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MONDAY MARCH 24 1986 




ick sale of 


to raise £5bn 


By Philip Webster, Political Reporter 

The Governracnt is prepar- investment and more direct Gc 
mg to £jwe nself a £5 billion measures to bring down soi 
pre-election boost by rushing unemployment by 

through the sale of at least half Ministers involved believe it 
the country’s water that the release of such large m« 
authorities. additional sums win further mi 

Contrary to previous expec- enliven the internal Cabinet 
tations that only the profitable debate over whether the pro- tht 
Thames Water Authority and ceeds of asset sales should be lin 
°? er be reinvested in job creation sys 
sold off before the next general measures rather than tax- ail< 
election, ministers . are now cutting. ins 

rapiffiy drawing up plans to The assets of the 10 authori- the 
dispose quickly of five, and ties are valued at about £27 inc 
maybe six, of the 10 authori- billion. Their total sale will err 
ties in England and Wales. amount to the biggest act of pn 
The; five earmarked for . privatization since the Gov- ■ i 


eariy sale are Thames, whose emment came to power in 
chairman Mr Roy Watts has 1979. 


been one of the foremost 
advocates of privatization. 


In line with the ministerial 
urgency and enthusiasm for 


Severn-Trent, Southern, An- their di sp o s al, the Bill to 
gban. and Northumbrian, privatize them is expected to 
whose assets include the be among the first to be 
Kielder reservoir. introduced in the next session 

Ministers are optimistic of Parliament in the autumn 
that the .sales could realize an with the aim of getting it into 
average of £1 billion each, the House of Lords as soon as 
They hope to float them off in possible in the new year. 


succession, starting The sate of 


swyear. 
half of 


within weeks of the B2I pro- authorities would give the 
vidingfor the privatization of — •• • ' 1 
the industry becoming law in • w* v 

the eariy summer of next year. ■ v ' ; ■:' = '; A : •: f v '• 

^Ministers accept that an ;“ ■ ySfHu^iAKi I 
early summer election in 1987 ; ^ f :■ ' 

would prevent most of the wnitmS 
sales going through in time. ■: I Yorkshire: .< 

But if, as they believe is 7 “ 
increasingly likely, the dec- ; * . < 

lion is not called until 1988, /S 

the .income raised could add -iVCijB - 
considerably to the Chancellor . ;^welsh | i 

of the Exchequer’s scope to get ebi 
down to his 25p standard rate west '-“Vf 
tax target, and.' in their view -T\ I 
more importantly, to allocate - 

far greater sums on capital ['**»'■ • '••:r r :• 


NORTH' 
'• WEST? 


..jf^NELSH 

■SOIXTH^X^ 

WEST^r^i 


^NOR.TOUMBRIAN \ 


YORKSHIRE: 


W0MKKM 


SOUTHERN i 


Tomorrow 

Cutting ■ 
the red tope 




Who reaflv pulls the 
strings in Whitehall? 
Colin Hughes eaters 
a shifting maze of 
bureaucracy in 
search of the power 
points ; 

the Great 
Debate 

Ten years after 
Callaghan's call for a 
rethink on education, 
Shirley Williams 
reviews the progress 


Test blast 
sets off 
US outcry 

From Christopher Xhcunas 
y. Washington 

The United States defied an 
urgent -appeal from more than 
60 congressmen on Saturday 
when it detonated a nuclear 
device in the Nevada desert, 
provoking a swift congressio- 
nal outcry and apparently 
adding to the strain in super- 
power relations. 

It was the first Mast since 
December 28 and since Mos- 
cow announced, more than a 
week agp,ihat it would extend 
its eight-momh-old unilateral 
test ban beyond March 31 if 
America did not test. 

Most US officials 3nd mem- 
bers of Congress believe the 


Government an additional 
source of revenue by cutting 
by more than half the amount 
it spends on capital invesi- 
- ment in the industry, £900 
million in 1986-87. 

.The legislation will convert 
the authorities into public 
limited companies, establish a 
system of regulating them, and 
allow domestic water meter- 
ing trials. The aim is then for 
the companies to be floated off 
individually at what the Gov- 
ernment considers the most 
propitious time. 

- All the authorities chosen 
for early sale are considered to 
have good prospects of finding 
buyers. 

In 1984-85 Thames made a 
profit of £55 million on a 
turnover of £455 million; 
Severn-Trent £45 million on a 
£352 million turnover South- 
ern £18.7 million on a of 
£1563 million turnover An- 
glian £52 mfllion on a £268 
million turnover, and North- 
umbrian, although with a 
turnover of less than £107 
million and a population of 
less than three million, has 
markedly improved its finan- 
cial performance 

When he announced the 
Bill, Mr Kenneth Baker, Sec- 
re laryof State for the Environ- 
ment, told the Commons that 
the authorities were now fit 
and ready to join the private 
sector, bringing benefits to 
customers, to the industry and 
to the nation, with improved 
quality, more efficient service, 
greater commitment from 
staff and more awareness of 
customer preference. 

Smear on 
Thatcher 
alleged 

By Philip Webster. 
Political Reporter 

Whitehall somces yester- 
day disxrassed as “smears” the 
attacks by Opposition polfti- 
rians on the Prime Minister 
after the disclosure that she 
had engaged in share d eal in g s 
in Australia in her own name. 

Dr David Owen, the leader 
of die Social Democratic Par- 
ty, yesterday accused Mis 
Thatcher of bring “amazingly 
foolish” after reports that she 
had bought and sold shares in 
the Australian company, Bro- 
ken Hill Proprietary, making 
a profit of £2300. 

He said in an interview on 
the Channel 4 programme 
Face tbe Press that# ft turned 





t. £ .All,:-. 


* 

* V;i- - 


Prince Charles, his arm m a sling after breaking his finger planting a tree, with Prince 
William in the garden of his Highgrove, Gloucestershire, home yesterday. 

DPP faces Yard’s fury over 
Glenholmes papers blunder 


Sir Thomas Hetherington, 
Director of Public Prosecu- 
tions. and his staff today face 
the fury of senior Scotland 
Yard detectives in a heated 
Whitehall inquest on the legal 
blunder which freed Evelyn 
Glenholmes from a Dublin 
court at the weekend. 

On Saturday Miss 
Glenholmes, wanted by the 
Yard as a Provisional IRA 
suspect in a series of London 
bombings in which three peo- 
ple died, was released in the 
middle of an extradition hear- 
ing after the judge ruled that 
the nine warrants were invalid 
because of a legal technicality. 

As the woman disappeared 
again criticism of the way the 
DPP’s office handled the case 
emerged both in Dublin and 
London where Yard sources 
were at pains yesterday to 
exonerate the Irish authorities 
of any responsibility for 
events on Saturday. 

One senior officer went so 
far as to complain that the 
DPPs office had foiled to take 
the case sufficiently seriously, 
adding: **As far as I am 
concerned we are going to 
have the most God Almighty 
row with the DPP". 

There is anger that the 
warrants lay for 18 months 
without any checks to make 
sure they could be used safely. 


By Stewart Tendler, Crime Reporter 

a. There was also a suggestion br 
i- from Mr Ivor Sianbrook, Con- at 
x servative MP for Orpington, be 
id an expert on extradition and 
id also an opponent ofthe Anglo- th 
al Irish accord, that the Irish a: 
it court should have honoured **j 
n the spirit of extradition and of 
not picked holes in tbe be 
;s warrants. wj 

le Today as Yard officers pre- nc 
\ pare a report on the extradi- it 
n tion senior officers are 
>- expected to raise the events in Ir 
le Dublin and the question of to 


New suspicions 12 

Lea ding article 13 

new warrants directly with Sir 
Thomas. 

Mr Douglas Hurd, tbe 
Home Secretary, is expected 
to make a statement in the 
Commons but yesterday there 
was no one available to com- 
ment from the DPFs office. 

Sir Michael Havers, the 
Attorney General has parlia- 
mentary responsibility for the 
workings of the DPP’s office 
and he may face questioning 
over the Dublin affair from 
MPs. 

Miss Glenholmes owes her 
freedom to cross-examination 
on her behalf in the Dublin 
district court on Friday when 
Del Inspector Joseph Glass, of 
the Yard's anti-terrorist 


branch, was being questioned 
about how the warrants had 
been drawn up. 

It emerged they were faulty, 
the Irish judge described them 
as “bad”, because the 
“information", describing the 
offence and the suspect, laid 
before the London magistrate 
who signed the warrants had 
not been sworn before him as 
it should have been. 

Extradition warrants to the 
Irish Republic are made out 
by a magistrate after informa- 
tion has been laid before him 
by an official, usually a police- 
man. The detective told the 
court that warrants were origj- 
nally issued for Miss 
Glenholmes on October 31 ; 
1984 but the warrants were 
returned to London because 
the Irish authorities warned 
they were defective . 

New warrants were pro- 
duced at Lambeth 
Magistrates' Court in Novem- 
ber 1984 based on the same 
informant bui the detective 
told ibe court the official 
giving the information had 
not been sworn in before the 
court as he bad been the first 
lime. 

The magistrate signed the 
warrant pro forma saying that 
sworn information had been 
laid before him that day when 
in fact it had not. 


Irish say Britain blundered 


By Richard Ford, Belfast 

The Irish Government an- the collapse of another at- 
grily Warned British legal au- tempt at co-operation against 


Soviet Union will now end its race tbe ness t&atri a jHraro thom^ yesterday for the terrorism, 
self-imposed moratorium, oat that Mrs ihaicher naa embarrassing debade border- With Miss Glenholmes 



The weekly prize In The 
Times Portfolio competition, 
doubled to £40,000 because 
there was no winner last week, 
was shared to' Dr Margaret 
Oliver . of Edinburgh and Mr 
George Gayson <£ Dunstable, 
Beds. Saturday's £2flQQ daily 
prize- was iron by Mr G Gray 
of Framlinghaia, Suffolk. 

This week the meekly prize 
of £20,000 will be awarded on 
Friday, rather than. Saturday. 
This is because the Stock 
Exchange wifi he closed on 
Friday ami there will be no 
daily prize for that day. Port- 
folio list page 20; how to {day, 
information service, page 16. 

Tobacco ban 

Tougher health warnings and 
a ten on cinema advertising of 
cigarettes are among measures 
expected in a new code to be 
announced this week 

Page 3 

Museum row 

The Victoria and Albert Mu- 
seum faces a dispute with foe 
Property Services .Agency over 
flood damage 16 

Fraud fighter 

The Government is expected 
to set up a central agency to 
combat fraud Page 2 

On this day 

Golden Miller astounded 
racegoers b\ winning foe 1934 
Grand National by five 
lengths On this day, pageI3 

Hoar News 2-4t U» ■»*»« 

5-r^m |3 

Aaatfc (8 DBfrt 

Jr 8 8eBs*W 14 

ndmrriMts 14 Science H 


American analysts say they 
are likely to conduct tests at an 
accelerated rate to make up 
lost ground and to hasten 
development of new air and 
missile defence weapons. 

After foe blast, delayed by 
15 minutes to test for unex- 
pected winds, the Stale De- 
partment said further planned 
tests would go ahead “to 
ensure foe credibility and 
effectiveness of foe US nucle- 
ar deterrent". 

Congressmen did not know 
until Thursday that foe explo- 
sion was to go ahead. Most 
had assumed foe US would 
not test a gain until ApriL 

Angry senior Democrats 
have renewed their demands 
for President Reagan to re- 
sume negotiations with Mos- 
cow for a comprehensive test 
ten treaty. Senator Alan Cran- 
ston, of California, raid tbe 
blast meant it would now 
appear to foe world that the 
Soviet Union was more inter- 
ested in peace than tbc US. 

The US has conducted 772 
tests compared with Moscow’s 
estimated 564 since the nucle- 
ar age began more than four 
decades ago. ft held 17 tests 
last year, whereas its figures 
say tbe Soviet Union tested 
CootiHsed oa page 16, col 4 


been dealing in shares all tbe 
time she had been in Downing 
Street and dealing in shares in 
British as well as overseas 
companies, the impact would 
be devastating. 

Ten Downing Street said 
yesterday that the Prime Min- 
ister did not wish to comment 
on a private matter. “But we 
can assure you the roles 
governing mftristerial conduct 
are, and have been, meticu- 
lously observed." 

The rules covering the bidd- 
ing of shares by Cabinet 
ministers stipulate that they 
should net have a holding of 
shares which c onstitutes a 
controlling interests foe com- 
pany, or foat they sheald own 
shares that night lead to them 
facing a conflict of interest in 
their particular departments. 
There is ao rule against the 
holding of shares 

Whitehall sources said that 
tite case disclosed could not be 
seen as breaching either of the 
rules. It was opes aad above 

board 

Mr Roy Hatterstey, the 
Shadow Chancellor, said yes- 
terday that the Prime Minister 
must make a foil statement 
today to protect -her own 
integrity”. 


ing on farce that ended with in hiding, a furious Irish 
Scotland Yard’s most-wanted Government rounded on the 


terrorist suspect a free woman. 

But as both Governments 
began inquiries into the ex- 
traordinary events surround- 
ing the extradition case, they 
insisted that it would not 
harm Anglo-Irish co-opera- 
tion on security matters, par- 
ticularly along the Nolhern 
Irland border. . 

Provisional Sinn Fein, the 
political ' wing of foe Provi- 
sional IRA. rsdelighted at foe 
court releasing Miss Evelyn 
Glenholmes. aged 29. a terror- 
ist suspect from West Belfast, 
and the authorities are aware 
of tbe propaganda value to 
Republicans and Loyalists of 


British authorities for failing 



Dukes: 

angry’ 


’extremely 


Venables the target 


Don Howe's resignation as 
Arsenal manager has left the 
London club even more eager 
to secure Terry Vena Wes as 
his replacement. Howe’s deci- 
sion, which came after 
Saturday's 3-0 win over Cov- 
entry and with three months 
of his contract still to run. was 
because Arsenal had made 
little secret of their intention 
to lure Venables from Barcelo- 
na. who have reached the 


European Cup semi-finals un- 
der him. 

Arsenal will have rivals, 
however, should Venables be- 
come available.as Tottenham 
Hotspur, for whom he once I 
played, are also known to be 
interested as would England if 
the Football Association de- 
cide not to retain Bobby 
Robson after the World Cup 
Finals in Mexico this 
summer. 


Sindona death leaves trail of mystery 


Com U Tfayrafrrtc \\ 
A * * * * * 


From Peter Nichols 
Rome - 

The death by poisoning on 
Saturday of Michele S indona 
means me of the mast myste- 
rious personalities in recent 

Italian history has left behind 
him Ms greatest secret — was 

be reordered or did he kill 

himself? 

And there is another secret 
-which may sever be revealed. 
Was Sindona really in posses- 
sion of sock tremendous se- 
crets that his fife, as he 
repeatedly said, was in coa- 
sjapt danger even m a modera, 
higb-seesrity prison? 

. According to Signor Nino 
Sindona, bis sen, the 
fimrow ralso left behind three 


letters in his cefl- They were bankruptcy, of which he had 
addressed to the presiding served five years, 
lodges of the two courts which His death is compared to 

had condemned him, and the ^ ^ Roberto CaM, (be 
pnhGc prosecutor. He said: itafisn banker whose body was 

^ h* IS aSSk^SSSStoySS 

} et ^‘ ^k+ ago- CaM was an associate of 

turned that a letter might have and be, too. departed 

been wri tten to the fangyand ^ mysterio iisly, either 


would eventually be received. 

Sindona was struck down 
two days after bring sentenced 
to life imprisonment by a 
Mflas court for ordering the 
minder of Giorgio Ambrosoti. 
the official liquidator of one of 
his foiled banks. He was 
already serving a 2^ year sen- 
tence, imposed by an Ameri- 
can court, for criminal 


bv suicide or murder. 

Tbe two had close links. 
They had collaborated in the 
world of banking and bad both 
belonged to tbe secret Mason- 
ic lodge Propaganda X which 
was banned as subversive. 


charged by tbe Palermo inves- 
tigators in connection with his 
Mafia ties. 

The secrets be is said to: 
have takoi to the grave are in 
part financial. He is alleged to 
hare helped some 500 public 
personalities to export capital 
illegally. 

Senator Francesco de 
Martino, former chairman of 
the commissioD of inquiry into 
Smdona's affairs, added at the 
weekend a less- known possi- 
bility. He sahPSindona had at 
one time threatened to reveal 
secrets which would have com- 
promised relations between 


Bw t m ■ fa j.toihg -m. 

aid New York. He had been Continued on page 16, col 4 


for the third time to ensure 
that nine warrants seeking her 
extradition were technically 
correct 

The criticism of Britain was 
echoed by the Fianna Fail 
opposition but it also served 
the political purpose of pro- 
tecting Dr Garret Fitzgerald's 
coalition government from 
domestic friction on the sensi- 
tive issue of extradition. 

It also limited criticism of 
the garda (Irish police) whose 
effort lo recapture Miss 
Glenholmes led to shots being 
fired by police in Dublin's city 
centre on Saturday. The 
garda's reaction was seen in 
some quarters as a fiasco but 
vesterday Mr Alan Dukes, the 
Minister for Justice, refused to 
comment as he was awaiting a 
fuff report. 

Continued on page 2, col 5 

5p a gallon 
increase 
on petrol 

By Thomson Prentice. 

Most motorists will have lo 
pay an extra 5p a gallon this 
week in a new round of fierce 
competition among petrol 
companies after the Budget- 

Prices are likely to vary 
widely around the country' 
with some retailers adding foe 
full 7.5p increase in duty 
imposed by foe Chancellor. 
But some of the biggest rivals, 
such as Esso, BP and Shell, 
will support dealers so that 
drivers will be asked for only a 
further 5p and even less in 
some areas. 

Both Esso and BP predicted 
yesterday that there will be 
price wars at foe pumps 

A spokesman for BP 
sai<L“We reckon that on aver- 
age 5p of the full increase will 
be appearing at foe pumps this 
week, and that figure will 
erode as tbe competition in- 
creases. We think the average 
cost of a gallon of four-star 
petrol will go up to £1.76 or 
£1.77 from last week's average 
of between £1.70 to £1.73.” 

The AA reported prices as 
low as £1.58 on Saturday. 


<Hb> 


BL sale review 
after takeover 
talks collapse 

By Philip Webster, Political Reporter 


Ministers will today review 
foe apparent wreckage of their 
plans for foe sale of foe British 
Leyland truck division and 
Land Rover after the break- 
down in talks with General 
Motors of the United States 
on Friday night 

Mr Paul Channon. the Sec- 
retary of Slate for Trade and 
Industry, will report to his 
colleagues on the reasons be- 
hind the American company's 
decision to pull out and the 
prospects for any resumption 
oT talks with them, particular- 
ly on the future of the track 
division. 

GM last Dight issued an 
official statement saying that 
foe Government had told it 
foal its proposal for the acqui- 
sition of BL's commercial 
vehicle business would not be 
supported. It described the 
move as "unfortunate". 

But after a confusing week- 
end there was still a reluctance 
among ministers last night to 
accept that foe last had been 
seen of GM. 

The reason the Government 
could not accept its proposal 
was because ministers, mind- 
ful of backbench opposition, 
wanted a deal that would 
guarantee British institutions 
retaining control, even in the 
long-term. 

Friday's meeting was in- 
tended to flush out GM's final 
negotiating position, but they 
were unable to accept the 
Government's terms, which 
fell far short of what was on 
offer when they were original- 
ly invited to talk about a 
takeover. It was at that point 
that Mr Channon told foe 
negotiating team that foe 
Land Rover talks could not 
proceed on their terms. 

Whether the dramatic re- 
turn to Detroit by the GM 
team meant that it had pulled 
out of the takeover talks for 


good was still the subject of 
some doubt among ministers 
yesterday. There is obviously 
a hope that the Americans are 
still interested in a deal on the 
track division, which could be 
merged with GM's Bedford 
commercial vehicles subsid- 
iary. The possibility of them 
eventually coming round to 
the idea of a minority stake in 
Land Rover is not ruled out by 
some ministers. 

Although GM would appar- 
ently have accepted the estab- 
lishment of a supervisory 
board to ensure that it com- 
plied with assurances on pro- 
duction and jobs, it was made 
dear to them on Friday that 
that was not sufficient. 

The weekend's events have 
clearly made it less likely that 
there will be a final decision 
on the future of the companies 
this week, although Mr 
Channon will still make a 
statement to MPs, probably 
tomorrow. 

The loss of any GM deal 
would be a severe blow for the 
Prime Minister, who had put 
her personal weight behind it. 
MPs who have opposed the 
GM involvement were re- 
maining predictably cautious 
until foe pull-out is con- 
firmed. 

Mr John Taylor. Conserva- 
tive MP for Solihull, said there 
were two interpretations. The 
company was either involved 
in a last minute bit of brink- 
manship, or it was hoping that 
the Government would be 
more conciliatory. “I hope 
that the Government will not 
be." he said. 

Mr John Smith, the chief 
Opposition spokesman on in- 
dustry. said the talks should 
never have been started. “It 
has now. for the Government 
come to a humiliating end, at 
least I hope it is the end," he 
said. 


Fears for 2,000 jobs 
at Swan Hunter 


By Derek Harris, 

Swan Hunter, the Tyneside 
shipbuilder sold two months 
ago by British Shipbuilders to 
a management group, called 
an emergency board meeting 
in a Durham hotel yesterday 
amid growing fears over jobs. 

Tbe Swan Hunter board 
fears that a contract worth up 
to £120 million for two vessels 
for the Royal Fleet Auxiliary 
may go to tbe state-owned 
Belfast shipyard of Harland & 
Wolff. 

This is despite written guar- 
antees from the Government, 
given at tbe time of the buy- 
out. that foe Tyne yard would 
have do unfair competition 
from nationalized businesses. 

The contract represents 
more than half Swan Hunter’s 
future base workload, leaving 
possibly 2.000 jobs at risk 


Industrial Editor 

The yard has been working 
closely with the Ministry of 
Defence on the design of the 
vessels and pet in a tender, 
believing it was firm favourite 
to pick up foe order. But a 
lower tender from Harland 
was followed by a request to 
Swan Hunter to submit anoth- 
er 

At the Durham meeting, 
still going on last night, the 
Swan Hunter managers were 
expected to decide on the new 
tender. 

The management team be- 
lieves that if the order is lost 
they will be forced to lay off 
design staff, with a threat of 
1.000 redundancies by next 
Christmas out of tbe present 
workforce of 4,500. There 
might be a further 1.000 
redundancies a year after that 


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Government to 
group big guns 
in all-out war 
on fraudsters 


By Philip Webster, Political Reporter 
A high-powered organiza- traditional worked separately 


lion charged with the detec- 
tion, investigation and pros- 
ecution of serious fraud is 
expected to be established 
soon by the Government 

Mr John Macgrtgor. the 
Chief Secretary to the Trea- 
sury, is heading an inter- 
departmental government 
committee, which is likely to 
report soon after Easter. It is 
thought likely lo recommend 
the unified organization as the 
latest in a series of measures to 
combat the financial fraud- 
sters. 

This would combine the 
resources of the various agen- 
cies that at present handle 
fraud cases; the police, the 
Director of Public Prosecu- 
tions. the companies inspec- 
torate of the Department of 
Trade and Industry and the 
revenue departments of the 
Treasury. 

It would be staffed by 
lawyers, accountants and in- 
vestigation officers, all trained 
in the appropriate skills. 

A study on whether such an 
organization should be set up 
was one of the recommenda- 
tions of the fraud trials com- 
mittee under Lord Roskill. 

Key ministers with depart- 
mental responsi bihtes accept 
Lord RoskilTs arguments that 
such an organization would 
allow fewer serious frauds to 
escape prosecution by slipping 
through the net of a series of 
bodies working in the same 
field. 

They believe it would lead 
to more effective prosecution, 
with scope for reducing delays 
in bringing cases to triaL 
. Ministers see practical diffi- 
culties in bringing together 
organizations that have 


but believe they are surmount- 
able. The proposal is known to 
have backing within the DTI. 
the Treasury and among the 
Government's law officers. 

If it wins the expected go- 
ahead it wiD be included in the 
main criminal justice Bill in 
the next session of Parliament 

But another, even more far- 
reaching proposal of the 
Roskill committee, the ending 
of jury trial in complex fraud 
cases, is understood to have 
caused considerable differ- 
ences within the Government 

Although the Roskill rec- 
ommendation for so-called 
fraud trials tribunals, compris- 
ing a judge and two lay 
members, is believed to be 
supported by the Treasury, the 
Department of Trade and 
Industry and Lord Haflsham 
of St M ary le bone, the Lord 
Chancellor, other key minis- 
ters with responsibilities in the 
area are known to have strong 
objections on political and 
legal grounds. 

Roskilfl proposed that the 
two lay members should be 
given an equal vote on the 
verdict and could if necessary - 
demonstrate their indepen- 
dence of the judge by outvot- 
ing him. 

But the judge alone would 
have respa □ sibil ty for sentenc- 


ing and dealing with questions 
oflaw. 


Senior ministers believe 
there are big difficulties inher- 
ent in such an approach and 
believe that the removal of 
jury trial in any field could 
prove to be highly unpopular. 

A derision has to be made 
within the next few months, 
and opponents of the change 
are confident of winning. 


Swoop on 
jockeys in 
tax probe 


By Thomson Prentice 

' Leading jockeys, trainers 
and racehorse owners have 
been visited in a co-ordinated 
operation by Customs officers 
investigating alleged tax irreg- 
ularities in the racing industry. 

Teams of VAT officers from 
London, Reading and East 
Anglia arrived without warn- 
ing at the homes and stables of 
the jockeys and pothers, last 
week. Their ■ investigations 
concern ' bonus payments, 
made by owners, which may 
not have been declared in 
individuals* tax returns. 


' The Customs and Excise 
raid yesterday that it had been 
making inquiries for some 
weeks. “The investigations are 
continuing. Nobody has been 
charged with any offence", it 
said. 


Large sums, possibly rang- 
ing into millions of pounds in 
total, could be involved in the 
payments, which industry 
sources said yesterday have 
been common practice. 


Ministry 
caution on 
new town 


By Hugh Clayton 
Environment Correspondent 


Secondary' 
i has told i 


The Ministry of Agriculture 
has issued mild reservations 
about plans to bo3d a new 
town for 14,000 people- at I independent 
Tfllingham Hall in Essex, W 
they fall far short of the 
outright opposition that local 
opponents of die town had 
hoped for. 

Almost all of the 761 acres 
OB tite green belt site east of 
London consist of unspoiled 
open farmland. 

The ministry says in its 
latest comments to local coun- 
cils that it would prefer the 
homes to be buOt on derelict 
industrial land south of 
TUlingham HalL 

It does not want farmland to 
be lost at Tflliagham Hall “if 
no need for development is 
established". Consortium De- 
velopments, the group of com- 
panies that wants Co bofid the 
sew town, insists that buBding 
should be allowed there. 

The appeal continues 
today- 


Britain should chalk up a Channel tunnel win 


By Michael Baily 
Transport Editor 


Britain's tmmefiers expect 
to be well over on the French 
side when the two contractors 
meet muter the waters of the 
Channel some time in 1989. 

That b not because Britain 
is necessarily better at trnmel- 
Kng, but becaase France's 
tmueBess wffl meet difficult 
conditions near the French 
coast, while Britain’s team 
expect a dear ran in ch a lk 
mart throughout perfect for 
tunnelling. 

As a resalt Britain expects 
to build about 22 km (13^ 
miles) of the underwater tun- 
nel compared with France's 
IP km (11.8 miles). 

This wiB be the only notable 
breach in the equality insiste d 
ob in inter-governmental nego- 
tiations. Both teams (five con- 
tractors poking np a national 
team on each side) are working 
foil oid to make a start 
immediately after tire treaty is 
signed in about May next year. 

Britain's Translink team 
(Balfour Beatty. Certain, Tar- 
mac, Taylor Woodrow, and 
Wimpey) is inviting tenders 
for the massive machinery 
needed to bore the three 
tunnels. 

Quotes are expected world- 
wide, with British, German, 
American, and Japanese com- 
panies perhaps favourites to 
build the six machines each up 
to 10 m (33 ft) long and cost- 
ing np to £20 mfltion. 

The first wiD start cutting 
an 8 km (5 mOe) land tunnel 
from the Cheriton terminal 



near Folkestone to Shake- 
speare CtifL sooth of Dover 
where the tusnef mB cross the 
coast about 50 m (164 ft) be- 
neath the waterline, then carry 
mi out to sea in a gentle curve. 

As shown on the accompa- 
nying diagram, Britain's team 
wifi be working in chalk marl 
throughout; a homogenous 
nateraL impermeable, strong 
bat soft, and consistent 

About the same time, the 
French team will be 
gling, by a geological quir 
through upper and grey chalk. 


which lend to be fissured and 
let water in. necessitating 
special ftwHteHing techniques 
to keep it oat, and ga alt day, a 
heavy expanding material that 
puts pressure on the tunnel 
and requires extra-strong 


The tunnel boring machine 
(TBM) is a long tube with a 
cutter head at the front that 
rotates to gouge out the hole, 
and conveyor belts or sluices 
behind to carry away spofl. 

Also In the machine is an 
erector arm that puts in place 


concrete or cast-iron lining 
panels behind the cottar ns 4. 
proceeds; and a control room 
where the operator works the 

piafhfaf- 

Only when boring Is fin- 
ished and the TBMs removed 
can railway equipment be 
installed in the timneL 

There is the perennial ques- 
tion of meeting is die middle; 
Accidents have happen ed, b ut 
tmmeUers reckon to get within 
two or three inches of target 
after 20 r km (12 A oaks) of 
tunnelling. Out fa tile open 


they take hearings and 
sure angles, to get the align- 
ment 


What it; itt splte of these 
aids to navigation,' -&e two 
sides meet A inches askew? 
“Yon offer your resignation,” 

Ross MacKeazie, the engineer 

heading Britain's team, says. 


But they do not reaBy expect 
It to happim. Instead, the first 
trains look Ose speeding to 
Paris .on time, late.to jj99ti 
through the biggest hole man 
hasever made in Europe's soil. 


Teachers 
keep up 
strike levy 


By Ronald Fanx 
Scottish teachers are to 
continue paying a strike levy 
of up to £15 a month to be 
prepared for further action if 
the independent review on 
salaries and conditions foils to 
provide an acceptable long- 
term settlement 
That is the strongest indicar 
tion that the teachers’ accep- 
tance of a 15 percent increase 
over two years and the prom- 
ise to end their examinations 
boycott do not mean a 
climbdown on other demands. 

A Scottish secondary school 
teacher said yesterday: “Ev- 
eryone regards this as an 
interim pay deal but the levy 
will continue because very few 
teachers expect that the fight 
has ended. 

“Neither side is committed 
to accepting the findings of the 
independent inquiry and a 
reference'by Mr Riflahd (Sec- 


retary of State for Scotland) to 
having the findings subject to 
financial constraints on the 
country frankly does not bode 
well. Thai looks to me like a 
lettiorclause.”^ - .. _ 


dation has told the Govern- 
ment that its increased 
funding for the introduction 
of the new 16-plus examina- 
tion 

that the planned 
start for the new courses 
should be deferred. 


is still inadequate and 
ined September 


Heart death 


David Ken ward, aged sev- 
en, of Great Barr, Birming- 
ham, died yesterday a day 
after a heart transplant opera- 
tion at Harefidd Hospital, 
north London. 


Glenholmes extradition 


Difficulties of a simple systei 


The general extradition ar- 
rangement between Britain 
and the Irish Republic under 
which Evelyn Glenholmes 
was held is usually one of the 
most straightforward legal op- 
erations of its kind. 

But there are exceptions — 
and one covers political ac- 
tivities, making the task of 
getting IRA or I NLA suspects 
to Belfast or London .fraught 
with difficulty. 

The first step in extradition, 
according to Mr Ivor 
Stanbrook, Conservative MP 
for Orpington and co-author 
of the standard English legal 
work on extradition, is the 
issuing of a warrant by one of 
the stipendiary magistrates 
normally sitting at Bow Street. 

The warrant does not re- 
quire prima fade proof of the 
offence supported by the evi- 
dence of witnesses as required 
by some foreign and Com- 
monwealth countries. 

All the magistrate needs is 
information on oath from a 
police officer that a particular 


By Stewart Tendler, Crime Reporter . 

political, an offence under 


Die warrant is sent to 
Dublin where it can be en- 
dorsed by the Commissioner , 
deputy commissioner or assis- 
tant commissioner. 

Once the wanted person has 
been arrested he or she must 
be brought before a local 
court The suspect must be 
given an opportunity to ap- 
peal to the Irish courts to show 
why they should not be 
extradited. 

A suspect may not be 
extradited, or fife warrant 
even endorsed, if it can be 
shown that the offence was 


military law which is not an 
offence under ordinary crimi- 
nal law, or a revenue offence. 
The offence on the warrant 
must correspond with a simi- 
lar offence in the Republic and 
must be indictable or one 
providing for six months im- 
prisonment on' summary 
conviction. 

'The appeal against extradi- 
tion goes to foe tocalDistria ' 
Court : and may- ;foen pass 
through the Irish judicial sys- 
tem to the Irish Supreme 
Court Much of the prosecu- 


tion case in Britain may have 
to be presented to foe courtsto 
back tbe.warranL .. 


IRA and INLA appeals 
have successfully revolved 
round defences foal foe acts 
laid out. in foe warrants were 
political /acts. The European 
Convention on Terrorism al- 
lows for “the extradition of 
suspects- between si gnatori e s 
irrespective of foe political 
character of foe offeme and 
Eire has recently signedthe 
convention, although it is not 
yet in operation. ‘ 


Irish blame Britain for blunder 

Continued from page 1 


The Irish government is 
concerned, that foe freeing of 
Miss Glenholmes will be: 
viewed in Britain as evidence 


sible for the errors that led to court in foe momm&rearrest- 
Miss Glenholmes being freed, ed Jess than an hoar later and 
Mr Dukes said: “The re- freed again in the afternoon, 
sponsibility lies with foe peo- Her first brief period of free- 
pie who drew up foe warrants do™ was accompanied ^by 

^ infoe first place. They have a . srenes MreOTfotag_foe_Key> 

that the republic has hot foe i setibf.prbcedur^i^ ’ stone Cops . * ; / a _ 

.polglcal will to extradite peo- ‘reeratefordfowiagup warrants. - He£* 
pie for alleged terrorist of this kmd^d' they were nd!f prominent memoerS'«f'5Hin 
offences. adhered to.” The word Fein, managed to girt her into 

Government sources said “furious” was. a restrained a waning special 

offence has' been committed last night there was no lade of uterm for foe Way Hefelt '*! Si ri 1 bimicff deuxttV^-HfffOff foe 

- - -- . ..rill knViV^uOC nnlA Rriwi ~ c a Wirt-rtutto- hnnner and mof m an attempt 


Landa naified psKofiis sought WB .burirwa gno Britain- to ; ^ extremely at«ut;foe , &Ct . _ 
for -the -crime in foe Irish ensuie-foat the accuracy of... that, we ^ng m®H)d feith,- .topoevC 


Republic. The. application is 
made by foe Director of 
Public Prosecutions and docu- 
ments are drawn up for the 
Irish court 


warrants. 

Mr Dukes accused the Brit- 
ish authorities, and in particu- 
lar the Director of Public 
Prosecutions, of being respon- 


found ourselves acting oir foe 
basis of warrants that were 
defective,” he'said.- 
On Saturday, Miss 
Glenholmes was freed by the 


The events' were described 
by Dr Midiael Woods, Irish 
opposition spokesman.. ..as 
having brought “international 
embarrassment? - 


New head 
tries Trust 
challenge 


Enter 


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A porch can add tremendously to 
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|& 




:«3 





By John Young ; 

Dame Jennifer Jenkins, 
who becomes chairman of foe 
National Trust today, might 
well hare resigned herself long 
ago to being simply foe wife of 
a famous potttkiaa. 

Being married to a man who 
has been Home Secretary and 
Chancellor of die Exchequer 
in Labour governments, depu- 
ty leader of die Labour Party, 
President of the European 
Commission and founder-ar- 
chitect of the Social Demo- 
cratic Party, might seem 
demanding enough. - 
. It was politics that brought 
her and her husband together; 
she was ch ai r man of- foe 
Cambridge U ni v ersi ty Labour 
Qub as a wartime md ergradu- 
ate at Girtoa, and they met at a 
Fabian summer sdwd at 
Dartinetou HalL But in recent 
years foe has pursued her own 
interests, notably in historic 
buildings and urban renewaL 

In 1965, while teafoing 
history and current affairs at 
Kingsway College, Holborn, 
she was appointed chairman of 
foe Consumers' Association, 
which she held for 11 years 
before mo ring to foe chair- 
manship of the Historic Bond- 
ings Council for England. 

Dame Jennifer concedes 
that conservation has come a 
long way since its low point at 
foe end of the 1960s. The 
public has been persuaded to 
see it as more than just a 
question of presaving old 
bufidings for theft own sake, 
and to appreciate foe benefits 
in terms of better bossing and 
a more attractive environment. 



Dame Jennifer m new chairman of finst 


But in the past three years 
reductions in public spending 
have meant a decline « pin, 
particularly in foe inner cities. 
Urban areas bnOt 100 yean . 
ago need important repaks, 
bot no money is bang - made 
available. 

. The inner cities are a long 
way from what is convention- 
ally foougbt of as National 
Trust territory. Does she foiik 
it has a role to play there? 

“I think we must be very, 
careful not to take on tasks for 
which there are other existing 
organizations. The conserva- 


tion of whole areas requires fer 
jpeater resources than we have 
at our disposaL 
“But I think we aright pay 
more attention to small build- 
ings, as they -do in Scotland. 
There is a tendency in: En-. 
gland to suppose that only the 
large and spectacular ' W 
interesting.**' 

One ounpaigp which ; she 
wiD continne to wage is against 
the imposition of value-added 
tax oa building .repairs while 
new bnDding5 are exempt. She 
considers this a direct disin- 
centive to conservation. 


Drama to 
return at 
Old Vic 

ByDavidHewson 


Serious drama is tb return 
permanently to foe Old Vic.- 
probably under the artistic 
directorship of Jonathan 
Miller. . 

Mr Ed Mirvisch, the Cana- 
dian entrepreneur who re- 
opened the theatre in 1983, is 
abandoning the present policy 
of using it for ax-week rims of 
plays and musicals from out- 
side production companies. 

Instead, foe Old Vm wiD pay 
for its own productions, for an 
undisclosed sum, ami is- nego- 
tiating witfrl# MUte-'fafa 
year ofsenqusplays beginning 
m"'t98B.“ 


Ofoer' 

directors are expected to join 
the * «>mpany. . V V. ' 

Since the theatre reopened 
under Mr Mirvisch’s owner- 
ship it has beeu.the temporary 
home of everything fh>ra clas- 
sical Creek tragedy to the 
Sandy Wilson musical. The 
-Boyfriend, and three. For each, 
foe foeiatre guaranteed a per-, 
centage of income but left foe. 
production of the shbw to its 
outride, backers, . 

- Its most serious- produc- 
tions, notably the recent dra- 
matization of Pride ~ and. 
Prejudice, have attracted foe 
largest audiences. ; 

Dr Miller, is at present m 
New -Yoik; directing : Jack 
Lemmon . in A Long Day's 
Journey Into Night, and- was 
unavailable for comment. . 

The theatre does : not expect 
to conclude details of its 
future artistic programme un- 
til ApnLbutit might include 
works by playwrights sndi as ■ 
Ibsen and O'NeDL 


Word-men tie in battle 


By onr Crossword Editor 

For the first time in the become Leeds champion. 
Collins Dictionaries/Times " * 


Crossword Championship, a 
tie-breaker was necessary. 

At the Leeds Regional Fi- 
nal, held at foe Queen’s Hold, 
Leeds. Mr P J Meade and Mr 
G P Conway had solved foe- 
four puzzles in an average of 
just under 10 minutes each. 

Mr Meade, aged 46, a com- 
puter scientist at GCHQ, 
Cheltenham, and a four-times 
national finalist, solved the tie- 
breaker in nine minutes to 


Mr Conway, zged 25, a van- 
driver from Blackburn who read 
electronic engineering at Lon- 

- don Universityrhad twice foiled 
by one mistake to make foe 

- national final, to which be now 
goes forward. 

. Mr_N_ Robinson ,.aged 43, a 
computer software specialist 
-from Whitley Bay, was third, 
taking an average of 12.5 min- 
utes a puzzle, and Mr R M 
HartilU aged 36. manager of the 
Forum Theatre. Billingham, 
for the 


was fourth. Both qualify 
national fi nal 


Britons ahead in chess 

By HarryGtfombek,Cliess Correspondent - 


At the end of round nine m 
the GLC London Chess . ChaJ- 
Jengp at the Great ' Eastern 
Hotel, the Leicester, intend 
tional master. . Glenn Flcar, 
looked likely to be.sharing foc 

er grandmaster, MforayQian 1 
dler, at 6Vi points. . ; 


jgear . snd Chanffier are 
folio wed . by 



Rear’s round game 
against Jon Speelman was 
adjourned in a positioii where 
he had a clearly won rook and 
pawn ending. - 


pauBK 

JFfcaris due lomeetiiisco- 
feader, .Oiandler, iB the n ext 
round 




■P 0-visa«ijtatrirl»anftc±5ri 

Ptejtea - 


Alliance 
may merge 
after poll 
says Owen 


Dr David Owen yttteiday 
co&xdcd . foe possibilitif; of a 
mdger between foe Ubetals 
and . foe Social Democratic 
Party, describing it as afegjii- 
mase qnestKra to be debated 
by- foe parties after tite pext 


In rcmarkff Winch Liberals 
west regarding asa riightshift 
in Dr Oww's poritioa, fog 
SDP leader said, may well 
be .that we will merge", and, 
**1116 tongerywigo on working 
together and do not adtieye 
pi^oitional repraentaiion I 
think foe forces are moving 
you towards a m«Ber*V 
Mr DavidSteel, foe.Uberal 
leader, Jast rnonfocamedown 
in jBmmr of ameiger after foe 
dfectioa. Dr Owett has always 
been opposed, believing that 
the two praties should operate 
as separate entities. Yesterday, 
on foe Cbminel 4 programme. 
Face the Press, he said a 
mager was not absdltftriy 
inevitable or necessary, al- 
foough it nagfat happen. 

- “When theparty is genuine- 
ly one party we will mow it,* 
be ' said, adding -- that : there 
would be a full debate about a 
merger after the .1 election, 
which was the right time for it 
Dr Owen also indicated that 
differences betweenvfoe two 
parties <rii defence jnay not be 
settled fry the next oftetion. 
Tfemamara ofimnzroversy 
6ver Tolaiis, - which the 


is 


iSDR, 'aUhot^h: against' Tri- 
dent. is prepared to replace 
while the Liberals are noL 
Dr Owen warnedr“Wfrjiiay 
not dose that gap ” Bui he 
said be thought the two parties 
would fight the election on an 
agreed defence policy, for the 
period of the next^ govern- 
ment 1988 to 1993. 


Whitehall 

efficiency 

chiefiqnits 


- -t - 


THe Civil Sbrvarit at the 
head of the Government's 
EfficSenCy Unit ft, leaving, to 
lake up a private sector job. 

Mr lan Becsley. aged 43. is 
to taken irianagemott consul- 
tancy post with Price Water- 
house. - . 


Hfc departure ruses ques- 
or the 


tions. about the future of 
iririt, one of the few surviving 
monuments within Whitehall - 
to fo^Gowramenfs .earlier 
CT^^^^Jiff^fortning^thc 

. BeCsRy fr^ been an 
active supporter of continuing 
the Financial Management 
IniSat&& : fris lraYujg' JiSiH 
remove a Civil Service advo- 
cate of. efficiency dose to the 
heart of the Government. • 

The unit was set up in the 
Cabinet Office to carry on the 
work of Lord Rayner in 
scrutinizing Whitehall 
managemeuL 

Its small team ‘Of Civil 
Service high flyers and busi- 
ness, people on secondment 
are supposed to carry dot 
cross-departinetrt . Studies on 
such things as psapcrWorfcand ; 
puTthasing of suppfres. r • 

IBtrt foe unit appwrs rerimt- 
ly to have, run into Whitehall, 
resfttmrce 'tp new methods. 

Spectrum, page ^ 10 


Print leader 
charged 
at Wapping 


- - Mr Tony Dubbins; the gen- 
eral -secretary of foe National . 
Gr^tiucal AasodatioD, is to 
an^rarin^ court chaiged with 

obstrnaingahighwaynearMr 

Rupert'* Murdoch’s-' -Wapping 
print plane - " .. ' :V - i 

Mr DUbbinswas duirgRi cm 
Saturday after dirturbancesr 


outside the plant which was 
producing the News cf : the: 


The Sunday 


World: . * nd 
Times, . ; 

Scotland Yard said 53 peo- : 
pie WerearrestecL'and charts 
were broughi against 45 of 
them, mostly for raxblic order 
offences: '. 

They are due to: appear in 
court from April 1 onwards. 
Mr Dobbins, who lives in 
Bedfordshire, is exported to 

appear before Thames magfr 
trafes.on Apri!3. " 


Labour lead in 
electfon poll 


A Gallup- poll published by 
the Sunday Telegraph riiowed 1 
foat 43.5 per emit, of foe - 
electorate would vote Labour 
. 'in the Fulham by-election and 
35-S per - cent would ;voie= 
Conservative. The SDP Alt 1 ' 
ance was iff third placfij with 
20^i per.craL. . . V ... 1 , ; V 

-A poll ; published in-: foe 
Dfdly Express on Saturday . 
gave Labour , 39' per cent* 
Conservatives' 3S; per' cfenV 
All ia nce 25^ per 7 cent and 
others 1 per cent *7 *. 


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THETIMES MONDAY MARCH 24 IQRfi 

THE TIMES MONDAY MARCH 24 1986 


ie 


HO ME N E WS 


Tobacco firms agree to 
ban on cigarette 

in cinemas 



A ten^ori cinema adverts- 
mg o f curettes,' six new 
oealtfi i warnings which include 
for the first time specific 
warn i* n s s that smokin g ran 
cause heart disease, hmg can- 
cer and emphysema, and a 
freeze in real terms on tobacco 
companies* advertising are ex- 
pected to be announced this 
week. 

The new voluntary agree- 
ment With the industry ^ 

separate agreement on sports 
sponsorship is being negotiat- 
ed - also provides that adver- 
tising for sponsored sports 
events must obey the provi- 
sions of the ordinary advertis- 
ing code. : 

That is understood, to mean 
that advertisements for the 
events should no .longer link 
brand names to success in 
sport, manliness, courage, dar- 
ing or healthy outdoor 
activities. . . 

A new committee to moni- 
tor the advertising agreement 
is also to be sex up under an in- 
dependent chair man L but 
composed half of representa- 
tives from the industry and 


half from the. Department of 
Health.:' 

At present complaints about 
breaches of the advertising 
code ■ are handled chiefly 
through the Advertising Stan- 
dards Authority but anti- 
sir] old ng groups complain that 

the authority has failed to 
enforce the spirit of the code, 
although the code provides 
that it should be followed in 
the spirit as well as the letter. 

The ban on cinema adver- 
tising will affect only X-rated 
films as cigarette advertising is 
already banned, for olher cate- 
gories. The • new ^health 
warnings are expected-to come 
from the chief medical officers 
as ministers believe a govern- 
ment health warning is seen as 
authoritarian and is rejected 
by some young people. 

Health warnings on poster 
and press advertisements are 
also to be increased marginal- 
ly in size. 

The changes are unlikely to 
satisfy those campaigning for 
a ban on all cigarette advertis- 
ing- and promotion, such as 
the British Medical 
Association. 


Doctors are increasingly 
critical of the evidence that 
sports sponsorship and adver- 
tising reach children. Scien- 
tists and medical specialists 
believe there is now good 
evidence that passive smok- 
ing — inhaling other people's 
tobacco smoke — carries 
health risks. 

A conference in Oxford at 
the weekend called for em- 
ployers and employees to take 
action to create no-smoking 
policies at work. 

One estimate is that passive 
smoking causes about 200 
lung-canccr deaths a year in 
the UK. Evidence is appearing 
that links passive smoking to 
fatal heart disease, the confer- 
ence of leading specialists in 
the field sakL 

Apart from such long-term 
risks, passive smoking has 
been shown to cause eye 
irritation, headache, nasal 
symptoms and coughs in 
adults. Symptoms are found 
in children, together with 
higher rates of bronchitis and 
pneumonia where the parents, 
particularly the mother, 
smoke. 


Mortgage ra^te cut 
to boost prices 

By Christopher Warmaa, Property Correspondent 


The announcement of 
mortgage rate reductions by 
most of the big building 
societies, after the Budget ana 
bank rate cut last week, has 
been greeted with delight by 
leaders in the property mar- 
ket, who see it as an important 
boost in confidence for 
housebuyers. 

At the same time h is likely 
to lead to a jump in prices. “It 
wiD give great encouragement 
to the. spring market, tradi- 
tionally the time to buy," Mr 
David. Robinson, vice-chair- 
man of the Royal Institution 
of Chartered Surveyors’ estate 
agency committee. 

He expected the change to 
have an effect on prices, 
although not immediately. “It 
will have a more direct effect 
at the lower end of the market 
but will gradually work its way 
through the whole range of 
prices.” he said. 

Within a day of the Budget 
which encouraged a reduction 


in interest rates, the two 
biggest building societies, the 
Halifax and the Abbey Na- 
tional, had reduced their rate 
for a repayment mortgage by 
0.75 per cent to 12 per cent 
with a 1.25 per cent cut for 
endowment mortgages, re- 
flecting the ending of the 
differential rate for endow- 
ment mortgages. 

The JJuflding Societies As- 
sociation met on Wednsday 
and decided, without a formal 
announcement that a reduc- 
tion of 0.75 percent in the rate 
would be “appropriate'*.. 
Shortly afterwards, the Na- 
tionwide, Leeds and Britannia 
followed suit” . 

On an average 25-year. 
£20,000 mortgage, the reduc- 
tion means a saving of about 
£5.50 a month. After tax relief, 
the monthly repayment wifi 
drop from £168.65 to £163.12, 
and on endowment mortgages 
the net cost will be reduced 
from £154.59 to £142.00. 


Solicitors 
acton 
care cases 

Solicitors acting in child 
care cases should have com- 
pulsory training and certain 
i¥ iiwhwnm experience, the Law 
Society said in its response, 
published today, to the Jas- 
mine Bedtford inquiry. 

The society said it had taken 

r steps to improve advocacy 
standards in child care cases 
and last year set up a specialist 

panel of soliritars to act in 
such proceedings. 

From the end of this year, 
solicitors on the panel must 
have at least 18 months of 
advocacy experience, have 
conducted at least five contest- 
ed chfid care cases, represent- 
ing either children or parents, 
and have attended a practical 
training course. 

The Law Society called on 
the Department of Health and 
Social Security to set mini- 
mum criteria on experience 
aqd t raining for local authority 
solicitors who conduct care 


In the year to March 31, 
[983, about 34^00 children 
rare taken into local authority 
are, a quarter of whom were 
involved m a quarter of these 
rtven3e court proceedings. 

The society is also reconsid- 
ering its rese lection procedure 
or the 1,000-strong panel, 
those membership has to be 
enewed every three years. 

It will issue new guidelines 
yr phocfyinfl that the solicitor 
s peting for the child rafter 
ban the parents. 



chain to 
go organic 

Organically-grown fruit and 
vegetables will be available for 
the first time in all 128 
Safeway stores throughout 
Britain from tomorrow. 

Mr Tony Combes, a 
Safeway spokesman, said the 
public was now prepared to 
pay up to 30 per cent more for 
the high quality produce. 

“Demand exceeds supply. 
The public want to buy the 
produce for the taste, health 
and environmental reasons.” 

Organic grower; and co- 
operatives in Kent, South 
Wales and Scotland have been 
supplying Safeway on a trial 
basis for two years. 

The chain’s largest supplier, 
Mr Donald Cooper, of 
YaJding. near Maidstone, 
Kent, said: “We can't achieve 
the same high yields as ordi- 
nary produce but I believe the 
future holds great promise*" 


Rescuer 
dies in 
pot-hole 

By Peter Davenport 

A member of > cave rescue 
team was lolled yesterday in 
an operation to find two miss- 
ing pot-holers trapped in a 
flooded underground system. 

Mr David Anderson, aged 
27, died in an accident in 
Rowten Pot, part of the 
Ktegsdale Master Cave sys- 
tem beneath the North York- 
shire Dales, one of the most 
popular pot-holing networks 
in the country. 

He was the first member of 
the North Yorkshire Cave 
Rescue Organization to be 
killed in an underground oper- 
ation during its 50-year 
history. 

The organization is one of 
the moist experienced in the 
world. Mr Anderson, a bache- 
lor and an electrician, of 
Clflpham, North Yorkshire, 
bud been a member for five 
years. 

Police later said that Mr 
Anderson, an underground 
search controller, and two 
folMgnw were crossing an 
underground waterfall when- 
he slipped and fell. 

“The pressure of the water 
was such - that. . the two men 
roped to Mr Anderson were 
nimble to pifll' bins out,” a 
spokesman for North York- 
shire police said 

The two cavers from the 
East Anglia University Caving 
Club who had gone missing 
were named as Mr Nigel Crisp 
and Mr Ian Kitchen, both aged 
23, of York Street, Norwich. 

They had taken shelter to 
avoid the rising Doodwaters in 
the caring system and when 
discovered apart from being 
wet and cold, were unhurt. 

• Two schoolboys on the 
Duke of Edinburgh Gold 
Award Scheme W to be 
rescued from .Cramond Island 
in the Firth of Forth after gale 
force winds blew their tent 

a**?* 

The boys, Sean Reid, aged 
15, of Cameron Way, 
Knightsbridge, and Michael 
Blade, aged 16, of Sedgebank, 
LadywelL, both Livingstone, 
f ^whiaiL, used torches to send a 
muse code distress signal. 


Hunt for three rapists 


Three rapists were being- 
hunted by detectives yester- 
day after attacks in Essex and 
Buckinghamshire. 

In two of the incidents, the 
women were raped in front of 
members of their families. 
The police do not believe the 
crimes are linked. 

Essex police have 100 detec- 
tives working on the two 
attacks which happened five 
miles apart in Basildon and 
South Ben flee L 

In the first, on Wednesday, 


a mother, aged 35, was raped 
after disturbing a burglar. She 
was hit on the head with a 
hammer at the house at 
■Thundersley, South Benfleet. 

The second attack took 
place on Saturday morning at 
Prtsea, Basildon. The rapist 
attacked after a boy had got 
into bed with his mother and 
father. 

The third attack took place 
50 miles away in Slough. 
Buckinghamshire, on Satur- 
day morning. 

The other victims, page 11 


40 years of BBC in Russian 

News that Ivan can trust 


he BBC External Services 
today be celebrating 40 
rs of broa dc as ti ng to the 
iet Union in Russian — 
I so will their estimated 14 
ion listeners from Denin- 
l in the West to \Tadivos- 
m the East. 

be BBC Russian Service 
man y firsts toils credit. It 
the first to broadcast an 
rriew in Russian with Al- 
tder Solzhenitsyn after he 
expelled from the Soriet 
on. Last month it broad- 
fte first interview with 

Krify Sbcharansky to lus 
w countrymen when he 

,ed is IsraeL . . 

Russian Service, like 
afire BBC External Ser- 
j, is funded by a grant-w- 
from the Foreign Office, 
ft decides in which ba- 
ps the BBC Should broad- 

The rest, including the 
an of ft* mosey and the 
vial content of pro- 


By a Staff Reporter 
grammes, is determined inde- 
pendently by the BBC 
manag ers and programme, 
editors. . 

In hs 4® years, the Russian 
Service has expanded from 
threeto 48 staff, to become one 
of the largest foreton language 
services in the. BBC. Its broad- 
casts have increased to 46 
hours a week and its pro- 
grammes range from news and 
current affairs to science, sport 
and the arts. 

It has a successful pop 
music, programme, which at- 
tracts a lively postbag, and a 
religious programme, which is 
the only transmission regular- 
ly exempted by fte Soviet 
authorities from jamming. 

The service has . been 
jammed intermittently for 24 
years, always in response to 
political developments. It be- 
gan m 1949 when the cold war 
was at its height and was lifted 
in 1956 when Khrushchev 


visited Britain. Jamming was' 
reimposed during the Hungar- 
ian nprising later that year and 
immediately alter the invasion 
of Czechoslovakia in 1968. 

The current period of jam- 
ming began in August 1980 
daring the rise of the indepen- 
dent trade union. Solidarity, in 
Poland. 

Jamming is expensive, and 
the Soviet authorities have 
tended to concentrate on the 
larger cities to make it as cost- 
effective as possible. 

The BBC & prized by Soriet 
listeners for its coverage . of 

international affairs and for its 

reporting of events inside the 
Soviet Union. 

The reaction of Anatoly 
Shdraransky’s mother when 
she beard that her son had 
crossed into West Berlin is" 
typical: she knew it was true 
because she had beard it on 
the BBC 

Leafing article, page 13 



A member of an all-women team lends a hand on the assault course in a military skills 
contest to find the top Territorial Army team from the greater London area, held near 
Brook wood, Pirbright, Surrey, at the weekend (Photograph: Peter Trievnor). 


Hospitals 
enter the 
world of 
commerce 

The medical electronics de- 
partment of St Bartholomew's 
Hospital medical college is 
going commerdaL 

Need for additional, income 
to finance research and devel- 
opment has led to the setting 
up of Medici Developments, 
an independent company 
which will initially manufac- 
ture three products: Ultra- 
sound therapy units and and 
interferential therapy ma- 
chines for use by physiothera- 
pists, plus a range of radio 
pills. 

Twenty years in develop- 
ment, the radio pfll is a small 
radio transmitter, designed to 
be swallowed, which measures 
either pressure or pH levels 
within the body. 

" In the case of a patient with 
a suspected stomach nicer, the 
radio pill offers a preferable 
alternative to examinations by 
tube. The pQI is tethered by a 
string and swallowed. An X- 
ray shows when it has reached 
the relevant part of the 
patient's anatomy. The string 
is then tied off and attached to 
the patient's face or ear. The 
piU can then remain in place 
for fte 24 hours necessary to 
make an accurate diagnosis. 

Signals are picked up exter- 
nal of the body by way of a 
“belt” type aerial which are 
then decoded by a microcom- 
puter controlled receiver. 1 
• A big regional teaching 
hospital has started taking in 
washing. 

The 1,288-bed Gty Hospi- 
tal in Nottingham is offering a 
cut-price laundering and dry- 
cleaning service from its laun- 
dry - the biggest hospital 
laundry in Europe. 


Bethell takes airlines 
to court over fares 

By Michael Bafly, Transport Editor 


Terror danger ‘greater 
at privatized airports’ 


British Airways* is facing 
legal action by Lord Betheli's 
Freedom of the Skies cam- 
eign over “monopolistic** air 
ires to Amsterdam. 

He alleges that an illegal 
pooling arrangement between 
BA and KLM, the Dutch 
airline, prevented him from 
enjoying the cheap £49 “early 
saver'' London- Amsterdam 
return that the airlines and 
their governments introduced 
two years ago. 

Lord Bethell says that when 
he tried to buy a £49 ticket at 
Heathrow last year he was told 
none was available. Instead. 


he was sold an open-ended 
Eurobudget return (current 
price £138). When he came to 
return from Amsterdam no 
Eurobudget seat was available 
and he had to buy the higber 
priced Gub class ticket. 

Lord Bethell claims that the 
BA-KLM agreement restrict- 
ing early-saver fares to a small 
proportion of total seats on 
the route is contrary to EEC 
competition laws. 

BA is seeking to bave Lord 
Betheli's claim struck off but 
the airline declined to com- 
ment yesterday on the 
grounds for that action. 


Britain's airports will be 
more open to terrorist attack if 
they are privatized, airport 
staff said yesterday. 

.The 10 trade unions repre- 
senting British Airports Au- 
thority employees claimed 
private owners would be 
tempted to cut corners on 
both safety and security. 

“The drive to maximise 
profits byt the new owners will 
make for lower standards*', a 
statement said. 

A bill to privatize the seven 
BAA airports is going through 
the committee stage in Parlia- 
ment. It will affect the future 
of Heathrow, GatwicIti.Sian- 


stead. Glasgow, Edinburgh, 
Prestwick and Aberdeen. 

Mr Tom Graves, chairman 
of the joint union committee 
raid:' “There is nothing in the 
proposed legislation to ensure 
the same level of public safely. 

“The sell-off will mean that 
fewer security staff will be 
employed in checking pass- 
engers' luggage and there will 
not be the same investment in 
sophisticated electronic equip- 
ment. 

“Once you run airports not 
for the public good but for 
profit, then looking after peo- 
ple becomes a . secondary 
consideration." 


Refusal 
by doctor 
affects 
thousands 

By Pearce Wright 
Science Editor 
Twenty-five thousand peo- 
ple are being denied a new 
medical test that might indi- 
cate if they have inherited a 
debilitating disorder. Special- 
ists in genetic disorders at the 
Churchill Hospital, Oxford, 
want to use the method to help 
early diagnosis of 
Huntington's chorea. 

They have bfcen refused the 
help of Dr James Gusella, a 
biochemist at the Massachu- 
setts General Hospital. Bos- 
ton. in the United States, 
whosefteam devised the test. 

Behind the rejection lies a 
difference in approach to 
medical ethics between British 
and American doctors. But the 
issues are wider than one 
disease. Comparable tests 
coveringmosi inherited disor- 
ders are being developed. 
They all raise similar ques- 
tions 

The dispute between the 
British and American special- 
ists has erupted into an un- 
precedented and bitter public 
exchange of letters in the 
scientific journal. Nature. 

Professor John Edwards, 
professor of genetics at Oxford 
University, and three col- 
leagues from Churchill Hospi- 
tal, suggest that the scourge of 
syphilis would have endured 
much longer if Dr August von 
Wasserman. the bacteriolo- 
gist, had used Dr Gusella's 
arguments to delay making 
available the his test. 

The Wasserman 'test was 
not a perfect method of detect- 
ing every case and Dr 
Gusella's refusal was because 
his discovery would not give a 
guaranteed ’ correct answer. 
The Oxford doctors are pio- 
neers in genetic counselling to 
individuals and families with 
anxieties about inherited ill- 
nesses. Their intention was to 
include the new test. 

Dr Gusellasays that his 
method has been available for 
basic research to 30 laborato- 
ries in 10 countries but his' 
hospital's ethics committee 
would not allow him to supply 
a copy for clinical diagnosis 
before any symptoms of the 
illness are apparent. 

Dr Gusella says that his 
group feels a moral responsi- 
bility to prevent the prema- 
ture clinical use of his method. 
Professor Edwards says: “We 
are not inexperienced and 
many members of the families 
we are trying to help are. 
responsible and intelligent.” . 



KAREN SMITH, 18 
By saving C30 a month with Moneymaker Phis. 
Karen could look forward to a stun of more than 

£7,100’ 

when shefc 28 years old. She also gets immediate 
life insurance cover of 13.250 far the next 10 years. 


JOHN SMITH, 45 

John and Eve arc saving for a cottage in the country. 
For a monthly investment of £100 with Moneymaker 
Phis John could receive a nest egg of more than 

£23,800’ 

in 10 years time. In the meantime he gels immediate 
life insurance ewer of £10.887. 


EVE SMITH, 37 
Eve’s savings of £50 a month wifi give her life 
insurance cover of £5.482. And in 10 years time, over 

£ 12 , 000 ’ 

could be hers to help buy that cottage in the country 
they’ve always warned. 


STANLEY SMITH, 65 
Stanley is retired. He can afford to pay £20 a month 
to give his great grandchildren a pood start in life. 
He could boost his savings to over 


£4,300 


with Moneymaker Plus and still have life insurance 
cover of £1,422 for the non 10 years. 


I P YOU'RE LOOKING for a savings plan that reaps 
real rewards, there are few better ways, lodo it than 
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SEE WHAT YOUR INVESTMENT COULD BE WORTH 


HIGH PAYOUT FOR ALL AGES 


Whatever the amount you weh to save (between £.10 
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after 10 years. Linder e u r i c n i legislation, this sum 
will be paid loy^/mt/faUpnimaliiixa. And your 
savings are in die safest possible hands - the Sun 
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teams have been looking after policyholders’ money 
for over 275 years. 

Josr think, your final sum could be £5.000 . . . 
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TWO FEATURES FOR EXTRA 
PEACE OF MIND 


Unhfce many other forms of saving. Moneymaker Plus 
gives you the benefit of life insurance from ihe nwmrm 
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Moneymaker Pins has another special feature. Arid 
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ABSOLUTELY 




FOR A MONTHLY INVESTMENT OF £20 

Pre&o 

rtr 

ndAu- 

Mai* 

at Age 

•Mw. ' 

Female 

Guaranteed 

Sum 

Assured 

Annual 

Bonuses 

Capital 
Bonus 
at 66*o 

Total 

Projected 

Maturity 

-Value* 

Immediate 

Life 

Cover 

18-28 

18-32 

£2,129 

£1.130 

£1*405 

£4,664 

£2,129 

30 

34 

2.128 

1.1W 

J.4N 

4.662 

2.128 

35 

w 

2.123 

1.127 

1.401 

4,651 

2.123 

40 

« 

im 

1.121 

1.593 

4.624 

1111 

45 

49 

2.089 

1.109 

1.379 

4.577 

1080 

M 

54 

i06i 

1X^4 

1.5w* 

4JI5 

2.041 

55 

59 

2,034 

1.080 

1.542 

4.156 

1.912 

M 

M 

2.012 

l.Onfl 

1.328 

4,408 

1.670 

05 

to 

1.975 

1.049 

1.304 

4.328 

1.422 

70-7*1 

74-79 

1.975 

1.049 

1J04 

4.328 

1.166 

FOR A MONTHLY INVESTMENT OF £50 1 

18-28 

18-32 

£5.492 

£2.916 

£3.625 

112.033 

£5.492 

30. 

34 

5.489 

2,915 

3.623 

1.1027 

4.489 

35 

39 

5.476 

2.008 

3,614 

11998 

5,476 

40 

44 

5.445 

2.891 

3594 

11.930 

5.445 

45 

49 

5J88 

1861 

3.556 

11.805 

5.383 

5fl 

51 

5.319 

1824 

3511 

Il.f>54 

5166 

55 

59 

5.250 

2,768 

3.4*5 

11.503 

4.935 

to 

M 

5,198 

. 2.760 

3,431 

11,389 

4,315 


to 

5.107 ’ 

7 7|2 

JJ71 

11.190 

3.678 

70-79 

74-79 

5.107 

1712 

3.371 

lf.190 

3.014 

"These protected values assume thai our current rates «’ bonus are maintained. Bonuses depend upon 
future profits, therefore, bonus rates cannot be guaranteed. Currently annual bonuses are 3_.75A> ot 
the Guaranteed Sum Assured and 7.5% of cMsting bonuses. Our current Capita] Bonus rale is 66°r of 
the Guaranteed Sum Assured. 


far better alternative, however, is to apply for a loan 
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SEND OFF FOR A NO OBLIGATION 
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LATEUHE- 


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APPLY BY 4th APRIL 1986 

tp Claim lor 1 1 .ur M-<nvuruU:r Plu-.prtut aid sour FfrER laart.-ciraucr.’Iii 


.m xn Mfif. ip< 


Forename* fa fuflx. 


2. iNt n a u r "YES* or*60~ id each quest ion bdoun 

II pn are under SO and ran muhnilh anr «cr 'NO' w the 4 qommns. 
>iu are pujamerd lobe accepted u«b tmlonher cuesuons or medical 
nominal ion II jouansuer ‘YES" loan} qucuion. please jiurh detail* 
You may Mill be accepted- 


i uitfa Co im CM each ■nnntiL 


kd&ea- 




Age. 


.Darenl Birth. 


- / ~ /— 


Name cd Broker. 1 Vpan. d any. 


ta* Haw you any reason lobche-re you are mein good heal'h* | 

(N Are joo reenvatj*. or tare you received 1 intiim the im 
twelve months, any medical ueaictcat : 

(cl Do vou participate te any haurdTj'. .ccopaucm a 

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HOME NEWS 


THE TIMES MONDAY MARCH 24 1986 


Swedish anger over 
Sellafield puts 
£100m deal at risk 


The Swedish government is 
close to making a formal 
protest to Britain about radio- 
active discharges from the 
Sellafield nuclear power sta- 
tion after evidence that fish in 
Swedish coastal waters have 
been contaminated. 

The Swedes will consider 
cancelling their £200 million 
contract to have spent nuclear 
fuel from Swedish power sta- 
tions reprocessed at Sellafield 
unless they receive reassur- 
ances of tighter controls on 
waste disposal at the Cumbria 
plant. 

Scientists in Stockholm 
have confirmed that fish off 
the western coast of Sweden 
have been contaminated more 
by radioactive waste from 
Sellafield than from adjacent 
Swedish nuclear stations. 

The Swedish minister with 
special responsibility for ener- 
gy and the environment, Mrs 
Birgitta Dahl, voiced her 
government's anxiety in an 
interview with The Times in 
Stockholm. 

“There have been alarming 
reports about the impact of 
discharges from Sellafield on 
our environment since 1983 
and we are becoming increas- 
ingly concerned," sbe said. 

“Our own experts believe 
there are grounds for criticiz- 
ing the British procedures and 


By Thomson Prentice 

we feel that something should 
be done. 

“We are following very 
closely what is happening at 
Sellafield. If the situation does 
not improve we will have to 
reconsider what to do with the 
Swedish spent fuel which is 
awaiting reprocessing there." 

The House of Commons 
environment committee re- 
port on radioactive waste, 
published two weeks ago, 
described Sellafield as “the 
largest recorded source of 
radioactive discharge in the 
world” and the Irish Sea as 
“the most radioactive sea in 
the world" as a result 

Such a situation created 
anxiety in other nations, the 
report said. “We found, for 
example, that the Swedes 
could identify radioactive 
traces in fish off their coast 
being largely attributable to 
Sellafield, greater even than 
contamination from adjacent 
Swedish nuclear power sta- 
tions." 

Mrs Dahl is due to make an 
official visit to Britain in 
September. Sources within her 
ministry said she would not 
hesitate to raise the Sellafield 
issue with the British Govern- 
ment then if sbe is still 
dissatisfied. 

The Swedish government 
has come under increasing 
pressure recently from opposi- 


tion politicians and environ- 
mentalists to register com- 
plaints over Sellafield. 

Sweden is committed to 
phase out nuclear power in the 
year 2010- 

Scientists monitoring radio- 
activity at Swedish nuclear 
plants have compared the 
levels with those leaked in 
recent months at Sellafield. 
"In one case the level was 
1,000 times higher than we! 
have recorded here." one ex- ; 
pen told The Times. 

Sweden does not reprocess 
its own spent nuclear fuel and 
has 140 tons stored at 
Sellafield. where it is due to be 
reprocessed in the early 1990s. 
“We are making sure that this 
Swedish fuel is not being 
processed there at the present 
time," Mrs Dahl said. 

• Anti-nuclear campaigners 
from the environmental pro- 
test group, Greenpeace, are to 
be allowed inside the Sella- 
field plant to meet its workers. 

Mr George Pritchard, the 
campaign director, will visit 
the plant on March 31 with Mr 
John Large, a consulting engi- 
neer, who has carried out 
independent surveys of the 
nuclear industry. 

• A hundred anti-nudear pro- 
testers held a Palm Sunday 
vigil .yesterday outside the 
plant and threw more than 
1 ,000 daffodils over the fence. 




Mr HmwM J enner , a naturalist, with a red kite injured when 
it crashed into a North Sea oil rig off the Norfolk coast. 
Workers on the Penrod 85 rig found the bird, which is com- 
paratively rare in Britain, covered in o3 and blind in one eye. 
After cleaning it, drey paid £800 to charter a helicopter to fly 
it ashore, and have since sent money to feed it 


Council’s 
Euro road 
guide 
‘could kill’ 

A road safety, guide few 
; motorists going to the.Owti- 
; neat '■an ting information 

which could LSI, the Royal 
' Society for the Prevention of 
Accidents says. 

Qnncfl officials who drew it 
ap have muddled up the road 
safety signs and got the con- 
version from kilometres to 
miles wrong. 

The guide. Drive Right m 
Europe, drawn up by the 
Labonrcontrolled West Mid- 
lands County Council, has 
been distributed in 
Biraingham’s Bull Ring and 
in and near the city’s New 
Street railway station. 

Miss Janice Cave, for the 
society, said yesterday: ‘‘The 
mo dtte'Sj? .between the two 
'signs (mud lead' motorists-tn 

be killed in head-on collisioas. 

The mistake in the speed 
limits tell motorists they can 
drive at 86mph on roads, 
outside Spanish towns, where- 
as the limit is 56mph. 

“Motorists are told to drive 
slower than they need to in 
French towns and on Norwe- 
gian motorways." 

The signs muddle involves 
one saying, “give priority to 
oncoming vehicles" and an- 
other saying “end of no- 
overtaking". 

Mr Don Jones, chairman of 
the road safety subcommittee, 
said: “We do not know wheth- 
er this is a mistake by the 
printers or by officials.” 


School governors: 


bigger voice in 


re ports in the first of two articles. _____ 

. -j c 



IF YOU WANT TO WIN, 

YOU HAVE TO BREAK THE RULES 




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■ - — 


Political domination by lo- 
cal authority appointees wffl 
end and the largest schools 
will have five parent gover- 
nors, the same number as 
those appointed by the local 
education authority,- undertbe 
Education Bill published last 
month. At present schools 
have one or two parent 
governors. - 

Sir Keith Joseph, Secretary 
of State for Education and 
Science, says the reform could 
mean more discipline, less 
peace studies but perhaps 
more pressure from parents 
for spending on education. 

The Bill aims to. give par- 
ents the opportunity to be 
more involved in the life and 
work of their children’s 
schools through the governing 
body's annual report, and an 
annual parents' meeting; The 
Government dearly hopes 
that the reform will raise 
educational standards arid 
make schooling more respon- 
sive to the community." 

- Governing bodies are spe- 
cificalfy grven responsibility 
for the conduct of the school 
arid the power to consider the 
local authority’s policy on the 
curriculum and how it should' 
be applied to their schooL 
. That means they will be able 
to question what is taught and 
how. It is the governors 1 job to 
write a statement of general 
principles on school discipline 
within which the head teacher 
is to take action. 

School governing bodies are 
not being given new functions, 
but their powers axe given in 
de^ for the first tinre in faiw. . 
That may hdp to givejmrent 
governors .more confidence_. 
about the kind of issues they 
may raise at governors 1 meet- ' 
ings. But some of the muddle 
about responsibilities is likely 
to continue and many parent 
governors will continues fed 
intimidated by the system. ■■■: ’ 

Some parent governors who 
spoke to The Times did not 


. want to be named for fear of 
getting into trouble with their 
school or authority. The Inner 
London Education Authority, 
for example, teBs parentsto 
contact the press o ffice before 
making statements to the 
press One parent governor of 
an Bea primary school said 
she felt she was the token 
parent on the governing body. 

“I fed that at the moment 
parent governors are thrown 
in at the deep end", she said. 
“When 1 was elected 1 had ooi 
idea of what was involved- or 
what my role would be.” Now, 
after 18 months, she is begin- 
ning to find her feet but is 
worried that other parents do 
not know of her existence. < 
Mrs Daphne Mullins, par- 
ent governor of a middle 
school in Bedfordshire since 
last September, found the job 
similarly intimidating. “That 
is something I have had to’ 
fight and tell myself that !• 
have as much right to be there 
asranyone dse’Ysbe sakt 
. “But I have one important 
which Is that f need 
to speak out on issues that are 
important and representative 
of other parents at foe same; 
time as being supportive of the 
head. Sometimes there is at 
conflict there.'" .\ 

One such issue for Mrs 
Mullins was corporal punish- 
ment to which sheds opposed. 
The bead and most governors 
were in favour:. $6 corporal 
.punishment was.kepL 
The parent governor of an 
outer London primary school 
complained that his authority^ 
did not allow parent gover- 
nors to see - theriusdves as 
re prese n t a tivnsjof parents but 
as r g rresema tives of foie 
- school; { 

... “It is. ludicrous" belaid- 
“Youcanaotdoanythinfr We 
senioffa letter to foe educa- 
tion authority about the 
reached pay dispute, but we 
never heard anything.” 
T om orrow: What parents 


Provincial sates spotlight 


Aten and Jim were fee twin 
pilfers on which fee success of 
Friday’s furniture sale at Col- 
liers, Bigwood and Bewiay, 
Stratford-upon-Avon, rested. 
They bought or underbid 
about one m three of fee. lots 
or offer. They followed fee 
porter roud, sizing up every 
piece as .it came up forsak, 
and fee auctioneer called their 
names as they bid. , : 

Thatisbowlknowdiemas 
Alan nod Jim; Alan declined 
to:. give. hfc surname, saying 
that he did not want any 
complications wife fee '-tan 
man and Jim was qnite cordial 
and happy so dSsdose-feat he . 
had an antiques shop in 
Chipping Camden. He (fid not 
boy nearly as modi' the 
furni t u re as Aten, but he had a 
particular interest in textiles. 

Agronpoffiveorsfacdeakats 
chatting in oik corner -of fee 
room was periodically ashed 
by/ the auctioneer to stop - 
wasting time and start bid- . 
ding. None of them liked fee 
idea tf Rafting. to .the. press. 
One paid thermos! surprising 
price of fee safe at £1,023 .fin-.a . 
little .. oak roffir wkh two 
crudely carved florettes on the 
frost, paneQedsides andkmg- 
ishlegs; it was all rather 
; ffaHug..japait and only - 29in. ' 
wide,but presumably a gon- 
ine sevCoteentb-century item 
at that price. 

At tbe other end of the 
spectrum, : Alan secured an ' 
Edwardian rash-seated chair, , 
fee back formed of two oak 
uprights and two cross bars, at 
£1.10- There woe two hmgW 
from nails by the door, and I 
got the second one at £3 JO. 
The extra £2. 

There were no deaids pio-. 
pared to bid against Alan, but 


he was prepared to bid against 
fee. All the same, I got away 
wife a very jolly openwork fish 
carved front a coconut, heaven, 
knows when, but not much” 
after 1820, at £1 without a 
single counter bid. 


The serious money was 
being paid for nineteenfo- 
century, and even Edwardian,? 
famitnre in reasonably good 
condition A set of four heavy* 
Victorian feather chavs wife- 
carved mahogany frames 
made £440, a flashy eternized 
.card table with bronze inlay - 
£330. and a glazed wabrat 
bookcase £550. 

The chairs turned out as 
tiieap as or cheaper than I 
forecast last week. Tire two 
matching Edwardian ‘rash- 
seated oak chairs made £5 JO 
and Jim got the set of three 
mid- Victorian circle backed 
chairs at £72^60, rather than 
fee £90 1 predicted. 

The weQ-fffoportioiied and 
well-made commode ri»nir gf ■ 
the 1 860s made £>?, roughly 
as predicted. The connection 
with the potty just pot bidders 
off; although ink example had"' 
*fready lost its pierced seat.' 
There is an exception to every- 
raie, however. An oak-boxed 
siape commode, stm complete-' 
found a buyer at 
£72M., • ■ . ’ 

Other pieces mentioned in 
my sate preview metaled ther 
tng elm settle which converts 
nito n bed. Tt made £25850, 
and a framed box of butterflies ' 

went for £88. 

It was a professional sate ; 
W*fe only about 20- or so- 
bidtteis. Mr Steven Brace, fee 
fBrftewer, got through 250 
lots within 90 mwnrtiw . Uve 
minutes out of fee rostrum, he- 
wa$ organizing the mfle ctim 
of goods for next week’s sale. “ 


Giacometti ‘cat’ table 
reaches record price 

By-Onr Sate Room Correspondent : 


A bronze and glass sculp- 
tured “car table by Giaco- 
metti fetched a record $77,000 


: or £50,326, ata Christie’s sale 
in New York on Saturday. 

. Wife a spindly bronzed 
frame- -with a green- patina 
supporting a plain gbsr top 
ana bronze cats’ hea£m each- 
comer, the price paid by a 

Svriss private conectorwas foe 
h^est on record for Giaco- 
metti furniture, 

r spent 

$28,600 (estimate $10,00 to 
$15,000), or £18,692, on 
-spherical purple glass vase- 
wife bronze bandies formed as 
styjricd leaves, by. Rene 
Lalique. 




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It was .a good day for . 
kihqufi rarities. A rare Hue 
glass dock, intaglio cut with a 
male and female nude relief, 
*52,800 (estimated 
f to *25,000). or 
£34,509, from, a European 
pnvate coDeopt. -a recoiti - 
auction pnee for Lalique glass. ' ; 

■ The revolutionary Viennese ." 
design ■ of the • turn ■ ’o£"fee ,,a 
century agate attracted high 
pnce&:-A silver table dock, - 
“^gned by Josef Hoffruann; * 
^ JPW 4 ^Alfred Meyer--, 
for the Wiener Werkstatte for 
1^06, made- $60300^ r 

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Turmoil In Central America 

Ortega offers to 

peace 




President Onega of Nicara- 
gua has offered to. hold talks 
witbPresidem Reagan to 
resolvewhat he called the “es- 
calating conflict*' between the 
Sanduusiasand the US, which 
threatened “to set alight" the 
whole of Central America. 

“We'll talk at any moment 
with him, here in Mansgua or 
oyer there in Washin g ton . We 
want a peaceful 
solupoo ... we want a dia- 
logue with the chief of the 
Contras." 

President Onega was speak- 
ing on Saturday, after Presi- 
dent Reagan had reiterated in 
Washington his intention of 
continuing the battle to secure 
military aid for the Contra 
rebels, who seek the over- 
throw of the Sandmisias. 

Mr Reagan has on previous 
occasions dismissed the no- 
tion of talking to the San ding 
tas, whom he : describes as 
“tyrants" bem on exporting 
Communism to the entire 
hemisphere. 


From John CarQn, Managua 

The Nicaraguan Resident 
mad e his offer during ad lib 
remarks at a public meeting 
with hardcore Sandinista sup- 
porters at a school in a poor 
neighbourhood of M anag ua. 

But the tone of the meeting 
suggested that both the Nica- 
raguan President and his audi- 
ence accepted that there was 
little chance of reconciliation 
with the US. ~ 

Senor Onega accused Presi- 
dent Reagan of lies, slander 
and threats against Nicaragua, 
to the apparent delight of a 
crowd of 500. 

As he spoke. President Orte- 
ga was continually interrupted 
by chants of “Death to the 
Yankee imperialists" and 
vows, long a part of the 
Sandinista liturgy, to fight to 
the death if American troops 
invaded. 

Sefior Ortega denounced 
Mr Reagan's “adventurism 
and aggression" saying his 
policy towards Nicaragua put 


him in conflict with the whole 
of Latin America. 

lie repeated that President 
Reagan's call for aid to the 
Contras “puts us on the 
threshold of a Vietnam ization 
of the conflict". 

He said President Reagan 
would provide the Contras — 
whom be called terrorists and 
criminals — with military 
advisers, and predicted that 
when he found the Sandinista 
army still continued to resist, 
he would send in “troops, 
helicopters and aircraft. Presi- 
dent Reagan won't risk his 
own neck but we in the 
National Directorate will 
stand and fight. No one here 
will surrender". 

Senor Ortega did not limit 
his attack to President Rea- 
gan, weighing in against the 
entire US Congress — whether 
members voted for or against 
Mr Reagan’s request for Con- 
tra aid — for holding a debate 
on “the best method ... to 
destroy Nicaragua". 



at ‘scurrilous 9 attacks 


From Christopher Thomas, Washington 

President Reagan claimed 
yesterday that some oppo- 


nents of bis plan to aid the 
Nicaraguan rebels had en- 
gaged in “scurrilous attacks" 
on him and in outright false- 
hoods exceeding the bounds of 
fairness. 

In an interview published in 
The New York Times he 
displayed “Tare” anger, the 
paper said, as his voice shook 
with emotion. Although he 
was not specific, it seemed to 
be directed mostly at . Mr 
Thomas : “Tip” O'Neill, 
Speaker of the Democrat- 
controlled House of 
Representatives. 


“I am not imputing the 
motives at.all, but some of the 
opponents of our programme 
engaged in some of the most 
scurrilous personal attacks 
against me; for example, the 
most dishonest use of distor- 
tions and outright falsehoods 
that I have heard in a legisla- 
tive battle.” 

He seemed to be referring to 
suggestions that his policy was 
aimed at sending American 
troops against Nicaragua. 

Mr Reagan kept up the anti- 
Sandinista rhetoric in his 
weekly radio address on Satur- 
day, saying further delay in ■ 
giving military aid to the 


“freedom fighters” would be 
too late. 

The House of Representa- 
tives last week rejected his 
plan to give $70 million (£45 
million) in military aid and 
$30 million in non-lethal 
supplies. 

The Republican-controlled 
Senate is to vote this week on 
a compromise plan delaying 
delivery of most of the mili- 
tary aid for 90 days to allow 
negotiations for a political 
solution to start 

If, as is likely, the plan 
passes the Senate, it looks 
unlikely that it will be accept- 
able to the House as it stands. 


Agreement on 
Bhopal gas 
leak damages 

New York (AFP) - The US 
chemical giant. Union Car- 
bide, has agreed hi principle to 
pay $350 million (£233 mo- 
tion) m compensation to vic- 
tims of the toxic ga$ : ~teakr in 
Bhopal, India, which caused 
the death of more &&n2,000 
people in December, l984, The 
New York Tithes reported 
yesterday, quoting a company, 
spokesman. 

Sources who wished to re- 
main anonymous told the 
newspaper that compensation 
would cover all the victims of 
the leak, whether or not they 
had taken legal action against 
the company. 

The paper said that a Union 
Carbide spokes m a n , Mr Ear! 
Slack, had con fir med that an 
agreement in principle had 
been reached. The final deci- 
sion. on compensation is to be 
fixed by a New York judge, Mr 
John Keenan, the paper sahL 


EEC faces farm price 
challenge by Chirac 

From Richard Owen, Brussels 


In the wake of the French 
elections, the EEC today feces 
its own version of 
“cohabitation", the phrase 
used for the modus rhvndi 
b«4(eeiu&^kJent Mitterrand 
and M Jacques Chirac, his 
new Prime Minister. 

France's European partners 
have to fihtf their own accom- 
modation with the Chirac 
Government, which is likely 
to bold strong views on the 
EEC not least on form prices 
and agricultural reform. 

EEC agriculture ministers 
meet today under the chair- 
manship of Mr Genii Braks, 
the Dutch farm minister, to 
tackle the long-delayed issue 
of farm prices for the routing 
year. The farm price question, 
with several other issues, was . 
shelved during, the French . 
election campaign. - 

In an ironic twist, the new 
Agriculture Minister in tire 
Chirac Cabinet is M Francois 


Guillaume, the outspoken 
head of the French farmers’ 
union and a vociferous propo- 
nent of French farming inter- 
ests. EEC firm experts say 
there are bound to be head-on 
dashes between M Guillaume 
and other agriculture minis- 
ters. including Mr Michael 
Jopling of Britain, who lavour 
reform of the EEC farm 
subsidy system and the cut in 
farm prices. 

Until recently M Guillaume 
was leading formers' demon- 
strations outside the same 
Council of Ministers' building 
in which be will now be 
meeting EEC form ministers 
as a colleague. 

There is anxiety in Brussels 
that the administration- of M 
Chirac, himself a staunch 
supporter of French formers 
when he was Agriculture Min- 
ister, will find itself at odds 
with other EEC governments 
over form spending. 


Pope trial enters final stage 


From Peter Nichols 
Rome 

The court hearing the case 
against seven men charged 
with having conspired to mur- 
der the Pope will today begin 
considering its verdict. 

The judges are expected to 
complete their work by Easter. 

Nevertheless, both the pros- 
ecution and defence agree that 
the full truth has not emerged 
during tire nine-month inaL 
The public prosecutor, in foot,, 
did not take advantage on 
Saturdav ofhis right to make a 
final pica. He had already told 
the court the sentences be 
hoped to see imposed: heavy 
terms of imprisonment for 
three .of the four Turkish 
defendants and an acquittal 
on the ground of lack of 
evidence, for the three 

The fourth Turk. Mehmei 
Ali Agca. who fired at the 
Pope in May, 1981. is already 
serving a life sentence. 

A gry. who was in court 
mainly as the prosecution’s 
principal witness, dominated 
the whole trial. It was he who, 
in a series of confessions, said 
his attempt on the Pope s life 
had been organized by the 
Bulgarian Secret Service and 
the Turkish Grey; Wolves, a 
terrorist organization. 


m 



Mehmet Ali Agea in defiant mood at the weekend. He told 
tire court; *My troth is not absolute.' - 


But on the first day of the 
trial, he embarrassed the pros- 
ecution by claiming to be 
Jesus Christ His subsequent 
statements in court have been 
a mixture of apparent fan and 


total fiction. On the last day of 
the trial he told the judges: “I 
am here to say that my truth is 
not absolute, and it will be for 
the court to take a wise 
decision." 



Contra aid supporters shouting across Biscayne Boulevard, Miami as several hundred anti-aid demonstrators held a rival 
rally. The anti-support group had to be taken from the area in police vehicles, and several people were arrested. 


Cairo hunt 
fails to 
discover 
gunmen 

From a Correspondent 
Cairo 

Egypt has detained a large 
number of suspects in connec- 
tion with last Wednesday's 
attack on Israeli Embassy 
employees, but the authorities 
admit little progress. 

Security officials said yes- 
terday that people fitting de- 
scriptions given by witnesses 
had been detained for ques- 
tioning at Cairo airport and in 
Alexandria, Suez City and 
Port Said. So for no one has 
been formally accused of the 
attack, in which the wife of an 
Israeli diplomat was killed 
and three other embassy em- 
ployees wounded. 

Officials declined to say 
’how many people had been 
questioned, but the group is 
said to include a Syrian who 
was detained while trying to 
leave Cairo airport for Saudi 
Arabia. 

Israeli authorities have 
quoted Egyptian officials as 
saying that they suspect the 
attackers are linked to Abu 
Nidal nom de guerre for the 
renegade Palestinian Sabry aT 
Banna, whose organization 
was blamed for December’s 
twin attacks at airports in 
Rome and Vienna in which 19 
people died. 

A group called Egypt’s Rev- 
olution admitted responsibil- 
ity for Wednesday's attack in a 
letter to a Western news 
agency. The group admitted 
attacks on Israeli diplomats 
here in 1984 and 1985 in 
which one Israeli diplomat 
was killed and three embassy 
employees were wounded. 

The lack of substantial 
progress in the investigation 
has again focused attention on 
Egypt's security services, 
which were discredited by last 
month's police riots in Cairo. 

Wednesday's attack was 
doubly embarrassing for Pres- 
ident Mubarak because it 
came as Egypt and Israel are 
seeking to improve relations. 
An Israeli delegation was in 
Cairo for talks on the Taba 
border dispute, and Israel’s 
Tourism Minister, Mr 
Avraham Sharir, was in town 
to promote tourism, 

• Peace deadlocluAfter nearly 
three hours of talks yesterday 
with the Palestine Liberation 
Organization's chairman, Mr 
Yassir Arafat, it was apparent 
that President Mubarak has 
made little progress in reviv- 
ing the stalled Middle East 
peace process or reconciling 
Jordan and the PLO. 

Mr Arafat emerged from the 
meeting to say that the peace 
process was on “a blocked 
road” and that it was up to the 
Reagan Administration to 
break the deadlock. Mr 
Arafat's pessimistic assess- 
ment echoed remarks made 
here on Thursday by King 
Husain that his year-long 
effort to bring the PLO into 
the peace process was at a 
deadend. 

Mr Arafat said that he 
agreed with King Husain, 
adding: “I share with King 
Husain what he said about the 
blocked road being caused by 
American intransigence." 

Mr Arafat, however, made 
no mention of the king's 
statement in a speech last 
month that the PLO leader- 
ship had gone back on certain 
commitments, among them to 
accept openly UN Security 
Council Resolution 242, 
which implies Israel’s right to 
exist. 


Spielberg may be the biggest winner 


From Ivor Davis, Los Angeles 


Although Steven Spielberg 
is sot a contender for best 
director ax temgbt's 5Sth an- 
nual Academy Award ceremo- 
ny,, be is likely to emerge as 
the biggest wiener. 

His controversial bnt sue- 
ccssful pktBK n > q* »r 
pxnde has bccu nominated nr 
11 awards. Including bes*i Pjf- 
mre and best ****for to 
new star Whoopi Goldberg. 

Bat much to Hollywood s 
surprise. Spielberg was not on 
[behest director tot. He has 


already won the Directors" 
Guild award and will be in the 
audience tonight when the 
prizes sure handed out. He 
politely declined the 
academy's invitation to be a 
presenter. 

The main challenge to The 
Colour Purple comes from 
Sydney PoUadk'5 intriguing 
picture Out of Africa, based on 
the work of the Danish author 
-Isak Dinesen, which has also 
been nominated for 11 awards, 
including best picture, best 
director, best actress — Meryl 


Streep — and best supporting 
actor — Klaus Maria 
Braudauer. 

The winners are more diffi- 
cult than astral to predict. Finn 
favourite for best director Is 
John Huston, whose black 
CODiedy Frizz*’* Honour has 
eight nominations, including 
Jack Nicholson for best actor 
and Huston's daughter, An- 
gelica, for best supporting 
actress. 

Huston’s mam rival is the 
Australian director Peter 
War, whose film Witness has 


eight nominations, 
best actor for Harrison F< 
regarded as an outsider. 

In Hollywood this year the 
main film studios have spent 
about $4 million (£2.7 million) 
to promote their films among 
the academy's voting members 
in the hope of picking up an 
Oscar. 

Marketing specialists say 
the outlay is well spent be- 
cause a film that wins we can 
be released again to earn $10 
million to $15 million more at 
the box office. 


US jets ready to penetrate 
Gadaffi ‘line of death 9 


In an escalated war 
nerves against Libya, United 
States Navy jets are planning 
to fly off the Libyan coast in an 
area that includes the disputed 
Golf of Sirte, inside Colonel 
Gadaffi’s so-called “line of 
death". 

The Pentagon said the ac- 
tion could come at any time up 
to the evening of April 1, when 
new manoeuvres beginning 
last Saturday night are due to 
end. “Carrier flight operations 
will be conducted in the Tripo- 
li flight information region 
daring that period," it stated. 

