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No 62,414 


s. 


^THE 



TIMES 


WEDNESDAY MARCH 26 1986 


<S) 


Dozens feared dead or injured as more patrol boats are hit 



new attacks 
on Libyans 


• 1^ warplanes are presnmed to have 
snDacted beavy casnalties in fnrtiier 
attacks on Libyan patrol boats and an 

anti-aircraft site on the niainland ' 

• libya, calling on. support finua its 
Arab allies, ttieatened to turn the 
Mediterranean into a *^ea of blood** 


• The Soviet Unkm warned the US that 
^ dash with libya was a breach of 
intemafional law and conld escalate 
into a wider emrfKgr 

• l^gal experts in London said the 
law was on Washington's side in the 
dispnte over die Golf (d Sirte 


Frnn Quistoi^wr Thomas, Washingtmi 


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Unit^ States warpSanes 
and sbips strack a Lilian astir 
. aircraft site apain yenerday in 
escalating ^htiiK in and 
around & (U^uted waters off 
the Libyan coast At least two 
more Libyan missile pamri 
bo^ were destroyed, bnnging 
the total to ionr, almost 
certainly resulting in dtnens of 
deaths and injuries. 

• Two A-7 Corsair 
bombas from the US aircraft . 
carria Saratoga. attacked ra- 
dar equipment gniding ^yJet- 
built SA-5 misnles at Sirte on 
the Libyan coast, the Pratar 
'^n said. The radars were. 
rqriacemeDts for another, ra- 
dar system diat was knodced 
out in the first American air 
strike on Monday, according 
.10 Mr Caspar Wemberger the 
Defence Secretary. 

The US had no immediate 
datnage assessment, bat Mr 
Weinbetga said he eaqiei:^ 
Libya to continue replacing, 
desboyed radar parts with 
Soviet-Dipped stocks. He 
added thu a fifth missile 
armed patrol craft may have 
been severely damaged. 

A soiior 'Pentagon source 
said itratailfaoiigh the military 
exercises that b^gan off Libya 
on Satiuday oiDt due to 
end on K die ships may 
withdraw as eariy as tomor- 
row . Mr Weinberger hinted 
that manoeuvres .may end 
earlier, sayii% that. **die exact 


lime of comidetion is op to the 
fleet oommanda and the U5I1- 
al practice is to end sooner^. 

Some Administration offi- 
cials suggested yesterday that 
Libya had fired more missiles 
at American planes during the 
day in addition to the six 
laundied on Monday. But Mr 
Weinbero^said the shuatum 
was confused. 

Soane missBes, not SA-Ss, 
may have been fixed from 
otba sites, pedt^ indnding 
an SA-2 firm a site around the 
coastal tofira ofBengha^ 

Later the Pentagon said that 
no Ubyan forces had <^>ened 

Crisb bsdtgro!^ 5 
Misjodged reprisal 12 
Leading artide 13 

World reaction 16 

fire yesteid^. Between six 
and .12 anti-aircraft missiles 
had been fired on Monday at 
US forces. 

Asked why the US had 
attaded otiier Libyan patid 
boats yesterday, the Pent^on 
spokesman s^ “We have 
been pven ample evidence, of 
hostile intent both by missiles 
and snr&^ ship movements - 
ip' tbe past two days and we 
are going - to protect 
oursdves.** 

No American casualtfos or 
dmnages ^ve been reported 
since fighting broke out. Two 


Ubyan patrol craft were sunk 
on -Monday. Early yesterday 
afternoon, Ulqran time, two 
A-6 attack jrianes from the 
aircraft earners Saratoga and 
Hie Coral Sea hit a lai^ 
missile petrol boat and left it 
“burning and dead in tbe 
water**, tbe Pentagon said. 

A fourth boat, a Wadi craft, 
was attadeed tw anti-ship 
mi s sil es from a US ernisa jnst 
Bordi of Colonel Gaddafi’s 
“Ime of death** across tbe Golf 
of Sene. “We have seen ddiris 
floating in tbe area,** the 
Pentagem repor^ 

The American action 
brcKight wide^nead partisan 
praise for Presideiit on 

Capitol poll yester d ay. niUic 
opinion was also soIkQy be- 
hind him. Mr Thomas *^p" 
O’Neill, Speaka of the Demo- 
crat-controlled House of Rep- 
resentatives. and a frequent 
thorn in Mr Re^iui's side, 
was effusive in bis, 
congratulations. 

“The Administration's ac- 
tions in protecting America’s 
armed fmees in interaational 
waters are justified," he said. 
“Ilie American planes at- 
tacked by Libya were on a 
peaceful misrion in interaa- 
tional watefs." 

State DoKUlment officials 
said that all 262 US difriomai- 
ic outposts around the wmid 
had put on alot against 
threatened attadcs by Ubya 



THETIMES 


TkeTimesviUl 
publish on Good 
Friday, the only 
quality national - 
daily newspaper to 
do so. This has been 
made possible by the 
lifting of restrictive 
. practices following 
the move to 
Wa|)ping. More 
copies than usual 
.will-be printed, but 
the demand will be 
substantial, so 
readers are urged to 
place a firm order 
for The Times with 
their newsagents 
now. An order form 
appears oh page 2 

The Times Pwtfolio 
competition weekly 
prize of £20,000 can 
be won on Good 
Friday rather than 
Saturaay. This is 
brause the Stock 
Exchange will be 
closed on Friday 
and dim will be no 
daily prize on /. 
Saturaay. Portfolio 
wfl] resume next 
Tuesday 



Yesterdmr^ ^ire in The 

Times FortSefro competitioD — 

donbied to £4,000 becanse 
there was no wimer Ae 
preriens day — wss shared ^ 
thrre reados, Mr. S S 
Hensley, of Carobrideft Mr 
Stnart Donaldson, <K Edm- 
bnrgh, Mr George Eve, of 
Kent Peiififfip Hst 


^ bw to play, hifbrmaf-. 
tioi sorice, 16. 


Court nilis^ 

A High Coort jud^ clamp^ 
down cmprocedores for expel- 
ling 12 Liverpool Militant 
supporters Fa^ 2 



Lsw Beport 

28 

Omscas 

5-7 

IviHm 

13 

Apfa 

14J9 

Lcden 

13 

Alts 

8 

EXcibacst 

4 

ftmriawf 

n-24 

Pnperty 26.27 


Sale Boon 

j 

■aciieses 

S4 

Sdeace 

4 

CoMt 

3 

U 


CtaiMmdsWje 

TVABade 

31 

Piny 

121 

WdStor 

J6 


it it it it ^ 


Urged to hit 
IJS embassies 


By Robert Fisk 

Smnmnnfng political sup- 
port from its Middle 
allies, Libya yesterday 
launcbed a i»tmaganda bar- 
against toe American 


$i»th jFleet, thxeatauqg to 
turn the Meditenaneah- into 
“a sea of Uood and'fixe" wli^ 
calling, bn Arabs in 
neigfabonridg crantries to at- 
tadc US eomasaes, o3 focili- 
ties and petsonseL 

Indeed, ff wars were won 
with words, Colonel Gadaffi 
of Libya would have frilfilled 
his ptec^ to siiik the . Sixth 
FleeL 

All dayyesteitby, the Ufry* 
an state nufio broadcast the 
sound of street demonstra- 
tions, in Tiipcdi and Benghazi, 
and governmrat-spoi^^ 
pf^rigg in .ndiicb rinieking 
youim men promised to stage 
yiiriA* attackS" a gain.igt the. 
Americans. 

From Algeria and Syria — 
arid, periiaps more omipoasly, 
fimn Batetinian foctions m 
Damascus — came-fieree coih 
demnation of the US Govern^ 
ment and the presence of its 
waishfos in tbe Gulf of Sirte. 

XJl^ was less fbrthcmning 
with ateut the actual 
engagements in the disputed 
waters. ; 

It conceded that it had 
fnigsites **in sdf- 
defeDoe" ggafnst American 
aircraft on Monday, daimed 
to have shot down three of 
them, bnt said that an attack 
by a US jetmi a missfie base 
near Sirte 1^ missed its target 
and left die rockets intact As 
ttciiai , tbeiefoie, the Lit^'ans 
feh able to pre^ tbeir ac- 
tions as a victory. 


More sober reckoning was, 
DO doubt, made in Tripbli 
doling the mcxning, wbea Mr 
Abdul-Ihilim Khaddam, tbe 
S^ian l^ce-Piesident, arrived 
fioffi Damasens. Officially, he 
came to ctmvey President 
Assad's support for Libya in 
its stand aounst what tbe 
Syrian Baau Farty paper 
caBed *ilagcant American 
provocation and aggie»oii." 

In his meeting with Mr 
Abdul-Salam JaDoud, Colonel 
Gadaffi's deputy, however, 
MirKhaddam b undostood to 
have questkmed bis opposite 
Dumba doseiy about just how 
ftr Libya was prepared to go in 
its tnihlary co n fr M tation with 
the Amencans. 

' More attention is likely to 
be ps^ to a statement emanat- 
ing from the PtiestiiK Nation- 
al' Salvation Front, 
leixesentiiig six Syrian-sup- 
ported Palestmian yfoaps in 
Dmiascns, vriiidi smd tiiat it 
“wilt take necessary measures 
to deter tbe US by attaddng 
every sh^ Amencan targa 
or intoest in the Middle 
East” 

In an the rhetoric about 
assaulting US interests, no 
mention was made of Occi- 
dental Petroleum, an Ama> 
can company which is 
lep o n ed to have resomed 
hmng crude oil in Libya. 

Cotond Gadaffi himsdf 
said little during tbe day, apart 
for promisu^ that Libya's 
“brave confrontation" would 
continue and that “the 
Jamabariya(U^) is not only 
^cfgmSng itself at this mo- 
ment,' but the entire Arab 
natum and its future." 





\ //a 'i* 
■ f:«'. 


An American jet ^iter pr^ares to take off darii^ Ae exercises in tbe Golf of Sirte which led to the clashes wfth Libya. 

Kremlin’s 
fear of 
escalating 
conflict 

From Christi^lier Walka* 

Mosot 

The Soviet Unioa yestei^y 
deihered a stn»g warnn^ 
that the US ndlit^ conflict 
wiA Libya was a breach of 
internadonal law and a provo- 
cathm whiA could qaicUy 
escalate into a conflict extend- 
b^ beyond the Medkerranean 
and Areatea world security. 

In a KremBn display of 
solidarity with Colonel 
Gadafn, Mr Vladimir 
Lomeiko, Ae Aief Foreign 
Ministry spokesman, tidd a 
aiiecial |n«to conference Aat it 
was Ae duty of aD peace- 
loving states “to take steps to 
se^ioit the sovere^ Ubyan 
state". Bat he stopped of 
plpilgwig iBimwIfatg Hulitary 
lidtoTrhtoli- 

Moscow’s next moves would 
d^csid mi “tite ytba^weMt 
st^ to be taketo oy.die US. 

AdmfoBtnition". 

^nien pressed by Western 
corre s pondents, Mr Looudko 
icfhsed to say wfaeAer any 
Soviet personnel had been 
womuied in the US attacks. 

There was specnlation 
SBioag East Ennvean dfolo- 
naats that FTesideiit CtodB 
Bciqedid of Algeria, vAo ar- 
rived here frur a scheiltied visit 
yetterday, deliveied a persoi- 
al message from Colond 
rsadafii to Mr Mikhail 
Gmbachov, Ae Soriet leader, 
lAom be met it die benlin 
fautnititt. 

The di^omadc sources said 
Fretident (AadK had been in 
tdqihmie contnet wiA Tibmli 
beftoe his departnre. 

Co ntinne d on page 16, col 4 


Thatcher rebuttal 
of shares claim 
delights Tories 

By miip Webster, Ptriitical Reporter 

Cheered on by ha back- 
bendiers, tbe Prime Minister 
yesterday denounced as scan- 
dalous, scurrilous and outra- 
geous tbe auctions in a 
Sunday newspapa that she 
had dealt in Aares in an 
Australian company. 

In tbe Commons at Que^ 
lion Time, Mrs Thatcha, in 
ba most combative mood, 
declared that she had scnqni- 
iously observed the long- 
standing conventions 
governing Ae holding of 
shares by ministers. 

She smd:“Unda Aese con- 
ventions there is nothing 
whiA requires me, on assum- 
ing office. lo dispose of my 
shares nor to transfer them 
into the name of a trust or 
mvestmsnt m a o a gprs.** 

" After repudiating op Mon- 
n^t the central allc^ 
tioo of The Mail on Sunat^ 
report Am Ae had dealt in her 
own name in shares to Broken 
T TOI Pn^nietaiy, MrsThateb- 
a decided to 1^ head-on Ae 
o{^x»sitiott'$ criticism of ha 
disdosuTB that it was not until 
last year that she transfened 
the Aares to a firm of invest- 
ment managers to administer 
them on ha behalf 

MPs asked why she did 
not set up a trust immediately 
on h eentning Prime Minister, 
whiA has been the practice 
wiA otha ministers 


Tbe verdict of her 
baAbeoA snmx>rtefs last 
night was that she had success- 
fully and satis&ctorily dealt 
wiA the issue. It was noted tv 
thu nehha Mr NeU 


Kinnock, Ae Labour leada, 
nor his frontbench collea^es, 
attempted to question her 
in the House on ha remarks 
and that Ae matter had been 
raised by Ae for left MP. Mr 
Terry Fields. Labour MP for 
LiverpooL Broadgreen. 

Mr Alex Fletcher, Consa- 
vative MP for Edinburgh Cen- 
tra produced a roar of 
support when he told Mrs 
Thatcha that only Opposition 
MPs would suggest that ba 
personal conduct required any 
investigation. The Conserva- 
tive benches and the country 
’Aave ev^ confidence in ha 
personal integrity". 

• Mr Stewart Steven. Ae 
editor of The Mail on Sunday^ 
was unrepentant yesterday, 
although he admitted the story 
was partly in arror. - 

“Our point is that there are 
rules and Aere are conven- 
tions, and Aey are not the 
same thing," he said. “Mrs 
TbatAa insists that she strict- 
ly observed the fong-sianding 
rules, but by not placing all ba 
shares in a blind trust Ae 
broke Ae convention which 
other ministers have 
observed. 

“ We made a mistake in that 
we said that Ae Aares bad 
been sold, when in foa they 
had been transferred to a trust 
Denvning Sirca had ample 
opportunity to correct our 
supposition that Ae shares 
had been solA as appeared 
from Ae r^sta, when we 
contacted Aem more Aan 24 
hours before our story was 
published." 


DPP orders inquiry on 
Glenholmes warrants 


By Fhuces Gibh, Legal Afifofrs Correspondent 

cause if tbe inquiry led to 
disdplinary proceedings, it 
woula be for him as the 
department head to dedde on 
Ae findiiigs of any tribunaL 
Miss Glenhohnes. aged 27, 
was arrested on NteiA 12, in 
connection whfa a series oS 
IRA bcMnbu^ including the 
muida of two pc^le in the 
CSielsea barracks nail bomb- 
ii^ the muxda-(ff the bmnb 
disposal expert, KenneA 
HoWmih, ai^ tbe ftigbum 
hotel m Octoba 

1984. 

Dnbtin police yesterday re- 
ceived anmba eiAt new war- 
rants fi>r Ae exaadititm of 
GtenhAnes, vAiA were lata 
being exammed Iv InA law- 
yers to estaUiA they were not 
also defective. 

Extradition rvlii^ 2 


The Director (ffPobtic Pros- 
ecutions yestod^ ordered a 
(Usci(riinay inquiry mto the 
handing of tbe extraditkm 
wairants for tiie IRA bombing 
suqiect, Evelyn (Bohedmes, 
which were finmd to be 
flawed. 

TEe inqmry, ixnmeoedented 
m Ae history ot the DPPs 
office, was announced afia 
atlaAs fiom MPs, wbo ac- 
cused the offidab .there of 
“slo^ incompeieiice” and 
“a discreditable botA-op". 

it win be bdd nnda normal 
Civil Service rraulatkHis and 
is expected to beheaded bytiie 
d^ty Director cf Public 
ProseAlions. Mr J(An Wood. 

Tbe DPP hinteelfr Sir 
Thomas Hetheringtnn, QC 
would not be inrolv^ be- 


Lords ban 
GLC’s 
final fling 

The ban on Greater London 
CounA plans to ^ve £40 
million to Ae Inna London 
Education Authority as part of 
its £76 million final flii% won 
tbe bacldng of the House of 
Lords yestoday. 

Five Law Lords led by Lord 
Brandon rqiected an attempt 
by tbe connol to overturn k^ 
week's Court of Ai^^ ruling 
that the spending was 
unlawfiiL 

Bnt they have yet to consid- 
a plans to give £36 miDion to 
volunta^ groups to ke^ them 
going after the GLC is abol- 
ished on Monday. 

The hearii^ continues to- 
day. 

Jobs fa the boys, 2 

Leading artide, 13 


Fleet Street ebanges 


Redundancies at Telegraph 


' ByGavinBeil 
Tbe TUIteTOpk and Ae 
Smday Tebgnvh are plan- 
gAg sobstantial redondancies 
in printing staff whoi they 
more ont of Fleet Stred in ml 
4rttemp> to .etindnate - heavy 
tradiiK losses, Mr Andrew 
gwtgiit- the company^ .Aiei 
exeentive annomirad last 


iTM conld not specify 

how many would be made 
rediadant by the move, whiA 

conld be before Ae end of Ae 

yea, ■"*« Ae ph Bte M been 

■ ftiWy wiA trade 

iBUon representatives. 

Hie storing vreaU be trano- 

fared to a aew lAmt in Wert 

Ferry Road; east London, mu 
to an eodsdDg <me in Manebes- 
la. The editorial, adatinisaa- 
tion and advertisement 
new 


to be in 

cendal'L.. . 

. It was b^ed tiiat printing 
eotf b^jn in East Leodon Iv 

September-OAiba. 

Mr Enigbt stressed Aat Ae 
f^Mwpany would continue^ to 
recf^nize flie (raffitieaal'jwint- 
iag trade nnioiis and hoped 
they would aeeept what be 
tamed attractive vohmtary 
ledandancy terms. 

“This is not a srtne^atflfaig 

exCT cis e, it is pomided in 
vi^artal reality," he said. 
“When we start prinA^ in 
Wert Ferry Road we have to 
have a compmv vAiA m able 
to trade at a pr^ We have to 
oMqiete WiA onr coBpetitoR 
in terms of cost and fleidbllhy- 
We do not expect tiiat oa 
MwfaMs win want ns .to amipete 

atadfoadvaiitag&*’ 
Mmaagenrat some e s said 


the Tdegra^ posi- 

tion had not improved since it 
rioted a £16 milKen half 
yev loss last DeeenAa. 

As 8 flirt step two lAirily 
owned . snbmdiary conmsaies 
called West Ferry Pr is t h i g 
and Trafibrd PaA Pl intiw 
have already bett created, hv 
Kiright said Ae new compa- 
nies would be seAh% contract 
wOTk -in addition to p rintia g 
boA Tel^nD newspapos. 
Titey wonid ase web-ofiset 
teclmidogy vriA a capadty to 
prodnee ertoa for adverti a ng 
and qiecxal events. ' 

The Teiegnph a ews pa pgs 
emrentiy anjdiqp abemt 
people .in Loodim and Man- 
Aester. MaugeiKBt semces 
said tiw initial rednndmcieg 
wmrid affect only putii^ 
Stott. TUC talks, page 2 


A-leyel changes could 
benefit more students 


A reform in A level grading 
nduA conld - give sixtb- 
formm a foira chance of 
getting a university place was 
aimounced yesterday by Sir 
KdA Jose^ Secretary of 
State for Education and 
Science. 


The chaiige — to take efilto 
from sununa 1987 — will 
affect Aose vriio are cnrrently 
awarded a grade C. At present 
there is a very narrow range of 
marks between a grade B 1 ^ a 
grade D at A lev^and this 
«an make nlj the diucrence to 
wheAer or not a candidate 

gaing a imiver^ pifae. 

In some sutgects, suA as 
English literature, the range of 
marks In a grade C can be as 
«mflll as three percentage 
points. Hal is because grade 
C is awarded in Ae hump of a 


normal distribution curve so 
that a lot of people are 
bimAed ova a few marks. 

In answa to a parliamenta- 
ry question yesterday. Sir 
KeiA said Aat Ae range of 
marks between a grade B and a 
grade N, tbe new foil grade, 
and Ae forma grade O, 
Aoukl be divided into three 
equal intervals and assigned lo 
grades C, D and E, wtA Ae 
same interval also being as- 
signed to grade N. 

The reforms were recom- 
mended by the Secondary 
Examinations Council and 
have been implemented after 
consultation. The problem of 
Ae Aort mark range of grade 
C was first highlighted by Ae 
Joint Matiicufoiion Examina- 
tion Board in Mascfaesia. 

F.ifaminMrtftii P*C** -3 


Shares in 
record 
£5.5 bn 
plunge 

By David Smfth and 
Richard Thomson 
Shares lost £5.5 billion on 
Ae Stock Exchange y^erday 
in Ae biggest ever foil in Aare 
values as hopes of an eariy cut 
in base rates receded and Ae 
Libyan clashes provoked 
heavy selling. The pound fell 
2.8 cents to S 1.4611 but held 
up against oAa currencies in 
spite of oil price weakness. 

The steiiing index, mea- 
sured gainst a basket of 
currencies, closed 0.5 points 
down at 75.4. 

The failure of (he Organiza- 
tion of Petroleum Sporting 
Countries to agree on output 
restriaions to stabilize world 
oil prices continued to affect 
financial markets in London. 

Money maikei interest rates 
edged up yesterday momir^ 
as the pound opened two cents 
down .^inst a stronger dollar. 

The slock market's response 
was a wave of selling which 
produced a 32 pomt foil m Ae 
Financial Times 30-share m- 
dex by lunchtime. Prices lata 
steadied, but Ae index ended 
29.9 points down at 1,364.7, 
Three of Ae big four clear- 
ing banks, meanwhile, an- 
nounced cuts of between 0.75 
1 pa cent on Aeir 
mortgage rates. Barclays and 
Midland aimounced reduc- 
tions of 0.75 pa cent bringing 
Aeir home loan rate down to 
1225 per cent from April 1. 
Natioi^ Westmmster cut its 
rate by a full percentage point 
to 1 2 pa cent for new borrow- 
ers from today and for existing 
borrowers from May I. 

Report, page 19 


Royal 

wedding 

with 

tradition 

By Also Hamiltoa 

Prince Andrew and Miss 
Sarah Ferguson ate to be 
married by Ae Archbishop of 
Canterbury. Dr Robert 
Runcie, in Westmmster Ab- 
bey on Wednesday, July 23. 
Buckingham Palace an- 
nounoTO yesterday. 

The date, only four months 
away, has been squeezed into 
an Steady crowded royal 
schedide, and fiilfits Ae 
couple's wiA that the wedAng 
should t^e place in the 
summa — to get it ova witii. 
MPs yesterday asked the Gov- 
ernment to declare the day a 
public holiday. 

Although no furAa details 
of tbe wedding have yet been 
announ^ — except that it 
will begin at 11.30am — it is 
certain to be a public specta- 
cle, wiA live television cova- 
age and crowds lining Ae 
processional route. 

The BritiA Tourist AuAor- 
iiy said yesterday that, while 
the wedding was unlikely to 
have any marked effect on the 
number of foreign visitors to 
Britain this year, Ae long- 
term effect of worldwide tele- 
vision coverage would be 
beneficial to Ae tourist indus- 
try, worth more than £6 
billion a year. 

Westminster Abbey is a 
reium to tradition for royal 
weddings after the choice of St 
foul's by Ae Prince of WAes 
because of its greater capacity. 
The Queen, the Queen Moth- 
er, Princess Margaret, Prin- 
cess Alexandra and Princess 
Anne were all married there. 

The first recorded royal 
wedAog in Ae .Abbey was that 
of King Henry I to Matilda of 
Scotland in 1100; Prince 
.Andrew's will be the 
fourteenth. 

AlAougb not favoured for 
wedAngs until recent times, 
Ae Abbey has witnessed 37 
coronations since William Ae 
Conqueror took Ae En^iA 
crown there m 1066, and is tbe 
last resting place of 18 kings 
and 14 queens. 

FinAng a suitable day 
proved AfficulL The Queen 
mready has an engagement oa 
July 13, attenAng an after- 
noon tea pany at St James's 
Palace in aid of Ae Royal 
Medical Benevolent Fund, 

Tbe Palace said yesterday 
that it would have to be 
chang^ probably postponed, 
but Aey presurned that Ae 
hosts “would not mind m the 
circumstances". 

The Queen is also due to 
hold mvesiitures on Ae pre- 
ceding and following days, 
and to visit Ae England 
against New Zealand test 
match on Ae Friday. That 
weekend she is due to take up 
a week's residence at 
HolvroocAouse. EAnburgh. 
In Ae at^nce of firm mfor- 
mation. speculation will now 
intensify on Ae details of the 
wedding. 

Contumed on page 2, col 3 



MHAalreadyhousesand cares for neatly 1400elderly 

people in residential Homes and Sheltered Housing sAemes in the UX. 
ikm the planned building pn^mme calls for a cost ly and sustained 
effort tea Aieve Ae taiget of more than 2000 places by Ae early 1990s. 

Every pound you give now will mean some elderly person being 
cared for all the sooner - Will you help? 

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Some E2 million is needed every year to (KDVKle 
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Housing as as ertra 

places in our tesidentjal i 
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McTHODfST HOMES FOR TH E AGED seCOndS. 




TO- OLD- AGE 




TO. MHA. Dept T. FREEPOST. London EQB INE 
I enclose my donation of 


Please send me more inlormation about MHA 


Name_ 

Address. 


EpMrthHouse. 25CevRd. tendjnEQYlOR. Reg Ctianty Na218504 









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HOME NEWS 


Qty watchdog 
‘given teeth’ 
as Government 
suffers defeat 


Bf Anthony Beviasii P^itical CnraqNHideirt 


The Government suffered 
iis second a^iHcaDi def»t on 
the Fmanc^ Services Bill 
yesterday, reflecting doubts 
about govemmrai assurances 
on City fraud and ihe ability of 
the Director of Public Prose- 
cutions to tackle il 

A Conservative axnend- 
menu backed by opposition 
MPs on the Bill's committee, 
was carried by 1 1 votes to 7, to 
give the proposed new City 
watchcU^ the Securities and 
Investments Board (SIB), 
power to launch prosecutioos. 

Mr Anthony Nelson. Con- 
servative MP for Chichester, 
who tabled the amendment, 
said last night that bavii^ 


retaiy of State for Trade and 
industry or the DPP, and Mr 
Howard resisted Ae new 
amendinent in committee 
yeda^y. 

But another of the Conse^ 
vative rebels, Mr Timothy 
Yeo, MP for SufiToUc South, 
said: **10 the li^t of recent 
events, Uk idea that we can 
rely on prosecutors who are 
employed by the Govenunent 
seems to me to be unwise: 


**unleashed the tiger” by 
to a full 


putting the board on 
legislative footing in a previ- 
ous revolt 'OD March 6 , the 
rebels had now **taken the 
muzzle off the tiger‘d. 

He said: *'lt has now-got the 
teeth which it needs." The 
second defeat makes it more 
difficult for Mr Michael How- 
ard, Under Secretary for 
Trade and Industry, to carry 
out his threat to delete refer- 
ence to the SIB from the Bill 
when it returns to the Com- 
mons for its report stage. 

The Bill had resirictra pros- 
ecuting initiatives to the Sec- 


“There has been great con- 
cern about the Lloyd's scan- 
dals and we cannot feoe a 
repetitioo of those kinds of 
shortcomii^” 

The fetluR of the DPFs 
office to secure the extradition 
of Miss Evelyn Glenholmes 
and its inability to bring some 
Lloyd's agents to court has 
clrany iq»et Conservative 
MPs. 


Mr Brian Sed^emore, La- 
bour MP for Hackney South 
and SMxreditcfa, and a mem- 
ber of the committee, said: 
'^We have decided to get tough 
with the fraudsters." 


The other Conservative 
rebels who voted agmnst the 
government were Mr Timothy 
Smith. MP for Beaconsfidd, 
and Mr Robert McCrindle, 
MP for Brentwood and Ongar. 


Stormy 
times for 


French 


In 1066 WUIiam. Dnke of 
Normandy, and his invasion 
fleet were pinned against the 
Nmnandy coast for several 
week^ held up by stormy 
weather. 

Ironically, 920 years later 
stonny weather yesterday pre- 
vented a French delei^tion 
from sdUng from the port of 
Cfaerboorg in France, to Ports- 
ttMuth for the DomesdiV 900 
pageant parade through the 
streets of Winchester today. 

the ferries had be«n 
cancelled*' Mr Mike Hoghes 
a spokesman for the Domes- 
day exhibition said. 

“Perhaps It has something 
to do witii the recent s^hlin^ 
of Halley’s Comet,*’ he said. 
The comet was also seen 
beftwe the Norman Invasioa. 

The Mayor of Bayenx was 
due to johi the Mayor of 
Winchester. Mrs Jean Free- 
man, in today's coloorfril pro- 
cession fo the thirteenth 
centnry Great HaJL 

llie processHHi will go 
ahead with flag of the City of 
Baj'eax, and ^ standard of 
William the Conqueror, and 
Mr David Cowan, Winchester 
dty chief executive, will take 
the place of the Mayor of 
Bayenx. 

The Domesday 9(H) exhfti- 
tion, sponsored joindy by Tke 
Siuuiay Times, Hampshire 
county council and Winchester 
city council will ran through- 
out the sanuner, dosing on 
November 1. 


Staff cut 


threat to 


hospitals 


More than 4(X) beds will 
have to close in the Blooms- 
bury hraith authority district 
in London and 1,800 staff will 
lose their jobs if the North 
^t Thames regional health 
authority adheres to its spend- 
ing plans for the next seven 
y’eais, a consultative docu- 
ment fiom Bloomsbury said 
yestonday. 

The bra cuts would amount 
to a 20 per cent reduction, 
badly affixting smaller hospi- 
tals and the teaching centres at 
University College Ho$i)ital 
and the Middles^ Hospital, 
and spending would have to 
be F^uced by £28 nuUion 
from the present £1 1 8 million 
a year. 

Even if the authority's pre- 
ferred plan was adopt^ £18 
million will have to be cut 
from the buc^L 
• Oxfordshire District Health 
Authority decided yesterday 
to defer for a month any 
decisions on a £1.7 million 
imekage of cuts, wiiich would 
“involve wholesale reductions 
to services", pending disras- 
sions with Mr Barney Hayhoe, 
the Minister for Health. 


Stroller dies 


Stroller, the pony who. 
partnered by Mrs Marion 
Mould, won a ^ver medal in 
the 1968 Mexico Olympics 
and five gold medals at 
Hickstead. has died, aged 36, 
of a heart attack. 


Spain writes to Luce 
over Goya dispute 


By GeraMine Norman, Sale Romn Cmrespondeiit 


Mr Richard Luce. Minister 
for the .Arts, has received a 
letter from the Spanish gov- 
ernment about Goya’s master- 
piece “The Marquesa de Santa 
Cruz", he has disclosed in a 
Commons written answer. 


The Spanish government 
has claimed that the picture's 
export licence from Spain was 
forged and its export illegal 
under Spanish law. Spain is 
trying to secure the letuni of 
the painting, due to be auc- 
tion^ at Christie's on April IL 
Mr Luce said that he was 
considering the letter, but he 


could not comment on the 
case, which may be the subjea 
of a court action. 

Yesterday, legal advisers to 
Christie's and Lord 
Wimbome. who owns the 
painting, were considering 
whether to app^ against a 
High Court ruling that the 
British courts were competent 
to decide whether the Spanish 
export documents were 
fotg^ 

Christie's and Lord 
Wimborne have mgued that 
the matter is outside British 
jurisdiction 


Hollaud 


to return 
oneOtA 


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A court in Amstredam rated 
yestn^ diat only one of the 
two convicted IRA terrorists 
arrested iu die city last Jao 
avy could be extradited to the 
Unit^ Kn^doos. 

The court rvled that 
Breadao McFarlane, aged M, 
could be extradited becaose 
the act for whid he was 
satoK^ to Iffe haprisoninrat 
in I97d, a bonb attedt m a 
pnbtic boose in Belfast which 
killed five people, could not 
*in reason** be considered as a 
meaBS te wAieviiig IRA politi- 
cal 

In die case of Gerard Kdly, 
aged 30, who was saitnced to 
life HH pri sMmart in 1973 ftor 
two bmnb attadto in Umdoa, 
the court rated that those acts 
were not at the dine pon^ 
fm exbadidOB under British 
law. 

Ob the changes of murder 
and attemitied murder against 
Krily, die court ruled that die 
Britteh authorities had sup- 
plied insnffideBt evidence;. 

llie court also rated that a 
nnmbtf odier charges made 
a gpimet Kelly, irtiicfa wooM 
normally lead to extradition, 
coidd in his case be constraed 
as bemg of a poiided nature. 

Both men were serviiig life 
sentences in the Maze Prison, 
B^est, wfami they escap^ 
dnring a mass br^-oot in 
1983. 

McFariane*s lawyer imme- 
diately appealed against the 
court's decision to allow hb 
extradition, while the pnbtic 
prosecutor has appealed 
againri die dedsSoo not to 
allow the extradidoo of Kelly 

New Glenholmes 
warrants studied 


Senior law <dficers in die 
Irish RepoUic yesterday start- 
ed to stndy nine new wamiics 
gefirii^ the extradition of 
Evelyn Glenholmes, the ter- 
rorist suspect (Richard Ford 
writes). 

The set of warrants were 
sent to DnUln to replace diose 
fbond invalnl in a district 
comt, arid will be passed to Che 
Gardai once the authorities 
are satis^ they are in order. 
Until dten, the police will not 
a renewed hunt fm Miss 
Gtenholmes, aged 29, who has 
been in hidii^ since she was 
d^en from die comt last 


Saturday aftcnioon. 

Loyalist attack 
on Thatcher 

The jwoqiect at Unkmlst 
leaders re-opening talks with 
die Prime Mihister was virtu- 
ally ended yesterday as 
hardline 'Toyalists** de- 
Bounced her refnsal to suspend 
the As^o-lrish ^reemeiit: 

Mrs Margaret Thatehm- 
coupled a robii^ defence of dm 
deal with a declaration ^t 
the Govenunent was anxioas 
for coosaltathm rather than 
confrontation, and was pre- 
pared to putidpate in a 
conference aimed at reaching 
agreement on devolved goveni- 
ment for the province 
In a threof^ letter sent to 
the naionist leaders, which 
was released by the Democrat- 
ic Unionist Party, the Aime 
Minister rdected unionist al- 
Icgatkms that the agreement 
represented j<dnt authority 
and threatened the imion. 

Mrs Thatcher also rejected 
their request for talks on the 
basistiimthedeaiissaspend- 
ed,bataddeddiattheGoveni- 
mmit was ready to appoaeh its 
workh^ in a '^sensitive vray". 

Both Mr James 
Molynraux, leader of the Offi- 
cial Uniomsts, and the Rev Ian 
Phisley, leader of die OUP, 
expressed disappointment at 
the letter and are expected to 
consult with their colfea^nes 
hdore draffiim a rejdy. 

Bnt Mr Pamiey went further 
and accused the Prime Minis- 
ter of having *Srofseiied* die 
shnation by '^siamnui^ the 
door" on unionists while in a 


t an tr um. He said she was "the 
new Son Friner of Downing 
Street” 


Two men face 
bomb charge 

Anned police rilled Lnm- 
beth Magistrates' Court, 
sooth London, yesterd a y when 
committal proceedings b^an 
against two men appearing on 
a charge connected with the 
planting a htmh ontride 
Cheteea Barracks last Novon- 
ber 11 . 

Patrick Mdjughlatt, aged 
26, imeinpli^red,' el Bracken 
Parte, GaUagh, Londonderry, 
and Peter 0*LomhIm, ag^ 
26, unemph^ed, of St Jalian's 
Rt^ Kfibrnn, north London, 
are with conspiring 

w^ offim unknown to eanse 
an exploskn] likriy to "enten- 
ger IRe w cause seilons injury 
to property". 

The hearing is expected to 
last three days. 





"Amodd pictme, as seen fiiom the west) chosen yestnday ^ ^ si^ 


Winning design preserves old Hn^ 


By Charles Knevitt, Architecture CoRespondent 


The competition to design a £30 mil- 
Ihm redevefopmeiit of the Grand Bnih^ 
ings rite at the south-east conur of 
Trafalgar Square, has been won by Mr 
Paul Gibson of SiddI Gibson Partner- 
sh^ London. ^ , 

The demgn is, externally, a replica of 
die present bnOding, or^hmUy the 
Grand Hotel. Ihe new bnilduiv wfll ^ve 
300,090 sq ft of modern offices around a 


central atrtnm, and two storeys of 
arcaded shops anmd its base fodu die 
Square, Che Strand and-Nortfaumberiaad 
Avenne. It is expected to be finished by 
1990. 

Professor WiDiam Wlntfidd* chaxr- 
man of die assessors, said yestaday dmt 
the scheme, one of three ra a finu fist 
frma wfaiA Land Secarides,. die devdop- 
ers, had. chosen the eventnd vrinner. 


ffitodwefi with the sqnaie and sn r rpu nd - 
hsstreets. 

The two nm iigs - np were Mr Dana 
iUtfoi4 of YHM FntnecA^ and Cb^ 
Qae Miller and Janes UttfaiL 

. There vrere 287 entries fiK* w caaqte^ 
dmL amioiinded time years agp* 

Mr Gibson said Oat the new bid^ 
wtmUtethesaaehdigldaadiraitefM 
pzesentone 


GLC abolition 


Jobs for Livingstone aides 


By CoUn Hughes, Local Govenuiiciit Correspondent 


Fewer than 500 staff out of 
21,500 employed by the 
Greater London Council will 
be made "involuntarily 
reduadant” when the councD 
is abolished next Monday, 
according to last-minute pre- 
diaions by the Government's 
Staff Commissioa. 

Few of those will include 
the politically controversial 
appointments which have 
a ixime target of the 
GLCs critics, over the past 
five years of Mr Ken 
Livingstone's regime. 

The only group of political 
appointees at serious risk are 
the team of Outreach woricers, 
taken on to wvirk with local 
groups on GLC campaigns. 
They have acted, in effect, as. 
paid ^ents of die ruling 
Labour grotqi’s policy. 

The Labour group's plan for 
'Toru^ funding”, vriiicb was 
Mocked last week the Court 
of Ain^coL and. is due. for 
hearing by the Lords tomor- 
row, would create an umbrella 
oeganizatfon to fund trade 
union campaigns. 

The aim was to 'fund Out- 
reach staff posts thioi^ the 
umbrella group, but even if 
theGLC wins its ai^ieal in the 
Lords, staff in the grants 
section will have only a few 
working hours to sign cheques 
and send them out The 


chances of forward funding 
succes^fiiUy are now small. 

Some staff have been taken 
on by. nine of the most left- 
wing Ateociation of London 
Authorities' borou^& who 
are paying out £1 mfllion each 
to support a researrii cenme . 

Most of die others have 
tranribned to successor bodies 
which continue under post- 
abolition arrangements, such 
as the new London Fire and 
Civil Defence Authority, and 
the loner London Education 
Authority (Ilea). 

Appointments to the latter 


have been oontroversi^, par- 
ticnlariy in tbepuUic iriatioDS 
field, bliss Nna Cbirke, Mr 
Livingstone's former perstmal 
assistant and pultiic'relatknis 
adviser, has transferred to do 
the same job for Mrs Frances 
MorireO, the left-wing leader of 
the Ilea. 

Mr Bill Bush, Mr 
Livingstone's fonnerpolitfeal 
adviser, has also movrato die 
Uca. 

Most stafileaving are talons 
die GLCs fevoumtie early 
retirement padrage. 


Leadhv arikle, pime 13 


Groups face rundown 


Several hmidred Londoa 
voluntary groups face randown 
and dosnre becaose diey wOl 
BO more money after the 
GEC is abotidied. 

Aldioi^ many cater to 
minority interests, those al- 
ready refined support hf bor- 
ongbs and other bodies taking 
ov» GLC responrildlities in- 
dnde fdor fow centres, in 
Sondmll, Hilliaig^ni, Pad- 
ifington, and Notiiwg Dale, the 
Wooderrit FoDl tenants and 
reridrate* associalfoiis fo Pad- 
dington and Broml^, and 
several child care centres. 

The Loodoo Vrinntary Ser- 


vice CooDcfl said yestexday 
that its records diowed 76 
groops had so to hera refased 
^Another 120 had 
been refosed tninridmial aid, 
280 ffoogs vett UBOtetoin.to 
tliefrtoe,- ' - 

The GLCs bwtot this year 
|novided£82 millto to grants 
to wduntary oeganizatioBS. 
From next week that fiffBn 
will be ent to £51 miilfoB: £22 
million from the London Bor- 
oughs Grants Scheme. £16 
mUlion fotrimshioiHl fnntinft 
£5 mfiUon frmn Londoa Re- 
oonal Transport, and £8 niil- 
Bon from the Arts Coanefi. • 


South Bank set for facelift 


By David Hewson, Arte CoRespondent 


Visitora to London's South 
Bank aits complex can expect 
to see the creation of gardens, 
staff uniforms and decora- 
tions des^ned to "turn con- 
crete into colour” after the 
abolition of the Greater Lon- 
don Council al midnight on 
Monday. 

The South Bank Board, 
which win run the complex's 
buildi^s, including the 
C^ueen Elizabeth and the Roy- 
al Festival balls, has arara- 
tioiis plans to turn today’s 
dismal facade into a new and 


- fively environment ^ pulling' 
down walkways, hiding the 
dirty concrete fedngs, and 
malong the area more o{ 

Most of die ideas 
upon lotig-tenn finance from 
the private sector, wl^ the 
board is trying to attract 
But there wiU be gradual 
minor changes on Monday, 
be^nning with new flags and 
informs for the com^riex. 

The board has dropped 
pl^ to bunch its new era 
widi a party because of pract^. 
cal dimcultfes and the possi- 


bility of o: 


litical 


opponeoto of to CLCs ^Ktii' 
tion. Its new security 

staff will' be 'patrolling tiie 
complex inunediai^y .it is 
banded over. 

The . dianqravtt will- be 
. madeed by.a joint celefoation 
on. May 3 wfaiefa will also 
herald the 35th anniversary of 
the Festival HalL ■ 

The proeranunfog of the 
South Bank , music halb wfll 
continue • as :itianned for the 
next two years alof» the lines 
anai^eedbytoGLC-. . 


Caflto 


abotislf 

council 


ByH«ACla 7 to% 
' E iiWIO I M — t- • 
CoReqnradoit ■' 


Avon Conn^ V Council 
tould be abomhed al^ 
with to Cheater London 
GomiciZ next wedc, Mr Rich-' 
^ CotndL' Oooserraixve 
htotoBristolandB 8 ah,«d 
yestoday. 


He -was spratr^ at to 
bnndi of a campatga by focal 
conservation: groi^ to .ste 9 
to council allaimng mo re 
than 10,000 homes to be. built 
villages to to 
north offirisicd. 


“The ettoty extoxS .m 
exists^m order to contiiihe its 
own existence” Mr* Cotfr^ 
said. He added tot to-Bris- 
tol-based ccran^ .on ndndt 
Labito has jiist foia obittit^ 
empIciys-iiKne pe^tfi? than to 
institotidn^to.l^L' , : • ; 

rrhere wmddto 
to streets. -tfj to coon;^ 
wenL” > 


Mr. Cdi&dt tifet 

to' oommerdiHl ;otoreSv<K 
Bristol and. Baih wouM'to if 
to 
'Ut 

(iiahTniu -of to CbraKsl ibr 
to Atoctidn^.rff -Rito . Eor 


hof jtoSy so mtidi 

bufldhig.j' 

TheieS' w a ^ri^ that 
Nratovob mould become ''an 
aiU to ug^ shbuibi ^ Di^ 

Brotor»hesaid. 



Worker buy-outs are 
praised by Thatcher 


By Antoray Bevuis, Fblitical Cmrespondent 


The. man^anent biiy-ont 
of Land Rover became the 
political fevourite in to Com- 
mons yesterday, after to 
Prime Minister had praised 
the Vickera bi^-out as '>opu- 
Im capitalism at woric”. 

In advance of formal paiiia- 
mentary confirmation of the 
breakdown of General 
Motors' negotiations with 
British Leyland, Mis Thatcher 
told M?s: "May I make it 
absolutely clear we are con- 
cerned tot there riiould be a 


MPs have also picked up 
the point made about the 
privatization of nationalized 
firms in the lam Conservative 
manifesto - “As before, we 
will offer Shares to all those 
who woilc in them;** 


the 


prospects for the fut^ 
people who work in it” 

Her praise for the Videers 
buy-out a political decisioD 
taken in the middle of the BL 
affair, came after Mr Cecil 
Franks, Conservative MP for 
Barrow and Furne», had 
pointed out that 8 1 per cent of 
the workforce had applied for 
shares. 


Mr Paul Channon. Secre- 
tary of State for Ttoe to 
Industry, told the House that 
General Motors had demand- 
ed effective control of Land 
Rover from the outset **and 
an assurance of full ownershm 
and control within a relatively 
short perio<r. 

He that GM had been 
unwilling to compromise on 
that poinL 


The reaction from Conser- 
vative badtonebere divided 
between severe criticism of 
Labour's attai^ tm the talks, 
to undj^ised delight that the 
management buy-out was now 
back in the running. 



furtber print 




News Interhational yester- 
day asked to TUG to arrange 
further n^otiations with to 
print unions over the newspa^ 
per group's move to Wai^nnk 
east London. 


MacAuley. Cldse, Lmitold,: 
Kent; pltoed goto. 


Die company 'wante a third 
round of talks after Easter, 

having evaluated ei^oratory 
discusrions with 'tbe unioos 
representing 6 , 000 ' worken 
dimissed amer going ^ atrfire • 
lastJanuiuy. 


• Feter-Lakev a praiter; ato 
43, accused rffassauhingT^ettr 
Sieidienson, g^iio 

bodflyharmandst^nga key 
befoitog tol^to Z^TNT 

.Ltd at. East Smitlifiefel,-Siq>- 
pey. to comnutted on bmdi^! 
tional bail' to . Souiliiaari;' 
Crown Comi for: trial; 


# arolicatioa by Sogat '82 
agaiirttfoe induskm ofbtoch 
funds in the sequestra^ 
order which has delved it of 
its £17 nxiflion assets will be 
beaid in to Court of Appeal 
today. 


Mr Late; of- SisgfewdI 
Road. Gr a toe a d, Kent, to 
told' af Tbamea Masstiato 
Court not to go within a mOe 

of to Wappiiig plooL 


• A Sogat member vtiib stole 
more than 300 ooities of , The 
Stfft and The Times oias fined 
i£3XX> at HigldROT Ma^uaies 
Court yesterday. Robert 
Clements,' aged 41v • of 


♦ OBto Dnke^ a journalist- 
appeared at the . same ccnirt 
accused of isdtlDg a groiiii of 
-deinonsbatofs oiiiside.;,.to' 
WaopDiR .Plant; to coaodit 
banxL.MrDidDe, 


Couple choose a royal mairiage with 

!iflnfilifiedfrnin naoa I & . « _i _ 


Contiiiiied from page I 
Favourites to be Miss 
Fergoson's mairoas honoor 
most be her sister, Mrs Jane 
Mafciii, who lives in Anstraiia, 
and ber former fo 

Battersea, Miss Carolyn 
Bedcwith-SBith, who is 
self dne to be married soon. 

The strongest cmiteiider for 
best man b Prince Edward, 
who acted a$ joint best man. or 
sapporter, wifo rifoce Andrew 
at Prince Charles* wedfii^ 
Precedent sntosts that the 


Arehlnsliop of Cantrebray, Dr 
Robert Bnncie, will 
offi(aate.TIie gnest list to 
indnde a gabxy of feragn 
ntofy and d^nnaries. 


of Britain since to Falkbusds 
war. 



Co rrect protoed will almos t 
certainly ensaretotaninvita- 
tion b extended to Mr Heto 
Barrantes* Mbs Fergnsmi^ 
stepfotto* fo spHe ef to 
possibility of diitonatic db- 
comfltore over hb bAtg 4 m 
AigenthUan and, tiiaSoee, 
nnwelcome on to polo fie^ 


Prince Andrew wift m oat ftw 
hb weddnq from Bnddngliaai 
F^ce in an opes coach — 
given fair weetber — and Us 
procession will foQow a ibote 

down The Man, Hwse Guards 

Arch, WhitehaU and Parib- 

ment Square to to AMwy, 


Mbs Fergttson b likely to set 
ont from Chreooe House, 
home of the Queen Motor, in 


be seen on telerisfon iro^ 
wide. The man ia go to 
PrilKe and Priaoess of Wales 
at t racted- one of.'to Wgato 
iatteaatioasll ' aodfonces- evor, 
and even tot of Prittoera Ainie- 
nnd Gapitom' Mark' Phfl^ 
to first royal -weddii^ ib be 

soeeimd fo Gtriom; attracted a ' 


secarity aad piivaiey of to 
rayal y^ Btonto as did 
to 'imnee aiid:'Mnoess.-.ed 
Walto, nid Princess Amir'jind 
CaptoinFliilBps.'-- 
T%e yto* fa sefatoed iiira 


' oCha* vtootoi deck^ bKwffi : 
tefrraafktetoiradiiBR ' ’ - 

Tbe vessel ^ wfil- :nexi be 


of Odnn' a ’ Oditor iriiot -ft 


C^iitkm to 


liabooron r 


MiUtfiiit 

atiion 


if 


Antony Berios, 
PriBtod : Caciespoiident 

A Hig^ Court judge 
dasipeA lioara yesterday on 
to .{BOGednres'iajMfer toch 
I^bcmr^ ttatKoal executive 
«S1 bear ex^mbion 
tod^ against 12 Uverp^ 

MffiteKst^ipwtersL . 

The l^ceOascdfor, Sir 
Hkbolas ftowne-Wflkhisoo, 
nded that it woidd be unfeir 
and contra^ to the rules of 
nfonrri jqstioe veitficte were 
leatoQ ds- to basis of evi- 
given is confidence to 
an e^- 5 trt»g etecutivc in- 
quuy and that ft would 
bewnto fortoteaoi to lake 
in today's proceedings. 

• Mfr' Lariy V^tty;- to La- 
bew Pnty% genem secret 
arid aftenimtb tot there tras' 
eningb evidence against the 
IT to go ahead with the 


A wss-airo tixH^i that the 
exdnrioB of the aAi execu- 
tive Aiembers who had heard 
'tfae~'evidfflce in Liverpool 
woiiki make no difference to 
to vetdkts reached, althc^ 
kemdd oaciow to majorities 
for csdntoni of Mr Derek 
Hatton, the deputy council 
learier, andUs ll;oomiades. 

Ozvtoi**to°^°L to VibO' 
Chanedior said thm to case 
tiitod on ytotor to prcce- 
dures pro p osed' for ado|ttioD 
toHEC did, or did nou.of- 
fend' {ffUBCipks of natural 
jibtice. 

' The mo^ important iras to 
appetenl threat , to use evi- 
dnre pvn in ctmfidence 10 
to inqtBcy. teanL, as evidence 
against-to 12-individnals. 

"Thm b an overwhelming 
. puMfe itorest in eofiauwto 
dedsfons arenot made affect- 
ing to fiv^ihddd of an indi- 
vMual without to procedure 
b^feir,**te$aKL 
' Toeiuto said.'^r have real 
mopato to Labour 
Jarty in to rireumaancei in 
!iiiikittoyfiddthcntseLv« it 
flbws fecsn to feet , that th^ 
have chosea ' to coodnet an 
induiiy .cai to basis of confi- 
iitouiatKm pven to 
SQOiemeitiheraaf to NEC.” 

^ M fo-witnessra .whom the 
IZwitod to call, there was no 
absedme-oght to call vrimesses 
far hesring. of a. domestic 
trilnutri;. The matto was vrith- 
mite toN^ 

Tire TDcto ordered to NEC 
to pay oalrof to 12 {datatiffi' 
costs..-'' 


■<fr 


*yd\ 




lUlieuoftax 




~i9y tXarid Hewson 
v"' AittCoiTesiKU^ . 
rriie Govenunent has ac- 
cepted a valuable cdlection of 
private ud State documents 
Qoveriiv British foreign pg^ 
firma to seventeenth to nhie- 
teenth centuries to air iuidis- 
dosedsum intieu oTtasb,',. 

Tte.oiriieiriup Oftoja^^ 
was. not' disdosed 
Rkbani Luce, toMinfoier to 
to vton he announced' 
to dtiri fo' a CotttxBfoia.iiiih-: 
tea reply yesterd a y. : *•!.,• .■ • 
The acceptanoe b to'fisf. 
under- a new ;scheme^ as- 
nounced last .yeas^i rOseaSaj 
impoftaat - beqis .'ooite ; be 
som to to nation Wfimos 
from to Pol^ Exjmfoqe 
Reserve. .Tire papers mwOe 

piensemaL. State^and. 
docomrats i bofieded: 

Ehikes of Jtotiand.mrikZjfei^ 
raistte. Most.^ alriadiyinBie 
pbsriisribtt ^to'* 

Ubraiy. V' 




trv 


ss« 








Sir Geitm 
mentaiy.. under .fieoirtlOT df 
Stete at to 

&vironmeni,',t61d .to':Cnn* 
mons ycrioday that.in donuti- 
tati<Mi nitii Mr Richard Lure 
Minister, to to Aits, .he .bad 
oideredan indepndarifo^ 
-tigatioit into the recent flood* 
iiig'al to VictDiia risdAlb^ 
MusemxL- 


r-Si 


V 






‘ V 


'Sdlafield woikefS bavecaP^. 
celled. -A. :.meeting . with ; tire 
'enyiro&meotal grbap 
Qrxrtpeaffe,dao to talif 


next Week vton .catnjs&wi^ 
' loihe liuci^ -piau 
an anti-Sellaifidd cruise in 


to Irish Sea,- 


‘MaafOTJur’ 


her 

wiii 


J(mes,A fonner inent- 
Women's ffeiiraa 


Radio on Ap^ FboTs 
Day, to firtttmieti has beeo 
ptoenlqd by-a idaiL 


CjBQ^OIl 


J: 


A report fo The Tinas (Maidi 
17) ,of tl^ ccnvicticni- at to 
CeittralCnininal Courtonoho 
Dhififile. Benreitd Honfefland 
Janes .Blaopw^to cocnipunn 
nibsated ttoofto'sentcBoes 
limpbsed'iHorafiO w tat: 
teaaed fo fg moDto'-bf Mnra 
to were-.lo .be ^enred;'^'^ 
Bboow.m 12-. mooto, 
four wrije to be served. .-' 4 . 











I ^AyLod 


% 


THE TIMES WEDNESDAY MARCH 26 1986 


HOME NEWS 


Woman abiandoned bv Full steam ahead for record-breaker Midwife 


lover must lose 
her home, court rules 





A household^, ai ffl ud o n gd 
by her lover, yesterday lost a 
legal fight to |ueveat-a fai ynce 
compatiy taluK possession of 
her home und^- a mortgage 
agr ee mem described by a 
judge as ‘‘extortionate'*. 

However, the Court of Ap- 
referred the cate to the. 
Director Genera} of Tiad- 
Bigtp considCT whether to take 
acuon. against the - company 
Castle Hlillips F inwnrf * 

Miss Irene O'Connor had 
riaimed that the tzansaction - 
a ^ort-term loan curyina 
imerKt at an annual rate « 
48 per cent - should be set 
aside because slv did not 
understand it and ^ 

ya& unduly infliui>nrftd by the 
man with whom she 
]ived,yri 20 has asce left her. 

Two judges dismissed her 
claims .and uph^ a county 
court ruling that Castle. PbU- 
lips 'were ratiiled to take 
possessioD and sdl her home, 
109- Cowper Street, Luton, 
Bedfordshire, valued at more 
than £22^000. 

' Lofd Jusdoe DiDon said 


that he was troubled by his 
“prinm facie view that- the 
credit bargain was 
extoitionate''.That point had 
not been taken by Miss 
O'Connor and it would not be 
^spropiiate to the «« 
bade to Lutoo'County Court 
for ft to be aigued, be said. 

The judge, sitting Mrs 

Jnstice Booth, added: “It is -of 
imMic. importance chat those 
' licensed under the Cohsomer 
Credit Act- 1974 should not 
enter into extortionate bar- 
gains or' engage in deedtfiil, 
oppressive or unfair TMneinwK 
practice^'' 

He directed that the papers, 
with a copy cf the court's 
judgement, should be sent to 
' the Director' General of ^ir 
Trading - 

Miss O'Connor and Mr 
George WQUains, her lover 
since 1969 and the fethd' of 
her chOd, borrowed £11,000 
from Ca^e Phillips in No- 
vember, 1984, to pay off a 
£5^700 building society rnoft- 
g^e, with whim ftiey were in 
arrears, and leave them with a 
ccyutal sunL 


I I 


^ ’ -ifc !•} 


issued to courts 

By Fete EvaoSk Hmae Affidis CofRspflndent 




. Ma^stratesand judges were 
given a hew weapon yesterday 
agtinst discrqjancies between 
sentences imposed tlifte- 
ent courts. 

~Tbe aim, according to a 
Home Office handbook on 
treatment of offmders, is not 
to secure unifoimity of $en> 
trace but . unfrbnnity . of- 
approach. 

“Much will ahv^ depend 
on the particular drcnm-. 
stances of the indhndual o^ 
fender and the individual 
offence,"' h adds: . 

' TfaeNational Association of 
Probation Officers, Mr Gerald 
Berminghain, Labour MPIbr 
St Helens Soutiu and Lord 
Hunt former chairman of the ' 
Parole Board, are among those 
who have expressed ooncem 
at wide disoepancies between 
penalttes. The Autoinc^e'As- - 
sociation disclosed big dift^- 
ences in 8,000 const oses 
involving its members. 

The new guidance is expect- 
ed to make couFtsless dq;)^ 
dent .on their ^tenchtt 
traditions, r^antodas one m 
the main reasons for i^er- 
ences'ta approactu-and^.the 
advice of the clerk. . 


The hazKibook, which is 
being di^huted to 26,000 
magi^rates, judges and clerks, 
says that imprisonment 
should be tiie penalty for 
serious offences; for others 
there has to be a good season 
for Slot imposing other op- 
tions. If a prison semence is 
inevilat^ it should be as 
shwt as is contistent with the 
need to pohish. 

It addS' that jail is not *in 
any wav a ireatmenf' for 
criminauty, and a pri^ sen- 
tence should not be impos^ 
with rehabilitative aims in 
mind”. 

Detoience also carries little 
wed^t “It would be wrong to 
impose a custodial sentence in' 
a case nhete that severe a 
penal^ was not warranted Iv 
the crime in qt^stion, inereiy 
hi the lu^ of adurvis]^ a 
detenent a reformalive 
effect,” it says. 

The handbook says that it is 
cootruy to estabhsl^ -sen- 
tench^ prtni^Ies to 
tute a custodial sraten<» ifOT 
line “simply ,becBt}ise the of- 
fender lat^ me^”. 

The Semence of -the ‘Court 
(SiatioDCTy Office; £3:50).: 


The IMnce of Wales sbowim 
yesteday, whidi he s^ wra 1 
struck it irifh a maUet at lus 


his isgared fin^ 
uteng on ^ a uread aftra he 
[kjtsrove Irame on Saturday. 


US fighters for Obya 
plan Vas just a joke’ 

A bttsmessman maintained out of Brhain in 19M and 
at the Central Criminal Court evade a drags mat 

yesterday that he was joki^ ^ bpcinwaarian, Mr 
when he spote agom Gill, aged sa of 

supply ofAmcncan FI 6 fight- pafQfieid Road, Great Tey, 
er jets to Libya. - , .. — 


cr jcis w uu>o. Cblchester, has admitted' rax- 

Mr Godfrey Shinw. igg part in the plot Giving 

48, of Napion on the ni^ evidence for the proseration, 
Warwieksbiiie, agreed wt be accused Mr Shiiier of 
spoke about iriaxte ^ the flight during a 

nb. motor cruiser in Maha. meetiK on board his boat in 

“Bin h was said joki^y, July llw. 
there is no doubt about it.” be GiU said that Mr Shiner 

the jury. ^ . . spojte about the supply of 

Mr Sinner, who IS m bi^ F16s to Cblond Gadafffs 
ness sopiriyit^ oilndd equip- ,^jne. Mr Shiner said be 
ment to Libya, dcnira ^ Shebli's' name as a 
conspiri% to pewen the kusujjss contact in Britain, 
course oHii^ by arran™ continues 


for Mr Mohammed SneoU, 
43. a Libyan, to be frown 


The 

to^y 


hearing continues 



The judge said that they had 
been introduced to the compa- 
ny ihrongli two other compa- 
nies, Mellcay Finance, of 
Luton, and Sovereign Fi- 
nance, orSonliiampion.Out of 
the £1 1,000, the couple had to 
pay a £1,120 “fee" to Sover- 
eign, £880 “interest in 
advance", and other diaiges. 

. The balance of nou^ 
£3,000 was banked by Mr 
WQUams in his own account 
Four months later be left Miss 
O’Connor and, within days, 
had married another woman. 

Tlie judge said: *^One can 
snqiect that, although this 
was, of course, unknown' to 
the comply, Mr Williams's 
{dan in his own mind was to 
raise capital which he could 
uso as a -deposit on am^her 
house, whenever it suited him 
to throw over bliss O'Connor 
and their child.” 

Miss O'Connor was unable 
to make any payments from 
the Joan, , which was over a 
period of four to six months, 
and the company therefore 
sought possession. 

Heathrow 

curbs 

foreseen 

By Midnel Baily, 

Transport Editor 

Restrictioiis on dmnesiic 
flints to Heathrow in the late 
I9n)s to halt worsening over- 
crowding at the world's busi- 
est international airport is 
foreshadowed in a Q\^ Avia- 
tion Authority report to the 
Government 

Charter flights to Gatwick 
could also be restricted later, 
and buriness, freight, and 
possibly international passen- 
ger flights to Heathrow unless 
foeainines are able to stop the 
rise in flights. 

The CAA is dearly con- 
cerned to move trafiic from 
overburdened Heathrow and 
Gatwick to Stansted in the 
1990s, though no airline will 
be directed from one to the 
other. 

Recommended steps 
include: 

• Restrictions on general, 

business, taxi, and all-fre^t 
frights at Heathrow and 
Gatwidc - . , - 

• Restrictions on new domes- 
tic routes at Heathrow; 

• Posrible removd from 
Heathrow of lightly-used feed- 
er routes smh as Cadisle and 
EHmdee, Inverness, Guernsey, 
Isle of Man, Rymoutb and 
Newquay, and Jersey; 

• Limits on the number of 
daily frights- on domestic 
routes to Heathrow, except 
vltere - competitive foicra 
make this impracticaUe such 
as shuttle routes to Gla^w, 
Edinburg and Belfisq 

• Possible restriction on the 
number , of daily flights mi 
international routes to 
Heathrow. 

• Possible reduction of char- 
ter flights from Gatmck to 
mate room fw more sdied- 
uled services. 

In another air development, 
a £50 million-a-yeer expan- 
sion plan was announced by 
Mti^ Caledonian yesietday 
. is an e&)Tt to catch up with 
British Airways on interna- 
tional routes. 

The airiine plans to acquire 
two more Boeing 747 Jets ^is 
summer and to open services 
to Japan, ^ina and Italy. 

B-Gal claims that its new 
routes are in line with the 
Governmenl's competition 
policy, but'they stili require 
pemission from foreign gov- 
ernments and will be strongly 
opposed by BA. 

Chandler and 
near still 
lead in chess 

By Hairy Gtdontiidt 

Cbras Cnrespondent 

With only two rounds to 
play in the GLC Chess Chal- 
lenge at London's Great East- 
ern Hotel, the Leicester 
international master Glenn 
Flear and the British 
grandmaster Murray Chan- 
dler still lead whb 7% points. 

Flev, by drawing his game 
raainst Nigel Short, made his 
^t of the gran^aster 
title. Chandler atUoumed 
gainst the former world 
champion Boris Spassky in a 
ifmg and difficult endgame, 
bat managed to draw. . . 

«nr 11 ronSB ChHidl«r. 
rt 7; Porosiat. Poms- 
Sinniv. 6: Nunn. 
^lagaMan. niMeinun.^ LMacn. 
I’y^iiilntrl miiw- Pttskntt. a 
NiSiB vMbU postpofMcl nnttl today 


Curry tops league for eating 


By RdMh YonES 
,Cv^ is ftitain's most pop- 
skr diuiK-ont food,_and the 
best carry m Britain zsservra 
at the BKNiAay Bmssene u 
Ksnsiogloa. acceid^ 
cay^w4 ^iriwi pf TkC GOOd 
Otrry - GaUe^ polished to- 

efiled by MrjM 
the fbuDdfer €f a 
ttey eiAasiate* cfafo ^ 
.&dfl0 oKflibra^ fists 
-pwii~flwF 710 iBcemmend^ 


book also lists Pakistani, 
Bangladeisiii, Sri-Lanl^ 


d^Indir. 

iae.biittiie 


gaporean, Miday and Caribbe- 
an estaUishaieiils. 

The restaurants «e as di- 
verse as the spices with which 

they carry tiieir dimts' bvom. 

At the Rkipooth Tandoori in 
Dohaoi, afrill Inadi is £L65, 
while in trendy IsEnutos the 

Sonar Goan prices its Kash^ 
nhole yonng lamb stuffed wifli 

yhtdibaii rice which win serve 

up to ^ tf fdOO- 

In Stroud Oeen. north Lon- 
ifffff, -the Beewees ofibrs. 


**amaattg honieHnade nni 
pendi” to wash down West 
tiHtian goat cvrxy . and crab 

Mr CbapiBaD dafans recent 
sarveys prove tiiat Indian- 
style food Ims overtaken Chi- 
nese in - popnlarity* Indiaa 
restaurants, he ealralates. are 
still opraingat tire rate of 400 
a year, bat less than 15 per 
cent are iq>erated by Indi an s. 

The Good Cum Guide 
1986^7. edited by Fat Chap- 
man. (Piaxkus Boole, £195, also 
avaiiatfc at same price from 
The Ciuiy Club, PO Box 7, 
Hasleniere. Sw^, GU2T.1EP). 



Mafiard, the steam engine 
whkdi readied a die^ of 
126mph m 1938, back on the 
tracks yesterday for Ae 
first time in 23 yrars. 

The locomotive, which 
made ffie record-breaking ran 
between Grantham and Peter- 
borooii, was paying a courte- 
sy vish to Scarbmoagh, where 
the -council has contributed 
£35^100 towards the cost of a 
nme-meiitfa restoration project 
and to help keep die engfoe oa 
(he tracks. It is expeted to 
hanl “steun specials** from 
June this year. 

From Scarborough, die lo- 
coBOtive went on to British 
Rail's works at Doncaster, 
where it was bmlt, for the 

fiiwuliiiig Hirimlhig a 

new coat of “garter blue” 
paint 

Mallard was designed by 
Sir Nigel Gresley fbr the 
London and North Eastern 
Railways' services between 
Lradon and Edinburgh. It was 
in service andl 1963, and has 
been kept in the National 
Raflway Mnsram at York 
since 1975. 


DOVER 


GCSE ‘shambles’ 
warning to Joseph 

By Lucy Hodges, Education Correspondent 


I The new GCSE examina- 
, tion for 16-year-oIds would be 
> a shrables and a disaster if 
the Government insisted on 
introducing it on schedule and 
without employing extra 
teach^ die le^er of the 
second biggest teaching union 
said yesterday. 

Mr Fred Smithies, giraeral 
secretary of the Natio^^As- 
sociation of School- 
fflastens/Uaion of Women 
Teachers, call^ on Sir Keith 
Joseph, Secretary of State for 
Education, to postpone its 
introduction. He said that 
otherwise the exam would go 
the way of the CSE in which 
the bulk of courses end with a 
conventional exam. 

Mr Smithies said that udth- 
out extra staff, teachers might 
work inadequately, rriiise to 
! co-operate with the GCSE, or 


take on a lot of extra work. 

He was replying to a letter 
from Sir Keith which accepted 
dial there were real concerns 
about the training 
programme. 

At the union's annual con- 
ference next week in Scatbor- 
01 ^ will be a motion calling 
on the 127,000 members to 
tpke no part in the develoi^ 
rnenl of the new exam unless 
the timetable is extended, 
a^uate resources are pro- 
vided for training, and appro- 
priate fees are agreed for 
exams and assessment 

The Government's recent 
injection of £20 million for 
books and equipment for the 
new exam, and £200,000 for 
training on top of an originai 
£10 milUcKt was inadequate, 
tesaid. 


Officer sorry 
about death of 
Hell’s Ai^el 

The rastedy officer in 
char^ of Hounslow polte 
station on the a^t John ' 
Mikkleson died turned to 
■Hells Angels in the pnl^ 
gallery at Hamoiersmith 
coroner's court yesterday to 
say he was sorry -. 

Sergeant Roger Sent made 
tbe statraient after gjvii^ his 
evidence. 

Mr MOckleson, aged 34, of 
Salters Road, North Kensh^ 
ton, died afte being arrest^ 
in Feltham last July in connec- 
tion with a car. 

Dr John Taylor said he 
belteed Mr Mikkleson had 
drank more tban ten pints of 
beer that night He also found 
small dn^ traces in his blood. 

Aw^er fmrasic sdentist 
Dr Anne Cfartotian said she 
ftnmd traces of bnman blood 
on two police trancheons. 




sues over 

hospital 

transfer 

A midwife was traced under 
special supervision and 
moved from an experimenial 
scheme, in which she was 
caring for expectant mothers 
throughout their pregnancy, 
when her superiors fouad she 
had been visiting her patients 
at home, it was alleged at an 
industrial tribunal yesterday. 

Miss Wendy Pearce, a^ 
31. was also formally repri- 
manded afrer complaints 
about two cases. 

Miss Pearce, a midwife at St 
George's Hospital. Tooting, is 
claiming constructive dismiss- 
al from Wandsworth Health 
Authority. 

Mrs Lynetie Murray, 
Wandsworth Director of 
Nursing Services, told the 
tribunal that the decision to 
transfer Miss Pearce from the 
“Know Vour Midwife" 
scheme had not been a 
punishment. 

Miss Pearce had been trans- 
ferred to the labour ward and 
offered extra training under 
superv ision. Mrs Murray said: 
“If you feel a midwife has 
problems a transfer is ar- 
ranged It is designed to help 
them and stop them going 
down the wrong track". 

. Mrs Murray denied she 
reacted an^ly when she dis- 
covered midwives had been 
visiting expectant mothers at 
home. 

' She said she initially sus- 
pended Miss Pearce from duty 
after a patient complained she 
had been “very distressed" 
after beii^ told not to rush 
into hospital but to remain at 
home and have a bath when 
she was in labour. 

Miss Pearce had also dealt, 
without calling a doctor, with 
symptoms of foetal distress in 
which a baby's heart rate 
dropped, the tribunal was 
toli Mrs Murray sai± “The 
midwives deal with the nor- 
mal and the medical staff deal 
with the abnormal." 

The hearing continues. 


CALAIS 



Eariysailingsapin^.Q7iti/tVU:}i\vinnorw'i^ 

Ikimiv July Ilth tiiid lUid it u'ilU\vtL'>i iImii I tiii yati: 


Stnailerfjtvs far larger cars. 

\U'ih'wlhv\\vilYTirOt\v-ltV}^b\niV ihtiv. 


HCAV TO CROSS THE 
CHANNEL WITHOUT 
GETTING SOAKED 


First the good news. 

As a glance at this page shows, if you w-ant to 
go across the Channel this summer; go Sealink. 

Whether you’ve a caravan in tow or a car full 
of kids, there are genuine savings to be made going 
over tiom Dover witli us. 

Now for the even better news 

Since we became a private company our public 
&e has changed almost be^’ond recognition. 

Our ships are being completely re^fitted to a 
level of comfort second to none. Our crews have 
gone through an intensive le-training programme 


that’s giwn them, amongst other things, a refresh- 
ingly new attitude: 

Namely that your holiday starts when \ou get 
on one of our ships, not when you get off 

"^’U have up to 16 sailings a day fix>m Dover 
tliis vean 

us. 'Vbu’ll find we ve become veiy- able 
seamen indeed 

For flirthcr details contact your local tra\el agent 
or call us on ( 11-834 8122. 


WERE FLEETS AHEAD 













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!/r , 


PARLIAMENT MARCH 25 1986 


Why BL deal failed 


GM plan for Leyland not 
in the national interest 


INDUSTRY 


sition spokesman on trade and 
industry. saidrMr Cbannon has 
announced the coQapse of a 


part of the Leylmd business. 

Mrr 


Despite the fact that General 


venture iUKXtnoeived id pirn- 
sfieci. 


Motors' j>ropo^ for Leyland 
uidLar 


dn 

chi 

tin 

Mi 

for 

to 

Gr 

be 

yef 


pn 

to 

d» 

coi 

Gr 

agi 

we 

20 . 

I 

lha 

She 

£B 

the 

ran 

an 

not 

Gn 

def 

/ 

wo- 
to I 
the 
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Trucks. Freight Rover and Land 
Rover were commercially 
acceptable to the board of BU 
the agieement was not accept- 
able to the Govemmem in the 
national interest, Mr Paul 
ChannoD. Secretary of State for 
Trade and Industry, said in a 
statement to the Cominoiis. 

The Government would go on 
with the established plans for 
L^laod Trucks. He hoped the 
BL board would be considering 
all the options available and 
would make recommednations 
to him wbicb the Govemmem 
wmild oMisider in the normal 
way. 

He promised no decisions 
.would be taken before the 
House letureed after the Easter 
recess. 

In his statement, Mr Channoa 
said that British 1^-land and the 
Government had been in dis- 
omions with several companies 
about the privatization of the 
main Land Rover-JLeyland busi- 
nesses. Of these. General Mo- 
tors (GM) had made proposals 
conceraing Leyland Trucks, 
Freight Rover and Land Rover. 

In relation to the truck and 
van sectors (he said) the talks 
with GM concentrated on the 
possibilities for combining the 
respective Le>-land and Bedford 
businesses to the muoial benefit 
of CM and BL. 

In respect of Land Rover, 
where there are opportunities 
for Land Rover in expanding 
European and world markets, 
the Government was deter- 
mined that as a condition of 
pri-vatization special arrange- 
ments should bis concluded to 
safeguard UK interests, includ- 
ing a measure of real UK control 
over the Allure of the business. 

For its pan, however. GM 
wished to have effective control 
of the company from the outset 
and an assurance of foil owner- 
^ip and control within a rel- 
atively short period, and it 
became clear that they were not 
able to compromise on these 
points. 

Despiie the view taken of the 
GM proposal by the BL board 
fiom Its commercial standpoint, 
this was not a basis for an 
agreement acceptable to the 
GovemmeBi in the national 
ioleresL 

GM have stated (he contin- 
ued) that they are not willing to 
proaxd with an arrangement 
for Leyland Trucks and Freight 
Rover which excludes the Land 
Rover company and the talks 
have therefore been ended. 

The BL board will give fonher 
study to the aJtemative ways 
forward for all the businesses 
concerned. For leyland Trucks, 
which opaates in a pressed 
and fier^y competitive mar- 
ket, the bo^ win continue to 
examine the possitnlities for 
collaboration with other nianu- 
foaums and other ways to 
sustain its improving trend in 
performance. 

The Govemmem continues 
to support the commercial 
development of this busiaess in 
accordance with the estaUished 
plans. 

For Land Rover and Freight 
Rover, the board will include in 
their examination the various 
expressions of interest which 
have already been announced, 
with a view to recommending 
the course most likely to achieve 
the privatization of the busi- 
nesses in a way which best 
secures ibeir future. 

Mr John Smith, chief Oppo- 


posti, anti-British in its effect, 
and bandied with almost un- 
believable incompetence: (La- 
bour cheers). 

Now he has confirmed the 
ending of talks, is this the end of 
this msci^ted proposal? 

Could the House have an 
assurance that there would be 
no question of Land Rover or 
any other part of the BL Group 
pa^og out of British control 
during the hfetime of this 
Government? 

Only the strongly-expressed 
voice of Partiament and people 
had changed the tUrection oftitis 



Chanmni: GM not able 
to eomptonnsc 


issue. (Labour cheersL 
By faangiog a **For Sale" 
notice over Uie premises the 


premises 
Government had been culpably 
oegli^t in their stewardship of 
acrucial pari of Birtish industry. 
(Labour cheers and Conser- 
vative iKOtests). 

We are now in a very fast- 
moving situation (he saidX Can 
we have an assurance that there 
will be no Anther announce- 
ment about any sale of British 
Leyland before the end of the 
Faster recess and that before 
there are any further moves 
there will be a AiU debate in the 
Commons so that all pans of the 
House can eiqiress their opin- 
ions upon it? 

Mr Channon said it was always 
made clear that they wanted to 
get adequate assurances before 
they would ever be prepared to 
sell Land Rover to GM. There 
might have been a possible 
compromise. That was some- 
thing that was discussed. 

But it was impossible to have 
a situation where GM insisted 
on having effecti-ve control of 
the company and an assurance 
of foil ownership control vrithin 
a relatively shon period. 

That was not somahing 1 
could recammcDd to my col- 
leagues or the House. 

Mr Robert Atkins (South 
RibUe, Cy. The puU-out of GM 
means Itec with the successAil 
recent record of Leyland Trucks 
in terms of imduct. price and 
market diaics, it wili need 
fonher investment from the 
Government, from the tax- 
payer, in the same way that 
other sucoessAti companies. like 
British Aero^nce, have de- 
served and achieved over recent 
yeara. 

The continuing partisan and 
shon-sighisd barr^ of ques- 
tions and statements Aoni the 
Opposition have probaUy done 
more harm lo the future and 
jobs of those working in Leyland 
Trucks than GM could ever 
have done. 

Mr Chunoa: On the future of 
Leylaad Trucks, that would be a 
maner for the board. They will 
come forward -with proposals in 
the normal vi^. At present there 
is no suggmion of nirtber equity 
for Leylaad Trucks or any other 


David St^ Leader of the 

Liberd Party, said GM bad a 
legitimate grievaace ia that 
when the take-over of the whole 
lot was first proposed by Mr 
Tebbit in jni^l984 there were 
no such concUtions. con- 
ditions had only been impos^ 
by pressure in the House, quite 
pTMeriy, in the past few weeks. 

Repremtations were comi^ 
in fiom Ute retailers of Austin 
Rover that the dann«ing un- 
cenainQ! was afleeting sales in 
the sale-rooms. Mr Channon 
^lould make it his business to 
restore calm on the foture of 
British L^land as soon as 
possible. 

Mr Chanoon said Mr Tebbit 
publicly sou^t would^ie buyers 
some time ago. GM*s ori^nal 
interest arose out of discussions 
about mutual problems in 
trucks. It was always dear ftom 
the start mu any interest in 
Land Rover/Range Rover 
mi^t raise questioos of this 
kind. 

The whole House ^uld like 
to pay tribute to Austin Rover's 
progress and congratulate the 
company on increasing exports, 
pariiculariy to Europe. 

Mr Mkhad Heseltbe (Henley, 
O. In the context of the bus and 
truck industries of Britain and 
Europe tfam is huge excess 
capacity. In trying to ju^ the 
reconuifendations of the boani 
of British Leyland. what critetfe 
win he have in mind in 
determining the strategy that 
will protect Britim interests? 

Mr Chsimoa: I s^ree there is 
huge eacess capacity. That is a 
feiom we ail have to 
consider very careAiUy and 
which the BL boani most con- 
sider careAilly in reoofflinenduig 
me future course of action to 
me. 

1 shall ensure that aD relevant 
factors relatiog to that are put 
before me before 1 come forward 
wim recommeodations. 

Mr Mfchacl Foot (Blaenau 
Gwent, Labk Whoi did the 
minister and the Government 
make the remaricable discoveiy 
that it was the desire and 
determination of GM to take 
over the whole busiiiesS? 

Mr Chanmnu It was always clear 
that GM wanted to take over the 
whole business. We wished to 
see if there was a compremise 


edge triiat he ssys. 

Mr Hilary MBlo (Bromsgreve 
O: lo the light of the tte 
O^x^tion crowing ^ in their 
isoUtionist joy, turning a^y 
mud) needed iovestmeoi in 
truck and comioetdal vehicle 
industry, what discussions has 


be had trim GM about keeping 
mest of 



Snutli: Govcnunait was 
aJpsbly negligent 


acceptable to all the parties 
concerned. No compromise was 
found and therefiire the talks 
were broken oft 
He added later that it would 
not be right for hiin to circulate 
on the foture ofBritish Leyland. 
On the BL subsidiaries (he said) 
1 wiD be able to brine to the 
House proposals made to me by 
the BL board vdiicfa will c^er 
them a secure foture. 

Mr George Park (Coventry 
North Labh Will be 

acknowledge the dawiay iimi 
has been done to BL by these 
abortive neogiatiotta. 

Mr ChannoB: I do not acknowl- 


tbe d^^ and development 0 
oommodd vehicles in this 
country? 

Mr Channon: I entirely 
wim aboBt the whouy 
hypocritical' attitude of the 
Oppoation. 1 lave lUK 
discussioiis with GM about this 
point. It is a maaer for I 
very much hope they cootiaue 
in mis country. _ 

Mr Graham Bright (Luton 
South. Cy This decision has 
an enormous question 
mark on the whole Arture of 
Bedfoid tnuks. The Opportu- 
futy for GM to make tbu 
CQuntiy tire centre of their 
research, development and 
sign for the whole of Eui^ie has 
been Mown. 

If GM update wim Renault 
trucks or Volvo we will lose 
these skills away to Europe. 
Sillily this is exactly the thing 
we ought to be trying to stop. 
The GM deal would enable us to 
have a propCT iniek manu&e- 
turing operation in this country. 
The people of Luton and 
Bedfotdsfaire wiB feel tins has 
beenUown. 

Nil Channom 1 very much hope 
his views wili not be justified. 
GM will be lookiag very care- 
fully at all the alternative ways 
forward for Bedford. 

IVfe Ian Wriggleswortb (Stock- 
ton South. SDP): The un- 
certainty is very damag ing. Will 
he seek to bring discussions, 
particulariy wim the manage- 
ment buyAiut proposals to an 
early condusion? 

Mr Cbannon: 1 agree wim him h 
would be belpfiii if these matters 
could be bro4^t to a conclusion 
in the reasonably near future. 
Mr Philip (^penhefan (Amber 
Valley. O Have we not tost a 
great opportunity to restructure 
me Mtish truck mdustry? Wni 
not GM DOW run off and make a 
deal wjm one of our European 
competitors? The Labour Party 
is wholly to blame far trying to 
pull the Union Jack over me 
eyes of tire voters, 

Mr Chaaaoo: If a deal whb GM 
could have been worked out that 
would have many advantages, 
but it was not possible to 
a^eve that deal and we shall 
ha ve to work on other so! utions. 

1 hope we shall find satisfoctory 
ones. 

Mr Andrew Faolds (Wariey 
Ei^ Labh Is not the lesson of 
mis wh^ unhappy episode that 
this Gorvernmeni must never 
again deceptivefy and sur- 
reptitioDsly bdiind the backs of 
the Mtisb public and Par- 
tiameai rhspose of such a vital 
part ofBritish industry?. 

Mr Chanmn: I refoie entirely 
the suggestion that the Govern- 
tnent behaved deceptively. 

Sr Aral Bryan (Boothferry, Ch 
Since me most successful of 
the motor industry is owned by 
the Americans and probably 
shortly by Nissan, what is wrong 
wim Land Rover being owned 
by Americans if they produce a 
better product? 

Mr Cbannon: 1 judged it was 
right if we could get a deal with 
GM by wbitii there could be a 
compromise about ownership 
on Land Rover but ( was uert 
prepared to recommeod to the 
Government a sniation in 
which GM had eSsetive control 


Thatcher’s shares 

us exercise 



LIBYA 


The Aroericana had every right 
to cqwam in internatiopal wa- 
ters and airspace and 

entitled to use semdefence 

attacked. Mn Thal^. tte 
Prime Minister, said m the 
CoouDODS when ariced fo coi^ 
ment on the ontbr^ of 
ities between the United States 

Mr N^Hmmck, Leader of fte 
Opposition, ariced during ques- 
tion time for her optnm w 
America's actions whidi be 


tiescribed as dangeioos and 
desia^lising. ^ . 

He said; I undeotaod that me 

Fbreipi Office is not makmg a 
statement lodw on the inodenc 
in the CtOT^Si^ yesterday. 

Can I therefon ask ber to 
agree that her Govemojat’a 
response^ both to-atreciuesand 
attach on British citizens and m 

the VS proposals for coodmuc 
sanctions against Libya m Janu- 
ary, may have been a great d« 
more rational and responaue 
than the dangerous and. 
desabslising attacks on Libya 
by US forces yesterday?. / 

Can she tell me iriiai view her 
Government eiqKeared to' the 


US when it was notified of Ibeir 

intenuon ,*o eaity oai nsral, 
excreoses tiiere ' some weeks 


Are any additioiiaf preciu- 
lioDS bemg advised, to . UK 
citizens in Libya in die wake of 
yesterday's inadesns? 

MnThdielMR Heisreferring^^ 

the Gulf of Siirte- Ma? Im^e it 
clear that foe U$ ships>_ and 
anoaft were operating in jmei^ 
naiunial waters and airspace 
and tiiey have .every, i^it. so » 
do. It is anpoftaat flat 
national waim and anqw a.rre 
kept open and we sttf^^iort foeir 
zi^somoperatK ■ . - • 


of mat company. 

■ Ihc! 


He later said m could not give 
Mr Jack Straw (Blackburn, 
Lab) a new time scale on 
privatiatioo of Leyland trudea 


Walker’s high hopes 
for privatized gas 


GAS BILL 


The Gas KO would create a 
maior industriaL man nftraimrre 
a^ distributive concern wbidi 
could have a at home and 
abroad and be able to fiilfii that 
rofe bettCT and Sfoaup 

fteedom and enthustasm than it 
had since nationalization, Mr 
fttar Walker, Seaeiasy ofState 
Are Energy, said when be mpvi^ 
the third reading of the Bin in 
the Conunons. 

Mr Stanley Ome. chief Oppo- 
sition qtcAesinan on energy, 
cai/t thm one of Britain's most 
successfol mdnsiries, a public 
monopoly whidi was pralhable 
and expaadiag. would be tnnred 
into a imblie monopoly withont 
competition and witbout regttla- 
tioB safegnards. 

Mr Walker said the Govern- 
ment wanted tire new gas 
consumeis* council to be a more 
eifective organisation. Over the 


Mtirii Gas woold.know thm 
could be more detn- 
mentti to their interest than 
suddenly to'acquire'a bad 
reputation Are safety. 

Neither consumers nor 
employees had fUt Beat benefit 

fimm the assets of ftiiirii Gas.- 
Iw bom woufo now hav e dir ect 
partieipBSfon in tbe romtstry.. 

This was the most major diift 
fiom public to private sector in 
this eonatiy or perhaps in any 
coantty. 

Mr Orme said ' the 
Govenuneai's oofy nsasrerlfor 
the ^ was to raise capital fire 
hs election strategy. The rights 
of consumers were still badly 
metbyiheBflL 

The only people to benefit 
Grom this masdve sale would be 
the finaoeal ma r lc eteei a 


years the meseiit coimcil had got 
mvolved in committees and the 


passing of paper. Now there was 
an opportumqr to make snre h 
ityri its power to the benefit of 
the consumer. 

If the taw material price of gas 
moved down, tbe firemula ebr^ 
sen by foe Govenunent would 
see that the consumer benefited. 


Mr Speneer Baffiiie (Elniel, C) 
said the flotation of British Gas 
would add significantly, to the 
national number sharehold- 
ers nliich. at 6 per cent,- was too 
low. it would add io the 
size, vari^ and v^ppr of the 
stodc maiicet iiselL 


La dnftiiig the l^islaiioii, the 
Govenunent bad reeoBiized the 
impMtanoe of high snsty tta^ 
danis and had not only trans- 
feired the existing requireraenB 
to the new company, but had 
examined and amenort them. 


Mr Malcofan Bnoe (Gordon, L) 
said tbe foam price of Brititii 
Gas would be seiioiulyafiecttd 
by foiling oil prie& The Lib- 
erals. uiuike the Govennnenti 
were prepared to erpe ne Britirix 
Gas to more' eractive com- 
petition and to consider break- 
log ii up into separate 
companies. ThQr would ensure 
that shaidiohlera woold an a 
foir retora, bm thm would be 
no licence to prist mon^. 


Value for 



critenOB 


SHIPBUILDING 


It was importuit that tbe lendire 
for oil r^tUMwhmgnr'iTfWptf fer 
tbe Rpyal Bern Amd&iy foonld 
go to foe film offering foe best 
value. Are moaef, M» T hat foe r 
said during Piiiire 
questions. 


'She was told by Mr Nlfoeloa 
Brawn (Neweratie upM Tyne, 


Lw) that foe. foture of 
Tynesjdedqrenfod.cm the order 
going IO 'Swan Huarer. so foot 
shipbufldiiig eonld-survive on 
the Tyne. 

Mr Alan Beitt (BenririM»CB- 
TwencL L) said foe.Piime. ifis- 
istershouid bearin anndthaz B* 
Swan. Hunter uaderesnhated 
tire cosL the shazdioildets wbtdd 
pay. bid ' if Harlaad A. Wiriff", 
oaderestimaied foe costs, then it 
rnigfat be the taxpoyen who bad 
to shoulder the nntdesL ' . 

Mk Thatcba!: We must wash 
eaiefoUy that there is aqekment 

and we are :taiai% t^t 
much into acooust and lookh^ 
aLdetafled figures. 


Biujiaiiieiit today 


lords (2J0): Debateson burden 
of rotes and on pnrvistoa for 
multi-handicapped ailuits 
within foe community. . . ' 
Conmoas (2J0): . Debate '4)a 
MPa* r epraretaaaoia on Sd- 
migtation 


Thatcher 

dismisses 


alle^tion 


PSPsQUEtmONS 


The hired Minbter nplied la 
ndial ahe deserihed as scnrrUutts 

.atf senadahras- aBegaHeas 
nhogit her .alum oufoMe foe 
OwfoMS bBcajoM they had 
been nuds a reiiifc^. -she reU foe 
Hnise drag-gresrirei dree.. 
■wtetjfoedi M q dhed foeaUe^ 
tions .ifo: anfonii'dcd and 


Ms HraiehB was . chw s s d by 
Csnaeirativcb-wbpdiireiNd La- 
hnD& . BCOtfaca;,, - 
M Afex nrieher (Ediibttgh, 
Ckrenl Q dedared-that only 
G^pfoflio8-MPb tnnU SBQesi 
Aar hre iBssand «Mdact woiM 
itqifoe aiay iaveilireufore and foe 
C uusae n ii v a beoCTes and the 
niiinrij.hiil evaiy coBfUeace in 

e 8i j- ' ■ 

Mn Tbardt^nendea con be 
readin foe lAra^ of the House. 
1 bare made aiy petitfan dw. 
hsr Fklds .OJretpoet. ' 

Bt o M green, lab): Am the 
'Pitae MbdsSer rreaB her own 
words ia the Ba^f ddme on 
ApB aBd:ber oteigfat • 

'MndeaBatioii of, share 
iperalilian? • . - 

Do fosse wbeds .not rb«; 
hoDow lo^, gim foe &ct foot 
we soefocagngim iniwgsrd of . 
fo e csnvreitfam of House by 
foe' Prime Mkoster, nfaoriag 
tfac afioe.iB ber.dediags in 
aailhrlefrd .foarra' for - five 
jiraira?' •. 

>Can -xrelhave. an asswance 
that wiken'foe dfasrkt aodhois 
hare fioefoed arre s tigrt iiig foe 
hobrat p o B ti d ans in Urerpoel 
and Lnobeih-lbey'Wffl open np 
foe bo^' of foe Prime 
MiBfatB? 

Mts TfcarebeK- 1 Jbntt sera- 
p a h ns l y. :obse n ied.:-fot 1oag> 
ODOvaaBen gsren d iig 
foe hoMiBB of ahaics by n»- 
isiiss. These ai« ret ore in a 
niuuotaiiihiai byvtite. Anner 
Scerefory of foe Cabinet wkfrti 
hen been In foe Lttn^- ef foe 
HnsesireclB^. 

..Under four, ewvtrehinv thm 
fe nefoing whidk laqaiica me. on 
aremning officrefo dspene of my 
shares nor re tjmnifor focm tato 
foe asore ef nlridtreldrrelBreitt 
manigerr. " 


Minister urged not to 



DISABLED 


The C^enunent was cooskt- 
ering its response to tbe Dis-. 
abled Persons’ (Services 
Consultstion and R tptuen ia- 
tioa) Bill, desired to ensure tbe 
memaliy ^ and idiyscally dis- 
sbl^ the mentally lU, andfoore 
who cared lot tbniu bad their 
needs pit^ieriy amened, and 
ireuM Ire anaoimdag its conclu- 
sioos sboiUy Mr Baney 
Ibyboe, Minister of State for 
Heohh. said dozing questions in 
the Ccanmons. 

Mr Thomas eSarire (MonUands 
Wret, LabX tbe Bifl's spoi^, 
said: The views tbe minister 
expres^ at second reading 
have finind no support at alL 
Pn^er assessmeaz and crises 
preveniioR acnully save money 
apart fiom being socmily de- 
sirable and, most imponaiit of 
aU, now be knows foe response 
to tbe Goreniinent's dorarment 
and knows that response was 
overwhelmingly in ftvour of 
every clause tn the BiU, would 
be accept that findii^ and refine 
to delete a word of it? 


Mr H^fooe The consuUatioos. 
show the cesouice imi^ications 
of the Bin and tbe resource 
imifocatians of the propoee d 
amendments to the BilLare very 
oonsidenbte. . 

Mr JohnVeinmm (&eter, 0: If 
be is fiicaig jcsourre limiratio^ 
over this wortbwtule B3L woold 
he consider the intraductioa <rf^a 
phased ' piqpnniroe of pro-' 
visions afecangassessmetii and 
representation of disMiled 
people? - 
Mr Bayboc: That point wwt 
put to me dozing the consuha- 
tkm period The Governinent is 
consideiiiig the resp onses that 
were given. 

Mr WOfiam HsariHon (1% 
CbntraL Labk There » inasive 
support for this BflL ‘Why does 
not the Govenunent acc^ the 
democratic dedrion of ibe 
House and release tbe .re- 
sooioes? IT the win is ibeze, tire 
resources will be fbond. 

Mr Hayhoe; h is easy for tbe 
Opposiiion lo suggest additional 
aiiKiidiRiie. Presumably' this 
would be on top of Che £24 
bfllion they are already commit- . 
tedto. 

Mr Andrew Roire (Mid Kent. 


O: Many (Donservaiive MPs 
l^ve sympuliy in not wanting 


to nut into siaiute provisions 
which ■ ca 


cannot be mex out of 
resources: 


CivaB the enormoas sunport 
fiwtbe KIL win be take care not 
lb crinde it and bave 'a wood 
wifo the ntymasier General (Mr 
Kenneth Qaihe) who reems'tb 
believe the ooanaimiiy and 
otbre prq^animes wjtitin the 
health service are more limited 
than they really ere. 


Mr Hayhoe: I would hot si^. 
port anything whicfa'would be 
unduly bureaucratic or acrease 


adminstrative cots imdaly. 


the Ooverpmnit^ intention , to 
-talre whafecfeaam'ootbrtireBifl 
and waierdewn otb^ how cut' 
he possibly justil^ thm decisioh? 
Mr l^hee Tte kiqdBiitbority 
associations- have- made dear 
from (be starKfoCTcai refobBap - 
tiai rtsoince:1nmiiim 
-this aUL/Owfe: a maner of 
:aaa. ihe 

Gpvenitmf^^ • . 

Ami. pi C) hSkra iM Prime 
Mirfour.foDflg.qOBgioa time 
to- consider m lofoDcy into tire 
-case.'bf Etob ^.3chwara wire 
laolhmldUedtqrajneiiisl^iU . 
- cUeitt. tdeased'iam tire borotiitt- 
miy withoUpnH'nsfosiBefltof 
:berneeda.‘‘-:; 


Mr Alfred Msevis, Opporilion- 
^kesmtn for foe disabtod: 
This is a humane BdL Vgta aBy 
all the voluntary, pw ft s sipn al.. 
health and lo^- ahzbority 
oranizatiohs sboidd be . con- 
sulted. .They . have 
■overwhenilingly. baclied foe BiS 
-and opposed tire.^Goverianeaf/ 
neutering aaaead«ePts.Tb^ ' 
are cyni^ UP oonedved and 
sl^-ri^uedarpendmerus, .. . 

In view strong critidsm of 


■■■.. Headded^altbis.rii6wed'tbe 
ireed for the DisaUnl Persons 
BiO lo-be passed IF it had been 
-passed- -in .-1982,; Elizabeib 
Sefrwara night have been aiiie 
now. •• -.T' • 


Mn ThncdreRTrThe Goverifc 
-ment attitude ibwards'foat 

Tsto tnm h. imo a Blit which wifi 
be wmfeaUe and nee Piu too 
■mmiy fairdens mv-Jqw health 
authorities: . r'' - «." ■ 


£143m drive on motorway 
and trunk road repairs 


By Mkliae] fieily, Transpoit Editor 


An increase in motorway 
repairs to counter a deteriora- 
tion in the nation's roads was 
announced by tbe Govern- 
ment yesterday. 

£143 million will be spent 
on motorway and trunk road 
maintenance, a 7 per cent 
increase in real terms on this 


year. Mr Peter Bottomley, 
Minister for Roads and Tru- 
fic at tbe Department of 
Transport, disdosed. 

He also said that this vear's 
target of maimenance for 70 
miles of motorway will be 
reached comfortably, and tiiat 
for 100 miles of trunk roads 


Notice to investors. 


The race of interest on investment shares 
and deposits will be reduced by 1.00% pa, 
exce^ as set out below. 

The rate of interest on the following 
accountswill be reduced as follows: 


Cardcasb 

Balances of £2,000 and over 

byU^%pa. 


Premium Xtra 
b)'0.98%p.a. 


The rate of inieresc on Deposit Cheque 
accounts, subject to the basic rate of tax, will 
remain unchanged. 

Some classes of investor will receive 
separate nonces which will then replace this 
notice. 

The new rates will apply on and after 
1st April 1986. 


HALIFAX 


BUILDING SOOBTY 

TRIM ft PO^iD, M.WCHI484 



exceeded by nearly 50 per 
cent. 

Credit for this goes partly to 
the laite rental scheme which 
rewards contractors for &st 
work, and which is being 
extended in next year’s 
pro^aisnK. 

As 3 result tiie Govenunent 
hopes the backlog in road 
maintenance will be eliminat- 
ed by the mid-1990's. 

Recently both the Auditor- 
General and the National 
Road Maintenance Survey 
bave criticized the state of the 
roads. According to the Audi- 


tor-General the backlcc was 
sudi that bills would be far 


hi^er unless the work was 
done at the proper time. 

Next yar*s programme 
covers 80 miles of motorway 
and 183 miles of tnink road, 
Mr Bonomley said. 

There will be particular 
emphasis on the older motor- 
w^s, which are now crum- 
bling fast under heavier-than- 
expeoed traffic, and the Ml 
will have seven separate repair 
spots, the M6 six, and the MS 
four. 

Spending had been doubled 
in six years, Mr Bottomley 
said, admng that the substan- 
tial increases were enou^ to 
start eliminating the backlcig 
of motorway and trank road 
work. 

The new pFogranuoe was 
welcomed by the British Road 
F^raUon as a move to do 
something about the enor- 
moas ba&og in keeping the 
roads in good repair." 

Trunk Road Ntaintenance 
Pn^rasune: 

Al: Colsterworth-South 

Witbam. April-Juiy, Great f^n- 
um. Augusi-October. Cromwell 
BP, r^l-Augusi; Markham 
Moor-Tuxford Br.. August- 
October. Morpeth BP. stage 2, 
Junc/July-October/NovemoCT. 
A2: A227 Tollgate to Marling 
XC4. May-November, Lydden 
to Cokdr^ .April-July: Black 
Prince, MayJune. 







Motonray repaiia in 1986-7 (wifo orap refareoees'ln boMk 


Ml: 1. May-December, Z, April- 
October J. SeptraibCF-Dectm- 
bet; 4, Marcb-S^nember, 5. 
May-Junc; 6, ^ptember-Orto- 
ber 7. Augiat-October. 

M2: 8, September-Oecember. 
M3:-9, May^JuIy. 

M4: 10, May-August; 11. April- 
July. 

M5: 12. June-Septemberr 13, 
April-Augusn 14, April-Juae; 
25, SeptembenOctober. 

M6: 36, May-Junr, 174uiy- 
SeptMnber, 18, >^>ri]-M^, 19. 


September-October; 20, April- 
Octoben 2 ], JuJy-Septeinber. 
M18; 22, AuguA-Oetober; 23, 
Jime-Novembtf, 


Saleroom 


Tribute to; St^ey 
totohes 


By GcnldiBe Nonnas, Sole 


The - diaiBond-eocrusted 
gold box presented by C^ueen 
'Victoria to Henry Morton 
Stanley, tiie.joiinialisi-exp^-' 
er. aft^ he tound Dr Living-’ 
stone OD tbe shores of Lake 
Tanganyiks in 1871. wa$ sitid 
for £102.(XX) (estimaie £20,000 
to £30,000) at 'Cfarirae's 
yesia^. . . 

The box is an' eleg^ piece 
of gold and enamd work, the 
lid centred Jay the crowned 
royal initialsindiainonds. It is 
engraved with tui inscriptioa 
commending -Stanl^s "pni* 
denpe and zeal". 

It was bougbt 'by Malcolm 
Forbes, ib^ proprietor - of 
Forbes Magaisine^ an eclectic 
collector who ownr inore 
Fabogft.Easter eggs than tbe 
Kremlin. 

The grot 4 >. of Stanley med- 
als and memorabUia sent for 
sale by Rictiaid M. St^ey, 


his giandifoB,' garfe £188,7^' 
wifo aU 26 finrfing a bu^: 

• A -pprfrmt . .mnuature of 
(^ueen - Victoria, .fiaroed zn 
diamonds; wfoiefa she presentr 
ed-to Stahl^ in 1890, was sold 
to Armitage, tire London deat 
’er. at £25,920. . 


.moniing *. 

total -'of £3194^ a teccHd-.fpr^. 
a .medaB :aucti<^ . with less' 
than 1 pet centimsold. 


The G^anlry.s Medal pto^. 
seate(l foe Queen in 1974 fo 
the jpofiemnan who rescued 
Princes Aiure from ail axifoiish 
in the. Mail, secured £2,376 
(estimate £1300 to -0,400)/ 

.It iiad be^ sold -by DM 
Constable Peter Edmunds 
some years. a^ .vdien Jw.was- 
short ofmoney. It was 
back yesterday by his brofoef- 
mJaw, of 

Bidefbrd, Devos. 


M20: 24, May-November. 
M25: 25. May^Noverober. 
M27: 26. Apnl-June. 

M4(k 27, ?. 

MSO: 28, AprU-AuguSL 
M56: 29, Aj^VJuly. 


M62: 30, Maj^ugiist; 31, Jun^ 
Sep^t^, 3 a August-Ociober. 


A1(M): 33. MayJuly. 


A5: Whiiegate FM-ivetsey 
Bank. May-August; Iveisey 
Bazik W of Staftbrd Lodge, 
August-November. 

A6: ArapthiU Road, Jufy- 
November/December. 

AlO: Hodd BP, Marcn-July. 
A12; Wktibrd, Onober 86-May 
87. 

.A19: Trasside XXv Stage 4, 
June/July-October/Novembei; 
A1018-A690. Juoe/July- 
October/Noveniber. 

A30: Csmborne-Scorria BP, Ffo 
86-Mar 87. 

A38: N of A61Q. ApriJ-August; C 
B'daiy Clay Mills. May-Augu^ 
A41: Apex Comer, Feb/Mar S5- 


A43: Peartree R’bout 

Kidlington R’boui, July- 
Ocufoer. 

A45; A1120, July-?, Creefoig, 
July-?. 

Ad3: 


Mar 87; Chrten Bvd Hooton 
R’bout, June-August. 


Eiloughton, July- 
December. 

A64: Mahon BP, Sep^ber- 
November. 

A74: Todhills-Mossband, 
March-Mi^.. 

A160: Humber Road. JuJy- 
Octobe-. 

A361: . Stuckeridge Bridge, 
September 86-March 87. . 
A405: Long Lane, August- 
October. 

A43& Aston X-MS. Aprii- 
Octo^. 

A449: MS0<A49 B Wflton BP, 
Juiy-October. 


raGfllm 

mmkinmt 


A BBC. fihn ' 1 ^^ otters 
gave a .miiiiadmg impression - 
and uo&ir tria mink taiuL 

.tire Broa^^jtig Cdritplania 
-ComniisaOTjibimd-yeaetday. 

The-Tlsree Countiifo Mink 
Hunt hod comttiaured about 
Op^itm. (kier, - IxoaSsaSt 
la^'ApriL Mr.fem.O^tSl, foe 
Joint mas^ -said viiie fibi 
aa>^ tire-impreasira thiri.foe 
nuntpomaoontihuuig focM 
lb otters, in feet, mink hiuUs 
ttKflc'care foavbodott^^ - 


■ The daimed that foe 
pinjgramBie lepbiied foefo^. 
the ^bfemstof 
im into the wild Jt did, not 
accept that die 
imphed.foe ifont .bad killed or 
v^ .prqiared to risk kiffing' 
'PfoSS*'/. 

