 

GrWmoas 

311 

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103 

30 11* 

473 

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59 

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473 

87 

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61 1!0 
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179 

2BS 

124 

120 

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285 

+1 

46 

68 

6.0 

3* 11* 
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96 

57 

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96 


23 

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M9 

179 

Monano 

249 


9.1 

17 130 

336 

106 

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233 

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232 

126 

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232 

+5 

1000 

1 40 150 

40-. 

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£36V 

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41.1 

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410 

258 

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410 

45 

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315 

184 

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313 

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316 

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315 

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251 

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503 

270 

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503 

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120 

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265 

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1 1 . I'.lt'.IT 


Weekly Dividend 


npinpinna 


BRITISH FUNDS 


Five Yean) 


IKS .. 
100V .. 

*'«•*% 
100': .. 
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83 *'a 

ID? 3 * 

97 

101 

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90'. +V 

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1041. . . 

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393 273 
260 160 
133 78 

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128 100 
145 104 
85'/ 8V 
136 78 
263 224 
169 131 
168 T1Z 
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154 116 
124 62 

227 136 
298 ITS 
168 SS 
486 316 
101 'i SI 

ID 630 
410 278 
121 64 

225 141 
62 53 

182 125 
314 94 

328 162 

112 56 


AKZO N/VBWW 
AMOSOVS 
Amanbem 
Alwnar Chemical 
BTP 

Bayer DM50 
Etajdan 
Won Owns 
Br Bonzol 

gSP W 

Coawe Bros 
DO -A 1 

Cory P Wragfl 
Cratfa 
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Hckson 
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225 

120 

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120 

57 

150 

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240 

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210 

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207 

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50 

100 

43 

23 

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43 

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60 

110 


DRAPERY AND STORES 


104') *4'. 

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113% 44. 


33 34354 
3.0 32 154 

31 14 344 

1.4 24 414 
134 24 303 

64 14 234 

32 24 314 

31 74 64 

12.1 34 124 

7.7 33 330 
67 44 124 


UNDATED 
44>i 381. Consols 
40V 33'.Wnr Ln 67% 

50'. 41 Con* 3'/V 
3y. Trees 3% 

23S 23VCqnsOT2'.-N 
28*. 23's Thus 2v% 

INDEX-LINKED 
1 1 8'. 1 0S') Trass A. 2% 1968 
IK'. 91 Tiaaa H. 2% 1990 
1141.108 Tiaw «. n. 1996 
103*1 OS'. Tram H2'A 2001 
1B3v 93V Trees UV* 2003 
10P* 98'. Tisw K. 3% 2006 
103V EVTlw 2009 

108’* » TrewSJ'/tEOII 
91V W- Trees JUV* 2013 
99". 87V Tra«S 177% 2D1B 
96V 66 V TVeoe K0'* 3E0 


118’. +IV 
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112 .*«. 
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37 4 -IV 
89 V 4 -IV 
95 V ♦tv 
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9 cp. *r. 

80V •+1V 



BANKS DISCOUNT HP 


613 
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72 32 

73 27 
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264 1047 


345 

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ELECTRICALS 


537 175 ABEMCI 310 *2 

438 63 Amend 426 a-6 

Z» 2 Aonool ComnaMfS 94 -3 

S3 28 Allan BO 

303 t§§ Mama Con 283 *3 

60 25 AUTO Roan 53 +3 

200 138 Aim See; 168 f3 

345 IBS BICC 310 -5 

185 43 B6H UK .. 

4*4 job e-an. . 474 


7.1 14 274 

24a 54 124 
24 15 1*7 
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114 <i as 108 

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124 2D 27.8 


11 4 37 231 
18 04323 
11 22 74 

24 04 157 

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15.1 44 140 
24 24 7.1 
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44 * 



FINANCE AND LAND 


334 210 
183 128 
510 200 
168 70 

36': 17 V 
243 159 
38 10 

26 16V 

253 120 
193 91 
190 114 
47 27 

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233 «-2 104 44 334 

164 .. 81 33 32.1 

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FOODS 



HOTELS AND CATERERS 


» M MM 418 a .. 110 

1 Kaaaady Brookes 258 -4 2.1 

I IMtrofca 367 47 181 

» Lon Par). Homs 475 .. 144 

’ MOM Chartoaa 96V 20 

’ Pm* 01 w Homs 104 *6 2.1 

IV CUane mm 78V 22b 

> Saw* HoWS -A* 405 *2 34 

I Sate 61 e+1 17 

I Trwamsse Forte 303 0-6 . 74 


INDUSTRIALS 

A-D 


791 

116 

257 

162 

128 

93 

326 

216 


71 

22* 

148 

280 

136 

150 

K> 

403 

86 

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406 

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346 

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278 

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580 

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200 

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423 


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550 

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121 73 Hay INomun) UK 

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131 55 Haswr 131 

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OVERSEAS TRADERS 


INSURANCE 



PAPER.PWI'fnNG, ADVERTS 


LEISURE 


PROPERTY 


♦17 260 

+w mo 


43 26 7*0 
34 29 347 


-V 87.0 917. 

.. 4SJD 5® 


*25 lOO -14 .. 
-- 230 44 .. 

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357 33364 
214 44489 

07 32 710 

11* “7.1 81 


MOTORS AND AIRCRAFT 


7.1 44 122 

7.1 54-44 

24 17 17* 
2-1 n 04 244 
IS -4A1U 


SHOES AND LEATHER 


» 35 5! 281*6 

*Z& ^5? Qarry B oom 208 *2 131 64 60 

■«'* j Hadam -SuB- • -33 - 3.ia B* 74 

■». w- a 5 !" WSSL *“ ” 72 «-«w 

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ms <* *■ Ream - to*. *4- 82 68 6* 

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2S6.M3 SV*.- 258 *8 .84 20914 


TEXTILES 


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NEWSPAPERS AND 
PUBLISHERS 


AawyrBcok 
gm mwipaoM 

ssr* 

CMnaNHto 

Bmp A - 
MayneaPbOUHna 
HOTaCowmes- - 

ga as 

**•»» traamawnrt 
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.-10 12 . 
+1 57 

+» £* 
229 


TOBACCOS 


21 SS -« 157 SV 8» 

SJiJH- SgSSL -30. •** 17.1 50 12.7 

Zn.-Ttr .IK -3 U U M 


• Br'eSaMorai 0 ForttoOM dMdend rn'mim 































































































THE TIMES SATURDAY MARCH 22 1986 


FINANCE AND INDUSTRY 


23 


WALL STREET 


FOREIGN EXCHANGES 


COMMODITIES 


| New Yoft (AP-DJ) _ a 
gwerfnl blue-chip rally 
gWftl the^xuader martet to 
“Sber levels on Thursday as 
tpeOow JnKSTDdostralaTer- 
aoe achieved its first dose 
shore the UWleveL 
t The industrial - average 
hjr. J&29 points to- 
W04J4, surpassing the preri- 
fns record of 1,792.74 which 
inis set hd Friday. The index 
held double-digit gains' 


. throughout most of the session 
- and peaked with - a 24-pomt 
gain in the final ^mnunes of 
trading. 

The" Mae dip, indicator, 
which first ventured above 
1,800 on Tuesday, dosed 
. above 1,700 for the first time 
lost three weeks ago 
yesterday. . 

The index tbea underwent* 
period of consolidation 


Mar Mar 


STERLING SPOT AND FOflWARO RATES 


DOLLAR SPOT RATES 


52* 50* 

38% 38K 
82% 53* 

W* Wa 


45% 43* 
80% 59* 


Baa 



LONDON METAL EXCHANGE 
EXCHANGE UdOMeWOrtCM 

OfflcH Turnover figures 
Price to E per metric tom# 
iEl«4a SINer to pence per troy ounce 
171071.4 Rudolf Wolf ft eo.ljtf. report 
575^75-0 COPPER HNSH GRADE 

1 800-78.8 CMli 9820-9825 

Three monttis. 10010-1003.5 

1B94-08.8 vsi 10200 

’”2 Tone SMaflar 

STANDARD CATHODES 

Cash 962-985 

3-0/ Three Months 1002-1005 


MEAT AND LIVESTOCK 
COMMISSION 
Avenge fetatoefc price* el 
regreMmtahve mart*** oe 
March 20 

Gft Cattle. 97.73p per kg tw 

^Shaep 23256(5 per Hflasl i 


VOl - 
Trow 

Nd 

itfe 

TW 

Cash 

— Suspended 

Three Months 


Tone 



qw (+13.01) 

G&Pns, 7S36pperkg>w 
(-3^4) 

England end Wales: 
Cattle nos. up 5.3%. we. 
«ce.9fl22p(-0.1ir 
s»ep nos. up 8.6 %. ave. 
price. 233.6201+1355) 


COFFEE 


March — 

342S20 


In line* 

Clearing BapAs 11% 
Finance House 13 
OMcount Itafeet Umw% 
Overnight hme 13 low u% 

Meek Seed: «%/» 


2mntS 11 s * 

Smntn iO*» 


2mnm 11 'w 
3nmth 10% 


MoaBmdc Bb (Dtscoant 
1 ninth 1 1 %ri 1 " *» 2 rarah IV b-iWb 
3mntb ICFxt-lOK Sindh t0%-10 
Tata# Hto {Hsco**it %} 

Imnth 12 2mrtti 11®* 

3 crash 11 6«dh 10% 

Merfaenkf*) 

Overnight open 11% cfes# 17 
1 wen 12%-12 Bmnth 10'»w-10 ,, a 
1 mnth 11%-IIX 9nvrth KPw-IO’iff 
Smnth ii*«*-ii% 12 mth 10%-10% 

Cota Autartty Depoata (%i 
2 days ITS 7dirys 11% 

Imrah 11% 3mmh 11% 

flmnth 10% 12 mth 10% 

Locm Authorthr Bond s (%) 

1 ranth 12 *-12% 2 mth 12X-1 2% 

3 moth \T\+\Z>* Smnth 12 ,, a-12"w 
9mrtai 11 Vll % 12 mth 11»i*-11Sf* 

Tiff rthfl Ole P ) 

I ninth 11»M-11"(63(mtft 11X-1TX 
6mrah 10 *w10 7 m 12 mth 10%-TOH 
DetaCOeflU 

1 mnth 7-40-735 3mrih 75072S 
Smnth 7.30-7.25 12 mth 755-750 


7 days 4«*«a-4'*ii 
Smnth 4%-4% 
French Franc 
7 day* 10*4% 
Strata) 11%-11H 
Sarin Franc 
7 days 11-10% 
Smith 
Yen 

7 days 8*4 
3 mm 5%4% 


GottS3S05055l50 


7%4% 

he-T** 

7K-7W 

54 

4%-4% 
4%-4% 
9*4* 
11V11 
10% -10% 
2 %- 1 % 
4%-4% 
44% 

6-5 

8%-CY 

5X-5% 


LEAD 
Cash 


Vo) 

Tone 

ZMC STANDARD 

Cash 

Three Months — 

“ I &== 


251-252 
25954605 
4400 


no nos. Up ZQ %.««■ 
pnee. 7528p<-3.09) 

Scottanct: 

Came nos down ii.i *.ave. 

ESyKSSS«».« 

once. 230 B5p(+l0.45) 

Pig nos. down 189 %- ave. 
pnee, 7956p(+097) 


LOTOON MEAT FUTURES 
EXCHANGE 
BaeCOoouKt 
p.perk8o 

Month Open Oo» 
Apnl 196-5 1985 

May 1605 192.0 

June 1935 1S25 

jSy 1905 Ittfl 

Aug «* ^2 

Sept 1855 1805 

VtotO 

L0M3ON 

POTATO FUTURES 
E per tonne 

jr* °s £9 °®5 

L&y 11550 11590 

Not B15-0 B13-0 

Feb 885-0 8805 

April «W>vJ^ 

EttFFEX 

GJLLMgMFutimnLid 
report MO per index point 
fr et ^tit indai 


The prices and onlt trust 
quotations on this 
page refer to 
Thursday’s trading. 





LONDON GRAM FUTURES 
£ per tome 

Wheat Bariey 
Month Case Close 
March 11570 114 15 

May 11795 11690 

July 11905 

Sept 9965 9850 

Nov 102.60 101.40 

Jan 10650 104.70 

Volume: 

Wheat 

Barley m 

LONDON MEAT FUTURES 
EXCHANGE 

Month ‘ Open Close 
Apm 1025 102.7 

May unq'ied unq ted 

June 102.8 1029 

July 1035 101.0 

Aug 101.5 1015 

Sept 107 1 106.8 

Oct 108.7 1089 

Nov 110.3 1105 

Jan 101.7 1023 

Feb 1015 1015 

Vot : 47 


High/Low Oo s* 
Apr 86 BOELO4O5-0 B07X 

jJ*88 735.07355 7385 

OCT 86 8425 

Jan 87 8555-8555 8599 

Apr 87 9355 

jtaB7 8105 

0087 MOO 

Jan 88 8955 


Spot7465 
Vot. 40 lots 


TANKER REPORT 
Htah/Low aosn 
Mar 86 9195-9009 9355 

Apr BS 83554205 B35.0 

May 86 BOa 08005 8175 

Jim 86 867 5 

Sep 38 885.0475 5 985.0 

Dec 86 9805 

vot 38 lots 
Open interest 61 

Spot martat co mm enta r y 
Tanker ndeac 
9485 up 269 
Dry cargo Index: 

74&5 down 15 


INVESTMENT TRUSTS 


Fixed Rate Starting Export Finance 
Scheme IV Average re fe r en c e rare lor 
'■merest period February 5 1968 to 
March 4 1966 hdume: 12954 per 


LONDON FINANCIAL FUTURES 


Hkr/SidCan 

HdsoSMJn 


three Motah Storing - Open 

Jim 86 ; — ; M54 

Sep 86 1__ 90.60 

Dec 88 90-85 

Mar 87 ; 9091 

Previous day's total opan Marest 10981 
Three Moon Emedmar 

Jun68 9275 

Sep 96 ; 92.70 

Dec 86 , 9259 

Mar«7__ ^ — 9242 

USTteaatayDond 

Jun86 ; 96-12 

££=— =• V 


Long Qlt 

Marl6 

Jor 06 

Sap 66 „ 
Dec 88 ; — - 
FT-SE100 
Mar US — 
Jun86-- — 


Hgh Lew Cfeee 

9013 8088 86-97 

9060 9045 9047 

90.85 9089 9073 

9091 9052 9055 

E r“S!“"iEr 

9273 9259 9273 

9261 8259 9251 

9253 9242 8243 

Pievtom dWitM open In 
9931 964% 96-24 

9643 

101-05 100-43 100-45 

Pievtoia dafa MM ogertM 

125-14 123-19 123-27. 

12548 12441 12446 

125-12 . 125-12 124-06 

Previous day's lofel Open hi 
16955 16750 16055 

171.75 16850 17170 




FINANCIAL TRUSTS 


AfcroyO 4 Smnhori GS5 .. 2&0 3616* 

. Awancjn Liprau £«*- -*» 

Argvte 51 e . 1 A 27 273 

Bouswad 25 -1 . . • .. 675 

Bntvwe Anew 156 *2 60 SB 17.7 

Drw» UM . E17>. .. au U ISA 

DO A £17-1 .. 893 40 124 

£*«*« 156 +3 5.4 35 33 7 

Fnp Trust « m-2 tO 4.1 136 

E»co 2Z2 *S> 20177 

Eieorttoi 85 -2 30 15 15 1 

FiBmhnqtcn 650 93 14 302 

Frost Go 65 .. 57 67 118 

Goode <0 6 Ml 88 *.. 25 28 24.6 

riennrwn Adm £1*>, .. 25.70 17 215 

ICH 195 +2 129 66 60 

UAJ 41D H 229 56 108 

USQ M 8-10 214 25 255 

M4na n i4 v House 322 4-2 IBS 59 68 

Pecrftc mv Ts BS'j 05 08 612 

Do Marrams 25 

Sown Browns 166 *1 23 4 7 229 


THE TIMES INFORMATION SERVICE 


m CMar Cmg YU 


Bid Offer CMg YU 


Bd Offer Cnng 


au Otter cmg YU 


Tiro SUefc^ctenge London BB2P 2fT » 















Banana tec (4) 
Oe Aocm M 
Incomff FiaUCT 
Oa Accnro 
ted kw CD • 
Do Aonan Si 
Samar, me (S 
-Do Aeoxn 0) 
CSRMDUAMM 

CS Japan Fund 


2113 2222 . +48 385 
3326 3493 +48 S85 

-949 10&0 ..487 

1712 1603 .. 427 

117.7 T229» ... 1J4 

155l7 1622# .. T84, 

£1025 1084 .. 27S 

naw 1185 .. 275 

Lonoon WC1V 6PY 

-872 722 .. 030 


eiuaiwmiweow 
I0gwl6». Wamotey. H» ONB 

Granffl 27*8 2967 +J.4 2JB 

mcooie , 321 2 -.3424 +M 409 

Fir EM 1542 -154.1 -4.1 063 

tarn Amwfcan 1»4 WL3 -1 A 073 


M a'm sHiN . 

m-ezijpii.. 

Capua® - - Ml 3825 .. fjl 

SB Sw: _ JS 

North American (3) .2622 2B3A ... L* 
01-6228314 

Off mm 1068 1121 +1210.74 

dDlTIIALBOAItbOFRNAIICEdF . 

01-588 1815 

tmrFWU . 3W1| « -,15 

MM *396 .. 1074 

Dapoik 100.0 ■ ■ 12iM 

CHARntaamCUL BweSTHENTFUND 
77. London vm. London ECW 1DB 
01-568 1815 

35188 e .: 584 


CBn woa ti 

Enorgy |TC« 

Eiaoeaan Growth 
Eaanipt Vic Bnd 
Dora K9 
Expkxaton 
Fmancsa S*ca 
Ge « n tec . 
M4P Ranan Urea 
Kryi YteW Und 
ROM um* . .. 
Wvw tmara Trt* 
vn e aanai 
Jman OrowtO 
Japan SmaarCOs 
MaatortiaM 
Naw Tecnmiogy 
SE AnaXJrow* 
Scotan 
Srasnimi 
Scocya fcB 

Srote Co's Inc 
5p«aa Steeuon* 

UK Eqiwy 
US Growm 
Unwvnai »on* 


5 08 534a 
44 4 4 7 4# 
917 MO 
748 788# 
588 B17 
386 412 
9913 B&5 
539 586a 
1786 1886 
166 4 1773 
948 100.5a 
B*M BOB 
1064 mi* 
676 722 
999 1058 
26.7 H2 
921 «8« 
Bl8 97 4 
1208 1263 
1582 1691 
1567 1675# 
713 762 
147.4 157 6 
925 983 
1813 1933 
718 767# 
795 85.1 


*03 153 
-03 4 17 
HU □» 
. . 563 
265 
-05 100 
•05 216 
•OBI 091 
•18 486 
•14 4 47 
40 6 63S 
♦05 250 
+02 359 
•OS .. 
-13 .. 
-01 223 
-13 

*05 206 
*03 228 
*05 4 14 
*10 381 
+02 131 
*12 472 
.. 2«J 
+16 209 
-12 164 
♦02 167 


Bid Offer Cmg 


Um inc 2852 3035 *0.1 1 74 

OoAxuii 3501 3725 *01 174 

Seeded Open me 602 64 1# *05 156 

Oo Aaun 653 7D2# *06 156 

•Mn no* 451 460 *02 228 

Do Aocun 458 490 *02 226 

TARGET TltUST MANAOen 
t^uhduh. Ganhouaa Hd. Afteexay Buc*» 

Aanr Eagla 748 788 -13 044 

Ausrsttm tiS 201 -03 0 10 

Comnxxxtir 718 775 -01 227 

Enemy 324 347 *dt 156 


19a WaR.Gaarga SL amgow C3 SPA 
W 1-332 3132 

BBBDGM Bfft Via 3832 4027 . . 

DO MOW. 3H8 4113 

tectarn OA Inc 372 398 

Do Accun 38,1 *05 

SmAot CD* Ac 388 412 

Do Accun 39-1 416 


Pstwn End. Dortana. Sumy 
am 685(156 ' 

FP Edity DW. • 2022 8M.B 

Oo tom 3339 35*4 

FP fa4 d W «U. 1157 1222 

Da Acam rann 1371 

hManfenpan. iBD 175.1 
Do Acorn . - 1828-1108 


PuBtc Tnnno. Ktegamy. WC2 
01-4054300 

Capaal' 3453 3520c 

Gnxa Inc - ■ .141.7 1428 

NfTA' . .2038 2TL2# 


QTUNTHANAGaS 
86i FkxrB. Dayoname 
01-283 ^75 DWtegtJT 


Lend»eC2M4YJ 

9431 


UK Gop Fnd lie 962 1K.1* *M 

Do MOO). 1401 1489a *09 220 

Mm Fund 802 859# +11 

(tension Eaaepl ISA 

kmnaPPiti 1435 1539# *1.0 180 

tsTSS* 1 «.| -05 1.40 

Tat# 8 Gm»A 668 70S ■ ■ J® 

Japan & Gffnata 1748 1M1 -05 0 2D 

Far EM A Set 758— 803 -85 180 

European Fund 2205 2359# 4*6 070 

CwnSny *”<1 ’ 6M »• «« 

MMm^FMMMBNjMgta . 

9 Kf um Aw. LflMtoO EC3A 88 k 

M&^DMfe0OMa5766imftl«S 

S0O6 

Anancan Teel 603 966 *1? £49 

Atmtaan That 195 20.7 -01 041 

Brutal Tit ACDan 562 602 -KU 232 

m : baa 493 328 toa oa 

CoreoKdn- Share . 57.0 607 . . 129 

E«P» Trust- 468- 498# -tfl.l 057 
farsKORK TW 433. SI 7 *09 518 

Far Caatwn That 1B28 100 1 *07 0.11 

M'HNl ROU 255 276 . 950 

GB-trasr : 271 +05-83 


9CHH0DER UWT TRUST 
EnBt prM ho um. PORsmoan 
0705 BS7733 

Anmrc a n Inc 123.4 131 9 

DdAcom 1 250 13*5 

tanteiK 614 ao# 

Do Accum 65 a 707# 

Eucvaan Inc 995 1068 

Do Accwn 1024 1035 

Gil A Rod me 56.0 590# 
DoAccum M4 879# 

Goto Ftmd Inc 32B 350 
Oo Acoun 3*2 365 

mama 1M2 1795 

DO Accun. 3695 39* 9 

Mtecau 1002 1071 

Da Accwn 1381 1477 

jap Sm» Co-9 Ac 1OS0 1153 

Snqapara I Matey 395 426 
doAcom *07 *35 

S i tal i CO* me 122.1 1305 

Do Atoan 127 * i362 

Sparta Sa me iQSi 1102 

Do Accum 1068 1143 

Tokyo Fund me 1615 172.7c 

Do Accum 1633 174 6c 

US Smaaw Co'S Ac 54.7 5S5 
UK Equ(y Inc 1035 1108 

DO Accun 1SS.1 169 0 

Racovary 7444 7961# 

SpacuU Ewn 1100 1185# 

P e n man * 5 Cntrky 5332 5702# 

9COm9< EQUITABLE 

28. SI Andraao 50. Ecmrowrai 

031-556 9101 

me income Unas 1*6.1 155 * 

Do 4 mo 2153 2290 

SCOTTISH LIFE M V E6T H B H S 
19. Si Andrew* So. Ednourgn 
031 225 2211 

UK Lousy 101 B 19*5 

Amencan 1458 1551 

Paaac • 13*8 1*43 

Ewopean 1991 2130 

SCOTTISH MUTUAL mveSTUEKT 
MAMAQER5 

109. vmcam Sl amgOw-02 shm 
041-2*0 6100 


-20 153 
-32 153 
-01 106 
-02 186 
+02 1 13 
+02 1 13 

+0.7 915 
+18 915 
-02 414 
-01 4.14 
.. 475 
.. 475 
.. 07* 
.. 0 7* 

-70 0 IP 
-06 1.6* 
-04 184 
*01 151 
+01 151 
+10 126 
+1 1 126 
-a* oa 
-oe oa 
-09 02* 
+11 282 
+10 282 
.. 251 
+01 167 
-263 3.45 


Amar Eagla 748 708 -13 044 

Ausrstem tiS 201 -03 0 10 

Comrnoooy 718 775 -01 227 

Energy 324 347 +4H 158 

Cowry 1258 1352 +28 Z70 

European Spec 3na B8B 932 -08 02B 

Exm meome 109+ ii7B# +14 607 

Fnancta 2565 2748# *65 1B3 

Oil incarw 108.1 1135# +3.4 767 

GOM mcorna 572 610 -12 28* 

Do Accun 10*1 m2 -2.1 284 

income 003 864# *2.0 4 46 

Jaoerr 750 010 -05 0» 

Maav B Smgapara 17, i iS2 -01153 

Paaac m 788 B22 +0i Ooo 

Do Renoeai 9*3 1O1 0 +02 008 

Prat Slum FO 17i 184 *02 064 

Uk Capoai 69 8 73 7# +10 100 

Soacui Sna 016 87 0# -03 093 

Tecmougv *53 M3 -02 o 10 

World mcood 51 4 55 1# -07 606 

Wonttwids Caooal 1373 1*72 +04 171 

Emv E» 131 76 1 012 .. 190 

Do Accun Ot 1428 1524 . . 180 


31 UWT TRUST MANAGERS 
2. S^Mar^Axa. umuon EC3A BBP 

Sntatet Co s 092 738 -15 010 



TOUCHE REM1AMT 
merman Housa. 2. i 
3AT 

01-3*0 1250 
emenean Gwai 
Ganar# Grown 
Oatta Tsai 
meome Grown 
tncoma uonmry 
jsMti Grown 
a*«« Grown 
pn aaer Ct» 

Sputa Opps 


Puna Dota. London EG4V 


376 400# *03 0.78 
533 574 *0.4 3J» 

§ 4 433 ..010 

9 63B +09 5*0 

465 488# *03 781 
313 334 +02 010 

§ 2 *32 -OS 132 
3 631 *03 2 90 

638 67.7# +04 250 


TRANSATLANTIC • OENEML 
SECURITIES 

91 99. New London Ra. CneVnstard 
02*5 51651 


Cotemco me [51 4*00 4580# .. 3B4 

Do Accun pi 7263 7580 . . 334 

FMHomg Fuw |*l 2*0 8 257 0 +54 289 

Do Accum |*| 2635 281 3 +58 288 

Flong Am A Ge" (•] 237 a 2*95# *83 a.74 
Do Accun |«| 289 4 2838# +04 074 

FtataQ »C Fimd (4) 17* 8 IB* 1 +48*49 

SAW Amer 131 1562 16* 4 . . 104 

S 8 W Snvr Secs 1261 1328 .. 031 


SAW Snvr Secs 


1562 164 4 
1261 1328 


UK Equtv 
Get A Food 


1700 1000 
1180 128* 


IK Sn#r COS EO 1434 1S6 


Euopeen 

N AlTHTCM 
Paane 


1703 1812 
108* 1132 
1290 1381 


St Sweats Lana, undan EC4 F *du 

01-280 5*66 


Grown Uteri 7*9 779 

EM 1 R**a W 1093 liam 
Hta> Inecma Urn# 106J 113*# 
hSt yuu on un as ss*# 
w Growth une H37 1208 
N Anancan Una ®* 738 
Far East Unfe 7*1 2* 
Saw Cm Find 86.1 702 


NC Amerea me 
Do Accun 
NC Energy Rea 
NC meome 
NC Japan 
NC Smafer CDS 


2789 29*5 
2970 3108 
1302 1400 
87 5 93 0 
1504 1599 
12S.6 138.lt 


Anancan Tncl 903 968 
A ia tra tan Rust 195 20.7 

•&£•** SI SI 

Si SI# 

E)«K mepnw Troat *L3 51.7 
Far Eaatem Thwt 1B2D 109 1 
Rvad mutM Rnd 259 276 
GB-trasr : 271 

Glob# M Meua 105 l«3 
Ds DM mM 1866 

GoB Sh w That «« 

Hagqgd Aeenoan 290 3'-7 
HSTtame Trust 1335 Mil 
3ng Kdng Tnta . 324 2S0# 

BiBtrrm find 713 763# 

tautace AgrniMs 9*880 4848 
JNtaTTrt ta . W3 1«| 
Marewd feamoi 2B73 uLS 
0* 4 aaroy Tnta 324 3*5 


i«CAPURmRurr _ _ 
UraCten Hta. 252. Bcmtora Hi E7 
01-234 SSU 

Mtnctp W73 1*60 

NBKUHY FUW MAMU08UD 
33. HUM union Bl EC*R 9AS 
01 -280 WED 


NCSm# EuopCos 1581 I860 .. C 

NC Ejwmpi Ga £1280 1310 . . I 

nc Amu Prop St 157 12.18 
NC Property 1885 1983e 

ROWAN UWT TRUST 

33 Kmg WMom SWdl London EC4R BAS 
01-838 5678 


+04 024 
+04 023 
-04 220 
-02 aio 

J 34C 
114 
340 
198 

+01 000 
+24 295 
-02 120 


g^rsSfT« 8S.S-: siis 

IDA • . ■- rS 

0+5BB66ED 

M Grown . 742 793 -02 1.74 


01 -280 WED 
AnurGnmae 
Do Moon 
AlMr tncota 
Oo accun . 
European aonfli 
Do a can 
Garni • 

DP ACCum 
0# A Feted 
DO Accum 
mcorna 
Do Aoeun 

MBHUUtN 

Do ACOaa 
Jaoan 
DoAccum 
fWOtay . 

Do Accun 
EtateitDet 

Eaenpi *oas 


Amencan W 
Sennas 0 
>«gn r«u (5t 

Me"" (3) 
Farad Maract 
Hgn imsrea 
Far Em (2) 


21*5 2185 -25 260 

669 5 0845# .. 259 

1560 lftl5 .. 557 

SE90 3870 206 

1720 1730# +70 247 
1275 1285* +251147 
1645 1600 .. 030 


95.1 1011 
98.* 1W4 
04 51.7C 
09 U0e 
113.5 1204 
1]U T240 
2*36 ZHte 
398 * 4917# 
89 4 903 
96 1 994 
77 B 820# 
058 91.De 
2054 2223 
2500 2744 
1200 1276 
1224 *306 
1864 2004 
1894 4120 
2300 2371 
3514 3827 


Naw Hta Rn. UMTOOra L69 3MS 
051-227 4422 

EOMY ma S3 1 87 1 +00 £50 

M Trust • 840 68 0# -03 103 

OA Trow 97 6 3B0 -06 605 

US Th4( 31 2 33 1 - -0 1 1 45 

Paohc Basai Ta 31-2 33.1 -01 044 

ROYAL LOKXM UWT TRUST UANAOERS 

R§Eif ^ond|n Cofc>nSnr C01 1fM 

Amencan Grown 032 884 -08 048 

Capa# Accun l»* 1973 -2J 2» 

GBtaxnw 555 585# +11 682 

1*71 tune 764 813# +13 516 

row A Growtn 87J uae# *» a «as 

Jaoan Grow* 6*4 ES5 -02 048 


HBDLAia BANK OMXIP UWT TRUST 
MANAQ2RS 

CnuwoooHaa. Star 5L tmed. Sfftatad Si 3RD 

07*2 79842 

CtoitaBe8» 794 04 8 +00 232 

^StaSST 1074 1144 +00 202 


Amencan GrowBi 032 884 -08 048 

Capra Actun 1»4 1B73 -23 206 

OB tame 555 585# +11 682 

1*71 tune 764 813# +13 516 

row A Growtn btj uae# +ts«35 

Jaoan Grow* 6*3 603 -03 040 

Soaew S4S 974 1050# +04 1.47 

SAW! A PROSPER 

ajfetw BA Rorotord RU1 3L8 
88-73 Queen Sl Eonteiran EH2 «nx 
monaord) D70M690G Or |£»n] 031-220 »S1 
Amer me S Grcwm 5B2 707 -17 750 

Capra un# 963 itEB +01 £40 


SCOTTBHUNtr TRUST 

29. Cftanotte Sq. EWKUtfl 
031-228 4372 

PsqAc *44 480 +03 02 

nano Grow m 33 fl » n . o 76 

N Amman 33.7 381 -00 032 

income Fund 440 481# +07 476 

SCOTTISH WIDOWS 

PO Bov BOL Edmeuroh EH16 58U 

031-655 6000 

Pag Eq me 233 1 2*01 *24 287 

Do Acorn 2«3 283* +2-7 207 

SSfTKCL PUM03 MANAGEMENT 

30. Oiy Hd. London EClV SAY 
01-838 6011 

Amer Tacn 8 Gan 1046 1119 -04 030 

Pacta: 1407 ISOS *80 010 

Sec Home Fnd 1718 1834 +72 4 60 

Spoon arusnen* 20*0 21B0 *50 245 

EneroySHev »< MS • 350 

Amencan Majero 702 75 1 -1 0 1 30 

Smal GO'S 37 0 395# -02 350 

jaoan Tatti 8 Gan 787 &2i -02 oio 

Iraeriabonal Income 563 602 -01 9 57 

Lranm *985 S31 3 .256 

UK General 323 340 +07 2E6 

Euro Growth 283 302 .. .. 

Ewo te eem t 293 312 

SmOKfCOATES 

1. London vraa Bugs. Lemon EC2M 5PT 

01-588 3644 EK3SV 

5pacta Stt (5) 510 M4 +00 140 

STAMMRDUFE 

3. Gnvga St Eonautyi EH2 7X2 
031 228 2552 

meuna Unas 2008 zns -2 1 2 05 

Oo Accum unts 285.7 3082 +23 £85 

STEWART. IVORY UWT TRUST 
MANAGERS ~ 

*5 Cnanone Sq. Edafeogh 
031-226 3271 

Amencan Furi 215* 229.4 -32 221 

Do Accum 2414 2578 -16 221 

Do mmaawal iS&5 I66i -£3 221 

Ausoaun FuM 116.9 tSO -06 092 

Do Accun 1102 1250 -06 04? 

Brush Fund 5580 5822# +74 815 

, Dp Accun 7403 797.7# +9.9 4.15 

Euopian Fund 25*7 2713 -1 1 087 

Do Acorn 288 1 2857 +1 1 007 

JMlin Fiml 2*7.1 2632* +0£ 028 

Do Accun 2*78 2640# +08 008 

S^PPP 15?2 1655 .. .. 

SUN ALLIANCE 

Sir ARaraa rqa. Hosam. 0uM a» 

0*03 56293 

Equty Trust «CC 3368 4219 +39 1.83 

N Am Truer ACC 55 6 541 -07 1 61 

Fat East Trust AtE 614 65.9 +00 105 

T38 UWT TRUSTS 

PC Bo> 3. Keens Hsa. Andora. Hans. 5P10 IPG 
0264 B21BB DeikBQE426« 6*32 


TYNDALL MANA0ER8 
19 Canyry Re. Bnstoi 
0272 732241 
Australmi 61 

Do ACC 63 

CapBN » 

Oo Accum 5a0. 

EtaW J2- 

Do Accum 622. 

Far Eastern 13* 

Do Aeon i*4 

Fm A Prop 5l. 

Do Accun ao. 

G*i Caen# 127 

Do *ca«n 1*3 

Gm meome no 

Do Accun 176. 


Do Accum 897 2 

mil Earrangs 1583 

DO Accun 2*31 

kni Growtn 7£i 

Oo Accun 749 

jaoan Grown Acc 834 
(Uijrai Pesouces 171 4 
Do Accum 2+43 

ry Amer Grown 120 1 

Do ACC 1343 

PrU 1133 

Do Accum 201 B 

Smtaet Cos Dw me 535 



UK PROVIDENT UT MANAGERS 
UK House. Cas» Sl Sa«Oury SP1 3SH 
CT22 XJ6342 


UK Equry 
Pa tAo Beset 
IJ Amer 


1364 13£9 +M 

1156 1225 *07 

1193 1285 -42 


VANGUARD TRUST 
65 Hcmom Vaoua GClA 2EU 
01-236 3053 


OrOMI PC 

DO Accun 
won f«a 
Soecta Sas 
Ttusne 
Do Accun 
Amer 5 Gen 


1996 201 0# +1.1 
275 0 293 5 +16 

2032 2162 +25 . 

40 1 427 +03 

1325 1*0.9# +04 

1095 7122 +1.7 

560 614 


waster FonfMP (+J £5936 6008 
Aomgdcn Rein Asa 107 B 1147 


215 * 229.4 
2414 2578 
1555 1681 
116.9 1245 
1142 1250 
5540 5822# 
7469 797.7# 
254.7 2713 

ZS0i E857 

2*7.1 2632# 
2*70 2640# 
1572 1655 


WARDLEY UWT TRUST MANAOOS 
WWdtoy House. 7. Darorehai Sq. Ltmdan ECS 
01-929 1532 

Amencan Traa 87 4 7£5 -1 0 1.70 

Far East 8 Gan 7*8 786 +20 140 

kid Grown 6*5 690 -0 4 140 

Income Trusi 77.7 836 +07 640 

Japan Growth g+0 938 *14 020 

Smqa Cflfflpsmes 1217 1309# -0)200 

Tectmaocy 3a2 36 8 -04 020 

Aimnhfl *51 *84 -05 150 

UK True 1324 1413 +07 £50 

Euopeon Growtn 47 0 509 .. 1.10 

Hong Kong 18 4 195# +03 200 


-1 0 1.70 
+20 1.40 
-04 130 
+0.7 640 
+14 020 


1217 1309# -01 200 

342 368 -03 020 

*51 484 -05 150 

1324 1413 +07 £50 

47 0 509 .. 1.10 

184 145# +03 £00 


0264 62186 DeataQE&S* 6*32 
Amencan me U32 1203 

Do Accun tiro 12S.+ 

Em meome me 106 7 113* 

Do Aocun 1247 !327i 

Gencta Un* Inc 1590 1702 

Do Accum 2803 2770 


117.8 12S.+ -10 098 

1067 1135# +11 618 
1247 1327# +13 516 
1594 1702 +1* 2G2 


G* 6 Filed Ire 
Do Accun 
tncoma 
Accum 


2803 2770 
515 537 
88.0 604 
210 7 2308 
335.6 3534 
1250 13*0 
128.1 137.4 


W4VERLEY ASSET MANAGEMMT 

13 Cnarraw So- EtWwon 

OSi 225 1551 

Auseaton Gobi 173 165# 015 

Panfc Basm Energy 117 144 -O.i oa 

Ctnanan B® Gtn 5* 0 57 7 . . 34S 

Omnw Mae Fnd SI 00.1 1043# -0.1 440 

WHfTTWfiOAtE UMTTOUST MANAGERS 
2 Homy La EC2 BET 
01-806 906676 

SM on 0*1 FUW E26 MS *04 1-3* 


WHDSOR TRUST 

Phraser house. 83. Kmgawa)i. Lonoon WC2B 
680 

01-405 8331 


Com* 6 Esvty 
, Incema 
I Growth 


460 51.1 .. 744 

*9 0 512 +1 7 5.75 

469 52.1 *14 £40 









































24 FINANCE AND INDUSTRY 





THE TIMES SATURDAY MARCH 22 1986 







yxx; 




yv; 


i£»£is 


»' v- 


STOCK MARKET REPORT 


In i 
is n 
was 
whl 
bUi 
It i 
Ha 
for 
son 
cer 


am 

« 


net 

BK 


( TEMPUS J 

Delta disappoints 
market with £ 50 m 

_ ... i_. __ fiw_ thp inland Revet 


AH eyes were on drink 
shares yesterday as the Argyll 
Group increased its otter for 


Distillers to nearly £7 a share 
following the Office of Fair 


Delta Group undershot unlikely to outperform fur- 
market estimates when it ther. The generous ^ 
produced pretax profits for cent dividend increase gives a 
1985 of £50.6 million, a rise yield of 3.8 per cent, 
of 10.7 per cent on turnover . , 

5.8 per cent lower. The shares Investment tTUStS 
eased 1 Ip to 239p. — 

Operating profits There have been suggestions 

most static and the pretax ^ Inland Revenue may 

gain came from a halving .m exclude investment trusts as 
interest payments. Theunex- securities for the 

peeled slowdown in trading J urposes 0 f personal equity 
in the second half was attnb- „i_iwpFp«y To do so would 
utable to adverse currency P lans -.u~i 


the Inland Revenue. PEPs 
give the investment _ trust 
industry an opportunity to 
compete with the unit trusts 
on more level terms and the 
Association of Investment 
Trust Companies should not 
miss this opportunity to press 
its case, and not only with the 
Inland Revenue. 


Grattan 


in the second half was anno- JJjlT^/pFpw. To do so would Mail order, or home shop- 
utable to adverse currency L m0 v e toe simplest method pingas Grattan prefers to call 
and metal pnee movements ... lhe sma j[ investor it now that most of the orders 
which reduced annual profits 1 diversify his holdings - are taken by telephone, is not 

4 XJS 5 S 

dollar and South African scheme 
rand were the main currency concerns toe tofficulty o 
factors, but. had average rath- spreading nsk. 
cr than end-year exchange vestment of :p.400 
rates been used, pretax profits toe investor has toe ° 
would have turned out £4.7 making, several ^11 mvesi- 
miUion higher. Delta is slick- ments. incurring high dralmg 
with Ind-vear rates, bui costs, or of having a singe 
aiven the extent of toe curren- holding in company to 
cydbumkm i. is hard .0 see 

W The croup's underlying this is to buy stores in 
ucrformance was encourag- investment trusts. Ely ^ irr “® 
iS cash inflow of £13 of toe fact that unit tmare 
million from trading and £20 not quoted, they are excluded 
million from disposals. No from toe Budget proposals as 
farther disposals of any size they stand But most invest- 
are expected this year, but ment trust* which have 

cash Generation is expected to shares quoted on a British 
casu generau slock exch ange. should quali- 

Gearing fell to a comfort- and to e industry as a whole 
ab>e 20 per cent from 40 per stands to gain, 
cent and should fall further In toe battle for saving, 
this vear. if there are no investment tntste have large- 
significant acquisitions. Met- !y lost out IO U " u t !^- ^ 
a! prices should show a trusts have greater freedom to 
modest increase and curren- advertise and tove done so 
cies particulariv toe rand, are with devastating effect. Unit 
«winans back ‘in Delia’s fa- trust estimates put total funds 

under management at around 
£23 billion, most of which is 
held by private individuate. 

This compares with £17 bil- 
lion for investment trusts of 
which private investors hold 
only between a quarter and a 
third 

The capital gains tax ad- 
vantages are unlikely to be of 
great importance to most 
investors since toe £6,300 
exemption will take care of 
most gains. What will be of 
significance will be the con- 
cession which will allow the 

fo'uT di'vuions of electrical nHnves.mem oHnc^e fi« -™ ™ £3KE 

asasns«sss!Mr ^ u “^ 7miuion 

The City expects profits to particularly attractive to PEP 
rise to between £56 and £60 holders, 
million this year, putting The detailed design of toe 
Della on a prospective multi- scheme will not be completed 
pie of SViullie shares have until all interested parties 


ties, paiuiuMuj vL,7 cl 
swinging back in Deltas fa- 
vour. 

Spending on plant im- 
provements will continue 
this vear at toe same £20 
million level, but toe benefits 
to be squeezed out of cost 
cutting must be coming to an 
end. , „ , 

The wav forward for Delta, 
therefore/ looks increasingly 
to be through acquisition. 
The company is prepared to 
pay up to £25 million and is 
looking particularly in toe 
United Stales. U wants busi- 
nesses lo add into its existing 
four divisions of electrical 


are laKcii uj 

a growth business. Nor is it a 
particularly glamorous seg- 
ment of toe retail market. 

Belying toe image of toe 
mail order business, 
Grattan's shares have been 
star performers since 1983. 
Five years ago new manage- 
ment was brought in with 
spectacular results. From a 
pretax loss of £1.1 million m 
1983. toe business has been 
turned round to show a profit 
of £16 million for the year to 
January, 1986. 

Of toe 21 percent increase 
in turnover since last year — 
£226 million in 1986 com- 
pared with £219 million — 
10 r /: percent was attributable 
to increased volume. This 
was achieved in relatively 
static conditions. In a market 
estimated to amount to £3 
billion, Grattan puis its share 
at around 10 per cent 

The company has been 
trving hard to diversify, but 
70 per cent of its turnover 
and more than 70 per cent of 
its profit are still based fairly 
and squarely on toe Grattan 
catalogue. 

This is the part of the 
business which has been 
made to respond to new 
technology both in 
warehousing and in eliminat- 
ing the huge amounts of 
paperwork previously associ- 
ated with instalment credit 
pians. From being toe last of 
toe big mail order house to 
computerize. Grattan claims 
to have the best systems. 

Future profits growth will 
come from gains in market 
share and diversification 


Trading’s clearance of the 
second Guinness bid, worth 
about 670p. .. . _ 

Distillers’ shares climbed 
39p to 68Qp, as Argyll feU 8p 
to 328p. after touching 320p. 
Guinness rose 12p to 31 lp as 
dealers awaited toe next 
move. 

Elsewhere in brewers, Bass 
jumped 23p to 825 p and 
Boddingtons improved by 7p 
to 125p after recent figures. 
Other shares consolidated 
their recent gains with scat- 
tered pockets of profit-taking 
causing a mixed appearance. 

After Thursday's big gains, 
toe FT 30-share index dipped 


by 2.9 points to 14122, while 
the FT-SE 


slipped 1,8 points 

to 1688.3. 

Government securities con- 
tinued to shine as sterling held 
steady above the crucial 1.50 
level against the dollar, sup- 
porting toe Chancellor’s view 
that interest rales will fall 
Fgain soon. Although below 
the best, gains stretched to half 
a point among conventional 
stocks with index-linked is- 
sues over £1 higher. 

Further evidence of falling 
inflation as measured by the 
Retail Price Index and the 
strong presence of overseas 


investors were additional en- 
couraging factors. , • 

Banks gave back 20p to25p 
of their recent advance while, 
among the merchants, 
Schraders retreated 90p to 
l,488p on further consider- 
ation of Tbureday’s results. 

Oils remained nervous as 
Opec ministers continued to 
wrangle over production cuts 
without any sign of agree- 
ment. The Prime Ministers 
warning of a possible petrol 
price war was an additional 
unsettling factor. However, 
falls rarely exceeded 8p in 
such as BP at 570p, but 
comment on Thursday’s. re- 
sults left Briton another - 12p, 

down at I76p. 

The renewed takeover ac- 
tivity m the drinks sector 
dimnhfwi . demand for other 
takeover favourites. In foods, 
Rowntrec came in for some 
strong overseas demand at 
520p, up 45p. The market 


t rvt.rw‘» » • y T. -V"- 1 ", 

rise in drinks 

'****** * V -•^^ ed32D io320|» In *** H 

asm arc sSk 


considers that the company 
‘ ly to bid is Suchard, which 
on Thursday announced a 


rights issue in Switzerland. 

Pearson 1 Group, which on 

forward by two weeks, 
prompting speculation of an 
immine nt consortium bid, 
jumped I9p to 500p. Wo 
Tinto-Zinc, another to attract 
speculative interest this week 
on talk of the Australian 
entrepreneur,- Mr Robert 


reverting an early. 15p de- 
cline. Lonrfao returned to fa- 
vour on takeover hopes, but 
closed below toe best at. 289p, 
up 4p. .... 

Buildings were, mixed, but 
plus signs were still in toe 
majority. C H Bearer gained 
15p to 633p, exerted by . a 
possible boom m 
housebuilding as . mortgage, 
rates tumble: In contrast, 
Barrett Developments fast 1 2p 
to 142p, after adverse com- 
ments on Thursday’s disap- 
pointing profits. 

Engineering shares were 
mainly higher, supported by a 
favourable circular by Quilter 
Goodison. “ "_/- 

GKN was among the best at 
372p, up 8p. while Expamet 
was similarly higher at 182p. 
Turner and Newall, at 207p, 
lost 7p of Thursday’s use 
which followed toe results, 
while IMI eased 5p to 178p m 
front of next Monday’s 
results. : 

Among leisure issues, -high- 
er profits foiled to help 
Pleftsurama at 375p,~ down 


Reed fateraationa* scored an- 
S*er20p ri» to87^on toe 
Hamlyn sale to Octopus- 
public relations and adver 
rising shares conum^d io 
reflect toe brighter 

outiootLeweHojwd Spirt 

advanced 35p to 385p atead 

of next Wednesday s fignj* 

Others to do 

Wight Collrt at 393p aM 
SuSff tf 970p. both up W- 
Extd Group softened jpjo 
390p as toe Demerger Colo- 
ration extended offa- and 
disclosed acceptances of U- 
per cent. 


In mixed 

dipped 8p 

As*t-naaditi% bv Scnmgeour 
Vickers, toe stockt^oj^- Mai 
' featured Cwrt. * 

42Sp. down 

sSSSfegS 

^butaren««5f tttilDbe ^ 

.% 63 SS 

bM fro m 

their recent volatility. 


recent issues 


equities 

Abbott Mv am 

Brookmount 0 60p) 
Chart FL ffl6p) _ 


Com 9% A 2D<* 
Crariswfck M (95# 
Diatehe (128p) 

* / V\ f 




I oiHWWM i— # « 

Graoyte Surface 


I2p. S & W Bensford hard* ^ , 

ened 2p to 230p and Tate & jarvts Porter (105# 
Lyle (up 7p to 625p) increased . KtsartokJ J1 18p) 
its stake lo over 8 per cent. -Lexicon moor 
The US expansion move an-. Macro 4 Til 
Bounced on Thursday boewted IM 


233 +5 
225+1 

180 

94+1 

80 

£2S+% 

107 

200 

32+2 

88 

47 

290+2 

138-2 

120 


SAC fofl 09°P* 

ZSJEfe* 

sssafftw* 

Spice (80p) 

Tech CoflV 
Underwoods ; «1 
Weflcoms (1- 
w York 
Wtckes (140p) 

RIGHTS ISSUES 


136 
180 
235 
85 

114+1 
96+1 
211 
T87+2 
217+7 
78 4 
175+16 


40^ 

i ’ 


HartwoBs . . 

NHW Comp 
Porter chad F JP 
Safeway UK 

w^iwF/P 
(tesue prk» In tacacfcerta). 


75 

*4 

120 +10 
104 
£48% 
151 +2 
88 


COMPANY NEWS 


from toe rights issue, an- 


nounced yesterday to repay 
luld reduce gearing to 


debt, woi 0 

20 per cent It is highly 
probable, therefore, that tur- 

nr.ll Iw 


ole ot »Va_, l ne snares nave umu *u will he 

had a good run, up from 150p have had an opportunity to Jher acquisifioiw will be 

four months ago, and look' take pan in discussions with made. 


acquiatuuiu* 

, especially in stores. 


• CHURCH & COi Total divi- 
dend for 1983 8.3p (7Jp). 
Turnover £33.23 million 
(£51.84 million). Pretax profit 
£4.38 million (£4.71 million). 
Earnings per share 25.6p (31p). 

• RYAN INTERNATIONAL: 
Turnover for 1985 £36.4 3 mil- 
tion (£25.3 million). Pretax 
Sit Sr million (£14,000 
loss). Earnings per share 4J4p 
( 2 - 12 p loss). 

• BANRO INDUSTRIES: To- 
tal dividend for 1985 7p (4.3pk 
compared with the forecast of 
5.5p. One-for-five scrip issue 
proposed. Turnover £3 1.41 mil- 
lion (£25,29 miffionk Prenra 
profit £1.61 million (£806.000). 
Earnings per share 15.8p (8.1p). 

• BLANCHARDS: Six months 

to Dec. 31. 1985. Interim divi- 
dend 1.5p (nil), payable on May 
9. Provided the group continues 
to trade at its present level, the 
board intends to recommend a 
final of at least 3p. Turnow 
£33 mini on (£534 million). 
Pretax profit £405.000 
(£243.000). Earnings per share 
4.42 (2.54p). 

• SHARPE & FISHER: Total 
dividend for 1985 2.33p (235p). 
Sales £50.43 million (£45.91 
million). Pretax profit £2.15 
million (£2.19 nnllion). Earn- 
ings per share 7p (7-3pk 


• MAYHEW FOODS: Half- 
year to Nov. 30, 1985. Interim 
dividend 0.75p (ml). Turnover 

, . . .. ten miltinnl 


UIVIW.UU V. ■ . 