The aircraft carriers Ameri- 
ca, Saratoga and Coral Sea 
will take part in the exercises, 
accompanied by an uadis- 
dosed number of other Sixth 
fleet ships. Tie Pentagon 


From Christopher Thomas, Washington 
of refused to say whether any Libya and has drawn his “line 


vessels would cross into tire 
gulf. Officially, the manoeu- 
vres are “routine". 

The exercises began just two 
days after tbe Sixth Fleet 
ended 36 hours of manoeuvres 
off Libya. American officials 
deny tint the US is trying to 
provoke Colonel Gadaffi into 
an attack to justify a 
retaliation. 

Some Administration offi- 
cials, however, have been 
quoted as saying that last 
week's exercises were intend- 
ed as ball; giving the US an 
excuse to destroy two new anti- 
aircraft sites in Libya if it 
attacks. 

Washington considers most 
of the Golf of Sirte to be 
international territory. Colo- 
nel Gadaffi Haims it is part of 


of death" where the gulf meets 
the Mediterranean. 

Mr John Poindexter, tbe 
National Security Adviser, 
said that if US warships 
entered the disputed area it 
would not be in provocation. 
“We have a regular pro- 
gramme where we challenge 
the illegal claims to territorial 
waters by various countries 
around the world." 

Mr Caspar Weinberger, the 
Defence Secretary, said in a 
television interview yesterday 
that the ships were in interna- 
tional waters. He refused to 
say whether they would cross 
the “line of death". 

“We have crossed that line 
seven times since 1981." he 
said, “so it would not be 
particularly significant." 


Pretoria ban 
on activist 
ruled invalid 

Johannesburg — A promi- 
nent black activist jubilantly 
tore up a five-year banning 
order served on March 1 1, 
after a judge declared it 
invalid (Ray Kennedy writes). 

Mr Justice van Rensburg, of 
the Port Elizabeth Supreme 
Court, made tbe ruling at a 
hearing on Saturday after Mr 
Louis Le Grange, Minister of 
Law and Order, said he would 
not oppose the application by 
Mr Mkhuseli Jack, leader of 
the Eastern Cape consumer 
boycott committee, to have 
the banning order set aside. 


UN condemns Iraq for 
chemical warfare 


New York — Faced with 
irrefutable evidence that Iraqi 
forces resorted to chemical 
warfare to thwart Iran's latest 
offensive in the Gulf war, the 
UN Security Council took the 
unprecedented step over the 
weekend of condemning Iraq 
for violating the 1 925 Geneva 
Protocol banning chemical 
weapons (Zoriana Pysariwsky 
writes). 

‘ But the Security Council's 
aciion.in the form of a state- 
ment, was tempered by an 
implicit condemnation of Iran 
for refusing to end the 5‘£-year 


war and a warning against 
Iranian designs on Kuwait. 

The Security Council’s con- 
cern over recent Iranian 
threats to attack Kuwait ab- 
sorbed much of its attention 
and gave Tehran a very quali- 
fied diplomatic success over 
the chemical weapons issue. 

Although most political and 
military analysis agreed that 
an Iranian amphibious or air 
attack on Kuwait was unlike- 
ly. since it would provoke 
outside intervention and sen e 
Iraqi imeresis. they saw- the 
merits of an unambiguous 
message to Tehran. 


in secret 


Hamburg (AP) — Kremlin 
sources have released a 15- 
minute colour film of Dr 
Andrei Sakharov, the Russian 
dissident, looking obviously 
healthy, says the mass-circula- 
tion Bild newspaper. 

The film, made by hidden 
KGB cameras, shows Dr Sa- 
kharov visiting doctors and a 
car mechanic, discussing dis- 
armament with a KGB ageni. 
and talking on the telephone 
to his wife. Mrs Yelena Bon- 
ner. in the United Stales. 

The KGB made the film 
between December and earlv 
Fcbruary. Bild said. 

Flats collapse. 

Bombay (LI PI) — Five peo- 
ple were killed and 1*3 injured 
when a 125-year-old five- 
storey block of flats collapsed 
after the demolition and re- 
building of a mosque near by. 


157 

L » 

Lyons (AFP; — A ware- 
house with large stocks of Feu 
d’Or (Golden Fire) cigarette 
lighters burned down in a 
suburb of Lyons. 

Train smash 

Tokyo (AFP) — More than 
200 people were injured. 13 
seriously, when an express hit 
a stationary train in heav\ 
snow a] Tanashi station in 
Tokyo's northern suburbs. 

Serbs jailed 

Belgrade (AP) - Two Serbi- 
an men have been jailed for 
five years in the Bosnian town 
of Tuzla for spreading hostile 
propaganda and harming 
Yugoslavia's reputation. 


Madrid (AP) - The Spanish 
National Library has paid a 
collector $25,000 (£1 6.500) for 
43 photographs of the Spanish 
Civil War by the Hungarian- 
born American photographer. 
Robert Capa. 


Khartoum ( AP) - Sudan is 
to postpone polling in 37 
southern constituencies in 
ne\i month's general election 
because of fighting between 
government troops and rebels. 


Belgrade (Reuter) - A Yu- 
goslav policeman was killed 
by a passing lorry, as he left a 
bar after celebrating his 
£40.000 lottery win. 

Glacier crash 

Moscow (AP) - Six So\ iei 
fliers were killed when their 
twin-engine transport plane 
ran out of fuel and crashed on 
a glacier in Antarctica last 
month, i:\vsno reported. 







TOKYO 

NON-STO 

‘ 'i/QRrvi )?>*’• r? 

• . .. V . - 



On April 1st Japan Air Lines will be 
bringingTokyo closer to London. 

Thafewhen we become the only airline 
to operate non-stop flights from London 
to Tokyo, offering the fastest route to Japan 
from the UK. 

The flights will leave Heathrow at 
19 20 every Tuesday, arriving in Tokyo, on 
Wednesday at 14 55 saving almost 6 hours 
on normal flight times. 


On all other days we will continue our 
one-stop flights from Heathrow to Tokv 
via Anchorage, including two on Satureia*. s. 

And. of course, oil our flights offer :h\- 
Japanese hospitality and serene «rffic!».-nc\ 
that ha\ e made ij> the w orld ~ number one 
international airliner 


UAPAN ASR U3SSES 


Everything you expect and more. 












— m t ■ ■aaTiiliTlfilTBliimww i — 


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v o > £.iyacAS JNbwS 

New French Cabinet meets 

Chirac plans early vote 
of confidence to test 
Government’s support 


M Jacques Chirac, the 
.French Prime Minister, has 
decided to test support for his 
new right-wing Government 
■by calling for a vole of 
confidence immediately after 
Parliament reassembles on 
April 2. 

Although the traditional 
right-wing parlies have an 
absolute majority of only 
three seats in the new assem- 
bly, M Chirac should not have 
too much of a problem in 
winning such a vote, which is 
not actually required of a new 
government under the consti- 
tution. 

Even if some of M Ray- 
mond Bane’s supporters carry 
out their earlier threat not to 
support a vote of confidence 
in a “government of co- 
habitation", the extreme-right 
National Front will probably 
decide to abstain rather than 
vote against the Government, 
leaving the Communists and 
Socialists with insufficient 
votes between them to defeat 
the motion. 

M Chirac announced his 
decision to call for a vote of 
confidence at the first meeting 
of the new Cabinet held at the 
Elysee Palace, with President 
Mitterrand in the chair, on 
Saturday. The discussions 
were brief but scrupulously 
polite. No attempt was made 
to broach specific proposals 
for new legislation. Thai will 


From Diana Geddes, Paris 
probably be dealt with at the 
next Cabinet meeting, set 
forWednesday.. 

M Mitterrand reminded the 
new ministers of the rules 
governing Cabinet meetings 
and the functioning of the 
Government. M Chirac out- 
lined his Government's prior- 
ities on employment and law 
and order, and emphasized his 
desire to work in a spirit of 
"tolerance, openness and 
rassemblemeru". 

Meanwhile, the Socialists 
began at the weekend to 
examine the implications of 
finding themselves out of 
power yet with their own 
leader still President. M Lio- 
nel Jospin, the party’s First 
Secretary, insisted that the 
Socialists were now “a party of 
opposition". They may find it 
difficult, however, to' attack 
legislation and decrees signed 
by M Mitterrand. 

While many of the party 
delegates were still riding taign 
on what some described as the 
“euphoria of failure", after 
winning one of their highest 
electoral scores this century, 
others — such as M Pierre 
Mauroy, the former Prime 
Minister - pointed out that 
the total score of the left (44 
per cent) was their worst since 
1962, and that the prepara- 
tions for the presidential elec- 
tions would necessarily be 
very difficult for the Socialists. 


The main reason for that 
low vote was the abysmal 
showing of the Communists in 
the election. With less than 10 
per cent of the vote, their 
lowest score for more than 50 
years, some tough questions 
on the foture direction of the 
party and its leadership will be 
put at today's meeting of the 
Central Committee. 

The rumblings of bitter 
discontent and expressions of 
fear that the party is now on 
the verge of extinction can 
already be heard throughout 
the country. 

M Pierre Juquin, one of the 
leading renovaieurs, who had 
been keeping his head down 
since the failure of the reform 
movement at the last party 
congress a year ago, has 
started calling again for a 
"cultural revolution" within" 
the party. 

More than 150 Communist 
intellectuals have signed a 
public declaration saying that 
they “cannot watch without 
reacting this veritable liquida- 
tion of the party. No, we do 
not have time before us. . . 
We cannot allow our leaders 
to continue to impose on our 
party policies a way of speak- 
ing and a mode of-fimetioning 
which is leading it inexorably 
to its destruction. Thai is why 
we are demanding the urgent 
convocation of an extraordi- 
nary congress. . . ." 



__ THE TlMRS MONnAV MARCH JfdJLQSML- - 

THE TIMES MONDAY MARCH 24 1986 


Jews say 
Waldheim 
on wanted 
Nazis list 

From Christopher Thomas 
Washington 

The World Jewish Congress 
I claims to have found a docu- 
I ment listing Dr Kurt Wald- 
heim, former Secretary 
General of the United Na- 
tions, as a suspected Nazi war 
j criminal wanted by Yugosla- 
via for complicity in murder. 

It said the 1948 US Army 
document was uncovered last 
week in Washington's public 
j archives. It came from 
Croweas, the Army's con*- 
bined registry of war criminals 
and security suspects, and 
listed Dr Waldheim as suspect 
No.79-724. 

The congress, which has 
been waging a campaign to 
prove that Dr Waldheim had 
finks with , the Nazis, did not 
say what crimes be was sus- 
pected of having committed. 
It said, however, there should 
be a file on him in the 40,000 
case records of the now de- 
funct UN War Crimes 
Commission. 

Dr Waldheim, a leading 
candidate in the Austrian 
presidential elections set for 
May 5, has been accused of 
belonging to two Nazi groups, ' 
including Hitler's SA, or ; 
Brownshirts, and of having 
served under a German gener- 
al later banged for war crimes 
in Yugoslavia. 

• VXENNA:The new alle- 
gations were dismissed by Dr 
Waldheim's office as “yet 
another attempt — to pub- 
licly discredit Dr Waldheim 
and pursue a campaign of 
calumny" (Richard Bassett 
writes). 


Ahrooz* statue of President Truman lies on tire ground yestedaya^ 

Truman statue blown up in Athens 


From Mario Modiano 
Athens 

A statne nf President Tru- 
man in central Athens' was 
blown off its pedestal and 
damaged by a powerful explo- 
sion at midnight on Saturday 
In what appeared to be a 
protest against tomorrow’s ar- 
rival here of . Mr George 
Shultz, the. American Secre- 
tary of State, for talks' with 
Greek leaders. 

- The 10ft- bronze statue has 
symbolized fbr-tfae Greek left 
its defeat in toe civil war, 
largely as a result of military 
aid from' the United States 
under Truman in 1947. The 
statue was the target of two 
bomb attacks in 1970 and 
1971. 


Last week a bomb placed by 
left-wing extremists blew off a 
garage door at the Hellenic- 
American Union. A second, 
device was defused. Responsi- 
bility was admitted by Revolu- 
tionary Popular Straggle, a 
Marxist group. speriattang. in 
anti-American attacks ni the - 
past ten years. ... 

Scores offeft-wmgand com- 
munist organizations in Ath- 
ens are,; mobilizing their 
followers for anas#- American 
rally hi Constitution Square on 
Wednesday to demand, the 
immediate removal of Ameri- 
can bases from Greece, whBe 
Mr Shultz will: be tawg 
crucial talks with the Greek 
Government on the same 
subject. 


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■* Under the existing US- 
Greek agreement, which ex- 
pires at the end of 1988, the 
Ameri cans can operate thetr 
bases mitD .nrid-1990, bot Mr 
Shultz makes no secret of his 

need to know if he can coant on 
the bases well into the next 
decide so that Washington 
may spend large, sums of 
money modernizing them. . . 

The Greek left is alarmed by 
■ indications that. Athens's in- 
creasing economic difficulties 
may force Mr Andreas 
Panpandreon, the Prime Min- 
ister, to give in to Mr Sbritz 
and so break Ut pledge tnrid 
Greece of the bases iff the end 
of the decade. ■ 

Mr Shuttefe expected to use 
economfc inducements rather 
than an ahimatam to get a 


firm commitinent . from Mr 
Panan dr eon- 

Mr Shultz’s visit to Athens 
follows that by Sir Geoffrey 
Howe, the Foreign Secretary, 
who arrived in Belgrade yes- 
terday tor a two-day vim. 

Although Sir Geoffrey made 
no headway with his call to 
Greek leaders to seek a recon- 
ciliation with Turkey for the 
sake of Nato onity and to 
rapport the UN Secretary 
GeneraTs latest initiative tor a 
Cyprus settlement, Mr Shultz 
is expected to takenp the same 
themes. 

# ISTANBUL: Mr Stadtz 
was boating on the Bosporus 
. ye s ter day, co utiwun g t four- 
day official visit to Turkey 
(AFP reports). • 


Moscow congress 


Prague to follow 

V • ByRoger Boyes, East Earope Correspondent 

TbcCzcchoriovakCoraniB- m gjvingfiictoricsrnoreairton- 
nist Party leadership, having omy, malting them jnore fi- 
watched nervously as Mr nancially . accountable, 
Mikhail Cfortadiov rattled a tijgrfening credit rules to eh- 
few skeletons in Moscow, courage V exports and 
today embarks on Sts own production; 
policy-setting congress. •greater incentive^ strict la- 

Itpromisestobeanimcorn- hour discipline to improve 
tollable experience for the productivity; •./ 

Prague leaders, who have 9 afleraing producers to work 
made only cautions and minor ; separate ' contracts with 

changes ance -^ the i -Warsaw c^mmeri; rate than wort- 
Pact mvaaoiroti 968. • - . . w tteMmh ffie "central 

• The r-teanT M’ ibr 'party 

^ • todbiiiagihg state fenns and 
smste 

•they would' ;/ ’ ’ . " " . 

political . lucpemtions^' lhey . .. This approach appears to 
believe this^ was tte main have gained me blessing ot Mr 
lesson of the Prague Spring of Gorbachov ; during talks m 
Mr. Alexander Dobcek. Moscow last year wub Mr 

‘ But the party; congress in Husak. - - 

Moscow last roonth has dis- In' any^case, the message 
tubed the raeain Plague, who from the Soviet congress was 
would have preferred an or- that Moscowis hot interested, 
dnly session, rather like the yet in imposing models on 
boaid- meeting of an t*J- anybody: the catchword is 
established puU<5hiag houseL “vnity in differentiation" 
Some of the Moscow con- . However, the Soviet con- 
gress disoissions cannot really . gress does mean that the party 
Mttaastofxed to Prague with- nr Czechoslovakia wifi have to 
wirf aue^oining rite legitimacy grasp the nettle of “openness'*, 
ofthe leaderemp. , Even the limited economic 

:i The ''criticism- ^of. Leonid xhanges being proposed mean 
Brezhnev, ^or example sits some form of political can- 
oncasdy witb a Pcrfitburo thai dour, more dc^rate of issues in 
essentially was installed by thc . the-, official press, a greater 
late Seviet ieader and which wifiin^rera to admit mistakes, 
owes its'existenceiotheaxiom, a m<«e critical relationship 
.known as the Brezhnev Doc- between the Communist Party 
trine. Nor. is it easy for the and the Government. 

Rumours persist that Mr 
Husak is preparing to step 
- praa?0C - ** towr'but to 
retain preridency. But at 
| **"* a* feast, he will 

telS 1x5 . needetl 10 intQfrate the 
Motc ^ various actions, 

may . not be toll of youthful 

reformers,; but it sees parallels In any case, it would be a 
between v its ^own plans, for. rad precedent for a party 
“ihlenstlyui^ the economy leader to resign at a congress, 
and some of Mr .Gorbachov’s rather than at a closed session 
1 proposals:- Intensification, of the Central Committee. 

. ratlrcr than market reforms. Such a move would make the 
means: party leadership look demo- 

• Streamlining central man- cratically accountable to the 


agementand plannmg; 


communist rank and file. 


Halley’s Priceless 
comet nine Polish 
mUes long relic stolen 


Munich <AF) W Photo- 
graphs of HaDey's Comet tak- 
:en earlier this month by the 
European spacecraft Giotto 
show its coreij 15 kflometere 
(93 nrilestm length, twice as 
long-as Jiad been believed, a 
report from the Max- Planck 
Institute saidL ;: . 

The photographs also Show ^ 
thatthe comet's core is “one of 
the darkest bodies in our solar i 
Wtem,” .Here Horst Uwe 
Kriter. -project director for the 
camera that was mounted on 
Giotto, was quoted as saying. 1 

“Because it is so' large, its 
stofea’s capacity to reflect 
** ywy small, compara- 
tor with charcoal," he said. 

frShi, . ? ocul n«rt 

lrom the institute's beadquar- 

tWff in West Germany de- 
^mbed preliminary results 
from the photographs taken- 
1M4 as Giotto 
penorated to wnfon 335 mfles 
cm the comet s'nucleus. . 

_The German Space . Rc- 
s< ^. Agency has begun an 
extensive analysis ofmctnres 
and 'data from Giotto. The 
anaJyns is expected to last 
I unnltheend of!987. : 


Warsaw 

Hie Govenunent offered a 
ferge cash reward to help tract 
grave robbers who plun- 
dered one of Poland's holiest 
“nues and escaped with a 
P^criess booty of drareh 
silvar. 

The burglars brake into 
^Catbedrai bat week, 
andiag their way to the silver 

sa ^»PBMgas Containing the 

rajfcs ofSt Adalbert, known as 

/^y ripped away foe life-’ 
MMfigure ofthe saint from the 
raffia^ three silver ahgris 
tto coniea. They broke 

“go, PobuHTs national m- 
w«5 and a riKeir pfide depkt- 
from the saint's life. 

«^gfad. 

obout 351 b, but Sfiv' raise 
“““<* be calculated. . - 

vuitHre Minfeter.amMraBeeda 

JSIS? * “fflfon Zlotys 
“ more th “ 
themageanoml aaln- 

•*** * FWe — to an* tone who 
ran provide ; • 




-v.-; . 


THE TIMES MONDAY MARCH 24 1986 


THE TIMES MONDAY MARCH 24 1 986 


OVERSEAS NEWS 



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H '•' '• • " I'r 'S 

V . - » ■ 


— rf *' 


• . -J^ndoea. western 
S*^c of Gujarat to fece the 

. problem bedevilling his, ad- 

• ministration — . violence in 
: Punjab. 

; As m Gujarat where, despite 
his best efforts. Iso cannot 
make it rain, in Punjab it 
seems he cannot put an end to 
the violent efforts of a minor- 
ity of Sikh activists intent on 
establishing a separate Sin. 
state. 

In the past .few days, the 
spiral of violent* between 
Sikhs and Hindus has taken a 
more vidous twist the Hitf= 
dus have began fighting back 
through such organizations as 
the Hindu Saruksha Samiti 
and the Shiv Sena. 

As the Hindus predominate 
in the industrial towns, the 
result has been a series of 
general ■ strikes, 

neighbourhood clashes, and, 
finally, police-enforced cur- 
fews in several of the chief 
population centres. : ; 

; . last week there were long 
curfews in Jullundur and 
Batala^and .the smaller towns 
of-. Nakodar- and - Muktsgr. = 
Enthusiasts of . ihe All -India ? 
Sikh Students federation - 
blockaded the riot-torn -town 
of Batala where looting Hin- 
dus stopped milk, vegetable " 
and cattle fodder deliveries. 

In Muktsar, the curfew was 
imposed when federation 
members and supporters of 
the so-called United AkaH 
Dal, the extremist Sikh politi- 
cal organization led by the 
octogenarian Mr Baba 
Joginder Singh, went round 
forcing shopkeepers to close. 
They were trying to enforce a 
protest about the death of Mr 
Jagpt.Singh Bode, the son of 


" 1 mv ibiawuM. 

martyr. Mr lagut Singh was 
nm over by a tram last week in. 
an incident described various- 
ly as suicide, mi accident, and 
murder. . ' 

The week " of violence 
culiminated in a'mass picket 
erf! the State ..Assembly,- in 
Chandigarh by ibe .United 
Akali DaL AH weekend news- 
papers were dominated by the 



Smjtt Singh Barnala: 
administration Inept. 

. image . of a Jeep : carryin g Mr 
jBaba Joginder Singh, and 
-atkrGRBiidedbyswisd^viddiiig 
.demonstrators, 'Charging 
through :po&£--blqacade 
amid aswirf-bf tear-gas and 
. panicking , poGcemen. -Police 
opened fire on the chanting 
mob, killing-three and injuring 

There are voices in Delhi 
now saying that Mr Gandhi's 


failed and he Should dismiss 
the Akali DalGoyemment of 
Mr Smjit Singh and 

reimpose presidential rule in 
Punjab. But it is highly unlike- 
ly this will happen as it is 
difficult to see how for the 
central authorities tango to; . 


Mr Gandhi ruled out the 
idea of state intervention as he 
-was leaving Gujarat. He said it 
was up to the state govern- 
ment to take more steps to 
maintain peace. “The Punjab 
Government got a dear man- 
date from the people that they 
are against violence.” 

- Mr Smjit Singh appears to 
be a. . weak Chief Minister 
. becanse his main concern after 

* his election was a search for 
-reconciliation.. Accordingly, 
he. released many extremists 
detained under the National 
Security Act. paid compensa- 
tion to Sikh soldiers dismissed 
for mutiny, and gave little 
attention to the law and order 
breakdown. 

But Mr Surjit Singh's hones- 
ty and integrity are respected 
in Delhi, and provided he will 
move with some firmness now 
it seems likely be will be given 
all the help he needs. 

There has been one item of 
more encouraging news for the 
embattled Chief Minister. The 
call for.; a general strike. to 
protest at deaths' in ponce 
firing dozing the mass picket 
of : the; .assembly', was only 
partly sbcressfuL By and large, 
.the people of Punjab showed 
an unwillingness to respond, 

• CHANDIGARH: Militant 
Sikhs yesterday lifted the 
week-long blockade of Batala, 
125 miles west of here (Reuter 
writes). 

. Mr Kabul Singh, a moder- 
ate. has been elected president 
of the committee which con- 
trols Sikh temples in succes- 
sion to Mr Gurcharan Singh 
Tohra, who resigned last 
month after IS years. 


Ershad 
sets new 
date for 
elections 

From Ahmed Fazl 
Dhaka 

President Ershad of Bangla- 
desh announced a new date 
for partLameniary elections. 
May 7, amid a nationwide 
general strike called by oppo- 
sition parties which paralysed 
Dhaka for 12 hours. 

General Ershad also abol- 
ished all militar y courts and 
withdrew zonal, sub-zonal and j 
district martial law adminis- 
tratora as pan of new conces- 
sions to the Opposition. 

An election commission ( 
spokesman s p i d that nominar * 
nods for elections to the 300- , 
seat Parliament could be filed 1 
up to April 6. The elections 
had earlier been set for April 
26. 

Life virtually stopped in 
Dhaka as public transport was 
halted, nver services were 
disrupted and shops dosed in 
a day-long general strike called 
as part of the Opposition's 
electi on-resi stance 
movement 

At least 20 people, including 
several policemen, were in- i 
jured when a crowd attacked a ! 
police station outside the 
Dhaka university caip M , 
i throwing crackers and other 

micsilfiK 

, Police burst tear-gas shells 
and fired into the air to 
disperse stone-throwing mobs. 

The new election date was 
announced less than 12 hours 
after a leading opposition 
group. Sheikh Hasina WazedTs 
15-party alliance, as well as 
the fundamentalist Jamaat-i- 
laiami decided to withdraw 
their earlier boycott and take 
part in the polls supervised 

under martial law. 

Officials said the date was 
changed to let political parties 
prepare for the polls,- but they 
msistod the four-year martial 
law would not be withdrawn 
before the elections. . . 


Amritsar events leave a bitter echo . 

Sikh violence angers Canada 


from John Best, Toronto 


Recent events in Punjab 
have left a bitter echo in 
Canada, poisoning relations 

* between the Federal Govem- 

* meat and Canada's Sikh com- 
munity and. creating tension 

* and' jus&vt: between Sikhs 
and Other Cuwfitiasl; . . . 

. Spokesmen for the comma- 

tnrned against the Sikhs. Far- 
:thef, tiiey purport 'to bee the 
long ara of lire Indian Govern- 
ment at work in the poisoning 
process. 

(Sikh leaders contend Out 
-there are wefl over 200,000 
Sikhs fat this country, but the 

- Canadian Office af Mafti- 
. CTtltnnt&sm places the number 

at between 75.000 and 80,000. 
The discrepancy Is explained 
.at least hi part by the fort that 
-many Sikhs do not identify 
themselves as snch to the 
■ census enumerator.) • • 

- The feeling was summed np 
wefl by a Toronto resident who 
said: “We should pot them aO 
on a boat and send them back 

to India.” 

. The most devastating in a 

series of trauma tic happenings 

affecting the community was 
on Jane 23 last year, when Air 
India Flight 182, from Mon- 
treal to Borahay via London, 
plunged into the Atlantic off 
Ireland with the loss rtf all 329 
people on board. 

On the same day, at almost 
at the same hoar, two baggage 
-handlers wore killed at Narita 
-Airport, Tokyo, by a bomb 

Spanish 
travel 
risk eases 

From Richard Wlgg 
Madrid 

The threat of widespread 
disruption to. Easter holidays 
in Spain has receded with air 
•and . ra ft - unions dropping 
strike irfans. 

A stoppage at airports to- 
dav, planned as part of selec- 
tive industrial action during 
‘Holy Week., was abandoned 
hv the sound: staff of Iberia, 
the state airline, on Saturday 
after they accepted an 8 per. 
_ cent pay. rise. . 

" - But on Rente, tbe state ; 

railways, the position was not | 
„so good even though ithas 
-aJreadv announced that trains j 
..will be running today. 

* ihe two main railway i 

unions, one controlled by the 
Socialists and the | 

S3&53S5ag 

dav but the Conummist-ted , 
union was yesterday suU . 
debating whether to JO ahead 
with the strike. 

it »S estimated, that one 
million holidayHTiakers . will 

be arriving at Costa del Sol 
resorts during the next few 
days. Malaga Airport *s due to 
'receive almost 900. incoming 
■Rights. With an estimate* TO 

pCT of hold beds rtrrady 

occupied, the tmmrt is 
forecarting a recort taster. 


which exploded Inside luggage 
just off a (fight from 
Vancouver. . ■ • 

Both tragedies are. widely 
thought, to have bee* . foe 
haadjworitof CaaadfowSikh 
extremists; whoL^appori, their . 
■ UBtsat Cfrrejjjgfomstg 4n In- f 
- £k, uirte* - 

pendent ..Sikh. . state of 

. t . 

•Two Sifchywere arrested irf : 
v British Columbia last-Norem^ 

Sikhs in 
Canada 

Parti 

beroo explosives dunges. The 
cases are q» for trial today in 
Daman <m Vancouver Island, 
and will-hedosefy wntehedfor 
any light they Bright shed «u 
the events rt; June 23u .. 

^The Government is plainfy 
.worried' about .the, impart- of 
Sikh extremism both «i social 
hanmmy wifoa . Canada and 
on. relations with India; 

This was reflected in a 
speech by the Foreign Minis- 
ter, Mr Joe Clark, on a visit to 
Delhi last autmnn. “ C a n a d a 
and Canadians wifi not toler- 
ate .. . those who advocate or 
practise violence,” be said, in a 
dear reference to Sikh extrera-. 
iste. “The fine must be firmly 
drawn when peaceful dissent 
. becomes violent confront- 


Canadian editorial w iitos 
show little respect for Sikh 
militancy. The Victoria Times 
columnist, reacting to demon- 
strations in Canada against 
last : summer’s peace aoee- 
ment between Delhi and Sikh 
lemtefs in Pmyab, told Cana- 
ifan Sikhs btiratly that it was 
aoaeoftbeir business. fc If they 
wish to make it their business, 
they sbonkl: return to India to 
do SO,” 

The Toronto Globe mid 
Moil commented: “It is a cruel 
irony those Canadian 
Sikhs who protested most 
vehemently in defence of then- 
kin in India have, by there 
offensive befcariom, hart the 
reputation of there comuraaity 
in Canada.” 

The Wimupeg Tree Press 
praised as “proper and 
appropriate 7 ’ Canada's office 
last December to step ap co- 
operation between Canadian 
and Indian, intettigence ser- 
vices, a r move dearly aimed at 
Sikh affiteats. ' 

. Rightly or wrongly, the wdrd 
Sikh td many now 

suffiests virteace. “Every time 
the word Sikh is mentioned ift 
wife die premise that we are 
bombers of Air India and 
Itifiers of 329 people,” said Mr 
Gvcharan Singh, secretary in 
Ottawa of tbe Federation of 
Sikh Societies of Canada. 

Co m passion fire Sikhs, and 
fire their justifiable concern 
about the pfight of brethren in 
India, is in short supply. 
Perhaps that is natural in a 


nmlti-caltnral c ou ntr y which 
tifcw ethnic tranqnfilky al- 
most for granted. 

Canadians, snugly hived off 
from the tensions that afflict 
tench of the rest of the world, 
have difficulty understanding 
why any immigrant group 
would want to import racial 
ami political tensions. ■ 

In addition, deeds commit- 
ted _ by__ the- . mffita nr Safe 
minority. - here have created 
antagonisms against the wider 
Sikh comnmnity 

In the aftermath of the 
Indian Army raid uu the 
Golden Temple in Amritsar, 
there was an outburst of anti- 
Indian demonstrations by 
Sikhs firing in Canada. In one , 
of these, the Indian High 
Commissioner was pelted with . 
rags in Winnipeg. After Mrs 
Gandhi's assa s si n a tio n, mili- 
tant Sikhs danced in Toronto 
streets! 

Beatings, bombmgs and at- 
tempted bombings, especially 
in and around Vancouver, 
illustrate the deepening divi- 
sioBS in the Sikh commamfy 
resulting from recent events m 
India. 

Some Sikh leaders fear that 
tbe ia-fightin$ wifi have the 
effect of dooming the commu- 
nity to a perpetual fringe role 
•to Canadian society, accentu- 
ating the subtle barriers to 
integration already created by 
accoutre m ents such as tur- 
bans, black beards and, to 
some cases, swords. 

Tomorrow: Deportations 


of 290 in rebel clashes 


From Keith Dalton 
Manila 

President Aquino’s hopes 
that communist rebels in the 
Philippines would lay down 
.their arms were disappointed 
yesterday by reports that 290 
people have died in 172 rebel 
dajfees since she took power 
la«a month. 

... Another 130 people .were 
wounded and .22 abdnetedby 
the • New: : People’s • Army 
. (NpA>, “ignoring government 
overtures Tor a. ceasefire and' 
"recoscilatiori", the Philip- 
pines news agency said, quot- 
ing military figures. 

Two hundred of the dead 
were soldiers, militiamen and 
police and 69 were rebels. The 
other 21 were civilians, in- 
cluding the mayor of a north- 
ern town, who was killed in an 
ambush. 

Addressing graduates of the 
military academy in the north- 
ern city of Baguio on Satur- 
day,. mis Aquino appealed to 
the estimated . 16,000 NPA 
guerrillas to lay. down their ' 
airns and join her in rebuild- 
ing the. station aficr the over- • 
throw, of ' former . President 
Marcos on February 25.’ 

“You waged war ; against 
Marcos because be was the ' 
embodiment of the worst 
injustice, greed and- cruelty,** 
she said- “1 fought Marcos for 
the same reason. We had a 
common stand and an over- 
riding purpose: the end of 


Mr Eduardo Cojuangce, an 
estranged cousin of President 
Aquino, who fled the Philip- 
pines with Bremer President 
Marcos, was replaced as 
flminiwB and chief executive 
of San Miguel Corporation, 
the company announced on 

Saturday (UPI reports from 
Manila j. 

Mr Andres Soriano, aged 
. 35, grandson of the forader of 
the huge beer-based company, 
wifi replace him while keeping 
his position as president. 

tyranny and shame and the 
beginning of hope and pride. 

“Now that the evil has fled, 
there should be no more 
reason to continue fighting. 
Our differences can be settled 
through peaceful processes." 

Mrs Aquino, the country's 
first woman Commander-in- 
ChieE. indicated she would 
soon announcea ceasefire and 
a programme to integrate the 
rebels inio society, 

A de facto ceasefire over the 
election period and during the 
revolution that followed does 
not seem to be holding. Sepa- 
rate ceasefires initiated by 
regional military commanders 
in central Luzon, north of 
Manila, and central Minda- 
nao, tbe island hairiest hit by 
the insurgency, have been 
Called ofi. 

Some attacks have involved 
100 to 200 guerrillas. In one 
battle 23 people died. 


“With the continuing esca- 
lation of attacks by the insur- 
gents against military 
detachments, we have no 
choice but to face them 
squarely," Brigadier-General 
Lorenzo Mateo said last week 
when he ordered his provin- 
cial commanders in central 
Luzon to resume “search and 
destroy" operations. 

His action came a day after 
the armed forces chief Gener- 
al Fidel Ramos, reminded all 
commanders that no ceasefire 
had yet been called, and said 
he would not condone any 
“unilateral ceasefire" by re- 
gional or provincial 
commanders. 

Despite the release of more 
than 500 political prisoners 
and her talks with Communist 
leaders, Mrs Aquino has 
hedged on her campaign : 
pledge to call a six-month 
ceasefire leading to peace ne- 
gotiations, peihaps because 
tbe rebel response has not 
been encouraging. 

So for the Communist Party 
Central Committee has not 
issued a firm policy stand on 
her peace offer. 

“It is still too early to claim 
with any assurance how many 
of those in the hills will heed 
our call and return to us," she 
admitted in her address to the 
174 graduates. "Those who do 
not will face a reformed and 
reinvigorated fighting force." 


i 


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THE TIMES MONTCAV MARCH. JA JORA.^ — 
THE TIMES MONDAY MARCH 24 1986 • ^ 


THE ARTS 


Television 

Emblem 
of loss 

Perhaps not since the days of 
Black Beauty has a horse been 
so thoroughly fictionalized, so 
it came as no surprise that Bill 
Morrison's Shcrgar (BBC2) 
was described as M a drama 
based on the events sur- 
rounding” the kidnapping of 
the famous animal. Of coarse 
it is difficult to make that 
particular ■ horse interesting 
perse and a modern Gradgnnd 
could only define it as "Quad- 
ruped. Forty teeth. Makes a 
lot of money. Commodity.” 

So the basic plot was a 
simple one: a member of the 
IRA. desperate to regain bis 
dwindling power in that orga- 
nization. decides npon the 
kidnap in order to raise mon- 
ey. At the very end we heard 
the recorded voice of the actual 
man, but this was not the only 
touch of realism in a play 
which gave a most convincing 
account of a squalid business. 
It seems to have ended only in 
one dead horse. 

The style of the piece was of 
that low key. bitter, slightly 
edgy kind which characterizes 
scenes from Northern Ireland, 
and it was precisely hers that 
the horse came into its own: it 
was seen both as a symbol of 
national identity ("Irishmen 
have been racing horses for 
over 2,000 years”, as one of 
the characters puts it) and as 
an emblem of lost national 
pride; the owner of the horse, 
the Aga Khan, was character- 
ized as an "absentee land- 
lord". To steal Shergar. then, 
became an act of emblematic 
vengeance. That is the theory 
at least, and of course it is one 
♦ha t puts the IRA in the 
kindest possible light — al- 
though Stephen Rea. as the 
increasingly desperate kid- 
napper, did convey an unmis- 
takable air of seediness. 

As a drama, then, it had the 
merit of simplicity — this may 
have made the occasional di- 
dactic passages a little tiring, 
but it did mean that those 
scenes daser to a conventional 
“thriller" were highly effec- 
tive. The scenes with the horse 
were good, also: he was such a 
good actor, in fad. that it was 
quite impossible to distinguish 
him from the real thing. 

Peter Ackroyd 


■KM 






■ ' % V '■ * ^ ■■■■>? ■/ 

jft-sTTSy 

i •: v . 




publishing 

Paperback pbinge 




Wharton as the world usually sees him, and as he sees himself 

The reclusive William Wharton, author of 
Birdy but painter by preference, has a new 
novel out this week: interview - and a rare 
one - by Nicholas Shakespeare 

Indelible variations 








^ v'^ | 


(Hi 


When Allen ^ w 

hie first Penguins in 1935 ai t» there is that relative 

wrc 7s 6d ami paperback, in fonn ?L^ 

Muc.miniri 


between izs ou - ^ cnmcwDere 

first. Penguins sold in .Wojj- and mass-mat^ 

worth’s and on station book- j t tends to be used 

stalls. Most booksellers Sm££| 0. liteW vte 






James II and his son, the Old 
Pretender, fled to the cobbled Pans 
suburb of St Germain-en-Laye. So 
did the Impressionists. And so in 
their footsteps has come a gregarious 
recluse known to the locals as “a 
crackpc-t American painter who has 
never written more than his name” - 
and to the rest of us as the novelist 
William Wharton. 

When al the age of 53 he published 
his first novel. Birdv, the paperback 
rights were sold for $500,000 and the 
book was made into a film. Stephen 
Spielberg is currently negotiating for 
his novel Dad. Robert Altman is 
hoping to persuade Marlon Brando to 
plav the lead part in Scumbter — 
about an artist living in Paris - and 
Robert Redford has shown interest in 
plaving two parts in Wharton’s latest 
novel Pride. Published this week. 
Pride is one more indelible variation 
on the theme of Wharton’s child- 
hood. 

Wharton divides his identity and 
time between the Paris studio where 
he paints, under his own jealously 
protected name, and the houseboat 
where he writes, transferring his 
fiction from index cards to tape to a 
word-processor. Fewer than a handful 
of people know the artist as the writer. 

His houseboat, once an Arctic 
explorer's Iove^nest. is reached by a 
gangplank which he winches up when 
working. Downstairs, under a cage of 
canaries, is his study, crammed with 
tapes of him reading aloud and hung 


with his proudest creations of all — 
Impressionist in style and content, 
American in colour. Around the 
wooden cabin are several docks. 
Their chimes every 15 minutes 
prompt him to stop and breathe. 
Sometimes for inspiration he ambles 
over to an exercise bicycle. “I do my 
re-writing there", he chuckles, widen- 
ing his blue, animated eyes. “Watch- 
ing Jane Fonda saying ‘Up and Press 
and Squeeze’. Whenever I’m stuck I 
get out Jane and we do our thing 
together.” Rubbing a neat tangle of 
beard, he boasts he has made it to her 
advanced class. 

Redting into a microphone. Whar- 
ton does not often get stuck. “One of 
the reasons I don't want to live the life 
of a writer is I don’t want writers’ 
problems. Not thinking of myself asa 
writer gives me the freedom to be 
one. I'm not a wordsmifo. I just 
basically look into my head and see 
the image and look for words.” 

Most of what he sees, before he 
blends it into fantasy, is personal 
memory’. “As the teacher said at 
school, write about what you know.” 
He points to a brown cabinet Its 
drawers bear the titles of his novels, 
titles which have been there 20 years. 
This means that after Pride come 
Tidings , Say Uncle and Frank v 
Forbo. Each title a different aspect of 
the same life, each the triumph of 
method over madness. ■ 

Though he is American, from 
Philadelphia, Wharton's stoiy begins 


in France, the home of his ancestors, 
where as a young soldia- he w^s 
wounded in the Second World War: 

In Paris his teeth were built up with 
gold and a metal plate was inserted m 
his jaw. “I remember thinking how 
beautiful Paris was. I said I would buy 
my life back and come and live ber^ 
My idea was to get lost, to be alone. I 
didn’t like humans at alL" _ 

Aged 19 and vested with the 
authority of captain, he had been put 
in charge of a unit filled with 
“Southern crackers". Some of these 
men captured a German squad and 
massacred 10 of them, “shooting 
them in the side of the head just to see 
their eyes pop out Technically it was 
my fault I felt morally it was my 
feult” He returned to America, 
remembering a trench talk with his 
greatest friend. “We agreed you had 
to be in control of your own life and 
people's access to you. When he died 
I took a personal vow to following 

this-" . 

He became a painter because rt 
was something I could do by myreu^. 
He started writing because of h» 
nightmares. Working as a night- 
watchman in a five-cent variety store 
he would wake up in the back room, 
sweaty with guilt “I wrote out my 
dreams and in the morning flushed 
them down the loo.” 

Unable to live off painting, he 
taught art married the girl next door 
in Los Angeles, and went to live 
above a canyon in tomcat country. 
“The prime reason I left America was 


television. When we got pregnant 1 . 
bought a used set Then one day I 
threw ft down the cliff into Tapanga 
Canyon, where my goats ate it It was 
ah intrusion.” 

' This fear of intrusion explains his 
refusal to be known nr photograplKd. 
“America chews up its creative talent 
People give up their lives for the 
artificial creations on .television. I 
want to go on working and living a 

regular life” — the life he has led since 

returning to Paris in 1960, when he 
scraped his living in oils and told his 
children stories while his wife taught 
at a kindergarten. 

When Body was published, about a 
wounded American soldier who 
thinks he is a canary, his publisher 
dapped him on the shoulder and said 
his life as a painter was over. 
Wharton told him he was wrong. I 
will always be a painter who writes. 
As long as 1 am you're going to make 
money out of me." When he h eard 
about the pap er ba ck rights, his first 
thought was he need never «4l 
another pointing.. His second was to 
boy back as many as he could. His 
third was to buy a chateau to house 
them. He fingers the spectacles on the 

cord around his neck. “I still don't 
know why I went public. ;It hasn't 
changed one thing. Except", he adds 
sandy, “the enjoyment of beingread 
is probably not compe n satio n enough 
for the invasion". 

• Pride is published on Thursday by 
Jonathan Cape (£9.95). 


reprints migiuuu u.. — - market sales, uranuu 

Wtecks. PublUh^toaBm Paladin, pm- 

foe tide couW not tj halt^ a non-ficao»imprmt, 

and by the outbreak ofjm taK1 gaion; Roto 

Penguins were selling every- ^ - ^ Swan (Corgi) 

newsagents, tobacco- Trade paperbacks 

nists, chainstores, department aweaoy oablrshed sunuJia- 
So^ovot dot machines and ^^^“^ibacks. to 
certainly boo kshop^ _ cash in on reviews. 

Today most pop^^L xL paperback industry is 
back fiction retails at £2.50 or worried. Until a 

Sunk and -hardback novels ™ paperback 

are mostly £10 less 5p. Thus . _ - were having to com- 

foe’ differential berweennew ^f^iforach other in the 
titles and repitoteaai^oxi- pay unnatu- 

mately four whereas halt a advances to ac- 

centuryagort^ 15. lather j^Sd tit j es , foe big books 
words. ^ Seeded both to obtain credr- 

day are getting a bad “cal- to gain rack-space in 

Mass-market iwirerback AraSimateiy half of 

sales ate not, overall, increas* to a few 

sgafw 

foauadecade aj^ In the USA, originating bouse.^^ 

paperback sales are plummet- Now hormajetong town 

imjr during the first seven in, and wherever fiaame 
months of last year sales were hardback h ouses are bnnging 
50 mOIibn fewer than in the out the paperbacks otUKar 
same period during the previ- authors’ titles. For 
ous year. Hardbacks likely to foe new John le Carrey 
be susceptible its aggressive perfect Spy , is to be 
promotion and marketing are, backed nett. as uaialby^i 
in the most : professional but by Coronet, Hodders 
houses, receiving the full treat- reprint arm. 
ment, and accordingly selling 0 f all is the 

■ high percentage-level of re- 
lf someone is indued io JJgjL paperback houses. It 

fork out £ 2 J 0 for a book a usedtob ^s^foJ the reason 


iuik. - ----- used to be sam tnai me rwawu 

year after it is why paperbacks were so mex- 

she IS torly_Mhkely m to ff- because of 

Seir paper cover, bul berause 


son wth other forms ofram- ^ printed in so many 
tainment are stdl . cheap, this reducmg the unit 

notwithstanding shoddy fond- wifob«t-sdkrs. 


iiigs, inadequate proofread-, 
ing, dull printing on bomble 
paper — to .buy the boo^.when 
first it comes out. . ^ . 

Two other fectors are 
ing the mass-market paper- 
back. First, there is ffle 


cosl Except with best-sdlers. 
this is no longer so. As print- 
rims are cut as unrealistic 
advances have to be paid to 
aftfact and retain major sefl- 
iog authors, as kings' ransoms 
have to be spent on promo- 




yurh as Philip McCutchan, 
Elizabeth Ferrais and Brian 
Calfison.are avidly borrowed 
— 80 per cent of their print- 
nuts may land up an library 
shelves — but they rarely get 


deeps closer to that of 
hardbacks. 

The paperback certainly has 
a past. But what of its future? 

EJjCraddoick 


Jazz 


Concerts 


Smyths memorial 

UCS Theatre 

Pat Smythe. the Scottish jazz 
pianist best known as a dis- 
creet accompanist of singers, 
was hardly a major figure in 
jazz when he died a couple of 
years ago. He is remembered, 
though, with a quiei but 
persistent affection, now ex- 
pressed in the institution of a 
memorial concert and an 
award to be presented annual- 
ly to a young jazz musician of 
outstanding promise. The big 
band of Allan Ganlcy was the 
featured attraction at the con- 
cert, at an intimate school 
theatre in Hampstead, and the 
first Pat Smythe Trust Award, 
a cheque for £700. found its 
way into the gifted hands of 
Steve Melling. a 26-year-old 
pianist from Preston whose 
work with NYJO. the Clark 
Tracey Quintet and oihers has 
marked him out as a promi- 
nent member of the new 
generation. 

Accompanied by Tracey's 
drums and by Phil Sieri- 
opoulos's double bass. Mcl- 
ling performed three pieces 
which together gave an idea of 
his considerable range. The 
first, cast in a modal harmonic 


framework and with hints of a 
rock beat, showed that he can 
cope with the long shadows 
that McCoy Tyner and Keith 
Jarrett cast over any young 
jazz pianist; the second, a 
breezv 32-bar tune by Smythe 
called" “Take it Easy”, dis- 
played a graceful swing and a 
civilized sense of humour, and 
in the third, a blues of the 
pianist's own devising called 
“Greens Enough for Thna”, 
one could hear a young mind 
at work on the venerable but 
limelessly intriguing discover- 
ies of Bud Powell and 
Thelonious Monk. 

Ganley conducted his 14- 
piece orchestra in an extended | 
work called Suite for Four ' 
Friends, its movements dedi- 
cated to dead heroes of British 
jazz. Tubby Hayes was re- 
membered by Stan Sulz- 
mann's urgent tenor saxo- 
phone. while colourful writing 
for muled brass evoked the 
spirit of the trombonist Keith 
Christie. Smythe received fur- 
ther tribute from the guitar of 
Phil Lee, followed by a finale 
dedicated to Phil Seamen, 
remembered with obvious af- 
fection by ihe energetic Terry 
Jenkins in the featured role. 

Richard Williams 


YMSO/Blair 

St JohiTs 

Once one looked to Penderec- 
ki for avant-garde showman- 
ship. Now, it seems, one 
should be discussing his han- 
dling of sonata form; his ripe, 
romantic scoring; his tunes. 
Not often has a musical 
medium been so thoroughly 
turned over to suit a message. 
That message is the volatile 
fusion of Catholicism, nation- 
alism, sacrifice and stoicism 
which infused Poland in foe 
1970s. and which is surely the 
inspiration of such odd works 
as his Second Symphony. 

This “Christmas Symph- 
ony” quotes (with a naivety 
that I found faintly embarrass- 
ing) the carol “Silent Night" in 
several places, but it is actually 
a very noisy night where 
goodwill to all men is mani- 
festly in short supply. The 
musical idiom leans heavily 
on the rhetoric of ambiguous 
protest perfected by Shostako- 
vich. Jagged, heavily counter- 
pointed string themes, for 
instance, are reminiscent of 
the Russian's Fifth Sympho- 
ny, while a jackboot-strutting 
climax, hammering away at a 
semitone interval over a back- 


The Royal Opera 


Richard Strauss 


Royal 

Opera 

House 








Conductor; Bernard Haitink. 

March 27, 31; April 4, 8, 10 at 7.00pm. 
Reservations: 01-240 1066/1911 

Access/Visa/Diners Club. 



ground of string trills and 
military drumming, hovers 
close to the “Leningrad". 

Perhaps Polish audiences 
find this blatantly reactionary 
and thickly-scored music full 
of symbolic meaning Western 
listeners might decide it hangs 
together rather creakily. 

The Young Musicians Sym- 
phony Orchestra was in deter- 
mined mood, and James Blair 
guided it through this complex 
score with a sure touch. He 
also just about kept the 
quicknre exchanges of Bar- 
tok’s Piano Concerto No 2 in 
line, though in this notorious- 
ly reverberant acoustic steadi- 
er speeds might have aid e d 
clarity. 

Where one could hear Nich- 
olas Unwin’s passagework 
.clearly, however, this young 
pianist sounded like an excit- 
ing prospect Technical chal- 
lenges do not daunt him: the 
first movement cadenza, for 
instance, was delivered with 
big-toned gutsiness which 
never hindered its pulsating 
momentum. There were wel- 
come signs, too, of a more 
lyrical awareness, especially in 
a rhapsodic winding-down of 
his fleet-fingered scherzo. 

Richard Morrison 

Opera 

The Coronation of 
Poppea 

Marlowe, 

Canterbury 

Monteverdi was nothing if not 
a pragmatist. The Coronation 
of Poppea was probably writ- 
ten for a travelling company: 
numerous re-writings bear 
witness to its need for flexibili- 
ty. and the reduced instru- 
mental textures to the econ- 
omic exigencies of Venetian 
opera production. On the face 
of it. an ideal package for a 
touring troupe like Kent Op- 
era. And so they proved, by 
making the work their inaugu- 
ral production in 1969. 

Now comes an entirely new 


Earl WUd 
Wigmore Hall 


In this second of his three 
Liszt recitals, Earl Wild con- 
centrated on the piano pro- 
scriptions of this most indi- 
vidual of 19th-century com- 
posers who at the same time 
had an unique capacity to 
respond to the weak of others. 
And not exclusively on his 
own terms; either. 

Bach's Fantasia and Fugue 
in G minor (originally for 
organ) and Beethoven's Hist 
Symphony, which took up the 
first half, are genuine tran- 
scriptions rather thanlaunch- 
ing-points for Liszt's own 
composing instincts, and are 
nonetheless interesting for 
that 

But the second half was 
what the capacity audience 
had obviously come to hear, I 
am simply glad I was there 
too. Wild's genial presence 
enhanced proceedings: be 

looks rather like a veteran 
lumberjack who has put on a 
tail-coat and white tie for the 
evening, sits down at the 
keyboard and makes some of 
foe most satanically difficult 

production, and Monteverdi 
would doubtless have ad- 
mired Jonathan Hales’s prac- 
tical ingenuity, but probably 
precious little else. With Rog- 
er Butlin (designer) he has 
opted for the seventeenth 
century: a single noble interi- 
or, black and white in heavy 
satin and ruff and circular 
tiled floor. Ivan Fischer’s 
choice is equally prudent: a 
large cootinuo group (five 
keyboards, lutes and cell!) 

, scattered in the shadows. The 
instrumental tints are tasieful- 
. ly selected and executed. 

But the whole purpose of 
Monteverdi's practicality was 
: minutely to stage-manage his 
i drama in and through the 

■ music itself To this purpose. 

> Kent Opera's chilly new pro- 

■ duction seems oblivious. The 
heavy severity of gesture and 

r deportment required by its 


piano music ever written seranC 
(I cannot resist this one) as' 
ample as felling of a log. -s.- 

Tire paraphrases of Verdrs 
Rigoletto and the Spinning- 
Song from Wagner’s Flying 
Dutchman were quite daz- 
zlingly done. Wild transform- 
ing foe latter’s fearful tech- 
nical difficulties into an 
iridescent, gossamer-light cas- 
cade of keyboard figuration, 
with only an occasional hard- 
ening of tone. 

Similarly, some relatively 
relaxed Schumann and Cho- 
pin song-transcriptions and 
three of the Paganini-based 
Grandes Etudes exemplified 
what this tradition of tran- 
scendental pianism is all 
about; even the fiendish “Ea 
Camptnclla " seemed not .to 
cause Wild undue effort. ' j 

One normally thinks of his 
playing in terms of what might 
be called its extreme muzzle- 
velocity, but his choice of 
encore revealed another side' 
of things: the long-breathed, 
wonderfully ornamented Lar- 
ghetto of Chopin’s Second 
Piano Concerto was delivered 
with memorable restraint and 
tenderness. 



Emotional authority much beyond that of the text: Natasha 
Richardson (left) with Sian Thomas playing to the life 

Theatre 

In fear of cliche 


Malcolm Hayes 

period actually inhibit toe 
maleability of emotion . ex- 
pressed in every twist and turn 
of Monteverdi's vocal line. 

If the high castrate role of 
Nero is to be taken by a 
woman then; for all her con- 
siderable qualities, that wom- 
an should not be Patricia 
Rozario. The projections of an 
inescapably female sexuality 
and her dusky near-mezzo 
soprano provide none of the 
hard brilliance which must I 
bounce off Poppca’s own 
musi&There are moments 
when Monteverdi's nerve- 

endings are fleetingly touched: 
in the intensity of Sarah 
Walker's typically regal" Ott- 
avia, and in the shrewd comic 
business of Christopher Gill- 
en's nurse, Amalta. His lulla- 
by, though, is all too potent: 

Hilary Finch 






it> -Vi-. - : 

& •Clsi.A 


S **<£*; V' 





With 'to in™ medical anent.cn, 
DUt Sties teaming tiierapv and nursing we are able to give to all 

. -T-% J** our 2/0 patients, Lynda is now improving. 

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Lvnda Ellis was ahvavs outgoing. Brought retumingandoursneech therapi 
up in Wffious countries’ she returned to her to t-Sk again. 6ut perhaps tl 

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soeedi and blind in one eye. Nine months (No. 205907) and rehr upon dona- 

la^stiU unconscious arid with little hope uons, covenants and legacies, 
of recovery, Lynda was admitted to the RHHL Please help. 

The Royal Hospital & Home for Incurables. 

" patrons: H-MThe Queen and HM The Queen Mothec 


result of all is that Lynda’s sunny nature is 
shining through. Her fellow teachers are 
amazed at the transformation. 


Please help. 


legacies. 



lb. Captain A a Hutton. OBgXNfRerd). 
Direcior of Appeals. The Royal 1 

Hospital ana Home for Inairableg . j 
Dept LWestHilL Putney, 
Londonswi53SW ; • 

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I 


China 

Bush 

Seek as I may for other levels 
of meaning, the message of 
Mark Brennan’s piece seems 
to be that Soho's demi-monde 
is a sad and tawdry play- 
ground where large sums of 
money are made out offurtive 
diems and girls wasting their 
best years by- staying up too 
late at night Simon Spokes’s 
.production at least, enables, 
you to niake this discovery at 
the Bush’s modest rates, rath- 
er than by paying ‘upwards of 
£50 fora bottle of champagne: 

China takes its title from a 
northern girl' who assumes 
that name on moving into 
Soho. The handout caffs her 
an “enigmatic drifter", but 
that is much too definite. She 
could be a drifter; she could 
have a secret plan;, she could 
be in flight from something in 
her past. China plays it close 
to the chesL All you can say 
with any certainty is. that she 
starts the job in a state of 
quivering nausea, and goes bn 
to captivate every man who 
crosses her path. 

Jusi why the ruthless - Mr 
Chandler^ takes on such an 
unpromising applicant as a 
night-dub hostess m the first 
place is one of the play’s other 
mysteries; but, once In it, 
China finds* her niche as a 
glacial untouchable whose 
eoittumption of. booze and. 
cigarettes rivals that of the 
boss. As played by Natasha 
Richardson she develops an 
emotional authority much be- 
yond that of the text ' 

-The opening scene shows 
China and her equally enia- 
matic friend William (Eddie 
O’Cwmell). preparing for an 


enforced threesome with the 
masterful Mr Chandler. From 
this you expect plot repercus- 
sions when she subsequently 
applies to him -for a job. But 
they gloss over it and the 
incident is barely mentioned 
again.. Then someone de- 
scribes the ciub as a place 
“where men can detide who 
they are.” This turns out to be 
another false doe: instead of a 
series of role-playing clients, 
we get a string of well-behaved 
insurance men and husbands 
showing off family photo- 
graphs. The plot subsides into 
brief episodes with many un- 
motivated arrivals and depar- 
tures showing typical mo- 
ments in the life of the club: 
advice from the senior hostess 
Cynthia, interludes with the 
freelancing Will iam, and the 
humiliating audition of anoth- 
er, new girL 

Much the most successful 
creation is foe torch-carrying 
Cynthia: a stereotype, but 
written" with wit and gusto, 
and played to the nutcracker- 
jawed 1 life" by 'S iari Thomas — 
characteristically seen wel- 
coming a quaking debutante 
to her seedy domain with the. 
line “Weil,, well, you shall gcr- 
to the ball”. Elsewhere, much 
of foe writing seems to go in 
fear of didfe. It is foil of hints 
of violence, threat »n<j desire 
which point towards senti- 
mentality and then get cut off 
■ before arrival This is particu- 
iariy thejase with Suran.. 
Wilson’s Chandler, a lordly 
aggressor forever puffing his 
punches _ and covering his r 
tracks wifo smoke-screens of 
• . obbqii e irony. As somebody 
m Made in Bang- 
faajc, badinage is ; instead of 
... conversation”. . : 


i 


mistake 




He took the experts’ advice and 
stopped eating everything 
they claimed could be harmful. 


Almost every food and drink has been 
riticised for something at one time or 
nother.lt would seem that if it doesn’t give 
ou heart disease, it’ll give you high blood 

iressure or even appendicitis. 

But now it’s generally accepted that 
here is no food that is harmful when eaten 

n moderation. 

Sugar is no exception. 

Now results of 3 years research for the 
American Government Food and Drug 
Adminis tration and a British research re- 
view “Sugar in Perspective” endorsed by 
independent experts have been released. 

Both agree that consumption of 
sugar, like many other carbohydrates, can 
contribute to dental caries. 

Hardly earth shattering news. 

What may surprise you is that sugar 
was cleared on all other charges investi- 
gated. If you have an open mind about diet 
and health you’d probably like more 

detailed information. 

Why not contact us at the address 

below. And then, armed with the facts, you 

*•. n'Ti"R 

ran make up your own mind. ... 


T TTP, 

• SUGAR 
BUREAU 


THE SUGAR BUREAU, 120 RODNEY HOUSE, DOLPHIN SQUARE, LONDON SWLV 3LS. 


Jkii 


„ .IHE TIMES. MONDAY MARCH J[4 ISafi 


THE TIMES MONDAY MARCH 24 1986 


SPECTRUM 



Who runs Mrs Thatcher’s Britain? Seven 
years ago, the Conservative government 
promised a revolution in Civil Service style 
and management. In the first of a three-part 
series, Colin Hughes goes behind closed 
doors and assesses what has really happened 


THE TWO WHO TOOK ON THE MACHINE 




CCM&MAL 


Sab fret 


T.gid Yriori*} 


J I Invert* c*te ^ 

rcitrlctiv* Jabtwr practice* 


Civil servants, a Cabinet Secretary 
once said, rank alongside Wigan 
Pier and mothers-in-law as butts 
of stereotyped humour. From the 
caricature of bowler, brolly and 
Surbiton semi-detached, to cosy 
Sir Humphrey Appleby mockery, 
inaccurate public images have 
long been exaggerated by an aura 
of mystery. 

The mass of Britain's 600,000 
civil servants are better represent- 
ed by the DHSS cleric who 
confronts the public from behind a 
benefit office grille; by VAT 


study now under way into die 
running of the £1.000 million 


Community Programme. 

But savings of that size loom 
small against the annual 
£16,000 million cost of keeping 
the bureaucracy on the road, The 
exercise has cot had the knock-on 
effect its advocates hoped. The 
system has accommodated 
Rayner. Jt has not taken him to its 
heart. The unit's very future is this 
week in some doubt, following the 
unexpected departure of its head, 
Ian Beesley, to a private sector 
management consultancy job. 

New navigators have also come 
in from the private sector, deter- , 
mined to pull the wheel more 


en 

d 

inspectors, driving examiners, im- 

di 

o 

migration officials and prison 

T1 

ji 

officers. 

w: 

IC 

Five out of six civil servants 

n 

’ll 

work outside inner London, a 

Mi 

ta 

third are aged under 30, nearly 

SI 


half are women, and most never 

w 

j 

meet a minister, let alone say 

ft 

'I 

S-es” io him when ibey mean 

a 

aj 

“no”. 

d 

e 

But recently, among both the 


Vi 

lever-pullers of Whitehall and the 

ti 

ir 

cogs and wheels in the rest of the 

c 

n 

country, there has been a shared 

& 

a 

feeling of disquiet The wrangle 

t 

»t 

over trade union representation at 

t 

A 

GCHQ and confusion following 

t 

:r 

the trial of Give Ponting have left 

« 

c 

many of them unsure and insecure 

1 

V* 

about their roles, rights and 

I 

ir • 

responsibilities. 

1 

it 

The leak rebellions of TisdaB 


•L 

and Ponting may be the price of 




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in dsxpv l cm 

3tt£uce wper-*e«*S*»viTy *o ___ 
cnviroflnwntal consider ata.o«C SOB 
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Slint GBvexn<«Mit cboEiwt* S» _l- 

Jwvbtir off **"*11 ■nd.BMJiom T 
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13.* Bc-prt-rllced Vh* Civil SenrScaCSD 




il't 




tightly round a right-hand bend. 
Most have been relegated to the 
back seat The Central Policy 
Review Staff “think tank" was 
scrapped by the Prime Minister. 
Sir John Hoskyns took over the 
Prime Minister’s Policy Unit with 
crusading zeal. Among his early 
plans was one to “deprivilege the 
Civil Service”. But he ended up on 
the roadside, thwarted by the 
Cabinet Office and advocating 
from his post as director-general 
of the Institute of Directors a 
mould-breaking reform to blast 
away the rocks on which he 
believes this government, like 
others before it, has foundered. 

Replacements have chosen to 
swim with the tide. Sir Robin 
Ibbs, brought in from Imperial 
Chemical Industries to run the 
Efficiency Unit, is a part-time 
agent with a small staff of only 
nine career civil servants, a David 
against the Goliath of government 
departments. 

The Number 10 policy unit, 
from which the mild-mannered 
John Redwood has recently re- 
turned to Rothschilds, still adopts 
the lower profile which he 
preferred. 

More politically motivated ad- 
visers have come in to oil the 
machine, and faced the perennial 
problem: they can only tinker with 
a vehicle built on traditionally 
stylish but old-fashioned princi- 
ples. The system that has survived 
1 30 years is being compared with 
slick French Citroens, sharp. Ger- 
man BMWs, brash American 
Buicks. and found wanting. 

The eternal question remains: 
who is in the driving seat? 
Ministers are still confident that 
they dictate the direction of 
government. Yet in the past few 
weeks the Prime Minister has 
begun to consider the creation of a 
new Department of Education and 
Training, a suggestion partly bom 
of the abiding belief that Depart- 
ment of Education and Science 
civil servants deliberately frustrat- 
ed education voucher proposals. 
Sir Keith Joseph was persuaded by 
his officials that the system would 
be unworkable, and be dropped it; 
the hope is that Lord Young, Mrs 
Thatcher’s “action man”, can win 
a replay. 

Michael Heseltine believes his 
introduction of line management 


disaffection which government 
has to pay to achieve change; the 
Westland affair exacerbated 
symptoms of uncertainty about 
where the buck stops. 


New navigators 
have been 
relegated to the 
back seat 


Britain's vaunted Rolls Royce 
bureaucracy still powers on 


smoothly and, for the most part, 
silently. Bui seven years of convic- 
tion politicians who came to 
power impatient for a “new style” . 
of government have raised ques- 
tions which could yet force exten- 
sive reappraisal of the written and 
unwritten rules of relations be- 
tween civil servants and ministers. 
Radicals both left and right want 
to go back to ibe drawing-board, 
while Whitehall and its defenders 
are fighting to retain old virtues. 

In some parts of Whitehall the 
administration's style has un-, 
doubiedly been streamlined by' 
new emphasis on management. 
Lord Rayner, brought in from 
Marks and Spencer, set up the 
Efficiency Unit and Financial 
Management Initiative to reach 
into dusty comers and sweep out 
money-wasting. By Iasi November 
the unit had carried out 206 
scrutinies, identifying £600 mil- 
lion a year savings, from cutting 
planning appeal delays to a huge 



W"--' 


t wJT< 


imSM 

wLWkl 





--j 7 V, -- - 










“Small victories had r been won but Whitehall had 
absorbed Raynerism as illiad ah the other schemes for 
reform and improving efficiency. In 1 985 a report by 
the Efficiency Unit summed up. Only half the planned 
savings had been achieved and even then ithad taken 
twice as long as expected.** 

Cli ve Ponting: Whitehall Tragedy and Forte* 1996 


accountability at the Department 
of Environment and Ministry of 
Defence enabled him to overcome 
“the tyranny of the in-tray, press 
cutting, parliamentary question, 
and manifesto” In charge of 
departments employing tens of 
thousands, he used die system to 
find what every branch was doing, 
unearthing absurdities such as the 
MoD having three separate units,; 
each ordering false teeth for the' 
three different armed services. 

Some officials have struggled to 
adapt, others have dug in their 
heels against threatening trends! 
One official's apologetic presenta- 
tion of a scrutiny paper to his 
colleague illustrates staff sensitiv- 
ity. He wrote “I have cleared the 
action plan. I think it is the 
minimum we can get away with, 
and ! hope it is something you feel 
. you can live with.” 

Miss Anne Mueller.Second Per- 
manent Secretary at the Manage- 
ment and Personnel Office, says 
management and efficiency im- 
provements show that “the Civil 
Service is going through the most 
profound changes for over a 
century”, creating a new “bias for 
action” Since 1979 one in five 
posts have indeed been cut, saving 


£700 million a year (and 13,000 
notorious adminstrative forms 
tom up). Although some of the 
133,000 jobs shed were in depart- 
ments that have been hived off 
slashed numbers have imposed 
heavier demands in some areas. 

The First Division Association, 
representing the 8,000 civil ser- 
vants at the peak of the pyramidr 
has, however, reacted by warning 
its members against succumbing 
to “workaholic” pressures. As one 
principal in the Treasury . says: 


The best are 
being burnt out 
by working 80 
hours a week 


“Most people are teen to lake on 
board new attitudes, and see the 
need for change: Being the expert 
on a policy costing billions when 
you're not yet 30 is still as exciting 
as it ever was. But it’s true that the 
best are being burnt out by 
working 80-hour weeks, at night 


and through weekends, with little 
reward.” 

Morale is low. The comparabil- 
ity pay struc ture, abolished in 
1981, has yet to be replaced. 
Index-linked pensions are a dis- 
tant compensation for sliding 
behind on the earnings scale. 
Permanent Secretaries voice dis- 
creet anxieties: the brightest and 
best civil servants, those mariced 
‘fsrith hold stars behind. their ears” 
as high fliers, are deserting ih larae, 
numbers to' take up jobs m 
■ indusny and theCity. . -• / , 

Hawkish ministers sec the drain 
. as a logical result of their aj>- 
‘ p roach. As one says: “Whitehall 
has for too long had the pick of the 
bunch, creaming off the top young 1 
talent straight out of university, 
and locking them away for the rest 
of their protected lives; It will do 
no harm for some of them to move 
into the wealth-creating 
sector.”They argue that too many 
of those carefUlly selected brains 
.were mouldering m obscure of- 
fices, with little to do but shuffle 
paper. 

Mrs : Thatcher, - by taking an 
unusually keen personal interest 
in appointments and promotions, ‘ 
has opened a vein of resentful 


muttering. -She is accused o£ 
attempting to politicize Whitehall 
by the back door. Mere ability, it is 
alleged, is no\ longer enough: top 
jobs go to those deemed, “one of 
us”. 

No evidence is put forward to 
prove that preferment is being 
made on the party political sym- 
- parities of career officials. Senior 
civil servants, even those toho 
make it privately clear they have 
no personal sympathy fin: this 
government's politics, say rela- 
tions at the top are more amicable 
than under most governments, 
since HarbldWffson’s attanptata 
wiute-hot revolution in 1964~- 
Most acrimony is unfocused, low 
. morale searching for a cause: .. 

• • But John Ward, general secre- 
tary of fflr;FDA;'nuddtt v a;raore 
idling pbirit which reflects the “off » 
. record” views of many mandarins. 
Senior managers, be says, are 
becoming more closely identified 


with the policies they implement, 
and therefore are seen “as more or 


less willing tools of a government 
Tthat is perceived to be hostile, to 
ithe Civil Service?. 

Lord Bancroft has other doubts. 
The former mandarin, who rah 
the Civil Service Department until 
it was abolished — along with his 
'job — five years ago, agrees that, 
'the old attitudes of tbe gifted 
'amateur needed to-be challenged, - 
but tugnes ftat sdf-cdhfidence in- 
the service has not never bedt so •" 
-low since the war.' ' ’• 


«- u The^ spirit and - ethos 7 of the 
service could be destroyed in a 
decade” be says, “unless those in 
' :fpower' "arev<arcfut : to protect its 
virtues.” : ' -j- 

Something, he adds, “has gone 
for wrong with any undertaking 
whote staff finds it necessary to be 
-. furtive, evasive or -apoJogeuc 
about their occupation?’, prefer- 
ring to answer dinner party inqui- 
ries afxniL their work by saying 
they are administrators, accoun- 
tants or economists, rather than 
adntit theyme &vU servants. 

Chaqge.has. been more ,than 
cosmetic: many ' features of the 
' remofflffied Tra^uCracy wifl en- 
dure- not; least because the most 
. enthusiastic' civil . servants . ap- 
^ve/The^lmcw -that despite 
* prtfchotRta Jog jams arising- from 
'• .cut^fhey have nothing to lose. 

■ • Bmtbe turmoil and'pressures of 
:.the- past few years have left an 
lannospherc of bewildered ques- 
. honing thatsoggests greater issues 
; lie beyond Frith in the power of 
the symbol . on British 
government's bonnet is clearly 
waning. Thatcherism promised a 
. revolution ' and ended with a 
redesign. 


TOMORROW 


How to decipher the 
coroplexities of ... 
power -at Whitehall 


ANIMAL EXPERIMENTS 
IN MEDICAL RESEARCH 


Living up to a legend 


YES 


OR 



Overshadowed for so 
long by a father he 
never really knew, 
Julian Lennon has 
found his own fame 


Would you treat a child suffering frorrr 
leukaemia? 


Would you retain Society’s hard won 
control "over polio, diphtheria, TB and 
smallpox? 



Would you agree we must have 
medicines and vaccines which have 
been tested for safetv? 


Would you agree that we need to 
alleviate and control, for example, 
cancer, arthritis, multiple sclerosis and 
heart disease? 


Would you like to see a cure lor AIDS 
and Legionnaires disease? 


Julian Lennon bad just Sown 
in from New York where he 
had hosted a fire-hour conven- 
tion and presented a television 
show. 

A quite remarkable first 
year as a singer and song 
writer has transformed this 
shy 22-year-old man into a 
star in the business with which 
he has lived vfcariouslyall his 
life. It has been something be 
has been striving to achieve 
ever since his chudbood when 
he discovered that being an 
off-shoot of a phenomenon 
could be a distinct disadvan- 
tage when it came to being 
accepted as an individual in 
his own right. 

Even when we met at his 
record company’s west London 
office, he looked strangely out 
of place - a visiting messenger 



Success story: Julian Lennon . 


boy, perhaps, in his jeans and 

blade T-shirt, except for that 
mesmeric pale face, which 
eonld only belong to John 
Lennon's son. 

But now, with his new single 
already in the charts and his 
second album out today, plus a 
European tour starting in 
April which includes a London 
concert at the Royal Albert 
Hall* Julian is emerging into 
his own success story. 

His first album, ValottepM 
US million copies worldwide 


CONCISE CROSSWORD NO 907 


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and be is already notching up 
the trophies in America: an 
ASCAP award for the most 
played single in 1985; a Gram- 
my nomination for the year’s 
best new artist; and voted best 
new male vocalist of 1985 by 
the readers of Rotting Same 
magazine. His only regret hi 
that his lather is not around to 
'see it happening* ’ 

Julian was born inl96$, the 
year the Beatles stepped; into 
history. He was five when 
John Lennon left his mother, 
.Cynthia - and himself - for 
' Yoko Ono. He was IT, and just 
getting to know bis father, 
when John Lennon was shot 
dead. 

“I still think about it, but I 
try not to worry about It too 
much. I just get on with life 
now and think *Oh well, 
maybe 111 see him again*” , 

He wrote his new album. 
The Secret Value of Day- 
dreaming* in a week in Barba- 
dos and paid, for {he 
production costa himself .with 
the £250,000 he made from his 
first album. 

ft is the first proper money 
be has ever had, despite us 
father's nuffioas. He believes 
there to be abort £200,000 in 
trust for him and his 10-year- 
old step-brother Sean to share 
one day. Into meantime, he is 
relying on his tour to enable 
him to bay the little brown- 
stone boose in New York, two 
Soon of which he cmrentiy 
reals. . 


vetting an with 





A lot has changed . 
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He saw little, of his own 
father after Lennon moved 
wfth Yoko io New York; 
. although fee sees both Ydtar 
and Sean now. “The <me thing 
that really gotto me was that 
he never came to see me’*, says 
Julian. “I had to go and-see 
him whenever I had free titne. 
That's the only thing Td have 
a go at him abort today fflto 
was around—” 


^ Then^MKandbookis&eewMembers' 

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12 Portion (8) 

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THE_TIMES MONDAY MARCH 24 1986 

THE TIMES MONDAY MARCH 24 1 986 


MONDAY PAGE 



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Paula Youang 


therape of an Ealing vicar’s daughter has 
focused attention on the diode s*n attack 
can cause to the men in the victim’* life ; 


TJ_ espite the Rev Michael 

I ••■ Sa ward’s protestations 

,-. <1 moS forgiveness for his 

■ ^ . attackers, men close to 
• »• ~. • rape victims do, in 
feclhave a tough time mining to 
terms with what has happened to 
their wives, girlfriends, daughters 
or sisters. It is an aspect of rape 
.that has, . mail- recently, been 
overlooked in Britain. . . 

The Islington Victim Support' 
Scheme in north London helps 
victims of any type of crime, from 
burglary to rape, referred to them, 
with the victims* consent, by the 
local police. When counsellors 
there began to, realize that rape 
victims' were often finding that 
their male partners or relatives 
were having problems coping with 
tbe atrack - problems that were 
affecting tire women's own recov- 
ery - they decided to offer a 
counselling service as well. 

“Rape", says Kathy Hobdell of 
the Islington- scheme, “is an 
enormously stressful situation, 
and people need as much help as 
they canget. It is not just a violent 
assault, it involves sex, a subject 
surrounded by taboos. Sex is an 
area that people often just don’t 
talk about So, if the partners in 
the relationship are «iw«*dy havin g 
a problem communicating, the 
rape makes it far worse." ' 


Dr Anthony Bateman, a psychi- 
atrist at the Royal Free Hospital. 
London, was asked to conduct the 
pilot project and byei- the past year 
-has counselled nine men at regular 
' interviews, at first alone, then later 
with their ' partners Hit miyini 
results will shortly be p ublished in 
The British Medical Journal. Only 
a small minority of tire Islington 
rape. .victims in feet had male 
partners, but nearly all took up the 
offer of co unselling. 

Dr Bateman welcomed the 
project because it took the subject 
out of its srrait-jadeet — the 
presumption all men are 
aggressive and all women victims. 
Although ^women prefer a close 
woman relative or, friend as their 
confidante after the attack — 
because they fed. they can talk 
more freely — rather th?n their 
husband or partner, most do fed 
that they can trust their male 
partners. They don’t believe that 
all men are rapists. 

In contrast, the Rape Crisis 
Centre (which offers a 24-hour 
tdephone counselling service) will' 
talk to men, only to suggest that 
they get their female partners to 
call tire Centre. Thor address 
renfeins known only to women: 
this, explained a spokeswoman, is 
so that “the women fed safe”. 
Suck an attitude merdyremforccs 



^Perhaps the greatest difficulties 
lie in the partners’ inability 
to discuss the event together 9 


the siege mentality that is part of 
the mythology surrounding rape. 

Dr Bateman found that the 
responses of the victims’ partners 
pointed towards a characteristic 
syndrome. ."There is an initial 
phase of angpf lasting Gve to seven 
days, followed by ..a . protective 
phase associated with avoidance 
activity' and anxiety symptoms 
lasting more than a month, and a 
later depressive phase associated 
with guilt and sexual difficulties'’. 

The third phase of guilt, hope- 
lessness and depression, com- 
pounded with anxiety, irritability, 
headaches, sleeplessness, in- 
creased drinking and smoking, can 
last for more than six months, and 
merely adds to the women’s 
difficulties in attempting to res 
sume their normal lives. Dr 
Bateman says. . 


The men's initial reactions of 
disbelief are followed by an ge r, 
directed first against the victim. 

. Why had she allowed it to happen? 
Why had she been foolish enough 
to be in a situation where it could 
happen? They feet however un- 
reasonably, that they should have 
been there to protect the wife or 
girlfriend Finally their anger turns 

X ’nsi tire a tracker, and they 
n say they want violent 
revenge. 


K athy Hobdell says that 
these responses have 
mud) to do with the 
myths that surround 
tape; that men tend to 
believe rhnr rape is an unambigu- 
ously violent situation where a 
Superman intervention could 
have saved tire day. “But," she 


says, “rape is not necessarily the 
unknown assailant armed with a 
knife in a dark alleyway; it’s to do 
with forcible sex by an acquaint- 
ance, or perhaps the result of a 
chance meeting in a pub, or a lift 
home from a party — the kind of 
situation that is difficult for the 
woman to explain without feeling 
she will be blamed for what took 
place.” 

It is this kind of rape that is 
seldom reported to the police 
because of women's fear of male 
disbelief and disapproval 

In counselling, many of the men 
still showed, some months later, 
an uncertainty about the actual 
facts and circumstances of the 
rape, revealing both the ambiguity 
of their feelings about their 
partners’ acquiesence, or even 
sexual eqjoyment of the attack. 


and the difficulties they had had in 
discussing it between themselves. 

During the second phase the 
men showed excessive and unrea- 
sonable protectiveness. They in- 
creased the security of their 
homes, with bars on the windows 
and extra locks on the doors - even 
when the rape had taken place 
outside in a public place. Some 
wanted virtually to incarcerate 
their partners. One man wanted 
his wife to stay at home when he 
was at work; or, if she did go out 
alone, to telephone him every 
hour. Another started to take time 
off work to accompany his 
girlfriend to the local shops; even 
six months later he still kept a 
starting pistol by the side or the 
bed. 

In a recent American television 
soap opera, the hero, having 
successfully chased away his wife's 
would-be rapist, declared: “It's all 
right now. I'm never going to leave 
you alone again, ever” A succinct 
phrasing of the myth of male 
culpability and resulting over- 
protectiveness. "The awftd thing 
about rape." explains Kathy 
Hobdell. "is that it takes away a 
woman’s control over her life So 
such cotton wool treatment can 
become a problem." 

This kind of reaction interferes 
with the victim’s adjustment to 
tire rape, and with such attempts 
to get back to normal as mastering 
her anxiety about travelling alone 
on the train because the attack had 
taken place there. 

Perhaps the greatest difficulties 
lie in the partners' inability to 
discuss the event together. Dr 
Bateman found that the men 
avoided any reference to violent 
sexuality in the media, or in 
conversation with other men. 

One vetted the newspaper every 
morning and, if it contained any 
item about rape, would hide it and 
claim it hadn't been delivered. 
Another broke bones in his hand 
when he punched a brick wall after 
bearing some workmen whistle at 
a woman passing in the street 


Dr Bateman said:“Interesi- 
ingly, this inability to come to 
terms with male sexual violence 
extended further than just close 
partners. One rape victim worked 
in an office with only male 
colleagues. When she told them 
what had happened to her, they 
were unable to talk to her for a 
week. 

“ It's as though any suggestion 
of being able to cope with sexual 
violence becomes impossible for 
men when directly confronted 
with the rape.” Most couples look 
up to those months to resume their 
sexual relationship, although for 
many it took much longer, espe- 
cially if there were had been sexual 
difficulties before the rape. 

O ne man described him- 
self as “trying to make 
love without really 
making love" — in case 
he did something the 
rapist may have done. “Aggres- 
sion forms pan of normal 
sexuality", says Dr Bateman, 
“which then becomes frightening 
when the rape confronts the man 
with the aggressive component of 
fits own sexuality. But without 
risking an element of aggression, it 
may feel impossible to him to 
have sex at all'' 

Although there is a feeling of 
hopelessness about the relation- 
ship. a feeling that things can 
never be the same again, the men 
said they were not too concerned 
with the essential Victorian notion 
of their woman women being 
“soiled'', although they admitted 
having thought about iu American 
studies have shown that a rape 
tends to end 3n existing 
relationship. 

All but one of the couples 
involved in the Islington scheme 
are still together, but Dr Bateman 
points out: “It's early days yet It 
doesn't all end happily ever after, 
but I do feel that these couples are 
at least being given the chance not 
to split up.” 

Isabelle Anscombe 


A school for senses ... Your money or your figure? 


By 1988, London 
children could be 
learning as they play 
in the classroom of 


the future _ ■ 


One 1 f-year-okl would {fire to . 
can it "the * Five * Senses 
Centre" because “in a real 
museum, tike tbe'Spence - 
- Museum, -you only use two , 
senses, you see andyoo hear 
and you can't touch, but here 
you’ll be able to use aB five". 

It will have a house in winch 
everything can be worked - 
washing machine, telephone, 
central heating — and a street 
beneath which children can 
explore. There will be a telcvi- 
sioa studio and an office fully Children’s London Discovery 
equipped with the latest com- Centre and Discovery WotkL 
in unications systems and a Its director is. 34-year-old 
personal computer. There will Stephen Feber, a former poty- 
be a huge mouth, the start of technic teacher. “ I have 
an exhibit called “Afl About always been more interested 



fj 

* > * v ' ’ 

3 - 





P-* >•;, •> • •; *.• .t.'- - ? 


The dess of *88: Stephen Feber and Vivien 


Me”. 

This is the ptoygroimd-ctxm- 
dassroom parents and teach- 
ers have so far been able only 
to dream o£ It now looks set 
to become a ceitainty since the 
Oore Fbtmdation pledged ini- 
tial funding which may be 
worth as much as £5 million. 

It wifl open in 198K . . Initial b uilding COStS . 

Exhibits like toilet cisterns *.i , 
and locks wifl lave cut-away Will DC million 
sections to show what happens • . • 

mhen they are worked, and "The definition of an attrac- 

tbere will even be a “sensory live exhibit for me is that it 
deprivation area" where chB- allows the learner to expen- 
dren wifl find out what it ment and play", he says, 
means to be handicapped- There will be a pedai xar 
"Fra years I have been which will only, work if four 
trying to encourage children to children pedal in harmony. 
IcanT by experience rather "Oeariy it's going to be as 
than the written word alone”, muefa^a social as a learning 
says Mrs Barbara Ryan, head event”, 
teacher of Laycock Primary The project began in 1979 
School in Islingttxn, north when Mrs Rosemary Gokl- 
Icth W -“This will be a great smith, wife of Trusthouse 
facility for schools. Teachers Forte’s planning and market- 
will be able to . use . it for ing director, took her family 
problem-solving, but it could ■ on a visit to a new children’s 
also teach . adults to trust museum in Los Angeles where 
children to think for. visitors were encouraged to 
themselves." play with exhibits — “some- 

Mrs Ryan's school is one of thing I'd never seen before” — 
several in -London whose chfi-. and derided there should be 
dren have been fartping to find such a place in Britain. The 
the nanre to replace the work- Los Angeles museum was 
iqg tide of Children's Muse- hself based on the Bosum 
um. Front-runners. so far are Children's Museum,- which 

Home at StreaSham 

cai?esSffCTOr3D0mcuMHe 
people of all ages 

Ife nurse them^ wiffi gentleness, kwe and 
dedication for many years- • . ■ 

Our costs-over a million 3 k— Afi T 

pounds ayear-seriousty H 

outstripourmcome. af 

Please help, by sending a ’ i 9 

donation or arranging a covenant 

or legacy to transform the 

of those less fortunate 

oar residents harafeapped 


in education which is -in the 
control of iht learner, in 
providing environments and 
situations where people, can 
learn at their own pace” says 
Feber, who ran the Sudbury 
Hall Museum of Childhood in 
Derbyshire until last year. 


t £□' { 

f iaenraaes g 

Hmie:«Jrti£rtn£t- ';■■■■'* j 

X AMius **■"— ...I., • tt ■ 


was to play another crucial 
part in the founding of the 
London centre. 

Goldsmith consulted 
and recruited experts and was 
further encouraged by a gov- 
ernment grant of £50,000 to 
research the. theme. Sire hired 
Stephen Feber and they pro- 
duced a glossy brochure to try 
and attract sponsorship. 

' Meanwhile Mrs Vivien 
Duffield, daughter of the late 
Sir Charles CJore and a trustee 
of the Core Foundation, was 
visiting tiie Ruth David 
Youth Wing of Jerusalem 
Museum and then the Boston 
Children's Museum with, her 
own children. “Here was this 
fantastic place for kids to learn 
by. doing, mid there was 
absolutely nothing in Britain 
remotely like it. - Then 
Stephen’s - brochure came 
through the Foundation's post 
and as I'd just seen these 
things I knew What it was 
: about”. . . 

She contacted . Feber — 
“with no promisesjust a show 
of interest" — and set to work 
persuading her fellow trustees 
to help. Though as yet she is 
cautious about the amount, h 
is thought that £5 million is 
being made available to pay 
for initial building work (ex- 
pected to cost about £3 mil- 
lion) and some exhibits. 
Grants and more sponsorship 
are being sought by Feber. 

In September last year Ron- 
ald Grierson, chairman of the 
Smith Bank Board, an- 
nounced that the centre would 
be shed there.- He has offered a 
site ; between Hungerford 
Bridge and the Festival HalL 
In . November the - Conran 
Foundation proclaimed the 
centre would go to its new 
complex at Butler’s Wharf. In 
feet a choice has yet to be 
made, and there is even a third 
site under discussion. 

This month, the Royal Op- 
era House's building projects 
manager, Robin. Dartuigton 
was appointed to evaluate tire 
various sites and a decision is 
expected by the spring. . 

“We are seeing the start of a 
new. service industry”. . Mrs 
Goldsmith .believes, “which 
we could " call 'leisure 
education* and we . believe 
there will be centres like this 
all over Britain m a few 
years," ... 

Mrs Ryan's children can 
hardly wan. One little enthusi- 
ast wanted 'to know: "Will we 
be able to go even without the 
school?" 

Simon Tait 


Dr Srnfly Blotnkk has just 
published the results of a 25- 
year study of career wooes* 
and has aired a problem that 
the working iterate may not 
have knows that she had: 
some mas might come along 
and marry her for her money. 

' This is a wmry ihat ssed to 
be confined . to bona fide 
.heiresses and never got mach 
sympathy oat of me: if a Ms 
Onassis or a Ms Rockefeller 
have sometimes- bees racked 
withdoebts thatjheir shining 
' souls are not the only thing 
abort them that causes gentle- 
men to break oat fir a rash of 
proposals, my reaction is that 
they are very lucky to hare 
something else which makes 
them desusbte. Inherited oil- 
tankers or dollars are a gift of 
natare, like Monde curls. 

But to have fortune-hunters 
flocking on account of tire 
money yoo have earned all by- 
yourself is something com- 
pletely different For whereas 
tire oO- tankers and dollars 
that are handed down from 
father to daughter tend to go 
on forever, one’s ability to 
draw a good salary is finite. 

It is upsetting enough to 
suspect that a man might take 
to the hills as soon as be spots 
silver threads among the gold. 
To be forced to accept that he 
could disappear along with the 


company car on the day you 
get die sack is dreadful to 
contemplate. 

This is an unwelcome new 
aspect of the female conditxm. 
Our main anxiety used to be 
that we were adored on ac- 
count of oar beautiful bodies — 
a man I know reassures his 
shapely wife that this is not 
the case by patting her on the 
bottom ' while exclaiming 
“Wow, what an intellect" — 
but it is now begnaing to seem 

_preferabte_to attract attention 
by means of physical 
attributes rather than by a 
bank balance that is in excel- 
lent shape. 

Just about the only compen- 
sation attached to men who 
hover around high-earning 
women is that they are unlike- 
ly to be over-coBceroed about 
the women’s looks. According 
to Dr BLotnick, M ... in high 
school and college, these men 
were attracted to the best- 
looldag girls. But when they 
were iu their late 20s, and 
throughout their 30s, they 
actually fled sach women ... 
because they sensed that they 
were not In a position to 
shoulder the emotional and 
fi ^tanrtal burden the women 
represented.” 

I wouldn't mind some one 
t hinking my pay cheque was 
the most gorgeous thing about 



( PENNY A 
V PERRICK J 

me if be were an international 
playboy who shot bis cufls, 
captained a polo team and had 
his eau-de-cologne made for 
him exclusively in Paris. But, 
sadly, career women attract 
rather lesser fry. The men who 
want them are unrealistic 
dreamers, waiting for a mirac- 
ulous “one day" and fifliug in 
time with odd jobs while 
preparing to write a major 
novel, or be discovered by 
Michael Grade. They flatter 
odiously and borrow money 
which Is never repaid. In fact, 
they have all the failings of the 
old-style gentlemen of easy 
virtue who traditionally 


buzzed around heiresses, but 
with none of their glamour. 

Another unacceptable habit 
of the modern male on the 
pwU is that he brags about 
the amount of money his 
current girlfriend earns. I have 
never felt comfortable with 
men who told the world about 
my ability to line curtains or 
cook crane brulee. I think 1 
should feel even less at ease 
with a man who boasted about 
my salary. 

One of the career women 
quoted by Dr Blotnick de- 
scribes herself and her con- 
temporaries as “a breed of new 
Puritans" and I suspect that I 
am among their number. My 
Puritanism has. so far, kept me 
immune from men who .lark 
about but makes me fell into a 
romantic swoon whenever I 
meet up with an unrepentant 
workaholic. There is no logic 
in tins behaviour. Men who 
live to work, can afford to take 
you to the Bahamas - bat can 
never spare the time. They are 
often stressed, grumpy and 
exceedingly tired. But they 
understand (who better?) your 
own urge to work hard. And 
they earn enough money them- 
selves to keep their hands off 
yours. 

* Oiherwide Engaged pub- 
lished by Facts on File (£8. 95) 


An evening in 

for two 

A friend of mine complains 
bitterly that the trouble with 
his single state is that he has to 
go out with H-omen all the 
time. This is no misogynist. 
He loi.es female company, but 
doestii like everything that 
goes with it: having to remem- 
bers pick up theatre tickets, 
book restaurant tables and sit 
through films with mystifying 
subtitles. 

If only somebody could tell 
him that women are often in 
no mood for cultural activities 
and would rather not dine out. 
since it tends to be fattening. 

Bur this is the best-kept 
secret in the world. It must not 
be admitted that, now most 
women work, what they like 
doing best are things that do 
not require changing out of 
their flat shoes or a visit to the 
hairdresser. To say this aloud 
would put theatres, restaurants 
and hairdressers out of busi- 
ness. Even so. the first man to 
tear up two tickets for a nigfu 
at the opera and suggest, 
instead, an evening spent 
leafing through Vogue and 
drinking whisky will never 
lack the companionship of 
women till the end of his days. 


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HOME NEWS 


THE TIMES MONDAY MARTM OAlAlfi^^- 


12 


THE TIMES MONDAY MARCH 24 1^86 



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1 :r 


THE TIMES 
DIARY 


Driven to 
extremes 

The business acumen of Richard 
Page, parliamentary private sec- 
retary to John Biffen, Leader of 
the House, gives some insight into 
what Commons insiders may 
really think about British Leyland. 
Page. Tory MP for South West 
Hertfordshire, is also a director of 
Page Finance, a Surrey family 
holding company which owns two 
car distributorships. His firm had 
a franchise to sell BL cars but 
switched to Volvo and Ford. As a 
result, he says, profits have soared 
and warranty pay-outs have gone 
down by three quarters. As a 
qualified mechanical engineer and 
ex-apprentice with Vauxhall Mo- 
■ tors. Page should know what he is 
’doing. “1 wanted to keep my 
employees in work," he says, “so 
'we had to finish with Leyland to 
slay in business. The bottom 
: simply fell out of their market” 


Rially 


If the Aussies were alarmed by 
their new dollar coin — the 
inscription on the Queen's neck- 
lace reads more like POM than 
DOM. the artists's initials -it is 
nothing to the horror felt in Iran 
over the new 100 rial note. More 
than a million are being recalled 
after the authorities found the 
artist had secretly incorporated in 
his drawing the words “Death 
upon the regime” and “Death 
upon Khomeini.” The artist, who 
has gone into -hiding, has also 
drawn into the beard of Mod- 
darress. a dead ayatollah, the head 
of a fox. The notes, and the artist 
are now naturally considered 
collectors' items. 