The conunissioiL. said 
tire.proffsmme was. uafiir in. 

foe -inipressibii thatit ; 
.n^ been, or was like W to-be, 
responsible for IdDing or 
hanifoig otteris. ^ ^ ^ ^ 


Poinc^’s is 


A piizzle that has chided 
some of foe nearest mathe- 
nfoiical aunds-of.tbepast^ 
years has been solved. . 

The problem fell to ■ the 
combing, imdlecfo of Dr 
Colin Rourke, atihe Mathe- 
matics Institute of Wartridc 
University, C^ven^, and Dr 
Ruy Luis Gofoe^ of Oporto 
Uuveia^ in Portugal. 

They have solved a toitu- 
mis.puzzle, in a branch rd 
thieediiMnaoDal .'geometiy 
classed as tofrelc^, known as 
Poincare's 'Coqiecttira, after 
foe -Frenchman .i^b was 
re|Brded' at -the be^nninjg of 
tins, century as die wood’s 
greatest niafoemaiiciait- 


Topolpgy; . IS - cooceriied 
.with the pci^etrical factors 
of an~ object, vrindr' ti ^ain 
unebiui^ when H tiadrigoes 
a coDtinuow dtfmmatioa, of 
change. oraUqre;.^' henriia^ 
streufoingor twisting wjlboud 

*^1^04^fo^re'pnoposed 
that' 'tiiree-dimeoaoioal^ 
jects sharedimine of the.same 
Topctiogictf c ha nk ^fe ife as 
two^Iimeasimiai ooe$.-Pibbf 
of the propc^tUm^Jfoa'sbffle 


standing of three-., 
-dunensonal fopok^ 

\ imponahi tr Sm tfo of/ 
topology .'in' tifo;Iast. centiuj;: 
'was tbe';c6nyilere-.d^Sbah 
ti(m trf rii6tef4ike 'sbrihora' 
valid. 'doif^ur sh9es.^' v^ 
possible, surfoces coo]d''b& 

- •. v.r-:-.' 


. ■;Fbafoaife.sQ^MtM tifotit' 
: fo^Qld'i^ipassd:te evresd; 




. Commenting bn tf^ wfork 
.in ATaiira; Dr/.lui Stew^' 
.alsO.of.Warmbk.'.^iiiivari:^' 
says ft iepieseiiia. a -fifoda*' 
iitartal adrance'm .foninidefw- 


wnh.^..-tire .-'fwOrdhiioatim 

Sburee: 

-‘.-y 


I 

0 


i 


0 

Lr- 


I 




irii 


i in 






Jt 

?■ *:?? 


'L ■ 1 V 


. I 


' I 


A X 


I- 




<0 


A 




•> . 2 














■* *51. 

S; 




- ^ \ 

-•> It ' 

r>^,‘ 

<»sC- 






jf 





THE TIMES WEDNESDAY MARCH 26 1986 


OVERSEAS NEWS 


Law on Reagan’s side # Unease in the region • How crisis escalated 



I^gal experts back 




hif «; 'Vsrv 

n.(m 

• % 


to the Gulf of Sirte 

By Nicholas' AsbfiMrd» Diplomatic CocrespoDdeiU . 


U 




aktnl 





9 « ► 



■ Wi^iMton*s claim that tiie 
US Sixdi -.Fleet, incairyiiwoiit 
exercises in the Gulf 

was within iatemaiional wa- 
is -weU supported by 
interoatioiial-law, according to 
experts. There is no l^al batis 
for Libya's insisiehoe that, the ^ 
adtole of the gutf fbrxDs pahof 
U^'s territorial waters. . 

■ Only onc-cptiiitry, Biutitia 
EssOr accepts the rfami to 
ownership of the. gulC whicfa 
Lit^anu^in 1973. I^even 
the Soviet' Union or radical 
Arab states support Libya's- 
rintrn , • 

According to Dr Patricia 
Binuei,'lectnTcr in mtenration- ' 
al. law at the London School of 
Etbtidinics, ibedefinition oTa ' 
bay is ba^ botb oa custom 
and on two .international trea- 
ties — the 1958 Gerieva oon- 
vMtion on territorial waters 
and the 1983 Law of the Sea 
treaty. ' . 

The is party to the 
•but Ubn is a^ 
signatory to the Law oTfhe Sea ' 
tiea^ (^diich also contain* the 
tenitoriai water provisions of 
the I9S8 convention), but not 
the US: However, Watiibigton 


accosts the tieatj^s jmvidons 
dealing with territorial waters 
and contiguous zones. 

UrKtethe'1958 conventioni. 
a nation can niaim as hs 
territorial waters miy bays uiat 
are l«s. than 24 teaks wide 
between tbe low^water marks 
at the namral entrance points. 
The Gulf of Sirte -is 275 miles 
wide and cannot therefore be 
accepted ais being part of 
Libya's territorial waters. 

However, this ruling does 
not api^y to what are referred 
to as historic bays — areas of 
water which.iuve been gener- 
ally abcqpted over the years as 


t^. -Cbesapeate Bay, on tbe 
US east coasL 'is consider^ an 
historic bay. ' . . 

Libya caxmot makea l^al 
case for the Golf of Sirte befog 
an historic bay, as its to 
those waters was made only 12 
'and has been dial- 


aQ Doajor niarttime 


years 
k 

nations. 

The US would have bees in 
breadi offoteniatioaal law if 
its ships li^- been within 
Lite's 12'imk terriunia] wa- 
ter lunit (even though, the US, 


like Brilhin, acoepu only a 
three-inile . territorial water 
limit). .. 

Aithou^ warships are per- 
-fflitted the right of "innocent 
passage" tbroogh a nation's 
lenitonal waters, they are not 
allowed to carry out exercises 
or manoeuvres. The US re- 
cently, ujfodd . hs right to 
innocem passage in the Black 
Sea by *en<fing warships to 
within ax miles of tbe Soviet 
Union's coastline. 

Britain yesterday backed 
America's rig^ to carry out 
manoeuvres in tbe Gulf of 
Sirte. "We don't accept 
Libya's claim that all. the 
waters enclosed by the Gulf of 
Sirte are li^'s territorial 
waters," a Fotesgn Office 
spokesman said. "We do ac- 
cept US’s right to exerdse 
in infemational watersand we 
do accept the US's right to 
setfde&ace:" 

Britain and its European 
partners lastyeu proiestM to 
lil^ about its territorial 
daims to the golf 

Mfaiadgiri rep r isal , page 12 
LeaSfoig article, 13 


Neighbour]^ Arabs view 
Gadaffi with suspicion 


As Cdonel Gadaffi con- 
fitmts the US Sixtii Fleet off : 
his shores, be ffnds himself 
surrounded by Arab neigb- 
boiml no 1^ su^dous of 
tiian piesideot Reagan. 

:T6 the' oast the . colonel 
fices Egypt whose govern-, 
meat accuses him of sponsor- 
ing ' subversion. Although 
tenskm has subsided in r ece n t 
weeks, the two countries have 
been on the brink of var on 
several occasions, a situation 
wluclt given the antagonism 
existing be t wee n the Libyan 
and Egyptian leaders, could 
recur at anytime. 

To the south in Cfaa^ some 
5.000 Libyui troops are sup- 
porting vdiels the former 
pFcsidem, - Mr Goiikoirai. 
Ouedd^ agjafosi the Bench- 
backed adnimistiStSki of 
Prmadent Hiastee last . 

month French m^lary air- 
craft attadced libyan-Tcbd 
pwitionsat Ouadi Doun after 
they had breatM the I9M 

Oilfuiid$ 

ambitious 

projects 

Tripoli (Reuter) - Key ficts 
about Lib^ 

Po^atiw 3.22 million 
(i982X State retigum: Srnmi 
Iftam. - 

Area: 685,524 ^ miles., 
bounded by Mediterraneam 
Egypt, Snd^ Algeria, Tuni- 
sia, Chad and Niger.- 
Caprtah TripoU, populatioQ 
980,00a 

Ecoaomy: Tbe discovery of oil 
in the 19SQs made lit^ one 
of the world's top 1 0 exporters 
a later. Concesaons. 

were graned to US,_ British, 
French and other foreiga ccan* 
panics fo 1955. In. the 1970s 
Colonel Gadaffi set out to use 
oil wealth to revolutionize tbe 
economy and by 1983- had 
nationalized 70 per cent of the 
oilindustry. 

His most ambhioos jmyect 
tiie $11 billion "great 
man-made river" zo pump 
water from underground Sa- 
haran reservoirs to the north. 
Seccfit histoiT: Libya gained 
indepradeiice in .1951, 
decade of British and French 
administratioiu as a . foderal 
inonardiy.. of three . r^ions 
under K^g Muhammad Idris. 

Id. 1953 it joined tbe .Arab 
Leag^ und sigt^ a 2(^yev 
treaty wiffi Britan, granting it 
military . bases in- renini for 
Soancial help. It signed a 
similar treaty with 

OnS^embv 1, 1969, ttl- 
onel C^dafii. 27, kd a 
military coiQ) xriiidi deposed 
1(^5. 


By Onr Fordffi Staff 

agreement whicb led to the 
withdrawal of French and 
Libyan forced from Chad. 

Oolond Gadaffi’s relations 
witii. Tunisia to the west 
temam deeply 'strained after 
1^ sumrrw^s expulsion by 
Libya of thoosaxids of Tuni- 
sian workers. His "treaty of 
union" with Morocco, vriiich 
was signed in 1984 to the 
cooslemation of Paris and 
Washfogon, shows little sign 
of life. The first meding of a 
joint parfiamemary assembly, 
scheduled for last July in 
RabaL was abruptly cancdled 
by Hassan after Libya 
azmoun^ a vesn with Iran.' 

Colond Gadaffi has been 
moiesoQBes^ fo coitivattpe 
Algeria arid Sudan, both or 
whkh had been at od^ with 
fora. Ob the ^ 'thai SbC; 
cdoiid'^ forces fust daftied 
vdih the Aittdiauis,''Algciia' 
and Libya armounced pi^ to 
increase bade tenfold this 
year. 



A boat ib Bei^iati nmilar to tbe ok sunk by tbe US. 

Backbone of the fleet 


Washing^ (Reuter) ^ At 
least the nrft of the Libyan 
Navy . vdsels reported de- 
5in>)^ ^ US planes was 
believed to be a small but 
speedy Fierrcb-built missQe- 
cairier that helped form tbe 
backbone of the Libyan fleet, 
according to available inflitaty. 
data. 

Id announcing details of the 
first dash, the US Defence 
Secretary, Mr Caspar Wein- 
berg, had identified the tar- 
get craft- as a Combattante 
fest attack boat Accord- 
fog to Janei Fighxing Ships, 
fSy a had at -least 10 


Combattante 12 C fast anack 
boats produced in the late 
1970s and early 1980$ by the 
CMN Cherbourg shipyard fo 
Fiance. 

It described the vessels as 
31 1 tons fiiUy loaded, about 
161ft long, capable of maki^ 
up to 39 foiotsand armed with 
four Otomat surfece-io-sur- 
lace missiles, one 76mm gun 
and two 40ram gnns. ' 

Military expert say that sea 
battles fou^t in the 1982 
Falkknds war between Brham 
and Aigentina showed that 
large wrnhips can be sunk by 
mssiles fir^ from tiny boats. 


Algeria and Libya also ap- 
p^ to have set aside bord^. 
di^nues, which prompted Ai- 
giena to Mock Libya from 
jofoi^ a 1983 "North African 
treaty of friendship and 
accord", which also includes 
Tunisia Mauritania 

years of hostility to 
Libya during the rule of 
former Presufent Nimeiry, Su- 
restored relations whh 
Libya and .signed a military 
protocol mthin weeks of the 
April 1985 coup that toppled 
the Nimeiry r^jme. In renirn, 
Libya cut ra aid to tbe Sudan 
Peoples' Uberaiion Army, 
whicb is waging a guerrilla war 
in the south. , . . . ... 

But Liibry&'s'.relflti 
with Sudan carries the risk of 
costly military irtvolvonent fo 
an unstable, .country;, taring 
tbe resources of a - nation 
whose political rhetoric out- 
weighs its military and diplo- 
rrialic resources. 


Why fleet 
crossed 
the ‘hne 
of death’ 

From Christopher Thomas 
Washingtoa 

US naval ships or war- 
foaaes have crossed Colmiel 
Gadaffi^ *iiBO of dentil" seven 
tines sinoe 1981 to demon- 
strate that all the of Sbrte, 

ocotide tibya's 12-adle terri- 
torial Ifout, is in international 
waters. 

Libya first annoanced fo 
19^ that it coosidend ^ the 
gntr to be put of hs terri t m ia l 
waters. Cotonel GsiaSffa 
**1010 of death", extendhis 
rooghly from the city m 
M isBrata on file western shore 
of tbe golf to Ben^aa on the 
east, was dedaiedfo Decem- 
bu 1985, It takes in aD 
150,008 sqoare ntiles of the 
0ilL 

The US has rejected LSiya^ 
efaum frM the eatset, al- 
tiufogh it has only htta miB- 
tarily challenged since 
' President Re^an took office 
in Jannuy 1981. ColoDti 
hag maintained his 
"fine of death" from 1973, 
even though be adopted the 
name only three numtiis ago. 

'in Jamaxy of this yeu the 
tffi Sixth FlA held exercises 
neu die gulf. Colo^ (^dafll 
boarded an armed Libyan 
patral boat and sailed into tbe 
golf to stage what he called a 
"confrontation". Bat there 

wgwa MO niilhay y »vi«han g>ig. 

However, tlure hare been 
dashes periodically since 
1982. The dispute esealsted 
sharply in Angnst 1981 when 
two US Navy P]4 
shfo down two libyan ^122 
^biters over the gnlf; 60 miles 
off the Libyan co^ after 
beiiy fired on by one of the 
tibs^ ptanes. 

The Rei^aB Administralion 
has adopted a gh^ apjwoadi 
to its- policy of keeping foter- 
netional waters open to free 
JHBsage. 

Recendy two American war- 
ships went into tiw Black Sea 
and approached to witiun six 
miles ii die Soviet coast to 
demonstrate the r^it ti "in- 
noccat passage" mder foter- 
MtiAnai law, even fo waters 
inside tbe 12-auIe limiL 

Britons on 
nlertte 
"backlash 

ByGarinBeU 

The US-Libyan confronta- 
tion has had no immediate 
efito on an estimaied S.0CX1 
British sutg^ living in Lib- 
ya, but ^tish fojsinessmen 
ar« watd^ do^ for any 
adverse reptecussions on their 
interests there and elsevfoere 
in the Arab world. 

Mr Dunnachie, the 
Consul in Tripoli, advised 
London yesterday that he bad 
nothing unusual to report, a 
Formgn Office ^kesman 
said. No new advice had been 
issued to expatriates, and 
standing evacuation proce- 
dures were not under actire 
consideration, he ulded. 

British Caledonian, tbe only 
Britirii airline that flies to 
Lib^ srid its services had not 
b«o a^cted and one of its 
thrice-weekly ftigba left Trip- 
oli on sdiedule yesterday. 

About half of the 10,000- 
strong British communicy fo 
Lil^ left tbe country after 
Britain broke dtplomatfo rela- 
tions in April 1984 when a 
policewoman was iolied fry a 
gunman in the Libyan 
People's Bureau fo London. 

Since then diplomatic rep- 
resentatioD has been limits 
to an "interests section" at the 
Italian Embassy fo tiie libyao 
capitaL 

The last reliable statistics, 
publisbed in 1983, showed 
foal about 100 Britifo comjm- 
rues- were then operating fo 
Libya, princtpally in rivil 
engineering, construction, 
computer, telecommunica- 
tions, petroleum and 
chemicals. 

Industry sources srid some 
of them fa^ since palled out, 
but accurate figures wea not 
available. 


Foreign contractors will be hit first 


Energy Cc 

Since 1980 libyn^oaeani- 
have 'dzopped by 40 pte 
cent a fraiher drop is 
expWted this year nooe tbe 
eiiects et falSng world 
prices start to be reflected n 
the rereqne c b eqaes fironi foe 
oQ companies doe to arrive 
shortly at the. . Libyan 
Tnasary. 

With- a popidati^ ^ ^ 
mOiiQa and an 
S29B8 WBaii 

~ aliBOsi of d fioB oft ^ the 

Ubcan GovaBWOt 
aciap Rs eanti^^ . for 

military pnticcfs and fo S9|' 
hs propifoMe «f social 

•jotiiifm,.’ • • 

catfo focome wfli firtf 


expendgare 


The main victiiiis vrQl be the 
Itaflaa constnetioa congloai- 
wiuefa have won n mst of 
foe coDStroction . contracts 
placed by Libya in the past 
fire yeacs, ■ ^ . • 

- The Britisb oontribntioa to 
such schemes, and to dm 
ranning 'Of die countryn w 
aetwofk, has been the supply 
of ooBSoUancy services. As 
most of these contract s ye 
by tnam COBttUXOKS 
they win inevitably saffer- 
Becaimeofilsheavydepeit' 
dence on ofifocome, Libya has 

nlsEyed a banHiiie rale withfo 

foe Oigaaiziitioa of PeiroieiiB 

E xp or ti i^ Comitri es (O pee) 
pod has b^ fostranentnl 
sfoee 1973 ia preddin Opec 
bito expfoittog the ni ia BCi al 
and ps&feal .pfo)foi>^ of Che 


However, becanse Lfoyt^ 
its^ wifoiB Opecmdi 
foe Inman regfote and its 


MnsQm fandamentalist poli- 
cies, the other Arab producers 
— notably Knwait, Sandi Ara- 
bia and the United Arab 
Fmirateg — bave distanced 
themselves recmidy from lib- 
yw dnrziK f^ec deKbentimis. 

libyais one of thrro.co^ 
tries, aloae vrith Iran, .wiiid 
hare caBM .fbr ririct output 
centHds by Opec to s^ world 
oH prices soaring again. For, 
mtiiitP Saqdi Arabia and the 
other Anfo Golf coontries, 
Libya does not have snbstan- 
fial carrency reserves 

to see it a period 

•ftf low prices, 

Hevrevn, in its favour Libya 
dees bareanhstantial reserves* 
die potential to open np new oQ 
fitids, pardciilariy sit its 

coast, as vril as the ahffity to 

send its oataral gas .into the 
Earopeen network by pipeline 
to soathern Itiriy, 
is the enide <dl. 


already bri^ jpodoced by 
Libya is of high quality and is 
used in the European refiner- 
ies to blend vrifo otiicr, cheap- 
er erodes to prodnee the 
prodnets diet are fo demand fo 
the European maiket place. 

The qnality of Hs oil is 
reflected in prodneti on statis- 
tics,.nhich show that while its 
ont^has laflea frxan 2.1 per 
cent Id’ world output in 1980 to 
inito 19 per ceat at present, 
its share i^ overell Opec 
output has risen from SJ. per 
cent fo 1%1 to over 6 per 
new. 

Libya is sitting on estimated 
oO reserves of 2U billion 
barrels compared to 34.5 bil- 
Dwi in the united S^es, but 
at current ontpot rates Libya's 
1 ^ should not m out for 
another 52 years, while 
Amtoka's tiioBld na dry fo S- 
9years. 







Jet filters preparing to Cake off yesterday from the afroraft carrier USS Sarat 
the Golf of Sirte, as demonstrators la Tripoli rent their asd-American feel 


north of 






The road to confrontation 


Washington (Reuter) — 
Cbronology of important foci- 
dents in the steady deteriora- 
tion of US-Libyan relations: 
December 2, 1979: A mob 
chanting support for 
Ayatollah Khomeini of Iran 
sets fire to US Embassy fo 
Tripoli. 

February &, 198D: US Embas- 
sy vinually closed down after 
attacks on two French mis- 
sions in Libya. 

Aprfl-May 1980: Washington 
expeb Ul^an diplomats amid 
daims that Tripoli was intimi- 
dating Libyan students fo US 
and was responsible for mur- 
der of Libyans fo Europe. 

May 6, 1991; US doses down 
Ub^ emi»s^ fo Washing- 
ton, accusing staff* of conduct 
contrary to foternationany ac- 


cepted standards of diplomat- 
ic b^viour. 

Angnst 19. 1981; Two US P14 
planes shoot down two Libyan 
SU22s over Gulf ofSine. 
November 1981: Reports sur- 
face that Lib>a has sent "bit 
squads" to US to assassinate 
President Reagan and Vice- 
President George Bush. 
Dmmber IL IWI: Washing- 
ton restricts use of American 
passports for travel to Libya. 
March 10. 1982: US bans 
imports of Libyan crude oil. 
Febraary 1983: Washington 
sends four Awacs radar pl^es 
to ^ypt amid reports ol 
Libyan miliiaiy build-up near 
its border with Sudan. US says 
FI •^eis chased off two Libyan 
MiC23s that approached the 
carrier Nimitz near the guIC 


March 1984: US bans exports 
to Ubya's Ras Lanuf petro- 
chemic^ complex. 

June A, 1985: Washington 
expels Libyan UN diplomat, 
claiming that he was involved 
in plot against Libyan dissi- 
dents fo US. 

December 17. 1986: Nineteen 
people killed in Arab guerrilla 
attacks at Vienna and Rome 
airports. President Reagan ac- 
cuses Libya of complicity. 

January 7, 1986: Mr Rea^n 
severs all economic ties with 
Libya and orders 1 .(XX) Ameri- 
cans there to return home. 

Jannary 8, 1986: Washington 
freezes Lib^ Government 
assets in US banks and their 
subsidiaries abroad. 


Unequal 
balance 
of rival 
forces 

From Mohsin AC 
Washington 

The balance of military 
forces between Libya and the 
United Suites is estimated by 
Western experts as follows: 

Ul^ Total armed forces 

73.000 regulars, 40,000 re- 
serves. Total defence budget 
(1982) S709 miUion (£472.6 
million). Submarines 6. Large 
combat missiles 1. Minor 
surface combatants 46. Com- 
bat aircraft S3S. 

United States: Total armed 
forces 2,(52.000 regulars and 

1.212.000 active reserves. To- 
ld d^nce buefoet $258.2 
billion (1984). Submarines 
138. Lai^ combat missiles 
200. Minor surface combat- 
ants 89. Combat aircraft 
S,600. 

Estimated US forces near 
the Gulf of Sine: Aircraft 
carriers 3 — the 59,460-ton 
USS Saratoga, with about 70 
aircraft; foe 52,500-ton USS 
Ccual Sea, with about 75 
aircraft; foe 60,300-ton USS 
America, with about 85 air- 
ci^ Esrart warships 27. Flag- 
ship 1. Servicemen 18,(XX). 

An A6 Intruder navy light 
bomber attacked the Libyan 
missile installation at Sirte 
with Harm missiles on Mon- 
day. An A7 Corsair 11 navy 
attack aircraft fired on foe 
Libyan control boat with Har- 
poon misiles. 

Harpoon is a lift air-to- 
surface anti-ship missile. 
Harm is a I3ft air-4o-surfeoe 
missile. 

The Libyan missile site 
attacked was equipped with 
Soviet SAS long-range air 
defence missiles, S4ft long and 
guided by radar. 

The Pent^n said that 
since 1970 Li^ has received 
more than $10 billion in- 
Soviet military equipmenL 
About 2,000 Soviet miJitaiy 
advisers are fo Libya as well as 
about 1,200 East European 
advisers and technicians. 

The Soviet advisory mis- 
sion assists with the assembly 
and maintenance of advanced 
Soviet equipment such as 
MiG2S Foxbat fighters and 
I^G24 Hind helicopters. 

The Libyans were reported 
to have be^ building two SAS 
sites, enablfog them to attack 
aircraft operating close to or 
over foe Gulf of Sine. 

In return for supplying LjV 
ya with arms, the Soviet 
Union has received additional 
access to Libyan pons and 
airfields, thus enhancing Sovi- 
et military capabilities fo tbe 
region. 


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.\t last some help for the hard pressed Imperial shareJiolder. 

MindfiiJ that share prices can var\ daily, we are publishing a bulletin 
showing the \akie of each of the offers for >ourcompany. 

In order to be perfectly fair, the values we've quoted are based on the 
best possible ofTers. 


RVNSON BID WORTH: 



UNITED BISCUITS BID WORTH: 




HANSON BID BETTER BY: 



FUnin*slNiMsii>ii ihr iniirki’l |inivs,il Tut-iliK. 


HANSON TRUST 


C () N T I N I IN (i <: R O U T II F R () M R \ S I C B I S I N K S S K S. 

TliP talimnTHARMHilYtM'-tndl mtpdBiM-mlt'nfrcr-dnii-ncI oiilhfir rr-pr<li%«*-lui-^pni'<*.Tiii' jbint'iifTiTUliiCN jrpf«irMdn^mTnLil\StMn-,iii(ti in>\i'nilili’-lu<-kKKiUi'rt 
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llinwHi JMtlH*MHiu-ri>lil,-|irrlrrnil iluin'-ciri iiiii'tlHi-a mi-. 




.. 







OVERSEAS NEWS 


THE TIMES WEDNESDAY MARCH 26 1986 


Arch-foes share platform in Matabeleland peace drive 

Fnnn Jan Raath hatchet-buiying, Mr Nkomo split in Zapu in 1963, then the appeals, even if somewhat less sidents, whoever they may '^pu is no more, Zuu is w 

Harare ^ Mr Enos Nkala, the only black nationalist enthusasUcaliy to Mr Nkala. be^. The Army was rep^^y more. Hie people of Zamlfr 

’ ^ -• • of|uu^uon oprang white He was bedded and shown the ^ * n«*tmESwouwpnm 

minority nile. was also outawken bitterness of the 


From Jan Raath 
Harare 

Leaders of both the ruling 
Zanu fPF) party and Mr 
Joshua Nkomo's oppositiou 
Zapu party are- planning a 
series of unprecedented rallies 


hatchet-^uiying, Mr Nkomo 
and Mr Enos Nkala, the 
Minister of Home AfiTairs and 
Zapu's bitterest enemy, shared 
a platform for the iiTst time in 
23 years to urge a thousand 
Ndebele peasants to co-oper* 


in the western provinces of ate with the security forces in 
Matabeleland in an attempt to dieir fight against pro-Zapu 


bring peace to the troubled 
region. 

The first of the meetings 
was held on Sunday in a run- 
down trading centre near 
Kezi. 75 miles south of Bula- 
wayo and one of the areas 
most infiltrated by guerrillas. 


guerrillas. 

The two men reaffirmed 
their sup^rt for n^tiations 
— which oe^ in &ptember 
last year — to noite the two 
parties. Mr Nkala, the only 
Ndebele-speaking member <» 
the Polithiro of the ruling 


In a remarkable gesture of party, helped to engmeer a 


minonty rule. He was also 
instrumental in fbnniu the 
predecessor of Zanu (Pf). 

His repeated promises to 
**smash ^pu** and campaigns 
for the harassment of the party 
are believed to be a result of 
his resentment of Mr 
Nkomo's unofficial leadership 
of Zimbabwe's 1.8 million 
Ndebele people. 

The peasants from the solid- 
ly pn>2^u area of Kezi — Mr 
Ntomo's birthplace — reacted 
warmly to the two leaders' 


outspoken bitterness of the 
people who for nearly five 
years have now borne the 
brunt of the Ixutality of both 
the secuii^ forces and the 
guerrillas. 

Mr Nkala was Uuntly told 
that foe Army was solely 
respoos^e for foe violence, 
and foe peasants voiced their 
doubts about foe actual ous- 
tence of foe guerrillas. 

Th^ recoved the thinly 
exKforaement <^Mr 
Nkomo, referred to “dis- 


sidents, whoever they may 
be“. The Army was repea^y 
criticized for its “psuedo- 


tneetings would provide a shot 


criticized for its “psuedo- bwearcone. 

operations'* in which soldiers Mr Nathan Si^uya^ of Sunday's 

AACA j u i ^ I itfap tn . Minister of fnfotmatio&f . The location , _ . 


ailegedfy pose as goemHas to. foe Minister of mrormaoo^ 

eliat information on their subso^ucnily denied that the j*. jni ffS t. 

movements from local people, meeting wm related to foe hm« naifav in 

However, an incideni at foe umty talks. These are reported 
very end ap pe ar ed to sum np to have been sttainedin reoent 1^6 were , foe nerntfa- 
ihe mood of foe meeting. An months, with fections in both bv 


Rocket 

attacks 

shake 

Tokyo 


tions to end a ^beUigi ^ 
Nddxle anmes that ten iw 
white settlers dead , . . 


foe mood of foe meeting. An months, with fections m ooin 
clderiy man in tradffionaTskin parties opposing a merw. ^ SJffiJJ Si;** tfaai 
garb, who had earlier danced Mr John Nkomo, apa s 
for foe crowd, seized foe iaformatwn secret, ho«w- wfutese^twa 
microphone to declare: er, agreed with Mr ^AJsoneart^to 
“Down with Mugabe, down Shamuyama that foe mectiiig 
whh nkomo.” could be a "contributory where, possiW^' 

But he went on as govern- fectoi' m improving foe ch- 
ment officials visiWy relaxed; mate of the n««otiatioiis. tion to foeir ancesu 


FnmiDavM Watte 
l6kso 

Salvoes of rodcei-propdled 
iacendiary bombs-were fired 


Also nearby is foe shrine of 21 foe Imperil Palace and foe 
Nielele, a granite outert^ US ^bassy here wstciday. 
wWpossiWforccntu^ wa_prot^ 

peosile have twcred propitia- a gaiiwt plans to ceiairatc foe 
tioD to th^ ancestral ^nnis. ^tieth year of Empwor 


Police swamp black 
township after 
two constables die 


Furore at 
Spielberg 
Oscar cold 
shoulder 


Hea \7 police reinforce- 
ments were rushed to the 
black South African township 
of Crossroads yesterday aflCT 
two constables — one of them 
white — were shot and killed 

The body of the white 
policeman, who had been 
suspended from duly for sus- 
pected drug dealing, was 
round eariv yesterday on a 
road near Crossroad^ a squat- 
ter camp outside Cape Town. 
He had been shot and stripped 
and his body burned. 

According to some reports 
Constable R. Spannenberg 
had been “necklaced” — 
burned to death with a petrol- 
fiJIed tyre round his neck, foe 
form of township execution 
firquemly used on suspected 
informers and 

"coHaboraiors”. 

Police headquaners in Pre- 
toria said they suspected that 
ho was inside Crossroads 
when he was attacked. 

The second policeman, a 
black constable, was shot a few 
hours later by a sniper near the 
murder spot as be jumped 
from a Cassptr armoured per- 
sonnel carrier in what ap- 


From Ray Kennedy, Johannesboig 

reinforce- peared to be a cleverly- 
i to the prepared ambush. 1 

township As senior CID men gathered 1 

rday after where Constable 1 

e of them Spannenberg's body was j 
id killed, found, foe Casspir crew i 
ie white moved off to where two trucks ' 
lad been were blasting. Shots believed 1 
y for sus- to have been fired from a ^ 
ing. was Soviet AK47 semi-automatic s 
[ay on a rifle rang out as the police / 
u a squat- jumped from the vehicle and 1 
pe Town, the black constable was killed i 
1 stripped instantly by a bullet in the i 
head. 

e reports The police yelled “pa^p" . 
nnenberg (look out) as they hurriedly ' 
iced” - took cover and began firing “ 
a petrol- back. &me climbra on foe | 
neck, foe roofs of shanties as other ^ 
:xeculion Casspirs drove into the squal- ^ 
iuspected id township. Reporters or- ^ 
and dered out of the area heard ‘ 
more firing as they left ^ 

s in Pre- The two deaths brought the d 
cted that number of policemen killed in tl 
ossroads political violence this year to r 
1. 14, three of them whites. Two C 

eman, a white policemen were killed h 
hot a few by a mob at the Westonaria h 


From Ivor Davis 
HoQywood 

The S 8 di amma] Oscar 


Police also reported yester- 
day that they had shot and 
killed a suspected African 
National Congress guerrilla in 
Katlebong township near Ger- 
miston. east of Johannesburg. 
They said the man came at | 
them with a hand-grenade 1 
when they nuded a house after 
a tip-off from other blacks. I 
AK47 rifles, ammuflioon and 1 


show will go down hi Ho^ 
wood histev as nmeh for me 


parts for limpet mines were 
found in the house, police 
said 

There were also dashes in 
foe Vaal Triangle townships 
south-east of Johannesburg as 


wood histey as nmeh for me 
failure of Stevea Spielberg's 
The Cohar Parpie, which wu 
left eom^eteiy out in the cold, 
as for the triamplis of directer 
Syd^ Pollack, whose mag- 
iiifioeiitfy pastoral pkrere Out 
Of Afnca cdlected seven 
Oscars. 

At the start of the kms 
everung Oat of Africa^ the $30 
mflUon (£20 dd-style 

Hollywood epic romance 
based on the life and writiiigi 
of fiarooess Karen ton BZix^ 
othtfwise known as Danish 
story-teOer extraordinary Isak 
Dteasea, and starring Meryl 


groups of youths stoned buses 

and hurf^ petrol bombs in an Rol^Bedtora, Khns 

attempt to enforce a work Brandaner, was ^ 


gold mine near Johannesburg 
in January. Last year 16 


policemen, all blacks, were 
killed in township unrest. 


stoppage called over the ar- 
rests of participants in an 18- 
month rent boycott 

• Colonel dies: A colonel of 
the South West Africa Territo- 
ry Force, Commandant 
(Tiaries Hochapfel, ag^ 44, 
has dittl in a Pretoria military 
hospital from wounds sus- 
tain^ in a clash with South 
West African People's Organi- 
zation guerrillas earlier this 
month. 


Doubt on Deng’s retiring hint 


Hong Kong — Political ob- 
servers here do not expea Mr 


Deng Xiaoping, foe Chinese 
leader, to step down, despite 
his hints that he is considering 
it (David Bonavia writes). 

Mr Deng was quoted in 
reports from Peking as telling 
Mr Poul Schluter. the visiting 
Danish Prime Minister, that 
he had deliberately kept out of 
the limelight for me three 
months to lend more author- 


ity to his likely successors. It 
was thought he was referring 
particularly to Mr Zhao 
Zi>'aiig, the Prime Minister. 

However, Mr Deng is 82 
and is knovm to want to retire 
as soon as he can safely hand 


over power to Mr Zhao and 
Mr Hu Yaobane, foe party 


Mr Hu Yaobang, foe party 
Secrctaiy-CeoeraT. as well as 
several others who are being 
groomed for leadership. 

• Zbao^ pl«tec= In his ad- 


dress to this year’s National 
People's Congress, Mr Zhao 
promts^ to boost living stan- 
dards and gave details of a 
new five-year plan, under 
which foe Goverament would 
ease controls on luices, let 
mismanaged firms go bank- 
rupt and link bonuses to 
(utxluctjvity, as part of foe 
development of "socialism 
with Qiinese charaaeristics” 
(Reuter reports). 


for 11 Oscars. 

So was ha chief rival. The 
Colour Purplti director 
^ielbeig^ c on troTersial box 
o&e ut based mi Alice 
Widker's Pidhzer Nze-wfn- 
ning book asd starring Dew- 
comer Whotvi Goldberg. 

By the time it waa all over 
foe scorelme read: Out Of 
Africa^ aevem The Colour 
ntrple, nSL The voti^ showed 
qnhe deariy bow animpressed 
academy moobera were by 
Spielberg's film. Nor were 
they moved by foe forore over 
foe fact that, although the 
picture had 11 nominations, 
Sj^bog'a dircctiiig talents 
were onrlookcd rorapletely. 

Never bdore in the tong 
history Of the Oscars has a 
film w^ so many Domimtioitt 
come away irittewt a solitaiy 
statuette. 

But Sj^elbeig iros not the 
only big loser in a night of 
nnpredktaUe results. Two 
other big favourites dso fared 
disappointin^y. Prizu*s Boa- 





exerciser by secutiw men who 
wffl boreroonsiblemr piotect- 


Geraidiaefttge, foe actieg, and Sydney PoUadc, the dfeecte^ after iB Md t in g their Oacm. 


oar, the Hack oomedy about a 
hit man and his assassin wife, 
started ctgjkt po mh ia ti D na 
but won only one award, that 
for Auelica Hasten at best 
supporting actress. The fihn 
was diral^ by vetrean fifan- 
mwltw John H*WrtOBt who **■*! 
to be content with bis 
dai^ter's victe^. 

Australian direcolor Pieter 
Wrir's stylish foriller IFft- 
aaSf whifo also had eight 
Donxnxatkms, mm two Oscars, 
inHadhig me for aoeen^y. 

The best actor award went 
(0 William Hurt, certaiidy no 
bonsehold name in Holly- 
wood, for bk brilliaiit portray- 
al of foe homosexual inmate in 
foe Brazflian-niade fihn Bss 


CfTkeS^AarlVemua.AaAit 
was a ni^t of trimnph for foe 
veteran actress Geraldine 
Pi^ who has been nondnated 
nine foncs in foe last 2 S years. 
She won foe best actress 
trophy for her role os the 
ageiiQ woaraa yearning to 
return to ha* Texas home ia 
Tub To BomuiifkL Both those 
fow-bodget films wiere pro- 
dneed without major stedio 
money and blessings. 

Another referan of foe Hol- 
lywood scene, Don Aawche^ 
woo best supporting Oscar.for 
hR role in dcoon. 

bronkaUy, however, foe 
leadnuc story m the aftanafo 


by Oseax voters. For 
Spidbeiib foe most commer- 
cfoBy Qm- 

of tile late 25 yean hi HoBf* 
wood, hb mvoboBCBt in The 
Cbfonr Pfopdr had been wfidtey 
MgudedasalndfivlqsliBm- 
qrandadgsQwhdgrmrntfami: 
tite film ooanmm^. 

It was yte anafoer siap ht 
the Cue few the yonag dh ecto i 
whose £ 1 ^ die teggete-canmsg 
pkfnre in Hollywood history, 
waapoaMdorerbytheaeade- 
ary to 1982. Many believe that 
Spidberg'^ e nwawto co»-. 
merclar snccesseii' have 
prinnpted an maiaiadly hatsb 
critkal aodpem badetaah, as 


wffl bere^pnsibtofbr piotect- 
worid kadets vfon they 
anivemMay. 

The Qnm Chbiset Secre- 
-lary, Mr Masahani Gotoda, 
said: "We dee^y icerat the 
acts of ottira^ which consti* 
title a ^ve foallenge to 
d em oc r aq ) . We intend to in- 
stnsctmir police force to step 
up tecnrity measures to 
vent a cecnnence of similar 
incidenfs.'* 


Moscow will 
continue 
its test ban 


Geneva bi calling yet 
am Sx an end to under-. 


of tiieawanbi was this foct tint whnesfied at Monday aiglifs 
^delberghadbeensokwaad cer emo ni es . 


Swiss give 
asylum 
to deserter 


Reagan emergency aid for Honduras 


Change of Interest Rate 
NEW BORROWERS 


The race nf interest charged for loans on private 
dwellings fc>r owner-occupation, wliatever the size 
of the loan, is now: 

Repa\Tnenl 12^'f —Typical APR 12.9'v 
Endowment — Typical APR 12.7% 


EXISTING BORROWERS 

1 . The rales >jf interest charj^d rvi existing loons iviU 
be reduced from 1st .April lysti. 

2. liifferentinis charged f>:>r endo\^'me^t mortgages 
will be removed with effect from 1st .April IfSti. 

3. BuiTi3wers will be advised of the effects of the 
abcive changes in due cuiu'se. 


Full wrilien details of the Societv-'s mortgage 
facilities are avaibble from your kcal branch or 
(headdress bdow. 


Bern (Reuter) — Switzer- 
land has reversed an earlier 
decision and agreed to grant 
asylum to a Soviet army 
de^er who spent two years 
interued bene after being cap- 
tured by rebels in A%hamstan. 
the Justice Minist^ said. 

Yuri Povarnitsin. 24, who 
alleged on Swiss television last 
year that he would be impris- 
oned and shot if forced to go 
home, first applied lor asylum 
in 1984 but his request was 
turned down. He is now 
working in a factory near 
Lausanne. 

Of 1 1 Soviet soldiers in- 
terned here, one is still held, 
seven decided to go home, one 
sought asylum in West Ger- 
many, and another has been 
given a Swiss residence 
permit. 


From Cbristepber Thomas America, aniears to be the 
Washington largest anti-rebel operation 

President Reagan approved conducted by Sandinista 
emergency military assistance trex^ since the guenillas 
ofS20miUion (£13 million) to b^an their operations five 
Honduras yesterday to help to years ago. 
repel a large offensive by US officials said Mr 
Nicaraguan troops against Reagan's action was in re- 
American-backed guerrillas sponse to a leqnest from 
operating from ba^ inside Honduran authorities on 
Honduran territory. Monday nifoL The Prerident 

The attack, according to bad notined appropriate 
diplomats and others in Latin members of Congress that be 


intended to exercise his emer- sentatives to siqiport Pt^- 
gency authority under the dent Reraan's leriDest for 


Foreign Assistmee Act to 
iwvide Hoodnras with male- 
rial training and services. 

The material indndes air- 
defence weqxms, conventioii- 
al ordnance, qnre parts and 
armaments Ibr hdicopieis. 

The US is amdous to play 
up the Nicaraguan attack in 
toe hope that it will enooDiage 
a reluctant House of Repro- 


aid. 

icials said 


' White House officials said 
up to 1 400 ^GGanguan troops 
had penterated lb miles into 
Honduras , in an attempt 10 
wipe out iriid camps. R^its 
firm Mexico supported, that 
figme. The troops are said, to 
have moved into El Paraiso 
novioce . in Honduras on 
Saturday. 


agam fix an end to unefer-. 
grouzid nuclear tests, the Sovi- 
et, L^nioU said yesterday that 
by last week's detonation, the 
VS was showing a ”toial 
disreganT for foeopinions of 
foe rest of the world and of a 
significaDt pan of puUic opin- 
k>D in the U5 itseff (Alan 
McGr^or writes^ 

Mr Victor laoMlyan, Soviet 
ddf^te at the 40-nation UN 
Disarmament Conference, 
said all five previous US 
Administrations had support- 
ed a comprehenrive test 
bas.He made it clear the 
Soviet moratorium, due to 
end on March 31, would, 
continue at least until the US 
carried out a filler test 
The US delate, Mr Doo- 
ald Lowitz, said 'nesting sup- 
ports the maintenance of the: 
nuclear detenent on adiidi (be 
US and its allies depend”. 


Train blaze 


EWHESTORS 

With effeci fr».»ni 1st April 1986 tile foDowing rates 
of interest will apply to investment accounts both 
new- and existing 


Colombo (Reuter) — Tamil 
guerrillas set fire to a passen- 
ger train in Sri Lanka's North- 
ern Province, after they bad 
ordered off the passengers. 



Net Rate 

Giyiss 

Equivalent* 

fi\t:st.ar 

ACCOLTNTS 

«.l up inSI.fti? 
Slt.u.iiiuptM&t.lAl'j 

tUj.tKKlplus 

7.75^ 

8.00% 

8.25Q- 

8.50% 

10.92% 

11.27% 

11.62% 

11.97% 

cheqi^-s.a\t: 

accounts 

£y.9# 

Slli.lH)fiuplii£24.3J’!:» 

STi^.niiUplus 

SaARE .ACCOUNTS 

4.S)% 

7.85% 

8.09% 

8.50% 

6.00% 

6.34% 

11.06% 

11.39% 

11.97% 

8.45% 

HIGHER INTEREST 
ACCOLOTS 

8.50% 

11.97% 

SEVEN DA^ lexisdnc 

ACCUfiNlS inveworsi 

7.61% 

10.72% 

OTHER ACCOUNTS 


Advice order 


Sin^pore (Reuter) — Singa- 
pore IS to make it mandatory 
for all women seekiiig abor- 
tion to undergo counseUing by 
doaors first 


Plant blast 


Issoire, France (AP) — An 
explosion tore ihro^ a 
smeltering plant killing at 
least one worker, injuring IS 
others and destroying the 
building Three others were 
missing 



Russians almost ready to 
launch first space shuttle 


The Soviet Union has made 
progress in its space plane and 
tytace shuttle programmes, 
and the first flight of a Soviet 
shuttle is expreied late this 
yearoriD 1987, according to a 
ratagon report publisbed 
yesterday. 

The report, Soviet Military 
Power — J9^ says that the 
Soviet Union had carried out 
snocessfiil (est fiigbts of the 
new medium-lift booster that 
will carry a maimed space 
plane into otiriL Testing is 
under way for the heavy-lift 
booster, dbigned to send aloft 
Moscow’s wse shuttle as wen 


From Mofasdn AD, Washtaeton 
The lS7-i»ge ^ossy report, . 
with numerous colour photo- 
graphs of the latest Soviet 
missiles, bombers and aitona- 
lines, as well as charts and 
maps, rays that Moscow is 
continuing to work <mi a a . 
vanced strat^c defence tech- 
nology, By the end of this 


also due for its first sea trials 
in tile late 1980s. 

On 9 ace, the report says 
that at least 70 per cent of 
Soviet spare .are 

purely notary, support^ 
botii defensive and off^iave 
operations. In 1985 some 100 
Soviet space laundies over- 


Witliin foe past year, the 
Soviet Union, as well as 
deploying 70 SS2S&, has -con- 
tinued testing the SSX24 mo. 
bile mteicontinental ballistic 


as spare station payloads of ro*ssJ®*.Thefbunh 


Princess Anae visiting foe Christ of Corcovado stetne foat 
overlooka Rio de Janm at foe Start of a private ftazd toar. 


I more than 100 tonnes. 

This fifth annual repent, 
issued by Mr Caspar Weinber- 
ger, the Defence' Secretary, 
also says that by the inid- 
1990s nearly all Soviet strate- 
gic nuclear attack forces now 
deployed wQI have been re- 
placed by more advanced 
systeffis.- 


and the third Delta and IV 
dass strat^ic ballistic missile 
sub m a ri ne s have also been 

laiinrhwf 


Over the next ton years, the 
Soviet Union is likdy to 
deploy 2,000 to 3,000 air, $ea 
and grousdJaunefaed nudear- 
anned cruise inissile& Jts new 

65, 000-tonne aircraft carrier is 


Gonnatssanre and surveillance 
systomis. 

A heavy-lift booster system 
wiu appmently be used to 
itoXDcfa foe Soviet shintie or- 
Inter, a spacecraft sunHar to 
the' American shuttle, it say& - 
This system woold be able to 
cany very heavy payloads of- 

about 1 WJ )00 kg. 

These disdosmes come in 
foe wake of the <*^aUwigpr 
axidoskm and reports that. 
Nasa is now planni^ .to 
dey^ most tiiuttle flints lb . 
militaiy missions once 
laiTiyhings resume. . . ' . 


Once bitten JupHUCSC OpCUlUg ShutS OUt forClgU lu wVCrS 

T n mr\ _ c.. _ _ a/ 


Lagos (UP!) — So many 
students and teachers have 
beenanacked deadly snakes 
at foe University of S^to in 
northwest Nigeria lately that a 
snake charmer will be t^ed in 
to bdp deal with the reptiles. 


Haven closing 


Interest rales for Cixporate Investments, Special 
Depr<sit .Accounts .nnd Additional Vduntaiy 
Comribulions available on request 

Interest rates on all other accounts are reduced by 
1% with the exi't'piinn of Housing Bunds and S.AVE 
accounts which remain imdianged. 


Singapore (Reuter) - Singa- 
pore, regarded by western 
nations as a haven for music 
and computer pirates, has 
introduced a new copvright 
Bill 


’ WIiiTe ln«mp Ta.\ Ls pari .i Kt* rate yf 29^ . 


r/Qet'i 
theW 
Abbey' 
Habit fj 


Ban sot^ht 

Auckland (Reuter) — Two 
French agents convicted for 
their roles in the Rainbow 
Warrior sinking are seeking a 
High Court injunction to stop 
Television New Zealand 
screening film of their trial. 


From Darid Watts 
Tokyo 

The Japanese Government 
will soon reqioad to requ^ 
to allow foreign legal practices 
to Japan by announcing a new 
law so le s hr i ctiv e that some 
foreigners are irishing they 
had never asked for it. 

The United States and EEC 
have been making test-mtoiite 
representations but there are 
mtiikely to be significant 
dtan^ in die law before it is 
approved for presentation to 
foe I^t later this week. It is a 
^phic exampk of the re- 
spe^ of the Japanese to the 
I^pecf fterign competi- 
tion, despite attempts over 
sevi^ yeara to persn^ them 
that foreigiters sbonld be given 
foe same opportimities foat 
the Japanese have been given 
inotbtf conntries. 


Eraa in a tnitited area sndi 
as the tow, wboe enliiinl and 
Ungnistie differences present 
formidable challenges to for- 
eigners, foe Governmeat, 
backed by the Japan Federa- 
tion of Bar Atoodatioiis, has 
decided to resbrict access se- 
verriy to a ma)^ which win 
grow rapidly as Japaim 
Business and financial institn- 
tions becomug more torolred 
istematioBally. 

The *^market opening” mea- 
sure, part of foe package 
proiniscd tote July, wfil 
dnee a far less tib^ law than 
that in force before 1955 and 
one which wQI disqaalify mote 
intmnatkmal la wyms and 
those who have takra foe time 
and trouble to stndy J^mnese 
law and iangnage and who 
have bnih op experience in 
Japanese practices* 


One of foe federation tf bar 
assodation*s main concerns, 
neewding to hfr khira 


al, is foat ton Ebarilnatioa 
wonld mean foat Japanese tow 
^actices oonU be smoii^ I 7 
dm snperior fomndal ctent of 
Amerira bew teSoes. Tb^ 
■re else conomed abont Ch^ 
lawyers **Gontnffi&te” 
Japanese lawyers. 

**The whole thiag is 
ridicaloiis,” one fMrdgb towyar 
said. *’Hie Japanese vrfll be 
lan^Md at when this law 
comes oat Its like soane kind 
of nasty brick.” 

prov i sions canstog mote 
ibr^n angi^h are: 

• Forri^ tawyen w3l be 
allowed to practise only the 
law of (heir native conut r y Or 
state; 

• They mast have five years' 


expericBce ontside Japan be- 
fora tiiey are allewed access: 
• ^ not be alloncd to 

ewply J ap an e s e lawyers and 


for six moi^ foe jftr. 

Britam and foe £EC in 
gen^ are partiedarty con- 
cerned abote the narrow scone 

of activities whidi w31 be 
pelted to foreigB bwyera 
and the demand for five years' 
ecpeneoce outside the eonn- 
tiy. Fonka towyers nrateim no 


irilo hm foim to inqiro foe^ 
gitofe in foeir Pint fftmitr log- 

response to foe pros- 
pect of J^pan. hppnm^p p an- 
Btoaatkma! financial and 
fwnws centre it to dtoamibiDt- 
The Japanese Goverii- 
ment has missed an 
W^riimity,” a Ennmean dip- 
tetid. «Bte tiito tow to 

fl am no tow at aB.T’ 

Abo dfatur hiiig jg tito fact 


in Britain foce no ^Ijatetoe wffi be m foe hands 
tions and may open a nrai^ «^^panFederteioaofBar 


Dons ana may open a practice V-^y*» "“y"«ranonoipar 

lomi as they safody for modi 


-ai uk „0«I of 

expmiencea yomw towvw« 
v^.have worktof^ 
elunmated bat, hi foe EECs 


5!^** Prorishm to 


likely to atixate poorer lawyers 


deterafomfom «■ 
>te territory agteast 
even fooo^ there, 
he plenty ofscoite for 
w form and local lawyers 

Uto^* ,«Wf f.lly 


^tieth year of Emperor 
Hsphzio's reign at foe end of 
next month and the summit of 
seven Western indusnialized 
countries earty the following 
montiL 

There trere no immediate 

tnnehtime asta^ nntber of 
vriixch roused usuries or rari- 
ous damage. 

Three rockets were first 
fired from foe boot of a car 
about 100 yards -from the 
Hanzomon Gau of the Impe- 
rial Falaoe and within a few 
hundred ya^ of foe. British . 
Embassy. The car burst into 
flatni>g as one rocket landed 
near the Hanzomoo Gate, 
another set fire to an old, 
luined palace gate and the 
third was nntraced. 

Three siniilar lodrets fired 
soon after at the US Embassy 
caused no damage arid were' 

ahan from a SCCOnd 

stotencar. 

Poike said the rockets were 
fimril<»r than (hoSe fired at 
ifoiitaandHariedariTportslty. 
tiie CtaukakaJia fotekm of 
sadical tofi-wingns almost a 
wago. - . 

The attama .'came 
tiriitersecurity in Toltyo since 
Mar^l infasparation for foe 
anniversary and the summit, 
nod despite wd^poblicized 


. ; ' • 


‘-■.i 4 i \ 






\ ... ' ■ :• 








•a I 





I 


iVft 


TWP TTAiTCC 


Philippines constitution suspended 


r. 


quino scraps Parliament 
and takes wide powers 





% f 

• 'aV 


I read)' 




President CorazMi Af prinw 
mailaxig her first month in 
power, abolished' the Phm^ 
pines Pariiament yestenlay, 
declared a provision^ jovem- 
ment and gave hoselfsweqi- 
Hig emergency powers for at 
least six months. 

In a nationany leleidsed 
address, 34n Aquino snqiend- 
ed'the 1973 inanial law consfr 
mtiern, under whidi depos^ 
President Marcos drew • his 
autocratic pow^ and an- 
nounced that an interim **fi^ 
dom cbjDSlitutipn**woald laW* 
immediate efittt, incoipoim- 
im some of the nneontrover- 
sim features of the old charter. 

A constitutional commit 
sion of no more than SO men 
and women mfl te appointed 
by Mrs Aquino to draw up a 
new consmution wi thin thm 
months. 

Tins win then be ratifi^ by 
the people in a plebiscite prior 
to dections ~ all within ^e 
year of yesterday’s 
prodamatioa. 

have listed urith care to 
the ai^uments about the fom 
in which we should conduct 
our political affeirs while we 
put in plm a new permimeht 
constitutioa,” Mis Aquino 
tok! a |K^ confeieDce. 

“Now, today, I am an- 


Fnm Keith Dahitm , Mantla 


noimdl^an intiirifn «ywwrifn- - 

tion under -which onr 
shattered nsdion can take sh^ 
ter afler years of dictatorship 
In ofdCT to heal its wom^ 
restore its stieiwih and eiyoy 
the fiist fiints orns new-fouiid 
fieedom.^ 

In her. prepared statement 
Ate Aquino promised to exer- 
cise her : sweeimig . ksidative' 
powers judidou^ and with 
the assistance of the CaEnnet 

The Jttstioe - Minister, Mr 
Nqpiali' Gonzales wto re^. 
out the ; fijil Prodamarion 
Number llnee, said laid.tfaat 


these powm would be sutgect 
to two judi^ reviews: 

Mis Aquino, who was swept, 
to power on February ^ aiwr 
Mr . Marcos left the country, 
said her aim was to st^ the 
country of the last vestiges of 
the 20-year Marcos regime. 

Mr Gonzales announced 
that the priorities of the new 
government were the com- 
plete reorganization of gov- 
ernment, protection of civil, 
pdhica], human, sodal and 
economic rights, the recoveiy 
of the iltgotten ovetseas 
•wealth of Mr Marcos and his 



Rebel ceasefire offer 


MaMb — CoananniBt Farly 
******^** and gaip'i i itliiii haiil foi 
Ae firstitime yeated^ tbat 
they were pnpai^ t» 
taus, wiOoat precoailitioBi, 
at an biaiilBal aatiMwide 
ceaadiR after 17 years of 


If tte c e asafiie held a 
“pditicals fitieireat" waspoo» 
sible, presided Preddent 
AqdaoTa -odreiBiitntiBD car^ 
rM aot the ladScal-diaiMes 
needed ftr national leeaneiBa- 
thai a liA-wiiv leader, Mr 
Aatti^ /mri, tcM jond- 
iste at a.aedct. press .eanfow 


Beach house moye 


Fron Molidn Al^ WadiiigloD . 


Mr Ferdinand Marcos and 
his wife Erndda havp moved' 
into a $1.5 milli on Hbncduhi 
be^ house after mendme a 
month at the heav^^guarM 
Hickam Air Base in ^waii. 

Hie qmet more on Mtm^ 
wight came anrid - -invesdgiH 
tioos in. the Philippines and 
the US mm the alle^ misuse 
of milfions of dolms bjr the 
former niilipiMiMS PrsKteot 
during his 20^year mle. 

The beadh tousei. whidi has 
a ooe-bedroom oentage on its 
extensive grounds, was 
searched by a bomb squad 
b^ore the exiled conjile toefe 
residaice. Loc^ estate agents 
said th^ did not ihiiilc they 
would lire feere for loqg.^ 

Mr Marcos had been ex- 
pec^ to move 10 Panama 
eariiv this month bat anthmi-. 
ties there decided at die test 
moment fiiey d^ nor wmt 
hha. 

Meanwhite, n Customs Ser-T : 
vice inventocy 'showed', that 
Mr Maroos todc about $7.7. 
million in bounty, to Hawaii, 
mainly diameuK^ emeralds. 


rubies, sapidun^ pearis, gtdd 
and silver. 

The inveotoiy was ideased 
in New Yoris ‘ by Senator 
JovitO jtelnmp, chairman of 
the Fhilippmes Commission 
00 Good Government, in a 
1 m 4 by Piesideiiit Aqnmo’s 
admimstiarion , to recover i 
prope^ liifr Marcos iqmtedly 
owns in ^few Ymk. 

Indttded in the inventacy ' 
were details ttf the baggage 
carried by the 904nenfi}er 
Marcos paity.cn fiidr flight to 
Hondnlo. 

Orer 400 iteitts were loaded 
into 12 .suitea5es atiarirf 
cases, 22 boxes contain^ 
about SlJi mfllkm in Philip- 
puaes pesos and a pociart 
calculalor. 

The most expensive sin^ 
fisting was ..Sl,4$7,415 for 
*‘<me set, oominiscd of one 
braced ope aC emimgs 
and <me brooch consisting of 
ct pphirftK, diamonds’’. 

The most expenrive cd* the 
tiaias was estimated -to be 
wortfa^5S,286. 

Ihe miallest amoimt fisted 
was $5 for a fonmain pen. 


India and Ten killed 
US in joint in Sikh 
drugs fight Tengeance 


From Michael Haralyn 
Udhi 

The .IWted States and bdia 
hire annoBiiced tte fenmaioa 
of a joint woAing party to 
tackle the g rowing trade in 
drags between the two 
contries. 

Mr Edwia Meese, tbe US 
Attorney>Gdieral, who is ris- 
hing India, described the 
country this week as prhnarBy 
a transit post for ilie^ drags, 
located bebreea two areas 
where flOdt narcotfes are 
grown. 

Tbejoon group win devdop 
pofides for oo-opererioB hi 
t raining ana sharing infonm* 
tion. Mr Meese also fad hated 
that c u s te ins officers from 

each country would be allowed 

ta t ^ ei ate m die ot^. 

He was less positive, howef^ 
cr, abonttbesapidy of din^ to 

India firan .A^han poppy 
WaMe md er ' the control of 
tribes snnMMTted 1^ lud to 
the gnerriDas* 

Mr Mcese, who met Mir 
Raiiv frpinihs, tile Frime-MBn- 
fefer, other In (flan Gov- 
en an ent has also 

discBssed tte grootb of teterr. 

■atiAnai (eiTOiist sctiritte 
anrf aMa m raJ that I jcmit 

stady wffl be the' 

reescaS extreditioa treaty be* 
t ween the two couu ti i c s . 

• ISLAMABAD: Pakistan 
was assure d of VS nritNary 
mid ecoaaudc asscstaace be- 
yond the present 1987 dead- 
line when Mr William 
Schneider, US Under'Secre* 
taiy of Stue for Seanity 
. A ss i ste ii ce, annwme ed a pa^* 

.-.1. age of aid for 1987-93^ 

, .cVfV amoBBting to S4.02 billion 

' i 1’^ 4..($i«b^)»siibjmttocoD- 

i ** /■ gr"**”*"* aRSOval (Hasan 

* Akfatar writes^ 


. FromMidiadHaiBlyn 
. Delhi 

At least to pec^Ie died in 
tim battered mac mPimjab as 
SDdi terrorists took revenge mi 
Hindn counter-stators 
simply random Hindus woefc- 
ing peacefidly in the Adds. 
There woe fonr d^fas in a 
riiootKnit'bdtwi^ Sfldt gnn- 
men and pacaxnifitaiy police: 

Escatetmg violence has led 

to fintber ctwwTnunal rJashna 
between Sikhs and the Hindu 
cbwvinists of the Shiv Sena 
(tlto Army of the god Shiva). 

Ontsade the .industrial aty 
of Julhmdm; whidi has been 
labouring nnto enriew rince 
Mardtl7, thm was a dash 
between Shiv Sena wodoeis 
and police, and later two 
broti^ nmo were both activ- 
ists in the morement were 
shot dead in the shop they 
owned. Pdke said tiiey were 
Jolted by three youths. 

The curfew was extended to 
the aliole of tte old .city of 
Jullunder after the TWO deaths. 
The neighluwring tOWB Of 
Nafcodar alto renmined under 
curfew. 

Terrorist s on a mqtmcyde 
shot dead two people in a fidd 
outsit Batala, but the weefc- 
sfege of the town ity 
extremists of the- ADJndia 
Sflefa Students* Federation and 
the United Akali Dal was 
lifted by-seenrity forces. 

They filmed out aromid the 
townandclreredsixoftbe 10 
roads blodced by swordHwidd- 
ing young mesL . 

Security forces yesterday 
cofdoned c^Mateiwal village: 
12' fiom the Skhs’ 
holiest town of Amritsar, after 
an encounter -in which two 
lemnists and .two poficemen 
di^ 


Bangladesh poll split 


From Ahmed Fad, Dhaka 


■ 


■ 


Pditical parties in Bangla- 
desh opposed to the military 
GorettoBeni, of . Fireident 
Prgharf are- divided 

over pans^iation in parlia- 
nwtiary decti^ set for May 

^Be^Khal^ 23a. 

<^-a sewsHpaity onwstto 
cngihiflaj bat>Bf«B dlfaerh^ 
tffiatifff of betsayaL 
Hto Mjpany affianica, led by 


Mrs 25a yesterday tdd a 
public la^ attended by more 
than 2^000 sun>oii^io ^ 
capital that el^ons without 
the jnior lifiint^'bf martial law 
wotOd cmiy l^itimize an flier 
mJ military gorernmenL - 
The laOy. called by the 
opposition aspartofa*l)la(^ 
day” nmridng the ftnuih anm- 
vereary maitial law, also 
hearil Mrs ^ accuse ^ 15- 
pgity jinlaneft of Stabbing the: 
^.^envnent movement, 
in the back. 


cace awth of Manfla. 

The an iiAi Mm }. 

mleat came as military head- 
qaarteis rep a rt ed Ae “ umaa 
smender’* trf 1^000 Commn- 
mt rebeb and synmatiiizas' 
on Central Negros Idand. 

Mr Zamel, a leader of the 
BBderBaMBd ambrdia groap, 
the National Democratic 
fkoBL said Us onaaibatioii, 
wife meoaflawed 
Pvty and ha mfliliiEy wfob 
the New Peo]rie> An^, was 
prepared to hdd ceasefire 
talks at a miitoally a^eed 


associates and the eradication 
of graft and comiption. 

Referring to her 
dissoloutioii of the 190-mem- 
ber National Assembly — 
nominated by the party of Mr 
Mareos — Mrs Aquino said the 
Pailiament “piUaged our 

politics'* Mr Marcos’s buri- 
ness cronies ’’pillaged our 

economy**. 

Using its majority, the as- 
sembly last month rubber- 
aamped the proctemation of 
Mr Manm as winner of the 
presidential election on Felv 
niaiy 7, knorii^ opposition 
charges of massive vote buy- 
ing and dieatiiig. 

That proclamation still 
stands and although the As- 
sembly — in an obvious 
gesture of self-survival — has 
ofieied to recognize Mrs 
Aquino as President and woik 
with her, she has chosen to 
^oreiL 

A new,- populariy-elected 
par li amen t is needed, she said. 

”If political power is to be 
retuiued to its premier limits, 
and o ur society elaanwt of the 
crime and repression of recent 
years, we must cut out the 
cancer of our political 
system”. 


r: 




... ..¥;rmsm 

Pretesteis de manding a civilian government in Haiti set fire to rnUiish at a road jniiction in Pcrt-aii-Prince. 

Barricades set ablaze in Haiti protest 


Port-an-Prince (Reuter) — 
Mobs of youths set idlgfat piles 
of rubbish at scores of road 
junctions throughout the Hai- 
tian ea pH atl tO presS HwiiaiMle 
for a civilian govemment 
Firemen aito soldiers tack- 
led the burning bamcades on 
Monday night Ptifice fired 
pisteds into foe air in one poor 
district, but' there were no 
repmts of usuries. 

The fires ended a day of 
anti-Government protests 
that began with a peaceful 
march ^ as many as 15,000 


people, most of them young. 

Lieutenant-Genera] Henri 
Namifoy, Resident of the 
ruling council that took over 
after dictator Jean Gaude 
“Baby Doc” Duvalier fled foe 
country last montit renewed a 
pledge to move foe country 
towards democracy. 

He also announced ministe- 
rial appointments viewed fay 
We^eni dqriomats and politi- 
cal observers as another in a 
series of efforts to stem the 
public outcry against the miH - 
tary-dominmed rule. 


On Friday, foe S3-year-old 
career soldier, who has foe 
backing of the United States, 
dismiu^ three members of 
the council with past links to 
Mr Duvalier or his more 
notorious father, Francois 
“Papa Doc” Duvalier. 

Both the morning marchers 
and those who start^ foe fires 
said they would continue to 
demonstrate for the establish- 
ment of a civilian 
govenunenL 

A newly-formed group of 


journalists, student leaders 
and young churciunen called 
for a national school boycott 
and for renewed demonstra- 
tions. They said they would 
escalate their campaign if 
there was no official response. 

At a blockaded bridge 
across foe River Bretelie, 
south of foe former city of 
Duvalierville, now called 
Caberet, about 50 youths said 
they would continue to block 
Hi^way One daily until foe 
Government bowed to their 
demands. 


■ .. . 





R .' '•C' 







A superb win for Nelsi 
blistering heat, at the Bra 
Prix on Sunday. 

Frank Williams’ team 1 
It again - with a rare blend 
teamwork and technology 

Mobil advanced synth 
lubricants are part of the V 
winning formula. These s 
and greases perform well 
in aviation, marine and tru 













iwi; iiMiiai wt:L)iM£60Ay MARCH 26 1986 


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THE ARTS 



Television 

Carrying 
on going 

Until last night the name 
H.W.TUman was nnfamiliar 
to me. In fact, watching Jolm 
Mead's doenmentary oa diis 
explorer's life, Ab Aqf, A/b 
F/v^ficfs, Not Mock Pkasun 
I bad on at least two 
occasions, an nneasy feeling 
the whole enterprise was a 
spoof. 

]t began with a parade in a 
small Italian town, oelebratiog 
Tilman Day. Qnite what the 
shy Major had done in 1944 to 
merit this accolade remain^ 
obscure. We then had a re- 
snine of his extraordinary 
Bochanesqne careen a dbtin- 
gnisbed soldier of two world 
wars, a tea-planter in Kenya 
who once rode across Africa on 
a bicycle, a mountaineer who 
scaled the Himalayas and, 
from 1954 (when an ad for a 
shipmate was placed in this 
paper with the programme 
title), a sailw to the otterroost 
parts of the eardu Then in 
1977. a^ 79. he sailed from 
Rio and was never seen again. 

Judging from several inters 
riews with former aow^mem- 
bm and climbers, Tilman was 
an oncompronilsing antocrat 
with the temper of die cold 
sooth wind. Some remarl^le 
home-movies, shot widi direct 
clomsiness. showed him si- 
leody pnfiiDg a pipe, in d ie 
posture of a walrns with a 
frosted moustache. Like dots 
charting ont a map, the resnlt- 
ing film was as evanescent as 
lllinan woold have wished. 

The photographer Don 
McCuUin is happier among 
fanmans. In Home Fnmt iAre~ 
jin, BBC2), he jonmeyed widi- 
oot commentary to Bradford, 
Harlow and the East End. In 
the steady, dearly-focnscd 
company of the cameraman 
Philip Bonham Carter, Mc- 
Collin made a bee-line for 
those living in modem poverty: 
both the poverty of sqoalor in 
Bradford conncil flats and 
poverty of iinaginatioa in 
Harlow's shoppii% centre. 

D^pite the impact of c^ 
tain images — a girl with 
chopped wood, a sldnhead 
with a tattoo • there was a 
sense this territory was over- 
famiiiar io McCulUn. Halfway 
through, the format of knock- 
ing on arbitrary orban doews 
took on the dereliction of die 
subject within. 

Nicholas 

Shakespeare 


The British premiere of 
parts of Olivier Messiaen’s 
opera St Francois d’ Assise 
is given tonight in the 
Festival Hall and 
broadcast on Radio 3: here 
the composer, in an 
exclusive interview, tells 
Paid Griffiths something 
of the work’s genesis 

The song of 
the heavens 

resounding 


Oliiier Messiaen, photgmpbed at rehearsal ' 

this week by Dod Miller 



Wifi .. V V 


U is hard to write about Olivier 
Messiaen without making him sound 
like a plaster saint, but his sweetness 
of temperament, his composure and 
bis mod^' are sublimely untouched 
by anything of modem doubt or self- 
promotion. If anybody else were to 
mention Monteverdi, Rameau, M<^ 
zart, Wagner. Mussofgsky, Dd^ussy 
and Beig as the only opmde coinpo^ 
era to merit consideration beside his 
own wofic. the efldn would be one of 
unpardonable arrogance, but Mess- 
iaen speaks with such open sincerity 
that objection is silenced. 

During the course of our conversa- 
tion I suggested he had made th^ 
difficult for himself in Saint Francois 
d'.issise in bringing an angel on to the 
stage, since no soprano of fle^ and 
blood could live up to his own 
description of the heavenly visitor as 
**a beautiiiil, enigmatic butterily”. 
But his resironse was more puzzled 
than reproving. He bad gone to the 
Ufifizi, seen an excellent an^ in an 
Annunciation by Fra AngeUco, and 
made that the pattern for his costume 
design. What could be more obvious? 

Everything about bis woiic he 
describes as if it were similaily self- 
evidenL When he was asked Rolf 
Liebennann to write a work 1^ the 
Paris Op^ the subject had of course 
to be religious. '*My dream was to 
make a Passion and Resurrection, but 
1 think it is impossible to put Christ 
on the stage: that is somethii^ trap 
beau. So I chose a man who was not 


God, but who most resembled Christ 
in being chaste, poor and humble, 
and in receivii^ Christ's wounds. 
Also, St Francis is dear to me because 
I am an ornithologist, and be loved 
and preach to the birds. Having 
made that choice, 1 left out everything 
that was secondary to the p ro g^ ot 
grace in his soul. I left out the dispute 
between fot^and son, on account of 
its being too psychoanalytical, and 1 
left out St Cl^ the interviews with 
the Pope and the voyage to ^ypL” 

The first of the three scenes to be 
peribrmed in tonight's concert is 
*Tbe Kissing of the Lepo^. '^One 
sees a leper who is not otiy horribly 
disfigured but also wicked. St Francis, 
dttpite his revulsion, approaches and 
talks to him, and gradually he is 
invrardly transformed. St Francis also 
is transformed and embraces the 
leper. Double miracle: the leper is 
cur^ and Francis becomes St Fran- 
cis from that momenL" One then 
passes in this concert selection to the 
lastacL 

‘"St Francis is alone in a cave, and 
he asks to understand the sofifhings 
of eWisL There is a choir which is the 
voice of Christ, and which grants him 
the same wounds to be rqjroduced in 
his body. The scene is a terrible one, 
because the w^ole first part expresses 
a sensation of extreme angui^, but 
then that suffering is transformed 
into an extraordii^ celestial joy, 
because St Francis is profoundly 
happy at this sign that he has been 


chosen by God. Then in the last scene 
St Francis is exhausted by peni^ce, 
by privations and also by the stigma- 
ta. He bids foiewell to his brouiers 
and to the birds, and the angel and the 
leper reappear to lead him into 
Pai^se. The choir rings of the 
Resutrection, transforming St Fran- 
cis's theme into a chorale of^ory.” 

For Messiaeo, charming touoied|, 
as be is by the present run of oonoert 
perfbnnmtces. the work remains es- 
sentially one for the theatre. **lt is a 
work I imagi^ with d^rs, people 
on st^ costumes — and also an 
individual who is very importanc the 
ordiestra, which is part of the action, 
because one sees some of the instru- 
ments on the stage." That at least was 
how de work was presented in Paris, 
in a production wi& which Messiaen 
prof^es himself happy, except for 
the lack of birds for St Francis's 
sermon to them. I st^gested that tiie 
work might iHofit from a more 
stylized treatment, looking towards 
Japanese theatre. 

*Thai is posriUte: I would not say 
no. In Toi^o the three scenes were 
p(^ormed in a semi-scenic version in 
the Catholic cathedral, with the 
ringers in costume and the angel hi^ 
in the oigan-lofr. That was bei^ tl^ 
a concert perfonnance, but 1 would 
prefer to see it in a theatre.** 

Might bis experience in the theatre 
now lead him to a second opera? 
'*Vou know, I woiired on Saint 
Francois for eight years. I am now 77: 


I have to think of smafler works." As 
to what those smaller works mi^t be; 
he is unforthcoming: "I never spe^ 
of thitigs until they are fmished.*' 

We turned to works of the past, and 
to Messiaen's often rnisunderriood 
statements about transcribing colours 
and binlsongs into hismurie. "When 
I read or listen fo music 1 see cdlonrs 
inwardly, not with my eyes bnt in my 
bead. Every soundfcom^ex has a 
correspond!^ colour.** For eveiyone, 
or just for him? "For me. I think tiie 
correspondences exist for everyone; 
but they will vary from person to 
person." 1 point out that bhie is 
assodated wifo A m^or in his music, 
Init with F sharp nuyor in Scriabin's. 
"Oh yes? But then I am by no means a 
disciple of SetiabirL” As for the birds; 
"I take down the songs with pe:^ 
and i^ier, quite rimply as murical 
dictation, but afterwards I transform 
them into my music. Of course I 
always arrange them in some w^ 1 
am not a tape^ecorto." 

I asked finally which works he now 
feds dosest to. "Those that I think 
are most representative, because th^ 
contain colours, because they contain 
bird^ and because they contain my 
rdidous frdth too, are La Tran^fig^ 
uration, Des Canyons aux &.oiles . . . 
and Saint Francois. 1 also love the 
Vingt Reffuds and ikiditatiom 
sur le mystere de la Sainte Trindi. 
Some works may be better, some 
worse, but wbateWr 1 have done is 
sinceic." 


Dance 

Twilight Rites 

The Place 

T have been trying to decide 
what upsets me more about 
this show: the waste of the 
performers' skills or of the 
audience's time. On the 
whole. I think the spectators 
deserve more sympathy, rince 
they have been lurdl by the 
repuuitions of those taking 
pan into gi'^ing up their 
evening (6S minutes but it 
feels much longer) and must 
endure also having tbeir intel- 
ligence insulted, whereas the 
paniciponts have, unlikely as 
it may seem, chosen to take 
pan. 

Nelson Fernandez, who 
founded Strip Search Dance 
Company, is a former mem- 
ber of Ballet Rambert: the last 


choreography 1 saw by him 
was entertaining. His co-direc- 
tor and composer is Carlos 
Miranda, vriio proved an able 
musician also with Rambert, 
although one might have tak- 
en wain^ from the feet that 
he has since worked on Lind- 
say Kemp's camp eccentrid- 
ties. The design^ five of 
them, come from Wimbledon 
^ool of Art and show occa- 
sional flashes of inspiration. 

But how can I b^ to 
convey the mind-numbing 
horror of Twilight Rited7 It is 
describe as a collaboration 
duce theatre woik, which, as 
happens too often nowadays, 
means that little snippets of 
movement which would not 
pass muster on tbeir own 
account are mixed with ama- 
teurish snatches of action, talk 
and in this case attempted 
singing to make an amalgam 
that a^eves the virtues of 
none of the forms. 

The performers, who have 


apparently made up tbeir own 
parts, daim to be exploring a 
surreal world of the imagina- 
tioD. That freely translated 
l^m the jai^n, means that 
the floor is Uttered with rub-- 
bi^ and that no rin^e ind- 
dent makes sense in itself or 
relates to any other inddent 

Lloyd Newson, vriio can 
dance very well when he 
performs real choreo^phy, 
stoically endures having his 
bald head rqwatedly slapped 
by Fernandez queening it in a 
bar&<houldered frock. The 
women, Julie Barnsley, Mi- 
chelle Richecoeur and ^xine 
Braham, have more costume- 
changes than the men and 
speak tbdr daft lines more 
clearly. Whether that is a 
benefit is arguable. Monday's 
performance at The Place is 
not to be repeated, so there is 
no risk of your catching tl 

John Percival 


Concerts 

Friends well characterized 


Extensive hvising to the aims. 



Some pictures taken on Alison’s birthday 
showing what her father gave her. 



His famiiyb constant demands for 
attention were simply more than her 
father could cope with. 

Unfortunately for Alison her birth- 
dw was the last straw 

Sadly the NSPCC deals with a grow- 
ii^ number of cases like Alison every year. 

But as the problem grows so too 
does the cost. £15.48 can protect a child 
for two weeks, although ariything you 
send will be gratefully recehred and used 
immediately to help children. 

With yoursuppwt the NSPCC can 
give them the dance to a secure 
future. 


I wane ID hdp pfoten a child and endm mv cheque or 
postal ordff foR 

^ X91S8D 
Xw ***—dVgscaid hcldcr*HB>dcbitdijaerg mm L 

> I > I I 1 1 I I I M I n~i 

BUCK onr.^ ruAK 



Addreu. 


MM* 


Ine b«a daopd 10 pfoHct the idcBHy of die diOd 


NSP.C-C- 


Philharmonia/ 

Davis 

Festival Hall/ 
Radios 


In some respects Elgar’s The 
Apostles parallels the "Eni- 
gma" Variations of four years 
earlier. The oratorio also has 
its "larger theme": the passa^ 
of Chnst's teaching, crucifix- 
ion and tesurrection. But & 
gar, for whatever reason, 
refers only obliquely to these 
events (the commoitiy accept- 
ed expfenati'on that he found 
the crucifixion "too painfiil to 
contemplate" too many 
questions). He prefers to con- 
centrate, as in the Variations, 
on the "friends pictured 
within”. 


It is, moreover, the apostles' 
frailties and flaws that receive 
deepest consideration, and a 
strmigtfa of this peribrmahee 
was that the three figures most 
senritivdy drawn by Elgar 
were excellently chaiactaized. 

Stafford Dean's Judas grew 
weightier and more compel- 
ling as the traitor’s mood grew 
blacker. He was simply the 
odd man oot during the 
Beatitudes, but coryured a 
chasm of nftiiMm as his 
suicide approadied. Jonathan 
Summers invested Peter with 
simple dignity, while Alfieda 
Hodgson, repenting in the 
Tower of Ms^dala, was ridi- 
toned and doquent 

Others were less convinc- 
ii^ Stephen Rob^ found 
his best voice right at the en^ 
in the Ascension scene, ten his 


earlier ascensions above die 
l>aes stave had been less than 
miraculous. Isobel Budianan 
rarely adiieved the reqt^te 
parity for die saintly 
soinono roles. 

Initially Andrew Davis's 
conducting seemed nnrespon- 
sive to the subtly shifting 
moods of this motiftedeD 
scoie. As the drama of Part n 
unfolded, however; . bis re- 
strained but often beautiful 
dynamic became in- 

crearingly persuasive. Those 
anguiriied brass chords in the| 
betiayal scene gained in inten- 
sity pr eci s e l y becaute Davis: 
ke^ his forces subdued else-! 
where. He also coaxed the 
Philharmonia ChOTUS tO some 
fine, controlled siligiiig. 

Richard Morrison 


Timothy Wilson 

Purcell Room 


Timothy Wilson begu his 
recital perched, jester-like, on 
a stool opposite his lutenist, 
and ended it leaning against a 
Steinway. singing Schubert's 
"Litanei". as an encore, as if 
Lieder were what he knew and 
loved best io all the world. It 
was typical of bis self-image: 
as eariy musician, as opera- 
actor, as Lieder recitalist, in 
short as ringer first and 
counter-tenor second. 

Not that the voice itself is 
by any means inddentaL He 
knoivs its unusually wide 
range, its mellow c hang ing 
colours, and its apparently 
eftbrtless intention of legis- 
ters. inside out .And he uses it 
with a lotaJ lack of cliche or 
manner which is as compel- 
ling as it is refr^iing. 


As an Ariel or Festt, he 
tuned his audience's ears anew 
to the ridll of the Elizabethans, 
Robert Joh^n and Thomas 
Morley. His "Full fethom 
five" ^owed no need to play 
the obvious acoustic game 
with its "din|^ong-bdr re- 
frain: the tfiiiirig harf already 
b^nn in his deep-anchored 
opening, so perfectly weighted 
and placed. No need, eithn, to 
wait for the refrain of "It was a 
lover": the cross-riiythms in 
each verse, out in his 

clean, agile diction, had al- 
ready started the dance. Doro- 
thy Linell, who had two most 
enjoyable solo lute spots ofher 
own, was a keen-eared ac- 
companist. 

Wilson crossed from the 
artful contrivance of the lute- 
nists to the contrived artifice 
of Tippett's Songs fw Ariel by 
way of Wolfgang Fortner. The 
early 1946 Shakespeare songs 


of Henze's teadier certainly 
deserve to be programmed 
more often, alon^ide, say, the 
Brahms and Strauss Shake- 
speare settings. V^lson and his 
pianist, Steifoen Naylor, 
much of the byimotic recur- 
ring figure whteh toms bade 
on Itself throii^iout the but 
"Willow, mUaw”, and m- 
phasized the harmonic astrin- 
gency of "O Mistress Mine". 

The evening ended with no 
less stylish p er fo i m inces of 
swing-style Shakespeare in the 
Arthur Young settings popu- 
larized by Laine and Dank- 
worth. 

inbry Finch 


Theatre 


Slings and arrows 

. > j nnsaspecied sttmospherics 

The Man of Mode 

Donmar Warehouse 


from the supe^fidoBy cold- 
bloodedtexL . ^ ^ 

There is osie particulany 
beant^ moment after the 
Etherege's best-known come- ntasquerade pam*, when ^ 
dv comes with the osaal the women Rate for mnwd. 


and the men are left alone 
briefly to fosget about sexual 
rivalry and get down to aquiet 
drink as watdi the &wn 

b paifing . Moments of that 
kind areaddstionaHy wdooiu 

VM >« HU-- - as you imdefstand vibsa is 

> 'vhy should yon, vriien going on. The tegdrsadvan- 
hold h, break tiie glasST lag-of^yinga Hestmation 
. 1 .... r\M«Miian • tn fhis iiiTTTr** IB the abstiBCt, and 
with a doubiiag compaiq^ is 
titat whatever outline the {dot 
mi ght witii cbnveo* 

tirwai dteor becomes oteiter- 
ated in te^ undefiaed 
dmroegi^y* . . 

It i yt«t also be said that 
there are not many left 

in iIk jday vdien Chedc by 
Jowl have deme with, it Tbe 
men are Todneed to moral 
^phers: waUang- e mbo di- 
men*s of vulisse rapacity or 

' yinile li^ With nO fiin OT 

misdiief to bring yoa half into 
g ympathy with - them. The 
women, fimn StejA BraoH 
wdTs jealonsy<iazBd Lady 
Wbodvfl to Leda Hodgson as 
W two43Suag confidante, an 
like mad, Martin 
Turner idays Dorimant (alleg- 
edly based on Rochester) with 
TWO expressions, hooded men- 
ace and a folse grim David 
GOieqae m’tians- 

ibnning Sir Fd{diiig Flutter, 
tiie auich lidiciiled fop, into 
the on^ sympathetic figure on 
stage. 

. Inii^ Wardle 


.tronagfrheg^ detficarion 
followed by the rudest pro- 
anywhere in Restoration 
drama. By way of inviting tM 
house to have a good n^ 
out, it condudes: "Smee 
of you is fond of his own^y 
fece, why should you, vam 
we hold h, break tiie glas^ 
Declan DonneliA m 
second production in the 
Cheek by Jowl season, has 
y»|Wd on this couplet (no^ 
incidentally, by Ethers bat 
by one Sir Car Scroope) as a 
kcytoihe^y. 

On a stage.flocn- resemtemg 
a horizon^ dartboard, ^ 
company first appears, gath- 
ered around the biiirsrcye; 
fevouiing ns witii hostile looks 
and sitimng out tbe pr ojogue 
in tones of the otmosc distaste 
Thereafter, they retire into a 
looking-glass wnM, applmi^ 
ing eatii other afl^ ea^ . 
s ftmg, and studioo^ ignming 
all signs oi appreciation from 
the house. 

The show is as wdl-dnued 

as a piece of dcicfcwoik; and its 

circular moves and 
pins tiw trick of finez- 
ing sev^ groups in postiro 
of desire (V amazemeirt while 
another group jeite . into 
speedi and motion, irastently 
cii g pftgr the operation, of a 
wind-up toy. It is an impees^ 
rive speriacle, e^ecially as Mr 
Donitellan also knows now fo 
vary his rhythms and extract. 


Moonona 
Rainbow Shawl 

Stratfiard East 

Errol . John's, li^itwright do- 
mestic come^ of evrayto 
Trinidadian lira won the Ob- 
server play coippetition oi 
1957, was jKemiited at the 
R(^ Court tiw next year and 
has not been , seen m these 
islands rince then. That woidd 
not appear to have been an 
important loss to the theatre- 
going pnteic. Set m -1946, the 
action devolves entirely in a 
cramped badori^ of wooden 
riianties in Port of Spain, 
where we meet a &oiOy 
comprisiiig an ag^Bg former 
fast boirier, Ms f airiy stodc 
harridan of a wi& and ibdr. 
, young danghter who has a 
of her own. but no' 
ht^tod.. .... ^ 

fo tiw shade next dboir lives 
Rori^ a c^' waitress who' in' 
true soap feshion is carrying 
cm with Ephraim, the hand- 
some troO^bm driver aooss 
the way; he in tom finds his 
nights disturbed by his imme- 
diate neighbour, an opportu- 
nistic tart malting the most of 
the then American milhaiy 
presence in the CarfobeiuL 

A plot of a kind luidies to. 
the surfece when the cafe is 
burgled on the ni^ of the 
veterans' victory celebrations, 
and F-phraim fitida the claus- 
trophcMc dead end of his life 
all too ■ much for him and 
elects to sedc his fortune in 


1# .. 


r- 





Tfoy Azmalndiiig's oprig^ 
and vofaiUe Epbraim 

Lxvetpo^ life win, wei^tiwr, 
on mudi tiw same without 


Ejecting his own for 
tiw first time, Mr John fe owed 
witii the proteem of making 
the IS dmracters come alive 
in less than 100 minutes of 
stage time. Tony Anna- 
trading’s iqsight and at times 
vohtide Ej^uiim worics weD 
dsougb with Jaye Griffiths's 
more banked-down Rosa, al- 
though one cannot but notice 
that the latter's attempt at a 
West Indiatt acce n t never gets 
mudiiarther west than Wales, 
while two of tbe other young 
players sound markedly Lon- 
don. Barbara Assoon le^ the 
way as the put-upon mother. 
andJoanne Campbdl makes a 
marvdlously vul^ tarL 

Martin Cropper 




Gioacchino Rossini’s 

SEMIRAMIDE 

Concert performances 

Conductor 

Henry Lewis 

Cast includes 

June Anderson, Marilyn Home, 
Samuel Ramey, Chris Merritt, 
Gwynne Howell 

April 9, 12, 15 at 6.30pm 

AccessAilsa/Dioers Club 
Reservations: 01-240 1066/19U 

A HiimitEzem 

IpCKifriJ h HllItJjSK HaUlUfi pk 


rOR4’vVEEK3 0r^LY 
. . 20 Mcrct’ :o 19 ip'i' ' 

EILEEN ATKINS' 


‘ESSEKUtf 



bv 

^c-hi rc:e-'T-0P 


Gi 923 6363 

crtlS OOpr^ (' CT"! 7 30pT), 
'iVec 4 Set Mptj tfpr- 29 Wprer, 3 : 3 OOpn 
S'O ptrTsMprch 2S43I ' 

P'pnr:n; 90 rr.-s. 



A mvided nation? ... or 

A IHTED KINGDOM 

MVID OWEN 

PubHriwd to coincide with the 5dt annivetsaty of 
the SOP, David Owen's dynamic new book cuts 
.to tiie centre of this country's political and 
economic crisis, confiontii^ ' those issues diat 
efivide our society and -putting forward a 
powerful argument- and a riwUgny for a better 
Britain - for a united kingdom. ' 

A Penguin (Original (§) sC2-95 


THE 'BEmX^ 

STRATA GEM 

-by George Farquhar 
Oirecied by Peter James - 

TInwdv Bailovi^ fttsy Byn^ Anm Carteret. Niceite Oogrin, 
Ron Fbnagan, Prid.Freenm Paul.Hun^poleB, Anna Undup, 
Reger UeweKyn. Susan Fbrrect, Robert PUce. David lUntOirt. 

' KenStea,Rjchitfd^te. Paub'Vil%eK ' 

Prnm 3 ITNaiy ' 

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-t: 






THE TIMES WEDNESDAY MARCH 26 1986 - - ■ 9 


Ilie marriage of Imperial 
cUid United Biscuits, 
have the OFTfe permission. 

(Now all we need is your blessing) 

IMPERIAL UNITED BISCUITS 


MAJOR INTERNATIONAL 
BRANDED GOODS COMPANY 
(United Imperial) 


VI 


LONGTERM PROFIT 
BUILDING POLICY 


EXPERTISE IN 

GROWING STRONG BRANDS 


DRIVE FOR NEW 
PRODUCT DEVELOPMENT 


V, . 


CDMMITMENTTO 
CAPITAL INVESTMENT 


LEADING UK 
MARKET POSITION 


INNOVATIVE 
NEW PRODUCTS 


PENETRATION OF 
OVERSEAS MARKETS 


EFFECTIVE 
COMPETITOR WITH 
MULTI-NATIONALS 



HIGHLY REWARDING 
PROFITS 


Imperial and United Biscuits are 
made for each other 

A marri^ would mean a totally 
logical pooling of resour^ provid- 
ing them with the immediate ability 
to compete in international markets. 
Successfully and profitably 

Hanson Thist, on the other hand, 
would never prove a suitable partnei; 
despite its aggressive courtship. 

Hanson^ attitude to business is 
completelydifferent 

Its way is to buy profit, throng 
acquisition. 

The Imperial and United Biscuits 
w^ is to earn it in the market place, 
wifli famous brands doing famously 
and looking forward to sustained 
profit growtii. 

Hanson has been married many 


times before. And some of its part 
ners havebeenleftathom^gathering 
dust 

Which isn’t suiprising when you 
consider Hansoi& miserly record for 
capital investment 

In 1985, Hanson invested just £59 
million inits companies-amere2%% 
of sales turnover By contrastjlmpe^ 
plou^ed back £193 million in capital 
investment a sum that represoits 
twice Hansoife rate of investment 

Support the Imperial and United 
Biscuits marriage 

And you too can look forward to 
a happy and prosperous future 



^ in this advertisement set bat or referred ta in the letter from the Channan. Imperial Gnmp pic to shareholders dated 13th February 1986. The directors of Imperial Group pic (inducing those who have ddecaied 
- - for the ntfui **** ^ ^^^^ sui^rvision of this adverdsem^t) have taken alt reasonable care to ensure that the facts stated and opinions expressed herein are fair a nd acc urate The directors accept lesponsibility’ accordingly 




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10 


THE TIMES WEDNESDAY MARCH 26 1986 


SPECTRUM 


( 



Can Whitehall stay on the 





The Qvfl Service has survived the Thatcher 


revolution but the fiiture still poses many 


threats to its traditions, as Colin Hoghes 
reports in the last part of his series 


Civil servants have endured the 
turmoil of cuts, leaks, secrets trials 
and trade union tussles with their 
core instincts and attitudes intact 
But can the ^sieni withstand the 
shocks in store? 

The well-tried Whitehall meth- 


od is fine_ for Monday 


moniing: **Get out the nle, and see 
what we did last time.** But can 
civil ser%'anis' world-weary prag- 
matism, bom of seeing r^ turn 
blue and back a^in without any 
obvious change in their day-to- 
day lives, cope with inexorable 
pressures that have been mount- 
ing for 20 years? Si^icions are 
growing that their crisis manage- 
ment horizons are too narrow ror 
the day after tomorrow. 

Sir Douglas Wass, former Per- 
manent Semtary at the Treasury, 
is no revolutionary. But he has 
voiced a widely-felt unease that 
**recent developments must cause 
us as a society to examine \i4iether 
we want to continue with the 
traditional relationship, the 
apoliticality of a career Civil 
Service**. 


‘The Alliance 
will need a 
revolution in 
WhitehaU’ 


Sir John Hoskins, director- 
general of the Institute of Direc- 
lors. has mounted a fierce right- 
wing criticism of government ever 
since leaving the Downing Street 
policy unit, challenging the com- 
fortable myths that pervade 
Vi^itehall and Westminster. He 


matches, in many ways, the 
radical left's long-held belief that 


the Civil Service stands like a 
rock-fell barrier in the path of 
progress. 

Hoskyns* argument goes fun> 
tber. starting with the blunt ap- 
praisal that Westminster simply 
does not contain enough people of 
the brains and ability needed to 
turn the ship of state, while 
Whitehall's backward-looking in- 
sularity lacks the vision necessary 
to grapple with an historic trans- 
formation in Britain's fortunes. 

“When r was head of the policy 
unit we produced a document 
which showed that maintaining 


present policies could mean aver- 
age tax levels of 45 percent a head 
by the end of the century, while 
the wealth-creating sector, private 
and public, was shrinking. The 
report was leaked, and the Gov- 
ernment. Gvil Service and politi- 
cians between them, backed off 
firom a serious rethink of the 
Welfare State. But that doesn't 
mean the problems wifi go away.**' 

He advocates injecting a frkb 
body of expertise into govern- 
ment, motivated both by political 
conviction and the drive to strike 
at the root of the malaise. It would 
mean, in effeci, “shadow** teams 
of 10 to 20 officials per depart- 
ment, maintained like private 
offices in exile at parties' head- 
quarters. at the taxpayer's 
expense. 

Whitehall shrugs its collective 
shoulders. Sir Robert Arrastrong, 
the Cabinet Secreta^. accepts that 
the neutrality tradition is under 
strain from political polarization, 
but insists: “We have by no means 
reached the point where it's 
impossible“. 

But a similar attack is bei^ 
mounted fh>m new quarters. Wif 
liam Wallace, a Liberal adviser to 
David Steel, says the Alliance will 
need to institute “a revolution in 
Whitehall" if it comes to ^wer. 
The myth that senior civil ser- 
vants are natural social democrats 
un^ their neutral skin is based 
on the fallacy that impar^ 
means centrist Alliance politi- 
cians are deluding themselves if 
they believe Whitehall will re- 
spond with special enthusiasm to 
their ideas. 

Wallace emphasizes the major 
items in the Alliance programme 
which are bound to meet strong 
resistance. The Civil Service 
proved, under the last Labour 
gpvemment its natural impulse to 
dig in heels on any attempt to 
devolve political power from cen- 
tral government Thot^ many 
civil servants approve ofrepealing 
the Official Secrets Aa and 
putting a Freedom of Information 
Act in its place, they might baulk 
at a BUI of Rights which gave 
ordinary citizens undue licence to 
mierffere. 

Green environmental policies 
threaten the habitual philosophies 
of most main departments: 
Energy's commitment to pressur- 
ized water reanors for nuclear 
power, Agrio/lture's sympathy 
with the farming lobby. 
Transport's ambitions for lorries 



Additional force is tent to 
pressure foe oven politi^ ^ 
pointments into policy advice aM 
administration by CKve Footing s 
widdy-hdd view tl^ “tte Ovil 
Service is being pnt increagn ^y |n 
the position of being the advoM 
of government poticy in public , 
and outsidCTsare needed t o“bn^ 
the grip of the administrative 
ctess.** Austin Miufeell, .the La- 
bour MP who is chairing a back- 
bench inquiry into civil servants 
duties and responsibiiities, . says 
that, although civil servgnt s are 
coming before Select Committees 
more often, tiiey ^merdy ^ as 
ministers' moutbpieoes. . . 

Use of the CivS Seryte as an 
jnst iMregnt of party politick j)pw- 
er ^Miile in goverament is well- 
esfeblish^ the difference and it 
is substantiaL is dun the'contra- 
(tictions are out in the open. 
Bernard. rngiianL. the Prime 
Minister's press seerdary, is a civil 


servant sumx»edly bound by the 
tr^ition or service with “energy- 


and airports. Not least propor- 
tional representation threatens po- 
iitied unpredictables which the 
Civil Service mind would rather 
not contemplate. 

As yet prominent Alliance poli- 
ticians tove been tentative. Shir- 
ley Williams rejects the Armstroi^ 
Code principle of total CivU 
Service loyalty to ministers alone 
as “inadequate and disturbing". 
David Owen's approach is to 
propose breaking the security of 
tenure, and the culture of 
Buggins's Turn and pensions that 
goes with it 

But if the next general election 
results in a hung parliament as 
seems possible, how would the 
bureaucrats greet a coalition gov- 
ernment relying on Alliance sup- 
port In a multi-party carve-up of 
ministries, the fear that dvU 
servants would use the Whitehall 
bush tei^rapfi to settle differences 
out of si^t is understandable. Sir 
Patrick Nairoe. former Permanent 


‘The winning 
party’s red box 
will be waiting 
for it’ 


Secretary at the DHSS, wryly 
remarks: “A coalition government 
would have to hang together as 
best it could ... all, most 
Cdjinets have an dement of 
coalition about them.** 

This “so what's new?" scepti- 
cism runs deep, and the Alliance 
response so is cleariy inade- 
quate. The best suggestion is the 
so-called “Cheshire rules", de- 
signed by tile ruling group on 
Cheshire County Council to en- 
able eqnal access to officials while 
^araotceing political confi- 
dences. But central government is 


a* fer cry from local authority; 
council committees have det^ 
sion-oiaking power, with an oppo- 
sition representation unknown to 
the pariiamentary constitution. 

The Civil Senvice taiefe are 
already being written for the day 
after the next genecal etection, one 
set for each party, carefully kept 
secret and separate. Whidiever 
party arrives in power the day 
after peeling day, its first red box 
will be Tc^y and waiting. 

Mrs Thatcher was allowed ac- 
cess to selected senior civil ser- 
vants before 1979, under the 
convention that policy is not 
disciLss ed: organization arrange- 
ments — sneh as the practicalities 
of splitting Trade and Industry, or 
blentfing Education and Employ- 
ment — are the only allowed toiw 
between Opposition leaders and. 
mandarins. If Kumodc, Sted or 
Owen come to power, they will be 
Idenied sight of this Governments 
political papers. 


but without entfausiam", but has 
beemne* publi^ identified whh 
Mis .Thatdier personally and pOr 
iitically. He could not survive a 
of government in his 
present post 

While' many' politicians sympar 
thize whh Hosk^’ criticisms of 
the system, support his sdo^ 
tions. Laboin* membm remembd’ 
all too well Harold Wilson's 
Department of Economic Affeirs, 
«^h Imn ght in economists and 
political advisers as a counter to 
Treasury consensus. Civil ser- 
vants nidcoaxned it the Dep^- 
meot of Extraordinary Aggression, 
and left u hi^ and diy. 

This govonment has 22 special 
“political" advisers, mostly oa 
five-year' contracts, based . in 
mixustets' private offices mound 
WhitdialL They are bti^ young 
Tories or expeiienced party Bac k s 
who act as a^ts for the minister, 
helping drw speechrs, mixing 
with career officials in areas of 
departmental poU^4ulDuig min-; 
Esters cannot readi. .' 

The slimmeddOTO policy imh 
at Downing Street mixes pcnitical 
advisers whh career civil servants, 
but has nooetheless been seen aaa 
nascent Prime Minister's 
dqranment . . 

Eager dvil servants, fruited 
by the slow system, baye been 
known to use it as an ontiet for 
ideas wUch are maHng no head- 
way. As one adviser says: “We do 
occasionally gn discreet tetephmie 
calls fiom principals .dr. under- 
secretaries who think that, vriiete 
ti^ baye hk a bsjckwalb wehaye. 
dfawi access to powex , at .-tius 
contre. If $ j:^y an m 

helps bur im^igenoogathcring: 
after all they . have a. lot more 


resources at their disposal and 
.more admimsusdve experience 
Thim we have." 

Wallace's aigamem Iwilds on* 
that saying that if all mini^ 
ters —and maybe even Opposi- 
tion, parties as wdl- had such 

ihini-depaitmenis of their own, it 
restore genuine CabiiM 
governraest and enaUe welMn* 
Snned political criticism. Such 
democratizing ambitions cut bt^ 

• ice elsewhere. 

As rate minister says: “The OvB 
Service is hardly a bioaic man. 
capable of being beefod up into a 
superstar bv tanspiant. It would 
simitiy .nejea the new oigans and 
leave diem to wnber." 

jFbr the first time, civil sen^ts 
have ceased to answer criticiCTS 
.with the argument that Britain's 
bureaucracy isadmiied and mod- 
dted the world over. Christopher 
y pgwifOtat , former European 
•Coriimqaity Commissioner, says 
foie^ners tend to respj^ the 
British sysm for ife emdcDcy, 

yt^fre df ^iisna, ^TBCSS . and - 
cdgecti^. 

did fed it was a 
natioiial asset to have a Gvil 
Service that served gcnmmenis 
'6F difierent parties with equal 
dedication and profesBonalism." 

But. thou^ the bureaucracy 
ntay be at “do^ what it is 
- tcM to do,- that does not mean 
pe<Hrfe would fed our political 


‘Foreigners tend 
to respect the 
British system 
foritsft^ess’ 


.is necessarily the most 
ittetmgmngl" . 

A TMem'exdiaiige between Jim 
Caltegban and Austin Mhchell at 
the Cit^ Service Sd^ Commit- 
tee inqmxy sums .scepticism 
about the i»^&)r diai^ and the 
ooutdttpt hdd' by. critics of the 
system^w iis.ouidaied d« 

. CaTfeghttn. was ariced. if there 
' were, to be .a for. loinisiers 
de^Tm^foeirdutiesaiMto 
sibOhies to^dvil - servants, what 
should h say? One paragraph, be 
a n s w ered: “It is yow teqxHisilMl- 
ky to be pothe, to be courteous, to 
listen what is said to you and 
absorb it, and be loyal to your 
JMvate Office so it can serve you 
.to the best of itt abUity." 

' Mftcfa^ retorted: *^11 sounds 
hike a Boy jScout code.** At which 
CaUa^Rcame bade, without a 
'’^Wbat^ wrtwg^ w Boy 
Scouts?" And foey bdong to the 
same,-p(ditical par^-. 


One day, little battery hen, 
all tins will be yours. 



gr 


Over 95% of Britain's 47 million hens 
Spend most of their adult lit'es in battery 
cages. 

Sharing an av'erage IS" x 20' floor space 
with threeormoreothers doesn't leavemuch 
room for the niceties of life, such as moving 
around, spreading their wings, or stretching 
their legs. If you would rather see hens 
given the freedom of expression in a 
more natural enrironment, there's 


I 


something you can da Insisting on FREE 
RANGE eggs will help to support and 
improve a growing industry where hens can 
do just thaL 

True, non-battery eggs may cost a little 
more. But as an aa of compassion, those few 
extra pennies can achieve a lot. 

So if you're choosing eggs this 


P Easter, think about battery hens. 


And put the chicken bdbre the egg. 


r; 


.Charity in Action. 


I would like to support the RSPGL I endosea donation of £. 
\ or charge my Aci:.?ss,''BjnHflyrt^r,l Nii 

Name 


Address. 


Send toRSPC.A, FREEPOST. Horsham. Vfei Sussex RH12 IZA 


.Postcode. 


The day of reckoning 


A much mafigued species can 
walk tall this year. Other men 
WED commemorate a momeat 
of history, but the estate 
agents of Engfaind can cele- 
brate a moBoment to Adr 
craft: in Domesday they have 
the greatest pra^ectns enr 
compiled. 

The fuss is not about heroic 
deeds or valuables imeartfaed, 
bat aboat “det bng Ige luge fall 
CH". The abbreviations m the 
Domesday text are the coun- 
terpait cS today's property 
columns. This is En gland in 
10^ as Knight, Frank and 
Rndey might have described 
it 

The King was opoiing all 
his cupboards to inspect his 
inheritance. William at Glou- 
cester, accord!^ to theidagfo- 
Saxon Chroakle, “sent his 
men all over Enriand, into 
every shire, and had them find 
ont bow many hmid^ hides 


An exhibition opens 


tomonow to mark 


900 years since 


10 do) one ox nor ooe-^giriiidi 
was there out, and pnt 
down in hfe record; and all 
diese records were bro^t tO: 
him aftrewaids.** . 


King William b^an 


the Domesday audit 


there were in the shire, or what 
and catde Ae' Kl^ 
himagif had ia Ae co un tr y , or 
what does be ought to hare fo 
twelve months from the shire. 
Also he had a record made of 
how much lenii his arefabisfa- 
ops had, and his bislMtos and 
his abbcto and his eai^ . 