£12.14 million (£9J3 million). 
Pretax profit £513,000 


(£616,000). Earnings per share 

•Pacific sales 

ORGANISATION: Half-year 

to Dec. 31, 1985. Interim divi- 
dend Ip (same), payable on 
April 30. Turnover £275 mil- 
lion (£2.63 million). Pretax 
|Sit £526,000 (£533,000). 
Earnings per share 634p 

• SANDERSON MURRAY 
AND ELDER: Half-year to 
Dec. 31, 1985. Turnover 0.17 
million (£272 million). Pretax 
profit £66.029 (£53,291). Earn- 

Total dividend for 1985 halved 
to 5p. Turnover £2932 miflimi 
{£20.77 million). Pretax profit 


net of dividends that are to be 
waived by shareholders m tbe 
company who sold shares at. 
lime of the placing last 
September-Had the companys 
shares been quoted for toe nut 
year, tbe directors would have 
expected to r ec o mme nd a total 
dividend of 1 . 75 p • net -The 
dividend is payable on July 10. 

• KELVIN WATSON: The o £. 

fers on behalf of Coopervinon 
GB Finance, a wholly owned 
subsidiary of Coopervision. 
have become u n condi ti onal m 
alt respects. The Office of ftir 
Trading has confirmed that 
ihercmU be no referenceto the 
Monopolies and -Mergers 
Commission- • ■ • 

• MYSON GROUPr The 
application list, for the offer to 
ordinary holders of 6,077300 
Myson ordinary shares issued m 
connection with the proposed 
acquisition of Thorn EM3 Heat- 
ing has dosed. Valid applica- 
tions have , bear - received 


SE offers scheme for 


25 -member council 


By JererayWaraer, Business Carre^twrieirt 
The Stock Exchange has 

come SenlemenL and that in rant 


say in iia 

problemofhowtoi ii ffl CTKm t 

these aims remains 

intractable. ■ . 

It is nearly a year smee toe 

exchange’s 4,500 members de- 
feated proposes fy coasting 
rional reform wbica wou» 


dend for the year to Sept 28. 
1985, 25p (122IP). Tornova- 
£1731 million (£20.64 million). 


Pretax profit on ordinary activ- 
ities £355.000 (£278,000). Earn- 
ings per share 2535p (17-26p). 
• COUNTER PRODUCTS 
MARKETING: The final divi- 
dend is 0-4375p- The amount is 


• PROCESS SYSTEMS: For 
the six months to Dccember- 31, 
with figures m £000, net sales 
were 5.486 (4363), interest, uir 

1/V7 MfibiviA « 


• a* t rt*TA 


total income n 
Cost (rfgoods sold came to 1.970 


The ««» %»— — -r 

adikve foirer representation 
has also yet to be resolved. 
The Stock Exchange’s di*®s- 
skm docameni saysonWtlmt 
“a mechanism will oe 
constructed" . 

Construction ts the difficult 
part. It has to be a0 toin p m 
an men. satisfying both toe 
Nomura&and Merrill Lyncnet 
of tote world - who wiH go 


uumu itiuiui 

have transfetred m e m bqwip 
and control of the exchange 
from individuals ' to 
companies. . . 

dneed plans to reduce the srt ^S{SieH£wni^S 
of the nrtrtcooncB-from 52 vote rto^rn u nraas 

provide for a fairer tfistribu- 


tion of ri^resenlaxives be- 
tween members, toymen and 
toe tog # firms that now 
dominate, stock market 

tra * n & - ; - -.ij’- 'im 

However, any rednewm of 


' However, any redaction ot w 
tbe comscfi fo iewer : thail 


*ni ffl^rt frwrtl_ ro^ Peis Q 

tpetood of sptilting these off 
from noting power wiB have 
fo . be, found to gain sheir 



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^ J 


THE TIMES SATURDAY MARCH 22 1986 


Bank looks at off-balance risk 




•*• 


' 3rV> 




AK 


... 



The Bank of. England has 
taken a further step towards 
regulating fre >ffbajance- 
shcet tenking business: with 
the pubjicatron of an impor- 
tant and wide ranging consul- 
tatiyg doc na ie nf - - 
.. The Bank aims to introduce 
a comprehensive range of new 

risk/asset ratios to apply to 
ttib rapidly growing business 
Define the end of the year. 

: The move follows the pubfr. 
catioa last week of the paper 
on the risk problem by the 
BasteCbnftnifltt. 

Off-balance-sheet 
includes guarantees and com. 
milmeius taken oh by banks 
. whidh involvc a degree of risk 


. By Richard Thomson, Banking Correspondent 


but . are not covered by the 
supervisory rules governing, 
conventional frwifr le nding * 

• Over the last two years the 
musfiroomkigof ofi-baianee- 
shcet business by banks has 
caused supervisors increasing 
concern. 

The. Bank says that such 
risks may dip. through, the 
existing reporting and control 
Systems of the banks and can 
escape , the notice of senior 
mana g em e nt and auditors. 

This has come about, the 
document says, because of the 
novelty and complexity of the 
more recently developed off- 


balance-sheet instruments and 
the absence of accounting 
discipline in comparison with 
conventional on-balance sheet 
assets.' 

The document concentrates 
on the problem of assessing 
the credit risk involved in 
different types of off-balance- 
sheet transaction and attempts 
to set up a “hierarchy of risk". 

This could then be included 
in the existing structure of risk 
asset ratio weightings imposed 
on conventional banking bus- 
iness. 

The paper invites banks to 
reply to its proposals and does 


not put forward specific 
risk/asset ratios to govern off- 
balance sheet risk. The blan- 
ket 0.5 per cent weighting on 
certain- new forms of risk 
imposed by the Bank last year 
will remain in force until the 
new set of weightings are 
introduced. 

The document divides off- 
balance-sheet risks into vari- 
ous types, including guar- 
antees and other contingents, 
commitments and foreign ex- 
change and interest rate relat- 
ed transactions such as swaps. 

It suggests alternative ways 
in which the risk in certain 


types of business could be 
assessed but comes to no 
conclusions. 

But it says that the tradi- 
tional “snapshot" approach to 
assessing conventional bank- 
ing risk was probably not 
appropriate for off-balance- 
sheet business which required 
a more forward looking 
approach. 

Supervisory bodies in other 
countries such as Japan and 
the US are also moving to- 
wards a more effective meth- 
od of regulating off-balance- 
sheet risk, but the Bank of 
England appears to be the 
furthest advanced in reaching 
a solution. 


Cotton industry spins a new prosperity 


ByOvOan^onlcnt 




i 

r * *••->; •- 
'-'* ■'£ :* ■’ 


s;, 


*<:■ 


$ 


■ There are signs of renewed 
hope and prosperity, in the 
Lancashire comm business. 
Over the past, five years there 
has been a quiet revolution in 
this traditioial manufacturing 


industry, for so I 
in therai 


tT«?rs scfiwaeS 

lumber coumfl 


»*U 


'.-5* 


. ■*> > 


- ’.Vi. 

“.".T j:.. 


■-i. 


;X.. 

r 


v> 


i yours of ifie financia l 
community by more fashion- 
able sectors. 

That revolution shows most 
: dearly at Pieter Keed Textiles 
in Nelson, one of the beart- 
. lands oflhe dd north Lanca- 

- shire cotton textile -belt. A 
. private firm employing 60 

people, this feadujg weaver 
and manufacturer of bed lin- 
ens has just opened a new, 
£750,000 factory.. . 

The 14.000 sq: ft building 
nestled against the Pennine 
foothills, on a new industrial 
estate in thePeadle Enterprise 
Zone, is significant not only 
for this 27-year-oW fiunSy-mn 

■ company, but also for the 
industry, since it is the first 

- purpose-built weaving shed 
, opened in north-east Lanca- 

■ shire for more than 60 years. 

Its outer appearance owes 

- nothing to the traditional 

* architecture of textile mills — 

- and nor (toes the the interior, 
with its! bright lighting andair- 
conditioning, recall the damp 

’valley sites that spawned the 
original cotugp spinners and 
: weavers who were tire precur- 
sors of the industrial revolu- 
; txn. Where it does draw on 
' tradition is in focal labour 
7 skills, which are fortunately 
still present. 

With access to markets no 

■ longer a problem smcc the 
: advent or motorways, the 
_ cotton sheets and pillow cases 
'of this Lancashire company 

■ have found their way into the 
: beds of cabinet mintslei? and 

■ even royalty, via London 
: sbop>. 

* Mr ftfler Reed, foun de r and 
managing director; -^said: .■ 



middleman and go direct.” 

Working on wholesalers' 
rather than manufacturers' 
margins has increased profits 
substantially over the years 
and enabled the company to 
plough money back. Re- 
equipping has been continu- 
ous and is still going on. 

The majority of the 44 
looms are under 10 years old 
and four new Belgian flexible 
rapier looms, just installed at a 
cost of £30,000 each, are the 
first of their kind in Britain. 

. These looms have done 
away with shuttles, and are 
characteristic oflhe new fully 
automatic, microprocessor- 
controlled machines being in- 
stalled by the industry. 

For Peter Reed they will 
produce 15 per cent more 
cloth and add a 20 per cent to 
the £2 million turnover. But 


despite this continuing expan- 
sion, the number of jobs at 


Quiet revolution: Pieter Reed (left), iff Peter Reed Textiles, 

. wfrh Kenneth Darke, Paymaster GeoeraL 
“We’ye got most of the retail manufacturer which has 


market here and there's, very 
little more we can do with the 
up-market sector in the UK. 
apart from selling more of our 
product”. 

The company has thriving 
export markets in Australia, 
the Middle East and the 
United States, and is soon to 
start selling in Hong Kong. 

Now, after 15 years building 
up its trade name, it is soon to 
go a step further and sell direct 
to. the public, initially by mail 
order through the glossy cof- 
fee-table magazines. . 

Mr-Reed typifies the new 
bipqd of har&headed,- textile 


emerged from the latest reces- 
sion. Bom into a prominent 
north Lancashire textile fam- 
ily whose fortunes were found- 
ed m the Victorian era, he saw 
the demise of his old family 
firm in the early 1950s. 

Not easily deterred, he start- 
ed again in 1959 by baying old 
looms, but weaving much 
better quality doth. Watching 
cotton trading come to a final 
close ‘ on the floor of 
Manchester’s Royal Exchange 
in 1963 made him realize that 
the company had to change 
tack. “The only way to remain 
in business was to cut out the 


Reed, as elsewhere, is unlikely 
to increase. 

In the Pen die area, where 
cotton textiles were once dom- 
inant, the industry is still an 
important employer, accoimt- 
ingfor about 10 per cent of the 
estimated 30,000 in Britain's 
cotton and allied textile 
industry. 

Independents like Reed are 
thin on the ground and almost 
all have been forced to seek 
direct access to retailers by 
carving out specialized market 
niches. Only three or four 
weavers of any note remain in 
the area. 

The bulk of British textile 
production is concentrated in 
the hands of the relatively few 
large conglomerates — 
Courtaulds, Dawson, Tootal 
ami Vantona Viyefla in partic- 
ular. And the changes of the 
last five years have not been 
painless for them either: all 
have been radically affected 
by closures and undergone 
drastic rationalization. 


I*, *-”■ 

C:-' 

-J. 


‘--TV/ ; /:■ r 




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yvnly the best unit tnist managers produce funds that are consistently successful 
V^Thafs why “What Investment's” comprehensive five year performance 
study makes Gartmore “Fund Management Group of the Year” 

We have investment specialists managing 21 unit trusts covering all the world’s 
major markets from investment offices in London, Glasgow, Hong Kong, Tokyo, 
San Francisco and Sydney. And with more than £22 billion investor’s money 
under group management, that means success in anyone’s language. 


Some of Gartmore’s 


*Total return on 
£1000 after 5 years 


Total return on 
£1000 after 5 years 


Gartmore Income Rmd 

£3461 i 

Gfltimnre Tapan Trust 

£3300 I 

Gartmore British Trust 

£2665 f 

Hjirtmore Global Fund 

£ 2328 f 

’•Offer to bid, n« income reinvested, I/1/8I to, 1/1786. 

Source*. Money Management Magazine 


Building 

Society 

£1609 


Income assumed ai 
2** over the actual 
Building Society 

ordinary share uue. 


For more information on Gartmore^siop performing unii trusts, 

telephone Ot-623 1212 orserid this coupon to Gartmore Fund Managers Limited, 

2 St. Ma^y Axe, London EC3 A 8BP 

Name (Mr/A^MBs/Titie) : 

Address — . — : — 


—.Postcode. 



T22/3 


The Fund Managers 


‘Discovery’ 
in £30m 
scheme 


By Joditii Huntley 
Commercial Property 
Correspondent 

pptain Scott’s ship. The 
Discovery, is to be the 
centrepiece of a £30 miflioo 
tourist and retail development 
on the waterfront at Dundee. 

The enterprise zone devel- 
opment is being carried ont by 
the G A Group, the successful 
management buyout (formerly 
known as Gilbert Ash), the 
National Leasing and Finance 
Company (part of the q noted 
International City Holdings 
group) and the Scottish Devel- 
opment Agency. 

The attractions of the enter- 
prise zone tax allowances have 
made the project commercially 
viable, and the SDA will 
provide money for the infra- 
structure in return for a share 
of development profits. The 
tourist and heritage centre will 
be financed by die commercial 
elements of the scheme. 

There will be a 65,000 sq ft 
superstore, with 60,000 sq ft of 
retail warehousing and 20,000 
$q ft of offices and craft 
workshops. 

Associated British Foods is 
to operate the 10 fast food 
outlets. AMC, the United 
States cinema operator, is to 
provide an eight-screen cine- 
ma in the complex similar to 
the one it has at Milton 
Keynes, Buckinghamshire. 

National Leasing and Fi- 
nance, which' has arranged 
funding ventures in Britain's 
enterprise zones, will package 
the finance for the Dundee 
project A big British bank 
may provide the long-term 
finance to take advantages of 
enterprise zone tax 
allowances. 


FINANCE AND INDUSTRY 


25 



How much money doyou 
lose by saving? 



INVESTMENT TRUST £L000 INVESTED 1975. 
INCOME REINVESTED WORTH IU.735 END 1984 


S ave, and you can lose a pile. But invest in Prize 
Plan, arid your funds purchase Investment 
Trust shares, which offer outstanding high yields 
and growth to the regular saver. 

Prize Plan also gives you friendly society tax 
privileges: one-third of the invested funds grow 
tax-free. 

You can invest £300 per year, £27 per month 
or fund the plan by a single payment of £2,400. 

To find out more about Prize Plan, telephone 
us on Tunbridge Wells (0892)41466, or post the 
coupon. No postage is required. 


BUILDING SOCIETY £1.000 INVESTED 1975. 
INCOME REINVESTED WORTH £2JlJ9 END 1984 

| Please send me details of Prize Pfan. 

I 


Address. 


-Postcode. 


-TelNo- 


I TUNBRIDGE WELLS 

I tiTKB SHi u EQUITABLE 

I FRIENDLY SOCIETY 

' Pwio TunbndfK WelliEduiUhk FncndJt Society. 
j F REEPOST Tunhnfltf M-cIlk.KimTMQBR. T2IJ86^| 


FRAMLINGTON 


pUNTT TRUST-, 


GUIDE 


fbr a free copy of our 
1986 Guide , with full 
details of our top- 
performing funds and 
both lump-sum and 
monthly investments 
simply send this 
coupon. 


lb: FRAMLINGTON. 
FREEPOST. LONDON EC2B 2DL. 


Name . 
Address 


L-_- Taa3 i 


LAST OPPORTUNITY 

TO INVEST IN BES 
ASSET BACKED 
NURSING HOME COMPANY 
APPLY: BES HENLY LTD„ 
P0 BOX 25, 
TWYFORD, READING. 
BERKSHIRE RG19 8DF. 
Tel: 0735-22 4300 


'i^OUR I NVHSTM ENTS STILL ELIGIBLE 


:'i<OPEN UNTIL-APRIL 1st-. 


THEAUDLEY 1985/6 
BUSINESS EXPANSION SCHEME 

sponsored by 

AUDLEY SECURITIES LIMITED 

Licensed Dealer in Securities in financial association with 

PKFINANS INTERNATIONAL 
(U.K.) LIMITED 

Licensed Deposir Taker 

pan of die PKbankea ((roup which has total assets of some £12 bQlion 


IT TO 60% Tax Relief in 198V86 


A unique BES opparwnhjio invest bn 
ihc evdiinR and projjressivc leisure 
and commanicaiioas seems. 


* Cri-aitw; a anm* rimndaivjn (nr^xnaa In i 
qiicad nf anvsiinrfH> prtfXifulh anhinihr 
tenmr and tn mmnmr Mitnh inditain-. 


» An xsne n tma ganHn pnhn in pmmmr it* 
devtfrpnwiu nf mvesitr fHnpaHes jnd ih*- 
nuitiiahilH) nl vtoir 


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nntsuwianrXiOO Vnulbrr BES^cheitK- 
turrmih nHn* ih&lciri nf pann^uun 


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pnipfw rtparb'xid BMcnp unfa the 
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Holding the 
right shares won’t be a 
taxing problem. 


J 


+ CONGRATULATIONS NIGEL + 


. + INVESTMENT TRUST SHARES 


ARE THE IDEAL VEHICLE FOR YOUR 


PERSONAL EQUITY PLAN FOR 


PRIVATE INVESTORS + 


+ ASSOCIATION OF 


INVESTMENT TRUST COMPANIES + 



InvestmentTrusts are UK listed 
companies with full voting rights 
for their equity shareholders. 
They are an important part of 
the UK savings industry with 
almost 20 billion pounds under 
management 

And they offer a safety net by 
spreadingyour capital over a whole 
variety of companies. 

They are specialists in long 


term investment and are particu- 
larly suited to first time investors. 
Some Investment Trust companies 
offer savings schemes for as lirtle 
as £ 25 a month. 

You won’t have to pay tax on 
dividends and capital gains under 
the Chancellor’s PEP pro- 
posals effective January 1987. 

Investment Trusts. 

Your shares of ihe action. 



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PEGASUS GLOBALTRUST ^ _ 


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The FT lists 89 


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international trusts. 






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If you are looking for a broad 
spread of investments then you 
should consider an international unit 
trust. But the problem is which one! 
There are no fewer than 89 funds 
listed in the Financial Times. 

Scottish Widows' new Pegasus 
Global Trust provides the answer. 

Its aim is to achieve capital growth 
and it has the freedom to invest in any 
stockmarket it chooses, including 
that of the United Kingdom: 

As one of the country's most 
respected life insurance groups. 
Scottish Widows currently manage 
assets of nearly £6.000 million, a 
sizeable proportion of which is over- 
seas, and we have been consistently 
providing outstanding results for over 
170 years. 

There are two ways to invest in our 
new Trust. Income units provide you 
with a half-yearly income paid directly to 


Here’s how to 
narrow it 
down to 

1 


to 

C/l 


General hrfomwlion 
Applications mil be acknowledged on recsapl of 
your Instructions and urtil certificates wd normally 


CD 

Uj 

O. 


CO 

co 


CD 

U4 

Ci. 

P 


be despatched wittun 4 weeks of the purchase date. 

Units may be sold back at any time at the W price 

ruling on receipt o( your instructions, and payment 
will normally be made within 7 days of receipt of your 
renounced cemficaiefs). Prices of units and yields are 
quoted dally in the Financial Times and displayed on 
prestei page*248 14434. 

An initial charge of 5% is included in the offer pnee out 
of which the Managers win pay Commission to qualified 
agents (rates available on request). 

The Trust Deed permits a maximum annual charge ot 
1 '/»% (plus VAT) but the charge is currently set ai only 
%% (plus VATi per annum and any change is subject to 
3 months' notice. 

Net income is payable to income unitholders on 1 5 April and 
1 5 October each year and carries a tax credit at the basic 
rated tax (first dstnbuoon 15 October 1986). The estimated 
initial gross yield is 2 % per annum. 

Managers: Scottish Widows Fund Management Unwed 
15 Dalkeith Road. Edinburgh, EH165BU. 

Telephone: 031 -668 3724. 

Member of the Unit Trust Association. 

Trustee: The Royal Bank of Scotland pic. 

The ofler is not available to residents of the 
Republic of Ireland. 



O' 

*4£.' 





On 


you. while with accumulatkm units 
your income is automatically 
reinvested to build up the value of 
your investment. 

True, the value of units, and the 
income from them, can go down as 
well as up. 

But that’s where our expertise 
comes in - and our flexibility. 

If you switch from one of our 
funds to another we allow a 
discount, currently 3V;%, on 
the offer price of the new units. 

' And, until 31 March 1986, 
we're offering al% diseduntfor 
Global Trust investments up to 
£5.000 and a2% discount/or 
£5,000ormore. 

The minimum investment 
is only £500 but whatever 
the amountyoull find it's 
an investment you can trust. Cv 
So fill in the coupon today. ^ 


co 


Edited by Loraa Bourke 


FAMILY MONEY/1 





The new way in menmrm 


to find losses 


HOOS 6 IHKOO^H 9 % SQUt % 

. •. . 1 , ^ A A 


I .V 

V ' 




for profit 


( CAPITAL GAINS ) 


The accountant Jack Harper 
of Spicer and Pegler has come 
up with a neat angle on the 
capital gains tax rules which 
has interesting tax saving im- 
plications for all building soci- 
ety investors. 

Mr Harper believes that 
because of the indexation 
provisions contained in the 
1985 Finance Act, which al- 
lows you to use indexation to 
create a notional loss, building 
society investors can “bed- 
and-breakfest" their shares in 
the building society to create 
notional losses. These can be 
offset against profits made in 
equities. 

Though few people realize 
it, when they open an ordinary 
account or extra interest ac- 
count with a building society, 
what they are actually doing is 
buying shares in the society. 

And Mr Harper believes 
that because they are shares, 
you can use the indexation 
provisions to creat- notional 
losses. 


assets that have not actually 
appreciated in value,. • # - • . 

What Mr Harper is saying is 
that since 1982.- the date from 
which indexation is calculat- 
ed, inflation has totalled 20 
per cent or thereabouts. 

This means that if you had 
£1.000 in a building society on 
that d»r* and have subse- 
quently left it untouched, you 
could now have a notional loss 
of £200 which could be offset 
against profits on equities. . . 
You have not actually lost 


anything at all but:what .the 
indexation rules take into 


account is the 20 per cent less 
buying power that your £1,000- 
investment now has — hence 
the notional loss. „ • 

“An allowable loss will be 
valuable to two categories of 


‘The procedure is 
straightforward 4 


To: Scottish Widows Fund Management Limited, 

FREEPOST. 15 Dalkeith Road. Edinburgh. EH 16 ONE. 

(Dealing Department telephone: 031-668 3724.) 
lAVe wMi io purchase Arc umujaurtiu ! or Income} 1 Uni ts (tick as appropriate) in Pcgaam 
Gl.ibal TniM w ih? value ot l£ _ZL l\fanmum initial investment 


£500. suhs«rqu«iiniinimuiii£250)ai the offer mice ruling on receipt of this application. 

<a, CT n.niji innfnns. net income L>amoniaticaUTre-imvstedhaK-ngrtr Income turns, oainoamei* 
paid loynuhalf-yearivl 

|.-lV.-«tidn«va dK-que made payable to Scottish Widows Fund Management Unwed. 

In the cave of twin applicant-. . all most sign, and prowde full names and addresses oa a separate 
All applkanls must be at hasi a^cd IS. Black letim please (Plea*: stare Mr/Mrs^bwimle) 


Surname 

FnM nilllrt I in lull I 

- 

Postcode., 

Swwurctsi 

Same and address of iinanrial adviser lif ani 


-2722/186 


EGA S U S • P E G A 


#4BT| SCOTTISH WIDOWS j 

RMI M;\NAGKMKVI LIMITED J 



A simple test for your 


investment manager 


Which way does he see Europe? 

A patch-work dominated by 
restrictive borders? 

Or an open area where one can 
move around freely? 

Yes, A is how it really is. 

But if you want to make better 
than average returns on European 
investments then you have to see 
it like l B! 

We do. Because you can’t any 
longer rely on blue-chip names 
or in the predictable performances 
of national economies. 

Success lies in spotting the 
coming companies — wherever 
they may be - and moving quickly 
out of one territory 
into another. 

Achieving that 


means a rare combination of on-the-i 
ground knowledge and solid invest- 
ment experience. 

It is that combination that has 
been responsible for the excellent 
performance of our European fund 
and indeed for every other fund 
we manage. 

No-one in the City has more 
experience, expertise and solid 
success behind them than MIM. 
Which is why no-one in the 


City is better placed to move quickly 


•niwiwiiUNiT TRUST 
[M /MANAGERS g 


adventurously and safely for the 
benefit of investors. 

If you would like to see 
that philosophy in action we’ll be 
happy to send you 
details of all our 
trusts. 


•INVESTMENT MANAGEMENT IS OUR BUSINESS.- 

11 Devonshire Square, London EC2M 4YFLTel: 01-626 3434. 


“Building society shares are 
not prevented from producing 
allowable losses, although 
building society deposits are," 
explains Mr Harper. 


Inflationary gains 
can be discounted 


investors,” says Mr Harper. 
-That is, those who have , 
sufficient net capital gains in 
excess of the 1985-86 exemp- 
tion of £5,900 to folly utilize 
the loss in reducing 'their 
assessments to tax, or those 
with no net 1985-86 gain wto 
wish to establish an allowable 
loss for carry-forward against 
1198&87. 



TtoiMt focterr 


gains in . 



“The tax legislation consis- 
tently distinguishes between 
ikung society shares and 
deposits. The disposal of 
building society shares can 
therefore establish allowable 
losses to the extent of the 
indexation with the amount of 
loss approaching 20 per cent 
of cost for shareholders who 
had money in building society 
share accounts prior to April 
.6,1981” 

What the indexation rules 
allow you to do is to discount 
any rains which are purely 
Inflationary. And since 1985 
rau can actually establish a 
loss, to take account of infla- 
tion, on shares and other 


“ The procedure is quite 
straightforward — simply 
withdraw your money from 
the budding society to estab- 
lish the loss — you may need to 
give notice. • 


“ You can then place the 
proceeds on deposit elsewhere 
or reinvest in a different 
building society.” 


q uences of a withdrawal as ah 
income penalty may occur. . 

“Retention of at least one 
share. win generally ensure 
‘ that ah additional payment of 
income or interest does not 
occur in advance of the next 


normal payment da te .- if need 
be.” ‘ 


The only cost to the inves- 
tor is the minor loss of income 
while the proceeds are not 
invested. 


Mr Harper says: “Premium 
share account holders may 
find that a longer notice 
period is required than for an 
ordinary share account and 
should check the conse- 


Can you simply- reinvest 
with the same society? "”! 
don’t see why not," say* Mr 
Harper. 

For those who want chapter 
and verse on the calculations, 
Mr Harper rites the example 
in the table. 


HOW TO CALCULATE 
YOURB&B 

Mr A opened a btgdinfl e od gr 
share account On April 7, IS82 wWi 
£20400- The dividend* am paid 
dheettoMsbanl^Tlie Retail Prices 
Index for April 1982 was 31A.7. 

On April 1, 1988 Mr. A reduces Ws 
shareholding by wiihdrawinq 
EULOOft. The m tor April 
puMrafcedfn May, is, say 385.0. The 
eBmniUa loseea ean.be cetadatad 
as toBowc ‘. ;- 


Proceeds ■ ■ 
Indexation refief: 
365-3197x10000 


C 

10.000 


+ 2.043 


dr2p5,5 


Lorna Bourke 


319.7 
Cost (part of £20.000) 


i 


12,0*3 
- 10.000 


Available loss 


2.043 


PI 


h 





1985 was a year of record 
achievements for Nationwide. 
It was the yea rthat the Society's 
assets passed the £10,000 
million milestone - an increase 
of 17.8%. And it was the 
year that mortgage lending 
reached a higher level than 
ever before. 

On the investment side, 
753,000 new accounts were 
opened, bringing the total of 
savers to 3,405,000. 

1985 also saw the introduc- 
tion of two imaginative new 
savings schemes; Bonus- 
Builder, launched to immedi- 
ate success, and FlexAccount 
CashLink, which marked the ■ 
arrival of Nationwide's auto- 
matic cash machine network. 


. At the same time. Nation- . 
widemadea pioneering ". 
.Euro5terlin£ issue, raising 
£200 million- for further 
mortgage lending. 

This helped to make 1985 
a record year for borrowers 
. too, with mortgage advances 
•' reaching £2,299 million. 

1 this provided 87, 900 buyers, 
more than In any previous 
year, with funds to purchase 
homes.-- 

• Fbr Nationwide, 1985 was 
a year tirat.firrnly_re|nforced 
" the 7 Society's belief that the 
more we can help people to 
build their savings, the more 
• we can help people to. build 
homes. To thatend^we look 
forward to the; hew' oppor- 


tunities presented by the 
Building Societies®!!, enabling 
the Society to.o'ffer an even 
wider range of services. 

For a copy of the Nationwide 
Annual Report and Accounts 
for, 1985, write to: Nationwide 
Building Society, FREEPOST, 
London WC1V6XA. 






■ "/ 




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■ — r— ■ - - 


THE TIMES SATURDAY MARC H 22 1986 



FINANCE AND INDUSTRY 


INVESTMENT 


a note of caution 


( BUSINESS A 

v EXPANSION j 

The Chancellor’s ' Budget 
changes to the Business Ex- 
pansion Scheme will have a 
substantial effect on the struc- 
ture of. new BES companies 
and must cast doubt on the 
status of some of the schemes 
currently on offer. 

h is no longer as dear-cut 
whether investors in some 
schemes will be entitled to tax 
relief on money invested in 
. iheseBES companies. 

Potentially the most contro- 
versial proposal is tb<* 
Chancellor’s attempt to curb 
secure asset-backed schemes. 

The proposal on the table at 
the moment is that, as from 
Budget, day, companies must 
not have more than half their 
net assets held in land or 
buildings for the fiisi three 
years following the issue of 
shares, or the date when they 
stair trading, if this is later. 

There were a number of 
ways ; in. which it was 
rumoured that secure asset- 
backed schemes would be 
taken outside the ambit of the' 
BES.. 

Some observers suggested' 
that the Chancellor would put 
a total ban on companies 
seeking more than £500,000 
. under the BES. Others thought 
that “secure asset backing'’ or 
some such similar phrase 
would be defined and out- 
lawed m the legislation. 

The current proposal dearly 
leaves scope for anomalies. 

- Keith Moss, of Lancashire 
and Yorkshire Investment 
. Management, quotes an ex- 
ample of a genuine trading 
company which owns a -fac- 
tory in ah area that suddenly 
booms on foe property market 

— say* 'because of a, new 
motorway proposal or a 
hypermarket being built next 
door. 

Tbe boom in prices could 
easily push the company over 
the 50 per cent limit intro- 
duced in the Btfdget 

At the moment the relevant 


sections of the Finance Bill 
have not yet been fully draft- 
ed. So anomalies such as these 
may yet be tackled, Tbe 
position of leaseholds may. 
also be more fully explored in 
the Finance B3L 
. There should, in theory at 
least, still be scope certainly 
for pub schemes and probably 
for 'hotel.. schemes to raise 
' money under the BES; Their 
much vaunted security 
through assets, often a snare 
and an illusion, will simply be 
watered down. 

' Similarly, h~ is by no means 
certain yet whether the inclu- 
sion of ship chartering of UK- 
registered ships within tbe 
scheme wifi alfow BES yacht 
companies to flourish. 

But the forming and proper- 
ty. -development companies 
are definitely allowed again. 
They will simply have to be at 
least 50 per cent geared, which 
in the case of property devel- 
opment companies wiB often 
bo the case. • 

Swift slap on 
the wrist is 
the safeguard 

Charles - Fry, of Johnson 
Fry, says: “It seems that, 
provided you borrow heavily 
enough, you wfll qualify." 

He is certainly considering 
possibilities in the property 
development line, including 
some more money for the 
existing Johnson Fry -spon- 
sored property development 
companies. 

But the most important 
amendment announced in the 
Budget is the power to enable 
the Government to, change the 
rules on what is or is not a 
qualifying trade by statutory 
instrument rather than prima- 
ry legislation. 

This effectively dobbers the 
yearly beat-the-Budget stam- 
pede in which investors rush 
to buy shares in those “safe" 
ventures for which a Budget 
dampdown is expected. 

. The new power appears to 
be the best safeguard towards' 


ensuring that the sprit of the 
scheme is observed. 

If, for instance, a sponsor 
comes out with a scheme that 
. slips through the rules but 
offends tbe principles of the 
BES, a swift slap on the wrist 
with a statutory instrument 
will ensure that others do not 
follow suit. 

. It may be that the Treasury 
.iwill use the newly found 
power at foe stage where tbe 
particular sponsor seeks pro- 
visional clearance from the 
Inland Revenue. In other 
. words, foe potential abuse of 
the BES would be killed off 
even before emerging into tbe 
- light of day. 

So what should investors 
who want to invest in BES 
companies which own or plan 
to own substantial elements of 
land and buildings do? 

The- answer must be that 
there is certainly a risk if you 
invest before the F inan ce Bill 
is published — usually in May 
or June, but certainly after the 
end of foe tax year. 

You could invest on the 
basis that your subscription 
must be returned if the com- 
pany will not qualify underfoe 
new proposals. But getting 
money hack once you have 
parted with it is not always 
easy and there could be long 
arguments over the interpreta- 
tion of the Bill and the actual 
agreement to return 
subscriptions. 

Readers of Family Money 
will know that we have 
warned m recent weeks that 
asset-backed schemes could be 
jumped on in the Budget. But 
this dampdown was not the 
only move made on the BES 
front 

On the encouragement front 
is foe proposal that BES shares 
issued after March 18 will be 
exempt from capital gains tax 
on their first disposal. Bear ini 
mind that it is new BES shares 
only that are exempt 

So all those people who 
rushed to beat tbe Budget and 
had shares issued to them on 
or before Budget day will not 
qualify for this CGT 
exemption. 




-7 WITH OTHER 

accouhts you err r : iwn 

IHTEBSST MOW. 



WITH AP£X SHARES 


7777 7 



‘ L v v*\Y vYV Cvtk \\\ u \ l 


. \t\Y\ \ \\ vVAAVYHU 


M Mnlike most, high Interest accounts our Apex shares can 

pay out once a month.. Interest • 

We guarantee 2%% above the current jpar 

Ordinary Share rate for 3 years (a* 7® 

moment that means 9 -5% net ) . : i 

With Instant withdrawals all you lose is SO days’ interest 
on the amount withdrawn (give us 60 days 9 notice and you 

lose nothing). . ’ . . - ' - 

£500 opens an Apex Share account. Keep a balance of 

£1,000 and you can get monthly Interest. 

Yon wouldn't wait s year for your wages , so why do It for 

your interest? 

* „ MmM i a Monies wiuu« iwm mm* r. wummo. wht whwbmt *a i** 

VWTTD MW COJHUST « MB of MW ID «US KT Uf SHUCd TO VMM nows. 

«*«» «■* »« «■« ««wuwr n* * rm <r rat awe «rt tm 

COMPOVKDtB MMMVAL MATT *-7TL.) ... 


apex shares 


. to be Invested Ib an APEX account. 


Please send further Information 


rh‘2 



Company 


Aeom Harfovoodo 
Aten tatematiOMt 
Man Paul 

Afltanee Assat Momt 

WWnCOTB 

Bonham Broom 
Brandi Rctinunent Homos 
Bright Walton Homn 
Cara tfomaa (UK) 
Chartotta St Rasta u ra m s 


Coastal Assorts Hotels 
Diodsx 

Rnotal 

First Fine Wins 
Frow MacKsnjci* 

Green Part HonJth Care 
Guardian Coro 
Hooeygkm Assured Const 


Roweroft Hospice Step* 
Wbatta Buy 
Theatre Royal Prestos 
PtayhouH Theatre 
Bristol Brandy 
Brenkaome Court Kudos 
Electrostore 
First RetaB 
Hamilton Bland 
London CoSectlan 
Naw Orleans Cafe 
Southdown* Hotel 
Stephen Cftarfaa Designer 
Stagecoach Hotels 
Sunha Group 
Technical Production 
Giack&ng Secured Contract 
Pleesureworid 

Sir Speedy Printing Cerda 
Event Group 

Bfrmfnflhani Exec Always 
Truman Services 
Modus Marketing 
Chartergronp 
Wtnebank 


Activity 


Sawmill 

Hairdressers 

Hairdressers 
Estate agency 
Country dub 
Country dub 
Nursmg homes 
Nursing homes 
Nursing nomes 
Restaurateurs 
Franchise shops 

Hoteliers 
Lighting 
Hoteliers 
Wines 
Booksellers 
Nursing homes 
Nursing homes 
Builder 

Household Eqpt 

Hospice loans 

Magazines 

Theatre 

Theatre 

wines 

Resthome 

Electrical 

Clothing 

Swimming pool 

Catalogues 

Restaurant 

Hoteliers 

Sort furnishings 

Hoteliers 

Nursing homes 

Cleaning product! 


Printing 

Clothing 

Travel 

Cultural centres 
Software 
Staff training 
Wines 


Sponsor 


Acorn 

Hitchens Hamsan 
Capital Ventures 
Lancs £ Yorks inv 
Mathercoun 
LET 

Ifmcorp £ari 
Hill Samuel 
Anglo Dutch 
Babe 
Baltic 

First Independent 
Mercia VC 

Electra 

First Fma Wine 
MeroaVC 
Poimon York 
DJ Townley 
Chancery Secs 
Bentnck Invs 
Reeves & Naylor 
Capital Ventures 
Darongton 
Chancery Secs 
Hesdtine Moss 
Bournemouth Find 
Strauss Tumbufl 
Robert Fraser 
Baden-PoweU ChUcott 
CoilinS'Wilde 
Fox Mitten 
Ponton York 
Fox Milton 
Centreway Devpt 
Pointon York 
Pnor Harwm 
Chancery Secs 
Electra Mgmt 
£Guipehousa 
Montano Secs 
Wiliam eta Bros 
HW Chaplin 
Menaa VC 
Truman Services 
Lawnstone 
Pointon York 
Baden Powan-Chllcott 


Telephone IneBv Min Cfostng Dote 


0723-3377 
01-5885171 
0242-584380 
01-4066266 
01-8319001 
01-5811322 
01-7309123 
01-628801 1 
01-5884278 
01-4939899 
01-4939899 
01-8312356 
021-2333404 
01-8367786 
0494-4506% 
021-2333404 
01-6313015 
0204-699131 
01-2422563 
01-4075381 
0304-205461 
0242-584380 
0272-213206 
01-2422563 
0272-276521 
0202-894514 
01-6385699 
01-4933211 
01-5883047 


01-6313015 

01-2482417 

021-6433941 

01-6313015 


01-5887511 

021-2333404 

01-6063881 

01-8288633 

01-6313015 

01-5887878 


March 28 
March 31 
April 5 
No date 
March 25 
March 25 
April 5 
March 13 
March 17 
Apd 2 
April 3 
April 4 

Aprils 

April 13 

March 14 
April 5 
March 17 
April 4 
March 18 
March 28 
March 10 
March 26 
April 4 
April 30 
March 26 
March 14 
April 4 
April 2 
March 27 
March 27 
April 4 
April 3 
open-ended 
March 25 
April 3 
April 8 
April 30 


£500 April 16 
£1,000 April 14 


April 3 
April 29 
April 4 


Moreover, it is only foe first 
disposal — in other words the 
first sale or gift — which is 
exempt. 

Those companies seeking to 
raise BES money for fine wine 
and antiques are going to have 
a much tougher time of it 

BES relief will no longer be 
available for wholesalers or 
retailers trading in goods of a 
land which are not collected 
or held as investmenis if foe 
company do«s not actively try 


to trade them. Fine wine and 
antiques are classic instances 
which will foil foul of this 
amendment unless they are 
actively traded. 

The practice of BES wine 
wholesalers “trading” by 
shunting their wine stocks 
from wholesaler to wholesaler, 
has been curbed by foe new 
proposal that BES relief will 
not be available for wholesale 

trades which do not sell their 
goods to retailers. 


Another welcome amend- 
ment is foe provision for joint ! 
applications for shares issued 
after March IS to be eligible 
for relief. This will, for in- 
stance, allow a husband -and 
wife to apply in their joint 
names. 

Overall, it isn't really bad 
news for investors — you are 
just going to have to be a lot 
more careful. 

Lawrence Lever 





wm 


TAX FREE « 
CAPITAL 

Is yourcapital actively managed for fej Jig iff £» 
capital growth? !j$ jits/ 

.Are you able to take tax-free r jT- |jj 

capital gains within the CGT '1 Ijj |ff of; 

exemption? ?;J jjjj 

Do you have the time and ““ 

knowledge to analyse worldwide 
market trends and currency fluctuations? 




IF THE ANSWER TO ANY OF THESE QUESTIONS IS “NO” 
THEN THIS REVOLUTIONARY NEW FUND IS FOR YOU! 


CONSIDER THESEFACTS: 

* There are no initial charges and no penalty when you cash in 
vour holding. 

* Your capital will bespread within a diversified international 
portfolio of funds managed by lading fund managers. 

* The Fund will be managed on a daily basis and is designed to 
make full use of the Capital Gains Tax concessions* thus 
providing the potential for annual tax free returns. 

£ Investors vtill enjoy the convenience of having only one 
certificate — there is no unnecessary paperwork and taxation 
complications. 

* You receive a quarterly valuation 3nd market report outlining 
your holding md future growth expectations. 

This limited offer is exclusive to IPS and is only available 
to the public until 10.00am April 4 tb 1BS6. Demand is expected 
to be heavy so you should act now! For a copy of the prospectus, 
please complete and return the coupon. m -tVi^ -i 

*TfirCu7.Vtwaiui-!'ir»V l M>i-i3 *»i“ vnl- riltu-.liinii i.uUlrr 


To: Investment Portfolio Services- Lid., 

15 Manchester Square, London W1M 5 AE. Tel: 01 -486 0177 


Postcode 

Tax rate 

Porfolio valuation. 


. Amount available- fi >r investment . 







S52& 


■m , 



■fe V*U- 


WSiii 


■if:-- .1 


;'4-. . 1 

■ ' •' :.y 

■■ '<■ 

• : "t 

• ; 




,. ; ' / ,v Jr 


" "- ! r .y-W-V#?- it Mi ; :!■' ’ '■ V 

: ^ "li n 

- ,-i - *■>£ 


Britannia’s JAPSCO tops 
863 other unit trusts 

AAar>3gerPalridafVeneta 




The LATEST ggg% 

performance 
figures from 
‘Planned Savings’ 

Magazine show 

that one of our ” 

Japan funds has ^ 

topped every other x 

unit trust this year. 

Britannia Japan 
Smaller Companies Trust 
(JAPSCO) is not just first of 
the 53 Japan funds, it is also 
first for g)rowth in 1986 so far of 
all 864 Lf.K. authorised unit 
trusts. 

By the 1st March JAPSCO 


had risen by 32.7%, 
jpgik and Britannia’s 

'mm Japan Performance 

Fund had also 
yJ lL risen steeply by 

f The latter was 

ft eighth best 
^ ? performer of the 53 

Japan funds, and 

16th outoftbe864 UJi. funds. 

These results suggest that, 
after an up-and-down year in 
1985, Japanese securities are 
now set to move forward with 
much greater confidence and 
Japan unit trusts with them. 



Unit holdings now £22.9 billion 


THE TOTAL value of invest- 
ments in unit trusts at the 
endofFebrnaryroseto 
<£22^40 milBon, a record 
for tins thriving ILK. 
industry. - 

With 864 funds to choose 
from, investors can direct 
their money much more 
profitably among unit trusts 
than in more limited areas 
sudiasfni3dSr®socfefes. 

In its guide to how unit 
trusts work, Britannia 
divides funds into four broad 
categories. 

Income funds are what 
they say: planned for people 
who need as much regular 


income as possible. Growth 
fiends should be the core of 
. portfolios that are designed 
to produce high long-term 
capital growth. . 


HELP? 


firadsare for investors with a 
belief in the economies of one 
area, say, Europe, Japan, 
USA, Hong Kong. 
Australia, UIL, etc Special- 
Ised sector fends are for 
moreexperienced investors 
with pBflrfkular interest in 
areas such as technology, 
energy, commodities or foe 
leisure industry. 

This Britannia guide is 
available free on request 













Jrii, * 


- • ‘ _ n ' ^ • pJB . '. ' 3 . : ~ 1- '■«>*- 


• >.- •■-Li'.. 


FINANCE AND INDUSTRY 


"HE TIMES SATURDAY MARCH 22 1986 


a i 


DO NOT BUY 

ANY UNIT TRUST 

urn. tone camera) us - 

FT WW. PAY TOO 70 DO S® 

REST*! OFFER THE 
BEST DEALS 

ON TW HARICET PLUS EXPERT 
OVESTMBfT ADVICE 

TELEPHONE YOUR 

ORDER 

NOW 


THE CHELSEA 
HOTLINE ^ 

Latest neemraendafiM 19 31% 

IMs Year— J 

UNIT TRUST 
PORTPOUO SERVICE 
Hoc*WB**.JfflninnJO £6,000 

Pjl III 

Most (mm of the 
CHELSEA VIEWPOINT. 
TttephoM 

lor poor free cop? now. 


CHELSEA FINANCIAL SERVICES LTD, 

mnnHAuna 01-351 6022 


nasdim 


UNIT TRUST 

Portfolio Management 

Whether you are looking for Income, Capital Growth or 
a combination of both, you can rely on us for quality 
investments, efficient service and total independence. 

Discretionary and non-discretionary services avail- 
able. We do not employ salespeople - our business 
depends primarily on recommendation 

NO FEES IN THE FIRST 12 MONTHS 
(Discretionary Service Only) 

For full details of our service please send coupon to:- 

A. M. BASSETT and ASSOCIATES 

Freepost Royston 

Herts, SG8 5BR. Tel: (0763) 47415. 

Member of National Association of Security Dealers 
and Investment Managers 
Licensed Dealers in Securities 


Address. 




Platinum is oocofthc rarcs metals on earth and 
one oTihe mast valuable, li is produced in 
exceptionally small quantities and the total world 

com^rcd^h about 1,200 tonnes cfggld. 5^ 

Much of the platinum produced is 
used in a rapidly growing range ofhigh // 

tedmoIaEV applications and a — j II, i 

aptificsm proportion is made mio (HV S> W 

jewellery. Consequently the metal is Iff: . 1 ^ =s~.\^ :jf 
always in demand. Ii is also a readily | l*JlN/il **' .. i| I if 
rakabkamiaodky. i== ^r J 

Nnw Tnhnmn Manhey platinum I ff / 

ban are avaiiahle 10 ihc private In R'AV 7 ^- \\ 

investor. Of course, like any other \\ 

investment, the value of ' v\ 

platinum can faB as well as ft \ j 

rise, particularly in the short term, v 
3m thr price m Berlins has ■Vi 

nearly quadrupled during the 1^^002/1 
past decade and over a similar V\ 

period it has easily outperformed 
iflflstkm.too. V 

Johnson Manhey platinum bars are j . ' 

pro du ced in agfar sizes up to lOnz troy. 
eaca one being individually numbered. 

You can rake possession of the bar* in the 
11K, in which case VAT must be charged . 

Alternatively, they can be held in safe keeping Vv 
a our vaults in Jersey or Zurich, in which case 
VAT is payable on the value of the bars. v 

Should you wish to sell your ban we guarantee to 
rrpordisrc them et any time. For full information on 
Johnson Man hey platinum bars, and an appltcai ion form, simply 
contpleic and send the coupon bv Freepost . 

JOHNSON MATTHEY 

Piaiinum refiners for over 150 ware. 


Please scad raefuD jnlormation on Johnson Atolibn platinum tun 


m m» xwiiiiniti »i 


Hawkdawn pic 

to trade as 



The CharterGroup PartnershgD 



z%0\ 


Johnson Manbey (Platmuiti Market ing Division) _ 

fteq»st London ECIHHJi ‘leleplnme; 01-430 0011 (l atfcmwi 35S} 
or 24 botlr answeraig service 01 K31 Vi2l 


V 22/3 86 


OFFER FOR SUBSCRIPTION OF UP TO 
363,200 ORDINARY SHARES OF 51 EACH AT 
£1.23 PER SHARE. 


* An exciting opportunity to participate, for the first 
time in this form, in profits derived mainly from 
Chartered Accountants and other professions. 

* Experienced professional management. 

* Directors are investing pari passu with investors. 

Hs Minimum subscription is underwritten. * 


Copies of the Prospectus aoattHbiefram 

POINTON YORK LIMITED 

(a member of NASDIM} 

7 Cavendish Square, London W1M 9HA - 
telephone 01-631 3015 

Ttrfs adi ertisemeit] is not M mriUUan to mvpsi in shares 


Vanguard 

A Double First! 


For the second year running. Vanguard 
Trust Managers won the Observer “Small 
Unit Thist Group of the Year” Award. 

The average gain of our four funds 
was -36.7% — better than all other unit trust 
groups. 


We have also been awarded the Money 
Management “Small Unit Unst Management 
Group of the Year" Award for 3985. We were 
the only group ,by their criteria, to have 
achieved 100% above-average performance 
over one and three years. 


A contributory factor was the performance of Vanguard Special Situations Thist, 
the only Unit Trust to have lieen one of the ten best performing UK Growth funds over 
the last one, three, five and seven years. 

Short term performance is often a fluke — long term performance is not. 


A Proven Performance Record 

Over one, three, five and seven year periods, 
the trust is among the Thn best performing 
U.K. Growth Funds*, registering gains of 
32.6%, 170.3%, 319.7% and 411.9% respectively 
No other U.K. Growth Fund has managed to 
perform so consistently. 

* Money Management figures tn 1st February 1966. 
Offer to bid, including net /v in res ted income. 

Investment Objectives 

The investment policy of this Thist is to 
provide capital growth from an actively 
managed portfolio consisting of shares of 
smaller companies and carefully selected 
special situations. _ 

These could be companies that have 
fallen on bad times, out are now ( pAi 

turning round; they could be {fnj f * 

compares thatlook ripe for a nth ( ^ 
take-over or perhaps companies W,, \ o. 
with new, innovative products. vKtv 

We also have the power to invest 
up to 25% of the Thist in USM stocks, 
as well as in traded options in 

General Information 

Upon receipted your application form ammract note I 

will be sent. followed hj a certificate” in dvy-^. Cm: I 

prices and yields are quoted in the Financial Tine.-,. ■ 

\}niU can t>e snkj bark to ihv Manacf r> at not lew than ■ 

the minimum bid ptvo calculated to a f«»rmuJ.i approve 1 

by tfif Depurtnu-ni of Tnidi-. The Trust uiauth'iris^d Kj- 8 

the Departmentof Trade n nil constiUUed hy a Deeil 8 

dated Marrh lt*7 1 lai amemld i. An initial chnrj-eul Vi- ■ 

ts included in the offer prut- ui unit.-.. fr«m w hi*, h B 

Vc-muneratinn i-i payable tn nuaiilh'd inl*Tm,iliari»*'. at S 

ntte-savoilaMenn mtuest. The annua Icfian? - i-i-'-C -U 8 

4j% plu*5 VAT nf thr value of the TVilSt la-< <ipp»rj*d In a 8 

maximtnflof I'* P'.’rmir^f in Oiv Lhxnli. ThiVt.*- rlrfwU'ti 
fn>tn the gross ino imi- and i ^ alliiwed lor i n tin* •■tirrvnt 1 

an&s yieW, W-ttrilwitdins will )«< paid twin- y « -.irly ui 8 

the end *if February ami Austiir'L i 

TVostee! Bttyal ii-mk nf Sinljiui'l |Av Kfc 1” 1 HH Kmati 8 

StwL Umihm Et 

Miuuurers; Vanetiard Tnist Mamr-'ers l.iniiu.l. I 

JloUHim Viaduct- 1 E«.T.\ -El", leleiihnnc: ® 

:?Ki!{. Memlier .if i lie Cuii Trust Aspirin linn. 8 

.iihTin nut inu//* ,, *i* r..-.,',/, HtflEir. . 8 


accordance with the guidelines set by the 
Department of^ Trade. 

You should remember that the price of 
units and the income from them can go down 
as well as up. 

An Enviable Pedigree 
Vanguard Trust Managers is the wholly owned 
subsidiary of stockbrokers Capel-Cure Myers, 
one of the City’s most quoted and authoritative 
sources on investmenttopics.They currently 
look after over £1 billion of funds on behalf of 
institutional, private and pension fund clients. 
Since 1985 they have been a member of the 
ANZ Group, a major international bank with a 
worldwide network of offices and with balance 
sheet footings exceeding US$30 billion. 