Small beer 

Scots Tory MP Michael Hirst 
thinks his Commons secretary has 
an exaggerated idea of his means: 
last week she sent him a note in 
the chamber thus “Please phone 
your wife. Nothing wrong, but 
urgent.” Nothing indeed; the 
sheriffs officers had just arrived at 
his home to deliver a writ issued 
by Robert Maxwell demanding 
■ £500.000 damages against Hirst 
and the Glasgow Herald for an 
. article slating Maxwell's working 
; practices. 

Orange red 

Fulham by-election voters may be 
interested to know that Boyd 
Black, the Irishman standing on a 
ticket of opposition to the 
Hillsborough agreement, is a for- 
mer member of the British and 
Irish Communist Organisation. 
His campaign could well damage 
Tory prospects. When I asked him 
about his membership of BICO. 
Black, a lecturer at Queen's 
University, Belfast, replied 
shirtily: “Not correct. I will not 
talk to you if that is all you are in- 
terested in. Goodbye.” His agent. 
Hugh Roberts, was a little more 
forthcoming: “He was indeed a 
member of BICO at one time, as 
well as a number of other dis- 
cussion groups.” 

Whole hog 

No half measures for Lord 
Kimberley. Six times married, 
president of the Falmouth Shark 
Angling Cub, he was expelled 
from the Liberal party for urging 
Liberals to vote Tory in marginal 
seats. Now his Tory credentials 
are impeccable: he has just been 
made chairman of Cricklade 
Conservative Association in Wilt- 
shire. 


BARRY FANTONI 

Post office 

'NEWlfcal*< 



‘You're right Red hair looks 
better on the 20p* 

Hatton’s castle 

Charles Spencer, a regular for the 
past 25 years at the Gay Hussar 
restaurant in Soho, the haunt of 
famous left-wingers, rang to book 
his normal table only to be told 
abruptly to ring back later. Spen- 
cer exploded, and insisted his 
reservation be made immediately. 
Grudgingly, it was. When he 
arrived, owner Victor Sassie ex- 
plained all: the restaurant was 
being used to film one of Channel 
4*s My Britain programmes, and 
the subject had answered the 
phone. His name? Derek Hatton. 

Rod of iron 

If teachers think life is tough 
today, they should take a look at 
the rules issued in 1 9 1 5 for women 
teachers at the Tauranga School in 
New Zealand which a reader has 
just unearthed: “You will not 
marry during the term of your 
contract you are not to keep 
■company with men; you may not 
smoke cigarettes: you may not 
■dress in bright colours; you may, 
under no circumstances, dye your 
hair: you must wear at least two 
petticoats your dresses must not 
be any shorter than two inches 
above the ankle . . .” pJJS 


A haven for misunderstanding 


Dablin 

The humiliating debacle that al- 
lowed alleged terrorist Evelyn 
Glenholmes to go free is the latest 
in a series surrounding the conten- 
tious issue of extradition between 
the Republic and Northern Ire- 
land. Extradition, or rather the 
lack of it. has bedevilled Anglo- 
Irish relations since the start of the 
troubles in 1969 and causes deep 
resentment among Unionists in 
the North. 

The failure of another extra- 
dition attempt has raised further 
doubts about the political will of 
the Irish government in dealing 
with terrorism and has reinforced 
Unionist suspicions that courts in 
the Republic are reluctant to send 
people to Ulster or Britain to 
stand trial. 

Unionists have long demanded 
evidence that the Republic was 
noL being used as a haven for 
terrorists, many of them born in 
Ulster, to plan and launch attacks 
in the North. Extradition was 
proof, but it is only a partial 
answer to terrorist violence. In 
two recent cases in which extra- 
dited men have appeared in court, 
the problem facing the Ulster 
authorities was the difficulty in 
gening strong enough evidence to 
secure conviction. 

Until four years ago the 
Republic's courts refused to return 
people wanted in the North for 
alleged terrorist crimes if they said 
the ad was carried out in pursuit 
of political ends. This enabled 
them to walk free. 


Richard Ford reports on the new suspicions 
over extradition of terrorist suspects 
from Ireland after the Glenholmes fiasco - 


Then Garret FttzGeraltFs co- 
alition government appealed- to 
the Supreme Court against such, 
high court rulings. In 1982 a 
redefinition of Irish extradition 
law began. In the case of Dominic 
McGlinchey it was argued, as 
before, that the alleged offence in 
Ulster was political in intention. 
But the Irish Chief Justice ruled 
out that argument and laid down a 
test: such offences had to be 
committed “in what reasonable 
civilized people would regard as 
political activity”. The Supreme 
Court added that present-day 
terrorist activity was the antithesis 
of what could reasonably be 
regarded as political. 

A further redefinition occurred 
in the case of James Shannon. The 
Supreme Court said: “The IRA 
has abjured normal political activ- 
ity in favour of violence and 
terrorism.” In both cases the court 
ruled that the alleged offences 
could not be classified as political 
under the revised criterion. The 
judgments appeared to indicate 
that extradition would be granted 
for practically any bombings or 
murders carried out by the Pro- 
visional IRA. 

However, despite this narrow- 
ing of the definition of whax 


constituted a- .political offence, 
extradition was to remain an issue 
of great controversy. McGlinchey, 
the first terrorist extradited from 
the South to the North — what’s 
more, on St Patrick’s Day 1984 — 
was found guilty in Belfast of the 
murder of an elderly postmistress 
in County Antrim in 1977. The 
burden of the prosecution case . 
was based on fingerprint evicfence; 
be appealed, and his conviction 
was quashed in October 1984. 

He was re-extradited to the 
Republic amid much -embarrass- 
ment in both the North and South 
and was subsequently jailed for 
ten years for shooting at the Garda 
in an attempt to resist arrest. 

. In December 1985 the second ; 
man sent to -the North for' an 
alleged terrorist offence was 
acquitted in Belfast. He had been 
accused of the murder of Sir 
Norman Strong©, former Speaker 
of the Northern Ireland House of 
Commons, and his son James, at 
Tynan Abbey. Co Armagh, in 
1981. Again the prosecution relied 
solely on fingerprint evidence so 
flimsy that nationalists suggested 
that the Republic's courts should 
consider whether a prima facie 
case existed against anyone whose 
extradition was sought. 


The same month saw the col- 
lapse of perhaps the most ua- 
portant_ extradition^ case so for. 
Brendan Burns, wanted for the 
murder of five British soldiers in 
Northern Ireland, walked free., 
from Dublin High Conn after his 
detention was declared illegaL 

A day earlier 15 warrants 
requesting his extradition issued 
by the RUC had been quashed by 
Northern Ireland’s Lord Chief 
Justice. He ruled that they had not 
been made by a police inspector 
under oath when they, were ini- 
tially issued- by a justice of the 
peace. Earlier warrants in the 
same case had also been defective. 

Similar deficiencies have dog- 
ged the Glenholmes case. Poli- 
ticians in the Republic believe that 
Scotland Yard’s errors hare fed to 
the re-emergence of British prej- 
udice in the belief that Dublin is 
reluctant to deal firmly with 
terrorism, --i 

. Meanwhile the- extradition 
question remains- a dehcate politi- 
cal-issue in - the Republic;- The 
coalition government backs the 
Supreme Court's re-interpretation 
but the opposition leader, Charles 
Haughey, dislikes it He believes 
that the police and courts in Ulster 
are discredited. 

For Ulster Unionists the 
embarrassments of the -.weekend 
-are manna from heaven. Anything 
which heaps trouble on the 
Thatcher and FitzGerald admin- 
istrations after the Hillsborough 
agreement is warmly welcomed. 


What does Nigel Lawson's call for 
“popular capitalism” mean, for job 
prospects in inner city areas with 
high ethnic minority populations? 
The government says the key is a 
package recently announced to 
target existing programmes on 
specific areas. 

The idea is that by using existing 
resources more imaginatively, 
workers can be retrained and new 
business opportunities opened up. 
The Urban Programme, for exam- 
ple. already spends more than 
£130 million, while the Youth 
Training Scheme alone provides 
21,000 places for ethnic minority 
youngsters at a cost of at least £50 
million. Moreover, the 1976 Race 
Relations Act has a little-used 
provision which allows for “pos- 
itive action" in training, whereby 
resources can be targeted on 
ethnic minorities if it can be 
shown that they are under-repre- 
sented in the types of jobs for 
which the training is seen as 
preparation. 

The potential, then, is consid- 
erable, but the effort will founder 
if it is not accompanied by the 
abandonment of assumptions that 
have hitherto dogged previous 
initiatives. The -first is perhaps the 
most tenacious. It is that ethnic 
minority youngsters in general, 
and Westlndiar^ in particular, are 
disadvantaged in a way that is 
analogous to physical and mental 
disability. Their “special needs" 
-are seen as being best. met..by 
support through pre-vocational 
training which combines a re- 
medial element with very basic, 
work disciplines. 

Nothing could be further from 
the truth. The accumulating re- 
search evidence shows that young 
West Indians and Asians in the 
inner city entering YTS schemes 
are likely to have educational 
qualifications at least as high as 
those of whites. They are more 
enthusiastic than others about 
acquiring a skill, possibly as a 
result of parental pressure, and 
more prepared to forgo earnings in 
the short ierm for latex career 
prospects. What are wanted there- 
fore are schemes of the highest 
quality that genuinely provide the 
basis for skilled work or employ- 
ment as independent craftsmen. 

A second assumption is that the 
problems of the inner city work- 
less can be solved only in these 
run-down areas. Ethnic minorities 
are assumed to be located in the 
inner city entirely by choice, and 
to be reluctant to move even short 
distances. The implication is that 
as employment declines with the 
relocation of production to other 
areas, so the opportunities for 
minorities are necessarily re- 
duced. But there is no reason why 
training courses, for ethnic minor- , 
ities should not be run in Win- 
chester, or Cheltenham, or 
Norwich, where the chances of 
involving an employer with va- 


Malcolm Cross calls for new thinking o n 
help for Britain’s inner-city blacks 

When pounds 
give way 



Handsworth, September 1985: deprivation cannot be blamed for 
black resentment ami violence — but racial bias can 


cancies in skilled work or further 
training are so much greater. 

It may be true that labour 
mobility is, in general, not as high 
as some would like — often for 
very good reasons (house prices, 
for example) but there is no 
evidence that ethnic minorities 
are less inclined than others to 
seek out opportunities wherever 
they occur.- On the contrary, the 
recent report of a government- 
funded team led by Professor John 
Eggleston confirmed findings by 
the Policy Studies Institute that 
West Indians in particular are 
willing to relocate for training or 
employment. 

In focusing on “training gnd 
self-employmem opportunities” 
there is an echo in the current 
approach of the view that the 
former is more suitable for West 
Indians and the latter for Asians. 
The assumption is that West 
Indians represent the new Irish 


while Asians have all the virtues of 
the Jews , for industry and .en- 
trepreneurial endeavour. -Recent 
research in the United States by 
Dr Robin Ward of Aston Univer- 
sity Management -Centre should 
guard us against these stereotypes. 
West Indians in New York, for 
example, are described collo- 
quially as “black Jews” while self- 
employed Asians working in the 
US are not disproportionately 
represented. 

it is much more likely that 
migrants and minorities pick up 
opportunities wherever they find 
them, so any differences in self- 
employmem depend on what is 
available locally in terms of start- 
up capital, trading opportunities 
and alternative prospects. . 

. The experience- of Dr Ivan 
Henry, wbo.ru ns- the Handsworth 
Employment Scheme in Bir- . 
mingham. is that West Indians are 
at least as interested in self- 
employment as any cither group of 


young people. The implication is 
that enterprise allowances should 
not be concentrated in Highfidds, 
Leicester, while Netting Hid has 
to make do with training schemes 
for semi-skilled employment. 

Where the Urban Programme 
has been focused on ethnic minor- 
ities, it has tended to fund various 
forms of “self-help” scheme. The 
assumption is that ethnic minor- 
ities are found only in commu- 
nities, which have special needs, 
and the organization and leader- 
ship necessary to see these are met 
if only money is made available. 

The truth is that ethnic minor- 
ities are not in “communities” any 
more than-, anyone else, even 
though they may face common 
problems. So-called “community” 
organizations are no'mqre; repre- 
sentative ofethnic groups than the 
Women’s -Institute " is of all 
women. It would be much better if 
additional funding was used to 
ensure that local services and 
facilities were improved and of- 
fered equitably to all local citizens. 

The final assumption is perhaps 
tiie most general, and holds that 
by targeting funds on training and 
self-employment, we will over- 
come tne fears and fru s tra tions 
that help to. generate inner-city 
disorder. Even if jobs weroavail- 
able there is overwhelming ev- 
idence -that discrimination ' still 
persists: " . *" “"T- 

This most be one factor -in 
captaining two recent , statistics 
fixuntheWesTMidlands. Recently 
qom plcted studies by Birmingham 
University show that of every 100 
new jobs generated in the inner 
' city, 83 went to commulers, not 
residents. Again, when Bir- 
mingham Careers Service submit- 
ted appropriately qualified and 
interested young people to the 
Construction Industry Training 
Board last year for entry to YTS 
training, 60 per cent of the whites 
were taken on but only 4 per cent 
of theWest Indians. 

~ These differenc^ confirmed by 
studies' ' on emplbyer^based 
schemes at the- Ctentro far- Re- 
search in Ethnic Relationship so 
great that unless an: imretenting 
attack is mounted on discrimina- 
tion, whatever good is achieved 
elsewhere will count for Bale. 
What we should be discussing' 10 
years after the 1976 Race Relations 
Act is why it has proved to be so 
ineffectual Do we need to re- 
consider the burden of proof and 
perhaps follow the United States 
in requiring evidence of equitable 
recruitment and promotion? 

Certainly we should not allow 
such ideas to be dismissed as 
“positive discrimination” .when 
they ;are m feet only a more 
determined effort to overcome the 
negative variety. ’ 

. Thin Hmipqpwn, IMS.' , . . 

The author is principal research 
fellow at the Centre for Research in 
Ethnic Relations, University of 
Warwick. 


Can Mr Reaganomics still hang on? 


Washington 

The authority of Paul Volcker, 
chairman of the United States 
Federal Reserve Board, arbiter of 
currencies, controller of i filiations, 
reckoned by many to be the most 
powerful figure in international 
finance, has been undermined. 

On Friday Preston Martin, vice- 
chairman. of the. .Reserve, noisffy 
resigned to stake his claim (they 
are saying on Wall Street) to 
succeed to the chairmanship. His 
departure follows what can only 
be called a revolt against Volcker 
by four new governors of the 
Reserve, recently appointed by 
President Reagan. The stakes are 
high. The battles are over easy 
money, the tightness of monetary 
policy, how to keep inflation 
under control in an election year. 

In late February in a four-two 
vote, with three abstentions, the 
governors of the Reserve made 
dear they no longer supported 
Volcker's overweening position at 
the central bank. He was forced to 
lower the discount rate m an 
attempt to stimulate the sluggish 
..American economy. 

Volcker was reported to be 
stunned He had agreed reluc- 
tantly, at a meeting with Nigel 
Lawson in January, to lower the 
rate to 7 per cent if West Germany 
and Japan reduced their rates first. 
He did not want the United States 
to make the first move and risk — 
he believed — re-igniting the infla- 


tion which his tight money policy 
had all but squeezed out of the 
system. 

Volcker persuaded his col- 
leagues to delay the announce- 
ment until after the West German 
central bank, the Bundesbank, 
said it would cut its discount rate. 
Then came the American cut. At 
first it was said to be a unanimous 
decision by the Reserve’s board; it 
seemed indeed to have been 
initiated by Volcker himself. 

Later, news of the revolt leaked. 
Martha Seegar, one of the gov- 
ernors who voted for the cut in 
February, said, “The Federal Re- 
serve is not supposed to be a one- 
person show. I would hope that is 
the message." 

It seemed that the Volcker era 
had ended. But the judgment may 
be premature. He was after all able 
to convince his colleagues to hush 
up the unprecedented revolt He 
remains in control of the 
Reserve’s Open Market Commit- 
tee which sets money supply 
targets, and so may expand or 
contract economic growth. 

Volcker's demise had been pre- 
viously announced.’ Three years 
ago the headlines were, "Will 
Volcker survive?” He did. despite 
rumours of antipathy to him and 
his policies at the heart of the 
White House. He was appointed 
to a second four-year term which 
expires in 1987. Ronald Reagan 
effectively acknowleged that with- 


out this independent, sometimes 
irascible man, Reaganomics might 
not have been so attractive. 

It was Volcker who derided, 
early in Reagan's first term, to 
tighten the American economy by 
squeezing the money supply to the 
point that the United States, and 
the world, were, plunged into the 
worst recession since the Great 
Depression, 

Before the 1981-82 recession, 
US' inflation was running at an 
annual rate of more than 15 per 
cent. In August 1982. to com- 
pound the problems of domestic 
inflation, a worldwide liquidity 
crisis broke. Mexico announced 
that it could not make payments 
on its S90 billion foreign debt. 

Volcker cobbled together a debt 
strategy. He convinced banks, 
governments and the' Inter- 
national Monetary Fund to agree 
to a rescue programme for the 
beleaguered debtor nations. 

In 1982 he had the Federal 
Reserve change- direction and 
increase the money supply" By 
luck or judgement it was the right 
time. The monetary conditions 
sparked a surge of growth without 
generating price inflation. The 
sequence was compared to the 
boom years of the early 1960s. 

Throughout, inflation has re- 
mained Volcker's preoccupation. 
In a recent, and optimistic, eco- 
nomic report to Congress, he 


warned that a sharp fell in the 
value of the dollar could bring 
inflation back. 

The Reagan-appointed “gang of 
four” - Preston Martin, Martha 
Seegar, Wayne Angell and Manuel 
Johnson - believe the message 
has been overdone. 3y their vote 
and in speeches, they have let itbe 
known that they favour- an in- 
crease in the money supply. Their 
priority, ibe priority of- most 
incumbent politicians, is, to sus- 
tain the economic expansion. It 
has already gone into the eco- 
nomic textbooks as an outstand- 
ing phase of economic growth. To 
keep growth going, they believe 
tire supply of money should' be. 
further loosened. 

The Reagan group is likely to 
seek lower interest rates to pro- 
duce fester growth, at the expense, 
inter on, .of accelerated inflation. 
This is anathema to Vokrket and 
sorae.think he wilt reagm *■ 

: But 'his not yn ex- 

hausted. He is now likely to 
regroup. His skills were sHowruni 
the:. 1970s with 1 , the sorcalfed 
“Vofcker Agreement” which eff- 
ected a 10 per cent devaluation of 
the. dollar and the. temporary 
flotation of the Japanese yen.' He - 
may. yet divide, and conquer, the 
Reserve's less experienced board. 

Bailey Morris 


Anne Sofer 



efficiency 


“What you should be doing, Anno, 
is . writing .more about* what is 
really going on inside the Alliance. 
The internal aiguinenk are always 
the most iineresting”. 

I am . sure they are. .There are 
plenty of people agog for stones of 
splits, rows, feuds and punch-ups. 
Several full-time jobs have been 
created in both the’ Labour and 
Conversative party machines for 
the express purpose of seeking out 
such stories. They have not had 
much joy. Even the chairman of 
the Conservative ‘Party, with all 
.the resources of Central -Office at 
his command, as wefl as his. 
considerable personal store of 
vitriol, has not made much head- 
way. Opinion polls show that the 
electorate- judges both T ories and 
Labour to be for more, disunited 
,tbauthetwo Alliance parties. 

. The person who gave me. the - 
advice' with which 1 opened this 
column is not, as for as I know, a 
paid political destabilizer. He 
made the suggestion as an objec- - 
five judge of good journalism with 
a concern for open public debate. I 
look it as a compliment to the 
SDP and the Alliance. He, like 
others, trad no doubt noticed that 
we originated many of the best 
ideas of recent times. Thus, to find 
out, what Wc are talking about 
behind dosed doors today is to 
discover what the others;. will 
.purloin tomorrow. - 

Th^ Iist of stolen clothes is 
impressive. The Tories’ : popular 
but. highly controversial trade 
union^kgKlation has beea pro- 
moted under the banner of “Giv- 
ing the unions back to their 
members’*; this phrase was a 
direct lift from the SDFs 1982 
green paper written by Roger 
Uddfe; now the SDP candidate in 
Fulham. It was not just the slogan 
but the very concept of controlling 
trade union ' extremism through 
internal democratic processes that 
was ours to start with. 

- Similarly Labour, in recent 
attempts to fudge the. commit? 
meats to Clause Four socialism, 
has looted to our proposals for 
decentralization formspiratiore: 

' The most recent example, of 
daytightrobberyis the proposaTin 
last week's Budget- for employee 
share ownership, and partrcntariy 
the possible use of this innovation 
to avert inflationary pay settle- 
ments. This, as the Times Diary 
pointed out,islaken almost word 
for word from a recent book by 
David Steel and has also been 
extensively discussed in recent. 
SDP publications. ■'.* 

. So L like , every other loyal 
member of the Alliance, has tjvery 
reason to remain. : . tiglu-lipped 
aboiit -our Internal detede^wby 

away preseoisare part of any good 
birthday party andJihe SDIViiye , 
y<San> old 1 tomorrow, fejh .oetor 
bratory and-generoos mood. -So let 
me disenssan issue which-wifi, I 
believe, be one source of Kvefy 
debate within -the Affiance oyer 
the coming months. 

Thu is the issue of productivity , 
in the public services, Cain ; it be, 
should it be, measured?! have felt 
the emotional temperature rise 


when I have asked this question at 
Affiance meetings. Both Affiance 
parties contain many acn vists 
£bo work in foe pubhe settor - 
nurses, social water* teacher^ 
civil servants. Most are admirable 
people with an altruistic comnui- 
mem to public sot**- a con- 
«ant reminder to the rest of us of 
why we are nei&er Conservatives 

nor socialists. They applaud with 

emotion when a party spokesman 
speaks of the equal importance of 
mfoaie enterprise andpuWtfSer- 

vice in foe society we are working 
.for. They, Iflce their colleagues m 

other political parties, we vpy 
sore at tiie denigration aM under- 
valuation that has been their lot m 
recent years. They are under- 
standably aggrieved and deten- 
Siva, And even where they are not 
themselves impoverSiedthey are 
working with those who are a 
feeling of moral outrage -fuels a 
strong commitment to higher 


Fscphological studies indicate 
that this sector of society, the 
“Sateriat" as it has been dubbed, is 
strong in our electoral sup- 
port Through their unions, they 
have resisted the idea that 
productivity, particularly in the 
“caring” professions, can be in any 
. way measured. The very language 
is inimical and inexplicably linked 
-with the cold' cruelties of un- 
restrained capitalism. 

; Yet there is little doubt that 
improving the effectiveness of the 
publfo services i$ one .of our most 
mgeart aational pnoritiesi The 
demands on them, particularly in 
the fields of health and education, 
are remorsefully mounting, to the 
extent that no realistic spending 
programme that any government 
is likely to pirt forward could 
satisfy them all, unless we find 
ways, of doing more for every 
pound spent. 

- David Owen’s bode A United 
Kingdom, which comes out this 
week, is blunt about this. “Any 
government needs more ways of 
measuring and ircwaitling e£ 
firing m foie pubtic service",. he 

foef^ ^^can^mbmist 
stem based; v otir^O&fficency*, 
whert “mere -outpfo relative, -to 
mpctcanbefnti^ucedwithoiita 
reduction in mpot” To adiicve 
th^ “fricentivc*. m well 
judged ■ .and the institutional 
framework geared ’fa. encouraging 
competition”. 

That, 1 am sore* mfi be chal- 
lenged. The very words <“incen- 
tives” “comperitioa”) have trad- 
. ftionally beee anathema. But it isa 
debate/that mast be had and there 
is no otiier pmy in which to have 
& l^bqur wouJd not, dare upset 
foe pofafip sector tundra shad foe 
CbtiServhtives arerso discredited 
as .foe enemy of the public sector 
that they would find' it impossible 

enjga^'foo^very^ participants 
foeyfceed,,. •/ 

,-Jr« m most of the best public 
■servants,- in their private assess- 
ment of the job they are doing, 
there isa creative imeUigeoce that 
knows how it could be done better 
and is itching to try out new ways. 

I hope that the debate will help 
liberate those ideas. 


moreover : . . Miles Kington 





Hello! (writes Sheepshank, our 
wandering naturalist % Have you 
ever noticed that Nature Notes are 
always about common birds and 
flowers? Things that we' can all 
see? Well, I thought for a' change 
we’d have a nature column about 
the very rare stuff that nobody 
mentions until it's threatened with 
extinction, and not always then. 

Pride of place tins March must 
go. to Halley's Osprey, which 
comes back, only every 76 years. A 
Mir are nesting somewhere' in 
Scotland this 1 year, - though " of 
course, we can’t zdl you where, 
otherwise you’d all want to go arid 
have a look and frighten the thing s 
off! wouldn't you? 

' Halley’s Osprey is a large bird 
with beautiful brown speckles — 
na hang on, that’s the egg. You’ll 
have to excuse me here, because of 
course I’ve never seen the bird and 
I'm working from a reference 
book. The Osprey itself is a huge 
black and white bird, unless of 
course it’s a black and white 
photograph of a coloured Jw«L 
You have to remember that the 
last photo of the bird was taken 76 
years ago . when colour ■: photog- 
raphy was .in. its infancy, but it's a 
■preny 6erce-looJdDg.bira, so if you 
do come across. it, don’t have a " 
go — send for the police. ' ' ' • 

Another piece of exciting news 
is that Hafdmayefs Parrot has 
been spotted somewhere in Eki 
A nglia. You caa’i actually look up 
Hafeimayer’s Parrot in a bird 
reference book, because there is 
actually no bird of that name— 
Hafelmayw is foe name of the 
.owner, and he is a weU-known 
member of the Jewish co mmuni ty 
in East London to whom I owe a _ 
few fevouis. Apparently, accbfd- 
ing to sightings, foe parrpi is fine 
but Mr Hafdmayer is pining away 
without him, so I would welcome 
fimherrcportsassodn as possible. 

- We've i also ..heard- foat: the 
Bacftdor JBird has been spottedin 
the CotswoWs.' Even -rarer than- 
Halley's Osprey because .m -least 
youger a pair of-ospreys whereas 
the Bachelor ford moves singly. It 
does not even maze with its own 
kind, preferring totako an inno- 
cent corncrake out for the evening, 
then leaving h to have the eggs by 
itselfin a apgjteoarent nest sW 
don. The Badiefor Bifd is heart- 


less and frivolous. It stay: 
London all week and flies o« 
foe country early on Friday to 
the crowds, hs call is a ras 
pleasure; if yon meet it c 
believe a word it says. 

- A small outbreak of Ta 
Woodrow Orchids has been 
ported from the site of 
intended A444<M) Extern 
Hus extremely rare orchid, bi 
yellow; is lcnown to Cmw nnli 


aMc» ui nnenaeomotorw 
“suafly starts breeding aft, 
motorway plans have been < 
up, as if in some mysterious 
knew that the protesters ' 
need iL On the other hand, i 
jwst have been planted ove 
by some ecological lobby. 

One of foe most uncormr 

Sk ffi® been seen c 

tnese first warm rinuc 


. a Dimerny j 

doesn't belong to anyone 
East End. Ii was discovert 
German of that name, and 
unusual about it is that 
dead Straight Most unusu 
fortunately, that's afl ft can 
h can't turn roi 

ontravelling. It was spJt* 
the 16th,. Luton 
pth and Guildford on foe 1 
salting foe Ch^J 

Ejy a foot-out 
Datterfly heading south. 

had a phoi 

from a reader who sayThe 
anythin, 

from several i 

worn Mr Hafehnawr’c 

conversation: foe 
“iit rj^T . 1116 mam or 

business?", iskrZ 

for lunar 

om^n new 

UouveUe mei 

and tunup^SS ® ^ 
ttunly sliced se f v ^d 

haconahd chin?? c 
we “-Gpod^ t S i ^ 1 ‘ w ‘loj 


i-f 


Cl 


1 < 


ji | sl\_ c& 


J 




«tr v, % 
s f,r 0| Cf i. 


-TOE .TIMES MONDAY MARCH 24 1986 

THE TIMES MONDAY MARCH 24 1986 


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Street, London El 9XN Telephone: 01-481 4100 

. ■ . death warrants 


Saturday’s force ht the courts 
and streets of Dublin was a 
diarp and frightening fflustra- 
tion ° f the problems foced by 
awlized societies, based on 
t he r ule of law, in bringing 
terrorism to book. Such sod- 
edes can accept the existence 
of political parties which — Kke 
Sinn Fein — come as close as a 
windy piece of rhetoric to 
endorsing murder and bombs. 
Such .societies have no alter- 
native to the rule of law, even 
when that means the rule of 
cramped and precise legal 
rules. . 

1 Pr opci procedure ma y 
sometimes, like Saturday, 
have its price. The smirk, the 
ugly grin, on the fece of Evelyn 
Glenholmes* lawyers; the 
looks of helplessness on the 
feces of the Irish policemen, 
desperate in their efforts to 
bring an a ccu sed person to 
justice, were what society must 
sometimes live with, a cost to 
be borne for the freedom that 
defines its civility. 

Saturday will bring 
recrimination. It will bring 
mirth from the IRA. It will be 
seized on fry Ulster -Unionists 
who do not want to believe 
that the Republic is, Hire the 
United Kingdom, a pluralist 


society based on laws. It ought 
to bring, and urgently, reviews 
of procedure in London. . 

It is difficult to imagine the 
account of events that must be 
given to Par liamen t this week 
that can omit a promise fry 
ministers to discipline anyone 
who performed the apparently 
so slipshod work on so weighty 
a document as the warrant for 
Glenholmes. No sentimental 
code of Whitehall tolerance 
should protect the official,, 
officials, or police officers who 
might be responsible. The 
reply to every exculpation, 
every “form of words” is short. 
That warrant accuses 
Glenholmes of bloody murder 
on the streets of the capital. 

The inquest has to range 
widely. To the Foreign Office, 
for example. Why has British 
legal representation in Dublin 
been so lacking ? Why, when 
the British Government can 
muster teams of silks to repre- 
sent it in big cases in Stras- 
bourg has legal nous 
apparently been missing in the 
judicially simple (but politi- 
cally so sensitive) case of 
extradition from the Republic. 
Every back-street Dublin law- 
yer knew that the process of 


A TALE OF TWO CITIES (AND A ROCK) 

Spain’s fbrdgn minister Seflor To describe Gibraltar in the at La Linea, then cross 

Francisco Fenfflndez Ordonez terms used by Senor Fenian- the first time into Gtbn 
has complained that Gibraltar dez Ordonez is anyway to state discuss in situ coopt 


is the last remaining colony in 
Europe. As such, he says, the 
promontory is a “morally 
intolerable” anachronism. 

The “colonialist” taunt is. 
often a convenient one. The 
Spanish foreign minister is not 
the first to use it in generalised ' 
abuse and be will not be the 
last. Nonetheless, coming 
from the representative of a 
country with the last remain- 
ing European colonies in Af- 
rica, it is a little rich. 

Those colonies are the city 
enclaves of Ceuta and Meiilla, 
surrounded by Morocco on the 
North African coast Calling 
them colonies is likely to 
provoke the red-blooded 
Spaniard to protest They are, 
Spaniards insist, an integral 
part of mainland Spain — and 
have been since before Mo- 
rocco existed. 

On the other fian&they are 
daimed by King Hassan of 
Morocca Some 19,000 Span- 
ish troops are garrisoned in 
each to protect them from his 
dutches. The parallel between 
their situation and that of 
Gibraltar on the for side of the 
straits (Ceuta is almost exactly 
opposite) is irresistible — and 
frequently drawn, not least by 
the government in Rabat. 
Hassan has made it perfectly 
dear that if and when the day 
should come for the Spanish 
flag to* flutter over Gibraltar, 
he expects to start hoisting his 
own over Ceuta and Meiilla. 


something of a half-truth. A 
colony it may be, but the 
passions surrounding it are not 
those normally thought of as 
colonial. Its inhabitants are 
hardly an oppressed people 
whose path to independence — 
or “return” to Spain — is 
blocked by the government m 
Britain, -The reason why the 
Rock remains British is that its 
people want it so. Their wishes 
are dear. Under the 1969 
Gibraltar constitution the 
United Kingdom undertook to 
respect them. The result is that 
the sovereignty of Gibraltar, 
ceded to Britain under the 
Treaty of Utrecht more than 
270 years ago, remains an issue 
between London and Madrid. 

That the arguments became 
so healed during the 1970s was 
the fault of General .Franca 
He dosed the frontier between 
Spain and Gibraltar in 1969, 
but far from making the 
colony fifi - like “ripe Suit” 
into his lap (as he predicted), 
the blockade hardened the 
attitudes of those who lived 
there and made them less 
inclined than ever to chang e 
landlords. That the issue has 
since cooled is a tribute to the 
good sense of Franco’s succes- 
sors who have reopened the 
frontier and begun the process 
of normalising cross-border 
relations. 

Earlier this month officials 
from Britain and Spain met for 
one of their periodic sessions 


at La Linea, then crossed for 
the first time into Gibraltar to 
discuss in situ cooperation 
over use of Gibraltar’s airport. 
Spain's refusal to grant 
overflying rights for British 
military aircraft and the status 
of Spanish eitirai!? using the 
airport before crossing into 
Spain are two issues still to be 
resolved. 

Both Spain’s entry into the 
European Community at the 
start of the year andtbe recent 
referendum which so dearly 
confirmed the country’s 
membership of Nato have 
helped to erode differences. 
Gradually, over a period of 
time, the question of whose 
flag flies above the Rock 
should become less relevant 
The concern of the Gibraltar- 
ians should become less acute. 
For the time being however 
sovereignty cannot enter the 
arena of discussions. Neither 
the option of ceding the Rock’s 
sovereignty then leasing it 
back norths two-ilag, so-called 
“Andorra ; solution” repre- 
sents an acceptable course for 
as long as the people of 
Gibraltar say “no.” 

This might seem unreason- 
able in Madrid. But to pretend 
that the status of Gibraltar can 
be otherwise is to deny reality. 
If Spain wants to realise its 
long-term objective it will 
have to win the confidence of 
the Gibraltar people — a 
process which will take pa- 
tience and time. It will not be 
helped fry words like those of 
Senor Ordonez. 


FOR THE LISTENERS IN THE EAST 


Forty years ago today the BBC 
began broadcasting to the So- 
viet Union in Russian. Those 
first broadcasts met a need for 
information — truthful, bal- 
anced, sometimes uncomfort- 
able information - with which 
the Soviet authorities did not 
see fit to trust their people. The 
Soviet system is, essentially, 
unchanged. And that is the 
reason the Russian Service of 
the BBC is as necessary as it 
was in 1946. 

Yet the BBC's broadcasts in 
Russian have not survived 
without a struggle. The Rus- 
sian Service has had to com- 
pete for support against the 
other language services of the 
BBC That has been healthy 
competition. But the External 
Services as a whole have also 
had to take their chances 
against the internal spending 
priorities of the Foreign Office. 

When cost cutting hasbeen 
ordered in the Foreign Office, 
the grant-in-aid which pays for 
Bush- House has appeared all 
too often at the lop of the hrt. 
It is hard to escape the 
impression that Whitehall re- 
gards a second consulate here, 
retention of a governor's house 
there, as m ore palpable ex- 

Weakness at A level 

From Miss Anne Dreydel . 

Sir, So long as we continue the A- 

tevd system, with 

tion on three sufcects m 

school years, in contrast 

other nation, science 

team no English- arts pumfr no 

mathematics. OT SOC^ aftcr tne 

age of 16. and only a f 1 ™** 

proportion «3 

language or ' history: no 

maSsLchutg at primary school 

!LJS*USL WS 5 mv 


Educationists use, ^ ” 

-breadth- in 3 

nervous cf kraag depth . 

university dons assume - 


pressions of British influence 
abroad than broadcasts from 
the BBC 

But it is not only financial 
difficulties that have dogged 
the BBCs broadcasting in 
Russian since the beginning. 
The Russian Service has also 
had to contend with the im- 
placable hostility of the Soviet 
authorities towards those who 
broadcast in a language its 
people understand. 

The Soviet Union does not 
provide facilities to visiting 
journalists to cover any but 
official events. Whole areas of 
Soviet life are effectively out of 
bounds. Secondhand reports 
cannot be checked and the 
accuracy of information ob- 
tained unofficially has to be 
assessed according to experi- 
ence, precedent mid instinct 
■ In such circumstances it is to 
the BBCs credit that its 
reputation for news-gathering 
and analysis remains so high. 

The Soviet authorities show 
the same hostility to those of 
its citizens who wish to listen 
to foreign broadcasts. In many 
Soviet cities it is virtually 
impossible to listen regularly 
to t he BBCs broadcasts be- 

mistakenly — that candidates are 
stronger in their entry subjects for 
having given so mac b time to 
them; hence, they argue, our three- 
year university courses compared 
with four or more years in other 
countries. (There are quite other 
reasons for our shorter university 
courses.) 

For seven years I watched year 
groups of 90 students taking either 
A- levels in three subjects or the ■ 

International itaccalaareat with its 

six subjects - three at higher and 
three at subsidiary level, plus 
theory of knowledge and an 
extended essay. • . 

As we expected, the IB st u d e nt s 
had “breadth” but. signifirantly. 
fliev also had “depth . being at 
least as strong in their higher 


cause they are jammed; delib- 
erately, expensively and in 
contravention of international 
agreement 

The level of jamming im- 
posed by the Soviet authorities 
is a compliment It is also a 
violation of individual lib- 
erties and should be rec- 
ognized as such more than it 
has been. The BBCs reluc- 
tance to have the government 
protest on its behalf — lest it be 
seen as the creature of the state 

— is understandable, but over- 
idealistic. Unless protests are 
voiced, and loudly, in the 
course of Anglo-Soviet diplo- 
macy and not just at inter- 
national broadcasting forums, 
the jamming will go on. 

From time to time an insid- 
ious argument is heard in 
Britain. Jamming so reduces 
the impact of broadcasting to 
the Soviet Union that the 
money would be better spent 
on other things. To accept this 
would be to capitulate to 
Soviet pressure. It would be to 
foil the many Russians who 
try, despite the risk, to acquire 
that most dangerous political 
commodity in a totalitarian 
state, information. 

levels as the A-leve! groups in the 
same subjects. 

They have likewise done as well 

— or better — at university later. 

This in fact accords with most 

people’s experience. We are not 
necessarily best at the things we 
spend most time on. Learning to 
work quickly is surely a valuable 
skill in itself, whether preparing 
the dinner or achieving fluency in 

a language. - 

— So a broader, .based school- 
leaving examination demands — 
and gets more from the can- 
didates,' along with flic satisfaction 
that comes from working most 
effectively. 

ANNE DREYDEL, 

11 Moreton Road, 

Oxford. 


LETTERS TO THE EDITOR 


Reflections on the Budget 


Glenholmes’ appeal up 
through the Irish judicial sys- 
tem was to have been a further 
test of the Supreme Court's all 
too recent dictum forbidding 
terrorists from claiming 
“political” defence. 
Glenholmes’ lawyers would 
have claimed that the alleged 
offence of murdering a British 
soldier fell inside the Irish 
courts* criterion of 
“reasonable” political activity. 
That test is for the time being 
lost 

But there is an opportunity 
from Saturday, too. No gov- 
ernment enjoys the service of 
perfect servants. Neither Brit- 
ish nor Irish politicians can 
guarantee the adherence of 
judges to their political prior- 
ities; that is the cost and the 
beauty of judicial indepen- 
dence. There is, in short, 
common cause to be made. 

For Mrs Thatcher it is a 
damage limitation exercise. 
When she turns to Ulster the 
point is simple. This incident, 
so unnecessary, says nothing 
about the sincerity of the Irish 
government, the effectiveness 
of cross-border liaison, or the 
good faith of Dr FitzGerald 
and the. Irish police. 


From Mr J. F. Gamer 
Sir, In his Budget speech the 
Chancellor referred to the report 
of the House of Lords Committee 
on Overseas Trade as predicting 
that “as the oil revenues diminish 
the country wiU experience ad- 
verse effects which will worsen 
with time.” He continued: “If we 
*can survive unscathed the loss of 
half our North Sea oil revenues iu 
less than 2S weeks, then the 
prospective loss of the other half 
over the remainder of the next 25 
years should not cause us undue 
concern.” 

The purpose of this argument 
was then to deny that the long- 
term decline in oil production 
from now on would have an 
advene effect on the l/K economy 
by means of a comparison with 
the halving of the price of oil in re- 
cent months. 

In feet the recent foil in oil 
prices in no way negates the 
Committee’s hostile conclusion 
about the validity of the 
Chancellor's arguments. 

At the moment we are a small 
net exporter of oil in relation to 
gross domestic product. Most of 
the effects of a price change in oil 
must therefore be considered as 
operating within our economy. 

Businesses benefit from lower 
costs and the general expansion in 
world demand but the Govern- 
ment loses some tax revenues. 
There is likely to be a redistribu- 
tion of profits from oil companies 
to manufacturing industry. 

The Chancellor is thus correct 
in stating that the present price foil ' 
is likely to have a small effect, 
except for external receipts, on the 
economy. His argument is utterly 
false, however, when applied to a 
future reduction in the volume of 
North Sea oil produced. When this 
occurs and we become again a 
large importer of oil we will need a 
strong manufacturing trade sur- 
plus to pay for it 

It is precisely the lack of such a 
surplus to which the House of 
Lords Committee referred. The 
Chancellor's argument does not 
impinge upon this problem at all 
1 and is a weak attempt at sub- 
terfuge. 

Yours faithfully, 

J Jr. GARNER, 

Corpus Christi College. 

Oxford. 

March 19. 

From Mr S.E 1 ScommeU 
Sir, It is now seven years since a 
Conservative Chancellor ex- 
pressed a strong view on the 
iniquity of a capital levy (at 30 per 
cent) on gams that were non- 
existent in real terms being merely 
a reflection of inflation. 

Thai the inflation had been 
deliberately launched by a Conser- \ 
vative Government in the so- 
called “dash for growth” and then 


Prescription charges 

From the Director of the Associ- 
ation of the British Pharmaceuti- 
cal Industry 

Sir, Your correspondent, John 
Weatherill (March 14), noted re- 
ports that the recent 20p increase 
in prescription charges (which is 
equivalent to about 3 per cent in 
“rear, retail price index-adjusted, 
terms) b exactly in line with the 
rising costs of medicines. 

He then goes on to express his 
concern, based on this informa- 
tion, that medicines must be 
taking a rising share of the NHSTS 
limited resources and that con- 
sequently other areas of care roust 
be suffering cuts. 

In fact, for tins year (1985-86) 
the available data indicate that 
NHS medicine costs, as expressed 
in manufacturers’ returns, will 


Money for farmers 

From Mr A. Harrison 
Sir. Your leading article (March 
1 1) calling for “much more basic 
thinking” on Europe's farm sur- 
pluses strikes right at the bean of 
the matter “Grain support levels 
have been reduced, but with 
technical advance, the yield still 
increases.” 

This “technical advance” has 
been a doubling of nitrate fertiliser 
applications within the last 10 
years. Because nitrate earns a 
financial return of 400 per cent to 
1,000 per cent, depending on the 
crop, farmers have responded to 
static or falling farm prices by 
using more of it, until some 40 per 
cent of crop and grassland produc- 
tion in the UK alone is now 
directly attributable to fertiliser 
usage. 

Europe's farm politicians are 
plainly mistaken in assuming that 
farm price levels are the chief 
cause of surplus production. Our 
Minister of Agriculture is now 
looking at methods of "setting 
aside” God's green acres, presum- 
ably so that yet more of our food 
production can be based on nitrate 
— a pollutant derived from our 
dwindling reserves of North Sea 
gas. 

Diaries at odds 

From the Head of the London 
Office of the European Parliament 
Sir, For the Diary Publishers' 
Association to claim (March IS) 
that confusion over the start of 
British Summer Time is, vari- 
ously. the fault of the Home 
Office, the Government and EEC 
harmonisation is simply an at- 
tempt to confound their own 
confusion. To add that there is 
“no harmonisation anyway” is 
simply untrue. 

The muddle into which British 
diary publishers have got them- 
selves is even less understandable 
when one recalls that since 1981 
the British Government (with the 


ran out of control, rendered such a 
levy even more objectionable, but 
the Chancellor did not need to 
refer to that: he condemned it 
quite rightly on the general prin- ' 
ciple. It can, therefore, only be a 
matter for disgust that yet another 
Budget has failed to remedy the 
position. 

Briefly, property or other 
investments, that have done no 
more than maintain their real- 
value in line with the price index, 
if acquired since March, 1982, 
suffer on sale, no such tax. If 
already held at' April 5, 1965 they 
suffer on sale tax at 30 per cent in 
respect of the inflation from 1965 
to 1982, which as a matter of 
arithmetic will take almost exactly 
20 per cent of the sale-price. If 
acquired between 1965 and 1982 
they suffer tax proportionately. 

If a Conservative Government 
maintains unamended a capital 
confiscation of such dimensions, 
never before seen in any save 
communist countries, there will be 
little criticism that the party can 
offer when dealing with anti- 
capital measures proposed by the 
Labour Party. 

The amendment could be easily 
made, either by substituting “1 965 
or later date of acquisition” for 
“1982” in the 1982 Act or (a more 
rough and ready method) by 
exempting all sales under com- 
pulsory purchase and all sales of 
assets that bad been held for 10 (or 
12 or 20) years. . . 

There would be little loss of 
.revenue, since except in case of an 
enforced sale the effect of the tax is 
to freeze such assets until death, 
when they can be sold without this 
liability. 

Yours faithfully, 

S.E. SCAMMELL, 

Steeple Gose, 

East Knoyle, 

Salisbury, 

Wiltshire. 

March 2a 

From Dr Sebastian Kroemer 
Sir, A return to full wage and 
salary employment is' a mirage 
fostered by post-war growth, and 
while the Conservative Govern- 
ment has done better than its 
rivals to bring this home no other 
political party is going to reverse 
the post-industrial trend signifi- 
cantly. 

But while there are so many out 
of work it is obscene to reduce tax 
for those with income instead of 
increasing benefits. It may seem a 
futile gesture but I wonder how 
many people would be prepared to 
take advantage of another of Mr 
Lawson's innovations and donate 
i per cent of their taxable income 
to charity. 

Yours faithfully, 

SEBASTIAN KRAEMER, 

59 Brixton Water Lane, SW2. 
March 18. 


have fallen by 1-2 per cent in 
“reaT terms as compared with 
1984-85. This means that NHS 
medicine costs have declined rel- 
ative to those of other types of 
NHS activity. 

Your readers should, however, 
note that in “real” terms NHS 
prescription charges have in- 
creased by over 500 per cent since 
the start of 1979. This outstrips 
the rise in overall NHS medicine 
spending recorded between the 
rariy 1950s and the present day, 
during which period most of the 
current life saving and enhancing 
pharmaceuticals have been 
inroduced. 

Yours faithfully. 

JOHN GRIFFIN, Director, 

The Association of the British 
Pharmaceutical Industry, 

12 Whitehall. SWi. 

March 17. 

It would surely be more far- 
sighted to place severe EEC 
restrictions on the use of nitrates, 
with a compensatory farm price 
adjustment, perhaps to real 1980 
levels? 

Yours faithfully, 

A HARRISON, 

Morrdhirst, 

Netherwitton, 

Morpeth, 

Northumberland. 

March 11. 


The ‘workers’ 

From Dr Robert J. Doig 
Sir, I was most interested by Mr 
Toomey’s letter (March 11), on 
the unfortunate divisive term 
“managers and workers.” 

For long I have thought one 
secret of German economic suc- 
cess is that they don't talk of 
employers and employees: (one 
employs a shovel). 

They have Arbeitgeber and 
Arbeitnehmer — work giver and 
work acceptor. If only English had 
suitable words. 

Yours faithfully, 

ROBERT J. DOIG, 

9 Court Lane, 

Dulwich. SE21. 

March 11. 


consent of Westminster) has 
agreed with all other Community 
governments on the starting date 
of Summer Time. 

Equally, it has been made clear 
by the British Government that 
there has been no agreement with 
our European partners on when to 
put the clocks back. So that this 
year summer time will end in the 
UK and Ireland on Sunday, 
October 26 and in the other 10 
Community countries on Sunday. 
September 28. 

Yours faithfully, 

ROGER BROAD. 

Head of London Office, 

European Parliament, 

2 Queen Anne’s Gate, SWI. 
March 17. 


Anglican record 
on church care 

From the Chairman of the Redun- 
dant Churches Committee 
Sir. The facts do not support Mr 
Freeman's attack (March 1 5) upon 
zhe Church of England’s record of 
care for its churches. 

The heritage is. indeed, excep- 
tional — 17.000 church buildings, 
of which no less than 1 1,900 are 
listed — but so is the record of care. 
The Church of England finds, 
mainly through the giving of its 
congregations, over £50 million 
each year for the upkeep and 
maintenance of its buildings 

The Church has had a system of 
statutory control over demolitions 
since 1252, i.e^ 700 years earlier 
than the introduction of town and 
country planning — and it has had 
a separate statutory system for the 
regular inspection of churches 
since 1604. 

Today it has. in the pastoral 
measure, a carefully worked out 
and effective, statutory regime for 
the care and control of churches 
which are no longer needed for 
worship. It is only when a demo- 
lition is carried out under the 
authority of a scheme made under 
that measure that Parliament has 
absolved the Church from the 
requirement to seek listed build- 
ing consent. 

The result of these arrange- 
ments — which have been re- 
viewed and confirmed by 
Parliament three times in the last 
15 years — is. as the independent 
English Heritage Monitor records, 
that a listed Church of England 
church has a chance of avoiding 
demolition three times better than 
a listed secular building. 

The future of 1.053 redundant 
churches (not all of them listed) 
has been settled since 1969 when 
the measure took effect Three 
quarters are still standing. Over 
half of them have been found new 
uses,' often for the benefit of the 
wider community — as indeed in 
the case of the three specific 
examples which Mr Freeman 
commends. 

Two hundred have been placed 
in the care of the Redundant 
Churches Fund, jointly financed 
by Church and State. Two hun- 
dred and sixty-six which did not 
merit preservation by the fond 
have, it is true, been demolished. 
But only because no alternative 
use could be found and after 
statutory consultation with the 
local planning authority, amongst 
others. 

Sixty-two of the 266 were listed, 
but no listed church has been 
demolished against the advice of 
the Advisory Board for Redun- 
dant Churches, an independent, 
statutory, expert body appointed 
by the archbishops after consults 
tion with the Prime Minister, 
comprising people of national 
distinction in the field of 
conservation. 

However, no system is perfect 
and that is why the Department of 
the Environment and ourselves 
are looking at ways in which the 
non-siatutory public inquiries can 
be improved to become an even 
more effective forum for weighing 
all points of view in particularly 
difficult cases. 

Yours faithfully. 

SANDFORD, Chairman, 
Redundant Churches Committee, 

1 Millbank, SWI. 

March 21. 


Accused of rape 

From Mr Philip Mickelborough 
Sir, Rape is a terrible crime; there 
is another, however, which must 
be even worse. That is the gaoling, 
perhaps for life, of an innocent 
man for a rape which might not 
even have occurred. 

The effect of merely a false 
accusation of rape on a man and 
his family, whether the accusation 
is made for revenge, money or 
attention, would be devastating 
even if he is not convicted, as it is 
rarely possible for a man so 
accused to prove his innocence 
even if there is no evidence on 
which he could be found guilty. 
The publication of the name of a 
man wrongly accused, whether 
mistakenly or maliciously, would 
itself be a great and irreversible 
injustice. 

Perhaps those clamouring for 
the publication of defendants’ 
names and anonymity for the 
victims could remember that in 
some cases the victim and the 
defendant are one and the same 
person. 

Yours faithfully. 

PHILIP MICKELBOROUGH, 

39 Kingsbury Street, 

Marlborough, 

Wiltshire. 

March 14. 

Guessing game 

From Mr Philip McLaughlin 
Sir. Mr Philip Pettifor (March 13) 
appears to have misinterpreted 
the relevance of his son describing 
multiple choice examination pa- 
pers as “multiple guess”. 

While he amusingly enquires 
whether “the pin is mightier than . 
the pen” it is nevertheless a fact 
that it is all too easy to team data 
but be unable to recall it due to 
inhibitory factors such as stress or 
nerves. Recognition prompts the 
mind into retrieval of the stored 
knowledge. 

That his son terms such a 
process “multiple guess” is ev- 
idence of a cri de coeur to the 
effect that he is lacking in knowl- 
edge. by a simple use of logic. 
There is still time to help, Mr 
Pettifor! 

Yours faithfully, 

philip McLaughlin, 

468 Tollcross Road. 

Glasgow. 

March 13. 



ON THIS DAY 


MARCH 24 1934 

Some talk of Artie. RedRum and _ , 

other steeplechasers but to many 
hone lovers there is none that can 
compare to Golden Miller, winner 
of the Grand National (carrying 
22st 2ibs) in 1934 and the 
Cheltenham Gold Cup in 1932, 33- 
34, 35. 36. He was sold as a 
yearling in Dublin for 205 guineas 
and was bought by Miss Dorothy . 
Paget for £6,000. He won 29 races, 
in all worth £25,000, his last race 
being in 1939, finally being put 
down in 1957 at the age of 30. 


THE GRAND 
NATIONAL 
VICTORY OF GOLDEN : 
MILLER 

FROM OUR RACING 
CORRESPONDENT - 
Miss Dorothy Paget won the 
Grand National at Ain tree yester- 
day with her exceptionally good- 
looking horse Golden. Miller, a 
seven-year-old gelding by 
Goidcourt out of Miller’s Pride, 
trained by Basil Briscoe and ridden 
by G. Wilson. Golden Miller, who 
started at 8 to 1 against, won by 
live lengths from Delaneige, who in 
turn was five lengths in front of 
Thomond II. . . . 

The conditions for the race were 
ideal, for the going was as good as 
going can be, and the light was so 
clear that the colours, even through 
ordinary glasses, could be seen with 
ease even at the far end of the 
course. It seemed to be generally 
agreed that the quality of the field 
was rather below that of any good 
year, but at the same time there 
was in the field more than one very 
good-looking horse. Golden Miller 
is a handsome steeplechaser, but J 
must admit that I thought before 
the race that he would not stay the 
distance over which the race was 
run or jump the country. . . . 
Almost as soon as the field were 
lined up they were sent off on their 
long journey. Unfortunately 
Trocadero lost considerable 
ground. Southern Hero, Southern 
Hue, Forbra, Delaneige. and 
Gregalach going to the first fence 
in front At once there was a 
tragedy, for no fewer than five of 
the starters came down. . . 3y the 
time that the Canal turn was 
reached there was still a great 
number of horses standing, with 
Southern Hue in front. By tbs time 
that the water-jump was reached 
more 20 of the 30 starters 
were still on their feet. I have never 
seen so many horses in this race 
approach this jump so close 
together. 

DELANEIGE IN 
THE LEAD 

Just before the Arm Chair Fence 
Cantiilius II had fallen and 
Delaneige just led Forbra and 
Gregalach over the water-jump. So 
the field, with considerably more 
than half standing, went out into 
the country for the second time: 
One by one the field now began to 
be reduced either by falls or by the 
horses falling back beaten. Grega- 
lach befean to lose ground and faded 
away, and by the time that' the 
Canal Turn was reached for the 
second time Forbra. Golden Miller, 
who had always been going really 
well, jumping with ease and gallop- 
ing without effort, and Delaneige 
had drawn away from the field. 
Really True was fourth. By the 
time that Valentine’s was reached 
Really True had drawn up, and was 
within challenging distance of the 
three leaders. Ready Cash was also 
well placed, while Thomond £1 — 
ridden for speed, there being doubt 
as to whether he, being by 
Drmmore, would stay the distance 
— was closing with the leaders. 

When the racecourse was 
reached Tbomond 11 was with the 
other three and no one on the 
Stands could say which of the four 
would win. Personally I thought 
that tire winner would be Thomond 
II. who is very fast, and had been 
ridden as perfectly as any horse can 
be ridden by Speck. Even this great 
rider has never ridden a better race. 
Still, like all jockeys of distinction, 
even he could not come without the 
horse, and approaching the penul- 
timate fence. Thomond II was in 
trouble, as was Forbra. The race 
was then between Golden Miller 
and Delaneige. and when Golden 
Miller hit the top of this fence hard 
it seemed certain to me that 
Delaneige, who had never been out 
of the first three, would win. It is 
very rare for a horse to hit a fence 
in this race at so late a stage and 
still stand, let along have anything 
left, but Golden Miller did not fail, 
and ran on as if nothing bad 
happened. Delaneige approached 
the last fence with a slight lead, but 
before he was over it Golden Miller 
bad passed him. landed first on the 
Flat, and drew away to win by five 
lengths. . . . Miss Paget brought 
her horse into the unsaddling 
enclosure. Owners are essential to 
racing, but Miss Paget would be 
the first to acknowledge that she 
owes everything to the horse, his 
trainer and rider. . . .The only, 
individual who comes badly out of 
the argument is mi-self, for I admit 
that I never thought that Golden 
Miller would stay the distance of 
the race or that he would jump the 
course. The time for the race was a 
record, the best previous time, that 
of last year, being beaten by nearly 
8sec- Golden Miller is without any 
doubt a very fine winner of the 
greatest steeplechase in the 
world. ... 

All-rounder 

From Mrs Audrey Shepherd 
Sir. I have done 23 jobs in the last 
35 years — housekeeper, cook, 
cleaner, chauffeur, mother's help, 
kennel maid, laundry maid, valet, 
shoe shine girt window cleaner, 
dressmaker, upholsterer, gar- 
dener. concrete mixer, 
pa in ter/decora tor. plasterer, 
carpenter, plumber’s mate, short- 
hand typist, telephonist, recep- 
tionist bookkeeper, car park 
attendant and. incidentally, all for 
one boss/husband. 

Yours faithfully. 

AUDREY SHEPHERD. 
Woodside. Upper Oakley, 

Diss, Norfolk. 


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COURT 

AND 

SOCIAL 


COURT 

CIRCULAR 

.BUCKINGHAM PALACE 

March 22: Dr John Clayt on had 
the honour of being received by 
■The Queen at Windsor Castle 
when Her Majesty invested him 
with the Insignia of a Com* 
maitder of the Royal Victorian 
Order. 

Mrs Stanley finbow had the 
honour of beingreceived by The 
Queen when Her Majesty in- 
vested her with the Insignia of a 
Member of the Royal Victorian 
Order. 

Mr Herbert Long had the 

honour of being received by The 
Queen when Her Majesty pre- 
. sen ted to him a Bar to the Royal 
Victorian Medal (Silver). 

Mr James Juffs bad the 

honour ofbeing received by The 
Queen when Her Majesty deco- 
rated him with the Royal Vic* 
torian Medal (Silver). 

The Princess Anne. Mrs Mark 
Phillips. President of the Save 
the Children Fund, this evening 
attended a Rock Gospel Concert 
at the Royal Albert Hall. 

Mrs Richard Carew Pole was 
in attendance. 


March 23: Miss Jane Lang ton 
had the honour of being re- 
ceived by The Queen at Wind- 
sor Castle and took leave upon 
her retirement from service in 
the Royal Household as Reg- 
istrar of the Royal Archives, 
when Her Majesty invested her 
with the Insignia of a Com- 
mander of the Royal Victorian 
Order. 

Mr Stephen West and Mr 
Frank Cults had the honour ol 
being received by The Queen 
when Her Majesty decorated 
them with the Rpysd Victorian 
Medal (Silver). 

The Princess Anne. Mrs Mart 
Phillips, attended by Mrs Rich- 
ard Carew Pole and Lieutenant- 
Colonel Peter Gibbs, left 
Heathrow Airport. London uns 
evening to visit Rio de Janeiro. 

Her Royal Highness was re- 
ceived at the Airport by His 
Excellency Senhor Mario Gib- 
son-Barboza (Brazilian Ambas- 
sador) and Senhora Gibson- 
Barboza and Senhor Paul de 
Jagy (Brazilian Airlines Varig. 
General Manager UK). 


Lady Greenock gave birth to a 
son in London on March 16. 

A memorial service for Mr B.T. 
Aikman will be held in the 
Queen's Chapel of the Savoy at 
2.30 today. 


Forthcoming marriages 


Mr C-J.P- Lawson 
and Lady Caroline Lowtber 
The engagement is announced 
between Charles, only son of 
Colonel Sir John Lawson. Bu 
and the late Lady Lawson, of 
Sorogrande. Cadiz. Spain, and 
Caroline, daughter of the Earl of 
Lonsdale, of Askham Hall. 
Penrith, Cumberland, and the 
Hon Mis Jennifer Sullivan, of 
Timberland, Lincoln. 

Mr J. Brooke Tomer 
and Miss AX. Reynolds 
The engagement is announced 
between James, younger son of 
Mr and Mrs Alan Brooke 
Turner, of Poultons. 
Dormansiand, Surrey, and Ali- 
son Caroline, daughter of Mr 
and Mrs William Reynolds, of 
Fleet. Hampshire. 

Mr T JL Clurlaton 
and Miss MJ. C lend ining 
The engagement is announced 
between Terence, son of Mrs J. 
Charlston and the late Mr V. 
Charlston, of Blackpool and 
Margaret, daughter of Mr C.R. 
Glendi mng and the late Mrs 
A.D. Glendining, and step- 
daughter of Mrs M.A. 
Glendining, of Tivenon. 

Dr M. Griffiths 
and Dr K.E. EUiott 
The engagement is announced 
between Malcolm, elder son of 
Mr and Mrs G. Griffiths, of 
Tyldesley. Manchester, and Kay 
eldest daughter of Mr and Mrs 
A.G. Elliott, of Seer Green, 
Buckinghamshire: 

Mr C J. Harding 
and Miss D.RL Hunting 
The engagement is announced 
between Joe, son of Mr Bernard 
Harding, of Algeciras, Spain, 
and Mrs Medora May Harding 
of Felpham, Sussex, and Deb- 
orah (Dumps), daughter of Mr 
and Mrs Give Hunting of 
Fulmer, Buckinghamshire. 

Captain RX-D. James 
and Miss F.MA Rhys 
The engagement is announced 
between Richard James. The 
Queen's Own Hussars, second 
son of Major and Mrs Philip 
James, of Streete Court Rooks 
Nest Godstone. Surrey, and 
Fiona, only daughter of Mr and 
Mrs Llewelyn Rhys, of Hill 
Farm House. Babcary, near 
Somenon, Somerset 

Mr AJL Lowed) 
and Miss US. Parr 
The engagement is announced 
between Alan, only son of Mr 
and Mrs C.E. Loweih. of 
Ail5worth. Cambridgeshire, and 
Linda, only daughter of Mr and 
Mrs R.T. Parr, of Boothant 
York. 


Mr N.E.T. Prettejobn 
and Miss E.F. Esch 
The engagement is announced 
between Nicholas, only son of 
Dr and Mrs Edward Prettejohn, 
of StonegaJlow5 House. Taun- 
ton. Somerset and Elizabeth, 
only daughter of Mr Robin 
Esch, of Concord. Massachu- 
setts, and of Mrs Joan Esch, of 
Concord. New Hampshire. 


Mr PJ. Quest 
and Miss SJL.W. Newsome 
The engagement is announced 
between Peter, son of Mrs S. 
Quest and the late Mr S. Quest 
of Newport Gwent and Sarah, 
daughter of Mr and Mis J. 
Newsome, of West Byfleet 
Surrey. 


Mr G.C. Thomas 
and Miss CA. Gibbons 
The engagement is announced 
between Guy.' son of Mr and 
Mrs H. Thomas, of Radfeit 
Hertfordshire, and Caroline, 
daughter of Lieutenant Com- 
mander P. Gibbons. RN. retd, 
of Seal Chart Kent and Mrs J. 
Gibbons, of Oiford, Kent 


Marriages 


Mr M.R. Acton 
and Miss F.M.C. Waller 
The marriage took place on 
Saturday. March 22. in Lincoln 
College Chapel, Oxford, of Mr 
Michael Acton, son of Mr and 
Mrs Rex Acton. of 
Abergavenny. Gwent and Miss 
Frances Waller, daughter of Mr 
and Mrs Anthony Waller, of 
London. 

Mr JJ.H. Brookes 
and Miss D. Rlvett 
The marriage look place quietly 
in London on Friday. March 21, 
1986, of Mr Joseph John Hugh 
Brookes, of Stourbridge, West 
Midlands, and Miss Diana 
Riveft of London. 


Mr I JH. Macalpine-Leny 
and Miss A.E. Ailes 
The marriage took place quietly 
on Friday. March 2). 1986, in 
Washington DC. United States, 
between Mr Ian Macalpine- 
Leny. only son of the late Major 
K.H. Macalpine-Leny and of 
Mrs Nancy Macalpine-Leny. of 
Doddington. Lincoln, and Miss 
.Anne Ailes, only daughter of the 
late Rear-Admiral John W. 
Ailes. Ill, and Mrs Carlton R. 
Adams, of Charlottesville. 
Viiginia. 


Birthdays today 

Air Chief Marshal Sir John 
Davis. 75: Miss Jane Drew, 75: 
Professor Stephen Elek, 72; Sir 
John Kendrew, 69; Miss Sonia 
Lannaman, 30: Sir finer 

Meinertzhagen. 66: Mr Mal- 
colm Muggeridge: 83: Sir Noel 
Mur less, 76; the Earl of 
Selbome 46: Professor Dorothy 
Severin, 44; Mr Tommy 
Trinder. 77; Professor H.B. 
Whittington. 70. 


Torquay bridge 

The annual Devon and Corn- 
wall bridge contest was held at 
Torquay over the weekend: 

Results; 'Mixed pairs: 1 Mrs P 

Cranaro, T Laktr.2 A B Ottley.Mn B 
Burke: 3. D McFariane. Mrs K 
Manhmick. 

txed teams: l . Mrs and Mrs L C Bell. P 
Bowles and D A McFarlane:2. Mr R 
Alnoer. Mrs P Fox. Mra M Blake. R 
Ntctiolsan: 3 Cautain and Mrs M 
Lincoln. R Parkini. K a J Woods. 
Tornuay Cup 1. K A H Kenner*. C n 
K rtmere:2. R Parkins. K A J Woods: 
3 Mrs M Bernstein. D Spooner. 
Swiss pairs. 1. M J Allen. Mta P 
Davies A D F HuwMt- J OuW: 5. T J 
Glubfa, M K Watts. 


Clifford Longley 


Churches as sacred symbols 
in the secular desert 


Most of the events in the Bible, in 
both the Old and New Testaments, 
happen out of doors. The Palm Sunday 
stones told this week, and virtually any 
other passages at which the Bible might 
randomly fall open, are descriptions of 
open air events. 

In striking and disturbing contrast 
“religion" is supposed to “happen” in 
contemporary Britain behind closed if 
not locked doors, usually doors with 
intersecting parabolic curves at the top. 

It is presumed to be confined to 
special and distinct buildings, which is 
why proposals to tear down or sell such 
buildings invariably cause such pain in 
the local community. The actual remov- 
al of the place where “religion happens” 
is a symbolic removal of religion itself. 

What is left is a secular desert, not 
only on the latest street map but also in 
the mental landscape, which Gerard 
Manley Hopkins called the inscape of 
the mincL 

It is quite unimportant whether a 
particular ecclesiastical budding has 
recently been mnch used. The removal 
of the police station or magistrates' 
court would in the same way symbolize 
the weakening of justice and law in 
principle, not just a longer detour next 
time their services are required and 
regardless of whether their services have 
been recently required at alL 

This is the dilemma which faces the 
Church of England generally, and which 
faces equally the Methodist Church in 
parts of Cornwall and the Roman 
Catholic Church in parts of Liverpool or 
Glasgow. 

None of them really believes that 
religion happens only in church. But the 
population does. And this is a key issue 
behind recent discussion of the church 
in the inner city, an issue fudged in last 
year's Anglican report. Faith in the City % 
and fudged every ti me the local archdea- 
con is faced with invidious choices 
between resources, manpower, and 
buildings. 

The Church of England's problem of 


surplus buildings has become acute. It 
has passed the point of declaring 
redundant those buildings which were 
obviously redundant ana is now faced 
with the difficult cases, just as inner city 
housing clearance has removed the 
obvious slums and has to decide what to 
do with buildings with some merits and 
some prospects of useful rehabilitation. 

So church buildings now selected for 
redundant have survived the first 
wave. Often the congregation has 
already merged with neighbours or 
moved from nearby, at least once 
before. Such churches usually have 
architectural merit, and often some 
important historical significance in the 
local community or in the life of the 
church itself. 

Cases recently aired in the correspon- 
dence columns of The Times are typical 
St Geo ige’s-in-foe- East, Wapping, the 
nearest ecclesiastical neighbour of this 
newspaper, was the subject of a similar 
case-study in The Spectator. Numerous 
cases exist which have had no such 
airing, but which present the sam e 
problems. 

The Church of England is usually 
sensitive to the feelings of local people 
that “their” church in the High Street 
whether they use it much or not is an 
important part of their landscape (and 
inscape). It is often said to be part of 
what being a national church is all 
about 

But at the same time, the doctrine of 
economic self-sufficiency is felt to have 
some weight This means that a church 
building which .is not adequately sup- 
ported and maintained by the parish, in 
most cases because the cost of repair is 
too high, has to be disposed of on the 
best terms available. 

It is almost always true, in the inner 
city at least that there is another church 
building not far away which would 
greatly benefit from a merging of 
resources. It is almost always true, too, 


that the church as an institution has a 
list of things it would like to do but 
cannot without an injection of capital 
from the sale of under-used and 
expensively maintained buildings. " 

The medievals understood the impor- 
tance of the church as a landmark. The 
church spire advertised ata glance to the 
peasants working on the' land where 
exactly was the altar with foeSacrament 
reserved. It was a constant reminder 
that the' “holy” was present in- their 
everyday midst, the merging of inscape 
and landscape in one symbol 

The medieval church spire, viewed 
from outside but dose to. employed a 
clever trick of perspective. It could be 
seen as what it physically was, a shallow 
cone; or as an infinite vertical column, a 
solid pillar tying earth to heaven, with 
altar and Sacrament at its root 

It was an architectural sermon on the 
eucharist, preached to aD who looked 
that way. It was not necessary to enter it, 
to get die message.. So the edifice was 
only a handsome means to an end, riot 
itself a sacramental presence. 

What has happened in the present day 
is that the bricks and mortar or stone 
have themselves taken bn this 
sacramentality, and they themselves 
now represent the sacredness they were 
originally built to contain and locate. It 
is as if human psychology demands 
sacramentatism in connection with 
religion one way or another, and if it 
cannot have it overtly, in a high 
mediaeval doctrine of the Real Presence 
on the altar, it has to have it 
surreptitiously, as the vaguer “real 
presence” of an architectural structure 
and the very air within. And therefore 
the removal of such symbols stir up the 
profoundest feelings. 

The Church of England’s manage- 
ment of its resources, so dismissively 
sometimes called “plant” repeatedly 
stumbles into collision with these 
unexpressed intuitions. It cannot expect 
to be excused when it handles them 
clumsily. 



Return of 
Eros 

A workman potting the final 
touches to the restored stat- 
ue of Eros in Piccadilly 
Circus before it is unveiled 
today by Mr Ken Living- 
stone, Leader of the Greater 
London Council (Photo- 
graph: Suresh Karadia). 


Parliament 
this week 

Cotnmoni 

Today 12.30). Conclusion of Budsrt 
denai« 

Tomorrow IS 30). as BUI. third 
reading Motion tor Uw Easier 
fdlournmenl. 

Wednesday '2.301' Debate on lin- 
mioraUon rules 

Thursday i9 30L Easier adjournment 
debates. 

Lords 

Today (2.301: Drug Trafficking 

CM fence. BUL committee 
Tomorrow <3 30C Education BUL 
committee. 

Wednesday >2.30r. Debates on the 
rating system and on care of the 
handicapped. 


Dinners 

Order oT St John 
The Council of the Order of St 
John in Greater Manchester 

S ve a dinner on Saturday in St 
ho- House. Fallowfield. : to 
mark- the eightieth birthday of 
Lieutenant-Colonel HLE. Hoje, 

honorary, appeals officer. Dante foe Ear* of Derby was toe3 

Kathleen OUerenshaw presided orindnaTmesL- • ' ' ' “M 

and Mr David Adams, area 


The Queen’s Lancashire Regi- 
ment 

The annual dinner of The 
Queen’s Lancashire Regiment 
Volunteer Dinner Club was held 
at Kimberley Barracks. Preston, 
on Saturday. Lieut enantXolo- 
nd G.B. Stain. Commanding 
' Officer, 4th Battalion, presided 


commissioner, also spoke. The 
Lord Lieutenant of Greater 
Manchester and Lady Down- 
ward were among those presenL 


Volunteers 


Royal Engin ee r s 
(Sponsored units) 

Brigadier G.W. Field presided at 
the annual dinner of The Royal 
Engineers Volunteers (Spon- 
sored Units) held on Saturday at 
the RE Officers’ Mess. 
Chatttnden, to mark the 
appointment of Brigadier 
J—F.H. Busk as Honorary 
CdioneL 


Engineering Industry Training 
Board 

The Lord Mayor of London, Sir 
Allan Davis, was the principal 
guest at a dinner last night in the 
Banqueting House, Whitehall, 
arranged by the Engineering 
Industry Training Boara. Other 

^ordshire^C^FcureJ 

SSTf CTgmeeriiigttmpames 
attending the EITB "WUW 
Margin" conference on invest- 
meni in human resources in 

London on March 23-24. Sir P5& 

Francis Tombs. Chairman or •fij* S“ » 


Rolls-Royce Limited, was a 
speaker at the dinner. 

Service dinners 

2nd Regiment Royal Artillery 
Lieutenant-Colonel D.M.P. 
Lowe. Commanding Officer, 
presided at a reunion dinner of 
the 2nd Regiment Royal Artil- 
lery held on Saturday at the RA 
Mess. Woolwich. Major-Gen- 
eral MJ. Tomlinson. Honorary 
Colonel, was among those 
presenL 

Makar Regiment 

Major F. Martin presided at the 

annual reunion dinner of the' 

Mabar Regiment for former 

officers and their ladies held on 

Saturday at the Belfry Hotel. 

Oxford. 

St Nazalre Society 
Mr Michael Burn presided at the 
annual reunion dinner of the St 
Nazaire Society held on Sat- 
urday at The Brewery. CbisweU 
Street The guests of honour 
were Brigadier K.RJ5. Trevor 
and Mgr Alfred Hemery. Cap- 
lain R.E.D. Ryder, VC, was also 
present 

Tbe Royal Hampshire Regiment 
Brigadier C.G.T. Viner presided 
at the annual dinner of The 
Royal Hampshire Regiment 
Territorial Officers’ Dinner 
Club held on Saturday at Safe's 
House. Winchester. 


tick . Venn presided. 'Colons) 
Richard Hill. couurty cadet conn 
mandant, received' the guests, 
who included the Lord lieuten- 
ant of Oxfordshire and Lady 
Ponsonby. 


Lecture 


Institute of Chartered Sec- 
retaries and Administrators 
Mr John Brooke-Little, Norroy 
and Ulster King of Arms, gave a 
talk on March 18 at tbe City 
Livery Club to members of the 
London branch of the Institute [ 
of Chartered Secretaries arid 
Administrators entitled 
“Genealogy”. The chairman, 
Mr G.H. Woodward, presided. 


Memorial service 

The Right Rev Victor Pike 
A service of thanksgiving for tbe 
life of the Right Rev Victor Pike 
was held on Saturday in Salis- 
bury Cathedral- The Rev Robert 
Willis officiated. Mr Simon 
Pike, son, and the Right Rev St 
John Pike, brother, read the 
lessons. The Ven Edwin Ward 
gave an address. The Bishop of 
Salisbury pronounced tbe bless- 
ing and the Bishop of 
Ramsbury, . the Bishop of 
Sherborne and the Right Rev 
George Reindorp were robed 
and in the sacrarium. 


Royal Society 

The following 40 new Fellows of 
the . Royal -Society, have been 
elected;. . 

BB toM r ft M Andanao. professor of 
Me ecology, imperial College of 
tf aM^KhDOMW. London: 



Ac 


AeronomMs. 


Katlenbar g-L Uidaud 

-MaK Breen, professor of I 
electrical englneertng and head «rfj tbe I 
I electrical engineering division. Cam- 
bridge University: Professor. C 

Bumstoek- Professor of anatomy and 
head of ibe department gt atwtomyl 
and embryology. University College 
London: Pi fssw D Chapman, profes- 
sor of biophysical dtcnbtiy at tha- 
ftayai Free Hospital sebool of MedM 
cine. London: P l M s mur X Ctartia. 
professor or pnyscs. UWvemty of J 

Dt*V 11 fej^* r SSwrstty lecturer In I 
Inorganic chemistry. Oxford Univer- 
sity- and fellow of si John's College. 
Oxford: Iftu ftsio r ft ft. Dima, professor 
of . -theoretical-, chemistry. Bristol 
‘Upivecsuy: nmSiiaor S.K DoasMsen. 
w jilts 3rofes«nm-hf mathematics- 1 
Oxford, i JmyertHy:- BreWssor 4 0 
Omit pidfissiar-or iSementary jhuh- 

sdnne of Tvcimoibw^raomm _ ft B 
FaBntt. professor of dymWW, 
Southampton University; Dr - C W 
Bamwa. ,vfcmSFesktet£ trwearoi). 

Smith. KUne and French Ltd. Wei- 
,wyn: Dr A E GBL senior pHncipal 
bammlltr ottievr (indivtdualmenu In 
masa^ om<rf\ Pr»t**3*>r J 

sssd 

sor of pfusto. University of AJbena. 

Or A J Jeffreys, reader In genetics. 
Leicester Unive rsity , holde r oTLKier 
Research Fellowship: P t sfS si m A Kerr, 
professor or pianljpathology. Univer- 
sity or Adelaide: Or C 4 Leaver, reader 
in botany. Edinburgh University: Dr B 
H Lotamr - research leader. E I'dj 
^^^■Nemours A Co-. Dr T HI 
Bmember of the United] 


Pom de 


Kingdom Atomic Energy Authority 
and managing director, ftorthern 
Ireland Division. UKAEA. Rbley: Dr R 
H Witched, reader In btortwnrtstty 
Birmingham University. Profe ss or E W 
J dUtc asd. pc Lee’s prori-*or_of 
MTOidhiIbI Engineering Pnuosoohy. 


and 

c WSS k »sf h 


K rt tffiB . professor at 


Hospital and 
Feeney 


mathematical physics and hog of! 
-ffCnartmefft of applied i 
and . theoretical RhyMcs. , 
mHBSiiy: .P mwar M A 
professor OT chemical biologj 

PSSl'i? £K%! director- 
general - Of Uie Indian- council of 
Medici Research: P ro TO sw P D 

RUiafdiOD. profesqor of physiology 
and engineering al Brown university. 
Rhode Mand: Mr NHL RMSey. 
formerly honorary consultant Sur- 
ran. MoorOehts Eye 
^hlhahtdc Marbnei 

professor of mecaUunn'. Birinlnghani 
University: fWtim H Smith, profes- 
sor of biochemistry. University ■ of 
BitiMi Col urn. b la. Vancouver: frdii 
ssr C J M StMtais. professor of organic 

srtenlisl al She MRC Laboratory of 
Molecular Biology. Cambridge: Dr 
Jean O Thomas, lecturer In bto- 
■mtstry. Cambridge Unlveri-ay: 
famor D J Wsnm. Tan professor of 
maihemahca l Ph ysics. Edinburgh 
University: Professor EHoMM K. 

Wanrocton. professor or clinical 
neurop^y rhoto«y . Nattonai HospItaL 
London: Profauor A C WHsett. profes- 
sor of b Vjc iie i iiritry. University of 
CMi/brnla. Bafehr: Jhphuiis Q ft 

Wroy. profp^sos gf mechanical 
Sneering. Loughborough UnBeriny 
of Technology. j~ 


BIRTHS. MARRIAGES. 

DEATHS and IN MEMORfAM 
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Births, Deaths and In Memoriam 


Thau basl comWwM my IrouNe: thou 
na* iinpwti my mi in advmiues. 
PsjIiii 31. 7 

■ BIRTHS 

ATKINS On lSUi March at Epsom, to 
Heather inie Jarriwi and David, a 
son iJeremy David). 

AENSTO Qn March 21st. In Copenha- 
oen. (g Jeannette mee Knstensen) 

and Peter- * ^ . 

BLOmCtXr Ob March llth 19B&. at 
H m. Stanley Hofiplt* 1 - St- toaob. to 
Cetu vSTjoms) and Revan. a 
Helen, sister 

for Laura. 


CAMUL-On 14tb March 1986 at Roy- 
al Bucks HospitaL Aylesbury, to 
Edward and Annie, a son Myles 
William. 

CAMP On 1 2th March io Sue and Jer- 
ry. another beautiful son David, a 
brother lor James. 

HOLLOWAY - On March I6lh at SL 
Luke's Hospital. Guildford, to £lba- 
beth (n*e Jamh-sonj and David, a 
second son. Andrew Franca. 

KENT-LEMON - On March iBth m 
Hamburg to Jeanette and David a 
son Allan Nort James. 

OSBORNOOffES To Anthea infr Cor- 
don -Duff- Pennington l and Tim on 
March I7lh. a daughter. 

P ENFOLD To Barbara and Anthony, a 
daughter Amelia Anne, on March 
15 th. a sister for Cehne and Sopfue. 

PlfUE To Richard and Pamaa mee Le 
Gresleyi on March 12Ui at SL John's 
Hospital. Chelmsford, a son. Oliver 
Jonn Fmdlay. a brother for James. 

ROSS - On March 20m, to Lucy and 
Clive, a daughter. 

WARREN To Andrew and Jennifer 
mfr» Colei On March 18 at St. John's 
Chelmsford, a daughter fHeanor Eu- 
genie) a sister for Henry and Ceorge 

WAJUNSON Bom on March 27 U) to 
Sarah (nee Rhodes) and Alan. In 
Preston. Lancashire, a daughter 
Lucy Elizabeth Anne. O naahe 
puichra fiata pmennor. 


DEATHS 


BIART - On March 22nd. peacefully at 
Wesuiampnen Private Nursing 
Home near Cmdiester Wesi Sussex. 
Douglas Edgar aged 92. charter town 
clerk and freeman of rugby Beloved 
father of Douglas and David, grand- 
father of Mark. Brian. Nicholas. 
Helen and Robert. Service at 
Fish bourne Church. Chichester. 
Thursday. March 27ih. ai l tSpm. 
followed by private cremation Flow- 
ers to. Edward White & Son. 6 south 
Pallanl. Chichester. Tel T82136 
BURTON. On SOUt March 1 986 peace- 
fully. Jessie Anne (nee Dun cam aged 
87 years, of Wlndlesham Manor. Be- 
loved wife of Murray, loving and 
much loved mother of Clare. John 
and Cuve. Quiet fune«t service at 
Surrey and Sussex Crematorium. 
Worth, on Monday 2«h March at 
10.46 am. Flowers to Raul Bysouth 
Funeral Services. Telephone 
Crowborough 6000 
CRABTREE Cavnn Sebastian 22-i v-BS 


to 18-9-B6. You gave us an so much, 
with all our love Mum. Dad & Lisa. 
Mass of ine Angels at SI. Augustine's 
Camouc Church. Woodland Road. 
SI. AuslelL Cornwall on Wednesday 
26th March 2 pm followed by buriel 
al Fowey Ceroeiery. 

DAUBEHY - On March 19th 1986. 
Ann Daubeny- M B5-, J-P- betaved 
wife of Ronald and devoted mother 
of Philip and Giles. Funeral Service 
al Si. Nicholas Church. Union. MaM- 
stone. Kent, at 2.30pm. on 
Wednesday 26ih March. Enquiries to 
Thomas MlUer. oj MelvUle Road. 
Maidstone. Tel: Maidstone 54234, 
CNWRV -On 20th March, peacefully 3* 
his home. On ore. Broadhemuston. 
Devon. Cuuiuert. CB E-. F l. Ex. 
Joyce's loved husband and father of 
Esda. John and Leone, much loved 
grandpa of all MS grandchildren. Fu- 
neral service at SL Peter's and St. 
Paul's Church. Broaanempston. Dev- 
on. on Wednesday 26Ui March, at 2 
pm. Enquiries to Peering Funeral 
Services. Tel: 0803 862417. 
FARMER On 2lst March, peacefully In 
hospital. Martorir. much loved moth- 
er of John and Brenda and 
grandmollter of Amanda 
GODFREY -JONES On Marm 20Uj 
very suddenly. Frida, dearly loved 
by Jonah and by Robin and Deborah. 
Funeral Service aJ Bishop's Ghwve 
Church on Maundy Thursday at 
2 45pm. followed by private crema- 
tion. Mo flowers, but donations If 
desired to Sue Ryder Home. 
LeckbampHxi. cneUenham 
JACKSON on 19 March 1986. at the 
age of BY. peacefully al St Uifces Hos- 
pital Guildford, Edith JacMsoa. 
formerly of Dublin. Widow of Ar- 
thur Jackson. Mother of the late Guy 
Jackson, and of Donald Jackson. 
Grandmother of Refer. Alexandra. 
-Carolyn and Patrick and Great 
Grandmother of Grace Funeral ai 
Woking Crematorium at 1 1.30am an 

36 March. _ 

MACLAREM On March 21st at King 
Edward, vu Hospital. Midhum. 
Archibald Shaw Madaren beloved 
husband of Gem A dear father of 
Antony Service ChK hosier Crema- 
torium Thursday March 27 in at 
1 1 30 am. Flower* to Edward White 
& Son. S South PailanL Chichester. 
Tet: i02«) 782135. 

O’BRIEN- Phyllis 'PhyD) peacefully on 
March 21 si. darling wife and bdoved 
friend of Turtough (Toby), dearly 
loved mother of T«9*. Nicholas and 
Cormna. and grandmother to Crania 
and Ftoola- 


F1CKLES MnrieL on March IBUt. 
peacefully at home. Private crema- 
tion. interment at Mount Zion 
CtapeL Ogden. Halifax, on Wednes- 
day. March 26th al 2pm. No nowera. 
Donations, if desired, to Association 
to Combat Huntington's Chorea. 
Hinck ley. Leicester. LE10 1AP. 

SAMPSON Tito, peacefully at Tres 
Montes Argentina, on March IBth. 
aged 81 years. Father of AUce and 
Wendy and grandfather or James. 
Melinda and Nicky. R.LP. 

SCMALLER -KELLY On February 
19th. 1986. in Hospital in Malaga 
Spain. Mary Kedy. aged 83. deafly 
beloved mother of Charles. Much 
loved aster and aurd. The funeral 
look place on February 23rd in 
Fuengirota. Donations, if desired, to 
Ecumenical Centre Lux MundL Can# 
Nueva 4. Fuengirola. Malaga. Spam. 

SMYTH On February 24th 1986. lit 
hospital, after a long Illness and In 
her 75th year. Mary (Bunny) Leigh- 
ton intc Macfarlane Hokitika. New 
Zealand) dearly loved wife of Basil 
and loving mother of Nigel and Hen- 
rietta. Funeral private. 

SORELL- Oh 21st March 1986. peace- 
fully at home. Ernes Robert. 
Clenask Court. London Road. 
Binfleld. Berkshire. Funeral at East 
HampNCM Park Crematorium, on 
Thursday 27th March at 12 noon. 
Flowers to Cyril H. Unegrove. 4 
Town Square, Brackneu. Berkshire. 

SPENCER HART On 17th March. 
1986 peacefully al home (Cant) wu- 
Uam Henry Soencer Hart aged 97 
years, son of the tale Sir Israel and 
Lady Hart of Leicester CremaMoat 
GoMera Green on Thuraday 27th 
March a 10.50am. Enouiries 
Leverton & Sons (01 5876075). 

WEODERBURN - Cynthia, on Thurs- 
day. 20 March 1986. In 
Bedfordshire, who of the late Alister 
and mother of Oarissa, Jane. Olivia 
and the late David -Cremation pri- 
vate. Service of thanksgiving 
3 00pm. Saturday 12 April 1966. at 
S Andrews' Church., East 
Hagboum*. 

WILLIAMSON Audrey Author peace- 
fully to March, cremation 3.30nm 
Wednesday March 26 at Mngtbn 
Crematonum Finchley Ftowers to 46 
Dais on Lane. London E8 

WOOTTON. On 2lst March 1986 at 
Ashtead surrey. Stanley Thomas. 
M.C- of Sydney. Australia, and Ep- 
som. Surrey, dearly loved father of 
Catherine, Seme* at sl Joseph's Ro- 
man Catholic Church. Epsom, on 
Tuesday in April at I Oam. Flowers 
to A & £ Longhorn. 21-23 Kingston 
Road. EwriL 


Science report . ’ 

Stripping off ears of 
com to cut costs 

By John Young, Agriculture Correspondent 


Tbe advent of the combine 
harvester is generally heU to 
have effected one of the great- 
est revolutions io ibe history of 
(arming. But now scientists at 
the National Institute of Agri- 
cultural Engineering atSflsoe, 
Bedfordshire, believe they 
have developed a still more 
efficient method of harvesting, 
known as grain stripping. 

The principle is that, in- 
stead of catting the whole crop 
and then separating the gram' 
from the strew, the gram Is' 
simply stripped off the plant, 
leaving the straw standing. 
With the intake of strew 
drastically reduced, machines 
can achieve a much higher 
work rate, and harvesting can 
be completed in only a fraction 
of the time, with considerable 
savings in feeL 

The idea is not new, and 


summer's heavy reins the 
advantage was even more 
marked; a late 'season experi- 
ment in East Lottuan, - Scot- 
land, on difficult waterlogged 
terrain, produced an improve- 
ment in harvested yield of 1*6 
touneso hectare. 

After thfc grain has been 
stripped; the straw can subse- 
quently be harvested separate- 
ly if required for fuel, animal 
feed or other purposes, or can 
be burnt or ploughed ? in. 
Because it remains evenly 
distributed, H is easier, to 
incorporate with aplough than 
when it is art and lying In 
scattered dumps. 

Potential applications are 
not confined to grain. Other 
crops harvested successfully 
with tbe stripping header in- 
clude Unseed, dried peas and 
grass seed, audit is hoped that 


several' patents'" have “been* “ir- might- -also- ^-used^-for-- 
taken wit over the past 50 defo liating herbage crops. 

years, iwi until now-wonc has Ins titu te sfitffL bdicjc rhaf _ 

succeeded in developing a the devetopment of tiie header 
[mechanism which performs __ could revolutiomsejtlie whole 
satisfactorily. concept of the combine Mr- 

Last year, however, trials vester and lead to Hgbter, 


with a new header carried out 
at (be institute achieved an 80 
per cent improvement in work 
rate without any significantly 
greater grain loss. With crops 
I that had been flattened by the 


faster machines that use far 
less IheL Their fear Is that the 
big manufacturers may have 
too heavy a vested interest in 
their present, models .to_weL 
Conte the new system. . 


OBITUARY 

MRC. M- JONES 

Influential tennis player, 
coach and analyst 


. Mr C. M. “Jimmy" Jones, 
who died on March 22 ai the 
age of 73. was an influential 
figure in the world of tennis 
who made bis mark as a 
player, coach, psychologist 
technologist, jounnuist and as 
ihe author of more than 
books. 

jimmy*' Jones as he was 


Tjticr he used his expertise 

k'Stt 10 ss 1 *,; 

Wrcros of compennve 
“eMis and also to 

of the plovers reaction times. 

Jones was never * 

His enquiring ni,nd rt i f 2?5 * 

searching quesuons exptorcd £ 

inner workings oflhc game 


uuiversalty known, brought to MC j Ils players. He era 
all his labours an original and * course for improving 


created a course : 


deeply aualytical brain fired ant j c ipation and conantra- 
by inexhaustible enihusiasra. ^ His special knowledge of 
He was a gentle, mild-man- -«- c ‘hologv w-as applied u> his 
.ha hsart flruf - 1 - . i . _ .. n.ii'h writer. . 


nered man with the heart and 
mind of an innovator. He 
came- info tennis with what 
seemed ai the time to be an 
irrelevant background in radio 
rt fin m u nirarions and lechnol-. 
' ogy in general, but was later io 
apply That scientific beat to his 
chosen sport, in' ways that 
made him a pioneer of much 

modern ihin&qg. 

He competed at Wimble- 
don from 1932 to 1951 and in 
1938 played two Davis Cup 
singles - for Britain against 
Romania at Harrogate. As a 
player he was industrious and 
a thinker, and he was always 
ready to help others. ’ 

. .Clarence Medlyeott Jones 
nadiiaied from the City and 
Guilds of London Polytech- 
nic,, taking his finals in radio 
communications and techni- 
cal electricity; . _ 

During the ’ Second - World 
War he became . a flighl- 
Iteuiexiam in the RAF and 
later served as a staff officer at . 
the Ministry of Aircraft Pro- 
duction and the Air Ministry. 
He designed and constructed 
one of the earliest hi-fi models 
of radio receiver and record 
player. , 1 


& roles as co^h wruer, 

lecturer and wnsulteflt 
pja vers io benefit from ms 
advice ind uded such one-ume 
Wimbledon cdebntw as 
Christine Truman. Ang^a 
Buxton and Sven Davidson. 
In 1964 Jones was captain 

and manager of the Rhodewm 

Davis Cup team. In his later 
years he and Miss Buxton 
became joint principals oi a 
coaching centre at 

Hampstead. 

Jones edited four maga- 
zines: British Lawn Tennis & 
Squash (1939-76), Teams 
(1976-78), Top Tennis <1978- 
S5), and British Bawls. Uncr 
known as World Bowls which 
he founded in 1954. 

As a writer on one sport or 
the other he contributed to the 
Dailv Mirror. Daily Telegraph 
and ’ Sunday Telegraph, in 
addition to his prolific output 
of books. _ . 

He was a member of the 
Institution of Radio Engi- 
neers. the British Society of 
Sports Psychology, the British 
Society of Sports Science^ and 
an associate member of lhc 
. British Association of Nation- 
. al Coaches. 