You can feel the apprehen- 
sion quickening as Ae chroni- 
cler goes on. “So very 
narrowly did he have it inre^ 
gated there was no «ing U 
hide, nor a yard of land, nor 
indeed (fr Jlf o skame to relate 
bat t semed no skame to Um 


CONCISE CROSSWORD NO 909 


ACROSS 
1 Fed sorrow (6) 

4 Silting room (b) 

7 Narrow road (4| 

5 Drive! (8) 

9 Unenlightened (8) 
13 MalectniJ) 

16 Flay drink gas (6.7) 

17 Be r ei notsefiit (3) 

19 Quarrel fighting (8) 

24 Sedge (8) 

25 Window shelf (4) 

26 Prestige (6) 

27 Yellowish (6) 


DOWN 
1 Soothe (4) 

I .Animal show 

3 DrifuS) 

4 Flaxfebric(5) 

5 Seconddiand (4) 



6 Relish (5) 

I? Encounter 14) 

I Jlakeconfu^(S) ,§ Blemish (4) 

!i T?!!f ^ ,fl, 18 German submarine 

13 Third artniversary 191 


20 InsisB upon f5) 

21 Sea golf course (S) 

22 Solicit (4) 

23 Defect (4) 


SOLUTION TO NO 908 


ACRO^: _ 1 Hansom 5 Gibs 8 Uni^^ 9 Support ItRehtiqn 13 


.Ache 15 Commercialism 17 Loss 18 Spurious ^Moe^ 22 
Vtsta 23 Troy 24 Notate 

DOWN; 2Ariel 3Say 4 Misconception SCope dBronchi 7 
Cumculum lOTheraiosiat 12 Trek 14 Fair 10 Masseur 19 On- 
set 20Stav 22 Vet 


The italics are mine, bat yon 
get an idea <rf irimt mart tone 
been the popoto reaction. The 
awUtors were in, and whh -a 
rengeance. 

The coontiy, vitet from Ae 
Northern comities where Ae 
Khig's writ stiD did not na in 
10^ was divided toto seres 
ciremts, and Ae Worcester 
dFcnh was travelled by the 
Bishop of Linodn, Remans, a 
derk and two nHmks wiA fahn, 
and three promtnpiit htymea. 

The questiems they asked . 
have survived in the oontempo- 
rary doenment known as The 
Ely Inquest. “They inquired 
what cto manor was called; 
vrbo held it at the Ane Kii^ 
Edward; vrlio hoUa it now; how 
many hides of land; how many 
pkn^hs owned by the knd and . 
how many beloiigiiQ to Ae 
men . . .** And . so file list 
lengthens. 

The • mrit ei inqn^ wait 
always the mamw, probaUy 
the area of the modm priri^ 
and there to snpfKMt the 
apkeep of the man in armorn'. 
At hs centre was Ae simkmi 
trad; and the line dL hats, 
perhaps a dmreh, and beyond 
Aese Ae fiiree immense <men 
fields. 



To the manor born: Major John Shirley (centre); sons PhiBp 
(left) and the tomily chapiel,-iin^anged since'tOSti 


KNIGHT LIFE 


The men who worked these 
fields hrm^t oorn to their 
lord's ntiU — they owed hint ' so 
many days* work — and file 
majority could not leave the 
manor withoat his permission. 
The Itod spent most of .Ae 
time consmniiig their prod nee 
like an enonnons ipnh. 

One fondly, miiqiiely, is sffiL 
where h was at Domesday; 
Major John Shirley' owns 
Etfittgton Park near.StratfQvd.. 
His fondly has owned it in 
nnbroken male descent d"ry a 
Saxon thane culled Sasvralo. 
Their estate was assessed at 
17 hides in 1086, a hite 


generally token .to;he' tooond 
100 to 120 acres, it is niow 
rather forger, at 3JOOO acres. 

AlAongJi the faimly.stgl owns- 
the manor ft . is inbre than 80. 
yean since a Sdri^ - lired 
there. - . . - 

“F ^hk if^ a ernnhinatfOD- 

of gpod in^ good breeding. . » 

and good stimed Domesday. 900. in one 

Phfl^Shhfoy, a^Andna riuw w ..'ofuemGsrdrm^cjocations 
ter^ accomubuit “We nm-j evailab^ , th&;' J 3A .century 
did "anyliiii^ parficnlairly' ex-' at' 'Win^estet 


KeniNth -.Pearson. vAo has 
stalked the cestiiiips like 1% 
.Who for ltis.-dld--ein{ripy^ 
The. Sunday Times;. coiyuifr% 
. lip: .Pharo^ .Vikings ^4nd 
• . loA . cefmiry .-soldieky-«ia a 
series- .of ..exhibitKMis;' has 


dfingor disthiinlied.' . 

- The list, was completed ht.-a 
harry antf'WQfoun -was dead 
hefoiv^ Ae returns of the 
eastern drenit coflM he written 
op, so Liwdon -was nenm 
indsded. • . 

'It lins neiler po^larl'The 
nameit^is a sacJaniBei first 
used in an idBcfol dnmniinitin 
J221, hut probably nsed hug 
briore.- It was.fiimt^'of as 
anofiier event wluai would 
also aBow no appeal, the.Day 
of Dome or Jm^jmntoit ‘ 


Inrid^ the te^ of.aninvad* 
iso haVeMn biiilt wiA 
a ltfe«^ Nbrinan on 


horseback ‘ batefiilly 

from thc-< 


Byroik Refers 


; db^ frofri the.-entrance'at 
Aose-qjonbers.^ the public 
: Mereii^ Aeir right of free 
rdcess'toihe medieval -Round 
.' Tabte hung on -the wall, inside. 

The exhibition opens lo- 
- morrow at the Great Han 
'Winchester' and- runs every 
day until NovemberJ (lOton- 
6pm, 10-8^' during June, 
July and August). Admission: 
£2. children, OA^ etc, £1. 
Euhiiy ticket £5. 


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THE TIMES WEDNESDAY MARCH 26 1986 


11 


•• '• V 



WEDNESDAY PAGE 


Working, and staying mum 


Conduding her series bn the modem woman, Bel Mooney asks 
whether a career damages the motherrdaughter relationship 


T^ey_ sat in the comiDon room in 
Walsiamain girls* comprehensive' 
school, Clapbam, south London — 
(he fsothers of (omotrow; a group of 
] 6-year-old$ who, though of mM ' 
race, class and abilz^, show^ 
remaricable uniformity of. opinioiL 
Are women and men equal? Not one 
band up. Should be? All 
up. How many want a &mily one 
day? All but one. How many wOl - 
want a job as well as ihwhernood? 
All. • • ■ 

Amanda Coombes, lisa Nfiliett, 
Elaine Mitchell. Afi Ansah, Elaine ' 
Brooic^ Jocelyn Amponsah, 

Spindh and Marcia Sybliss all have 
woildog mothers, aO believe &then 
should help with **motberii^ — 
their own did noL One 
**My mum keeps on at me to go to 
univ^ty because she never had the 
chance. It's part of being a parent, 
wanting your kids to do better,** 
Another **Our mums-. have been’ 
made to think about ail that and say: 
Yes, -there's more to ti& than just 
being. a mum." Another "Yeah, 
they've been made to think it by . usT* 

So will they be different their 
mothers? A moment of doubt 
"There's a danger of it aO slipping 
back . . . getting married and having 
kids and settling for staying at home. 
It's always one step forward and two 
st^badc.” 

It would be imjiossible to imaginea 
friendlier, more mdependentgroup of 
— all bom at the end of the 
Sixties, all but one admitting did 

notwanttobelikeiheirownmotbers. 
Content to be a mother and have 
dau^teis the same? Na Tbmk yon 
can be independent-mioded and a 
mother?. Of course. 

This generation of daughters has a 
confidence that must be bred of 20 
years' pushii% by other, olderwom- 
en. They assume that for them there 
will be choices. 

*Sbe does seem 
to spend a lot of 

rfegning 

the house’ 



§ 


From a different hadcgnHUid, 
Lindsay Hawdon echoes their views. 
She is 14, and a day gjd at 
Kingswood School, Bafo, a co- 
educational boarding school Lind- 
say is deiennined to become an 
actress like her mofoer Sheila, who 
gave up the theatre vhen Lindsay 
was a baby becai^.'£'ai tbe time I 
thought you were 'ather a. c»eer 
woman or a wife and motbec.** ' * 

Now Siala Hamlon works as 

a marriage guidance counsellor and . 
part-time drama teadier, tmd looks 
surprised when her daoglilcr mur^ 
murs that Sheila's life seems "(hilT. 
"She does seem to spend a lot of time 
cleaning the house**, says Lindsay. 
"I'd pimer to be in the theatre all the. 
time." 

Lindsa/s scenario Am- her o^ 
frnure is dear. She wants to establish 
herself as . an actress before havi% 
two children, and thinks it **natm^- 
that her husband will help her bring 
Dp foe cfaiJdi^ She would stop work 
to have foe tables, fom go ba^ 

*The mBB rd many would think 
men and women are the same. Td 
. want him to encourage me, and Td 
racqurage him otherwise it 
wouldn't work onL** • 

Whence comes such confidenCK 
The due comes when Lindsay says 


how influenced she is by faier mother 
in ^judging acting performances. De* 
spite the eaiiy dedsion to give 19 
work, Sheila Hawdon is a women of 
great wisdom, who does not live 
"through** her two daughters. "Td 
like to tha t whatever lindsw 
does, it w(m*t be.ftNT meAfy own lire 
is so. interesting die doesnh have to 
achieve for mec" 


■T certainly had 
things to rebel 
agahist; my 
daughters don’t’ 


But for some moth^ sedng their 
daugblos "get on" is mon impor- 
tant than- perhaps foey admh. If 
daughters can learn to define them* 
sdves forou^ their mofoers* deni- 
als,. motheis can r^in what they 
lost through what their deleters. 

There is a. him of that with Mo 
HoUand-and.her 1 7-year-old dan^ 
terEnima, a dxfo former at a tou^ 
Cardiff co mpt dw n gve. Mo is mar^ 
Tied to' foe artist Hany Holland, 

' always longed to study art heiself, 
and IS dd^ited Emma has a itace 
on a Foundation course. "My par- 
ents fooii^t I should ^'aj(fo when I 
left school, so I ended np a secretary, 
and marrinl Harry wl^ I was 20. 
There was a for greater difference 
between my mother and me than 
there is between Emma and me. 1 
certainly had flungs to rdrel agamst, 
whereas Emma and her older sister 
don’t** 

£mma Holland has a lelaiced set of 
assumpticms about her future in- 
clurfe mofoerbood and a career, 
focnigh she imagiiies foe latter more 
vivi^. On foe sorfece that mi^ 
seem strange, as her "role modd** 
has always. biren at home. But Mo 
ascribes to the ideas of grmter choice 
for women that were aired in the 
Sixties and Seventies, "so I've 
alw^ tried to the ^ris feel 
that** Emma shni^s:*' 1 can't imag- 
ine having to prove Fm equal, to any 
boyJ like men . . . but I don’t know 
any g^ who jnst wants to get 
married and ham duldren. I thmk 
it’s bow thtt timet ait.” 

■ Mo says it will be "easier in 
general” for 1^ daii^ler's genou- 
tion: ** You foink about wtat yoa 
want tbeb future to be. But in the 
end it must rest wifo foeitt** 


T never wanted a 
mo&eTathome. 
because Inever 
had one’ 


Of cohr^ foe ideology of mofoer- . 
hood is always most powerful when 
there are pnssuies to reduce foe 
levd of remale emplt^unent, or 
anxiety about foe poor qirelity of foe 
nation's children. There are signs of 
foattoday. 

Yet when women are needed in 
the work^ce (at a time of war, for 
ezampleX national nursery fecflities 
are extanded, a^ foe importance of 
constant mothering is imdentayed. 
.Then guOt is foe harden carried by 
foe .. worlring mother, and the 
"bigger** the career the greater the 
guilL . 

If all the young giris who iKme one 
day to have .a job and be mofoers 


could meet Hden and Elizabeth 
Westwood, they would feel 
reassuredJlelen is bureau chief at 
the American Broadcasting 
Corporation's London office, one of 
only four women to have such a 
position in the ufooie of the ABC 
news division. A miner's daughter 
from a smaD Pennsylvania town, she 
tad a mother who was "a nice apifle- 
{ue !a^ who tai^t her ghls how to 
cook, bake ^ emtaoidCT.” 

At university Hden migored in 
physics and was first in her year; she 
later joined The New York Times. 
Hfaaheth was bom in 1963, when 
Hden had "wdcen up” to the 
opportunities foe wmnen in broad- 
Msriwg and joined ABC She never 
conadered not working. 

"It didn't bother me”, says 22- 
year-old EKrah rth, and tdls of "nice 
people” who helped look after her, of 
accompanyii% her mother to woric 
and meeting adnhs. "Sure, I would 
spend summers at my grandmother’s 
and it was nice. But g(^ to work 
with my mother was excttii^ I never 
wanted a mother at home because I 
never had one. I a!w^ felt my 
friends' ihothers weren't as good as 
mine, because they stayed at home 
and foe was out there doing 
something 

Hden was successful acadenrical- 
ly; Etizabefo gave up her art course; 
to her mother’s disappointment 
Helen has achieved a distingmshed 
serious career, Elizabeth has doire 
s(Mue modelling and is now set to 
launfo herself on the pop world with 
her band Westwoild. Helen supports 
her "It's hard for an 01^ child. 1 
wanted her to be everything: an ic^ 
skater, a beautiful movie-star-Iaw- 
yer-doctor ^ rdled into oat.” 
Glamorons but levd-taaded, Eliza- 
beth sketches out her own f u t ur e; it 
involves success and selfsidficiency 
in the fineground, with children in 
the backgronnd when she is 
proaching30. 

Helen's husband has an important 
job in Washington (the new transat- 
lantic mania^); Etizabefo lives with 
her mother m her dry Kensington 
flat They are more like friends man 
mother and daughter. Etizabefo 
exiflains wfoy: "Oh, it’s the way she 
aooqjted me in everything I wanted 
to do, and badked me. I am proud cmT 
ufoat she has adikved, being a 
woman. And if I am confident now, 
lo(A at tta mo^ 1 have! The biggest 
influence in my life is my mofoer.” 



Sb^e-stnick: Shdla and lindsay Hawdon share one ambition at least 



Itaet ambitknis: fbr : 


Hdhuid, as taiqlit by motiim’ Mo 




Best ftfends: Helen Westwood snpports dang^ EUzabeth in everything she does 



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Teachers don’t have to he taut 


About 40 teachers, mo^ 
from London, . did something 
unnsual earto this month: 
foey did not discuss the. 
di^te, talk about or tiie 
minutiae of supervision rotas. 
They sat in a hjfo, shut foeir 
eyes and tried to imagiire the 
ideal sebooL 

It was an . exercise that 
initially met wifo scepticism. 
Ithadbeenpreceededl^a 10- 
mxnute moaning session that 
tad produced foe femiliar 
cal^ogue of edncational woes: 
drunk colleagues; lack of fecil- 
itie^ wideqjread steali^ and 
ho communication wifo. fel- 
low. teachers. They were fired 
up uifo the awful impossibfl- 
-hyofitalL 

But a calm spread. The 
tense firees relax^ as t!^ 
were ad^ to imagine waking 
up in the morning full . of 
enfousiasm because they were 
going to their ideal ^ooL 
"Stand outside foe gates for a 
moment. Watch foe feces of 
the children. Notice how they 
look going to an ideal school 
Now go iaride.” 

' . Hie roeaker was Guy 
Claxton, director of teacher 
training at Kings College. 
London, who for foepast year 
has been running Education 
Nmworfc workshops for teach- 
ers who are demoialired and 
depremed by their working 
co^itions a^ want to redis- 
cover foe idealism that made 
them take up foe professioiL 

Education Network b^an 
about, three years ago when' 
half a tiozen tike-minded 
teachers starting meetiz^ legn- 
larly to discuss their <»ling. 
The Network nm hs first 




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workshop last year, at £1S a 
head, and it also produces a 
small magazine. 

Slim md bearded, with a 
ti^t and easy manner, 
Oaxton began by talking 
about his Amstrad. "Fve jnst 
got one of those computers 
a^ all my metaphors are 
computing at the moment. 
Today is a chance to see if foe 
progriuns we are rumiing are 
the ones that are foe most 
ftilfniing and inoductive.” 

A few. weeks eaifrer I had 
attended a siqiport group run 
1^ Claxton for foose who had 
done the woiktiiop and found 
it helpful to have somewfoere 
to go to talk about their hopes 
and secret terrors. As one of 
the teachers said: "The whole 
scbCKri system is an emotional 
no-go area. We don't teach the 
children to value and expre s s 
their emotions. What I get out 
of coming here is foal 1 find 
others are experiencing foe 
sane feelings as me ana Fm 
not going crazy.” 

“Emotions aren't the 
point”, one woman retorted. 
"It's about actions. This i^ace 
e^les me to make commit- 
ments to myself to do som^ 
thing. If 1 don't do something 
afterwards then it has been a 
waste of time.” . 

One of the most moving 
moments of ibe monaing bad 
come triien this woman start- 


ed to explain that she wanted 
to tell her deputy head bow 
stron^y she dis^reed with 
her but k^ quiet because she 
was afraid she would not 
express herself dearly. She 
was obviously distressed, and 
Oaxton, who was sitting be- 
hind her, b^n to mass^ her 
neck. "Slop touching me”, she 
said. "I want to cry.** The rest 
of the room laueJied nervously 
but in sympathy. 

"Is there anjihing else you 
want to say without worrying 
about who*s listening?** 
Oaxton inquired. Suddnily 
and tears tumbled out 
together "I love my school 


to RX»1 it.” Sobs punctuat 
her words. "Fm not going to 
let her. 

Fm a fentastic teacher. 
Working there is the most 
creative thix^ I have ever 
done. I want to let hd* know i 
feel foe doesn't care. And I 
don't want to cry in front of 
her.” 

"Fm not going to tell you 
what to do”, wxion com- 
mented, "but foe possibility is 
that ifyou talk to her foe way 
you talked to us. she is going 
to understand you.” 

The rest of the morning was 
less dramatic but two constant 
themes emerged. One was the 
fear that teachers tave of 
authority and how hard they 


find it to talk to senior 
teachers. .The other was foe 
.widespread feeling of not be- 
ing appreciated 

The one piece of personal 
ifoilosophy apparently shared 
by e^'eryone in foe support 
group was the idea that people 
are responable to some d^ree 
for their problems. 

"Whenever we feel threat- 
ened or rejected or worried 
about looking foolish”, 
Oaxton said at one point *^ve 
stop living according to our 

Our defensive media- 
nisms start woiking and we 
forget our vision.” Then came 
foe clincher. "Stress is foe 
unwanted by-pi^uct of foe 
reaction to demanding cir- 
cumstances ineptly handled”. 

At once there was a roar 
from foe side of the hall "Fm 
angry”, declared a tall beard- 
ed man. "Fm not ready for all 
this enlightenment stuff. Fm a 
secondary* teacher in south- 
east London wifo mixed-abili- 
ty, multi-racial classes. When 
1 tave a difficult class it's not 
because Fm inept” But as he 
talked his anger feded and he 
went on to talk about the need 
for greater professionalism. 

Caxton explained how 
teachers can avoid wtat he 
called "gumption traps”, 
those moments when energy 
and idealism seem to drain 
away. The first requirement 
for handling them, he said, 
was to recognize them — and 
to do that there was another 
exercise. 

The workshop paired off, 
one per^R playing foe ideal- 
ist putting forward proposals 
ba^ on his or her vision of 
foe ideal school, foe other 
{taying foe cynic, pouring cold 
water on everything. "Notice 
foe point at u^ch you ideal- 
ists start to loose heart”, 
Claxton instructed. "Being 
aware of the change is foe first 
step towards preventing it” 

Jerome Bume 

The Education Network, .13 
Qovelly Road, London WS 


Making safety 
child’s play 


How parents can 
help to tackle the 
terrifying increase 
in child abu% cases 


Last week die National Sod- 
ets for foe Prevention of 
Cruelty for ChiUrea pnb- 
Ushed figares revealhv that 
foe nnnber of British chQ- 
dren repMlii^ sexnal abase 
had dooMed in 1985. 

It was a amilar and equally 
shocking statistic — that np 
to 46 per cent all American 
foildren are sexually assault- 
ed in some way ta foe age of 
18 — tint stwrred tearaer 
and psyctah^isC Sherryil 
Sens Krazier to create a 

t raining pmg mwima fof chil- 
dren cm personal safety. The 
IMt^yanuM formed part of an 
Eb^ award winning televi- 
sion doenmentary, fllnstrat- 
ii^ bow vnlneraUe children 
are to people thw trust 
As anfoor of Tta S^e 
CkiU^ 36-year-old Mrs 
Krazier belief there is only 
onepersoMfoo can protect a 
yom^stre — the child itself. 
"At the moment of risk, tiie 

only * l wng « onr <*l»H«ir»n fnn 

fiidl back im are their own 
instincts and the training we 
have given tiieoL” 

^reryll Krazier is one of 
foe leading experto in safety 
training fta chGttm in the 
United Sties. The firet tint 
in Britain tiie maiority oi 
cases also involve nn ^nlt 
foechlU trusts is, she says, all 
foe more reason why yonng- 
sters most be taught mm an 
enriy age tiurt ibey can say 
"no” to tiieir feaite, step- 
parent or neighhonr, if some- 
thb^ seems wrong. 

Jnst as nfo mngiit 

to ride a bike, svrini and cross 
the road saf<^, so foey niiist 
be tanght responsibility for 
tiieir own body, she says. 
"Smply as a first step in 
prevoition, yon can tell yoar 
chfldren timt th^ body be- 
longs to them, foat they tave 
a i^ght to say wta tonches 
tliein and how, amt fhat it's 
okay to say 'No, stop it*, and 
that person shoald stop.” 

T his approach can begin 
at two, irimi a yom^ 
ster discovers tile mag- 
ic powCT of foe words “yes” 
and "no”. As amit to her 
sister's pe-sdioolers, Mrs 
Krazier discovreed th^ even 
small children know instinc- 
tively if excessive tickJIs^ 
hogs and kisses from a bust- 
ed person seems dfetnrMng, 
and this is die time to 

encoorage them to speak ito* 
"Abnse is a deticate snb!^ 
to raise”, agrees Mrs Kra^. 
"Bat jnst let your difldrai 
know yon tave some new 
ideas and rales yon'd like to 
discuss. Most ebik^ are 
astomshingiy receptive to 
this simple appnmch.” 

Rather than a formal per- 
haps frighteung, oonversa- 
tion benveen parent and 
diOd, Mrs Krazier has creat- 
ed a "What If” game nring 
the yonngster^ natarai en- 
thusiasm for a new skill as a 
springboard for spontaneons 


discnssioii. The parent poses 
simple questions like "What 
if wiwwwwy was in the shower 
and there was a knock on foe 
door?” to the more worrying 
"Uliat if a stranger bother^ 
yoa?” In rhfe relaxed enri- 
rooment, childrea are en- 
conraged to talk — and foeir 
parents or teacher enconr- 
ag^ to listen. 

The NSPCC bas pointed 
ont foat traditionally riiUdren 
have not been listaied to — 
irften with disastrous conse- 
quences. Now their social 
workers are trained to believe 
a child, a policy supported by 
Mrs Krazier. 

A lmost withont excep- 
tion children' do not lie 
about sexual abuse, ex- 
cept to deny that it 
happened”, she says. "Chil- 
dren don't nmuially tave 
access to descriptions of sexn- 
al activities, so it's not really 
possible for them to make np 
sexnal abuse. Children who 
can talk about fois abase in 
detail tave experienced iL” 
Sometimes adults ~ nsnal- 
ly the mother — do not wish 
to hear foe trnth. Often the 
abuser is her boyfriend, the 
child's father or new stea- 
dier. Believii^ that ^ise 
shoald be stamped out before 
h settles into a long-term 
pattern, Mrs Krazier hopes 
that teadiing the "Wtat If* 
game at pre-^ool st^ can 
pepare a child for Hiimmac 
inlatorUfe. 

"It is important to talk about 
what they should do if mmn or 
dad their parents or someone 
else in die family asks them 
to do something they know 
tiiey shonldn't” 

Until the pnblicatioa of foe 
NSPCCs alarming fignrm 
last week, parental ndmoni- 
tion not to t^e sweHs from a 
stranger seemed warnii|g 
enon^ Now the problem is 
mneh more distnrfaing. Bnt 
there are ways of giving a 
child coniideoce withont turn- 
ing him or her into a nervons 
introvert Mrs Krazier says . 

If yon tave to ask a 
nrighboar to do foe school 
nm at short notice, always 
give her a frunily code woiil 
so a chOd knows ft is safe to 
entK her car. Teach yonr 
child to stay at least an arm's 
ie^^ from an onknown adnit 
so ta or she can keep a 
discreet eye on the person and 
remain in control 
Training yonr own chOdren 
is one thi^ bnt koowii^ the 
roles with other people's chil- 
dren is ^nally important 
Mrs Krazier approached a 
secom^ly lost child in a 
shopping centre. "He did 
everyfoiiug right kept an 
arm's leiqEtb aw^ frm me 
and said he was gon^ h> ^ 
cashier for help. My first 
reaclMKi was to be hurt After 
^ I knew I was an OK 
person. Then I realized be 
was doing precisely wtat I 
teach in schools.” 

Even die experts are 

iBaming . 

Suzanne Greaves 

The Safe Child by Sherryil 
Kems fCiazier (Futura, £1.95) 
is published on April 3. 




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THE TIMES WEDNESDAY MARCH 26 1986, 



THE TIMES 
DIARY 


Tripoli 

alliance 

While the bombs ere droppiog 
thick and fast in Libya, two 
Greenham Common women are 
being feted ^ Colonel GadafS in 
Tripoli. According to the Workers 
Revolutionary Party paper 
jSevnline they' are attending a 
symposium entitled the Second 
World Mathaba (forum), hosted 
by the Libyan leader, at which 
Louis Farrakhan, the American 
leader of the Nation of Islam, is 
also present. The meeting of pro* 
Libyan factions is to berate the 
evils of fascism, racism, imperi* 
alism and Zionism. Can the peace 
ladies of Greenham know that 
Farrakhan, darling of black sepa- 
ratists in the US. recently said: 
'"Hiller ^^as a very great man. He 
rose Germany up from the 
ashes."? Fanakhan. subsidized by 
an £8.5 miJIJon loan from Gadaffi, 
was recently denied entry into 
Britain by the Home Sectary 
after being invited by Hackn^ 
Black People's Association. 

Rolling stump 

Lightest moment in the dark days 
for English cricket at the third Test 
in Bartiados came with the loud- 
spraker announcement: "Will Mr 
Mick Jagger please report to the 
players* entrance at the pavilion." 
Jagger had indeed turned up to 
play, but not on the field. He 
fetched England's fallir^ star Ian 
Botham and whisked him off to a 
nightclub. 

Ad-Libbing 

You could tell that Liberal QC 
Louis Blom-Cooper was tre«lmg 
on thin ice when be told Alliance 
lawyers this week that it was time 
to take a rational look at abolish- 
ing jury trials in complex fraud 
trials setting up a national police 
force and alTowfng the Crown the 
r^t of app^ over sentencing. 
The norm^ly word perfect Blom- 
Cooper, who has wooed many a 
juror with his rhetoric as well as 
his reason, twice stuttered and 
stammered when he found his 
papers out of order. 

Fair shares 

Lord Wbiielaw certainly knew 
what to do with his shares on 
reaching Cabinet rank. He has 
admiiira placing them in a trust 
for safekeeping. As a result he 
reckons he has done a great deal 
better than if he had been conduct- 
ing his own affairs. 

Headstart 

Blackpool Goiild 'more than 
usually busy this year, thanks to 
well publicized misinfomiation 
from the TUC. Its annual direc- 
tory, apart from failing to give any 
TUC telephone numbers, has the 
AUEW conference earmarked for 
Blackpool when in it will be 
held in Eastbourne. Many indus- 
trial hacks who enjoy Blackpool's 
bracing northern air have already 
b(X>ked into the Imperial Hotel, 
the scene of much conference 
carousing in the past 

BARRY FANTONI 



THE TIME.S 

O THATCHER 
fi i’rlARH 

^ DEAU 

t denial 


*Y'OD can't blame her. It's no fan 
living on a state pension' 

:■ Musical break 

' Despite the presence of the Prince 
and Princess of Wales, the 
planned non-stop performance at 
the Royal Festival Hall tonight of 
three sections from the opera St 

• Francois d’Assise will in fact have 
! a Zd-minute interval Conductor 
'■ Seiji Ozawa apparently feels that 
' one hour and 45 minutes of 
' unrelieved Messiaen is too much 

foranyone.especiallyhimself.and 
; demanded a break. As a yoga 
' enthusiast, he will no doubt spend 
I it in a spot of meditative relax- 
; ation. It's not only the royals who 
' could find themselves confused: 
listeners to Radio J will suddenly 

• find Messiaen interrupted by Six 
!; Continents, which originally 
' , should have followed 

■ Out of place 

I' The only mystery about the 
I' appointment of Bill Bush, Ken 
Livingstone's political aide, to 
head the IL^'s external relations 
department i$ how the man it 
L passed over — Michael Ward 
information chief — ever got a job 
with the authority at alt. Ward 
who complains of an increasing 
politicization of senior posts., is, 
after all. SDP parliamenta^ can- 
didate for Tonbridge. During his 
original job interview in 1984 a 
Labour member is said to have 

• passed a note to another asking if 
the ILEA chairman. Frances 
Morrell, knew that Ward a former 
Labour MP, had joined the SDP 
three years earlier. “No, arid don't 
tell her." was the reply of the other 
mein^, impressed by Ward’s 
qualifications. “I‘m sure the 
story's apocryphal*’ ays Ward 

PHS 


Reagan’s misjudged reprisal 


David Selboanie 


The Americans have had Colo- 
nel Gad^ in their gun sights for a 
long time. Almost three years ago, 
aboai^ a missile destnqrer off 
BeiruL a senior US naval officer 
told me; "We may not know who 
our enemies are here, but we will 
get Gadaffi." His ship had just 
sailed from the Gulf of Sine, 
where American jets had chased 
two Libyan MiG-23 fighters 
awayfrom the aircraft carrier 
Eisenhower. Several off-duty sea- 
men wore T-shirts announdu 
their intention to “zap" Gadafn. 
.And this week, zapped he was. 

That, at least, seems to be the 
American assumption as its planes 
leave Libyan patrol boats 
smouldering in the disputed wa- 
ters of the gulf, the missile bases 
ashore sm^ed by US air force 
rockets. One after another, the 
diplomatic rituals had been bro- 
ken as foe Libyan colonel and the 
American president mutually ac- 
cused each other on prime time 
US television of terrorism, imperi- 
alism and blackmail. Arab leadm 
who would have liked nothing 
more than foe overthrow of foe 
Libyan leader listened appalled as 
Reagan's rhetoric forced them to 
offer Gadaffi their suppon. 

Just how stunned foe Russians 
are foe whole af&ir is likely to 
emerge in the next few days. For 
Gadaffi is at foe same time their 
most avaricious arms buyer in the 
Middle East and their most unreli- 
able ally, ^xteen months ago the 
Libyans negotiated an enormous 
weapons deal with Moscow, 


Robert Fisk considers the likely oatcome 
of the Sixth Fleet strike gainst Libya 


promising to pay Si. 000 million 
over three years for advanced 
ground-to-ground and anti-air- 
craft missile systems. Some oil 
bartering was involved but Mos- 
cow insisted on undercutting foe 
flat rate per barrel. In October last 
year Gadaffi himself went to 
Moscow to ask for new aircraft. 

Mikhail Gorbachov was report- 
edly shocked, not so muck by 
Gadaffi's changeable, moody 
personality but by his arrogance. 
He has the habit of telling Moscow 
how to handle the Americans. The 
Libyans were not given foe treat- 
ment normally accorded to Arab 
delations and the Russians, 
even in their published 
condemnation of foe US air 
strikes, distanced themselves from 
full political support for a country 
whose leader appears so untrust- 
worfoy. 

Nevertheless, Moscow cannot 
shrug off the huge military invest- 
ment which it has placed in Libya. 
The loss of a few missile batteries 
and three or four patrol boats in a 
naval scuffle is negligible. But if 
the Americans choose to attack 
the large Libyan air bases outside 
Tripoli. Ben^tazi and Tobruk, 
millions of dollars worth of hard- 
ware would be destroy^. The 
Libyans possess, for ex^ple, a 
squklron of TU-22 bombers (foe 


"Blinder" in Nato terminology), 
143 MiG-23s. SO MiC-2Ss, 55 
MiG-2is and 30 Hind-24 heli- 
copter gunships, which the Soviet 
air force has with devastating 

effect in Afghanistan. 

Many of these machines are 
believed to be in stora« - though 
no doubt availalrfe to foe Russians 
themselves in the event of an 
iniemationaJ conflict -but 'this 
makes them no.less vulnerable. A 
serious American military opera- 
tion against Libya itself — a ma- 
rine landing or a series of air 
strikes throughout foe country — 
just might provoke internal un- 
rest, perhaps a military coup by 
army officers smarting at the way 
Gadaffi’s own revoluuonary cad- 
res have been put in rommmid of 
barracks and anusunitioo stores. 

America's critics in the Middle 
East suspect that Reagan mi^t be 
thinking along those lines. The 
loss of Libya would cause almost 
as much damage to Soviet prestige 
as the overthrow of the Sbab did 
to the Carter administration. 

Indeed, it does stretch the 
imagination to go on r^airding the 
Sixth Fleet perambulations in the 
Gulf of Sirte - three aircraft carri- 
ers and 22 other major warships — 
as nothing more than a "routine’* 
manoeuvre whidi had been un- 
happily interrupted by Gadaffi's 


missile crews. Libyan involve 
ment in the killings at Rome and 
Vienna airports in December was 
not so clea^ traced as other 
bloody Gadaffi adventures and his 
involvement in the el imi nation of 
ftis lib^n opponents sbroBd. But 
the message that Gadaffi mi^ be 
** iaiig ht a^sson" has been around 
for some time. 

Unfortunately, the political re- 
sults of military action in- the 
Middle East rarely turn out to be 
as satis&ctory as their initiators 
intend. While Gadaffi may well 
regret that missiles fir ed jg 
the Americans from the droen 
Sam-5 ba^ outside the town of 
Sirte, foe. Americuis are unlikely 
to reap many advant^es from 
what has happened cm* mas any- 
thing worse that follows. The 
Lebanese debacle, it seems, . is 

standing in the Arab 
world has again bem augmented: 
is he not the only Arab leader to 
have been in -conflict with the 
"American imperialists"? Evm 
moder^ Arab statesmen are in 
no position to remain silent when 
a superpower is involved in 
military action against a s m a ll 
Arab ^te. The Russians win 
quiddy see advants^ in this. For 
at the very moment when a 
Middle East settlement should be 
more earnestly puraued than ever 
before, foe US is directing its 
attention at a petty tyrant who can 
survive only on the sort of 
publicity that Reagu is now 
generously aiftntiing him. ' 


Rjp.hard Dowden on the plight of Yugoslavia’s oppressed Serte 

Ulster of the Balkans 


Be^rade 

It is almost impossible to squeeze 
into foe front door of the Serbian 
Writers Club on a Monday night 
Young and old crowd in to hear 
Titian writers read their works 
and obliquely attack foe govern- 
ment It is a lively cauldron of 
criticism and dissent 

At a recent meefoig the gu^ of 
honour, greeted with impassioned 
applause, was not a distinguished 
writer but a 14-year-ofd boy. Mitar 
Saric. a Serb, lives with his mother 
and two brothers at a village called 
Mece in foe southern province of 
Kosovo. His fother was killed by 
Albanian nationalists in 1982 and 
his f^ily are now foe only Serbs 
in foe village. Eariier this month, 
in a fight at his school, he was 
knock^ unconscious by an older, 
/Ubanian youth and spent six days 
in hospital. 

Mitar Saric has become a 
symbol of Serbian victimization 
in a province where .Albanian 
nationalists have subjected their 
Serbian neighbours to attacks and 
intimidation to try to drive them 
ouL Women- and children- have 
been attacked, their cattle blinded, 
their trees cut down, crops burned 
and wells poisoned. More than a 
quarter of a million have fled and 
foe rate of departure is now 
running at 2,000 a month. 

The rise of Albanian irreden- 
tism, as it is called here, and foe 
ftirious reaction of foe Serbs, is foe 
greatest threat to foe stability of 
Vugoslavza since foe war. It is a 
matter of grave embanassment to 
foe government in Belgrade. De- 
spite public attempts to maintain 
a fiont of public unity, even foe 
Yugoslav Communist League is 
becoming increasingly torn by 
r^onal foctionalism. Rancorous 
mistrust and ancient feuds among 
the Balkans' diverse and volatile 
nations have often been the cause 
of war in l^rope; foe major 
powers cannot ignore foe strategic 
importance of an unstable' Yugo- 
slavia. 

Mrs Saric. Mitar's mother, com- 
plained to foe local authorities but 
got nowhere and came to Bel- 
grade, where she met officials 
ftom the Serbian party. They told 
her it was sad but there was 
nothing they could do because it 
was a maner for Kosovo. A 
delegation from foe federal par- 
liament has visited foe region and 
is expected to repon by the end of 
foe month. 

"We had no one from whom to 
seek assistance or protection," 
Mrs Saric said. "We feel th^ are 
all against us." At the reception at 
foe Serbian Writers Cub prom- 
inent Seibian writers spoke 
contemptuously about foe Sert>ian 
politicians who h^ done so little 
to help them. A well- known 




UtiK appeasement 


AUSTRIA 


‘SLOVENIAN 


Hoxha: emotive slogan 

AUTONOMOUS^ 
HUNGARY- PROVINCES ^ 

■ • ' • - 




CROATIA 

Y BOSNIA /Belgrade W 

YUGOSLAVIA 


:MONTENEGRO=^ 


MACEDONIA 


s ALBANIA! 


1(X) miles 


'GREECE 


Yugoslav painter has since housed 
them in his Bel^de home and foe 
equivalent of u, 1 SO was collected 
for foe family. The meeting was 
given ortly a mild rebuke the 
local authorities. 

Sixty thousand Serbs in 
Kosovo, meanwhile, have signed a 
petition demanding action and 
warning: "We can no longer 
tolerate foe genocide carried out 
against us and our families. Unless 
the authorities take matters in 
hand and ensure our constitu- 
tional rights, we shall take matters 
into our own hands.” 

To foe Serbs, predominantly 
Orthodox Christians. Kosovo has 
a symbolic sacredness not unlike 
that of Londonderry to Ulster 
Protestants. It was foe birthplace 
of foe Serbian nation and the 
inscription on the monument at 
the battlefield of Kosovo where • 
the Serbs were defeated by foe 
Turks in 1389 damns all Serbs 
who will not fight for their 
fatherland. 

Not unlike Ulster's Catholics, 


the Muslim Albanians were al- 
ways foe underdogs in Kosovo. 
Towards the end of the 1960s 
President Tito tried to deal with 
the problem by Albanianizmg the 
province, althoi^ he did not go ' 
so far as to ^ant it the status of a 
republic and it remains an autono- 
mous iHovince of Serbia. This 
relieved foe immediate pressure 
but has created an Plicated 
Albanian youth. leading to a 
resurgence of Albanian national- 
ism. pa^cularly in schools and at 
the university in Pristina, the 
capitaL 

At foe same time foe birthrate 
• among Albanians, 2.9, is foe 
highest in Europe and fttmilies of 
seven or eight are common. 
Pressure on land is. enormous. 
UnemplqyTziein is officially a 
third but is fooi^t to be more like 
a half Seventy per cent of foe 
l.S million population are under 
26 years old. 

*rhe fury of the young Albanians 
finally burst out in rioting in 1981 
throughout foe province. The 


official death toll was nine, but 
jouinalists working there at the 
time, whose reporting was strictly 
censored, put foe f^ure much 
higher, whh at least six policemen 
killed. Since then the nationalists 
have gone undeigroimd, armed 
themselves and disseminated lit- 
eiatum According to the Kosovo 
Miiustiy of the Interior, 96.undCT- 
ground organizations have been 
unrovered since 1981; 13X) Alba- 
nians sentenced for subversive 
activities and a ftuther 3,(X)0 for 
lesser ofiRmces. A group of 120 
were ariested last week, including 
two en^neers, teachi^ and a 
number of students. 

The literaiure.seized with foem 
used Marxist-Leainist terminol- 
ogy and called for the unity of all 
Albanian people, ' prodaiming 
“Long live Enver Hoxha", foe 
former president of Albania. Local 
party ofifidals bint at financial 
support fiom Albania tt^lf. 
Many of the Albanian datiomUists 
warn -Pristina-to be the capitd of a 
Greater Albania.- wfaidi would 
include 'Kc^Vo and mimh 'of 
-:Ma<:e^nia,.whic)r.a2ro.b3s a huge 
Albanian population; ' ' 

The .party makes. encouraEi^ 
noises 'about stoppii^ irredentist 
prop^^ck in sifoools and' foe 
like; but the party line 'does not 
seem convinemg. in the ble^ 
gritty streets of Pristina, filled with 
poor Albanian peasants, the men 
in distinctive white woollen caps. 
foe women in shawls and wide 
skixts. It is a drab new dty of 
offices and fiats at the end of aj 
windy and waterlogged iriateaul It 
is rare to hear . anythii^ but 
Albanian spoken. . 

There are strong suspidoiis that 
foe kM^ Albanian party Chiefs are 
less than fully committed to 
Yugo^v unity and while i»eacfa- 
ing frateraalism between Yugo- 
slav nations turn a Uind ^ to 
their compatriots* excesses adjust 
the Serbs. Serbs in Belgrade, even 
party men, argue that their 
Kosovo comradra act only to 
protect the Serbian minority when 
pressed by Belgrade^ 

But Serbia, which dominated its 
neighbours when its kingdom 
embraced them,, has hot many 
friends among the other 
r^blicsjMl except Macedonia 
have their ancient reasons 'ibr 
being quietly pleased at foe Alba- 
nian lesiugence against Serbia. 
This incieases Serbian isolation 
and fervour and builds up.- foe 
pressure. 

Asked what he fooii^t the 
outcome would b^ a neutral 
observer living in Rtikina said: "I 
think Kosovo wifi soon be eth- 
nically pure. Then, if Yrraoslavia 
is to be kept KMetfaer, they wifi 
have to' send in foe army." 


Why Hume will not be joining Home 


i'l 


Conservative MP Richard Holt 
has presented the Commons with 
a bill under foe Ten Minute Rule 
desired to bring leadii^ non- 
Anglican religious leaders into foe 
House of Lords alongside foe 
Church of En^nd bishops. Given 
that Anglicanism .now seems 
merely one church among many, 
albeit one established by foe law, a 
certain logic is on his side. The 
Pope, however, is not And it is on 
that rock that Holt’s proposal will 
founder. 

Putting an ecumenical bench in 
foe Lords is an old chestnut of an 
idea. It is surely only righl foe 
argument goes, that the state 
should have foe advice of the best 
and wisest minds in the kingdom, 
and even foe Church of England 
has long since stopped believing 
that it has a monopoly thou. 

If the Archbishop of Canterbury 
sits in the Lords, then why not the 
Cardinal Archbishop of West- 
minster, foe Moderator ofthe Free 
Churches, the Chief Rabbi and 
even some of their lesser ranks? 
More than a decade ago. it seems, 
the late Cardinal Heenan's name 
was being toyed with in Downing 
Street patronage circles. Mm 
recently. Cardinal Hume’s name 
has been mentioned. 

The Chief Rabbi, Sir Immanuel 
Jacobovitz, would be an ad- 


mirable recruit to the ranks of 
cross-bench life pe^. It is hard to 
believe that foe Prime .Minister’s 
office has not noticed that already, 
and Sir Immanuel's recent excur- 
sion into foe field of inner-city 
policy, saying things much more 
agreeable to Tory ears than foe 
Church of England has done, has 
not weakened his case. 

Bui the problems sian not with 
Judaism but with the non-An- 
glican varieties of Christian^. 

Free Churches are constitu- 
tionally and by ethos strongly 
oppos^ to what fo^ ah 
"prriacy", to foe extent that they 
insist on foe annual replacement 
of foeir chief officers, foeir presi- 
dents and moderators, lest any of 
them should get too big for foe 
moderatorial boots. 

This is an annual self-inflicted 
wound, particularly when those 
same churches also regularly com- 
plain foal foeir leaders receive 
mininuil attention from the Press 
and public. No Free Church leader 
ever stays long enough for the 
public to catch up with who be is. 

Such churches are noncon- 
formist by choice; and they do not 
want a publicly visible hierarchy, 
personally famous. And foey have 
Lord ^^r, the exception which 
proves the rule. There are several 
other distinguished and senior 


noneomfonnist ministers film 
him, or fonner moderators of the 
General Assembly of the Chindi 
of Scotlas^ who would count&> 
nance an invitation to their 
Lordships d^te their own 
churdi's distaste for prdacy. 

The Roman Catholic ^urdi 
has numeriealty a very strong ease. 
Churchgoer m choichgov, it 
matches the Church of FngfanH, 
and in foe United Kingdom as a 
wfoole it is the largest denomina- 
tion in terms of xegular ^uidi 
attendance. But it U official' policy 
under Pope Jofao IT that 
churdunen should leave potito 
to foe ptriiticians — paradmdeal 
though fois may app^ consid- 
ering his own poHtu^ impact in 
Poland and recent church-state 
events in the I^ilippmes. But 
three pri^ have been suspended 
for remaining in the goverxuneni 
of Nicai^ua and Catholic dngy- 
men elsewhere have been obliged 
to political careers. 

Against that bacl^round. there 
is no chance of Bntish Catholic 
prelates accepting nomination to 
foe House of Lora. And without 
that ingmiient, Holt’s jmposals 
to Chan^ its ^ is 

doomed. 

Nevertheless, in the present 
ecumenical .climate, there is- no 
Catholic desire to be seen to be 


critidzhg the Anglican episccqnl 
bendi in. the Lords. The presence 
of their 19 bidiops is the resuh at 
the unique constitutional perotion 
of tia Church of Eqgland in the 
British constitution. . Pariiament 
still has a veto on internal Chuidi 
ofEn^and le^latitm; the 9 »uf pro 
quo is foe church’s guaranteed 
place in.PariiamenL 

Behind the issue is the im- 
lesolved place of the Honse of 
Lords in national life. Successive 
govemn^ts have been tempted 
to abolidi it, or refi^ h-by 
maid^ it truly representative of-a 
certain mamre strand in the 
natitHL a council ofeldm ofevety 
kmd ofbadr^ound or experience. 

It is in du&sli^tly idealistic role 
of a council of eiders that most 
Anglican bishops are happy to' 
]foiy a part, able to on 

general moral issues as wen as 
those in foe Church of 
Errand has a more partiodar 
stake such as church kgishtion. 

Most of them would not otiject 
if foey were joined by ecumenical 
leinfoFcements. But at leastfor the 
moment those reinforcements -are 
refiismg to be enlisted, and the 
Anglican bench will have to 
soldiff on alone. 

Clifford Longley 

effidrs correspondent 



Today'is hearing by Labour’s na- 
tional executive commiaee.tm foe 
activities ofthe Livopool unng of 
the. Revolutionary Spdalisfo. 

League (afias- the MUitast- Ten- . 
dentty fad foe .“readers” of its 
paper) is m^y another ejasode 
in an elaborate masquerade. 

For 'tire importaite oFwhat is 
going on is not to be found: in the 
arti^e of barradc40om- charge 
and counter-dmrge as ip l^tant ' 
"subveraon” and intimidaiiott. 
Laboni” party "witch-hunts" and 
oiher pcooeduial mayhem l' The 
real issues ^ difforat, - and 
firndamental. Most obvious is the 
sound of brooms and hoses in ds 
Angean stables as Labour starts' 
preparing for foe general deetko. 
Tlie old cart-horse, now saddled 
^fo Ndl Kinobek. is having its 
electa^ mane brushed and its tail 
plaited. "Seeing off the Tto&" to 
use the vernacular of.-tbe iimei- 
party grooms and -stable la^' is 
tbermre high cm the party’s, 
prioifties. The voters scare ea^, 
according to convniiionat Labour 
wisdom, and iieed reassuran ce. 

But more import^ Mfliliars 
local strength in Liverpo^ is a 
(Moduct oflJbaaFs loi^ftandiqg 
internal policy cbafosiocis- ud 
(wiiatever the opaudii 'pc^ may 
say) lost sense of dhection. The 
present quasiriudicial 

theatricals — in wfaidk one kind of 
Tammany,! foat of W^wnfo 
Rioad, is presuming to judge 
another— -serve temporarily .lo '. 
divert and suppress pahy 
consciousness of fois..Tbe tnifo is 
that livopool Miliiant isinesadi- 
cable, .hs- -fooit-4udred, snappfiy 
dress^ "Troisityite entryists" 
yond lalrour'a'powmctf.iemb^ 
Moreover, Militant is not juk a 
' reflection of Scouse Lab6iirian.m. 
gexierai; it i n corporates a Livoi- 
-pool tcaditioh of bare4cmickled . 
ardour in defenre of . the dty. ' ! 

Arid the dty needs it liyeipool - 
has- 2S- per cent 'ttsemirioymeiit — 
80 per cent in. the. .yhuxhafl 
ward — 56,000 housdfolds. on 
: supplMDeiiiary ben^.and 50.000 
domestic ratepayers poor endigh 
to receive idbates. IfDeiek Hatztm 
and company had' not existed,, 
so'mebne would have had to 
invent them.. . ' . 

Indeed, the . probtem for the 
Labour Party is .'that foe hard-^ 
pundunfe himpen Trotskyism" . 
which has been broo^ to ihis- 
la^ of dvic defence hasc^Ued the . 
bluff of Labour's own coafisrence 
decisionsrthc^tdodemanded tbe . 
defence .of "jobS; and. services" . 
fiom Whiidasdl fo^nodazioro — - - 
. tte very, policy the .Liverpkxri 
coinicjUm so fiercely pui5ued. In. .. 
Liverpool itself acro^ .the’dilire '' 
•spextiiW - 

the- MiUianVs'Scbuse thattymunn . , 
still , (ommands .siibscuitial -fo- ' 
vour,. any. dislike^ of Hattob’s ! 
metheids -js -matched'.by; resent- 
meut ; at - •'ineiropdfitan 
“inteiforence'’!'in Uveipool’sbiisi- ‘ 
ness. The Labour }<EC. tbe.Efi^ : 
Court and 'ibe niedia^ are con^ 


Sated by tire averegu Scouser into 

(me fonngn bo^. 

Thrrmg ho tft foe laboiiT move- 
ment its SBBsoo for every 
Tom;Z>idtaDdIb^toassentite 
aecMsity of hs tfietic. Ins suai--"'; 
egies and his "virion*! for tifo 
sodafist future. ;Wifoin Liverpool 
aifoouglt; Militant has car- 
' ried foe red baimet; there- a a 
jriefo(»a df- "poations7, ramgiDg 

' frot&l%ff&B™* woffeeristB toam. 

twisting oeGOrisS in seardr of-foe 
grouBd, 'to (muhly Catho. 

Ire) rigM-^«nngBS oow.wi^ 

foat strefdtes from earth 
ro heaven; or IGairock ro'Om. 

' Hiere is,- in tnher words, no 
Goriaessas- in Uverfowl, 
nor one to bo. disBavered: in 
LooAm; .'.eiren - if . foe Labour 
luaflg fe ifo vritt iB -tiie end give a 
' nsdn^niritatibn of h. Fillmgthe 
ideolamctf -vacBUB-udfo boa air, 
'vfoefoer IQmksdA or Hatton’s, is 4. 

. OlreasM8B;.^’ p« g i lq ^ ^foe pgty -~ 

wiale simuftBiieoiisly crretii^ a 
.'haudshipriiindforfoephigees-— is 
anofoer. Above aS,. Lapwi's ac- 
tioism foe liyerpooi matter have 
beien nnkh less by pr^ 

foan' tty foe sense foat its 
nataonal- proq)ects;,«iU be even 
nkrre danaged ^ inaction than Ity 
with HMxon and hs 
firioty triboates..lt is wrorig about 
this dso; MSitaat has the capac^ 
not meiety td' give its (lame) 
pfosuds'-a good run for foeir 
is6fieyrbiit;id .Kinnock 
himsdf mfoe strug^ fOT pohlicai 
survhteL .-■• •• 

- £ndeed K fa mpe k . -Jeading the 
iaqdny ' fim b^md — fooqgh 
' oooQeBte9 foe firet — has allowed 
fannsrif.io be rimuitaheously' 
eg^: on and brdwbeattn by yet 
.another Tammaiiy L^urfoction 
in lAverpoct: the crurading anti- 
Mffiiaats; tnaity.of fodh in foe 
. yasxfaall .vrard -party, .for.' vriiom 
Txotriwsm is foe . work of the 
devil iwt.foe .net oopsequence of 
.foe bias b^-to exaoer- 

biate party diyteious, duck foe 
mdh issuesiofliyerpod^s appall- 
ing edoocunre nxya^^ 
-thecixjlooinwfo the 

Ai^ wfa^ is .cenaur is that 
'will- not' be<;^diriodged 
.fiom c^r^myesrigatiofts, 
surt ha tycs, -expulsions ,and dis- 
qaalm^Toiais . notwithstanding. 
\V^ ,a sotaaaa kecifoup bottle m 
one hand and a volume of Trotsky 
in foe other (it is-foe.first that 
makes Militants red in. tooth and 
daw.-mre foe'secdod) .It will. go *. 
inaidnngomacrossai^Uticalaiid ' 
ecGHumic landscape ransacked by 
unemployed and devastated by 
•' rndefagfolc .'cmitiut j^vernment 
iae^ixraiidTC^inte 1^ 

^^'lidl!08ds ..iKEClir no- stranger 
rfls^ SQ Mfitiiaiit'4 methods —can 
^pa^rjoj^todoite wo^ but the 
. R^^utioDary Socialm Lea^; 
!OB6.-'wity br anMher^ w^l survive 
foe'-hidS^ and puffing of its 

Dtakt Seiboume. is the author of 
Agaast'Sbdalist Illusion: a Radr 
ical Aigument (Macmillan). 


moireoyer . . . . Miles Kington 


Anu^ an foe tong tributes to foe 
late iGiy 'Millaiid I saw no ref- 
ererice to Jfo vmy .eariy film, Tib? 
Ffyir^ Scasman. made so ea^ 
that if was'a silent film when it 
started production and a talkie by 
the time, it finished:. Halftvay. 
through, tiie actors suddenly burst' 
into speech. I folt slightly cheated 
to this mnisaoD, . because 7^ 
Fljnng Satsman is- tiie only Ray 
Kmlaiid film I have ever seen. 

My -access fo this fbigooen 
treasure came about because Ian 
year I was involved in makinghalf 
a dozenpiogtamnw5--fbr.foeIIBC 

about steam railways (no traos^' 
ntissibn date yet), one oa foe 
Hying Scotsman. Neil our pro- 
diK^, had foe. bij^ idea of 
getting alt : the ffim.- faMage - he - 
could find- on and ; 

foowu^itma-vievnirecinema to . 
a laa histei^ JcAhlfantlfty; »nd . 
a man wfao'had aiebially bieea'a 
firemao oh foe - en g ine, ' Frank 
Ma:^ foen film their reaction in 
the fiont row ofthe tialb, ... 

The Rity Milland . film : was 
undoubtedly foe star ofthe coli^ 
tibn, because h . featured a dimao- 
felastiedm which the driver 
into a '^it with the 'fiianan^ foe 
vfllain dmibsbver the tender and 
attacks tiie driver, tire driver's 
dai^ter dimbs alo^ the outside 
of foe loiit to rescue her daddy — \ 
ail while - foe train is careering 
along at about 50 mph. What 
seems incredible now is that none 
of -tins was done in the studio; it 

was all done for real and all the ac- 
tors did their own smnt wotlL 

"The LNERrlet the cont. ‘ 
pany have a Hertfbrdfoire loop 
line aD. to tiremsdves fbr- four 
consecutive weekends," J<tim 
Huntley told ‘^nd the Flying 
Scotsman e^ine . as wdL -Ibe 
company up a sort of 

c^eta platfoim ontriefe the en- 
pne to that foe cameraman could . 
moot down the outride- of foe 
tram, but unfortunately foe very' 
firri tunnel foey went into hh tire 
platform and swept ft off foe'tritin. 

They had meuiired tte dearance 

between tire engine and foe tunhd 
ail what they hadn’t bar- 
gained for w» the &tthatengines 

sway fiiora side to side in mo^^" 

At one. point Ray hfiUteid. 

stunned by a blow fiom the drivw 

hangs outside foe engine as if 
about to feu oS; though wie never ' 
tee him sadsfectorily dimb 


opened bis eya to see a station 
plaffimn -niriung towards him 
. which would uadmibtedly have 
removed .his head had he. not 
t a ken immediate actum. Sbaken, 
he refused to do any more 
■dangling soeoes;. and Mio ‘can 
blame him? 

Frank Mays, who had often 
been (m the fobtplate of the real 
'■•engine, had never, seen this film 
.beforeand was quite by the 

..i^.tirey topk,.especially to foe 

- ■herome .Fuiline Johnson as dw 
came afong foe outside oftire train 
in tight 1920s dothes and. high- 
h eded shoes, and then croM^ the 

idP on to the engine. ' Wifo aB his 
expenence; he said, be would 
never have attempted the same 

tiring hrnigeff - 

: -A much carier-way ofgettiiisrto 
the roolplate would have bedr to 

walk'm inride tire train, then'm 

tiuon^ ' -the corridor inaiH-n foe 
..fdider. Tbis hadbeen built forthe 
non-stop . Loind'oii-Edinhiirgli. -nm 
so a fierii engiiie orew could 

,re^ace foe old one without the 
•wain having io come to a stop. 
Qneadvmrtage of this, said Hank, 

- ^ were, just coming 

off duty you could go tofoe b^m 

• yoororeians, be imrodiicBd.tn the 
casstimets by the harmfl n as tiie 
had just been driving 
fipre Loodon. and be guaranteed 
admiring rounds of drinks: . 

The Stoiy 

^ Mjw .a coalman from 
gmfo Wales, had a job wfth the 
Wm company as stagehand 'while 

ssAssss 

ral^ Milland uras ^ only per^ 
ra foe paynffi had experience 

of.^ so suddenly he found 
mmseff grafted into astarring 

2lm3 His. acting was 

to Hollywood and feiily 
WM spirited away froi 
the Br^ film ecene for ever. 

foe recent trib- 
another siorv 

s fetiicr was m coal ftv« 

young man who had 
Household 
and vfoo was spotted at a 
2«ndy London partv bva w/v 


MXM 




'V. 

i t. 

•i » . ■ 

■ V-. ■ 



VJi 


L 




y[^ 




THE TIMES WEDNESDAY MARCH 26 1986 


ii 








^ WJ* 


-J 



1 Pennington Street, London El 9XN Telephone: 01-481 4100 


THE BATTLE OF SIRTE 


US ships Tim |»esnt in 
' the Gulf of Sine on Monday 
despite warnings fiotn the 
- . Lib^ r^ime of Colonel 
Gadaffi that it bad been de- 
dared Libyan territorial wan 
; ters. To cross ^e of 
death” into it, the Libyans had 
threatened, would invite jus- 
. <- tified milit^ retaliation. 

b the^ in la^ any validity 
/ in the Libyan teirito^ 'claim 
to the Giilf of Sine under 
international law? Plainly noL 
. Gulf waters can be absorbed 
: into a nation’s territory only 
' ■ vdien they are 24 miles across 
.. orless.TheCu]fofSiiteis27S 
■ miles in extent. Not 

V surpising^, therefore, the Iib> 
' yan daun has little support 
.C Only Buridna Faso endorses it, 

and both Moscow and radic^ 
t:. Arab states friendly to Colonel 
Gadaffi are opposed to it 

That being so, the U.S. Sixth 

• Fleet was defending the ri^t 
' of passage throu^ inter- 

national waters by being 
^ preseitt m the Ool£ The initial 
' Libyan attack was thmfbre 
aggrebive and the American 

V response legaUy justified. 

That much was conceded in 
yesterday's Co mm ons ex- 
changes by Mr Neil Kinnock. 

• What he and other critics of 
the American action maintain , 
however, is that the initial U.S. 
p re s ence in the Gulf was an 
unnecessary provocation and 
that its subsequent use of 
retaliatory force was excessive. 

The concept of provocation, 
; however, is a dippery one. 
Cdond Gadaffi's daim to the 

• Gulf and his threats to enforce 
it is, on the frioe of it, even 

' more provocative than the 
~ Azb^cas defiance, Ettt they 
are not seen in that light, 
; perhaps because the lib^ 
leader is thou^t to be so 
' irrational that a is useless to 
ju^ his actions by the usoal 
criteria of international rela- 
tions. 

Similarly, even if the U.S. 
action is criticised as needless 
provocation, it was always 
open to the Libyans not to 


respond to it That is, after all, 
tile reaction being Mr 

Kinnock upon the Americans. 
In shor^ the argument of 
provocation is us^ to ex- 
culpate the Lib>^ns for making 
an unlawful rfaim upon inter- 
national waters and for 
employing aggression to en- 
force h; also to condemn the 
U.S. . fiv defending its mari- 
time rights under international 
law. It is difficult to r^ard it as 
a serious argument. 

Whether the U.S. response 
was di^roportionate is a mat- 
ter of judgment on two levels. 
There is a peifoctly straight- 
forward military argument for 
taking no chances when deal- 
i^ with an unpredictahle re- 
uhich has equipped its^ 
witii advanced m£^e sys- 
tems. Even a weak opponent 
do great if un- 

restrained 1^ normal' pru- 
dence. And it would be a 
disaster, both internationally 
and dome^call^r, fin* the Rea- 
gan administration if it suf- 
fered the loss of a naval vessel 
at Libyan-hands. 

But it is the political argu- 
ment fora strong response that 
raises the more interesting 
questions. The Libyan regime 
h 2 s demonstrated an utter 
contempt for international 
norms of bdiaviour in numer- 
ous ways. It has invaded 
ne^boring countries, sought 
to sifovert others, sponsored 
assassinations of l2byan exiles 
abroad and given support, 
training and sanctuary to ter- 
rorist groups which have then 
hijacked American civil air- 
liners and mounted attacks in 
Wein European airports. 

Yet the Reagan administra- 
tion has found itself in the 
psychological language now 
employed in international af- 
feirs, **finistrated** in its re- 
sponse to this lawlessness. 
Western Europ^ countries 
have refrised to join in Ameri- 
can sanctions against Libya, 
thus onderminingwhat was an 
already w^ repri^ And the 
opinions of allies and 


critics at home have persuaded 
‘tile Reagan administration to 
forswear the policy of lespond- 
ii^ to terrorist attacks by 

“ inriigrriminflt g** pttarTfg on 

the territoiy of states which 
sponsor th^, of whidi Libya 
is the prime example. 

Thas the U.S. required some 
good cause before it was able 
to retaliate for the above list of 
Libyan outrages. And, by 
attaiddng the Sixth Reel, Colo- 
nel Gadaffi supidied it The 
U.S. re^nse was therefore 
not dis^iwrtionate in rela- 
tion to this background of 
Lilian aggression. 

‘Tbe final quertion is; but 
was it wise? That is, was it 
likely to advance tJ.S. in- 
terefts? 

The common re^y is to 
claim that atta^ win merely 
serve to strengthen CoIomI 
Gadaffi's position both whh 
other Arab countries and with 
his own coontrymen. In ternu 
of ImwiMiate ^toric, that iS 
almost certainly corrrect. 
There wifi be much raUying 
round the Libyan leader in the 
next few days. 

But will that be so in tiie 
longer term? The more cau- 
tious Arab leaders may make 
the prudent calculation that if 
extreme ivovocation of the 
U.S. leads to such results, then 
it should perhaps be avoided 
Even Colonel Gadaffi appar- 
ently took tiiis view, when the 
U.S. last seemed likely to take 
military action a galngt him 
earlier this year. 

Nor should it be foigotten 
that the greatest internal threat 
to his rule comes from the 
armed frnces ^ forces n4iich 
his recklessness has yet ttaiQ 
exposed to defeat, loss of life 

and pointl ess h timiliati otL 

Military leaders who sufier 
defeat in the pursuit of reckless 
adventures often find that they 
have lost the p restige that 
fwaWad them to maintain 
titemselvies in power at home. 
If Colonel Gad^ doubts this, 
he might consult former Presi- 
dent Galtieri 


MAYOR DALEY WOULD APPROVE 


^ much for the ^brave new 
worid of mumdpid socialism. 
Whavhas been on display at 
County Hall in the last days of 
the Greater London Council is 
good old-feshioned patronage 
on a scale that would have 
done credit to Mayor Daljey of 
Chica^ 

Political service has not 
lacked for rewards. Staff ap- 
pointed \3iy the Labour GLC on 
short term contracts as advis^ 
ers and heads of the ubiquitous 
units have moved — so easily 
• into permanent positions in 
the Inner London (Interim) 
Education Authority, with vol- 
untary bodies (funded by com- 
pulsory levy), and with the 
Labour-controlled boroughs. 

As fer as anyone kno^ 
which given the public's 
brradtii ' of ignorance about 
activities within County Hall 
IS not fer, nothing contrary to 
law has happraed in the recent 
rash of appointments. It is up 
to Mrs Frances Morrell to 
choose her own personal assist 
tant and saffiy it will make 
lictie difference to the con- 
dition of London Khools that 
her chosen aide is tmtil the 
weekend the persona] assistant 
to Mr Ken Uvii^tone. 

Westminstn' City Council 
has attempted in the courts to 
thwart the GLCs efforts to 
leave a handsome financial 
i^acy to fevourite benefi- 
ciaries. But the destination of 
the GLCs employees has not 
been challen^d. 

Aft^ the amounts of money 


tiUit have been spent over the 
few . years on dubious 
public puj|K)ses this rush of 
last-minute appointments 
may, indeed, seem scarcely 
worth a second glance. And yet 
they are. For Mr Livingstone 
has come to take on a heroic, 
even a martyred air as the 
Government, for no good 
reaso^ proceeded with the 
abolition exercise. His claim to 
sp^ for Londoners against 
an authoritarian central gov- 
ernment has gained credence. 

The recent jobs and grants 
bonanza puts the Lal^ur 
administration in a difiitient 
light. For it shows that Labour 
also stands for publicly fi- 
nanced incomes for a new ehte 
cadre of political bangers on 
and fixers these too have been 
a facet of the GLC story. 

Municipal patronage, it 
should be said, has had less 
and less scope the further one 
looks into useful fenctions. 
The disposal of London’s 
waste: protection of the capital 
against fire; these services are 
untainted. Bat in ’’public . 
relations” and administration 
and the new class t>f 
’’advisory” jobs the qualifica- 
tions are much vaguer, Mrs 
Morrell can say. for example, 
of the IL^’s new head of 
exteriial relations that his 
political service at the GLC is 
a qualification: bnt that only 
reflects the growing, incoher- 
ence about the purposes of 
many municipal jobs. 


A common reflex in the 
1980s, when confronted by 
these latter day tales of 
municipal misbetoviour is to 
send for the civil servants, 
making the implicit judgetnent 
that somehow central politics 
are more sanitary and central 
officials more trustworthy 
than local The judgement is 
moot It was, after aU, the 
Departinent of the Environ- 
ment which made grandiose- 
claims for the savings from 
abolition and which has since 
kept mightily silent as its 
creature committees, aided 
and abetted by its rate support 
apportionments, have ke^ the 
spending show on the road. 

In an ideal world, the man-' 
agers of the ILEA would soon! 
be called to book. Electioiis are 
to be held in May for the new 
authority. Labour's admin- 
istration of London’s schools, 
its preoccupation with sex and 
race initiatives over against 
the core quality of schooling 
and their relationship with 
employment will in pnndple, 
be up for voters’ judgement It 
will be sad. very sad, if London 
parents, London citizens do 
not go out to register their 
hopes for public education. 
For foe local ballot box alone 
(^foin a reformed system of 
local finance) is the way to 
regi^te this public service. 

Where better than on the 
hustings 10 explain and justify 
jots for foe. boys ? 


Benzodiazepines 

From Mr D.R. Bfe^en - . 

Sir, I vais astomsoed to read of 
Professor Ian Oswald’s suggemon 
th«i benzodiazepine tranquillisers 

should be made available over tM 

counter without a doctor’s 
prescription (rqiort March 171' 

Ninnerons studio in foe UK 
and have shown 

conclusively that the 

benzodiazepioes, far from heiw 
Safe”, as Professor Oswald 
daiois. are a highly addictive 
range of drugs w4iidi should (Hiiy 
be prescribed the- utinosi 

cauuoo. 

. . The comparison wifo alcohol 
a«/t cigaraxes is pernicious and 
misleadiiig. The nrics associated 
wifo use of these recreational 
dn^ are universaUy known. In 
conirasi. many patients who are 
presribed ■nnmw’* tranquilly 

^ tb^ doctors are never warned 

at the time that these drugs are 
addictive, and'indeed many only 
tealtse foal they have become 

■ drug-dependent when they try to 

reduce or discontinue foe dosage 
are taking. 

ji. Moreover, ualite alcoiw^ 
ntcotine addiction, which ^ 
imiaDv • assodaied wifo ab- 
nonoaHy . levels of intake, 
(rfiarmaq^Jogica! dependenty on 


benzodiazepines occur even at 
normal fo^peutic dosages and 
following short courses of treat- 
ment . . 

Fortunately, a minority of 
enlightftied GPs is now mnch 
mere cautious , about , prescribing 
benzodiazepines unles there ^ 
strong piiwical grounds for doing 
sa The sugg^on that these drugs 
be avail^le without 

prescription is highly irrespon- 
sible. 

Yours fihhfiiHy. 

DEAN RAYMOND BLAGDEN, 
2 Denning Road. 

Hampstead, NW3. 

Mardi 18. 

Lost for words 

From Ms B. Gillian DonmaB 
Sir, One sympathises with the 
concern earnest by Professor E 
H. Brown and otbem (Febrnaiy 
23) concerhing school leavers* 
inadequacy ini predse use of the 
‘ F»E ^^*** language. - They should 
know of the existenoe of foe 
National Congress on Languages 
in EducaiioD, a body consisting of 
37 language associations embrac- 
ing all lan^ge. areas and all 
sectora of education. 

. Four years ago it set up a 
. wbrldiig party to u[ork wifo tea^ 
ers m -sdiools in inecisriy tim 


area. The intention is that pupils 
should learn vdiat laimiage is and 
how it fiinctions in order (o be able 
to convey meaning effectively. 

A netwoiic of schools around the 
country whidi are taking initia- 
tives of this land has been 
established and foe woridng party 
is at present produdng a pro- 
gramme for' foe training of teach- 
ers to teach effectively in this area 
and is produ cing an evaluation 
programme for use by schools. 
Yours fiuthiiilly, 

GILLIAN DONMALL, 

Kill’s Coll^ London (KQQ, 
University of London, 

Chelsea umpus, 

SS2 King’s Road,.3Wl0. 

From Pn^essor N. KmU FRS 
Sir. About 30 years ^ the sub- 
feculty of engineering of foe 
UniveTSity of Oxford lecom- 
mend^ that the finals examinen, 
m assessing the essay paper, 
should take into account gram- 
mar, style and ptesemation. This 
proposal was turned down by the 
Facul^ Board of Physical Sciences 
as uDfeir to the caodidates! 
Youraraithfully, 

N. KURTL 
University of Oxford, 

Depanmem of Engineering 
Science, 

Paries Road, 

(Mord. - 
March 18. 


LETTERS TO THE EDITOR 


Anonymity of 
rape victims 

From Dr B. S. Markainis 
Sir. The continuiu reluctance of 
the police to publish photographs 
of nisp^ rapists may or may not 
be justified, given the wording of 
section 6 ( I ) of foe Sexual Offences 
(Amendment) Act. 1976. But 1^ 
attracting public attention to this 
long and in many respects un- 
fortunate enactment, these in- 
cidents may help alert Paritament 
to yet another of its defixiive 
provisions. 

This is section 4(1) which, while 
purporting to protect the anonyra- 
of rape victims, actually 
achieves this laudable aim in a 
patchy and deficient manner. For 
in foe first place the sanction 
provided is the event of a breach 
of this provision — a maximum 
fine of £300 — » unlikely to deter 
foe unscrupulous publisher. Sec- 
ondly, only victims of ‘’rape 
offences”, as defined in section 
7(2), are protected by the 
statute-Equally meritorious vic- 
tims of other sexual offences, for 
example indecent assault, incest 
or taigg^ are thus exeludM from 
the prot^ve ambit of the Act 
(and may not always be co v ered 
by other enactments). 

En^isfa law has been known to 
put up wifo a certain amount of 
illo^caliiy and inconsistency. But 
to make privacy for the victim 
depend on who penetrates whom 
wifo what and where appears quite 
absurd. And even the victims of 
rape are inat^uately protected if 
the prosecution drops the rape 
charge for a guilty plea to a 
different, lesser, sexual offence. In 
such cases a eonvieiion can be 
obtained at the fai^ price of losing 
one’s right to anonymity. 

Despite an increasiog number 
of impiHttnt judicial pronounoe- 
ments concerning aspects of hu- 
man privacy, Pwiamenl (and 
many lodemics) have taken a 
hostfle view towards recognising a 
tModer right of ^ivacy such as 
exists in other systems. One of the 
arguments often pot forward for 
fohi stance is the difficulty of 
defining priva^ and of balancing 
the competing interests of 
mionymity and freedom of qieech. 

But in foe pre sen t type of 
^tuation foe difficulties of defi- 
nition, which have been a cause or 
an excuse for parliamentary in- 
iacti^, disappear since we are 
baling whh a narrow and clearly 
defined issue. Would it therefore 
be too much to hope that the 
Icsislamrs will turn their attention 
(0 this deficiency of foe 1976 Act 
Mien draffing foe Criminal Justice 
Bill? 

After an, bow many times must 
one make the point that not 
everything that interests the public 
should be published in the public 
-interest? 

Yours truly, 

BASIL S.MARKES1NIS. 

Trinity CoU^ 

Camlmdge. 

March 23. 


Skirting the issue 

From Mn Sarah Thurtfteld 
Sir, As a dressmaker, much of my 
busines is ioitrated by telephone, 
and 1 have observed that where a 
woman of marure years will start 
briskly: ”Hdk) dear, could you let 
out a sidn br me?”, her daughter 
takes a deep breath and 
says:’’Wifo r e fe renc e lo your ad- 
vert in foe Sutton CoU^tbi Oh- 
server. 1 am calUiig to enqim 
about foe ponbility of baviaf 
aome bridesmaids' drenes made. 

b fob b ec om ha a w i des p re ad 
practice, or b It simply that 
dressnuken are iww sudi a rare 
breed that younger women are 
unwre how to approach ibem? 

Your sinonely, 

SARAH THURSFTELD. 

68 Uadridge Road, 

Sunra ColdfieM, 

West Midlands. 

'March 19. 


Finding a &ke 

From Mr Brian R. Baiters^ 

Sir, It was not only Victorian 
restorera who altered paintings in 
order to conceal embarrassing 
detail (Mr Dachinger's letter, 
March It). Josrob Faringion 
reooids the artist Westall's addi- 
tion of ”fojn drapery” to part of a 
figure of Apollo, bmre its inclu- 
sion la foe Royal Academy’s 
summer exhibition 1806. The 
artist deverly used water-colour 
for the added drapery, propp^g 
to.wash h off after the exhibition. 

West^ feared that objections to. 
the unadorned figure might be 
raised, particularly as the Royal 
Family was expected to visit foe 
exhibition. Royal sensitivities are 
not so well considered today, as 
we saw during foe recent Antipo- 
dean tour. 

Your truly, 

BRIAN R. BATTERSBY, 
Loi^dale House, 

Wincle. 

Macclesfield, 

Cheshire. 

March 13. 

Keeping out the cold 

From Dr Rosie Ueweilyn-Jones 
Sir, Mr Arnold Freedman's 
delightful description in today’s 
Times (Mareh 17) on keeping 
warm in Iras leads him to 
speculate that foe word kursi may 
be the origin of our English word 
'‘cosy.” A nice idea but in feet 
kuni b timply foe Fbri word for 
chair and presumably by 
oitrapobtion foe name of the rug- 
covet^ heated uble; 

Sincerely. 

ROSIE LLEWELLYN-JONES, 
135 Buratwood Lane, SW17. 
March 17. 


Doubt on animal experiments Bill 


From Mr Richard D. Ryder and 
otkm 

Sir. We would like to support the 
\iews critical of the Animals 
(to'entific Procedures) Bill ex- 
pressed by Bishop A^llus An- 
drew and other retigous leaden 
(February 22). We have worked in 
aninial laboratories and we be- 
lieve fob Government Bill b 
inadequate for at least the ten 
foQowing reasons: 

1. It does not stop pain in animal 
experiments. In ^ foe Bill hardly 
mentions pain at alL 
Z It does not stop LD30. Draize, 
or cosmetics or non-medical test- 
ing on animals. It allows experi- 
ments for a fiu* widtf range of 
purposes than in the current law 
(dause 3). 

3. It does not require experi- 
menters lo use feasible humane 
alternative techniques, nor to be 
skilled in pmn lolling. (The White 
Paper promised more). 

4. It does not ^ve animal welfare 
an equal say wifo industry and 
academics. 

i The giudelines (draft Home 
Office guidance) sound quite 
good, but they have no l^gal 
stanfong, they are not explicitly 
admisaole as evidence and they 
can be roran>ed or changed with- 
out Parliament’s approvaL 

6. The codes of piictict on which 
the Bill depends have not even 
been pnUisbed yet. 

7. The Bill itself is almost empty of 
proltibitions or guarantees. 

8 . Under the Bill almost all wilt 
depend on the compassion and 
determination of the Home Sec- 
retary and on hb or her time to 
give attention to foe sutgecL This 
Enabling” Bill enables Govern- 
ment lo by-pass Pariiament 

9. it increases the secrecy of 
animal experimentation and 
thiratens to send to prison those 
who bre^ ’’coimdentiality” 
(dause 24). 

IOl The new Home Office 
coamutree will be racked with 
and win be able to 
antoint powerful sub-committees 
entirely composed of the ex pen- 
men teR themselves (clauses 19 - 
20 ). 

Your fiufofiiUy, 

R. Dl RYDER (dinical psycholo- 
gist), 

A WALDER (laboratory tech- 
nician. cancer research), 
HAROLD HEWITT (retired 
experimental pathologbt), 

GILL LANGLEY (biologistX 
WILLIAM JORDAN (veteiinary 
suigBon), 

Hay House, 

HaytorVale^ 

Devon. 

March 7. 

From the Chairman of the Royal 
Society Jbr the Prevention of 
Cruelty to Animals Council 
Sr, Wifo foe Animab (Scientific 
Procedures) Bill having reached a 
critical sut 0 : in its passage through 


foe House of Commons, it b more 
than unfonunaie that such atten- 
tion as has been given to it in the 
media has largely concentrated on 
the extremes of the subject — foe 
scientists who want no control on 
their activities versus foe total 
abolitionists. 

It is therefore hardly surprising 
that the responsible middle 
ground occupied by, among oth- 
ers, foe RSPCA has been ignored 
or misrepresented. 

It must be obvious to all that a 
scientific .Act 110 yearn old has to 
be replaced, and thus the RSPCA 
welcomed the Government's ini- 
tiative in facing this fecL How- 
ever, contrary to the impression 
given by some, including Min- 
isters, the society has offered 
support for the Bill itself only if 
the changes which we regard as 
critical are incorporated. 

Each of these changes is aimed 
at foe prevention of pain in 
laboratory animals and should 
therefore have the support of all 
humane people. In summary, the 
RSPCA's criteria are: 

a. The so<alled ’’termination 
condition”, which specifies that 
an animal must be humanely 
killed if suffering severe pain, 
must be inviolable and made part 
of foe Act itself, not just foe 
guidelines. 

b. Project licence holdeR must be 
required to demonstrate relevant 
competence to prevent and relieve 
pain. InspectOR must be iafiimied 
when a neuro-muscular blocking 
agent such as curare b to be used 
and an anaesthetist or similarly 
qualified pmon must monitor 
anaesthesia in such cases. 

c. .A competent person must be 
available to monitor the condition 
of laboratory animals at all times. 

d. The monitoring body, the 
Animai Procedures Committee, 
must be invited to comment on all 
license applications for procedures 
invc^vtng the maximum permit- 
ted levels of pain or distress. 

e. The committee should also 
scrutinise all applications for 
experiments to improve manual 
sidlls. since these represent a 
widening of the existing law. 

The RSPCA has reported many 
examples of experiments involv- 
ing unacceptable severity which 
have bren permitted under the 
1 876 AcL The present Bill must be 
amended on foe above lines if foe 
new Act is to deal adequately wifo 
what must be its central purpose — 
the prevention of pmn and suffer- 
ing in animal experiments. 

Yours feitbfiiJly, 

A. C. W. HARt, 

Chainnan of Council 

Rox^ Society for foe Prevention 

of Cruelty to Animals, 

Causeway. 

HoRham. 

West Sussex. 

March 24. 


Hospital pressures 

From Dr B. J. Boughton 
Sir, Professor Shuster’s letter of 
hfatrefa 15 describes major short- 
ages of medical equipment in foe 
Newcastle teaching hospitals. 
Other bospitab could tell a similar 
story but & accounttelb less than 
ite whole truth, and foe public 
should be reassured that there is 
no fiilnre to rei^ace vital medical 
cquipmenL 

fn my own experience foe 
reason for long equipment 
**ieplaceiiient Usis^ is the pce- 
BUture withdrawal of maiote- 
nanee contracts by private 
equipmein manufecturers. This 
vbitiary action is for cominetdal 
reasons, and it b common knowl- 
edge foal foe health service is 


exfrioited in fob way. Lists of 
repbeement equipment consist 
la^ly of perfectly satisfactory 
machines which are not a dan^r 
to patients but which outside 
commercial interests are virtually 
forcing the NHS to replace. The 
new unit roanageR in the NHS 
could if nothing ebe end this 
practice. 

No private corporation would 
tolerate our present NHS proce- 
dures and when this changes. 
Professor Shuster will find that tus 
own local list of ’’replacement” 
equipmrat will largely disai^iear. 
Your sincerely, 
a J. BOUGHTON, 

The Queen Elizabeth Hospital, 
E^baston. 

Birmingham. 

M^h 17. 


Justice for debtors 

From the Deputy Director cf the 
National Ctmsumer Council 
Sir, Bernard Levin does neither Sir 
Gordon Borrie nor the debtoR 
about whom be expressed concern 
justice in hb article ’’Nanny 
cannot save us ail finm our folly” 
(Mai^ 14X 

First, some ferns. Debt b a real 
and growing problem. Every year 
over one and a half million 
"money plaints” are started in foe 
county courts. In foe five yeaR 
fix>m 1979 to 1984, the Hnance 
Houses Association reported that 
foe number of accounts of their 
membeR wifo two or more pay- 
ments in arreaR grew finm S pn* 
cent to 7 per cenL 

Id foe year eodii^ June, 1985, 
two and a half million consumera 
had difficulty meeting their beat- 
ing bills. The number of properties 
r epossessed for non-payment of 
mortgages went up five tunes 
between 1979 and 1984. 

Nor are foe people who get into 
d^ generally feckless idiots. Re- 
search slioiR that foe cbssic case 
of d^ proWems b someone on a 


relatively low income who takes 
on, in good feiib, a credit commit- 
ment and then cannot meet it 
because of an unforeseen disaster, 
unemployment, a death or illness 
in the family, the break-up of a 
marriage. 

One way of helping pmple to 
avoid such a situation b better 
information. The National Con- 
sumer Council strongly support 
foe suggestion that foe credit 
industry should help to support 
better information services for 
those faced wifo an ever-extending 
choice of more and more complex 
credit oflets.' 

This is nou pace Mr Levin, a 
nanny state at work, it b sound 
market-place common sense. 
Debts that go bad are a disaster for 
individual consumers. Th^ are 
also unwelcome to those offering 
credit Providing the information 
to avoid them is a sound invest- 
ment in the fiiture. 

Your sincerelv. 

MAURICE H^Y. 

Deputy Director. 

National Consumer Council. 

18 Queen Anne's Cate, SWI. 
March 19. 


Coach chaos 

From Mr Michaei Sissons 
Sir. The fiRi cuckoo is of less 
significance to LondoneR as an 
omen of spring these days than the 
first influx of tourist coaches. 1 
claim the first sighting this Mon- 
day morning, when by 9.30 Mar- 
garet Street in front of foe Palace 
of Westminster, was lined wifo 
coaches, half of them European, 
fh>ffi Lambeth Bridge to Par- 
liament Square, wifo a traffic 
warden looking on bemused. 

When will foe Minister of 


Transport grasp the nettle and 
confine these coaches, which will 
now bring certain chaos and 
congestion to foe centre of Lon- 
don for the next eight months, to 
appropriate coach parks away 
from the centre? Then our very 
welcome visitOR would have the 
option of using taxis, our excellent 
public transport service, or even 
their feet Think of Venice. 

Your feiihfullv. 

MICHAEL SISSONS. 

10 Buckingham Street, WC2. 
March 20. 


Weighty advice 

From Mrs B. O. Cooper 
Sir, Apropros your letter from Mr 
John Banfield (March 81, 1 have a 
very few eggs, not only in Imps* 
basket but also in DistillcR* 
basket 

Consequently hardly a day 
passes without an enormous white 
envelope pushed through my let- 
ter bm and thudding on to foe 
doormat, containing an obviously 


extremely-expensive-to-produce 

bmk of incomprehensible (to me) 
figures from one firm, contradict- 
ing what another firm has said to 
me the day before. 

I could wbh that, instead of this 
squandering of so much money on 
me. a little extra sum could be 
added to my small dividends. 

. Yours feithfullv. 

B. O. COOPER. 

67 Ponfield Street. Hereford. 



Mai«h26l965 

The first civil rights march from 
Selma to Montgomery was on 
March 7 when the 600 btaek 
people who cook part ofcre driven 
fnek state trooper* tuing 
batons end tear-gas. FoUoa/ing a 
court injunction ordering 
Gouemor Wallace to refrainfrortt 
harassing the march, President 
Jr^ruKin mabUised Natior^ 
Guardsmen and militaiy police to 
protect It, and 3,200 people set out 
on March 21. On the 60th the 
governor received a 16-man 
deflation bearinp a petition for 
block nghls. 


*‘WE SHALL 
OVERCOME” 

From Our Own Correqiondent 

WASHINGTON. tAARCH 25 
The civil rights manJi on Mont- 
gomery, state capital of Ala- 
bama and the first seat of the 
Confederate Government, ended 
today without incident. The 
marchers appear not to have much 
eroded the defences of this bastion 
of white supremacy, but clearly 
they have achiev^ their first 
purpose of rallying national sup- 
port for ^e new voting Bill. 

Thousands of Negroes and 
whites r»mp from all parts of the 
country to join in this symbolic act 
of inter-racial unity in a city proud 
to call itself the heart of Dixie. 
Some had walked only from the air 
terminal or railway station, and 
among the galaxy of film stars and 
other entertainers there may have 
been a few publicity seekers; no 
matter, the impact upon the 
nation^ conscience seems to have 
been enormous. 

As was expected, Mr. Wallace, 
the Governor, refill to receive 
representatives of the marchers, 
whose number bad risen to about 
17,000. He was willing to accept a 
petition from citizens of Alabama, 
should they present themselves ”in 
a pitY>er and moral manner”, but 
only after the marchers bad 
dispers^. 

’The long column of marchers, 
who approached the Capitol build- 
ing singing “We shall overcome” 
and shouting *'Fre^m”. gathered 
to listen to their leaders, who came 
armed with a petition. It said in 
part: 

’’We come peiiiioning you 
to join us in spirit and in iniih 
what is history’s movement 
toward the Great Society: a 
nation of Justice where none 
shall prey upon the weakness 
of the other, nation of plenty 
where greed and poverty shall 
be done away: a nation of 
brotherhood where success is 
founded upon service and not 
given for nobleness alone. . . 

“We have come not only 
five days and SO miles but we 
have come from three centu- 
ries of suffering and hardship 
and have come to you, the 
Governor of Alabama, lo de- 
clare that we must have our 
freedom now. we must have 
the right to vote; we must have 
equal protection of the law and 
an end to police bruiaJity.” 

For the Rev. Dr. Martin Luther 
King, the Negro leader, it was a 
return to the beginnings of his non- 
violent movement. It was in 
Montgomery in 1955 and 1956 that 
he organized the bus strike after a 
Negro woman bad refused to give 
up a seat to a white. When that 
small beginning is recalled one can 
see bow far the movement has 
come in less than a decade. 

Then thousands of 
labourers and charwomen trudged 
miles to and from work day after 
day, month after month, each for a 
tot^ distance far greater than the 
54 miles from Sel^ By compari- 
son. the ardours of the march for 
the few hundreds who set off from 
Brown’s Chapel in that unhappy 
town were easily supportable, but 
complete it they did in spite of rain 
and southern sneers, and the 
reward should be something more 
than the right to sit in a bus. 

At the beguming of the march. 
Or. Ki^ said: “Walk together 
children. Don't you gei weary, and 
it will lead you to the promised 
land". Today the organizers 
warned the marchers not to talk to 
unknown people or answer back, 
a^ go strai^t home after the 
meeting. The Army, the National 
Guard and F£ J. agents were much 
in evidence, and altogether the 
promiWd land could not have 
looked very promising. . . 

BUSINESSBIEN 

CAUTIOUS 

The business community, which 
has hopefully boosted the city as 
the home of progress, was more 
cautious. Racial antagonism does 
not always frighten away industry. 
Both Selma and Birmingham are 
doing well, but Montyomeiy does 
have an unsavoury reputation for 
\iolence and businessmen called 
for restraint A local newqjaper 
advised its readers to ignore the 
march. 

Ove^. however, were .two dis- 
ciplines: the discipline of federal 
authority personified by armed 
troops standing on every street 
corner, and the Negro discipline of 
non-violence. The first was clearly 
neoessar>' today, but only the 
second will cany the country to the 
promised land which Dr. Kiz% 
describes with such religious 
fervour. 

President Johnson said this 
afternoon that thinp were going 
well in Montgomeiy. . • 


Meaningful terms 

From Sfr K. H'. Johnson 
Sir. in one of your American 
contemporaries eariier this week. I 
noticed that whai in that country 
used to be called a "girdle" was 
advertised as a “de-emphasiser”. 
YouRfeifofulU. 

K. W. JOHNSON. 

Tanai. 

97 Wolsey Road. 

Moor Park. 

Nonhwood. 

Middlesex. 

March 21. 


14 


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THE TIMES WEDNESDAY MARCH 26 1986 



COURT 

AND 

SOCIAL 


COURT 

CIRCULAR 


BUCKINGHAM PALACE 
March 25: The Queen, held an 
investiture at-Buckin^am .Pal- 
ace this morning. 

Capiaiu Bhowailsiflg Limixi 
and Camain Kharkajang 
Guning (ilie Queen's Gurkha 
Orderly Officers) had the hoiir 
our of being received by The 
Queen when Her Majesty in- 
vest^ them with the Insignia of 
Members of the Royal Victorian 
Older. 

Major the Marquess of 
Don^U had the honour of 
being received by The Queen 
and delivered up his Stidt of 
Office upon relinquishing his 
appointment as Standard 
Bearer. Her Majesty's Body 
Gu^ of the Honourable Corps 
of Gentlemen at Arms. 

The following Officers of Hn* 
Majesty's Body Guard of the 
Honourable Corps of Gentle- 
men at Anns had the honour of 
being received by The Queen; 
Lieutenant-Colonel James Ea- 
gles. who delivered up his Stick 
of Office as Harbinger and 
received his Stick of Office as 
Standard Bearer - and ' Colonel 
Philip Pardoe who received his 
Stick of Office upon his ap|x>ini- 
ment as Harbinger. 

The Right Hon Ms^ret 
Thatcher. MP fPrime Minister 
and First Lord of the Treasury) 
had an audience of Her Majesty 
this evening. 


The Queen and the Duke of 
Edinburgh were entertained at 
dinner this evening by His 
&eellency the High Commis- 
sioner for New ZealaAdand Mrs 
Harland al A3 Chelsea Square, 
London SW3, 

The Marchioness of 
Abergavenny, the Right Hon Sir 
Philip Moore and Sir William 
Heseltine were in attendance. 

The Duke of Edinbu^. Pa- 
tron of the Fleet Air Arm 
Museum, gave a Reception at 
Buckingham Palace this evening 
in aid of the Museum's 2Ist 
Birthday Development .Appeal. 

KENSINGTON PALACE 
March 25: The Pripce of Wales 
this morning presented the Ex- 
port Awards for Smaller Busi- 
ness 1986 ai the Savoy Hotel 
London WCZ. 

Mr David RoycroR was in 
anendance. 

The Princess of Wales. Pa- 
tron, Help the Aged, attended 
the launch of the Charity’s 
Silver Jubilee Appeal at the May 
Fair Hold. Stratton Street, Lon- 
don Wl tod^. 

Miss Anne Beckwith-Smitfa, 
Mr Victor Chapman and 
' IJeutenant-Cora mander Rich- 
ard Aylard, RN were in 
altendimce. 


KENSINGTON PALACE 
March 25: The Duke of 
Gloucester this morning opeoed 
the Office Environment Ex- 
hibition '86 at Olympia, 
Lond^ 

Lieutenant-Colonel Sir Simon 
Bland was in attendance. 


Luncheons 


Imperial Society of Knights 
Bachelor 

Sir Colin Cole. Knight Principsl 
of the imperial Society of 
Knights Bachdor and Garter 
King of Arms, presided at a 
council meeting of the society 
held at die Royal Thames Yacht 
Club yesterday. Lord 
Karvington was host at a lun- 
cheon held afterwards. Those 
present included: 

Th» RRIil R«v Gcraie OIBon. Lord 
Fraicr ct KUxnonick: Sir Arthur 
Driver «nd Sir CiJbert InvIencM 


OMiwrary deputy fcniuhl princtpal»i. 

ider Dune tcnainnan of the 


StrAiesMidcr - - . 

ncctiUve), Str Ro^er Falk ibonoraty 
reWMrvi. Sir Peter Lane (honorary 
Beasurer*. ^ Cheadie. sir 

Rohert OVMon.Brown. Sir wmiam 
Harra. Sir lan McFanarw. Sir Amar 
MainL Sir Da\lU wapiey. Sir Rex 
Niven and Mn Rattrl £aaen ider* ip 
the council). 


of SiKdaod. yesienui- eniertaiaed ai 
lupcneoa al ihe coOeqe MM Phyllle 
Geocoe. Mr Gerard Dent and Mr 
Alexander Spark*. Master of ine 
Crocera* Cunipany- 


Dinner 


InscHntioa of Lighting 
Engineers 

Mr K. Shaw. President of the 
losUtuiion of .Li^.Ung En- 
gineers. presided at titt iuauM- 
ral dinner held last night at the 
Institute of Directors. The 
guests included Professor Sir 
Francis Graham Smith. 
Astronomer Royal. Dr J. Marek, 
MP. and Mr P. Bruinvels. MP. 


Supper 


Lord Mayor trf Westminster 
The Lord Mayor and Lady 
Mayoress of W'esiminster were 
hosts last night at a supper held 
at City Hall for lay vicars and 
representative clergy of the City 
of Westminster. 



Latest wills 


Viscount Daveniry, of Chelsea, 
former High Sheriff of Rutland, 
left estate valu^ at £157,593 
net 

Mr James Measures, ofDunsby. 
Liocolnshire, left estate valued 
at £1,086.057 neu mostly to 
relatives and other personal 
legatees. 

hfr John Ewart Marwham, of 
Hare Hateh, Berieshrre, Gerk in 
the Committee Office of tte 
House of Commons 1977-81 
and Ambassador to Tunisia 
1973-75, left estate valued at 
£388.455 net 

Mr Eric Wellington Ward Bai- 
ley, of Andoversford. 
GkHicestersbire. left estate val- 
ued at £1,304,869 net He left his 
estate mos^ to relatives. 

Mr Robert Burton SemnnL of 
Udimore, East Sussex, left estate 
valued at £9^,542 net 
Mr Thomas Edward Nivot, of 
Alston. Carlisle, left estate 
valued at £3,189,695 net. He 
died intestate. 


Appointments 

Latest appoiotments include: - 
Mr jastke TDCfcer to , be a 
Preriding Judge on the Midland 
and Oxford Circuit, in place of 
(he late Mr Justice Sfctnner. 


Sir Arthur Driver and % 
GObeit Inglcfield to be Honor- 
ary Deputy Knight Principris of 
the Imperial Society of Knights 
Bachel^. 


Ca pipin J.SXJoyd and lienten- 
ant-Colonei Ronald 

G.Woodboose to be Deputy 
Lieutenants for Somerset, 


Dr Monica E. Baiy who has 
been appointed centenary 
fellow of tte Qneen^ Nurs- 
ing Institate. llio author of a 
ointtber of books on nnisii^ 
she served wiA the Princess 
Mair Rwal Air Force Nurs- 
ing Serritt daring the Sec- 
ond World War and was 
western area ofScer for the 
Rojnd College of Narring 
from 1951 imtil her 
retiremraL 


Guild of Freemen of 
the City of London 


At the annual meeiing of the 
Guild of Freemen of the City of 
Loncon held yesterday the 
following were installed as offi- 
cers for tbe ensuing yean 
Master. Mr Deputy Wimbum 
Horlock: WardMs. Mr Donald 
du Braham, Mr CUflbid 
Newbold and Dr Jobn Bicen. 


Mr Raymond Sears 


Mr Jtaymond Sears. QC has 
been appointed a Judge of the 
High Court in Hong Kong. 


Mr A.J. Morsley. a 
housemaster at Plymouth Col- 
lege. to be Headmaster of 
Ruhwortb School West Ymk- 
shire. from September I . 


Air Chief Marshal Sir John 
Gingell to be a member of tbe 
Conunouwealth War Graves 
Commission, in succession to 
Air Chief Marshal Sir John 
Barraclough. 

Mr R.P. Whitehurst to be joint 
registrar for the districts of 
Norchamptoo. Birmingham and 
Coventry Connty Courts and 
joint district iqistiar in the 
di^'et imstry of the High 
Court at Northampton, Bir- 
min^iam and Coventry from 
l^y 1. 


Eton CoUege 


Lent Half at Eton Ctffiege coded 
yesterday. Tbe Newcastle 
scholarship has been awarded to 
P.S. DrinkaD, OS. the Newcastle 
medallist is J.W. Ree$-M(^ 
and the Wilder divinity prize 
has been awarded to P.M. 
Wilson. OS. who is also the 
Rosriiery exhibitioner. Tbe 
Newcastle classical prize has 
been awarded to aA Brown, 
KS; The Queen's prize for 
French to A.P. Bayne. OS, and 
for German to J. R. Lonsdale, 
OS, and the Keynes prize to CJ. 
B^es, OS. In tile nnal of the 
house football, Mr M.T. 
Phillips's defeat^ Mr DJL 
Evans's by 1 1 points to 6. Mr 
T.L. Holden's retained tiie 
Athletics CupL School op^ for 
the Summer Half on Aim 24. 


Linooln^s Inn 

Mr T.L.G. Cullen, QC has been 
elected a Bencber of Lincoln's 

Inn. 


Memorial service 


SirRonaMWaias 
A memorial service for Sir 
Ronald Wales was fadd yes- 
terday at St Lawrence Jewry- 
nexi-Guiidball Tbe Rev Basil 
Watson offidafed. Mr Micfaad 
Wates. son. Oiainnan of Wates. 
read the lesson and Canon 
William Purcell led the prayers. 
The Right Rev George 
Reind(ffp gave an address. 
Among those present were: 


Its jSnaw 

vSSck Mr J M j 

ONinMilca- 

VMraimt KMBpdm ijOWinSSSl 




HMBIWMl 




_ „..j Mr Btfry _ 

Mr m'C j wiunar (M MWr w 


TIM 

Mr 


' sir Huwptg ey^ tAdy 




mdiMm.„La$r Muum 


jolm 




Lady Wales (wMowl. hfr aad Mn 
DavM Wales. Mr and Ws.Paul waws 
and Mr aM Mn /Uidrew Wates . 
and dauahlers-m-lsw): Mrs Mici^ 
wain (daughler-bvtai^ 

(epfier watts. MU Sarah Wates. ^ 
janws Wales. MU Eiwn a Wa u. 
Holy Watts. MU AuiaMte^^les. 
MU ViciMia Wales. Mr Anlrw 
Watts. Mr eairard Wales. Mr Oiartn 
Watts and Mr TimaOiy Wales (firand- 
etiDwenr. Mr and Mrs Pelw AMon 
iDratneT'liKlaw and atsitt'). Mn Pew 
Wans and MnJtiy w^ ( Mwen-in - 
law). Mr and Mn Jack Trace <br«tnu 
in-iaw and slater-ln-iaw). Mr 
CMtoPhtr S Wales (cnief cacecuuse. 


Cdmmmee. HWo fK .Qnac^ .Tt ? ^ 
Mr AUin ttadi (msttp* 

Sturebes rreiac rvation TnUI 
mSu n I usdiqna.jal»oJ ^vseii ting 



™ .An»a, 


watts Special Watk^ i«^- -nsres 
n DA>eM„ in 


-t-dincu. 
J J RtCtlM' 


(repreUMDid • 
Ian Calntfard . 

Ktng^ oaattr. 
eSuHe 


watts SudioiM oiniplijdr and Mrs 
John tttttMrMr OavM Tf£«. Mr and 


Mn atve AsMon. mis and Mn 


_ _ TBSSiC 

Muctor): D BddieD 

joOn^ School. tudi ertieadL Mr.Wer 
MM lenalnnan. united WesMuMttr 
§Sw<ii)?MdSi R Hiiiiwr ((diairnttn. 
Sww Asaocist mn w BW OjSjJ; 
Mr r S Ceoea irewiesenM n d J ttgdtt y 
Oicket dotU. the Rev B Co«e 




ins ADeS ■riid 'bv ^^ W , JdW 

(au leianaBtBtt t nvMlo^lH 

and TheebaMk 

kilufi- iiDA WtiiSrei^UfRns Mr An* 
law MU wjW&i Mean. fOt 
oSm AA AMW. Mis E Boorke and 
Mrs RiiUi de savaty. 


Forthcoming marri^es 


MrNJ-.Ceote 
^ Miss En^ish 
The engittement is announced 
betweeuNkho^ thhd son of 
Mr and Mes L.G. Cq ot^ o f 
Goring on Thames, (Xdoro- 
shirei, and Bettina, daughter of 
Mr R.N. Ei«Ush. of Bowihig 
Gceeo Houss, Putney Huth. 
London, amt the late Mrs B,^ 
Ffigiixh, and stepdaughter of 
Mrs J.C. Boglisb. 


MrGJtf-Mwr 

ud Miss SJ. Laaa 

The engsement is announced 

betweraGraeme, sem of Mr and 
Mrs Matthew Muir, of 
Bfl r r tdftn, Glasgow, and Sus^ 
dat^ier of Mr and Mn Jobn 
Lucas, of Aylesbury, 

IttiffHwghamditfB. 


MrTJH.F1ueli 

Miss JJH. Scarisbridc 
Tbe enffigement is annoimced 
between Thomas, son of Mr and 

Mn A.M. Fineh, of Hoimfirtb, 
pmi Jill, H»nghf»,r of Mraod Mn 
E.D. Scarisbrick. of Cambridge. 


Mr A.S. Freemau 
and bGss J-A. HammerslMi 
The engagement is aniXNinced 
between Andrew, sou of Mr and 
Mrs M.S. Freeman, of 
l/pminster, Essex, and Jennifer, 
daughter of Mr Mn L.R. 
Hummersion, of Ick e nha m . 
Middlesex. 


Mr MjG. Sfekard 
Miss RJjC- T odd 
Tbe »«*pf**"*n t is announced 
between Maxim, youngest son 
of Mr and Mn P.W. EUdeard. of 
Coopen HiO. Gloucesteisfatie, 
and Rkfaenda, younger dai^ 
ter of Dr and Mn LC.C. Todd, 
of Oidcfield, Sussex. 


Mr M J. Garduer-Roberts 
and Miss L.R. Patieut 
Tbe eugagement is announced 
between Micfaad James, only 
son of Mr and Mn M. Gardner- 
Roberts, and Lesley Ruth, oitiv 
dauriiter of Dr and Mn D.w. 
Patiimt, both of Reigate, Surrey. 


MrKJV.Rawley 
and Miss CA- MadMiaie . 
The eng^ement is aanmmeed 
between Keith Nigel younger 
son of Mr and Mrs James 
Rowley, ofWest Byfleei, Surrey, 
and Chuial Anna, only dau^ 
lerofMraiid MrsD.C. Macken- 
zie, of Cfaelsea, Londoo. 


Mamies 


MrJ,CB.HaBiltoo 
and Miss J J. Allen 
The engagement is announced 
betweeu Bruce, only son of Mr 
James Hamilton, of 
Blainiatboit Farm, Milnathort, 
and Mn Nonna June Hantilton, 
of Penh, and Juliet, only daugh- 
ter of Captain and Mn Frank 
ADen. (rf Dollar, Scotiand. 


MrRJ<i.CHaD 

and Mn J JV. Spdr 

Tbe marriage took place quietiy 

on March 15, 1986 at Hales. 

Market Drayton, Shropshne, 

between Mr Richard Hall and 

MnJaneSpdr. 