Act Now 

To invest in this TVust, please ■ 


To invest in this TVust, please ■ - 

5 \ W) complete this application form • 
m and send it to the Managers. 

6 I 'm F° r your guidance only, the offer 

vv|*. _ _ t*3y (W price* of units on 20th March 1986 • 

was 42,4p per unit The Estimated 
Current Gross Yield is 2. 58% pa. 

'9 fnr l split of units on 2 January I9fk i. 

r ib: Vanguard Trust Managers Ltd, 65 Hoiborn Viaduct, 
London ECL4 2EU Telephone 01-236 3053. 

I IAVe wish to invest rniimmum £500) ) £ 1 in the Vanguard 

Special Situations Trust at the offer price ruling on receipt of my 
application. A cheque is enclosed, made payable to Vanguard "Dust 

I Managers Ltd. 

FirstNames tin full) - - - 

Surname i Mr/Mrs/Missl - - - - — 

_ Wj if K t.fTTTF.lte 1 1'U'- V^K 

1 Address- — — 


, Postcode 


Signature. 


FAMILY MONEY/3 



( CURRENCIES ) 

Shower a small businessman 
with cheques made out for a 
few Deutschmarks or yen and 
he will end up out of pocket 
because of the hank charges. 

But any businessman who 
gets a regular flow of payments 
in foreign currencies can side- 
step the charges by channel- 
ling the money into a money 
fund. 

At the Good Book Guide - 
a sort of postal bookshop for 
expatriates - customers are 
encouraged to use credit cards 
in spite of the charges. But if 
customers insist on sending a 
foreign currency cheque they 
have to add the equivalent of 
£1.50 to the bill to cover the 
cost of bank charges. 

“That probably does not 
always cover the cost of 
banking the cheque," says the 
chairman Peter Braith waite. 
“But, after all, we cannot 
charge customers anything to 
cover the cost of credit card 
commission." 

The average book order 
received by The Good Book 
Guide is £30, but a bundle of 
cheques can be processed 
together so the cost comes 
down to something like £1 a 
cheque. 

Eurocheques are increasing- 
ly being used, which means 
expats can write cheques in 
sterling and there are no extra 
charges for banking them. 

Sterling cheques drawn on 
non-UK banks are just- as 
inconvenient as foreign cur- 
rency cheques. They still have 

‘Liquidity is 
all-important’ 

to be sent back to the original 
bank. 

But there is a differ ence 
between US dollar cheques 
drawn on the large New York 
banks and those drawn on tiny 
hillbilly banks in the hinter- 
land — the latter take much 
longer lo wend their way 
through the system. 

*Tm concerned we have an 
efficient system to bank the 
cheques quickly,” says Mr 
Braithwaite. “liquidity is aD- 
important How long it takes 
to get a payment mio the 
account can be more impor- 
tant than the bank charges.” 

It is possible to open current 
accounts in almost any foreign . 
currency. But most . banks 
demand a fairly hefty mini- 
mum opening balance. 


PoN'75eNi) A cheque you 

SAID, SBNP MB A 

Of YbUR WOM&tfVl COUdm. 


Barclays, for instance, asks for 
the equivalent of S 1,000 and 
charges a commission fee of 
$10 a quarter if the average 
credit balance falls below 
$1,000. The American Citi- 
bank asks for $2,500 as a 
minimum opening balance. 

But Llqyds has a good deal 
— current accounts in 50 
currencies, requiring just the 
equivalent of $1 to set up, pay 
interest automatically once 
the balance reaches the equiv- 
alent of $3,500 (for 30 differ- 
ent currencies), and offer a 
cheque book for all currencies 
except the ECU. 

The interest paid on sums 
between $3,500 and $25,000 is 
3.5 percent below base, which 
earlier this week would have 
meant 3.625 per cent for US 


.dollars, 0.875 iw cent for 
Deutschmarks and }25 per 
cent for yen. 

- But there are even higher 
-yields on offer m foreign 
currency accounts run, by' 
Rothschild and Guinness Ma- 
hon. Both these merchant 
banks built up strong currency 
funds offshore to take ad van- 
tage of the tax breaks m rolling 
up income into capital gains. 

But since the clampdown oil 
roll-up funds they both run 
two. types of fluids — one: a 
roll-up fond and the other a 
“distributor” fund, which has 
to pay out afleast 85 per cent 
of its income that is then 
taxable in the hands of inves- 
tors, or the company, as 
income.. ' 

For instance, earlier tins 


Bank charges for banking 
foreign currency cheques 

Barclays Nat West Mkfiand Uoyds* 


Rate (%) 
Min (£) 


* Lloyds rates are gudefinos fiom head offlea, but branch, managors haw 
considerable discretion. . 

Midland charges a flat £5 (or cheques up to E10Q and a nwwnurujLEIC 
for cheques worth more than £100. 


The 


i '* -T 


aajws 

us dollars k5,Pef cat, 

and yen *9 percent Jbereae 
16 currency units, including 

the ECU as wefl as a moaged 

currency share, priced zs 

sterling. 

There are no charges for 
paying in cheques in any 
currency, no charges for 
switching between qur enaes 
and no spread between me 
buying and selling prices of 
the currencies. Most n npor- 
ta nr there is no aumOmro 

opmingts!w“7*l'te™M 
you tried proffermg $10 you 
would not expect a wsnn 
welcome. 

At Guinness Mahon the 
minimum in the rdU-Bp is tjie 
equivalent of $3,000 and in 
the distributor fond,^ «1 Global 
Strategy it is £1,000 and the 
yields are sii T1 0< IT to those at 
6ld Court. 

“We have some small and_ . 
m^ium-sized bus in es s es- who . 
use the fund to manage their 
liquidity,” said Howard 
Flight, who manages 
Guinness Mahon's currency 
funds. : 

Small businesses can use the 
roll-up funds to defer a -tax 
liability became the gain does 
not crystallize for m* purposes 
until the rolled-up interest and' 
capital is withdrawn from the 
fund. Companies iacydicaJ 

Good for small _ 
businessmen 

industries which have 4 cash 
surplus in the good years can 
leave it on deposit and cash it 
in during the lean limes when 

theliabfoty canbe setagainsi 
any losses. • 

Tbe<mmmcy.foDds can 
be used by companies: hedging 
their cunracy transactions for 
future purchaaesasan Alterna- 
tive to the currency futures 
market. V 

iBut even theinqdest small 
businessman, ■arih'qg . Small - 
value items.. to -customers 
abroad, can use tfre funds 

i^^^chmges imposed by 
banks for deafrng with foreign 
cinrenty<*eques.^^ ^ : - - 

yivien^oldsmith 


If you are puzzled about what 
the Budget means in tax terms 
you can get flee tax and 
general money advice from a 
team of more than 300 char- 
tered accountants who will be 
manning telephones for eight 
days before the end of the tax 
year. 

The Moneyline service or- 
ganized by the institute of 
Chartered Accountants to pro- 
mote chartered accountants’ 
special expertise will operate 
from nine regional centres.. 
Last year only London ac- 
countants mounted the ser- 
vice, and in nine days received 
more than 1,200 calls. Predict- 
ably most (40 per cent) were 
about income tax, but others 


were about capital gains tax, 
savings and investment, yaT 
and business problems. One 
caller even asked what to. do 
with . a large collection of 
unused postage stamps. 

If your problem is too 
complicated for genera! tele- 
phone advice, the chartered 
accountant at the end of the 
line will, refer you to the 
inquiry service run by the 
Lbndcm-Soriety of Chartered 
Accountants (01-628 2467). 

: They will pass on the names 
of three accountants spedaliz- 
ing in . your type of problem. 
This service dealt with 900 
callers last year. . . 

“We expect a lot of ques- 
tions to Moneyline about the 


new inheritance tax and per- 
sonal equity plans,” said Peter 
Wyman of Deloitte Haskins 
and Sells. 

■ Hie .Moneyline Service will 
operate from Monday, TVfcuth 
24, to Thursday, March 27, 
w then again Rafter Esther 
from Tuesday, April 1, to 
Friday, April 4, from 2pm to 7 
pm. Loffldon — 256. 5312; 
Liverpool — 236 1235; Man- 
chester— 228 7846; Neweasfle' 

- 320312; Leeds — 445087; 
Wolverhampton — . _• 50733; 
Bristol — 293922; Maiden- 
bead — 29955 and Brentwood 

- 211825. 



Retirement? 


With London LHe your savings can attract a 
net yield of 22% p. a/ 


There's no better time to bean making 
provsk^foraFrospenDiisandhappy 
retirement than the present - and no better 
wayddoingsothanw^aLorwbnLlfe . 

retirement sawings plan. 

With London Life a net outlay o f jus? £50 
per month over aten year period cotdd 
produce a cash (undaf £19.761 " to provide- 
retirement bendns^whk^represemsanet 
annual yield of 22.5%*.' 

A\^impressiwfiquretosaythelCTSt- 
butho\uexat^Krtacniwed?TTTeaxKWGr 
is idmple. The plan teoneofthemosttax- . 
effidem on the market 

• Tax reBef at a minimum of 30% and a 
ma»nnimof60%oneachccinJnbutton. 

• The savings accurnulaie in a tax- 
free fund- 

• Tax-free himpsum payable at 
reflrement. 


^^wal pertemance is foe faerthat 
to a v ®y 

1 


tondontife 


P -rr -4 

[ A 

I Name — — r — - — — — — r — -Date of Birth . .. J 

I Address ; : — . -■/ . ; •' • '• - ' . • 

1 ' — — ^ Pbs y° tte - " ' . ' " ■ • p reler re dR airen , e ^r~ — ) 

| ‘Amount of Monthly Savings ' -v ... .. 1. 

j 'Arevou a member of a Company Pensfop Schema ~ a ^Ka te _ — 

TelNt^Bugn ess • . ' . - ^ ’ ~*-f 

I Altemarwelyt if you prefer you on ca3 Carole Woodver or < 


■PreferiedReti! 


irementj 


-Tax Rat 




* .-£$ 

4 !,i 

%! 




i - !T- 




.- -- ‘ ’• 


Hi 



uirnra 


\ 


r ii 




THE TIMES SATURDAY MARCH 22 1986 


FINANCE AND INDUSTRY 


29 


FAMILY MONEY/4 


Bouquets for 
paying up 
with honour 

&^£:TC^T^ Aifw 

Eszasgsr*—”*- 

r0fnalf *»g brokers 
who are stiU hiding behind the fact that 
meyare trying to sue— not very 
urgently— their professional indemnity 
asurers who provide cover when a ^ 

this 

sho«« to that the smell investor can 
brtB tMck gainst the fraudsters and the 
r^igem intermediary rt they join 
fwces wtth other victims and form an . 
a cton gr oup." said John Potter, co- 
orarwtor of the Signal Life Investors’ 
Action Group. 

Those who look Hke losing money in 
tite collapse of the Leeds intermediary. 
Haw Mitoael Roes, whose firm is 
now in the hands of the official receiver 
and te being investigated by the Fraud 
Squad, might do well to heed Mr Potter’s 

Europe again 

■ The iove affair with Europe as the 
place to put your money continues with 
the launch this week of a new 
European income Fund from Sun Life 
Trust Management The new trust is 
stabtemate for Sun Life’s European 
Growth Trust and is aimed at those 
investors who believe Europe is the (dace 
where the acton is. but need some 

sort of income from their investments. 

The Initial gross yield of the new fund 
is expected to be between 4 and 4.5 per 
cent - rising over the years. "It's not 
just the prospect of capital growth which 
shoOtd attract investors to Europe. 

Our experience In Europe, demonstrated 
by our htaWy successful European . 
Growth Portfolio, has ted us to befieve 
that European markets can provide ... 
the right Investment opportunies for .. 
income," said Big Riehards,-inanager ' ' 
of the new fund. “The objective of our 
new European income portfolio is 
primarily to achieve an attractive initial 
yi8U coupled with prospects for 
capital growth and steadfly increasing 
income/' 

Sun Life's existing European growth 
fund has turned in a creditable, above 
average performance during the past 
three months— there is no reason why 
the new mcome fund should not . . . 
perform similariy. 

Detafls: Sun Life Trust Management’ 

107 CheapsUe, London EC2V 6DU (01- 
6067788). 

£10,000 offer /"■ 

■ The place where reafprofits are to ' 

be made — or, conversely, where you can - 
lose your shirt — is the Unfisted 
Securities Market Here, shares can 



an 18 month suspended sentence 
after pleading guilty to charges of 
obtaining property by deception, and 
of falsifying accounts. 


Protection Policy 

■ Haml 
galProt 
24-hour 


Ham too is revamping its Family La- 
‘ Protection scheme which provides a 
fecal advisory service on any 



*1 Oink we have lots in common - 
, you’re rich and Fm greedy and we Ye 
both beyond the dreams of avarice’ 

double or halve in value in a matter of 
days. But it is not lor widows and 
orphans. However, a unit trust 
investing solely in this market is now on 
offer to the investor able to afford to 
take a chance with at least £10,000— 
Temple Bar Unlisted Securities Fund 
— managed by merchant bankers 
Guinness Mahon. During the past year 
the price of units has risen from 300p to 
about 350p. Over the longer term it 
has gone from lOOp. when the fund was 
launched in 1982. to 372p on March 
14. 

Details: Guinness Mahon Fund 
Mangers. PO Box 442 32 St Mary at Hill, 
London EC3. 

New views on VAT 

' ■ Value-added tax (VAT), unfScs direct 
taxes, is levied not on profits or gains but 
on total business turnover. Therefore, 
poor VAT planning has far more serious 
consequences for the finances of a 
business than foe neglect of any other 
areas of tax planning, says Tolley, 
publisher of a new VAT guide. 

The first edition of Totey's VAT 
Planning highlights the main financial 
drawbacks that can result from 
underestimating the importance of this 
tax and gives practical advice on how 
best to avoid them. It deals with 
registration, partial exemption, land 
and buddings, international services amt 
business acquisitions and disposals. 

The book Is available from Tolley 
Publishing Co Ltd. Tolley House, 17 
Scarbrook Road, Croydon, Surrey 
CRO ISO, at £14.95 

Cash in now 

■ If you have capital gains on shares, 
don't wait until next year to realize them 
as you could find that “bed-and- . 
breakfasting" them is more expensive. In 
his Budget statement, the Chancellor 
introduced a 0.5 per cent stamp duty 
charge —effective from "big bang" 
scheduled to take ptace on October 27 
next year. Bed-and-breakfasting — 
indeed aH dealing within a Stock 
Exchange account — will from that 
date Incur the 0.5 per cent extra charge 
which at the moment does not exist 

Adviser charged 

B tttos come~to our attention that 
Eric Foxford, a former employee of 
Private Patients Plan, mentioned in 
last week's Family Money as an adviser 
on group medical fees insurance 
schemes, received in January of this year 


each legal claim compared with the 
currentlimlt of £5,000. However, thepre- 
mium Is to go up from £6 a year to £7. 

Details from: Hambro Legal Protec- 
tion, Ham two House, East Hill. Col- 
chester, Essex COi 2QN (tel: 

Colchester (0206) 870570. • 

Budget bonus 

B Investors with unit trust group 
Fidelity can look forward to a bonus as a 
result of the Budget changes to stamp 
duty. When stamp duty is cut from 1 per 
cant to 0.5 per cant next October, 

Fidelity is planning to pass on the benefit 
to unit holders in toe form of a 
reduction on the spread between the bid 
.and offer price of units of a full 0.5 per 
cent "Before the Chancellor s 
announcement Fidelity unit holders 
could switch between its unit trusts at a 
cost of just 2 per cant of which half 
was stamp duty. Now that stamp duty is 
halved, the cost of switching between 
Fidelity's trusts will be down to only 1 .5 
per cent in October. 

Trust twosome 

B Everyone is dang it— launching 
unit frosts that is. Latest in what is 
becoming a long line of new fund 
managers, is Onon Royal Bank which has 
formed a unit trust subsidiary and is 
kicking off with two new trusts - RBC 
Select Growth Trust and RBC Select 
Income Trust 

Hand in hand with the two new trusts 
comes a new cash withdrawal facility 
called UnitCash, run In conjunction 
with Western Trust and Savings. 

UnitCash cards which can currently be 
used at over 175 Link Automated Teller 
Machines around the country will be 
issued by Western Trust ana Savings to 
unitholders in the new RBC trusts. 

Detafls from Orion Royal Bank, 1 
iEC2Y 


London WaH London 
6006222). 


5JX(te!:01- 


Book belters 

■ Two useful new books from the 
institute of Chartered Accountants could 
turn out to be best sellers. Interest on 
Unpaid and Overpaid Tax and Meet die 
Receiver may appeal to a similar class 
of reader but they set out respectively the 
circumstances in which you can claim 
interest on overpaid tax and when the 
Revenue can clobber you in a similar 
fashion. 

Meet the Receiver is something most 
people hope wB never happen but it 
comes as a nasty shock to most 
business people when through no fault of 
their own a company is wound up, and 
they discover just wnat being m 
receivership means. 

Detafls: Publications Department, . 
Institute of Chartered Acco u ntant s , 
Gloucester House, 399 Sflbury 
Boulevard, Central Milton Keynes, MK9 
2HL. Meet the Receiver ES-30: Interest 
on Unpaid and Overpaid Tax £5. 



Better Off WuhAn Investment 
TuatWtrks 24 Hours AEte 


lnwMiif> in the wrlds stockmarkets is undoubtedly one of the best 
Mats ,4 making jTMir wrings grow Over ibe last Eve years the UK. stock- 
niarkfl lia*-ri**n IW>%- and the American and German markets fay 171%" 
n,„l 323^1 n->prrtiwfy Gtmpare this with a Building Society share 

a*"!*. *ii !i I THi»mwfjnst 47^ tbewme period and ^ can see why more 

imr-iur- are putting their money into Hocbnutai around the world. 

Tin* pn.ldem (or must people, whether they are first time investors 
«w iiol. ► that rhuusins the most promising stocks demands a high 
ili-gn-** of iperialist knowledge, and a great deal of time. 

Fiilt-firv Managed International Trust offers you a way round this 
imiMt-m. The Trust aims to. provide m a ximum capital growth through 
an artnely managed portfolio of stocks selected horn the worlds stock 

markets. , 

Fidelity s managers can swiftly move funds from market to market 

in order to ensure -both the best possible return, and the m inim u m 
investment risk. 

acti ve management, consistent performance 

Of coarse, to manage an internal kraal fund Boccesufafly require* 
considerable skills. TheTnist dim® upon Fidelity^ strenglhcasoneofthe 
iareest investment management groups m the world, with invertment 
off-*** in all the worlds miqor financial centres, % are therefore m 

In uerfau terms. 


a position to know which stockmarkets offer the most potential -and to 
make sore y*xir money is there, working for you. 

ANNUALISED RETURN OF OVER 39% 

The performance of Managed International Trust highlights the 
enccess of ear investment philosophy. Over the past one and two years, 
the Trust is ranked 4di and 2nd in its sector. (Source; Planned Savings. 
March 19861. And since launch in October 1982. the Trust has produced 
an annualised return of over 3V%. 

SPECIAL DISCOUNT -INVEST NOW 

Don't mss oal any longer on the superior growth opportunities of 
slockmarket investment The minimum investment for Managed Inter- 
national Trust » only £500. 

lb give your investment a bead start. Fidelity is currently offering 
a spedai 1% discount on all investments in Managed International Trost- 
but you must reply now to qualify So retuni your completed coupon today. 

Alternatively, phone Fidelity's investment advisers on Calif ree 

0800414-161, between 10.00ajn. and LOO pjn. on Saturdaysor between 
930 in. and 530 pan. Monday to Friday. 

Iba should bear in mind that the price of units and the income 
from them can go down as well as up. 


FIDELITY M A NAG ED INTERNATIONAL TRUST 


ENEB «!. IWnmuTHW A 
h. \ AT. J ir 

r^ : !—>««. U— h. • , 

ii(Xiu( Amktth 


He RDELITY INTERNATIONAL Siawliire 

MANAGEMENT LIMITED into* nf j»*vt uAJllsr-iicv, 

pu Bn\xan*BRIDGE. Somame HR MRS MISS 

. KENTTWMD® iniiiUTTosKirwi 

| TELEPHONE O9604I4M Rnu 


Address. 


.Pul code. 


Im noi npra fe> 




I in FidrfiTv tnup-H 1 trfnuaJHwJ Thm 
a ihv (tffcr ]*Kr ndmp an trrrtjri at T, 

I B« apfJmino inri twWw nj rbc<pK ' 
madr iimilr is Fidrim lowrnaunnal ■ 

| - , 
i Rnn mmsm iUn 



Fidelity 

INTERNATTONAL 17 


BRADFORD INVESTMENTS 

FIXED TEEM DEPOSITS, £ 50 j 000 ts in its um 

16 . 7 % p.a. gross 

STANDARD TERMS ACCOUNT. £1.000 minimum 
Under £10,000 12*5 p.a- Neg. 

Over £10.000 1 2'6'5 Neg. 

HIGH \ IELD ACCOUNT, £500 minunum 

1214% p.a., NEG 

Deposits are secured Rales are fixed. 

Interest is paid annually, half yearly or monthly. For full 
details simply send this advert’ with your name and 
address written on it. 

Enquiries from brokers, financial advisers, pension fun d 
managers etc. etc- are welcome. 

BRADFORD BWESTMEKTS, IT, Ucc a s ed DeposS-Takere 

91 Maarngham lane. Estofisbed 1972 

Bradford 1, West Vortdwe 

Phaw (9274) 365807 or AosRrpbo&e (0274) 737548 


titan £1 0.000 - 9.70% net, 9.94% compounded I 
annual rale. 1420 3 © gross equivalent 2 mcmh£ natux of ) 
I withdrawal or 2 months loss oi mi eresL Mmimnm investmem £1000. [ 
CIVIL Sendforbrodniror 
SERVICE CSRS(T Ji FREEPOST. 

1 BP ILDWG Sooth Crcv*n.CR29FIT. 
SOCIETT Tel: 014803322 

km>iaViet3KtSti Xtrag o!ra > tsjaraSoomo Srwn m tm 

( Inon rrrnotcr So-r» -raiw- Suu wlwr v- wim 


WE. 
maxlmis 


How? 

^ By advising you which investment gives die 

most income a man aged wah mihfeassmanct could 
e*pen w recene 12 . 0 % p a tielparmeetl 

% By reducing your income tax bill 

many retired people Ioh' out unnecesvinh on tlw ’age' alkwancc 

^ By making your capital grow to increase your 
income in the future. 

Knight Williams has specialised for many years 
in identifying income investments for retired 
people. Send for full details. 

Knight Williams 

Independent financial advice. 

g 33 Cork Street, London W1X 1HB. 01-409 0271 

B Name. 


Address. 


8 

■ 


I 

I 


■B (fxu»»v4taii t 22/3 M 


UnitCash can give you access to ;nsiant. \&t± 
cost cash credit when you ourenase one of 
the new Royal Bank of Canada Group 
Unit Trusts This facility, the Erst ever of <ts 
kind, is provided through Western Trust S 
Savings ltd, a subsidiary otTne Royal Bank of 
Canada 

in fact, if you invest £1 .000 or more in 
either the RBC Select Income Trust or 
the RBC Select Growth Trust you could 
receive instant cash credrt secured acamst 
your investment worth up to 70% of 
the b*d value of your units ibo value 
£ 1.000, credit available £700). 

And, as your RBC Select Trust grows m 
value, so your credit limn will grow 
with it! 

With the LINK card UnitCash provides, 
you may draw from £5 to £250 a day 
through cash machines in the 
rapidly expanding LJNK network 
across the country. 

Best of all. when you use UnitCash 
you don't have to repay over a set period. 
Interest only is charged on what you borrow 
ata highly competitive rate from as low as 


1 45% a month. APR 1 836% variable 1 for a 
loan facility over £ 1 0,000). paid on receipt of 
quarterly statements And of course, you're 
free to pay back the capital a: any time 
For full details of this unique offer contact 
Western Trust & Savings on FREEFONE 9427 


Western Tru st & Savings Ltd 

Ut h \t bank oi ( ainada 
The Money Centre, Plymouth PL1 1SE 



f '. . 



now unit trusts mean 
cash instantly! 




Two UnitTrusts from the 
Royal lank of Canada Group! 


The RBC Select Income Trust and the RBC 
Select Growth Trust are the first authorised 
Unit Trusts to be launched by The Royal Bank 
of Canada Group via their Orion Royal Bank 
subsidiary and investment advisers Kitkat & 
Aitken. 

These new Unit Trusts will be invested primarily in 
UK equities, but the Trust Managers, may at their 
discretion, place up to 20% of each portfolio into 
overseas securities. This means that investers benefit 
by the manager's having the additional ability to make 
timely moves between international markets. This can 
increase profit potential and improve portfolio stability. 

Kitkat & Aitken, Investment Advisors to the Trusts, are 
themselves members of the Royal Bank of Canada 
Group and are internationally recognised as having 
proven research skills. 

RBC SELECT INCOME TRUST 

■ Invested principally in UK shares but with up to 20% 
overseas. 

The Trust's aim is to provide above average a 
income with the additional prospect of capital pQ 
growth over the medium to longer term. — 

Gross Estimated Starting Yield 5%. 

Distribution Dates: April and October 

(First Distribution: October 1987). 

GENERAL INFORMATION 

Bu^OTjfelhngUfl'lS U"ittfTO*nCW'«iVlKbPuqIi:0'«3i'3 0naTy 

DuiretttMv Pnwi ana re-os are Qumeo flitj^j' •»««»«« 

AopuioK «i ne ac» noAirtgsj >«*&' oi nMrucWS a 
cyitraa v,:s ssjM in wium ro n ltfmng 3-orttae toUowkI fcv a IM 
Ce^*ote »«nkmg oawtiic 

urwrr^MvjidojckiorneManagPionfl-ivh^nessilA-aiihearec 
nj"ng RwxiicNjw Drocefos v»i tie torA.roeo Dv tiw Manags^ witw 

id L«y»n5<M,% ijf reo?itJt toe renouwo cen«icate 

Charges An M-a’ o* SS f. indodeo « IN? DKeoi u^is ioqert«r 

> s « •J'fltfnnw manSe 'S I*b' plji'.' A T| 
a-i3 is oeAined «te*N l*>e ~’vU'i income The ■■ gW *4 n 

tftei ne wd o' :i>«e ch^-ges 5uot«i 10 ne three wcci'hj "cr« •■} 

LtKhoioera n iro>'flec 6, the Trust DrtCi 

ip Out OI the -mil# rlwgn remunpdlitin All oe 

p&d to autlwtee e •efetwe sr.eon on see town oeanng 
■a.jmc to ives ifw wa die uim on 

reguor/ 

income - R3C Se“r Gnjunh Tom - A» inns m me Fund <re 
dccuruiacon trAS ana «c»ne genpaiec <•, dDTrmjiicaK re 
net ?* 3 x*. '5te m> :o mcreaw 'he -jiueci un.«j S3C Seec: inccme Irusi 
- income o» a? tumr^aton u^iis are .jwaaaoie On -rt. rme ervts. 

CV-Outcn 01 nC5"e net o' 6AK «3» »a«. s n :t*iorr- .jl a 

dTOien*“'rtB H »»'AB'iianfliTc!W se*ieinc‘rj:ennine<jcoiitj:on 
lorr-i JJTi'Ch tvoe u' uT '■ vfit -VQbO '*6 

Each 'rue A a ivoe: -ange nuesmvn: unce» the Tr^siee investment Act. 

!3bl ano-iauttor-w: Oy Deoanmeni cp tiae 
Manages; Or*n Riwl Sank i*ufl :eo. ' Lenspi .\a» 

LPtoon ?C3V ‘is 

TTOstees; CVoesiw- Bani pic. Gu*3Wi 



RBC SELECT GROWTH TRUST 

Invested principally in UK shares but with up to 20% 
overseas. 

This Trust aims to provide capital growth over the 
medium to long term. 

Gross Estimated Starring Yield ?.5%. 

Distribution Date: April 
(First Distribution: April 1987). 

Please remember that the price of units and the income 
from them can go down as well as up. You should 
regard your investment as long term. 

HOW TO INVEST 

The potential of these new Unit Trusts, allied to the 
security of The Royal Bank of Canada Group, make 
these investments important elements in every 
portfolio. 

To invest simply complete the coupon below and 
return it with your cheque (minimum £500 per Trust) 
to the address shown. 

Orion Royal BankTrust 
Managers Limited 

Administrator^ PO Box 48, St Julian's Avenue, 
St Peter Port, Guernsey, Channel Islands. 


This form, together with your cheque, should be returned to Orion Royal Bank Trust 
Managers Limited, P0Box4S, Si. lulan's Avenue, SL Peter Port, Guernsey. 

Channel islands. 


Ll/Ve wish lo invest £ 

Trust is £500) in the Tr ust selected in th e boxes below: 

RSCSBECTMCDME TRUST i£ ~ 


.(minimum investment in one 


RBCSBHT GROWTH TRUST I £ 


For income attuffiulatton units please wfc here |~*~j 
SURNAME 


FORENAMEfS) 


ADDRESS 


POSTCODE 


SIGNATURE 


DATE 


1986 


if there are iOini applicants all must «gn and attach names separaiely Chilean under the age of 
18 are not allowed to be registered holders in their own names 

Orion Royal BankTrust Managers Ltd., Administrators, PO Box 48, : z 
St Julian s Avenue, SL Peter Port Guernsey, Channel Islands. - 









JO 


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The Foreign and Colonial Investment Trust PLC 
1985 Annual Report and Accounts 
now available on request 



Success of savings plan— 

1,553 new private shareholders. 


n 


To: The Foreign & Colonial Management Group 

I Laurence Pouniney Hill. London EC4-R OBA 

Please send me a copy ofThc Foreign and Colonial Investment Trust PLC 
19S5 Annual Report and Accounts and details of Savings Plan. 

PI LAM VMIMS 

Surname \lr.- Mrs- MK' - - - - — _ 


FirM Name *•. 


AdUtcs' 


prist Code . 




FAMILY MONEY/5 


Inheritance tax — good and bad news 



By Lorna Bonrke and Lawrence Lever 
game is up for the for the purpose of establishing 


The 

insurance companies and the 
insurance salesmen who made 
rich pickings out of the lucra- 
tive business of selling people 
•‘inheritance trusts”. In his 
Budget this week the Chancel- 
lor batted them out of court 
while at the same time intro- 
ducing radical changes to capi- 
tal transfer tax — or gifts tax as 
it was often called — which has 
completely transformed this 
tax on wealth. 

“Capital transfer tax or 
inheritance tax as it has been 
renamed is now a purely 
voluntary tax”, says John 
Greener of investment advis- 
ers Richards Longstaff. And 
accountants and other tax 
adrisers have been quick to 
point out that inheritance tax 
can now be avoided altogether 
— provided you are prepared 
to actually give your assets 
away and you live for seven 
years after the gift has been 
made. 

The C hance llor has abol- 
ished the CTT lifetime rates of 
tax for gifts between individ- 
uals. We can all now give away 
as much as we like without let 
or hindrance — the only 
restriction being that a lot of 
people don’t have all that 
much to give. 

However, if you don’t give 
away your assets during your 
lifetime you are going to pay 
the higher “death” rates of 
inheritance tax on everything 
above the new exempt thresh- 
old of £71.000. Under the old 
regime, gifts during your life- 
time above the ex empt ion 
threshold attracted CTT at 
only half the death Yates. 

There is now a single rate 
payable on death and on gifts 
made within three years of 
death. If you die three to seven 
years after making a gift you 
don't pay the full rate of tax 
but a proportion — as the table 
shows. 80 per cent in year four 
falling to 20 per cent in years 
six to seven. 

There has been an improve- 
ment too in the way cumula- 
tive gifts are treated. In the 
past ail gifts made in any ten- 
year period were aggregated 


INHERITANCE TAX RATES 



UNIT 

TRUSTS 


With over eight hundred unit trusts available and more being launched each month, how do you 
know which to choose? In reality there are only three basic types of unit trust, and M&G has an out- 
standingly successful example of each: Recovery Fund for capital growth. Dividend Fund for 
income, and SECOND General for a balance 


between income and growth. 

You should remember that new funds or 
funds which suffer a change of management 
are likely to be more of a gamble than those 
which can point to a long and successful record. 
M&G r s investment team has remained largely 
unchanged for many years, and our long-term 
performance record reflects this. Past perform- 
ance cannot be a guarantee for the future, but it 
is usually the best measure you have of a fund's 
likelihood of achieving its objective. 

We are offering an extra 1% unit allocation if 
you invest £1,000 or more and 2% if you invest 
£10,000 or more per Fund. 

The price of units and the income from them 
may go down as well as up. This means that unit 
trusts are a long-term investment and not suit- 
able for money you may need at short notice. 


Income 


DIVIDEND FUND 


If you need income which will grow over the years M&G Dividend Fund 
could be your ideal investment The Fund invests m a wide range of 
ordinary shares and aims to provide above average aid increasing 
income andayield about 50’/a higher than theFT. Actuates All-Sharelndex. 


COMPARATIVE PERFORMANCE TABLE. £10.000 invested m ham i^uts at the 
bundi ol MiG OncdewJ fund on 6th May. 196s. compared urtft a smvldr 
investment n a Budding Scceiy. 


Year ended 
31 DECEMBER 

;.\coivc 

CAPIWL 

mu: 

DIVIDEND 

BUlDlNG 

SOCIETY 

M&G 

DIVSEND 

BULDMG 

SOCIETY 

6 May ’64 
1965 

£396 

£536 

£UW)00 

10200 

£10.000 

10.000 

1970 

463 

650 

10.760 

10.000 

1975 

828 

871 

16,300 

10.000 

1980 

1,660 

L20O 

24£80 

10.000 

1985 

2578 

908* 

65460 

10.000 


NOTES AH maxty figuiessho-nr are net ot base <ate Uk. 

77» 8uiWmg Seoery mo jr*? ispres are ft 1 ; above the average of the rate s 
ottered *1 each /ear (source fijLtSrg Societies Assocaton) 

M&G pryidend caoil a 1 figures are a« reaVsaticn nalues -Estimated 


Growth 


RECOVERY FUND 


Balanced 


SECOND GENERAL 


M&G Recovery Fund is probably the most successful unit trust ever 
launched and ihetablebefowshows just how well it has achieved its am 
of capital growth. The Fund buys the shares of companies which have 
fallen on hard times. Losses must be expected when a company fails to 
recover but the effect of a tumround can be dramatic 


M&G SECOND General Trust Fund aims for consistent growth of both 
capital and income and has a 29-year performance record which is 
second to none It has a wide spread of shares mainly in British 
companies. 


COMPARATIVE PERFORMANCE TAB LEVa'ue ol flO.OOO mweslW at the Muncti 
Ol M6G Recovery Fundi*) 33/dMay.l9^5. *nh net income remvesitsl 

Year en de>J 
31DECEMBLP 

M&G 

RECOVERY 

FT. C'SOlNAfJY 
INDEX 

RET-tt. 
PRICE INDEX 

BU(LCWW3 

SODET# 

23 May -69 
1970 
1975 
1980 
1985 

£10,000 

11,760 

26A00 

102,560 

270,800 

£10.000 

&570 

11.121 

17287 

49,474 

£10.000 

11.020 

21283 

40,175 

55248 

£10.000 

11.058 

16.178 

25.521 

40.168 

NOTES Aft ftcures include re«ve£;«l income nef o< tec ute tax. 

1 heBuJdmgSociely Inures re teed on an enra mteresl -account o’lewgl-'S 
3 e«tj 9 r*ie oteroy? warty rarelMtrtvBuittngSoctete AKOtCWnl 
PA&GRecovirvhfcM*-- a-<.yi--n , -'aM" .*m 


COMPARATIVE PERFORMANCE TABLE. Value ot £10.000 invested at the 
launch si MiG StC0*«D o*i S:h June. 1556. with net mcame ranvtttefl. 

SCCCEMBcr 

MAG 

SECOND 


RETNl 
PRICE INDEX 

BUIDWG 

SOCIETY 

5 June 56 
i960 
1965 
1970 
1975 
1980 
1985 

£10000 

19,520 

31320 

40480 

79,840 

195,400 

546,000 

£10.000 

20.080 

26230 

30.540 

39,620 

61600 

176240 

£10.000 

11293 

13.492 

17,143 

33.107 

62.494 

85.941 

£10.000 

12.483 

iao93 

21.636 

31.651 

49.931 

78.588 

notes ss rr^?=s b».« ■ -e-T-nsne xyr* m d 

theSjiitw-s 3'X'e'/licu:es veaasai-an sne*rra inierer; accc^inr ottering i-j'-o 
aboii e the yean., ra - * i E^iHJing Sooeties A^ooaocnj. 

M*G 5KCVC <i«n- era', f gu-es 21 e an reaiiia;iofl vaiuK, 


FURTHER IN POWUOKJN Oh m March 1386 offered 
prices and estimated gross cwrent yields were 

fticome Accumulation Yield 
Recovery Rind 352 3p 4S1.6p 2-96% 

Dividend Fund 416-5p 1203 3p 476% 

SECOND General 704-6p 1374 7p 3 50% 

Rices and yields appear dalv in tte financial Tunes The 
difference betvwsen the offered once (at which you buy urts) 
and the 'tar pnee (at which you sell) is normally 6\ An i ratal 
charge of 5% is included iri the ottered pro? and an annual 
charge of up to 1% of each Fund's value - currently W&- phis 
WT is deducted from gross income. Income for Accumulation 
units 6 reinvested to incr&sethar value and for Income units it 
is distributed net of teac-rafe tax on the tallowing dates. 

Recovery Dividend 5ECON) 


SPECIAL OFFER CLOSES 5th APRIL 


I All a ppfi cations received by 5th April, 1986 will be given an extra 1% allocation of units. I 
1 Thtf rfillrcrease to2% for appikaScns of £10,000 Of more per Fund. ■ 

I Ta M&G SECURITIES UMITED. THREE QUAYS. TOVVERHiLl, LONDON EC3R68Q 

I Please invest the sum(s) indicated below m the Fulfils! Of my etwee (minimum investment 
in each Fund:£L000) in ACCUMULATION/INCOME urate (delete as applicable or 
Accumulation units wil be issued for Recovery and SECOND and Income units will be issued for 
Dividend) at the price ruling on receipt of this application. DO NOT SEND ANY MONEY. 


A corrtrau noil? will te wn: to you staling 
eiactiy “raw much owe and me setrlenw.! 

Sate, row certificate wiH follow ah«lj 


mLWMEMHWS 

r^ikv-ikwr 


Distributions 


20 Feb 
20 Aug 


IS Jan 
15 July 


IS fob 
15 Aug 


Next distribution 20 Aug 
for new investors 1986 


15 July 
1386 


15 Aug 
1986 


You can buy or se8 units on any business day Contracts for 
Purchase or safe win be due fur settlement two lo three weeks 
later Remuneration is payable to accredited agents: rates are 
available on request The Trustee for Dividend and Recovery is 
Barclays Bank TradCoLirnitedandforSECONDsUoydsBank 

Rc The Funds are all wider-range investments and are 
authorised by rtie Secretary of State for Trade and Indusby. 

M&G Securities Limited. Three Quays, Tower 
London EC 3 R 68 Q. Tel: 01-426 45 SS. 

Member ol the Unit Trust Association. 



£ 00 

DfVtoEND 

|U« iiOll 

£ 00 

SECOND 

;MW Ii !jWr 

£ 00 


POST 

coot 


I 


SJGTWhjRt. 


I 


DOE- 


TU 481216 



THE M&G GROUP 


your transfers up to the ex- 
empt threshold (£67.000 in 
1985-86 now £71,000). That 
cumulation period has now 
been reduced to seven years. 

Bui the most important 
changes were reserved for 
wbat the Revenue describes as 
“gifts with reservation". This 
means that ail the inheritance 
trust type schemes so actively 
marketed by the insurance 
companies are now dead — 
they don’t work. 

These CTT mitigation 
schemes, which went under 
various names such as inheri- 
tance trusts, discounted gift 
schemes and PETA (pure 
endowment-term assurance) 
plans, have been withdrawn 
from the market. The life 
offices and insurance compa- 
nies that marketed them are 
shell-shocked by a move 
which they claim was totally 
unexpected. Not all of them 
are yet prepared to concede 
defeat. 

Sun Life, for instance, has 
•“temporarily withdrawn" its 
“Flexible Transfer Trust ( 
with discounted gift values)" 
scheme. It was only launched 
on February 4 so this may 
prove a rare instance of a life 
office not recovering its mar- 

The main asset is 
the family home 

keting expenditure through its 
policyholders. 

Legal and General, howev- 
er, which had sold 10.000 of 
its Capital Preservation Plans 
since the company launched it 
in 1982, has accepted that it is 
the end of the road for 
mitigation schemes. It' has 
taken it off the market. 

Chris Marshall, the 
company's legal affairs man- 
ager, said on Wednesday; “We 
withdrew the CPP as from 
today. None which were fully 
completed by March 17 are 
affected by the new provi- 
sions. We were totally sur- 
prised by the Budget We had 
no inkling that this was 
.coming," 

’ The provisions which have 
effectively seen off the mitiga- 
tion-schemes are those con- 
cerning “gifts with reservation 
and insurance policies". The 
initial gift made under a 
scheme will be taxed — at half 
the inheritance tax rates — if 
the recipient is a trust or a 
company, but be free of tax if 
to another individoaL 

What really finishes off foe_. 
mitigation schemes, however, 
is the provision that wben foe- 
reservation is released, which 
in the case of mitigation 
schemes is generally the death 
of the donor, then inheritance 
tax becomes payable on the 


Tim ChMcdtor proposes that 
there should be a smtfft rata 
laMe. The fun rate would apply 

to transfers on or wfthm aevan 

years before death, with a 
tapcied reduction in the tax 


payable on transfers between 
seven and 

death. Other transfers that 
stffl chargeable wouM be 
taxed eo the basis of half 
death rates. 


Tax rate fit) 
Nil 
SO 
35 

40 . 

45 

50 

55 

60 


1985/86 scale 
0-67 
67-89. 
89-122 
122-155 
_■ 155-494 . 
194-243 - 
243-299 
over 299. 


1986/87 scale 

0*71 

71-95 

95-129 

129-184 

164-206 

206-257 

257-317 

over 317 


RATE OF CHARGE 
ON GIFTS WITHIN 

7 YEARS OF DEATH 

: Transfer on or within 7 years 

of death wiB be taxed on therr . 
value at the date of the gift or A 
the death rate scale, but using * 
the scate in farce ar the date of 
death. 

Tax on transfers in the years 
before death wiS be subject to 
the faHowing taper; 


Tbe new rate te to apply to tiwsfars madt anor aftw Milch 1& 1985 


Years between 

gift & death 

0-3 

3- 4 

4- 5 

5- 6 
8-7 


« of Ml charge 
at death rasas 

100 

80 

60 

<0 

so 


7b rrm/fttH— 
Jt&MCtt7n£CHWCUL9K0MX<& 
/ns Hiubohj txfrm'mxfe&TM ', * 



value of the gift at that rime. 

In other words, the . gift 
would be taxed as if it were 
made at the lime of death, 
even though it was actually 
made many years earlier with 
a reservation such as the right 
to eryoy income from t he 
gifted asset. Inheritance tax — 
which starts at 30 per cent — 
will be charged on the value of 
the gift itself, with credit being 
given for any tax paid when 
the gift was first made. , 

Any doubt that the new 
provisions apply to mitigation 
schemes is dispelled by the 
Inland Revenue press release. 
Referring to .the provisions, it 
reads; “One of the main areas 
to which they will apply ~wiil 
be insurance. There are many 
commercially marketed ar- 
rangements intended to miti- 
gate capital transfer tax 
through the use of insurance 
policies. 

“They include . arrange- 
ments known as PETA 
schemes, discounted grit 
schemes and - ' inheritance 
trusts™ under the Chancellor’s 
proposals gifts of this sort wiO 
be “gifts with reservation” 
and will be taxable On -the' 
donor’s death, with credit pad .- 
for any tax paid at the time the 
gift was made.-” 

The Inland Revenue also i 
appears to -have anticipated r 
that there may be a LAPR- 
type problem whereby there is 
a question as to whether a ' 
particular mitigation scheme . . 
was implemented before the 


liew provisions came into 
force after midnight on Mon- 
day, March 17. If you com- 
pleted the scheme on Budget 
day von would have been too 
late.’ - 

The question wOl really be 
when the particular gift was 
made and the Inland Revenue 
says that “ir will be necessary 
to look at the sunooriding 
circumstances". It would ap- 
pear that the legal formalities 
must have been completed 
before the deadlrae m the case 
of a gift to a trust. In the case. 
of a gift involving an msur-- 


Ericreased role for 
maintenance trusts 


. death is "a severe burden with 
the top rate of 60" per cent . 
applying to .estates over 
£ 3 n.QOO(wbere the donor has 
not made gifts in the' seven 
years before death). Such . 
WeaWris not a vast fortune." m 
they say.. 

. The special rules that pre- 
vent you from giving away 
your assets bat retaining some- 
son of interest have, not 
affected just the old inheri- 
tance trusts- Accountant, Da- 
vid -Tafion of- -Dearden 
Farrow, says: "It's back Jo the 
old estate duty rules in many 
instances." He points put that' 
for a fat. of people, their main 
asset is the fa mily home and 
- muter tte old C1T regime it 
. was possi We for granny to give 
away the house within the 
£67.000 exemption limit — but 
'continue to.live there. . . 

. Under- the hew. ndes^ if she 
does this, the beneficiary (usu- ft 
ally a son or daughter) wiU 
have to, chaise rent in 
order fa gef’ round the “gifts 
with reservation” da uses. 

“I think it is also going to 
apply -hi those cases where a 
person puts shares m the 
femily business into a discre- 
tionary trust of . which he or 
-she was a trustee. People did 
ftiis.m avoid CTT tart were, as 
trusses, able to keep control 
of the company by exercising 
their vopng rights". Mr TaDon 


tfVv i 'V- 


ance poticy the dale of foe gift-, now believes that this sort of 
will be the date foar^ ^ foe^ scheme won’t work.:, 
insurance policy is made — 
generally when, .a letter of 
acceptance or a policy is sent 
to a policyholder. • 

The oniy consolation for foe 
insurance companies is. the 
amount of term assurance 
they will sell to people who 
want to give away their prop- 
erty and insure against ithe. 
possibility of dying -within-. 
seven years-of the gifts, there- 
by Jfjggeriflg oft thfr. tapered 
inheritance' tax cE&rga: ' 


Many accountants see an 
increased role for accumula- 
tion.' and maintenance trusts 
(used nr put money away for 
the under Ms) in terms of 
school fees planning. Howev- 
er. iftir is really only likely to 
be of interesuo the really rich, 
r. In foe-past.a grandparent 
could puLup » £3.000 a year 
into ’an ; accumulation and 

maintenance trust under (he. 

varinualj 

“br-'i 


♦- 


aiuict wutc uim unuci wic, 

imialjCTT exempt) pns. -If he 
sire put any more into the 


Bear in mind foal ibe ratettf-rtrusi. they started to rat into 
inheritance tax pajaSle oh : their £67.000 total exemption, 
death is really quite penal ; - Now they can push as much as 
AccouniantsSpicer and PegJer : they like into a trust and incur 
say in ihetr report: on: the no inheritance tax liability 
budget that inheritance tax on whatsoever. 






TIME. AND NO PENALTIES 


High interest AND instant access to your investment 
at any time, without penahyThafsthearriple, hd-stnhgpj 
promise of Moneyspihner Plus. 

The minimum investment is £500 and a balance of 
£10,000 or more earns the highest rate of 9.55% net pa. 

Interest is added annually in October oryou can 
receive it as monthly income 

Send the coupon to lis FREEPOST, Newcastte and 

start earning high, 


AMOUNT 

INVESTED 


£500 or more 
£5,000 or more 
£10,000 or more 


INTEREST 

PA* 


‘9X>3% 

930% 

955% 


GROSS 

• PAt 


1293% 

1129% 

1164% 


no-strings interest 
vyithoutdelay. 


tEquiiotent yiebi for bax fa« tfeepagm. 
♦The rate may vaty 



Jt>:.Mike McCardle, 

WWe endose cheque foi*£ _ 

tobeirnrestedfoMoneyspir^ 

(Pienetidc) 

Q - T_ 

C3 Nerestto be paid monthly. 

appficatioa 

FULL NAME/S:. 


1 


NORTHERN ROCK 

SS BUILDING SOCIETY™ 




Ifeople^ with your interest athean. 

OiiefOffice: 

Northern Rock Housa, Gosforth, Nevrcasile upc« Tyne 4PLTW: (Bl-285 719L 

City of London Office; 

Stone House 128^40 Bishop5gateEC2M 4WtTaephane 01-247 68PL .■/ 

Scottish Offke: 27 Castle Street; Edinburgh EH2 3DN. Tfclqabone: 03f‘226 34QL 


: POST CODE 
SIGNATURES __ 

,. | DA TE ^J '■ 


T12 
















T»— 

•*-’2^ <£** 
»*» •** - *“- 


'< 


&■ 

\„ 


•fy- 



L,"-fr, 


v *!^ 


.K 


dl 


; '■T 
.? ■ 


— J u "?.7 "... ' .' 





i nc i iivics oa i ukL>ay maalii 2z i y&o 


31 


FAMILY MONEY/6 


J obs in the sights 


A number of Budget measures 
were aimed at stimulating 
enterprise and employment 
For a start the Enterprise 
Auowance Scheme - whereby 
toe- Unemployed satisfying 
various conditions can apply 
for a £40-a- week grant to sum 
thar own business - is being 
expanded to take in JOfcOOO 
W^fnts a year, rather than 

The loan guarantee scheme 
has survived the Chancellor’s 
axe, which some thought 
might &U on it The guaran- 
tee, which the Government 
gives to the lending institution 
advancing money to the bor- 
rower, remains at 70' per cent 
of th e loan. However, the 
interest rate premium payable 
to the lender under the scheme 
has been cot from S to 23 per 
cent. 

This should boost the num- 
bers applying for finance un- 
der the scheme. They have 
declined since the government 
guarantee dropped from 80 
per cent and tire premium was 
increased. But vital has really 
knocked applications is the' 
much tougher requirements 
for. individuals with security 
in, for example, the famil y 
■ home, to put this into the pot 
when the business is started. 

CAPITAL GAINS TAX 


BUDGET 

BRIEFING 


These pensions are pud on 
the basis that the pensioner 
has been deprived of qualify- 
ing service or unable to maim 
pension contributions because 
of persecution. AD recipients 
of these pensions will be 
brought into line with the 
exemption for annuities paid 
by the German government : 
for more serious forms ofNazi 
perfection. 

BASIC BATE TAX REDUC- 
TION 

Reducing basic rate 
tax to 29 percent will have an 
impact on a number of trans- 
actions — apart from merely 
signifying a reduction in the 
tax blO. If for instqnc^ you 
are m a kin g payments under 
deeds of covenant then the 
total received .through the 
covenant will be the same if 
the covenant is expressed in 
gross toms, but lea if in net • 
terms. 

This applies to payments 
doe under the covenant from 
April 6 onwards. If the.cove- 
nant is expressed in gross 
terms, Le_ ■“ £100 a year”, then 
the net payment received by 
the person or body you cove- 


nant to will be increased by£l 
If anything rt was capital gains since £29, rather than £30 is 
rax, rather than rapmi trans- deducted by die giver. Over- 


fer tax, that Iras seemed under 
threat from the Chancellor’s 
guillotine. CGT has si mply 
been tinkered with but CTT, 
in name at least, has gone. 

The Budget has . increased 
the exempt CGT threshold in 
line with the retail prices 
index. For the 1986-87 tax 
year an individual win be 
exempt from CGT on the first 
£6300 chargeable mins ( this 
tax year it was £5900), while 
for most trusts the exempt 
limit is increased from £2950 
to £3150. 

NAZI PENSIONS 

Certain pensions under the 
laws of Austria and 1 the Feder- 
al Republic of Germany to 
victims of the Nazi-rraime are 
to become exempt from in- 
come rax from the next tax 
year. 


all, however, recipients will be 
in exactly the same situation 
as they simply claim the £29 
from, foe Revenue and end up 
with £100, as before. 