#: 


MBS TOBY ROBINS 


Toby Robins, the actress,' 
who died in hospital inlLon- 
don on March 21 . aged 55, was; 
a handsome, dark haired, and 


•■ She was. for example, 
Berinthia in .Trevor Nunn's 
l968 revival of Vanbrugh’s 
The Relapse for the Royal 


invariably elegant Canadian. . ' Shakespeare Company at the 
•esdSbnM' successful in her fAkiwych {she- played during 
' ceaurtry to^The wne season in Paddy 

in tSet n9d-T9MB i : CbayevsIty'sJTie Latent Het- 
wi® brfhusband. ihe'jywfejc- erosexUnly, she was tbe volu- 
ihg manager. But HredHwn, JWe; Creoje widow in Shaw's 
who was occupied with (fas- Genera at the Mermaid 


Unction in North America and 
later in Britain. 

During. 1957 her. perfor- 
mances as a panelist in'- a 
television programme, Front 
Page Challenge, made Iter a 
national figure across Canada. 

She acted widely at that 
time in what was known as 


(1971); 

At tiie; sajne theatre (1974) 
she appearerHvith Constance 
Ciimmings in A.TL Gurney's 
Chddrert and in one of vari- 
oiis productions at Hamp- 
stead, Dinsdale - Landen 
partnered her in a two-hander 
by Jam« Saunders.-' 


“the Golden Age of Canadian 

- -Mr^: recently, in tohdon, 
'during- (962 : she was Roxane sfe had given a warm and 


at Stratford Ontario, to the 
Cyrano de Bergerac of Chris- 
topher Rummer in a produc- 
tion by Michael Lartgham; she 
,also played Bianca in The 
' Taming Qf the Shrew. 

In Toronto she appeared as 
Shaw’s - Cleopatra and as 
Maggie in Cat on a Hot Tin 


Afterwards her work on foe 
English stage confirmed her 
style and resource in dealing 
with plays of various periods 
(also her gift for wearing 
costume).. 


warm 

truthful , rendering of foe 
American Mrs Rest - in a 
Haymarket revival of. the 
Redgrave ' version of The 
Aspern. Papers (1984); on tour 
she acted Marie Stopes in a 
new play of that name that did 
not reach London. 

Toby Robins’ was happily 
married, with three grown up 
children, two sons and a 
daughter. An endeared col- 
league in foe theatre, offstage 
she was closely interested in 
antiques. 


< 


GLUBB PASHA 


Somerset tie Chair writes: 

; In your ofotywise. admira- 
ble obituary of Gltibb Pasha, 
you dismiss in two lines the 
only two campaigns in the 
Second World War in which 
Glubb and foe Arab Legion 
participated, yet bis contribu- 
tion to foe. capture of Baghdad 
m 1941 arid foe subsequent 
.capture of foe desert fortress 
'of Palmyra in Syria was 
derisive. 

' General Smuts recognised 
this as» a turning point in foe 
war, in denying the eastern 
flank , of the . Middle East to 
Hfafer- . •/- 

'■ ^. InteffiMiice-; Officer to 
-*|ie 'British Column in these 
campaigns, I depended entire- 
ty on. Glubb and-his “girls" for 
information as to the where- 
abouts of foe enemy. Especial- 
ly in the crossing of the Iraq 
desert we -were harassed by a 
brilliant guerrilla leader, 
Fawzi Kawukji, and would 
never have known where he 
was but for Giubb’s 
information^ " 

In The Golden Carpet I 
described the first meeting at 
Rufoa of foe Commander of 


the Column (Kingcol). Gener- 
aJXingstoneand Glubb Pasha 
as a meeting of prima donnas 
behind foe scenes before an 
opera. 

The. confusion arose be- 
cause although Glubb had left 
the British Army with the ranlr 
of Major, he was a Lieutenant- 
General in the Jordanian 
Army, as indicated on his 
epauieties. KJngstone was a 
Brigadier. Bui in foe end they 
got on famously. 

Glubb was essentially mod- 
est: loo modest, as it tran- 
spired. when he was abruptly 
dismissed tty King ; Hussein. 
This was what we would call a 
^tstcnx; and proved to foe 
Arab world, a few months 
before Nasser’s 

nationalisation of the Suez 
Canal, that Britain’s ascen- 
dancy m the Middle Eas t was 
over. 

Nothing has ever been the 
same since but (hat does not 
diminish GHubb's contribu- 
UO j “pun? or Baghdad 
and the liberation of the 1.000 
British hostages shut-up in foe 

£S!£ ° r ihe Brilish 


t. 


>v -W® MORLEY penistan 

J.E.G. writes: 


\. A Nuffield Feilowshin t0 o£ 
him to Europe. South AfricL 
and New Zealand to 
Planranoii methods. 
e wcame interested in 


With Morley Penistan’s 
death forestry in .Britain is 
deprived of one of its leading 

figures who took 3 leading psn cnTKmrot^ m 

in developments involving andS ? ****.*& 

natural regeneration and l ® ad, «g Pan in the 

broadleaved woodland. hS?i2F, mem and control of 
A' member of foe pre-war GlouSiS!f rVation mist in 
generation at Oxford whose hrlt??i ersh,re - an d was 
introduction to plant ecology /S™ me *tal in estab- 

came from -lectures by foe ai r^ th Wess « x SiKicuUur- 
great Sir Arthur Tansley. he h£? v : . 

spent some time at Dartingion Wif uEf* 1 “ forestry ar ail 
^efore-^oamg^foe.. Forestry -nfc n b > h “ involve- 
Commission, choosing a ca- e^ nVri'^^ of Foresi- 
. reer m. Bn tarn, .unjili most of he Bntain « of which 

his contemporanes. ^ 5 a fo rmer president and 

Exp^ence'iri Scotland gave •' devel 'opniwt fow 

him ah encyclopaedic knfwU £Lj nsu >'“e - P - ent 
edge of its forests , and wood- ■ rester *- 


of 


Chaneted 

re ™ e mbered C 

. ... to imagme. 


lands; this was later paralleled 
during his time in South west 
England -and - in his. final 
Commission post as Conser- 


as it ts 


|> 

I 


\ 


. -/ 




15 


THE TIMES MONDAY MARCH 24 1986 



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_______ * 

A preservation expert cairying oat repairs yesterday to Islamic artefacts damaged in the 

Museum faces battle over 

compensation for flood 

r *Kn mmivnotiffli carried out drainage work* 


Irnrtinn of the comiM^satMHi carried om onunage ww*» 
By David Hewson for tolKtoK between the mnsenm and 4he 

Arts Correspondent HgS hoDS^fc^ms of BromptonOratt^. 

The Victoria & Albert Mn- 3SK interest destined for Some *■”“ on 

seum faces its second kmg and the British Theatre Mnsenm, ^on^g, a^l on^t*^> 
expensive wrangle with the as well as a ^te b ^Tb!Lwtf 

Property Services Agency and and Japanese artefa^ tang the room 

its sub-contractors after a stored in the mnsenm Swssads of pieces 

flood damaged priceless ex- basement ^ ^ At ODe stage the 

hibits onSahirday. n>e V*A imfeUy btajed wm> *“* 

showed t he «ed fajugher «ato &£ 

is already involved in a con- SAglS 

pensatHm datm r^nltiogfr om would lead to tatter stamed 

radiators aad mad«,oate rdatjpos ibctwsa itaMari; to- 


carried ont drainage works 
between the mnsenm and 4he 

Brampton Oratory. 

Some' time on Saturday 
morning, a seal on the tempo- 
rary pipe bnrst, se n d in g water 
fjwrtuiing through basement 
offices and into the room 
where thousands of pieces 
were stored. At one stage the 
water was 4ft deep 
The mnsenm estimates it 
needs around £26 million in 


which - a workman's ladder 
toppled a £1 million bast by 
Aigardi, shattering it into 
several pieces. 

The bust remains unre- 
paired as milts on the cost of 
restoring it continue between 
the PSA. a Government de- 
partment and the private con- 
tracting firm which employed 
the workman. 

But the cost of the Algardi 
repair could turn out to be a 


drainage are not u nc o mm on 
Bat an -investigation re- 
vealed that tiie real canse of 
the flood was a new water main 
which had bees installed to 
replace its supposedly unsafe 
Victorian predecessor. ‘ 

The four-inch pipe, capable 
of carrying 5.000 gallons of 

water an hour, was installed as 

a temporary replacement 
while PSA sub-contractors 


relations between national - in- 
stitutions, which must r ely on I 
the PSA to carry ont structural 
work for them on-behalf of the 
Government, which usually 
owns the bnildings. 

Tbe V&A said it had no 
alternative hot to store items 
in the. room affected by the 
flooding. "There is just no- 
where else to pot them. We are 

very short of space,” a spokes- 
man said. 


US outcry 

Continued from page 1 
seven firngg in 1 985 before the 
moratorium. 

• MOSCOW: Pravda yester- 
day accused the White House 
of trying to sabotage growing 
public support for Moscow s 
offer of an indefinite ban on 
all tests by bringing forward 
the date of Saturday’s blast 
(Christopher Walker writes). 

“By fixing the dale of the \ 
explosion initially slated for 
mid-April for late March, the 
White House decided to 
‘neutralize’ public opinion for 
the moratorium that would: 
have gained momentum dur- 
ing. the coming month,” the 
party-daily said. - 

In a report from Washing- 
ton on Sunday night, Tass 
claimed that the blast was 
“tell-tale proof that the Rea- 
gan Administration is bent on 
speeding up work” 


Continued Irompage 1 

to force tbe ltafian Gov exa- 
m«mt to intervene with the 
Ameri cans on his behalf. Hie 
senator believes Sindona was. 
m ordered. - 

Even though Sindona had 
fared crises in the past which 
were dearly leading to his 
destruction, he never, as for as 
is known, tried seriously to 
make use of his secrets to 
defend himself — hence the 
theory that Us secrets were 
another bluff and that, freed 
-frith uriOariiFor the. rest of ,4w 
Went the age Of 
to hhttsetf and somdKftr 
: Bipsaged : to obtaiyra dose af 
jg&sssfess cyanide/ "7. 

' Sodde is only one theory, 
because there were certainly 
people who would have pre- 
ferred him dead to alive and 
would have been ready to put 
an end to him 


UP hT 

ss-raSsSSStt-- 

nil 1*11 1 T m jTj" 

«The 'law is rin our sidc^. .' 
toMldtton-He rKOOT^dte . 
achievements to me. 

forced- into town brothels.. I j save mnoc^ . 

^ flagpr efeom prison. I ogam gOTerpriwirt 

land for landless Harijans^ " 

“We’re not afraid any more, he mrormea - 
me in the village square, with mgh-caste 
landlonis listening. “Hie Government is 
helping us.” ; 

When I first knew M ***■££>* 
to name him in my amcfes. He bad pwn me 
information about: corrupt officials and 
exploiting landlords, and feared tbor re- 
venge. I had changed all the names m the ar- 
tid.es I wrote then. Now; there was no need ' 

for concealment - • :, r 

The high-caste Brahmins and-.KnpiA . 
remained m^^nare when he left -JHk 
. boasts are’ lies”, .they 


been appointed a member <n4he 
Harijan Wei&re ;Boaid* and Ppw wanted 

morepubKciiy. . ' '• t., 

The^^fire board had always had a 
reputation for diverting government fonds 
ftlto private pockets. “Nowhgnratemgeto 
his share of the fockbadcs,” 

told me. The Harqans denied it The 

Brahmins* siandet they said, wasdesigned to 
damage his chances in the next etemon. 

Man gatram compiled 'I'lBt of villagers 
who, he said, would receive government 
grants for the purchase of buffaloes. Among 
Item. were those Wpo had J5 

nomination as headman. "That 
honest,” his defenders said. No, smd tas 
detractors, a fl.it^proye d was that he was 

t ^rE passed 0^ ^ 

aspersions 

^ a^thel^ky^»to, 

sign receipts for tiie money 1 

receive, most do nbts w ere 
official now” to supportere dedmed.^ 
village headman, Nam Singh, 
he would make off with tiie grants, bnt.lew 


and had sow into to pay for his 
edneatkm. Durgu vas Still wt, stih 
S tnnKfing.Hcccilddowi*;a^TO - 

IwasTawayfrom the ytitigp wtenjn 

Mangat ram and his associate, r Attar-Shigi^ 
m^ng ' oenam that ' the .'vufogers; aw 

tv., Hn . hu wav nf nioiniw lha( 


the oanu Would nadi. those for whom they 
^ intm^-Tlm.two villa^represeuta- 
■'■'twes signed the reoai«,aBdhe^^^_ _ - .. 

Mangatr am went mto a huddle with the 
derfcs who had remained to supervise the 
Proo=atings.Ev«y^e entitled ux the mm* 
was to receive 4 ,p 0 p.‘rupees (about £-70). 
Mang atram distributed the money. ■ .. . 

. ,-rhe villagers counted it Some thought 
■there- had been a mistake. Hiey roamed 


3060. . ■ . 

- ’He bad to give a cut ib the clerks. 


wouldn’t have got anything. They protrat- 
ed.He threatened: “If you.don’t shut UJJ, m 
see to it that you get nothing noj tyne- 


brother _ 
isdoiaglWs . •; 'v 


His brothcr pleaded with him; ^ake it or 
leave it,” Mamptram said. E>ai0i threw the , 
money in his.fice. recooddereitand pickecS 
it ud “Whatetee could I do?” beasked 

me fotm. *Td alrca<^.a^e(lfifr4,0W.” He 
was too poor — as they aflwere —to risk los- 
ing ft. “My own brother is doing thisto us,” 
he kept- repeating. to me. He still hadn’t 
repaid tlw debts , he had incuneditp help 
Mangrtram- rise above his fellow lowcasles. 

• •. O toer vjBagers c o n firme d his account and 
jgwe^ ^me tijem mjm . storiesLbf the . extortion 
and trickery Wangafram had prated on 
tftfm - rtsflhy -he ieamed Ihat T-l^d been 
q^cing ^oMins^^iXitinter-^tiacked. 1 was 
fSeSw*® 1 Id bring harm to the 
1 wflasfe. ^We don't want you here,’? he told 


“ ^‘It’s he who should the headman told 
me. He bad found a way tb free tiie village of 
. hrtn ~nr «> he thought. 


Tod ay's events 

Royal engagements 
Tne Princess of Wales, Patron 
of the Royal School for the 
Blind, attends a Charity Conceit 
at Hammersmith Palais, w 6, in 
aid of ihe school, and of the 
Young Variety Club of Greal 
Britain, 7.35. 

General 

The statue of Eros, which has 
been removed for renovation, 
will be unveiled in Piccadilly 
Circus today at 12.30 by Ron 
Livingstone and Tony Banks 
MP. 

Fun run, Wapping and Shad- 
well, with the London Hash 
House Harriers: meet Wapping 
Underground, 6.30. 

New exhibitions 
The Triangle Show, work by 
painters and sculptors who have 


attended the Triangle Artists’ ^ 

Workshop, Smith’s GaDen«, 33 : ™gmx 
ShehonSuWC2; Mon 10.30*0 ggjyg® 

. 5/ Toes. Thure to Sat 10.30 to 
9.30. Wed and Suu lOJO io 6. , . . . MUSIC. 

. . _ . Mendelssm 

Art Upstairs paintings, tex- tj,- jhe Wh 


Art by Rowland Suddaby. 
Phoenix Gallery, . L^venh am , 
Suffolk; Mori to Fn, 10 to 5.30, 


Nature notes 


~ J Roads — 


Weather 


Men^tohon’s “ Hijah," by 
<> The Whitehall Choir and 


Art Upstairs paintings, tex- -p* Whitehall Choir and 
tiles, fashion and interior des^n Orchestra, Barbican 

displayed in the evemn^; The HaU ECZ 7 . , 5 


Victoria, Strathearn Place, 
7.30pm to 10.30pm Moil 
6.30pm to 10:30pm Tues and 
Wed (ends March 26). 

Works in textiles, fibre, 
ceramics, wood, glass, jewelry, 
metalwork and mixed media; 
Oxford Gallery, 23 High Si: 
Mon to Sat 10 to 5 (ends April 
23) 

Last chance to see 

Architecture. People and 
Places: photographs by Mortey 
von Sternberg. Royal Institute 
of British Architects, 66 Port- 
land Place, WI; Mon to Fri 9.30 
to 6 fends today). 



The Times Crossword Puzzle No 17,001 


ACROSS 

I Don't take a holiday (5). 

4 Many captivated by fear- 
some heights get guides (9>. 

9 It’s a draw - naturally (9). 

10 Unavailable to a trainee? 
Rubbish! (5). 

II Looking different grips 
youth (3). 

12 Carriage entrance (9). 

13 A degree with true potential 


6 “X" is far from pleased (5\ 

7 Obviously not in the pink! 
(3.6). 

8 Disunited place in Dalmatia 
( 5 ). 

14 Looking for a soil fruit in 
middle of undergrowth (9). 


youtn to;. jg A ^ce serving one's pur- 

Camage entrance (9). (gj_ 

ror d &™ira^ff(7l 17 MembCToforterisnoleven 
d,w. chruLTi hv a rame a uon (7>. 


15 Restraint shown by a game a oon 

painter (7). jg Right in but it's taken ouil 

18 A stretch of nver accom- . 7) 
modating some vessels (7). 

20 Skipped - was concerned 20 Loads dean cts carry back 


about exercise (7). 


for example (7). 


21 Dance when given tea 2J 5ma)1 firms getting together 
repeatedly (3-3-3). over a drink (5). 

23 A lot of cattle went on the 

road (5). 22 It's swell up in Paradise 

25 Feature A - The Land of without end (5). 

mXS fore* ™te - 24 Present from the queen (5). 
love lost - so sorry! ( 9). — — — 

27 Feathers wild tigers eat (9). 

28 The cast will find this line is TJ|p SolUUOIl 

to be omitted 15). *“5 . i 


22 It's swell up in Paradise 
without end (5). 


Recital by the Cavendish Trio' 1 
of works by Schubert and De- , 
bussy. Royal Festival Hail, ( 
12.30. . . \ 

Concert by the Philharmoma j 
Orchestra. Philharmonia f 
Chorus and RCS Junior Choir; 
Roval Festival Hall, South , 
Barik, SE1, 7.30. , 

Piano rental by Janusz , 
Pfotrowicz Stechley, St Marun- ( 
in-the-Fields. Trafalgar Sq, 
WCl, 1.05. . . , , 

Organ Tecital by Mictoet j 
Rhodes, St Midiael’s. ComhiiL , 
ECZlpm. _ ■; 

: Organ recital by --Catherine / 
Ennis. . St Lawrence Jewry, 
Guildhall Yard. EC2, 1pm. 

Piano recital by Margaret 
Lion, St Vedast, Foster Lane, ' 
EC2, 1.10. 

Recital by students. Guildhall 
School of Music and Drama. 
EC2. 7pm. 

Concert by the Cathedral 
Choir of Bach’s Si John Passion, 

St Paul's Cathedral. EC4. 6pm. 

Recital by Linda 
Nicholson(piano) of works by 
Bach. Mozart and Haydn. Si 
George's Church, Bloomsbury 
Way. WCL 1. 

Organ recital by David 
Liddle. the American Church in 
London.' 79 Tottenham Court 
Rd.W!,1.05. 

. Talks, lectures 
Introduction to manuscript 
illumination by Penelope -Wal- 
fis.ll: 

the Resurrection in medieval 
manuscripts by Penelope Wal- 
lis. 2: 

Medieval Bibles by Penelope 
Wallis: The British Museum, 
Greal Russell Sl WC2, 12.30 

The Week’s Walks 

Today: Ptimcal LondavGowmment 
and Partament, meat E mUen townt 
Underground. 11: Inside Dichen'a Lav 
don. meet Kolbora Uncwgrnuna Z 
Roman London, meet Museum of Lon- 
don. ZJft Mauntad London-A OwaWaBt 
landing m a pub), meet Si Pears 

Underground. ? , _ 

TMBQIIOWilnSWlWL q^ptgwM - 

ground. £ Saxon and Lo™* 1 - 

maw Museum of LandOP,2^0. 

Wednesday: Inns of Co urt-Eng wrars 
Legal Heritage. me*ChMcaiy Lm» 
UndergrSmd 11 t g i* 1 

Medieval Londort PBfl ua and 

Lordorr-Tha Lam- 

ground. 11: Tudor and Sunt La™"' 
meet w e sm w mo r Underyoun o. & Ma- 
turn Mono tna fitwr&ank. raon i tawr- 
Pddga (south sate). &Sft Oe«hn 
London, meet Cownt Garden Undw- 
□round.7. 

Friday: Charles Dickens 1 Uterwy Lorv 
don, meet SI Pwra Underground. 11: A 
Lneraiy Wak-Ot Poets and Authors, meet 
SI Pod's Underground, t Belgravia 
Upstairs and Downstairs 1 , meat Swan* 


Spring changes are coming to . Lgii'fca. aad Souft -enc ifeft.f teto - 
the lakes and ponds,. Little- doadresjn Ceolinjo*' Rd, StmS» St Hywe.' 

grebes are. back:a£i^hey are K ®**^ c ^ 5 ^ WO{)cs « ^ ^ 
dumpy birds which puff up them ^SJSoiKiton 4 EgmMmWind 

sterns like a feather-duster, and pudeyiand lunctofi 
! at f&rm&meirit are diving out in. md 
■ the middteof the water In a few 'rSSmSs 

weeks. when. they -rtaitoeniajL sn^toru y - . _ " r 


they will skulk in the reeds. Wild 
duck. are leaving and beading 


Wtfas and Wash MS c u cdr a Bow on 
southbound 

Sons 12 ( Glouceesar} and 14 l B4S09. 


aucx are IMV.UR 5ora12i [GioucaB»r> and 14 < B4S08. 

north: teal are moving up to ebs. Nwmbowd exit at 

lonely pools on the Scottish junction 13 dowd. 
moore, sho veins arc heading for 
north Europe. Other shovefars, 


north Europe. Other shovelers, . 
which have wintered further 
south, are coming in to breed in 
the water meadows of East 
Anglia. . _ 

Redpolls are leaving the birch 
trees in the south and returning 
to Scotland: they are like small 


A " -depression 
deepen - J rcg tyoasly a 

movefflvBwoss the 

• _ 

. 6 am to midnight . 




JWWSSDFSS 


snow showera; win0s S strong a 
□ala. becoming W gate or seven 


Redpolls are leaving the birch and33t a£ Lan caser Soirt h^aa ^ to | 
trees in the south and returning j 

to Scotland: they are bke smaD sl Sm*port 

linnets, with a pale putk breast tfvaniien. 

i and a neat black, bib. The. first Scottroq m* i -Sw gbamd 

wheat ears. are appearing on the 


England: Rato at first, MWl 
vale and squaiytooj^ of Jg 
sleet or snow; fW BghJ? 
araunrhJ .winds:^ ' , ^oi ,s heWL -W® 



^storat-for^pwJ 


Downs. Skylarks are 


on nonWxxmd. 


vigorously over the fields. Many 1 oi cmante. Rparand & uaarty. ~ l imlinii nr 1 -- 1 

wrens took -refuge in reed beds ■ —w* ■ ■ ■ ~ j “ '. : . .1: dt 

during the frosL and it seems lfiC pOUBIl -=• ' . .. I hWyWW SS 


that many died. Bit! they are ■ ■ ~ ■ 1 1 \ 

begirming to spread through the . 
country again, churring and 
singing in the hedge-bottoms. Autfrato* 

Flowers and grasses are grow- j*”! ? 
ing slowly in the cold ground. A 
few leaves are opening on the DamnwkKr 
elder trees. Small tortoiseshell 
butterflies have come out of ^mmDm 
hibernation, looking rather GrMcuDr 
small and crumpled, and warm- SSSw 8 * 
ing themselves in the sunJDJM 

— yipmYio 

Anniversaries 3SSS , " <Bd 

- Portugal Eac * 

Births: William Moms, sou* Africa Bd = 

Walthamstow; London, 1843; . gpMgj^ .., - 
OHve Schreiner, writer, author . v * 

of The Siory of an African FOrtv. usas ' _ 

Wmenbergen. Cape : Colony, YuBcMwia ** 

South Afh«Tl.855; - ■ ’ . • 1 5 
Deaths: Eamtbrth L ret^ flBSy£^3Bu Bn °" mm 
1S58-1603. Richmond _ 1603, ^ London: The FTktdex dosed down ZB 


3JS 

1IL52 

.217X0 

ass 

20BJOO- 

«LSS 

..279. 

-IjOS 

<7000 


S?S£5?^ 

^^ovrarar drifting on 
winds SE to • E strong or go } 
becoming NWw^*«_stti 

Rato, sleet cx^snowat times, ortron 

on. has; trrtna more showei 
laterretods SE at fkitt strong or gal 
becoming northerly later, max tarn 



High Tides 




ST - 


Ditferem raws apply to sravaltere 
.cheques and other foreign cunency 
i_ Retd Priarlndes: 381 4 
• ■ London The FT todex closed doem £8 


ShstlaiKl: . Sunrty', ’ 
shovrecs of sleet or arim 

•agtfaabggy - 

: Outlook - for; ttoesday 
■Wednesday: Continuing rathei 
and windy wltoshowera i^ing pul 



ventor of the marine chronom 
eter, London. 1776; 


dosed up &27 on Friday at 


544 am. 

no moon March 26 . 



Ughting-up tone 



pywio eo - how w mu _ _ 
jSMvnhy record yoor daar 
> total. 

these topeOwr to determtae 
eddy Portfolio told. 


DOWN r 

1 A light covering (9). ITIZC 1. 

2 An emotion some people Nfrt 1 *7 

consider dangerous (5). A ■* ' 

3 One such as Myrtle never nr|l] or 
leaves off 19). 

4 Aimless t)pc turning colour flCXt 2)3. 
about the rent demanded 

(7). 

5 Sheepish creature with some 
defence (7). 

Concise Crossword, page 10 


The Solution 
of Saturday’s 
Prize Puzzle 
No 17,000 
will appear 
next Saturday 


auuiriay; Shakasoeara's London (pub 
walk), meat Mommant Underground 
(Fish ST entrance), 11: Afieys and Court- 
yards o ! the City, meet Mansion House 
UnCar ground. 11; Pitfuesque Hamp- 
stead Ydiam. meet Hampstead Under- 
ground. 2.M. 

Sunday: An s acr a ac London, meet 
Green Parte Underground, 1130; A Lon- 
don -Vllage-Chstoea. moot Sloana Sq 
Underground £ The Famous Snonock 
Hofcnes Detective Trad, meet Baker Street 
Underground 230; An Itotonc Pub WalK- 
Hampaead mem Hampstead Under- 
ground. 7.30. 

Parliament today 

Commons (2.30): Conclusion 
of the Budget debate. 

Lords (2.30): Drug Traffick- 
ing Offences Bill, (committee.) 


ss,s^si ?gu5^ a.sgs 

of -nwrenee Is no! a cendlUon of on B» Slot* Exchange Prices nape, 
ijittnq pari. In Hie column* provided next lo 

yow snares note the price change C-t- 
or ->. in pence, as publtstied In Dial 
day's Times. 

After Hating the Price changes of 
your efehl Shares Mr IMt aUF- add on 
an emu share changes Co give you 
your overall total plus or ndmai+or- 

- 


3 Times 
the figure 
the optima 
.largest ux 
cambhiatic 

S oup) Of t 
iy. eomi 

S S to^«»rmtoe 

S Times Roruouo tin and details, of w wwWv Portftbo total, 
the daily or weekly dividend wflj also 
he available for Inspection at me 
offices of The Times. 

6 If the overall price movement or 
more Utan. one combination of shares 
counts the dividend, the pri ze wtu b e Hew p e toha. _ 

equally divided among the a atina nts Tlsphoos The Tine Portfrito dtiw 
holding nwsr combinations of shares. mUH-Mtl bi t a een 10MM end 
7 ah rtatms are soWect to scrutiny 
before payment Any Times Portfolio I* *?. ■rS*H aMn 

card Dial is defaced, tampered wtth or !*” ” 

Incorrectly prinled in any way will be — I 

declared void- You must have ywir card wltK'yoa ! 

8 Employees of News International wnen you teiephono. , • -, ■ , 

t£^t soJUS^el^ca^o ^SPESS 

DMhSuL auowcd 10 Times between tn* stipulated -times. 

Fvrfew?. u. rmnnsibUlly e«>- Jbe e' e -l *» i l 

,or any raasem within .the stated 
lo way and now to ctaint wnetner hours. ■ 

Mibusned m The Times or In Times _ _ - — . 

Portfolio cards wffl be deemed to he 

part of these Rules. 5RS££* l 3«SS n flaDy 

10 In any dispute. The Eddo rU Ql^upulcialPd. - ■ 

decKion w ilnal and no eoeteapoh- • _£®™£™?2EgL- Efflfflg? 
deuce will be enicred Into. maoae tranor i wgprm B in je inwoc - 

It If fnr - ml TKa Tlnill* UOHS Ofl UW HV6TK I ftQC TUuS 

ll if lor 3zty rewon 100 irnvw a?i» hai invilldfiM, 

Prices Page is not miblbfeed in the j 4-._ 
normal way Times Portfolio will be : ♦Tt * w wgj 
susoendcdTur that day. purposes, 

Mn* to My • Daw ogtdead useu b not anected md vulU 
On each day your unique set of eight to dc played in exactly toe same way 
numbers win represent commercial as before. 



Yesterday 


Belfast 3) 439 O ofa n o sy , f. 
B'mghMk a B46 faram — ,fl 
.Bte&fead- -.f.*43.-*ret» 1 .- c 
Bristol ...f.846 London . - 1 
CsnJtif . - I 743 MPnchstor e 
Eift*ureh' T-337 Hotaanffa I 
dasanw M 337 IftiUsny -• - 


Best Wines 




1 1 T mk l ( J-’ 1 



■Jj® 









"i -'i 1 iSn 



V ill. ’9^^441 


He tiafab Mh 6* aoMMadl 


normal way Times MrU 
suspended for that day. 



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[' ':'L- - 















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^ r - W 



"•k- 





— •*- — '* 


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J’S 

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ar— 1 
.. •**•!? 

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LB 



MONDAY MARCH 24 1986 

TIMES 

17 

L 

FINANCE AND INDUSTRY 



US NOTEBOOK 


The case 
against 
Volcker 

From Maxwell Newton 
New York - 

Tie resignation of Mr Pres- 
. ton Martin as vice-chairman 
of the Federal Reserve Board 
removes from that institution 
the leading critic of Mr Paul 
Volcker, ns c hairman JVfj 
Martin was the -spearhead of 
the Reagan Administration's 
attempt to break the Volcker 
stranglehold on the Fed. - 

The jnBghtmg at the Fed 
has oue ‘ again 1 raised, the 
q ues tion of .wiry the Admmis- 
(ration so dislikes Mr Volcker. 

Here is a list of reasons:' 

- t Mr Volcker is a Demo- 
crat, appointed by Mr Jimmy 
Carter, the former President. 

• In -the early months of 
President Reagan's first term, 
Mr Beryl Sprmkei, who was 
that Under-Secretary for 
Monetary Affairs in the US 
Treasury, constantly nrg 
Mr Volcker to bring about a 
"slow and steady'* redaction in 
thereto of growth of aumey. 
Eventually, the President 
called Mr Vofoker in, on April 
18, 1981^ihd after (hat jiomt, 
Mr ' Voider instituted an ' ef- 
fective freeze on money growth 

— something fte'Admudstra- 
tton had never asked fojr, or 
wanted. 

• Ti|e Administration pub- 
licly and privately vSBfied Mir 
Vokker for having precipitat- 
ed the 1982 recession. This 
recession led to a permanent 
loss of federal revenues and 
the deficit problem. • Follow- 
ing the huge money growth 
explosion-in July 1982, to July 
1983, the Fed became more 
and more concerned tint it had 
re-ignited the fires of inflation. 
Mr Milton Friedman hi April 
1984 said whoever was the 
President in January 1985 
would have to impose wage 
and price control to stem a 
prospective serious inflation. 
Manypeopie in the Fed felt 
the same way and from April 
1984 until October 1984 there 
was a a effective freeze ea 
money growth. Mr Martin, by 

then vice-chairman of the Fed, 

argued that the freeze on 
money growth had been fiur too 
sadden and Ear too severe. - 

• In the first half af 1984, 
real GNP growth averaged 8 
per cent a year. In the third 
quarter it fell precipitously to 
an annual rate of £ljper cent 
and in the fourth quarto: to 9.6 
per rent and the strengthof 
Mr Martin's criticism was 
enhanced. In October 1984, 
the Volcker dupe hi the Fed 
conceded defeat, and an ex- 
traordinarily rapid rate of 
money growth was instituted. 

• As vacancies on die Fed 
became available in the nor- 
mal course of events. President 
Reagan appointed economists 
and hankers sympathetic to 
“the Preston Martin attitude”. 

•Recognizing the seriously 
negative effects on domestic 
economic growth total of nega- 
tive net exports, Mr James 
Baker, Secretary of the US 
Treasury, and Mr Richard 
Durmast, his secretary, seized 
the initiative last September 


and forced Japan to abandon 
its policy of under-valuing the 
yen. 

• Since July 1985, Mr 
Volcker had instituted an 8 per 
cent Federal funds policy 
which was increasingly resent- 
ed by the markets, 

and by the “gang of four” 
p«a p »» nominees on the Fed. 
After the first cut in the 
Japanese discount rate, pres- 
sure mounted for a break in 
the 8 per cent funds policy. Mr 
Vokfcerargoed it would weak? 
eu the dollar and increase the 
possibility of domestic infla- 
tion. The “gang of four” 
overrated Mr Volcker, and 
humiliated him in public, 
which I believe was unwise as 
it wiR worsen relations within 


policy making body'. 



to sell JMB next month 


. . The Bank of England hopes 
to sell Johnson Mattbey Bank- 
ers, foe international bank and 
bullion dealer it saved from 
collapse, within the next 
month. 

Mr Robin Lrigh-Fember- 
ton. Governor of the Bank of 
England, indicated over the 
weekend that JMB coiild~be in 
fresh hands very soon.possi-' 
My split' up and sold fo more 
than one buyer. : - ' 

A spokesman for the Bank 
said: 


By Cliff Fettham 

of its problems were caused by Last December JMB. in its 


a lack of supervision and at 
the heighth of the scandal 
there were calls for the resig- 
nation of Mr Leigb- 
PembertotL 

. The Bank will be hopingit 
can recover from the sale 
almost all of the £150 minion 
pnt up to rescue Johnson 
Matthey as part of .a package 
arranged with other - City 
banks. . 


first set of accounts since its 
near collapse, reported a pre- 
tax loss of about £70 million. 
There were bad debt provi- 
sions of around £250 million. 

.At that time the Bank of 
England said the results 
marked a turning point in 
JMB’s affairs and losses this 
year would be considerably 
reduced. 


.ion Rich rewards defended 

we said we would find Ukely 

Young financial experts 
should enjoy their six-figure 
rewards while they can, Mr 
Robin Leigh-Pem berton, Gov- 
ernor of the Bank of England, 
said at the weekend. 

Stepping into the controver- 
sy over big dty salaries, he 
said be could understand that 
it was “distasteful” for the 
unemployed to read of high 
wages hut employers were 
competing in world markets 
mid needed to pay to attract 


buyers as soon as. various 
problems had been sorted 
out”. However, he added that 
there was no certainty a deal 
would be completed within a 
month. 

Johnson Matthey B anke rs 
was rescued with debts of 
more than £250 million in 
1984 and has been at the 
centre of one of the biggest 
financial and political storms 
in the City for years, involving 
allegations of 'multimillion 


pound currency frauds. Many the right sort of people. 


Stock broking firms have 
been offering staff salaries of 
£60,000 or more plus huge 
Idea hellos” to build up 
teams for tiie Big Bang in 
the autumn. 

“In addition”, Mr Leigh- 
Pem berton said, “three is a 
shortness iff career which is 
comparable with pop singers 
and athletes. Indeed, this 
trend may not be sustained: 
some salaries may come down 
and some of these high-fliers 
may even be redundant.” 


Baring Brothers, the mer- 
chant bank handling the sale, 
has contacted about 40 insti- 
tutions thought to be keen on 
making an offer for all or part 
of JMB. 

The main attraction is its 
bullion-dealing side ~ it is a 
member of the exclusive Lon- 
don gold bullion market - 
which is understood to have 
been trading profitably 
throughout the difficulties af- 
fecting the banking operation. 

A substantial tax loss on the 
loan book, which can be offset 
against profits on other pans 
or the business, is also attrac- 
tive to would-be buyers. 

One bank thought to be 
interested in JMB is Chase 
Manhattan, which is heavily 
involved in Nigeria — the 
source of many of the British 
bank's loan problems. 

However, Chase Manhattan 
or anyone else would insist 
that the Bank of England 
provide watertight guarantees 
offering indemnity against any 
legal action which could arise 
after the sale. 


Rolls-Royce sale in motion’ 


By Our City Staff 

Rolls-Royce, the aero engine 
company which was rescued 
by the Heath Government in 
1971, could he back in private 
hands by September. The com- 
pany confirmed yesterday that 
all the preliminary stages lead- 
ing to an autumn flotation 
were complete. 

“We have no indication of 
an exact date for the privatiza- 
tion ' but everything is in 
motion”, said a spokesman. 

. The Government said . . last 
November . that Rolls-Royce 
would be sold before the next 
general election but the compa- 
ny yesterday dismissed sugges- 
tions that it was now able to 
pencil in an autumn flotation 
because of the setback in 
British Airways' plans for a 
slock market debut . 

“It would be wrong to 
assume that our timetable has 
been affected by British 



Sir Fronds: massaging 
the company image 

Airways* difficulties. We are 
proceeding quite 

independently” 

Rolls-Royce has the more 
immediate problem of pleasing 
the market with its 1985 profit 
figures, expected next month. 
The chairman. Sir Francis 
Tombs, has indicated a sub- 


stantial increase on the net 
total of £20 million last year, 
itself a sharp turn round on the 
record losses of £193 million 
previously. 

Over the coming months Sir 
Francis will be trying to mas- 
sage the company's image, and 
in particular to ease worries 
over the heavy research and 
development spending pro- 
gramme which is essential for a 
business operating on the fron- 
tiers - of engineering 
development 

Even so, the massive costs of 
launching new engines — and 
the calibre of the competition 
worldwide — will inevitably 
dampen some of the enthusi- 
asm for the issue in the dty. 

Bui Rolls-Royce has never- 
theless been transformed in the 
last two years from a millstone 
around the neck of the state to 
a profitable operation with real 
prospects. 


Dutch to 
cut 

in KLM 

The Hague (Reuter) — The 
Dutch government will lose its 
majority slake in the national 
airline KLM this week for the 
first time in 67 years as the 
company issues new shares to 
fund expansion plans. 

A complex reshuffle of the 
KLM share structure will cut 
the stale's holding from' 54.8 
per cent to 36.6 per cent* 
although the Government re- 
tains a supervisory role and 
will have an -option 'to bii|r 
back into tire company if it 
wishes. 

The move, which comes as 
Britain hesitates over-privatiz- 
ing British Airways, reflects 
KLM’s desire for growth rath- 
er than a government policy of 
selling off business assets. 

The airline needs money to 
renew its 60-plane fleet and 
add new capacity to keep pace 
with a growing market. 

Orders have already been 
placed for 21 new planes and 
the share issue on the Amster- 
dam and New York markets — . 
to be based on Wednesday's 
New York dosing price — will 
help to pay for them. 

After Wednesday, the sale 
of 15 million shares, of which 
three million were previously 
owned by the state, will begin 
and press estimates say the 
sate could raise $300 million 
(£200 million). - 


board meetings 


■ ■ f, 

i 


TODAY - Interims: The 
Fleming Japanese Investment 
Trust, James Halstead, Mag- 
netic Group. Murray Ventures, 
Trafford Park Bates. Finals: 
Associated Steel Distributors, 
Barrow Hepburn. Brent Chemi- 
cals, Chanerhall North Amer- 
ica. Early's of Witney, 
Freemans.' Gartqn Eironeen^. 
Grampian Holdings. Great Dol- 
lar Fund. HaU Engineering 
(Holdings). Hickson Inter- 
national. IMI, Lament Hold- 
ings, Pahna Group. Ferranol, 
Sovereign Oil & Gas, Spring 
Ram. Steeiley. Technical 
Component Industries. 
Warisila. ... 

TOMORROW -Znttruw: A 
B Electronics, British Car Auc- 
tion, Bryant Holdings, Ckae 
Brothers Group. Afanson Fi- 
nance Trust. John Maunders, 
Pressac Holdings. Finals* 
American Trust Aquascutum. 
BAT Industries (expected 
Wednesday). • Booker 
McConnell. British Aerospace. 
W Canning. Chart Foulks 
Lvnch. OURskTs Dames. Com- 
bined English Stores. Group. 
Comcap. John Crowtbcr Group. 
EBC Group. Estates and Gen- 
eral investments. 

PulpMills, Goal Petroleum- HB 
Electronic C rnnpcneots- Iceland 
Frown Foods HoMiiWS. -Brin- 
son Group Cleaners. The Keep 
Trust. Unread. UndOT & Sot- 
tish Manse Oil- Albert Martm 
Holdings. Peninsula:* OncrU^ 
5le&m Navigation Co, Pnulen- 


Corporation. 

Group. Southampton, 


lial 



Rockware 

ivi> o, isle of 

Wight* and South of England 
Royal Mail Steam Packet, Stan- 
dard Chartered, Sunbeam wol- 
sey. Telfos Holdings, Trade 
Indemnity, United Newspapers. 
VG Instruments - famended). 
Wills Group. Wptetenhohne 
Rink. ■ „ - . 

WEDNESDAY - Interims: 
) upas. Industries, Minerals Oils, 
and Resources Shares Fund, 
ptfco Holdings. Precious Metals 
Trust, Real I;' ,W! *' ** 

You 

ctateu bw* * miiji iv. - — . — - 
BICC Bridon. Britannic Assur- 
ance. Brown Boveri Kent, Gibbs 
and Dandy, Horizon Travel 
Lowe Howard-Spink CampbeU- 
Ewald (Holdings). Lyon &. 
Lvon, Bernard Matthews, Metal 
Closures Group, Monument Oil 
and Gas, Readymix, Rotork, 
Stag Furniture Holdings. Steel 
Burrill. Jones Group, Supra 
Group, Tricentrol. Wold, Ar- 
ihtfr .Wood A Son (Longpan), 
Wool worth Holdings. 

THURSDAY - . Interims 
Town Centre Securities. The 
Trans-Oeeanic Trust Finals; 
Attiari. Automated Security 
(Holdings). Breedon & Cloud 
HiH Lime Works. Croda gnw» 
national Derwent Valter Hold- 
ings, Downiebrac Holdings. The 
House of Louse. John I Jacobs. 
Manders Holdings. Mart vn Cur- 
rie Pacific Trust, Plan invest- 
ment Group. - 

FRIDAY — None announced. 


Opec split as oil price 
crisis talks continue 

From David Young, Geneva 

. World oil markets will open era attending the Geneva 
today in continued uncertain- 
ty as the Organization of 
Petroleum Exporting Coun- 
tries begins a second week of 
discussion to find an answer 
to the imbalance between oil 
supplies and demand. 

Opec is now deeply split 
between the conservative 
Arab Gulf states who want to 
keep their present output lev- 
els ^ to continue pressure on the 
non-Opec oil. producers to 
reach r an agreement with 
Opec. and the Iranian and 
other members who want a 
dramatic cut in output to force 
prices back up. 

The five non-Opec produc- 


meeting since last weekend - 
Egypt, Mexico, Malaysia, 
Oman and Angola — are also 
becoming increasingly frus- 
trated at Opec's indecision. 
White they have offered to 
make production cuts to help 
share the burden, Opec has yet 
to put a figure on what quota it 
is prepared to adopt. 

Dicussions now centre on 
proposals varying from an 1 1 
miftion barrel a day ceiling 
and a continuation of the 
quotas set in London three 
years ago at 16 million barrels 
a day, which have been consis- 
tently exceeded. 


Controls 
for BES 
misfire 

By Lawrence Lever 

Budget proposals aimed at 
curbing the proliferation of 
heavily asset-backed ventures 
seeking finance under the 
Business Expansion Scheme 
have allowed BES sponsors to 
increase investment 

Johnson Fry, the licensed 
dealer and specialist at pro- 
ducing asset-backed compa- 
nies, has been given the go- 
ahead by the Inland Revenue 
to invest £50,000 in each ofits 
sponsored companies. John- 
son Fry win be investing in a 
number of its own ventures, 
mainly through its own BES 
Fund. 

The Budget proposals stipu- 
lated that Tor a company to 
qualify for BES status it must 
not hold more than half of its 
net assets in land or buildings. 

An exception to this rule 
was made for the first-£50,000 
of a company's share capital, 
the idea being that the asset 
restriction should not apply to 
small, often private, BES 
projects 

It appears, however, that 
the £50,000 rule applies to the 
first £50,000 of a company's 
share capital which is issued 
after March 18 this year —and 
not simply the first £50,000 of 
a particular company's share 
capital. 

“The Revenue has allowed 
us to issue a further 50,000 
shares in any of our issues, 
even those that have already 
closed for subscriptions", Mr 
Charles Fry of Johnson Fiy 
said on Friday. “I have to be 
fair to existing shareholders so 
I will probably only use up 
£300.000 by putting an extra 
£50,000 in six of my 
companies." 


Executive Editor Kenneth Fleet 


How Lawson played 
the numbers game 


There is nothing like a busy Budget to 
distract us from the fundamentals. 
But Mr Lawson's obligatory Red 
Book acts like a black coffee after the 
Budget fizz. In sober figures, his 
forecast for economic growth re- 
mains unchanged at 3 per cent, for all 
the ability of the oil markets and 
political ingenuity to change it for 
better or worse. This is, however, 
virtually the only Red Book figure 
not to have experienced a sea change 
since Mr Lawson was last obliged to 
open the books. The first puzzle to be 
solved is how the great conjuror has 
managed to pluck an egg out of the 
ear of public finances: that is, how the 
Chancellor has simultaneously man- 
aged to cut both borrowing and 
taxation while losing half his revenue 
from the North Sea. 

For clues, look back at the forecasts 
for 1986-87 that he made in the 1985 
Budget. Public spending figures have 
come down just enough to justify that 
gesture of reducing the public 
borrowing target from £7.5 billion to 
£7 -billion. Not quite all the extra 
revenue expected from sales of public 
sector assets will be absorbed by 
higher spending on public 
programmes. 

But the most important shift is that 
while North Sea revenue forecasts 
have been scaled down by £5.5 
billion, other receipts have been 
scaled up by about £3 billion. 

Part of this increase will be quite 
painless. Company profits are ex- 
pected to jump — rising a further 20 
per cent in 1986 if oil companies are 
excluded. While the rate of corpora- 
tion tax is going down, corporate tax 
receipts are expected to go up some 
1 3 per cent But the small print of the 
Red Book reveals a more painful 
source of revenue, which does not 
reflect buoyant income: a 14 per cent 
rise in local authority rates. 

Dramatic change 

More broadly, however, the in- 
crease in revenue that has enabled the 
Chancellor to sprinkle Budget fresh- 
ener over the tax-paying electorate 
arises from his forecast of continuing 
economic growth. The hope that 
1986 would be another year in which 
growth topped 3 per cent did not 
feature in last year’s' Budget, but 
emerged in last November’s Autumn 
Statement; cannily, the Chancellor 
did not then reveal his new revenue 
forecasts. 

But the explanation for these 
growth hopes has changed dramati- 
cally in four months. According to 
the Treasury, they now look much 
better balanced. Exports and invest- 
ment are both expected to rise faster 
than consumer spending. 

The export side of the picture 
credibly reflects a lower pound 
(against the Europeans, anyway) and 
a stronger world: one. incidentally, in 
which the inflation rate is expected to 
drop clear below the growth of output 
for the first time since the 1 960s. The 
Treasury now believes that Britain's 
export markets will expand by 5 per 


cent, in volume terms, this year. 
While the Treasury has been too 
optimistic about exports before, there 
is a comforting margin for error on 
the trade balance in the fact that it has 
also nearly doubled its forecast for 
imports. 

That is why its growth figure has 
not gone up, even though the 
Chancellor is now counting on a 5 per 
cent increase in the real volume of 
fixed investment this year. But wart a 
moment: he was counting on nearly 
as large an increase last year, and was 
disappointed. Only last November, 
with one month to go to the end of 
1985, the Treasury’s estimate was for 
a 4 per cent rise in fixed investment. 
The latest guess is that investment 
rose a mere 1 per cent In the second 
half of the year, it actually fell. 

Capital allowances 

- A seesaw pattern in investment 
was expected, following the changes 
in capital allowances .that have 
encouraged business to cram invest- 
ment decisions into the final months 
of each financial year. And since the 
Treasury still reached its growth 
forecast for last year as a whole, it 
may seem churlish to argue about the 
components. 

Again this year, consumers’ extra 
spending may make up for business 
caution. But Mr Lawson is sticking 
his neck out with an investment 
forecast way above the indications in 
the Department of Trade and 
Industry's survey of intentions, and 
this helps to explain his determina- 
tion to get out of the interest-rate 
straitjacket imposed by his now- 
discarded medium-term financial 
strategy. 

The simplest signs of the times are 
often the most revealing In the Red 
Book, the passage on financial con- 
ditions used to begin with a disserta- 
tion on the monetary aggregates. Last 
week’s began baldly by talking about 
the dollar. 

In a couple of weeks we are 
promised further, and. better particu- 
lars, as defence counsel would say, of 
Mr Lawson's revised monetary strat- 
egy. One wonders why he bothers. A 
Chancellor who-can substitute an 1 1- 
15 per cent target for sterling M3 for 
one of 4-8 per cent without under- 
mining his brand-new 3.5 per cent 
inflation target can tell the City 
anything 

Perhaps this reflects his present 
tactical advantage, having succeeded 
in reversing the latest rise in interest 
rates without being forced into a 
second increase. Or perhaps it is 
simply that we all now understand 
the dominance of the exchange rate 
in his thinking in which case he can 
still save his breath. For all is fair in 
love and the currency markets, a 
subject on which no one expects 
Chancellors to tell the whole truth. 

Sarah Hogg 

Economics Editor 


Jobs linked 
to housing 

Housingroarket reforms are 
needed to cut unemployment, 
according to the journal of the 
Institute of Economic Affairs 
published today. 

About a fifth of the rise in 
unemployment since the 
1960s can be explained by the 
Rent Acts, it is claimed in 
Economic Affairs. 

The article, by Professor 
Patrick Minford, Mr Paul 
Ashton and Mr Michael Peel 
of the University of Liver- 
poors Department of Applied 
Economics, says Government 
interference results in direct 
waste — overuse or underuse 
of accommodation — and 
indirect waste — the immobil- 
ity of labour. 


Charities hope for windfall 


By Derek Harris, Industrial Editor 


Britain's 150,000 charities 
are preparing to recruit worker 
power to increase their reve- 
nues by up to an estimated 
£100 million a year. 

Approaches are likely soon 
to many companies to per- 
suade them to take advantage 
of Budget concessions on pay- 
roll deduction schemes. 

The Chancellor in the Bud- 
get announced that from April 
next year tax relief would be 
allowed on donations up to 
£IQ0 a year when made 
through payroll deductions. 

The Charities Aid Founda- 
tion, which acts for donors but 
is also the main umbrella body 
in the charities field, said it 


expected to see many payroll 
schemes starting next year as 
charities soon began to sell the 
idea to more companies. 

The foundation and about 
200 leading companies are 
organizing conferences for a 
concerted approach to the 
opportunities. 

Mr Michael Brophy, the 
foundation’s director, said: u lf 
10 per cent of the workforce 
ask for only half the conces- 
sion, which would be £50 a 
year donated, that would pro- 
duce about £100 million in 
new money.'*Charities receive 
abouL £4 billion a year in 
donations and earn about £6 
billion more. Public sector 


donations amount to about 
£2.4 billion, while private 
individuals give about £1 
billion, companies some £100 
million and charitable trusts 
and foundations about £400 
million. 

Some payroll deduction 
schemes already exist: the 
charities benefiting include Dr 
Bamado's. the Save the Chil- 
dren Fund and the National 
Society for the Prevention of 
Cruelty to Children. 

Contributions from compa- 
nies fall well behind the 
performances of businesses in 
countries like the US. 

This could be turned to 
advantage 


Gil slide catches Norway out 


From Tony Samstag, Oslo 


When the- price of oil looked 
set to go through the roof, 
successive Norwegian govern- 
ments argued hard that pro- 
duction should be kept at 
moderate levels. 

Now that prices have col- 
lapsed, pressure to cut produc- 
tion intensifies almost daily. 

The irony is not lost on the 
present Conservative coali- 
tion, which in recent weeks has 
had to contend not only with 
the Orgairizaiioa of Petroleam 
Exporting Countries, but also 
with domestic critics urging, 
production cuts of 25 per cent 
or more. 

Mr Hermod Skaanland, the 
head of the Central Bank, says 
Norway is already for too 
dependent on oil, and suggests 
a reduction from the present 1 
milli on hands a day to last 
year's level of 740,000 barrets 
a day. 

Opec has accused Norway, 
which is Europe's second! larg- 
est oil producing country) w 
foflowfog a line dictated by 
Britain, Europe's largest, in 


refusing to cut production. 

The Norwegian Govern- 
ment dismisses such talk as an 
effort by Opec to Bnd scape- 
goats for the disastrous drop in 
prices. 

Statofl, Norway's state o3 
company, says that prices 
would have to foil for below 
current levels before produc- 
tion cuts could be considered. 

Mr Kaare Kristiansen, the 
OH and energy minister, re- 
peats a longstanding convic- 
tion that oil companies must 
be free to manage their huge 
investments, now totalling be- 
tween 20 and 40 bill ion kroner 
(£2 billion to £4 billion), 
according to tbezr own com- 
mercial standards. 

Opposition politicians, and 
some independent economists, 
argue that a cut in production 
might in any case be too small 
to have any real effect on 
market prices; thoqgb it could 

be psychologically important. 

The Government has pro- 
posed an emergency Badge! 
that would raise the price of 


alcofaoL tobacco, meat and 
petrol in what is already one of 
tbe most expensive countries 
in tbe world — an attempt, it 
says, to raise at tease 2 billion 
kroner in lost oil revenues. 

Mr Rolf Pres thus, the fi- 
nance minister, has warned of 
‘•economic catastrophe” if the 
shortfall is not made up. 

Since the price collapse in 
January, according to the 
Government, last year's cm- 
rent account surplus of 26 
billion kroner, or about 5 per 
cent of the gross national 
product, has already become a 
.deficit of almost exactly the 
same size. 

At present rates oil revenues 
could drop from 20 per cent of 
tbe Government's total income 
to 3 per cent next year. Those 
revenues are estimated to have 
fallen already from $6*8 bil- 
lion (£4.53 billion) la 1985 to 
S2.1 billion. 

But the most ominous devel- 
opment of all is the increasing 
threat of a fierce pay dispute in 
the public sector, perhaps the 
worst this centtiry. 


State ami municipal em- 
ployees have fallen well be- 
hind private industry in pay 
and benefits; many feel that 
they have in effect been cheat- 
ed out of their share in the oil 
boom. Now, the Government 
says, the money has nm oat 

Record pay claims of 20 per 
cent and more could, after the 
long Easter break, lead to 
industrial conflicts of a sever- 
ity rarely seen in this country. 

The Association of Local 
Authorities has threatened a 
lockout of its workers if any of 
them take industrial action. 
That would be unprecedented 
here and guaranteed to pro- 
voke political Fury. 

A conciliatory proposal by 
Mrs Astrid Gjertsen. minister 
of consumer affairs, that more 
than 300 of the most senior 
jobs be marie more competi- 
tive, by exemption from gov- 
ernment pay scales, has only 
served lo exacerbate the anger 
of the unions. 

Teachers are already refus- 
ing to substitute for colleagues 
who are rick. 


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FINANCE AND INDUSTRY 


THE TIMES MONDAY MARCH 24 1986 


GILT-EDGED 


USM. REVIEW 


Chancellor outwits the City 
in high-stakes poker game 


Smaller firms come back into favom 


^Nevermind the content fed 
the paper." gasped old Trea- 
sury hands, as they rac their 
fingers onr the track vellum 
of ibis year's Red Book. The 
1986-87 Financial Statement 
and Budget Report has been 
produced on truly sumptuous 
paper, perhaps the most ex- 
pensive ever used. 

A metaphor for h$l week’s 
rallying cry to the tipper tier 
of the property-owning de- 
mocracy? Papering over the 
cracks in policy? The gills 
market was in no mood to 
savour such wisecracks last 
week, as ii trumpeted approv- 
al of the Chancellor’s state- 
ment Goaded by the bulls 
and allegedly some panic 
buying by one jobbing firm 
with a crazy book, the market 


swept on to fresh heights. A 
bellwether stock Kke Exche- 
quer 10W per cent 1989 saw 
yields fell to nearly 8 per cent 
The low coupons continued 
to advance. The knights of 
the shires are still backing the 
Chancellor. 

Lateral thinkers among the 
traders likened the Budget to 
a successful coup in a long 
poker game. They imagined 
him seated at the green baize, 
cigar in hand, flanked by 
some extremely hard-looking 
gentlemen indeed, and sud- 
denly bursting out of policy 
constraints with one effort- 
less piece of bidding. 

The traders, as usual have 
an intuitive grasp of these 
things. It was a very effective 
Budget staiemenL The way 
that successful obstacles to a 
triumph, like gilt bears, Opec 
threats, Tory die-hard fears, 
and apprehension about cen- 
tral banking obligations, sud- 
denly faded away during the 


enhances the chances . of suc- 
cessful privatization 1 moves 
later in the year. This was 
really a Budget about equi- 
ties. And It i$ foolish for the 
City's teenage scribblers to 
complain at the sectarianism 
in the Budget's definitional 
bias; in a generalized sense, 
the Government now is the 
privatization programme. 

The angle of this approach 
also helps to reconcile the 
apparent inconsistencies in 
the Red Book. Glad tidings 
for gilts, like low inflation, 
the restoration of monetary 
targeting and, subsequently,' 
base rate cuts, are hard to 
square immediately with the 
good news for equities, like 
thundering growth in con- 
sumption and good growth in 
earnings. The fact that the 
Latest data on GDP and 
inflation directly contradict 
some of the Chancellor’s 
assumptions does not make 
the task of reconciliation any 
easier. 

On this basis, the Budget is 
almost an articulated struc- 
ture, like a pop-up picture, 
designed to satisfy separate 
markets almost in isolation, 
rather than provide a consoli- 
dated analysis, underpinned 
by visible consistency. 

The sensation of disaggre- 
gation certainly applies to the 
gilts market. Normally, gQts 
trade with dose reference to 
obvious benchmarks like the - 
exchange rate and money 
costs. But as gilt yields near 
the 9 per cent yield barrier, 
the spread over base rates is 
still an awe-inspiring 220 
basis points. 

The chances of normal 
fundamentals catching up 
with the gilt market look 




high drama of a show of 
hands in a tough poker 
school. 

It looks very much as if the 
Chancellor has broken new 
ground in his Budget ap- 
proach. Rather than produce 
a Budget for the economy 
itself, be has put greater 
emphasis instead on compil- 
ing a statement to allay 
market fears about the 
economy. 

The logic of this approach 
holds on one level insofar as 
the relentless projection of 
good news in the Budget 


Sterling looks set to trade 
between Sl.SO and $1.40 as a 
preferred range. Break-out 
above that range poses prob- 
lems for the oil account and 
.on the Confederation of Brit- 
ish Industry fronL A drop in 
sterling below $1.40 would 
amount to a vote of' no 
confidence by the foreigner in 
the Budget, as well as threat- 
ening to push up base rates. 

The authorities also face a 


policy bind on rates. As the 
first round of international 
rate cuts draws to a close, Mr 
Preston Martin, vice-chair- 


man of the Federal Reserve; 

: has emerged as the first 
apparent casualty. His resig- 
nation appears to enhance the 
power base of Mr Paul 
Volcker, the chairman, who 
is known as a gradualist on 
rate cutting. Coincidentally, 
the Bank spent last Friday 
punishingthe houses for their 
exuberance by lending at 12 
per cent. 

On a practical level, the 
British authorities must be 
' keen to see base rates in single 
figures m order to consolidate 
the move towards cheaper 
- money and to buttress the 
UK gut yield curve. But rates 
theoretically come down in 
half points That suggests no 
fewer than four rate-cutting 
. moves before base rales hit 
single-digit level. It could 
take until Christmas, cry the 
bears — who recall that Opec 
is still in session, that the US 
economy is very weak, and 
that oil prices may continue 
to weaken. 

But the Chancellor has no 
time, presumably, for such 
theoretical niceties. Gilts 
have a different role, appar- 
ently, in his scheme of things. 
They exist to lead the markets 
down, pushing equities ahead 
in the process. This in turn 
helps the Government to 
evade the constraints of tire 
young turks by fadtitatingthe 
privatization programme. 
The process is circular, but 
the operational gearing is 
high. 

The authorities, for exam- 
ple. must be delighted at the 
amount of foreign capital 
sucked into the British mar- 
ket through partly-paid 
stocks. Such foreign capital 
will constitute a marvellous 
sump of cash for the autumn 
privatization programme, 
provided foreign gilt holders 
do not take fright at the scale 
of negative carry in London, 
take their profits and depart 
A similar line of argument 
ought to apply to the Budget’s 1 
ambitious projections for real 
disposable income growth 
and base rate cuts. On this 
basis, if gilts fall seriously, 
then the operational gearing 
built into the Budget coujd, ii 
thrown into reverse, threaten 
the hulk of the programme. 

The lagging relationship 
between gilts and traditional 


fundamentals plus the policy 
role for gilts in the privaliza- 
. lion programme makes the 
■■ goodwill vacuum created by a 
coffee-table Red Book quite 
critical The acerbic relation- 
ship between Square Mile 
analysts and the Chancellor, 
strained anyway in the run- 
up to March IS by the series 
of false trails put down by 
Whitehall means that City 
thinkers will be (ess inclined 
than ever to give the Chancel- 
lor the benefit of the doubt, 
assuming some of the num- 
bers occasionally look 
awkward, • 

Faced with this delicate 


March is the height of the 
results season on the USM 
and this year is proving to be 
especially rewarding for long- 
term backers of the market as 
the stream of good results 


The company, which makes • much of the expensive raw 
polythene bags, was floated material , . . • 


at £175 million but this looks 
tij be conservative. -Shane- 
holders should take up their 


and taken over by -Rocfcware 
iii 1 9JI 8 for£4.6 million. There 
was a management buyout for' 


from companies suth v as £2,9. million in.* 1983 aid in 

World oTLe£ber.*nd Mien*,;. November 1984 it was floated .. With 

film Reprographics is .proyitf-- • <m the USM on a market _ fflV xf 

ine- a <nlid underamninfi to capitalization of £7 mitiion, tracts. - to supply t . f .. 


interplay between promise 
and fulfilment, will the Bank' 


ing a Solid underpinning to 
share prices. 

Smaller companies were 
very much ont of fashion in 
the latter half of 1985 as 
investors felt that ratings were 
too high given the risk element 
and problems of illiquidity in 
the shares. Several shares have 
returned to favour, however, 
and many of the sparkling 
results are coming from the 
less glamorous sectors. Alida 
Holdings, for exam pie , report- 
ed a 77 per cent increase in 
pretax profits last week. 


capitalization of £7 mutton. 

Behind these bald figures 
lies a tale of technical innova- 
tion which has succeeded itt 
both revitalizing the company 


company to sellings at higher 
vaJuc-addttf margins. 

. With. the. improvement in 
quality, Alida' has won con- 
tracts to supply many of the 
bags used by the big retailers. 

At the beginning ofl 984 the 
company embarked on. a £o 
million, capital expenditure 
nroeramnie which -is two 


atxng in a rector wncre raves- 
jqts usually fight shy is 
Associated Steel Distributors, 
a steel stockholder and distrib- 
utor, which jsdue to announce 
prefiminaiy 1985 results this 
week- : 


At .die halfway, stage, turn- 
over was up 49 per cent and 


t L: 


previously lost to imports. 

In 1980, Alida began to 
develop a polyethelene mate- 
rial known as linear low 
density polythene; this pro- 
vides much stronger bags than 
conventional polythene _ while 
using .only about .a third as 


this year and the company has 
returned to the market for 
further equity finance. . 


J turnover in the second hall 
' with an even greater increase 
in pretax profits to comfort- 


Therights ’ “Jl aWy above £2 million for the 

Bounced is a one-for-fourat 


oouncca IS a ■*“ fi.iiwar 

I40p to raise £L7 milbcraafter 

are forecast ISS&Cl 


Uns worth 


'9? 

: jf 


'play a leading role and pro- 
vide the gilt market with 
discreet support at current 
levels, hence marking a re- 
turn to a more traditional role 
in its gilt market operations? 

The arguments in favour of 
such a policy response must 
be compulsive, not least be- 
cause the Bank will not be 
keen to see a major correction 


to gilt yields some six months 
before Big Bang. Some of the 


before Big Bang, Some of the 
more exuberant players could 
be wiped out even before they 
reach the starting line. 

Some analysts claimed to 
see signs of a new order 
emerging last week, even as 
the- market boomed. The 
EMS rumour was trundled 


out yet again each time the 
market showed sagns of flag- 


market showed signs of flag- 
ging, even though officials 
admit the Cabinet must be 
temperamentally opposed to 
Europe's obsession with 
gridshifting. Perhaps the au- 
thorities will be keener to 
stabilize the market at cur- 
rent levels, rather than see it 
shooting farther ahead. This 
may be the muted message in 
Friday's switch from partly 
paid stocks to taplets. 

In poker terms, the Chan- 
cellor has doubled up so 
, much on this one that -he’s 
actually got bis bankers there 
with him at the table. And it 
remains- the bankers' respon-. 
sibility, in this scheme of 
things, to see that the young 
master leaves the table with a 
fair chunk of his winnings 
intact Omnibus est labor 
impendenduP. 

Christopher Dunn 

Orion Royal Bank 



CuX a ft i Mon 

E company 


Pra Ch'ga Qom Bv 
Mat on d* YH 
Friday waaic pence % P/E 


Price Origa<M» O* 
last on # % 

FMar Mah paooa ■%• fff. 


1299900 > t a Uo 13'J 

5418900 ATX S as coo n 51 

3.2*6.000 Aurora 62 

6.6S09QO ABMrcnw 100 

assojMo ADonmn s» Haa sa 


12-B* Acass SM*W BO «-1 

46 ««■ doom Comp 70 -6 

I OH) 000 Ana jot .-I 

4900000 Adam Luaur* . 16 -'i 

40.ta AoOBon Page 2S8 +S 

tun Air caa ass -5 

Z1.2M Awa 42S *03 

19.4a Atotumarc • 138 - -2 

7.813.000 AppMtraa . . : MS • 

IS-.:? 

• IBAn Aspen CHnms 235 +2 

S B* Aaomtf ■ i«& -\ 

fc» ASpny 6C3 *5 


. r 08 4.4 T29 

£(n 36 158 
-1 2.0 02 7.7 

-9 36 35 142 

-9 31 55 131 


SO a-1 48 S3 116 


I Gaud (AotondJ 
I Oaofftosen 4 
I OOtXn Lyons 

I albeit Haul 


. . . . 49 

.. 10.7 
.. .. 20 

33 ■ 1.3 38* 
flO 64 M9. 
.10.7 15 32.4 
-18 1.1 212 
14. .19 139 


IGtoWCp 
I God** Warren 


t GouW ILawancej 
i GranrW Waca 
Oraamftx Ottfr 25 ~ *3 

owwsq. .. as 4wr 
Ouenaar Atlantic-- 160 ~ 
HBffcet -': 

Hampaaol Kamaeva 



2216000 Aasoc Envoy 
165* Asaoc 9uaT 


162m Aaaoc 3w 
420000 0 Autamxfc 
1.658000 app 
3.800.000 BTS Op 


235 +2 3V 16 289 

166 -1 16 52 S3 

603 *5 112 22 2L5 

32 -1 .. .. 79 


+5 - 1Mb -50 132' 


I hahay (tf ^homp 158 
1 HaMuek Eucopa ' 243 
1 HowM Wrong .. AS 0 

1 Hauh Cara -,32 


7S •-» 8.0 102 774 


4613000 Badton) (WAuiD 95 •-« 64 17 S3 

i0.3« Bennett i Pmmai isv 0.8 16 75-6 


71 33119 

55b 73 19 
64 17 13 


Commercial Bank of Wales ^ 

. announces, that its Base Rate has 
been reduced from' 12%% to 11%% 


the 21st March 1966. 


Interest payable on Demand 
Deposit Accounts will be at the 
rate of 7% per annum . 
equivalent to a gross rate of 
10% p.a. to basic rate taxpayers. 


a® 



Commercial 

BankofW^Ies 

PLC 


BANC UASNACHOL CYMRU 


Head Office: 114-116 St Mary Street, Cardiff CFI 1 XJ 


• .The Securities & Invest- 
ments Bdffihd: Miss Barbara 
Conway has been appointed-a 
director, and chief in- 
formation officer. ' 

WillisJFaber & Dumas: Mr 
R J Elliott has been named as 
managing director. 

Robertson Research Inter- 
national and Robertson Re- 
search Petroleum Services: 
Mr David R Keith and Mr 
David C Wilson have joined 
the boards. 

Close Brothers: Mr S R 
Hodges has been made a 
director. 

UKF Fertilisers: Mir John 
Coleman is to be commercial 
director. 

Falcon Industries: Mr Nor- 
man Parker has joined the 
board as a non-executive 
director. 

Refuge Assurance: Mr Ian 
Colgan and Mr John Walker 
are to be directors. 

Norcros Distribution: Mr 
Roger Feariour is to be 
chairman. 

UCCEL Software Products: 


’«*»_• . 

Mrlafl'CaitwngMhasTieen 
made managing director. 

Bank of Engtandi'Mr R A 
Barnes is to be an assistant 
director, banJting'supervfsion 
division. 

Midland Bank: Mr P J 
White has been named as a-j 
corporate finance director, 
with responsibility for the 
Channel tunnel project j 

More O’berraii: Mr Trevor j 
Mannd has become finance ; 
director. 

Ford & Weston Group: Mr 
T .Peter Whitehead has been 
jaiade a divisional chief 
executive. 


2384300 Bensons Cmpa 
1766300 BvWTO • Hay 
16.1m Bartatay Exs 
eft an Bariuioy Op 
2.432.M0 bk> mams 

2171.000 Bomaetlancs 
115(7.009 Bancftvdt 

106m Bioentra Toys 

4276.000 Bnemnkar 
103m Bnut 

7550300 amr 

4.161 3W.Bniarott.B«: 
0540300 Br BkxntBcfc ■ 
■550300 Bnjofcriiroil 


43 


43 54 12304 

-3 


*S 33 TL* 172 


183 «-3 50 27 142 

24 -1 1 1 45 122 


-tfl ' " i 3-.' 1.7 3S3 -■ 
-5 35 .\ 26 205 i. 


- 270 46 11.9: 45 


Riax ResourcttS T - 4 ... 

3214.000 CCA Gatones '•■flV'Sr ,SA*4A .. 
• 125m CMLAKcn] 153- 23 13 111 


5m CMUAScnj .. 153- .. SL0J316.8 

6m CVD v * 1 * , i*f; :■ >13 if •?: . . 
- rmtaum mi, rwi sen -an ’ " 


+32, 173, 69 9.9 
+8 11 19 1S2 

-3 .. .. .. 

-3 30 214 .. 


- — C+Ocmundl *3SB -30 >. .. .. 
i5.4m Cannon Sttaat Hv 1BO +2 29 . 29 153.. - ■ 

J2.000 Cnwonnoor 63 +2 - 82 8337.1 • . 

• KUtt Cml TV - ■•- 260 +32. 173. 69 99 

13.1m Cnwcary Baer 00 +8 11 19 152 

3 'Ss2£ Ow 1* ^ 30 214 

?K§r w . v-* 

4.746000 C-capnm 90 - i . 13 1.7 10 J 

254m cuyfortvi Prapa 961 +6 10.7 4.1 115 . 

2563.000 Ctogau GoU IS'r -» 

12*n OuSOB Hdo* 38 -6 

260m Com EmeieW 89 

10.6m Cowgmi he 96 +1 

1577.000 Comp FeaneW 110 43 29 25 21.7. 

3.420300 Conpaqfi .5 -1 29 64 75 

112m ConauBann ' IW 411 1.1 13 324 

2634300 Cant Tim kws 53 «-2 7.1 134 355 

6313300 Com MicronttM 266 - -- - -- 

6536300 Comb 03 

lam CPM 135 

5316300 Ownpnmn 356 


-2 30 214 .. 

62(132 236 
-■» .. .. 1.8 

i. 15 1.7 103 

40 107 4.1 165 



HOME SHOPPING 


Substantial profit growth 


* Significant improvement in sales - up 21%. 

Substantial profit growth - up 66% after first alloca- 
tion of £300,000 to Employees Profit Share Scheme. 

* Recommended final dividend 4p, making total 
dividend for the year 6p against 3p last year. 

Proposed Rights Issue of 1 for 6 to raise 
£27.1 million. 


Economic Insurance Com- 
pany: Mr Derek Hammond 
Giles has been named as 
managing director. 

Jeyes Hygiene: Sir James 
Cleminson becomes chairman 
and Mr Peter Turnbull a non- 
executive director. The new 
board will comprise Mr Bryan 
Long (managing director), Mr 
David Sutherland (finance) 
Mr Michael Rigby (sales and 
, marketing). Mr Stephen Pryor 
(manufacturing and technical; 
and Mr Tony Pearson (buying, 1 
and distribution). 

Falcon Industries: Mr Nor- 
man Parker has joined the 
board as a non-executive 
director. 

H J Maybrey & Co: Mr. 
John Carlisle has become 
managing director, succeeding 
Mr Peter Steadman, who has 
retired. 

European Vinyls Corpora- 
tion: Mr J York is to be chief 
executive. Dr K Kell technical 
director. Mr W J Prinsdaar 
commercial director. Dr A 
Celenza finance director and 
Mr A E Young resource 
director. Dr L Autuori and Mr 
R Brown will be non-executive 
directors. 


arocPM 
5512000 Ownpaum 
5 640.000 CraMxooH' 
'59K.000 Ciromet 
. 5575500 Oavn Lrdge 
' 9.4114)00 CriMi.liM . 


166 -66 57 21 155 

63 -* 3.7 13J 

135 -5 25 15 199 

M 74 20 26.1 

73 •+* 21 22 192 

107 . .. 75* .71 92 > . 

.. 29 , 2.7-20.1- - 


5247 JK» QBE Tach 
2449500 DDT 
1.1SJ.OOO DJ Sac Annas 


7JM.HU OUm 
20».Hn Da Bran lAKtta 

12 On Omn 

22714DD DTOw 
190m Dancora 
4217.HU Damnana BK 
4284JXW Deway Wanan 
731m Out* 

3.96+000 Dunor 

463500 Oo 12% 


98 «+1 .•-•64J 21 129 ’ 

96 +1 1.J) . 12 >29 . - 

s6 -a am 

145 -,-S .14-14)154.'.-- 

96 *45 . 2.1 32 75 

3B . -5 741: 35.165. 

26 -i .. a .. ^ 

80 .14 ’15 115 

48 26 29134 

113 +3 25 25125 

105 5 62 SO 79 


4284 J»0 Dewar Wanro too •-« 107 127 29 

331* Drue* 370 +19 21 14 2*7 

3964.000 Owaon 22 03. 14 129 

463.000 Oo 12% 315 .. 17.1 24 • 

125* E*f"j Baa Opecs 125 ” ' +14 “Si ' 25 145 

, 143*7.000 Eoohrte 12 -2>j . . • .. 125 

465* am Ftmtl 320 +16 88 27 t9M 

44)524)00 E»n Sacs '38 -2 02* 05..' 

245* EUridgs Papa *" 3Z7 +33 24 25 121 

•92m Etearon Houaa 140 «-1 46 23 222 

-45B6JXU Beoranc Dala P 72 25 22 105 

17 la Eras 33 +J 

Ttajoco Enarammam Proa 10 1.4 1«J>- 4J 



530 
143 

34 

- aasuBQ lAi— na Mans - io5 

- Mdwmror.lm 336 

. -AstOOff Was 33 355 

. 102* MPWtttt WO TO ' 1TO 

2524402 ttaswvttf - - 173. 

. — .Unamo* 36 

7JX».000 Mroiga* Op 
- 135* Mortis * CTO* 
1576400 SMB*r mm 
5.K&000 Moms (iTOa m ) 
29B04UO Mon Aanmrog ns 
16Wa NMW Como 340 

- 2223460 NSSOniMda LMttn 77 
5567400 Maw Cl WNtt .17 

Do Wrro. . 


25 25.155 
14 '23172 

s m 

35 23125 
57 54 145 
60- 1.1 249 

7.4 45.102 


20 15291 
39 -25 142 
51 '05 209 

M 13-127 
69 25107 
34b 70 61 
24 141 45 


4563960 imi Entsati Plops 
990500 Do lot . 


ajsmmamw 
* .* 728500 HllSO CNy '( 

2171.000 RSM aft* 

■■ lie* Radius - 
5503500 Ramoo cw 
4470500 Rsnwi: 

1220.000 RM Tto* Control 
1.716500 Rohm Motor 
4525500 Rk*b HUG 

1581.000 RoSa « now 
7.707500 Rud* K3} 

165* SAC 


619* SCUSA 
2500500 Sang n Photo 
7.616500 Sapprisa P* 
4.672000 Scanro 
95*0.000 Scanttmc 
343* Scot Hariiotn 
6995500 Sacunguaid 

1441.000 S*dW 

1166.000 STOn0*dc 


1743.000 EWKV Rfli 
67X000 Do S% 


Ftt 

>70* FKB Cp 
T 530000 Fad HOusM 
5512000 FMODSCK 

8500.000 Ferowroak 

6501.000 Bawaui 
24.4* Ftogn 
>aa* Fiova 04 

32 «m Franai Conn 
71 Dm FiMiaMka 


29 lia Fwaar SnWi 'A* 485 


7508500 Gootuco 


200 •+? 67 34 105 

39 +4 . 19 ' 55 205 

£09'j • .. 800 115 .. 

160 • 

166 +13 25 13 354 

67 -5 47 64 U 

03 .. 28 69 203 

37 45 124 31 

35 -3 .... 45 

140 .. 2S6 .. .. 

56 -2 .... 238 

205 75 27 106 

78 +8 24 39 425 

465 +30 10 1 21 169 

133 +2 45 35 185 


288m 9w> Drug I 
1620.000 Snewoo Jon 


29Aa Snarston Sac 
7960500 ShafVMH Conp 

7994.000 Sign** 

6.080500 Sms cawing 
7.861500 Smctw nvMm) 
9457500 swan food 
747*500 Seam Boaga 

— Sdm Bus 
124* SW Resourora 
1914500 5PSKW Tm* 

2573.000 Gpactta AMO 
35W|000 Bpacl nsn 

7.150500 Srouass Maw 
1507500 SroaUD 


+7 
+3 

132 +Z 

85 +17 

33 -5 

146 -5 , 

03 -2 

140 .44 

<01 «-4 

10 '» 

203 -3 

330 +07 

70 . . -4*. • 

as-j +3'» 
205- - -5 

86 

163 +8 

105 -'.•+2 
163 .+5..' 

114 . -+1 

129 +3 

20 . 

103 ’•+* 
S3 

26 -1 
86 •...+* 
143 - +1 

ST -3 


0.1 .OJ .. 
57 78 12 
59 aa 109 
11 .15 334 
05 ; 08 Itt 
IS 3.1 239 - 


&3 35444 : 
19 23199 
49 29 M2 

35 35117 . 


5 30 2*S»r 
-26 05.360. 


990500 DO W% 

■ 142* Moan 
41 <9500 Ham* 

114* Rortta* 

.. 5377900 Mneot How* 

7.630000 Npi 3as 9 Gao 
45B7DOO OMMO Utfpac 
— Optorotnca- -* 

,146* QSCOmaS LOtls 213 

■ met OwDM’Rbraad - . ST 

4 . 437. 0 00 per-- ~ ioo- 

12te-PWaAt(SM*l - .230 

- 1 ■ llfiOJKC foofle fflSa^;-.'. 63- ■. 
&S»M fow Wa W “ . 139 

3.i*n ftotfak+Cp ■ • j 44« 

•f Wi-s S 

■ . 153* foroy S #■* 166 

. • 37.7* fop* Gohj(+ -^.,119. 
sjKoooo.Papcom n». 

2860000 Proms tD .30 

' .. . Ju2m PMan (McnaoO 165 

. OM000 Pasdgan . • ' 16 

- 3418500 ncroSy Raao 3i 

5.762000 fta Pttl <6 

1503500 RaittM Danes 41 

1936.000 nan^mit - • 86 

-.. .1516500 nasmac ~ 33 . 

. 5733500- Run* . 130 

154*fo*npa U9 

111* PWjtadi Marin* 213 

15ta PowTOme 130 

19.7m Pnnom Ent 13+ . 

7523 000 Ptomoam Haa nr, 

195*. SM-Plia 273 

Tl.»n swing Pob BS 

5846500 StrtMri BlCt ■&'* 

S.HKMU0 Stme*«HET) 60 .. 

1 6» 000 SwridonPr Heap -120 -• 
-7566900 Sw*d*» Co(bp JlS 

154oi T tsanM . . 193 
1 1 fin TDS- Orcwsa H»7 

^T.MZOOfrTUn.Mwrt 
4547500 Ttt7 Honws : 78; 

.. .3525500 TaqnHan tar. 

■ 

2330500 Totaconpulaig- 175 . 

120 * TatSro M- *wv 

9.425500 5ww< " . ‘ ; ; w . 

• 4a Tm Tjam». SdaWSe ■ - «S. 
1.733500 Itapae . 75 . 

zmkms.Tmm r mai ■..» 
9500500 Too \ • 140 

• W5* TPM Etwaa. 3ip 

• .2564900 Toangwii See «S 

«7atr.«u Toot Pnxaamm tss 

9&>n -nanAanoaod. 290 

. 7293.000 Tr*wi 78 

. 9538500 Tm* Tees-’A 1 205 

1 '20-7* UDQ • • - • 303 

. 1411.000 u« Ceramic 50 

747* Utd FriawHy 493 

•„ . 4,450500 UW PKkaang • . 105 
7*81500 VWn foSl - -160 
, 108m Vtowjsan- 100 

9969.000 Wttine Karr ■ B6 

45(3500 nab* eacso 08 

3JJZ4.000 W|**C _ 161) 

1886500 wait YcrtsJWfl 78 

8570500 Whe-ortn'a Ftoas ; 01 •' 




25 14320 
,14 «5 1U 

4J 46114 


A3 .65 05 
50 *0147 




2.6 "13 184 
45 35157 


19 1,6 58.4 
1.7 57 74 
3.7 .22 205 


29 84 185 
.. ... 94 

..107 
28 39105 

a 139 .4.1 

. 2.VW* 


*7 . *5 17.4 
5 A 25304 
26 29174 
29b 22298 
10b 3.4 175 
44 14219 
29b 3*205 
04 T.8 53.1 
49 82 109 
.. .. -SOD 

21 . 19200 
45 . 229U 
7.0 42 72 
24 15238 
84 8* 114 
1*5 at .. 
9.4 74 745 
49. -20 2|6 
1.1.. 06 107 
290 18 261 
14 17 .. 

^STb. W31.1- 
' 29fi 49 Hi 


*.1b 75 J5- 
42 39259 
. « ■ « 3 .. 
15 ;38 S02 
50 30 W2 
74 26135 
1.6 21 165 
169 92 7.4 
5.4 - 15 162- 
SD‘ 69 67 
316 . 4* .. 
45 47 S3 

14 09 369. 

15 -18 14 
2.1 £2152- 


09 04 61 
lib £1 248 
39b 15 215 
-06 09 09 
S3 33 255 
75 45 HU 
39 2£21> 
39 34 149 


flflra.000 Wsyne Karr 
<6(3900 WHO* Sa t 


S -54 125 

' v V 

57 73 105 


5? 7m WtJtus 
. . 521.000 Wriam ; 
- 2 j i55oo wa*m 1 


135* Who** 
i4j*wt3T. . 


T9 50 28 
29 .25 154 
34 «4 87- 
.. £5 
49 .2 MS- 
69 42204 


MMWWFi 

. .150* YWrob a w* 
2650000 VaMnon 
1.720500 York Mount 


• - •' 175 - . 

5'/ 

WB*. W* 
68 - 

*r.. 215 

-' 96 • 

200* ■ 
P. . 153 

..- 33 

-.-43 


Z9 36 16.0 
« V7-U5 

35 69 114 

35 1.7 229 
34-.' 35144 


1.050.000 zygat Dynanaes 21 


£3605 283 


r commercial! 

PROPERTY 


THURSDAY 

Judith Huntley 


iiWe believe that the general outlook for 1986 for retailing is 
favourable and that our plans for the Home Shopping 
Companies will result in continued real volume growth.M 

John Haim, Chairman 



Preliminary Results year ended 31st January 1986 


Sales 

266.0 

219.1 

Profit before tax 

16.0 

9.6 

Profit after tax 

12.8 

9.0 


Dividend 


Earnings per share \ 


Grattan PLC, Anchor House, Ingleby Road Bradford, BD99 2 XG. 



"m-omc* Eajunge ff oo as not coroMA* an mvnsa on * amputta to sdDffcnW-Hbro)'. 

. ' ' Jwwa»flny saeHWsoii»»Coi»|Sfl«r ' 


FEDERATED HOUSING pic 


{Heeepenma m Engma under m Corrosnas Ms }9tato'iBO0 
ntotao&nanuireer 1538*77) 


INTRODUCTION TO THE OFFICIAL UST 
Share Capital 

Authorised issued and Number 

fuBy paid 

£ £ 

600.000 Ordhary Shares of Sp 450000 9,000.000 


Appbcaaxm has been made ta the Counci! of The Stock Exchange to 
admit the whole of the issued share capita of Federated Housing pic 
(cumwitfy draft in on the Unfisted Securities Market) to the Official List 
It is expected that dealings win commence on 8th April. 1986. 

Listing pertcuiars relating to the Company are available in the Em 
SiahStta) Servsas ana copies of such paraeulars are a/so ava&Me 

during normal business hours on any weekday (excluding Saiudays) 

up to end mduttng Zttt April, 1986 from . 

Hffl Sarramt & Co. Limited W. Greenwdl A Co. " 

100 Wood Street Bow Bote House. 

London 6C2P 2AJ Broad Street, 

London EC4M 9EL 
Federated Housing pic 
Swan House, 

Swan Court 
Lesthertiead, 

Surrey KT22 8AH 

and are also available from the Company Announcements Office, 
QuatatKXia Department of The Stock Exchange. London EC2 until 2^h 

Marcn. 1966. 








9 


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Lit Missende 
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«S^ Peace have 


Seaford 



Westdean 


Eastdean 


EASTBOURNE 

Beachy Head 


elsey 


vi 


C athay Pacific fly to Hong Kong from your doorstep. 

If you live within forty miles of Gatwick airport, think of your living room as our departure lounge. 

Because, when you fly business class or 1st class with Cathay Pacific, well send a chauffeur driven limousine to your home 

to collect you. 

* 

This way we can ensure that you not only arrive in better shape. You’ll depart in better shape too. 


For full details of our limousine service to and from Gatwick airport, see your travel agent or call us on 01-930 7878 or 
Linkline 0345 581581.' . 

■ ■ • ~ : — Arrive in better shape— 

CATHAY PACIFIC 

The Swire Group H3 A 




25B8 PI 








































































































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20 


FINANCE AND INDUSTRY 


THE TIMES MONDAY MARCH 24 1986 


THEtS^TIMES 

Sbdfotio 

From vour portfolio card checi 
eight shore pnee movements. Add 
up to give you your overall total, 
tlus against the daily dividend 
published on this page. If it match 
nave non outright or a share Of th 
dailv prize money stated. If you 
winner follow the claim procedure 
back of vour card. You must alway 
your card available when chimin] 

5 

vour 
them 
Check 
figure 
es you 

c total 
art a 
oa the 
have 

V 

No. 

Company 

You 

guoor 

loss 


BUILDING AND ROADS 


l 

Meyer Ini 



Amec 


J 


mm 

ID 



In 

Nemarthill 


Ll 

Bryan, 


rr 

Person mon 


K2 

Vibroplaiu 


■a 

r attain 


Ed 

Ward 




mm 

m 

Brtiobdt 


■a 

- J Bodvrow 


EJ 

” Burgess-.;. . 


wa 

ColoroU Gp 


m 


mm\ 

in 

Dupon 


EQ 

Braramer 


m 

Chemring 


■£1 

Cookson 


El 

Brasway 



INDUSTRIALS E-K 


D 

Grampian Hides 


ta 

HarpvJ'o 


m 

Juhnson Cleaners 


E3 

Fenner (JHr 


m 

Edbns 


m 

Kershaw ,\i 


ta 

Hunting Assoc 


El 

Johrreion 


El 

Johnson Mauhey 


e a 

English China Clays 



ELECTRICALS 


tn 

Allen 


El 

Bowi home 


m 

M I'll B IM 1 1 

mm I 

tn 

Br Telecom 90p P 


El 

BIC'C 


tn 

Brown Boi.cn Kent 


Ell 

Tunsull Telecom 


Ell 



Ell 

Stone lull 


Ell 

Schotes IGH, 


| © Times Newspapers Ltd. Daily Tout { 


Weekly Dividend 

Please make a note of your daily unals 
for the weekly dividend of £20,000 in 
Friday's newspaper. 

ups 

TUE 

WFO 

THU 

m 

SM 

WroMy 

Tsei 









BRITISH FUNDS 


Sw Oul- 
wane+k} 

E Stock 


Pna Oge inL Gross 
toll 00 on* Rna 
Fnu y mO»i yld% 


SHORTS (Under Five 


7H9m Treas 2S ,986 
,W7m Ejco 10 % 1386 
1150m Treat I2*» 1386 
556m Tn*K B .% !9fl*-88 
625mE.cn 2' *- 1986 
UBOm E>:n UV 1986 
128*" E.cn ,3'.“- 196/ 
1001m TrwsC1IV.M907 
653a E.C0 2' +- 138" 


1558m E«en 
54im Fund 
i593m Tins 
688m Tins 
20ttm Tins 
485m Trou 
1485m E-cn 


10' % 138T 
6 *• 1385-87 
IP*. 1387 
3*. 1987 
17*. 1987 
7’.** 1965-88 
10 ■» 1988 


ii4~m Tims C9 ■"* 1968 
1173m Tuns 3*» 137888 
2037m Tins 9' ’» 1988 
r?45ra T'Nl II’*. 1383 
IJJSm Trois 10 1969 

2*:2n E*cn 10”. iW» 

1 1 78a E«cn i0 1969 
2 *. 1930 
11*. 1389 
5'. 196669 
11*. 1990 


32'm E«en 
i8Hm E.cn 
S37m Trw 
1255m E*ch 
1108m Treat C9 '• 1969 
433m TieiS 3". 1989 
,053m This IT. 1990 
13708. Eu* 12 *. 1990 
456m TrMS 3*. 1990 
579m Treaa 8 1987 90 

1476m Treat 10V 1990 


Years) 

9*> +■» 

993 + '■ 
100 

993 + '. 
96’» +•* 
102 *'■ 
1021. + '. 
100’i »•« 

9*-to-’« 
W. +•♦ 

98 - *•. 

99- *• 
93’’ *• 
i02> +•■ 
97 .1 

101 *1 . 

99 + *11. 
SO - . *1 
»-to+1V 
104- *1 .• 
i Or • 

100 . *iv 
tor. .3, 

80’. *2 
102'. to* l 1 - 
89'* •■.IS 
I04 - - .IV 
HM'.W-a'- 

B6-. - . 

110 . * 1 *. 
1 W- +» 
83 +,•« 

96'. *2 

102'.to+2<. 


30 
105 
120 
86 
25 
13 7 
329 
102 


10 4 
67 

100 

02 

117 

80 

104 
98 
33 
96 

11 0 
103 
100 

98 

11 

106 

56 

105 
94 

35 
II 7 
114 

36 
85 
98 


104’. -.3 
106 *2. 


114 

120 

10 * 

117 

69 

123 

12T- 


*3 i 
•*3- 
+3: 
-3'. 
•»3’» 
*3'. 
+J. 


FIVE TO FIFTEEN YEARS 

2332m Treas 11 1991 108'.- *2. 

»?m rurel 5 - -*. 1987-Ji 91 •• *2 . 
1503m E»cn MV 199’ 10710+2'. 

906m Tins 12 V .992 n6 *3 

ii46m Treat i0*. 19S2 
tOQim TreasCiO •• i992 
1539m E*cn 12 -V 1952 
21 .2m Excn 13 *• 1992 
125im Treat 10V 1993 
1287m Tr M j 12 .S 1993 
5J4m turn 6*. 1993 
1543m Treaa 13 1993 

77 »m Treas m 199* 

1348m E-cr 12 *, 1994 
162 'r« E«9i 13 *. 1994 
1055m Treat 9*. 1994 
2659m Tims 12*. 1995 
163m Gas r. 1990-95 
2i75m E+O, 10 *. 1995 
1212m Treat T2’>*. 1995 
1157m Treat 14V 1996 
75im Treat 9*. 1992-96 100 
1859m Treat 15 ■% 1998 137 

1006m E*cft 13 -V 1996 
3Jm Oompi 3*. 1996 
1B9Tm Treat 13 •. I99» 

2756m E.cn 10 V 1997 
978m Treat B *. 1497 
1377m E«sn 15V 1997 
852m T-ea.t 5 *. 1995-98 
2600m 6 ion ? ■*. 1988 
1575m T«at 15 *. 1996 
2990m E-y 12*. 1996 
'TO*» Treat 9 1999 

3530m Eion i2 ■*. 1999 
i3*5m Treat 10 V 1999 
151 im Con. 10 1999 

2276m Tr ea s ir, 2000 


127. *->3 
117. -7 

99*. *3’ 
1 1S*- *3' 
76. “2 
106’. -7 
121". *4 

128" - -4 


125 -4 . 

82 -*-2- 
128. *4' 
108 *4 

97. -3. 
137-r*-4-. 
85. -3. 
i04 *3-. 

1*3 ■ m-4 . 
119. -4 . 
103. *3- 
i2r.to-4 
109. *3-. 
108'- «4 
12B - . +4, 


108 
63 
102 
11 0 
96 

99 
107 
113 

96 
107 

67 
11.1 
1IJ 
II 0 
106 
90 

104 
39 

97 

105 
109 

90 
ir 1 
i05 
37 
105 
97 
09 
109 
79 

94 
109 

100 
92 
101 
96 

95 
101 


OVER FIFTEEN YEARS 

10*, 2001 107'. 