MrCHarris 
and Mias CS. Oswald 
The eng ag eme n t is announced 
between Qivc; elder son of Mr . 
and Mrs J.Hmris, of Pon Tal- 
bot, West Glatnarttan. and Gath- 
erine, dau^ter of hfr and Mn 
I.W. Osvrald, of Chepstow, 
Gwent. 


Mr T JLW. JeBkjwJoaes 
amd Mn JX. Dnkes 
The marriage took |dace in 
Hoitt Kong on Friday, Matdi 
21, between Mr Tolw Jenfcyn- 
Jmies, sod of Dr w. Jenk^ 
Jones, of Sandbadi, Cbeshne, 
a^ Mn E. Sisk, of Anindd, and 
Idrs Janet Drakes, youieest 
daiqibter of tbe late Mr J.hLG. 
Bril and of Mrs P^y 8dl of 
Stonegate, Sussex. 


Birthdays today 


Cbltmd Sir Mi;Jiari AnseU, 81: 
1^ Pierre Boulez, 61; Sir Aithur 
Brace, 91;- Miss Kyu^nha 
Chung. 38; WJ. EdxKh. 70; 
Lofd Fletcher. 83; Lmd Graham 
of Edmonton. 61; Ju^ Gra-' 
ham Hall 69; Lord Hooson, 
QC 61; Air Marshal Sir Peter 
Horsley, 65; KGss Elizabeth Jane 
Howard, 63; Sir George Jefin- 
soo. 65; Sir fienurd Katz, 75; 
Vice-Admiral Sir lan McCeodtu 
72; Dr Keiuetii Mdlanby, 78; 
Sir Leslie MriviOe, 84; Mr 
Geoffrey Panl 57; Mr David 
Quilter, 65; Mr Harry Rabino- 
witz, 70; Sir Sidney Ridley, 84; 
Nto Diana Ross, 42. 


Institiition of 
Ovil Engmeers 

The following have been elecied 
hoomaiy JeOows of the Institu- 
tion of C^vU Engineen: 

Lord Ezra. Lord McAlmne of 
Moffiit..Lonl Soames. CH. and 
Sir Francis ToBibs. 


RAF sword 


The Diamond Jubilee Sword of 
the Royal Air Force has been 
awarded for. 1985 to RAF Brize 
Norton, Oxfordshire, for 
oulstiindiDg service to the RAF 
Benevolent Fund RAF Haiton, 

Pm cIringiMiinahir ft, was IhC TOD- 

ner-up. 


Omreh news 


Appointments 

Tiw Rfv J O M mm. car ^ 
Mauiw w_w«i S t Jaw wt PSlSW; 
fiSnial Oivtn. dloecae aT.Landan., 




Srfe^R"c 




Stacexe yfog; 

» PliUUa. W«sieii PU In Uie NMtb 
MBMiy 


Oh 


'In 




ISSSv. 


^ B a iititt p ir Taam 


gj g mwiL yur. 
HpBt Trtiiu;;0(sai^ ^a^pM iu 


SiS Ittv W WBtlblM. A j U tt W I I c w^ 




Realtt^irtmr, t a p lar 


S^UUUMM* tt Be Virar. SI Antfiaw, 
BenMU RaadL ae awgty. cV B oaraa- 
bwhUi. tfwccae of WluePeM^. 
TTWW^L ScotLVWr. — ' 
wtib Si Alban, woe ttf a tt — 

BUncTicitiT lb M I ttuer. U Andraw. 

wwttD- 

also Rival Dran of Emiy, 


_8t 


: Sbwom. Guattu. 


%wk. to ba flTT*^*** Coratt af.tU 

vBe Rav B S Sl i a ili. v ijjir. ktt niB iMW 
wan ftfctfwrt mo yn o i a miaH, ^ 
ocexe €t St E duna M tt banr and tta- 
wul to u atto mtotinuarpi. 
FTMBinonrtS and Wevtocad. 

Ttie Rav H L M Sowom, 

Cardan son so 

8i S^* RBOcr. Rttra 
Baniet diocee Londan. _lo U 
Recur. SI M gii i It B ow. sitoaS jB i tt m. 
Tlie Jttv D Aarptta. view Sr J W bM . 
Aahton-iBider<iMie. qweto* cTMaa- 
ORjtti. to be VKar. Si Jamea Hopa. 
SaBora. I ■* — ‘ — 

aUpendlafyf sSuibjttiflliig. SautoC 
cnutiwter. to be 

SoottJM'Euope. to be 
Andraw ra. Zbrteb. 

TW^’lwv R A' wuuaiua. Vlor. 
Monfclan. dteoae arm OavidL to be 
CttapMn to tbe SOU and. wm 
MtoiPB to tbe Dtof. is e ce i e at Btob 
and IVUtt. 


RestgoEtkosaiid tetiremeiits 
Tbe Rev R S .ftMi ttox!. ft tw t to . 
ebarpe. Didlnv. 'Lo m gbrd fjoc. and 
Rkttpwito dlKStoS’Datar. torcon* 

%e”%>v * C noMnwe. Vkar. 'St 
ChrttieplMr. MlaSey Pwle. Cownnu. 
dioccu or OoveMBy. to mtre at Um 


m SlevcftMnanL 


l 4 Fiwb wioi ipton Matati. dtoontt oT 
adOteato'. to ratm «n April 30 l 
T be tiav A J WiaMnentadiDn Itocwr. 
Kingmorpe. Wui nai i n iton. aioceae at 
PeiBitxiroapb. m mtie on May 31. 


Other tgipointiiieats 


D*eca«i a» S et m an an . Ca|. h cuar; 
ary partab woctor. llu ma^md 


Oortopk dtoeew.or 


mrt-iinie Etot Coari 
ialn. cne duecoa.- 
Deacowto S Rnridan- w be 
non^etomdlWT -Jdtattttr. 
aaded — ara rcb Wottar m ^,-.» 
Wtotbary CUncB ar CbaccB|p,.Btto 
toL^dlootoeor towiol.. - ^ ^ 


i« ll ce w' t a' 

■SS 


Save and PkDsp^ 
tedmolo^ 
scholarsii]^ 


Two Save and ftos^ tecfaixrf- 
ogy scjKABships have been 
awarded for September 1986: 
J.W. Stevenson (Matiborough 
OoUegp), LD. Thomas (G^ 
Sduxri, Ewril Epsom, Sarny). 


Births, Marriages, Deaths and In Memoriam. 


Hr a onward and rrirctrd or mm: a man 
of sorroma. and aequaimrO wim grtrf' 
and «rr hid as It «»vrr our (acw from 
bun. 

todb S3 3 


aUM - On March 19th, a( St Maiy^ 
Hoepital Raddbigun. to AUwn tote 
wuuxi,) and Andrew, a "daurtittr 
KamerlM Maty Anne. 


8IRTIIS, MARRUGESr 
DEATHS usd IN MEMORIAM 
£4 a Um'* 155b VAT 

iffliBifiiiim.J Line) 
Aanouncemenu, auihenucaied by the 
name and pennaneni address of ibe 
sender, may be leni to: 

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uon Ihe MIowinB dav phone by 

1 3npm roimicoMiiiu MAto 
RMSES, WZDSmss, elc on Court 
and Social £0 « Bae 1S% 
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CouR and Sncial ftge amounoe- 
menu can noi be aecepicdc by 
idt^ otie. Enqaines w 01 
eSS3, or send lo 1 
SttMl, La w daa El 


MAirrM - On asm lUarcb. to JOI tote 
Mason) and Kevin, a eon Andrew 
lan. 


NOIAN en Mard) 22nd at Lewtaban 
HospHaL to Adrilne tote Ob) and 
Mike, a aon (Hugb WU ShanL 


OUCr - On M ondgr Mareb 24ttk 
Angela Ruth. oT IMielineA Wood- 
landaSt. Mary, Newbuiyisivlfeor the 
late John GUbeR and moOier of 
Arabelta and wa ndm oOwr of Oare. 
Funeral Service to ttke Mace on 
Thuradav 27th March. llDOam. at 
Sl.Mary WeofOandsCbivdL Faitolv 
floweip only. Plaaae no tttien. Dona- 
none. U oamo. to Cancer Researdi. 
c/o Lloyds Bank. Hiugotard. 


LABM: On 24ST March . P w alaice 
Mary, rider dauNi^ of toe late Per- 
0 and ConMance. dearly loved ateter 
andauiL mniiflrtUr after a long U- 
nes. born wtlii outstanding oounoe 
and resOicnca. FlBierai at St McMIai 
Gburcli. CMririnneL on Prlittar ApcO 
4to at 2 lam. Fandly flowcn only, 
but daaaUona H dealied to the ResFal 
Star and Garter Hene. Rtctannad. 


mo n a m on Marm 22 nd ibss. ar 
Ids hene. Aittnr John, mber of 
RaymoBMl and Audror. Ctenattan to 
lake place on Tuariiay 1st Apia. 
1Z46POI al Sotdh Weal MMdlcaax 
Cnmalnliim. Hanworth. Me flewrin 
ter nuuat Dwiril o M tf dealred to 
Mascnic Fbandaflon ter toe AsM 
and Stek. 198T Ftetom. 20 Cteeal 
Queen Steeel. WC2. 


-Mn. annn ■ ■ 
. pto Bj. toito rii 

Sitt. E. cemjpra 
Mn. Chapman " 


PAXTON - On M«cn irin ai me 
OrinUIr HamttaL Tamo, to 
Jenri >nl« AneHiand AnUwny. 
a roa James Launderdale. 


On Marrti 23id In Bast 
PrenbiL Susmx. wmian Hugh, be- 
loved husband. tetoer and 
grandtetoer. Funeral private. 


MVNE • On iamary ZSrd fSSS at toe 
Prtncaas Anne HosptiaL Soutoamp- 
ion. 10 Cairiona tote Moncrlefn and 
John Payne a daughbs*. Laura, a ate- 
ter tor Alexander and Alice. 


PUM On March Uto. at CUnlca 
ftjUMa. uma. Peru, lo Sbefla toee 
Harper) and Shamknder. a son. 
Roahan James, a brother tor 
Oerstian Stuart 


MU4LAND On Uie Slsl March, peace 
fUtly al FUccri Lodge. NUttey. Evriyn 
Emily aged 94, much loved laotoer 
and grandrnotoer and slater of Doro- 
toy. Funeral at St John's Heron's 
GhyiL East SiasTT. at 11.30 ajn. cn 
1st April. 


UEIE Mary Jtune tote Htette) peae» 
fully on 24to Mairii at Yoifce House. 
Relgale In her lOOto year. wMow or 
Outfles Leonard Leue and CF.M. 
Joad. teaves two dMriiien and one 
son. Private cremaUen. Centrton- 
Hone lo Save the ChUdnn Fund tf 
d e si re d . 


WATKINS - On M«h S2nd lo Gartti 
and Jane tote Hamuton) a son. Job- 
than MIriiael. 


WIBTTLE On 2401 March 198S. at 81 
Thomasu Hoapflal to Atmemarte 
<nte Foley) and PaiiL a beautffid 
daughter CharioUe. 


BIRTHS 


WRJJIN ■ On March 2lst to fCate tote 
Tumer-iashmar) and MiehaeL a 
brotoa- tor Lucinda lAndrew Kuril). 


nWVMNC - On March 24th. peacetooy 
at home. Fdleltt Vlotet youngest 
dauriiter of the late Mr Rupert 
Gwynne. M.P.. and toe late Hon. 
Mrs SteUa Hamilton: much loved sis> 
ter of Piisdlla. Btabeto and toe late 
Diana, and Ainu of Sabrina. Julia. 
Rupert Johnny. Oulstabri. Stettien 
and Oiristopher. Fimoai 12.45pm 
on Wedneaday AprB 2nd at SI 
Peter's CZHBtli. FoMnglon. nr 
Polerite. Hie 20.60aRi oaln Rum 
victoria wm be mel at Potegate. 
Flowcn and cnoulries to R Butler 
and Sons. 3 BeHlwnhs Road. 
HaUahant tel: saoOBd. 


LEWIS • Piiteeiuny on Friday 2lsi 
March a^ 73 yean. Katem briowed 
husband of EBaner and son Kasmelb. 
win be sadly mte sed by tomfly and 
friends. Ore ma non to take place at 
Golden Green Cr ma wn im t an 
TMasday 27tti March al it.OCwn In 
toe West Oiapri. Flowris aM cnoui- 
rtes to JJiKenyon. 6. Woodhoosa 
Road NX2. 


l-OnZtatlteich.peaeaM* 
ly at NufBdd HospEak Btelar. to Ms 
82nd year. David, briimd husband 
of Julia. fbUier and granriklhan of 
Rooefieaai IWyne. Une He^ Fu- 
neral Sendee Uplyiae Parish amrcli 
on Thundsy aTto Marrii 230pni. 
FXnfiy f iu it ura oriy mease, but do- 
»»-*««—« 10 toe MIC Curie Fuad, c/o 
W. O. Potur A Sons Funeral Dlrec- 
lon. t West SneL Axndnsier. tel: 
32063. 


On 2iei March t9B& 
veiy suddeiricy al hetne. near Tala. 
RosS'shire. Bm brioved husband of 
ant. toDier of Rosamund. Babel 
and Rory and gean d fatoer of Jamie 
and Alasdalr. Donattese tf deshed to 
toe Htridand Hoastee AppeaL PO 
Box too. hivcnteaB. ivt lYW. 


Miasni. Nonuan Harvey aeed 61. 
died suddenly on Friday 2isl March, 
husband of Jo (aoier or Uz. Nigri and 
a much loved grandtouicr. The Sw- 
vice win behrid at Si Mans A AD 
Satott. Boxfey. near diCaidstene af 
tisgro mi Friday 4to ApriL toh 
lowed by cremaUen ai Vtoiers Path 
Creanatactam at 2J)opm. Faudly 
flowris only. OonaUons to NatiMial 
Rcaral Uto Boat taattoillon or The 
Maidstone Wlshbig Weh Itoridee. 
c/o D w rmnian A Son Ud. 79 
Uidon Street Afaldsimie. Kent Tri 
0622 53033. 


Mr. T.W. OoW 
ptt. Aj. dd Sbetom 
M-. FJC. rinmnnd 
Mra DL Donbam - 
Ms. A. OiBdmm 
tat. F. Ihmi m m 
Ms. F. Dsahma . 
M; o. Ciialtam 
Mrs. V. DtinMm 
Or. W. EaoHtt 
Mrs. W. BagMt - 

M. o. Enrinb 

Mrs. D. EariMi 
Mr. C toasito 
Mis. c mplib 
Mr. H.W. nsiam 
HAS. K.W. PMOa' 
Mr. C: Ftach 
M. J. Frir 
Mn. A. GUbNiu 
Mr. N. Ckipps 
Ms. N. Gness 
Mr. MXtM. Hamm 
Mr. M. iruiwH 


Mbs e. Han 
Sri. T.6. Harw - 
Mr. B. Hawktas 
Mr. R. StoMCeU 
Mr. M. HvwMR 
Ms. Hat 
Mr. M. HsriM 
M. HaB 
Sri. W. JMte 
M. O. Jeocs 
Sri. PC. Kraus' 

Mr. CXE. 1 lairi 
Sri. a I iiceme 
Sri, rjttacKSswmi 
tan, P. ssacKcowsa 
Fauier Cttuda Sfuenr 


MIUUTO, On March 19in, n 
Vanessa inee ingle) and Mioiael. a 
daughter Katherine Oalrc. 


BW6S On 24th March to Lynn inte 
Perrin) and Michael, a sen Edmund 
Chrlstoplier Pernn. 


DEATHS 


HAIMNOND Piairii. Anhouarian Book- 
seOer. a) heme en iTtb 

MaiTh 1986. He win be smiy aisste 

by Ms fMiny. 


BOHEHU. • On March 20to. to Caro- 
line Inte Claaen and Michael, a 
daughter Charlotte Victoria, a sister 
(or Nicholas Beniamin. 


BRAT - On March ISth lo Eleanor 
Grace inte Knealei and Ni^ Anthm 
ny. a son AUsiatr Douglas. 


BECKER • On 2Snd Mwch 1986. irag- 
Kally. Bob much loved husband of 
Jenny and beloved father Of DailW 
and Amy. Senta at A Nletwias 
Churcn. PyrterO. oA Thunday 
March 27th. at 3.00pm. followed by 
burial. Flowers to G BotileD and Sen, 
60 HIM Road. Byfleet Sumy. 


■umuiy - To Geoff and saiiy on 
March 24 at Rorol Budo. Aytte- 
bury, a daughter virgixua Louise. 


CHAPMAN • Samuel Stephen on 20to 
search at Furness CeneraL Barraw. 
Son lo June and Roger and brntorr 
lo Marcus. 


CLARK - On Marc!) 14to 1986 lo Lyn- 
da (nrc Stogg) and Mike, twin sons, 
Alexander Michael and Christopher 
WHUam. 


BENTUV On 22nd March 1986. 
peacefully al hb home. WUbam Bent- 
lor. M.B£m MSd 81 years, of 
Rushey Fields Manor. woodhooBe, 
Leicestenhlre. toe dearly loved hus- 
band Of Barbara. FuncrW serviee at 
SC James TTie Oeater Chureh. Lon- 
don Road. Lelceater. on 'niursday 
27th Mted) at 12.30pm. CremattoB 
toUowtug at Letteater cremaieriian. 
AH ftowen and enautrtts to Gtora 
and GuUeiMge Ltd Furtteal Dmetare 
of Letoeeier. T4: 0693 661 17. 


HMT - On Marrti 22nd 1986. after e 
long Ulnea very bravely borne. Nor- 
man John Hart aged 60 years, 
dfrecior Gwynne Mrf A Associates. 
Qiaimian ■ Chebea SIV. dearly 
loved husband of Vivian, betoved fa- 
ihar of Russell and D eb o rah and 
graudfatoer of Laoraioe and Sartei. 
Funeral on Wednesday April 2nd at 
Mortiake Crematorinm at IJOpm. 
Ftowen to J H fCenyon Ud.. 48 
Martaes Read Wa. or donations to 
the Cystk Flbrcsii Research Ttust or 
to Chneer R es e ar ch. 


MACDOUaALL - Ou March 24tb 
1966. aped 96. peacMUBy at Mount 
Alverala Narsbig Home. BramsboU 
Close. HtoWitod. Surrey. Agnes tote 
McCulreX bWoved uose of toe late Bb- 
Raibttwt MacDoogaD. K.CAtQ~ 
LCS. Fonnerty of Gbsgow. Banna 
and Worthing. Much tawed roalher. 
gr an d m e t her and wratgramBnath- 
er. Reonlcn) Mass at Mc Alwida 
Nuntna Heuc. 11,00am April 1st 
toBowed by cr a na tl on al GuUdtord 
acmaiortnm 1200^ Family Row- 
ers only plense. OonMioiis in U« to 
Ml Alvoido Nurdng Homett Third 
world Praieds. 


SEEKMBS on March 2Sto peacoftdly 
al his home In Pour Maeta. Thomas. 
Alfred formally of Natal. Souui Afri- 
ca hosband of the iMo Aototoeite. 
FUther of John. Geoffrey, grandfri 
Uier Of Cormac. Jentny. Kate. 
Duncan. Gdtaan and Sally, 
cnemacton at Aidershoi CKmaton- 
um on Thursday. ApHI 3rd at 4 pm. 
Family llowm only but dOnaiiOM to 
Naiional Tnul c/o Kemp & Stevem, 
93. Higii street Alton Tel: 0420 
63177 


aUSewn Kurt on March 84to in Ms 
86ih year Funeral Service at GoMm 
Green Cyemaierium Thuraday 
March 27th at 12 neon. 


HARVEY - On March 19to 1986. 
peacefully to heepilal In the Wes of 
Sony. Leslie Anhw. aged 82. ne- 
fessor Emeritus. UrdveraUy of 
Exeter. Deer Husband and ftlond of 
Clare, father of Michael and Marga- 
ret Private emnaUen. No ftowos 
please. 


CONSTANT » Elena, wtto of Hugh 
Constani of Dimsham. Chlor. a stsirc 
for Beniamin: born In Beverly HUb 
on 22nd March 1986. 


de NOHaiANN « On l9Ch March to 
Sttn. wife of Roderick de Normaniu 
a daughter Camilla HenrieRa. 

FARR • On March 23 to PabWia <nte 
LarMoi and Nicholas a son. 


BRUeC-en24to March 1986. Audrey 
Patricia viUers. formerly of Niton. 
UndereStf and FPirford. beloved 
wKe of Dr. Nigel Bniee. Any enqm- 
rles lo Packer A Slade Funeral 
Direciora, Qreneester. Tel: 0286 
SS2S. 


KELLY WHUam Cnanes. husband of 
Mela, en Mvth 20th at & 
Augustine's CeUege. Wesigate on 
Sea. Kent 


HOMSON On Sunday March 23rd. 
Maurice Hilary iLarty) Tlwinlaf 
Hodgson, mudv-toved husband of 
Catharine, father of Sandra and 
Bompa to Samantha. Benlamla and 
jQShiB. FuiierW 2.00pm Thundiw 
2701 March, at 6L AndKwV. 
Honingham. 


MAY - On 2aid Mwch. DoroOiy aged 
91 years, peaceftoly al Tlie Ouse. 
BureoL AMogdoD. after a long O- 
nea. She ws toe betoved daughter 
of toe late Ftederick Aftour and Su- 
san May. of Bradley. Cumnor. 
pea Family flowers ortfi 
donatiom if desim L 
Branch of the N.S^.C,X 
MUanti BaAc. NulL 


gKOBIWf- on Match as 1986. peace- 
hdly ai Bau n gito ke . Helen DuUe, 
widow of Jimmy, betoved metoer of 
Jane and Ann. Funecte servm at 
Bartiam cremalertoni. sear Cwdep. 
bury M Tuesday April i ai zpn. 
Flowm to Bladtowm FaMni Se^ 
vice, Broteetan. M: Thanet 52S97. 



0 The 


• On March 24th to Sarah Inte 
ColvUiv) and MfchaeL a son (John 
Hugni. 


FRICNaT - To Corinna Inte Heywoed) 
and Marrer on March ISth. a son 
Vi.es ennstophe. 


HARDT-KSM On 24Ui Mmch at St 
Mer'b. Mahlea. to PlUUppa- inte 
Stoinwnds) and MariVn. a daughter 
Katrina AUson. a ust>T for Howard. 


COUmswOOM - Of) Saturday 22no 
March 1986 to hespitaL Peter Noel, 
husband of Jeaete. father of Rose- 
mary and Susan, tormerly of B. P. 
Oienucais. Funerat Woking aemalo 
rium March 27tn at iZ-SOpm. 
Family Bowers only. Donations if de- 
sired to Ottershaw iiomBaL 
Cherisw. NO leiicn. 


NOaHES In March 1986. pesceAilfy aC 
home Rkhard SHiley Hutfiea T.D.. 
much loved nrotoer of Pal. tormerly 
utUh Cesttiner lid. Cremtolcn at 
Golden Green Crematorium 
Wednesday 2nd Aprfl al 2,20pm. 
Family flowcn only. Donanons tor 
Masonic Fffurdflfwin fur Aged and 
Slcfc ahouM be sent to. 6 Trimly Ave- 
nue Lmdon NS OLK. 


NUTTMJ.-(Ri24lh March 1986. after 
a tong fitness. John Radubotlsin 
MZL F.F.R. aged 62. beloved hus- 
band of Alice and totoer of Bany and 
Peter. creRiauon at the Cnuniys Gre- 
malorium. Mttton NaKor. 
Noftoamptoa at 12 neon on 1st 
Ann). Ftowen to Arm Bonham. 71 
SlXfitas SL Northaoiptoa. Tel NdfUl- 
aioMon 34368. 


TALBOT - Hesuy Deairia. late of to. 
Royal Craiwnar SdieoL W!i^ 
ombe and Hong Kong Uhlweisity. 
widrtfiily oo 22nd Mandt at 
ombe HoraOaL aged 60 years. Sl^ 
missetl husband of Norecn and noier 
of Martin and Cbristorticr. Funeral 
Service 2.46pm Wednesday 2nd 
Aprt at Bt Jancs,^ Church. 
Oownlcy. Hlgb Wyoothbe Buda. 


YURNMU. - on 29M Manh 3966b 
suddoily al Me home a few daya aF 
ter hs 78to Uiihday. Pasric Edwad 
XenoQion TwnbulL M.C sahUerand 
author, brieved mahand of and 
dearfmhcrofDomlnlcand'(jUes.Ea- 
QUlries to R 6t H Barter. 40 WttUage 
Read. DUat 


Mr. EA 

Mrs. EJX toMssn 
Mr. J. wraus 

PO'! B. SUihouse 
bte. J. am 
Mr. J.UL seal 
Mis. JJ). Seal 
ran ct SettMc 
Countess PI SeBttb 

Mrs. lU. Shaspwd 
h&. M. SbnMP • 
sir. J. SkiaiHr 
Mr. N. Spurwmr 
Mr. J. Stolcre- 
Mr. DH. TauiMSD 
Mr. O Ttiemas 
Mr. H. T wrei ice 
Sir Peter Treiicb ' 
Mr. T. TMtepe 
Mr. R. VasBody 
kto. R. VUandy 
Mr. D. walnwnebi 
Mn. D watowrioM 
bn-. WUkvrte 
Mrs wuhwisp 
Mbs K. WMMWn 
Mr. L£Ji wntens 
Mr. Ul. WHitoM 
Mrs. LJ. wnittm 
Mrs. wqioiieittv 
Mr. AJ. woiMbetet 


OWDI On Mard) 14ib, pracsfidly at 
Ganhgwyiiion to her aSh year. 
Margmui Cbm. wtte of toe late Uoyd 
Owen Owen and ranch loved mother 
of Roto. David and Edward, and 
Natal to her elgM gr a nd c hildren. 


MEMOftUL SESVICES 


INMEMQKEAN 

-PRIVATE 


barker On 24ih March V9S6 at Col- 
chester to Rita tnte Nashi and 
Norman, a aon Roben Harry John, a 
bratber tor (Marie. 


DVBBfR • (nee Von IMlBkai on 20to 
March. peoeefiiUy lo Waaminstw 
Hespliai. Eva. devoted wife of Harry 
and tavtaig moiher of Henry and 
Ceoraina. after a long uineto bnvdy 
bonw. 



March 2nd 1986. to John 
^ a daughis-, LQy 
F»une«. a stoer tor 


. • Sibyna. on Tuesday 
March 2Sto. suddenly In Scotland. 
FUnempmatriyacharoe. Memorial 
service to be aimoiuieed later. 


KNATCHRULL-HUBESSCN. On 

March 2isL al hb home CUweni. 
TaHey. UandeUo. Rohm John Ko. 
aged 64. Betoved husband of Anne 
and adored father of Peter, S^. Si- 
mon. and Jara and devoted 
nrandfatoer of Torann'. BBIy. Lydia 
^ Holly. Funeral on Thursday 
2Ttti March at Talley Chwrii. 
12.S0pm. (oDowed by private u e ma - 
iwn. EnguiiatoD. w. waudne. FD. 
Uandeita 823486. 


PALUHBP • Ooda Maod-OtoNimh on 
Tuesday 2Sto Magcti >986. peaceful- 
ly at bome. Deafly loved dangiittr of 
ONia and the teu Uouel Wigram and 
betoved spur of M itf ia el and Antho- 
ny. Darting wife of Peter and touch 
towed mother of AnmbeDa. 
and Lama. Fnneral savieu at Sl 
Mary's Church on Pmidinaten 
GreesL on Tuesday let Aprn at 
ll.OOam. followed by prtvatecreroa- 
don. Flowers Id St Mary's Church on 
Addington (tteoi. 


A nwmariBl terrice tor. Cyril 
Jeha OunliaH ms cmm on 
Thureoey 20 Mveh M SI cacB- 
UimeFteMs. Si eSUe* Mgn 
sireeL WC2. aeverend o Tay- 
lor offlewiM Sir H ob u t 
Newton, rvenjus. antanMa 
Builduie SocMv. gave toe ad- 
dress and htt, U6.H. wgibno, 
OixirMaA. NanonwMe Bididbw 
Soelecy. read me Uwiim, Amoiig 
tom present were: 

Mr. A.L Ashiiis 
Mr. J. uetmam 
M-. G.C Bmwy 
MS. S.E BHfee 
Mr. 1C. Bradtaig 
Mr. M. Bridosaan 
Mr. O. Brock we e 
Mr niiMe 
MTt. Bruce 


p ai ae obote n ttL tram 
icmiy en toe . 1980 BtpedNttn in 
MalL Ramembarad wtBi lova on twr 
34th Btnbday nd always tar-ew 
tbougnts. 

ANDERSON la tovtou rasmonr 
of WUHara Oirtfiig Andarson 
wbo passed away oo Mon- 
day March 2601 1907. 

Deeriy memed. 

IfHSON 'John ’ Oun oc aL Of 
Rotoameted aid' Butoounm. 
273.22. lo 24.636. ' reoienibered 
wtto love at tote fde BfrtfHter. by ftb 
sisters and children. Abo Ids vittc 
Eve. who dtod ou Good Friday 1966. 


OBITUARY 
PROF FRANCIS SGARFE 



Poet, critic and umvmity 
adnunistrator 


Piofoffior Rands Scar^ 
CBE. wiw OB 5 
the agn of 7S:was Dixwtor.of 
the British InstiRUe in ms 
fiom 1959to 1978aad.P!rofes- 
sorof Efwch in ^Umyersif 

ty of IxmdfHi . fiom 1965 ti> 

As poet, -novdist, scoolart 
niby ph^ and rdiioaitf 
administrator, Scaifo 
absbi^**8 end bi^ ufe 
stzidiixl at the Universines <n 

Dufhanu Cambridge and Par- 
is, and alto war service (194l> 
46} became Senior Lectnier m 

Pjrencb at the Uinversny of 


Duiiira his twd^ years in 

Scotiaadbe esctcBsiv^ 

and although he bdiBY^ fhat 

there is oo .vabal eqnivalent 
ftn* human fife, he sevotb^ 

leraspemnijMiyho oraCTe at^ 

htmadf) ' arid doddatmg m 
otfaets .the nnapoative posw 
ofpoets. • . . 

FOems came snn bis pen m 
abundance: the- volumes, 
lascapes (1940); fioemf m 
JLr/We (1941); and Vnaet-. 
worlds (1950); and critical' 
e^uatioBS of W. H. Aud^ 
Paul 'Valery apd^ T. & Efiot 
opened op.new inqghtg znftT 
theseauthorl . 

These sdiciaziy woiks, m 
both : mid Rendi, ' 

martn hjin a natmidioiae foe' 
the Diractorriiqrf^ilie BritiA 
Issthnle in ?m ufoen it 
became vacant in 19S9; For 


neaiiy tncBtj rem U Jht 
2 ssi£m which Shdped lo 
twnfomilieiimMtpcsfo^ 
bsb smog edttcmxmtil and 
broad 

pfaiM . and the .UiBKd 
Kingdoni.' - 

la 1968 !mmet.«iAM 

caha. aadandeiaiaiidifl^uie 
ccmseqseiKesofthhiipbeKi^ 
that offsd thrpngbooi the 
Qoaifen ihe fbOowing- 
w te;Sn^ Hic ceed Ml in 
penarading tte tJCy and^ 
Univcirity of London, of the 
of te ogporn^ 
tbe W»iW>te sBto the ]bilin 
imn>e«5iiyay5tfmrindiii 1976 
be paitsci^ed, crest 
saii^crioB, in themaiRr of 
die Institute ito the new Cnt 
.to^ Ceasre^ me deCaiHla^ 
tine. 

AO ^flie BritiA 

- jnstitDte is Fhiis must be for 
erer to Poads Sovfo 

- for faai dediattiflii skS nd 
fescnioe -m mwa g ing so 
roadL' 

' T hiw g b orthisndnMiisin- 

'tioia be. *vwrtmsirct Sft .mritn 
and n> fisien to vraoesof odier 
:his scbolariy wth on 
judM Chenkr came- oat in 
1965; bis editibosaod iniBlfe' 

- tkms of BnddiBra Cbenkr 
and l3 Rndahe foOoNed. 

Oidyaieur.<^before-fni 
deaih fie m cOifiaii hii 
tnoslitibos oTLa Foomne to 
the test gneratioft.of liii- 
dete nt 'ffii Inttimie - ' 


iqQ Q 1 i 5 


r v» 


HASRIEitEMlNOW 


Haniette AxrioiBr,.ihe Ame^ 
icu novefist Tsiio has-died at 
faer&^ in WaSldeBamrOR»' 
ty,' Bdiddsan, at die iflB of 77, .. 
gmfte eyoenvdy ahom dm 
fives of die Kentni^ ^ folk ^ 
ain^ Yriiom te gte w 

. 7%ir sbe deacabed 
effectivciy the "cbBisioa of 
sinq)l^ niral y^ies widi 
uban life ander die inffaistritf 
. impetatives of zraitime. 

Sie was bom Htfiiette. 
-SbimKMi od Jn^ 7, 190H and 
grew im m theiodK wooded 
mils <n soathem Kentridcy. 

first joh^ at ei^leen, was 
as a .teaeher in a remote ono- 
Toorix .sebord' in ai matBeai 

wM U terfa i n flnmmmifty tint dig . 

SQbseqneridy g i adna ie d Aom 
U iu Y w^ and 
eventuafiy afafe to dewQfo 
sdf 10 writing. 

Her first novel, TheMdioh 
tool Path (as Bniieite . 
soa, ' 1936) was irart^ 
amobiograidukal and di> 
soifaed die fife of a .yooqg 
leadier in n backwoods area. 


'^Sfae iihet -lurried Hnold 
Airiof^n Cbicagoiieiapiper- 
mao^ . and - her adboemeat 
woiifa;' which ap pe afed after a 
’ hmakfenbigwmcb 
la fei^,:i*eie Ynineii. as 
HairididATiioir. 

' fiftariier'g Him deib 
'widi a fioor gdte fenner- 

Y^beoomes ofaaaeaae?w^ 

hs nusBOL m a faa whiA 

'So. ThS ' 

berate rinctira'Cnb sdeo' 
lioo and a brat sdier. 

^ Bnt nndonbttdly ber best- 
knotfn ''TiDyef is The 
PoBhudd& (1954^ Idls 
- dfe stdiy dfa eonMiywoinaft - 
diedaltaiakeroftbe tide- wbo 
foBowS her imAaaA hi fail 
aeasfa-. for-: /ca q iiqyiiicat to . 
wartime Deixoit Yte'.vbeie 
she fanides hopdete to pee: 
serve the~ decencies or ooodliy 
fife.-..--: 

ITusbecrinmaTuriawayRSt 
sdleriiKi m 1983 was made 
te a tevisiak film grfnch 
stanedJriie Honda. 


I Sr> 


jfCRETAI 
Sf Ex'terr 


m Man 


ph 


DRJOilNMOOilE 


r J3r Jc»A-Moore;08E,'i^.... le- 

died.XABdbrnaiyJil wiO 

Ticflianbered « a dedicated ;i^iidribirai ; rcs«nrdf mtn>- 
nieDtiia who devoted-fier fife.; 4&peddie X^ritorner-Owlrac- 
10 a inbai^ nmAA mterest in. .. .lorFiiiirarife' Dr Moore jou^ 
{dantpedKdogy. ^ ■ the Inei^ fisrmed *Qiief 

After gadnating in borady^ , Saentisfs <hoim! at Wesl- 


nnd FliD studies on potato 
storage; she joined theDcpaii- 
ment of Plant Pathbiogy at 


minster. She was leqxmable 
far the prqianition of com- 
misrions for leseaidi in arable 


RodiMnst^ wotkai^ oa-ftn- aims and ptetsdeace. 


gid diseases of crops iritro- 
-ihioedfixnn abroad. 

. Tltis fed to a iite isiefest in 
quarantine, profatems and . a 
move to .die Mimsby of 
Agrioilxuie*s ' laboiatories ‘ at 


Her outstanding capadiy 
ftw taaid. and aoconte woik 
and her ability to atte a case 
fonefidly but with dbann and 
good, hraotu; nrade a vate- 
9^ contrfoatioa to n^tia- 




Hatching Green, tbe centre of tions which ' we, iteally, 
tlmnewqoaraiitinesembe. somewhat stressfiiL 


GEN SIR GUVRY ROBERTS 


Steiriien Hanfer writes 

Your otfierwise aifanir^rfe; 
obituary of Geneiiri % Oui^ 
Roberts passed over Jns com- 
mand of the fend fiira in 
Operation 2Spper, ^ inva-. 
sioo of hfelasa and n^xut- 
quest of S^ngaiKxe Mndi was 
already monnted whra . the 
atomic bombs were dnvped 
oriJa^^ 

Saifing mainly , fiom badta, 
this was the. hm y ra sea^.. 
crossi^' bf an iitvasioa annri^ ^ 
da - baore . die Falklands- 
coaffict, throiring • 180,000 
Britirii and RkSui forees omo 
beaches near ' Port- 
Swettenhaml 

By the time D-Day (Sc^ 
tembec .9) came die .Ja p anese 
in Mafeya bad reloctuitfy. 
aoc^ited dirareiiteroPs ord^' 


to-oease fire and die tandingi 
irate i ui o p p b aetC Even so the 
iayaskm loi^ apart fiom 
die first araault troops^ tet 
bogged down on beaebra wife 
mnefa worae sorfeora dtan 
at^thuig ' mtefli^ioe- bad- 
indicated . \ 





.^'V 


RecrifiQg hisowB at 
dwrabnipt Ja p anese s un e n der 
despito its rifobfrig him 
grim woold have been ' bis -'.' j- 


_ tfrid dw.jReste-writer 
receiidy,; .**1116 nneatpec te d 
;,dififfihies. on .foe 'beaches 
would bai« added oraisidera- 
bly to our caroafite As foe 
cominandra ifooakl have told 
Itfson dungs out mysrif and 1 
dont simpdsc I shooid be here 
-today** 


■k.. 


Cwafaridge . : . 
ftofeisor Ooliit Rcnfi^, Mow 
(dSt Jfrini's GoB^ Cambridge; 
and Duuey . &ofessor ' of 
• archaeology at uiribridaB, baa 
.been dected Master of Jesns . 
CcriiegB.frnm October '10. 

College elections and. 
iqgKiiniineats 
oansTW epUEGB 
ngsegra ^raraiTiras!t pctaiisr l; 

dowenL 



o«w. MA im 
GsMWk imuouHttr w 




c J. .w.ji^dw., no 







ggraw COUJBQE 
tennocte^ rmi 




tm 




mt mmmm is ^ eiu mmnmma 




M T,. 

>aBrDCtjaan.B* 


r:r 









'i ••- 


’ \ 
- V* 


- 1' -Vii 






a uiUB). _ MA fTBWui. 





iteste n ). (rera oetetair x. 


teavHAU. : 
feu rtsCte S W j, 




TWm 









Tf - ; 





'Si' 







i 




% 


THE TIMES WEDNESDAY MAkai2i> ^6 



CMME DE LA CREME 


MARKETING 

OPPORTUNITY 

:C£9,<W 

.Challenging PAopeiiing ‘ 
in a;Direct Marketing or-: ' 
"^nisaiion. Working for a 
'c.MDwho.icavels -- 


COSMETrCiSPA 

£8,500 

Sipert>pppc^niiyfbr . 
bi^l young secretary to 

join Internanbri^M^ke 
Divsiop.oftlUsprestfflous ' 
cosmetic bouse. Wbrangat 
to the 


PBRSONNEL/PR 

£ 11,000 

Unique o^ponunity for con> 
fident PA.m an International 
Oil Co. This interestiiu post 
is working for the Public 
Affairs Manager and the 














New Business Crgatinn 




. Titis is an unusiuil interesting and 
' chafien^ngtq^xnlunitvfbreuiambi^^ 

? alide perrau^gbbd secretarial si^ . 

Ventures, pairtcrf a succssshd 
£100in+ company thik imports and 
cBstributesMazchandF^vdiidesa^ 
,'*-Vv cdnuT^^.todoubEr^itssi^ 
year&.TF& wfflbe achieuiedby 
fl^.busiiessesinffutiaSyrelE^fiek^ 
inmost.casesuallinvc^jntrodLic^ 
exdtirign^ concepts into the 
. Ourn ianBcqadKrectorwhols ' 

- . reqpbnable for ihk New Venture 

. ^'5 giaiiitae.isMkinsafa^^ilycoi]^^ 

'‘•-‘■'I .&cecn^eSecretaiv to manage his 
^bbs decisiv^. Heor^wffl 

- opei^e.tbe easting inlomiatkmco^ 

' ^ ^ %.>iandi^)prting,%st^^ .. . 

.y 'V: conqaai^cah be montiored effectively, % 



wdl as in^a temen t in g a PR p r ogramme, 
j J^Wseeking an intelligent achiever who 
has no liang-i^ abotti hoiiis of vuoHc 
buaness trwa, who possesses the aUfily 
andan^ritiontomoveintonianageTnent- 
quite sbcn and urfio,. therefore, 
fh^ good seczetaxial skins are just the base 
^ (Offeer devek^3ment 

Such a person be rewarded with an 

excdlent career opportunity, a competitive 
tiv&figuie salary and an attractive range 
benefits. 

. To efrply, please tdei;tx»e 

~ GetkfHaffenden, 

Personnel & Truning Manager, 

MCL Group Ltd, 77 Mount Ephreum, 
Tunbridge Wdb TN4 8BS. 

Telqrbone: (0892) 40123. 


MCL VENTURES 

MCLGROUP 


SECRETARY 
for External 


Affairs 

VictorUi 


inager 

c.£8!5b0 


' . A Sacfstary is- required in the Public ./if- 

' Ji-; at B^T Industries; one 

' of ^ wc^'s'iarg^ indus^ .enters ttv 

prises with fatterests hi 90. couirafes.^ 

■ ■ ‘ The success camfidatB wiH be inieft- jgf 

gent end able to work on their own 
, ”'“7 " initiative. &rcelterrt 'typir^ sliffls iTO re- ^ 
■' quked with sbrne^^hicktiiand'as'weH Bs'a 
interest intpS i atiofideffiairs-^^^^ 

' ^ ^ soQ^ for deV^Soptn^ for sqrne^ 

' jr* '.'. .one 'interasted in .urtdehal^ rasra^c^^-; 
l-Aft Vf . , . ' and ifiaiptaiAiDg a • an^ Jnfon na tionj^»- 
service., ' , 

The benefits package hxAides hineh/ 

■ nbn-owitributorv pension scherne and 
flexUe'hours. 

I. ,1 - . .• . 

' ' ■ ‘-i • For an appBcation fonri please telephone «|t\ 

;v Beryl .Pye 01-222 7979 ext 2070. ?*. 

- B.AT. Industries pte., Windsor House, . "A, 
50 Vicinria Stiaec, Lonclon. SWtH 

I '■ 

BAT INDUSTRIES 

■f ; ASMDnSTSATiyE SECBETABT 

' The fihiiitwwMi of hAwynwlUm Edncatloo 
' The Macmillan Press,. Adrian Soar^ needs an 

, u-'y Adnumatotive. Secriitaty. 

' The job ipyol^ riiorthand and maSo lyping, 
fbdl% meetingSr taWng Tmmiteft 

• I *' direetog* meet ing s and en s ura^ tiny nato 
V'- seme,- keqpteg s. diaxy,. exxmiging itinezaries. 

■ and 'dealing with' oariapmdmce when Mn 
. ; Soar is atatad (riwurS^ vaes&s per year), 

:: ineluding «<»salting the r^it petals whan in 

- fiKiy , maka^ sma Mr. Soar has the. 
^^tpiq[)enfbfmee&igB'and.griietaSy cnetr 
Mder.oDt of chaos. 

'Rie mif i fnafiil an^cmit will have 


PERSONAL ASSISTANT 

The Irish Bcport Board is.the Irish Government 
Org wisa t io n respon sto le for assi s t ing Irish 
•companies-to promote and develop the export 
of their products and sarvioes.. 

PA^CRETARY 
to the Head of Market Researeh. 

Wa are seeking someone to take dayfo^tay 
responsibiBty for our busy trade 
1^fb^mafioo^nari(et research urfL As wel as 
runnkig the Ibraiy and computer based 
IriforTnation systems, the job involves he riaaig 
market and trade information enquiries vtd 
provicring secretarial siqiqsort fo the Head of the 
Departmpnt : 

The successfol candidate wH have some 
•.expmence of and a keen interest mruming an 
infonmation unit, good oraantsatibna / 
secratarM sl^ and ,PlC. / WP. experience 
;(prefera^ WANG). 'We woukf wdcome 
applications from graduates for tffis position. 
*' -Salary - wiH be commensurate ' with 
. expOTience c£9/XNH neg. 

* ' Luncheon Vouchers. ' ~ ' 

T ; 20 days aimu^ leave; 

Apply ffi wiling pieasa with opmprtfiensive 
C.y. to: 

Mr Marie Gray 

- Heed of Adete ris tr eB on 

Mab Exp(^ Bosid, 
Ireland Honss^ 

Vll^^ ISQfISt NSW Bond 9M, 
London W1Y OHD. 



MEDIA* FINANCE-AIA'ERIISING'SALES* PERSONNEL 
s • < 

1 Market Research g 

S £10,500 ? 

S rft^trnuK Homir twr your UM n u» d in nt at teM & 

2 wnMniy h> rAm eannimer market eoMuftnU n Ma 2 

cqL.rhun titr dtmfit hottever, it Ar mnMft and g 
> taamiality of the tampm^ Thit it a taper onportuniQi . u 
.Q erry hard worUag ttoHaiy itko hat had « 

£ . tome W.P. experinue. Shortkaad iwt ementiaL ■ g 

Atrsi-s? " attar a ^ 

Reception/Office g 

^Administrator , g 

g Up to £8,500 S 

^ l>’arHtr one of the bwi features ef Hat Jeb. Your ^ 
n . dirtM* iriB ewffr wfaw, toam tte i tt at ial work and . 

irrraftua Ahwwdnvidp; (tr jotinUdRMtai wAycMi. u 


pncitet yeponkdedmwl rewnbanas 

• fia* HninfimL 









GOLDEN EG^ FOR TEMPS 

Earn your golden Eaeter Egg with our top rates 
working for. exciting clients tnroughoia London. In 
return you should be liv^, enthusiastic and w^l 
presented with stalls of SO/lOO/sh or audo, 5(M- typ. 
and aged 1&2S. Ang us and start saving nowl - 

437 41B7/89 

mtSTONES 


irector’s Secretai7 

li-ail-blazer 

A Ud>ly Tcmcml imenudoMl eonamy e in the 
M mNaanisH^ and etpmaina tMie of tti 
tniiar.divtaont.op ei aB ii giHaniBipoff a m|fgwthafcaof 
dwecDnomy. 

To do dw they have broiidit in a new Diiccwr. an 
. adcnowledflU auchonw in diit field. t» lead clw 
o p ei a t i on.BeiMe d5 aPAwtioisad^aiwotlungwiih 
. layalg»»dpo !>fenf» nalBnim4fegma»Hi g e n,i i un inaic. 
and wte wiU wekoine del^abon and rcrpmsdMlit)'. 

Mndi of the Ruterial you be dcalinil wtd) - bodi 

cBenc and intenial manen - will be conndeniial and 
eoiiuovenaltTOurdiiaetin wdl beat valuable as your 
afaSiy to give 1^ pesiBve advice. 

Tbe MGKBrial eement win vaiy, but mil not rise bcyoid 
50% ^ ^eeds of 100/60 wdl oe required. 

The ideal OBtdidaw for thb poet wiD be ^ed 30-40. 
educated to A level tiandara, puderabiy anih a 
b ae^ f ou ndinan a dvertitin B OrHi ani ^ em e u uonsulaaer 

COVIlOilUICJJL 

The sataty u negotiable^ but wdl be in dw Rgion of SI 2MI. 
rfcirMcIcphuiM. 437 1561 

MacBlain 


8c Awoaatet Ltd 
01.4371564 

RecruhiucBt Consultants 1 30 Regent Street, 
London WIR5FE 


YOUNG SECRETARIES 
MARKETING TO £9,500 

A bi^ht young secretary with probaUy 2 years' 
solid eigtecience is needed to join this young 
oonsultancy based in beautiful offices in St 
Kadierine's Dodt. In additton to normal 
secretarial duties the successful candidate will 
also be able to help oiganise some of their own 
accounts. Spe^ 100/60 -i- WP.- 

PARTY ORGANISERS W8 

A young secKtaxy is needed to join this smdl firm 
of par^ consultanis.*The ideal candidate will be 
weU spoken and able to deal with VIP clients. 
Drivn^ Uoence useful. Typng 60 {dus. Salary to 
jESjno. 

COBBUJUDDAWS 

BGCBHTMHiriJD. 

35 Br«tM Plies W1. 01-493 77B9 ^ 


PUBLISHING 

POSTS 

K you baiw A Levels 
or a riteTfo of sevs. 
19-25 7r% k>okii« to 
-earn c £9,000 (iocl 
eenwLX -be tnioeif 
WRBi !D carve out 
•a V career fai' aniedia 
safer- m mp Loadon 




SECRETARY ft 
- '.GENERAL 
FACTOTUM 
SALARY ESvOOO 
.PA 

For CUtf Bocntlve of 
bmr West End Adi^ 


DUlilflMCi 

TEUniONE 

mnr 

' 01-680 9fiS2 


lU^iljF uiufLinlmiil man- 
Mcr r e n iured ter wen 

' OltelMiHt eoBtipww of ap- 

pindiiMMy «o wur. a 

m nwre u ge td c emp an y 
■ I ■ ■ rmnai and lesai nwt- 
lew I nnnnl_ as b uia 
aHWh/ to recfutt .and au^ 
gwviw itaiL 

iMtM ndiUrtd fbr a 10% 
s a aet ar laf cement Eatcd- 
iBd iMBelKs tadade BUM 
. unil a gBMRMH PCDSfOB 



1 1' i, 7.’ te 1 1 >-"i i‘, ;4 R . . 


PERSONAL SECRETARY 

A petsoaal secretary is required for the Museum 
Seoetery who is Seoetary fo tiie Baond ofTrnst- 
e^ works with the Director and Deputy 
Directer to hdp establish ptrficy, ptens and con- 
trob for the Museum and heads the Dqrartmmt 
of Administrative Services in the Mnseom with 
itRxmrihnity providing financial, personnd and 
accommodation services. 

Ibu post cab for a person with secicterial sldOs 
and piefefaUy previous eiqierience as a Personal 
Secretary. The successful candidate, «dio win be 
an enerxetic person with a pleasam and tactful 
penimaifity, be expected to wmk on her or 
Ids own and te tal» responsibility. An ability to 

hawrilft mntef inl nf n rywifuMtitial ttatitw! i« ffgw n- 

tial and previous experienoe of word processmg 
OT a wfllir^ness to learn is desirable. 

KGnimnm qualifications: 3 GCE ^ levd 
passes; indndiiig Esri^ language, Siortfaand 
100 w|Hn or audio sldUs: . Typing 30 wpm. 

Fbssfldlity of a starting salary above the mim- 
nmm tri'thescale of £6887 pa rising by 6 animal 
incremente to £8172 pa. Additional ^orthand/ 
audio and typiitt pnmdency p^rmei^ can be 
earned. 5 d^. 41 hour wedc (inriodiite lundi 
boms), 4 wei^ 2 daw paid holiday plus IWi 
Public and privSk^ hobdays. 

Apply in writing widi cmriculm vitae to: 

. Mbs J Fminwoitii 
Diiliah Bliieum fMatursf IRatory) 
CroimvsB Road 
London SWT 5BD 
Tol: 01-689 6323 oxt 441 
The BM (NH) is an equal opportanhy employer. 


British Standards Institution 

PERSONAL ASSISTANT 
Director General's Office 

B51 is a national body with over IJKX) naff. Our 
activities nnge from the preparation of national 
Standards for all sectors of mdustiy. to ihe famous 
' Kiiemark' and other quality assurance schemes, and 
a wide range of testing and infonnaiion ser\ ioes. 

We have a vacancy for a second PA m our Director 
General's office ai our Mayfair headquarters. The 
jobholder «il| work with one other to ensure the 
smooth runnii^ of the Director Generar» office. Top 
level contacts whh industry and Govern mem depart- 
ments and with iniematiunal and overseas organ- 
izations means that discretion and a first cUss PR 
approach is esvntial and there are excellent oppor- 
tunities' to use adminiviraiive and organizational 
abilities as well as secretarial skills. 

Education lo *A' Level of B/TEC National Ls 
desirable: first rate secretarial skills (N) wpm typing. 
iniU12ll wpm shorthand) and previous senuir secre- 
tarial experience are both essential. 

Salaiy'wQI be-in a range up to £9JM pa dcpendii^ 
upon qualifications and experience and the package 
indudto 5 weeks annua! («ve, pension and season 
ticket loans. 

Foe more mformatioii and an appiicahon form', please 
eotaaev 

SOBS B. MACABTHUBSmiar Petitnnrl OfKrr.. 

nnr^ BrlUsh standards insutotion 

Uml 2 Park Street. I.ONDON W1A2BS 
TtfeDhone:0l-6399000 Exi .tUMi 


PERSONNEL 

FRENCH RETAIL' 



PERSONNEL 


INVOLVEMENT 
IN PR 




bimiediate top calibre 
temporary assignments, 
PLUS.. 


”V % 

' . -. .s' 






• Top rates of pay x >r ol * 

• The exclusive MacBlain Nash Privilege Card with its many beiefits and discounts. JVlQCDfflin 

• The opportunity to earn two weeks holiday pay. rrj'***®* 


Ring Victorja Martin today on 01 439 0601 to join our senior level 
temporary team. Ot5LJ.clalJt5o 

3rd Poor. Carnngton House, 130 Regent Street. London WIR 5FE. (Entrance in Regent Place, opp Midland Bank). 


MARKETING 
£11,000 + Mtg 

The MarheUng Oiractor 
ot this wte known 
Merchant Bank needs a 
PA to undertake 
conference and seirrinar 
organismg. 

The job revolves around 
two mapr conferences 
a year, one of which is 
moad, and you wW be 
expect^ to work 
ja iy^ on your own 
ininetnfe. 

Exceflent shorthand (to 
take Semins' notes), PC 
experience and the 
personality to carry on a 
front Hne Marketing role 
are aB essential for ths 
positnn. 

Fm 24.40 : Sklls 
lf0/50. 

Cite Office 
7» 8491 



SECRETARY 

raoulrcd to wade for dtrector 
and two executtves in 
Lendoo (Wl> sales office of 
leading Dutch pnnttng com- 
pany. Musi have good copy 
typiag. pleasani l el epbene 
ma u M f and abody to use 
telex. Would soU outgoing 
penentoSy wlBtag to flttnlo 
a small ExceUexit 

.ivarUBO conditicwi and 
benefits package indtidlng 
salary c. £&000 pe. plus 4 
weeks holiday. TeJephone 
number 01-486 4941. exL 
216 




Bfideut , calm, 
mature seentary to 
administer bu$y PR 
office. Salary 

n^tiaUe. Trieifoone 
01-352 827a 


ST. THOMAS’ LITHOTRIPTER CENTRE 
PATffiNTS LIAISON OFFICER 

An ongoing, flexible 
personality with a flair for 
admin and accounts 

Up to £9,000 pa • BUPA ■ Season Ticket Loan 

Could you be the personality behind a new and exciting venture 
in the heart of Londm ? A centre created especially to provide 
a new form of treatment Let's tell you about it . . . 

A lithotripter is an extremely advanced and costiy piece of 
eqinpment iiriiich treats kidney stones without the need for 
surgery. Thanks to the combined efforts of BUPA the NHS 
and the DHSS. the first lithotripter in an NHS hospital is now 
treating patients at St Thmnas’ HospitaL 
To ensure the success of this unique collaborative project, 
BUPA Hospitals are kxddng for a committed, outgoing and 
above all flexible personality to undertake the private patients 
liaison role. 

Your responsibilities will indude reception woric, patient 
administration, patient accounts and pubfic relations. To 
qualify, you should have some administrative and typing 
experience, but more imptHlantly the ability to get on mth 
people. 

In return for a 36 hour week, we offer an annual salary of up to 
£9, (X)0 with excellent bene^ induding free BUPA and season 
ticket loan. 

If you would like to discuss this post in further detafl, please 
contact Karen Carter, A^istant Operations Manager, on 
01-831 2668 ext 242. Foran application form andjob 
description, please telephone Shiriey Smeaton on 01-831 2668, 
or write to her at BUPA Hospitals, Do^yn Court Great 
Turnstile, Lincoln's Inn Fields, London WCIV 7JU. 



RET 

cngwcH/nreunti 

vtb, 010 ward-winning tour operator (gstaMstiad 1971) 
spaettisng in dfavet-saO holidays to Ranca. needs an 
experienced bilvinil secretary K> idn its smaB team of French 
and Engksn staff. 

Tbs posriian is that of SecraCtnr to Ure Marirefing 
IHMctor srxl his coOeaguas kl oir expamSng noduct 
Mansgemsnt team. rasponsUg for Ow buyvoAnarkeOng ot 4 
hoBi^ pr otfa mmes (Auberges. Qite. Short Sreaks and Skf). 
Merasiad? H you have the folowing quaUes. we'd Bie to hMT 
from you: 

- an above-average lonwiedpa of Frendh. txHh wittlBn and 
spoken (MMiWi. probably galnad through workkig abroad. 

- a good aduceWonal background coupled witti at least 5 
years saaetaftal expananea. 

- good organi sa tional atHStm/aad motivation 

• an open. brigM perooaaOy asabEng you to flrin wet in a 
tmall compafty efWRoninent requmg neodbOlly/lnad walk. 
We after a salary of aroiaid £8K pfe» bonus. hoEdiy 
eonsmatan ana private matbcai insuranoe. 

Send C.V. and photo to Sue Ocfcwel, ' 

VPB LinRed 

8 SL MerMreCs Terrace, WRL 
CheRenhaai, HCOWS 

6L50 4DT. Wna^fisnee 

stating when you'd ba abla to attend tor 
Irasretaw m cneitenh am (ig> to mid^ApnQ. 



ADVERTISING W.1. 

Bright young, highly- 
motivated Secretary PA 
to work dosely with M.D. 
and Creative Director in 
new and growing 
Advertising Agency. 
Ring Chrys on 01-734 9601 


£10,000 at 20f 

You nfiD haw to be exception- 
albuttfyDuaR,ywwiUbB 
worth ei^ penny to this fab- 
lEous company. Young 
emiiiin ant arttwiely Iwcoc 
you wil find to emrironmBnt 
exMianting. An excedant 
pnwenco and skdis (d 100/80 


SEC/PA EXPORT 
DIRECTOR 

Pashicn CO 

German /FraKti. sh/lye 
essential. Salary aecordtog 
to age and expertonce. 

01-253 9333 x210 

NO AGENCIES 


PERSONNEL 


EXCLUSIVE LAW 
at c-£l0,000 

a you are a top nt eilti 
sound seamnes HI to fiatos 
to com caBy conveymng or . 
tbgaMn, logalhar wtoi good 
audn staUs, ai en el la nt op* 
pomnMy smas you at the 
very prasuwas Arm to taw- 
yen n tbaliaart to to West 
End Vu wd be closely as* 
soBe a Saner Pannei n las 
confUerdol dealings wO to 
etttasm dubes on a dady ba- 
sis and you need to and 
topnecy wbn bandton 
uem CM SONIA on 73<f 
0911. 


Cell Deel OiBndiam 
938 1646 
HASTERLOCK 
RECRUfTMEHT 


PERSONNEL 

PA/OmCE 

ADMINISTRATOR 

£10,000 

For a top computer 
comp an y we are tookmg 
tor« sgpnisDcawd PA who 
cm take on a sttorvegiy 
tele with aiafl, negen ai a 
wilh top cfHnB. and nandte 
not otoy me boss's 
eecasionto eotre ap an- 
dsnes, but a loi of your 
own loa He Is 3 charmer, a 
good dalegaior and wd 
only want your me skdis 
cxice or nmee a wetod 
To find out more eM 


SECBETART 

tor Wot End 
Old Master 
ART GALLERY 
Very BMd cmwiiUniis fbr 
rititt peson. Pleasv spghrto 
Barrindsn to tbr HEIM 
GALLERY. S Jmm Sl 
SW1. TU 01-493 


BUPA 

Hospitals 


CHIEF EXECUTIVE AND 
TOWN CLERK’S DEPARTMENT 
This post is now being offered on an unre^cud 
basis ihroi^ the ring fence procedure, with the 
agrrement of the London and Metropolitan 
Government StalT Commission. Apppiications 
wiO be welcomed from emirit^Fees of the GLC and 

Metropolitan County Councils. 

SECRETARY TO THE 
HEAD OF 
PERSONNEL 

£7,593 - £8,406 Inc. p.a. 

Required to provide a iiill range of confidential 
secieiaiial servicte to the He^ of PCrsonneL 
includii^ word processing, typing, shorthand and 
adroinisirative support 

A knowledge of Wang word processing would be 
an advantage. 50 w.p.m. typing and 100 w.p.m. 
^orthand are desir^ile, alto the ability te deal 
with a wide range of contacts in a confidtotial and 
sensitive manner. 

Fom Cron Head off Poraoni o i S anri coa , 
Miwicipal Officoa, Twiekaohan TWl 3AA, 
(01-091 7112), ratomaMa by lllh AprB, 
1986. _ 


Z Z7iW7ZW BOROUGH OF 
RICHMOND UPON THAMES 


tArrooua/appoaiMtyemplovrrf 


BHJNGUAL West End £9,000 

Work lor 8 M ana gw a to wal laww n rt i at— wiyHctoi Cfto. 

AUDKVRECEPnONIST W1 £84100 

Supw jg^ Bto ap ma ai ter toopaf» Os re topi n i n i Ca dew 
Bone Snat wont fweeaaainfl txpamnea wsanbaL 
CaS Shan on 40B-iei 


AUDIO SECRETARY/PA 

partner of West End firm of Chartered Surveys 
ois leqiiiies experienced Secrelary/PA. P leasan t 
mall ofiice with fiiendiy amoqdieie. nease 
write witii CV to: 

Miss C Thomas 
Alexander Reece ft Thomson 
1 1 Welbecfc Street 
London W1M 7PB 




ESPANOL 

PresiWOts City merchani 
bank seeks a secretary to 
work as an assL Duector 
level in the Latin 

American division. 

Secretarial speeds (80/60) 
less imponant tban fluency 
tn Spanish and eicelim 
orsahitaiioiul skilh. 
logeiher with the flexfinliiy 
10 work an 1 1-7 day when 
lleGcSSto^. Sbbry to 

£ia000 -I- MS and profit 
share. Please rin^ 

588 3535 


Ccnkill 


RoeraibnentCeftatotanto 

18 Eldon Sfieeu EC2 


COMPETAHT 
SALES ASSISTANT 
FOR VALENTINO 



SECRETARY 

neqatred for busy oen- 
re»iit«i.t cardiologist in 
London Wl. Extensive 
paOstC oontacc. Tele- 
^tene OI 935 7101 
(office haatO 


Age 87 l■ ^w a re s . Patty wfUi 
CV . Ta BOX Ea6. 


ADVERTISING 
CONTINUED ON 
PAGE 25. 




















i.; Ilf aSS I s.sa" 8 s a« aa-s « B 


r>i 


•U> 



16 


THF TTMRS WEDNESDAY MARCH 26 1986 


Europe fearful as Arabs back Gadaffi 


By our PMelgn Staff 

Mixed reactions were re- 
poned around the world yes- 
terday to the clashes between 
US forces and those of Ubya 
in the Gulfof Strte. 

Europe 


The strongest reaction came 
from Italy, where the Prime 
Minister, Signor Bettino 
Cmxi. criticM the US tna- 
noeuvres, saying they earned 
hi^ risk and caused concern 
to Italy. 

He told an emeigency ses- 
sion of Parliament it was 
unacceptable that a dispute 
over the Gulf of Sirte should 
be dealt with militarily, or that 
Lib^ riiould resort to arms to 
assert its claims. 

He added: “Italy wants 
strongly to lestore a state of 
normality in the r^on. It^y 
doK not want wars on its 



doorsira." 

In Gi 


... Jreece a govenunent 
statement said its firm posi- 
lion was that “provocations 
and conflicts are a danger to 
peace particularly in the east- 
ern Mediterranean” 

Spain appealed to both the 
US and Libya to avoid any 
fiuther steps which could 
“endanger the stabflity of the 
Mediterranean zone”. 

West Gennafly backed the 
right of the United States to 
hold naval manoeuvres off the 
Libyan coast but said it hoped 
that clashes between Libj^ 
and American forces would 
not escalate. 

A For^ Ministry spokes- 
man said Bonn shar^ ^ 
view of the overwhelm^ 
majority of states, including 
the Soviet Union, that Libya's 
unilaxei^ extension of its 
territorial waters to the Gulfof 
Sirte was not in accordance 
with international law. 

“The military action is tak- 
ing place on the bi^ seas and 
not on Libyan territory,” the 
spokesman said. 

Middle East 



IGAMMON 

Surface to air: length 54ft ains, range approx 155 miles 



harm _ -.e 

Air to surfaceitength 13ft 81ns, range over 11.5 milea 





HARPOON . . 

Air to surface; length 12ft This, range approx 68 mBee 


Kremlin sees world security 
threatened by conflict 


The misses involved in the oMiflict 


Israel described US aetkm 
against Libya as I^itimaie 
selfdefeoce and said it was 
encoura@?d by the American 
resolve against Colonel 
Gadaffi. 

The Prime Minister. Mr 
Shimon Peres said: “It is Ae 
right of the United States like 
any other country to iroteci 
the freedom of navigation in 
international waters.^ 

A Foreign Ministry spokes- 
man said: “We are encouraged 


by the firm stand of the 
United States towards the 
behaviour of Muammar 
Gadaffi who continues to 
promote be involved in 
international terrorist 
actiyity.” 

Tbe reaction of Libra's 
neighbours was highlighted by 
a call broadcast by Radio 
Tripoli on Arab revolutionar- 
ies “to invade and destroy all 
American embassies, institu- 
tions and bases in the Arab 
worid”. 

In Cairo, President 
Mubarak of no friend 
of Colonel Gadaffi, said he did 
not have enough details to 
comment 


But Sndan said it was 
prepared to put all its poten- 
tial at the disposal of the 
Libyan in the face of US 
^session. 

Colonel Gadaffi had a tele- 
phone t^k with President 
Chadli Benjedid of A^eria on 
Monday ni^t and sent his 
Foreign Minister to Mcwocoo 
foUoudng the first dashes. 

Prime Minister Mir- 
Hossein Moussavi oflran said 
Iran fully supported Libya. 

And ixedicatably, Cuba ac- 
cused the US of ddibera^ 
provoking the confrontation 
and condemned ^ “insolent 
demonstration of force and 
perfiffious attack on Ubya**. 


Cootinned from pa«e 1 
1 b an tiSGdtd statement, Mr 
liffi fffffcn said: USSR 

beard with nidignatiw^abont 
the pcovocativei, reactioa^ 

ag aingf tbo SOTesOgn 
state of Ubya .... These ara 
deliberate adhms taken in 
order to destabilize the sitaa- 
tioD in tte F^oa' and to 
destabilize tbe otire system of 
internatioaai seenrHy.*' 

He Baked die US action 
Ubya witii last 
Satarday^ nndergnand na- 
dear test to Nevada, sayii« 
that both, atong wiffi other 
recent US actions, were “a 
pronication ^atosC the spirfr 

ThetoaeofhisnewsoMifcr- 
mice led many ^ptomate here 
to predict tint chaares were 
now even dnmner for finSiiv a 
date for tire 2986 snniuiiL 
Rdferriim to American to- 
todcs oa Ubyan misdle dtes 
and naval vessels, Mr 
Lomeiko said: **rheae moves 
are aimed not <aly Matost tile 
peoples of tile Miow East, 
hot f^ftinst totonntioaal secB- 
rity as a iriide, mnee die 
■ifiMiriflB ill the Middle East 
and araand Ubya specffically 
is so tense BOW as to make die 
area h^hly caqxlodve. 

is Hke a smoalderiiqi 
fire. A few tocendhury deiiccs 
wtald be enon^ to make the 
conOkt flare op, tovolving not 


mily adfaceat ooatries- but 
(rthm coontries as wefl.** 
Despite US dahas Aat 
SOvieC vessds are to (he 
area, Mr Lomdko 
said: **We are not coBdacting 
aay BMMitortog activity to Aat 
area. We are not tokfag part to 
ffiat conflict to any way at alL** 
Alffieftgh the aati-toiperhd- 
istic rhdm was fioce yester- 
tey la the qaestkin-aiid- 
aaswer s ess ioa that foUemM 
theKremlto statement. West- 
ern observers noted timt Mr 
lom^o appeared to draw 
hack OB a namber of occasions 
from amkhm aire ^ecific coBH 
Mii tpi MtB vraid cerid have 
dnnvn Soviet forces tola foe 

fi g h l in g , 

American Goncspoadenls at 
the crowded press cmiftreiice 


appeared snrprised ttat Mr 
JiOmeflto did not nse dm 
ftprariwi to deliver nme spe- 
cffic threats f^atost the US or 
more eoBcreto haddi^ for tike 

Lfoyan leader. 

One Washn^ton jornnanst 
asked i^effier die KremSn 
intended to take any more 
speczSc steps on bekaff of 
Cofonel Gadaffi beyond cail- 
hm press confer en ces. 

Diphiiiiatic dbserven said 
die KicniDn^ stand was a 
rentinder that tile idationri^ 
between Moscow and Tkfofdi 
was not withoat its diffiodties. 
These are nderstood to have 
sarfaced dnziBg' Colonel 
Gadaffih visit here lato OcIih 
her and to todiide boffi tike 
Gulf War and tile Arab-Isndi 



The USS Saratoga, operating in tike dilated area 


THE TIMES INFORMATION SERVICE 


Today’s eTents 


Royal ei^ageinents 

The Queen, accoinpenied by 
The Duke of Edinbuiih. opens 
the new Civic Centre, Westgaie,- 
Bromley, 3. 

Tbe Duke of Edinburgh, 
PresidenL the British Ainaieur 
Athletic Board, presents the 
BAAB Trophies and Worid 
Record piques for 198S, 
Budongham Palace, l(h and 
later, as PresidenL tbe institute 
Sports Sponsorship, chairs In- 
stitute meetings. Fiabmoogers' 
Hall. EC4. 10.45. 

Queen Elizabeth TTie (hieen 
Mother arrives Smithfield Mar- 
keL ECl. 12; and lunches with 
the Butchers' Company, 
Butchers’ Hall, ECI, IZ4S. 

The Prince of Wales visits Lea 
View House. ES, 11.30; and 


later, accompanied by The Prin- 
cess of Wales, attends 


a perfor- 
mance of Messiaen’s Three 
Tableaux from *St Francis of 
Assisi*, Royal Festival HaU, 
South Bank, SEl. 7.20. 


Princess Margaret visits Jo- 
siah Wedgwood & Sons, 
Barlaston, Stoke-on-TreoL 
12,30. 

Princess Alexandra visits 
Canada Block nurses quarter.' 
Royal Naval Hospital Haslar, 
GosporL I2JS: and later opens 


the ' new coas^uard station, 
rade we 


Marine Parade WesL LecK>o- 
SoleuL 2. 

New exhibitioiis 
pilings since 1980 by 
Donnagh McKenna; Warwick 
Alls TrusL 33 Warwick Sq, 
SWl; Wed 10 Sun 10 to S (ends 
April 27) 

Lithographs by David 

Hockney; The Tate Gallery. 
MUlbank. SWl; Mon to Sat 10 
to 5.30. Sun 2 to 5.50 (ends May 
11 ) 

HM The Queen: tixtieth 
birthday portrait by Michael 
Leonard; unveiling IIJO, on 
public view from 12 noon; 
National Portrait Gallery, 
Tra&I^Sq,WC2. 

Double sided drawings by 
WUliw Roberts; Gillian Jason 


The Times Crossword Puzzle No 17,003 

13“ 



ACROSS 

1 Origin and end of Arethusa 

( 8 ). 

5 Rural areas lacking right to 
a Territorial division (6). 

8 Coth worker once bad car 
damaged (10). 


5 Castle governor commits 
schedule to memory (9). 

6 Free lea in Union? No, love 

(n 

7 Cooks boast about a bit of 
hot stuff (7). 


9 Hector's mother an ambas- 12 Object straddling waler- 

sador to this island? (4). couise; causing sensation 

10 Hollow grief when a car- ^)> 

nivore causes lacerations Croatian in a spotted coat 

(9.5). (91. , 

11 Extremely dodgy and >6 Boy twice goes on a forage 

disagreeable line^ succes- (7L 

Sion (7). 17 It'S quite enou^ to suppon 

13 Letting oneself go on follow- former modri (7). 

ing a grout) (7i. 18 He learns about horses — a 


ingagroup(7). -v. t^v- 

15 >^ne produced by some .. specialist area (7). 


repuWiGin5(7j!’ ' " ” 19 Lombardy's turbulent ro- 
18 Lay going on for ages (7). mance(7L 
21 Iris Cassio. for instance, the 20 An excellent H^ttien of 
‘ - the Crotalidae amily (7). 



Admiral's helper (4,10>. 

22 Aileron causing panic (4). 

23 “The moan of doves in — 
elms” (Tenn>-son) ( 10). 

24 Ne'er-do-well gave insvuc- 
lion 10 Goveroor-Genei^ 
(3,3). 

25 Composer runs inside for a 
device to catch leaves (8). 

DOWN 

1 F«We young creature 
reared by detectives (7). 

2 This Head assumed to be an 

liar, do we hear? (9). 

3 Ir^me to be ordered out- 
side (7). 

4 ^uselessness of batting oa 
It in any circumstances (7). 


SolntioB to Pnmle No 17,002 



B E 

[g _B m ca rs • s 


Conefoe Crossword, page 10 
iito 'llBies Jinnbo CiOBSword will be pnbUsIied QB Satontoy 


gent Si 
ITT hi 


Gallery, 42 Inverness SL NWl; 
Tues to Sat lOJO to 5.30. (ends 
April 26) 

Japanese potters; Liberty. Ro- 
itSLWI;MontoSat9.30to 
lurs 9.30 to 7 (ends Apnl 

12 ) 

Twenties St^ Women's 
fashion in the l92(rs; Tbe 
Museum of Costume. AssanWy 
Rooms, Bennett SL Bate; Mon 
to Fri 9.^ to 6, Sun 1() to 6 
(ends Febroary 1 1987). 

Caribbean Focus: 

photofiraphs of work life - 
Caribbean style; Caribbean style 
by Rosbini Kempadoo; Rutland 
County MuseiiuL Oakham; 
Tues to Sal 10 to 1. 2 to 5 (ends 
April 23) 

Last chance to see 

British paintings, drawings 
and sculpture; Rewm Gallery, 
20 Cork SL Wl, 9.30 to 5.30. 

Important English drawings 
re lating to cubism and voni- 
dsm; Anthony d*Oflky Gallery, 
9 Dering SL Wl, 10 to SJO. 

Mosic 

Recital by the St James^ 
Baroque Players; St James's, 
Piceadiny, Wl, 7.3a 

An evening of Operetta: r^ 
cital by Jane Betsworth and 
Anne-Marie Hetherington (so- 
(ffano), Christopher, Ventris 
(tenor) and Andrew Mayor 
(batons) and Clara Taylor 
(piano); The PuiceD Room, 
&uth Bank. 7,30 


Piant^ iecital_^ John 


ham; Quen Elizabetb 
SouUi Bank, 7.4S. 

Concert by tbe London Col- 
1^ of Music Choir and Or- 
cbeara; Westminster Ceutial 
Hall, Storeys Giu. SWl. 7. 

Concert by tbe Salomon 


String Quartet; Kin^s Hall, 
shy, 7 , 


NewoHtie Univershy.^Ja 
Concert by the Boumemontfa 
Symphony Orchestra, Takashi 
Shimizu (violink Pavilion The- 
atre, Weynomb, 7 Ja 
Talks, lectures 


London as it mi^t have been. 

:en The Linnean 


by Felix Barter; 

Soaety, Royal Academy, Piccar 
dilly, Wl, 6J0. 

Imraessioaist pninrii^ by 
Leah Kharilnan; Cosrtauld In- 
stitute Galleries, Woburn Sq, 
WCl, 3. 

Architectural Associations: 
Jane Drew talks about her life in 
architecture with Sir 
Casson. IC^ Natii House, The 
MalLSWl. 1. 

Rocks in the Electronic Age. 
by 1^ J MUlen Grant Institute 
of Gedogy, Edntoor^ Univer- 


sity, 7.30. 
Bon 


. _jes. bodies and the Mary 
Rose, by Mim D Suriand; 
Buckiaglra University, 7J0. 


General 

Harrogate International 
Youth Music Festival; various 
venues; for details telephone: 
AnnaCju^afonOi 6S80I2I. 

Chatham Historic Dockyard 
opens for the summer. Wed to 
Sun and Bank Holtdaja 10 to 6. 

Covent Garden Street Enter- 
tainers Easter Festival: ex- 
hibition about Govern G^den; 


The EcqIq^ Centre, 45 Shelton 


Sl WC2. TOam onwards (ends 
March 31). 


Book Fair, Book MarkeL 
Fi^er HaU. Cambriitee. 10 to 5. 


Parliament today 


CommoBs (2.30): Debate on 
MPs’ representations on im- 
zoreration cases, 

Lords (2.30): Debares on bur^ 
den of rales and on provision for 
muUt-handicapped adults 
within the community. 


Books -hardback 


bodds'pubHshed this week 


ter C. Newmen (VUdng. £14.95) 
Dune! in Roiria, by Gerald and 


byPe- 


Lee Durrel (Macdonald, £12^^ 


Fntrmirf AnnotBhone on the New Teetament the 
/MA.Scre^( 
Gortmehav. by Zhoras iriedbadw 09ladcwel 


Arme Reeve. Mpdiiction by MA. Screach ffhicfcworih, 
)s Hilecnadev CStackweli, 

Mncbee PasL by Pete Fuler (Ch^ & Wriduf 


,£15] 




edhad by 


Rupert Mtedodi. A Paper Prince, by George Munster 
tognund Freud, The Gssanliais of i^qfite>-Aftaiysis. 
introduced Anna Freud (phefto A VVindua. 


j, £12.95) 
setacted and 


The Cun Placet ol die Ae g e an , te Bogdan RuBwwsfci (Yale. E3S) 

The Oxford Cooipenlon to llBtWiiaa> edtad by John Watton, Paul B. 


, Beeson, and Ronald Bbdtey Scojtt (Oxford, two voftanss, ES^ 


PH 


AnniTersaries 


Krtbs: Coorad vou Gesner, 
pbyadaiL Zurich, 1516; Sir 
Bmijamin Thompsoa, Coont von 
RinmiMd, physic^ a oofoundn- 
of the Rc^ Institution of Great 
Britain, WoburiL Massachu- 
setts, 1753; Gewge SmitlL 
Assyriolcfist London, 184(h A 
£ Hoasa^ poet (A Skro/anire 
Lad) and scholar, Focfcbury, 
Worcestershire, 1859; Kobert 
Fkost, pocL San Fransdsco, 
1874. 

Deaths: ffir John Vanton^ 
dramatist and arefaitea (Castle 
Howard and BJenbeim Palace) 
London 1726; Ladwig van 
BwdioTeiL Vienna, 1827; Walt 
Whidnan, essayist and pocL 
CamdCiL New Jersey, 1892; 
Cecil Rhodes, Mnizenberg, 
Cbpe Cedony. S Africa, 1902; 
Sarah Bernlmrdt actress, Paris, 
1923; David Lloyd Geor^ 1st 
Earl Uoyd-Geoi^ of Dwytbr, 
Prime Minister, 1916-22, Ty 
Newydd, near Llanystmndwy, 
1945; Raymond Chandle, La 
JoUa, CaUromla, 1959; ^ Nott 
Coward. St Mary, Jamweia. 
1973. 


The pound 


AartnIsS 

aussliSeh 

DsnomkKr 

nmwirtllHr 

RanwfV 

ilte 


Bank 


Bar* 


OaraMMOi 

Of SS C oDr 

H^KaSgS 
Inland Pt 
IWyLin 
JapwiVsn 
HaHiof lm dsQhl 
NoraasKr 
PartBgalEae 
SouBiAMcsM 
spasm 
SwadanKf 
SwtearfaodfV 
USAS 

To g gi j l Bvls DBr 


2.12 

sera 

73.r40 

2.125 

13.1S 

7J7 

10J7 

3S« 

22SJIO 

11.70 

1.17S 

27&00 

ass 

11M 

227X0 

350 

ttiM 

1150 

zsr 

1J2 


2A0 


6SZ0 

2sas 

12.4S 
7^7 
1042 
3Z6 
20840 
11 JO 
1.115 
228BJDS 
2614)0 
SZO 
10S4 
»74» 
3.10 
210410 
1085 
£82 
145 
4804)0 


Rates for smaH denominBiion bank note 
oidy as si«)p8ed ty BeiGtays Bank RjC. 
fMa8PileeMexi3SL1 


LondBR TDe FT Index dosed down 28S 
at 1364.7. 


Roads 


LondoB aad the SoatiHcasl: 
A23S: Single line tiafflc in both 
diiectioos along the Brighton 
Rd at the junction of Fuilew 
Downs Rd, Croydon. Wodwia 
Ferry: Only <me boat wiU be in 
use on the Woolwich Ferry 
servier, alternative route advis- 
able. Ml: Roedwoiks sondi- 
bound at junction 6 ^ridcetis 
Woody, inside lane closed at 
9 JO am. 

The MUhads: A425: Road- 


works Ml the Biimindiam Rd 
in Warwii 


are causing delays in Warwiefc. 
MS: M^or roadwt^ between 
junctions 4 (Brom^ove) and 5 
(TMtwiefay only one lane open 
northbound and two 
southbound. 

Wales and the West A377: 
Temporary traffle lights in 
Bonhey Rd, Crediton. A48: 
Sin^ line traffic we stb o u nd on 
th^ewport to Carffiffraad. 

Tbe North: MS3: 
wideitin^ ai Barton 
between junctions 1 and3.AS6: 
NMihixmod cairiSReway dosed 
at Altrincham; contraflow 
southbound; Ato Two ianes 
open in both directions at 
Preston Rd, WhittleJe-Wood^ 
traffic Ugbts in use at nigbL 

Seodand: M74/A74: Various 
lane and carriageway dosures 
betwe e n Gla^ow and Carlisle; 
lengthy delays possible. 
A9:Soutfaboiind bne dosures 
between Penh and Stirling at 
Dunlase near Stiriing: ddays 
lik^. A9: Single line traffic 8M 
other road restrictions at vari- 
ous locatioQS in Inverness. 

Infonnation sappMed tj AA 


RSPB birdwatdi 


Anyone wishing to take part 
in the Royal Society for the 
notoctioo of Birds spota o ied 
Birdwatch whidi taJees place in 
May this year. Should send a 
stamped addressed envdope toe 
Boblm Sibley, ^xnttored 


Birdwatch, RSI^ The 


Sandy, Beds, S019 2DL, 
076780551. 


Snow reports 


u 

330 


Condtions 
Off ItenstD 
resort 


wealher 

(5pm) 


good powder fair fine 


good heavy good doud 


Depth 

(OT) 

AUSTRIA 

StAnton 70 

Superb ski conditions 
rTM.Y 

Courmayaur lOO 2S0 

New snow on good base 
FRANCE 

Megve 30 110 

Varied snow, icy in parts 
Morzine M 210 

Powder on crusty base 
SWrrCERLAND 
Andermatt 45 190 

Superb powder on north slopes 
Davos 70 zn good 

Powder on the Petrssnn 
Grindetwald 15 110 teir 

Slushy snow 

LesOlaWereis 70 110 good 

Good sking above 1500m 
jn me above reports, sufg^ by representatives of the Ski Club of Great 
Britain. L refers to lower slopes and U to upper, and art to artItitiaL 


fair 

good 


heavy (sir 
powder good 


doud 

straw 


good 


powder good 
powder fair 
heavy fair 
powder good 


fine 


sun 

rain 


doud 


Weather 

forecast 


A ri^ oTbiglt pressure ^ 
more E across tike UnHud 
K^om followed hr (roughs 


6 am to niidnfofat 


LoadOB. SE. E 

MaMy urjt. suix y Tmrwl i st tte 
■ — ^ cfcxity. ecc aslato fgi; uro 
modsiaie. beotehg Irtei • 




AgPlUl 

lanUi, dtePrt ' Wite Pry,, 'mm - 

InigvtertftsthscenmBdP uty.occa- 
stansi rifei Mbr wM w modatoB, 


bscoHWxiSW.tetoor.sirere ts y.””. 


Beconnra cloutyt .waWy.dn f^ -^ 

•iriFafwHw: 



<lw Ha, 

ko± nantBd.shama 

Quteeaks of ten Mer wM nw, moe- 

wite, bsconire 8W fteh Itei; nax Imp 

e aia m rt Sumy Har^ 

seMsrad rtioMn; ten ften «M NK 
Ml, bsconing ^ UMi; nte lenp 7C 

tisn. 

Narthnm bstete Cloudy, outtrerta Qi 
ten; Daeoteng shOHiy mw: wM SW. 
(resit or sxong, gte bi pteM: mne Mtip 

feir tonoiiew' and Rfdty: 
Cun if w k i u iswedled. Showte or Ipngir 


000 x 000 * of rain, but nm M ifim 
Mervils. very windy and rnwr cold. 


&5(am fttopm 


□ 

6.11am 7J»pm 

FUR moon: S4B am 


l^jhtingHip time 


InndMemfin 106.18 an ' 
Britel 74)3 Dm to &2B am 
Cimiwigii T^flBpmto SJB am 
•r74ISpnto&2Smn 
7.14pmto8L4lain 


Yesterday 


Tempnkirae at nUdev yMtedey; e. 
Gtoud: f, ten r. rah; s. sun. 

C F C F 

f '746 Omsej) e 848 

r. 643 Immnaee r '841 

t 745 teeay t 438 

r 643 iMdM r 74S 

Ctodir c 643 irnclmer t 848 

edtabote f 846 fiswcaillB t T4S 

— , 7 ^ ITiddini s 745 



You mat love 
win you teiemt 
If you atw- 


«tod wtUi yon 

unable to twe niw n o 

Rd3n m yows^S 

M ttimr miiK have your card and caB 
TTw Times Pnirallo. damn line 
betwee n die rttete lea ttmto; 

No ' VMpemIbiliiy can be acomed 
far auun to oontacrdie cWma eAMe 


for ny reasen ■ wmiln toe atoicd 
boms. 

Tbe towve tastneHM an n 

gdteteto^ dtoW end weebto 

ae lUnes 


PerUoUo emda tnetode 
minor mispniitt to die taatnielloBi OB 


toe iwcfw side. Tbese earda are not 
invabdaud. 

onw wordliis of Rmm 2 and S m 


been moanded ftwn earlier wegw ns 
te.cuuincadjm- purpo wa . Ttw <5^ 


te rauiflca agr pur pM ca . T be ga me 
fWeK h not aftoc&d and wn cenUnue 
to re payed in exeedy tbe sane way 


OffitKNES NEWSPAPERSLtoUT^ 
1TO6. Primed to LaPdMMm mud- 
en) Umlted^ T ragbita te eeL 
wetetadte; Mren 
26 , 19B6rRccMend as a newmper 
ai toe 1w Omoe. 


Ldier^niC^o 



up 




on 



Sorry^ Norway is closad. 
Bani^ post offi^ cinemas 
and concert ifolli restoBzasis 
and food stores are shuttered, 
the ^ streeto deseitod. If 
you nirixf, yOO C8II 
fytA a doctor, and even, 

. somewhat incredibly, an 

(iiirtL OtiienwseL the 
only fi groe in town is the 
**S0S!^^ wfaoseteleiiboBe 
^unteeis win fry to ^you 
ont of killing yoursett Or, of 
cotiise, you could go to 
churdL . . 

The Ncttw»aas lo<^ k«p- 
ward to their Easter hoiklay; 
which they claim is the 
loi^estin me worid. ynth a 
mixture of excitement and- 
idread. (It is no! liogui^ 

acddenl that thdr exproson 

for Good Friday is “Long 


Friday"). 
Offid^y, 


ly, titc heyday l)e- 

gins today and next' 
Wednreday; in practice, ev- 
erybody who can get away 
with it drifts off during lot 
■previous weekend. 

This is the secood most 
sparsdy-ftopuia!ed country, 
araer foeland, in Birope. Even 
on a normal day, even al die 
bri ght f^fiie lush-hoiir, even 
the capital city feels, to a 
LondottCT, lilreahscfccbop fiv 
The Scram, Mundc^ Ex.- 
pressiomst znasteipiece even- 
ing a sense of loneliness and 
ri«* 4 pair b dl many 

peo^ know about Norway.'- 

During Easter wedc, the 
cities present vistas of emmi^. 

that mi^t wdl have 
inqnred Munck even at lus 
least morose to li^ up his 
read and take to his bed; .. 

Tte cold hand of Lutherui^ 
ism can be blamed frvmoch 
fhat may seem Odd to US 
about Scandmayia. but , not, 
any longer, for tins! Ea feet, - 
Emter has devdoped,' with' 
postwar proq?erity, from a 
dour rdigjoas obsenrence to - 
a bolUl^ exodus, a iratioDal 
riieofqmng. 

It is estimated tiiat 700.000 
. Decide, out of a poputartion 
fom. xnillioa, wiO be on tiie. 
move durii^ the ten -days of-. 
Easter. 

Most of them will^scatter 
into the mountain fistnesses, 
to sld ^ to cnitivate their 
first suntans of the seasim ira 
the dazzling soowfield, 
weather permitting, • 


Some wiS 8^ into trouble 
in the wUden^ and rescue 
teams “oo every other peak”, 
accoding to one newspaper, 
stand poised to bdp thoox 

Some will die: lost and 
Ifo i a e a to in fidls and 
avdanebesy or in. road aod- 
dei^ who.survTve vjp 

do wbecasse (bey heeded iw 
{ReliininBy UHients of ad- 
vice and made «ire to ap- 
proach even the most 
innociioas outii^ m com- 
mand st^ — warm and 
waterproof clothing, of 
conise; podeets fiUed with 
biscuits, dioeolate. raisns, 
oais, nuts, dried frail and salt; 
and ^ipty plstoic bottles to 
liH' with -mow and bold 
agaiist tire bo(^ for mritii^ 

pieihaps the most curious 
as^ ofEasier here is that » 
many peosde wha have ^sent 
ax montib or more longing 
fra: an end to tiw aiow and ice 
sh ould now take ili^t from 
qir iiq ftime in the cities e 
piusmt of the last knockings 
ofvrinter. 

Tbe newai^ieis dm dose 
down fw ^xnit a we^ 
reappearing this year on 
FooTs Day, which has a long 
. and robust tradttion here. 

The ' dbssic jape, - still a 
dtdiriing . matter sane de- 
cades 1^, was pqpe tta i ed 


just after the war and was 
predicted. inevitaUy, on tbe 
snqtfnicfa^de . Scaoduiavian 
fiima for stmogdikik. 

- A series of <^frdal-l 
annouBcemeste 
noting that die yinnuwpol, 
the gpvd uiu ent dtoitt of off- 
ficeMes that con&ols all alco- 
bo! sdes exc^ beer, 
givii^'tiie stoffau^ b^us» 
ofa poa-warshortageofglass 
dnzeiis 

were.-mviied to bring tbdr 
dwricomameis, ThQ^ tpieued 
in tbetr- tens of. thousands 
vrith mffk cfannis. ' - 
It Buitopcisi^ihat this 
yeaifs4Msr Fod has 
afaotty crane and gone. Nor- 
w^, whidi tode fim place in 
•the ,198$ Euiovisioc Song 
Craitest,!- has just -chosen its 
etoty m tile 1986 competi- 
tion, io.be heldrinBeigen 
Tte winning gioim,imown 
imcndaltiy as The Garlic 
Gxris^isadtagaci 

-Toiur Siunstag 





^ . ■« 










150 

45 1252 

45 


1259 

4.1 - 

1021 

S5 1042 

&7 

628 

74 654 

7J * 

657 

95 629 

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ctaady: mgs iHUtei le . b-- 

■ntol: rattMmil: - Mtec u a na w ; to. 
thnndaraMna: »toe«Mefs. . 

Airaws mow wind dkvctkn, «4 h 1 
Onplt) circMd. ~ ’ 


tlMipeal 

1123 

95 1444 

95 


LowusMtl 

550 

25 946 

25 


'ftflMiaflto 


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ItolBirdllBM 

ftie 

75 641 

75 



559 

72 -sai 

72 


Okte- • -- 

640 

440 

42 SSSgl.AA 
SJ ASD^Sr 


Pwtend 

751' 

25 74S 

22 


ffibofftawiBtofo* 

1129 

4T115S 

45 

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MofilroB 

11.17 

65 1143 

65 


WfluUmMnf 

1151 

45 1126 

4.7 

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ftiMtotototo* 

626 

05 848 

95 


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8148 

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5.7 


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1254 

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MtcM 

AMxWs 


Vf:e,doaa:. A Wtety-L ter (a Iqo: 7. teb; a, stnr si^ saowc t OiPitiK 

c F . C F ' c . 

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e 16 61 NoS 
f *8 18 Nvoer 
s 16 se tiro 
• 29 84 Oslo 
f22 72Rtes 


s 28 CTsogior 
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s 28 82 Wp. 


S 14 57 


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f -5 41 
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jj i 


WEDNESDAY MARrR 26 1986 


THE TIMES 


17 



AND INDUSTRY 


•i 


' -5 •■ 


STOCK MARKgT 


FT 30 Share 
1364.7 (-29^ 

FT-SE100 
1633.6 (-^.1) 

V&A (Datastreair 
116.81 (-2A7) 

THEPOUWD 

USDotlar 
1,46^(>0.Q28P) 
W German mark 
3.4167 (+0.0128) 

Trade-waigiited 
75.4 (-0.5) 


UB offer for Imps ‘final’ 
after OFT clears way 


Index falls 
29 points 


* *'v 

* ‘ 


- . . 

'*• •• 


The stock markets sieq> 
T|se went sfatBply into leverse 
Tcsteiday, wiping baUons of 
pounds off ware values, as 
sierliitt weakened against the 
US doUar and worries over ibe 
price persisted. 

AAffnsiiig strongly follow^ 
ing the Budget, the FT>30 
share - index dropped 29.9 
points to finidi at 1.3^.7. 

The pound sank overni^t 
. against the dollar, ending the 
juy 2.2 cents down at S 1 .46 1 S. 
The sterling index, however, 
was down by only O.S at 7S.4. 

: The fall on the Stock &- 
change wiped £5.25 bilUon off 
share values, easily the bigg^ 
ono4ay fall ever in value 
teims. 


: Booker rise 



Booker McGninell yesterday 
reported pretax pipnts for tte 
yearto December'31 of £46.5 
railfion, up 26 per cent on 
1984. Turnover was up 8 per 
cent to £ 1 , 1 88 minion and the 
dividend was raised finuh ^ 
to 12p. Tempos, page 19 

Lasmo surge 

• Lasmo's group rrofh after 
taxrom 19 percent intbeyw 
to December 31 to £37.7 
mObon. Oil production in* 
creased by 28 per cent to 
43.800. barrels per day. The 
dividend is maintaini^ at 
I2.2p. ' Tempos, page 19 


■■ 

4- 


Good Friday 

^ Tmus win pnUi^ a ftiD 
sembe of finanAI news and 
information on Good Friday, 
mdiliqi k. the fast qaaiiiy 
.newspaper ■ tO: - carry 
:Thnr^y*s priccs-iuiAfinaa- 
cSd niei^ The Friday pqhtf 
• wfU pablbh. Scodc Exchange 
and mait trust piic^ Tluse 
wiQ be repeated in Satnrday'ls 
.cditiQii, whidi win abb cairy^ 
,lai^ Family, Mon^ section, . 


By Cliff Feltbam 

United Biscuits, the 
Crawford's and McVide's 
group, received permisrion to 
press on with its M for 
Imperial Croup yesterday and 
promptly announced that h 
would not be lairing hs 
billion offer. ■ 

The Office of Fair Trading 
waved, the bid through after 
■ Impnial -agi^ to sen its 
Galden Wonder crisps Ima* 
ness to Dabety, a move aimed 
at escaping a reference to the 
Monopolies and Mergers 
Comniisaon. 

^United Biscuits* 

Sir HeeUw Lbmg, then an- 
nounced that his current oCBa* 

~ sdll some way bdow the 
rival IM from Hanson Trust— 
would not be raised and would 
close on April U. 

.**ShaFehplders of Imperial 
can DOW decide on the intrin- 
ric merits, of the two compel*’ 
ing offers. We are confident 
that they, wfl] . condude that 
our offer, which has infinitely 


grratercmnmerciai benefits, b 
the better**, he said. 

As a sweetener Sir Hector 
forecast a 19 per cent rise in 
dividends this year to 9Jp. 
sayi^ that Umt^'s KeblOT 
si^diary in the United 
'States was doing much better 
than expected. 

*'Our offer is very feir and 
provides a firm bw for the 
joture**, he said. “The institu- 
tions we have seen have been 
swayed by the arguments we 
have put forward and can see 
short and lo^-term advan- 
tages in accepting our offer.** 

bfi* Geoffiey Kent, the 
diainnan of Imperial — the 
John Player cigarette and 
courage beer group — whidi is 
badosg the gel-lQgeiher with 
United Biscuits, said: “The 
decks are now d^red for a 
strai^l fight The raising of 
the dividend United Bis- 
cuits was a co^dent move 
and die market has seen it as 
such. The next thrre weeks 



commmdal 

will see ukether the institu- 
tions and our {wivate shar^ 
holders are lo<»ng ^ shortp 
term cash or are going to 
support a highly profitable 
long-term company which is 
going to grow its own busi- 
nesses and not rely on lar^ 
and larger acquiritions.** 

The United Kscuits move 
brought a sharp response from 
the Hanson camp. Mr Russdl 


Edey of the merchant bank 
Rothschild said: “I think their 
decision has increased our 
chance of winning. While I 
always thought there was a 
pomibility of them raising 
their offer they obviously were 
worried about knocking the 
value of their existing riiare- 
holders and this must have 
weighed quite heavily with 
them. 

“*niey are asking sharehold- 
ers in Impei^ to chose be- 
tween two different types of 
management — but at a cost to 
themselves. It is mie thing to 
say back os uken prices are 
evenly matched, but quite a 
difterent matter uken share- 
boldeis are being asked to 
accept a lower olfer on the 
groimds that the board gets on 
better with the other cnaps.** 

The movement in the share 
prices of the two rivals yester- 
day left Hanson Trust's “best 
shot** ofter worth 362p — 27p 
more than the 33Sp United 
Biscuits terms. 






-if ! 


a-.c 

-wnf 




. • W. 

■* 

- 


^ • 








Joims talks 

Jonas WoodUiead has received 
an approach which may or 
may not lead to an offer being 
made for the sriioie of the 
ordinary riiue capit^ of the 
oompuy. 

DRG search 

. DRG has coaSnned that it is 
in the process of identifying a 
pufdia^ for its carums bi^ 
ness in- Fishponds, Bristol 
The company is also examin- 
ing the posability of a 
maoagement/employee 
buyout. 

Steel ventiire 

The British Steel Corporation 
and Guest, Keen &. 
Nettlefolds have agreed to 
‘ form' United Engineering 
Siel^ a jointly-owned com- 
pany which has aogubed the 
manofecturii^ aenvities of 
BSC special steels business 
and CRN's ^lecial steels and 
forgings operations. 

Crest issue 

Dest Nidiolsoh is imsii^ 
about £16.9 ntiUion throng a 
ri^ts issue of 12.49 mimon 
new riuues at 141^ on a oner 
fiv-five basis to increase 
growth in the property- di- 
vision. 


Prudential 
profit 
up by 39% 

By Ridiard Tbomsmi, 

Bankhig Conespondent 

The Prudential Corpora- 
tion, Britain's largest insur- 
ance group, yestoday revealed 
a 39 per cent boost in pretu 
profits for last year after a 
airong imiKOvement In its 
reinsuraiice buaness. 

But although some areas of 
long term life business contin- 
ued to grow, the Pni was still 
aftected by losses on gmierai 
insurance and overseas oper- 
ations. 

Total pretax profits for the 
group rose from £78 million in 
1984 to £108.6 million last 
year. 

Overall profits on long-term 
business remained almost 
static. liriog only 1 per cent 
from £136 million to £137.7 
million desiHte an undertying 
growth in j»einiinn iuconie 
6 per cent to £1.7 billion. 

AUowing for the exclusion 
of non-recuntait . amouots 
suck ^ iqtecial^reversionaiy 
bonoseSrJhe increase in prof- 
its ires 11 percent 

The Pro said that several 
areas of long term business 
had ppfrmned riuggishly last 
year, including new pensioas 
whidi h^ hit 1^ the 
iincertaiiity caused by new 
pensions legislation planned 
by the GoveramenL. 

The divided for the year is 
being increased by 3Jp to 26p. 


P&O profits 
up 39.2% to 
£125 million 

The Peninsular -and Oriental 
Steam Navigation Company, 
h^ded by Sir Jeffrey Sterling 
has tarnied hi pretax profits of 
£12^6 minioD -fbr die year 
ended DecembO'31 compared 
with £90.2 million the previ- 
ousyear. 

Another. £3 million went 
into the group's profit-sharing 
scheme. 

The expected trid for either 
Europe^ Ferries cm* Overseas 
Containers did not 
materially 

These are the first fignnb 
from P&O ance its merger 
with Sir Jeffrey's rt-named 
Sterling' Guarantee Trust, for- 
merly Town & City. Earnings 
per £1 deferred stodk are up by 
51 percentto34.9p. 

The dilution produced by 
the Sterlhig Guarantee merger 
has been extinguished in one 
year. 

The company is recom- 
menctii^ a total dividend for 
the year 6f 16p compared with 
I4pinl984 


MARKET SUMMARY 


.>• 


STOCK MARKETS 


< 


NewYortc 
Dow Jones . 

Tokyo 
NMwiOow . 

NoigKo^ 

HwigS^ 

AnsMtfWRGen 280>. . _ 

AO tte&O (+11. 

Ffsoknirfe 
Commerzbank 
Bnissefs: 

General 

Paris: CAC 

Zunetc 

SKAGenerat .. 


1775.14 (-7.79) 

1482B47 (-148.36) 

1626.71 H 
M(- 
0(+1 

...2048.2 (+4.5) 

.451 04 (+321 




323.5 


. 509.40 Csane) 


GOLD 


y. 

\\ 

V 

f. 


i'- . 
i S.- 

•• ■ e 


LondcMi Rrim. 

!w^2lapn>-S351. 75 _ „ 
dose $347.06^7.75 (t238.00> 
228.75 ) 

NeHtVork: 

Comex 8348.60^10 




MAIN PRICE CHANGES 




'i 

. K 


-USES' . - 
A end G See _... 
IJWoodtisad — 
;Ta^Xsmsltfy.r 


..4^1+60) 

.easthsm 

12S>|+6P) 

1480 (+3d) 


Pru 

■ AC Cars.. 


.fi99p(+12n 
1750 (+200) 
I83p(+11p) 


PALLS: 
BhieOrcie 
BP. 

Hawker 
tCI 

Luc 

BnestiAero 
ABBecirie 
Ametrsd 


66 lp(- 17 p) 


3i9pH' 

&ioafy^/s Pulp 

Accjuascutum 84p(-9p) 

Wooiworiri 

WoletenhoimeAink 
PandO 
Uoyds _ 

Rosebaugh 



CURRENCIES 


London: 

2:81.4620 

£:£A<a 4167 

C:SwFr2.B655 

£: FFr 10 . 47 S 2 

£:Yen26323 

&lndex:75.4 


NewYoite 
2:81.4617 
S:DMZ3370 
8: Index: 119.7 

ECUQ).638426 
SDR £0.768027 


INTEREST RATES 


London; 

Bank Base: 11K% 

3^montn t i ile ^nk 11%-1l*iA 
SHTionUi eb^ie b4ls:1 1 %-1 1% 


,^ingi 


Prime Rate 9% 

Fed^ Funds 7K% 

S^Ronin Tr»swy 8Ws 6L37«6.35% 
30-y^ bonds iis-K-115*^ 


Aerospace request 
for launch aid 


By Edward Townsend 

Indastrial Correspondat 

Britirii Aero^iace; nhiefa 
yesterday reveal^ 1985 prof- 
its of £1 SO milUon, is to seek 
ftiU Govemment finanrial 
backiiig of about COO million 
for its share in the work on the 
next European Airbiu airiiner. 

D^ite a 25 per cent boost 
in pretax profits over 1984, 
and huge cash reserves, the 
company said it would need 
Government launch aid to 
help it to spread the risk 
during the long lead times 
associated with aircraft 
deveiopemenL 

Airbus Industrie, in whidi 
BAe as tbe.wing^inaker has a 
20 per cent stake, has given the 
go-ahead for a detailed study 
of the A330 and A340, the 
next two airlioeis to be built 
by the consortium. 

They wD) be four-engined, 
lon|;-tou1 aironit aimed at the 
aides' so-called long, thin 
routes. 

Sir Austin Pearce, the BAe 
ebainnan, denied that the 
company had asked the Cov- 
eminent for 100 per cent 
launch aid altiioi^ it is dear 
that the company will bqgin 
n^tiations, probably at the 
end of May, on the ba^ of its 
entire deveknnnent expendi- 
ture being covered by state 
loans. 