If the covenant is in net 
terms, Le. “a sum equal to £70 
after deducting tax at basic 
rate”, foe recipient ends up 
with slightly less. There is a 
net £70 payment, but foe gross 
payment necessary from foe 
covenantor to arrive at this 
net £70 is now £98.59, instead 
of £100, and foe tax rebate 
claimed by foe recipient will 
be cmrespondingly lower.. 

Another area where foe tax 
reduction will affect most 
people is mortgage mterest 
ie!ie£ From April 6 income 
tax will deducted from the 
interest payments foiling with- 
in the MIRAS scheme at 29 
per cent rather than 30 per. 
cent so there will be a slight ' 


increase in foe interest pay- 
ments you make. 

For those getting higher rate 
tax relief on their borne loan 
the net cost may remain the 
same depending on bow much 
of the mongage interest relief 
is ofis en able against higher 
rates of rax. Whore all mon- 
gage interest relief is 
ofisetrable against higher rates 
of tax there wiH be no change. 

For the basic rate taxpayer 
with a £20,000 home loan at 
13 per cent, monthly repay- 
ments will go up from 051.66 
to £153-83 a month. 

AGE ALLOWANCE 

Pensioners got a better deal 
on personal tax allowances 
when age allowances were 
increased by just over the 
inflation rate. A single person 
is now entitled to a tax 
allowance of £2,850 compared 
with the c u rre n t year’s allow- 
ance of £2,690. Married cou- 
ples win see a rise from £4,255 
to £4*505. 

The income limit above 
which age allowances start to 
be clawed back has also been 
raised from £8.800 (1985-86) 
to £9,400 (1986-87). Every £3 
of income over this threshold 
results in a clawback of £2 of 
age allowance down to the 
level of ordinary tax allow- 
ances. The point at which all 
benefit from age allowance is 
wiped out is on incomes of 
£10,173 for a single person, 
£10,675 for a married couple. 

Elderly people will also 
benefit from the foct that the 
July increase in pensions will 
be tax-free for 1986-87 — the 
increase, not the entire 
pension. 

MARRIED COUPLES 

Increases in personal allow- 
ances mean that generally 
where both partners in a 
marriage are working, it will 
pay to opt for separate tax- 
ation (not to be confused with 
separate assessment) when 
joint earnings top £2&520, of 
which the wife’s earnings most 
total at least £6,986. The figure 
for foe current year is £25,360 
with the wife’s earnings total- 
Kn&£6,956. 

Lawrence Lever 


NEW INTEREST RAWS 


Notice to Account Holders 


Gross 

Merest 

%PJL 


Midland Savings Accounts 


Net 

interest 
% pn. 


Gross 

Equivalent 

toaBasic 

Rate 

■fexpayer 


With effect from 19th March 1986 


7.69 


10.37 


deposit Account , 


Griffin Savers 


5.75 


7.75 


8.21 


11.07 


With effect from 20th March 1986 


10.37 


8.03 

9.36 

10.37 


Monthiy Income Account 


Saver Plus 
£100+ 
£500+ 
£1000+ 


7.75 


6.00 

7.00 

7.75 


11.07 


8.57 

10.00 

11.07 


Saveand Borrow Accounts 

With effect from 1 8th April 1986, interest paid on credit 
balances will reduce by 1% to 5.75% net per annum. 
For those customers who receive interest gross, the 
rate will reduce to 7.69% p.a. 

Interest chained on overdrawn balances will reduce 
by 2% to 21 % APR 22.7%. 


^MMaiMl Basic 

Midland Bank pic, 27 Poultry, London EC2P 2BX 


building society investors 

EARN MORE 

INTEREST 




ChurthmPWcham, 


Address 


Postcode. 


TeteahonfcPay 


Evening 


AUboiWmgsocieCK* 

JU»eBuiWiiigS(icieii« 
AtsooUaiiiifli" , 
Assaaaiwn'sln'' 1 ” 1 ** 

. Protection SchBK^ 


I 
I 
I 
I 

Tfo/M | 




BASE 

LENDING 

RATES 


Aten & Company 
BCC1 


12HS 
11h% 
.12N% 

Citibank Savinost. — ;12 k% 

Consolidated utis 12**% 

Comments) Trust 11V»% 

Co-operative Bank. — I2tt% 

C. Hoars &.Co 11v*% 

Lloyds Bank— 11W% 

Nat Westminster 11K% 

Royal Bank of Scotland— 11*%' 

TS8 _11»% 

G&&nk NA 11H% 

t Mortgage Ba»e Rue. 



BIRMINGHAM 

EXECUTIVE 


AIRWAYS PLCI 


L 


Offer for Subscription under 

BUSINESS EXPANSION SCHEME 

jointly sponsored by 

Mercia Venture Capital Limited 

and 

Smith Keen Cutier 

of up to 800,000 Ordinary Shares of £1 each at 
£2.50 per share, payable in full on application. 

Birmingham Executive Airways: 

# already has traded for 3 years showing continuing substantial increase 
in number of passengers and revenue growth 

$ operates twice daily from Birmingham to Copenhagen, Geneva, Milan 
and Zurich 

$ has been awarded route development grants of £1.8m for flights to 
Amsterdam, Dusseldorf, Frankfurt and Stuttgart subject to an increase 
in the equity base 

$ is raising £380,000 by a Rights Issue to existing Shareholders 

Fora copy of the prospectus, postthis coupon or telephone Norman Rowland, 
Smith Keen Cutler on 021-6439977 during usual business hours. 


To: Smith Keen Cutler Exchange Buildings, Stephenson Place, 

Birmingham B24NN. 

Please send me foe Birmingham Executive Airways PLC Offer for Subscription. 

Surname (Mr/Mrs/Miss) — Initials 

Address — 


Telephone Number. 


This 

advertisement 
does not 
constitute 
an offer to 
subscribe for 
shares 


Bank of Ireland 


announces that 
with effect from 
close of business 
on 21st March 1986 
its Base Rate for lending 
is reduced from 
12%% to 11%% 
per annum 


Banker Ireland 




THE 

BUILDING 
SOCIETY- 
RESIDENTIAL 
PROPERTY BOND 

Building Societies and houiei rerreteni lo most people ih« irCL-rest 
intfMtments they eon moke. Now Spoet, Service-. lid. hoi combined 
them to offer you a current rate of 13'V net on vour account -nth o 
lending Society together with on investment in o leading f u r.d thot 
only invests in the very peti ho j>es end riots >o Central London. 



One year 
Building Society 
return 


Offer 
closes at 
£5 million 


* At banc me io. 




Residential Property 
Fund growth 
in lost 12 months 


Free 

video 

available 


T QHertaatm Unv-.cm 
qo 9&— ■ rwv wild up 


Co# 0272-276954 now and get ,our Building Society Peservalron Number 
or lendifiic coupon to. Society Service* Ltd,, FREEPOST, firntol ESI 


NAME. 


.ADDRESS. 


-TEL:. 


ITI'I 

-NAS DIM 


AGE(S) 


TAX RATE 


AMOUNT I - 
4b AVAUA£i£ I 


First class investment management from 

GUINNESS MAHON 

-we let the figures talk for 

themselves... 


One year to 1st February 1986 


Three yean to 1st February 1986 


Five yean to 1st February 1986 


BS t^^” to ‘ emB,i0na,1 ■ 6I8 ^ uilmess Mahon International 3,1 : 

■Hill '• • aWgTO f 


’one tear to 1st February 1986 

UKE**, 


Not many international fund 
managers can claim the satisfaction of 
saying 1 told you so*. But the latest 
figures on the performance of three 
mqjor funds within the Global 
Strategy Fund, from Money 
Management, show just how well our 
investment managers have worked for 
investors in our funds. Over one year 
the Managed Currency Fund and UK 
Equity Fund are each TOP and the 
European Fund is second in the league 
table& 

The longer established International 
Managed Currency Fund is TOP over 
the three and five year period. 






r „ One year to 1st Febru&y jggg 

European ^A’llep. ' * 

Giunneaa Mahon GS European 1,622 




Furthermore we offer investors among 
the lowest initial investment costs 
available in the market — indeed on 
investments of £30,000 o%more in the 
Global Strategy Fund there is no 
initial, charge. 

Fill in the coupon today, send it to us 
without obligation and we will send 
details on our top performing funds. 

The Money Management figures are 
produced on the basis of sterling 
converted results of £1000 invested on 
an offer to offer basis with all income 
re-invested- Please remember that the 
value of your shares may go down as 
well as up. 


GUINNESS MAHON FUND 
MANAGERS (GUERNSEY) 
LIMITED, 

P.O. Box 188, La VieiHe Cour, 

St Peter Port Guernsey, 

Channel Islands. D 

Or telephone (0481) 23506 S 

extension 231 S 

or telex 4191482 GUIMAC G ft 

Please send me a prospectus! on the sole basis of j§ 
which investment may be model and an 'C 

application form. O 

Name 

Address _ 



Please tick for 
information required. 

[ | European 

□ Managed Currency 

□ UK Equity 



Guinness 
Mahon 

This advertisement has been placed by 
Guinness Mahon & Co Limited, on exempt dealer 



























In e 
is n 
was 
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bllf 
It i 

Hoi 

for 

son 

cer 


mg 

am 

< 


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me 

an 

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na 

lri 

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Stl 


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rc 


si 


] ! 


32 


FINANCE AND INDUSTRY 


THE TIMES SATURDAY MARCH 22 1986 


Best terms 
for 


mortgages 


If you need finance for a new home, a second 
home, school fees, or for home improvements, 
there's no reason for you to think that our 
excellent reputation means high costs. 

On the contrary. You’ll find our terms 
extremely competitive with anything on offer 
in the High Street And we’ll consider advances 
from £40,000 upwards, for primary mortgages 
and £5,000 upwards for secondary mortgages. 

Our service is countrywide. If you'd like to 
know more, call us on 01-486 8305 any day 
of the week? 




MORTGAGE SERVICES 

Well do the homework. 


Residential and Commercial Mortgages 
Re -mortgages, Second Homes and School Fees 
Harrods Estate Office*. FREEPOST. London SW3 ft Z 


To Harmds Estate Offices, FREEPOST. London SW3 1 YZ 
Please send me details of your Mortgages Services. 


| Name 
I Address 


I 


* Pbsfcnde Tel No T ? 

| *9am-9pm * eekdays. 1 0.3Qam-25Qpm Saturdays and Sundays | 


FAMILY MONEY/7 


Rates down, and still dipping 


( MORTGAGES ) 


The big banits performed ibeir 
usual Budget time duty and 
reduced their lending rates 
which, to the relief of the 
nation's home owners, al- 
lowed the building societies to 
cut their mortgage rates. 

The reduction of 0.75 per 
cent so for pot through by the 
largest societies will bring’ 
ordinary repayment rates to 
12 per cent from April 1, and 
after the recent abolition of 
endowment rate differentials 
endowment mortgages will 
generally cost the same. 

But although all home own- 
ers can see when their mon- 
gage rale falls, it may only be 
the sharper-eyed who noticed 
anything about the way it was 
done. 

For almost the first time 
there was none of the dither- 
ing and messing about which 
usually characterizes building 
society decisions on rate 
changes. 


Since the demise in 1984 of 
the building societies' mort- 
gage rate cartel, rate changes 
have usually been attended 
with even more vacillation 
and secrecy. 

Not so this time. As soon as 
the banks brought down their 
base rates the Halifax and 
Abbey responded with their 
own cuts. 

The societies had certainly 
had ample warning that an 
interest rate change was likely 
but the episode does seem to 
suggest that they are learning 


Mixed news for 
the investor 


how to operate more profes- 
sionally and on (heir own — 
more like the banks, in feet 
“It is a qualitative change of 
approach which shows the 


growing maturity of building 
societies in the free market,’’ 


said Adrian Coles, of the 
Building Societies 

Association. 


MONTHLY MORTGAGE REPAYMENTS 

NET OF 30 PER CENT* TAX RELIEF — PER £1,000 LOAN 

Interest Term in Years 

Rate% 5 10 15 20 25 30 35 


10-00 

1025 

10.50 

10.75 
11.00 
11.25 

11.50 

11.75 
12.00 
12425 
12450 

12.75 

13.00 
1325 

13.50 

13.75 

14.00 


2053 

11.87 

9.15 

7.87 

7.16 

20.41 

11.95 

924 

756 

725 

2052 

12.08 

956 

8.09 

758 

20.60 

12.15 

9.45 

8.18 

7.48 

20.71 

1226 

956 

8.30 

751 

20.79 

1254 

9.65 

a40 

771 

2050 

12-45 

9.77 

852 

7.84 

2059 

1254 

9.86 

8.62 

755 

21.10 

12.65 

958 

8.75 

858 

21.18 

12.73 

10.0 

8.84 

8.18 

2129 

12.85 

10.19 

857 

852 

2157 

12.93 

1028 

957 

R42 

21.48 

13.05 

10.40 

920 

856 

21.60 

13.16 

10.53 

953 

8.70 

21.6S 

1325 

10.82 

9.43 

850 

21.76 

1353 

10.71 

953 

850 

21.88 

13.45 

1054 

956 

9.04 

29 per cent from April 6th. 




6.72 

6-82 

6.96 

756 

.720 

720 

7.44 

7.55 

7.69 
7.79 
7.94 
8.04 
8.19 
633 

8.44 

8.55 

8.70 


6.44 
655 
669 
680 
6.94 

755 
7.19 
750 

7.45 

756 
7.71 
752 
7.97 
8.12 
823 
854 
8.49 


mortgage net of baste! rata tax reflet For loans over £36000 borrowers 
may be asked to make great repayments and reclaim the tax raM front 
the inland Revenue. 


From now on the omens are 
that general interest rates will 
continue to slide downwards, 
perhaps in 0.5 per cent steps, 
towards about 10 per cent 
during the spring and sum- 
mer. That will almost certain- 
ly mean mortgage rates will 
drop too. 

But for investors the news is 
more mixed No cut in invest- 
ment rates is welcome but the 
I per cent reduction on most 
investment accounts may not 
stick. 

The societies did well in 
attracting nearly £800 million 
in new deposits last -month, 
but mortga& lending is run- 
ning at high levels. The cut in 
the mortgage rate will increase 
the number of people wanting 
to borrow money, and the 
sag-sp nal upturn in the house- 
buying market is due to start 
about now. 

Some building society ex- 
perts are confident that they 
can cope. 

“We have got enough mon- 
ey to meet the foreseeable 
demand for home loans," said 
Tim Melville-Ross, chief gen- 
eral manager, of the Nation- 
wide. “And even if we start 
running short of retail depos- 
its to fund our lending, we can 
always dip into the wholesale 
money markets to- make up 
the difference. 

“ That should mean that 
investment rates won't change 
much over the next few 
months." 

But Michael McGarry, of 
the Leeds Permanent, 
sounded a warning that could 
prove to be good news lor 
investors: 

“We don't have much extra 
money on hand because we> 
are lending all we've got We 
will have to keep an eye on 



real boost this week — now is 
fine to boy that honre 

investment rates and if many 


Property ownership 
dearly 


societies find they are running 
short of funds there could be a 
round of upward leapfrogging 
on the rates paid to 
tors." 

societies do not relish 
the thought of leapfrogging 
and they will do all they can to 
m aintain the current rate 
structure. 


VU Lli 

depositi 

The s 


Bui past experience suggests 
that the balance can easily be 
upset — as it was last summer, 
for example, when war broke 
out between the societies and 
the hank* and investment 
rates went spiralling upwards. 

If thtotappens again, inves- 
tors may not lose as much as 
they currently expert. 

Richard Thomsen 


Pension 
prospects 
perk up 




»■ 


* IT 




fie 


ff*- A 


Pension 

like a yawn — -hut .. .... 

Chancellor's chai« • . 

sc h eme members. i,', 

The Chancellor does not ^ 

mint companies 


to nse the 

'Jit 1 


SnTte C*i. so 

them to deal wfth the 






Previously, many coups- 
lave deBberately.lwt fi* 

cash into toe pension scheme * 
and overfunded it during years ^ 
of high profits, thus sheltering re*, 
it from tax. br leaner years, 
they could take a coutrflmtlQa- 
holiday and put nothing in. 
Some companies c alle d lack 
cash when fie business was 

muring ft {OSS — ftWWding ftfljr 
tax charge on what was effec- 
tively taxable profits from, 
earlier years. __ 

This now stops. Fund man- G e? 
agers have been green one of- ; *2 
fine options - improve bene- ^ 
-fife to soak up any swptos, 
reduce contributions, . which 
wffl almost farariabfr mean 
employers* rather than 
employees* contributions, or 
take the ssrptos cash bade into 
fie company where it/wfll 
suffer a 40 per Cent tax charge. 

“This could be rery good 

news for.' 'pension : fund 
nanboV said John Greener, 
of ipensSmL consnlrants Rich- 
ards LongstnfL Tbem h an 
«wri«Mrtgd £50,000 udfifonsur- 
plus already locked.- up in 
penakm.lhndc.**' 

He. believes me pension 
funds wifi .want to- :improve 
benefits- So it looks like a 
golden opportunity far-trade 
unions and staff represoata- 
tives to push fin: a better deaL 


f 






1 


■-to 




" i 


THE EAGLE STAR FAR EASTERN TRUST 


Invest in the lands 



f 

33-^ 

i 






A 


*■ 


o 


cr 


Look around your home or office and you 
are bound to see a large number of goods 
made m the Far East. That’s why It makes 
such sense to invest in successful 
companies in places like Japan, Hong 
Kong, Taiwan, South Korea, Singapore, 
Malaysia and Australia. 

Now you can share in the success of 
these companies- by investing in the Eagle 
Star Far Eastern Trust. 


+\&rs 


o 





\ £=mr 


Have You Made Big Money? 


If you had invested £1.000 in our Far 
Eastern Trust on 1st October, 1985, your 
holding would have a cash value now* of 
3334. 

That’s impressive growth. 

So. we’re celebrating. 

On behalf of all the people who invested 
in our Far Eastern Trust when it was launched 
less than 6 months ago. And who now find 
themselves much richer. 

To celebrate their success - and to make 
it even more worthwhile lor you to join them 
now and share in the continuing fortunes of 
our Far Eastern Trust, we are making a very 
special offer to people who invest 3 .000 or 
more in it before 4th April. For details see 
opposite. 


■AilSth March. 1986 

Noir. Wt apprecwic that & momhs is only a *hcn penod of and 

ol courw patsi performance is no) necessarily a guide 10 the luiure. 
Y&u must expect urw poem, and the income from item. k> LiU Iron 
time to tone as well as itse 



Japan, the leading market in the area, is 
already receiving a major boost frbm the sharp 
drop in oil prices. Japan is totally dependent on oil 
imports -as it has no resources of its owin- But oH 
now costs Japanese industry only about a third of 
what it did a year ago. Imagine what that will do 
for Japanese competitiveness - and Japanese 
profits.’ 

The prospects throughout the area continue 
to look excellent. 


How to Invest 


The Far Eastern Trust is available to everyone 
aged 18 or over. Simply decide how much you 
wish to invest (minimum £500] - then complete 
the application form and send it, with your 
cheque, to Eagle Star Group. (LG43), FREEPOST. 
Bath Road, Cheltenham. GL53 3BR. No stamp is 
needed 


Now you can Invest by Phone 


Alternatively, dial 100. ask for FREEFONE 
EAGLE STAR and speak direct to our dealers. 
They will be pleased to take details of 
your investment there and then. \bu 
can also obtain further information 
about this (or any other) Eagle Star UnitTrust on 
this number. Our experts will be available lo 
answer your call from 8 am. to 8 p.m. on 
weekdays and from 10 am to 6 pro. at weekends. 


The Trust’s Objective / lAVcwish ;oht**sI L 


YOUR APPLICATION 

Ta Eagle Swi Umi Managers Limited (LC431 1 
FREEPOST BdthRojd.Chrtenham.aos. 
GL533BR 


SPECIAL OFFER 

FHEES&nfihe 
Solar Calculator - 

■f you Invest □. 000 or 

more m the Eagle Siar 
Far Eastern Trust before 
April 4&\. APPLY TODAY. 



GENERAL INFORMATION 


Price end Yield. Units will be afiocaledat the "buying- price 


The aim of this Trust is to achieve the 
maximum possible capital growth from a range of 
investment in Far Easiem companies. 

The major emphasis will be on Japan. 

But the Managers will also invest whenever 
ihey consider it appropnate. in other Far 
Eastern countries, such as Hong Kong. 
Singapore. "Malaysia and Australia. 

All Eagle Star Unit Trusts are Rainbow ft 

Rated, according to their risk/reward potential. | 
The Far Eastern Trust is rated Orange - 
Higher Risk. 


I minimum £300 1 
m the Eagle Star Far Eas*cm Tro>t A ch«ufl m&df 


payable >o EagU* Sur Umi Managers it mlosed 


\ 


Sumanw. 


I 


(VI, Mh’iAM-.l 

fijTCCTdrtVS 

tinnjOl 


I 


I 


Addrns. 



Paucodc 


■fau^mq" price d wmm tfwfrusr on 18556. was 71. Ip and 
Swesamatedgioss annual teconre was )usl urxkrt%. 
hfoHkHaiQiw^N^COWarenwibvacha^eoIM 
which logedter wiih a sourxiinq adjustment of up 10 i % « 
laiuen mio acojuni m fecakutefton ot Ijuving* aid 
*seUtng‘"pdces.NormaAydtmisa6Vi%dilterence 
between ihcse prices. Ongoing cosb are mat by a charge, 
eurremty Hi {ph* WAT) a year (the Tiusi DeedaSows a 
maxrmwn of deducted trom the Trusl'smcomo. 

Income. As ihe aim o( this Trust is the nuumum 


I 


I iffl-Wt awowT IS w ? jk oid^e 

Ilihohoklingt jnrwbenifjminarnci pfos« give lull names and 
addrettot cn Ihcortwr pint hddrri (ma-jmjrrioi3)on a separate 
ihc el ol paper. 


\ 


l 


Signaiurels). 


Dare. 


Excellent Prospects for 
1986 


i 


Name a"d address ol Fnvmojl Adwser (if anvl 


The Far East contains the most 
dynamic economies in the world Why? 
Because the people have extraordinary 
technical ingenuity - plus the marketing 
skills necessary to exploit that ingenuity. 
What’s more, the workforces are extremely 
loyal. 


f 

i 


I 


posable growth, afl Income writ automatically be 
nnnwsiedmihe TrusfonywtebaJJ: 

Foflowlng The Progress Of ^ Vbtr Investment. We mD 
send you a Contract Noiew»itwt7daysand a IMn 
Certificate usually w*thm28 doj^> Bw ot these w»H 
swte she number of units you have bought. Und prices 
are shwuim The^ Times and the Financial Times. 

Capital Gains Tax.^ The unit trust well is noi subject to 
capital gains lax and when you «B your units, you wiB 
not haw to pay this ta*. unless your total realised gains 
m the tax year exceed the tax-bee threstokLwhreh « 
cunenitv £5.900. 

income Tax. Tax at the bask: raieb dedurted hom ihe 


NcHawjiUtilotoieviclCTtiolEire Tl 22/3 


Y 

Eagle Star Group 


Trust sffKoro. before n is retnireaedfo you fcv the 


Ea^e Star Unit Ma«4ere United 
Eagle Star House. Bath Road. Chchenham, Oes GL53 71Q. 

TI>etei9<uilo<>ca<>rrtirtwAM«lMftiwnwambn«iuwnC«glcSia> 
Mwtevtarwfa^eleiiwi-iiiiMtaadtottPdllcwwTxpMctkx. 


L TbebrionMaMOBec 

mm“wm 


managers. It gou are nor llaWe to b*ie rare tax, you 
can redaen lire amount deducted. II youontv pay laxal 

« ttiebas« rale, you wiH haw no further tax topav Uyou 
are a higher rare raxpayet you wdthaue repay the 
additional note of tev on rf. 

i Trustee: Midland Barth ^ Trust Company LimiteA 
Managers; Eagle Star Ural Managers Untried. 

ReqswredOltiO£.lTh«Mdneedh ‘ 

ET2R88L 

Reghrrar. The Ffoyal Bankol ScoriandPk. 


.London 


k shart 




Income Tax Relief 1985/1986 





A BES mvestmervtin an. 




, O^torSiibsck^tifiBn 
under the Bu^ess Expansion Scheme 

- •5fX)njor*dly ■ — .. 


Strauss, Turnbull & Co. Limited 

MemteofTbeStodrExctiaiige _ 


‘ ’ share payable in full on application 


The ELECTROSTORE 


Prebpc profits forecast of £190,000 . 
fortheyear^ntfing 30th JUNE 1986 


Present faitentjcni Is for a USM 
Lining 

Group is comprised of two - - 

manufacturing and one distributing 
company covering different areas « 

thedertrtmksrndustnr ‘ ^ 

The fourtdercompanyfprriied l3 


: rears ago withfoe original directors 
uDvinvol 


ly involved and committed to the 
future expansion 


Excellent spread of customers, 
products arid suppliers 


The BES Benefits 


Up to 60% income tax relief 


# Nocapital gains taxon first share 
' sale 


Asset levels well within new 
Government limits 


Opies uf the ok amiable farm 


Strauss, Turnbull & Go. Limited. 
3 Moorgate Place 
London 1 

EC2R6HR 

Tel: 01-638 5699 


77us fldirrhwTWitf y mil an miHafmu 
lo srtecnht* lor or pu nitaseawi titans. 


■* ' 


‘T-* 

. i ■ 

r'.‘ 


1W1S 


: » to get 
/ sprofrt 


V 




. . 


.< * 
r. *■ 

V 


./ 41- '^r 




a 



BUSINESS EXFANSION SCHEME 
TAX RELIEF 1985/86 & 1986/87 


Sr* :-i 




BUDGET ANNOUNCEMENT 

FIRST RETAIL STORES PLC 


• £1,250,000 RAISED IN RRST 13 DAYS AND OFFER 
REMAINS OPENUNTIL9TH APRIL, 1986 

•. SUBSTANTIAL ASSET BACKING : 

• 100% LOAN FACfl_fTTES AVAILABLE 

• OVERALL RETURN TO NEW INVESTORS SHOULn 

BE SUBSTANTIALLY ENHANCED BY REMOVALOF 
CAPITAL GAINS TAX ; 

• MANAGEMENT INVESTING £140.000 FARI PA^l I 
WITH INVESTORS WHO ALSO RECEIVE 61 % 
PRIORITY RETURN 



TRADING RISKS REDUCED BY THE USE OF 
FRANCHISING \ 




I 


22/3 


I 


Jo obtain a Prospectus ptease ^complete coupon and send to: 

Robert Fraser & Partners Limited — . 

29 Albemarfe Street, London Wl X 3FA or-Phone; 01 -200 0200 (24 hfs -7 dgyg) | 


■ ... 


Name. 


Sponsored by 


i 


Address. 


i 


Licensed Dealer in Securities 

TMs advertisement 6 not an toyttafianp pun*iase shares. 



Fraser 


1 "".r" — — — ■ — J 














THE TIMES SATURDAY MARCH 22 1986 


minimum subscription exceeded 

OVER £3M ALREADY SUBSCRIBED 


' BUSINESS EXPANSION SCHEME 

GLADDING SECURED CONTRACTORS PLC 

IConpanjp Number 19268361 

OFFER FOR SUBSCRIPTION 

Sponsore d By 

CHANCERY SECURITIES PLC 

(Licensed Dealers *1 Secures) 

The Company has been descrftied as being “possMy the 
pick of the bundr and “head and shoulders above the 
rest” by a specialist financial magazine. 

Business- A bufldhg contractor working mainly for property 
development clients, offering deferred payment terms whereby 
aH or part of the contract price wffl be paid after building work 
has been completed. Amounts due willhe^ecuredJncCTnally 
by a mortgage over land and buikfings. Property, 
devetopment clients wiQ benefit from an improved cash flow 
and so buSdng contracts u«] be at M^ier prices with h^her 
gross margins. *•'* 

Over 20% p.a. pretax return on shareholders' fund is 
anticipated. in the medium term. 

Tt» Management Team have many years of actual 
experience in the property development and budding 
industries. Their mam reward comes from maximising net 
asset growth to the benefit erf shareholders. Maxwell Creasey 
{non-executive Chairman) recently retired from being Deputy 
Managing Director of MEPC pic. 

Tut ReOef-The Company began trading in September 

1985 and so I nve s tor s should receive their tax relief ■ 
ce rti fica te s without delay. 

65% Loan Fbcffity- Appropriate subscribers need onty pay 
35% of their investment {pkis documentation fee). 

NEXT ALLOTMENT DATE - BY TUESDAY 1 8th MARCH 
1 986 t BUDGET DAY. 

Offer extended to 30th April 1986 (unless over subsatoed). * 
thus enabling investors to decide in which tax year they wish to 
seek tax refet 


FINANCE AND INDUSTRY 




Profits exceed £50m 
-a record 



Another year of strong performance 

Fourth successive annual increase in 
earnings per share 

Cash flow of £35m * 

Dividend for the year increased by 44% 

Market capitalisation has risen by a 
multiple of five since 1981 to 
exceed £300m 






Geoffrey Wilson Chairman 


electrical equipment, fluid controls, metals, industrial services 

Copies of the annual report, oj u hu h the aboce i- an extract, trill be 
ataihbk after 7th April front ThcSecrttan.. Delia Group p.Lc. 

I Kiitfrimy. London WC2B6XF. 



Why sharers feel flat 


One of tbe proposals tucked 
away in the tax reform Green 
Paper will .find Bute favour 
with London's fiat-sharers. 
The Government intends to 
soap, the arrangement under 
which a person is entitled to 
mortgage interest relief on 
loans op to £3Q£00 and 
replace it with relief on the 
property being bought, rather 
Sian relief lor the individual. 

This is an attempt to etinu- 
nate the anomaly whereby a 
married couple get only 
£30,000 of mortgage interest 
relief but twopeople living 
together get up to £60,000. 

This could have severe im- 
plications for tfce ; London 


labour 


rime to work love huge diffi- 
culties fitwlhig rented accom- 
modation. And with London 
fiat prices starting at around 
£40,000 it requires several 
sharers to be able to afford to 
buy anywhere to live. Budding 
societies frequently, make 
loans to two and three fiat- 
sharers who are just friends — 
definitely not living in sin. 

If the mortgage interest 
relief is attached to the proper- 
ty and nmtheindmdua] these 
young people will no.. longer 
be able to afford to buy. 
-HbwcVes, tire proposals jaie, 
not doe to be implemented 
* iratxTthe 1990s. \ 


NEW ISSUES — 

how to set them, how 
to profit with than! 

; Did fMlmiMttm Am mlaanfytto'aHxta a* kiMMiora in ibis country who m>ka 

. . .Bnd*rt|OBU»h^i»bSd»dootiyour^ahc»iTm^p«p^MMivc«»emw 
piiMiiMM emoi temnMrbHvaniroriwsoiterteMaiidiTiOMOfaiMBM 
rmpwt«iMv'M*Mde» whan ii avow id snxki and Vwu. . . ttoy am just bettor 

And «MmMytatfwaacn'...faa«OfaminfenMd about raw tawaiaav«itnom 
, hrWttawninipPWqUiMfaimioli u i t Bn «in .amrnboughte ny MMKdoheman 
Muk atana, an* «*t mmnkaM* Mnk oAmnu&iftaa out wtvt otmr 
atfwwafl»< am howytmcaipwl m money 

o# dm udmiW. VMa TODAY tordaato* ttw MawlawwShm* Mk auiww 
aa»^8«aqwemv^™ lt ^» w» >a wM»«l*iy.rea»Bi«tanawtian<iaSnfaalrMCTa» 
wtihnm-ihw^fXpww nuu i B i i i vuuM flnfbraoinn c omp w M wni onBgilwnwwwiiM. 
lu lrwut dlxiiwl - • ■ ‘ 

Vo«»V »Ibo a« n utfc vty h nnnoogy of aat boofcWt" W w »U«U M- Howto 8*1 

__ ^ . __ ; _ 

'-teTHCM^VTOUESHATOGUfoi. 3 nlcr STREET. UMDOtt BOW 1AU. 


J Post Cods. T2ZI3 

l — — r— - 


INCOME TAX RELIEF 1985/86 

! 

EwIiTSI»:aAW«! 



SsrflF • 


- -Offer for Subscription ; j 
of 1,000,000 Ordinary Shares 
oi&l each at £U 0 per share. 

★ Existing fireefaoki hotel has increased in 
value by 94 per cent in 2Va years. 

^ Company ^trsdsis- BES relief for 1985/86 
ti® still be available. 


★ Founder directors have an investment 
of £233,614. 

★ Strong net asset cover. 

Copies of the Prospectus updatedfoflowing 

' the Budget can be obtained from 
7 Square, London W1M 9HA 

Telephone 01-631 3015 

TV, MM * r.a mliMiaitmwmroiinstaiw. _ 



,> 3 » >' 


mm 'am 

: MM£M8SS^m 


European Growth Portfolio: Number One. 

_ - Almost all the gains in Europe over the past 
year have been for the benefit of investors who 
want capital growth. The investor who wants a good 
and growing income has largely been excluded. 

To remedy that, we’re launching the new Sun 
Life European Income Portfolio. 

It enables the investor for income to enjoy the 
fruits of the European stock markets as fully as 
investors for growth have done. 

It can do so because the economic outlook in 
Europe continues to look very bright 

It can do so because the whole basis of the 
spectacular capital growth we’ve seen in recent 
months is the promise of higher yielding equities. . 

And, just as importantly, our European Income 
Portfolio can do so because it’s managed by an 
outstanding investment team. 

They re the team responsible for the success of 
our European Growth Portfolio, up 85.2% in the nine 
months since its launch, outperforming not only 
every unit trust in Europe but every other unit trust. 


European Income Portfolio: Newly Hatched. 

This isn’t a one-off wonder either. Five of our 
other Professional Portfolios are in the top five in 
their sectors. 

Behind this success, lie all the resources and 
experience of the Sun life Assurance group, which 
has funds of over £3.5 billion under management 
We’re confident that our new European Income 
Portfolio will prove every bit as successful. 

Until April 11th, you have the opportunity to join 
in this success at a fixed opening price. To take 
advantage, please speak to your broker Alternatively 
clip the coupon or phone 01-606 6010. 

eTJro'peaIv - iFcTmT portfo”lTo 

To: Sun Life Trust Management Limited, 107 Cheapside. London EC2V 6DU 
Please send me more information on the European Income Portfolio □ 
and the other Professional Series Portfolios □. 


Name 

Address- 



SUN 

LIFE 


T 22 i 

All statistics:- Planned Savinas 1.386 oHeMo-offer. income re- invested 


Trust Management 
















•.-Si/* 


34 


FINANCE AND INDUSTRY 


THE TIMES SATURDA Y MARCH 22 1986 . 


] t 


Id c 
b r 
was 

whi 

blit 

in 

H* 

for 

son 

cer 

tag 

ant 

c 

k. 

net 

me 

an 

tbt 

ua 

Iri 

wf 

sti 

ca 

en 

cl 

n 

W! 

rt 

•*1 


A 

K 

.t 

l£ 

11 

n 

5 

rt 

r 

n 

s 

e 

it 

y. 

a 

t 

> 

e 

y 

h 

0 
v 
a 
d 
.o 
ji 
1C 
<1. 
la 

~>i 

5 

1 
a’ 

'e 

u 

«■ 

n 

a 

*r 

<4 

:r . 

0 ■ 
t- . 
tr 
li 
l 
h 
\ 
it 
r. 




Your 
Personal 
Equity Plan 

In (he Budget, a revolutionary new plan was aruinimced 
which will enable you to invest in shares with considerable tax 
advantages. 

You will be emitted to invest in a plan> 

$ £200 a ntuiilh or £2.411(1 a year 
# Free from income tax on reinvested dividend# 

4* .And free from capital gains tax 
Fidelity International, one of the worlds largest invest* 
menl organi-a lions. firmly intends to be a leader in this 
exciting new area of investment. 

lii make sure YOU are one of the fir*l to benefit from 
these new opportunities, r^mplete the r»Mip»n below or "plwsoe 
us on Callfree * >8U0 4i4lol. 


■fix Fidelirv International Management Luniini. PO B»x 90. Tiuibriil{>r. 
Krai TNV’UX}. Tulephnne: WUMI 414lhl. 

tfr*. 1 •mold like rn leant, mnre about ihnee now im*‘lmeat oppartnnirim. 
I PImm lead me further iteiuiK 

f Name 

] Address 

I 


I 


210 


I 



Fidelity 

INTERNATIONAL^ 



HONEYGLEN ASSURED 
CONSTRUCTION PLC 

Offer for Subscription - Sponsored by 
Chancery Securities PLC 

LONDON RESIDENTIAL DEVELOPERS will be the main clients 
ol this building company which offers deferred payment terms. This 
wiU assist developer dents' cashflow and payment win not be due 
until after the property is complete. Honeyglen can make HIGHER 
PROFITS. Such debts will be secured normally by a mortgage 
over LAND AND BUfLOfNGS. John 0. Wood are Consultant 
Surveyors and Valuers. 

Tax Relief -the Company began trading in July 1 985. 
INVESTORS SHOULD RECEIVE THEIR TAX RELIEF 
CERTIFICATES WITHOUT DELAY. 

The Management Team only share in net asset growth after the 
first 1 0% pJL (net of tax) increase. THIS IS MORE BENEFICIAL 
FOR SHAREHOLDERS THAN IN SEVERAL OTHER BES 
OFFERS. 


APPLYBEFO R E 5t h AP Rl hi 986 


IF YOU HAVE A PROSPECTUS SEND IN AN APPLICATION 
FORM. IF YOU DON'T TELEPHONE US ON 01 -242 2563 (OPEN 
SUNDAY KUJOarrMpm). 


To: Chanceiy Securities PLC, 1 2 NoriMngton Street, London WC1N2NW. 
Teteptone: 01-242 2563 

Please sand m a copy al the Piospedus ol Honeyglen Assured 
Conshuctnn PLC. 


Name. 


Address. 


L - = * I 



In the latest annual performance rabies pub- 
lished by Planned Savings magazine.The Equitable is 
again in the number one position, for 20 year regular 
premium with profit policies. 

This is the fourth time in nine years we’ve 
occupied this spot, and in the other years we've never 
come fowerthan fourritan achievement nor matched 
by any other company. 

The 1985 20 vear result meant that a gross 
annual premium of £ 500 would have accumulated a 
fund of £47,142 with which to secure j pension at rhe 
bat available rate. 

Yet half of our competitors' funds in the survey 
amounted to less than £40,000 and one as little as 
£31,575. 

Of course, the pasr cannorguarantee rhe future, 
but what berter way is there of judging a company 
than by a record of such consistent excellence? 

So if you want the best return from your 
pension plan, fill in the coupon or 'phone 01*606 
6611 today. 

Tn- Th* Equmble Liic.FREtl'OST.-JCo'rwwn Strwi. London EC2B 2JT. 
I'd uviorme further detail* on *Ovr Stlf-Empl mod ftmwn PJjbv »>»b; 

□ Annual tarublcCrminburons: P MomhU Ominbuiwnt. 

□ Unit-linked bawd jlrmumc*. 

itlk HMdrnK i id . 

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i The Equitable Life J 

L _ *You gain because we’re different— — — J 



FAMILY MONEY/9 


Now charity can 
begin at work 


**Jt is a very good Budget 
indeed for charities - it could 
raise as much as £100 million 
of new money,” enthused 
Michael Brophy of the Chari- 
ties Aid Foundation- 

Three measures which 
should swell charities' receipts 
were introduced in the Bud- 
get First from April 1. 1986, 
companies will get tax relief 
on single donations to charily 
- at the moment they do not 

Secondly, the £10,000 ceil- 
ing on the amount individuals 
can give to charities under a 
deed of covenant which quali- 
fies for higher rate tax relief 
has been abolished. 

And thirdly, a new scheme 
for “payroll giving” — deduct- 
ing charitable donations at 
source from the employees' 
wage packets - has been 
introduced. 

Employees will get tax relief 
on donations of up to £100 a 
year deducted at source by 
employers from wage packets, 
and due to come into force in 
April 1987. 

"The payroll scheme is the 
one to go for,” says Mr 
Brophy. 

He calculates that if only 10 
per cent of the workforce put 
in half the maximum, or £50, 


then it could raise as much as 
£100 million a year for chari- 
ties. He also hopes that during 
the committee stage of the 
Finance Bill the Government 
can be persuaded to change 
the maximum amount quali- 
fying for tax relief from £100 
to £104 or £2 a week to 
facilitate the deductions. 

Individuals account for 
£1.000 million a year of 
charitable giving while com- 
panies contribute only £100 
million. 

The Charities Aid Founda- 
tion has been working for 
some time on a payroll 
scheme and the Budget 
changes should give these 
plans just the boost they need. 
Mr Brophy hopes to get all the 
main charities to agree to run 
payroll schemes through Unit- 
ed Funds, an organization set 
up by CAF in conjunction 
with its American counterpan 
United Way of America. 

Details have yet to be 
worked out but it looks as 
though employers will deduct 
an amount agreed by the 
employee from wages in much 
the same way as pension fund 
contributions are currently de- 
ducted. with tax relief given 
automatically. 

Monev will be passed to 



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it Proven operating profit 
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★ Investment offer will still 
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Offer for Subscription 

f rider the terms of the 
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OF 


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on 3rd April 1986. No application is to be 
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the Stock Exchange or to the Unlisted 
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Copies of the Prospectus updated following 
the Badge* can be obtained from 

POINTON YORK LTD 

7 Cavendish Square, London. W1M 9HA- 

Telephone 01-631 30X5 




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CANTERBURY, CHAGFORD, EXETER AND READING 


Reforms get a rocket 


‘He calls it post-Budget eu- 
phoria — 1 call it drunk* 

United Funds and once a year 
the individuaL the company 
or an appeals committee will 
decide which charities are to 
benefit from the accumulated 
deductions. 

“Charities will continue to 
approach companies direct 
and obviously the chief targets 
are now not so much the rich 
companies, but those with 
large numbers of employees — 
local authorities, Marks & 
Spencer, BP and others,” says 
Mr Brophy. 


The proposals contained in 
tire Green paper, ^ The Rtfonn 
cf Personal Taxation ,- luive 
found few friends. The 
Government’s stated i ntea- 
ton is to adjust the tax system 
to create equality between 
men and women and to 
benefit families with children 

- particularly those where the 
wifoslays at home xo lode 
after children. 

Yet the oiganizations repre- 
senting families, and children 

— - Child -Pbveity Action 

Group, One- Parent Families 
arid others — all condemn the 
proposals. • -■* 

“I Hiiriif this is a dishonest 
document,*’ was the blunt 
reaction from Ruth Lister of 
the Child Poverty Action 
Group. 

“We think it would be 
disastrous for women,” said 
Penny Letts, of One-Parent 
Families. 

And even the prestigious 
Institute for Fiscal Studies, 
which has no axe to srind oh 


1985/6 TAX RELIEF 


r Sir Speedy 

Pr inting CantrM Pfc 
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Sift SPEED V PfUMTiMG CENTRES Pie - Tha Company ha* Men Htatfltfndto 
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cuMoman mroupn a ntiwoik al cOrtrtxnanily srtuamd. company o mao rotwi 
eantm Thmo am currently 5 S'f Spaafly Rnnorip Camroi m Lonflon witn afitrtnw 
27 location, to opan in 1 B 8 B. 

SUCCESS OF ULS. REDKMEZ • In mo USA Sir Sporty. Me Kh »«uaw nad 
■ppraximaMy BOO priming canmn with the avaraga Centre ba nn ed to do S0% 
more notiima man its nearest competitor 

MANAGEMENT - The Managing Director of Sir Speedy Printing Centra, PIC w» 
pievnuaty a member of me eiecutim management of Sir Speedy. Inc.. USA and 
was directly in a pmed m rhe oaf-KMtay ectanlw and on pomp buamaa, 
development of tne Sir Soaeov avnema. 

THE MERITS OF THIS INVESTMENT 

• BES la* relief ** the year ending Sth April IBM 

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• Experienced management 

• Potential for high capital onm 

■ Minimum aubecnption of £300000 naa been un d o writ te n 
SUBSCRIPTION (Minimum ASpAfiMon £500) 

The MEacnpeon Mri u now open but may be ciOMd at any nma 

ftwaifreNae»nem float weongffuMenoftor or m»imw»e«*ecn<» tar jhenMi 

Purdue tatontmooit ana up fleraio or me ettar an eo”Urtrt *r me pmpodut 
when can oe oownad Iiodi - 

M'dS™76VECumTrE^ 

No 1 Royw Dwnanga *«mnue. Lmvxm EC3V 3LT 
leaned (kdiflrs ^ fetormes ji«t mraters of me 

Naiena' fttsoeuuen ct 5ecureies DeaierviuSAi 

Telephone; 01-283 7671 

NAME: 

address- 

POST CODE. TEL NO; 

NN 


behalf of any sector or society, 
says:' “These proposals will 
discourage wives from work- 
ing, give most to. rich couples 
and create problems ' over 
privacy.” 

The proposals are seen by 
many to be politically moti- 
vated and have been criticized 
not least because the other 
options disdissed in the previ- 
ous 1980 Green Paper on the 
taxation of husband and wife 
have not even been 
considered. 

The current Green Paper 
proposes that every person, 
married or single, will have a 
personal tax allowance: In rite 
case of mamed couples any 
unused portion of the personal 
allowances would be transfer- 
able, in total or in part, to the 
spouse if one partner bad 
insufficient income to use the 
full tax allowance. Clearly, 
this would pul families where 
the wife does not work in a 
much better position. So why 
does nobody seem to like it? 

“The 1980 document did at- 


ieast acknowledge the prob- 
lems — this one tries to gloss 
' them over,** says Rtith Lisrer^- 
“I dotft think it deals, ade- 
quately with, incentives to 
work -and doesn’t direct re- 
sources where they are most 
needed.” ' . - 

Mick Monis, of the Insti- 
tute 'of Fiscal Studies, 
says^Tfere was a Green Pa- 
per in 1980 in which the 
Government rejected transfer- 
able allowances. In the subse- 
quent debate, a dear majority 
were in favour ‘of e much 
vsiitipler systern of' indepen- 
dent taxation with the money - 
released by abolishing .the 
married man’s allowance be- 
ing spent on raising -duM 
benefit,* 1 . 

Of four reforms proposed in 
1980 — separate tax allowances 
with no transferability, partial 
transferability or total trans- 
ferability, or separate non- 
transferable tax allowances 
allied to an increase in child 

‘Inefficient and 
wasteful option 9 

.benefit — the latter option 
attraefed by for the greatest- 
support. * 

Arid it is what is seen as the 
political decision -to ^ignore 
totally any alternative bat 
fully transferable allowances 
that has thrown the carrent 
Green Paper proposals into 
disrepute.-' .. 

CPaG points out that transr 
finable allowances are an inef- 
ficient way of getting extra 
income to couples with young 
chUdreo: * “ - 

“This is the least attractive , 
option because it is wastcfuL 
Tax allowances wffi go to 
every couple, regardless of: 
their sitoaUon, and will bene- 
fit the chikliess. coupfeas well 
as femOies with children.’’ 
says Ruth Lister.' 

- CPAG would like to see- 
non-transferable allowances 
with .any money saved , being; 
added to child benefit: “We ; 
would rather nothing hap* ' 


pened at aB than have these 

r roposals implemented-, what 
find so heart-breaking is thai 
money would be squandered.’' 
penny Lens ays: “We are 
disappointed that once again 
the Government has retained 
io frying to push transferable 
allowances.” 

She points ont that if the 
reforms are aimed at oving a 
married couple where the wife 
stays at home to k xA after the 
children the same tax allow- 
ranees as a two-income couple, 
then logically single parents 
should get the equivalent of 
three tax allowances to cover 
child care costs; 

“There is absolutely no 
recognition of the. special 
needs of one-parent families - 
particularly in tire area of child 
care costs. The Govern mem 
has totally ignored foe select 
committee's report.”' . 

The Institute for Fiscal 
. Studies also points to a politi- 
cal motivation behind the 
proposed reforms: ~It is possi- 
ble that the. : Government 
would genuinely like io see 
fewer iqamed wo meaaiwoik 
and is willing to use foe tax 
system to achieve this. But ilis 
fer from ;ofrviousThai foe jobs 
that women who would leave 
the workforce do how can 
easily be filled by men who are 
currently unemployed.” 

The institute alto points to 
the high cost of transferable 
allowances. In any redistribu- 
tion there are. winners and 
' losers and *ribe only way the 
Government can prevent the 
.ranqy this redistribution will* 
inevitably cause is to raise tax 
allowances for everyone by 
around 30 per cepratthe same 
time. The. whole . exercise 
would then cost, we estimate, 
someth iogin excess of £4,000 
million”. 

About foe only consolation 
for the opponents of these 
proposed reforms is that the 
Chancellor has said they can- 
not be implemented until 1990 

at the earliest. 

Boorke 


The Alliance T rust PLC 

New Records ; . 

from independently managed investment trust : 


RVEYEABRECdlD -—pence ^stock un^ T : - ; 




9 


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2039 

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:■*:£ 

1982 

1983 

1984 

1985 

1986 

Distribution of £457 .9ra< 


' NET ASSET ^ VALUE. 

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M5.4 





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In the interests Of the large number of private shareholders, our balanced 
poliity.pf income and capita) growth remains appropriate. 

A 20% increase mthe Ordinary stock dividend. The compound income 
growth of 14% peranntim querthe last 5 years has been more than twice the 
rate of inflation. 

23% - compound growth rate in net assets over the last 5 yeare. 

High quality and marketable investments worldwide are favoured. 


\ 

i 


For a copy of the Report and 
Accou nts please return to 
The Secretary. . 

• TheAffia nee Trust PLC-, 

64 Reform Street Dundee DDY1TJ 


- — — — 

T Name ^ 


Name 
Address 


BtJl>GET *86— BUDGET *86 —BUDGET *86 

PERSONAL 
EQUITYPLANS 

. . , attractive tax incentives 
for file private investor 

The Chancellor threw his >S 

weight behind private share f k ^ 

ownership with the K 

announcement of new tax 

incentives linked to ‘Personal Equiiy Plans’. . 

The full details are not yet known-butover 
the next few months AXE Financial Services 
will be reviewing the proposals and issuing a ' 
regular ‘P.EJV Bulletin. The first s&mple . 
issue, is free. You will then be able to order 
the rest of the series, if required, for just £5. . 

Reserve your free copy now by returning the " 
coupon today - or phone 01-623 2402 (office 
^open this weekend). ' ' 

* To AXE Financial Services Ltd. . ' ’ ' ' ' 7* Z ? V 1 

FREEPOST. London EC3B3DE - - - 

Please send me my free issue of your T^JP.’.Bulletih.. 


Name__ 

Address. 



JSW 

WERE ON EARTH 
DO YOU INVEST? 






^^^nONALRJND , 



















Lfc UMfcSfrAlUKDA* MAKLh 22 W6b 


rilNAiNV-C rVJ.N LJ UXUUJ 1 K 1 !L,r\ W 


r 0f[ 


FAMILY MONEY/1 0] 


up odds for a big win 


Law Report March 22 1986 Queen’s Bench Divisional Court 


Lord Chancellor’s reply to Bar case 


Regina v Lord Chancellor, Ex beads that have to be home by 
parte Alexander barristers”. 



'1 \ | 


C SHARES ’ 1 

TheCbancdtoi't budget boost 
to private shut owouAdl in 
the Tons of the ftnooal 
Eouity Pin (PEP), received 
an instant and npnuuia vd. 
come in the City. On amber 
reflection it appeared that PEP 
could have revere adxninistra- 
tive drawbacks for the profes- 
sional advisers, who will act as 
plan m a n ag ers , unless those 
advisers have sufficiently so- 
phisticated computer systems 
and can gain an adequate 
volume of PEP clients to 
it cost effective. 

The scheme wiQ allow any- 
one aged 1 8 and over to invest 
up to £200 a month or £2.400 
a year in a plan to be used for 
buying British equities. Pro- 
vided the shares are held for a 
minimum period of between 
(Hie and two years, dividends 
will be free of tax and can be 
reinvested in the plan, and any 


Globe; Scottish American, 
Robert Fleming and Touche 
Remnant already run such 
regular savings schemes and 
would have little difficulty in 
ad aptin g them for PEP. 

The main administrative 
problems win be the small 
•m otwts of money involved 
in PEP* and the hassle of 
reclaiming tax paid -on divi- 
dends from the Inland Reve- 
nue. Commissions on 
baiEmns of £200 a month or 
less would not justify the 
administration costs to stock- 
brokers and the administra- 
tion charge of a plan manager 
could be prohibitive unless 
sufficient volume was - 
obtained. 