862m Treat 
630 m C-jrw 

Cor™ 

1003m Cor™ 
i657m Treat 
77 In Ccmv 
I «:» Ejo" 
954m Treat 
1088m Treat 


? 2001 l£». 

5“o 4 2000 29 
9*. 2000 iOO-» 
14*. 1996-01 137* 
10'. 2002 <07 .« 

12-. 1999-02 120 - 
9 V 2002 106 

. 10*. 2W3 108- 

2*I4m Treat '3 2000-03 Ija . 

2260m Tien 11 •• 2W-04 119- 
97rint Treat >0\ 2804 JOS 
256m Fung 3 V 199004 58‘- 

946m Ct« 9 20(14 104' a 

41-im riami 9 V 2005 105 t 

iiSiim Eicn 10 V 2005 113 « 

2938m Treat U V 200J05 129 
iSIm Treat 8". 20024K 92 
1797m Treat 11 -S 2003-07 127 
I7i Bm Tie« 1 3 *. 2004-08 137. < 
70im Treat 5 ! « 20C8-I2 70 - 

5* bm Treat 7 20:2-15 90 

13l5mE.cn 1 2* . 2013-17 1J1 . 


:*> 


93 

92 
310 

90 

106 

93 
10 0 
92 

92 
103 

96 
9 2 
60 
51 
90 

93 
57 
86 
96 


9 B 


UNDATED 

161m Ccnv4l 4", 
779m Aa- Ln 3 
63m Co". 3 
18m Treat 3*. 
75m Con tort 2 "■ 
)J5m Ten *.*a 


40 . 

SO 

5J. 

»- 

20 


90 

86 

69 

89 

07 


INDEX-LINKED 

n«m 


f! 


nCtim 
732m 
5E2m 
9s6m 
r-jm 
1003 m 
sG3m 
992m 
852m 


T-eat it. •*. 

Tte.it U. 7- 
T-eat 'L2 *• 
7-»3i 'C * 
Treat 'L 2*- 
Treat iL2 * 
Treas U • 
Treat IL2 * 
Treat il 2 * 
Treat 'Li « 


1M8 

1990 

i486 

rooi 

,2003 

2006 

2009 

2011 

2CI3 

2016 

2329 


M2 

r 


1 1 
22 
25 
3i 


■ 

9S - 

TOO- 

n ■ 
90 '1 
89 ■ 


23 

i: 


32 

3.2 

32 


BANKS DISCOUNT HP 


ciQ r m 
10 ? Sa 
915 <m 
1 7^ 2m 
1946 m 
533 2m 
11 7m 
57? im 
1902 3m 
70 im 

57 a* 

25 im 
22*0 9m 
5628 2 m 
UOm 

'60m 
1 568 7m 
7 (59 am 
25’ 8m 
it. Dm 
207 5m 
2(0 9m 
aSOm 
7855m 
20*4 Cm 
11 2m 


1’ i 


4« 7m 
3 34* im 
11 3m 
iSI Cm 
I 2M W1 
?I?9n« 
3J02 I* 
52 5m 
'7C«n 
16 Im 
487 Im 

1491 4m 

i OK Om 

2338m 

8856000 


*•*-7 mtn 
antOaereK iHerryi 

"us m»» ? 
Baneama rea 
Bar* O' Want 
Bare LMTh is-aei 
Surji leunn UK 
Sara 01 6wiLaM 
e» aa ft 
Breivr 3*irffe* 

C XV Awn 

Q-i-s! Maimjsan 

CiMore 

C'r<6 

Cv” Matoe 
Cemmjraarl. 
IVuiten* Ban* 
s.r« vai Ftnanes 
Oerrir.; Ma; 
‘lumne-JS Pear 
ham ores 
Ol 1W01 
h-il itirem* 

H» STeTifiar 
ana* ilw»:- 
-1-54 Sna.it" 
n oreen 9eiw 
Ucylt 

ttVVFt S«t 

U4U’4 

Nat A-lK Bk 
iia* '(writ 
Cneman 
Ptivsere 

to"4 8'55 
HMRUma I JI MM 
8nt« S'* OI Ca" 

"o»> One OI 6C0l 


245 
7S 
273 
t’l '• 
470 
ta 
3*0 
462 
563 
*80 
613 
56- 

E30". 
[40 . 
50 
67 
re? 

£244 
206 
384 
85 
225 
126 
*30 
65 
*28 
196 
826 • 
862 
y» 

896 

5*2 

288 

9‘5 

[105 

*!« 


90 3.7 


• ■0 150 5 5 


*10 170 38 .. 


4*3 
• *55 

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•3 
a -i • 
-1 . 


*4 


1-1 


-1 

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*23 

•42 

*4 

-8 


♦22 

-2 

-9 
-20 
-M 
• -7S 


TOO 67 112 
1B0D 39 112 
268 67 82 
13! £«M7 
11 3 6 7 1*9 
26 46 165 

139 45 
205 5» 

13 2691 

J* 5 1 103 
60 01 . 
1200 *9 . 
IB 19 125 
189 49 224 

2 7 3 2 13 5 
96 43 108 

3 4 J3 .J 


957 


170 40 T-3 


*24 

• *54 
-3 

• ♦98 


17 4 4 1 22.3 

11 8 60 236 

26 7 3i l!0 
>30 45 7 1 

21 5* 1*9 

2 2 9 26 13 8 
36 4 6 7 29 7 


*! 


H66! 


5rnm Si AuOvn 
Sana Ow 


130 

£15 

360 

ci« - - 


40 3 4X74 

550 5 2 226 
IBS 4 S >22 
IB 25211 
6.5 5.0 15 9 


957 


137 36 104 
264 18 210 

'9 2437 


r-u 4?1 7£ 87 



STOCK EXCHANGE PRICES 


Capitalization and week’s 



ACCOUNT DAYS: Dealings Began March 10 . Dealings End.March 27 .§ Contango Day April 21 . Settlement Day, April 7 . 

§ Forward Bargains are permitted on two previous days 


&6K*an»n 

£ Company 


Mee Can Gross Dm 
U on n w 
Freer wMk paw* v 


P/E 


99 im Unmn 
1 198 3m W665 Fargo 
270m WrnOuH 


793 *105 539 67 79S 

£56V *r. . . 

3tt ■ *20 7 7 22 203 


BREWERIES 


rjo?s» 

2 7017m 
ii 8m 
1133m 
1066m 
9i 3m 
29 im 
4i 7m 
59 6m 
2*69 5m 
ZR'm 
9« im 
88i 5m 
IB »n 
IIP 8m 
*09m 
65 4m 
85 0m 

ioem 
Bn Cw 
68? 5m 
34380m 
1553m 
1.172 3m 
52-2m 
158 3m 
182.4m 
7.701.000 


AMtlVB 
BUI 
BB'WirBn 
BoddiigAK 
Brown itumewl 
Burner ch Pi 
Burmmmxid Brew 
Oart luatmaai 
Dmremtn (3 Al 
&5B**S 
GreenH WWN 

Greens King 
Gumnsss 


Htghtond DtSB 

iiwwwi Dim 
Intn M 


Monaiw 
S* BrewreK 
Scot 8 Mmr 

Seagram 

Wwtiraaa -A’ 

DO "B 

WMOroKl ln» 
VfQMnmam B D 
Young A' 


336 

-33 

It 5 

35 

198 

825 

-106 

210 

25 

17.6 

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1.1 

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125 

-19 

40 

07 

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480 

+ 15 

200 

42 

17 E 

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7.0 

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♦40 

140 

26 

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a -2D 

10 7 

22 

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-20 

166 

23 

2*2 

680 

+59 

223 n 

3* 

139 

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- 16 

700 

39 

Hi 

226 

+8 

72 

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311 

a *30 

100 

30 

118 

473 

to -14 

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122 

87 

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32 

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295 

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189 

2*9 

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106 

233 

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232 

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100b 

40 

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41.1 

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+29 

158 

35 

158 

31 J 

+55 

102 

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159 

JI* 

+49 

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IT 

160 

251 

+28 

99 

39 

370 

sra 

♦20 

,22 

2* 

164 

26b 

+45 

9.4 

J5 

210 


BUILDINGS AND ROADS 


42.6m Aoardsen Coratr 
173 m Amec 
2.700000 ArecHte 
52 Im Atmaotts 
907 6m BPB tnduitnet 
T4 4m Baagenoat Bm* 
2*8 Bn Barron j 


258 

209 

54 

147 

476 

361 

1*0 


*6 

*16 


105 4.7 16.1 
157 58 106 

01« 02 83 
61 4 1 135 

11 6 24 19 o 

98 27 (31 

109 75 





a* 

1.7 40 


182 

-IS 

10 0 

5b 205 

ISSm Banforo Conenm 

ra 

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5* 

77388 



+ \ 

4 4 



90S 

-5 

323 

30 ,00 


888 

*45 

28.6 


i59m BreMraifiCtOua HJi 280 


138 

52 3, 7 


91 

+1 

*9 


(04m Br Oiadana 
4000000 Brown S J+Ckson 

72 

74 

+3 

•1 

36 

M 151 
.. 166 

il 0= Brownioe 

69 


44 



,21 

-16 




26 





112 

-1 

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70 

+2 

21 

3 0 289 


.US’ 

+16 




380 

• -16 

60 

2? 102 

18 rm (5 men i Derek] 

150 

• *8 



7600000 On* (Gmxk( 
135m Doughs IRU) 

ss 

0-2 

86 


83 


25b 0 0 14.7 


76 

-4 

4.4 



81 

-2 

4.2 

52 1,0 


K? 

-A 

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88 84 

6205000 Flrlan Gp 

« 

0-2 

5* 

6* 250 


Bb 

a-* 

60 

7.4 138 

2.105000 GtaM 6 Dandy Oro 121 


23 

,94,0 


340 

+20 


20 ,18 

79.iba HAT 

10* 

a *2 

54 

52 108 

4 300000 (taken 0m 

1*6 

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.. 297 


W> 


20 

42 11.1 

56 In, ttaywpoo wraarns 

216 

r *25’ 

98 

44 100 



+15 

,80 

3* ,47 



•*•14 

6.1 

0, 149 


tViB 

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2S.0» 

7.1 120 

nOJm Laura (j) 


-27 

as 

22 ,27 

102 7= Da A 


-27 

as 

20 12* 


IDS 

r -B 

50D 50 77 


88 


50 

60 133 

1069m Loro* fVJ) 

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1 1 Bm Mbv 6 Has ten 
1498m MjUone lAKiedl 
2496m Meyer mi 
1560000 Muw iSunMyl 
13 Im Monk |A) 

136 6m Mowtem (Jam) 
90 9m NewVIMl 
230a Narongnam Bnc* 
23 Bm Pertunman 
28*53100 Pnoenx Tuntwr 
3553 000 Pocrens 
5768a PMC 
9:52a Reaana 
8 06*500 RoMra Adtoiti 
32.5m RubmtM 


2566m Rugjy UnM 


138 0m 
194m Sneroe 6 Foliar 
8066000 Smart U) 
i.4878m Tarmac 
*i3ta Tayky nvoomwr 
227m Ttorey Grous 
872m Travo 6 AmaU 
S 569 000 Trail 
6738 000 Tumn 
1 69m vemun 
37 8a WM 

201* 000 Wtmnqu«> (T) 
*06m Wans Btoki 
U7BOOO wenem Bros 
5*16000 Wrggmt 
174 3m W»wn (CormoM 
5153a Wmp«y (Qrurge) 


I2S 

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157 17 165 

93 44 159 
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60 29 164 

14* 1.7 164 

4 5 i ii 135 
45 25 173 


. CHEMICALS. PLASTICS 


1 764 8a WCO uy Baarar £44 
23* 3m AH so Cc*KB 
100 (tor Amersnam 
9389000 Anehor CWWF 
530m BTP 

5.3795m Bayer DM50 
31 oa Btogtien 
805a Brom Cnemt 
172m O' Bsniol 
220m Canning |W) 

2*3 3a Caame 
26 im Coares Bros 
3i 3m Do -A 
25*4.000 Cory (Horace) 
i7H0a Croaa 
130m Do DU 
33.6m 8 Euerord 

2*1 8m FotSCO-MorWD 
21 Bm Hatouaa (Jamal 
02 7m Hickson 
47253m Hownst DM50 
e.a333> knp Cnem M 
SS4 7m Lands 
17 Sm Lagn 
54 1m 

5775.000 Paeuroak Mags 
283 3m Ren row 
*24 5m SNIA BPD 


14 6a roHanre CMn 


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CINEMAS AND TV 


30 3m Argu TV A' 
5.31* OW Gramoan 
460m «TV UN 
570m LWT Hugs 
230m Scot TV A" 
50 3m TVS N/V 
9289 000 TSv* 


2K 

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DRAPERY AND STORES 


15>" aausseuium "A 
42 7a BmiTC i James) A 
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9*59 000 
4.972000 
7*3m 
948 8m 
7 199 000 
*697 000 
331m 
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127 5m 
28 S« 
18 9a 
56 2a 
13:31m 

190 2m 
23 4m 
7 920 000 
6*3m 
1302m 
2 007 000 
80 9m 


BUCK Lm 
Bremer 
Brown (N) 
flunon 
Cantors -A" 

Caster |S1 
CnuOl 
Ccats Vryeaa 
CvntnKM Engtrsn 
Courts iFurm 4 
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Dlioiis Grp 
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Ejfl lurnuuv) 
Enure Sures 
Eum 

EiKiFer CWmeS 
Fi*V Art Dev 
Fo»a (Uerrmi 

6279000 Famwriae. 

303 9m Freemans 
6 853 000 G*l«r iAji 
6m Gam SR 
20 4m Gcwnerq r*i 
17 7m Gansncns Op 
194 5m Groun 
76 la GUS 
2382 2m Do * 

*09 0m Hares Queens**, 
9.41J.0M Hstone 01 London 
9272 GOO Hows 

<558m Home Crvjr-n 

68X1X10 Nduse Of Lem* 

S «ffli.ogO )w« | Eroaw j 
233* 00C Leons Prete 

105 2m LCP 
39 8m Le* COOSMT 
36 Im Leery 

8 383000 L«c>on ICSgrxir 

£ TijOm Mirrej 6 508(09* 
1905m V+<u«s 

9 36C 000 MAens i mue 

106m M«s Bros 
42 6m NSS Nawsacems 
J85 7m Nec 
8033000 OWer (CD 

31 2m Our (*-<» 

33 4m Ferret 

2.1 73 000 Pm era Snares 
10 Oat ProeOy rki’retfi 

4*0m Pamers ueweaerii 
■52m Rmi e* 

8 669 000 Read lAusm) 
400m Do a 
2.904 000 S 8 L Swan 
M9m Samuir imi 
708m Do * 

2075 im Sears 
488 3m £rmni iwmi A 
39 la Do B 
Si S« Sukhoy |4G) 

26' 


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33 35 35 8 

30 32 154 

31 11349 


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63 11235 

32 2.6 319 
31 70 65 

121 38 125 


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61 13 225 

33 41 n 1 

129 20 331 

36 21 294 

46 1 3 2'0 
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47 36 236 


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1 4 23 361 

21 10 895 

107 53 131 

5.7 1J271 
25 8 19 329 

258 38 153 

59 21 115 

23 64 03 

30 B J 159 
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58 69 IB 1 

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£9 1 6 40 ] 

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11.7 3 7 230 

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37 2 6 41 5 

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4 4 3.1 19 4 

7 8 2 3 227 

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1 J55 Un Smrmcnim 

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11 3n 

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6+4 

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35 147 
1 J 334 


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ELECTRICALS 


93 0m 
464 ;a 

486m 
4377 000 
1*9 *m 
I 4*2000 
I29 6« 

nib im 

174 9m 
SiOBm 
69070m 
71 bm 
3900000 
6i 9m 
0544 5m 
119 3m 
*9 Im 
STfia 


*B E-er 
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*pnc«ii CdCMero 
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Alunus Comp 

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Br Tweayn 60c 9 
Brown Boron nan - 
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CeMa 6 i*"reto» 
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Cap Gc 
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Capuuaum 

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Pres QTge 
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34 6m 
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96. im 
513m 


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486m 

1.440.000 
459m 
3J0n 
62 Jm 

4413m 
1393000 
1710m 
4 2 Sib 
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301.1m 
6302m 
SO 3m 
6 305 000 
5 nBOm 

6.357.000 
aS77M0 

1097m 

477 Sa 
19 4a 
7251000 
160m 
925m 
125 0m 

1101m 

2? 4m 
338m 
8.400000 

19 5m 
*0 3m 

0.OO3OOO 
2325a 
ID 2n 
219 440 
120a 

20 7a 

3 572 7a 

4 033000 
3019 000 

1,6282m 

15. BOS 9m 

112m 

4 700 JOS 

1|»67m 
201m 
359m 
18 7m 
44 7a 
666 0a 
7! Da 
144 7m 
1.654 *m 
166 4m 

192m 
1 026 7m 

5.987.000 
*8 5m 
143.1m 
121 Aw 
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4£Ow 

7236000 

1405.000 
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225 

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198 

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DO 7W CPF 
Comcap 
Cray Eton 
Ovioaie 
Darn Decs 
Datotaur 
Damw A 
Domino 

Dcrwomg 6 k»S 
DuDAOr 

Baetrocomoonents 4U 

Eiecptnc Ma eh 65 

Eiaoronc Perea's 80 
Emass ugntmg 284 
Euromami 

Fame* Eton 
Fmrarei 

Fra Casjie Bee 
Fonvaro Teen 
6EC 

Grosaanor 

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148 

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330 

410 

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Jones Stroud 
Kooa 

Lac natngeroton 
Luge* 

MK Bad 
Marne 
Mere BS 
Mcro Focus 
MMma Elec 
Murrey Bad 
Newman — 

Nawmarh (Lours) 270 

NEf IM 

Oorand 33 

O»ioro instrumonn *93 
Pweom 21 

PMps F«i 5'«V CTS7 

preups Lamps tty £18 * 

PrlCO IBS 

Do A LM Voong 130 

F ’aT2on 25 §1V 

Pressac 140 

Quad Automation 32 

Race! Bed 192 

Romka* 183 

ScncWi (GH) 560 

Bnorrock 
Souno Drfhisron 
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4.0 2 I 139 

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29 12 276 
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7.1 U 280 

179 89 73 

1 4« 07 202 
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38 09 383 
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4 0* 77 427 

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193 7.1 123 

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20 04 265 

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Teteomne RanMS 203 
Tatontotrei 96 

Thorn £Mi 477 

Thorpe (FW) 195 

TunStSI TatoCOm 30S 

UEJ 270 

Llnaecti 263 

UM Leasing 773 

(Hd Scant*: 168 

VG Insmanares 392 

YOU 279 

western G elect io n 73 

Wtotwortti Bee 88 

wnousma Fntmg 268 


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6.7 17 113 

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FINANCE AND LAND 


488a 
7i 3m 
327m 


57 0m 
173m 
927.000 
6361300 
30 8a 
45.0m 
49 9m 
30 0a 
225m 


ADmqwunti 
ANken Hume 
AnMagaGia 
* -^Tecn 


Berkley T 

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Camnwar 

Cereronay 

Eouiiv 8 Gan 
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M»|jn-r- 

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13 50 117 

104 4.5 334 

33 321 


BS 4.7 27 J! 


• *2 BOO 179 


FINANCIAL TRUSTS 


9325 m 
i06m 
9320900 
2336m 
897m 
88 5m 
229 7m 

20 7m 
512.7H 

103m 
31 im 
it An 

21 in* 
1524m 
88 7m 

244 4m 
1519m 

2*62m 

44 0m 


51.4m 


Akrovd 8 Srnnn 
Airman Eamaa 
Argyll) 

BcnrWastS 
Braanoa Arrow 
Da By Ms* 

DO'*- 
Bectra 
Eng Trust 
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FramkngKKi 

From G o 
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Pacific hw Tst 
Da warrares 
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695 

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FOODS 


1 7180m ASDA-MR 152 

2263300 A»ne Drlnka 22 

GSLSm Amy* 331 

13676a AS Food 318 

T93m Assoc Fohena* 110 
(08an Arana __ 13? 

8390300. Banks (firtwy Q 255 
353m Barker S DoDson 1*'.' 
2r. 0m Bd |AG> 

250m Bassan Foods 
150m Bailey* 

198.4m Bejam 
4 072000 Bkrooea Cont 
5099300 Br vanong (BVI) 


313 

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975 7m CaObun+SclMppai 18T 


113m Carrs M*mg 
1500.000 cwhwb r— 
30 la Da A- 
36.4m CuSsns 
1377 0m Dee 

90.9m FWier (AtMTO 
209 Im Rfcri LCwett 
343m Gtoss Gto*w 


200 

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275 

293 

181 

788 

256 


186 ,a Hwewaod Foods 868 


193 

250 

80 

554 

278 

108 

95 

515 


95 Ora Hi Sards 
5039m Htosaown HMgs 
3J34300 Home Farm 
792m Iceland Frozen 
4165m Kw* Sam 
2 160300 Leas (JOfm J) 

898 000 Loves (GFl 
803m Low (Wliil 
1036a MaiBWwS IBomardl 650 
2905.000 Meat Trade Sum HO 
177 9n Monoon Ml 192 
46*01 fwcnrrs uni (Vareo) 2S0 
Z6Ar. srormans 73'.- 

56* lm Wn Foods SH 

1285m Nuroai 6 Paacock 172 
13 7m Park Few* 134 

533 to RHM 224 

Bff On Rowntroo Mac 523 
2B*4.7a 5amsoury (JI 
*17 im Svrosen iCntmi 
a.TiXOOO Scmpornut 
4308m Tate 8 Lyto 
1 4404m Tasoo 
657 0m Urngate 

971 7m UM Breams 
J50m We boo 6 Pimp 


408 

151 

168 

525 

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114 

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HOTELS AND CATERERS 


3214 im Grand Mat 416 

*0 Im Kemeav Brookes 2S8 

757 2m Lento C+e 387 

23 Bn Lon Pare Hotels <73 

207 am Moure Cnanona 96'. 

129m Prince CP W Noels IX 
129 lm Queens Moat 70'.- 

1121m Savoy Ham® A - 405 
187 0m S'lxn 81 • ** 

1 S64 lm Trustfoma Fda 203 »+12 


S *41 110 

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1 7 

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08 113 
44 173 
3D 209 
21 153 
23 187 
28919 

09 193 
21 200 
16 201 



1034m 
97 Im 
103m 
1033m 
35 on 
69 7m 
31 Cm 
3 783 300 
115m 
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5636000 
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4.299 MU) 

. 29 6m 
52 Sm 
*0 9m 
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221 7m 

1 0863m 
509*000 
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5380 0a 

2699a 
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103 5a 

133 6a 
11 flH 
40 7m 
59 8m 
167lB 
9W.00D 
46*9 000 
H5m 
3.705MD 

2 371 5a 


AAH 

AG9 Research 

AIM 

APV 

Aaronson 

Adnere 

Awenora W wee 

Amoer Hid 

AdtSMOnj 

Aronson 

Armour 

A Pi i Lacey 

AoMey 

Am Br Eng 8*« 
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A urora 
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Metal 


210 

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280 

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4403a 
5 5420E0 

i'3ra 

465a 

205m 

2.396 000 

367 7m 
7600 OCT 
1.K6.W0 
83 7m 

JO 8m 
13 Jr* 
67 5m 
47 im 
«.9m 
24 6m 

43? *m 


BET Ri 

BETEC 

0OC 

BTR 

Babccck 

Ba»1 (l»ni 
Baker Panmc 
Barvo tna 

Bamjm 
Bolton Band 
Barron Henhurn 

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1.840900 WflofllArtiurl 
2909.000 WOOd (SW) 
6252900 woodbousa 8 Rto 
IJOEim wymviem Eng 
24 im Yarrow 
7562900 Young (H) 


165 

243 

202 

119 

186 

273 

278 

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29 

88 

117 

270 

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+26 W 

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• +4 ' 459 

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+10 43 

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•+1* 111' 
-1 19 

0+6 . 5.1 

+7 ' 23 

-1 107 

- +3V 4ln 


27 ,24 
35.13.1 
0.1 ,5.1 
39 269 


29 167 
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55154 
1.0 .. 
22 269 
08 368 
3.8 18. T 

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160 

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38 

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67 

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• 7 9 
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• -2 114 

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64 97 
15 230 
79 447 
25 ,72 
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37 195 
45 103 
19175 
33 13.1 
23 171 



505.0a Abhe^ 


. 64638! — ,- 

24629m JmOen 

32.7m Brectotoek 
1891m Bonne 
1J27B5H Com Uoon 
KjmgudySLa. 

1.7266m Gan Accident 
i.*03J3m ORE 
2052m Haata G £ 


154 1m Hogg 
1 TCG.im Legal 


r ilOm 

202.7m London 6 Man . 
51.1m to> UU tan 
23Q2.Ba Mann S mcloi 
. 195.3m MMM 
19ln PWS 
521.4a Peart , 

Z.65I.AB RWUMM . 

5091m Ratuga 
2.119Sm Royal 
1.1132m Sedgwick Gp 
178.1m Stewart wraon 
119 Era Straw Hugs' 
14109m Sun AMnea 
5137m Sun Lift • 
307m Trod* tadamidty 
717.4a WM Faber 



LEISURE 


5274900 Ban 8 WA -A' 


4382900 CsmparJ 
55 Sm Ctaysato 
1179m F*tt Lmun 
33.7m.GHA 


839m HarizO" Travel 
655m tat Loan 
135m Jutamr* Hkfga 
3.100000 Matomtar 
2863m Ptoaaraanra 
365m Reedy UaeW 
9354000 Pley Lwaure ' 


378m Saga Hotuaya 
739a>-SmnmlaDn Gp 


106 

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133 

126 

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188 

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-MINING 


- 2474m Ang Amar Goat 
2980.701 Ang Am 
1.1415m Am Gold' 

•' 5200m AAit 


. .6£4m AigkMHd 


81 5m 

9.150000 tw Hear 
88 5m Hyvoore 
■ 175m Breotan 

194 5m Bufteto 
19309m CRA 
349m Can Boyd 
1.038.4m Coos GQUBaU* 
17298m De Bean 
1692m DoafenaU 
7BAa Pom uM atata 
19431m (Mefomam 
132m Durban 
333m E Deagss 
4579m Bnfinmd 
7.7M900 B Oro 
573m Bstxyg 
Ml Sm E Rand SaU 


20.0m ER wU ^Rp 


^ R5 Omr 
]90*9OP Ghnrar Tin 
2263m GtoMI- 
7202m Gwi Mlreng. . 
756 im OFSA' • 
*63® <3M KHgayl 
0*53900 Gooena 
34»n Orofttl 
339ra Hampton Areas 
•• 2302m Hammy. . 
32*.»e Hartui 
5362m -Monies 
181 ,m Kmroxs 
T*83m KfOOt 
152m Last* 

Sl2m Utanon 
S0.*m Laraoa 
eeo3n MM 
823a Matayetan Mring 
4.725900 Manenie 
7.473900 Menus E radiadon 
2900.000 Miwngraa 



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5* 8m New wo* 


39.7m Nth Ktoaudi 
Z35taMmg% . 


+45 109 10 .. 

.. 239 40-.. 

+5 ... • .. .i 


9976900 1 ... 

2019m Peko 1 

Raret Mmee Ltd 

An Mines prop 

3775a Raredcmtan 
1*39*1 Rm**on 
2300.0m HT2 
9393m Ruarantwg 
StLflm St fWana 
1171a SA Land 
672.7nr Stvjmyaal “ 

.- B3 SHtgremn - - 
7.IE4.000 Sung* Baal. 
1.605.000 Tareong 
59.6a Ta*' 

133a Trorwh 
1260m Unreal - 
966 0m VBM RettS 
214m VtnwrSDOSt 
3-700.000 IIUklaiMn 
156m Vogare 
3.0*0.000 wutde Coney 
1252m vrasuan 
1168a Wesjero Areas . 


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.. 26.0 35 580 

-■*. .125 139 .. 

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SKLftp western Mm 


B3630OO Wes Rand Ch 
26*m Whtoi Croak 
-r589m nkwere 

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17.1 a Zanure Copper 
6.510900 ZBretun 


290 
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226 
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-25 5*0 127 .. 
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MOTORS AND AIRCRAFT 


1743a AE 

’‘hisses' 

B80m ARtmiong 
1353a AuU PKUucta 
SBOraBSG 


16*01 

•1477.5a* 


1CDJ 


“lEShra. 
■SE Km 


Iff 


3149m Lfct ' 

8071000 Lookers 
7704m Lucas 
&0n -Piny gp 
99*0900 Arena (Gn 
396*900 Dock IHJ) ' 

9756.000 Swiit 

5455.000 WMMhaad (Jont^ 


1 F8 

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NEWSPAPERS AND 
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*6 7a 
9i4m 
3012000 
SS.1m 
514m 
90. rm 
100.7m 
177m 
4329900 
510m 
1040 6m 
*37 9m 
2H1.7m 
i63a 
369m 
• S29*m 


«n Bade 200 
AMot'NowiiMpar - WJ 

IssT* a 

^A 1 ^. S 

Soap A' - .- - ta , 
Haynes PUBMm gs.| 
Home CtMd iei 173 - 

W* 3 horo 5 ii tit 

Ntwa tatarnabanat £11 
gpopw '660 
Ponamoun arau tsa 

TrwMy MU . 
uk Hampirow .;S 


. 70 39 110,. 
-81- Zl 150 
IM . 47 164 


320 63 230. 


11-1 42 211 
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47-45 2*9.- 


»6 5,6160 
5.7 . 30. 74 


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Pncn Ch'gaGTOH Dre 
W on * nj 
fretty era* pence V pje 


Oil 


9 


2*73Bi mmW - 
129te aob Enra 

AttorK Rauvra 

10431 0m a MTOIBPi 
3,6*7000 BntM CM 
7m Br Bonmo 
8792m Bros* 

5096*1 Bramah ■ 

52-lm C*rta» Cap« 

- 237m Gennev 

•' 11 am QmnartiB 
36tim EremO Md - . 

149m Gmw 6*57 
44 Bn Qob* n Rw 
• 254m float WB _ 
,55ra Gi waflwn Bn 
-4757m c 0» 

; : — - ICG 01 

warn au» ' 

• 160m KCA Oftorg 

■> 228.9m CASUO 
4387m - Do 1WB 
7982.000 NEW IflPIWT 06 

MKDOO P8WC0O 
5S9mFromar 


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15 
12 
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-7 13 57 75 

+f 5 7 53*78 
■-3T -09 a* 23 

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65,2DmS»' 
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- 278m Somstscp ' 
4466000 TR Eireroy 
- • - 844m TacHiwr - 
..laBtornTMoo Europe 
• 460. im uww 


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•30 .500 05 76 
«5 120 6.7 39 

-7 .. 22 

-v 155 

-15 1*3 157 25 
+9 230 -W 

-28 ISO 5, Si 'P 


OVERSEAS TRADERS 


196m 

514S00Q 

92.1m 

481.7m 

2975= 

30*2000 

77B9m 

151m 

623a 

S80ro 


Bantam* 
CMwgtaa . 
Fnfiqr (jammO 


37 

130 

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22«4m 

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p®ar»m.2m» 

DO A' 

Poey Peck 
S'* 1 * DMff 
StetoBroa ^ 
Tour Kenatoy 

Yaw Cam 


36, 

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+1 66 
1-10 75 


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77 34 
60 47 
68 101 
74 15S 
39 11 1 
59 ,29 
69 78 
34 81 
14 8* 
5* 25 


-5 229 

+23 

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4fl g* 
333 
55 71 


PAPER. PRINTING. ADVERT’G 


tUuMHOH 6* ' 

*3(kn Assoc M • - 23* 
04*6000 At* 8 W&B *3 
. W tm Bdaatxa ' « 

•- *22= Bomm Mason 339 
. 3344m BFCC 307 

1007.800 n i to M B B . ... , MS. 
3022.000 • DOW ■ 1» 
6ii-2ra B*n) - MS 
-236Sm cadkm Oamm - - fiso 
67*7.000 Owanan - 2*0 . 

. 15U> cnatwynd Sawta 1*3 

I 

2tm Dadcwon Pam 186 
,70m Eneafipw Adt» .470 
G63m FWgiffloa tad .- 25, 
TUnMDngi .460 
ft.«B3000GaH*Gm> S4 

worn Coot , ftm e a ni ISO 
19 lm Hraaarpms 730 

537wLomlHB.CE 966 
117.1m UcCorqraxWa 225 
336m Mate O Feral - 436 - 

MGapHtnan Opn (M 
22GGra (Wiytiaw £23V 
'1.028000 oCaa Paper .. 32 

SAaa S kroa-Gn - 8,5 
.Eaai«SaanW*Wj» 975 
. M8tan DO 63V Cmr m 1*8 
3uanWH(MR> • (58 
i *26.680 Utter Bfatac 206 
3,57000 mwa- --*7 

748m wattagtors M 735 
' .32BaYttmn5jh . 290 
29«re wagmCmtow 383 


.13 

+9 

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12 

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+10 
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♦7 
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to -10 
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54 - 
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70 
70 
,43 
06 
T20 
30 
36 
110 
56 
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43 
70 
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22 ,98 

32 ,40 

. ,04 

11 69 
10 31 3 
7* 87 

43 409 

44 *31 

23 28.4 
10 279 
57 9? 
21 196 

14 14* 
35 ,2* 
19 ,66 
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42 17* 

15 338 
61 6.4 
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23 8* 
222 56 
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TUB 16 33* 
20D 21 165 
90 60 

4.7 30 
97 47 112 
.. . MB 

33 7 40 Mi 
93 32,59 
46 1234* 


PROPERTY 


' 45a* Aeaoo 
-36.4= mat Loa 
7682000 Aon. 

64 9m Bantoar free 
3897m Baamr (CH) 

- 174m.8#sr®« 

. 'tttsam B4»n (PJ ' 

12, TH BraoHonJ 
' . 3470at Br Land 
124.1m Bnikxr 
2.100000 Cwl m. iScoa 


37 V to+2- 




LTOQ.OOO Caatf-tM.lfiore 
OUa Cap 6 Counaat 

4290.000 Cm 00 Pnv ■ 
27.6m CMsmM 

. 9*0= CbwarUU 

aiwcriA . 

7.731 ooo'Cance hmi 

- 2* ,m-Cotwe*v 
CUHjMO edmad Sect 

61 7m cowry, 6 New 
163= County B 

- ,12m CM*m 
. laUa DHiar 

' H&tos Data, Da» 
7.DS8000 (tarot 
fl.BOB.OOO Estates S Agency 
. 21 7m Estates Cton 

36 fin E5©S9B Prop 
300a &wre Of Lead* 

3026.000 Ftoa Oaka 


,77 

,51 

42 


+58 
-I - 
.40 
.+58 
■ +10 
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02 05 565 
20 27 178 

20 40 'S3 
2 .7 ft. 1 6 P 7 
17, 27,53 

fi 1 6, 
60 «U 
272,9 
22 160 
50 232 


00 

,5, 

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39 

76 


t 


2)0 

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470 


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210 


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86 49 ,56 
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J»7b 3, ,32 


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aOt 80 353 


♦9 

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0+6 

10 


50 25; 

45 273 3, 

20 ,7 895 

50 30 50 
BB *0 J4B 
160 30 123 


9 r .r-'.- 


IS 


67.0m ftoranoro 
1 Gr Pontand 


• U 

MtUm Greycoat 

. H M w ood Gp 

1559m Hanwian 
56*8= Do 'A 
90GKOOO Huoitr 
T40m H bmugb 
TB04h Hadmnaro 
’ Nil hay • . - 
1-550,000 Jermyn 
1720= Lltqn ftrp 
61 am Land kw anon 
l.fiOQjka Land Sacu waa t 
iso am Lon A Eom Tm 
29 ta Del'A 
405m Lon 6 Pro* Shop . 
763= Lon Shop Rrcp 


38 4= torem 
1 MEPC 


832tal . . 

160= Udnamay 
04ta . McKay 5ac« 
>i70a Mare naa in 
17.1 = JMnuaie Moore 


105 


43 

26 7*0 

120 

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34 

20 3(7 

160 

to 

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5, ,22 

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♦7 

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176 

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100 

5 7 259 

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26315 

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♦5 

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24 325 

233 

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60 68 

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22 403 

260 

to - 

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20 337 

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13 

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316 

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30 275 

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-8 

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2.8 323 

157 

•+1 

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40 169 

295 

+5 

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20 371 


T97n Martaorough 
12*m Molar Elf 


83-Zta Mounman 
240= Mowilview 
. 5, Ira Mucktow (A6J) . 
9.177000. MWDMl 
5208000 New Caroadtah 
6S37.00D Phrkdon 
9»0= Paacnay 
Wfira Prop 8 Re* 
TOlSet Prop HUgs 
782= Prop Saoaity 
106= Ragtan 
540= Regsura 
231 ta " - 


348 

125 

TI3 

56 

1*4 

73 

250 


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0-2 


150 40 22, 


+14 
+10 
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780 to+EO 
480 to+S 
+3 


• +18 
• +3 


+8 


231 Sm Rosehauai 
360= (taah 6 Tomptana 
raj= Smut 
Kara Set* MR 
4381= 5Hugh Estate* . 
65.5m Speynawk 
. 164m Sons Secs 
3(66= Sasck CQromakn 
“ 1902= SsotJdH* 

** 3m Two (tarare 
- 222= TrsdortS Pllfc - 

5.468000 UK Land ' 

'66 4m UH Baal. ' 

7*6m Warner 
47.01a wsnjfrm 

5.660.000 wetJO (JOS) 

5014.000 Wes fi Country 


96 
€19 
75 
61 
273 
186 
128 
117 
9<. +’. 

455 +25 

560 -35 

280 -3 

191 +8 

68 . *1 

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400 +45 

•60 to +2 
605 +25 

60 -1 

49 +1 

210 +5 

,26 -4 

E70 to +5 
785 to +40 

490 to +10 

22 to-f 
.160 


49 

31D 

30 

0.80 

434 

1Q.7n 

64 

74 

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21b 

12.1 

60 

38 

:96b 

01 

52 


43 TM 

60 253 
25 1*3 
1.1 380 
17 SB 
1A 228 
,0 160 
7.8 ,50 
08 476 
23 330 
34 588 

44 363 
33 3,2 
30 3(4 
XI 254 


»i 


11 


112 

M 

57 

74 

136 

SB 

12.1 


1.1 3*6 
02 _ 
40 123 
4* 296 
66 ,9 7 
.44 192 
54 203 
X6 ,6, 

“ 3 i 

mm 


ZD 04233 
257 '33 336 
21.4 4* *0 9 
07 32 7,0 

11* 71 9, 


SHIPPING 


2,54m Aesee « Rons 528 

7760m Br CtMaaonwaaUi 370 

338 ta Cai ed t ra a 3*8 

^8ra Frebar (fnmtu) 88 


a*4*.«io 
,33a 


-2 

-23 


10 ). 


801.000 L*l* 

- WO0OO Aiareay Docfcr- 


56 
9 _ 

m&&SB P * O DM 5*1 

,*772-000 Rumman (Wader) ,00 
■“ 375 


1090000 TLmbito Score 


+34 125 2* 

-10 83 17 296 

' fi 1 . .1 6 773 
42 50 81 
178 3*258 
60b 80 272 

!i 

84 *1 ISO 
+10 X0 32 166 
' 7.! T 1-297 
120 34 309 


SHOES AND LEATHER 



iEr 


SB 

to +20 

93 

26 

(39 

206 

+28 

(3 1 

6*. 

82 

33 

. -1 

31b 

.9* 

75 

306 

+13 

72 

35 


n 1 74 

• -2 

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59! 


-106 

'+« 

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58 

68 

142 

+2 

,14 

BP 

S' 

256 

+23 

64 

35' 

316 


■ -Orta AIM Text 
W5BMW AUtato Bros 
.5417000 Beal* (John) 
TO-lav O + Oia ai (A) 

UDO.im Cetaatdos' - 
465m Crowner « 
37* Ara Dawson 
H im Debwn 
6010000 Dtion (D) - 

. IMto'Dtoi 
IBWJRrtW 

I Faster (John) 


msmoo S5SS 

i-gMN tagrem (HmaNO 
30|BJXH Jerarnt (5) 

<25m. Leads 
,21m Omr 


CTTLES 

363 

»**s 

,75 

+2 

M0 

+3 

100 

-2 

142 

*4 

r 

■Hf 

308 

+ 14 

64'.- 

290 

• -'; 

t8 

144 

+5 

260 


. -47 

-1 - 

375 

+14 

140 

• +3 

» 

+5 

96 
n 91 

-11 

37 

+1 

ISO 

+20 


30*1000 Lyre* (Si 


79 

108 

74 


-9 

♦3 

+S 


3053000 MUWR . 
44,1000 Ptabtand ‘K - 

S0JB0OO Sffi? 1 "*. 

6076000 SimrCatpaai 
87.1= Srabr 

T.QQ0OO Sarensbaw (R) .... 
fffTMOO Sroudfitey 
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During the past 10 years, Ladbroke Hotels 
have become one of the top two hotel chains in 
Britain. 

We’ve done it by building and buying 
businesslike hotels that businessmen like. 

MI find us in London, Leeds and 
Edinburgh, certainly, but we’re also in the kind 
of towns often neglected by the more staid hotel 
groups. 

Watford, Leyland,Teesside, Huddersfield 
and Hornchurch all feature on our list. (Just as they 
do on a lot of executives’ itineraries.) 



Wherever we are, you’ll find a good “Welcome to Hornchurch, Sir” 

restaurant, comfortable rooms (our Gold Star rooms are really like mini-suites) and 
a friendly welcome. 

All at the right price for the customer- and for us. (Last year, Ladbroke Hotels 


Of course, we do own tourist hotels as well, but we’ve found that concentrating 
on the businessman has been good business. 

We’ve recently opened new hotels at Swansea, Livingston and Basingstoke and 
we’re currently building at Manchester Airport and Portsmouth. 

. In London, we’re relaunching the Curzon in Mayfair and the Sherlock 
Holmes in Baker Street (where else?). 

By next winter we’ll have invested £15 million bringing the 22 hotels we 


bought from Comfort up to Ladbroke standards. 

Good news for businessmen, everywhere. Well, almost everywhere. 






t 


i 


\ 


&srs srs.ffft?s8ir-i¥" ‘rspsspsspf fjjjre asHsassa ea.8,33. ^a 







FINANCE AND INDUSTRY/ LAW 


THE TIMES MONDAY MARCH 24 1986 


Tate builds up defences 


in British Sugar battle 


By Michael Prest, Financial Correspondent 


New moves in the. highly 
political three-cornered battle 
for control of British Sugar 
Corporation, the S & W Beris- 
ford subsidiary, are likely this 
week. 

The latest potential bidder. 
Tate & Lyle, the sugar compa- 
ny, raised its stake in fierisford 
to 8.2 per cent last week, 
joining the Italian group 
Ferruzzi with 9 per cent and 
the food conglomerate Hills- 
down with 10.4 per cent. 

Berisford recently made a 
£35 million provision against 
losses from the tin debacle, 
saw its 1985 pretax profits 
slump, and has been forced to 
withdraw from trading on the 
London Metal Exchange. 

But it has suddenly found 
itself valued at £435 million, 
largely because of the one 
division which is really profit- 
able. Berisford’s share price is 
up from 134p at the beginning 
of the year to 230p. 

British Sugar remains an 
attractive property despite a 
less lucrative EEC sugar re- 
gime under which output and 
prices are controlled. 

Last year the corporation 


crac.y responsible ' for 
competition policy. 

As Europe's biggest sugar 
conglomerate, Ferruzzi 1 is al- 
ready familiar -with the ways 
of Brussels. In recent weeks its 
lobbyists have been busy. 

So Tate's move is partly 
defensive. It fears that should 
Ferruzzi succeed in taking 
British Sugar out of the 
Berisford camp the new group 
would be too powerful. 
Ferruzzi would control up to 
23 per cent of European sugar 
beet quotas, and around 30 
per cent of consumption. 

• By contrast. Tate's 1.13 
million tonnes of cane sugar in 
Britain and- 160,600 tonnes in 
Portugal jgfve it a Iftjfe more 
than .5 per cent share of 'a 
European market totalling 
around 14-million tonnes. 

British Sugar, a beet refiner, 
has a fractionally bigger share 
of the British market, which 
runs at a static or slightly 
falling 2.3 million tonnes 
annually. 

Tate also fears that because 
its margins are thinner than 
those of beet refiners, it is 
vulnerable to dumping in the 
British market by Ferruzzi, 


made £53.6 million pretax. ^ Beahin^v 

£10 million less than when 


Berisford bought it in 1982 but 

more than the whole of lftSrio areue that 

Berisford’s profits and it is still 


a useful contribution to any 
group. 


its position as the main outlet 
for the sugar exported to 
Europe by the African. Carib- 


British Sugar has some of ant j pacific countries 

the most modem refining un( je r foe Lome Convention 


capacity in Europe and has 
invested heavily in new 
products. 


should be protected. 

But the competition au- 
thorities in London and Brus- 


But the decisive action will ^ ma y nol kindly on a 
be on the lobbying front in the grouping as powerful as either 


corridors of Brussels and Lon- Ferruzzi -British Sugar or 
don rather than boardrooms Tate-British Sugar. 


and bourses. 


London would have to con- 


Interested parties include sider whether the conditions 
the National Farmers Union, attached to the Berisford ac- 


Lhe Ministry of Agriculture, quisilion of British Sugar, 
the Department of Trade and notably producing separate 


Industry, the Office of Fair annual accounts, can apply to 
Trading, and Directorate^ .a largely private foreign 
General IV. the EEC bureau- company. 


private 


Ferruzzi does not publish a 
-consolidated balance sheet 
and says one will not be 
available until 1987. 

There is also the complex 
question of British sugar poli- 
cy. Whitehall is committed to 
increasing Britain's sugar quo- 
ta - the amount produced - 
from its present level of 12 
million tonnes. 

That objective is hardly] 
likely to be advanced by 
introducing a competitor 
which might force the closure 
of Tale’s Silvenown refineiy, 
in east London, or try to sell m 
Britain Continental beet sug- 
ar. or both. 

But trickiest of all is the 
possibility of a Tate-British 
-Sugar- link. -On the face of it, 
nothing could be further from 
the letter or spirit of such 
monopolies legislation. Yet so 
extreme a prospect might be 
preferable in Whitehall’s eyes 
to European domination by 
Ferruzzi. 

A combined Tate and Brit- 
ish Sugar group would still 
have less of the European 
market than the Italians, and 
therefore could commend it- 
self to Brussels. 

Since there is not much 
intra-community trade in sug- 
ar, abuse might not arise. But 
in the very political world of 
sugar a. group as big as 
Ferruzzi-British Sugar would 
wield great influence. 

For all these reasons there is : 
smart money on Hillsdown. It 
also is a largely private group, 
the directors and their families 
holding more than half of the ' 
equity. 

Hillsdown is run from 
Hampstead High Street and 
has grown rapidly in recent 
years to embrace such names 
as Buxled Poultry, Smedley's, 
and the FMC meat group. 

Unlike its rivals. Hillsdown 
is interested in other parts of 
Berisford. including its 1 5 per 
cent stake in Ranks Hovis 
McDougali. _■ . 


• SMITH & NEPHEW: Total 
dividend for 1985. 4.65p (3.79p. 
adjusied). One-for-one scrip is- 
sue proposed. Sales £423 mil- 
lion (£374.1 million). Pretax 
profit £70.6 million (£55.5 mil- 
lion). Earnings per share, before 
extraordinary items, I I.83p 
<9.Spl 

• CONSULTANTS (COM- 
PUTER & FINANCIAL): Total 
dividend for 1 985 0.75p (Q.25p>. 
Turnover £2. J7 million 
(£550.000). Pretax profit 
£971.000 (loss £90.000). Earn- 
ings per share 5. Ip (loss l.2p). 

9 WICKES: As stated in the 
prospectus, no dividend for the 
year to end- Jan. Had the com- 
pany been quoted for a whole 
year, the diredtots would have 
recommended 2p a share. Turn- 
over £114.72 million (£103.26 
million). Pretax profit £3.72 
million (£2.18 million). Earn- 
ings per share. 9p (6.8p). 

• SUPERDRUG STORES: 

Total dividend for the year to 
Feb. 28, 5p (4.2p). Turnover 
£164.28 million (£131.58 mil- 
lion). Pretax profit £10.35 mil- 
lion (£8.73 million). 

• SALE TILNEY: Total divi- 
dend for the year to Nov. 30. 


GLG grants illegal beyond abolition 

° in justice Browne., who gave \ 


Regina v Greater London 
Cooucfl, Ex parte Westmin- 
ster City Council and Others 
Before Lord Justice O’Connor, 
;Lord Justice Parker and Lord 
Justice Nourse 
! {Judgment given March 20] 
Decisions made by the 
Greater London Council in 


February 1986, allocating funds 
to benefit certain organizations 


THIS NOTICE DOES NOT CONSTITUTE AN OFFER FOR SALE 
AND THE LOANS LISTED BELOW ARE NOT AVAILABLE TOR 
PURCHASE DIRECT FROM THE BANK OF ENGLAND. OFFICIAL 
DEALINGS IN THE LOANS ON THE STOCK EXCHANGE ARE 
EXPECTED TO COMMENCE ON MONDAY. 24TH MARCH 1986. 


New shopping 
scheme 


for Glasgow 


ISSUES OF GOVERNMENT LOANS 


The Bank of England announces that Her Majesty 's Treasury has 
created on 2 1st March 1986, and has issued to the Bank, 
additional amounts as indicated of each o< the Loans listed 
below: ' 


£150 million 9 per cent TREASURY LOAN. 1934 
£150 million 82 per cent TREASURY LOAN, 1 997 
£1 OO million 8 per cent TREASURY LOAN. 2002-2006 


The price paid by the Bank on issue was in each case the middle 
market closing price of the relevant Loan on 21st March 1986 
as certified by the Government Broker. 

In each case, the amount issued on 21st March 1986 represents 
a further tranche of the relevant Loan, ranking in all respects pan 
passu with that Loan and subject to the terms and conditions 
applicable io that Loan, and subject also to the provision 
contained in the final paragraph of this notice; the current 
provisions for Capital Gains Tax are described below. 

Copies of the prospectuses for 9 per cent Treasury Loan, 1994 
dated 14th January 1971. 82 per cent Treasury Loan, 1997 
dated 7th July 1971 and 8 per cent Treasury Loan, 2002-2006 
dated 15th October 1971 may be obtained at the Bank of 
England, New Issues, Watling Street, London, EC4M 9AA. 

Application has been made to the Council of The Stock Exchange 
for each further tranche of Loan to be admitted to the Official 
List. . ' 


The Loans are repayable at par. and interest is payable half-yearly, 
on the dates shown below: 


-ttedemptiontaa 


9 per ram 'feasuiy loan. 1994 


17th November 1994 


8j percent Treasuy Loan. 1997 


1st September 1997 


8 par can Treasury Loan. 2002-2006 


5th October 2006. 
or on or ai any tmw 
alter 5th OnoOer 2002 
suDjecJ io not less than 
Wee months nates 


tiemtpamem 
'dales 
17th May 
17tft Nowmto 
1st March 
IstSepteirtw 
5th Aon) 

5ih October 


A 400,000-sq ft shopping 
centre for Glasgow’s 
Sauchiehali Street is planned. 

City of London and Europe- 
an Property, part of the Ar- 
buthnot Group, a subsidiary 
of Dow Chemical, and 
Europe’s biggest shopping 
centre developer, Sodete des 
Centres Commereiaux. have 
pul in a planning application 
to Glasgow District Council 

Savacentre, the retailer 
jointly owned by British 
Home Stones and J Salisbury, 
may anchor the scheme by 
taking 200.000 sq ft of space. 
Standard Life, the insurance 
company which initiated the 
Sauchiehali Street scheme 
with SCC, will also be a 
member of the development 
consortium. 

The development will pay 
for the building of a new 
concert hall on the 1 0-acre 
site, providing the Scottish 
National - Orchestra with a 
home. But Strathclyde Re- 
gional Council has yet to 
approve the development. 


• INDUSTRIAL SCOTLAND 
ENERGY: Results for 1985, 
compared with the previous 15 
months. No dividend. Turnover 
£9.36 million (£9.78 million). 
Pretax profit £890.000 (£3.73 
million). Earnings per share, 
before extraordinary item, 8.32p 
(22.75p). 


The further tranches of 9 per cent Treasury Loan. 1994 and 83 
per cent Treasury Loan. 1997 will rank for a full six months' 
interest on 7 7th May 7986 and 7 si September 7986 
respectively. The further tranche of 8 per cent Treasury Loan, 
2002-2006 has been issued on an ex-dividend basis and will 
not rank for the interest payment due on 5th April 1986 on the 
existing Loan. 

Each of the Loans referred to' in this notice is specified under 
paragraph 1 of Schedule 2 to the Capital Gains Tax Act 1979 as 
a gilt-edged security (under current legislation exempt from tax 
on capital gains on disposals made on or after 2nd July 1986, 
irrespective of the period for which the Loan is held). 
Government statement 

Attention is drawn to the statement issued by Her Majesty's 
Treasury on 29th May 1985 which explained that, in the interest 
of the orderly conduct of fiscal policy, neither Her Majesty's 
Government nor the Bank of England or their respective servants 
or agents undertake to disclose tax changes decided on but not 
yet announced, even where they may specifically affect the 
terms on which, or the conditions under which, these further 
tranches of the Loans are issued or sold by or on behalf of the 
Government or the Bank; that no responsibility can therefore be 
accepted for any omission to make such disclosure; and that 
such omission shall neither render any transaction liable to be 
set aside nor give nse to any claim for compensation. 



BaseRate 


BCC announces 
that from 24th March 1986 
its base rate is changed 
from 12V2% to 11%% p.a. 


BANK OF ENGLAND 
LONDON 

21st March 1986 


Bank of Credit and Commerce International 

SOCIETE ANONYME LICENSED DEPOSIT TAKER 
I'm LTUrl MIM.I. NIKI I f LuMluN ll - 1\ Ut» 




I Wj * » j OFFER FOR SUBSCRIPTION 

I OR NEXT I under the- Business Expansion Scheme of up to 

i 1 3,600,000 Ordinary Shares of 25p each at 

50p per share payable in full on application 
sponsored by 
ERG. LIMITED 


LENDING 

RATES 


tj I loli n tnumm-t 


* BES tax relief complying with new rules. . 

* Experienced management by Economic Forestry Group PEC. 

* Ready supply of standing timber to be acquired, 
sfc No special shares for management or sponsors. 


ABN 

Adam & Company 

BCCl™ - 

Citibank Savings! 

Consolidated Crds 

Continental Trust 

Cooperative Bank 

C. Hoare & Co 

Uoyds Bank 

Nat Westminster 

Royal Bank of Scotland 

7SB ; 

Grttoank MA 


FrPiG 


For a copy of the Prospectus phone 


FRFCiF.kICKS PLACE GROUP PLC 

i i l I 


- 101-600 3677- ; 


t Mortgage Bate Rate. 

ALL BOX NUMBER 
REPLIES SHOULD BE 
ADDRESSED TO: 


6.5p (4.7p). Pretax profit £4.1 
million (£3-1 million). Earnings 


per share. 17p(t5.8p). 

• BRONX ENGINEERING: 
Year to Nov. 30. Pretax profit 
£1 19.000 floss £645,000). Turn- 
over £10.91 million (£7.15 mil- 
lion). Total dividend unchanged 
at Q.Sp. 

• SHELDON JONES: Half- 

year to Nov. 30. 1985. Interim 
dividend !.35p (same), payable 
April 25. Turnover £6.07 mil- 
lion (£5.34 million). Preiax 
profit £254,000 (£265.000). 

Earnings 2.98p (2.79p). 

• BODDINGTONS* BREW- 
ERIES: Total dividend 3.25p 
(2.85pj for 1985. Turnover 
£72.93 million (£51.58 million). 
Preiax profit £11.73 million 
(£9.45 million). Earnings per 
share 8-28p (6.95p)_ 

• A & G SECURITY 
ELECTRONICS: Six months 
to Jan. 31. 1986. Interim divi- 
dend 0.475p (0.475p). payable 
May 12. Turnover £1.65 million 
(£1.95 million). Pretax profit 
£301.000 (£405.000). Earnings 
per share I.65p (2.15p). 

• T CLARKE: Total dividend 
for 1985. 23.1 per cent (same). 
Turnover £29.5 million (£26.38 
million). Pretax profit £608.000 
(£886.000). Earnings per share 
3.56p(5.J7p). 

• THOMAS WALKER: Half- 
year to Dec. 31. 1985. Interim 


to benefit certain organizations 
for a period which extended 
| beyond Ifae date of the GLCs 

abolition were illegal and should 
be quashed. 

The Court of Appeal so held, 
allowing an appeal by West- 
minster City Council and seven 
other councils in Greater Lon- 
don, from a decision of Mr 
Justice Macpherson ( The Times 
March 4. 1986) dismissing their 
application for judicial review. 

The subject matter of the 
appeal related to decisions by 
the GLC for the allocation of (i). 
£40 million to the Inner London 
interim Education Authority 
(ILIEA); (ii) £25 million to 
establish a central reserve fund 
for emergency organizations 
(the “umbrella scheme"); and 
(iit)£ll.l million to the arts and 
recreation programme for the 
Roundhouse Arts Centre in 
Camden. 

The GLC was granted leave to' 
appeal to the House of Lords. 

Mh Andrew Collins, QC and 
Mr Mark Lowe for the ap- 
plicants; Mr Roger Henderson, 
QC and Mr Charles George for 
the GLC. 

LORD JUSTICE 

O'CONNOR said that the back- 
ground to the decision to fond 
the ILIEA. was to be found in 


Report PR137 dated February 
7, 1986, which recommended 
that power for that decision was 
to be found in section 97 of the 
Local -Government Act J98A. 
That section obliged the GLC to 
cooperate-with, the London bor* 

' ougn. councils md with' any new 
authority, to which .the .GLC 
fun cub ns were to be transferred. 

Mr Collins submitted that 
section 97 did not give the GLC 
power to fond the. ILIEA. Mr 
"Henderson submitted that the 
section imposed a new duty on 
the GLC so that cooperation to 
facilitate the implementation of 
the Act was itself a fimetion. 

He" submitted that even if 
section 97- itself did not give the. 
power, it did so when read in 
conjunction with section III of 
the Local Government Act 
1972. 

Mr Justice Maty hereon dealt 
with those submissions in his 
judgment and held that as a 
inaner of construction be pre- 
ferred Mr Henderson’s argu- 
ment. ; 

His Lonlship oould not agree 
with that construction and 
could find no function of the 
GLC requiring or permitting it 
to fond ILIEA. 

The section imposed a duty to 
cooperate with ILIEA but his 
Lordship was unable to read 
into that duly a power to give 
£40 million to ILIEA. That 
particular decision should be 
quashed., 

Next, his Lordship considered 
the decision to fund voluntary 
organizations in 1986. Another, 
report, PR 127, had made -a 
detailed analysis of the pros- 
pects of the voluntary organiza- 


^ vi r* justice Browne. **0 8 ave ** 
tiara funded by *^2 L &n nj JuSnen* of toe 
. 1985/86 .getting wSd^n»«eronttab«is 

other sources and wnauaeti expenditure by the 

■that foci® wotMJK a o^egu. county council was made m 
shortfall ‘in . 1986/87 of £» scheme bc^an^m 

milli on :- 1 ■ ' the current year. It ought be 

Itwasobviorathatifthe^C . _npon as a single sum 

was toinake money avaflat^^ Kfcfc wouM be applied for 

wQuldba^set^nd for^a began m the 

scheme before jApnl l. . 

scheme proposed in the report asnwj ^ nothing in the 
was to identify a number of ^ ^ House of Lords 

Sr J 

sums of money for dtstnbun Lordship had come to the 

to nominated or voluntary fo* validity of 

organizations for Jdenufied pur- Manchester reheme de- 
poses and up to a stated ^ fo c fact that it was for 

maximum. ■ , . . . ^Traireni vear and not an 

Ii was. not disputed scheme. Whatever else 

of the voluntary JSffiJsaid about the umbrella 

could be given assistance by way ^ ^ not expenditure 

df ^^ri^siitenitttdthat for the current year. 

' not toffee had heUMhat the 


sssfisassw 

cit v Greater Manchester County change of consroL His Lordship 
t OR 71 (CM v™trt not ajtree- In realny the 


5«MHL}) and approved » GLC was 

lawful by the House of Lords., year's grant in the curremycar 

In that case Greater Manches- ^nd that could not bejustiried. 
ter County Council established a That itself was suffici ent to 
trust for the purpose of provid- distinguish the present case 
ing fit* or assisted places at from the Manchester case- 
independent schools and a pay- p OT l j K > 5 e reasons -h» Lerd- 
mem of £f. 12 million was made .. gjso hold that the 

to the trust by the county Ro „ a dhouse scheme was 
council for the purpose ot Both decisions woukl 

paying the educational costs of 

^^dratio^wjtanat ^^^usdee Parker and Loxd 

Justice Nourse delivered 




new- 


care 


In re D 

Before Lord Justice Dillon, 
Lord J ustice Stephen Brown and 
Lord Justice Woolf 


neglected or his beahh is being 
avoidably impaired or neglected 
or he is being ill-treated”. 


[Judgment given March 19] 

It was proper in law for 


Mr Nicholas Medawar, QC 
id Miss Barbara Slomnicka for 


dividend O.I7p (0.1 67p), pay- 
able on May 7. Turnover £1.28 
million (£1.21 million). Pretax 
profit £96.000 (£102.000). Earn- 
ings per share 0.8p (0.91 p). 

• WESTMINSTER AND 
COUNTRY PROPERTIES: 
Half-year to OcL 31, 1985. 
Interim dividend 3p(3p). Turn- 
over £1.74 million (£1.92 mil- 
lion). Pretax profit £171,000 
(£163,000). Earnings per share 
3.9p<3.6p). 

• RENISHAW: Six months to 
Dec. 31, 1985. Interim dividend 
0.7p (0.6p). Turnover £8.49 
million (£6.74 million). Preiax 


f trofii £2.21 million (£1.92 mil- 
ion). Earnings per share S.03p 
(3.95p). 

• BLAGDEN INDUSTRIES: 
Mr A R Sparrow, the chairman, 
says in his annual statement that 
he hopes to see a significant 
improvement in- the perfor- 
mance Of the activities in Brit- 
ain in the current year, leading 
to improved group results. 

• HTV GROUP: Half-year to 
Jan. 31, 1986. Interim dividend 
2.8p (2-5p). payable on May 6. 
Turnover £56.12 million 
(£50.67 million). Pretax profit 
£4.34 million (£3.93 million). 
Earnings per share 12J>9p 

(1128p). 


It was proper in law for a 
court to find that the condition 
under section I(2)(a) of the 
Children and Young Persons 
Am 1969 was satisfied in 
circumstances where the child 
had never been in the care of its 
parents or out of the care of 
responsible agencies. 

The condition was capable of 
being satisfied where the ev- 
idence of the child’s: proper 
development being avoidably 
prevented or neglected or -Its 
health being avoidably impaired 
or neglectml or its being ill- 
treated related to when the child 
was in its mother's womb. 

' The Court of Appeal so held 
allowing an appeal by the Berk- 
shire County Council from a 
decision of the Divisional Court 
of the Family Division (Mr 
Justice Boilings and Mr Justice 
Wane) who on February 4, 1986 
allowed an appeal by the guard- 
ian ad hiem from a decision of 
Reading Juvenile Court on Au- 


gust 1. 1985 granting the 
council's application for a care 


council's application for a care 
order. “ . 

The condition required by, 
section l(2Ma) which conferred 
power on a court tomakea care 
orderon the application of, inter 
alia, a local authority, /was that 
the court had to be satisfied that 
the child's “proper development 
is being avoidably prevented or 


and Miss Barbara Slomnicka for 
the council; Mr James 
Townend, QC and Mr Chris- 
topher Critchlow for the guard- 
ian ad litem; Mr Paul W. Reid 
for the mother. ' - ■ 

LORD JUSTICE STEPHEN. 
BROWN said that the child was 
prematurely born on March 12, 
1985 to a mother who was 
addicted to heroin and heroin, 
substitutes. 

At birth the child .was suffer- 
ing from drug withdrawal sympr 
toms and was. taken to hospital 
where her condition deteri- 
orated. She was kept in inten- 
sive care for several weeks 
immediately following her birth. 

The council decided to seek a 
care order ' from , the juvenile 
court under the 1969 Act and 
the child was represented by a 
guardian ad litem. 

The justices found that the 
mother had been a registered 
drug addict since 1982 and had 
been taking drugs for about lot 
years. Throughout her preg- 
nancy she had continued to lake • 
drugs in excess of those pre- 
scribed for her and she knew 


that by doing so she- could be 
causing danuge-to her chfldL. 

They abo fonnd ' that the 
chfld’s . medical condition at 
birth was : a ‘direct result of 
deliberate and excessive taking . 
•of drugs by. the mother during 
pregnancy and that fx#b parents 


. continued to be add i c t ed.' to 
drugs and remained. so on the 
final day of the hearing. 

The justices took the view 
that a child's development was a 
continuing process winch en- 
compassed the prat and the 
present - and considered that 
events in the prat life of the 
child; even daring the time 
when it was a foetus in the 
womb, were reievaaL 

Therefore- they considered 
that they were entitled to have 
regard tQ ihe mother’s abase of 
her own bodily, health doling, 
pregnancy .when deciding 
Wb«her.ihecodcfitMMiih section 
T(2Xa) of the 1969 Act was 
proved: They decided; that the 
Child. came withm that section 
and made' tire tare order.. 

- The Divisional. Court said 
that the mother had had no 
opportunity to care for the child 
since birth and no conduct by 
- her could have heed said ttiiiave 
affected the health ofthe child. 
Therefore they bdd that the . 
conditions of section 1(2X1) had 
not been satisfied. 

The Pivisonal Court fdl into 
error in restricting hs^ view of the 
cfaikLto events wtucfr had taken 
place since both. That was too 
.narrow a view, r 
. 1 was abo coniended By the 
guardian- ttd Stem- that- the 
• appropri a te 'procedure would be 
wardship 'proceedings. How^ 
ever; section J(2Ka) ofthe 1969 
Act .was apt-iotoover the fects of 
the present case. 

,)t was ptsm foat those events 


which had the effect of impair- 
ing the child’s health were 
avoidable and could be in the 
con tem plation of the conn and 
would justify the care order. 

LORD JUSTICE WOOLF, 
agreeing, said that it was quite 
■ clear that “child" did not mean 
a foetus but meant a child that 
had been bom. 

Section 700) ofthe 1969 Act 
defined “child" as “a person 
under the age of 14". “Person” 
denoted someone who was liv- 
ing and not someone who bad 
yet to be bom. 

•The proper approach to sec- 
tion l(2Ka) was to ask two 
questions. 

First, was the living child's 
proper development being pre- 
vented or neglected or his health 

km. ; I lir,- . rtl* 


bring impaired or neglected? 
Second, was that avoidable? 

• in regard to the first question 
it would not be proper to look at 
" the situation before birth but it 
would be perfectly proper to do 
so in considering the second 
question. 

LORD JUSTICE DILLON, 
agreeing, said that where the 
statutory scheme applied there 
was no same for wardship 
proceedings. The juvenile court 
.was fiifly entitled to be satisfied 
' that the primary conditions for 
the operation of the 1969 Act 
were satisfied. 

Solicitors: Mr D.CJL Wil- 
liams. Reading; Rowberry, Mor- 
ris &. Co, Raiding; Blandy &- 
BJandy, Reading. 


Ship is ‘equipment’ under liability Act 


The Derbyshire 
Before Mr Justice Sheen 
(Judgment given March 14] 

A ship was “equipment" 
within die meaning of section 
1 ( 1 X«) of the £m ployers’ Liabil- 
ity (Defective Equipment) Act 
1969, Mr Justice Sheen held in 
the Admiralty Court of the 
Queen's Bench Division on a 
preliminary point. 

Accordingly the plaintiffs, 
Mrs Eugenia Goltman and Mrs 
Alisia Martin, administratrices 
of the estate of Leo Coltman, 
who was the third engineer on 
the Derbyshire when she sank 
with the loss of aD hands off the 
coast of Japan about September 
10, 1980 could bring an action 


and machinery, vehicle, aircraft 
and clothing; . . .“personal 
injury” includes loss of life . . 

Miss Belinda M. Bucknall for 
. the plaintiffs; Mr. R. Hay for the . 
shipowners. . ' . : 

MR J USTICE ~$HEEN said 
that the Derbyshire was an 
**OBO” carrier of 9 1,6 50. gross- 
registered tons, about 964 feet in - 


- part of the defendants without 
PTOpidice to any remedy which 
the defendants might have 
against the shipbuflders by vir- 
tue of tire provisions ofthe 1969 
Ace ; 

: The defendants denied that 
the vessel constituted 


length and 1 44 feet in beam and 
bufft in l97fr by Swan Humer 
Sbipbuildets Ltd, At the time of 
her loss she was on a voyage 
from Canada to Japan via the 
Cape of Good Hope laden with 
iron ore. 

U was contended by the 
plaintiffs that the design and 
construction of the ship were 
defective in that her 
longitudinals were not continu- 
ous through the transverse bulk- 
head at frame 65 in accordance 
with the Lloyd’s Rules then in 
force. 

U was submitted that because 
of such defects the Derbyshire . 


tnnenr" ‘-wRhur tfre^nean- 
fXbat word fn the Act.- ’■ ^ 


for damages against the ship- 
owners, Bibby Tankers Ltd. 


vners, Bibby Tankers Ltd. 
Section 1(1} of the 1969 Act 


provides: “( l) Where — fa) an 
employee suffers personal injury 


employee suffers personal injury 
in the course of his employment 
in consequence of a defect in 
equipment provided by his em- 
ployer for the purposes of the 
employer's business; and (h) the 
defect is attributable wholly or 
partly to the fault ofa third party 
(whether identified or not), the 
< injury shall be deemed to be also 
attributable to negligence on the 
pan of the employer (whether or 
not he is liable in respect of tbe 
; injury apart from this sub- 
section). but without prejudice 
to tbe law relating to contribu- 
tory negligence and to any 
remedy by way of contribution 
or in contract or otherwise 
which is available to tbe em- 
ployer in respect of the 
I injury . . . 

“(3) In this section — 
"equipment" includes any plant 


was unsea worthy, that she broke 
in two at about frame 65, which 


was ini mediately- forward ofthe 
bridge 'and accommodation - 
with the result that foe, after, 
superstructure and .bridge sank 
rapidly. 

In foe statement of daim 
there were allegations of neg- 
ligence on the part of the owners 
in failing to ensure that the ship 
was constructed properly. 

There was a further allegation 
that the deceased lost his me in 


tnat me acceasea lost nis me in 
the course of his employment in 
consequence of a defect in 
equipment provided by his 
employers for the purpose of his 
employers' business and the loss 
of life had to be deemed to be 
attributable to negligence on the 


U was contended by Miss 
Bucknall that a ship came 
within.' the two categories 
specifically mentioned, ‘'plant" 
and “vehicle". Tbe Oxford En- 
glish ■ Dictionary gave seven 
meanings of foe “vehicle”. 

The seventh stated any means 
of carriage, conveyance or trans- 
port; a receptacle in which 
anything was placed in order to 
be moved. Miss Bucknall said 
that that definition embraced all 
forms of conveyance, including 
ships- 

Mr Hay submitted that in the 
shipping industry a. ship con- 
stituted a mariner’s - place of 
work and . foe machinery on 
board was the equipment and 
drowan analogy between astdp 
as -foe equivalent i>f factory 
premises on the one. band and 
.plant, and machinery as equip- 
ment oit foe "other. 

His -Lordship said that that 
might be a Bur analogy concern- 
ing the words “plant" and 
“machinery” but me Act de- 
fined "equipment” to include 
any vehide and aircraft 
Ifafoip was the equivalent of 
the premises in which the crew 
worked and if they were pro- 
vided -with equipment in the 
form of plant, machinery, or 
-clothing one asked why the 


It was a legitimate aid to 
construction to consider the 
mischief the statute was in- 
tended to remedy. 

• It was dear that the Act was 
passed to give an injured work- 
man a right to recover damages 
from bis employer if his injury 
. wsp attributable to any defect in 
equipment provided by foe 
employer for foe purpose of his 
business. 

Before tbe passing of tbe Act a 
workman would have had to 
seek a remedy from a supplier or 
m a nu facturer who might be in a 
foreign country, un traceable or 
not worth suing. 

It was to be presumed that 
Parliament did not intend to 
pass an Act which on its true 
construction would be xnani- 
. festly unjust or absurd. 

It would be absurd and un- 
just, Miss Bucknall said, if a 
steward on a train or on an 
aircraft had foe benefit of die 
Act and not a steward on a ship. 

Likewise the absurdity which 
would result from accepting the 
defendants' construction could 
he -illustrated. It could be as- 
sumed that loss of life resulted 
from the sinking of a ship. 

D ependants would have a 
remedy against foe shipowners 
if foe disaster occurred because 
of an explosion in her defective 
machinery but no remedy if foe 
ship was so badly constructed 
that she broke in two parts and 


sa nk w ithout any explosion. 

„■ Parliament could not have 


same was not true of a Boeing 
747. - - . ■■ ■ - . 


intended, any absurd or unjust 
result. The ship was 
equipment" within foe mean- 
ing of section I ofthe 1969 Act 
Solicitors: Evfll & 

Holman Fenwick & WDlan. 


Court order facts are usable^in lbreign case 


1. Fredericks Place. Old Je wry. London EC2R SHR 


7"L'* iii J riti - * ■ J 


Box No 

Co/Times Newspapers, 
P.O. Box 484 
Virginia Street LONDON 
El 9XN 


Bayer AC v. Winter and 
Others (No 3) 

Before Mr Justice Hoffmann 
(Judgment given March 19] 

Mr Justice Hoffmann refused 
ia the Chancery Division io 
discharge an ex parte order 
which he had made on February 
7 giving leave to the plaintiffs to 
use information obtained on the 
execution of an Anton filler 
order in proceedings to be 
instituted against the defendants 
in Austria and in Switzerland, 

Mr Seddon Cripps for foe 
defendants: Mr Peter Prescott 
for foe plaintiff. 

MR JUSTICE HOFFMANN 
said that Mr Cripps contended 
that the order went beyond any 
existing authority. 

While reserving for possible, 
argument in a higher court the 
quesnoo of whether foe court 
had jurisdiction to make such an 
order he did not, in vfew of foe 
decision in Sonv Corporation v 
Anand ((1981) 7 FSR 398) chal- 
lenge foe grant of leave to use 
the Anton Filter information for 
foe purpose of proceedings 
against other parties in Austria, 
but said there was no case in 
which the court had permitted 


such information to start ac- 
tions abroad based on the same 
cause of action against persons 
already parties to foe proceed- 
ings in this country. 

His Lordship was not trou- 
bled by foe lack of precedent,' if 
the order would not offend 
against principle or policy, and . 
be did not think foar hduL 


While a multiplicity of suits 
was not desirable, a distinction 
should be drawn between 
proceedings to preserve assets 
and litigation ofthe substantive 
merits of the dispute. - 

The plaintiff had do. wish to 
litigate the merits in Austria and. 
Switzerland .anff wais wiping to 
undertake once protective mea- 


have to have resort to fo 
. other • countries. . particularly 
those . in. --which no. English- 
judgmeni would be enforced; so 
ra to prevent a defendant from 
fnmrating any judgment foe 

-PlamUff might obtain '-Jjy 

. of his assets in foreign 

junsdjcttons as wefl. .. 

If foreign courts were willing 
to make orders similar 
Afarem injunction, it would be 
pointless insularity, for an Eq. 
dish coun to put obstacles in 
tfSJW ■<£ a plaintiff who - 
wished, with foe-aid : of'foreign 
«»rt^ to enforce, an Emdah 
• jut^mt agtinst a defendant’s ; 


no criminal proceedings were 
contemplated. 


.. ^J^ripps submitted that if 
Tjte Older wra permissible at all. 
it was too wide because It did 

oh! a iJc SIria **** Pkfotiff to 
obtaining protective measures. 

The order allowed unlimited 
use of toe information in the 
aesignated Swiss and Austrian 


' m ** 1AU 

KJPJSJW* including proseco- 
tton of foe merits of the action. 


sures were in place, to apply for. 
a stay of proceeding u the 
Swiss and Austrian courts, 
pending the decision, of foe 
Englislwtturt on. liability. 

If the effect of a Marem 
injunction was .to secure an 
adequate fund in this country. 


'H'-ir* -wnere. the 


merely oppressive; but it. as 
here, the fund in England was. 
inadequate, the plaintiff might 


j7 Y j, -wwiuicuu IQ u 

disclosed for use in proceedines 
in The - Netherlands, was di? 

toe 

^S^.f niyprqiKlice “foe 

defendants was that -the 

proceedmgs against them might 

. Here also the foreign proceed- 
• ^ not separate, bSwere 

. ,n reality ancillary. Iq. fojj case 


"Hie reason for imposing no 
restriction was that the court 
-3£?/* oot folly conversant with 
H. aecessaiy under Swiss 
“gdAustnan law to preserve foe 
.effectiveness of the protective 

.fopasures. 

, \ now the undertaking 
by foe plaintiff would 
proiect foe defeo- 
against litigation in a 
» u '£ty°fiuSiont 

^ ***** proceed- 
m §nL? usuia ^ nd Swltzeriand. 

Soliotoi« . Piper Smith & 
^^^m; Durrani Piesse. 




V 

i 


THE TIMES MONDAY MARCH 24 1986 


SAVE £1,000 BY TAKING 


131 


***** . . 









9 






9 ' 



* 




In February rising interest rates meant that we had to revise this scheme. However the 

new rate offuKince was a low 5.9% p.a. (11.4% APR) over three years, or 4.9% p.a. (9.5% APR) 

over two years. It proved extremely popular 1™^ 

So much so that were now extending _ — 

it to cover any Capri or Sierra registered MQPEL ls laser 2.0 laser 

between March 1st and March 31st, 1986- APR UA% 

Don’t forget that the examples we give in ^ 7253.38 7328.44 

the fehle de based on the maximum retail price Initial Payment (minimum 20%) 1450.68 1465.69 

of the Car. Amount of Credit 5802.70 5862.75 


SIERRA 
L8 LASER 


CAPRI 
2.0 LASER 





APR 

Cash Price* 

Initial Payment (minimum 20%) 
Amount of Credit 
36 Monthly Instalments of 
Charge for Credit 

Total Credit Price 


114 % 

725338 

1450.68 

5802.70 

189.72 

102722 

8280.60 


114 % 

7328.44 

1465.69 

5862.75 

19L68 

1037.73 

8366.17 


-N 





^Maximum retail price as at March 1st 1986 
excluding delivery, number plates and road fund licence. 


■ if you talk to your Ford 
dealer you could get an even better deal and still 
use the attractive interest rates quoted above. 

The above finance plan is subject to credit approval and applies to 
Sierra and Capri vehicles registered between March 1st and March 31st in England, 

Scotland and Wales and which are subject to Conditional Sale Agreements arranged 
bu nartiapating Ford dealers and underwritten by Ford Motor Crecfit Company Ltd, 
Reg^Hous^l Hubert-Road, Brentwood Essex CM14 4QL_ Applicants must be over 

r various factory fitted omtlons.are available for 








tm 




cfigible vehicles at extza cost Figures are corrected time of going to press. 












- - 24 


THE TIMES MONDAY MARCH 24 1986 


LA CREME DE LA CREME 


ROYAL FREE HOSPITAL 
SCHOOL OF MEDICINE 
(University of London) 

SECRETARY 

required to work Tor the Professor and Depart- 
ment of Pharmacology, sityated in the Medical 
School in Hampstead. Excellent typing and 
shorthand essential. Occasional audio work. 
Previous experience of working in an academic 
department and word processing would be 
advantageous. 

Own office, IBM typewriter. Salary on scale 
£6,993 - £8,092 inclusive of London Allows 
ance. 33 hour week. 34 days leave including 
Public and customary days. Interest free annu- 
al season ticket loan scheme. 

Further particulars and application forms 
available from. School Office, R-F.H.S.M-, 
Rowland Hill Street. London, NW3 2PF or 
telephone 01-794 0500 Em 4262, 

Please quote reference PH M/3. 

Gosing date: 7 April 1986. 


FRENCH & ITALIAN 

Amenran Oty Bank reoures exp Server See witb fluent French + Kaon 
Excellent Enghsti & sec skins (100/60) nec tor tte nsponsana post 
witch mdute lots of admn. as well as extansve (Kokins with dnms 
abroad. AGE. 25+ SALARY fl 0.000. 

ITALIAN 

A cretinous poup <rf Chartered Accnntarns require a mature & expert* 
weed PA With fluent ttaban lo work m mar M Dept. Duties utette 
admn & consoni tefeptane lasai wWi ttaijn cherts. Etc typing 
(GOwpni). tlx & WP exp are necess^r. AGE: 25+ SALARY: E1Q400+. 


Energetic. eonhdsrtal Senior IWmgual Sec wlti ftient Dalan isrequkad 
iiy to presognus fewicei tostnutun. fnt Banking S Oty exp. as mU as 
era sec state ii00/65i & WP exp are ess torttos posma n the Captd 
Markets dept. AGE. 27-35 SALARY. EH.OOO+. 

SPANISH (TV) 

Esta famose cornparak buses unfa) jnwn v svnpttca "See" MhgOe 
(80/60) con un ado de exp commercial rare wubr an ta vena de 
programs de TV a Latnamfnca. Edar 20-25 £7.500 + ben. 

FRENCH 

Est^e oue vous etes urw sec Wngue a la redientie de uotm deuakme 
ampler’ Le conseJiff iundxp« de certs baraue preanpasa a besom 
d'we exceBente sec. precise ei efficace. capable de notar sttno/dactyta 
daisies deux froies Vous sera ttoable et prtte a travadler en dgwpe. 
&S9-9.500 + end. pehts MnHicas. 

BOYCE BILINGUAL 
01-236 5501 

7 Ludgate Sq. EC4 (Mon-Fri 9.304.30J Ernp. Agy 


EXPERIENCED SECRETARY 

Needed Immediately * 

We are the small London office, of a large Japanese 
chemical compmany. We are looking far a person aged 
over 25 who is well spoken, presentable, has a pleasant 
personality- and appropriate professional experience in 
running an office. Good typing is essential and 
knowledge of word processing would be an advantage. 
The managers are frequently away on business, and 
need someone on whom they can rely. 

An appropriate salary will be paid to the right 
applicant 

Please write with full CV to: 

MrHUis 
General Manager 
Asahi Chemical Indusiry Co Lid 
-• 54 Grosvenor Street 

-*”■ London WI-- ■ - 


SECRETARY/CONFERENCE ; 
ORGANISER 
£8,500 - £10.000 

If vou are 21-26 and the most outgoing and weQ pre- 
sented candidate we interview you will have the 
opportunity to be in charge of every aspect of 
organising in-company courses for our clients. Your 
enthusiasm, commitment and eye for detail will be well 
rewarded working in a busy atmosphere with a small 
and friendly warn. Skills of 80/60 prefened- 

SOMETHING SPECIAL 

Enjoy speaking to people on tlw phone? Do people 
enjov speaking to you? If you are young, enthusiastic, 
well educated and ambitious we will train you to earn 
XT 1 .000 pa selling our seminars and courses to a wide 
variety of customers. Interested, then ring:- 

01-381 6233 

LEADERSHIP. DEVELOPMENT LTD . 


SUPERVISORS - Word Processing 
up to c. £12,000 inc. 

Are you already a suoervuwr at an asststanl supervisor ot a 
Ivpog pooT The Rovai Borough leqtues 2 supervisors for 
our ivtwvj cenlie (I oeroaneni. 1 temporary to up to 9 
months to cows matemiry leave) You w* be expected to 
have preen supervisory experience word ptocassmg expe- 
rience ie»penence on an IBM 0100 a parTwUar advantage), 
me apwiy to work under piessve. 10 respond positively 10 
the varying demon* at the ongmawg depanmenis and 10 
moiivaie start to do the same, the knowledge to enable them 
la help iraxi dheis on the wotd processing system 
We ofler a 36 hour week, rrvrwnum 28 days leave. Reabto 
wxVirrg iwurs. substorseo statf lestaurant, and sports and 
social dun 

Apdcarwn forms 0 noting Bef T J77 from the Pereorewi 
Service The Town Halt Hanton Street. London W87NXTet 
- Of 937 ©6; <2* hour anewenng service) 

Closing cuie lor 3pptaalwns 1 1th Apr! 1986. 

ufief 

* ; KENSiHGTOH&CKELSEA 

l 4^sa80y i AN E'JIJAL OPPORTUNITY 


WHY NOT JOIN US 
IN OUR VENTURE? 

SborifraBd/«iH&o aecretary/vffico adra fa- 
btrator urgently required for a fiist moving 
international company. Word processor expe- 
rience. organisational ability and an excellent 
telephone manner essentiaL Accustomed to 
work under pressure. 

We offer a salary of £10,000 per year with a 

performance bonus aid annually. There will 
be 4 weeks holiday. 

Please telephone us immediately 
for an interview on 01-229 1942. 


Conference & Publications Secretary 

We are looking for a responsible, well-educated 
unflappable secretary to look after onr small 
team of busy research economists. In addition to 
normal secretarial duties, the person appointed 
will be responsible for the organisation of onr 
conferences and the distribution of our 
publications. 

Minimum starting salary £8,500 with a review 
after 3 months. 

Please telephone N3dd Spacer on 01*636 3784 

(no agencies) 

Institute for Fiscal Studies 


FUNCTIONS SECRETARY 

A leading Trade Association requires a Functions 
Secretary. Principal duties are the organisation of 
seminars, dinners, golf days and sfmiliar events and 
promoting participation tn them to Member Compa- 
nies. Post shortly vacant would suit youngish but 
mature person with appropriate experience and 
some secretarial skills. 

Salary negotiable circa £&5O0 to £9X00 according 
to age and experience. 

Apply in writing with CV to:- 



LONDON FESTIVAL BALLET 
DEVELOPMENT TRUST * 


Deals with sponsorship and ffaodit 
requires a highly oigapised and d 


t and immediately 
idenc 


SECRETARY/PA 

Experience in the City or a similar business 
environment an advantage. Salary £8,000 pJL 

Applications in writing by 1 April 1986 ta 

R. D. Chubb 
London Festival Ballet 
39 Jay Mews 
SW7 2ES 


Swiss financial consultant needs for Its office tn 
Geneva . _ ' I...!’ 

Private Secretary / Personal Assistant 

With English for mother tongue but 'fluent tn 
French - age 20-25 - good appearance - flexible and 
free for travel In Europe and the United States, - 
previous experience not necessary - salary 
negotiable. 

Written applications including c-v. photo and ref- 
erences to: 

IDEM S-A. 

Av de MiremonL22 
CH 1206 GENEVA 
(no agencies) 


ADVERTISING AGENCY 
Directors' Secretary 

*St James's' is a leading Advenising Agency and Public 
Real lions Consultancy with offices just off Fleet St. We 
need someone with a confident te lephone manner 
when talking to diems and able to liaise tactfully with 
Directors and Creative people within the agency, if you 
have accurate shorthand and typing and se cret aria l ex- 
perience this will be an interesting and rewarding job. 
Start C&L250. 

Telephone Roger Thompson 01 583 2525. 


Dream Wardrobes 

£9,000 

Join a «orfd of immense intereu and sheer theatrical 
ffilendouc Hitli rhir tup I K nwuimr hire company 
As Secretary in Chief Executive you will become totally 
involved m major film TV pmjeci-. farms etc. 

The role demand- nwoiiiilv flexibility and a mature, 
professional approach. V»u should have good -kills l9U SOI 
Ass* 22-31 riea.-eceUil-HN 

■■MBHMBB Recruitmenl Con -ul I -ml- ■■■■H 


Not only £350 Holiday Pay 
but also a Privilege Card. 


Our team of top level temporarysecretaries can all receive £350 
Holiday Pay this year and, as members of our Privilege Card Club, will MacBlain 

also get substantial discounts on travel and package holidays. r R*J* SH 

Join our successful temporary team by contacting 
Victoria Martin on 01 439 060L oeCTBtanBS 

3rd Floor. Carrington House 130 Regent Street London WlR 5FE. (Entrance in Regent Place, opp Midland Bank). 


r OFFICE DIVISION 
£ 9,000 

This division has designed for some 
of London's top PR companies in an 
exceptionally inspired and creative 
wav and want to recruit a mature, 
professional secretary to an 
associate . director and his leam. 
They have experienced rapid 
growth ;t<. more and more leading 
UK ‘ companies realise the 
importance ot a viauallv 
harmonious and well-planned 
office environment. You'll be well 
organised, able to balance several 
projects al once and ncl panic. 80' 
bfl Skills and previous WP 
experience needed. 

Gaenl Codon 01-240 3511 
West End 0J-2TO3S3 

Elizabeth Hunt . 

^ i m fecurtmentGansutanb ^ 


TEAM LEADER to £10,000 

You'll need strong leadership qualities as secretary to a divisional 
managing director and his dynamic group. You'll co-ordinate 
their movements, have extensive contact with clients and 
handle staff recruitment for the division. 90/60 Skills and WP 
experience needed. 


GONE SHOPPING 


£9,500 


This division concentrates on architectural designs and the 
refurbishment of some of the UK's largest shopping centres. 
You'll work for an associate director and co-ordinate the 
movements of his lively and creative design team. 80 60 Skills 
and previous WP experience needed . 

MD's OFFICE to £9,500 

Client PR is an important part of the business and you’ll help 
set-up frequent social events and provide first class secretarial 
support. You'll be verv well presented with a professional, self 
confident manner and be aged ideally 23-24. i00'65 Skills and 
previous WP experience needed. 

°SSosT Elizabeth Hunt nSmss a 


Temporary Secretaries 


PaMHoMay*? 

Work for Manpower end start earning your holiday 
pay now. 

Do the ideas of paid holiday entitlement as well as 
excellent rates and FREE Word Processor training 


COLLEGE LEAVER OPPORTUNITIES 

' f . ~ . H .IMI-Mniift riTTIHflhr t 


LEUE ucniw* - ” . * 

i .of companies offering cta&MgWfl ena 


Oxford QrcUt 

cny- 

WcfOffe 

Chancery LaM 
Mayfafr 

Russofi Square 

cay 


Fabric Mgnwa 

IWvertfty 

American B»dt 


Call us now and start planning your holidays. 


©MANPOWER Tel: 225 0505 


★ PLUS MANY MORE * 

»St Elizobelh Hunt SS 

■ — : . tWritamantCnngfcffe ■■■■ + 


Temporary Staff Speculisis 


24 hour answering service 


MARCH INTO APRIL 

with 

OUR TEMPORARY TEAM 

£6.20p.h. 

CXir busy taan of protesstonat tempo rar y seorel g rie a are always In demand, and it 
has estabfisbed an excellaa ropi^ation owr the years. 

it you are a first class, senior level secretary whh speeds ot lOtyEO. 2 years Director 
level experience in central London, and proficient word processing sMte, we can 
offer you an in t e resting variety off lamponay aecreta r tal aa al gnmsnt s and the best 
rates in London. 

Our skated temps me al paid the same rates and are frequently offered the 
opportunity of temping into a per ma nent position. 

If you would Bke to temp at the levef you deserve and be posttrefy appreciated. 

please telephone for an appointment or a factsheeb 

til -434 4512 (West End) 01-588 3535 



Crone Corkill 

ftocnArieirt Consultants * 


THE BURLINGTON MAGAZINE 
SECRETARY/ADMINISTRATIVE ASSISTANT 

Energetic, intetflgent and responsftte secretwy/admMstiatlve assistant required 
for General Manager and Advertisement Manager of tearing art magazine. Must 
have shorthand and good typing and be able to work underpressure. Degree 
preferred interest fn art history and foreign languages helpful Must be numerate 
and prepared to pay attention to (total. Accuracy essential Salary negotiable. 
Luncheon Vouchers and 4 weeks annual holiday. 

Please write with your curriculum vitae to: Miss K. Trevelyan, The Buffington 
Magazine. 10 -16 Bm Street London WC1X OBP. 


7Y*i Anacombe 
Xi-W A Ringkmd 

Ririidential lettingj 





Work in laxarioas sur- 
n i WKlny with taper 
people tor two easy going 
directors of this prestigioas 
property development ca 
Cheerful presentable per- 
sonality just as important 
as&d s/b typing dcifis and 
organiwrinnal ability. Age 
2I+. Salary £*500 + bene- 
fits. 5 weeks hob. 


Susan Beck 




Creative Elan 


Loddog far sosiethiD^ special? Then look do fiirtbec This 
top-ranking jDtmg ad agency has it afi. 

More titan highly successful thecompany has brought flair 
and a startling originality to its TV campaigns. The leam Is 
tight-knit, highly motivated, artic ulate and intelligent . , . 
and in need clone more secretary 
Ybu will need good skills lc.90^50) -and sound recorcL 
Salary £9,000. fiease tdepbemi 01-J09 1231 • . *..$ 
■HMtef Recruitment Consnhaats ■■■■■ 


to £10,000 

This is an interesting opening hi die challenging world of 
office design. Oundients are leaders in thelrfield. successful 
and expanding in the London market. As Purchasing 
Secretary yxi will work with a small team translating 
design concepts Into realty The lob offers scope far 
development and the opportunity far front-fine progres- 
sion in the purchasing function. You should have a sound 
record, good presentation and the capadty to cope wider 
gesure. Skills 90/50. Age 27+. Please telephone 01-493 

-Gordon Yates Ltd. .. i 

3 5 Old Bon d Street, London W1 ... 

(Recruitment Consultants) . ■ 


Chilled Champagne i 

£ 8,000 

This is a super opportunity In a young and lively set-up. 
The company specialises in organising functions — 
garden parties, balls, receptions etc They presently 
need an extra pair of hands to help with quotes, diene 
liaison, office or^nising, everything! Ybu will thus be 
totally involved, going out to functions and in time 
running some of your own. Ybu should he bright, 
numerate, flexible and able to drive. Good typing. Age 
19-25. Please telephone 01-493 5787. • ' ' . ;* 

Gordon Yates Ltd. 