. The Airbus superrismy 
board is to present the consor- 



^ Austin Pfeaioe: fiirtber 
study on airliner 

tiuih partners of the UK, 
Fiance, West Germany and 
Spain, with a detailed assess- 
ment hi May and Sir Austin 
said this would be followed by 
further study by BAe. 

BAe's order book at the end 
of 1985 was £il38m corn- 
par^ with £4,820m a year 
eariier. 

This did not hidiide orders 
arising from the£S billion deal 
between Britain and Saudi 
Arabia for the supply of 
Tornados and other roilita^ 
equipment and whidi will 
have a significant impact on 
profits for 1986. A pre-tax 
figure of about £2 1 5m is betog 
forecast 

The dividend was raised 
fiom 53 Jp (0 56.4p 

Tempusi page 19 


Standard Chartered 
beats currency loss 


. Standard Chartned, the in- 
ternational banldi^ group 
with stroi^ interests m the Fu* 
East, A^ca and the United 
Stat^ yesteiday aimounced a 
12 per cem increase in pretax 
pniifitsdespite £58 miltion lost 
through adverse exdiange rate 
fluduations. The results in- 
dude Britidi profits more 
than doubling during last year 
while profits in Swth East 
Aria more than halved. 

The group turned in pretax 
profits lad year of £267.9 
milliCKi, up from £239.6 mil- 
hoD in 19^ Although Stan- 
dard Chartered shmes had 
fallen 13p earlier in the day as 
the w4iole banking sector 
weakened, the results were 
sUgbtly bdter than expected 
and the diares ended the day 
back at their opening price of 
547p. 

Commenting on the results 
the chdrman. Lord Barber, 
said that tiie coup's exposure 
to exchange rate movements 


had produced a strondy ad- 
verse effect cm last year's 
results. If the same ex^ange 
rates Irad obtained last year as 
in 19M, the pretax profit 
would h^ beoi nearly £60 
million higher, he said. Of the 
currency lora. £21 million 
related to Stanbic — the Sonth 
African operation — which 
was hit by the fall in the value 
of the rmd. Most of the inest 
related to adverse movements 
in the dollar. 

Profits from Stanbic 
dropped from £54 J million to 
£35.6 million. Standard Char- 
ter^ said that its stake in the 
bank would drop to below 40 
per cent diis year. Without the 
Stanbic result Standard 
Chartered's profit would have 
been up by 25 per cent last 
year, Lm Barber said. 

UK profits, however, leapt 
from £54.7 million to £135.7 
million as ofiMwlance-sheet 
activities made a sharply in- 
creased contribution. 


Pergamon 
in £238m 
share deal 

^ Jeremy Waner 
Bosfoess Correspondent 
Mr Robert MaxwelTs pri- 
vately-owned Peigamon Press 
is sefi^ its highly profitable 
scientific rablishing interests 
to British nintiis and Com- 
munications Corporation in a 
£238.65 millioa tiiare ex- 
chiu^ deal that will signifi- 
cant tidy up Mr MaxwdTs 
business eminre. 

The deal will boost 
Pergaimm's interest in BPCC 
from the present 56 per cent to 
jist under 75 per cent and is 
subrject to approval tnrminoi^ 
ity sharebolden in BPCC 
BPCC said the acquisition 
would result in an immediate 
increase in the profitabiliiy 
and market capitalization of 
the company providing a base 
for further expanrion in the 
imUishiag and communica- 
tionsfidkl. 

Mirror Group Newspapers 
win remain with Pergamon 
though most of its lainting has 
already been contracted to 
BPCC Mr Maxwell has set a 
mid-1987 deadline for remov- 
al of newspiqier production 
from the Holbors (Tircus piam 
in central London to an 
alternative rite owned by 
BPCC. 

The sdentific journal acqui- 
rition would give BPOC the 
cash Oow it needed to help 
meet the considerable planned 
investment in new printing 
facilities, the company said. 

BPCC listed contract {nint- 
ing of national newspapers as 
one of three principle areas of 
growth. 

The company said: 
“Sepmtion of oewspapn* 
printing from pnUishing is 
oflfer^ tReaktiuougb oppor- 
tunities for both publishers 
and printers to use their 
particular gMife ' faiiy to the 
benefit of their shareholders 
andstaft" 

BPCC said that yet-to-be 
announced profits for last year 
would not be less than £25 
million, while Pergamon 
would make pn^ profits of 
about £26. 1 millioa in the year 
to the end of this month. In 
1984, BPCC made profits of 
£2225 million but this iodud- 
ed ^perty jNofits of £6.64 
miUfon. 

The documentation of the 
deal casts no new light on the 
mystery surrounding the ulti- 
mate ownership of ragamtm 
whidi is hidden befamd a 
Liedieitstein n^isteied diari- 
taUetnisL 

Dealings in BPCC riiares 
were suspenefed on the Stock 
Exchange yesterday at 2^ 
ahead of the deal 


Executive Editor Kenneth Fleet 


CBl seeks young business 
brains to plan the future 


FBteoi of Aftahi'^ top busi- 
ness peiqile aged under 35 are 
being sought by die Cmfeder^ 
ation orBritisb Industry in an 
effort to fonnuiate a 21st 
century Uneprint fin indutri- 
aj and coaDnerdal action. 

The plan, onttfaed fast uigiht 
by Sir Tmence Beckett, the 
€BI director gneral, is to 
Meotify the cream of die 
coimtry‘% rising business tal- 
ent and to sm from than 
detailed' and infonned opin- 
ions abont how die coontry 
sbonld proceed over the next 
20 years or so in the hope of re- 
gaining or at least improvii^ 
ita position in dte wwM bnsi- 
ness leagne table. 

Sir Terrace said his team of 
high flyers, the oldest of whmn 
wodd be under SO at the tmu 
of the century, would comprise 
people who were “chief execn- 
dve materfal". 

Speaking to the animal 
dln^ of the Yorkshire and 
Hnmberride region of the CBl.- 
fa Leeds, Sir Terence said fnl! 
deta^ of the srifame wmild be 
disclosed 00 April 23. ' 


By Onr Industrial Correspondent 


The CB1% idea is that its 
elite gnmp iff “riri^ stars'* 
will lie mven a simple, duee- 
poiot bci^ to stndy the trends 
whid will slmpe die soctal and 
economic eaviroomrat in ftit- 
ain and worldwide in the years 
ap to die next centnr^ to 
define the role which Britun 
abosM pfay in the world 
eemomy from 2000 om and to 
state what needs to be done 
between now and then to 
prepare the nation far that 
role. 

The employeis* organiza- 
tion dearly is aopfag that the 
first report wiB be ready for 
poblication at its annual con- 
ference fa Boarnemonth in 
November so that it can 
draumstrate diat it is thinkiiig 
beymid the immediate con- 
straints imposed by the next 
general ele c tion. A final report 
from dm team, bOowfag inn 
consultation with CBI mem- 
fa possOrie next year. 

Sir Terrace said the 1^ to 
sDCcess * was the aNlfay to 
change. “We most look for- 
ward to the 21si cratnry — 


only Idyeais away. That is not 
at ril a dfattmt future when yon 
look at some of die lead times 
favxilv^ eqmcfaUy in a pmiod 
of rapid ctenge." 

It amid tAe 14 ye^ to 
devAip a new product fa the 
phanracentical indnstiy and 
those fa the bioiediiuriogy, 
aerospace and enmgy fadas- 
tries had to look b^ond 14 
years. 

In sdioofs, 13 and 14-yea^ 
olds wme fadi% crndal deci- 
sioos about wfarther ID go into 
the arts or sciences, and the 
CBl wanted more fa dm 
sdences. After that it conid be 
anotho' five years to A level, 
thiim to a degree and another 
five years fa work before diey 
were «»afc»ng a real confribo- 
tion to their companies. 

“Here we are talking fa 
terms of a lead time of 13 
years. Bttt that is snpposing we 
already have fa pl^ all the 
ipaihs and sdence teachers we 
need - and we dmi*t have 
theoL So to pnt our edacadmi 
system ifaht vrill take at least 
20years.^ 


Balancing act ahead 
for the httle men 


In the Chinese year of the tiger the 
Organization of Petroleum Exporting 
Countries has become a papw tiger. 
The only subject on which it man- 
aged to agree after nine days of 
discussion was to meet again on ApiB 
15. The immediate expectation is 
that oil prices will continue their driA 
downward to SlO per barrel and 
below, now that the spring season of 
low demand is almost upon us. 

This prospect brings into question 
the continued existence of the in- 
dependent oil sector. The financial 
resources of the smaller exploration 
companies were always slender. 
When the oil price was rising the 
shareholders could always be relied 
upon to subscribe to r^ts issues. 
Acreage could be farmed out to help 
to pay for the cost of drUliog. And 
there was always the possibility of a 
bid. 

Now the bidders are themselves in 
financial szraitiackets and, far fiom 
farming into the many juicy drilling 
prospects now around, are them- 
selves looking for ways to cut back on 
d rilling expenditure. In this, they are 
encoura^ by their partneis, the 
sniper independents. They are find- 
ing it increasingly difficiut to pay 
their way, despite, perha^ even 
berause of, the purchases of Forties 
and Claymore units. 

Most of these units were bought 
when the oil price was $30, largely 
with borrowed money, much of it 
limited recourse. The income fix>m 
the production was liable to petro- 
leum revenue tax and corporation 
tax, and would provide tax stelter for 
these companies* drilling pro- 
grammes. Of every $1 spent on 


drilling, up to 80 cents would be 
suppliM by the Government as tax 
relief. 

The fall in the oil price has made a 
nonsense of this strategy. The tax 
payable on the units will become 
n^igible and the cash flow will be 
swallowed up in interest and loan 
repayments; with disastrous results 
for the companies* ability to pay for 
any kind of credible driUing 
prmcsmme. 

’nieir North Sea oil production will 
continue more or less unchanged, but 
cash flow is dwindling. Out of ever- 
decreasing income these companies 
must support interest payments, 
overheads, includii^ exploration 
teams recruited during the boom 
years, and tax on production depend- 
ing on the level to which drilling is 
cut back. For many it will be a 
delicate balancing act between keep- 
ing up interest and loan repayments 
and not throtring money down the 
drain by doing too little drilling to use 
up the tax shelter. 

IfOpec fails to raise the oil price by 
re-instituting production controls ~ 
and there is every reason to believe 
that it will fail • then the oil price 
may not recover until after 1990. 
Under these circumstances, drilling is 
only for those who will still be around 
in the 1990s. Many of the small oil 
companies will not make it and it will 
be left to the majors to hoover up the 
debris. 

This is unlikely to occur for some 
time, however, as the oU price has not 
yet settled down and even those with 
money to spend on unfashionable oil 
assets will wait until the sellers are 
desperate. 


Industry endorses Lawson 


The Confederation of British In- 
dustry has provided the Chancellor 
with encouraging support at the most 
vulnerable point of his Budget 
forecast 

Its own new view of the economy, 
published today, suggests growth of 
only per ^nt this year, compared 
with the Treasury's forecast of 3 per 
cent growth. And this is not enough 
to make more than a trivial dent in 
the level of unemployment Blit like 
the Chancellor, the CBI now expects 
growth to be much better balanced, 
with exports and investment leading 
the way. 

Export orders, says the CBI, have 
started to recover strongly aftia’ the 
winter setback. Its forecast for trade is 
much the same as the Chancellor’s, 
with strong growth in exports just 
outpaced by the rise in imports, but 
with the current account of the 
balance of payments remaining in 
surplus this year and next On 
investment however, the CBl is even 
more optimistic than the Treasury, 
foreseeing an increase of about 6Vi 
per cent in fixed capital formation 
this year and nearly as much of an in- 
crease again next year. 

The public sector is responsible for 
none of this growth, a source of 
constant complaint by the CBI: its 
forecasts assume that the Govern- 
ment including public corporations, 
actually cuts its investment by a foil S 
per cent this year. Nor does manufac- 
turing industry's improved prospects, 
after the fall in oil prices and the 
exchange rate, bold the key. But 
stronger investment is expected in 


housebuilding, and the financial and 
distribution sectors. 

However, lower oil prices are the 
main factor in producing a rosier 
outlook for the economy as a whole, 
according to CBI economists. Tliis 
ye^, the main benefit of the fall in oU 
prices is felt in lower inflation: the 
CBFs forecast is close to the 
Chancellor's, with inflation averagiiig 
3.7 per cent this year and falling to 3.4 
per cent in - 1 987. Next year, lower oil 
prices are-also expected to speed up 
growth: the CBl is expecting a 2.8 pot 
cent rise in output in 1 987, which is a 
whisker more than the OianceUoris 
first indications for next year. 

Tins cbeerfiil forecast, therefore, 
endorses the Chancellor’s view that 
the weakness in the economy at the 
turn of the year was only a blip on the 
screen. The March monthly trends 
inquiry, published along^e the 
quarterl}^ economic forecast, shows 
that while export order books are 
still, on avera^ below oormaL they 
have improved considerably fiom 
the January position. In January, a 
balance of 19 per cent of companies 
had export orders below normaL This 
fell to 10 per cent last month and 7 
per cent this month. 

The CBI, however, continues to 
nag the Government on interest and 
exchange rates. It is still pressing the 
Chancellor to accept the need for 
greater exchange rate stabilit^f, as 
respresented by foil membership of 
the European Monetary System. On 
that subject, however — as the CBI 
well knows — there is no point 
addressing its remarks anywhere 
but to No 10, Downing Street. 


Income Tax Relief 1985/1986 


Electrostore PLc 

A BES investment in an 
established and profitable group of companies 

Offer for Subscription 
under the Business Expansion Scheme 


Sponsewed b>‘ 


Strauss, Turnbull & Co. Limited 

Member of The Stock Exdunge 

Of up to 1,400,000 Ordina^ Sliares of 50p eadi at 60p per 
share payable in full on application 


The ELECTROSTORE 
Advantages 

# Pro tax profits forecast of £190,000 
for the )«ar ending 30th JUNE 1986 

# Present intention is fora USM 
Listing 

# Croup is comprised of h%o 
manufacturing and one distributing 
companv ani^ne different an?as of 
(he electronics industr}' 

# The founder company formed 13 
years ago with the twijtinai directors 
'fully invoK-ed and committed to the 
fu tun; expansion 

# EACclIcntsfweadofcustomers, 
products and suppliers 


The BES Benefits 

# up to b0% income tax relief 

9 No cairital gains tax on first share 
sale 

9 Asset ievx'IsuTlI within new 
Gov'emment limits 

Sbauss, Turnbull <& Co. limited 

SMoorgatePlace 

London 

EC2R6HR ' 

Tel: 01 -Ci3S 5699 

TTiRiMfn’rf.'MviiitK i< tn>.' <itt MinUUf'H 


nr* I-' 


J 






18 


FINANCE AND INDUSTRY 


THE TIMES WEDNESDAY MARCH 2t) ivab 


WALL street: - 


FOREIGN. EXCHANGES 



JVew York (AP-DJ) - Tbe 
stock market tamed in a 
mixed performance oa Mon- 
day as bine chip issses rallied 
from Friday's technically-trig- 
Sered selling 

Tbe Dow Jones iodos&iaJ 
average rose by 14J7 points to 
1,782.93. absorbing abont half 
of tbe 3S.d8 points sniren- 
dered in FridayY session ^len 
finanders onwoimd positions 
gainst expirii^ sto^ index 
fMnres and options contracts. 


The broader market fared 
feu weil, with falling issses 
ontanmbaing rising ones by 
nearly 10 to seven. Noncthe- 
ius, the NYSE composite 
index mantled a gain of 0.74. 
to finidi at 135.5C 

Both the American Stack 
F. xrhflng e and NA^AQ com- 
posite indices aided lower, 

Volnxne oo tbe NYSE 
duank to 144.4 mfllioB dares 
from 199.22 fldBion oa Friday. 


liAar 

24 


Mar 

21 


AMR 

ASA 

Afied Signal 

AhadSlra 

AlhsChknra 

Alcoa 

Amaxinc 

AmWaHs 

Am Brands 

AmBrdcasi 

Am Can 

AmCymn'd 

AmePwr 

Am Express 

Am Home 

AmHospial 

Am Motors 

Am St'nrd 

AmTeiepn 

Amoco 

Armco steel 

Asaioe 

Ashland 01 

AtRichMd 

Avon Prods 

BkrsTstNY 

Bankamer 

BkolBsion 

Bank or NY 

BeaireeFds 

Beth Steel 

Boeing 

BseCascde 

Biden 

Bg Warner 

Brmi Myers 

BP 

Burl'tonlnd 

BurTtonNm 


CanPaollc 

CaterpHer 

Ceianese 

Central SW 

ChempKm 

Chase Man 

CtvnBliNY 

Chevron 

Chrysler 


Oarkl 
Coca Cola 


Cl 

CMMG8S 


Cmb'tnEM 

IttiSl 


COimvMh 
Cons Ecus 
Cn Net Gas 
ConsPoiver 
CnirlData 
CeraigGi 
CPCM 
Crane 
Cm Zeller 
OenaKratt 
Deere 
Delta Ar 
Oetroiffid 
Oi^Eq 
Dianto 
DcNvCnem 
Oreeserind 
Di»e P ower 
DuPont 
EisMmAir 
Estm Kodak 


S24i 51 h 
SS^ 39!i 
514. 
74H 73% 
6 8% 
43X 42% 

16 15% 

a 20 * 

83« 84 

nfS 

76% 78% 
71% TOM 
26% 26% 
66% 

77 76 

n/a n/a 

4% 4% 

45% 45 

22% a% 
so 59% 
11 11 
22 % 22 
48% 46% 
S1% 52% 

31% 31% 
45% 45 

17 16% 

76% 76% 

62% 62 
48% 48% 

20 % 20 % 

56 55% 

59% 58% 
58% 58 

29% 29% 

74% 75% 

34 2of, 
38 37 

76% n 
64% 62% 
52% 52% 
14% 14% 

53% 51% 

195 193 

a% a% 

27% 27% 
46 44% 

53% 52% 
36% 37% 
45% 45 
59% 59 
22% 23 
104% 103% 
38% 38% 

146 140 

38'4 37% 
35% 35% 
33 33% 

41% 40% 

50% 49% 
12 % 12 % 
23% 24% 
70% 70% 
62% 63 
47% 47% 
46 45% 

52% 51% 
34% 34 

42% 41% 

f7H 17% 
153% 153% 
85% 34 

51% 52% 
18% 18% 
41% 40% 
72% 72% 


8 % 


Mar Mar 
24 21 


ExjcenCdrp 

FedOpiStB 

Rrestono 

MCMcago 




PwnBro 
imC 


FtiPann 
Fort 

FTWhOva 

OAFCorp 

GTECerp 

GenCorp 
QenDy'mcs 
Gen 
Gen Inst 
Gen MIS 
GsR Motors 
GnPbUtny 
Genesee 
GeoroaPac 
GHiaia 
Qcwdrich 


$ 





■& 


54% 

74% 

a% 

3t% 

63 

9% 

79% 

43 

72% 

50 

81% 

81% 

75% 

19% 

73% 

m 

19% 

3% 

32% 

86 % 

43% 

84% 


Inc 

ftfafwi 

GtAK&Tac 

Gr'hnd 

GrumanCor 

GuH8Weet 

HaauHJ. 

Heraaea 

H'letl-Pkitf 


26% 27% 
S2% 52% 


23% 23% 
36% 34% 


27 26% 

58% 69 


a% 36% 
46 45% 


ICi 
HigefssI 
InSndSMI 
IBM 

MHantr 

mco 

Int Paper 

MTelTM 

IrvkigBanlc 

JhnsnSJhn 

KamarAkan 

Kerr McGee 

Kmb'iyCkk 

KMart 

flTcmp 

Litton 
Locldiood 
Lucky Strs 
ManHYMT 

MamneQp 

M^CO 

MsimMU 

MrtMaMM 

Masco 

McOonna 


42% 41% 
71% 74 


46% 
68 % 
27% 27% 


148% 148% 
^yk 1e% 


60S 60 
46% 46% 


62% 61% 
56% 64 


22 21% 

27% 27% 


83% 83% 
43% 44% 


46% 46% 
9% 9% 


64 84 

58% STS 


26% 26% 
92% 62% 


7% 7S 
36% 37% 


49% 49% 
41% 39% 


96 66 % 

37% 37% 


UmstaMng 

MOIOI 

iunnianm 

Morgan 

Motorola 

NCRCorp 

NLMsm 

NaiDsds 

NaiMadEnl 

NttSmenOt 

rMdhStn 

NWBjnop 

OKttnPM 


1» 


47% 

161% 


104% 104 

29% as 


64% 62% 
78% 79% 


43% 44% 

40% 40% 


14% 14% 

42 43S 


24% 23% 

13U, 13% 


95% 94% 

36% 36% 


Oadmi 

CBnCm 

Owenefi 


24% 24% 

32% 32% 


a% 39% 

72% 71 


PwGna 21% 21 


S9% 

MnAoi 

fl% 

3% 

71% 

P*MwyJ.& 

EfiH 

oa 

$$% 

Narauai 

SS% 

S7 

n/a_ 

Mom 

S1% 

00% 


Mar 

24 


Mar 

21 


9% 

64% 

65% 

73% 


Pfizer 56% 

Pheioengo 31% 

PhaipMrs \22 
Ph^PU 
Poiemd 
PPQind 

PcctrGmM .... 
PbSESG 36% 
Rayiheon 61% 

R&Corp 62% 
RynUsMat SIS 
Rockwailnl 45 
RO^DUCO 72* 
Saf- . - 
Sara Lee 


37% 

SB* 


SFESepac 38% 


SCM 


Seen. ^ 

O eagr a m „ 
SwsRteh 47 
StaaTkiM 46% 


74% 

31% 

SB* 

63% 


61% 


8tt 


BMOSOhlo 




20* 

30% 

61% 

46% 


Stmersji 

Sin Comp 

Taledyne 

Tenneco 

Texaco 

Texas E Cor 

Texas Inst 

Texas Uois 

Textron 

TlsvIrsCer 

TRW Inc 

UAL Me 

UndevarNV 

UnCartUdi 

UnPacCor 

Utd Brands 

USSMi 

UidTadmcl 

Unocal 

JimWaher 

WmerLmM 


WeBsFarig 


wngrae' 

We^'ser 

WlMipoei 

Wodwarth 

Xerox Corp 

Zemth 


36S 

49% 

354% 

37% 

29% 

32% 

124% 

33% 

60% 

67% 

99% 

S7 

im% 

20 % 

54% 

28% 

22 % 

53 

21 % 

55% 

52% 

86% 

51% 

38% 

n% 

73% 

37% 

24% 


56% 

32% 

119% 

9% 

64% 

65% 
73% 
36% 
59 
62% 
51 K 
48% 
75 
36% 
59% 
37% 
74% 
31 
60% 
52% 
48% 
<7% 
51% 
88% 
20% 
30 
SO 
47 
43% 
38% 
48% 


37% 

29 

32% 

124 

33% 

60 

57% 

%% 

162 

19% 

91 

23% 

22 % 

52 

22 

55% 

52% 

87% 

49% 

38% 

66 % 

72% 

67% 

24% 


CANADIAN PRICES 


AMU n/fe 
AlenAkeii lUfs 
AMpmaBd 1^ 
BATele n/a 
CenPadSe rua 
ComrncQ n^ 
ConBaihrsI n/i 
GuHOa 
Mu/SktCan 
HdanBMn 
imaseo n/a 
fenpanalOl n^ 
InPipa n/a 
Masa.Parg n/a 
A^TruatBO ii/fe 
Saagram n/a 
SiaaCo n/a 
'nvnsnN'A' n/a 
WlrrHirBin 
WCT n/a 


26% 

48 

17% 




13% 

25% 

17% 

29 

27% 

30% 

46% 

40% 

276 

aos 

74% 

28% 

29 

32 

14% 


STERUNG SPOT AND FOflWARO RATES 


Harfcetrataa 
day's langa 
»M24 

NYofIc 1.4815-1.S1N 
Montreal 2.0782-2.C991 
Am$’dani3m954.^6 
BiusS8ls69JS-70^_ 
Cphaan T25T71.1258S5 
Dubii 1.1211-1.1405 
Praracfiat3.391 03.4471 
Uibn 22fi.97<22«J» 
MaiM 21120«a96 . 
UnanM 290334J345 l 46 
(Mo 10.643O>l0.7389 
W 104Q2S.105896 
SrkMm ia761S>10B922 
tgfeye 26955^05 
VlanrB 2334-24.Q? 
ZtfUi 2mS^2!5883 


Mad t e t i Hi 
etaea 
March 24 

14880-1.4805 

2.06402.0587 

30409-3.8477 

68.91-5990 

1ZSS12-12MS0 

1,1211-1.1211 

340003.4088 

221.5022328 

213J7-21423 

231242-232224 

10.6761-109943 

104416-104670 

ia7967-10.9160 

26S.7M66S0 

2SA9-2SS4 

2A99-18S80 


iBKMh 

a57-OS4prani 

o.i64ii>4ixmi 

2%-2prsm 



SmoiMhi 
134-i30pfem 
041-020prsm 
S%^%preni 
ZOOprim 


I1'4-9%pi9m 

89-141* 


560-11 
70-lflSM 
2025* 
S%4%* 
l%«Ma 
1 %-lSpram 
8%-3Spmm 
34%43^rwh 
5%4%prafn 


Storing ladSB eemiMrad wWi 1975 was aane al 7SJ (6ai^ laaga 

Rates wmM by taieliys Bnk HOPEX aod &UL 


7SA-7EJ). 


MONEY MARKETS AND 'GOLD 


BiMRa(M% 

Ciiertng Banka 11% 
finance House 13 


DtMoanC Madnl LeaiM % 
Overnight HUkIZLowIO 
Week feud 11% 

naaaoy Bllla (Dbeount %) 


2fflnm 11 *» 
3mmh 10% 


2 fflntn 11 % 

3emn 10% 

P*» Bmdi BMe (Oscetfil %) 

ImnO) 11 %- 11 "n 2 flin(n 11 %- 11 *<a 
SiwMh 11 'wia*Sa Ecnntft 10%-10 


Tkadens(Dlseoimt%« 

1 mnlh 12 2mnti 11% 

3mnm 11"<t 6mnmi0% 


MMrbenfcm 

OvemMhe dpen12%ekae 10% 

1 week 12%-12 6 mntfi 10 %- 10 % 

Itnntfi 11%-11'^ia 9ninlh 10 *i^1Q’m 
3imd) 11S-11% 12mlh IOM-10% 


Local Aidhortty Dapoi* ra 
2dqa 11% 7days 11% 

1mntfil1% 3tmdh 11 

Smntti 10% 12 fntti 10 


lArOertlyB 

imnei 12 %- 12 % 
amnOi 12 - 11 % 

9mMh 11%-11% 


2im^ 12S-12 
6mnrti 11%-11% 
12mth 10%-IOM 




imrih llS-1 
Sfinlh IOS-10% 


Samm ii«<«-Yi*w 
12 Mh 10%-IQ 




1 fiMti 74D-7.3S 
6fl«Mh 7.30-725 


amnlh yaMSB 
12mei 725-720 


EURO MONEY OEPOSTTS % 


Tdqrs T*ir^ 
Snawi TTu-T’m 


7days 64% 

9 man ^i*4iia 


1 nmOt 
errMh 

ea 

1 im8l 

6nrth 


7dms 20-10 
amnlh 13-12 


1 nrth 
6mV1i 


Tdays 11%-IIK 
SffMth 


ifBMh 

OflMh 


7days 6%^ 
3mMh S'wB'ra 


1 iiMh 

8main 


7%-e% 

7«.*2»u 

7S-7* 

s-« 

4%-4% 

9S-8S 

16-15 

12*11 

2 %- 1 % 

4%-4% 

66 

81i*-6*m 

S»i*6*j* 


GOLD 


000536060-0120 
51 



DOLLAR SPOT RATES 


trdand 


Sing ap ore . 
Ma & ya ia .. 
Australia . 
Canada 
&ueden - 
Norway. 


12190-12210 

2.1E^16m 

22650-22700 


O a t ma rk . 


west Germany 
dMilzertBrtd ... 
Nalherlanda M_ 
France i„ 


Japan. 


oSS|lan(ComnO. 


Hong Kong 
Portugal. 
■Spain 


•Auatrla. 


aneiM).7i70 
12897-1.4007 
. 72500-72550 
, 7-170O-7.17S0 
,6435024400 
.32e*£2970 
. 12200-12320 
.2230022820 
721507.0250 
, 17820-17920 
,15532-15552 
_ 46.704620 
, 7212S-72146 
14820-14940 
14370-14320 
... 1625-1625 


*Uby*Bmli 


OTRER STERLING RATES 


AraantInaauBnr 
AiMad09er_ 
BarvainGnw.,... 
Brad cruaBOp* .. 

gSSKS: 


1.159M.1918 

2271822762 


02SSS4I259S 


Graeea drachma. 
HongKongi 


9aq*ar. 


KuamlidkiarieD . 
HiUyiG iJaU - 
Uexkjopeso. 


a747S4. 

, 72330-7.6730 
20920-21120 
11205-11217 
1800-1620 

9-.^ 


,048604 
32147-828D4 
.860^ 


NewZaelaniJdelar 2-791M79S 

^AnU.^ |»|g0 


The prices and Bnktraat 
qwrtatioDSOBlhii 
>fcArtD 
*stndfng 



LONDON COMMOOnr 
EXCHAME 

eeeeobicpvtiax 
Qaa-el end soBBr to US9 


GW Jayuaen awl Co report 

SUGAR 


May. 


Aug 


Oet. 

Dae 


March 

K7- 


!754-7aa 

1B42252 

18624&B 

168247.6 
196245.4 
.200-1984 
2994 


COCOA 
March _ 


May. 

J^. 


Sapt. 


Dee 


March 

SS: 


141045 
1420-tO 
1451-50 
1480-75 
151246 
155045 
1S684D 
3308 


COM 
March — 
Mae — 
jmy — 
Sapt — 
Near 


Jan. 


-Meieh 


2315-10 
2365-82 
2417-15 
2464-55 
S1046 
256040 
258040 
4756 


80VA8EAN 
■Axe 


Jtfi 


S3: 


Dee. 

Fab 


{??: 


I37.029L0 

1322312: 

1272262 

1272472 

1292872^ 

13S.2292r 

1342292 

-g* 


GUOB. 

SC. 


June. 


^ 1542632 
_ 1872272 
... 1292205 
_ 1282282 
... 1302282 
133.^0325 
1382-375 


LONDON 5eriu.EXCHAfide 
UseMcWpiiM 
OAtofal IbraovarRoNnes 


Pifee biE persMtdetomw 
’Stverto pence p ar bey ew n ce' 
Mdon Watt * ca Ud. report 


COPPER MGH GRADS 

, „ 987«S 


Tiueamenths . 10Q8.(MCU2 
Ml 


Tone 


STANDMIDeATHam;, , 
(Ml — 9B7-4 


Three Mends. 
Vd 


1O06-1( 


Tone 


IWWO'' 

:.3S 



Svpvndetf 


‘Tone 


HEAD 

'Cash 


247-248 


*Three Months ... 2S42W 
Shjl -• — 1450 


Tom 


StaadarMfluiet 


:ZBie STANDARD 
CaMi 


405410 


'niMf Mends. 
Vtf- 


Tone 


. MU 
.1* 


zmeMOHaiAOE 

Cuh — afla^ao 

TIveeMertfu 440^ 

Vbl ana 


Ttoaa Momis ..... 30126082 

vm M 

Tone I* 


SILIWRSHALL 
Cash. 


381-282 


Three Monas 39123522 
vm N> 


Tone 


ALUMBS U M 


.81222122 


Three MetUha 55426342 
Vci 


Tone' 


Cash - gflOagD 

ThmeUondw^w Z792M0- 
Vd : -107% 


Tone 


. Steady 


MEAT AID UVEBItaX 

COMMNSION 

AveregeMMW ckp dC M t 


cat CaWe. sasSiP par l« hr 


ew(^i426) 

GB;Pl^742<ppar1c9hr 

frassT 

fi^MPdandWtoeK 
Cattto IKS. down M %. m 
prlc%9&65p(-^pf2 ^ 
Sheep noa. ft M 'l?**- 
ixice.24144p(+lA^) 
*'~inoa..i6)i>1 iLevB. 

■ l-aCT 


SeeOtoid 

Cana nos. up 22%. ave. 
94.71pe-1.SB 
nos.ifrlO'.^M. 


pnea. 


ncS.(B55%M. 
8075p(‘f127) 


LONDON OIUM FUTURSB 
Eps-toone 

WbaaC EMail; - 

MoMii ^ 9:91. 

May 118.16 11&30 

July 11920 

SeH 9825 SS40 

n3T 10220 im.m 

J«i 1CI&25 10500 


VOkaaK 

MViaat.- 


205 

37 


^lSSdON MEAT HITURBS 
EXCHANGE 


Month 


PW 

p.perMto 
^Opan Oose 
1022 
unqlid urnTtod 


1012 ^0 
1012 1002 
1002 1012 
fff2 
ims in.0 
toss 10U 
1012 1002 
1012 1005 

VW;18 

toBON MeATPOIUMS 

^etCHAMOi 


I > * 


K ' 




P-pwMD 

iJST %.e "mo 

^ ii 

lOfOON - " 

POTATO Rjnnet 

£pmin«Mr ' 

Mflntb ■ Open Ctoee 
Aont IOOlSO 10^ 

iSS mss 11BJ0 

H SIS ^ 


GJUFrugHPetareeLkl 

lepBi ltiO pw In da a pela t 


Cieee 
:?M2 . 7072 


AijrSS 

Sl86 ia62-7ta2 7852 

OdW E3SM3S2 834.0 
Jan87 856.28500 8482 

Apr s; BS2S2U 

JM87 !>■ 

OaST . ■ 

JanSS . i 


9192 

6182 

9062 


'Spot7482 
weir 151 «M 


Ctase 

MW86 566298*2 9652 

Apr58 03526202 . 3352 
lEyff 50026002. 8002 
Jut86 7905 

SapOS 10021000 . 1004 
Dac86 — ■ ■ 1001.0 


2267.TO1 


INVESTMENT TRUSTS 


ECGD 


fixed Rate Bterflng &o»*t Bryiae 


Stfwis IV AxereM reMrenee ng far 
tosrest period Atouary 


March 

canL 


4 1906 Inehsrye: 


Three Month Storing 

Junes 

Sep 86 

Dec 56. 

M»87. 


ISs iS 


finwaus da/e tetil opm 
Meath Eumdoaar 


5056 
9023 
9120 
14713 


5567 

9025 

912Z 


Idh 

Ctoaa 

EMVH 

sais 

00X1 

3112 

9050 

0058 

OSS 

90.79 

00.79 

417 

9054 

0056 

2S0 1 


Three 
JUnOS 
Sep 56 
Dee 56 
Mar 87 


USTYaaaanrBaiid 

Jun86 — 

sap 56 

Dae 86 


92.76 

9574 

9824 

9545 


9214 


Pieiloul Ok/% total span kitaraet 17440 
9562 9574 9221 1506 

9550 0574 9220 1003 

S570 9224 9570 316 

9250 924S 9552 46 

fimvtaua dn's total span toiaraei 5508 
21 9211 97^ 5730 

9060 0 


97-21 


Short on 
Mar 86-- 
JunSS ... 
Sep 56-. 


RevImB day's faM open Irdareat 873 
MT 10235 0 

100& 1006S 10046 10063 87 

HfT 0 



iSff. 



12S02 

N/T 


Wevfauiday%MMiegn^iBreto 10166 

12SOO 124-lS 124-17 5770 

12202 12200 12408 7 

12225 0 

fieiMusdeyetofalcpsnMtomMSIO 
187.90 1054) 1«20 272 

17000 10580 1851S 134 


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t« t» _ - . 

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t» iO*a *iea« BbA. 

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147 110 finNS ABwde 
177 127 ttoue OtlMM I 

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288 224 Wm 
6D0 448 IwnUU 

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230 182.^ - 

B K imi HMOam Sac 
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ID IS m 
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123 M NIh 
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127 e-a 
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143 -3 

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227 . -a 
315 • .. 

245 

1« -M 



287 282 Raatom 
tS IK MtoraUMC. 
as tK Amt nsi 
242 IK RobMO 

2 K ta RaiMo 
set 2K ncsiat 
13% to a«Mo 
137 K StAxmsn 
348 2K Stoas 
20T 211 StWMS fcS 
no 73 Sew Eusm 
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AS 

33 zaaaj 

«47 ma B7 

- AX 254» 

- 22b 41423 
22 ' 22473 
33 33400 
43 51 H4 

"OJh 41343 


FINANCIAL TRl^TS 


TOO 2B Atoeyo A SMPim 
0% afii AnauunSumae 
Sf lb AruTlx - 
K 0 g nmaa d ■ 

155 B MmxaABDw- 
tt 5B DMUli 
T7%BB ' DB >- . 

IK 113 BteM 
IS 78 Eiplhat 
5K ITS 2mo 
K B yidguto . . 

6B aao r wn* iP Bi .. 
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W5 44 6eeex0Si4 
i5%97a Medaaen MMli 
iB M3 n 


■M ' 

217% 

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aiA 331A8 

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•47 -14. 25 aos 


.« 03 23173 

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8B 217 Hlirui ■ 

113 75 MaSebMito 
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46 223 
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A4tS3 
14302 
AB113 
23 244 
-1302 
A7 73 
82112 
AS 243 
A1 A4 
S3 113 


-158 


02 47823 


THETIMES UNIT TRUST INFORMATION SERVICE 


.4MKV UWnMSTMXMkaDM 
ae. HOMWkni M. Bonnuimm I 
-Ots 7 i:TC 


•oa 5 FMd 
Hen hE Erufy 
MttUnUi taid 
Awmii Ofowti 
A94T PlM 
AiMta 4 Eata 
CuU n >MW 
Comn a En«w 
EinMui caaW 
Gmrw 
Juan 

UK anaui me 
Da — 

US amwang Ce% 




T?1 4 IK4« 
KO 9134 
1722 1KM 
ISXO 1S7 

B1 417 
905 1003 
S3 KM 

SO nxa 

atj assc 

MOB 1903 

aofl BX 
B3 «73c 
19.1 lauc 
99J SS7 
1M4 2112 
541 azx 


•17 oza 
-14 ora 

«08 300 
<2 1X0 
401 iH 
445 148 
•1 1 173 
•10 ZS 
«03 . 

•at 13t 
1 11 
-02 041 
-13 3X7 
-Ci f 30 


4UJCB Duman wtir imsie 

MM oumh Owwx SMwm sm lEL 
07B IISK 4 OTB m 


Tcisr 

firuMVi 5 ineqtu 
Cum Tiwi 


fvem Tnu 


lapi incenw Til 
GMty meoma 
xgn rua 
6wt Sou Thm 


Jtoan x«xW 
Vasin Tw 
xiw Sod Sis 
Sacs or Amw T« 
«d ASMt Vdui 
Oh Qroom 
Snialw Cos 
8M StnawrCds 
numiwi Tnn 
Mar Mm 4 Ontty 
OsiW Eotnngs 
Tidmaim TH 
Wcorna &• 


072 3*236 
197 C 1409c 
2373 2SOO« 
3572 2»12 

557.1 ma 

Ke 323* 
2472 2B23* 
134.* 103 
1411 1902 
Sit 3L4 

74.1 705 
01 a 87 .1 
1K7 W93 
BAI K2* 
2KQ 2182 
2SX 2402 
K4 401 
1152 107 
1902 16006 
793 9*3 
K4 913 
l«i 2024 
903 9«1 
1244 131 9 


EumprSnBwCd* 2179 010c 
USX Excmel Trust 374J 0336 


-02 AM 
•09 312 
■19 272 
•23 AM 
•33 2M 
M}.1 4.14 
•AO 4« 
-06 479 
-OS US 
4fl1 639 
.. 10 
405 001 
412 10 

- 0.1 lie 
■13 03* 
•06 314 
*01 2to 
•01 267 
-02 251 
-63 221 
-06 216 
-09 233 
-10 oe* 
•03 50 
403 277 
-13 10 


xmuTMHOTeeaaam 

131 XmsOu>> ^■enwnt Loneon EC2A lAT 
01-toi 9679 m-OB mtonisfl 
Cnnd <ko«m me 964 s24 
Do xeewa K: 597 

Efdamiwe 1070 T 14 40 
Do es Wiswr i w i l 573 6126 
rnoiRa * ProDsny S7 9 61 9 
G« 6 And mcens U9 S71 
Oa Aeeuin 02 gt S 

M mcomc meeais 73 8 763 
oa Aeeum i7i 0 iu e 

non m cews 72.4 n.4« 

M Accum 101 20i ie 

M AcaxB K4 74 4 

D09%weuu Mi 706 
UnsM FixiO 573 03 

Woiarsnes means no ase 
Do *ea«n 67 9 05c 

SmUr Co S AcQsn 106 14SO 

Worm Pwmy 95 102 

MHI u S u 7st UK 77 4 M3 

Mnua Te J4eni 79 4 623 

MmcM Tit US 71 4 739 

Portmao Ttt Ernes 9«i 975 
Penidn Tst m 363 378 


-09 1.M 
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*03 1.74 
405 1 74 
-04 20 
*0 9 820 
*09 60 
-03 4H 
-15 456 
-05 7M 
-14 70 
-OJ A49 
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. 1030 
-15 10 
*02 i.ie 
-03 159 
*06 010 
-05 107 
-25 010 
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BAAUEOi rrcxiu 
AamnMwSt 
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Jmn Ex (43) 

UK 2i On 
Psd Mm m 
PmI Pwis UK 
BG Ainsnei 
BCEnafpr 
SG Ineons Orwtn 
BG joniR 
BC Toamemgy 


... EH3 eyy 
[|-2H 60661 


399.6 417 2 
m 6 0436 
211 4 3248 
368 6 3H2 
1612 106 
1612 171 S 
1176 104 
190 4 90S* 
1345 101 
IU7 1763 


.10 2 121 
030 
-167 156 


*12 056 
-0.7 161 
-43 431 
•07 000 
•02 120 


BALTIC TRUST MAMAOSS 

29/96 AIBotmaira SlrSSl London W1X 4X0 

01.491 0295 


Ainonean 
AusMwn 

.luan a Cinsral 
H^ meome 

n «*fii 4ujiu i Tfinr 

meonw cm Tsi 
gob 5 fhoo in 
Gbod Mason 
Spsotf Sduawns 
BAReUYSUNtoORN 
Uncom KewA 2SS. Renvera Rd E7 
01.934 5944 


491 

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191 

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914 

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wandmds Trioi 
B* Tm im Fund ACC 3291 3A95 
Db me 2132 0A5 

BMHHGnmouAiuoaiis 
PO 8w IK. Beeurvom. kam BR3 4X0 
014K90Q2 


6*5 89.B 
1431 102 
10A2 IH7 
70 4 74 Be 
4332 4609 
730 776 
2306 N53 
2S83 7'4.7e 
109 l«98e 

643 574* 
129.4 i33.4e 

1&5 134 9e 

160 0 191 4e 
3335 35U 
80 7 696 
1377 104 
IK2 IDO 
1100 1170 
02 01 
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1377 104 


-05 A32 
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-32 I 73 
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-31 3K 
-02 529 
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-02 310 
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-1.6 147 
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-12 255 
-05 2M 
04 092 
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-1.6 1 16 
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935 K5 
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101.0 1004 
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Fini SimMr Cd'f B7 67.4 

Fka Am 90 6 M3 

Fni H Nimt 495 92* 

BASaiNGTDNHMUGSlIBn' 

59. Qwlwn SL LenaeA EC3P 70S 
4H0M 4433 


03 020 
01 030 
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05 2» 
07 030 
■26 030 
-25 020 
. 270 
05 050 
-02 150 


Hannsa m« 

EucDoasn me 
De Acgup 
G anM me 
Oo Acsum 

cn m me 

Da Accum 

H«> r«H me 

Do Aecuii 
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De Aeami 
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De A«vn 
Mnsc mam* 

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Soft Co's me 
Du AcGuni 

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I%?8_ ansn Ay Psup ne ns imba EC3A UO 
SiS8^i**V<n0» 04788 iSncSds 


1160 1235 
816 K5 
1005 105.1 
194.7 16*5 
2095 2S* 
1174 1 S 1 in 
164 3 1901 

945 B3« 
IBS 1755 
IK 4 2010 
1901 2019 
00 00 
532 U6 

104.1 109 7 

117.1 1222 
731 765 
645 902 


1.75 
03 178 
03 128 
01 321 
*02 321 
01 556 

01 656 

02 950 
05 AS9 

03 0X9 
03 029 
07 094 
05 004 
-I I 080 
-12 050 
02 199 
02 159 


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274 

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1504 

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413 

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974 

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383 

215 
335 
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14450 

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2155 

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271 

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14.7 
405 
225 

35.7 
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141 
8A7 

67.7 


05 154> 
01 OK 
.. 70 
•25 4 13 
01 451 
0.1 9K 
*A3 20 
•03 223 
•05 3K 
.. 051 
05 1.16 
01 1.74, 
-05 OK 
-05 A27 
.. A0 
01 051 
*15 157 

01 024 
•OA 1.10 

02 2K 
•02 IK 
07 .. 

03 

09 A70 
.. 4.14 


Ai7, Mnymena He. Ha« wa rds Hswh 

0444 48BW 


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Do 


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Do Ace 


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121.7 1308* 
1943 2K9C 
12&2 134.7c 
K3 67.0* 
TOO 5176 
M7 655 
1H5 1100 
K5 KJ 
64.7 K5 
352 41.1 
1325 I4ZA 
312 3A0 


•02 A12 

03 .. 
•02 1.79 

04 OK 
•03 924 

05 AK 
*15 .. 
03 IK 
*15 OK 
01 A31 

.. OB 
-12 2K 


aumaiaoiB iMMiu aa gr r 
71* SMk ErnMnee lenden GC2P SJT 
01-9M28K 


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b*en« Nmd 
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Soesm mc(9l 
Do AcBwn |5I 


2115 23U 

. 3H 

0733 i*)^-** 




33U 3465 

. 3K 

Anwntti 

9U 104 

. OK 

9U IDU 


Amw Ewoiy meea# 

370 

345 

*5* 

1715 16U 


AmapMMSM 

919 

01 

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1177 las* 

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310 

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310 

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1054 

1074 

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ni.1l 11.64 

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323 

344 



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IK. HMi Mcbera. Unden WCiV MV 
01-8*2 110 


CS Mpin fime 


675 722 -02 OK 


C6MN0N RSto MANU8B 


8876 

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A* East 


2Bta 301A *02 28S 

327.1 3400 *06 402 

1576 1670c .. 022 

1S2 UAIc .. 0.73 


CAPEL (.lAHEto MANAOEIKMr 
10 Oe Bread 8 l Lenoen ECm IBO 
01-621 0011 


CiOM I 


3442 3625c 
2742 3807e 
2602 283AC 


121 

4.62 

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CATER AUER 

1 . m wmom SI EC4N.7AU 
01O25MU 


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1096 1135 031OK 


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77 . London wan. Lonaon BC9i IDS 
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39106 • .524 


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CLSnCALSWCAl UNIT TRUST 
MANAOERa 

Nnicw Piaa Bnm BS2 05* 
0279 277719 
Gonoiai Eeury 
Eeuiy H 91 meems 
G4I t Fw0 In* Gai 
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Jaoan Onwyi 


Binpein 
Ml a Rx 


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302 07 
415 440* 

26 7 31 6 
23 5 KO 

24 1 K7 

242 299 
235 Kl 

29 0 267 


03 260 
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COUNTY BANK UNIT TRUSTS 
I6i^ Ow ag ma. Lenoen EC9V 6EU 


CW Aavn 
Ene>cv Tius 
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meonw 5 Qcwvi 
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ngn irtcoma Trust 227 7 305c 
G/wtn Trust 2322 Z37.A 
Ainsnean TruM Ms 5 1342 


293 9 2B7 
413 05* 
IS85 169.9 
147 9 1969 
950 96.7 
K15 3995 
04 A£5B 
1297 1237 
iQiS 111 I 
1048 1114 
19*7 2071* 
MX 592* 


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04 519 

05 236 
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-35 251 

03 444 
08 001 

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08 236 

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-15 SK 
00 303 
-14 D7S 


BFM IUBT TRUST NAMAGERS 
4 uoMs ciasesn. Eoiauiai 
031-29 3492 
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Caoxa ftmd 
GrOMh A Ine Fmd 
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EACLB STAR UNIT TRUST MANaGEM 
Bbbi Rose. Ctwoermnn. Qeuceaiy Gi53 aO 
0242 921311 

«4 74 0 
0 4 74 0 
73 6 789 
62.7 KB 
00 672 
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Eurepoon Aeom 654 7*0 

UK Gill A H me S95 S5X 

995 $93 


6B 7 745 
91 30 97 41 
1339 105 
1094 1129 
1783 1907 
20.1 21.5* 
27 9 294 
1194 127.7 
109 147.7s 
636 103 
2I7S 2246* 


02 22S 
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603 01 017 

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705 -OA 2.40' 

600 ..IK 
7U 05 077 


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190 

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Do Inaema 
me Aeewn 




OIB/ Fmsa Ac eww 
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NBI Amor Tat Aewm 
Far East Tsi Aeeum 
bire Tsi Aeeum 
Ofond Truer 


104 

1305 

2361 

1945 

1015 

875 

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1U.7 

1K6 

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1575 

1385 

2602 

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91.7* 

1415 

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02 270 
01 017 
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•24 057 
01 250 


p 4 c war auuuaBASir 
1. LaiFonea RxiDwy Ho. LMOen EB4R OBa 
.01-623 46B 

Fimd 725 77.6 

CaeatFmd ISO 1105* 

meonw Rmd 751 5U* 

Fw Eamn Pimd *i 6 K 1 

Oncmeai mea n * 64.7 K3 

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<69 71.6 


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DoAcemn 40*5 4S8c *150 .. 

memiw ^ me 985 4i 8 *22 «M 

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Svmea Co s km 4i * MX *25 150 

OoAewn 415 A45 *26 

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JN** ThiM 


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km* meerw i 


Cm^ 

Souai Earn As* T9 aS Si 
Secod Eua 104 1K8 


M7 109.1 
129.6 1ST* 
*56 745* 
54X 


OK 

*16 


305* *02 224 
0.78, 
Ok 


UMHOIROBEirn 

a. Otmot S* Lomen EC3A ban 

0108 9BH 


0*85 3675* 
Japan Emi 0i05 3305* 
Am M lM SiRI Ta 510795 0 

Pi w eir Trum 00335 c 


150 

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PRABtOrarON IMTIIANAOEMENT 
B.Leneen vm enyi, LMen WA unoen 


EC2M SNQ 
OIOS 9ir 
Miwr a Gan tac 
Oe AeB*" 

Amor TimvM me 
Do Aeemu 
C«d Tor km 
Do Aeorm 
Cenv A G4i me 
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Do AcEun 
mcema Tma 
Do Acemn 
M Grenm Fd MC 
Oo Acemn 
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Oe Acemn 
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Poee«a>T 
De Aeeum 
Sunxean me 


2S0 S92 
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22ZA 266A 
19A5 3090* 
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M4 940 

list ISA 

1922 1915 
ISQ 1722 
116 0 1&4 
IS4 1K2 
1945 1645 
1718 1825 
67 4 716* 
M5 722* 
79* M6* 
ISO IM2 
109 104 
902 9A2 


•05 OK 

05 OK 
02 1 17 
*02 1.17 
-1 7 251 
•02 251 

■04 as 

•04 09 

06 40 
0* 40 
06 411 
05 411 
02 000 

. OK 
•02 OH 
04 OK 
04 4K 


Do Aeojm SO 3 M2 

FRBtOSPOOV IO BII MAIM O B I* 


03 OM 
02 OM 


PoMn End. Deruin, Sunc* 
03Kfl890Sfi 


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De Aeewn 
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Oo AceuR 
Smwanaho Oto 
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SIX 2135 

asx as27 

1163 IS* 
IS5 1375 
1U5 I7S.1 
169.7 160.1 


•2X 2K 
09 2K 

01 SK 

02 5K 
-18 210 
-15 210 


54 COURT 

fiioie Tnw H X Kmoway, WC2 

iOT-4a on 


iCap4d 
Amos me 
iHpi V«id 


3463 39200 
141.7 1406 
2025 2112* 


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751 

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BT UNIT MANAGERS 

8m Fkni. 6. Davonsiwc Sa London EC2W 4YJ 
Ol-aa 2575 Dodng Oi0M 9431 
UK Cop Fnd me 
Do Accum 
Incoma Raid 

Penns Exompt 
iMamatoiiai 
US A Canard 
Toea 1 Greudi 
jaeon A Gmwrai 
Fr Sm A Gan 
Euiapian FiM 
Owmany Fund 

aXUTMORE Fwe HAMACERS 


979 

1049 

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230 

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14938 

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-81 

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1E6.0 

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S75 

615 

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140 

6E1 

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»01 

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-81 

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22ZI 

237 6* 

*(L1 

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2. Sl Mm All. LoKun EC3A 68P 
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UK BaHncae Ine 
Oe Aea<m 

UK QfUWWI ACOim 
IK ii^ Ilk: 

N Amercan xecum 
F* Easem Aeewn 
Aeeum 
UK Gn A H me 
Do accum 


05 270 
09 2 70 
01 159 
05 »23 
-I I 1 49 
05 078 
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0 I B5S 

01 8*5 


EkWRAICE FUND MANAOEMENT LTD 
Aonai Coima Htaawn houm M Woomii 
R oad Risnbid RMI 3LB 
070M6BK 


lOOt 1071 


026 


eoumtsu UNttS A0BBWS7RAT1OH 
S Fmiwm Si. aiBiieiiMiar 
MI-236 96K 


9606 
Arnencan Truai 
Ausnkan Tfus 
Ekmn Ts Acaon 
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Cammeaay SKiia 
Ewooean Yiisi 
CxPt mcema tiugt 
Far Easrwn Tmn 
Fiiad rrwesi Fwie 
GO Trvd 


Do 0>si 

Gold Snare Tnm 
Hcdgoa x<iMne»i 
H-OR mcenw Trust 
Hong keng Trust 
mcenw Rnd 


Mean Trust 


Uinsgte Eawnpl 
Oh AEiwi 


•84 

0B 

-0.1 

OK 

220 

21A 

•OA 

D40 

599 

09 

-ID 

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4U 

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-1 1 

234 

00 

6Z0 

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1X7 

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465* 

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4U 

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818 

103X 

1104 

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KO 

279 


9.0 

273 

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30 

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138 

136 

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217 

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315 

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n? 

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715 

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-04 

30 

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46M 

-001 

197 

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3671 

276.36 

-to 

335 

309 

331 

-13 

1 2i 

M9 

»2 

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64.8 

6S4 

-15 

1.0 


Ensrgy Tiusi 
Ssecid Sm rant 
UU Snur C • Roe Tst 
CDVEVT gOHN) UMT MANAOBMSHT 
RMcnasaP' Hse. 77 Londdn ‘■I'si Lonaen EC3K 
IDA 


01.S89 96S0 
ma 6ro»m 


Amanesn Gwnim 
Anw^w me 
Eurepaan Qa*w 
GdK A Mmorao 
Japan Qre«iiii 
Paeme meoma 
UK 500001 OPPi 


743 

04 

•01 

10 

61 9 

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-04 

10 

679 

rzx* 

*06 

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1636 

1993 

-1 1 

033 

437 

16? 

-1 1 

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1245 

1334 


0X1 

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0S 

*03 

439 

617 

67 6* 

.10 

2K 


QUEUMT MANAOCRS 

g«d Ejcwiiga. EC3F 30n 
0108 6003 


oaor Os 4 VH 


ORAFMPN 
Quoim Eody 


1225 1Z7.1* 
2055 221J 
2373 3065* 
1355 M56 
1745 1BL5 
2382 2539 
au 21U 
212.7 2253 
OUMCK IBBHOd war TRUST 


N 
none 

R eet wiy snarl 
Smabsr CBn*aiMa 
riimniin Tnoi 


*oj oa 

-15 ZK 
-04 iM 
'15 IK 
*V 054 
*15 IK 
*35 IK 
01.051 


5K 

U1 

2K 

■5* 

551 

0J7 

850 


ttg B» 44Z 32 St MwiNdNE. iandon eCM 
3AJ. 

01-623 5333 

»M menma SG2 57.1 

H •irm ThNI 1145 121.7* 

Rueeiwy IBiX liU 

G« Truai 05 01b 

SI vmeoic me aoj 835* 

St VmeM US GBi 725 75.7* 
TdnemBirSmCa's 1S5 1515 
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0Z77 217516 

HmMrea Sn* Ce% iru 1275 
HMsca N xmar 6U 7i.i 
HaimiJBAFE SIX 57.1 
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HwMceCudmi 4U 05 
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P»*uiafOTA tAW Ma aa cn5 n B | W W RM*ato" 


Msm» *g 


65.1* 


. . 254 
.. OK 

04 0.0 

05 152 
>25 OK 
*87 154 
04 4X7 
01 552 
-02 2K 



Tnf, 

Hicwne A QOHai me 
Do Acemn 
Wd' mc^»7>ukt 


Sraalw Cat On 
PmI 1 G* 
qaTi yd _ 
F%id kupsoi ihni 
owv iiMaciiv 
WMdTkdi 
GeU 




EWdPMn _ 

Ewd Soiilw Cm 

japwiTnM 

jwwi Spaed Stt 
MMie wndor Cm 
Smsapom 6 Mom 


Anwr Smolw Cw 
Anwr n aeeiwy Via 
MCpi ineema Exwpi 
Smdor Oea bwmpi 
Ewe EMOVI _ 
JMin EaWMI (3) 


Odo* Toen E> K 
PUoke 8dn«l 


1275 1HX* 
17S4 1R5* 
575 10U* 
S7B 615* 
565 712* 
1115 115.1* 
105 1S84 
mi 1S3X 
2762 2M.4 

178.1 lau 
18U 1KXS 

N7 1M6 
4U 902* 
05 07 
9U 981b 
6M 874 
1042 1105 

04 525* 
1874 1584c 

05 747 
3941 972.7 

fU T34C 
2KQ ai5 
755 541 
1225 1387 
12U 1345 
870 S04b 
22.1 235 
1381 147 0 
A1X K4 

117.6 1270 

122.7 iKOb 

117.1 12U 
IK* 1112b 
1149 iKSb 

K6 HI 
K5 57.1 
1332 103 


-IX OK 
•15 OK 
-IX ZXA 
-87 257 
05 207 
-15 875 

01 257 
07 257 
-IX 25F 
•83 422 

03 451 
-OX 851 

-. 5*1 
*02 920 
.. 9K 
051 
■03 023 
*35 OK 
•U 851 
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-. 323 

02 080 
-29 874 

.. OK 
-. 041 
*15 801 
*83 101 
-02 237 
•82 090 
02 Ul 
07 8X7 

04 451 
-89 257 
-12 IK 
*1X 041 
07 1.17 
07 818 
•*1J 20 


idi twain iiMTTTiirFrkmtinBrT 

0. Boodl SL eC2P 2LX 
01-6K 8011 


Tiuoi Una 
Capoi Trull Ursa 
.OoMf -Run Ul*| 
Ewanowi Trust 
F» Eo Trus: 
Fawned 7>ud 
on Rine mr me 
Do Grcmai 
TWtS TRai 
kwemi Trud 


jSQin Tedi Id 
rmwmi nmowcee 
Soeurcy Trust 
Smaow Cos 
Speed SB 


K1X 9572 
97.9 104 2 
1794 190X 
1112 1184 
963 1014 
361 * 374.1* 
29 7 309* 
<95 04 
6U 683 
915 873 
111 1 1182 
249 3M 
322 343c 
1M4 1073* 
*14 M*e 
912 971* 


03 2M 
08 279 
-15 2K 
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0* 239 
-15 AK 
02 944 
70 
. 121 
02 4 0 
*«2 2K 
•53 80 
•55 2K 
-IX 29C 
01 IK 
-l.t ZK 


01 FWB HANAQBtS 

K. Quev Aiawe Gum. undwi 9M1H SAX 
0K2 10CO 

01 StC 5 (Tails 1275 1382 04 IK 

attgimsama KO 979« .. SK 

■to sSwCy « K4 924c 01 200 
hncemwc Tsi Fnd MO 6U 0t 30 


E LD taw nTaB — I 

80, foii l im lh 6L lbMwi BB3 

015D60N 


rmnr QeMn me 
Do Aeewn 
Find kw T« is 
De AcewD 

T Tidd me 
Aeewn 

kc RacDovy kie 

Pe Aeewn 
JMM GrcwOi «c 
Op Aeewn 
SmaDcre«'»bw 
0* Aeewa 
UK 6a GnwOi M 
Oe Aeown 
wonewda tcwi m 
O o Aeewn 


530 Ml 
544 6U 
196 3i.0b 
34J X9 
13U 1345 
2CU Zl7i 
K.4 IflU 
ICU 1M9 
TU 904* 
781 B7* 
104 19955 
1SU 2022* 
K7 307* 
47.1 SOW 
41.7 02* 
4U 445 


05 575 
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03 2S3 

04 

01 U3 
01 .. 
03 IK 
01 . . 
07 .. 
07 -- 
*14 2SI 
*13 
03 124 
0X 
•02 OK 

•83 


L I C war TRUST MANAOEMBir 


TBE 


moomp RM 414 1 4225 

knvniaaiM 8 Cw< 2287 2304 


5K 

OK 


lEOALAGENaUL UNIT TRUST 
MANAGERS 
6. Ri ywiqK Rnaa. 

0777 04634 
Eouky ORneuaen 2780 20$ 2* 
Do Aeewn 4303 4603* 
De Inewiw 983 94.1 

EwoPHn 628 685* 

Far Easam Tze 775 

6« Tiud 804 K I 

M Managid 703 792 

NaMWHcs 914 KO* 

M Anwnesn Trust 7U 759 

UKSpoewlSie 504 545 


06 207 

01 207 
-54 *32 

05 IK 
*ai OK 

02 &K 

06 121 
05 320 
-92 ISO 
01 ZM 


LLPTOS BAIMUWr TRUST H/UUQER$ 
Rogsms OIB, aerag0y0ai. Y/prpmg. 


SuSM' 

0444 4S5IU 

OdMma 
Do Aeewn 
ElHogv lid 
Do Aeewn 
Estra moont 
De Aeeum 
Gonnan GUi kw 
Oo Aeewn 
rncemi 
Do Aeewn 
k* Teel) 

De Aeewn 
Jvin GnMOi 
De Aeewn 
N Am* A Con 
Oo Aeewn 
Piemc B«*a 
Do ABBum 
SmaFir Cm • Roe 


1M3 INI 
3383 303 
05 07* 
512 94.7 
fKS IMS 
27SX 29i« 
507 636 
96 7 636 
M64 8HI 
9225 9969 
IMS 1606 
1761 1K3 
80 0 64 1 5 
BO MIC 
671 105 

lOiX mr 
982 1KD 
I0Z9 1096 
176.4 IM.6 


09 2K 
-15 2K 
02 337 
-03 397 
-10 9K 
-IS 904 
0S Oil 
09 Oil 

08 421 
-19 421 
02 044 
•25 5 44 
*09 003 
05 002 
-2.6 537 
02 0X7 
01 039 
01 939 
-17 iSS 



De AcM liU iib.1 

TMemantd a Qnodi 1785 IKX -85 IK 

Du Aeewn MU K82 -15 IK 


UKDSMHHr' . 

28 OSwi 9 l Londdi 
D10toai1 

11*4 I3U 
K.I 

'SI 'kj* -83 iiis 

su KJD* 03 1.16 



DOi 
Affli 

Ob Atom 

AIM A Gm he MJ B.I* 

Do Aeon 51 J K4* 

Cornu • OM he 1KX 1KJ* 
Do Aeeum 2045 5155* 
.cwiawwid Qcntl *181 4H5 
Cwnwden QMdi 3387 501* 
Do he 1181 1985* 

DMMnd F%nd Me 4974 4513 
De AeoR E1I.79 1247 

BWCMWlOOWWld T7BX IK2 


Oo Aeewn 
Bdsvwshe 
Do Aeewn 
nr Mewm he 
Op Aeewn 
nod OTMk Me 
Do Am 


Do I .... 

MklRddM 
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THE TIMES WEDNESDAY MARCH 26 1986 


FINANCE AND INDUSTRY 


TEMPUS 


r : 


Unkntjwn profits from 
BAe’s Saudi order 


Confrnnatjoii of the £5 
billion Saudi order for Torna- 
do 'and other aircrafi, weap- 
ons and ground support has 
taken British Aerospace's 
shares 1:^:$torTn. In the p^ 
month th^ liave junip^ 
44Qp to. over 600p,' 
though yesicFdajr they, lost 
some of thdr height, ^ing 
. by 25p to S83p. 

The..beKef that this order 
dramatically transforms the 
I outlook for BritiA Aerospace 
is wi d e sp re a d in the City, so 
ye^erday's figures were wide- 
ly viewM .as an interesting 
iriett of history, rather than a 
guide to Uie future. 

■ Profits rose ^m £120 
rhillioii -to £iSl million be^. 
fore tax, mth most of the 
increase coming' fiom the 
military aircraft and weapons 
lines. ’Civil aircraft made a 
loffi of £4.9 million, having 
made a profit of £1.5 miiion . 
lastyev. - 

Hie Sau£ order, will ke^ 
the niilhary aircraft and . 
weapons lines in the fore- 
front,- it is not ye^'clear 
bow much' of the £S billioiL; ' 
half of which aiU be subconr. 
tracted. will sub^tute fot 
odier-ordeia. And, with 14 
separate.contrmts involved it 
is difficult to estimate the 
average margin on' the work, 
which is to- be qiread over 
thm years, initially at ieasL 

At .this sta^e forecasts of 
the contribution from the 
order- can only be very- ap- 
proximate. In theory, a profit 
I'O per cent would be worth 
£170 million to operatisg 
profits, ill addition to which 
there will be some benefit 
from the interest received 
down parents. 

-'Agaiiist operann^ profits, 
last year of £180 miUion and 
interest received of £18.6 
million die potential is clear- 
ly huge. 

In practice, however, me 
Saudi order is unlikely to lead 
to defied profits, though It 
dearly iharks a waterdied for 
the company, especially if 
further orders follow. 

. Meanadiile, Briti^ Aoo- 
space ^&cK' cononuing high 
depenrfiture on the dvil air- 
daft though much de- 
pend on the assessment of 
the potential for the Alitus 
330/J^ project and sub^ 
quern negotiations with the 
Governraent over ftmdu^ 
Briti^ Aercqtqiace daims its 
relations, wUh the-<^yern-' 
ment me unchatmed feUow- 
ing tlui Westland s^aL but 
ttat remains to be seen. 

■ In the current; year laofits 
are likely to rise to about £200 
miUion living the shares at 
583p trading on nine times 
earnings, after a higher tax 


charge. While that, rating 
looks modest, The shares can 
not -be expected to fly ever 
hi^ier. 

iasmo 

Lasmo has not yet battened 
down the hatdies. It has 
tnaintaioed its 1983 dividend 
at 12.2p net, putting the 
shares'on an historical gross 
yield of . 14.3 per cent at the 
current price of 120p. 

On the basis of the resnlts 
pnblished yesterday ftfr the 
yevto December 31, a dit in 
the dividend is not justified:-' 
OS production increased to. 
45,800 barrels per day. lip by 
28 per cent -compaidl with 
1984 

Turnover reached a record 
£303 million, a 21 per cent 
increase ovd* the same peri- 
od. Reported : earnings per 
ordin^ share 31Jp 
against 29.7i:^ leaving -the 
dividend 2% times covered. 

No company aill take . 
. li^tly die (tecision to cut its 
divideiid. But unless 
prices --recover sharply, 

. Lasmo may msh that it bad 
started the process of reduc- 
ing the payout to . the share- 
hddf^ sooner. 

..The immediate pain 
caused by the filling ml price 
can be eased by entfing back 
severdy on exploration. It is 
impos^le to give exact fig- 
ures at diis stage as 22 out of 
the 25 North Sea wells which 
Lasmo had budgeted for this 
year axe operated by others. 

Of the three Lasmo-operat- 
- ed weDs. only one is now 
firmly schedulra to be drilled 
in tte autmnn. With these 
and other cuts, mainly in 
exploration, die capital bud- 
get is planned to fill by at 
least 30 per cent diis year, a 
. saving of £50 million. 

Tanwft has the advantage 
of havi^ extensive overseas 
acreage in Australia, Canada, 
tte United States, Indonesia 
and Colomb^ Tbe price of 
oiUs no dbEferent in these 
places, but the costs of co- 
ating are usuaDy much less 
than in the North Sea. ^ A 
company with cash can mck 
up unpromottd acreage at 
what look like quite les^n- 
able prices these days. 

Hie qoesiioa ik are the 
prices reasonable enoi^? 
Tbe oil market is fir from 
~ set^ and no one knows 
where the , oil . will 
stabilize. 

Lasmo has cash and securi- 
' ties amoundng to £225 -mil- 
lie^ bur it also has debt of 
some £325 miUion which has 
to be serviced. Overheads 
have to be paid, payntents on 

the oil production stock'unrts 
have to be 'met and fidd 
opomting costs have to be 


Our business is sellmg yours 


CHESHAM 


Thfi best imbwn name in mergCTbitJgng 


NXrnCEOFAE^GS ' 

Clerical Medical 


frTninal General Meeting 

,-endmfiel62nd.ArmadGerierriMeeni¥«{*e _ 


oJSSUdas- 23 .^pril 1986 ai 230 pm for ihe foBciwiiig 

2 Tore-deaDireooR. , 

3 Tbrt-appitoihe.Audiiorsairitoaudiorisechel^^ 

xemunoauon. i 

4 TbiranaaanyochwotdinaiybusinesofmAimu^ 

.Meeting. 

- gjfttaotdinaiy General Meefii^ 






paid. And of course there is q 
next year^ dividend. a 

Stability is what the Indus- p 
try craves. It professes to be i 
1^ concerned with the abso- c 
lute ie^ of prices than that e 
they shoidd not fluctuate p 
vioiently and unpredictably [ 
as it makes planning 
impossible. j 

But' for the sake of the . 
independent oil sector's c 
health, they should not fin ^ 
too fir for too long. Other- ] 
wise the only plans that will ^ 
be made win be for funerals. i 

Booker McConnell * 

The reason for Booker s 
McConnelTs low share rating < 
is to be found in City | 
restaurants. .; 

At. dining room tables | 
stockbrokers and ftind man- ■ 
agers can be teen ordering r^ ' 
meat and heavy food, while 
Booker's strategy focuses | 
heavfly on tbe trend to ^ 
healdn living. ; 

Professional investors may ' 
iiketbdrdietbuttheyhaveto | 
acknowdge the commercial ' 
attractions of such a fhnda- J 
mental shift in eating habits. > 
Yesterday Booker an- 
nounced a 26 per cent in- ' 
crease in pretax profits to | 
£46J miliioa, just beating the 
forecast made at .the time of 
Dte Corporation's bid last 
year. 

That was despite the rise in 
sterling against the dollar 
whidi cost £2.75 million. 

Including- the benefit of a 
full y^'s contribution from 
acquisitions made in 1984 
and the £400,000 profit from 
Hich LovelTs cash and carry 
business, bought last year, 
there was probd>ly a boost of 
£2.5 million from 
acquiritions. 

The rest of tbe increase 
reflected organic growth, par- 
ticulady in tbe. American 
poultry breeding business 
which is benentii^ fitrm 
growing demand for white 
meat and low feed prices. At 
home the salmon firming 
and forestiy businesses also 
didw^. 

The retailing business con- 
sisting of Holland & Barren 
and the Kingswood chain of 
chemists are growing, but 
/Mnerican Heuth has been 
sold having made losses last 
year. 

It remains- to be .seen 
whether Booker o^ for a l»g 
acquisitiem or sticks to its 
timtional policy of building 
on existiiig businesses 
■ That uncertainty is mom 
than dlscoonted by the raulti- 
[rie of 13 times prospective 
earnings, assuirung profits 
rise to £33 million this year. 

On an mcreased dividend 
the shares at 343p yield 5 per 
cent 

Newspaper 
profits up 
by a third 

Pretax profits rose by neariy 

a third at United Neu^pm 
last year on turnover £1 17.8 
minion higher. , . . 

An increased final dividend 

of 1 Op is lecommended, which 

will also be paid on the 
shares issued for the acquisi- 
tion of Fleet Hc^ngs. The 
increased dividend, makiDg a 
tot^ of 16p, against l4.Sp 
previously, will be paid on 
June 16. 

Turnover was £312.26 mil- 
lion, up from £194.42 million, 
and profit before tax £34.91 
million, against £26.71 
milnoD. 

The lesubs include Fleet 
Holdings, publisher of tbe 
Daily Express, as a tdated 
company.fiom February 13 to 
November 1 6 and as a whoUy- 
owned subodiary from No- 
vember 16. 

The prospects for this year 
and beyond, taking into ac- 
count the growth expected 
from acquisitions and long- 
standing busmesses, ''should 
offer rewarding and exciting 
oppoitnmties.to shareholders, 
eropk^ccs and rnanagers, ac- 
cording to the compan y. 

United Provincial Newpa- 
-pers produced an extra 34 p^ 
pent i»ofit in_ spite of static 
ciicultefons and industrial a^ 
tjr.fl by the National Graphi- 
cal Association at Blackpool 
M Preston. The mag^e 
division Aowed advertising 
revenue up overaQ. 


Ir appointments 


Malaysia 
to start 
tin futures 

By Michael Prest 

Financial Correspondent 
w Taiay iria believes that com- 
modity agreemeats are dead 
and intends to introduce a tin 
futures coutract oa the Kuala 
Lumpur Conunodities Ex- 
change, in addition to the 
natural rubber and 
palm oO contracts. Mr PanI 
the Malaysian primary 
industries minister said 
yesterday. 

Bnt Malaysia vras very con- 
cerned about the oversnpply in 
most commodity markets, Mr 
Iie o " g said. He added: **ln 
view of this syndrome com- 
modity agreements have 
proved to be ineffective.** 

Mr Leong said that Malay- 
sia li^ bMD consitoing a tin 
contract for some time, bnt its 
iamicli had been delayed by 
the tin crisis. He said: "We 
'had no intention of aggravat- 
hig tite shnation bnt today it 
wonld be different" 

The London Metal Ex- 
change effectively abandoned 
its tin contract this month 
after the fiilnre of tbe Interna- 
tional Tin Conncil and its 
■ credhois to reach agreement 
forc^ tbe exchange to settle 
ontstandiBg contracts at a 
fixed price of £6,250 a tonne. 

Mr Leong accepted, howev- 
er, that there was no hope of 
revivii^ the price r^platiiqt 
fanctions of tiie International 
Tin Comwil, of which Malay- 
sia is a member. He sa& 
"Wlien yon talk abont a free 
market yon can't do anyting 
abont it" 

He added:"Events have 
proved the tin i^yeement 
is not effective in view of the 
stro c tur ai oversnpply of fto." 
Mr Leoi^ estimated that at 
present tin i»ices of between 
£3,000 and £4,000 a tonne only 
22 mines in Malayma prodne- 
ing 10,^ tonnes a year were 
economic. 

Mr Leong did not believe 
that the tin producers wanted 
to revive tiie tin agteement 
The ^ly onteome was timt 
tiie ITC would become a 
statistical organization. 


STOCK MARKET REPORT 


Share prices tumble on 
Middle East fears 


Share prices were in full- 
scale retreat yesterday as in- 
vestors rushed to take profits 
in the wake of heightening 
tension in the Middle East and 
Opec’s fiilure to reach agree- 
ment on a production strat^. 

Losses reached double fig- 
ures in most sectors. 

The FT-30 index fell 29.9 
poinisto 1^.7, while the FT- 
SE 100 tumbled 30. 1 points to 
1633.8. The FT-30’s previous 
biggest drop was 27.9 points 
on October 17, 1984. 

Fears that another eariy cut 
in interest rates will now be 
postponed indefinitely hit 
consumer sectors like aores, 
breweries, foods and builders. 

Banks tumbled afrerit and 
bad debt worries returned. A 
constant stream of mainly 
fivour^Ie trading statements 
from big companies failed to 
help sentiment and there was 
little sign of a rally by the 
official closing belL 

Among ieadeis, !CI dipped 
16p to 95 Ip. still overshad- 
owed by EEC iMice-fixing 
allegations. Hawkv at 587p, 
Bine Cirde. 661p. Beeeham, 
361p and Thorn EMI, 4S7p, 
were others to decline by 14p 
to 17p. 

Government stocks suf- 
fered, too. with losses of more 
than I Vi points, although the 
pound held up well against 
CoQtinenial currencies. 

British Aerospace, a strong 
market recently, slipped 38p 
to S70p as pretax profits of 
£150 million failed to match 
expectations. Lncas, repomng 
interim figures today, fell I5p 
to 613p in sympathy. 

P & O was another to 
disappoint at 53Sp, down 13p, 
even though mtax profits 
showed a nse of neariy 40 per 
cent. Imperial Group hdd 
steady at 347p after trading 
betw^ extremes of 356p and 
340p as United Biscuits de- 
clared that its latest bid 
(cleared by the Office of^Fair 
Trading) was final 

Dealers now think that tbe 


Hanson bid will win by a 
narrow margin. Hanson 
slipped Sp to 174p, while 
United Bisenits rallied 5p to 
240p. 

In dull bnildefs. Crest Nich- 
olson receded 8p to lS8p on 
news of a £17 million rights 
issue. Higher profits failed to 
help Bryant Holdings at 1 16p. 
down 6p. or C H Beazer, 2p 
lower at 628p. A 9 per cent 
profit setback' knocked 12p 
from J. Mannders at 166p. 

In stores. Combined Engl^ 
failed lo satisfy tbe optimists 
with a 35 per cent expansion. 
The shares dropped ISp to 
22 Ip. Woohrmth, reporting 
todav, retrrated 12p to 626p. 

Barton at 3 1 4p and Gns "A** 
at 934p were others to weaken 
16p and 20p rrspectively. 
while news of a £6 million 
cash-call lopped 9p from 
Aqnascntmn “A** at S4p. 

^arply lower profits and no 
dividend cut lOp from 
Rockware at 39p. A £2 million 
rights issue was enough to clip 
3p from Albert Martin, at 99p, 
while a 5 percent reduction m 
earnings upset W. Cannin g at 
I23p. 

A 28 per cent profits in- 
crease was discounted at 
Booker, down 7p to 343p. 


WSL Holdings, suspended 
i py t year at 8Sp, returned at 
146p and clcn^ at 130p 
following the acquisition. A & 
G Seenrities were marked up 
6p to 48p on the bid terms 
fiom 7p lowerat 241p. 

ftnidi St Anbyn jumped 7p 
to Sip and fellow discount 
house. King and Shaxon, 
launched a counter-bid to the 
Irving Trust bid. Jonas 
Woodhead improved 9p to 
49p on ne>vs of an approach. 
lEP Securities (Mr Ron 
Brierley's vehicle) hold a stake 
a^ Tozer Kemsley closed 8p 
to 1 29p on expansion hopes. A 
27 per cent profits increase 
supported KeeplVnstat 146p. 

Snpra Group added 4p to 
63p ahead of today's figures. 
Recovery hopes stimulated 
Johnson & Firth Brown at 
4 Ip, up 2%p. Babcock slipped 
5p to 213p ahead of today's 
figures. 

BPCC were suspended at 
230p on the announcement of 
a deal with FOrgamon. United 
Newspapers, unchanged at 
323p, recovered an eariy mod- 
est fell after good results. 
Encalyptns Pnlp plunged 4Sp 
to 438p after a 60 per cent 
profits setback. 


RECENT ISSUES 


EQUIHES 

Abbott M V (180p) 226 -4 

Ashley (U (135p) 211 -8 

BPP (160p) 190^ 

Bre^mount (160p) 180 -2 

Chart FL (86p) 93 -1 

Chancery Secs (63p) 78 

Conv 9% A 2000 ^7's -Vs 
Cranswick M (95p) 105 -2 

Oialene (128p) 186-12 

Ferguson (J) (lOp) 32 

Granyte Surface (56p) ^ 88 

Inoco (55p) 42 -5 

JS Pathology (I60p) 278 -12 
Jarvis Porter (105p) 130-5 

Klearfoid M18p) 118-^ 

Lexicon (l1te) 


SAC inti (loop) 

SPP (I25p) 
Templeton (21 5p) 
Sigmex (lOlp) 
Snowdon & 6 (97p) 


Spice (80p) 

Tech Comp (13Cfo) 
Underwoods (180p) 
Wellcome (I20p 


Klearfoid (11 8p) 
Lexicon (l1te) 
Macro 4 (105p) 


Meilvale M (1l5p) 
Norank Sys fflOm 


138 

144 

106 


W York Hosp (90p) 
Wlckes {\4Qp) 

RIGHTS ISSUES 

Cullens N/P 
Hartwells N/P 
NMW Comp 
Porter chad F/P 
Safeway UK 
Wates F/P 
Westlana F/P 


138 -»-2 
158-1 
233 -2 
84-2 
117 

96 
204 -7 
185 
212-2 
78 
170-3 


75 

34 

114-1 

104 

£47-2 

148-1 

85 


ReSy uSfuU^) 340-10 (Issue price In brackets). 


Bankers 
hit at 
register 

By Rkhard Thomson 

Raniting Correspondent 

The En^h and Scottish 
clearing banks yesterday at- 
tacked the pro]>osals being 
considered by the Department 
of Trade on the registration of 
life assurance and unit trust 
sriesmen. 

In a document to the DTI. 
the Committee of London and 
Scottish Gearing Banks said 
the proposals would increase 
administrative costs to several 
million pounds without 
achieving their real purpose. 

The proposals on regisli^ 
tion were pul forward by the 
Securities and Investments 
Board and the Marketing of 
Investments Eloard Organiz- 
ing Committee. 

The banks* document com- 
plains that they were not 
consulted when the proposals 
were drawn up and do not 
meet objections put up to an 
earlier set of proposals last 
year. 

The banks called for ur«at 
laiits with the DH and the SIB 
they were becoming 
increasin^y alarmed at the 
impracticality of many pro- 
posals being put forward on 
the selling of unit trusts and 
Life assurance. 

‘‘We are in favour of a list of 
rogue salesmen, but not of a 
huge i ndex of reputable on^** 
the document sa^ Mr Philip 
Wilkinson, chief executive of 
National Westminster and 
chairman of the banks' chief 
executive officers' committee, 
said that the extra layer of 
bureaucracy set up by a 
brokers* register would create 
unnecessary cost for no extra 
heng fil , 

The tanks have 50,000 staff 
involved in marketing life 
assurance and unit trusts._Hw 
cost of registering each indi- 
vidual would come to around 
£2 million with a further 
ann ua! £1 million compliance 
cost The expense would even- 
tually have to be borne by the 
clienL the document says. 


When YOU WANT 10 

OPEN IHE RIGHT DOORS 




1HAT OURS HWENT CIOSED 
SIIKE 1858. 










memte randed 

appSaproxrtoawndandvoieaBtre^ 

memberoriheSocec.-. . • 

im- mgrnmeaappwpcnga prmy onisi 

%l|^1brtbe<^k!cune& . PrindpalCfflice 

W‘-i; •• ' - 15 SLlasnes's Square 

\^ttderofihc Board / LonddnSWn'4LQ 


Cavanagh Associates - 
Quickwofd Graphics: Mr 

Mike Cavanagh is made man- 
aging director of both 
companies. 

A P Bank: Mr Joe 

Ain»ri((on has become a depu- 
ty ebainnan. - 

John WiUmott Heddings: 
Mr Ian Dbrnn is now deputy 
chairmaD . and • Mr Trew 
: Crow b managing director. 

TecnEcom Mr David Meek 
has been m^e director, Glas- 
gow operations. 

Menswear Association of 
Britain: Mr Allan Sayers 
takes over as chief executive 
next Tuesday. 

Good Relations Public Al- 
feirs: Mr Peter Luff has been 
made deputy managiDg 
(tirecior. 

London Park Holdings: Mr 
Peter Docker 1$ now on tbe 

bo^ as marketing director. ■ 


Nearly 130 years ago, we opened a branch in 
Shanghai, to serv'e trade between China and the rest 
of the world. 

Long before any other Western banks opened 
branches, it had become so well-established that the 
Chinese gave it a name in their own language. 

(Even today in Shanghai, many people will be 
able to help j-ou if you ask for directions to“Makalee'*.) 

Perhaps even moie remarkably, it has provided 
an uninterrupted service ever since it began. 

Today; it has been joined by offices in Beijing, 
Xiamen, Guangzhou and Shenzhen. 

Which suggests that when you need information 
and expert services to help you seize the burgeoning 
opportunities for business with todays China, 
Standard Charteretl is the bank you should talk 
to first. 

It also sa,vs a good deal about tlie depth of our 
involvement in the countries w'here we work all over 
the world. 

In China as in over 60 countries worldwide. 
Standard Chartered can offer you all the local know- 
ledge, contacts and services to help you do better 
business. 

Put us to the test. Bring your toughest problems 
to your nearest branch. 

You 11 find an ever-open door. 




STRENGTH IN DEPTH ACROSS THE WORLD. 


STANDARD CHARTERED BANK. HEAD OFFICE; 38 BISHOPSGATE. IDNDON EC2N 4DE. 










FINANCE AND INDUSTRY 


THE TIMF5> WEDNESDAY MARCH 26 1986 




S-'K 


itj. 


sir" 


•/ . i-.t -s^.V-. 




•■, v‘ , <c / -si. . ■• 

; % 1 •• •^> •• "!t# _ 

^ • .• ••.••,.• tv'- :: !>••..!■/ •<<•>•> 


Ayear of progress and diange 

Total profit before tax in 1985 was £108.6m, compared with £78.0m in 1984. Loi^-term 
business profits continued to show significant underlying growth, but there was only a 
modest increase in the reported figure because it included a smaUer non-recurrent 
element than in 1984. The main feature of the general insurance busing re^ts was a 
recovery at Mercantile and General Reinsurance, but this was partly offset by 
a deterioration in the Overseas Division. There was a small improvement in the 

United Kingdom. , , , ^ ^ ^ 

The directors have declared an increased final dividend of 17p per ^are, makin g a total <n 
26p for the jear, compared with 22.5p for 1984. The increase reflects the underljhig growth 
in loE^-term profits, the encouraging overall improvement in general insurmce results 
and the strength of the solvency mai^ins supportii^ the Group’s insurance business. 


Profit and Loss 
Account Summary: 


Financial Highlights 


Profit before tax from: 

Long-term business 
General insurance 
Shareholders’ other income 

Total profit before tax 
Tax 

Minority interests 

Profit attributable to shareholders 


Earnings per share 
Dividend per share 

Long-term Business: 


General Insurance: 


Shareholders’ Other 
Income: 


Premium income 
Surplus for distribution 
Policyholders’ bonuses 
Shareholders’ profit before tax 

Premiums written 

Underwriting result 
Investment income 

Trading profit (loss) before tax 

Investment income 
Miscellaneous net income 
Expenses 

Other income before tax 


1985 

£m 

137.7* 

(53.4) 
24.3 

108.6 

(31.5) 

( 1 . 0 ) 


25.3p 

26.0p 

1,719.1 

1,016.7 

928.3 

137.7* 


(131.6) 

782 


136.1* 

(79.9) 
21.8 

78.0 

(31.9) 
(0.9) 


15.1p 

22.5p 

1,837.5^ 

1,099.9 

1,011.3 

136.1* 


(161.4) 

81.5 


* Tken are special Matures in these items, tokich an explaitted and quantified in-ike texL 

The abridged income statement fir 1985 is an extract fiom ike latest accounts. These aeeouMs haw not yet been delieered to the Registrar of 
Companies, nor haw the auditors reported on them. 



We have again made increases in the benefits payable on 
United Kingdom with-profits policies. As in 1984, some 
of the increases on assurance policies which would 
normally have taken the foiTn of terminal bonuses hatre 
been declared as special reversionary' bonuses, in order to 
give policyholders greater certainty as to the eventual 


proceeds under their policies. Shareholders’ proHt before 
tax from long-term business showed a small increase at 
£137.7m, but excluding the laigely non-recurrent 
amounts resulting from the special teversionary bonuses 
in the U nited Kingdom, the underiying profit rose by 
11% from £1 12.4m to £124.4m. 


The general insurance trading loss before tax of £53.4m 
represents an encour^ing impro^'ement. Total premiums 

Premiums 
written 
1985 1984 

£ni £m 


UK Division 
Overseas Division; 

Canada 

EEC 

Other Countries 
London Market-Overseas 
Marine and Aviation 

Total Overseas 
Mercantile & General 


327.9 279.0 

SS.6 100.9 
36.4 51.2 


218.5 232.6 
219.4 276.9 

793.8 788.5 


written rose by 1 1 % in local currency, but by only 1% in 
sterling terms. 

Underwriting In\’estment Trading Profit 

result income (loss) before tax 

1985 1984 1985 1984 1983 1984 

£m £m £m £m £m £m 

(47.8) (>4.8) 22,6 24.6 (25.2) (30.2) 

(13.5) (1.3) 8.7 9.3 (8.8) 8.0 

(13.6) f3.9) 9.1 7.5 (4.5) 3.6 

(0.5) 1.3 1.6 (2.0) 1.1 

(3.0) (5.8) 3.9 4.7 0.9 (1.1) 

(3.2 ) q.5 ) 2.6 2.6 (0.6 ) 1.1 

(36.6) (13.0) 23.6 25.7 (13J)) 12.7 

(47.2 1 f93.6 j 32.0 31-2 (15.2 ) (62.4 ) 

(131.6) (161.4) 78.2 81.5 (53.4) (79.9) 


(13i)) 12.7 
(15.2 ) (62.4 ) 

(53.4) (79.9) 


In the United Kingdom the modest imprm'ement to a 
trading loss before tax of £25.2m was attributable to 
asubstantial imprm*ement in commercial business offset 
by a worsening in personal lines. The domestic property 
result deteriorated compared with 1984. but the beneficial 

In the Overseas Division a sharp deterioration in 
underwriting results produced a trading loss before 
tax of £13.0m. In Canada our business suffered from 
the severe weather conditions early in 1985 and 

Mercantile and GeneraTs trading loss before tax was 
much lower at £15.2m. Much of the reduction was due to 
the corrective a ction we have taken in recent years, the 

Capital Resources: The total capital resources of the 
Group at the end of 1985 amounted to £555m. The solrency 
margin of Prudential Assurance and its subsidiaries was 


effect of the corrective measures taken at the start of 1985 
became ev’ident in the second half of the year. In the motor 
account the frequency of claims continued to rise, 
contributing to a higher trading loss. 

there was a marked downturn in the motor accouoL 
Of the main regional groupings only our Belgian 
subsidiary' and our operations in the London 
market produced a trading proHr. 

effectiveness of which is now being demonstrated by the 
emerging results of business written since 1983. 

64% and that of the Mercantile and General Reinsurance 
Group was 67%. 


Copi^of thel^pmandAccomtsmllbeamiUd^koiiMc^^ ■ 
■■ fram'theE^trar'sDcpanmefUi 

I^UDEJmALCORPORAnONplc - 
142H0LB0KNBARS,;L0ND0N ECiN 2NH 




• PmUFS* LAMPSe The 
European Investment -Bank is 
lending the company the 
emJivalentof2()0nullionguildeis 

(£52.6 million) to finance a 
lar^'Scale investment 
eranune aimed at mastw^ 
sulHnicron technology, whidi 
will be used for the production 
of'ibe next generation or inte- 
eraied circuits. 

• KLEARFOLD INC Pretax 
profit for 1985 S1.86 mflliw 
(£1.25 million), against Sl.^ 
million. Turnover $19.62 ^ 
lion (517.91 million). Eanungs 
per snare 14. 1 cents (8.3 cents). 

• LAMONT HOLDINGS: “g- 
lal dividend 4^p (3.1p) for 
1985. Turnover £46.58 milliOT 
(£40.81 oiarion). Eteiax proft 
£4.61 million (£3.45 mimraX 
Pan-nings per Share I9;02p 
(1S.63P). 

• aquascutum group: 

The bOMd is proposing ip raise 

about £5.95 million, afur ex- 
penses. by .the . issue of to 
10.13 nmiion new “A” (re- 
stricted voting) ofdinaiy diaies 


by a rights isrije at ^ per sl^ 
•OQ the basis of Ode new ^ A 
ordinary share for every three 
ordinary and/or “A'* hdcL The 
issue. ' • IS not being 
mider w rit l CT.Results. for im . 

year to Januaiy 31 (P^res m 
£000): Turnover /3T 859 
(33.64^i Pretax profit 1.765 
(1,230). Earnings per. Share 
4.87p (3.08P). Total divideiid 
•2.Sp(2J5p). • 

• SPRING RAM GO^^- 
nONi Total dividend fw 198S 

I.81p(l:65p). One-fbr-onescrip 
issue propos^^ Tuinovw 
£27,39 milQoo (£19.36 milucm). 
Pteiax profit £4.43 million 
(£3.02 mfiliOD): Eanungs ptf 
ihaie 16.2P <14Jp). The 

Imports that the cstTcnt year has • 

b^n wclL 

• eucalyptus pulp. 
MILLS; Dividend for 1985 7p 
(lOp and 5p special payment). 
Turnover £24.79 million 
i£25J7 million). Pretax profit 

Q mSlion ' (£7.23 million). 
Ffifting s per sbare 59p (136p). 


-STANDARD CHARTERED 



The Directors announce the results of 
Standard Chartered Group for 1985, as follows: 


£ million £ million 

Tratfii^ profit . ^irrc 

Company and subadianes 205.4 1 o7.o 

Share of associated companies 62.5 . 82.1 


267.9 239;6 



85.3P . 64.4p,! 


Profit before taxation 

Taxation: 

United Kingdom 
Overseas 

Share of associated companies 


Minority interests . 96 ^ 

Profit before , 

extraoitfinaryttems 132.7 1OT.1 

Extraordinary items- . ,15.7, '(26.7) | 

Profit attributable to 

members of the Company • 148.4 73.4 

Dividends: Interim 163. 14.8 

Final 31.1 . 29.5 

Profit retained . 101. n . 29.1 

Earnings per share 85.3p 64.4p. 

DIVIDEND; The Directors wiB recommend at the 
/Annual General Meeting oh 8th May 1986; a final 
dividend of 20 lO pence per share, making a tofel 
distribution for 1985 of sas pence per share. TTie 
final dividend will be paid on 16th May, 1986» to 
shareholders on the Ftegister on lltti 1986,_ f- \ 


Standard ^ Chartered! 

Notice to members 

C&G 
Rates Powm 

Mnrteji^pres comoletedafter IstJanua 

In accordance wi^'the Mor^a^ Ckihditi^ notice is 
spven of the following Mortgage Base Rates: 

C&GBaseRatel : 12 % effectftreimmeApriiigse 
C&GBaseRate 2 : 12 ^ 5 % effecthefmm6Apigl9S6 

■ 12% effective from 1 June 1986 1 

C&GBaseRate 3 : 11 . 75 % ^ectivefrom6Aprjll986 1 
(Cheltenham Goldloan) ' . 

These reductions also apply to mortage offers already 
made but not yet completed. 

Under the Annual Instalment Review procedure fliere . 
will be no change in borrowers’ mcmtfiiy 
mortgage ps^ents. 

All changes in morlg^eratesdurin^ 1986, whetherupor 
do^,together\ritnthediangeinthebeisicFate(X . 
income tax, will betaken into accountwheficalcul^ng . 
new mon^ mortage pmnients p^ofole from March 
1987. AfuUexplanationoftneAnnueJ instalment I^ew 
was given in the ‘Important Notice; Introducing a'New 
Mortgi^ Parent System’ sent to bcxroweis in January 
1986. No irulMdual notices will be issued>3bortdwers 
on changes of mortage rates. 

All Ofter Mnrtffap ree 
Borrowers will receive notice shortly of their rerised 
instalments and rates ofinteiiest in accoidancevvith the 
ter^ of their Mcff^age Deeds. 

BuUqgSodety 

Chief Office: (^Itenham House, Clarence Street 
Cheltenham. Glos GL50 3JR. Ibl: 0242 36161 




^Vi 








'• b£NSONSCK 1SPS: Year to - 

Nov. a. 1 98S. No di' Ktend, but 

thc'diien^ intend w restart 
■payments ax the cariiei prac- 
waUe date. Turnover £H.21 
milHoa (£9.3 mfilwol 

£204.000 (loss £^*9K))- 
per share 19p (h>S5 
ITJpirnie company ptans raise 
sboiR £742.000(Dei oTexpesses) 
by an und^tiueo nghts issue 

oT2.^3 zniflioB new oisdu^ 

«hatgs at 3Qp ekb 6o a owSfotw 
two basis.- ' ' 

Ptpher fadPtime. prafits me 
lepartri fo 
AsetiStt^ Grpq ^whri i 
jn Handheadi Swrey. in ^ six 
o> Jan. 31 last 2^ 
Bwrffeiu -proceeds me frem 
£708.1 vfiliOB » £7313? «**- 
Ben. Pretax 

•edrides expuiocd nraas 
lattw, iidniott.The 

aim reports 

lOitBry priAs'aft^tax.ef £1.97 - 

ndffion (b 3). Eam&ss per share 
icadwd 3 l8|1 <2.9^. 

diridaid fe goisg 19 fow 
L2& (D 1,^ The ijesBla »r the 
1S85 hd»ear have beea re- 

board -is omBdeat of good 

• res^s fee the ew rent year. . 

• JOHN • CBbWTHER 
GROUPt Final divideml ^ 
J9M, 0.5p[. Tomover £37.98 
fflfiUon (£10.86 mUfionX 
profit £1.83 xniilioo (£51^000^ 

- ^rnings per sbare kUpiS.Tp). 

• Edurry a law life 
ASSURANCE: Total dividend 
for 1985 6.7P (5.6p). The boaid 
reports that. 1985 was another 
good year, both in ternis of 
-profits and. of -new busineas 
secured. The . .total fongrterm 
bim'oess profits altbeeted to the 
policyhoiders and diarehoideis 
were £27.5 million, c om pared 
viih £^8 million, for 1984. . 

• BELL GROUP: Interim re- 
sults to December 31 (Aus 
SOOO): Vta SS.780 -(26.850). 
Turnover 361.040(286,020). In- 
terim dividend. Se (same). - 

• JORSH TRADING GROUP: 
Figures produced in-' Johannes* 
bin show share loss diluled 

, 32.7JC (profit I0.7c> for the rix 
months to December ' 31, a 
pretax loss of R26.69 milUon 
(profit R9.7S mflUoo). 

• CLOSE BROTHERS 

GROUK Results for six months 
to January 31 (fflGDlt £retax 
profit -1.14'S (866>. Tax 417 
.(323). Minority ihleresis debt 6 
(nil). Eps Interhn' 

dividend 2.8p C2.tU^)» payable 
May 2. 

• C H -REAZER (HLDGS): 
Resnlis for ' six,' monifas to 
Deoeoi b e r 3l':and two4i»>oiie 
scrip issue, figures in £000): 
Turnover 139,562 (65.8441. Pre- 
tax proGt'10.664 -(6,615). Tax 
3,519 (Z315 )l' Extraonfanary 
credit 1,030 (nili). ^ 22.fo 
(20.^1. hrieaim dividend 4^ 

- (4p). payaUe. May 16. The 
.oompamy. has forecast a total 
dividend oa the exisung capiiai 
. of less dian 14p (I2p). 

la 1985, Johnson Gr»ap 
Cleaners' pretax profits dimhed 
firem £6j67 nrillioa n» £7.78 
milVon. Tanioeer was op from 
£70^ aalBim fo £89JS9 millfoa. 
Tire fetal dividend fe to be raised 
fioa l&Ap-to 20.jfe. Eaniings 
per or£nary share, cxdnding an 
exceprioaal exchange gain, were 
37.^ (32.:^) and iireloding 
the gain, 37, ^<36Jlp). 

• JOHN MAUNDERS 
GROUP: Halfyear to Dec. 31. 
1985^ laterim dividend 2.4p 
(22Sp). Turnover £12.37 mil- 
lion« (£8.78 million). Pretax 
pndit £856,000 (£936J)00). 
Earnings per share 7.9p (7.6p). 

• A MARnN HOLDINGS: 
Results for 1985 (Figures in 
£000): Turnover 38.800 
(34,580), Operming profit 1,985 
(U7S4). Net finangg charge 608 
(632). . Pretax profit L.377 
(1,122). Tax 228 (237). Minority 
interests 37 (94). Earnings from 
opentions 1,112(791). Extreop- 
dina^. debits 60 (debits 110). 
Profit-anributable 1.052 (681). 
^»11.9p(9.0p). Final dividend 
2.4p (2p), making 3.6p (3p).Tfae 
bdiud proposes to raise about 
£2.1 million (net) by an under- 
written r^ts issue of 2.69 
million new otttinary rtiares, mi 
a tworfopseven basis, .at 83p 
each.. ‘For 1986, the directors 
expect to beableio recommend 
at least the w«iniMwnr«> of the 
3.6p total dividend. . 


BASE 

LENDING 

RAIES 

ABN — __12h% 

Adam & 

.BCC1....: i.^_11)4% 

Citibank Savingsf 12u% 

CorisoMated Cfos.^: 12H% 

Contnential Trust....:.....1lM% 
Co-operative BanK_UW% 
C. Hoare & Co 1t%% 
LLoyds 

-Nat Westminster 

Royal Bilk of Sedfland iih% 

llH* 

CiOank HA—.,*. 1l)rt 


t Mergsae Brec'RMc. 



Wth efltofrom Marc^ 
for new boiTOweis, and j&om 1st 
for existing borrowers, ’ 
the NatWest Mortage Rate ' 
payable under (nnrentMortg^e Deeds ' 
and Conditioris of Offer will be decres^d 

from 13.00%p.a. to 12.00% p.a. 

A National Westminster Home Loans Limited 

41-Lothbury. London EC2P 2BP. 






• • '*9 




*%'.' s|; 
. • f.'* 


\ 





* 7: ■ ' ' ■ 

• ■ if-- ; j 




■■ ;...> 


•*' •> u ,r^ z 

« j . ^ . 

•• M -:-»rs 
.. ■.-< ,'-ifr.-M; 















4 




> 1 ^ 



THE TIMES WEDNESDAY MARCH 26 1986 


FINANCE AND INDUSTRY 


21 




accepts new bid 


^ TT» smprije bidder. &r 
Smith St Ao^ tbe discount 
iKTOe. was revealed yeste rda y 
' P Kigg and Shamon, anothCT 
.disooaiit bouse which alieadv 
owns 3SO.OOO Smidi shares. R 
Jias made an oiler fiir the im 
under a complex fimnnla. 

bond 

bas^wtihdmwn its recommend 
daHon to sharehoUere to ac- 
cffl a prevkwisly annoonced 
OOBf p y Iry^ Ttust and to 
aocqd the King ofo instead. ' 
_^.Fpf gcfa Smith share the 
ah amount in 
shares . wfaidi e gn«i« 
.1.157 times net tangible assets 
^u^l^^lsect to a maximum 

If tte asset value - 

54p t hat excess will, to the 
edem permitted by jaw, be. 
distribttted diroagh a nedal 

dividend to die outfuttSm^ 
sbaiebolden oa dierakr be- 
coming uncoiiditioQaL- 
The asset value meanc the 
net tt yble as sets attributable 

to ea c h ordinary share n the 


dore ofbusiDess on the day on 
which the offer becomes or is 
declared unconditional as to 
acceptances on the basis of the 
audited consolidated 
riiieet of Smith and its 
subndiaries. 

TMEWVALO ITLHS 


Kng a Shaxion oner 
Asset Cash Share Irving 
■ aa offer .• offsr - 
sop. 57.8p ,47p 

Sip SdSp - 48p 

Shp 60.2p . • :49p 

53p 61.te SOp 

5to e£sp .-5^ 

5$ 63.6P ’S2p 

56p SkS - 


value 

Sg 

JBe. 


a fermula “asset 
value of 46p estimated by the 
board ci nnith as being the 
value last Friday, at<d assum- 
iire' foil acceptance, the- bfler 
wol .cost £12.8 million and 
involve .the . issue of approxi- 
mately 6.7 tnillinn lOng 
shares. 

Kleinwort Benson, the mer- . 
dant bank, and Jolm Govett 
and Co win make a cash offer 


of JMp for each new King 
riiare. 

The - cadi alternative is 
worth 3p per Smith share 
-more thra the rival ofiGn* by 
Irvii^ Trust. The shares offer 
is estimated to be worth at 
least id to per share more. 

No ofio' will be made for 
rany of die 42 per cent 
p r efere n ce shares, the 9.5 per 
cent second preference shares 
or the 7 per cent suboidinaied 
unsecured loan slodt 1986-91 
of Smith. 

The Kii% directors intend 
to recommend a final ^vi- 
dend of hot 1^ than 5.75p net 
for the year to Ap^ 30. The 
aocpiisitioD of Sinith will in- 
crease Kii^s capital base, 
which King sees as an impor- 
tant advantage in the increas- 
ingly competitive disconiit 
houK markets. 

The Banlr of England haS' 
been consulted about the offer 
and has indicated that it has 
no objection to the proposed 
acquisition of Smith fay King. 