; Mr Paul Bateman, market- 
ing and development director 
at Save and Prosper, said he 
was not afraid of the adminis- 
trative burden as S&P was 
used to handling large vol- 
umes of clients doing small 
transactions. He thought there 


rrahsed gains will be free of would a pooling arrangement 
capital gains tax. . to avoid excessive admmistra- 

PEP is specifically aimed at lion costs, 
eq urnes. Gilt-edged stocks are It is not yet clear to what 

excluded except fbran unspec- 

ified but low ceiling. Options, _ 
futures, unquoted shares and Pooling plan tO 
unit trusts are also excluded. cut down rrrete 
The unit trust industry is not — 
best pleased and will be lobby- 
ing hard, while the Finance extent PEP investors will be 
Bill is at the committee stage, allowed to - roll up monthly 
for the exclusion to be lifted, contributions and keep the 

The investment trust mdus- “2°"** on d ^» sit l .° invest m 


uy. by contrast, is delighted. 
Mr Peter Gray, depoty chair- 
man of the Association of 
Investment Trust Companies, 
said investment trust shares 
were ideally suited to the new 
scheme, because they offered a 
spread of opportunity coupled 
with protection against undue 
risk. He pointed out that the 
schemes already run by some 
investment trust groups en- 
abled ravings of as little as £25 
a month to be invested m 
investment trust shares. 

Investment trust managers 
like Foreign & Colonial. 


non costs. 

It is not yet clear to what 

Pooling plan to 
cot down costs 

extent PEP investors will be 
allowed to roll up monthly 
contributions and keep the 
money on deposit to invest in 
shares once or twice a year. 
S&P, however, aims to pool 
ad PEP holders' contributions 
and. make monthly bulk pur- 
chases on the stock markeL 
S&P would of course have to 
have discretion over the 
shares bought or the benefits 
of pooling would be lost 

Investors will however, be 
allowed to put the whole 
£2.400 into the plan in one go 
which should appeal to foe 
larger investor who wants to 
make his own decisions on 
buying and selling. 

Mr Bateman, who is all in 


favour of PEP but would like 
to see unit trusts included, 
said that monthly contribu- 
tions of less than £100 still 
look too low for direct equity 
investment and would be 
better put into unit trusts. - 

Reclaiming foe 29 per cent 
advance corporation tax paid 
by companies on their divi- 
dends would also have to be 
done in bulk by the plan 
manager to make it adminis- 
tratively workable. The Inland 
Revenue envisages the tax 
relief working much the same 
way as for mortgage interest 
relief (Miras) and life assur- 
ance relief. The plan manager 
will make claims on behalf of 
all his clients perhaps monthly 
or quarterly. 

Stockbrokers are also fever- 
ishly examining ways of tak- 
ing advantage of PEP. Mr 
Tony Richards, of' brokers 
Qu liter Goodison. welcomed 
foe Budget measure as a 
tremendous move, but said 
foe next few weeks would be 
spent looking for cost effective 
ways of making it work. 

Reinvesting dividends of 
typical sums as small as £5 
could pose problems, he said. 
Reclaiming 29 per cent tax on 
such small amounts would 
also cost more than foe 
amount being reclaimed, un- 
less it could be done in bulk. 
The answer again came down 
to pooled investments in 
nominee names invested at 
the discretion of foe plan 
manager. A pool would have 
the added advantage of at- 
tracting volume discounts on 
foe stock market and making 
the plan administratively • 
cheaper for the PEP holder. 

Mr George Lynne, of stock- 
brokers Buckmaster & Moore, 
believes PEP will make people 
more business culture mind- 
ed. Once people have shares io 
a company, it will encourage 
them to read everything about 
that company. 

There will, however, be a 
steep learning curve for those 


unused to investing in shares. 
Although investment trusts 
apppear to have a strong 
advantage, their perennial dis- 
count to assets might pose 
problems of explanation for 
the plan manager. Shares also 
go down as well as up. which 
can come as a shock to those 
used to building society 
investments. 

The Government expects 
PEP to cost £25 million in lost 
revenue in the first year of 
operation and then to become 
steadily more expensive as 
dividend tax and CGT relief 
builds up. Mr Nigel Lawson 
wishes to create a nation of 
shareowners. Mr David 
Tallon of accountants Dear- 
den Farrow has mischievously 
suggested. "The only thing 1 
can think is that the Govern- 
ment intends to sell off British 
Gas with 12 monthly calls of 
£ 200 .” 

Privatization issues will un- 
doubtedly benefit along with 
other shares if PEP takes off. 
Some of foe greatest gainers 
are likely to be high yielding 
shares, where the dividend tax 


Registration for 
plan managers 


relief will be most marked. In 
the early years of PEP divi- 
dend tax relief will be more 
significant. Capital gains 
above the annual tax free 
ceiling of £6 .300 ( 1 986-87) per 
person are unlikely to accrue 
unless one or two shares 
perform like rockets. 

The Government intends to 
allow a wide range of bodies to 
become plan managers, in- 
cluding stockbrokers, licensed 
dealers, banks and others. 
Would-be plan managers will 
have to register with foe new 
investor protection authority 
set up under foe Financial 
Services legislation now be- 
fore Parliament 

Alison Eadie 


Before Lord Lane. Lord Chief 


Kenrridge commented 


Justice. Mr Justice Bo reham that those matters were con- 


and Mr Justice Taylor 
[Argument March 21) 

The Queen's Bench Di- 
visional Court continued the 


tained in the report of Coopers 
& Ly brand. 

The affidavit continued: 

“In deciding whether rates are 


hearing (The Times Mairh 21) fair a wide range of factors may 
of the application by Mr Robert be relevant- By way of example. 
Scott Alexander. QC. chairman 1 would not think it .right to 
of the Bar ofEnglartd and Wales consider the present claim of the 
and as representative of the Bar Bar for .increased rates of 


The Lord Chief Justice: Are 
you saying that part of the 
legitimate expectation held by 
the Bar was that these negotia- 
tions would be carried out with 
expedition and with the best 
endeavours on the Lord 
Chancellor's Department to do 
so? 

Mr Kentridee: Indeed, my 
Lord. 


Mr Justice Taylor said that 
the Bar must have understood 
that the timetable was still alive 
so far as the Lord Chancellors's 
Department was concerned. 

Counsel said that the Bar 
must have been expecting some 
communication before the 
extraordinary general meeting. 

Lord Lane said that, looking 
at the letter of February 7. it 


Council, for judicial review of a remuneration in criminal legal 
decision of the Lord Chancellor, aid without bearing in mind. 
Lord Hails ham of St Maryle- among other factors, the oul- 
bone, communicated in a letter come of discussions which are 
of Mr Alexander dated February wtojJS P^ce in relation to 
7. 1986. to make regulations similar assumptions, analyses 
under section 39< 1 ) ofBie Legal and arguments which have been 
Aid An 1974. as amended, to advanced on behalf ofihe Law 
increase with effect from April I Society and are based on a 


increase with effect from April 1 Society and are ba sed o n a barristers' overheads, 
next by no more that 5 per cent rFP° rt . by MessrsHeal The Lord Chancellor and his 

the level of fees payabiy to Marwick Mitchell in respect of officials acknowledged that they 
barristers under the Legal Aid in almost exactly the same range of nol have the necessary 


In an affidavit io reply. Mr would have been simple for him 
Alexander stated that the Lord to have said that time was short 
Chancellor stated that it was and he proposed to make an 
“relevant” to a consideration of increase of 5 per cent and in the 
fair remuneration to consider meantime discussions were to 
what levels of earnings could be continue, 
and were achieved from legally Counsel turned to the letter of 
aided criminal work by bar- February 7. 
risters of different seniority and Lord Lane said that the court 
standing and further to consider had to took at the letter objec- 
barristers' overheads. lively. 

. The Lord Chancellor and his Counsel agreed. 


Criminal Proceedings (Costs) rases as those ^considered in the 
Regulations (SI 1982 No 1 197) Coopers & Lybrand report, 
as amended by the Legal Aid in Again. the out come of dis- 

Criminal Proceedings cussions concerning the pro- 
(CostsMAmendment) Regula- P<»«i remuneration of counsel 
tions (SI 1985 No 333). «*d solicitors instructed by the 

Mr Sydney Kratridge. QC. Crown Prosecution Service 
Mr Thomas Morison QC, Mr which will begin io operate in 
Nicholas Underhill and Mr Apnl 1986 is. in my view, a 
George Leggatt for Mr Alexan- proper factor to which I should 
der Mr Nicholas Phillips, QC have regard; another is the level 
and Mr John Laws for foeLord of rem unction available to 
Qiaacellor. counsel and solicitors employed 


information. It was for that 
reason that the Bar undertook to 
obtain that information. 

Now that it had been ob- 
tained. the Lord Chancellor 
intended to disregard it in 
prescribing the level of fees for 
April 1986. 

The Bar was willing to co- 
operate in any sensible exercise 
which the department might 
propose but not at the expense 


Mr Kentridgc. reading the in civil legal aid work, 
affidavit of the Lord Chancellor. “It may also be relevant to 

said that Lord Hailsham said consider whether competent 
that he was swearing the affida- people are continuing to be 
vh personally he be- attracted to. and retained at. the 

lieved that the application criminal Bar in sufficient nunv 
raised issues of high principle here. In considering that, it may 
and did not turn on the detailed be necessity to bear in mind 
facts, some which fell within the foal foe Bar has approximately 
knowledge of members of his doubled in numbers since 1970 
department rather than himself, while the qualifications for call 
— . ■ have been made more exacting 


, aod . rojjcitora employed a further delay in the payment operation. 


lively. 

Counsel agreed. 

Lord Lane said that the words 
“I am not persuaded", "nor 
would 1 accept", “remain to be 
convinced" meant “I reject" did 
they not? 

Counsel agreed. 

Mr Justice Taylor said that 
the one thing that was totally 
absent was any suggestion of any 
further consideration of the 
report. 

Mr Justice Borduun said that 
the letter did not say or make 
dear that that was just a holding 


of fair remuneration. 


Counsel said that thereafter 


The remedy sought was simply a the Lord Chancellor made it 
declaration. It was thought m- abundantly dear that he had not 
appropriate to seek any other rejected the report, 
remedy against the Lord Chan- Mr Justice Taylor asked 
cellor. whether the lawfulness of the 


Mr Phillips said that the decision to be considered was in 


application raised five issues: 

2 Was the decision to effect a 


routine increased to reflect the be. 


that letter. 

Lord Lane said that it must 


derailment rather than himself, while the qualifications torcaii effect D f inflation one that the 

The affidavit continual: ! iav * b eea made more exacting Lo^ Chancellor could lawfully 

“My statutory duty is to ‘have m the interval. take having regard to section 39 

regard to the principle of allow- “I would also be obliged to 0 f me 1974 Act? 
ing fair remuneration according consider the basic structure m F 2 Was the conduct of the Lord 

to the work actually and reason- ,ees for criminal legal aid wmen Chancellor's department such as 
ably done'. I refer to -this w°uld almost certainly be at- ^ 3^ legitimately to 

principle hereafter as foe prio- ‘Ccted by a general review ot expect that negotiations on the 
cipie of fair remuneration. enmina! legal a id remuneration. Cooper & Lybrand report would 

“This involves considering ‘Finally, but by no means ^ concluded in time for the 
(amongst other factors) the rates jeast, I would contend that so fer April regulations? 

payable for different items of from being reasonable it would 3 jf ^ did the fact that the 

work, the amount of time be wholly unreasonable ofme as expectation was unfulfilled ren- 
reasonably devoted to each such on * fo e J oint stewards of ^er the Lord Chancellor's de- 
item and foe skill which should public _ moneys raised by cjsion unlawful? 
be devoted to iL borrowing and taxation 10 dis- 4 Did the failure to consult 

“lx is relevant to consider the regard wholly other cla ims on Bar on the appropriate 


“My statutory duty is to 'have in the interval. . 

regard to the principle of allow- “I would also be obliged to 
ing fair remuneration according consider the basic structure of 
to the work actually and reason- fees for criminal legal aid which 
ably done'. ! refer to this would almost certainly .be af- 
pnnciple hereafter as foe prin- feted by a general review of 
aple of feir remuneration. cnmmal legal aid remunerauon. 
- ... ... “Finally, but by no means 


"This involves considering 


(amongst other fedora) foe rates 'cast. I would contend that so for 
payable for different items of from being reasonable it would 

1 * . . f ka miIiaIIii irarMConnh O At ITIP M 


be devoted to iL 
“It is relevant to consider foe 


levels of earnings foarl can be foepublic pur«. 


4 Did the failure to consult 
with foe Bar on the appropriate 
percentage to reflect inflation 
render the Lord Chancellor's 


a ch i eved and that are achieved “State funded legal aid is one render the Lord Chancellor's 
from legally aided criminal aspect of a wide spectrum of dccision unlawful, 
work by barristers of different social services provided by the 5 Was the cost of paying legal 
seniority and standing. It is gate- The question of what is a id fees a relevant consideration 
relevant to consider the over- feir remunerauon for legal aid when fixing the rate of those 


seniority and stand 
relevant to consider 


“We are not 

trymgtodo 

anything 


aid fees a relevant consideration ambiguous. 

- . . when fixing the rate of those Counsel said that he had 

work cannot be consider^ ! n concluded his second 

isolauon or in disregard of the | t been submitted that the submission, 
relative .merits of fo® decision to u prate foe regula- if that was not accepted, did 

ofoCTclatmsOTfoepuWcpuwL tions ro reflect inflation was the fact foe legitimate expecia- 
Before making any decision unlawful, that there was no tjon was unfomlled render foe 
as to rasing. scope under section 39 for a decision of February 7 unlaw- 

remuneraUoD for legally ' mart routine u prating and that the fa!? The legitimate expectation 
work it is ray practice to discuss Lord Chancellor could not law- could not have the effect of 
SLfaTJSnSi ^ talTZmuv fo"y n l ake any regulations with- precluding foe Lord Chancellor 

5SSSS& decisions FiSSoT ^ 

*2" tiJ ^Ponun^tnmakl "fflSrS^contct lire rc^ ex^fo^cJSy “operated 
Sh'TT^St II, ?f ‘2! lions made in 1983 1984 and ESTEd a d'ecSf^iich 
™LJJ. rcspect 01 my 198a were also unlawful. adversely affected foe com- 

^VfrKUtridEe commented: , Refutations were p | ainaoL The Lord Chancellor's 

“I „rkv lawfully made in compliance decision was not such a 

Lucky idem wuh the Lord Chancellor s dury decision 

The Lord Chancellor in his ._ have ^orA », fair remunera- ^ . . . . . . 

affidavit went on 10 state that J? w pSwto T £ cf ? imh ,ssue de ^ 1 "J* ® n 

when he took over responsibil- Xai S?nEs P° ,B L ra,5ed A *5 
ity for criminal legal aid in July to reflSfinStion 2d no aPP 1 ’^ n foepaa foe Lord 

1980 he announced his inten- JSk coSdDTOPerly be made Chancellors Department pro- 
tipn to rake «eps to ensure that 

criminal legal aid resources were ment lo th e regulations which ? u,led fo e Bar and that resulted 
spen, as cflldsaUy aad effic- jXS/aTm.^ ■■ JL.^.1 « 

lively as possible. Turning 10 foe second issue, 

At an early stage ? became lhe question of whether foe £ 

apparent that it would not be negotiations would be con- r?™i£?^Fe5 

possible in one step to make aU dut jed so that foe effect of foe lhc Chancellor on Feb- 
foe changes to foe existing oulcom c could be embodied in ruar ^ '■ 
arrangements which might be regulations was to be deter- The dear objection of the Bar 
desirable and be deeded to m j n ed objectively. was not that it was not the right 

introduce certain interim mra- There must be clear conduct if routine u prating, but foal it was 

sures which could then be j t was ^ *j ve ^ IO su C h an only a routine uprating. This 
followed by subseq uent dis- expectation. It was one thing to was a point without merit, 
ettssion with those concerned. undertake to consult; another to It was accepted that it was 


Counsel said that it was a 
decision of a proposal which 
was subsequently clarified by 
correspondence. 

Lord Lane: It seems to me a 
great pity that this maner was 
foe subject of litigation at afl. 

Counsel after a further ex- 
change with the court, contin- 
ued that the decision was not 
one to reject foe report but one 
to award foe Bar 5 per cent to 
reflect inflation without prej- 
udice to foe claim advanced by 
foe Bar. 

Lord Lane said that it would 
have been so simple to spell that 
out in dear terms of February 7. 
Instead of which there were the 
extraordinary cliches which 
seemed designed to be 
ambiguous. 

Counsel said that he had 
concluded his second 
submission. 

If that was not accepted, did 
the fact foe legitimate expecta- 
tion was unfulfilled render foe 
decision of February 7 unlaw- 
ful? The legitimate expectation 
could not have the effect of 
precluding foe Lord Chancellor 
from making a routine uprating 
for inflation. 

The doctrine of legitimate 


1985 were also unlawful. 


adversely affected foe com- 


The 1982 Regulations were p | ainaoL The Lord Chancellor's 
lawfully made in compliance decisian was not such a 
with the Lord Chancellor & duty qe^sion. 

1° The fourth issue dealt with an 


adjust foe rates in foe regula- 
tions to reflect inflation and no 
attack could properly be made 


applicant. In the past foe Lord 
Chancellor’s Department pro- 
posed small percentages, con- 


on foe validity of an amend- 33 aHSRH 
ment to foe regulations which increase on one 

was made with that sole aim. ' ic ^ . w. 

Turning 10 foe second issue, “ ", “*'**■£ 

the question of whether foe bv 

negotiations would-be con- I^nn^e tot a^ted ^ 


sures which could then 


followed by subseq uent dis- expectation. It was one thing 10 


exceptional 

A. John Gittings, Touche Remnant, Sunday Telegraph, ! 


55 


John Gittings, Touche Remnant, Sunday Telegraph, December *85. 


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ettssion with those conoemed. 

His officials consulted widely 
on the proposed measures. 

He was aware by Octobcr 
1982 that both branches of foe 
pr o fess i on remained dissatisfied 
about the level of remuneration. 

However, he took foe view 
that the proposed regulations 
provided remuneration at levels 
which accorded with foe statu- 
tory criterion and were feu- 
having regard to all other rele- 
vant considerations. Accord- 
ingly foe regulations were 
brought into effect on October t, 
1982. 

Following foe making of those 
regulations it became the Lord 
Chancellor's practice to promul- 
gate annual uprating regulations 
to take account of the effect of 
inflation in April of each of foe 
three years from 1983 onwards. 
In doing so he was having regard 
to the principle of feir 
remuneration. 

The Lord Chancellor's 
Department declined an invita- 
tion to participate in a survey 
and took foe view that it would 
be for the Bar to assemble foe 
evidence it wished to present 
and for foe department to 
consult afterwards with foe 
profession. 

The affidavit stated: "No 
assurance was given that I 
would accept that foe approach 
of foe report commissioned by 
the Bar would provide a valid 
test of what constituted fair 
remuneration for work actually 
and reasonably done. 

"Moreover, no assurance was 
given as to the effect, if any. that 
the conclusions of such a report 
might have on any deiermina- 
uon of foe appropriate levels of 
criminal legal aid remuneration. 

"I accept that it was and is 
reasonable of the Bar to expect 
that foe Coopers & Lybrand 
report should receive detailed 
consideration, by. my depart- 
ment and that there should be 
frill discussions between the Bar 
and my department upon foe 
conclusions of foe report and 
the basis upon which they have 
been reached." 

Mr Rentridge commented: 
"That seems to recognize that 
there is foundation for 'reason- 
able expectation' of foe future 
discussions" 

In his affidavit foe Lord 
Chancellor went on to state that- 
quite apart from any implica- 
tions of the Coopers & Lybrand 
survey he considered that it 
would be appropriate that crim- 
inal legal aid fees should, as in 
previous years, be increased in 
recognition of inflation. 

“While I am not so far 
convinced of foe validity of the 
claim put forward on behalf'of 
foe Bar, f am and always have 
been prepared to hold dis- 
cussions about it 

“J must reiterate that I have as 
yet reached no final determina- 
tion or conclusions about the 
merits of the claim advanced in 
foe Coopera & Lybrand report." 


undertake to consult; another to It was accepted that it was 
undertake that the discussions proper for the Lord Chancellor 
and negotiations would be con- to have regard to public puree 
eluded bv a fixed date. considerations, but it had been 

The Coopers & Lybrand re- submined foal fair remunera- 
port was thought to be out in lion was foe exclusive tesL 
earl% 1 985 giving ample lime for For foe Lord Chancellor, two 

negotiations and drafting submissions would be made: 


regulations thereafter. 

Mr Justice Taylor asked 
whether it was accepted that it 


1 It was not correct to treat costs 
or the interest of the taxpayer as 
irrelevant to foe question of feir 


was in everybody's mind that remuneration. There was no 


that was foe target. abstract concept of fair 

Counsel accepted that - remuneration. One had to con- 
Lord Lane said that on sider whar remunerauon was 
November 14. 1 985 neither side (w* m foe context of the society 
envisaged any impossibility. in which the particular 

Counsel agreed. Both sides remunerauon was paid, 
contemplated a timetable which - The obhgauon to have 
enable negotiations to be com- regard to foe principle Ot lair 
pleied and proposals to be put remuneration when imposed 
forward by foe end of January, upon the Lord Chancellor did 

The legitimate expectation not oblige him to disregard ail 
was that the report would be other considerations, 
fully considered, fully discussed h was accept™ that tt was 
with negotiations on foe basis of an exclusive tesL 


the report and that foe Lord 
Chancellor would have regard to 


The Lord Chancellor was not 
obliged to disregard other mat- 


the outcome of the negotiations ters. including foe question of 

in considering foe stage 2 review lhe c h aixe ^ the li- gil Aid 


of foe 1982 Regulations. 


Fund was on public funds, and 


It was not accepted that foe olher charges on such funds, 
doctrine of legitimate expecta- 


doctrine ot legitimate expecta- 
tion bad the effect that consid- 
erations. discussions and 
negotiations would be com- 
pleted in time to affect the 
outcome of foe regulations. 


The Legal Aid Act 1974 itself 
recognized that foe Treasury 
had a part to play in foe funding 
of legal aid. Of course foe 
T reasury could not dictate to foe 


Mr Justice Taylor asked if 
there was a legitimate expecta- 

linn that vK» nportfistinric u.-niiiri restraints were & r«evani factor 


lion that the negotiations would 
proceed with speed and with foe 
department's cooperation. 

Counsel agreed that they 
would use their best 
endeavours. 


to which he could have regard in 
foe exercise of his discretion. 

A final point related to foe 
question of what useful purpose 
these proceedings served. The 


Lord Lane: What evidence is remedy sought 


there that the Lord Chancellor's 
department did? 


cretionarv and one which was 
not normally granted if foe 


Counsel said foat the evidence proceedings served no useful 
was the foe department formed pu ™* . h—#t 


the view that there was no 
reasonable prospect of conclud- 
ing negotiations within foe time 
scale. Officials notified the Lord 
Chancellor that time would not 
allow discussion of the report to 
be concluded before foe April 
regulations. 

It was not surprising that on 
December 20 foal they reached 
Thai conclusion. 

Lord Lane asked why it could 
nol be done aU at foe same time, 
concurrently. 

Counsel said that it could. 

Lord Lane: The feci that the 
Lord Chancellor goes to India 
and has a Christmas holiday 
appears to me irrelevant. 


appears to me incl 
Counsel agreed. 


Mr Justice Taylor sub- 
sequently asked why. if the 
decision that foe regulations 
were going to be uprated S per 
cent was taken before Christ- 
mas. there had not been a 
squeak about it until the day 
before the Bar's extraordinary 
general meeting. 

Counsel said that it was foe 
Lord Chancellors practice to 
discuss -decisions with min- 
isterial coilegues and before 
those discussions were carried 
out. no decision was taken. 


The Lord Chancellor had 
made it plain that the door had 
not been dosed on Coopers & 
Lybrand. that he was anxious to 
continue discussions and to 
reach stage 2 of the review of the 
1982 Regulations. 

Lord Lane: Why should not 
he enter into a binding 
timetable? 

Counsel said foat the only 
question was foe uncertainty as 
to precisely what he would need 
to consider, and his reluctance 
to bind himself. 

Lord Lane: We have now got 
down to the very narrowest of 
narrow points. I wonder why we 
have been spending a day and a 
hair oxer these matters which 
cause great unpleasantness, 
whatever happens. 

Mr Phillips: ! can say for the 
Lord Chancellor foat he would 
undertake to exercise all reason- 
able endeavours to pursue nego- 
tiations - 

Lord Lane: We are all minded 
to adjourn this matter until 

Monday, before anything more 
is said. 

The hearing was adjourned 
until Monday. 

Solicitors: Lawrence Graham: 

Treasury Solicitor. 


-- e S*fi T.eimv 





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PHe lei for appi 01-589 5491. 
313 BTomWcm Road- swi 
W10 OFF LAD8NMWE CNOVE. 
Own room In efi house. 

■ailing rm. dining rm. mi i a : wm. 
CSSpw rv Tei. 0763 81 4 s4 - 
HKSHBURT FIELDS-AvaiJ 

imiried. Spat. flat. W (OonvAIl 
mcd.com.£65pw 354 1760. 
HUHCTON Prof Femato. o/r. S 
mins stalfon. snare ftaf.C« 
£150 pem TN: 01-359 8852 
TWICKENHAM f to share 3 befl 
no use with prof male. 39. All 
HlhilK £40 p w. Tel 898 6795. 


lux ruu/nousce up m uoo 
P w. Usual fee* «9. PMIIips 
K ay & Lews*. SouBi of (tie Park. 
Chelsea office, 01-362 
North 


SALES & MARKETING 


BOURNOHOLm* a vacancy ex- 
ists lor a Person with sales or 

nunaacnKni e xp eti^wrc- T«e- 
phoiw 0202 28490 


DOMESTIC & CATERING 
SITUATIONS 


OVERSEAS AU PAIR AGCMCY 
87 Regent Sfreeixondon wi. 
Tel 439 6534. Vfh. Overseas. 
Also m hetoi rtoms lemp. perra 


IRELAND 


CASTLE WML Beaullhd S C 
flal avail Apr - Sepi. Superb sel- 
ling on prtvaie 1500 acre 
lakeside estate. 50 m Dublin. 
CH. let. Sips 4,5. Tel: 01 72T7 

7624 


WILTSHIRE 


MARLBOROUGH DOWNS. Re- 
mote luxury house. 6 beds. 3 
baihs <2 en suiiei. hilly fined 
oak -kitchen. 3 reccp . 20 acTes. 
stabUng and oulbuUdlngi. heal- 
ed swimming pool, lentils court. 
Could easily be divided Fishing 
available 1': hours West Ena. 
12 miles Swmdan. Oilers 
around £200.000. 0672B6- 

232. 


house. Nr. Tube. 3 dbte twd- 
rooms. 2 weeps K» wt. dlnrm 
KK MWUO with Wvrty view*. 
Oas (91. S. Factns Carden. Ga- 
rage £230pve. 01-607 1549. 

KENSMTON / Pafaro Cardens 
terrace. nr« floor balcony flat 
large living room, double bed- 
room. mcety furnished. CH. 
£|46 pw Tel: 0755 882252. 

MARIA VALE Attractive newly 
convened S/C Fd fl IML 2 
beds. £450 pan. 01-402 7701 
or 01-422 2280 

NR MARBLE MICH. Qmet sunny 
Hal in small Mock. dH# bed. 
lounge, sen kll. fully equipped. 
£200pw Inc. TH Ol 402 2805 

RESENTS PARK luxury fur 
MsJhed flai. 2 dMe beds- 2 
reran. CH. parking. Co Mt. 
£278 pw. TH: Ol 402 6390. 

ST JOHNS WOOD. 1 bed fur- 
nished nai. Lux block. 
Porterage- Laundry service. 
£140 pw. TH Ol 4S2 6890 

W-14. Rustic gch paUo flat (bea- 
ut. known/ bathroom). £250 
p m. Suit suiglo. gutel pm fld- 
gers. 603 5091. 

W2. LUXURY 2 bedroom 2 bath- 
room flat company lei 
preferred. £180 per week. TH 
01-570 0230 

CENTRAL! DM* bedim flat nr 
tube. TV. £90 pw. Others loo 
627 2610 Homefocatoro. 

DELIGHTFUL SUNNY PLAT 
overlooking Montagu So. WI. 1 
bed. 1 rec. £200 pw. 935 3395. 

HAMPSTEAD newly convened 1 
bed garden flat o’looung lennis 
Club. £125 pw- 01-435 4869 

IULOND0N1 DMe bed mi flat CH. 
nr tube. TV. £75 pw. 627 2610 
Homelocatort. 

OPEN SUNDAYS Over 1600 va- 
cancies to choose bom. 627 
2610 Homrioraiora. 

SLOAIK SQUARE, NR. Superb 
bnghl lux dMe studio apt ner- 
vtcri. £240 pw. 689 7824. 

STREATHAM lovely Might room 
In autet house lor non smoker. 
£40 pw. Inc. TH 749 3412. 

SW 2 bedr oomrd Hal TV. recepL 
parking £90 pw. others too 627 
2610 HomeMCBloro. 

WI Rooflob mod balcony flnL. 2 
dMe bedrms. £225 pw incl. CH. 
CHW TV 834-BT88 


WALES 


PROPERTY WANTED 


WANTED SW AREAS 11.2 bed 
fiats from £90 10 £120 pw Co 
lef poss. 387 1490 (Tl 


TIMES HARE U.K. 


nr Beaumans. Sparioia lux Mt. 
an cons. C.H . games room, kr- 
. races, mooring. Sipe 8. Also 
cottage tips 2. Ol 435 8573. 
ABERSOCH A NEFYH 2 luxury 
hoi may homes Id lei. Healed 
pool Sea views. S teens 8. Ring 
Ballon 591197/22524. 

NR CARMARTHEN. Cottage In 
beautiful countryside. Fr £60- 
£120 Brochure 0667 82335. 


TRESOO, Wes of Salty. 
Timeshare tux. cottage 2 
weeks mid-May. Sleeps 6 • 1 
dbi- 2 iwlm. 2 baihs it m 
suite), lux. filled kll . dining 
area and senary!* lounge. fuUy 
lumHned and eguipped 10 an 
excepdonally Wgti standard, 
eh. Bed imcn. towels and col- 
our tv all provided. Offer in 
region of £11600 Ring: Gl- 
ass 0617 - LU- 


YORKSHIRE 


comfortable 4 betroamed 

farm he*, sll a miles York. Open 
views to Minster, convenient 
for exptoHng Date, N.V-Mom 
A East es«. Ideal children. June 
28 onwards. TH 0904 768300 
PEAK District, peaceful old farm 
collage, sips 7. SH. col TV 
Marsden Thorpe farm Haxher- 
saoe Sheffield 0433 60659 


GENERAL 


AUDO 200 fuel inietbon 4 door 
saloon metallic blue A reg. bo- 
inacitfai* condfuan £7000 ono 
Ph Ol 640 3961 e» 204 Mr D 
Mo rtuner 


V.W. AND AUDI 


20Q TURBO AUTO Feb 86 1.000 
miles. Leather Upholstery. 
£19-250 ono Tel: 0953883997 


MERCEDES WANTED 


EASTER BREAKS 


COSY PEACEFUL rnacMienes. 
Sips 4 -6 between Andover & 
wmcheiier. Log fires. Self ca- 
icrtng AU mod cons £300 Teh 
0962 760268 


OPERA & BALLET 


DORSET, HANTS- & 
I.O.W. 


IRELAND 


THEATRES 


SHAMROCK COTTAGES. West 
St. Wells. Somerset >0934) 
742269. Cat. Broth Of ISO 
houses In Eire. DecoarU fares. 


LAKE DISTRICT 


PEACE ANO Comfort m superb 
collage nr GonMon Water 
Steeps 5. £120- £200 pw. Avan 
mU April onwards. TH 1022 
9 88i 2SS 

WINDERMERE, fully modernised 
due. sum s 4 200 yards lake. 
One lo an amenities. Most 
dales available. 0253 726684. 
LAKELAND Self Catering. Cot- 
tages. Farmhouses et c G rey 

Abbey Brorti. 10946) 3773 . 


ADCLPKt 836 7611 or 240 7913 
4 CC 741 9«W 836 7358/379 
6433 Cm Sales 930 6123 CC 
BOOKING TO XMAS B6 EXCLU- 
SIVELY With First CAP Do 240 
7200 24 Hr 7 Days 

ME AND MY GIRL 

THE LAMBETH WALK 
MUSICAL 

NfgMfy AI 7-30 Mats Wed at 2 JO 
St Sat 4 30 A 800 

“THE ONLY UV E MUSIC AL 
nfE EVER HUOYES’* 
Spectator 


LONDON 



KENSINGTON W1L. Lux serviced 
apan Coi TV. Unicorn Ltd. IS 
Elgin Cres. Wit Ol 727 6382. 


LAST 2 WEEKS. 

From 1 Apr f or tonlied s wan 
HARVEY F gRS TEBi 
a Ms award -winning 

TORCH SONG TRILOGY 

TnDLLtANTVY FUNK*” DM 


EAST ANGLIA 


WALSMCHAM Norfolk. Tudor 
coliagri. sleep six. £70 80 pw 
Jh. JV. Set) 03£B72 295 


SCOTLAND 


ANGUS. Setf-csferfng eatuoet 
sleeps 5 6 web eaulDDed UW 
linen auiet central in Cams 
beaches golf etc. OM 782 340 

HIGHLAND cotUflr and wmg of 
Lodge. 2.8 persons Stating 
telling. £100-125 pw Tel 
>0549821 COS or i0474) 59221. 

PERTHSHIRE 6 bth. fully 
serviced luxury caravan rm 
C65 pw Colour TV. Brochure 
<0738 8S> 308 

Scotland Rcnvshtre. cottage 
skvpft. all mod cons, rouxir iv. 
all dim available pn Muir -of 
Ora 870352 

WESTER RGBS. Catrloch. Sea's 
edge trod hse Sips 7 Own Jel- 
ly Arrc garden From £ioO 
pw. TfL 01 736 J493. 


SOMERSET & AVON 


EASTER M BATH- Private Gror- 
gtan annmenh. warm and 
nenwouslv egwpped Dernil*: 
■0229) 530221. 


MARK KINGSTON 



EAST MOATM.Y Stwcv. 3 bed 
modernised fann coBage lo W 
trom May I . To mod con ELIO 
per week. Holland 357 


FLATS-HOUSCS. shorMong Ml 
central kmdon Ol 244 7369 
London AooHmencs 

inlematlonal 


District 


- jar' ' * 


CHELSEA KnuotarMOP. Bekjra- 
vIl ramiico. womimk r- 

Luxnry Mart and flaa avao- 
flbie for long or short lea. 
Please ring for cumm HM- 
CooP=>- 69 Buckingham palace 
rd SWl. 01-828 B26I. 


INTE KVATIO WAL S11MMEB SCHOOL 

AND FESTrt'AL w . 

In avocialion with TELECOM 
ttpJAsdaJ Ctaatber Mak Came Mr Str 


CMMtHMC* 

iti d tadl. 

2W-MA AMPN IW 


RctModU Ctaotber Made Came fcr SUggf aad Ecrhari. 

KUriv FmM Cskwh ttou ak uu Ac atoc PabBc Mstow CRmbb tdwMra U»m . , — 

xS*. beMe UmHoy Omewb feme ScMsH QsMNfHRNmm to jroy, 

Tno. Brian Oh- banx bo> F eeO« Q»?M«f i . i o» »^ * w " 

BH— Britosuv, ptaaoi I M | Mi- M i. pbpo: Mnwto wtoU l »pm, vwia. * n Mi j «M »r s . norm o«w- 

ERaaat- WatfNL chamber music _ — en itnitr Te£ 0625 

Brortmre ncxn LDsnt OfOCe. The Om% Otv Unu. Hxadforth. CtmsMv. SKP -aw. 

522908. 


CONCERTS 


SUPERIOR FLATS A HOUSES 
aval. A road lor dtpMmats. 
ex endives. Long o short iet» in 
all areas. Ltpfrimd A Co. 48. 
Albemarle St W l . Ol -499 S53*. 


2SHi March 1386 ' 9t BaptBb’a, Hw w i rlpR i, WI 

J. S. BACH 

ST MATTHEW PASSION 

(sung in English! 


ST. PAUL'S J 
CATHEDRAL i 
HOLY WEEK! 

PALM SIMMY 


Oxford, and Cambridge are 
level after yesterday's foursomes 
in tfie university matoi ai 
Canton, so everything is ™y 
set up fora rousmgciLmax m tne 

S ^ e tte^orucioJ Uiiid match. 


lain Smith, the CambndBe.sec- 
rptarv . and • Gavin Dixon 


Bussag au Doshpen at na« 

gggSte 5gsgi*tfMw 
tits omMLwei^® 

nouar .RL -Ito.- «"» 


A unique opportunity to hear The P*s$ioa in Uie comsxt oT 


15.0QOT 


Ids, Martin 
uuoe 


i lUESDAT XRb MMB 1 

taoo ST JOHN NUNN | 

H* dBhkd CM- 
SsNR Ctor Ad Ite Lprisa BKhl 


mete S&5D, CUB, OJ25 Frw Rk OOCB 0H28 BT3 


1000 MATINIS AMD UTAMV I 

- CsndKM bf R Don Mdl 


rotary, aad • Gavin Dixon 
achieved an extraordinary 
recovery. They were seven 
down after 10. holes to ..Chris 
White and Charles Hall, but 
were only two adrift at ioKb, 
winning five of the last six holes- 
Renraricable. putting *ep* 
Cambridge going in the airer- 
noon. They won the seventh bin 
lost the ninth with a birdie to 
Oxford’s two-under-par three. 
Cambridge squared die match ai 


By Nicholas Keith 

ridge are 16 th. but neither side couki 
bur&omes gain an cd^- 

natch at Fiona . Macdonald, of Cam- 
- is neatly 'bricks, the first woman to win a 
naxinthe golf Blue, was involved in a 
narrow defeat 

d mat ch , oxkw a%. CBmgWM 2* 

i Dixon Maim lest to 
ordinary atot;KFr6asona^OR«^«^ 
re seven Sim g »*«v p 

to Chris CTFMacD ohpW 

Hall, but andC EDison. JanOZ. OWBWGjMjifl j 
ar lnnch. *?' H pft ®P* B 

ISfir **— -*•*'■ 


• In yesterday's pnrriew of the 
university match. Sue Brown 
was incorrectly described as a 

former cox of a Gunmiflg 
eight. She steered the Oxford 
. crew in the Boat Race. 


THE DRAGON’S TAIL 

’Funny * EJiNTtautw 
City Limits 

A New PW by Dongba 
WaUansan 

Dbccieri by Michael Ruginan 
Evg» Mon-rri 7 30. Tina* mb 3.Q 

Sals 60 A Lit 

Group saiw 9313 6125 

FINAL DAY 


SimtbwQ O 101 M Sot^ ara oeletinnnig 2J years qf miek nahii^ 
wiili a special concert oa Sattmtay 22 s 7.30pm at Southwdl 
Minster. They wiB pvc a first petfinuasBce of The Rusion ac- 
cording 10 Sl Luke' « specially coamnniooed work by Richard 
SbepartL who is Head of the Choir School ai York M rosier and 
cotnposetl nuaic 10 celebrate ibe Micwert ccajwaxry in 1984. The 
lexi has been provided by Canon Leslie Motley. The programme 
also uidudes Hadyn’k Great Organ Mass. OiguisL Mktad 
Overbury. The East of England Orchestra wfD accompany under 
the baton of Choral Society conductor Peter Wood. Soiotsu ate 
Patrizn Kwclla. Catherine Denky, Martyn Hill and Brian Rayner- 
Cook. Tickets sic available from AJ. Backett Market Phtx, 
Southwell and The Box Office, Victoria Centre: During the w txk 
leading op to rite concert. Much 13 - 22 the Choral Society ate 
staging an cxhibiiion of memocabilta of the Society in Southwdl 


8»H n»«n Mtartar. Nous. 
7.30pm. fmi ptr tur maww Tit* 
9Xuw Passion by mdois 
Sncpard & Haydn ■» Great 
Organ Mom. Southwell atom 
Society. East of England Or- 
chestra. Soloists Patrtzla 
KwwUo. CaQwTbw DnHor. 
Martyn van. anon fttyher- 
OOOk. 


MATFAHt S CC K9 3036,-741 
9999 First Can sMhr T day CC 
240 7200 Mon-Ttra 8 Fli/Sat 
5 AO 5 8 IO 

RICHARD TODD 

ERIC LANDER ANNETTE ARMS 

THE BUSINESS OF 
MURDER 

The Mi nuratf by Richard Hants 
-The bast (hrOn- kr 9 

Mir "An unabashed winner" 8 
Exp "A ihruier Hut achieves it aH. 
Sensabonar’ Times -The mow In- * 
gnuous mystery to hove appeared b 
In a decade" D Mall 

6th GREAT YEAR 



COMEDY THEATRE Box Office 
01-930 2578 First Can 24-haia- 7 
day re bkw 01-240 7200 

“Expert Comic WiM E'BsJ IaN 
GLENDA . NKXL 
JACKSON HAWTHORNE 
■PsrfscOy KricM’ Roibri 



ACROSS FROM THE 
GARDEN OF ALLAH 

by CHARLES WOOD 
Dtrected by RON DAMELS 
Evgs Maa-FTI 8.0 Sat SJO * 8JO 


comsuiE -s- 92 s 2203 cc 
(Nottcmai Theatres smalt audt- 
tortumL Today 2.3 0 * 7.30. 
then April 1 to 3 FUTURISTS 
by Dusty Mugftee. Men 7.15 



BASKETBALL 


Avon enjoy 

the scent 
of success 


BOWLS 


Richards s 
winning 4 
comeback 


Avon Norttromptno {to. fo*" 
duct successive women nation*! 
championships at Wembley to- 
stay - and sponsors have 
cause for ceJebnrtkw aiready. 
The English Basketball Fellow- 
ship are presenting Avon 
Cosmetics with a trophy next 
Tuesday in recognition -of their 

lODgand vtdiiable contribution to 

the game. -. 

Aron have sponsored the. 
NortluunptoD-b&sed Women s 
Narional LewK team for seven 
years. Membership of the 
feUowshipis open to infirktaab 
who have gben outstanding 
serrice to basketball over m*oy 
years. 


Arno were chosen to be the 
lint recipients of this new 
trophy as it was Wt they , had 
demonstrated similar qualities, 
Paul Sontftmrth, president and 
chief executive of Avon, said: 
“We are very pleased to be 
honoared in drisway. 


“As we are in the beauty 
business, and interested in 
community relations,, the choree 
of a locad women's basketball 
team for sponsorship is a natonral 
toras.* ■ 


- Wynne Richards made an 
Impressive recovery to beat Bui 
Charles of the Victory Club. 
Portsmouth. 21-14 in the ni« 
round of the Prudential English 
national singles championship 
ai Hartlepooi yesterday (Gor- 
don Allan writes). . 

Richards seemed bound for 
defeat when Charles led 13-3. 
But m the sinister tradition of 
bowls, 13 proved unlucky for 
Charles. Richards dropped into 
a line and length commensurate 
with his international txepuia- 
tion, and Charles could not 
check foe-flow, of shots against 
him. Richards scored, four on 

the twentieth end to win. 

Gary Harrington beat Steve 
.Bloomfield from Harfow 21-8, 
and David Bryant beat Bob 
.Dickens, of Not tin g ham , 21-11. 
David Cutler, runner-up to 
Bryant in 1 977. had his^ work cut 
out' to beat Mick Sharpe of 
Weningbonni&i 21-17. Sharpe 
led 14-12 and then Cutler's 
greater experience and accuracy 
made themselves feh. 


The 1 fellowship grin receive an 
award from the Ensfish Basket 
Ball Association tony in recog- 
nition of the important rote 
played by volantary workers in 
developing tbe gainer 


nEStR-TSStoMERMiHMi: R OaasM 
O PwkWYZt^DHCuflBT.U M Sharp* 21- 

17; R Cut* MG Strath White IB R 

®oti 2 t- 12 . OaywttM R Qckens 21-11: 
G HGi^itnon ta S BioanMd 2i-ft a 
S tepfatnMrt ■ bt ■ P MBt&wao. 21-tfc W 


Norman M KSharratt 2V19r W If ay w ar d 
MTScottZI-tB: JGsbb MG Dura 2t-7; J 


Boytobt K Marsh 2t-17tW fWnrtis M W. 
Oiwt8S21-1k J-NewsQrtMK. Orury2l- 
2a Pain: Socoad reuoct G Ptaskiri and R 
smamMAAacaduMMJ0fuari26-i& 


BRETT FORREST. 

JEANNE 

DabccnWiinn ttrtsn'Mdw 
JEANNE Tlv Mbrical 
AMERICAN DANCE SEASON 
. Apia to - May 10 
American Ballroom Theatre, wttb 
the Pasadena Roof OnMm. 
naaafind Nawnton * □ mem. bu 
T Jonex * Ando Zone. RtngZTB 
- 0885 for totaur broebure. . . 


RACING 


Paddy’s Peril the pick 


LYRIC MAMME NTM TT H 01-741 
2311 LAST 2 FCRFB TODAY 

4.oo a, tab. 

DOUG LUCffTS 

PROGRESS 

From 3 Ami 

THE BEAUX’ 
STRATAGEM 

ITBC STUBKh Loot |Mrf T«fl 

8pm prompt) Adrian MUrtMTs. 

SATE DAY-NIGHT 

FNm IO Ap<tL 

ANGRY HOUSEWIVES. 


SAVOY. Box Office- 01-836 8888 
OC 01-579 6219. 535 0479 JErg*. 
7j«S. Manna* VMiWriW 50 
Saturday 8.30 _ 

"MICHAEL FRAYhTS AWARD 
WINNING FARCE NOW IN ITS 
4TH YEAR to STILL ONE OF 
THE FUNNIEST THINGS IN 
TOWN." S Time* 16/2/86 
CHRISTOPHER GODWIN 
STEPHANIE • . HUGH 
COLE PAODICK 

MICH AEL OOtaHRANE 
COLETTE..- -TIMOTHY 

OLEE8QK ; CARLTON 
. NOISCS OFF 

Dir by MICHAEL BLAKEMORE 


Thereisnodea^ofpbi^ foe^expehsr of Lochage and 

point ineeliqg^ today. foree of Balbeg- > . i- 

those j ;poslpoee<t jn.-Eebruaxy^^.-. -- 

having been added to the 14 There are four other meetings 

already scheduled (Brian Beel w^lhqudxfiers tor foe Chepstow 
writes). face- the Hurwnrth attracung 

- Paddy’s Peril is already miali- last , year’s winner, Utser. The 
Bed for the Land Rover final, . horse who came third to him. 
but be can reinforce his chims General Rule, goes to . the 
by winning .foe VWH event at FfowaBam. 


SHAFTESBURY 379 6599 CC 
579 6435/741 9999. Flxri CaH 
24 nr 7 day CC 240 7200. On* 
SUMS 930 6123. 

ROWAN ATKINSON 




CUFF RICHARD 

AS THE ROCK STAR- 
THE PORTRAYAL OF 'AKASH* 

LAURENCE OLIVIER 

Rid Price Prev* from Ttw 27 
March. Opens W«) g Anrtl at T. 
Mon-Frt 7 JO Thu Mot 2JO sal s 
ft 8JO 


LOWER A LOWE’S MUSICAL 

GIGI 

Directed hy John Dealer 
-Creeled with lumunous 
OMriouw" Dally Enm . 
Evga 7 JO Son 9.0 * 8.18 
Wed Mat* 3.0 
croup Sale 01-930 6123 
LAST 5 WEEKS 




1 ') l ' _ 













m UtP WjW National Opera 
production of 

AFTER AIDA 

Dir ay Howard Davtm 
A new play try Mtaa MlliAiW 
BMP on tne life & later work of 

GliiHW* VmriL 


FORTUHX % OC 836 2238 <9 741 
9999 Finn Call zonr 7 day OC 

2407200 Eve llm/ SW 64 540 

COMEDY OF THE YEAR 

Laurence om-ier Award 1984 

UP AND UNDER 

By John Godbrr 
-A WONDERFUL C OMP rr S 
Tbnrs * •SPLENDID" D TW 
-One «f me fimnMri pud MM pr»- 
lenbou* Play* you are mar going 
la tee. TOTALLY HYSTERICAL" 
OM “ A JOY” S Exp 

2nd HILARIOUS YEAR 


OCTVttR *• 928 2262 CC 

(Kattatul 7hMrtnr‘f ooen Vogel 
Today 2.00 (low poor twu 4 
7.15. Mon 7 18. (haa April 1 lo 
3 THE TMKEKHMY OPERA, 
try BreciiL with music by Kurt 




CARRKK. B 01836 4601. CC 
370 6433 6 CC. 24 nr, T day MO 
7200. Grp Srin 930 6123. Evas 8 
pm. WM mat 3 0. Sal 5.0 and 8-0 

NO SEX. PLEASE- 
WFRE BRITISH 


POHOO TO OCT 4 MOW OKU 


GREENWICH THEATRE 01-858- 
7786 Evenings 7e46 mat fiat 
2 30 OIK or US bv ROMM 
CHAPMAN WHB ANTHOWY 


gu Booiung wt jw* w> 
930 6123 


MMviih.iAiiraa.rfmS 


JENNY QUAYLE "A CBOtial 
cast’ D TW “Fa*tln*ting_a 

Uvut nrn miTTfaB i" fUra minn 


THE MUSICAL ' ,'v 

Op«ns 14 May M 7pm 

RM Price Previews from APTO 30 








































































jj J 


THE TIMES SATURDAY MARCH 22 1986 


SPORT 


H f v RACING 

1 j4j_ ^ — 1 — . . 

Rana Pratap boasts 
ideal credentials 




■v u,- 

'•‘‘V H: 


i ' S 


is tikei1 10 win 
today's William Hffl Lincoln 
Handicap ai Doncaster from 
faus relatively low draw seven 
places away from -the far rail. 
Discussing his horse's chance 
yesterday, Geoff Lewis, the 
trainer, said; “I don’t mmft 
where he s drawn as long as 
it's not in the middle. The 
important thing is to have 
other fit and landed horses 
around you;” 

With the ante-post 
favourite. Well Rigged, 
QuaUtair Flyer, Gundreda, 
Star Of A. Gunner and the 
recent Cagnes winner. Emer- 
ald E a g l e , all drawn low, Rana 
Pratap will certainly have that 
My selection also enters the 
fray on a- wave of confidence, 
having been backed by his 
trainer at long odds soon after 
tire weights were published 
and framed solely with today 
in mind ever since. 

Yesterday Lewis also told 
me that Rana Pratap was extra 
well; that he was pleased with 
the state, of the ground at 
Doncaster and that his horse's 
last bit of work ai Epsom was 
the best that he had ever done. 
Asked if he would stay a miv, 
as he Iras never won beyond 
seven furlongs, Lewis replied: 
“Yes I'm sure he will on this 
ground, with this weight and 
in the form he is.” 


By Mandarin (Michael Phillips) 

The pattern of the race 
■rote fairly easy to predict. 
WeU Rigged, the favourite has 
the perfect draw for a front 
runner along the far rail and I 
can envisage him .making a 
brave attempt to emulate 
Cataldu who made, all the 
running on the far side 12 
mon ths ago. However, the fact 
remains Rana Pratap beat 
WeU Rigged by three lengths 
over seven furlongs when they . 
clashed at York last October. 
Now I hope to see him do it 
9g2ui on only 31b worse terms. 

Of those drawn low, my best 
news confirms Go- Bananas, 
who finished third in the race ' 
12 months ago with 61b ires on 
his back, and the big Newmar- 
ket fancy, Virgin Isle. 

Lewis is . also hopeful of 
wi nnin g the Mail On Sunday 
Handicap with Beresqne, a 
well-bred colt who began life 
at Puiborough with Guy 
Harwood before being moved ' 
to Robert Armstrong at New- 
■ market and finally switched to 
his present quarters in Epsom. 
There he has done all his early 
work with the stable’s Lincoln 
hope, whose preparation also 
included a gallop at Sandown s 
with Thursday's ■ runner-up $ 
TremblanL 1 

Having won the Cam midge l 
Trophy twice and been placed r 
second once, Vorvados is out t 


to improve his record. But be 
would litre it much softer 
underfoot and on the prevail- 
ing ground I prefer Grey 
Desire. 