35 Old Bond Street London W1 . 

(Recruitment Consultants) 


CflftouiiE wnQ 


MARKETM8 £10,000 

ThlssmaB Wl Martel Research Co. needs you to run the 
office, recruit junior staff & keep a8 expenses in check. You 
wSl have lots of cBenl enteitainment to organise as wen as 
acting as PA to their young-ffiMdng Chairman. WPessen- 
tiaJ. 80/60 skflls, age 25-35 yeas. 

c£8,0OO 

This young Bvety Video Production Co. is^ looking lor a 
sectary with lots tff -common sense to join ffieir mateftig 
learn. This is a brand row joli and yartf meet their dents, 
AjWtee maS-shofc sortecoa^ny research. SJdfe- 

460idBflnlSbntlomlnM1. ■ "M. 



No hassles Noiet-dowus. just plain, ample, high grade. 


A tasteful package of top jtAs, c&e‘ rates aod thorob^Jy 
profeseionaJ service. ■ . . .. .• • 

If you have Bound ddUserid experience, you diould be" 
taOtira; to ‘The IXbik Shop'. ’ ' • 

Telephone Sue Cooke on 01-409 123£ 

■BWBtete Recnriboein Cowiiultoiiw MBMteMteBre 


BOARD DIRECTORS P.A. 
£12,000 VICTORIA 

A major bteuMal group to looking tor * senior PA. to vm* n 
tttorHMd OMce. tn-aA UMort to prMWng tot UPporf to 2 
Dtractor* you wW Tawa some nMpangasMty'tor pnounL'A 
this level.you wW o< coune be expected -» work on youcimfi 
irtoabva. and the more you Wee qtl the more be Uategawl 


to you. B you are BracfcaliwactoWiou s -. here *A‘ 
bonund sWh ofiotyrogy. 


Grate Corkill 

RecruRnwmCoosunanto 

99 Runt Strari Wl 



CAREER IN PR 


£9000m* 


SECRETARY & EXHIBITIONS 
ASSISTANT 

The L&rarten of Regents Cofiege, The New interna- 
tional Higher Education Institution in Regents Park la 
looking tor a secretary and exhfatoons assistant 
Good secretarial skills are essential: experience in 
museums and/or a qualification in tiestgngrartdesir- 
abte. For firf details telephone 01-935 ffi17 or wrfto to; 
The Librarian, Regents Goflege, Inner Ode, Regents 
Park. London NW1 4Na Starting salary up to 28.000, 
reviewed annually. Cfaskig ctate far applications: 11 
April 1986. 


Total imrotvement, tovehr atmosphere, variety - are 
these the quaMes you seek? Jodi the Accounts Exeo- 

** «5S8SS tofrte 

ftA. Good audio stdRs ptos punchy pereondRy. . 

TEMPORARY PERSONNEL 

“1^ you look for that perfect job. Wt have . 
jwtodtete booWngs with the security offanglemi or 
the vartoty of short term position®. Excetont rates. 

. _ ate Ri J SH t ffbaro. jUmtete.W1. 

P*m* caim 434 Mtttetewdlatelj 






CMTO353 


Design in 1986 is a t A-- 

very healthy industry to / r f ■■jF' 

be in. ft is rapidly growing, : f.f 1 

spearheading British talent and fjr ■ / -p 
setting new standards of excellence v. • - • 

in many fields from product to interior and contract design. Oiir 
client, leaders in the field are ready to recruit experienced 
secretaries with the necessary attributes to become part ot their 
exciting team. 

Elizabeth Hunt 

— (teauitment Oonsuitonfe — r 

WEST END • CITY • COVENT GARDEN 


BENEFITS • 

, & PHILOSOPHY 

This cranpany wifliecognise your 
potential and will encourage you 
to work Vet? much on your own - 
initiative and strive for new goals. 
-Their standards are high and so are 
the -rewards. The. -working- 
environment Is considefacl to be 
very , important ,Trahttng -and ; 
personal devetpp«rient . activities, 
.far. alt staff are very' much 
encouraged.' You'H enjoy regular 
'social events,. - an excenent 
subsidised 1 lunch arid' superb 
discounts at the local health dub. 
They are award: winners and 
leaders m the fridtijiry- wfifi a 
reputation second to none. 

• 07teffi<k*tiBn(««33l ... „ 

• VfestB»dOaG35S - 

. EHzobeth Hunt ^ 


TOP TEMPORARIES 

Spriog has anived - and i he- dc mand for 
icmporarics with good sccnetariaf/word proccssit^ 
skills is on ai Hodge Recruitment. 

With Advertising. PR, Publish rng and Fashion 
companies, we offer a wide choice of bookings 
throughout the London area. 

For an honest 'appraisal of what we can offer you, 
please telephone: 

* - - - — 

JUG ntmon 

•. or .. . , U 

Lucy Arnold 

• 629 8863 

====HODG 

SSSSRECRUrrMENT 



...l- -H. 


•••■' TELEVISION - • - 
■ •- ■' €9,000; 

Probably one of the nicest ^Exeah 
fives in Television needs a secretary, 
with a sense of humow to mateh hlst 
You wiB also need good shorthand/ 
typing, great org ani s a tional skis 
plus a common sense approach and 
basic knowledge of figrae work. 
The aspect is intemationaJ. the pace 
is even, frw atmosphere is retoted 
and taan spfeaed, the outlook is ex- 
effing. Age 21+. ' . . 

.. 01-499 6566 

: ■ .V ;Z\i «M9»:«89».. • 


'&UJUVOUUL 


PUT ALL YOUR EGGS 
IN OUR BASKET! 

And latch a Happy Easter. We urgently need you top 
secretarial sMBs now witti or without WP ana wiB ensure 
you lave work you wrfl enjoy with appreciative peopte. Top 
top rates paid in tin currant week. Welcome! 


PI-5898807 



BEaUmmgflMSUHWns a Bnmpte Ana*. fa g baM te SW3 



Run The Office 


£ 10,000 

Bare opp«rtunJty for e hteh-achtwr to «n all the way tothe 

top* n this exeitinR Ci»y-based mmpanv.- 

^ Director you w)U take fnmt4)ne 
n^onrtbUfty'Sir ofBwadmtn mallet*, whilst rraining for a 

. “SWr.as.afluaJiftfHdMlet * 

Skills 8(100. Ape aj+. td UI-4UO- 
R-amilimeoi Cnrnultants mmommmmm 


government affairs 

£10,000 

A prestigious government affairs and pariiamov- 
30 experienced and 
1 nistrator/PA for their SW1 of- 
need good shorthand and 
wp^rHs. wtih a fl«obte and professional 

^ ih * & imeresting 
' fS SwT,.v’ offering much .involvement 
■for further details. contact Melanie 1 aing. 

^MTTMReeCom’ ’ 

: r. 

CONFERENCE CALI. 
c.E11,00 + MS 





S88 3$3$ 

Gone Corkill 

18 ^Idoe S treet EC2 


AUDIO SECRETARY 

With experience and initiauve for 
MS £ L UJ w fayfiir Estate Agents. 

tel^Top b ^ 0perateWp ^ 

01-491 3154 


v 

t 






t 








THE TIMES MONDAY MARCH 24 1986 


25 


LA CREME DE LA CREME 



- ' -*-c 

- U 

• 


GOLDEN EGOS FOR TEMPS 


should be Strata w g 1 

437 4187/89 

Histones 





fef_‘ 


- ".' ■' i? , ' 



Audio / 
Sec / WP 
£10,000 phis Mwlfam 
benefits. 2 Yrs Comm 
Convey exp. Partner 
teveL fctfwhlial 
Hotbom SoSdton. 

Snr Legal Audio Sec 
WP£10JOOO + Vari 
Peris. 3 Yrs Litigation 
Exp men. Ptar Level. 
Sh neM. Lam City 
Solicitors. 

831-7622 

CLAYMAN 

LEGAL 

300 High Holbarn 



CHRISTINE WATSON LTD. 



OIL 

£9,250+ 

SutaB MturfHr ofl ce urgent- 
ly nMd a man wen 
g iwnud PA/ne wim good 
Mm. rariy b mad Wang 
WP (win X train). YW win 
— — - a— m« wm 

woridwta* Ham. 

PERSONNEL 
£6,500+ FREE 
TRAVEL 

Malar CW traBTOBofo 
aacr/PA 18+ wholi 


wM II 




SALES 
c£S,500 

K jm an bright. awBcbad 
on wtih 

awv tnm the 
of this M ce mans yoo ur- 
ga u dy la aaaM him and hh 
*— You should (me good 
skies and be good ol 
organMne 

01-935 8235 . 


TRAVEL 

£8,500 

With tout ability to 
deal with people at all 
levels and yoor enthasi- 

parr) tO mrrang m ImWu 
eons etc, a young see 
with SHT/ Audio/ WP 
Bkfflg «Q1 enjoy com- 
pkta co. inv ol vem ent 
when waddng with the 
Director^ Sec of this 
reput able travel co. 

BOND ST BUREAU 

22 Sooth Mate St, W1 
- (Bee Cona) 

09 302 / 629 5580 




wMi modem commareW Im- 
age soak Sec/PA with 
good side, for Mr nmty 
appointed Obaetor of Ad- 
mWs h atd a Age 28+. 
no t ponoftta posOon. & 

euAOQ. 

Promotions Co. fci Comm 
Garden raqufce , Senior 
SH/Sec vttti gas. aMRafor 
iMr MD. e. £WJ500 l 

Tm fcte gtfa jW or Trick* on 

lor derate on those and oth- 
er pvmanent and tamparary 


TOP 

ADVERTISING 

SECRETARIES 

For W1 agen d a s. 100/60. 
25dh.topaxperiance,excM- 
tont salary neg. 

CM Kenie . 
01-489 4582 
That Agency 
48 ADemade Street. 

- ' London, W1. 

- - ptec Cora) 


S' STAR HOTEL 

5 STAR JOB 

Du yoo *ec youfseff** *a cC 
Mm agd Qcniblc a co many 
<a die d a m o TOM s a nv aa d- 
rnqx oTaa imenaatkwd 3 uar 
bolcL MMtai for the Corpo- 
rate riaaan Pira n o r . This 
rate ha a An aaa coma true 
if yarn ham (he actu aria l 
sfcflk dm prestsiOM hold to- 
qainL So if joa can work 
MfermaROprayaw 
day and your baa. call as for 
mote details. Sal £8500. 
Typta* 50+ erptc. SH prof 
bat ttot csscbImL Benefits inc 
etc fixe meals Aje 20+. 

m 

%s® 

WORD PROCESSOR; DlVlSJC^i 


ADMM PA , 

fiM PR 

IIP TO £11,000 

Are yoo a uxrie pereon 
who rase flair for admin 
and ofganaarioa? A dy- 
namic Director of a 
lading Cay PR Consul- 
tancy needs an 
outstanding 

serretary/assmant who 
will help her run the per- 
sonae! and ad mm Mrs live 
operation. She will rely an 
your ability to prioritise 
and to anticipate and 
solve problems before 
they arise. You'll need to 
liaise effectively at all lev- 
els. . Accurate skiRs of 
100/60 age 23-30. 

01-606 1611 

SeniorW 

Secretaries 


£13,000 

This is atottfi and absorbing 
opportune wtti great scope for 
total Mfmrmn Wo a job triad) 
win become a way of Be. 

The brief is to work to tandem 
«nth the Director ot European 
Operations in a nutt-ntiml 
Company which is a wortrLtead- 
er in a fast-gtwmtg, m- 
dtanging fiaftl Vfttity. stamina 
and a nahnl empathy tor pao- 
pto ad lead to an immensely 
dodeoging Boutin SecraM- 
al rale 


STr.E.LA 

BOYD-CARPENTER LTD 


01-629 9323 


SECRETARY 
(GradeateT) 
tCMOO ' 

DNMrt S ac wtary tor 
prrtflrsMnsI • ‘research 
group doso to Pint 
Strew. An Inwest fci eco- 
rracracs and current offs** 
IWTIIW Duties to m- 
dude travel 

■ w a rvyiiient t . oan i stiig 
research start and main- 
taining a emaP ttxsfy. 
State of 100/50 required 
and some WP 
experience. 

CaB Tina Crekar 
930 5733 




PUBLIC RELATIONS 

S(k/ A ssistant (no SH) 

j £8,500 . 

Job) this young fun 
Company. Act as right 
hand Assistant to M.D. 
Lots of chant Kalson 
deaSng with Media. Fast 
typing / 90 short hand. 
4838$7B 

Altar 7pm - 5994377 
DUKE STREET 
PERSONNEL 
63 Duka Streat, 
G rosvenor Square 
London W1 


UNITED NBNCAL AND 
DENTAL SCHOOLS 
GUY'S CAMPUS 

SeerUay-requredtouwtedi- 
tws o< a new paetSancs JmtuL 
We taquira good jn oM r dg t ot 
Engtoh gnmac starttand sad 
tyqmg skSs. Audo/iod pro- 
wny aha an advamage 
though toemop can be gran. Sal- 
ay OR Scale EfijOl to E7J75 
ncfctwm. Job deseripden tern 
lbs. a Shies, Gw's Hast** 
London Bridge. London SEl 9RT. 
Telephone 01-407 7600 edeo- 
son 2093/4) to wtam C-V.'s 
wm names and addresses of 2 
referees should be sol. 


BANK ADMIN SEC 
£9,0004- 3% MTGE 

Ow cSents. a prestigious 
Merchant Bantam do w 
Cannon / Fen St Stna. m«k 
a professional wet educated 
S/H Sec who Is soaking a 
career within banking. A«flh 
admin coniant + providng 
Bn usual secretarial support 
to a busy Martadng Dno- 
tor. Mrs May. Acme . . 

88 daman St EC4. 01 


Ctwttitete 

mvofnag 


MARKETING 
PA/SEC £9,500 

MD ' of iat era ad o n fll 

and 

Coven 

office 
. eSent Haieo& 
and t&ture omwi uevtL 
Farther pstning On WP 
offered. Ase 2S+. DeteOe 
01-408 mb Steve Mffle 
(Rec Cora). 


PA 


PUBUSHING 

Graduate for admioisua- 
tion of prestimous 
DLreaory. West End of- 
fices. Energetic, flexible, 
good communicator with 
excdkni typing drills. 
£9,500. 

Ptrene Patsy Franks , 
Blacksionc Franks, 
491 4924. 


SECRETARY 

RECEPTIONIST 

with initiative • to be 
totally involved run- 

a this friendly 
but growing ad- 
vertising agency. Mid 
20’s to 30T Present- 
able. Salary 

negotiable aae. 

CaS 01-928 8085. 


Advertising 

PA! 


Managtog 

requires 


Director 

stylish 


hardworking sec/pa with 
sense of humour. Good 
SH/typing and education. 
Must have worked 


senior 


level. 


Successful company. W1 
Aged 23-35MI £10.500 


CaB Mrs Byzanbne 
01-222 5091 
NORMA SKEMP 
Panama! Consultants 


t/pop musk: 

CT« 0 OtowiB ugiMrtcM Wl On 
dwwre ociuMvety to mw bet 


c/kaverx wm 

good WWW. Working for a 
youna aoucHar yoo wu earn 
towoivMiMBt ♦ tot, wrraeM eow- 
taci tretotog. IB-23. CjO 
UW 831 7372 Ktotoond Pm 


OIL ORIENTATED? 

We have at present several interesting opportu- 
nities in trading/'shiRjing environments for 
Secretaries wishing to become more involved. Wl 
and SW19 areas. Eudent salaries. For more 
details please contact: Victoria Graham Ltd, 
(Rec Cons) 01-493 3492/4467. 


PERSONNEL ORIENTATED? 


Lively and ambitious secretaries 
aeeded-to progress in Personnel/PR 
and around the City. Excellent salaries and 
benefits. For more details please contact: 
Victoria Graham (Rec Cons). 
01-493 3492/4467 


SCARCH 
FOR SUCCESS 
to £ 10,000 

Fte Orectoi o la pofot- 

•erai E-ecunve Sewch gmv n 


ihe Wesi Ena needs a tram «v 
Mgeni KoeUrv 'Mtn a riMta 
Boproach and ■ sense el hu- 
mour A6 pm ol Bw Busy. 
fneiVSy learn, you artend 
ore^ess m et mg s . te* with 


» mui me general offee 
aOnouraaon «i addition to vour 
ncraunal dunes a you are 


(A tore* and 

i am 


of 

audo and WP 

ue Age 2305 


434 4512 


Crone CorkiU 


I Rageni Sued. London 1 



RECEPTIONIST 
PR COMPANY 
£ 8^>00 

A successful PR com- 
pany with beautiful 
offices to central Lon- 
don needs a first class 
r ec e pt io nist to )otn 
their reception team. 
With two others you 
will greet cJHents. look 
after a Monarch 
switchboard and at- 
tend to other 
reception duties. 

Bernadette 
of Bond St 

Reminmant Con tutu nts 

.watoucnf—iM 
01-B291SM 



PA SEC 


If you have eme P e nl 
ah/aec aUb A a (lair for 
orgutatng. then (Ms pnstt- 
gious Off stockbrokers 
need yowl Financial back- 
ground ideal. Fabulous 
OpportrralW 

01-828 2727 
Uptown Personnel 


SUPER SECRETARIES 


f i. 

ft-. s^tr*m%Tsn 


CdfiDUnEHOQ 

EXHmmON JDRGAMSER £7^500 

Assisting the MD of this we* known firm of confer- 
ence and exNbition wyonsare you w* no* only 
arrange but attend the vanue*. Thera s kite or efienf 
contact, »o o livly pareonoftty » es s ential with your 
80/50 & WP ska*. 

CONFERENCE ADMIN/SEC c£7,00Q 

There is never a «U aonwrt ot this ntwnationoi 
West find framing organisation. They need a bright 
coRege leaver with cm outgoing p«rsonaSty toMs*r 
with conf e rence or flooding. They offer cxcefiant 
training & promotion prospects + the aimi to get 
out of the office. SH pnrf. typing 45 wpm+. - 




ybn muplwi: 01*499 8070 
46 0W Bond Street London WL1. 
cnioune mu sECBETMuu. mammam 



: _. ---V" 


, i«« 

.. _ '*?* 


■noamnamiAn«wBto 
lor agwrtwpeiwnr Www »*r 
■ooMuy. smart nwnkr and 
good (BidM Mm coaM wcure 
■autNsBMaUf gasum work- 
M wall dsstoon* «*tw B» 
bteoc awtnMk ure bjw 
. gtoos Wl nrtx>my Co, And 
■ran weretorwi nwvort wa 

wW hr vumng preoaWM we 

22 * cv.ooa 

dcuodoa 

FattifaU 



: ’ ’ i 3“ 


M iaw *nom m -nsto 

M wrt for two S«Dcr Orrac- 


Tne RBptuafo H om roar 

—ton e and eomrewia: 

HM mum. M yow W M tu 

— » Oenk 

90- AO 
— oak 
MortoMe 

^ ■ msn. * 

p.ma C*U HAZEL SMOKlXB 

aBAraam- PPtsofgjg - 

now for an cartv ew**wi 
A29 7838. 



PA - W 

atoormaad. gat accuraw tratog 
aral moor fo «wmj» 
m Curvgean meal* 
too anar uw arwawrl ***?.*» 


;\V4- m 


-Mi. Iwi* and awwL wmiug 
ant busy tnftri reatna. «- 
Senw "gw togji; 
mnn «WH re uxnaa aW to 
n«i ooswaav CMT f* r , irr . 
Ewetoni aarkaaf ««*» 
CaB HA2£L SMOKLtfl U 
MWCTTPEHS07040. «» 
7838 for an rartv 


"«w' i^w tiV re r^ wwera igw 
aeratottowaon. awtoyto 
too. pawn* -fopta a ana turo 
uwL to Min recrudinaw w» 

vtounev. Trjufwno «• 
prammn offrred Ut amt. 
Good arum *. huwmjpyig 
osap wrai. yoa^sg**^. 3Z 

□mfnulua £7.000- CT.OOO 

A CP iBre Conor Wf 2?” 

tammBaa an 638 OtBO 


O P POKTU Hmr for 


SdmuMtntiaa. MBriJOJ* to- 
ns. ‘2222J52* 
wan. «o mao nrcrtfnnen* «W- 
Mltw O' TtUtfmO maa 
B W MB ca eerrmi » 

Cooes Q-B tog. S H n fofi^ btf tryr 
MMHI. good naa c WiBP^and 
un s witwn C7.030-CVOOO 
nmmninrnuM Vjmmjua 
ACpm rc cay W watawtn- 
fornwaon on 638 0600 mn. 


CtO.000 reward for an 

ai^PAutn Wrrirt toWg 

SS,-SSKSf2^|~ 

akin* w w “ > w e«w»W 

WMWI h**k OP ISSSS; 


01 -*y» 
Prranow] 


/ 




0 . 7 — m oat a and ?»ap_ tog» 

£7600 AA rw vatw «— OrtM 

IV UK a WK»« vomwr 7« » 

tofterr m rnrrr W*- 
derdn. V H — P ?" *** .. *^ 
munoandan— WIW*” 
HV 1 vnouto Mfo M ggra r 'aware 
%ou new 
atELced an 01^39 
FadhMid - 


wmm f inmSt/M *6 

«» mirtinng miiww »y» 
aula its *oOa'rtn»’**w» 

tod. PnatnJun*. JdtoFom. 

SH no* 

Mssn on *M *2” 

Tam SW AST?- Oll» * IK 

Cx». 



, HW 

London coOrgs- Efltwolnd 


Sorer Ut or 2nd j ob cffrrtne 
rtcctUM u n wre. to* .* 


£7.000. PtKMW Ol B OT 98B t 

Ann wsrmmoo See Cattma . 


MO %mt -nars.exc snena Pre*; 
tMB WMt End OoreuataoMnwd 
2 »+ 2 nd jonber S*c whoenww 


optMM. C. £8.000. Covad 
<£££ Burtm. 110 Fleet SU 
ECA. 363 7696. 


FIAT SPW1 TOP Estate Agent! 
need toMlMrawragm- 
uneo lAudio or S/H iSMootp 
£8.300 la sin to Fiats Dept- 
SSmd to omartod eWN 
.. mm Qnefll Garden Buna. 

' HO FleM SL. EEA 353 7696. 


SWOS WIM in advattstee. 
ML to— dotsn. suhUtotog 

& ffifm tor SunUr tee* lo bs trn- 

M tovahed end Muni the 
w— . S/h. aratog. iwro 

IC&800. Jaygar oavera aSMeae 

SlE. 01-730 ««a 


fotuc RfUTHM £8LOOD to 
00.000 Pres* HO** wr- 
«g mro a ue PR Conmnncy 
ISs temiung 2 nd footor and 
more eenfor PA Secs_Cov-«n 
Carden Bureau, t to Fleet St_ 
£CA 3E3 7696. 


for swung PA eec. 8h «M« ™- 
Graat ecooe for pramoUon. Ur- 
sew r&soo ♦ tag bows. 
re»e 01-688 9861 Ann War- 
ruwtoa Sec Chraere. 


IW _ „ „ . staooo 

menUir Paid —M direr- 

SrWtaxurtoa. 8 W 3 OCROfo. 

EXreOeM pertn- Sen— jf m* 


Saw So) Ltd. 01-730 8148. 


1 1 w dh 

good oramo for 

So) LKL 01 730 Bl«8 


SS.'SuS %mT£&£3 , nZ 

mewwh “8 *22 
SS^ Sortd8»yyj« rt^ y 

S^SSr-eErte““2St 


MUM - 

"JSdjMOA Duvctnrof 

for b itracraUf PA “»■««**• 

AH MCWOV! A««W * «■ 

B me Btoiuy to 

ntpewmw* "I 1 
mum wfc -^? r 

mmt 11 lanr CraunwaHe Re- 

BcatKbainD Pt»*- Londoo 

SV3- 


' DIRECTOR'S 
SEC/PA 
£10,000+- 
. MORTGAGE . 
The Director of Capinriteteto 
of ttos mstignos City Bank is 
sedu ng an etp t ne o ca d Sc cr» 
tary, wdi good stortond/wp. 
free tomes. 24 days tos. 
mortgage sutndy + pnoml 
loais form part to tte pactep 
of unfits, tbs 9-5! life 
Hayes, Acme Appts. 158 Sto- 
ops Gate EC2. 01-247 9701 


UMl iHtolto Large fit gidty 
n Hl ehora wdh fovety modern 
odlcto requfoe rtn»e Mcrcrarwc 
for HdsaHon. progeny. 
ny and noanng Papuans aa al 
Patna leveL. Pain tndude 
BUPA. Ufo —uranrr .. pension. 


dacounL H you are 22+ with 
-legal i npis lanc o ahnewlth 
confidence Mr Thompson <>i- 
828 5792 Ktagbad Legal r 


+ exe 

bencma. Join one or dia worlds 
Inw-iiMi succewM aoo dt- 
verPfied cosnoanica a* ihetr W6 
Headquarters. As PA to their 
V— PresadenL r es p ond Me for 
toe Manccung or Uieir Medical 
SyBna Dlvtooo. yoo wni cer- 
tainly be Kept on yoor tom m 
iMoafly. 


SupeTO oTOceo. sports co m plex 
ana 5 weeks hoo. 100/00 + 
Wang no. age. 23-56 ycarv 
Mephone 01-999 8070. Caro- 
line Ktog Appts. 

mKfl a lev el EngMh sh PA.* 
NW6 £9000. Language Start 


itocC S OOOwtoi 
Juiy review. Prostlgsaas ortvafe 
Invesmient hank with snpoto 
offices In Beslietey Square re- 
.qidrea a part-ttme recepoo ffi sr 
to he involved to a variety or 


swMHboard. oecOog chons and 
oruanhung poaraoma. Some 
experience and a IHodV pro- 
fessional approach essentia l 
Mornings onto. <U 45«.4St2 
Otmr Conan Roc nm n u sd 


AOMM ASW TO «MM0 ♦ nto 

review & exc promotional pros- 
pects. Join on* tofiuentiai 
magaztor where you wni carry 
out a vaned aundoonentated 
function. w«h office manageri- 
al resnonstoUtty. you win have 
lots ol op p.id ra n toy contrt- 
■ button wtthtn a sti ni id attn g 
eavtroomeal. Typing at 35 
worn reo'd. SH an asset. 
Synergy, the rec ruuihwit con- 
Buttaoar. 01-637 gsSB/V. 


This targe City Finance housa 
are ollertng torW career pros, 
pacts for a Uvety. cortWad 
young secretary wtm 46 wpsn 
typing. You wta work for their 
Cmef Executive as his second 
secretary and deal wnn every- 
thing from me typing to 
researching chant infarraaBea. 
FuB WP training pwg s «C- 
benefits. Teh 999 0070 Carey 
Une King Appauumems. 


c£ 11.000 plus per *4- tots ex- 


based la the CBy need a poised 
and wen groomed secretary to 
asstM toed- young dytwwdc 
M3. You wut be r esp o nam fo 
for fcseuiog the office running 
smoothly, anaapng travel do- 
owfcsand aalflM with clients 
worldwide. 6Uts 100/60 and 
WP experience, tetegnane Ot 
899 807a Candtoo Mag Appts. 


PA/SCC £9600 + P«*A The 
Management Constmncy.dM- 
Mon ot this prestigious 
Inter n ational City based turn 
seeks a wen educated person to 
provide secretarial tS/H> and 
administrative wonon to two 
Partners: TWs pdsMon requires 
a sod starter wm excMIOd 
nraftfttssnanji an d rommunten- 
SSpchb. OB uaratoe 
KfMmrdl 905 6X98 

KuKhiaad Peri Ca n a 

ne/pi nutod Mnr hotel. 

R^SSL VIP AW Ol- 
930 0691 


AdOSO sec M O W - Sougnr by 

smaO agrtcultinW assoctotloo In 

Kntehtsbridgc. Hap py, eas y go- 

fog cam urnnd toaUng after 

members qu otes. prodtWfl 
quart ertey mBgaitne. co-ordi- 
natmg comndxtre meetings eto. 
You should have a bubbly, oul- 
appraacn. - Good typing 
Ssmniai. Pfooae irtephooe Ol 
490 5787 Cordon 

ConsuOancY 


MM CTB SI PA 89600 - He- 
- a tided by malor CKy-based 
service rompanv. Wottong with 
, twocbanamoddrclora you win 
be Ibi-oii-ed in all bmects of 
company pUniUdd. admin and 
m ui toe menl. Varied torareslUW 
nde. Exteilem benefits. . You 
fMUM nave pood typug. some 
shertnaM. Age 23». Phase 
telephone Ol 403 57B7 Gordon 
. yarn Oon wianc y. 

oanrenFDRCXSSW- presn- 
poux Mayfwr car showroom 
seeks admin seemaxy to tsar- 
dmMr sales and handle went 
Haim, nip **i «o«i- 
Ltsety frtendly em+ronmen. 
You sbooU b* totoBL wemoa- 
cal and memm. Com 
typing . WP exp esscMkd. Age 
ipas. pgaase ruep n e u e Ot 993 
6787 Oorfloo Yales 
OlIQIlUMy. 


Too marketing coRfoany to- 
■vohiqd to worldwide ■ t is rirnn ic 
rnatr c sj ea r ch seeks secretary 
to Sam Dtrecsor. Varied, toisr- 
eMtog rale lor a franMtoct- sec. 
He is rarty 401. ftdl of fun and 

easy to wcrk-wBh. You should 
have good sxmr (90/609 and 
pood preseotadoo. Age 2TW3. 
Pterae lei Ol 909 1232 The 
Work too. 


Beany toppar- axoang sa- utny 
a toety sec wssdtag to bceek 
Hilo Big-name PR. The compa- 
ny H dynamic. IMWIM end 
always looking »o oraraore from 
within, g you have energ y, tow 
of motivation and *ra« totnow 
mere, ga in touch- Oood typing 
A WP exp e sse n tial, shorthand 
usefoL Pleear M Ol 409 1232 
The Work Shop. 


Sought by ■ 


rdun/at edttort etc on dm 
production Of cookery and ga^ 
dentno books. Hectic Mormst 
(tlendiy envimament. 



tiOO/emi 

MMktfot aM * Phase Mi Ol 
409 1232 The work Shop. 


1 S/H 

£7 .coo + perks. A e /leaver or 
2 nd Jobber is rsqutrad by Cwy 
company waft tardy offices 
and a yotag and very rnendtv 
atmospher e. O .levds and a 

auty ess. in renam^MMata 
trauangmcl wp end p rurpecls. 
Caa Lorraine i ft nantawn 406 
6148 K to gda nd Peis Gobs. 


/Administrator required for UK 
National Company bated in tob- 

. den you wni be required to 
cower for holidays to branches 
through toe UK. ReshteotiM 
training course . Ail hotel and 
travel expencea paid, salary 
£8.500 good toorthand re- 
quired age 20 * ■ Alexis 
Personnel 01-439-2777 

Ftonwr 27-38 UrgaaUy re- 
quired for young Mayfair 
purveyors. Must rave 
Wordcrafl and Wordstar expe- 
rience and be used lo working 
under pressure for two part- 
ners. Benson ticket loan 
scheme. Salary C £9-500 lo 
rtotd aopHeam. Ring laa 
Stewart on 01-628 8001 

TRAV6L SEC - gnu win be hrtng 
and working in Unzarole as- 
sisting the sales manager or a 
friendly and sucre a fid trave l 
company This to m rsttog 
rote for syouwgsec t82-26i.au- 
cut in Spanhh with ac cursse 
sktos (80/951 contact Tracy 
Forties 01-631 1841 price 

Jamtson A Partners nee rat*. 


-seeking a secretary far produc- 
Bendhr. of Fine Art Puttoshera. 
Good sec (SUM and abitlly to 
work on own uuntatve at. £na 
opeemmuy for AXevel/ 
Graaaafo c/Leaver considered. 
Merrow Eton Agy Ot-636 
1487. 


speaking ■ 
asp so Sara Director of totema- 
ttonai company wfm 
responsmaity for after sales «f- 
uce Old batson wtm German 
stser Co. Good SKUs. IBngBsb 
SH) salary nag R Jflauiiiriiiisd 
Language Pm oo reJ 01-493 
6*4 6. 

juoatm sic £«» -too snort 

hand requnvd. as sec wKMn me 
■aartMUng upecatlan of Bub 
prestigious American co mpany. 
Some sec eap p r efer r e d. But not 
essential. '. Accurate typing 
tSOwpml required. Aw 184- 
Pteare wi Ol 909 1232 The 

.-Work Shop 

PA WITH own* retoouPtoiDmtok 

mar ton research - Wl. M ust 
have uuuotne and aotatv » 
work wttnout supervUton. Ex- 

pertence Of book keeping and 

word procemtoB q g ""* 1 Jgf 
rb swnnand or audio. £9.500. 
ot 37T 8600 WordPtas. The 
WPStodalws 


MayfairreUflsrseebkwea.spo- 
Un and nMDR« ytmog 6ato 
Afoistam. to work as part of 
small ream Age 194.. Salary 
£7000. For further d etail* 
please telephone ot 993 6787 
Gordon Yales Conwaamy. 


with confueottai mantra. To 
£9.000 + excaOrat benefits 
City Centre Dto Agy. 788 
MM. . 

M/TMDOn JUST r £7JOO 
Buccemfid imermnuiigi cay Go 
* arete ifoantf career wundwi per- 


adraqiaradA 


potential. S 
ability to . work dn own tnttto- 
ttve. can Nicky 63o 7066 
■CCRMTkCDfT COMBOLnUfr 
Mr languape to o rl aiBt aoency. 
Sates/Recrumnem experience 
preferred, lan g n ba ai usaful a 
aome typing. EJeoeBenr package. 
LtafcLqia n apa In* 8*6 9743 


■ST 


2849) 


friendly dept of a large muOto» 
Bona! company- Dam wTOi «fl 
recofda. office adrmo and chad 


and typing 80 wpm. c taa» 
R J Re cru touesa 01-493 6446 
TOP TY P I S T S 66 wppi ■» UrOOU- 

mrai^MpaitoraaSiTwanf 
ran tune bom 2JO pm-lOJO 
pro .'2-30 pm <S 00 pm. Odd 


Agency 01-890 0074 


uan of raentoo kgi portham 
for — cre tPrtas with Bdn 1 yr 
exy. y yo u want to ewn re to a 
Patter job gmartre are £8-000- 
£10.000 Cad Mr Tbompoan 01- 
898 0792 tantotobd Legal 


1 C lu d r m n Qty A m e rt c an 

Bank. Mud have enc S/H typ- 
ing sums, prefootty WP. age 
18 - 20- t&SOOi 430 1651/ 



.1 

r A » for 

18 

C6.SQO- C*y Cadre Eng Aw. 
788 936*. 


, ... , 7.000 Uvety WI 

Co seek bubbly typist Training 
onto thefr **a system. kHn M 
wpm. Rare A-enctongopoorB^ 
■toy. CU1 Mr Thompson 01 -828 
5792 

SCO with stow to for m atkeu ng 
dew or wi cetane arm. Uahe 
with designers, interest to 
' hton/kamtog. To £8000 
Woodhouse Rec Cone 01- 


vmut WOUOAY Orm m Mayfair 
requires travel awlsmt woh 
typing sMBs. nwesai i g work. 
Salary cxr^oo. p/t obo 
avail. Phone John .Ewtogton 
01-629 1476. 

ESTATE A8IWT8. Sotoh Keo- 


to work to busy office. Salary 
£*-«». Contact Mb J nhnswn 
Ol 684 4231. 

PART THE SECRETARY /PA 
with theatre orgamsatton to Be- 
' — - Park. Shorthand 


487 8432. 


required with German or Sran- 
Wi or French. Mar row Crop 
Agy (The Lang uag e Spo rt a H S TN 
01436 1487. 


PA/ SECRETARY 
for West End ZXrecmr Salary 
ts £1 2^)00 Good audio toins re- 
quired phooe for ftrtl details 
Alexis Penoonei 01^394777. 


Permanent A temporary past- 
Dam. amsa Sbedtoff Rec. 
C ons. Ol 7 34 oe« 

AOVamStMO /PR Sec Top agen- 
cy wc2.(SH SO wpa) Busy but 

fun. To casoo 20*. Grade Om 
Roc O0n» 01-734 6266 

6GHUR CPK SECRETARY H 


Financial DBecfor of 
renound co. Good work record 
and sec suits eat. Age 28-37 
Cl iJOOt- S was hois, free bbv- 
Aqy nrne 
01-636 

1487. 

RRADtMTE SEC tt«AO» tota- 
nalional bank Wl seek 
executive sec. speeds lOO.fiO 
wpm with knowledge of WP. 
S enior exmdtvr.-dirartdr level 
pafBon. generous annual Ito- 
BUS. age 249. 01-491 3241 
OKA wp rk Cans. 

F1AL COMTROL eCSOOO - Look 
Mia toe office, and organise 
your ramf typtsL as secretary 
ig mu small. daHgMfUl Wt-up. 
Basad to a uvety Mayfoir Mews 

house, you wm enfoy a young 
lively yet professional tin lion- 
mem III me world ot pr operty 
consultancy "“O' 

shorthand /good tyntog tw*B- 
ed. Age 23e. Please tel 01 409 
1232 The work Shop 

81 THE FAMLY *8000 • SmaO. 
eery frienay fondly co nr Mar- 
Mc Arch seek 

i e t u poop /secretary to handle 
Incoming calls and work for 
MD * t other Direct or. Lovely.,. 
supportive eniUotaneni- where p 
jtucrcsi and invotvmtm a* en- 
co id a ged Good skiBi (90-S0t 
resumed- Some sec to pre- 
ferred. PM* >rt 01 409 1232 
Tlw work Shoo. 


DON’T VISIT ^ 
A BRANCH IN 
THE HIGH ST. 
COME TO 
JOAN TREE 
IN THE GARDEN 

Ai our new office in 
Covent Garden we 
have some of the best 
and most rewarding 
temporary assignments 
for skilled secretaries. 
-Call us pow for instant 
bookings in the Arts, 
Publishing and PR. If 
you think temporary 
work should be as inter- 
esting as a permanent 
job rail us now. 

jOAKUP R££ 


■Mr* 01-379 3S5 arftmk 


TRAINER-ISM 

5520 

£10.500 

The trainee opportunity yoo 
have been waiting fori This 
riiy based company is look- 
mg for someone with masses 
of patience: a bright happy 
personality and aa excellent 
knowledge of 5520 coupled 
with experience of raining. 

Telephone S77 8600 


LLIord Flu sh- 

The WP Consonants] H 


EVENMfi RECEMWBTS 
REQUIRED 

Mtracbve. tncgo iK, avriy. at* 
drastad. ifokwotic. good nanaer. 
naaaUfBpaaatjabrthiRRl- 

g aevne ol tt2an pa. Age 20- 
Previous a ip ewnCB ml 
—A Heat antt noft Wl 
C.V^a soy) a aamaried by a re- 
cent photograph to: 

Reply to BOX C17. 


A GERMAN 
GENHJSS 
cX14^kOO 

A discreet and efficient 
lop calibre PA with flu- 
ent German is rapiircd 
by a private individual 
to work from a luxuri- 
ous W10 office. 

His main interest is col- 
lecting works of an and 
much of your time will 
be spent liaising with 
private dealers and gal- 
leries. You will also be 
required to organise var- 
ious social functions, 
arrange extensive travel 
plans and manage sever- 
al private residences. A 
junior secretary is pro- 
vided as your assistant. 
Skills 90/60 + WP 
Age 30 - 45 

West End Office 

629 9686 

AB^LMgBBSR 


FRANKFURT 

c£\ 2,000 

This Irish company, 
specialsing in table- 
ware, needs a mature 
PA preferably around 
30 years ot age, to work 
for the Managing Direc- 
tor of their omce dose 
to Frankfurt The office 
language is Engksh but 
very good German is es- 
sential, as is organising 
ability and admin experi- 
ence. Secretarial skits 
are required but this fe 
mainly a PA job. A clean 
(hiving licence is also 
needed. Start as soon 

& 174fe^BMd SL Wl 



NAME YOUR OWN 
SALARY^. 

Sent* PA/Scc 28 35. As PA to 
Senior Eieatta ol promrart 
merchant bant. City, you an rang 
yaw awn enata story phs 
benefits d you Iwe superb tot and 
tying speeds. sattoMevd men- 
enceln tnnieng w finance, used to 
a hqh lent a) le sn cne M fy. good 
eduannR background wd soefifl- 
h confident. 

Phone 01-734 3768 
or 437 8476 

133 Oxford Street 
Rec Cons 

MILLER 

MCNISH 


PA 

TRANSLATION 

COMPANY 

If yoo have had good gecre- 
Carla) experience, want a 
position wtm respottsibtny 
and Ukc the prospects of 
working with languages In a 
very Infsmanona! company, 
men call us. Good ratary and 
perks etc. hut we are looking 
for someone medal. 

Ring ns. We are Tek 
Translation on 
01-749 3211 


DESIGN 
TO £9,000 

i (imi opportunity for 
hnghi. positive semtary 
to iu>n expanding Design 

! to. afoutmg Marketing 
Manager with vviout 
proRXU (exhibit wit*, sem- 
inars etc. x Lovely creative 
offices. S/h. typing &. WP 
exp i 


Most of you have been 
aware over the last few 
years that the really un- 
usual jobs have started 
here. 

Can wc tantilise you 
now with the thought 
of a brand new Tempo- 
rary Team with equally 
exciting one-off 

opportunities? 

Wc (dan to be small 
and secure and arc 
ready to kick-off imme- 
diately - arc you? 

629 9323 

SHEILA CHILDS 

KI-CRLinMKX T 

—— Ol 385 9072= 



CHARITY 

Nr ST JANES’S MRK 

jr you are able to give total 
committment lo your job. 
are responsible, outgoing 
and wcll-cducaicd. then 
your good typing (no short- 
hand or audio) will help 
you secure a fascinating 
position running courses 
and conferences in the VIP 
world. Age 20-45. c£8.00Q. 

Bernadette 
of Bond St. 

ReCTuiimaw Ccnaotum 
a>u.j-to*BMftM**d 



FERSOMEL 
OFRCBt 
E 15 S 80 

Leading profts- 
sxmt cowpony Kelts 
experienced Pe no onei Of- 
’ foxr to handle 
| recruitment and adminis- 
i ration for oc u e tari al and 
I delicti naff Having se- 
iccicd yoor own awtoaM. 

| yoo wiB act up new sy*- 
i rents, develop inmhig 
programmes and update 
ibe records (d COrttputoT- 
iied). Attractive offices 
and cxceUeai benefits. 

CU1 Rebcccn Headley 
on 283 1685 

iMMomRMiinaemM* 


UNIVERSITY APPOINTMENTS 


UNIVERSITY OF 
OXFORD 
University 

Lectureship in 

Neuroscience 
In association with 
Sox&erviDe and BaOiol 
CoQeges 

AtoBrflnnr a* mvM for 
(be above port taxabkt fraai 1 
January 1987. CandM a fri 
should haw canfed tart re- 
aesreh In fMirtaoaoioa. wUn 
campa la nc e to i wuroartmca 
and ocB rtrnctora. Stipend ae- 
cordtaa ta aae ob Ow seate 
£8020 la SZ6.760- The wc- 
cbm can dk ltar may be 
qflarod a tutonal MlawtolpM 



wxn a fan Ort w ea Bt vitae, 
summary of resrareft truer 
erts and ms norms of three 
referee* should be sou by 30 


UNIVERSITY OF 
ABERDEEN 
Gilroy Scholarships 
Hebrew and Semitic 
Languages 



Brtw «f Ahorteen for an 
I period or 2 years. wUh 



JESUS COLLEGE 
AND TRINITY 
COLLEGE. 
CAMBRIDGE 
FELLOWSHIP AND 
COLLEGE 
LECTURESHIP IN 
HISTORY 


ty rtDi 

TrtnUy Otoege from I Octo- 
ber 1986 to European History 
since 1760. The aeootnuaenl 
wk be for three years, wun 
Oto pcmtbUny of respprtM- 
rorM for tw* yean. The 


sxpeciea » leaai up to twetve 
mm a week rtortng Fun 
Term. The salary for the port 
win be as a iBVtaMr potnl on 
tbs scale CTJBSO to EIMIS 
on age and 



UNIVERSITY OF 
NOTTINGHAM 
LECTURER IN THE 
DEPARTMENT OF 
ELECTRICAL AND 
ELECTRONIC 
ENGINEERING 


_a totaled for a 

Bcturertdp Creaied asa ras ul l 
of (he UGC EngtoMOBO and 
Technology . Programme, 
candwaa shouH. have 4 
good honours atgw and 
knowledge of ul o ifum i r «n d 
nmtig. Experience to arras 
such aa software. dHtol syt 
Inns. roboucs.. control, 
cuiimai nlnliran or senucon- 
ductors would bs aa 
advantage. 

Salary wiiMn the range 
£8.020 - £18.700 per aaman. 
Further ptremfon and appW- 
eaUons lomt avallahfo from 
me Staff Awatotmmo Offi- 
cer. umvereuy of 
NoB I nBftan i . Um versx y Parte. 
NotttophBin NC7 2RD rrturn- 
aMr no later man 30 April 
1986. Rtf NO 1029. 


THE UNIVERSITY 
OF MANCHESTER 


National Weundnrter Bank 
Chair to Bmtnert Finance . 

The University Invites appH- 
for the NrtMnal 
WoOdowr Bank Cntar to 
B udn c a s Finance m the Facto- 
ty of BuBneae AtoahdatraOan 
(MlBCMrtCT Bmtness SCMoatl. 
TMs Chair has raeenrty be- 
come vacant foDowfog me 
a utoJ O H On e ca of Pr o f oaor R-C. 
StopMon to .a feaowa n i p al 
CMirtMn codgge- Canmdga. 


meal and financial markets. 
The Stood aiao baa one ether 
chair to hntln c fo team of 
seeee nl oemoted try P i uftton r 
CM. Lawson, and » about ta 
a d ve ma e the vacant chair to 
management acootBdftra- Tha 
salary win be m the normal 
profossortal range wtlli u&s. 
s—ranauaUon benefits. Da- 
ouiiabie 

oniaMno 

the names Of five referees 
should reach The We gU t ra r . 
The Urtveesay. Manchester 
MIS 9PL lirom whom further 


before 2101 April 1986. 


UMI CBTY OF MWOtSIEB 
■MK36TB 0J9CSS SCMXH 
CHW H UMlfflWL 
MXOMTKMO 

KUmtH UlUi/f UQfT 

Hi Utatosfy kadet «pfoafons 
hr fe» wort Char * Ungni 
AzraWv M> Rwctf Mrape- 
■ad h «8 Facaty ol ha w 
WaHitnihin (Man: M b Bdb- 
amSchooQ. This Chw tes ittuH/ 
beams want tofawg fee jp- 
poafenert ai ftalessai A McCadt to 
3 Ot* a W Unwendr Of £ 4 n- 
dofgh. AppfcMs staff few a 
good Rcocti of Rsevth ri touage- 
tmrt rautag aral a Rtafed 


The satoy t* be fn fee nonsai p»- 
kssortf angc «0t USS. 
mnuratm hereto. DefeU 
ippaeita(fuhMtortirtocapr- 
iag) emfWtag fee mass of tWe 
ofe tees i tofo teach the Ffeflsw. 
The Dnmratf. Maretiesfer. U13 
9PL (feOBi oson homer paftsWB 
ny he attaned) fetore April Stt. 
18B6. 


THE UNIVERSITY 
OF HULL 
DEPARTMENT OF 
LAW 

LECTURESHIPS 

AMrteaUana are bulled to 


from trt Octooor 1966: 

1. LectureaMp - A Perma- 
nent POST and p reference 
win be rtven toeandMrtn 
wan mieresa (n mr «e*fl» 
of bneUecxdai properly 
Law and Companion 
Law. 

2. Two temporary lectwv 
shim - usually for one 
year. Preference win be 
given to candidates wm 
(merest in (be DeM» of: 
Co mm o n Law. Prtie 

Law. European communi- 
ty Law. Jurisprudence. 
Appdcatuns «6 riraieM gttaog full 
details of education, quaimea- 
Uom and e xp erie n ce, togrther 
wnh the names of mree referees. 
ihnM be lodged by 14 April 
1986 with Uie tw r ron nrt Officer. 
UntueraKyOfHutl. Hull HU67RX 
from whom further particulars 
may be obtained, informal enqui- 
ries may ae made of Mr. r. 
Smith. Denartmem of law. Tet 
<04821 497736 until 4 April 
1986. 466738 ihereaffor. Ptaue 
quote ref. T/L. 


UNIVERSITY COLLEGE 
CARDIFF 

OF Hr 

S MO 
STOWES 

research assistant 

AMnoeon are totaled for 
(he port of Research Airtstant 
to work on an &.C.R.C. 
o p on snrsd Proleo on scuffing 
and (he fsftie-e of 
etartohydrodynanuc lutrua- 
Hon The Research Assistant 
wdl be mainly invaded la 
ComputaBonai meets ol toe 
protect and cantOdam should 
have a good Honours 
In Enp to e rr i ng. Phyocs or 
Apgded Mam Salary range 
R . & A. Range m £70S6 ■ 
£8606 per annum. 

The ap p ointment is fora max- 
I mum period of ts mourn 
starting on tat May. t98» or 
as soon as aoswMo thereancr. 
Applications IS raMesi. 10- 
pettier with tne names and 
mM k bb Of two re f eree s , 
should be rorwardsd ta mo 
EsuMtHimcM Officer. U» 
ventty Co l lege. P O Bor 78. 
Cardiff CFl 1 x 1 from whom 
further particulars are avail- 
able. OMHlg date 1 Hh April. 
1986. Ref. 3074. 


UNIVERSITY OF 
NOTTINGHAM 
DEPARTMENT OF 
INDUSTRIAL 
- ECONOMICS. 
ACCOUNTANCY 4 
INSURANCE 
TEMPORARY 
LECTURESHIP IN 
INSURANCE STUDIES 

Applications are Invited for 
the port of te mp or a ry lecturer 
wfth special reference to in- 
surance. tenable UriUaRy for a 
period ol one year. The soc- 
cetoftd ca n d ida te will must 
P ro l es, or Rj_ Carta. Nor. 
wicti Union Professor of 
Insurance Studies in connec- 
tion with the diploma in 
Insuranc e studies and Insur- 
ance management- The 
digoaroa ts a one year f rti nme 
course for managers working 
In Uie Insurance industry and 
ts taught foamy with the cliy 
university busmen school 
which has been successful to 
attracting students rram an 
over the world. Preference 
will be given u c an rtMa tas 
with a professwnal qualifica- 
tion to In s uran ce and . or 
practical experience ta toe in- 
surance industry- The post 



for someone who has recently 
r eared from a senior postman 
m an insurance company or 


Institution 

organisation. The 

will be effectrxe 
from 1st August 1986. Salary 
wsi be wtoim me range of 
28020-06700 per annum. 

Father particulars and appli- 
cation forms available from: 
The Staff Appointments Offi- 
cer. Untaeruty of 
NotUMham. University Park. 
Nottingham NGT 2RD. Oca- 
tog dale 16th April 1986. 
Wt fs c en ce No; 1031 


MPBHAL COLLEGE OF 
SCIENCE AND 
TECHNOLOGY 
DEPARTMBiT OF 
AERONAUTICS 
Research Assistant ia 
CompgtaSoDal 
Aerutyaauflcs 

required from 1 April 1966 to 
work on fog computation Oi 
comprasaSXe Dow past compta 
bodies. 

A good nonous degrae ei Engi- 
u ee rin q. Physics to 
Marnomabca a sso e n s rt and 
some retorant pos^aduaia e«- 
panance wortd bo of 
advantage, tha a ppookn an r a 
tar two years and * sponsored 
by foe Measrry of Oetanoe. 
Starting saury m fog range 
57.055 10 £3.495 PJI. plus 
Cl 337 London APowance de- 
pendng upon ago and 
gukrtrakona. The mkamum saL 
ary Ito an appscant vafo a Pn.D 
* £8020 pj. plus London 
Alowaneo. 

Appkcabons. kichirtng C.V. and 
aamesottworalsraas.toDr. R 
Hner. Dsoanmem of Aeroneu- 
ucs. knpenai CoDage. Pm» 
Consort Rood. London SW7 
2BY. 


UNIVERSITY OF 
BIRMINGHAM 
Department of 
Ancient History and 
Archaeology 

APPHcanons are totaled for a 
past of Temporary Lecturer 
to Creek end Roman History 
for three years from 1st Octo- 
ber 1986 during the parted 
for which a member of staff 
has been gran led leave of 


Salary an the scale £8020 ■ 
£9495. 

Applications <6 c op i e r ) , nam- 
ing three re f erees by 14Ui 
April 1986 to Assistant Rcfos- 

nr (ArtSL University of 
Birmingham. PO. Box 363. 
Birmingham Bi 5 2TT. from 
whom further garnctdars 
may be obtained. 

An Equal Opportunities 
Employer. 


UNIVERSITY 
COLLEGE OF 
LONDON 
Faculiv of Laws 
LECTURESHIPS IN 
LAW 

from October 198(5 

SaUfY range £8020 - L \ 5700 
* £1297 London Altawance 
AppUcauoos. with a CV. and 
names and addresses of two 
referees By 40t April 1986 lo 
Departmental S ecre t ary. Fac 
uhy of laws WC1H OEa 
(ran whom fUrthtr MTUCiF 
tan may be obtained. 
Preference will be fom to 
speculate m toranationai 
Law- Gonmiacul 
Law 'Shtspmg 
Law/BMiraacg uw. 


UNIVERSITY OF GLASGOW 

DEPARTMENT OF ELECTRONICS 
AND ELECTRICAL ENGINEERING 

Ac DVt of Ibe UGC Shift Initiative THREE oca floss are 
available for appointment of 

. LECTURERS - REF. NO. 5t97E 
Particular interens m CONTROL SYSTEMS. VLSI C IRCUI T 
DESIGN. CAD AND DEVICE MODELLING. PATTERN 
RECOGNITION or SIGNALS ANALYSIS wwdd be aa 
advantage but applications arc rawed 6om persons having 
ioioess within the general Electronic E ngine eri ng area. 

In additioo a fourth LECTURESHIP « araittblc dnoo^i Ac 
Government's LT. inihaiive in support of a ««»«*« 

ssS. ” 

Salary win be in the range £8jOQO - £15.700 on. ft* Lectutns* 
wale. »hh piacenmn aococdin* to age. quahScahoaa, and 
experience. 

Further pankahn and dena* of the Departmental Kcmdi 
Pragrammes may be ubiained from: 

The tofeafc Peraonn d Office, 


where 

three 




(8 copies), giving ihe names and addresses of 
should be lodged on or before 26U) April 1986b 

rote a pwra p riB e Ret No. 


U reply p) 


NEWNHAM COLLEGE 
CAMBRIDGE 
Appointneot ef Bursar 
Applications are 
invited from men and 
women for the full- 
time post of Bursar, 
to take office on or 
before 1 October 
1986. 

The Bursar is 
responsfcte for the 
management of the 
College’s property 
and income in 
accordance with the 
directions of the 
College Council The 
person appointed will 
have experience of 
financial planning 
and administration 
and be expected to 
tafce an active 
interest in 

fundraising. 

The College Statutes 
provide that if a 
woman is appointed 
she shall be elected a 
Feflow of tiie College. 
Further particulars 
may be obtained 
from: 

The Princfpal, 
News ham College, 
Cambridge, 

CB3 9DF, 

to whom applications 
with a C.V. and the 
names of three 
referees should be 
sent by 19 April 1986. 


UNIVERSITY OF 
BIRMINGHAM 
THE CHAIR OF HEALTH 
SERVICES MANAGEMENT 
DIRECTORSHIP OF THE 
HEALTH SERVICES 
MANAGEMENT 

DIRECTORSHIP OF THt 
HEALTH SERVICES 

MANAGEMENT CENTRE 

ADOkafctms rt mood tat for Cku 
ana Dratuwta <* ret Cornit » 
can) totKwng tno tpgoriiwt N for 
tonnr [}m 3 ai, Prrttssor Off VW- 

iobs x Mnwraen oswtoanail 

Adnscr to foeWtSTA 

Sam « the prntesurai renge. gu 

sqamattn. 

FiaiMf oxtedn mow nom me 
Vn dtaveftr. Umtftrty d *•- 
mOfen. Ftf Bto 363. e«mnglton 
9t? to wren tapNJtvms fl5 
am. ore «xn W; 

ans) stand ba «rt fe 3to wm 
1396 

ta tool Oopnam 


NEWNHAM 

COLLEGE 

APPOINTMENT 
OF BURSAR 

Applications are 
invited from men and 
women, for the lull- 
time post of Bursar, 
to take office on or 
before 1 October 
1986. 

The Bursar is 
responsible tor the 
management of the 
Ortega's property 
and income in 
accordance with the 
directions of the 
College Council. The 
person appointed 
will have experience 
of financial planning 
and administration 
and be expected to 
take an active 
interest to 

fundraising. 

Tha College Statutes 
provide that If a 
woman is appointed 
she shall be elected 
a Fellow of tiie 
College. 

Further particulars 
may be obtain ed 
from the Pr i nc ipa l, 
Newnham CoSege. 
Cambridge, C83 
9DF, to whom 

applications with a 
C.V. and the names 
of three referees 
should be sent by 
19 April 1986. 


UNIVERSITY OF 
LIVERPOOL 
Director of the English 
Language Unit 

Appurauora are InvtiM for 
UM- coat of Dreclar or the 
newly w aMu litd EngiBh 
Languap* Vi* Mum a# Out. 
xwHy . Ttw Ural will offer 
fPKWnst language round for 
potmuai oimta ■ttxtenb. 

Tha salary win bg tn> lo 
£15.700 orr annim on Baugg 
U of toe Htary xaks lor re. 
wan* And analogue oars. 

Airahcaaora. tograwr wim 
ihr nann of tnrre rtfavag. 
whouio or rccoKgd not Uwr 
u«n 14 Area. igso. by me 
Ramtrar. Tha Uwsgnuy. 
P.O. Box 147. Ltvmool m 
JBt trom whom (inttwr par- 
UetiUrt may St oottfoert. 
Ouofe R*f: RV -709, T 


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THE TIMES MONDAY MARGH 24 19 86 


((HORIZONS^ 



Nine oui of 10 adults listen to the radio 
on average for 20 hours a week. But 
working in radio can cover anything 
from being a sound recordist to Director 
of Programmes. Two of the most sought 
after Sots are those of presenter, and 
producer. 

The BBC has its own established 
entrance route into radio via the BBC 
Trainee Scheme. Acceptance on the two 
year BBC production trainee scheme 
virtually assures a job at the end of iu but 
each September there are six places and 
more than 1,000 applicants. For the 


There is not yet a direct 


route into broadcasting. 


Corinne Julius examines 


the vital prerequisites 


for radio work 


Local Radio Trainee Reporter scheme 
there are 12 places for 3,000 applicants. 


Perhaps from the outside world the 
most glamorous job is that of presenter. 
It is hard work making presentation 
sound easy. A good voice is a prerequi- 
site and a number of actors and actresses 
have become presenters. But it is also 
important to be able to write a good 
script and many presenters have some 
journalistic experience. 

A producer will choose a presenter 
with the right kind of voice for a 
particular programme, for example a 
“sympathetic” voice fora programme on 
divorce and an “authoritative” voice for 
cunent affair s. To many listeners, the 
voice establishes not only the presenter’s 
character, but that of the programme, 
and in local radio, the station. 

Gill Pyrah, presenter of the Pyrah 
Programme on LBG says, “It is impor- 
tant to have a good grounding. You must 
have an inquiring mind, understand the 
news, or your subject, and be able to 
express it well. Chi commercial radio 
particularly this involves doing much of 
your own research and preparation. You 
should be able to correct English on air 



Gill Pyrah: An inquiring mind 
Continuing Education Programmes on 
BBC To her the delight of being a 
producer is that no day is ever the same. 
The producer is responsible for initiat- 


ing ideas, reading round the subject and 
talking to the relevant experts. Once an 


The skill lies in 
identifying a story 


and make sense of ungrammatical 
inaccurate cues. You have to be able to 
think on your feet and be able to talk 
your way out of anything.” 

For Gill Pyrah who is on air for two 
hours at a stretch each weekday, this 
means packing a lot into an eight-hour 
day. She needs time to research her 
subjects and read the papers, before 
making her introduction notes for each 
guest and outlining potential questions. 
An important skill is the facility of 
summing up speakers in advance — some 
will just freeze up and others will attempt 
to bully the presenter. 

Diana Goodman who has just been 
appointed the BBCs first woman foreign 
correspondent, thinks news reporting 
“the best job in the world” but is under 
no illusion as to the toll it can take on 
personal life. “You have to have 
enormous stamina, and an ability to 
preserve. It is fundamental that you want 
to talk to people and it is a skill to get 
people to talk into a recorder ... you have 
to have an ear for what makes sound.” 
Within radio the other side of the 
microphone often has more prestige. 
Gaynor Shutte is a producer of the . 


idea is decided upon, the producer 
selects the interviewer and interviewee. 
Each programme is mapped out- and 
scripts checked with the presenter. The 
time in the studio spent recording and 
cutting tapes is relatively short. ■ 

A producer is only as good as his or her 
last programme. 

How do you get into these jobs? The 
routes often overlap and people change 
from production to presentation and to a 
limited extent vice versa. At present 
there are 32 BBC local radio stations in 
England and the Channel Islands and 48 
commercial contractors. A local radio 
station is run by small professional staff 
under the guidance of a manager, one of 


■ although in radio journalism there is uotl 
' Ome^Tor- tangential questions. “It : is,T 

- says Julian Holland, “a more disciplined] 
technique which can be taught or learatl 

- by experience.” . • . J 

Starting out as a freelance reporter is] 
pretty daunting and journalistic training 
is probably an advantage. The skill lies in 
being aWe to identify a story, put it 
together, do the interviews and then to 
sell it — to the Central Office of 
Information, one of the commercial 
stations or to the BBC This approach 
requires perseverance, drive, enthusiasm 
and confidence but everyone agreed that 
it is foolish not to try. Producers are very 
keen to spot potential, but require proof] 
of ability and reliability. 

Gill Pyrah thinks that women are 
cuirently at- an ^advantage both in 
production in presentation. - The 
BBC, in the light' of a recent report b; 
Monica Sims bn “Women ~ in BBi 
Management" fa likely to encourage 
women candidates. Women are increas- 
ingly -finding jobs as producers arid 
presenters bid there are still very few in 
the more senior positions. Women have 
a further advantage in the traditional 
alternative route of becoming a secre- 
tary. In the BBC this is an established 
way to better things, particularly 
production. 

Michele Tidy is a typical graduate 
secretary hoping to make her way up. 
Currently a production secretary in 
Radio Drama, she thinks the possibility 
of promotion is good. But you “must do 
the job you are employed to do welL 
People will then notice you .are compe- 
tent and allow you to do more. You must 
make yourself indispensable and 
different.” . . 


Producers regularly 
seek out new talent 


those jobs is to encourage local people to 
broadcast. There are oppo 
if ini 


xtuohies for 
making programmes of interest to the 
local community on a voluntary basis, 
especially for those who have worked in 
student broadcasting or hospital radio. 
This experience is helpful in getting a job 
in local radio. 

David Harding, who got into local 
radio via education, became Network 
Manager and is now Deputy Editor of 
Current Affairs and Magazine Pro- 
grammes for BBC radio. He says that 
producers regularly listen to local radio 
output to seek out new talent 

According to Julian Holland, Editorof 
the Today programme, local radio is 
where “the business can be learnt as you 
have to be a Jack lor Jill) of all trades.” 
Mistakes can be made in a confined area. 
There is also less competition. Journal- 
ism is a common ; route into radio, ' 


The attachment programme is a 
recognised way of gaining promotion at 
all levels. Candidates apply for a short- 
term attachment usually on a temporary 
basis, in another section. This often 
results in a permanent post This system 
is used to develop staff across the board 
and is a further way of finding the right 
contacts. Within the BBC it is unusual to 
progress without going on attachment to 
a different department but no ultimate 
job change is guaranteed, and ibis' can 
cause resentment and job dissatisfaction. 

The menage for those wanting to get 
into radio is clear. It is very competitive 
but production f *•*. appointment staff 
are surprisingly ding to take to an 
aspiring employee. The opportunity has 
to be made by you. 

■For further information send a 
stamped addressed envelope to The 
Times, Special Reports (Radio) 1, 
Pennington Street, London Ei 9XN 


The book Careers in Independent Televi- 
sion is available from ITCA Ltd, Kmgtira 
House, 56 Mortimer Street* London; 
WIN 8AJV at SA ( including postage) and 
not from bookshops. . . 



university college, oxford 

GENERAL ELECTRIC COMPANY 
VISITING FELLOWSHIPS . . 

The College invites ramnurtkms&om conpeanw and 1 

f fiomthrir regular toplayaaat m mdratiy. commerce 

and dimer. It fc expected that the Fellow win continue to «eo»e iris/btr oonnal many 
from his/her employer. - i .. 

Further details may be obtained tom The Senior TWar, Unfeerotf Cottage, Oritod, 
OX1 4BH. Eoanries and appKcations ara welcomoat aiy timftJ^^ CoDe«wiU 
to review applications for the Mkhaebnss term (starting in October) on May 1st. | 


THE CITY UNIVERSITY BUSINESS SCHOOL 
LECTURER: 

STOCK EXCHANGE PROGRAMME. 

As part of as preparation ter toe , tfgtang , 1 The Stock Exchange 
has agreed with tl» Unhwsty on a new programme of educate 
training. From September 1986. the Management Development 
Centre of the Business School will provide wring courses and 
msideflta! courses preparing tar boSi tie base and professwaT 
examrottons tie Stock Exchange. • ' ‘ 

The Lecturer to be appointed w» be responsfcte tofteffirecte of 
the progra m me tilth duties touting teaching, course dewtojh 
mart and atfirfnisftafion, fatson The Cfty ad research to 
me area of capftal martets and m sa u mert s - THb balance be- 
tween these duties wifi be tailored to the person appointed. 
The University wffl be happy to consider appficabons both from 
those whose base is academic and from practitioners to the 
securities industry and an interest to education. The lecturer wte 
be appointed in the Centre tor Banking and MemaBona! Banes 
or within the Finance Division of the Business School. 

The basic salary wilt be near the lop of the Lecturer scale 
maximum F1R997 inclusive of London Aflowance but-tfie total 
remuneration Is expected to be in the region of £20,000. The 
a ppo in tment win be hr 3 years in the fist instance. Rafter 
particulars and appfcatim form may be obtained from the Aca- 
demic Registrar's Office. The C8y University, Northampton 
Square. London, ECTV GBR. 

TEL 01-253 4399. Ext 3035. 

Clostog dm 21st April. 1988 


/Z 


COLLEGE OF ST. MARK AND^ST. JOHN 
SENIOR POST IN MANAGEMENT AND 
• DEVELOPMENT 
BURSAR ‘ 

^ ft 7I» 



Tht Carts® (I I aotd i at Foredate. I tat f ted gw qf 

4 ftn om i vtrt y £4.000.000 OtrneO Han tfw DapaWW at 6toBWw red 
Scant Local Educate! Moms red a aida grareqaagi fe admen 


Steybr nrenaton «■ te bind en B» praam Bantam Sc* OM» V 
(E17000 - £15.0001 and all nflaet tba —M W «duM ntta 
i of M naccareu reteont 


RrBwr date, tram its fence*. Cdkga of SL Mi* and 5L Join. 
Otntfod Rom. PtjmedtL PUS BEN. 


University of Oxford 

Depart ren tal Demonstrator in Geojyaptty. 

School of Geography. 

Time is i wooer tor a Denertnete! Desraiaxloi teteteretlniitl Are 
1966 a so* theruter, 3 jea appatafloml in the- test ttstma ten Be 
ngtemnl to Mure once rceW» in tarn, to ccolict eewte. to mn Sc 
sonars avrooompukr netert ml to tab wane strong. Presence gun to 
eaaddtts rati raarcti marats in am mb as phrsute geops«»r Totm to 
cofcges op to B hous m e My teto lees. Sste y tr JM to S mo teBi USS 
rneneesixi fixe copes tf aptectooB QMnp age q u rt Br ilmu spea) xtef- 
ests and ap toen a to tt. H Jeflartas, Tie Secretory School cl Geography 
MmsMd Rd. OdonL 0X1 3TR 

Nol latoi Ban & fitrt 1986. No appUkn tone. Ust to tetoes tea stnto to 
[toueskfl by the appficaot to send refcmess direct to Mr. JHtaries by 1 May 

taxi 




‘WOMEM M MANAGEMENT: 
CREATING AN EFFECTIVE 
WORKING CLIMATE 1 

16th/I9th June 1986 
Holly Royde College • 
Manchester 


This workshop has been designed to meet the 
needs of women in management who would 
like to explore issues and problems that con- 
cern them. The programme will incorporate 
aspects such as stress and stress management, 
the problems of being a working mother, creat- 
ing a collaborative climate, dealing with 
difficult people and time management. The 
workshop w til be sufficiently flexible to deal 
with participants' specific issues in addition to 
those outlined above. The cost, including 
accommodation, subsistence 8c tutors' fees is: 
NHS personnel - £280 per person 
non-NHS personnel - £400 per person 
Further information and application 
forms are available from: 


Mis. M. Emery, 
Administrator, 

Centre for Professional Development, 
University of Manchester, 
Stopford Building, 

Oxford Road, 

Manchester M13 9PT 
(Tel: 061 273 8241, Ext 194) 


FRENCH 
COURSES FOR 
8-18 YEAR OLDS 


Learn French in an interesting and vital way in the 
beautiful Dordogne Short courses, total immersion, 
language laboratories, video. TV. Bilingual French start. 
Visits ■ Chateaux, caves and historic towns. Activities 
include tennis, horse riding, canoang and cookery. 


Further data*: 

L"Eco*e Hampstwe 
24250 Veyrmes-de-Domme 
France 

Telephone (01O3&53) 2SL53.1S 


The Hampshire School 
63 Ennismore Gardens 
London SW7 
Telephone 584 3297/8 




The Arrays 


A flying start to a career as an officer 
in the Army’s technical corps. 


Applications for the January 1987 
intake dose on May 1st 1986. 

Boys should be between 16 and 17ft 
years old at time of entry. 

Applicants should have, or expect to 
obtain, 5 good ‘O' level passes (or equiva- 
lent) including Maths, Physics, English 
Language and ideally Chemistry 

For further details and a prospectus, 
please contact T be Principal Dept G603 
Wei beck College, Worksop, Notts S803LN1 


Army Officer 


CHIROPODY AS A PROFESSION 


TlMiiMmtno tor Mininad nw or wooim enkcoodU n M moot li 
■flOBWV MOM cf On Mtog nKwv) IB OMBy tar a Oftom m ctaopody 


may to often ai henwby vary 
oy ti* 


l pnmtkpl You M «MM *3 



TW SMAC MSTntfTE i 

nrNwMp^MMII^ 

Bvto W i l i i w hM i l . Bwto tal w SU OX 

I (M28) 21 NO O* bog aotf (DOR SMS 


WIUHAItONAL prtvale neo- 
tradlbonal UnvcnUy otters 
ctvm s u mUtarrccr aamts 
over SSL rmJrety at home and 
wttt, lull crrdtl* lor Ufc nvnu 
nwnaiw. Praswcna from 
DW. T. Nell ataon & Co.. Sud- 
bury. surioLk. coin cco- 


S*f«rr ■rrCMSWE TyprwrtttnB 
WdividuU tnnon'SpHd dm* 


w» fafl4mv day. BeWmen 
Aorll 7. Mav 6. Td MrePhtpga 
OI -W9 2904. TI}V LWIfUBi 
centre IB. Dumvan SL. 
ParkJapr loMMb wi. 


Baker & McKenzie 


Trade Mark Agent 


HongKong 


Baker & McKenzie, Hong Korig, have a vacancy for a capable 
person who has experience in a wide variety of trade mark marrers 
to join the Trade Marks Department. Ideally, the person should be 
a member of The Institute of Trade Mark Agents. However, appli- 
cants who are not ITMA members with a solid grounding in trade 
mark registration and related issues are also encouraged to apply. 

Attractive salary and benefits will be offered to the successful 
applicant. 

In the first instance please write with full curriculum vitae to> 
Blair Wallace, Partnership Secretary, Baker& McKenzie, 
Aldwych House, Aldwych, London WC2B 4JP. 

Interviews will take place in London. 


mu 


career In 
COMPUTERS 


You're jbi arc ptane al a* 
bom Uwwng tl you're a 

ratnr torn ftp* ("■£«’ 

mg — Id pt arep u toa 




01-636 6441 




STGOOraCS COLLEGE 

Secretarial. Business 
and Language Cbones 


Word Processor "Raining 


English for Overseas 
Students 


Reajdenl & Day Students 

The Registrar (ST) 

2- Ait wright Rood. 
LONDON NW3 6 AD 
Telephone: 01 435 9631 


CRUCIAL EXAMS 
IN 1986 ? 


Bcj-a w * imp Aaptore 
UCCAot Pa<t T Gf<rfuliof ? 


BOW IS THtnOt to 
■s tm expwt mtuauKMd 
item, fits bnckm: 


jG • • CAREER ANALYSTS 


».Oi 


SO OhjcmOi Plare.WI 
01-935 S4U (24 text 



dHa&>Lr«H: 
ire. M Torwood j 
TQl IDT 0803 : 


PASS GCE 


- GUARANTEED _ 
I UNINTERRUPTED | 

■ HOME STUDY TUITION . 

Ensue YAitf your torre'SMnto I 
Ore <0 'O' and "A' lete aCjsas ■ 
Pea D> ptene udiy tn @ 

_ re Mcmrton pkh 

llfase ■ 

Adees | 

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I " US ScmaOuWUS " 
manna sms. S on ■ 
SowSuVR IdBHMtefi* 




srcretami cm- 
lere. Oiwtcnn sKretartai uuss 
ana tw«>tprm ansona caureo 
CMOWI 16 Aprs, wntp or 
teto pftonr 22-34 Qumacmrv 
PUT. London 6W7 20S, Ql- 
889 8683. 

—m 0 UI7 BURST Call Ol- 
2 T2 1319 for tavttonan to tree 
memory (rclnina/ mental 

MfcrreiO' WOK shop. 8-iOpm. 
1 tZ AonL for cotaia a. 6 and 6 
April. 

U WWM 8rtrmrui CoUcoe. 
18 Dumaven Simt par* Lana. 
London wiy 3PE. Ptorec write 
or w e p none for rmnpiKln; 
Tel. 01-679 2904. 
n re i A MS 6wLha Me. C20» 
visual Aria Oww asrts 26Qs 
Abhl AOObl Mad pal CU -684 
0667. 


UNIVERSITY OF KENT AT CANTERBURY 
FACULTY OF SOCIAL. SCONCES 

j v . lecturer m economics . : 


Appfcaflbns are .far a poa t of teBqjoqty 


-lecturar jn Econo mi c s fora pariod of two yean 
effect from 1st October; 1986.- , 


Safety accorcfing to qualifications and expeiferice M 
be on the scafe £8,020 - £15,700 per annum but.fhe 
appointment wffl not be made above the seventh port 
of the scale. 


Rather particulars and appfcafion forms are evafebto 
from MrJ.E. Rafiy, Secretary of ffecuMesand Deputy 
Registrar. The Registrar, University of Kent at 
Canterbury. Kent, CT2 7NZ. Completed appiicatian 
farms (three copies) should be returned not fetor than 
Monday 28th Apri, 1986. Ptoase quote reference 
number A17/88/T. 



a mar 


nsv 

l« to me Lkaoe 


oSkPs.' 


- ALL BOX 
NUMBER 
REPLIES 
SHOULD BE 
ADDRESSED 
. TO: 


Bent Mo 

C/e Times 
Nrwsoapm. 
P.O. Box 484 
Virginia Street 
LONDON 
El 9DD 


TCT 

IN 



Applications are 
invited fortwo 
-additional fedueafaips 
in fee School of Law? ; 
from Istjtds I®6, * 
■or by axangemenL 

Sailing salary in fee 
range £8,000 to 

a6,ooayss. 


dosing date for 
applications: 
4tk April, 1986. 


Further particulars 

fromTbe Registrar; 

Tbe'Umversityof 

Budringham, 

Buckinghain 

MK181EG. 


.The 


UNIVERSTIYOF 
BIRMI NGHA M. 
fSculty of mhnone mo 


DBmSlHY 
QWR OF EMD0CHM0UKY MD 
HEAD S» 

OF THE DEMKrUBir OF 

BKoemoLoer 



UNIVERSITY OF ; 
BIRMINGHAM. 

TWTHSMB OWR OF. 


HEADSHP V THEOBWnennF 
■IWBDttL KOCH 

tern totonwvCter armddm ate 
»>ll«iW8nHte>reBwe0irefr 
M et MM 

_ 

Ore re 


■lap Ore 
HMfetafr . 

Stevr ■ to* dteol MU 
BMW 


Ftirthn pMtxOn MtaH tore toa 
VtaiOredtar.lMreiWair 
tare. F 0 Bni 3K3 . 1 
ZTTtoatom 

ere tan _ 

Medd toreUJjy 30to Aed 

re EMI appoTCMtas EsVtaMr. 



. Univenity. - j 
CONVOCATION > 
A.GM. AND ‘ 
REUNION ••••*' 


UNIVERSITY 
COLLEGE OF 
SWANSEA 
Chan- of Mathematics 


m MewteL Ote two 
Ontre UtW d*- 



.SA2 8PP.MWMM1. 
BhoaM team ter Monday. 21 


4 


THE UNIVERSITY OF SHEFFIELD 
me um¥C 7 ^ KOlE Kr OF Jmmo and 

OMffVTATKWAL KATHHWTW8 



LECTURESHIP 


' AoofcMWns n taritedtor ■ na* pew of 

Comtusedopre uxtmamm tm -post 

Sbnnme* >*«***+»* *3* 

— t amiyMt, by tne<JGC» pwt^ 

J and TMhnotonr *<$**»*■ 

(m® f August 1988, 

CmdrfitBS stnUtt •»* teedwfl research jnknsts kt ooe 
« more or tra»o«««g 

9s«i Proraastos 

Candidates, wth 01 ***““ 

MathBoabcs w« a*w t» coBstoarea. — 

tmtial safety •* ° ° 

£8.020 .- E15JDQ acranfag to aga. exoMtence and 

sa^sssgas 

18 Apt* f»M. Rsaaa 

quota Ref . Nol B395/A. 




•> 


UNIVERSITY OF 
EDINBURGH 
DEPARTMD4T OF 

AKIIHCfAL_ 
INTELUGENGE 
rrLECTURESHIP 
IN ARTIFICIAL 
INTELLIGENCE - 
- (INTELLIGENT 


wirLNamMtaAnnfti 

wdw«(.retoHHtato- 


. TM 

DreSmcnt «r AzttfUM ta«^ 
Is am — 


arete wrem mare retw.. 
There arc. store* aatas^vritt 


the MM MSc. arc- 

- te - l uturm re on 

TMnotonr. red te a My 
mutfhreore xK arct te rereto I 
areiMb O mu a u to r Sdrec a — f 



’ me hoc* it Lecnre- 


- wttbrre (hr toctonr 

-fl» 0m.700 p re 

~e» Unfiftrcay Sarer- 
Itar 



bure o n ils| 
t-EK^sreretaMtotocoaM* 


toner matowm JWrtJeA 


jjwvDamr 

tfnMWBMt 


FACU.TYOFMDKHE 
WSOENnSTHY ~ 


OiABTOT 

omocawoux nf . 
«ewMXHaar-TiB 
. depacttmcnt or . . 

- smocantouxY . 



On ire rey eF _ _ 

MS- an-. . -:ta n amu 

•m 



AND ABCHAROLOOY 


M ila w . ya It e m motto- 
btr 1986 itaMM DM OtnoO 
tor wfekbl Mmbe «r MI 
I re n a of 



et cacao - 


es~ copno . 


AMU 1986 la ft Mtotan i Mato- 
tore CAitol. tMvaretbr of 
ata iiaiq trea. PO Bex 963. 
Benatotfure bib arr. mm 


■J ' ■ 


mOTT BgVHCTTT 
1 w 





MW for DlitoMi 

SgJgjSflPS 










..UWMRYflr. 


TM 


senvKES MANACtoMcwnr 
AND DaracronsHm or 
THE lEALTH SER VI CES 
MANAGEMENT CENTRE 


A ii HMc amsu arc tawtotd tor te 

dveur are OfereserMp «r ~ 


m i ■wwB t iMii r wr n ir to r isi r 
Director. B iutoa aa r DTE 


vt l uy lB H H MMre to ttaa 
MOTE. . . .... 

Satan- m ttw mtomw 
raMre-Vtani 


■» -v 



tt ■ 

PO -are 365. 

MS 2TT to vreere . re asea 



UlCYERSTTYOT 
READING - 
Depautment of 
Agraeultiiral 
. •'.v: Earaomics 
'• zbA Management 

AWlUMlnito are BwItoS «ar a 
RnpritaMtareutontota 
mi Octotar l«6.Mre 



b {.. *y 

iKVi- •“ 


i utliUM I im —I nrmei hr 


n ta Carare -'md among 
“ -ere 


23 RSU 


mcMSoi»DWi»»a- 
i m voeroeoes tore 


cataon fanjm. (a entoj ara 


Ofdotr. CMiwnay at naata- 
InB. liltatortnlfeito p -0. am 


2LT.Y j )o8n .- RQ6 2AK- 
T i Kpti a n a K>734> 876123 

■SB.m nmt.NM net. 
Acea. Ctaetnetetorsa AW* 

1986k, ...... • 




UNVEMrtV 


FACULTY OF MEXNCne 
AND DENTKTRY 
AM) HEADSHIP OP THE 
DEPA RTMENT OF 
MTERNAL MEXBCWE 
AavtacaOeu are ta wto ta tor 
ttw wmm wtmerine oar 
of aiiWrlmi a na ree . H rere m p 
at lire proresed Dritonmenl 
erManal Mrawne. Hie pre- 
riooi notoer at am Mum 
wnnertne-- Chair wm sto 
Raymoha HtOUbov. ' 
Staltoy in Ihe ctanlcal pre«re- 
■onar ' ranga. 

127.770. 


• ^-u. *. 
r* 

-M ... 

t* r. 


^ : tdi- 




FKtMr 
nxre me ym . Oaa crer. 
Urdvaratto at Hmtniian. 
PO Bov 363. Hrreingbani 
B16 2TT to 



«.< 



ST, DUNSTAN’S COLLEGE 

Catford, London, SE6 4TY ' ■ 

Independent HMC Day School - 
for Boys 7 - 19 ■ 

DIRECTOR OF BfUSIC 

Required preferably for September 1986, but would consider January 
1987. 

Above Inner London Burnham salary scale. Some assistance with 
removal expenses. 

Applications to the He adma ster (from whom further particulars may 
be obtained) with frail c-v. naming two academic, or professional 
referees, by 4th April 1986. * - 



WYCUFFE COLLEGE 

Stonehouse, Gtos 


APPOINTMENT OF HEAD 


of 


Applications are Invited by 29th April for the 

Head in succession to Mr. R.C. Poutton - who. 
predecessors, has been a member of HMC -when he 
becomes Heed of Chrisfs Hospital on 1st January, 
1987. 


Detaife of the post and application farms may be 
^ " to the Council of 


obtained from the Secret. 

Gosvenors, Wycfiffe College. Bursar's Office, Regent 
Street, Stonehouse, Gtos. GUO 2AD. 


(HANDER PORTMAN WOODWARD 

24 Evasion Place, London $W7 
TUTORIAL COLLEGE 
500 students in London * 

One Tutor each in. Chemistry and Biology. 
Required immediately. Young, enthusiastic and 
outgoing graduates to reach O and A ievd. Stu- 
dents. Flexible working hours wife no extra 
curricular strings. Salary £9,500 per 30 hour 
week. Telephone the Principal on 01-584 8674. 


BELMONT 


(MUl HID Junior ScMW 
ReaiarMBiSeiftnTfDvr 1986 B 
Here of Enreah and Oram. 
Own retev ~fr»ir Han win 
rens-cuRicuiar jcnvma> 
wv kw o t . crendMea shedd 
•end full ev are toa urees or 
he n lnre to.- 
THE MASTER. aELMOOT. 
-ns AroccwAV. 

MILL HILL. 

LONDON NW7 4ED. 


jaSERBBBS 


tawiwtetatar latoa a ww 

are IM dnr to day running at 
Die GDiDH..Rritota.avo<- 
sure an advantage, nreiw m 
Ta* MonstoBae school an Oi- 
*377900. 


ST PAUL’S 

SCHOOL: 


umdatefMsumaio. 

. 0I-748»6i ... 


Raqtarre lor SapnntoaF 1889 
Irianra^ity SW). 
1. - A: - 
PHYSf 
StanoL 


» feacb 

troughout lha 


Bn School. 


Then arc ml mgr UD boas 
Mudring trianeai -to A lore 
andjharc la « atrora OSMtoa. 
■■■tearJi tamSSn 


nay ba obttenod tram tn 
Haad ol Sdanoa. 


totenr w b — ra m r 

BuniiBBL Aeoom 


•tefebfe. ARDetifona wfeito* 
nanas al taorteanasre soon 
aspooua to an Mph Maafer 


DEPUTY COUNTY 
EDUCATION OFFICER 




£ 24,153 - £26565 per anumt (Wff 1 <B 6 ) 


UPeCTSS De PV t y CounfyEAJcatidn Officer, 

jn g a n ew Deputy who' can dononstrata that 
quafifications and axpe- 
*wand assist the County 
^ operation o* fee 
P»™nt »id devstopment of pofides. 

APPLICATION FORMS AND FL1BTMPR 
DETAILS ARE AVAILABLE FROM TKEPER- 
SONNH. OFFICER, NORTHAMFtyCMS^P 
OTUNTY COUNCIL, COUrSYF^QmSI 
ROW. NORTHAMPTON^ NNI^ TOt 

STS w 


^tataa " ^ 



Northamptonshire 


> r» 




^ MDENHAM SCHOOL 

ISO ben are* afci. 





/j'-y’. 




Appfcrekua u torited ter tie pot ol — m,n SacrtoteW Wi - 
ft rate ted t itw , fldtei.tem lie mtMM t.. .- 

Wrae. MraSo>ttti)93 wbooi ** wferefanad to to- 


D H BOtod MA 
Sawatery tette ewm 
London Bsgfarcrf feoatotoo Bowtf 

-asmsF*-**'* 


T'-' 





COLIMNS 



BUSINESS 

OPPORTUNITIES 


HOW TO START 
and operate vcwr own prtifif- 
abto business at home. Join 
me hundreds of sueeasaU 
begtantn who m pmopw- 
tng in mer own promote 


LEGAL NOTICES 


BANQUE DC CHTDIT 
INTERNATIONAL, GENEVE. 

EN LIQUIDATION 

CONCORDATAIRE 

Cen to rah a m t is f-Aror*r *i at 
rOrtionnane* do Tribunal FMtf- 
aldu 11 avrll lUSconanunib 


5 1653 


Together we can but iL 

VW* fund over Dnr third of 
“ TTM-irxh into the preven- 
tion Jnd cure of cane t-r m " 
the UK. 

HtMpm, by lending a doiu- 
Don or nukr j Irgar) io- 

Cancer til 
Research 
Campaign aty 

2t'KteinHntnr>rr*r. . . 

ItVpi nmo. I .mrinn SW1Y MR 



UPFRlEND 

Wli Unusual mod toe. duel ba- 
non. Nn fum and dec. 3 bed tms, 
ream icu/on. ban. 2w c Pfcg 
Dose tube E23S 
E. FINCHLEY Sac etatwtef 
toe. 4 Bed ims. Z taths. 2 temp, 
kd/tkn Odn. 5 mns bOe EfflO. 
ISLINGTON Attract, mews own- 
ers own home. 2 dtte bed mo 
weep. K & B. ray c on veraatt loco- 
Don 2150. 

CHISWICK Super odntm Lowly 
consevmon *«■ Oose nwsr. dftfe 
bed im. recep. EMO. 

01-4995334 


PROPERTY 


womuHor/rrunio eaonn. 
BuutKU docklands wanrtKMao. 
£80 D.W. Oi 488 IM9 


COMPANY NOTICES 


PEMBRIDGE 
VILLAS Wll. 

Newly decorated and Fur- 
rushed 2nd floor flat in 

new conversion compris- 
ing: 1 dbte and 2 twin 



■W-BSt-i* hwe*. NS. o/rm 
« BaL EI9B Mm inc. Tbi oi 
870 aw.e w M a n 


Fantasy Iceland 

f Iceland, a fantasy Island where nature, hand 
In hand wfth the legends, has created a 
landscape of breathtaking beauty volcanoes, 
bubbling hot springs that burst into 160 foot 
geysers, spectacular waterfalls and worm 
summer days that last for 24 hours. 

You cam step in to another world for as 
little as £199 


® 01-221 7278 


ICELAND 


Esa 


WANTED 



FOR SALE 


£ 


TtT- 


REStSTA CARPETS 
SPECIAL OFFERS 

WtcaiMen Oprt t op m t 
TNif mm- adirt-wity 
£8.95 per ac ya + VAT. 
Wool anx Berber carpets 
4m wide Hessian backed 
C*JB per at Vd + VAT. 
wtuir nocks usl 
207 Havaistock Hfl 
H a mpstead NWS 

Tel: 01-794 0139 


18 carat oyster guartz. 
day date, diamond nu- 
merals.. - superb 

condition. - - 

OFFERS . 
INVITED.? 
0685-70129 





rw 


3 


i 


£99 RETURN 

"Save wilh' Swissair's 

.Super. Apex 

London to Zurich or 
Geneva daily .on con- 
venient afternoon 
flights. 

And daily morning 
flights London to Basic 
(except Sundays). 

Book and pay 14 days 
before departure. 

Stay in Switzerland at 
least until the Sunday 
al ter arrival. , 

Similar savings also 
from Manchester and 
^Birmingham direct to 
Switzerland. 

; Bookings and full con- 
ditions from travel 
agents' or 437-9573. 



AUSTRALIA 
FAR EAST 


The lowest cost flights 

Enrochack Travel 
01-542 4613 


r i j r ' * z *** i 


Estab 1970 




swissair 


vr£J 




i 


GATWICK 

• NICE • 

•■EVERY THURSDAY-' ‘ 

■ SATURDAYS, SUNDAY- 

• Fronri May 17 • 

F LIGHTS !» HOTELS 
l',* FLYDRIVE • 

EURC**-’-s 

TEL:; 0293 775555 



beds, large light recep. 
modem fully fitted kit 
and 2 baths. (1 en suite). 
Available now Tor long 
companv let at £400 pn 

Marsh & Parsons 
01- 221 3335 


Spacious Ita nr tube wnh 2 dtM 
Decs, dhie gtszsO. recepl mth 
long bn widows. lot w/fflyer- 
bam. Res porter, wdeo entry 


"sun Sc SAND 
ai. mw kmm« 
91*439-2100/734-4668 
■umt c.'cmoi Accomcb 



3 


it 


m 


pc? 


nUUMSW *- unOMML F/H M 
«4ocauan able Inumd 9 to 
room, garden. ofiere over 
£180.000 Ferrer Stead ana 
aye 01-731 «W1 


property to let 
LONDON 


rtli", 3 tre dmom town name, 
oood p art of Eteina. flag fur 
hum. Eaoopmr month- Tel OI 
579 0851 day 


SOMERSET ft AVON 


HUnm COTTAS*. 4. bed 
room, tovw new Dried 


CiSCuOQO freehold. 
9*53 


UPUP&AWAY 

bURM.-JeVarp. cam. Do- 
D4L MaaPUL SnqmPore. KX. 
Ddu. BuoMk. Hong Kong. 
Sydney. Europe, h The 
Aowncaa, FMnrtngo TTavrt. 
3 New Quebec St Marble 
Ami London wih 7D0. 

01-402 9217/18/19 

Open Saturday 1Q.OO-KLOO 


LATIN AMERI C A- Low cool 
OJghtc C.B. mo CMS. Lima 
£475 rtn. Ai>o Small Croup 
Hobday Journeys. JLA Qi -747- 
3108 

LOW FACES WORUWIOC - 

USA. 6. America. MW and Far 

- EaaL -S. Africa. TnurvAta. 48 
Mnwnt Sired- W1..QJ 880 
aaairvia aotwmw 

ROUND WOftLD£745 econ. Club 
it £ 1599 . mat fr £2036. Syd- 
ney tr £659 rtn. Cobmunk. 
CbOen Cardens. lODruraWre 
Square. ECZ. Ot 929 *aai. 

DtKOONTS M /Economy ack- 
ers. . Try ns 

UM .FUCHTBOOKERS 01-387 
9100. 

LOW CMTFUGMTS. MM Euro- 


i , oiXs.rfgC3Ttfr'Ncir-o=i £3J- 
Stdicv C'639'- 'Sc/roVikCM? 
iVtk. £750 £239 

' IJO Jermyn.SIfeer, SWt 
Schedule* fKflMi »n 71«4 
■Bw^iel flight* 819 7146 


DRATCOTTS WIK SAK reouires 
Assistant Manager aged ZSJO 
wttti catering experience. Excel- 
Im I ntary and tnmMco 
dependera on previous expert- 
ante. Please teraewim tub C v. 
and paa m on piwto u> N .C. 
WMdrldge. Drartom Wine 
Bar. 1 14 DravcMt Avenue. 
London SW3. 

QUALiraD COOKS needed ID 
xnn team in kudien of expand- 
ing (nod company preparing 
dencalemen load and catering 
for pantos. Mini be etmiuaiay 
tic. Hard *grlni and 
adaptable. P to aw nag Heather 
James on 01-627 2770. 

FART TRW general assistant in 
private Tends dub dining ream. 
Must be cneefut. eftldenl and 
well preaNd 3 evanlngs and 
alternate weekends. Near Hot 
land nark. tcMtew 01-743 
9822. ■ 


LOOKMB FOR a waitress and a 
chef. For details contact Mr 
WoshUnm 01-T22 3864 

LZITirs ROOD FOOD reouirtsim 
enpsnanced cook fbr mor Mnv 
C ity kb ctiens. To wort S day 
week Including some week- 
mas co. 800m neo + over- 
time. Ptaue cafl 261 0216. 