Beer kits win export award 


By DcfA Bburi^ ladnatrad Effior 


. Fivecompanies, induSiiga 
maker ^boine-brew bere& 
and a puhKdwr of English-- 
Aiab indnstiial guides, low 
won the 1986 ex p ort awards 
for smaller bnsinmses spon- 
tailed to the foitish Overseas 
Trade Board, Britirii Galedo- 
nian Airways, Midland Bank 
and Thmnas CcxdL 
They will share £25,000 
cadi, idus £5,000 worth of 
husinras air travel for each 
winner, with up to £2,000 in' 


addhioniat benefit indndiiig 
some.ito einrioyees. 

ftewing Flmhicts 
u4uch mamifecuires 
wine making and home-brew 
beer kits at Censett, Co. 
Dntbam, has deydm^ ex- 
pwts by appomtntg mstribu- 
ton in .AuAtalia and New 
Zealand,- 

ItopuUidier, Beacon Pub- 
Bca ti mis of Wesfam Fav^ 
NortiiampiDn, produces in- 
dustrialamdes^dir^oiTrs 


with 


for the Middle East, 
electronic data bases. 

The otiier winners are Ac- 
cess Engineering, of Ponte- 
fract, West Yorkshire, makers 
of phitfiHms as an attenialive 
to traditional scafloldiig 
Smith & Telford, of Hawid^ 
in the Scottidi border^ mann- 
. focturers of cadimete 
lambswool knitwear; and 
IXmlciik Metals, Nottis^bam, 
whidi produces ahnninium 
deoxidaiits fiem sCTwi. 


IMI profits soar by £45.1 million 


IMI, whidi is Udding for 
hfoitonair Intemationau, a 
valve manufoctDier, yesfordt^ 
announced record profits of 
£57.8 milliott be^ tax for 
the year to December, iqifrom 
£45.1 mOlum. 

Mr Eric Swunson, the out- 
going managing director, said 
be Ikh^ the bid for 
Martonair would not be re- 
ferred to the Mbntoolies 
Commission, even thonghthe 


By Quire DoMe 
two companies would account 
for 20 per cent of the hmne 
maricet for control equipment 
The terms 'of the bid, whidi 
are recommended by the 
Martonair board, value the 
comjNmy at £83 miiKm. Mr 
Swamaon said furtheraoquisi- 
tiosps would follow. . 

The hugest profit increase 
.came from the titamnm and 
copper tefimi^ . burinesses, 
wher e profits increased from 


£4w5 million to. £11.9 zniDum. 
The company supplies titani- 
um to the aerospace industry 
and is ' benefiting from the 
success of Rdls4uwce. 

Cornelius,' the minks dis- 
penser company acquired four 
years ago, was the only major 
area to suffera downturn, with 
profits fening from £13.0 mil- 
lion to £12L5 milfimL 
hiterest payable ^ hy £1 

tnilltnm. 




Combined En^ish Stores Group pk 



Combined EngU^ Stbees has agam shown inajor profits 
growth in all divisions. This year’s record results refiect the 
success of the groups strat^ and the potential for 
continuing growth 


. /The.lastyear has iinpprtain in the 

devek^MDcnt of the Grmqx.We have adiieved 
exceneiu results with toroover mcrearing by 
17%^ profit before tax by 34% and earnings per 
share bave risen 27%. 

' The results of the last tiiree . years, the 
strong balance sheet, low gearing and cominued 
improvement in the quality of earnings a all- 
•dw result of careful planning instigated by the 
mjnagwngn'^ fgam-. It IS that m 

Jaauaty 1983 our marker capitalisation was so 
more titan £15m. Today its exceeds £125m.* . . 

Murray Gordon 
Cboinuot 

Suriunaiy of Results 

For ihe-52 weeks ended 25 junury 1986 - imaudued 


12.40 


925 


'5.95 



1986 

£m 

1985 
. £m 

Tumover 

142.76 

121.91 

Profit before tax - 

12^ 

925 

&nung|5 per share 

13J)9p 

1034p 

Dividends for the yearloet) 

6.71p 

490p 


1.75 


83 84 85 86 

Profit before tax (£m) 


If you would a copy of the 1986 Aoruial Report, 

please an:4y to: 

The Company Secreuiy, 

Combined English Stores Group pic, 

1-^ Clay Street, LMdon WlH SIX 
Tdqihone 01-}8b 3331 

I Wn^y ai cwticiiiiaHr com p ai ues; Sdts^urts 

mL r^jshmCmup (Wea Gernany). Emxam Hait^ 


Combined 
En^isb 
Stores 
Group pk 


IN BRIEF 


St Ives offer 

$t Ives has received accep- 
tances for its offer for 93.9 per 
cent of Richard Clay prefer- 
ence shares. The offer is now 
wholly unconditional and re- 
mains open for acceptances 
until forlher notice. 

Bullers buy 

Buffers, manufecturer of 
fomhure and consumer prod- 
ucts. has completed the pur- 
chase of the business and 
assets of CaverswaU Oiina 
Company from the receiver 
for£15a000. 

Factory plan 

The Great Bri tish T-Shirt 
Company, a promotioiial 
dothiog specialist based at 
Brighton, is planning a £4 
million Midlands fectory. 

Added sugar 

The Tokyo Su^ar Pjtrf«ing ^ 
Ires granted its first foreign 
associate m embatiiips to two 
London-based snar co mp a- 
nies, E D and P Mu Iineina- 
tiond and C Czaniikow. 

Japanese deal 

Philips Lamps, Nippon 
ChemfCbn Corpoiatioo and 
Nippon Steel CoqMration are 
in the final stage of est^di^ 
ing a j<Hnt company in Japan 
to nudee ceramic dectronxc 
components. Philips will have 
40 per cent and tite two 
Japanese companies 30 per 
cent each. 

More stores 

Ravenside, part of the Land 
Securities Group, has added to 
its retail warehouse portfolio 
with stores in Dundw, Wol- 
verhampton, Dewsbury and 
Bristol The schemes together 
involve a capital content of 
^about £7.7 mulion. 

Bank moving 

The Union Bank of Switzer- 
land and Phillips & Drew, the 
stodebroker which h is aoquto 
ii& will move ti> lAase three 
ofthe Bfoadgale office devd- 
opment at Loodoo's Liver- 
pool Street Station at the end 
of 1987. 



Financial statement, 1985 

SKF Group sales for 1985 rose 1 1 per cent lo 19,758 million 
Swedish kronor. Profit after financial items totalled 1276 
million kronor (1228 million in 19S4|. 

Jan-Dec1985 Jan-Decl984 


Sales (MSkr) 

19J58 

17^ 

Operating income after 
d^reciation (MSkr) 

1289 

1,442 

Profit after financial 
income and expense (MSkr) 

1276 

1228 

Capital expimditure (MSkr) 

788 

727 

Average number of employees 

44.265 

43,869 


In Europe, SKF increased its market shares in both bearings 
and other products, and strengthened its market positions in 
Latin America and South East Asia. SKF Industries in the 
USA could not adapt quickly enough to the changing market 
which hit US bearing producers as a whole. 

The steel sector was affected by weakening demand. Cutting 
tools income, however, improved, and sales were up by 16 per 
cent. SKF Component Systems sales rose 30 per cent. 

Capital expenditure increased to 788 million kronor (727L 
while inventories as a percentage of the years turnover 
decreased to 37 per cent (40 K 

The SKF Group forecasts a 10 per cent sales rise for 1986. 
Profit is expected to be about the same as in 1985. 

The Board recommends a 3 kronor dividend lift for A and B 
shares to 10 kronor, the same level as C shares. 

The Annual General Meeting will be held on 29 April 1986. 

Aktiebolaget SKF, S-415 50 Gdteboi^, Sweden. 


Inthis coiinti^wete\veUlmo\raforoOT 
distribution services to nKy or organisations. 


AND THIS COUNTRY 


AND THIS COUNTRY 


AND THIS 
COUNTRY 


AND THIS 
COUNTRY 



AND THIS 
COUNTRY 


AND THIS 
COUNTRY 


AND THIS COUNTRY 


AND THIS COUNTRY 


Ocean has always been an international 
oiganisation. 

began life a century ago as a shipping line, 
pioneering major trade routes to the Far East and 
Australia, and swiftly built a reputation for going further 
than any of our competitors, in temu of service as well 
as nautical miles. 

Today as well as shipping, we operate in areas 
such as forwarding ofBhore oil support and 

warehousing 

But the legac>' of our early days remains dearly 
visible. As much as ever, our success is based on quality 
of service. 

And as much as ever, it is based on doing_busi> 
ness all over the world; on oSsring the rig^t service, in 
the ri^t place, at the ri^t time. 

V^ch is why our cargo shipping activities are 
now concentrated in key areas such as the UKAVbst 
Africa trade route. 

And why we have moved into businesses such 
as ship towage, and offrhoxe oil support Cory Ibwage is 


one of the world's largest tow^ companies, operating 
as far afield as Canada, Angola and Colombia. And 
O.I.L.. our offshore oil supjxrit company is probably 
the most profitable British company of its kind, serving 
the oil industry in V\%st Africa. America and the Middle 
East as well as in the North Sea. 

On land and in the air, our international 
presence has grown along with our spedalised ware- 
housing and freight forwarding operations. 

McGregor Cory Warehousing now has over 
three million square feet spread strategically throu^- 
out Europe. And MSAS is among the top ten fieight 
fiarwarders in the world. 

In all. we have 7500 staffs in over finty busi- 
nesses, In twenty-ei^t countries around the world. 

Facts which are extremely important 
\^ety after all, is not 
only the spice of life, j 

It^ also the j 
source of strength wr i vi 

andstabiiity Can iiancile it. 


OC€RN 



OCEAN TRANSPORT&THADING pic, 47 RUSSELL SQUARE. LONDON WC1B4JR 


.. .. J 



















from 1st April 1986 

Investment Rates 


SHARE 

6 . 00 %= 

8 . 45 % 

ACCOUNTS 

iiei pad half yearh- 

eqim-alaii* 

CASHBASE = 

9 . 15 % 

ACCOUNTS 

net pakl anniull}- 

gmss uqunal^ni* 

PRIME 

8 . 00 %= 

11 . 27 % 

ACCOUNTS 

nei poid annualK 

gros cqur.-alKnt’ 


8 . 25 %= 

11 . 62 % 


nci paid anmulh.' 

gross equu-alenl* 


8 . 50 %= 

11 . 97 % 


iK> paul annual tv 

siaooe-i- 

gross equn-alent* 

CAPITAL 

8 . 52 % = 

12 . 00 % 

ACCOUNTS 

ivt luid hall u-art\ 

piiw .qun'at-ni* 


The rale of interest on all other personal accounts will be 
decreased bv l.O ".' from 1st April. iy86. 

These new rates give Woolwich savers and investors an 
excellent choice. There is no limit to the amount you can have 
invested. 


Mortgage Rates 



SpMM IW-i luT httlWtlf 

d>i>J )epa>Tmni moni^a^ 


Ml rate patablf on dHtMe loans Midi 
monsa^e mteiM u> ide( a 27i> 


Fc>r Woolwich borrowers with account numbers beginning 91, 94 
and 96. the interest charged on mortgages for the purcha^ or 
improtement of owner occupied residential property will be reduc™ 
to l2"o from 1st April. 1936; for other mortgages the same rate of 12^ 
will applv from 1st Mav. 1986. 

The normal effect of this reduction will be to shorten the term of 
repayment mortgages. However, if vour present monthly payment is 
bas^ on at least a 12.75 "m interest table, payments can be reduced 
on appiica6on to \our local branch. 

If vou ha\e an endOAmenl mortage, we will be writing lovou 
with details of revised monthly p^enis within the next wedc or 

Where an offer of a mortgage was made before 22nd Mardi. 19w 
but has not been completed the interest rate quoted w ill be reduced 
to 12 m with elfect from 1st .April. 1986. In the case of offers made for 
further advances, the decreased rate will apply from the date on 
which the principal mortaaae rate changes. The amount of the 
revised monthly payment will be notified following completion or can 
be obiain^ from your branch. 


M 


WOOLWICH 

EOl^TABLE BUiLDINQSOCETY 

Glief Office: Equitable House, London SE18 GAB 


Checkout cash 
retreats before 
plastic Darts 

^ By Derek Hairis, Indostrial Editor 


Electronic bill processing on 
Uie biggest scale so far seen in 
' lain was launched at Brent 
iss shopping centre in 
th London yesterday with 
system developed 


Mr 


by 


try Ui oaicia^9 

Peter Ellwood, 


So fer 22 Brent Cross reiail- 


Barclaycard's original 
of setting up around 1.000 
terminals around the country 
is teing expanded because of 
favourable retailer reactioiL 
said Mr Ellwood, who added 
th pt it was now likely tto 
several thousand would be 
inst^ed. 

Originally it was planned to 
use the system only ^ 
Bardaycard's own Visa cards 
and also those of Access, the 
oAer big credit card opoator 
supported by a consortium of 
other clearing banks. But ^ 
Ellwood announced plans for 


system, called Darts, wiin a tuwooo annouuwupio^ 

farther 30 likely to start using theienninalstoac^moaoi 

it soon. Among othere joining the b«t-know 

. •_ AllJ *ka . J __ -1.—.... MW* 


the s^eme is Alldcrs at the 
duty^fm outlets in Heathrow 
.Airport's new Terminal Four, 
where there are expected to be 
54 terminals. 

The terminals read plas^ 
blowing a bill to be 
primed out and providing 
overnight payment for ibe 
retailer — who also gams by 
not having to deal with the 
paperwork now needed on 
card transactions. The system 
is said to be more secure and 
error free. 

Compared with credit card 
transactions, which take 45 
seconds on average, the new 
system ^ould mean a cus- 
tomer ne^ be detained for 
only 25 seconds, it is claimed. 
The average shop transaction 
employing cash takes about 1 1 
seconds with a farther eight 
seconds if change is needed, it 
is calculated. 


in ghiriing cbaige cards lilm 
American Express and possi- 
bly store cards issued by an 
individual retailer. 

Mr Ellwood said Darts was 
aimed at retailera with large 
volumes of credit card sal^ 
‘'Rjetailers are very enthusias- 
tic about Darts but they want a 
single electronic plastic card 
terminal at the point of ssde, 
and not a row of separate 
machines for different cards.” 

Darts is being sold as a key 
step on the way to a natioi^ 
system which could make the 
cashless society a reality. This 
is EFTPOS, or clcctromc 
fands transfer at point of sale. 
A wipe of a plastic card ^ 
tapping in of a customer's 
persoi^ identificaticKi num- 
ber could mean payment of 
bills by instant debit from a 
customer's bank account and 
crediting to the retailer. 


Chemicals 
fear skill 
shortage 

By David Young 
Bnei^ Correspondent 

The demical industry b 
faring a shot^ «f skOM 
magpower while aniversny 
places for the design and 
process engineers it n^ are 
nnSned, the Chemical Indns- 


Wlie indnstry is biling to 
attract ywn« peopte.** Mr 
Martfa Trowondge, accordiag 

to the assoeiatioB^ director^ 
general. 

The association m its amn- 

al survey of aembers' invest- 

ment intentions says that after 

a rise in 1985 the rise in new 
capital spoi^ by tte iad^ 

try is expeded to readi nearly 

£1,5 billion this year. 

In tte three years to tte end 
of 1988 the fanfastry pluB b) 

spend £4 j 4 bOlion on new 
gtont, Boderafaation and near 
snres to save energy and 
pr o tect the envi ron merit . 

Ahhonab still below the 
investment peak <rf 1977-79 
spending pfams are moie than 
17 per c ep* higher dian in the 
previons three-year period. 

Mr Trowbri d ge said; **Thb 

year's investnmt inteit ions 
pfMronune will cun dune to 
support the indnstry's ra^ 
naliaation and cost saving 
measmes. . . 

**If achieved it win mamtam 

the UK's increased share of 
EEC capital spending 

“Part of the reason for the 
stiengdi of the aptorn to 
imi<‘»iiiiifiit in 1985 and die 
spin over into 19M has bM 
the acceleration to s pending 
due to to Government 

regioiial pidicics and tax 
togstotte'* 


1 calculated. ctouuiib ^ 

Hickson International profit slips 

- I .,.,1 koifnrios^ order to recover British cos 


Hickson Intemational was 
hit by currency devaluations 
and severe competition in the 
chemicals industry in 1985, 
the company says. 

Pretax profit was down 
from £14.96 million to £13.12 
million. 

But ibe final dividend was 
maintained at lOp, making a 
total of 15p s^nst 14p in 
1984. 

Hickson says demand has 
shown an improvement in 
1 986 and the lower price of oil 
is expected to mean better 
margins, 

THe increased strength of 
the mark should reverse the. 
downward trend in export 
prices of chemicals to the 


second half of 1985. 

There is some evidence m 
increa^ building activity in 
Britain which should eventu- 
ally boost timber protectioD 
sales. 

The board says the three 
principal negative factors 
which aSected group perfor- 
mance were: 

• Local currency devalua- 
tions, which reduced the ster- 
ling value of p^t in South 
AJfrica, New Zealand and Aus- 
tralia by about £800,000; 

• Severe competition in’ the 
chemicals industry, coupled 
with dull market condititms.- 
which largely removed the 
ability to raise seUing prices in 


order to recover British cost 
increases; ^ ^ 

• And recession m the bui^ 
ing industry coupled with 
adverse pubmei^ about tim- 
ber-frame houses which re- 
duced the volume of sales of 
timber protection products at. 
home. 

Chemical safes were strong 
in the first fa^ of 1985, but 
there was a sharp dedtoe in 
the last four months leading to 
a reduction to pretax iirofit for 

the set^ fiom £7 niillion to 
£6.7 milli on. 

Domestic bnsiDess failed to 
sh<rat its nmmd reoovecy afier 
the s utnnmr holidays and 
exports were affected by the 
strength of steriing^ 


La w Report March 26 I 98fr 

No VAT credit claim on 

non-taxable inputs 




9 


Coonnistoonen of Custo^ 
and Esuise v Apple and Pear 
Devdopa»it Comefl _ 
Before Lord Keith of 
Lord RosIdU, Lord Brandon of 

Oakbrook. Lord Brigbcman and 
LordGiiflStbs , . ^ 

ismches sold March 
A taxable person (wiife the 
meaning of the value<td^ tax 
legislation) whose activities con- 
_'Z. ' j „f «h» t u wnrigwa of 


council were.not perfb nnedjw 
a consideration and therctoit- 
so fir as those activities woe 
coneeroed, the senrices ^ 
cou^ were not suiwns 
within the meamng of tne 
feghlaxioa. 

To constitoiea*Tinsinesi”^ 
activity had to todudefoc 
making of taxaUe suimi^ 
therefore the mpnt tax paid by 


legfilation)wli^activitiescofr ^ council had to be appor- 


mrvices that did not attract 
output tax (beca« snch ser- 
vices were provideo withom 
consideration), and u» part oi 
the suwdy of goods and senna* 

that di^ couM not daim a er^ 

for tax p^ on inputs whi^ 
were conuecied with the 
taxpayer's non-taxaoie 
activities. 

The House of Lords so held 
on the meal of the A|^ and 
Pear Developc^t Coun^ 
aonitiiu the dedaon to that 
^ct by the Court of Api^ 
rt ««H Justke Lawton, Lord 
Justice Fox and Lord JustM 
Km) (The Times Aprfl 10, 
1985? [1985] STC 383). 

However, the House 
jouraed the appeal pending 
^^PTwiiwatiAn by the Court or 
Justice of the European 
Communities of the question 
whether charges imposed oo^ 
pulsorily on grow ers amounted 
to consideration for the services 
rendered by dm council ,in 

pursuance of their gencia] activ- 
ities. . . 

Mr Andrew Park, QC. for tfe 
Mr John Laws and Iw 
Robert Jay for the co m m is- 
Stoners. 

LORD BRIGHTMAN said 
that in 1981 the commissionets 
ruled that the council^ general 
activities (those funded by com- 
pniqw dau ge s ) did not con- 
stitute a "business** for, value- 
added tax p urp ose^ with the 

result that the council could not 

credit for inpm tax on 


tiomd. That 

^ mhdd. . - _i 

In the Court of AppeaL Ixm 
Justice Fox said: “tfan 

neither makes IKW « inten^ to 

make supplies, i do xM. 
think that the draftsman of me 
Finanoe Act 1972 can have' 
contenuriated that it was. a 
•bnsmess* for the purposes of 

. ... . - 
The Divisknxa! Court and the 

Court of Aj^ readied the 

coma cdndutiofL The sdienre 
of die l^shtion w Jf 
tte business activities of w 
taxpayer were sudt tiiat aB the 
yij yiies whidi be made were 
subjm to output tax («4idlm 
positive rated or zero K 
recovered all the tax whidi he 
paid on the inputs of that 
^i « f in « g see sechoos 3(3> and. 
4(lX8)oftbel972AcL 
If all the s upplies wl^ he 
fnadg were exempt sii iq i fie s, be. 
could recover none and the 
probabili& was. that he would 
not even be xcffssned. 

If the supplies wliidi be made 
w eie par tly taxable siqipiies and 
p^y exempt sureties there . 
to be an vpwtionni^.of the 
tax that udiicfa - am 

attribuiabte to exempt suptdies. 
was not tecofwenMe : ^ 

His Lonfifaip adeed hirasdf 
bow, agaiiist that . background, 
one comdtationally come rotbe 
coDclssion that if the Imsipes s 
adivines of ^ taxpayer- were 
such foal sOToe' services weie- 

raxable supplies and some wm 

not snniUes at aOf tire adurie of 


take credit for input tax on not sunnies u au, w wuw i 
^^lotemnaatmgtosud. 

Bigumem by the Sixth European 

Commaaity Council 

Directire'm tlw bannoniation 

of foe laws member slates 
fpjattng - to tumover. taxes 
(67/2^/EEQ: 


activities. 

On appeal fiom the value- 
added tax tribunaTs finding that 
tbe ooundl did carpf on a 
business, the commissioneis ar- 
in foe Divisional Court 
that foe general activities of foe 


Inout ox wasTKJt deductiMe 
so far. w 

saviccs upon which the tax had 

fc— ii levied were for Ibe pin- 
pbses of the taxpayd's taxable 

riantociicms. ^ 

TboFioaoceAct 1977TewnM 
sec tio n* 2 to6 of foe 1972^10 

oideriogyeefieatofo eaxt h 

Dirocave: Acourr was thereto 

Rouiftd to construe foe 1972 
Act, as amended, in foe light of 

ibatdireictive. ^ . 

The House had ooimde^ 
foe esse on the tiypofom that 

foe na^meni of diagw imposed 

on growers iMttot 
gi pQitnt to consktefatioti for foe 
services rendered by foe cooncil 

in pureuanoe of-foeir general 
activixies. . - 

In' trntfu' foe first question 
which ought. to. be asked .was 
-gfoefoer or uot sudi ridges 

were cohadentioh: Only if foe 
aaswer to foat 'qttesiiQB ws in 
the negative did foe poxni so far 
considered arise: . 

The Cooxt of Aned took foe 
view dot "oonsiderationr in 
section 6(2) of foe 1972 Act bore 
is ordinary meaning 

in P"gti«h taw. His Lordship fdt 
kssconfident. 

In foe absence of any dear 
care taw of the Court oTJustice 
of tbe Europe^ Communities 
. wfaiefa was decisive of the mat- 

- ter. U was app w^i ria iie for the 

• House to refer 10 the European 
G na t fo e question whether the 
dceidre of- the council's, ntne- 
tioni and foe toqiosition on 
grower s rf an annw diaige to 
the council to exercise, 
cuefa fanctioas was tbe supply 
services efiected for oonad- 

- -eraiion wiitain tbe mronii^ of 
artide 2 offoe Sixth Direenve. 

It wmdd foen be for tbeir 

Londfoips to decide, in the light 

of that answer, whether the 
. payment of such aonnal charges 
' ^ ther mowers was ' conad- 
wifoin' foe meaning of 
foe 1972 Act for foe, supply of 
services by foeconneiL 
Lord Kehh; Lord RoskiU, 
Lord Brandon and Lord (irif- 
Sfos agreed. . ' 

.Soifehon: Biffc Nebon & 
Doyte Devonshire; for Buss 
Slone A Co. Tnnbrite Wells; 
s\tanmK and ExdreSwiciior. 


Ill health can fhistrate contract 
of employment 




1985 

‘Asigilificant year for 
British Aerospace’* 


tResults for 1985 

1985 
J&n 
_ 2.648 

1984 

jCm 

'2,468 


180 

166 

Lauinching costs written off 

_ (52) 

19 

(51) 

4 


150 

120 

Profit after taxation 

_ 127 

108 

Eaminsp per share ( net basis)^ 

__ 56.4p 

53.5p 

Diudends per share (net)^ 

_ lS,8p 

13.65p 

■fExtrjcl from preliminary unnouric^miint of results fir 1985 based 
rear to Slst December 1985. 

on audited accounts for the 


Tfotcatt V UniTcrsai Eqoip^ 
meat ^ (Lmdbo) Ltd 
Before Lo^ Justice DiDoo and 
‘Mr Justice Siddoii 
IJodgment i^en March 14] 

• Ibe common law doemne of 

frustration cotdd to a 

ipetiodic contract of enqiloy- 
;inent detenninaUe by sbewt 
notice. It aiqdied to frustrate an 
,emirioyee's contract of emfri^ 
*ment when he was pernumen^ 
•prevented fiom resuming his 
«m^(^inent by reason of his iO 

i.healih. 

Ill Ibe Court of Appeal so bdd 
■in dismissing an appeal by foe 
blaintiii; Mr Derek Notcozf, 

from the decision of Judge Birfcs 

*at Braitfoid County Court that 
tbe defendants. .Universal 
Equipment Co (London) Ltd, 
.were not liable to wm to 
Hum during tbe period of his 
notice. 

• Mr R.GB. Alfen for the 
plainti^ Mr Andrew ICllier for 
the defendanis. 

LORD JUSTICE DILLON 
^iri that the appeal was the first 
wbm foe Court of Appeal - 
had been required to conrito 
foe applicBtiim of tbe doctruie 
of fitistmtion to a penodw 
contract of employment, which 
was detenntoable by short or 
rdativeiy fooct notice where foe 
contract was said to have been 
frustrated tbe illnere or 
incapacity ofthe emidoye& 

The idatotifr became em- 
pl(^ by foe defendants in 
1957. His -wages were at an 
hourly rate. Subject to statute 
his emplc^ment was originally . 
terminable by a wedfs notice, - 
and it was a lerm of his contract 
that no remuneration would be 
paid for absence from work doe 
to sickness iqiury or incapacity. 

However certain nirther 
tenns were incorporated into his 
contract by statute under the 
Employment Protection 
(Consolidation) Act 1978. Under 
section 49 tbe notice required to 
terminate his contract had to be 
not less that 12 weeks. 

Fm^raph 3 of Schedule 3 to 
that Act obliged tbe defendants 
to pay the ptaintiff at his average 
hourly rate in so fir as daring 
the period of his notice be was 
mcainUile of work because of 
sickness or iqjuiy. 

Tbe plaintcET bad a coronary 
in 1983 tfoen he was nearly 63 


Sales at £2»648 million increased by 7.3% over the previous 
year's figure of £2.468 million. Exports accounted for 61% ^ total sales. 

The outstanding order book at the end of 1985 was valued at 
£5,138 million* as compared with £4,820 million at the end of 1984. 

Trading profit at £l80.1 million shows an increase of 8.4% over 
the 1984 l^ure of £l66.2 million. 

Profit before taxadon at £l50.5 million represents an increase 
of25.2^'o over the 1984 profit of £120.2 million. 

Tne Board has proposed a final dividend of lO.Op per share. 

This wfill bring the total dividends paid for 1985 to 15.8p p^ 
share — an inaease of 15.8'.'it over 1984. 


•£.VCU'ra.W OFDEP.S FROM THE 
RcCfNTKAi. t'f «H£E\,'r-.T 


Sir Austin Pearce, Chairman 


...up where 

wehe/uffp 



• ■■ 'it. British .Aerospace Public Limited Company, 100 Pall N'lall, London SWlY 5HR. 




yeara old. Tliereafier^ was off 
work and to July 1984 the 
rihintiffs doctor wrote to a 
tetter to foe defendants that be. 
doubted whether be would ever 

work again. 

The platotifi'himsdfsatotfaat- 
bft InfiiM v that he could not (to Ml 
wofoiiig. Thus the defendants > 
gave the ptaintiff notice to ' 
terminate his emidoyineiit. 

The pbfatiff now daimed 
entitlement to sick pay unto 
paragr^ifa 3 rfSdiedulc 3 while 
absent fiom work dartog. the 
period of his notice. 

Tbe defendants contended.. 
itaer alia, that die comna of 
em^oyment had -been • frus- 
txai^ by foe plaiixtifi*s.91iiess 
before foe puiported notice of 
termtoatiocL 

It was impossiUe to dtscera 
from foe Aa why Parfianiem 
yiiAnM have leqimed uvemr 
Ttoyer to i»y «* pay to w 
employee who wss off work 
becanre of rideness wide unto 
n Qiiwij foe cm^pyre 

was under no' sndi o M ig ti p n 
iriiile the enqiloyee was not 
unto -notice. However it was 
.'dear foat foe Act did inqwre 
sud) an tfotigation. 

Counsd both agreed that if 
the plaintiffs ooninct was ler- 
mtoated by foe notice tint he 
was entitled to tbe money 
claimed. Conversely. tb» 
agre ed rift if the ptatotifia 
contract had been nnistnted- 
befoie foe notice was given foen 
rtnu notice was of no effect and - 
foe plaintiffs- ririm conld'not' 
sDCceed. 

The plaintiff argoed that foe 
doctrine of frusnatioo. could 
have no apidication to a'pe^ 
odic contract of emdoymeiit 
because there was no need for it 
- tbe contract could dways be- 
termtoated by riiort notice; 
Further he said that there was 
no fiustratkm. as abrence foe 
was enrisj^ed by tbe 
contract and by pangraffo 3. - 

Notwidstandiiig the views of 
Mr Justice Bristow to Harman v 
Flexible Lamps Ltd <[1980] 
IRLR 418), there were cases in 
foe National indnstrial Rda- 
tions Court and tbe Employ- 
ment Appeal Tribuna! wfaere-it 
was held that eoutncis . of 
emido'yaient tenntoable by rel- 
atively short mdee were cap^e' 
of .bong tenninated wifoonl 


by finidracibn as a resuh 
ofafi wnployee'^ illness. And m 
Him ^ Brother Ltd 

atmi . J -Ail WO) I/rt 
-Master .of foe Rolls, 
hdd fo*t-a centfikt of emidoy- 
moot of a- workman was fius- 
h yyd vdieii.. the. man was 
-aehienced:- to'.'EZ monitot* 
imprisonment. 

There was no reason to pnn- 
di^ why sudi a periodic con- 
tract of employment should not 
fw Mppropnate ciimmsMiKes be 
beta to have been tenninated 
wifootd notice by fiustration 
accordtog to the accepted and 
long establtshed doctrine of 
fiustiatioa to foe law of 
ooDiraa. 

The mere fia that the con- 
tract could be terratoated by tbe 
employer, 'by tdativeiy short 
Dooce cotdd not of itsrif render 
tile doctrine of- fiustration in- 
evital^ inapplicable. 

The p rin c i ples governing the 
doctrine were conveniently to 
be found to the speedies of Lofd 
Reid and Lord Raddifife in 
Davis Contractors Ltd v 
Far^iam Urban District Coun- 
cU ([1956] AC 696, 721, 728). 

The plaintiffs contract pro- 
vided that the defendants were 
not bound to pay Mm Miile be 
was absent due to illness or 
injury. That reference to irfoiiy 
•did not cover an injury wfaidi 
totally dbaUed him from worfc- 
in such a-case tbe injury 
'would ha-ve his contract 

lo-be.frustiaied. 

Again if tidaess was consid- 
CTM rather, than injury, tbe 
result would be the same. Here 
both parties ^predated that the 
plaintiff wouu not work again. 

He .was tet^ tocapacitated 
fiom performing the cmi tract 
The coronary was an un- 
expected occurrence which 
. made his perfonnanoe of his 
coDiracoial obtigation to work 
impossiUe and brou^ about 
such a dange to tile siipficance 
of the motiial obligations that 
the contract, if performed, 
woold be a differem ihh^ fiom 
that ctmtracted for; Both the 
judge's ^praadi- and oondu- 
rion had been conecL 

Mr Justice Sbddon ddivered 
a concurring judffuaiL 

Solidtois: Mr Simon TondH, 
' Konndow; Rodmefc A Co, 
Harltogson. 


■'*9 

if. —iV' 

^ ■ 
at ]:■! 

Jil- 


'o. . 


Subjective test for ^reliable device 


Thompson v Tfaynne 
Before Loid Justice Wotdfand 
Mr Justice Webster 
[Judgment given March 18] 

The words “reliabte device" 
to section 8(3)(b) of tbe Road 
Traffic Act 1972, as sobstituted 
in Sdiedule 8 of the Ttansport 
Act 1981, should be coustnied 
suhjectiv^ and should be given 
the meaning "a device wbia the 
opeia^ reasonably believes to 
be rdiable". 

Tbe Queen's Bench Di- 
visional Court so held dismiss- 
ing an appeal by way of ease 
stated frem Newcastle upon- 
TVoe Crown Court which h^ 
u^dd tbe defbidani's convio- 
timiofdrivmga motor car after 
coisuni tog alcohol . over tbe 
iMescribed fimits in eontiaven- 
Ition of section 6(1) of the Road 
iTraffic Act 1972 as substituted. 


The cr o w n court sought the 
«^)toioa of tlM Divirioftal Court 
as to whether the words *freli- 
aUe device" wm io be cm- 
strued -subjectively- - oc 
ohjeeliyely. . . 

Mr John MilfiMti for' the' 
defendant; . Mr Guy Mansfidd 
for the prosecutor. . 


. MR JUSTICE WEBSTER 
said that'be fiHind if impossible 
to direqB^ tbe fact that the . 
yhawe of section 8 necess^y 
ihvedv^ the making of a serira-. 
of decirions for the officer in - 
question.''. 

■ Tbe express provbions of ■ 
paragraphs (h) and (c) of aub-- 
sectiOD (3) theenct thattbe ' 

officer's decision was . made to 
depend upon wliai he "bad 
reasoohble cause to beUeve" or 
*‘had been advised”, and there 


no laasoo' to.pttociplc 
why - tbe perti^ wjectrre 
element wbidi. was eiqxessly 
■present in pai^raphs (a) and (<0 
should, be abs^.ih paragnin 
Cbl 

The -woedr ’''reliable'' -w» a 

, wqtd vfoich implied a subject, 
tifat is'fo w someone who 
.idM OF eoaSi rely .upon tbe 
. devie^' or someone to whom the 
deviw was not reliable. 

For those reasons, the words a 
NdfaMe device” were to be 
tiie meanisg "a device 

whiefa the t^EBoer reasonably 
bdie^ to be' reiiaUe" and in 
Gonsequeoee, die defendant's 
appeal to the crown coun court 
was rightly disni^sed. 

. Lm^ostioe Wottif apeed. 

StdidKMK Row & $oini/Nev^ 
■ ca^ Dp(m Tyne; Mr D. E 
Brown, Newcastle upon Tyne. 


s ■ 


Branch funds bdong to the union 


News Gronp Nesrspapers Ltd 
and (Mien V S(^ 

Funds raised by oontiibutimis 
from membera of a local union 
branch and retained by the 
branch for local purposes feU to 
be considered as part of SoM 
funds in proceedings for 
sequestration, snee the branch, 
as an uninaKporated associ- 
ation. was to law not entitled to 
own prope^. 

Mr Justice Taylor so held in 
foe Queen's BenA Division on- 
Maich 4 in dismissing an 
api^ication by the London 
branch of derical, admto- 


.istrative and execu&ve.psron- 
ne|- of Sogat ' 82 and the' 
syndication intemaiional deri-. 
ad duqiel for direciions m 
proceedings pursuant to an or^ 
der of .Mr Justice Michad 
Davies on February 10, 1986 
givii^ leave, for a writ of 
sequestration robe issued ^ tbe 
■ptaintifik. News Group Nswa- 
papers Ltd aeunst the defen- 
dants, So^ 82. 

MR JUSTICE TAYLOR said 
•that nothing in section 2 of foe 
Trade Union and Labour Rela- 
tions Act 1974 required tha t 


.eonml. and. adnunistratitm ot 
the property of tbe anion should 
be m. the hands of the same 
trustees as those in. whom die 
property was vested., 

There was a diriinction to be 
drawn between tile nature of the 
relationslup between tbe trust- 
ees and -members iff-a soda! 
'club, which was upon a eontno- 
' tual basis, and that m the instanl 
case. The funds adminisimed by 
the branch and the chapel were 
the* -property of and. 

accoriSin^ rome wifoin the 
ambit or • the sequestration 
proceeding 


0 



f 







~ TothrbJ d uTl?”* onbchalfofllaH}mnTVu.si P]^C'nip|)irPci»rsnrn.'m‘;fniTnisi Pi,(:.'in'ih(*pt'rMiii>in'spnnsibleriirihPiiir(irmHiiiiimiiilflinedinthjsadM'rtiM:mt'ni. | 

^ ^ *’*'* ”®'’^**’“^**"**^*i**nha\iriplakpn«IlroDsonablei%urolopnsiinMhalKii(‘hislluM*;iM*)lhoinfoniialii»nn»nlaiiM‘dHilhisad\rrliM*mciilihliinmiiTiHurcv\iJhihrrHt'ih.TluM)lr«H-l«irN«rilunM • 


I'NITED BISCUITS HANSON TRUST 


’IJiiit^ Bfe^ and Hanson Trust’s best and 

final bid values yotir final bid values your Imperial 

shares at 3 33.3 p. , ‘ shares at 362.9 p. 


per ^a^ : have - grown 
9 .2% p.al over the last 5 year& 



Hanson Trust’s earnings 
^share have grown by 
^ p.a. over the last 5 years. 


United Biscuits’ sharehold- 
ers have, over the last 5 years, 
seen then dividends: grow by 
13J% p.a. ■ 






Hanson Trust shareholders 
have, over the last 5 years, 
seen their dividends grow 
by 28.7% p.a. 


in the middle of 


V. •;>//. • 


United Biscuits giycis you 
the pptibn of taking weU 
under half their offer ip cash. 


Hanson Trust gives you the 
option of a 100% cash 
alternative. 


United 

bujnig a company 2V^ times 
itsownsize. 


Hanson Trust would be 
buying a company smaller 
than itself. 


£1,000 invested in United 
Biscuits in 1980 would nowbe 
wOrth£3,i00. 


£1,000 invested in Hanson 
Trust in 1980 would now be 
worth £13,300. 


Having read botli sides oflhe argument we think you will see why we find it hard to believe that tlie Imperial board does no^ ^ 
in your interests, favour the Hanson Trust offer. We recommend you accept it 


HAN 


O N 


T R U 




CONTI NXJING GROWTH FROM BASIC BUSINESSES. 

1' • . , ! j-ua iMuiw TyuaVsandL'niiedBiyit?>N’i>n'mtf<T>pfi^ oniheirivspficlive sharp prices. The abotcuffrrwlites are for Hanson TmslVStiarrandCnnxeriihtp Stock Klrtlictn and I’liiicd BiM’uiis'Offfrba^tedonthr market prices a! a.lOp.m. on Marrti25. 1986. 

i-iMi ini nfihpvatn^ai ihp w»ti>\.aHt nrdinar> share prirftt.i>rihe iOptTceni.romerliblF loan hlttpkorilansnn and ihrniiaPrtiblcHrrfrrrrd^han'&ofrnitrd BiscnitvThrrapilal comparison in ba.sedtm 
. .'fn'r TiW w&TV . ^fp^yn^tun^/ippitori iw ifaiaSrrfamanda«>umcs£iJKlO»et orp\pen&f« had been imputed ineiichca^cadiualcdrofMibseaurnt rieliLs ibsups (ahMimiug tio not\ t>0> inv<«slnirni)aiidrupilaliiiaUi>Hfa.siift». 









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24 


FINANCE AND INDUSTRY 


THE TIMES WEDNESDAY MARCH 26 1986 






From vour portfolio card dieck your 
ei^t share price movemems. Add loem 
up 10 give you >tnir overall lotaL Chedr 
this ^nst die daily dividend figure 

S bli^M on this page. If it maiches you 
ve voa ouuighl or a share of the total 
dailv prize monev staled. If you are a 
winner follow the claim procedure on the 
back of your card. You must always have 
your can available when claiming 


N<l 

CnmpMy 

Yonr 

gaisor 

lOM 


FOODS 



RHM 


2 

Ro*THfce Mac 


i 

Antyll 


4 

Nibn Foods 


S 

ASD.4-MF1 


6 

Rsher (Mbani 


7 

Nurdin & Peaccdi 


g 

Baiun 



Wauon & Philip 


10 

Buks iSMhm- O 



DRAPERY AMD STORES 


TT 

Emcuux Gethes 


12 

Ladies Pnde 


13 

Bkiik (Jatnesi 'A' 


14 

Sunk* iAG) 


15 

Blacfcs Los 


Id 

Preedv (AITitd) 


17 

Dewhini lU 1 


IS 

Goldsmiths Cp 


19 

Elam 


20 

Ravbeck 



PROPERTY 


2( 

Giewoai 


32 

COnocUs 


23 

Bdmvp 


24 

Peaetm 


“ 

LynioD 


26 

Lain Prop 


IT 

Bdton (PI 


28 

6r Land 


29 

Sainiid 


30 

Or Rnland 



INDUSTRIALS E-K 


31 

Enslnh China Cbv 


32 

FoIkdS Group N/V 


33 

Clynwed 


34 

Haicreaves 


35 

Frnoer tIH) 


3b 

Johnsion 


37 

Foitanv 


38 

XcnJiaw lA) 


39 

Ha»lcy 


40 

Hopkinsom 



!•■** Naimpapos IN. ENDf TnU 



Weekly Divkleiid 


Please make a note of your daily tou^ 
for the weekly dividend of £20,000 in 
Friday's newspaper. 


UM 

TUT 

wa 

THU 

m 

s«r 

HMUf 

IM 









BRITISH FUNDS 


IMM6 

LOfc SlDC* 




(n. Gam 
oMy Rm 


SHORTS {Under Five 

w*. 99 Tim SN 19H 
100 93-*Exn 10 A* 1906 
tOi't 9«VTi«M I2S I9B6 

R ff'iTrwtS S'.S 190446 
Or-.EaVi 2'.'S 1906 
too-. M Em <**• '900 
I0«'« •S'lEiOi 1967 

lOOs 9a'-TiMaCia>Sl907 
SS'a •('.£•» 2'iS 1007 
100'. Ol.-bOi 
V « F|»« 
too az'.TiMa 
S».TrM* 

KC'. 9« Timj 
97'» 09'*Tim6 r:U I9&348 
101'. 91 'Cm 10;'« i«e 
100'i 90>Tin6C9‘iS 1906 
90'. 79'.- Tim T» '9TM6 
99'; OOWTitai 9'A. 1980 


lO'.’i 19S7 
O'A }itS^7 
lO*. 1907 
3S 1907 
18% 1907 


104>- U'>Tr«M 11'.'* 19S9 
108 . 90 '^ Tim* 10 1% 1989 


10% I9B 
I0'i% 1909 
8l%l9M 
11% 1919 
a*t 190M9 
11% <990 


10Q < 90': Em 
1D7‘, 94 .Em 
0D>. TO'.EiOi 
m*. 90'. Cm 

S '; >9 Tm 

10l'« 08 TiusC9':M9e9 
as'f 79 Tran a% 1909 
11 V .100 Tm 13% 1990 
110 99'* Em IS'A. 1990 
0)V 7$i.T>Hf J% >990 
OS’. ae*T>«M S‘.% 1987-90 
108>. Ol'iTm I0% 1990 



FIVE TO FIFTEEN YEARS 

109 90'p Tim 11>A« 1991 
9l '« 79 Fuie S'.% ISB7-91 
107'; OS'. Even 11% 1991 
116 100 Tm l2>-% 1992 
ICU'y 97'; Tm 10% 1992 
106 . 94 TmCI0':%1992 
114'. 96'*Em 12'.S 1993 
120'- 103'; Em 13'.-% 1998 
lOi'f 9«i>Tm 10% 1993 
117‘. 99';TrH« 18'iS 1993 
09-1 74f.Fv« 6% 1993 

i8».iOO>Tm 13’.% 1993 
l38'.10S'>Tm 14':% 1994 
l23M07’iSien I2'i%l994 
13-Ai. 1994 
9% 1994 
ir. 1995 
y* 199045 
10 <% 199S 
• Tm 12'.% 1996 
Tm 14% 1996 


1071. 

99* -I'i 

ios’ie*i'j 

l|4 >1N 


-I'l 

-I'l 

-|i> 

- 1 >. 

-1>i 


118 9T%Em 
994. 03% Tm 
1161- 97'. Tm 

rs'. er>e« 

108'- 88'.|4Gti 
121’. 104 'i 
ia\ 109 


100 ■ 84'. Tm 9% 1992-98 
1371. 120'. Tm 16'-% 1996 
126 IQO'.Em I3'.% 1996 
82. BT'.Romel 3S 1998 
126'- 106'* Tm I3'<% 1997 
TOO'-- »• Em f0’.-% 1997 
97 f 79 .Tm aVS 1997 
138 i19'.Em 10% 1997 

C. 69 - Tim« 6'.% 199648 
104 88 Em S’<% 1980 

I43>. l2r'#Tm 15‘Av 1990 
119'.ia2 Em 12% I9H 
103 > 06%TiM» 9'.-% 1999 
121 '• 103 > Em 12 .% 1999 
109. 93.7re4S i999 

108'* 01 . Com 10 'i% 1999 
129. 108'. Tm 13% 2000 


102 '. 

I04'r 
118 '. 

IIB’i 
102 '; 

1i5'. 

H e-t 
121’. -II* 
ISO- -li* 
120'* •-1'* 
116.1 'IV 
98‘. -«•< 
113V -»». 
75».e-'« 
104V -1% 
110V -IV 
126 • -IV 
98'; -I'l 
I3P* -IV 
134 -IV 
Br:e-v 

184V -1V 
106'.- -TV 
96'. -I'l 
136 «- 1 '* 
B3‘. »«3'. 
103'. -IV 
141V».1‘f 
117% -r» 
101 V -1*. 
TI9-«-T'4 
100 -IV 
106'. -IV 
ise*. -I'l 


104 

&3 

104 

112 

97 

100 

109 
11A 

90 
108 
68 

113 
11 4 
iia 
108 
u 
106 
40 

96 
10.7 

110 

91 
112 
ia? 

37 

106 

9J 

61 

no 

80 

95 
110 
103 

9A 

102 

97 

96 
102 


OVER FIFTEEN YEARS 


107'. 91'. 1>MS 
ftI5'. 09’. Com 
29 - 25‘-Conv 
inv 96>*Conv 
132'. 114 .'n«is 
lOTV 92'.Con 
120'- IHTp&cn 
106'. 90 Tran 
108'. 93 . Tim 


I08‘. 


IIPV 8001 


_ 


9'.% AMI 

103 • 

• 


A 20U 

37 > 


n 

9% 2000 

98V 

a' 

n 

14% 199541 

MOV 

• 


l0% 7002 

IQS'! 

1- 


13% 169643 

lift'. 

• 


9'-** »08 

IIM'o 

• 




• 


13V% 200043 

I38'i 



11'.% 2N144 

I»7% 

• 


ItPi 3004 

106': 

- 

• 


94 '.Ti*_ - - 

48 Piina 3';% 199644 97 .- 
104 . 87 .Com 9';% 3004 103'. 4 

106 90‘.Com 9'.'% 2006 103 « 

IIS'. »4'.Em lO'.-S 2006 111% 

139‘.I10 Tims 12':% S00646 127 
93'. 78': Tims 8% 200248 91 
132% 102 Tmiv.% 200047 12DV 
137%116iTm 13‘A»80O4-0e I36'.'« 
70'. S7 Tm 6 .% 8008-12 68). 
90 - 74'; Tims 7'.% 2 OIS-I 6 S9't 
131'. Ill Em 12*« 2013-17 129% 


45 

44 

332 

91 
107 

95 
iai 
94 
94 

104 

98 

94 

61 

93 

92 

94 

96 
18 

97 
too 

80 


83 


UNDATED 


44'/ 36'.Corsois 4% 
30V 33'iWjrUi3"% 
«'• 41 Cany 3’.% 
33’. n -TiMs 3*. 
28% 23-'iCansc« 2‘<% 
28'. 33': Tims 2 .% 


43'. 

3T* 

SO 


91 

88 

70 


89 

a» 


INDEX-UNKED 


tlO'iiOS'iTm n. 1988 
103‘< 91 Trm IL 2% 1990 
113 V 108 Tm IL 2% 1998 
103'. 96 • Tim IL2'.% 2001 
1U. 93'. Tims IL2 .% 2D03 
106'. 96'. Tm IL 2*4 2000 
103V 9r.Tm IL2';% 2009 
108. 97 TmU'.-SSOn 
91'. K'. Tims ttJ:** 2012 
99'. erVTm Il 2 A-; 2010 
99V 86'.TmlL3‘.%2020 


11^ 

102 


ST*. 
96. 
99 ‘> 
98'. 
100 '. 
83V 
9»i 
89'. 


21 

22 

as 

31 

31 
20 

32 
32 
32 
32 
32 


3W 

M 

Mhad nm* 

396 


9.0 

26 . 

M 

4b 

iUisbaen*i iHyrayi 

76 



N3 

331 

Ift*': 

Aus Maw 2 

371 


ISO 

M .. 

18' 

#• 

Banunia'ieB 

ms 




470 

329 

Bank 0* haiand 

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172 

37 

1» 

8 

BoK Lsum Israel 

EB 




390 

3*5 

Bw* Leo* Utt 
BwAOrSMMW 

SN 

» .. 

162 

57 112 

469 

Nr. 

447 

-7 

180b 

42 103 

6» 

333 

Barclays 

539 

e-i« 

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49 78 

4N 

3N 

Brnwi Snoter 

4m 

-5 

193 

82 N3 

6i6 

423 

Caw MM 

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41J 

67 Ml 

57 

23': 

CaoHs 

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30 

46 15D 

37 

17 1 

Ow Mantistun 

aiv 

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139 

4.4 .. 

42' 

27 1 

C*4WP 

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206 

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73 

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13 

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Com Bank WiIm 

66 

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364 

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300 

82 .. 

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Fan Nal Fmoea 

900 

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187 

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379 

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Ctoneu nai 

66 

4-1 

27 

32 136 

348 

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96 

40 180 


Jl 12'} 
430 273 
99 61'' 

4» 233 

190 138 

or) 375 
677 340 
42 a 
080 390 
659 32C 
306 173 
936 567 

no « 0 'j 

410 109 
00 68 

191 92 
27 . 12. 

380 216 
ie-7n 


OO I6«l 
HN Simai 


HK srwe# 
....xiOMDoni 
Kmg 8 9witMA 


JWffl I 


KMnmt Omot 
L loios 
Mama 
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lUMd 
MM AUM 9» 

Nit WM 
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PlBMOtW 

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Sn* Bnk 01 Can 
BOYl Bwi 01 B.V7I 


06 

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967 3721S 
170 40 11.1 


O ftl il UUMt 


609 . 
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402 

550 

182 

10 

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46 72 
22 83.7 
42 18.1 

ae 303 
20 1&0 


117 

327 



40 92 
23 102 


STOCK EXCHANGE PRICES 


Full-scale retreat 


ACCOUNT DAYS: Dealings began March 10. Dealings end March 27. I^nango day^ril 1. Settlement d^, April .7. 
^Forward hai ^flins are permitted on two previous business days. 








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THE TIMES WEDNESDAY MARCH 26 1986 


25 


lA CREME DE lA CREME 


HOTELS 

Lhib immwiiniiri j{^ 
Ewafcni TA/TYP fBOuiml 


Ewafcni TA/TYP tequiiiii 
pta.fliir..lte «Beu flDBaa * 
■tei^ imi dnm A 
B ^ piX w mwi iy. A ewttr- 
CMCL GiM pan A boMm 


MMMMIKrCMN 

■ndedjHw Ar HunctfDi* 


VI CTTYi 01-4812345 
^ |WEST9ID:0>5I382] 


ipoadm'wodE to'dnd Ena. 
Wa.Oo jtlaiA IBM HtprrtcBct 
*|<Bfc Rncb«pln^ff 

ionui A tautiMoSica • . 

OTVi 01-481 2345 
WEST END< 01-938 2188 


TMIMNO PLACES 

Tip Top Se^j^needetf Ibr 
ORiBiodiiy bsttan denlun in 
CoM '8ii^ . Hectie Rut 
pncfr- to you mua thrive on 
ptowK « ei||oy « «■*— **~y 
Scnce of hutiur a oun. Lve. 
mw i gi g f ftcihiia, CTIS. ex- 
ccHcM twrina 'omdiiioM. 
RECCONS .. 

CITY: 01-4812345 
WEST-END: 01-938 2188 


CAUBRE 

22-1- £12,000 

fncmdiMe epponunity Ar 
briflii yotag sb seoatiy to 
join the eiiie m tin 4 ynmtc 
young co.Htgli levd or edno- 
lioR (A leuei mariom ). top etc 
duUf oT iOMO.ieaai span, a- 
eeUent ceonniiniCHiwe ataOiiy 
egenliiL Ewrilent promocroo 
PIP^BCt^. 

CITY: 01-4ai'234S _ 
WEST END: 01-938 2188 


cmr sucKEK 

SlOySOO 

A Poe Pa job tbr w0> 
Of gnn d effieien A nnncfate 
pmon with joed e d uawn to 
m the atponie Offi« o( 
RnodM Scrwc ei Cotnpo- 
fiy. Loo of tUoM eemn. 




ik|Uc. tH i hipi i wn nd drive 

OTY: 01-4812345 
WEST END: 01-938 2188 


MAimmiM 

24-i-£i0,000 

A non S/N nenonr s noniml 
tar the pmarind M Madly M»- 
taod /hrhettiniQ OwnMoi oi 
Its m hanamta . A 9 Ht 
dsl of hKtananl A vnty e tt- 
wid ■ arrsam traS . 
g taOM ta . upSS« ptota h- 

sau.’WJ^Eri 

iQiBes He. 

CnV.-0!-4Sl2345 
WEST END: 01-938 2188 


aUiattl laliilt dbatt aUiatt aHtott albatt 


ESTABLISHED 
ART GALLERY 
KENSINGTON 

EfRcient. intelligent 
admio/sales assissaat 
reguired for typing, 
filing, bookkMping 
le s earcfa and custom- 
er haTitCing HOUIS 
Tbesday to Saturday 
10am to 6pm. Start 
£9,000 pa. 

Tab 01-352 0055. 


remporaries ControUei 

M icBlain Nadi is a broadly based recruinnetKConwliancy with an jgiwtwuMwe 
in die highly eompedtive leaipofaries tnariteL Inorderto d evdopand tnaii i n i n , 
our position in this market we need to recruit an additional Taaporaria CoonoSK 
AppUcams must be committed to a career in recruicmem and musi be expericoeedn 
runtting a temporaria team and really enfoy a demanditw and piessurned 
eiitirimtnent. Salary will be jdtoveMer^ and is negotiable acecMding to eaperiowA 
Irtitul contact should be by letter stating an evening telephone number. This s h ou l d be 
addressed to'Mr. Geoffrey Nadi. 


x>ranes 
ay pay? 


ifybuim almporarywith Brook Scre^ you not only qualify for 
. Bank.HoiidaypaybutyDuai^enddAdtplourweekshoIfd^and 
free word processor training, aii aficen shoh qualifying period. 


BROOK STREET 


An equal opportunity employer 


OXFORD CaBCDS . 

Seniiv'SoilieitMB Btigirtion FA/Seiezetaiy to take 
chaige of Mneqiefa seetfam ko9 tiw wlieds 
baniiv imoothiy. AdmaUiixaSivs ability, MMad 
litigation socrotarial eqwiience andiaumo akfllB 
no c ea aa i y. Top aalaiy omnmBnnEste e^tii top 
job. 

01-489 4661 


PA SECRETARY 

£10^000 p£ 

A small ^creative mari aet iug obiisAltaiicy «ith 
bige visioii based m'UoUmid Feik reqotre a 
aoper effidem PA secretsy to inrk with 2 
demanding IMreetorl 'woridng 'bat' 

infbnnal nnvir an mfytt Shonhand ■«««*»** tidlls 
and &st typing are esseatiaL . 

01-^^2041 

and ^ hr PoM iMat a Ualui- * 


SENIOH SECRETARY 
AGE 23-25 
SALARY £8,500 

We a» losing Car an emerienoed seeietaiF to 
work with an Aaaodate Dimetar of our Public 
Kehtioiia dtniioa wJncIi is part of an eaCabliBhad 
Management Ccoauhancy baaed in Gooent 
Geiden. The xole will nwabe all eleorir 
aeoetarial dntiaa and fea^ accmate bpmg skills 
are fHftflnti fll ts mrirems M t a . ig folly 

WPtDOfriadga woold be a dwtinet 
adnurtagSL Yoo mbst be pw aM ted and have 

good pwBonal akiSs. If yoa an lookhre fiw 
varied; mvabciMiit and re^ionaitnlit^ plaMS 
bontaet Jean Byatt, S ec wteiy to the 
EKrectdr at the.Uqyd Graigi co; 

930 5161. 


CETY PUBUG RELATIONS 
to £9,000 

need to fid a 


PROPERTY CO, W1 
Mature, experienced Secretoy/PA vfith good 
Sboithand and Typing T90/50) to work with 
Company Secretaiy of prestigntB and MenKUy 
young team in elegarit suriioundmgs. Success- , 
ful applirants will be trained on WP. 

Ben^ indude exoeffent safaiy and working 
conditions. For further details ring;* 

TrislB Love dn;dt-4^ 9<t8 ' * • 



To £1^000 

Nwiiwal Officer 


wBb 3 FCBis aipcrt- 
ence required by tw* 
jeorOne W.i PiAttblng 
House. TVw responti- 
bOltF mr air aaoecb of 
PereeemM AOnbUatr*- 
Hon for 400 vtaff- 
meervtewlng and eelec- 
ttui or Admin. 

SeuwarW. ProducUon 
and Janlor Manage- 
raent Staff, banme 
rebiiles. ad mUif i ttetl o w 
and peiS M ina l 

ownertllno 
MeallF BfM qoaiffi- 
however 
wcpaSqice at.ttds levM 
most Inportaht 
TSL Options Peree n - 
net CDnsunants'on 01- 
493 *969 




SECRETARY TO MANAGING 
DIRECTOR 
£9,500 

A ifiiea maiketing agenqr bas^ in W2 

. is k)okii« for a yon^ ontgoing. mtdltowrt aeo- 
letay to woik for the ' 

Word processing skfib (IHd) inM 

as a imk fiff a<todn- Duties also ^noude tnvm 
and timdi anangements. , , 

to lemrn fix’ ymv cconmitmeDt (some late 
may. be.rapnred!) we ofo h 5iendly, oomfon- 
atde pitMwaip g envifonmenL 

good? Writt, widi yoor C.V., tbc . 

liz Van Pnt 
WWAV 
35 Cbapdada 
Moscow Road ^ 

Lmidon. W2 4LL . 

or phooe 01-727 3481 Ext 213 


'\B 3 kcurm 

experieiitt tif - bperal^ LDP 
T5Q^ordstar. Must be c^good ^uca* 
,'.tiou' and be able to wpfk diligently on 
his.^er own fiom j^yate. house -nesff 
Ri^nts PailL :• ;r ■ 

' • 01-730 9511. 


WtaetaaURgWrtMKttadbliaidemri- 
• mWuOiVtaMlaXPelacMrtSiliW-*- 
I SBdL MNdy aid buw tan w Seenwy » «■ 
QM bacane ad gSan. Lstalr nai ofiEe, cwe M bataMi prataid. 
.any cart w onn iM Ml ii See. 

CITY: A ODOd bnita pMagi ad 1 vday gf avud nun ae 
ollaW W s addSBT aiddi aoUae ta avatSiace. Huae 
•■aa. od« tareM ta>v. Ttae iii mV. taw gwe of am 


i,«tieeMgaaMWeaiicB6taJMi«anfaiaaainB.6w- 
til flOei ad lae W Ba HM wapeasL Shattwd 

MULTILINGUAL SERVICES 


UNDERWRITING 

ASSISTANTS 

Expandtog worldwide iosufance busi- 
ness requires wdl educated, efficient, 
energetic people with good secretaiial 
sl^ nod numoacy to walk in a team. 
T anpiagfts computeT abilities are 
additional advantage bat not essentiaL 
Go(^ tratnii^ provided age 22 plus. 

PUase pnv^ c.y. and covering letter 
to: 

BOXD 9 . The Time^ PjO. Box 484 , 

Virgima Street, London EL 



SECRKTARY £10,000 

An experienced secretary is reqnbed for 
our Gioiq> Financial ControOtf . 

The succnsfii]. candidate win have bad at 
Icajrt three years experience with w ac- 
counting fir^ possess excellent secretarial 
skills (lDO/7% have a mahire dispositon 
and be capeiue of woridng <m own initia- 
tive. • 


Irmo Wtaods 01-458 5518 

<Ne «,M»1MI . 



LONDON ZOO 
RCOUNKS 


sianARV 

PONOnCCTOll 

' laltnaeog, remootibfe 
•nH virwd riiftix which 
oS icaae ofinitauive 

—ri hi ri^lrwg 

with perete ct lO kvdi 
eoocdned unkOift 
ConservittoB red 2oo*s. 
R»p»jiaH reir e mia l 

driiu and word pt ec y- 
iiig a gyrie p c e furittiil 
S&iy in 9c^ rmfls to 
£7,M6 |M indnshw poly 
tevMM^ aeeorduic to tgo 
«tiH mpcricBo^ 

Homi-9JO.jja.Moo- 

dry - Fdday. Pg nurim t 
pcfttioMWe pod. Sttff 
cafbierw. 

Apply in wiitiflt, fivtBg 

AiB Aotaho ooA 

sac. Or reply itt Ibo Ef* 
fhiMwww Ofieer. 

gooety of 
Inndoii. Rcgmft Fnfc, 
IMre NWl 4KY. 


EXECUTIVE PA 

£ 11,000 

liner Chartering Company close to London 
Bridge Statkm seek matme PA, aged 25-40, for 
thdr Manarif^ Director. This is a responable 
position le qumng exceOent audio WP skflls 
(shorthand an advantage but not essential). Cor- 
reet shipteng/lmer company exper i ence is 
required togrther whh f/M presentaiioD and 
afauity to work on own mitianve. Non-smokcis 
only. Pleaso idepbone Angda GaUone or Jackie 
CambreU on 0M03 OimT 

ALFRED MAIilCS 
RECStUfTMENT CONSULTANTS 


INTER NATI ONAL 
. LAw Y£R 

SMALL MAYFAIR OFFICE 
Intemataonal lawyer xeqoires 
Secntaiy/PA with good S/H and ty^ng 
No prevuNS legal is necessary 

bnt qspUeanta shouu be betwemi 23-40 
with smart ^ipaazanca, pleasant twofwtaF 
able to etvmFmTTrii^fco with an interna- 
tional bntHTWiaa cliesitele. Four weeks 
hotiday, season tidtet loan and salary in the 
region of £10,000 +. Pfeaae ring: 

01-498 9631 


MOVE ON UP! 
to Director level 

£8,000 + perks 

We are looldog for a bright and 
conscientioiis secretary to work for 
our Finance Director and part time 
Chairman. Conveniendy situated 
in the Qty. Age 21 4- (p»ssihly 2nd 
jobber). Please contact Paula 


& Assochks 
- Ot-43710'14 

Rreniitinent CoBsulone 130 RegeiuStrea. Loudon VlRSFE 


Combine your Secretaiial Skills 
with your interest in the Popular 
Music Scene 

The International Finance and Administiation sections 
servicing the Warner, Eleetzn and Atlantic labels of Warner 
Ccmimunicatibns Ixic’s record groi^ is moving to oenttal 
London creating a number of interesting secretarial ^ts. 

We would therefore like to talk to young (19-^) recently 
qualified secretaries who can demoasnaie good skills. Ptevious 
word processmg' e xp erience would be an ^vantage. Good pre- 
sentation, social oonfidenoe, and a bri^t *on the ball* af^noach 
are essential. 

The working environment whilst cot^ professional is also 
very lively and our cheat offers an attractive ranM of benefits. 

Applicants should apply in conJ^ence to Ben Dixey on (0962) 
53319 (24 hour service) or write to Johnson ^^Ison & Panners, 
Ladgate House, 107-111 Fleet Street, Londcu EC4 quoting 
ref. 674. 


Johnson WOson & Partners 

Management Recruitment Consultants 




PJL/ADMINISTRATOR 


fis-KrectorafwdltauiwafirmQftotenntioO’ 
ri itocnaimexn Cbttsnltittts, based in the West 
fold. 


•sQUj^QSUon 


)od secretarial- sIoSb. uiagy, 
commercial skills. Osrs'is a 


pecqite sad you «31 quickly be dva 

real reqmisibibty for md drect devet- 
cpmaii if yoo have the ri^ personality. 

Please contact Jtem Steeds or Ridiard Roberts 
at ARA InleniatiottBl on 01-629 2356. 


orr sECRCTAmr 

Areaeew Cay oOica am Livapoal SL SWEtaa 
TteanataU oahUm vO be nqsM w«vfc ga ere 
■itiHivc red te ow^ta of pradwini e UihievcioraytpoiiB 
■ ctcoari areaer. SUi Ban odeik timhrert red 99 ^ 
red WP CTper i eao e . - 

Sdar c. CljOOO pA. red eiber bredtt iaCtade C uma e 
mamA'iuof lebl w*ta dWi 


dss w B Dmxttc> 
Sreioa 




UJwri 



WIIM4SS 




NATIONAL FED ERAT ION 
OF WOMEN'S INSTITUTES 
Administrabve Assistant requred by gei^ secretoy of 
tte W to co-oteinaN tte central seerNariat and to minute 
the principal committees. We we looldng for a canfidate 
with some years experience of working for a National 
(Irganisatton. bm^ with aH aspecN (rf committee work, 
aUe to work on their own under pressure but with good 
Mer-persond skiHs. The post Is London based and re- 
quires secretariat skins, good educrtional qutiiricatnns, 
particularty in the use of Entfish, and an orgai^ ap- 
proart to wDilc and time managonenL Secretarial back- 
up provided. Salary £9.000 - £11,000 aae. Please mg or 
write for an ankication form to Isabella Norden. Per^ 
net Officar. NSWt, 39 Eedeston Street London SW1W 
WT. Tet 01-7^ 7212. 

Application forms to be trtumed by 14lh April 1986. 


5EC/AD90N 
£99000 + BOg 

EreaMiiBe us Bmk ir> 
renal' ireutav ■ 
srrentare weracanr/ ad- 
mtotantor k> piovMe 
BOpert W rwD Mrer taw- 
Hnml OOes*. 

cvnairem wire pw t* 

CBBriI WWBIdMlhtBli 

fUn*. typins et COwihil 
nwttMKy and u O Iml 
cducallofi. Are 21-f. 



latrelTr oigenOy req ni red for a fost moving 
inteniatiaDal company. Word procesor expe- 
rience orguimtional ability and an cxceOest 
tricphoQc "^*""**‘ essential Acenstomed to 
work under pressure. 

We oBan sriaiy of 510,006 per year whh a 
garfavmwBcw hanws aid anoo^. There wfll 
he 4 vredB holiday. 

Please telephone ns immediately 
for an interview on 01-229 1942. 


BIUNGUAL ADMINISTRATION/ 
SECRETMIAL SKILIS 

^maii team of people W Dc km g for intereatronri 
non-ferrous metals company require an experi- 
i»n <*d person with shipping knowledge to haiyBe 

COntlWl ■^tminiOrafinfi haiSB With SOpplietB 

and consumers in French as weS as ondenake 
light secretarial duties. 

Good op po rtu nity end remtmeration for the 
right person. 

. TELi 01 031 4059 Ifra O a m a g i 


A d3maiiiic young marketing 
Gonsnltancy is Iroking for a dynamic 
yonng secretary 

We're a socccaaful 3 year old, 6 person strong marketiiig consol- 
tancy in Smithfield working in U^t, modem, igren plan offices. 
We're looking for a second secretary to join ns, probably in her 
early 20's, edora^ to at least *A‘ le^ with no less than 60 ^m 
on an IBM word processor and 100 wpm shor thand . Salary 
negotiable dependent iqxm eqierience or skUK 
If you're inteiWted write to Da^ Drakes at Box E48 telling us 
wliy you fit the bOL 


PA /SEC F OR 
ARCH ITECTS 

WOnSTAl IBM PC) 
SbbD barf W| otBee 
wBB ii es fat mng 
gi>a WmJNbwI Wanktar 
euataace. Nre reMfar a»e 


RECEPTlONlSr/lYPIST 

Rsqnircd for dynamic, young detign 
consultancy in Noning Hill area. The ideal 
win bave an exceOeat tdepboiu 
pius good Qrping and rodmg. 

Salary e £6,750 

Please teiepbme Garefiae am 

01-221 4420 

(No agencies) 


PA/OFFICE MANAGER £11,000 

A medium scad interior deagn company in 
Knightsbrutec'is loofdng for a young PA. to 
cope wiUi younger staff ordering office supplies 
and equipment and geoeraliy be responsible for 
the smooth nmning fo the office. 100/60. Age' 
22-25. 

COLLEGE LEAVER £7,000 

We are looking for a college leaver whh SOwpffl 
typing to work in our agency in Knightsbridge. 
Shorthand useful but not essential, very varied 
workload. An interest in people essentiaL One 
years training given. Age 17-21. 

We me deUgHed te maM i aee (fa wsr* af oar mem 
Tuaperaiy Hyisioa. 




Reservations 

Assistant 

Required at the Churchill Cfnic. an 80 bedded 
pnvare hosphai Including e Day ^re IMt and 
an Intensive Care Unh. opposite the Imperial 
War Museum in Lambeth Road. 

A computerised booking system is being 
■ntrodueed and the postholder/appomtee wflf 
be involved in the devete^ent of the 
system as wefl as the day-to-day 
administration of in-patient bookmgs. 
Previous e xp erience in s busy rnedRsI 
environment essential. 

Attractive salary - negotiable, 
nease telephone die Rreervadorts M ana g er , 
Mss M. Eyies, for an appiication form and 
fob description. 01-928 5633 Exl 201. 


BRITISH VETRRUIAIIV ABSOGUTION 

PA/Se aeu ry t» Prewfan and Qictf Exendve of Ai» trey 
pmiriiiniM? mopiinrir wfewrirtBs OK Vasnsy Smteaat 
Weg End taeatioa Coed awho typni Aak, Aecttared 
BB4MvaBiare - WP tnmiaa fivtB. Good tdrebooe rninrer 
csKstfa/Direetor level eqioieiice prefcntd. red 4 reefs 
bobdre. AnMud £8J00 px 

Ctatew deaiti uk Tbe Clref EncDSve, &VA. 7 thrnfifht 
soea LofdoB wiM Oat. 




SeXITH BANK BOARD 

SECRETARY 

in the Chairman's Office 

The Arts Coundl's South Bank Board is saeldng 
to appoint a Secretary to the Executive Chairman 
to work with his present Senior Personal 
Secretary. 

The position calls for first class shorthand and 
~ typing quaBfications (minimum speeds 100/50), 
a wfliingness to be trained in word process i ng, if 
not already proficient, and involves aB 
rassoctated secretariat skids. AppRcants should 
have a pleasant telephone manner, be able to 
work under pressure and be used to high 
sianderds of accuram. The post wodd offer a 
young person invaluable experience at hi^ level 
as a useful second step in e career. 

Starting salary circa £7500, subject to review 
after tnal period. 

Please telepbone for an application form 
01-491 0364. or write to the South Bank 
Board, 105 PiccaeSfy. Loruion W1V OAU. 
Ctosirig dare for reoei|rt of eornpiafad forms: 
8th April 1986. 


riiii 

soiiHn 

li.\NK 

CKN'FRK 



RECEPTIONIST FOR AD. AGENCY 

Highly active advertisiiig ^ency near Covrat 
Guden is looking for a super peiwc to enhance 
the image oX the company. Will have to'cope 
whh ibe swhcbboanl and hdex as well as: hoaids 
of visilors evoyday. Age 25-40. The lovdy pe^ 
SOD chosen trill gto a lovely salary. 

Caff Ann HaO OB 01-636 9501. 

(No ^poneleo), * 
















26 



PROPERTY BUYERS’ GUIDE 


LONDON PROPERTIES 


REnRE TO ABELLWAY 
HOME Eff WIMBLEDON 
AND START LIVniG 


Bellway 
^ beflero fcbafi, 
for masy, retirement 
means Increased activity 
rather than the reverse. 

That'S why each of our locations 
Is carefU]^ selected for Its eaay access 
to all the Important i /■" f 

services and entertain- | 

sneatfhcOlUesinthe ^ 

area. Shops, Transport, _ 

Sports Centres, Clubs, TWEBBoaP igi 

Societtes, Churchea, \q\ 

Theatre and Cinema are 
aB nearby. 

Tlie BeOwsy aim is ' 

togLveyouyourtDdepen- 
dence,nottaheitaway. 

Time and thought go into the 
design of each of our flats, backed by 
a policy to provide im to 20% more 
floor space than many other builders. 

As a result, the flats are well propor- 
tioned with one or two Bedrooms, a 
separate Lounge/Dining Room, 

Kitchen and Bathroom. They all have 


Gas Tired heating and are serviced 
by a Lift. Mok of the either worries of 
Home ownership are relieved by the 
Hanover Housing Assodation. 

They look after all the building 
and garden maintenance as vrsU as 
providing a 24 Hour Emei^ency Cover. 

f 1 A resident Sup®^ 

iTueinn^ vlsoT IS OD hand fio Offer 
jlSfericRwl help and advice should 
you need it. But rest 
\ assured that your priv- 
s\ acy is respected. You 
wont be bothered unless 
ill you call or there is a 
a[jg \ -J ° 1* spedSo reason to do so. 

Come and see a Bellway 
Home for yourself. There 
are one bedroom flats fi?om £54.500 
and two bedroomed flats from £57,950. 

Then judge for yourself 
whether Bellway 
gives you more for 
your retirement— 
morefbryoup 

money. ICJIH 





CMELSCA SWia Sp««tMdV 
Tewly 9 Md. 2 

fWf> «an fl*i m 2?^ 

ton Be. eiS7jxn anna 
^SfianLXl 06S& 


fM Creen tube ,5?SS: 
fMcmsVtc. namen B*L Ett 
SSr^a ^ ntt. 

Mt^dUMT 67 VMn PVUB 

02^ ot-997 aUl. 


■Afssrr WD, Wia 

Sncteia iMBmnc «dni ww 
•irMi 9 Ate bfMBB. 2 » 
£cbUoib imaMi 20 k >8^ 
Ter Ol-MS 9629 


uixitfy lawn MUM wRl, eeuDie 

9»f»9*. 3 ®*5i’ ***• 
Looi naa e. C400.0 0B ' 
kUmMw SWfi. 4 Mdroom. « 
MMMnu. fwm Mjijt g». 
Freehold. _ 

KoiehBMdoe ^ 

Mdrddin ww bou w- u iw 
IMM. Cisoxm unns Ud: 

Ol 662 6664. 


TinBun8 wwngaTttniai»r.aTg exchange even ifit has a greater value 

As a special feature Bellway will con- than the home you purchase at 
siderbiyingyour existing property In Griffiths Road. 


Show Hat a? Sales OfBce open lOam to 

8.30pm seven daysaweek: ^9| KaIItaTAV MOTTIAfi 

01-543 66S9. IKSUWoy^ AA*JlUCO 

A BETTER HOME FOB TOUR MONEY- JUDGE FOR YOURSELF 

Railway Lftng Lodge. 26d Kingston Road. Merton Puk. SW19 3NW Tfelephoner 01-S43 301 1 . 


Roberts Court 

43-49 Barkston Gardens Beridgr House 
Kensington, London SW5 

A MAJOR RECONSTRUCTION 
OF FOUR FINE HOUSES TO PROVIDE 
33 SPLENDID NEW FLATS 

LEASES 125 YEARS FOR SALE:- 
One bedroom flats from £62,500 
TVvo bedroom flats from £128,000 
Three bedroom flats from £155,000 
Three bedroom penthouses from £295,000 
Lifi ■ Resident fbrter ■ Gas Central Heating • 
High quality finishes throughout ■ Balconies, 
terraces or patios to many flats. Access to 
beautiful communal gardens. 

SUPERB SHOW FLATS (01-244 8253) 
OPEN TODAY (AND DAILY) U a.m.-7 p.m. 

Joinl Silling Agents 

WAELLIS 


174 Bromptoa Road 
London SW3 IHP 
telCT23Mf WAE 

01-581 7654 


FARRAR " 
'STEAD & 


t52 Fulham Hoad SWIQ 01.973 8435 
281 Kensnigion High Sneei W8 01.603 1221 
T«ln 295645 FS4NOG 



SOUTH OF THE 
THAMES 


RICHMOND A 
KINGSTON 


wmiwnm cohmh uvv- 

<f Bui 4 B*d iri c i wt— 

how in conservanoa anw. 
0»wi.jlry»*>dMt.doUM>r » c « h 
wn wtih nurUr uresm. 
Gara*rvaiary'«nlng roaok 

latv klictwn. S dH* d i ^u — 

4 a Uror «nidia/«Ui hedragm. 
LAnc ccNv. «T fiBrten, QCH. 
£169.960 r i M Wald. 1W: 01 
7e74893<H):01 7S886l9rW). 


«lwnan« vuiaw haa. 3 dte* 
IM». w MX Rh. d«or a Maw tat 
Omum * utUd. vmrw w- 
fMog gtti. £86.000. (Ml Ol- 
2Sa 8974 IW) 01.489 4*00 Bra 


rtandsd. 5 t»da, 2 recto- 
tk»6. tuxw eoM kticiMn 
InctuOln?: 0 U hot*, don- 
Mr even, ouge Arecser. 
Gwen. Open Biany a*- 
Btd (tent and rear. OCH. 





Ondteburnuu/HSifTlieTma/rEftau Lai.— 

HILL HOUSE. KNIGHT5BRIDGE. 

LONDON SW7 

potentially one of London’s 

^ ^ ^ .] C'l finest houses — For Sale 

'w.i4stir ^ g'- If 'k Freehold, with Vacant 

Possession 

I • L' «j^f '"iSv V.. BuUteirii-lVdicenrun-andoccufhing 

sm- [r J prominent poMCion Jt (he junebon of 

Kn^Bbrii^ with Tmor PIjcc Hill 
"fj [ 4' I Ig fVff f House is tor sole with PLmning 

\ • •; IVnnission ind Lisaii Building 

vl ■- * [ Consent tnrieconsTniakin as a superb 

_ . ~ nsidcnceofaboutV960iq.ti. 

■ I. topnn'ide; 

FOUR PRINaPAL RECEITION ROOMS BILLIARDS ROOM. SWIMMING 
POOL WITH AN’CILLARi’ CHA.VGfNG ROOMS, SAUNA & 
KTICHENETTE. GARDEN AND ROOF TERR.ACE iWITH R^RBECUE). 

GARAGE FORTWOCARS. SIX PRINCIPAL BEDI«X)MS& FIXT 
B.ATHROOMS THREESTAFF ROOMS&TWO R.ATHROO.MS KTTCHEN, 
SERVERYScLAUSDRi’/LTILITV ROOM. LASSENGERLIFT. FOOD HOIST. 

Price £1,650,000 

— apply sole agents — 


WAELUS 


fM Bmapion Road 
LnadcwSH.IlHP 

01-581 7654 

Kin Z.1«6i W4R 


wn d«( 9 Mdrm naL Isi (leer. 


Lm «ara«n 4 dMK edraae. 
f^.OOO. 96 vriw. TW: Ot-680 
641 1 day or 746 3744 hooc 


BATmSCA FARK. LWN W8- 

Clows 9 OM, in noor (M In 
raanMn oiacfe cMm aw*. Oi. 
90ad docoraO** ordw. 
rei 01496 4116. 


Fimsr. Prvay. su niawi 9 m 
9Mcn AM hi coiwm wow 
a(«i. Kilns shops 'trampqrt/ 
nvw cantmon £43.780. T«t: 
Ol -786 9039 allw 4 Mh 


— aClRIITt 1st (Mr flat M l 
OWN read «n«H9«a«( WMrtr. 
don MOL Oew Is Oan winw 
VUM*. Staooev Os Mint 90* rv 
ceBiiso ream and two 0 ood Ore 
doiMc BtdiuaiiM. fuiiv niKd 
kiidifn with awn in imO/cvoi 
M c «d w«a aanofeded Mh- 
loom. Cntmationc. Burww 

.alarm. aW -mi.i4 psrktns OCNn 
arowW S84.96A TW: 879 0489 
<«\«iUB9i and iiiifenon. 



LONDON PROPEim’ 


Sr JOHNS W'OOD 
Fully ftnisbed Iwuiy flat ar. 
tube. 2 double boh. IVi 
bads, fidly equiped Cennan 
btehea, laige double lecep- 
lioB. pvfciiifr porter, colour 
T.V. Cta. LA. £330 p». to 
ind. CM. and H.+ C natw. 
and laes. 

Tcfa 01-3« 5747. 






£280 

Coaveyancing by City Solicitors 

For buying or seUim your home in the usual 
way, we charge £280 (+ VAT. and disburse- 
ments) for prices up to £60.000. Please 
lelepbone us for a quotation on figures higher 
than thaL We can also help you find a 
mortgage. 

BARRETTS 

49 QUEEN VICTORU ST 
LONDON EC4 

TELEPHONE: 01-248 0551 



ST. JOfOTS WOOD. 

Suraiy 2 Madreoni rui tn 
iiaiBglPMa Mock, daco- 
roKd to a Ugh itandvd. 
2 recapdoB. fidtir (Wod 
UlctMB. bruid new 
Mattnom. 24 hoar por^ 
aerogp and 

uaweiuuuse. AD 

aerviocu. 

£105,00a 

0372-66314. 
After 7 p.m. 


DUL^^ICH 


CRESCCIfT WU 

LovfSy M« raMl>> heoK «v- 
wgjtw ct a' Oh io s acm of 
gSortoua cotwiiwHuJ uvdR& 
7 OVUOOTO. 3 UBVOOfTVi 
dOuOK drawing room. Urti- 
OL dUUng room. 

£480,000 

WwtMB 81.391 MBL 


4 UCBROOIKD MSS' to mattualn 
loww hauw. SreiraK 
(ninge/dmiM toqip- Qum cul- 
d*-sar oicrUHiciiio woods. 12 
mans ttf tram lo VKton«. Car- 
Pfied Ihroantiout £7£.00Q. 
T4l- 01-990 IJ14. 

NR DULWKN S worwt «an nu In 
cons %'m MS. Oasch Looq tsc. 
£S7.BSa Edwardian s.d 4.'6 
bMiw F-hldC69.000.Volker 
4 VoUifl' 741 6224. 



— I b<m deoiy, tlmiiks to Pttoi»"CtorI«s: ISth-centiiis Hinise Ooistt 

A revival at the inansion 

^ II ■ ■ TKa MIM aOMlfS W7! «^tfM 


The Prince of Wales* mteiest in housing 
and arehiteciure and the preservaUOT of 
the environment is wefl Imown, with his 
comments on a certain “carbuncle 
propoMd for Tia&l^r Square easily 
qualifying for a quotation of the year. 

He will therefore be pleased to know 
that his address to the Insutute of 
Directors a year ago on Britain's heritage 
struck a chord with at least one mmber 
of the audience whiiA has resulted in Ac 
saving of a line Georgian mansion much 
had fallen on unhappy nines. 

Henbu^ House, at Wimbome 
Boumerooutb. was built around 1730 for 
the Earls of Strafford ^ was the main 
house for a 3,000-acre estate. It js a 
Grade II listed house which has been 
expensively renovated and has many 
|!^ntng permissions for its future 
development, but in recent years it was 
occupied by a lady who lived in one 
room at a time until h became uninhab- 

Plan for 39 cottages and 
a leisure complex 

liable; a squatter occupied another port 

In January I98S, businessmen Roy 
Baylis and his brother Guy bought 
; Henbury for £226,000 after h had failed 
to attract a bid at an earlier auction when 
the reserve was something over 
£300.000 l They saw an opporttmiw to 
revive the house and with it bring life to 
a srnail comer of Dorset, but had an open 
mind about its future. When Prince 
Charles in his speech challenged direo- 
tors to “revive and regenerate decaying 
assets wherever possible**, the Baylis 
brothers were in^ired to take the ri^ 
and press on. 


By Christopher Wmipian 

Pny/erty Conwpd/idfw . 

complex to aclfoin the bouse, which isset. 
in grounds of 12 acres. It may seem an 
odd developnient for a fine estate, bnt m 
many cases it is the only way in whidi 
such buildings can be saved, and tte plan 
was apprbvM by 13 votes to 2. vdih <Aie 
member of the planning commiiltee 
commenting that approval was “die best 
way to protect the Green Belt and that is 
what we are hm to do'*. 

Altogether Uie proifect will cost £1 JS 
million, which the owners point out ^ 
be monev invested locally, will revive 
the hous& will bring a new, year-^und 
ameniQ' and will create SO j)emahcat 
foH-thne jobs. The sdieme is diyrigiuri by 
Peter Luck and Associates and there is an 

option to purchase a ftmher. SS acres. 
Savills and Fox and Sons are joint sdling 
agents and are asking for offers in the 
region of £500,000 to ft million, a range 
reflecluig the difficulty in valu^ surii 
an omis^ proper^. The idea is that ^ 
house would become a county club with 
leisure fedlities, while the ootta^ and 
flats would be sold to the secot^ home . 
market or retained for ' self<aterix^ 
Time-sharing is another possibility. 

Henbury House is the latest eixami^ 
of the dimeuhies feeing the owners of 
fine old houses and of the ways in whiefa 
they can be sai^ 

Fox and Sons* country house depart- 
ment have other such properties on the 
market. The Gimige, at West Charlton, 
Kingsbridge, South Devon, is a spacious 

a. - - 


id press on. fonner rectory built in the'ISthceotniy 

So fer they have sprat about £1 00.000 and now divided into four units, wiu 
anning the reviv^ indud^ £30.000 three holiday cottages and permisaon 
3 archtuxts* fees, and believe that a for a fourth, standing in nine acres near 


planning the revival, indud^ £30.000 
on archtuxts* fees, and believe that a 
further £ 1 50,000 needs to be sprat on the 
house, with £50,000 on landscapirtg. 
Given estimates of £5.500 for the 
repointiag a chimney, they realize the 
costs involved and are looking either to 
sell Henbury or to find partners to bdp 
them complete the projecL 
Their plan, approved by the local 
authority, is to build 39 cottages to 
replace old outbuildings and for a teisuie 


the IGngsbridgB estuary. The addng 
pdee is around £250,000. , . ' 

On a smaller scale is Lb«w 
Southbrook farm, at Whimple. Exeter, a 
charaiing 200-year-old -fonner ferm- 
house suitable for bed and breakfest 
trade, and with additional inootoe firan 
three holiday bungalows, standnu'-in 
about four acres. Offers over £12^000 
arc asked. 


The same agrafe me sdling The Mol 
House, Doccombe,^ , ; near 
. Moreionhampstead, . Newton. Abbot, 
Devon, .^ch has been odfekied to 
provide a. houre-div^^ between. the 
owners aixf bed and breakfest u^ There 

is a converted cottage m (he lO-acre 
grounds vidiidi broe^tt in more than 
£5,000 during 1985 maiidy fiom self, 
cateririg iM^idaySu Olfeca - (ff over 
£150,000 are invited. 

Humberts* leisure (fivision is selting 
Wood Dalliiig HaO, ^ .Wood Dalting 
near Noririch, a liflfel Elizabethan 
manor bouse set m 30 acres parkland 
9riitdi has been (xwrened to a residential 
hoU^y feKnplex. The house, has a 

licensed fiee bouse and there is tanning 

penmsskm foraJeisaecfeBiplex indudr 
tng ah indoor smmini^ pool The 
bdiday cooqilex ' at piesem has eight 
units, w^ darted, pennisrioit for four 
morea^ outfiae pem i s ri on fix another 

HmUoffi lodge fw 

flHiwrsfamlly 

20. No'pi^ has bera givra Ibr ths goi^ 
concern. ' 

Tn oo^uncidoii-wUh''Svntt & Paiker, 
Humberts are also sdxng Barnsdale 
' HalL in Rudand, a-Ciade II 

listed bouse^BUiig fecMh J 890^ wbkh was 
built as a liuhtihg lodge for 'Earl 
Fitz^lliam's fe|hily» when regular visi- 
toR rndoded die Piioibe of Wales, later 
Edward YU. The property has receiidy 
been eanted outhne ifianning' permis- 
sion & cfaapge'or Oise to. an hotel and 
co nfe ience centre. , 

The acco m modation* indiides four 
leceptionioosns^ six bedrooms, two staff 
fiats, twoattinbediooinsaiid cellais. set 
in nearly nine acres, «alb a further 44 
acres avdilat^ In addition thm is a 
coach house suhable for conversion, arid 
the agrais am expecting offers over 

£6so,Aa . . 

it imy'sixih'WiO soine people that 
fiire houses {ff varying shapes and sire^ 
lose their lokuas iajnify houses and 
becomeboiefe. bolidayoentres and such 
like, but fet' foBL fiiey survive amt are 
again- liyn^.'pads of the -country's 
heritage: 


REGPriB PARK 

LuwR^^nnpiMd fw Bbbt 
fat n iRtsOpB 4 bcOmiB. 
2 ta a a orre. rtorer ro an, gnst 
dw iMuuHV nagnSkMi inpto 
G9MB. fl4r KM IMnd. CH ft 
CHW. Lit, POT. WM womr. 
fser Long IM*. E3SOJ100 



W2 

EDWARMAN 


bsOiroatTU P HcTifn . dMM 
ream, paUo. Ore CH. 
£74,950. 

01 743 6951 eve 
01-407 7272 x416 



m 


Bi^^tedSalka 
Laxnribo dpaifiDaofefi 
Iknses-baSlto 
buaoaisewBb 
Dahn^ipast 

ai rltflerftiw * ' 

ZBdmaApOTMi.' 

frOBiS],5Sa 




11^ SpiuficUm IiBinire 
itpOTcaaslImB-Wilig 
kammisewitblUaidlip^ 
JiUultC6M6 
. ZBeAMmApOTenU ' 

. frnn£5l,50R' 

iBcdminlbOT ... 
; froin£l444ffi.. .. 


naer (H wHb TO 
ft. ■enaMMBf gHOCM. 1/9 ra- 
cation. 1/9 w8. net. roBy- 
»I4 MMORI. iMti wtniiH, 

Cm c*. 88 ytM*. B84.800 
C. 4C.N08grt».01-494 1704. 



a . UNBO FLAT. OoM «uaB- 
» coa« • I b««. 1 rae/b4d. 20 ft 
utamt/aua. ao it are. Mor- 
agp creoowre. 004. 96 yr tor. 
esasee. Ttf 8S« 6683 OMnu. 


FVLIMM Lregv uini atMUnF 
ar m ioO t f u to ** mbk. io nrgt 


JU96.000. 01-686 8880. 


MACM tali; 2 ore nor osr- 

nbftre DM. P/B Block. 44 year 

torec. uft/pom*8go. . emi 
CMltf. £7A.00a Ol 988 6326. 


ftfMDI - A 4 ynr oM M ftBocr. 

ty in a coRcaci oMi. eanuy 
MlBOlo rornurtincm or B bay 
Bwcvttve. *1 BUIe from Rniwr 
BK( HR • 18 * nvtno'tfintog rm. 
ruMy nrire Hi/onfs mkcuim. 
i bre». brew ftfIM Ctv gge. 
Pmy odB. OOtoi mtum 
cg&ooo. Fmta. ret chnw- 
ptKT ftowtwd A eo 01 868 
1 144 Men • Frt 9 • 6 . Sat 9 • 4. 

, WEST KEMIOTTOW W14. 
(aoiam R4i. CtwKO of 3 newly 
reov lux Ato aludio flat* in 
oraM M. New (KtBigs. gre re. 
E / tome. Lao rm. Qiiauty Ml A 
btfh. I wmt ouiB gtoi. Lew 
eutgtfngL Lmb. 195 yra. 
£43800 • £43.600 AtoO Orel 2 
ore nat £ 68.660 Dw vtos*. 
view lotfre wbHmaa Peeur 
Ol 748 4366. 

i w ii r iwoi u. mLL. 4 bm m 
oiBtot bungalow. OaeOL river 



THE nWEST 
VALUE AND QUALITY 
-iS^mWARBELLA 

2 bedroom luxury apmin^ts;: Marble floors ' 
spadouS'terraoeSv fully fitted kitdieris,. with uninterrupted ' 
soudt teeing sea vieMS» dub house, syrinirniiig pod. - 
Courted bus serrice. Rea<^ for hrimeicfiate.oocu(^tion.~. 

3 bedixxnn penthouses available Intxoductoiy prices . . 
from £5^000 with 50% 10 year mortgages available. : . 


sount '• I iirtiinnn 

ftaauL - . fomCE.. 

)3967W ffv IhliM j toimagmf MBTTBMS 


NAAtoOW ON THE toU - Private 
M. MatoiVlconiSBreKsael ui 
9 acm Inc Icnnto cwnl*. Avan 
n4W to £1,760 BCm. ALSO 4 
brenn dot Iso £1.650 pcm ft 4 
beftm lowntao at £1M0 MIB. 
Fer Feaae pireao on wiaon 
HawUreOt 864 4395. 


BELmAVIA. Luxury hnitobre 
flat mertooiang ganlen, £ den- 
tate bedreoBto,. 2 baoirBeiM. 
fteuHo uvna room, unreon. 
pomr. £400 Bw. 01-236 6Sl9. 

MATFA8L BoaotllW OaL 1 bod. 
recUftB Kyrtoo. cilOOOa 
Low Buigtonre 01-489-7830. 


ireWOHCA Doiito nfta mim-aaa- 
hOUto by MB. 2 bedraom. 
aiBaaiiB viows. £34,goa 0l> 
896 8834/730 6866 430 . 


FRANCE 


VUME, 


ALOHA ; 

Luamr M. slMtg 4, ftinisbad. 
ranly |g oconr- On gglf come. 
iMT PuMo Bbbs. Can eg 
viewed ftm; 3-12 ApA . 

omAMmb £55,000 



Qumhig 5 loom bcaiE 3 
hQinsAn. iZbn Lobdon.' 
£l9.50aForqnicknIe; 
TdOi-mo«i« : 
' Office booixi 


MONDAY Edgattau Univer* WEDNESDAY La Cigaiedeta 
sity Appoirnmenis. Pnp. & Public CraBeiSecreianal/RAappOinuittnis 
Schoo]Appoinifiwnu,EducatJon3] over £7.500. Gencralsecncuria]. 
Couises.5choIanhips& FsIlOHships. nopoiy; Residenual, Cornmaeial. 


LaCrnnrdeU Citem: Town ACoumiy. Overseas. ReniaEs. 

TUESDAY CnBOTtgr HeriniB: 

a comprehensive gunte to the THURSDAY Centnl Appaiid- 

compuiermarkeL iaeais:ChierExecuiives.Managing 

Legal Afy^Kweatia Soliciiofs. Diieclois,Direcior5,S4iesand 

Comhaereia] Lawyers. Legal MaiketingExecuiivesandOveneas 

OrTicen.Privaie&Publkpractice. Appoinunenis. includinganew 

Lcgtf ta Qene: a new dassiriea- ctassiTicaiion entitled Flnadal and 


tion for top kga] scoetaries. 


AccentaKT AppointBWBt& 


lUe WORLD FAMOUS PERSONAL COLUMN APPEARS EVERY OAV. 
ANNOUNCEME.NTSCAN APPEAR WITHIN 24 HOURS. 


FRIDAY Moteir. A compleie car 
buyen' guide featunng esuhlished 
dealers and prirare sales. 

Hiwltuye n. RwriMcv 

Selling property, Tianchises. 
equipment etc, lo stiull and Urge 
c(ini|nnies or businesses. 

SATURDAY Cheisere Tmvel: 
Holidays abroad. Low cost flights. 
Cruises, Car hire. L’JLTrtvd: 
Holds, Couages, Holiday ieis. 
EaienehnOTs! 

Pea Friendsa new classification Tor 
yourig readers to contact peode wiih 
simiiarinieiesisalhomemdoveiseas. 


Fill in the coupon and aluch K to your advenisemenL Prior lo it appearing, 
we laill contact you wiiha quotation and eonrirm die date of insertion. 

Rates are Lineage £4 per tine (min. 3 linesi. Boxed Display £33 iter single 
column centimetie.Couit and Social £6 per line. All rales + 15% VAT. 

Pay no P^^TAGE* Sc«d le; Hw *nncs, Sbkiey Maffelis. Group 
ClKtfied Advertisereeot Manage^ Tlaies New ipepec Lid. Adveitiseneiii Depart- 
mcaL P£>. Bert 484, VligWi StreeL Leaden El 9DD. 

NAME 

ADDRESS - 


TELEPHONE (DayiiiiK) 

ACcassonviSAA/CNo 


. DATE OF INSERTION 

iPVuw ill4» iinw (or pouing jctil toociMinf i 




PMVuik VRUI ScflBlaBdMlfe. 4 

3^ (toualnnre^^ 

. cwiiBmiBg bo«L ereOM. (mbi- 

towgw. *ea.<S5rT«?£ 


■OJA6 Comb oh Sol. ftewuixurv ' 
«W AndBlucMn toyto . wrono^ 

f M? I T 0tl P * ** ™ ®*** 


.rw' 













































t 


A choice that 
charts the 
(jondon scene 

V?*' 

Chelsaa lor.£l s 

£2J!S5^ 

nwM®5* KnIghisbrtdQe neotflng total 
for £ 1 16 nil^^ 

eloqu witly reflect .values in the London 


Han^}^ and Sons Is seffing the 
houM Inst LeonaidsTarrm Chelsea. 

TTie house was 6uK 

aboitf 1 765 on a fiM boif^ from the 

statesman Sir Robert Wal^le. in 1970 

It was ccmpieMy rebutftintBmaiiv to de> 
signs by Enzo ApicaUa and preserved 
mtemally. Its accommodation Indudes a 
60ft iBcafStiQn area, a master bedroom 
sirite and five fiuther bedrooms. 

Hn House in Trevor Place. 
Kfrightsbridge.builtfntheeertyl9thcei>- 
tury. has (Naming peimfesion and 
fitted btakSng consent for a house of four 
reoap^ rooms, a bilfiard room, a 
swimmmg pool, six main bedrooms and 
lhfBe8tanrooms.itisthefirstindivid- 
tiBl freehold to be reieesed by the Trevor 
Estate, which takes its riame from Sir 
John Trevor, tfie corrimt Master of the 
Rons and Speaker of the House (rf - ■ 
Commons, who bufit a on the ttte 

htt)out1700. - 


Roddy seifs 

B Bodqy Lle w e l lyn, Jandecaipe 
gardener and friend of R<ve>ty. ie eeVbig 
hie house in Claphaia, south London, 
dose to the Common. The three-atorey 
Victorian terrace house has been 
restored and roodemlzecL and has five 
bedrooms and a double mewing 
room. The 45ft garden, with IMM end 
fountain, is the work of Ae owner, 
and Roy Brooks is asl^ £165^000 for 
the freehold. 



PROPEKTY BUYERS’ GUIDE 


COUNTRY PROPERTIES 


Bro^e Fbce ontdde Kagmer, East Sussex, & a fine Tudor manor house, with a 
self^ntaiiied annexe, aim is for sale at axonnd £295,000 throo^ the Heathfleld 
office of the Black Horse agency Gemruig and Odyer. The mansion was expanded 
bwB its tfigins foto aa ECiabtthan himtiiv lo^^ and was later Oe home of two 
Archbishops of CanterlmiT. Althoi^ the propmty is only a portion of that pal- 
ace, it retains its Elizabechan features. It b bnflt of hon^-colonred aslar stone 
and bride aod b set in 15 aoes, induding moat, pond and imddock. It has a grand 
hall and diiriim room; two more recqrtion rocmis, a master bedroom, four furthw 
bedrock and an attic, llie one-beeboom a«n»gy^ b one of several ontbmldings 

The pride of Playfair 


Friary charm. 

■ The Friary, Appietongate, 
on-Trent, Nottingnamshtre,' ii 
fisted bidding wmin waited < 


ornate, Newark- 
nshtre,isaGrade II 
waned gardens. 


fisted biddirn wmin waned gardens, 
and dose to me centre of Newark. It has 
been completely fostered and divided 
inte tour sett-contained aparbnerits.. R 
dates back to 1 270 and was occupied 
the Austin Friars, Observant Fnars and 
Franciscans until the order was' 
suppressed by Henry Vlfl. The property 
changed hanos frequentty and has 
addoons dating from the 17th, 18th arid 
19m centuries, givhg Ra ttiarmiiig 
mixture of styles. 

Each of the four selfrcorrtsinad 
apartments has period features, and the 
first two are for sale at £85,000 and 
£60,500 through Strutt & Parkis 
Granrnam office and the Newark office 
of Earl and Lawrence. 


■ ft should be made deer that in the 
Regents Park Gardens development at 
Veuxhefi, sooth London, mentMiicd 
last week, the prices for iBiitBlnttie ■ 
converted vat house ranfle.froin . . 
£SOjno for a -ene^bedRsam flat to 
£275,000 for a fourhedroom . 
ponthouae. 


There is nothing like the Oxford and 
Cambridge boat race to ebneentrate the 
mind on Thames-side properties, wheth- 
er they aie the modem blocks of flats or 
the fine period houses Dning A'e banks 
that catch the eye as tbe contestants glide 
pasL 

With the boat race being staged on 
Saturday. Knight Prank & Rutl^ has an 
ideal ba^loth for Said House, Qiiswick 
Mall, opposite Chiswidc EyoL now a bird 
sanctuary, which must ux^ortunately 
block pan of the river view. 

Said House is mainly Georgian, and in 
the 1920s Sir Nigel Playbir, the actor- 
manager famons for hb prodoctions at 
tbe Old Lyric Themre in Hammersznilh, 
added considerably to it by building a 
Jwhofe ving inco^rating munificent 
curved glass bow windows. The house 
was later occupied by Viscount Davidr 
son, chairman of the Conservative Fury 
from 1927 to 1930 and Chancellor of the 
Dochy of Lancatter. 

. The bonse, which b doubie-ftonted, 
overlooks its own jxivate riverside 
garden, and also has a ISOft walled 
garden. Il has a targe drawing room 
lookiog out to the river, a dining room 
and study, a penthouse sun room, and 
four principal bedrooin& There is a staff 
wing and a roof terrace, and the agents 
are asking for offers of more than 
£675,000. 

Knight Frank & Rutley has two more 
fine properties in the area on its books, 
althou^ not on the river. Number 17, 
Tbe Butts, Brentford, is one of the 
earliest houses in the road, which 
cominises mainly »i1y IStfa-centniy 
housed Thia bouse dates from 1686 and 
is .built of mellow brick under a clay tile 
- roiaf. -Tt Js back from the road and has 

three rooms and six bedrooms on the 
first and second floors, it has a 140ft 


walled garden, and offers of more thgo 
£250,000 are sought for the freehold. 

The ^lace Gate House, The Green, at 
Richmond, forms pan of the sole 
remaining portion of Henry VIFs Rich- 
mond Palace. It is a superb period house, 
listed Grade L dating from about 1500, 
and of great historical importance. Tbe 
property includes the gateway itself and 
over this is a panelled room that is the 
sulyect of many legenrta, including the 
belief that an emerald was dropped 
from the window as a signtt that Queen 
Elizabeth I had died in 1603. 

Despite its TUdor facade, the interior 
is Georgian, and during the past 12 
months the house has been totalfy 
refuihisbed. It has a principal bedroom 
suite, whh three further Bedrooms and 
the panelled Queen's room, which could 
be a fifth bedroom, three reception 
rooms and an 8Sft wailed garden with a 
separate paved courtyard. The Crown 
lease luis 66 years to run, and tbe agents 
are asking for offers around £600,000. 

Back to the river, Sturgis and Son has 
several iHDperties on the Thames, in- 
cluding Number 21, Upper Mall, be- 
tween Hammersmith and Chiswick, and 
overiooJdog tbe boat race course: This , 
Georgian bouse, with later additions, j 
retains many ori^nal features, and also a I 
roof terrace, which rives a sweeping view 
of the river. The nve-bedroom house, 
with a first-floor drawing room, is for 
saieat£45a000. 

The Anchorage, Rrverside, Twicken- 
ham, a Grade n house with five 
bedrooms, which has been carefully 
improved. It has a secluded riverside 
garden and a. pontoon with two moor- 
ing. The is £390,000. 

cw 


LiTTLEPORT BOAT 
HAVEN 

CAMBRIDGESHBRE 

An exclusive development of three luxuiy 
apartments on (he island. Located in this 
tranquil site just 5 miles from the cathedral 
city of Ely. Each flat benefits from a private 
mooring and carpark space. 

3 Bedroom flat £59.950 

2 Bedroom Flat £53.750 

Studio Flat £33.500 

New 125 year leases. 

VIEW OVER EASTER 
WEEKEND . 

or ring joint cote agents: 

SNELL A CO on 01 286 6181 
or C J Awociatei on Ely 860860 


Medwp 4 bwroonirt bMBBa- 
low won mil r.h.. d«aM« 
Oaans Md AIM c«fV# 0 . 
cemvnang Unr bvinq room. 
dWng room. f>l kNOim. 9 
taOm. soMy. son room, daw- 
M« nntf. patM wiiii 

flohMM aM ftaintain Sa- 
eluded •'J am Moi m ni an 
offsard Mtm t w anty apoio 
trees 600 yards to foU 
(duno, rninla acid imniTti 
eoum. Cecellenl train see- 
vHw lb London and mast and 
•aay access to M2. M20. 
MSS. C 96.000 FreenokL 


CKILHAM 

Nr Canturbury 

9 bed eoitaga restored and 
modernised set in imigue •■‘ll- 
laqe. Open On place, 
beaimfin fully mud kiKim. 