Newbury’s mammoth nine- 
race programme begins with 
the Philip Comes Saddle of 
Gold Hurdle Final, which has 
been carried forward from the 
last fixture candled because of 
frost For this I go nap on 
Pike's Peak, who was runner- 
up to Ten Plus in the Sun 
Alliance Long Distance Hur- 
dle at Cheltenham 10 days 
ago. 

Of all the horses Nicky 
Henderson look to the three- 
day Festival meeting. Pike’s 
Peak probably needed the race 
the most because be is not 
inclined to over exert himself 
at home. Overall his form- 
looks the best and be certainly 
has the beating of Corbitt 
Coins on two counts. 

Half an hour later the 
presence of the Grand Nation- 
al second favourite. West Tip 
in the field for the Newbury 
. Handicap Chase should create 
more than a ripple of interest 
I was rather disappointed to 
see West Tip finish only 
seventh in the Ritz Cub 
Trophy at Cheltenham, but 
having seen the film of the 
race, it was not a bad perfor- 
mance. 



DONCASTER . C4 


Televised: 1.30, 20, 235, 3.5 

Draw advantage: tow numbers best on soft ground 
Going: good 

1 JO MAIL ON SUNDAY HANDICAP (3-Y-O: £3,739: 7f) (13 runners) 

1 301002- ANDAflTtS (D) (Mrs H Cambonis) Lord J FrtZQnrald 3-7 R Hals 12 

2 100100- CRETE CARGO (W Amidol M Frantss B-13 Paul Eddery 8 

3 033- BERESQUC (Bwhio Invosimonts LM1 Q lms B e PWaMror»3 

4 33221/S- SUPREME IQNODOH (J Gocxfl R HooinsiiMd 8-4 W Ryan 10 

5 001020- MEADOW MOOR (C Hound) Mrs J Reavey 8-1-. SWMwxtfil 

e 4220- MSNAAO (USA) (MtidounAI Maktoum) B Hanbiry 7-13 W Carson 2 

7 320- PLANET A& (T Ramadan) A Bttey 7-13 G Carter {5) 9 

8 000210- TOUCH OF GREY fT Jennings) D Tnom 7-12 ML Thomas 4 

9 002331- BEHMGRA GUO. (A PemHoj M Haynes 7-8 RFra 13 

10 82-0031 SOVEREIGN LOVE (K Rscfierl W i+Bass 78 RUnes (3) 7 

11 1404- LADV ST CLAIR fT Macdonald) Denys Srntfi 7-7 M Fry 11 

12 030010- BMOVtSE (D) (P HatsalQ R Thompson 7-7 — 6 

13 000400- TA W AS DAO |P O'DcnneB K wxy 7-7 A Proud 5 


»RGO(WAmidsiM Francs B-13 Paul 

UE (Bnfco Investments L*n Q Umrts 88 - P 1 

E IQNQDOH (J Good) R Hconsiwad 84. — — U 

Y MOOR (C Hound) Mrs J Reweyfri-. SW 

3 (USA) {Maktoun Al Maktoum) a Hanbiry 7-13 W 

A8H (T Ramadan) A Balov 7-13 GO 

JF GREY fT Jemmas) D Than 7-12 ML1 


8 000210- TOUCH OF GREY (T JenrHngs) D Thera 7-12 ML Thomas d 

9 002331- BEHMGRAGm (A P wcBoTm Haynes 7-8 RFra 13 

10 82-0031 SOVEREIGN LOVE (K fisenart W tfeaas 7-8 RUnes (3) 7 

11 1404- LADV ST CLAIR fT Macdonald) Denys Snath 7-7 M Fry 11 

12 030010- BMOVtSE (D) (P HatsalQ R Thompson 7-7 — 6 

13 000400- TA M AS DAO (PDDowiaq K hoty 7-7— A Proud S 

1 1-4 Sovereign Love, 3-1 Andsns.4-1 Misread, 6-1 Crea Cargo. 7-1 M a a dcwMoor. 10-1 

Baroque, 12>i Supreme Kingdom, 14-1 others. 



20 RACING POST MAIDEN STAKES (3-Y-O: £3,743: 7f) (10) 


MY MHO OF TOWN! 


PELLS CLOSE (Hraodoromo Racing) M W Easteroy 9-0 . 
PETENCOftE (Mrs S RwKem) J Redfam 9-0 




BaUymDan takes the last to win Newbory’s Wood hay Chase (Photograph: Ian Stewart) 

Swinburn swoops on Formatune 


Patient r iding tactics by Wai- 
ter Swinbnra paid off with a 14-1 
victory for the Newbury-trained 
Formatune in the Leger Way 
Handicap at Doncaster yes- 
terday. Well bemud in the 
straight, Swinbnra threaded, his 
way through die field to get into 
a challenging position behind 
the Willie Carson-ridden Re- 
pealed in the final fnrioog. 

Carson tried bis utmost to 
keep the lead on Repealed, who 
had taken over from Palmtoa 


two and a half furlongs out. 
Close home, Swinbnra forced 
Formatune op for a photo finish 
and the camera showed they had 
won by a neck from the fast 
finishing Verbalism, with Re- 
pealed a head back in third. 

Forma tone is trained by Da- 
vid Arbothnof, who said: “This 
colt is the only one of my 32 
horses forward enough to rim. I 
had him in the Lincoln, but he 
was going to get balloted out, so 
we switched to this race. It's his 


first time over a mile and hell 
probably try the trip again at 
Kemptc on Easter Monday.” 
Princess Anne finished eighth 
on Little Sloop in the opening 
Haywards Pickle Stakes. It was 
her fifth ride in public and she 
walked the entire coarse before- 
hand with Little Sloop's trainer, 
David Nicholson. The Princess 
had Little Sloop in 15th place 
behind Wise Cracker turning 
into the home straight. The filly 
stayed on to finish eighth 


1 KG LEAGUE (Mrs P Yang) E Ek&i 9-0 . ML Thomas 3 

2 BOLD SEA ROVBt lU-Cof R Warden} M H EasterDy 941 ML Thomas S 

3 MY KIND OF TOWN (A Rudolf) R J Wwams 9-0 Ttves2 

4 OSCAR DE SOUSA (a ftnsmora) P Hasiam 94) T WHMama 7 

5 PELLS CLOSE (Hyjpodororno Racing) M W Easteroy 9-0 K Hodgson 9 

G PETENCORE (MreSRedtarn) J Redfem 9-0 SKetahttoy 8 

8 ROWE (Fand Salman) P Cota 9-0 TCkmnS 

10 F ALIKE (M Pere&eos) M Franca &-11 Paul Eddery 4 

12 nrAMi»0{USAJ{MrsMCa5hman)kYHa*v)gs-Ba5»S-JJ BUnas JO 

13 SOXOPH (MS A VanoerveS) M H Easterby frl 1 — — — 1 

13-8 Raw, 7-2 Fame. 5-1 My KindOi Town.7-1 Bott Sea Row, 8-1 Oscar da Sousa, 10- 

1 Scncopn, 12-1 tysmsta, 14-1 oftara. 


Doncaster selections 

By Mandarin 

1.30 Beresque. 2.0 Faiinc. 235 Rana Pratap. 3.5 Grey Desire. 3.35 
Recharge. 4.5 Quel Esprit. 

By Our Newmarket Correspondent 

1.30 Andartis. 20 My Kind of Town. 2.35 Virgin Isle. 3.5 Que 
Sympatica. 3.35 Lady Woodpecker. 

By Michael Seely 

2.35 Well Rigged. 3.5 QUE SYMPATICA (nap). 

235 WILLIAM HILL LINCOLN HANDICAP (£22402: 1m) (Str) (26) 

1 331211) BOLUNKMGHTfCHN WesttVOOk) M H Eastwtw 4-9-10 M Bn* 18 


1 331211/ BOLUN HflGHT fd | 

2 031000- GO BANANA’S (t»(fc 

3 040200- QUAUTAM FLYfcR U 

4 122001- EMPAPAHERO(D)(h 


NEWBURY 


Televised: 1.30, Z0 , 230 
Going: good 

CORIffiS SADDLE OF GOLD HURDLE (Ffnat £7,648: 3m 
120yd) (16 manors) 

J White 
BUMgm 
.PTftk 
SSmiSiECties 
JJOKafl 
-GMm 
GLmdai 
ROkmwMXfy 
P Scudamore 
M Bndtw 


PnctMater) I Belting 11-0 


1 22$ IpksB 

«8 308201 WATBt CAaWaNHP tF Laa)F H Lae S-1T-S 

109 00-4123 CAMAMAN XNG (A PWBmtB SahtoT-tt 

110 423/M0 CONTESTS (PWatimPCunml £1141 

111 P DR BRUIABerabnO mss ESnayd frlt-0 

112 MilW 

TI3 2-03014 IV A DEALER 
m 000002 JMPANZEfRI 
T15 04&324 MfSSMGMAN 


308 1U WIDE BOY 

309 22F3Q SANTEUA 

21S KflFFl 

311 03312 JUBfY 

312 3108 COPSE AMD 

313 011110 BALL' 

315 301130 SAFFRON 

316 130 

317 - mm SAN CARLOS 

310 10140 BB. COURSE 
TO 

320 11100 

322 100 FOR ALAR 

323 003404 NONE TOO 

334 10 AVEBURY 

325 210 BOLLM 

326 1403 

327 3110F3 IKS MAGNETISM 

328 00214 BWNCE CROFT 
4-1 Svftpatia. frt My Dominion BoNn Ptiacn 9-1 A 

hnpsriBl Bid, Troy Ftir, 14-1 Bo^ny. 16-1 TTw Footmen. Wda 



G22 43/PP-00 GLAZEPTA AGAIN (0 Canar) O Carter 7-11-9. 


_ I 5 130000- CHRISTIAN SCHAD 


C Brown 
MoCowt 
H Darns 
ACamd 
S Kragfit 
K Mooney 
-RHyett 
JJONefl 


J Bartow 
C Hawkins 
Jbnmy Lorenra 
t. 20-1 ODiars. 


637 0 PUCKS PLACE 

638 P0 ROVOiGOLEN. . , 

6«0 P/RMM SrAMDFVtMfA WBMS)R Gowfrll-9 

641 00000 SUNNY SUNKAM IMrs A Patereon) E Owm pm Hl-0 . 

650 RAQSCA (Mrs BDtiins) Mis B Dukes 7-1 1-4 

651 Rl- STRAIGHT ON (A Taylor) A J Taylor 5-1 1-4 

652 400-0BP WHID CHMES (Mrs E Rotmson) D Rollinswi 7-11-4 


(thraga)NGaselee 5-11-9 

L Dreshor) R Amiytsge 5-11-9 


S Smith Eeaes 

RBeggan 

MRichwte 

N Coleman 

P Scudamore 

B Powal 

PDever 

S YoUUen 

J Lovejqy 

Mr A Taylor (7) 

Mr DRoaraon 

BPcnwi 

13-2 Bruni Baby. 6-1 


6 021- DORSET COTTAGE 

7 212001- SHARP NOBLE (USJ 


8 301000- 

9 100000- 

10 434000- 

11 133000- 

12 040010- 

13 83000- 


1 


sttmxftiMHEasterby 4-9-10 M Birch 18 

iwryj K Ivory 5-9-2 R Cochrane 19 

Ur Big Ltd} K Stone 4-8-13 A Murray 3 

IT Transport Senncas) M McCormack 

4-6-11G Baxter 14 

(G Kaary) R Holder 4-frlD SCauthen26 

rsSRanflamw Jams 4-8-9 WRSwottumS 

*h Mohammed AI Sabah) B Hantxjry 

4-8-8 w canon 24 

Xvfrmilh)CBiktafei4-fi-6 PRobmson6 

Ssay 5-8-4 J Lowe 12 

1 1 Matthews 5-8-3 N Day 17 

npson 4-8-2 RPEtottll 

me 4-8-1 — LCHamock20 

(Stoke-an-Trem) Ltd) R HoOnaheed 

frfrl WRyeniO 


71h, BOLUH 


11*110 Solar Coud (1 1-0) with TROY FAW(11 
1(Mh,28 ran. CheltanhamTnwnpt) Hurdle 2m 


116 «t201 SMAU. H00UE (Ec0q> Stud) W A Stephenson 6-11-0 
118 32200 CORXTT CQINS^taJ COrbsS) FvShnyn 5-f — 
100-30 race’s Peak. fr2 Cortutt Coma, 11-2 Tara, 8-1 WAter Cannon. 
BroraU. T0-1 Smi Noble. 14-1 others. 


Peter Hobbs 
R Lamb 
KUoamr 
rm A Dealer, 9-1 


leerher TROY FWH (1 1-0) 3rd beaten ll to Tenganat p l-OT : end COLj 
kl) 4tfi temen 3t, n ran. Owtranham an hdto soft Jan 21 . coumslJ 


U) 4th baatan 31, n ran. Otaiti 
3 out when going wel aarOar 

3th beaten 5*L 22 


m v. m : 

■il.W PEHO 
OH 2m tufa 


hde soft Mar 8. 

(ll-7>u>nbnad: 
betiea 17*1 to Piaactors Gam 
an 41 nov M b good Nov 20. THE DOSE hi -0 3rd l 
ran. Fomwal Sn2 nov oh soft Fab 3. WATER C 
16 ran Uttaxater 3m h eap htia 




*■> I ■*! I 1 * 

rm 


■PelwlM (11-0) 2nd beaten nk to Sotor Cloud (11-0) wbh BEL 
Pointer 5VH. 22 ran. Kbmpton&n hdto good Jen 17. Wf DO*OON(11- 
fel by RMr Cabiog (11-N 30 ran. Cheltenham 2m nov hdto good to-sofr 
BOY late st bet rttferBBi. eerier fl 1-0) won 41 from KQm (fi-0) IB ran. 

N<* 22- BALLYARRY [1 ) Bttl txrntwi 3« ® THE FOOT- 

■■IIAN (11-0) 2nd beaten 121 and SAFFRON LOHD(l1-3) 5th 

■m ~ ■ ~ ~ ~ ~ "M| ■ ft' 

|qt-4)i5iii 


12th Oi 1&IMVWUI 

Valf 10 - 1 { 91 B 

CANNON boast (9-7) won 101 tan 
la oood Id soft Mir 15. CANADIAN' 


JHedlnn- COLONEL JAMES 

3U) NEWBURY HANDICAP CHASE (£4,058: 3ffl){9) 

-402 022000 WOTTW(D)(PLufflM0*VBrfr11-7 

403 ItKtUF MR MOOWAKBl (CXBF) (Mrs P Blackburn) L Keraara 


Ctapstawara nov hdfc soft Mar IS. 
ran. WbicarSon2m8l novb'ap tjda 
tan vuo|stee>pi-iD20aii 1 


(10-10)wan2*ltan Cane Cel 
to soft Jen 24. SMALL HOBLEl 
star 2m At no* btie good Mar 


_RDwwoody 
9-11-5 BPowel 

404 903000 BEAU RANGER (WMeBros) J Thomo 8-1 V3 : J Duggan 

405 1H3MP TRACYSSPECUL(D)(L Ames) ATumaS9-11-3 SteveKngM 

410 3011UP OUMPOmfrT Harrison) FVttntarfrlfr? -ByHfgn 

412 21113P COOLttelffiipChrbtolofnuJPD Haynes 9-1 04) A Webb 

414-400W1P- NORO WOOUB Wartwram) O awonh 8:1M— — 

. 415 3-00400 CONNAUGHT MVB) (Mrs J Mou«) D r&hoteon 7-lfrO. P Scudamore 

417 0/4U4- GLEN B0W(C PBdnglon) F Walwyn 11-100 K Mooney 

04 MrMoontiiar. 10fr30 Wert 1^4-1 Dumper, 8-1 Beau Ranger, 8-1 Cool Gm, ifri 
Tracy's SpedaL 14-1 aflws. ' 


Newbury sdections . 

By Mandarin 

130 PIKES PEAK (nap). 2.0 Into Song. 230 My Dominion. 3.0 
West Tip. 3.30 Hasty Gamble. 4.0 Pucks Place. 430 Leweston 
Prince. 5.0Comandante. 530 True Fourteener. 

By Michael Seely ..... 

1.30 Pike's Peak. ‘ '• ' 

23 HOECHST R88UMATE NOVICE HANDICAP HURDLE (Rnat 
mares: £6^97: 2m 4f 120ydH20) 

2D1 20130 VMO PESTA (J Dwey) R Pertuos 7-12-0 MWtoa 

202 30 RtSE AN RWttttrs A urarnhsm) J Grtfcrrl 5-12-0 Pmr lk tb i 

2B3 2fr11 AlllABAJESWJniwBsCnchm ant OShewmod 6-11-11 CCw(4) 

206 0WH0R KAD BJAH W?(V Kn* 0 BurcnBa /.IO-IO N Cotorom 

207 MHOS PMOnCE MOSS (Ms J LantiMSj Mra V Mc«e 6-1M Mtotoy 

208 DOW PAGE OF GOLD (R Bnrtnwxifi) 0 danckrffo 6-10-7 Pg«on 

209 00-1000 FREACHBTS CPIjB Bteham) K B»te^7 4>7_^- ^- BPwrei 

210 9-30144 DONNA PARMA tJTJwnpwn Fvm lia 0 Behsrde 5-10-7 P Tgk 

211 000401 INTO SONG A Sioaa) N -z^r= -—.. J Wlto 

212 BOO-200 FEBREMH3NDeTO (R» d Brofcara ) P Cimdea B-107 P Satte™* 

213 240010 SaXBI TURN (N A P pfclPtovtob 8-10-7 PA OMltW 

2H tM)102P HOT HAIDBjfcNiemCrrasb 5-10-7 RD !fS222 

^ S 2 S S^^hss^r^,£^===rv'!^ 

% sss 

223 M0ARFF LAMPSTONE (R Bw^ P D rtMJBS 9-1&-7 n J nf IS? 

HONEYS SWmodTRtiiBfjMTrDSler 10-10-7 MSsS Belcher 

M Donna Fawn. 3-1 AadMtaAfrl WaSoogfrl W8d Queen. 8-1 PracttioeMoss. 10-1 
Ymo Fast*, ifri sthere. 

230 TOTE CRSMT HURDLE HANDICAP (4-Y-O: EHL254: 2m 100yd) 
(23) 

- 3S 201FO THE FOOTMAM (P Powei) D Bsworta ll-7 G -%*5 

303 nawn TRffY FAR fH UcAtme) J Fdwards tl^ — PBarttjo 

304 SV C0UMB.4Aa^S^)pj0'Calaghan)MraSCKw-ll-5-- MasJOfewlT) 

300 TIITtO MVlXNMMMtfT RwwdonJM Ppv 7J-2 J Lower (7) 


330 ALVESCOT NOVICE HURDLE (Dfvl: £1,733: 2m 4f 120yd) (24) 

502 BIU. CORNWAU.JMTI C Hodwwi) Mrs VMdOe 7-11-9 — --J— 

503 03 B0RDBI RAMBUS (R Tynv)U Rbwrds 6-11-9 PTwk 

505 fr30F 8WTISH HEROlKHoq(j)P Burgoyne7-11-fl — ■— 

049 CROOMNGBBqI 
00 CROUGHAUN ~ 

F ENGC8JHASI 


053 004400 MAORI WARRkm(B)iD Coombs) A Barrow 4-11-0 BPmel 

3-1 Liner. 100-30 Easter Festival. 4-1 Be My Wings, 11-2 Akto King. 13-2 Bnmi Baby. 8-1 
Castle Douglas. 10-1 Pucks Place. 12-1 others. 

430 BETTESTON CHASE (£3^38: 2m 4Q (14) 

1 FP4B14 LEWESOONPHWCEfT Frost) S Clnstnn fr!2-0 RBeggan 

2 04-3141 DOHONJCUU (Ih (Ewan Enfjn Lid) GRicftante 7-1 1-10 — - 

4 P4F-041 MANNA REEF IQ (K Al-SaU) J Edwards 8-11-10 P Barton 

6 4F3000 AWIULLAH fT Thom) J Bndger 6-11-6 BPOanl 

7 33fr342 CHffltYRUfWCrwreggfRParlchs 6-11-6 DatWUams 

8 P-OPPOP CROZBRTOGEfMissC James) RE James 11-11-6 MBosley[4) 

9 FFR DUNVEGAN LAD (B Rice) P Brttsy 7-11-6 

11 03-22 GOLD BEARER (BF) (Lady Joseph) F Winter 6-11-6 BdeHaan 

12 120-P03 HIGHLAND CLmR (M bs A W lWfieldIO Sherwood 7-ii-B CUM (4) 

15 3M2FU OLYMnC PRIZE (H J Joel) J Gifford 7-11-6 PCaus 

16 P004>0 OUACX QUACK URogenton) A Tumail 6-11-6 CMam 

18 0-11 200 SUMMONS (Mrs S Em&icas) J Gtflorrl 7-1 1-6 Peter Hobbs 

19 t304BF TREYFORD (BFlfS Simsbury l TFbrsttr 6-11-6 RDunwoooy 

21 00 CLEAR THE COURSE (5 Samebury) T ftasw 6-11-1 HDavte 

11-4 Lewesdon Prince. 4-1 Manna Reef. 11-2 Olymptc Proa, 15-2 Cheeky Rupert. 9-1 
Daroncun, 10-1 GaU Bearer, 12-1 Highland Ctaper. 14-1 Treytord. Ifri others. 

5.0 SPRING NH PLAT RACE (Di v 1; £973: 2ra 100yd) (25) 

2 ARCTIC BARD (TWreggjRPertdn* 5-1 1-9 MrGWraggm 

5 BELLAStS (P Wates) hGow 5-11-8 NHunier(7) 

6 BIDDISHAM BOY (R Robnson) R Robtison 5-11-8 — Mr R Ro&nson (4) — 

ID 0 COHDICOTE 80Y(D Sarwart D Nicholson 5-11-8 

13 FORTASCUE IP CowelJP Haynes frl 1-8 PCom»n(7) 

17 HJANUGWalSfrWBrlngJGPrest 5-11-8 — _ MfT Ebwwrts m 

18 JUST IMS ONCE 0Q} (Mrs JRobshaw)D Barm 5-1 1-8 — Miss K BSS(7) 

24 MEXICAN JOE (MS MSmtiDG Ham 5-1 1-8 S Mackey Q 

. 26 BOHTGOMBlYfRE A BottJFWtnar 5-11-8 MrCBroaksfT) 

28 PEACBTJU.MQIBBI (A Strange] LKennard 5-1 1-8 STaywrp) 

32 ROYAL W0RSTEAD (Mrs OHainai Mrs D Hama 5-11-8 CCo*(4) 

35 SWPl^Y^PRnJEU&lrtjm^JBiutJ^ 5^-8^— 

37 SUN8EAMTALB0i(MrsRlM«M)R Annytage5-11-8. MrMAnnyttg8j7) 

46 1 COMAHDAHTE (M PmWI J GBmrd 4-11-7 EMurpfiy{4) 


VVIGM ISLE fC-D) . 

WELL RIGGS) (C-D) (Mrs J MountfisW) M H Easterby 5-7-10. G Carter B) 1 

CONMAYJOySte) D H Jones 5-7-9 DWttams(7)23 

RtMNNG HJJSH (N Capon) D Oumon 4-7-9 BCrosstevl3 

XHAI (M Tompkins) M Tompkms w-8 R Morse 0 15 

WELL COVERED (K Tomlinson) R Hotmshead 5-7-7 A CuOiane (7) 22 

FU8HJER (B3(R RfchardSI C Brittain 4-7-7 AMack&yS 

MERRY MEASURE (D)(JAOeon) A Madwar 4-7-7 GKtng(7)25 

KAMPGLOW (J Bust) D Thom 4-7-7 ffftwB 

EMERALD EAGLE (D) (A Lyons) C Booth 5-7-7 (7ex) AShotits2 

frl Wtil Rtgoed. frl Christian Sehad, 10-1 Rana Pratap, 12-1 Empapatum. Virgin Me. Go 
Bananas. GunSSda. 14-1 Quataar Flyer. Sor Of A Gunner, ifri Xliai. Dorset Cocage, ifri 
Sharp Noble. Hay Street SheAran, 20-1 Ruimmg Rush, Conmayjo, 25-1 others. 

FORM: BOLLM KMQHT (fr2) won II from Mr McGregor (7-10) with QUAUTAIR FLYER 
(8-8) 4th beaten 3%. and CHRISTAIN SCHAD (9-1) 5tn beaten 4t, 18 ran. Doncaster soft 
Nov 10 GO BANANAS (fr 13) Oh beaten av>l 10 staney (8-7) 7 ran. York 1m h'cop good 
to soft Oct 10. EM*APAHERO (8-5) won sh.hd tan Siyah Kalem (8-3) 9 ran. Ne*Mx*y 
imgood to firm Sep 21. CONMAYJO(7-9)2nd beaten l%ltoFMaHand(9-1)wtihVIR- 
GINmE (7-6) 3rdbuten 31. MOORES METAL (8-6) 5th baatan 4 W. STAR OF A GUN- 
NER (8-2) 8th beaten 71, CHRISTAIN SChad (8-7) 8tti of 11. Haydock im h'cap good 
Sep 7. DORSET COTTAGE (6-5) won sh.hd hom Parts Match (S-p) 12 ran. Beverley im 
stks 000a June *. Barter (frO) 2nd Beaten 'yi to Kufuma (9-0) 21 ran. Pontefr a ct imstKs 
firm May 13. SHARP NOBLE (8-7) won 1 V,| from Mlonnay (B-4) with WELL COVERED (8- 
IliSmbrawnSYil. 12ran. Wmwicklm2fhcsegoodtoftTnOai4. GUNDREDA (8-® 
10th beaten (fr8)101h beaten orerlll to Flyhome(fr3) with MERRY MEASURE (frffl 8th 
of 10. Ascot 1m app'ce h'cap good Oct 11. RANA PRATAP (8-4) 4th beaten a to 
Freedom's Choice (8D) 21 ran. Newbury im h'cap good Oct 26. WELL RIGGED (7-10) 
won %l from Cascabai i8-5) wah QUAUTAIR FLYER (SW) 7th o( 20. Doncaster imh'cflp 
soft Nov 9. EMERALD EAGLE (10-7) won 41 from Autnom (10-1) 15 ran. Cagnes Imamat 
stks good Fab 23. Selection: DORSET COTTAGE s BOUUN KNKSKT (each way) 


CONMAYJOCJGfcbs) D H Jonas 5-7-9 

RtMNNG RUSH (N Capon) 0 Oughton 4-7-9 

XHAI (M Tompkins) M Tomptons w-8 

WELL COVERED (X Tomlinson) R Hdnohead 5-7-7 

FU8HJER (93 (RRadardSlC Brittain 4-7-7 

MERRY MEASURE (D) (J Aison) A Madwar 4-7-7 „ 


HJANUG WabdvWaring)G Prast 5-11-8 Mr T Edwards 0 won’Al (rotn Cascabai (6-5) with QUAUTAIR FLYER (9-4) 7th of 20. Doncaster im h'cap 

JUSTTwS ONCE PO (Mrs J RobshawJD Barons 5-1 18 — MfeSKESsQ soft Mov 9. EMERALD DW3LE(10-7) won 41 from Aumonj (10-1) 15 ran. Cagnes Imamai 
MEXICAN JOE (Mrs M SmBh)G Ham 5-118 S Mackey Q stks good Feb 23. Setectiom DORSET COTTAGE :BOUJN KNIGHT (each way) 


ROYAL W0RSTEAD (Mrs 0 Halnaj Mrs D 
SHIPLEYS PRIDE (J&irbtdga) J BuMa 
SUNBEAM TALBOtmto R LMOuix) R * 
COMAHDAHTE (M Pmti)) J GBwd 4-11-7 
BANNYBRiN (A mme)P Hayward 5-1 1-3. 


Mrs D Maine 5-1 18 

urbidgo 5-1 18 

dRMmytage 5-118. MrM 


1 COMANDAWTCfMPtrt^J Gifford 4-11-7 

BANKYBRiNCA Byrne) P Hayward 5-1 18 - 

aYlNG CHERUBoirs J RettoriJ Mrs J Rotter 5-118 

TARJJ MELODY (T UeenlJ D Thomas 5-1 18- 

A88A LAD (Abba 


3.05 CAMMDGE TROPHY (£8,834: 6f) (13) 


P Scudamore 

RRohcB 

_ R Dennis W 

— C Evans [7] 

— K Mooney 

H Domes 

GBratiey 

R Rowed 

CC0X(4) 

S Smith EocIbs 
JLowjoy 

CMarm. 

— M Botiey (4) 
Gaorne Krigfn 
. MHwrtngmn 
_ M Richards 
_ ROunwoody 


t jl JJ , 1 [J 1 


509 989 CROONS B^fY(PGraan) W Musson 7-118 P Scwtawo 

OW Wl*® . H 

rtGDoktge 5-118. : R Dennis ffl 

516 OOOOfrP HADDAK(USA) (C Lfllan) BPtiftfo frTJ8 — C Brans (7) 

517 040 HASTY GAMBLE (LOotwaflJF Waiter frl 18 

518 00 HOOTN HOLLER ” * 

520 DP0-30 JET3FRJPOK 

522 MAJOR BUSX 

529 OOlOm ROYAL BiSIGHT(iBA) (tea J - ’ 

530 40 SALBURST (Stfetuast 

532 04/000 SOBB) SAM (Mrs 
534 0 - TAR FLAME (Ml 

536 0200 TJMLW ‘ 

538 000-400 TROUT 

539 PPP0-00 TUTORS 

540 4W 
IM 32F3/P4 

545. 4000 .. . 

547 00» ElOR SU-TANffl) (Unicoi Group) S Mefcr 4-118 M toringwci 

548 MAGIC TRACKS (Mss S CoffmlMrs 6 Kennard 4-118 MHeftaids 

549 3Z30U MARR5U7IW(POImmoe*)GPnBit-*-118 Rnmwody 

74 Emir Soften, fr2 Hasty Gentfe, frl Sefchurat, frl British Hero, Border Rambler, 12-1 

Croonog Batty, 14-1 Mariefito, 20-1 others. 

4J) ALVESCOT NOVICE HURDLE (Div 2: £1,760: 2m 4f 120yd) (24) 

601 0030 ALDO IOTIG pn) (Mrs VLangtarth DOoghWi 5118 _-__P poubje 

602 40MM ATWN^Drf^GEnrirait 5-118 MO’CtitatiiBn(7) 

604 room SElJJVHf PWNCE(Cadl 4C0 LI^T Hated 8-1 18 BWdgM 

605 &S/D440 BE MY WMGSIUrs S-FBrtfs) M BoBon 5-118 C Brawn 

608 0PQ3 BR1R8 BABY (ffllfP Kearney) J Sayers 5-1 18 HE»wes 

609 0P0/403 CASTl^ DOUGLAam (Unity HoSdayJP Hobbs 6-1 18 GMcCoun 

912 0 DAMSH PAlffSI^ EThorbefo N Henderson 5-118 J Whha 

613 0 DIRECT APPROAQt (H J Joel) J Gtftonl 6-118 — PeterHobta 


A88A LAD (Abba GtazfcgiMrsJ Pitman 4-1 18- 
BAY-EM-VlfrW Price) GfcnrW* A-1 18 — 
RUU.TO BRIDGE (J Morris) JM Morris 411-0- 


Dtices) Mrs B Dukes 8-T18 

Tucker) A Bamw 5-1 18 

A Everett) G Baiting 6-118 

-- - M^PBalw 7-118- 

D Heine 7-118; 

5-118 

■»CTCoonor 5-118 

rCtay 7-118 

P Hayward frl 18 — 
■114 


Vtoing 5-114. 
S Merer 4-TI-fl 


SOUND OF MUU 
STRAIGHT SETSI 


PdmdaU 4-118- 


Mrs JRanerf?) 

— MO'Ctitawim 

PMcNetim 

UrGChdeyp) 

. Mr T Thomson Jones 

C Haywood (7) 

Princess Arme 

MrJCaldwodm 

C Hopwood (7) 


1 000140- DAWN’S DELIGHT (C-D)JK Ivory) K Ivory 89-10- HCortryeS 

2 000301- GREY DESIRE (C-D) (M Bntiain) M Brittam 88-10- 

3 000004- VORVADOS (C8) (Mas G GaBcnan)M Haynes 98-10 r.UP 5 ® 

4 110003- JOHN PATRICK t&tJHP Bowes) P Mncnefl 5-9-7 JMattNas 7 

5 040000- SHARP ROMANCE (U5AXD) (She*h Mohammed Ai Sabah) BHwtay 


48Canandma.5-2AbbaLad.fr1 Montgorewy. 10-1 Wei Wisher, Condrcow Boy. 


6 404240- AIBGOLOCO(n(C)(JLi)K Brassey 584 

7 000404- QUE SYMPATICA (Mrs A MunosIR Boss 484 — _- 
CORNCHARM ffl) (Corncharm Ltd) M McCormack 588 

GENTIL£SCHI(U»)(B Kidd) RNcflOlS 488 

TANFENffl) W Bans] TGraigfrfrO 

ATAU ATAU. (A MNward) MPipe 3-8-10 


9 300100- CORNCHARM (C 
9 2210/00- GENTHESCHI (t 

10 301200- TANfCNfUffWI 

11 312030- ATALL ATAll. [> 

12 32081 VAGUE LASS (J 
14 23000- JARHOVIANJA I 


12 32081 VAGUE LASS (J Rosa) WH-Bass 38-1 

14 23000- JARHOV1AN (A Le Bkmd) T Fanhurst 3-7-10 


48-7 Pat Eddery 4 

S WNtwtmn 1 

M Miber ID 

N Howe 12 

G Driffield 11 

V Curtate 9 

SCauttan2 

W Carson 13 

JUiwe8 


5L30 SPRING NH FLAT RACE (Div 2: £969: 2m 100yd) (25) 

1 ADMRABLE CRCHTON (Mai PThormanJD Bsworth 5-118 MBensario(7) 

7 BOLD BVRESSION (C G^n)N Gasetee 5-118 — 

6 BOOIOES WORRY (MRawfinffiJM Rawlings 5-118 

9 BROXTEO SPAR (T Wanfc) Mrs J PtonBn S-118 M O'Cataghan (7) 

ETW«ii(iniBWi A iiitim«itP i i i»— 5-118 

5-118 
5-118 


114 Vague ' a*” 4-1 Gray Deere, 118 Que Sympatica. 13-2 AIM Anti, 7-1 Shaft) 
Romance. 8-iArmgo Loco, 10-1 John Patrick, 12-1 Dawn's Debgla. 14-1 ottiere. 


S Cation (7) 
MCCalaghanm 

_ P Corrigan (7) 
Mr C Brocks (7) 
P McOeimoM (7) 


3.35 MARCH MAIDEN STAKES (£959: Im 6f 127yd) (17) 


1 0434-00 ARTESUM (Mrs R CrutcHeyl R Houghton 488 JHoMIO 

3 CHRISTO (CAN) (T Stafford) R &mpsbn 488 SWh»worth4 

4 0000- DAWN SPIRIT (Ws G Smpsonl M C Chapman 480_ J WOm&3 

6 MR OUKKtC Sanderson) W Wharton 7-98 MHmtieyS 

7 lEWMSlW Hayes] NByaoft 588 M Rcharttmn (7) 14 

B 00- N0RWHISTLEJA DawdfiO" (PD) Ltd) T Craig 688— C Coates 2 

9 PRECIPICE WILL (Mrs M RosenfiekfJ A W Jones 588 ~.CD*nw 7 

10 PRIVATE AUDfTKM (Mrs E Craft M Usnar 488 M Worsen 13 

11 RAPfDAN (Mrs □ Brawsteri M H Easwrtw 58-0 '£j* rch ® 

12 204- RKHARGEfk Fischer) R Htikrahrad 488 > M 11 

14 24220(0- SAIffiYLA (W (Mrs E Begonto) D Thom 58-0 M W*6M2 

15 SCHOLAR (InA) (C Homson) J Casgrawe 588 RFOuB 

20 0/00- DEW (JO'HarmR Holder 58-11 

22 000003- LADV WOOOPECKBI (Wss C Coyne) M Ryan 4811 G^artcey 17 

23 LtiaiPATH (Mrs SSavtialAff Watson 4811 S Webster! 

24 003000- N0RTHHtHH0PE(FR)l“5 J Savile) P Krtwray 48-11 -PC2S 1 ® 

25 000/00- RNANCV(I*SD Holtoway) H VWienon 58-11 — _ DffichO»s9 

3-1 Recharge. 7-2 Northern Hope. 9-2 Lady Woodpecker. 7-1 ArtesMn. Christo, 9-1 

Rapfoan. 14-1 5andyta.2D-1 others. 


y) R Houghton 488 

i H Simpson 48-0 


J Reid 10 

swnnmhe 


GDI 0090 ALDO KING (FR) (Mrs VLanglorth DOoghton 5-11 
602 400800 ATWNSJT Drtecrf) G EnridH 5-118 

604 FOOOO SEIilVBI PraNCE {Cad SCO Ltd}! 6-118 

605 00/0440 BE MY WWGSIMrs S- Ferris) M Bonon 5-118 

608 0PQ3 BRIM BABVtmtP Kearney) J Sayers 5-118 — 
608 090/403 CASIUDOUGLASfm (Unity Hoidoy)PHotfoB frl 1 

612 0 DAMSH PAiraplWbeMN Henderson 5-118 

613 0 DIRECT APPROACH (H J J Gtftord 6-118 

614 0-HW80 DOUBLE TWNUMarehal) A 381*8 5-118 

615 03-2PW DtIHVEGAN CASTLE (P Dknmor*) G Prest 7-118 . 


615 (S-2PQF DUNVEG AN CAS TLi 
BIB 0-0043 EASTER FESTIVAL 


DBSwdrtfiS-11-i 


C Brawn 

— H Danes 

— GMcCoun 
JWN» 

Peter Hobbs 

— T Jareis (4) 

. RDrowoodv 
__ M Bastard 


54 
59 
61 

71 

72 
82 
68 

90 ... . 

93 TTIHME CHANCE (M Bryant) S Wbodmen 4-108 G 

11-4 BmdBd Spar, 4-1 Shame Boy. 5-1 Swindon Boy. 7-1 Admirable Cnchton, 


. C Coates 2 

— C Dwyer 7 
M Wfoham 13 

— M Btrch B 
_ S Perks 11 
_ Mutter 12 

R Fox B 

— 15 

.G Starkey 17 
.SWabsterf 

PCook IS 

.. DMch08s9 



HEXHAM 


Going: good 

1.45 KXJRSTONES HANDICAP CHASE 
(£1^1 95m) (11 runners) 

1 1242 HOre OF OAK (C-0Q(BF)J I ChadtOO 

10-1 1-13 REemshaw 

3 118 SIWEY SON (08) W A SHBhenson 8-11-11- K Jones 

4 0123 COEUR VALUANT (C-iqVThO«npSOn 8-1 1-2 

Mr M Thompson (4) 

5 4320 EmSSYfC-te R UcDonak) 12-11-0 PAFarraB/4) 

6 231F CntCKSTDVm G W Rfchenfe 9-10-13(4 ax)- 0 Cosktay 

7 284 PARK TQWB)jC8)P MonWth 6-108 D Nolan 

8 303- MASTBtPtPBl(D)JM Jefferson 10-10-4.. S Chariton 
11 40U4 ROf4A»4RAUi.{Er^iD)SJLeart«ner 13-10-0 — — 
13 D0P1 BOSTON LAD hBVSoAoUB 5-ltWJ (4 ex) J A Hams 


3.15 SE7TUNGSTONES HANDICAP HURDLE 
(£1,1 552m) (18) 

1 mo WLLC GREY (OO) TO Barron B-11-13 .. GHa>ker|4) 
3 3010 DONTAfMOYME(D)[BF)RM Wtntaker 

6-118 RBeggan 

5 3301 SATTLEFEUfBANDJWBbndelfr7f-f(5eii) D Duran 
e. 0004 FRENCH M3»NEW(0) Denys Smth 5-10-10 __ C Grant 
9 PCS) TEllCSRjC-D)V Thompson MfrlO MrM Thompson (4) 

12 014F SECRET WALK (C8)WAS»pl«nson 5-108. K Jones 

13 0003 DARK UBXJH Johnson 6-108 M Pepper 


13 0003 DARK TBXJH Johnson 6-108 M Pepper 

14 804 MQH DROP FSSaray 6-108 BSforay 

16 IFOO CM MAI J Norton 6-10-4 Sharren James (7) | 

17 0011 BUBO BURN MH Easterby 9-108 MDwyar| 

78 180 BtCXERSTAFFElDyMW 


4.05 EBP GREY FRIARS MAIDEN STAKES (2-Y-O: £1,172: 51) (10) 

1 BOOTHAM LAO (J Sykasl M Bnttstn 98 

2 CAMMAC LAD (Cemmac (Part) Lid) C Tinkler 9-0 M Bvch 3 

5 QUEL ESPRIT (intsfiiaiKinai Vacauners) M McCormack 98 .. R Cochrane 8 

6 TAKE EFFECT (M Srttam) M Bnttaifl 98 — K Dg-Say 6 

7 TOUCH OF SPEED (K Richer) R HoUmshead 98 — zSFJbAs4 

S ARTFUL MAID ((Senwnght Bloodstock Co Lid) R Stubbs frll - D Nichols 2 

9 CARtftGMORE n< Myy) K Ivory 6-1 1 GMoroan 1 

_ © Gfoson) W Wharton frll NCar%te7 

11 HAZEL’S cm. (B Lee) A Madww 8-11 MMaerlO 

12 MADOYKt«rr<JCBnipbel)K Stone frll C Dwyer S 

94 Que) Esprit. 4-1 Taka EHea. Touch of Speed, fri Maddybermy, 7-1 Cemmac Lad, frl 

Artful Maid. 12-1 others. 


M Dwyer 

8 

MrPDenms(4) 


14 4W KtWEA Mrs F Gray 12-108 ... . 

15 4fjt NORmSBEJH Johnson 10-190 M Pepper 

11-4 Hope Of Oak. 4-1 Boston Lad, Crickstown. frl Coeur 

VateTB. B-1 Bcsby. Mswr Piper. 12-1 Shmey Son, 16-1 others. 

Hexham selections 

By Mandarin 

1.45 Hope of Oak. 2.15 Vak Of Secrecy. 2.45 
So lares. 3. 15 Blind Burn. 3.4S Dun com be Ptince. 
4.15 Kiliipper. 


2.15 WALWICK 


HURDLE (£874*11) (21) 

1 3044 AMAOtSTD Barron frl 18 A Stringer 

2 D AROUW) THE CLOCK JlChwtton 

5-1 1 8 Mr P Dennis (4) 

4 040 SnOARONA A Scott 5-1 18 BSttxaf 

6 CELTIC tOCGHTEWeymes 7-1 18 CBmloB 

7 00 CHANGED PERSON W A Stephenson 

5-11-5 DCondel (7) 

9 0006 HOOTS OF LAUGHTER JWBtundel 5-1 18- DOubon 

ID 2000 LE PtAT D*OW R M Whjtnkar &-118 RBeggan 

11 480 BISTBt HAMMY CVBranery 6-118 — 

13 0440 MOOT HAYTON S J Laadbeher 5-11-5 — 

15 -FOP FRAME SUNSET WA Stephenson 6-118 — K Jones 

16 0 PRMCEMETTERMCHCJ BeU 5-118 CGran 

17 0000 PRINCE RAPDJ Norton 5-118 — ShsranJemasm 

21 F0U4 TRAVBLLO ID Jordon 6-118 G Martr (7) 

22 2 VALE OF SECRECY (8F) R F Fisher 5-118 — 

24 P BROXS0.GR Otdrayd 7-118 MPepper 

25 08 D0NA8REYT ABwnes5-118 M Barnes 

26 0042 DOREGOO Lae 7-118 G Harter (4) 

27 300 GALAWOOOCJBbH 5-118 M Brennan 

29 OOOO SAMQNtABEW»ins»>fr1r8 M H ammon d 

32 4000 NORVALGWRichantS 4-10-11 DCoaktoy(4) 

34 00 LOLAS DREAM J M Jertarson 4-10-6 SChertton 

8-4 VMe Ot Secrecy, frl Amatis. frl Congo, frl NoraaL 
2.45 HUGH JOtCEY MEMORIAL. HANDICAP 
CHASE (£2^1 5:3m) (16) 

13P2U SKEWSBYfBVBFIMWEWtaibjr 10-11-10— A Brown 

4 1230 UTILE niSCmUNim EH Robson 

13-11-3 Mr T Reed 

5 1300 CASA l0VE(C-O)DL» 11-11-1 GHarke»(4) 

6 314/ Rams M f Banitiough lfrio-13 S Charlton 

7 P330 BRUSH (MADE (D)JAktar 10-10-11 — Mrs V Jackson 
. 9 tan mss RUBBISH (DJJEBmahark 

frlD-lO(5<a)TGDun 

10 1F33 SQUU&SJD) J Berry 6-108 C Potion , 

11 MOO KEEP A PMeHSEflqJWbon 8-108 UDwjgr ] 

REemsrew 

C Grant 


19 2021 WPECUMOSCTY fC-D) J S WBsan 

4- 10-3 (4 ex)8 Chartten 

20 1440 TRAVEL HOME (WC-D) M W Eteihy 6-10-2 A Stringer 

21 FOOO SECRET LAKE JT Chariton 7-10-1 REamshaw 

22 1200 TMGLE BELL (BWIJGM Moors 4-10-1 _ M Hammond 

23 0000 THARALEOS (USA) F Watson frl 00 — 

24 0100 SHAGAYLE(ncJ Bel 4-1O0 M Brennan 

25 000- ULTRASONIC WBtacbKt 7-108 TG Dawes 

2-1 Bhnd Bum, 7-2 BaoMflid Bend. 5-1 Secret Walk, frl Deni 

Annoy Me, frl impectfK&Jty, 10-1 Dark Tnx. 12-1 others. 

3.45 ALLERWASH NOVICE CHASE (£1 ,066:2m 4f) 

3 1P32 DUNCOMBE PRINCE (C8) J M Jrtfawon 7-11 -12 — _ 

SChertton 

4 2F12 FERGY FOSTH1 (BF) W A Stephenson 

fi-n-i2A5mnger 

10PP0U EAST PARK JH Johnson 6-118 Mr T Reed 

12PPPF IHPAGE R Robmson 9-11-4 — 

13 M3U KINGS MAR KERMraP Stevens 7-1 1-4 — 

14 SMF MENAUST R W Johnson 10-11-4 Mr P Johnson (71 

15 MONAS SAINT AG Knowles 10-11-4 Mr S Whitaker (7) 

16Q30U PARAGLOWN Semple frl 18 C Sample (4) 

17 PRINCE SOL (B)V Thompson 

7-11-4 Ml u Thomson m 

18 800 RANDOMLY CJ BeB 7-11-4 M Bsenron 

19 48F SANOCRACXER M W Qerby 7-11-4 A Brown 

20 0300 SHQOLER PRINCE F WaSon 9-11-4 B Storey 

23 0PPP ABJAD R D WootiXMSO 5-1D8 J A Hams 

24 0000 RKJC N Chambertaln 5-10-4 MPepper 

158 Duncombe Prince. 3-1 Fergy Foster, 98 Menattt 

4.15 SANDHOE NOVICE HURDLE (amatuers 
£769-Jm) (17) 

1 2IIU1 ERASTER BRIG GW Richards 6-12-1 J Qtarm 0 

2 3100 FROSTY TOUCH Mre E Sack &-12-1 _ Mas D Slack 0 

5 801 SHELMORE BOY MreJ Barr 6-12-1 T Smith (7) 

7 281 BLnPPBt Mrs M Dickinson 7-11-10 Dooms (4) 

10 BWWSWARK C Parker 5-11-7 — 

12 2PM GRACEFUL IQCKER{B) J A Edwards 5-11-7 — 

14 0 JAY DOUBLE YOU JSWison 

5- ll-7DMaetaggart0 

16 000- KELDLAWS J G Fteaerald MW E Freeman (7) 

16 0 MANASOTA KEY R F «hflr frl 1-7 — 

23 PP THERMUWRedlemfrll-7 — 

25 0000 WATER WAGTAIL W A Stephenson 

5-11-7 M Thompson 

27 0000 CMBSETTG VHDI5-11-2 VHal 

29 PO- JWGLWG ALICE 1C TumbuO 7-118 — — 

30 POOS OF 7HATHJC Mrs J tVer 6-118 D Robertson (7) 

32 043 TBEMETER GEM RFFisMr 5-118 T Reed 

33 F TRUGOD LEES-1 1-2 A Robson (4) 

34 41 BP HOBOUWCS GIRL RDWoodnuse 4-1 1-0 — 

5*2 KUtpoer, 3-1 Easter Brfo, 4-1 Teiematar Gem. frl Graceful 

Kicker. B-1 Ghtimora Boy, 12-1 Frosty Touch, 14-1 pdwrs. 


12 024P TWRJtiHT (C-D) J l Charlton frl 08 

13 OW BURGLARS WALK Denys Smtn ft-l(M 

14 00V MBTY RASCAL JKOii«rll-t08 

15PPU4 KSEWt^M£Ven<&0)P Mental 1 
16 0134 TARTAN TRUBW G W Achards 7-lfr 

19 OF/3 WHLOWBURN n»R Brews 12-tWJ 

20 0620 KEWffTEADWDn 
.21 Z4BF PURPLE SEASTA 


Today’s polnt-to-points 


6W 'MWjf hmtgt 

son 

| HAIG ANNUAL 1986 
S READY NOW 

ant 

896 pages providing hours of pleasure for the start of the Flat The 
4f) whole of the 1985 Plat season has been recorded and analysed. 

_ Detailed commentaries on each horse pinpoint 

nan distance/course/going preferences. Pace figures for every race. Our 

own handicap ratings and the official ratings. The Haig Annual is a 
sor (nine of information. Add ft np to your collection. Available through 

_ any branch of W. H. Smith or direct from ourselves post free. Free if 

you order Superform for complete Rat season (see below) Paper- 

S tack El 0-50 □ De Luxe Hardback E11J50 D 

OhTifta Atr Moil add £6. Eire add £3. 

2 SUPPLEMENT TO THE HAIG ANNUAL 

41 

an 201 pages. Part one of this new publication provides an expended 
index tor the 1986 Haig Annual giving for each horse, ad race 
^ references, form figures, ratings, plus total prize money won (win 

per and place). Part two, the trainers' section is quite unique. Here for 

| the first time horses are published trainer by trainer, in order of age. 
complete with form figures, prize money and ratings. It's a marvel- 
Jre lous guide to each trainer's prospects in 1986 and a permanent 

record of achievements in 1985. if there is a pattern in a trainer's 
ig} methods, tins book wiH help you find it A most useful aid and 

1(7) excellent value at £5.00 per copy □ 

:B superform weekly 

— Covers every horse in each race throughout the complete 1986 Flat 
. m season. Superform ratings andotlioai ratings shewn. Each horse 
,w summarised racing record to data. Going/distance track preferences 

— pinpointed. Last 7 form figures shown for the first six past the post 

— Going and pace figures make the fast run races stand out a mile. 

Weekly Winning Trainers list shows last 6 weeks record of each 
trainer. Horses to fotiw. 

— Posted first class each Tuesday. First issue comes complete with 
t/n fifing cower (same size as Haig Armuat) and resufts since start of Flat 
peg season. 

Jj FLAT SEASON Complete season plus Free Haig Annual £89 □ 

. 8 weeks subscription £18 □ 4 Week Trial £10D 

m N HUNT Season remainder ot season until June plus 550 page book 

of results to date __ £30 □ 

— FREE PROSPECTUS S samples avartabte □ 


P Monta 13-108 DNobn 
chads 7-KHL— DCoakfoy 

s 12-108 — A Swiger 

8-108 — JKKJnane 

7-10-0 — — ... UBtmt 


3-1 Stiwca, 4-1 S tow by. frl Mte RubMt frl TananTnreiph. 
frl UBfo Ftwdmn, id- 1 TWAgtt ifri wSbWDum. 