AUFAK6 A MOTHER'S IttLF ro- 
amred for France. Spaki. 
Austria and Germany. Hdp- 
mataaEmpieymem Agency. Oi- 
874 4151 

HEALTH CLUR in Chiswick 
rewires futi time person to 
cooking/ serving in . busy 
restaurant SMI ox-chaM gkl. 
01-995 4600. 

MANAOOt tor new Fulham rep- 
laurant Suit wtr-starter with 
some enrag experience. Age 
20-35. Contact Mark MtUon 
78S 9151 


87 Regent Street. London Wl. 
Tel 439 6634.UK/Overaeas. 
AMO nuieips/dbms ump/penrt 

SITUATIONS WANTED 


EX JMR ARMY Ofcr. seeks led 
pref abroad. Oxford entry Oct 
aneaks French Mian Greek. 
045-383-4481 


DOMESTIC & 
CATERING 

SITUATIONS WANTED 


CARTER Maos. Ctm. AKtorve 
22-24 J6.2T-28JO Mar. 162 
wM. Fiats, pensions, hotels. 
Bonavenlur* OI 937 1649. 
A8TA ATOL 879B. 


COSTCU1 ruts ON fughts/hots 
to Eioupe- USA A mod dostina- 
hons. Dlplomai Travel- 01-730 
2201. ABTA LATA ATOL. 


Appoi n t m e n ts 



BAR STAFF 

Full tune bar staff re- 
quired for West End 
wine bar. Age pr eferred 
20-35 yeare. Musi be of 
smart appearance. Mon* 
Fn Itmcbomes and 
evenings ‘til 10 pm. 
Approx 40 hours pw. 
£2.75ph. Phone Lindsay 
on 01-629 1643. 


francos engage HiunatiaianNi 
pour stags, efudtems «n 
traduction, lectmloue Istaoes 
reftumtresl Env c.v. on Me 
phoner; Sodete «T ■ 6. rue dr 
rOuest 92100 Botdogne lei 
48JS.77.73 l 

French TranslaUnp Company 
regutm unraeduiiy techaKai 
translation students tor training 
periods (paid ftagesJ send cv or 
phone: Sodete 4T & Rue de 
rouest 92100 Boutogua TN: 48 
29 77 73 


SHI COMPANY requires sales 
person deau do wHh saiss enqui- 
ries m busy London nine*. 
Proven sales NMiny and love of 
skting essential. Phone Jea nn e 
Wain 01-940 7782. 



required to be profe ss io nal ly 
trained in a rew a rd i ng career tit 
the Bnanctal sector. Interested 
partes should contact London 
Ralph Beaumont 01-587 son) 


MALDIVES, LANZAROTE __ 

islands Ot B36 4385. ATOL. 
2051. 


CHEAP rUSHTS Worttwld*. 
Kaymarkd 01-930 1366. 


USA from £99 Major travel, oi 
48S 9237. IATA 


IF YOU ARE arttcutaie and wefl I SALES ft MARKETING 
educated and wouM toe to sen | 







property m West London for 
Folkes SoncMors ring Haul 
Baguley on Q14MO 3333 


son travel abroad. £15.000 
Language Staff Agy 435 8922 


Long co let £290 pw 
SOOTH RasaKTOH 
merai tfescnw) 1 bed Ha n 
supenor burning n tube. Res 
pons & nfleo any pnont 
Long co Ibl £155 p* 


m ROME, CWKHEA, 

2 newly decorated 2 
bedim Apartments on 7ih 
nr. of this excellently 
maintained block with 
goon security. U*grnd. Ga- 
rage. porterage- £300 per 

Wfc. 

Ch elsea Office: 

01-589 5211 


CHE^RTOfS 


LETTING? 

See Your 
Specialist 

GEORGE KNIGHT 

Tlie l.vliin- A cent — — 

9 Healh Street 
Hampsttad Village N\V3 

Tel: 794 1125 


SWISS COTTAGE. C3SOPW Mod 
3 tied. 2 bath town hsr. IW Holi- 
day bm. Co let only. Omen 
avauame. A.CRX. 686 88) t. 
9*7 Ml The ntmmcr lo remem- 
ber when seeking best rental 
properties in central and prime 
London areas £l60/£2.000pw 
WI4. Sunny taittiouse flat receg 
with bale, dole bed. k 6 b Gas 
CN/CHW. £i iopw Totepnone 
Barnard Marcus 602 2428. 
WE LET FLATS and houses We 
urgently noun your proper- 
ties bi W.SW and NW London. 
Dqvtt WOOife A CO 402-7381. 
W MW M RWN Luxury fully 
furnished p'b 2 bedrm naLCH 
ofl street parting, close lube. 
£146 pw. Tel 231 0750 
CAS MANAREMENT. Landlords 
contact in lor a corapevuve & 
reliable service. 01-439 9130 
CENTRAL CHELSEA Organ r , c 
flat Ratable to l mature man. 
£ABgw. 01-684 2420 
CEN7RAU DMe bed Ra) nr lube, 
phone. £90 pw. Others too 627 
2610 Homeiccatars. 

CHR1SEA Spacious 3 bedrm Itai. 
Lge receg- FM ktt. Cardens. 
£240 pw. 01-236 4991 Off lire 
CHELSEA FLAT, Off Ctwyne 
Walk. 2 bfds. 2 batta. 2 recepa. 
new refurt£229pw. 937 9681 . 
cure WICK MM New luxury dou- 
ble serviced MudMM 'bedsits 
£60. £8Sgw. 01-747 3254 
CITY. Lux 2 bed male. K B 
Lounge.CH F-T. Tel. £1-35 pw. 
Tel: Ol 561 6740. 

CLAPNAM OMMBOIL Lux 3 bed 
nwHonette. Roof garden. £150 
bw .Parrots.-Ql 720 9226'T. 
CROYDON! renov double bedrm 
riauel. £60 pw. Others too 627 
2610 Homclocutare. 
DELIGHTFUL BUNNY FLAT 
avertooMno Montagu Sq. Wl. t 

MKL > ret £200 pw 936 3393 
FUUIAJH DUe s/C no bdh. CH. 
£90 pw. Others 627 2610 
Homeiocators. 

HOLLAMI PARK HOUSE. 3 bn». 
2 batta. garden, quiet street. 
New return £62 Sow 937 9681. 
KLMOTONI CH 3 bedroomed 
flu. £150 pw. Open 7 day*. 
627 2610 Homeiocatora. 
MARBLE ARCH attractive period 
mews house. 1 bed. reep. KAB. 
£150 pw. Long co let. 936-9512 
HLQWMNl 1 bedroomed nal nr 
tube. TV. phone. £76 pw Oth- 
re* loo 627 2610 Homelacaiorv 
NW 2 be d roomed Hat. no Nils. 
recepL £80 pw. Olticra loo 627 
2610 Homeiocators. 

PUTNEY SW1S. 3 bed Iwure 
dose ra River. £250 pw. Co lei. 
KbUetsdi: 01 786 2122. 



in expenema Worldwide. 

Fandes. stngta. 8 pets an 

HOMELOCATORS 

ROITAL ACCOM. PUBLISH BIS 
flf 7ZB2K» 

OR CALL OUR LOCAL OFFICE 
OPEN 7 DAYS 


PLAZA ESTATES 

CATHCART ROAD SW1Q 

Very Orel tv well turn gmd Hi 
Bed Sam. Clk im, r ecap tat, 
utmry C200pw 


Suw kit oegamd bom and 
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Beautriuty rehjrtxshed use with 
Odn m mm* location 3 beds. 2 
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£>d tat CSSOpw 

01-681 7646 



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01-3517767 


PARRAR $TEAD& G lYN 


DONNE PUCE, SM L 
Debgtttful Mews house with 
roof terrara. Two recaphons. 
tine bedrooms, one bath- 
room. fully fined kitchen. Ideal 
locatWL Available now tang 
company let E375. 


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rooms. 2 receo*. lge kll. dinrra 
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S KENSMOTON. Lge bngtil re- 
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standard 2 beds, rrceo. fitted 
ktf with all machines CH.E160 
pw 244 7353 

HEMAKFORD DO- Compietely 
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beds. 2 balm. 2 recepl. excel 
lent kiu to gun. £350pw. Neg 
Tel 01-373 6982. 

KEMHHTON / palace Cardens 
terrace, first floor Balcony (la L 
large Uvtng room, dotmie bed- 
room. mceiy lunoshed. CH. 
£145 pw TiH: 0753 882252. 
LUXURY 2 BEDROOM Oat close 
10 Ourensway and Hyde Park, 
colour TV. -wa&hing madttne. 
icrvxed. £250 pw Long or 
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Hr WHtiLED OH PARK- Serviced 
Use. 2 dbte bedrm. 2 reept. 
b'krast rm. mod KB. lux bath, 
gdn 4 patio. Srnl Co or prof 
vhlor Details 07986 412. 
URGCNTC.V RED. Is) class « '6 
bedrtml houses In London A 
Home Counues tot Iona Co lets 
to £500 ow. Samuel 5 Co 736 
6000 

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BEDFORD PARK HT4L 6 PM. 3 
bath house Carden Off Street 
parking. £460 pw Co let. 
Klnlmoh: Oi 785 2122 
REHR A RUTHCMOF for luxury 
properties in Si Jonns wood Re 
penis Park. Manta Vate. Sww 
Oon A Hampstead 01-5R6 7661 
BELGRAVIA C NEIW A 

KWCHTSaRIDCC flats houses 
available now. £ 100-1 003 pw 
Burgess 01-581 5t3o 
■oumgrrohe road wi4. 

Owners own 1 bedroom flat n 
gursiiety d*r and lurn Oose lo 
tube £125 pw ^44 7363. 
CHtSWncM 5 elegant mod era Bed 
3 bed family houses, available 
now on long lets £290 pw 
Property Serv-lres 01 -995 4 1 70 
FASHIONABLE Still Designer 2 
peti nai in superb location over- 
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pw. Buchanans 351-7767. 
HYDE FARM W2. Unique 1 
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Garage. Co let only 
£!76pw Tel. 724 889T 
MAHM VALE Attractive newly 
convened S.C grd fl flat 2 
beds £450 pan 01-602 7701 
or 01-422 2280 
MAYFAIR/ HYDE PARK lire 12. 
3. 4 A 6 bed flats 5 houses. 
Long- short lets. Best prices 
915-9512 

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FUTMUOSCL short-long lets, 
central Iona on oi 244 7363 
London Apartments 

tniernaltonai 

WL Spacious 2 bed flat m Pb 
block Recep. kll 5 bath. 
£250pw. Allen Bates 499 1665. 
WEST London! Dbte Itodroanted 
llai. do bills, renov TV. £100 . 
627 2610 Homeiocators. 

SHT 6. BrMhl 2 bedrm flat. Newly 
dec CCH Co Lei. £150 p.w. 
Phone 08926 4889. 

RECuill PARK linuy fur 
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recew. CH. parking Co lei. 
£275 pw Tel: OI 402 6390. 
RE GE NT S PARK LMUrMStied 
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machines etc and garage. £200 
pw Buchanans 351-7767 


CmtiI 601 fir flai in Mayfair. 
2 no beds. 2 recces, lge Ul. 2 
path*. HR. oocser. me. 
CH CHW. E4£Opw 


BnwtHuUy lurealwd and 
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rat In ML 3 beds. 2 recem. 2 
baths. £5TSpw. 


OH Park Lane Is this pretty 
2 nd fir Rbl bed. receg. ml 
bath. £ 26 0 pw. 

352 1111 Sastfe HThM 
725 5135 Steftfc of TV Fart 

PffllPS ICAY 8t LEWS 


I COOTESl 


M BUtaHBMH nOACt 80 SW1 

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Still. SnacMHis newly dec A 
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row -dbUng. kit a bath. 
C200DW. 

ELOAkE AYE PW. 9m floor 
pied a lerre wun super vwwv 
Studio nai v*nh bath 4 UL 
£IQOpw unci CH A CHW. 


Short letsw centraliareat.. 
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' .•0L823'S251^l i v'; 



ASSOCIATES 
01 S8X 8025 


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£360 per week to £200 per 
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ch.cn wand tv Oiler for lundnd 
period Ay lestoH A Co. 551 
2383. 


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wnired flxL Beautiful an- 
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brd -sitting room, dining room, 
kll. bain TV stereo £270. Tat 
235 0260 5891697. 


KENSINGTON. Deughifui. 2 dou- 
ble bedrooms. 2 bathrooms <1 
en *uue< mataonette available. 
Long let Companies only £320 
per week Tele phone. 0(351 
2932 12 noon-Opm. 


LAWSON A MERMAN DwtomalS 
A executives urgently seek 
auabrv properties m all renlral 
teesl London areas For anrn- 
lion please ring Ol 938 3*25. 


MAYFAIR Wl lux self rant rum 
nai l large oeorm ermine tvaih 
. room, recep. Kite hen lullv 
equipped £200 pw Burfprd 4 
. Co 629 2646 


ST JAMES SWl deUghlful t bed 
flal in me heart M London 
Small block write HU, short 6 
long lets £220 pw ♦ GodCUlti 
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Stiftl PRINCE OF WALES Drive 
luxury 1 bed flal overlooking 
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week *■ from £160pw. 499 
1665 


Slaying In LendanT 

Wr specialise in renting quality 
furnished homes Tty us. 

Hum pm 837-7366 


HOLIDAY FLAT SERVICES Butt- 
gel oi luxury apis. Sturt teh. 
Crnirai London- 01-936-24 >2. 


QUALITY FLATS A HOUSES 

available in all areas. 

Rl i B 637 0821- 

FLAT TO LET ui the west End 
Spacious, ixo bedrooms, two 
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in Ihe near) of London, loudly 
a met Would sub someone look- 
Ino lor a pred-a-ierr* Apply In 
writing IhMr Batty Foyle*. 119 
Charing Cross Ro^. WCT 
AMERICAN EXECUTIVES Seek 
lux flats houses up to £500 
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Chelsea office. 01 352 81 1 1 or 
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Ol 4SS 8615. 

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cunv 3 bed maisonette, retain- 
ing original learners 
Stunningly decorated Large 
drawing room, kitchen ond 
bathroom, all mactnnes. CH. 
Lnlurn. £2^5 PW 244 73S3 
QURAtSM CONST ANTI M otter 
ouaiiiv furnished unfurnished 
properties In Kensington. 
Chelsea. Fulham. Putney. 
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ST JOHNS WOOD. 1 bed fur- 
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Porterage Laundry service. 
CI JO pw Tel O! 452 5890 
SUSSEX CARDEN W2. Large 4 
bed flat overlooking Hyde Park 
and k'msinoton Cardens. £375 
pw . Co lei ktnieigh-7B5 2122. 


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28 


SPORT 


THE TIMES MONDAY MARCH 24 1986 


CRICKET 

Australia 
continue 
to plumb 
depths 

Christchurch (Reuter) — New 
Zealand took an unbeatable 2-0 
lead in their one-day scries 
against Australia on Saturday 
when they beat the touring side 
by S3 runs. Australia must now 
wto'at Wellington and Auckland 
if they are to tie the series. 

The day before the match 
Allan Border, the Australian 
captain, had threatened to re- 
sign if bis side failed, or per- 
formed badly, in the remainder 

of the senes. He was not 
immediately available for com- 
ment on Saturday, but be will 
not have been amused by the 
three run-outs in the Australian 
innings or by his side's fielding, 
which was once again well below 

international standard. 

NEW ZEALAND 

K R Rutherford c Waugh b Rad B4 

BA Edgar bRad - W 

M 0 Crms c RftcMa b W3ugh 12 

-J V Coney run out ■ 64 


JQ Wright c Matthews b McDermott - 6 

R J Haoee c Ritchie b Davts 11 

B A Btatr c McOemxm b Daws 13 

fT E Han not out 0 

J G Bracowel not out 2 


Extras (lb 8, w 2. nb Z) 
Total (7 wtts, 49 overs) 


12 


S GBespte and E J Chateau ted not bat. 
FALL OF WICKETS: 1-125. 2-150, 3-170, 
4-191, 5212, 6246,7-256. 

BOWUNQ McDermott 10-1-50-1: Davte 
10-l-5l-2:ReKll0O-44-2:Gnbert5O-29- 
0: Matthews SOWt wauflh WM7-1. 


AUSTRALIA 
Q R Man* run out , 


DC Boone and bGBeopie - 
■A R Border C BWr b Crowe 


— 9 
_ 47 

- 27 

d M RBcMe c Crowe b Harflee = 31 

G R J Matthews c Wright b Bracewe* 13 
tWBPMB|JB runouts. 12 

" 37 

_ 5 

B A ReU C Crowe b CftatfieU 3 

S P Davis not out 1 

. 205 


C JM^mcrnb Chatftald . 
□ ft Gilbert run out 


Extras (w 2}. 
Total (45.4 overs) 


FALL OF WICKETS: 1-27. 2-67. 329. 4- 
132. 5-137. 6-150. 7-160. 8-189. 9-204. 
BOWLING: Hadlee 10-2-36-2: Chatttold 
Gfcspie 8-0-51-1 ; Crowe 7-0- 
27-1; BraceweU 102-37-1: Coney 

Rameez to 
aid of 
Pakistan 

Colombo (Reuter) — Rameez 
Raja made his highest Test score 
of 73 not out to rescue Pakistan 
in the third and final Test 
against Sri Lanka yesterday. 
Pakistan had slipped to 49 for 
three in reply to Sri Lanka's first 
innings of28l on the second day 
when Rameez arrived to inspire 
a recovery to 180 for five by the 
dose. 

Kaushik Amalean, a medium- 
fast bowler making his debut, 
dismissed both Mohsin Khan 
and laved Miandad. 

SHI LANKA: First Innings 

S Wertmuny c R«a la Akram _ 0 

R S Mahanama cZuiqamatnbGatSr 41 
APGurosingtiacZulqamaXi blmran 39 
A Raratunga c Imran b Zakir 53 

P A do Stem c Mohsin b Zakir 16 

"L R D Mend is c Ziiqwnain b Imran: .58 
J-R Hatnsyekec Miandad b Zakir — 7 
tflG da Afwnb Imran — 16 

A L F d« Mai not out 14 

S D Ammsiri b mran — — ~ 6 

K Amatean IbwbOadk • 2 

— 25 
..281 


Extras (b 7, b 9, w 6,nt>3) .. 
Total. 


FALL OF WICKETS: 1-12. 2-79. 3-109, 4- 

148. 5- 202. 6-218, 7-251 . 8-280. 9272. 
BOWLING: Imran 32-11-69-4; Akram 22- 
841-i;ZaWr 24*203; Mudasaar 7-2-19- 
0: Qatfir 23 5-3-56-2. 

PAKISTAN: First Innings 
Mudassar Nazar ede AMs b do Mel- 8 

Mohsin Khan Ibw b Amalean 12 

OnsimOTTarcdeAlwtabRatnayekB 19 

Jauad Miandad Ibw b Amalean 23 

Rameez Rata not out 73 

SaNm Mate c sub b Ratnayeka 29 

Imran Khan not out 3 

Extras (b 4. lb l.w 1.nb7) 13 

Total (5 wfcts) 180 

Wasim Akram. Abdul Oater, Zakir Khan 

and tZulqamain to baL 

FALL OF WICKETS: 1-24. 2-32, 3^9. 4- 

87. 5- 158. 

BOWUNG (to date): de Mel T 5.5-2-53-1: 
Amalean 11-0-452; Ratnayeka 15-1-70-2; 
AnurasM 4-2-7-0. 


ROWING 

British repel 
invasion 
by Italians 

By Jim Rail ton 

The threat from the Medi- 
terranean to the Tideway Head 
of the River title was thwarted 
on Saturday. The British heavy- 
weight eight, with three Olym- 
pic gold medal winners on 
board, had a shade more than 20 
seconds to spare over the tal- 
ented British lightweights, with 
Campania, the Italians, who had 
seven Olympic oarsmen, in 
third place almost half a second 
behind the runners-up. 

There were notable surprises 
among the top 10. the light- 
weights second crew taking 
fourth place. Nottinghamshire 
County tenth and Stirling, the 
Scottish Commonwealth 
Games aspirants, ninth. 

So the British continue to rule 
the roost- The Italians will be 
bitterly disappointed, although 
they had two in the top 10. Fiat 
finishing fifth. London Univer- 
sity came a cropper when their 
first two crews were not placed 
or were disqualified for appar- 
ently impeding crews during 
and after the race. Imperial 
College impressed in finishing 
eleventh to take the Senior A 
pennant. 

Cambridge University, 

preparing for next Saturday's 
Boat Race (3.15), impressed in 
an outing against a national 
squad eight that had not entered 
for the Head. 

TODAY'S OUTINGS (trom Putney): Ox- 
tom 12.0 and 430: Cambridge 10-0 and 
430. HEAD OF THE RtVEfc 1. AHA 
National Squad. 17mm 47.i9sec 2, 
Namflus LwWwetaf H B. 18:7.52: 3. Camp* 
mafltt, 18:787: 4! Nautilus UoftNwxjtts II, 
18: 162: 5, fiat (M. 18:1660: 6. Vesta, 
18:19.34; 7, Tideway ScuSere School, 18: 
25/46; 8, London Unnersrty-Tynan. 
1 £25,40; 9, Stirfing ABSC. 1& 2832: 10. 
NMUngham County, 182837: 1 1 . Impena 
Cottage. 183332:' 12. Lea. 18*4.97; 13, 
Garda Stocftsna, 183537; 14. Hampton 
Softool, 183734; 15. London. 1839.58; 
16, Gofctte, 18*0.81: 17. Bedtont, 
18:42.08; 18. Thames. 18:42.54-. 19, 

Leander. 18:407)23. Waim 1M6.K; 
24, Reeding University. 183057; 25. 

WIN NERS; H ead crewiARA 
Natural Squad. Vernon Trophy. Vesta 

University (24th) Senior C. Hampton 
School (37A)- Fastest Unweretty Second 

Cr»w;R«^ngU«versrtyll 

CWWtBHWj 71 
Royal Navy (182nd). 


.novIck 

Crew: 


RACING: HIGHLY-TRIED COLT SHOULD GAIN OVERDUE WIN AND MAINTAIN EXCELLE NT FORM OF RYAN AND RAMSD 

tv .. . .. j K-Battery 

Piggott 


Bright As Night 
should lead 
off fine day for 

Newmarket 


By Mandarin 


Bright As Night, who ran 
well against the cream of last 
year’s two-year-olds, can con- 
tinue the excellent form of 
Mick Ryan, the Newmarket 
trainer, by gaining his first 
success in the Burton Overy 
Stakes at Leicester this 
afternoon. 

The son of Miswaki ran two 
sound races at Newmarket 
when second .to Jewelled Reef 
in the Danepak Bacon Stakes 
and seventh to Uuntingdale in 
the William Hill Dewhuret 
Stakes, but bis best perfor- 
mance came at Sandown Park 
where he chased home the 
consistent Bold Arrangement 
with three good previous win- 
ners behind him. 

Like Ryan's recent big-race 
winners Motivator and Mac's 
Reef. Bright As Night belongs 
to Terry Ramsden, but this 
flamboyant character is un- 
likely to make a killing this 
afternoon as his promising 
three-year-old will start at 
short odds to beat three 
seemingly inferior opponents. 

Robis looks totally out of 
his depth, but there may be 
little between the other two 
runners, Lance and Fleet 
Form, with marginal prefer- 
ence given to the former. 

Newmarket trainers should 
also take the other three-year- 
old races with Hubbards 
Lodge (Paul Kelleway) in the 
Simon de Montfort Maiden 
Stakes and Volida (Clive 
Brittain) in the ' Loddington 
EBF Stakes. 

Like Bright as Night, VoBda 
raced against some of the best 
of her generation last year, 
finishing fourth to Kingscote 
in the Lowther Stakes, fifth to 
Green Desert in the Flying 
Childers and ninth to Embla 
in the Cheveley Park, with 
good winners behind 


King Of Spades and Niccolo 
Polo, who runs here in prefer- 
ence to taking on Bright as 
Night form the nucleus of the 
opposition, but Volida looks 
slightly better class. 

Habbards Lodge has Target 
Sighted to beat in the maiden, 
but Paid Kelleway’s Henbit 
coit need only reproduce the 
form of his excellent second to 
Highland Chieftain at New- 
market in November to record 
his firet victory. 

For the day's best though, I 
look to Folkestone where 
Scfanla can make his fitness 
tell in the Aldington Handi- 
cap. Hugh O'Neill's sprinter 
has already had a run this 
season, finishing tenth of 18, 
beaten only eight lengths, to 
Will George at Doncaster on 
Friday in a much better race 
than today's. 

With that race under his 
belt, Schula will have a deci- 
sive advantage over his rivals 
here and it is worth noting that 
he won this race two years ago 
without the benefit of a previ- 
ous outing. 

of completing a dw^fcSe^fan 
hour later when Mr 
McGregor, who was bought 
out of Bruce Hobbs's stable at 
the Newmarket September 
has only his second run 
for his new stable in the 
Rochester Stakes. The Formi- 
dable colt was running over 
seven furlongs and a mile last 
year, but appeared not quite to 
get the trip and the return to 
six furlongs should enable him 
belatedly to get off the mark. 

Hexham abandoned 

Today's meeting at Hexham 
has been abandoned because 
the course is waterlogged. A 
total of LIS meetings have 
been lost to the weather 


LESTER, The Official Biog- 
raphy, bv Dick Fronds, is pub- 
lished tddoy. WOODROW 
WYATT reviews this appraisal 
ofihe career of arguably our 
greatest jockey , - 

It is sad that we wfll never see 
again that strange crpaching 
figure, bottom raised, galvaniz- 
ing a horse and winning fro* an 
improbable position. Lester 
Piggott had a magic be commu- 
nicated to the crowd and the 
horses. By hard work, experi- 
ence and instinct he coaid get the 
maximum response any horse 
was capable of at exactly die 
right moment. The horse and he 
were partners who understood 
each other. 

When be was 28 in 1954 he 
rode his first Derby whiner. 
Never Say The owner 
thought it had no chance and. 
preferred staying in a health 
bum to going to Epsom despite 
the trainer's confidence. Piggott 
was the tmefttfansmstre third 
choice as jockey. He had ridd e n 
the horse when easily beaten in 
an uni m portant Liverpool nee 
ami again when it ran badly h 
the Free Handicap at 
Newmarket. 

As he bad reluctantly agreed 
to ride Never Say Die, having no 
other mount, Piggott thought 
hard about his poor prospect 
which started at 33-1. Never Say 
Die was heavy in front with a 
heavy bead and hong to the left, 
and was fitted with aO manner of 
devices to co unte ract this defect. 
Piggott insisted oa these correc- 
tive additions being removed 
because Epsom is a left-handed 
coarse. Never Say Die, perfectly 
positioned by, and in rapport 
with his jockey, won easily. 

Piggott comments; “There are 
certain bors<s_. Yon nm them 
one way and they’re useless, and 
the other way they're cham- 
pions. Yon try to tell people it 
makes all that difference and 
they don't believe yon, but it's a 
fact” 

The Jockey Club Stewards 
were among the disbelievers. 
They took Piggott's licence away 
at Royal Ascot, a rigM-kmi 
coarse, because N ever Say Die 
hnng to the left and Piggott was 
unreasonably held responsible 
for his interference with other 
horses. 

Piggott is not starry-eyed 
about horses. U A lot of them are 
stupid. A lot are inteU^mt_ At 
least 60 per cent of horses don’t 
really want to do their best. 
Winning- doesn't mean all that 
much to them. Yon hare to try to 



At one stage In thb 


dose wtpervfciOH, ^ 

relative poverty. P*ggJ*t 1 

that -to the lW®s the 

press said be was a maiionaue. 
whereas' before tax In* : 

were 0g|w jpj LJO boi . 

weep too soon- Mr Piggott 

trefeer is installed a very fine 
stables at 

m rnteOf-tbe-min jockey arm 


charges 
home ior 


bit of an act, and I do hg 
grudge him a penny of h» 

milfawt. - - 

Able to charm at w9L be B not 
naturally a d&cowteons man, 
although he disfikes conversa- 
tion- He has always been P* i 



tartare to answer, became he ha* 
not heard,' him keqpeai if- been 
taken te rudeness.- • ■ 

- F®rtmat«dy his desfaewjta' 
serted him when fixing riding 
.engagements on the telephone. 
- - pgg piw had nvuivrom ba nishe s 
with authority. If y emjee trying 
to win — and anlike other 
lackeys I do not think Piggott 
ever tried not to -yon ba« 
take split- secon d chances which 
so m etim es tevolrc pmn tegtional 
tramping or ehsowcfmn. Prootr 
■ e ver complained *boot his 
Mspcndons, bnt l ampect tad 
w t of (fcw were doe to- the 
inability of the stewards to 
recognize' the tpmEly of tree 
snatness and an itch to get at 
this cool, sdf-contained chanc- 
'•tor.'" 


two and a half 
Wantage. Martin _ 


Lester Piggott: glamour and superstar quality, 
weakness for the truth. ... - ' 

Folkestone is one.ef the 
mpleasant 


Certainly Piggott b a difficult . trainer, took the prize last year 


to do 
i*s a vast 


hmaonr them to 
what they can. . 
difference between a 
horse and a bad horse. _Ifs sot 
a matter of 20 lengths difference, 
Ns a frxrlong. If yon get ahorse 
who's very tost, very intelligettt 
and wants to race, it’s a revela- 
i tioa. On one of those yon can 
beat the world.” 

A top-rate jockey can get half 
to three-quarters a length extra 
ont of a horse, enough to be 
decisive in dose finishes. 
Piggott could coax one to two 
lengths extra. He was an artist 
and a geufas, and like many snch 
he has his foibles and eccentric- 
ities which per ha ps he: afccea- 
tuites deliberately for the fan wf 
it He enjeys not being a 
clubbable maw, to appear no- 
rose and tospeak laconically, if 
' not enigmatically. 


In 

1 was in Hong Kong fee 
the opening of.thonnitMnillioa 
pound Sha-thi raceco urse re- 
claimed from the sea, and of 
which the Hong Kong Jockey 
Onb was very - praod. Piggott, 
one of the invited jockeys, was 
interviewed on Hong Kong tde- 
risfam and asked which coarse In 
E ngla nd Sba-tin most remin de d, 
him «C “Folkestone,' 
said, and added nothing. v 
His mother warned him to be 
careftd of his money, pointing to 
saccessfhl jockeys who had r 

lavish' -br their 


revelled hi 
althon^i bebnot 
judging by the " 



mi and as a~ tranter will raffle 
epoers with his weakness for the 
tntiL' Bnt any ovnaer with a 
reasonable horse wfll be ftacfcy to 
have this remartaMe, -cIeaP- 
headed jadge training fir him. ' 
. There , was a glam o ur and 
superstar quality to Pfetott 
which none of his c onten t porar- 
les have. The housewives adored 
him and wotdd bade him on 
■nfrncied bones at long, odds, 
hot reafiring that he bsd^ worked 
another ti rade when be . won. 
Their instinct was right the 

^ „ old curmudg eon of 

whom stable hub, trainers, own- 
css and jockeys were in awe, was 
not aa ogre-at all, however much 
he pretended to be one. 

Dick Francis started writing 


has 4fcis/He*aphy with Piggott in 
advice, ' 1973; it Was not aneasj rate but 
mheteft it-js- a winne r. / 

Dick • LESTER. The Official 


tnMh fitwtfkh help; often - raphy, by Dick Fnaris 
s n rrep lin oas, to theseln ti onliku chad Joseph, £1X95) 


FOLKESTONE 


to soft 

Draw: sf-Gf, low numbers best 

1.45 HEADCORN STAKES (2-y-o: £684: 5f) (7 
runners) 

2 C HB tRYWOOD SAM HOWeB 8-11 I Johnson 3 

3 MBDAY SAMTO P Mttcftel 8-1 1 A McOtora 1 

4 (OSIER COLMR Hetman 8-11 L Jones (5) 6 

5 PRMCE MAC WKWin 8-11 CftAtarRS 

8 CAWSTOKS COHSMAN R Horn 80 RPBMB7 

10 FLAKY LADY R Smyth 38 S Whitworth 4 

11 LADY PAT MMcConnack 8-8 L RC(Kiir»s2, 


3.15 ALDINGTON HANDICAP (£1,223: 5f) (t 8) 

1 141/ PRMCESSWBDYP8NCa*gh»100 G Carter {5)16 

2 008- PEH0H (D) G Lewis 9-13 PWUdionlO 


_ l(D)GL 

3 040- JACKEBLAR(D)MMcC0llliai*»-13. 

4 040- THATCHWUEI Matttina 9-12. . 

5 420- RUSSELL FLYBtmiR Hood 9-10 

6 000- BELIE TOWER (QR Smyth 9-10- 

7 240- O0HWY A Dawson 9-5 

8 090 SCHULA (C-O) H ONaO 94 


N Howe 2 
W Woods (^5 


9 001- HOKUSANK ftoty92 

10 000- MR ROSE (CJ B HutCf*»on 9^1 
12 040- ALICE lttU.(C-01 AlndwnS-0 
14 000- LEAN STREAK (B)R HOBd 8-1 1. 

16 000- MAHOOMAN 

17 -400- EDWtPSPRB 

20 D20- STTERRAHAR 

21 000- ROYAL BEAR 


- A Cote (7) 8 
_ DGfesonlS 
_ 1 Johnson 6 
AShoufls(5)3 
B Thompson 12 
RCurant 17 
BCrossteyA 


NMacadayB-fO ROoctnitelS 
(BND)Khmiy38 SDamon(3)7 
lDJ«myM__G0iciw1 


- Q* 1 - 4 -!. g- 1 OFT^TpOd 22 400- LOTTIE (B)RAtetaraM. 

Ssm.91 PmiCBltec.10-1 todday Santo, 16-1 CawstonsComndten. 23 000- HAMPTON WALK JHott 8-3 


Folkestone selections 

By Mandarin 

1.45 Lady Pat 2.15 Icen. 2.45 Icaro. 3.15 
SCHULA (nap). 3.45 Mr McGregor. 4.15 Truely 
Billy. 

By Our Newmarket Corre s pondent 
2.15 Icen. 2.45 Icaro. 3.15 Thatch ville, 3.45 
Northern Gunner. 4.15 Truely B31y. 

2.15 ALKHAM SELUNG HANDICAP (£739: 1m 2f) 
(14) 

2 4M- VAIGLYREL B Fonoy 9-7 RCochram4 

6 M0- HOT BETTY DIP Buder 8-13 RGusstll 

7 041/ GREATEST WTSWKtmp 9-12 CRuttwj5)3 


KBrwlshSwrai4 
. AOmtU 
NAttamsS 

4-1 ASca HB. 5-1 Th*Wiv* 0 , 6-1 PWlon. Seta*, 8-1 StTommar, 
10-1 EcMnsPrinosss. 124 Hokusan, 14-1 odnts. 

MS ROCHESTER STAKES (£684: 6Q (f 8} ■ 


000- BLACK SPOUT HOTte«9fl. 


090 DMENSK3N 1*5 N Smith 90 ■ 
20- GOU) PROSPECT GBakSnoMft 
230- JAMES OECOOMBEMBofion 9-0 . 
440- MB MCGREGOR HOTteN 90 — 
■■ PULSWGH C BMKtMd 90 


i I Johnson 8 
. NON-RUNNER 6 
, JWUansll 
. PWaktanU 
S Whitworth 7 
. B Rouse 1 


1 
2 

3 

4 

5 

6 

8 029- VISUAL BENTITY PMtatal 90 

9 00- YOUNG BORSNCaMUn 90 

10 JBDORA J Bridoor 8-fl- 

11 400- UNGF&D LADY W Karo 8- 1 ' B Thomson 18 

13 000- M1LETRIANS LASS GGuiwuy 8-11 MWtahamS 

14 030- RESTAND WBLCOMEGBaUno 8-11 _ J Mafias 15 

15 OOOf 5HIRLY AIM Mrs N Macatey 8-1 1 . S P Griffiths (5) 17 

16 00- DALSAAM BAY Pal MMchflfl 7-11 —4 


AMcGtana3 
. T Lucas 10 
NDawe9 


2- LOW KEY NCMagtan 7-11 
TROYAttAC 


19 2- LOW KEY N Calagftan 7-11 GCartar®2 

20 0- SIATHOTROYAtt A Davison 7-11 IJupp(7)l6 

21 009- NORTTOWGUNNHtW Jan* 7-11 __ MLIbomas 13 

22 000- PASSOONBI R Hoad 7-11 B.Cntesfay 12 

. 94GoM PrespocL 7-2 Mr McGregor. 4-1 Low Kay. T1-2 UngfiSld 

Lady, 8-1 Ran AndWtotooma. 12-1 Jamas da Ctoombs. 14- oOwra. 

4.15 SHORNCUFFE STAKES (3^-a £684: 1m 4f) 


8 040- TAK DUCHESS A Moots 8-11 . 

9 400/ ICEN OH WMuasan 8-11 

10 OK- CHAJttMA MUSK R Hoad 8-10 
12 000- ALCAZABA J DavteS 8-9 
16 000- C7QBOY(B)D 


.'MVfighamS 
B Rouse 7 


L Ashworth (7)2 
. SWhsworm 12 

18 000/ MODERN MAN ffllJBradtey 8-4 JWMsnsI 

19 000- BLASTS W9fl«FfC-0) PM MsM 94 —10 

20 009- TAXtNETTE A Davison 6-4 D Gibson 6 

21 009- COURT JEWEL GGretay 84 G Carter (5) 13 


0) 


23 000/ BtkAMSSHARD Jenny M G Dickie 9 

26 000- FLEUR DE THISTLE A Darisan 7-7 M 

11-4 OG Boy. 3-1 
Hits. 8-1 Hot Betty. 10-1 


L Thomas 5 
. 4-1 Chartstna Music, 6-1 Greatest 
s Winnie, 12-1 ton, 14-1 others. 


2 009- MMNMSPRMGRHmdM. 

3 003- MKSHT MOVE R Smytti 9-0 — 

4 00- NEVER BSJJ Bni^Br94J . 

5 000- OWL CASTLE M Usher 9-0 — — 

7 STRQHGARM JR 1 Matthews 9-6 . 

8 32- TRUELY Baj-YTUatthaws 90 _ 


2.45 KINGSNORTH HANDICAP (3-y-a £1,082: 1m 
4f)(7) 

2 301- ICARO N Catodan 9-7 G Carter (5) 7 

3 200- HOUDAY MKJ. P Kefleway 98 Gay Ketewsy m 2 

4 404- HELEN’S PLEASURE l Mantem 96 ~w Woods (3) 6 


_ B Rouse 7 
C Rutter (5) 8 
_ N Da we 9 
AMcGkmeO 
GDk*te5 
_ N Oav4 

9 000- WWQBEEJBrifl g8r9-0 ROuesM 

COUNTLESS C0tMtESSRVMtonsB-11 R Cochrane 2 


10 
11 

64 
Baa. 12-1 


HSHLAHO DAISY H Smyth B-11 Symtworth3 

Truly BBy. 7-4 NJcM Move, 92 Msnt m Spring, 8-1 
l Highiamf Daisy, ft-1 others. 


5 000- N0RTHNCHG Baking 9-1 
8 000- RED EHLLYC Brittain B-2 


S 000- FOUL SHOTWMusson 7-12 

10 430- TIE WOODEN HUT RVborapuy 7-8 


. JWfflmnsS 
C Rutter (5) 4 
_ A MacksyS 
— D Brawn 1 


5-2 icaro. 3-1 hetan s Pleasured Red BBy. 8-1 HcBdayMH.8-1 
Tho Wooden Hul 12-1 Foul Shot M-1 NorttincK. ■ • 


• West Tip signalled he is right on target for 
another crack at the Grand National with a 
splendid victory under top weight at Newbury on 
Saturday. Mecca make him 10-1 joint favourite 
with Mr Smigfit for Ain tree, while Hills offer 12r 
1. 


TENNIS 


Strong boys and weak 
girls under microscope 

By Rex Bellamy, Tennis Correspondent 


The winter indoor series 
sponsored by the Royal Bank of 
Scotland is a useful guide to the 
Lawn Tennis Association's 
traini ng stafL who can check the 
progress of juniors and see bow 
they react to what is, at this 
modest level a stiff test of skill 
and character. And the national 
junior co-ordinator, Derek 

Bone, suggested yesterday: 

“Thu son of competition makes 

the choice of international 
teams more fair, because players 
have a chance to prove what 
they can do when it matters." 

During the past three days the 
eight leading players in the four 
groups — both sexes compete at 
16 and under and 14 and under 
- have contested the ultimate 
double elimination series (too 
complicated to explain) at 
Queen's Club, West Kensing- 
ton. Sound judges watched them 
play - which mostly looked like 
hard work — and, on the whole, 
responded with the feint praise 
that can be damning. 

Susan Mappin, the women's 
national team manager, was 
concerned about the your 

S ris. “There is a tendency 
e better players in a particular 
age group to get a false sense of 
security.’’ she said. "In terms of 


talent and depth the 14 and 
under group is the weakest for 
maybe 10 years. I hope some- 
body will come through and 
prove me wrong, but if these 
girls have any ambition to be 
senior players, they have a long 
way to go. Otherwise they will 
be overtaken by the next age 
group: throughout the country. 

The boys provoked cautious 
optimism from Bone and a 
former Davis Cup player, Rich- 
ard Lewis, who coaches the 16 
and under group. They thought 
Marie Petcbey or Essex, aged 15. 
was likely to go far. “Both 
groups look very strong, which 
is heartening", Lewis said, 
"Mark is an outstanding talenL 
He has a lot going for him and 
has every chance to get to the 
top.” 

Bone suggested: “Both the 
boys' groups are probably the 
strongest, in depth, for 10 years. 
They are fairly solid groups, so 
we should nave solid adult 
players coming out of them. The 
competition and rivalry win 
help. But many of our best 
seniors were not dominant as 
juniors. It is difficult to pick the 
junior with the best combina- 
tion of talent, physique and 
motivation.” 


BOWLS 

Cuttsbooksa 
place at 
Coatbridge 

By Gordon Allan 

Roy Cutis, of Ipswich, won 
his first major singles title when 
he beat Lee Shoo bridge, of 

Tonbridge, 21-17 in the final of 
the Prudential English indoor 
championship at Hartlepool on 
Saturday. He thus confirmed his 
place in the world champion- 
ship' at Coatbridge next Feb- 
ruary. to which the national 
champions of all the home 
countries are 'automatically 
invited. 

Cutts is a phlegmatic charac- 
ter, unlike the quick and eager 
Shoobridge. but he still did a 
little dance of joy when 
Shoobridge's last bowl of the 
match brushed the j*Hr without 
moving it decisively, Cutts was 
8-1 up in the opening exchanges 

but Shoobridge responded weU, 
drawing level at 14-14 and 16- 
16. 

Cutts beat David Bryant 21- 
19 in the semi-finals and said it 
was the best match be had 
played in his life. At two hours 
and 50 minutes it tested nearly 
an hour longer than the final. 

RESULTS: State* T«mi rtnxlr R Cutts 
npswieft) 21. o Bryant (Oovadon) 19: L 
Snoodridga (Angst Tonbridge) 21. W 
Hayward (Preston. Bngtaon) 14, Rest 
Cutts 21. Shoobridge 17. P*tk final: 
Cyphers (G Smith. A Thomson) 22 . 
Cun*rta pi Cume. R Gass) 16. 


LEICESTER 


to soft. 

Hft, low numbers boat 


2.15 KNIGHTON MAIDEN AUCTION STAKES (2-y-o: £1,159: 5f) (17 
runners) 


I 

3 

4 

5 

tt- 
12 - 
■ 14. 

15 

- 18 
f7 
18 
21 • 

24 

25 
. 26 

27 

11-4 

IBsteya 


EVEirrrrraMF 
TIH O wesns tf HI 
UfiTOHfiTOta 
JtRKlritaP Haste 


WRY LAD (C HI 
BBUlRKtodi 
(LASER (Mrs S 


PETRUS SE VENTY | 
NLYARMT^HHI 
HUfflYi 

. -Boe ttmuQl 
CGtD^toffl 

■ PEATSWOCffi I 
*7* «AAEY*T0PI«EJ 
. CUTLER MDGE (Cl 
: RMGBACKOtaM 
SARASOTAfll 
. . SPABSHOLTfW* 

m surra s itoM Gfl 

WLDOtRarace 


P Hasten 8-13_ 
HctfRSte*i8-7. 

97. 


rare* 


Hasten* 8-7 


JOanvB-4 

ihtortMBd 


BritnfcS*: 
G Stem 9-1 _ 
8 -0. 


t McMbtHL 
CWMmanso. .:..., . 


P Cote 90. 
R Boss 90. 


(T Monts) W Wharton 7-tl 


FRSMMGOLDgteMbaryStttWOK Cwrin^tenhBRwn 

QUICK STICKS (D Chnpraan) D Onpman 7-4 1 

TAWNY PUT (JWeMonQ AMKhrer 7-11 ; 

VALDOSTA (CVftkm)CWIdmsn 7-11 


TJwefl 

rtWsmsC 

„WGareonlI 
. KDwteyZ 
_GDnfltetrf3 
-Li-MMM 
A Proud 7 
-JP^otensonB 
i — Ttttefti 
_LLMtMte*7 
_NCarthte14 

7-11 J Lowe 1 
M 


. R Morse 
R 


IRyM 

ses 


tosrehafi. 3-1 Ptotswood Shooter. 4-1 &U Lnsr, 11-2Suttsr» l«.8-lKI»Sojat. 12- 
if opine. 18-1 ' 


Leicester selections 

By Mandarin 

2.15 Sutters Mill 2.45 Sweet Gemma. S.^Apple Wind. 3.45 Bright 

As Night 4.15 Hubbards Lodge. 4.45 V^ida; ‘‘ r . ‘‘ 

.• Gur Newnijukei Corre^xindenl- ; 

ZI5 Petrus Seventy. 3.15 Jack’s Island. 3.45 
Hubbards Lodge.. 4.-45 Glildaa Moil .* 

By Michnel Seely - 

3.15 BOLD ILLUSION (nap). 3.45 Bright As Night 4.45 Nkcofo 

Polo. ' ' 


Z45 BJLLESDON SELLING HAM»CAP (E70B: (12) 



DNteftofeon 4-9-11. 


P* 


(CavtarQretaU4PWMMm4«5. Jftakf« 
s J Mer ^bneece *oT — — SKrtgUeyr 
I UL 1 *«n 


(OsfNtxxyStaMas/KCunninghareBiown 


10 

KtaTMsrmO 
KDerlqf 6 


D Chapman 4-8-8 

to^T^CTfc*tef3*7 . 


Q Moons 97-7 


4-99TIMS5 
. DMchtosS 
_ U Wood 12 
_KCaraon 3 
— J Lowe 2 


94 Frisco, 52 Snekefltesr. 92 Sweet Gamma. 9-1 Pan Taw. 191 DanKtener..14-1 


7^30 unless stated 

FOOTBALL 

Scottish first division 

Airdrie v Hamilton 

Scottish second division 

Stirling Alb v Berwick 


TODAY’S FIXTURES 

FREIGHT HOVER TROPHY: Sotribeni Sec ond tfite star Coventry v Oonctoten 

_ Sunderland v Scurvtnorpe. 

FOOTBALL COMSaWtON: a rnangham 
vSwtadoni 

RUGBY UNION 
SCHOOLS: fiosstyn Psh sevens 

OTTStSPORT 

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cn Whiggje Geo. Mahogony 
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Saturday’s results 


DONCASTER 



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- K-Batteiy broke a 1 3-year-old 
losing sequeoce^ ^ for pftrtteu- 
tramed numers 10 wn the first 
big handicap of the Fla srasm. 
ilS Wiffiam Hril Lincoln, at 
Doncaster oa Su unto. Jte 
five-vear-oki scoreneo noise at 
od^'of 25-1 for Bill Hscy, the 
Mahon trainer, who won the 
race in 1971 with another 
outsider. Double Cream. 

Once again alow draw proved 

decisive as Well Rigged, the hot 
favourite, who was drawn one, 
set the pace from tiro start. John 


haul Weil Rigged: who stayed qn 
to finish second wi th Fusilier tn 
diild places Another of the 
fancied runners. Go Bananas, 
was withdrawn after he refused 
to go irao tiro stalls. , •. 

Elsey. whose Father Charles, 
trained Babur to win the Lin- 
coln in successive years in the 
fifties. saMb ^Pve been planning 
since December for K-Batsery to 
go for foe Lincoln. TVe kept him 
on foe go since last season and 
he’s been working with my 

JU jS^^minion, wboorigmafiy 
cost 300 .gnineas. took his 
winning tally for (he season to 
seven when landing the Tote 
Credit Hurdle at Newbury by 
' s from 


the 


with Quickstep. 

' After My Dominion bad won 
five races be was bought by 
Teny r Ramsden and. he ma y 
now- join foe. -same owner's 
Doncaster winner. Brunico. in 
the fine-up for the GlenJivet 
HonBe at Liverpool in two 
weeks. After that My Dominion 

may nm on the Flat. 

. • Princess Anne suffered the 
-embarrassment- of having to 
weigh cut twice before her latest 
riding appearance at Newbury. 
The Princess was caltecT bade to 
the scales after a racecourse 
official, spotted an error: She 
initially weighed out with a 71b 
allowance fm i ne xperienced rid- 
. era. but under the conditions of 
foe race she was not entitled to 
'die claim, because she is aged 
'Over25v i: " •" 

- With foe: conf usio n cleared 
.up, foe-Priaoess went out to ride 
Well Wisher info fourth place 
behind Co m m an damc. 


Greendltbe mostsatistaction as 
Jtit .£4%8P0 porchase jusiped 
nmch better than he ever did 


. David Turner responded with 
three winners, Lexador, Critic 
Smager. and Oweitsville, at the 
EMtaeHtetiBS. 

Graham Tidgeon saw 
Gatoombe Park, Random Leg 
aod Matchplay bade in the 
wihnta^: enclosure at the 
Gzaftan, but only foe first was 
ridden by his daughter, Jenny. 
After her win in the members 
she was sidelined again bring 
kicked fofowxng a fell from 
Scotch On The Rocks. 

Haying entered the winners 
enclosure for die first time last 
week Amanda Harwood, Guy 
Harwood's daughter, bad a dou- 
ble atthe Crawley and Horsham 
on two of hfr wbef! horses, 
Lawn-Meet and Red S hah At 
the Weston and BaaweU Jane 
Southcombc rode a well-judged 
race- on Gerry Doyle to win a 
ding-dong battle with 
BereenroseL She was the rider of 
Polly Toodle last week to whom 
my stutter inadvertaniy gave an 
extra Toodle. 

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THE TIMES MONDAY MARCH 24 1986 


SPORT 


29 


'*-N 




FOOTBALL- ENGLAND FLY OFF TO RUSSIA WITH TWO CASUALTIES BUT NO LAST-MINUTE SNAGS 


*5 


Robson enjoys 
the luxury of 

a trouble-free 



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By Stuart Jones, Football Correspondent 

P® 1 ^. 1 suffered was fell wondering whether he 
two casualties over the week- would be contiiumia his prep- 

n , enhe 5 shouW araiions for the Worid Cup 

dimmish the strength of the * 

side that lines up against the 
Soviet Union in Tbilisi on 
Wednesday. One injury forced 
Banws, of Watford, to with- 
draw, the other wound was 
self-inflicted by Don Howe, 
the team coach, who resigned 
as Arsenal manager. 

-After an extended ran on 

**5 0aak •iW.umHmea wiuun a 

’ Ba ^, has not frameworkofdiscjplme, 
nartedm any oflheiast seven wasiast seen almost two years 
inten»atjonal& Be has stepped ago at WemWey. Their im- 

S ri L “?? 11,(5 fading wide pressive 2-0 victory seemed at 

role and become the under- ■ ■ 

study to Waddle, who scored 
for Tottenham against ffis old 
club, Newcastle United, on 


Finals with a significant game 
or relatively meaningless 
practice. 

The Soviet Union, who 
have, also qualified- for Mexi- 
co, represent by fair the most 
fcnrnidable opponents during 
England's -build-up to this 
summer’s tournament Their 
power and their skin, tradi- 
tionally. contained within -a 


the time to be a dark omen for 
England's visit to South 
America. 

rvr** . But Robson’s side has since 

Saturday . As long as Bobby lost only four of their subse- 
Robson remains committed quem 20 matches and three of 
to selecting three forwards, those defeats, by Uruguay, 


Waddle is always the more 
likely selection. 

As -he prepared to leave 
yesterday morning, it was not 


Italy and Mexico, were inflict- 
ed during summer tours. In- 
deed, since he took over as 
manager, England have yet to 



- -- — p- -- uhiiiiiqw , uimntm VCL iu 

so much the relauve health of be beaten in Eastern- Europe, 
bis squad that concerned the They haw beaten Hungary 3- 
England manager as the pros- 0 and drawn- 0-0- with 
peel of being en gage d in a Romania. 

-■competitive fixture in mid- The squad is weakened by 
week, which had looked a lost the absence' of Reid and 
. cause a week ago,. For as particularly of Bryan Robson. 
.Robson travelled beyond the the captain. Stevens, who 
Iron Curtain for the third time underwent suigery on a trou- 
as England’s manager, he was Wesome swollen knee last 
genninely relieved. With the week, was not available for 
exception of Barnes, all his Everton on Saturday and may 
squad had reported for duty be doubtful The other repre- 
on Saturday evening, not for sentatives, including five who 
training sessions at Bisham scored for their clubs over the 
Abbey’ that Robson had feared weekend, are all as fit as can be 
might be their lot for the week, expected at this stage of the 
but a meaningful fixture with demanding domestic 
the Russians. programme. • 

The elongated games of One of them, Shilton, is the 
diplomacy played last week .lone survivor from England’s 
between the English and Sovi- last appearance ,in the .Soviet 
et Embassies, had pot . the Unioil He played a significant 
friendly international in Tblisi role in the 2-1 win in Moscow 
-in such doubt that:Robson 13 years ago. 


Scorers suited: Lee, who scored twice, embraces Speedie (right) after his third goal for 
Chelsea (Photograph: Ian Stewart) 


City show 
all the 
sharpness 

By Simon O’Hagan 


Dixon misses the 
cup that cheers 


ByCHve White 


Manchester Utd. 
Manchester City 


2 

...2 


Foster’s 

By Nicholas Hailing 

Luton Town 2 

Everton 1 

For the manager of a team 
who in their eighth match in 22 
days had just called on their last 
reserves to gain spectacular 
revenge for a recent FA Cup 
exit. David Pleat certainly bad 
plenty of gripes on Saturday. 
Were it not for dfc.HcT that 
Foster had inspired a fete vic- 
tory that the centre Half himself 
bad earlier jeopardized. Pleat 
might well have been boding 
over instead of merely 
simmering. 

Even if he did not seem most 
gracious in victory, it was easy 
to commiserate with the Luton 
manager, for he did seem jus- 
tified in accusing Evenon’s 
players of histrionics which 
contributed to four Luton play- 
ers getting booked. 

Luton deserved to be ahead at 
half-time but a minute after the 
interval they fell behind as 


revenge 

Richardson’s shot took a cruel 
deflection off Foster, leaving 
Sealey stranded. So often the fell 
guy, Foster was in more trouble 
when he was booked for fouling 
Lineker. 

Since Luton were now unable 
to make much impression on 
the game or the referee, there 
seemed little danger of Everton 
suirreudering an unbeaten 
league record stretching back to . 
December 14, . -r . •• - . 
But such is the perversity -of 
football that with Everton well 
in control Foster beaded id 
Hill’s 82nd-minute free kick and 
completed his atonement by 
sending in another header from 
Preece’s corner four minutes 
later which Newell diverted past 
SouthalL 

LUTON TOWN: L SNtay; H Johnson, M 
Thorona, P Nicholas, S Fostar. M 
Dooaghy. fi HU M NavwD. M Htafert, T 
Breaker, D Preec®. 

EVERTON: N Souffiaft.A Harper. N 
Porton, P Van den Hauwe. D MountfleW. 
K ffccftardson, T Steven. G Lineker. G 
Sham. P Breoewaft K steady -tuubc J 
MarshaS). 

Baton*: a Lewis (Great BooktareJ. 


Southall create history 


Southall are through to the 
final of the FA Vase for the first 
time in tbeir history after win- 
ning 3-1 at Wisbech Town in the 
second leg of their semi-final on 
Saturday to record a 5-3 ag- 
gregate victory (Paul Newman 
writes). The Vaux ball -Opel 
League club's opponents at 
Wembley on April 28 wflj be 
either Halesowen Town or 
Warrington Town, who meet in 
a reptav tomorrow at Telford 
after drawing 3-3 (4-* on 
aggregate). 


Southall rarely looked in dan- 
ger after scoring twice through 
Ferdinand and Powefl in a four- 
minute spell at the end of the 
first half 

Ferdinand added a third be- 
fore Mitchell scored a consola- 
tion goal for Wisbech in the 
closing minutes. 

A crowd of 3;035 saw 
Warrington (North West Coun- 
ties League) equalize three times 
at Halesowen (West Midlands 
ie) and not even extra time 
separate the two sides. 


The decline in Manchester 
United’s form has continual for 
so long that Ron Atkinson, then- 
manager, should know better 
than to put down a performance 
as poor as Saturday's simply to 
“two moments of irresponsible 
defending”. As any history*" 
[will tell you, fads are not -the 
same as reasons. 

Thanks to Everton’s defeat ax 
Luton Town, United remain in 
contention for the first division 
title, but this should not disguise 
the feet that it was City who 
were more controlled and 
intelligent 

A draw was the least they 
deserved. With only a minute 
and a half gone United took the 
lead when Colin Gibson drove 
the ball in following a free kick 
and after 61 minutes Strachan 
made it 2-0 from a penalty. 

The score made nonsense of . 
Cny's domination of the game.' 
during the intervening hour. 
Their midfield was neater, their 
aqack sharper. You wondered- 
sometimes bow much United ' 
really want to win the League, 
championship. When Bryan 
Robson returns from injury— as 
soon as next week is hoped — he 
will have a lotofinspirmgtodo. 

In his absence the mantle of 
captaincy rests uneasily on the 
boorish Whiteside. There is 
something particularly un- 
pleasant about the shrill in- 
dignation with which- he 
responds to being fouled. By so 
doing he seemed to influence the 
referee in the bookings of Lillis 
and May when their offences 
hardly warranted them. 

During the last half-hour City 
remained composed' and ‘deter- 
mined. despite having lost 
Clements with an injured knee 
and as a result being forced to . 
move a forward. Lillis, back into 
defence. The impressive Wilson 
pulled a goal back with a 
stooping header and, with 12 
minutes to go, Albiston miscued 
the ball into the comer of his 
own net 

MANCHESTER UNITED: C Tumor M 
Dux&uy. A AMston. N WNtasidft, P 
McGrath. M Hlgans. C Gibson. B 
Strachan. M Hughes. P Davenport. P 
Barnes (S ite F Stepteton). 

MANCHESTER OTT: E Nixon; N Reid. P 
Power. K Clemente (sub; P Simpson). S 
Redmond, D Phffips. M Lute. A May. S 
Kinaey, N Mctaab. fc Wtoon. 

Referee : D Shaw (San dh ach)- 


CtieJsea 5 

Manchester City...... 4 

The decision by John Hollins, 
the Chelsea manager, to leave 
out Kerry Dixon, his England 
centre forward, because of a 
groin strain put the real im- 
portance of the first and last Full 
Members* Cup Final properly 
into perspective at Wembley 
Stadium yesterday. Dixon, who 
apparently aggravated the injury 
at Southampton 24 hours ear- 
lier, missed a thoroughly enjoy- 
able and seriously contested 
game, whatever the scoreline 
might imply. 

. A remarkably large and good- 
humoured crowd of 68,000, 
paying £508,000 in receipts, got 
value for money on a fresh, 
sunny afternoon. Dixon, who 
admitted that be probably 
would have been fit for a 
midweek game, must have felt 
disappointed since Bobby Rob- 
son, the England manager, had 
declined to select him for the 
trip, to Tbilisi this week because 
of his Wembley appointment. 

. Dixon may have been slightly 
envious too, as Lee, his replace- 
ment.', though normally a full 
back these days, bagged himsdf 
a- couple of goals as Chelsea hit 
back with -a vengeance after 
felling behind in the ninth 
minute. 

The excellent results both 


teams had achieved in the 
league the day before had left 
them in differing moods for 
Wembley; Manchester City 
buoyant after their recovery at 
Old Trafford and Chelsea 
lethargic after their ordeal at 
The DdL 

A goal by Kinsey, deflecting a 
shot by McCarthy, was no more 
than City deserved as McNab 
propelled them forwards. But 
when Nevin was allowed to 
cross a wicked outward curling 
ball in the 23rd minute Speedie 
attacked it with a fury that set 
Chelsea into motion for the 
remainder of the game. 

Lee put them ahead and 
Speedie went on to complete a 
treble before another goal by Lee 
put Chelsea seemingly out of 
City's range. But the Manches- 
ter dub gave us a rousing finale 
with three goals in the closing 
minutes from Lillis (two. one a 
penalty) and an own goal by 
Rougvie. The Wembley officials 
who operate the manual score- 
board have never seen such fun 
or been kept so busy as the 
scoreboard moved directly from 
5-2 to '5-4. 

CHELSEA: S Frwcte: D. Wood. D 
Rougvte,. C Pctss, j McLaugMn, -.J. 
Bumsaad. P Nsvn. N Spadonm, C Lea, 
OSpeade. K McAfatar. 

MANCHESTER CITY: E Nixon: N Raid 
tout). P Slmpsonl, P Power, 8 1 
M McCarthy, D PNSps (sub, G Baku). M 
LBBs, A May, S ttnse*. N McNab. C 
WBson. 

Ha fo ra a- A Saurian (Newcasttonjpon- 
Tyne) 


Villa sunk 
by spirit 
of fiercest 
rivals 

By Vince Wright 
Birmingham City’s first goals 
at Villa Park since 1977 gave 
them a resounding 3-0 victory 
on Saturday over their nearest 
and fiercest rivals. Birmingham 
still have much to do if they are 
to escape relegation to the 
second division but under John 
Bond's managership they have 
become a more entertaining and 
spirited side. 

Aston Villa, who are precari 
ously placed themselves, could 
not cope with Birmingham’s 
newly-acquired enthusiasm and 
were second-best in every 
department. Clarke turned the 
match Birmingham's way with a 
pair of goals in the first half 
then wtainon ended Villa': 
hopes of a recovery by scoring in 
the second. 

Another Midlands club in 
distress. West Bromwich Al- 
bion, lost touch with the rest of 
the first division long ago and 
Saturday's 1-0 reverse against 
Ipswich Town was the latest in a 
line of away defeats. A scrappy 
game was decided by Butcher's 
full-blooded shot from 30 yards 
after 67 minutes. The three 
poims enabled Ipswich to move 
above Villa and out of the 
bottom three. 

Oxford United's run of away 
successes came to an abrupt halt 
on tbeir first visit to Anfield, 
where they were given a 6-0 
hiding. Rush and Molby scored 
two each and Lawrenson and 
. Whelan were also on target for 
Liverpool, who were at their 
most ruthless. So Liverpool 
joined the leaders Everton on 66 
points while Oxford continue to 
live dangerously. 

Leicester City and Coventry 
City are also nervously looking 
over their shoulders after de- 
feats at Nottingham Forest and 
Arsenal respectively. Leicester, 
who went down by the odd goal 
in seven, were denied reward for 
their part in a thriller when 
Nigel Clough scored the winner 
Coventry never looked like 
collecting anything from then- 
trip to Highbury, where they 
were 3-0 losers. A speciactular 
own goal by Mclnally started 
Coventry's slide and in the 
second naif Arsenal increased 
their advantage through Wood- 
cock and Hayes. However, 
Arsenal's joy at their fourth 
consecutive victory was im- 
mediately cut short by the 
resignation of their manager 
Don Howe. 

The runaway second division 
leaders, Norwich City, con- 
firmed their quality by winning 
5-2 at Sheffield United 
DrinkeU. Mendham, Barham, 
and Biggins all got on the score 
sheet and Norwich's other goal 
came from the head of the 
United defender Smith. 

Portsmouth's match at Stoke 
City was postponed because of 
illness and, in the- fight for the* 
third promotion place, Brighton 
gained ground on Chariton Ath- 
letic and Wimbledon, were 
both held . to 1-1 draws at fcom&r 
itoo’s third win in a row is 
icr indication that they have 
pulled themselves together since 
being knocked out of the FA 
Cup by Southampton. 


Hearts unstoppable pacemakers 


Heart of Midlothian moved a 
step doscTto winning their first 
Scottish Le ag u e championship 
in 26 years when they beat 
fUbembiB 2-1 .at Easter Road 
and established a record of 22 
premier division matches with- 
out defeat. 

With six games to play,, they 
have become firm title 
favourites. In defeating their 
Edinburgh rivals more easily 
than the score suggests, they 
showed such composure and 
organization that it is difficult to 
see them losing their grip. 

Again they were given con- 
fidence by the superb general- 
ship of Sandy Jarinne who, with 
the manager, Alex MacDonald, 
had been a member of the 
Rangers tide who had played 2! 
unbeaten games in winning the 
championship in 1975. Fine 
from tbeir forwards, Clark 


By Hugh Taylor 

and Robertson, gained them the 
points. Hibernian could not be 
faulted for their endeavour, 
Cowan scoring a splendid goal 

It was a happy afternoon also 
for Dundee United, who are 
Hearts’ closest rivals. They si- 
lenced tbeir critics with a come- 
back to more entrancing form in 
beating Motherwell 4-0 at 
Tannadke. Inpired by Stuxrock, 
their international forward, who 
scored two spectacular goals. 
United treated their supporters 
to a display of glorious football 
that made light of the gale and 
overwhelmed their lowly oppo- 
nents. Bannon and Dodds were 
the other marksmen. United lag 
three points behind Hearts but 
have a game in hand. 

The gloom over Pruodrie 
deepened when Aberdeen, the 
champions, dropped another 
i m portant point as they drewO-O 


with Dundee. As in Sweden, 
where Aberdeen felled in tbeir 
attempt to reach the last four of 
the European Cup. they should 
have won with plenty to spare 
but again missed good chances. 

Although the East is winning 
the battle for football power in 
Scotland, the old firm of Celtic 
and Rangers showed that they 
are still supreme in providing 
unique excitement. They made 
history when they forced the 
country's most bitterly divided 
crowd of nearly 45.000 to stay to 
the end of the game at Ibrox to 
give a standing ovation to both 
teams, who had shared eight 
goals in a rip-roaring contest. 

• Speedie. Sharp- Archibald. 
McAvennie and Nicholas were 
told by Alex Ferguson, the 
Scotland manager, yesterday 
that they would be going to the 
World Cup finals in Mexico this 
summer. 


FuB Members* Cup 
Final 

CHELSEA • S) 5 MAN CITY PM 
SpwMB&L»#| Kinsey. Lite (2.1 
pec*. Bougvte 
SR. 000 toO 


Second division 


Brighton 
Cfew ton 
Fulham . 
Grimsby 
Leeds Utd 


First division 


AWto 

Ipswich 


Lnmpoal 


1 West Bran 
6 Oxford UU 

2 Everton 
2 Man City 

Utd a Tottenham 

No ttng ha nFo* A Latoaster 

OPR 2 WstSonl 

‘inumuipttoi 0 CtohH 

wSttST 0 1 SitetfteldWed 

PWDL F A Pte 
S3 SO 6 7 73 33 68 

34 19 9 6 71 35 66 

MmteiarLRd 33 is 6 B 56 27 63 

31ia 6 5 <9 31 g 

3,17 7 T 42 32 SB 

3316 '10 5] f? 55 

2916 6 7 *4 27 5* 

34JS 910 g 54 

221410 8 -2 en 

Hlto 3215 512 £7 47 SO 

3313 614 51 41 45 

nwo 23 •£ 5 ]1 ff ff 

Manchester Cey 3*11 fJS 'H S 1? 

ooa as 12 5 IB 35 53 « 

Mil 715 41 44 40 

35 9 S 17 *4 

33 81015 4f 
33 B 017 43 __ __ 

22 9 blS 2§ 45 32 

33 61116 35 54 29 


Em ton 
Lrwefpool 
Hanches 
Chelsea 
Arsenal 
SheftiecJWed 
wewMamUH 
LutpiTown 
Newcasse Jifi 


SteffieHl 
Stake 
Wknbtedon 

MxvrtchCtty 
Portsmouth 
VWmteadoa 
Chariton 
BnoMon 
HuflCdy 
Sheffield Utd 
Crystal PM 
Oldham Atti 
SsofcaCtty 
Banwtoy 
Gnmsfty Town 
BraOtaRJCtty - 
MMwad 


3 Hudderefletd 

1 WBMfl 

1 Oldham 

2 C Pataca 

1 Sundartana 

igr-*”" 1 

2 Norwich 

P Puf to m wd h 
1 B lac kb u rn 


Tosrvt 

vsaricro 


OPR 
S&JtaacipSsn 
Gcvmtry Cm" 
leee&tarCey 
OrtStfdUnteJ 

losMKft Town 

Assr.Vda 


60 
61 34 
66 32 


filiSef e#M B 1 wq m OB 

! 92 $ S * 

Ha les o wen 3. 

Btfitawa SCENE WSTEWnao® 
a-3-UM-i Harwrtr 
Carter* L 6« 


2 
D 
0 
1 
3 
1 
1 
2 
5 
P 
1 

PWDL F A PtS 

3321 7 5 72 32 70 

32 18 5 9 53 29 59 

3218 B 8 43 30 56 

3116 7 8 56 35 55 

3215 7 TO 56 45 52 

34141010 58 49 52 

3314 811 SS 51 50 

3314 712 41 40 49 

3413 714 52 52 46 

33111210 40 42 45 

32111011 35 35 43 

34111013 49 52 43 

3143-414 39 45 43 

3112 514 45 46 41 

BtociibumRvn 34 1011 13 <2 52 41 

Shrewsbury Tri 3411 716 42 52 40 

Lb*^U"SkJ 3311-715 43 55 40 

34101014 g 57 40 

Sunderland g S 915 ® 51 36 

Mridteshraugh 33 8 £17 Jg 45 32 

CariSieUtd 32 8 618 33 59 39 

S 3D 8 517 32 44 29 

vision north: BatoiiRiwwa 2. Hiringey 
890 1: ChaitteN St Peter 1. KlngotHay 4; 
Clapton ft Roystan 2; Hemei Hempstead 
1. Letctasorui <3C a Stow age faro 0. 
UVare Oi Trine 5. Ranham ft Vauxhafl 
Motors 1. BerkhwimiBd ft Wbteenon 1. 
Hertford 0- Second AMn south: 
Bammed Athknc 3. FeUtom ft Brartmrt 

1. Sonihwwh 2: Camhertay 2, ^ldng ft 
Eastooume U« ft Petei«Wd Utq i. 
Rackwefl Heath 1. Egham 2: Hunovfcrd 

2. Ruskp Mwwr 1 : Motseey 2. Newffiury 1 : 

1- Hpntam 1; Woking 4. 

MULTIPART LEAGUE: Burton Atrion 2, 


Z HawriW Kc.trs o wjf" * 

Slas-roaMR 2. Sshijr w g 

Ssdtair> 5. Bury 0. T,psw UW 2- 

WMUnL^PEi. LEAGlffi: *- 

ww Barirms D. !<?=** 0 

WdPansssari- C/eieca ~ 

Eteril 1. Ha,* O BdMDS | 

ar. 1: SesM* - > 

K SiSf, USmS i. 


amdon ft Gatnsocnrxjgh 1. Carnarvon ft FOOTBAll COMB8MTION: Birmingham 
GaKShead 1 , Chorteyft Honrich 0. WttKXt 1. OPR 3; Bnew Ftowre 1. ReatUng 4: 

i Ltoxledeto 2. Hyde 3; Mattock 1 . Rhyl Chelsea 1, West Ham 3; Oxford Lira 2. 


»avwi5f3»» ixts C- ymes * 
C. ramrvx* 1 -- 


1. uaceie£fiBid2. Hydeft 1.._ 

V Mgssley a Bangor Ctty ft Oswesay -. 

ssasuasias ^ 
t^vssursjsa 

AMauren: ft Fereham ft Cheknstord ft 

fSaDtrisy 0: Folkestone^, Woroes- 

0. Gosport ft Stepshed 
3 - Gravesend ■ 1: Waiting 4, 

I ^caster Utd 2, MN 0*r Rovers ft 


Third division 

Bolton Wandrs S CanHT ' 0 
Brenttord 1 Black p ool 1 

BdstoiR 2 B onin amo u th 3 

Uneoio D Notts Coumy 2 

Newport County 3 Wlgn 4 

Plymouth 4 Derhy Ceusty 1 

Reading 2 Bury 0 

Rotherham Utd 4 York - 1 

Swansea City 2 G&toghan 2 

Watoafl 0 Ctarftwton 0 

WoivefhamptDn 2 BriatofC 1 

PWDL F A Pis 
Reading 3525 4 6 57 39 79 

Wigan Alt) 3620 9 7 67 36 69 

Dactiy County 3218 B 5 63 .28 63 

Plymouth Aigyte 38 18 810 62 45 62 

GOngham 371613 B (5 44 61 

Watean 3616 612 72 48 60 

Noas county 35151010 54 47 55 
Doncaster Rwa 37141211 37 41 54 
Brantford 3615 912 42 47 54 

Bristol City 37141112 55 51 53 

YorkOty 3715 715 59 49 52 

Blackpool 3613 11 12 55 40 50 

Rafwriiamutd 35131012 SI 40 49 

Bournemouth 3712 817 52.57 44 

BotonWhndrs 3712 718 -45 50 43 

Bristol Rovers 3412 618 41 60 42 

Chesterfield 36 91215 40 49 39 

Dartngton 3210 913 47 57 39 

Bay 35 9- 917 47 53 -36 

Newport County 37 71416 39 56 35 

Uncoin C)ty 34 81115 43 S2 35 

CardWCBy 37 9 8 20 42 68 35 

37 9 72) 34 69 34 

35 H 819 41 74 32 

Merthyr Tyrin 0. W eBngOoroute) ft 
Raddffch B, Ruandan ft SourM&e 1. 

Cay z ~ 

Ashford 

Burnham end HHngdon 

SaBsfawy ft oxchester 2, Cambridge CRy 
ft Dowr AtMedc 1. tXmstatte 2; Piooie ft 
Hastings 2: RutsSp ft. Woodford 2: 
Sheppey Utd ft CorMMan-1; Tonbridge 1. 
Erith end Bebedere 1: Wa terioo» » 1. 
Trowbridge l. 

CEKTRAL LEAGUE: FHt 
Everton 1, Newcasdaft 
FOOTBALL C0MB8MTI0N: 

1, OPR 
Chelsea . 

Portsmouth 1: Tottenham 1, Arsenal -1; 
Wariordl. Ipswich 1; Norwich 1, Luton ft 
SMIRNOFF BrtSN -LEAGUE: Bangor 1, 
CSItomrlBa 0: Carrick 2, Larne 2; Ccrartene 
ft DetSery ft Crusaders ft Aids 1: Newiy 
l.BaHymanaft Ponadownft Gientoran 1. 

Worth west coutnics league: Hist 
tOiMm: CBAeroe ft COrron Ashton ft 
GongtaKn a Acomgtoo. Stmfey 0; 
Eastwood Manley ft HaeBmod ft tram t. 
Fdnoby ft Lew ft BoaOe-1; taytmd 
Motors 1. Smyttridge Gettic ft NotesifiBid 
t. ST Helens- ft Radcfifle Bom 0. 
Burecwtfi ft Wlnstord Utd 0, Panrite 1. 
NORTHERN COUNTES EAST LEAGUE: 
Pre mi er Adatom Benttoy VW ft 
Eastwood ft Boston 3. ArmthorDe Wettore 


Fourth division 

Bnrhtoy 1 

Chester 2 Wrexham 

Crewe 2 Aldershot 


Hereford 1 Sc unt horpe 

llmrtiemi,lm, 4 ^nlnheetea 

i«nih«i4hui ■ amnr 

ttat erbo r o u gh • a 

3 

1 
1 


Scottish premier division 


Aberdeen 
Clydebank 
Dundee Utd 


Swindon Town 


Torquay 

Yesterday 
Fourth division 

SWMDON W 0 POUT VALE fD) 0 

10.122 

PWDL F A PtS 
3424 2 B 52 31 74 
371912 6 70 38 69 
Mansfield Town 3420 7 7 59 34 67 
Port Vale 371614 7 56 31 62 

Hartlepool Utd 3517 810 52 42 59 
“ • * 37161110 55 50 59 

351511 9 62 47 56 
3815 714 64 44 52 
3614 813 52 64 50 
3613 814 56 65 47 
3813 716 61 54 48 
3813 716 49 54 46 
35121013 48 54 46 


Rangers 

Hearts 

Dundee Utd 

Aberdeen 

Cette 

Rangers 

Owne 

St Mirren 

Hibernian 

Moteerwea 

Clydebank 


0 StHBmn 2 

4 Moteerwea fl 

" 1 Hearts 3 

4 Celtic 4 

PWDL F A Pts 
3016 9 5 48 29 41 
291410 5 48 24 38 
n 13 10 6 50 25 36 
28 12 TO 6 46 36 34 
31 12 811 47 37 32 
3012 711 38 45 31 
2810 513 35 43 25 
31 9 616 44 66 24 
28 6 517 26 SO 17 
30 5 619 25 82 16 


Queen ofSte 
DunfermOna 
Queen's Park 
Meadowbank 
Arbroath 
St Johnstone 
Strtno A4> 
Raite Rovers 
Cowdenbaam 


Scottish first division 


Stockport 
Otters 

Northampton 
Southend Utd 
Hereford Utd 
TranrtwraRm 
Bumiey 
Roehdete 
. Wrexham 
Colchester Utd 
CnrtmAtex 
HaMaxTown 

■ray 


AMrie 

Alo* 

Ayr United 
Brechin 
Clyde 


1 Kflmamock 

2 Parttok 

0 Hamfltoo 
0 Forfar 

0 East Fife 

1 Faicitk 

P D umba rton 


Berwick 
East Stating 
AKson Rovers 


Andover ft AsmoRl ft Cantetbuy City 3. 
' ’ ‘ don 1; Chatham 1. 



M IS 716 S3 68 46 

12 912 55 48 45 

3612 915 '4& 53 45 

3411- 914 49 55 42 

„ -36101214 32 43 42 

Scunthorpe Utd 35101114 35 43 41 

Aiderahor 3411 617 41 52 39 

Peterborough 34 81412 41 50 38 

CsmbridgnUtd 3710 621 50 74 36 

Torquay Utd 34 8 719 32 65 31 

Preston K-End 37 7 8 22 40 70 29 


vn ft SjMkftm Utd 1, 
ft SuttonftSnoid 2: 
0. 

TROPHY: 
Mormon 1. Bristol Manor 

FarmO. 

WR.TSHWE SO«OR CUP: 5eak-finat Old 
ft Supermerfne 1. 

SENIOR CUP: Third 

r ft Oxford City 5. 

HALLS BREWERY HELLENIC LEAGUE: 
Start ftemtar dhrto 
Aimondsbory Green way 
Utd 3. League: Pienrter tflvtetecr 
1 Town ft Thame thrift Hou«- 


H amaton 

Dumbarton 

KUmemock 

Fate irk 

FOrtarMi 

East Rfa 

Ayr United 

AmJrteontana 

Morton 

ParUck 

Broctiin City 

Montrose 


Athletic 


2818 7 3 58 27 43 
3014 9 7 51 37 37 
3114 710 49 40 35 
3013 8 9 41 27 34 
2911 810 37 35 30 

30 813 9 38 39 29 
3210 913 33 47 29 
2910 811 41 33 28 

31 91012 44 53 28 

30 71310 4f 52 27 
2811 413 45 49 26 

31 71212 38 47 26 
28 61210 28 39 24 
27 5 814 33 51 18 


JUtdl.BetettonuUft 

crown and Manor 1, Thatchem ft 
Edgware 0. Rerih* ft Northwood ft 
Brimsdown Rovers ft Pennant 1. 
Amerehani ft HanweH ft Denson 3. 
NORTHUMBERLAND SENIOR CUP: 
S ainl- 6 naL Norte Smefcts ft Blue Star 1. 
GREAT ULLS WESTERN LEAGUE: 
League Cure Third round: Heavttroo Utd 
t. Exmoute 3; Woaon Rovers 2, Portway 
Bristol 4. Premier dtetafon: Bristol City ft 
Dawitth ft Chard 0. Taunton 3; 
Ctfopenham 1 . Ptymoute Arayia 1: From 
siiMtaksham ft Bidet 


Scottish second (fiviston 

Berwick 1 St Johnstone f 

Dunfermline 0 Arbroath 0 

East sorting 2 ICsadowbank 3 

Queen's Park 1 S&feg Mb 0 

RofttT Rovers 2 Cowdenbeath 1 

Snnhme 1 QueenofSth 2 

Stranraer 2 AXrton Rovers 3 

2819 8 3 54 21 44 
281610 2 63 36 42 
31 16 6 9 4a 32 38 
301211 7 52 41 35 
3013 6 9 47 37 34 
2914 411 51 40 32 
2811 611 39 33 28 
2911 612 52 49 28 
29 9 6 W 36 44 24 

27 9 414 4Q 55 22 

29 8 914 38 54 21 

28 8 416 32 47 20 
28 7 615 31 62 20 

30 6 420 31 63 16 

Goto League 

1 EtaMd 2 

1 Barnet 1 

0 Frtcktey 0 

1 Boston 2 

0 Nu ne a ton 3 

0 Kettering 1 

Scarborough 1 ChaRatun 0 

Stafford 5 Darttord 1 

Wetadsttm 0 Nddermtoster 3 

Weymouth & Altrincham 0 

Wycombe 1 Telford 2 

yesterday 

Scarborough 1. Enfield 3. 

NENE GROUP UNITED COUNTES 
LEAGUE: Premtef/Rrat dhrtnon Cup: 
Burton PW 3. Bourne ft Cottmgham 0. 
Rsunds 2: Long BucMqi 7, Towcesrer 1. 
Laagum Premier dtototore Amptha ft 
Newfxm Pegnel ft Anesey 0. Potion 3; 
Buctangham ft BrataUey ft Hoe»acn 1. 
Norteampion Spencer ft irteUngboro 1. 




Cm: -Senrt-ftnt 
w ft Shortwood 


Abingdon Utd 2; Ma idenhead ft 

aasgRayr 


Abingdon' 

taw 1 Ab_ 

Sharpness gRaynera Lane 2, wantage Oj 
WaSJngtord ft PB9&6US Jtworsft Vb» 2, 
' Morris MMora ft ■ 

LONDON SPARTAN LEAGUE: Leapte 
Cure SemPHnal: Watteam Abbey ft 
CoSer Raw 0. Harry Suoderiaod SNekt 
Wan d swo rt h 3, Southwark Sports i; 
Royal Areanal ft Soute^fo ft Penh® 
Standard 1. Bari^igaideT Chtngterd ft 
CadonJ Wanda 1. League: Preotor <fi- 



.4. Barnstaple i; Meiksham ft Bidetord 4; 
Mmehead 1, Stanch Utd 5: Patatnn 
Rovers ft Laksard Athiebc Z Torrington 

1. Cievedon 1; Weston- superstore 1. 
Ctandown 1. 

ESSEX SENIOR TROPHY: Final: 
iSwiflSftVUWiBma 
W0R LEAOtC: CUP: Semi- 

td Lag: Eton Mantjr l. Ford 

Uto 5 (Ford League: Brentwood 

2, Bunteam 0: Bnamiwsw 1. Bowers 
CM a Canvay tMi, East Ham Utd f; 
East Thurrock 5, Sawbn^Bworft 1; 
Halstead 1, Cheknstard ft stanstod ft 
Coqqeshao ft Whfenhoe ft Mtadon 1. 
COitoMB} COUNTES LEAGUE P»- 
BitortMvistoreChortseyftHarttoyWIntnegr 
ft Cum 3. Godatawg 1: Oateff) 1 
Westfield 4; Famtam ft Coaiam i: 
Fhtatey Green 1, FarteWi Roubts 3; 
Honey ft Meritham ft Maiden Town ft 
Fleet f; Malaen Vale ft Ash Utd ft Virginia 
Warar ft a« WeytWdfle 3. 


Desboroum 4: Rodwref ft EVnessury 1; 
SI Neote^ ft Stamford Z S And L Corny 1. 
Wooon 1. Po st pone d: Stotfokl v Btadock. 
SENIOR 


SUSSEX 

St eynmg 1, Worthing ft 
SUSSEX COUNTY lEAGUE: ChalRnge 
Cup: Third round: Poetpomrt Arnnoe v 
Psace haven and Tetoacombe. League: 
First dteiaton: Buroess HU 3, Midtust 1: 
Chichester City t, wtautawk 1: Lancing 
1, Ringmsr ft LdBehampron 2. Eastooume 
Z Ponfield 1. Haitsham 3: Three Bnrtws 
1. Shoreham 0. ORYBROUGHS NORTH- 


ERN LEAGUE: First (flvteten: Brikngham 
Symhonta 2. Chester le Street 1: 
awnghain Town 2. Rytaoe CA 3: Btyte 
Spamns 0. Whflby 1: Consett 0. Pesrtea 
ft Crook 4. Brandon Uid 1; Farryndt 
Athtobc 1. Bishop Auckland 3: Grama 3, 
South Bank 3: Tow Law 3. Wltetey Bay 1. 

ARTHUR DUNN OR StonMtaat* Otf 
Brantwoocs 1. OW Carthusons 1. 

SOUTH EAST COUNTIES LEAGUE: Ffcrt 
tavtofore Cambridge Urattd 1. Watford ft 
Chelsea 4, Southend ft Fulham 6. OPfl 1; 
GMngham 6. Portsmouth ft kstMch 1. 
Ortgrrid: MOwal ft Norwich 1: TodKtaam 
2. Chariton a Postponed: Arsenal v West 
_ rt ifiSton: 


Ham. Sacoad division: Brentford ft 
Oxford Umtedft Bnaaon ft viAmaedon ft 
Rearfing 1, Bristol Hovers 3: Swindon 1 
CokdwsterO. 


GOLF 


Ballesteros feels 
the cutting edge 

From John Ball an tine. New Orleans 


Severiano Ballesteros failed to 
qualify by a single stroke, while 
Bernhard- Langer and Peter 
Oosierhuis missed by eight and 
seven respectively, as the half- 
way point was reached in the 
rain-delayed New Orleans Clas- 
sic. Calvin Peete held the lead 
by one from Dick Mast, a little- 
known Ohio professional who 
was 35 yesterday and so had the 
chance to celebrate a memo- 
rable birthday. 

So Ken Brown and Nick 
Faldo, who slipped from joint 
first position with Peeie on 
Friday night 10 joint sixth after 
being able only to score par in a 
second round when nearly 
everyone else was improving on 
il. were left to uphold Europe's 
honour. 

Yesterday’s situation was 
very similar to that of last week 


in Orlando, the difference being 
that a full 72 boles instead of 
only 54 were to be completed on 
what was sure to be another 
exacting but exciting day of 36 
holes wiifa any of 50 players in a 
position to win. 

Peete holed a full six iron for 
an eagle two at the 405-yard 
seventh and this earned him the 
lead. Faldo began well with two 
early birdies and although he 
faltered later he was still in a 
good position. 


T3& C Pane. 68. 67. 13& D Mast. 72. 64. 
138: K Knox. 70. 66: P McGowan. 69. 69: 
W Israeison. 73. 65. 140: N Faldo 1GB). 66. 
7ft D Tewen. 71. 69. M Sulkvan. 71, 69. 
141: T Sills. 72. 69; D Foreman. 73. 6ft G 
Archer. 73. 68: J Murid, 72, 69; M Rad. 70. 
71. M Nicoietu. 75. 66. 146: K T 
74. 72. 147: S Ballesteros 
153: P Oostertus (GB), 

Langer (WGL 7ft 76. 


RUGBY LEAGUE 

Oldham’s 

dream 

shattered 

By Keith Madklin 

For 60 minutes Oldham clung 
to their dream of reaching 
Wembley for the first time in the 
club's history. Before losing 1 8-7 
toCastieford , they led 7-6 in this 
hard-fought Silk Cut semi-final 
at Wigan. Then then came one 
of those cruel strokes of luck 
which often swing a game. The 
Castieford halfback. Bob Beard- 
more. who bad scored a first- 
half try, pul in a high kick which 
bounced wickedly away from 
Oldham's Australian full-back. 
David Liddiard, for Beardmore 
to touch down, Ketteridge add- 
ing the goal- Castieford made 
sure of their first trip to Wem- 
bley since 1970 when Beard- 
more and Ward sent in the new 
Great Britain centre, MarchanL 

Oldham took the lead late in 
the first half when David 
Uddiard kicked ahead and his 
brother, Glen, aged 16. got the 
touch down, Hobbs kicking the 
goaL In yesterday's champion- 
ship games Widnes and Hull 
Kingston Rovers lost heavily at 
Bradford and Warrington, but 
Wigan maintained their chal- 
lenge to Halifax by beating 
Swinton. 

SrtJC CUT CHALLBiGE CUP: Stata-fovk 
Casttetord 1ft Okteam 7 tm ffnanL 
SLALOM LAGER CHAMPIONSHIP: 
Dewsbury 12. St Htaens IB; Hu« 34, 
Statord lft Wamnqton 31. Hud KR 16; 
Swinton ft Wigan 28; Fsetherstom 40. 
York 10; Bradford 4ft Widnes 8. 

SECOND DMSIOft: Branuey 14. Barrow 
22: Doncaster 18. Sheffield E 26. Carts* 
17. Kanteey ft Lman 22. Huddersfltad 12: 
Wakefield 6, Baney 24; WMecaven 20. 
Rocnttetolft 


BOXING 

Last call for 
four champs 

Puerto Rico (AP) — Jose 
Sulaiman. the World Boxing 
Council President, is calling on 
four ageing former world cham- 
pions to retire before they are 
seriously injured. Sulaiman said 
Roberto’ Duran. Alexis Ar- 
guello, Wilfiedo Gomez and 
Wilfred Benitez no longer have 
the skills that won them worid 
titles in three different divisions. 

All four are currently talking 
about a run at a title in a fourth 
division. “They all should re- 
tire. but the one that worries me 
most is Gomez, because ! feel 
like his godfather,” Sulaiman 
said. 


HOCKEY 

Goteborg 
gateway 
for Scots 

By Sydney Friskln 

Southgate were unhinged by 
Edinburgh Civil Service in lhe 
qualifying hockey match for the 
European Club Championship 
to be played at Goteboig. in 
May. Although Southgate won 
1-0 at the River Stadium. North 
Haringey, yesterday, the Scots 
had beaten them 2-0 on Sat- 
urday and went through on 
aggregate. 

A penalty stroke converted by 
David Craig shortly before the 
end proved insufficient for 
Southgate who squandered sev- 
eral short corners. Yellow lees 
and Edwards scored for Edin- 
burgh Civil Service on Saturday. 

I sea qualified for the semi- 
finals of the Hockey Association 
Cup by defeating Bournville 1-0. 
A goal in the second half by 
Martin Rodgers proved 
decisive. 

Pickwick also reached the last 
four with a 6-2 win over 
Bishop's Stortford. Bishop's 
Sionford took command in 
extra time after the scones were 
level I-I at fell time. On target 
were Bhuiji. Dalbir Sidhu u). 
Balkar Ji wander (2). and Dalbir 
Jandhu: Lence and Tee scored 
for Bishop's Stortford. 

The last semi-final berth was 
taken by Cannock, who defeated 
Lewes with a goal by Eroston 
from a short comer. 

Midlands bank 
on Bayliss 

Midlands won the first Na- 
tional Westminster Bank under- 
21 women's territorial 
tournament which ended yes- 
tenday witii a splendid perfor- 
mance in the last crucial match 
against the North, played at 
great pace and in part with 
considerable skill IJoyce'White- 
bcad writes). Lisa Bavfiss 
scored three of their total of 
eight goals in the tournament, 
while Jane Sixsmith showed 
moments of brilliance. 

The tournament's fust match, 
between the South and the 
Midlands, was poor but after 
that the standard of play 
improved. 

RESULTS. Final placing* 1. Mdbmrts; 
2. Nonh: 3. South. 4 East ft Watt. 
Saturday: Soutn 0. Midlands 0; East 1, 
Wesi 0: Norte ft South ft MtaiandS 3. East 
0: North 2. Was: 0. Sumter: South 1. East 
0: Midlands ft West 1. Nonn ft East 1; 
Wasi 0. Soute 0; Midlands ft North 0. 


FOR THE RECORD 


BOWLS 


HARTLEPOOL: Prudential man's national 
ctiamptomtafM: Stafpac Smot-fintas: R 
Cons Upswety w D Biyara (Owwonj 21-19; 
L snoouwgo (Angta. TononQgel M W 
Haywato iPraston. BfigMon) 21-14. Fmafc 
Cults bt Snooondge 2M7. Pam: Samr- 
(mats: H Cume and R Gass (Cumbria) ta G 
Biaka ana B Taylor (Count Arts. Norwch} 17- 
16: G Soutn and A Thomson (Cyphers. 
Beckenham) bl D Srmd and R Buddand 
(Thamesaown. SwwMfom 23-19. Ftaat smm 
and Thomson bt Cutne and Gas 22-16. 


32 16 mSesI f. A Wallace (Reynanji 16mm 
16 78sec 110555 mtrn): 2. M Sandro . 
fvwfc 3. b Scott iRwnann. Fastest tap; 


Sate 


BOXING 


RENO (Nevada)- W8A tumor Imavyweiglil 
chBRipwhaMp (15 rodsk Dwight Uuiummad 
Qam (hoteeO W Leon Spmfcs. rsc 6th. 

LAS VEGAS: WBC 


■hip (12 mts); Cartas DeLeon t» Bernard 
Benton ftodert. pts. - 


Wallace. 5422SK (106 76mphi 
Easo Fonwia Fort 1S00 chwnptonsWp (10 
laps. 1606 miesy 1. S RMenson (Van 
Die men), tomr 2fiJ7sac ISftaimpn); 2. J 
EDkki (Van Eheroenr. 3. J VHage (Van Munen). 
Fastest lap: ^ Seednouse (Van fteroeni 
61 23sec (9* 54mpn». 