£70,000 offers 
Td: 02302 2387 


' THE PERIOD 

- moo m rr aesarat 

TTieorly roortWy njttJooal 
cKslosue of OM SMI Hb- 
tortc Mosnes for Stic. 
BBVliia or ceBlBB contact 

THEmmae 
aoajniw co 
GfoMMkauM ana 
wsos »m/«xaa 

kwreawud . BwtOwd C e wi c i . 
Two ftot teccpcton ««n ingle- 
aaoks wd evesed beams. 
Modem msv fined WKMn. 
Abom « aei« BMto. 1369 . 600 , 
OMO«aOSa 6 . 


MMDDMEAD. nr iOver Tbames. 
nuer ponion of.iooesma vis 
terian bouse or o«M enanoer 
with deHgMfW aeckMad a« 
am garden. SOA sutlng room. 
dWlnp reack Mtobesi.brec M a a 
raooL uibily raom, ctoakraatn. 


BUCKS 


dULrofrrcTdaus. Anexnv- 
Honst RioHry boose w>«h A 
recent. 6 baorms. 3 bamnns. 
Sir aoMK. OM CH. age. s«»in>- 
nmaPoaL aoec. Soutbcr ir 
gasc. £336 fW ). Ot r ito ae d i it 
Rowland 03*03 6707 . 


DEVON A COBNWAU. 


' PMnrcsgueaco.ennrprep- 
eny ai SBUtienon. 

: a dH' beds. Mlifei. b/tosl 
I roeen. vary large loimge. 

: BaibroesD wWi RPante wc. 

I Box mm. Fun OCH. axes- 
j leu order. 

' £ 69.600 

CoMKt .0983 721512 or 
039 S 4 3674 , 


CORNWALL. Nr HeWoed rauw- 
' CMWTtung trad del Oomldi ool- 
‘ taoe SiyinpaUteUcaOv nod wm 
I tiusaaor. 3 recep. %wen med 
I ow kK. udiBr. 3 dbto beds- 
oaUirm. Car okog. AOraei «dn. 
£ 61 . 000 r/bM RefTSTTSra- 
lon A HMberow fi Lemoo SL 
Troro. T«l < 0673 ) 40606 . 
DCVON • Cbowoknl M 5 .. Min 
Une Ototovi 4 vMlagc smmii- 
Hts. EtoUK fsaiDl Pvtod 
Oeiaae In idyOic canal sioe sel- 
onaonedgs WOwocy Rv*. 2 
Rec Rms. 3 Bedrras. smau Gdn. 
£*LOOO. STAGS. 19 Banottn 
8 L TTwIan lOOSS) 966331 . 
WMmMVflL Old Seafkcaia Inn. 
cw i w iefied into 9 mactoua mab 
.•ancoes. Sou yaemwnan or 
.retired, live In coe. M the atn- 
cr. flumraer rm £160 pw. 
n eeticid C 54 £ 00 . Pbofie 
060039 419 . 

TORQUAY dcL chancier house 
auMt res. area dose town ce» 
tre, iMiMo 19 ntoi. sea imw. 9 
" hfet rm. 3 dU beds, 
eg. eunny gtta. C 67 S 00 . 
ooiek stir tiwne 0805 



aUFTOUK. CMCLSWORTH. CM- 
cbesur sin 17 mis. Lond<m 69 
mis. wiin ISO ydt a roiiuiae m 

' ibeRlverBiea. mNUed tOlh 

CMMiy nail hotwe in wvely \ll- 
isge 0 miles LdMUum. «Wi 
fine gortod feaiures inc arched 
TXidor bricK fimpiam A gd cs- 
posed umbering. Fuu on cu. 
Hall. 3 reccoa. tannhse ml 
lauMky im. 9 kes. 3 uaun. 
Vird am mMnly waBN gdn- 9 
acres paddocks. OnHMdga Inc 
auur Mock. wMsbop^tacli 
na. gge. etc. Offen In me regton 
dffii 60 . 000 r/nid neaeoaopiy 
ihieraem 67/66 Worth SLSud- 
bury SuOblk. Tel « 0 T 8 T) 76655 . 

SItfroUi/ ESSEX Ml. Croton. 
CoKbesv an 10 mis. imaguia. 
live resuratien of moerianl 
Manor House utdi paerfm Pb- 
thees connection iWInUitop 
OeaSy).. Ono-unR romaining. 
Tbe old Guildhall wing. Carty 
Tudor ongm. good twoerd urn- 
bertag A ludor wan paRiUng. 
HaiL dWTn. One drawing m. 
dtotng rm. Mt.-ktMR rm, a 
bem. 9 batha, ch A 
nHOOdbwmna fadUdas. Laeeb> 
wRRcd gon. Apom b am. 
Orang 2 can. £ 96000 . Please 
aopty Sworaers 87.66 NerUi 

' SL Sudbwy . Suffolk: Tel 
10767 ) 76686 . 


SUrrOLK/ESSEX BORBOL CM- 
cneiier sin IS lalM Fine 

coBtemporary cenurv house in 

irwoidl stmnp to IS own 
grouMs on about 3 acres. Nice- 
ly propomoncd rooms. 
beautKul gaideos. swimmlna 
ooMilex. aod gancs lawns, a 
bcdroesas. 4 oaOi/snower 
roams. 4 reception rooms. oU 
eh. garage . region 
-fiieSMO. Su nen BMry 6 
Paitenars. Creal Cornard. Td 
0787 7999 t. 


■SUE OF W RI OWT. SEAVREW. 

Unnvalled poatnon overlooking 
tM SoteciL •'While CMLwe. 
SprtngvBM-*. douide framed 
irMhoU resilience of Miaracier. 
9 bedrooms. 9 Fecepoon 
<Mcks/W.C. BathnMto.'WC 
Kudten. eur; Gas central heat- 
• ing. wuiM owoen and 
car /boat sarkliia s pace, auc- 
bon 39 ih Mmf- Ab^ Sir 
Francis PRH» 0 Soil 36 Unnn 
StresL Ryde l.w. Ten 0983 
65769 . 



EASTER DEADLINES 


THE TIMES- WILL APPEAR EVERY 
™S WEEK INCLUDING 
GOOD FRIDAY 

the Classified Advertisemeni 
Department 
Will be closed on . 

Good Friday and Bank HoHday Monday 

AdvertisiDg for the issiu^ oft 

Sainrday 29lh ftlamh 
Monday Slot 
Tuoodaif lirt A|m« 

Wednosday 2nd April 

Must be placed ^ 

Thttindny 27lli Mareb by SUIOpni 

Cbncrilations and Alterations for_lhe above issues must be 

-Wednoaday 26Ui Mar ch hv 5.00pn - 

TO PtACE YOUR ADVERTTSINO 

ring 01 481 4000 

USE YOUR ACCESS OR Vl^ CARD 


■3 TOfWFORVOURAWERTBE^ 

Mgp yam ACCESS OB BARCLAVCWPiV 


ACeSS 


jam IBU MSB 

ffigMam ■■■■«» 


ROSIE VAUEY 

Se0-conttined flat with 
sgNeMIU views In MMsrlc 
mm. 3 beds. 2 toaUmoRis. 
ftdly fitted tncben. Urge 
snttpg room, large study, 
iiiglll storage b eat ing, 
parking space. With or 
withoal 6 m tvood. 

Whh wood: £85,000. 
W/0 wood: £75,000. 
0452-813881. 


** T * frf?*" COTTASE, Cbarm- 
loa. satHbeity taeUA 9 
badrpom in cnaHOrd Hm. runy 
m ud am is ed. Gtorloua wiob- 
■ scured views. Mem 
hotklay .rettreinenC borne. 

jAgwho. Tet 0463 889901 . 



OVrSKRTS snSHSmuiBIE. 

l 4 od det rural biui^tow m loiio-. 
ly country srtuna London I nr. 
M 9 lO iwm. KalL 3 recs. 4 
beds, study. 9 bams. 9 w<-s. 
CH. mod ML me see. Appm 
iMrd ocre. £ll 9 MO. Age« 
Norrnan WhUcron 0796 
79159 / 6 . 

eROABSTAHH DeBMdf ld l 3 bed 
Ceorgun bungalow ui oougM 
tiler N Foreiaad area 
Mamnocani views over gatr 
course and Joss Bay, P iTft ci 
Iwluiay or rePremont neme 
£ 62600 . TM 01 677 9461 or 
OerS 68969.(0 


village resuHnee. 4 beds. 9 re- 
ccwienA 3 bsiha. laiw garden. 

' vacuum. Dover. SBiMwieii, 
CaMertwry Oilers £ 89000 . 
Tel 0304 6 I 766 T. 

SANDWICH SAY. UnMne auBimr 
rsadrnce Offer) in toe region 
of £200000 Preview. TN 
Wotstotos. SonawicA 030a 
614119 Anyumn. 


MIDDLESEX 


ENFIEXO DETATCMBb 4 bed- 
room hotae in approx 1 am. 
Ptannimi prrnnmtoa ttr 6 raam 
house bi graundS.Frw ptmides 
walk tram DMuitryHde and MU 
course. Close lo MSS and AlO 
and amgs 3 S ndns to Wen 
CnL £ 237 . 000 . 01 365 9791 . 


Noein WEST 


WaJOLOW CtKSNIRE -mtaun- 
OH detached 3 beds aoprox nnn 
acre rural viewt froni/back 
£ 78 . 990 . Ring 062 S 624606 


OXFORDSHIRE 


NIALLAMS 

A SEUenONtf PERSDD 
MUgES AND COTTASES Rl 
THE OXfOi Dl I U 
eOtlNTRYMOE. 

KENCOT. Uiasial cetfnry reimt 
ta nMuNdts FiSV nwd du 
oak imnid comaiM CetsaoU 
siopt bm Magnit XR Hung rm. t 
tads, 2 tusas. supu tanuiK id. 
SMS gor b aoa praity 
gdnfioSSoO 

uEPeRiSTOli Pmi ksaid Jmebe- 

iflhoiftonMuSa Weamodenni 
nanw ora leauss. i^aMl 46tt 
lecso wH. 3/4 femes, igs 
D (MAH beds. 4 baita, siaR 
suie. dblr pcs. vi acre sediided 
wNled gdn ^lESilOO. 
ALOSWOBTH. Hitenor d es tiners 
GMwefSiOn of lonnef 



HASCOMBE, SURREY 

Godalrrung 4 miles An elepant and spacious Victorian country house in a 
superb situation commanding extensive views. Principal bedroom suite, S 
further bedrooms. 2 further bathrooms. 4 recepton rooms. biUiard room, 
iiitchen/breaKfast room, domestic offices and cellarage, seli-contained 2 
bedroom flat, ^ceiient detachi^ collage. Extensive outbuiidmgs including 
siabiing. hard lennis court. Superb gardens, woodland and paddocks, in all 
approximately 20 acres. Freehold for Sale. London office. Tel: 01-493 8222 
or Cranleigh Office. Tel (0483) 274204 

NEAR SEVENOAKS, KENT 

A tine listed Queen Anne country house in mellow ragstone, set in parkllke 
grouncte. Futiy restored and modernised. Fine hall, 5 leception rooms 
(Including billiard room), doakroom. kiichen/breaktast room. 7 principal 
bedtooms, 3bathrooms. shower room and dressing room, additional 2nd 
floor accommodaffon. Detached lodge cottage with 2 bedrooms, 2 recep- 
lion looms etc. Garages. Extensive siabNng. Gardens and grounds of in aJj 
about 12'^ acres. Freehold tor Sale Sevenoahs Office. Tel (0732) 460222 
and London Office. Tel: 01-493 8222. 


6 Arlington Street, London S\\'1A IRB 


01-493 8222 


SAVILLS 


HAMPSHIRE — Scockbridge About 10 ACRES 

5T.i.‘>.h,h;6' 1 rn:L U‘fn.n, ici L”nJ>-f| Uiih-iliu' 
*hnir.itii-» li>nj,«il''JiiiiJi-i. 

Charmins listod Grade D Cvorsfian manor houtemitable 
for furthts* mcdcnmisaiion in an idvilic position uith 
gplendid viesvs iacin;: south down the Tv4 \allw 
Main House: HJL 4 leciTi'*'*' rmiTi- m.r.>i‘T Ksir.iwn -.uik' 

wci-nJar. 

Stables: jJh).ic,*.>ininrdj>u.n. sd^.il |. -r j 

Tj», f-ni l"jjr?LV f»iimf'in»’p.-l H.irjii-nrii-coun 
M.l'Uf|.■c‘t;dl■n^ Vimijcd jthunj,.inJpakiiJ.icL'. 

S.sj.'lLL's Ri-'f.-sHi-u-i h.*Msli.>TiJSshvi.S.iU'N»rs'.\Viij-.i«s,.. 
si’l X-! ti’T-J' 20-ir: iJAViLL'-. Li4>J-4f 


On>a'eni>r HiU.BcrLeL-s' ?nu.ire. Ls'<ndon \V1\ OHQ 

01-499 8644 



Lane Fox & Partners 

wiihRylands 


HAMPSHIRE - FARRINGDON 
Alton 3 miles, Alvesforil 9 miles, Petersfittd 
10 miles 

AN ATTRiMTTne AND LASIIV MANAGED PERIOD HOUSE 
ON THE EDGE OF THE VILLAGE 
Hao, 3 rprrplwn rooms. wNl *auiopi<a hifrlwn brMUM room. 
iJUlity rerni, oniwipal Urdroom wiin MiO-mng drnmg room 
and Mihroom. 4 lutihrr brdroenK. Mt ream and bainroom 
CxrHirni ouibwidinai wnh garagino lor 3 COn. Aliracilse gar- 
dnis toiin hard imnts reurl. Paddork. 

Abaaf 3 i< toes 


6 JEWRY STREET. WNCKESTER, HAMPSHIRE. TB. B 962 B 9999 . 



WESLEY I 7 tb C vutbpr Bbtil Mrr 
couaoo wtiabie 

reure-UMMtt.-hoto. Lgo dbie 
bed. mod both rm. UR rm. 
dtotog/Ul. ch. ottill rear gdn. 
S 3 AD 00 to tod odMinlng «moH 
voMiod con. rurOier t /9 nm. 
Tol 0432 277965 or 0463 
793 B 7 

M WEr D SDfl l RE . cay cwiBc 
2 k. miles. Mod period use. 2 rec 
TIM. hlKUiy klL 4 beds, bath 
rms. eh. h acre 9 ^. £B 9 doo. 
Rumen Bahiwm A BrigM. 0432 
66441 . 



CBXntAL BATH. 2 bed Modern 
MesHS house, game. £- 1 6 . 000 . 
Balb 102261 3 S 12 S 4 . 


SURREY 


ESHEB: DMe rremed ronage style 
rm 6 beds. 3 baiiis. 3 receps, 
eildm. lua Ml. utility, gas CH. 
gge carport, laon gdn^ v rew, 
over 01 CSH greoB. £ 260 . 000 . 
Sole ag-iiis BUimgifurai Higby 
Chard 0372 63323 . 



SUSSEX 


^UTSHIRE 


Ah rlimni wound floor anan- 
iiMW m VTcmnaa manor set In 
mature parkland BneremiveOT 
fi oak pancBM d ra svhtg room. 9 
Igr due bdrns. master wHh 
ensuHe Oiewer roenk mam 
baihroorn. fully fared 
breakfast -‘knehen. Double m- 
rage and stnoa cellar. Freehold 
£ 66 . 000 . Toll 0769 779962 


Most eto gant character 
liousa. sea viesvs. iminac. 
3-4 recs. 7 beds. 4 baths, 
large oak unit kltchat. 2 
oarages, extensive level 
gardeiH. (tiUy doiSile glaz- 
ing. 5 min from statton - 
London by min 1.26 min. 

£197,500 

Tel 0323 646783 

e*et/Wlw 6 d 

(May toy dwf Uw e aa «aV 


HOVE 

i HOUR LONDON 

Brautfid. sucHiy r e genq’ 1 st 
floor balcony cml OsaevUe 
Sea and Lowir 5 bedrooms. 
drawMie-'dlningroom. KIKh- 
en. bath room and sh ower 
room Mrking mace Very 
aiiieL Fumthed le eenec- 
uon by Harrods. Ltfl and 
caretaker very retootuMe 
ouigouigs 

£ 125,000 iaeL t ee lart i. 

Immediaie occubaiion. 
Viewing moi Pn 

Tet 0273 779560. 



BRATTON 

WILTSHIRE 

Uodeni ileadied hose m ongi- 
iBl lurt of viKaw- soutiierly 
asDocL S bediooiiB. sineiQ lo- 
aars news 2 lecepkons. eoen 
Ratal nuitiie hieoiace: hat: 
knehen: 2 banmams. 6CH: gt 
ngf. lar^ TOfikiiM gMm 
ons open tiSds. 

£90,000 

Bah 16 mles, P a ftlitigBn Man 
Ln sofwe ham Wesduy. 

0380 830506. 


SCAORAV. CHARRBNO 

moder a aed vUtoae cuioge 6 
miles M 4 , Easy access Swindon 
A WMMI. I <titr London 9 b->d- 
rooms, bamroom. Mlchen. 
dinino room. tlUinq room, 
downstairt ctoakroom, hall, 
small garden Immeduie vacant 
bossession on compieiwn. 
£ 6 SD 00 ono. Tel: 0249 

690236 

SALBBURT. Deiathed 5 beds, 
banirm. 2 large recep. sliidv. 
hcobs rm. CFCH. iiiiM Mien- 
en luxury DBL garage, 
gdn £69960 Te ar 2 Si 22 IS 0 


YORKSHIRE 


RETIRIKO T J 
DORSET? 

iMiy ilw dne nen t i' wtite 
hhM moMM lar .4 nJMti- 
statd ■BDg doss I nwiiaBMm 
CBBe nee oeanp jmmn. 
l4eSDm BBS mm B&fnO 
2 - 8 amem fta fiom esasso 


AtospOee m tbe wai i on 

Near Andover. Hams tihsma 
dNMdrui doMied I 70 i Ccniu- 
ru aenod ibaiehed prepORP 
with an annex set in a deHenBid 
law garden. The accom in 
iDunac order tun i H ri itj : en 

trance Mfstibuie wen dkitn. 
duung baU ti 7 x 13 k lounge. 
i»;bM mu 3 bcdnrn. 
bemnii. Src annnk noD. 
si witiwfMg rra. ehewer rm, store 
m. Deaehfd dbto gge. cm. 
fW CH. Bealas Andover B 745 S. 


sHRoiuM. oaRRK end df m 
nee coumry eoaage. Large 
kneben. CH.'SlRliig room wm 
Mg stove. 4 be or ooma. bath* 
room, d aal oooin. gum- 
- £ 65 .fXX) one,-T«l: 0288 S 2 ni 
. » 390 'fdWL 0266 860070 
(ssies). ' 


FOR SALE 

PATEJLEY BRIDGE 

Detached stone mall rni- 
dencp siandhig m 
BppToximaMy 6 acres of 
grMlsnd. Thb fully 
toodernned. four bedroomed 
residence stands in alirartne 
terraced gardens wiui paved 
rear courtsanl wiUiin easy 
reach of Harrooaie. Leeds 
and Bradford. Insoeclion 
hiohh' recommended le fully 
appreciate Ibis uiUQiie 
reddenie. 

Mce 469.066 
Tri tt a iragtoe TliSSI 

tor inofe details 


HCLJIISLET N. York Mows N« 
Park Soanous sione buiH pen. 
od houto CM. 4 bds. 1 1 double 3 
smaini. Close le till ammcniiies. 
Ptekihg Meal for nouday or 
VorS eonimuier £ 60 - 000 . TN 
0904 431969 evenings 


6 IIULEIBIB 1 T JO Mins Char X.* 
VIC, aaranve houu dOK KT 
woodlaiids. 6 bML 2 baiM. 
mbSHllceni L Shaped lointge 
36 ^ 2V. iwauttfnl 16 * Carman 
eoed ktt/ breakiasi rogm. ulM- 
ly mm. study, dies, iidi cot. 
dtite one. V, acre partly wooded 
. 4 dn. eatSMO. 0669 90 b 69 



W E 'S 


KING EDMUND COURT, 
GILLINGHAM, DORSET 
UNIQUE RETIREMENT 
COMPLEX OF 
CLASS AND CHARACTER 

Reiease of FIN.AL PHASE of these sup^ luxury homes 
for the retired. Built lo hi^ spec and finished to beautiful 
local sione. Peaci^l rural setting only 250 yards from 
ntarkei town. (Waterfoo 2 hours). 

Prices £38,00&«55,250 

Ts6 10 Ann Cbiher on 0?SZ 878685 BM*H> Code WTf. 

SHOW HOMES NOW OPEN FOR VIEWmO 
WESSEX RETIREMENT HOMES LTD., 
OepL T.T., Saddlers Court, 
Yatriey, Hants. 


SOMERSET & AVON 


BATH 

AWARD- WINNING 
NORTHANGER COURT 

RENOWXrED poa OUaLTTV and ao* 6 m 1 > eonpiBRd. oor muipir ci» 
oawr lUu hi«e as* been irmrswul sa Ute ben taury ik w Jui m viii 6 y 
the* 94 iM Houae~ amdi te 1915 . 

SurefUv iitmcd hf« 4 e dr River Awn. Ac Bm oradr qsaSi y m evtnr 
atpKI of despi and cxecBnaa. FcaisM lodndE; soM wmo 

tiHftmkuiiri batbioDau with i nn p sju vt ubnsand Ainuco Itexinp The 
mafD'5<cni iMlfaiB omie biriitnig • m aaidn ddighifiil kmdiaped niin- 
pimalim BimiuiidiigL «nbm tbe dniilgcfy pf 

maintiuMB ibn VKwmg n lo as appnaatiaa td* ibe diabty w, 

PRICES: £BOMO-£ 24 S ,000 
Brodiiiie from: 

UTHODOMOS LTD 

Sales Office. I Nonittincr Own. Owiic Street, 

Bath Ba:: OPE 

Teh Bub («C2S) tewrntmt 


SWANSEA 462 MumUCS Rd fcs- 
uue iidly (urnunrd. Unigue 
poriunity to aequir* on 
MafioM. MooerniHd freehoM 
terr a ced cooage wrth garden A 
car aeceto to rear 3 bedrooms, 
bathroom 6 MUel. large loungo. 
breaMaal room, klichen 6 out- 
side iiuuty washroom A loiief. 
CCH To be soM fully furniNied 
6 carpeted througnout 4 miM 
walking dHance shopping cen- 
tre AsMng pnee £ 56 . 000 . Tius 
preperti' imst be viewed. Ap- 
ply. A Davm. 84 Derwen Fawr 
Rq^ SLeiiy. Swansea SA 2 
8 AQ. Tef 206119 

DETACHED COTTABE, 3 beds. 2 
rerepa. knehen. baOi. CH. good 
garden with orchard, garage, 
all mam serwas, 5 ms oil MO. 
IS fin from the Gower Peninsu- 
la vacam ii o saesa o n Fr w bci o . 
£ 59.000 lor auKk sale. 01-692 
0261 

LLANHON LlaneUI Dyfed superb 
new del house a neat 2 rec su 
pern taichen 2 balhrm 
loundryrm d-gge eulsianduig 
slews M 4 ton Swansea Cower 
12 m £ 56000 . Tel 0792873424 

SNOWDONIA. DeaKtMd 

modernued S bedroomed col- 
lage M characier on Mawddacn 
Eaur>. £ 66 i 000 Phono 0341 
260 616 

S TONE PAfHN Gorbioe. Mid 
toaies. rocenny renovaied. Iso- 
laied yei only 2 nuies from me 
sea £20 000 . Phone 00443 
413 or Dr Cowley on OI -886 
ObSO 





RIVERSIDE HOUSES 
AT SKEPPERTON 

MinMsuie 9 imaeiiaii^'C manna-siyie houvL itady thii wrefc. 3/4 


ilifcri nscf fnmia6.-;moono£ Unique view and teaiiun h% 
Shcppcnim bwk and Rislt Way. From iib4J]00. View ioda« 
Phunr The DcMB'u.'n. 0432 244J*ib. 




PROPERTY TO LET 
COUNTRY 


eiOPSTCAD. KCHT. PurnUhed 
17 Ui Century period bouse. 4 
bedrooms i 2 doubiei. 2 bam- 
rooms, downdairs rMakroam. 
dining room. UHino room, 
aiudy. lame ruiiy fined kochen. 
uuuiy room, large ptavroom 
Walled oardeo. Central healing 
30 rninuias iraMi toom Central 
LmWon. easy ream Calwtck. 
Heathrow airporU. Asallable 
irornMavisi laooprrmonin 
CalL 0752.462682 before 9 
aan and afler 6 pan. 


UTTLE CHAUrONT (Burks) a 
Bedrmrm, lurnaaieo On lube 
and rau Pram May C 660 pm. 

Phone 024M 46TQ 

COUNTNT COTTACE to M. 2 
bedr-mnn heaumid iihsvs aicr 
wooded sallev near Dosor Mo- 
torways in esss reach, barwoie 
garoen asauaMe acconunq 
torequimnientt . Suiiaiue lor 
■econo or Holiday Sionw a w. 
FINN A SONS. SrooUands. 
Fordsipfeh. Canierhury. hvni. 
■7109001 

6 UBRCV. FrenoluMB. Couniry 
nouse woniru) ewiie. 40 aOM. 
7 B btoreems. 6 iwepnon in- 
door heated boN staff cotUV- 
FismiM) Shooting ndmg 1 5 
year lei £i Coo pw negoiiable. 
Telepnone- 02 SI 26 -S |70 



SOUIMEBN SPAN Granada 
coast seaside siUa 3 oeos 
lounge dining room kli gge 
£36000 TN 013 (M 947 lievesi 


SWITZERLAND 


THE SWISS SPCOAUSra OODI. 
Plele range oi oioperiin in oser 
60 siniuer summer rmorts Ed: 
\ertaer. Viiuus. Lake Lucerne, 
ttofnesr ooeriand ere. Contort 
Hilary' Scon Propeny. 422 Up- 
per RKhmond ROiUi. wasi 
London SW 14 . ToL 01-876 
66 S 5 . 


. T1IA6IMEND SutoUniial 
Biiidemiw-d ruime en Tioean- 
Linboan burner, a oed 2natn 3 
recep. CM. anir rooira Funner 
smedanlwl aCidn for deseMp- 
mem. garden terrace one arre 
lobil. £i 20 D 00 or near oilrr 
Fuillwr info Seend i03B062i 
238 


OVERSE.LS TRA\T:L 


SWITZERLAND 
FROM ONLY 
£99 RETURN 

Save wiih Swissair's 
Super ,-\pex. 

London lo Zurich or 
Geneva dailt on con- 
vcnieniaficmoon 
flights. 

.-\nd daily morninii 
flijihis London (n Busic 
(except Sundays). 
Book and pu) 14 days 
before departure. 

SUi)' in Switzerland ai 
least uniil ihe Sunday 
after arrival. 

Similar saviniis also 
fror?i Manchesfcr jnd 
Birminiiham direcl lo 
Switzerland. 

Bookincui and full enn- 
diiions from travel 
ttgenisor 437-9573 


Darjaiii 


i?n 



■ s ATO L'I S24-' -- " ■ 


SELF-CATERING 


N T-3r» ■ A-/' turn LSUV 

lo% .-*rig i.3 1 ^ * Nojroti . 

:. TT . 

C75'j ■ -Tc(Q-i|Q-k_i3^ 

130 Jmrrmim StrMt. LWJ* 
fliphi, 130 7144 
budget rllgklt S3* 



■:topdeck>;travei^: 

01-373^5/6^ iS-ahrs):. 


LOWEST FARES 


C-airu C?06 
Jniiio C346 
H hnriq >;ao6 
LAST U4S 
N k'ori. C275 
fiydMet Cpo4 
-TAtn £169 

or htophsni 


SUN & .SAND 

Zl. Sualleu 61 , Loudm W 1 

01-439 2lfnp34 6068 

HAIOR C 'CABOS ACCEPTED 


Pam £6" 

Milan emt 
aineie. i inn 
Ur n 2 iir £70 
raio GR9 

\mina 1129 
OniM CMS 


VILLftS&APARTMENTS 


• FRANCE • SPAIN 

• BALEARIC ISLANOS 

• ANDORRA 

• PORTUGAL 

• GRAN CANARIA 

• GREEK ISLANDS 

• YUGOSLAVIA 

• MALTA • CYPRUS 

• WEST INDIES 

PHONE OR UTRire FOR 
mCE BROCHURE 

EMMA JAY HOUDAYS LTD, 

l« R4CA.4N PRECINCT 
CATERH4M.ON-rHC.HILL. 
SL.RRCV 
CR5 6LC 

TEL CATERHAM 
(0883) 45267 

fHir ancmTMl jrT*Jre> 


The Palazzo 
Belmonte 

iVt-yihinCit 

r-viii.il ,srr:i > ic'irr/rO'.k'J 

hi hd-.v V'.jr.? --4.0*} a 

i-rxcd 

eupnorK cbeni io:at Mimmei 
OnlioleuMnina«vachanc«lo , 

sample trii9 un^ue hcilida, - a 

I ?irvceniui . C-j proudhl 
ima'hi ~Lihceniur\ tolTnce 
andF^mCov.-ii&rlno'Vc.iktw 

tidvet.'ftr-jh.'Cr-r'teeul -Teqanr 

S^dTI'nL'ni:-. ^pinKsMdch, 
iinpoiliJcdMa.k-vnrraiqp^ 
t to Thae-.' n j nudKal 

huirVn K4 Mniibi.-'.Tr -TJUpk- 

*dnUPjr(ipeilir-£kert 

dillBicniino.i!lH;nlir, 

tm>(>oA-cl ..xcTern (rah- 
,v,jktf lOSbiho vpu^ei 
the hJtdj, ri.|hl asLioi-fui 
bcMhureinii GrMCo France. 
PC4U>9al'i CVTiaveUffffUi- 
^ ^ lUlanDepariineitt. 
.' -130tmalPlace, 

' ' I London 8W7 1 ER. 

\ 01-5810851 

(5890)32-24hr 
—• .. brochure sei\3K) 





























































28 


PERSONAL COLUMNS 


Mosi other dasuried ad^'enuc- 
mcni< cao hr acccpied l» 
ulcptionc. The deadline a 
S UO^ 2 da>s pnor lo puUka< 
liM tic S.aOpin Monday fbr 
WednesdayL Should you wMi 
10 vnd an advennemeni in 
wriimf piBOsr mriude your da>- 
lime rtone number. 
CUSnMKR SERVICES DC* 
RAimillENT. If have any 
querio or proMen w retaunt M 
your ad^eniacmmi onre n has 
appeared, please ctmixi our 
Cusiontcr Services Depanmeni 
byid^meon 

481 4IBH CM Jn/.l 14/5 


announcements 




Come and see 
Cliff Richard 
in the musical 
"■nme"and 
help our cause. 

On April Tih IW« IIRH The 
Duchess of Kent mil Joend .1 
chanry gaU periormance oi the 
ne«« musical^ime'ir. aid ei 
Cancer Relief di >ne Di)minicn 
Theaire Youcanhvlpihevie- 
{vns«r<.'ancer hr coming along 
Tickei deiaiLs are aiMilable 
htRn Cancer Pvliei. Anchor 
House. iSI9Briiien Sireei. 
London SWa 3TT Tel' r>i ■ ;;i :&11 



CRANADA TV 

is lookna for tm diiUren 
(Qoe mil& one fiemalei to 
lake pan in a duldms* TV 
renes to be reconkd ia 
Muchester bcKwoi Ainot 
1986 aad Ocuber 1987. 

The p u fccwd chiUreu 
shodd be 13 years of age b* 
AuRal 1986 and under 
ia bc«bL 

Tuidan «n be arranged n 
Ma^esur as idioohag will 
tc tniei t rip led thnw^uiui 
the filmiag poMd. 

Standard English aooenu are 
aenuaL 

PICK miy in wthing with 
fell deuils and phounpaph 


lanes Bain 
Castins INredor 
Granada TelevisMD 
MANCHESTER 
M 6 C SEA 


PIMM HOP the Nauonal Be- 
nwoiwn Fund for Uw Aued W 
a m rtOc *Mm' madiina Mr me 
luW «r pain U eonauMte IIW 
arttirK C «0 Mv» a macMnv. 
Doaaam pMw* to _il>e M» 
<«gni Tony Ponoy. Owlrtnan 
NBTA. 3*. Newport Si. toiMOTi. 
tea MINH 

a TW iUVE e\rr lud a relec 
Um sue tnen a mMWter. or 
aocni and are Iniemtcd In 
fonnmo a Society « Un^ 
Ushed Aulhorv S U P A. Wrt ie 
lo P O Box set. SWI4 7PP. 


SERVICES 


F0RS.4LE 


THERES AN EASTER 
BUNNY 

CaLUNO vou 

PIANOS NEED HOMES 
MAKE neiR DREAMS 
CMIE TRUE 
Wllh our iMiwur hire 
WHh oMion u purenaw plain 
From only Sldptn 
MARKSON PIANOS. 
Albany sreeeL NWi. 

TeL 01-9S5 eeez 

ArUHMy Place. SEia. 
Tel: Ol-asa 4617. 


EASrCR SKCMLS at ToK 

Open Priday. CEC VMco £419 
I4HI CM £149. 91 l£Wcr 
SMane Street. SWi. 73P9M3- 


WANTED 


WINTER SPORTS 


BENTLEY SCO 

notr ur ge nt ly regntec to p p rehnge 

DUUMWIS/INDIHM^ 

iienwarfintn rtnall after. VlllTiatiOIIS made. 
66 Nbw Bond Street, W.l. Telephone 01-629 0651 



Sr.IOSEPH’S^ 
HOSPICE 

KilRESEUMXnafil 
(pBiilylU.No.23nS) 
“HfffioaldqssditaiBn 
BBOos fa d btf Ht 
Ym SBifc AOs onwit the 
bidoB of dyfaij eih m 
aMixiiL” 

Ihae poi^Bd Boi fen a 


andvBbysataUfaBSB. 

Tief w qBOkd hse in 
jfailo^feg to yn for fa bd 
opport OD vlfeh on OR 


E4e MNnauM paw w ros-n 
Dounon Flgureo g^SK" ^2 
malsaiu wani«d.0t*29t 3 506 


MUSICAL 

INSTRUMENTS 


BROADWOdO caAM sn lin 

Roi«ui«od No S1794. 
rare . reaoilclMd. wee^- 0< 
fer» Otor £2.000. 01 736 327T. 



MARRL4GES 


BiMdiiain iiai On Mardi 22nd 
1986 Andrew Craaix. only eon 
or Mr and Mn $ Beiuiuon. of 
Hale ChnMre. lo Fiona Helen, 
oidy dauemer Mr O E Ocrar. 
of MUIon Keynet and Mn J M 
Crorv of Bowden. CheWilre. 

BCWflHOaCBMAlA On MaiTh 
22ire 1996 in Srenmerv. MU- 
dieen Nigel Paul Oewlnu lo 
Aoae Mamaroi BcdaaU. 


ffftintttr CV*S profemonaily 
««Tinen and produced 
cuRlcuiiMn viiae documenls. 
Details: Ol-Sao 2969. 

KART la HEART. Todays way 
of meeuna. Confuenure Intro- 
ductloas Uuouqnaui UK for 
Oon u re u r on ataa. rnenreMp. 
Marrtate- Heart to Heart. K 
Ijondon Rd. TwteXenhara. 
Middx 01-692 2061. 
IBAIWUABE • ADVICE Bureau 
KaPMrtne Alien icx Foreign Ol- 
flee) personal interviews. 7 
Sadtoy PL Wl. 01A99 2666 
ISMB) 

coBiaaaffieH a PAiHrme oi 

your home • large or small. De- 
tatii Ol 801 1420 levesj 
fSnEMMHiP. Lo%e or Marrtagr. 
All apes, areas DateHne. Oepi 
«Ol6i 23 Abingdon Road. Lo» 
don W8. TCL Ot-938 1011. 


FLATSHARE 


UVCLT PROFEBSieNAL Person 
21 26 reoulred lo share acran- 
OMMlalion m Battersea Area 
Clan per raomh Phone Ol- 
7314087 Between 9.30 A II 
Am week days A Oi'22S-29i7 
after 7.90 pm a Wn« Enb. 


SHCfgiBRDB BUSM W12. Phare 
with 2 prar tttiHfes for oetwy 
decoraied hse. C.'b Own bed 
aire haUi. Oose lubes. £60 p.w 
incl. ra&pliis TelLoma Worn 
94. O-tO: Ol 740 8040. 


PIITMET. 2 people sinoir reen. 
Ri f.C36p«> F.sharedMerm. 
£90 pw Top of eld Inlrrior de- 
smnnl house. Oi-'W 7946 di 
day wed in S OO.p.ri. 


SWiT Nr Sorthem line. V.lge 
dbl. SiMe coupte or 2 snarers, 
rjn p w oart) mi * small igl 
£86 p w excl LUX. CH IKP. all 
mod roiB Avail >sl April. Tel 

01-293 3S49 

WA HBB MWHmi CONmlOH. 2nd 

prof f. 25*. cal Msrr NS. o.-rm 
m nal. £195 P^n me. Tel Ol 
870 9819 evemngs 

WAPPM6 conventmt rtor. 2 
tnlm UPk. Young prolcSAIMtal 
person wanted lo share superb 
merside flu ESQ pw 01-268 
OIIB. 

AeTON/SHimUIDS BUSH prvf 
M-'F shai* flat. pauo. CH. cu- 
«t0-TV.O R. £39pweyrf- Tel: 
01-749 S686 lafler 6 SOI 

CLARMAM prof m s for own 
room in shared noose CH. 
w iriach £188pcm esci. Tel 
737 0873. 

eouns WKMD, swio. share 
(lesn nai near lime wtih proin- 
sional male. Cl 40 pan. Tci 543 
tl69c 

riATMATES Selective Shanng. 
Well esiab uiiroounory ten tee 
Pbc lel tar aOPL 01 569 6491. 
913 Biwnpion Road. SWi 

HAWMEHWni. Latrty room in 
lamiit house 4.6 lugnis. 
£50. £60 pw hiel brSIsl Tel. 
602 4312 

NIARVLEBOKE Prof person own 
rm. rirpaoUy dec. CH. CHW. 
£49 pw excl Long Irt only 
Beis eu. 01 402 we 

M19 I min (torn Nihn line O.R in 
Ige flat CH -r all mod eons Prof 
m 1 n s to snare w'tlh F 90s 
£48 pw excl 272 6893 eve 

9RUIU or WALES DIRVB. M/f . 
toe o r lux rial. C240 pc.m. 
TriepIMMie 01-731 7992 Idas I. 
01- 720 9499 levesi. 

STM lor 2 mofilhs. £160 pm 
•ajB. l-S pcoale lo share mi- 2 
omen in ou mao. 373 
8830.636 8040 01^174. 


SUsrSfokc 


BOX REOUIBES I day. Roya^ 
ra wees Jiaie i7 Ui-aoih 
Phone: LB. BUir i092^ 

6041 1 from Tunday ^re 
ociwards- 

LAROC WA MH BB CI A MrrM 
Desks. Boofcrae eie A Pre 1940 
fumllure TO: 01-6B6 0148 or 

Ol 228 2716. 

CLVHDEBOIMaiE 
wanM ToppnrcspaM.TelOf 

aaa otts. 

ROYAL Aseor - private box re- 
quired. Phone PAUL <04321 
761791 after dpffl 
ROVAL BOULTON flguresmand 
Tohy -fugs wanted Honest 
prices 01 699 7t9d. 


DO.MESnC A 
C.4TER1NG 

HEW LORDOH THAI Restamnt 
opening nua June reoidres ftdf 
and part ume staff. Mtirt be flu- 
eiH In ThU language and 
cNpertenced M aU aspects of 
TTiU food, service. Salaries 
high arre negoUabie. The tet- 
Mwlno ROSUfocis are avUUMe: 
Head Chefs. 2ire Chefs. Preo 
Oiefl. HeM walter.4ss-s. 
waUer.'Mi*s. Bar staff. Cash- 
lera ere Reply in ThU or 
CngWh pfeesr with referanra 
aiu cv to BOX £67 TheTimes, 

virUnia SRcet. London. El 
9DO 


SITUATIONS WANTED 



GENERAL 


EXCHANGES 


FRBMCH Mat IB yew old < fam- 
ily home on CMC D*Aaur< 
-Mishes to do enchanor v«U with 
Cmpkdi girt/aoy or smdiar a«e. 
10 «BM M Qigiand now unui 
mid June. For juFOwr detUh 
ptMW Phone 01*602 2327 after 
6 00 Dm for 0392 30*09 over 
Easier weekend). 


SHORT ins 


•ERTB9CH srwi. Oepsnt «d« 

1st n flat 1 dMe bed. Rec . K A 
B. OCH. Video W mach. E20C 
pw ine cleaner 2 hrs pw. Avail 
28 Mar-mre June. 01-93B607C 
CWBIBCA, Lmpe SMdM wHb gU 
wry b iii i uu m. £200 pw. tcI 
961 6S44 or 362 88 95. 

El, Comfortable. 2 baiiraoimd 
lut AvaU for 3 Montt d is i 
July. £176 PW. Tel 788 T779. 
LUXURT SERWCBB Aportmenti 
near Staaiw Souare Ashton 
worth Ud Ot-68t 8008.iT> 
LUXURT BCRVIGED FIATB. 
central London from £32 6 pw 
Ring r-pwn we Apts 373 3435 
NEW RaWB RB. Lme W com tort- 
abW 9 bed flat 10 let £200 pw 
Tel 01 909 3683. 


AUDO 200 fuel miecnon * door 
sawon metallic blue A ng. Im- 
maculate rondiuon £7000 one 
Ph 01-6<IO 3961 ol 20S Mr D 
Mor a nter 


OVERSEAS TRAVEL 


TRAILFINDERS 

middaHU totv can AqMi The 
bes-and iM cai pnm iL 
170/100 Okerts 9IK2 1970. 
AROUND THE WORLD 

FROM eras 

ofw 

mWE9 082 



Kenstngton. Ool TV 24hr iwbd. 
Us. CoUlngham Apli 3735906. 
ST JAMES SW«. LiBTiDv 2 bed 
fully itimtahcd serviced opt nr 
pwk. 01 373 5906 IT). 


NON-SECRETARIAL 


★★SAVINGS** 

★ ★iSTCLASS** 
★★CLUB CLASS** 
★★TOURIST CLASS** 

* SrOlCT * * IBRIPC « 

9 PRIIH « * BbSeNC • 

6 tCB»r • * foaMi * 
9JCUS * * _S •RCS ■* 


EDUCATIONAL 
ADMINISTRATION 
AND ACCOUNTS 
ASSISTANT 

We gie loolung tor a person 
mih good eoucaional qwNS- 
c2tnns who can wotii 
accuiaiglv and qtudJv mth 
ligms and has a hign slan- 
daid ol wnnen and spoken 
Engldh Prewus etpenenoe 
5 deaiabie Out iwt essanuel 
and we aid open-minded as to 
4QF 

SUary en appoeitmenl e with- 
in the ran^e SSOSlO-CrjOO 
and wf I ba reviewed after nrie 
irumhs 

Detads hom. 

MCS. 

as Maiyiebone Road, 
NWI SJP 

Telephona 01-935 3723. 


HEEDEB HMMEDMTELT 3 peo- 
ple for worthwhile and 
rewarding work in congentU 
office of Fuinam Publuiung 
Company. Cxpoieiree not es- 
sential bin pieasani and 
(onfldenf telep h one manner 
necewars-. Good money and 
few parking proMene. Please 
Mepnone 01-681 1697. 


niCNCH rSRAIRSM ure or DIIUI 
spfco trainee travel clerk 
£7.500 exp not nee. WH fluency 
In 2 of ihe above with EnglMi 
a» rind Language exs. age 20-25 
Paragon Aw M-8N 7086, 


* SUCUWO » * «aiMSTON * 


* RJ 

* BfAGMX 9- -* 10F«Q « 

* WeWK * « UMA • 

* OISN 9- 9- BWWR ■* 

« WSI51 -9 5 WROa * 

9 lUSW* * «- HWMf * 

* lOKvro * « vwCDMe * 

-0 I «NG£LS « * «*>M 9 

* CMERNi * *sntNCSCO* 

• * SCUDIHKIKA ** 

9 iSf -9 Ids * ICS 9181 9 

SUNWORLD TRAVEL tCSTD 
1W"I 

$9 South Sl Epmn. Sunn 
1037:71 iTsss^so/trioii/ 
233(5f:J«3?/3e097 
THn WM? 


* k H]fC9T 9 


* « VWCDMe 9 


AUSTRAUA 
FAR EAST 
WORLDWIDE 

The lowesl coal ni*itt 

EurocliBcK TraYCl 
01*542 4613 
01*543 4227 

Esiab 1970 




PART TIME VACANCIES 


RARICT STREET part time inme- 
nenred audio sh tynsi in 
mieresung pracuce. Sam suver 
37 Harley Sired. London Wi. 


RBON-KECPER for pay-rulL 
V5T and cretUi controL Some 
upinq. 1-2 days per wfck m 
W6 B4h 9743 


DOMESTIC & CATERING 
SITUATIONS 



CITY WINE BAR 
& RESTAURANT 

uisenily requires full & pm 
ume sufT for Ihrir ban and 
FtsiaiinnL Ouigoing penou* 
alit>- a miBi. Comact Tom 
Wcir 248 li:i liMl 13 ■ 
3pm). 


IF YOU ME toolunq for PWt Ume 
Comon Birti cooklne Mb . sw 
area in rx p pwding catering bra- 
nna and am qualtfied. call 
Ctore Ol 676 4786. 


inwan niCHTS WocMwidg. 

Haymarhei 01-930 1365 


USA from £99 Malor travel. Ot 
486 9SS7. lATA 


SWITZERLAND Scheduled fll«h 

abta atoi 

ALnailVE. MecMTca. Tenertfe. 
Creek Wands vuias APIs. P*^ 
am Tavema*. H oliday^ 5 

lAfm ADMilfiA L5W ^ 

(ItghU e.5 Rid £499. J-fH M 
£476 rtn. AM 

journeys JLA 01-747- 

3106 

LOW PARES WfltoLDWBC • 

USA. & Ameriat k«d M rar 
CML S Afrtca. TrmrvaW 48 
Mvgarcf SDvei. wi. Ol 680 
2928 rVha AcnDM) 

ROUND WBRLS £746 eCMl Chib 

fTfiepg. flrxi ff £8038. Sya- 
fr tt59 rtn. Oolumhw. 
Cutlers ^rdene. lODevonHUr* 
Wruare. EC2 Ol 929 4261. 
mil IXIMT1 ift'Emoniy oca- 
era. Try «• 

M.FUGKTBOOKERS 01-387 

9100. 

LOW COST P LI8IITB . MOM £W 
new oesUfiaiMna. vaimanrier 
Ol 408 42«.00M ARTA 
61004 ATOL 1960 
MUBB, 1*— sw-4. N.TB R N. 

Worldwide ch rupeil faf» 

Ricmnond Travel, i Duke M 
mctifflond ABTA 01-94O407& 
SPARL portubm. brem 
PUW its from tnod UK alrpoRP. 
Many law ppeciN often. FaMer 
Ol 471 0047 ATOL 1640 
TIINMU For that perfect haNdgr 
with sunny days 8 carWree 

Asgiia. tdeuf for Marcti-'Apni. 
TimHton Travel 01-373 4411. 
USfk N, Vorh £169 Miami £198 
LA £299 rtn Alan C h ea p «re 
artiedule III on mainr US carri- 
ers. 01-584 7371 ARTA. 
ALJCANTE. Faro. Mataga ra. 
Ovnond Travel ATOL l,W 
01-581 4641. Hnraham 68641 
AU6SM. N.Z.. ah Africa. U&A. 
Hong Kang. Bes Fares 01-493 
777S A8TA. 

SYD/HEL JWia Perth £546 AB 
sealer camces M AUS^ME Ol- 
S84 7371. ABTA 
JOUTM APRKA johura fr £468. 
01-584 7371 ABTA. 


CHALET ‘PARTIES:.. 



EASTER NOLHMT StOMB SO/S 
5-4 by air ftorn CaiWleii A 
MaireheNw wim howls or M. 
Prom £129. Ufi pan only £^ 
Freedom HaBdamOi-741 4688 
ATOL 482. IATA ATTA 


CSSTER « APM 8M-RM. U6 

avaiiahiiKy, vre d*isere. Ttgnes 
A Lee Arcs, from £2B£.p p me. 
rtn fiL Tre. Sid VIA 01-903 


eastes breaks 


SWAP CIS* Clsn aaer Town 
house. ndd-Esara for ftder or 

Sipnmer hoUdmu. 0248 74348 


BUSIN ESS 

OPPORTUNITIES 


SHPAf IHRJU8AW, nreny yaw 
ea tp enqre e. rpuuke* IM jjhrtM 
baditno for targe vessN E x^ 
tern potenual mveniaen i - RMii 
posBUe rttums. Far detaOs re- 
pfr io BOX E4B. 


COMMERCIAL 


W0RW8IIBP/8IMBIB 900 M A. 
rriTTT'f"* doe dsndiuArahouaa, 
cao P.W. Ol 488 1509 


PUBLIC NOTICES 


NEW BULOH tt ASAP 

COMPANY LDtflLD 

N0nC£ M HBtERV CaVEN 
that ax EMaoMuon GcmM 
MfgCBS or Die Caooaoy wR be 
MW at iO LWebvre Street 
Omtimf «n We^eWi 9 
Aprfl I9ee« itOOuikfurtlte 
fouowtne putpoia:- _ 

ih osnNdcr Ml olltr fbr pre Oh 
diniey Riaree of Hre Coomny. 
Bv Orair of an Bewd. 

A V1agl6 
SreretBiv. 

28 Maroi 1906. 
A meona' onuoM to be prceem 
and to v«p al the imoliM Mtof 
WPOM a preafli to annre. on a 
poA. to voM iraemd e* him. 

A proxy muN be a namberof 
the Oamoany. 


LEGAL NOTICES 


prospect place* El 

A- charming new town 
House overlooking attrac- 
tive coartyari 2 douUe< 
bedrms. Ideal for Oty busi- 
nessman. Company let 

Min 6 months. 

faOOporwMk , 

A RIRTHBi safCTHm OF » 

houses is aniMto to 
HYDE PARK OFHCE: 01-262 5068 


aVVide iangeet 4 U 3 My(uf**st 7 BCi 
and unfurrushed oropeHy 

• PuH Mvn^inent SeiwGR 


<ass®!S!e 


-LoganfaAdwee. 

. PBrsonalsed Senw ihioogh 


KMIPSTEAIL NW3 

Uniquely locaied modem 
House in the heart of 
Hamper^ VlBage. 5 bed- 
roomSv 2 balhroomSs ^ 2 
recepdon x^ms. ■ Patio. 

Available now.; . 

p«r werik 

UnUVENKSGFn^ 



Hampton & Sons 


PARWWICN. Lmt minute Saner 
eanceUaMu 5 bed pnwd sane 
raiage. ano Bummer baoldne 
avaiL TN: f04S 3871 3357. 


IRELAND 


aNABRIOCR OOTTAOEB. Went 
SI. Weds. Seraerset. f0934t 
742969. Cof WtX* of 160 
IMWCS In enc. DUCbunt fares. 


LONDON 


GENERAL 



imniftnii nouil 200 Nbwe 
rooms. fi68pw partial boatd. 
Aeoly 172 New mm Aaad 
SCI. 4VT. TcLOl-TOS 

417S. 


YORKSHIRE 


BObVORTABLB 4 bed r oomed 
fannhne.sii4BMtoVtor« Open 
views 10 MiMier. c oti e enw nl 
for e x pa ufto oan. N VAtoors 
A CM cn. Meal enildran. June 
2B dbWMdS. Tel 0904 768500 




OelghibJl tarr tnuMonquf* 
8t SM8t to NRgaw MlBBe. 
2 bedmtt 5 an BUM baSiim 
8 <9«S8ina m drawing rm; 
l/r Ml/bricK rm; B8p dMlL 
CaEOpN. 01 727 722/ 


rabuous giBipKi flr ft In 
Bought altar oiinsion t* 


mt 3 hbWin K 2 batf i n n s. 
Nx wiW im; t f kh; omat 



Amcombe 
& Ring land 

Residential Lettings 


6 AiMngfaKi Streep London S^WAIRB 


LtTTINC;? 



See ^ c*ur 
Specialist 

CKORt.E KMC;m 

I )jr I clltn-.; XlvuI 

^ {it.itfl .‘’Cfi.-vt 
Hjm[>sti.-ad \ iUa^e NVV5 

Tel: 794 1125 


Quality Houses 
and Flats in 
SW London, Surrey 
Berks. 

PS areas ~ 

Teh 037284 3811 ' 
Tdex; 8955112 


01-49?8222 


barnard 

marcus 


^01-629 6604^ 


TUITION 


GENERAL 


UP UP & AW.A^' 

NalrebL J6*Biirq. Cairo. Du- 
bai. Menbre. Sinoapore. K L. 
DriM. Banpkoii. Hong Konu 
Sydney. Europe. A The 
Amenras. FUnungo Travel. 
3 New Quebec SL Marble 
Arch London wiH tdd. 

Ol-lO: 9217/18/19 

Open Saturday 10.00-13.00 


tXIhlCW T u is ON fflgnu-'hob 
to Europe. USA A moft desOnv 
HORS. Dipiomai Travel' 01-730 
2901 ABTA lATA ATOU 


OVERLANDERS 


KmVA for an oM style, ranpura 
ptMiewaphic safart laxunmw 
and e ra eoMve: or an oreliMve. 
guided lodge trip. <no p ark ag e 
tours), raicaet Msawsirt BaMns 


SELF-CATERING 

FRANCE 


BRITTAHT Morttoian 

noitfunwl. near Camac. rau- 
fensMe flat sips 4. in how 
with gnrdeto 300 yds frara ses. 
April to OcL Le OUUNCHC. 14 
rue Hafteur. 29140 RoMden. 
prance Tel 96 S9 24 M. 

8. PRAHCC lovely vtiuunViaere 
fTtootaig Cav-Naira Bay. 8 dale 
iMdnm. 0628 31713 


SELF-CATERING 

GREECE 




appointments 


Crata. ORbBBiB. CertiiZBW. 

1 Wh tram nsedp. 

2 Ms Iran GZSgp. 

Sane NSC data pBew. tort 

1.8.19.2279 Htaf 9J.12 
wm mn utBiTOincN to 1 We M el 
siinniei OSiMd *meV "tai 8 
tutaB deie ■ Mm IbaIk*- 
Fer ietaBi TN 

0403 59708 


BUSINESS FOR SALE 


UfCauTM BBNBRAI PriBttto 
Buwte* B per reiei g fnm Free- 
iMd ph leeaee in • favourad 
Devon U frti wefl pemb iM ied lor 
mwarwkp and aarpeel raaBui- 
nfraaoBe. boxiav-er XBt W.OpO 
per anmub. tdgh grofti mandti. 
soenreHng to books. Icaneci. 
pamphira. adveroanu. w i no - 
ncry ere. Orfex to tne rxNon of 
£300.000 tar the rraehoM. fts- 
torn. firUngs «id gMdwfll 0 * 
Die buonern. FuBordt Conner- 
CUL «0392) 314015 MJ4PT 


AMBITIOUS 

ACCOUPITAIfTS 

ASSISTANT 

YqgBp nm «r Mcond Mbber 
vnoi 'A' toFeN n eede tf by 
young ftWbiUy Ann of Cbar- 
itovd Antnmxmi toeuMd In 
Prvenide waeliuuae by 
loww Brtdoi fowa gwon- 
ning poolQ. A nuBy good 
ogporrmny lb prowes - <m 
wu toocR you. Good sgjwy. 


01-ai f7«i. 



LEGAL AFPOINTMENIS 


L U C 1 R B6 ASA LAW Die loQnn 
.f*.*Mw— weteome eoeavtocM 
I muma to-uno Its OmudiywUi 
Bervicr. SidUMeb A Legal 
Execa. 5 ovctgtdB aon. are bl 
A ctoiv. Sheet A lime Nm 
ae uMo gi. Feta uiiwwatee Aan 
LAW 01-248 1159 


THINKING 

SECRETARY 

SnaB fliBcr nrfdS an 
u r gmitag a peneo to tain 
mantfly team near 
Warron SWacI Tubs. No 
it fcrt hond . good typing 
ewgntinl and fUD ffitan- 
ing gtvfsi In wp and 
cemputcr. CC 7 . 500 . 
Ring Marte cm 01-387 
2838 Oio agencies 


CABBAN A 


smi pfMy ft Bv flhw. 2 

Md. Rena. K i B 5 PMb 
WWB. Et2S 

112 snap ft. taiMr dm 4 

fini,2BNi,8ng,K4 2B. 

[Mlk« WPS 

SWIfeRttg/tooUnBlInM- 
■B.2Bid,2itacap.GreDWW 
K. 2 H. BdC. C27S 
MB Itahn litt vM BeodB 
08L5Bed.2RN2p.nhD0b- 
w K. 2 A £400 
nrgdtadf>EWft2aH2 
itaaaHl-TachiC2B.MTcB. 
EM 

01-589 Sttl 


ROBERT BRUCE 
& PARTNERS 

BENBOW ROAD wo 

BilBlar itatved BWden flat 
comMIbb or 2/3 bedroDiis. 
Btody. doiMa -racaoneB 
roan. OBed ubften. 2 baBi- 
fdoms. fiSSBow. 
CMUMDCR Sr JM 
An i8U l98 newly deewWed 
fML 2 donMe faeWoons- re- 
EWdlon RMok utetaen and 
taa lhnwnL snaO paOo wr- 
dan. c»7»pw. ^ . . 

01>937 9684 

St Janes House, 

13 Kensiiigioo Scpnie; 
London, WS SHD. . 


:9LAIB*flO«8«S 





WEHWEWmNG 
COMRMWTBIANTS 
WUnMGTOREHr 
VOURHOMEW : 
esmUL/SW LONDCN 

Bachanans 

Lw^attoiniimeid . 

(K-3S177S7 



01-736 4851 



PEEL STRECT.m 

FMorciMvaKWriflMFniw- 
ty period booee ta- iBwnad' 
HI enr of a cWoarfDl groan 
of BtxBBCt on caeapdoB HB 
and M a iBPll L ' ida ily at- 
uatave lay (ML DMa 
recep.4hcdg,HLSbMa8. 

pano. Obo cx nwiwiif 

£22SvOOCL < ' 

Mwsti a P n mnf : 
01-B37 6091. 



tarn taL 4 badi Sbtaiii, tana 
18 ^ F/F m, tat pgiwr 
£70000 fkw- - 

OBLIOM sr WI 
A oawly dMontad Ml.ap- 
pomlcdMtereW 2badl,2 
tndn. 2 langM- M. tat i»ta£ 
esaaoopik. Uagiai 
01 7243106 




iMK very best 

’ •“uireiiirta ta aoEnB 
..come to i« Bor 
■OAtaBWA. BM mprrut , 



GREEK EASTER 

CandMlt proceslon 

eraund a Bny harbour. 
Sarbequed lamb waehed 
dowB with Cretan wine. 
eeaiiOfid flower nned val- 
leys A mow-capped 
nwunlalia A CMan nopt- 
laBiy with a wann praiid 
fnendly people. 77110 to our 
Crete, come A share II wlUi 
IB. In our beachtoOe vIBae A 
studM 

•pMire «•»] 
depi 22/4 A 2P/4 
frrai £175 M 

Ttb 01^ 44a/5226 



SELF-CATERING ITALY 


COACH TCUNB M fTALT. The 

Seerei Souin. A Tmie of TUera- 
ny «r Splendour* of ihe VencM 
A xflect mo or vulue tar metier 
coach tours. AHoviiimA hoieto 
vtun vwimnung pools and eibr 
weekends Free bTbcnure frera 
KUgre of lUiy Deo) T. 47 sne»- 
herds BuHi Green. wi2 8PS 
ref: Ol 749 7449 (34 MS 
service 1 


SELF-CATERING 

PORTUGAL 


ALOAKVe For luxury vUlae wlo< 
pooh 5 maw senice 41 
Pernipars e«cl««lve CarvoeUb 
aub. cau ftoOKU wiwbuod 
Ud 0349 817033 dr 01 866 
«723 ABTA ATOL >276. 

ALOARVE ALTCMATIVE. YUM 
HNidays of distuKUon tor am 
very tew Tci 01-491 0802. 79 
SL James's Sueec SWI. 


SELF-CATERING SP.AIN 


auXAMtON L'ntadiU resort to S 
Spain vma» Apis Sal Fit Cal 
MlF^ (Nr La Man^ Beacti 
Bav Hob (K33 77018S ATOL 
ACT 1 617. 

pmrro banus 8 m Cxei lux 
accom Sertuded Oash wnis^ 
pool Ibcinei. bar Ko rtuidren. 
From £9Spw 031 226 7676 
.031 668 3405 evee. 

CBSTA HJlHeA modem flat 3 
beds lemce vwirammg pool 
golden beach unspolii area 
S2O.000 Tel 0S?2 338683 


WINTER SPORTS 




KAIMPitaUA—awiagiliOTC- 
toHeto’. fuiidNiiil 401 taur Oto 
wtUi B aedb. 2 recope. lUiy 
orndpHL 2 btohs «re2bgno- 
toeo. CBTS-pw. 8ABCETS 01- 
720 3160. - 


Htohm iO'nwildnig_L f»yrey | gpi4.Ti ini 
liMignimi wc. SbiM bto* ' ware.abetoito 




UDC UC noHD 9UKT. Ptdiy 


I P MoMh oei 857 3838. 





USA APRieA EtmOK AusmHa 

New Seatond. Cemune discouni 
fom OTC. 01-602 3236. 




EASTER A APRIL 
AVAILABILITY!! 
Pneos iRKi £2<4 
C3MLET HOLIDAYS IN fflE 

TOP RESORTS 
01-584 5060 


SM JST FUCHTS. Geneva 7u- 
rwn. Mumrn nc. Rnon 
transfer froni £59. Ski Jel. 
(Q3T3 I R64S11 

ymtCiL Simerb caiered apcv 
avdiiame 29fh Mar and 6lh 
Apr BenBey TrOvi-l Tel Ol- 
361 -7967. 

HU DAVOS. AvaoabllKl' 30 Mar 
- 30 Apr Tailor mage Tel. 
0225 859598 

BM BARCAM ROT Uire. HMels. 
ctialea i aoes by air. tieeper 
coarh A s drive Insuni bMk- 
Mfli acccK - vwa. 5U West. 
■0373) 864811. 


PANT TVS PA/SCC CCTCOO A 
medium sed tamtfy run firm 
in GCl seeta an adavtotoe part- 
tone scoxtaiy lo wm for toe 
M.O. and u^CHlonilti’ for toe 
Beutor CdHar. OoOei wio to- 
votve prratoing ranflOenBH 
repotta and lenm. icaearch 

and reCTtMneM admtoWr*. 
bon. In addUMn yon wia have 
tne Sdie rasgexotoUity Ser toe 
Ihtns suflonaiy regvrereoa 
A team sauited person IS fdutatl 
Who WIO enley thto totormal yet 
efllcieni ranpany lOnetoften. 
AudW/FGHh- goed typing. Ase 
a»45. oone Garbtt fwcrwi- 
tmnt Co^ulunts 
nuenm scc/pa tdx* 

Adrato AdnuntoouDon pamer 
Of a lane g ucceud ui Oererai 
Landau firm reqitoT See 'PA to 
hHp him cortv atn hti bob’, it- 
raonslbierole Aainiiiiaamior 
eoutioii wUhtn the cvnpany Uic 
wxrk to efien pre mU ia mid 
denuhduid you shouH hara 
iniuaUve and die cciifl dmre e to 
dealwinigcgptoat aflimeto. An 
9e for deoH. taai typing and 
WP aap ertwree ve also rr- 
gidreO. galrey £9.280 At* 
as* F uu i e we AinkjfiiUiieiito 
iNec Cora) 01-499 9I7& 

M C ORP CO • PersenDto 
aaatHaie secrxuey. 88* w«h 
55* xtwrihand and WP exp to 
handle own cormpendenre. 
busy letoptwne and toke gei 
admin »r rnnratou' b 
L adbrou Grove, wii. fSAlOi 
Bweekahoto *che«ofBghto«re. 
CNt 577 8800 fOW 6P *39 
7001 iWeto Eirei seoxartes 
Pito The SecTxtortN 

ftocmdbntS. 

AW A UMI B I T RA TTVE Boa sutoi7 

to required by one of our cbene 

w on ■ peetaorTrt posKtan 
worWrafor Ihe head of Techsi- 
eal Services U vou have 
experteiwe on Ihe I8M PC wllh 
Word Stor and are ii ne ras w d In 
toto posUMn Dfease contoct 
Catherine Bu ige cl i en 01-836 
9972. Mngawiy Temporary 
sun Consuuma. Pef CBOOl 

BiSAX OUT C £9500 Udloue 
opp to breaX out ef eeC role, 
ftesp for all eontracts sarMOto 
for imcmai. Co with awn line 
debt. Ilatoon wmi European 
OMonwes & venirig up as coo- 
iracB. only 20^ sre tar 
Manaper. some inretemg en 
red as is n um erao’- wraeof hu- 
roour A inwauve. Call BopMc 
630 7066 V P Cm. 

VnMt CO • Bu*y. VHSed I06 a* 
serreury » SaM Manager of 
urpeWesi End Wine Co, Short- 
hand * WP skllto w eeded. Age - 
early VTsr w £9.000 * bonua. 
CaM 3T7 8606 tCftyl ar 439 
7001 iWM End) SKTetartes 
Phis ThP Otcf t ar m 

CdASunants. 


«M Neal to stwer. Lavra S dtoe 
bed <■*. torn and dae » bitoi 


NOPf-SBCXETARIAL 


g«n7, HAiJIAIB. OliaHliiw dbW 
bed nai III ip» fiauiy hee. gtt 
and ttL c3Me Btoa/BR. £i05 
pw Inc. 573 0542. 

BARNtt IWU. 1 F. Rwn *te 
ran. Stm MC IHuge wm 3 bn. 
£50 pw. 01-576 1818. 
■jmifATW greond pebT p0^ 
•on to mare hmiMy bouee. 
£170 B.CJU. Ol BBB 81 19 (ML 
G8AMMM CDINWON/BBllMa. 
9htoe H6IIM. Ipe Able m. £80 
pw. TmO) 228 5031. 
HDC9MOT0R Sirr own room. r. 
n < wnege- alir gxGcBcnl CH OK, 
£89 p.w. Ml. TN 573 1431. 
N8 run To mwe toM bae. 
O.'R. AB mod cars. £136 PGM 
EXCL TCI Ol 3B9 3962. 

RVfB. nraf F ftN tor O/R m Ptod • 
terre ip bar DbL £210 pen toe. 
686 497D CUBS. 

PRSr P. to share I bee fbf bi 
Barotto Court. £148 pm eub 01 
808 8408 Bftor 69m- 

pimcr prof M mw 20a. o./r. 

Large nw mar itver. C180 
PBB . Ttt TBB 68B2 levtat 
STRCATINUi toeeiy Rtem to* dul- 
at iwiac. MV» pitoirer. £40 p.w. 
UIC . 609 0579 fObT68 3d 1 2 (to. 
SW2B O/R. totora we * g«. 
£180 pan Nrs pfx^> May gg- 
ceeeCtly 843-8901 Icvaai. 
51517. o,'R to nXxed tim udBi 
CH. 1 min Tube. £8o pw 
cmL 757 8802 ail 6. 

SWt M grad IP letn cuntf Iwa. 
gtok Suimv O/R £68 pw toe 
biBs. same toed T3G8743. 
URBDf7 >'dung lady arltol with 
pan tlme to b peg u(r «a bu e m . 
cent LdR 9579742/3282779 
W7 pref n.'gmofcer lo Nare ftoL 
own room. £166 pan Ml. Tot 
Ot 857 5179 after 650 pga. 
MfX Peraen to toiaix urge hm IM 
wtm analhei. £300 pon exc A 
drpdsiL 800 4003 (aftor 6L 
WBO.'R tor 3rd pman, 28*_N/S 
In guMt. apacIMtoflaL fiiBOpcm 
me. Tel: 937 6239 afier 650 
W35, urge room m imim. gaa 
CH, nr tube. euB prof "fs. EBB 
pw toe. Tel 01-743 diOS. 



57 JAMB 5*1 aNtattoftil I bed 
net In Ibe heart af Laadea. 
8 naB bwcfc wioi bil men a 
ton lato. £280 pw *. CQiOto'il 
A aWBl Ot-930 7381 
































































































































Irtfc UtAtZi WbUMtbUAy MAKCH /b 


SHORT 


2y 


RACING 


’s Solntioii 
the answer 




to 




'T' ■'• - ST*. 

Avv'SX** 

yl* • 




. Pr^tondarmrhmiaftiP iinigfa) 








Unlike pot plants, horses 
canaoi be forced to Uoom 
before they- are natsiialW 
rea(^. For that reason h b 
advisable to look for one who 
has come to hand, e^y in the 
p^ when wri^Uiog up races 
■in tbese.earty days of the new 
Flat season. At Gatterick to< 
day God's Strintiim fits - that 
bm in the I^ce Around Yoik- 
shire. Handicap airi he is my 
naiK 

He did not 'win &st timi* 
out. as. a three-year-(^ in 
1984, -but on rraectibn tha* 
was not particnlarly smi»isiDg 
because it was the first race of 
his life. However, he did make 
a triumphant start to bis four- 
yev-bldcareer 12 months ago 
.when he won tte eqnivalent 
' ritoe. • intenestini^y .mbm the 
same draw that he this 
afternoon. 

The word finnrNcmh.Yoik- 
shire, where he is trained ^ 
David Bmron, is that he is m 
and wen and expect to 
another good start, even 
thoi^ he has 4Ib more on his 
back than when he was suc> 
cessfiil last year. Later in the ' 
season God's Solution won 
anotba* qirint over today's 
course ' and distance besides 
one at Beverley. 

On one occasicm he beat 
Crowfoot's Coutore by three 
lengths.. Now it is hard to 
envis^ him not doing it. 
again on onljr a jppund worse 
terms. In tms instance 
Bazaar, who finished 22th in 


tlience wda by Will George at 
Doncaster last wedk, looks tte 
main threat to my nai^ cspe> 
dally as be will enter tne^y 
with a reoe under his bdL 

Btaemede, the couiageons 
winner of. the Brocklesby 
Stakes at Doncaster on - the 
first day of the season makes a 
Quick return to the hurSy-buriy. 
of the ladQg scene m the 
Toytop Stak^.and.K will lake 
a ni^ newcomer to beat 
hii^ Twelve months Mel 
Brittoiii, hb trainee, won the 
sanie race '^th. Dublin Tad, 
who developed into one of the 
toughest and most consistent 
of bis age. At Doncaster I 
admired (be nay in' which 
Bhiemede^ who has {denty of 
iast bhiod in his veins, battled 
2ns way back into contention 
after seemingly lookiiig beaten 
afixriongout 

Interest in today's jumping 
programme at Huntingdon 
has been ftidled by the pres^ 
ence of The IVfighfy- in 
the field for the Nbnhcote and 
Company Handicap Chase. A 
winner over this course and 
distance in November, Moni- 
ca Dicldnson's 11 -year-old 
was then hot seen out at all 
until die National Hunt Festi- 
val when be was runner up to 
the Cheltenham qiedalist, 
Half Free, in the Caihcart 
Chdlettge Cup. That was a 
good perforr^ce by any 
stahdara and now I expect 
him. to prove too good, ei^ 
with 12^ Tib bh Ills bade, for 



Clara Momrtain takes the last fence on his way to victory at Sandown Park 


the likes of Carved Opal and 
Vdeso. 

Finnesko, firom Simon 
Christian's well-run 
Lambourn stable, appeals to 
me as the possible winner of 
the Finsbury Pavement. 
Handicap Chase. . 

Course specialists 

HUNTINGDON 

TRAMBISi Mrs M Diekinaon. B wkvwn 
fnm m lUHMTS. 30a%: J CHtoRt. 32 from 
172. ias%; D GsiKtolto. 12 from 65. 
l assfa. 

JOCKEYS: S Smltli Eedes, 34 whinen 
from 145 ridos. 214H; H Dnias, 14 from 
78, 18d%: R Rowe 19. from 135, 14.1%. 

CATTERICK 

TRAO0S: T fianon. 1 1 wkmars from S5 
nmnars. 20M-. Mbs S Han. 7 tram 4S. 
14.3%: M H Eaatarby. 9 from 80. 11S%. 
JOCKEYS: .G DulliBld. 36 wkmera from 
206 rMas, 17.3%; M Bbch. 22 from 187, 
11S%. . 


Three more for Forster 


lim Forster, iriio had a fSDm^ 
timer st Newbvy lest Friday, 
aiahitaiiied his flow of wiaiiers 
when he landed a treble with 
Clam Mountain. Qnaiiier and 
Lefrak City Rt Sandown Park 
yesterday. 

Desert Orchid started odds- 
on fhvonrite to get back on the 
winning trail, in Clara 
Mountain^ race, the British 
Aerospace Kapier Novices* 
Chose. However, a monumental 
bhmder at the fence did not 
help matters. Desmt Ordiid 
contfnned to lead mitil chal- 
lenged by Clan Mountain after 
die second last The pair rose at 
the lest fence together and Clan 
Monntain gained the adrantage 
to irin hy one and a half lei^dis. 

Forster reported that his 1SI$5 
Graad Natiimal winner. Last 


Suspect is very well and will be 
aoconvanied to tbe big race on 
Saturday week by Fort Askaig. 

Qnarrier gave his rider, Tim 
Thomson Jones, an exasperat- 
ing time in the doshm sta^ of 
the Royal Artillery Gold Cnp. 
Thomson Jones drove Qnarrier 
into a challenging position at the 
pond fence. Qcanier then began 
to lake an erratic course and 
veered sharply left when toacb- 
ho: dovrn ahead over the lest. 

Mark Bradstoek dien surged 
into the leed on the bUnktfed 
Laurence Rambler. However, 
Thomson Jones got Qnarrier 
racing in a straight line t^ain 
and they jnst got np to irin by a 

Laftak City completed the 
Forsttt treUe when he jnst got 
the bmter of Itozy Sunset 



GATTERICK BRIDGE 


4.15 YARM HANDICAP (£1,394: Ira 7f 180yd) (16) 

1 112100- IOaEOUR{64h(MraAtaagiOJRBg^7-1(M). 


Going: SO 
Draw S-7f, 


soft 

low numbers host 


SVMBCUe 
041100- RBI 
0OS33O- ranmsoH 


AUrriyO 

agflbleiteiOR SulSe 40-13.: D NKtMBs 14 

IBiaiMWiC Bn 6 n- LBH nja TftolMttfr9-1 MBewioftll 

•ONffljRDnmrtKStm^M CDwwIO 

STOIC (b (Mm BanyiGRRiivdifreS-- JCwraa[7)7 


'• -iC 


2.15 EV OBAN1UIDEN STAKES (2rY-0: £1,031:.^ (10 nnnera) 


: Bern) G RWivdi S46 . 
"" imM R Rotonon 54 
IW9iaiw7-5< 


SWMMorthS 


1 

2 

3 

4 
7 
9 

10 

11 

12 

14 


BMfrELBUZBI 


LAZBIffi Bnndai^ Mm I B4B90 . 
MORf^ (J 8qi*se J BWTT M - 
w (K nsMADemsSiioi SO 


m CBUumK noMio M«9 s 
SCMMHQ SPAnSa (F Cwi) F ewr so . 


.Ncmwes 

.WCmon2 


MljffltortSBO... . GCntarBS 
S7-13 KOwtoyl 


. Mf^7 
SMoiibB 


vmSTLhraWOlDattlBinkOMBrtlbbiSO 

0 ARTRAMACjGimMWBbocMomCDUeRSlie^ DNichdiS 
CIIE01£BAr(M»JSMCOTfbiRwntS-11 CCo^gB 


KIMeylO 

I.. DNichdIij 


LAMEDOEt 
MARKOPI 
SEATON GIRL {r1 



. JR(M4 
EVMtaMrl 


SO MaHNW. 7-2 Rbbonof Bw. SOSwittOfe, 6-1 Red DiistBr. 6-1 Duiw 0( Dant, 10-1 
BusKiHa,1S-1 JuUMUdy.20-1 atwi. 




64WMSBgWnbr.7-2SeUDaGM.5-1 MrGnnuy, 6-1 LMeOge. 10-1 BnUBIaar. 
12-1 Mb HaM. 14-1 BSMS. 

245 FORCETT PARK SELUNG STAKES ^,147: 7f) (20) 

1 D AROOONPRBICE IB GahMK Stone 4-S7 

2 SB0005' BRAtfOONJMWttUiWSliiiwtfDavnm - - - D 

1000CS- BlK0BBOLTiC406*BJBBnb9J6MTy4«-7.. ^ M^ 16 


COimlB 

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S- GRANDCElEHRAt 


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12 409000 TinmLOWOBaeSMHes4«-7. 


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14 Off- BUCTiAZZApWinKm4JRedbm4«4 

15 OXMOOIK CAatCCUKUnraSi^JHifi^ 
17 o/nDOO- txoveiime&muDavtowimiBnw4^ 



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16 1040^ MBSAI>EX( 

21 8UNM- SAREMA (North ( 

22 ' S BAIvrELSeAUR 



Gatterick selections 

JEfy Mandarin 

2.15 Whistling Wonder. 145 Can Me Claire. 3.15 GOD^ 
Si^tnriON (oapX 3.4S Blnemede. A 1 5 Caroeades. 445 Mohican. 
5.l5MreChris. 

- ' ■ ' By-OurNewmaikei'CorrespondeDt ' " . 

3ul5hftjay-zee. 4.45 Say Something. - 

By Michad Seely 

3.15 God's SohitioiL 415 CARNEADES (nap). 


IS- fCUISDIAIIOmpOaRhwrtWGUUu^ 

0- UXBSM£3MBpAwiio^ 

OISO GUWim eo(M entora^ nlnThniMmnSOO . 
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010000 sermNAixnrtiifesJNeiiB^MU^^ 

0050 UCDABSaOMMURNWOOSninnenSOO.^ 


PBtMumiT 
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. SO Snwie,S4Meitela. 5-1 Mbs Apex, STBtifflplDnlDgieifei, 12-1 .OnndCelebnlion. 

14-1(hlMeCnn,'tS1 aOwre. 


3.15 'RACE AROUND YORKSHIRE* HAIftNCAP (£1,257: 61) (13) 


OOOMD- MRJAy-ZB(n(N( 
300350 RRYBAZAARr ' 
KWC10- RXMEVMlJ 

35do- Gonssouin 

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.6Caibr( 


4jtS WHORLTONflAlOEN HUES STAKES (E68ft 1m 4f 40yd) (B) 

0- oaSAWOlCYjQPtowidOJfriMeiwilS-ll 

00- MAOAMQERARDflHiuiei)WWierttn8-11_ 

6 322S HOMCANtGResdCTIionitonB-ll 

7 000- mnUIUTIWlUMllBAblMaSNerlenB-ll 

9 MRKESSPBhALJRMMMVlJPWknO'll- 

11 . 000- SAYSOM ETWHG ff Weto i iiiaii iJWWBrB-ll.^ 

12 000- S0L£mBiEEZE^MSeiUdeitiW6MTinwS-1^^^ 

13 WHnTWMAUVtt£(BMui^WEbBr5-11. 


CCoeies(S)S 
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. CDwyerO 


BMcGMff(7110 

iSO&_ DMiM2 

)PC6apiiHH80-1._^_ NLeKh(7}3 

rElUB^4M .MBinb8 

1500 KHodgeontl 

i CUWR 500 L Chunodc 12 

IJ Pwtoe5«0_..... TRerfeeejns 
) D Omunn 4-8-1 _ S PCMUa (R 18 
14-7-13 ARraudS 


40 Mcbieui. 7-2 Madem GemU SI Siy SofflUhtog, 10-1 WM NUhw, 1^1 vvHttiiigim 

Wb.iSiaAeK. 


5.15 SPRINGTIIE APPRENTICE HANDICAP (£SS1: 7Q (17) 


(S7-18. 


,RVlGfeen(7)4 


SI M-Jav^zm.4-1 QDm60bMn.S1 aneyGH,S1 BwBa&ur.S1 ortoB'litofc.lSI 
SponFMOWw.1MLD>irn)ar.t4-ladMM.. 

345 TUYTOP STAKES (^Y-0: £1,136: Sft (S) 

t I — ; KOamys 

3 UTERALUBiowBlJBer^ll MRyl 

4- . . EPTALamaQN(JU»hiBrtGMeeM641 .Jlowes 

■ 6 0 TEAM EFFORT 16 Menses (MThonpaon 8-11 — 

9 jnTEHSUOriASniliOAanieiSO 

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340050 im8CHRB«X]L44RHmiaflMNwghlon4-S7. 

303420- RAM ACTION jCBi«Clan}Glilm^ 

004033- MURRlpm(F&i)P CUT 1506 

005- IIAIjiO(ltoA9gaiiCrti0TBaiiw4OO 

Bifiininf wuc “ ■“ 

010001- JANFSBRA1 
310001- YEtiOWBEAR(HBauUWd) 

0050 ULTWQLADf • ■ 

OOttOO- JOHNI 
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.OKing (7) 14 
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20BlMmeda,4-1 LuaciLSI TeunEBort. 154 GHDlBar,25-1AiioneLa^, 25-1 Royal 

MUCtaQ. 


WWtarton 40-12. 

HaUi 40-11 

H BRXxalbnRiSdarT-S-IO.-...^— 

0( Read) JRowluim 456 

R SamOncon) R NUnIs 556^ 
rs D BreimertM H Eniutv 554. 
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JCarrIS 

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. 16 


. SQiagoiy(7)6 
— 12 


23 0OOOOO- MAW0atmN(jaairamjeariy553 

24 SCOOPTffiKimipBeiMdlanEMtanSM^ 

27 OnOSO- AICIJFr(MBrtte^M8rl|iain57-7 


.ET(vnar3 
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.JiOaBowkerlS 
AMunro(7)2 


7-2 AnpHy. 4-1 MwHo, 50 Rapid AGUon. 51 Mani OohNn, 51 YMaw Bav. 151 wan 
Gm.ia-1 Boid ito i^ Btoa Uy Top, 251 oihem. 



HUNTINGDON 


10 FINSBURY PAVEMENT HANDICAP CHASE (£1,872: 4f) (14) 


Going: good to soft 


/■ \4 

•9 . - 


20 SANDY NOVICE HURDLE (Dfvl: £1,433: 2m 4Q (18 ronnore) 
BYRNE8 GROVSn BiStaaorttO r 


1 101340 OUMWC 

2 avoroo SHADY 

4 1VIP02 MA8TBI 

5 #4600 MARMASTAR 

6 40FFRP DONJIU. 

8 00215P 


)TCa3ey51i-io 

AHiCtardl5t1-10. 


)WHaefceB 1511-6. 
niOOlW 7-11-6. 

1 1511-3 . 


. NFaam(7] 
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MBasiaiii 


JDRGmdaNo 7-1512. 


FTWntor5l512. 
7-1512 


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8 6P/D502 EDOZIBIQfrai 

10 560063 HEAHNOBra.j_„^- . 

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RFNuy(7) 

HDabaa 



450064 eOUPORTBI 
4DD1/n TOTTRACK 
P28CB AMOTHE B 
mipa-1 NOOUB 
50& ARCHERS 
00B5O4 rWBPICO 
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444035 JOAT(D} (I 


iaiUh)PRHBdger 

1511-1 MaaCAm ^bgiffl 

RDunwoexh 


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^ JSSKifefflSiaSStK 

0I3P PUnWUM BLOMI (T w SuOw^B.Son Ud) fte (briar 5157 UrS Cowtoy(7) 


7-2 htoabr Malady. 51 Anubar Pbur, 51 Toy llacfe. 7-1 Cola Portar, 51 Gunnia, 151 
NooUa Baw, Rruaalie, 144 Aiehara PriKa, 151 oHiats. 


. PScudamora 

, MtoaCSnndais 


P jwnraRivaa^c^ROm 

■SE 


JBartow 

NOHR UWen 


r, 51 .TUnmy, 51 Hear No Brl. 151 




11-41 

EUniei^l 

2.30 B.TISLEY NOVICE CHASE ^,671: 3in 100yd) (17) 

i sg? 


Hantiogdon. selections 

- ' ' By Mandarin 

ZO Provide. Z30 Ronalds Carole. 3.0 Tixnsah. 3.30 The hfighty 

Mac. 4.0 Finnesko.' 4 JO Pamparoid. S.0 Arctic Cavalier. 

Midmel Seely's selection: 3J0 The Mighty Mac. 


CAVI 


15 OMn QSAlGHotojtj .T^ 
" 5 4W404 JCMwwajm w^.yir tw 


7-T1-1 






4J0 SANDY NOVICE HURDLE (Dhr 2: £1,489: 2m 4Q (19) 

2 .2^ ARTFUL CHABtEYtH&BItalJGFiBOefaM 51512. 


MrATbamP) 

'siflomtoaliob, 10530 51 Capping 1wn»OMy(tomaf, 51 Fbnbiguifc 

m-ijum W8«wn.Ceier. 151 omaie. 



MM ARTFUL CHARtEYM 
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R6 BiWlFMK.-.. 

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6^ 51 512. 


(MariayR^ M J Haynes 
isM J n JenniB 51512. 


51512. 


S 51512 


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«. WARESIEY CCMHTIONAL JOCKEYS SELLING 
lURDtE ^864: 2m 200yd) (1^ 

38cm TMK»nra(AFoguVBJ«Bi«4.ii-io 


3 051400 CAPITAZUE^. 
7 568140 TAVARGOS' 

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10 

13 . 005FO ROOOOSO 

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15 


1511-3. 


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SMsNer 51512 
5156. 


5156. 

5154L 


10 004564 gARNatYaAtWn gOBdr 


HANDICAP 

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GaeiginaHarSBn 
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.-ewanen 


02D4F3 FAWAROS 

000356 smur~ 

TRUEFOl 

03002 ASTRALUUrr^.. 

Fomp UTTLEKATWiAg 
pp. bOUSEJESSICA 
33 POO TBCKANSWER 
. 37 . 4020 . VneOdA PAGE/ 

51 MU Owtay. 10530 P 
tBKtnnmi, 151 Lactoy Hoay. 151 

SJO BOURNE LEISURE GROW NH FLAT RACE (£1,156: 2m 200yd) 

( 22 ) 

- - .DSkyma(7) 


N J Hendwaon 51512 J WhBa 

iCDo(*5157 — 

„ J SuOieni 

f Mrs GJonaa 5157 — 

$ J^M Casna 7-157 -sr^ — 

AetUrB)NJHendaisan5l56 — SSnWiEodss 
51 VkgMa ^aant 51 Astrtf udy. 51 


X mnm in irniur t IWeyTumar 

51 Caixn (anew. 7-2 6ato Boy. 5T Aaaft 11-2 TtaargDe, 5nanaah. 151 Tashonya. • 

Woihuii^^^ 

^^L30 NOBTHCOTEACO HANMCAP CHASE (E3.13ft 3m 100y( fl(8) 

1 321M-12 nsiiwmriiACj 
■ 14W5 


CAaWE PflPRLW 

TWFFB QRBMMXIDUD 

osawLfL 


. TWn» SEAL 


mesoi 



5106. 


MRUmda 

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.U.36P030 aMHTWnSNm^ -• ■ - ■ — 

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1 

2 

4 

' 6 
' 8 
. 9 
10 
18 
20 
32 

25 

26 
30 
32 
34 
38. 

37 

38 
43 
48 
04 

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0 BASRUUAH(MraPHaiTWPWHaiTb51M0... 

BEE GAROai (M MUM PQ 8May 511-10 

DROMAKEUY^ IDr? Brown) FT Mmar 51 1- 


MrTTbamaanJema 
MrCBraolB(7) 
MrTRaad 



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WaUs)MsJP>iBn511-2,.« :WI 

3 A DniinMl) DM Gdweo 5114 
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VMatowM 511-2. 
PPIa 4.11-2 


MM MNGLETjMlS P BbMn) A W PUB 5151 1 . 
SLENT lURHONV p Steiens) ( 


.KBurha 
MrsOMUdiBl 


tCPRaad 51511.. 


54AiedeCavbler.7-2NBwFbrastL8d,51 Baannni,7-TFhmaLn. 151 Bvamne. 15l 
DriiiBKal^ Lad, 1 51 -stfieri. 


Leicester results 

Gnh^antl 


. Day. _ 

11-4 No noatra ai L 5l PhrUand Hawk 
(501). 152 TWob Bme. 151 Countiy Cr^ 
151 Alpha Habc (Bm. 151 Harmany 
Bowl, 251 GaofTs FMy, Marina Pbia. 
Mbs Brady (404- 12 rart atiM. 21 & 
ihL N Vigus u Upper Lamboimt Toto : 
1340: EfSO. £3.10r£8.3a OF: BZrJOa. 
CSF: E34.51. 

2.45 (51) 1, SIZZIJNG MELODY m Mb. 
Mr. 2. Wndmeda (K Ouby. T-T ~ 
Unob Pnt 
ibvLaia 

2 Harr FIch (BOA. '151 Mbs Pba. 
Lawiswood Led (4th), 151 Swyiiaonl 
PimcesB, 151 Mark -Sait^ 551 Poir 
Latte. 11 ran. 41, SI. 4L It 1KL Lil J6hn 
FiDnaraid at Wewii ia ihat Tote : £4J0; 
£i!20r £1.90. £4.10. DF: £2620. CLSi^: 
£2227. 

515 (im 49 1. aurnsrs own (Par 

Edci^. 11-6 tne 2, S 5 Santo (M 
Rnmnar. 5^: 3. Not Riier (K Daitoy. 51). 
ALSO RAN: 11-2 Arch Prfeicess. 51 Tara 
Dancer (6th). 51 Fast And Fiwidly ^). 
151 Afidrsa's Pnea rath). I5l Star 
Command . 8 rm. 21. a. 31. IM. ■*. N 
CaBaghan at NowmarkoL Tote: £320: 
£1.60. £1.10. £230. OF. £14.70. CSF: 
£9.45 

3L4S (tm 20 1. BALGOWME 


(SP 


GrUlIhe, 51 2. Lontf BHttarfly K 

Darby. 7-1): 3. Web MM AgOb (B 
Rouse. 7'^ 4, Bwiana (CSb (R Cechiane. 
51). ALSO RAN: Count Baifrnnd. 
Monetara Trophy. PUm Tanura Gttt. 
God's Hope. Tods Rorea Avanii, 
SuperfresCM- Mitsto Man, StM Rabugk, 
Fioraat Ptoreat Trumro. Nordto Hawk, 
LadW Fi rapowar. snensman. Record 
ReU 19 ran 2»l Ml jMitol at Ybrk. 
Tote: £580; £1.70. £220. £220. £325 
DF: £1520. C2.F:£45.15 THcasn 
£24165. 

515 Jim) 1. HIDOEN BRIEF M Mnar. 
11-4): 2. ShMag Popw (T Qum, 511 
bv); 3. HWMt NM^ buttield. 251). 
ALSO RAN; Uptown Rarm, Naner, 
ChaHont Ma 6 ran. 41. 8L R Boss « 
NawmarkeL Toto: £320; £1 60, £1 .1 a DP; 
220. C2.FXS.10 
545 @9 1. 

Adame. %): 

Rimmer. 


Crosslay. 251). 
Affltwr oown. Y 


COPPERMU. UUI 
2. Taytor 01 Soham 
12-1); a Mnwb (Md 


ALSO RAN: 7-4 Mv 
I. Youig Jason, Bradbwy 
Han, Lady La Paz, LM Right B Abmsln. 
HUxximes Kane. GoUan Giakbr, My 
Darya. Sfromharg. Feaitinr Gift KUd 
(Sreea 15 ran. ahJid, nk. J HoH at 
Baaa^BI^ Tote; £67.80; £1 1 .30, £420. 
m 20 . DR In or 2 nd with any other 
£10.80. C.S.F: £22720. TrIeast: 
£424325 

515 JTfl 1. RHAPSODY M BLACK JM 
GIBS. T-lf; 2. Tend Bora (M WIghun, 25 
1); a Com Racing Nal (W Carson, 52 
fav). ALiORAN: iaxtar^. CeU Op- 
erator, Dona Lima, Gtanant Natchakam. 
Bold Uir^ Bryanthus, The Litlb Joker. 
11 ran. nk. hd. M Rm at NawmarkoL 
Tots: £1590: £595 R20. £1.l0. OP; 1U 
or 2nd with any other.£S.40. 
02^215146. 

Ptaenpofr £860.05 

Sandown Park 

Goino' amid to oofi 
22ja?4f eh) 1. SE.VER ACE (J Lewer, 
' * Nudpn |Q Landau, 15 

Sainantha Ounstar, 25 
1 Wily Yneman (Sth). 
15-2 Sutton Pnnes. 51 
thernM (405 151 Cara, MambiiiM. 1 5 
1 ComeUaa i^1 Freddb Bee. S^Pobr 
E»r<M 12 ran. ah.lid, 5L 71. %L nk. M 
Pipe at WaBbgiDn. Teia ; £2.80: £140. 
£1.60. £520. OF: £585 OSP. £1535 
Tnont: £229.91. 

220 |2m4f ch)1 , CLARA HOUKTAIN(H 
Dawes, 5lk 2. Dnut OroMd (C Brown, 
1511 tev):a WMakaYBrnaJM Haning- 
ton. 51). ALSO RMC 14-1 Roundmxw 
(Ml). Dunkffk (4tM. 351 Sainiiiy Lux (6th). 
6 ran. IML ISL tol. ML 61. T Forster u 
Tota: £540; £1.10, £120. DF: 
£425 lid dd 
50 (Ml 118yd eh) 1. QUARRIER (MrT 
T1ioiT6on Janas., 54 iav); 2, launaet 


r Mr M Bradstoek, 51); 5 Four 
(Mr S BuUwd. 1051). ALSO RAN: 
52 Prydel (4th). 25i Jacko (5lh|. 351 
Nova (P.U.), Redenham (6th), 651 
Cokmal Lad, Mountain Lad. 1051 
Dolbsara Lad. Doibeara Lass, PamruBah 
(FeB).12taa NR: Ladeibox. Next Best hd. 
20UMI. T ■ 


Utafihiaa. C9 

^20, £1.10. £620. IV^mloa C2f. 
£525 

538 gtm Gh) 1. LEFRAK CITV (R 
Ounwoody. T3-2L 5 Hazy Suiaat (8 & 
Haaa 51): 5 Leith HU P^ (P 
Scudamora. 251). ALSO RAN. 2-1 lav 
Our Fun. Adnwu's (kip. Left Buik, 
Faarlass imp. St wUam, Pan Arctic. 
Ckmcormack. 10 ran. Nr 2 hrawd Op- 
erator. HL20LTFoisieruWantsge.Tote: 
£6.80; £2.50. £1.50. E2.A. DF: 
£t02a&5FX4027. Tneast: £81426. 

42 (3m 116yd CM 1, 1 HAVENTAUGHF 
Scudamore, 158 toO; 2. 


Siasal (H Dawes. 1 1-4): 5 SpeeU Cano 
(K Mooney. 152). 6 ran. ALSO RAN: 
(btto Phrase, Boh YMman, (^asun. 3L 
10L F WMar u Lamboum. Tota: £240; 
£1.n, £125 DF: £320. C.S2: £725 
42S ton 4f eh) 1 . ROYAL JUDGEMENT 
(Mr P Hadidng, 1 1 -10 faU: 5 GraWlMbn 
(Mr C Brooks, 151); 3, Oimiuiwsw (Mr D 
Neybr-Lsyluto, 15^ ALSO RAN: Bea- 
oon Time. Foot Stich, Jack Ol M Traoea, 
L a va n gre. Mr ABoniM Mr Oaikb. Never 
Deemed Sagaham Dm Liko A Lord. 
Nsk's Joy. Tbitoiaer. (tombe HH. 2MI. 16L 
15 ran. NR: Roynta Pass. Thomaseoua 
LM Rootss at Ashford. Tota: EZIft 
a.32. £225 £1.40. DF: £23.70. C-S.F: 
£1821. 

Ptoeapotrass 


Blinkered first time 

CATTERICK 246 11 -=— 5.15 Blaek 
River. 


CmCIAL SCRATCHMOS: Grand N 5 
ooiiai Hancficm Cnam Lirapoci: Big 
Brown Bear. Soooish Natfonal Handbap 
Oasa Ayr JockambeL EM 01 Srton 
Stakes NevnnailuBi: Super Move. Fafr (M 
ITie Rna. 


ATHLETICS 

Lewis has 
a wish 
to bounce 
back 

By Pat Bntcher, .4thletics 
Correspondant 

Dave Lewis is cairying 
a bruised ego to Newcastle for 
tonight's city ceatre road 
races, yet hoping that an even 
worse run than he had in last 
year’s cross^xiuniry champi- 
onships will again be translat- 
ed into vict(Hy in the 5,000 
metres. 

Lewis was at a loss to 
explain his SOth place in 
Neuchaiel on Sunday (he was 
18th last year), when he had 
confidently expected a place 
in the first 10 or better. The 
only reason he could give for 
such a pained performance in 
Switzerland was that he had a 
stitch (as did Tim Hutchings, 
who finished 74th, and Mike 
McLeocL who dropped out), 
possibly induced by racing at 
the 450 metres altitude. L^s 
maintains that he is “still in 
supeii) s^pe, and I hope to 
bounce back like 1 did last 
year". 

Steve Cram may have 
something to say about that, 
as will Pat Porter and Bruce 
Bickfordtbe Americans sixth 
and ISth respectively in Neu- 
chaiel on Sunday. Cram's 
training has been going well 
since his winter injuries and 
he said yesterday: “1 want to 
uin. but more than that I want 
to record a fast time on a 
measured course." 

When John Ngugi won 
Sun(lay*s world cross country 
title so impressively, the fin 
question on everj^ne's lips 
was “Who?". But it was not 
the Kenyan's first foreign race. 
A Kikuyu tribesman (unlike 
most of his compatriots, who 
are Nandi), Ngugi ran 3min 
37.04 sec for 1.500 metres in 
the .African championships in 
Cairo last summer, followed 
by a S,0()0 metres in 13min 
18.99 sec 


GOLF 

Sentiment 
proves 
a winner 

By JohnHennessy 

The conditions returned to 
romething like normal for tbe 
Sunningdale Foursomes yes- 
terday and the results tended to 
Mlow tbe same panem. Ronan 
RalTerty and Roger Chapman 
won through to the last 16. with 
par golf morning and afternoon. 

Bui sentiment drew the larg- 
est gallery of the day to the 
fourth round match involving 
mature ajnaieur-jprofessional 
pannerships of both sexes: Neil 
Coles with Martin Christmas 
against Vivien Saunders and Jill 
l^omhill. 

A wise old bead proclaimed at 
the start that Saunders and 
Thornhill, receiving eight 
strokes, wc^d have to win by 
the 14th. It rather seemed that 
the match would fall into that 
panem. for the women were 
three up after 10 holes. 

But Coles produced a little 
magic at the 1 1th. 

A glorious six iron by Christ- 
mas sav^ the shot conceded at 
the 12th and his eight iron onto 
the 14th green was answered by 
Coles with a I S-yard putt for tbe 
first birdie.Thai was one up and 
so it remained until tbe ISth 
where Mrs Thornhill booked 
her approach shot out of 
bounds. The rain now came 
down in torrents but they bad to 
turn their badcs on the club- 
house and, without the help ofa 
stroke at the punishing first 
hole, they surely had to turn 
their backs on the tournament 
too. But sadly for Coles and 
Christmas they took six. 

Thiiti round 

OLD 03URSE: N Lawrence (Harpaitoan 
Common) and A Ctofk (CM Foto Manor) bi 
A fleas arto R Tickiiw (FdKhlbLI tMla: K 
Brake and M SqiM (Cahst Park) W J 
Davies (Sumbadale) and Miss M 
ScoUkv (Rwal Ascot Heath). 2 holes: 1 
Whyatt and M McCXean (ChesarfieM) U K 
MacDonald and G Thompson (Beiks). 1 
hole: G Ytodiar(Doiiraf«ra)andGSttel 
(Waxtam Park) bt K Kelsall and 8 FsMns 
(Haywards Hsain), 1 hots; G MeOuitty 
(Exm) and C Strange (Btobuyon-Seai 
M S KaHy (TiAlBlIan) and K Campbra 
(Gtodd^ Hous8).4 and 2; Miss C Pamon 
(JMm Lenars) and Mss M Watar 
(Hac&akn M K ENm and M CUcett 
(Ashterd), 5 and 4: 1 Mosey {unaltacliaffl 
and W Hunwtirays (LeM King) fit P 
Franktn aito D Carrol (CIrencesteri, 3 aiM 
5 C Clark ffiiMwigaaiB) and J Cook 
(Horam) M A Barr (Garrans Cross) and E 
BuBock (Badlerdk sand 4; n RaHsrty and 
R Chapman (isttMchad) M A Ratlua and 
T ClWTtonts |S( George s HII 5 5 and 4; 
Mtos V Saunters (Heald Dickkisen) and 
Mrs J ThwnhM (Waiion Heath) M K 
Ntexwan and M Dfacon (Sunimdale), 1 
tale: N Coles (Expot^ and M (Trains 
bt G Hawkins and 6 Harris 
re). 2 and 1: M HowsU 
P^ and S Llort (Fanwood 
bt G Drummond ana J McLaren 
(Gatun ktenq^ 1 htde: P MO|yoy (Cm 
Heath) and E Richardson M J 
Robson aito G Marks (Batohworm Parf5 2 
and 1: D McCteBsnd (Regsm MarigM 
and P Bsen (Strattord-upon-Avon) bto St 
G Bimne and N Job (Rnimend). 2 and 1 ; 
G Thomas and Miss K Douglas (Long 
ANMon) Bt J Chrttotoe anf Mrs J NIeoisai 
(Vltorpiesden), 7 and 6; M Hughradon arid 
A Howard (Sunningdale) bt (3 Ritche and 
R Harvey {Lan^ftiiil. 3 and 5 
NEW COURf Mrs M Gamer ffert- 
stawart) and Miss M McKenna IDonabme) 
bt G Stutamgton and A Davin (Dunweod 
Manor). 7 and & J Hirtes and Miss V 
Marvki (Easingwaid) bt P Andersen and S 
CtatoM (BSks). B and 7: A Lyddon 
(Knowle) and M Lews JHsnbuiy) M A 
Reyitolds (Royal Cinqw (^) and A Has 
iBiaekmoar). 3 and 5 N Cole and C 
Bonner (Brockenhursf Manor) bt K Wil- 
lisna and M Onts (Hantoy), 4 and 5 K 
Buridn (Latalay P^ and R Latham 
PbtiTm K StabiBS and Nda Bntp 


a (Xmha (Sunrangaaia), 1 hole: I Catowal 
and Mrs C CaUwea (Smmfligdale) W G 
Hunt and L Lavaaon (Hartsboiane). 4 and 
3; B Putllck and C Gough (Wtet Herts) bt 
M Kkig end M Oevana (SunnbigdaleL 3 
and 5N MftchaflJMid Kant) and H Francis 
(Tandiite) bt D Evans and J Hopkto 
(Royal K%awl), 2 and 1: P King and J 
Jamas (BenHay) bt E CampbeB and R 
Oeekn (Addxi^), 1 hola: A Sharboma 
arri D R8y (Long Ashton) bt P Can- and M 
Bum (SwttiKdlte). 4 arto 5 D Jones and 
L Plalis nhiae Rnrersl bt S Barr 
Sexteyhaem and C PMips (Addtogton 
JOUR), 5 and 4: J Patanor (Wemwonh) 
aid A Drake (Muswel HiQ) M O Russel 
(KecSasion Park) and 1 woosnam, 1 hole: 
T Mmshel and K Vatenma (Ha Vaiey) bi 
8 Sparks (Stonaham) and Miss T Ham. 
mond (Le am ington). 1 tola; N Wichetow 
(HaratoM Piaoel and P (iiozia (RiSsHm bt 
B (SaiaOiBr and P Gamer {Wentworth). 2 
totes; C McLachan SM 6 McKay 
(Gtenoervie) bt R Duxfield (Wentworth) 
and R Ropv (Cattendi Oainsoid. 3 arid 5 
D Mixgan (Wnham) and 1 Haatey 
moriarrwiim)Dt P Morley arxl R Burgess 
(ReadiK>).Sand4. 


RUGBY UNION 


Pulling out all the 
stops to pull 
in the crowds 

From David Hands, Rugby Correspondent; Sydney 


Tbe explanation for 
Anstralia's Uatantiy commer- 
cial approach 10 ragby union is 
not 10 find. Open the sports 
pages of any Sydney new^per, 
tom on the television on a 
Satinday and Rn^ty Leaime 
stares you In the face. Tie 
success of the New Sondi Wales 
Sevens this last weekend, there- 
fore, has been in business and 
social fields as mneh as those of 
sport. 