WBt», Badtxry Rings (i 


Keraham, 
t. Higham 
•m ft. 30k 
T» ft-30): 
.Teesaoe 
yStMa-7 
133); Vale 
rigs p8): 


rtiaw mark r our reauiremenn ahw 

NAME__ 

ADDRESS — 











1 






38 


SPORT 


THE TIMES SATURDAY MARCH 22 1986 


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FOOTBALL: BARCELONA GAIN HUGHES BUT MAY NOT HOLD ON TO VENABLES 


Loss may 



Though officially unwant- 
ed, England remains the Euro- 
pean choice. With the 
Continent queueing up for the 
privilege of being coached by 
the Cockney wit of 
Barcelona's Terry Venables, it 
was announced yesterday that 
Mark Hughes has signed to 
join Barcelona at the end of 
the season at a cost of more 
than £2 million, a record for a 
deal between a British and 
foreign dub. 

So while the tactical brain of 
Venables homes in on London 
(he is believed to have spoken 
recently to the chairmen of 
Arsenal and Tottenham), the 
brawny skills of Hughes will 
travel in the opposite direc- 
tion to the Catalan capital 
Hughes's departure has been 
assumed for several weeks and 
the dub and the player decid- 
ed to end the speculation 
which bad seemed to upset the 
young man's form. 

A statement issued from 
Old Trafford yesterday read: 
"Both dub and player now 
hope that all speculation will 
stop and Mark will be allowed 
to get on with playing football 
for the remainder of the 
season and contribute to 
UnitecTs attempt to win the 
championship.'* 

The Welshman has accept- 
ed a long-term contract which 
will make him financially 
secure for life. He will join 
forces with Archibald, the 
former Tottenham Hotspur 
forward, at Barcelona. 
Venables, who guided the 
Spanish team to a momentous 
victory over Juventus in the 
quarter-finals of the European 


By Clive White 

Cup on Wednesday, had five 
hours of talks with Barcelona 
officials yesterday, but his 
future is still undecided. M I am 
not prepared to discuss this 
matter, which is up to Mr 
Nunez (the club presidem)," 
he said. 

He may yet be tempted 
financially to stay with the 
club he led to the Spanish 
championship in his first sea- 
son. Should he leave there is 
talk that another Englishman, 
Howard Kendall, of Everton, 
will be approached. Juventus 
have already shown an inter- 
est in the qualities which 
helped take an Everton dub 
from the brink of despair to 
their glittering destiny. But 
Kendall would leave 
Goodison Park a frustrated 
man; he still hankers after 
claiming Europe’s biggest 
prize, the European Cup, with 
the i earn he nurtured. 

With Europe having taken 
some of Britain's best players 
and managers to their bosom, 
Everton. and others, might 
ask: why not welcome our 
teams as well? (Our support- 
ers, as the Belgians have 
intimated this week with a 
view to the Scottish invasion 
next year, are the only unde- 
sirable British export). 
Everton would fancy their 
chances against Venables's 
Barcelona, I would bet 

Everton, indeed 

Merseyside, remain too much 
of a handful for the rest of 
England. In the last week the 
League championship has be- 
gun to take on a typically 
northern slant as the chal- 
lenges of the capital have 


TODAY’S TEAM NEWS' 


First division 

Arsenal v Coventry 

HRegta does not recover from 


reserve ( 
suspended Arsenal recall Ad- 
ams tor his first game of the sea- 
son. 

Aston Villa v Birmingham 
Vffla see no reason to change a 
rare winning side. Birmingham, 
who wffl be without Kennedy 
(groin) and Geddis (broken nose), 
include Wright recalled from 
Chester, in their squad. 

Ipswich v WBA 
Varndl makes way lor 
Saunders's latest signing, Madden, 
the profificgoaiscorer from 
Bury, who was signed on Thursday 
night lor £50,000. Bennett 
should be back after injury in place 
of Palmer. Brennan, weak alter 
a virus, is Ipswich's only doubt 

Liverpool v Oxford 
Nical, who has not played since 
suffering a double fracture of the 
jaw six weeks ago. Is included 
In a Liverpool squad of 15. Oxford 
wffl be without Judge (tonsfffftfcj 
and SJattsr (hamstring); Hardwick 
and Lang an stand in. Charles 
returns for Leworthy. 

Luton v Everton 
The six internationals rested by 
Everton lor the Super Cup semi-fi- 
nal all return, but Stevens, 

Ratcffffb and Raid are stai unavail- 
able, as is Heath. Two untried 
youngsters. Bifflnge and Coyle, 
contest the substitute spot For 
Luton Harford and Foster return af- 
ter suspension 

Man Utd v Man City 
City will be without McCarthy, 
who is suspended. Baker, wno 
facesa fitness test, or Red- 
mond take over. Stapleton, a 
successful emergency replace- 
ment for Moran in midweek, vies 
tor the centre back vacancy 
with Higgins. Barnes, who has not 
played since November, may 
succeed Olsen. 


Newcastle v Tottenham 
Ardiles may be recalled to the 
Tottenham team after missing the 
last 13 games because of a her- 
nia operation. Chiedozte is injured 
and Hugh ton and Clive Allen 
ay in the reserves. Newcastle will 


_.„.Jaferfive 

successive league wins. 

Nottm Forest v Leicester 
Forest drop Webb, their top 
scorer, and play Birties up front. 
Sutton succeeds Sagers in 
goal Wilson returns for Leicester 
after missing four games with 
an ankle injury, as should Cunning- 
ham. 

QPR v Watford 
For Rangers a fractured cheek- 
bone rules out Byroe. while Robin- 
son is expected to keep his 
place in a squad which also In- 
cludes Fereday. 

Southampton v Chelsea 
Jordan, out for five months af- 
ter a cartflage operation, is poised 
to make his comeback for 
Southampton. Wallace could also 
return after missing a couple of 
games. Wright must test a thigh. 
Francis, the Chelsea goal- 
keeper, makes his first league 
appearance In U months in 
place of the injured NiedzwieckL 
West Ham v Sheffield Wed 

West Ham, who have lost their 
last three games, may again be 
without Devonshire (ankle) and 
Steward hamstring). Wednesday 
must check on Shuttycalf) and 
Smith (toot). 

Second division 
Charlton v Oldham 
Chariton wffl probably make Da- 
vies. the Welsh international on 
loan from Newcastle, substitute 
and keep the team who won at 
Bradford. 

Wimbledon v Black born 
Wimbledon retain the side who 
have won their Iasi three games. 
Blackburn bring back 
Brotherston after an absence of 
two months for the injured 
Lowey. O'Keefe deputizes in goal 
for Gennoe, who has a virus. 


melted after the freeze. Seven 
days ago Chelsea's hopes 
looked inviting but two 85th 
minute equalizers at 
Goodison Park and Stamford 
Bridge have put their chal- 
lenge into a more realistic 
perspective. It has left them 
contemplating tomorrow’s 
Full Members’ Cup final at 
Wembley as their season’s 
only likely honour, and a 
dubious one at thaL 
Even that is threatened by 
the midweek injury to 
NiedzwieckL their goalkeeper, 
with damaged knee ligaments. 

Today they play at the Dell, 
where Manchester' United’s 
League aspirations appeared 
to founder recently. South- 
ampton may be rejuvenated 
by the return of Jordan, 
another roaring British export 
success. Jordan has been inac- 
tive for five months with a 
cartilage injury but after five 
reserve games is ready to 
return. 

The crazy weekend of 
Chelsea's opponents tomor- 
row, Manchester City, begins 
with the small matter of a 
Manchester derby. At least 
McCarthy will be fresh for his 
Wembley’ day; be is suspended 
against united. 

Everton's three-point lead 
could be threatened today on 
Merseyside. Skill notwith- 
standing, Liverpool^ oppor- 
tunity depends on whether 
their desire to usurp their great 
rivals is greater than Oxford's 
wish to survive in the first 
division. Everton's oppo- 
nents, Luton, may be motivat- 
ed by the desire to avenge 
their FA Cup defeaL 

On course 
for main 
attraction 

Geneva (Reuter) — The pros- 
pects of a Barcekma-Anderiecht 
European Cup final in Seville on 
May 7 looked bright yesterday 
when the champions of Spain 
and Belgium avoided each other 
in the semi-final draw. 

Having ended Juvemus's 
reign in Turin on Wednesday, 
the Spanish club, led by Terry 
Venables, now face a trip to 
GAteborg on April 2. If they can 
avoid a disaster in Sweden. 
Barcelona should reach the final 
for the first time for 25 years. 

Anderlecht may have too 
much attacking flair for Steana 
Bucharest in Brussels and their 
equally efficient defence should 
complete die job in Romania . 

Barcelona have never won the 
European Cup and the choice of 
Seville as a final venue will be an 
incentive, but the Swedes will be 
awkward opponents. 

Eastern European chibs have 
a good record in the Cup 
Winners' Cup tmd they are 
assured of a finalist in Lyons on 
May 2 following the pairing of 
Dynamo Kiev, the 1975 winners, 
and Dukla Prague. Atlctko 
Madrid, winners back in 1962. 
meet Bayer Uerdingen of West 
Germany in the other semi- 
Spain could complete a dean 
sweep although Real Madrid, 
the UEFA Cup holders, will 
have to overcome their old 
rivals Interaazionale Milan. 

EUROPEAN CUP; Gotsborp v Bmcatona: 
Anderlecht v Steaua BuctmrasL 
EUROPEAN CUP WOOERS' CUP: Dy- 
namo Kiev v Dukla Prague: AttoUco 
Madrid v Bayer Uerrfngen. 

UEFA CUP: Cologne v Weregem; 
(ntemaznnais Mfton v Real Madrid. 



Hughes: a statement to put an end to all the speculation 

Hibernian hearts 
beating faster 


_ _ _ j on Apr# 2 md April 16. wtt , 
named team at home in firs/ leg). 


Hiberabin hope to play the 
role of gatecrashers at their own 
home during Edinburgh's big- 
gest party of the season today by 
blocking the attempt of their 
arch rivals. Heart of Midlo- 
thian, at a place in the record 
books. Three points dear at the 
top of the premier division. 
Hearts aim (o beat Rangers’ 10- 
year-old achievement of 21 
League matches without defeat. 

The League leaders know that 
there is nothing more dangerous 
than a jealous rival - and Hibs 
are smarting over the praise 
showered on their Edinburgh 
neighbours. It is seven years 
since Hibs last beat Hearts. 
There will be a capacity ali- 
ticket crowd of 24,000 today. 

“I am certain Hibs will be 
determined to stop us getting 
the record," Sandy Jardine, the 

Illness stops 
Stoke game 

Stoke City had only right 
players fit when their manager, 
Mick Mills successfully asked 
the Football League to postpone 
their second division game at 
home to Portsmouth today. 

• Billy Bonds, out of West 
Ham’s team all season after a 
toe operation, plays in the 
Combination match at Chelsea 

• Liverpool and Manchester 
United each have three players 
challenging for awards at the 
Professional Footballers Associ- 
ation dinner in London tomor- 
row. Hughes and Whiteside are 
among the six in contention for 
the Young Haver of the Year 
award and Paul McGrath is in 
the top six for the players’ Player 
of the Year title. 


Hearts assistant manager, who 
played in the Rangers side who 
recorded 21 unbeaten games a 
decade ago. admitted. 'That's 
just the sort of thing which will 
lift them and we will need to 
play very well to keep the run 
going. However, the prospect of 
a new record is simply a side 
issue and not something we 
think about. Every game now is 
a big one." 

Jardine. who missed last 
week’s win over Motherwell 
with a leg strain, is fit to resume 
but Ian Jardine is doubtful 
because of knee trouble. Hibs 
have Gordon Durie back at 
forward after a one-match ab- 
sence due to an ankle injury. 

Frank Connor, dismissed by 
Celtic Kven weeks ago, has 
become manager of Raith 
Rovers. „ . .. 

Experience on 
Town’s side 

Wisbech Town’s befief in 
continuity and experience could 
be rewarded today with a place 
in the Wembley final of the FA 
Vase (Paul .Newman writes). 
The Building Scene Eastern 


Ui LLKT&I aciur-iuiai mwn 

thall (Vauxhait-Opcl League) a 
dear favourites after securing ; 
2-2 draw in the first match last 
week. . 

At this stage of the com- 
petition last season. Wisbech 
were knocked out by Ha lesow en 
Town, who drew 1-1 • away to 
Warrington Town (North West 
Counties League) in the first leg 
of their semi-final last week. 
They expect a crowd of up to 
3,000 to cheer them to Wembley 


RUGBY UNION 



FromDarid Hands, Bog^ OteMpoodent* Sydney 
The NewSeuth Wiles tom- . 

national sevens toarnaraent, 2?* worid 

which takes place' here today Had. of - 

and tomorrow, is in its way an tournament s yggg* 
experiment in mudatare for committee 
Australia. They and New Zea- when they wet the Anstnlasan 

land play host m next, year’s 
inauguralwerid tournament and 
the problems the stale fc en- 
countering fofc w eeken d- hi 
terms m .organization : . and 
comnHtnkatioJi wifi be mag- 
triOetf coasiifaubly hi 1987.' . 

' Fii ghn«i - for instance, have 
beta delighted. the way their 
pr®i santam for today’s - event 
has worked out- However, much 
of it has .been 'dmcBeatal; for 
example, they were due to train 
at Mindy yesterday. Tint found 
that the Manly Oval fa as not 

local training ground was m- OOt twO, should be BMtWirsw 
satisfactory. Tew than- a mUe. 
away, though, fa an Army train-, 
ing range with : as excellent 
rugby pitch, of. which they were., 
able to make foil use.: . .... •-! ' 

The previous evening^ fooling 
for setae opposed training; they 
and die Canadian squad went to 
Randwick where die focal team 
offered some opposition. Testing 
opposition -it wns,-'too; (be. 

Anstraliu dub, tfaoagh there 
only for normal dub .training, ' 
offered so quarter and provided 
just the jolt to the system the 


Within foe next two months it 
is hoped to announce mafir 
sponsors of the world tou£ 
naririrt and, in October, officials 
from a0 16 competing ow®*® 

will visit Anstralia and New 
Zealand to inspect venues and 
ascertain whetlw' tire accom- 
modation and back-up facilities 
are suitable- - •• 

England and Wales wQI be 

phased to know that there has 
fee® modi sympathy Jbr the 
view expressed by. Mr Kendall 


all 


Jest year, when England play 
tbeir world tournament 


tick International Board coon- 

try, even though each man may 
not handle a game. 

New Zealand were distorted 
to bear that yesterday the Privy 
Connell fa Britain upheld the 
derision of a New Zealand judge 
which led to the cancellation of 
the AH Blacks tour to Sooth 
Africa hut summer. The ques- 
tion at stake was whether the 
two Auckland solicitors who 
brought the case as members of 
the Aacklaad University Club 
nninsi die New Zealand Rugby 
.' (that a- tour to South 
Africa was net in the best 


Interests, of *hc game) had the 
games in Australia (unless they standing to do" so. - 
reach dm final, which is to' ..ThelNrivZeaMulcoartdria> 
Auckland) and all their qualify- mined that they bad, the Privy 
ing games in Sydney, they wHI Council agreed. , 

Wasp who A b ig day 
may lose for front 
his sting 

By Aryan Stiles - 

Huw Davies, who brought an 
occasional splash afcolourJo a 


of brim on the 
if his dub. Wasps, 
reach the final of the John 
Player Special Cup. 

Because of the recent bad 
weather Wasps are faced with 
the possibility of three cup 
games in a fortnight. To reach 
the final they have to beat 
Btodkheath in the fourth round 
today, dispose of Nottingham 
on March 28 and defeat foeir 
semi-final opponents on April 5. 

Even by: then Davies is un- 
likely to nave recovered from a 


runners 

BylanMtfjwditai 

Ian Barnes, thevStewarfs- 
MdriHfi coach, said at die 
fairly drab season for England, be ginning of the season tiiai in 
mid find himself in the star- order-to win the League title his 

charges would have to beat 
Him: Thfa afternoon they; 
have that opportunity as the 
Border side visa lnvcrieith to 
play a postponed- match. 
Stcwan VMdlviBe lead the race: 
A last-minute derision will be 
made on the fitpess of Simon 
Scott, the home crime; who has 
not fully recovered Bow the leg 
knock he received against 
France R Stewart VMdvUIe 
have listed tape, forwards. 
Hawick are at full strength. 

The home side play a fast; 
shoulder injury. So if Wasps r unni ng, game. They are adept 
reach Twickenham on. April 26 ' spoilers and theCalder bnothers 
they wiL have to deride whether are expert s! stealing loose balL 
to reinstate him— ifheisfit— or They compensate for their lack 
retain the' highly successful of height in the linoout by 
Stringer , at full- bade. Today imrovafive variations which are 
Wasps are: also without Md- difficult to counter. Hawicfc 
ville, there sennn baff^OTemy, however, are possibly the most 
their lock, and EIlisoa, their No_ adaptable temn jn Scptbnd. 

8, against a Bteckheath learn 
who wffl be without Colyer, 
their centre, who is injured. 

No sooner did Orwin, 

Gloucester's England lock, ob- 
tain his release -from the RAF 
team than be went down with a 
hamstring 'mtisy and cannot 
face LondonScotBsh in a. ^ quar- 
ter-final today. He is replaced by 
Scrivens, who will - -have to 
confront Scotland's discarded 
lode, CampbeU-Lammon- 

In the other quarterfinal 
Leicester bring in Bates for the 
lull at -the Stoop, 
include Salmon, 
who was dropped by England in 
mid-campaign. 

• In tbe - Welsh . Schweppes 
Cup -semi-finals. Cardiff spring a 
surprise against Bridgend by 
dropping " their centre, 

Acfcennan, who was: discarded 
by Wales this season.- Aberavou 
are uncha n ged, against -Newport. 


RUGBY LEAGUE 



facing 



task 

. By Keith Mactlffl 
OMhmn and Cfcstfefofd mert 
today in way ^ 

SJSSffiSSSKS 

ofi-WemWey final, but there b 
no doubt that the wuro«s of 
next week’s second semi-final 
between HaH Kin«to» 

SJnXte will teftvountts to 

win « Wembteyoa May3- 
Today’s match js ret central 
Park: Watan, where last week- 
end ChsSefbid pulled off the 
shock of the tou rnam ent by 
beating the mighty Wigan on 
their own ground. They win, 
therefore, know the ground well, 
but the Castiefoid conch, Mai 

Reilly, is more wwned about 
today’s match against Oldham 
than about the task -tint con- 
fronted him fast week. Rally 4 
wonders whether his ream can 
lift themselves agam against an 
Oldham side who do not have 

toe reputation of Wjgan. 

Oldham have seweved the 16- 
vear-old half back, Glen 
Liddiard. at stand-off half, even 
though the experienced David 
Topuss is fit again. 


SKIING 


Two titles 


A force to be 
reckonedwith 


The. Royal Air Foirce, tfierf _ 
Semceschamptonsanditridera^ 
of the Windsor Life TrapT 
probably pbssetolreffiarinfi 
power- to mwart theRoyal Navy 
m the second of the later- 
Serviceschampicmship matches 
at Twickenham . today (Peter 
Mahsou writesV ■■ 

Tbe RAF have bcDr steadily 
this season . with nine of 14 
matches won:Jrifaa Ormn; there 
mienatronal lock forward and 
former captain, has been onrit- 
(cd as he is. leaving the service 
soon.-.*. • 

The Navy, whose derring-do 
pushed the Army out of tifeir 
stride a j fortnight ago, wHI be 
looking to : spring a second 
surprise. 


FOR THE RECORD 


BASKETBALL 


UNTIED STATES: National A wo daMoa 
(MUfc Now York KWhs 93. Ctovouna 
CaaMrs 87: Milwaukee Bucks 116. Hcwoon 
Rackets 1O6. Dates Mavericks 114. Utan 
4a*z 107: Seattle SufxaSancs 116. Golden 
State W3mora 104. 

MILAN: Women's European ChamkM 
Chibs' Cop: Hnet Prtmsa V«nxa (lu m Agon 
|WG) 71^57. 


CYCLING 


LERttWL- Catalan Weelc Fourth stage: 1. E 
Ranorart (Beig). 3hr 43mn 4 Shc Z. A 
Gueerrez (to). 


GOLF 


HARARE: Zhn Babwe Open Second meat 
Laodtag acotes (Bnesri unless stated): 137: 5 
Bennett 68. 69. 138: D UefteHyn 69. 69. P 
Walton drat 68. 70. m K Wawi 89 70; E 
Oussart (Ft] 68. 71. M(b W McCoO 70 70 
■MXAATA: iBstonestso Open; Second month 
Lawting score* (Tawanese unless stated): 
132: HskKi Yu Shu 65. 67. 136: Ho Mm 
Chung 85. 71: Kim Voting (S Korea) 65. 71. 
137: O Wer* [US] 68. 69: F MmozaTPItai 69. 
68. J Rutleoge (Can) 68. 71; Tsau Clven tong 
70. 67: Busn (Indan) 89. 68: R Uvmz (PhA 
OT. 68. 1» Lu Ctnen Soon 7Z 68: Lu Hs 
Chlon 70. 68: M Manubav (Phi) 71 . 67. 
TUCSON: LPGA toumammfc Fiat rmmt 
Leading acare* {US unless sand): 65: P 
Bradtoy. 68: S Turner. 69: L Baugh; D Massey: 
A Okamoto (Jap): J DldUnsoiL 8 Bunhowsky. 


ICE HOCKEY 


BNDHCVEN: World dm epia uUil p . Peel a 
The Netherlands 6 Yugoslavia 3: East 
Germany A Austra ft Smzeriand a, sary 7; 
France i. Japan 2. 


RACKETS 


SCHOOLS MATCTt Radtey (A KsrrKson ana 
M Stuert-Ciary m Waoromn (A Waghom ara 
P Huxtabte) 1M. 16-15, 16-14, 6-lfi. 6-lS. 7- 
15. 15-10. 


REAL TENNIS 


GBOAGE WMREY AMATEUR CKAMPtQN- 
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6^,64 AJW Page WP Paterson 6-0, 6-0; t 
D J Wartwo Niaw so n 6-1. 6-1. 
' - iiwuhSnaUMWjM3ffi)y64.6-Z: 
Burg 6-1. 63. More&xr MomNt 
Ftrit mutt A Qoury W S Somerville .6-4 . 6ft 
OaMMngraanct H F HoAngtan tn Gouity 6- 
Z C Dean bt G FBaker 60. 6*«. 

MtocbeaTsr: Risl round: N J J P6 ' v *^ m J 


PTnoraM.WJtPButiwbii 
rat OiiaMyieg round: Fendrtgh tt 

w 


RUGBY UNION 


maim csasshoppebs auet Aa b>- 


ScfceOl Fwtrvek Croup anew __ 
GS- Roeoeawip: Edmtxjrtih Acade- 
my. Greep nra KitWtam GS. Hoonet*^ 
Vflrrtf GS. Group One: Hunon GS. Runaen- 
aec woodlouse Grow School Group four 
Leeds GS. Aatoen-tip: King Edward VII. 
Upturn- 


SPEEDSKATING 


ALMA ATA: I M e ma tion a fc 
EngSwene (EG). 4ew 
record). 


1, Aaoroa 
07 sac (Wtartcf 


TENNIS 


FORT MEVER& FM p Oassfc SwwJd 
round: I 
J Connors 

BRUSSEL __ __ 

Second rotnfc' M Wtertder (Svw) «' S 
Zivoi»w"C (Yug) 7-S. M: J CantBr (US) tn K 
DWiBjyndt Mj 7-5. 6-1; B Dyke (Ausj bt L 
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WGForgat(Frt^i.26.7’-€.AJanycl(9rrn)bt 

WMTO^wSatnnVehaMpleB SlitoK QuM)- 
twtoto S Grai (WG) M P StaiW (l£) 64. 7- 
6, S-3. 


WEEKEND FOOTBALL, RUGBY AND OTHER FIXTURES 


3.0 unless stated 

First division 

Arsenal v Coventry 

A Villa v Birmingham 

Ipswich v West Brom .... 
Uvarpool v Oxford Utd > 

Luton v Everton 

Man Utd v Man City 


Second division 
Barnsley v Carlisle 


Newcastle v Tottenham 

Nottingham For v Leicester . 
OPR v Watford 


Southampton v Chelsea 

West Ham v Sheffield Wed . 


Bradford v Huddersfield . 

Brighton v MSwaH 

Chariton v Oldham 

Fulham v C Palace 

Grimsby v Sunderland — 
Leeds Utd v Shrewsbury 
Middlesbrough v Huff — 

Shaft Utd v Norwich 

Stoke v Portsmouth 


Third division 
Bolton Wandrs v Cardiff City . 
Brentford v Blackpool 
Bristol R v Bournemouth 
Lincoln v Notts County - 
Newport v Wigan 


FA VASE: SwnHfrtals, »tcond lag: 
Wisbech v Soutnat KatesoMfl v 
Warrington. 

VAUXHALLrOPSL LEAGUE Premier tS- 
riskw: Barking v Yeovt BOencay v 
Walthamstow: Croydon v Epsom ft Ewt* 
Hayes v Brshop’s Stanford; Hendon v 
Bognoc Klngstonian v Wokingham; 
Slough v Dulwich; Tooting A Mbcltam « 
Sutton Utd: Windsor ft Eton v 


and Horsham p.sle Harlow « Aveley; 
Leather head v Hampton Leytonstone: 
Word v Lewes: St Albans v Maidenhead 
Utd: Tilbury v Staines. Wembley v Horn- 
church. Second dhtiebn north: Barton 
Rovers v Haringey Boro; Chattont St P * 
Kingsbury; Clapton v Roystorr. Hemet 
Hempstead v Letcriwortn GC; Stevenage 
Boro v Wrer Trtng v Rwnham; vauxhan 
Motors v Berkhirmswd; Wdverton v 
Hentord. Second division south; 
Bans ic ad Athletic v Fettham; Brocknefl * 
SouthwicK; Camterley v Dorking; East- 
bourne Utd v Pewsneid U«; nadewafl 
Heath v Etjtwn; Hungsrford v Rwsfip 
Manor Motesoy v New&ry; Whytetaafev 
Horsham; Wolung v Marlow. 

SOUTHERN LEAGUE: Premier tfMstte 
Basingstoke v Crowtsy: Bedworth * 
Alyectuach; Fareham v Chsknsford; 
feher v Duitey, Folkestone w Wcreeswr 
King's Lynn v GospOrt Shepsted * 
Gravesend: Welling v R S Southampton; 
WOenhall v Corby; Witney v Aylesbury. 
MMtend dMston; banburyUM v Coventry 
itey: Forest 
Grantham * 
g ramsg nwa 
Rovers: Leamington v Oldbury Utd; 
Lewrete Utd v Mm Oak Rovere: Merthyr 

K v Wsfingborough: Reddish v 
Jem Stourbridge * Gloucester Cay. 
Southern dh riakm; Andover v AsMonb 
Canterbury City v Bumham and HJBng- 
don; Chatham v Salsbur Dorehester v 
Cite: Dover Athletic v 
Poole v Hastings: Rusflp v 
Woodford; St»»ey U» v Corinthian; 
Tonbridge v Erith and B; WaurtooviBa v 


Wimbledon v Blackburn Rvrs 

Fulham v QPFh GaUngham v Portsmouth; 

Orient HBbraB v Norwich; 
e Chariton. Second dMsfom 
Bremtara v Oxford Utd; Brighton v 
Wtmttiedoir. Reading * Bristol Rover* 
Southend v Tottenham; Swindon v Col- 
chester. 

LONDON SPARTAN LEAGUE: League 
Cup: Senti-flnefc Wabham Abbey v a*ar 
Row. Henry Sunderland Shield Wands- 
worth v Southwark Sports; Royal Arsenel 
Southgate; Penltill Standard tr 
_ riungskle; CHngtord ¥ Cadoal Wands. 
League: Premier Anatom Beaconoftokl 
Utd v BecAton Uni Crown and Manor v 
Thatcham; Edgware v ResSsffl; Hanwtil V 
Dansom Nortttwood v Brimsdoam Rovers; 
Pennant v Amerettem. Senior dhrfston 
norite GreenfOravBROB Barnet; Ulysses 
v Conmhian Casuals. 

ESSEX SENKW LEAGUE: Senior Trophy 
fin tt Heytedge Swifts v Wttnam (at 
Cheteslord C&y). League Cure Sami- 
fffngjl, second leg: Son Manor v Fort UBL 
Leagae: Brentwood v Burnham; 
BrtgftBngsea v Bowers Utd: Canwy 
Island v Eastern Utd: East Thurrock v 
; Halstead v Chs m sf o rd ; 
v CoggmiiaS; Wbmnlxe r 

Makton. 


Ptymouth v Derby County 

Raacfing v Bury 

Rotherham v York 

Swansea v GUnghanr — 
Walsall v Darlington 


Fburth cfiWsiofi 

Burnley v Haifax Town 
Chester v Wrexham — 

Crewe v Aldershot 

Hartlepool v Exeter — 
Hereford v Scunthorpe 


Wolverhampton v Bristol C 

SUSSEX COUNTY LEAGUE: Ch eB sog e 
CW»r TMrd round: AruntM v Peacehmun 
end Tetesoombe. Ret tflvtoton: Bi 
HH v Mldhurst CLtft CWdwsar 
WMMtiawk: Lancing v Rlngmer; 
LiOetnmptM v Eastbourne: Porneld v 
Haasltam: Three Bridges v ShontiianriL 
Secood dMaton: Boaham v Fgrrirn: East 
Grinataad voakwood; Franklonds VBage 
v Wigmore Athletic; Hassocks v Papism 
(2.0). LmgflekJ v Albion (ltd; Nntein v 
Ston to gton; Seisey v Ha yw ar ds Heath; 
Stotoy Utd v Wick (20). 
GLOUCESTERSHME SENIOR TROPHY: 
Scnri-ftoat: Moreton v Bristol Manor Farm 
(at Shortwood). 

wlLTSHIRES9aORCUP:Sani-finafcOid 
Manor v Supemtanna lu Devizes). 
OXFORDSHIRE SENIOR CUP: Third 
round: Bicester v Oxford Ow. 

HALLS BREWERY HELLBuC LEAGUE; 
Skol Premier dtvtston Cup: S e mi B nefc 
MmondsbUiy Qraenway v Shortwood Utd. 
Skol Rial dMetoa Cupc Second raurxfe 
Dtdcct v Badnsmoo. TMrd round: 
Oanfioki v Rntoury Rangers. League: 
Premier dMatom Abingdon Town v 

Thame UtftMounsiow v Abkigdon Utd; 
Maidenhead v Sharpness; Rayrnrs Lane 
v Whntags; Wafingfotf v P*gasu» JU- 
niore; Yale v Morris Motors. Rrat dMafon 


Northampton v Cotehester . 
Petertwrou^i v Cambridge 

Preston v Southend 

Rochdfde v Trenmero 

Torquay v MartsfteW 


Scottish premier (fivision 

Aberdeen v Dundee 

Oydsbenk v St Marsn 

Dundee U« v Motherwell 

Hibernian v Hearts ~~ — — 

Rangers v Cette 


MULTIPART LEAGUE Burton Afcton v 
Button; Gainsborough v Caernarvon; 
Gateshead * Chortey: Horwcti v Wlttort; 
MacdesteW v Hytte. Mattock v Rhyl: 
Mo&stey v Bangor Cuy. Oswestry v 
Woriungtte: South Liverpool v More- 
CBmbe: worksop v Marine. 

CENTRAL LEAtolE: Rrat tSvfatiort 
Everton v Newcastle (2.0). 

FOOTBALL COMBINATION: Bton in g ha m 
y QPR Bristol Rovers v Roaring 
n t.0k Chelsea v west Ham (3.15); Oxford 
United v Portsmouth: Tottenham v Arse- 
nal B.0k Watford vtoswite. 

SMIRNOFF BUSH LEAGUE: Bang*- V 
QiftonvCS ( 2-30): Ca rricAjr Lame j 
Coteraine v Dts&ery ^30); Crus* 

Ards (2J30); Urritetd V fa WW l_(2Jg ); 
Henry v Ba»yrosna (2JJ0); Poftadown v 

Sureai&raiJUIITlES 

SSmi Ate? 

IfU v Watford; Ctetoeo v Southend, 


Third round: Heavrtree Utd v 
Wohon Rovers v Portway Bristol t 
Premier cSvisiorr Bnsto) City v 
Chard v Taunton; Gtappenham v Ptymouth 
Argyte: Prone v Barnstaple: Mefcsham v 
BtoHord: Mmehsad v Babash Utd: Patton 
Rowers v Lttkeard AtMettc Torrington v 
Glevedon; Weston-super-Mare v 
Oandowa Rnt dteii orr Gtastonbury v 
Weymouth; Dtracombe v Backweff Utd: 
Keynsnam v Redstoek: Odd Down v 
Elmore; Swanage Town and Herston v 
Devizes Warmmster v Barit City WeKng- 
ton v Larkhafl AlttieBc Mnibonw v Ottary 
St Mary. 

NENE ' GROUP UNWED COUNTIES 
LEAGUE: Premier/Finrt Gritbn Cop: 
Baton pw « Bourne; Cottmgham v 
Ratmds; Long Buckby v Towwster. 
League: Premier d fri ite rt : AmptHB V 
Newjxxt Pamielt Adeaay v Potton 
Buckingham; Bractoey Holbeach v North- 
ampton Spencer; Irthltngboro v 
Oestoroiigtt RdtftweB v Eyn^buy; » 
Neals v Stamford; S and L Corby v 
Wotton; Stottofo v Bakfock. 
ORYBOROUGHS NORTHERN LEAGUE: 
Rrat dhriSiOK BedRngton v Spwmymoor 
Utd; Bringtem Synmcrta v Owster-te- 
S treat Bttntftam Town * Byhope CA; 
Blyrii Spstans v Wha&y (3.15): Consett v 
PewteK Crook v Brandon Utd. Fenyhril 
Athtetie u Btsriop Auckland; Gretna v 
South Bank; Tow Law v WteOey Bey. 
Second d M afo tc Alnwick v Norton; 
Asuncion v NontiaBenon; Pe rotan d 
Bndge v toottotc Oamrigton v Sastagton; 
Dmtem v Harden CW; Langfay Park v 
Snflckxi; Seeham Red Star v WHSngton; 
S t oc k ton v Evenwood; Waet AucMm v 

HORTOU^ERLANO SENIOR CUP: 
S^ti-ftnal: Norm Shnkfo « Bbe star. 
SUSSEX SENIOR CUP: SwMfoal: 
Stoynng v WOriWng (at Soifotwick). 


Avon 

fiworth; 


roe, mw' * ruinwnnw "viriWO, 

UM v GuWey; Emfoy v Briper; 
Celtic v Pontstroci Cautery; 


Bishop Cteeve » Avon Bradfoni: 
Cir en ces te r v 

Sports v AFC 

Lambouma Sports; Wring Sports 
Hazells. 

NORTHERN CQLMT1ES EAST LEAGUE: 
Premier dhrieiom Bentley CW v 
Eastwood; Boston v Anmhorpe Wellare; 
Demfoy U8 r “ ' ' “ ‘ 

Farstey 

Haanor v Hkeston: Long Eaton ya 
Appleby Frodtagtam: Sprifog utd v 
Bridington Tnroty; Sumo v Arnold; 
Ttecktey vABretOTT. 

BIBLDtNG SCENE EASTBW LEAGUE: 
Brantham v Harwich and Pmk a st on ; 
Chatteris v Great Yarmouth; Clacton v 
Gortestoft Colchestw Lte v Newmarket 
HB»n v Bramtroe: Lowestoh v HaverhH 
Rovers; March Town Utd v Sttemareet 
Seham v Felixstowe; Sudbury v Buy; 
Totree Utt v Thetford. 

COMBINED COUNTIES LEAGUE: Pl»- 

mier dhtefore Cheraey « I 
Cow vr ■ ~ „ 

Famham v Coofiam Frorttey Green 
Farteigh Rovers; Honey v Merchant 
Maiden Town * Fleet Maiden vale v Aah 
Utd: Vlmtota Water v Bae weyOri da e. 
MOTS SENIOR LEAGUE: Premier re- 
vision: bag Stevenage v St 

Le w Mo ck Green v 

. Leaveadon Hospital v 
Bedmond Sodd; Bovingdon v Sun 

Sports; Mount Grace Potters Bar v 
London Gotaey: Oteey data v Wtogete: 
Ssndndge Rows v Robs Royc* Potters 
Bar Crusaders v Evergreen. 

SURREY COUNTY LEAGUE) 
dwtefoo C«K Seeeod Round: cmpsteaa v 
Bedford. Santi-rirab Ashford v Oman. 
Premier dvteion: Frmon Ravere v Wtatey 
And Dtec London Hro Brigade v Totworth; 
pyrford v Monotype Sports: Mwi ow t 
C nsssngcon: Worcester Park v %ring- 
BaldHoipimL 


NORTH WEST COUNTIES LEAGUE: Rrat 
dta tato ic CHtheroe.v Corzon Ashton; 
Congleton V Accrington Stanley; 
Eastwood Hanley v Fleetwood: triam v 
i Leek v Bootle: Leytend Motors v 

/»„u| n ■ luirti mrflail il m Cl I IrJfM »w i 

geiBCfitiinaniwYKnpws; 
V Burecoogh; Wmslord Utd 
v Peortoi Liverpool. Sente Cup: Senri- 
finafc Southport v Presoot Cabtea. 

VOLLEYBALL 

ROYAL BAW ENGLISH LEAGUE: Men's 
find dWsteo: C*p;= 2 S? Cttv Brtxton v 09C 
Poole (7.9}; Newcastle J&Bs) v Potonta; 
Maiory v Liverpool Chy Redwood 
Lodge v LwarpooL . . 

HANDBALL . 

BRITISH CUP: SemHfoefc Srieteead v 
Tryst 77 (ftO). 

HOCKEY 

PIZZA EXPRESS iOMXM LEACBJE: 
Premier taegne Beekontem-v Sranriw; 
Hounslow v St Albans. League: Beck- 
enham v Bromley; Hampstaari v fllch- 
mond: Hawte v QuBdfons HounakNvva 
Moans-. Maidenhead 1 v Purity; Old 
Klngstonlais v Duhvicff; Reateig V Mid- 
YW«ri#<fon; Soutogato v 

NORWICH UNION EAST' LEAGUE: Pre- 
mier tSvtakm: Btaieharta v Bshop’s 
Sta nfor d. Brentwood v -Broxbotene; 

Bedford; Pont * Norfolk 

He rla a ton Magpies v S> 

Neots Ipswich v Cambridge City; Oto 
Loughtonians v Wastcfift: Peterborough 
Town v Cambridgeshire Nomads. 

MeEWMirs lager soutn league 

Premier dMafon: Cantoeriey v Old 
Taununiens; Eastcote v Anchoriaite; East 
Grmatead v Fareham; 


Scottish first division 

Airdrie v KBmamock — 

AMoavParttak — 

Ayr v HamHton — 

Brectwi v Forfar 

Clyde vE Fife ; — — 

Montrose v FaDtirk __ — — 


Morton v Dumbarton 

Scottish second divtetoh 
Berwick v St Johnstone — .... — 
Dunfermflne v Arbroath 


E Stkfing v Meadowbai* : — 

Queen's- Park vi Sfafirig Alb 

Raith Rovers vGoWdenbeafh 

Stonhsmur v Queen of Sth 

Stranraer v Albion Rovers i 


Gola League 

Barrow v Enfield 
Bath v Barnet -X. 


Dagenham v Frlckiey- 
Mffidstone v Boston 
Northwlch v Nuneaton, 
Runcorn v.Kettering . 


Scarborough v Owteenham . 
Stafford yDatfortf: 


Wealdstora-v KkJdwrtnsw 
Weymouth v Altrincham* — 
Wycombe v TeHoid wil 


-MVUWIV. ‘ 

Crostyx v 
Wanderers; 


BQWLSS Men: PrudariM-champiMAipa? 
(at Hartiepool)- 


BUGBY UNION. 

JOHN PLAYER SPECIAL CUP 
Quarter-finals . 
Hartoquiwv Latocatar . 

London ScotfiahvGloucester 
frourtb round 
- Bteckhealh v Wasps - 

MERITTABLEB 

Nort ha mp to n v Waterloo 

Bedford vOireB : : .- r 

SCHWEPPES WELSH CUP 
- r Semi-finals . 

Swanaas v Abarawon 
CWdOfv Bridgend (ar 

SCOTTISH FIRST DIVISION 

Edkfouroh Aca^ vW of Scottetd . , . 

Heriors^vlSMrk.-r 
Jadforestv Preston Lodge. . 

KebQV WstBonfone 
MeiroM v KSmunock . 
StewteMehSe FP-v Hawick 
CUB MATCHES: Bath v Rich m on d; 
Blrmlrigham .« Harrogate; Bristol . ' v 
RossJyn Paric Brougtein Park v Mortey; 
ftaham y H arttepoo L He»Bnday v New 
Brighton; London Irish v Pontypridd; 
London Welsh v Newbridge; Mamteg v 
Coventry; , Wddtosbrougb v Fyldo: 
Mosefcy y Swansea; Neath r Uanelfi; 
Nonhem v WakafiM Nottln^am v 
LWmpoot Nunaeon v BkkenhMf Park; 

. Ptymouth v Exeter; Pontypool v.PenaiHi; 
PremiGraahfippersv Rugby; Sheffield 
v veto « Low South Wates PoSoe v Met 
PoPtoe; Wbst tHaritepooi v. Houvctny; 
Wssycn c-MBre v Camborne. 

WBH- UEAQO& Seaior Cap: I 

fiesta: Ante vBatiymena; North v 
Coteg^ v- MteoriK instontane v Aod- 
:emy.- senior. Pham ^ Queens AMwralty v 
c»y or Deny.attmatotaK Ronadovm v 

RUGBY LEAGUE 

MXCOT OX*: SateMnefc Cssttetord v 
OUiaffl( 2 . 1 ^ 


TOMORROW 


3b unless stand 

. FOOTBALL 
Fufi Members 1 Cup 
Final 

Chels8evfi4arichiBSfarCity . - 

Fourth division 

Swindon Town v Port Vale 

aou ism***** 

Crantagh v Barnes; DulwWi v Burnt Aah; 11 T, a ^ 

Eastcon v MmbtadoD: fan "Court v 


Grmatead v Fareham; Lyons v Etessa; 
Oxford Hawks v Amtrsham; Timbridgs 
WetevBoonor. 

COUNTY MATCH: Natwest Barrie U-21 
territorial tournament (al Atexander Stt- 
(fiuml. 

WOMBTS (UTCHES: AttaM v C8y Of 
Oxford; Amwshan v Harlow: Dtedd wa ft 



Hufl KRr 

yyUnrinxnin 

”ohuwm3 

Barrow 
tf 


Crawley; Hounslow v Sracknelb Home 
B ay v A n chor te ns; Thames Vatoy v 
Fvnham. 

LACROSSE . 

BRINE NORTH OP BWLAND LEAGUE: 
F)ret <£vwkxc Old Wacontans * Sate; 
Shefoted v Heaton Maroay; umwon v 
Ashton. ■’ 

BRINE SOUTH OF ENGLAND LEAGUE 
(Z^FMrBvtateRCHpsteadvHamp- 
stew: HScrott v Buddwret HU: Kenton v 
London Unkr. Ruriey v Enfield.- Second 
t flvta ta n! Beckarti a m A v Orpfrtgton: 
Bucknursr HM a v Hffcroft A: Croydon v 
Httchki; Hampstead A v Purley K 

OTHER SPORT - - 
BASKETBALL: Certsherg netfonarf 
c l t w itfoitaMpe (at wetnbtey): WasreR 
R«t Crystar Pataea v Nonhan yt on 
aaO). Man: Btirt piece ptay-o It 
Rnab Bkntingmm or ■“ — 

Mnpsaan or Leicester f 


CUP:' 
Maidenhead;: 


RUGBY UNION 
GIDDY ft (BODY BERKS 
final* (2.1^: Hesdteg 

DWW^Si^^StepteiBfc Tteenon v 

SdSeBB I^AcIaR^ CUP: famiHfoete i 
Giwtooppers^v^UabiUge' (230^. OH' 

Wsh-vCW 


HOCKEY 


■. HACUPaQnertta-flaiteBounwfltev Isca, 

NomnCH uraoitEASr league p»- 

:s 

oooNnr 



fATTVE MATCH: Bterir Of 

England XV v Bob Raectfff Invltetfon XV 

. OU-^fcWrWgfKar* v: 
OxmL '■ TV-'-. ••- 


RUGBY 


SUUjOMLAOBRL ... . 
ford v Widne* (3 30fr 
HetewrS^DiftMhtestoM vl 



U-ZT.Terrltortei Tournament (te Aiaxenoer 
Stadium. Bkminghem). ■ 

>v‘ ; ; VOLLEYBALL .. 

HOWL BANK LEAGUE Man** first 
tfivtafon: Spesdmfl ftoeanor v Capital 
Otyfliwton (23C9- 

-v; . llAfpBAU. 

OTHffl SPORT 

eGrnshrt'v; 

Sgaw 

60 RRac*(ei Henley^ 


BfifTW f_ 

:.y&*X]t. 

faftriLadMv 



v St . 

c&aot s»-.: •_ 


in one day 

WaterviUe Valley, New 
Hampshire (Reuter) - Vrem 
Schneider of Austria woo a 
World Cup giant slalom here on 
Thursday to win /tbe 1986 
women's giant' slalom 
championship-^ Schneider's vic- 
. tray, her third of tee season, 
*ave her 95 pouts after seven 
- evens, good e noug h xh assure 
her of the. tide with one race to 

'■jgfy. ■' 

. Also cefebratmg was Maria 
W^ffiser of’ Switzerland, who 
was conftrmed aS the winner of 
the-, overall World . Cnp 
champiomhip when one of the 
twogamt Bfatonts which were to 
have :tak£a .pface; here was 
ciincelleiL'. . 

RESULTS: 1, V Schntedar (Swta) ante 

T&4BMC: & a 

3,0 Charewon (Cz) 4. S Edar 

(Amiri*) fetus; STk Ofott tetfi-TS; 

Uii«> (SwtaiatftS; 7.C Gtassor- 


MKtaW(Vtf^Zrt770; n.B Madsen (US) 
£17.76: 12. J LacMW lC»n)2: 17.88; 13. 


8TA 


t, V 





MB) 1B7: 8.T Haediw (WG) 153; S. K 
faMnaohn (Aui&ta) 145; TO. M Gary (WG) 


ROWING 

Italians mount 
threat to 
national pride 

An action-packed weekend 
starts today with the sixtieth 
Head of the River race and 
continues tomorrow at Henley 
whh the .Oxford and Cambridge 
womens' Boat Race (Jim 
Railtoo writes). ' 

Since the inaugural race in 
1926 the head title has never 
been won by an overseas crew, 
but this year the Italians, racing 
as Campania region, will mount 
a powerful threat- However, the 
title will be well defended by the 
ARA .national squad. 

Garda were on duty against 
Oxford on Thursday evening 
and^ Cambridge yesterday. 
Against Oxford Garda finished 
half a length ahead after a nine- 
minute row, and in a four- 
mi a me contest yesterday 
Cambridge moved out fast but 
coaid not shake off the Irish and 
had almost a length at the end. 

Today’s outings: Oxford 8:0 
Md Cambridge 930 (from 
Putney). 


HOCKEY 

Extra burden 
for Burrows 

Pfcktoklt, one of the Wrongest 
dubs in the Midlands, wilfbe 
without two ■ leading players. 

Nm® OrandSri^ ziK 

-^hran, for their home match 
^ ^shop’s Stanford in the 
quarter-finals of the Hockey 
^“‘onTow 

dney Frisian writes). 

suspemfed 

S£Li^? d 5 ,s 10 *«■ fourth 
round match against Taunton 

K“ I 25 rolc es after a>3 draw. 
The absence of Chaudhri in 

811 «“» bli? 
denon Simon Borrows. 

. Quarter-final hetw~i 
Welton and Southgate has been 
postponed. ‘ 


World service 
MB Ngg ig Y SS 

Britain iid| ,tew s 


tUS 0tftan 

Bsaa.*g rtga!J S£.a- 

S^WasKarfiiSsU! 


* 


£ 


saw 
JMI- 
far GUI) 




<fc-.il. 


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I ^ LjA 


f W 


THE TIMES SATURDAY MARCH 22 1986 

Weekend television and radio programmes 
Edited by Peter Dear and Christopher Davalle 


Sunda 


^(i fc.i .45 Op en Uniwareay. Until 
Nl 30 Huntarte Gold. W 

penuttmate episode of the 

id.' <*ama serial set to New - - 
• Zealand during the 1860s 


-v (LOO Saturday SupeiStore 
. managed by Mike Read. 

Among this week's 
customers is Cfiff Richard 
who vrfi be taking an 
interest In the final of the 
Search for a SuperSter 
contest: and John Craven 
i " who reports on Ehergy 

Conservation. . 

115 &BrKJstand introduced by 
Desmond Lynam. The 
Hnenip is: 1220 Cricket: a 
■* report on the.TWrd Test 

between England and toe 
West indies; 1220 
Footbafl Focus; 1SL5S 
News and weather; 1 . 00 , 

- t 2.10,240 and 420 

Snooker: (he Cun- 
. 8 ft 1.25,1 jSandZSST 
Ractog from Newbury; 

** 140 Judm the Women's. 

'■ L 3J50 Hsif-time 

reports; 420 Ice Starting 
from Geneva; 440 Final - 
score. 

■ 525 News with Jan Leendng 
535 Sport/Regional news. 
528 The Moppet Show. The 
puppets re-enact the 
legend of Rotwr Hood wfth 

■ , 5.45 jbnH Fix it Among those 
tor whom Mr SavBe fixes it 
• are two rrtd-tWrty year old 
J- ladies to do some charring 
^ on toe QE2. (Ceefax) 

620 TbeDutcesof HaxzanL 
\ n ' - Boss Hogg promotes 

Enos sideways because 
' he « too honest and hires 
a crook in his place to help 
him run his many rackets. “ 
, ****.7. OS The Little and Large 
**, Show. The comedians' 

guests this week are MSre 
4 Burton. Stanley Unwin and 

Thereza Bazar. (Ceetax) 
7.40 Every Second Counts. 


t55 Good Morning Britain. 

rejxwtat 72* and sport at 

720 The Wide Awake Club 
includes news at a.?s : 



025 No 73. Today's vistors' 
include Bobby davro, toe 
Roger Oattrey Band and 
. Mark Shew < 1.00 
- Captain Scarlet (rt 1120 

Secret Vattay The 

Ortega's daughter makes 

• „ Wends with Marianne. 

32^2 with Martyn Lewis. 

1225 Saint and Greovsie. Ian 
and Jimmy preview the 
week'sfootbau. 1220 
Wrestfing.Two bouts from 
• ; Dewsbury Town He#. 

120 AinraH. A top aircraft 
designer ts fodnapped and 
the only due to tus. 
whereabouts is locked in 
the mind of ius mentally 

2.15 cS^m^Stjr heroretums 
from holiday to find Kraus 
minting his apartment 
. with her newly arrived 
mother. But what Benson 
does not know is that the 
mother believes he and 

' Kraus are married. 

245' Ice Skatfrig. The Free 
Dance section of the 
Work* Figure 
-Championships from 
Geneva. 

445 Results service. 

520 News with Martyn Lewis. 

525 Connections. Sue Robbie 
presents another round of 
the fast moving quiz game 


Daisy (Catherine Bach) Lake Duke (Tom Wop&t) and Bo 
(John Schneider) The Dukes of Hazard (BBCI, 620pm) 


620 Open University. Until 

125 Film: Every GM Should Ba 
Married* (1948) starring 

- ' Cary Grant. Betsy Drake- 
and FranchotTone. 
Romantic comedy about a 
bachelor doctor who is 
adored by a shoo 
assistant, heraaK the 
amorous target of the 
■ -- store manager. Directed 
by Don Hartman. 

3-15 MyFavorattoWWe*f194Q) 
it Irene 


1.15 Channel 4 Racing from 
Doncaster. Brough Scott 
introduces coverage of the 
Mail on Sunday Handicap 
ft .30); the Racing Post 
Maiden Stakes (2.00); the 
William HSi Unco in 
Handicap (225); and the 
Cammidge Trophy (3.05). 
The race commenta t or is 
. Graham Goode. 