Fort Credit Rests ChaOengaliO laps. 1608 
roles). 1. B Wttams (F«8ta XR2). iZroet 
lOftOsec (7927mpnj. 


NETBALL 


MTER-COUNTT CHUMPtONSHIPS: 

Hem 13. Suney 13. Under-21: west Yorxs ft 
Berongnaine 

NORDIC SKIING 


WBC h aa sTw ta ta 1 * ctiaottaonatap (T5 most 
Trewor BertacK m Pnklon Thomas ihotuei). 


P« 


STRB5KE PLESO (CeecnoNovauai: 15km 
cross country: 1. H ... 

Schwarz iwgj. 3. G Anonreen (Nori Huai 


Wentmcn (WG); ft H 


CYCLING 


CRtTEWta! KTERNATK7NAL: Ftori stage, 
IB8M11 i-insn Las Ptes. France): 1 . S KelyilreL 
4nr 3*mn 1 9sae 2. F Crotang iFrj; 3. S Bauer 


Work) Cup combined standings: 1. 
wembuch. 120 pts: 2. T UusSer ftvGI. 8® 3. 
Andersen. 8V Overall team stancSagn 1, W 
Germany. 484 pis; 2. Norway. 337: 3. 
Smcrertand. 164. 


4nr 34fitt19sac: 2. F Castling IFrj; 3. S Bauer 

REAL TENNIS 


(Sum. 1.06 oenmss. Ketiy. 1.11. 
RNODE-ST -GENESE (Betorum): FUcha 
I72kmk 1. J van der Vetee 

(NeteX 41^1917^1,- 2. EnanekaerttBeft l2s«c 

behind: ft T de Rooy (Nett). Britan placing: 
13. R UBst. 


CROSS-COUNTRY 


LORD'S; Gecige Wtnpey amateur singles 
ctiampuMtstap: Ftrat round: A C Lovell 01 C 
Dean 6-0. 6-2. 6-1: N J J Pwyjngti w M 
5-5. 65. 6-2. W R Boone Of P G 
Seaorook 4-6. 6-2. 2-6. ret M F Dean bt G 
BradtiSM 6-3. 4-6. 6Z 6-1: J P Snow bl D 
WaSace 6-1 . 6-1 . 6-ft A J W Page bt I SneW 6-1. 
4-6 6-3.6-d. JDWardbtR F Hotatgton 6-5. 6- 
2.6-0. 


DURHAM: 




umor« (4.900m): 1. L Crane 
l8ron btaac 2. U Thred^l 
16.05: 3. C Rees (Nonnumoor- 


RUGBY 


OCSHtRE CUP: Sea imna t 9>kneBwad Peru 


Itenaysrte. 146 po. 
... .. «k 1. S Duval rsttaSi. 
22-31. 2. J Dervns (Hants). 22.40; 3. M Hunt 
{Merseysrce), 22.42. Taaac West Yorksrtra. 
215 Sum (0.00am): 1, S Muggiestone 
(AvonL 3036: ftC Payne (Surrey). 31.0: ft P 
bay (Berks). 31.03. Tsan: Mersaysida. 138. 


29. MA-Cnesnre Couages 4. 

as CtiPr I 


Float- Leighton 


GOLF 


HARARE: ZtedMtnM Opaa: Flnta le a d ta g 
■cores (Brash unless sraSMft 277: s Bennaa. 
68.69.71.69 27» S Reese (NZL 69. 72. 66. 
72. 280: S Btsngo. 69. 71 71, 6?T R Raftorty. 
73. 7ft 69. E8. 281: K Watera. 68. 70. 71. 71. 
282: W McCoa. 70. 7ft 71. 71. R 
Dnsmnona. 74. 69. 68. 72: P Brown (ZimL 71, 
71.87. 74;G Ralph. 72.69. 72.70:5 Stewen. 
7ft 73. 7ft 68. 284: P Wa«on (ka) 68. 7ft 7ft 
73. R Chapman. 72. 72. 74. 66. 28& C Mason. 
73, TD. 68. 74-. M MaeUanaa. 70. 71,72.72: D 
UeweHyn 6S.69. 73.74:J Moraan.70. 75.71. 
68. T Lamote (US), 71 7ft 70. 68; T Honoa 
7ft 71. 72. 70. 280: B Wanes. 71 . 7ft 89. 73. D 
Jones. 70. 73. 71, 72: M Roe. 7ft 7t. 73. 69. S 
Capa. 71. 7ft 73. 7ft 
TU«ON (Arizona): LPGA Taoroa 
trnnl roun 


EAST MIDLANDS 
Buzzard 16. Petwborougti 6. 

KENT CUP: Final Asroans 6. Bbotteath 11 
REPRESENTATIVE HATCH: Norm and Mri- 
lands U-ftt 1ft Anglo Soots U-21 Si. 

SKIING ~ 

PLANICA (Vugostanai: Worid SU Jnmpteg 
“ piPenultmMcevMici, M NyVaenen (finr 
r.7 pts 1 92.0m. 91 51. 2. A Fetoer (AustriaL 


m 


224.6)91 5 »i Ot ft F NeuiaemanoDAumiaL 
202-2 IB&0. S3 Ol Final event \ E Vettori 
(Austria). 242-3 pts n27.5m. 126.0|; 2. Folder. 
23&A (1250. I3t 0L 3. Nykaenen. 234 9 
F123.0. 1270). Final overall sandtefle: 1. 
Nyuenen. 250 pts: ft V Brian, 23& ft Feiaer. 


SPEEDWAY 


CHALLENGE MATCH: CraSsy Heart) 40. 
tpsmcn3ft 

LEAGUE CUP: Coventry 46. Svmdon 3ft 
Bese Vue 3ft Bradtort 40. Postponed: tangs 


Leading 


round acorns (US 


Lynn v Wotvenuanpun. 


stated): 205: P BradUv 65. 6ft 72. 208: M 
Biaatweiaer 70. 69. 69: R Jones 70. 7ft 65 
210: A-M PaftfrtTO. 7D. 70. 211: A Atom 73. 
_j. 69: J Bntz 70. 69. 72: J Dckataon 69. 71. 
71 . 2Tt B Thomas 70. 71 . 71; P Pulz ( Aus) 72. 
71.69. 


TENNIS 


FORT meters (Fiona a)- Paine Webbet 
Ctestac San»4inats: I Lanai (Cz) ht A Gomez 

(Ec)6-ft 6-3- J Connors lUSiMTMayone (US) 
WRIS5ELS; Betatan Indoor Semi-Bnata: B 


GYMNASTICS 


Oyka (Ausi m M ueor iCfl 6-1. 6-3: M 
Wtancer (Swe) bt J Nvsffom [Svroi 24. " 

2. Fmal: VWaMer ot Dy*e frft 6-3. 


8. 6-4,6- 


BARCELQNA: EztutatktK Span bl Bntan 


266.65 pa to 249.05. 


LACROSSE 


MBWOtt Women's , 

19a tournament : 

fort 1 iMik wan London ft 
WanOsw&I.Finafc West London ft Putney 2. 


Clubs and 
Putney ft 
2. Wir» 


NEW YORK: Women's ehatnptxwripa: 

tar^ooier H Mantflmova iCz) tn CKobde- 
K4S4H (WGl 4-6. D-ft 7-5. C LLovd (USl M H 
SuKOva (Ci) 1-ft 6-1. 6-1. Semi-finals: M 
Navraflowa (US) t» S Grat (WG) 6-2. 6-2: 
ManffliMwa bt UevrtM. 7-5. 

WRESTLING 

BtSHOPfiRtGGSfGiasgtsvl Bnttjti WiestUng 
Chompiohsfiip: 46kg: D Bums (Bytoni bt 5 
Wood (L4j-gn>. 52v* n Dananue iLeron) b: J 
Defl<5sii»jrocM. 57Vgr D Ogaen tce»gh) bi a 


MOTOR RACING 


SU.VERSTONE: British Foe*«ta Ttaae Cham- 
thfo: CtaaEhnng race HO bM. 1G0S 
finest 1. D Hril iStatL 9ron 18J8 secs 
Ifl3impht2 G 09 2kie)Rtatt ft PMcCantw 
~ mart). Fastest lap: u Guvm (Rant 
>1see (UKOmph)- Round Two (20 laps. 


F iVSkmlMinaie^''YMC« 

i^*^*^*^ («*a«toworSiS 

M Doyte (Live^oofl fofctr G Enaten',? 
K*m»)W C Manning (MR^cLftaTOOka: N 
» 0 ffram itfot pSl 


i\ 

n I 







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In c 
is n 
was 
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30 


SPORT 


THE TIMES MONDXY MARCH 241986 



Paris 

The right-wing election shift 
in France may prove disadvan- 
tageous to that veteran Labour 
campaigner Denis Howell 
Jacques Chirac's position here 
as both Premier and Mayor of 
Paris will give him valuable 
international prestige in his 
attempt to establish Paris as 
the host for the 1992 Olympic 
Games. 

His elevation has come at an 
opportune moment for im- 
pressing some SO foreign jour- 
nalists who have been invited 
here to investigate the struc- 
ture of Paris's candidacy. Lun- 
cheon spent listening to the 
Premier carries a social per- 
suasion several tones higher 
than hearing a mere Mayor. 

The journalists were imme- 
diately informed that there is 
no truth in the tumour, which 
gained ground two weeks ago 
at the meeting of the Olympic 
Summer Sports Federation in 
Rome, that Paris is about to 
withdraw to dear the path for 
Albertville in their bid for the 
winter Olympics. The reverse 
i$ more probable. 

Alain Danet, the executive 
chairman of the campaign 
committee, is delighted with 
this week's developments. 
“The election reinforces our 
position", he said . “Instead of 
our campaign being represent- 
ed by three figureheads, the 
President, the Premier and the 
Mayor, there are now just two 
men. President Mitterand and 
M. Chirac. The President is 
wholly in support of our bid, 
irrespective of party, and now 
M. Chirac £s in apositioo to 
talk directly with other heads 
ofgovernmenL" 


Aura enhanced by 
Chirac's advance 


Prime Ministers may not have 
votes on the International 
Olympic Committee, on Octo- 
ber 17, yet the anra of French 
hospitality, always a major 
factor, in this issue, will be 
snbstautially enhanced by 
Chirac's " political advance. 
This additionally : gjves him 
direct influence in • matters 
such, as security. Chirac had 
said, prior to the election: w Do 
not- under ’• estimate three 
things.' The prestige of Paris, 
the technical quality of our 
bid, and the exceptional recep- 
tion that we will give to 
competitors and delegations." 

With a £6 million publicity 
budget, Paris will have far oat- 
spent Birmingham on promo- 
tion, though not Barcelona. 
Already nearly 40 IOC mem- 
bers have visited Paris, com- 
pared with a dozen or so to 
Birmingham. Yet this is not to 
say the' battle is over for 
Birmingham: or Paris. Every- 
thing, Danet agrees, will de- 
pend on the second aid third 
voting. 

“1 do not think fora moment 
that Barcelona can gain the 
46-vote majority they need at 
the first count" be said. “They 
will probably receive around 
30 the first tune, including 
their guaranteed 

Latin/ American support but 
may well not get more than 
that in a second or third vote. I 
think everything will depend 
on how the votes then fluctuate 
between Amsterdam ourselves 
and 'Birmingham. Initially, I 
would expect the Anglo-Saxon 
votes (of Western Europe and 
the Commonwealth) will be 
split between Birmingham, 
Brisbane and Amsterdam". 


Altruistic reasons 
for French bid 


Danet supports Chirac's 
theory: that the strongest 
claim of Paris is that they want 
the games, on the centenary of 
the formation of the IOC not 
as do Birmingham and Barce- 
lona for the benefit of the dty - 
“we don't need the games" 
Danet says - but, as (he French 
claim, for the altruistic benefit 
of the Olympics: hospitable 
and free of boycott and acrimo- 
ny. Secondly, Danet thinks 
their security and telecom- 
munications will be as good as 
any. “The IOC should take 
note of the reports by their 
own commission, and by the 
National Olympic Committees 
and Internationa] Sports Fed- 
erations. But in the end they 
should consider why each 
candidate dty wishes to have 
the games". 

The Paris bid £5 emotionally 
powerful What chance Bir- 
mingham has depends on how 
much notice IOC members do 
take of the specialist reports: 
these will show that in sport- 
ing terms, for informality and 
transport ease for competitors, 
Birmingham is probably the 
most suitable apart from 
Brisbane. 

If either of France's candi- 
dates withdraws, it is sure to 
be AJbertriJJe. The publicity 
has been beneficial to its 
chairman, Michel Bantier, a 
political ally of Chirac. It 
would be sense for Barnier to 
make the gesture. 


RUGBY UNION: WALES SEVEN WILT IN AUSTRALIAN HEAT AFTER AN UNBEATENSTART 


All Blacks’ power clouds the day 


Wasps fly 
off from 
a helipad 


By a Correspondent 


Blackheath. 
Wasps 


12 

24 


Wasps may have had five 
internationals among their 
forwards 


their 

hacks but it was the 
who laid the foundation for this 
fourth-round John Player Cup 
victory which gives them the 
right to meet Nottingham in the 
delayed quarter-final next 
Friday. 

Their pack set up not so much 
a platform as a helicopter pad 
from which raiders took off to 
harry the enemy in all direc- 
tions. Blackheath assisted 
Wasps with feeble tackling, 
starting in the first minute of the 
game, when Bailey on the left 
wing was generously allowed to 
pass by three defenders as be 
went over in the corner. This 
weakness in defence manifested 
itself in the next try, carved out 
by Stringer and scored by Rose. 

Then Bonner went over from 
a move begun by Card us, the 
second try in succession where a 
forward finished off work begun 
by the backs, which sums up the 
way Wasps were playing. A 
conversion and a penalty goal 
by Stringer, to which Blackheath 
replied with a penalty by Wal- 
ters. gave Wasps a commanding 
lead of 17-3 at half-time. 

Helped by the wind, 
Blackheath got within striking 
distance midway through the 
second half with a try by Slack, 
converted by Walters, and a 
cheeky dropped goal from 


neartoucb .by McHardy. But 
a Stri 


another penalty from Stringer 
and a lovely try from Simon 
Smith in the corner saw Wasps 
comfortably home. 

SCORERS: IWcMitrtlu Try: Stack. 
Conversion: Watters. Dropped goat 
Mctanfr.Peodtic Walters. Weeps tries: 
Bailey. Roes. Bonner. Smith. Convection: 


BLACKHEATH: G Walters: K Purchase, L 
Coked. R Bodenham. N Alcorn; G Hughes. 
H McHardy: P Easentvgh. B Howe. K 


Rutter. 0 Vaughan. D Hursey. I Anderson. 
G Hamftor, S Stack. 


WASPS: N Strtrnan S Smith. R Cardus. R 
M Bailey; 


LozowsW, M Bafley; G Roes (raa K 
Tlicomoej. S Bates: P Renda*. A 
Simmons, J Prabyn, M Rigby, C Plnnegar. 
J Bonner. D Pegtar, M Rose. 

Ha tense: C High (Manchntar). 


RAF potential 
underfined 
by Underwood 


By Peter Marson 


Royal Navy. 


Royal Air Force 


..9 

20 


A brace of tries by Rory 
Underwood -in a 12-minute 
counter-offensive before no-side 
underlined the Royal Air 
Force's true potential and sig- 
nalled a hard-won victory 
against the Royal Navy in the 
inter-services tournament 
match at Twickenham on 
Saturday. 

The Air Force had left it late 
but. by retaining the Windsor 
Life Trophy, the Services cham- 
pions made it plain the Army 
will have to be in their best form 
if they are to share the title. 


SCORERS: Royal Navy: PanaStaK 
Price (2) Dropped Boat pries. Royal Air 
Farrar PenattM: Worrafl (2L Tries 
Underwood (2). Parsonage. 

Lazenby. 

ROYAL NAVY: U C 


From David Hands, Rugby Correspondent, Sydney 


The only cloud on a day of. 
sunny celebration for the New 
South Wales Rugby Union 
and their new Concord Oval 
ground yesterday-was the final 
result in their international 
-sevens tournament. Australia, 
who go to the Cathay Pacific 
Hong Kong Bank Sevens next 
month as defending champi- 
ons, were decisively beaten by 
New Zealand who scored six 
tries in a 32-0 win. 

The rivalry between the two 
countries remains as intense 
and abrasive as ever. The AD 
Blacks allied the strength and 
power of the 1 5-a-$ide game to 
the sevens requirement of 
dominating possession and 
produced outstanding playing 
personalities in Frano Botica 
and Wayne Shelford. 

Botica, the North Harbour 
stand-off half, scored 56 
points (seven tries) in live of 
his country's six matches. 
Shelford, who toured with the 
New Zealand Combined Ser- 
vices in Britain before Christ- 
mas. had the strength to draw 
defenders, stay on his feet and 


leave gaps for his hard-run- 
ning colleagues to exploit .. 

Two tries by Brooke, the 
Auckland loose forward, gave 
New Zealand the best of starts 
in the final. Botica added a 
third before Australia lost 
Glen Ella, dazed by something 
approximating to a stiff-arm 
tackle from Shelford. He was 
followed off by Could and 
Australia conceded further 
tries to Botica, Kirk and 
Clamp, Botica kicking four 
conversions in a scoreline 
which equalled the most con- 
vincing win of the tournament 
and gave New Zealand an 
average of 22 points a match. 


ons who. to their credit, 
recognized from, then on the 
need to step up their game. .. 

Wales were unbeaten in 
their qualifying group and 
beat France in the quarter- 
final spurred on by Davies's 
sixth try and fine form from 
Moriany. Unfortunately 
Moriarty sustained a dead leg 
in that game and Davies 
played against Australia with a 
slightly strained hamstring 
(which did not prevent his 


produce 

Rfvero, 


scoring another try against 
those from 


Australia had disposed in 
the semi-final of Wales, who 
comibuted one of the person- 
alities of the tournament in 
Jonathan Davies. The twin- 
kling Neath stand-off enjoyed 
his finest moment in the 

qualifying rounds against New 
Zealand when he showed re- 
markable sustained pace and 
scored three tries in an 18-12 
defeat of the eventual champi- 


Lynagh, Williams 
and Ella). Bui in the face of 
Australia's overall pressure 
the Welsh game wilted in 
temperatures which, on Satur- 
day, exceeded 90 degrees. 

The dark horses were Spain, 
who defeated England in the 
qualifying rounds and gave 
their F*rin cousins' from Ar- 
itina a run for their money 
fore bowing out in the 
quarter-finals by 12-6. The 
Spanish had to study film of 
Australia earlier in the week to 
understand sevens technique 
and they received coaching 


from Pearce, the former 
Wallabies flanker, - but ; they 
luced their own “heroes in 
; a bearded centre who 
for A^ . ra FraiiCeand 
a fine nmnef and 
goal-kickcr. 

They may- be among the 
Spanish party to visit E nglan d 
next month when they will 
play a Devon and Cornwall 
XV and England Under-23. 
That at least would allow 
England a measure of revenge 
for a desperately poor tourna- 
ment in which they looked 
among the least talented 
teams. 

Hill the Bath scrum hall 
scored a try against Spain in 
the 24-6 defeat and- Winter- 
bottom, another against Aus- 
tralia bur lhe_, Dutch-pro ved a 
considerabte obstade before 
late tries - by - Clough and 
Thomas (ra the tut seconds) 
brought imgland their' only 
win by 20-16. Ripley and 
Williams scored earlier tries 
and Hill revealing a hitherto 
unsuspected talent for goal- 
kicking, landed the two con- 


versions which 
difference. ' . . 

NEWZEALAM)^ 


made the 


-ISTHAdA: 1 JOTSanw, G Ela prop 
t^Qhr PCcbc R Gould 
^captain. rap S Tuynmanl S 
Poktev&vP Lucas:' ' • ‘ ' ' - 

Referee: R Rxdhaji (New South 
Wales).. 

POOL A: Austria IB, Netherlands- 


Of Spain 24.'Eogtand'6; Spain -12. 
Netherlands ft Australia 24. En- 


gland ft England 20. Netherlands 
fft Australia IB, Sptf« 10. _ 

POOL B: New Zealand 22, TongaO; 


22, Tenant); 

Wales 18. USA.0; Tonga 18.. USA 4; 
Wales 18, New Zealand 12: Wales 
IB. Tonga 12; New Zealand 28. USA 


of^Mrs 

same o^ on 1HU!am g pff * 

Soviet Union from the International 
'.f* Kng Union. Mr Uwratce- ■ 

done, is unprecedenied, . n^mv, a British member of 

If anyone has ever asked for .^cggncil of the ISU, described 
such public humiliation, ^ DanOeflko's decision as 
Tatiana Pa puan did so on .. — - of 

„ — — - a*,®. 


0. 


POOLC: Western Samoa24. Roma- 
nia ft Argtina27i Japan ft Romania 
12, Japan ft Agj*#* 18. Westem 
SfflTmfift /VgOTBna 21. Romania 4; 
r Western Samoa 10, Japan'S: .. 


lm Korea lo: somn.iviraa 


16. .South 

10, Caneida*1ft RP-tft fiance 12; 
1 Franca 2ft Camria-ft FA 18, South 
Ko rea ft-' ' ' 

QtlAJrii&FINALS: Austntiff -14, 
Western Samoa -.4;- WSIes 12, 


France ft Aroen&n 12. Spate: ft 
New ZeatandFlB, ra a SEMI- 
FINALS: Australia 1ft Wales ft New 


rates ft New 

Zealand 24, Argentina 4. FINAL: 
New Zealand 32. Australia a 



Gloucester 
denied 
their feast 


London Scottish. 
Gloucester 


12 

-.8 


They Me their rugby served 
red raw with plenty of hot 
mustard m the West -Country. 
Add the. spice of cup com- 
petition and it can. warm the 
blood on a cold Saturday, after- 
noon in Spring. 

Just such a piquant dish was 
served up at Richmond where 
Gloucester's robust forwards 
had arrived with the intention of 


Seen but possibly not heard: Davidson of Leicester earmarks Jackson of Harlequins for 
• special treatment in the scram (Photograph: lu Stewart) 


Richards the lion-hearted 


ByJphiiCleinuon 


Harlequins 

Leicester— 


15 


Leicester were overwhelmed 
by Bath, the John Player Cup 
holders, in their first main 
fixture of the season at Wriibid 
Road, their home ground, last 
September. Now, as the season 
draws to a dose, they must again 
beat Bath, again at Leicester, if 
they are to progress to the final 
of this year's competition. 

Is reaching the semi-finals as 
good as Leicester can hope for 
this time? Anyone who saw last 
September’s encounter might 
think so. but the hordes of their 
vociferous supporters at the 
Stoop Memorial Ground, 
Twickenham, on Saturday will 
have none of it. 

Leicester's hopes rest heavily 


on Richards, the England No 8, 
whose p er forma nce- against 
Harlequins was outstanding. 
Supported by Richardson and 
Davidson, among others, be has 
matured well this season, and 
will be giving Egenon, Hall and 
SpuneU a hard time when they 
meet 

They also depend on Hare, 
their prolific kicker, who had 



metres, 

rebounded off the crossbar — 
ami on Cusworth, who took an 
age to. realize that the tactical 
kick was more effective than the 
swift pass a g ains t Harlequins' 


second Hariequ ins, try ' to give 
them an Sr6. leacTat halftime, it 
was inevitable: that. Leicester 
would win,- and Richards's try, 
touched down after almost the 
entire Leicester pack had tried 
to barge their way through to the 
line, only served 10 make the 
point 

Cusworth scored the earlier 
Leicester try from Richards’ 
break. Hare converting both and 
adding a solitary penalty goaL 


they had almost devoured on 
then- last visit; in January. This 
time; bbweverjhe exiles were 
much better p repar ed and the 
-West Country- SKle wait away 
hungry, losing by’one'^paL two 
penalty goals TO two frrei:: 

. Sor rt way the Scots; after a 
: higfr . coriwqtifi^ who 

- qualified for the 'semi-finals of 
the John Player Special Cujx , 
Gloucester can only Maine 
themselves. Somq of their for- 
ward surges were a joy to watch 
as they covered almost half the 
length Of the pitch, unle» you 
happened to be a Scot It was a 
pity that their lock. Brain, was 
foolish enough to get himself 
sent off for punching 14 minutes 
into foe second hauand deprive 
his colleagues of his^anirid- 
erable services. ' -, %'■’ 
Tlfetizcstmieian^^y^iting 
' spectators wfaodirt^totf a- chant 
* of “cheats” at Gl oTOester, r mu« 
3 have hardicAth^^ n vic tx ottof 
. those who their 

Iru^y aevoid> -com- 

‘ petitions hecauseof thetatation 


hard-tackling centres, 
icester 1< 


Leicester looked as though 
they would go through as soon 
as they had recovered from 
Deni's try, scored after just two 
minutes. Even though Jackson, 
another high class No ft added a 


Cu8 Wftft. Rjchanfa . _ 
tions^Hare (2). Finib. Kara: 
HARLEQUH^M Bose^Oont, J Stiman. 
A Thompson. 6 Human R Cramb. R 
Gtonnister: P Curfia. J Otar.-I Mteft.M- 
Skinner. Wl CuWwtaoa- N . OBrtert, X) 

Coo ka.T* Ja ckson.;. 

LBCESTHt WHara; BkErani“P Dodge. I 
Bates. KlMfcms;LCU8worth.SKonny;S 
Redlem. C Tmastar. W Riohsnlson, J 
W MS. J Davidson. M Foatas-AmoM. D 
Ftehards. R TebOutt 

IMeraarG C CronnMH {GtouceataraMno 
SocxKtf. 


whohad^tfae 
right to' fed aggrieved was 
iFrazier, the uniortimfte Soot- 
tish prop, He did not e^en reach 
the-field of play' having pulled a 
fog muscle on the way from the 
dressing-room. 

Irvine kicked two penalties 
for the Scots before the GTouces- 
ter flanker, Gadd, 'scored a try 
.after a . fine forward thrust 
.McKay, ^'substitute, ftraeased 
■the home laid m 


Irvtiitf, t»nyertal*.aha^1&n in 
injury tune- South: collected an 
luncon 1 



iOtOON SCOTTISH: e HaaSnqs; T 
L RonwK*. S tmna, L 


Winds help Newport 
breeze to victory 


By Gerald Davies 


Newport 

Aberavon 


..15 

— 6 


eapt): LPT R Fanfold (Amazon). 
Pomma J PockBngton ((Mmgwonft 
a Oa**l 70afl»v»fc_AB M 


MEMO) G Priee 


Ewms (Tameraffe) 
ptwi). U B Howmfl 
Woodcock (Daedalus). LPT 


rtoo (Bwot CPOPT R 
I, LS(S)SM n jgr pru- 
g(Wotoon). LABSKM) B 


Rusaod 


(Drakel Cpi H Hewtt (Royal Marines). 
AEM(M) G Wood tOsprey), U S Hutfm 


(Bros 


'AL AIR FORCE: Col S I 

Nwnonj: « U M Aspteaff (Snzs 1 

JnrTodi $ Roko (St Ajhan), FO 1 1 

IBnza Norton, caoq. FO R Undanwood 
(Chnmnort Sgt P ATMitc (St Athan) 
N Rrtras (Oonnham 

K 

Dwtea (Uxbndga). SAC A BOffl (Bros 
Norton). Cpi B MteanteB (Oakhangtul 
Cpi R Bum (Bnza Norton), Cm D 
Psmxuga tRmngiefl. TO i r 


(replacement SAC N Rakes (Qreenhar 
Common), Cpi S WomH (WHtBrtng): (tel I 
Wtwcomte (Norm umerman). SAC l 


neuenarij. JwToS^oog 1st Athan). 
Retow Dr J Coubon (Northumoertand 


Society). 


The weather took a turn for 
the worse, so this Schweppes 
Welsh Cup semi-final was never 
going to be anything more than 
a fierce and uncompromising 
contest up front Newport, with 
their immense and powerful 
pack, would make certain there 
would be no broad sweep on 
Saturday’s muddy canvas. They 
can dominate matches but often 
struggle to win because they 
cannot offer much elsewhere. 

Aberavon. who have im- 
proved steadily since Christmas 
and took Llanelli's scalp in the 
last round, must have hoped for 
a similarly loose game as they 
had at Stradey. The weather 
conditions denied them the 

opportunity and Newport were 
in no mood for frivolities and 
won by two goals and a penalty 
to two penalties. 

Aberavon are no slouches at 
forward but Newport, with 
Rhys Morgan and Michael J 
Watkins, were not to be shifted 
in the scrums. Aberavon. even 
though they lost Fauvel their 
promising No.S, after 20 min- 
utes. were still dominant in the 
line-out through the bali-win- 
ning ability of Brown and 
Jenkins- But it was a scrummag- 


ing sort of day and it was here 
that Newport drove home the 
advantage. Time and again 
Aberavon were forced to con- 
cede ground. And if by chance 
Aberavon tried to wander away 
from the pattern, they were 
enveloped by Roger Powell and 
Richie Collins, who played 
terrifically. 

They took an early three- 
point lead with the wind in their 
favour. Jonathan Griffiths's first 
penalty was from well within his 
own half But a little later the 
full back misjudged Turner's 
grabber kick and the stand-off 
followed h up to get the try 
which he converted himself It 
was in the third minute of injury 
time that Aberavon draw level 
with a Mike Lewis penalty. 

Within 20 minutes Newport 
had added another try when 
Cal lard went blind side of the 
scrum and passed to Collins to 
get the try which Turner con- 
verted before adding another 
penalty. 

SCORERS: Newport Dries P Tumor, fl 
Cc*ns. ctnwrwiar P Turner (SO. Pm- 
altlee; P Turner (ifAberavoK Pennies J 
GrtfWw. M Lewis. 


Hawick hopes 
are high 
as the wind 


Patoraon-BnMn. 
tetton; N CtKOwartl 
McKay). AO ' 

Morrison, J 
3 Austin, J A 
GLOUCESTER: T Smith; □ Morgan 
(replacement R WM o i n q , P TaMor, R 
McLean. J Breeze; M Hsnifln, M Ham* 


oflh (reptocemert A 
, D Tosh,- 


tort; P Jones, K While. R Pascal, J QwJd. 
N Scrtven. J Brain, M Longstaff, M 


ICE SKATING 


Humiliating bar* 



FromJ©hnH««messy,G^w 

Be wrid The Austrian 

championshjps fopk a ^ awarded 5.ft which 

:-r of 

being suspended nor, n, TTre Russians declared focm- 

judges from . otfacr coimtiT^ J &i the stuoidiry 

■i- oirPfrrma the 



MfS UWuiBirav 9 — ~ 

- ‘•xhe most ridiculous piece 01 

H&'jsriznr 


hoisted a mark of 5.9. a tenth of final event of the 

a point below perfection, for . champjoashfos, the ke damre. 
technical content in foe pro- onof uachallenj 
g ramm e ;of Alexander radeyev, ■ - ^ ■ 


a young compatriot. 



a 

diffi- 
culty. but his failure -was »> 
complete that all except om 01 
foe other -eight judges confined 


championsoqn, 

once foe ondtallei^pd domain 
of Torvill and Deaiu 
for the second tone by Na^fy* 
Bestemianova and Anaret 
Bukin. 


ilS Jon«.«te P AsMwm tftt Coins 

gndAAMHL . 


SKIING 


Girardelli 
on top of 
the world 


Bromonl fReutrrj — Marc 
Girardelli of Luxcmboiug won 
his second, consecutive overall 
men's World Cup tide on Friday 
despite fiiHng co “finish -the 
season V‘ final: race, a slalom 
event won by Bojan Krizaj of 
Ytgbstevia. - 

Girardeili, aged 22, straddled 
a gate during (he second leg of 
the race and had to wait for ms 
Swiss rival- Pirmin Zmbriggcn 
to dclcrorine the otneome. But 
‘ZurijriMeni' who would have 
teken tne title had be won, 

w pniwll y finishwi third. . 
RESULTS: .1. S Krtzaj (Yutff IwteSSLSB 
nc 2, P PranwTWAajiirt ISShft 3. P 


b ZOIJOSi 8. H Stratz. (AuMri#) MT.IBt 
, (T. 201 .30; ID. L-G Hatv«aoo 


[ 11. J 


; 12. 13. 


Tawnriwffil21)32ft 14. F Woonvfl (WG) 


GOLF 


Oxford’s 


singles 
lead way 




fcir 

10.-D _ 

OVBMLL FINAL OT 

'jSBtaaiL.-. 

(S«dtz|204(ft 1 SuranwK 

196;&LS«*(^iBtria>m:7.nP«trow 
(YUS) StrotetAurtia) 165; 9, P 

MmnMger (Austria) 148; TO. G Mate 
(Austrta^i43. - 

• Mateja Fvet of Yugoslavia 
won the women's giant slalom 
on Saturday to consolidate her 
third place in tbe Worid Cup 
standings. 

RESULTS: (MM (Yuo) 2 11*1 19.18 
sac 2. 0 Owteow «ST2:17JS 3L V 
SetSlMte (Swta) 21B27; 4, M WaNsar 
Sw&ri 23XJ.18; ft J JjCBste (Can- 

2200 : 8 . csaMtMtMtaaoim 1 . s 

. Wolf (Austria) 22033. ft C Maria (Ft) 

tike 

JSa . Btt WL-'S- Ete 
tAuseta) iS^LSa^j (Cara 

,2^1 .90; 14. Kiskxe m&zzbrk 1ft B 


UWNn«| . «ur, i«- oniHrti 

^21^0; 14, KtSnU (WES22£l3; 1ft 
FarnapCtoOchca ffip) 72237, - 

womocupsTtelnMi&i.vscrvtsM 


MHHHMTv Schntidar 

THaactarCwgsftft 

|MWaBaar(SwH^7ft 


52;*ft 

MMNIBMItetelMlIl. 


OVBMLL: 1. M MUSsar ©akri 2! 



BOXING 



By Ian McT anchlan 


Tsaous. ' 

IWsraa: T Friand ftateastar). 


Las Vegas (Renter) — Trevor 
Berbick ..became, a cut-juioe 
heavyweight ebampriqn on Sat- 
uixtey when tie won foe World 
Boxing Council title with a 
u mmimo Hs points: win .over 
PinkJon Thomas, a preyiously- 
unbealen American. Berbick, a 
Jamaican-born Canadian, re- 
ceived only ■ $50,000 (about 
£35,000) for a victory which 
made hun asucorssor to the tikes 
of Larry Holmes, Muhammad 
AK and Joe Frazier. . 


Hello bye for 
the holders 


ABERAVON: J Grlffithf; P Jones, G 


Mantwra. m Thomas. R Dutodc M 
Lew& R GMS (capft P KMgm.B Jams, 
D Joseph. T Rees. I Brawn. J JanWns, P 


Rawfirot.MJWaSow (capon 
Goans, J YintecomtM, A Perry, fl 
D Waters. 

RatanwCNortngPWUfl. 


Hawick, by beating then- 
nearest rivals, Stewart's-Md- 
villc. 16-6, remain <mi course td 
win their ninth League title. In 
hi^i wind and squally showers 
thevisiling -pack, proved too 
strong for their opponenfs. j*" 

Tomes dominated the ; Eri6- 
out, taking two-handed , catches 
or deflecting to a fellow inter- 
national Campbell who drove 
Strongly forward. In the loose 
the work of McGaughey, 
Turnbull and .Hogarth was 
exemplary. 

Hawick elected to [Bay into 
the wind. They opened the 
scoring in seven minutes when, 
from a turned scrum, the pack 
drove and propelled Deans over 
fora oy. 

Stewart's-Mclville surged 
back and Symon Sara put over 
a penalty midway through the 
half. He' pul bis side into foe. 
lead two . minutes later when 
Turnbull- foe Hawick- flanker, 
was penalized for punching. ■ 

in foe; second half Hawick 
used the wind to telling effect 
Their forwards took foe game in 
hand. Hogarth feeding 
McGaughey. who crossed foe 
line unopposed, and Easton 
converting magnificently from 
the touchline. In the last quarter 
Oliver touched down and again 
Easton converted. 


WEEKEND RUGBY UNION RESULTS 


JOHN PLAYER SPECIAL CUP: Quariar- 
Rnsls: Harlequins B, Lacsster 15; London 
Scomsn 12. Gloucester 8. Fourth ro un d . 
Blade heam 12. warns 34. 

JOm SMITH’S HEnT TABLE B: North- 
ampton 16. Waterloo ft Bernard 0. Orel 
35. 

Schweppes welsh cup: sent-finA: 
AOeraron ft Newport ift cartdf 17, 
“ »e«o3. 

3rra»1 FIRST DtVtSKK EdWaurah 
*c B06 ft West o» Scotland 75: Gala 2*. 
Borou^mur ft Hanoi's FP ia Selkirk 4; 
Jed-Forea 15. Presron Lodge 9: Krtso 45. 
W3Bonan5 ft Mefrose 22. tOVrsareock. ft 
Stewart's-MehnUe FP 6. Hawick 16. 
INTERNATIONAL MATCH: Italy Colts 1& 
England Colts ft 

CLUB MATCHES: Bath 30. Richmond 13: 
Bvminqnani 3. Harrogate ft. Bristol 34. 
Rosdyii Park 22: ttomam 15. Hartlepool 
5; HBaSngtay 22. Way Brighton a London 
Irish 28. romwcMd ft London Welsh ift 
Newtjndoe 1ft Mateeg M. Coventry 4: 
MHWesdroogh 10. ft ktosetey 24. 
Swansea 13; Ne«h lO. Uaneli4; ffcrtv 
em 12. WakeMd 13; Nottowham 38. 
Liverpool ift Nuneaton 14. Bitentieed 
Park 16: Portypool 34. Penanh 1ft 


Sneffieid 15. vale or Luw 1 ft South Wales 
Pokes 14. AtelPDice a Sale 25. Saracens 
18; West Harteoool a. floundhay ft 
Weston-supw-Mare 7. Canttome 13: 
Cross Keys 18. AoenBenr i5. 

ULSTER SEMQR CUP*' Qoarter4rariE 
Ards 11. telymjna ift Coue^ans 8. 
Malone 15: NlFC 10. Bangor ift 
hT Sk k w ms 17, Academy 4. Senior Plate 
Queen's Unwerwy 20, aty ol Deny 10. 
Club mat ch es ; Dimgarmon 1ft Canck 6: 
CTOUSfl, Safymonejrft 


REPRESENTATIVE MATCH: England 18 
Group ft Presttenfs XV ia 


Top form 

The eighth AH -England schools' 
festival, played at Preston 
Grasshoppers, ended in a 1(H) 
victory for St Brendan’s over 


QEGS Wakefield. 

RESULTSSefnMhmta: St Brendan’s ft 
Kkkltam GS ft QEGS WakeMd 8. Hutton 
GS 4. Brat St Brendan s 10, OBSS 
WakefisJdO. 


BASKETBALL 


Kingston in command 


so 


Birmingham theirs was always 
to be a losing battle. 


In the end it was all 
absurdly easy for Team Polycell 

Kingston in foe final of foe ^Kingston are a good 
Carisbcrg national champion-. oflensiy^Iy ‘ but not .so 
Ship play-offs that it was diffi- defensive^ yet w© just, 
cuiz to see why there had been - take advantagft M 'Hajis'f 
any doubts in the first' pfece . Davis deservedly • won 
(Nicholas Harting writes). 

Kingston's 114-97 


MATT! 


the 


win over 
Birmingham Bullets at Wem- 
bley on Saturday was little more 
than a procession. 

By half-time, with their lead 
57-37, the trophy looked to be in 
Kingston's safe keeping fix' the 
first time and gallantly though 
Donaldson (31 points). Hays 
(26) and Shoulders (22) tried to 
stem foe inevitable tide a&unsi 


most, .valuable, player of the 
match award for his contribu- 
tion of 37 points and' 15 
rebounds for Kingston. The big 
American was irresistible; 
Bomrager and Clark, with 30 
poin ts apiece, enabled Kingston 
to win with mud) to mare. - 
136 (JewWigs GO. teaman 3ft Jsrensite 
171 w were Crisp* Ltfftter 117 
(Vautfte38.Mughari4.Ja<nBSi3)- - 
WOmBFS HNAL: Crystal PWro* 7ft 
Avon N a nfaamp tenflS. 




JXHIWTipNS 


CINEMAS 


M«w and.', f. 

l. film. jmT *- 


CUObC* WUya.lOa. Baa. 2JOT 
a. AdW. ■ • • - . 


ART GALLERIES 


Street. Wl. SW 6176 1 


rKTUMunumn. 
MUPTWU, ■ 


1 «S> 29S1. Acad*. 
-'Award Winner 

• (PCD. 

Prow JIMO (MX Sun). *-ta 
&5 S.BAO. LM * weMK. 

5129. THE 
-*■• 1 •' TABU (POL- Fta M 
a.ifc4Mjg. UM waefta. 
AC *te mr » 4S 7 8819. THE 
W****?m« <PCl. prog* AM. 
AlOMftU* weeks. 


Loco™ mums thcatmc 

- 9301 5282 (Cnai / 839 1769 (24 
*»£A«J2^Vfcai BaoMnoo 

a®, sev prom 

Dtflv 2.EO. 5.00. 8.40. All 

- Progs BookMDa m AHvanfg. 


St lSoa. 

wca OdoMer So ium wu. 

^Ajs BOOKABLE £r 


Una 11 Anrfl MocvPrl 9-30- 

830: Thor* art* 


MMDTfLAZA 488 2443 (Onn. 
Omwi Town tuba) OodanTt 


800. 5.00. 




Mean Ocnire. EC2- 01-638 
.4141. UnCU 27 AMlfc ART « 
1M, looking at Ume nd Me 
4th dHMMatan In inotwrn art. 
Arina £1.60 and 798 Td»S« 
. lOaro-84Spm. St® a 8 (MR 


351 3742 

■ ivn (Mmcst lube 

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MrjMt £W perr^ 


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WC1. tenROR OP TRE WORLDc 
AUasea. MwSand OUMk wmtjr* 
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Pite S-SW7. 01 -3 84 Q6C7. 

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‘ KuroMwaS MaMowece. RAM 

- Accen/VtHk rice Bfw. 


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ROYAL ACADEMY Or ARTS Bur- 
tongton Home. Plctatlffly 01-734 

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■wtetoi mb i*— ^-*-yir im 








& 


,9 


rv »* 




By Nicholas Keith 

' Oxford km one singles match 
on Saturday but their. victoiy 
over Cambridge at Gantpn, an 
inspired choice for -the 97th 
University match, was not as 
dearart as foe finaf score of 1 1-4 
would suggest ■* 

With the sponsors. Gram 
Thornton; a firm of chartered 
accomuants. extending their 
support until I990"ai least and at 
“an advanced stage" of planning ^ 
a four- way tournament between 
Oxford. Cambridge. Harvard 
and Yale, at Rye next spring, it 
was by a happy coincidence that 
Tim Dickens, a Harvard man. 
daimed the decisive point 
against Brian Bergstrom, a fel- 
low American. \ 

The top three saqjes held the 
key. Simon Ellis, the Cambridge 
captain, «*"♦"*** 10b many short 
putts mid also broke wo dubs in 
succumbing on the last green to 
Mkiad .J&cPbceJn. the most 
gearing match, David Meacher 
won the first four boles- against 
Duncan RehdaH; buftifeo found 
himself three down with- seven 
to play. He holed three putts 
from, over f5ft on successive 
greens from the fourteenth and 
he had a six-footer for foe match 
on the ltit, although bendmit- 
tedtbai a half wasa faxr rtsuit in 
the end. . 

Tain - Smith was .the only fr 
Gernbridgesucoess m ariwetiag 
betwee n sen year’s captain 
against Kari Frorson.' 

SCOMtefCMcMr namulkaOcM W M R 
McPhmbtSDateomlkte OL RteM 
JtewfratoCDMWkte T MHMrtwlltJ 
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■nriftE JPmfmbiQWVbmQ and ft 
CEAMHbH MCCHawnflite ItelftT E 
DIckwirbrB D.Batpfflro*n,5 anri 4; J E 
Rotate WMm F j EtaatotaSandi. 


c-' 1 . ^ 


Tbedraw fortheSunxungdale 
Foursomes,, which starts today 
and continues until Thursday, 
stems to have been kind.to the 
holderi. Sam Torrance and John 
O'Leary,. JLyder Cup players 
both (John Hennessy writes). 
-They have a bye info the second 
round? and" their prospective 
early . opponents tend to lack 
weight 

It may not be ,umil Wednes- 
day. afternoon before they face 
their first .. difficult test This 
presupposes thaf Mickey 
Walker and Katherine Pan ton, 
founder . members of the 
Women’s' Professional Golf 
Association, overcome the three 
pairs of opponents who block 
their way to the sixth round. 

Neil Coles makes his faithful 
pilgri mag e to Sunningdale, this 
time partnered by an amateur of 
marching vintage in Martin 
Christmas. 




rfT- 1 


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i 






» 1 . 

^ JIT 


Today’s television and radio programmes 


Edited by Peter Dear 
and Christopher Davalle 


00 cmfax.AM. 

50 Brodfctest Time wtth Nick 
Ross and Denote 
Greenwood Weather at 
645, 7.25. 745, 025 and 
845; regional rams, 
^weather and traffic at 647, 
'737, 737 and 8JT7; . 
national and international 
news at 7.00, 730, 830, 
630 and 930; sport at 
730 and 830; and a 
review of me morriing 


TV-AM 


6.15 Good Morning Britain 
presented by Anne 
Diamond and Nick Owen. 
Exercises at 630 and \ 
9.17; news with Jayne 
Inring at 630, 739, 730, 
800, 830 end 930; sport- 
at 83Sand734; Derek "• 

. : Jameson et 630; Popaye’ 
cartoon at 7.24; jjop video ' 
' at 745; Jimmy Greaves's- 


fJ-l 


Lynn Fautds Wood's 
consumer report pqp 
music news from Steve 
Biacknefi; and Russefl 
Grant's horostxjpes. 

(20 Ceefax 1030 Ptay School, 
(f) 1040 Ceefax. 

* 3.15 The Gospel According to. 
St Matthew. The first of 

- seven fUms narrated by 
Peter Bsrkworth. 

"330 News After Noon with 
Frances Coverda fa and 
David Davies. Includes 
news headfines with 
subtitles 1235 Regional 
news and weather. 

<130 Pebble MU at Onawtte 
s Paul Con, Marian Foster 

- and Magnus ktanusson 
The guests Include Peter 
Cusrang who taSm about 
<»• Ws We and career on both 

■•L sides of the Atlantic; and 

V there tea report from toad 

i expert Michael Smith in 

Calitomia where he is . 

1 sampling the Napa Valley 

wines 145 Little Misses 

and the Water Men^r) 

’• 2.00 The Parent Pro gram me. 
What can be done for 
those parents of under- 
fives who thkik that they 
are an underprivileged 
minority? 2.15 Ceefax 

- 815 Songs of Praiae from 
Uverpoofs Roman 
Cathofio Cathedral, (r) 

" (Ceefax) 3J52 Regional 
news. 

. 3L55 Paddington (r) 4.10 

Heathcfiff-TheCat(r) 

430 Jaekanory. John . 
Grant with his story of 
Uttienoce and Two-Eyes. 
435 Thundertmds 2086. 
Animated science fiction 
series. 

435 John Craven's 

Neweround 5.05 Blue 
Peter. Peter Duncan 
reports from Hartlepool on 
the restoration work being 
done to the 120 year old 
- HMS Warrior .(Ceefax) 

535 Charfes in Charge. 
American comedy series 
about a male nanny. 

- 800 News with Sue Lawley and 
Nicholas Witchefl. 

■ Weather. 

635 London Phis, introduced 


1TV./LONDON 


935 Thames news headlines 
followed by Fim: The 
World of Suzie Wring 


aired, one sung by Chad 
Brown, the other Cofin 
Heywood. Also on the 
programme are Terry 
Gilliam, Maria Aitken and 
Paul Shane. 

735 ITs Yoor Move. The 
. . second and final pert of 

domestic comedy from the 
United States.- - ■ 

~ 830 Scott PraeuFor fills final . 

programme other-earies 
- SefiraScoKjote-i 

journalist rrsd broadcaster. 
Jonathan WBs on the forty 
from Aberdeen as he 
makes an emotional return 
\ . to Ws Shetland Islands - 

■■i origins, f Ceefax) 

. 830 Dear John— Comedy 

series staiylng Ralph - 
Bales as a sdmolteacher 
whose wife suddenly 
walks out on him. (Ceefax) . 
930 News with Julia Somecvffle 
and Andrew Harvey. 
Weather. 

930 Panorama: Uganda 

CfukfreR of Terror. Gavin 
Hewm interviews the . 
Ugandan leader Yowan. .. 
Museveni and reports on 

• sbrneoftiwapp afing 

atrocities in the infamous 

Ljwerb Triangle. 

10.10 FBm: Tlw Looking ©ass 
War (1969) starring 
Christopher Jones, Ralph 
RWtaroson and Anthony 
Hopkins. Lb Carre's spy 
thriller about the 
investigation into the 
murder of a British agent 
m Finland. Directed by 
Frank R -Pierson. 

1135 The Gospel Accwdmg to 
> St Matthew, toid by Peter 

^ Barfcworth. (Shown at 

12.15) 

1235 Weather. 






• ••• - vt" 

»- < . 
r-'^7. • 


Maria Rekbe: Mystery of the 
Naxca Lines (Channel 4, 10pm) 


Holden.- Nancy Kwan and ; 
Sylvia Skits. Ro ma ntic lale ' 
'of an American artist in 
Hong Kong.who fans for.ar J 
• CteinesegR Directed by 
- Richard Quine.. . . r 

1130 AboutBritaft^firstbf'V 
. a new series in which 
Michael Duffy explores the 


855 Open tMvers%: Maths 
Cta&^fyingQjwcs. 

&00 Ceeftox. 

1235 Contact and Change in 
. E Ai eaBon. Lessons end 
attitudes compared at a 
comprehensive school -. 


1230 Ticlde on the Turn. VEJage 
tales for young children Tri 
. 12.10 Left Prateod to the 
story of The Singer Who 
Lost His Voice. 

1230 SunrivaL A documentary 
about the rattlesnake. 

1.00 News at Ona with Leonard 
Parkin 130 Themes newa 

130 FBm: Fifty, Fifty (1984) 
starring Lynda Carter and 
Loni Anderson. A made- 
for-tele vision drama that 
was a ptiot story for an 
aborted television series 

. about a coupie of female - 
private detectives. 

, Directed by Harry Faulk- 
335 Thames news 
headfines 330 The Young 
. Doctors. - 

430 Tickle on ttw Turn, A - 
repeat of the programme 
. shown at noon 810 
James the Cat Cartoon 
series 430 He-Man and 
Masters of the (Adverse. 
Science fiction adventure 
series 4.45 Supergran, 
starring Giidrun Ure and 
lain Cuthbertson. (r) 
(Oracle) 

815 Connections. 

545 Newa 630 Thames news 
with Andrew Gardner and 
Trida Ingrams. 

825 Hatpi Vtv Taylor Gee with 
news of the VVbmen fri ~ 
Barnet Action Group. 

635 Crossroads. Ronald- 
Hathaway falls lor Nicola's 
charms. . . 

730 WWi. You Were Here.? 1 

- - ' The last programme of the 
series and Judith 
Chalmers reports from 
Lanzarote; Armeka Rice 
from China; and Chris 
Kelly reports on the 
progress of Stoke-on- 
Trent’s summer 
f ntemational Garden 
FestivaL (Oracle) 

730 Coronation Street Rita 
Fairdough nods help with . 
:• her foster daughter. 
(Oracle)- ■ 

800 WorW to A tfton Special: 

: TheAesMenf afttate^i ; 

•> War. A report from L 

!■'. Nkraratpraonliow - V. 
PresWent Reagan’s men - 

- setup a secret army, ■■ 
financed and aimed by. the 

- CIA. to launch an 
undercover war gainst 
the left-wing government 

• forcesw- ... ;■■■. 

800 ThrBter. You’ll Never Sea 
Me Again, starring Leslie 
phUBps and Yves 
Beneyton. A debt-ridden 
detective in vesttaates the 
disappearance of a 17- 






1 , 1, , Iff! 



coast of Germany, who 
stumbles on a plot to 
invade Britain. Directed by 
Tony Maytam. 

1235 The Madonna and the 
Magdalen. A discussion 
on the cult of Mary. Ends 
at 1230. 





Peter, marriesa New York 
night chib singer and 
- Incus the wrath of the 
folks back home, not least 
his erstwhile fiancee. 
Directed by George 
Stevens. 

435 The Paper Chese. The 
first of a new series about 
the students of a law 
-— school in the UnSad- - 
. . . states. Starring John 
Houseman. 

535 News summary with 
subtitles. Weather. 

530 MteraUve. TWs last 
nroaramme of the series 


comparison between the 
Commodore Amiga and 
the Atari 520ST. 

Presented by Fred Harris, 
tan McNaugro-Qavfs and 
Lesley Judd, (shown last 
Friday) 

630 FBm: By theUght of the 
SBvery Moon (1953) 
starring Doris Day and 
Gordon MacRea. Musical 
romance about a young 
... lady faithfully awaiting me 
■ return of her soldier nance 
' who. when he does 
. appear. ha$ marriage as 
. ". ihe last thing on rite mind. . 
1 Directed by David Butler. ; 

740 Open Space; The Price of 
Insubordination. Sacked 


about what they beSeve 
are unjust anti-union laws. 

810 Horizon. AIDS: A Strange 
and Deadly Virus. A 
documentary reporting on 
the current state of 
research into the Aids 
virus, foBowing the story 
of Bobbie a nurse who 
developed Aida through a 
contaminated blood - 
transftision(seeChol<»).;- 

93d'Now r 3bowtfih>g Else. 

- RoryBremnerwnh . 
aTtolher selection of 

- cotn^inwrtiMlpns. . 

930 Joan ffivere: Cm We . . 
Talk? The American 
comedienne end her co- 
host Peter Cook, are • 
joined by Dudley Moore. 

- pt«Dollbs,Satnar«haFdx 
and Kenneth WURams. 

1030 From London with Love. A 
documentary about the 
statue of Eros and its 
refurbishment in 
Edinburgh. The narrator Is 
John Humptays. .... 

1045 NewsitighL Thelaiest 

naticnafand tetematiorari . 
news mdixflng extended 

- • coverage of one of the - 

main stories of the day. 
Presented by John Tu$8 
Peter Snow, Donald 
MacCormick and Ofivia 
O'Leary 

1130 Weather. 

1135 Tele-JouniaLTonlgWs 
news bullattn from 
Antenna Deux and a 
round-up of the main news 
stories In Europe. 
Presented by Chantal 
Cuer. 

1230 Open UntvwsHy: 

ModeHing with 
Mathematics - Seat Belts. 
Ends at 1230. 


• HORIZON (B8C2, 8.10pm) 

takes a cool took at an emotive 

subject As Max Whitby's 
programme reminds us. it is only 
two years since the AIDS 
virus was first identified, since 
when the disease has 
become a global obsession. 
Contrary to what must be - 
common befief. AIDS is wreaking 
its greatest havoc not in . . 
permfesfve CaSfomia but Cmitral 
Africa; where neither of the 
most commonly suggeste d 
causes- homosexuality md 
drug abuse — are important 
factors. All the same it is the 
American experience that has 
grabbed the headfines. In San 
Francisco, it is estimated, there 
has been tenfold increase in 
infection in two years. The 
programme looks at the 
medical basis of AIDS and 
reports on attempts. 


CHOICE ' v 


inefudmg a Scottish vers 
researches into leukaemia in 
cats, to find a vaccine. But the 
conclusion is pe ssi m istic . 

• MYSTERIES OF PERU 
(Channel 4, 10pm) follows the 
story of an ancient monument 
under threat The Nazca 

Lines w ere etched Into the 
Peruvian desert, between the 
Andes and the Pacific, some 
thousands of years ago and 
comprise striking geometric 
figures which can only be 
property appreciated from the 


German-bom Maria Reiche has 
devoted her life to their study 
and preservation. She is now B2, 
partly lame, almost blind and 
shunned by the experts, but her 
campaign goes on to protect 


the Lines against such modem 
incursions as Peru's busiest 
road, the Pan American Highway. 

• JARVIS'S FRAYN (Radio 4, 
1237pm) is an unlikely radio idea 
that works to perfection. The 
older members of the class will 
recall that before he made his 
name as a playwright, Michael 
Frayn wrote brilliantly witty 
newspaper columns for The 
Guardian and The Observer. 
These have now been 
dramatized by Martin Jarvis 
who in the course of the series 
shows such a facility for 
voices that he plays 99 different 
parts. Gems from the first 
programme include Pythagoras 
trying to explain hts triangle 
theory amid interruptions from 
his children. 

Peter Waymark 


minor (Wq 166)Aufeie 
Ntcdet, and Haydn 
Symphony No 72, in D major. 
11.45 Song Recital: Patricia 
Rozario (soprano) Mark 
Troop (piano). Schumann, 


CHANNEL 4 


235 Winston Churchto- Die 
Vafiant Years* Part 19 of 
the series tracing the 
history of the Second - 
' World War Oased on the 
memoirs of Winston 
Church* includes an 
account of the 1943 
Warsaw uprising which 
lasted a Moody 63 days. 

330 The Late, Late Show. 
Dublin chat show hosted 
by Gay Byme. 

430 A Plus 4, presented by G£ 
NevH. 

430 Countdown. The fourth 


Radio 4 


White against Roy 
Jackson. The 
ouestionmaster is Richard 
Whitatey, assisted by 
Gyles Brandrete as 
adjudicator, 

530 Afice- Mel's dream of 
owninga Porsche is 
fuHaed bat he is shattered 
when the vehicle Is stolen. 

530 CapabiBty Brown.A 
documentary cetebratlnb 
the 200th anniversary of 
landscape gardener in 
which Penelope Keith 


tours some oi the country 
estates that are indebted 
to the gardening genius. 
Among those are 
Chatewotth House in 
Derbyshire, and tee 
homes of the Duke of 
Marlborough and Lord 
Harewood. 

830 Every Window Tefla a 

Story. Part four of 
Malcolm Mffler*s series on 
stained glass windows. In 
this programme Mr MUer 
examlnes tee reasons why 
saints played such an 

. . important part in me<flevaJ 
. fife. (Grade) 

730 Channel Four news wfte 

- * Peter Sissons includes tee 

first of four reports on 
education. This evening: 
how weir are today's 
chfldren being prepared 
for the needs of industry? 

730 Comment With his views 
on a matter of topical 
importance is Robin 
Hutchinson, director of 
Shoestring Theatre. 
Weather. 

830 Brookside. tt'S Bobby's 
birthday but Sheba's 
choice of present upsets 
Mm. 

830-toii Grant A hectic day tor 
the newspaperman 
includes a tunnel caveJn; 

• a human fly scaling a 
skyscraper; and a man 
who has news from outer 
space. 

935 Kate and AIBe. Kate 

makes plans to go on a 

•• romantksskHng weekend 
with her ex-husband to 
see If he realty is Mr Right 
after eft. Starring Susan 
Saint James and Jane 
Curtin. 

865 Conversation Places, a 

. . conversation recorded 
behind the scenes of a 

- radio breakfast show, (r) 

1030 Myotaries of Peru. Tha 

first of two programmes 
about the Nazca Unas and 
the meaning of them 
which has bean a 40 year 
labour of love for 82-year 
old Maria Reiche. (sea 
Choice) (Oracle) 

1130 The Eleventh Hour, TWo 
films on the problem of the 
Latin American debt Don't 
Eat Today. Or Tomorrow, 
was made in Argentina; 
The Loneliness of the 
Gods Is highlights of a 
conference about the 
external debt that was 
held in Havana. Ends at . 
1238 


556 am Shipping. 630 News; 
Wasthar. 6.10 Fanning 
Week. 635 Prayer lor tee 
Dayfs)., 

830 Today mcfcxSng 638 
730, 830 News 
SuMsnaryJ 645 Business 
News. 635,7.55 
weather. 730, 830 Today's 
News. 735, 835 Sport. 

746 Thought tor tea Day. 

835 Tha Weak on 4 with 
David Symonds. 

843 JohnEbdon. 

Investigation of the BBC 
Sound Archives. 837 
Weather; Travel 930 
News. 

935 Start tea Week, with 
Richard Bakarjs). 

1800 News; Money Box; how 
the budget affects you. 

1030 AB Stations to the Cross 
given by Roden Foxcroh 
I ft) Just the Ticket (rj. 

1045 Daily Service from tea 
Chapel of Lambeth (s) 

1130 News; Travel Down 
Your Way. Brian 
Johnston vtsks Newport on 
tha Isle of Wight (r) 

1148 Poetry Please!. 

Listeners' requests (s). 

1230 News: You and Yours. 
Consumer advice with 
PatneCokfwBlL 

1237 Jarvis's Frayn (new 
series). A series of 
unguarded observations (s) 


745 Science Now with Peter 
Evans. 

8.15 The Monday Play; Mr 
Allred MA, by George 
Friel (s). 

9.45 Kaleidoscope: includes 
interviews, news on the 
arts. 

1815 A Book at Bedtime: A 


Settings from Goethe's 
WUhelm Meistfir, Op 98a: 
Mlgnon (Kormst du das 
Land): Nurwerdta 
Sehnsuctn kennt; Helss 
midi racht reden: Smget nich 
in Trauererronen. Manier 
Laider und Gasan ge aus der 
Jugandzeat 
Fruniingsmorgen; 
Erinnerung: Scheiden 
und Malden; ich ging mit 
Lush Abtosung im 
Sommer. 

12.15 Orchestra of the National 
Centre lor Orchestral 
Studies. Beethoven's 
Symphony No 7, in A 
major. 1.00 News 
1.05 BBC Lunchtime Concert 
Live from St John's 
Smith Square, Yitkin Seow 
(piarto). Copm (Fantasia 


Perfect Spy, written and 
read by Jorm le Carre (6). 
1039 Weather. 


1030 The Worid Tomato. 
11.15 The Financial World 
Tonight 

1130 Today in Parliament 
1230 -12.15am News; 


above except 5.55-6-OGam 
Weather; Travel. 135- 
230pm For Schools; 
Ustarang Comer. 530- 
5.55 PM (continued). 1130- 
IZIOam Open University. 
11.30 Reaong in Bottom 
Gear. 11.50 18th Century 
Political Pnms. 


Radio 3 


■ 


tor Georges Simenon. 
kaleidoscope. Looks at 




635 Weather; 730 News 

735 Morning Concert Handel 
(Arrival of the Queen of 
Sheba: LPO. Beecham), 
Mozart (Symphony No 
25.inGminor.KT38). 
Berkeley (Divertimento 'm 
B flat). 830 News 

835 Morning Concert, cont 
Granados (Ef Fandango 
del Candt Quefaed la Maja 
ei Rutseor), Rirnskv- 
Korsakov (Cappriao 
espagnoleL Soier 
(Fandango: Rafael Puyana, 
harpsidtordj.TixIna 
(Danzas fa n asti oa s). 930 
News 

9.05 This Week’s Composer: 
Elgar. Overture: 

Cockaigne (in London 
Town) Op 40. 
Phaharmorta/BarbiroW: 
incident^ Music and 
Funeral March: Grania and 
Dnrmki, Op 42. 

LPO/Boutt: Sea Pictures, Op 
37, Janet Baker (mezzo- 
soprano). 

1800 Violin and Piano. 

Frances Mason and 
Michael Freyhan play 
Schubert's sonatina No 
2. in A minor (D 385); 

Dvorak s Four Romantic 
Pieces Op 75. and Stephen 
Dodgson's Five 
Occasional Pieces. 

1855 CPEBachand Haydn. 
Bach Flute Concerto in A 



in F minor, Op 49), Debussy 
(Pour le piano). Chopin 
l&pata No 3, in B minor. Dp 

230 Music Weekly. 

introduced by Michael 
Oliver. 

245 New Records. Anon 
(Three 16 th-century 
Polish dances: Chifonla 
Ensemble), trad 
Romanian (Ballad of the 


(Airs de ballet David Roblou, 
harpsichord], 

Charpentier (Motet pour 
I'Otfe noire da la Messe 
Rouge), Scarlatti (T wo 
sonatas: In B minor, 

Kk487; in B flat Kk 266, 
Agnes GiBleron, 
tortepiano). Avtson 

S kxiceno Grosso No 9. 

C, after Scarlatti; English 
Concert). Handel 
(German anas: Maine Seele 
hon im Sehem Die ihr 
aus dunklen Gruftsn. Emma 
Klrkby, soprano), 

Walnnsley (Sonatina No 2, in 
G; Robin Canter, oboe, 
Richard Burnett piano), 
Beethoven (Symphony 
No 2, in D). 435 News 

530 Mainly for Pleasure, 
presented by Jeremy 
Siepmaim. 

630 Music for the Iron Voice. 
Kevin Bowyer (organ). 
Berio's Fa-Si. Henze’s 
Toccata senza Fuga and 
David Eagle s Stranlen (first 
UK broadcast). 

730 Poulenc and York 
Bowen. Sonatas for 
oboe and piano. Malcolm 
Messiter (oboe) John 
Lenehan (piano). 

730 Ogar The Apostles. 

Oratorio in two parts 
from the Royal Festival Had. 
isobel Buchanan 
(soprano) Alfreds Hodgson 
(mezzo-soprano) 

Maidwyn Davies (tenor) 
Jonathan Summers 
(baritone) Stephen Roberts 
(baritone) Stafford Dean 
(bass). Phdharmonia 


cond Andrew Davis. 

B35 Awake and Asleep. 
Anthology of poems 
a imaged by Diana Griffiths. 

8-55 The Apostle: part two. 

9.45 German and Italian 
Music: Musics Anti qua, 
Cologne. David Potoe 
(pavanne: Testament da 


Concerto in D. RV 425). 

11.00 Beethoven and David 

Matthews. Deimd Strong 
Quartet perform 
Beetnoven’e Quartet in F 
minor. Op 95, and 
Matthews's Quartet No 2 
(first boradeest). 

1157 News. 

VHF only: Open University. 

From 6.35am-655. Maths 
Foundation Tutorial 

C Radio 2 ) 

News on the hour. Headlines 
5.30am, 6.30. 730 and 838 Sports 
Desks 1.05pm, 2.02, 332, 432, 
532. 632, 6.45 (mf only. 955) 
4.00am Catin Berry (sj. 800 
Ray Moore (s). 836 Ken Bruce (s) 
with a special Song for Europe 
preview. 1030 Jimmy Young (s). 

1.05 David Jacobs (s). 230 
Gloria Hunntford (s). 330 Music All 
the Way (5). 4.00 David 
Hamilton (s) plus two entries tor A 
Song for Europe. 830 John 
Dunn (s). 8.00 Alan Dell (s) with 
Dance Band Days. 830 Big 


Sound. 11.00 Brian Mathew 
Round Midnight (stereo from 
midnight). 1.00am Peter 
Dickson Nightnde (s). 800-430 A 
Little Night Music (s). 

( Radiol l 

News on the halt hour from 
6.30am until 930pm and at 1230 
midnight. 

6.00 Andy Peebles. 730 Mike 
Read. 930 Simon Bates. 1230 
Newsbeat (Frank Partridge). 

12.45 Gary Davies. 800 Steve 
Wright 530 Newsbeat (Frank 
Partridge). 5.45 Bruno Brookes. 
730 Janice Long with exclusive 
interview with Mick J agger. 1030- 
1230 John Peel (sj. 

VHF Radios 1 and 2: 430am As 
Radio 2. 1800pm As Radio 1, 

1 2-00-4.00am As Radio Z 






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Magic Magic 680 News 68S-7.00 C«t- 
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The Master 128Swn Contact 1236 
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SPORT 


A lulled England 




caught in storm 


From John Woodcock, Cricket Correspondent, Bridgetown 


In an agony of anti-climax 
England's first innings fell to 
pieces here yesterday after 
they had started play with 
what seemed a fair chance of 
at least drawing the third Test 
match, sponsored by Cable 
and Wireless. From an over- 
night 1 10 for one — they had 
had much their best day of the 
tour on Saturday — England 
slumped to 189 all out and by 
2.20 they were following on 
229 runs behind. 

Lulled into a false sense of 
optimism by the wav in which 
Gooch and Gower bad batted 
on Saturday evening, we had 
visions of the West Indian 
bowling machine beginning to 
run out of steam by yesterday 
afternoon. Yet they were bril- 
liantly effective in exactly the 
conditions that England were 
hoping to be spared. 

On a still, humid, often 
cloudy day batting was not at 
all the simple business it had 
appeared on Saturday eve- 
ning. In Gamer's first two 
overs alone Gooch was beaten 
five limes. The grass may have 
grown a little but, if so, that 
was no more than a contribu- 
tory factor. 

Soon the follow-on loomed 
and when, in the last over of 
the morning. Botham, as he 


was beginning to play well, got 
limself out. England never 


himself 

looked like avoiding it Ft will 
give an idea of the problems 
involved because of the way 
the ball moved about that 
Dujon held five catches at the 
wicket. Richardson two at 
second slip and Best one at 


third slip. Saturday’s . 
had ended with the thousand 
of England supporters won- 
dering whether what they had 
seen might have been too good 
to be true. After a first day on 
which England had been out- 
played. there had come a 
sudden change of fortune. At 
269 for two on Friday night 
West indies looked like scor- 
ing as many as took their 
fancy, especially when by 
Saturday morning Emburey 
had fallen foul of the stomach 
virus. Yet wondrous things 
boon to happen. 

Emburey, thought to have 
an hour's bowling in him 
before having to take to his 
bed. soon removed Richard- 
son, the star of Friday's play, 
and when Emburey withdrew 
and the new ball was taken 
Thomas bowled as Snow or 
Stalham would have been 
proud to. By tea West Indies 
had lost their last eight wickets 
for 149 runs, four of them to 
Thomas. 

On the corresponding Sat- 
urday of this corresponding 
match five years ago Ken 
Barrington died while assis- 
tant manager of the England 
team. As a great fighter he 
would have loved Saturday's 
play, the more so when Gooch 
and Gower added 104 togeth- 
er after tea. Had bad light not 
ended play five minutes early 
they might have become the 
first batsmen from any coun- 
try to bat through a full session 
of play against West Indies for 
eight years, a scarcely credible 
statistic. 


But vesterdav morning they 
never looked like doing so. It 
had become, for two main 
reasons, a different game; 
Richards bad given his 
bowlers what jockeys call a 
“reminder" and Gamer and 
Marshal! made the ball lift and 
swing and seam as they had 
shown no signs of doing on the 
previous evening. Although 
Gower played a nice stroke or 
two, including a hook for four 
off Marshall Gooch was regu- 
larly beaten by Gamer. 

After 25 minutes Gower 
was caught at the wicket off a 
lovely ball from Marshall that 
left him just enough to find the 
outside edge. Gooch. 46 over- 
night. took 40 minutes to add 
to his score, and when be did 
so it was with a boundary over 
the si ips off the shoulder of the 
bat. Marshall this time mak- 
ing one rear. In the next over it 
was Gooch's turn to edge a 
nasty lifting ball from Garner 
to Dujon. There was really no 
avoiding it. 

Just before the morning 
drinks Willey was also caught 
at tbe wicket. Barker, the 
umpire, keeping him waiting 
so long for a decision that it 
was hard not to think that he 
reached it on the vehemence 
of tbe appeal. Barker, it should 
be said, seemed to see a funny 
side to it Next to depart was 
Lamb, the edge going this time 
low to Richardson at second 
slip. Marshall ■ being the 
bowler. 


that it was 90 minutes- before 
Richards broke them up. Al- 
though Gamer had taken only 
one wicket in his eight overs, 
while Marshall was taking 
three, he had. played an equal 
part in dashing. England's 
hopes. And when Holding 
replaced him he at once hit 
Botham a crushing blow in the 
ribs. - 

. Even so, Botham had batted 
for an hour with a proper 
sense of responsibility when 
he let the side down. He had 
played one fine hook off 
Holding. Trying another off 
Patterson, in the last over 
before lunch, be skied it to 
Dujon. The stroke was palpa- 
bly 01 timed. 

In tbe second over of the 
afternoon Emburey was 
caught at third slip off Patter- 
son. Down ton hung on for 35 
minutes before being leg-be- 
fore, playing no stroke, and 
Edmonds for 50 minutes be- 
fore being caught -at second- 
slip. Foster was leg-before to a 
full toss. So England followed: 
on* the West Indian fast: 
bowlers still full of going, the 
day not yet half run and 
clouds hanging ominously 
over Bridgetown. 

WESTM3E8: Ftot tarings 
C G Graeotdg* c Button b Fuftra _ 21 


D L Hawns c Button b I . 

R B RictafdMa Biw b Enbaray — 110 


J Duionci 

Ha Hauling b 
M 0 Mantofl: 


HA Quran cGanrbThoaas 3S 

*IV A RfctontscDawntonb Thomas 51 

C A Bast tew b Footer 21 

c«ubb 8 ottom... ... 5 

b Botham 28 

ran out 4 


J Garni e Gooch b Thooteo . 
B P Patterson not oat . 


So much were Marshall and 
Gamer enjoying- themselves 


Extras (b2,8>S l w8,i*2) , 
Hotel. 


- 18 
410 


International Gulf tournament 


Shaijah (Reuter) — The suc- 
cess and popularity of cricket in 
the Emirate of Sharjah is 
underlined by the decision to 
stage the first Australasia Cup 
here next month. Sheikh Faisal 
bin Khalid al-Qasuni, chair- 
man of the Cricket Benefit 
Fund series, said recently that 
Australia, India. Pakistan, New 
Zealand and Sri Lanka would 
compete for $ 1 1 0,000 (£75.430) 
in prize money in a series of 
five one-day matches starting 


FALLOT WICKETS: 1-34. 2-226, *2*, *> 
361, 5-362, 6-367, 7-406, B41*-»41S: - 
BOWLING: BoOran 24-3-00-1; Tboorao 
15.1-2-70-4; Faster rom o ortr 

2BMB* Erateny 38446-1. 
ENGLAND: mil 


on April 10. 

The Australasia event will 
open with New Zealand meet- 
ing the last of three teams — 
India. Pakistan, or Sri Lanka- 
due to compete with Bangla- 
desh in the Asia Cup series in 
Sri Lanka from March 30 to 
April 6. Australia wifi play the 
second best of the three on 
April 11, with the semi-finals 
on the 13lh and 15th and tbe 
final on the 18th. 

• Colombo (Reuter) — Paki- 


stan have called- up the aB* 
rounder Mansoor Hahi to their 
14-man squad for the Asia Cup 
one-day competition. HaHi -will 
join 1 3 members of the 1 6-man 
party currently touring Sri Lan- 
ka. 


G A'Gooeb e Dufcn b Craw . — __ 
Kxicbujoa b UrateraB — . 


RT Robinson cl 
*DI Gowerc Dtgonbl 
RWWoycDteonbr 

AJLranbc 

I T Batbsra c Dafon b I 
fPRDowtoo towbHofcflno . 
J E Enboray c Boat b T 
P H Edmond* cl 
bl 

N A Foster few b I 


SQUAD; Imran Khan (captain), Javad 
Miandad. Mudassar Nazar, Mohsin 



J G Tbonras not ate 


Khan, Qassn Omar, Rameez Raja, 
Abdul 


Safari Malik, Wasim Akram, 

Qacfir. Zulqamain, Zakir Khan, 
Mohsin Kama, Tauseef Ahmed, 
Mansoor Bahi. 


FALL OF WICKETS: 1-6. 2-126. S43J.4- 


141, 5-151, 6-168, 7-172, 1-1*1, 
BOWUN& Manual 14-1-42-4; Gamar 
14-4-35-1; Patterson 15-5-54* MoMteg 
13-4-37-2; Richards 3-0-94. • 

Unpins: D M Archer and L Mar. 



.The ■onfarafier the fight before: Goiter, SI overnight, lived forodyanatiHi T5 : 


TENNIS 


Navratilova assured of 
world championship 


New York (AP) — Hana 
Vlandlikova, the reigning 
United States Open ebampi- 
jn, defeated the second seed, 
ZTiris Lloyd. 6-3, 7-5 to join 
[he top seed, Martina 
Navratilova, in yesterday's 
five-set final of the Virginia 
Slims championship finals at 
Madison Square Garden. Miss 
Navratilova crushed the West 
German, Steffi Graf, 6-2, 6-2 
in only 53 minutes. 

The defeat of Mrs Lloyd 
assures Miss Navratilova of 
the World Championship title 


and the $225,000 (£155,000) 
bonus that goes with it Mrs 
Lloyd finished second in the 
season-long points race to 
earn $150,000 (£103,500). 


Miss- Mandlikova breezed 
through the first set in 34 
minutes, although Mrs Lloyd 
fought off five set points 
before falling. Miss Graf, the 
third seed, was no match for 
Miss Navratilova, who domi- 
nated her 1 6-year-old oppo- 
nent from the baseline and at 
the neL 


ROWING 


Oxford pull 
together 
to earn win 


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3040 

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HOMEOWNERS 

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The women's beat race has 
been rowed since the 3920s, 
but in those days they used to 
get marked for style as weft. 
There were no marks going for 
artistic impression yesterday 
when Oxford beat Cambridge 
by half a tengthin a cracker- 
jack race. - • 

The race is not over the Boat 
Race course. Tbe crews battled 
it oat, the lead chopping and 
changing bewiWeringly at 
Henley. They rowed over 
1,800m, starting opposite 
ground that looked oddly na- 
ked withont marquees full of 
Pimms, and finishing in sump- 
tuous or despairing heaps at 
Temple Island. 

There is a little touch of 
whimsy about it aH. The 
reserve crews are not Isis and 
Goldie but Osiris and Blondie. 
Hie interests of tbe Cam- 
bridge se c r et ar y. Catie WalHs, 
are getting thinner and grant- 
ing but these are still the jokes 
of serious athletes, who are the 
product of daily gym sessions 
and vaulting ambition. 

“There are far more women 
rowing at Oxford and Cam- 
bridge these days," the Cam- 
bridge president Judith Slater 
(interests: oppresshmof op- 
pressed minorities) said, “be- 
cause there are far more 
women at the two universities 
than there were 15 years ago." 

The women naturally suffer 
from short funds and generally 
being overshadowed by the 
other Boat Race. But they are 
working on both of these 
drawbacks. Oxford even want 
to row- die race over the full 
Boat Race course; Cambridge 
prefer the current four-event 
card at Henley. “We don't 
want to be just the poor man's 
Boat Race.” Miss Wallis said. 


This year, television cam- 
eras followed the race, and it 
will be shown as part of the 
Boat Race preliminaries next 
Saturday. It was the kind of 
race that makes one's heart 
bleed impartially for any loser. 


OXFORD: Sou, LWttSCfl (TaSCK Esat S 
Pemwohoj; 2 K KMfeM lUnenesto & 
Si Auras): 3^C Griffith* IHUL Kateyfaury 
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& Sereerv.Trt; 6. J Gough 

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Sho Moten g* Hd a ns i Bresraiwo) 
CAMSRXTC Bow. H Oweo ISt Pams 4 
JpSta* 2-.E V)P»» '(Kings, Ely « 
Dcnwrangt 3. N M oiu y RS o raon w eun & 
Tnrattf. 4. J Steter jHowetrs. Omagh & St 
Joftrs|: 5. K Lemmon (Straurgh Aca 6- 


nmj & Newnftamj. & S Tumor (Lwrtands 
& Sydney Sussex); 7. C Write (Pvraay S 
ib ^ota. M Bcfara B {S; Ws, 


SI Hiktes. Oaftad A Chradafl)! 

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OT>EH RESULTS: Oxford lifilJ i wtulm. bt 
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WEirs RESULT: 


M Oxford hgttwe 

More rowing, page 28 


CBbSS^UNTBY 


Budd leads women to victory 


From Pat Butcher, Athletics Correspondent, Neochitel 


British athletics looked to 
the women for success for a 
change yesterday and were 
eventually rewarded in both 
tbe individual and team 
events. Zola Budd slipped and 
slid to an expected victory in 
the world championships. 
And, after another couple of 
slips, England scored a largely 
unexpected victory in - the 
team race. 

The first slip in the team 
race was on the part of Miss 
Budd’s colleagues, Carole 
Bradford. Julie Laughton, 
Jane Shields and Ruth Par- 
tridge, who tried to match the 
voungster's flying start. After 
figuring in the leading group 
behind Miss Budd for tbe first 
lap. their impetuosity was 
rewarded with a painful slide 
down the field on the second 
•lap. 

They were then victims of a 
series of appalling organiza- 
tional gaffes when Mrs 
Shields, in ~34tb place, was 
missed off the result sheet and 
the New Zealand women were 
declared the winners. It took 
the jory of appeal two hours of 
deliberation to decide that the 
unmistakable figure of Mrs 
Shields in her England vest 


was indeed the person in 34th 
place on tbe video of the race: 

•Miss Budd agreed after- 
wards that she was wrong not 
to wear shoes on a course, 
which, albeit firm, had been 
made greasy by early morning 
rain. In the .one or two spots 
where there was also light mud 
and water, she had difficulty 
keeping her footing. Nonethe- 
less she. ran out the winner by 
18 seconds over the United 
States champion, Lynn Jen- 
nings, with a final time for the 
5km course of 14min 49.6sec. 

Miss Budd won impressive- 
ly for tbe second year in 
succession and England en- 
joyed their first victory in the 
women's team race since 
1974. They also won in 1973 — 
the first year of the event 

The men's and junior men's 
races were dominated by the 
central highlands Africans, 
with foe much-vaunted En- 
gland team making the same 
rast start as their female 
colleagues but paying more 
dearly for it 

John Ngugi, until yesterday 
an internationally unknown 
Kenyan, established a lead of 
100m by foe half-way point in 
foe men's 12km race, was 


pulled • bade in tbe last 
kilometre by . . Abebe 
Mekonnon, of Ethiopia, yet 
mustered his forces;to spnnt 
away again to victory. 

Ngugfs colleagues reversed 
foe recent results over the 
Ethiopians when, with; five 
finishers inside the fizsfeighL 
the Kenyans easily .^cm foe 
team. race, with; 45 , points. 
After their, impressive start, 
when they had four men . 
inside foe first 15, England- 
could finish only eighth an 
359 points. 

Dave . Clarke was . best-, 
placed in 16fo . 


:1J 
M oKon non 


35m32Ssoc;2.A 
A 3. J Kiptum 


Man). 3S3&& 16. D Ctofcs. 36*4; 19. J 
Woods (Ira). 36 fl* 25, S-BIms ' 
3&29A 55. T Mtovsorov jEnqX: . 

: 80. n Lewis; lOBjtWitoa 


Towns: L Konya. 45 p&K 2. EWopla, 129: 
a USA, 236: 4. Italy, Z72; 5, Spain, 313:8. 


1. 2 Budd 


Jonmngs flJS). 15X17. 
t5rtaziO.CE 


1449.6: 2. L 


P fw 4 A .j< 
txaORjfO ■■ 

H1&340; 


1527 se.__. 
M Robrat- 


SOn (SCO). 34. J 


Omo. Team: 1. England, 65 pcs 
Zoatand. 67; 3, Rwx», 76.: . . - : 

AMOR MBfe 1. M FMte (EB* 22^7 JSr 
Z S Ktotwot (Ken). 2252.7: aTo BekoM 
(Hh). 2256JL 35. J NuttaU (Eng). 24*44; 

E^nfiSjiBsto 

61. R Carev (Sco). 244^ 64. D Smith 
ffirefl. 24^4® 74. J Hobbs (MteQ. 2AS4J3. 
tEfltLBhfapte 1^5:2, Kenya, 32; a 
Span, be 


Storming 

Bennett 


SPORT IN BRIEF 


mnmmcwG 


Piquet’s 
effort a 
true tonic 


By John nmuden 


Nelson Piquet ..and the 
Canon Williams team gave 
foe best possible tonic ip . foe 
injured Frank Wiffiams yes- 
terday by scoring' a decisive 
victory in foe Brazilian Grand 
Prix at Rip de Janeiro. Befenre; 
foe race all ..tbe other team 
chiefs posed on foe startline 
for foe TV cameras.bdniid a 
large board canymg the mes- 
sage: “Don’t worry Trank, 
we're minding the store!” But 
in foe race to follow, it was 
Piquet’s management of the 
fuel consumption by his 
Honda engme' whicb got foe 
job done over foe 6.t-lap race. 

After taking- the lead- from 
his fellow ihzalian, Ayrton 
Senna, oh the third la^ Piquet 
worked .bi s way into a com- . 
fortable ' pp ation ‘after! : the ■ 
seconP dT nistwb pft stops for ' 
tyres.F,' • r • s*.\ ' : • - ; 


Harare (Reuter) — Britain's 
Stephen Bennett braved thun- 
der and lightning to score foe 
second victory of his career in 
foe Zimbabwe Open golf 
championship yesteitlay. Ben- 
nett aged 26. shot 69 for an 
1 1 -under-par total of 277 to 
win by two strokes from foe 
overnight leader, Stuart 
Reese, of New Zealand, who 
finished with an even par 72. 

Bennett was two behind at 
foe turn after Reese bad holed 
out with a seven iron from 1 70 
yards for an eagle-two at foe 
eighth. But Bennett hit back 
with a pilch close to foe pm to 
birdie tbe 10th and drew level 
two holes later He took foe 
lead when foe former New 
Zealand PGA champion 
missed dropped a stroke at foe 
ISfo. Both bindied the 16th. 
but Reese feO two strokes back 
at foe short 17th. • 



Dyke buster 


Brussels (AP) — Sweden’s 
Mats Wilander, 


" i i au ua , the No. 1‘ 

seed, needed just over an hour 
yesterday, to overcome the 
riant-killer of earlier rounds, 
Broderick Dyke, of Australia, 
and capture the’ Belgian in- 
door . championship. Tbp 
strong-serving WQander won 
6-2, 6-3 to' take foe £34300 
first prize. . ' 


Wilander: easy win. 

Kidd quits 


Ineligible 


Brian Kidd, the manager of* 
Preston North End, anchored 
at the bottom of. foe fourth 
division, resigned on Satur- 
day, Naming his departure on 
an inability to develop a 
satisfactory working relation- 
ship with foe.Preston board- 


Harare (Renter) Kevin 
Conan, foe .Gloucestershire 
county cricketer, has lost his 
eligibility to play for Zimba- 
bwe. Boni.m'foe farming area 
of Rusape m eastern ZSintia- 
bwe, he railed to renounce his 
claim to Irish citizenship 
deadline of December 2. 
year . .... . 


Defection 


Flyrag doctor 


A sell-out 


Ticket sales for the Com- 
monwealth Games in Edin- 
burgh from July 24 to August 
2 this year look certain to 
exceed foe £1 million estimate 
following foe announcement 
that all eight days of track and 
fidd are sold oul 


Hamburg (AP) — An East 
German footballer who de- 
fected to foe West, wdl start 
training next weds with 
N uremberg’s Bundeshga 
team Rank Lippmanu. for- 
merly of Dynamo Dresden, 
disappeared from bis team's 
hotel in KrefekL West Germa- 
ns after a European Cup 
Wmners’ Cup match there last 
Wednesday 


/, ignpretf-bjL 
the Welsh selectors for' foe. 
world CTOss-country ^champi-: 
onships. won foe Pearl Assur- 
ance half marathon at Ffeet 
Hampshire, yesterday The. 
RAFdoctorbeat his Aldershot 


dub-mate. Berine-Fbrri,-by 26 
seconds in a time of 64 mm 


7sec Fond’S wife. Ann; alsd 
had to be content with second 
place as she was beaten by her 
twm. Pa uh. Fudge;, who won 
in 72mm 47sec 


Only two other cars com- 
pleted foe full, distance,* Jac- 
quK Xaffite overtauling . his 
XJrier team paiixter. Rote 
Arnoux, nine laps from the 
finish to earn Vxr third posi- 
tion bn the victory rostrum: 
Behind them came Martin 
Brunidle. 


' After a i^an start from 

which, foe 25-car fidd got 


away smoothly, .there was 
drama at the fifth corner 


Nigel Mansell had lined ujphis 
WiDiams-Honda to feke the 
lead from Senna. Hejgbt along 
fine entering foe Idt-hand 
corner bat ' Senna moved 1 

into tlie " baittS^ He : /sras 
unhiht. - 1 ' 

. Jjenna led for two more laps 
before Piquet took command ' 
and foen. foe Wifliams driver' 
allowed foe world dtampioul 
Alain Prost, mtbja brief lead 
when he pulled mto the_pits 
for his first tyre stop on lap IS: 

Frost and Rbsberg, in 
McLarens. retired with engine 
trouble, as did Alari Jones and 
PamckTambay, ra LolasThe 
new; Brabhafos wefesv^Boff 

require ■ 

iommy . Dumfries, nnaavrau 
reaweflem foaraceforfoSIPS 
Lotus team for Whtcfi he was 
holdup r fifth . place: beferc » 
loog ^ stop bun fam - > ; 

R^ILTg: 1 H F^uta ^Bf> Wtew 

Rggf g »g ^4c. IHhmt 

4 taRbMSnU 
BwWtoorBMW; 1 ten 


agreedwithH^-Wood, sbfoi-' 
h^y amkabfy, ihaf he worid 
see . out tire j an a mm g three 
moafoS ofhfeiroutiaCLHe bid ' 
aifelh tofttfe:cfein BttLfbt ■ 
,he wtshed-to ; r«^^ I JoB|8iirhig. - 
news of ArsenaFs ratere^ m 
Venahks; bat had modified 

foisTeqwesL 

Two weeks ago. IfiftWood^ 
mfermed Howe tto his am- 
tract wotddoot be renewed at 

the end of this season-They 

had agreed befora.yistefdayV 
match, with Howe aware fort 
BSt-Wood bad had discas- 
sIobs with ’VeaaWes, thrt it 
would make sense, both for the 

dab and for Hon, fbr.hua to 
andme te manager for the 
renorinder of therseaw* in 
a vire#Armid^tttinmf 
ootside. chance of the League 


ss&. 



Venables 



Arsenal 





. - By David Miller 

Arsenal are. optimestic ihal 
If Teny_Ve»fote5 derides tj 
return to Tagfand btra fott- . 
tena fi»r a first dinM.dib - 
which is by- no means certfoj 
yet — that he ‘ wp . prefe 



he has brought Barcelona ^ 
tire forefront of Eteupeay 
footbalL Venabtes wtight de- 
dde to take a tert frwiMhe 
This ins apparewf froa 

folfowiiig. 




oterJnveiifns. 

Peter HHFWood, thedair- 
man of Arsenal, was Surprised 
by the auoonnceniati'on lS^ 
reday evead^r 
after ArsenaTs detey mr 
Coradry CSty, Don 
the manager, that fae wished to 
tenhinaite' his contract on the 
.'spot... 





Howe’S' repfltatioa "triuat* a 
te nteTiiigefseWlwr^ His - 
' bF attitnde by foe «d 

. match canie .. as" a. : 

smprise toArsenal ofliaafc. J 

HflFWood, sympathctk to 
the enonaeos pressarcs benii; 
red vpon 'Venabte hi Spate p 
and by bis dbmestfc,diffiod- 
ties, is awaiting a decision , 
from the Barcehma manager. 

Imdentod 

howas,'ni<u*^uM ; 

i)Bin;riterwed£ti^ = 

wmhf jnre expected of a man:';', 
tybo had just schemed tb*:, ‘ 
defeat oftjbewmM champions, . 
has also been approached bf ‘ : 
Tottenham. They are wiUteg '■ 
to pay him well in excess of 
what Arsenal wonld be mffiqg 
Or aMe4o consider. - 
Yet I believe that Venable*, 
tfheretmnstblmiidon,imid . .. - 
be idacttBt tD consMcr Tot- !#. 
tenham because of certain 
personality dashes, and flfet ;ff 
be has any understanding it is 
only- one erp m ed h foe . . . 
broadest gentlemanly , terins 
wifo ArseBaL 

However, -one factor thrt 
wftlaloopossibly inflnencetire 
decision, as T motioned bet. 
week, is that- Venables weald 
Wish to be amsiderod forihe 
pft^itlnn nf Fw otond BaQQBg . . 

shoedd the FA decide dot to 
continue wlfo Bobby Robson , 
after the World Cop. Arsenal / 
are aware of the risk that if ' 
they appointed Venables they .- - 
might subsequently be - con: 
fronted by his wbh, ff ap- 
proached, to consider the & 
national job. - 








Morefootball, g^ge^B 


SNOOKER 


Thwhurn’s 118 
first mitiny 
of tomnamoit 



Qiff Thortmm, Canada’s 
captain in the Gar -Care Plan 
world team champiohship af - . 
Bournemouth;. made the- fiesta, 
centiiry break of the tcninra^ 
mem dn the , lT-fianae , final- 
against Iidand, foe holders, 
yesterday -(Sydney Friskin • 
writes). . His I I 8 was answered 
to: foe 87 made by_ ftainis; 
T^ylor in the first frame. 

Kirk ^Wyens^afflie lit next . 


ir> 


a:* 


w.ww wiu uauiw mi _ 

Hughes and rive.C^nadaa ^l' ' 
tead. Stevens made a break of 
59. in foe first frame.- and- .. 
watched foe second with a . 
run .'on foe colours - after 
Hughes had made a costly 
mistake oh ibe yeUow. Alex: 
Hjggmsi howeYer. levelled foe- .- - 
match at 3-3 bY tekmg both A 
framesofFBill Werbeniufc;and - . 
teterfoe score. was 44. • : 


Tborburn had played a vital 
rofe m^Ganada's' 5-3 -victory 
oveiv England in-.foe" semv- ‘ 
final^Salupday^. .. f 

RQML^ShMmIk bnfoitf A tit 

Wales,: 6-2 msh names fireft- A 
bUJ.Moinijoy, jRrfoTsQS- • 

RRoanton-SOi 
66>S3w'DTaylor WT.GrfffBhs, 66- 
f 1 7? 14 ..78-8. ^ Canada bt . 
nvaoo. 5^3 (Canadian namas .. 

^ :A 

j9ww*B8 2T-H0. 69-25 . K Stevens - 
tt J White 9541 36^': 

-1%68. Thpfoom dww^with 
Davis 31-67 BO-OT Rrtefc Wantf A 
draws '-wfth.v'C^«da:i44: posh 
names - -ThvIOf ' draw.. with 

£borbira . Hunhe^SS, 

to Steyena -4ffw Hoons bt 

Wtertjenwk' n-oa , 7B-20 


drew Vdto SteOens 6M6 




.JFfi:-: ::y 






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