Ken Etphick, exeentive direc- 
tm- of die New Soatta Wales 
Rngby Unioa, was appointed not 
far his knowledge of rugby 
football — his spmrting badt- 
groond is in athletics — but his 
marketing ability. He is alleged 
to have inquired of local ofRdals 
whetiiCT be really needed to 
watch aD tbe ragby over tbe 
weekend which may raise an 
eyebrow bnt puts bis job statns 
in context. To celebrate the 
opening of the Cmiconl Oval he 
1^ palled in an the elements of 
showbiz, the load, fiimer-ta^ 
pii^ music, tbe clocks £amati- 
cally ticking away the seconds in 
every corner and, importantly, a 
large slice of the focal 
population. 

Several hundred children 
were involved in a »Mr«-hiwg 
display, gymnastics, choreo- 
graphed entertainment before 
the oflidal opening of the 
groimd which helped to attract 
tomUy and ftiends, many of 
whom may not have been essen- 
tially rugby supporters. Some of 
the eleownts of tbe paclu^ went 
adrift bnt overaD it was slickly 
done, drew some 23,000 people 
to the gronnd, create tel^ision 
interest and an excellent video 
fm potential sponsors. 

To ensnre constant risnal 
impact tlte playing conditions 
were tamper^ with to an nn- 
acceplnble deg^ no time was 
add^ on for n gories until tbe 
knock-ont stages, important in a 
game of sevens which lasts only 
14 minutes, and a belf sqpialled 
theendofearii halfnmanUessof 
tbe state of play, u a team 
happened to be in the process of 
rnnniiq; in a winning score and 
the gong went, that was their 
ntisfortane, and thoagh there 
were no controvenies in this 
respect, it is a practice I wonld 
advise against lAen the toar^ 
nament is held i^ain during the 
next two years. 

At the ssBN time, there b 
constant atgament hm — and 
this may tinag a wry grin to 
some faces in Britain — abont 


the demands of repr e s e ntative 
rngby. Peter Fenton, the former 
Sydney coach, spoke out 
strongly in a Sunday paper 
about the detrimental effect on 
elnb rngby and made accusa- 
tions, not substantiated, of 
poachit^ by tbe stronge r richer 
dnbs, with aJJ the suggistioas of 
under-the-counter payments 
that that emails. 

To a newcomer like Clive 
Woodward, the former Leicester 
and England centre who has 
Joined the Manly Club (as has 
Steve Holdsiock. tbe Notting- 
ham wing) the contrast is Indi- 
enus. His new club will see little 
of Wallabies like Ross Reyn- 
olds, Bfll Calcraft and Phuip 
Cox. yet they will hope to 
dullei^ for grade honours at 
the season's end. The two 
EngUsiunen are there to sta- 
bilize an otherwise .yon^ and 
iBexperienced back division. 
Once a player has achieved top 
honours his dob appearances 
may be coimted on tbe fingers of 
one hand bmnse of the de- 
mands of district, stale and other 
representative appearances. 

The overkill this seasmi b 
immense: with tbe Anstralbn 
dnb season barely begun al- 
ready there have been the 
Sydney Sevens, to be followed 
next week by the Hoi% Kong 
Sevens, ana thb week the 
Australian nnder-21 sqaad, an 
important cooiponem in the 
national framework, has a vreek-' 
loi^ camp ander tbe manage- 
ment of John Fordham, brother 
of tbe international referee. 
There b district and state 
football all next month, together 
with the new Soath Pacific Cnp 
competition; in May Ititiy arrive 
and hi June, France. Hard on 
their heeb are Argentina and 
then Australia leave for their 14- 
malch New Zealand tour. 

Andy Dalton, New Zealand's 
captsin and bookm, made a plea 
lam week for a s tru c tu r e in hb 
country which ensnred a proper 
place for club football so that it 
would not be emasenhted by 
superimposed representative de- 
mands. Haring said that. New. 
Zealanders and Anstralbns — to 
a huge extent — accept that tbe 
national side b their best 
adveitbemem and that sac- 
rifices have to be made. 

There are not too many sports 
in which Ansiratu are top dogs 
Jnst at the moment and, in 
bnOding op to next year's World 
Cap, ttey are maMii^ the most 
of it. 


St Joseph’s in final 


By Peter Mmsoa 


St Joseph'5 of Ipswich, 
marched info the final of Che 
sevens competition in the Din- 
ers Oub national schools seven- 
a-side lournameni at 
Roehampton when they 
Slopped Monmouth in their 
tracks ai the quarter-final stage, 
scoring a small triumph in an 
emphatic victory by 22 points to 
six, and then easily overcame 
Eastbourne 28-4 in tbe semi- 
finals. 

St Joseifo's bad previously 
shown themselves to be too 
clever for Britton, who they 
beat 22-10 in the sixth round, 
but Monmouth's demise came 
as a surprize. 


St Joseph's developed a knack 
of keraic^ possesrion ofthe ball 
and nelding a big. strong side 
with some nusive runners every 
bit as g/^ as their opponents 
and their four tries and ihree 
conversions proved to be more 
than enough. 

RESULT& Sixth reuiHt Ra 
0. King s CantarOuiy 9: St 
Chrisi-s Colege Brecon 1Q; Bryanaton 6. 
Rossall 0: Trent CoBega 26. Sto«w 4; 
Haretord (tethadral School 0. Monmouth 
34; S< Joaaph’s. IpsiMch 22. BngMon 
CoOaga 15 Epsom (SoHega 6, Eastoourne 
14; Prior Park 16. WaWAgton CcEega 12. 
QimteMiBate. King's School (tentertxiry 
0, St Baas 20; Bryant 0. Tram College 
22; Monmouth 6. Si Joeaphs 22: East- 
towne 24, Prior Park 10. Seml-linab St 
Joseph's 28, Eastbourne 4, 


HOCKEY 


Four for Yellowlees 


By Sydney FYiskm 


Scotland made sure of ibeir 
place in the semi-ilnab of the 
British Universities Spons 
Federation tournament at 
Loughborough yenerday after 
d^eaiiiig Universities Athletic 
Union II 3-2 in a thrilling 
match. Earlier in the day the 
Scots bad over-run Cambridge 
5-2. 

Mike Yellowlees. the Scottish . 
international, finished the day 
with a total of four goals, having 
scoi^ two against Cambridge. 
He put Srotland 2-0 ahead by 
half time against UAU, who 
reduced the lead early in the 
second half through John Rees. 
Stanfield increased Scotland's 
advantage to 3-1 from a short 
corner but Skinner brot^t 
UAU back in the hunt with a 


well-taken goal. London, the 
holders, having earlier defeated 
Northern Ireland 3-2, were 
beaten 3-1 by UAU II 
UAU II who lost 3-2 to 
Oxford in the morning were a 
completely transformed side 
against London. Tliey took an 
early lead through O^m and 
sto()d up well under pressure, 
Rtzgerald in goal making a 
number of fine saves. London 
paid the price when Ian Potter 
put U.AU further ahead. Osborn 
scored the third goal from a 
short comer to which London 
obliged with a goal by Hickman. 

RESULTS: Gmig A: UAU II 2. Oxford 5 
London 5 Nonnwn Ireland 5 UAU II 5 
London 1 . Oxtoro 0. Northern Ireland 3. 
Group B: UAUI 4, Wales 2: Scotland 5, 
Cambridge 5 UAUI 5 Scotland 3; Wales 1 
. Cambridge 2. 


FOR THE RECORD 


BASKETBALL 


TENNIS 


UNITED STATES; Nawate Au o cl atla n DALLAS: AsMdatkxi of Tennia ProteHton- 
Daaas Mavanclcs 186 . kidira Paevrs 
120: Wsshngion BiilHs 1 OO, Phradilptia 
TSsrs 93: BMlon Caiha 114. Houaion 
flochais 107: Utah Jazz t1& SaatBa Siipar- 
Soncs tOB; Lm Angelas Lakers 124, San 
Aittono Spurs 102. 



r(WQk 
9. A Janyd (Sw): 10 . B 
Maer iCzL 15 K Cmren 


ICE HOCKEY 


... .iUSKi4,HLaenntB{AI: 
(USl. IS A Gonw (Ecuh 17. T 
Mayone iUSp 18 . T TiAasna (Fr): 19. M Jalie 


EBIDHOVEN; Woto ChamplanalilpK M B: 
Snttzerlana Dt Ausn 4-3. 


RACKETS 


01 M AlW 52. 7-6; R Snw M 0 Paw 51 
7-5 L LavaDa (Maxi u M F^rnibrs js*4 52. ( 
1: L State; b M M Dare 51 , 54: P Amacon 


OUEEHU CLUB: PiMe Sebeeia Pa to te a 
Smeend ta uB it ! Ruobv bt 
Ctwiertouse 151. 1510, 1514, iMOllon 
1515 IM 15-9. 17-15 515. 

PC Radi^l59, 11- 
1SA. T514;^ninbiidga 
01 Maw em 153. 15-2, 155 15-5. 


M Halwtexy 1515 IM 
14-17. 1515 Wstoignn I 
15. 7-15 1515 1S-6. 15-4 


(A^ 2D. J Anas (USl. 

CHbSaOO; Vbin CMcaga tawnaaMM JUS 
unlass swad): FM roixA G M«ti4»ia Kten) 

• M 0 Pate 55 
',5 
'AnhacOM 

H A ChasnohM (USSR) 53. 57. 51: K 
Cutrwi M E Teasehar 51, 7-6: J Kntei bt T 
GuNtscn7-5 55 

ROnSIDAIfe HMite Oiand Piix: FkW tnond; 
ESanchK(to}MBDyka(Aus)»6. 54.53; 
H Qiximardi iSwi H J Qinnarsaon iSw) 6-2. 


TODAY’S FIXTURES 


KKk-oH 7A0 imless stated. 

intematkMial matches 
N Ireland v Oenmailc (&()) 

Rep treiand v Wales (A30) 

Scotiand v Romania (8.(n 
Soviet Urdon v England (4.0) 

UEFA Under-21 Chat 
Quarter-final, second 
England v I^mark (at Maine 
Road). 

Ttlird division 

Derby County v GllEngham P 

Fourth division 

Exeter v Torquay 
^terborough v Hereford 


SCNITHERN tevialeK 

V Oldbury-. Wel li ngidn v Sutsn 

CAPITAL LEAGUE: Darrtord V Wycemba 
BUILOMG SCENE EASTERN LEAGUE: 
Bury Town v Ely: Soham v (treat 
Yarmxiih. 

LONDON SPARTAN LEAGUE: Cup: 
Saini Sual rapl^ (foSar Row v WMtnam 
Abbey 

RUGBY UNION 

CLUB B4ATCHES: Chaltenham v »• 
mkigham p.0); Covaniry v Nuneaton 
(7.iB: Newbndga v Bitogend (7.0): Naw- 
V Marateg (7E); Rum v RAF (SLO); 


Wigan 


PREKtefT ROVER TROPHY) 
aae d on, acini Wnah Port Vkte 
Athtebc 

GOLA LEAGUE: Chaltenh am v Kidder- 
nrinster. Bob Lard Traphy: ffanii final- 
Weynmith V Barnet. 

CSmiAL LEAGIK FIrel liriBtore Barite- 
iey V Man CMy (TM Blaekbm v 
HudderatiM (7X$ Hui v ijverpooi ^J)); 
Man utd. V Latoesur: Newcaaife « wgan 
Nbtlffl Forest V Evenon (7.0): 
iM V Stoffleto Wad . Saoend 
dMaton (ail 7.0); BdBon v Commry: 
Dencaatar v Seurtteme t WolvaB v 
Sunderland 

VAISOULLOPEL LEAGUE: Second «• 
vision seutb: Flackweil Heatn v 
Souttevek; Horsham v Egham 
FOOTBALL COMBINATION; Ananal v 
ChalS88(2.0) 


mpii wMi 

(7.0); N0 
SneMeu 


JOHN SMITH'S MERIT TABLE B: 
Btecfc heath V London Welsh. 
REPRESENTATIVE MATCHES: Army v 
Ccmbaied London Old Boys (at AktersnoL 
3.C^ Eiigleh Students v Walsh Students 
(at Grange Road. Csmbrloga. 8E). 

RUGBY LEAGUE 
FIRST DIVISION: Bridferd Northern v 
Wamnotort. 

SECOND DIVISION: Keighley v 

Hudderetieid. 

OTHER SPORT 

BASKETBALL: Bfltkah Mastm third 
tdl i ienad on round, tkat leg: Sparrings 
SOtent Stem v Team Pofye^ Kmgann 
raO). Saeond te^ Portsmouth v C^sbl 
Paiaoe(50) 

(sOLF: Sumigdale Foursomes (at 


StamingdBie}. 


: Welberalt NOrVl Of Ens^ Hard 
Ceuit Ch amp ton sh ipa (at SouthpoR Ar- 
gytoLTO. 

ImAL TERMS: (foorgs Wbnpey Amateur 
Sinfles ChantotoiGhip (at Lord sL 











T 


30 


SPORT 


THE TIMES WEnNRSDAY MARCH 26 1986 


FOOTBALL: FITNESS DOUBTS THREATEN SIGNIFICANCE OF ENGLAND’S WORLD CUP WARM-UP MATCH AGAINST SOVIET UNIOTI 


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Hateley heads the list 
of injured as Robson 
sees his plans dissolve 

From Stuart Jones, Football Correspondent Tbilisi, Soriei Union 


England's plans for the most 
significant fixture during their 
World Cup preparations are 
on the vei^ of collapse. 
Injuries, the usual problem, 
have forced Bobby Robson to 
defay selection and threaten to 
reduce ihe team he picks to 
play the Soviet Union here 
diis evening to a threadbare 
patchwork of a side. 

.^ready without Btyaa 
Rob^n ' and E^ter Reid. 
England's manager discovered 

i resterday that he is likely to 
ose Hateley and Woodcock as 
well. Neither are Lineker, 
Hoddle or Bracewell fully fit. 
but at least they were able to 
lake pan in a brief tnuning 
session. 'The three Italian ex- 
iles. Hateley. Wilkins and 
Cowans, were not. 

Exhausted after their 30- 
hour journey from Milan, they 
were advis^ to rest instead. 
Their lengthy flight via Frank- 
fiirt was funher e.\tended by a 
three-hour delay in Moscow, 
and although they were re- 
lieved 10 reach their destina- 
tion. there was no comfon for 
Robson when they did so. 

Hateley irnmedratcly re- 
vealed that the thigh trouble 
which has been restricting him 
for several weeks and which 
necessitated injections bad 
moved up to his groin. "It is 
very, very sore," he said, “and 
I don't know if I can play. It is 
a long way to come for nothing 
but there is not much point in 
going into a match as demand- 


ing as this ifl'm not able to op- 
erate properly." 

The memory of the ghostly 
perfonnance by Duoo when 
England played Israel in Tel 
Aviv last month is now haunt- 
ing Robron. Lineker, who has 
a similar groin strain to 
Hateiey's though less serious, 
needs "a big man" alongside 
him to be at his most efiective. 

Robson will pn^bly be lefi 
with no option but to bring in 
the inexperienced Beardsley, 
who is anything but "a big 
man". The absence of Hateley 
would also diminish the con- 
tribution of Waddle to such a 
degree that it would scarcely 
be worth playing him. His 
crosses would be aimed at 
relative midgets in the middle. 

England's attacking poten- 
tial is further weakenra by the 
ailments which are affecting 
Hoddle and Bracewell. Both 
require a couple of days to 
recover from club games. 
Robson's side, therefore, can 
hardly be considered even to 
be approaching full sireng^ 
and today's fixture is in 
danger of becoming a raean- 
and possibly painful 
experience. 

The players will train as a 
complete unit for the first and 
last lime this morning. In 
contrast the Soviet Union 
squad has b^n together since 
last Friday. They have lost 
their two matches so fitr this 
year. 1-0 in Mexico (the same 
result as England's last sum- 


mer. incidentally) and 2-0 in 
Spain. 

But their overall record at 
home is formidable. Since the 
West Germans won 3-1 here 
in 1 979. they have been beaten 
only by Czechoslovakia, and 
that in an Olympic qualifying 
lie. 

The Soviets will be missing 
tbeir two leading forwards, 
including Protasov, who 
scored one of his side's goals 
when they won 2-0 at Wem- 
bley in (984. That defeat 
happened to be En^and's last 
at home. Robson remembers 
how “we then went to South 
America and turned a little 
disaster into a little revival". 

If En^and's run of seven 
games without defeat is to 
remain unbroken, they will 
need another “little revival" 
today. They must puncture a 
defence wluch. except against 
Czechoslovakia, has not con- 
cede a goal at home for seven 
years. That task would be 
difficult enough even if their 
strike form was at its most 
potent 

SOVIET UMON (probable): R 
Desayev; G Morozov, A Bubnov, A 
Demyanenko, A CWvadze: S 

Alein*ov, S Gotsmenov, F Cheren- 
kov; S Rodionov, S Dobrovolsky, G 
Kondratyev. 

ENGLAlto (probable): P SIMion 
(Southampton); V Anderson (Arse* 
naO. M ^outharra^, T 

Butcher (Ipswich Tovm), K Saneom 
(Arsenal), G Hoddto rrottenham 
Hotspur). R WUdns (AC Milan). S 
Hod« (Aston vma): G uneker 
(Everlon). M Hateley (AC Mian). C 
Ufpddle (Tottenham Hotspur)- 



Ireland to find out 
whether they are 

a test for the best 

ByCfiveWbite 

■me decision of Billy Kng- on* -»year-ol4 


Lineker could be withoat tiie 


Elite move Under-2is Scots give Dalglish lead role 


ham, the Noitbern Ireland man- 
ager, to ^ his team only against 

me best as tb^ (xepare for more 

World Cup fun and games thu 

■pimm er is a laudable one. Bat it 
could c^xnmd uonervin^y ou 
the men in ^reen at Wudw 

Park this eveniog when the iri A 

Kceive Dennn^ <me of 
Europe's few realisic hopes for 

success in the Mexico fio^ 

Denmaric are a team of many 
blit few of tten defen- 
sive one& They really ^ not 
know how to defend with die 
same acomn|didu&eot as the 
Irish. The last time thqr vished 
these shores, just four months 
ago, (hey ripped die Re^Uic of 
Irdand apart ^ a inai^ oT^ I 
with a demotistredon of coo- 
trofled aggresstoo une^oalled 
-poRbly anywhere else in the 
woiid. The Ulster team's de- 
fend, wbsdi has gained .them 
ffirth astoni^iiDg suco^ over 

the years, is iudile to be dis- 
rupted by postthma) Hiai^es as 
well as uyiny which does not 
bode wdl vdim fedng unfoigiv- 
irig forwards of the qnalj^ of 
Laudrup. 

With NicboO, the West 
Bromwich Altuon full back, oia 
•with a hamstring strain, Bing- 
ham wiD be tempted to recall 
McCfeUand., now bade afier 
injury, to somethii^ like the 
fonn which bhmted the ihnisis 
of Kari-Heinz Rummenigge 
across three hours of dueUmg 
with the West Germans a couple 
of seasons ago. But it will cause 
an uplieaval in the ' heart of 
defence with McDonald, 
outstanding in each ofhis three 
perfonnances against Romania, 
England and France, moving to 
fiiU^k. 

Binaham has a few options, 
one ofwhidi might also invol^ 
a place for Worthington, also 
just bade in the squad. But an of 
them will involve tednifBii^ 
the defence. At least Jenniiffi is 
umnovable. Tonight the rduo- 


ham has pereided to grace 
world stage once bk^ wul 
equal the world goalkeepiiig 
recoid of 115 caps ret to 
Nor^visL ofSweden. betoeea 
I96rand 197$. Of cowa 
Bingham, who is not averse to * 
goringjng a few bui'prises on his 
pbyen as well as his pobfi^ tray 
have somcdiing oom(fleldy dif- 
ferent in mind. 

' ' The Irish has set a 

deadline ito (be recovery from 
iniury of three of his pbyers, 
including his- former captain 
Marlin 074eili, who has teen 
absem for over a year wifo a 
knee injury bnt first 

competitive game mi Saturday 

for Cbeaerfidd. Hamilton and 
Ramsey are the other long t erm , 
casoaltles -wbo must move itetr 
fitness to %idiam by AprQ 23 * 
the date of Norfitem Iidaad’s- 
final rebeaisai Sot Mexieoi , 
agamst Moraoco.^ -Iteniltoo, 
who scored twice m his ootne- 
• back at the wedteud. for Oxford- 
United rererves at.lM ktoks 
of making h to foe 
sunting line m Gnad . . 

BiwghattL, udmse SOtn matdi 
this will be in dwge of the Irish 
team, is bopefol that the e^ 
mtets of wind and tai& wiH 
dmCT Danish enthuriasm on a 
pitch wiuch a renowned for 
begging down, die opposifioo if 
not the Irish spi rit vriiidi has 
seen them come ihroi^all bin 
■two ^mes whbodt defeat in die 
last SIX yess. 

NOfriffBiir«euwDg .. . 

ningrp’flWwtlini Henpwt A 
(puseiU Rifk Rmwd,- J m 
Mteird). J 

(tixaa TbiMiL a 
toiA D MefeMijr (Am 
M dbey JMaiM«inlw OM, I 
(nwvisfig ua» II WMwilrii pimdwe* 


Sports 

Commentary 




CkiUiEe,iinmtBeiitaadl 0 iig- 
tenn, 1$ About to take plaee in 
the adBunistndioB Of foUUb 
sport. 1 mdetstoad Oat the 
Biftisii OiyB^fe Abociatmn 
has tempMd (teiBsieiiatiQa of 
Kdt Pateer, Ae g ene w d sec- 
Ktuy, white yesfoiday*s 
of te '-Speite .CooDdi 
fihHureiq^ (he Cemsil CooB- 
^ for PhysicaK Remtloa 
and. ted prob^bffity, today's 
repoft.td! ^ Hoose of Com- 
Boos Sdeef CMBsittee. sog- 
a dosMte fid&re for ite 



l(HCOI 

.. . lAd). 

,Kl«swMr{SDPn4:« 


closer to 
the brink 

The threat of a super league 
being formed has loomed a step 
nearer after all 23 first division 
agreed in principle to breaking 
away from the existing structure 
unless their demands are tnei at 
a crucial meeting next month. 

After meeting at Villa Park. 
Birmingham, on Monday, the 
first division chalnnen gave 
their sternest warning yet that 
they were prepared lo go it alone 
unless their 1 0-point plan for 
reform, which would give them 
greater power and resources, 
was raiified with the required 75 
per cent support at the April 21 
summit 

Mr Philip Carter, the Eveiton 
chairman. said:“We have said 
all along that we want these 
changes to be implemented 
within the present league struc- 
ture. Bui unless we get 39 ofthe 
53 votes, we reserve the right to 
take whatever action we deem 
necessary. 

“We are not happy with the 
way football is going and we will 
not be happy ifihe lO-point plan 
is rejected." 

Mr Carter would not say if 
such a go-it-alone super league 
could start in time for next 
season, but such a scheme 
wxjuld immediately mean a 
closed shop, leaving Norwich 
City, the second division lead- 
ers. and the other clubs seeking 
promotion out in the cold. 

Mr Martin Edwards, the 
chairman of Manchester 
United, underlined the 
determination of football's elite 
dubs. “We are not joking on this 
issue." he said. “If the resolu- 
tions are voted down on April 
21 we will give serious consid- 
eration to going our own way.“ 

Graham Kelly, the Lea^e 
secret^. said:“l don't know 
anything about this meeting so I 
cannot comment" he said. 


looking 
to Cottee 

Tony Cottee leads En^nd's 
attempt lo win a place in the 
under-21 European Champion- 
ship semi-finals against Den- 
mark at Maine Road tonight 
The West Ham United forward, 
who at the weekend was voted 
the Professional Footballers' 
Association young player of the 
year, was missing because of 
club commitments a fortnight 
ago when Errand, who are the 
holders, won 1-0 in the first leg 
of the quarter-Hnal in 
Copenhagen. 

Tonight's team includes only 
four England players from that 
match. Barrt' Venison. Ian 
Burterwonh. Neil Webb and 
Paul Rideout Dave Sextoo, the 
manager, who is anempting to 
lead England to their third win 
in the competition under his 
chaiie. said; “Although we beat 
them over there with an under- 
strengdt side. I'm not taking 
anything for granted." 

Coventry's Nick Pickering, 
who scor^ the goal in Den- 
mark. is ruled out through 
injury this time, but Sexton's 
side is full of skill and experi- 
ence. Danny Wallace and Mark 
Wallers wiu attack the Danes 
down the flanks, with Paul 
Rideout and Couee forming a 
formidable central strike 
partnership. Cottee. still only 
20. has scored 1 7 goals for his 
ciub this season. 

On the bench Sexton has 
Luton's Mike Newell and Man- 
chester City's Paul Simpson, 
along with the Arsenal defender. 
Tony Adams, and the Everlon 
reserve goalkeeper. Bobby 
Mimms. 

ENGLAND UNOER-21: D SMiran (Or* 
iningitarn): B VMtoen (SundertandL M 
Thooaaa (Luton), I Buttaiwarai iNoteg- 
ham Foraat), P GIBalt (Aston vita). P 
Paikar (FiPniiL D Waltaea (Seuthainp- 
lon). N WMb (Nottingham Forest). P 
RldMui (Ban), A CoOM (Weal Ham). M 
WaHan (Aston Vila). 


The sobering thought for Alex 
Ferguson, Scotland's manner, 
os he continues the preparation 
of his team for the World Cup 
finals with tonight's friendly 
against Romania ar Hampden 
Park, is that in 14 matches in 
five previous final com- 
petitions. Scotland have won 
only three: against Zaire, Hol- 
land in 1978 when the Dutch 
wvre not needing to win. and 
New Zealand four years ago. As 
England have also discovered 
over the years, there are no easy 
matches at the lop. 

The centre of stage tonighL at 
least before kick-oiT. is takeo by 
Kenny Dalglish, who will be 

K nted with a memento by 
r Beckenbauer. Ihe udoniog 
captain of West Germany in 
1974 and now their manager, to 
mark his lOOtb cap. But 
Dalglish «nll not be granted the 
freedom of Quereiaro in three 
months time the way he has bad 
the Freedom of Glasgow this 
week — a generosity which could 
be echoed by a Romanian team 
without motivation. 

Biminated by Nortbem Ire- 
land, Romania will not have 
come to Hamiiden expecting to 


By David Miller 

plant trees, so it may be difficult 
for Ferguson to judge the true 
value of any performance, 
thoi^ it certainly makes sense 
to give experience to Goram, his 
reserve goalke^ier from Old- 
ham who tak^ over from 
Leighton. 

Most dfsapimintiiig is the 
absence of Archibald, who has 
been present wiib the squad at 
Turnberry but, according (o 
Ferguson, is continui^ to have 
trouble with the thi|pi injury 
suffered against Juventus and is 
likely to be out of action f<x- a 
further two we<^. 

Archibald's taciica] value to 
Barcelona iri their march to the 
Eoroixsan Cup semi-final has 
been exceptional and it certainly 
must be questioned whether 
Dalglish, who tonight partnere 
Shaj^. will still have the ap- 
petite for the demanding con- 
ditions of Mexico, faaviog spent 
so much of this* season on 
Liverpoors bench.' Certainly, 
Dalglish has the ball comroi that 
will be necessary and we may 
see lonigbi how much of his 
touch remains at international 
level. 


Also absent is the injured 
Nichol. so Gough and Narey 
ftom Dundee are at fiill back 
with Miller and Mal|»s in the 
centre of tefen^ This has been 
Scotland's area of strength over 
the past year. Since losing at 
home to Wales last March ih^ 
havecooce^ only one goal in 
seven matches, or whidi diey 
have won four. 

“What we have to improve is 
our finishing," Ferguson says. 
“What' we have to pracuoe 
toni^t is trying to keep the baO 
to ourselves. We want to main- 
lain our consistency, which win 
^ve us confidence when wr go 
into the finals under a lot more 
pressure," 

Scotland have two matches 
after this, against En^and at 
Wembley and then away to 
Holland a wedk later. There will 
be two unofficial practice 
matches against Northern Ire- 
land in New Mexico before they 
arrive for the finaL • 

SOOriAIS: A Gem (OIGtaM). R 
QdmA (Dundee UtSWd). D Nerw (Di^^ 
UreSEt. W Mtar gUMTde^ 
(DundeeUniM).OSBacitan(Maic»iasMr 
Unlied). J ARken. (peMO. G Seonea 
(SMipdoriA E D— ten (Oundea UnMd), 
K oilgltab (Lteipaol) O mm 


Charlton’s chance 
to harness talent 

From EaoiOD Dinvhy, Diiii& 

Games bet w e e n the Republic afternoon from at 


Friar denies meeting Venables 


Ken Friar. Arsenal’s manag- 
ing director, has denied having 
had a meeting with the Barce- 
lona manager, Terry Venables, 
and said be expected Don Howe 
to be in charge for Saturday's 
League match al Tottenham. 

Speculation mounted about a 
secret meeting when Venables 
flew into Gatwick on Monday. 
Bui Friar insisted: “I didn't 
meet him and to my knowledge 
(he chairman I Peter Hill-Wood) 
didn't either.** 

.Arsenal's reiMned interest in 
Venables resulted in Howe 
requesting his release from his 
Hi^bury contract after last 


Saturday's home win over 
Covemiy. 

• Brian Clough, the Notting- 
ham Forest manager, is teen to 
sign a central defender before 
tomorrow's transfer deadline, 
“if I don't get one, we could find 
ourselves in the second 
division," Oougb said. . 

• Martin O'NtrilL Nonfaern 
Ireland's captain in the last 
World Cup, will deride this 
week whether to bid for Mex- 
ico by playing for Fulham. 
O'Neill has been out of action 
for 14 months following a knee 
injury but Chesterfield recently 
gave him half a game. 


The Fulham manner, R^ 
Harford, said: “If be can get m 
enough to play fbr us, we are 
definitely interested." 

• Chariton Athletic have com- 
pleted the £40.000 signiiig of the 
Manchester Gty forward, Jim 
Melrose. 

• Oldham's tong serving (to 
fender, Cary Hooiiclda, who is . 
in his testimonial year, has bm 
ruled out for the rest of the 
season with a dislocated 
shoulder. 

• GiiUngbam's match at Derby 
County lontgbt has teen called 
off because of an outbie^ 
influenza at Gfllingham. 


of Irdand and Wales are gesh 
erally worthy but <»f no parflen- 
lar interest to anyone other than 
the principles. Things 'wfll be 
difietrat here this afteritoon. for 
today's marks Jack 

Chanum's imroductiorrto inter- 
national team management. 

Chariton was oppimited bish 
manager in the most bizarre 
circumstances five weeks ago. 
Given only three of the 18 votes 
cast on die first ballot lie was the 
ultimate beneficiary of a bun- 
gled attempt to. secine the 
appoinunent of Bob Fairiey. 

However, a month is a tong 
time in Irish footitaD arid an that 
is now forgotten. Much credit 
for this is due to Charium 
himself whose teiff oeKnon- 
sense style ^rpeals to the 
natives. 

In a footballii^ context his 
arrival here is equafly fascinat- 
ing. . The team he has been 
diaiged with leading is lalenied 
but brittle, or if yon inefer. seff> 
indu^ent, indined in the pastto 
turn S on cmly when the mood 
was Under Eton Hand, 

«4io took over from John Giles 
in 1979,s(»neindifterentRsiibs 
were adneved despite the 
presence in the scioad of ifiayen 
such as Marie Lawrenson, Ron- . 
nie Whelan. Paul McGrath, 
David OXeary; Prank Stapleton 
and Li^ Brady- 

Chariton has already dedared 
that repotatibn will mean noth- 
ing when be selecta his team, as 
observatUMi that nay be of 
{articular interest to two of the 
side's most cdebiaied pJayen. 
Brady and Stadeton, both of 
whom have perifai in ed withoat 
distinction wfaeir waaring the 
Green in recent years. 

Both have been sdected this 


to iivuries. ttotafify to Mark 
Lawrenson and Kera Sfaeedy. 
CBarlton's most sigaificant 
initovation concerns Brady, 
whose midfidd nte has be<m 
leddbied to aflow him more 
scope . for attack. Mandiesier 
United's Paul McGiadi. wdiom 
Chariion described yeoerday as 
“the beri pl^cr in rnttain". wfri 
I^y alocotide Brady in mid- 
field. Oxford UntetTs .born- 
again Iridunen Ray Hoi^hton 
and John Aldridge are . botii 
given first caps. 

Wales will take the .field 
without Mark Hiigtet> having 
already lost Edkife Nkxizwiedki. 
Neil Slatter, Kevin Ratdifie; Phi 
van den Hauwe. and. Mark 
Aizlewood. Joey Jones wins his 
69ih cap. break^ the Welsh 
lecord set by Nor ABc&iifdL 
RBPlMto OP MBANn: Q FWIM (Ftil- 
htnik D Laogin (OWML b — 

i^lwinxxS). R Hoe^iM (Oriia^ 

I (ManchMto Unitad. 

~ t Safer guitar ISM F 
lanclwswr UOtsfe,. J 

(Bwnofe: R jia 
: Ptak Rsngsffe. It JSefna ftt 
. P MbMm glSM ToMfeL J Cbtaiw 
runtt^ i Jw tas(Hiia wltalfe S 

fwOtaMtoSiaSw 
(MmcKstoUitato),dDeHS«(Mtai c) ta * 
taroui). 

#p8ri$ (Renter) — France, de- 
prived or their meat esqieiknioed 
task ibfce'with the absence of 
Mtcbel Platmi and Alain 
Giresse, metf Argentina today 
in wfeai many r^ard 

pieriew for Che World 
Ip find Usdf on JuiM 29. 

With Platini and (jiresseside- 
Zioed tbroi^ iajmy, Hesrr 
Michdj the coach, has decided 
to britfe m two {daym with Ihtie 
imenatfonaf enerieoee: Jean- 
Mate JFeneiL Auxerre, and 
Leia's'Philippe Vercrynsse. 


BOXING 


Tighter medical control 
sought by Europeans 


STRASBOURG. France (AP) 
— .A report to be published by a 
committee of the Europran 
Council has called for tighter 
medical control of boxing, 
which it desoibes as a form of 
“gladiatorial violence." 

The report, which was ob- 
tained from sources on ihe sub- 
committee on youth and sport, 
said that unless medical super- 
vision is increased voluntarily. 
European governments should 

step in and impose conuols. 

T))e report, wniien by 

German depuiv Gunther 
Muller, said that boxing was 
publicly condoned “suicide or 
self-muiilaiion.'' 

Muller, a Christian Demo^ 
031. said “profestional boxing 
in particular implies accepting 
brutality as one of its major 
attractioos.“ 

The report estimated that 
about l.OOOboxershaddiedasa 
result of ring injuries this cen- 
tury. The number of boxing 
casualties nuy be low compared 
with other dangerous sports, it 
said, “but it is 1 .000 too many in 
a sport where damage is 
inientional.“ 

On March 17 Steve Walt, the 
Scottish writerweight champion 
died three days aner collapsing 
iu the ring during a non-title 
bout in London. Wait was 
walking back to his comer after 
the referee had stopped the bout 
in his opponent's favour, when 
he dropped to the canvas. 
Despite an operation to remove 
a blood elot from his brain, he 
sank into a coma and never 
regained consciousness. 

Muller's report, together with 
recommendations, wilt be 
submitted to the April session of 
the Parliamentary Assembly of 
the Council of Europe. 

It endorsed the recommendar 
irons of several n^onad and 
w<md medical associations eaii- 
mg eiiher for a ban on boxing or 


goverumeni-imposed safety 
regulations. 

Muller's recommendations 
included compulsory wearing of 
protective hndg^. medical 
supervision at rin^ide and 
mandatory, accurate and ufvio- 
daie records on all boxers' 
records in (he ring. 

He also said blows to the head 
should be banned and the length 
and number of rounds redu^. 
Any boxer who is knocked out 
should undei^ a tborou^ 
medical examination and be 
banned from the ring for at least 
six we^s, be added. 

Don Hull, president of the 
International Amateur Boxing 
Association, disagreed with 
Muller and lashed out at “the 
rich doctors" for their 
inicrferencc. 

“It is true that boxing is a poor 
man's sporu“ )te said m a letter 
to Ihe sub-committee. 

“The rich doctors have sin- 
gled out boxing for criticism so 
as not to hinder (he sport of 
their rich friends and because 
boxing does not have the wealth 
orjpoliiicai influence to respond 
cflfeciively." 

Hull maintained sports like 
car racing, horse racing, cycling 
or mountain climbing are for 
more dangerous than boxing. 

Norway and Sweden have 
banned professional boxing, 
while Iceland outlawed boxing 
altogether. 

Mulfer Slopped .short of 
recommending a Europe-wide 
ban on boxing, suggesting in- 
stead that governments should 
discourage professional bouu by 
levying heavy axes on prize 
earnings. 

The Sirasboutg-based council 
is Western Europe's oid^i and 
largest inter-governmcnial 
organization. It was created in 
1949 as a forum for political 
dialogue and cultural and educa- 
tional cooperation. 





SQUASH RACKETS 

Cardwell back 
to vie for 
Devoy’s title 

By CoUn McC^nUlan 

Vicki Cardwell, an Australian 
who dominated the women's 
scene until she retired two years 
ago to start a family, has 
returned to challenge Susan 
Devoy. the world champion, in 
the Hi-Tcc British Open to be 
drawn today and played at 
Wembley next month. 

Miss Devoy. a 22-ycar-old 
New Zealander, makes no secret 
of her ambition to emulate tiic 
inexorable supremacy of her 
male eounierpart. Jahangir 
Khan. She has accumulated 18 
months of uninterrupted victory 
among the current teders of the 
women's game but must view 
the sudden and probably uo- 
seeded appearance of the tough 
little 29->‘ear-oid as a distinct 
threat to her hopes of a third 
successive British Opoi title. 

The last lime they met. during 
the 1983 world championships 
in Perth. Mrs Cardwell be^ 
Miss Devoy and went on to win 
the wx>rld final from Rhona 
Thorne. 

She retired after winning her 
fourth successive Brititit Open 
title in 19S3 but has returned 
with her eight-month-old son. 
Joshua, determined to add a 
fifth. “It will be an uphill battle 
but the British Oten is a 
complex tournament often won 
by the most adaptable player." 
she says. 

A growing awareness of Miss 
Devoy *s astute exploitation of 
her world ranking may have 
motivated the return of Mrs 
Cardwell. Apart from signifi- 
canilv increased prize money 
(£3.500 will go to the women's 
champion at Wembley itext 
month). Miss Devoy carries a 
new Hi-Tec shoe contract, 
worth around £25.000 over the 
next three years, and in New 
Zealand earns several times that 
amount from insurance. rackcL 
clothing and car deals. 


DRESSAGE 


Bartle misses trials 


By Jenny MacAithor 


Chrisiopt^ Bartle, Britain’s 
top rider, will be absent fixioi the 
two^y selection trials which 
Stan today at Sumeleigh in 
Warwickshire. Barrie and his 
horse Wily Trout whose numer^ 
ous successes over the past two 
years -included second plM in 
the Nashua World Cup m the 
Netherlands last Sunday, have 
no need to prove anything to the 
selectors a^ have been excused 
these trials. 

Bartle's sister. Jane Banle- 
Wilson, a member of the 1984 
Olympic team, has been less 
fortunate. Her horse. Pinocdiia 
endured a lOu^ passage back 
from the Hook of Holland to 
Harwich after competing in the 
Netherlands last wedeend but 
she is still expected to take part 
Pinocchia now 1 8. only arrived 
back at 4.0 am yesterday 


Uppermost in the selectors 
minds are the world champion- 
ships in Can^a in Angua and 
two riders that they .wiU be 
ke^itg a sharp eye on are Lady 
Joioey, with Bowdennonkey, 
who were second in the pre- 
selection trials, and Ratees 
Rudge, with Florida Flash. 

Today’s Prix St Geoigm class, 
involving 43 riders, is the 
strongest ever and, unlike the 
other classes, it win take jdaoe 
outside in the all-weather arena. 

On the form of the im- 
selection triab. the pn^ 

festional Eric Thefigaard, wife 
Concoins Leonardo, will be 
hard to beat but they are up 
against two jMomising hones 
— David Hum's Chaucer and 
Jennie Loriston-Clarke's 
CatbeisiOD Dutifo ffid, an 
outstanding seven-year-old 


RUGBY LEAGUE 

Another two 
clubs want 
super league 

Two RMRie dabs,' Olttam anil 
Leigli, have joiiied the tea who 
are plwBi^ lo ferv a new s^er 
lea^ becaase they are dissatto 
fied wifo foe way the*gaine is 
ran, and with the distri tetion of 
televiaoa, spo nso rs h ip and 
odier monies- (writes Kotfa. 
MaAB^ 

The wibs have had anothre 
mrrtinfc at which the advice at 
David Oxley, the Rn^ Le^ne 
secretary-genenl, was so^hf on 
how lo form a . siqwr leupe 
witliiii the cons titu lio iu Tte 
dobs said: ‘These ofc|eelives are 
now bdife panned nrga^." 

The Lffligne offidab have 
reseraiioiiB ahont a super 
kagne and are stfll hfedag to 

answer foe ctebd* 9fevaaces to 

RStroetpriq the 


CRICKET 

Pakistan look 
poised to 
win series 

.Colombo - <Renter) — Sri 
Lanka, wliose batting has let 
them down in the series, need a 
mudi-improved - perfusuiaitce 
today when the deciffing fined 
and final Test agahist radstan 
resum^ Pakistan wrested the 
initiative on Monday, 
fittmselves in a snoim positioo 

to nun the series, odiin is tMl-I . I 
, Ramcea Raja, in only bis I 
.sixib Test, Zauntfeed Pikutanh | 
revival with a magnificent nw ' 
ni^ of 122. Uffing the touring I 
stoetoanistinnu^leadofjy, ' 
Sri lanka then slumped to 24 
for two in their second wining^ 
Wasfm Akram .and tenaa 
Khan, file foa bowlers, remov- 
ing both their openers, and 
resume today stifl ,I3 nuts 
behind. 


ROWyNGiSTRIKING A NICE BALANCE FOR THE BOAT RACE 

Oxford hope to throw weight around 


By Jim RafitoD 

Oxford, avei^tng 14 stone 
and ‘Seven ei^ths of a pound, 
weighed in almost six pounds 
heavier than Cambridge at the 
official weigh-in yesterday. They 
will, on Saturday, be the third' 
heaviest crew ever to contest the 
Boat Race. In the first race at 
Henley in 1829 Oxford averaged 
list I '/:1b (Cambrid^ failed to 
announce all their weights). The 
heaviest, man will be Bruce 
Philp .the Oxfbtd President, 
who. in the past also rowed for 
Cambridge. He tipped the scoitt 
yesterday at I $st 91b. 

The lightest oarsmen will be 
Clarke and Wilson, the Cam- 
bridge bow pair, who each 
weired in at 12sl 91b. Carole 
Burioik the Caml^dge cox- 
swain. displayed a very trim 6st 
91b. 1 71b lifter ihaa Andy 


Green,of Oxford, which win be 
useful If she steers the rig^t 
course. 

The heaviest man to confront 
the scales yesterday was Chvin 
Stewart of Isis, vmo towers at 
6ft Sin and wei^ied in at Ifist 
61b which, if he tod made the 
Oxford ciw, would have been a 
record lib heavier than Steve 
Plunkett Oxfrud's Ulfeennan. 
in 1976. 

AH things being equal the 
heavier crew should beat the 
lifter. But, in this I32nd Boat 
Race, there are for more param- 
eters 10 be laken into acrouoL It 
is interesting to note that last 
Saturday in uie Head Race from 
Monlake to Putney the British 
lightweight Nautilus crews fii^ 
i^ed, astonishingly, in second 
and fourth plaoes. well ahead of 
hundreds of heavywright crews 
including Italy's C^pania with 


oarsmen on oxford: o r 


seven Olymiw 
board. 

Cambridge’s .reported un- 
intentional “reconT on Mon- 
day from Hammersmith Bridge 

to the Univei^ Stone was not - - -«isp 

a recOT f Ooser scni^ of foe 
record book revealed that Qx- ana un hi mre A a 

fordin l982wfthatinKrtr6min • wd 

tiitaa gB ntfPwniMalig).siro)ta. laaiiab- 


piek PiiSma is Iert^ a 
whiefe Ha faais filled 
v^fiisliii^ba lb' become fire 
uew ftfiliB».duccaBr of the 
Olynqiae SofidaxiQr Food is 
sBcoessiOQ to Aasdaso. Livez. 
8 retired SpRRfehteBincff.vmau 
who has teea baudliiqg the 
(^pB^c -.dmri^ioD a part- 
. ... 

TteBOA Caanefi wiU-have 
'to te ^tepared t» pay sBbstaa- 
th^:to SbA a ceafeiar^tle 
rtoliccnrote, SDnieone wiffi a 
caoibfnaSin aCctaeqey* a«fear- 
sj^ited . arfegaaitdlBg of fiie 
coBgpla bOTomcnsic and po- 
iMfl ' wwM . of- hrtttoatioiial 
sport, and .minted tacL. 

He wte aecd Id be abie lo 
syKhroaite widi file forth- 
Charies - IMBer, the 
a ; ^ainaiiL The two 
Pfitaieis have been at pahis to 
eaphasiee (hifi there to been 
no ‘ toflfct btoeea them 
i^drmi^ Save cncoai^ted 
the - general secretary's 
departve..- 

Detacbed and 

Charito Fidoer is one few 
adaumsteaton topate of tak- 
ing dctadhcd,^ irti|i«thre viewa, 
thoqgh.ftis mte&ably direct 
manner' trends fiiat always 
diffioDlt and nacrow divisioR 
teeween antborftntiire and 
atehontaRBii. 

Seif-dctHininatioa by the 
cere vcBi-be seriously noder- 
tt seems 10 me. by the 
copfiriraaf leans of tte Spor^ 
ComKjTslifiest'g^Ht approval 
sirare £6O(L000, ^ered 
■nder the 'coatnKtnal agree- 
meiitof 1972. 

The Amfiauif^ financiug to 
tte Sports .Comcil is depen- 
dent on: the CCPR providing a 
prognuniBe ba^)eC triuch re- 
iafos expendltore to aiiiieve- ' 
jnrait; fite- Sports 

Cotmefi in an organisafion 
audit to aiostrate the extent of 
vafato for moiKv-adiiered; and 
accepting a detailed man^^ i 
meat aodit by the Sports 
CoancO's chief internal 
anditocs. 

AhhOfi^ fiife dedribn was 
taken by file ^lOits Conncil on 
Monday prior to seeing tte 
Select Committee's report 
whidi is embargoed nnffi to- 
day — which 1 have not yet 
seen — ft will be smpiishi^ if 
die r^ort does not echo, or 
evmi exceed, the Sports 
Conncil^ implied restriefion 
of the CCPR's acfiviies. 

The long-nianiQg eoaffiet 
between die CCPR, who are 
dtampibned by Prince Phffip, 
and the S^mts Conndl, whom 
a&irs are increasiiqly, 
oc^ioaally disturbingly, 
domhiated to De paiitine iit ^ 
die Environment direefion 
feom the Ministor of Sport, 
came to a head last year siith 
threatened hdwtfn 

Peter Lawson, die CCPR sec* 
retaiy, and Ndl M a ti fai lanc, 
the then minister. 

Anomaly of 
co-existen<y 

Tte oo-existoBce of tte two 
bodies does, oi coarse,, consfi* 
tote an anomaly, thoogb the 
CCnc Mwvides a le ritfanate, if 

tergely dboii^snizedl hid^ii- 
dent wdee ttf indiridiiai sposts 
frovemittg bodies. 

Two weeks m before the 
Budget, Pei^XswOT tidnl}' 
seat a five.foiiit eequest to to 

na m esake, the Chanedtor, re- 
toiaxation of the 
pools tax in order to 
^ feaSK dahs;.of VAT on 
spots dob entry ito in line 
nidi EEC policy; local rates 
M yonch sports organbatioiis; 

01 tax alloitoiices on. sp^ 
““isor^p; and of coqrora- . 
lost on non-profit matog 
to bodies (such as the 
>A Appeal). 

present gorenmient 










46sec were uiae seconds fester. 
Cambridge's mab offering yes- 
trrdto moning was a sustained 
row lasting 20 mmutes ou the 
etfo from Giiswick. . 

Ladbrokes, tbe Boat Race, 
sponsoisjiave made the crews 
even Stevens, and have invited a . 
Cambridge untbigradnaie to 
present the Ladbreke Trophy to 
the winner ofthe race. The odds 
are 5-6 for both crews, 

TtXMrS OUTMGS Oterd 8.00 and 
3Slh Ca na ri tge 10.SO «nd 5.0D 
(bomPuimy). 


oxFom): G R SenoM Otadtatai Cta. u " EwrenuDeai, 

j». schoqjtaid M enoni. ^*tover, remains adamant 

^iiffiSrfaS'SElS'RSS!! noney shMJd be 

w aiSfen. 1S?“*A that sport, like every- 

iRnnmtnn ti,... — s^^ioit, atid that aoy pohtf** 

nmtment shonld be maxi* 
toire a under the vaine for 
waty pdky. 

SjKHts 

'-oen^s director, in^sted 
yesterday that tiiey are not 
to shori-fenn finan- 
decision on. lomHerm 
f"«««s. Vet the danger is 
qdte ^ ftom the 

(sailing) and Has-y- 
™>an (monntafai aefirifies), 
'*bose leisitte vaiiie;ib the 
ft fa 

«®fe to aeasore^ij^ be 

tod. 


-V..- 


s-'-- 

, ‘''•w 


V. 


CAUraiDaS; I R CMW ( 

ana fliz wt aa n i ). bow, taw ) 




"“"“..srsKss 



. etrake. test ist; c A 

'Abiub 






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ItUCl ilMJbS WtJJWtaUAX XkOAKCHid ly»d 


Ji 


«¥••■ •- 


Today’s television and radio progranunes 


Edited by Peter Dear 
and Peter Davalle 


BBC 1 


&00 CmIbxAM. 

BmkfaslTInM wHh Frank 


rat 6^7^ 

regional news; westher 
and trafficat e.sr< 7^, 
7^ and &2T; nadmtf and 
■International news at 7JML 
7 JO, 84», and 

«Mit at? JO and 8J0s the 




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■-•X- •'■*^1 
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rt''. •>>•> ' 

■ i.n 

3* r 
• ^ •«.% - * 






andareviatvofi 
momirm newspapers at 
'8J7.pEis.Bevem Aft's 

- fashion hints; and 'phone-: 
in financial advice <ram' 
ABson Mitchefi. 

9J0 CeefexioJunav 
' SebbeLmSDGhHbar. 
Hamseda Atoin R2z^ talks 

- • atXMitherbookofsfMrt 

stories in Urdu; and' 

• ShaM Prabha Mathur 
discusses her paWinBS of 
■ . • scenes from Hmlu ■ 

myftwiogy 11.15 C ee fax . 
12.15 TneCtomelAccofCfifMitD ' 

. .8tllatttie«.7hathird^ . 
seven films featurino Peter 
Barkworth. . 

12J0 News After Neon with Sue 
Carpenter and-David 
.. Davies, irtcludes news 
' headDnesvidBi subtil 
.12J5 R^ionsl news and 
weather. 

1J0 Pebble MB at Orie.Suzi 
Quatro talks about her rote 
of Anrtie Oakley SI tbenew 
musical version of Anriie 

• Get Your Gun; and litvinia 
Warner teRs the story of 

' Uole Hessen, who; at the 
fime Miss OaMey was - 

• sharii-NiootBig, was 

Amum^^Basaias.' (li 
2J0 Ceefax 3J2^ioi^ 
news. 

9JSS SapeiTed. Cartoon series 
400 The CfiuehlBHaiinde. 
405Heattieim-'nwCat 
(i}415dackanory.42S 
L aurel and hardy. Cartoon 
version M 430 You 
Should fie Lucky! The 
final of the talent contest 
. -between stm schools 
throughout me country. 

455 JohnCraven'e . 

NewsrauRd 5JS The , 

December Rose. Part 
three of the six-episode 
' drama series and the 
wicked inspector CreMter 
traces Bamade to bie 
London docks &35 Rod 
Harris Cartoon Urea 
5J0 News with Nkdiolaa 
Witehell and Andrew 
Harvey. Weather. . 

645 LondooPhis. 

740 Wogan. Terry and Oefia ' 
Smith are at a recaps In 
London's Savoy Hotel to 
marfcihe pubiktetion oflha 
Food Aid Cookery Book. 

. Among those htf ping them 
celebrate are Barbers 
. WkKfsor^ Phil Cidins, 

Bruce Oldfield and June 
Whitfield. There era also 
two more Song for Europe ' 
hopefuls. 

7jI 0 NoPleeeLfteHome. 
Arthur |s nursed by Vera 
rsabsacoa- 


1005 




O10 DaNaalnthecontinuirig 
saga about Ewing Oi. - - 
MissEHieseBcnslobe ' 
wavering between backing 
JAorseBr^autto 

WandeR-fCama)^-' - -* 

940 A Party Political 

Broadbast by John Cleese 
onbehaHofdieSDP. 

006 News with JuKaSomervite 
andFrances Cowrdate. 
Weather. ^ 

035 a£.D.NewUvMFarOld. 
A documentary about^n 
aty. Arizona, a oofflmuni^ ' 
of n .000 retired peo^ 
teChohs^ (Ceefax) 
S p or te nig m , introduced 
byStara rbdsr. Mark 
Austin assesses the mood 
ofEngi^'serideet 
tourists in the West Indes; 

' AKan Weils recalls his 
athletics career wifti Kevm 
Cosgrove; and htGR4ights 
of five's Icehockey ^ 

' mme oebveen Nkinayfieid 
Racers and Dundee 
Rodeets. 

1050 Raquieitt. Andrew Lloyd 
Webber's composition 
recorded at St Thomas's 
church. New York; the 
sdoisaarePtaddo 
Oomlnga Sarah 
Biightman and Paul Mass-) 

Kiri 9 Ston.(r} 

1140 TheGospalAceordbiolo 
StMeiltiew.AreMof 
ftepro a ramme shown at 

12 .W. 

12.00 Weather. 


TV-AM 


6.15 QoodMomiiigBiiU^ 
presented by Arme 
• Diamnd endNick Owen. 

' Exercises at on and 
0.17% news wHh Jmiw 
kvingat 740, 740, 840, 
840«nd 040; sport at 
545 and 744; 
cartoon at 744 pop lUeio 
at 746prideo review at 
844 Zandra Rhodes at . 
944 and You and Your 
Bodyat9.12. 


iTV/LONDON 


945 Thames news headlines 

foHowed by Once Upon a 
Tbna.Han. An animated 
seriBsU 
of man I, 

Cafaaiicl _ 
by Leon Mobi^iaiO 
Oangarfreaka.1he sidHs 
and daring of stunt men (r) 
10.55 Canodn Time' 

. featuringCkxirageousCat 
11.05 bMtan Legenito of ■ 
Caaads..PltcM me Robin. 

1140 About BritafR. Michael 
Duffy confinues Ids 
expnrailon of the Ulster 
way and reaches Lough - 
Erne. 

1240 M oi O hope. Cartoon series 
about a (Biosaur ( 1 } 12.10 
. OurBaelqratdM 

1^ WishYouWareHaralTA 
repeat of Moixtay's 
programme, the Gate in the 
series, Mr which Judim 
Chalnters reporte fitim 
Lanzarote; Ann^ Rice 
from Qiina; and Chris 
. Kelly from Stoke-on-Trent 
140 News at One with Leonard 
Parkin 140 Thames news, 
presented ^ Robin 
Hou8ton140The 



ChemphM^ Posing as a 
Big embarks 


«vrtha 


prisoner, Craii 
. on an escape l 

fellow irunate. , 

Stuart Damon, Alexandra 
Bastedo and William 
Gaunt (r) 

245 Onihe Market Susan 
Brookes and Trevor Hyatt 
-with the best fresh food 
boys. The guest cook Is 
L^ley Judd. 245 Gantt. 
Drama serial set in the 

■ Covent Garden workshops 
ofafashi y^de ^n^ 

news headlinse 345 Sens 
and Daughters. 

345 Intem a tlonai Footbafl 

■ Special. Live coverageof 
me friendly international in 
Tbilisi between Russia and 
Bigland, kilroduced by 
Brian htoore. The 
commentator is Martin 
-Tyler. 

S4S News with Michael ' 

' Nicholson 5.10 Titamas 
nenAiPresteited by 
Andrew Gardner and 
Trida Ingrams. 

645 CiossiaadB.Adam - 
dedares that he vn1l never 
,.divoroeJ& 

740 TMsfe Your Ufa. Who wUI 
be the surprised worthy? 
Eamorm Andrews is ready 
with his big red book. 

740 Coronislion Street Where 
does Ken fit into MDce 
Baldwin's grand design for 
' SusanTfOraclB) 

840 MindeR breinihouse. 

. When a pop si nger leaves 
for an engagement in Las 
~ Vegas iifS manager asks 
. Art^ifhecan 

racorrunend someone to 
lookafterthestar's . 
Georgian mansiorL Terry 
is immedtetely installed 
and promptly hits a snag in 
the shape of a drunk who 
- clainte to be the pop star's 
brother jr)<Oraete) 

940 British CtoemK Personal 
View. The third and find 
prograrrsne in the series 
andSir Richard 
Attenborou^ gives his 
viewof the sttee of British 
Cinema, from the point of 
view of director and actor. 


Sr Richard Attatboroeglu eo 
rrv, 940pm 


•NEW LIVES FOR OLD 
(BSC1 ,9.3Spm) shows how some 
venerable Americans 
arcumvent the sixth of 
Shakespeare's seven ^es of 
man: the lewi and sUpper'd 
pantaloon. There is nothing 
of the shrank shank about these 
bronzed and hyperactive 
pensioners who ha ve wtthdravwi 
trom the rest of society and 
Choose to live out the rest of their 
lives In the middle of the 
Arizona Desert “This is Shangri- 
la", says one of Sun City's 
60400 over-€0s.8y that ha 
means a cHy without children 
or in-laws; where the ladles can 
twirl their yellow and orange 
pom-poms to their hearts 
content and the (eathar-dad 
men can give a fair 
impersonation of HeBs 
Angels as they roar off on ttieir 
motonordes. “Retirement is 
not for the young, “opines 


CHOICE 


another Sun City worthy on 
whom the sun seems destined 
nevertoset “Youneed 
stamina to keep up with it”. 

There are no signs of the 
marital tensions you would 
expect when eoig^ who, 
during their working lives, were 
apart weight hours a 
day, are now together for 24. 
ShangrMa andlftopia: ail for 
^ dcurars a year. 
•AMAmiAGEOP 
CONVENIENCE (ITV. 

9.00pm)has Richard 
Attenborough, no mean fitm 
actor and (vector himself, 
asking other actors arto directors 
the questions to which he 

’ knows the answers 
sr than they do.The result 
isa strangely unfocused 


probably I 
better tha 


melange of impressions 
about the up-and-down British 
film industry, packed viiith fitm 
clips which, though interesting in 
themseives.do not throw 
much light on the marriage 
between acting and direction 
that IS Mr Attenborough's brief. 
•June Knox-Mawer's 
TALES PROM PARADISE (Radio 
4, 6.l5pm^ 8 collection of 
marvellous yams about tha 
British in the Pacific, 

Paradise, impbdtly. is in quotes 
because we learn abtxft 
hurricanes. earthquakes,a 
missionary bishop who lost 
his false teeth when he was 
unceremoniously apped into 
the surf .a battte-exe of a wife 
who assailed a Good 
Samaritan, and a canntbei with a 
preference for human 
thumbs. 

Peter Davalle 


1040 A Party 

Broadost by John Cteese 
on behalf of the SOP. 

1045 Nows with AlastairBumat 
and Pamela Armstror^ 

1045 MWwaak Sport GpMteL 
Highlig^ of the football 
matches betwotet Russia 
and England: Scotland V 
Rumaru; and hkxthem 
(ratand against Denmark. 

1145 ThsTs Hollywood. The 
. cinematic career of Shlrlay 
Tempte. 

12.15 The Madonna and tha 
Magdaten. Ends at 1245. 


BBC 2 


645. open I 

Psychology- Islt 

as ABC? Ends at 

940 Ceefax. ' 

12.55 Conflict and Change In 
Education. An Open 
Univers'i^ production 
examining the ProgressTva 
Revolution 140 M a ritetkig 
in Action. How important 
are rewards and 
Incentives for sales 1 
in the service I 

140 Ceefax. 

, 245 House of Loids. Live 

coverage of ttw (tebete on 
rates, moved by Lexd 
Marshall of I nods. Lord 
Elton r^iltes for tha 
Government 

540 News suHxnary with 
subtitles. Weather. 

545 Bridge dtei. Improve 
one's technique with 
Jeremy FGnt and mentoers 
of the Bristol Brk^ Club. 
Introduced by Jeremy 
James, (r) 

6.00 FOiRHoRdayAfiair* 

(1949) Starring Robert 
Mi^um. Janet Leigh and 
Wendell Corey. Romantic 
tale of a war widow, 
devoted to her young son. 
who inttfids to marry the 
stolid and dependene 
Carl But at Christmas time 
Steve, a drifter, arrives in 
New York from California 
and proceeds to court the 
lady by pMdetIng to her 
son's de^ for a train seL 
Directed by Don Harfrnan. 

740 Cartoon Twa Players, 
made by John Hates. 

740 Out of Court TTia final 
programme of the series 
aruulavid Jessei and Sue 
C(X)k examine how ttia 
Transport Police are 
taekJirig the problem of a 
dangerous increase in 
malickxis acts on the 
raiiways. Plus, news of 
anti salmon poaching 
patrols. 

840 Al Our Working Uvae. 

This documentary series 
frac'ir^ the hisR^ of 
working Britain in the 20th 
cermsy erxls with a recap 
of the series explaining 
what went wrong with 
Brito's IrKbistrw 
performance and a note of 
optirnlsm for the fubxe. (r) 
(Ceefax) 

940 Im*A‘S'H. Hawkeye. after 
three days of surgery and 
a request tor leave turned 
down, begins to behave 
erraticaBy. (r) 

945 That Uncertain re efing. 
Parttoreeofthe 
adaptatnn oTKIn^sey 
Amis's novel and John is 
caught In a passionate 
embrace with Elizabeth by 
the early arrival home of 
her husband. FBtting from 
cupboard to wardiobe 
John makes his escape by 
dressing up m a Welsh 
womane tradteomi 
(xtetume. 

1040 We Shoot Hones Don’t 
We..? A documentary 
about the tirade ki Brmsh 
horse flesh, slaughtered 
for human consumption. 

i&Eat 


(Rrst shown on B 
1040 APartyPofilieRl 


East) 


Broadcast by John Cleese 
onbehaHoffrieSDP. 
1045 Newsnfghl1lA6 
Weather. 

1140 Articles of PUOv 
presented by Bishop 
LessUeNewbigin. 

1245 Open Unlver^ Arts 
Foundation Course - 
Looking at Poems 1240 
Psychology: Qusstkxts of 
^ '.Endsatl-Oa 


CHANNEL 4 


240 nfeKAieafieLi8iin*(1932) 
' starririg Joim am Lionel 
Banyrnore. Corn^ 
thriller in which the 
brothers play a Raffles 
type character and the 
whode 

trails hkn. I 
Jad< Conway. 

440 APIus 4. Mavis NIehoison 
tefcs to Irish writer, 
Terence de Vera White. 

440 CountdowiL The second 
semifinal of the words and 
numbers competition pits 
ttie number two seed, 

Andy Keebie, against 
Antfiom Butcher, seeded 
three. Richard Whftsley is 
the questionmaster, 
assisted In the 
aCQudicator's chair by 
Gyles Brandreth. 

5.00 ABea. Mel b^iens he is 
being hard (tone and 
refuses to leave hte 
apaitmant His depression 
becomes so acute that hia 
mother decides titet 
desperate measures are 
needed. 

540 Do 1 Detect a Change bi 
Y<MfrAttkiide.An 
antm^ed comedy made by 
Vera Unnecar. 

640 TheCtirislteite.The 

jrammatri 
Gas'eoigne's 
documentary series on tha 
story of Chrtetianity. This 
evening he t^ces tea witii 
. a chintoanzae wh9e 
(flscusslng Darwin's 
theory of 6V(tiution. 

740 Chennei Four news with 
Peter Sissons end Alastair 
Stewtft inejudes reports 
on how MiBiant operratM 
in South \Atetes; and the 
current prHiticai toinkif^ 
(xieducatitm. 

740 Comment This week's 
political slot la filled by Jeff 
Rooker, Labour MP for 
. p^ Barr, and ftis party's 
spokesman on housing. 
Weather. 

040 Athlatica. Jim Rosenthal 
infroduces cowsage of the 
Newcastie City Centre 
Race over 5,000 metres. 
The ctxnmentattxs are 
Aten Parry, Peter 
Matthews and R(Xi Hifl. 

840 Divane Reports, 
presented ^ Cornell 
Astronomy Professor 
Thomas Gold, who argues 
that the United States 
pre^ramme is a 
wute (if time. The first 
senator is space, Jake 
Gam, (fisagrees, but G(^d 
receives 

retired Admiral Gene La 
R(X]U8 who claims that ttie 
shuttia is reaily a mifitary 
vehide 

940 Proapecte. Pkicy and Bitty, 
owing £100 in rent arrears, 
decide to rent a cheaper 
flat in Bow, where they 
hope to impress Mor« end 
Chris, an expectation that 
fails far short of 
realisation. Starring Gary 
Olsen, Brian Sovelland 
tonigU Bernard Heptoa 

1040 Mr Are. A repeat Of 

Sunday's find episode in 
which Mr Pye decides to 
humiiiate himself in front 
to the istandere dixing the 
annual cattle show. The 

E lan works too well and he 
I forced to make a hasty 
retreat chased by a group 
who want him lynched. 
11.00 Shake,RettieandRolLA 
(tocumentaiy fflmed at the 
10th Annual Wortd 
Backgammon 
Champtonship, held In 
Monte Carlo In July.Ends 
at114S. 


C Radio 4 ^ 

545 Shipping 640 News: 
Wa»thar6.10 Fanning 

545 Prayer for tlw Day (8) 
640To&,lnd640, 
740.838 News 
Sunvnaty.6.45 
Business News. 645. 

745 Weather. 740. 
54970(^/8 News. 74S, 
84SSpart74S 
Thougnt tor the Dsy 6.S 
Yesterday in 

Pwfiamam 647 Waatiier; 
Trevef 
940 News 

945 Midweek wHh Lbby 
Purvesfs) 

1040 News; Oanlenars' 

Question Time. 

Ustenars' questions 
1040 AllStstiOfwToThe 
Cross (^Psnalty tor 
Improper Use 

1045 tw Service from the 
Chapel of Lambeth 
Palscefs) 

1140 News; ‘neval: Into His 
Own A Beti-portrait of 
Robert Frost as a young 
poet(s). 

1148 EnquuB Within: NeR 
Lsridorand speciatist 
tttoerts answer ilstenars' 
queries 

1240 mws; You and Yours. 

John Howard reports on 
topical issues 

1247 Lord of Misrule final pert 
-The Conjurer 12.S 
Weather Travel 
140 The World at One: News 
1.40 The Archers 145 

Shi»lirnR9reeast200 
News; .Jesus Dramatisation 
based on the Gosoel 
narratives (2) From (saSiea to 
Jerusalem (s) 

245 The Enthusiasts. Allan 
Smith reports on The 
Whovians 

340 News; The Afismoon 
Where are you 
Munk?^ Philip 

Raes(s) 

347 Time For Verse: poems 
inspired by pictures in the 
Tas Galleiy ra A Sense ot 
Summer. 4.M News 
445 Be (XI 4. issues 

and Important avente at 
noma anti abroad. 

445 KaJakioscope Extra: 

Wrftar's Block. Tha 
problems which teoe some 
writers with Kingsley 
Amis. Bar^ Batnbriage, Mary 
Brown. Ooti(^ Dunn. 
Zachary Lsuier and Anthon* 
Sforr. 

540 Sh^ngS45 Weather 


640 News; Fitandal Report 
640 FBm Star James StewarL 
Another of Alexander 
Walkers pnvNes 
7.00 News 
7.05 The Areners 
740 Fxeside Tales: (aeordisB 
share some stories in a 
working men's dub south of 
Newmastle. 

745 Brainwaves (new series) 
Education rrmgazine 
discusses religious assembly 
815 Tales from Paradise (new 
senes) June Knox-Mavrer 
with storias of tne Britisri who 
went to the South Pacific 
as missionaries, planters and 
teachers (s) 

940 Thirty4Jinuta Theatre 
Squ% Quite QutcMy in 
tha by David Marshall (s) 
940 Adventure. The British 
Meunuiiiiuuring 
Exhibition. 

945 Kaleidoscope. Arts 
reviews wiw Natalie 
Wheen. 1049 waarher 
11.15 The Rnandal World 
Tonight 

1140 Today in Pariiament 
1240-1815am News; Weather 
1243 Shipping 

VKF(avaHabie in England and S 
Wales (Kily) as above except: 545- 
6.00am Weather; Travel 145- 
8D0pm For schools: Listening 
Comar 540445 PM 
(Continued) I140-18l0am Open 
Unhrerstty: 1140 The 
Metaphysical Poets 1140 Social 
Scienees: Grapevine. 

C Radio 3 ) 

On medium wave. VHP variations (X) 
' stereo are Qivsn at the end 
645 Weattier. 7J» News 
7J)5 M(XTiing Concert 

Bizet arranged Gordon 
Davies ( Jeux d'enfants 
suite), Debussy 
(Chad's Corner 
suitetMi^langafi. 
piano), Dohnanyi ( Variations 
on nursery song: 
Katchenjxano. end LPO). 
800 News 

805 Conceit(conid)Purce6 
(Sonata a 4 No 6 in G 
minor), Britten (Hymn to St 
Cac5la:London 
Symphony Chorus). 


d'ete^rieg (Holberg Sufts). 

805 This Week's Compaear 
Bgar. Philharmonia 
under Haitink play the 
Symphony No1 
1800 Academy of Andent 
MusicCPEBach 


(Symphony In G, Wq 182 No 
1), Tetemann (Concerto 
hiEmnor tor flute and 
reoconier). Haydn JCeOo 
Concerto in C), C P E Badi 
(Sytophony hi 8 wq 162 
No l^wwi DavtesCftiia), 

gtoATlrnaifrecaRlaO; 

1140 ABtionBMmbta: 

Graham Sheen 
arrar^tement of The Mfean 
Ladder overwe by 
RossWJUao fflalean 
, Bona 
iLarxl Grateger 
Tune: IJsbotO 



Usbdm 
1140 Ayres tar the Theetre: 
vniiem(;raft(T^ 

Rivals). PixcM (nie Mewled 
Beau). Parley of 
tn stu iment s 

1815 Loewe and Wolb Ruud 
vanderMeer 
(barftane)and Rudsolf 
Jansen (pianoljhe Won 
w(xks includeTrelbenixfntt 
Lieben Spott, and Auf 
dem gninen Balkon.The 
Loewe works include 
Wanderers NaehtHed 1 (Uber 
alien (Sipfeta 1st RulO. 

140 News 

145 Count Basie: 1953 

recordhigs inchiding Neal 
Hefti arrangamenb of 
Bubbles, and OiBiry 

Point 

140 Matinee MusicalerBBC 
Concert Orchestra under 
Lawrencdwith Dhiab Harris 
(soprano). Gordon 
Stewart (piano), Martin 
Loveday (violinX Nigel 
Biomiley(celo). Mac Cum 
(Urto of Mountain and 
Flood overture). Vaughan 
Wiliams (Greensissves 
), Beethoven 
isongsL 
iHany(noe(iene 
frexn John FlM suite). 
Mozaft (A (kiesto seno), 
Schubert (ballet music 
No 2. Rosamunde) 
Mendetssohnf 
overture) 

1145 Cricket; Final day ot the 
Third Test Until 8^ on 
medium wave. 

7M Debut Susie Meszaros 
(viola). Eleanor Alberga 

'L BrMan (Lachrymae). 
r(AndBfitee rondo 


740 St Francois If Assiseirte 
Messiaen. SO. BSC 
Singers. BBC Symiihony 
Chonis urxier 
OzBwa.With adolsts 
Qalbmirri. Riegel, 
Hseher-Dlsskau and 
RouBon. 

815 Six Contteen te: Foreign 
radiobroadcasts. 
me ntored by ths BBC. 

945 Music for Flute and 
Piano: James Dower 

K , John Lanehan (piano). 

(In Iratand fantasy). 
Delius (La Calnd8 Kom^ 
Vaughan Wiltiuns (Suite 
debaliat) 

1040 Winter play by Susan 
Hii.Witti Doreen Mantie 
and Cyril Lucknam 
1D4S Triple Concertos: Bach 
On cTbWV 10664), and 
Braridanburg Concerto No 4 
1140 Chamber Music frtxn 
Manchester Gordon 
Feroue-Thompeonbiano). 


Op 126). 


Rachmaninov (Senage No 2 
inBAatminotl 
1147 News. 1240 Closedown. 
VHP on^ 240 Paganini ; 
KantDTOwfviolin) and GHIotd 
(gui^. Paganini S,onatas Noa 


9,10 and 11.345 Vaughan 
wmamsulob: a masque for 
dancing. 440 ChM Everaongrirom 
Gttildford Cathedral: 448 News. 
540 Midweek ChoicftMozart (Don 
Giovanni musto, ArensKy (Stele 
Nol lortwwplanoa).Shostakpvidi 
(Vtaln Ooncerto No H Mareeto 
paato8wto ItezzarfeiUeniiait^ 
Rubbra G^pnphofw No __ 

1 lM)MUnlimral6r from 645am to 
648 Open Foweit 

( Radlo2 ) 

440aai COIR Barry M 840 
Moore (a)806 Kan 
Sqm nr Eurooe or 
Jtomy VW^W Plue your legal 


W 


Dunn 

M800I 
Spateai Northam Mend V 
Denmmfc. 048 LUen to the 
Band to iBsluring The Teniple 
Bend to 888 Spain Oeek 
1040 fite A Rirmy Bueineee. MBte 
Crtegislratevteiviii h Jack 
Wtonar In November 1977. 1040 
Hubert Grm am Tnanka lor 
the MarnoKlIJO Brian Maittiew. 
R(xjnd MdMtea (siaieQ train 

Peter Dickson 


840 Gtafia Humaerd (s) from 

Caribbetei Focus 08 a new 
exhUionatttie ^ 

COmmenweaah inatitute, 830 
Music al the way (a) 440 
kHamaOente Soccer r ~ 


iMemoiyri14C 
undMUmte 
ntidteghOUAteal 

<U 800440 A UHte 
MsfttMu£. 

C Radio 1 ) 

840m Andy Petoiea 740 
MB(e Read 040 Sbnon Bates 1240 


Esbferg,,^ — 

and Peter Powel are loined by over 
8000 Brieah end Darbh 
Bcoute. 800 Steve Wright 540 
Newsbeet (Prank Partridge) 

545 Bnxio Brookes ted at 830 a 
review of the new Top 90 afeum 
chart 740 Janlc Long 1Q4(F1840 
John Pete (s) VIF fUDIOS 1 8 
2 440wn As Radto 2 440-800 
David Hamtton (s) 640 As 
Radio 2 800 Yer Roots are 
Showing (a) 845 Big Band 
Soeeiallsl 816 Uaten to the Barxi 

'* DaskllLOOAs 

AsRadio2 


WORLD SERVICE 


600 Wawaeaili 74N News TjM IVienty- 
~~ DB«teepfiwnt ‘SB 
aoe News aoBReBe cti o ni 815 Ostticte 


Four Hous; Newt 7J0 1 


Record Revtew 830 Tnnuamie Qua 
800 News 80S Review ot tee Britwh 
Press 81S Ihe iwxtd IbOw 830 Ftnen- 
eel News 840 Look Anesd 845 FlBnders 
end Snsihi 1800 News 1801 Onwmus 
1830 My Wertt 1140 Na«v« ilJH News 
About emate 11.16 CXene 114S A teaer 
from viMes 1800 Radio NCw a rete 1816 
Naure Notebook IZZS The Finwng 
World 1846 toons Round-up 140 World 
News 141 Twenty-fbur Hours: News 140 
Pevteoprwx 96 8B0 Ovdotet 846 Re- 
pen on Reloioi) 340 Rato newsreel 815 
b ywaws olHMory 830 Joyce GreitWI 
440 Nawa 449 Comneniary 816 Reck 
Salad 846 Tiw World Today 800 News 
848 toamtelonte Soccer Special 800 
MnioflllBTwiinni rratHnin HowiaiB 
memetonte Socew Speew 1800 News 
1049 The Wend Today 1045 Leoer from 
Wales 10JD Pinendte News 1840 Refiee- 
tois 184S Sporte RoundW) 1140 Newe 
1140 Cc mH wiw at y 1816 Good Books 
1140 TOP TMiify 1800 News 18M 
News Aficui Brisin 1815 Rato Newsreel 
1830 Joyce GrenMI 140 Newt 801 
Oudock 830 wavegude 140 Book 
(teoiee 146 Mottecr 240 NM 240 
Revww el M Bman P*esa 8is Naenerk 
UK 830 Aaegnmont 340 Naws 800 
News ABoorSnaHi 8 19 The world Today 
830 PreedkJlM 440 Newsaesk 440 
OutecH Raceid Raeiew 645 riw world 
Today (Al wen OMT) 


FREQUENCfE& RwBo 1:1053kHz/2B5m;1089l(Hz/275in: Radio 2: 6S3kHz^433ni; 909kHM33m; RBdb 3: t2l5kHz/E47rn: VHP -90- 
9Z5; Rad»4: 200kHz 1500m: VHF -92-95; LBC: 1152kHz/261ffl: VHP 97 Capital: 154»Hz/194m: VHP 95A BBC RBdb Lindon 
1458kH:V206iK VHP 94,9; WoMSeiviitoMP648lcHz/463i^ k- 


lObO-IOJOSoorimm. 1800-ia 
News inflweamer. SULAti 


RRC1 WALES 835pm-4te> 

warn Today. 83S-740Jukas. 
'l24b-18(Ben News end weattwr. 
SCOTLAND 6,te|iai-74D Repor ting Scot- 
M. NOirnCRM SELAND &35pn»- 
540 Todw’s SM 548640 Inside 
(Mar. 6JS-T,to (Twites fciCnwM 

■ ~!40-i2X6ani 

iND 

835PW-T40 Regiente iwwe nwgBinaB. 

821 Seserm Steiet 18M Peaedtan 
net iiZO-iiJOCwtoon. iZONewe 
1 JO-825 The Engagement 826- 
865 Young (taciers. 6.lD4J6Cnannaf 
Report 1H»f 046 Mike Harris 
Bwid.1145Sw<lloOnemConcsri. 1815 
Ctandewn. 

Ttoa 830 Saaanie Sveai 10J0 
Termawk*. 1140-1810 Mas and Jwmy. 

1 20pm PMws. 1 JM26 Cewdw 
Practice. 865 5.g ran: Jews OetoSo- 
persw. 810835 Hem TompM 
1145 Jan UlB 1816MI Newe. 
Ooudown 

ANGyA;^j;:st. ton: 

BesM el Austeititz. I830pm-140 Mr 
Bid Mrs. 120 Newt 1JO-Z25Coimy 
Practice 810835 About AnoUa. 

11 45 Short Sioiy Thaava. 1815am Ficm 
CiN^ 10 KerrV. CkmadowiL 
HTV WPfiT As London ex- 

n,i Y yycoi cpcajs—Newa. 

WoildteJ«neeMitewner.1040CBl- 
ItorMHvrMwys. 1040 Caneen 1141^ 


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Faeanattng'l 

News 1J0-82S Ran to Hart 81M25 
News 11.45 JoteSmJainteei. 
IZlOemClDsadown. 

tmGS£&Li§£S?!SL 

1020 wono ot Hamee Mielwier 
800pm-5J6 Wales et Six. 

iORDERsy^IXS;^ 

10J0 FMm: Oliver and tee AntuI 
Dodger, pan one. 11.1IV1120 Gnxwy 
(teoullBs 1830ptn't40 Mewe Mek- 
ers 120 News 1J0425 The Lorn Boat 
825855 Yemg Doctors 810425 
Lookaround 1145 Fraea Frame 
181SBB News, Cmsedown. 

TVR As London excape 025am 
JJLs (Xitlook. 928 Sesame Street 
1025 toeetdon nes 1120-11 JO An- 
nals Eat m Many Ways. 120 pm News 
1 20-225 The Eiqjagemeni 830- 
440 Yoimg Oocmis 808625 Coest to 
Coast. 11.45 StutoOrw m Concaa 
18l5eni Cenymny, Ctosedosn. 

PPMTRAI As London excaot 
ktoELLEsSkeJSamRimawayis- 

hnd 940 Groovy Ghoukas 1810 
CixnesiKid Strikes Agan. 1026 Rxte 
11.00-1120 Home Cookery 
1830pm-l4D Sometfvng to Traeawa 
120 News 120-825 Scareciow and 
Mrs iwig. 810 Cmssreeds 625-740 
■News. 1145 Fitm: Kni 145am 


TCW As London except 82Sam 
-ISgLsasameSeaet 1825 too Fee 
1835-1 120 Standby Cwn- 
erg. Ao«n. l20pmNews 838825 
Country Pracaee. 810 TodeySoute _ 
west 620-740 Amoebae toZebras 1846 

^rkgn^ 1815WB Paateenpt 

enfold Telee 5401404 Rescale. 

1800 Struggle Benaite tee Sea. 1025 
Anenels teat Fly. 1025 Captwn Scar- 
iBl 1145-1120 Man and Jwtny izjQpm- 
140 Wmeis on wrti^ 12D Granada 
Reports 126425 The Baron 325-855 


Story ThaaiTB 1220WD 1 

RCOTTI RH A* Loiden ex- 
teUUJ I Incept 025emSaaame 
Streei 1825 Otearworld 1120-1120 
Advaimees Of tea Blue Kr^ 120pm 
News 120 Job 8pm 126 Flm- Vow 
MoneyorYoieWMe.245GeinsS26Re- 
pon Back 855626 ton: Jesus 
ChrstSitematv 815-625 News end 
Scodwid Todey 1835 Mkhmak 
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SKxy Thaaira 1820em Cteaadnwi. 
expSlene: 140pm Ceimtoown 
b2b 120 Artel Perauasien 800 
Ffalabteam 815 Interval 340 The 
Chnsaara 440 A Plus « 420 world of 


AnMunon 446 Uyfr UteHmr 440 
Dan Deg 540 Biumwear 520 Poe^ Pro 
gramnw 800 Broofcsidt. 620 T Res 
Ola 740 NawiMkon Selte 720 
tonmedau 800 Drwmoste Y PWr 
830 r Syd Ar Bedwsr 805 FOIK Dead 
Men Den t Wear PiBxr 1845 A0M- 
Bi 11.16 Dnaraa Rapeite 1140 
Oes ouu wn. 

YORKSHIRE i!?,a:aL^c^. 

tom FimrVM 850 insnortw Herttaga 
1810 Tarteewks 1835 Rey toartcn^ 
1145-1120 Under tee 


UoisMte 1320pm-140 calendar UteCth 
BM Uva 126825 totaen 

Cnai S2M4I Sore and DeuglMra. 
816420 Cteander 1145 Jazz 
1819HI Madteoeiw. Cioaedown. 

As London ex- 
oeDtOJSemNBws 
830 Seawne Sbeet 1020 Rock of 
ineSevandeal045Mevlemalws1120- 
1120 Canoen t830pm-140 A 
Htomanxnbea 120 News 125 Where 
The Jobs Ara 830-825 Country 
pracilea 8i64to Nonnam LUo 1146 
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«.34H3<88glS 






WEDNESDAY MARCH 26 1986 


THE 







V«f> :■■■■■.■■■■■ ■■.■■.•■ ■■ ■ ^ 

V ^ ■ ^-1— 





A spray of Dark Blae: Oxford in practice for the Boat Race on the Tideway yesterday. Their afternoon outing piodnc^ an easy 


the Thames eight (PboCognph: Tommy Hindley). Boat Race news, page 30 









on the line 


From John Woodcock 
Cricket Correspondent 
Brit^etown 


West Indies duly won the 
third Test match, sponsored 
by Cable & Wireless, by an 
innings and 30 runs here 
yesterday, their eighth over- 
whelming victory in a row 
against England. That 
England's last four wickets 
lasted until just before lunch, 
and kept their many loyal 
supporters out of the sea until 
the afternoon, was because of 
some light rain and a deter- 
mined little partnership be- 
tween Downton and 
Emburey. “But there is still." 
said Tony Brown, the England 
manager. *‘an aw^l lot to play 
for •> and we can still yet 
square the one-day series." 

As in Trinidad during the 
second Test match, no play 
would have been possible on 
the rest dav here because of 
rain. Though still overcast 
vesterday it was mostly dry. 
By the Lime of the first short 


stoppage, after 20 minutes. 
Edmonds had been leg before 
to Garner, moving into his 
stumps to try and hit a full 
length ball to leg. Before the 
next even briefer interruption 
Downton and Emburey added 
35 with just enough certainty 
to make England, and espe- 
cially Botham, rue all the 
more that dismal batting in 
the last hour of Sunday. 

With victory assured the 
West Indians, if not con- 
sciously taking thin^ easily, 
looked a little languid. When 
Marshall and Gamer, who 
bowled the first 16 overs 
together, produced anything 
special, Downton and 
Emburey played and missed. 
Mostly, thou^ they batted 
very decently, putting on 50 
for the eighth wicket before 
Holding replaced Garner. 

.At once Holding had 
Downton well caught at the 
wicket off a nasty lifting 
outswioger. and Foster, sec- 
ond ball taken high up at 
second slip. Ten minutes later. 


with just over 10 hours of the 
match left. West Indies had 
won and retained the Wisden 
Trophy, the last word being as 
conclusive as the margin of 


their victory, the cartwheeling 
removal of Thomas's middle 


stump. 

Only once before has one 
country lost eight successive 
Test matches to another. Ttal 
was when Australia, having 
made a clean sweep of their 
series against England in Aus- 
tralia in 1920-21, won the first 
three Tests of 1921 in En- 
gland. England stopped the rot 
by drawnng the fourth Test at 
Old Trafford, having been 
beaten eight times in seven 
months. 

If the Great War, and the 
dreadful losses and depriva- 
tion which came with it. were 
the main cause of England's 
slow- rehabilitation then, the 
reason now is just as clear cut 
If the fast bowlers of the two 
sides, in EnG^and in 1984 and 
out here this winter, had 
changed sides, the results 


would have been reversed 
Tliey might have been less 
conclusive, but England 
would undoubtedly have won. 

oW the course of recent 
history a pair of top-class fast 
bowlers Oct alone four of 
them, bowling as short as they 
please, when it suits them, and 
with more than 700 Test 
wickets between them) have 
invariably been enough to win 
a Test series. Gregory and 
McCtonald Larwood and 
Voce, Miller and LindwaU, 
Trueman and Statham, Tyson 
and Statham, Lillee and 
Thomson, Procter and Pol- 
locl^ Hall and Griffith... the 
list is very long. 

The time comes when the 
side without the test bowling 
starts to give of nothing like its 
be^ On the present tour this 
happened straightaway when 
the first Test match 
played on a dangerous pitch in 
Kingston. Since then England 
have not had the confidence to 
lakp the chances offered them. 
The tneskk of six days be- 


tween the Test just finished 
aiKl the fourth and final one- 
day international, to be played 
in Trinidad next Monday, was 
piannad originally to allow the 
pngianri team a well-deserved 
rest In the event t^ have 
their wounds to lick. But 
whether Brown and the vice- 
captain, Gatting, one as the 
managw and tiic Other b^ 
cause he has the personality 
required, can do it, is another 
matter. 

' Gatting's absence from the 
first three Tests has been a 
heavy blow, but it is not long 
ago that he had to look to this 
colunrn to find a champion. It 
would be expecting an awful 
lot of him now, poiticularly 
after his two recent injuri^ to 
come in make the differ- 
ence. But at least his qi^ities 
are being widely recogjiized. 

“We have obviously missed 
Mike greatly,” says Peter May. 
“He is such a good influence 
on and off the field and a help 
to David." "Mike,” says 
Brown, “is a real fighter. 


There is little wrong in my 
opinion with the attitude of 
the others, but Gatting's <teter- 
minati on comcS tiuough.” 

As of the England 

selectors and a spectator here 
in Bridgetown, May has con- 
veyed to Messrs Brown, Willis 
and Gower that the next two 
Test must be seen u 

vital, not only for England's 
cricketing name but for each 
player in the context of the 
next 12 months. “The players 
must grit their teeth and 
fight,” he says. He wonders, I 
ihitilc, how whole-hearted one 
or .two of them have been md 
says that noK>ne on the side, 
from the senior to the most 
junior, can take for granted a 
place in the England side this 
coming summer. - 
“It would be more disap- 
pointing than in 1984 to go 
down now by a similar mar- 
gin, becau.se we are a better 


all five Tests in a series out 
here, not even since. West 
Indies took to playing four fost 
bowlers. Though outeriayed. 
New Ze^and d^ two (om of 
four) last year. Australia two.: 
in 1983-84 and India three in 
1982-83. An three probafoly 
had better pitdies to jrfay on. 
but they must also have nuufe' 
more of their coOective abSir 
ty. 

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side,” says Gower, referring to 
the “blackwash'* which 


Lloyd's administered 

that year. No side has ever lost 


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CRICKET 


HANDBALL 


BOXJNQ: FORMER WORLD LIGHT-HEAVYWEIGHT CHAMPION TURNS ANALYST 


Wessels finds himself 
left out in the cold 


From Paul Martin, Johannesburg 


A cold shoulder awaits South 
African cricket's prodigal son. 
K^ler Wessels. who is return- 
ing to the country of his bir^ 
f^m bis adopted Australia 
admist fierce controversy. 
Thou^ be will be eagerly 
welcomed in Currie Cup provin- 
cial cricket, he will be excluded 
from either rebel inlemaiional 
team in next season's repeat 
Australian-Springbok “Test" se- 
ries. 

Kim Hughes, the Australian 
rebel captain says Wessels had 
“made his bed in the official 
Test camp and that's where he 


must lie. Hughes contends that 
Wessels had been helping re- 
cruit Australian players for the 
rebel lour during the World Cup 
competition in England — only 
to renege at the last moment. 
W'essels, ironically, has now 
burnt his boats with Australian 
Test cricket piqued at not 
having been onered the most 
iucraiive type of contract 
Nor is Wessels lo be included 
in the Springbok team. “He 
cannot change horses mid- 
stream," said Dr Ali Bacher, 
South Africa's chief rebel tour 
organizer. 


No escape 
route for 
Stafford 


Conteh to lend support to Andris 


By SrikDiiiiir Seo, Boxing Cofre^pondent 



You don't need us to tell you how easy it is for 
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BACKFORD 


INVESTMENTS 
L I M I T E, p 


By Paul Harrisrai 

'The nnexp^ed success of 
the h fl"4 hailing Uunites of 
Stafford Prisou ndiied a 
showpiece cup final. The M & 
B Midlands Cup final was dne 
to be played on May 14 at the 
Granbv Halls In Leicester, bnt 
since Stafford Olympic are nte 
allowed to play away nmtehes 
— for obvions reasons ~ that 
match is now off. 

'The Midlands Handball 
Association plan instead to 
stage a challenge match on 
that date at Granby Halls, 
between the other finalists, 
Olympia Cannock, and 
Leicester *73. who were beaten 
14-10 by Stafford Olympic at 
the prison on Sonday. 

It is hoped that the real final 
fan be played on Nlay 18, at a 
sports hall near the prison. 
N^tiations are goiite im 
between prison and MHA 
officials to that end. 

The MHA are i^ainst play- 
ing Um final in the prison, not 
least becanse tiie sluing pitch 
gives a considerable advantage 
to the home mde. 'The probim 
for tiie prison antborities is to 
find enough players who would 
be allows ont to play: a final 
in which Stafford eonld only 
Md a few regnlais oonld soon 
de^nerate into farce. 

As H was, on Sunday some 
of Stafford's players had never 
played befve. Stafford ended 
the season midway in the 
Midlands League while 
Leicester readied the last f(m 
of the play-offs for the British 
cbainpioaship. 

Tan Harris, the Leicester 
secretary, has no doubt they 
were affected by the surround- 
ings. “It is SDch an nuosoal 
arena,” he said. “The whole 
enviromnent got the better of 
the Tn^ were fright- 

ened to dive around on the 
tarmac court and also 1 feel 
they were slightly intimidated 
at barii^ to play against 
prisoners. Perhaps they were a 
bh frightened to go in hard for 
fear of being hit back.” 

“Pop” PopoTic, the secre- 
tary of Olympia Cannodi, 
says his team will not play tiie 
fii^ at tte prison. “A tat of 
our playns are under 18 and, 
in any prison roles would 
drastically cot down the nom- 
btf of supporters allowed in. 
71 m whole event would be 
devalued." 

Stafford play on the league's 
only oDtdoor coml. Tliree 
sidk of it are overshadowed by 
Victorian prison blocks, while 
space is so short at the prison 
that the goals are stored 
against the walls of the old 
execution chamber. 


John Conteh has been 
called in to hei^ Dennis 
Andries, the Brib^ light- 
heavyweight champion, pre- 
pare for his world title bout 
against J B Williamson, of the 
United States, on April 30, at 
Picketts Lock, Edmonton, 
London. But the former world 
light-heavyweight champion 
will not be putting on ^oves 
and getting into the ring for 
sparring at The Thomas 
A'Beckett gym. His job will be 
to analyse Williamson's style 
jind instil self-belief in the 33 
year-old Andries for when the 
going gets toi^ in the contest 
Whereas, according to Gr% 
Steene, Andries's manager. 
Andries, who has not been 
beaten for four years, sees 
WiUiamson as just another 
opponent Conteh believes 


tha t there could be times in 
the contest when Andries 
might need more mental than 
physical strength to keep 
pushing. 

“Dennis has the capability 
but he has bad a bata time 
flatting the spar. And vdieo 
you are fitting for a woiid 
title you can fiM yourself in 
unknown areas," Conteh said. 
“Like Mugabi against Hagler, 
after rix rounds, Dennis could 
find himself being dr^ged 
into areas he 1^ never 
Imown. I shall try to give him 
the confidence to fi^t more 
a gaincT himsglf than WUliam- 
son at such times and keep 
pushing." 

Conteh could even be in 
Andries's comer on the big 
nig ht, thoi^ he will have to 
get himself a second's licence. 


Andries was delighted yester- 
day to have Conteh on his 
side. ^ 

Williamson, a former Unit- 
ed States marine who says his 
initials stand for "Just B^”, is 
reputed to be a light puncher 
but a g^ boxer. Only eight of 
his 22 wins in .23 bouts Imve 
come fibm knockouts against 
Andries's 16 knockouts in 24 
contests. But, accordm| to 
those who have seen William- 
son in action, the fi>niier 
national middleweight Gold- 
en Gloves champion is diffi- 
cult to hit deanly and can put 
his shots u^tfaer welL That is 
why a puncher like Andries, 
who depends on landing the 
big one, wUi need all the 
mental lift he can get from 
Conteh . 

Even though Andries £5 


aged 33, his connections be- 
lieve that, like Archie Moore, 
he gets better as begets older. 
For Andries, sriio took up 
bolting . at- 21 and turned 
profestio^ at 23, won the 
British light heavyweight title 
at 31. ddended it tiuee times 
and boxed a disputed draw for 
the ^ropean-title. ' 

Purses have not been dis- 
closed, but Frank Warren, the 
promoter, for whom this con- 
test is the first of a series of 
woild title bouts he will be 
puttiz^ on in Europe and 
Britain this y^, says that 
Williamson will be getting 
“very much more” , than the 
$25,000 he earned for out- 
pointing . Prince Mama 
Mohamed, of Ghana, for (he 
title vacated by Michael 
Spinks. 


SPORrlN 'BRlEF'w"’o 


Connors 

delays 


New Yoik (Reuter) 

Jimmy Coiwors, suspraded 
for 10 weeks and fined 
$20,000 for walki^ off court 
during a mat^ said yesterday 
he vvould consuh his lawyer 
before deciding what action to 
take. 

Connors, who has 30 days 
to appeal uainst the suspen- 
sion by the Men's Intemation- 
al Professional Tennis 
Cou^. said “I will review 
ibe decision with my attorney. 
At this point 1 can only 
concentrate on my tennis.” 

The American, irate over a 
line call against him, walked 
out during the fi^ srt of the 
final of a tournament in Boca 
lUlon, Florida, last month 
against Ivan Lendl ofC^ho- 
slovakia. He was immediately 
fined $5,000 by an MIPTC 
official 



Pelen quits 


Paris (Reuter) — Penine, 
Pden, France's top woman’ 
skier of the last decade, has 
confirmed ^ is retiring fiom 
Internationa competition, the 
Frnidi Skiing Federation said 
yesterday. Pelen, w4io is in 
Canada for the final World 
CW events of the season, told 
oSno^ and team-males she 
wanted to retuni to her stodies 
to be a phygothenqrisL 


Dr Jones aims 
for two 
more titles 


Coaaors: seeing lawyer 


Cash drive 


Ckilombia ‘yes’ 


Ice spectacle 


Colombia have become the 
first South American country 
to accept an invitatioo to 
compete in tte National Dairy 
Coundl Milk Race from May 
25 to June 7. The Cotomtrian 
c wiists will travel to Britain 
after competing in the War- 
saw^BeriiiHPiague Peace Race. 
The 1,130'inile Milk Race will 
Sian in Biimingham and finish 
at London's Waterloo Bridge. 


Britain's young assistam 
profesaonal gerffers have been 
given a hu^ boost for their 
championsbip later this year. 
The car manufacturers, 
Pei^t Talbot, have stepped 
in to ixovide £23,<X)0 in 
prizemoney for the assistant 
IHofession^* charapioo^p, 
making it the richest in its 37- 
year hisuxy. 


Charity bouts 


Debi Thomas, the 19-year- 
old American who won ^ 
women's world ice skati^ 
title in Geneva last week, is in 
an impressive parade for the 
St Ivel gala of world diaropi-^ 
ons at Richmond on April 1. 


Race havoc 

Frank Pong's Muden He 


Two amateur boxii% teams 
from England and Bel&um 
meet in a charity tournament 


Miss Thomas is joined by 
er comoatriot Tiffany Chin, 


her compatriot Tiffany Chin, 
the bronze medallist and 
former world champion and 
Olympic gold medal winner, 
Katerina Witt of East 
Germany. 

Natalia Bestemianova and 
Andrei Bukin, the ice dance 
champions, and 14-year«old 
Ekaiarina Gordeeva and part- 
ner Se^i Grinkov, who won 
the pairs title, will also be in 
the line-up. 


Frank Pong's Muden Hoi» 
Kong edged ahead ofanh rivm 
40-foot sloop, Bimblegumbie, 
sidppexed by Australian Kehh 
Jacote, as commumcatitm 
problems caused havoc in the 
Silk Cut South China Sea 
Ra^ Electric storms and force 
six winds vdiich forced three 
boats to retire continued to 
pose pr^ilems. 

Postponed 

Last night's Slalom Lager 
(Thampionship Ru^ League 
game between Bradfonl Nortb- 
era and Warrington was post- 
poned until tonight because 
the Odsal pitch was 
waterlogged. 


in London today in an attempt 
to £10, (XX) for charity. A 


southeast London team and a 
Brussels select mete in a 10- 
bout contest at the social club 
of Ailders of Croydon, with 
money raised goiite towards 
the retail trade chanty's linen 
and wooDen drapets' coo^- 
homes. 

Full strength 

Nottii^am win be at full 
stren^ ^ their ddayed John 
Player Cup Rugby Union 


warning 
over ban 


reprieve 




FVomStitan Jones, 
■nHns$,SorietUnioa 

jftbp Smith, (he dtainnaa 
ofLiv«ipo(fi,is€OBriBced that 
flkfr door to Gtvope should 
KflBun le^ed for at least 

attother two years. The ban OB 

cupiicfc cliihs w» hnposad, 
(Kigpiiffiy ud^Bhiely, after 
Ins own difo was cang^ in the 
trugie M that preceded the 
Eanmieaii Ov Fted ra Bn^ 
stes last May. 

Suiiti^ here for today’s hi- 

tetnatioaal between the Soviet 
Umon and Engjanil, woidd, in 
effect, preftrte keep Lbexpote HJ 
oat of dier three cOaflaftnlal 
eompetiiioiis until -at least 
1992. Once tiw Earopean 
antherilies have dedded to 
nivfie Ea^h heck from 
thewfidenieasi livtepool were 
odered to qndify to.anether 
tbee seasons befoie their own 
fcawigbmettf te to he Hfted. - 
While other ntisgaided 
■res - at die head - of- die 
demestic game are pleading 
fbr. rendmission, 
Sb^ piesaited a rekvant 
and scaa^ case agaiosC:it. 

As Che chairnas also of the 
Conefi, be takes a 
breeder view and, yesterday in 
Tkihi^ he sifoke with the 
w^rtiy Ttece of reason. . 

is no ..way ^ 
ftiifliiBh ^dis shbold be al- 
lowed beck hao Enrepe yet,” 
he **lt is too soon. There 
mast be a tangte period of 
fMiw- ..Erea more fanpoi^ 
tm4ft oar ^bfie is not psy- 
cholegkaBy rea^. We need a 
IftBser pccM bte of Enropean 
eoateetitioD to Iweak the habit 
povle travding abroad for 
riekatporposes. 

. ^e cumoC tefitat havoc (n 
oar fidW. comnunuties in 
.Eanpe fothe Bune footim^ 

No game is wordi thatJ It is 
troeihitf edier oontries have 
as ff not more, anrest in 



Smitb: voice of reason 


ffieir feoffiaB matches hot the 
difference is that we ahme 
export onr hooUgaatem. 1 am 
distiirbed that one' or two 
mflneitfiai peoirie in Eagfisb 
foodnD are presmng for the 
bantobelift^ 


quaner-fiaal with Wasps on 
Good Friday, if their wing, 
Chris Oti, comes safHy 
tluough a for English 
Students agmnst Wdsh Stu- 
dents at CambritteB today. . 


Myson Jones, the 29-year- . 
old doctor from Harrow, takes 
to the water again .week- 
end frir a spell of competition 
whidi could dedde whether 
she will mount a serious 
attempt for a place in the 
Commonwealth Games squad 
for Edinbuigh. . 

Dr Jones will be the oldest 
competitor talcing part in the 

Hewlett-Packard oaiional 
short course cbwpionsffips at 
Barnet Copihall, Hendon, 
from Good Friday to &ster 
: Monday. She wilt be aiming to 
add the 50 and 100 metres 
freestyle titles to the long 
course verrions she won in 
Leeds in August, her first 
national titles. 

At Bsnet she will be focing 
Nicole Bates, ofNwwi^vriio 
was only a year old wlien Dr 
Jones won a bronze medal in 
England's fre^le relay team 
in the 1974 Cmnmonw^th 
Gaines in ChiistdiDndL 

Nine swimmers who ureie 
^detorioos at last yeai^s diam- 
jMOtt^ps are expected to 
defend ihdr. titles, Inri mting 
the double Olympic medal 
winner Sa^ Hmdcastle. M 
part of her busy -programme 
she defends her 400 and- 800 
metres freestyle , and 4(X) me- 
tres medley tides; as does the 
European breastteroke cham- 
pion, Adrian Moorhouse (100 
and 200). 

The local pair, Mark Mat- 
thews (100 and 200 metres 
backstroke) and Ma^ Reyn- 
olds (50, 10() and 200 metres 
fii^yle), will be hopii^ to 
add the short course titles to 
the long course titles they won 
in August in Leeds. 



*They are obtessed'wldi the 
shut tenn cossidmatioos. An 
ea^r return woidd inflict Ir^ 
damage on our game 
in the k»g term. If onr clubs 
were to play in Europe next 
season, there irindd ceitaiidy 
be tro^Ie and we would be 
tlvown ont for ever. 

“While we have reduced 
hotefoanism In our grounds to 
a ndiumnm, there is still awftd 
trouble in the streets away 
from the heavy poHcnig, a-hrt 
of whidi fe bdra kept quiet 
We at LivopooT are among 
diose proving tiiat it- is posa- 
ble to sncceed financially with- 
out Earopean revane. Onr 
Sftas are good. Loidc at. the 
38JM0 agamst Oxford. 

“We are always consdons at 
Anfidd balanchig wr bnd- 
^ It is a good disdpime'fDr 
die dobs to have to get tbdr 
fittaaoes in mder. Th^ when 
we do retarn to Edhtee, the 
extra iaooaie will gnaw as a 
boons which we can iavest fior 
die good of du game’s fatare 
to improve facilities for 
example. 

*Ttee is no duince of toe 
ban beii^ Hfted Am* a while 





in Ei^bh football ptesist .in 
their.campaign to get as back 
in. Even then they wonld 
IvcbaUy wrt sacceed. 1 wooU 
hope that they wooM not 
There are aune in 

Enn^e. w^ m^t want ns 
bad( purely <m finandal 
gonads. That is wrong. 

“I would hope tiiat even if 
the opportmiity was offered, 
we woidd be responsible and 
dedine. That wooid be hon- 
and would restore a 
littie oedrt to ^ffsh footoafl. 
Don't misanderstand me.- 1 
love Earopean footbaB and, at 
UverpooL we have a wonder- 
foi tradition in th«» respecL 

“Bnt we shoidd not even 
ooasidCT the ban being lifted ia 
less tiian chiw years'. I'm 
spoaldi^ as dainnan of Liv^ 
wpool a^ of the Sports 
^Mmeu. rm' conomn^ not 
onl y with footfaaU's 
Its fouire bnt also:,with file 
good name and repntatioa 'ef 
onr country,** 

^^Biond preview, page 38. 




“ J 






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