' 320 Fflm: Bowery to 


820 The CoBectora. Episode 
four of the drama senes 
about the work of HM 
Customs and Excise. 
Starring Peter McEnery 
and Michael 
BfttngtorLfCsefax) 

9.10 News and Sport With Jan 
Leemma. Weather. 

925 Deceptions. The second 
find final part of trie mini 
. drama senes about 
idenocaf bwn sartors who 
swap identities and 
kfestyfes with sinister 
results. (Ceetax) 

(120 Match of the Day. Jimmy 
Hill introduces highfaghis 
from two of this 
afternoon's First Division 

1120 ^BraThe Legend of the 
Werewolf (l 974/ starring 
Peter Cushing. Honor 
movie about a young man 
who finds work n a Paris 
zoo after being reared bv ' 
toe wolves who savaged 
h*s parents. He faSs m 
love with a prostitute and, 
when the moon is JUI, . 
begins to fuu-offfbe 
customers of the focal 
brothel. 

1.15 Weather. 


525 The A-Team. The 
resourceful quartet 
. smuggle themselves on to 
a Jumbo jet in order to 
rescue the hijacked 
passengers, (r) 

620 Bobby Davro on the Box. 
Another senes of sketches 
. from the talented comedy 
Impressionist and his 
guest Jessica Martm. 

720 The Price is Right Game 
show presented by Lesfte 
Crowther, 

820 FBnc Winter JOB (1974) 
starring Andy Griffith. 
Sheree North and John 
Calvin. A made-tor- 
tBfavislon thriller about a 
ski resort in the United 
States mrnriaedby a 
senes of systematic, cold- 
blooded shotgun kiOings. 
After several murders, a - 
variation appears arx} it 
looks as if mere has been 
two kJBars an me time. 
Directed by Jud Taytor. 

945. News and Sport. 

10.00 Aspel and Co. The Co this 
week are YOkoOno, Boy 
George and John Cleese. 

1045 LWT News headlines 
followed by lutemational 
Darts. The Nations Cup, 
introduced by Dickie 
' Davies from the Alexandra 
Pavilion, London. 

12.15 Joofsin Jamaica. A fUm 
• report from Trenchtown, 
the reggae capital of the 
work! First shown on the 
1584 Midsummer Night's 
. Tube. Among those .. 
appearing are Denote 
Brown. Sack Uhuru, Sfy ~ 

: and Rootae, ana Mighty 

1 Oreadny 


starring Cary Grant Irene 
Dunneand Randolph 
Scott Comedy about a 
wife who disappears for 
seven years only to 
reappear on the day her 
husband Is about to re- 
marry. Directed by Garson 
Kanin. 

445 Internationa/ Snooker. 

The first semifinal of the 
Car Care Plan World Cup: 
From the Bournemouth 
I n tern atio nal Centre. 

620 Horizon: In the Wake of 
HM5 Sheffield. An 
analysis of the lessons 
learnt by the Exocet 
missile attack on HMS 
Sheffield in which 21 
people lost their Rves. (r) 

620 News View. Jan Leeming 
with today's news and 
sport; Mofra Stuart 
reviews the week's news 
in pictures with subtitles. 

720 International Pro- 
Celebrity Goff. Arnold 
Pafmer and Gary Player 
are joined by Kevin Kagan 
and Bruce Forsyth. 

820 The Sea of Forth. Part five 
of Don Cupitt's series 
examining the reasons for 
today's lack of religious 


9.10 Stuart Burrows Stegs at 
. the National Arts Centre, 
Ottawa. He is Joined by 
Rosemarie Landry 
(soprano). Corey 
Cerovsek (viofei). toe Brian 
Law Singers, and the 
National Arts Centre 
Orchestra conducted by 
Robin Stapleton. 

10.10 In te rnational Snoofcar.The 
second semifinal of the 
Car Care Plan World Cup. 
1120 Saturday Review includes 
reviews of Alan 
Bleasedaie's f9m. No 
Surrender and Patricia 
Highsnuth’s new thriller, 
Found in the Street 
11.50 International Snooker. 
Further coverage of the 
second semifinal of the 
Car Care Plan World Cup. 
1230 Jazz 625: Clark Teny and 
Bob Brookmeyar* in 


Jackie Oakie. Maria 
Momez and Donald Cook. 
Musical comedy about two 
rival bowery beer garden 
. owners continuatiy trying 
to outdo each other in the 
entertainment stakes. 
Directed by Charles 
Lament 

525 Brookskle. A compilation 
of the week’s episodes. 
(Oracle) 

5 . 0 Q Family Ties. American 
domestic comedy series. 

620 Unforgettable. This last 
programme hi the pop 
music nostalgia series 
- stare Middle of the Road 
and The Fantastics. 

720 News summary and 
weather followed by 7 
Days. Ann Loades talks to 
Nick Partridge, 
administrator of the 
Terence Higgins Trust 
about Aids: and Robert 
Kee discusses President 
Reagan's postponed 
plans to fund the Contras 
with George Galloway and 
Harold Biakemore. 

720 Down Home. The fourth 
and final programme in the 
series tracing the history 
of fiddle muse. 

820 Saturday Live, introduced 
by Peter Cook. Among the 


•' 1 .1 SWeotoer. ' - 1 1220 kfight Thoughts. ■ | 

, Rat3to * 1 21 5 kHz/ 247 m: VHF- 90 - 

VHF9?3: C ^ t W 95 BBC flado London 


concert, introduced by 
Humphrey Lyttelton, (r) 
Ends at 1.10 


Saunders, Raw Sex, Ben 
Elton and Twisted Sister. 

1020 MU Street Blues. Coffey 
and Bates discover a steer 
' on tne fifth floor of an 
apartment block. (Oracle) 

1120 Fibre The Ghost of 
Frankenstein* (1942) 
starring Lon Chaney Jr 
and Cedric Hardwicks. 

The Baron's son is 
blackmailed into restoring 
to He tvs father's monster 
creation. Directed by Erie 
C Kenton. 

12.15 FBm: The Return of the 
Vampire* (1 943) starring 
. Bela Lugosi The stake 
that has pinned a vampire 
to the ground for 20 years 
Is disturbed by an 
exploding bomb and the 
beast is free again to 
indulge his blood lust 


rtBdbyU 

i at 12 a 


' BBCI WALES S.ISpm-620 
''SSxiSpotiNwswiMSCor- 
UHD 5.i5om-$J0 Soman News 
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Film: SMuc«ll£1 San Afar MW> 
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REGIONAL TELEVISION VARIATIONS 


T^WUlMonnctlcnAIn 
G<J* HooevUFt 1Lfl3-TZJ» 
Frwraframa 2.1Spifrvt45 < ne 
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( Radio 4 _ 

525 am Stepping. 820 News. 

6.10 PrSude. Music 
selected by David BeCnger 
(s) 620 News: Farming. 
820 Prayer tor toe Day (s). 
6 «Weamer;TravaL 
720 News. 7.10 Today’s 
Papers. 7.15 On your 
farm. 

745 In Perspective with Andy 
OManoney. 

720 Down to earth, weekend 
gardening 725 Weatoen 
Travel 820 News. 8.10 
Today s Papers. 

8.15 Sport on4. 

848 Yesterday m Parliament 
8.57 Weatner. Travel. 

S.00 Hows. 

9.05 Breakaway. Bernard Fa& 
presents a practical 
guide to holidays. 

920 News Stand. Dawd 
walker reviews the 
weekly magaanas. 

1025 Tha Weak m 
Wes t m in s ter. 

1020 Loose Ends with Ned 
Snorrn and stufio 


Goroon of The Times. 

1120 From Our Own 
Correspondent 

.1 ZOO News: Money Box. 

1227 Take me to your reader. 

Tim Brooke-Taytor nA 
Change of Medium (s). 1225 
weatner. 120 News. 

1.10 Any Questions? 

£00 News: The Afternoon 
Play. Jack Squater's 

Time, by N*k McCarty (s). 

320 News; international 
Assignment- BSC 
correspondents report 

320 The Saturday Feature; 
into Hrs Own. A self- 
portrad of floben Frost as a 
young poet 

4.15 Noranatherteff 
proarmame Or Alan 
Marycn-Oavis presents a 
pratmcalgukte to getting 
the best trom your food. 

445 TheFo9dy«eSaga8. 

520 The LwingWortt News 
of wikftfe endow 
counov^de. - , . , 

5JB Was* Endjng. SatincaJ 

review of tne weeks • • 
new* SJBStoopmg. 525 
Weatoer Travel. 

6.00 New:Sportetou«*tai. 

6JS Conro a aw n piece. 2ua 
MacGraoor tsfics to 
Dan^Rotwrtson.wraar . 

gndteiBvtwon agony 
aunt 

820 Ten thousand dries on 
an overdraft. FrfltJ 

. Basrwn finds temselfwWito 
me Arctic C*de. . 

726 Sa>p to* weak,^ wnh. 

Roaart Roanacnii) 

74S aaurt Dozen- Rictwti 
Ba»ar»nftraeo^s^ . 

820 Satuntey-reghtTheWe. 


G RAMPIAN 

OSawn Amoncwi H«o ifltoot- 
sx Bucumsm ia.T5»a BeSvcnons. 
dosedcMm. 

1120-12M Rym Kmi a.lSpm-245 
Otl ma Rack Sjd£L35 Bmckduswis 
TZ. t9un Snamo Pnjw. OomHoml 

HTV WEST Lonttone ** 

niv assJ rape imsw raarefl 

XL5 1120-1220 Cstwan Searto 
2.1Sp»-2.*S Swercwi S.06-525 
TanaflaMs 12.15m Oowoown. 

TVS AsLonctonteovOt itJJflwn- 
iaS 1220 Greansr Araancan Haro 
2.T9pn-Z46 1* Smnti 545425 
SiocwxiEtBrs 12.15am GwyNwnan 1.15 
Company. OosoGown. 

Malgrafs Special 
Murder, by Gearaes 
Stmenon (si. 928 
Weather. 1020 News. 

10.15 Evenmg Serves (s) 

1020 The turn of toe fide. How 
Christian faith is 
cnanqexj. 

1120 Science Now. wito Peter 
Evans. 

1120 In other wonts ... toe 
Bodmrs. Comedy series 
(s>. VL00-12.15am News; 
weather. 1223 Shipping. 
VHF Ovarisoiejn England antf 
S. Wales only) except: 
5252J»ain Weather; TTOveL 
3y00-520pm OpoonS: 320 
View at toe top. 320 The 
countryside in trust te). 

4.00 Literary walks. Exploring 
Lyme Regts. 420 A Child 
for We? ____ 


GRANADA 

einR Aowncen Hwo2.iSjpn>- 
ZAS Mma Your Language 12.15am H i m: 
riia Taa-Taw H*«n (AcMenna Cent) 

120 O oseoo wn. 

SCOTTISH A» London aa- 

wvwt ,,w, cMt 1120am Qan 
Mcnaal CavWcaos ILAS-HOOAd- 
vamuma of Jeremy 2.15^45 Cwxbd 
Cnwi 12.15am Lata Cafl. 

Ctasaoonm. 

SdC teanx 1.1 Smb Racing from 

Ooncastwlte Dance Matmae 
4JI0 Awl- T he Man Who watered 
Tran&GoBySJSO Patterns o> Ufa S20 
i How Does Your Gareen Grow? 720 
Hwraowm 7 JO 7 AS Suntan 

B.t5 YmwGtea Hal A Dtflryn Owyd 
&^0 Bwyts'n Dda S.15Y Mass Chwaw 
10.15 Sroxday Urn 11-45 Bratiws 
l2.iSa mQosadown. 

Tamar). Ravel (Vetoes nobles 


YORKSHIRE 

12.00 Othanrona Z15pRKL45 
CandKf Camara 12 .fSHa Fasttval FOfc 
12^S OOMdovm. 


Franck, onto MtxrionfPttce 


225 -7.1S (MW only) Cricket 
Third Test Commentary 
cm toe second day’s play 
425 Howard Shelley and 


s Sonata 


Radio 3 


6-55 weather 720 News 
725 Aubede. Malcolm Arnold 
(Four Corns!) Dances). 
Vtta-LobostCirandades 
sept notes), Deoussy 
(Tlvee Preludes Book 1. 
Nos 3. 4 end 5. 

MKhetenged. piano). Dvorak 
(Serenade in Dmmor. Op 
44). Detwssy (Intermezzo: 
Waltoscn. ceUo, Hendry, 

. .piano), John Addison 
(plvenimemo. Op 9), 
Meooefssc<no (Symphony No 

■ 3. Op 56. Scottish). 920 
News 

925 Record Review, tod 
builteng a library. 

Brahms's German Requiem. 

1025 Stereo Release. 

Rachmaninov's Piano 
Concerto No 4. in G minor 
Ashkenazy (piano), 
Amsterdam Concertgebouw 
under Haitink, and 


Britten's Mazurka elegies. 
Op 29, No 2 and 
Rachmaninovs StAe No 2, 
Op 17. 

S45 Critics' Forum. Weekly 
discussion on dnema, 
theatre.' broadcasting, books 
and must arts. 

625 Music for toe iron Voice. 
Peter Maxwell Davies 
(Sonata ter Organ: Bowers- 
Broadbent. organ) and 
fvss (Variations on 
•■America". Gfltian Weir. 

. . . organ). 

7.15 Mr Gottlieb W» Not Be 
Writing, by Michael 
•Swiss, real by David Garth. 

720 BBC Welsh Symphony 
Orchestra, cood 
Frtmaux with Jean- PWSppe 
Coliard (piano). Live 
perterrrance from Branqwyn 
HaH Swansea. Part one: 
Bizet (Suae: Carmen) and 
Sami-Saans (Piano 
Concerto No 2. in G minor. 

825 Strange Fhs of Passion. 
Anthology of poems 

925 BBC Welsh SO. Concert, 
pen two: Dvorak’s 
Symphony No 9, to E minor 


Sports Resets lllSem hews at 
Closedown. 

border 

Amencan Ham Zl5ea»-2A5 Smal 
Wonder &0S-545 Oraaim l2.1Swn 
CioaedDwa 

nNETEES^BS^ 

; ing Glory 11JI5-12JQ tea Sxarra 
&&pm-SjS MM Your Language 1U0 

Po«-» Corner. Closedown. 

CEmT ML «jggu«S 

Skawn UtVZASpm Flint The Kid 
From fens (Autie Murphy). 54M4S 
Mr and Mrs 1215am Cloeedown. 

at the news. 120 Sport on 2 
introduced by Renton Lakfisw. 
FootoaJL Luton v Everton. Test 
Cricket Commentary from 
Bridgetown on the 2nd day's 
play of the 3rd Test Racsig from 
Doncaster 225 £25,000 
William HiU Lincoln Handicap. 325 
£12,000 The Cambridge 
Trophy. Rugby League: Silk Cut 
Challenge Cup. Rugby Union: 
Reports and news from today's 
John Player Cup and toe 
Schweppes Welsh Cup. Motor 


Racing: assesses tomorrow's 
BraziBan Grand Prix. 520 Sports 
Report 6.00 Folk On 2. 7 JJO 


Fsstaff. LPO, 

Mac k erra s . 

"■sssssssewl 

Beethoven Symphony No 6 . 
in F mater (Pastoral). 

.12.10 tnwval reading. 12.15 
Beethoven Symphony 
No 5. in C maxjr Recorded 
late mate at toe Royal 
Festival HaA. 1,00 News 
125 Early Mu 9 C Network. 

The Lute Grotto pay 

gyres, maangais and 
. instrumental works by 
French and Engftsh 
composers. 

2 00 vaucran VWffems kr His 
Tune, Reconstruction of 
eoncartat Queens Haft 
1914 . Delius (to a 
Sinsnar Garden), Wffiams 

(A London Symphony), 

BaxlA Ceton Lunacy; A 
ChnairnasCei* 

Slumber Song, with Sarah ' 
Leonard, soprano. Fust ■ 
o^aocest). Batekirev 
(SyrapnomC POSTC 


[ (from toe New World). 

; 9.15 BerthoW GofcJschmtdt 
' TWo Quartets. Ouartat 

for cfannet and string trio. 
String Quartet No 2. 
moo The SfaJoenandtoe 
Beast by Zinovy Zink, 
read by Michael Pennington. 
10.10 Lenten Choral Music. 

BBC Northern angers. 
Cavafii's Requiem and 
JomeB's Mteerera. 

1120 La Psote Bande. Corsta 
. . (Concerto Grosso, to F • 

major. Op 6 No 9). C P E 
■ Bach (Symphony In C 

major. WQ 182 No 3), Mozart 
(DwertimenKun B flat K 
137) and Franz Beck 
(Stnfonia in D minor. Op 
3 No 5). 11-57 News 

( Radio 2 ) 

News on the hour urns 1.00pm, 
then 3.00, &0Q, 720 and hourly 
from 102a Heacfltnes 820am, 

720, Cricket Thud Test West ■ 
todies v England- Reports from 
Bridgetown. Barbados at 1122am, 
7.02pm, 1002 , 1122. 

420am Martin Stanford (S). 

6.00 Sne Ti'uetov© (s). 825 David 
Jacots(s). 1020 Sounds of toa 
60s |9)..1120 Album Ten* with 
Peter C%m 120pm The 
News Huddbies. Roy Hudd toughs 


Pop Score. Quiz Gama 720 Owaln 
Arwel Hiqhes Introduces and 
conducts music of the masters With 
the BBC Concert Orchestra (s), 
820-8.40 lmervaL Bnan Matthew 
talks to Owain Arwel Hughes. 

920 String Sound (s). IMS Martto 
Keiner (s). 12.05am Night Owls 
Introduced by Dave GTOy (s )- 1 20 
BfflRennefe presents NighirMe 
I to). 320-420 A Little Night Music 

( Radiol 

News on toe half hour until 
1220pm, then 2.00L 32a 520^ 

720,920, 1220 Midnight 
620am Mark Page. 83» Peter 
Powell. 1020 Dave Lee Travis. 120 

? m Adrian Juste (s). 220 My 
op Ten to) Paddy McAioon 
chooses ten all-time favourite 
muse tracks. 200 The American 
Chart Show to)- 520 Saturday 
Live (S) with Richard Skinner. 620 
In Concert (sj featuring Big 
Country. 720 Annemaria Grey. 
920-1220 The Midni^it 
Runner Show with Dixie Peach. 

VHF RADIOS 1 S 2 420am As 
Radio 2 1.00pm As Radio 1. 720- 
420am As Radio 2. 

WORLD SERVICE 

IL00 NewsOask 720 News 720 Twenty 
Pour Hon 7 JO From re Wwttes 7.45 
Network UK 820 News 828 Reflections 

8.15 A Jouy Good Show 820 News 929 
Renew oftrw Brasn nses &15 Trie 
World Today 820 Financial News 9.40 
Look Ahead MS About Bntafei 1020 
News 1021 That's Tran 10.15 Lam Irorn | 
America 1020 People end Pones 1120 
News 1129 News About Snjffln 11.15 
Classical Muse Talk 1220 Rada News- 1 
reel 12.15 Aiwimng Goes 1245 Spons 
Rourta-uo 7.00 News 129 Twenty Four 


: HOUIS 120 Network UK 1.4S Country 

; snw 220 News 221 mum now 226 
Saturusy Special 320 Ratto Newsreel 

3.15 SKurdey Special 420 news 429 
Commentary 4.1S Saturday Special 520 
News 521 Saturday Special B2Q News 

&ro Twem Four hows 9.1S wrers now 
520 Peopiaano Potecs 1028 News 1029 
From Our Oam GQneSDOKMt 1020 N 9 w 
ideas 1040 Reflections 10 A 5 Spons 
RourxMo 1 LOO News 1 128 Commwnry 

11.15 Letterbo* 1120 Hrtsvfe USA 1220 
News t£M News About BMSfo 12.15 
Radio Newsraal 1220 Bakws Halt Dozen 
120 P&r oMhe Weak 220 News 22S 
Rewewd tbo Brash Press 2.15 BreaMas 
at Tiffany's 220 mm Time 320 News 
329 News About BntMT 3.T5 Prom ow 
own Corresponaem 320 My Word 420 
Newsoesk 420 Jazz trom Europe MS 
Letter, tram America tan mas m GMT) 


645 Open Unfverstty. Until 
820. 

8J5 Playschool, presented by 
Kate Copstick 9.15 
Articles of Faith. 
Rediscovering religious 
behef 9 JO Thro is me Day. 
A Palm Sunday service 
trom a viewer's home in 
Sowerby, North Yorkshire. 

10.00 Asian fttagezlne. Are 
Asian chtidrsn ttoiJdren 
under-acteeving at 
school? 1(L30 switch On 
to English. The firat of a 
new quiz game senes 
designed to help speakers 
ot English as a second 
language 1055 Recovery. 
How Wedgwood 
weathered the recession 
(r) 1120 Tete-JoumaL (r) 

11.45 With a Little Help 
from the Chip. How 


disabled people, (r) 
(Ceetax) 

1135 Fanning. PhfipWrtxon * 
reviews the relevant 
changes to fanning 
revetead to the Budget 
12L58 Weather. 

1.00 TMe Week Next Week. 
David Dknbleby examines 
popular capitalism and the 
government’s prospects in 
me aftermath of the 
Government Tfw guests 
include John MacGregor. 
Roy Hattersiey and tan 
Wrigglesworth ZOO 
EamEndara. (rKCeefax) 

300 FUnt Fathom (1967) 
starring Raquei Welch as 
Fathom KarvOL a dental 
assistant and champion 
sky-dhrer who becomes 
embroiled in a plot to 
recover a nuclear device to 
the Mediterranean. 

Directed by Leslie 
Martinson. 

405 World Figure Skating 
Ckamplrjeihflpa The 
Exhibition Gaia from 
Geneva. 

500 Brat Famur. The final 
episode of the drama 
serial and Brat discovers 
something sinister about 
Simon. (Ceefax) 

500 Antiques ROKlshoar, 
introduced by Hugh ScuSy 
from Edinburgh. (Ceefax) 

600 ffews.with Jan Leeming. ~ 
Weather. 

6.40 Songs of Praise for Patm 
Sunday from the Roman 
Cathoac Cathedral of 
Christ the King, LiverpooL ' 
(Ceefax) 

7.1S Hancock's HaH Hour* The 
. tod decides to donate his 
house to the country as an 
historic monument after 

iva/lpaper . ^r) 

(Ceefax) 

7.45 Miss Merpie: The Body on 
toe L3>rary. The third and 
final part of the murder 
mystery and after a trip to 
London Miss Marpie helps 
the police to lay a trap for 
trie toter. (r) (Ceefax) 

8.40 Mastermtod, presented by 

Magnus Megnussoo. The 
specialist subjects are: the 
m 8 and plays of 
Christopher Marlowe; the 
works of Rabelais; the 
operas of Wagner and the 
Ate and times of Edward 
toe Confessor. 

9.10 News with Jan Leeming. 
Weather. 

9.25 That's Life. Consumer 
affairs programme. 

10.15 Hie Rock Gospel Show. 

10£0 Geoffrey Smith’s WorM of 

Flowers. Geraniums and 
Pelargoniums, (r) 

11.15 Secret Nature. The tost of 

vrikS^^aDwet farm. 

1145 Weather. 


BBCI WALE»B25am-920k>- 
SSiti mom 82W15 Sk» Siwad. 
ZOOpaXmo w awnfl Rugby Union 
1015-1055 A view ol ttw Rhonodk: 

Fartn. Hops . . . 1055-1120 Thk 
Rock GospM 1120-1125 Geoffrey 
Sreti's Wono pi Rowers 1US- 
1220 t*nn and wearer SCOTLAND: 

1 1 .15pw-1 120 voyaoBr 1 1 20-1 125 
NewsmtwMmsr MteTNERNRE- 
LANPi UBQpm-OM A Q uM Son of 
span 220-320 Fwm vtow 11A5-VL50 
News and wearer. 

CHANNEL 

920-1020 Los Francais Cnaz-Vous 
120pm Gardens tor AB 120 Video Clro 
125220 Oofcnsn eufttors 220 
Women'* Crass Country Championships 
3.15^20 Hotel 1220am Closedown. 

XYNETEES^g^^, 

XL5S20 Sunday Loolearaund 055- 1 

1020 MomnQ Gk>ry i.Otom Farming | 

OuBoOk 120-220 vfesri You War* 

Here-.? 220 Ameses 015-420 Looks I 

Farmker 420-520 SmaS Wonder 
1120 wn Good Reason 1220 Epflogue. 
caosedowa 

TVS ^ Loridon excepr 82Seai 
J-iS Action Lme 9^-1020 Cartoon 
120pm Agenda 120-2.00 Enw r p T se 
Sou* 220 Are»cs a 15 j.ro Horn 1 

1220em Company. Closedown. ! 


Radio 4 


5£5 am Shipping. 620 News; 
Weather. 6.10 Prelude. 
Music selected by David 
Beffinger (sL 620 News; 
Morning Has Broken. &5S 
weathec Travel. 

7 JJO News. 7.10 Sunday 
Papers. 7.15 Apna Hi 
Ghar Samayvy a 7.4S Bels. 
740 Turning Over New 
Leaves. 745 Weather: 
Travel 820 News. 8.10 
Sunday Papers. 

8.15 Sunday. Retifrous news 
and views. 

850 John Gielgud talks about 
TheSooatyfortoe 
Protection of Ancient 
Buddmgs. Weather, 
Travel 

920 News. 9.10 Sunday 
Papers. 

9.15 Letter from America by 
Abstair Cooke. 

920 Momma Service. 

10.15 The Archers. Omnibus 
edition. 

11.15 Pick of toe Week 
presented by Margaret 

Howard (s) 

12.15 Desert Island Discs. 
Micnael Parkinson talks 

to Shirley WWiams (s) 1225 
Weather. 

1.00 The World this Weekend: 
News. 1.55 Shipping. 

220 News; Gardeners' 

Question Time. 

220 The Afternoon Play: 
Remembrance, by 
GranamReid. 

4JJ0 News: The Food 

Programme. 5JJ0 News; 

TraveL 

5.05 Down Your Way. Brian 
Johnston visits Newport 
on the Isle o< Wight. 550 
Stepping. 555 weatner. 
6-00 News. 

8.15 weekend Woman's 
Hour, HoMignts from toe 
pestwero's programmes. 

7.X Travel; L0R3 Ot Misrule. 
Fmal part (s) 

720 Feedback. Listeners’ 
c o mmen t s about me 
BBC. 

7.45 Streams In the Desert 
Last of six meditations 
for Lent 

too Bookshelf. Katherine 


655 Good MornfogBritoin 
begins with A Thought for 
a Sunday; cartoon at 720; 
Are You Awake Yet? at 
7.25; the What's News 
quiz at 750; Jeni Barnett's 
Pick of the Week at 8.10; 
news headlines at 827. 

820 Jonathan Dimbteby on 
Sunday. 


9- 25 Wake Up London, (r) 925 

Woody and Friends. 
Cartoons 9.45 Roger 
RanqeL Cartoons. 

10- 00 Morning Worship from toe 

Parish Church. 
Casfledawsort. Co 
Londonderry 1120 
Getting On. An 
examination of the public 
and private institutions 
available to care for the 
elderly mentaBy ill 1120 
Natural Resources. A 
disc u s si on on toe minerals 
available In ton's country. 

1220 Weekend World. Should 
General Motors take over 
Land Rover? Brian 
Walden investigates 120 
Polices. 

1.15 International Athletics. 
The World Cross Country 
Championships. 220 
Encounter. Michelle 
Guinness was bom Jewish 
but became a Christian. 
How did her family react? 

220 LWT News headlines 
followed by Rim: The 
Beachcomber (1954) 
starring Robert Newton, 
Glynis Johns and Donald 
Snden. A young British 
Colonial Office official 
arrives to take up his post 
on a tropica) island and 
immediately finds trouble. 
Directed by Muriel Box. 

4.00 I n ter na tion al AttOebcs. 
Further coverage of the 
World Cross Country 
Championships. 

420 Survival A documentary 
about the curlew, (r) 

5.00 Seal Mooting. Part three 
of toe serial about a young 
orphaned girl who is sent 
to live with her aunt in a 
remote comer of the 
British Isles. 

520 Buflseye. 

6.00 Albion Market (Oracle) 

6.30 News with Martyn Lewis. 

640 Appeal by Sir Steuart 

Pringle on behalf of St 
Loyas College, Exeter. 

645 Highway, Sir Harry 
Secombe makes his 
second visit to Exeter. 

7.15 Catchphrese. Quiz game 
show. (Oracle) 

745 FUnt: Reunion at 
Fatiborough (1985) 
starring Robert Mitch urn 
and D&orah Kerr. A 
made-for-television 
romance about a wealthy 
but embittered man with 
two failed marriages 
behind him who returns to 
England from Chicago to 
attend a reunion of his Air 
Force Squadron. Directed 
by Herbert Wise. 

945 News. 

1020 Hot Metal. The final 
episode of toe comedy 
senes set in the offices of 
- - a Fleet Street tabloid. 
(Oracle) 

1020 The South Bank Show. A 
profile of Australian artist 
Arthur Boyd. 

1120 LWT News headlines 
followed by Mapp and 
Lu c i a . Episode three and 
Lucia's Italian looks as if it 
is going to be tested, (r) 

1225 The Madonna and the 
Magdalen The first of 
seven Holy Week 
discussions. Ends at 
12.35b 





k Mae West and W C Fields embark on a fake 
in My Little Chickadee (Channel 4, 2.25pm) 


7.15 Open University. Until 
155. 

220 Rugby SpeciaL Nigel 
Starmef-Smith introduces 
highfights and reports 
from top cup matches 

Inglan dlmcTvv^les . and in 
the league in Scotland. 

320 International Snooker. 

The opening frames of the 
final of toe Car Care Plan 
World Cup. introduced by 
David Idea from the 
Bournemouth International 
Centre. 

4.10 The Great Art Collection. 
The tost programme ol the 
series, presented by 
Edward Mutins. Milton 
Brown assesses Jackson 
Pollock's Autumn Rythmn; 
George Melly examines 
Rene Magritte’s Empire of 
Lights; and Robert 
Rosenbtum reviews Mark 
Rothko's Red, Brown and 
Black. 

445 Music by Heytte. The 
ChlKngtnan Quartet play 
Haydn's String Quartet No 
5 in D from the Op 76 set 

5.10 International Athletics. 

The Wood Cross Country 
Championships from 
Neuchatel. Switzerland. 
The commentators are 
Ron Pickering and 
Brendan Foster. 

550 Inter na tional Snooker. 
Further coverage of the 
final of the Car Care Plan 
World Cup. 

620 The Money P rog ram me. 

This week's edition 
Indudes an examination of 
the reasons behfng the 
rush of take-over bids; and 
a profile 0 / toe 
Businesswoman of the 
Year. Pat Grant 

7.15 Nature. How do 

hibernating animals keep 
watch? And. is Scotland's 
ski-tog Industry being 
over-developed? 

7.45 Previn on Concertos. 
Andre Previn conducts the 
Royal Philharmonic 
Orchestra in a 


performance of 
Prokofiev's Violin 
Concerto No 1. The soloist 
is Salvatore Accardo. 

825 Internat i onal Snooker. 
The condudlng frames of 
the final of the Car Care 
Plan World Cup. 

9.40 Grand Prix. The Brazilian 
Grand Prix from Rio de 
Janeiro. 

10.15 Screen Two: Shergar, by 
BHl Morrison. Stephen 
Ree and NiaH Tobin star in 
this drama based on the 
events surrounding the 
disappearance of toe 
celebrated racehorse in 
February 1983. Directed 
by Nigel Finch. (Ceefax) 

1120 International Snooker. 
Highlights of the final 
frames of the Car Care 
Plan Worid Cup. Ends at 
12.25. 


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SATURDAY MARCH 22 1986 


THR TIMES 


*#* 



I. 


SPORT 






International tours take heavy toll on cricket teams at 


England take 




From John Woodcock, Cricket Correspondent, Bridgetown 


Although England won the 
toss in the third Test match 


•here yesterday and had the 
advantage of fielding 


first, 

their bowlers still Took a 
hammering. In 25 overs be- 
fore lunch West Indies, un- 
beaten in Barbados since 
1934-35, made 113 for one, 
Richardson especially batting 
with irrepressible confidence. 
By mid-afternoon they had 
made 153 for one. 


Botham's head for an all-run 
four, Gower having to chase it 
from cover point- Though not 

S operiy timed, and so partly 
rtuitous, the stroke was an 
immediate declaration of 
intent. 


In the first four overs 


Greenidge and Haynes hit five 
fours, when Gower moved 


lx was a disappointing first 
morning for England, who 
ended it keyed up at the 
prospect of bowling first In 
the event the pitch, though 
still a little damp after a dawn 
sprinkling, was not as lively as 
it can be, or as it might well 
have seemed had England 
been batting, and Botham, 
Thomas and Foster lacked the 
control required of them. En- 
gland also gave Richardson a 
life when he was 55 through 
the offices of the 
usuallyreliable Gooch. 


There was an unusual start 
to the match when Greenidge 
lofted the first ball back over 


Foster from third man to mid- 
off for Botham, Greenidge at 
once slashed a high ball to 
where Foster had been. It was 
that sort of an opening hour, 
though it did bring the wicket 
of Greenidge, beautifully 
caught at second slip in 
Foster's first over by Botham 
diving to his left. 

On' a scorching morning 
Thomas had taken a Thermos 
of iced water out with him and 
left it on the boundary where 
he would be fielding. In his 
first spell he found the slight- 
est error in length was pun- 
ished; in his second he bowled 
several balls that showed what 
life the West Indian fast 
bowlers might have extracted 
from the pitch. After only 47 


minutes, and in the tenth 
over, the 50 was raised. Al- 
though he bad only just come 
in, Richardson was already 
throwing the bat. After a 
dreadful season in the Shell 
Shield for the Leeward Is- 
lands, be is suddenly an 
immensely dangerous 
opponent. 

With Haynes dropping an- 
chor at one end, Richardson 
raced to 50 in 44 balls. Unlike 
Haynes and Greenidge, he 
does not bother with a helmet. 
He batted not as if it was the 
start of a five-day Test but the 
end of a limited-overs innings. 

It was a dazzling display, 
though it should nave been 
ended when he was 55, Gooch 


at extra .coyer putting him 
Gooch 


Trinidadians threaten 
to increase boycott 


Piort-of-Spain (Renter) - A 
Trinidadian anti-apartheid 
group have threatened to step 
np their protests when the 
England cricket team returns 
to Trinidad next week. The 
Committee in Defence of West 
Indies Cricket (CIDWIQ, 
who helped to sponsor demon- 
strations when the England 
squad paid their first visit to 
the island, said they mU go 
into action again for the 
remaining games in Port-of- 
Spain. 


Lyle Townsend, the chair- 
man of CIDW1C, said demon- 


strations during the second 
one-day international and the 
second Test match in Port-of- 
Spain had exceeded the 
committee's expectations. Pro- 
tests reached a peak on March 
4, the day of the one-day 
international, when 400 dem- 
onstrators were involved in 
incidents with police which led 
to 16 arrests. 


down off Thomas, 
seemed to sight the firm drive 
a fraction late and dropped it 
in front of his fore, two- 
handed. By lunch England had 
Emburey on at one end and 
Edmonds at the other, where 
two hours earlier the foster 
bowlers must have been fan- 
cying their chance. 

The first hour of the after- 
noon brought a reduction in 
the scoring rate, Richardson 
batting now as though his 
captain had told him that he 
was not to get carried away. In 
the interests of containment, 
Edmonds dispensed with the 
two close fielders that had 
embarrassed Richardson in 
Trinidad while Foster, who 
had been given only three 
overs in the morning, had a 
steady, unrewarded spell 


Scoreboard 


WEST INDES: R*t Mm 
C Q Gramidga e Botfnm b Foattr - *1 

DLHaynuMtottt 47 

R B fOcbartfsoa not out 82 


Extras 


ToWCferlnkQ 


16S 


H A Gomes, C A Best n V A Rtchrads. 


id play tiie fourth 
one-day International on 
March 31 and the fourth Test 
on April 3-8. 


CIDWIC are protesting 
against the presence in the 
England team of five players 
who have appeared in South 
Africa. 


JfJD^MD MarshaB.J Garasr, M A 


1 PattmontolML 

HULL OF WICKET: 1-34. 

ENGLAND 

G A Gooch, H T Robinson. D I Gcnmr. P 
WRay, A 4 Lamb, I T Bottam, IP R 
Hamilton, J E E m b u rey. P H Ed m o nd* . 
N A Foster, J G Thomas. 


Christchurch (Agencies) ~ 
Albar Bonier said yesterday 
be wodd resigji as Aastrafia’s 
cridket captain ff Ms side 
continued to play second fiddle 
to New Zealand ia their one- 

day series. 


tions on to* eve of today’s one- 
day fixture, the second In the 
four-match series. New- Zea- 
land won the first game , on 
Wednesday, 48 boars after 
their second sdccesstve Test 
rictmy over. Australia. 

“I wBl resign the captaincy 
ff we lose or play badlytolhe 
remaining matches. Pra sad- 
dened by the way things are 
going,’’ Border said- 

Border walked ©at of the 
nets at Lancaster Parfc where 
be had been releasing the 
frustrations of Wednesday's 
lifts with.' some aggressive 
hittinaJtevealinghewonldDot 
be giving Ms astral team talk to 
tire players before today’s 
match, be said: *Tve given np 
tmtfeing to them. Tve satd all 
Tm going to say to . this 
bunch." 

Bonier was angry that some 
of his players were not readt- 
iug strongly enough to defeat 
“1 hope everyone deep down is 
feeling pretty hurt tire, way 
tilings are going and that they 
want to do something abont it. 
They are simply- not a? disap- 
pointed by that loss as they 
should be. If they want to play 
for me and for Australia they 
wffl have to show It hi the next 
three games.'* 

■ He said Ire tiH vnot mind 
losing to a better ride but 
Anstrafiawcreiiottryhiglrard 
enough ' wheir confronted by 
adversity. “When we are 
placed under a bit of pressure, 
wefbhL* ; ; "-S 

Border topfe ever the cap- 


Ai 


The man 


SNOOKER 


Rapid progress by Canada 


By Sydney Frisian 


Canada made a fast entry 
into the semi-finals of the Car 
CareWorld team champion- 
ship with a 5-0 victory over 
the Rest of the World in a 
scheduled nine-frame match 
at Bournemouth yesterday. 

Cliff Thorburn tods the 
Canadians into a 2-0 lead at 
the expense of Tony Drago, 
whose early mistakes proved 
costly. Thorburn made a 
break of 41 in the first frame 
and 54 in the second. Kirk 
Stevens, however, beat 
Omprakash Agrawal less com- 


fortably. The Indian matched 
him for potting ability and led 
22-1 in the first frame before 
Stevens climbed back. Even hi 
the second frame, Agrawal 
had his chance until Stevens 
fluked the blue and finished 
the frame on the pink. Bill 
Werbeniuk completed the 
match with a break of 78 
against Sakchai Sim-Ngam. 

Wales will oppose Ireland A 
in the first semi-final this 
afternoon, Ireland A having 
beaten Ireland B 5-0 on Thurs- 
day. The senior Irish side were 


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INVESTMENT SERVICES 


much too good, but Dennis 
Taylor struggled to subdue 
Paddy Browne in a 51 -minute 
frame. 

Thorburn later criticized 
the selection of the Rest of the 
World team by the World 
Professional Billiards and 
Snooker Association, saying 
they were not up to standard. 
He believed that higher 
ranked players such as SDvino 
Francisco, of South Africa, 
and Dene O'Kane, of New 
Zealand, should have been 
chosen. 

SCORES: Outtter-fbialK Canada bt 
■ Rest of the World 5-0 (C Thorburn bt 
T Drago, 78-23, 65-8; K Stevens bt 
O Agrawal 65-40, 60-43; W 
Werbeniuk bt Sakchai Sim-Ngam 
102-6). Ireland A bt Ireland B, £h) (A 
Higgins bt P Fagan, 81-16, 109-1; E 
Hughes bt T Murphy 66-39, 57-49; D 
Taylor bt P Browne 84-5). 


GOLF 


who threw the bat at England: Richardson emerges as a world force 




tk wcwd Test in Brisbane on 
.tire 1983-84 tour of, the West- 
Indies. He hns; played in 81 
Tests and is the third highest 
toi scorer in Australian Test 
history.- He has been captain 
in IS Tests; "inning three and 
toshi gaeven. _ 


Oosterhuis falls 


on hard times 


From John BaDantine^Vew Orleans 
Times are hard mi the tour good enough if I 
these days for Peter 


OLYMPIC GAMES 


Campaign 

pair 

defiant 


Oosterhuis, the British Ryder 
Cup player whose appearance 
here in the 144-strong field of 
the New Orleans Classic is 
only his fifth of the season 
with 10 events gone. 
Severiano Ballesteros may 
have his troubles with the 
PGA commissioner, Deane 
Beman, and Bernhard Laager 
definitely has worries with 
American immigration and 
tax officials, who want to 
restrict him to J2J days here, 
but Oosterhuis's problems are 
on the course. 

“It’s been just as hard, if not 
harder, than I thought it 
would be,” the California- 
based Londoner said yester- 
day before play started in the 
rain-delayed first round. The 
tournament, like Bay Hill last 
week, ends with 36 holes on 
the final day tomorrow. 


regain 

125." 


my place 


want to 
in the top 


Oosterhuis planted the 
seeds of his problems, which 
have grown to beanstalk pro- 
portions, by finishing 130th 
on the money list list year 
with $41,805 (about £29,000). 
As only the leading 125 quali- 


fy directly into toe all-exempt 


tour, be has had to wait 
sponsors’ invitations and it 
has been nerve-racking. 


Two Birmingham MPs have 
defied warnings and are flying 
into one of the world's trouble 
spots in an attempt to boost 
tbeir dty’s bid to host the 1992 
Olympic Games. 

Denis Howell, who is spear- 
heading Birmingham's cam- 
paign, and Sir Reginald Eyre, 
have ignored advice from the 
British and United States 
embassies in the Peruvian 
capital, Lima, to stay away. 

A curfew has been imposed 
in the dty, where gunfire and 
heavy fighting involving 
guerilla flutes have become 
common place. Bat the two 
men are determined to go 
ahead with their meeting «vi£ii 
the Peruvian International 
Olympic Committee member. 
Ivan Dibos. 

Dibos is one of the Latin- 
Amerfcan members whose 
votes at toe IOC meeting in 
Lausanne in October could 
prove derisive in deriding 
which dty hosts the Games. 


The two men left Rio de 
Janeiro in B razil yesterday 
afternoon with Birmingham 
Olympic officials after meet- 
ings with other South Ameri- 
can IOC members. They are 
doe home on Monday. 

At one time It seemed 
certain that the the Sooth 
Americans would vote en bloc 
for the favourites, Barcelona. 
But indications are that sup- 
port for the Spanish city from 
the Latin bloc is by no means 
u nan imous, and Birmingham 


has sensed an opportunity to 
take advantage. 


“Tve played in five tourna- 
ments, missed the cut in two 
and I bad to withdraw, sick, at 
toe Honda Classic. I’ve won 
$1,203 so for, and my average 
score is 72.53. That's jnst not 


“My biggest disappoint- 
ment was Ming to be invited 
into San Diego, where Tve 
played every year since com- 
ing to the States in 1974. It was 
between myself and Mike 
Sullivan and they chose him, 
together with a number of 
local pros. Both at Los Angeles 
and at the Honda, I got in right 
at the very last moment and 
had to scramble to get there. I 
foiled to qualify in the first 
and withdrew feeling rotten 
after scoring an 80 in the wind 
at Coral Springs. 

“It may become easier to- 
wards toe end of toe season." 


CROSS-COUNTRY 


*v- r 


Budd with spring in her step 


From Pat Butcher, Atfckrids Conrespoiideixt, NCuchfitel 


Zola Budd goes into the 
world championship here to-, 
morrow enjoying toe sort of 
supremacy over her competi- 
tors which can only be halted 
by what is normally referredto 
as an act of God. Maybe that is 
tempting Providence, for the 
last time an appraisal 1 in 
similar terms of Miss Budd*s 
likely victory appeared in- 
these columns, she -wta 
stopped by an act of man (and 
woma n) wh en anti-apartheid 
demonstrators -forced- her off 
toe course of the national 
championship in Birirenhead 
13 months ago. 

She was nevertheless select-, 
ed to represent England in the 
world championships in Lis- 
bon last year, and won the tide 
at her first attempt by the 
impressive margin of 23 sec- 
onds. Neither Cathy Branta, 
of the United States, who 
finished second, nor Ingrid - 
Kristiansen, of Norway, who 
was third, is competing this 
year. 


race is over 5,000 metres, toe 
distance at which Miss jBtidd 
. holds the world track record. 
She admits to feeling stronger 
thro ever after a better winter 
of training, toe proof of .which 
have afteady seen with her 
recent world indoor .best for 
3,000 metres. : 


.. Logically, vSvetlana 
Ulmasova and Elena 
Sipatova, of the Soviet Union, 
Carole Bradford, of Engjand, 
Cornelia Buiki, of Switzer- 
land, toe Tooby twins, from 
Wales, Lynn Jennings, of the 
United States, rod Betty yan. 
Steenbroeck, of Belgium, will 
be riinnmgfar second place: 


But the undulating course, 
closer to British crosscountry 
; than' most world champkrn- 
. ship course in recent years; 
can only be to toe advantage 
of Hutchings and Dave Lewis: 
in their stniggle tbr individual 
\ medals, rod to tor England 
team which, despite bemg the 
best for years, will suHJuiveio 


win a battle 
Ethiopians^ 
Americans. 


to beat toe 
and 



And, despite Miss BudcTs 
pleas earlier this week that she 
does not expect victory to 
come too easily, the. signs are 
that toe coukl win by an erven 
greater margin. The women's 


If Tim Hutchings is lookiiig 
for. a sign which points to 
victory in toe men’s race, he 
need look no further thro this 
town. Neudbatel^ is German 
for Newcastle. And it .was in 
the Geordie capital where 
Huicfaings won the national 
title so nnpresavely three' 
weeks ago. However* it rs/a 
kmg 'time- sifcce^ bring: the 
Engutothampion wasgyirte- 
al assurance ctfb ec omin8 the . 
world champion. There are 6 7 : 
nations contesting this year’s 
event" . : \ V 


The 

Carlos Lopes, 
out wfth mjury, as is 
JonesyoFWales, whose injury 
has also made, him withdraw 
from toe Boston. Marathon 
next month; Alberto Cova; of- 
Italy, is on his best cross- 
country form ever. And, of the" 
other previous champions; 
Defaele Bekde rod Moham- 
med Kedir, of Ethiopia, John 
Treacy/ of. Ireland, whose 
desire to win is so, great that he 
has -been There since last Sun- 
day. ahd Craig: Virgin, of the 
United States, they should -all 
l^withinspriniiag distanceof 
'the lead in the fast kilometre. 
Throwm toe Americancham- 
pfcnvfai Porter, Some Muge, 
of Kenya, and' may the best 

marf wm- 



, :*'t i w 





t.' 

i; - 



• i-. 






The indoor 
unveiling 


& SPORT IN BRIEF 


British sport will know the 
identity of its first national 
indoor arena on Monday 
when the Sports Council de- 
ride which of six applicants 
will receive a £3 milli on grant 
over the next three years. The 
contenders are Manchester, 
London Dome f Royal Vic- 
toria docks), Basildon, Bir- 
mingham. Copthall and 
Milton Keynes, 

The council will also discuss 
the level of their participation 
in the “Action Sport” pro- 



Having a Kerr 

Lincoln City’s 43-year-old 
manager, .George Kerr, .whose 
squad has been hit by injuries; 


has named Jrimsetf in the. 
squad for tomorrow's third 
division home.: game against 
Notts County.' Kerr,- who cre- 
ated two goals in a midweek 
charify game, ' said; “I was 
surprised by my fitness and 
beingih toe squad winput the 
rest of on tfaeir . toes:“ .- 


Kerr picked himself 

Shuler dies 


Slim Spinks 


gramme in conjunction with 
the Manpower Services Com- 


mission. The £6 million 
project is aimed at young 
employed and features 
“motivators*’ who encourage 
youngsters to lake up sport. 

Another scalp Ace Connors 

Brussels (AP) - Broderick 


Philadelphia (UPI) — The 
middleweight boxer, James 
Shuler, aged 26. who last week 
suffered the only defeat of his 
professional career against 
Thomas Hearns, was killed 
when his motorcycle collided 
with a tractor-trailer here. 


Reno, Nevada (AP) - Leon 
Spinks has scaled a major 
hurdle in his effort to take the 
World Boxing Association ju-’ 
nior heavyweight title from 
Dwight Muhammad Qawi fo- 
morrow. Spinks had to trim 
down to the 190-pound limit- 
for tonight’s weigh^ra. • 


Tour boost 


Dyke of Australia continued 
his giant- killing ways at toe 
Belgian indoor tennis champi- 
onship yesterday by beating 
France’s Guy Forget 6-1, 2-6. 
7-6 to reach toe semi-finals. 
Dyke had earlier upset toe 
reigning Wimbledon champi- 
on, Boris Becker of West. 
Germany, and toe Czech, 
Libor Pimek. 


Fort Meyers (Reuter) —Jim- 
my Connors, toe second seed, 
beat Britain’s John Lloyd 7-5, 
6-2 in toe second round of toe 
Florida Classic. Lloyd said . 
Connors' game was as good as 
it was five years ago when the 
33-year-old American was in 
his prime. Ivan Lendl of 
Czechoslovakia, toe top seed, 
defeated Eliot Teltscber 6-4,.6- 


Colombo (Reuter) “.Sri 
Lanka resume their battie'for 
supremacy against Pakistan In 
the Third rod final Test 


starting here today. Beaton in 
toe first Test, Sri 


I-antffl 

levelled the:.' series with an 
emphatic dgfat-wicket victory. 
But their historic success was 
soured by a row wer umpir- 
ing- The tour ' .was saved 
through toe efforts of the two 
boards and an emissary sent 
by Pakistan - " : 


ICE SKATING 





' •% ' -' 
«■ " • V.. 


on 


-r - 


mistakes in top duel 

From John Henness?, Geneva "v 




. . Geneva is steadily under- 
mining . the.- belief toat kt 
skating is predfctaWe. FoDow- 
.ing hartion thesfcateblades of 
the- 14-year-old- Ffeainrfhft 
Gordeyeya^ anff ; ■bet' Soviet 
partner, Scrgd Grinkov; in die 
^irs, ' Brian , Boitano (United 
States) stole away with the 
men’s world championship on 
Thursday night sfeki as he 
put it afterwards, “toe other' 
two were fighting itOUt”. r. 

The othertwo wereAleiaii- 
der Ffideyevj the winner iast 
year for the SovietU^ncm, and 
Brian Orser,- last yeai°s run- 
ner-up fin* Canada aikl-gener- 
afly regarded as the prihdple 
threaf to-fhe RiSsian? - 
; -.The,, partial;: oofiapse v of. 
Fadeyev this time was not all 
that ■ surprising; since he had 
done.mudi'tbe same thing at 
Copenhagen in .January to 
surrender his European tifle to' 
JozefISabpyqk, 
vakia. The Joki 
was.wiihiu, Orser’s graspiwhen 
he came on toe fee. . - r 
.- Certainly BoiEahd hid pef; 
formed with his cilsiOr^r 
composure, excludingpidythe ■ 
loop from, his- ranged of ' 
triplejumps. Even the poni^i- • 


under 


ing- -triple axel was 
: ^Storing controL; 

. Orser r was last of - the con- 
...tenders to skate, in the knowf- 
.edge ..that, as. one super 
muneraiy jwfee put-it^ ‘Tfe 
had only to stand up . to wni w .- 
.'Boitano, . dini<aUy cdirrecl, 

. had notched up four scores of 
5.9, otherwise u wasr5;8 all toe 
way. The target was sadly!, 
witoin Oretr's range but to a 
foige.extont-fi&'repufotion.is 
founded , .on bis total com-, 
mand ofthetripleaxel, which- 
he ; has- perfected to. ..g 
...degree .thai he Jhad 
toe - sobriqrot “Mr ; Tmle^ 
• Axen. But now, . when be 
traded it most, it foiled him — 
or he foiled ft ^ hot tmee but- 
; twice. Canadians, seemed fo 
r^earef ft almost ro affront 

to the Jaws ot nature. , ' ; 
_ SusatiJ^kspn, representing 
-Britain ra the women’s event, 
.withdrew from. the final, suf-, 
fenng fr^ a stomach" tipseL 1 

^ MBEfagab?t% 1 ; - 

•(O^ZO:3.V^PSR}3;0 ; 4, V 


- +- 


• - *i%» 


: 


I 


y.Cr' 

" --Si 




’A -V. 

« . 4